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Paris, Friday, March 18, 1994 


No. 34,539 






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A Jolted Los Angeles 
Makes Fast Recovery 

Billions in Earthquake Aid Bolster 
Region Hit Hard by the Recession 


By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. 

.Vfw York Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Two months after it 
was struck by one of the costliest earth- 
quakes ever to hit the United States, Los 
Angeles is making a quick recovery. 

Southern California's economy, already 
showing signs of pulling out of recession, is 
getting a jump start from the 515 billion in 
reconstruction aid that has started flowing 
in: $11.5 billion in federal and state money 
and 53.5 billion in insurance payments. In 
June, Californians will vote on a 52 billion 
bond issue for quake repairs. 

The latest unemployment survey uncov- 
ered a significant post^quake dip in jobless- 
ness in Los Angeles in February, to 9.7 
percent from 1 1 percent. 

Nancy Bolton, who specializes in the Cali- 
fornia economy for the Business Forecasting 
Project at the University of California at Los 
Angeles, said. “It's a one-shot thing, not a 
permanent creation of jobs and marke ts, but 
every little bit helps when you’ve been 
through what Southern California has been 
through.*' 

While unemployment might start to rise 

r n once the reconstruction winds down, 
setback might not be particularly great, 
Ms. Bolton said, because the economy could 
be producing more jobs here by early sum- 
mer. 

Today, workers are rebuilding highways 
with a headlong vengeance — some dam- 
aged sections are expected to reopen in May, 
a month ahead of schedule — and are recon- 
structing crunched houses, offices and 
malls. 

True, a few residents have fled, hastened 
by the hundreds of aftershocks that cause no 
new damage but are a reminder that the "Big 
One" is stiD to come. Many people have lost 
jobs, homes and businesses mid will not 
soon recover, if ever. 

But for the most part, Los Angeles is 
pi cking itself up one more time after being 
floored earlier by recession, riots, fires and 
mud slides. : 

“Fm toughing it out, and I'm going to 
make it,” said Laura D'Angelo, the owner of 
a children’s novelty store in the Northridge 


area of the San Fernando Valley, the epicen- 
ter of the quake. 

“I'm open for business even though Lbe 
c eilin g is still sa ggin g and one wall is 
propped up," saiaMs. D’Angelo, whose 
store was closed only six days. “1 don't say 
things are good. Not yet Sales are off at 
least 30 percent. " 

The quake, measuring 6.7 ou the Richter 
scale, left 61 people dead. 9,000 injured and 
25,000 homeless. It seriously damaged more 
than 30,000 houses, apartments and busi- 
nesses, many beyond repair, and left per- 
haps 250,000 others with minor damage 

State disaster officials still do not know 
how many jobs and businesses have been 
permanently losL Nor have they been able 
to compute lost wages and sales, although 
initial indications are that tourism, an eco- 
nomic pillar of the region, is holding up welL 
Governor Pete Wilson has estimated the 
cost of the quake at more than 520 billion. 

Despite such losses, the recovery effort'is 
providing a much-needed economic boost, 
as often happens in disasters. It is creating 
jobs in construction and markets to offset 
some costs of the destruction. 

More than 450,000 applications for disas- 
ter aid have been submitted to the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, a national 
record in requests for recovery money, and 
the agency has so far handed out 5870 mil- 
lion . 

The people left homeless by the quake are 
now living in houses and apartments — 
there was an 8 percent bousing surplus at the 
time of the disaster — or they have moved in 
with friends or relatives. Frequently, it is a 
spare, uncomfortable and costly existence, 
but it is a step back toward normality. 

“Our house is in danger of collapsing, so 
we sleep in what's left of the garage," 
George Wolfus, a Northridge optometrist, 
said this week. “We lost all of our china, and 
so we're eating off paper plates. Eventually, 
well get it all back together. It’s a good life." 

But Mr. Wolfus has stiH not been able to 
repair and reopen his office. 

“I can't take much more of this because 
I’ve got no cash flow,” he said. “The damage 
is so bad that I may eventually have to move 
to a new building. But places are opening up 
everywhere as more repairs get done.” 


Russia to Stop Producing 
Weapons-Grade Plutonium 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Russia has agreed to 
shut down three nuclear reactors still producing 
weapons -grade plutonium, Russian and Ameri- 
can officials have announced, ma kin g Russia 
the last of the world's five declared nuclear 
nations to stop producing fissfle material for 
warheads. 

When the last plutonium is extracted from 
the irradiated uranium fuel rods at the plants, it 
mil mark the first time since the begi nni n g of 
the atomic age 50 years ago that none of the five 
major nuclear powers will be producing the 
basic b uilding block of nuclear arms. 

Although full implementation of the U.S.- 
Russia agreement is several years away, “both 
our governments recognize that ongoing pro- 
duction of these reactors makes little sense in 
this day and age," Energy Secretary Hazel R. 
O'Leary said Wednesday, hailing “progress 
along the path of nuclear disar mamen t.” 

The reactors “pose a security threat to the 
entire world," she said. 

The Russian atomic energy minister, Viktor 
N. Mikhailov, appearing at a news conference 
here with Mrs. CTLeaiy. said that “eight years 
ago in my most fantastic dreams I would never 
''teve imagined" that Russia would stop produc- 
ing plutonium for its nuclear arsenal. 

Russia, like the United States, has a surplus 
of plutonium recovered from dism a n tled war- 
heads. Its continued production of the mat e ri al 
has beat a source erf concent to the Clinton 
adminis tration and the arms control communi- 
ty. 

In three days of talks in Washington, Mr. 
Mikhail ™ and Mrs. O’Leary concluded a deal 
under which Russia will shot down the reactors 
as soon as alternative sources of beat for their 
communities are available, and the United 
States will help Russia find the money to pay 
for the new heating plants. In a related accord, 
the two countries have also agreed to permit 
inspections of each other's plutonium storage 

facilities. , . ,. .. 

Plutonium is a by-product of the inadiatiOT 
of uranium fuel rods in nuclear reactors. In the 
United States, all reactors designed to produce 
plutonium have been mothballed, and used to* 
from commercial plants is left intact and stored 


Russian f Partnership’ 

Russia told the United States on Thursday 
that it planned to join NATO's Partnership 
for Peace program this month. (Page 6) 


icaUy to have its plutonium content extracted. 

Russia, however, has continued to separate 
plutonium from the reactors to be dosed down, 
in Tomsk and Krasnoyarsk. Tbe Russians said 
the reactors had to be' operated as a source of 
heat, and that once the fuel was irradiated, 
plutonium bad to be extracted because storing 
the fuel rods intact was unsafe. 

By agreeing to help Russia acquire new heat- 
ing plants, the United States made it possible to 
stop operating the reactors within a few years, 
meaning there win be no more spent fuel from 
which plutonium will have to be removed. 

Fire broke out at the Khmelnitsky nuclear 
power statical in Ukraine, but it was quickly 
extinguished and ibere was no increase in radia- 
tion, Reuters reported Thursday from Kiev, 
quoting tire plant's chief engineer. 

Theme, rated zero cm the seven-point inter- 
national scale of nuclear accidents, was tire 
latest in a series of incidents afflicting 
Ukraine's nudear industry. 



Pact Signals 
First Break 
In the Siege 
Of Sarajevo 

2 Sides Agree to Open 
Bridge and Key Beads 
To limited Civilian Use 


By Chuck Sudetic 

Yew York Times Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herzegovina — The 23- 
month Serbian stranglehold on this city eased 
for the first time on Thursday, on paper at least, 
when Bosnian government and Serbian leaders 
signed an agreement allowing limitwt move- 
ment for people and “humanitarian goods" 
across siege lines b eginning next Wednesday 
morning. 

“This is a first, modest and very important 
step," said tire UN military force's dvtf-affairs 
chief, Sergjo Vieira de Mdlo, after witnessing 
the signing by Hasan Muratovic, a Bosnian 
government minister, and Momcilo Krajisnik, 
president of the Bosnian Serbs' self-styled par- 
liament. 

The agreement marks the latest high point in 
a march toward peace that began last month 
when tire nationalist Serbs, under threat of 
NATO air strikes, withdrew scores of artillery 
pieces they had used to pummd this dty for 22 
months. 

The deal, signed at Sarajevo airport, paves 
the way for traffic, albeit restricted, to ply four 
routes in the area: 

• A mam road linking the government-con- 
trolled core of Sarajevo with central Bosnia 
through the Serbian-held suburbs of Vogosca 
and Eyas and the Muslim town of Visoko. 

• The front-line Brotherhood and Unity 
Bridge connecting central Sarajevo with the 
Serbian-held Grbavica neighborhood. 

• A pair of criss-crossing roads through the 
UN-con trolled airport, one linking the Bosni- 
an-controlled areas of Dobrinja and Butrmr, 
the other joining the Serbian-held suburbs of 
Ilidza and Lukavica. 

The op enin g of the Dobrinja-Butmir route 
across the airport would effectively end the 
Serbian siege. The agreement allows for groups 
of vehicles, including passenger cars, to travel 
the route each day in a pair of two-hour shifts. 

“We won't have to go underground like rats 
anymore," said a Bosnian Army officer, refer- 
ring to a tunnel under the airport runway that 
has been the only secure route into and out of 
the dty since ias; spring. Tbe tunnel will remain 
the Bosnian military’s only access to the dty , 
however, because tire agreement Thursday for- 
bids solders or military supplies from using the 
agreed access routes. 

People wanting to use the Brotherhood and 
Unity Bridge in either direction must be an- 
nounced to the opposite side at least 24 hours in 


FRANCE TRIES COLLABORATOR — Paid Toorier, the former pro-Nazi militia chief, in a bulletproof glass bo* Thursday 
before bis trial for crimes against humanity opened in Versailles. He is charged with complicity in the kfifing of seven Jews, Page 2. 


over who may cross. 

The agreement is the fruit of weeks of negoti- 
ations, which took on momentum with the 
implementation of a cease-fire that has silenced 
all but desultory small-arms fire around the 
Sarajevo battlefronL 

“We've persuaded the three armies that 
they’re not going to make any more gains mili- 
tanly,” said a high-ranking UN military offi- 
cial, expressing confidence that the agreement 
will be carried out. 

Until four weeks ago. warfare between the 
See SIEGE, Page 6 


Feeding Bosnia by Airs One Program That Worked 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Post Service 

NAPLES — Every night, it’s the same thing: Load the 
planes with food, fly over the dark wasteland of Bosnia, shove 
tire stuff out the back, fly home. 

Mercy has become an endless routine in the endless Bosnian 
civil war, perhaps because the feeding of Bosnia has been a 
modest achievement overshadowed by failures — failures of 
diplomacy, of humanity, of nribtaiy threats that until recently 
were all bark and no bite. 

Nevertheless, if there is a positive counterpoint to the 
Western world's inability to end the carnage in the former 


Yugoslav republic, it may be the dogged persistence in hauling 
food, medicine and other supplies night after night week after 
week, in a relief mission that now has lasted 20 months — 
nearly a half-year longer than the Berlin Airlift of 1948-49. 

Nearly 1 1,000 flights have hauled more than 100,000 tons of 
supplies, from candles and clothes to beans and flour. About 
three-quarters of the missions have flown into the Sarajevo 
airport; the rest have involved airdrops over besieged areas 
inaccessible to land convoys. 

“It has basically kepi Sarajevo alive," said Ron Redmond, a 
spokesman in Geneva for the United Nations High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees, the agency supervising international relief 


efforts. “Without this aiiiifL, Tm sure there would have been 
starvation in Sarajevo. When we started, we thought it would 
last at most a few weeks or a mouth. That was in July of ’92." 

“I feel very good about what we have been able to do,” 
added Admiral Jeremy M. Boorda, the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization's southern commander in Naples and Mr. Clin- 
ton's nominee for chief of naval operations. “For many, many 
months, 80 or 90 percent of the sustenance that was getting 
into Sarajevo was coming that way." 

The humanitarian campaign has not been an unvarnished 

See MISSION, Page 6 


Kiosk 


Uneasy U.S . Businessmen Lobby for Open China 



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Links Extended 
ForRA,USAir 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Trans- 
portation Secretary Federico Pefia on 
Thursday extended for one year the code- 
sharing flight links currently available to 

British Airways PLC and USAir Group Inc. 

But Mr. Pda said be would not act on a 
request by the two carriers to expand their 
code-sharing authority to more American 
airports and dties. Code-sharing lets the two 

carriers sell each other’s services on selected 
routes by sharing flight codes. 

Last March, Mr. Pena gave one-year ap- 
proval for the code-sharing links. He indi- 
cated he would not renew the rights if Brit- 
ain failed to give other American earners 

more access to Heathrow Airport, the hub of 

dunce for many travelers to London. 

Rules for Derivatives 

The president of the Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York is leading the rail for 
dearer regulations on derivatives, which are 
sophisticated investment vehicles derived 
from the price of other instruments. Page 1 L 


By Peter Behr 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — American business ex- 
ecutives from Detroit to Beijing, shaken by 
recent sharp exchanges between the United 
States and China over human rights, are step- 
ping up pressure on the Clinton administration 
and Congress to keep China open to US. prod- 
ucts. 

The business community’s chief argument is 
that with China on the threshold of huge invest- 
ments in industrial and communications infra- 
structure. a trade conflict now could not come 
at a worse moment 


At the same time, a search is on for new ways nance trade subcommittee, suggested the cstab- 
to pressure China on human rights short of lishment of a U.S. -China human rights 
cutting off its favorable trading rights with the commission and the use of targeted trade sanc- 

tions against Chinese products that violate U.S. 

TfelLS. secretary of state rejects criticism of ***■ , 

Us mission to CbW, Pane 6. For now, however, the future of U.S. -China 

_ business ties hinges on a single test. President 


stance, are considering asking U.S. businesses 
to adopt “codes of conduct" for doing business 
in China, trade sources said. 

And on the Hill, Senator Max Baucus, Dem- 
ocrat of Montana, chairman of the Senate Fl- 


quire specific improvements in human rights, 
such as freeing political prisoners and permit- 
ting prison inspections. China’s recent defiant 

See CHINA, Page 6 


Headed Up, Shanghai Moves People Out 


GUILTY —Tonya Harding bong sen- 
tenced after pleading guilty to iimdering 
prosecution in the Kangan cast Pagell 


LATE SOCCER SCORE 
UEFA CUP 
Quarterfinals. 2d Leg 
inter Milan 1. Borusaia Dortmund 2 
Inter wins 4-3 on aggregate 


Book Review 


Page?. 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Pots Service 

SHANGHAI— Near a rubble-strewn swath of land that cuts through 
central Shanghai, an elderly scholar gestured angrily over his state- 
ordered eviction from the apartment he has lived in for decades. 

Hie slight, gray-haired man said he must soon move to a new 
apartment about 15 kilometers outside the dty. 

“We have no choice," said the man, who declined to give his name. 
“We're being ordered to leave. We have to leave." 

Tens erf thousands of Shanghai citizens have been swept up in a forced 
exodus to the suburbs to make way for the dty*s muItibOlion-dollar 
urban-restructuring plans. With central government support, the au- 
thorities in Shanghai want to restore tbe dty to its prerevolutionary 
postion as a financial and cosmopolitan center of Asia —an dm that 
could take many years. 

But even now, Shanghai is caught up in an economic, investment and 
real estate boom that has driven rental rates for office space in the city 
center to levels higher than New York and roughly equal to Paris. 


Shang hai is in a hurry to catch up economically with tbe prosperous, 
dynamic south coast of China. 

In tbe past, under China's central planning system, Shanghai was 
forced to band over most of its industrial profits to the cemral govern- 
ment in Beijing, and the dty fell behind the special economic zones 
established nearly 15 years ago in southern China. 

But since being granted similar economic freedoms in 1990, the dty 
has been taking off. Economic growth readied 14.9 percent last year, 
exceeding the national average by 1.9 percentage points. Dozens of 
Fortune 500 companies are now investing here. 

Few dties could afford to build the infrastructure projects that 
Shanghai has either under way or planned. They include a subway, 
roads, tunnels, bridges, a power plant, a new telephone exchange, a 
second international airport and the foundations of an entirely new 
economic zone in the dty's Pudong district across the river from centra] 
Shanghai 

To hdp pay for this and related development projects, the dty has 

See SHANGHAI, Page 6 


Sp-E.g 9:3*0' h w 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


u 



In Italy, the Old Communists Now Seem Anything But world briefs 




n/uxc Servier power in ejections later this month from party affiliation who is not running for 

- 7~ n a J? 1 “ ‘ or n . c ' v respectabil- the discredited governing parties of the last Parliament 

lty. Italy s former Communists areembrac- four decades, the Christian Democrats and Th e sumestion that the former Commu- 

UKSoaalis,s - 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization and _ . w 


lariy because many of their hard-core sup- alliance is the Communist Refoundation 2 Zulu Leaders Warn Against Vote 


potters have become so dependent for their Party, which broke with the Democratic 
livelihoods on the bloated state enterprises Party of the Left over its acceptance of 


stion that the former Commu- livelihoods on the bloated state enterprises Party of the Left ove 
again harfr Mr. fUmpi who which have come to symbolize much of the free-market principles 


^7- » 1 reaiy L/rgaiuzauon ana , led the country through an 11 -month peri- corruption and inefficiency that has eroded 

generally acting as custodians of moderate But thesudden surge of Mr. Berlusconi s oublic faith m government 


gencrany acung as cusuxuans oi moderate »ui me suuaen suige oi wir. nenuscom s ',7 nf „ "i : 7 TT. ■ . m :7 T. .d. nuhlic faith m a 

E SEME****"-** 1 


Its leader, Fausto Bertinotti, insists that 
his party will do all it can to halt the selling 


ever to enter government. reached a tenuous alliance w 

Now known as the Democratic Party of ratist Northern League and n 
the Left, the former Communists have re- *1* wwj. has forced AchJle C 
nounced the ways of their old Stalinist ca< _' , “* Democratic Part; 
comrades and increasingly embraced the toacoderate the transfonMtic 
views of their erstwhile capitalist foes as identit y to the point when 

rt.™ allies have become mfunated. 


reached a tenuous alliance with the sepa- “Ej* 
ratist Northern League and neofascists in 
the south, has forced Achille Occhetto, the 01 , 
leader of the Democratic Party of the Left, Under Mi 


try at the head of a technocratic govern- 
ment, reflects the dramatic transformation 


Besides offering a disciplined domestic off of state industries that employ so many 
program, Mr. Occhetto has made several supporters from the old-guard Commu - 


trips abroad to reassure Western bankers nists. But Mr. Occhetto is now h i ntin g that 


they struggle to recapture momentum and 

repel the rise of Silvio Berlusconi’s rightist 
alliance. 


leader of the Democratic Party of the Left, Under Mr. Occbetto’s influence, the for- and allied governments that the ascendan- is prepared to jetuson bis old allies in 

to accelerate the transformation of his par- mer Communists approved an economic cy of a leftist government in Italy should favor of adopting new centrist ones, 
tv’s identity to the point where some of his program for the election campaign that not roach off a run on the Hra or alarm Many of the Democratic Party of the 
allies have hecram inflated states that, “there is no alternative to the bols at NATO. Left's leading candidates for Parliament 


bells at NATO. Left's leading candidates for Parliament 

maiket economy.” It also promises to pur- The progressive alliance beaded by Mr. are drawn from business and moderate 
The former Communists, who lead an sue Mr. Ciampi's plans to slash the state Occhetto includes the remnants of the inteDectual circles. Such people as Rodolfo 
eight-party coalition of progressive forces, deficit “with the same rigor and severity” onoe-powerful Socialists, the eavironmen- De Benedetti, brother of Carlo, the chair- 


ULUNDL South Afnca (Reutera) "“T^cZohi chief, Mangosjjjni 
Buthdezi, said Thursday lhai war lay ahead if South Africa s first all-race 
Serious were held next month without him. President F.W. dcKkrfc 
said he was upset by the remark, made m a hard-lme speech opening the$ 
KwaZulu homeland legislature. , _ . . 

The African National Congress, meanwhile, canceled a meetmg be- 
tween its leader, Nelson Mandela, and Kmg GoodwiD Zwehttam, anally 
of Chief Buthdezfs, saying it feared for Mr. Mandda s safety. KiA 
Zwdithini. bead of 9 million Zulus, said Thursday that the etectwfr 
should be resisted at all costs. . 

Chief Buthdezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said the April 
26-28 elections could take place only if “the might of the state^ stilted the 
democratic opposition. But Mr. de Klerk said be had made a^proposal to 
Chief Buthdezi that would “lead to a form of participation. 


races in five of are promising voters that they will keep and will reduce taxes only when the deficit talist Green Party and the anti-Mafia Net- man of Olivetti, and Pino Arlacchi, a sod- n rt li«A p_;J \71 a divnfitnk Hfill 

iber. the former Italy in NATO, cany out far-reaching problems are solved. work Party run by the former Christian ology professor who is one of the country's lOllCC XliUCl T laUlvuoivn. 


Italy’s main, cities in December, the former Italy in NATO, cany out far-reaching problems are solved. 

Communists were catapulted into the lead- plans to privatize state industry, and possi- Despite these rhang^s., many voters say 
ing role as the vanguard of a progressive bly retain the outgoing Prime Minister they are still skeptical about the real in ten- 


that seemed destined to assume Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, a banker with no dons of the forma: Communists, particu- 


work Party run by the former Christian ology professor who is one of the coun 
Democratic mayor of Palermo, Leohico top anti-Malia experts, illustrate 
Oriando. change in the composition of the party. 

Another key component of the leftist — WILLIAM DROZDIAK 


France Confronts 
Its Wartime Role as 
Touvier Trial Opens 




W illiam Drozdiak 

Washington Pan Service 


Lyon, Cardinal Albeit Decourtray. 
The trial could also prick linger- 


VERSAILLES, France — Fifty ing sensitivities within the conser- 
years after its liberation, France vative government of Prime Minis- 
coaf routed one of the most sordid ter Edouard Balladnr, who may 


confronted one of the most sordid 
chapters in its history on Thursday 
— the extent of its collaboration 
with the Nazi occupation — by 


ter Edouard Balladnr, who may 
testify during the triaL Mr. Balla- 
dui was a chief aide to President 
Georges Pompidou, who in 1971 


p ladng for the first time one of its decided to pardon Mr. Touvier, 

1 _ _ . _ » i_ i rvo i -.r 


own citizens on trial for crimes 
against humanity. 

The long-awaited case of Paul 


In 1981, after years of intensive 
research by the Nazi-hunting cou- 


Touvier, 78, a former intelligence 
officer with the pro-Nazi militia, 


pie Serge and Beale Klarsfdd, Mr. 
Touvier was charged with crimes 


Touvier was charged with crimes 
against humanity for the execution 


sened in a local courtro om here as of seven Jewish prisoners, ostensi- 
e gaunt pensioner took his place bly in retaliation for the assasrina- 


inride a bulletproof box to face 
charges of executing seven Jewish 
prisoners in June 1944 as part of a 
policy of genocide. 


lion by Resistance fighters of a 


He was finally arrested for 
comes against humanity in 1989, 


As dozens of relatives of Jewirii when police officers stormed a 
victims protested outride, Judge monastery in Nice. Bnt three years 


Henri Boulard asked Mr. Touvier later, foflowingtheinvesl 
to confirm h is identity and place of the Catholic Church, a 


residence and then chose a nine- peals court ruled that Mr. Touvier 
member jury lor the case, which is could not be tried for crimes 
expected to last five weeks. against humanity because the Vi- 

Mr. Touvier was the leading in- chy regime “was not a distinct to- 
tdligence officer for Klaus Barbie, tafitanan state and did not practice 
the brutal Gestapo chief in Lyon ideological hegemony” — a claim 
who was later deported from his that its anti-Semitic policies were 



MOSCOW (Renters) — The police seized the aty hall m das Russian 
Far East city of Vladivostok on Thursday after Mayor Viktor Cherepkov 
was removed from his post on corruption charges, news agencies repoit- 

Tbe police took control of the building early in the morning in what 
local correspondents said was the latest stage of a protracted feud 
between the local governor and the city authorities. Pictures taken by a 
television cameraman showed Mr. Cherepkov lying cm a bed m bis offfce, 
apparently after suffering a heart attack. The Itar-Tass news agency said 
he later left the building. 

Mr. Cherepkov was elected in June 1993, but soon fell out with the 
Moscow -appointed governor in the region, Yevwsu Nazdrazenko. who 
accused him of being corrupt. Supporters of Mr. Cherepkov were holding 
a protest rally Thursday night outride the city halL Itar-Tass said. 


Egypt Executes 2 and Condemns 9 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Egypt executed two army officers on This 

f 9 ■ \ i ni fL r j.^i Yt.^! l/uLifrib «M/1 rantantwl nlrv U 


CAIRO (Reuters) — Egypt executed two army officers on TbinsdjQ 
for plotting to kill President Hosni Mubarak and sentenced nine Musfan 
militants io bang for trying to kill Prime Minister Atef SedkL 
Tbe militants exploded with rage in court over their sentences, chant- 
ing: “We will go to paradise, Mubarak, and you will bunt in hefl. We wQl 
kfllyou.” They were charged with trying to kill Mr. Sodla with a car bomb 
that blew up as his motorcade passed in Cairo chi Nov. 25. A schoolgirl 

was killed and 1 8 people were wounded. 

The court rulings coincided with the execution of two army officers by 
an army firing squad in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. The 
officers were convicted in a secret trial last month for planting explosives 
at an airstrip near the Libyan border that was to be used by Mr. Mubarak^ 
A third officer sentenced to death is a fugitive. 


Bomb Driven Near Israeli Embassy 



BANGKOK (AP) — The police found a large bomb on Thursday in a 
Tented truck that had been abandoned near the Israeli Embassy after a 
traffic accident last week. 

A man’s body also was found in the vehicle^ which had been parked at a 
police station for six days after it was towed away. It is believed the bomb 
was meant to be detonated at the embassy, less than 500 meters from 
where the trade was abandoned on March 11, a police official said. He 
said the bomb, containing about 1.4 kilograms (3 pounds) of plastic 
explosive, had been wired to a detonating switch on the dashboard 
The truck was involved in a collision with a motorcycle. The motorcy- 
clist said the truck driver had fled. The bomb was found when the track's 
owner came to claim the vehicle, which be rented on March 8 to a man be 
described as appearing to be about 30 years old and from the Middle 
East About 30 Thai and foreign Muslims were demonstrating outride the 
embassy against Israeli policy toward Palestine around the time the truck 
was abandoned. 


LmcH RdMoo/llcAuKMcd Em 


PARIS BURNING — One car went up in flames ami others were overturned Thursday during a protest in Paris by students and 

i - - -i _l . - V? • s l_ .1 A. l i * • * i . l l ■ 1 n 1 


trade unionists over a government plan to promote Isi.i'by aBowing wages below the legal nmunniHi for entry-levd jobs. Several 
hundred of the 35,008 protesters stoned police officers There were 200 arrests in Paris and eight at a protest in Bastia, Corsica. 


South American sanctuary to stand imposed by the Nazis. 


trial far war crimes before a French Public outrage over the decision 


tribunal in 1987. He was found led the appeals court in Versailles 
guilty and died in a prison hospital to reverse the decision and compel 
four years later. Mr. Touvier to stand trial even 


Even more than the Barbie case, though be pleaded for mercy be- 
the accusations against Mr. Ton- cause of his age and health. 


Draftee Deficit Threatens Spanish Army 


7Zr : - pr ’ 3 ' 


Pakistan and U.S. in Nuclear Talks 


vier have forced the French to ac- Mr. Touvieris lawyer, Jacques 


knowledge that collation with the Tremolet de Where, sought Tburs- 
Nazis was far more widespread day to push far a dismissal of the 


inflated glories of 


The Touvier trial is expected to len 8 cs brought by victims more 
produce mounds of incriminating than 30 years after the fact Howev- 


evideace showing how the cdlabo- er, French law exdudes crimes 
ratiomst Vichy regime executed or against humanity from having any 


rauomst vicny regime executed or 
deported French Jews, even with- 
out orders from the regime's Ger- 
man patrons. 


cause of his age and health. By Alan Riding 

Mr. Touvier’s lawyer, Jacques New fork Tima Service 

Tremolet de Where, sought Tburs- MADRID — After one otrt of three men of 

day to push for a dismissal of the draft age claimed to be conscientious objectors 
charge*, claiming they could no lust year, Spain has suddenly realized it may 
longer be valid under France’s new soon be unable to fill the ranks of its army, 
peaal code, which bars legal dial- The statistics are compelling. The number of 

tenges brought by victims more 18-year-olds giving reasons of confidence for 
than 30 years after the fact Howev- avoiding military service rose from 6,407 in 
er, French law exdudes crimes 1986 to 13,130 in 1989 to 6^202 in 1993. And 
against humanity from having any the estimate for this year is around 100,000, 
time limit. which represents almost half those eligible fra 1 

Mr. Tremolet also said he in- die draft, 
tended to invoke the “Schindler de- The Movement for Constientious Objection 


timelimit 

Mr. Tremolet also said he in- 
tended to invoke the “Schindler de- 


The trial may raise embarrassing fense” by comparing his client to is already cheering, saying that anti-militarism 


u rations about the role of Roman Oskar Sc h indler, the German in- is on the rise in 


questions 

Catholic 


“We have been cam- 


monasteries, which sup- dustriahst and Nazi party member paigning for over five years and our message is 

. J — * — V- ■ - M 1 f *T*. nrliit 1 IfV) Tumi* /l.ui RnoIKr ffllftviii amnn rv imhiiii MaAfila^ r«i«/I 


and sheltered Mr. Toovict who saved 1,100 Jews from death finally t akin g bold among young people,” said 


for more than four decades even can 
though he had been sentenced the 
twice to death in his absence after 
the war. — 

A study of the Catholic Qmrch’s - 

rote in aiding Mr. Touvier was I 
commissioned by tbe archbishop of J 


Mr. Schindler’s story forms Joan GGmcz^ocK of the movement's 


i for a recent film. 


Pacifism, though, may not be the 


even the main — reason for tbe phenomenon. 
Because those claiming to be conscientious ob- 
jectors need only give an ideological, political, 
religious or ethical motive for their position 
when they register, this has now also become 
the fashionable way of draft-dodging. 

The Defense Mmstiy warned that the com- 
bination of the growing number of objectors 
and the sharp drop in Spain’s birthrate since the 
late 1970s meant it may have trouble covering 
the ntmfanal needs of me armed forces by the 
year 2000. 

Like other ^ Western countries, Spain has been 
shrinking its armed forces since the end of the 
Cold War. But even with its troop strength due 
to be cut from 227,000 in 1990 to 3 80,000 by the 
end of the century, unless the present trend is 
reversed, it may not find the necessary 100,000 
draftees per year. 

The Defense Ministiy proposed a solution. 


Conscientious objectors should be called before 
a special tribunal to demonstrate they have 
reasons of principle rather than just conve- 
nience for not saving their country. And those 
who fad this test should either be drafted or 
face the prospect of a spell in prison. 

For the Justice Ministiy, however, the 1978 
constitution impedes any change in the rules. 
Further, only 19 years after the end of General 
Francisco Franco's army-backed dictatorship 
and just 13 yean after the last military uprising, 
it believes that Spain is not ready to take the 
army’s side in the dispute. 

Rather, the Justice Ministiy argues that the 
number of objectors has jumped because the 
system of requiring them to cany out an alter- 
native social service has virtually collapsed un- 
der the avalanche of demand There is a back- 
log of 115,000 objectors who have not been 
found jobs in the public sector. 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AFP) — Pakistan confirmed Thursday it was 
bolding talks with the United States on nuclear nonproliferation and the 
possibility of Washington lif ting a ban on military sales to Islamabad 
The two governments are en g a ge d in “deep dialogue" on the subject, 
the official Associated Press of Pakistan said. 

ULS. officials said Tuesday that Washington might ease the breeze on 
military assistance to Pakistan and Hft sanctions to enable the delivety of 
70 F- 16 jet fighters in return for a “verifiable” pledge that Islamabad will 
halt its nuclear program. Pakistan has refused to sign the Nuclear 
Nonproliferation Treaty until India also agrees to sign. 


V. i- . - 
it 




$2 Billion fe Set For Environment 


{•-r 


In Kenya Tribal Strife, a Sinister Motive 


ffiavtyx f&vt, 


"the original" 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
“Sank roo doe noo"® 

5, rue Daunou Paris lOp&a) 

. TeL- (1)4161^1.14 - 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Past Service 

MAELA, Kenya — Anna Wam- 
bui remembers well tbe day in Oc- 
tober when tbe raiders struck. 


said/* because we did not vote for thus Development Program repre- 


him_” 

Miss Wambui and Mr. Njau are 
among some 30,000 Kenyans, 


sen ta live here. “We’re seeing a con- 
fiict between the pastoralists and 
the agriculturalists — and we’re 


members of tbe Kikuyu tribe, who soring it all over Africa. 


They came from across the hills were chased out of Enosupukia 
surrounding Enosupukia, 500 war- during several days of bloody tribal 


riorsin alL dressed in the tradition- dashes in October that left at least 
al red wrap of tbe Masai and bran- 20 people dead. More than four 


But many here say that beyond 
tbe issue of land scarcity lies anoth- 


Most of the Kikuyu refugees in- 
terviewed here said they would like 
to return one day to the land in 
Enosupukia that they claim is le- 
gally theirs. But they also said they 
were afraid to return without ade- 
quate government safeguards for 


Britain Robs 
Hong Kong, 
Beijing Says 


GENEVA (NYT) — Tbe United States and other aid-giving countries 
pledged $2 bflh'on in financial aid over the next three years on Thursday 
to bdp poor countries keep tbe environmental promises they made at the 
summit meeting in Rio de Janeiro two years ago when they undertook to 
fight global wanning and preserve animal, plant and insect life. 

The rnonw wiU be used to replenish a new and restructured -version cf 
the Global Environment Facility, first set up on a trial basis in 1991 by 
the World Bank and the United Nations Development Environment 
Program, and to help the^ Third World pay the additional cost of making 
development projects environmentally sound. 

At the Rio meeting, rich and poor countries undertook to reorganize 
the Global Environment Facility, provide “new and additional re- 
sources” and give it responsibility for helping developing countries 
finance projects related to the two environmental conventions most 
summit countries signed then as well as the cleaning op of water 
pollution. 


hi-- : 
^ ‘-T 


dishing spears, panga knives, 
sharpened sticks, even guns. She 
was able to flee into tbe bosh — the 


months later, about 9,000 of these 
refugees are still here in Mada, just 
over the hill from Enosupukia, liv- 


er, more insidious motive for the “curity. The Masm warriors 
surge in tribal violence that began ^ Enosupukia s land as part of 


Masai never ItiD women — but ing in rented rooms in private 
when she returned to her farm a homes or makeshift tents and sur- 


more than two years ago. Kenyan 
politicians, particularly members 
of the ruling clique around Presi- 


their people’s traditional grazing 
area for cattle and goat herds, ana 
they view tbe Kikuyu farmers as 


dent Daniel arap Moi, have been UI ^^ c 9^ c . 5etl ^ rs - 


few days later, her belongings were viving on food from international 
being carted away and some of her relief agencies. 


widely accused of i 


Royal Plaza 


neighbors had been killed. 

Alex Njau also survived the at- 
tack. He is a school readier who 


On one level, the ethnic clashes 
that drove the Kikuyu farmers 
from Enosupukia reflect a broader 


bloodshed as part of a “divide and wasjustthelatestdevdopmrat ina 
rule" strategy to k«p tbe country’s 


MONTREUX 






had lived in Enosupukia for 20 struggle under way as Kenya’s rap- 
years, growing corn and potatoes idly expanding population is 


nascent oppoatiOT movement off ^ 

balance and to preserve their lock mostly m the Rift Vafley area and 
on power through the support of western provmces. More than. 1 .000 


on land he bought from a Masai. 
He remembers a time when Kikuyu 


plunged into competition for the 
country’s diminishing resources, 


on power through the support of . - , .. . . .... 

small tribes Qke the Masmand Mr. peope are believed tohave died m 
MoTs Kalenjin. the dashes that first began m late 

J 99 J, just as Mr. Moi made his 
In December 1991, just as inter- prophecy. 


and Masai lived together peaceful- partksiariy its fertile land. 


Three great 
restaurants. A food 
festival every month. 
The only grand hotel 
right on the shore 
of Lake Geneva. 


Iy as neighbors, and he has no 
doubt about who is responsible for 
this sudden outburst of tribal 
bloodletting. “The president,” be 


“We underestimated the ten- 


national donors were A 
Moi to adopt a multipar 


sons building up in many parts of system as the price for continued 
Katya over scarce resources,” said foreign aid, the president predicted 
J. David Whaley, the United Na- ominously that pluralism m Kenya 


A report last year by the human 
sthts group Africa Walch directly 


yap Africa Walch directly 
the government for the 


™o!d tod U. Sm viotoce. lS 


ask the butler.. 






1820 MONTREUX - SWITZERLAND 
TEL. 41-21/963 5131 
FAX 41-21/9635637 


l*N-C-A-P*0- 


Ww Irrrnt ii mtjiiitt jtw vsml it <i it. 


To jutweriba in G er man y 
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0130 84 85 05 


instigated by President Moi and his 
inner circle." The report said the 
government has been slow to pun- 
ish attackers and resettle victims. 
“If action is not swiftly taken,” it 
added, “there is a real danger that 
Kenya could descend into civil 
war.” 


Agemx France- Presse 

BEIJING — The British au- 
thorities in Hong Kong are en- 
gaged in “modem” robbery 
that will impose a huge finan- 
dal burden on the territory 
once it reverts to Chinese rule 
in 1997, a senior Chinese offi- 
cial said. 

Li Rujhuan, a member of 
the seven-member standing 
committee of tbe Communist 
Party Politburo, said Wednes- 
day that the British colonial 
administration bad raised the 
costs of Hong Kong’s new air- 
port project to a level “rarely 
seen in the world,” the Xinhua 
news agency reported. 

The cost increases violate a 
Chinese-Briiish memorandum 
of understanding on Urn pro- 
ject signed in 1991 and would 
impose a huge burden on post- 
1997 Hong Kong, Mr. Li said, 

Mr. Li's comments came de- 
spite the Hong Kong govern- 
ment's announcement March 
2 that It would leave behind 
fiscal reserves of 120 billion 
Hong Kong dollars (S15J bil- 
lion) in 1997, nearly five times 
the amount promised in tbe 
1991 memorandum. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 




Greek Law Puts Cap on Nightlife 


ATHENS (AP) — -A law restricting dub hours and the entry of minors 
has gone into effect in Greece. The law imposes a 2 AJW. dosng time on 
thousands of dobs, bars and nightclubs throughout the country 
requires minora under 17 to be accompanied by a parent or guardian. 

The new boors also apply to restaurants. It replaces previous legislation 
that allowed places of entertainmoit to set their own hours. Although the 
law restricts entry to minors, it does not impose a drinking age. In Greece, 
people of all ages are allowed to purchase alcohoL 
Public Order Minister Stefios Papathemelis said he drafted the law to 
cut down on crime and to increase worker productivity. “There is no 
reason for paiple to stay up all night for enter minrnm t ” he said. “There# 
has to be a lumL” 


:i -r . ■ 


L ean i ng lower of na has started strajgbtenoig n, scientists say, 
and experts may let viators climb its 294 steps again CoontCTwrighis 
placed al the base of the marble tower have begun to reverse the slant 
The tower was closed three yeans ago. ( Reuters j 

Amsterdam's I7tit-cen!iirv skvfine of mMm tp kpina dMlinWfl 


'fe*--: 


I - B * kf - MIIIW If u IA4J 

by modem construction, a preservation group warns. The 
Conned for Monument Care has dnenmentMi aha! it cam: 


Council for Monument Care has documented wfaai it as building 
blight amid the canal houses, including water tanks, pipina and conduits, 
industrial chimneys and advertisements. (AP) 

before te first' flight was due to leave, tbe U.S. government 




Sendai, in northern Japan, a new route. Japan Airlines’ application to 
make weekly flights on the route is pending at the U.S. Transportation 
Department. ^ (AP) 

A parish itonr operatwl has canceled trips to land and Egypt because of Pft!; 

tension in the rcgion^The operalor. Tjaereboig. is Denmark’s largest 
offering trips to the Mideast (AP) 

_ 



With MCI CALL USA and MCI WORLD REACH services, 
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022-903-00 

07B-H-00-Q 

0-800-2222 

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900- 99-0014 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


Page 3 


THE AMERICAS/ FINDING TRUTH ON THE 





Hlakathap^- ' 

^^crksasc^V-V^H, 
to a lens -f - Ir «- 


^ By Helen Dewax 

■ Washington Past Servi pp 

WASHINGTON — Behind the 
partisan dimoie in Congress over 
•^etha- to hold hearings on Presi- 
dent Bui Clinton's role in the 

Whitewater affair lies a rich — and 

strikingly inconclusive — history of 
congressional efforts to find truth, 
justice and political profit in front 
of television cameras. 

^ In 19 73, the Senate Watergat e 
Committee struck a vein of incrimi- 
nating evidence leading straight to 
the Oval Office, contributing sig- 
nificantly to President RichaS 
Nixon's resignation in disgr ace. 

But 14 years later, special com- 
mittees investigating the Iran-con- 
tra affair stumbled into a legal 
snare that led to reversal of crimi- 
nal convictions of the person found 
to have run the Illicit arms opera- 
tions. That person was Oliver L 
North, then a White House nation- 
al security aide who is now a candi- 
date to join the crowd that tried to 
exile him from public life. 

Four years after that, several 
days of hearings before the Senate 


Mixed Bag of Capitol Sideshow i 


uncharted paths, producing high 
drama and low comedy. 

But the risks do not stop Demo- 
crats or Republicans — dep ending 
on who is in power in Congress and 
out of power at the White House — 
from demanding hearings to probe 
dunks in the other party's political 
armor. 

In the Whitewater matter, the 
clamor for hearings brought the 
special counsd, Robert B. Rske Jr„ 
to Capitol Hill last week to suggest 
that congressional inquiries, such 
as the scheduled March 24 House 
Banking Committee hearing that 

Republicans intend to use as a fo- 
rum op Whitewater, would inter- 
fere with his ongoing criminal in- 
quiry. 


Bob Dole of Kansas, leader of 
the minority Republicans in the 
Senate, who has been stoking the 
Whitewater fires daily, responds to 
Democratic criticism of his tactics 
by noting that Democrats staged at 
least 20 hearings on alleged execu- 
tive-branch wrongdoing while Re- 
publicans held the White House 
from 1981 to 1993. The list, com- 
piled by the Congressional Re- 
search Service, included every thing 
from Iran-contra to an ambassa- 
dor’s gift fund. 

Often, as Democrats are discov- 
ering to their dismay, the d eman d 
for hearings serves a political pur- 
pose, regardless of whether hear- 
ings result. In the Whitewater mat- 
ter, Mr. Clinton gets bruised, and 


Democrats appear to be invoking a 
double standard for hearings on 
Democratic and Republican presi- 
dents. 

"Republicans have succeeded in 
placing a little cloud erf doubt over 
the whole thing,'/ said Senator 
Daniel K. Inouye, Democrat of 
Hawaii. 

Senator John F. Kerry, Demo- 
crat of Massachusetts, said, 
“There's no question they’ re stir- 
ring it up for political gain." 

In a tradition that Congressional 
Quarterly traced back to 1 792 — an 
inquiry into why troops led by 
General Arthur Sl Chur were rout- 
ed by Indians on the Ohio frontier 
— Congress occasionally creates 


special committees to investigate 
particular incidents. 

Such congressional hearings can 
turn into a blood sport when the 
political stakes get high enough, 
which seems to have happened in 
the case of the Whitewater. 

While Mr. Dole talk!; increasing- 
ly of the “lessons of Watergate 1, 
and refers to things like “something 
unseemly lurking in the 
Whitewater bog," no one goes so 
far as to suggest that Whitewater is 
another Watergate in the making. 

But Congress's difficulties with 
Whitewater are linked directly to 
the Iran-contra investigation. An 
appellate court threw out the con- 
victions of Mr. North and John M. 


Grand Jury Hears Departing Counsel 


Poindexter, saying their rights were 
violated by the use of testimony 
they had given to Congress wider a 
grant Of immuni ty. 

With Republicans having scored 
an early round in Whitewater by 
forcing Mr. Clinton to support the 
appointment of a special Justice 
Department prosecutor. Demo- 
crats argue that congressional hear- 
ings, especially if immunity was 
granted to assure full disclosure, 
could jeopardize any convictions 
stemming from Mr. Fiske's inquiry. 

Under these efreums lances. Re- 
publicans run the risk of looking as 
if they are trying to have it both 
ways, while Democrats are in dan- 
ger of looking as if they are grasp- 
ing at legal straws to avoid public 
hearings. 

As a result, both parties are 
hedging. 


Judiciary Committee to explore 
Anita Hill's charges of sexual ha- 
rassment against a Supreme Court 
nominee, Clarence Thomas, result- 
ed in putting Justice Thomas onio 
the court and making tire commit- 
tee into a parody of the “Saturday 


Night Live” comedy show. 
The onlv end urine truth 


The only enduring truth about 
congressional hearings may be that 
even Congress cannot repeal the 
law of unintended consequences, 
fts often as not, hearings go down 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The departing White House 
counsel, Bernard W. Nussbanm, testified for about 
four hours Thursday before a federal grand jury re- 

S contacts between White House and Treasury 
in the Whitewater affair. 

“I’ve responded to every question they put to me," 
Mr. Nussbaum said as be left the courthouse. 

The counsel, whose resignation is effective April 5, 
said he was certain that be and everyone in his office 
acted legally and ethically. He said he did not claim 
executive privilege in his questioning by the grand 
junr. 

Mr. Nussbaum resigned his White House position 
on March 5 amid a number of missteps related to the 
Whitewater affair. 

He will remain at the White House until April 3, 


devoting most of his rim<» to turning over his responsi- 
bilities to Lloyd N. Cutler. Mr. Cutler was named by 
Mr. Clin ion earlier this month to temporarily take 
over the counsel's office. 

A week ago, three other White House officials 
appeared before the grand jury in the federal court- 
house here. They were Margaret Williams, chief of 
staff to Hillar y Rodham Clinton; Mark Gearan, the 
White House c ommunica tions director, and Lisa Ca- 
puio, press secretary to Mrs. Ctintan. 


The three were among 10 officials subpoenaed by 
the Whitewater special counsd, Robot B. Fiske Jr n to 
testify about their involvement in a series of discus- 
sions at the White House dating from last fall The 
discussions involved the status of an investigation into 


discussions involved the status of m investigation into 
a failed Arkansas savings and loan at the center of the 
Whitewater controversy. 



A Canadian 


Is Guilty in 
Somali Death 


Washlngm Pm Service 

TORONTO — A Canadian sol- 
dier was found guilty of man- 
slaughter and torture on Thursday 
in the beating death of a Somali 
teenager a year ago. 

The incident occurred while the 
soldier was serving with Canadian 
peacekeeping forces in Somalia. 

Private Elvin Kyle Brown, 25. a 
member of the Canadian Airborne 
Regiment, was the first of six para- 
troopers to face a court-martial for 
the incident at the Canadian com- 
pound in Belet Huen, S omalia. 


Graphic courtroom testimony 
ver the last six weeks has told 


over the last six weeks has told 
more than a sordid tale of soldiers 
gone amok. 

It has dealt a blow to Canada's 
image as the postwar era's pre-emi- 
nent international peacekeeper, 
and to Canadians* seif-image as a 
people naturally adept at mediat- 
ing and s tabilizing foreign con- 
flicts. 


Habcfi GtooMmet Fnncc-Picne 

Mr. Nussbaum leaving the courthouse Thursday after testifying. 


The deaths of the teenager, Shi- 
dane Abukar Arone, 16, and, in 
separate incidents, of three other 
Somalis by Canadians last year 
have added special gravity to a 
broader debate here about Cana- 
da's foreign policy and military 
posture. 

And its once axiomatic commit- 
ment to United Nations and other 
peacekeeping missions is under its 
toughest scrutiny yet 


* POLITICAL AO ITS* 


A Vote to Limit Prwcrlptlon Drug Prlc— 


WASHINGTON — A congressional subcommittee voted to im- 
pose a kind of price control on prescription drugs, as part of a bill 
that would provide all Americans with insurance covering the cost of 
such medications. 

Under the proposal approved by the House Ways and Means 
subcommittee on health, the government would review prescription 
drug prices and could deny Medicare coverage for mugs whose 
prices were deemed excessive. 


U.S. Sees 
Narrowing 
Of Options 
On Korea 


At D-Day Staging Grounds, Preparations Anew 


m if Miuiv (Uii&U UW14LVW*W EK UUI tyUlVVlUC 

all Americans with insurance for a standard package of health 
benefits including prescription drags. The bill was offered by Repre- 
sentative Fortney H. (Pete) Stark Jr M the California Democrat who 
heads the subcommittee, is an alternative to President Bill Gin ton's 
health plan. But Mr. Stark shares the president's goal of universal 
health insurance coverage at affordable prices. 

The subcommittee also voted to guarantee coverage of a wide 
variety of mental health services. Mental health benefits guaranteed 
under the bin would be more extensive than those now provided 
under Medicare and same private insurance plans. 

Any of the actions taken ou Wednesday may be revised by the full 
Ways and Means Committee, other committees, the full House or 
the Senate. (NYT) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dhp&kts 
WASHINGTON — U.S. offi- 
cials are concerned about the short- 
age of options available should the 
Canton adminis tration decide that 
it must take action in the face of 
North Korea's refusal to allow full 
inspection of its nuclear installa- 
tions. 


f PVIIow Talk 1 Remark Draw* m Rebuke 


WASHINGTON — During the committee debate on drug prices, 
tempers rose when Mr. Staik asserted that a Republican congress- 
woman had obtained ha knowledge of health care through “p2k>w 
talk” with her husband, a Connecticut doctor. 

Mr. Stark made the comment about Representative Nancy L 


as an “extraonh 
that government 


expansion" of federal authority aim warned 
ala might substitute their judgment for that of 


doctors who wanted to prescribe cotain drugs for their patients. 

After Representative Jim McDermott, Democrat of Washington, 
who is a doctor, challenged her arguments, Mr. Stark said: r Tlte 
gentle lady got her medical degree through pillow talk, and the 
gentleman from Washington got his medical degree by going to 
school" 

Mrs. Johnson, a Raddiffe College graduate who has been in 


she satdr He takes enormous res 
1 day in and day out, working a tot 


up immediately. “My husband is a 
s enormous responsibility for life and 


Hty for life and 
than we da He 


keeps his business entirely to himself, and it is no part of our private 
lives because he respects his patients. 


lives because he respects his patients. 

“I get my knowledge of the medical system from endless hours as a 
representative in this Congress, in hospitals and physicians’ offices, 
lancing with patients." 

About 43 minutes later, Mr. Static said, “The chair would like to 
begin by apologizing to Mrs. Johnson for personal characterizations 
that were not in order," (NYT) 


Goldwator on Whitewater: Turn » Off 


PARADISE VALLEY, Arizona — Washington should lriH the 
clamor over Whitewater and let President Clinton do hisjob, said 
Barry Gold water, the former Republican senator from Arizona. 

“I want to oree my Republican friends in Washington, and those 
Democrats who are participating to get off his back and let him be 
president," Mr. Goldwater said at his home near Phoenix. 

Asked whether he had talked to Mr. Clinton, Mr. Goldwater 
replied, - I didn’t call the White House. I don’t even have the number. 

“I just think ifs time to let the president be president and stop 
nitpicking cm a thing called Whitewater or White River. They tdl me 
it’sagood fishingp&ce. That’s about the only thing good I've heard 
about it H 

Mr. Goldwater, the 1964 Republican presidential nominee, retired 
from the Senate in 1987. (AP) 


The preferred American option 
is to percuade the UN Security 
Council to impose economic sanc- 
tions against North Korea. 

But the three Asian countries 
with the largest stake in the issue — 
Ghina, Japan and South Korea — 
have indicated vinying degrees of 
resistance to economic sanctions. 
All prefer to deal with North Korea 
diplomatically, but the United 
States is concerned that the time 
for diplomacy may be running out 

Winston Lord, assistant secre- 
tary erf state for Asian affairs, told 
Congress on Thursday that North 
Korea had not fulfilled a commit- 
ment to allow the completion of 
nuclear inspections and exchange 
special envoys with South Korea. 

Mr. Lord said there was now no 
basis for holding scheduled high- 
level talks with North Korea in 
Geneva on Monday, but he said 
U.S. officials still hoped for a rever- 
sal erf course by the Communist 
government by then. 

He said no country, hiduding 
the United States, wanted to im- 
pose sanctions against North Ko- 
rea, but he said the desire to ensure 
a nuclear-free Korea was strong in 
both Japan Mid China. 

“We expect them to join us in 
whatever is required to advance the 
goal erf nonproliferation," he said. 

The CIA director, R. James 
Woolsey, declined Thursday to dis- 
cuss U.S. options for dealing with 
North Korea, but he said the intel- 
ligence community believed “they 
have reprocessed enough phitom- 
um to have available enough for at 
least one nudear weapon.* 


By John Daxnton 

New York Times Service 

WEYMOUTH, England —The memories of those days 
SO yean ago when three and a half million troops turned 
southern England into one huge army camp have faded a 
bit, like the snapshots that bleach into a pale brown over 
time. 

But once they get going and pull out the pictures as 
stepping stones to the past, those who are old enough to 
remember revel in talking about D-day and the arrival of 
thousands upon thousands of American soldiers. 

Now, as June 6 approaches, the English wait for the 
Yanks to return. Nobody knows how many to expect for 
the 30th anniversary of the Allied invasion of Europe in 
World War n. The Southern Tourist Board, while ac- 
knowledging that commemorative events in France are 
lifcdy to draw many more, is hopmgfor as many as 30,000. 

