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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON post ' 




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By Tod Robberson 

Pm Seri** 

aft^'oSr 0 ^’ 44 51101 10 toth Wednesday 
campaigning in Tijuana, hS 
been almost certain in 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Friday, March 25, 1994 


Leading Candidate Is Slain 


No. 34,545 


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? “ MIred “ Ihe “Ml -noons of 
Mr. Salmas six-year term — and because Mr 
Colono s&scension lo the presidency was virtu^ 
ally assured — the killing carried almost the 
s^e waght as if the president himself had 
been the assassin s target. 

“fins is a national nightmare," said an an 
wxmcer on Mexico QryVfSdS Mil 
• Tnt wspected assassin was identified as 

^SK2£, V’ “* «“*- 

A S irtt ? I . lold “ ,ve stigators he 
had bought the Brazilian-made 38-caliber 

V* laying is fikdy to help define a new 
identity for Mexico. Page 3. 

handgun used in the assassination several 
weeks ago with the intention of Mr 
Cotosio. Mr. Abuno reportedly told the au- 
thorities he was a pacifist and had written 
books about pacifism. 

{The weapon was reported by U.S. officials 
Thursday to have been originallypiirchased by 
a man in San Francisco in 1977. They said they 

. were seeking the man in order to determine how 

and when the gun readied Mexico.] 

The candidate’s death threatened to send 
shock waves through Mexican financial mar , 
hets at a time when international investors were 
looking forward to a seamless transition of 
power and the continuation of economic re- 
forms engineered by Mr. SaKn»* 

.In order to avert a potential crash 

Thursday, Mr. Salinas ordered the stock mar- 
ket, banks and currency exchange houses 
■dosed to prevent a sudden run on dollars. 

With Mr. Colosio out of the picture, Mr. 
Salinas and the party leadership have suddenly 
been thrust into a crisis-management mode. 
The party executive committee held an emer- 
gency meeting Thursday morning. Traditional- 
ly, however, it has been the mcninhwii presi- 
dent's prerogative to name his successor. 

The party’s acceptance of the president's 
dictates on candidate choices has given rise to 
criticism, particularly among opposition par- 
ties, that Mexico’s political system is anti-dem- 
ocratic. Underscoring that is the absence of a ■ 
runner-up candidate to take Mr. Cdosio’s i 
place — bec ause there was never a list of • 
candidates presented Tor a vote within die par- { 

Diplomats said teat while Mr. Cotosio’s 
death has thrown the political system into cri- ' 
sis, it could have the effect of democratizing the 

See MEXICO, Page 4 



M&rNdB*iMctace Pmcc^mc 


Members of Mexico’s ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party carrying the coffin of Luis Donaldo Colosio to a hearee in Tijuana for the night to Mexico CSty. 

Assassination Shakes World Markets and Dollar 


By Lawrence M alkin 

International Herald Tribune 
NEW YORK — The assassination of Mexi- 
co’s leading presidential candidate shook the 
world's already nervous financial markets 
Thursday, but President Bill Gin ton offered 
help in stabilizing tee peso while financial and 
political analysts sod the Jong-term outlook for 
the country was still good 
Markets in Mexico were shut down for the 
day following Wednesday night’s shooting of 
Loos Donaldo Colosio in Tijuana. 

Teldfonos de Mexico traded off 6 percent on 
WaO Street, and other Mexican blue chips were 


off somewhat less, but the principal market 
focus will not be on the Mexico City’s bolsa 
when it reopens but on Mexico’s currency. 

Fears that foreign investors would puD their 
money ont of Mexico exaggerated the pressure 
on the dollar, which was already trading anx- 
iously because of tee upward trend in short-, 
tenn interest rates and Wednesday’s quarter- 
point rise in U.S. banks’ prime rates, (rage T I) 

On Wall Street, worries about interest rates 
joined geopolitical concerns ranging from 
North Korea to Russia to Mexico City to pull 
down tong bond prices and push up bond 
yields. The benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 


closed with ayield of 6.95 percent, higher than 
before tee Fed tightened credit on Tuesday. 

The bearish bond markets pulled down 
stocks on Thursday, and tee Dow Jones indus- 
trial index closed 48.37 points weaker ai 
3,821.09. 

In .(he medium term, both Washington and 
Wall Street objected jittery and volatile mar- 
kets in Mexico through much of tee spring and 
summer until the August presidential elections, 
but few found that cause for alarm. 

The first and probably the most important 
financial test for tee Mexican government will 

See MARKETS, Page 12 


Down 

48.37 


Down 

030% 


3.821 .09 . 112.63 ^ 

r.' *. .. . .V , .. i. .ii-eL" 


The Dollar 

NewYortc. 

DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


Thurs close 
1-668 
1.4975 
104.55 
5.7038 


4ou8cfc»a 

1-6815 

1.4975 

106.325 

5.745 


Commanders 
In Algeria 
Dig In for 
A Long Fight 

Army’s Chief Is Given 
New Powers , Dialogue 
With Militants Rejected 

By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — Top Algerian military and security 
commanders have apparently adopted a fight- 
to-the-end policy in their effort to end an Islam- 
ic fundamentalist insurgency, senior Algerian 
officials said Thursday. 

In interviews, the officials noted teat the 
government’s decision Wednesday to mobilize 
army reserves had come on the heels of a secret 
directive a few days ago, by the select group of 
generals who nm the country, to grant the 
army’s chief of staff. General Mohammed La- 
man, a well-known hard-liner, the powers of 
defense minister. 

Advocates of the hard-line policy seem to 
reflect a majority view among top army gener- 
als, the senior officials stressed, bo t not a unani- 
mous one. 

They said a majority of the military leaders 
also wanted to abort plans for a dialogue with 
Muslim militants, advocated by tee country’s 
appointed president, Uanrine Zeroual, a for- 
mer genera] named to his job by the army. The 
officials said a minority among army chiefs 
apparently believed that sharing power with 
fundamentalists was still worth exploring. 

[Foreign Minister Alain Juppfe erf France said 
Thursday that the security situation in Algeria 
was rapidly deteriorating, adding that the out- 
look for the North African state was poor. 
Agence France-Presse reported from Pans. • 
[The situation in Algeria “is deteriorating 
sharply” Mr. Juppe said. “The news is not 

The mobilization decision was announced by 
a key member of the hard-line group of officers 
in the cabinet. Interior Munster S afari Saadi. 
The fateful step has yet to be confirmed by the 
top command, but its announcement clearly 
reflected the thinki ng of senior miliiary leaders 
who believe greater force can end the two-year- 
old Islamic insurgency, which has taken 3,000 
lives and significantly weakened Algeria’s bat- 
tered economy. 

In theory, mobilization of reserves could add 
150,000 soldiers and officers to the hard- 
pressed Algerian Array. The reserves, up to age 
50, have never been mobilized before. But offi- 
cials said it was far from clear that such a move 
could be successful, given the chaotic situation 
and the defection of hundreds of regular offi- 
cers and soldiers to join the rebels. 

The Islamic insurgency began after the mili- 
tary canceled elections teat were certain to 

See ALGERIA, Page 4 


For UN Force in Mogadishu, the Comforts of Home 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Peat Service 

MOGADISHU, Somalia — Street lights 
bum brightly again here, although the city 
has been without an electrical grid for three 
years. 

Roads are again being paved, although the 
city’s public works department has long since 
.vanished. 

Houses are again being built; a suburban 
development of 100 homes is taking shape 
with sewer, water, telephone and power con- 
nections. 

Yet, all these trappings of civilization — 
from chilled chocolate milk to don’t-drink- 
and -drive signs — remain within the fortified 

32-hectare (80-acre) compound erf the United 
Nations Operation in Somalia, from which 
almost all of Somalia’s 9 million people are 
excluded at gunpoint 

The United Nations plans to speed rough- 
ly $].6 billion on its militaiy mission here 
over a 19- month period ending in December, 
while its Humanitarian aid program for So- 
malis seems stalled. Of the money devoted to 

the militaiy, officials here estimate that only 
S72 million — 4 percent — will work its way 
into the Somali economy. 

Even as the UN militaiy c omm a nd here is 
disbursing money — mostly to foreign cot- 



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U5. Marines waiting on So malia beach Thursday to be transported to their ship. 


tractors and military contingents — to build 
its compound with Western-style comforts, 
planners are considering how best to aban- 
don what they have built in anticipation that 


the UN mandate in Somalia will expire a year 
from now. 

“The truth is that in tee Unosom peace- 
keeping budget there is no provision for hu- 


manitarian expenditures," said a senior UN 
force official, who spoke cm condition that he 
not be identified. “We’re not into repairing 
mosques and schools and teat sort of thing . 
Economic and social development in Somalia 
is not our business, and it never has been." 

“That’s the task of tee humanitarian side 
of tee UN," the official added. “We came 
here to protect them, to enable them to get on 
with the job. But that’s been difficult, h 
hasn't happened." 

The budget for the UN force here for Nov. 
i to May 31 is $639 million, according to UN 
figures. That comes atop about 5560 million 
spent from tee beginning of the operation in 
May 1993 through last October, planners 
hoe expect another $500 million to carry 
them through the second half of 1994. 

Richard W. Bogosian, the senior U.S. dip- 
lomat in Somalia, said that the UN Operation 
in Somalia could be criticized “for gold-plat- 
ing the compound in some ways.” 

“But in another sense," he said, “it’s not 
really fair, because it’s hard enough to attract 
people to come work here It’s not really that 
so much has been done here in tee com- 
pound; it’s teat so little has been done else- 
where." 

Still, Mr. Bogosian added, *Tm not certain 

See SOMALIA, Page 4 


Only Serious Proposals, 
Kantor Tells Japanese 

Tokyo Is Preparing Open-Market Plan 


Kiosk 

Serbs in Bosnia 
Shun Federation 

PALE Bosnia (Reuters) — The pariia- 

" men t of the self-proclaimed Bosnian Ser- 
" bian republic voted Thursday not tojom a 
new [deration of Croats and Muslims in 
the farmer Yugoslav republic. 

In a statement, the assembly said that 
because it had already voted for an mde- 
: pendent Serbian republic, it 
tee new federation, ^ been agreed 
■■ to as a result of a US.-RnssiaD initiative. 


Berlusconi Keeps Promising 'New Italian Miracle 9 


By Alan Cowell 

Hew York Tima Service 

ROME —The candidate had been touching 
the bases — the soccer set in Milan, the disco 
set in Rome, the homemakers, the aristocrats, 
the chief rabbi. Then, last weekend, he traveled 
to Palermo to take on the mob, his message 
relayed by television hookup to piazzas across 
Italy. 

Bin before he threw down his gauntlet to the 
Mafia, Silvio Berlusconi, the most packaged 
and most talked about of the candidates for 


Italy’s watershed election this weekend — and 
some would say its most likely winner — want- 
ed to tefl his audience what they wanted to hear 
after years as Italy’s economic orphans. 

Their rapturous response confirmed that af- 
ter two years of corruption scand a ls and soul- 
searching over tear country’s future, Italy has 
produced as a standard-bearer of renewal, a 
Train whose dose business associates — indeed 
his own brother — are under investigation for 
c o rr up tion and who has been assailed by his 
adversaries as the Mafia's choice. Not only does 
Mr. Berlusconi deny such allegations, but he 


has somehow turned bis swashbuckling busi- 
ness ventures of the *80s into credentials for 
leadership in tbe ’90s. 

“I’m here to give my solidarity to Palermo, to 
Sicily, to tee South," he said in a voice that is 
part game show host, part television evangelist, 
clutching a microphone to his chest as be 
strolled a stage beneath a huge televised image 
of hims elf against a sky-blue backdrop. “We 
are going to put Italy on the road to recovery 
and I’m convinced that this will only happen if 

See ITALY, Page 4 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

Hew York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. trade repre- 
sentative, Mickey Kantor, urged Japan cm 
Thursday to be as forthcoming as possible in 
tee prtposal it is about to make to break the 
trade deadlock with Washington, because oth- 
erwise the United States will resent to more 
punitive sanctions to open Japanese markets. 

“We have been encouraging them to come up 
with as bold and far-reaching a package as 
possible," Mr. Kantor said. *1 met with the 
Japanese press twice this week to convey that 
view. It cannot be tee same old story. Other- 
wise, we will have disappointment here and a 
continuation of our approach of ratcheting up 
the pressure on Japan.” 

The lop government spokesman in Japan, 
Chief Cabinet Secretary Masayoshi Takemura, 
said Thursday that Tokyo was likely to an- 
nounce by Tuesday a package of measures it is 
prepared to take on its own to satisfy American 
demands lo open closed Japanese markets in 
autos, auto parts, telecommunications, insur- 
ance and medical equipment 

UJS. officials said that in the past few weeks a 
succession of Japanese “special envoys,” “se- 
cret envoys," “personal envoys" “private en- 
voys" and “self-appointed envoys" from tee 
Foreign Ministry, Finance Ministry, Ministry 
of International Trade and Industry and tee 
Japanese parliament have trooped through 
Washington trying to gauge tbe bare rnmimiim 
the government would accept in order to defuse 
(he trade crisis. 

The Japanese appear deeply distressed at the 
high value of tee yen against the dollar now and 
at tbe nervousness erf the Japanese stock mar- 
ket UJS. officials said Japan seems to be striv- 
ing for a proposal teat mil be just enough to 
bring down the yen and soothe the stock mar- 
ket but will not require deep concessions. 

The Japanese, some U.S. officials said, have 


been conditioned for many years to believe teat 
in negotiations with the United States, Tokyo 
can engage in commerce while Washington will 
engage in diplomacy. That is, the Japanese can 
focus on economic interests, while tee United 
States can be counted on to worry about tee 
witter aspects of the relationship, such as securi- 
ty ties or cooperation over Korea. 

Tbe officials said tbe Japanese hold the view 
that President BQJ Clinton really does not have 
the stomach for a further confrontation with 
(hem on trade and will look for a fig leaf to get 
out of the current impasse. 

Think again, said Mr. Kantor. 

IT that is Tokyo’s view today, he said in an 
interview, tbe Japanese had better reconsider it 
before they come forward with tear unilateral 
offer. 

_ Mr. Kantor said Mr. Clinton had made “the 
firm decision" that he would open Japanese 
markets, either through negotiations, which up 
to now have faded, “or on a bilateral basis using 
our trade laws." 

If the Japanese produce something bold, Mr. 
Kantor said, the government will be ready to 
resume negotiations. If they come up with 
something less than that, the United States will 
resume its efforts to open Japanese markets by 


US. officials said there were a number of 
United States- Japan trade agreements — those 
governing wood products, glass, computers and 
paper in particular — in which the Japanese 
appear to be in violation. In each one of these 
areas, the United States market share in Japan 
has been going down rather than up. In each 
case, Japanese noncompliance could be met 
with punitive tariffs bring slapped on Japanese 
exports, the U.S. officials said. 

“We could mck anyone and begin to react," a 
U.S. trade official said. 

It was sodi a threat that last week prompted 

See KANTOR, Page 5 




Book Review 
Bridge 


Page 8. 
Page 8. 


So Much Money in the Bank, So Little Time to Give It AU Away 


Newsstand Prices 

Andorra 9.00 FF W«^ ur9 “^ r 

' Canwwn" lliooCFA ffiESSwft 
C0nWDOn..i4Kl wr« pA,„ilnn 11.20 FF 

-Egypt — E.P.50M Saudi ArobVa^.OOR- 

. . Fronce....~.9.00 FF Senegal 960 CFA 

;Geteon....—960CFA Spain ..... J00 PTA5 

■ Greece .300 Dr. junteia .... 1 . 0 WDm 

; Ivory Gocst .1.120 CFA Turkey ..TJ-JWJJ 

.■isst-s’iS 


By NJL Klednfidd ity. annually distribi 

Hew York Tima Service wealth and thllS HCVC 

NEW YORK— Irene Diamond has $60 mflHnn and less Diamond Foundatiot 
than three years to get rid of it life. 

Of course, everyone should have her problem. Such Onceit had receive 
charming circumstances make her limitlessly popular, from Mr. Diamond’s < 
Scarcely a day goes by teal supplicants don’t write or call it was to give av 
beseeching her For mow. go out of business. 

Ms. Diamond, the widow of Aaron Diamond, a million- ul . . 

aire builder, is now final arbiter of tee work of the Aaron Most foundations 
Diamond Foundation, which a decade ago charted an unor- Diamond said. “They 
thodox destiny for hsdf. That wasn’t our style. 

Unlike most foundations, which seek to exist in perpeta- This puts the deadh 


ity, annually distributing just a s m al l percentage of their away. There are about 1,000 days left. That computes to 
wealth and thus never dulling their philanthropic glow, tee $60,000 a day. The checks better get in tee mafl. 

Diamond Foundation chose to have a constricted but lively “It’s interestmg, H Ms. Diamond said. “There's no trouble 

life. lading places for tee money. I only wish I had four times as 

Once it had reedved its major financing of $150 million much. If I on help it, llm wMrt 1- a penny IrfL" 
from Mr. Diamond’s estate, which came by tee beginning of The calls for aid do pour in. “There is an acceleration of 

1987 it was to give away aD the money in 10 years and teen requests recently to get the last of it," said Vincent McGee, 
go out of business. foundation's executive director. “We get out of tee blue; 

“Most foundations spend wy little of their money " M, how atouI » 

Diamond said. ‘'They’re almost m the investment business. pleas for m0Qey now nomber lf500 a year, jhe 

tat wasn’t our style. answer has been yes to organizations like the AIDS Action 

This puts the deadline at the end of 1996. The dock ticks Foundation, New Yorkers Against the Death Penalty, the 


Chinatown History Museum and the Dance Theater of 
Harlem. 

The answer in about 1,200 cases is a polite no. “It’s a 
difficult morale situation in tee office,” Mr. McGee ac- 
knowledged, “because we’re mostly saying no these days.” 

Irene Diamond is a small, gracious, chirpy woman slowed 
perhaps no more than a half-step at the age of 83. She very 
much runs tee rather lean foundation — just n staff 
members in a suite of offices by Radio City Music Hall — 
but happily tolerates discord. 

She was once outvoted 9 to 1 by the foundation board on a 

See CHARITY, Page 4 







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Moscow 
For Talks 
On Korea 

Conference Idea 
Gives Russia Role 

By Fred Hiatt 

Washington Pan Service! 

MOSCOW — The Russian For- 
eign Ministry, continuing to seek a 
more visible role in world diploma- 
cy, proposed a multilateral confer- 
ence Thursday to resolve growing 
tensions with North Korea. 

The conference would seek to 
enforce the Nuclear Nonprolifera- 
tion Treaty while “preventing a 
slide into confrontation,'’ said the 
minis try spokesman, Grigori Kara- 
sin. Russia would take part, along 
with the United States, Japan, Chi- 
na and North and South Korea, he 
said. 

The proposal represented the lat- 
est in a series of Russian efforts to 
reinject itself into global diplomacy 
and ensure that Washington not be 
allowed to lead unilaterally. Rus- 
sia’s recent flurry of activity, aimed 
at showing that it remains a super- 
power, has ranged from the former 
Yugoslavia to the Middle East to 
Somalia. 

Tensions with North Korea have 
been growing since the Communist 
regime in Pyongyang refused to al- 
low an international delegation of 
experts to inspect some of its nucle- 
ar installations. U.S. officials have 
said they suspect that North Korea 
is secretly building one or more 
nuclear weapons. 

In its statement Thursday, the 
Foreign Ministry stressed that it 
would continue to support interna- 
tional efforts to force North Korea 
to comply with the nonprolifera- 
tion treaty, including voting for a 
resolution now pending before the 
United Nations Security CounriL 

But Russia also insisted that the 
issue could not be settled “on a 
bilateral basis.” And it spoke of 
“denuclearization of the Korean 
peninsula” in ways that might not 
suit Washington, which has always 
sought to keep separate the issues 
of North Korea's nndear ambi- 
tions and the U.S. military pres- 
ence, nuclear and otherwise, in 
South Korea. 

“Considering the fail ore of the 
negotiations, we conader that it is 
not enough to attempt to resolve 
the problem on a bilateral baas,” 
Mr. Karasin said. « 

A multinational conference, 
which would also indude represen- 
tatives of the UN and the Interna- 
tional Atomic Energy Agency, 
should take into account “the le- 
gitimate interests of all the parties 
involved," the spokesman added. 

“That would include appropriate 
international control and noninter- 
ference in the in Umal affairs of the 
DPRK and the Republic of Ko- 
rea," Mr. Karasin said, referring to 
North and South Korea, respec- 
tively. 




Aha Ynn| tam/Thc AmciaKd Pra» 

A North Korean scntthaziiig U.S. and South Korean troops Thursday on the border at Pamnunjom. 

China Nuclear Force Called Minimal 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON— China is de- 
veloping a new generation of long- 
range nuclear weapons, but the ad- 
vancements are only the logical 
progres si on of a nuclear program 
that remains far behind America’s, 
a leading U.S. weapons expert says. 

Robert S. Noms, the principal 
author of a book released Wednes- 
day on the origins and current sta- 
tus of nuclear weaponsprograms in 
China, Britain and France, said 
China had deployed only four nu- 
clear missiles capable of reaching 
UAsofl. 

“China is apparently content to 
demonstrate its capability to pro- 
duce and deploy such a mini mal 
force” and “not provoke undue 
fears of Chinese nuclear in ten turns 
in Washington and Moscow by de- 
ploying a larger number,” he wrote. 

the authors, who studied the se- 
cretive Chinese nuclear program 
for several years, said China’s focus 
is on qualitative improvements, 


and the number of weapons in (he 
Chinese arsenal is untikaty to grow 
for the foreseeable future even 
though Ghrna has the industrial ca- 
pacity to produce many more war- 
heads ana 

China is striving to develop the 
ability to move its long-range uris- 
sfles on rails or other means of 
transport, enable its missiles to car- 
ry more than one warhead each and 
make them capable of being 
launched on shorter notice, the au- 
thors wrote. 

The bo ok was sponsored by the 
Natural Resources Defense Coun- 
cil, a private group opposed to nu- 
clear arms development 

Mir. Noms said that contrary to 
common U.S. perceptions, neither 
Britan, France nor China was 
planning to substantially increase 
its arsenal. Expansion plans have 
been quietly scrapped for financial 
and strategic reasons, he said. 

“As in the United States, there 
arc large question marks in these 


three countries about what role nn- 
dear weapons will play in their 
security and their united forces,” be 
said in an interview. 

The authors estimate that Britain 
at the end of 1993 had an opera- 
tional stockpile of about 200 nucle- 
ar weapons, which is expected to 
rise to apeak of about 300 near the 
end of the decade; France had 524, 
falling to 465; mid China about 
450. with no expected change. 

The United States now has about 
10,500 weapons in the active stock- 
pile and Russia has about 15,000 
active. 

Mr. Norris, who visited C hina 
three times in the course of his 
research for the book, said the Chi- 
nese ars enal probably comprises 
about 300 strategic, or long-range, 
nuclear weapons structured in a 
triad of land-based ntissQes, bomb- 
ers and submarine-based nsssOes. 
The other roughly 150 weapons in 
the arsenal are artillery shells and 
other battlefield nuclear weapons. 


Major Says EU Vote Stand 
Is a Matter of Principle 

By John Damton 

New York Tima Service 

LONDON — Prime Minister John Major said Thursday that 
Britain was fi ghting a tattle of principle in a bruising confrontation 
with most of me rest of Europe over bow many votes will be needed 
to Mock decisions when the European Union expands from 12 
countries to 16. 

In speaking to the House of Commons over a stalemate (hat has 
stymied the European Union for weeks, he said his government was 
trying to check an undemocratic trend in which the populations of 
huge countries had many fewer votes per capita that tne populations 
of smaller countries. 

Britain's position, supported only by Spain, has been a tt ac k ed by 
the other 10 member countries. In Parliament on Thursday, John 
Smith, leader of the opposition Labor Party, charged that Mr. 
Major's stand was designed to head off a rebellion erf rightists in the 
Conservative Party. 

“He’s more concerned to protea himself and his position from 
attacks within his own party," Mr. Smith said, as fellow Laborites 
booed and hooted the prime minister. 

Officials in the prime minister’s office, meanwhile, let it be known 
that they were working csi proposals to break the deadlock in 
Brussels. It will go before a meeting of foreign ministers in Greece on 
Saturday. 

Mr. Major’s hard line emerged Tuesday when be condemned 
European countries cm the other ride of the dispute and attacked 
leaders of Labor as people who do not stand up for British interests. 


Waste Racketeers 
Threaten to Soil 
Cleanup Trade 

By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

Even if developing nations succeed in their aim of banning toxic 
waste exports from rich to poor countries, experts said Thursday, 
there is little to stop the trade from being taken over by racketeers. 

The developing countries are calling for die ban at a meeting in 
Geneva of signatory nations to the Basel Convention, which regu- 
lates transboundaiy shipments of hazardous waste. 

The convention secretarial has only a handful of officials, a 
woefully inadequate million budget to cover the world and no 
powers of enforcement 

Several industrial nations, including the United States, Germany, 
Britain and Japan, have argued that export of "recyclable" toxic 
waste should be allowed to countries that agree to receive it and have 
the proper facilities for dealing with it The United States has not yet 
ratified the Basel Convention. 

Pope John Paul n recently denounced the toxic trade as “a grave 
abuse and an offense,” and British bishops similarly condemned it as 
unethical. Environment Minister Sveud Auken of Denmark, the only 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


industrialized country to s u ppo r t the developing nations, said in 
Geneva that most recycling is a “sham.” 

Greenpeace, the environmental organization, says recycling is just 
a pretty word for loopholes. To prove its point, it gathered a ton of 
German and Dutch plastic waste in Indonesia and spread it on the 
ground in front of the conference center where minis ters and senior 
officials from Basel Convention countries are meeting 
Police and environmental sources said that if a ban was enforced, 
the trade inevitably would be pushed into the arms of organized 
crime. 

Following an attempt to ship nriUions of terns of waste to Somalia, 
in which the I talian Mafia may have been involved, investigators are 
convinced that racketeers already have taken ova much of the 
business. The mastermind of the Somali deal moved to Indonesia, 
where he was last reported to be working on a deal to ship toxic waste 
to Vietnam and Cambodia. 

In the United Stales, organized criminals are alleged to be in- 
volved in the waste haulage business in several cities. Paul Staes, a 
Belgian member of the European Parliament, said he has tircum- 
stantial evidence that American crooks and former security officials 
in Eastern Europe have teamed up to exploit o p port un ities in 
Europe. 

John Arans, a Greenpeace investigator in the Netherlands who 
worked for 22 years as a detective, saidhekept running into (he Mnn» 
people he used to meet when he was investigating narcotics and 
arms- trafficking cases. Michael Braungart of the Hamburg Environ- 
mental Institute said that dishonest waste brokers can make profits 
available elsewhere only from the drugs trade, and at no risk to 
themselves. 

Even though many developing countries have enacted import 
bans, they are powerless to prevent collusion between wealthy 
traders in the West and corrupt local nffirink and b usinessmen. 
Thus, the developing countries at the Geneva meeting have argued 
for an export ban on hazardous waste exports, which they say will 
help deal with the problem at its source. 

However, this will not prevent unscrupulous traders using a 
panoply of, euphemisms such as “industrial raw materials” to get 
round a tan, or relabeling toxic waste as nonhazardous garbage, 
which can legally be exported. 

Every year thousands of tons of waste containing heavy metals, 
solvents, dioxins, sewage sludge, incinerator ash, acids, scrap tires, 
and expired pesticides are dumped in poor countries larking elemen- 
tary means 10 deal with the hazards, Greenpeace says. 

The Earth Resources Center at Exeter University in En gland says 
that the poor countries that receive toxic waste are unable to afford 
proper pollution control technology, leading to serious environmen- 
tal degradation. And some countries that have been receiving toxic 
wastes, particularly Russia, have enormous environmental problems 
of their own making. 

A senior official at the Basel Convention secretariat said the 
organization did not have enough money even to help countries 
stru g glin g to deal with the problem of toxic waste already dumped 
on their territory. 

One paradox is that the more industrialized countries clean up 
their own environment, the greater is the pressure for the waste 
problem to be swept under somebody elsc’s carpet 


WORLD BRIEFS 


[plant Companies to Pay $3.7 Billion 


By Gina Kolata 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — In the largest settlement 
ever negotiated in a class- action lawsuit offi- 
cials of three companies gave final approval to 
an agreement to pay $3.7 billion over 30 years 
to women claiming they were injured by sili- 
cone breast implants. 

In the highly complex settlement, the compa- 
nies — Dow Corning Corp, Bristol-Myers 
Squibb Co. and Baxter Healthcare Corp. — wifl 
pay women specific amounts for injuries. 

The agreement Wednesday still must be ap- 
proved by the companies’ boards of directors 
and by Judge Sam G Pointer of UjS. District 

Caul in Birmingham, Ala bama Even if he 
approves it the settlement can cnimble if too 
few women sign up. But if it goes through it will 


dear the courts of many of the 12,000 cases 
involving more than 25,000 women who had 
implants and say they were injured. 

The manufacturers of the implants said that 
there was no scientific evidence that they were 
harmful, and that they were agreeing to the 
settlement to put the expensive litigation be- 
hind them. Dow Coming agreed to pay $2,018 
billion, Bristol-Myers $1,154 billion and Baxter 
Healthcare $555 million. 

An estimated one million to two million 
women had silicone breast implants in the Iasi 
25 years. Some women and dooors say that the 
devices caused a variety of diseases, including 
autoimmune disorders, like lupus, and connec- 
tive tissue disorders, like scleroderma, a pro- 
gressive hardening and thickening of the skin 
and internal organs. 


Space Photos Prove It: Asteroids Have Moons 



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By John Noble Wilford 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A spacecraft 
bound for Jupiter has returned a 
photograph and other data giving 
scientists the first conclusive evi- 
dence that at least some asteroids 
have tiny moons of their own. 

The photo, released Wednesday 
by the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, shows the 
newly discovered natural satellite 
of the asteroid Ida. The picture was 
one of several taken Aug. 28 when 
the Galileo spacecraft flew dose to 
Ida, one of a multitude of small 
rocky objects that populate the re- 


gion known as the asteroid belt 
between Mars and Jupiter. 

The discovery adds a new class 
of objects to the inventory of the 
solar system. It could also provide 
scientists with dues to the origin 
and evolution of asteroids, thought 
to be material from an early solar 
system that failed to coalesce into 
planets and has been fragmented 
by repeated collisions. 

Analysis of one of the Galileo 
pictures and data from the near- 
infrared mapping spectrometer 
show that Ida is about 35 mfles (56 
kilometers) long and 15 miles in 
diameter, and has a companion no 
more than 60 mfles away. 


This little moon is about a mile 
wide, probably elongated, with the 
long axis pointed toward Ida. 

Astronomers were not too sur- 
prised to learn that asteroids had 
moons.- Some observations with 
ground-based telescopes had pro- 
vided hints, but nothmg definitive. 
The surprise was that the discovery 
was made on only the second aster- 
oid to be inspected at close range 
tty a spacecraft. 

“It previously was thought that 
natural satellites of asteroids could 
form, but they probably weren’t 
common,” said Dr. Torrence V. 
Johnson, the project's chief scien- 
tist at the Jet Propulsion Laborato- 


ry in Pasadena, California, where 
the Galileo mission is being direct- 
ed. “Having found one fairly 
quickly, we can say that they’re 
probably more common than pre- 
viously thought.” 

In October 1991, the Galileo 
spacecraft made the first fly-by of 
an asteroid, the small potato- 
shaped Gaspra no more than 11 
miles long. Then it flew within 
1,500 miles of Ida last summer, but 
because Galileo's malfunctioning 
mam antenna is only partly de- 
ployed, transmission of tne record- 
ed pictures and other data has been 
extremely slow. 


2 Russian Submarines Safely Graze 

MOSCOW (AP)— Two Russian nuclear submarines grazrfeadtother 

during an exercise in the Barents Sea, the Russian Navy said Thursday, ft 

said there were no casualties or damage . .... 

The acodent occurred Wednesday, the navy’s press service said m a 
short statement. The Itar-Tass agencysaid the two vessels earned nuclear 
weapons at the time of theacddeaL The navy said the submarines, along 
with their weapons, remained “m service” after the madott, returning 
safety to their base without assistance: There were no radiation leaks, the 
press service said. , 

The Finnish Center for Radiation and Nudear Safety reported no 
increased radiation levels in the Barents Sea area. Tbe center has abouta 
dozen monitoring stations in northern Finland dose to the Barents Sea 
coast 

U.S. Affirms Stand on China Trade 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) —The White House said Thursday thatjts 
policy of Hiking China's trade status to the human rights issue stands “at 
i hie point" and that future decisions would depend on China’s actions. 

The White House spokeswoman. Dee Dee Myers, said an executive 
order that President Bui Clinton signed in May outlining the steps Chi n a 
must take to win renewal of its most-f avored-nati on trading status 
remained in effect 

Asked if Washington would ever drop the linkage between human 
rights trade . WAtii s for China, Ms. Myers said “At this point the 
executive order is in effect «nd I think it depends on what China does 
between now and the time that MFN needs to be renewed in June.” 

German Veterans Criticize U.K. Flan 

BONN (Reuters) — Goman veterans on Thursday welcomed Britain's 
plan io ask Germany to join co mmemo rations of the end of World War 
u, but added that to exclude German former servicemen was outdated 
arid did not bdp reconciliation. 

Prime Minister John Major on Tuesday invited Germany, ten: out of 
this year's D-day commemoration in France, to join celebrations next 
year in Lo nd on to remember YE (Victory in Europe) Day on May 8, 
1945, when Nazi Germany capitulated. 

But British rtffiriak said Wednesday that German veterans would not 
be asked to taka part, al though present-day German soldiers migh t be 
invited. Joachim Faustmann, spokesman fra a German veterans' associa- 
tion srid that to draw a distinction between forma’ and present soldiers 
was “outdated and anachronistic.” 

2d Kurdish Woman Dies in Germany 

BONN (Renters) — A second Kurd has died in Germany after setting 
herself ablaze in protest at what she called Bonn’s support for Turkish 
suppression of her people, the police said Thursday. 

Police in Mannheim said Nugmt Yfldirem, 25, died in the hospital on 
Wednesday after she and a companion set fire to themselves on tne bank 
of the Rhine. Her com panion, Bcdriye Tas, 24, died at the scene of the 
self-immolation on Monday, the Kurdish New Year's Day. 

The two women left a note accusing Germany of hostility to Kurds and 
of supplying arms for Turkey’s military attacks cm separatists in sooth- 
easi Turkey. 

Clinto n Keeps Out of Jerusalem Feud 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — President Bill Clinton said Thursday 
that the question of a united Jerusalem should be decided in Mideast 
peace negotiations and not by outside interference. 

Mr. Ctmtan met Jewish-American leaders at the White House. He was 
described afterwards by Lester Pollack, head of the Conference of 
Presidents of Mtgor American Jewish Organizations, as telling the group 
“ that he believes in the united Jerusalem as the capital of Israel” During 
the 1992 presidential campaign, Mr. Clinton said that be would like to see 
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. The United States, however, keeps its 
embassy in Tel Aviv. 

Asked later to elaborate on his view toward Jerusalem, Mr. Clinton 
replied: “My position has not changed on that issue, but my position is' 
also that the United States and other countries should retrain from 
intervening in these peace talks between the parties themselves.” 

For die Record 

The remaining 26 hostages seized by Scriaamese rebels were freed 
overnight when the army stormed the Afaboka fydrodectric plant where 
they woe held, the Dutch news agency ANP said. The army freed them 
“without bloodshed,” ANP reported from Paramaribo. (AFP) 

The Colombia Constitutional Court ordered that the first round of 
presidential elections, scheduled fra May 8, be delayed to May 29 because 
of a technicality. The court ruled that the law calling the vote was an 
ordinary one and not a special statute as required. (Reuters) 



p 



feed 


* 


lines O 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Queen Opens Grown Jewel Showcase 

LONDON (Reuters) — Queen Elizabeth II made a rare trip to the 
Tower of London on Thursday to open a new showcase for the crown 



S3 Gc- 


Geoffrey Miller, a law professor at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago said the agreement was virtu- 
ally unprecedented in size and complexity. “It’s 
going to be a model for future class-action 
litigation,” he said. 

The agreement provides that set amounts will 
be paid to women with specific conditions, with 
no requirement that they show that their im- 
plants caused the disorders. But the fees can be 
reduced if too many women sign up. If that 
happens, the women can decide to drop out of 
the agreement. 

The companies can also opt out if too few 
women sign up. “We can’t pay both the im- 
mense costs of litigation ana the settlement,” 
saidT. Michael Jackson, a spokesman for Dow 
Coming. 



ty," she said before heading 

She last catne to see the nine crowns, two orbs, scepters, maces and 
other treasures when she opened the old jewel house in 1967 in a bunker 
at the tower that soon proved enable to cope with the crowds. The new, 
larger home, inside a vault in a fanner barracks, has steel doors, bullet 
proof glass cases and numerous hidden security devices. It is designed to 
receive up to 20,000 people a day. More than 2 million people a year are 
expected to pay £8 ($12) each for a visit. 

Barcdona subway and bos woifcm walked off the job Thursday, leaving 
2 million commuters struggling to get to work with nwiimu l transport 
services. The police reported a 10-percem increase in vehicle traffic. The 
walkout was to continue through Friday. (AP) 

A fee brake out on a Greek erase slip white it was docked in Piraeus 
harbor early Thursday, but no one was injured, officials said. The Pallas 
Athena was due to leave Friday on a ihree-day cruise to Greek 
and the Turkish resort of Kusadasi with 800 people. Only some walch- 
men were aboard at (he time. The fire’s cause is not yet known. (AP) 
Brussels po&ce evacuated tire Central Station for two hours on Thurs- 
day after a bomb threat The police said the threat was a hoax. (AP) 
Smart workers at ScUphol airport struck for two hours Thursday 




fi? 



__ . . I two-year salary freeze. 

KLM Royal Dutch Airfares has cot fares to Suriname after a newsdS 

Wmrf that Inn rer pin e mop 1 n • “ 


M — - — — j — - Mwiuuvumuiji 

refused to deny there was a link between the threat and the cuts, 
omept to ray that the derision was based on “market situations and the 
rdaoonsmp between income and costs of flights." (AP) 


Thursday as well as a huge swathe of the state, causing widespread 
disruption. Business^, factories and homes lost all pow^dSing ttapeak 
morning period. In Perth, traffic lights were blacked out caulns rush- 
to chaos, and trams came to a standstill Radio services were intemipt- 
ed and some phone systems failed. (AFP) 


the aty until the ramy season begins in May. (AP) 

“ Ja P“ *** ejected to cancel a 24-to strike 
planned fra Friday, news reports said from Tokyo. 

I At*/ 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


Page 3^ 


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Killing Jolts Mexico 9 s Steady Image 


Bob h^n/KoKii 

in die fiery airfx^d crash Dnrcday that killed paratroopers on the ground. 


Mixed Signals Blamed for Fatal Air Base Inferno 


By Edward Cody * 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Tie bullets 
that killed Luis Dooaldo Colosio 
npped a ragged hole in the dreams 
of Prcsdcm Carlos Salinas deGor- 
lari to make Mexico a stable, mod- 
em nation and an equal partner of 
the United States. - 

The shooting of Mr. Colosio, in 
its own way like the assassina tion 
of John F. K enne dy three decades 
ago, is likely to help define a new 
identity for Mexico — sharply dif- 
ferent from that of the reliable, 
business-minded neighbor that Mr. 
Salinas sold for theNorth Ameri- 
can Free Trade Agreement. 

For more than 60 years, the In- 
stitutional Revolutionary Party has 
ruled Mexico with few ripples. Its 
hold on power often has been criti- 
cized as corrupt and stultifying, 
built on electoral fraud and official 
payoff. But few have contested its 
claim that the party’s domination 
preserved Mexico from the tumult 
and bloodshed that marked its rev- 
olution at the be ginning of the cen-i 
ttuy and led to frequent U.S. mili- 
tary intervention. 

While many Latin American na- 
tions lurched from one military 
coup to another or bogged down in 
Cold War guerrilla warfare, Mexi- 
co seemed to anise evenly along, 
its political derisions made behind 
dosed doors and its leaders chosen 


in an intricate intraparty power 
dance. Even with the pnckjy na- 
tionalism and extravagant corrup- 
tion, Mexico was a neighbor the 
United Slates could count on. 

Mr. Swlmas himself, although 

passionately committed to reform, 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

repeatedly told visitors that the 
sclerotic party st r ucture budl up 
over the years could not be disman- 
tled abruptly for fear of political 
turmoil. Economic reform could 
move full speed ahead, he coun- 
seled, but political reform should 
be limited to cool, dear doses that 
he could control 

Mr. Colosio, a former senator 
and party leader, was chosen by 
Mr. Salinas as the official presiden- 
tial candidate in large part to main- 
tain that cautions course. 

A native of northern Mexico, 


Mr. Colosio built a career that has 
been steady, dependable and dis- 
tinctly tmrevolntionary for a mili- 
tant m a party whose very name 
speaks revolution. In a conversa- 
tion several years ago during a 
campaign tour through the Mexi- 
can heartland, Mr. Colosio piloted 
a panel truck down country roads 

accor^^w'fdmas^th hardlya 
comma of his own. 

Manuel Cnmnohn SoKs, the oth- 
er main contender for the party’s 
mantle and a dose friend of Mr. 
Sdhm*, seemed too closely identi- 
fied with calls for genuinely com- 
petitive elections. In the end, Mr. 
RaKimg chose dependability over 
radical reform. 

But over the last three months, 
all that calculation seems to have 
fallen apart 

First Indian rebels, led by an 
anachronistic “Comandanic Mar- 


cos,” wearing ski masks and ban- 
doliers, staged an armed uprising in 
the far southern state of Chiapas. 
The insurrection was timed with 
the Jan. 1 beginning of NAFTA's 
new trade rules. Instead of cele- 
brating entry into the 21 st century 
dub of North American trading i 
partners, Mr. Safinas and bis Mexi- 
co found themselves dealing with a 
guerrilla movement that seemed to 
pem out of a historical comic book. 

The rebels demanded not only 
reforms to end the historical dis- 
crimination against Indians, partic- 
ularly visible in the south, but they 
also demanded reforms of the po- 
litical system, a loosening of the 
ruling party’s long grip on power 
and a tempering of NAFTA's most 
stringent effects on the backward 
segments of Mexican society. 

The image of Mexico in 1994 
became not NAFTA traders but 
Chiapas rebels. 


A Candidate With a Common Touch 


Washington Part Service 

MEXICO CITY — Luis Don- 
aldo Colosio. the ruling party’s 
presidential candidate who was as- 
sassinated while campaigning in 
Tijuana, was notable among Mexi- 
co's political elite for having 
worked his way to the top from a 


The Associated Press 

POPE AIR FORCE BASE, North Carolina 
■i- —“ Military officials blamed a co mmunications 
■* failure for the collision of two air force planes 
that seat fiery debris crashing onto hundreds of 

- army paratroopers preparing for a flight. 

- Twenty people were killed and 85 injured. 


An F-ldD fighter and the C-130 transport 
collided less than 300 feet (90 meters) above the 
base Wednesday. Both pilots thought they had ' 
been cleared to land, said Brigadier General 
Bobby Floyd, a wing commander. ’Tor some 
unknown reason they both appeared at the 
same time in the same place," he said. “Obvi- 


ously, there was a failure to c ommunicate ." 

The 0130’s five-member crew landed safely. 
The fighter pilot and a flier being trained Eject- 
ed, but their jet crashed in and skidded 
across the runway. Its flaming hulk plowed into 
a staging area where about 500 army troops 
were preparing for airborne exercises. 


• 1 - 5 — *-**«i* i V 




Away From Politics 

• Philip Morris Tobacco Companies Inc. has filed a S10 billion libel 
lawsuit against the ABC television network for wbat it said were false 
and defamatory statements alleging that dgarettes woe “artificially 
spiked” with nicotine. ABCs “Day One” said that tobacco makers 
spiked dgarettes "to keep people smelting," a Philip Morris state- 
ment said. 


of Jerusalem Fee 


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Ames Case Moves Toward a Plea Accord tatiai^^Nigeri^^roman, dting^the'^obability that heMwo I leagues 


l . By David Johnston 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Federal 
prosecutors have begun negotia- 
j-.tiom with Aldrich Hazen Ames in 
'^.the hope of a plea agreement with 
a the career intelligence officer and 
- iris wife, Rosario, who have been 
^ accosedofspymgforMoscow.gov- 
r eminent officials said. 

At this stage, prosecutors have 
agreed only to show defense law- 
>• yep portions of the circumstantial" 
-evidence that investigators turned 
up through electronic surveillance 
and in searches of the Ameses’ 
home, office and computer files. 
n That information would enable 
.'defense lawyers to assess the 
~ t strength of the government’s case. 

! The prospect of the government’s 
‘prevailing in a trial appeared to be 
“ strengthened when, prosecutors 
' sard, Mrs. Ames unexpectedly ad- 


mitted spying for Moscow in a con- 
versation with federal agents short- 
ly after her arrest Feb. 21. 

Discussions between prosecutors 
and lawyers for the couple are deli- 
cate and still at a preliminary 
phase, officials said. But lawyers 
inside and outside the government 
believe Mr. Ames and his wife are 
likely to seek a plea agreement. 

The government wants Mr. 
Ames to describe any espionage 
activity he may have engaged in, 
but prosecutors want to avoid 
spending lira and money on a trial 
in which they would almost cer- 
tainly be forced to disclose details 
of highly classified operations. 

Moreover, the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency might be embar- 
rassed if defense lawyers ques- 
tioned the agency’s failure to detect 
Mr. Ames years earlier. 

. Mr. Ames and . his wife are both 1 


presumed to be seeking leniency, 
lawyers say. They have already 
asked the {government to unfreeze 
some of thor funds to care for their 
5-year-old son, FauL 

Both have been denied hail, and 
their son is in the care of relatives. 
Some defense lawyers have sug- 
gested in interviews that Mr. Ames 
might accept a plea agreement with 
the understanding that his wife 
would set a lesser sentence so that 
she could take care of their son. 

Prosecutors have accused Mr. 
Ames, an intelligence officer with 
3 1 years at the agency, and his wife, 
whom he met when tie recruited ha 
as a paid informer while stationed 
in Mexico City, of conspiring to 
commit espionage. 

In corn documents, the govern- 
ment has ac cu sed the couple of 
accepting mare than S 2 J million in 
payments from the Soviet KGB 
and- later from the Russian intelli- 


gence service during a nine-year 
espionage career. 

■ Pollard Plea lift Denied 

President Bill CKnton has denied 
clemency to the convicted spy Jon- 
athan Jay Pollard, saying that the 
“enormity” of his crime and the 
“considerable damage" h cansed 
meant that his life sentence for spy- 
ing for Israel shou ld be main tamed. 
The Washington Post reported. 

In announcing the decision, 
which had been expected, Mr. Clin- 
ton said he had considered Mr. 
Pollard’s plea for leniency “be- 
cause he spied for a friendly na- 
tion.” But he added: “1 neverthe- 
less believe that the enormity of 
Mr. Pollard’s crime, the harm his 
actions caused to our country, and 
the need to deter every person who 
might even consider such actions, 
warrant his continued incarcera- 
non. 


ration of a Nigerian woman, citing the probability that her two 
young daughters would face ritual female dreumeudon if she were 
forced to return. 

• An explosion early Thursday hi an underptNmd natural gas pipe- 
line destroyed eight apartment buildings in a fierce blaze in Emson. 
New Jersey. Twenty-nine residents were injured and hundr ed 8 
forced to flee. 

• New York got its first phumtfw dedicated eroedally to providing 
medicines and services to AIDS patients. Lest year, a wmiinr 
speciality pharmacy for people with AIDS opened in San Francisco. 

• Scores of grass ffacs wuned for the death or a firefi^ter flared out 

of control in northern Oklahoma, adding to more than 10,000 acres 
scorched this week. 

• A US. Coast Guard c u tter returned 234 Haitian “boat people” to 

1 1 J : i -m .-r. : i • 


42,761 Haitians at sea since Haiti’s tmbtaiy ousted President Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide in 1991. 

• British researchers reported that nicotine patches appear to relieve 
the symptoms of ulcerative colitis, a chronic inflammation of the 
colon that causes bloody diarrhea and abdominal pain and is 
sometimes hard to treat. 

• An early monrfm fire engulfed the too floor of a home and killed 

seven persons in Keokuk, Iowa, Thursday. ap, Rnaen 


working-class background bereft of 
economic privilege. 

President Carlos Salinas de Gor- 
tari chose him in November to be 
the candidate of the Institutional 
Revolutionary Party, passing over 
a roster of Ivy League graduates 
within his cabinet whose presiden- 
tial qualifications perhaps sur- 
* passed those of Mr. Colosio but 
who lacked his fed for the needs of 
common Mexicans. 

Mr. Colosio almost certainly 
would have succeeded Mr. Salmas 
in the presidency, given the party’s 
unbroken control of the govern- 
ment for the last 65 yean. 

The son of a northern Mexico 
meat packer, Mr. Colosio went to 
public school and, tmliice his col- 
leagues in the party, was forced by 
economic necessity to attend col- 
lege at Monterrey Technical Insti- ; 
tute, majoring in economics. He ; 
later attended graduate school at 
the University of Pennsylvania and 1 
was an avid American football fan. { 

Chief among his hobbies was rid- 
ing around Mexico GtyonhisHar- I 
ley- Davidson Elcctra Glide, a hd- : 
met helping conceal his identity, j 

Before leaving Mr. Salinas’s cab- j 
inet in November to take up the 
candidacy, the 44-year-old Mr. Co- 
losio served as secretary of social 
devdopment, a post that took him 
throughout the country, meeting 
with pom- Mexicans and doling out 
government funds through the 
president’s social welfare program. 

Political observers say his dedi- 
cation to Mr. Salinas and his pro- 
gram of deep-cutting economic re- 
forms was unquestionable, and a 


major reason for his selection as the 
party's candidate. Mr. Coloao's 
detractors contend that he was cho- 
sen for malleability and for the 
likelihood that he would let Mr. 
Salinas have continued political in- 
fluence long after his presidential 
term expires in December. 

But in an interview with The. 
Washington Post while campaign- ■ 
ing in the eastern state of Veracruz 
in January, Mr. Colosio said he 
would have no reservations break- 
ing from Mr. Salinas, especially in 
the area of social programs aimed 
at helping the poorest citizens. 

— ’ TODROBBERSON 


- • “ ^ ~ ■ ' 




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White House Coverap, Lawmaker Say 

WASHINGTON — - A Republican lawmaker delivered a fero- 
cious attack against President Bill Gin ton over the Whitewater affair 
cm Thursday, accusing him of “arrogance of power” and charging an 
a dminis tration cover-up. 

In a speech in the House, Jim Leach, Republican of Iowa, offered 
a detaflai list of accusations against Mr. Clinton and top administra- 
tion officials over the affair; which involves a 1980s Arkansas land 
deal and the failed Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan institution. 

“Within the landscape of political scandals, Whitewater may be a 
bump but it speaks mountains about ‘me generation’ public ethics as 
wdl as sinrie party control of certain states and the UJS. Congress,” 
said Mr. Leach, the senior Republican on the House Banking 
Committee. “In a nutshell, Whitewater is about the arrogance of 

P °Among Mr. Leach’s charges was that money was skimmed from 
Mfld Guaranty to support the Whitewater land deal in which 
the president ana his wife were partners, and that the Clintons 
benefited from Whitewater “wdl in excess of resources invested." ■ 
He also charged that the independence of the governments 
regulatory system had been “flagrantly violated" to protect Mr. 
Qmton. “Congress and the executive are employing dosed society 
techniques to resist full disclosure of an embarrassing arcum- 
stance" said Mr. Leach, who has been outspoken in demanding a 
full congressional inquiry into Whitewater. _ . 

Meanwhile, two more White House aides testified Thursday 
before a federal grand jury over the Whitewater affair. Bruce 
Lindscv and George Stephanopoulos brought to eight the number of 
administration offiaals who have gone before the grand jury mvesti- 
gating White House and Treasury Department contacts on the 

^Afterward. Mr. Lindsey said he had answered all the questions 
asked. “I have complete confidence, once all .the facts are out, that 
nothing improper was done by anyone at the While House, he smd. 

Thegnmd jury, under the direction of die special prosecutor, 
Robert B. Fiske Jr, is investigating whether ihc contacts improperly 
interfered with the government’s inquiry of the Madison savmgs 
institution. (Reuters) 

President Moves to Battt* Low Popularity 

WASHINGTON — president CUnton scheduled a prime-time 
news conference for Thursday night to try to make the case that Ins 
Sri. tr.tio. is mavingforwajxfon its teptte the 

ethics controversies that have surrounded the White House 
The decision to hold a news conference came as several polls 

Sh T?f I JtSSt d S iSttSSdtor Seeks that_ Whi^S and 

.“SsasssMSSsasa 

"rhrn w 4 &« rating in seven months. (WP) 

Quo te/ Unquote 

— 7 — ■ _ r,— pwetmiknwslo. Democrat of Illinois and 

Rcprera^ttve Cto Mcans Committee, on President 

chairman of the Houre ^ ^ n0l guarantee 

Ointons vow to -nJft what the president wants. 

in the right direction. 

jus ask ihe butter... ^ 




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- Israeli Army Takes Some Flak 

F< Firefight at Hospital Said to Terrorize Patients 


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By Clyde Haberman 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli Army found itself cm 
ibe defensive Thursday, both from angry Palestinians 
and at least one Israeli cabinet minister, for having 
med a children's hospital as a firebase against a band 
3f Palestinian fugitives in Hebron. 

Groups of Palestinian and Israeli doctors accused 
soldiers of “terrorizing patients and staff" at Moham- 
med Ali Hospital when they used it along with other 
buildings on Wednesday for what turned into an 18- 
bour battle against suspected gunmen of the militant 
Hamas group, who were holed up in a nearby apart- 
ment house. 

Three, and possibly four, of the wanted Hamas men 
were killed in the long assault, in which a pregnant 
Arab woman also was killed under disputed circum- 
stances. Palestinians say the soldiers killed her, but the 
army insists she was hit by fire from the fugitives. 

The siege in Hebron touched off new rioting Thurs- 
day across the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. At 
least 30 Palestinians were reportedly wounded by 
soldiers and half a dozen or more Israelis were injured 
by Arab stone-throwers in Hebron, Nablus, Jenin and 
the Jabaliya refugee camp in Gaza. 

The battle on Wednesday intensified Pales tin i an 
demands fhgf Hebron’s population be given special 
protection, a central point of continuing negotiations 
m Cairo between Israel and the Palestine Liberation 
Organization. 

According to Israeli officials, the two sides have 
agreed on a lightly armed Palestinian police force and 


for that flash- 
point town. Most likely, an official said, the foreign 
contingent will be comprised largely of Norwegians, 
whose country has been an important broker in the 
Isradi-PLO talL-s. 

AJ though the Cairo negotiations were described as 
friendly, the atmosphere was hardhr improved by the 
battle on Wednesday, the most violent day in Hebron 
since the Feb. 25 massacre of at least 29 Muslim 
worships* by a Jewish settler. 

Whatever the death toll turns out to be, the focus 
Thursday was on the army’s use of the hospital, with 
its 32 young patients, as a staging area for its assault 
on the Hamas fugitives. 

The action was criticized by the International Com- 
mittee of the Red Cross as a violation of international 
law. Two local groups, the Association of Israeli- 
Palestinian Physicians for Human Rights and the 
Union of Pales tinian Medical Relief Committees, pro- 
tested that the army had sealed off the hospital 
grounds, confining staff members and “32 terrified 
children." 

In response, Major General Danny Yatom, who 
commands forces in central Israel, including the West 
Bank, defended the Hebron operation as a necessary 
tactic against armed Muslim militants, who, he said, 
were “sane of the senior terrorists or Hebron and its 
surrounding area.” 

A cabinet member, Communications Minis ter Shu- 
lamit Aloni, questioned the wisdom of the 
assault. Aides to several other cabinet members 
said that they felt the operation was ill-timed. 


Ciskei’s Troops Occupy Parliament 
5 ? As Pretoria’s Seize Strategic Sites 


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2CO 

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Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BISHO, Sooth Africa — Heavily 
armed South African troops took 
r| over strategic points Thuraday in 
U the black homeland of Cfafeai, now 
officially under Pretoria’s control 
Two lmpala jet fighters streaked 
que low overhead as the troops, backed 
he by Puma helicopters in camouflage 
xce colors, took control erf the radio 
xp; station, the Ciskei military intelli- 
r gence office and other points. 

A correspondent saw soldiers 
move through Bisho, the capital of 
nominally independent Ciskei, dis- 
arming security guards and home- 
land troops. 

“ But Ciskei soldiers loyal to the 
former military strongman. Briga- 
dier General Oupa Gqozo, who re- 
{8* signed Tuesday, still occupied the 
ty? parliament, government buildings 
/eU and police headquarters. 

^ General Gqozo, saying he feared 
nc a bloodbath, handed control of the 
^ homeland of about a milli on people 
1 to Pretoria and the multiparty 
*£* Transitional Executive Council 
which is overseeing the transition 
to South Africa's first all-race elec- 
tions next month. 

His resignation followed a muti- 
ny and strike by the police, soldiers 
and civil servants d emanding to be 
paid their pension contributions 


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before Ciskei is reincorporated into 
South Africa. The other nine home- 
lands also will be rcmeorporated 
when the new constitution takes 
effect April 27. 

“We don’t want Gqozo bade,” 
said a policeman in civilian dress 
outside General Gqazo’s former 
residence. “But we want him to 
come and tell us what has hap- 
pened to our money. We don't 
want our money to be national- 
ized.” 

Peace monitors said the South 
African soldiers would have to 
tread carefully. 

“Taking over the parliament is 
tricky. Have yon seen the piles of 
ammunition they have stacked up 
there,” said a European peace mon- 
itor. 

South African soldiers arrived 
outride the parliament complex in 
seven armored troop carriers 
Thursday morning, but were forced 
by Ciskei soldiers to retreat to the 
nearby white administrative center 
of King William’s Town in South 
Africa proper. 

“Get out of Ciskei,” a Ciskei 
soldier shouted op to a white offi- 
cer commanding an troop carrier. 
“We don’t want you here." 

Less than an hour later, a column 
of about 30 vehicles, including ar- 


mored cars, troop carriers, a field 
ambulance and supply trucks, rum- 
bled into Bisho from the port city 
of East London about 70 kilome- 
ters (40 miles) to the south. 

The Ciskei collapse occurred less 
than two weeks after Pretoria dis- 
missed the president of Bophuth- 
atswana, Lucas Mangope, and in- 
stalled an in terim administration to 
manage the territory until its for- 
mal return to South Africa. 

Fears for the future in a post- 
apartheid South Africa have also 
produced unrest in the homelands 
of Lebowa in the Northern Trans- 
vaal and Qwa Qwa in the eastern 
Orange Free State. 

More soldiers and police wd be 
sem into Natal Province, where 
tension over the elections is height- 
ening, President Frederik W. de 
Klerk said Thursday. 

But be played down suggestions 
that the security forces would take 
over KwaZulu, the fractious home- 
land of Zulus who oppose the elec- 
tion. Leaders of two other home- 
lands who opposed the election 
were deposed tins month. 

KwaZulu is led by Mangosuthu 
Buthdezi, whose Inkatha Freedom 
Party is the archrival of the African 
National Congress. 

(Reuters, AP) 


MEXICO: 

Candidate Slain 

Confined from Page 1 

ruling party by giving its rank-and- 
file a genuine say in how the re- 
placement candidate is chosen. 

“We are most Kkefy going to see 
a joint decision between Salinas 
and the PRI leadership at this 
point,” said a diplomat. “Salmas 
probably will not make this deci- 
sion by himself.” 

Mexico’s constitution prohibits 
Mr. -Satinas from running for re- 
election and requires any govern- 
ment official to resign at least six 
months before elections are held in 
order to run. Since the presidential 
vote is scheduled for Aug. 21, no 
current member of the cabinet is 
eligible. 

A short list of potential candi- 
dates already was circulating at 
party headquarters Thursday, as 
Mr. Colosio's casket was flown in 
fromTijnana and placed an view in 
the auditorium where he gave his 
candidacy acceptance speech last 
Nov. 28. 

Diplomats said the two most 
commonly circulated names of po- 
tential candidates are Ernesto Ze- 
dillo, Mr. Colosio's campaign man- 
~ w— ager and former education 
army’s secretary, and Fernando Ortiz 
xs also Arana, the party’s president 

They said ano Lher potential can- 
didate was Manuel Camacho SoHs, 
a chief rival of Mr. Colosio’s within 
the party and currently the govern- 
ment’s peace negotiator with peas- 
ant rebels in the southern state of 
Chiapas. Mr. Camacho had indi- 
cated in recent weeks that he was 
considering a breakaway presiden- 
tial campaign. 

But Mr. Camacho announced 
Thursday that be did not want to 
be considered as a potential re- 
placement candidate. Before male - 
mg his statement, he was attacked 
by a Colorio supporter standing 
vigil at the funeral home, and the 
statement itsdf provoked cheers 
and sustained applause from other 
Colosio supporters. 

Wednesday night outride the 
party headquarters, mourners were 
beard shouting, “Colosio yes! Ca- 
macho no!” There were also audi- 
ble expressions of support for Mr. 
Ortiz Arana, but it was unclear how 
much backing be has. 

For Mr. Salinas, it is the second 
major crisis in three months, the 
first being the Jan. 1 peasant rebel- 
lion in Chiapas, which led to at 
least 145 deaths. Mr. Camacho has 
yet to secure an accord with rebel 
leaders of the Zapatista National 
Liberation Army. 


Three Alliances Square Off for Italian Election , 

A total of IS political parties have joined three alliances to contest Italy's general elections on Sunday and Monday. 


Left - Progressives 


initially seen as firm favorites at the polls, the 
Progressives have been eclipsed by the 
rising right and have been forecast to win 
about 35 percent of the vote. The alliance’s 
main members are: 

Democratic Party of the Loft (PDS). 
Successor to what was the West's largest 
Communist Party and Italy's permanent 
opposition since World War II, the PDS of 
Achilla Occhetio hopes to capitalize on big 
gains in mayoral elections last December. It 
says that, since it has been largely 
untouched by Italy's graft scandal, it is the 
right party to take Italy into a new era. 
Communist Refoundation. The hard-line 
core of the old Italian Communist Party that 
refused to join Occhetto's PDS when the 
party changed Its name and ditched Marxism 
in 1991 . It has defied the PDS over economic 
policy and is demanding an end to 
privatization and extra taxes on investment 
income. 

Socialist Party (PS1). The remains of the 
party that was the linchpin of governments for 
two decades under Betti no Craxi. It co ll apsed 
under the weight of the political corruption 
scandal. The new leader is Ottaviano Del 
Turco, a former labor leader. 

La Rate (The Network). 

Sicilian-based anti-Mafia party headed by 
Palermo Mayor Leoluca Orlando, a former 
Christian Democrat who has launched a 
challenge to organized crime that is believed 
I to have put him on the mob's hit list. 

Other small parties in the alliance include the 
center-left Democratic Alliance, Christian 
Socialists, Socialist Renewal and the pro- 
ecology Greens. 



Achilla Occhetio 


Center 


Silvio Berlusconi 


Expected to win about 16 percent of the vote, 
the two-party centrist alliance is the smallest 
of the three, but could hold the balance of 
power if neither of the two big blocs wins an 
absolute majority. 

Popular Party. Launched in January from 
the ruins of the Christian Democrats, the 
main force in government for tour decades 
and, with the Sodafists, the worst hit by the 
corruption scandal. It is led by one of the 
dourest figures in Italian politics, Mino 
Marinazzoil. 

Pact for Italy. The 
alliance formed by ex- 
Christian Democrat 
Aland Segni, father of 
the 1993 electoral 
reform referendum 
that has given Italy a 
new simple majority 
voting system. Segni 
is the only politician 
openly running tor 
prime minister. 



Mario Segni 


Right - Froodom Alliance 


Headed by tycoon-tumed-politiclan Silvio 
Berlusconi, it is the best placed alliance in 
opinion polls but ts also the loosest and most 

affected by internal squabbles. Most recent 

surveys give ft about 45 percent support. 
Fora Italia (Go Italy). Founded five months 
ago by Berlusconi to keep the left from 
power. Buftt from fie top and staffed by 
executives from Berlusconi's media empire, it 
Is promising one mDEon jobs, tax cuts and 
free enterprise. 

National Alliance. The grouping founded by 
Gianfranco Fire, leader of the neo-fascist 
Italian Social Movement (MSI), to attract 
conservative voters uncomfortable wifi fie 
MSI's connections to fie Fascist government 
of wartime dictator Benito Mussolini, it is 
fielding candidates wifi Forza Italia to central 
and southern Italy, where it made big gains in 
local elections last year. 

Northern League. 

The pro-autonomy 
movement fiat 
has become fie 
biggest party in 
northern Italy. 

Leader Umberto 
Boss/ says he joined 
forces wifi 
Berlusconi only to 
stop the remains of 
Italy's scandai- 
ridden establishment 
from subverting fie 
poiaical right Umberto Boss! 

Other small parties in the alliance are the 
Christian Democratic Center (CCD) and fie 
Union of fie Democratic Center (UCD). 



Source: Reuters 


nrr 


ITALY: Berlusconi , the Upstart Tycoon, Keeps Promising r Ne w Miracle 5 


Bomb Wounds 4 in Istanbul 

Agmce Fnmce-Presse 

ISTANBUL — A bomb explo- 
sion wounded four persons Thurs- 
day in Istanbul's Grand Bazaar. 
Police said a Romanian was among 
the casualties from the blast, which 
occurred in a ladies* toilet. 


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Continued from Page 1 

North and South walk that road together." 

Instantly, the crowd begun to chant “Stoio! 
Silvio!” and the candidate’s campaign manag- 
ers notched up another direct hit for marketing. 

With just days to go before the vote on 
Sunday and Monday that will, in all probabili- 
ty, bury the ruling class that has dominated 
I talian politics for four decades, Mr. Berlusconi 
has emerged as the npstart who would be king, 
the millionaire tycoon of television, publishing, 
supermarkets, and real estate who would use 
corporate savvy to produce what be calls “a 
new Italian □made.” 

His would-be miracle-working has not been 
without challenge, particularly from leftist ad- 
versaries, who are running a dose second in 
polls that show man y voters undedded. And he 
has tangled publidy with investigators and re- 
porters, calling them all part of a communist 
conspiracy. 

On Wednesday, in murky circumstances 
horns before a major television confrontation 
with his main adversary, AchiDe Occhetto. 
leader of the Democratic Party of the Left, 
plainclothes agents raided his headquarters in 
Rome to seek a list of candidates at the request 
of a magistrate investigating links between 
Freemasons, politicians and organized crime. 

"These things happen only in totalitarian 
countries,” Mr. Berlusconi protested. 

[Prime Minister Carlo Azeglio Gampi broke 
his silence in the dection campaign on Thurs- 
day, angrily rejecting an attack on his govern- 
ment by Mr. Berlusconi, Reuters reported from 
Rome. 


[Mr. Gampi, a former central bank chief 
with no political ties, rejected allegations by 
Mr. Berlusconi that Budget Minis ter Luigi Spa- 
venta had presented false figures to PariEunent 
on Italy’s budget deficit. “Nobody can honestly 
speak of falsification,” Mr. Gampi said, de- 
fending his government’s economic record.] 

Mr. Berlusconi, 57, has been compared to 
America’s Ross Perot. Indeed, his extensive and 
skillful use of television, derived from his own- 
ership of three private networks that regularly 
draw almost half of Italy’s viewers, bears com- 
parison to both Mr. Perot’s nationwide hook- 
ups and President Bill din ton’s use of televised 
town hall meetings. 

Above all, Mr. Berlusconi's campaign has 
been far closer to Ronald Reagan’s Teflon 
years, somehow eluding the most damaging 
riharg wt and contradictions surrounding him 
and his Forza Italia party. 

While he offers himself as the emblem of a 
new Italy after years of corruption, his own 
fortune was made in the booming 1980s under 
the tutelage of Bettino Cnuri, the former Social- 
ist Party leader who faces more corruption 
charges than any other old guard politi cian. His 
brothff , Paolo, and severafof his senior execu- 
tives face corruption inquiries related to his 
business empire, though Mr. Berlusconi himself 
remains untouched. 

Whfle his adversaries accuse him of being the 
man of the Mafia and the Masons in Palermo 
(he has acknowledged membership in Propa- 
ganda-2, a spurious Masonic lodge disbanded 
in 1981 amid accusations that it tried to over- 
throw the government), he has managed to turn 
the assertions around. 


“We say it loud and dear ” he declared to a 
standing ovation. “Every vote for Forza Italia 
in Sicily, in Calabria, in Campania, and every- 
where else in Italy is a vote against the Mafia.” 

And while his whole campaign is suffused 
with the notion that a successful entrepreneur 
can run a successful government, his own Fm- 
invest corporation is $12 billion in debt, losses 
that could only increase if his leftist adversaries 
win the election and fulfill their promise to 
restrict his television empire. 

For his followers and allies, though, none of 
that seems to count: With his business empire 
and his 70-room villa outside Milan, and with 
his sense of personal style that Italians call 
“bella figure . Mr. Berlusconi has packaged 
himself as the Italian dream. 

His adversaries see it somewhat differently. 
A victory for Mr. Berlusconi, said Mr. Oc- 
chetto, the leader of the leftist coalition, would 
mean Italy’s “passing from the hands of the 
father to the hands of the son, from Craxi to 
Berlusconi." 

■ TV Debate Called a Draw 

Italian newspapers woe at a loss on Thurs- 
day to designate a winner in the broadcast 
debate in which Mr. Berlusconi and Mr. Oc- 
chetto came face to face for the first time, 
Agence Francc-Pressc reported. 

Most papers provided extensive coverage of 
the raucoos exchanges, watched by milli ons on 
Wednesday mghL £ In sport terms, the debate 
was a draw, politically as wen,” said the center- 
light La Stampa daily, echoing a generally held 
view. “The cnampions of the right ana left 
traded insults for 20 minutes and then witty 
words at the end." 


SOMALIA: For UN Force, AU the Comforts of Home 

Continued from Page 1 
that we need to have developed 
things quite as much as they've 
been developed." 

Although some private aid 
groups have undertaken significant 
development programs, such as re- 
brnJdmg schools or establishing 
small businesses, UN humanitar- 
ian efforts have been minimal, U.S. 
and UN officials agree. The rea- 
sons usually given are the unstable 
security situation, a preoccupation 
with emergency assistance and 
what Mr. Bogosian calls the “scle- 
rotic” condition of the UN aid bu- 
reaucracy. 

A breakdown of the $639 million 
allocated for the c ur r en t November 
to May period offers a glimpse of 
priorities of the UN force in Soma- 
lia. Almost $176 million is being 


spent to hire the roughly 19,000 
UN soldiers posted in Somalia. 
Each soldier collects $1.28 a day; 
another $988 per soldier per month 
goes to the troops’ governments, 
with an additional bonus of $291 a 
month paid for each military spe- 
cialist. 

Another $50.8 million is budget- 
ed for depreciation of the troops’ 
equipment and vehicles. S33.4 mil- 
lion [or food rations and $23.5 mil- 


lion for the cost of sending troops 
home and bringing new soldiers to 
replace them. 

“We've also got ideas for recrea- 
tion — tennis courts, squash courts, 
swimming pod, a mini-golf course. 
But we’re not quite there yet,” the 
official of the UN force said. "We 
thought that was really gilding the 
lfly a little bit. We don't want to be 
seen as looking after just ourselves 
when, after all. we're not going to 
be living here that long.” 

Nevertheless, this week work- 
men began erecting a new subdivi- 
sion for 800 UN force employees 
along an asphalt street in the com- 
pound. The new village will cost 
about $12 million, including $7 
million for the plumbing system. 

“This is the only place in town 
with street lights,” the UN force 
official said. 

The prime beneficiaries of the 
spending by the UN force, other 
than the military contingents, have 
been Western contractors. 

The biggest contractor is the 
Houston firm of Brown & Root, 
which has become the operation’s 
new logistical arm. The UN force 
in Somalia has requested $94 mil- 
lion from UN headquarters in New 


York to pay for the company’s ser- 
vices through the spring. That is in 
addition to a $107 million contract 
let by the U.S. Army Corps of En- 
gineers to support the army and 
some UN operations in Somalia 
from December 1992 through this 
month. 

The UN force has hired more 
than 1,800 Somalis for tasks rang- 
ing from ditch digging to transla- 
tion services. Yet, the fact that the 
overwhelming majority of the oper- 
ation’s money has gone to compa- 
nies and armies from elsewhere in 
the world rankles many Somalis. 

“They have spent at least 90 per- 
cent of their money cm the rmli- 
taiy,” said Mohammed Abdi Him, 
an aide to the Somali faction lead- 
er, Gtmeral Mohammed Farah Ai- 
did. “There are still no schools, 
there’s no electricity, there are no 
social sendees at all. We can't teD 
the world community where their 
donations are going because we 
don't know. How can Unosom tell 
us they are here to help us? We 
don’t see anything.” 

A Somali businessman, Ahmed 
War same, added, “They built 
themselves a little Washington in 
that compound. And that’s all.” 


Somali Peace 


Is Signed by 
2 Warlords 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NAIROBI — Somalia’s two 
main warlords signed a peace 
pact in Nairobi on Thursday 
caffing a cease-fire to end three 
years of violence and a recon- 
ciliation conference in May to 
elect a president and set up a 
new government. 

The agreement was secured 
by an overnight c ompromi se 
under UN pressure and fears 
of renewed dvfl war as the 
United States completes its 
military pnllout from Somalia. 

“We sign this declaration 
with great trust and confi- 
dence in each other,” said 
General Mohammed Farah 
Aidid, the Mogadishu war- 
lord. Mo hammed AH Mahdi. a 
self-styled president who was 
General Aiditfs enemy, said 
the pact put them “at the 
threshold of a new era.” 

The last U.S. soldiers will 
board flights for home Friday 
morning, and wi thin hours the 
Marines will return to their 
ships offshore. (Reuters, AP) 


ALGERIA: Commanders, Refecting Dialogue, Dig In for a Long Fight 

Hard-liners among the fundamentalists have 
also rebelled against those Islamists who opted 
fordialvjguc. The Armed Islamic Group, which 
refuses all compromise, insisting on bringing 
toe government down by force and driving aff 
foreigners out, has threatened to kill Islamists 
who agree to negotiate an end to the dvfl strife. 
Indications that secular hard-liners within *° e . call-up plan coincided with one an- 
the army and among the elite were ready to price rises of up to 100 percent from 

rebel against any notion erf a dialngne have intraday on tune basic foods. Officials said it 
been evident lor days. ^ a * a to the International Monetary 

In aficryartid* H Waun, a Fr^ch-ta- 

SSSSTC3 assess 

ssaasassS? 1 " 


i 

bring fundamentalists to power. In the last 
year, the insurgency has nearly turned into a 
dvfl war. Among the deaths are those of 32 
foreigners singled out by the fundamentalists in 
an attempt to discourage foreign support for 

tbe government. 

The directive granting new powers to Gener- 
al Lamari, who leads a group of Western- 
oriented, French- trained officers bent on pre- 
venting fundamentalists from sharing any 
power, greatly diminishes the authority of the 
president, Mr. Zero ual, who officially bolds the 
title of defense minister along with the presi- 
dency. 

Mr. Zeroual was picked earlier this year by 


the militaiy junta to be president for a transi- 
tional three-year period. But shortly after com- 
ing to power, he seems to have incurred the 
wrath of the country’s ruling elite, which is 
largely francophile and deeply secular in be- 
liefs, by raising the specter of sharing power 
with Muslim fundamentalists. 


CHARITY: So Much Money in the Bank, So little Time to Give It Away 

ed to give away enough money to 


Continued from Page 1 
grant proposal and afterward de- 
clared it one of tbe best board 
meetings she had ever been to. 

Long before she settled into dis- 
pensing money, she dreamed of be- 
an actress. Instead, she 
found herself attracted to judging 
scripts. She eventually advanced to 
story editor at Warner Brothers, for 
which she bought nearly all the 
Bette Davis movies but will un- 
doubtedly be best remembered for 
saying yes to “Casablanca.” 


mood, with whom she had a daugh- 
ter. He was a man much on tbe go. 
He grew up one of nine children in 
modest circumstances in the South. 
His mother died when be was 2. 
When be went to Harvard Business 
School, be earned money volun- 
teering for medical experiments. 

After college, he tried ret ailing, 
beginning with Mac/s and then 
Abraham & Straus. 

A friend enticed him into the 
construction business, and he be- 
come one of tbe most successful 


wasn’t Interested In accumulating 
more and more money. He wanted 
to do something with it” 

In 1 984, the couple began discus- 
sions about firing it up. Their sensi- 
bilities about phflanuiropy coincid- 
ed. They were not interested in 
keeping their name burned into 
some perpetual memorial eventual, 
ly controlled by other people. Most 


achieve real impact, anri they want- 
ed to do it in New York, the ci 


aty 




After a decade in Hollywood, builders and developers in the city, 
she came to New York as t he story “We lived very nicely, but we 
editor and talent scout for Hal never lived luxuriously,” Ms. Dia- 

Wallis, the producer. mond raid. “He wanted to give allow a small sum of money to never one to iWm * A «rh- 

In 1942 she married Aaron Dia- something back. My husband dribble out every year. They want- the girte,” she 


York, 

that had enriched them. 

. Thus they wanted the founda- 
tion to hand out as much money 
each year as foundations with three 
or fo nr times its wealth — and then 
to an expedient end. 

y v r~, k a discussion in April 1984, the 

foundations disperse a portion of tJuunonds worked oat a spending 
the investment income produced formula: 40 percent on minority 

education, 40 percent on medical 

research and 20 percent on the arts. 

A week later, Mr, Diamond died 
of a heart attack. Ms. Diamond 
went on with the plan alone. “I was 



The Diamonds weren’t keen to 
allow a 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


Page 5 


People fining up Thursday at a checkpoint near Vltez separating Bosnian-held areas from land held by r martan fa^ 

Serbian Hijackers Terrorized UN Drivers 


Return 

SARAJEVO, Bosma-Herzegovv 
na — Armed Serbs who hijacked 
and looted a United Nations aid 
convoy in Bosnia gave its drivers a 
white flag and ordered them to 
walk across a front line after warn- 
ing them it was mined. UN officials 
said Thursday. 

A spokesman for the UN High 
Commissioner for Refugees, Peter 
Kessler, said the Serbs had forced 
the unarmed Danish drivers from 
the 10 trucks at gunpoint, and then 
stole their personal possessions. 

The 10 drivers were lined up at 
gunpoint and “were frightened 
then for their lives," he said. 

The United Nations said the 
men were taken to the front line, 
given a while flag and told to walk 
m the direction of Bosnian Cro- 
atian forces. The convoy was hi- 
jacked on Wednesday while trans- 
porting of food and medicine to the 
Muslim enclave of Maglaj. Nine of 
the 10 trucks were still missing, and 
drivers said some of the mariierne 
was dumped in a river. 

It was one of the the most serious 


provocations directed at UN 
peacekeepers in Bosnia and again 
raised questions about the extent of 
political control over the Bosnian 
Serb in Army. 

The leader of the Bosnian Serbs, 
Radovan Karadzic, said, “That was 
not really the army, that was, rath- 
er, an insane person and it is being 
investigated right now. The respon- 
sible people are going to be pun- 
ished.” 

Kris Janowski, a UN relief 
spokesman in Sarajevo, said the 
convoy “was looted completely by 
Serb military, people in Serb uni- 
forms, aimed people” 

“The convoy had a Serb police 
escort which evaporated,” he add- 
ed. 

Maglaj. a town of 19,000, has 
been under siege for nine months. 
Serbian and Croatian forces have 
often refused to let aid convoys 
pass, leaving the town to rely on 
supplies dropped by air. 

Meanwhile, a UN decision to in- 
vite Turkey to send troops to Bos- 
nia as peacekeepers brought a 
sharp response from Bosnian Serbs 


Japanese Workers 
Settling for Less 


By Steven Brail 

International Herald Tribme 

TOKYO — Afraid that the re- 
cession could spark layoffs of the 
sort seen in the West some Japa- 
nese unions are accepting manage- 
ment demands for a freeze on 
wages in exchange for job security, 
a concession unprecedented m 
postwar Japan. 

As Japan's annual spring wage 
offensive, or shunto, reached its 
peak on Thursday, unions at elec- 
tronics companies and private rail- 
ways bargained late into the night, 
threatening to strike Friday. But 
any eventual compromises are un- 
likely to change the average settle- 
ment of less than 3 percent, the 
lowest figure since the shunto start- 
ed in 1955. 

“In essence, it’s a work-sharing 
deal,” said HBdcfairo Iwagi, a senior 
economist at the Nomura Research 
Institute. “But it's good enough to 
allow workers to maintain their 
standards of living, because prices 
are stable or falling." 

Although in line with expecta- 
tions. the settlements were a disap- 
pointment to onions that had 
hoped for increases greater than 5 
percent- They argued that higher 
pay would stimulate private spend- 
ing and help the broader economy 
emerge from the worst recession in 
Japan’s postwar history. 

But management, struggling to 
reverse four years of decl in in g prof- 
its and overcome the strong yen’s 
corrosive impact on competitive- 
ness, insisted that wages be held in 
check. 

Economists said the lack of an 
increase in inflation-adjusted sala- 
ries would leave cuts in income 
taxes and lower import prices as 
Tokyo’s only tools for boosting 
personal consumption, which rep- 
resents 60 percent of Japan's gross 
domestic product. The impact on 
corporate profits, they said, would 

negotiations under- 
score the flexibility of Japanese in- 
dustrial relations that have spared 
Japan the pain of massrve layoffs 
andrising unemployment, tbepoor 
settlement for labor casts farther 
doubt on how much longer me 
shunto process will reman viable.^ 

“Shunto is behind the time, 
Mr Iwafti said. “As a structure for 
wage negotiations, it wflj die out by 
the end of the century. 

Shunto’s demise would mark the 

a system that has beffl “ esOTtid 
component of Japan s Wetmeem- 
ployment system. It 
wfaat would replace it, however, be- 
and labor mar- 


ket mobility is far less developed 
than in the West 

The idea of the shunto, which 
began in 1955, was to marshal 
onion strength by mounting a coor- 
dinated wage offenave each spring. 

During the fast-growth era until 
the early 1970s, the system worked 
wdL Companies, enjoying rising 
‘ profits, were willing to share gains 
with workers in exchange for loyal- 
ty that justified investments in 
worker training and led to worid- 
beating standards in manufactur- 
ing. 

Since the first oil shock of 1973, 
however, wage increases have been 
on a long-term downtrend, reach- 
ing a nadir m this year’s no-in- 
crease settlement. Moreover, the 
shunto system, in which a handful 
of leading firms reached wage 
agreements that set the standard 
for entire industries, is increasingly 
ont Of step with economic reality. 

“When every company was 
growing rapidly, a common wage 
increase was possible, but now 
there are stark differences between 
industries, such as steel and autos,” 
said Tsuyoshi Tsuru, associate pro- 
fessor of economics at Hhotsuba- 
<thi University’s Institute of Eco- 
nomic Research in Tokyo. “A 
diversification of corporate perfor- 
mance is contradictory, to a coordi- 
nated attack by unions.” 

For example, Toyota Motor 
Corp., Japan's top carmaker, which 
is weathering the recession better 
than expected, was offering a 3.06 
percent wage increase, the lowest in 
the company’s history. Yet, Nissan 
Motor, which is struggling to 
emerge from the red, is offering 
only a slightly lower increase of 
2.89 percent Japanese steelmakers 
earlier agreed to a meager 1.56 per- 
cent rise 

To maintain their authority in 
the face of slower growth in wages, 
unions have been moving away 
from a strict focus on wimting sala- 
ry increases to a broader agenda 
including calls for shorter working 
hours, lower income taxes and oth- 
er benefits. 

The broadened agenda has done 
little to prevent an erosion of union 
solidarity. Membership fell to 242 
percent of employed workers in 
December, compared with 55.8 
percent in 1959. 

“The rank and file are disap- 
pointed because they find it very 
difficult to understand the long 
laundry list of union demands,” 
Mr. Tsnrn said. 

Employees at several railroad 
companies such as Tokyu Corp., 
S pyrni Railway and Hanshin are 
_ threatening to hold a series of 24- 
hour strikes starting Friday if their 
demands are not met 


TRADE: Kantor Warm Japan 


i 

Japan to renegotiate ** 
ket-access agreement wii* i Mowr- 
ola Inc* so that the American tele- 
communications 

beaccorded fair access to the To- 

Mr Kantor said. “But we cannot 
tack down because wecanaol put 
the relationship on a 
sis for both countries unless they 


that it is not going to happen all at 
ouce but we have to begmnow.lt is 
not a one-way street anymore," 
After eight months of negotia- 
tions on a “framework” agreement 
for United States-Japanese trade, 
the United States last month 
walked away from the table, saying 
the Japanese simply were not seri- 
ous. It was that move, and the 
threat of American sanctions, that 
prompted Tokyo to try to come up 
with tins unilateral package. 


and from Greece and Bulgaria. 

The UN had been reluctant to 
accept Turkish troops for Bosnia 
because of centuries of Turkish Ot- 
toman rule in the Balkans, which 
ended in the early 1900s. 

Mr. Karadzic said the UN deci- 
sion was “one among several other 


very dangerous precedents created 
in the Yugoslav crisis." 

Greece, an ally of Serbia’s, was 
reported to be considering offering 
its own soldiers as peacekeepers 
after the Security Council rejected 
its objections to the decision to 
approach the Turks. 


In France, Students Are on a Rampage 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — They were long thought to be 
passive, indifferent to politics, and resigned 
to their lot, but suddenly French students are 
back in the streets, battling the police, chal- 
lenging the government and demanding a 
voice in the country’s affaire. 

Born in Paris three weeks ago, the protests 
have spread quickly, with teas of thousands 
of students joining often violent demonstra- 
tions in a dozen other cities. On Wednesday, 
youths paralyzed a Paris railroad station for 
more than two hours and protesters in Lyon 
fought Lhe police with baseball bats. 

The movement was prompted by a govern- 
ment decree that allows employers to pay 
between 30 percent and 80 percent of the 
$1,000 minimum monthly wage to those un- 
da 25. One person in four in this age group is 
(Hit of work, and the government argues that 
the measure wifi encourage employers to hire 
young people. 

But tor those who have continued their 
studies in the belief that that would improve 
their job prospects, the decree is seen as a 
betrayal by a political system that channeled 
them into higher education and has now told 
them to Iowa their expectations. 

“We're tired of being known as the genera- 
tion that doesn’t care about anything,” said 
Lofc Isambert, 20, a Parisian studying busi- 
ness. “This movement is a pretext to express 
our general unhappiness.” 

[Thousands of young people defied gov- 
ernment warnings of heavy punishment for 
troublemakers and look to the streets again 
On Thursday, Reuters reported. 

[The police said about 6,000 young people 
marched through Lyon, ignoring warnings 
that individuals could be jailed for up to 


seven years and fined 700,000 francs 
($120,000) each if the march led to disorders. 
The police fired tear gas and water cannon to 
disperse the students. 

[About 3,000 students in Valence, 90 kilo- 
meters (55 miles) to the south of Lyon, 
marched through the city. In nearby Sl 
E tienne, about 100 youths blocked a bus and 
tram depot for about two hours. Hundreds of 
students also protested in Alpine towns, in- 
cluding Cbam hery, Grenoble, Annecy, Anne- 
masse and CJuses.] 

With another demonstration planned for 
Paris on Friday, editorialists have even begun 
speoilating that France may re-live the hinge 
anti-government movement that paralyzed 
the country in May 1968 and eventually led 
to the resignation of President Charles de 
Gaulle. 

So far at least, this movement is different. 
While May 1968 was inspired by the roman- 
tic ideal of chang in g the world, today’s Stu- 
dents have been mobilized by an attack on 
what a different generation considers its 
birthright — a secure and well-paying job. 

For many students, then, the message is 
painfully dear. “We're going to be worse off 
than our parents,” said Suvain Aye, 19, a 
statistics student “A minority will be much 
better off . But the great nugonty wED be much 
poorer." 

And the students are angry. 

“This has nothing to do with 1968,” said 
Renand Gardaire, 20, who is studying statis- 
tics at the University Institute of Technology 
in Paris, where the movement began. “In 
1968, the young rejected the consumer soci- 
ety. Now it's the opposite. We don't reject 
society; we want to join it.” 

This same cry can bp heard across Western 
Europe where, despite the mood of prosperity 


du ring the 1980s, economies have failed dra- 
matically to generate enough jobs 10 keep up 
with new entrants into the labor force. And 
with the recession of the early 1990s, the 
situation has turned critical 

Unemployment among 16- to 25-year-olds 
stands at 30 percent in Italy, 25 percent in 
France, and 17percent in Britain. In France, 
even with 2 adman students in higher educa- 
tion, young people account for 22.6 percent 
of the unemployed (who currently total 33 
million), up from 19.8 percent last year. 

“Change the world?” asked Karine Lasney, 
21, a statistics student. “It’s impossible. The 
way things are, we have no chance of doing 
so. My dream is to have a good job and a 
family. Politics don't interest me. For me, left 
and right are the same. The government here 
changed, but nothing changed.” 

But the defiant mood in the amphitheater 
of the University Institute of Technology on e 
morning this week suggested that something 
had changed. The students began an indefi- 
nite strike and, with 400 youths crowding the 
hall, plans for Friday’s demonstration were 
bong discussed. 

Hdfcne Joubert, who has emerged as a 
leader of the movement, said it was important 
to avoid violence. 

The movement’s goal is to force the conser- 
vative government of Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur to revoke the wage decree. 

The government has already excluded those 
with senior degrees for the wage reduction. 

Further, haying worked in the office of 
Georges Pompidou, who was the prime min- 
ister m May 1968, Mr. Balladur is said to be 
haunted by the specter of a new social explo- 
sion. But for the moment, officials say, he has 
decided to stand his ground and gamble that 
the movement will run out of steam. 



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niBUSUED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Keeping Russia on Course 


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If Russia can tighten its budget deficit over 
live n ext mouth, the International Monetary 
Fond will lend it an additional $1,5 billion to 
pay for imports. Both parts of that agreement 
are encouraging. Since the IMF is the instru- 
ment of the wealthy democracies, its offer 
suggests that the democracies have not aban- 
doned active efforts to help Russia. 

But the agreement also means that the Rus- 
sian government has not abandoned reform. 
Most of the reformers resigned or were fired 
months ago, and as winter arrived it looked as 
though economic disaster was ahead. But 
while the economy is stfll in a state of chaos, 
policy continues much as before, and now 
Prime Minister Viktor Chemoniyrdin is going 
to undertake another attempt to get revenues 
up and subsidies down. 

The IMF struck its bargain with Mr. Cher- 
nomyrdin, not with President Boris Yeltsin. It 
is now the prune muriate who is managing 
most of the Russian government's business 
and, apparently, making most of the derisions. 
The next step will be to persuade the Russian 
parliament to accept budget revisions that pro- 
vide less money for aD the outstretched bands. 
That will be difficult, for the parliament is full 
of people who are angiy about economic 


rfiany and resentful of foreign advice. Mr. 
Chernomyrdin, former apparatchik that he is, 
will have a better chance than Mr. Yeltsin to 
bring the recalcitrant legislators along. 

This loan of $3.5 billion trill hardly meet 
Russia’s needs for long. But it is a key to 
getting much man. Narrowing the budget 
deficit will itself bring great benefits by lower- 
ing the inflation rate and moving the economy 
toward greater stability. The IMF loan will be 
a si gnal to the world that the Russians are 
moving in the right direction. With that, they 
can begin negotiating debt relief with the 
governments to which they owe money, and 
they con recruit more foreign investment. 

There will never be enough Foreign aid in 
the conventional form of grants and low- 
interest loans to finance the rebuilding of the 
Russian economy. But perhaps it will turn out 
that large amounts of aid are not required. 
Russia is, after all, a rich country with much 
industry and immense natural resources. Rus- 
sia's prospects remain highly uncertain, but 
they are no longer as bleak as they seemed at 
the beginning of the winter. The West now 
needs to consider the next stage, and bow best 
it can help maintain this progress. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



An Inquiry 
Without 
Paralysis 


, >. \( ■ 
f ■ 


The Wrong Nuclear Policy In Indonesia, Spielberg’s ’List’ Could Clean the Air 


D 


Under former Defense Secretary Les A s- 
pin's leadership, the Pentagon put a high 
priority on curbing the spread of nuclear 
arms to other nations — and on reducing the 
role played by nuclear arms in Washington's 
own strategy. Thai policy made sense be- 


cause the proliferation of nuclear weapons 

sUnit- 


qut 

he- 


xx 


xpi 
T: 
s a 
an 
A 
101 


lys 

«dl 

:ar 

ric 

ue 

T 

ice 

:ft 

le 


potentially poses a direct danger to the 1 
ed States and its allies and because the Pen- 
tagon, with its overwhelming superiority in 
conventional arms, has no need to rely heavi- 
ly on a nuclear arsenal that will only encour- 
age other nations to emulate it. 

Now Mr. Aspin’s successor, W illiam Perry, 
seems to be turning this astute policy upside 
down. In a recent review of U.S. nuclear 
posture he established a role for nuclear arms: 
deterring and responding to chemical and 
biological threats. At first blush that seems 
reasonable enough. The United States is com- 
mitted to global bans on chemical and biolog- 
ical weapons and to ridding itself of than. 
So why not use nuclear arms to counter any 


use of these weapons by an adversary? 

One reason is that the United States has no 
need to use nuclear arms for this purpose. It 
already has ample conventional force to 
counter chemical and biological threats. Ask 
Saddam Hussein, who did not dare use his 
chemical weapons in the Gulf war in anticipa- 
tion of the allies’ assault because he knew that 
if he did, nothing would stop them from 
occupying Baghdad and getting rid of him. 

Worse yet, Mr. Perry's plan to have the 
Pentagon prepare for such nudear contingen- 
cies would legitimize nudear arms instead of 
stigmatizing them. Increasing the number of 
nuclear targets to indude every suspected 
chemical and biological weapons site drives 
up the requirement for warheads. 

The new policy reeks of a desperate effort to 
find any possible justification to maintain the 
Pentagon’s huge but obsolescent nuclear arse- 
nal It would only encourage would-be prdifer- 
ators to follow Mr. Perry's lead —backward. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Chance for the Warlords 


ie 

nd 

TOI 


The United Nations is plugging away at a 
thankless job left to it in Somalia by its 
member states. It is trying to induce the war- 
im lords lo cooperate in fffiing the vacuum being 
rcr created as the United States and other West- 
on era countries withdraw their last peacekeep- 
ing forces. The task involves abandonment of 
the civilian elders who were once touted as 
alternative leaders. Now the United Nations 
endorses the very men, formerly dismissed as 
“terrorists” and “criminals.” whose feuds de- 
^ stroyed their country. The result, if it comes 
off, will be a long way from democracy. But 
no one sees any other possibility than to let 
the warlords have a political go. 

_ It was, of course, the attempt of intematioiia] 

y| interveners to disarm the warlords that predpi- 
Ji lated the shootout that led Washington to 
j; pronounce its humanitarian mission accom- 
plished and to set in motion its current “tactical 
_ redeployment-” Some 20,000 peacekeepers 
from non-Weston countries stay behind. Their 
ibi mission is to so up a lightly armed national 
v« police and to ensure delivery of relief. There are 
£ many guns in the country and, in addition to 

\M 

Jol 

3 

its 


T 

"or 


Other Comment 


Handling the Nudear Issue 


cl The North Koreans continue to taunt the 
& -est of the world. Why is this? 