The tourist board calculates mat American and Canadi- 
an visitors will spend more than S3 million during their 
stay, roughly one-third of what the D-day celebrations are 
expected to bring in between April and October. Altogeth- 


ships and romance, wartime rationing and rivalry and 
bring young and part of preparations for history’s great 


endeavor. 

Operation Overioid was the largest amphibious attack 
ever mounted, sending 185,000 men and 19,000 vehicles to 
Normandy by sea and another 19,000 by air in the first 
two days alone. 

“The days were exciting,” said Betty Hockney of 
Bournemouth, who now has a halo of bkmdish white hair 
and is outfitted in a sweatshirt emblazoned with “397th 
Bomb Group.” 

As part of a troupe called the Nonstops, she drew wolf 
whistles on more than 1,000 nights entertaining troops 
throughout the Southern Command. 

“I was the naughfy one doing the cancan,” she said. 

Of all her recollections, one stands out: a show for fliers 
in a muddy tent by the runway at Hum Airfield just as D- 
day was beginning, shortly after midnight 

“Of course no one knew the actual day but we knew 
something was up,” she recalled. “The planes were coming 


“I’ve often wondered how many were shot down that 
night” 


Preparing for the invasion, about 1 J million Americans 
joined troops from a dozen other countries. They virtually 
took over Dorset and Hampshire and the Isle of Wight 


Relations were not always smooth. American soldiers 
went after British women, incurring resentment that is 
forever summed up by the anonymous wartime British 
complaint about Americans as bring “overpaid, oversexed 
and over here.” 


“We haled the Americans,” said Maurice Curtis, who 
was 14 that summer in Weymouth. "They had everything. 
They got all the girls." 


By contrast, his wife, Betty, IS at the time, summons up 
memories of generosity. One day she and her best friend, 
Rosemary, went for a quick dip in the sea and when they 
came out onto the beach they were suddenly surrounded 
by American soldiers. 


er, about 330,000 additional visitors are predicted in that 
period, including British day-trippers for June 4 or 5. 
The commemoration will stir the recollections erf friend- 


and going and the tenstonjust filled the air. That night we 
sang The Anthem' and The Star Spangled Banner’ and. 


sang The Anthem’ and The Star Spangled Banner and, 
you know, those boys, they rose up and just took it away, 
we stood there with tears as they sang their hearts out." 


“There were about 10 of them," she recalled. “They 
seemed so taH We started talking and these two chaps, 
they asked us if we had any turned fruit. We said no, and 
the next day they came over with a basketful. " 


No Happy Landings for Kohl on Normandy Side 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tunes Service 

BONN — What to do about the Germans has emerged 
as a hitch in plans for the 50th anniversary of the World 
War II allied landings in Normandy in June, when Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton, President Francois Mitterrand and 
Queen Elizabeth II will be among 15 heads erf state and 
government in attendance. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany will not be there, 
shut out as be was 10 years ago from the 40th anniversary. 
Some diplomats say he would like to have been indudra 
this tune to show the enduring nature of postwar reconcifi- 
ation between Germany and its wartime enemies after the 
defeat of the Nazis. He is also running for re-election in 
October, against heavy odds. 

French diplomatic attempts to explain the chancellor's 


desire to attend the 40th anniversary celebrations in 1984. 
This time around, he has been far more discreet, and if he 
feels wounded pride, he is publidy denying it. 

In an interview last week, he said that be was neither 
surprised nor offended that he had not been invited. 
T find it quite understandable that (he Americans, the 


French, the British, and the Canadians would want to pay 
tribute to their hundreds erf thousands of soldiers who fell 


exclusion to the German press have only made t hing s 
worse, creating a momentary strain in the French-German 


worse, creating a momentary strain in the rrench-Gennan 
partnership that is at the care of the European Union. 

On Thursday, in a move remmiscent of a Iras friendly 
era, the German Foreign Ministry called the French 
ambassador to Bonn, Francois Scheer, on the carpet for 
tdUng German newspqwr reporters earlier this week that 
Normandy was not so much a problem between Germany 
and France as a symbol of unease in the smaller countries 


of Europe about the assertiveness of reunified Germany. 
Mr. Kohl who was 15 when American troops liberated 


Mr. Kohl who was 15 when American troops liberated 
his part of the Rhineland in 1943, made no secret of his 


tribute to their hundreds erf thousands of soldiers who fell 
during the war, and that is not an occasion at which it 
would be appropriate for me to participate,” he said. 

But in private with Mr. Mitterrand and other European 
leaders, diplomats say, be has argued far a gesture by the 
allies to stow that Hitler and the Nazis, not the German 
nation for all etennfy, were their enemies in 1944. Diplo- 
mats said that Britain and France prefared to make any 
such gesture on the 50th anniversary of the Nazi defeat in 
May of next year, when the Germans win organize the 
ceremonies. 

On Wednesday, Jean-Marie Girault, the mayor of the 
Norman city of Caen, took the question into his own 
hands. He had no authority, he told French television, to 
invite Mr. Kohl to come on June 6. But he could extend an 
invitation to the German ambassador, JQrgen Sudhoff, to 
a ceremony at Caen's peace memorial he said, idling Mr. 
Sudhoff that as far as he was concerned it would, be all 
right if his boss came, too. 

Jacques Baumcl, a ranking member of the French 
National Assembly’s defense committee, retorted: “If the 


mayor wants to hove Mr. Kohl to dinner, that’s his 
problem, but the problem is that Germany should not be 
officially present on the landing beaches since the allies 
were landing against Mr. Kohl’s grandparents." 

Mr. Scheer’s attempt to explain the French perspective 
in a session with Goman reporters, on condition that they 
not quote him by name, backfired. A German television 
station reported Wednesday night that Mr. Scheer had 
been summoned to the Foreign Ministry to explain what 
-“French sources in Bonn” had beat quoted as saying in 
the Frankfurter AUgemeine newspaper. 

President Mitterrand, the newspaper quoted “French- 
men in Bonn" as saymg, had explained Normandy to Mr. 
Kohl some time ago; “The problem is rate between Ger- 
many and Europe, between Germany and its past; this is 
against the background of 10 centuries of European histo- 
ry" 

“Only France and Germany together can banish all 
these ghosts," the newspaper quoted its French source as 
saying. 

“Cooperation between France and Germany is the 
foundation of all progress in Europe — only France and 
Germany can build the Europe of the next century," be 
said, but added that Germans seemed increasingly in- 
dined to go their own way. 

“The new position of Germany is difficult to accept, 
and not just for the French." he said. 


Mr. Woclsey said on NBC that it 
is not only North Korea’s nucto- 


Quote/Unquoto 


President Clinton in a public service advertisement that urges 
Americans to do more to fight violent raime: “As a parent I ' want 
this violence to stop. As your vcajdnV^JM sommrtted to ending iL 
We must give our children back their childhood. (AP) 


Away From Politics 


“ *■<* rt- the book 

ana-abortion and other groups upset by us 

SSbStSSt werealstale. 

_ ” UJ mi n MTPO shin from Fip (Bed after jumping 


— SJS- :Wo ship from Ffli (Bed after jumping 
a^Cti Sound) oe^l 


* A* iTSSte. *ESy A February 

degree cooler <Jdestever in five Northern stales. 

5Sou£h! 11 settle Ctto^shutrffsonKSden* 

<1 Five a*™* 1 ? before packing for 


was not only North Korea’s nucle- 
ar potential but its role as a weap- 
ons supplier and promoter of ter- 
rorism tha t causes concern. 

In Geneva, Han Chang On, the 
North Korean deputy ambassador 
to the UN European headquarters, 
said, “The present attitude of the 
United States and International 
Atomic Energy Agency could pre- 
vent a complete solution of the mi- 
dear issue on the Korean Peninsula 
if they continue actions like this." 

“It will cause very complicated 
pro blems and create an unexpected 
situation," he added. 

The latest setback occurred with 
North Korea’s refusal to grant sev- 
en inspectors from the Internation- 
al Atomic Energy Agency access to 
a laboratory suspected of being 
used to extract plutonium, a key 
component of nudear weapons. 

The agency concluded that as a 
result of the North Korean action, 
it was unable to verify that there 
had been no diversion of nudear 
material at the facility. The agency 
will give a final determination of 
the inspection process on Monday, 
when its board of governors meets. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Finger- Jabbing Legislators Are All Thumbs at * Real 9 Debate 


at Kennedy 23 tours and 16 minutes. U the 

longest shuttle flight , iZhour lap around the world, the crew 

wratherfotett weather forecast is good, 

^setanwduranar^ii^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

•An over-tiie-e«' s ^ tS^^Uodated with at least three rases m 
acute hepatitis. Jin Bu Huan - ^ ^ ^ Graham M. Woolf, 

Southern atSars-Sinai Medical Center in 

AtveosK of hepatology .. . mau V links*! In 


More California Spans 
Face Quake Retrofitting 

Los Angela Tima Service 

SACRAMENTO, California — 
California officials have deter- 
mined flmt seismic strengthening 
wtQ be needed on 1,000 more road 


By Michael Wines 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —Members of 
the House of Representatives have 
made their political points in many 
ways — beating opponents with 
fire tongs, sleeping through the 
1812 resolution declaring war on 
Britain and. in one early instance, 
undressing on the House floor — 
but in recent decades, staring polit- 
ical debate has not been one of 
them. 

Under normal House rales, 
members are restricted to brief re- 
marks of no more than a few min- 
utes duration. An exhaustive 
speech lasts nearly as long as a beer 
commercial and is almost never as 
entertaining- . 

So in a bid to raise the mtdlectu- 

al bar for oratory, four Republi- 
cans and four Democrats comman- 
deered tire House chamber on 
Wednesday night with the stated 
purpose of showing their fellow 
members what a classic Oxford- 
style debate looks like. 

For two hours, they argued and 

rebutted and cross-examined and 
interrupted each other over the 
proposition, “Resolved: The Clin- 
ton health care plan best represents 
the elements that should be includ- 
ed in health care nrfonn. 

It heean in a tedd enough fash- 


Then: “That is just factually not 
true,” Newt Gingrich of Georgia, 
the Republican whip, retorted to 
Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, 
the majority leader. 

And: “Not true! Not true!, Not 
truel" (Rosa DeLaurc, Democrat 
of Connecticut, over the insistence 
of Nancy L Johnson, Republican 
of Connecticut, that it was. too, 
true and so there.) 

“It does." 

“It does not.’’ 

Tt does.” 

“It does not." (Mr. Waxman to 
Republicans, and vice versa.) 

“The gentleman is hiding behind 
com pone vernacular." (Fortney H. 
(Pete) Stark Jr„ Democrat of Cali- 
fornia, to the deeply drawling Mr. 
Bliley.) 

And lata:: Td like to take an 
tour on the floor and discuss that 
with you.” (William M. Thomas, 
Republican of California, rhetori- 
cally rolling up his sleeves.) 

“You could probably take an 
hour cm the floor and explain that 
your plan does nothing." (Mr. 
Stark, doubling his oratorical fist 
to Mr. Thomas.) 


There was also a spirited discus- 
skm of President Bill Clinton’s 
health plan. Unfortunately, much 
of it was inaudible because speak- 
ers for both sides were shouting 
over each other’s remarks. 


humor and plenty of jousting with 
facts, with the object of backing 
one’s opponent into an intellectual 
comer. 


Although leaders called it an 
“Oxford-style debate," in the man- 
ner of the English university, the 
truth is somewhat plainer. Real Ox- 
ford debates employ large doses of 


Perhaps predictably, experi- 
enced debates gave the perfor- 
mance tow marks. 


“It’s not an unmitigated disas- 
ter,” said Stephen C. Wood, a Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island professor, 


debating coach for 23 years and 
author of a college textbook on the 
art. But as debates go, he said, it 
was “mud wrestling.* 

The House wall bold two more 
debates, in April and May. The 
hope is that the notion of rhetorical 
battles will “infect” other lawmak- 
ers and spread to gmeral debate on 
the House floor, Mr. Gephardt 


Wiere to find the Worlds 
Finest Hotels and Resorts. 


UJL Leader to^ Visit Sarajevo 


That would douUe the sttope of a 
retrofitting prc«ram and increase 
costs by SI Mhon. 


It began in a tepid enough fash- 
ion, with the customary floweiy 
references to “the gentleman” and 
“the gentleUdy.”* But slowly, the 
ties unkno tted and the coats came 
off. 

And then: “Henry, you know 
better f han that," Thomas J. Bliley 
Jr- Republican of Virgnia, ad- 
monished Henry A. waxman, 
Democrat of California. 


Agenn France-Prasc 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
John Major of Britain is to visit the 
Bosnian capital, Sarajevo, on Fri- 
day to meet the British general 
commanding UN forces in Bosnia- 
Herzegovina, a spokesman said 
Thursday. Mr. Major wQl meet Sir 
Michael Rose in Sarajevo. He will 
also travel to the contra! Bosnian 
towncf Vitez. 


The Oriental, Bangkok 
Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong 
Mandarin Oriental, Jakarta 
Mandarin Oriental, Macau 
Mandarin Oriental, Manila 
Mandarin Oriental, San Francisco 
The Oriental, Singapore 
Baan Taling Ngam, Thailand 
Phuket Yacht Club, Thailand 
Hotel Bela Vista, Macau 


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Page 4 


FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 

OPINION 


. 'oV ** 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 17ie United States and China Are on a Collision Course 


niBUSHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Migrant Words That Fit 


The Eminences grises of the French cultural 
elite are in a lather once again, resurrecting 
the venerable bate noire of the linguistic mas- 
alliance of foreign patois with their precious 
mother tongue. Sans doute it’s a case of d$A 
vu. These cris de coeur seem to occur every 
few years; successive generations of intellec- 
tuals and demagogic politicians throw a grand 
mal fit at the inevitable incursions of Ameri- 
canized English into their daily lives. 

The term “Franglais” was coined back in the 
‘60s. when the jeunesse dorte fell in love with 
hamburgers and Nancy Sinatra. It has been at 
least 30 years since terms like *Tc camping” and 
’Te parking" first embedded themselves in the 
vocabulary, it is hardly America’s fault if they 
have served so weO that they are now to be 
found in every French dictionary. 

Maybe it's tune this new generation of winn- 
ers woke up and sanded the cafe au laic 
Perhaps they need reminding that the lexicons 
of war, belles lettres, politics, haute cuisine and 


The IRA Has Replied 


The mortar shells fired at London’s Heath- 
row in recent days were, whether by intent or 
defect, duds that hurt no one; but thrir political 
impact was unmistakable and mmen« The 
shots came from the Irish Republican Army, 
which seeks to drive Britain from majorify- 
Protestant Northern Ireland by terrorism, and 
they shattered any residual hopes that the IRA 
was tiring of its bloody 25-year struggle. Earli- 
er IRA bombings of London's financial dis- 
trict had struck at an important dement in 
Britain's international status. The latest pro- 
jectiles, which dosed down Gatwicfc airport as 
well as Heathrow, expressed an IRA capacity 
to move from one strategic target to another 
and to isolate Britain. The IRA strategy of 
eroding the popular will is still on. 

In December, to test whether the IRA was 
ready to consider a new approach, the British 
and Irish governments had launched a joint 
peace initiative for Northern Ireland. It drew 
only a propagandists response from the out- 
lawed IRA’s legal political arm, Sinn Fein, 
which last month sent Hs leader, Gerry Adams, 
on a brief American tour. Now the joint Brit- 
ish-Irish declaration has also drawn a response 
from toe IRA. One part was the mortaring. The 


Appointment at State 


Phyllis Oakley would seem to be a shoo-in 
to run the new bureau that the State Depart- 
ment intends to set up, Congress willing, to 
deal with refugee, migration and population 
affairs. A ca re e r Foreign Service officer who 
emerged with flying colon from a stint in the 
spokesman’s office and another as deputy 
head of intelligence and research, she current- 
ly is acting chief of the dqjartment’s refugee 
orograms. As a woman, as a diplomat who 
worked her way up a hard ladder and as a 
respected professional, Mrs. Oakley ought to 
be an easy choice for an administration beat 
on cultivating diversity and recognizing quali- 
ty bureaucratic service. But this is the Clinton 
'administration. You will not be surprised to 
learn that at least one other candidate is being 
considered at the White House. 

She is Carol Tucker Foreman, known as a 
former assistant secretary of agriculture and 
consumerist and also as the sister of Jim Guy 
Tucker, governor of Arkansas. Mrs. Foreman 


arrives with credentials and references. The 
refugee, migration and population job, how- 
ever, appears to be one of several fra- which 
she might be considered. Mrs. Oakley is not 
only wdi qualified but in a position to land 
naming. The administration is already being 
pressed hard to account for the slow pace as 
wefl as the over-dubby friend-of-the-fanri- 
lyism of many of its appointments. Why in 
this important job would it want to reinforce 
either one of those lines of criticism? 

The dock ticks. Rising global instability is 
moving refugees and migrants increasingly 
toward the center of official American con- 
cern. The United States cannot afford to lag 
in preparing its positions for the major United 
Nations conference on population and devel- 
opment opening in Cano in September. The 
While House needs to get the best suited 
person in the job as quickly as possible. We 
think it’s Mrs. Oakley. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Biased Death Penally 


The numbers are amazing, even Tor those 
familiar with the racial discrimination that 
plagues the death penalty in America. Nine out 
of 10 times when the Justice Department has 
sought the death penalty under the 1988 federal 
“drug kingpin" law, the defendant was black or 
Hispanic. Don Edwards, ch airman of the 
House Judiciary Committee, whose staff col- 
lected the statistics, understandably asks why. 

It is a timely question as the committee 
considers bow many of the Senate’s proposed 
new capita] crimes — there are more than 50 
altogether — to recommend for House ap- 
proval So far neither the Justice Department 
nor congressional fans of the death penalty 
have any answer, which is reason enough to 
slow down the execution express now barrel- 
ing through Congress. 

Under the 1988 "drug kingpin" law, the 
death penalty is available to punish and deter 
drug-related murders by major narcotics op- 
erators and their hirelings. The government 
has invoked the law against 37 defendants, aD 
but four of whom were African-American or 
Hispanic. Attorney General Janet Reno ap- 
proved 10 of the penalties during ibe past year 
— all against blade defendants. 

What makes the lopsided statistics especially 
odd is that in recent years three-fourths of aD 
federal drug trafficking defendants have been 
winze. Why then do U.S. attorneys single out 
minorities when they identify defendants they 
deem worthy of the severest punishment? How 
can this happen when the federal government, 
and (te Qmton administration in particular, 
have been so committed to racial justice? 

Since 1 976, when the Supreme Court autho- 
rized the resumption of executions for mur- 


der. the states have been notorious for then- 
prosecution patterns, seeking the death penal- 
ty more often when the victim was white and 
the defendant black, almost never against a 
white whose victim was black. 

Again: Why do these patterns exist? The 
Justice Department needs to explain the 
workings of its fledgling death penalty appa- 
ratus. Meanwhile, the ugly answer must be 
that the death penalty is, again, governed by 
bias. Congress, take notice. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 

Other Comment 

The Disabling of a President 

Even if the Clintons emerge vindicated, or, as 
is more likely, technically innocent but foolish, 
their hopes of enacting an ambitious domestic 
reform program are gravely damaged. As in the 
Nixon While House at the time of Watergate, 
aD the energy and effectiveness cf the president 
may be monopolized for months by me strug- 
gle for political survival 

A weak president means a weak America, 
and the West needs America to be strong. 
President Qmton was promising to be a good, 
even, in context, a great president (foreign 
polity apart). He bad squared up to issues U.S. 
pohnrians had avoided for years: health care, 
education, guns. He has spoken honestly about 
race. Tbe destruction of President Clinton 
would bring joy to zealots of the right But it 
would raise the question whether, m this all- 
seeing media age, America is governable at all 
— The Independent (London). 


all the performing and visual arts are larded 
with the linguistic residues of yesteryear, when 
the French ruled much of the world and aD (he 
world turned to Paris for enlightenment 
A rendezvous with reality is in order here: 
the innovations that marie the late 20th centu- 
ry come not from Paris but from Tokyo and 
New York and Detroit. If “te databank” and 
“le hit parade" have become part of the lan- 
guage used comme (Thabitude, it is because tbe 
thing s they signify started somewhere dsn 
Americans don't talk about “fat liver paste" 
because, for one thing, it sounds stupid, and for 
another, pfite de foie gras cranes from France. 
ShnSarfy, "prime timer is more euphonious 
than (te maladroit “hemes de grand ecoute," 
Tbe French savants, of coarse, are spectac- 
ularly blind to their own double standard. 
Other languages — notably English — have 
endured for centuries the fate that they now 
complain about. Cest la guerre. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


other part was a weekend statement threaten- 
ing new terrorist attacks in tbe absence of 
flutter British political concessions. 

Many British officials and citizens, overlook- 
ing the deep let-evezybody-speak tradition in 
America, are still sore that tbe United States 
winked at its own rale denying visas to terror- 
ists and let in Gary Adams. Britons and others 
should know, however, that many Americans 
have sympathy and respect fer tbe way British 
authorities are handling a terrorist menace far 
more deep-rooted, pervasive and deadly titan 
anything that Americans have ever had to bear. 

Certainly the British have made major mis- 
takes, police and political, in dealing with 
Northern Ireland. But the December joint 
British- Irish declaration stands as a princi- 
pled basis on which Irish unity, based on 
consent, could yet be negotiated. 

An IRA that had a regard for the democrat- 
ic process would now be putting aside terror- 
ism and embracing the new initiative. Its 
failure to do so condemns it to isolation and 
disrepute, and imposes a great but inescap- 
able burden on Irish people as well as British 
to continue striving for peace. 

— TBE WASHINGTON POST. 


L ONDON — Tbe United States 
1 and China are on a collision 
course. Tbe recent visit to Bating by 
Secretary of State Warren Christo- 
pher leaves little doubt that the dash 
of these two titans is unavoidable. 

Even if znost-favraed-naxion trad- 
ing status for China is renewed by 
President Bill Clinton in June, an 
adversarial relationship between the 
United States and China is likdy to 
became a key feature of international 
relations in toe post-Cold War world. 

Tbe world order has been in Dux 
since tbe collapse of the Soviet 
Union. New nations have taken 
shape and regional conflicts have 
erupted, but no overarching rivalry 

Gestures Are Needed 

W HAT is critical is what hap- 
pens or doesn't between now 
and June, when President Clinton 
is required to tell Congress whether 
he favors renewing China’s most- 
favored-nation trading status. A 
large measure of mutual pragma- 
tism is in order. A few face-saving 
gestures are needed from both Boi- 
ling and Washington. 

U^.- Chinese relations need not 
be irretrievably soured. Before te 
left Beijing, Warren Christopher 
tried to grve hb trip an upbeat spin. 
The Chinese turned over new infor- 
mation about political prisoners 
and agreed to procedures for inter- 
national inspection of suspected 
prison labor rites. 

Beijing will have to demonstrate 
human rights progress to satisfy the 
Clinton conditions on most-favored 
status. But even if it does, both sides 
need to explore ways to disengage 
tbe rights issue from trade — with- 
out the U.S. abandoning its commit- 
ment to h uman rights. 

— Los Angeles Tones. 


has yet emerged to replace the Soviet- 
US. divide. It now ap pe ars that the 
Chinese-US. relationship has aD the 
dements to polarize Asia, and per- 
haps the wood, in the years to come. 

Japan win be caught in the mid- 
dle, and the likelihood that it will 
side with Chmq increases as its own 
disputes over trade and other issues 
with Washington intensify. 

Like tbe rest of its partners in tbe 
Group of Seven industrial nations 
as well as its Asian neighbors, Japan 
does not share the U.S. govern- 
ment’s agenda of trying to change 
China politically. Tokyo fears that 
such Retire will destabilize the re- 
gion and and reduce Japanese earn- 
ings in the lucrative China market. 

The Chinese- American relation- 
ship been tumultuous since tbe 
authorities in China brutally re- 
pressed the pro-democracy move- 
ment five years ago. The two coun- 
tries are like a couple that separated 
in 1989, realized that despite ten- 
sions they needed other, and 
tentatively re-engaged, only to learn 
that their differences were deep and 
intractable Now they are trying to 
decide whether to coexist unhappily 
or file for a divorce. 

The consequences of a split would 

be far-reaching. A withdrawal of 
most-favored status by the United 
States would set the relationship 
back 20 years. It would hit both the 
Chinese and the American econo- 
mies hard, not to mention those of 
Hong Kong and Taiwan. Job losses 
would be in the millions. 

More importantly, the fallout 
could not be contained in the trade 
arena. It would spill over into every 
facet of the retatiooship. Beijing 
would become a reluctant partner at 
best It could make life very difficult 
for the American agenda in Asia 


By David Shambangh 

riace the Soviet- and the world — particularly with 
ippears that the respect to arms control nuclear pro- 

ismp has aD the liferarion and regional security. 
Asia, and per- The U-S.-Chmese rivalry has sev- 
: years to come. eral components that run deep, 

ght in the mid- Some have beat apparent since 

lod that it will 1949; others are more recent, 
ases as its own In a real sense, the Qrinese- 
fnd other issues American imbroglio shows that the 
engjf y. Cold War is not over. If that era was 

partners in tbe a struggle between political systems, 

lustrial nations the contest is still alive and well in 
a gfab ors, Japan Washington and Beijing. 

US. govern- The Chinese government perceives 

ying to change a systematic American campaign to 
>kyo fears that subvert Communist Party rate in 
tnhniyg the re- China, thus completing die West's 
Japanese earn- “victory" over communism. Beijing 
China market. perceives the UJ5. harping on human 
rican relation- rights to be a rose for such subver- 
sions since tbe stem. There are certainly politicians 
a brutally re- and officials in Washington who pro- 
oocracy move- vide credence to China s daim. 

The two coun- Washington's other troubles with 
1 that separated Beijing are well known; prison labor 

u despite ten- exports, intellectual property rights, 
aefa other, and suspected nuclear proliferation and 

4, only to learn chemical weapons exports, destabi- 
were deep and lizing arms sales, j amming of air- 
y are trying to waves, and a range of trade issues. 
Dost unhappily But these irritants mask a deeper, 
less well-known problem. Each side 
of a split would sees the other as a growing security 
withdrawal of threat This mutual perception wiD 
by the United sustain the future rivalry. 
ie relationship From Washington’s perspective, 
ild hit both the the Chinese military has embarked 
lerican econo- on a concerted buildup cranmensu- 
ntion those of rate with its expanding economic 
ran. Job losses power. From Beijing’s perspective, 
ons. not only is this force modernization 

f, the falloot program overdue but it is necessary, 
ed in the trade given what China sees as a new UJ>. 
aver into every containment strategy, 

oship. Beijing Numerous Chinese publications 
taut partner at and discussions with specialists in 
every difficult China make clear that Beijing be- 
renda in Asia lieves that the United States is 


seeking to expand its influence in 
the Asia-Pacific region and at the 
same time contain a growing China 
through a network of bilateral alli- 
ances and defense arrangements, 
the forward positioning of U.S. 
forces in the area, and the creation 
of a new multilateral mechanism 
for regional security. 

Washington has yet to grasp the 
fact that China no longer sees 
American forces in Asia as condu- 
cive to its security: just the oppo- 
site. Withdrawal of most-favored 
trade status would cement this per- 
ception in Beijing and create a fis- 
sure between the two nations that 
would be difficult to mend. A 
break would reverberate negatively 
against all concerned. 

America and China must step 
back from tbe brink and foster a 
more constructive relationship, even 
if it does contain a large dement of 


competition. If America reaDy wants 
to influence peaceful evolution in 
Chinn , wigagem ent will have greater 
effect than punishment. Washington 
should heed the Chinese aphonsm 
that warns against lifting a stone only 
to drop it on one’s foot" { 

Accepting China as a great power 
will be one of the greatest tarics 
facing the international community 
in this decade. Newly emergent 
powers are always disruptive to the 
established order. Tbe task is to 
minimize the disruption and pro- 
vide incentives fra the new power to 
be a force fra stability and progress. 
With China, the stakes are large 

The writer is senior lecturer in Chi- 
nese politics at the School of Oriental 
and African Studies, University of 
London, and editor of The China 
Quarterly. He contributed Otis com- 
ment to the Herald Tribune. 


Don’t Link Trade With Human Rights 

A RIFT between the United Slates and China would have advene 
implications for stability in the Asia-Pacific. It is bound to affect U.S. 


policy m tbe region, especially if America sees little prospect of its 
differences with China bang resolved satisfactorily. 

Mr. Christopher’s visit to Beijing was til-timed, as it coincided with the 
annual session of the National People's Congress, which is an occasion 
when restrictions are usually placed on the movement of dissidents. 

Washington is pressing tne human rights issue at a time when fear of 
instability has grown in China as it attempts a delicate transition from a 
moribund socimisi system to a modern market economy while faring high 
inflation, rampant corruption and widening social disparities. 

Beijing probably also feats that yielding ground on human rights would 


moribund 
inflation, 1 


pot it c® a slippery slope, encouraging Washington to seek more political 
concessions in one with its foreign policy objectives of promoting democra- 
cy around the world. Such concerns would suggest that tbe U.S. presaire on 
China will not succeed, just as it has not worked in the past 
It is wrong to link trade with extraneous issues. The United States is 
understandably concerned about its growing trade deficit with China, which 
exceeded $20 bflEon last y eta and continues to grow. But if it wants to 
improve its export position, it should do so bry focusing cm matters that are 
directly relevant, such as greater access to the Chinese market deariy, China 
cannot be rusted on human rights. — The Straits Times ( Singapore % 


Settle This Wrangle and Get On With the Integration of Europe 


By Flora Lewis 


The trouble is on the old issue of 
“deepening versus widening,” more 
integration or more members, osten- 
sibly settled several years ago but 

This time^Ee wrangfebas attract- 
ed little notice. But the Europe that 
will emerge after new candidates are 
absorbed, and its capacity to act on 
the world, are at stake. The will to 
solidify exists, embodied in the 
Maastricht treaty, but so does re- 
sistance, the insistence on preserv- 


ingnational power. 
The current inmasi 


me current impasse is over voting 
rules. The existing 12-nation commu- 


nity uses a weighted system to pre- 
vent a single state’s veto but also to 
guard against domination by a few 
large countries. It sets 23 votes as the 
blocking minority. Two large coun- 
tries and me small one can prevent 
decision by the majority. 

As they complete tenna for the 
admission, expected in January, of 
Austria, Finland, Sweden and Nor- 
way, members are arguing about 
how to take those added voices into 
account Led by Germany and 
France, most want to increase the 
blocking minority to 27 votes, which 
could be three large countries and 
two or three small ones. Britain and 


Spain are opposed, arguing for the 
present rales, which would increase 
the power of a small er minority 
in the larger club. 

The Maastricht treaty provides for 
a general review of the institutions in 
1996. But how the issue is resolved 
now will set an important precedent 
and influence the shape of the Union 
that eager East European ca n dida t es 
hope to join a few years later. 

As usual principles, narrow na- 
tional interests and day-to-day poli- 
tics are jumbled almost inextricably. 
Fiance has definitely moved from its 
old Ganliist position stressing na- 
tional rights to a push fra integration 


that wfll increase common European 
power. Britain is still the main brake, 
welcoming new members primarily 
as a way to dilute the Union's author- 
ity and make it more like the free 
trade area that London organized in 
the late 1930s in an attempt to break 
up the Common Market 
Bui Spain, which always looked to 
a cohesive Europe as the way to 
emerge from Franco-era isolation 
and enhance its influence, seems to 
have lowered its sights for limited 
commercial advantage. With the old 
rules, Spain, Italy and Greece, all 
Mediterranean countries, could widd 
a veto voting together. Fearful of an 
increased northern preponderance as 
new members join. Spam worries that 


Help Macedonia and Pressure Greece if Necessary 

T EW YORK — The Western alliance, led By George Soros This irredentism is propagated by Macedonk 

I hi/ tUe» TTnf«4»/4 Ctofne »a lain Uoa • ^ * Z 


N EW YORK — The Western alliance, led 
by tbe United Stales, needs to help Mac- 
edonia at a moment when Greece is needlessly 
fueling another Balkan crisis. If that, regretta- 
bly, requires diplomatic, political or economic 
pressure on Athens, so be it 
Greece dosed its border on Feb. 16, blocking 
access to the port of Salonika, landlocked Mac- 
edonia's main gateway to the outside world. This 
move was in tended to destabilize Macedonia’s 
precarious economy. It could topple the govern- 
ment unless Macedonia gives in to Greece’s de- 
mands on several issues. 

To counter rising irritation in Europe, Athens 
let some fad enter by rail last week. Otherwise, 
the borders remain dosed, endangering Macedo- 
nia's ability to ship its most important export, 
eariy-season vegetables, to Weston Europe. 

But it is in Greece’s interest to foster a prosper- 
ous, democratic, multiethnic ndghbor to its 
north, not to work toward its destruction. 

The existence of Macedonia, the only multi- 
ethnic state in the Balkans that is not war-tom, 
depends on its ability to satisfy its nationalities: 
a sizable Albanian minority, Turks, Vlachs, 
Serbs, Gypsies and others. But the three-party 
coalition faces strong opposition from national- 
ist extremists. Macedonian extremists want the 
Albanians to have limited power; radical Albani- 


ans want parts of Macedonia joined with Albania. 

If extremists gain the upper hand, Macedonia 
may not survive as an independent country. 
And a conflict could draw in aD the ndghboriog 
countries —rump Yugoslavia, Albania, Greece, 
Turkey and Bulgaria. 

Nationalist passions are running high in 
Greece. Tbe last government was defeated main- 
ly on this issue. The Greeks fear that implicit in 
the Macedonian republic's name and constitu- 
tion is a claim on the Greek province of Macedo- 
nia. Skopje denies this. 

The name “Macedonia" arouses powerful 
memories that go bade partly to the Communist 
insurrection in Greece after World War IL 
sustained by Tito’s Yugoslavia. More potently, 
they go back to the turbulent period after 
World War I, when many Slavic Macedonians 
inhabited Greek Macedonia — a period when 
Greece asserted the principle that all the inhab- 
itants of Greece were Greek. 

Large-scale population transfers took place. 
Tbe injuries suffered by Slavic Macedonians, 
who today form the majority in the republic, 
gave rise to an irredentist Macedonian national- 
ism. which in torn inflames Greek nationalism. 


This irredentism is propagated by Macedonian 
extremists, not by die government. 

Greece wants Macedonia to recognize tbe pre- 
sent borders (it has done so), to delete the infer- 
ences in its constitution to protection of Macedo- 
nians outside the country, and to remove from its 
flag the star of Vagina, an old Greek emblem. 

These are legitimate concerns, but sach 
changes require a two-thirds parliamentary ma- 
jority tbe Macedonian government could muster 
only after a shift in U.S. diplomacy. 

Both countries should compromise on the 
name issue. Then Skopje would be unfettered in 
its drive fra economic reform, which would stifle 
irredentist and nationalist extremism. 

The Clinton administration has not formally 
recognized Macedonia and established diplo- 
matic relations. It should do so right away, and 
it should deliver an economic and humanitarian 
package and press UK allies to follow suit 
This could persuade Athens that its anti-Mac- 
edonian policy will fail Bat if Athens does not 
come to us senses, the United States might have 
to put on heavy pressure. 

The writer, a Walt Street financier, funds foun- 
dations that support East European democratic 
leaders and movements. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


Asian Population Growth Is Overtaking Rice Output 



M ANILA — The race to avoid a 
collision between population 
growth and rice production in Asia 
goes on, amid worrying signs that 
gains of the recent past may be lost 
over the next few decades. 

In the past quarter-century, popu- 
lations of countries where rice 15 a 
staple food grain have increased by 
an average of 70 percent, but this 
increase was matched by higher 
yields, thanks to the spread of new 
rice technology. Global rice produc- 
tion doubled, world rice prices fell 
by more than 40 percent and per 
capita rice consumption rose by an 
average of 25 percent 
But while the populations of major 
rice-consuming nations continue to 
swell growth m rice production has 
slowed dramatically in the 10 coun- 
tries that account for 85 percent of 
global output. If these trends contin- 
ue, demand for rice in many parts of 
Asia wiD outstrip supply within a few 
years. Chang es in diets m some indus- 
trializing nations, where people are 
eating less rice, wiD not alter this trend. 

Alleviation af poverty is an addi- 
tional force behind the rising demand 
fra rice. Millions of Asians and Afri- 
cans stiD have rice only once a day, if 
at alL The need for rice wfll be an 
estimated 70 percent higher in 2025 
than it is today. Yields most more 
than double just to maintain current 
consumption levels. They most in- 
crease stiD more if malnutrition and 
poverty in Africa and South Asia are 
to be overcome. 

Yet complacency seems to be grow- 
ing. In some places, attention is shift- 
ing from raising productivity to pro- 
tecting nature] . resources. Donor 
agencies are allocating more of their 
limited research funds to projects 
that aim to conserve the natural re- 
source base: Less money is directed 
to protects designed to raise food 


By Mahabub Hossain 

production. Both are needed, in a shift from mte 
mutually supporting framework. cropping systei 

Policymakers in less developed cultivation will 
countries are also shifting emphasis. This will in tea 
Many govemmeaits are withdrawing yields to meei 
subsidies from fertilizers and other crease in detna 
agricultural supplies. They are reduc- Irrigated rice 

ing investments in water-resource de- percent of the 
vdopment and agricultural research plant bigb-yidc 
and extension. They are adopting and output is a 

S ograms that promote crop divers- attainable throi 
ation at the expense of food pro- techniques. For 
duction. Financing to develop and yields in Japan j 
maintain the irrigation and drainage fluctuated betw 
systems that helped spread modern hectare (25 acre 
strains of rice in the 1960s and 1970s tbe main Indot 
has fallen dramatically. and in Punjab 

Declining real prices on the world India, wiD soon 
market have added to the complacen- In the tropi 

cy about rice production. But world yields and expe 
trade involves a mere 4 percent of tial is still large 
global output. International price ral forces as fk 
trends do not reflect the shaky bal- rainfall and sali 
ance between overall supply and de- Most of tbe i 
maud. For example, China and India in the favorabk 
consume 55 percent of world rice .last 25 years wi 
supplies. If a series of natural disas- ing genetically i 
ters forced cither country to import signed to respc 
just a small fraction of national de- fertilizer and ag 
mand, international rice prices would needed is a new 

rise substantially. as well as crop 

Growth in rice ootpnl in the last 30 relies less on inf 
years has been achieved primarily by and more ou la 
increasing yield. But yidd gains ap- agement to mal 
pear to be flattening. Reversing that source while rai 
trend wiD not be easy. Studies show 


The equation is complicated by a 
reduction in Lbe area ol rice cultiva- 
tion. Prime rice land is being lost to 
industrialization and urbanization in 
the faster-growing Asian countries. 

In the 1980s, the harvested area of 
rice declined in China, Japan, Burma 
and the Philippines. 

If environmental concerns result in 
policies that remove maiginat lands 
from rice production and hasten the 


shift from intensive to less intensive 
cropping systems, tbe area under rice 
cultivation will decline even faster. 
This will intensify pressure to raise 
yields to meet the anticipated in- 
crease in demand. 

Irrigated rice accounts fra almost 75 
percent of the total Most farmers 
plant high-yielding modem varieties, 
and output is approaching tbe ceiling 
attainable through modem scientific 
techniques. For me last three decades, 
yields in Japan and South Korea have 
fluctuated between 6 and 6.5 tons per 
hectare (25 acres). Yields in China, on 
tbe main Indonesian island of Java 
and in Punjab and Tamil Nadu in 
India, wiD soon reach tint level 

In the tropics, tbe gap between 
yields and experimental yield poten- 
tial is stiD large because of such natu- 
ral forces as floods, droughts, heavy 
rainfall and salinity. 

Most of tbe increase in rice yields 
in the favorable environments of the 
•last 25 years was achieved by plant- 
ing genetically improved varieties de- 
signed to respond wdl to chemical 
fertilizer and agrochemicals. What is 
needed is a new generation plant type 
as well as cropping technology that 
relies less on inputs from off tbe farm 
and more on knowledge-based man- 
agement to main tarn (he natural re- 
source while raising yields. 

Studies show that per capita rice 
consumption depends largely on in- 
come. Rice is a luxury for the 
world’s poorest. They rely more on 
low-cost foods: coarse grains and 
sweet potatoes. When their incomes 
rise, their rice consumption goes up. 
Rice becomes less important only 
when incomes increase to a point 
where people can afford meat, fish, 
bread and vegetables. 

In Asia, per capita rice consump- 


tion has declined only in high- and 
middle-income countries, such as Ja- 
pan, South Korea, Malaysia and 
Thailand. The income threshold at 
which higher-quality, more varied 
foods are substituted for rice has not 
yet been reached fra China, India, 
Indonesia and Bangladesh — which 
account for 70 percent of world rice 
consumption and dominate growth 
in demand for rice. 

The writer, head of the Social Sci- 
ences Division at the International 
Rice Research Institute based in Los 
Banos, Philippines, contributed this 
comment to die Herald Tribune. 


it may lose support for its subtropical 
agriculture products if the blocking 
vote is changed. 

Maybe it coukl rely on Greece to 
back its stand on lemons, oranges 
and olives. But judging by the way 
Greece has behavea since it entered 
tbe community, all the other mem- 
bers can rely on it to cause trouble 
with its nationalistic Balkan politics. 

This is a formula fra prolonging 
the impotence that Europe has dis- 
played on Yugoslavia. 

Madrid was understandably an- 
noyed at the outcome af community 
negotiations with the United Slates on 
agriculture in the GATT trade agree- 
ment. France made aD tbe nose and 
got the goodies, and Spain felt let 
down by its partners in asserting Hs 
interests. Now it is trying to make up, 
at the risk of undermining its larger, 
longer-term need fra a strong Europe. -* 
And tins is at a time when the 
United States has moved from a skrt-' 
tish, kneejerk dislike of consolidat-i 
ing European political and especially 
defense muscle to a greater apprecia- 
tion of toe weight that Western Bo-' 
rope could bring to bear on the troiK 
bled eastern stretch of the con tinent-’ 
America has served notice tbat itwiD 
not be the world’s omnipresent, ever-' 
ready policeman. It needs a partner 
capable of decisive action. 

At this point, tbe solid center of toe 
European tug-of-war is Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of Germany, not just 
because his country is tbe biggest and 
richest in Europe but because it has- 
hed a dear, steady, determined idea: 
of Europe from the start 
“We're not going to build Europe 
in a day, but at tbe end oT this oeatu-' 
ry, I expect to live to see toe zwtKra-.' 
tion of Adenauer’s virion of German 
unification and European unity vs 
two sides of the same coin," Mr. Koh£ 
told a New York Tunes interviewer 
this week (1HT, March 16). •' 

Mr. Kohl is in electoral trouble. 
His party just took a sharp setback in 
Lower Saxony elections, and the' 
polls indicate that he may lose his bid 
to remain chancellor when national 
elections come in October. . ' 

His major opposition seems to be 
equally pro-European. But it has al- 
ways been hard to keep that vision of 
unify moving forward, and toe cur- 
rents are running practically evoy-g 
where now toward reviving, quarrel-' 
some natio nalisms . It matters that 
what may appear just a procedural 
dispute on how the Union functions 
be settled quickly in favor of a Eu- 
rope with a wilL 

© flora Lewis. 

intended for publication 
addressed “Letters to the 
cfitor" and contain the writer's 
signature, name andJuB address. 
Letters should be brief and are 
subject to editing. We amnot be 
responsible for j he return of unso- 
Hated manuscripts. 


IjV OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: Nearer tbe Moon Stead of “to the King of the Serbs, of 
PARIS — According to comments by jaSs "'prinSL *5. Sla !^' 

^sssssas!^ 


tain astronomical objectives much 
larger than any hitherto produced. To- 
day, the largest optical instrument is 
that at Chicago, which has a diameter 
of 40in. A benefactor to scieaoe might 
dow order one of 50 ul, winch would 
enable photographs of the moan, as it 
appears ata distance of 100 kilomfetres 
to be taken. By enlarging these photo- 
graphs ten tunes it would be possible 
to reproduce lunar landscapes as seen 
ten kUom&trcs off. 

1919: A Serbian Rebuke 

ROME — Principe Lmo Borghese 
recently went to Serbia as Italian 
Minister. When he reached Belgrade, 
the Minister of Forriga Affairs in- 
formed the prince that his credentials 
could not be accepted, as they were 
addressed to the King of Serbia in- 


is a matter of common knowledge 
that neither Italy nor any other of the 
Allied Governments has yet recog- 
nized tbe “Kingdom of the Serbs, of 
me Croat ians and of the Slavon- 
ians,” and that, consequently, the 
contested credentials could not be 
worded otherwise than they were. ; 

1944c Vienna Is Bombed 

m-lied headquarters, aj- 

9 ers ,“ (From our New York edi- 
tion;] Vienna was bombed by Allied 
planes today [March 17] for the first 
tUQc m ibe war. Among possible mUi- 
tary objectives in Vie nna are railway 
J^rds occupying large areas and vu-. 
mnai stations of six important lines 
Vienna with Germany, 
vzecbo5lovalria, the Balkans and Ita- 
ly. Vienna also has an important har- 
bor on toe river Danube; 


»ibi (>' 






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INTEKNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 5 


Whitewater: The Law as Bludgeon 


■W out, after the hordes onJwleS Robert J. Samnelson 
and lavratigators have finished their 

v?S J.?” . a V llons ^ be found Disabilities Act because it did not have 


k “«ys unisnea tnnr 
ffworJc, that Sic Clintons will be found 
i° “ve committed some ghastly crime 
lor which the president will be im- 
peached and his wife will be thrown 


a seat big enough for her 360 pounds 
and refused to let her use a folding 


the “ thf0WD chair -" reports The Washington Post. 

Maybe the theater manager made a 


economic incentives might work bet- 
ter than regulations. If laws are un- 
avoidably ambiguous (and some will 
be), penalties for breaking them 
should be relaxed. But all this would 
require rare qualities of self-restraint 


■though therein ! ha „-ir e Maybe the theater manager made a lawyers, judges and regulators, 

and the whole thls ’ But should it be a Si .5 million lie ultimate problem is that the 

Vides a gro2™? l 23 ter i* ff *lF pro- “““ke “ or even a 550,000 mistake overuse of law subverts the respect for 
'AtrSin 0 n?«S que .u ex ? inp c of bow fora settlement? Probably Bill and Hil- law. People increasingly fear running 
^SSSWSr^tiTi. .U.^. acted stupialy aad cep- mSL I. k open R»jZS J 


Americans misuse the law 
Although I am no fan of the Cliu- 
tons, the purported scandal is so far a 
political vendetta draped in legal trap- 
pings. The trappings are essential, be- 


The larger issue is how 

Americans are debasing the 

law by applying it to aU 
manner of disputes for 
which it is iM-suitecL 


sorted with sleazy characters in the 
Whhewater affair, but are stupidity 
and sleazy friends really crimes? 

The delusion is that we can some- 
how solve every conceivable problem 
and right every possible wrong 
through law. Lawyers, legal scholars 
and judges hold themselves out as the 
means to this noble end. But the result 
has been to transform vast areas of the 
law into a nightmare of complexity 
and judicial discretion. 

Consider, for example, U.S. environ- 


mental laws. They are almost impossi 
ble to understand fully, as the attorney 


. .. ... James DeLong writes in American En- 

cause it is the mere possibility of terprise magazine. The basic laws run 
wrongdoing mat justifies the ongoing hundreds of pages, and these are sup- 
“^11 at ten ll0I i- . plemented by thousands of pages of 

me Democrats sanctimonious implementing regulations, which are 


* , ^uiuwaw ^ aaucumonious implementing regulations, wmen are 
complaints about this would be more further refined by "policy pronounce- 
credible if they had not played the meats . . . guidance documents, judi- 
smne game. In a raent book, entitled dal opinions, thousands of letters of 


Politics by Other Means, the pohti- agency interpretation, verbal advice 
caJ scientists Benjamin Ginsberg and grven over the [agency] hot line . . . and 
Martin Shefter show how Inquest and positions mtren in civil and criminal 


prosecution have become routine po- enforcement actions r 
litical weapons. “What the Republi- In surveys, many < 

mane ora ^nina In lV. « ..... ... t. -« - . 


uucai weapons, wnat tne Republi- In surveys, many corporate lawyers 
cans are doing to the Clintons, says admit that their companies may violate 

Mr Chahaf * T ,o nritat ih, r«_— , 1 __ 


Mr. Shefter, is what the Democrats 
did to the Republicans." 

But the larger issue is how we Amer- 
icans are systematically debasing the 
t|aw in the name of law. We apply law 
'to all manner of conflicts — political, 
economic and even sexual — for 
which it is ill-suited. By its nature, law 
presumes that the “right” and 
‘‘wrong" of a dispute or crime can be 
discovered. But in most conflicts there 
are gradations of right and wrong, and 
disputes are best resolved by methods 
that recognize this. 

In politics, the usual mechanism is 
an election. "You boot the offending 
politician out of office," as Mr. Shefter 
puts it Voters decide whether, all 
things considered, they want their 
tainted politician or not. 

Good law should codify consensus 
— widely shared values and standards 


Democrats environmental laws as a result of uncer- 

tainty and complexity. Sim, violators 

basing the An Appeal to Torkey 

: apply law Nor does this sort of uncertainty ap- Turkey is an important country with 
-political, ply only to corporate behavior, what an ancient culture. With the indepen- 
ai — for is “sexual harassment"? No one can dome of Turkish-speaking former Sovi- 


15 “sexual harassment"? No one can dome of Turkish-speaking former Sovi- 
reaUy say (courts will spend decades et republics in Central Asia, and because 
trying), and its elastic meaning can of its involvement in the tragedy of Bos- 


trying), and its elastic meaning can otitsmv 
do great damage. nia, Tor 

In The New York Review of Books, be a brii 
Richard Bernstein of The New York between 
Times recently recounted the story of But a 
J. Donald Silva, a 58-year-old tenured us of an 


nia, Turkey appears more than ever to 
be a bridge between Europe and Asia, 
between the Orient and the Occident. 

But converging reports have reached 
us of an impending decision fromTuric- 


J. Donald Suva, a 5 e-year-old tenured us of an im pending riecinfm from Turic- 
English professor at the University of ish military headquarters to “put a de- 
New Hampshire. He made a few mild- finitive aid" to the rebellion by the 


pseudo-legal proceeding he was sus- don of the Kurdish area and the death of 
pended for a year. He had touched no thousands erf innocent civilians. 


of behavior —and provide clarity. Peo- 
ple should know wnat they are expect- 
ed to obey. By contrast, today’s laws 


one, dated no one. 


We cannot believe that a state that 


to obey. By contrast, today*! 
increasingly expansive and i 


As one female student who testified aspires to belong to a democratic Europe 
for him put it: "These women who is cn the verge of co mmittin g genocide. 


for him put it: "These women who is an the verge at co mmi tt in g genocide, 
have made these complaints have gone Turkey has yet to prove convincingly 
on to live their own lives, and they that democracy is not just a facade but a 
haven't been affected by this at all. reality. Ankara faces a choice: It may 


their own agendas and impose artificial 
consensus, we Americans have codi- 
fied so many aspects of life that we are 
gradually turning every bad judgment, 
indiscretion or even honest mistake 
into a potential lawsuit or crime. 

A few weeks ago, a 38-year-old wom- 
an decided to sue a movie theater tor 
“$1.5 millign under the Americans with 


overturn the university's decision. 


tnd they that democracy is not just a facade but a 
s at all. reality. Ankara faces a choice: It may 
a man's choose to move against its population of 
suing to more than 10 million Kurds, which is 
si on. militarily impossible and politically sui- 


The point, of course, is that bad law cidal, or it may choose peace, 
intensifies and prolongs conflict The Kurdish Workers Party long ago 
— precisely the opposite of what discarded its Maxxist-Leninist oriental- 


law should do. 


non. Its members are ready for peace, 


Law will always be imperfect; but it based on a federal solution within the 
is being made unnecessarily imperfect Turkish state. 


by its overuse. In some areas — say, 
the environment — taxes and other 


We appeal to the Turkish government 
to immedia tely seize this opportunity 






i mm. 






HBiAW is noTa CBOOKj 
SHE Ctifewr R6WEM0gR/ 
SHE WAS MOT 1H THE JjQSp/ 


They’re Getting the System 
To Work for India’s Poor 


good judgment by legislators, 
its, judges and regulators. 


By Burn S. Thomas 


B OMBAY — The situation seemed 
hopeless for Bhagwandas PanchaL 


D hopeless for Bhagwandas PanchaL 
Lawyers told Mr. Pancual, a 37-year-old 
member of an impoverished tribal group 
at the bottom of India's social scale, that 
without a tide he did not stand a chance 
against the property tycoon who was 
attempting to evict him. 

The police had refused to register his 
complaint when hired toughs destroyed 
the shed on his plot and rook his farm 
tods. Fearing for bis safety, friends ad- 


afoul of it. It is open to more abuse by 
lawyers and regulators of all stripes, 
who can exploit it for their own pur- 

E oses. Because no one can always 
now what is legal and what is not. 


lawyers and clients play a constant 
game of legal and ethical poker. This 
process makes some people feel dirty 
and tempts others to skirt the law. 

Either way, their actions may be 
challenged, and when they are, people 

typically react self-righteonsly. The 
response is “This can’t be illegal" or 
"How dare you." It is this sort of 
behavior that has caused trouble for 
the Gintons. Legally, their initial de- 
fiance might have been a good tactic; 
politically, it was a blunder. 

Depending on politics, people will 
cheer or boo Whitewater. Bui unless 
major misdeeds ore uncovered, it 
marks the growing use of law as an 
instrument of abuse and even tyranny, 
not justice. Often an ass, the law is 
now also a pit bull. 