?S One reason is that their intransigence fon 
jwiudear inspections] has thus far been re- 
w varded. In this the North Koreans have been 
w 1 lelped by Washington’s inability to distin- 
^ijmsh between ends and means. 

All along the Americans have put their 
'* aith in "talks,” and the North Koreans have 


vo wen happy to talk while fulfilling their nu- 
m lea r ambitions. Seoul has spoken softly for 


ear of agitating Pyongyang. The result is 
- hat despite North Korea’s many violations 
u nd broken promises it is Pyongyang that 
« as been issuing demands — no joint South 
3alorea-U.S. military exercises, no Patriot 
S tissues — and not vice versa. 


£ It is time to aid the farce. Yes, demanding 

3M - -- - 


fiat Pyongyang comply with the nudear 
$tj]es could anger tbe unpredictable Kim fi 
|7ung, one reason Seoul has hoped the issue 
4 oald simply go away. At the moment the 
Rebate is over economic sanctions, which 
flight have worked before the credibility of 
j® J threats against Pyongyang wore so thin 
jeat are less likely to have any effect today, 
options are disappearing. History, however, 
remarkably consistent The perennial les- 
"in is that it is far better to stop bullies by 
4| hat ever means are required before it is so 
u 

M 


late that they must be stopped by whatever 
means are available. 

— Far Eastern Economic Renew ( Hong Kong). 

North Korea's decision not to allow inter- 
national inspectors to take samples from one 
of its declared atomic facilities has shar- 
pened the nuclear controversy in the Korean 
peninsula. Pyongyang's action has only 
served to deepen suspicion that it is involved 
in nuclear proliferation. 

Despite these gloomy developments, the 
United States and its allies should pursue 
patient diplomacy, while si gnaling to North 
Korea that it must not take their patience for 
granted. Since Pyongyang has painted itself 
into a corner, applying pressure on it or 
doing that too soon would raise tbe risk of 
confrontation, which must be avoided. War 
would be unthinkable. 

But the United States also must realize 
that it needs to engage China more closely on 
the nuclear issue. As experience over the past 
year has shown, persuading North Korea to 
settle the issue wfl] not be an easy task for 
Washington. Should sanctions against 
Pyongyang become unavoidable at a later 
stage, it will need Beijing's support not only 
to obtain the approval of the United Nations 
Security Council for such measures, but also 
to make them work. 

— Straits Tones (Singapore). 



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J AKARTA — Steven Spidbag has an important 
decision to make about Indonesia, home of the 
world's largest Muslim population. The American 
film director can uphold his aesthetic principles and 
withdraw “Schindler's List” — as he threatened to 
do in the Philippines-— in the Kkriy event that 
censors snip out an offending sex scene. Or he can 
accept the cut and help combat the spread of anti- 
Semitism by exposing millions nf Indonesians to tbe 
black-and-white horror of the Holocaust. 

The Oscar-winning film arrives at a critical junc- 
ture. As in many other countries, emotion in Indo- 
nesia is running high over the massacre or Palestin- 
ians at Hebron. In recent weeks, Muslim youths 
have thronged tbe gates of the UJS. Embassy in 
Jakarta and U.S. consulates in Medan and Suraba- 
ja. waring posters scrawled “Go to HeB With Your 
Jew” and “Jews Can’t Be Trusted." Four Indone- 
sian journalists were pilloried in the press as “Zi- 
onist spies” after accepting an Israeli government 
invitation to rish Td Ariv recently and interview 
senior Israeli officials. A three-hour visit to Jakarta 


By Margot Cohen 


by Yitzhak Rabin, the prime minister of Israel in 
October 


the heavily armed warlords, many hungry and 
undisciplined young men. It is uncertain 
whether tbe aid providers, or even the remain- 
ing peacekeepers, can be adequately protected. 
Bandits killed two Italian journalists last Sun- 
day while trying to steal their vehicle. 

To many Americans, UJS. responsibility in 
Somalia is a thing of the past Somalia has 
become a “lesson” in discretion — go slow tbe 
□ext time a humanitarian emergency stirs 
thoughts of hdpful intervention — not a place 
of engagement There is not much more pas- 
sion to be spent on a country that returned 
what Americans saw as their country’s gener- 
ous initiative with bullets and humiliation. 

Yet the needs of Somalia’s people are real 
Relief lias to lie kept flowing, mid so does 
development aid, to the extent that local 
conditions permit. The warlords are being 
given a rare opportunity to save and even 
reinvent their country, which at the moment 
lacks any governmental structure at alL On 
their capacity to work with each other hinges 
the future of Somalia. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


prompted fears of a “Jewish invasion,’' 
although the Indonesian government reiterated 
that diplomatic ties would not be established with 
Israel until the Palestinian question was settled. 

Meanwhile, a recent wave of books and articles 
in Indonesia has aimed at fomenting hatred. Jews 
are said to “call on the supernatural power of 
Satan” when they worship in a synagogue. “Tbe 
Protocols of the Elders of Zion," the notorious 


tura-o f-the-cen tuxy Russian tract outlining a sup- 
posed Jewish conspiracy is presented in mam- 
stream newspapers as fact rather than the fabrica- 
tion of czarist police. Local bookstores in Jakarta 
display such gems as “76 Characteristics of the 
Jews," “The western and Jewish Grudge Against 
Islam” and a host of others, mostly translated 
works from the Middle East 

"The descendants of Israel kept performing evil 
deeds, so finally they met with the horrifying retri- 
bution of Hitlers slaughter.” writes Dr. Majid Kat- 
lany, author of “The Zionist Threat Against the 
Islamic World” (Jidda, 1984), published in Indone- 
sian in 1991. u ADah will surely inflict even greater 
tortures, as was His promise ... We are waiting for 
this promise to be fulfilled in the days to come.” The 
slender paperback is in its second printing. 

Why arc such ideas catching chi in a couni 
noted for its religious tolerance and moderate 1 
of Islam? Indonesia’s ongoing Islamic revival has 
sparked a search for identity. For man y people, this 
means greater participation in Islamic study groups, 
charities and business dubs. Others, however, find 
their new identity in symbols of Muslim pride. 
Anti-Semitism serves as a convenient badge to ex- 
press solidarity with other Muslims worldwide. Af- 
ter the Hebron massacre, that can all too easily 
translate into a formula that reads: Baruch Gold- 
stein = All Israelis ■= All Jews. 


The prejudice thrives in the absence of real hve 
Jewish faces. An empty synagogue in Surabaja, 
Indonesia's second largest city, testifies to the smat- 
tering of Jews that once made a home in Indonesia. 
Jewish immigrants from Holland, Iraq, Singapore, 
Malaysia, Romania, Hungary and Poland worked in 
Indonesia as small traders or carved out a niche in 
medicine, engineering or law. By the 1950s. howev- 
er, almost till of the 2,000 or so Jews had moved to 
Australia, the United States or Israel 
It would be a gross error to describe matt 
Indonesians as anti-Semitic. Many prominent 
Muslim intellectuals deplore such sentiments. 
Large numbers of the 189 million people living in 
this vast country of more than 13,000 islands have 
barely heard of Judaism. Some Indonesian villag- 
ers assume it is an obscure branch of Christianity, 
Understandably, historical consciousness of tbe 
Holocaust is viztualiy ail 
This is the audience that awaits Mr. Spielberg’s 
decision to release “"Schindlers List," minus 30 
seconds or so. By providing a human face to 
Judaism, the film might hern alter tbe current 
image here of the Jew as Israeli murderer. It might 
resonate among Muslims enraged over “ethnic 
cleansing' in Bosnia. It could, at least, dispel the 
impression that the director won his coveted Oscar 
thanks to the Jews who run Hollywood, backed by 
a worldwide Zionist network. 


The writer . ; a journalist based in Jakarta, contribut- 
ed this comment to the International Herald Tribune. 


Let Us Not Forget Those r Righteous’ Italian Saviors 


ASHINGTON — Half a centu- 


ry after the Holocaust, the pub- 
lic and most Holocaust historians 
know little about tbe rote of the Ital- 
ians during that tragic period for Eu- 
rope’s Jews. How many know that 
from 1941 to 1943, the Italian army 
saved thousands of Croatian Jews and 
Serbs from certain death ante bands 
of the Croatian Ustashc- 
In April 1941, Germany, Italy, 
Hungary and Bulgaria invaded and 
def eitifidY^Ddam The Ansjowers 

a fascist Croat state that included Bos- 
nia and Herzegovina, under the fanati- 
cal nationalists, the Ustasbe. Italy an- 
nexed most of Dalmatia and kept 
military garrisons in Croatia. Germa- 
ny occupied Serbia: Slovenia was di- 
vvied between Italy and Germany. 

The Ustashe’s unbounded hatred 
of Serbia and of all “foreign ele- 
ments.” such as Jews and Gypsies, 
was unleashed almost immediately 
after taking power. So swift and 
deadly was the Croatian roundup 
that by the end of 1941 two-thirds of 
Croatia’s Jews were dying in Cro- 
atian death camps. Croatia was the 
only Nazi satellite with its own net- 
work of concentration camps. All the 
other satellite countries eventually 
turned over all their Jews to the Na- 
zis, except Bulgaria, which delivered 
only foreign Jews. 

I was among the 5,000 Croatian 
Jews who managed to reach the Ital- 
ian-occupied zone in Dalmatia. My 
parents and I fled from Zagreb in July 
1941 in hopes of crossing into the 
Italian zone. But Serb guerrillas at- 
tacked our train and we had to leave 
the train in the town of Gospic. Two 
other Jewish families joined us at tbe 
station. We had nowhere to turn for 
help except to Italian soldiers, who 
happened to pass by. Their sergeant 
saved our lives by putting us on a 
military train bound for the Italian 
zone. Hie came with os to make sore we 
crossed the border. We never knew his 
name. From Flume, the Italian carabi- 
nieri took us to tbe resort town of 
Crikvenica on the Adriatic coast, 
headquarters of the Fifth Corps of the 
Italian Second Anny, and freed os. 

Nine days after our arrival we bad 
the first proof of what turned out to be 
a consistent Italian attitude of humane 
ooosideratioa of our plight. The army 
lifted the curfew car public assembly so 
we could bold Yom Kippur services in 
a school room. Shortly before Christ- 
mas 1941. Italian entertainers n a me, to 
town to perform for the troops, and 
tbe Italians invited all the Jewish refu- 
gees in Crikvenica as guests of honor. 
We were the only dvinans present As 
the band struck up the Italian national 
anthem and all rose, I saw tears in my 
father’s eyes. He whispered to me, “If 
we survive tbe war we must never 
forget bow the Italians saved Jews.” 

Our case was typical of the terrible 
summer of 1941, when the lower 
ranks of the Italian army acted spon- 
taneously to save minorities in tbe 
Croat state from certain death. By 
October, the Italian policy to protect 
Serbs and Jews was dearly estab- 
lished by the nrilitaiy high command. 

By mid-1942 the fate of the re- 
maining Croatian Jews was scaled by 
a treaty between Germany and Cro- 
atia in which Croatia agreed to deliv- 
er all its remaining Jews to the Nazis 


for 30 German marks per prisoner to 
cover transportation costs. Suddenly 
our lives were at stake, since the Ger- 
mans and the Croats insisted (hat 
Croatian Jews in the Italian zone be 
included in the treaty. 

Mussolini informed Ins Foreign 
Ministry he had no objection to hav- 
ing us delivered to the Nazis. But the 
commander of the Italian army in 
Croatia, General Mario Roam, sup- 
ported by his staff and senior officials 
in the Foreign Ministry, dedded to 
sabotage Mussolini's decision. It was 
necessary, they insisted, lo determine 


By Ivo Herzer 

The Kraljevica camp was certainly 
i unusual concentration camp. We 


who among us might have a claim to 
rip. It vi 


Italian citizenship. It was a strategy of 
indefinite delay and it worked. 

Against relentless German pressure, 
the Italian "rescue committee” decid- 
ed to recommend that aD of us be 
interned in camps, which they hoped 
would placate the Germans at least for 
a while. On Nov. 1, 1942, the Italian 
army interned ail the Jews in tbe Ital- 
ian zone. 1 was among the 1,770 refu- 
gees taken to the Kraljevica (Porto Re) 
camp- The others were ladder. The 
Italians placed them in holds, often 
guarded by a tingle carabiniere. 

We feared that the camp was the 
preliminary step to our danger to the 
Germans, and two internees commit- 
ted suicide. This induced General 
Roatta to visit us personally. He 
vowed that the Italian army would 
□ever deliver us to the Germans. Gen- 
eral Roatta flew to Rome a few days 
later and succeeded in changing Mus- 
solini's mind about handing us over. 


an unusual concentration camp, we 
had a building for social and religious 
activities. We organized an etemen- 
taiy and a high school the army 
supplied textbooks. I still have die 
school reports, two pieces of yellow- 
ing paper, reminding me that under 
the Italian flag Jewish children stud- 

mattematics, while £e Nazis "were 
murdering thousands of Jewish chil- 
dren, unopposed by all of Europe 

Following the Allied victory in 
North Africa in 1943, tbe Italians 
knew that the Allies’ next move was 
the invasion of Italy. At General Roat- 
ta’s urging (he by that time had be- 
come the commander of Italian forces 
in metropolitan Italy) all the Jewish 
refugees were transferred to the island 
of Rab off tbe Dalmatian coast, which 
had been annexed by Italy. It was 
deemed safer for us. 

After Italy surrendered in Septem- 
ber 1943, the Italian array evacuated 
the island. The Allies, only a few hours 
from Rab, knew of our perilous posi- 
tKHi but refused to bring us to safety in 
southern Italy. Tito's Partisans occu- 
pied Rab and most of the refugees 
sought safety on the Paitisan-ara- 
troffod Yugoslav mainland. The Parti- 
sans concentrated the refugees who 
could not help the war effort near 
Topusko, where British transport air- 
craft landed daily with supplies. The 
British were reluctant to take Jews 
back to Italy, fearing that they would 
some day tty to get to Palestine. 


Some of us set out for liberated 
Italy, reaching Bari in January 1944. 
The island of Rab fell into German 
hands in March 1944. The 204 tick 
ami elderly Jews who could not es- 
cape were departed to Auschwitz, 
where they perished. Of the roughly 

40.000 Jews in fascist Croatia, only 

10.000 survived. The Italians saved 
6,000; the rest survived in hiding. 

The rescue of Croatian Jews by the 
Italian army was not an isolated epi- 
sode. As long as Italy was an indepen- 
dent nation, Le. tmtd the German oc- 
cupation of 1943, the Italian army 
protected Jews in southern France, in 
Greece, in Albania and in North Afi> 
ca. No Jew, Italian or foreign, was ever 
handed over to the Germans. Yet the 
Italian response to the Holocaust and 
the rescue at foreign Jews by the Ital- 
ian army belong to the leak known 
rescue chapters of the Holocaust 

There are several reasons for this. 
First, the history of the Holocaust has 
been recorded and transmitted essen- 
tially by and about the Jews of East- 
ern Europe. And in tire first postwar 
decades, no historian could praise the 
humanitarian deeds of the Italian fas- 
cist army and fascist Foreign Minis- 
of being 


By Arthur L. Lhn a n , 

N EW YORK —As Congress de- 7 
bates the timing and procedure 
of hearings on the Whitewater affair,' 
people in both parties are citing the 
Iran-contra hearings as precedenL * 
But there is a big difference. 

The activities in Arkansas, years m 
the past, oould not have involved 
abuses of power by a sitting pres-’ 
dent. Whatever one may think of alle- 
gations of a White House “cover-up 
impeachment is not even a remote, 
possibility. In the Iran-contra affair; 
by contrast, impeachment was ranch 
in the air. It was imperative that Con-' 
grass determine as promptly as possi- 
ble, and with immunity grants where 
necessary, whether there were 
grounds for removing tbe president • 
Before Congress dedded to inves- 1 
ligate, there was a soles of accusa- 
tions and admissions of official 
wrongdoing or apparent abuse of 
power — from the revelation of an 
arms-f or- hostages deal with Iran to; 
the secret and illegal aid to the Nica- 
raguan rebels lo the allegations of file 
shredding by Oliver North. 

It was dear that grounds for im- 
peaching Ronald Reagan would exist 
u he was implicated in either the 1 
diversion of funds or the cover-up. 
With new rumors each day, the gov-' 
ernmenl was paralyzed. 

Fortunately, Daniel Inouye, the 
Hawaii Democrat who was chairmait 
of the Senate Iran-contra committee, 
shaped the inquiry in a way that re- 
flected his love of country and re- 
spect for constitutional processes. 

Mr. Inouye is one of America's 
great war heroes and patriots. As 
long as the possibility of impeach- 
ment existed, there was no room in 
his mind for partisanship. 

His mandate to us was unambigu- 
ous. If there were grounds to impeach 
President Reagan, we should seek to 
discover and establish them promptly, 
If there was no proof of an impeach- 
able offense, we had an obligation to 
make that dear so the president would 
be free to complete his term. 

The Iran-contra inquiry quickly 
found that all possible roads to the 
president ted through three national 
security aides: Robert McFarlane. 
John Poindexter and Mr. North. 
Without their testimony. Congress 
oould not determine whether there was 
proof of an impeachable Offense. To 
await the independent counsel's inves- 
tigation, which might take years, was 
hot an option. The president would 
have been tang gone from office. 

To accommodate the Independent 
counsel Mr. Inouye tried to posuade 
the key witnesses that it was their 
patriotic duty to testify without immu- 
nity. Mr. McFarlane did so, but Mr. 
Poindexter and Mr. North were un- 
willrng to waive their Fifth Amend- 
ment privileges. Congress had no 
choice but to give them immunity. ; 

We delayed their testimony, never- 
theless, until the independent counsel 
could seal his* evident* against them. 

Even if the congressional commit- 
tees had teen able to anticipate that 
tbe grants of immunity would later 
lead the U.S. Court of Appeals to 
overturn the crinrinal convictions of 
Mr. North and Mr. Poindexter, they 
still made the right derision. 


* 


There was simply no other way of 
* letter 



between the 
Italian puppet fascist slate under 
complete Nazi control between 1943 
and 1945, and the sovereign fascist 
stale before 1 943 is often overlooked. 

Finally, rescue is a relatively recent 


determining whether the president 
should be impeached. It was far more 
important to resolve that issue 
promptly than to ensure that the two 
men oould be prosecuted. ' ■ 

One often bears it said that the 
congressional investigation of Iran- 
contra was inconclusive and that con- 
gressional hearings on any complex 
subject are doomed to a simil ar fate. 
But the independent counsel reached 
the same conclusion in his 1994 re- 
port as the congressional committees 
did in 1987. There was no proof oj 
criminal action by the president 

In Whitewater, with no prospect of 
impeachment. Congress does not 
have the same need to bold bearings 
immediately, but it does have tine 
same need for the Inouye spirit of 
h*P ai ti saQs hip and fairness. 

Congress has no need to give im- 
munity and can acc ommo date the 
special counsel Robert Flske, so his 
inquiry is not impeded. 

Conere 


- Degressions] 


in Holocaust historiography, to corelssues of imegrityare the only 

o«nn ^T, feW J?**?* "ZfiV- unfair speculation and tat 

9.500 Righteous Gentiles, officially the president move ahead without 


A Race to Asian Prosperity 


C AN INDIA OUTPACE fast-growing China in economic liberaliza- 
tion? Both nations have huge populations — together they account 
for nearly 40 perce n t of the world's people — that work, hard and achieve 
high rates of savings. Both have demonstrated successful entrepreneur- 
ship driven by materialistic ambition. 

India, burdened by colonial memories, still suffers from a reflexive 
antipaLhy toward multinational corporations. Yet foreign investment will 
improve Indian industry's access to higher technology and bring modern 
managerial and marketing skills. It will stimulate domestic competition, 
which has been constricted by protectionism. 

India needs to devote more resources to educating and training its 
people. Much of its bureaucracy, including money-losing state industries, 
remains hostile to foreign investment. The country's inflexible labor laws 
make it difficult and costly to tiled excess labor. China outpaces India in all 
these respects, and so attracts much higher volumes of investment. 

Yet the policies of self-reliance followed by India after 1947 have 
provided it with the capacity to grow quiddy, provided tbe economy now 
gets needed stimulus from foreign investors. India has indigenous entrepre- 
neurs and high rotes of domestic savings and capital formation. If the 
stifling regulatory regime can be lifted and the dead tend of the stale 
removed, the country will be well positioned for rapid expansion. 

However, China's economic liberalization program, begun in 1978, has 
a 1 3-year head start on India’s. China also has Hong Kong, an invaluable 
source and conduit for foreign trade and investment with the mainland. 
China’s gross domestic savings rate, at 39 percent of GDP, is almost 
double that of India's. Beijing's authoritarian rulers can break factory- 
floor militancy and forcibly keep wage rises below productivity increase. 

There are other areas in which India has an rage over C-hina. India 
already has the sort of grass-roots capitalism and consumer ethic from 
which a healthy market economy can grow. Official Indian statistics 


this vibrant private sector. India’s other advantages include a 
system that, while i 


financial system that, while rudimentary, is more advanced than China’s, a 
large professional class, an education system with established links to the 
Et^lish-^peaking would, a wcU-devekped framework of property rights and 
commercial law, as independent j udtdaiy and a free press. 

— Rome A Thakur, professor of Internationa} relations and director of Asian 
studies as the University of Otago in Dunedin , New Zealand, contributed this 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


recognized by the state of Israel — 
and few Jews were rescued. 

a public education effort can 
i to the general awareness 
of who it was m Europe that extended 
a tend of friendship to the Jews. It is 
time to give the Italians credit 


waiting For the counsel to complete 
ait aspects of his investigation. 

, Tte Inouye principle, that an un- 
anpeached president should be al- 
lowed to govern with the air cleared, 
is the central lesson Iran-contra of- 
fers for Whitewater. 


TTie writer is a historian and the 
editor of “The Italian Refuge,’' a col- 
lection essays. He contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post 


The wruer, a New York lawyer, was 
Chief counsel to the Senate Iran-contra 
commute*. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: IOO, 75 AND 50 YEABS AGO 
1894: Harbor Diplomacy 


NEW YORK — It is said that one 
reason why Rear-Admiral Walker is 
being sent to Honolulu is because 
diplomatic complications are expect- 
ed over President Dole’s objection to 
the United States occupation of Pearl 
Harbor. This is a point upon which 
President Gevdand's Administra- 
tion will insist. Pearl Harbor is a 
very important naval coaling sta- 
tion, the concession for which was 
granted exclusively to the United 
States some years ago. 


case the Spartacisis fail however, he is 
with Ebert’s Government. 
Moscow is to the 
S®** although the Gennantf- 
15 nc « yet an accomr 
Pteted^fet, its conclusion may be 
“pccteo m the immediate future 


1944 : Germans Rooted * 


LONDON — ■ [From oar New Yorij. 


coahpa sta- «ffijjan:] Russia's 1st Ukraine Amy 
^£2^^ prarateRiverar 


1919: Lenin Seeks Allies 


y. £i mans and caotnnne 3 


20,000 

S£“- Svt ■>*? Of forme 


province of Bukovina and 

TSgSi™ 0,41 Ctec^ovaldl 


PARIS — According to latest des- 
patches from Russia the Lenin Gov- 
ernment is making efforts with a view 
to the formation of a Germano-Rns- 

sian affiance: On the one hand, says bdow Tamcnoi - 

the “Temps,” Lenin is supporting tte ffiOusantS^lu^GS^iJttiS 
SpartacwanioirenieittmGenmmybe- to the cast. Dart^^-^S a ?. troo P s 
cause he realizes that the success of divisions already thnSiS G ? na ^ 
this movement would automatically antianou in the Odcs?”^? 681 


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Whatever He Got in China, 
The Secretary Got It Right 


p* Wd Jing- 
bcfarnd bars, didn’t 

: “ 197 9. wh^an 

JSJSJB?!? 1 .* { ^. kdow ° on dissidents 
might not bejn China’s interests. “Did 


By William Safire 


' The paramount leader^^^ l. What ^ reaction? Incredible. 
Ttejaiungonto WeL the ^L!?!f* 8 £? n ‘ American business executives in China 

of an unan tho ri rrri t0< * *e side of the Chinese government 

the abortive “Demoa^t ^ States, berating Mr. 

namt, severely Chnstopba; for jeopanfiong their pro fits 

"aS^JSSSSMSSSffi 

adEcadeSr ^nanmm Squire Christopher for not aborting the trip at 

leadmg^ri^ o? ^pressedtbe Chinese 3 U.S. resolve. 

^^tS^fhLSSS* 8 *** * Washington, the cabinet 

Like NpJcnn rLf.rj.? 10 ^, - m ©®bers Lloyd Bentsen and Ron 

aneraed from hk^fl de uJu*' ^, ei Brown undermined the U.S. position by 
wuL Sakhanw l h<. < ikLi ni ^ rc * en: i. ^ ta ^ n 8 MFN compromise; tne national 
nS^ S th?S; h «f l ?^“ em J bodl ' sccarit >’ backgrounded a split- 

dav will be a nSLu frcedom » 811(1 one the-difference proposal; and White 
t ^ S reate ; House aides dovSn-rSoutbed Mr. Chris- 

t t Vr 1 Shattock, assistant lop her while the president waffled. 

0f toppBM rights. Even State Department bureaucrats, 

S-no °?v, kCy meetlI1 8 with Mr. Wei in trying to “protect” their boss from ap- 
neiiing. tins was not provocative; on pearing tough-minded, sawed the limb 
the contrary, future generations will see off behind him. 
it as the most significant Chinese-Amer- “What Christopher's critics didn't 
lean con tact since Zhou Enlai and Rich- know,” Time magazine was led to re- 
111 *572. port, “is that the advance foray el that 

tne Chmese leaders wanted to register so irritated the Chinese was carried out 
tneir displeasure at this diplomatic drier- without Christopher’s knowledge.” 
ence to a dissident They also wanted to That’s a baloney-leak. The secretary 
display then m ach i smo (do the Chinese did know in advance about Mr. Shat- 
“J * £ "O™ l0r maebismo?) in the face of tuck’s meeting with Mr. Wei, approved 
a Ui promise to end most-favored-na- it, and hats off to him for it Having 
non trade status unless substantial pro- zapped Mr. Christopher for Bosnia 
gress was shown on human rights, weakness long before it became popular. 


They harassed Mr. Wea and rounded 
up other dissidents. On the eve of a visit 
from Secretary of State Warren Christo- 
pher, this could only be taken as a calcu- 
lated insult to the United States. 

What was the reaction? Incredible. 

American business executives in Chin* 
look the side of the Chinese government 
agains t the United States, berating Mr. 
Christopher for jeopardizing their profits 
with this silly business about democrat. 

American editorialists hooted at Mr. 
Christopher for not aborting the trip at 


the-difference proposal; and White 
House aides down-mouthed Mr. Chris- 
topher while the president waffled. 

Even State Department bureaucrats, 
trying to “protect” their boss from ap- 
pearing tough-minded, sawed the limb 
off behind him. 

“What Christopher's critics didn't 
know,” Time magazine was led to re- 
port, “is that the advance foray d that 
so irritated the Chinese was carried out 
without Christopher’s knowledge.” 

That’s a baloney-leak. The secretary 
did know in advance about Mr. Shat- 
tuck’s meeting with Mr. Wei, approved 
it, and hats off to him for iL Having 
zapped Mr. Christopher for Bosnia 
weakness long before it became popular. 


A Basis, Still, for Peace Remember Banna 

Regarding “The Chance for. Mideast In response to the report " 
Peace Is Collapsing” ( Opinion, March a Harder Line on Burma" 


Peace Is Collapsing* (Opinion, March 
I I) by Flora Lewis: 

■ • Notwithstanding my considerable 
respect for Ms. Lewis’s views on inter- 
national affairs, I found myself in dis- 
agreement with her particularly 
gloomy prognosis for the Arab-Israeu 
peace process following the tragic He- 
bron massacre. 

’ While the peace process clearly has 
suffered a setback, Israeli and Palestin- 
ian leaders recognize that a way must be 
found to move forward, lest the talks 


century of conflict be eradicated 
• This recognition that a unique mo- 
ment exists, and that a basis for progress 
has been established first in Madrid 
later in Oslo, will, I believe, prove more 
powerful in spurring the talks forward 
than the faces, however considerable 
and unpredictable, seeking to destroy 
the process. 

DAVID A. HARRIS. 

New York. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 7 



J can hardly fault him now for gutsOy 
asserting U.S. policy to the Chinese. 

China is not such a tender bamboo 
shoot that it cannot be dealt with prag- 
matically. linkage of trade preferences 
to progress on prison labor, emigra- 
tion, jamming of the Voice of America, 
Red Cross visits to jails and other crite- 
ria is a fact — an executive order 
backed by Congress. It is no more a 
challenge to China’s sovereignty than 
Beijing’s uncharacteristically mal- 
adroit treatment of the secretary of 
state is to America's sovereignty. 


Chinese negotiators strike postures 
just as Americans do. To some of them, 
“soft on dissent” is like the old Ameri- 
can charge of “soft on communism,” 
but in the end the Chinese deal with 
realities. One of these is the strange 
American preoccupation with more 
freedom for human beings everywhere. 

I have a hunch Mr. Christopher got 
something from the Chinese at the last 
minute, not yet revealed that will be 
the basis for face-saving leading to the 
extension of MFN — provided the dis- 
tracted Bill Clinton whips foreign-poli- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


In response to the report “U.S. Takes 
a Harder Line on Burma ” (March 14) 
and “Don’t Appease Rangoon ” ( Opin- 
ion , March 14): 

Unfortunately, until a recent spate of 
articles brought on by the visit of U.S. 

Congres sman W illiam Richardson to 

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the world has 
had too little access to details of the 
miserable situation in Burma. 

Not enough people know about the 
outrageously brutal treatment of its citi- 
zens by the military junta illegally in 
power, the so-called State Law and Or- 
der Restoration Council, which held 
elections, then voided the results when 
the opposition party of Aung San Suu 
Kyi won by an overwhelming majority. 

The regime put her under house ar- 
rest, (where she has been for nearly five 
years, just extended to six); it impris- 
oned tortured or killed other political . 
opponents; it bled the country of its 
resources, leaving citizens with little 
food, medicine or fuel, so it could spend 
bflhons on weapons to keep its oppo- 
nents under control; and snipped citi- 


zens off to the wilderness to haul weap- 
ons for the military or do forced labor 
on the railroads arid highways that win 
take Burma’s virgin teak wood and gems 
to Thailand and China to exchange for 
foreign cunency for weapons. 

The regime, in short, has turned Bur- 
ma into a house of horrors. 

DOROTHY A PEDTKE. 

Kobe, Japan. 

Pressure Whom? 

Regarding “ Help Macedonia Pressure 
Greece if Necessary ” (March 18, Opinion) 
by George Soros: 

Greece has earned its place in the 
world through heavy sacrifices, both hu- 
man *nd material, throughout its history. 
1 End it difficult to understand wiry its 
natural allies should nowbdp the Former 
Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to be- 
come a nation by borrowing Greek his- 
torical names and symbols. FYROM's 
cons ti tution has r emnan ts of the aggres- 
sive policies of Tito, claiming to unite the 
whole of the geographic region of Mao 
edonia at the expense of Greece. 

It must be remembered that the last 


war fought by Greece was a gains t Com- 
munist guerrillas who were given safe 
haven in Skopje. 

Skopje declares its nationhood at the 
expense of Greece. 

DIMITRI SERBOS. 

Rome. 

War in the living Room 

I saw it while eating breakfast It was 
another television report on Bosnia. 
More bombing, more civilians creeping 
through the streets ready to run at the 
sound of sniper fire, more pockmarked 
buildings. The camera focused on a girl 
14 or 15 years old. standing with her 
mother. They looked too calm and 
cheerful to be in the middle of a war. 
The girl had a patch on her eye. The 
voice-over translated: She had lost ber 
eye in a mortar attack. The girl smiled as 
she started to explain this. She said she 
was sorry to bear that a UN convoy had 
been blocked. She had been hoping that 
they would bring her a glass eye. She 
tried to keep her smile, but couldn't. Her 
mother reached out for her. The girl 
wept in her mother’s arms. 


The Tough Line Plays WeU, 
But Will It Really Help? 


By Ellen Goodman 


cy freelancers into line. (If be refuses, 
Mr. Christopher should quit.) 

China's longtime “foreign friends” 

— Richard Nixon, Henry Kissinger. 
George Bush, Winston Lord, all of us 

— should send this word to Beijing: 
A nervous crackdown on dissenters is 
a telltale sign of instability, which is 
what China fears most as the Deng era 
comes to an end. The durability, self- 
confidence and security of a govern- 
ment can be measured by its toleration 
of peaceful dissent. 

The New York Times. 


S AN FRANCISCO — I have never 
been a fan of jock-talk in political 
life. The endless campaign lingo about 
slam-dunking opponents and hitting 
questions out of the ballparic has left 
me on the sidelines. 

But I am even more uncomfortable 
when spoiling life stops being a meta- 
phor and starts becoming pubuc policy. 

MEANWHILE 

This is exactly what is happening with 
the new favorite anti-crime legislation 
tha t is known as “three strikes and 
you’re out" This is criminology accord- 
ing to Abner Doubleday. 

At heart, the Three Strikes bills are 
meant to send third-time felons — in 
some places, violent felons, in other 
places, all felons — to jail for life with- 
out parole. This is an idea that is popular 
with everyone from Governor Pete Wil- 
son of California to Governor Mario 
Cuomo of New York. It is even popular 
with President Bill Clinton. 

The first of the proposals passed 
a Washington state referendum last falL 
A second variation cm the law went into 
effect in California two weeks ago. It 
mandates 25 years to life or triple the 
usual sentence, whichever is more. There 
are bills or ballot initiatives in 30 state 
legislatures and both branches of Con- 
gress. Georgia, not to be outplayed, just 
passed a bin that will put a Two Strikes 
proposal on the state ballot next falL 
) am not surprised at the cheers this 
idea has received. The real national 


The scene then changed to the same 
old faces sitting around a negotiating 
table somewhere. But all I could think of 
was that girL While girls elsewhere were 
worrying about who was gang to take 
them to the prom, she was probably won- 
doing how any boy would be able to look 
at her I had not shed one tear 
during this war in a faraway land. But as 
1 watched her smile melt away, her brave 
front crumble, the impact of the atrocity 
finally made its way into my living room. 
And I cried with both my eyes. 

JAMES GALLA 
Vichy, France. 


Shock Treatment for Japan 

Regarding “ Great Powers Shouldn't 
Play Chauvinistic Games” ( Opinion , 
March 7) by Philip Bowring: 

Mr. Bowling says that the Clin ion 
administration's revival of Super 301 
has generated considerable sympathy 
for Japan in such improbable quarters 
as Seoul and Brussels. 

The Seoul authorities have expressed 
concerns over the reintroduction of Super 


301, not out of sympathy for Tokyo in 
trade disputes between the United States 
and Japan, but because it is against 
GATT rules barring unilateralism and 
managed trade. Requests fa reducing 
hpgp trade imbalances have been made to 
Japan not only by the United Stales and 
(he European Union but by such Asian 
countries as South Korea and Taiwan. 

Many Asians are convinced that the 
barriers and impediments will never be 
lifted if Japan is left to do so voluntarily. 
Historically, outside pressures and shock 
treatments have served their purposes in 


301 will do the same in further opening 
the Japanese market. 

D. &. KIM. 
Seoul 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
citing We cannot be responsible far 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 


pastime —one that i share 7 - is watch- 
ing and worrying about crime. Crime 
may not be on the rise in the statistics. 
But it is on the rise among the young. It 
also is on the rise in the news and in the 
polls that track Americans' concerns. 
Three Strikes laws have become the 
easiest way for legislators to prove that 
they are on the people’s team. 

But life is more complicated than 
baseball and so is crime. Not every felon 
warrants the same punishment. Some 
first crimes deserve much harsher sen- 
tences than they get Some third crimes 
deserve lighter sentences than Three 
Strikes would mandate. 

In Washington state, for example, 
Cecil Emile Davis and Larry Lee Fisher 
were caught under the same new law. 
Mr. Davis had attacked two people 
with an ice pick and severely beaten 
two others before he was picked up for 
allegedly kidnapping, raping and cut- 
ting another woman's throat. Mr. Fish- 
er was charged for the third time with 
robbing a store. He took off with $151 
after idling the clerk that the finger in 
his pocket was a gun. None of his 
crimes involved violence. Do they both 
deserve the same life sentence? 

James Alan Fox, the dean of criminal 
justice at Northeastern University, puts 
it this way: “P unishm ents should DOt 
just fit the crime, but the criminal ” 

That subtlety is rapidly being lost. 
Under the proposed Georgia law, two- 
time losers as young as 13 could be- 
come lifers. Under one Illinois bill, 
someone who was caught passing three 
bad checks three times in a year could 
be jailed forever. 

If Three Strikes sounds like it's tough 
on crime, it is really tough on judges. 
And even on prolice. 

A law that makes sentences manda- 
tory rather than presumptive, an abso- 
lute rather than a general rule, takes 
away tfaej udges' role in sentencing. The 
law in California has police worried 
about facing desperate criminals with 
two strikes and nothing to lose. It has 
others talking about geriatric prisons 
filled with people whose crime prime is 
long past. 

WHl these riders fill space that should 
be left fa younger, active criminals? Will 
less dangerous people nse up money that 
should be allocated to — if the word may 
be spoken before today’s filled and angry 
bleachers — crime prevention? 

No politicians want to face charges 
that they let any c rimin als walk — into 
their town. But to be rational about 
c rimin als is not to be soft on crime. 
Violent c riminals — first- as well as 
third-timers — should indeed be pun- 
ished harshly. They should be punished 
according to the quality of their crimes, 
not just the quantity. 

I’m afraid it’s going to take a whole 
league of brave legislators to step up to 
that plate. 

9 The Boston Globe Newspaper Company. 


't r Ah- 




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more than survive: it conquers. The Pajero's record in shows the strength and reliability of our techno- 

the T2dass at rallies proves it. logy — the same technology found in Mitsubishi 

T2 cars axe regular production vehicles with only vehicles on highways all over the world. 

basic modifications for racing. They’re very similar to So when you drive a Mitsubishi, you can just enjoy a 

the cars you see on the highway. In long- — -,,-ii^^^^^retoring cruise. You don t have to conquer 

distance rallies, these T2 cars are / j|||gy^^^^Hiec-deep mud, treacherous ice at high 

pitted against conditions no speeds or mysterious unmapped 

IfSI ordinary driver should have to courses in the Sahara Desen. We’ve 

endure — blinding sandstorms, already done it for you. But you 

bone-chilling snow, searing beat . always have that option. | 

Only an extremely durable I 

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; International Herald Tribune 
! Friday , A/arcfc ’ 5 , /P 94 
Page 5 







Jr 


A Museum for Kids of All Ages 


By Susan Kesdenko Coll 

L ONDON —If all Of the 2.5 million 
cars in this city were parked end to 
end, the resulting queue would 
stretch for thousands of miles. Lest 
one wax nostalgic for the days when London 
resembled something other than a scene 
from Godard’s “Weekend.” however, a trip 
to the Transport Museum might end the 
delusion that things were ever much im- 
proved. 

Recently reopened after a £4 million ($6 
miHi nn) overhaul, this Covent Garden muse- 
um may not be the city’s most highbrow of pit 
stops, but h is certainly one of the most fun. In 
crisper, brighter environs, the museum houses 
an array of vehicles, many of which are kept in 
working order, and traces (he history of mod- 
em transport from the Gist regular horse bus 
service in 1829 to the creation of the modem 
Underground tube system. 

Judging by the crowds, the most popular 


feature is the chance to simulate command 
of a city bus (that’s an Optare Metrorider, 
for bus aficionados) or a Circle Line subway 
car: but be prepared to arm wrestle a school- 
child for a turn in the driver's seat Should 
one’s patience wear thin while waiting, there 
are nearly 100 other interactive and audiovi- 
sual activities as well as several costumed 
characters roaming about, giving on-the- 
spot lectures on subjects such as street 
sweeping and tunnel di gging . 

Hus is undeniably a museum with a mes- 
sage, and visitors are advised in one of many 
short films that the solutions to solving 
transport problems lie not in new technol- 
ogy, out in attitudes toward utilizing public 
transporta lion. The bus gets high marks 
here: cheap, flexible, and not requiring much 
in the way of infrastructure — * “the humble 
bus may turn out to be one of our best hopes 
for the future,” we are told. 

London commuters might take note of an 
1887 photograph that suggests traffic snarls 
are nothing new. A scene of the London 



Bridge shows a familiar, congested mess, but 
the culprits are horse-drawn vehicles. Even 
these presumably “greener” days were not 
without their headaches: horse power creat- 
ed a pollution problem to the time of 1,000 
tons a day of waste deposited on the streets 
of London. 

There are other interesting bits of trivia to 
be learned. The first escalator in London, 
for example, was built for Harrods depart- 
ment store, while the first installed in the 
tube system was on the Underground at 
Earl’s Court One can learn something of the 
history of the elevator, as well, with minia- 
ture exhibits that allow (me to view the inner 
mechanisms at work. 

The museum also houses two small galler- 
ies. “Laughter line” features cartoonists’ 
views of London and its public transport from 
1747 to the present giving insight into how 
the two World Wars affected services. The 
exhibit also shows that the transport manage- 
ment has a sense of humor about its own 
shortcomings. One cartoon depicts empty 
trains at various slack hours Of the day; under 
the drawing of a jam-packed train the caption 
reads". . . everyone perversely likes to travel 1 
at .the same moment 

The second gallery contains the exhibit 
“By Underground to Kew,” which consists 
of a selection of posters commissioned over 
85 years to promote the Royal Botanic Gar- 
dens as a destination. 

Which brings one to the inevitable gift 
shop, where many of these posters are avail- 
able. Other collectibles include “mind the 
gap” T-shirts, coffee mugs emblazoned with 
the name of one’s favorite tube line, and 
Underground toothbrushes. And for the 
more serious of mind, choose from an assort- 
ment of video tapes that include “Trolleybus 
Days in Belfast,* and “Glasgow Trams, The 
Final Years.” 

The warm, cozy feeding one gets about 
public transport is stretched a bit at the 
nearby tube station, however. As rats scurry 
across the track and an announcement ad- 
vises delays because of a security alert, one 
has ample time to reflect on that carbon 
monoxide-spewing car titling idly, at home. 


The Brimh Tourfa Authority 

Some of the historic buses in the Transport Museum in London. 


Susan Kesdenko Coll is a free-lance writer 
living in London. 


I EE 110 VIE SPUE 


The Hudsueker Proxy 

Directed by Joel Coen. U. S. 

“The Hudsueker Proxy” begins 
with a lush, romantic image of a 
New York City that never was. 
Heavy snow falls as the camera 
moves in among a crush of sky- 
scrapers that stand as symbols of 
progress and glamour. On a 
ledge, ready to jump, is Norville 
Baines (Tim Robbins), like the 
cityscape around him, like every- 
thing else in the visually stun- 
ning and funny new film by Joel 
and Ethan Coen, Norville is a 
pop-culture myth straight out of 
old movies. Although the story is 
set in 1958, the look and the 
dialogue and the plot evoke 
films of the ’30s and '40s. His- 
torical accuracy means nothing 
when you're fondly retelling leg- 
ends bufll by Frank Capra. Pres- 
ton Sturges and Howard Hawks. 
As the film flashes back, h is 
instantly clear that Norville is 
the Capraesque little guy. An 
innocent from Munde. Indiana, 
be arrives in New York and gets 


a job in the mail room of giant, 
heartless Hudsueker Industries. 
The next day, he is its preridenL 
Jennifer Jason Leigh plays a 
smart-talking girl reporter 
named Amy Archer, and Paul 
Newman the ruthless executive 
Sidney J. Mussbuiger, who de- 
ride tint Hudsueker company 
executives must depress the 
stock so they can buy it cheaply 
and gain control of the compa- 
ny. “The Hudsueker Proxy" is 
likely to evoke the standard 
complaint about the Coens. (Joel 
directs, Ethan produces and they 
co-write their scripts, this time 
with Sam Raimi). They are ac- 
cused of being cold, and so they 
are. They don’t mean to cream 
realistic, fuzzy-warm people. 
What they love is genres, and 
they reserve their warmth for the 
styles of old movies. Their 
“Blood Simple" is revived film 
noir, “Miller’s Crossing" a poet- 
ic gangster tale and “Barton 
Fink” 1940s naturalism. To ap- 
preciate the Coens, it is neces- 
sary to delight in their fUms’ styl- 


m*S& 


THE MONKEY INTRODUCED HIMSELF TO 
THE ASTONISHED GUESTS by swinging from 
tree to tree in the fash tropical gardens beneath the 
balconies of their first floor suites. He made his 
surprise appearance last month, and has reputedly 


now made Raffles 


Hotel his home. 


A RM f 115 IHTEKHkTIQlALUOTEl. 



r\x.iHOJvstso 


ized, surface charms. Those 
charms are abundant in “Hud- 
sucker.” winch is a shrewd comic 
valentine to the kind of movies 
they don’t make anymore. 

(Caryn James, NYT) 

The Ref 

Directed bv Ted Demme. 

US. 

“The Ref begins on Christmas 
Eve when a petty thief named 
Gus (Denis Leaiy) attempts to 
bail himself out of a botched 
burglary by taking hostages. 
Unfortunately, his prisoners 
turn out to be Caroline and 
Lloyd Chasseur (Judy Davis 
and Kevin Spacey), a constant- 
ly bickering husband and wife. 
They never stop, these two; 
even tied to a chair, they snap at 
each other viciously, driving 
Gus, who’s not in a very good 
mood himself, to the point 
where he is ready to add murder 
to his rap sheet. The premise is 
flimsy to bain with, and the 
movie never develops much be- 
yond it. Caroline and Lloyd in- 
dulge themselves in what 
sounds tike the verbal equiva- 
lent of flaying — every put- 
down takes off a layer of skin — 
while Gus, who’s supposedly in 
charge, tries to get a word in 
edgewise. To their credit, the 
actors do their best to make 
something out of the material 
they’ve been given. But while 
Spacey and Davis are both tal- 
ented (and undervalued) actors, 
they are forced to raise the ener- 
gy levels of their performances 
too high too soon, and they 
can’t sustain the effort. Leaiy is 


more problematic. A stand-up 
comic trying to translate his im- 
patient, hipster editorializing to 
the big screen, he doesn’t have 
the modulation of a trained ac- 
tor, only one speed (fast) and 
one mode of attack (loud). 

{Hal Hinson, WP) 

Monkey Trouble 

Directed by Franco Antoni. 
US. 

On screen. Harvey Keitel has 
done things that would shock 
you so hard (as the phrase goes) 
they’d kill your whole family. So 
what is Keitel doing in a famfly 
movie? In “Monkey Trouble." 
he lurches' through tie role of a 
snaggle-toothed, greasy-haired 
Gypsy organ grinder whose 
monkey has special pickpocket- 
ing skills- Wonders never cease: 
Keitel turns out to be innocently 
funny this time. And “Monkey 
Trouble" is one of those rare 
children’s films to winch you can 
actually take small children. 
Falling loosely into the Swell 
New Pet genre (think “Beetho- 
ven"), “Monkey Trouble" tells 
what happens when the Gypsy’s 
monkey runs away. He is found 
and nicknamed Dodger by Eva 
Gregory flhora Birch), a girl 
who could use a secret friend 
The director. Franco Amurri 
(“Flashback"), bolds the interest 
and avoids the saccharine. He is 
helped in the latter area by Kei- 
tel, who comes across as refresb- 
never more so than 
be turns up in a Harvard 
T-shirt while irritably following 
the monkey’s trad. 

(Janet Maslin, NYT) 


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A daubiere and traditional gratin dishes in nests of coco matting, from Terres a Terre in Vallauris. 

Yallauris: No Nostalgia, Just Pots 


By Christopher Petkanas 


V! 


1 ALLAURIS, France — Vallauzis 
is nobody’s idea of heaven, least of 
all those whose heartstrings are 
vulnerable to Gerald Murphy’s 
Fitzgerald-era memoirs. In other wvrds, 
don’t come with dewy eyes. The last thing 
that is satisfied around here is nostalgia. This 
is true even if the only experience you are 
guilty of wanting to renew is having a salad 
nicoise, even if it was bom 18 miles up the 
fabled coast 

It has come to that: bottled vinaigrette in a 
town that since antiquity has been known for 
its culinary pottery. Sometimes for belter 
and often for worse, ceramics is still what it 
is all about in Vallauris, which for touristic 
purposes is always lumped together with 
Golf e-Juan, a mile or so away on the water. 
Golf e-Juan won a footnote in history when 
Napolfon disembarked there in 1815 after 
his exile on Elba and before taking off for 
Grenoble. 

Like many one-job towns, Vallauris is 
heavy, sad, thwarted. What is worst in its 
ceramics is the so-called faience (Tart, fre- 
quently grotesque, never more so than at the 
megaboutique off the main drag run by the 
actor Jean Marais. This road. Avenue 
Georges Qgmenceau, a high celebration of 
cement, scissors through the town like one 
endless aisle in a hypermarket, leaving the 
often atmospheric tide streets, hung with 
drying laundry the way the postcards prom- 
ise and the way daytrippers are supposed to 
like it, unexplored. Depressmgly, the kind of 
faience d’art represented by spidery little 
iron tables faced with bloblike sunburst tiles 
is a much hotter ticket than the daubieres, 
earthenware pots with swollen bellies that 
are ciudal for making long-percolating 
daubes. 

And yet some people know a good thing 
when they see one. According to Renfc Figuc- 
cio of the shop Tores k Terre, in the choked 
summer months Americans vacationing in 
Cannes waste no time hiring taxis and raring 
up to stock op on his traditional gratin 
dishes. Fra oven- to- table service, the dishes 
slip neatly into nests of coco matting a 
material that has its origins in Provence in 
the disk-shaped scourtins used fra filtering 


olive oB and, now, as doormats and floor 
coverings. 

You’d probably never notice them among 
all the junk, but Le Barometre has a reserve 
of leftover daubi&nes from 1942; they are a 
terrific buy. In the realm of olive wood, the 
Boutique de i’Olivier has attractive free- 
form salad bowls, salad servers, mortars and 
pestles, cheese boards and pepper mills with 
the essential Peugeot grinding me chanis m. 
Skip the lamp shades with dried flowers. 

One of the attractions of cooking in earth- 
enware is that it has what cooks like to call a 
“memory” — that is, the fired clay retains the 
fragrance of what is cooked in it and passes on 
this history each time the vessel is used. In this 
way it is not unusual for a daubifcre to absorb 
the scent of the dried ofepe mushrooms that 
often figure in recipes fra daube. In “Richard 
Olney’s Provence: The Beautiful Cookbook” 
(CoDms), an important new work by the dis- 
tinguished Icrwa-bora food authority, he 
writes, “A daube prepared in anything else 
never tastes as good as a daube simmered for 
hours in a daubi&re in which, over the years, 
hundreds of daubes have simmered for thou- 
sands of hours.” 

No shop in Vallauris is more intimately tied 
to what made the town great than Foocaid- 
Jourdan, the best address for the poiions. 
smbby -handled casseroles, that are tne b asis 
of the Provencal batterie de cidsine. And fra 
lore and perspective no one surpasses the 
owner, Fran raise Foucard, who remembers 
her grandmother “soldering” cracked pofikms 
by scraping the fissures with garlic, the juice 
drying to a reinforcing pellicle, and who says 
she extinguished the town's last wood-burn- 


ing kiln, in 1984. With the wood ovens went ; 
the krvdy old glazes, irregular and human. • 
Yvan Koenig, who makes dazzling faience ; 
inspired by Muslim mosaic work in the tradi- ‘ 
tion of his wife's grandfather, Jean Gerbino, ? 
says one reason wood was banished was be- ) 
cause it was noisome. 

Vallauris owes its reputation to the superb 
refractory qualities of the local clay. Produc- , 
tion peaked in 1886: 16,530 tons of cook- - 
ware, 56 potteries, a market extending from 
Algeria to Greece to the Americas. Heart- * 
breaking turn-of-the-century postcards 
show piles of vessels, glazed on the inside 
and unglazed on the outside, on the wharf at - 
Goff e-Juan waiting to be loaded for ship- * 
ping. In 1938 the threat of aluminum, enam- 
eled iron and Pyrex was felt The next year.; 
many ateliers were occupied by troops. In ; 
1945 Vallauris was challenged not only by i 
the efficiency and convenience of metal but - 
by themounting popularity of electricity and _ n 
gas, heat sources with which earthenware is I 
unsuited fra direct contact 


T 



■ Jean-Claude Killy, the French 
tiding champion and president of the 
1992 Winter Olympics, reportedly 

hitting himself in the fare 

wearing them. Good thing he doesn’t flog 

men’s underwear. 


HE year 1946 turned Vallauris on y 
its ear forever. On July 26, Picasso ' 
pat his head through the door of ■*'. 
Ramie’s Madoura studio, intro- - 
during himself “with the radiant simplicity * 
of a medieval pilgrim " Of his time with the „ 
artist who went on to produce his large body. - 
of ceramics with him, Rami added, “No / 
matter how many watches Picasso handed 
us, we were still barely able to give him the - 
correct time.” * 

In many ways Vallauris’s vulgarity and. - 
sinister casb-and-cany atmosphere is the ‘ 
price paid today fra Picasso’s sojourn. People ' 
associate the place with him, head up 
fra a fook and (hen forget why they came.-' 
Picasso decided how many could be made of ', 
each of his pieces (25 to 50D) and Ramie's son - 
Alain is engaged in the business of selling 1 
them. Prices start at 2,500 francs (about S430) - 
fra an unglazed tenfrcotta tile stamped with a ” 
face in an edition of 500. “ 

“Ceramics are ora postcards,” says Koenig. 
“People buy than in Vallauris the same way ^ 
they buy a statue of the Virgin in Lourdes or a ► 
can of cassoulet in Carcassonne." 


Chris, 
the New 


Umher Petkanas is writing a history of '< 
•York decorating firm Parisk-Hadley. ; 


BOOTS 


DENG XIAOPING 
AND THE MAKING 
OF MODERN CHINA 

By Richard Evans. 339 pages. 
$ 27.95 , ; Viking 

ELDEST SON: 

Zhou F.nlai and die Making 
of Modern China, 1898- 
1976 

By Han Suyin. 483 pages. 
$27.50. HiU and Wang 

Reviewed by 
Anne F. Thurston 

of Deng 

China' s paramount 
but unofficial leader, will plunge 
China into a crisis of legitimacy. 
The last of the heroic Long March 
generation, who struggled to bring 
the Communist revolution to vic- 
tory, Deng is also the last of the 
men who stood with Mao Zedong 
atop Tiananmen Gate on OcL I, 
1949, to proclaim that the people 
had taken control. And he is the 
architect of the policy of economic 
reform and opening to the West 
that has brought China a decade of 
economic growth averaging almost 
9 percent a year and resulted in a 
dramatic increase in the standard 
of living of milli ons of Chinese peo- 
ple. He wffl be sorely missed, as the 
former British ambassador to Chi- 
na, Sir Richard Evans, points out in 
“Deng Xiaoping and the Making of 
Modem Qima?’ His passing will 
occasion reflection on what nearly 
45 years of Communist Party rule 
has meant Who can explain why 
the sacrifices, measured m tens of 
millions of lives, were necessary? 

These two books do not answer 
that question.- Instead, they tell us 
why it mil be asked. 

With the coming topower of the 
Communists, when China’s doors 
were dosed to the West, Han Suyin 
(who was bom in China, has lived 
much of her life in the West and is 
the author of the best-selling “A 
Many Splendored Thing”) became 

one of a handful of officially recog- 
nized “foreign friends" with access 
to ranking leaders, including Zhou 
Enlai, who is the subject of her 
latest book, “Eldest Son." 

Zhou Filial is the most enigmatic 
of China's revolutionary leaden. 
Handsome, sophisticated, intelli- 
gent and urbane, he was loved by 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Jimmy Carter, the former U. S. 
president, is reading “How Doer a 
Poem Mam ” by John Clardi and 
Miller W illiams , and other books 
on poetry theory. 

“I read one or more books every 
week. I bare a book of poems to be 
published late this year.” 

( Brian Knowlton, IHT) 



the Chinese and respected in the Zhou’s life is his role in Mao’s 
West After bis death in 1976, when Great Proletarian Cultural Revolu- 
radical forces refused to allow Zbou tion (1966-1976), which left the 
to be property maimed, grieving Communist Party decimated and 
Beijing citizens converged on Tian- in which hundreds of thousands 


airmen Square in the largest out- 
of popular sentiment the 
's Republic had ever seen, 
ikes Zbou enigmatic is 
the nearly universal perception that 
be was the most humane of China’s 


were exiled, imprisoned, or killed. 
Zhou was a moderating force. But 
no one was more loyal to Mao, and 
he never chaflengai the Cultural 
Revolution Mao led. 

With the death of Mao and the 


Communist leaders and the fact ascension of Deng Xiaop ing, Qn- 

,kn» Wa. _U„II ,L. ..1, '.I V.® r . , 


that be never openly challenged the 
gross inhumanity of Communist 
Party rule. Han Suyin provides 
dulling evidence that Zbou was ao 
tively engaged from the very begin- 


nas 

revolution to modernization. 

Deng is less colorful than either 
Mao or Zhou, and his path to lead- 
ership was far less certain. Evans's 


Deng’s transformation froth f 
Communist to pragmatist began - 
with the disastrous Mao-inspired' 
Great Lem Forward- /; 

Evans does not shirk from criti- " 
asm of his subject Deng’s pursuit * 
of economic reform within tightly 
circumscribed political limits has- 
been singleminded, and be has not - 
hesitated to purge those who would 
undermine his delicate balance be-t 
tween economic liberalism and po- 
litical control . ; 

The hard edge of Deng was most, 
apparent to 'China and the world" 
on the night of June 3, 1989, when 1 
he ordered the army into Beijing to. 
suppress the demonstrations that* 
had been going on for more than' 
six weeks. 

The massacre would not hare ■ 
occurred under Zhou. During the 
Cultural Revolution, be spent end- 1 
less hours remonstrating with re- ■ 
brihous students, slowly defusing 
their anger. Furthermore, he would * 
not have used the a r my . Evans - 
makes a persuasive case that Deng" 
Xiaoping was not happy with how ' 


official passions reverted from the mSy redSnST^ 
lution to modernization * raannea na j. 


in the witch hunts that became account is most interesting after 
emblematic of China under Mao. Deng becomes general secretary of 
The most notable enigma of the party in the mid-1950s. 


(ing. 

"Anne F. Thurston is the author of 
Enemies of the People " and “ A 
Chinese Odyssey: The life and 
Times of a Chinese Dissident ” This 
is excerpted from a review she wrote 
for The Washington Post 


H196E 


By Alan Truscott 

F AR baric in the history of the 
game there was a brief period 
when the lawmakers permitted 
players to make a bid of eight. 
There are certainly times when that 
would be advantageous, as witness 
the diagramed deal, played during 
the Christmas season. 

Santa Claus decided to give both 
South and West a hand that might 
plausibly make a forcing opening. 
Just as Duke Usdan as West was 
preparing to open two dubs, be 
heard that bid from Arthur Netter 
on his right. The West hand now 
became a candidate fra the title of 
best hand whose holder hears a 
gome-forcing opening by an oppo- 
nent. 

Somewhat shocked. West bid 


four hearts, an error as the sequel -since the spade king, if 
proved. South, whose nickname is would no doubt be with South, 
the Launc her, launched himself Thai result would have been 


into six dubs. This indicated an 
expectation of making 12 tricks, 
and West well might hare diag- 
nosed a freakish hand on his right 
and tried six beans. When he chose 
to double, East passed. 

The lead was the diamond ace, 
making South slightly nervous, but 
the result was that North-South 
scored 1,540 when East-West could, 
have made a grand slam in either 
major suit. 

It would have been better tactics 
for West to overcall with two hearts 
at his first turn, in the certainty that 

there would be further develop- 
ments. East could then raise to four 
hearts, showing good heart support 

and crowding the auction for B4uh i 

South. Good heart support would bidding: ^ re vutoerabJe - " a n* 

suffice for West to bid seven heara, Km1, 


most annoying for South, who' 
could onlylong for the days when a 1 

rtlSL e * sfat Ie ^- clubs’ 
doubled would cost just 500. 

. NORTH 

♦ 752 

OQ3 • = 

O 10 8 7 4 2 

♦ 10 5 2 

WEST p .„ 

* AQ J93 6 K 10 8 6 4 ■” 

^AJ 108762 ?KB5® 

It *53 i 

616 -4 

4 JOUTH TO N 

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♦ A KQ08743 


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west 
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East * 

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St Pots 


V , . 


Pushing Tourism 
The Canary Way 


% A1 Goodman 


M ™ 0 Would you Dy with 

?w, f0 7 1 f r T 0 ** to Span's 
Canary Islands and sl eep for a 

in the same ho Lei room if 
~™°ne gave you the trip f or “«? 

tourist office is confi- 
nW iwil- U wlD find 70 Spanish former cou- 
J ^ st f thaL Tourisl offi cials 
T** ca f ae out m favor of reconciliation 
for divorced or separaied couples, not to 
motion some free publicity for tie Canaries. 

Tie 70 couples will be selected on a fiist- 
jJJJ 11 x/ 11 * 1 :? 6 ™* 1 basis for die vacation in 
J^ce May, but there are several conditions, 
ihe participants must share a luxury hotel 
room with their ex for the entire week The 
rooms are equipped with twin beds. Nervous 
types who cop out early will have to pay their 
own airfare back to Madrid, at least $U0. 

The couples also have to certify that they 
did not trump up an argument just to get the 
tree tnp. 

The “Reconciliation Flight" includes ex- 
cursions around the seven-island archipdaeo 
“°P?n °uly to Spaniards. But a tounst 
official said there might be similar flights for 
British or German estranged duos later this 
yc&r. 

The reconciliation trip is a follow-up to 
SS, C f naries ' successful “Love Flight" in 
1991, in which 69 newlywed couples, decked 
out in wedding attire, got a free weeklong 
tnp. 

■ 

A l Goodman reports from Spain for CNN. 



International Herald Tribut le 
Friday, March 25, 1994 
Page 9 








Hotel Souvenirs: Taking Them to the Limit 


By Barbara Rosen 

~V~ N THE category of souvenir-seeking 
II hotel guests, there are those who take 
I the shampoo and the soap, and those 
JL who steal the silver. “Everything that 
is loose in the hotel is stolen,” says Daniel 
Kraenzlin, a Swissdtel executive, especially 
“the basic things — like ashtrays, coat hang- 
ers, bedspreads, televisions." 

In truth, many hoteliers really don't mind 
if you leave with the extra shampoo or an 
ashtray bearing the hotel's stamp — it helps 
to spread their name around. 

But the largess has its limi ts. “We have a 
Sfrlvv nice, crested bathrobe that's very popular for 
«**£££$ theft,” despite the fan that it’s available for 
j-j| j&k 'v sale, says Mark Nolan, general manager of 
the Dromoiand Castle hotel in County 
Clare, Ireland. “We lose about 100 a year.” 


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Not us, says Jean- Jacques Regnault, man- 
ager of Le Relais Christine, a luxurious hotel 
on Paris's Left Bank whose robes bear no 
insignia. “They're of very, very good quali- 
ty,” Regnault says. “Bui they’re all white. 
People never take them.” 

in fact, Dromoiand is in the process of 
changing its china — it will still be Wedg- 
wood bone, but with a simpler pattern and 
without a crest. “We've had a lot of theft of 
it." says Nolan. “I would start crying if I 
thought” how much. 

In hotels like Dromoiand, “where tbe 
room rates are rather high, people feel a 
certain assumed right, from time to time, to 
take things,” says Nolan, adding that before 
they installed a closed-circuit TV. “prints 
went off the wall from time to time,” 

The ITT Sheraton Brussels Airport Hotel 
lost 250 framed photographs from its corri- 
dor walls wi thin two years Of its January 
1989 opening. Silver-plated coffee spoons, 
stamped with the Sheraton name, disappear 
on a regular basis. 

“Yew can buy your own spoons back if 
you wish,” notes Mark Ketels, the hotel's 
food -and- beverage manager. He said liis 
mother-in-law once bought a Sheraton 
spoon at an Antwerp flea market 

Sometimes hoteliers never discover who 
walked away with even their larger goods — 
like the one-meter-tall, very heavy antique 
porcelain flower pot that disappeared from 
the lobby of Zurich’s Baur au Lac hotel 15 
years ago. Or the antique Persian rug that 
graced a room at Venice's Hotel Gritli Pal- 
ace until a few years ago. Or Dromoland's 
mahogany and ivory chess board — which 
measured two and a half feet square and 
five inches high (on legs) and did not dis- 
mantle, and which vanished three years 
ago. 


But sometimes the thieves are caught red- 
handed. 

Back in 1985, when Regnault worked at 
the reception desk at the Crillon in Paris, a 
couple checked out with an entire silver 
breakfast service — coffee pot, milk jug, 
teapot, hot water pitcher, jam pot, cudery. 
Fortunately, a hotel employee had called the 
couple a taxi and knew they were headed to 
another hotel Regnault called tbe other ho- 
tel’s manager, who went into their room 
while they were out and took back all the 
silver from their valise. 

“They didn’t say a word," Regnault re- 
calls. “It was the best that I’ve seen — and 
the worst.” 


T HEN there was the case of Dromo- 
land's Galway crystal telephone, 
which a guest nabbed from the 
castle hall about a year ago — not 
realizing he was being watched on in-house 
television. The law prevented them from 
doing anything until the man had left their 
property, Nolan says — so three days later, 
authorities pulled him aside at Shannon Air- 
port with a warrant to search his lu gg a g e. 
The phone was returned and no charges 
were filed. 

“He had loads of money,” Nolan says of 
the perp. “It was a problem more than any- 
thing else." Dromoiand would even accept 
him back as a guest, Nolan says, though he 
would be watched “very closely." 

A porter at the Griiti Palace once noticed 
guests packing an antique candelabra into 
their suitcase. On arriving at reception, they 


their suitcase. On arriving at reception, they 
were told, “Wehave to caB the police, as you 
have a candelabra in your suitcase," recalls 
the reception manager, Piero Penzo. “They 
gave us back the candelabra.” 

Further in the line of forgive and forget. 


The Ritz in London is advertising for glove 
stretchers, wine jugs, all sorts of things 
dating from the hotel’s opening in 1906. 
They want the items to put into a museum., 
"We’re not asking how they left," savs The 
Ritz's manager, Radha Arora, though he 
adds that be believes most disappeared by 
legitimate means. The hotel is even offering 
rewards. 

A couple recently exchanged a guest book 
signed by Chaplin, Churchill and Gandhi — 
which had changed bands at auction — for a 
weekend at The Ritz. Another lady, having 
reached her 100th birthday, offered' two Riiz 
Royal Doulton teacups and saucers, plus 
sugar bowl and milk jug, in exchange for her 
first tea at the hotel itself. 

Back in 1938, this lady’s gentleman 
friend was leaving hisjob as a Ritz waiter to 
join the German Army, and gave her the 
china as a gift. Arora recounts. “This was 
something he probably took,” the manager 
says of the ex-waiter. “It doesn’t really 
matter now." 

Arora is still waiting to recover just ooe 
Ritz chamber pot, for which the hotel is 
offering a weekend for two, with dinner and 
a champagne breakfast Could a chamber 
pot really have disappeared legitimately? 
“Maybe a guest took it in error," Arora 
muses. 

Perhaps the last word in hospitality meets 
audadty belongs to a tale with few details. A 
guest in one Swiss hotel the story goes, once 
called down for wrapping materials and a 
porter to help him put together a parcel — 
then proceeded to check out with his room 
TV in tow. 


Barbara Rosen is a free-lance journalist 
living in ' Brussels. 


AUSTRIA 

Salzburg 

Osier Festspiele Salzburg 1 994, tel: 
(662) 80-46-361. March 26 to April 
4: Performances will include cham- 
ber music concerts, orchestral and 
choral concerts under Claudio Ab- 
bado and Sir Georg Solti and two 
performances ol Mussorgsky’s “Bo- 
ris Godunow” directed by Herbert 
Wernicke and conducted by Abbado. 
Vienna 

Albertina, tel: (1) 53-48-30, open 
daily. Continuing/To May 23: “Ko- 
koshka: Das Frohwerk. " 200 of Ko- 
koshka’s early drawings and water- 
colors created from 1898 to 1917. 
Jewish Museum, tel: (1) 535-0431, 
closed Saturdays. To June 12: 
"Chagall: Bilder, Trauma, Theater 
1 908-1 920." Little-known works cre- 
ated in Chagall's native Russia, in- 
cluding murals tor the Jewish State 
Chamber Theater in Moscow and 
paintings describing the life and at- 
mosphere In Chagall's village. 
KunstHaus Wien, tel: 712-0495, 
open daily. Continuing/To May 1: 
"La Corbusier, the Architect; - 
Charles-Edouard Janneret, the 
Painter." As an architect, Le Corbu- 
sier (1887-1965) became world 
famous, as the painter he remained 
Charles-Edouard Janneret The exhi- 
bition features 150 drawings, paint- 
ings, sculptures, architectural mod- 
els and tapestries. 

Kunsthlstorisches Museum, tel; 52- 
177, closed Mondays. Contlnu- 
ing/To May 29: "Isabella cTEste: La 
Prima Donna del Mondo." The Re- 
naissance princess (1475-1539), a 
patron and connoisseur of art, em- 
ployed such artists as Leonardo, Pie- 
tro Perugino and Correggio, and ac- 
quired the works of others, such as 
Michelangelo. On show are paint- 
ings, cameos and bronze statuettes 
as well as ceramics, drawings, coins 
and medals. 

BELGIUM 

Brussels 

Muate d'Art Moderne, tel: (2) 513- 
9330. dosed Mondays. To June 12: 
"Hommage a Henry Evenepoel 
1872-1899.'' 200 paintings, pastels, 
drawings and watercolors represent- 
ing street scenes, landscape® and 
portraits creeled in France and Alge- 
ria by the Belgian painter who died at 

age 27. 

Musses Royaux d'Art et CHtetdre, 
tel: (2) 741-7211, closed Mondays. 


under the Mogul emperors. 

BRITAIN 

Edinburgh „ . , al . 

Royal Museum of Scottend, tel. 
(31 ) 225-7534. open daily. To May 
29; ■■Are Mecfica: Art. Medicine and 
the Human Condition." Pnnts, draw- 
ings and photographs telling iterete- 
tionship between the history of man. 
medicine and visual arts. Included 
are works by Lucas van Leyden, Pu- 
rer, Rembrandt, Hogarth. Munch and 
Rauschenberg. 

^ot^rOpera, tel: (41 ) 248-4567. 


Britten's "Peter Grimes." A new pro- 
duction drected by Joachim Herz, 
conducted by Richard Armstrong 
with Anthony Rode Johnson and Rita 
Cuffis. April 12, 23, May 10 and 19. 
London 

Covent Garden, tel: (71 ) 240-1066. 
Birtwistle's "Gawain." Directed by Di 
Trevis, conducted by Elgar Howarth 
with Francos Le Roux, Penelope 
Walmsley-Clarke and Richard 
Greager. April 14 (premiere), 16,20, 
22 and 28. 

Hayward Gallery, tel: (71) 928- 
3002, open daily. To May 29: "Salva- 
dor Dali: The Early Years." 50 paint- 
ings, 50 drawings and photographs 
reflecting Dali's variety of styles, from 
neo-impressionism to Symbolism 
and Cubism. The subjects include 
scenes from cafe life in the '20s, 
portraits oi his family and friends, and 
the port of Cadaques. The exhibition 
will travel to New York and Madrid. 
National Gallery, laL* (71) 839- 
3526, open daily. Continuing/To 
April 10: "Claude: The Poetic Land- 
scape.” 25 paintings and 50 draw- 
ings by Claude Lorrain, the 1 7ttvcen- 
tury French painter. 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (71) 
439-7438, open daily. To June 12: 
"Goya, Truth and Fantasy. The Cabi- 
net Pictures, Sketches and Minia- 
tures." 100 small-scale works, In- 
cluding oil paintings produced for the 
Spanish Royal Tapestry Factory, 
sketches for altarpleces and many 
portraits and self-portraits. 

South Bank, tel: (71) 633-0274. 
March 29 to April 12: The Motorola 
Festival of American Music includes, 
among other festivities, three orches- 
tral performances of works by Bern- 
stein, Glass and Ives, conducted by 
Leonard Satktn (April 6, 9 and 11). 

CANADA 

Montreal 

Musde d'Art Contemporain, tel: 
(514) 847-6226, closed Mondays. 
Continuing/To April 24: "Rofcert 
Doisneau: A Retrospective." A tribute 
to the French photographer, includ- 
ing 250 photographs taken between 
1929 and 1992. 

MusOa des Beaux-Arts, tel: (514) 
285-2000, closed Mondays. To May 
15: "Flora PhotographJca: The Flow- 
er 'm Photography, From 1835 to the 
Present" ZOO photographs focus on 
composition and technique as well as 
symbotem and allegory. 

FRANCE 

Parts 

Bibliotheque Nattonale. tel: 47-03- 
81 -10, open dally. To June 26: “Pay- 
sages. Paysans; L'Art et la Terre en 
Europe du Moyen Ape au XXe Sie- 
cie." The peasantry in art and litera- 
ture from the Middle Ages. Features 
illuminated books, paintings by Brue- 
ghel. Oarer, Watteau. Oudry, Millet, 
Dufy and manuscripts by Victor 
Hugo, Balzac and Zola. 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-17-30. 
closed Tuesdays. To June 13: "Le 
Soleil et r Etofle du Nord: La France et 
la Suede au 18e Siecte." Paintings, 
sculptures, art objects and architec- 
tural designs showing cultural ex- 
changes between France and Swe- 
den under the aegis of King Gustavus 


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Figure of gilded copper and inlay, in Houston show. 


Ill in his efforts to emulate the Court of 
Versailles. 

Institut du Monde Arabe, tel: 40-51- 
38-38, closed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/To April 30: "Syria: Memoire et 
Civilisation.” Art objects covering the 
history of Syria from the 3d and 2d 
millenniums B. C. to the early 20th 
century. 

Mona Bismarck Foundation, tel: 47- 
23-38-88, closed Sundays and Morv 

S . To April 23: "L'Art des Peupies 
ues, 3000 a 300 avant J.- C.” 
Features terra-cotta and bronze ob- 
jects. weapons, jewels and statuettes 
that were part of the daily life of the 
peoples that lived in Italy before the 
Etruscans. 

Musde-Galerie de la Sola, tel: 45- 
56-60-17, closed Sundays. To May 
14: "Lyonel Felnlnger 1871-1956: 
Oeuvres sur Papier." 60 drawings 
and watercolors by the American- 
born artist who stud>ed and painted in 
Germany and France, became a fam- 
ous caricaturist for the Chicago Tri- 
bune. was Influenced by Robert De- 
launay and Cubism, and became a 
member of the Bauhaus workshops. 
Mus6e du Louvre, lei: 40-20-50-50, 
dosed Mondays. To April 18: "Egyp- 
tomania: L'Egypte dans I'Art Occi- 
dental 1750-1930." Egypt as a 
source of inspiration In European ar- 
tistic creation. 

Mus6e du Petit Palais, tel: 42-65- 
12-73, closed Tuesdays. To May 29: 
"L'Art des ScuJpteurs Tatnos: Chefs- 
d'Oeuvre des Grandes Antilles Pre- 
cotontoiennes.” Cult objects, stat- 
ues, weapons and belts made by the 
aborigines living on Cuba, Puerto 
Rico and the Dominican Republic, at 
the time of Christopher Columbus. 


Opdra Comique. lei: 42-96-12-20. 
Massenet's "Werther." Directed by 
Gilbert Blrn, conducted by Laurent 
Petitgirard, with Alfredo Kraus/Luca 
Lombardo /Christian Papis, Marline 
□upuy/Martine Olmeda/ Beatrice 
Uria-Monzon. April 5, 7, 9,10. 13, 15, 
16. 17. 19, 20 and 22. 

Ramies 

Musde des Beaux-Arts, tel: 99-28- 
55-85, closed Tuesdays. To April 25: 
"De Dorer a Friedrich: Quatre Siecles 
de Dessins AJIemands." Drawings 
from the Wallrat-Richariz Museum in 
Cologne spanning the period from 
the Renaissance through the 19th 
century. 

GERMANY 

Berlin 

Staalsoper Unter den Linden, tel: 
(30) 203-544-94. Richard Strauss's 
"Etektra." Directed by Dieter Dom, 
conducted by Daniel Barenboim, 
with Uta Priew, Deborah Polaski, 
Alessandra Marc and Reiner Gold- 
berg. March 27, 31, April 5 and 10. 

Hamburg 

Hamburgische Staatsoper, tel; 
(40) 35-66-454. Verdi's 'Ml Trova- 
tore." Directed by Wolfgang Bpcker, 
conducted by Samuel Fnedmarm, 
with Giorgio Zancanaro, Michele 
Crider and Maria B Isabella Fiorillo. 
April 6, 12 and 15. 

Munich 

Bayerisches National Museum, tel: 
(89) 211-24-1, closed Mondays. To 
May 29: "Silber und Gold: Augs- 
burger Goidschmiedekunst tor Die 
Hole Europas." Silver and gold table- 
ware created in Augsburg for the Eu- 


ensnu 9 


ACROSS 

1 Encircles 
sWord in Old 
wedding vows 

to Door securer 

14 -t Him' 

(1963 hit by the 
Angels) 

15 Tot's first word 

16 Maintain 

17 Photographer 
Buliaty 

is ‘Come — - r 

19 More than 
gratify 

so Blood supply 


22 Fast planes 
from New York 
24 Rebuke to 
Junior 

26 Low-voiced 
ladies 

27 Sunday book 
29 Article in Le 

Monde 

N Catty remark 
si primitive means 
ot investigation 
34 Former tide in 

Tripoli 

37 Howls 

38 Guitar sound 


go frriftn in Poetie o* Mart* 34 


BIIJIllP 

iiitP 1 

IP 111 iglii 


39 Scruff 

40 Flurry 

41 Boxer's Bpot 

42 Mixed drink 
made with an 

egg 

43 Clear, with "of 
4« Open 

46 Wise guys 
4i Polling subjects 

51 Dr. Johnny 
Fever and 
Venus Flytrap 
S3 Blocked 

87 Uzbekistan’s 

Sea 

os Paradise 
evictee 
ooScrim8haw 
medium 
•i “Who's the 
Boss?' mother 
■2 Vogue 

83 Onetime 
colonial power 

84 Memorial Day 
weekend event 

05 Appraised 
58 Finn name m 
cosmetics 


1 Shocked 
response 

2 Pedestal figure 


3 Barrett of 

gossip 

4 Efving's cars 
a Tar 

o Prefix with 
meter 

7 Players pick it 
aupflft 

0W.W. IIArmy 
' magazine 

ie Big bother 

11 Stop, atsea 

12 Altercation 
« Basketball 

stratagem 
21 Made fit 
23 Ratted 
2s Revealed, as an 
Identity 
27 Govern 
» Vacillate 
z» In a state of 
mental collapse 
30 C-EO.'s degree 
32 Neb. neighbor 
aa Afl thumbs 
34 MOMA work 
45 "Iliad,* e.g. 
34Uh-huh_ 

39 Top gridiron 
players 

41 One method of 
sealing 


43 Instant 

esCookstowty 


48 Thou 
498/15/45 


40 Hindu honcho 50 Tree cultivated 


47 Goodyear's 
home 


tor hedges 
52 “How you!* 



Naktr Him i rtil M 

© New York Times Edited by Will Shore. 


ropean courts in the 17th and 18th 
centuries. 

Kunsthalle Der Hypo-Kuttur stif- 
tung, tel: (B9) 22-44-12, open daily. 
Continuing/To April 24: ' Bonnard.'’ 
140 oil paintings, a screen and seven 
sculptures. Includes interior scenes, 
views from his house in southern 
France, still lifes. nudes and land- 
scapes by the French painter. 
Stuttgart 

Staatstheater, tel: (711) 2-03-20. 
Mozart's "La Clemanza di Tito." Di- 
rected by Jossi Wfeter, conducted by 
Philippe Auguln with Keith Lewis, 
Catherine Nagiestad and Sonja Zlat- 
kova. April 16 (premiere), 19, 22, 
27. 30, May 6, 21 , 23, June 6 and 1 0. 

ISRAEL 

Jerusalem 

Hie Israel Museum, tel; 972-2-708- 
811, open dally. To April 30: "Uwe 
Loesch: The Race, the Time and the 
Point." 70 posters and billboards by 
the German graphic designer. 


ITALY 

ftivon 

Museo d'Arte Contemporaries, tel: 
(11) 958-7256, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing /To April 30: "Keith Har- 
ing." 150 paintings, drawings, sculp- 
tures and objects by the American 
artist who died In 1 990 ai age 31 . The 

F#j/>wT exhibition will travel to Ma&no, Swe- 

tston snow. ^ ^ Tal Avfv 

Venice 

. Chiesa San Bartokxneo. open daily, 

tei: 42-96-12-20. Continuing/To May 1 : "II Tintoretto: 
her." Directed by Rappresentazionl Sacra nelle Chlese 
ucled by Laurent veneziane." 15 large religious plc- 
fredo Kraifi/Luca tyres including "The Christening" 
in Papis, Marline and "The Last Supper" from the 
3lmeda/Beatrice churches of San Polo and San SMves- 
5,7.9.10.13,15. tro. 

22 . ^ 

_ JAPAN 

(-Arts, tel: 99-28- — — 

sdays. To April 25: Kobe 

ch: Quatre Siedes Kobe Hankyu Museum, tel: (78) 
lands." Drawings 360-1231, closed Thursdays. To 
chartz Museum in April 13: "Drawings by Morita" Four 
1 the period from scrolls depicting scenes from the 
through the 19th "Ugetsu Monogatari." the Noh dra- 
ma "Sumidagawa," a novel try Tanl- 
zakl and a fairy tale by Andersen. 

1 Sketches are also on display. 

— Tokyo 

Dai mam Museum, lei: (3) 3212- 
den Unden. tel: 8011. To April 4: "An Aspect ot Art 
Ftlchard Strauss's Deco." Early 20th-century 
d by Dieter Dom, crattworks, jewelry, furniture, table- 
iniei Barenboim, ware and art posters, as well as cos- 
Deborah Polaski, tumes and fashion accessories, 
and Reiner Gold- National Museum ot Western Art, 
I, April 5 and 10. tal: (3) 3828-51 31. dosed Mondays. 

Continuing/To April 3: "Great 
. , French Paintings from the Baines 
Staatsoper, tel: coHection." Pictures selected from 
"I™ 3 : the collection of Dr. Albert C. Barries 
MS!: in Philadelphia, 
icanaro, Michele 

B Isabella Fiorillo. MONACO 

Monte-Carlo 

Printemps des Arts de Monte-Car- 
inal Museum, tel: lo, tel: 93-1 5-83-03. April 2 to May 8: 
>sed Mondays. To Indudes recitals by Yo Yo Ma, Alexis 
und Gold: Augs- Weissenbe/g and Paul Badura-Sko- 
edekunst tor Die da, symphoiy concerts, the world 
/er and gold table- premiere of Bihar's "Second Requi- 
gsburgtortneEu- em" and bailer performances by the 
Monte-Carlo BaHet. 


NEfHERLANPS 

Amsterdam 

Museum hot Rembrandthuis, tel: 

“sasr" 

se Measure of -j 7tfi and 18th centuries, rndudlng 

fores Bloemaart, Dusart, van de Velde, 

59 — school pronk and Troost. TT» subjects in- 

dude ddrcal scenes, landscapes, 
JT rr « » portrarts, animals and still fifes. 

[ PORTUGAL 

Lisbon 

■ Museu Nacional de Arqueotogia, 

tei: 362-0000. Continuing/To Dec. 

5 31: "Subterranean Lisbon." A ds- 

— play of archaeological with Phoeni- 

dm, Roman, Vtegothic, Mozarabic 
__JiSsPiPl and medieval artifacts. 


SPAM 

Palma de MaDorca 

Teatre Principal, tel: (71 ) 72-55-48. 
Verdi's "La TraviaJa." Directed by 
Serafl Guiscafre. conducted by Fa- 
biano Monica, with Kathleen Cas- 
sette / aeri Lamoris, Olator Bjame- 
son / Ignacio Encinas, Carlos 
Alvarez / Guido Lebron. March 26, 
2B. 30. April 2 and 4. 

SWEDEN 

Stockhofm 

Nationalmuseum, tet: (8) 666- 

4250. To April 24: "Imagination and 


Dream: French Symbolism." An 
overall view of the movement, from 
Puvls de Chavannes, Gustave Mo- 
reau and Odilon Redon to the Pont 
Aven School and the Nads. Swedish 
Symbolism is also represented with 
works by Acke, Osslund and Jans- 
son. 

SWITZERLAIP 

Lmntmme 

Fondation de I'Hermltage, tel: (21 ) 
320-50-01, closed Mondays. Con- 
tinuIng/To May 1: “La Nouvelle 
Vague: L'Estampe Japonaise de 
1068 a 1939." From a private collec- 
tion, 1 60 Japanese prints by artists ot 
the Meiji. Tateho and Showa periods. 

Martfgny 

Fondation Pierre Gianadda, tei: 
(26) 22-39-78. open dally. To June 
12; "Dessins et Aquarelles des Col- 
lections Suisses et du Musee Rodin.” 
Features a lesser-known aspect of 
the French sculptor's work with 66 
drawings, sketches, prints and water- 
colors. Twelve monumental sculp- 
tures are simultaneously on show In 
the garden. 

UNITED STATES ~ 

Houston 

The Museum of Fine Arts, tel: 
(713) 639-7300, dosed Mondays. 
To April 17: "Royal Tombs of Sipan." 
Gold, silver and turquoise ornaments 
discovered in the burial chambers of 
Moche royalty, a pre-Inca civilization 
that dominated northen Peru from 
100 to 800. 

Malibu 

The J. Paul Getty Museum, tel: 
(310) 458-2003, dosed Mondays. 
To May 29: “18th- and 19th-Century 
Drawings." A selection of drawings 
by Italian, French. Spanish and Eng- 
lish artists, including Plazzeta, Wat- 
teau, Goya and Rowlandson. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (212) 
708-9750, closed Wednesdays. 
Continuing/To May 10: "Frank 
Lloyd Wright Architect." A retrospec- 
tive devoted to Wright's 70-year ca- 
reer. It includes 350 drawings, 30 
scafe models as well as photographs 
and architectural fragments. 


|krrj{^MQ ?3 


SB 


Edmond* Cbbc 

Dreaming of Peace 

Detail of drawing of children's hospital by 14-year-old Suzana. 
from “I Dream of Peace," a collection of drawings, poems and 
photographs by children in the former Yu gosla via. Proceeds 
from the book, which is sponsored by UNICEF and is being 
published in 18 countries, will go to the I Dream of Peace 
Foundation to aid child victims of war throughout the world. 



HGKL miO$ 


Swimming Pool - Beauty & Fitness Center 
Restaurant “Les Arcades"- Night-Club "Les Caves du Roy" 

Avenue Paul Signac. 83990 StTropez. France 
Tel : (33-16) 94 97 00 04 - Fax (33-16) 94 97 40 52 

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Genuine care for your safety and comfort. 
Delicious dishes, delectable cuisine to touch the heart of 
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A world of smiles and friendliness. 


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KARACHI KUALA LUMPUR - KUWAIT LONDON ~ MUSCAi 









,t?SScSS‘K ,« 3-B I I if . » w . * * 5FJ= 


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Thursday's Prices 

NASDAQ prices as of 4 p.m, now York time. 
This list compiled fay the AP, cons i st s of the 1,000 
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updated twice a year. 


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73 t 33 33 33 —1* 

23 5 34% 36% 34% 1 W 


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- _ IX 3* 

- 11 81 11' 


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: 5 S S! % % !-*" 

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5w _ 5 14 4% 4% 4% — u» 

9% 2WT5XO> n t u ■% V* 

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'£2 ■“ 19 14 5' “** '2V, lS% —vs 

vft r „ - M x 4% 4% 4% — W 

H 14 2 9W 9M 9M — 
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21 ,3%TtfnR .10 J 63 75 14% 14% M% — W 


18% !2%SuerSra 

7 SHSugrmmd 1 
A 5 SCHKpurf 


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7 VS Tie 


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(— dlwOMI paid in stock m 


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THE THIS INDEX: 112^® 

280 .""I*’®*''* 

by^Bloomberg 



Asia/Pacific 


Approx. «i0Wffig:3» 
Close: 127.93 Prev.: 12722 


Europe 


Approx. Hekfting:37% 
Ctoss: 1 72.63 Pibvj 1 1299 



pw Max tracks US. doBar values of stodu tor Tokyo, Horn 'folk. London, and 
Aigwtfna, AuntraBo, Austria, Mghxa, Brad, Canada, CMte, Danmaik. Ftntoid. 
Prim**. Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Maatfeo. Natharimu, Naw Zratond, Nonray, 
Singapore, Spain, Q wa d an, Snttnriand and Vananiate. For Tbkyo, New Yak and 
London, the rater b composed at tha 20 tqp teura to towns of market ea p rta tea t fa a 
othorwiM the tan top Blocks are tracked. 


1 Industrial Sectors 1 


Tha Pma % 

dow daw drags 


VML 

dam 

raw 

* 

drags 

Energy 

111.90 11A04 -1.01 

Capital Goods 

114.05 

114.43 

-023 

Ifiiltte 

123.40 123.96 -0.47 

BavHitartata 

12164 

12432 

-OS 5 

Finance 

116.12 115.77 +020 

Consumer Goods 

98.07 

98.46 

-040 

Services 

119.15 119.98 -0.69 

Hbceflaneoua 

12967 

13051 

-064 

For mom information about the Max. a be<ddgt is available tree of chaise. 

Writs to TO) Index, 181 Avenue CharioedsQatfe, 92S21 Noufy Codex, France. 


50 Billion Francs 
Of Restructuring 
At Credit Lyonnais 


By Jacques Neher 

IruemauonaJ Herald Tribute 

PARIS — Credit Lyonnais, 
the huge French state-con* 
trolled bank, Thursday an- 
nounced a 1993 loss of 6.9 bil- 
lion francs ($1.2 billion) and a 
50 bflK on-franc restructuring 
plan that its new chairman said 
would make it healthy enough 
to gp private within two years. 

The loss was more than three 
limes thedefidt posted for 1992 
and reflected a big boost in pro- 
visions for bad business loans. 

The financial plan, which 
calls for a transfer of 40 billion 
francs of doubtful real estate 
loans, 10 billion francs in new 
capital and the elimination of as 
many as 4,700 jobs, were more 
severe than analysts had expect- 
ed, but they predicted the mar- 
ket would react favorably. 

Tired and testy after long ne- 
gotiations with the government 
this week, Jean Peyrdevade, 
who took over as hod of the 
bank in November, said die in- 
stitution’s core bulking busi- 
ness was “healthy*’ and that he 
aimed to bring Otdit Lyonnais 
to the break-even point by the 
end of 1994. 

He ducked questions about 
the accuracy of the accounts 


presented a year ago by the 
bank’s previous chairman, 
Jean- Yves Haberer, now chair- 
man of Crtdil National. Mr. 
Haberer, at that time, said the 
bank’s problem loans in rad 
estate and the film industry had 
been largely provisioned and 
that the bank only needed an 
economic upturn to take off. 

“I wasn’t there,’* he said. 
“How can I speak of things I 
don’t know?” 

The heart of the plan calls for 
the bank to transfer 40 billion 
francs of problem real estate 
loans — out of a total French 
real estate portfolio of 58 bil- 
lion francs — to a company to 
be manag e ^ by Crtdit Lyonnais 
and guaranteed by the state. 

Toe loans, most of which went 
to Paris speculators and proper- 
ty developers before the market 
collapsed three yean ago, could 
be transferred lode to the bank 
after two years if prospects for 
their repayment imprewed, Mr. 
Feyidevade said 

In exchange for promising to 
absorb any losses on these 
loans, the state would be issued 
stock warrants that could be 
exercised later, potaps after 

See CREDIT, Page 15 


Dollar Drops on Mexico Concerns 


Compiled by OwStofl From Disptadta nation of Luis Dooaldo Colosio, date, could trigger political insta- 

NEW YORK — The dollar nun- Mexico’s top presidential candi- bflity there undermined die dollar 
bled against most major currencies ___ 
on concern a political assassination 
in Mexico could hurt U.S. invest- 
ments there and on prospects For 
German interest rates to remain 
firm. 

The doDar plunged to a five- 
month low against the Deutsche 
mark, dosing in New York at 
1.6680 DM, compared with 1.6815 
Wednesday. The dollar dropped to 
104.550 yen from 106.325. to 
5.7038 French francs from 5.7450 
and to 1.4165 Swiss francs from 
1.4275. Sterling was steady at 
$1.4975. 

“What you are seeing is a general 
lack of confidence in owning dd- 
lar-denominated assets,” said Win 
Thin, an analyst with MCM Cur- 
rency Watch. 

The possibility that the assasst- 



because of the importance of U.S. 
investment and exports to the Mex- 
ican economy, a trader at Chase 
Manhattan dank said. 

Banks in Mexico dosed for a day 
of mourning, effectively choking 
off trading in the Mexican peso. 

“If you want to seD the NAFTA 
countries and Mexico is dosed, you 
sell Canada and the U.S., said Da- 
vid De Rosa, analyst at Swiss Bank 


Corp. 

Thai 


sentiment also burdened 
the Canadian dollar, taking it to a 
seven-year low against the UJS. 
dollar. The dollar finished at 
13736 Canadian dollars, up from 
1. 3645 'Wednesday. 

Prospects for President BOl Clin- 
ton to tackle the Whitewater issue at 
a news conference Thursday eve- 
ning also enoouraged investors to 


Source: Bloomberg 


lulenutional Herald Tribune See DOLLAR, Page 12 


European Markets Shaken by Inflation Fears 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Stocks and bonds 
feD across Europe Thursday on 
concerns about inflation and i 
pointing interest-rate differeaitu 
with the United States. 

Markets in France were the 
hardest hit, reeling from a small er- 
than-expected interest rate cut by 
the Bank of France. The GAG40 
index fell 2.16 percent, to 2,15156. 
on disappointment with the central 
bank’s lO-basis-pomi cut in its in- 
tervention rate. The rate, which sets 


the floor for money market rates, 
now stands at 6.0 percent 
‘The disappointment is that 
we’re still following Germany's 
lead so closely, ” a broker at Crtdit 
Agricole said. 

The rale cut sent the yield on the 
benchmark French 10-year bernd to 
655 percent from 6.40 percent 
British government bond prices 
vat the biggest casualty of the day, 

with the yidd on the ben chmark 15- 
year issue singing to 7.68 percent 
From 7.41 percent Wednesday. 


Analysts said the chances for a 
British rate cut diminishe d after 
Wednesday's report erf higher-than- 
expected inflation for February. 

Traders speculated that German 
interest rales woe unlikely to be 
lowered soon in Hght of a surge in 
the country's M-3 money supply ag- 
gregate reported Thursday. 

The Bundesbank said German 
M-3 money supply rose 17.6 per- 
cent in February, down from the 
213 percent growth rate in January 


but still well above the bank’s tar- 
get range of 4 percent to 6 percent. 

German braid prices plunged on 
the data, even though the Bundes- 
bank has said money supply is not 
its only tool in setting monetary 
policy. Bui German stocks finished 
with small gains; Frankfurt's DAX 
index edged up 0.03 percent 

Reflecting inflation fears, gold in 
London rose $2.15 an ounce, to 
$390.40, at the afternoon fixing. 
(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


VW Says the Road Leads to Better Times 


O International Herald Tribute 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribute 

WOLFSBURG, Germany — Af- 
ter a year like 1993. things could 
only get better for Volkswagen AG, 
Ferdinand PiScfa and Jose T gngpin 
L6pez de Amortua, and by some 
s> gn< they already are improving. 