The Washington Post. 



and leafy vegetables. Formal land titles 
are alien to India's 67 million tribal*, 
most of whom are illiterate. 

But someone told Mr, Panchal that 
the Shramjcevi Sanghuna, or Laborers 


Union, might be able to help him. Its 
members are tribal* and Hindus exdud- 


MEANwHlIJR 


vised him to'take the pittance being of- 
fered bv the obliticaOy influential devel- 


fered by the politically influential devel- 
oper and move away, as other tribal 
people in similar drcumstances had done. 

At stake was a 13 acre (0.6 hectare) 
plot in Kandivili, a Bombay suburb. 
‘‘Wien my father moved here long ago. 
this was forest,'' Mr. Panchal recalled 
the other day. “The then landlord gave 
us this land, which we cleared and have 
been farming ever smee.” 

Kandivili is today an urban jungle. 
Even a modest two-bedroom apartment 
sdls for more than 1 million rupees 
($33,000), a sum far beyond the means 
of most Indians. Here Mr. Panchal and 
fellow “tribals" hold sizable tracts of 
prime real estate cm which they grow rice 


members are tribals and Hindus exclud- 
ed from India’s caste system. They con- 
stitute the bottom rung of the social 
ladder and are much exploited The 
union, formed in 1982 by Vivek Pandit 
and his wife Yidyut, two upper-caste 
Hindus, has successfully championed 
cases of injustice on behalf of the poor in 
rural areas around Bombay. India's 
commercial and financial capital. 

"Panchal’s only advantage was actual 
possession of the property," recalled 
Mr. PandiL "The builder on the other 
hand had the law, political patronage 
and money on his side." 


The union planned its strategy caneful- 
\ First, it removed the bidder's sign- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


for peace, and to stop the military — 
which seems determined to take irrepa- 


which seems determined to take irrepa- 
rable steps — before it is too late. 


If a just and durable peace can be 
reached, we will be the first to commend 
the Turks far their courage. If not, Turks 
must be prepared to meet the interna- 
tional community, standing squarely 
in their path. 

BERNARD KOUCHNER. 

Former French Minister 
of Health and Humanitarian Action. 


tiful car in the world" will soon be going 
into production; 

• A line of exclusive personal accesso- 
ries — the "Ettore Bugatti Collection" 
— has been successfully introduced. 

Lastly, in accordance with our strate- 


— GT and Supersport), but will produce 
only 140 to 150 vehicles because large 


gic development plan, especially in the 
field of engineering, we purchased Lotus 


BERNARD DORIN. 
Ambassador of France. 


Tuning the Corner 


Regarding the report “A 1 500,000 
Dream Car Has Yet to Turn the Comer" 
(March 7) by Jacques Neher 
Our company has proved itself, in its 
five years, to be capable of some excep- 
tional tilings: 

• Our automobile factory is com- 


pletely innovative —from its advanced 
laboratories for research into pollution 
reduction, to the comfortable surround- 
ings it offers employees; 

• Two sports cars, produced in very 
limited senes, designed, developed and 


field of engineering, we purchased Lotus 
from General Motors last August. 

Even the question “Who is behind 
Bugatti?” has an answer that could 
hardly be more banal: Romano Artioli 
has worked for 40 years with his family 
to achieve this goaL Mr. Artioli has 
taken these years to create a sound basis 
for the relaunch of Bugatti, and subse- 
quently of Lotus. 

If Bugatti, during the first year of its 
production, in a period that is economi- 
cally very difficult, produced only 50 to 
100 can, this does not appear to us to be 
a piece erf news which could throw the 
car market into turmoil 

Indeed, because our production is lim- 
ited, many of our sales have been to 


volumes do not play a part in the strate- 
gy of Bugatti nor, for that matter, of 
Lotus. In the second half of next year 
the EB1 12 wifl join the production fine; 
full production of this model will be of 
around 400 to 500 cars per year. 

What is for other automotive produc- 
ers a very negative fact is a "must” for 
Bugatti; we need to produce very little, 
only the indispensable nwnwwnm, in or- 
der to pass the break-even point. 

The number of Bugatti cars on Oder 
today is 1 15 EB1 10s, of which more than 
half nave been delivered; 85 advance 
orders have been placed for the EB1 12. 

Another very important factor will be 
the arrival on the U.S. market, to take 
place in the second half of this year. 


iy. First, it removed the bunder's sign- 
board on Mr. Panchal’s property. When 
the anticipated backlash came, Mr. Pan- 
chal filed a complaint with the police, 
dung a 1989 law mat gave special protec- 
tion to tribals against violence. 

When no police response followed, 
Mr. Pandit got friendly lawmakers in 
Bombay to raise the issue of police inac- 
tion in the state legislature. An embar- 
rassed government ordered die arrest of 
the developer. A series of articles fol- 
lowed in the local and national press, 
depicting the publiaty-shy property ty- 
coon as an exploiter of the poor. Result: 
He quickly signed an agreement with 
Mr. Panchal and a dozen other tribal 
famili es permitting them to continue 
fanning for as long as they wished. 

“But for the union's help I would have 
been on the streets,” said Mr. PanchaL 

In the last decade the union has freed 
about 1,500 people from bonded labor. 
It has raised sixfold the minimum wages 
for laborers in areas where it operates. 

But the unity and strength of the 
union are not, by themselves, enough to 
effect change. The strategy used by Mr. 
Pandit ana other leaders puts pressure 
on the system from within by getting the 


legislature, bureaucracy, judiciary and 
news media to work for their cause. 


news media to work for their cause. 

A research unit in the union feeds 
information on poverty issues to select- 
ed legislators, and they raise the issues in 
the national Parliament or the state leg- 


MARIO G. BARB1ERL 


Vice President. 
Bugatti AutomobQi. 
Campogalliano, Italy. 


islature in Bombay. Several lawyers pro- 
ride free legal advice. Contacts in the 


coDecton, to royalty and to customers 
who did not need or want to register a car. 


built with sophisticated Bugatti equip- 
ment. are in the absolute too of the 


ment, are in the absolute top of the 
range, having received acclaim from the 
specialist press throughout the world; 

e A new four-door sports sedan de- 
scribed by journalists as “the most beau- 


who did not need or want to register acar. 

The magazine Automobiles Classi- 
ques reported that among specialist auc- 
tioneers, the EB110 is considered to be 
the most collectible car in the world. 
This explains the discrepancy between 
the number of vehicles sold and the 
number of vehicles registered. 

This year our factory could produce 
220 cars (split between the two models 


Auto-Kflnig Mflnchen was founded 
over 60 years ago and is one of the 
world's most successful dealers of luxu- 
ry cars. One year ago we entered into an 
agreement for a Bugatti dealership. We 
already have sold 13 cars. Bugatti and its 
100 -p c rccn t committed crew at Campo- 
gaDiano are on their way to success. 

RUDIGER CZAKERT. 

Munich. 


ride free legal advice. Contacts in the 
media help keep pressure on authorities. 

Mr. Pandit’s success with the union 
has encouraged him to try to extend this 
program to other parts of India. With 
help from the Advocacy Institute in 
Washington, he hopes to establish the 
country’s lint organization to train 
field-level activists m the art of malting 
the system work for the poor. 


The writer is a coordinator cf AC- 
TIONAID India, a private development 


agency. He contributed this comment to 
tne International Herald Tribune. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


*» 


Russia Tells U.S. 

It Wants to Join 
'Partnership ’ Plan 


By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Post Sente 

MOSCOW — Russia plans to 
join the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization's Partn ership for Peace 
program by the end of tbi« month , 
Russia's defense minister said 
Thursday. 

The program, which officials say 
is intended to promote cooperation 
between the Western European al- 
liance and former members of the 
Communist Warsaw Pact, has pro- 
voked considerable controversy in 
Moscow. At a parliamentary bear- 
ing Thursday, several legislators 
spoke oat against what they saw as 
a U.S. effort to extend its domi- 
nance into areas of traditional Rus- 
sian influence. 

But Defense Minister Pavel S. 
Grachev, during a meeting with the 
U.S. defense secretary, W illiam J. 
Perry, repealed Russia's intention 
to join the program and, for the 
first time, set a timetable. Mr. Peny 
arrived in Moscow on Thursday 
morning. 

“We will be ready by the end of 
this month to join this co ncept," 
Genera] Grachev told reporters af- 
ter the meeting. The Partnership 
for Peace plan provides for joint 
exercises, training and cooperation 
in areas such as military p lannin g 
In remarks that alarmed some 
East European governments, Gen- 
era] Grachev added that Russia 
would soon announce its “basic 
conditions” for joining the plan. 
The foreign ministers of Ukraine 
and the Czech Republic have spo- 
ken out against granting “special 
status” to Russia. 

But U.S. officials said General 
Grachev had not indicated that 
Russia sought any special condi- 
tions. Each couutfys agreement 
and plans for cooperation will be 
somewhat different, the officials 
said, and General Grachev was 
simply referring to the complex 
task of planning cooperation with 
an army as large as Russia's. 

Mr. Peny is in Moscow on the 
first leg of a four-nation tour of the 
former Soviet Union, his first as 
defense secretary. The visit is in- 
tended to promote cooperation in 
the conversion of military indus- 
tries to civ ilian 'uses and the dis- 
mantling of nuclear and chemical 
arsenals, officials said. 

The defense secretary is expected 
to sign an accord Friday allocating 
$20 million for military conversion 
projects. The money would go to 
American companies that form 
partnerships with Russian arms 
makers to enter the civilian market. 

The agreement is aimed particu- 
larly at Tour companies that were 


most involved in the production of 
weapons of mass destruction, offi- 
cials said, and about 75 others that 
were tangentially involved. In part, 
US. officials hope to stimulate the 
production of prefabricated hous- 
ing that could be used to solve a 
pressing problem for the Russian 
militaiy: where to house retired of- 
ficers as the military reduces its 
size. 

After signing the agreement, Mr. 
Peny will fly on to Kazakhstan, 
where he wQl visit the space- 
launching complex at Baikonur for 
talks on denuclearization, space co- 
operation and conversion. He will 
then visit Ukraine and Belarus for 
similar negotiations. 

NATO, an aflumne that indndes 
the United States, Gwn»H» and 
Western European countries, de- 
veloped the Partnership for Peace 
program as a compromise alterna- 
tive to bringing East European na- 
tions directly mto NATO. Former 
Soviet satellites like Poland and the 
Czech Republic are eager to he 
shielded by the NATO umbrella, 
but U.S. officials feared that early 
membership would alienate Russia. 

As a result, Partnership for Peace 
was developed as a flexible cooper- 
ation program that each country 
will sign separately with NATO. 
Former East European Barto ns and 
former Soviet republics as widely 
separated as Kazakhstan and the 
Baltic states already have applied 
to join. 

Vladimir Lukin, a former Rus- 
sian ambassador to Washington 
and now chief of the Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee in the State 
Duma, or lower house of parlia- 
ment, attacked the program in 
hearings Thursday. 

“Russia joining this program is 
like when a rapist, having cornered 
a girl gives her a choice: Either she 
can just give in or he will have her 
anyway.” be said. “It toms out that 
on top of that, the girl is supposed 
to pay” 

East European states such as Po- 
land and Hungary, eager to become 
full members of NATO, have al- 
ready joined Partnership for Peace. 
On Wednesday, Moldova became 
the 1 2th country to sign. 

■ Joint Naval Maneuvers 
Russia will join the United 
Stabs and other European coon- 
tries in joint naval exercises off the 
Norwegian coast next week, the 
first time the framer Cold War foes 
will meet for such a venture, Reu- 
ters reported from Moscow. 

A Russian naval spokesman <p » ri 
the maneuvers would “promote an 
exchange of naval culture between 
Russia and the West” 



Did Hebron Killer Have Help: 

Soldiers Say 2d Armed Man Entered Mosque 


Jin HnBanfcr/Rcrtn 

y, divided by a new fence at a settlement near Hebron. 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pm Service 

JERUSALEM — Two Israeli 
soldiers who were posted as guards 
at the Tomb of the Patriarchs on 
the day of tire Hebron massacre 
raised new questions on Thursday 
about the weapon used by the mili- 
tant settler, Baruch Goldstein, and 
whether he may have had an ac- 
complice. 

The two soldiers also confirmed 
that one of them had fired into a 
door from which survivors of the 
massacre were trying to nee, con- 
tradicting earlier assertions by se- 
nior military commanders that 
both had only shot into the ceiling. 
The commanders said the soldira 
did not hit anyone. 

It was the first time that the 
Israeli commission investigating 
the massacre in which 29 Arabs 
were killed on Feb. 25 had taken 
taken testimony from the soldiers 
who were at the scene that morn- 
ing. Their statements were contra- 
dictory and inconclusive but ap- 
peared to challenge some points of 
the early accounts given by the Is- 
raeli Army. 

Sergeant Kobi Yosef, who was 
guarding one of the gales, told the 
five-member panel that he saw Dr. 
Goldstein, a physician from the 
nearby settlement of Kiiyal Arba, 
enter the budding where a small 
group of Jews and several hundred 
Muslims were worshipping. 

Mr. Yostf, who serves in the Is- 
raeli tank corps but had been de- 
tailed to the site, said Dr. Goldstein 
was carrying an extended version 
of the American-made M-I6 as- 
sault rifle. Previously, the army and 
other witnesses have said that Dr. 
Goldstein carried out the attack 
with an Israeli-made Gain machin e 
gun. The army had also said previ- 


ously that ballistics tests showed 
that the 110 shells found at the 
scene had also come from his Galil 
An army spokesman said a Gain 
was obtained by Dr. Goldstein at 
the scene of the shooting. But both 

guns use the same ammun ition. Dr. 

Goldstein brought seven maga- 
zines of ammunition with him into 
the prayer hall before opening fire. 

Mr. Yosef said that five minutes 
after Dr. Goldstein entered, be saw 
a second person go inside with a 
GaliL 

“Are you sure?” he was asked. 
“Yes,” Mr. Yosef replied. “It was a 
settler whom I didn't know.” Mr. 
Yosef said he knew all the Jewish 
settlers who prayed there regularly 
because he had been posted there 
for four months. An unarmed, 
third person also entered whom 
Mr. Yosef described as an army 
worker. 

Nrv Drori, a private in the tank 
craps who was Mr. Yosefs partner 
at the gate, said that he also saw Dr. 
Goldstein enter with an M-16, 
which is a longer weapon than the 
Galil, and then saw another person 
enter with the GaHL Asked if he 
was sure, Mr. Drori replied “100 
percent." However, neither he nor 
Mr. Yosrf described the second 
person in detafl. 

A number of Palestinian witness- 
es and survivors have said that Dr. 
Goldstein was helped by a second . 
Jewish settler, but the accounts 
have been contradictory and vague. 

When the shooting began, Mr. 
Drori said, he and Mr. Yosef 
thought an Arab was shooting, so 
they shot at the door in order to 
block it Mr. Yosef said they be- 
lieved they were saving their own 
lives. 

“They would have trampeled 
us," he said “There was a boy who 


was trampeled and killed They of 
course would not pity us. There was£ 
a big mess.” 

Mr. Yosef acknowledged that by 
dosing the door, known as the 
Eastern Gate, he forced the wound- 
ed to be evacuated on a longer 
route through the Main Gate. He 
said that when Mr. Drori fired at 
the door, the worshippers “hadn't 
readied the door yet He said Lbey 
did not realize until later that a Jew 
had done the shooting inside. 

Immediately after the massacre, 
however. Major General Danny 
Yatom, the chief army commander 
in the West Bank, asserted that the 
only shots fired by soldiers were 
into the ceiling. 

Earlier, lieutenant Rotem Ra- 
vivi, the las; guard to see Dr. Gold- 
stein before he began shooting, tes- 
tified that be saw him carrying a 
Galfl. He said he had exchanged 
brief greetings with Dr. Goldstein, 
who seemed “totally at ease.” 

A group of paramilitary border 
police guards who were late arriv- 
ing at the scene testified that they 
were awaked just minutes before 
the shooting and told to go to the 
Tomb of the Patriarchs, but arrived 
after the massacre was over. 


■ Temple Mount Restricted 

Foreigner travelers will not be 
allowed onto Temple Mount out of 
fear that Jewish extremists might 
enter the compound disguised as 
tourists and attack Muslim wor- 
shipers, The Associated Press re- 
ported Thursday from Jerusalem. 

“We are worried that what hap-- 
pened in Hebron wQl be repeato!?' 
here,” said Adrian Husseim, head 
of the Islamic Charitable Trust, 
which is in charge of the holy area, 
known to Muslims as Harem a] 
Sharif, or the Noble Sanctuary 


Rabin Stresses 


By Alan Cowell 

Mew York Tima Service 

ROME — With Middle East peace 
talks still deadlocked almost three weeks 
after the Hebron massacre. Prime Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Rabin said Thursday that 
Israel fdt a “moral commitment” to en- 
sure the safety of Palestinians living un- 
der Israeli occupation. 

At a news conference after he met here 
with Pope John Pan! Q to seek the pon- 
tiffs help in restarting peace efforts, 
however, Mr. Rabin gave no indication 
of any new initiative to meet Palestinian 
demands fra security guarantees in the 
occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. 

And although he criticized the pres- 
ence of Jewish settlers in Hebron as 
“dumb from a security standpoint” he 


made it dear that (here were no plans at 
present to evacuate them. 

“What will be in the future, wait and 
see,” be said. 

A Vatican statement after the 30-mm- 
nle meeting said both Mr. Rabin and the 
Pope were convinced of “the necessity of 
doing whatever possible to further the 
peace process in spite of the recent regret- 
table incidences," apparently a reference 
to the Feb. 25 massacre of Pales tinians at 
prayer in Hebron by a Jewish settler. 

The statement said that the Pope had 
accepted Mr. Rabin's invitation to visit 
Israel “with the sincere hope that circum- 
stances will permit him to make this 
desired visit." No date was set. 

At a news conference before he re- 
turned to Israel, Mr. Rabin was asked 
what measures he planned to guarantee 


Palestinian security under Israeli occupa- 
tion. 

“We have taken many measures and 
there are others that will be taken," Mr. 
Rabin said. “We see ourselves responsi- 
ble by the law and by our moral commit- 
ment for the safety of evetybody." 

[Mr. Rabin also said Thursday that 
Jewish settlers in Hebron were in danger 
because they were scattered around the 
West Bank town in a “stupid” settlement 
pattern, Agence France-Presse reported 
from Jerusalem, quoting from an inter- 
view on Israeli militaiy radio. 

[“The Jewish presence in Hebron is 
based on a stupid system in terms of 
security," he said. “The settlers are dis- 
persed throughout the town instead of 
being concentrated in one place. That has 
put the lives of settlers in danger.”] 


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The Vatican interpreted Mr. Rabin's 
comments during his meeting with the 
Pope to mean that the Israeli leader 
“hoped that the Holy See's role in the 
peace process would have a great rele- 
vance m the future,” according to a Vati- 
can statement. 

Mr. Rabin, too, seemed to be seeking a 
more prominent role fra the Pope when 
be said: “I believe Ms voice is heard all 
over the world. I hope that be will come 
in support of peace and will call the 
parties to engage themselves in peace.” 

■ Arafat Firm om Protection 

Youssef M, Ibrahim of The New York 
Times reported from Tunis: 

Hie PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, in- 
sisted Thursday that the PLO would re- 
turn to Mideast peace talks with Israel 


only after a form of international protec- 
tion for Palestinians in the occupied terri- 
tories against armed Jewish settlers is 
agreed upon, particularly in Hebron. 

PLO officials also appeared to reject 
out of hand a suggestion by the United 
States and Israel of a Palestinian police 
force to be placed in Hebron under Israe- 
li command, saying such a force would be 
ineffective and subject to intimidation by 
the Israeli Army and settlers. 

“What is required now is that the Unit- 
ed States, the two co-sponsors of the 
Middle East peace process, America and 
Russia, and the Security Council respond 
to the just demands of the Palestinians to 
provide international protection to our 
children, our women and our holy 
places,” Mr. Arafat said after meeting in 
Tunis with a Vatican envoy. 


Christopher Denies 
Easing Up on China 


Agence Fraiux-Pn are 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State Warren M. Christopher on 
Thursday rqecwd criticism that Ms 
mission to China had been a fail- 
ure. 

“In my sessions with the Chi- 
nese, I pulled no punches and 
yielded no ground,” he told a 
House subcommittee. 

“What we are asking them to do 
is neither extraordinary nor impos- 
sible” 

“It is in China’s best interests to 
meet the conditions to get MFN,” 
he added, referring to most-fa- 
vored-nation trade status. He said 
(here was stiQ time for China to 
comply. 

Under terms set by Congress, 
President BiO Clinton must decide 
by June 3 whether to continue Chi- 
na’s trade privileges. 

To renew most-favraed-nation 
status, Mr. Clinton must determine 
that the Chinese have improved 
their performance on human rights. 


Mr. Christopher denied that the 
United States had softened its 
stand against Beijing and said there 
was “solid improvement” on two 
important conditions for extension 
of the trade privileges. 

The secretary said that during his 
trip to Beijing last week he had 
received “coooete assurances” on 
prison labor inspections and that 
Chinese officials turned over infor- 
mation on 235 political prisoners 
and an additional 106 prisoners in 
Tibet 

He noted that these actions ful- 
filled the two mandatory condi- 
tions for most-favored- nations sta- 
tus and said there had been a 
“narrowing of differences” in other 
areas. 

“Most Chinese know MFN will 
not be renewed without progress” 
on these key issues, he added. 

China objects to the notion of 
tying trade questions to human 
rights issues, saying the UJS. ap- 
proach is interference in its internal 
affairs. 


Beijing Denies 
Allegations of 
Shipping Attacks 

Room 

HONG KONG— China hay do- 
med reports that its official agen- 
cies carried out illegal attacks on 
ships in the South China Sea last 
year, a UN maritime safety official 
said Thursday. 

Reports of nearly 100 attacks on 
shipping have been monitored by 
Hong Kong’s marine department 
in the last 18 months, and the radio 
reports alleged that Chinese offi- 
cials were responsible for about 
half of them. 

Admiral Eflhimios Mitropolous, 
chairman of the UN-backed Inter- 
national Maritime Organization’s 
safety committee, said he talked to 
Foreign Ministry, customs, securi- 
ty and communications officials 
during Ms visit to Beijing earlier 
this week. 

The Chinese government gave 
him a statement rejecting any alle- 
gations that “the normal execution 
of law enforcement duties by com- 
petent Chinese authorities consti- 
tutes any form of unlawful act,” he 
said. 


CHINA: U.S. Businessmen Lobby to Keep Trade Open 




Confoued from Page 1 
reaction to the Clinton position has 
made the decision on its trading 
status more uncertain than ever. 

A termination of most-favored- 
nation status “woaJd be a very seri- 
ous blow,” said Caiman Cohen, co- 
ordinator of the Business Coalition 
for U.S--China Trade, an amalgam 
of lobbying organizations. 

That action would price many 
Chinese products out of the U.S. 
market by imposing prohibitively 
high border taxes, and China 
would immediately retaliate 
against U.S. products, Mr. Cohen 
and other business spokesmen said. 

Loss of most-favored-nation 
privileges wonld boost tariffs on 
Chinese products from an average 
of about 5 percent now to more 
than 50 percent on the average, and 
as high as 90 percent on some 
clothing imports, said Robert A. 
Kapp, who takes over next month 
as president of the UJS.-CMna 
Business Council, a member of the 
Business Coalition. 

“No consumer would buy prod- 
ucts at those prices and no retailer 
would carry them,” Mr. Kapp said. 

William J. Warwick, hold of 
AT&T’s China venture, said: 


"When China retaliates, they are 
going to lot* for large American 
companies to punish.” 

Boeingjetliners. General Electric 
generators and Caterpillar earth- 
movers arc among the obvious tar- 
gets, he and other business execu- 
tives said. The United States 
exported S8.8 billion in goods to 
China Last year, importing S31J5 
billion in return. 

Thomas Denomme, Chrysler 
Crap.’s executive vice president, 
said Ms company illustrated the 
stakes for American business. Chi- 
nese officials have selected two fi- 
nalists for a project to construct a 
new minivan factory in southern 
China — Chrysler and Germany’s 
Mercedes-Benz. 

At the same lime that the United 
States is turning up pressure on 
China over human rights. Genua- ■ 
ay’s government is pushing to lock 
up the minivan deal for Mercedes- 
Benz with offers of favorable fi- 
nancing, Ouysler officials said. 

“All things being equal the Chi- 
nese prefer the Chrysler product,” 
Mr. Denomme said at a Economic 
Strategy Institute trade conference 
in Washington last week. “Unfor- 
tunately, all things are not equal.” 


Equally on edge is Mr. Warwick 
of AT&T. A year ago, China invit- 
ed AT&T to take part in the rapid 
construction of a modem phone 
system in China, complete from 
telephone-manufacturing plants to 
a Chinese version of the Bell Labs 
research and development facili- 
ties, be said. 

Only two of every 100 Chinese 
have telephones today, Mr. War- 
wick said. In a nation of 1.1 billion 
people, the potential is enormous. 

“By the year 2020, China will 
have the largest idecommunica- 
tions network the world has ever 
known,” and, he argued, it is esseo- 
Ual for AT&T to be in on the 
ground floor, or else lose the lead- 
ership to French, German, Swedish 
and Japanese rivals. 

“If you are not in China,” Mr. 
Warwick said, “you will not be able 
to compete anywhere in the world, 
including the United States. There 
are no other places like it.” 

Aware that their motives are 
questioned by human rights advo- 
cates, business executives argue 
that trade and economic growth are 
strong levers for improvement in 
China’s social conditions. 
A 


MISSION: Aid Dropped From the Air Is One of the Few Success Stories in a Besieged Bosnia SIEGE: 

Cmrtmnpd from Pncw t innm u . m.m . . ... . . . 

Accord on Access 


EXP. DATE. 


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0HT VAT number FR74732021 1 261 J 
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Cbatiniied from Page I 
success. Planes have periodically 
been unable to land at Sarajevo 
because of the fighting. 

The recovery rate of parcels de- 
livered by airdrop has been esti- 
mated at somewhere between 20 
percent and 100 percent, depend- 
ing cm the accuracy of the drop and 
the ability of besieged townspeople 
to scavenge under fire. Last week, 
reporters who reached Maglaj, a 
Muslim enclave in central Bosnia 
where no aid convoy has been able 
to get through since October, 
quoted some residents as saying no 
food had fallen in nearly three 
weeks. 

For thousands of Bosnians, how- 
ever, the relief flig hts have made a 
huge difference. 

As of early March, the “winter- 
ization” that began late last fall had 


delivered 138,000 blankets, 9,232 
mattresses and 3,628 sleeping bags. 
Crews now are preparing to haul 
163 tons of vegetable seeds intend- 
ed to permit at least 50,000 families 
to plant survival gardens. 

The airdrops in particular have 
demanded ingenuity and courage 
from the flight crews, many of 
whom are military reservists or Na- 
tional Guard troops on temporary 
assign men t. On a typical night, 
U.S. C-130s fly a dozen sorties a 
night, with French and German 
planes contributing another four. 

In areas where snipers are not 
lurking to pick off rivuians search- 
ing tor food, the crews chop 1,000- 


pound (450-kilogram) bundles on 
parachutes. The loads fall to earth 
at 45 miles (about 70 kilometers) an 
hour and planners worry about 
crushing someone — although, as 
one U.S. military officer noted, UN 
officials “tell us not to worry about 
hitting the bouses because they’re 
all destroyed anyway.” 

In more dangerous areas, the 
crews employ a system developed 
with help from Rand Corp. engi- 
neers, who used computers to simu- 
late the dispersal pattern of objects 
dropped from ^ different heights. 

individual food packeuffrom each 
airplane. The loads often are 


dropped directly over towns; the 
packets fall gently enough to avoid 
injuring anyone struck acridental- 

iy- 

The Bosnia operation bas profit- 
ed from shortcomings seen three 
years ago in Kurdish areas of 
northern Iraq, where airdrops were 
largely unsuccessful Now, using 
sophisticated navigation equip- 
ment, pilots are able to make min- 
ute course corrections that land the 
packets relatively close to their tar- 
gets. 

To avoid anti-aircraft fire, how- 
ever, the planes usually fly at 
10,000 feet or higher, which makes 
precision drops difficult 


Pilots vary their routes and al- 
ways fly under cover of darkness. 
Even so, several planes were Mt by 
anti-aircraft fire over Serb-held ter- 
ritory in December. 

With a fragile cease-fire bolding 
in Sangevo and signs of a potential 
political settlement elsewhere in 
Bosnia, officials hope the end may 
soon come into view for the air 
operation. The mission has b*m 
expensive— UiL costs thus far are 
estimated at S124 million — . and 
wearing for both planes and crews, 
who shuttle between Germany. Ita- 
ly. the Croatian coastal city erf Split 
and Sarajevo. 


SHANGHAI: An Ambitious and Cosily Plan to Recapture Past Glory 


RUST NAME 


PBtMANB'JT ADORESS: □ HOME □ BUSNESS. 


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fac 31U6l?065n^ 31lJtSS r s§6r ftTC 
This offer expires March 31, 1994, end hemAAkboawsubsaijmaJy. 

licralb^^^Sribune 




DEATH NOTICE 


PHTil-fP Paul Karin 

53, of Albuquerque, New Mexico 
and Paris, cried unexpectedly in 
Paris, February 25th, 1994. ' 

He is survived by his mother, 
Maudine Karri 1 . sisters. 

Paula Fisher and Phyllis Karrii, 
and brother in law. Don Fisher. 
Because of Ills lifelong interest in 
literature and a recent visit to a 
literacy project In Africa, 
the family requests memorial 
contributions oe made to the 
Guardian Angels of Conakry, 
Guinea African youth literacy 
program, ci a Mix. Judy Smim, 
5456 31st StrettN.W.. 
Washington D.C, 20015- 


Confirmed from Page 1 
leased state-owned real estate, in- 
cluding plots totaling about 2 mil- 
lion square meters in 1991 
Being crushed beneath this jug- 
gernaut of development are many 
of the dark and deteriorating two- 

S apartment buildings and 
shops that for dairie s stood 
in the city's center. 

Near the scholar's home, the 
Shanghai No. 1 Department Store 
wiD be modernized and expanded, 
and everything from apartments to 
aoodle shops that stand in its way 
mil be demolished. Less than a 
kilometer away, developers have 
ripped open a path for a six-lane, 
north-south artery that will bdp 
relieve the city's infamous traffic 
congestion. 


Although he will be given a more 
spacious apartment in the far-off 
suburbs, the scholar — and many 
others like him — is incensed be- 
cause he has been ordered to sacri- 
fice bis desire to remain in central 
Shanghai for the good of the state- 
planned future. 

Several shop and restaurant 
owners being moved out of the cen- 
ter said they would receive some 
compensation from the govern- 
ment so they can reopen their busi- 
nesses in the suburbs. But others, 
such as tbc owner of the Beautiful 
Taste noodle shop near the No. I 
Department Store, still prefer the 
central location. 

“I can sympathize with both 
sides in this,” said Norman Givant, 
an American lawyer who has lived 


and worked in S hang hai for nine 
years. “The city faces enormous 
costs in renovating its antiquated 
infrastructure. It feels the need to 
maximize the value of downtown 
land to help defray those costs.” 

But Mr. Givant said he believed 
that current land prices were “un- 
sustainable” and that the real-es- 
tate bubble may bum. 

As part of China’s ongoing eco- 
nomic reforms, state-held land is 
being leased to the highest bidder, 
and real-estate prices sometimes 
exceed actual market value. 

According to city officials, the 
scholar 1S . among more than 
100,000 residents being moved out 
Of the heart of S hanghai m tfrfe 
stage of the plan. 


More will follow, but the offi- 
cials do not yet know the total 
number to be displaced out of die 7 
million people who are now 
crammed mto the city’s 230-square 
Jtikraelercore. The population of 
greater Shanghai, including the 
suburbs, is about 13 minion 

Construction crews, meanwhile, 
are hard at work, blasting a wav 
much of old Shanghai 

Although some of the most fam- 
ous European-style buildings from 
the prewar era, when Shanghai was 
known as the Paris of the East, are 
being preserved, others will be 
fdled along with their neighbors. 
Sizable sections of the heart erf the 
city at the moment look like Berlin 
after World War IL 


mostly Muslim Bosnian Army and 
the Croatian militia blocked the 
Bosnian government’s overland 
route from central Bosnia to the 
Adriatic. But a cease-fire and the 
conclusion of a U.S.-brokered fed- 
erauon agreement between Bos- 
nia s Muslims and Croats, as well 
as the creation of a confederation 
between the Bosnian federation 
and neighboring Croatia, has re- 
moved those barriers, thus allow- 
at least theoretically, for vehi- 
cle traffic from Butmir to reach the 
coast. 

In return for the Dobrinja-Bul- 
mrr route, the Bosnians agreed to 
allow Serbs to journey across the 
STP 011 between the suburbs of 
““ “"d Lukavica. again in two 
two-hour shifts daily that are stag- 
gered so no Bosnian or Serbian 
vehicles will be on the airport 

grounds simultaneously, 
i ^lations here in the 
^T^ hOUrs underscored the con- 
tin rang security concerns. 

Th„ r Jr° sman Serb opened Are 
011 a streetcar packed 
people, wounding at least one 
Snipers killed a Bosnian 
J^bran solchcron Wednesday and 
a Bosnian on Thursday. 


"'Sir 




• 1 






H 1 * cosy to subscribe 
fc* fnan 

05 437 437 








IWTElWAnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MARCH 18, 1994 


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Sleeping in Business Class 

A brief history. 




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International Herald Tribune 
Friday, March 18, 1994 
Page 8 



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On a Slow Boat to Angkor Wat 


By Thomas Fuller 

International Herald Tribune 

S I EM REAP, Cambodia — “Going to 
Angkor Wat by taxi? Think twee! 
We were robbed and held up at gun- 
point. Shots were fired.” And so a 
viator to Phnom Penh, scanning a hold’s 
bulletin board, was warned. 

Reaching the 100 or so temples of Angkor, 
undoubtedly the archaeological highlights of 
Cambodia and its neighbors, today poses 
somewhat of a dilemma. 

By far the easiest way to Angkor is by 
plane. Thrice-daily flights leave from Phnom 
Penh and arrive 45 minutes^ later. 

But for more advents re-minded travelers, 
who believe in die well-worn adage about 
getting there being half the fun, two options 
present themselves: taxi and boat 
In choosing between (he two, the traveler 
might be influenced by (in addition to hotel 
bulletin boards) a recent entry in a local 
paper’s Phnom Penh police blotter: “A gang 
carrying handguns rob two German military 
attaches of a white Mitsubishi Pajero . . . 
in front of the German embassy.” 
Cambodia’s Latest scourge is banditry. 

As for (he boat option, nearly every morn- 
ing a shallow-draft cargo boat with room for 
about 30 passengers leaves from the docks 
north of Phnom Penh up Cambodia’s tradi- 
tional economic lifeline, die Tonle Sap, a 
river which connects a lake by the same 
name to the Mekong. 

“Fast” boats can sometimes make the 150- 
mile (240-kilometer) trip in nine hours. 
“Slow” boats are supposed to do it in 28. 
This traveler, armed with a hammock (the 
boats have no seats) and six liters of drinking 
water found hims elf on the slow boat. 

Leaving the bustling riverside port an hour 
late, the boat, true to its name, chugged slowly 
up the Took Sap past canoe-like fisning boats 
returning with the morning’s catch. 

On board were Cambodians eager to 
avoid the $50 plane trip (the boat costs $10) 
and a gaggle of foreigners: a group of Japa- 
nese stuoents, an Fnglfoh couple m a seem- 
ingly permanent state of travel, an Indian 
sailor from Bombay who had “always want- 
ed to see Angkor Wat,” an American foreign 
service officer based in Mexico but vacation- 
ing in Southeast Asia, a free-lance photogra- 
pher from New York and an American div- 
ing instructor who lives in Bangkok. 

Among the Cambodians were a pharma- 
cist who spoke good English and French, 
two Buddhist monks, a man carrying a pistol 
whose occupation was unclear but who said 
he had flown helicopters for the Americans 
in Cambodia, and a woman who while knit- 
ting furiously told a discouraging tale of how 
the boat to Angkor once took 24 days during 
the height of the dry season. 

The boat's destination was in fact not the 
Angkor temple complex itself but a town 
four mOes away called Siem Reap, which 
translated from Khmer means “Siam defeat- 
ed.” 

In a preemptive strike on boredom, read- 
ing material had been sought out by some of 
the passengers while still in Phnom Penh. 
But finding a bookshop in the Cambodian 
capital is very difficult — the lack of bodes 
one measure of what decades of war and Pol 
Pot's reign of terror did to the country. 

The Cambodian pharmacist, whose par- 
ents were executed during the Pol Pot regime 
(his father was a doctor), lamented Cambo- 
dia's intellectual vacuum. Virtually an entire 
generation, he said, was brought up without 
proper schooling. 

However, I did manage to find deep in a 
stack of dusty textbooks and political tracts 
at a Phnom Penh market, a copy of “The 


Horse and His Boy” by C. S. Lewis, subtided 
“A Story for Children.'’ Fortunately, as with 
almost all children’s books, they can also be 
enjoyed and perhaps better appreciated by 
adults — especially when the fight-reading 
alternative was a high-school chemistry text- 
book. So with hawimnric in place and G S. 
Lewis as a companion the afternoon shaped 
up Quite nicely. 

When the first shot was fired and the boat's 
code ran wildly down the deck, her hands 
flailing in the air, few of the foreigners on 
board understood what was going on. An 
angry-lodting man in an adjacent boat was 
holding a rifle pointed at the sky. The Cambo- 
dians on board had stopped what they were 
doing and crouched or lay flat on the deck. 
But almost instantly calm was restored — or 
rather the confusion aided with some of the 
foreigners seemingly unaware that anything 
had happened. 

It took a few more shots as the afternoon 
wore on for reactions to quicken. Those in 
hammocks would drop onto the deck and 
those already sitting on the deck would lie 
flat. The exception to this was the group of 
Japanese students who took little notice of 
their prostrate neighbors. The American for- 
eign service officer opined that it was per- 
fectly normal for the Americans in the group 
to be more sensitive to the sound of gunfire 
— it’s the difference, he said, betweenTokyo 
and New York! 

Ever our link to the outside world, the 
pharmacist explained that government 
troops along tire river tried to intimidate 
passing boats into handing over money or 
cigarettes. Soldiers bad in the past, he said, 
fired shots at the boat. Wiling or wounding 
passengers, but this had become increasingly 
rare. 

Fortunately the gunfire stopped well be- 
fore the boat got stuck in the sand. The crew 
exchanged a can of gasoline for a tug by 
some nearby fishing boats and the boat was 
able to continue on its own. 

But after the third sandbar and the third 
can of gasoline many on board began to 
realize that 28 hours was a rather imprecise 
estimate. 

The delays allowed curious (or bored) pas- 
sengers to wander around the boat, inspect 
the cargo of bicycle frames, sacks of flour 
and mattresses, as well as to watch other 
boats passing by. One vessel, probably 
bringing its cargo to the markets at Phnom 
Penh, had large cardboard boxes stacked on 
the deck, each with the marking, “Gift of 
EEC/WFP. Canned fish in tomato sauce / 
Not for sale.” Cambodia is after all a coun- 
try where pharmacies seD packets of rehy- 
dration powder in Unicef packets. 

T HE delays also allowed passengers 
to admire the Tonle Sap’s fishing 
culture, both on the banks of the 
river and aboard the houseboats. 
Fishing villages made up of a series of small 
thatched houses on stflts lined the shores, 
highlighted at night by cooking fires peril- 
ously close to the dwellings. 

For food, passengers were at the mercy of 
the kitchen crew, who kept a pot of water, 
taken straight from the Tonle Sap, boiling all 
throughout the day. Although the water 
maintained its green hue even after bong 
boiled, instant soup packets were popular 
with passengers, as were rioe dishes. 

In the end, the trip lasted 72 hours — by 
the morning of the fourth day we disembark- 
ed. Uncharitable travelers might have de- 
manded their money bade. But for most of 
the passengers the slow boat to Angkor Wat 
was, at $333 a day, the cheapest pleasure 
cruise money could buy, and highlighted, as 
the Foreign service officer noted, “with some 
occasional intermittent gunfire to brighten 

things op.” 



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In Xian, Temples and Fast Food 




By J- D- Brown 

X IAN, China — On my red-white- 
and-blue place mat is primed “The 
History of Kentucky Fried Chick- 
en" in English and Chinese, run- 
ning from the 1890s to a final entry dated 
1995 when the “first KFC restaurant . 
opened in Xian, with 550 seats.” Xian is 
China’ s showcase of imperial history, situated 
in the middle of the Middle Kingdom, 550 
mites (880 kilometers) southwest of the mod- 
em capital Beg m g. In the aftermath of the 
sudden, huge economic boom of the 1990s, 
fast food has come to the ancient capital, and 
there’s little doubt that it will spread. 

As I devour meal No. 1, consisting of 
chicken breast, airy round dinner roll and a 
dollop of instan t mashed potatoes soaked in 
gravy, I contemplate the changes that have 
ta trnn place since I lived and worked in Xian 
nine years ago. In this notably poor and 
politically conservative province, private en- 
terprise now employs more than 500,000 
workers. Since 1989 and the massacre near 
Tiananmen Square, nearly a dozen interna- 
tional holds, with names like Sheraton, Nik- 
ko, Hyatt and Holiday Inn, have opened 
inside and outside the 600-year-old Ming 
Dynasty walls that encircle Xian. 

Xian has a new airport as well, which 
opened last year, the trip downtown, about 28 
mfleg by taxi via a four-lane paved highway, 
requires an hour and costs nearly $30. That 
there are taxis at ail is another economic 
miracle. In 1984, the streets were a jungle of 
articulated buses, heavy black bikes, and carts 
pulled by beast or by hand. Foreign tour 
groups to Xian were escorted via air-candi- 
tianed buses to one of the century’s greatest 
archaeological discoveries, the funeral vaults 
of the First Emperor’s army, where each sol- 
dier is memorialized in terra-cotta. 

Qin Shi Huang Di (259-210 B. G) is cred- 
ited with unifying (Tima and establishing its 
first unified dynasty near Xian. The unearth- 
ing in 1979 of Emperor Qin’s 6,000 life-size 
day soldiers opened his underground ne- 
cropolis to tourism, and Xian has ca p i talized 
ever since as the showcase of China’s early 
imperial history. The tity served as China’s 
capital over the coarse of 11 dynasties, from 
the Qin and its successor, the Han Dynasty 
(206 B.G-A.D. 220), down to the Tang 
Dynasty (A.D. 618-907). Massive earthen 
burial mounds, the tombs of emperors, gen- 
erals and concubines, encircle Xian for a 50- 
mile radius. The Big Wild Goose Pagoda 
(Dayanta). built in 652, and the Little Wild 
Goose Pagoda (Xiaqyanta), constructed in 
707-709, are the chief Tang structures stffl 
standing in the city’s southern suburbs. Re- 
mains of the andent capital's celebrated 
Buddhist, Taoist, Lamaist and Confu dan 
temples, scattered throughout the dty, are 
being renovated for tourists. 

The most complete visual history of China 
I've seen can be found in Xian’s two muse- 
ums. Inside the dty walls is the Shaanxi 
Provincial Museum, situated on the grounds 
of a 14th-centnry Confudan temple. It 
houses China’s most extensive collection of 
fine carved stone monuments. The muse- 



CHINA 


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urn’s displays are poorly lighted; few signs 
are in English. The treasures, as a result, 
appear as they should, as if freshly unearthed 
or carted by hand from some fallen-down 
temple: silk scraps from Silk Road days; 
Tang Dynasty tricolored hoses; andent 
bronzes; the world's oldest seismograph, 
shaped like a punch bowl, and a side re- 
cording the history of Christianity in China. 

By contrast, there’s the new National Mu- 
seum of Shaanxi, south of tire dty wall. The 
new museum buddings are fetching, their tile 
roofs and columns modeled after those of a 
Ming temple. The central display is the 39 
Tang Dynasty frescoes removed from the 
walls of royal tombs. These morals of Chi- 
na's cultural zenith reach bade as far as 14 
centuries, when traders from (he barbarian 
West called upon a Xian of camel caravans, 
hunting dogs and polo tournaments. The 
scenes of Tang Dynasty musicians, dancers 
and court eunuchs, rendered in pale oranges, 
reds and blues, are well-lighted and accom- 

jjshaod 

Upstairs, the Qin Dynasty (770-206 B. G) 
contributes five of its famous terra-cotta 
soldiers. While there are thousands of these 
warriors at the Emperor Qin vaults a few 
miles to the west, constituting Xian’s num- 
ber one tourist attraction, here for a change I 
can take an unhurried, dose-up look. Sepa- 
rated by an inch of glass, I can see the bow 
ties on their square-toed shoes. Twenty-two 
centuries old, these figures look like flesh 
and blood men buried alive inside skin* of 
day. 

The heart of the andent capital today has 
a modem, distinctly Western beat, winch I 
can feel the moment I walk through its gates. 
When I reach Dong Dajie, Xian’s mam 
street, I can see the radical change in the 
appearance of metropolitan China. There 
are huge department stores with shining 

from mountain bikes^croellular telephones; 
cafis and fast-food emporiums, such as 
Honey Hamburger, where hamburgers, fries 
and colas are served on molded plastic trays; 
leafy trees and parks with potted flowers. 

The once-dingy Xian Antique Store, at 375 
Dang Dajie, has a racy new entrance; mat 
door is a store devoted to the latest in lamps 
and interior lighting. Down the block is a new 


boutique, named Billy, that seQs almost noth- 
ing but blue jeans, races for jeans, American- 
styte fast foods, Chinese antiques and any- 
thing imported are seldom less than half what 
is paid in the United States, meaning few local 
people can afford them often. Yet the dty 
bustles with prosper! ty it hasn’t enjoyed since 
the days of the Silk Road. Double-decker 
buses, boldly striped in orange, red and blue, 
are replacing the huge sardine cans of the 
past The motorized rickshaws sport orange 
molded fiberglass bodies. 

Between storefronts, down tide streets, 
rate can seethe hunts of the economic boom. 
There are masses of hopeful beggars here 
from the countryside. They sleep against 
buildings, their padded cotton coats folded 
into pillows, their gunny sacks of possessions 
their mattresses. At any major intersection, 
one-speed bicycles outnumber taxis and 
donkey-pulled carts rival jeeps. Average 
white-collar salaries are, say, $40 a month, 
with an unofficial but quite real inflation 
rate exceeding 25 percent. 

Sanxue Jia, lined with lantern poles, bor- 
dered by banners, festooned with red and 
yellow paper globes, is the first street in 
China I’ve seen that has been completely 
remade for tourists. Even the wooden-rafled 
balconies are strung with outdoor lights. 
Hundreds of Old Town shops hawk T-shirts, 
soft drinks, sSk embroideries and folk crafts 
but most of all scrolls and rubbings lifted 
from Xian’s great repository of carved stone 
monuments. Canned soft drinks are about 
SI; T-shirts about $10, and the rubbings, 
most of which are not taken from the origi- 
nal stone tablets, but from metallic recon- 
structions, run from $50 to $100 when 
mounted on scrolls. 

The dty wall has undergone a commercial 
metamorphosis, too. Nine years ago, the wall 
was in sorry shape, hardly changed From the 
days of its construction during the early 
Mug Dynasty. In the *90s, however, the city 
walls have been thoroughly restored. 

F ROM a souvenir shop in a watch- 
tower, I peer north into the city, 
south into the suburbs. At first it is 
the Kan I remember, low and gray, 
concrete and brick laid out in ponderous 
blocks of post-liberation pro-Russian con- 
struction. A longer, closer look reveals new • 
towers — high-tech holds and offices — and- - 
a dozen metal cranes about to raise the wings 
of new housing complexes. 

Just inside the wall is a duster of low-rise 
cement and bride apartments topped with 
talismans of the future: banks of solar panels 
and satellite dishes that enable residents to 
view situation oomedies from Hong Kong 
and bowdlerized MTV with pop idols from 
Taiwan. The sky, like the sky over every 
major Chinese aty, is stuffed with the sweat 
of industry, opaque with unwashed oral 
dust The tips of Xian’s two 1 300-y ear-old - 
Tang Dynasty pagodas are as delicate as 
long fingernails in a field of blocks and iron 
bars. Construction dwarfs these monuments 
for die first time since 652. 

J. D. Brown wrote Bus for The New York ■ 
Times. 


F 


nt rn cun; 

Going Green at the Cafe Royal in London 


Scenes along the Tonle Sap, on the 
way to Siem Reap and Angkor Wat. 


By Matt Wolf 

L ONDON — For a city rife with 
entertainment, London is short on 
cabaret nightspots, which is where 
The Green Room at the Caft Roy- 
al comes in. Here, you can sip wine — prices 
start at £1330 ($20) a bottle, £2.75 a glass — 
while Annie Ross sings some of her songs 
from ’Shortcuts.” Or finish a three-course 
meal before welcoming Michael Fdcstem, 
whose first remark to the audience after a 
glance around the room was a droll, “It's 
very green.” 

Indeed it is, with ils green velvet drapery 
lending a lushness to a setting that aims to 
recapture the prewar ambience of London’s 
bygone Cafe de Paris. In the old days, soci- 
ety swells would gather there to hear Coward 
or Dietrich; these days, as a fellow expatriate 
observed one recent Saturday, “millions of 
pounds of hairdos and facelifts” are pleased 
m this debased age to find a place where they 
can see and be seen. 

Such rooms are rare in London beyond 
Knightsb ridge’s Pizza on the Park, where a 
yuppier crowd flocks to hear the intriguingly 


named Issy van Randwyck and recent Tony- 
winners from Broadway like Debbie Shapiro 
Gravitte. 

The obvious prototype for the Green 
Room, by contrast, is the Caf6 Carlyle in 
New York, with which the new site shares 
such performers as Barbara Cook and the 
venerable, if now exceedingly throaty, Bob- 
by Short 

But while perfumes may smell the same 


//.// TilS 


■There's a run on laserdisc copies of 
“Who Undressed Jessica Rabbit?” because 
somebody undressed her more than 
anyone knew — on three frames she has 
no underwear, according to Variety. 

This isn’t viable to themoviegcang eye, but 
can be seen if viewed frame by frame. 
Disney’s not too worried: An 
source said, “This whole thing falls 
under (he get-a-life department” 


the world over —Short noted the “fragrance 
in the air (of) Egoiste from Chanel” — the 
Green Room clientele suggests only London. 
Isn’t that fashion doyenne Jean Muir, look- ! 
mg as spry as ever, as she makes her way to 
the front? Or the American chanteuse Ensa- ; 
beth Welch, herself a longtime Belgravia • 
resident, there to lead the cheers for Cook? 

Since the 150-seat room opened last Sep- 
tember, its look has evolved. Gone are the • 
rather cramped banqueting tables requiring \ 
couples to snare in favor of intimate round . 
tables for two. A dramatic red curtain by the • 
piano, suggested by Cook, heightens the 
theatricality of the setting. And while the • 
younger crowd repairs to Daniel’s Wine Bar 
a floor below, the Green Room goes aim an 
older, more upscale public. 

Non U p: Buddy Greco, from May 10 to 
June 4. 

Cafi Royal, 68 Regent St ., London Wl. • 
Open Monday to Saturday, serving food and 
drink from 7 P. M. with the show at 9 P. M. • 
Prices start at £45 for supper and show, £20 for ' 
show only. Tel: (71) 437-9090. \ 

Mast Wolf is a London-based writer special- 
icing in the arts. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


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contact in Paris: 

Tel.: (33-1) 46 37 93 85 
or Fax: (33-1) 46 37 93 70 


La OtadclaPwir 

Directed by Alain Berberian. 
France. 

Anybody who has been to the 
Cannes festival knows that it’s 
an easy subject for parody. Les 
Nuls, a comic threesome who 


triumph on the Canal Plus ca- 
ble station with send-ups of 
mainstream networks, have tak- 
en on the job. Chantal Lauby 
plays a hysterical press attach^ 
who win do anything to get her 
film talked about, Dominique 
Fami gia , a brain-damaged star. 


Grand Paris Culturel 

Plastic Arts . Book. Classical music 


% 


Livre 


Musicqngjp’ 

Entrance 25 F DeCOUVeiteS 

23 - 28 march 94. 

Paris. Porte de Versailles. 


Evav day from 10 a.m. to 7.30 p.m 

Lae nrtn : thLrsdoy 24 unti 10 30 p m. j 

Monday 28. professional day from 10 am to430pm d 

lotos Mrte)3616code Salons RatSff 




and Alain Giabat, a dead-pan 
bodyguard. There’s a plot of 
sons: A projectionist is mur- 
dered during the screening of 
“Red is Dead,” an absolutely 
Nul horror flick, and the kfller 
strikes again when the film, cat- 
apulted (0 success thanks to the 
juicy PR, is shown. The idea is 
to take a poke at cinema preten- 
tiousness in a comedy d ranuir- 
icaine. The problem is that the 
Nuls don’t know about change 
of pace like Monty Python or 
Med Brooks; they only have 
about five gags — all scatologi- 
cal — and no timing Send-ups 
of movies like “Basic Instinct” 
fall flat because, finally, it’s not 
[be movie being ridiculed but 
the media tizati on of the movie 
world. The Nub’ audience may 
be loo young to gel the refer- 
ence io “Pretty Woman” — or 
perhaps ihey never go to movies 
— they miss the laugh cues, but 
are thrilled just to see their he- 
roes on the big screoi, jubilat- 
ing every time Chabat passes 
wind or Famigia vomits. 

{Joan Dupont. IHT) 

Lightning Jack 

Directed fry Simon Winter. 
U.S. 