But it will take at least two more 
years for the Europe’s largest auto- 
maker to return to profitability. 

Meanwhile. VWs riiairmim, Mr. 
Pftch, and its controversial produc- 
tion and purchasing manager, Mr. 
Ldpez, said Thursday they had 
only begun to convert the company 
from the world’s highest-cost pro- 
ducer of automobiles into what 


will be one of the most 
it and profitable. 

The road ahead, mapped out at a 
news conference on the company’s 
1993 performance, is supposed to 
lead to big reductions in costs; a 
slow switch to modular production 
methods; cars worthy of the name 
Volkswagen in its literal sense of 
“peoples car”; strong growth in 
Asia, and a triumphant return to 
respectable market share in the 
United States. 

When all these things will hap- 
pen is anybody’s guess, but Mr. 
L6pez, high priest of the so-called 
continuous improvement process 
that is reshaping the way VW 


Thinki ng Ahead /Commentary 


Clinton’s Asia Policy Runs Big Risks 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribute 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clin- 
ton’s much-vaunted Aria policy is in big 
trouble. Unlike his predecessor, George 
Bush, Mr. Clinton understands the impor- 
tance of Asia for America’s future. But he has 
no idea how to cope with it in the present 

In just over a year, Mr. Clinton has suc- 
ceeded in antagonizing nearly every key play- 
er in the region, to the extent of jeopardizing 
the “new Pacific community” he has pro- 
claimed as his objective. 

High-handed U3. behavior toward China 
over human rights and Japan over trade is 
alienating other Asian governments and cre- 
ating widespread suspicion of America’s mo- 
tives throughout the region. 

Although Mr. Clinton has made “economic 
security” the touchstone of America’s foreign 
relations, be has allowed his China policy to be 
di ct ated by old-fashioned politics. His Japan 
policy is rooted in an alarmist picture of the 
aiU rfyynquflrmg Japan Inc. of the 1980& 

Worse, Washington’s actions are underlin- 
ing differences between Asian and Western 
values — when many Asians believe, with 
some reason, that their societies arc more 
dynamic and successful th an those of Europe 
and North America. 

If not quickly checked, Washington’s over- 
tvmnng approach will encourage Asian cram- 
tries to form their own new links, from which 
America may be excluded. Already, Quna 
and Japan are being thrust closer together by 
their conflicts with the United States. 

U3. hectoring of Beijing on human rights 
is it difficult to resolve Washington s 

prime foreign-policy concern: North Korea s 
nuclear adventurism. 


It is nor just China and Japan. Washington 
has managed to: 

• Alienate India, the world's largest democ- 
racy, by failing to senda new ambassador for a. 
year and making iO-judged remarks about 
Kashmir . 

• Enrage Indonesia, the wcricTs largest Is- 
lamic country, by threatening to remove pref- 
erential access to the US. market because of 

U.S. behavior is 
alienating governments 
and creating suspicion 
of America’s motives. 

Indonesia’s alleged disregard for labor rights. 

• Fend with Thailand over access to mar- 
kets for financial services. 

• Scare Hong Kong and Taiwan by its 
threats to disrupt trade with China. 

• Irritate Singapore by arrogantly attempt- 
ing to interfere in its judicial processes over 
an American youth sentenced to be caned for 
vandalism. 

(Washington might do better to try to learn 
something from the way Singapore has estab- 
lished a dean, crime-free city-stale, in dra- 
matic contrast to the American experience:) 

Throughout the region, Mr. Clinton's trade 
policies are causing justifiable alarm. Austra- 
lia, Indonesia, New Zealand and Singapore 
have expressed concern that Washington may 
delay implementation of the Urugnay Round 
of worfa trade talks until next year. 

The dispute with China over human rights 
is threatening to hold up China’s entry into 
the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 
which ought to be a top American priority 


The aim should be to negotiate tough eco- 
nomic safeguards and conditions for China's 
GATT membership and disentangle h um a n 
rights from trade. 

Instead, many Asian countries see Mr. 
Clinton’s China policy as at least partly a 
camouflage for protectionism that in due 
course wifi be turned against them too. Mr. 
din ton’s renewed brandishing of the Super 
301 trade weapon against Japan has only 
saved to confirm the feats of other Asian 
nations that they are next in line. 

At a recent conference organized by the 
Economic Strategy Institute m Washington, 
a leading American businessman ominously 
reded off names of countries that had of- 
fended America by running rapidly growing 
trade surpluses. After Japan came China, 
Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand. He urged 
America to keep its trade weapons primed. 

U.S. officials argue that toughness is the 
rally way to get results. But Mr. Clinton's 
obsession with Japan’s trade surplus and 
Beijing’s dissidents is undermining America’s 
strategic interests and Cuming Asians against 
the Untied States. 

Mr. Clinton is focusing on issues that were 
of concern five years ago at the expense of 
today's rad challenges — stabilizing Korea, 
creating healthier, broader-based relations 
with Japan and integrating Chi n a into the 
world economic system. 

His Asia policy gives the world an impres- 
sion not only of confusion in Washington but 
of incompetence and insensitivity. 

It is not too late to admit mistakes and 
change rack. Mr. Clinton should reenri! a 
better-qualified Aria team to review the 
whole approach, and someone should have 
the humiltiy to ask whether Western values 
really are that superior. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Craft Rates 


Mar. 24 

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United States Close Pm. 

Dticorat rate ISO 100 

PrUnarale UD &00 

Fadaral harts 3 Yi H 

J-monTti CDs 128 128 

CanoLDoaerlMdan 480 192 

s^nantti Traraanr MB 143 145 

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X-ytorTreonry bond 685 689 

Merrill Lynch away m u dr oH it 281 281 


1% T« 

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514 

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2S1 as 52 ts 

NOW York 39180 391J0 +650 

US. dollars per ounce. London affldal fbt- 

w; Zurich and New York canine tmd dos- 

Ha prices; Now York Comer tAnffl) 

Source: Reuters. 


works, says h will be “sooner than 
you expect-" 

Mr. Pi6ch, noting tiiat the com- 
pany’s break-even point has been 
lowered to 74 percent of capacity 
from more than 100 percent a year 
ago, said VW was “still one of the 
wodd’s most expensive automak- 
ers, but no longer the most expen- 
sive." Its goal is to be profitable at 
65 percent of production capacity. 

VW had a loss in 1993 of almost 
2 billion Deutsche marks (SO bil- 
lion) in 1993 on worldwide sales of 
76.59 billion DM, a 10 percent de- 
cline from (he year before. The div- 
idends on both its common and its 


pr eferred stock were unchanged at 
2 DM a share. 

The extent of the company’s 
problems is most evident in a com- 
parison with 1989, the year before 
German unification. VW sold 
about the same number of cars 
worldwide in 1993 as in 1989 — 
2^62,000 and 2,941,000. respec- 
tively. But it posted a loss last year 
of 1.94 billion DM, whereas it had 
profit of 1.04 billion DM in 1989. 

Last year, the first under the 
leadership of Mr. Pinch, saw the 
sadden departures of seven board 
members, rate of whom was later 
called bade, and the beginning of 

See VW, Page 15 


Mieno Berates Bankers 


By James Stemgold 

New York Times Service 
TOKYO — The governor of 
the Bank of Japan delivered a 
stem tongue-lashing Thursday 
to Japan’s battered commercial 
banks, criticizing in stark terms 

Aetr pack mentali ty, their in- 
ability to evaluate f inan cial 
risks and their unwillingness to 
innovate in spite of their mas- 
rive size. 

The governor, Yasushi 
Mieno, has criticized Japanese 
hanking practices periodically 
after a plunge in the stock and 
real estate markets four years 
ago exposed a pattern of reck- 
less lending and buried the 


banks under a mountain of bad 
debts. Analysts say the coun- 
try’s 21 largest banks bokl at 
least $270 nflHon in bad loans, 
and the toll is mounting . 

Bat Mr. Mieno’s latest re- 
marks, made in a speech here 
Thursday, were even harsher in 
their assessment of the banks’ 
weaknesses. He also insisted 
that deregulation was the bat 
solution tor many of the short- 
comings, not more of the gov- 
ernment hand-holding that 
many here regard as the root of 
the problems. 

In effect, J roan’s top banker 
was saying that the system 

See BANKS, Page 12 


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^ Page 12 

! MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


I MEXICO: World Markets Shaken 


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Controlled Grom P^fe 1! 

come Friday if It allows currency 
markets to reopen before picking a 
new presidential candidate. 

That choice is expected to be 
mad e this weekend and to result in 
a show of solidarity for the Tilling 
party. 

But the danger was immediately 
recognized by Mr. Clinton, who 

U.S.8tocfc» 

disclosed that he called Treasury 
Secretary Lloyd Ben [sec “to see 
what we could do to help” if trad- 
ing in the Mexican currency got out 
of hand. That was obviated by the 
dose of Mexico's markets, but Mr. 
Clinton's words were not the last 
ones from the U-S. government on 
the subject. 

The Federal Reserve and Mexi- 
co's central bank have close ties 
that predate even the 1982 collapse 
of Mexico's currency. Recently 
they have been strengthened by 
new and sophisticated currency 
swap agreements to help both cur- 
rencies through storms. They have 
both become more vulnerable due 
to the commercial ties of the North 
American Free Trade Agreement, 
which came into effect Jan. i. 

“Mexico has a pile of reserves" 
said Mdses Naim, a Latin Ameri- 
can specialist at the Carnegie En- 
dowment for International Peace 
in Washington, referring to the 
central bank's $28 billion hoard of 


foreign money. “If they are smart, 

they w 

use them when the 


and I think 


will be, they will 
markets open to 
defend the peso in the short term." 
This was echoed on Wall Street 


by Chip Brown of Morgan Stanley, 
who said that the peso was a sym- 
bol of the continuity and strength 
of Lhe Mexican government and 
that its stability would offer inves- 
tors reassurance that the ruling In- 
stitutional Revolutionary Party, or 
PRL would remain in control. “I 
don't see any immediate outflow of 
money ” he added. 

■ Steep Drop on Wall Street 

Blue chips sensitive to economic 
cycles, including large industrial 
and financial shares, posted some 
of the larger price drops on Thurs- 
day, the Associated Press reported 
from New York. 

Decliners swamped advancers 
by more than 4 to I on the New 
York Stock Exchange and trading 
volume swelled to 303.75 million 
shares from 281.44 million on 
Wednesday. 

Caterpillar tumbled 3ft to 1 16% 
and International Paper fell ft to 
69%, while such financial shares as 
J. P. Morgan dropped % to 64%. 

The bond market is weighing 
heavily on the equity market right 
now," said Kent LiHick, an analyst 
at Kemper Securities. “But there 
are a lot of more tertiary items that, 
in the singular, probably wouldn't 
cause the market to fade like this 
but when taken together are a big 
overhang." 

In Nasdaq trading. Media Vision 
led in volume, plunging 10% to 
close at i 1, after the computer peri- 

E herals company said it would 
ave a substantial fust-quarter loss 
and that price cuts would reduce 
revenues. Lehman Brothers report- 
edly downgraded the stock. 


DOLLAR: Mexico Takes a Toll 


qu Continued from Page 11 


ne unload dollas. Whitewater deals 
*“ with Mr. Clinton's investment in an 
^Arkansas land development tied toa 
TfaOed savings and loan institution, 
s t Several central banks were ru- 
aL mored to have intervened to slow 
<*the dollar's slide, including the 



Foreign Exchange 

Bundesbank, the Bank of France 
JSand even the Federal Reserve 

IvsBoard. 

,e U The mark was shored up by a 
su^urge in German M-3 money sup- 



jested 

from lowering interest rates 


rft 


ig.nn soon. 


3C Plunging U.S. Treasury bond 
,u, )rices also discouraged investors 
**>00) buying dollar-denominated 
on ecurities, said Amy Smith, analyst 
“vith IDEA. 

“No one knows where the floor is 
7B , m the bond market,” Ms. Smith 
nd aid. This is having the effect of 
101 lealers and funds testing the floor 
fj 1 m the dollar as foreign investors 
^ mil out of dollar assets and go 
. ‘ kewhere." 

01 Mr. Thin agreed, saying that 


there were strong portfolio flows 
switching into mark-denominated 
assets. He noted that the mark 
gained strongly against the lira on 
concerns about die upcoming Ital- 
ian elections . 

The French franc struggled 
against currencies other than the 
dollar after the Bank of France 
shaved 10 basis points off its inter- 
vention rate, which sets for floor 
for money manet rates. Growing 

{ mblic disorders linked to a plan to 
ower minimum wages for certain 
workers in France also kept the 
franc pinned down. 

Sterling lost ground against most 
major currencies as investors 
dumped British government securi- 
ties after higber-than-expected in- 
flation data on Wednesday. 

Gold served as a shelter from the 
falling dollar. Gold for April deliv- 
ery on the New York Commodity 
Exchange rose $4 JO an ounce to 
$391.90. 

In addition to the Mexico con- 
cerns, the Canadian dollar was 
pressured by sentiment Canada’s 
central bank would continue to fa- 
vor low interest rates, despite the 
78-basis-point jump this week in 
the key central bank rate, 

(Knighl-Ridder, 
Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


Via Anod ato d ftc» 


24 


The Dow 



j. <] 

.•Vw^ , v , V"W' m ' 

'jifc'r.'. 

»■ 

■ - -ex'- 

■ if s; S ■ . 


'aSsF* :r *> ■*' ■ 

vrTft'f 5 ■ w* « < 

*■ S-S :<■ :✓< ''z***'' 


IHT 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open HWh Low Lost Ota. 

Indus 3849X8 3869X6 380X24 3821 J» — 4837 
Tram 1771.24 1725J3 17004)7 170403— lan 
UW 205X4 U4S9 7SOM 20406 —144 
Comp 1M9JB 137435 1353X8 135678—1641 


Standard & Poor’s bxlexos 


High low Close are* 
Industrials 549 £7 S42X4 54430 — 5J7 

TraiBP. 421.11 4140* 41491 —07 

Utilities 16101 159.19 15902 —090 

Finance 4408 4X55 4X75 — 023 

SP 500 46857 46241 46405—4.19 

SP 100 43X54 4X773 430.12 —3X2 


NYSE Indexes 


HU Lew Law cm. 

Composite 26029 257.10 257.96 -432 

Industrials 322.10 31805 319.19 —2.91 

Tramp. 2*8-48 76443 26SJ7 —101 

Utililv 215.64 212.90 71X47 —2.12 

Finance 214.25 212X5 21X67 — 1J8 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Low Last dig. 



VoL 

HkA 

LOW 

Last 

at». 

TdAAox 

113734 

61ft 

0 ft 

60ft 

—3ft 

Limitd 

«402 

23ft 

20 ft 

22 ft 

*lft 

OirvsJr 

44131 

57 

55ft 

56ft 

—2 

Merck 

4DB45 

30ft 

30 

30ft 

+ v* 

FordM 

37130 

62ft 

60 

61*li 

—2 

GnMatr 

336*7 

59ft 

57ft 

58ft 

— 2W 

PtaaerD 

2541 4 

25ft 

25ft 

25ft 

+ ft 

SunMn 

25394 

3ft 

3ft 

7ft 

+ ft 

attcora 

23560 

0 ft 

37ft 

0 ft 

— ft 

AT&T 

23102 S3>» 

52V, 

S3 

—ft 

Glaxo 

ixm 

18ft 

18ft 

18ft 

♦ ft 

PhkMr 

22917 

53ft 

52 

52ft 

_ft 

WalMris 

22420 

27ft 

77 

2711 

—ft 

IBM 

19981 

57ft 

56 

56ft 

— 1 

Hmsike 

19371 

22 ft 

22 ft 

22 ft 

+ 9* 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL Htgh 

Low 

Lost 

Cho. 

Novell s 

153972 19ft 

18ft 

19ft 

♦ ft 

MedVsn 

140874 15 

9ft 

II 

—10ft 

Ciscos 

115583 37V, 


34ft 

—2ft 

GtARc 

66755 l’A» 


(■/„ 


TokrfMex 

47272 3Vp 


3 

— v r 


44226 20ft 

17ft 

20ft 

-4ft 

AAOS 

43026 25 

24 ft 

74ft 

—Vi 


38673 23 

20ft 

21ft 

—1ft 

CareerHz 

33058 0ft 


19ft 


CrTchLI 

31410 27 Vi 

24>n 

75ft 

—3ft 

Wendts 

30904 BOft 

72ft 

73ft 

—7ft 

TeiCmA 

29512 23ft 


22ft 

—ft 

Amaen 

29486 0ft 

0ft 

0ft 

♦ft 

Intel s 

' . ’ ■ J Lr V 




PricCst s 

28354 19ft 

IBft 

19ft 

—ft 


AMEX Most Actives 



VOL 

Utah 

Law 

Last 

a*. 

Echo Bay 

12143 

13ft 

13 

13ft 

♦ ft 

SPDR 

11485 46F/J, 

46Vp 

464* 

-ift, 

RavalOp 

11411 

4'Vl, 

4ft 

4>¥,» 

+ •* 

ExpLA 

5910 

PA 

IV* 

11* 

-V* 

HIShrTcn 

5718 

S’* 

5 

5 


ForSILb 

5050 46ft 

43 ft 

441* 

—3ft 

Chevsns 

4971 

45ft 

42ft 

43 

—2ft 

CtTFst 

4234 

Bft 

Bft 

Bft 


VtacB 

4088 

30 

29ft 

!9V« 


ivaxCo 

3550 29ft 

0ft 

29 

— 


Composite 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurance 

Finance 

Transp. 

Telecom 


793.91 78328 
837.78 824.1$ 
69174 487 JT 
93154 91X88 
901.46 898.00 
779.16 795l69 
171.96 149.74 


78643—11.0 
B29JJ7— 1X35 
688.12 — X17 
91X89 — 9.61 

14974 — 2J37 


AMEX Stock Index 


Kgti Law Lost Cbo. 
47X38 46X68 669-66 — X73 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

Ctose Prevtapa 

Bid ash bm Ask 

ALUMINUM (High Grade) 

Denars per metric Ion 
Seat 130150 1302.00 131100 131400 

Farmed 132600 1377 JO 1 33X00 133850 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Doubts per metric tan 

Spat 192X50 1929J0 1«8J0 W«JD 

Forward 1941.00 194X00 195X00 1959 JO 

LEAD 

tST %Perm W4Sl M 46X00 461.00 
Forward 46500 46650 474.00 47450 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric loo 

Spot 568500 5695.00 5660 J» 557000 

Forward 575000 576000 5725JJ0 57300) 

TIM 

Dollars pgr metric ten . _ ^ _ 

Spot 545000 546000 547000 548000 

Forward 550am 551050 552000 553000 

ZINC (Special High Grade! 

Dollars per metric fan 

Spot 942m 94300 9S1« 95X00 

Forward 96X00 963JJ0 9713» 972m 


Financial 

High Lew Char Change 
S-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

SOWN - Ft* Ot HO Pd 
Jan 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
JUB 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jm 


Mar __ 

Esf. volume: HJ7A38 Open hit.: 427,758. ' 
1-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE) 

SI mtUoa-ptsoflMpcl 
m 9557 9SL4 

IP 95X5 955 

«C 94m 94J 

tar 94J9 «4J 

n N.T. N.l 

EP N.T. N.1. 

Esi. volume: 1X53. Open InL; 9X91 
3-MONTH EUROMARKSjLIFFE) 


MJD 

94.W 

9473 

—WO 

9467 


94J4 

— 0.U 

94J9 

94*1 

9425 

— 0.14 

94J6 

9183 

9165 

— 022 

9169 

9135 

ss 

93L47 

930 

—026 
— 022 

910 

9172 

9276 

— 0J1 

92J9 

9K3 

9246 

— 0J2 

9143 

9113 

9118 

— 0J3 

9223 

9150 

9153 

— 135 

92JO 

9149 

9174 

— 634 

9U3 

91 JO 

91J7 

— Ul 


Jm 

9557 

96*5 

9565 

Sap 

9575 

9574 

9574 

Ok 

9460 

9460 

9439 

Mar 

9459 

9458 

9454 

Joa 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9434 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9198 


Dew Jones Beml Averages 


ctose ctrae 
20 Bands 10174 — X18 

10 Utilities 99X5 —XII 

10 Industrials 10X64 —1125 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New Hiatts 
New Lows 


520 1159 

1742 945 

522 668 

2784 2762 

32 83 

111 40 


AMEX Diary 


Oose Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


180 

460 

211 

851 

12 

21 


319 

297 

240 

856 

18 

12 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Ames 

Nosdoa 

In millions. 


Today 
4 pin. 
33434 
1X84 
30X75 


Prev. 

CMS. 

282m 

21419 

29005 


NASDAQ Diary 


AdvcncBd 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Hiahs 
New Laws 


Oose Prev. 

1089 1583 

2037 1441 

1716 1815 

6842 4839 

79 145 

74 48 


DM1 mllllea - pis of IN 
Jim B4J3 9X48 

Sep 947B 94.71 

DOC 9490 9481 

Mar 9497 9487 

Jon 9486 9477 

Sea 9471 9463 

Dec 9453 9447 

94.40 9438 

Joa 9421 9418 

S«P 9405 93.99 

Dec 9X84 5078 

9X68 9X60 


9450 Unctv 
9473 —am 
9483 —005 

9490 — 002 

9479 -006 
9464 —am 

9447 —X06 

9430 — am 

9414 — am 

9401 -am 
9300 —are 
9X64 — 


Est. volume: 161030 Open hit.: 91X517. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF1 


FF90L0O 

pfi or mod 



Mar 

12450 

12372 

12148 

— 1.12 

Joa 

13404 

12X78 

12102 

— L10 

Sep 

12374 

12240 

12132 

-10 

Dec 

12116 

12116 

12162 

— 10 


ElL volume: 350,74V. Open InL: 19X529. 
LONG GILT (UFFE) 

*5X880 - pt* A Shuts of WO PCt 
Mar 10929 108-30 10840 —240 

Jon 108-30 106-17 10740 —M2 

Sap N_T. N.T. 106-04 441 

Est. volume: 134031. Open ha.: 16X595. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LI FFE) 
DM 25X801 - PtS Of 100 PCI 
Jan 9X55 9X38 9X73 —051 

Se« 9X44 9X44 9548 —049 

Est. volume: 22X627. Open Ini.: SUL53X 
3-MONTH FRENCH FRANC (MATIF) 


FF5 aim km 

-PMonoopct 



Jm 

9409 

9402 

9402 

-00 

sop 

9461 

9471 

9432 

— 00 

Dec 

9459 

9445 

9447 

—0.13 

Mar 

9465 

9454 

9455 

— au 

Ju 

940 

9449 

9451 

— an 

Sep 

9443 

9432 

9436 

— 0.10 

DOC 

9424 

94.17 

9419 

—0X7 

Mar 

9410 

9404 

9404 

— 006 


ElL volume; B4J79. Open bit.: 25X383. 


Spot Commo di ties 


Commodity Today Prev. 

Aluminum, lb 0566 0566 

Coffee, Braz. lb 076 0755 

Copper electrolytic, lb 096 096 

Iron FOB. too 21340 2J3B0 

Lood.lt) 034 034 

Sliver, tray az 5-555 5J55 

Steel (sera)), tan T3433 13433 

Tin, lb 1*603 3.6321 

Zinc, lb 04S27 04SZ7 


Industrials 


High Lew Lost Settle arge 
OASOILNP8) 

Ui dollan nr metric tofrtats afl« tans 
Apr 14173 14075 14075 14075 — im 

MOV Ml JO 13975 140m 1«U»— 875 

Jan 14 0S0 13975 13973 13975 — IJO 

Jol 14150 14050 14050 14050 — UN 

A OB 14X25 14X00 142m 142m — IJ» 

Sep 14450 14425 M450 14425 — 1J30 

OG 1477 5 14725 147JD 14750 -1X0 

Nov 14975 149m 14925 14925 — UW 

Dec 15X00 15050 15150 1S15D — LOO 

Jen 15X00 15050 152.00 1JZ2S —075 

Fab 154m 15050 15325 U2m — 125 

Est. vofunfe: 10201 . Open inf. 109552 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

OS. dollars per banrHats of wot barrels 


May 

1350 

1X62 

130 

130 

+00 

Jm 

1185 

1164 

1363 

1362 

+ 0X9 

Jot 

1X52 

1178 

1351 

1191 

+ 0.10 

Aug 

1404 

1365 

1356 

1356 

+0X2 

Sep 

140 

140 

140 

1405 

— 002 


1418 

1410 

1418 

1420 

+ 063 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

140 

+ai2 

Dec 

1446 

1436 

1445 

1440 

+ 0X1 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1451 

+ 0X1 

Esi. vatame: <0433 . 

open tot. 126.149 


High 

LOW 

Last 

Settle 

arte 


Stock Indexes 

High Low Close Chaegc 
FTSE 100 (LIFFE) 

*25 per ladex POM 

Jan 71640 30943) 712531 — Z5J 

Sep N.T. N.T. 31423) — 253) 

Dec N.T. N.T. 3151 J —2531 

Est votame: 21 590 Open ML: 5779X 
CAC48 (MATIF) 

FF20I per htdex nohrt 

Mar 2207 JO 216X00 ZT 65JM H-4400 

Apr 221650 21733)0 217550 -+463I0 

May 2209JHJ 2209 JN 21793W -+46JM 

Jan 22025(1 2163J0 21*258 -+46Q0 

21993)0 21H7JI0 21HLffl0 -+46JW 
Dec 2229m 2229m 221150 -+4650 

Esi. volume-. 44J16. Open bit: 71572. 
Sources : Mof If. Assoclatod Press, 
London Inn Financial Firtms ex c hange, 
inn Petroleum Exchange. 


Dfvidonds 


Company Per Amt Pay Rec 

IRREGULAR 

Hitachi Ltd ADR x 5183 3m 

x -approx amount per ADR. 

INCREASED 

Prime Bancorp Q .15 4-3 5-1 

OMITTED 
PubS la rase Cdn IV 

INITIAL 

Amer Fsf Prep Fd - .1288 3-31 5-2 

Gropa Fin Ser Fin X 7282 330 4-14 

MHMevcraon . JD 4-13 5-13 

Ptaneer Fin Sven . 3075 4-1 4-15 

x-csxxim amount per ADR since gate) public 
REGULAR 


AL Labs 
AhmartsanHF 
8 fa B 

Boston Edison 
Campbell Souo 
Capital Am Fin 
Charter Bank 
CommunltY Bncp 
D eer b an k Cp 
Dreyers Grand Ice 
EimresICASoc 
Grow Group 
Katy Indus 
Kyocera Cora 
Montana Power 
OHSL Find 
Pioneer Std 
Summit Reeaurg 
VSB Bancorp 

Warner Insur 
y -approx amount per AD' 

oaauoul,- a-payahte bt Co nodt ao funds; m- 
maathlv; (eeuarterly; s-semMmaual 


Q .045 *4 4-14 

Q 72 5-10 6-1 

Q JD 3-25 4-8 

Q M 48 5-1 

Q 78 4-7 4-29 

Q -03 5-3 5-18 

. .125 4-1 4-15 

a .15 Ml 4-15 
a .11 H 4-13 
O 3)6 3-25 4-5 

V .165 4-4 4-16 

Q 3)7 4-15 5-2 

- MKTS 3-31 4-20 

Y Am 33B 

Q .iffl 48 4-29 

- .15 Ml 4-15 

O JB5 46 5-1 

JD 4-29 5-16 

5-2 
4-29 


Q J7 44 
Q J1 4-15 


To subscribe in Gormqny 

just eaU, tofl free, 

0130 8A 85 85 


U.S. /AT THE CIOSI 


Loral Enlists Satellite-Phone Allies 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — Loral Corp. a defense and 
dSs concon. lined up a fia of global heavywagbo Tboraday 10 
StaTSvdopSr its Jl!s billion Giobalsiar saleflite-based mobile 

U l££S^U a worldwide (XMisorthun of 10 relecot^udcations 
caiSSSSZS d spend $1.8 billion to build a 

network that aims to undercut competitors costs by amplifying the 
connections between earth mdjgn. ^ jt ^ ^ ^ ratK ^ 



Deutsche Aerospace AG 

Microsoft Has Computer Venture 

JACKSON, Mississippi (Bloomberg) — Mobile Tehx o mmiinications 
Technologies Corp. and Microsoft Coro, will jointly develop a wireless 
data communication network for portable computer users, the companies 

said Thursday. .. 

The companies will invest about $130 million in a new company that 
will operate the network. The new company, called Nationwide Wirelres 
Network, will offer its services to customers in 300 metropolitan areas by 
the second half of 1995, the companies said. 

The venture is the latest investment by Microsoft, based m Redmond, 
Washington, in companies developing technologies to allow computers to 
communicate without ir«ang telephone wires. 

Live Entertainment to Buy Carolco 

LOS ANGELES (Combined Dispatches) — Carolco Pictures Inc. will 
be acquired by Live Entertainment Inc. through a $15 million stod swap, 
the comp anies said Thursday. Live Entertainment will exchange one new 
common share for each 5 5 shares of Carolco stock. 

Current shareholders of Live Entertainment, which distributes home 
videos, will own 22 percent to 29 percent of the combined company, lo be 
called Carolco Entertainment Inc. Carolco is a small movie studio, which 
has had ties to live for several years. Earlier merger plans were scuttled 
by financial problems at both companies. 

The companies said the number of shares to be exc h a nge d could be 
raised so that the mar ket value of each packet of 5 J Carolco shares was at 
least $3 ea ch . Under terms of the acquisition, a new Live share cannot 
represent more than 65 or fewer than 45 shares of Carolco. Carolco fell 
6.3 cents, to 56J cents a share cm the New York Slock Exchange on 
Thursday, while Live rose 12J cents, to $2.75 a share. At that price, 
takeover would be worth 50 cents per Carolco share, although the $3 
minimum would raise that to 54 J 5 cents. 

Carolco has been supported through its difficulties by four strategic 
partners: Pioneer Electronics Corp., Cinepole Productions BV. Canal 
Plus and RCS Video International Services BV, which own a combined 
42 percent of Caroko’s voting stock. These same investors own 56 
percent of Live's voting shares. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. owns 18 
percent of Cardco's voting shares. MGM, an unprofitable subsidiary of 
Credit Lyonnais, invested in Carolco in order to distribute Carolco’s 
movies to theaters- (Bloomberg, AP) 

Northrop Outlines Staff Cats 

LOS ANGELES (Bloomberg) — Northrop Corp. said in a letter to 
shareholders it would cut its work force by 10 percent, ot 3,000 people, in 
1994, to reduce costs as revenue from its current contracts dedines. 

The defease company said its 1993 earnings were affected by a $201 
milli on charge related to its AGM-137 missile program, which reduced 
net income to 596 million from $121 million in 1992. Northrop also said 
sales would decline to about $4.4 billion in 1994, although it expected 
earnings to increase significantly over 1993 levels. 

Northrop began a bidding war for Gr umman Corp. when it made an 
unsolicited bid valued at $60 a share in response to a SS5-a-share offer 
made by Martin Marietta Corp. on March 14. 


BANKS: Mieno Says Japanese Banks Must Become More Innovative and Suggests Deregulation Is the Key 


Continued from Page II 

needs not a cyclical rebound but a 
major overhaul, and he was advo- 
cating a strong dose of competition 
as a remedy. 

“Our style of doing things has 
been wrong," said Takaaki Waka- 
sugu a professor of finance at To- 
kyo University and the University 
of Michigan, who has long - made 
the same arguments. 

Mr. Mieno said that Japanese 
banks have refused to do the sort of 
independent, hard-nosed analysis 


of the ability of borrowers to repay 
that is standard in other countries. 
Instead, be said, they tend “to me 
industry averages as a benchmark 
and stay in the pack" in their lend- 
ing decisions. 

That practice pushed Japanese 
banks to pour a flood of ill-consid- 
ered loans into the real estate in- 
dustry, or to accept property as 
loan collateral, during what is now 
known as the bubble era in the late 
1980s. Those loans have now 
threatened the stability of tbe 
whole banking industry in Japan. 


even though the Finance Ministry 
refuses to allow any banks to fail as 
a matter of policy. 

“ID-managed behavior in one 
corner can spread risk throughout 
the sector," Mr. Mieno said. 

He also wondered out loud why 
Japanese manufacturers were trend- 
setters in developing products while 
commercial banks have_been con- 
spicuously lagging. “Why is ii that 

innovation is hard to come by for 
Japanese financial institutions?” he 
asked. He hinted that deregulation 
and more competition were required 


in what is one of the most tightly 
regulated industries in Japan. 

Mr. Mieno concluded that tbe 
problems in the banking sector had 
so impaired their operations that 
they were impeding the economy's 
recovery from two years of stagna- 
tion. 

The government reported earlier 
this week that the economy grew 
just 0. 1 percent last year, its skwfist 
rate in 19 years. Bank lending has 
barely grown, and thus the com- 
mercial banks have not filled their 
traditional role of fueling a recov- 


ery by spurring business activity. 

Mr. Wakasngi has argued for 
several years that Japanese banks 
have been discouraged from weigh- 
ing lending risks intdligenUy be- 
cause of the heavy-handed inter- 
vention of the bureaucracy. 

While small companies fail all 
the time, it is exceptionally rare for 
a large, weD-estaolished company 
to go4>ankrupt in Japan because of ; 
government support In addition, 
no commercial bank has failed here 
since World War'll. The Finance 
Ministry just does not allow it 


Each industry is overseen by a 
ministry, and thus tbe ministries 
feel they have a stake in rescuing 
companies in trouble, no matter 
what the cost is, “If a big company 
goes bankrupt, it implies the bu- 
reaucrats faded,” Mr. Wakasugi 
said. 

Thus, be said, banks have been 
willing to.make what in hindsight 
were reckless loans to companies, 
particularly big companies, with- 
out worrying about their sound- 
ness. 


* VORLD STOCK MARKETS 


IBncB Fnxx» preue March 24 

CtoMPrw. 


iBI 

\CI 

Vet 

vhc 

via 

KM 

Sol 

: si 
3SI 
lb 
=o) 

IB 

(el 

•la 

fu 

HC 

Ml 

nr 

(L 

;n 

JM 

)a 

>C4 

111 

*ol 

to! 

!*» 

W 

Ira 

to- 

ta 

Jni 

'oi 

'N 

Vo 


Amsterdam 


BN Amro HM 

6540 

670 


131 

132 

IF HokHng 

48.10 

50 


4070 4040 


93 

9480 

Huhtamatti 

209 

207 

■mid 

4860 

507U 

K.ap. 

120 

120 

ao Nobel 

21920 22460 

Kymmenc 

122 

122 

SAEV 

7480 

760 

Metro 

210 

210 

DS-Wessonen 

40 

400 

Mokki 

410 

402 

iM 

0 

0.10 

Pohfola 

880 

89 

SM 

12450 126.10 


95 

96 

isevter 

167 167 JV 

Stock marm 

303 

305 

Bt-Brocodes 

BG 

53 

315 

530 

316 

WS5«SWBr 


Unekofi 





toaovens 

5770 

« 









ICCokmd 

410 

4260 

Hong Kong 


n Nederland 


BZ20 

Bk East Asia 

3375 

L * l- 




Cathay Pacific 

110 

t k fc [i 
* 

HP BT 

4040 

0.90 

Cheung Kong 

• 


idltovd 

tGrtatan 

6770 

69 

China Until Pwr 

41 


86X0 

8/ 

Dairy Form inn 

il .20 

110 

ikhoed 

51 

520 

Hang Lung Dev 

IMO 

150 

4IIP9 

52 

pqi 

Hang Seng Bank 

55 

550 

4yoram 

7670 

77 

Hendera*i Land 

45 

460 

ibeco 


HK China Gas 

440 


taamco 

610 

62 

180 

1840 

■Unco 

12670 126.10 

HK Electric 

220 

2120 

rente 

9470 

940 

HK Land 

210 

210 

■val Dutch 

1930 I960 

HK Realty Trust 

79 01 

22 


47.10 

470 

HSBC Holdings 

910 

920 

lllever 

010 20460 

HK Shana Hits 

12 

12 

to Ommrren 

5030 

51 

HK Telecomm 

130 

130 

4U 


HK Ferry 

90 

9J5 

tilers/ Khmer 11520 1150 

Hutch Whampao 

3275 

82 

lE Index : 48U9 
torioas: 41SJB 


FwfIPI 

250 

48 

250 

26 

•75 

26 





Ii0 

1040 

150 


HUM 2410 2645 

■Fin 2720 2770 

*0 4540 4670 

rco 2290 2300 

24100 24575 
jWl » !B8 190 

, 1400 1422 

-ctraM 67*1 6240 

3 1610 1615 

L 4470 4S2S 

«err «no 

igetfaank 7290 72M 

10300 10400 
wrfln 3200 3268 

5680 5710 
'Gen Banque 8560 

I, Gen Betataw 2680 2ns 
.na — 

'tav 
cWbH 
5 


15100 16300 
14850 14975 
1 10625 10750 
23475 23600 


'SEwfSisi 0 : 1SOJ * 


166.6016X30 
2517 2539 


i Frankfurt 

I s 

'am How 
ma 

•o 1079 1040 

jSF 328J0323.90 

■Of 386JD388J0 

■■ Hvno bank 466471 JO 
- verelrnbk 492 492 

iBank 3? 3 

W _ , B3Z50 839 

■wnerztwnk 35X70356J8 
tlnontal 296 291 

rntar Beni 86650857.40 
Hasa sitt sit 

tabCOC* 277382-70 

. tsche Bank 799 jo «n 

Infers 587 484 

Miner Bank 398J0401J0 
Jmuelile Njv. — 

rupp Hoesch 211 212 


630 637 JD 
1095 1090 
339 336 
940 943 
228 234 


ke< 

Mlet 

ifcfai 


fen 

•i 


Sab 


jnui 


143 15IL50 

“SJ 

daierWerke 149 148 

e 876 873 

20250 198 

437 JO 437 JO 
42X80 422 

17U0 180J0 
3200 320C 
865 852 
464 467 

226 226 
45X50457 JO 
330 335 

1070 iaeo 

40050 40$ 

70950 70S. SS 

27050 271 JO 

_3S5 355 

49420 491 

364J0 36S 

462 463 

5B2J0495J0 
880 865 


JHK. 

tool : 82672 


■ligeaefl 
inch Rued: 

,«SOB 


ttvnetaJf 


[r 


Helsinki 


Miramar Hotel 
New World Dev 
SHK Pram 
Stdin 
Swine PaeA 
Tai Cheimo Pres 
TVE 

Wharl Hold 
Wing On Co Inti 
Wlnsor ind. 


23 2X30 
28.70 na 
55J0 5550 
440 445 
SB 58 
11 JO 11.90 
ISO 3-55 
J1JS 30J5 
1X40 1220 
11-30 1140 

Itel&KiSSSi 2 ** 75 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Altecti 
Anuta Artier 
Bartowo 
BJyvoor 
BufTete 
DeBoers 
Drtotanloki 
Gencor 
GFSA 
H ar mony 
HleftveW Steel 
Kloof 

Nmflxxik Gre 
RancffonfeJn 
Rusofeil 
5A Brews 
SI Halena 
Sascl 
Welkam 


200 

21 

90 

90 


0 3025 

NA 

90 



1080 

1 HI 

59 

59 

955 


99 

100 

26 


240 


49 


280 280 

47 


mat 

84 

« 

86 


44 

22 2275 

46 


205 

206 


S!^ssa , ?ss7 :sn, " 


London 

itil&SSL 


Ario 
Argyll 
Asa Brit Fi 
BAA 
BAe 

Baik Scotland 
Bardavs 

Ban 

BAT 

BET 

Blue arete 
Boc Grant 
Boats 


BP 

Bril Airways 
Brit Gas 
Bril Steel 
Brlf Telecom 
BTR 

Cable Wire 
Cadbury 5d> 
ICaradon 
(Coats viyella 
Comm union 
Courtauftts 
ECC Group_. 
enterprise Oil 
.Eurotunnel 
Fbans 
Forte 
GEC 

Gen'IAoc 

Glaxo 

Grand MM 
GRe 
Bulmess 
5US 
HOrtscm 
tuisdown 
■ISBCHktaS 
1CI 


4L74 

5J8 

2-93 

2-52 

543 

9J7 

5JB 

155 

5-24 

LIB 

453 

1227 

X2S 

7J1 

554 

447 

X71 

419 

195 

1-41 

195 

X81 

432 

471 

3J8 

2J7 

5.77 

X23 

HO 

409 

5L20 

U1 

256 

103 

623 

623 

453 

1J5 

466 

5.72 

2-77 

150 

7JB 

116 


479 

403 

X91 

2J4 

5-55 

958 
5.13 
1.92 
5JS 
SLID 
459 
US 
3J6 
7.1 T 
5-38 
43S 
X77 
432 

3 
1JD 

4 
135 
435 
458 
192 
241 
5J2 
533 
5l23 
411 
530 
133 
259 
103 
616 
633 
464 

i2S 

S56 
X76 
1J3 
X03 
XID ’ 



Close 

Prev 

inchcape 

Kingfisher 

50 

544 

10 

50 

562 

2 

Land Sec 

60 

46/ 


7.92 

8JU 

Lamo 

10 

174 


473 

47V 


547 

549 


4.12 

4.15 

MEPC 

466 

46U 

Nan Power 

4J7 

40 

Narwest 

40 

46/ 

NthWst Water 

578 

5J4 


60 

6.13 

P&O 

6.96 

665 

Pllkington 

10 

17!J 


544 

5LS6 

Prudenllal 

3.18 

3.1H 

Rank Ora 

3X2 

375 

Redhmd 

545 

553 

Reed Inti 

80 

874 



200 

RMC Group 

948 

VAC 

Rolls Rovce 

10 

IJ& 

Rbthmn (unit) 

30 

3X6 

Rural Scot 

4X4 

4X9 

RTZ 

855 

80 

Satasbury 

30 

3JU 


50 

516 

Seal Power 

4X1 

4L04 


1.14 

1.13 

Severn Trent 

50 

56/ 

Shell 

662 

66/ 

Slebe 

5X2 

576 

Smith Nephew 

10 

142 

SmlttiKllne B 

3X4 

30 

Smith (WH) 

Sun Alltance 

50 

375 

50 

3.13 

Tate BLyte 

479 

47S 

T«ca 

113 

118 

Thorn EMI 

1042 

100 

Tomkins 

151 

246 

TSB Group 

111 

115 

Unilever 

1042 

100 

Uta Biscuits 

30 

331 

Vodafone 


54S 

war Loan 3ft 

45J0 

4671 

Wellcome 

548 

50 

Whitbread 

5.18 

S23 

Williams Hdgs 

30 

30 

Mills Cor roan 

276 

129 

F.T.so Index:: 

1670 



Madrid 

BBV 3215 3238 

Boo Central Htsp. 2910 2915 

Boko Santander *800 6860 

CEPSA 2910 Vm 

Dregaara 2400 300 

Endesa 7450 7500 

Ercros 155 157 

Iberdrola I 992 1015 

RWJl. 4530 4685 

Tobqcntera 3740 3900 

Telefonica 1040 1BT 

^rw ,:Bus 


Milan 


Banco Comm 5690 5670 

Bcatagl 02 84 

Benetton group 26000 26820 

£!?? NJL — 

Cl R 2380 

Credltal 2410 3430 

Entahem 2405 2440 

Ferfta 1790 1819 

Pertta RHP 789 786 

F lat SPA _ 4998 4976 

Finmeccanica 2015 2000 

335 sn 

j totem 12100 12410 

|tah»MS 5410 5395 

natawWItaro 37550 38600 

Medlo txmcn 1505015149 

«ont«nson 1239 1229 

Olivetti 2551 2532 

Pirelli €m 

RAS 239SD 34200 

Rtaascente 10600 10460 

Saliwm 2940 2927 

San Poo la Torino 10375 10J97 
SIP 4335 4398 

SME 3828 3860 

Snip 3X7 2033 

Standa 34200 3^51® 

Me* . . 5097 5009 

Tara Asti Rlsp 26000 36050 


Mytss^ws?’ 


Montreal 


Alopi Aluminum 33W 339k 
Bank Montreal 28K Wk 
Bell Canada 
Bombardier B 
Combi or 

Cascades 
Dominion Text A 
Donohue A 
MacMillan Bl 
Noli Bk Canada 
P o w er core. 


Quebec Tel 
Ouebeear A 
DuabeggrB 
Teteatabe 
Unhra 
Video Iran 
Industrlah 
Previous: 


451* 45V* 
TP* 22*h 
21 lb 2ffW 
79fc 8 
8 BVi 

28 28V. 
22H 23 

rtb lOM 
23W 2314 
23 ffl* 
21V. 219* 
214k 71** 
23V* 3314 
61* 64* 
15ft 18ft 
2011.37 


Ctose Prev. 


Paris 

Accor 709 735 

Air U outdo 833 862 

AlcntelAlsmom 680 706 

Axa 1312 1329 

Bcncalne IClel 588 606 

BIC 1409 1410 

BNP 2 am 253 

Bouyyues Wi ?ss 

B5N-GD 85® 890 

Corrofour 4055 4105 

CCF. 34230 8060 

Cerus 137137.48 

Chorseurs 1455 1485 

aments Franc 377 JO 375 
Club Mad 403 407 

Etf-Aqulfabie 40570 40KJD 
ElfeSanofl 1050 1137 

Euro Disney 35J0 36.15 
Gen-Eaux 2690 2686 

Havas <664047770 

I metal 6ia 613 

Lotaroe Coppee 461 46940 
Leorand 6280 

Lyon. Bowk 582 590 

Oreal(L') 1231 1266 

L.VJVLH. 843 873 

Matra-HactiottB 138J0 139.10 
iUUctielln B 257 JO 2625Q 
Moulinex 137 145-80 

Paribas <5223)47120 

Pedilnev Inti 189 192 

Pernod- Rica rd 395J0 404J8 
Peugeot B73 805 

Prlntemns (Au) 940 945 
Rodtofectmlaue 556 551 

Rh-Poutanc A 145J0 1*30 


Raft SI. Louis 
Redouts (La) 
Saint GoOofn 
LEJ. 

S to Generate 
Suez 

Thomsotv-CSF 

Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


1739 1764 
864 864 

668 675 

548 554 

640 650 

3 70 IQ 32660 
T8BJ0 )9S 
319J0 331AO 
185 189 

1290 1354 




Sao Paulo 

Boneo da Brail 21.99 28.70 

g awap o 9J5 9J5 

Brodesco 14 21JS 

Brahma 195 198 

17.SC 1SJ0 
152 161 

37 JO 39 
V^RtaDoce 8850RLM, 


7 7.10 
6JS 6J0 
mo ii^a 
17.40 16JD 
15J0 1X20 
2J9 2J4 
114 118 


Singapore 

Cerebos 

Fraser Neave 
Qentlne 
Golden Hope PI 
Haw Par 
Hume industries 480 5.10 

Inchcape 4jn c 

g&ng ^ S 

IS, IS 

acce itSo n 

OUB 7^0 7JH 

QUE 6J3 xS 

Sembawano 11J0 12 

Shwwrlla ilO xis 

Slme Darby uo jm 

SJA 7JS 7JS 

Start Land 6 6 

Spore Press 1350 luo 

Sine Steamship 152 U6 

S TtaTO Tjrtoconun 352 354 

S traits Trading X48 jax 

H9P ’■« 9J5 

UOL 1J4 1J| 

S^Ml^ :2,,9 - 4S 


Stockholm 

AGA 
Asea A 
Astra A 
AHra Copco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
EBMHp-A 
H andeteb reiken 
Investor b 
N orsk Hydra 
PnseordtaAF 
Sandvik B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
SkancflaF 
Skanska 

SKF 

Store 

TraUetnni BF 
Volvo 


m ab 

M7 614 
163 152 

«2 SOS 

375 384 
363 370 

111 113 

IIS 

_ 177 178 

244JB241SD 

119 119 

120 123 

,131 129 

5X50 57 

IS JS 
in 2oo 

a ™ 

% 21 


Sydney 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boral 

Bougainvllte 
Cotes Myer 
Comalao 
CRA 

CSR ^ 
Fosters Brow 
Goodman Field 
1CI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Cora 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pac Dunlop 
Pioneer Inn 


10J4 1086 
524 5J4 
1734 17A2 
4.11 4.18 
088 0J1 
4.91 453 
X10 5J)5 
17.56 17J4 
453 4.94 
1-23 1 M 

1-60 160 
1U6 11.36 
Z10 Z1B 
3-18 X24 
1188 1154 
932 932 
530 5J0 
367 367 
587 560 
XII 114 


NmndY PoieWoo Z13 X17 
OCT Resources Ul 1J2 
Santos 4JH 4.12 

THT Z17 117 

western Minina 7J2 7J1 
westpac Banktag 5.19 551 
woodstda 4 l12 4.16 

wwssraisr : ™ ,jB 


Tokyo 


Aka I Etectr 
ASatd Qtemlcn 
Asahi Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Carton 
Casio 

Dai Nippon Print 1850 1870 
Dal wo House 1600 1610 
□aiwa Securities 1620 1600 
FamiC . 