“Lightning Jack.” a comic west- 
ern produced and written by its 
star. Paul Hogan, sinks under 
the weight of a disastrous, if 
innocent, miscalculation. This 
takeoff of an Old West buddy 
movie mismatches the sardonic , 
Australian star of the “Croco- ! 


rifle Dundee” films with Cuba 
Gooding Jr„ who made such an 
impressive debut in John Srn- 
gtaon’s “Boyz N the Hood.” 
Gooding plays Ben Doyle, a lit- 
erate but mule store clerk who 
runs away from his abusive boss 
to be the sidekick of a notorious 
hank robber. Ben, who commu- 
nicates by scribbling notes on a 
pad he carries around, comes 
uncomfortably dose to the old- 
fashioned movie stereotype of a 
bowing and smiling Negro ser- 
vant Even though race is never 
mentioned in the movie, audi- 
ences are likely to wince in 
sceneswhere Ben, patronized as 
“boy,” reacts by rolling his eyes 
m discomfort. lightning Jack 
Kane (Hogan), Ben’s partner 
and teacher, fancies himself the 
fastest gun in the West but is 
insulted by the paltry rewards 
hong, offered for his capture. 
Ope of the film's bmp running 
jokes is that Jack, who is getting 
on in years, couldn’t locate the 
broad side of a barn without 
first putting on his glasses. The 
movie follows the team's misad- 
ventures, including a bungled 
bank robbery in which Ben 
Shoots himself in the fooL Si- 
mon Wincer, (he Australian di- 
J? tor v^» osc crcdils include 
Free Willy” and the mini-se- 
“Lonesome Dove," doesn’t 
know what to do with material 
uus whimsical. The film has no 
internal comic rhythm to ynatch 
its faltering sense of humor. 


;>V^ 

% 


m 


(Stephen Holden, NYT) 


-in 





Food 



S & jP 



International Herald Tribune 
Friday, March 18, 1994 
Page 9 


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, Marketing the British Breakfast 


.// .1 mscE: (Hi Tiiru mu 


By Roger CoIIis 

International H erald Tribune 

•A ' " " " ~ — ” 

S omerset maugham once said 

“St to eai well in England yon must 
«t breakfast three times a day. Well, 
thugs have improved over the years, 
especially if you're on expenses. But the old 
cynic would surely be aroused by the con- 
stant appeal for the Great British Breakfast 
among fl je business community. Not that the 
three-hour lunch has gone entirely out of 

style, but doing breakfast" is the most pow- 
erful success symbol. Last month, after 146 
years SunpsonVin-the-Strand, bastion of 
the male chauvinist business lunch, finally 
opened for business breakfast 
The British invented breakfast but the 
Americans have reinvented it as a manage- 

Tit fr/fiut Turriff 

mrat tool. Some people, especially tradition- 
al Gty types, may look on it as a barbaric 
custom; but a breakfast invitation is hard to 
refuse. The person you want to see may be 
plausibly booked three weeks ahead for 
lunch or dinn er, but If be for she) is seriously 
interested in meeting you, he will surely be 
able to squeeze in breakfast. Breakfast does 
imply a sense of urgency — of business that 
can't wait. 

Some people order breakfast; others have 
breakfast thrust upon them. like the tim « I 
had four breakfasts on a flight from Tokyo 
to Copenhagen with my former boss, a ge- 
nial Norwegian who announced when we 
landed at 6 A. M. that we would have a 
Norwegian breakfast This consisted of a 
medley of smoked fish, scrambled <yi*t 
aquavit and beer chasers. Which gave us no 
end of encouragement for our meetings with 
the auditors back in Geneva. 

“German advertising agencies often lure 
people into their office at about 8 o'clock by 
offering breakfast of sausages, ham and 


cheese — which looks like lunch, 1 ’ says Ron- 
ald Beatson, director-general of the Europe- 
an Association of Advertising Agencies in 
Brussels. “In Germany, there is such a thing 
as a free breakfast.” 

In London, breakfast is one of the greatest 
bargains in town. Even at the poshest holds, 
you can enjoy the full country house treat- 
ment for around £15 ($22 JO) per head — a 
fraction of the price you would pay for lunch 
or dinner with the same opulent surround- 
ings. And somehow maltre d’s seem less 
intimidating than at other times. Folks who 
would never dare query the wine are quite 
happy to send back the teabags (“I say, I 
asked you for high-grown Daq'eeling"). 

The Savoy (favorite of politicians and 
bankers) offers a Continental breakfast with 
fresh fruit for £12 and Tull En glish breakfast 
for £15.75. At The Ritz in Piccadilly — 
frequented by advertising and publishing 
types — you can breakfast in ineffable tradi- 
tional style on such specialties as deviled 
lambs’ kidneys or kedgeree (a wondrous con- 
fection of smoked haddock, rice, mushrooms 
and cream, glazed with light curry sauce) in 
an elegant during room that doesn't smell of 
the night before. M 2t provides fertile ground 
for buying and selling,” says one habitat 

A popular spot is the Fox & Anchor pub, 
off Southfield Market, near Fleet Street At 6 
A M. you can join meat porters and BBC 
producers for a heroic breakfast washed 
down with Guinness or Champagne. 

Britain's Institute of Directors canonized 
the power breakfast by converting the mens' 
room at the old United Services Club, next 
to its Pall Mail headquarters, into an authen- 
tically paneled brasserie in response to a 
demand from members who want to start the 
working day earlier. 

“British executives have realized that to 
compete successfully they have got to put in 
more hours, and more work into those 
hours," says John Nicholas, the institute’s 
deputy director. “If the habit spreads at the 
expense of the long working lunch, it could 
even be good for directors’ health." 


The power hungry can start doing busi- 
ness (from 8 A. M.) with a choice of prunes, 
green figs, kippers, Cumberland sausages, 
black pudding, pancakes and syrup, eggs, 
bacon, tomatoes and mushrooms, with Indi- 
an or China tea, coffee or chocolate (£825). 
After that, who needs lunch? 

Which is exactly the point. Get a power 
breakfast under your belt and you can afford 
to take lunch lightly or not at an. (‘"Yes, you 
guys go and discuss the issues over lunch; I’ll 
have made a decision by the time you get 
back.’’) 

T HE problem is that the neopuritan 
cult of minimalism, which de- 
stroyed the business lunch, has be- 
gun to encroach on the business 
breakfast. There’s nothing quite as discom- 
fiting as your breakfast partner saying: "No, 
t hank s. I’ll just have coffee," when you have 
just loaded up from the cholesterol trolley. 
“Let's have breakfast tonight to save time m 
the morning,” is the correct counter to this 
kind of behavior. You can avoid it by check- 
ing out whether your partner is a “breakfast 
person" and planning your venue and menu 
accordingly. Continental breakfast for your 
First meeting and a full-scale breakfast for 
the second. Or vice versa. The idea is to 
appear as a morning person with energy and 
putative virtue. “Sony I'm late, T had an 
early breakfast." Or, “1 must get back to the 
office before Tokyo closes." 

The new Great British Breakfast at Simp- 
son’s-m-the-Strand is great value at £850. It 
includes the usual ritual of juice, sausages, 
eggs, bacon, tomatoes, mushrooms, fried 
bread, black pudding, toast, pastries, juice, 
and as much coffee as you can drink. Plus 
such k la carte delicacies as smoked haddock 
and quails' eggs, and pig’s nose with parsley 
and onion sauce. Breakfast is served from 7 
A. M. to 12 noon Monday to Friday. So 
breakfast could overlap with lunch. (“Morn- 
ing. gentlemen, would you like lunch or 
breakfast?"). Could be the start of the power 
brunch. 



Carrier/Hotel 

AIR CANADA 


AIR FRANCE 


AIR FRANCE 


Location 

Worldwide 


Britain to New York 


ALL NIPPON AIRWAYS Eurape/United States/Japan 


ALL NIPPON AIRWAYS Japan to Eurape/United States 


BRTAIH 

London 

National Gallery, tel: (71) 839- 
3526, open dally. Continuing/To 
April 10: "Claude: The Poetic Land- 
scape." 25 paintings and 50 draw- 
ings by Claude Lo train, the \ Ttivcen- 
tuiy French painter. 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (71) 
439-7438, open dally. To June 12: 
“Goya, Truth and Fantasy: The Cabi- 
net Pictures, Sketches and Minia- 
tures." 100 small-scale works. In- 
cluding oil paintings produced for the 
Royal Tapestry Factory, sketches for 
altarpieces and many portraits and 
self-portraits. The exhibition will trav- 
el to Chicago. Also continuing /To 
April 2: "The Unknown ModlgffanL" 
More than 400 drawings by Italian 
artist Amedeo Modgfiani from 1906 
to 1924. To April 6: ’In Pursutt of the 
Absolute: Art in the Ancient World." 
300 masterpieces from the George 
Ortiz collection. - ■ ’ ' 

CZECH REPUBLIC 

Prague 

Statni Opera Praha, M: 26-1 669. A 
revival of Prague-born composer 
Hans Krasa's “Betrothal in a 
□ream.” Conducted by Israel 
Yuinon, with the orchestra and the 
women’s choir of the State Opera- 
March 27, 31 , April 6, 17 and May 1 5- 

PEH—AHK 

Humtebaek 

Louisiana Museum of Modem Art, 

1 tel: 4219-0719, open dally. To June 
26: “Aratjara: Aboriginal Ait" Works 
, on bark, canvas and wood by modem 
Aboriginal artists in which the close 
connection to nature and landscape 
of the original Australian civilization 
prevails. The exhibition will travel to 
I Dosseldorf, London and Melbourne. 

; FRANCE 

Lyon 

Opera de Lyon, td: 72-00-45-45- 
“An American Evening." The Lyon 
Opera Ballet performs three cre- 
ations by American choregrapbers 
Susan Marshall, Stephen Petronio 
and Bill T. Jones. March 22 (world 
premiere). 23. 25. 26, April 7, 8, 9 
and 10 . 

Paris 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-17-30, 
i dosed Tuesdays. To June 13: "Le 
: Sdeiletl'EtoileduNord: La France et 
la Suede au 18e Stede." Features 
• a paintings, sculptures, art objects and 
-architectural designs showing cultur- 
; al exchanges between France and 
Sweden under the aegis ot King Gus- 
tavus III in rtis efforts to emulate the 
Court of Versailles. 

Salon de Mars, tel: 44-94-86-80. 
March 16 to March 27: 70 French, 
British, German and Belgian private 
: galleries will exhibit antiquities, primi- 
tive arts, African, Japanese and Ori- 
ental art as wall as books, glassware 



Rostin's “ Femme au Voile” at Grand Palais in Paris. 

and lacquerware, carpets and manu- 26, April 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13. 15, 17, 20 
scripts. and 22. 


OERMANY 

Frankfurt 

Schlm KunsthaJle. tel: (069) 29-98- 
82-0. open daily. Continulng/Tb 
April 17: "GoWhelm. Schwert uhd' 
Silberschaize." Gold helmets, 
swords and silver treasures represent 
6,000 years of Romania's artistic her- 
itage. 

Munich 

Bayerisches National Museum, tel: 
(89) 211-24-1, closed Mondays. To 
May 29: "Silber und Gold: Auas- 
burger Gerfdschmiedekunst far Die 
Hole Europas. " Silver and gold table- 
ware created in Augsburg for the Eu- 
ropean courts in the 17th and 18th 
centuries. 

ITALY — 

Milan 

Teatro alia Scala, tel: (2) 80-91-60. 
Donizetti's "Don Pasquale.” Directed 
by Stefano VizioH, conducted by Rio- 
cardo Muli/Maurizio Benini, with 
Bruno De Simone, Nuoda FbcUe and 
Ferrucdo Furlanetto. March 22, 24, 


JAPAN 

Osaka 

Dahnaru Gallery, tel: (6) 343-1231. 
closed Tuesday. To March 28: 
"French and American images of 
Leisure. 1880-1920" Al the end ot 
the 1 9th century, wealthy French citi- 
zens patronized a culture of leisure. 
Artists portrayed women dressed In 
the latest fashions in luxurious interi- 
ors. The exhibition features oil paint- 
ings. drawings and watercolors by 
French and American artists, includ- 
ing Renoir. 

Tokyo 

National Museum of Western Art, 
tel: (3) 3828-5131 . closed Mondays. 
Continuing /To April 3: "Great 
French Paintings from the Barnes 
Collection." Pictures selected from 
the collection of Dr. Albert C. Barnes 
in Philadelphia. 

SPAIN 

B a rc elo na 

FundackJ La CaJxa, tel; (3) 404 60 
73, closed Mondays. Contrnu- 


ing/To April 3: "Willem De Koo- 
ning." 50 oil paintings, bronze sculp- 
tures and drawings from the Abstract 
Expressionist's early figurative paint- 
ings, Itis explorations in Cubism, and 
his lyrical abstractions of the later 
years- 

SWEDEN 

Stockholm 

National museum, tel: (8) 666- 
4250. To April 24: "Imagination and 
Dream: French Symbolism." An 
overall view of the movement from 
Puvls de Chavannes, Gustave Mo- 
reau and Odilon Redon to the Pont 
Aven School and the Nabb. In addi- 
tion to the 1 20 French works which 
include pottery by GaJie and Deal and 
tapestries by Maillol and Ranson, 
Swedish Symbolism is also repre- 
sented with works by Acke, Osslund 
and Jansson. The exhibition will trav- 
el to Oslo and Helsinki. 

SWITZERLAND 

MarUgny 

Fondatlon Pierre Gianadda, tel: 
(261 22-39-78, open daily. To June 
12: Dessirs et Aquarelles des Col- 
lections Susses et du Muses Rodin." 
Features a lesser-known aspect of 
the French sculptor’s work with 66 
drawings, sketches, prims and water- 
colors. Twelve monumental sculp- 
tures are simultaneously on show m 
the garden. 

UNITED STATES ~ 

Los Angeles 

Music Center, td: (213) 972-0777. 
Mozart’s "The Marriage of Figaro." 
Produced by Sir Peter Hall, conduct- 
ed by Markus Stenz with Elzbieta 
Szmytka. Paula Rasmussen, Gerald 
Finley /Richard Bernstein and Thomas 
Aflea April 12, 16, 18, 20, 23 and 25. 
New York 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (212) 
708-9750, closed Wednesdays. 
Continuing/To May 10: “Frank 
Lloyd Wright: Architect." A retrospec- 
tive devoted to Wright's 70-year ca- 
reer. 

Washington 

National Museum of American Art, 
tel: (202) 357-2840. open daily. To 
Aug. 7: "Thomas Cole: Landscape in 
History." A retrospective of 70 land- 
scapes and aBegorlcai history paint- 
ings by the “father of the Hudson 
RNer school of landscape painting," 
Including two allegorical series, ' The 
Course of Empire" and "The Voyage 
ot Lite." 

ASIAN TOUR 

Los Angeles Phifarmonic. A 13-day 
tour Inducting performances al the 
National Theatre and Concert Han in 
Taipei (March 18), Symphony Hall In 
Osaka (March 21), Suntory Hall in 
Tokyo (March 22, 23, 24) and Ko- 
seinenkln Kalkan in Hiroshima 
(March 25). The Philarmonic will be 
conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen. 


ALL NIPPON AIRWAYS 


AMERICAN AIRLINES 


BRITISH AIRWAYS 


CANADIAN AIRLINES 
INTERNATIONAL 


CHOICE HOTELS 


GULF AIR 


Britain to United States 


London to Hong Kong 


Britain to Canada 


Singapore 


Manchester to Gulf 


Worldwide 


ORCHARD HOTEL 


ROYAL ORCHID 
SHERATON 


THAI AIRWAYS 
INTERNATIONAL 


Singapore 


Bangkok 


Worldwide 


Members of Aeroplan frequent-flier program earn triple bonus points 
on all routes between Europe and Canada and between London 
and New Delhi. Valid until April 20. 

Members of AF Frequence Plus making six round-trip flights in busi- 
ness class from Britain get an Apple Newton Message Pad. Until 
April 30. 

Pay the fuB round-trip, business-class fare from Britain to New York 
(via Paris) with an American Express card and qualify for a one- 
way upgrade to Concorde (Paris to New York). Until April 30. 

First- and business-class passengers flying between Japan and 
Europe or United States on March 29, 30 or 31 can claim a free 
one-way business-class ticket for each one-way trip they make 
during the three-day period. Free tickets are valid for use on any 
ANA service between Tokyo and New York. Washington. Los 
Angeles, London, Paris, or Frankfurt between May 11 and 
SepL 30. 

PEX fares to the U.S. East Coast and to Europe will be cheaper by 
an average of 44 percent and 41 percent, respective!)/. So- 
called “Tob'iroaiu” economy passengers will be credited with mileage 
points in Program A equal to half the distance they actually fly 
For example, four round-trip flights between Tokyo and the 
United States or Europe earn a free economy round-trip ticket to 
Hong Kong. 

Double mileage for members of Program A frequent-flier program. 
Until March 25. 

Full-fare business and economy passengers traveling Manchester- 
New York or Glasgow-Chicago are upgraded to “first-class sleeper" 
seats and business class, respectively. 

Executive Dub members earn double Air Miles in first or business 
class on Cathay Pacific. Until April 30. 

Economy passengers can upgrade to business class for £150 
($225) each way on flights between Gatwick and Calgary/ 
Edmonton/Vancouver and between Manchester and Toronto. 

Save up to 45 percent on "deluxe rooms" at the King's Hotel 
Clarion. Until June 30. 

Two-for-one for full-fare first- or business-class passengers, plus free 
connections from any U.K. airport to Manchester. Full-fare pas- 
sengers to Oman, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and United 
Arab Emirates will be upgraded to the class above. Until March 31 . 

Members of Flying Dutchman frequent-filer program receive double 
points when staying at Holiday Inn hotels. Until March 31. 

Business Package promotion for deluxe rooms at 185 Singapore 
dollars (U.S.$117) for single and 195 dollars for a double with 
American breakfast About 35 percent off rack rates. Until Dec. 31. 

Getaway Package offers two nights river-view deluxe room for S359 
single ($199 twfri share) with buffet breakfasts, one seafood barbe- 
cue (firmer and show at the “Rjverrught Market"; airport transfers, wel- 
come drink, use of health dub and a late checkout Until March 31. 

Members of Royal Orchid Plus frequent-flier program flying 20 sec- 
tors with Thai in first or business class between Feb. 1 and May 
31 qualify for a free round-trip ticket to any of 22 destinations in 
Thailand. New members earn 2,500 bonus miles on fust Thai flight 
after joining. 


AMhough the BIT cmMy checks them cflbrs, please be fonnrnmod fact some tnml agents mnybs rnnon otlhaTK or iwxtbto to book them 


enssnn 


ACROSS 

1 Manatee 
7 Desert bloomer 
12 Sheepherder's 
bane 

14 Slices of life 
it Broadway 
tribute to wine? 
isO.T. book 
before Jer. 

20 Impnnt as in 
the memory 

21 Dr. Scholl's 
purchase 

22 Hong Kong, 
e.g. 


22 Relax 
29 Up to Ihe task 
29 Cheerleaders' 
number 

29 -a V67 

Wayne film) 

31 Headed up 

32 Kind of crazy 
3« Under-the-slnk 

item 

38 A ’deer' French 
wine? 

38 Insurance 
payment 
4i Toning salons 
«4 ill-wisher 


Solution to Puzzle of Mart* 17 


DCIESfl 

■aW 

syinii 

MSI 


45 Add a design to 
48 FHntstones - pel 
so Goes (for) 

K Architectural 
overhang 
6* Foyer spread 
95 Sale locale 
88 Multipurpose 
protein source 
59 Lasorda or 
LaRussa.Abbr. 

w Artsy wine 
center? 

83 Flower good for 
winter bouquets 

64 Involves 

65 Mailroom gizmo 
86 Literary heptad 


1 Add NaCl » 

2 Maroons 

3 Culpable 

• EmestQ 
Guevara, 
familiarly 

s Bey window 

8 All for naught 

t Health otq. 

a Dry Mongolian 
expanse 

* Sherman 
Hemsley TV 
senes 


10 Vice follower 

11 Dignify 

is Brand of craft 
knife 

is Person with 
many bills 
ie Pegasus, e.g. 
IB Symbol of 
poverty 

24 Barely tinged 

27 Rickey 
Ingredient 

29' 

Rosenkavalier* 
so Propels. In a way 
'w Colosseum 
setting 

39 TVs' Blue’ 

37 PiCfc-Up- gtiCfcS 
game 

38 Pan of a 

sentence: Abbr. 
»Roy 

Lichtenstein 
. works 

40 item good for 
another go- 
round? 

43 Skywriting? 

43 Be cozy 

44 Noted world 

traveler and 

- namesakes 

48 A Franklin 
invention 


© N& York Times Edited by Will Shorn. 



Rada by Hah DU* 


47 Penning up the si Clement Moore 57 Nietzsche's _ 

pigs character ' Homo 

so Conference site 61 Not him! 

_1 IJB 

49 Fairy tale 82 Retriever, 

meartie 58 Carnage informally 


TRAVELS WITH 
VIRGINIA WOOLF 

Edited by Jan Morris. 258 pages. 
£17.99. The Hogarth Press. 

Reviewed by 
Katherine Knorr 

V IRGINIA and Leonard Woolf 
drove through Germany for 
three days in 1935 with a pet mar- 
moset named Mitz. 

“Sitting in the sun outside the 
German customs,” Woolf wrote in 
a diary entry dated May 9. “a car 
with the swastika on the bade win- 
dow has just passed through the 
barrier into Germany. L is in the 
customs . . . Ought I to go in & 
see what is happening? The Dutch 
Customs took 10 seconds. This has 
taken 10 minutes already. The win- 
dows are barred. Here they come 
ont & the grim man laughed at 
Mitz ... We become obsequious 
— delighted that is when the offi- 
cers some ax Mi ta — the first stoop 
in our back . . . . " 

Later the same day she wrote: 
“By the Rhine, sitting at the win- 
dow ... We were chased across 
the river by Hitler (or Goering) bad 
to pass through ranks of chudren 
with red flags. They cheered MitzL 

. . . Bann ers stretched across the 
street The Jew is our enemy’ ‘There 
is no place for Jews in — So we 
whizzed along until we got out of 
range of the docile hysterical 
crowd. Our obsequiousness gradu- 
ally turning to anger. Nerves rather 
frayed ...” 

So goes one of the more dramatic 
passages in a handsomely printed 
collection of Virginia Woolfs 
“travel writing.” Jan Morris chose 
the pieces from diaries, tenters and 
articles covering travels in England 
and abroad, and followed in 
Woolfs footsteps to see what was 
left of what she saw. 

Virginia Woolf wasn't a great 
traveler. She was most comfortable 
on known ground, and the Woolfs 
span many of their holidays in 
houses in the English countryside, 
the last of which was at RodmeD in 
Sussex (where Virginia drowned 
herself in the Ouse River in 1941). 
Yet she had the keen eye of the 
“travel writer,” the attention to de- 
tail, to light and shadow, that also 
marks her fiction. 

In some ways, the most impor- 
tant trips of WoolTs life were to 
Cornwall. It was there she spent 
summers as a child, in St. Ives, 
where her parents rented TaHand 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Henry Lonis Gates Jr., 
W. E B. Dubois professor of the 
humanities at Harvard University, 
is reading “Jazz” by Toni Morri- 
son. 

“Rarely have music and lan- 
guage been matched so perfectly 
together. ‘Jazz’ is a veritable talking 
book." 

(K N. Cu/der. 1HT) 



House. That was Virginia's para- 
dise, the summer of her hfe, water 
and light, and that place (or raiher 
its loss, and associated with it the 
loss of her mother, who died when 
Virginia was in her early teens) in- 
spired “To the Lighthouse." 

Remembering Sl Ives in an es- 
say written in 1940, Woolf wrote: 
“The town was then much as it 
must have been in the sixteenth 
century, unknown, un visited, a 
scramble of granite houses ousting 
the slope in the hollow under the 
Island .... It was a windy, 
noisy, fishy, vociferous, narrow- 
strewed town; the colour of a mus- 
sel or a limpet: like a bunch of 
rough shell fish clustered on a grey 
wall together" 

Woolf, in her letters as in her 
wild and famous conversation, was 
a master of the quick put-down. 


By Alan Truscott 


X Burgay, the Italian television 
producer, m challenging all comers 
m January for a stake of $50,000 
was to tanonstraie the efficiency 
of his method of bidding in re- 
sponse to one no- tramp. But tire 
post-mortem was not always easy. 
On the diagramed debt, for exam- 
ple, his methods readied an inferi- 
or game contract, bat it succeeded 
with a little help from the defense. 

North and South for the Burgay 
team were the star French pair, 
Hervt* Maui el and Alain Levy. Af- 
ter the compulsory one no-trump 
Opening, showing 16-18 points and 
4-3-3-3 or 4-4-3-2 distribution. 
North described a hand with 4-1-4- 
4 distribution. South had to settle 
in three no-trump, a contract that 
seemed doomed, ne had little help 


Writing to her sister Vanessa in 
1908, she described Cheddar: “A 
wretched place, like the scenery be- 
side a switch back, crowded,' and 
full of grottoes and caves, into 
which I could not bother to look." 

In June 1938, again in a letter to 
Vanessa, she called Oban the 
“Ramsgate of the Highlands." She 
said that the Scots, “being entirely 
without frivolity built even bathing 
sheds erf granite lei alone hotels. 
The result is grim; and on every 
lamp post is a notice, Please do not 
spit on the pavement.” 

She liked Ireland but found it sad, 
a place from which life was draining. 
In her diary in April 1934, she 
wrote: “A mixture of Greece, Italy 
& Cornwall; great loneliness; pover- 
ty and dreary villages like squares 
cut out of West Kensington.” 

She loved London perhaps most 


nun 

when a bean was led and he was 
able lo win with tbe nine. 

He led a dub, in order, perhaps, 
to develop a trick in that suit. East 
won with the jack and made the 
obvious return of a heart. South’s 
jack was taken by the queen, and 
west shifted to the spade ten. 

Levy won in his hand with the 
spade king, and cashed the K.-Q of 
diamonds and the spade queen. 
Thai he crossed to the spade ace, 
thanking the gods for tbe even split, 
and cashed die last spade. He 
cashed tbe diamond ace mid led the 
last diamond, forcing West into the 
lead. Ihe heart king in the closed 
hand scored at the finish, giving 
South his ninth trick, and East's 
iop clubs withered on the vine. 

Paul Soloway, the American 
East realized too late that he could 
have beaten the game by cashing 
one or both of his dub winners 


of alL she loved “traveling” in Lon- 
don, and she painted tbe rity beau- 
tifufly in her novels. In her diary on 
Dec. 10, 1936, the day Edward VTfl 
abdicated, she wrote: "Whitehall 
was full of shuffling and tram- 
pling ... A very beautiful yellow 
brown lighL- dry pavements: still 
lamps lit . . . Opposite tbe Horse 
Guards there was Ottoline [Mor- 
rell], black, white, red lipped com- 
ing towards me ... We looked 
up at the beautiful carved front of 
— what office? I dont know. Thais 
the window out of which Charles 
the First stepped when he had his 
bead cut off said Ottoline, pom ting 
to the great lit up windows in their 
frame of white stone ... I felt I 
was walking in the 17th century 
with one of the courtiers; & she was 
lamenting cot the abdication of 
Edward ... but the execution of 
Charles." 

Jan Morris has put together a 
delightful book; the reader can dip 
in almost anywhere and find a gem. 

In April 1927, Virginia wrote to 
Vanessa from Palermo; “We 
crossed over to Palermo by night 
and I shared a cabin with an un- 
known but by no means romantic 
Swedish lady who complained that 
there was no lock on the door, 
whereupon I priced my head out 
from the curtains and said in my 
best French ‘Madame we have nei- 
ther erf us any cause for fear' which 
happily she took in good part." 

Iniemniianal Herald Tribune 


after winning the second trick with 
the jack. But if the declarer leads 
elute, it is not easy to appreciate 
that you have to do likewise. 


west 
« 103 2 
<7 A Q10 7 3 
69743 

*9 


NORTH 
4 A 7 6 4 

0 A852 
* 10 7 6 5 


EAST 
* J 98 
? 865 
0 J10 8 
OAK *3 


SOUTH (D) 

♦ KQ5 
S K J92 
0 KQ 
+ Q84 2 

North and South were vulnerable. 
Tbe bidding: 


South 

West 

North 

1 N.T. 

Pass 

2<? 

2* 

Pass 

2 N.T. 

3* 

Pass 

3* 

3N.T. 

Pass 

Pass 


West led tbe heart seven. 







Page 10 


NYSE 


Thursday’s dosing 

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Approx, waiting: 32% 
Ctaw 129.4a Prevj 130.17 


German 
Car Firms 
Hit Skids 

Profit Tumbles 
For AU 3 Giants 

Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

BONN — Volkswagen AG, Eu- 
rope's biggest carmaker, said 
Thursday that it had a group loss of 
1.94 billion Deutsche marks (51.14 
billion} in 1993 after posting a 
profit of 147 million DM a year 
earlier. 

The two other major German 
carmakers also reported sharply 
weaker earnings. Daimler-Benz 
AG, Germany's largest industrial 


LVMH Profit Rebounds 

Luxury-Goods Firm Sees Better Times 


Approx, welgjhfing: 37% 
Ctosa 11451 Piwj 114.43 



M 

1994 1993 


North America 


Approx, weighting: 26% 

ClOS* 96.09 Piwj 9&08 


l — . ..... 


Latin Amorica 


Approx, weighting: 5% 
Ctose; 13333 Pw.: 132^3 


O N 
1993 

World Index 


F M ON 
1994 1993 


Vm Max Cracks US. doBer values of stocks hr. Tokyo. Now York, London, and 
kiganOm, AuatraSa, Austria. Belgium, Bruit, Canada, Chlla, Danmark, Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Natbvtends, Nm ZMtand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Swacton, Switzerland and Vknuuaio. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the index la composed of the 20 lop Issues tn terms of market capHaBzation, 
otherwise foe ten top stocks are tracked. 


Industrial Sector? 


Tha. Pie*. % 

ctoae dew dn^e 

Enmgy 113.73 111,80 +1.73 Capital Goode 

WSBes 120) 12&52 -0.17 RwrHrtMto 

Franca 117.44 118.13 -0.58 Consumer Goodi 

Sendees 121.51 121B3 -056 WscelsneoDB 


11454 115.04 -009 
12189 123.17 ■4058 
9956 100.15 -0.17 
129.15 129.01 40.11 


For mom toformallon about the Index, abookjetisavaiabiB free of charge. 

Write to Trib Index, 181 Avenue Claries de GauBe, 92581 NeuSy Codex France. 

. ©International Herald Tribune 


WALL STREET WATCH 


from 1.43 billion DM in 1992. 
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG 
said that profit declined 29 percent 
in 1993, to 316 million DM. 

Volkswagen and BMW said they 
would leave their dividends un- 
changed while Daimler-Benz said it 
review its payout to take account of 
the effects of the recession, 

VW said that its sales fell in 1993 
to 76J9 billion DM from 83.40 
billion DM, while it also slashed 
investment to 4.84 billion DM 
from 9.25 bilHon DM. 

Analysts said that the VW fig- 
ures were slightly better than ex- 
pected but that the company was 
unlikely to return to profit until 
next year, despite comprehensive 
cost-cutting efforts led by Jos6 Ig- 
nacio Ltoez de Aniorttia, its con- 
troversial production chief. 

“VW will remain in loss this 
year," said Klaus-JQrgen Melzner, 
an analyst at DB Research in 
F rankf urt. “But it will see a clear 
improvement in 1995.” 

"The question is how rapidly 
VW can achieve a reasonable level 
erf profit margin,” added Bob Bar- 
ber, an automotive analyst at 
James Cape! in London. 

But Mr. Bather said he expected 
VW to raise its dividend again as 
early as this year as the company 
pared its losses. The direction of 
the next move is colainly upwards. 
The question is only how much.” 

VW also said its supervisory 
board had approved apian to buy a 

See AUTOS, Page 13 


By Jacques Neher 

Intemoaortal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Belying reports tha< 
luxury goods are headed into de- 
cline m the more austere 1990s 
LVMH M&et Hennessy Loui: 
Vuinon SA said Thursday that ii 
was headed for a comeback, re- 
porting an unexpected pickup ir 
1993 sales and profit. 

Executives at LVMH, the larg- 
est luxury-products company a 
the world, said 1994 earning! 
could jimm 20 percent on tin 
strength of a vigorous upturn in 
the UJS. economy, continued 
growth in several Asian nation! 
and a bottoming oat of the slump, 
in Japan. 

The French producer of chain- 

G agne, cognac, perfume and 
ather goods also said it w&! 
actively looking at acquisition 
targets in the luxury sector. The 
company, which in January an- 
nounced it would untang le its 
cross-shareholding arrangement 
with Guinness PLC, could now 
raise more than $2 billion for 
acquisitions, analysts said. 

Separately, Guinness said 
Thursday its profit had slipped 
in 1993, and the British-based 
brewer and distiller offered only 
a cautious outlook fa- 1994. 


Guinness said its pretax profit 
fell 12 percent in 1993, to £702 
million (SI billion) after a one- 
time charge of £173 million for 
the restructuring of its stake in 
LVMH. Chairman Tony 
Greener said market conditions 


The funda- 
mental need for 
luxury products 
is the same as it 
was in the ’80s. 9 

Bernard Arnault* 

LVMH chairman. 

for Guinness would continue to 
be difficult in 1994. 

Guinness's shares fell IS pence 
to 485 in London trading. 

LVMH, whose stable of 
brands includes Hennessy co- 
gnac, Mflct & Chandon and 
Veuve Clicquot champagne, 
Christian Dior and Givenchy 
perfume and Louis Vuitton 
leather goods, is already plan- 
ning to buy C&line, which oper- 
ates shoes and accessories bou- 
tiques. Other possible 


acquisition targets have been 
said to include Guerlam SA, the 
Gucci and Pierre Garriin fashion 
lines and the perfume and cos- 
metics division of Elf Sanofi. 

In 1993, net earnings at 
LVMH rose 19 percent, to 3.57 
billion francs (S619 million) 
from 3.01 billion francs in 1992, 
while sales grew 10 percent, to 
23.8 billion francs. 

The profit rise included a non- 
recurring item of 602 million 
francs, mostly resulting from a 
capital gain cm the disposal last 
fall of RoC cosmetics. Without 
that gain, net income would have 
been down 1.3 percent, to 2.97 
hfllinn francs. 

Demonstrating its faith in the 
future, the company announced 
a 10 percent increase in its stock 
dividend, to IS francs a share. 

The results were better than 
most analysts had predicted, and 
LVMH shares jumped 5 percent, 
to 4,389 francs, on the Paris 
stock exchange. 

For LVMH's chairman, Ber- 
nard Arnault, the company’s 
1993 performance should extin- 
guish doubts about its future ex- 
pressed by some, who have said 
the company would face limited 

See LVMH, Page 13 


New York Fed 
Seeks New Rules 
For Derivatives 


U.S.-German Air Treaty Near 


AFP- Ex tel Nows 

WASHINGTON — The United States and Germa- 
ny are poised to announce an agreement on a new 
aviation treaty, perhaps as soon as Friday, a spokesman 
for the U-S. Department of Transportation said 
Thursday. 

The most recent U.S. proposal was largely in line with 
the German position, said Dan Lewis, a spokesman for 
Lnfthansa AG. He echoed the UJS. official's sentiment 
that announcemoit an an agreement was imminent. 

Airline industry sources said the new agreement 
would allow U.S. airlines to implement or expand 
code-sharing agreements with European partners, 
which allow flights to be booked on one carrier and 
continued on another. 

The switch would allow Northwest Airlines and 
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to expand their code- 
sharing arrangement to serve six German cities from 11 
U.S. cities and would allow Northwest to doable the 
number of flights to Germany jointly operated with 
KLM. The agreement also wffl allow Delta Air Lines to 


operate its own ground service at the Frankfurt airport, 
an industry source said. Delta now must contract out 
about 23 percent of its ground service at that airport 

■ JAJL Gets First Hawaii Flight 

The U.S. government on Thursday granted one-time 
p ermis sion for a Japanese airliner to fly to Hawaii on a 
new route, the Associated Press reported from Tokyo. 

The approval was granted just hours before the 
flight was scheduled to leave Sendai, in northern 
Japan. Japan Air Lines Co. has applied to make 
weekly flights from Sendai to Honolulu, and Hawaii 
has already approved the route. 

' But the route has fallen victim to a broader aviation 
dispute and the United States has delayed full approval. 
The United States and Japan are negotiating a treaty on 
air service and several issues remain to be resolved. 

Matsuo Toshimiisu, the president of Japan Air 
lines, complained about the U.S. government’s reluc- 
tance to approve the new service, callmg it “extremely 
regrettable.” 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The president of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New 
York, calling for more public dis- 
closure in the fast-growing and 
controversial derivatives market 
said Thursday he had asked the 
world's leading accounting firms to 
speed efforts to better evaluate the 
potential finanrial risks. 

William J. McDonough, the New 
York Fed president said in an inter- 
view that he asked the firms to work 
to improve risk assessment because 
“more transparency is needed” on 
the part of banks and securities 
firms involved in the trading of fu- 
tures, options, swaps and other risk- 
management tods that are known 
gcncnraBy as derivatives. 

The New York Fed, in addition 
to the regular b anking supervisory 
duties of the regional Federal Re- 
serve Banks, oversees financial 
market activities and international 
transactions. 

Most derivatives are not traded 
on exchanges and are custom-de- 
signed to meet the requirements of 
institutional investors. This com- 
plicates the assessment of risk for 
regulators. 

Bank and securities regulators in 
the United States, Europe and Ja- 
pan have become increasingly con- 
cerned in recoit months about the 
risks inherent in the use of over-the- 
counter derivatives that are pegged 
to exchange rates, interest rates and 

biT vdatiS! *Mr. McDonough esti- 
mated the size of the global market 
in derivatives at nearly $7.5 trillion 
at the end of 1992. or more than six 
times what it had been in 1986. 

Mr. McDonough stressed that he 
was not opposed to the use of de- 
rivatives as tools for risk manage- 
ment, but he said the challenge for 
accounting firms was to come up 
with ways to provide “a reasonable 
estimate of possible gains and 
losses” in the future. 

The need for increased disclo- 
sure and fast action by auditors, the 
Fed official said, “reflects the fact 
that derivatives are off-balance- 


sheet devices that create an addi- 
tional challenge for us. A balance 
sheet does not tell you what it used 
to because of this, so we need to 
make progress in the accounting 
area to get greater transparency.” 

Mr. McDonough also said he 
had recently joined a work group 
comprising officials from the 
White House, the Treasury and the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion that would examine “the op- 
portunities for financial markets 
and the risks that come from new 
financial instruments.” The group 
was formed after the New Yore 
stock-market collapse in October 
1987 and was “re-activated" a 
month ago to examine derivatives, 
Mr. McDonough said. 

The New Yore Fed effort to per- 
suade accounting firms to aoedoate 
their work on derivatives will be 
formalized next week during a meet- 
ing with market participants. It 
comes at a rime when members of 
the House Banking Committee are 
demanding legislation to establish 
new rules for regulating derivatives. 

On March 25, Mr. McDonough 
will host a private seminar in New 
York to dismiss derivatives with 35 
prominent market participants. 
Among those invited are John G. 
Hermann, former controller of the 
Currency, Susan Phfih'ps, a Federal 
Reserve Board governor, and exec- 
utives from Moody’s Investors Ser- 
vice. the credit-rating agency, Price 
Waterhouse ft Co., the accounting 
firm, and Bankers Trust, the big 
New York bank. Mr. McDonough 
said the aim of the meeting would 
be to ask those directly involved in 
the derivatives sector “to oome up 
with regulatory proposals that re- 
duce risks and are manageable.” 

Last week, after a meeting of cen- 
tral bankers from the Group of 10 
major inriiiqrialiyefl countries, the 
Bundesbank president, Hans Tiet- 
meyer, made a point of saying that 
new moves were not required to 
control hedge funds, the speculative 
investment funds that use deriva- 
tives as part of their market strate- 
gies. Some hedge funds suffered 

See FED, Page 13 


Analysts Expect Sun Micro to Shine 


6 U.S. Airlines Settle Price-Fixing Suit 


By John Markoff 

New York Tima Sendee 

SAN FRANCISCO — While 
the technology industry has been 
focusing on Apple Computer 
Inc.’s fast Macintosh line, un- 
veiled this week, and Intel Corp.’s 
recently announced quick Pen- 
tium chip, it has been easy to 
discount Sun Microsystems Inc., 
the leading maker of computer 
workstations. 

In fact, the common wisdom in 
Silicon Valley has been that Sun 
woold simply be gored by the 
twin horns of ever-cheaper and 
faster personal computers and 
Microsoft Corp.’s commercially 
oriented NT operating system. 

But Sun. which prides itself at 
>*>ing both quirky and arrogant, 
has been counted out before. “As 
usual, reports of our demise are 
premature,” said Eric Schmidt, 
Sun’s chief technology officer. 

Now the computer maker is set 
to catch up in the workstation 
business and may end up giving 
fits to its chief competuors_ — 
Hewlett Packard Co., Digital 
Equi pmen t Corp., Silicon Graph- 
ics Inc. and International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. 

Sun, which introduced the 
$10,000 Voyager, its first “trans- 
portable’’ workstation, this week, 
will soon add the Sparc 5 and 





Sparc 2U, woresiauuu umuci* un- 
signed to refresh the performance 
of Sun’s desktop systems and put 
the company back “in ihe hunt 


Source: Bloomberg 

in the performance-sensitive 
workstation market — a market it 
created 

Several weeks ago the compa- 
ny, based in Mountain View, Cal- 
ifornia, treated analysts to a pre- 
view of a group of products it 
plans to introduce this month. 

Since then, the buzz that the 
products have created has begun 
turning beads on Wall StreeL The 
word was that there had never 
beat a better time to buy Sun's 
slock, which bad been languish- 
ing in the $20 range since the 
be ginning of January. 


Imemnucmaf Herald Tribune 

The stock traded late Thursday 
at $30.75 a share, unchanged 
from Wednesday. While still well 
below its 1987 high of $45.75, it 
has risen about 10 percent in a 
little more than a week. Its trad- 
ing all year has been volatile, 
however. The stock ended 1993 at 
$29,125. 

“I don't always have kind 
things to say about Sun, but I do 
right now," said Laura Conig- 
fiaro, an analyst at Prudential Se- 
curities Inc. “If you’re going to 
buy Sun, this is the window.” 

What Sun did wrong in the 


past was essentially fumble the 
transition between one genera- 
tion of its Sparc microprocessor 
and the next, when hs ally Texas 
Instruments Inc. took far too 
long to complete designing a cru- 
cial chip. 

That could have been fatal, ex- 
cept that while that Sun was lag- 
ging in performance, none of its 
competitors could dislodge it 
from its 30 percent share of the 
workstation market 

“Sun has been a company that 
is perceived to have lagged techni- 
cally,” said Doug van Domes, a 
stock analyst at Hambrecfat ft 
Quist in Sam Francisco, “but they 
still have the largest market dare, 
so they’re doing something right” 

Thai something, be said, was to 
develop systems that spoke di- 
rectly to the needs of its core 
customers, who wanted to 
“downsize,” or move critical ap- 
plications away from expensive 
mainframes and into the Unix 
workstation market 

That, in turn, has protected the 
company’s margins in the past 
year, because Sun’s high-end 
server computers have sold better 
than the computer maker itself 
expected them to. 

“Any way you look at it Son is 
an inexpensive stock,” Mr. van 
Dorsten said. “You could make a 
credible case that Sun should be 
valued as high as Hewlett Pack- 
ard." 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


March 17 

Cross Rates „ ** SJ=. YH CS MM 

{ E UM. FJ. ^ m 

AjUfefttlffi 1*15 IE5 U* UW JJjH.gjus it 1775 LOT 21*5 2UBP 

low SUB M “g «S- MW U* ^ um tldto 

Frankfurt 

LMtfMta) LOB *5 2 ?S. wo UNI MAB ™ 7 

Madrid nun vasd jj® *”5 bub bm uom ura \mm uaa 

MHon Uffi *2 vm JUI u» «n 1JW os 

NMYor*(t» ““ 5350 *£5. 300 IMfl IriOl UU- 41W 4MI* 

W* IS* M turn * UJB UK* USU 1»* •»* 

zwk* urn 1H1 ,«« lim wn wi oun im »n 

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ISM l-* 77 ^ ^ Yarn and Zurich ft**#* rantna: Toronto 

a: n tar one aeuna, »■ ,OUUT 
quaHabk t 


Eurocurrency Deposits March 17 

Swiss French 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Starting Franc Yen ECU 

1 manta 3 V3 *. 5WwS«N AMY. 4 VW IV MMVi flfrAk 

3 mantas MWta 4<vw4*. 3%4W 5«r5 V. 6-6% 216-216 6tW*v 

Smooths 4-4M 5VWM 3%-4 SW Y. SWK. 216-216 S*riV> 

1 year SKrfh IIMV 516-5% 5Vfc5?b 2%-®i S 'Viri <*. 

Sources; Reuters, Uordf Bank. 

FUasoppacotamMoixaUcdeiMaidSI rnman minimum for euuhiokntl. 


* ! ; 

^ ■ 

ta ■ z. . « 

* • 


Other Dote* 

Corrancv W* 
Anwar, peso MW 1 
AmtraLS 12Q25 
Aarir.scM. H- 827 
Brazil crux. 76BP5 
CUMMvaai kSH9 
CnchkBfwfla 2921 
Dtahh krone ejn 
Egypt poand WJP 
m. markka 54 S 7 


Value? . 

CorrertCT per * 

ft****- 

HWOttM* W* 

isr* « 

Motor, ring- 172 


Currency Perl 

Mex.pao S3TJ 

RZnotaodJ l - 7413 
Manr.knwe 73BS 
PUL peso VSA 

pofishztahr 2 am. 

PorLmcude 17105 
■bps. ruble 17 J 4 M 
Saudi rtyoi a aevs 

Om. 1 we* 


Cmvhcv p 

$. Air. rood 
SKor.wan 
p mod .kr ewa 
TofamS 
Thai bow 
Turumnra 
UAESrbom 
Venn. t»Hv. 


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""•"""•SL — — «-=— ss " , ss 

ZSLrn 3 SS !S SS- “ , “ , “ a 

IA» '*** ln lf! r pome fBrvsselflt '£££ 

urreas: .NO Bonk ™ *** « «***» 

Wont; ***"*,£* “SfSaWffl Reuters ennAP. 

Wcnto): IMF (SDRI-Otherdim 


Key Honey Ratos 

Unffitd States Close 

Dtaonmlrate 3JB 

Prlmsrato 6 j 00 

FsdsraltaMta 3K 

2-mMtaCDi 3 V. 

Comvt, paper W days L97 

Smeatb TnaHTT MB SA3 

J-rear Treawry Ull ASSJ 

2-year TreaHiry note 4.91 

SwTraasorvMta 5JB 

Tartar Treawnr aale 6J)1 

16-ysar Treasury mrte 6X1 

ta-vrarTreasory band 6J3 

MeniH Lynch 3May Ready asset 279 


1-mMtta Intarbaak 

3- moalft Ms rh art i 

4 - moalh brttrbaak 
lft. y » or Ba w wi mwir Nil 

Ceweagy 
Lombard rota 
Callmoaay 
l-maaMi jnterh nnk 
leioott tatarbaak 
Muntti fatartnik 
UHrear Band 


Britain 

Bulk base rata 
Can money 

I- montk interbank 

Smooth Intartmk 
i^Dflafh lolerhaak 
l *-yw OIK 

Froeee 

inta rvaHon rete 
CaD money 
Vmenlh latarbak 
3 gnamk tatarhank 
S^notk Intarbank 

II- yger OAT 


516 514 

5JD0 5ta 
56 . 5 ta 
5h 516 
SY. 5*. 
7.25 731 

6.10 &.10 
IS 6*4 
5 h 6 6. 
616 616 
59W 5* 
423 4.17 


Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg. Merrill 
Lynch. Bonk ot Tokyo. Commerzbonn. 
GnetmmH Monloou, OddH Lvoonau. 


— 1M 

— 2.10 


US. doltors per ounce. LoOdonofHclalflit- 
Ingtu Zurich and New YorkonenkigondcM- 
too prices; New York Qumx (April} 
Source: Reuter* 



AM. 

PM 

Zurich 

no. 

38U5 

London 

38MS 

SOM 

New York 

38L60 

moo 


Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Six major 
US. airlines agreed to settle charges 
that they used their jointly owned 
computerized ticket-information 
system to gain as much as $1.9 bil- 
lion in fare increases through illegal 
price-fixing from 1988 to 1992, the 
Justice Department said Thursday. 

The government did not file 
criminal charges and acknowl- 
edged that the airlines had stopped 
the practice in December 1992 
when it filed its civil antitrust suit 

There were no consumer refunds 
negotiated in the settlement be- 
cause the government has no legal 
authority to seek than in price- 
fixing cases. 

But private lawsuits for damages 
have been consolidated by a federal 


Japan Firms 
Plan to Link 
Phones, TVs 

Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispmdtex 

TOKYO — Four Japanese com- 
panies said Thursday they would 
cooperate in (he development of 
multimedia services, which would 
be the first link between the coun- 
try’s telephone and cable television 
industries. 

Three of the companies — Tokyo 
Electric Power Co„ Mitsui ft Co. 
and Mitsubishi Crap. — have stakes 
in Tokyo Telecommunications Net- 
work Co, a fiber-optic telecom- 
munications network used by busi- 
nesses. The fourth, the railway 
operator Tokyu Carp., runs a cable 
television system in Tokya 

The companies said they 
planned to begin testing the possi- 
bility of offering telephone and 
other interactive services by con- 
necting Tokyu's cable system with 
Tokyo Telecommunications Net- 
work. The sendees are likely to in- 
clude video on demand, in which 
viewers can request programs at 
any time; television shopping and 
karaoke, news reports said. 

Industry analysts hailed the 
agreement as a sign of loosening 
government regulations, which 
nave been blamed for Japan’s lag in 
multimedia applications. 

“It dearly illustrates that these 
areas are bong deregulated and 
new combinations can emerge,” 
said Steven Myers, an analyst Jar- 
dine Fleming Securities. 

The Japanese consortium fol- 
lows a series of mergers and agree- 
ments between cable and telephone 
companies in the United States and 
Europe.* 

The consortium presents a po- 
tential threat to easting telecom- 
munications services, including 
those provided by Nippon Tele- 
graph & Telephone Corp., which 
once held a telephone monopoly in 
Japan. (AP, AFP) 


court in Atlanta, and as part of a 
settlement of that case, air travelers 
stand to receive 10 percent dis- 
count coupons for future airline 
trips, based on the number of trips 
they said they had made on those 
carriers in the past. Some consumer 
advocates have criticized that set- 
tlement as too small. 

The Justice Department said it 
had identified more than 50 price- 
fixing agreements among the air- 
lines to raise fares or to end dis- 
counts on hundreds of routes. 

The airlines — American Air- 
lines, a unit of AMR Corp.; Delta 
Air Lines Inc.; Northwest Airlines, a 
unit of NWA Inc.; Continental Air- 
lines Holding Ino; Trans World 
Airlines Inc„ and Alaska Antinea, a 
unit of Alaska Air Group Inc. — as 


well as the information system. Air- 
line Tariff Publishing Co^ sealed by 
agreeing not to exchange ticket- 
price information in advance. 

Two other carriers. United Air- 
lines and USAir Group, entered 
into a consent decree in December 
1992 after the Justice Department 
first filed the lawsuit against all 
eight carriers. 

Assistant Attorney General 
Anne K. Bingaman, bead of the 
antitrust division, said the airlines 
operated by putting a notice of a 
proposed fine increase into their 
computers with footnotes indicat- 
ing what routes would be affected 
or when they would end a discount 

Other airlines, she said, would 
signal their counterproposals with 


different prices or different foot- 
notes until there was an agreement. 

Under the settlement, the six car- 
riers agreed to a court order that 
would bar them from offering new 
fares available only at a future date, 
the Justice Department said. 

Hie department said that once a 
fare was posted in the computer 
system, the airlines would have to 
begin selling tickets immediately at 
that price. The order also would 
limit communication about ending 
dates for discount fares. 

The proposed consent decree 
must be approved by a federal 
judge before it can be made final. 
Members of the public wOl have 60 
days to comment on the settlement 
before the judge rules. 

(AP, Bloomberg) 


BlancpaiN 



The ultra-slim watch 


Since 1735 there has 

NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BLANCPAIN WATCH. 
And THERE NEVER WILL BE. 


Arfan 

joillllrr-nvtogct MWrilto * *torf * <■ wtto de Puri* 

35, boulevard da Cnpudnm, 75002 Pari*. T6L (1) 42.6I.6&74 
70. hubouig Sl-Honow. 7S0O8 fan* Tel. (11 49 24 01 36 

Hotel Royal. 14800 Deauville. TU. (161 3L88.1&4! 












■ r - 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


** 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Technology Rally 
Brings OTC Record 


Va Aiteefatad fteH 


Men* 17 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Strength in 
technology stocks lifted the Nas- 
daq composite index to a record 
dose, while expectations for strong 
corporate earnings in the first quar- 
ter kept the broad market finn. 


The Nasdaq index closed up 4,58 
points at 803.57, eclipsing the previ- 
ous high set Jan. 3 1 . The Dow Joaes 
industrial average gained 16.99 


U.S. Stocks 


points, to 3,865.14, while gamers 
outnumbered losers by a 9-to-8 ratio 
on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Lotus Development led the over- 
the-counter index higher, jumping 
5% to 8595 on its agreement to adapt 
its Notes software to serve business- 
es over American Telephone & Tele- 
graph's network. AT&T rose Vo to 
53% in active trading on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Intel was the most actively trad- 
ed Nasdaq stock, rising % to 72W 
after the computer-chip maker was 
added to the “priority list of top 
stock recommendations at Gold- 
man, Sachs. 

Oracle Systems rose 1W to 31% 
after the database management 
software company said it planned 
to announce new partnership 
agreements on March 28. 

In Focus Systems slumped 3% to 


10% after the liquid-crystal-display 
maker said it would raise its invest- 
ment in a joint venture with Motor- 
ola by up to S7 million over the next 
two years. Motorola fell % to 109%. 

Hanson’s American depositary 
receipts topped the New York 
Stock Exchange’s most-active list, 
rising % to 21% alter announcing it 
was creating a subsidiary called 
Hanson Pacific PLC that was 
opening an office in Hong Kong. 

The benchmark 30-year Trea- 
sury bond price fell 10/52 point, to 
92 23/32, with the yield rising to 
6.83 percent from 6.80 percent 
Wednesday. Despite data this week 
showing inflation under control 
other indicators of economic ex- 
pansion fueled sentiment that the 
Fed would continue its bias toward 
higher rates to ensure that inflation 
remains in check. 


The Dow 


of the • 

Dow Jones Industrial average 



3500 


3400 


SOM 

1983 


D J 


F M 
1994 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open HOT Low Lotf Cho. 


Indus 385303 3865.14 3842.77 3265.14 -16.79 
Trans 174/30 17 STM 1M0.68 1747-53 —485 
Ulfl 20670 20762 205.77 20760 -0-20 
Como 1377.75 1JB1.I1 1373.95 136106 -Z.26 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Industrials 
T ran so. 
Utilities 
FI maw* 
SPOT 
SP in 


HOT Low Close CUT* 
S5266 547.28 ”7 9" +262 
42525 4001 <2523 + 02* 
161.00 16073 161.90 +036 
6463 44.17 6423 — 018 
471.05 46862 47089 + Lg 
436.11 434.15 63568 +030 


Analysts said they expected 
stock-market focus to' shift from 
interest rates to corporate earnings 
through mid-April. 

“Earnings are really picking up,” 
said Don Hays, director of invest- 
ment strategy at Wheat First 
Butcher & Singer, in Richmond, 
Virginia. He said he thought there 
was “a powerful bull market” that 
was temporarily derailed by a Fed- 
eral Reserve Board interest-rate in- 
crease on Feb. 4. 

(AP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Dollar Trends Lower 
On Bundesbank News 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
slightly lower against the Deutsche 
mark and the yen in subdued after- 
noon trading Thursday, though it 
had largely recovered from a de- 


Forolgn Exchange 


dine caused by the Bundesbank’s 
decision to leave interest rales un- 
changed, dealers said. 

A dealer for UBS Ltd. said the 
dollar had fallen as low as 1.6780 
DM before finding support 

At the end of the New York 
session, the U.S. currency was 
quoted at 1.6883 DM, just below its 
dose of 1.6890 DM on Wednesday, 
and at 105.730 yen, off from 
106.055 yen. 

The UBS dealer said the dollars 
decline had been triggered Gist by 
the Bundesbank's decision not to 
cut German interest rates and then 
by a lower-than-expected inflation 
component in a survey on the U S. 
economy published by the Federal 
Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. 
Higher German rates and lower 
U J. inflation would both tend to 
bold down the value of the dollar. 


The deala added that although 
the dollar’s rebound had been fair- 
ly sizable, there was little fresh buy- 
ing interest in the currency. This, 
he said, meant it could be vulnera- 
ble to renewed selling pressure. 

Some other dealers said covering 
of short positions had brought the 
dollar back up Thursday after tech- 
nically oriented traders dedded it 
would not sink below 1.6750 DM. 

“When technicals supported the 
dollar and we couldn't go any low- 
er, the market’s next move was to 
turn around,” one chief dealer said. 

The Bundesbank decided to keep 
Germany’s discount rate at 5.25 
percent and its Lombard rate at 
0.75 percent until at least April 14, 
the date of the first scheduled 
Bundesbank council meeting after 
the central bank's Easter break 
Those rates effectively define the 
lower and upper limits of interest 
rates in German money markets. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar rose to 1.4385 Swiss francs 
from 1.4323 francs Wednesday, 
and to 5.7533 French francs from 
5.7420. The pound rose to $1.4985 
from $1.4948. 

(AFX. Knight-Ridder, 


NYSE Indexes 


HOT Law Lad CUb- 


Gorramite 261.16 260.0 261.11 -0.77 

SxSrfafa vam 321-33 mg -iJ7 

Transo. 27165 27062 27103 -0.71 

Ulflltv 21452 715-36 216J2 +024 

nnance 715.53 21485 215.18 -0J6 


NASDAQ Indexes 


HOT LOW Lot a*. 


IHT 

NYSE Most Actives 


vm Mgh 

LOW 

Lest 

Cbg. 


78364 21 Va 

70% 

21% 

- »/« 


35934 XM 

IBVj 










19V. 

20% 


AT&T 

26623 53V. 

52*6 

53% 



B S SX 

ss 

55% 


TvneWn 


41% 

42% 

*1% 



31V. 

31% 


RJR NOT 

22610 6* 

6% 

6% 


WotMrls 

22542 77Va 

27 

27% 


EMC* 

■ . i e 

22 Vi 




H'Mrtttra 



• >'l 



75 VH 

25% 


PhflMr 


5414 

54 V, 

—1 

Chcorp 

I92W 41'., 

JOV. 

47 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


VO* High 

Low 

Lost 

Oig. 


41422 73V, 

72V. 

72% 

*% 


39446 23 Vi 

21W 

225i 




10% 

10% 




10% 

m» 



29167 29 'A 

2 6* 

27 




79% 




25794 31 U 

29% 

30% 


QVC 

TetCmA 


367/4 

40% 



22% 

24V. 

*1% 


24079 243k 

23% 

24% 



23396 38V, 

27% 

28% 


Mas 

22609 25*4 

25 



Novell s 

21575 24M 

23% 


* '% 


20626 42Y. 

36% 



Cooart 

18867 14*k 

13 



AMEX Most Actives 


VO* Htgh 

Lew 

Lap) 

Cha. 

ENSCO 

33509 3*Vi. 

3% 

TV., 

- % 

ExpLA 

13167 U-i 

19.1 


-»u 

MSJYwt 

10821 r\ 

2’Vj 

3 

_ 

ViocB 

7434 77V. 

76% 

27% 


Daramt 

6953 S’/., 

21%, 

2% 

_ 

ivtncCP 

6997 31 Va 

30% 

3l 


TooSrce 

5432 8Y. 

7% 




5185 36W 

35 

35% 


Amdht 

1791 6’. 

6% 

6% 

— % 

CheyStrs 

3497 43V. 

47% 

42% 


Market Seles 


Composite 80X57 

industrials 851-53 

Bonks M»-j» 

Inscrcroe 92gJ7 

Finance 898.15 

Trams 81 066 

Tofecom 17181 


800-57 an. 57 -458 
848.78 451.52 -496 
68764 68764 —1.34 
92X74 73469 -1.89 
895 69 898.15 -XI7 
802LO9 87064 ~iJ6 
77105 17X81 * 164 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


OOM 

Bid uk 
ALUMINUM (HM OmS*) 
Donarc oar metric ton 
Soot 131400 131400 

Forward 133400 133X00 

COPPER CATHODES (High 
Dollars p»r metric ton _ 
soot 195400 1957 JO 

Forward 196400 196400 

LEAD 

Del Ian per metric ton 
Spot 462JQ 46100 

Forward 47400 477J0 

NICKEL 

Dollars per met ri c ton 
Soot 571 DJ0 5720J0 

Forward 577OJ0 5780JD 

TIN 

Dollars pot metric ton 
Snot 551 5X0 557(7 00 

Forward 556500 557030 

ZINC (Special HOT Grade] 
Dollars per metric ton 
Seat 94X80 94400 

Forward 97400 977270 


1 291 JO 1292J0 
131450 1315 JO 
Grade) 


194XJ0 794100 
195400 1*57 210 


65400 45728) 
472J0 47X00 


555528) 556528) 
urannn 56X0281 


jflj UQ Q 5*1*717 
5480281 548X00 


931 JO 7322)0 
95100 95128) 


Financial 


HOT Low Close Change 
1-MONTH STERLING (LIPFE) 

4500080 • Pts PtK8PCt 
Jon 
Sen 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 


Dec 


AMEX Stock Index 


HOT LOW Last Old. 
470.96 469.14 47063 + 001 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 



Today 

Prey. 


4 Am. 

cons. 

NYSE 

50X89 

36*94 

Amcx 

21.71 

ww 

Nasdaq 

2B8J9 

33*01 


In millions. 


20 Bonds 
10 UtHItfes 
10 Industrials 


10229 

10025 

10423 


arte 
— 0216 
— 02 * 
— aos 


NYSE Diary 


Artranced 
Declined 
UnchOToed 
T olid issues 
Now HOTs 
New lows 


1147 

1346 

1013 

803 

617 

633 

2777 

2782 

92 

86 

39 

69 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New HOTs 
Now Lows 


300 311 

30 274 

239 256 

842 841 

19 21 

11 30 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New HOTs 
Now Lows 


1721 

1381 

1726 


154 

46 


1736 

1382 

1709 

4827 

123 

54 


Spot Commodities 


Cooper electrolytic. tt> 
Iran FOB. Ion 
Load, lb 
Silver, troy or 
steet (scrap), ton 
Tin. ID 
Zlnclb 


Today 
0579 
OJO 
OSS 
21 32)0 
034 
5345 
13433 
16401 
04371 


0L5S6 

170 

0J5 

7132X1 

034 

541 

13633 

15738 

04378 


Jon 

Sep 


9*90 

9*84 

9405 

002 

9*79 

9*71 

9*73 

— 0.02 

9606 

9*46 

9*50 

*02 

9*28 

9*17 

9*20 

-nil) 

93.98 

9X86 

9300 

003 

9X68 

9X55 

9X59 

002 

9137 

9X25 

9X29 

— 003 

9X09 

92.97 

9300 

— 034 

9200 

9272 

9X74 

— 002 

9255 

9X45 

9X49 

— 006 

9225 

9X19 

9225 

+ 005 

9205 

9196 

92J2 

— 003 


Aw 

Sop 

Oct 


141J0 Ml JO 1*135 14173 + 125 
14X50 M3J0 14X30 14335 + 1 JO 
14475 1 4635 14635 14475 +135 
14X75 148281 14X75 14X50 +1J0 
Dec 15035 14930 15035 15075 +135 

Jan 15130 15130 15130 15130 + 100 

Feb N.T. N.T. N.T. 15135 +135 

M or ‘H.T. N.T. N.T. 15138 +230 

Ext. volume: 8208 . Open InL 108.715 


BRENT CRUDE OIL C1PE1 
UJ. dollars per barraHols ofUOi barrels 


Apr 

1X90 

1X53 

1X53 

1X54 —028 

Mar 

1301 

1X58 

1158 

1309 —022 

Jun 

1X98 

1X70 

1370 

1X70 —X10 

Jo! 

1409 

1300 

1X80 

1X80 —0.10 

Ana 

1*16 

1*30 

1*05 

1X95 —0.10 

Sep 

1*23 

1*20 

1*23 

i*ia — <Lio 

Oct 

U36 

1*36 

1*36 

1*19 —0.10 

Nov 

1*49 

1*69 

1*49 

1*32 —009 

Dec 

1*60 

1*60 

1*60 

1*43 (Inch. 


Es>. volume: 34316 . Open InL 124.921 


Stock Indexes 


FT5E 100 (UFFE) 

125 per index point 

Mar 3267J 32382) 3247J +9J 

JOB 327X0 3247 J 3254.0 + 63 

SOP N.T. N.T. 32752) + 9J 

B% t. volume: 29799. Open MJ 68300. 

CAC 40 {MATIF) 

FP208 par train paint 

Mar 227X00 224428) 22572)0 —100 

Apr 228230 225830 2267 JO — XOG 

May 22792)0 226430 2271 JO —330 

JOT 226930 224X00 7255-DO —230 

Sep 226BJ0 226X00 22722)0 —100 

Dec 230X00 229730 230450 — 100 

Est. volume: no. Open Int.: 64287. 


Est volume: 59377. Open bit.: 400364 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS CLIFFS) 

Si million - pts of 180 pet 



9572 

9572 

95.72 

+ 003 

Sep 

9X31 

9500 

9503 

+ 004 


9*91 

9*90 

9*93 

+ 036 


N.T. 

N.T. 

9*73 

+ 006 


N.T. 

N.T. 

9*43 

+ 007 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*19 

+ 006 


Est volume: 374 Open Int: 8740. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS fLIFFE) 
DM) munon -Pts ptioopct 


Joe 

9400 

9*51 

9*52 

Sep 

9409 

9*77 

9400 

Dec 

9SJ8 

9*97 

9*99 

Mar 

95.18 

9505 

9507 

Jen 

95.14 

9505 

95.06 

Sep 

9502 

9*90 

9*92 

Dec 

9*83 

9470 

9*73 

Mar 

9*63 

9*54 

9*56 

Jen 

9*44 

9*35 

9*38 

Sep 

9*26 

9*21 

9*23 

Dec 

9*10 

9*08 

9407 

Mar 

9X99 

9X91 

9192 


UnctL 

UndL 


Est. volume: 162010 Open InL: B8S97X 
3-MONTH FRENCH FRANC (MATIF) 
FFS million - Pts of 188 pci 


Jun 

9*28 

9*16 

9*10 

— 007 

see 

9*60 

9*48 

9*50 

n ns 

Dec 

9*78 

9*67 

9*69 

—004 

Mar 

9*88 

9*77 

9471 

— 1136 

Jim 

9LB5 

9475 

9*76 

003 

Sep 

9*70 

9*57 

9*60 

— 004 

Dec 

9*51 

9*40 

9*40 

— CM 

Mar 

9*34 

9*24 

9424 

—005 


Source*: Mat If. Associated Press, 
London inti Financial Futures Exchange, 
tntl Petrotcam Ex chmge. 


Dividends 


Company 


Per Amt Fay Roc 


IRREGULAR 


Arizona Land - 75 3-31 4-14 

Keystone B2 . S3 325 +7 

Sth Alabama Bna> - J6 3-25 +1 

2002 Target Term _ 2J7B1 325 3-31 

Wrtpflf Blue Chip - .185 3-16 3-23 

STOCK 


Alleghany Carp 
Am List 


-2% +1+26 
_ Krt +4 +9 


STOCK SPLIT 
AutoZone Inc : 2 fori split. 


INCREASED 


citizens Nat) Q .126 +21 +31 

inferwest Svbs Q J75 3-30 +8 

Ott reoubUc Inti x .12 

Wash Trust Ben Q .25 +1 +15 

x-record & pov doles u n a n no u nced. 
tsO, 


''CORRECTION 


FlotchChli Forest 
Corrected amount 


7037 3-24 4-20 


Est. volume; no. Open bit.: 243799. 

LONG GILT(LIFFE) 

8SUN0 - pts & 32mfs Of IN PCf 
Mar 112-00 110-30 111-05 - 0-19 

Jm 11+11 109-20 1 10-05 -0-19 

Sep N.T. N.T. 109-(H — +19 

Est. volume: 74934 open bit.: 155492. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM 29Q0M - Pts ofl 08 pet 
Jan 98.14 97.16 9702 —076 

SOP 9739 9770 97.17 — 077 

Est. volume: 165398. Open int.: 207792 
1+YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF5WUND-ptS ofltO PCt 
Mar 12660 12560 12464 —046 

Jon 12414 125.16 72578 —<L*4 

Sep 12SJ6 12448 13464 —046 

Est. volume: aa Open ML: 235434 


Industrials 


L an Lost Settle CTree 


HOT 

GASOIL (IPE) 

US. dollars per metric ton+ots of 188 tons 
Aar 13875 13828) 13B75 13825 +128) 

May 1382)0 137 JO 137 JO 13730 + LW 

JOP 138JD 13750 138J0 13X00 +1J0 

JOI 13975 13930 13973 13975 +175 


Summit Praps 
Vesta insurance 


. .1838 
- JOS 


+n 5-i3 

+15 +29 


CBTCp 
Central Maine 
Centrl Newsp A 
Colgate Palm 
Fsl FedlSvasCO 
Gamma B la tool cats 
General Signal 
GtatfetterPH 
Gtotxti HI loco 
Granite Stale 
Health I mopes 
ICN Btomedlccds 

Keystone Cust bi 

Keystone Cost Si 

MGl Properties 
Medio General 

Meridian Insur 

Metro Snchsrs 

St Joseoh LAP 
Sovereign Bnep 
Sumitomo Bk CA 
Thomson Carp 
VonlCam CA Murrt 
VanKom lav Grd 
Vanguard RE Fd 1 
Wabash Natl 

West Newton 
Wright Oual Core 
Wright SeiShteOilp 


70 


§ 

3 £ 

Q 70 
O 21 25 
O 725 
Q .175 
M .T15 


s m 

a J425 
M J7B 
Q JI7 
Q 71 

a .11 

- J6 
O .16 
Q 45 
Q J25 
a to 
0 .113 
M .06 
M J775 
Q .15 
Q 223 
O .10 
Q 234 
Q 2M 


3-31 +26 
+B +29 
+31 40 

+25 5-16 
3-31 +Z) 
+12 +26 
+7 +18 
+12 5-1 

3-25 3-31 
3-28 +7 

5-20 +15 
3-25 +5 

3-25 +7 

3-25 +7 

3-30 +8 

Ml +15 
Ml +15 
3-28 44 

5-3 +18 
+28 5-16 
3-31 +25 
+13 +15 
+31 +15 
Ml +15 
3-31 +29 
+13 +28 
>41 +15 
+16 +23 
+16 +23 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Viacom Installs Dolgen at Paramount 

LOS ANGELES (NYT) — Jonathan L. Dolgen, a motion picture and 
television executive with a reputation as a stedy negotiator and a tough 
businessman, was named chairman of Paramount Pictures and television 
divisions on Thursday. 

The announcement was made by Sumner M. Redstone, chairman of 
the board of Viacom and Frank J. Biondi Jr., the president and chief 
executive officer. Four weeks ago Viacom survived a five-month battle 
whh QVC Network. Inc. and tot*, over Paramount Co m munica ti ons Inc. 
in a $9.7 billion deaL 

Mr. Dolgen, who was president of the Sony Morion Picture Group 
199 ], will hold the new tide of chairman of the Viacom Entertain^, 
ment Group. This indudes Paramount Pictures, the company’s television 
productions and stations and the proposed Paramount network. 



GAPs Saturn Unit Cuts Production 


DETROIT (Bloomberg) — General Motors Corp.’s Saturn Crap, has 
slashed its daily output 29 percent, the first production cut since the 
ubsidiary i 


small-car subsidiary started operating almost four years ago. 

The production cut could mean that Saturn will delay plans to formally 
ask GM for a second assembly plant. There had been reports for months 
that GM could either build a new Saturn plant or use an existing GM 
factory to increase Saturn’s annual capacity, now at 322,000 cars. 

Saturn cut daily production to 800 cars a day until further notice, from 
1,133 a day, said a spokesman. He said the company will assess its 
situation “within a week or two.” 


SEC Fines Firms for Bid Violations 


WASHINGTON (Knight-Ridder) — The Securities and Exchange 
Commission fined Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. and Chicago Corp. on 
Thursday for violations of bidding rules in U.S. Treasury auctions 
through noncompetitive tenders. 



Under an agreement with the commission. Cantor agreed to pay 

Chicago C 


$190,000 in penalties and interest to settle the charges. Chicago Corp. 
agreed to pay $300,000 in penalties and interest. Both firms entered into- 
the settlements without admitting or denying any wrongdoing. 

The SEC charged that Chicago Crap, had made agreements with 
employees and tbeurrdatives to acquire more non-competitive tenders than 
the firm was allowed. Cantor was ciarged with devising a plan to profit on 
trades using noncompetitive tenders in secondary markets at auction 
deadlines. Under the plan. Cantor customers placed bids for non-competi- 
tive tenders, and Cantor quickly traded those securities in secondary 
markets at or near the auction deadline. 


Figgie Int’l to Divest Subsidiaries 


NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — Figgie International Inc. said ! 
Thursday that it would divest several business that represent a third of its 
total sales as part of a major restructuring effort. ~ 

The diversified company also reported its first annual loss and blamed w 
depressed sales and Midwest flood damage, among other factors, for a 



o-cnmioi; g pay able In CaaaOan foods; m- 



R euten 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank on Thursday defied market 
expectations of a symbolic cut in a 
key interest rate, but economists 
woe optimistic that there would be 
a clear easing in German monetary 
policy next month. 


Markets had been tipping to- 
ward a reduction in the German 
central bank’s Lombard lending 
rate, which usually forms the ceil- 
ing for German market rates, as a 


signal of its continued commitment 
to brin ging interest rates lower. 

But die Bundesbank left both the 
6.73 percent Lombard and the 
more important 523 percent dis- 
count rate unchanged, putting im- 
mediate pressure on the dollar, 
which plunged a full pf ennig . 

A cut in German interest rates 
this week would have allowed other 
European nations to reduce the cost 
of their own credit and help pull 
Europe out of its economic slump. 

As it was, Switzerland. Austria 


and France said Thursday that they 
were keeping rates unchanged too. 

As markets swallowed their dis- 
appointment at the Bundesbank’s 
inaction, economists were already 
targeting the Bundesbank’s next 
meetings on April 14 and 28 as the 
most likely dates for rate cuts. 

“April 14 is the date we are 
watching,” said Ulrich Beckmann, 
senior economist at Deutsche Bank 
unit DB Research. By then the 
Bundesbank may well have 
brought its securities repurchase 


rate down to 5 JO percent from 3.88 
percent now. be added. 

The repo rate is used to guide 
German money rates between the 
discount and Lombard levels. 


To our renders in Bekpum 


ft's never been i 
lo subscribe end save. 
JurfccI taHrag 
0800 1 7538 


income of $283 million in 1992. 

In addition to its recently-announced the divestiture of its Advance' 
Security unit, Figgie also plans to sefl its fire truck parts and service unit 
American LaFrance; its pumps and mixers business Essick/Mayco,! 
Rawlings Sporting Goods, its safety product distribution business Safety. 
Supply America, Sherwood-Drolet Corp., which makes hockey equip- 1 
ment and insurance unit Waite Hill Holdings. ‘ 

Separately, Standard & Poor’s Corp. said that ir cut Figgie Internation- 
al's senior unsecured debt to double- B-plus from triple- B-minus and* 
subordinated debt to double-B-minus from donble-B-plus. ! 

( Knight-Ridder . Reuters) ■ 


( oat I 
mz Purlin 


Kendall Square Gets Funds Injection j 


WALTHAM. Massachusetts (Bloomberg) — Kendall Square Research 1 
Crap, said Thursday (hat it has received $28 million in new funding and,' 
that it agreed to settle a dozen stockholder and derivative law suits. 

The company disclosed accounting irregularities last fall that led to the' 
ouster in December of Henry Buxkhardt 3d, its founder, and two other! 
executives and to the appointment of its largest shareholder, W illiam I.. 
Koch, as chairman and chief executive: j 

The company said dial Mr. Koch, a multimillionaire who heads Oxbow! 
Corp., would pump in $23 millio n to bring his investment in the company- 
to $63 milli on. He currently owns 29 percent of die company’s stock. j 


For the Record 


Woofworth Corp. said its Woolwortb Canada Inc. subsidiary complet- 
ed the sale of 122 of its 142 Woolco discount department stores to WaJ- 
Marr Stores Inc. (Bloomberg) ^ 

Chrysler Crap- more than tripled bemuses for its top executives in line 
with soaring sales and stock prices in 1993, according to a preliminary 
proxy statement. (NYT) 




WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agena France Pressa Mon* 17 


Amsterdam 


ABN AmroHM 
ACFHoWfng 


Ahold 
Afcm Nobel 
AMEV 

Bots-Wcwonen 
C5M 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fokker 
Gfet-Brocodss 
HBG 
Ha broken 
HooBovena 


47.70 69 

5430 5450 
9660 96 

51 JO 50 JO 

222 22460 
79 7750 
42J0 4270 
70JKJ 72.10 

12440 12650 

177.40 18170 

1460 1450 
5470 5560 
315 308 

231 23110 
66 


Hunter Douglas 8470 8450 


IHC Calami 
Inter Mueller 
Inn Nmcrtond 
KLM 
KNP BT 
Nedllorf 
Oce Grlnten 
Pokftood 
Philips 
Polygram 
Robeco 
Rada in co 
Rollnco 
Horonto 
Royal Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 

WOHers/Kluwer 11450 11770 
fOE. tade* :.fMj8 
Prevtaai : 42574 


42.90 42J90 
B570 8630 
8460 85.10 
48.10 47.90 
5170 5030 
7160 72 

8640 8250 
55 5160 
5510 WJ0 

7870 7950 

127.90 12760 
6260 6270 
12870 12870 
9550 9630 
19960 19860 
4830 4420 
20950 20870 
5170 5060 
184 1B150 


Brussels 


Acec-UM 
AG Fin 
Arfted 
Bar co 
Bakaert 
Cocker! 1 1 
Cotxroa 
DeltiolM 
ElKtrabei 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevaen 
Kredtettneik 
Petrafl na 
Powerfln 
Roval Beta® 

Sac Gen Banque 


2590 2580 

2840 2850 

4900 4850 

2310 2300 
23850 23875 
189 190 

6240 6050 
1436 1436 

6370 6360 

1615 1625 

4530 4500 
9900 9900 
7480 7700 
10400 10425 
3250 3320 
5800 5800 
0500 8590 


SacGenBcOTnie 2ZS3 2750 

SoJIna 15200 13200 

Sc Ivor 14750 74500 

Trpaebel 77100 11000 

UCB 23600 21525 

skssi; 


Frankfurt 

A EG 7616076870 

Allianz Hob) 2673 2625 

Altana 63450 627 

Asko tLA. 1089 

BASF 31450 314 

!° ve L _ , 37737560 

Bov. Hypo bank 470 463 

Bay VerHnshk 498 500 

BBC 7DO 700 

BHF Bank 43350 437 

BMW 871 B7* 

Cora mertOc nk 3635036650 
Continental 28850 29a 

Daimler Benz 85385450 
PW uyo . 51351250 

Dt Babcock 27726850 

Deutsche Bank S23B24JD 
Douote 56S-W1.50 

Dreidner Bonk 4M47U0 
Fsldmuelile 33050 335 

FKruppHoextl 31220450 
Haraenor 359 355 

Henkel 645J0645J0 

HOOntel 1077 IDS 

HOQCtWt 328322.10 

Hatanonn 950 939 

Horten 230 230 

IWKA 394 397 

Kail Sab 150149 JO 

Kortfodt 570 567 

Koufhof 510 496 

KHD 14814480 

Kloecfcner Werte 141 137 

unds 881.90 877 

Lufttunsa 197 195 

MAN 44750 450 

Ma nn estn onn 425 429 

Metaiieesell 790 790 



Helsinki 


Amer-Ytitvma 140 135 

EnsaGutzolt 4150 4050 

Huhtarra*! flo 205 

K_OJ>. 13J0 1X70 

Kvmmene 121 122 

Metro 277 220 

Nokia 408 399 

PohJoJa 90 90 

Repo la 98 99 JO 

Stockmann 300 300 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Alla 3125 33 

Cathay Pocfflc 1220 1260 


Qteung kens' 4025 4025 
Wit Pwr 4075 4225 


China Light . ... 

Dairy Farm Inti 12 1250 
Hang umg Dev 14J0 1550 
Hang Sens Bcmk 56 57 

Henderson Land 47 <750 
HK Air Ena. 39 <025 

HK China Gas 18 JO 79J0 
HK Electric 2150 2260 
HK Land 2460 25.10 

HK Realty Trait 22^0 2180 
HSBC HokUnas 9750 79 

HKShanaHtts 1160 II JO 
HK Telecomm 1360 1190 
hk Ferrv 9.7D iojo 

Hutch Whampoa 3725 3750 
Hyson Dev 2580 9* m 
JanflneMam. 5650 5750 
Jordlne Sir Hid 29 30 

Kwrtoon Motor 1450 1420 
Mandarin Orient 1060 11 JO 
Miramar Hotel 2320 2AJB 
New WorW Dev 29.90 30 

SHK Proas 56 57 

Sfelux 455 460 

Swire Pac A 52 54 

Tcri i Chouno Prp* II jo 12 
TVE 150 153 

Wharf Hold 30 3lS 

Wing On Co Inti 12.90 13 

Winsorlnd. 7150 1230 




Johannesburg 

AECI 
Attoch 
Anglo Amer 
Bortaws 
Btyvoor 
Buffets 
De. Boors 
Drletantetn 
Goncor 
GFSA 


HlghveW Sleet 
Kloof 

N ad &onkGrp 
Rondtonle tn 
Rusplol 
SA Brows 
Sf Helena 
Sa*oi 
Welkam 
Western Deep 


TLX 23 
90 90 

223 226 

3050 30 

8-75 BJ5 
HA 48 
1105011450 
57-25 5250 
9 JO 950 
9850 77 

25 2550 
2350 2250 


3BJS 28.75 
43 4150 
84 87 

9Q50 91 

NA. 44 
3425 2425 
41 4150 
IBS 787 


8SES??^i :S1,7J 


Abbey 

AIRoa 


London 


Nari 

Lvons 


Bank Scotland 
Bardavs 


BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Bools 
Bo w o t er 
BP 

Brtt Airways 
BrftGas 
Brit Stool 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cawe wire 

Cadbury Sch 

Ca radon 

Coats Viral la 

Comm Union 

Courtaulds 

ECC Group 

Enterprise Oil 

Eurotunnel 

Floons 

Porte 

GEC 

GonlAcc 

GOTO 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsdown 

HSBC HUBS 

ICI 


486 

417 

U1 

Z57 

556 

iolos 

5JV 
2J0 
553 
S23 
473 
7 JO 
354 
753 
567 
490 
368 
4J6 
3.11 
165 
416 
350 
453 
5JS 
3.95 
259 
578 
566 
5L16 
411 


7J3 

256 

X1D 

413 


473 

1.74 

485 

578 

254 

172 

843 

7J7 


481 

472 

253 
257 
556 
9.95 
5.73 
155 

555 

574 

475 

1J3 

352 

7.17 

547 

498 

360 

475 

110 

763 

474 
US 
<52 
4-98 
4J0 
260 
578 

556 
5.10 
410 
547 
1-33 

254 
113 
410 

475 
471 
US 
5J0 

473 
27V 
154 
857 
773, 



don 

Pree. 

Inchcapa 

5L5D 

£48 

KmaHsher 

602 

605 


107 

105 


700 

707 


800 

800 


171 

129 

Legal Gen Gra 

509 

£00 

Lloyds Bank 

5.92 

504 


*74 

*23 

ME PC 

450 

*90 

Manpower 

475 

404 


*93 

*ft 


£37 

£42 


607 

673 

P40 

X91 

6J57 

PllkJnglan 

154 

155 


505 

£53 

Prudential 

X32 

X22 

Rank Ora 

*21 

*10 

Reckitt col 

636 

636 


574 

573 

R«cd Inti 

800 

903 


20.15 

2005 

RMC Group 

905 

971 

Rolls Royce 

1.92 

149 

Rothmn (unit) 

*16 

*30 

Rojrarscof 

437 

803 

*35 

850 


308 

183 


5M 

£43 


X93 

198 


1.19 

1.19 

Severn Trent 

503 

505 

Shrtl 

602 

674 

Slebe 

600 

£95 


1-44 

1-0 

Smith Kline B 

407 

196 

Smith IWH) 
Sun Alliance 

520 

£17 

330 

326 

Tate X Lyle 

*27 

*31 


220 

‘123 


11-0 

1128 


X53 

153 

TSB Group 

237 

336 

Unilever 

1078 

1073 

Utd Biscuits 

3-48 

140 

Vodafone 

503 

£55 

War Loan 3V, 

4608 

4706 



628 


509 

£51 

williams Hdgs 

194 

196 

Willis Conroon 

229 

221 

F.T. 30 Index : 

56558 



Madrid 


BBV -•wan 3220 

Ben Central HISP. 2850 2850 
Banco Santander 6890 6870 


CEPSA 

Dragadas 


Ercros 
IDerarola I 


Tabocolera 

Telefonica 


307 0 3015 
2490 2570 
7480 7430 
160 161 
1070 1090 
4775 4790 
4090 4075 
1925 1925 


*s%£*}jgr :3nM 


Milan 


Banco Comm 5890 6259 

Bastool 82 82 

Benetton group 26980 26673 

“ nao 6so 


38 


Clf 

Cred Hal 
Enktoni 
Fortin 
Fortin Rtop 
Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 
(OTerat, 

I la Ice m 


flalmablllare 

Mediobanca 

MontadlSOT 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnasconto 
Salpom 


2460 2386 
2588 2570 
2OT 2470 
1850 1783 
81250 795 

5110 4998 
1955 1850 
39000 3B730 
20700 20510 
11920 11700 
“95 565 7 
39100 38028 
16100 15950 
1269 1250 

2610 2550 


25540 24995 
10220 10050 
■ 3U5 3059 


Scm Paolo Torino 10635 10650 
4500 4524 
8 ME 3915 3800 

| =£2 
jTOOQO 35200 35009 

stot sSSoctS 

Toro Asst Rbp 26940 26810 




Montreal 


SSTiMr ss *3 

Bell Conodo 45Sh 451% 
Bombardier B 23t% 
Comblor 3^, 2m 

C mcodee 7V tv. 

Dominion Teel A S<6 bw 
D onohue A Z7vt m. 

MacMillan BI 23 3 

Natl Bk Canada 
Power Corp. 

Quebec Tel 
Outtecsr A 
QuibecorB 
Toteaiohe 
Unlva 
VtdMtran 


ID 10 

Z2*t 23 
21 1h 213k 
21 Vi 21W 
23 23 U. 




164* MW 
291459 


Close Prev. 


Paris 


Accor 726 710 

Air Until de B70 867 

AJcaM Alsltiom 730 729 

Axa 1430 1441 

Banco I re (CJc) 615 632 

BIC 1293 1300 

BNP 26250 26O40 

BouyOueS 712 711 

BSN-GD 910 923 

Carretaur 4241 <209 

CC.F. 2S56D 261 

Coras 142J0 144 

qiarsMira 1560 1498 

cirramts Frtmc 387 399 

au&Med 408 40550 

Elf-Aqultatne 4127041060 
Elf-Sanofl 1093 1090 

Euro Disney 3SA0 34.15 

Gen. Earn 2753 2767 


imetoi 

Lafarge Coppee 
Logrand 
Lyon. Eaux 
Oreal (L'l 
LVJVLH. 

Mufi w-Huiiie/le 

MOTollnB 

Moulinex 


Poctdnev inti 
Pernod- R laird 
Peugeot 

Prtrrlemus lAu) 
RodtotectnUaue 
Rh- Poulenc A 
Raft. St. Louts 
Redouts (La) 
Saint Gobaln 
S£.B. 

Sle Generde 
Suez 

Thomsan-C5F 

Total 

UJLP. 

Valeo 
CAC 40 


470 473 

6170 6070 
610 606 
1303 1301 
<389 4181 
153 15220 
260J0 261 

14570 14470 
490 486 

19250 194 

411 41050 
878 882 

935 929 

555 550 

14850 14860 
1744 IT1S 
875 850 

688 701 

577 582 

674 674 

33970 34050 
199.40 199.10 
332.70 333 

194 195 

1407 1430 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do Brasil 


19 

Bcnesoa 

10 

921 


1X00 

1X60 

BAJw rtc 

200 

Ito 


1930 

20 


16550 

162 

Tetehras 

37.40 3090 

Vale Rio Doce 

87 

88 


139 

13937 

IX 


Singapore 

Cerabos 7.10 7 JO 


City Dev. 

oes 

Fraser Heave 
Gontlng 
Golden Hope p( 


645 6J5 
1170 11.10 
1460 17 A0 
16.40 16.10 
256 268 


How Par 374 118 

Hwrie Industries 5.10 M3 


I r OTc ap o 
Keooel 
KL KepOng 
LumctOTs 
Moiarai Bcrnkg 
OCBC 
OUB 
DUE 

Sembawanp 
Stnngrtlo 
Slme Darby 
SIA 

suontLond 


5J0 560 
950 965 
258 3J3 
170 174 
865 865 
1270 1260 
770 7 JO 
7J5 7215 
1170 1160 
5JQ U0 
368 178 
755 750 
6.10 670 
1460 1470 
350 362 


5 ‘Parr Telecomm 154 154 

Straits Trading 370 X74 

UOB 10 10 

UOL 1.91 1.94 




Stocfdiolin 


AGA 
ASM A 
Astra A 
Atlas caoco 
Electrotux B 
Ericsson 
Esselie-A 
Handel sbanfcen 

investor B 


<20 <21 
623 627 

166 170 

508 SOB 
403 409 

362 304 

113 116 

120 123 

188 1*1 


Procord fa A F 
Sandvlk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Barken 
5bmdio F 
Skftnska 
SKF 

5 fora 

TraiiMora bf 
V olvo 


121 ns 
123 123 

137 136 
6050 6050 
165 165 

305 206 

14] 141 

-= 
90 vO 

M 667 




CfaMProv 


Sydney 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boral 

Bougainville 
Coles Myer 
Comalco 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brow 
Goodmai Field 
iCi Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pac Dunlop 
Pione er Inri 
Nmndy PoMtdon 
OCT Resources 
Scmtos 
TNT 

Western Minina 
westpoc Banking 5.15 5.16 
3.99 4 


10 KU4 

5.1 B 574 
1766 1760 

4.15 472 
1J1 1 

4.90 4.92 
5 5 

177* 1766 
478 479 
175 176 
161 160 
1050 1068 
2.10 rio 
370 370 
1178 11J6 
959 959 
570 133 
357 357 
575 575 
3.18 374 
270 272 
173 172 

4.02 42B 
275 275 
7.13 773 


Ahorgiwte^hgex : 216460 


Tokyo 


Akoi Etoctr 
Asohl Chemical 
Asa hi Glass 
Bank at Tokyo 
Brldaestono 
Canon 
Casio 

Dal Ntooco Print 
Dalwg House 
Detwo Securities 
Fonue 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
FUHSU 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 


llo Yofcada 
Itochu 

Jcsxm Airlines 
Kallma 
Kmsol Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
KJrtn Brewery 
Komatsu 

Kubota 

Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu ElocWks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mlfsubistll Kasot 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mlfsubistll Hev 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and CO 
Mltsukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
NIkko Securities 
Nippon Kogaku 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Stool 
Nippon Yuson 
Nissan 
Nomura Soe 
NTT 

Olympus Optfad 


Ricoh _ 

Sanyo Elec 
Sharp 
5hlf7KZTU 
Stdnetsu Chcm 
Sony 

Sum itomo Bk 

Sumitomo Qtein 
Sum I Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tat set Cera 
Tolsha Marine 
Tokoda Chem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tappan Printing 
Toray Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
YamalctilSoC 
a:xU0i 


513 
715 714 

1200 1200 
1600 1640 
1590 1580 

1700 1700 

1360 1350 

I860 1880 
1630 1650 

1700 1740 

4270 4310 
2270 2280 
2430 3470 
1080 1050 
970 957 

801 799 

1780 1730 
5690 5800 
700 706 

690 693 

945 950 

2790 310 
378 373 

1270 1260 
938 951 
692 700 

6710 6780 
1820 1810 
1200 1200 
2860 260 
490 490 

415 606 

705 705 

1130 HOC 
778 775 
”2 955 
2190 ZT79 
1110 1880 
1100 mo 

1370 1390 

1070 weo 
738 7a 
360 356 

598 599 

897 913 

2390 2370 
96400 9*WO 
1140 1129 

2700 2740 
816 807 

510 512 

1750 1720 
720 725 

2180 2190 
6390 6150 
2190 2200 
494 489 

908 91D 

2S4 284 

667 679 

0*0 843 

1310 1340 
4470 4450 
470 480 

133Q 1330 

3370 3370 

1340 1360 
685 678 

808 802 
2100 2118 
912 909 


AMtlW Prteo 
Aon lea Eagle 
Air Canada 


Toronto 

IB* 18W 
15* 14 

TV. TV. 

19* ms 
33 37W 
52 5ZVS 
31 31 

16 

26V* 26 Vi 
020 QJD 
037 0J9 
91k TU 

7V, TMi 

4JS 4J0 
35 35 


Am Bortick 
BCE 

Bk Nava Scotia 
BC Gas 
BC Tetecom 
BF Realty Hds 
BramaMa 
Brunswick 
CAE 

Camdov 

CISC — 

Canadian Pacific 23fb 2 » 


Can Tire A 

Oxifor 

Cara 

CCLIndB 
cmeotex 
Cam Inca 
CamveSt Ex Pi 
Denison Min 8 
Dickenson Min A 
Dofasca 
DytexA 

Echo Bar Mines 
Equity Silver A 
FCAIntl 
Fed Ind A 
FtoOTerOnll A 
FPI 
Gen fra 
GoldCorp 
Gulf coa Res 
Inti 


12VS 

47VS 

435 

9 

«W 

21W 


0J5 

8<4i 

25)k 

092 

16» 

095 

170 

8 

21 

5V% 

056 

m 

4J0 


Hernia GW Mines 1JVS 


Hollln 
Horshom 
Hudson's Boy 
Imasca 
IncD 

lotorpray pIpo 
J annock 
Labott 
LabkTwCo 


15% 
14 
30 Hi 


Magna Inti A 
Maple Leaf 
Maritime 
Mark Res 


3436 
31 Vi 
21H 

211k 

2SW 
12U 
73 
13 
26 
8 Vi 


MacLean Hunter 1» 


AMXson A 
Noma indA 
Norando Inc 
N orand a Forest 
Nurcen Energy 
Nthem Tetecom 
Nova Cara 
Oshawa 
Pagurln A 
Placer Dome 

Poco Pefrotoum 
PWACera 
Royrock 
RsnaJssonce 
Rogers B 
Rottunans 
Royal Bank Con 
Sceptre Res 
Scoff* Hasp 


Scars Can 
Shell Can 
Sherri tl Gordon 
SHL Systomhse 
Southern 
Spot Aerospoce 
States A 
Toihmoi Enera 
TeckB 

Thomson Nows 
Toronto Oomn 
Torjtor B 
Tranjotta LM1I 
TransCda Pipe 
Triton Fhl A 
Trtmoc 
TrlsecA 
Unlcorp Energy 


27 

7 

76 V. 
14 Vk 
MW 
41W 
ID 
72* 
155 
314i 
9* 
1.14 
17^4 
30W 
2316 

34Vj 

30 

UK 

B* 

4(JVb 

B 

3916 
)3Vn 
Iff* 
204i 
18 
9 * 
31L, 
25 

im 

23Vfc 


nw 

47% 

05 

M 

4W 
20W 
22 
0J6 
SVh 
2 S* 
191 
16* 
0.90 
3* 
8 

20* 

5 

157 
1188 
4J5 
15W 
13* 
158k 
19V8 
30 
38 
34 
32 
21 Vi 
2188 
24*8 
12 
72 

n 

2588 

788 

17W. 

27 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via 


March 17 


Oran Hgti Low Case Cho OpJnt 


Grains 


258k 

14 

14W 

41 

ID 

22 %. 

9h 


98- 
118 
178k 
2948 
2348 
8348 
2918 
13V8 
888 
40 
784 
39 (k 
1288 
1046 


1544 

2018 

4H 

17 

U4 

1J0 


IS 

916 

31 

25V8 

i8to 

ZPk 

2518 

1546 

2018 

5 

16% 

083 

144 


WHEAT (CBOT) l4toBunWWww.-cpeermewb.klwl 
194V) 100 IVtar94 137W 139VS 3J7 137W ♦ODIU 

117 L0D May W 142 1C* 141 14144-OaiVi 

156 196 Jut 94 333 12944 127Vi UH4-OID44 

Sjr-i 102 Sep 94 130W 131 Vi 129Vi 

165 1D9 0X94 138V) 139 137* 

1569, 114 Mar 95 139* 148 319 

1424b 111 M 95 

Est.Hftn NA. Wed’s. sales 1951 
WW: aowilnt 44J94 off 34 


137 -aoi 
140 -am 

136V8— (LOOM 


WHEAT (Kaon MOO buirOWnen- defers ■ 
2M lAa 


tsrv 

2J3K 

179to 

ua 

2JT4 

MV) 




Zurich 


Adkllntia 248 243 

Alusutosc B .now OT 6*5 

BBCBrwnBovB 1«» 1E0 

CBMGetoyB 872 »4 

CS Holdings B 
EloktrowB 
FIschorB 
Interdlseoisit B 
JolfnoQ B 


MoeVtJWCK a 


ISO 645 
3980 3940 
1330 1290 
2485 2OT 
876 879 

959 950 

<35 440 

1251 1268 


MwHe R . . . - IUM 

O raUk-B uotrleR T66 162 

PorgesaHIdB ISO «« 
Roche HSs PC 7225 7Jg 
Sofro Republic l» 123 
Sander B _ 3770 3 960 

SChlndtorB 7820 7800 

smzer pc _ raw too 

Surveillance B _ 2090 2100 
Swiss Bnfc Corps 436 435 

Swiss Reinsur R «S 627 
swtootr R ,«M ,22 

UBS B 1244 1239 

Winterthur B ^ 7« 
Zurich ASS B 1390 1385 

rnr>nm ■ ww^t 


192 7M MOT94 iny» 153 1504* 

177 Vi 298 Mov 94 U9V> 140W 13844 
X55 197 JUt 94 129 1 » 12744 

155V) 102>isep9* 17W4 12946 law 

160 11 JW Dec 74 135W 1354m 134W 

153 133 Mar 95 137 137W 137 

Est.sotes NA. W.xrc.5ak» 1962 
Wed’s open Inf MM3 ip 134 
CORN (CBOT) fctoOburiurim u ni oeOw i ewb 
HIM UTViMarM ZJOVj 2JUM, 7J)U 
11446 238WMOV94 2J4W 2J7 2J5W 

116W 2A1 JUI94 2.90V, 2.9W4 2J9V5 

2j40ViS*p 94 178 V) Z7S44 27744 
216 h Dec 94 1854b US* IMS, 
2 53 Vi Mar W 171 L 171W 178W 
167V, May 75 175 175*6 27446 

270V, Jul 75 177 177 176 

Ul Dec 75 152 Vi 2J3V) 152 

ESLSOM6 NA. WOd^. sates SA466 
Wetfsooenirt 37WH 08 445 
SOYBBANS (CBOT) SJtobu nvmmum-i 
754 5J9WMar 94 172 652 M, &S7W 

5.92 W Mov 94 6.94V, 6.9S 6.91 

5J4WJut94 695 &5S41 692 

69 AM 74 6J6W 6876, 684W 
617 j«p74 U9W 670 667 

£5545 Nov M *56 V) 657 653 « 

61IWJW195 66IW 65! 657W 

642 Mar 95 665 666W 684 

653 MOVTS 646M 664W 664 Vi 
642’5JuJ95 648 648 6M 

5JIWNOV73 634 674 62! 

ESI semes na wetf^-wras 57,137 
wetrsaranirt ISUtoUP 744 
SOTBCAN MEAL Ito ^Otoorspe 

23750 1B520MCT-74 17620 19550 194J0 

1 8550 Mov 94 19670 19750 196.10 
I9QJ0JUI94 197J0 198JO 19690 
189 JO Aug 94 19630 19680 19600 
18BJD5s>94 19670 19SJ0 IMS 
187.100094 19258 W2JO l?L» 
640 Dec 94 ITLOO 19120 191 JO 
14650 Jan 95 19108 19128 19150 
187 JO Mar 95 

19100 May 95 

EsLscies NA WetfLWlw 15*230 
Wed’s open Int B0J97 off 939 
SOYBEAN 08. (CBOT) to5totoj-dtoor«Mrl 
30.75 71.I3MCT-94 29.10 29J3 2193 

Z1 JO May 94 29 JO 

21 55 JUl *4 to. 92 
21&SAugf4 3650 
22rCSee94 2600 
22100cf94 27.15 
alODecto 3665 
2255 Jon 95 2455 
2550 Mar 95 

^^61 


35tH*-aoaw 

3J9W 


17HW 


177*4 flap* U3I 
275*4 -OJO'L 316 
17474 7100*6 U05 
1HW *0J1 


751 

750 

7JS 

6»W 

757V, 

670 

673W 

670 

675 

650V, 


65014-QJHi MB5 
6J1W-OJ3 63J1D 
L72W— 0J2W 468S5 


6*7 — 0J3*k 1982 
653*4-403 30,501 

4J9V,-0J2V. 2520 
644 -403 445 

656V.-0J3W 7 

646 -a03 245 

621 — OJlVi 998 


23100 
Z3QJ0 
223J0 
71000 
20600 
209 JO 
20100 


19150 


19660 —*00 1.341 
1 9650 —AM 29,195 
1 97 JO -0AI36879 
19610 -050 6584 
19650 -030 5JW 
19120 —440 1022 
19150 -040 0-431 
191 JO 90S 

17150 —I JO 33 
19150 -480 II 


30-45 
»jo 
29 JD 


3471 


2755 
2690 
2665 
2635 
2610 
Est. cates 


29.18 

790B 

2S JO 

2410 27 J5 

77 JS 2705 
2675 2450 

2655 2635 


2495 

2486 

2477 


WM’&OPenH 99531 up 2017 


36597 


27 JO 
27 JS 
2653 
2638 
2658 
2618 


-419 1-457 
— 0.19 36BB 
—051 26812 
-OO 1-074 
-431 4005 
-408 5598 
-412 H7*5 
-415 1-676 

— 4w so 

-402 3 


Livestock 


Vieocfto 

i bVott/ 


jost a* 155 57 57 


CATTLE (CMBR) 
tvs 7128 APT 94 7655 7650 

7£J7 71 55 An *4 76ffi 76* 

7X77 7420 Aug 94 7252 72.97 

7600 71470094 TIM 7d£ 

too 7255 Dec 94 7195 7*55 

7*25 7X00 Fi* 95 7X73 7450 

75J8 7350APT95 7W» 7610 

Est. sen* na. wetfLiotto 14S47 

06917 * 264 

FEB7S1 CATTLE (CMETO SUtoNi- 
8635 7952 MOT 94 B1J0 t\M 

K m 79 jeAprto 8493 8157 

K40 74 70 May 94 BQJ5 B1J0 

KUO 79JSAueto 81^ y-g 

8150 79J05ep*4 8150 W,*0 

IIJ 79J0MM SIM SIM 

5400 77-45 Nov to S1J0 J1J0 

0490 79J0Jan9i BOM 80M 

EsLsBfes NA. W«rs.saHK IA22 
WecrtopenW 12J65 M» _ 

HOGSTOSERI •goej-a 

SS 55SSS S5 si* 

49JS SUOOrtto OJO £.70 

eem 4SJ0D9Cto AM MM 

S4H 4420 Feb 9S 4490 M.W 

4SJ0 40J0Apr93 47.10 47.10 

SI JO 54IOJim9S 

PtodYupenW 344 71 oW IM 

Sja 4450 May 94 56* 5650 

an 39J0AH94 5665 BSI 

5930 42MAug*4 53M 050 

Sjs 39.10 Feb 9S 59 JO 59M 

59.90 S4MMtoM 

AM 59.90 Mov 95 . __ 

Est. soles NA. WHTDOteS 2JB7 
Md-*«P«niflt 9.964 UP 231 


7615 

7600 

7252 

7355 

7X90 

7X75 

7SM 


7647 

7637 

7X87 

7600 

7615 

TAM 

7X10 


,410 36257 
*420 0,712 
*405 1X159 
*418 9 JOB 
<413 2-503 
• 0J3 BS» 

*425 119 


81 S 
849S 


81 J5 
AM 
Mil 
BUD 


iMTh 

0155 
51 JO 
ML97 
AM 
ai* 
njs 
0150 
8490 


*4W iota 
*415 X1B2 
♦ 432 3JS0 
<420 2J6S 
*433 367 

«0JB 539 
*430 2» 

*435 10 


1 Season Season 






HOT 

Low Open 

t -WORLD 11 (NCSE) 
aJOMovto 1X14 

«oh 

Lour 

Close 

Ota 

OpJnt 








1119 

1X10 

1X14 

-003 63263 


9.15 JU to IX* 

1272 

1X27 

1X31 

*002 34-440 


9.4200 94 1101 

1103 

• 1174 

1178 

—003 29341 

1127 

9.17 Mar 95 1137 

1100 

1120 

1120 

-006 1X167 

11-48 

1057 May 95 1134 

1124 

1121 

U2B 

-006 

1,708 

1107 

1057 Jut 95 1130 

1120 

1120 

1123 

—008 

1010 

1100 

10570095 1128 

1)28 

1128 

112! 

-005 

309 

Eit. xries NA. Wed’s, sofas 17017 




Wed*sepenlnt 142-436 up 

1012 





coca 


i- Spar ton 





*78 MOV to 1347 
9990494 1272 

1249 

1714 

1716 

—XT 41066 | 

1365 

1273 

1340 

1341 

-29 1*990 

1377 

1820 Sep 94 1294 

1294 

130 

1263 

-78 

9091 

1389 

1041 Dec to 1325 

1325 

1299 

1299 

—44 

*552 

1382 

1077 Marts 



1332 

-24 

9058 

1400 

1111 May 95 1378 

1378 

1378 

13S2 

-24 

5259 


1225 Jul 95 139) 

1393 

1393 

072 

— M 

X716 


1Z73Scd 95 



1371 

—24 

<81 

ISP 

IBS Dec 95 



1414 

-24 

285 

Est. scries NA. Wed's, sales 7-54* 

’ 



Wafi open Int 9XS38 up £8) 





ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) lUoatob- 

*n«rb. 



13*25 

8*SMcrH 10830 

10930 

10820 

10905 

*085 

258 


89 JO MOV 94 11150 
lOXJOJulto 11400 

11X45 

1112! 