Full Bank 
Fun photo 
FulflMJ 
Hitachi , 

HHocW Cable 
Honda 
no Yokado 
Itochu 

Jaoon Alrilnn 
Kallmo 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

MmuEkc indi 1740 1720 
Matsu Elec Wks 1160 1140 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasel 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mlisubbhi Hev 
Mitsubishi Corp 1130 USD 
Mitsui and Co 772 772 

MHsukMhl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 
NGKIl 


510 495 
730 727 

1160 1170 
1580 1570 

1590 1570 

5TO0 

1360 1320 


4300 4130 
2310 2330 
2320 2360 
1030 1040 
952 950 

795 791 

1740 1730 
5520 5590 
659 662 

676 681 

889 882 

Z710 2730 
365 365 
1230 1240 
911 916 

653 649 

6560 6530 


482 482 

601 595 

670 572 


90D no 
2090 3710 
1110 1090 


imitators Wtso 1070 

NBcka Securities 1280 1280 

Nippon KODOfcU 1010 992 

Nippon Oil 720 723 

Nippon Steel 342 342 

Nippon Yirsen 593 593 

Nissan 878 870 

Nomura See 2290 2270 

NTT _ 9260a 93)00 

Olympus Optical 1070 1070 

Pioneer 2560 2570 

Ricoh _ 803 803 

Sanya Elec 510 508 

Sharp 1680 1700 

Shimaxu 700 693 

ShkwtyU Chern 2080 2070 

Sony 8100 6090 

SumHomo Bk 2160 2160 

Sumitomo. Chem 486 464 

Suml Marine 918 922 

Sumitomo Metal 276 279 

TatseiCara 659 662 

Tafeho Marine 801 822 

TokedP Cham 1270 1250 

TDK ■*»? 4000 

Tetlln «B 483 

Tokyo Marine 1280 1280 

Tokyo Elec Pw 3340 3260 

Toppan Print tag 1340 1350 

Toroy ind. 680 60S 

Toshiba 773 173 

Toyota , 299 2B30 

YamaieM Sec 800 884 

e.-x M a 

maw. 

jssfew 415 


Toronto 


Atattiw Prte 
Aon) co Eagle 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
AmBarrfckRH 
BCE 

Bk Nava Scofki 
BC Gas 
Be Telecom 
BF Realty Hds 
Bramaiea 
Brunswick 
CAE 
Camdev 
CIBC 


IWk T7V> 
171k 169b 
7V* 7ft 
21V* Zltfa 
25ft 34ft 
S3 52ft 
29H 30V* 
15ft 16 
26ft 26ft 
OJ3 003 
039 0J9 
9ft 9 Vf. 
6ft 7 
4.90 4.90 
34 34ft 


Ctose Prev. 

Canadian Pacific 23ft 23ft 
Can Tire A 121* 12ft 
Con tor 47 47ft 

Cara 445 4ft 

CCL Ind B J J 

Oneptax 480 

Comlnco 20ft 21 'A 

Conwest Expl 23ft 23ft 
Denison Min B 034 033 
Dkkwisan Min A BVf „8ft 
DcSosco 24ft 24ft 

DylexA «8 0X9 

Echo Bov Mines 18ft 17ft 
Ewrttv Sifter A 097 ass 
FCA Inti 328 2M 

Fed Ind A B 7ft 

Fletcher anil A Zlft 21ft 
FPI 5 3 

Gentro 8-57 ft57 

GoidCorp 12 12 

GuHCda Res *40 4 ft 

Hees Inti 15ft 15ft 

Hem to GUI Mines Uft Mft 


Hoi linger 
H u ra hu i n 
Hudson's Bav 


Inco 

Interprov pipe 
Jamock 
Labatt 
LoblawCo 
Mockenzte 
Magna Inft A 
Maple Leaf 
Atari time 
Mark Res 


15ft 16ft 
20ft 20 
30ft 31 
39U 39 

351* 35ft 
32 32ft 
21 21V* 
22ft 22ft 
24ft 25ft 
lift 12V* 
71ft 72ft 
13 13V* 
26ft 26 
8ft 8ft 


AtacLeon Hunter 17ft 17ft 


27 Z7M 
6ft Aft 
36 26ft 
14V* 14 

15ft 15ft 
42ft 42ft 
TOJ* HJft 
22ft 23ft 
X3S 145 
34ft 34 
10ft 10ft 
1.11 1.15 
18ft T7ft 
31ft 31ft 
23ft 23ft 
84 85 

28% 29** 
13ft 13V* 
Bft 8ft 
41ft 42ft 
81* 8 
40 41 

12% 13ft 
10 10ft 
20ft 20ft 
17ft 18 
9ft 9ft 
33ft Bft 
25% 26 

18% 19 

22% 23 

25ft 25ft 
15V* 15ft 
19ft 19% 
4JD 470 
17ft 17% 
SUM 0J9 
US 130 


Motion A 
Noma Ind A 
Noranda Inc 
N a rond o Forest 
Norcen Energy 
NHietn Telecom 
Nova Cora 
Oshawa 
Popurtn A 
Plocer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
pwa Cora 
Ray rock 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
KDffHnam 
Royal Bulk Can 
Sceotre Res 
Scott's Hasp 
Seagram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherntt Gordon 
5HL Svstamhse 
Sautham 
Saar Aerospace 
S toko A 
Talisman Enirg 
TeekB 

Thomson News 
Toronto Damn 
Torxtar B 
Transalta Util 
TransCda Ptpe 

Triton Flnl A 
Trlmoc 
TrtecA 
Unlcorp Energy 


Zurich 

Adta inti B 2<l 

Alusuisae B new 65) 
BBC BrwnBov B 1» 
aba Gelor B 910 
CSHoMtaasB mo 
E tektrawB 39SS 

FIs chares 1260 

Interdtacaunt B 2640 
Jetmoll B 867 

LantBsGvr R 955 
Ataevenpkk B 

StokR TsS 

m 

SafreRenuofic 
Sandra B 3960 

Schindler B 7790 
Sutmr PC 1000 

Surveillance B 2180 
Swiss BnkCaraB 434 
Swiss Rdnsur R 614 
Swissair R 765 

UBS B ISO 

Wlnterttwr B 715 
Zurich AssB 1360 

V®S2P.\22£ 


252 

652 
1218 

910 

653 
3940 
1305 
2608 

875 

955 

440 

1229 

165 

1540 

7000 

132 

3970 

7800 

1018 

2140 

423 

59B 

780 

1220 

730 

13S 


H'i easy to sataaBw 
fas France 
i*st cafl, lei free: 
05 437 437 


U.S. FUTURES 


Ugh Law 


Open Wgn Low Oose Cbg OpJni 


Seam Seam 
Hah Law 


Open Ugh Low Oose Chg QpJnt 


Seam Seam 
MBh Low 


Open Utah Law Close Ctlo OpJnt 


SUGAR-WORLD n (NCSE) uxoaosa.- cans nrs 


Grains 

WHEAT (CBOT) Mstbu numm-MnK'MM 
172 3J0 AtayM 3J3’A U« M2 X33ft 1A711 

156 2JN Jut 94 X25Vi 126U 124ft 325ft HUS 71.252 

157ft 3J2 SspW 3JWV. 128 1241* 127ft *0-02 1434 

X65 109 Dec 94 135 136ft 134ft 136 +0H1ft 4620 

XSSft 334 Mar 95 3371* 139 137 337 -OJOft 130 

135 116ft MOY 95 337 +002 1 

MTft 111 JU) 95 123ft *6Jlft 

Estsotos fteas wed’s. soles I >343 
wetfsopenirt 4LAD up 165 
WHEAT (KOTO swotoi mSt m igi- ocean eerlsnlwl 
379ft 258 MovH 330ft 133 X30ft 332 tOOlft 9J62 

XS5 197 Jut 94 US 126ft 125 USft HW1 11306 

155ft 3JBft5ep94 127 128ft 127 127ft *0Jlft 1061 

150 3.12ft Dee 94 335 135 334 334V. +0J1 1A06 

151ft 333 Ate 95 337 »DJ1 145 

Est soles 3J56 wed's, softs 4.014 
WatfsopanM 25JM up 64 
CORN (ODD MHbumwenum-eotesBarbudwf 
116ft 238 ft MOV 94 TAS'U 256 2J4 ZJSft »0Jlftlt3J83 

116ft 141 JuiM 28744 169 Z87 2J8ft +0J1 117,347 

192ft 140 ft SCO 94 275 2J5ft 273ft 174ft 26.982 

273ft 236 K. Dec 94 252ft 252ft 260ft 751ft 60JM 

277ft 2J3ftAteTS l6«ft 2J9 256ft 257ft 4JW 

M2 259ftArtoy 95 271ft 271ft 270ft 271ft 337 

283ft 270ft Jut 95 271ft 274ft 272ft 273ft 1.243 

250ft 250ft Dec 93 151ft 25)1* 251 251ft 187 

Est. tees 32800 Wed-note 36799 
Wed'S open M 325896 OR Ml 
SOYBEANS (CW7TJ sjNbunWimni-aoeanpwbuM 


5.92 ft Mov 94 6.92 6.95 630ft 632ft-081 59896 

534ft All 94 634 6.96ft 6.92 633ft-a01 49.954 

638 AUO 94 &.B7V> dJWVr ABSft AJift-ODI 7,901 

4.12 5eg 94 65874. 459ft 45* 457 — ajnft 4J78 

IHVVNnvW 6-55 656ft 651 653Vs-ODlft 31591 

618ft Jan 95 651ft 451ft 6S7 6SBft-Oinft 1799 

642 Mar 95 656 666 663 664ft -081 ft 517 

651 MOV 95 666ft 667 655 665ft-0J»ft 15 

652 ft JU 95 665 658 665 667 -002 296 

5J lft Nov 75 632 Ua 619 620 -082 1871 

Estsaies 35fm wt ds. sales 46 748 

WodlopanH 158,125 up 3689 
50TBEANA4EAL (CBOT) IHM-Mnwen 
23280 leSJOAAay 94 19530 19570 19580 19530 

19080 Jut 94 19600 19650 19570 19580 
18980 Aug 94 19530 19550 19450 19690 
1 0870 S8P 94 19300 19370 19280 19310 
IfflMOOd 94 19180 171 JO 19180 19180 
450 Dec 94 190. 00 79050 1B9J0 19010 
18451 Jwi9S 19020 19051 19030.19030 
137.00 fete 95 19180 191 JO 19180 191 JO 

18610 May 95 l OILS 

Est. sales 11800 Wed's.sate VLSIS 
Wed's open W 79J11 off 1033 
SOYBEAHOB. (CBOT) aMte-dohnMr«fe 
3045 IIJOMOyM 2752 2952 29.16 297* 

2970 71 J5 Jut 94 2972 29^ ».13 29JJ 

2930 21 5S Aug 94 2688 2880 »80 

2640 2250 SOP 94 2830 2875 28.13 2035 

2750 22.10 CUM 27-50 27J9 2778 27J2 

2785 690 Dec 94 2685 27JJ0 2678 268* 

2655 2256 Jan 95 2674 3675 2660 2659 

2655 25_50 Mar VS 2650 2664 2650 2658 

2640 25JDAtav9S 1648 

Ed. sales 11000 WWl.BiU 20.923 
Wed's open W 100.133 up 2055 


7J1 

7 JO 

775 

689V. 

757ft 

670 

673ft 

670 

675 

650ft 


Z3080 

ma, 

21080 

9B4M 

20980 

20080 

19480 

192J0 


+030 36773 
+Q3D 25803 
+030 7J11 
4050 5,921 
+030 1088 
• 030 1831 
.050 90* 

+ 180 58 
+ 139 15 


-ail 3284 
-008 28857 
—086 6714 
—am 6471 
-083 6654 
— 081 12.914 
-081 1793 
-002 « 
-OLOf 10 


1287 

1230 

1185 

11-52 

1181 

1182 

1180 


8308 


7 94 1118 


DMoy9< 

9.15 Jill 94 1282 

98200 M 1189 
9. 17 Ate 95 1186 
last May 95 1183 
1057 Jut 95 1180 
10-570(595 1180 


1234 

1150 

1188 

11-52 

1181 

njo 

1180 


Est- sate 16458 Wad's, soles irunv 

wars opwi int M5J77 up *72 

COCOA (NCSE) Wimmciwp-kOTriwi 


1118 
1239 
n j? 
1184 
1183 
1180 
1180 


12 

1284 

1175 

1187 

1185 

1180 

1138 


+0.13 41833 
♦ 087 36149 
♦a«l 30,9*4 
+ 08213803 
+0JK 1749 
+002 1850 
+482 329 


UROOOLLARS (OHBt) *1 (neson-oua Uppl 


1368 

97BMovta 

17)5 

1232 

1217 

1225 

1365 

999 Jul M 

1253 

1259 

1246 

12X1 

1317 

USD Septa 

W6 

1282 

1265 

12/2 

1389 

1041 Dec ta 

1300 

1312 

1293 

1301 

1382 

1077 Mar *5 

139 

1340 

1335 

1341 

1400 

MIIWovH 

1367 

1367 

USB 


1407 

1225 Jl4« 





139 

1175 Sao 95 





143) 

1338 Dec 93 




1423 


—14 36577 
— 13 21 340 
—10 9732 
—20 6890 
-20 9889 
—10 6354 
-10 3,174 

-40 an 

. . —Id 205 

EfiLsate 6233 Wed’s. sOes I2JB5 
WtafS open ml 94842 a» 251 
ORANGE JUICE (NON) ILwabs^arespvlL 
13580 MJSfttoyto 110.15 11075 110.15 11045 —OOS 7,989 

13580 1OL50 Juiw 113.10 11375 1I1W 11389 +0.10 5303 

134-50 10530 Sep 94 11650 11625 I1SJD 11600 +033 2,196 

moo 10180 Nov 94. 11458 1I4JD I14J0 114JD -030 1,236 

13280 1(050 Jan *5 11650 11580 II4JB 11690 +0.10 17<2 

12425 10600 Ate 95 11680 11650 11680 11680 + 0.10 213 

Est. sales 1800 WBtTs. sates 1,136 
Wed's open W 19.104 up 237 


Metals 


9335 

1BZ20 

9170 

10275 

10130 

101.90 

9081 

9980 

9235 

9170 

9170 

9135 

9135 

8980 

0830 

9175 


Livestock 








1 Wed's opon kit 22.107 up 1 






7652 

76J2 

7612 

7625 

—00 32612 

GOLD (NCMX) WmyOL-diAnBerirDra. 





74 67 

74.12 

7425 


23679 

31630 

375WAte« 






7275 

720 

7257 

7267 

—60 12650 

4180 

3350 Apr 94 3910 

39230 

3200 





7377 

7X52 

7362 



3960 

3780 MOV 94 3220 

3720 






7155 

7377 

7X87 



4170 

3390 JlinM 3*30 

JfS0 






7370 




1719 

4150 


3280 






747* 

7455 

7460 


125 

4170 

3440 Oct 94 3*640 

3220 





6776 






34U»DKM 4020 

4030 


«BJQ 


UP 318 





4110 

300 Feb 95 4050 

4050 

480 

40540 


■unfe-cMcvk 











■1J7 

8137 




4280 

3610 Jot 95 







81.15 

00 


-622 

3677 

4120 

3800 AW 95 










W« 










810 

8177 

—00 

270 

42*0 

ABM Dec 93 45070 








8605 

810 



ESLUJlS *0+000 wed*s .SOSes 4UM7 




8075 

8675 

869 

8655 


5W 

WMrgapenlnt 14660 all 318 






81.10 










80.90 

790 JOT 96 




800 


12 


Financial 



Estsaies OBI WwftwjM 767 
WetrsopenW 12363 OB : 

MOOS KMGW «ntt- 
51.99 2957 ACT 94 47.10 

5627 4537 Jun94 5480 

5537 45JDJUI94 SL73 

5180 4635 AUO 94 5180 

49.75 438000 94 47J7 

50J0 4530 Dec 94 4035 

4830 Feb 95 4875 
4070 Apr 95 4645 
51 JO SaHJWItS SOM 

EpTsote 48*4_ i WM'S.SM« 68 U 
IMkTs open tot 31JI3 *S* 
KH»BBL1JES (OVIER) «UWI». 
(A90 3880Ate9J S6J0 

6180 42-50 Muv 94 5730 

am 39308894 5780 

59 JD 4280 Aug 94 5580 

61.13 V.ltWtt 930 

59.90 SBMMV99 

am PJOMnK 

ESI. sate XtaO WHfL sales 6345 
Wed's open H 9858 p« 45 



4695 

47.13 

—0.15 

6114 


5477 

540 

-617 1X427 


5X45 

5X77 


X553 


510 

5353 


7. 75? 


470 

4IJX 

♦ 0JB 

1,915 

•55 

*U5 

4663 

to 0 

2.196 


480 

4655 

—610 

ZD 


4625 

4648 

-610 



5645 

5675 

-605 

23 

I 60S 





994 


to. 




560 

5777 

* 607 

40 


560 

5640 

<680 

5.901 


5695 

5637 


3,184 


5475 

560 

+00 



580 

V/Jt 

+Q« 

TO 



520 

+645 

3 



5B0 


8 


Food 

OOFFCEC (NCSE) PJOOlAk-cMpei'je. 


njo 

17 JO 
8830 
9180 
U JD 
8850 

87701 


5135 Mav 94 DJU 
64708894 UJ 
46.50 SCO 94 4670 


lUIMwH B 8 SB 

15J0JUI95 

Cst.Hte 8712 WetTS-Sdes 0834 
wed's open int 57 835 up Ml 


830 

BUS 

DM 

+075 3L802 

830 

840 

8SJB 

+60 1309 

64.15 

US 

8610 

tOJb 

6107 

870 

8645 

87.15 

• 640 

309 

8610 

BIAS 

870 

t615 

1,773 

880 

BUS 

880 

*635 

ITS 



890 

*0JS 

3 


HI GRADE COFFER (NCMX) 28000 tn. am xrh 
107 JO run Ate to 9OJ0 90J0 S980 9000 

7450 Apr H 90.10 90.10 90.10 0970 

7380 (May 94 9080 9075 8980 8980 

7610 Junw 8985 8985 8985 8975 

7430 Jul 94 89 JO 9080 NJO 8970 

74.90 Sep 94 8930 9085 8930 89 JS 

7575 Dec 9* 8970 90.15 0980 8155 

7690 Jan 9S 1970 

73.00 Feb 95 8985 

62.70 Ate 95 9030 9030 8930 90J» 

7605*50995 «« 9000 9000 90.10 

7100 Jl 8 95 9020 

7130 Aug 95 8985 

79 , 10 Sep 95 taJO 9650 9080 9035 

7SjeOt295 09 JS 

7775 Nov 95 89 JS 

B&30DK95 9695 

. Jon *6 9185 

Est. sates 6500 Wed's, sate 6754 
Wed's men Ini 71J28 up 240 
SH.VER (NCMX) 3JM (rev rat- own* w few at 
5493 3*68 Ate 94 S77J 

5718 51 to Apr 94 

5728 3713AAavM 5768 

577.0 3718 Jill 94 S79J 

5860 3765 Sep 9< 5860 

5860 3860 Dec 94 5908 

5640 401 JJ tei 95 

5948 4165 Mar 95 SMJ 

5888 4IUMayf5 

5958 4208 Jul 95 4028 

5658 4910 Sap 7S 612J 

<128 5393CMC95 £713 

tel 96 OU 

Est Kites 21000 WwTv softs 26646 
Wed's opwiint I169KI up 447 
FLATWUM (NMBi) 90 tow KL- fetes Dvvovw. 
42650 335 . 00 Apr 94 0480 40980 40480 40610 

42000 35780 Jul 94 40600 41080 40600 40980 

41280 SAAIBOCIW 41(un 410 JO 40980 41610 

41280 37480 JOT 95 41280 41280 41280 41660 

4148D JMU0Apr95 41280 

Est.rate NA. WbcTs. soles 6918 


—1.15 1754 
—1.15 1.121 
— 1.10 42758 
— 085 
— 085 13710 
-083 4012 
—070 1861 
—075 
-630 21 

—070 1,560 
-470 $14 

-070 451 

-085 
-070 291 

-080 
—080 
—670 
-670 


9SJ90 96400 Junta 95700 95700 95630 95850 -40492853 

95570 903nSep« 96280 9S3B0 95310 95730 -5D3598X) 

96110 90710 Dec 94 9480 9480 9470 9470 —90281803 

, ® »MJMar9S 9450 9450 94890 94J1U -120241353 

M730 96710 tel 95 94390 94390 9430 94310 —120196354 

Si %% %% gs sss =aga 

Wed’s open tot 64633? on 23982 
J*™™ 1 ?®*!?. (CMOU tfernowM- 1 i**il *00004001 
T-53M MDTOAteM 1 OVX 

3-22 '8916 18951 L4H6 18922 

1-2“ 84® SflPta 1800 1-4920 1.4BS0 1.4390 

10SD lASBDacta M872 

Est. tales MA. Wed's, softs 14J10 
WtoTsooenM 26,964 up 1790 
“HADlANDOtLAR CCAAERJ .pw»- 1 pgtolwwOT 
JS” F™ °-™° 0-7215 07209 

67805 07285 Junta 07317 07332 67253 0320 

0770 D7Z76Se>94 07290 67390 07234 67344 

2^5* ajZB 07235 67226 
67532 67250 tel 95 07305 67205 07198 07191 

Est. sofes NA. Wbfs. sedes 6526 
Wed's open int 46570 oft 84 

<OAER) .ra TO + l .,p # w» B tei I0 
08305 (L5642 Marta nm« 

08133 OJUTtelH 65921 65983 63915 65969 

68065 0560 Septa 637)0 05963 65910 6951 

6910 0390 Dec 94 65950 6953 65945 65944 

Est. soles NA. Wed’s, safes 4L6&5 
Wtefs open ini 97832 up 90 

JAPANESE YCT tCMEK) s pur vw >- 1 pant ovmasi s&QOOQOl 

689429080961 36IWWTO0UJ09SB9 +135 4620} 
W“«68096ffl60094716a09641 +157 1886 

ft-A, l¥acrs. sales ZS#T97 
VftsfsopenW 50881 on 25 
SWISS FRANC (GM0U iparflronc- tpoMMidiiAm 

II ES 5 » bs s — 

Est.tees NA wed's. softs i 6 J» 

Wed's reen tot 31512 up 348 


—12 


-5 3LSH 

—10 

627 

—10 

33 

1160001 


—57 

un 

— » 4i jn 

S3 

1X21 

— 55 

772 

— 57 

19 

UMN 


+• 

770 

+•96992 

+• 

2X54 

+• 

114 


+0 

+0 


259 

43 


Industrials 

wi 1 dM (O k. 1 pfl nnCbMiM-e. 


5760 

542.0 

57X5 


750 



5724 

+ *J 



5765 



574J 

5764 


5860 

5765 

SB3J0 

+95 

6185 

5940 

SI5X 

589 J 

+9X 

9,983 

SA10 

44X0 

591J 

(M 

599 J) 

SUM 

5267 

♦ 97 

6343 



401X 

+95 

I.9S1 

60X0 

mo 

607 J 

♦ 95 


®£AAovM 77J5 
00.15 5630 JU) 94 77.95 

7485 5931 OdW 7485 

7480 59.43 Dec 94 7180 

JtS “JJMorta 7170 

ZSKST 71,5 

Bfetfs awn 'Sf" S JS r X% 
HEAHHGD 6 . IMAAER) 


7620 

7870 

7458 

7289 

73.90 

7115 

16601 


77.17 

7780 

7425 

7187 

7170 

7115 


7725 

7782 

7480 

7184 
7250 
7145 

7185 


+ 108 
♦ 161 
+ 102 


+480 6917 
+450 1102 
+450 IJII 
•4JD 587 
+ 450 


4325 
4173 
4385 
44.15 
4480 
4383 
4650 
47 JS 
4980 
•80 
•50 
4675 


4U5 

4125 

4350 

44JS 

4580 

4683 

4720 

4885 

•JS 

•JS 

4675 


+480 
+40 46159 
+450 2 

+440 49.370 
+450 7870 
+4L70 
+480T3J75 
+480 3837 
+450 
+580 3893 
+ 520 
♦ 330 
*340 3847 


*•£5 4240 Apr 94 45.15 

5750 41 JO May 94 413 s 

SMJ 41 JOJunW 4350 

S780 4255 Jul 94 4480 

5660 4X2SAU0 94 4UQ 

g.n 44.60 Sep 74 4580 

gJO 43700094 4650 

44-70 Nov 94 4755 
»80 47JSDec« «80 

■025 Jan 95 4940 
*673 4630 Feb 95 49 JD 

... 47-95 AAtr 95 4675 

.... J 01 * 1 taA West's, tees 30JM 
‘98 ,520 up 7 B 

'4WOTU- 

1444 Ju) 94 1385 

J*“AU 0 _M 1616 

1677 SSP 94 1526 

I4590C794 1344 

15t7NovM 1332 

1625 Dec 94 134$ 

1647 Jan 95 130 

>“4P«b9S 1694 

1i75Ate9S 1687 
KtOSAAayfS 1620 
1628 Jul 95 160 

K«95 1674 

\LM)DCC»5 1780 


4615 

4385 

4130 

4485 

4480 

4585 

4685 

47J5 

0.70 

•40 

•J5 

4675 


2080 
2185 
2U8 

am 

»JS 

2673 

2049 

2080 

I7J0 

1940 

2666 

1923 

1723 

19.17 

xuo 
Est. fete 


1616 

1522 

1528 

1520 

1631 

1659 

1525 

1386 

16M 

1607 

1620 

160 

1674 

1780 


jt 


1453 

1585 

1616 

1626 

1644 

16S2 

1662 

1 SJ 0 

1554 

1607 

1620 

1640 

1674 

1650 


1605 

1611 

1615 

160 

1638 

1633 

16® 

1675 

1586 

155* 

1607 

1620 

16« 

1624 

1780 


-842 21598 
-029 R479 
+0.14 2271 
♦ 024 14413 
+043 719 

+620 225 

+0.15 39 


+0.13 29,184 
+021 50860 
—082 37 JM 
+0LD3 2ZJU 
*083 9277 
—682 0415 
—622 6919 
—613 4J92 
-612 HU87 
+083 1359 

nm 1 tH 

+020 


+61510,116 
+615 55297 
+ 610 31532 
+604 16558 
+612 20255 
+615 11.100 
+ 089 9J68 
+ 613 20J55 
+612 6739 
+60 6023 
+089 6592 
175B 
+085 1310 

♦089 11214 


US T. BILLS (OMERl tl oMon- Htel IN 

96J6 9S59JUS94 *589 *610 9687 9610 —601 37464 

Sf-ff « W4 «JS 9373 *374 -6(0 4437 

96.10 luDKN 9341 9S4I 94 Sr ww ««■ %S74 

Ate9S 9S8B — 71 

Eststaos NA WMT3fefts 33» 

Wed's open in/ 47498 a If 387 

5YB. TREASURY (CBOT) limAHpm.«i&Bife*iMi>0 

552f ,OT -” W7 - J0 , ® r '® W7-07— 195 172441 
110-1*5108-29 SCP94 106-12— T2 4U 

Est.softs 21 JOB Wad's. softs 76710 
WttTs open hv |*69 «2 oU jhj 

15 T 6 . TR E ASURY fe+iffj IHBfeprh. M+pfe+dPAI 


41 JO 
6180 
050 


4130 ACT 94 4*35 
44-20 MOV 94 47.10 
44.95 Junta 4720 
4325 Jm 94 47J0 

45.10 Aug M 4TMS 
43ISSOOM 4*40 
<4400094 «M 
•JS Nov *4 4*« 


5480 
4615 

4600 

Wed's open ml 122472 up 300 ^ 


4670 

<720 

4745 

4740 

47.1S 

4680 

4325 

4485 


4610 
4670 
•■10 
<7. til 
468S 
4630 
4125 
4X85 


47.13 

47 JB 

47 JJ 
4722 
4840 
4343 
44J5 


+607 24221 
+60 47813 
+613 23857 
+617 9,*0* 
*ai7 6056 
♦617- UW 
+617 

+617 2299 


„„„ Stock Indexes 

, , , su+coMP.Moeac (cmepi «, 

115-21 107-20 Junta 100-11 108-14 ^40^203887 I 484L « «M0JunM cSS 

U»J M M Sto" M I rn» MOJo^ta « » 323 

472.55 4*780 46945 e “ • 
4710 


114-21186-01 Dec 94106-10 106-10 105-30 105-30 —10 

111- 0 M0r9S10S-M 105-27 WWB lXot -10 

w-a sJT’SiS” 1 {S3 -in . 

fcat.MUes 71,171 WotTugafts 66168 
WM>t open tot 300.126 on 207 

SteJeiSPS. ptaWte.6«ad»M« 
iitS Sslss £££! SHS IS ?- 01 1 »- 2 * 197-27 — T I* 354214 
Jf-]J SStiJSH? !£-« 106-27 106-30 —116 42J16 

lit?* MCrW105-IT 10 b - 1 1 105-H 105-22 -1 17 

■1S-19 18-15 JW19S iq»_oi 117 

112- 15 106-29 SOP 95 JEu_j{7 U 

113- i 4 i 04 -ea Dec 9s 31 

M44I6 99-04 Ate *6 iStiedlF M 

*“4M_ WfeTyteW 797J0 
wera open IM 44A72D off 17109 

93-17 att? £22215 Z 5 - 9 * 94-11 -10 27,815 

m 94-04 93.14 93-17 -106 4* 

WW WetfLtees 3J9S 
Wetfsoaenw 278*4 an S682 


29.941 

1.177 

64 




A*ar95 


-450 443 
— SJO 


2050 

2 am 

2640 


ijjj tata 25695**23620 — *»«« J40S 
|~as»ta 26040 2400 MMO 

Mar 95 -385 1J 


Moody's 
Routers 
DJ. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity indexes 

Close 


ian.» 

UU3.9D 
144 Jg 
230.79 


Previous 

tatwo 

134070 

win 

230.10 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. MARCH 25, 1994 


Page 13 B 


7 "‘“South East Asia pa 


ff llg Liquidity Fund % 






ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


March 24, 1994 




f hm4 o tInninipn id>ytiqidott«tod.Ho6q»»atuilMaTMt«ttoii» l ra iuw | fc | i 

!*• — rghiaiBWIwfcil wlFf jwuBw eyTqMoMBB iw oogB inh M-dqByiW-woo M ifiW 

FINMANAGEMENT SA-UrgaboHlJl/UTJtl] l m Hermes Gold Fund— 


fflHS* fUJXEMEoUROl 



USD 


GBP 

Yea- 


w Detta Premium Caro™— * 117 

FOKUS BANK AS. 472 «M 5SS 
n> Scant wxs mil Growth Pti_J 1 

FUNS MARKETING GROUP (BIO) 

PjO. Bom MOL Hamilton, Bermuda 

m FMG Global OB Pobl S u 

mPMGN.Amcr.ISlPcbl J II 

m FMG Europe (28 Feb) ) II 

mFMGEMGMKT (2JFrt|_S U 

m FMG 0(V Feb). S II 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 
w Concepts Fore* Fund— s II 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 
■vGataHoaaaii— _— * t* 

ivGota KtKUw M | S V 

w Qaln Swiss Franc Fa SF a 

tr GAIA Fx J Ti- 
nt Goto Guaranteed CL I S SI 

mGota Guoronteeaa.il s Si 

israwasr® fumd5m/ww 

Fax; 1352)4*54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

tf DEM Band WsSAS—JJM 

0 Dlverband (Ms LSI SF 

d Dollar Band DtsUS l 

0 European Bd Dto l JO Ecu 

0 Freneft Franc — DIs HUS— FF 

d Gfotwal Band— DbZW S 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
0 ASPau ... 

0 Alia Pactflc — — - . _ * 

0 Continental Europe Eat 

0 Developing Markets S 




fgtTO ii 


d France — FF 11J1 

0 Germany- DM S*» 

0 IntwmnMl . u j 

0 u™" Y 27400 

0 nortn Amartm % 2of 

0 - - S P US 

rf United Klnodom l 142 

RESERVE FUNDS 

0 DEM — D*J SJS6 DM UK 

0 Dollar DfelBS I 2.19 

0 French Franc— FF 12*3 

0 Yen Bmnw v HU 

GEFINOR FUNDS 

London : 671^994171, Geneva ; 41.Z23535M 
w East Inveslmcnl Fund * 747J6 

iv Scottish World Fund S 461790 

nr State Si. American s 348J7 

GENESEE FUND Ltd 

m (A) Genesee Eagle S 135JB 

m fB) Genesee Short t um 

w (C) Genesee Opportunity » 152*4 

iv (Ft Genesee Non-Equity S !2M» 

GBO LOGOS 

wll Straight Bond B Eat 105409 

iv 1 1 Pacific Baid B SF 14S48 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

OFFSHORE FUNDS 

II Athol SUtauahiU D4 Man 4442F42M07 

■rGAMerico- S HUt 

nr GAM Art* trope — J B9437 

iv GAM ASEAN— 5 0077 

W GAM Australia . i 777 0 

l> GAM Boston ■ ■ . S 15443 

mGAMOtnXn Minnetonka _S 10151 

IV GAM combined- DM 0477 

-CAM C ra w Market 5 ihms 

iv GAM Euntoeon » *171 

w GAM France— FF 20214* 

IV GAM Frai&val SF Z742S 

wGAMGAMCO S 206* 

wGAMHWl Yield X 159 J72 

nr GAM EOBl Asia Inc S 71248 

iv GAM Japan S STX40 

Hr GAM Money Mkls U5S 5 loan 

0 DoSteriLna i 101X14 

0 Do Swiss Front. _SF 18611 

0 Do Deutscnemork DM HHJCT 

0 Do Yen Y 1 001600 

nr GAM Allocated Mltf-Fd S 17183 

nrGAMEmeraMktSMM-Fd-S 1BL» 

wGAMMlftEurapeUSL— _ S 141*1 

w GAM Mltl- Europe DM . . DM UL54 

nr GAM MltHSIoDol USS S IB&M 

mt GAM Market Neatral l ittti 

■r GAM Trodkip DM DM mi* 

w GAM Trading U5S l 17247 


w GAM Pacific — S 88027 

w GAM Selection S 664.96 

nrGAMStogapore/Mcdknrsia-S 67LB7 

w GAM SF Special Band- SF 13248 

■vGAMTvcne— — 1 3719 

vGAMUS S 20554 

nr GAMut Investments I 80000 

nr GAM Value S 13857 

iv GAM IMUtetharn . « 19154 

w GAM Worldwide. J 87287 

nr GAM Bond USS Ord 5 14474 

IV GAM Bond USS Special S 10X47 

nr GAM Band SF SF WU9 

iv GAM Band YBn_ Y 149080 

W GAM Bond DM DM 1ZL20 

w GAM Bond t. £ 16453 

nr GAM [Special Bond 1 14654 

nr GAM Universal USS S 15456 

nr GSAM ComcasHe. S 34754 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 1626 
Muhtc lmUot i i nt e TTlOt NDLZurtch 

0 GAM (CHI America SF 1567.33 

0 GAM (CH) Europe SF 10046 

0 GAM (Of) Mandat SF 171237 

0 GAM (Of) Pacific SF 212153 

REGISTERED FUNDS 
)57rd StreeLNY 1002221 758M7D0 

mSSi — - x 14629 

nr gam latomatfonal S 19523 

iv GAM North America S 8631 

wGAMPadncBcxin S 18054 

EGI5TERED UCITS 
. . TemxauDubfin 2 353-157«M30 

iv gam Americana Acc —DM 93J06 

nr GAM EurwoAcc DM 135*7 

nr GAM Orient Acc DM 1»J6 

Tokyo Acc DM T76.V4 

Total Band DM ACC— DM TW46 

~ mversal DM Acs DM 17676 

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
295-4000 Fair. 1809) 2954180 
STRATEGIES LTD 

.... 1 8. M*tal* S 14176 

, HOST 

— S 609 

nl S M554 

L)) DfvenJBed Rsk mi S 11449 

(10 I nh Currency 6 Bond _S 11236 

**““ “fORLDWOE FND_S 1744 

FUTURES A OPTIONS SICAV 
nt Bd Progr-CHFCUF 10080 

"SACHS 

ate Mart Fd II S 953 

Jl Currency . S 12375* 

Global Eaid hr S 1221 

worm Bond Fund _S 1043 

“-T« income Fund S 950 

FUND MANAGEMENT 

p Fund ECO MOTS 

CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

lapNal Equity 1 UD35 

MtolMkt Neutrals 14)305 

^pUdMoriiioae-J UNO 

MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
in: tmi /I -710450 

'GTAsean FdAShm* S 7659 

GT MUI Fd B Bent S 7659 

'GT Asia Food A Shane* S 205 

GT Ask) Fund B Share* S 2440 

GT Aslan Small Comp A 5hJ 1945 

" GT Aston Small Camp B SItS 1958 

GT Amtnolla Fd A 5hart*_S 3398 

GT Australia Fd B Shares— s 34.13 

GTAlNtr.SnNEQtA5h — S 29.15 

GT Auetr. Small Co B Sh — S 2955 

' GT Barry Japan Fd A Sit — S 2172 

GTBcnnr Japan FdBSh_S 2354 

GT Bend Fd A Shares S 19J1 

J GT Bond Fd B Shores 8 1977 

GT Dollar Fond A Sh S 3644 

GT Donor Fund B Sh S 3651 

GT Emerging Mkts A Sh — s 7050 

GT Emerging Mkts ft sh — % 28*3 

J GT Em MU Small CoASh_S 945 

GT Em MM SmaR Co B SIU 956 

GT Ewe Small Co Fd A sh~s 424* 

wGT Ewe Small Co FdBSX-S 4217 

0 GTHana Kona Fd A Shares* 7247 

0 GT Hong Kmo FOB SharwS 7255 

d GT Honshu Patofinder a Sts 1119 

0 GT Honshu Pathfinder B ShS 112 

IV GTJOP OTC Stock* Fd ASM 1323 

nr GT Jap OTC Stocks FdBShS 1350 

wBT JtmStnonCoFdAShs ism 

wGTJop Small Co FdBSh-JI 1555 

w GT. Lotto America Fd S 24J2 

0 GT Strategic BdFd A Sh_X 850 

d GTSfnJteBfcfldFdBSh— S .698 

d GT Tdccomm. Fa A Snores* 1572 

0GTTdeaxnm. FOB Shams 1555 

r GT Technology Fund A Si-J 5944 

GT Tedvwiaov Fund B Sh-S 5972 

T MANAGEMENT PLC(*4 71 7M« 67} 

G.T. Blolcch/Heaith Fuad—J 2356 

GlT- Pe u t SCi Uond Fund S H33 

&T. Europe Fund S 5145 

G.T Global Small Co Fd s 2R£7 

G.T. invcslMicut Fund— S 2540 

- G.T. Korea Fuad S 545 

■V G.T. Newly lad Countr Fd_s 56.94 

GT. US SmaU Companies -4 2577 

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
rdSeLFa. S 10944 



INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 

w Aslan Fixed income Fd * 

INTERIN VEST (BERMUDA) LTD 
C/e Bank of Bermuda# Tel : 809 295 — 
m Hedge HBO&CemerveFd-J 957 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2 Bd Royal, L-24* Luxembavro 

w Europe SudE— Ecu 9741 

INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 


0 Asia Super Growth 
0 Nippon Wnrrom Fund 
0 Asia Tiger werram— 

0 European Vwrranf Fund 

0 Gtd N.W. 1994 

PREMIER 5ELECT FUNDS 

0 American Growth 

0 American Enterprise 
0 Asia Tiger Growth. . — * 

0 Donor Reserve— 

0 European Growth 
, d European Entorortse 
4 jo I 0 Gtobal Emerglne Markets— 5 

IjS 0 Glonol Growth 

ju 1 0 Nippon Enterprise 
d Nippon Grawm 
546 ] d UK Growth— . 

145 I 0 Sterling Reserve 

27440 I d North American W or nont S 

j*e I 0 Greater anna Opos 1 

ITALFORTUNE INTL. FUNDS 
w Class A (Aaar. Gcewth itoUS 
■vCkmB (Global Enuitv) 

>v Class c (GtabW Bond) 

wdttWD IFni Bte Hf i , 

JARDINE FLEMING, GPO BOX 11448 Ha Kg 

0 JF ASEAN Trust S 5484 

0 JF Far EtW Wmt Tr t 2944 

0 JF Gtobal Cam. Tr S 1580 

0 JF Hang Kong Trust * 1693 

0 JF Japan Sm. Co Tr Y 4938550 

d JF Japan Trust y 1292680 

0 JFMokiYSta Trusf I 2451 

0JFPadHchK.Tr. S 1221 

m , d JFTnoihmd Trust j 3639 

15244 JOHN OOVETT MANX (LOAD LTD 
1293 Tel: 44424 - 62 H 20 

( w Govett Man Futures— — C 1341 

ivGovettMan.Fut.USS 5 971 

w GovetlS Gear. Carr % lua 

ht G ovett S GRd BoL Hdee S IL2539 

JUUUS BAER GROUP 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 
0 



Mot GGL Fin 2003 


45 1 CO 
dt 


by the Roidg fistod with Ow «n»fittoa of goeue cgmtae hased ea sat prices, 

- btmanthly; (f) hrtfl^tdfy [wwy two wmldb W - Mflutorfn |t) . twice wedkfn [raj - menth^ 

RO^O.'LJIMO-PEMM.DM. 

w Aston Cdrttol Holdings Fd-S 
MT Doim LCF RamscMia B0— s 

iv Dot no LCF Pomsch Eo S 

w Force Cwn Tradihon chf jf 

wLtlcom- 5 

w Lewrogea Cop mojowbs_5 

w OhimMnr - » 

s »! Swiss Fd— SF 116471 

6 Prieoullv Fo. Europe Ecu 117250 

b Prleaulty Fd-Helyrha sf in«u 

8 PriMuily Fd- Lofin Am S 

D PrIDond Fund Ecu. 
b Prlbond Funa USD— 

B Prlbond Fd HY Emer MM54 

w Setecrtve invest SA 

b Source 

ir US Bend Plus 

w Vorloplus. E cu imn 

g?S^F H » DR0M,,EDMOT ' B,,E, 

0 Asta/Jmn Emoro. GrowmS 

Hr Esprit Eur Portn im Tst Ecu 

nr Eurgp S trong investm M_Eeu 

b Integral Futures s 

b gutted Gloom Fd General DM 
« Ophgest Gtaoal Fix income DM 

d Pacific Nies Fund 5 

■v Per mol drakkar Growth rrvs 

1 Selection Horizon 

b Viaotre Arlene S gnjg 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT 1CJ) LTD 
mftomrod i^wroged HU — s 9493 

SAFDIE GROUP/ KEY ADVISORS LTD 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USS) 

2 Ctoss A. I dm m 

0 Class A>2 DM 10*5 

d Class s-1 s 9.96 

a Pen B.9 c 3D_54 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

0 Category a. 1 1672 

0 Cmeg&rr B r live 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

0 Category a S 1174 

d Category B ' x 1340 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

d Coteoory A y 1385 

0 Categerv b v 1257 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

d Class A s ->i 

0 Ctoss B J 2285 

U5 FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 

0 Doss A j g 4i 

0 Class B % 10.17 

MERRILL TtNCN 

fournr / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

0 Ckru A _J 15.15 

0 ClftgB . g 1AH 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

dCkwiA — $ 1440 

0 Class B < 1421 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL IU5» 

0 Ctoss A — J 1043 

0 Class B — « 10JB 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

rfCJassA. J 9.95 

0 Class B $ 942 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

If Class A — 1 1414 

0 Class B . « 1348 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

0 Class A J 1643 

riCImsB g 1652 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

0 Class A _ * 1258 

0 Class B — S 1L72 

DRAGON PORTFOLIO 

rtOmsA . 1546 

d dan B t 1526 

MERRILL LYNCH INC 1 PORTFOLIO 

0 Ctoss A s 9.19 

d Ctoss B — S 9.19 

0 Class C_ _ S 9.19 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

0 Mexican lnc * pm a a 5 955 

0 Mexican IncSPtfl a B I 9.95 

d Mexican Inc Peso PHI Cl A £ 927 

0 Mexican Inc Prsa Ptti OBJ 927 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum NavtHller Pert-S 10&54 

m Momentum Rainbow Fd S 12623 

m Momentum R*R RJJ S 8951 

m Momentum Sfocimosler __S !6t58 

MORVAL VONW1LLER ASSET MGT Co 
Hr WlllerfUlHtoWlltertiond Caps 1544 

w Wniartunds-Wliiertniid Eur Ecu 12*6 

w willerfunds-Wiiierea Eur— Ear 1429 

nr WlUertwids-Wlllereq Itatv-LH 1303120 

W WUterfunds-Wllleraq N A S 1170 

MULTIMANAGER N.V. 

nr Cash Enhwtcenient— S 1040 

wEmerglnBMaricefsRj s zim 

w European Growth Fd Ecu 15L71 

w Hedge Fund S 1137 

w Japanese Fund Y 875 

w Marian Neutral s 1178 

w World Bona Fund Ecu 1277 

NICHOLAS-APPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 

wr KA Flexible Growth Fd S 1598478 

w NA Hedge Fund S 1349151 

NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG) LTD 

0 NoiTtora Jakarta Fu nd S 695 

NOR IT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCF USD S B2D.9S 

IWNCF DEM- DM 895*9 

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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25. 1994 


Wellcome Drops on Research Choice 


Compiled by Our Staff From DupaiOKS 

LONDON — Shares in Wellcome Group 
PLC plunged Thursday as investors focused on 
the company’s plans to end research into a 
promising ami-herpes compound instead of 
news its pretax profit jumped 12 percent in the 
first hall of its financial year. 

. Shares in Wellcome plunged' to.a low for the 
year, falling 8 percent, to 548 pence, compared 
with 598 pence Wednesday. 

Welcome's first-half pretax profit rose to £364 
million ($545 Bullion) from £325 million, while 
revalue advanced to £1.08 billion from £1.03 
bflUoo. While the profit was above expectations, 
the revenue growth fell short, which contributed 
to the stampede to sell the stock. 


uct showing dear superiority over SmithKline 
Beecham PLCs new herpes drug Famvir. 

“It was an important drug — it’s clearly very 


But they said the main impetus to dump 
WeBoome came from its abandonment of a 
compound called netivudine, which was being 
developed to treat herpes. Wellcome said toxic- 
ity tests of the compound on rats showed it did 


pot meet required safety standards. 
Stare analysts said the loss of die 


Stare an 
bitter blow. 


ts said the loss of die drug was a 
riving Wellcome of the oneprod- 


“It was an important drug — it’s clearly very 
disappointing,’' said James Culverwell. analyst 
with Hoare Govett 

The decision leaves Wellcome with only one 
successor, called Valtrex, to its already success- 
ful ami-herpes drug Zovirax, the patent on 
which is about to expire. 

Analysts said there was little difference be- 
tween Valtrex and SnrithKline’s Famvir, which 
could mean the two companies were headed for 
a price war. 