11X15 

*005 

8.723 

13500 

HUE 

n*oc 

11*50 

♦025 

5290 


10550 Sap 94 11700 




*030 

2036 


IDBMNdvW 115M 





100 

IPJB 

10X50 Jon 95 11535 

11X50 

11370 

11X05 

*020 

1048 


106MNOT95 11475 

11*73 

11*73 

11*73 



Est. sales 1000 WefTs.Mrin 889 

1 WecTs open bit 19097 up ST 






Metals 




W GRADE COPPER (NCMX) an 

bi-caltnre. 









308» 


7450 Apr M 9 255 

9X10 

9170 

9175 

—ITS 

1.154 



9X30 

9170 

9100 

—125 41094 



9170 

9100 

91.10 

—135 

845 


7** Jul to 9100 

9175 

9000 

9100 

—123 11067 


7*90 Sep to 9150 

9130 

9000 

9005 

-120 

17U 


7575 Dec to 9100 

9100 

90.70 

9075 

-105 

3763 


7*90 Jan 95 




—105 



7X00 Fab 95 




—135 

13 







10*4 

9170 

7*85 May 95 91.10 

91.10 

9000 

9000 

—105 

<52 






-170 



7530 Aug 95 BUS 

9125 

9000 

9070 

-100 


9030 

79.10 5ep 95 91.10 

91.10 

91.10 

9005 

—170 



7570 Oct 95 



9030 

— 125 


■00 

77.75 Nov 95 



9025 

—105 


9BM 

98J0 Daevs 












EsLsdes KL0M WtaT+sak 

9 1X000 




IWlOTW 






I SXVER (NCMX1 tan,a.-arapvin»n. 

5365 3660 Mar 94 S36J 537J 53*0 5350 

—22 

1,112 

54X0 

51 aj Apr to 5480 

5480 

5480 

5357 

-23 


5552 

3710 May M 5370 

5403 

1360 

5377 

-237X079 

5650 

3710 Jul to 5410 

5443 

5400 

5413 

— 20 1*100 

5*13 

37*5 S*o M J460 



3430 

—27 

4725 












56X3 




41*5 MOT 95 5590 

5400 

55*0 

5383 

—19 



4180 May 95 S6X0 

5650 

5420 

56X1 

—30 


5950 

4200 Jul 95 



5682 

— IB 


5650 

4930 Sep 95 



5730 

-10 


5900 

H90Oec9S 



5812 

-10 

796 


Jon 96 



5834 

—10 


Est. iotas 24-000 Wad’s, iotas 1X516 




weersepenw ns-vo* up : 









47X50 

32500 Arato 40200 


39730 

39830 

—470 10008 





39970 

—570 


41200 

36800 Ort to 40X50 

4(050 


39970 

—520 

1,162 

41X00 

37400 Jan 95 4)600 

40400 

40X00 

4S0.HI 

-570 

563 

41400 

39000 A|ta 95 «4J0 

40*30 

40420 

40120 

—570 


Est. sotas NA wests. Pries 

107* 










GOLD 

MCM» MnyiL.di 
ITXaa MB' 94 32*40 

Om mt 

37440 

tWOL 

3JLM 

38X00 



4IBJ0 

33570 Apr 94 30300 

38*40 

38270 

► ■ ll # 






[■ ’ V M 



41720 

33900 Jun 94 385.80 

38670 

38500 

[• !■!■ ■ ■ 


41X00 

34130 Aug 94 31900 

38900 

38730 

30770 

-200 

'206 1 

41700 

34*000094 390.90 

39100 

39070 

39070 

-2 00 


4650 

34300 DCC 94 39*00 

39400 

39100 

y, / 1 .1 J 


41100 

36150 Feb 95 






417M 




r ,! ¥ ’B 

—200 







—200 








634 


41*20 Oct 95 






42*00 

402J0DeC 95 41X00 

11200 

■1100 


-200 

ua 

EA scries 28000 Wed^. sofas 34002 


Wed'S Open Kri 14X628 up ail 






4685 4635 4650 


SOBS 

4723 

4405 


c m 
SSJSt 

AM 

47J7 


4662 

5463 


-0-47 123* 
-445 14954 
-445 X377 
—4*3 X7» 
— 453 1,799 
-4S 1J27 
—043 345 


5XS3 

5*45 

5X10 

5X85 

5450 


5600 

SXIS 

5X47 

5122 

5455 


5650 


—065 13/ 

— 4S2 6311 
-450 1910 
-043 541 

-445 54 

3 


Food 


COfFEEC INCSEI 5*?? ■•T*’ 


«US 
9450 
87 JO 

out 

91 JO 
87 40 
87 JO 
87.90 


iLXMorM Bin 
025 May 94 B2JS 
4690 Jill 94 Bfl 
46W5ep<4 B4J5 
77. 10 Dec 94 J630 
7490 Mar 93 87 JO 
SUDMpyVS 
B5J0 Juf 9J 


S1.U 

8025 

8030 

-OJO 

177 

8X65 

8135 

8X10 

-0,20 35.128 

8X95 

BUS 

8105 

-ass null 

8X00 

8370 

8*55 

—0J0 

4.4*6 

■*20 

8X10 

8X55 

-070 

100) 

8720 

■630 

6*35 

—005 

1,103 



87.15 

—AID 

IS* 



0*15 

—000 

3 


W«';aaentfs 56034 uo 1774 


Financial 


UST.MULS (CMER1 linwon-ikymra. 


1*76 

96.02 Jun 94 

9*11 

9*14 

9*18 



1*48 

7X65 Sap 94 

9X73 

9X80 

9X73 




>*10 

9X31 Dec 94 




9X44 


2008 


McrfS 




9117 

«aas 


EscnSes X942 wed6M«K *J54 
wsdYaaanlnl 4+74* up SN 
SYR. TREASURY (fflOTl ligutOim-ntMiaiBKi 
11MSS1D+07 Mo- 94108-24 108-305 IDS- 1» 10+308- 035 27J04 

II3-0AD7-I45 Am 94 108-01 IMS 107-365 107-28*- OS U6383 

110- 195106-27 Sep 94 107-036- 015 OS 

Eli. iotas NA Wars, scries 47-790 

Wed’s opan int 2060 31 off 1113 

19 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) siaunerm-eNKiaitoBiiaiBa 

116-09 108-00 MarWllfMM 11+11 10+25 109-21— « 34741 

11+21 100-00 Jun 94 109471 109-08 10+71 10+23— 05 25*2*4 

I1+OI 107-08 Sec 94 10+10 10+10 107-28 107-28 — 07 X739 

IK-31 10+30 DOC 94 107-05— to 74 

111- 07 10+09 Mar 95 186-11— 09 3 

Est. series NA Wed's, sales 96204 

Wcd’sooonlnt 287.817 off 4071 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) nua-lKUM l Me, itoecn 
120-31 <M0 Mar 94111 Ht2 111-09 11+19 11+22 — 09 36854 

11+29 91-06 JUn 94 109-91 110-08 10+18 10+23— 07 376419 

11+26 9+12 SOP 94 109-01 M+10 10+31 N+25 — 07 39,965 

118-08 91-19 Dec 9410+lt NB-23 I 0 B- 0 D 108 - 06 — 07 
11+20 103-01 Mer 951 07-20 107-2* 107-15 107-15 — 07 

11+19 f+15 Jun 95 IBS-25— 07 

11+15 1B4-29 Sep 93 106-03— 07 

11+14 104-0) Dec 95 10+19— IP 

NA Wed’s. sate 48049 
WetrsaoenM 477 JM off 19 

MMOPBL BONDS (CBOT) siOOtotatowais&iMtirilsaea 
10+22 9+09 Mgr 94 9+29 97-09 9+H 9+34 - 06 BJK 

104-07 94-09 JW194 96-03 9+15 9+33 9+2* — 07 21237 

9+01 9+1* Sop 94 9+17 9+17 9+38 to- 38 - 03 49 

E£sam na wed's. sales 9jBi 
W od’s ope n Int >*0» on 438 

EURODOLLARS (CM*fRJ u nra e n WieMOOett _ 

9S«a 94400 Junto 94720 95J40 94680 9SJ00 -10497JM 


Season Season 
HOT Law 


Open Hgh Low Close Om OpJn 


I C5M.-S 


9S.180 90710 Dec 94 96910 96940 96860 96880 -202&5J7J 

95J80 94240 Mir 95 96870 96710 96630 9440 — 20249J49 

9*730 90710 Jun 95 96390 9*440 96360 96270 -2017UW 

96520 91J10Sep95 96160 96200 96)20 96140 — 2015X099 

96M0 91.1MD9C95 91890 91930 93J60 91*70 -30122JB4 

96220 94750 NOT 96 9M20 93J60 93790 91800 -30106410 

Estsotas 390A44 Wed's, sales 396-527 
WecfsrawiOT 7-479.1 tj up 3736 
BRITISH POUND (GME3Q Seeraeanl- 1 nomteauata <08081 
1-5150 lA474Junto IM10 1.494* JJJ870 14882 -30 25,179 

1 AMO 1 -4440 Sep M 1-4870 1-6920 1-4830 IM50 -31 588 

L4950 1 -4500 Dec 94 1-4830 -38 3* 

Esf. Uriel 14125 Wad's, stoes T3JI2 
Wed’S open k* 75,797 Off 19478 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBU seer (fir- 1 seeriewAtotOODOl 
4871 1 07338 7-tar 94 07268 —20 IS 

07805 07318 Jun 94 0J3a 07335 47296 07799 -28 43727 

07740 07313 Sep to 07315 07320 07290 47209 -21 925’ 

07670 07306 Dec to 07300 47300 47289 07279 —to 604. 

07522 QJ292Jun95 47256 —38 H. 

Est. soles 1876 Wed's, sotto 2,171 
Wed's open W 4*929 ott 11467 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) Spermork-lpoMewOTtUn 
1 94 0.5995 0J933 45BBI 0J893 


-2 87,112 
-2 2756 
—2 131 


06133 45607 JIM 94 

46065 45600 5ep 94 45083 4914 45868 OJE76 

45910 OJSWDecto UNO 45895 45060 45869 

Efl-mles 51.945 Wed's. series 4*213 
WacTsopen ire 90J6J off 49S9T 

JAPANE SE YOT (CMBU irerw-i roMnuant* 

JUlWMBMMTLkJnW OJ»M710iM950BOJI0946ai 009482 +16 47J90 

(U«99000MB»42SeP 96 OM95500J095m0095290JI09S32 
OMtOlOOJOWaDec 94 M096inUI(»60KUn95900J()95B6 
Est. sofas 13790 Wed's, soles 1*571 
WetfsopenW 49735 off 45X3 
SWKFRAtK (CMStl spcrbmc- ipomeoMritiaJU 
S-ZS? 48977 47005 46938 0.61930 

ajfm 017,115 0l4 *» ILra 
07105 04950 Dec to 46974 

ESI. scries 21718 Wed's, soles 19 AM 
Wed's open irt 33J39 off 20284 


1 16 1,647 
*11 40) 


—36 3X745 
— 25 257 

-74 37 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 (NCTN) Rnta-aninrk 
79 JO 57-47 May to 7475 77.10 7*11 

1415 5430 Jul 94 7768 77M 7490 

This 59.5100 to 75J0 7SJ5 7*65 

74M SSSotm nS nj nS 

^ ^5S?s W7WS 7405 7 “° 

Est. soles 7-500 Wed’s, sofas 6-416 
Wed-3 open W SX910 up 200 
HEATING 04 . (NMER) enw-amnr 

42MAPTW 4470 

41 jn May to 4375 
41 JOJlVlW 43-40 

4Z55Juf 94 4*10 

*375 Aug to 4*75 

4*60 Sec to 4500 

*57000 to 46M 

4470 Nov 94 4BJD 

<7.55 DOC 94 49-60 

4375 Jan 9 5 5000 

445DFeb9S SOLDO 

47.95 Mar 95 4480 

■005 Apr 95 4370 

47 JO May 95 47J0 
4770 Jun VS 47.40 

47.85 Jul 95 4400 

«80Aue95 
4900 Sep 95 


7*11 

7*17 

—076 22056 

7*90 

7635 

—073 13799 

7405 

7*70 

-035 2245 

7205 

7220 

-026 11293 

7308 

7321 

—036 

591 

7*00 

7377 

-OT* 

187 


7429 

-033 

39 


5875 
57 JO 
5400 
57 JO 


57.17 

5770 


at. mi 

4*10 

4424 

—023 36264 

43.90 

43J0 

4111 

—043 50068 

«*05 

4320 

4322 

— 0JS 3*366 

4440 

4300 

4173 

-003 2X384 

45J0 

4*65 

4407 

-003 

9039 

4£80 

4575 

4X07 

—003 

8017 

47 JB 

4*80 

4*57 

— 003 

5041 

4BJ0 

4700 

4707 

—0.0 

4058 

4900 

4*90 

.4*52 

—003 10041 

aim 

4900 

4907 

—003 

X774 

5000 

4905 

4907 

—043 

9, SO 

4925 

4800 

4*27 

—003 

989 

*870 

4820 

4707 

-043 

698 

4700 

4700 

47.07 

—0.0 

464 

4700 

4700 

4607 

—043 

456 

AOS 

4*00 

4727 

—003 

587 



4*07 

-043 

92 



49.13 

—048 

18 

35,123 




13.96 Apr 94 15J8 15.14 MJ0 

U12Mav94 1106 15.15 1478 

1476 Jun 94 15.11 1119 1*83 

t *44 Jul 94 1110 1577 1*93 

**5Auato l!Jt I5J9 1570 

13X3 1s3 

1*9900 94 1JJ0 I5J5 ]&-« 
'iljttovto 1162 1505 liS 

J^Dec« 15-77 ISM 1560 
1567 Jon 95 

'S+JFeb’S 16M 16M 1*00 

1575 Mar 95 1*11 1*19 1*09 

1506 Aar 95 (675 1*25 1670 

1*03 MOV 95 1*37 1677 1*31 

1662 1604 iffi 

1673 

,*w ,770 ltf9 


1*82 

1481 

I4J8 

14.98 

15M 

15.18 

1530 

1562 

1553 

1566 

1579 

1590 

1601 

1*12 

14M 

1*34 

1*44 

1*54 

1*81 

17J4 


rbbt 

—074 57390 
—424 9X276 
-424 72615- 
-005 32039 
—436 M044 
—428 18714 
— 079 1X505 ‘ 
—079 9.560 . 
-OJO 20J09 
-431 *241 
—432 8-049 ’ 
—031 7029 
— OJ4 3756. 
-434 3787 

—074 16711 
-074 1,969* 


-436 5724. 
—071 12717 
—434 


7*791 

1.1C 


9L57D 94360 Seeto 9SJ20 95750 95780 9SJ00 -1037X80 


wetriocenm <30477 ua nk 
WXEASBMSOUWWM^, - 

4370 Apr M 4*60 4*85 

**20 May 94 4705 47M <*J0 

^AMOTto 4770 47.66 46M 

tt^0ri94 4770 4765 toJO 

JfJSAWto 47-10 47.10 4*40 
JilS^to 4600 4*70 6*20 

^ _ 4375 Nov 94 

CPen lee 1 30060 up 1891 


6X50 
161701 
61 JO 
6050 
«BM 
5*00 
4*15 


4X86 

4X99 

—45* 2*H9 ‘ 


4*30 

4628 

-0*14*144- 


4600 

4*66 

-059 2X406, 


4*90 

4*61 

-OS4 *311 

.to 

4*60 

4629 

-054 7006 


46JQ 

4604 

—OS4 4236- 



Stock Indexes 

S4P COMP. INDEX (CMER] sm.m. 

484M SbmaSTw* S® ta3D 470J0 *165 67024. 

yro t rf ope n Int 2Q«4C up 4997 

I giflFlfF- 

Wetfiapailnt 6074 up ug 


II. 


Moodrs 

Reuters 

DJ. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 


1711.10 

lasojo 

144J5 

22122 


Prevfcnti 
1709JC - 
I^ZOD- 
14X57* 
139X1- 




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since the 

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t TjsihV 
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tore. ■ rom 

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~ '••*A rrviij;, 
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“-".L* '.’."rpKs 
of K-.ap^s 
“-ir.e 'e-ide:; 
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•.• y 


Page 13 


EUROPE 


,^c * 

*?<fii! 

Sic? 

5:<^ 

r ,n Kj 


BASF Revenue 
Picks Up in 
First 2 Months 

/toaoj 

LUDWIGSHAreN, Germany 
t-JJASF AG, one of Germany's 

three hi? cnniufutc t « 




“ — --a - — « wb wuuipaujes, said 

Thursday that sales had risenrn ihe 

first two months of 1994 and ihai 
die wmst of a downswing which has 
slashed profit since the start of the 
decade was now over. 

“From today’s perspective, the 
positive trend will continue in the 


CostCutsPare 
Lufthansa’s Loss 

Conpikd by Our Stiff From Dupaicha 

FRANKFURT — The parent 
company of Lufthansa AG said 
Thursday it sharply reduced its net 
loss last year to 1 10 million Deut- 
sche marks ($64.8 million] from 
373 million DM the year bdfore. 

The airline added ihm operating 
losses were lower last year than 
expected, hut it gave no figures. 
Sales were flat at 15 billion DM. 
Luft h ansa said the number of pas- 
sengers was up 3.8 percent and 
freight volume had risen 5.4 per- 
cent, but that the company's reve- 
nue had been dampened by pres- 
jHme on price levels. 

Lufthansa said 1993 results were 
boosted mainly by extensive cost- 
cutting measures, which shaved 
about 3 percent, or 500 million 
DM, from overall operating ex- 
penses. (AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


coming months,” said Jhrgen 
Strobe, chairman of BASF. 

Hre company said that higher 
net profit was possible in 1994 de- 
spite an expected sharp rise in com- 
pany tax payments. 

. Drapite weaker underlying prof- 
itability, BASF surprised analysts 
last week by reporting a rise of 
nearly 40 percent in profit, to 858 
million DM, for 1993. 

Mr. Strobe said that sales in the 
first two months had totaled 6.7 
billion Deutsche marks ($3.95 bil- 
lion) and that this was “slightly 
above" levels for the same period a 
year ago. 

“Among most sectore of German 
industry, there is ag ffm a general 
feeling of cautious optimism," he 
said. Hie chemicals industry has 
suffered from overcapacity and 
falling demand for basic che micals 
such as plastics and fibers for the 
last few years. 

BASF said its key plastics and 
fibers division was stul posting a 
loss in January and February, but 
that the sector should be breaking 
even by the end of the year. 

BASF said it expected only a 
slight economic recovery in Ger- 
many this year and in most other 
West European countries. The up- 
trend would continue in Noth 
America and South and East Asia, 
while Japanese growth would be 
weak.it said. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters ) 


Butt Says 5 Companies 
Discussing Partnerships 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupauhes 

PARIS — The chai rman of 
Groupe Bull said Thursday that 
the troubled state-controlled 
computer maker was discussing 
partnerships with at least five 
companies from France, else- 
where in Europe and the United 
States. 

Jean-Marie Descarpen tries 
would not name the companies 
involved in the negotiations, but 
said Bull was more interested in. 
companies offering knowledge 
of the industry than in compa- 
nies with deep podots. 


The French government said 
last week it would try to priva- 
tize the ailing computer maker, 
which posted losses totaling 
20.15 billion French francs ($4 
billion) in the past five years. 
The company told employees it 
might cal 1^00 to 2 , 000 jobs by 
next year, mostly outside 
France. 

Mr. Descarpentries predicted 
the company would break even 
in 1995 with “no problem," re- 
gardless of whether its loss wid- 
ened this year. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 


A Shift to Green at Geneva Car Show 


By Sarah Veal 

Special 10 the Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — If glamour, speed and tech- 
nological flair remain the sefling points at the 
Geneva Automobile Show, a new message 
has also zoomed to the fore: Green is good, 
especially if auto manufacturers are thinking 
about their own health. 

This is not because this fair had a particu- 
larly environmental orientation — the side- 
show of electric cars is in its third year with 18 
companies represented, about the same num- 
ber as before. Rather, public concerns about 
global wanning, the ozone layer and the 
health hazards of dirty air are quietly dung- 
ing the rules of the market. Switzerland, 
winch voted last month to require trans- 
Alpine trucks be transported by rail, was an 
appropriate backdrop to the fair, which be- 
gan May 10 and runs until Sunday. 

The adoption of California's stringent air- 
quality standards by the District of Columbia 
and 12 Eastern states suddenly makes toy- 
like electric cars lode serious. These regula- 
tions win require 2 percent of new cars sold in 
1998 to be exhaust pollution-free, rising to 10 
percent by 2003. 

Additionally, the U.S. government pro- 
posed last autumn to provide military re- 
search to Chrysler Corp n Ford Motor Co. 
and General Motors Corp. in exchange for 
the Kg Three automakers producing cars 
with high fuel economy. It is likely that these 
vehicles will be electric. 

European companies such as PSA Peugeot 
Gtrofin SA and Renault, meanwhile, are al- 
ready producing workable models. In Febru- 
ary, Daimler Benz AG’s Mercedes-Benz unit 
and SMH Sod 6 t£ Suisse de Micro&ectroiu- 
que & d'Hodogerie SA announced an agree- 
ment to co-produce an electric car known as 
the Swatchmobile. Japan has also made a 
commitment to electric vehicles, promising 
200,000 on the roads by the year 2000 . 

Potential in the developing world is best 
exemplified by China, whose vast market, 
growmg economic might and polluted cities 
make it a prime target. The Chinese, however, 
seek to develop their own electric cars. At the 


Swiss show, a delegation from the Norenco 
industrial complex met with electric-carmak- 
ers and distributor!, such as Ligier of France, 
Eco-Drive and Horlacher of Switzerland and 
Solon of Sweden. 

“The Chinese delegation came 10 see what 
electric-car manufacturers are now offering," 
said Henri Payot, president of the European 
association of da trie-automobile manufac- 

Public concerns about 
global warming, the ozone 
layer and the health 
hazards of dirty air are 
quietly changing the 
rules of the market. 

Hirers. “Their plan is to buy a special chassis 
from Japan and build on it with European 
technology and electronics." 

Electric cars' relatively slow speeds of 70 to 
100 kilometers (43 to 62 miles an hour) may 
have little bearing on their suitability for 
urban transport, a key market But their lim- 
ited kilometers- to- the- batLery (60-100 kilo- 
meters) and long recharging times remain 
discouraging. 

“It is hard for small companies to support 
maintenance," said Mr. PayoL “You cannot 
afford to service one car in Geneva, one in 
TjnMniM and a third in Paris. The business 
doesn't work that way." 

But manufacturers are eager to produce 
solutions. Scholl Sun Power, the Swiss distrib- 
ute: of the French cofupany Ligier, announced 
it would lease rather than sdl batteries with its 
cars. “Problems in the past with batteries that 
didn’t live up to expectations are over. The 
new leasing program allows owners to calcu- 
late use accurately," said Pierre ScfaolL 
While the Geneva Automobile Show spot- 
lights the future potential of dectric can, an 
exhibit by Compagme Ladustrieflc & Cammer- 
icale du Gaz of Switzerland offers a different 
and more immediate option: natural gas. The 


exhibit itsdf was easy to overtook. In a sea of 
futuristic shapes and glossy finishes, its con- 
verted 1.41 Renault looks decidedly sober, like 
a' World War Q jeqp at a sports car race. 

But the car works and it is cheap. For under 
53,000, the Swiss company’s kit converts a car 
to run either on natural gas or to alternate gas 
and standards gasoline. While not zero-emis- 
sion, the converted car makes sizable cuts. 
Tests carried out by Compagme Indns tri d le 
under the eye of the Swiss authorities show 
that (be natural-gas car produces 20 percent 
less carbon dioxide than conventional cars, 85 
percent less carbon monoxide, 93 percent less 
non methane hydrocarbons and 97 percent less 
of the volatile organic compounds responsible 
for ozone depletion. 

The Swiss authorities approved the technol- 

the 


lew Zealand engineer who has been in charge 
of the project for the past three years. 

“The Gist year, we studied all available 
co n version Ida on the market. None of them 
were very good so we spent the second year 
working with a Dutch company to develop 
and improve a kit and the tiurd year working 
with a German catalyst manufacturer. The 
Swiss paperwork alone look two years and if 
the company wants to distribute to the EC, 
we will nave to stare the whole process over to 
enter that market,” he said. 

Mr. Bates drives a convened car. “When Tm 
in town, I flip a switch to use the natural gas 
tank and if I am on the highway, I switch back 
to gasoline. While maximnm speed is less fhan 
that of the unconverted car, its autonomy 
range is impressive. For gasoline use, it is (bat 
of the normal car, while ibe natural gas mnif 
can reach 200 kflanetas. When the two sys- 
tems are combined, the converted car can go 
800 kxLometexs without refueling.” 

Compagnic Indnstridle wants to sec natural 
gas pomps at service stations in the same way 
unleaded gas pumps are common throughout 
the United States and Europe. The company is 
trying to interest Swiss retail outlets keen on a 
“green image” to invest in the pumps. But fa 
now, small compressors plugged ' 
lines refud the cats overmgfaL 


1 . .. '..iv .... 1 1 


Investor’s Europe 



Sources: Reuters, AFP 


lmtmalional HenddTntnne 


Very briefly: 


• Hoogove&s NV, the Dutch sted compay, said its loss for 1993 narrowed 
to 234 milli on guilders ($123.2 million) from 595 milli on guilders in 1992. 

• Germany’s union of bank employees said it had agreed on an accord 
giving 340,000 workers a 2 percent pay rise beginning on April I. 

• Royal Ahold NV said that profit totaled 343.1 millio n guilders in 1993, 
up 13 percent from 1992, as sales were boosted by its ILS. units. 

■ Spain levied fines of 1.8 billion pesetas ($13 million) against the 
bankrupt Sp anish holding company of the Kuwait Investment Office for 
violating securities laws. 

controlled by South African interests and 
fell 15 percent, to $127 million 


• Minorco SA, a comp 
based in Luxem” 
on lower metals prices. 

• Rockwell International G 
agreed to form a venture to 


and Deutsche Aerospace AG said they 
/dop satellite-based navigation. 

Roam, Bloomberg, Krught-Riddor. AFX dP 


$600 Million Fraud Traps Czech Bank and Church Group 


Bloomberg Btainas News 

PRAGUE — A Czech bank’s 
plan to raise hundreds of millions 
of dollars is unraveling amid claims 
by the bank it was defrauded, in a 
scheme that also ensnared one of 
the largest religious organizations 
in the United States. 

The U.S. Securities and Ex- 
change C ommissi on has said that 
about $600 million of “possibly 
fraudulent" securities was issued in 
the name of Banka Bohemia, based 
in Prague. Tire notes, which pur- 
port to be debt instruments, are 
being traded in the United States 
and Europe. 

The SBC warned that investors 


who buy the securities, known as 
“p rime bank guarantees,” are un- 
likely ever to see their money again. 

Those who have bought th em in- 
clude the National Council of the 
Churches of Christ in the U.SA, 
an ecumenical body that represents 
32 Christian churches with 48 mil- 
lion members. 

Emilio Carrillio, the head of hu- 
man resources for the council, said 
an outride investment manager for 
the church had bought $12 minion 
of the notes with money from the 
coxmriTs health-insurance premi- 
um fund. 

“This is a major scam,” said 
John Shockey, a financial-fraud 


specialist who works for the U.S. 
comptroller of the Currency, a 
bank supervisor. 

Mr. Shockey, the SEC and other 
investigators say prime hank guar- 
antees are used in a complex form 
of financial fraud that is spreading 
throughout the world. 

Known as “rollover" schemes, 
they work best when unscrupulous 
middlemen bring together people 
who are eager to borrow money but 
lack knowledge of Western capital 
markets and unsophisticated lend- 
ers. Typically, the middleman 
promises to purchase securities on 
behalf of an investor and to quickly 
resell them for a profit- But the 


profits never materialize, and the 
middlemen disappear. 

After hearing a sales pitch filled 
with arcane hanking terminology 
and assurances that the securities 
are off-balance-sheet hems that are 
actively traded in a secret inter- 
bank market, people and even in- 
stitutions typically invest in the be- 
lief they mil receive returns of as 
much as 200 percent ayear, accord- 
ing to the International Chamber 
of Commerce’s C ommer cial Crime 
Bureau. 

The securities are often called 
“prime bank guarantees," “prime 
European bank letters of credit” or 
“prime World Bank debentures,” 


j to an advisory published 
last year by an American mteragen- 
cy enforcement group trying to 
warn investors about the schemes. 

The Czech bank whose name was 
used in the current case, B anka 
Bohemia, was founded in 1991 and 
now has 20 branch banks through- 
out the Czech Republic. 

Its troubles began when it decid- 
ed to try to step up its growth and 
increase its loans to small Czech 
companies by tapping into^ Western 
financial markets. 

Its chairman, Amost Klesla, says 
Banka Bohemia got the idea to is- 
sue prime bank guarantees last year 
from a group of foreign partners 


who promised to use the notes to 
obtain foreign currency for the 
company. The bank issued $13.2 
million of the notes, which it in- 
tended to redeem at maturity. 

The project quickly got out of 
hand when some of tire partners, 
who were not identified, allegedly 
began trading photocopies or forg- 
eries of the notes and American 
and European h anks began asking 
questions about the issue. 


To subscribe In Switzerland 
N call, foil froo, 
15S5757 


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NYSE 

■nwrodoy’o dooflns 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wai Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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AUTOS: German Giants Hit Skids LVMH: Profit Rebounded in 9 93 


CoftiBued finau Page 11 

factory at Pamplona in Spain for 
12 billion DM m a move to inject 
cash into its troubled Spanish sub- 
sidiary SEAT SA. 

“Tins measure, which will lead to 
a considerable im provement in b- 
qindity position at SEAT, confirms 
Volkswagen’s co mmi t m ent to its 
Spanish subsidiary in view of its 
comprehensive restructuring," VW 
said. 

Volkswagen had predicted it 
would make a 1 993 loss of about 23 
bQ&aQ DM, almost entirely due to 
losses at SEAT. VW have said they 
were not adequately informed of tire 
Spanish company’s problans. 

Daimler-Benz, in releasing its 
preliminary figures for 1993, also 
said that exact figures would not be 
released before April 12 but gave 
few further details. 


In addition to publishing profit 
figures, BMW also announced an 
offering of new shares to current 
shareholders at a ratio of one new 
share for 1 1 shares held. The new 
shares will be priced at 500 DM per 
common share and 365 DM per 
preferred share. 

The rights issue is not related to 
BMW’s acquisition of Rover 
Group PLC of Great Britain, how- 
ever. “We don’t need the money for 
the Rover purchase," said Mr. 
Hussmaim. “Capital market condi- 
tions were so favorable and our 
share performance so good, we just 
wanted to seize the opportunity.” 

As previously announced BMW 
sales m 1993 totaled 28.9 billion 
DM, down from 31 2 billion DM in 
the previous year. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP, AFX) 


Continued from P&ge 11 
demand for luxury goods for the 
rest of the decade. 

“The fundamental need for luxu- 
ry products is the same as it was in 
the *803," Mr. Arnault said “It’s 
just that three years of recession 
have put an end to consumption of 
•show-off products. The consumer 
is stiD ready and willing to buy 
quality, but now he will ask for real 
value, not just a name.” 

“I think and hope that since mid- 
1993 we are emerging from (be re- 
cession in a significant way," Ik 
said “If the economic trend con- 
tinues, we think we can obtain an 
increase in net earnings, outside of 
exceptional items, of 20 percent." 

Pulling the locomotive, he said 

would be the American market, 

where LVMH sales should rise by 
as much as 20 percent tins year and 


10 percent to 15 percent in each of 
the next few years. 

The company's Christian Dior 
perfume, cosmetics and skin-care 

{jS^mrket lasfyear. with sales 
jumping 32 percent 

Overall sales of beauty products 
rose 16 percent to 5.83 bflhon 
francs, and operating earnings in 
the sector increased 5 percent to 
852 million bancs. 

sales rose 4 percent 
francs, and operat- 
shpped I percent to 776 
francs. 

Cognac, hit hard by Jman’s eco- 
nomic crisis, experienced a 16 per- 
cent drop in operating profit, to 
1.91 billion francs, even though 
sales rose 5 percent to 5.85 bflhon 
francs. 


to 5.44 


FED: 

Calls for Rules 

Continued from Page 11 

steep losses during the recent Euro- 
pean bond market slide. 

Mr. McDonough, said Thursday 
that participants at the G-10 meet- 
ing “(fid not believe financial mar- 
kets were in a state of jeopardy, nor 
that additional combined central 
bank regulatory activity is neces- 
sary at this point.” He said howev- 
er, that he believed more public 
disclosure of derivative risk could 
work at the international level, with 
cooperation possible among major 
maricet participants in financial 
centers such as New York, Tokyo, 
London, Frankfurt and Zurich. He 
added that “banks involved in 
lending to hedge funds have to be 
extremely careful about the collat- 
eral that is backing them." 

Inte rnational cooperation on de- 
rivatives regulation has already be- 
gun between the United States and 
Britain. “We have very active con- 
versations going on between securi- 
ties regulators and central tanks," 
Mr. McDonough said, adding that 
the discussions included securities 
regulators on both sides of the At- 
lantic and the New York Fed and 
the Bank of England. 

Although he declined to comment 
on the path of U.S. inflation or 
short-term interest rates, Ml Mc- 
Donough said the Fed announced 
its quarter-point increase in rates an 
FA. 4 “because h was the first shift 
in monetary policy in five yeans that 
involved an increase in interest rates 
and was of such significance that it 
-was worth making a statement” 




STOP ! 

For rale, legal daim pwaltyFee) worth 
26000.000.00 USD 
DeMDr.NotBryPihte.lnr. 

Mristar/Diplomat. weriflty femBy, 
Chicago II. - resident 

Pt*_ coated ++4M1-41 1289fe&aM^*4 



Income after financial items increased 
by 6% to SKr 1,562m (1992: 1,477). 

Net income per share rose to 
SKr 23.75 (22.60). 

Proposed dividend increase from 
SKr 9.00 to SKr 10.00 per share. 

In addition a 5:1 split of shares is 

proposed. 

Continued improvement in earnings Is 
expected in 1994. 


The AGA Group's sales rose by 35% to SKr 
16,063m, and operating income increased by 

28% to SKr 1,648m, due to higher exchange 
rates and contributions from the cold storage 
companies acquired around year-end 1992 - 
French CEGF and German Bremerhavener 
Kuhlhauser. 

Gas Operations’ sales increased by 27% to 
SKr 1 1,385m, and operating income by 18% 
to SKr 1,373m (1,159). Although the continued 


recession in most European countries, and in 
Venezuela and Mexico, subdued growth, most 
gas companies reported satisfactory develop- 
ment, due among other things to extensive 
rationalization programs. Investments in new 
plant and equipment totaled SKr 1,346m 
(1417), which corresponded to 12% (17) of 
sales. New operations were started in Latvia, 
Lithuania, Poland and Kaliningrad. 

Frigoscumfia’5 sales amounted to SKr 4,688m, 
an increase of 1 8% excluding the contribution 
from the new companies. Operating income 
rose by SKr 145m to SKr 275m, an increase 
that came from the new companies. The Food 
Process Systems business area reported a return 
to satisfactory earnings, while Food Services 
noted a weaker income trend. 

The associate company GuRspftngs Kraft 
reports a 33% increase in income after finan- 
cial items to SKr 608m (457). AGA’s share of 
this income was SKr 206m (145). 

The Amual G ener a l Mee ti n g will be held on 
May 5. 


i 

f 

1993 Summary 

SKrmOm 

1993 

1992 

SKrni&on 

1993 

i 

1992 ! 

| 

Sales 

16,063 

i 1,870 

Liquid assets 

2,021 

2828 i 

i 

Operating Income 

1,648 

1,289 

Other current assets 

4,285 

3,624 j 

( 

NetfinandaJ hems 

-327 

-3 

Shares, etc. 

2,031 

2472 « 

i 

Share of income in 



Land, buildings, machinery, etc. 

14,454 

11.628 ; 

S 

GuHspftngs Kraft 

206 

145 

Total assets 

22,791 

20352 | 

i 

Income In other associate 



Loans 

6,400 

6.175 1 

| 

companies 

35 

46 

Other current liabilities 

4,056 

3.054 ) 

i 

Income after financial Items 

1,562 

1,477 

Other long-term liabilities, etc 

4,025 

3,745 \ 

f 

Net income 

1,136 

1.007 

Shareholders' equity 

8JI0 

7.578 j 

i 

Net income per share, SKr 



Investments in plant, etc 

1,663 

1.756 i 

i 

-after paid tax 

26.65 

26.40 

Return on shareholders' equity, % 14 J 

I4B 1 

t 

L 

-after lull tax 

23.75 

2260 

Dividend per share, SKr 

10.00 

9.00 j 


IS 


AGA is one of [he world’s largest gas companies with operations 
in 32 countries in Europe, the U.S. and Latin America. 
Frigoscandia is the world's leading company for rhe fretting, 
storage and transport of food. The associate company GulUpfrigs 
Kraft is one of the largest power producers in Sweden. 


AgA 

AGA Akxfebobg. S-I8J 81 Ud&igo. Sweden 


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ib 

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Page 14 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


USA - Miramar (Fort Landerdalei, Florida 

FOR SALE one storey ofiBce/distribotion 

bonding under construction 

FEDERAL EXPRESS CORPORATION 


Price. 

Tenant. 


Lease., lemi, 

Rent: 


S4.630.000 

Federal Express Corp . world leader in courier services, 
shareholders equity Si 7 billion 
10 years, two options of five years 
S4 16.980 pa YIELD 9% 

TRIPLE NET lall oasts and expenses paid by tenantl 
approx S2.900.000 at 7 875% available 
local property management, tax and legal advice by our 
specialists 

OTHER INTERESTING OFFERS IN OUR SALES PROGRAMME 
ofl Investments fa Tnttt Ltd. Orion Investments fa Maaarenreirt 
25, me de ChantepotfleL Ltd. Coro- One Dalian Center, 

121 > Geneva 1 , Switzerland 9100 Dadeiand Bind, Miami, Fla 3S156 

Tel.: + 41-22-7324805 TeL= + 1-305-6708400 

Fax: + 41-22-731-4491 Fax: + 1-305-6701505 


Financing 

Serv’ws, 


iop or r hi 


Luxury flats in very best location, 
connected with 5-Star-Hotel. 

■ 4 roams, 166 sq.m., living/dining 
roam, fireplace, 3 bedrooms, 
2 bathrooms, kitchen. 


■ 2 rooms, 82 sq.m., I wing/ dining 
roam, fireplace, I bedroom, 
1 bathroom, kitchen 
not furnished, long lets. 

Fasimile: +41 82-2 15 22 


SWISS REAL ESTATE) 


Looking for 
property in 
Switzerland? 


NEUCHATEL 

Two elegant buildings, luxury flats 
from 1 lo 4 bedrooms, terrace 
overlooking the lake and the town of 
Neuch&teL 

Prices range from Sfr.790 000- 

Ucmsed Swiss Reef EsiBig Broker 
CaB Pierre CLJungo at CUC 
SO. d* Mm maBa4HrpteiaOTM,5vtortnr 
Tab 41 21/701.5035 . Flue 41 21/701 JM7 


PORTUGAL 


PARTNER REQUIRED 


We are a well established company with no 
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Excellent investment opportunity 
For further information contact: 


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Av. Casal Ribeiro, 46- 60 
1 000 Lisboa, Portugal 
Tel: 351.1.352-6979 
Fax: 351.1.352-7473 


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+ ft» abatement Mostly Beach 
Front. 7 mOan. 


Tel NYC USA 
2) 888-7555 


p,2, L 

(2)2) 371 -9133 


CORSICA 


CAVALLO BLAND 


2000 


MI JCORSKAV 

tan dor of land an a wondarful 

no id between Caraao and Scrdra 

Core truction parobfe an ISO sqm 
Pnce FF^OOMFor further detab 
contact Frm Euro TradHH Tel: 39-11- 
5818168, Fmu 39-11-581 



INTERMEDIA 

ISOLEAGB4T 


Tel 33-93 50 66 84 
Fax 33-93 50 45 52 


MONTE CARLO 

New protect with stuck* to 5-roam 


csxxtmerti avriabfa Ponaraosc view, 

irobfe off 


dNUiUc athce MKMf, ottractMi price- 
Firther dotoik- MrsBodansen - xhH, 
9 ave (TOstende - MC 98000 Monoax 
Tel: (33) 92 16 90 00 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CHATEAU on 18 am lovely grounds. 

West Burgundy near Aunrre. Lane- 
stone manor of 40 rooms, 15 &*• 

pSaees. an^ta parquet, votfted 

eekav 2 modem besh* & kitchen. 
Property indudw 16th cenhvy 
bmnds home, targe eo u iucn 
Restart ooretid nsr. Only $375,0X1 

US. owner showing property urtf 

April & Call tar appointment, 33-86- 
29-1605. beqjnrcnq forth 20. 


raOVENCE 1797 Farmhouse, imagno- 
tortdy restored on 7 acres hurt & aCva 
trees. Magtiunl views from Atas to 
Median uuetn. FooL Itfony e 

room. 2 bedroom s- 2 batik Modern 

kitchen. Screened veranda IK houn 

Nice airport. F2, 500.000/ 
U5S450.000. Huntington, 83830 
Powers. France, TeL 1331 94 76 64 60 


NEAR SPANISH BORDER 
betw een sen trad snnunttwi 
Character estate 600 sqm. Iwirtg space 
an 4.400 sqm grounds with mumming 
pool MuncL yxanzL FF8 MILLION. 
Tab (33) 68 83 15 88 Fax 68 83 26 62 


BCCBnWNAL - COUfKTRYSHX 
ON PARTS DOORSTEP 
18 Km East Paris 

5 min wdk Boo ds Vincennes & KB 
1 5 min Orly & Rcsssy Airports by AB6 
Owner safe GROUP OF 51 HOOSB A 
2 GARDENS, yard + pcxkra. 

• MASTS HOUSE, rodohe a new. 
120 sqm. + converted ertftc ana 
basement. Profeaond use passible. 


• 1988 HOUSE bull by rt ernationefly 
(More HBJJt LOFT 


renowned crdvect 
STYLE, 210 sqm. 

Mr or Mrs Pruvat TeL honmjll 43 94 
.487757 <5. 

Fax: |1) 


21 60. Office: (11 4 

1 43 94 22 89. 


BEGANT SMALL 


18th cent. CHATEAU 

230 sqm. in PERFECT CONXTIOH 
60 Ians east of Pons. 

Lovely see, overfttaanq river Marne. 
+ 2 CHARMR4G FAVKIONS 
I at courtyard errtrunce. treed 
s' * told surface: 66 ha 


mterost. Justfied^hjgh jem 


1 33-1 1 45 ' 


RANGE A SWITZERLAND BORDER. 

Overlooking Geneva and die take 
Htuoled on a golf course of Boney. 
Lame randy home. 4 bedroom s . 3K 
baths, 202 sqm 3 garages. Below 
30% ™km Contort U3A. FAX: [305} 
285-9255- Owner. 


MOUaNEffi OLD HOUSE in vilage, 
3) mm Geneva airport, 20 irinrt« 


Bdleaorde TGV 34 t»dooms/2 baths 
3500 sqm 


rsqm.grouids.Teli 335042 2678 


FRENCH RIVIERA 


BAY Of CAhNB PROPKTY 

anered on behaF af our ciertii 


• MANDBJEU-MARMA 


Aemmeenli Comes Mama 
c bedrooms/ 


FFl^OOOOa 


tenooe an both sides. 


• MMIBI - BEACH FRONT 
Exttasne boa* front apartment 
an Marina Site. 


Far fafe at* (S3) 92 97 11 99 


CANNES OtOtSETTE 

Netr Caftan 


SPECIAL Qffg TO GRAB1 

St^ierb targe 4-5 room apartment, 187 
iqm, taciig seq3ari|txaae portaig 


Romantic *** HOTH 

ON FRENCH flfflHA 


8 com fmtuUa rooms with ____ 


r , FEAR ST TROFEZ 

as ,sita 


on 1/00 sqm lord, met. 

fPOOAJOO. 

L ARHEE AU 50L8L TeL 03) 75 28 1809 
‘ 1 75 28 16 69 


Fax.- [33] ! 


„ SAMTEMAXIME 
Exa^ond view on sea & golf course, 


prostigioBS bjd, 3W ^."tfced FniS 


400 sqm 
TdT41 


viKo up to 


Fern- 733.1449 


A IACOUE5UR LOUP 1061 

Owrw hIs verybeautihil old propnty, 

w^vfcge. *0 sqm, LUXlttSS S 


-Td 

i|331|. 


. Jurtified 
, J 32 55 82 
190 50 


CAM4E5, 3 BH3ROOM APARTMENT 

far sofa., 126 sqm, bq^ view, balcony 
Enqwnes 


far sofa 126 sqm, boy view, b 

Srgg^gflbrf' 


ITALY 


TUSCANY 


In defahtfU rud setting near Sena. 
Troi trend famdioun far sale. 
Auwentiady restored induing modern 


faefins, pmerang 4 large bedrooms. 
3 bathroom efc, private lanet 
out-buUngs aid bam. 

Td 0039 556 696Wor 0044 483 425722 


M TUSCAN HfLLTOWN near S. Grn- 
gnanq restored medevtd house 350 
sqm, eckdy ekvtsfale, scenic, garden 
grafneorb^ orrvate [0039 /S5i 
42/05291 Ur 550 000.000 or best otter 


OID RENOVATED COUNTRY HOUSE 

ISO sqm, gardmi, 3 bits from Lake 

fe ,, £*ss i aap L J5 

_hotrs or 39-2 669 2417#vjnim^^ 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 


In residen ce with private peef, 2-room 
U|AB bitffil, pme condtion, race view, 
porfang and ale. 


AAGEDI 

Tel 3392 1659 57 Fax 3393 50 1942 


PANTTEON-LUXEMBOURG 


19* contory buUng, duplex of charm, 
+ 2 buLaam, 


75 sqm, recephon . 

2 bathroom s , beonq teefface. FF2JM. 


A MUST TO VISIT 

TeL (1)45 67 80 91 


VI HE D’AVRAY, Was! subub. 7 Kim 

S neor tnteniirt« n d schools, in 

residence weh gtxden, high dtss 
180 sqm + terrace. Sumy tap floor. 


40 sqm, high ceing. 


fufy equipped kitchen, 3 
boms, locum. 


pom 2-ax parking & 

' '"w; 1-4709 6305 


F38 M. Owner Tel/Fax: 


1 6th - PI. DES ETAT5 UNIS 

4th floor, 390 sqm, high ceings, 
auWamSng 4 reaipban areas, 
bewtifd view. 4 bedrooms, 3 bate. 
Owner Tnfc (1145 01 96 99 
Fax (1)45 00 54 91 


SEBONG FORBGN AGB1T 

mterasted in the sab of 
MAGNB=KB4T ESTATE BORDERING 

FONTAINBLEAU FOREST 65 km from 

Paris. DocumerMian on request. 

IB. 19 roe Henry de GounTtonr, 
75019 Paris, Franc* 


SPAIN 


GRAN CANARIA 


Parted e&nae as year - th 
Far s de, furnished. Faring 


2 bedrooms, bahoam, Evmg roora^ 


kstthen, tenooe. Slurted n son . 
greenlowre 3 fwded swmxring pods, 
tennis coils Bar, rastouranr, 
supermarket, hanJiBSser. bot mq ues on 
Site. Perfect ter retie neat. Avoid*: 
manedbteiy- Tel UK +44 (0453 
751065 or Fax +44 (0453) 


CANARY BLANDS/ Las Mira Oty, 
luxury residence. Uptown, 1st dais 
txeq qrrrt ncula r view over town, 
port. Afkmc. Private entrance to 
1/72 sqm aatnk Lrvmg space 640 
sqm an 2 Boors. 278 sqm terraces 
A spacious, eleoait S'' 



am- 

etc. KSR Zed Es- 
■ Wands, TeL 34-28- 
Fa* 771458, POfi 4 94, 351 00 
, Gran Cam xia /Espano 


MALLORCA. VAq M hr from Pt*na 


300 sqm, 2 acra, pool, tangs roams 
2 garagei Good 


2 kxg ti 
awStwn, 


mourtaim. Cl 89, 


& 

1600 


FUBVOMOLA VUIA - 4 double bed- 
rooms, ovgfadrin g the sea U2JXR. 
Teh +345-25BJ976 


SWITZERLAND 




muni HESflRIS 


Sdtta 


11975 ■ 
CHALETS 


setacti _ 

ip MONTREUX, VfllARS, lETSIN. 

LB DIAKBgTS. GSTAAD , 
CRANS-MONTANA. VERHBL etc. 


From SI r. 2^0DCL-^MnrteoBet) 


5J MonfcrP i wt , 0+121 IJBneva 2 


1 4122-734 15 4a Fax 734 1220 


USA COMMERCIAL & 
INDUSTRIAL 


BH> A BREANRA5T FOR SALE 
NEW MEXICO, USA 
OUt SANTA R 
Seven luxury ndvidudi Santa Fe style 


Cbntni with U baths, private pabos, 
" kfetan 


cable TV, hieptaces, Four with 
units, in histone dwmttwm Scnta Fe. 


Just a 10 minute waft; from Plaza, 
for odtEriand Cashs included. 
USD cash. 


t» marines 
Cdl nr Fax Stove Satan 
(505) 9BB-1631 USA 


MARION, ILLINOIS, U.5.A. 

5-story btmk buickng with vault*. 
28000 spume feet. W3 semfee, 
512100000. Fax: (618) 9935656 or 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


BELGIUM 


URGE BEAUTIFUL GROUND floor 


space m efcad 200 yr twidnin. 1/ 
2hr Bn nsS/A 



BRUSSB5, PLACE S1EFHAN* 

dtsi apartment, 2 bedr o o m s. Kving, 

krtchen/dining, bathroom, shower 
room BF T9JM + charges 4500. 
Teh 02/539 1106 - Fax 02/539 08 02 


FRENCH RIVIERA 



FRENCH RJVBIA 

ST JEAN CAP FBKAT, CAPO- Afl. 
VRlSRANCHtSUR-ffil and 
BEAUUB35UM« 


For rent dtace of vias, 3 to 6 


bedroom s twertoo ki ng Ihe sea with 
on n>* sea 


swimming pool, some n^tfoni 


LUXURY VRiA 


OveHookng Lake Ltraaio 

5un Trap Loccton. A *yJy v4 
fl tx t u rone c new. htode svnmning pool 


Ax Candtioned. 3 receptor 'rooms, 
large Salon widi 5m » ta PkJure 
Wmdow, Study, 3 Bodroam, 3 Bdh- 
rooms, Indmendunt guest uumta m i 
Wefl estabisfied g txo si i w* grope 
vinos, fig trees, lawi, palm trees me. 

fok SaiFm flnrfaehpwi 

Can Buy. Teh UK +44 (045^751065. 


VUIARS 


balcony 10 sqm. garage, 
~.70 mrutei Geneva. 


19. Bid do Gerard tedere 
0u10 BEAUUE13SU3MB1 
Tel (33) 93 OHM 13 Fax (33) 93 01 1196 


(ZRMANY 


ternohed 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


IES HAILES - ST BU5TACHE 
torn wew DUPLEX IN FflGH CLASS 
JiM'IG (l98 3). Top Root*. 5 rooms 
+ rnezzonre, large renaoes. 

TeL Paris: (331)^02 14 77. 

Fax provinces: (330 33 24 50 79 


I6fa/NRIB1Y/ PORTE MAILLOT 
OtBag de Bouioqm. high doss buftfeg 

p ^!£M?Sii , sr 

Fax Province*: (33 33 24 50 19 


■l PALAIS ROYAL GARDENS 

T20 sqm. iT wondaU conition, 

kta of charm. 

& ABSJNG Tat fIJ 40 20 M 00 


, 1AT1N QUARTER - 178, century 
batoned buiUrn, dxxooer, 5/6 rooms 
^ WPKCABIE FF4J M. 

Tel: 1-43294318, office: 3443 3034 


;nua-iiv*v\L. nfcUSU.7. Very b 
M fittings. NEV® LJVH1 IN. JOO sqm 

Fax: HI47 05 59 02. 


11th. NEAR CANAL ST MARTIN. 3 

rooms, 55 sqm, 150m high ce&m, 

very cahn, on tape : treed ymd 17rti 

ffiowo0 - t * ^ 


BflSANT TOWN HOUSE, Nor. R. 
Gcnos & Boa de BtxJogne. About 
«t sqm mdutfag rod terrace. 

W. No agency tee. Tek 
everana* 0311 46 05 ~ ~ 


I71h - PEAR PORTE MAIUOT, 25 
sqm. stotfa. VBW BBGHT 3 CALM, 
beautiful renovation, ideal owd 
terrt RARE FF795M}. 

46 03 93 61 Fax 111 4 Haa-i W 


NYC/lmcah Carter 

2 BEDROOM CONDO/ 
VIEWS 

Sundrenched 1500 sq ft. dudex rondo 
with panortmic views, hjflreennce 


buUng, hedlh dub wrt^poo^r^e 


mini home steps from _ 

US. Please call Susan Dougherty 
at 212-780-2209 or (res) 71884S6I89. 


CORCORAN GROUP 


fifth Ave. PREWAR CONDO 7 Roams 
, UPlNTfCTROSI 
Spterfd 2^00 SqFL/228 Sq Meters 
Plus 700 Sqfi. of Terraces 3 Bedrooms, 
15 Marble Balhs, Fornxd Dump Room 
+ library. State of the 
Breafei* "due. Must bs 
colt 

212-752-7789 *72 


AMBROS&MARUA 


NYC/15 W_53Mu«mii Tower 3J5 Rooms 

, Perfect Corn. Apartment) 

1200 at ft me* 1 Bedroom, 1H marble 
ha+j.. Ftak view. A1 hold swioH. 
Fumstad or urtumahed. Most luxurious 
oundo r Now tort S67SK, Contnon 
Ctxxge* S750. 

frene Leeds Hartog 712-891-707 

DOUGLAS ELUMAN 


rcwyoiK 


,40 MM. - NYC 


Hm Waterfront 
Long bond, 4 ‘ 


S?*. ^ ■ Mmd « 4 bedroom, 

Wtafc pod, deep voter dock. 

Overlooks golf course and Yadt Oub. 
Golf, terms, yad* dub induded. 

let sit 




16fc. HOttfefOQL, owner aft 
(roestone Jmtfng, 230 iqm, tar 
bdaxiy. Nstane port (Marcel Prom 
■nartart tnro. Trt Wl45 00 71 B2. 


92, NEUUY - BOtS, 6 rooms. Free- 
stone buddmg, ceHor, mod’s room 
F7 JOO, COO. Teb |1) 


V HK Af HFS , near chateau, owner rents 

or sets 2-roam 

residence 


OWNBL . M 

ttntKB + 

2»ioidi'rooms.F17: 


room opattnmni m serviced 

Tek 44 5l 53 76 Prownorol 


Victor Hugo, 3 roentj. 


PORTUGAL 


R ICH AN D FAMOUS STYLE + 
bcxravn apartmem. fa- 

med with eteganoe and darn Sea S 
bay view Condele seeunty. Cm Do 
Esronl. Ponugii Pnas USS700JXXL 

Fox Frgiii von Lreven - 351.1.4869131 


RUSSIAN REPIBL1C 


MOSCOW ONTBL quel reridenfid 
area ut renovated. 6rh Floor, 66 
sqm. 1 drpwmg roam. 1 bedroo m. 
wp furmdwf, refirwl decor o- 

4937. 


ON CAPE COO, QS1BVR1E. Dis- 


_ house, 4 

rooms, .« > :xicJ 3-car 

ratal aprat umn , private 


4 bath- 


land- 


Sound, terns courts & 


Fit,'* 


Nwtoctat 

courses 


pEB’ciK 8 " 35481 1KT * 




WWflNGTON D.C 1.118 Housra 

k* j*** l« hST 

*! ni«an. Abo ljOIS flats for sde. Al 
pnas. Cot fax deft* of needs far 
you- home or flat We w* seanh d 

nvMftasftfli 

1835 KSt. NW. WraK PC 


FRANKFURT 

faxsry serviced ro 

exduneiy desyied.l 

dara to wpart and cily 
IfxHie/ldx/arewierng m odx n t 
40 sqm. apartment, DM 60 per day 
70 sqm. opmtmert, DM 110 par day 
Porthoura, DM154 per day 
oantrad tuns from Ita 6 mom 
free of conmestxxi 
■mUKJLOBE IMMOBIM 
Learmsir. 4, 61350 Bad Hamburg 
fU +-W4172-86051 

Fax +49-617786136 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGM N PARIS 
Tel: (1] 47.20.30.05 


74 CHAMPS BY5EES 


CLABIDOE 

FOR 1 WBt OR MORE high doss 


stixia, 2 or Iroom apartments." FULLY 
EQUATED, IMMEDIATEI kESHVl 


RESHVATTOhe 

Tab (1) 44 13 33 33 


NEXT TO RUE K5 MARTYRS 


65 sqm, lovely fireplace, parquet 
floor, overlooking roofs or Para, 
doming 2 bedrooms. F8.5t'5 net, 


and 

iTIONAL I 


I. Tel: VENDOR 

) 47 17 09 09. 


MARAIS, view on fflatfan, sunny, 
quiet. 85 sqm Douae kving room, 
bedroom, larqe btdien. For 7-9 mu. 
FI 1.500 induding garage. Tef: 
1-0 TO 61 35 or tea 142 7T*5 20. 


Stfv BEAUTIHJL 2 bedrooms. 150 nun. 

room, wrap-nound Eta- 
redone, very quet & 
rot. TeL VB4DOME 
0147 17 09 09. 


6A - ASSAS - RENNES - HAT, 
35 sqm, 6th Hoar, Eft, 1 kving room 
with high oeSng and moraine, 2 


be dro oms. TeL today (office) "(1) 
64 94 59 99. Ve rt u rturaay morning 


PARS 10th, BEAUtmiL 4 ROOMS. 
120 sqm, ’bourgeois”, das, 3rd 
floor, elevator, portraete. Excelent 
oration. FI 2,96o net Td 1-42404141 
extensor 12 or 1-4586 9388. 


BOULOGNE 3 roam apartment, fur- 
nished and faty rajipped. Tek 41-22- 
3612273 or 32-3^089 [nonoffice 
houril. faxT4V2Mfiagn 


17th METRO PLACE DE CUCHY, far 
rerrt smdl My fijrnehsd 2-roam flat 


faxhdde far btxMor), 5th Hoar wMi 
R gOO/month, Teh fll 45 67 10 07. 


BOULOGIC, 3-room qportmenfa. high 
"1*4067 HOUsr - 


das furniture. FB, 

roorm FI 0,100. Owner tel 1-4825 




TTOCADBJO 85 1 

1 bed. cbublg I 

net. TeL- 1-4256 1 


^'rt 

. Fax 1-4256 1 


tt£ SAHT LOUS, Luxury large itodb, 

furnched. Maid. Free inweifi- 
lM Owner fll 46 34 19 25- 


BU) OJCHY, mix Montmrxtre, studio, 
25 sqm, 5fli floor. Bft, sunny. 

FiaP ne t Tef; Ow ner 1-45 to 21 


PARISIAN CHARM Amerieon standards. 

Fwrishod rarttfa 3 months to 1 yece. 
Best Nh> Td/fisx 142 SO 96 22 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


HEART Of 7Hi 

Very rare, Townhouse. 

. Priweged etmromwul 
Living room + 3 bodroona. 

dxxii^y"X^^L 

Tataphena: (1) 45 55 46 63 
W Fax: (1) 45 56 02 79 


Direct from the owner - 
No farts A gents faro payable: 

Bcdushre teuttafoi and office spaa n 
fir* date ba*ons throoghax 

Wert Brain 

mdhtie far leasing; earitat 
nrtitadurq top quc«y finahmgs. 
Fine forward any enquiries to: 
SBHON GrunddbdsgeseCxhaft mfaH, 
Srakrv Tefc ffiO/79210 94. 

ra* 030/7921090 
Mm Wigrove, Mr. Rinat 


MUNICH 

For 1 week or more ■ c o mfa r tdde 



Tek +49-89-620 394) Fax 620 39-614 


(SEAT BRITAIN 


LONDON-XNKSH15BRIDGE Fabulous 

& elegant private apartment, 140 
2 boms, termed dody, next to 
gN. 44 71 


rrods From tflO/night. 44 71 581 0816 


KMGHT5BRIX1E £59/dqy luxury flats 

next Harrods, £33/day in Ken smu to n . 
Tet71 835-1611 Fax 71 3730136 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


FLATOTEL 

mm TOWER OR 
EXPO PORTE DEVBBAaiE5 
Fran rtudkM to Five-room de knn. 


Dad^we^ or monMy. 


Cat 05J45J45 TeB Free 
or [33-1 ) 45 75 62 20 


PARIS LA DBB45E I 


KESDENCE CARTEL 

Spacious 2 cr 3room apartments 
to rent far 3 days or mare. 

C -, Immesfiate Reservations 

Stri Tefc (33-1 1 41 25 16 16 
Tar (33-1) 41 25 1* IS 


ANDREW SPHIS 

RELOCATION CONSWJANT5 
Hm profestknal Approach to 
ExeeuHvr Rebajhon 
n Potts and the fc do France 

Tefc (33-1) 34 75 17 33 

Fate (33-1) 34 75 17 36 


NA‘ 

roans 


illON, unfantawd, superb 3 
xxns (lave ce fart eghtfl 225 


ttcheiL FI, 

WIBNA' 


xjjsi., 


Wing room (■ 130 


m~47 17 09 09. 


SPAIN 


PLAZA RA5UCA APARTMB4T5 27, 

Cbmvdanfc Zbnto Madrid loarted n 

tfie iinaool & budrnm orea. A van 
& mtfividual 

Monthly nrtes. R es e rvflrions - Teb 
1)5353642 


,fae 04-1) 5351497. 


7 PLAZA DE ESPANA APARTMM5. 

In the heart of Madrid. FSgh dm 

rtwfios to Irt. DaSy weddy, monthly 


rentes. My w^^ «L Direct reservo- 


ttaro. Tet _ 
34.1 -548.4380 


85 as. fane 


LOS JERONIMOS APARTMENT5 
Mofefa, 9 hfadrid. Brtvmen Prodo 
Museum & Retiro Paris, finest 
of ho dil iMiul Mm Deify - 


MtxX H v rafts. Reseraabaro - Tet | 
142002)1 Fax Q+1) ^9*458 


BARCHONAI SaaS, bettaifal 1-tent 


USA 


MANHATTAN- 2000 *q. ft. 
knury apextmeni, mograioerV view* 
on tne East River. 6 rooms wrti tape 
master bedroom 3 berths, 2 bteharo, 
Fimtad/unfantaied Teb 212-463- 
7177 mon-fii Fax 212-4637294 USA 


• • * • TO RENT * • • • • ■ 
Handpic ke d qw6ty oxwtmerh, al 
' tfart eHTsubuS. CAnTALE 
fretS Tel: (1) 46 14 82 11. Fax. 
(1)47 72 3096. 


REAL ESTATE 

WANTED/EXCHANGaE 


F TOPI COMPANY S «5 TO Rgff 

FwiiJrfi opprafnwtf/ftMio n ftni 
l6ihbl7M, Boulo gn e, from June to 
1?M or more far 


sa 


Drraoar. 

494245. fia: 49 


49 


KSPONSBIE EXECUTIVE on sobbtrti- 
ed seals sonny Paris flat to rate/ 

hause-srt 34 rnarehs from May 1. Cal 
Grata (416) 3239221. 



NEW YORK OTT 5tb Avne 

"CRiYMPK TOWBt CONDCT^ 
1300 sq. ft. 1 bedioom/2 berths. Must 
feudal* at uatsuno cmK Brdrer. 
Tib 718^767854 fST 71B-4J7-OB4 


MAUI HAWAII, OCEAN FRONT 
Condos. $!(UXM+ down/U pnce 
S140J00+. taftoise finana 
Col 24 ham. Teb 
803669.1228 USA. 


Ft bra t terdefa Gu ll M8« 3 bwfatonn, 
21/2 btoht, ocean front corner, fait 


floor luxury coodo^ZM sq ft,' new 


PimapcA 


hr. seeunty. 
6K. Fax: 305-565-6769. 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


BIROPE 


NORTH AMERICA 


FRANCE HCfc fan, 
Tdj ^)46 37 93 


85. 

14637937D. 


Fax: I 

GBtMANT, AU9BA & CDHRAL 


NEW YORK: 

T«L Cl a 752-3890 

^^0^572-7212. 
Foe (212)755^785 


Tr 

Fox: 


72 671 

72 7310. 


ASIA/PACWC 


swnzaaAMfcPufiy. 

72BSJ21 


Id.- 1 

Fdel 


1)728' _ 

!1 738 3091. 


UMIB> KNSOOMi tendon. 


HONGKONG: 

Tahsc6l 1?U MWC 

Fbc (BS) 9222-1190- 




Take) 

Fax: (071)260 2254. 


Tefac 28749 HTSU 

Fac (65) 224 1566 


China Finds Small-Town America 




By Edward A. Gargan 

JVrw Tori Times Service 
COLUMBUS, Mississippi • — Ii 
was August, when this part of the 
country -sags under a slathering of 
humidity and heat. T. Scott Berry 
was up the road from here ax a 
dealers' show in Tupelo, displaying 
some of the furniture be makes. He 
was in the back of a warehouse at 


the show, not doing much of any- 


thing, when be got a call from t 
riwir A man was there to see him. 

"So I go out and there's this guy 
standing there," Mr. Berry recalled. 
“1 almost threw h» m out, but 1 said, 
•OK, I’D talk to him.’" 

Three months later, at the invita- 
tion of the Chinese man who had 
come to rail, Mr. Berry, a descen- 


dant of Arkansas mule traders and 
Mississippi furniture makers, was in 
Beijing trying to figure out how to 
work China into plans for his family 
company, Johnston Tombigbee 
Furniture Manufacturing Co. He re- 
turned with a deal to have the Chi- 
nese make chairs for him; the first 
shipment wQI arrive next month. 

Here in Columbus, a town of 
23,800 people, of white-columned 
antebellum mansions and a main 
street languorous in its pedestrian 
traffic, the global economy seems 
to intrude in a scattering of Japa- 
nese cars, a handful of Chinese res- 
taurants and not much else. But for 
Johnston Tombigbee, the future 
probably lies as much in China — 
in places like Dalian, in what used 


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to be Manchuria — as it does in 
America’s Southern heartland. 

China , with Aria’s fastest-grow- 
ing economy, has aggressively 
sought international markets for its 
growing industries, including furni- 
ture. Chinese business executives 
are diligently trolling the waters of 
trade shows, scrutinizing merchan- 
dise, buttonholing manufacturers, 
looking for deals. Ln Columbus and 
elsewhere, furniture makers such as 
Mr. Berry are often obliging, in the 
interest or cutting their manufac- 
turing costs and increasing profit- 
ability. 

Mr. Berry’s new Chinese partner, 
a man named Yang Yijian who he 
said prefers to be called James, 
quoted him prices for the chair s 
that were two-thirds less than what 
Mr. Berry pays in other countries, 
such as Brazil 

Although Taiwan has exported 
furniture to the United States for 
several years, China has made a big 
push into the American market 
only in the last year, according to 
Bruce Plantz, executive editor of 
FDM Furniture Design and Manu- 
facturing, a trade publication. 

For the first nine months of 1993, 
furniture imports from China came 
to $225 mOboa, or 56 percent more 
than in the same period of 1992. 
And combined imports from China, 
Malaysia, Indonesia, Sjng a po n* and 
the Philippines were up 52 percent, 
to $687 millio n. During 1993, the 
value of the U.S. wholesale residen- 
tial furniture market was about $18 
billion, aocardingto Mr. Plantz. 

For Johnston Tombigbee; cheap 
labor and twataria ls in China are 
the backbone of en expansion 
strategy. With reported sales of $40 
million last year, Johnston Tom- 
bigbee ranks 139th among the top 
300 makers of furniture in Ameri- 
ca. according to FDM. But Mr. 
Berry said he intended to move up 
by exp anding jam higher-end fur- 
niture, which he has started to have 
manufactured in Honduras the 

Phinipines. 

Johnson Tombigbee is among 


the small, specialized furniture 
makers battling for the great Amer- 
midiile-dass home market. 


icon 


The company, in its modest prime, 
specialized in wooden beds, dress-y ‘ 
ers and side tables — what is 
known in the trade as “promotion- 
al bedroom furniture." 

While the company still pnp. 
duces wood furniture cheaply, C&- 
na bolds the promise of even lower 
costs. That is why Mr. Beery agreed 
to give the Chinese an opportunity 
to make what is known as a sled 
chair, about the simplest and 
cheapest wooden chair made. It 
sells for about S5Q. 

With a fabric-covered seat and 
back held together by two square 
wooden frames, the bottoms of the 
squares mimic runners on a sled. 

Mr. Berry recalled telling Yang 
Yijian during his visit to Tupelo, 
“when you get back, m fax you a 
print of the chair and send you a 
sample so you can make it.” 

“He quoted me an outstanding 
price on it, an unbelievable price,” 
Mr. Berry said “17115 chair costs 
me SIL50 from Brazil. James gave 
me a quote of $4.50.” 


Jl!' 0 ‘ 

Pi 


Mr. Yang told Mr. Berry he rep- 


resented Guangming Furniture ( 
in Dalian in northeastern China. 
Wi thin a month, the company had 
shipped some samples of a sled 
chair frame to Columbus. Mr. Ber- 
ry sent back some of Us bedposts 
and booked a ticket to Beijing. 

“There are massive quantities of 
lumber to make bedposts there.” 
Mr. Berry said. “When I showed up 
at the Grand Hotel, they had these 
bedposts all made for me. it was 
pretty dear that they could abso- 
lutely do what I needed done.” g- 

Mr. Beny still finds his relation- 
ship with Mr. Yang somewhat enig- 
matic. Tm not sure who Tm deal- 
ing with, with James Yang, to a 
certain extent,” he said. “But it was 
obvious to me that James was the 



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The International Herald Tribune 
and the State Commission for 
Restructuring the Economic 
Systems of the PRC are delighted 
to welcome Asea Brown Boveri, 
Caltex Petroleum and 
Peregrine Investments Holdings as 
official Summit Sponsors of the 
1994 China Summit Meeting. 


T 


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The International Herald Tribune and the 
State Commission for Restructuring the Economic 
Systems of China are inviting the world’s 
business leaders to an unprecedented summit 
meeting on China’s economic reform. 

Its aim is to foster a dialogue as well as 
business development opportunities at the 
highest levels amongst the leaders of the Chinese 
government and the international business 
community. 

The Summit, “The Socialist Market 
Economy of the People's Republic of China, 
1994-2000: Implications for Global Business", will 
be held in Beijing on May 11th. 12th and 13th of 
this year. 

Participating will be the major figures of the 
Government of China as well as key provincial 
government and state industry leaders. It will be 
are opportunity to hear and personally meet the 
people who are driving China’s economic 
direction into the next millennium. 


As you would expect with an event of th/s 
stature, it will be a closed-door meeting and will 
not be open to the general public. 


The International Herald Tribune is inviting 
a limited number of the largest multinational 
corporations with a stake in the future of the 
Chinese economy to participate as sponsors. The 
three levels or sponsorship offer corporations the 
opportunity to express, at the highest level, their 
commitment to China s economic development 
pin worldwide exposure and advertising 
benefits, and learn first hand about the latest 
changes in China's reform program. 


Gatt 


For a complete information package 
please fine Mr. Richard McCiean, Publisher 
at +33 (1) 46572133. Or call on +33 Cl) 46379301. 


The 1994 China Summit will be the most 
significant gathering of international business and 
the Chinese government in recent history 


Confirmed Summit Sponsors 


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1 *i:rix.i;i\i 


^ _ Summit Sponsorship, die top level of participation, is limited to four 

Companies interested in the final Summit Sponsor slot should contact the IHT no later than 18th March 1994 

fll fa IINTPHIVATTriMir — ~ 













































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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


Sanyo Securities 
*To Get a Bailout 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFK 


Led by Nomura 


Spy vs. Spy in Hong Kong 

Fear Is Hie Key for Security Companies 


1 Bloomberg Business News 

■TOKYO — Nomura Securities 
,Co. and three major banks agreed 
Thursday on a plan to bail out 
■Sanyo Securities Co^ which said it 
now expected a loss of 8 billion yen 
-{$76 nnlhcn) for the year ending 
March 31. 

' The plan calls for Nomura, Nip- 
pon Credit Bank, Daiwa Bank and 
'Bank of Tokyo to buy 20 billion 
yen of new shares to be issued by 
■Sanyo, a Nomura spokesman said. 


than its previously estimated profit 
of 200 million yen. 


Sanyo also said it would have a 
consolidated current loss of 7.2 Ni- 
hon yen, in contrast to the earlier 
estimate of a group profit of 600 
million yen. 

The company had a current loss 
of 33.4 biihon yen in the previous 
financial year. 

Nomura, Japan’s biggest broker- 
age concern, and of the country’s 
16 second-tier brokerage compa- 
nies also cut their earnings fore- 
casts Thursday. But most major 
Japanese brokerages are poised for 
an earnings rebound this year after 
co ming through the worst bear 
market in Japan’s postwar history. 


B l oom b er g Businas News 

HONG KONG — Growing fears of corporate 
spying among companies in Hong Kong have 
created a profitable counterespionage business for 
security companies. 

Sophisticated bugging and viewing devices, 


“The basic outline erf the plan 
has been decided but not all of the 
details," Takashi Ikeuchi, a Sanyo 
vice president, said. The plan is 
aimed at getting rid of the securities 
■company’s bad debts over a period 
of nine years, he said. 

The three banks will reduce the 
interest razes on loans to Sanyo’s 
three nonbank affiliates, Mr. Ekeo- 

chi said. But the new interest rate on 

the loans has not been set, he said. 

The Nihon Keizi, Japan’s lead- 
ing fin ancial daily newspapers, said 
the rale would be cat to about 1 75 
percent and added that Sanyo 
would also ask its other lenders to 
lower their interest rates. 

Sanyo will use 40 billion yen of 
unrealized profit on equity hold- 
ings to reduce its affiliates’ burden 


many developed by state security services during 
the Cold War, are available at bargain prices in the 


analysts say. 
Nomura k 


neb is, Mr. Hceuchi said. 

Earlier in the day, Sanyo revised 
its earnings forecast, saying it ex- 
pected a current or pretax loss, mi a 
parent-company basis, of 8 billion 
'yea for the financial year rather 


Nomura lowered its forecast of 
its current profit for the year that 
ends this month by 29 percent, to 
50 billion yen. 

Among the smaller companies, 
New Japan Securities Co„ Wako 
Securities Co. and Ofcasan Securi- 
ties were the only ones to predict a 
profit for the year. Two others — 
Universal Securities and Tokyo Se- 
curities — forecast that they would 
break even. 

Ichiyoshi Securities, based in 
Kansei, said it expected profit to rise 
to 200 million yen, making it the 
only brokerage bouse to forecast a 
rise in current profit for the year. 

Although the Tokyo stock mar- 
ket has risen this year, brokerage 
companies say tbor profits from 
bona trading have dropped. 


the Cold War, are available at bargain prices in the 
territory’s shopping centers or by mail 

According to U.S. security consultants such as 
Pinkerton Security & Investigation Services and 
Krofl Associates, there are enough businessmen 
prepared to use subterfuge to get an upper hand to 
make regular sweeps of Hong Kong boardrooms 
and management offices more a necessity than a 
luxury. 

“The potential for eavesdropping cm people by a 
variety of methods is pretty high in Hong Kong,” 
said Graham Lander, detective superintendent in 
charge of the Crime Prevention Bureau of the colon- 
y's police. ~A major reason is that we have one mul- 
tistory glass office structure right next to another.” 

Mr. Lander said that companies rarely come to 
the police with complaints about surveillance or 
theft of information. He said theft of computer 
data is likely to be a bigger headache for major 
Hong Kong companies than bogging. 

“In terms erf computer data theft, there is proba- 
bly a krt more going on than we realize, but there is 
probably a little too much paranoia over the possi- 


are other explanations. “Quite often when they 
think they have been bugged, you find that they 
don’t control the disposal of tbor rubbish or it is a 
young lady in the office who is asked to leak 
information by her boyfriend," Mr. McVeigh said. 

He said that Pinkerton docs about 17 sweeps of 
Hong Kong company offices each month. Quite a 
few of those are repeats. 

The short distances between Hong Kong’s office 

to«ers is an important concern. The shorter the 


Japan Sees 
Signs of 
Recovery 


: Hong Kqng :;ii«.:i.r s S™jjji 

'HangSeng..>.. .Straits'.: 


**£ 'A; -A 

pfe'.V V\j 


Bugging and viewing 
devices, many developed by 
state security services 
during the Cold War, are 
available at bargain prices. 


distance between a bog and the radio receiver, the 
less chance that somebody else will also listen in. 


Compiled by Our Swff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s economy is 
showing signs of recovery after 
nearly three years of stagnation as 
the government revised upward its 
industrial production figure for 
January and reported a slowing in 
the decline of corporate profits. 

"The overall economy is headed 
for an upward move," a Ministry of 
Finance official said Thursday. 

The ministry’s quarterly survey 
of corporate financial health 
showed that the scale of profit de- 
clines was much smaller in the Oc- 
tober-December quarter than in 
July-September. Profits shrank 62 
percent in the October- December 
quarter, compared with a 21.6 per- 
cent fall in the previous quarter. 

The government also said Japan’s 
industrial production increased 1.0 
percent in January from December. 














m^^7 ; 77^Atr 


Feeding on the fears are people luce Steven 
McVeigh, who is a manager with Pmkerton (Asia^. 
Neither Pinkerton nor Kroll would reveal their 
clients. Yet Pinkerton claimed to rep re s e nt trig 
local corporations and foreign multinational con- 
cerns. 

Pinkerton (Aaa)’s Hong Kong office now has a 
team of eight conducting counterespionage work, 
up from just two in 1990. 

To check that 5,000 square feet (450 square 
meters) of office space is free of bugs takes about 
18 hours of work and costs a client about 20,000 
Hong Kong dollars (SZ589), Mr. McVeigh said. 

He acknowledged, however, that companies that 
fear they have been bugged often find that there 


In 1993, Pinkerton discovered about 12 listening 
devices across Asia, Mr. McVeigh said. Kroll Asso- 
ciates (Asia), which has a smaller team doing 
similar work, found three dear cases that micro- 
phones had been used last year, said Stephen 
Vickers, associate managing director. 

“A lot of sniff became available that was hither- 
to the province of the security services only," Mr. 
Vickers said. "The goodies are on sale all over 
Hong Kong and you only have to go to the upstairs 
departure ball of KaiTakAirpoA and you can find 
a shop selling world-class stuff." 

There are tiny listening devices in plugs, in 


A government official said pro- 
duction of machinery, particularly 
computers and semiconductors, 
boosted output. 

Also on Thursday, Japan's Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers Association 
said it expected domestic demand 
for new cars to grow by 3.9 percent 
in the financial year be ginning in 
April 

But Prime Minister MoriHro 
Hosokawa, maintained a cautious 
line on the economy, saying the 
outlook remained uncertain. 

“Housing demand continues to 
be steady and there are some bright 
spots in home electric goods,” Mr. 
Hosokawa said. "But in general 
the economic outlook as a whole 
remains uncertain.” 

(Bloomberg, AFP, Reuters) 


iuhi nuujj wureuuw u« a mere are uny liste ning devices m plugs, in 
eight conducting counterespionage wort calculators, in pens, and in almost anything else 
just two in 1990. vou want to name to simnlv todav’s James Romfe 


you want to name to supply today’s James Bonds. 
Many of the items are available for less than $100. 

The end of the Cold War also produced an army 
of jobless professionals ideal for industrial espio- 
nage work. “If you had been involved in this kind of 
work and then found yourself redundant you would 
be inclined to look elsewhere,” said Mr. McVeigh. 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Tfrfflv ; 


iM HWMlw l Herald Tribone 


Very briefly: 


• Cana's energy sector may require as much as S300 billion this decade in 
investment for exploration, production, refiningand power generation, 
the vice chairman of Amoco Coqk, Lawrason D. Thomas, said in Beijing 


the vice chairman of Amoco Coqk, Lawrason D. Thomas, said in Beijing 

• Australia’s National Roads & Motorists Association, its largest motor- 
ing emergency road repair and insurance concern, proposed a public 


mg emergency roaa repair and insurance concern, proposed a public 
offering valued at 2 billion Australian dollars (S1.4 billion) and said it 
would offer shares free to its 1.8 million members. 


• Wharf (Holdings) Ltd. was given an "implied A" rating for long-term 
debt by Standard & Poor’s Carp. The the Hong Kong company has no 
short-term or long-term bonds outstanding 

• Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. and Wanfley Ltd. are merging 
their treasury and capital-markets businesses to meet competition. 


• betas Qk, a department-stare operator, and three other Japanese 
companies set up a $1-8 million jomt venture with clothing designer 
Calvin Klein, called Calvin Klein Japan. Other partners are Mitsui & Co., 
Onward Kashiyama & Co. and Okano Associates Co. 


India Drops 
Foreign Curb 


Profit Lifts Qantas Toward Privatization 


Mitsubishi Cuts 
Jobs , Outlook 


• France will soon lift restrictions on fish and fish products from 
Indonesia, Mauritania, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand, the Thai 
Foreign Trade Ministry said, quoting Thai diplomats in Paris. 

Reuters, Bloomberg, AP, AFP 


Agenee France- Presse 

NEW DELHI — The gov- 
ernment said Thursday it 
would, for the first tiiw fet 
foreign companies buy shares 
in public-sector companies. 

The government hopes to 
raise about $! biUkm through 
an offering of shares in several 
companies. 

These include Bharat Elec- 
tronics, Bharat Earth Movers, 
Bharat Heavy Electricals, Bon- 
gaigaon Refinery ft Petro- 
chemicals, Hindustan Petrole- 
um, Mabanagar Telephone Ni- 
gam and National Ahmrinum. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — Qantas Airways 
Ltd. reported Wednesday that it 
had returned to profitability, rais- 
ing prospects that the Australian 
government may float its 75 per- 
cent stake in the airline this year. 

Hie national flag carrier report- 
ed net profit of 71.6 Australian 

second half of 1993, whic^ is the 
first half of the company’s financial 
year. It had posted a loss of 3653 
million dollars in the preceding 
half. 

But Gary Pemberton, rJmirman 
of the airing also predicted that 
profit for the six-month period 
ending June 30, which is the second 


half of the company’s financial 
year, would be lower m spite of an 
improved domestic market and 
prospects for better results in the 
Pacific market after the withdrawal 
of Continental Airlines and North- 
west Airlines from those routes. 

"I would expea something less 
than the first-half result in the cur- 
rent period owing to the seasonal 
reduction in traffic,” he said. 

While routes to Japan, the Ori- 
ent, New Zealand and Britain woe 
profitable during the first half, "the 
Americas continued to sustain 
losses owing to low fares and over- 
capacity,” he said. 

Mr. Pemberton said that the air- 
line might be Hoaxed as eniy as 


October in view of the improved 
results and a strong stock market 
He said that the bullish market 
“would encourage you to go earlier, 
and the eariy feasible date would 
be around about October, Novem- 
ber this year, so that you would be 
gang to the market on a full-year 
result” 

Mr. Pemberton said that man- 
agement would like to achieve a 
full-year profit of more than 400 
million dollars before the airline is 
floated. 

Analysts widely expect the gov- 
ernment to raise more than 2 bil- 
lion dollars from the sale of its 
stake. 

The government said last Octo- 


ber, after Qantas reported a net loss 
of 3772 million dollars for the year 
that ended June 30, 1993, that it 
emected to float its stake in early 
1995. Qantas said the loss was 
mainly a result of the cost of ac- 
quiring Australian Airlines in 1992. 

Interest charges fell to 64.2 mil- 
lion dollars in the most recent half, 
from 1479 million dollar a year 
earlier. 

He said Qantas was working 
with British Airways, which paid 
665 milli cm dollars fra its 25 per- 
cent stake in Qantas in March 
1993, to reduce costs by cooperat- 
ing on some administrative, techni- 
cal and support activities. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


T7x Associated Press 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi 
Heavy Industries Ltd. said 
Thursday it would reduce its 
workforce by 3,100 over the 
next four years' to cope with 
the slumping economy. 

The cuts wfll trim the work- 
force by about 7 percent, and 
wiD manly by done through 
attrition and reduced hiring . 

Mitsubishi predicted sales 
would fan 3 percent, to 2.42 
trillion yen ($23 bflboo), in the 
year ending March 31, and pre- 
tax profit would be 120 billion 
yen, 17 percent below 1992. 


Dairy Farm flits Chinese Wall 


Compiled bt Our Staff From Di^atcba 

HONG KONG — Dairy Farm 
International Holdings Lid., a re- 
tailing arm of the Jardine Mathe- 
son group, said Thursday that after 
nine months it was stiQ waiting 
approval from Chinese authorities 
to develop a chain of up to 60 
supermarkets in Shang hai. 

Jardine Matheson has been sub- 
ject to vitriolic attacks by Beijingfra 
supporting political reform propos- 
als put forward by Governor Chris 
Patten of Hong Kong and fcatteriy 
opposed by Qdna. 


**We have got a partner that we 
wanito work vrith, but we are in the 
hands of the regulators and it does 
take time to gel the paperwork 
through,” said Graeme Seabrook, 
manag in g director of Dairy Farm. 


Dairy Farm also announced that 


its wont rose 11 percent m 1993, to 
8197.5 milli on, mainly due to re- 


5197 .5 million, manly due to re- 
duced losses in its Spanish, grocery 
and variety-store chains, which off- 
set an earnings fall at its Australian 
supermarkets. 

(Bloomberg, AFP) 



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For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


THE CONFERENCE WILL BE 

divided into the 

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Derivative and alternative 
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Emerging market 


GLOBAL FUND MANAGEMENT 

WhichWay are the Markets Moving? 


THE EXPERTS DERATE THE TRENDS * DOLDER GRAND HOTEL • ZURICH • MARCH 2S&24 • 1994 

□5) HmnQE&ribunc 

litTHKSAtianiL Fiinb Investment 


FOR LAST AVAILABLE 
PLACES AT THE 
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Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 


§’&B.g 3.S-Q' fca.K'h H X 



















































































4 . 



SPORTS 


American 
Skis Another 
Big Super-G 
At Finals 


Compiled by Our Siaff From Dispatches 

VAIL, Colorado — Diaim 
Roffe-Steinrotter showed once 
again her ability to rise to the big 
occasion by winning the women’s 
super giant slalom Thursday at the 
World Cup Finals in the last race of 
her Cop career. 

The American racer, who won 
the Olympic super-G crown at LQ- 
lehammer, started fourth and 
roared through the 1,822-meter 
(1,990-yard), 41-gate course in 1 
minute, 24.93 seconds and the time 
withstood all challenges. 


Katja Seizinger of Germany, 
who won her thud successive sea- 


son World Cup downhill title on 
y, finished second in 


Wednesday, 

1 : 25.07 to repeat as super-G cham- 
pion for the season. Anita Wachter 
of Austria was third in 1:25.09. 
Roffe-Steinrotter, whose only 


other World Cup victory came in a 
atLakcT 


giant slalom at Lake Placid in 1985, 
thrust her poles overhead and 
clapped them together, acknowl- 
edging the cheering home crowd at 
the end of her aiming nm. 

’Tm thrilled," said the Ameri- 
can, who burst into tears after the 
last racer had finished and victory 
was has. 

Switzerland's Vreni Schneider 
finished tied for eighth place at 
1:26.39 to pick up 32 poults and 
increase her lead in the overall 
World Cup standings to 133 over 
Sweden’s Pemllla wiberg. 

Wiberg was unable to race be* 
cause of bruised ribs suffered in a 
crash in the downhill but hopes to 
be able to race in the weekend's last 
two events, the giant slalom and 
slalom. 

fiibiana Perez of Italy finished 
second in the season standings fol- 
lowed by Hilde Gere of Germany. 

The victory raised Roffe-Srein- 
rptter only into 13th place in the 
final standings. 

"This was a great way to finish 
mv career," said Roffe-Steinrotter. 
whose final triumph came one 
week shy of her 27th birthday. 
"This is a special day. I’ve never 
been so nervous before a race.” 

Seizinger was .16 of a second 
faster than the winner at the first 
intermediate stage but lost time in 
the next stage and again at the 
bottom of the course. 



This Could Be the Start 
Of a Really Big Career 



Imemmkmal Herald Trtbme 

And the International Newsmakers Lifetime 
Achievement Award goes to . . . Mrs. Tonya Harding- 
Gfflooly-Von Bulow. 

(Applause, modi applause.) 

Unfortunately. Tonya is unable to Join us tonight. 

(Laughter.) 

But let us wife this evening to review her sensation- 
al, spectactular career. 

Tonya came from a troubled home in Oregon, and 
as a skater she really wasn't the best But in 1994 she 
rocketed to fame, becoming an international celebrity 
at the age of 23 when her husband pleaded guilty to 
arranging a bizarre attack on a rival American skater. 

(Nervous laughter.) 

And when Tanya agreed to a plea bargain shortly 
after the 1994 Olympics —proving only that she knew 


Jeff, did or did not Tonya help plan the attack on Nancy 
Kerrigan six years ago ? 

Giuoolv : It was all ha 


IAN THOMSEN 


-a ■ . 

StocDtpaflb'IUskn 

Tonya Harding listening to her lawyer, Robert Weaver, before signing a waiver related to her plea of gritty to hindering prosecution. 


of the conspiracy after the attack — it looked like an 
anridfnaactic conclusion to the most sensational epi- 
sode in American sport. 

(Chuckles.) 

Well, we all know now that that was only the begin- 
ning. Much lugger things wens in rime for Tonya. 
Unable to travel beyond Oregon, Washington and Cali- 
fornia because of her probation, she spent those three 
years practicing the Asian arts of self-defense, most 
notably karate. Inspired by a S2 millio n offer to become 
a professional wrestler in Japan, she chose to remain in 
America. In 1997, she became the instant star of the new 
Ladies Professional Kick-Boxing Association. 

(Highlights of Tonya kick-boxing appear on screen.) 
Were the matches fixed or were they real? The 


Harding’s Plea Leaves Questions Unanswered 


debate raged as Tonya's opponents were carried out of 
the ring one after the other. S 


New York Times Service 


cap- 
tured world attention against the 
unlikely backdrop of figure skating 
came to an inconclusive halt when 
Tonya Harding pleaded guilty to a 
single charge in the assault on her 
rival, 1' 


Nancy Kerrigan. 

In a negotiated plea Wednesday 
with a district court in Portland, 
Oregon, Harding admitted to con- 
spiring to hinder prosecution of the 
case, a felony offense that carries a 
maximum prison sentence of five 


years and a fine of 5100,000. 

Under Oregon sentencing guide- 
lines, she will not serve any prison 
time. She received a probation of 
three years, a fine of 5100,000 and 
500 hours of community service. 

Also, Harding agreed to contrib- 
ute 550,000 to establish a fund for 
Special Olympics in Oregon, to re- 
imburse the county 510,000 in It 
expenses and to undergo a 
atric examination. 

As an additional condition of the 
agreement, Harding must resign 


from the U.S. Figure Skating Asso- 
ciation, a move that means sue will 
be ineligible for the world champi- 
onships next week in Japan. 

As a result, her amateur career will 
end with an eighth-place finish at the 
Winter Olympics last month in Nor- 
way, where Kerrigan was second be- 
hind Oksana Baiul of Ukraine. 

What the agreement did not in- 
clude — and now might never be 
known for certain — is the full 
extent of her knowledge of the Jan. 
6 attack in Detroit, where Kerrigan 


was struck on the knee with a col- 
lapsible metal baton. Harding has 
always insisted she had no involve- 
ment in the attack. 

Harding's plea came after a day 
of testimony before a grand jury 
deciding whether Harding or any 
of at least three others involved in 
the assault would be indicted. 


Slow-motion replays 
showed dozens of her competitors suffering career- 
ending knee injuries, the devastating and practically 
unavoidable consequence of the “Triple Axel” — the 
name Tonya gave to her signature spuming air-kick. 
Within months, stadium crowds of 100,000 and 
pa-view audiences in the tens of millions were 
Tonya and her ex-husband/ manager, Jeff 


those tes 


Wednes- 


day was Tier former husband, Jeff 
Giilooly, who had told federal in- 


vestigators that Harding was in- 
volved in planning the attack. 


Giilooly — she in her rhinestoned, muscle- bound, 
ugly, figure-skating-style outfits, her lavender makeup 
visible from the furthest seat in the house, her hands in 
boxing gloves, a cigarette stuffed in her mouth in 
between rounds, and her ex-husband constantly 
shouting instructions up to her. With a glare she would 
spit the butt at him, the crowd roaring as she stomped 
toward her next victim, her French-braided head 
weaving back and forth like a cobra's. 

(Lights dim for video.) 

Question: If we could finally set the record straight, 


ha idea. I still can’t believe I was J 
the one who went to jail. 

Question: Was it your idea, Tonya? ; 

Harding: I think it’s time the truth came oul / am" 
ready to confess today that the idea was all mine .NOT!' 
Hah Hah / Hah Hdh HACK Hah HACK HACK ... - 
(Video freezes with Tonya in mid-hack.) 

(Applause as the lights come back up.) ’. 

A generation of pie- teenagers who knew nothing'* 
about the 1994 Olympics were docking around Tonya.." 
Every has-been edebnty who sought to regain his or her 

15 minutes of lost fame could dare enter the ring for “ao “ 
exhibition" against her, often with painful results . : . 

(A montage of Tonya photographs: Leaning to T 

Madonna on her stretcher... Kneding to sigtij t 

O’Neal’s cast .. . Standing by as Baddy Ebsen receives'" 
Iasi rites... and relief as he regains consciousness . . .) * 
Then — disaster. During a rare tag-team m Vir h. * 
Tonya rushes out to defend GiDooiy from a double-^ 
attack by Roseanne and Tom Arnold, who are grap-” 
pling to regain their place as America’s most notorious 
couple. But for once Tonya's “Triple Axel” is misdirect- ’ 
ed — or is it? — as tie kick takes out Gillooly’s knee '. - 
The Arnolds seize the moment, casting the distraught' 
would-be pixie and her ex-tit-man-huSband from the 
ring in a heap. Tonya will never kick-box a g ai n . 

instead, she uses their millions to buy the Ice” 
Capadcs, starring Katarina Witt. The show takes a 
new direction as Harding orders Witt to sit on a trap' 1 
door over a pool of water and a sign that reads: 
DUNK THE ICE QUEEN. The interactive gimmi ck - 
initially successful, fades rapidly. 

The remaining years are a whirlwind: The final ~ 
break-up of their on-again, off-again marriage . . 
Tonya loses the last of her savings, and her righr 
pinkie, as the star of a sea-life extravaganza in which 
sharks are trained like dolphins ... She applies to 
work with die Mother Teresa Foundation m fndia bur 7 
is turned down after lying on ha application. 

Thai, while starring in a questionable film biogra* x 
... « j a Henie on location, Tonya meets and rails 
in love with . . . Claus Von Bulow! 


(Laughter and applause.) 

Tonya really warned to be here tonight S 
Swedish government to la ha attend this 


government 
but they aren’t 
y Claus 


She sued tee 
this cere mo ny,'" 
til they find out"’ 
why Claus fed into that coma last week. On a personal 
note, I have just this to say: Good luck finding outl J * 
(Applause.) 7 

Good night, and thanks for joining us. I've been ' 
your host, Nancy Kerrigan. 

(She walks off stage holding Tonya's award. Stand- * 
ing ovation.) 


SCOREBOARD 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN COMP BRB NCI 
Atlantic Division 


In the men's downhill on 
Wednesday, veteran Mac Girar- 
delli collected his sixth World Cup 
discipline title, earning the down- 
hill crown despite not winning any 
of the II races this season. 

Girardelli, already a five-time 
World Cup overall champion, was 
content to add the downhill title to 
his impressive collection, and virtu- 
ally conceded the overall to Nor- 
way s Kjetil Andre Aaznodt. Girar- 
defii trails Aamodt by 261 points, 
1,242-981. 


Girardelli finished seventh in 
Wednesdays race. That was worth 
36 points, giving him 556 do wnhill 
points fa the season. Austrian 
Hannes Trinkl, who finished sec- 
ond to race winner William Besse 
of Switzerland, wound up second 
in the final standings, too, al 536. 

(Reuters, AP) 



W L 

pm 

GB 

New York 

43 19 

Mi 

— 

Orlando 

a a 

603 

3V5 

Miami 

0 0 

-563 

1 

New Jersey 

0 0 

J14 

11 

Boston 

0 40 

J55 

0 

Philadelphia 

0 42 

03 

22VI 

Washington 

19 44 

Central Dtrlstan 

■302 

24 Hi 

Atlanta 

43 19 

■694 

_ 

Chtaaeo 

4i a 

-6S1 

2W 

Cleveland 

36 0 

.571 

TVS 

Indtana 

a a 

541 

9ta 

Chortotte 

27 34 

AC 

15W 

Milwaukee 

17 45 

Hi 

0 

Detroit 

17 46 

m 

261b 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Dfvtatoa 



W L 

Pet 

OR 

Houston 

43 17 

>717 

— 

San Antonio 

45 19 

JV3 



Utah 

43 0 

672 

2 

Denver 

0 31 

-492 

131b 

Minnesota 

17 45 

.274 

V 

Dallas 

■ 35 

Pacific DiVIslaa 

.10 

01b 

Seattle 

45 16 

70 

— 

Phoenix 

41 21 

661 

41b 

Portland 

0 26 

-994 

Bib 

GaWen State 

M 0 

60 

9Vi 

LA. Lakers 

25 0 

A10 

0 

LACIfapera 

33 0 

sn 

72 


73 41 

J49 

24 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Chicago 29 0 0 11— Ml 

Boston SI SB a IS— NO 

C: Plppon 5-IS M IX Grant MB *4 SO. B: 
Brawn 11-20 M 27, McOofllf I MS 4-7 11 R»- 
bounds — Chicago 91 (Ordnt t), Baofon 94 
(Brawn, Bari •>. Assists— Chicago 23 (Orant 
7), Boston 14 (Douglas 91 

Dallas SB 17 SB 2S- M 

Orlando St 21 St SI— IBB 

Atlanta M II SB 25-79 

Chari ottf 27 31 St 17-M 

D: Mashbum 14-27 4-9 34, Jackson 11-27 4-5 
21 0: scat! *11 H 23, O'Mtal I KM 12-12 34. 
Rebounds— Dallas SB (Williams 101. Orlando 
M (O'Neal SI). Assists— Dal las 23 (Lever, 
Jacfcson 7), Orlando 20 (Sklfsii). A: Fsrrsll?- 
12 1-2 19. Willis 5-193-4 13, C: I- Johnson 4-123-3 
16. Mourning 6-13 W 20, RtbMHldS- Al la nlo S3 
( Keefe 71. Charfatts SB ( Hawkins, Brtckowikl 
7), Assists— Atlanta U (Mamins 9). Chorions 
26 (Boaust 10). 

Phosillx 34 3S SB Sf-tB 

Indiana MUD st-iat 

P: Borictey6-l5B-i03a Cabal Iai7-ll 6420, K. 
Johnson 4-11 15-2023. Is Williams 7-19 4-4 10. 
Smlfs HI 4-4 II, Minor 13-19 7-7 34. Rg- 
bo uod» - P hoenix 49 (Klein* 9), Indiana 42 
(DJDcvtalfl.AeN s te -Phoe n ix 17 1 KJahnson 
«. Indiana 36 [KWllltanu 7). 

Portland 24 24 It 11—102 

San Antonia M a > is— no 

P: C. Robinson 7-167-7 31, Strickland 6-193-5 
17.5: El IIS 11-212-227.D, Robinson 11-205-10 27, 
Dal Naora 5-12 6-916. Rebound*- Portland 54 
(Williams IS), San Antonio 52 (Rodman It). 
AsiMi— Portland it [Strickland 7), San An- 
tonio 24 (Del Negro 12). 

Wostdaatoa 22 21 26 »- 94 

LA Latwrs 34 0 SI 0—129 

W; MacLsanM4>4 16, Chapman 11-17 2-4 
24. LA.: Campbell Ml 0-1 11 Van Exel 6-13641 
21. Rebounds— Washington 0 (MocLean SI, 


Los Angeles 70 (Campbell, Lynch, Rambli 
iDl.Autato-weaningrwiH (Prices), Lai An- 
BMtl 34 (Van Exel Tl). 

Now Jersey 0 19 34 41-111 

Sacramento 0 0 0 44-10 

N J. : Coleman MB 1 1-190, Andsraon 4404-7 
19.3: Richmond M4 7-4 25, W. Will Jams 7-12 M 
IB Rebounds— New Jersey 99 tJ.WIlllams. 
Coleman »), Socramento 60 (Polynia ill. As- 
si sts New Jsrssv 17 (Andersen 6), Sacra- 
mento 0 (Webb 9). 


Winnipeg 


0 44 S 40 214 295 
Pacific Division 


Calgary 
Vancouver 
Sai Jus 
Anaheim 
Los Anoeles 
Edmonton 


II 299 20 
73 20 20 
63 194 223 
0 196 221 
96 290 271 
49 219162 




NHL Standing! 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W 

L 

T Pte OF OA 

N.Y, Rangers 

44 

21 

6 

94 253 193 

New Jersey 

» 

0 

ID 

0 251 10 

Waditagton 

» 

0 

B 

72 226 217 

Florida 

0 

79 

10 

70 10 190 

PhUodetahla 

31 

33 

7 

67 250 262 

N.Y. Islanders 

29 

33 

1 

66 239 226 

Tampa Bay 

75 

37 

10 

60 194 01 

Northeast DhfMan 


t/ 1 |wi) r—~l) 

momma i 

37 

22 

12 

S6 246 202 

Boston 

. 0 

22 

12 

M 20 199 

Pittsburgh 

0 

73 

12 

« 254 244 

Buffalo 

36 

26 

B 

W 235 IN 

Quebec 

75 

34 

7 

63 226 233 

Harttord 

23 

40 

1 

54 190 237 

Ottawa 

10 

53 

B 

28 166 30 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 



W 

L 

T 

Pt* 

OF 

GA 

s -Patron 

41 

73 

5 

37 

302 

20 

x-Toranto 

0 

72 

11 

87 

234 

2D1 

Dallas 

35 

25 

10 

n 

236 

09 

Chicane 

34 

79 

B 

76 

03 

196 

3L Louis 

0 

27 

9 

75 

09 

232 


x-d Inched playoff spot. 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Chicago 1 0 2-3 

Montreal 1 3 3-9 

First Period: M-SChnelder is (Bellows, 
Dampnoune].- C-Rosnlck 0 (Suter, Mur- 
phy). (op) Second Parted: M-Ronan 6 iDato- 
necuilt) j M-Oam ptwuss a 32 (Schneider, Mull- 
er). (PP).TMrd Period: C-Pouiin ij (R. (utter. 
Ruuttu); M-Damphewas0 (LeCloIr, Haller); 
(pal. M-Sevtgny 4 (Ol Pietro, Renan) ;C-R. Sut- 
ter 12 (Ruuttu Poulin). Shots sn goal: C Ian 
Rav) 14-7-11—32. M (on Beffour) 4*10-22. 
Harttord DO#-# 

N.Y. Rangers 1 I 1—4 

First Period: N.Y.-Lormer T7 (Zubov, Nor- 
■tram); N.YX) roves 48 (Gartner. Meseler). 
(pp) S econd Period: N.Y.-Ueulwboam 7 (Mess- 
ier, Gartner). Third Ported: N.Y .-Kovalev 14 
(Amonte, Larmer). Shots on goal: H (on Rich- 
terl 94-10-27. N.Y. (on Burke) 17-1W2-0, 
Edmonton 2 I 1 B-4 

Tampa Bay 1 2 1 B-4 

Ftnt Period: E -Grieve 7 (Otauason); T- 
Elviwlk la (Bradlev. Joeeph); E-Anwft 36 
(Bennett, McAmmand). Second Period: E- 
MacTavlEi 15 ( Thornton, Buchberger) j T-Sa- 
vard 14 (Chambers. Gallant): T-Zamuner 4 
(Chambers). TMrd Period: T-Eiynulk « 
(Tucker, Cretehtan); E-Cloer 21,(pp). Stmts 
on goal: E (on Young] 15-744-33. T (on Ran- 
ford) 12-16-16-1— 4& 

Calgary 1 0 6—1 

Florida I 1 tr-0 

First Parted: PKudelskl 0 (Banning, Low- 
nr); (pp). C-Ftourv 31 (Roberts, Mac Inn Is). 


(pplJecond Period: PMeltanbv 24 (Lomakin, 
Murphy). (PP). Shell on goal: C (on Vonbles- 
brauefc) 104-16-11 F (on Kidd) 1IM4-17, 
Vancouver 1 S 1—4 

Taranto 0 1 0-1 

Pint period: V-Momesso IS (Ramble, 
Burt). (ppLSscMd Period: v-Ronnlng 21 
(CeurtnalL Bun); (pa). V-Slegr 3 (Adame, 
Craven); (pp). T-Emtwood 6 (elietr. Mir- 
onov). (pp).TMrd Period: V- Burs 46 (Plavsic. 
Odllckl. (an). Shell an goal: V (on Patvln) t- 
144— M. T (on McLean) 7-64-19. 

st. Leals s i e— a 

Winnipeg - . 2 11—4 

Phot period: W-Oorrln Simmon 16 (Tko- 
chuk. Zhamnov); (pp). w-ZMrmwv 0 (Dar- 
rin Shannon. Quintal). S ec on d Period: W> 
Quintal 1 1 Ysedoert. Darrin Shannon). TMrd 
Period: W- Darrin shannon 17 tTkadwk. Em- 
erson). (pp). Shota ea goal: S.L, (on Chevel- 
dne) 15-12-16-41. W (an Joseph) 12-7-90-28 
Los Angelas 1 t 1—2 

Anaheim 7 S 2-4 

First Parted: A-sacco is (Lebeou)i LA#- 
Lana B Secaad Parted; A-W1lloms4 (Yoke, 
Pentari: ipp). A-labeou 11 (Baccu Lonoy). 
tPPl.Thlrd Period: A-Bweenev 13 tYoka, 
Hill); (pp). A-Bwaenoy 14 (Haulder); LA- 
Dannolly 12 (Long, Sydor), (pp). Shots on 
goal: LA. (on SMolontov) 114*24—33. A (on 
Hrudey) 7-20-7^-34. 


World Cup SMIng 


Results Thursday of the wonm’i World cup 
Super-G datum In VaH, Coterade: 1, Diann 
Rofte-5Mnrattw, United 3Mofcinrirwte,24J3 
seconds; 2> Ratio Salilnger, Germany, i :29JJ7; 
X Anita wachter, Austria 1:2U9; 4, Sylvia 
Eder. Austria 1:25-46; 9, HeM Zurbrtoooa 
Swttxertand l:26J»; A Kerrin LoeCartner, 
Canada 1:26.16; 7, Martina Erfl, Germany, 
1:2622; B ha Vreni Schneider, Swtttertand and 
Kafta Karan. Staventa lrt»0- 


1B Reekie Cavagnoud, France, 1 :2643i 11, 
Atanfca Dovbbv Soventa, 1:2641) 12, HeM 
Zeller-Boetiler. aw H — rl an d , l:26JIJ Utahan* 
non NeM a Unltod Statoe. 1 :2617; TA Katharlna 
Gutsnsohn, Germany, 1:2LM) 15 Marianne 
Kiooratad. Norway, 1 : 0 . 13 . 