John Robb, the chairman of Wellcome, said 
he was prepared for a price battle if necessary, 
although he did not believe SmithKline would 
want to start price war. 

“There’s no evidence that SmithKKne Bee- 
cham arc going to try and substantially undercut 
us — and f don't think that would work because 
aO we would do is match them." he said. 

Wellcome said sales of Retrovir, the AIDS 
treatment drug commonly called AZT, fell 16 
percent in the first half, mostly because of a 
study showing that AZT does not significantly 


reduce the length of time it takes for HIV- 
positive pa lien Is to progress to full-blown AIDS. 

But Keith Memfield. the company’s market- 
ing director, said the study concerned only p re- 
AIDS patients, not those with AIDS, who con- 
stitute 70 percent of ACT users. 

The company on Wednesday said it forged a 
deal with rival Glaxo Holdings PLC to develop 
and market another promising AIDS treatment 
called 3TG which, if tests are successful could 
be marketed as a companion treatment to ACT 

late next year. (Bloomberg Reuters, AFP) 


Revived Art Market Buoys Sotheby 

Bulls See Net Doubling After Fivefold Rise in 1993 


By Leslie Wayne 

Se* York Times Service 


■ Sandoz Net Lifted by Sales Increase 

Net profit for Sandoz AG, the Swiss drug 
and chemical company, rose 14 percent in 1993 
from the previous year because of improved 
sales in the pharmaceuticals division and im- 
proved -margins in the chemical division, 
Knight- Ridder reported from Zurich. 

Sandoz earned a net 1.71 billion Swiss francs 
(SI billion), while sales increased 5 percent, to 
15.1 billion francs. 


NEW YORK — In this era. 
when companies come into the 
world in a flash and often have a 
half-life of a few years, it is reas- 
suring to note that Sotheby's 
Holdings, the world's largest auc- 
tion house, has been in business 
since 1744. 


Despite its 250-year track re- 
cord, however, Sotheby's stock has 
been trading lately with all the 
madness of an initial public offer- 
ing. The stock jumped from $16 a 
share a month ago to a high of 
$19.50 last week. 


Some analysts feel the stock 
will continue to climb, especially 
since the downturn in the an 
market forced Sotheby's in the 
early 1990s to cur costs drastical- 
ly by reducing its payroll and 
freezing salaries. 

Now. with Sotheby’s revenue 
growth greatly outpacing any cost 
increases, analysts say this re- 


newed buying activity should go 
straight to Sotheby’s bottom linn 
The more bullish believe that 
Sotheby’s earnings will double 
this year, pushing the stock into 
the mid-S20 range. More cautious 
analysts say Sotheby's is a buy at 
$15 a share, but not at $18. 


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With the share trading at a 
heady 50 times earnings, it is as 
though the same fever mat people 
catch at Sotheby’s auctions is 
now affecting share buyers. 

Much of this interest results 
from strong 1993 earnings that 
Sotheby reported last week: a five- 
fold rise from 7 cents a share in 
1992 to 35 cents a share in 1993. 
These rising earnings reflect a am. 
pie economic fact of life — that 
the market for ait, which peaked 
in 1989. is coming bade. 


“With the cost-cutting, Soth- 
eby's has the potential to realize 
si gnif icant sums of earnings, 
said T erre nce J. McEvoy, an ana- 
lyst with Janney Montgomery 
Soon and a leader of the Soth- 
eby’s bulls. “This could be the 
beginning of a strong uptrend.” 

Mr. McEvoy said he bdieved 
the company’s earning?; would 
double in 1994. to 70 cents a share. 
20 cents higher than most other 
analysts. *Tne last few years have 
been difficult, but business is get- 
ting a lot better after a long dry 
spell.” Mr. McEvoy said. 




la®! 


Whether it is for Impressionist 
paintings, jewelry, silver or furni- 
ture, buyers are returning to the 
auction market Sotheby’s has 
even found new owners for El- 
vis's aviator sunglasses and Vivi- 
en Leigh's Oscar. 


* Jan. Feb. Mar. % 


r--7i 

Source; Bloomberg 


There are encouraging signs. 
Auction sales grew 17 percent last 
year as collectors returned to the 
rpaHces in large numbers. Rising 
— and stable — auction prices are 
encouraging sellers to bring more 
art to market, and good merchan- 
dise, in turn, attracts buyers. 

Last year, Sotheby’s was able to 
increase the premium that buyers 
pay, and sane fed that a new 
psychological tone was set by the 
solid auctions in 1993 for Impres- 
sionist, contemporary and Old 
Master paintings and (or fine jew- 
elry, the biggest money-raisers. 

Richard Sanderson, an analyst 
with Panmnre Gordon & Co. in 
London, also said he bdieved the 
combination of lower costs and 
rising revenue translates into “tre- 
mendous operating leverage.” 


Mr. Sanderson is more modest 
in his earnings projections. He 
sees Sotheby’s profit nsing to 52 
cents a share this year. But he 
warns that betting on the art mar- 
ket must be done carefully. 

"The art market is the most 
volatile sector of the economy.” 
he said. “It’s a little bit like trying 
to predict the lottery.” 

Although the art market has 
picked up, the speculators that 
fueled auction prices in the late 
1980s still appear to be on the 
sidelines. (In the four quartos 
that ended in June 1990, Soth- 
eby’s had record auction sales of 
$3 billion; a year later, it was less 
than half that.) 

“I like the momentum in the 
numbers." added Thomas Kully, 
an analyst at William Blair. “The 
spring season is shaping up to be 
quite good. CoDeciors are back 
into the mar ket in spades, and 
Sotheby’s has got a marvelous 
franchise." 

But Mr. Kully still rated the 


stock as “very attractive” at $15 a 
share, but a “hold” at $18. 


“There’s a lot of speculative 
fever that moves this stock,” he 
said. “If you believe that Soth- 
eby's will get back to the never- 
never land days of $3 billion in 
auction sales, then the stock is 
cheap. My view is that this is a 
very, very interesting stock, but a 
hold right now." 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


Page 15 


nl9 9 . 


rolyGram Buys 
Russian Music 
Recording Unit 


AlliedrLyons’ Turn to Buy 

Drinks Maker to Take Over Domecq 


JAgemsnt ltd 

r. Engine SL 4 


1 

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HIM EXCIAIti! 


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i & 

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Bloom berg Businas News 

— PolyGnun 
NV, the recorded music arm of 
Philips Electronics NV, has be- 
come the first Western music com- 
pany to set up a Russian subsid- 
ary, its second expansion into 
Eastern Europe in as many months. 

.After starting operations in the 
Czech Republic and Slovakia last 
month, the Dutch entertainment 
and software company said it had 
bought the record and music pub- 
lishing business of BIZ Enterprises, 
a company only five vears old hut 


iwwivuAi uiumV) 

PolyGram said that financial de- 
tails would not be disclosed. 

. Boris Zosimov, owner and 
founder of BIZ Enterprises, will 
become president or PolyGram 
A/O in Moscow. He will remain 
chairman of BIZ but will delegate 
the daily running of its nonmusic 
activities. 

In addition to its music activi- 
ties, BIZ also is active in direct 
mail, concert promotion, newspa- 
per and magazine publishing, tele- 
vision production and adver tising 
The agreement announced Thurs- 
day also gives PolyGram an option 
to buy BIZ'S direct-mail activities. 


Mr. Zosimov said he would u»ir« 
a number of Russian artists with 
him when he started PolyGram ’s 
Russian subsidiary but refused to 
say who. Among the groups whose 
music is produced and distributed 
by BIZ are Est and Obelisk, two 
popular Russian pop-music bands. 

.PolyGram’s new Russian chief 
said that it would distribute rock, 
pop, classical and jazz music on 
vinyl records, compact disks and 
cassettes. All these wiD be pro- 
duced domestically, Mr. Zosimov 
said. 

PolyGram also intends to export 
music to Russia on Digital Com- 
pact Cassettes, he said. DCC is a 
digital cassette technology devel- 
oped by Philips, which owns 75 
percent of PolyGram. 

PolyGram said the acquisition of 
BIZ gave it access to its fourth and 
by far its biggest Eastern European 
market, with 180 milli on people. 

Mr. Zosimov said the launch of 
PolyGram’s Russian unit would 
also help combat the distribution 
of counterfeit tapes in Russia. 
“They are a major problem in the 
Russian market,” he said. “They 
are very powerful, powerful com- 
believe 


petition. But we believe it’ll work 
out It will take some time.” 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Dispatches 
LONDON — Allied-Lyons 
PLC said Thursday it would pay 
£739million(S1.1 billion) to gain 

control of Pedro Domecq SA of 
Spain, the world’s eighth-largest 
spirits company. 

The acquisition will make a]. 
lied-Lyons the world’s second- 
biggest marketer of distilled spir- 
its, after International Distillers 
Sc. Vintners, a division of Grand 
Metropolitan PLC. 

The acquisition by AUied-Ly- 
ons, which sells Ballan tine’s 
Scotch whisky, Canadian Club 
whiskey and Beefeater gin, will 
add six more of the world’s top 
100 spirits brands to its reper- 
toire, including La Ina sherry, 
Presidents and Don Pedro bran- 
dy and Sauza tequila. 

After the purchase, the com- 
pany plans to change its name to 
Allied Domecq PLG 
The transaction not only will 
make Allied-Lyons the world's 
biggest seller of brandy and sec- 
ond-biggest seller of tequila but 
also w3l increase its presence in 
Spain and the rapidly growing 
Latin American markets. 

It will also enable the compa- 
ny to benefit from the North 
American Free Trade Agreement 
by allowing it to export products 
distilled in Mexico to the United 
States without tariffs. 

“It’s a good strategic move," 


Charles Winston, a beverage an- 
alyst at Morgan Stanley A Co~, 
said. “It <ak« them into a num- 
ber of Central and Latin Ameri- 
can markets." 

Pedro Domecq has 40 percent 
of the Mexican wine and spirits 
market, followed by Bacardi 
Corp. The Mexican spirits mar- 
ket grew to sales of 252 million 
cases in 1992 from 19.7 milHon 
cases in 1988. 

Antonio Ariza, chief executive 
of Domecq Mexico, said Mexico 
also was well placed to gain from 
growth in the United States and 
Latin America. 

Michael Jackaman, Allied-Ly- 
ons’ chairman, said, “This is an 
exciting move of major impor- 
tant Fen- our ambition to be- 
come ultimately world leader in 
spirits." 

Despite the increase in sales 
Aliied-Lyons expects to realize, 
the company's shares fell 45 
pence, or 7 percent, to 558 pence 
on the London stock exchange 
Thursday, as an earnings fore- 
cast that accompanied the acqui- 
sition announcement disap- 
pointed investors, analysts said. 

Allied-Lyons said it expected 
to post pretax profit of not less 
than £604 million for the year 
that ended March 5. But that 
minimum would be well below 
the average of £667.5 million 


predicted by a group of nearly 2U 
analysts, according to the Esti- 
mate Directory. 

The company said results 
would include a one-time charge 
of £25 mill i nn for additional 
pension costs and £26 million for 
losses on sales of businesses and 
properties. 

Allied-Lyons said it expected 
to pay a second-half dividend of 
14.9 pence a share, making a final 
dividend of 222 pence, compared 
with 21 pence a year earlier. 

The acquisition is to be fi- 
nanced mainly by an issue of 
shares to holders at 490 pence 
each to raise £651 milli on in two 
installments, the second of which 
will depend on European Com- 
mission clearance of the transac- 
tion. 

Allied already had a 32 per- 
cent stake in Domecq and has 
joint ventures with it in Spain, 
Mexico and Latin America. 

Mr. Jac kaman said the deal 
had been made after about 500 
Domecq family shareholders had 
expressed an interest in selling. 

The Domecq business, based 
in Jerez, in the center of Spain's 
sheny district, was acquired by 
the family in 1816. It owns the 
world’s top-selling brandy, Presi- 
dente, and the No. 2 tequila, 

® auza ‘ (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Weakness 
In Europe 
Hits Nestle 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Dispaicha 

ZURICH — Nestlfc SA, the 
world’s largest food manufacturer, 
said Thursday that its net profit 
rose 7 percent in 1993, to 2.89 bil- 
lion Swiss francs ($2.02 billion). 

Even though the profit figure ex- 
ceeded the company's own predic- 
tion of 5 percent made in Novem- 
ber. many analysts were 
disappointed and the company’s 
share dropped 16 francs, to 1213 
francs, on the Zurich stock ex- 
change. 

Nestli said that although sales 
rose by 52 percent in value last 
year, they rose by only 1.7 percent 
in volume, due mainly to recession 
in Europe. 

“In view of the economic circum- 
stances, maintaining volume 
growth at this rate is considered 
satisfactory and was largely attrib- 
utable to the strong development of 
the group's business in Aria and 
Latin America," it said. 

The 1993 figure also reflected 
restructuring costs of 611 francs. 
“Everybody was betting on 400 
million to 500 million francs,” said 
Serge Ledermann, an analyst with 
Lombard Odier in Geneva. 

The company forecast an in- 
crease in sales and net profit for 
1994, provided that the recession in 
Europe did not deepen. 

The company said that cash flow 
rose last year by 62 percent, to 4.97 
billion francs. (Reuters, AP, AFP) 


Investor’s Europe - 



y W-S Automaker Says It’s on the Road Rack to Profit CREDIT! French Bank Posts $1.2 Billion Loss 


Contimed from Page 11 

tiie legal battle over Mr. L6pez, 
who left General Motors Carp, to 
join VW in March 1993 and has 
since been accused by GM of steal- 
mg corporate secrets. Prosecutors 
hi Germany and the United States 
are still investigating. 

The arrival of Mr. PiSch and of 
Mr. Lopez coincided with collaps- 
ing sales In North America, a crisis 
at VWs Spanish subsidiary, SEAT, 
ind an unexpected loss at its luxury 
car division, Audi. In fact, only 
Skoda, its Czech unit, sold more 
cars than the year before. 

. This year, VW introduced a radi- 
cal labor plan based an a f oar-day 
workweek, gradual early retirement 
for older workers and gradual rise 
in status for trainees, and it intends 
to continue cutting costs and im- 
proving efficiency, Mr. Pifich said. 
He projected personnel cost sav- 
ings this year at 1.6 billion DM. 

1 Mr. L6pez and his disciples 


preached the gospel of quality and 
efficiency in 30,000 workshops 
worldwide last year, involving one- 
fifth of the global VW staff, and 
they plan 5,000 more this year. 
When they are done, VW wfl] be 
capable of a “quantum leap" in 
productivity, Mr. Lopez predicted. 

“We will improve, we will im- 
prove considerably, and on the bot- 
tom line well see blade figures by 
1995,” he said — an assessment 
that many anal ysts share. 

Asked how much his workshops 
had already improved productivity, 
Mr. Lopez would only say “a lot." 
Mr. PiEch described the improve- 
ment as “between 25 percent and 
30 percent” in “the specific areas 


in the workshops.” 

In fact, the German parent com- 
pany, which excludes SEAT, Audi 
and Skn dfl, saw Its pretax profit rise 
12 percent last year despite a 19 
percent drop in sales. Mr. Pifich pre- 
dicted further improvement in par- 


ent-company earnings this year — 
and VWwiD need it to offset expect- 
ed losses at SEAT and Skoda. 

Regarding North America, 
where VW sold 50,000 cars last 
year, Jens Neumann, the board 
member responsible for the region, 
said the company expected to sell 
100,000 cars this year. 

Mr. Lopez said VW was eventu- 
ally aiming to recapture the 5 per- 
cent market share in the United 
States that it had in the early 1970s, 
though Mr. Neumann said that 
goal was far-fetched. Today, VW’s 
U.S. market share is less than 1 
percent. Asked how VW would 
make the comeback, Mr. L6pez an- 
swered with a question: “Haw yon 
seen the new Beetle?” 

The Beetle he meant is a “con- 
cept car” designed in California 
and shown at the Detroit Auto 
Show in January. VW has not yet 
derided to bufld the car, winch 
would be a modern incarnation of 
its most popular modeL 


Continued from Page 11 

privatization. France’s Finance 
Ministry said it would guarantee 
the loans for losses up to 18.4 bil- 
lion francs. 

Sasha Serafimovsld, an analyst 
at Merrill Lynch & Co. in London, 
said that while the operation would 
severely limit any upside potential 
for the bank, there was not much of 
an upside in the foreseeable future. 
“Pans property looks like it will 
remain dead through 1996," he 
said. 

The recapitalization of the bank 
will take place in two phases. The 
first, to come “as soon as possible,” 
calls for the institution's three pub- 
lic-sector shareholders — the state, 
Thomsoo-CSF SA and Caisse des 
Depots — to contribute 4.9 billion 
francs. 

The second phase, if market con- 
ditions permit this year, would take 
the form of a rights issue of about 
the same amount for holders of the 


bank's non voting investment cer- 
tificates. Mr. Peyrrievade said he 
would ask the government to con- 
vert these investment certificates, 
which represent 25 percent of the 
bank’s equity, into voting shares- 

To cut costs, the executive said 
he aimed to cut the bank’s 38,000- 
person work force in France by as 
much as 10 percent over the next 
three years and to make a 4 percent 
cutback this year in its European 
banking network, which would in- 
volve 900 jobs. 

He said Crfetit Lyonnais would 
continue to try to turn around the 
Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer Inc. film 
studio, with the prospect of selling 
it within three years and recouping 
the loans it made to Italian finan- 
cier Giancario Parrctti to take it 
over in 1990. The bank took posses- 
sion of MGM after Mr. Parretti 
defaulted. 

“If the studio turns around, the 
upside is extremely high,” he said. 
“AH we need is a utile luck." 


Analysts were pleased with the 
balance-sheet dean-out 

“The higher the losses the bet- 
ter,” said Mr. Serafimovsld “This 
will be a big step toward privatiza- 
tion.” 

The bank said its increased 
losses last year were affected by a 4 
percent increase in general costs 
and a jump in provisions, to 17.8 
billion francs, for doubtful real es- 
tate and commercial loans. Provi- 
sions in 1992 were 14.4 billion. 

Provisions for commercial bank- 
ing in France rose to 4.9 billion 
francs, including 700 million francs 
from real estate loans which will 
nott be transferee! to the new com- 
pany, from 4.0 billion francs. 


Vs easy la i id imire 
■ View 
pm ifiiiliwgi 
JastcoB: 0660-81 55 
or fax: 06069-175413 




Sources: Reuters, 


Very briefly; 

• Sun Affiance Group PLC, the British insurance conglomerate, earned a 
pretax £221.7 million ($332 million) in 1993, compared with a loss of 
£129.6 million in 1992, helped by tiring general-insurance-policy sales. 

• Veha AG, the German energy and chemicals company, earned a net 825 
mfflm n Deutsche marks ($490 million} in 1993, down 9 percent from 
1992, but said it expected restructuring to improve results for 1994. 

• German and Dutch oil-bar^e shipping companies are joining forces in a 
bid to raise freight rates on inland waterways in northern Europe. 

• Whirlpool Europe BV, a unit of Whirlpool Corp. will increase its stake 
in the Whiripoof Tatramat joint venture to 72 percent from 49 percent; 
Whirlpool Tatramat is a Slovakia-based venture that makes washing 
machin e and other major appliances. 

• Eriberto R. Scotimara has been appointed president and chief executive 
officer of the Hungarian- American Enterprise Fund, a Washington- 
based group that channrik US. government seed money into Hungarian 
business development projects 

■ SP1 Pharmaceuticals Inc, the Calif ornia-based subsidiary of ICN 
Pfamnacouticali Inc, is buying a 48 percent stake in Oktyabr, a Rumba 
pharmaceutical company. Reutm, Bloomberg, AFP 


EU Steelmakers Agree to Cuts 


Agence France-Preae 

BRUSSELS — European steel- 
makers have agreed to find cuts in 
hot-rolled steel production capaci- 
ty that would satisfy a European 
Union recovery plan for the sector, 
an EU spokesman said Thursday. 

He was speaking after a meeting 
late Wednesday where private-seo- 
tor steel executives from several 
countries presented plans to the 
EU Commission to cut capacity. 

The commission has been de- 
manding that private and public 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 



. ” -'Co . 


a**,, 

■C. 


• «• J. "- r ^t ’ 


•" : "5.< 


Property Brings 
Li’s Companies 
Large Profits 


Page 17 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Bond Pricing Gets Sharp 

Companies Forced to Sweeten Deals 


:’r j^l 

*■ ' 3 = V.7»: m 



>wCu ;-■ 


Miracle 




HONG KONG — The two main 

companies controlled by Li Ka- 

a reported large rises in 1993 
on Thursday, with results 
d by the soaring Hong Kong 
real estate market 
Cheung Kong (Holdings) Lid. 
said its profit rose 56 percent, to 
9.78 bflhon Hong Kong dollars (SI 
billion) on sales that were up 4 
percent, to 10.69 billion dollars. 

At Hutchison Whampoa LuL, 
which is 403 percent-owned by 
Cheung Kong, profit more than 
doubled, to 630 billion dollars, 
from 3.05 triffioa. Sales were up 18 
percent, to 24.75 billion dollars. 

Analysts said Cheung Kong 
would have a good year in 1994, 
even if the Hong Kong real estate 
boom cools and the stock market’s 
slump persists. “Cheung Kong is 
the strongest among property de- 
velopers,” said Michael Great, di- 
rector at S. G. Wariwag Securities. 

The company could earn as 
much as 12.8 billion dollars riii« 
year even if real estate market 
prices stop rising, he said. Most of 
its income will come from three 
luxury residential projects in Hong 
Kong: Kingswood Villas, South 
Horizons and Laguna City. 

Mr. Li said those projects would 
be completed by 1997. 

0Last year, Cheung Kong en- 
larged its real estate holding? by 
purchasing or jointly developing 
projects with large land areas. 
These would buQd a good founda- 


tion for the business after 1997, Mr. 
Li said. Cheung Kong »iao « gn*fT 
several contracts and letters oTin- 
lent with China companies in inJta- 
ffrutture- power, property and ho- 
tel businesses, he said. 

_ Mr. Li said be approved of recent 
Chinese measures to control prices. 

financial control measures 
which have been implemented in 
Finla n d China are having a posi- 
tive effect in guiding the overall 
economy along the path of sustain- 
able growth,” said Mr. li “This will 
be beneficial for Hong Kong’s econ- 
omy winch is becoming inc reasingly 
boxed together with China.” 

At Hutchison, earnings were 
boosted by a recovery at Husky Oil 
LtrL, a 49 percent-owned energy 
subsidiary in Canada it also got a 
boost from a 1.66 billion profit an 
the sale of a 31.8 percent stake in 
STAR TV to News Coip. of Austra- 
lia, Rupert Murdoch’s flagship 

These jjains were partly offset by 
a 1.41 billion dollar loss provision 
for the dosing of the Rabbit tele- 
phone system m Britain. Rabbit was 
a kind of mobile phone that amid 
make but not receive calls when 
used within 200 meters (660 feet) of 
transmitters placed along busy 
streets and in public places. 

Mr. Li, at 65 the richest person in 
Hong Kong, founded Cheung 
Kong, or “Long River,” at age 22 
with $900. He acquired 22 percent 
of Hutchinson in 1979, mwiring him 
the first Chinese to take ova 1 a Brit- 
ish-owned conglomerate in the colo- 
ny. (Bloomberg, Berners, AP) 


By Kevin Murphy 

ImenaitmU Herald Tribune 
HONG KONG — The fat days are over in the 
pricing of new Asian securities. 

Rising interest rates, faffing stock prices, a deal 
backlog and a surfeit of existing paper are forcing 
companies raising funds to either sweeten their 
deals or work a lot harder. 

Underwriters who winced at the flops of rivals’ 
deals — such as Taiwan’s attempt to privatize a 
chunk of state-owned China Sled Coip. and Bang- 
kok Bank’s $400 miBion Euro co nverublc bond — 
have' put dozens of new equity and equity-linked 
bond offerings cm hold across Aria. 

“Anyone trying to bring out a new issue in a 
falling market at a hieh mid dole is real hr Mine to 


earn their fees,” said one Singapore fund manager, 
who has sold all his holding s nfTndian equities 
equity-linked bonds traded in the Euromarkets, 
one of 1993’s most active issuing areas. 

“We are bullish on the Asian markets overall, 
India especially, but we’re not doing anything nn til 
the inflation and interest rate picture is clarified in 
the United States," said the fund manager, echoing 
an Asia-wide sentiment. 

The U.S. Federal Reserve Board’s decision to 
fight inflation by pushing interest rates up in early 


February marked the end of a staggering bull run 
in most Asian equity market. 

Stocks in Hong Kong, T hailand, Indonesia and 
the Philrppmes have fallen by as much as 23 
percent since the beginning of the year. Fears of 
finthear rate increases have kept investors nervous- 
ly on the sidelines, forcing many issuers to rethink 
their deals. 

On Thursday, an Indonesian entrepreneur, An- 
thony Salim, changed the terms of his $600 million 
public offamg of shares in Indofood, the world's 
largest maker of noodles. 

Aiming to sidestep Indonesian regulations rh 
limit prices of new domestic equity offerings to 15 
tim es the company’s earnings, the Salim group 
plans to offer $50 million of Indofood shares to 
domestic investors and S550 million of what it is 
calling mandatory exchangeable brads to interna- 
tional investors. 


In a package accepted by Indonesian regulate 
the bonds offered to the Euromarkets must be 
converted into Indofood shares to be listed in 
Jakarta eight months after the smaller domestic 
issue is approved. 

The am version price had valued the issue at a 
P/E multiple of 26, allowing the Salim group to 
raise much more money than if it had lappedthe 
Jakarta market alone. 

Late Wednesday, that multiple was lowered to 
23. 

Mr. Salim has “had the opportunity to hear from 

ASIAN MONEY MARKETS 

investors” and is prepared to “put a little more on 
the table,” a banker at Union Bank of Switzerland, 
the issue’s global organizer, said. “In the current 
environment, pricing is very important.” 

Fund managers are watching closely to see 
whether investment houses go bade on pledges 
made in the competition to secure underwriting 
business. The final pricing of an international 
offering of Videsh Sanchar Nigam Ltd, an Indian 
state-owned company with a monopoly on inter- 
national telephone traffic, is of particular interest 
The company had hoped to raise $1 billion from 
the sale of 20 percent of its equity to foreign 
investors, in a deal in which the market expected 
shares to be sold at nearly 100 limes current 
earnings. 

But a slowdown in the chaotic Indian stock 
market and steep declines in prices of other Asian 
telecommunications stacks make that an ambi- 
tious target 

“Even cefore the interest-rate rise there were signs 
of o versa turalion in these markets,” said Harry 
Cheung, managing director of Bant Johns Baer 
Investment Advisory (Hong Kong) Ltd. “Some of 
the issues were priced a little too greedily." 

- “There are many attractive issues already trad- 
ing below par, some very good names trading in 
the 90s,” Mr. Cheung said, referring to the stan- 
dard of bond pricing on which the face value of the 
issue equals 100. “An new issues will have to be at 
least as ai tractive.” 


Beijing Sets 
Offering ol 
State Firms 

Agmct Francc-Pmse 
BELTING — Four Beijing state 
enterprises hope to raise max than 
1.0 billion yuan ($115 miffira) in 
the first public issue of shares in the 
Chinese capital, the China Daily 
reported Thursday. 

Beijing Department Store Group 
Co_ Boren Printing Machinery 




Investor's Asia 


Co 7 Beijing LightBus Co. and 
Beijing Town County Trade Center 
Co. will issue 175 million shares 
over three days starring Sunday, 
. said Li Junhua, the director of the 
municipal commission for econom- 
ic restructuring. 

Although 204 Beijing companies 
have issued shares in tematiy, this is 
the first time slate enterprises in the 
capital have openly offered shares. 
The companies will eventually be 
listed on the Shanghai Stock Ex- 
change, the paper said. 

Prospective buyers are required 
to deposit funds in Beijing hanks 
for half-year terms, and the ac- 
counts wUl be entered into a lottery 
to decide who is eligible to buy the 
shares, the report said. 

Mr. Li said the sale will be an 
important step in the process of 
reforming state enterprises. He ex- 
pressed confidence that the bank 
savings requirement would ensure 
success. 

Boren, the biggest maker of 
printing machinery m China, float- 
ed 100 millio n shares on the Hong 
Kong stock exchange in July. The 
company earned 133.6 million 
yuan last year, while Beijin g Light 
Bus registered profit of 2232 mil- 
lion yuan, the report said 

The Beijing Department Store's 
sales volume hit 1.1 billion yuan in 
1993, it said 





.... 

wMmmxx*?xsw 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Very briefly: 

■ Japan's External Trade Organization published a survey on the Europe- 
an operations of Japanese companies m the manufacturing sector that 
showed that 513 percent ran a deficit in 1992, up from 47.1 percent in 
1991, and that 83 percent said results had deteriorated further in 1993. 

• Fgvtnwn Kodak Cd, Chase Manhattan Corp* Goodyear Tire & Rubber 
Ok and Befl Atlantic Cory, applied for delisting from the Tokyo Stock 
Exchange, which continues to undergo a prolonged slump. 

• Westpac Banking Corp. and the insurer Australian Mutual Provident 
Society said they were relaxing the terms of their 1991 alliance. AMP will 
be released from the requirement to keep a major stake in the bank. 

■ Japan's average land price fell for the third consecutive year in 1993 and 
the most expensive commercial land in Tokyo dropped 323 percent. 

■ Bank of China said it would open branches in Milan and San Francisco 
and a representative office in Malaysia this year. AFP. Bloomberg, ap 


Ted Turner Sees Satellite-Broadcasting Shakeout j ap an Protests U.S. Air Route Delay 

Complied hv Our Staff Fmm Dimawhr* at b nmfannM m, fk. w. t _r -r kt— — l. ...... „ in i j t .l. w 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

-,;5 HONG KONG — The satellite 
■' '■ television industry faces over- 
■" crowding, and many networks 
-. - could g p broke, Ted Turner, the 
-- founder of Cable News Network, 
said Thursday. 

Digital-compression technology 
. . soon to be introduced would com- 
_ pound the problem, allowing much , 
... •’ more traffic on each satellite, which 
would mean greater competition 
“ and slimmer profits, Mr. Tomer 


said at a conference on the satellite 
and cable- television industry. 

Mr. Turner said there were “way 
more networks planned than are 
already up there,” more than he 
believed themaiket could support, 
and he predicted there woukToe “a 
lot of money lost in the game be- 
fore it’s over.” 

He said that in “any business 
where the cost of entry is very low, 
then usually the profit margins are 
very low too." 


Mr. Turner, owner of Tumor 
Broadcasting Systems Inc, spoke 
of the ease with which companies 
could enter the satellite transmit- 
ting business. 

“All you have to do,” he said, “is 
purchase a transponder and have, 
or be able to acquire, programming 
at a reasonable enough cost so you 
don’t go brake” 

The STAR TV network, which 
broadcasts in Asia and is 63.6 per- 
cent-owned by Rupert Murdoch's 


News Corp„ said it would have a 
loss of about $20 million in 1994. 
But STAR, which has access to 
News Corp.’s film library and other 
programming sourcing, is expected 
to start covering its costs next year. 

Turner Broadcasting System has 
its own programming library for its 
TNT and Cartoon Network, which 
it will launch in Asia this year. 

Mr. Turner said the new network 
would incur losses but that having 


its own library would lessen the 

finanrial rink 

Turner said that CNN, which has 
been available across Asia since 
1982, made money in the region, as 
it did in other parts of the world. 
Although TNT and Cartoon Net- 
work will lose money “for quite a 
while, ” he said, the amount was “not 
going to be significant, because we 
already own the programming.” 

(Beuurs, AFP) 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan on Thursday protested the 
U3. government’s postponement of approval for 
flights by Japan Air lines Co. between the north- 
ern Japanese city of Sendai and Honolulu. 

In a message delivered to" the U.S. Embassy in 
Tokyo, the Foreign Ministry said the U.S. action 
violated a 1984 aviation agreement between the 
two countries and called for approval of the route, 
a ministry official said. 

Officials from Japan’s Transport Ministry spec- 


ulated that the US. delay may be connected to its 
request for more flights for US. airlines, including 
a Detroit-to-Sydney route via Osaka and a New 
York-to-Sydney route via Tokyo. 

■ Japan Agrees to Promote U.S. Chips 

Japan agreed on Thursday to try to increase the 
domestic market share of U.S.-made computer 
chips, but said U3. manufacturers must make 
mare efforts to sell their products, Knight-Ridder 
reported from Waikolea, Hawaii, quoting the 
Kyodo news service. 


:■:! by 
i srd> 


REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 

COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 
MINISTRY OF HYDRAULIC AND ELECTRIC RESOURCES 

INVITATION TO BID 

The Lebanese Government, represented by. the Ministry of Hydraulic and Electric Resources and the 
Council for Development and Reconstruction (CDR), is launching an international tender for the 
supply and the construction of the electrical line of Dbayeh pumping station from the power 
generation plant of Zouk. 

This supply will comprise two 66 KV buried electric power lines (3 x 300 mm*, 15 MVA each) on an 
approximate length of 4,100 m and all relative works including connection equipments. 

Suppliers will have to deliver a fully fitted and ready for use supply within a maximum duration of 39 
weeks. 

Financing is available from the Italian Government for Italian contractors. Non-Italian contractors are 
also invited to participate to the tender on the condition that their offer be linked to a financing 
proposal. 

Tender Documents will be available at the CDR office at the cost of US$ 500 (Five Hundred US 
Dollars) as from Thursday, 24 March 1994 at the following address: 

CouncD for Development & Reconstruction 
Tfellet El-Seray - PO Box 116-5351 
Beirut - Lebanon 

Deadline for returning the duly completed document with ail requested justifications is 12:00 noon 
(Beirut Local Time) on Thursday, 26 May 1994. 


win/ 



Jardines 


Highlights 1993 

Jardine 

Another Record Year 

■ Profit after taxation and outside interests + 23% 

■ Earnings per share +21% 

■ Dividends per share +18% 

■ Net asset value per share + 34% 

■ Outstanding performance by Jardine Fleming 

■ New investments lay foundation for future expansion 

■ Hong Kong property values boost Shareholders' funds 

* Over the years, Jardine Matheson, together with its affiliates, has become a multinational 
business employing more than 200,000 people in over 30 countries around the world, its 
particular strength is in the Asia-Pacific Region, which remains the world's prime growth area, 
but the Group also has extensive investments elsewhere , which hold promise for the future. 
While it is too early to forecast how earnings will develop in 1994, the Group’s Financial 
strength and diversity of business allow it to look forward with confidence. ” 

Henry Keswick, Chairman 
23rd March 1994 


Ion- 

r* 

Doth x 

of a 

n 

“in 

1 

ntly 

ni 

ti 

am- 

ai 

■one 

le 

■ be- 

io 

firm 

v is 

jl 

lop- 

th 

cow 

to 

Lets 

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kets 

ih 

gin 

hi 

of 


had 

re 

es- 

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er. 

min 

se 

=ent 

3c 


iri 


uk 


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159 

I 

igh 

s 

iih 


ear 

1 




, p REPUBLIC OF LEBANON 

* 1 * ** 

> COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION 


INVITATION TO BID 

~ The Lebanese Government, represented by the Ministry of Transportation and the Council for 
Development and Reconstruction (CDR), is launching an international tender for the supply of buses. 

: The tender W iu comprise 140, 7.5 to 9 meter long buses, with a capacity of 40 passengers, of which 
j 20 seated, for the urban public transport (mainly Beirut). 

• Suppliers will have to deliver the 140 buses folly fitted for use in several equivalent lots spread on a 
maximum duration of 18 months. 

Fmanrino i* available from the Italian Government for Italian suppliers. Non-Italian suppliers are also 
invited to participate to the tender on the condition that their offer be linked to a financing proposal. 

rp , TWnmpnN will be available at the CDR office at the cost of US$ 2,000 (Two Thousand US 

■ Council for Development & Reconstruction 

Tallet El-Seray - PO Box 116-5351 
Beirut - Lebanon 


J! ^ 



Year ended 31 st December 


1993 

US$m 

1992 

USSm 

Turnover 

8,424.5 

7,899.5 

Operating profit 

362.0 

335.9 

Share of profits less losses of associates 

467.9 

362.1 

Net interest expense 

15-6) 

(10.6) 

Profit before taxation 

824.3 

687.4 

Taxation 



— Company and subskfiary undertakings 

(66.4) 

(52.8) 

— associates 

(93.6) 

(77.8) 

Profit after taxation 

6643 

556.8 

Outside interests 

(275J5) 

(240.0) 

Profit after taxation and outside Interests 

388J3 

316.8 

Extraordinary items 

35J2 

30.7 

Profit attributable to Shareholders 

424.0 

347.5 

Dividends 

(1283) 

(110.0) 

Retained profit for the year 

295.7 

0 70n A 

237.5 

n iv> 7 O 

wHUiCl lUIUUla l lintS' 

£,f£Ua>l 

US* 

£,UU7.3 

use 

Earnings per share 



— basic 

67.21 

56.97 

— fully-diluted 

6631 

54.59 

Dividends per share 

22.00 

18.70 


^ ir the dulv completed document with all requested justifications is 12:00 noon 

Deadline for returning uk • « j 1904 

(Beirut Local Tune) on Thursday, 20 May 


Ja refine Matheson Holdings Limited 

Incorporated in Bermuda with limited liability 

TtefbvaltBvkfate of USe1530 per stem wilt be payable on 10th Juno 1994 , subject to approval at the Annual General Meeting to be hold on 
2 nd June 1994, to Shanhoktors on the register of members at the doee of business cn raft April 1994 and w& be avaBabto In cash with a 

scrip alternative. The stem registers wtS be closed from 18th to 22nd Aprt 1994 indusiVB. The dividend wiS be available In United States 
Dollars, Hong Kong Dollars or Sterling. Shareholders on the International branch register wftl receive United States Dollars while 
Shareholders on the Hong Kong branch register wfS receive Hong Kong Dollars, unless they elect for one of the alternative currencies by 
notifying the Company's registrars or transfer agents by 20th May 1994. Shareholders whose shares are held through the Central Depository 
System In Singapore (VOF? wffl receive Hong Kong DoBam, unleas they elect through CDP to receive United States Dollars. 












Page 18 


INTERN ATION.A L HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


SPORTS 






Gretzky’s Record of Creativity 



By Helene Elliott 

Las Angda Tima Serrke 
INGLEWOOD, California — He was too 





knowing nods. Didn t have much of a shot. 
Couldn't score on a breakaway if the Stanley 
Cup depended on iL They laughed over the 46- 
goal season be recorded as a teen-ager in the 
World Hockey Association. In the NHL, where 
men are men and elbows to the jaw are dis- 
pensed without mercy, he would be just another 
failed pbenom. 

Yeah, this Wayne Gretzky kid had no future. 

Neither did another scrawny, blond small- 
town boy who joined the pro basketball ranks 
that same year, 1979. He couldn't jump, 
couldn't shoot and he was destined to be a 
casualty in the nightly wars under the basket 
Larry Bird bad no chance, either. 

Gretzky still doesn’t have what players call a 
heavy shot, one that stings goaltenders’ hands. 
He stopped growing at a modest 6 feet (1.8 
meters), never attaining the bulk of a Phil 
Esposito. And be has yet to master the art of 
scoring on breakaways. If he had developed 
that knack, he joked last week, “I probably 
would be well beyond the 802." 


800 goals, a player would have to average 40 
goals per season for 20 seasons. Or 20 goals for 
40 seasons. Gretzky, whose record-setting goal 
was his 37 ih this season, has averaged 35 goals 
over 14 NHL seasons. He broke Howe's record 
in his 1,117th game; Howe needed 1,767 to 
score his 801. 

For his career, Gretzky has averaged 2.19 
points per game; Howe averaged 1.05 per game 
and finished with 1,850 NHL points. If he had 


His game isn't rink-lengih rushes. like Paul 


Coffey, or the pure speed up the wing of Mike 
Gartner. It isn’t breakaways or shots from the 
point or one-handing a shot with two defenders 
on his back, as Lemieux can do with the reach 
afforded by his 6-4 frame. 

What be did was bring to hockey a vision and 
creativity never seen before. 

Gretzky’s game is built on quickness, not 
flat-oot speed. It’s the ability to know where the 
puck is going to be, to dan there, startle a 
defender and force a turnover with a flick of his 
stick. 

His game is seeing everything, analyzing it 
and acting a split-second too quickly for oppo- 
nents to react. By the time they realize he has 
set up behind the net, he has already released a 
pass to a teammate who was left open for a 
shot. Thai’s why that bit of ice behind the 
opposition's net has become bis favorite spot. 
Ins command post, because from there he can 
see everyone coming at him and recognize 
where his best play mil be. 


averaged as many points per g 3 ™ as Gretzky, 
he would have collected 3,940 points. Among 


he would have collected 3,940 points. Among 
the NHL's top 100 point leaders, only Mario 
Lemieux comes close to Gretzky’s wizardry. 


Lemieux has averaged 103 points per game, 
but his career is being threatened by back 
problems. No other player in the top 100 has 
averaged as many as 1.5 points per game. 

The sellout crowd of 16,005, which moments 
earlier saluted Oscar winner Tom Hanks with a 
standing ovation at his Forum seat, gave 
Gretzky an even louder cheer. This crowd 
knows class. 

“Six years ago when 1 came to LA* they said 
California wasn't a great hockey area," Grttzky 
said during the ceremony that commemorated 
his goal “Mr. (Bruce) McNall brought me 
down here six years ago, and we showed North 
America that they were wrong." 

“To the fans of LA_ I’ve loved playing here 
for six years and I'd love to play another six 
years." 

Gretzky doesn't have a mean streak like 
Howe, who probably would have checked his 
grandmother into the cheap seats if she stood 
between him and the net. He didn't revolution- 
ize the concept erf how to play a position, as 
Bobby Orr did for defensemen. He didn't have 
the slap shot that Bobby Hull made famous. 
He's not tall enough to have the regal air of Jean 
Bcliveau. He didn't invent the goalie mask or 
the curved stick. 



Gretzky has become the 
scoring leader. 

With a neat bat unsc 


-’s career 


Hie Kings' Wayne Greta 
year career, which broke 


BUkc Scfl/Raaen 

^debating the 8Q2d goal of Ms 15- 
NHL record bdd by Gordie Howe. 


With a neat bat unspectacular wrist shot 
from the near edge of the left faceoff circle, 
Gretzky on Wednesday scored his 802d goal 
and broke Gordie Howe's NHL record. The 
Great One became the greatest one, grabbing 
the only significant NHL scoring record he 
didn't have after he broke Howe’s NHL point 
record in 1989 by scoring the second goal m the 
Los Angeles Kings' 6-3 loss to the Vancouver 
Canucks. 

To appreciate bis feat, think of this; To score 


Jazz Attack Shaq, 
But the Magic Use 
Their Other Tricks 


0 


The Associated Pros in October because one of its prime 

The Utah Jazz couldn't stop sponsors is McDonald ’* a rotan- 
rheir slide by surrounding Sha- rantdi^ thasdlsi^Coca-Co^ 
ouille 0*NeaL The US. team will be the second 

The Jazz blanketed O’Neal, manned byNBA plaj^Thc^ 

holding him to 11 shots, but the which mchided Michad Jordan 
strategy made room for Orlando’s Magic Johnson, Lany Bird and 
omsid? shooters, and the Magic Charles Barkley, won the 1992 
won, 98-93, on Wednesday night. Olympic gold medaL 
“Every time I touched the ball. In to Mag«>Jazz game, Anfer- 
guys dropped and I wm just ttying “1 JSSLHJSK' 


manned by NBA players. The first, 
which included Michael Jordan, 


Magic Johnson, Lany Bird and 
Charles Barkley, won the 1992 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


His record- breaking goal was only a wrist 
shot, like hundreds henas scored, but u was the 
completion Of a clever passing sequence with 
Luc Robitaflle and Marty McSorley. Robitaille 


to hit the open man." said O'Neal, 
who made seven of his 11 shots and 
scored 19 points, 10 under his aver- 


nee Hardaway scored n pcants, 
Dennis Scott 18 and Scott Saks 11, 
pine of tom in to fourth quarter, 
to Orlando. Soles bad a 3-pomter 
with 2:44 left and Mi a 17-footer 
with 11 seconds remaining, giving 
to Magic a 94-91 advantage. 

"1 •feAnt a — * 


left a drop pass to Gretzky, who passed to 
McSoriey on the right side. McSorley passed 
back to Gretzky, who quickly put the puck in 
to net. 

Nothing flashy, just subtle, smart and well 
executed. 

Is he greater than Howe? Purists will argue 
Howe was superior because be set bis records 
against tougher competition, in the days of to 
six-team NHL and before overexpansion diluted 
talent. But he didn’t have to endure an 84-game 
schedule or to draining coast- Lo-ccast travel 
Gretzky faces. There's no real answer, merely to 
fun of arguing and to joy of appreciating the 
unique gifts each has brought to the game. 


O'Neal’s frustration surfaced 
late in the game when he was whis- 
tled for a technical foul with 2:02 
left for elbowing Tyrone Corbin. 
Utah made two of to three result- 
ing free throws, closing to 89-87. 

Of his elbow to Corbin, O'Neal 


John Stockton's 3-poini attempt 
r a tie bounced off the rim, and 


for a tie bounced off the rim, and 
Orlando's Jeff Turner was fouled 
on to rebound. Turner converted 
both free throws to make it 96-91 
with 6.4 seconds remaining. 

Karl Malone had 27 pcants and 
17 rebounds and Stockton 22 


said, “I just have to let people know points and 12 assists for the Jazz, 
they can't grab on me all night. If who lost for to sixth time in seven 
somebody’s not going to do some* games after winning 10 straight- 


thug about it, I guess I have to." 

Things weal better to O’Neal on 
Thursday, however, when PepsiCo 
Inc, with which he has an exclusive 
mar keti n g agreement, agreed to let 
him play on to U.S. team in the 
weald championships in Toronto 
this summer. He had quit the team 


Lakers 11Z Mavericks 109: In 
Dallas, to Lakers outscored the 
home team, 13-2, in the final min- 
utes. 

The Mavericks, who lost their 
12th straight, trailed, 65-55, with 


8:24 left in the third quarter, before 
chanting back behind Dcwa Smith,. 


Vanderbilt, 

Villanova 

Advance 


Johnson 9 s Back Where He Belongs 


The Associated Pros 
NASHVILLE Tennessee — Van- 
derbilt is two victories away bom its 
second National Invitation Tourna- 
ment champ ionship in five years. 

Yandy (19-1 1) has pulled itself 
up from a lackluster loss to Auburn 
in to first round of the Southeast- 


er ROUNDUP 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washington Poet Sendee 

This is where Earvin Johnson belongs, in the gym, an NBA gym. 
One of to greatest basketball minds who ever lived doesn't boons 
on some traveling caravan, being banned by an AIDS-hysterical 
foreign government Finally, after a lot of foolishness from men such 
as Jeny Colangelo and Karl Malone, somebodyhashad the wisdom 
and decency to embrace Magic. Lucky Lakers. The only thing better 
than having him for an entire career would be having him for a 
second career. 

If you're wailing here for the voice of a skeptic, somebody to 
sound a note of caution because he’s never coached before, because 
transcendent players rarely make great coaches, because of what to 
stress might to do to his health, blah, blah, blah, you’d better turn the 


ern Conference tournament. 
Wednesday night the Commo- 
dores earned a ticket to to NIT 
semifinals with an 89-74 victory 
over Gemson (18-16). 


it possible he can be a flop as a coach? Sure. People who insist 


“We’re playing a tot looser, with 
lot more confidence and more as 


a lot more confidence and more as 
a team." guard Frank. Seckar said. 


Seckar enjoyed a perfect night 
om the floor, hitting all five of his 


from to floor, hitting all five of his 
shots, including four from 3-point 
range, to finish with 15 points. 

Seckar’ s back court teammate, 
Billy McCaffrey, scored 27 points. 
“I’ve never beat in the NlT and I 
want to win it,” said McCaffrey, a 
senior who transferred to Vander- 
bilt from Duke three years ago. 

Vanderbilt defeated Saint Louis, 
74-72, in to 1990 title game. 