StaAdlnos In the womeaY Sumt-O (offer 6 
rocn): 1, Sridnger, 416 oolnti; 2, BFbtana Pe- 
rn, Italy, 266; 3, Hilde Gera, Germany, 200; 4 , 
Devna ltB; i Wiberg, i»; 4 Koran, IN; 7, 
Ulrflw Malar, Austria 160; B Zurfertanen, 139; 
f, Wa«Msr. 157; IB Bytvta Eder. Austria 1S1 
Restate Wedne s day from the men's Workt 
CupdewnhlBfUMtelnValLCaterado: 1, Wil- 
liam Bene, Switzerland, 1 minute, 33.17 ik- 
onds; 2, HanrmTrtnkL Austria, i:3B34j 2 , tie, 
Tommy ttom. United States ond Patrick Ort- 
lleh. Austria 1:3866; 5, Ed Podlvlnsfcv, Cana- 
da 1:3460; 4 Polar RunaaaMer, Italy, 
1:3469; 7 , Marc Girardelli, Luxembourg. 
1:3874, 

I, Cary Mullen, Canada, 1 :38J7; 9, Daniel 
Mahrar, Swtteorland, 1:3483; IB Luc Al- 
phand. Prance. i:3BB7; 11, Kletll Andre Ao- 
modt, Norway, 1:3492; 12, Franc Helnzsr, 
Swlteertana 1:021 ;U Franca Cavagn.Swt»- 
Milana 1:00; 14 Rob Bovfl. Canada 
1 : 027 ; 15, tie, Franck Piccard, Franca end 
Jan Elrw Thoraen, Norway, 1:024 
Final DawnhHI Standings (after 11 racos): 
!, Girardelli, 5S6 paints; 2, Trinkl, 536; BOrt- 
lltb, 40; 4 Mullen 461; 4 Besse. 446; 4 Alta 
SkaanfaL Norway, 399 j 7, PodMnskv,3l3; 4 
Mot. 30; t, Mtairar. 302; 10, Amnodt. 294 
Results la Ibe women’s world Cw dewnbBIt 
1, Katla Seizinger, Germany, 1:470; Z Kate 
Pace, Canada 1:470: 3, Vranl Schneider, 
SwDMrtand, 1:4727; 4 Plcabo Street, United 
States. i:47Xlt 5. Martina Eril, Germany, 

1 : 47A4; 4 Mlchelw Rutimm, Canada 1 :4TM 1 
7, Regina HaeusL Germany, 1:4B0B 
B Isolde Kastner. Italy, 1 :4B27: f. Blbkma 
Perez, ltaly,1:4B34; IBVararrlkoStgllmaler, 
Austria l:4B40; 11, Barixura Merlin. Italy. 


1:4152; IB WUrward ZelenskoJa Russia 
1:640; 11 Svgtfana GlmBshha Russia 
1 :4I23; IS, HHcrvUndtfcUmted States, 1:49.15) 
11 Hehfl Zurbriggan, Swltariaml, 1:4921. 

Phial Downhill Standings I otter 7 races): L 
SOUnaer, 4S2; 1 Paco. 201 1 Mekmte Sudiet. 
Franca 2SB; 4 Kastner, 20; S. Llndtv 214) 4 
Stallmater, IN; 7, zelensfcaja 10; 1 Street. 
ITS; 9, Ruthvea 16B; id, Haaa 153. 


' 2: 


Wf///. iiU 

htlwltenf 


SOCCER 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Chelsea 1 Wimbledon 0 
Leads B Aston villa 0 
Manchester United & Sheffield Wednesday B 
Sheffield United 1, Queen's Park Rangers 1 
Oldham vi Tottenham, PPd. 

EUROPEAN CUP 

Borcatona Spain 9. Spartak Moscow, Russia 1 
Gatetasarav, Turkey B Monaco. France 2 

Warder Bremen, German vi, AC Milan, I tolyl 

FC Porta Portugal B AndorfecM, BeMum 0 
CUP WINNERS CUP 
Quarterfinal 2d leg 

Parma Italy 1 A lax Amsterdam, Nether- 
lands B 

Parma win w on aggregate 
UEFA CUP 

Quarterfinal 0 teg 

Karlsruhe. Germany 1, Boovtsto, Portugal 0 
KarunFie win 2-1 an aggregate 


€ 




SECOND TEST 

Autarafio vs. South Africa First Day 
Thursday, la Cape Town. South Africa 
South Africa 1st innings; 237-5 (91 overs) 
SECOND TEST 

Engtami vs. west imses. First Day 
Thursday, la Georg eto w n, Savona 
England let Innings (at lunch): 70-2 



DENNIS THE MENAGE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


‘Iw.*. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


Page 19 


Caree r 


isc: 7cr:j , . 
v«awup.‘ : 

Ka: ; :t . . 
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. 

PfcS* .r'j ; l'J\ . 

sr;i\ir. V 


Connecticut, Maryland 
And Wake Forest Cruise 


. ™im.Tr?!?S aed f ras ^ Ul 8 three-point play by A1 Flow- inside play of freshman center Tim 

„n w New York — ers gave Rider a 29-28 edge, the Duncan, who finished with 16 

ooyeu Marshall scored nine of 10th lead change of (he first half, points and 13 rebounds and 
5 19 points as Connecticut started before Alien's free throw with 5.7 blocked eight shots. 


Dooyefl Marshall scored nine of 
his 19 points as Connecticut started 


JX ? 5 ** ^ r vantage of the drought to turn a 29- 

t “"* r 2' z: ‘ - x ~- 7 * r '-' Us IT 29 halftime tie into a 52r35 lead 
1-03* i cz ■. . : . . 7 v with 6:34 left. 

Freshman Charles Smith 


os :r.e Freshman Charles Smith, Rid- 

xae ih s !Tvt..t: • ". ,J '- : Smith's leading scorer with a 17-ptmit 
t.s: .-V- : = '7.;^'5 iverage. scored 14 and Deon 

jMyjai; r.r.- ;'rr»? Hames finished with 12 for the 

t uses :7-:r * Broncs (21-9). 

KnLL-.-jW- 'n, Donny Marshall scored 14 
as Hirer > - --V ■ 1_: *2c* Joints and freshmen Doron Sheffer 
30 c; c( -* •.•11’“.* 7 ^ ^ a- ajTT; md Ray Allen 12 each for Con- 
ICEOl Eiv' :■ . 

ssfai, !od-. - _..* ' UCmrn, averaging 86.7 points 
i-a i- uid shooting 502 percent from the 
htr'ir'.~; " Idd this season, struggled offen- 

ft* , a c-‘ Tf t ' ' ' - rr J ® avely most of the game. In fact, the 

stir^’-V. " tfr ' : •'?• i-c? ^Ides* best weapon was the of- 
wZ : "r ' - r iiir rebound, accounting for 

“ 7 7 1- ' 5rr»ll? ievcn °f tbeir first 15 baskets. 

; : 5:5 - - -r The smaller Broncs, behind a 3- 

a -‘®" ■ • " > "f ® joint goal by Mark Wilcox and a 

THZT'.r.g hree-point play by Tim Pennix, 

lender, .7^'; ised a 10-2 run to lead 12-6 with 

' -?■ ir.-e ■■«.:'■ , ' { Z~-f^ 13:53 left in the first half. 

td *' Allen then hit a jumper and 3- 

--.• ... . jointer during a 9-0 run by Con- 
inci: -.- _ I ^Iiecticut before Rider scored the 

gr-.r.i: s: wxt six points for an 18-15 advan- 

; -:r - — “ " ■" Xjjtt 

it " “* The Huskies appeared to gain 

:: 'i” nomentum on Allox's rebound 
i,-j •^ _ Th . Jasket after a missed tree throw, a 

.-*■ K— - ■ - - i; "? Rider turnover on the inbounds 

/V . .j’l if 7 . . . - . jlay and Donny MarshalTs layup, 

- : : - - - si^ illinaqwnofeightseamds. 

That gave UCam a 28-24 lead, 


-' »int goal by Mark Wilcox and a 

. - hree-point play by Hm Pennix, 

-•-■V-M,” 7 ^ ised a 10-2 run to lead 12-6 with 
1 ^ i left in the first half. 

"‘ :,v Allen then hit a jumper and 3- 
.. jointer during a nm by Con- 
, I '..'^^iiecticut before Rider scored the 
' lexl six pants for an 18-15 advan- 


scconds left tied it, 29 - 29 , at half- 
time. 


Charleston (24-4), making its 
first appearance in the NCAA 


■?fi -i f pre-'.^r- "7 '■■■ -r ■ the NCAA East Regional. 

4 ^ Marshall, who averaged 25 8 
n cels'?.-;:*, a -1 V points this season, was hdd under 

! s ‘" : -"■ssiSV" for onJ y tbe third time in 32 
ams: 5 — l' games. He missed his first four 
r c# ll-V. '_r : t.. sb 015 wa® 2-for-7 while scoring 

’xz sinr—~ r " wdy six points in the first half. 

Siar -- V. . sr =■■ :-.i : 7?>5vi 801 *be Huskies, ranked fourth 
vj « ' : “ z -c-'. ^WnationaHy and the second seed in 

master*' S-.'-l V =“- r ' - .^ ^tbcEasU forced I5th-seeded Rider 


66 : La Wichita, Kansas, fr eshman 

Joe Smith bad 29 pants and IS games, led, 50-46, on Stacy Harris' 
rebounds as Maryland defeated layup with 6:17 remaining. 

Saint Louis in the fast round of the Harrison then madea3-pointer 
NCAA Midwest Regional. from the corner. After Charleston's 

Saint Louis, making its first tour- Thad Ddancyhitalayup, Harrison 
mem appearance since 1957, sank another 3-pointer from the 
aked confused on offense and top of the key to pull Wake Forest 
— even at 52 with 4:19 left. 

NCAA ROUNDUP Chmtetotfs Marion Busby, who 

. finished with 21 points, then made 

d no one rn match im with Smhh two free throws before Bhicas hit a 


namem appearance since 1957, 
looked conhised on offense and 

NCAA ROUNDUP 

had no one to match up with Smith, 


only the fourth freshman to make long-range shot to give Wake For- 


the All-ACC team in 47 years. «* at one-point lead. 

Maryland (17-1 1), the 10th seed, Harris made a 17-footer to give 
led by 15 points in the first half and 12ih-*eded Charleston a 56-55 
by II with 7:53 left in the g*m» lead, but Blucas then hit a 3-point- 
But seventh-seeded Saint Louis ral- or to put Wake in front After Dun- 
bed and closed to 64-6 1 with about can blocked a shot Wake Forest's 
four minutes remaining. Trelonme Hams sank a short 

The Billflcens, who started their jumper and Duncan hit two free 
season with a 14-game winning throws to give Wake a six-point 
streak, lost three of their last four l®*d with 1:22 remaining. 


er to put Wake in front After Dun- 
can blocked a shot Wake Forest's 
Trclonnie Harris sank a short 


streak, lost three of their 
games and finished 23-6. 


id with 1:22 remaining. 
Randolph Childress, who picked 


Saint Louis shot just 37 percent °P bis fourth foul with 11:23 to go, 
in the first half and fefl behind,' 23- stayed in the game and finished 
13, following a 10-2 run by the 14 points. Harrison also 
Terrapins. scored 14 for Wake Forest 

Maryland, making its first Charleston scored the first nine 
NCAA appearance since 1988, P 0 ™* 5 of *be game, and increased 
took a 30-15 lead with 4:12 left in ^ marpn to ] 16-4 m. Busby’s 3- 
ihe half before H Waldman pulled pomier with 13:03 left m the half. 


the Mlikens to within 35-30 at in- 
termission. 


CM dress later scored six j 
during a 1 0-0 run that gave 


Maryland regained control at the Forest a 25-22 lead, and the Demon 
start of the second half led, 62- Deacons hdd a 29-28 lead at half- 
51, od a basket by Smith, who had t “ne. 

15 points in the First half. ..... _ . _ 

Wake Forest 68, Charleston 5& ■ NA1A Champ Advances 
In Lexington, Kentucky, Marc Bhi- The defending champion, Ha- 

cas and Charlie Harrison each hit waii Pacific, war its second-round 
two 3-pointens during a late 16-6 gnnv» Thursday in the NAIA Divi- 
run that carried Wake Forest to sion 1 tournament, 97-78 over Aztt- 
victory over College of Charleston sa Pacific, in Tula, Oklahoma, 
in the first round of the NCAA in wintfiwr second-round 
Southeast Regional. in Tulsa, Life College of Georgia 

fifth-seeded Wake Forest (21- defeated Westmont, California, 85- 
11) also got a lift from the strong .65. 



Charlotte Finds 
Something to Be 
Defensive About 


Nick Van Exd of Los Angeles shooting over Brent Price of Washington during the Lakers’ victory. 


The Associated Press 

Defense is back in Charlotte 
with the return of Alonzo Mourn- 
ing and Larry Johnson from injury. 

The Hornets, last in the NBA m 
points allowed with 108.7 per 
game; have given up an average of 
98 j points while winning three of 
four games, including a 92-79 vic- 
tory over Atlanta on Wednesday 
night. 

Charlotte held the Hawks to 35 
percent shooting while bolding the 
opposition under 100 points for 
just the 19th tune in 61 games 

Mourning bad 20 poms and 
three blocked shots, and Johnson 
scored 16 points in his fourth game 
back from a sprained lower back 
injury. 

“We felt like this was a momen- 
tum builder” coach Allan Bristow 
said. “Our defense stepped it up.” 

The Hornets are 446 games be- 
hind New Jersey for the eighth and 
final playoff spa in the Eastern 
Conference. 

“I think this is the kind of effort 
we have to put forth to get back in 
the playoff picture,” said Mourn- 
ing, who was ejected late in the 
game after a scuffle with the 
Hawks' Kevin Willis. “It’s a big 
obstacle, but we have nothing to 
lose." 

The Hawks, who trailed by as 
many as 22 points in the second 
half, got as dose as right in the 
fourth quarter. 

Spurs 110, Trail Blazers 102: In 
San Anloaio, Dale EBis and David 
Robinson scored 27 points each for 
the Spurs and FHic ram*- within 
two of becoming the first NBA 
player with 1,000 3-point goals. 

Ellis had 19 points and three 3- 
poolers in the first half, but he 
trussed all three of his attempts in 
the second half 10 stay at 998 lor his 
career. 

Clifford Robinson scored 21 
points for Portland, which lost its 


fourth straight after a 10-1 sireak- 

Lakers 129, BuQets 94: In Los 
Angeles, Nick Van Exel had 21 
points and 1 1 assists and Los Ange- 
les manhandled visiting Washing- 
ton on the boards, outrebounding 
the Bullets 61-28. 

Sedale Threatt scored 12 of his 
16 points in the first quarter, lifting 
the Lakers to a 36-22 advantage the 
Bullets never threatened. 

Pacers 109, Sons 98: In India- 
napolis, Indiana won its 11th 
straight home game as Reggie 
Miller scored 21 of his 34 points in 

NBA HIGHIiGHTS 

the second half, rallying the Pacers 
from a 16-pont deficit against 
Phoenix. 

Kevin Johnson scored 23 points 
for Phoenix. 

The wild game featured 93 free 
throw, 63 personal fouls and five 
technicals, four of them on Indi- 
ana. 

Bulk 101, Celtics 100: In Boston, 
Scottie fippen’s 3-pointer with 51 
seconds left broke a tie, and Chica- 
go banded Boston its eighth loss in 
nine home games. 

Pippen's shot gave the Bulls a 
101-98 lead. Kevin Gamble hh a 
short jumper with 40 seconds left to 
pull the Celtics within a point. 

Boston got the ball bad: with 45 
seconds left after a 24-second viola- 
tion against the Bulls, but Dee 
Brown missed a 3-pointer with 2.4 
seconds left. 

Horace Grant led the Bulls with 
20 points. Brown scored 27 points 
for the Celtics, but just one in the 
final period. 

Magic 106, Mavericks 9& In Or- 
lando, the Magic dealt Dallas its 
ninth consecutive loss when Don- 
ald Royal hit a f alia way jumper at 
the buzzer. 

ShaquiDe O'Neal led the Magic 
with 34 pants and 21 rebounds. 


£ * . 
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Persistent, The Fellow 
Wins Cheltenham Cup 

Compiled bp Our Staff From Dhpatdta 

CHELTENHAM, England — French-trained The Fellow, twice 
beaten by a short head in the Qwjtenham Gold Cup, finally 
triumphed on Thursday in jump racing's most prestigious prize. 

> Ridden by Adam Kondrat, The Fellow, ar7- l chance, battled up 
the Cheltenham hill to hold off last year’s winner Jodami, the 6-4 
favorite ridden by Mark Dwyer. 

The Fellow effortlessly cleared the 22d and last barrier in the 3 
mile, 550 yard (3.72 kflameter) race, but Jodami stumbled over the 
hurdle, loang enough ground 10 put victory out of reach. 

Young Hustler, a 20-1 shot, ridden by Carl Llewellyn, finished 
third of the 15 runners. 

It was The Fellow's fourth attempt at winning the race. The horse 
finished fourth at Cheltenham last year after two agonizingly narrow 
defeats in 1991 and 1992. 

The Fellow was the first French-trained winner of the Gold Cup. 
Trainer Fran 90 is Doumen said: “He really deserved to win.” 

After the race. The Fellow was installed as the new favorite for the 
Grand National at Ain tree in Liverpool on April 9. (Reuters, AP) 


Northwestern Makes a Successful Return to Postseason Play 


The Associated Press 

It could be said that DePaul lost 
a doubleheader, first, it was the 
Grateful Dead; then Northwest- 
ern. 

“We have no excuses,” Depaul 
coach Joey Meyer said after his 
Blue Demons — denied a home 
game in the NTT because the Rose- 
moat Horizon was booked for a 
Grateful Dead concert — lost to 
city rival Northwestern, 69-68, 
Wednesday night at Evanston, Illi- 
nois. 

Northwestern’s Wildcats played 
like the postseason rookies they are 
during a shaky first half. They fell 
behind by 12 pants, but it was to 
be their night. 

“We understood from the begin- 
ning what the NIT means and we 
didn't want an emotional let- 
down,” said Wildcats guard Patrick 
Baldwin, who helped lead a sec- 


ond-half turnaround that produced 
a victory in Northwestern’s first 
postseason game in 11 years. “We 
were down in the first half, but we 
knew we could come back.” 

The Wildcats (15-13) finally took 
the lead with 4:17 to go whm Kip 
Kirkpatrick tipped in a missed frre 
throw. 

Baldwin bad 12 of his 21 in the' 
second half, including a stem dunk 
with 1:51 to go that gave the Wild- 
cats a three-point lead. 

DePauI (16-12) got 18 pants 
from Tom Klansdmndt, only five 
in the second half . 

Siena 76, Georgia Tech 6 & In 
Albany, New York, Dcremus Ben- 
nerman scored 33 pants for Siena 
(22-7), including a 3-pointer from 
fire top of the key that broke a 66 - 
66 tk with 56 seconds to go- 

Xavier ((Mo) 80, Mum (Ohio) 
68 : In Gndnnati, Brian Gram 


scored 17 points to lead Xavier (21- 
7), which survived a scoreless 
streak of 6:28 midway through the 
second half. 

Duquesne 75, N.C Charlotte 73: 
In Pittsburgh, Derrick Alston hit a 
short hook shot with eight secoods 


left, lifting Duquesne (17-12) to its 
first postseason victory in 14 years. 
Alston had 27 pants. 

Bradley 66, Murray State 58: In 
Peoria, Illinois, Deon Jackson and 

NIT ROUNDUP 

Chad Kline scored 16 points to 
lead the Braves. 

Murray State tied the game at 54 
on two free throws by Marcus 
Brown with 2:41 left. But Bradley 
(22-7) made 12 of 14 free throws in 
the last two minutes. 

Marcus Jones had 20 points for 
Murray State (23-6). 


TUane 76, Evansville 63: In Ev- 
ansville, Indiana, Kim Lewis 
scored a season-high 23 points and 
career point Na 1,001 for Tblane 
08-10). 

Tulane’s bruising man-to-man 
half-court defense stifled the Pur- 
ple Aces inside as Lewis went 4-for- 
7 from 3-poim range, loosening the 
inside defense of Evansville (21- 
H). 

New Orleans 79, Texas A&M 73: 
In New Orleans, Dedric Willough- 
by made a 3-pointer in overtime to 
put New Orleans (20-9) ahead to 
stay. 

Tony Madison led New Orleans 
with 18 points. 

Chuck Henderson led the Aggies 
(19-1 1) with 19 points. 

Vanderbilt 77; Oklahoma 67: In 
Norman, Oklahoma, Billy McCaf- 
frey and Ronnie McMahan took 
toe Commodores (17- 11) on a deci- 


sive second-half rally. McCaffrey 
scored 12 of his 16 points in the 
second half, and McMahan hit two 
big 3-pointers. 

Oklahoma (15-13) lost for the 
sixth time in seven games, ending 
its worst season since 1980-81, Billy 
Tubbs’s first as coach. 

Fresno State 79, Southern Cal 
76: In Fresno, California, Cari Ray 
Harris scored six of his 30 points in 
the final 2:31. Fresno State (20-10) 
trailed, 73-71, with just under three 
minutes left when Harris went to 
work 

Burt Harris, who led Southern 
Cal (16-12) with 20 points, missed a 
3-point attempt with less than 50 
seconds left in the game, and Fres- 
no State waked toe shot dock 
down to five before Carl Ray Har- 
ris hit an off-balance shot from the 
top of toe key for a four-point lead. 


A Gun Charge 
Against Maxwell 

The Associated Pros 

HOUSTON - Houston 
Rockets guard Vernon Max- 
well has been released on 
$ 1,000 bond after an inddent 
that allegedly led to the dis- 
covery of a handgun in his car. 

A county judge charged Max- 
well on Wednesday with unlaw- 
fully carrying a weapon, a mis- 
demeanor punishable by a year 
in jail, a $3,000 fine a both. 
Maxwell was arrested Tuesday 
in a cafeteria parking lot 

Last summer. Maxwell was 
arrested for arguing with an 
off-duty police officer who 
was working as a security 
guard at a Houston nightspot 


NFL to Consider the 2-Point Conversion 


m 


' : Z' : By Frank Litsky 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Tired of (hose 

- 18-15 or 9-6 National Football 

-i League games in whidi one team 

0 . . ■ v; j kicks a ton of field goals, toe other 

IN'' 1 '® 1 *’- . i locks one fewer and no one scores a 
• [ touchdown? Tired of watching 
... • • i kickoffs booming through the end 
■. | rone? Tired of watching a kick re- 
.. — j turner tmeel down in the end zone? 
_ So are the league owners, whose 

: \ - approach to toe game has tradi- 

: hoaaHy been stodgy rather than 

- „ 1 creative. But when the owners meet 

• V • - ' “ next week in Orlando, Florida, the 

“ ~ -■ jfip C ^petition Committee wil l rec - 
TTi-". ■£r-_’ ,s Drnmend that when a team scores a 

— touchdown, it can try two-pant 

conversion with a run or pass. 

- — a person familiar with the com- 
mittee discussions said that toe 
'■ : committee had unanimously rec- 
^ ' ] ommended toe two-pomt conver- 
_ - | skm option and that the owners 

■ j seemed sure to gp along with the 

•~ e ‘ proposal. 

” The competition committee is 
_ , also making two proposals to help 


restore the kickoff return. Fust, 
kickoffs would be made from toe 
30-yard line, rather than toe 35. 

In 1973, when kickoffs were 
made from the 40-yard line 74.4 
percent of them were returned. In 
1974, when kickoffs were moved to 
the 35, 92.1 percent of them were 
returned. Last season, oily 685 
percent were retumed. 

Joe Browne, ibeNFL’s vice pres- 
ident for communications, said the 
two-point option was one way to 
re-emphasize touchdowns and re 
ducenekl goals. Heated these fig- 
ures from last season to show how 
field goals had become more preva- 
lent: 

• Teams scored four touch- 
downs for every three field goals, as 
opposed to ratios of two to one in 
1983 and six to one in the 1960s. 

• field goals accounted for 24 
percent of the scoring, toe highest 
ever. 

• field-goal kickers made 76.6 
percent of their attempts as op- 
posed to 59 percent in 1970. 

Browne said two-pant conver- 
sion attempts were successful 43 


percent of toe time in colleges last 
season. 

In past years, almost everyone in 
the NFL opposed the two-point 
conversion. 

Coaches felt they faced enough 
difficult decisions during a game 
without one more, and hard-core 
traditionalists simply dismissed toe 
idea. 

But colleges have been offering 
the option since 1958, and it has 
made [bear game more exciting. 
Such former college head coaches 
as Dennis Green of the Minnesota 
VDrings, Bobby Ross of toe San 
Diego Chargers and Jimmy John- 
son of toe Dallas Cowboys have 
recommended that the NFL try it. 

The Competition Committee 
comprises eight owners, team offi- 
cials and coaches. The committee, 
with Coach Don Shula of the Mi- 
ami Dolphins and General Manag- 
er George Young of toe Giants as 
co-chairmen, studies playing rules 
and league procedures. Its recom- 
mendations to the owners are usu- 
ally accepted. 

In previous years, Young had 


opposed a two-point conversion. 
Now he said, “1 feel less negative 
than in the past” 

"We want to allow a team to be 
able to rally from a deficit,” Young 
stud. “We nave overtime, which is 
exciting. A two-point conversion 
can be viewed a little differently 
because late in a game, most coach- 
es who trail by a point will kick 
themselves into overtime rather 
than go fa two pants. But if a 
team is eight or 11 pants behind 
late in toe game, it might go fa two 
points.” 

Shnia , like Young, had never 
been comfortable with the idea erf a 
two-point conversion. But al- 
though Shula has one of the best 
field -goal Jockos in Fete Stcyano- 
vich, he is also uncomfortable with 
the rash of field goals. 

“I did not like the idea of tire 
two-point conversion at first,” 
Shut* said, ‘‘but toe more I looked 
at it, toe more I realized how it 
could help our league. I think it’s a 
way to bring not only excitement to 
the game, but to make scoring 
touchdowns a premium.” 



XBDflCg 



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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Mired in Entertainment 


Shirley MacLaine: What’s Going On Here? 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — A writer 
named Neil Postman pub- 
lished a book a few years ago argu- 
ing that the United States was en- 
tertaining itself to death. It was an 
entertaining book, which undercut 
the force of its argument. 

If Postman was really afraid we 
were being entertained to death, 
what was the idea of writing an 
entertaining book about it? Was he 
trying to speed us into the hearse? 

Still, he had a point. Cassandras 
bowl about drugs, tobacco and high- 
fat diet, but it's entertainment that 
has us all booked. Drug-free, tobac- 
co-cleansed, dietetically approved 
by the American Dreary Dining As- 
sociation millions of us may be, but 
cut off our daily entertainment fix 
and you will see an entire nation 
writhing in Promethean agonies. 

No, I am not about to beat up on 
poor old television one more tune. 
Television has our minds by the 
throat, and we all know it, and it’s 
useless sermonizing about it be- 
cause we are as powerless to stop 
gaping at it five, seven, 32 hours a 
day as the pathetic nicotine fiend is 


Not that there is any evidence 
yet that Whitewater involved the 
Clintons in such stuff. So far there 
is no evidence of anything except 
White House bumbling. 

□ 


By Karen De Witt 

Netv York Tima Service 


M ALIBU, California — Excoti for Ibe sound of Ihe 
sea outside, it is perfectly still in Shirley MacLaine’s 
beachfront apartment. She has shifted from talking about 
movies to the mystical, pondering the cause of the under- 


The reason this rickety construc- 
tion of innuendo and circumstance 
occupies the media so intensely is 
that presidents are central to the 
American need to be entertained. 

Government is too complicated 
to be entertaining: those 533 char- 
acters in Congress, all those myste- 
rious regulatory agencies, lobbies. 
Pentagon, State Department. It is a 
pandemonium of incomprehensi- 
ble realities. 

Worse than that, it is duLL Dull, 
dull, dull! A country dying for en- 
tertainment can’t stand for dull- 
ness, doesn't want incomprehensi- 
ble realities, doesn’t want hundreds 
of congresspeople, thousands of 
lawyers, hundreds of thousands of 
mind-glazing complications. 

It wants entertainment. This is 
why almost all media coverage of 
government centers on the presi- 
dent, his wife, his family and his 


lying chaos on the planet. 

“To me, it’s like we’re coming to the end of this 
millennium,” MacLaine says in her reasonable, woman- 
next-door manner. The red-haired, 59-ycar-old actress 
paps a tiny marshmallow from her fruit salad into her 
mouth. “We’re coming to the end of what is really based 
on the alignment of the planets. You can see it in all these 
weather changes. You can see it in human behavior 
becoming more erratic and bizarre. You're bound to look 
into yourself and say: What’s going on here? Why does 
this all seem like a science-fiction movie? Why does the 
world seem like its having a nervous breakdown?” 

MacLaine, who has written seven books about reincar- 
nation and psychic communication, has made it very dear 
at the outset of this interview that die does not want to be 
identified with kookiness. But since the 1983 publication 
of her best-selling “Out on a Limb,'’ in which she de- 
scribed her reincarnations and out-of-body experiences, 
her name will be forever linked to a certain brand of 
mysticism. 

The reason she is submitting to a barrage of journalistic 
intrusions over lunch is to promote her latest movie, 
“Guarding Tess.” in winch she plays an irascible presiden- 
tial widow who drives her Secret Service agents crazy. The 
movie, which opened to favorable notices, is No. 1 at the 
box office this week in the United States. 

But there is no escaping the shallow trays filled with 
psychic crystals scattered about the apartment (she does 
insist that tbe one in front of her be removed when she is 
photographed) or the beachfront doormat that says “Wel- 
come to UFOs and their crews.” 

People don’t need to agree with her particular spiritual 
stance (she points out that her philosophical outlook is 
almost mainstream now with Hillary Rodham Clinton 
talking about a spiritual need to do her work and Bill 
Moyers dedicating whole television series to alternative 
medicine), she just thinks jt cynical to ridicule her beliefs. 

It is, she says, “tacky, tacky, tacky” when people — 
specifically journalists — make those metaphysical com- 
parisons about her work. “When a person reviews one of 
my movies or my show. I really think it is tacky, tacky 
journalism to mute a metaphysical joke about whatever 
I’ve done in my theatrical work,” she says. “The ‘1 wonder 
what incarnation this is that she thought whe was play- 
ing?* or “She played it like it was from one of her old 


powerless to stop himself from 
fighting just one more. 


fighting just one more. 

a 

It’s the so-called Whitewater 
business that brings Postman’s the- 
sis to mind. The likelihood that 
Whitewater amounts to more than 
a hill of beans — or at the most, 
two or three hills of beans — seems 
very slight to me. 

Whatever was done seezns to have 
been done on the small-bore Arkan- 
sas scale, involving a small-bore sav- 
ings and loan and some two-bit 
money transactions with BiD Gin- 
ton back whoa Ik was governor of 
Arkansas, a small-bore statesman in 
the kind of environment where the 
establishment usually consists of tbe 

local real-estate speculator, two law- 
yers, a feed-grain capitalist and tbe 
town’s undertaker. 

If there was dirty pool, obviously 
it should not be excused. With a 
high-powered counsel on tbejob, it 
obviously won't be. Obviously, the 
Clintons will pay dearly for iL 

Still, Washington reporters, who 
are in a lather about it — “in Wa- 
tergate mode;” George Bush might 
have said — must have enough ex- 
perience of their own state legisla- 
tures to know that state capitals are 
natural breeding cultures for 
cheesy little back-scratcher deals. 


entourage. They provide a manage- 
ably small cast for a national sit- 


com, or soap opera, or docu drama, 
making it easy for media people to 
persuade themselves they are cov- 
ering the news while mostly just 
entertaining us. 

Tbe Whitewater business is a 
natural for a press that needs to be 
entertaining. The realities of Clin- 
ton governance — health care and 
welfare reforms, declining stan- 
dards of living, alarming trade im- 
balances — are hard to cover in the 
press and impossible to cover on 
television in ways that entertain. 

□ 

Whitewater, on the other hand, 
is a scriptwriter’s delight. We have 
fearless reporters going jaw-to-jaw 
with tbe star of the show. We have 
bush-league Ricfaefieus like Dole 
and D’Amato playing the Suave 
Forces of Righteousness on cam- 
era. We have justification for end- 
less pondering about the first lady. 

No. Watergate it’s not, nor even 
Iran-contra, both of which were 
about criminal abuses of presiden- 
tial power. Big stuff, really great 
shows, those. Still Whitewater is 
the best news in Washington now 
that Barbra Streisand no longer 
guests at the White House. 



The Cult of BaUadur? 
Sculpture Is Withdrawn 


An outsize sculpted head of 
Prime Minister Edouard Baling 
of France has been withdrawn from 

an exhibition in Paris after he was 


ribbed on satirical television pro-- 
grams and in the weekly Canard"- 


Enchain e. Tbe plaster sculpture bv 
Georges Oudot was to have been r - 
the highlight of an exhibition at tig- 1 
Galene de la Presidence, but tv® f|,i) I 
withdrawn at the request of the |{[l J 
prime minister' s office and replaced 

by a photograph. Oudot said on tbe 

radio that the bust had been with, t -j 
drawn because it was “voy fragfleT llm l 
but sources quoted by Ageoce ill' 
France-Presse said Bahadur did not ' 
want to appear to be fostering a 
“personality culL” , I. t ‘i- 

□ irr - 


Sea 

,,1 1 


■ Mil"*'*' * 

i*" 1 


Shirley MacLaine with Nicolas Cage in her new movie, “Guarding Tess.” 


Egyptian lives." 

The apartment is sparse, beige-carpeted and, by Holly- 
wood standards, modest But n has a wide view of the 
Pacific. Polished red driftwood furniture dominates the 
room. Nearivy tables hold pictures of MacLaine at various 
stages in her careen of her and her brother, Warren Beatty; 
their parents: of friends Eke Jack Nicholson and Frank 
Sinatra; of bo- daughter. Stephanie Sachiko; of her godchil- 
dren; of the Dalai Lama, and of Stephen Hawking, the 
Cambridge University cosmologist who has Lou Going's 
<n«a« and can aimmnniaite only through a computer. 

“Stephen Hawking,” she says. “I just love that man 
because he’s had to Eve in his own universe, and from that 
extraordinary space within himself he is helping us under- 
stand the secrets of the outer universe.” The two were 


introduced 10 years ago by their mutual editor at Bantam 
Books and have been friends ever since. 

But enough of that, she says. This is a lunch to talk up 
MacLainc’s latest picture, and so she gamely throws 
herself into its promotion. “What goes on wHh people who 
are now out of power, who fed that their privacy is being 
invaded at every juncture: 1 just love tbe frustration and 
humor in that’’ she says of her character, Tess Carlisle. 
Her co-star, Nicholas Cage, plays a by-the-book special 
agent in charge who longs for the kind of macho duty - that 
features weaponry so sophisticated h is identified by 
numbers and letters. 

“I love the study of tbe interplay that goes os in that 
particular situation,” she says. “People who are in charap 
of taking care of people out of power have their own put- 
upon agendas.” 

MacLaine has spent lour decades in the movie business, 
playing roles Eke that of the vulnerable waif in “Tbe 
Apartment” (1960) to the smart-mouthed hooker in “Irma 
La Douce” (1963) and, in more recent years, a series of 
eccentric seniors Eke the cantankerous Aurora Greenway 
of “Terms of Endearment," the 1983 film that brought her 


as 1 read through the whole thing. I just went back and 
where it said Tess Carlisle, 75, 1 put Tess Carlisle, 57, and 
didn’t change another damn thing.” 

And bow old then is Tess Carlisle in MacLaine’s mind? 
“She’s a woman of indeterminate age like all the people 
I’ve been playing.” says MacLaine. who wore makeup and 
a trig to make her look older. “She's too old for a lot of the 
other Hollywood actresses to {day. Those are tbe ones I’m 
getting, and I have to be careful of iL” 

What MacLaine longs for — as what 40-plus woman 
does not — is a film that would portray a woman of a 
certain age as vital dynamic, sexy. “If they would only 
write for someone over 45 a love story,” she says. 


Prince Edward bad a belated - ■ t 
30th birthday party with his friend v M ’- L 
Sophie Rbys-Jones. fading rumors 

of a deepening romantic attach- 
ment Queen Elizabeth's youngest 
child was out of tbe country when 
he turned 30 on March 10. Rhys- 
Jones, 29. a public relations consul ‘ 
tant joined him and a dozen 
friends at London's Savoy H«d 
for a dinner. 

□ 


an Academy Award. She wiO reprise the role in a planned 
remake, “Evening, Star.” 


remake, “Evening Star.” 

Her last half-dozen movies have featured her playing 
irascible but lovable women of what she calls “an indeter- 
minate age.” She says she has always found playing older 
women interesting because they have “so much wisdom, 
the parts are richer.” But there is also a slight irritation 
with the Imitations of these roles. 

‘They sent me the script, which said Tess Carlisle, 75. 
and I thought: Should I be insulted or should I reaEze that 
this is a compliment as long as I can see the gold under 
here?” MacLaine says. “So 1 made one change in the script 


'How do you see this character? ” she says. But she said 
she is writing another book that will deal with just that 
kind of woman. That woman would have to be as complex 
as MacLaine. ambitious enough to Eve on tomato ketchup 
and pickles when she arrives in New York to work on 
Broadway. She would have to have one of those fairy-tale 
occurrences to thrust her into a starring role, as did 
MacLaine. when she became Gladys in “The Pajama 
Game” after tbe star. Carol Haney, injured her ankle a few 


days before tbe show’s opening in 1954. 
She would have to be a member of the 1 


She would have to be a member of the 1960s gang of 
actors called the “clan” or “rat pack,'* a group that 
included Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr. 
She would have to be socially and politically active, 
campaigning for politicians like tbe Kennedy*, Senator 
George S. McGovern, for civil rights, against the Vietnam 
War. And. “Oh, of coarse,” she would have to be interest- 
ed in tbe spiritual and mystical she says with a wave of her 
hand. 


The opera star Luciano Pavarotti 
says he was aware of the controver- 
sy surrounding his concert in Ma- 
nila, but was determined to go to 
the Philippines anyway. Some 
feathers were ruffled when tickets 
were priced as high as 25.000 pesos 
(S900) far the concert, to be held on 
Friday, tbe 66ib birthday of Presi- 
dent FWd Ramos. Bat Pavarotti 
said at a news conference, “It has 
been my desire to come here for a 
long time.” Several enormous TV 
screens have been set up oat&cff 
the concert hall to carry the prtK ’ 
gram to a wider audience. 

□ 

Arthur Kent, the former “Dale- ' 
line NBC' correspondent who filed 
a lawsuit over ms firing in 1992, 
announced an out-of-court settle- ' 
menL Tbe terms were not dis- 
closed. Kent, who cow works for - 
Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in 
Toronto, was suspended on Aug 
12, 1992. The network said he re- 
fused an assignment in Croatia 


New York Tima Service 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appear* on Page* 8, 1 1 & 19 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weatfier. 


Copartaom 
Costa (MSd 
Dut*i 

E*N> 


Today 
Mgh Loir 
OF OF 
22/71 13155 
0/43 4 XV 

1060 -2 «g 
16/01 0/40 

18*4 10/50 
11/52 3137 

3/37 <1127 
6/43 1/34 

0/43 205 

1/34 -4125 
21/70 13*5 
4/» -3/27 
307 -1/31 
12/53 5/41 : 

7/44 307 i 




Today 
Mgh Loa 

C1F OF 








HsrgKong 

FtewDoM 

Smi 


32 OB 26/78 
1203 104 
2000 1740 
32/09 22/71 
32/09 10154 
11/52 104 

16/81 7/44 

30/00 24/75 
21/70 10*1 
1203 £05 


W M* Lot V 
OF OF 
I 3403 25/77 pc 
S 12/53 104 pc 
I 21/70 10/51 pc 
pc 33/91 23/73 pc 
pc 32/09 10/M pc 
a 0/40 -2/29 pc 
C 16/50 0/43 pc 
Sh 31/00 24/75 pc 
r 23/73 Ifi/si pc 
S 13/55 307 pc 




Deptti Htn. 
L U rtatei 


Rasort L U 

Andorra 

Pas de la Casa 100 iso 
Sokteu 100 195 


Res. Snow Last 
Ptstas State Snow 


Depth Ifc. Be*- Snow Last 
L UPtetea Plata* Stale Snow 


Open spmg 3/13 Assort iwy open, mossy goon 
Open Var 3/13 Reaon tt/ty open, good up tap 


Coyrmayour 

Setva 

SestriOre 


65 735 Fair 
10 75 Far 
80 200 Good 


Some Spmg 3/3 Hff 27 Hits open, good above 3vn • 
Open Spmg 3/ 4 72 75 rts or n . rare spas bekm ; 
Opan Pctcd 3 3J > Mils cpn. good spring stag 


Ganna 

II/S2 

GM3 ah 

0/48 

0/32 * 

Hrfs Wo 

-3C7 

-8/10 

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-307 

-9/10 ll 

MvU 

1Z/S3 

4/39 

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13/55 

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UiUw 

am 

lerei 

s 

23/73 

16*1 pc 

Lubai 

PI /TO 

12«3 

pc 

18*4 

11«2 a 

London 

8/46 

2/35 

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7/44 

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Madrid 

am 

0/40 

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Mfem 

11/E2 

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16/51 

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North America 

MUrler weather wU return to 
rna Northeast lor a Bros this 
weekend. Showers and 
OwidBfStcxms wffi empt over 
ihe Plains late h (he week- 
end and spread toward 
Chicago and DetrolL Rain 
will also spread Into Port- 
land. Heavy snow wil blan- 
ket parte o» (he Upper Mid- 
west late in the weekend. 


Europe 

The northern half of Europe 
wfl have ch*y weather this 
weekend with areas of mow. 
Snow Is most likely from 
Stockholm to Helsinki. 
Madrid and Lisbon wR) have 
sunny, mild weather this 
weekend. Rain will soak 
so uth eastern Europe. Lon- 
don to Paris will have dry, 
chilly weather. 


Asia 

Rain will spread northward 
Irom Taiwan Saturday, 
reaching Japan and Korea 


M0gn 

C<**TOTn 

O mteiu 


by early next week. Tokyo 
will be dry and mild, bul 
showers are possible by 
Monday. Sect* will be mider 
Oils weekend with showers 
by Sunday. Beijing will be 
dry and mfldar whfle Manila 
wfl be sunny and hot. 


18/04 12/53 s 19*6 13*5 pc 
24/75 14*7 pc zrma 17*2 pc 
73/73 12*3 a 21/70 11*2 pc 
24/75 7*4 pc 20/03 11*2 PC 
32*8 20/79 pc 32*0 27100 pc 
26/79 11*2 » 20/79 13*5 pc 
1»*0 0*0 % 21/70 12*3 pc 


AasMa 

techgl 

KltzbuheJ 

Obergurgl 

Saalbach 

SLAnton 


35 7 BO Fah 
0 100 Spmg 
60 130 Good 
20 70 Spmg 
25 270 Far 


Open Var 3<l7 Aflhfte open good above Tflftjm 
Ctsd Hvy 3/4 35 '6* frits open, ippa runs tun 
Sts/l Var 3/6 All 22 rifts open, fovety upper ptstes 
Same Hvy 3/7? AS apn. upper slopes improving 
Ssh Hvy 3/6 26/35 hfls Opn. loemr runs just ok 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Sfttebcug 

TMtei 

Venlca 


9«» 3/37 1 11152 
-4125 -7 HO jn -3/27 
11152 0*3 ah 16*9 
7*4 am c io«o 
3/37 -3/27 c 3*7 
9/40 3*7 r 12*3 


Oceania 

Auddand 23/73 17*2 pc 23/73 10*1 pc 
Ru*«, 22/7i 15*9 pc 23/73 17*2 pc 


. Today 
High Lot 

OF C/F 
21/70 14*7 
26/79 14*7 
10*4 7/44 

10*4 11*2 
34/93 12*3 
20/79 >0*0 


Rijwfi 20/79 W*0 

Lagan d: s-sumy. penalty 
snaww. Hot. W-Weathar. 


W Mgh law W 

OP OF 
s 21/70 14*7 pc 
a 26/70 13*3 pc 
a 17*2 8*0 pc 

a 18*4 11*2 pc 
• 34/93 12*3 pc 
« 27*0 13*5 pc 


Today Toaaanow 

M* Lot W High Lot W 

of of of car 

BwnnAn 25/77 17 1® pc 27/80 10*4 pc 

Cwoon 29*4 20*8 a 28*4 20*0 pc 

Una 20/79 21/70 a 27*0 2 1/70 pc 

UadeoCty 25/77 9*0 pc 25/77 9/48 pc 

FBodeJonaho 31/88 26/77 pc 81*8 25/77 pc 

Smtoga Z710O 12*3 a 31*8 14*7 pc 


Decor 
HanokAi 
Hwokjn 
Lu Antrim 


Franc* 

Alpe dHuez 115 300 

Lea Arcs 95 310 

Avorfaz 155 195 

Chamonix 20 320 

Courchevel 120 ISO 

Les Deux Alpee 35 310 
tsola 110 170 

Mfeibel 45 175 

La Ptagne 125 260 

Serre Chevalier 20 v»0 
Trgnes 130 266 

Val d lsfire 105 310 

Val Thorena 100 250 


Opwi Hvy 
Open Hvy 
Open Spmg 
Steh Hry 
Open Hvy 
Cbd Var 
Open Spmg 
Open Hvy 
Open Var 
Steh h«v 
O pen Var 
Op«i Var 
Open Crest 


3/3 75/86 Brs open, snow son 
3-3 57 -6* rifts opn. bast <w arc 2rim 
3/3 Att 41 Me open, upper Stapes good 
3'3 40 -46 «ts opn. grand more goad 
3/13 At open, spring spring 
3/4 45 -65 Ms opn. 1.2m of snow 
3«1 24/26 fcfts qperv. spring sfcang 
3/3 dt/49 rifts open, heavy conations 
3/3 tOSm2 rifts open, n slopes best 
2/28 72-77 ttsopn. upper slopes good 
3-13 59 -61 Ills opn. grand mottv g/tut 
3/12 60/51 lifts open, plenty good sV'g 
3<6 At 29 rifts open, n slopes good 


Ge»o 

Spain 

La Molina 

Swr ftxaHa pd 

Arose 

Crans Montana 

Davos 

Grindefwafd 

Si. Moritz 

Verbier 

Wengen 

Zermatt 


90150 Good 


v* 3'12 ASMtso ton. goooskl'g. newgpe 




Open spmg 2/20 9, 1 5 Ms opn. best early muimg 


Open Spmg 
Worn Spmg 
Open Var 
Cfcd Hvy 
Open Spmg 
Steh Hvy 
Cted Hvy 
Some Var 


3/ 13 At hits opn. good above HOQn 
3/2 ah Mts o can. baa a&av* 3QIW 
3-13 All ufts opn. sugary below 2000m 
3/6 2S- 33 Hits open, best over t909a 
3-4 Ail 64 nils open, good pOK stav 
3 6 37 39msopn.lorm5miMgoal 
3 /6 18 23 bits open, upper slopes c* 
3/3 ~0 '73 hits open, best above 1 frn 


Germany 

Garrmsch 

Obwstdort 


Far Cted Spmg 3/16 26.' 38 ms con, goodaoovg 1700m 
Fair Cted vw 3/17 25 27 Ma open snowing \g> up 


U.S. 

Aspen 

Heavenly 

Mammoth 

Park City 

Steamboat 

Talluride 

Vail 


Open Sp/ng 3 9 
Open Var 3 6 
Opan PckP 3/9 
Open Var 3 /13 
Open Var 3. ’9 
Open Var 3/12 
Open Pcfcd 3/9 


AH a frits open 
2 1 24 Hits open 
Z~ 30 lifts open 
i-l Iris open 
19 20 i<fts open 
AO 1 0 hits open 
AH 35 hits open 


douty* wtoudy. shshowers, Mhunderstoma. wain, sf-snow Hurries, 

AB maps, foreesat* and data provided by Accn-Wedhcr, Inc. C 1994 


Italy 

Botttuo 

Cervfnia 

Cortina 


5 135 Fair Soma Hvy 3/14 15' 17 Iris opn. good ntxwe 2000m 

35 285 Good Open Sprng 3/3 AH Ms opn reaper slopes good 

5 76 Far Cted Spmg 2/6 38 40 frits open, lower stapes poor 


WhBttef 55 270 Good Open Var 2:17 AO fills eng ptsles open 

Key UU Depth m cm on lower and upper slopes. Mtn. Pfstofi-MountainmJs pees. Re* 
Plates Rins leading to resort vUage. AnAnfflCW snow. 

Reports suopbea Dy mo Ski Quo Of Creel Br*s* 


■eekh 


anac 


Ilwel in a maid without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABET Access Numbers. 

How to can around the world. 

1. Using the chan below, find the counuyyou are calling from 
1 Dial the con«poriding Ana - Access Number. 

5. An Arer English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number vou wish io call or connect you to a 
customer service representative. ’ 

To receive your free waDet card of ABETS Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 
the country you’re in and ask for Customer Service: 


^ Curb 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA/PAOFiC 

Australia 0014 - 881-011 


ChtaaJKP+4 

Guam 

Hong Kong 
Iodtev 


New Zealand 


SafrMf 


Sri Lanka 
Taiwan- 
Thailand* 


. arakvgeam ~ l Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

the US. directly from over 1 25 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at3 a-m. knowing they’ll get the message in 
yOUr voice 31 a more polite hour. Ail this is now possible with ABff 1 

- - 1 -' • To use these services, dial the AE5T Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 

help you need. With these Access Numbers and your AIST Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AKT Calling Card or you’d like more information on AIST global sen-ices, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


A gatrtar- 

Belgium* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia'* 

OecfaBep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

G ermany 

Greece* 


keLind** 


~ 10831 

018-872 

800-1111 

000-117 

001*801-10 

oo3»m 

009-11 

ir 

800-0011 

000-911 

MW 

235-2872 : 

800-pi n-ni 

430-130 

0080-102880 

0019-991-1111 

EUROPE 

8*14111 

022-903-011 

P7H-T 1-0010 

OP-lHOfrOOIQ 

99-38-0011 

00-420-00101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

jgajgn 

0130-0010 

00800-1311 

00*80001111 

999-001 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Wand 1800650000 

~ 172-1011 

riccfHrmtefa* 155-00-11 

lidnanto* 8*1 96 

tuxemhourg 0 - 800-0111 

Mate* 0800890-110, 

Monaco* 19*0011 

W rrfa e rim te* OSOZZ-9111 

Norway* 800-190-11 

Poland**" 0*0104800111 

Po»t°g«r 05017-1-288 

BOPWmte 01800-4288 . 

15 5-5042 

SkrraJd* 0042080101 

Sp«to 9009900-11 

020-795-611 

ftrtc Miftm d* 155-00-11 

U-g- 0500890011 

SUPPLE EAST 


Nrifarrianda* 


COUNTRY 

Colombi a 

j CMBBtfl 

Ecuador 

H&jtwdorti 

■Guatemala* 


Potent**” 


ACCESS NUMBER 
980-110010 ' 

IM 

119 

190 

190 

165 

1Z3 

958004624240 

*gna) 174 

109 

191- 

556 

000410 

83011-120 


Bahrain 

Cypms* 

lara d 

Kuwafc 

Irtenw iOtiraQ 

Saudi Arabtar 

Tnrfcey* 


800001 
OHO- 90010 . 
177-100-2727 
B00-Z88 
426801 
1-800-100 
00800-12277* 


AMERICAS 

A/geodna* 001800-200-1111 


Honduras^ 125 

MerictteAA 95800-4624240 

Nicaragua (ManagoaT 174 

Panama 109 

Penr 191- 

Suriname 156 

Uruguay QQ0410 

Venezuela** 80011-120 

CABIBW*H 

Bahamas 1800872-2881 

, Bennuda * 1-800872-2881 

■Bridflh VX 1-800-872-2881 , 

Cayman triands 1-800872-2881. 

fo enada ’ 1-800-872-2881 

****** 001-600-972-2883 

Jamaica ” 0800872-2881 : 

gnteAnia 001800872-2881 

■ St- Kms/Ncvto 1-800-872-2881 

AFRICA 

510-0200 


Bdre* 

BoUvfa* 

Brazil 

Chfle 


555 

0800-1111 

0008010 

00*8312’ 


Gabon? 

Kenya* ~ 

Urerta 

■Malawi- - 



AT&T 


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l*«fc.-84e»ptt*liw ni » lT m.Uwup, 
ytC wr wram a v h juWr irwi h.ilxn wm- m»»*J 

cost terilCanM \nL«|Ar> irf*i 
Alar nMlMnci* wVhtuliif kw jll n». ,vnimty~. h^.,i *-—■ 

*1* | 4’4-r h, "* , ' , ‘'r 1,,l ‘*T<'«'4n4niirni.ni. 1 -j,dr,„j w | lltt 

iteV-4. 


00*801= 

ooiir 

0800-10 

797-797 * 

101-1992 


Wi/4<lvhi*inni n), , 
— Ci 4ini *-jJTirv! ,wli . 




r ** ^*1 * « jiLiH; [ dm g|r jfvjs 
A Ate jd nci nml dul han> 


© 199 ^ Area: 


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