VBlanova 76, Xavier (OMo) 74: 
In Villanova, Pennsylvania, fresh- 
man Jason Lawson had 17 points, a 
season-high 15 rebounds and six 
blocked snots for winners. 

Eric Ebeiz hit a jump shot with 
25 seconds left and Kerry Kittles 
made two free throws with 5 sec- 
onds remaining to seal the win to 
to Wildcats (18-12). 


they know to sure so-and-so is destined to be a great coach or 
destined to be a bad coach aren’t to be believed. We don’t know. We 
never know. About anybody. 

We didn’t know about Joe Vantage 

Gibbs or Pat Riley or Guide Point J • 

Daly or Richie Petitbon. And we 

don't know about Magic. But if we're taking sides here, will he or 
won’t be. r m betting well soon lookback on this day and ask, “Why 
in the world did people doubt he'd be a great coach?" 

First, even if Magic turns out to be to worst coach in to league, 
to Lakers will have lost nothing. They’re terrible now, 20Vi games 
behind first-place Seattle, 516 games behind in to race to the final 
playoff spot. Everybody you remember from the '80s is gone except 
James Worthy. The Forum is half -empty most nights. So tins end-of- 
season experiment isn’t going to cost the dub a thing, even in the 
worst-possible scenario, m which they’d lose a bunch of games and 
probably get a higher draft pick. 

The potential problems are real, not imagined. He has to make the 
transition from preparing himsdf for a game, to preparing an entire 
team. The players he’s coaching aren’t going to ocas good as be is 
now, two years into retirement Between games, he’ll nave to teach 
them things he’s done naturally for 20 years. He*fl have to pick up to 
nuances of calling timeouts and substituting, without benefit of 
apprenticeship. Even John Lucas coached at to minor league level 
Riley had a few minutes as an assistant before becoming head coach. 

The tme theory most people seem to be buying into is that great 
players cannot become great coaches. Lenny wilkens, who's about 
to pass Red Auerbach to all-time victories, is a Hall of Famer. Dan 
Issd was one of to best Mg men in to history of the ABA. Jerry 


Sloan, Rudy T., Paul Westphal, Kevin Loughery, Lucas and Nelson 
aren't all-timers, but all were big-time players on championship- 
caliber teams. So there is precedent. 

Magic was obviously a once-ih-a-lifetime player, but it’s not like 
he relied solely on physical gifts. He could never run or jump very 
well and he taught himself to be a great shooter. The Doc and 
Michael were The Naturals; Magic's game was as much mental as it 
was physical Through work and thought he took the doable to an 
absurdly high level. With Magic, it was all about looking at another 
videotape, talking to some obscure scout who might have seen an 
opposing player, squeezing a piece of information out of a reporter 
or ex-player mat might help him on the road one right in Sacramen- 
to. The levd of Ms preparedness and fanaticism through 12 seasons 
was almost incomprehensible. 

Wifi he be able to make players do what has been communicated? 
Can he inspire people to leave their egos at to door and play to their 
potential, or above it, night after right? Can he make a difference in 
a player’s league, a league where coaches, at best, enhance? That’s 

the challenge. 

I suspect, though, given that HIV-positive people are participating 
fully in every walk of life. Coach Magic Johnson will bring Ms 
personality to to bench and be one ruthless, uncompromising 
coach. You know that trillion-dollar smile we saw for 12 years? 



Forget it, ifs gone. 
This is more thau 


Jins is more than a hunch. A couple of years ago during tbe NBA 
finals, Mapc got to talking about wry he didn't think he could be a 
coach. “Because when I ask for defense, I want defense," be said. “I 
wouldn’t be one of the boys, I don’t want to see you making a face, I 
want you in that guy’s jersey!" Magic, at the time, knew be couldn't 
coach A.C Great, Byron Scott, Sam Perkins, all those former 
teammates. He figured it was just too difficult to make the transition 
from one of to boys to authoritarian overnight. 

Probably, be was right But enough time has passed. Green, Scott 
and Perkins are gone. The kids who now wear Lakers uniforms think 
of him as to preeminent basketball god, which he is. This wall be one 
of the few times in sports where the coach is richer, more talented, 
more recognized than all of to players. Every one of them. Did you 
see how Riley benched three starters and jump-started tbe Kmcks to 
a 10-game winning streak? The first thmg Magic will do is make 


Vince Socd/Agon Fnacc-Prenc 

Magic Johnson talking after he was named Lakers coach. 


players value playing time more than their pa 
During Wranesday’s news conference, one of the first things 
Magic said was that right or nine players — those playing — would 
love him and to other three or four would bate Mm, but that that 
was O.K. Never one of to boys anyway, distance and age have really 
enabled him to take a half-step back. Already, before bring intro- 


duced as to newest Lakers coach, Marie called Riley, The Coach. 
He had already planned conversations with Bill Sharmaa and Jerry 
West. 

For 12 years in to NBA and two before that at Michigan State, 
Magic has coached. We just called it playmaking. Through five 
cbampionsMp seasons and four other trips to the NBA Finals, to 
Lakers did what Magic told them to do. They ran to this spot or that, 
set tbe appropriate screen, rotated on defense, spread to court, and 
whatever rise based on his word, nod or scowl 

You look at tbe name “Lakers’' down toward to bottom of the 
standings and it’s hard to figure how this move is anything but the 
right move, to only move. 


charging back behind Doug Smith, 
who scored a career-high 36 points 
to lead, 107-99. with 2:29 left. 

But Nick Van Exri, who scored 
28 prints, led to Lakers down the 
stretch, scoring five points in the 
game-winning run before passing 
for their final three baskets. 

Hanks 100, Hornets 92s In At- 
lanta, the Hawks became to first 
Easton Conference team to clinch 
a playoff berth as Kevin Willis had 
32 points and 16 rebounds against 
Charlotte. 

Alonzo Mourning led the Hornets 
with 25 points and 15 rebounds. 
Stacey Auginon finished with 20 
prints arm Moritie Blaylock 18 
prints, 14 assists and five steals fa 
Atlanta, winch improved to aa 
NBA-best 294 at home and took a 
half-game lead over the New Yak 
Knicks for first place in to East' 
BnBs 99, 76ers 87: In Phfiadel- 
phia, Soottie Pippen scored 31 
points on 14-for-I9 shooting as 
Chicago handed Philadelphia its 
eighth straight home loss. 

Pippen scored 10 points during 
an 1845 run that gave to Bulls a 5f 
44 halftime leaid, and they led by as 
many as 17 in to second half. The 
Sixers lost for the 20th time in 21. 
games overall • j 

Facers 78, Cavafiera 77: In India- 
napoHs, Indiana turned the tables 
on Cleveland, in to last second of 
tbe game. 

Dale Davis put baric an offensive 
rebound with 0.8 seconds remain- j 
ihg, giving the Pacers to victory 
one night after the Cavaliers em- 
barrassed them, 93-61. 

Cleveland scored just 27 prints 
in to first half, but Marie Price's 
16-footer gave to Cavs a 77-76 
lead with 10 seconds left. 

The Pacers, with no timeouts, 
rushed the ball downcourt on their 
final possesion, and Reggie MSler 
missed a 15-footer from the base- 
line. But Davis was open for the 
rebound and made the layup. 



U ■ - •- - 




MENACE 


PEANUTS 


THIS 15 MY REPORT ON 
THE BUSINESSMAN BARBER 
I INTERVIEWED.. 

~*mrm 


YEARS AGO, HE 5AICJ 
HAIRCUTS WERE THIRTY-FIVE 
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WERE A NICKEL.. 


BRINGS BACK A LOT OF 
MEMORIES FOR T0U, j 
v HUH, MA'AM? [A 


BUT NO ONE EVER 
DENTISTS? „ 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


Page 19 


mans 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


•mcmuiivnoi neratd Tribune ^ mnds ° r a Tomd ^ across the ring and make 

STUTTGART —The German fbo, u S c °PP onenI s^ fer for celebration? Ii is unique lo ■ i rn i pn i 

Italian flags were flappintwES is ¥“ Gcnnan y* **“ *9*^ champion until someone ultimately f Ir A Chief oLLDTITlftllP/l 

as if flagsbear only X K of provcs bcllcr *“ a™®**- The odds grew Wednesday 1 V>AUC ' A UUUIUIUUCU 

fans were smanE because halt. a * amil everyone else. The Associated Press 


v- — • . ■ * ‘ . ■ 


.''Si. 

■ . 


f - 


chose lo make only two substitutions. u Ii*s too difflculi for Klinsmann, always sunning, was ready to collect the 

tD6 tesun if YOU c han ge more than tWnT VnPfC nnnnpf o^iisn A nAr**QQ Untlof’e Am MIMA Toft HAnf 


as u nags Dear only the breeze of ihrir A*™ . « ” x*T7 wuh uw aumuiw. me uuu> grew weoDesoay 

*fans were singing because tafy bad just Mn“SJdof t ^ levei y oae !^. The Associated Press 

. Gwmany, 1-0, and. for the moment you were caught no m ^ °P lums ¥ . for *!* fulu * of this BERN — Joio Havdange, the long-reigning president 

. the elementary euphoria of international soccer of one aft "£j' s sc®®* 1 §oal had complet- of international soccer’s governing body, FIFA, has been 

side glumly allowing the visitors their cheer — then Germanjfs 2-1 victmy. ^Now we can see that we are summoned to discuss his contested redection bid with the 
1 something on the field was happening, able to beat everyone. This is a good base for us to build heads of the five con tinemal federations. 

OnN a mmute remained in the half, and any other of the T 5? loday ’ have every chance of winning The European Football Union, UEFA on Thursday 

.Woritf Cup finalists aright have spent itmbSStte ** W ° rld Cup ” "*■ it! had Sraned the meeting for April 5 in ZurichJt 

► w ® tu *jB to recuperate in the privacy of the chanema The Italians arrived without Roberto Baggio, European “id Havdange had agreed to attend. 

• room. Really, that kind of attitude is just an excuse to fed P^yer of the year, sidelined by a knee injury. Thai said, Havdange, a Brazilian who has ruled FIFA since 1974, 

sorry for oneself, but the truth of it doesn’t come out until 1,16 two ,eams P 811 ^ witii the understanding that one is comes up for redection this June. He faces increasing 
you watch the Germans. They don’t fed sorry for any- hurting the mountain steadily while the other is uncer- criticism by soccer officials, ind tiding U.S. World Cup 
body. J 3 lain how to go from here to there. A 2-1 loss at Germany is organizers, lor his autocratic ways. 

They didn’t care about the referee’s stopwatch or their no ^Smce; but the Italians were also beaten last month in UEFA has taken the lead in (he cam paign p gainct 
. miserable record against Italy (five victories in 23 meet- Naples by nonqualifiers France. Havdange- UEFA’s own president, Lennart in fiaosson of 

' mgs), or ihrirown old age or — certainly not this — the Their direction is hard to fathom. Ail that separates Swedai, is tipped as a candidate for the job. 

■looming embarrassment of defeat at home. They were nianager Arrigo Sacchi from his deposed colleague, Gra- Havdange infuriated UEFA by announcing at a meet- 
" 0 OU1 8 u> . sc ®[ e - T°u realized none of this until something kam Taylor of England, is a goal by Portugal last Novem- big hi New York last month that he had unanimous 
“W. m “c Italians collective throat Down below, her. Had the Portuguese scored once mare in their 3-0 support for his renewed candidacy. The Europeans said 
. -Matuuas hammer was chasing the ball as if he had just qualifier ova- Estonia, they would have come to Milan a l»i*r they had not asked him to stand for redection. 

1 see £- tI ■? urde f somebody. With a slide he dug it off the wec k later needing only a draw to take Italy’s place in the 
’ 11110 100 box, and in its mid-flight everyone real- World Cup finals. 

* **“,!,?* G f nnans had cbsrgeti As it was, Sacchi employed 34 players in the dgfn 

d^doorlSt been S2 VU l g ttWar , d games — numbers famiSar w Taylor, who 

a WaS **“ CquaI ' ^Perimented and experimented without solving anything. 

; “nSHKff - head , To congratulate Italy for aggressive play Wednesday is to 

How many champions get up from a knockdown in the ignore the fact that it createdaLnost no chances for the 


_ •* — — — ii iw wuiiwuii lyi 

the team if you change more than two" Vogts said. 

With 84 days to go. who among the 12 European 


finalists can be expected to chaligny Ge rman y? Perhaps year-old midfielder Guido Buchwald. “I 
the Dutch can lure back Ruud Gullit and overcome the ire can play better. This is a good start 


winner when Andreas MDller’s shot came off the left post. 
“The German team is a tournament team.” said 33- 

year-old midfielder Guido Buchwald. “In the tournament 

«vmi sMivt nlo^r haf tar Tkle !a n naa^ ** 


World Cup finals- 

As it was, Sacchi employed 34 players in the eight first 55 minutes. Not until die I talians trailed did they convinced the others to run whhhim, at one point pub tidy 
qualifying games numbers familiar lo Taylor, who begin to assert themselves, and even if they had equalized embarrassing than after no one came forward to provide 
experimented ana experimented without solving anything, with their five chances during a melee in the83dmmute.it him support on the right side. 

^Lf. 8 S^ Ivei>tey w 5 dncsd3 y “ 10 would not have covered up their problems. Sacchi went They might have scored five coals, bm when thev didn't, 

■gnorc .Ik /act tha. u cra.ed almost no cfcmc* for (ta through 15 pl&yen, wiiileGennan manager Beni Vogu thuyVeroS.&co^^lSuMfarotSwtaU 


loss of Marco van Basten; perhaps BraziTs victray These, for their opponents, are the most worrisome 
Wednesday is an omen; perhaps the mood is right for truths of alL 
another Denmark to surprise everyone. Or perhaps the old 

age of the Germans, against the inability of opponents to ■ A Good Start for Brazil 

Sfe f. P wTS^S‘ro OW ”’ “ ** tep0ram Bebc .0 roorod mice to give Bnrol a 2-C vicror, « 

gn lo be. Argentina in their exhibition match Wednesday, the Bra- 

Theu starting lineup included seven players from the Titians’ first win over their old enemies for five years, 
1990 final, among them 32-year-old captain Lothar Reuters reported from Recife. Brazfl. 

MatthSus, since rerovered from a severe knee injnry, and An overwd gb t-1 ooking Diego Maradona sat on the 
33-year-old fullback Andreas Brdune, the scorer of the substitutes’ bench wearing the No. 11 shirt but Argentine 
victorious penalty four years ago who was supposed to coach Alfio Basile resisted the tem ptation to bring fum on. 

^o^«S^! I ! tC ^ aD r^ y V ter *i c 1992 “®Pf“ Brazil, which led from the seventh minute, played some 

Sn has even talked of spaHding soccer in the first 20 minutes with tfidr play- 
recallug 33-year-old striker Rudi VOUer. maker Btiii finally playing like his old sdf. 

Though they did without Karlheinz Riedle, and Mattb- But the game degenerated after that with both sides 
Sus was staying back a gains t the ineffective but relentless committing a succession of cynical fouls and Argentina's 
I t a lia n pressure, the German attack flourished cm the runs players arguing almost every decision. Bebeto wrapped 
of Thomas H assler and the constant chasing of Klins- the ud with a header in the 76th min ute. 

mnnn Iati» elnVar 1 AAA U a ..aaJ . “ . * . _ ... _ „ 


Brazil, which led from the seventh minute, pla 

1 . 1 : .i e in : :.L A 


manm the lone striko- and another hero erf 1990. He used Argentina desperately needed the creativityofa fully fit 
to VgrtarAe dub m Stutgart, and by examrfe he Maradona iri nndfidd and relied on individual efforts 
convmod theothos to run wrth him, at one pomt pubbeh, from Batistuta for their best scoring 

embarrassing than after no one came forward to provide 

him amnnrt nn th^ noht ciH* _ . 


i;i >. ‘ 


. ... ■ ’ ■”’'^4% 


: -- „ 


' 1 " "»v -- 


■ * u L". 


'wr» T :• 





, Chen La practiced, bat It 
with a stress fracture of 


ter had to drop out of the cfaampiouslBps 
her right foot that wiD require surgery. 


Stojko Hits the Big Combination 


^ earera without a two-foot landing . But the quad-dou- 

CHIBA, Japan — Elvis Stojko of Canada ble was the plan. He jnst went for a little bit 
snatched the world men’s figure skating tit le f rom more.” 

France’s Philippe Canddoro cn Thursday with a The 22-year-old Canadian, who celebrated 
performance bordering on the stupendous. his birthday on Tuesday, had the quad-triple in 

Stqjko’s knockout blow was a quadruple- mind for the Olympics before opting out and 
triple combination jump that almost came off, finishing second. But all week here he has 
dose enough to earn him a perfect 6.0 from the insisted that it would be part of his routine. 
American judge. The rest of the program, to music from the 

The quad toe loop was perfect and he landed *?“ “^Dragon; The Bruce Lee Story," was 
e triple toe which followed but stumbled v^^ally flawless. 


the triple toe which followed but stumbled 
slightly on two feet 

Still, the other eight judges all gave him 5_9 
for technique and he was first on aB their cards. 

His performance followed a superb display 
by Canddoro in his “The Godfather" role, 
marred only by a single axel right at the end of 
his routine. Still, it looked good enough to win 
— until Stojko skated. 

Viacheslav Zagorodniuk of Ukraine was 
third. Olympic champion Alexei Unnanov was 
only fourth after falling on an atte m p ted qua- 
druple toe loop. 

Stqjko’s audacious move — he is the first 
skater ever to try a quad-triple in competition 
— was the fulfilment of a promise he had been 
making afl season to attempt it in competition. 

Stqjko’s coach, Doug Ldgh, had not expect- 
ed his charge to try the quad-triple. 

“1 expected quad-double. That’s what we 
discussed. He made a split-second decision lo 
try a triple. It was a great call,” Leigh said. 

“He did quad-triple in practice this morning. 


He began with a high triple lutz, followed by 
a triple axel-triple toe loop comb ination which 
he made look easy. 

Four more triples Followed the big move and 
he looked cool throughout. 

“It feels pretty amazing,” Stojko said. 
“Something like this is hard to explain. AD the 
times 1 spent at the rink, the hard times when I 
didn’t fed like going to the rink but I did 
anyway and I had a good day out of it. Today it 


truly paid off. 

“I landed the triple but stepped out of it But 
it was not a matter of going for perfection, 
which can never be achieved, but for excellence, 
which can be achieved. That’s what I was striv- 
ing for Stojko said. 

Of equal satisfaction to the Canadian were 
iris marks for artistry, mduding four of 5.9. 

Canddoro, 22, has now been beaten by 
Stojko four times in a mouth, in the technical 
and free programs at the Olympics, where he 
was third, and at the wodds. 

He was not dismayed. "There are three more 


world championships before we meet again at 
the next Olympics so we will have many bat- 
tles," he said. 

On the women’s side, the battle was over 
before it had started for Chen Lu, the Olym pi c 
bronze medalist from China 

Injury forced her out of the already depleted 
ranks of the women's event on Thursday. 

The foot injury which has pln gnwt the 17- 
year-old Chinese skater all week was finall y 
diagnosed as a navicular stress fracture on 
Thursday and a Japanese doctor recommended 
that she undergo surgery. 

He said Chen already faced six mouths off 
the ice and, without an operation, could be out 
for a year. 

Her absence means that all three Olympic 
medal winners have dropped out of the event. 
Gold medalist Oksana Baiul has not recovered 
fully from the back injury sustained in a high 
speed practice collision at the Olympics, and 
runner-up Nancy Kerrigan said she was ex- 
hausted after the Olympics. 

Also Thursday, the Olympic champions Ok- 
sana Gritschuk and Evgeny Platov kq>t setting 
the pace in the ice dance event. 

The Russians won the o riginal dance, the 
second phase of the event, on the cards of all 
nine judges. In three dances they have been 
voted first by all the panel 

French couple Sophie Moniotte and Pascal 
Lavanchy remained m second place, ahead of 
Finns Susanna Rahkamo and Petri Kokko. 


Bebeto took a battering from Argentina full-back Jose 
Chamot, one of four Argentines and one Brazilian player 
to be booked. 


“'If': ' f - 


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fon- p 
both ^ 
of a u 
“in i_ 

ntiv ui 
' it 
am - at 
ong t* 

• be- _ 

firm 
1 is 3* 
lop- 
cow w 
bets * 
iv 

kets ^ 
gin « 
of 

had re 
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a 

iain se 
eat D: 
iri 
ok 

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ib 
iri 
us 
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tb 

y&- i oi 


Ton YmMkUAatBK Pnmee-Praje 

□vis Stojko used a quadnqrle-tiiple combo to inn the men's title. 


d ■ M T 


d-'U.S. Goes for a Go-Go Game 

, NEW YORK (Reuters) — A set of changes designed to stimulate 
offense and make soccer more appealing to Ame r ican fans has been 
' ; announced by the U.S. Soccer Federation, which is turning its develop- 
• r mental league into a rules laboratory. 

USSF president Alan Rothenberg said that FIFA had given the go- 
r~. ___ ahead for the experiments to be conducted this season in the U.S. 

. -. i- -• , Interregional Soccer League. The third-division USISL, made up of 72 
_ ’• - learns in 34 states from coast to coast, begins a five-month season in eariy 

- April and w£U use its eight divisions to test different rules. 

... - Experiments involve enlarging the goal size, punishing committers of 
: multiple fouls, providing for free kicks and shoo touts, shortening some 
. " comer kicks, and c ha n g in g rules involving the throw-in and use of the 
1 " Hock in the game. 

“This is a turning point for soccer in the United States,” he said, noting 
V tbe World Cup wUlbe hosted here this summer and next spring will bring 
- - _ ; the lfum ch of Mqor League Soccer, a fust diviaon outdoor professional 

" league. “We want to make it more exciting, more entertaining to improve 
^ ^ *»‘this exeat game.” 

— South Africa to Host ’98 Nations Cup 

* TUNIS (Reuters)— South Africa are to host the 1998 African Nations 
x-.'Cop finals after beating out Burkina Faso by 31 votes to 10 at the 

■Confederation of African Football’s congress in Tunis. 

'■*, ; The derision on Wednesday comes less than two years after South 
i ^ ! Africa’s readnrission to international soccer. 

■ ■ “We are delighted to get this sort of recognition so quickly after our 
2^ 'y \ acceptance into the African fold," said Solomon Morewa, secretary- 
‘*<V? . .general of the South African Football Association. 

J 1* Kenya’s candidacy for the next edition of the Nations Cup finals m 
• ; • , V.' 1996 will be confirmed in September, CAF derided on Wednesday. In 
L this year’s finals, starting Saturday in Tunis, Nigeria is the favorite. 


Britain ’s Head Track (]«ach Quits 

LONDON (Combined Dispatches) — Frank Dick, a key Sgore in the 
■success of British track and field over the last decade, announced on 
^ 'Thursday that he was quitting as the national director of coaching. 

; Diet who has held toe post for 14 years, has been unhappy for some 
I Rut what brouHht matters to a head was a cut in the 


^ - P UJ1UL3U AUUCUW rwutfi UUVU « vvw a ““"D , II 1 

; i: In his resignation letter, he said the “draconian cut would damage 
emerging talent and insisted: “Having progressed the coachmg scheme to 

A I' its present high levd,rm not willing to owasee ns dennsa 

Earlier this month at toe Europran indoor championships m Pam, 
Britain won five gold medals, despite fielding & weakened . torn. And last 
■ ; summer Britain enjoyed its best-ever world championships m Smttgan 

■ with 10 medals, including golds for Cohn Jackson, Linford Chnstie aod 
. Sally GunnelL (ReuXerS} AFP) 

; Malay sia Suspends CoaA Amid Probe 

kijaia LUMPUR (Reuters) — Malaysia's national track and field 
^ ^dtagtheoulcoroeof poUcc == 

' into aUeged sexualSasstnent of a woman athlete, the Beraama news 

athlete filed cheiges With 

: - St 'Se Nfa^^aDAmiS^AtlileriK 8 ‘ 

an emergency meeting, Beraama said late Wednesday night 

V ' Upheaval Hite Austrian Ski Team 

y vqpxnq* / aFP) — Austria’s World Cup skiing team ms leflrn 
after top women s coaches 

forced out by the poor results 
i&by SiSTteS cf uwro Main at the Ganmroh- 

ul^i'fp emsch iir does not wwt to continue in 

‘ | We™! W9n.dk. head ot alpine skiing at the 

' "S .5“ nflnner who used to train the men’s team, had 

--,S angered a mnp of SaJviSis lo her credit, has had her 

- v Gtnther, 24, and with ax Worid ^p^ ^ m0nth dunng a 

/£5££li32£r ^tearing knee iigamn^ ■» 

^ .y* ‘her back in 1992. 


i left in 
coaches 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AHcntic Divtaim 

W L Pel 
NawVnrk 46 19 JOS 

Orlando 40 Z7 SfT 

Miami S3 79 Ml 

NawJtrsev 34 31 SI 

Boston 22 <2 J44 

PTillodeiptita 21 46 J13 

Wasnlnetan 1» 47 288 

Ceatml Ofvbioa 

XnAllonto 47 1* J12 

aikow 44 Z3 JS7 

Ctewrtand 37 » SS2 

Indiana 35 3D su 

Charlotte 29 36 Mt> 

DelroM W 47 -286 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

W L Pet OB 
x-Haustan 46 It 719 — 

x-SanAntoaJo 46 2D 411 1 

Utah 43 25 432 5 

Danvar 33 32 M 13M 

Minnesota 19 47 31 3 

Dallas B 58 .121 39 

Pacific Division 

x-Seattle 48 17 J38 — 

PhaenU 43 22 442 5 

Port 40 27 SI 9 

GokMn Stale 38 27 Jts ID 

LA. Lakers 28 37 Ml 20 

LA. Clippers 24 41 369 24 

So a o men ta 23 43 J48 2SV> 

4-cJinched oiayofl soot 

WEDNESOAVTS RESULTS 
CMcno 39 31 30 30—99 

PWtadeMlIa 22 32 22 21-87 

C: Plppen 14-10 SS 31. Grant 6-10 04) 12; P: 
Ptrrv 7-16 3-5 19, Woolridae 7-14 M 17. Re- 
bouBds— CMcago 55 (Grant 9). PMIadetphla 
42 (Perry 11). Assbts— Chicago 19 (Enaltsh. 
Grant 3), PhllodeWila 21 (Barras 7). 
Ctaiatte M 25 22 25- 92 

AUoalo 27 8* 31 26—100 

C: Mourning 5-18 15-1025. BaawesO-1504 14; 
A: Willis 12-22 7-6 32. Auamen 5-8 10-12 20. 
Rebounds— Onriotte 52 (MeunUno 15), Al- 
tetta 60 (WUUsl 61. A ssis t * QiartottaWIBo- 
gues 9), Atlanta 26 (Blaylock 14). 

LA dipper* 40 29 23 IS— W 

Detroit 38 31 21 29—111 

LA: Outlaw MOM 17. Harper M7B-9 27; D: 
Mills 10-19 VI 71, Hunter 9-20 1-2 19. Re- 
boaads— Lai Anodes 57 (Outlaw 14), Detroit 
58 (Mil Is 14). Assists— Las A n g e la 27 (Jock- 
son 15). Detroit 28 (Hunter 13). 


Cleveland 16 11 31 28-77 

(OdtaM 18 22 2i 18-71 

C: xwi I flams 7-14 VI 13kW1lklm7-154622; 
I: McKey 5-12 0-0 11 Smlts V7 4-4 la Re- 
hn i i s Cleveland 47 (J.Wliflants 16). Indi- 
ana 57 (ADavIS 11). Assists— aewtond T7 
(Brandon, Price 4), indtano 15 (McKey 5). 
LA. Lakers 35 18 29 30—112 

oesos 2 i n m at— no 

LA: ThreaTt 8-74 5-5 21, Van Exol 10-14M3I; 
D: DJSmHh 1M2 10-12 34. Jackson 7-11 W 17. 
Reboaods— Log Angeles 46 (EXBmdbeH 13|, 
DaUas39 ( D iScnMi7). Asstota-Las Angela 28 
(Van Exei. Dtvac6l. Dallas 26 (Jocksan 71. 
Ort BW dP 25 » 38 26-98 

UWh 16 U 19 38-93 

O: owed Ml Ml 19, Hardowav M8M7I; 
u: Malone 10-34 7-10 27. Stockton 9-15 M 22. 
Rebounds— Ortando 47 (O'Neal 8). Utah 54 
(Malone 17) .A nUts O riande21 (Hardaway, 
Andersen. SkHes 5), Utah 22 (Stockton 12). 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DMsisa 

W L imOFOL 
x-N-Y. Il a n eer * 45 22 7 97 245 207 

New Jersey 41 21 11 93 268 195 

Washington 34 31 8 76 235 224 

Florida 31 29 13 25 204 201 

Philadelphia 32 34 7 71 262 275 

N.Y. Istandvs 31 31 9 71 250 215 

Tampa Bay 25 39 10 40 198 229 

Northeast DMsiee 

Pittsburgh 38 23 13 89 267 253 

Montreal 38 23 12 88 252 207 

Boston 36 25 12 04 249 216 

BufWo 37 28 9 S3 2(6 196 

Quebec 30 36 7 47 240 247 

Hartford 24 42 ■ 56 197 248 

Ottawa 12 54 6 32 ITS 349 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Ohrtstaa 

W L TPbSFGA 
X-Tbranto 39 23 12 9D 242 210 

x -Detroit 42 24 5 09 312 24S 

x-Cal)as 38 25 M 86 248 225 

St Louts 35 29 9 79 231 247 

Chicago 35 31 I 78 224 206 

Winnipeg 22 44 8 S2 221 298 

Partite Dtvtrtea 

x -Calgary 36 27 12 84 269 2)S 

Vancouver 36 34 3 75 250 238 

SOI Jose 25 33 15 65 206 235 

Anaheim 27 41" 5 59 201 225 

Lab Aiwrtes 24 38 11 59 261 2M 

Edmonton 20 42 12 52 231274 

x-dtnctied playoff spot 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
SL Loots I 1 »-S 

Buffalo 1 0 V- 2 

First Period: B-Ptante 20 (Sutton. Audstte) 


(pg); SL-Nedved3 (Stastny. Duchesne) (pp>. 
Second Period: SL-Prekharev 13 < Tilley. 
Medved). TTrird Period: SL- Korolev 5 (Haw- 
ley); B-Khmylev25 (Boucher). Shots oe goal: 
5J- (on Hoick) 4-7-7—18. B (on Joseph) IV4- 
13-29. 

Detroit 1 2 1—4 

Ottawa 1 • 4-« 

Firs* Parted: D-LfmoMe 4 (Konstantinov, 
Sherxxud) (pg); O-Moyer 1 (Yoshbi). Second 
Ported: MbmR 3 (LooofcPe, Draper); D- 
Prtmeou 21 (HrtWdb). Third Period: O-Dow- 
dov 6 (Rumbte Murray); DAtvaeoR 4 (Shep- 
POrtL Draper); OWtayer 2 (Yashin. Bourque) 
(pp>; O-Tinean 8 (DaWe); O-Yoahln 26 
(McLhMdni Kunravd). Shots an goal: D (an 
Bfliingtan) 14-U-T3-41.0 (on Essmo) 53-7— IS 
Tsronto 8 0 1 0-4 

Florida 10 0 8-1 

First Period: F-Bames 20 (Meliantiy. Low- 
ry). Third Period: T-GUmour 26 (Gartner, 
Clork). Shots ox snot: T (on Fitzpatrick) 12- 
IV7-1 — 3L F (an Rhodes) 7-2-12-1—22. 
Mo n treal 0 8 1—1 

Winnipeg 2 0 V- 2 

Flnl Period: W-Emersan2B (Mansaa Dar- 
rin Shannon); W-LeBlonc 4 (Quintal, Dorrln 
Shannon). TWrd Period: M-OdeWn 71 (Bel- 
lows. Damphousse): W-Le6lanc 5 (Darrin 
Shannon, Steen). Sbeti engota: M(onChevel- 
dea) 15-1V14— dL W (on Tugnutt) 8-74-7—29. 
N.Y. Ra nger s 2 1 3-4 

Edmonton i 1 2—1 

First Period: N. Y. -Graves 5D (Messier, An- 
derson); N.Y, -Groves 51 (Ttkkanen.Karaovt- 
sev). Second Period: New York, Kovalev 16 
(Leetch. Beukeboom) ; E-McAmmand 6 (Mir- 
onov). TWrd Period: E-Anxtft 28 (Mironov, 
McAmmomt) (pp>; N.YvNoonon 15 (Zubov, 
Gilbert); N.Y.-Matfeau 17 (Kovalev); E-Ar- 
nott 29 (Been. McAmmond) (pg). Shots on 
gota: N.Y. (on RonforrL Brattwralte) 8-9-3—20. 
E (on Rlctiter} 5-16-17—32. 

V QPCOOver 0 3 3-4 

Los Angeles 8 2 V-3 

Second Period: LA^Canartier 12 (Me Reyn- 
olds. McSoriey) (shj; V-Gelinaa U (Slegr, Lo- 
favette) (pp); v -linden so (Momesn, Ron- 
nino); 1_A.-Gretdcy 37 (McSoriey. RoWtaine). 
(pp); V-Rannlng 23 ILumme. Linden). TWrd 
Period: V-Courtnall 26 (riedkxxv RonrUng) 
(pp); V-Unden 31 (Ronnlne, Bure) (pp); LA- 
RobKtalle3f (Draae.Zbtrnik);V-Bure 50 (Cra- 
ven) (en). Shots aa gota: V (an Hrudey) 76-23- 
W— 49. LA. (an McLeai) 9-1V14— 37. 


BASEBALL. 


Major League Scores 

PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAMES 
Ws dn st dgy l Resorts 
Alton to 6. New York Mels 5 
St Louts 4. pmsbureh 2 
Los Angeles 18. New York Yankees 10 
Cleveland & Cndrmafl 2 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 14) 



Houston IX Detroit • 

Boston 7, Texas 7. 1) innings, tie 
Toronto 1Z Minnesota 9 
Oakland Z Son Diego 0 
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Chicago While Sox 9, Baltimore s 
Colorado (si) A California 7, 10 Innings 
Colorado (ss) la Arizona 8 


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BASKETBALL 

Natloata Basketball Assodatloa 

BOSTON Re le as ed Tonv Homs, guard. 

CHARLOTTE— Act! voted LeRrxi Elth, cen- 
ter, from In lured list. Pul Marty Canton, for- 
ward. on waivers. 

DALLAS— Activated Sean Rooks center, 
from (niured list Put Randy White, forw ar d, 
on kilured HsL 

PHILADELPHIA S ig n ed Isaac Austin, 
center, to 1 D-day contract. Re toeaed Mamrte 
BoL center. 

FOOTBALL 

Ntatoota Football Leagae 

HOUSTON— Matched otter sheet tool Ke- 
vin Darmattey, offensive tackle, signed wtfti 
LA Rams. 

PHILADELPHIA— Resigned William Per- 
ry, defensive tackle, to two Wear contracts. 
Signed Eddto Murray, ptaeefekker. to 2-vear 
controcL 

HOCKEY 

Kattoaal Hockey Leagee 

NHL— Suspended Dennis Vlai, Ottawa Sen- 
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fined him SS00 for shooting puck kilo BuftaSo's 
bench on March 20. 

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man. 

DETROIT— Recoiled Martin Lapointe, 
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MONTREAL— Signed Kirk Midler, center, 
to * year contract, retroactive to start of seg- 
son. Recoiled Brian S avage , center, from 
Fredericton. AHL 

PHILADELPHIA— Recalled Andre Faust 
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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Telephone Violence 

By Russell Baker Recently, however, oar te 

N EW YORK — As you know, the fidd have begun coflecti 
the world is speeding toward a -JSir'S.'M 


Joe Queenan, the Mad Dog Movie Critic 


people 


total communications breakdown 
even as the communications indus- 
try foolishly thumps its chest about 
the c oming glories of the informa- 
tion superhighway. 

Evidence amassed by our re- 
searchers leaves no doubt the cata- 
clysm will occur sooner than origi- 
nal projections indicated. Those 
were based on the number of tele- 
phone callers who required police 
attention after encountering 
phone-answering machines, voice- 
mail systems and robotic phone in- 
structions. 

In 63 percent of these incidents 
property damage resulted from loss 
of self-control by persons unable to 
overcome these popular devices for 
rendering the telephone system al- 
most totally useless. The damage 
usually involved destroying phones 
with which callers had failed to com- 
municate with living human brings. 
□ 

In 21 percent of these destruction- 
of-com muni cati ons-equipment 
cases, handguns were used on 
phones that had driven their users 
berserk. Mine percent involved ri- 
fles, shotguns or hand grenades, and 


Recently, however, our teams in 
the field have begun collecting sto- 
ries that show the end is closer than 
we suspected. Here is a typical story 
from a man we shall call Pearson; 

After the customary series of 
failures associated with airline 
travel, Pearson's scheduled night 
flight from Cleveland to the Hart- 
ford area deposited him at New 
York's La Guardia Airport shortly 
after 1 A. M. 


By Janet Maslin 

New York Tunes Service 


T ARRYTOWN, New York — This 
town is certainly picturesque, but it’s 


1 town is certainly picturesque, but it’s 
not normally thought of as a place that 


ought to be in pictures. But here in Bella’s 
Restaurant, where it takes work to run a 


2 percent involved mortar assaults. 

Twenty-seven percent of all inci- 
dents involved physical violence, 
including suicide by callers unable 
to get around answering machines 
or voice mail or maddened by in- 
structions to press buttons endless- 
ly if they wanted a mechanical 
voice to tell them to drop dead. 

We have asked the telephone in- 
dustry for statistics on the percent- 
age of incoming calls answered on 
an average day by a h uman being. 
The industry continues to stonewall, 
insisting it doesn't have such figures. 

“Oar sole obligation is to make 
sure that any given telephone can 
ring every other telephone in the 
world at any time of the day or 
night, but especially in the middle 
of dinner, ” according to an artifi- 
cial voice that we reached by press- 
ing buttons 2, 7, 9, 3, 8, 2 again, and 
the pound sign. 

□ 

Identifying itself as a spokesman 
chin e for the miracle-of-communi- 
cations octopus, the voice said its 
employer had no interest in wheth- 
er the ringing phone was answered 
by a h uman, a machin e or, for that 
matter, by gunfire. 


The airline chose to motor its 
wretched Hartford customers by 
bus to Bradley Field, arriving at 
approximately 3:30 A.M. Since 
Pearson would still face a 20-mile 
trip to get home after being depos- 
ited at Bradley, be thanked Heaven 
for the communications miracle. 

“I shall simply phone my daugh- 
ter Alma and ask her la drive over 
to Bradley, meet the four-wheel 
surrogate airliner at 3:30 A. M_ 
and drive me home, 7 ’ Pearson said 
to himself. 

Fitting deed to the thought at a 
La Guardia public phone, Pearson 
used his caning card to dial his 
home, whore Alma — the hour be- 
ing past i AM. — was sound 
asleep. Very sound, as it turned out 

Pearson had his own answering 
mantiine and had programmed it to 
stop the phone's ringing after the 
fourth ring and make itself avail- 
able Tor messages. Obedient to 
Pearson's co mman d, it now did so. 
Alma obviously hadn't beard it 

Worse: Pearson had pro- 
grammed the device so that after 
taking its first four-ring call, it 
would thereafter ring only twice 
before falling silent again. 

□ 


Restaurant where it takes work to run a 
check for two into double digits, Joe 
Queenan is tiring up the local talent 

First and foremost there is his own: niL 
Queenan freely admits to knowing abso- 
lutely nothing about how to make a movie. 
That is why he is determined to make one, 
and to make it right here. 

Queenan is the self-appointed mad dog 

of movie criticism, specializing in gratu- 
itous wisecracks, ad hominem insults and 
exhibitioaistic practical jokes. 

Among his more notable stunts, many 
conducted for articles that appeared in the 
irreverent West Coast magazine Movieline 
(and newly collected in a book called “If 
You're Talking to Me, Your Career Must 
Be in Trouble," published by Hyperion), 
has been dressing up as Mickey Rourke and 
devoting an entire day to doing or saying 
things Rourke has done in public. “I really 
like this family," be claims to Lave told Ins 
son and daughter at 5:06 A M^ quoting 
Rourke in “Desperate Hours,” “but you're 
pushing my patience.*' 

Pushing other people’s patience is an- 
other of Queenan’s specialties. He con- 
ducted an experiment on heckling “The 
Crying Gamer (“If s a guy!"), “The Lov- 
er” ("Child molester!”) and “AKve,” the 
film about air crash survivors who resort 
to cannibalism ("You’d better marinate 
him first!”), just to see if audiences would 
fight back. (They seldom did.) 

In a more scientific mode, be tested the 
power of the auteur theory by surveying 
people in line at various movie theaters, 



Jo*e Lopc/Tbc Net Yorii Ton 

Queenan says his mafice is the “cheerful, fife-affirming’’ kind. 


directed the film they were about to see. 
Five out of 10 "Jurassic Park” patrons 
could name Steven Spielberg, but two oth- 
ers thought the film had been directed by 


Stranded at La Guardia at 1:30 
A ML, Pearson realized with honor 
that it would be impossible to get 
the incessant, insistent ringing out of 
his phone that would be necessary to 
rouse Alma. IBs devotion to the 
communi cations miracle had made 
him an agent of his own destruction. 

Pearson was found by the Con- 
necticut roadside, severely frostbit- 
ten, at 5 that morning, having set 
out to walk home from the jimey- 
busport, and a number of toes had 
to be removed. Upon release from 
surgery, Pearson took an ax to his 
answering machine and severely 

riamn<wt his thigh 


Stephen King. 
For someone 


New York Times Service 


r or someone who sees much of the movie 
business as preposterous, what can be the 
next step? Spurred on by the example of 
Robert Rodriguez, who directed the wefl- 
received "El Mariachi” for a reported 
$1,000, Queeuan plans to put his own mon- 
ey where his mouth is. That’s $6,998 of his 
own money, to be precise: He thinks of 
undercutting the competition by $2 as part 
of the fun. “Rodriguez proved that some- 
body could make a movie for seven grand,” 
he explains. "I want to prove that anybody 
can make a movie for sevm grand.” 

The film, which he insists will be made 
sometime this year, will be called "Twelve 
Steps to Death,” and it will be a murder 
mystery about a psychiatrist who treats 
dysfunctional patients. But it is only part 


of Quecnan's game plan. He's talking pa- 
perback novdizatioDL He's talking film 
festivals, and he claims to know of one in 
Canada that gave out five prizes when it 
had only two entrants. He's talking (in 
another nod to "El Mariachi") about put- 
ting out a Spanis h-lan guage version. 

He's even talking Bella's, where most of 
the patrons and waitresses seem to know 
him, since he has a tiny office several doors 
away and lives withm walking distance 
with his children and wife, Francesca 
Spinner (who is active in community af- 
fairs and whom he mns “one of the thou- 
sand points of light”). 

Queenan is back in Bella's after having 
completed the first part of his game plan. 
He has just received his first (and possibly 
only) official filmmaker's training, in die 
form of a $279 weekend-long course on 
directing, hdd in Manhattan. 

He found the course through an adver- 
tisement in the back of a movie magazine. 
Die main thing he has learned is that much 
of the business of filmmaking is about 
money. "You need money," he says, read- 
ing from the notes he took over the week- 
end. "You need a phone, so you can get 
more money. You need energy, so you can 
say no to people who want your money." 


Meanwhile, he has made notes on the 
visual cliches be considers obligatory: 
“Lots of shots of feet getting out of cars. 
Head-butts. Frontal and rearal nudity, 
preferably of somebody who looks like 
Harvey Keitel Someone dead apparently 
coining back to life, and then trying to kill 
somebody.” 

Clearly, Queenan, 43, has watched more 
than Ms share of bad movies. Another of 
his experiments in criticism had him rent- 
ing an assortment of Fart m movies — 
“Basket Case HI,” “P up p etma ster HL” 
“The Howling HT — when he hadn’t seen 
any of the Part I or U installments. Among 
the thematic inrights to emerge: Authority 
figures in such stories often wind up being 
eaten by monsters. 

What gives him the right to vent his 
malice (which he has described as “cheer- 
ful, life-affirming malice, not the noxious, 
downbeat variet/*) in print and an screen? 
“Tbe world is full of nice people,” he says. 
“I'm not one of them. I don’t have to be 
nice. Nobody ever told any of the people I 
admire that you have to be nice, either .” 

Queenan, who honed Ms brand of guer- 
rilla journalism writing for the now-do- 
funct Spy magazine, accepts the idea that 
he is sometimes shooting fish in a barrel. 


“But these are fish that need shooting,” he 

insists. __ _ 

He maintains that mainstream Holly- 
wood filmmaking is less an art than a 
business, and that as a sometime business 
writer (for publications including Forbes 
and Barron's), he has a right to regard it 
with a jaundiced eye. 

“Look at the way Consumer Reports 
operates,” he says. “Somebody comes on t 
with a car, and the car stinks. Does Con- 
sumer Reports say, ‘Gee, the guys who 
made the car, we’d better not hurt their 
feelings7 When you’re writing about mov- 
ies you're writing about finance, because 
Lou Diamond Phillips and Melanie Grif- 
fith are commodities. And they are reve- 
nue-generating — or, in the case of Kim 
Basinger, revenue-losing — commodities 
that belong to publicly traded companies. 
I have a bunch of mutual funds, m bet 
you one of my mutual funds owns shares 
in one of these companies. Therefore, I 
own Kim Basinger. Therefore, if Kim Ba- 
singer makes another bad movie — which, 
even as we’re speaking, she probably has 
— then Pm not just being nasty as a critic. 
This is my money going down the drain!” 

So Queenan often zeroes in on what he 
thinks is Hollywood's crazy way of making 
business decisions. "It wasn’t just one per- 
son who said, ‘Why don't we make a movie 

with Melanie Griffith where she pene- 
trates the Lubavitcher Hasidim?’ he 
points out, referring to Sidney Lumet's 
“Stranger Among Us.” “Hundreds of peo- 
ple may have been in on that decision, and 
maybe they all said. Yeah, that’s a really, 
really good idea!'” 

But Quecnan’s animus for. certain movie 
stars goes well beyond the demands of 
fiscal accountability. "That's because this 
country has become obsessed with celebri- 
ties,” be says, this time with a touch of 
anger. "It’s gotten to the point where ifs 
become like France just before heads 
started to roll You can hire a whole pub- 
licity network to tefi people that movies 
that aren't any good are really very good. 
Journalists just feed their readers this stuff 
as if these celebrities had real problems, 
and as if they had anything to say that 
could possibly be of use to you. 

"I'm sorry, but Sting does not have any 
information in his possession that could 
improve my life. Spike Lee? Nice guy, 
hope he's doing well but Spike Lee can’t 
help anybody. I hale to raise the ugly 
specter of ctes warfare, but these people 
are a different class from everybody else. 
Their problems aren't real problems. Peo- 
ple living in East New York or the South 
Bronx have survived more than Roseanne 
Arnold wiD ever dream of surviving. Blue- 
collar people like me have zero tolerance 
level for the problems of celebrities.” 


IkeTurner to Remarry, 

Denies Tina's Portrayal 

Ike Turner, portrayed by his for- 
mer wife as abusive, has announced 
that he will many again. In an 
interview with the Tv talk-show 
host GeraMb Rif era, Turner, 62, X 
says he trill many 31-year-old •* ’ 

Jeanette Bazefl-Tnraer in June. 

They have lived together since s , 

1988. Turner was scathingly por- * * /}% 

trayed in Tina Turner’s book and Lf*7/|€- ^ 

the film “What’s Love Got to Do !I/Ij 1 9 

With It?” But Bazefl-Turner says 

on the Rivera show that "the man < $ .-«• 

that they portray in that movie is , 

not the man that I'm with.” Turner ilj] J 1 * h* 

has admitted to beating Tina dur- 

ing their years together, but he says f - * 

the abuse “has been exaggerated.” 

0 W* 3 ' 

After a three-month self-im- i» l \ 


Lech, Austria. More than 40 pho- 
tographers were waiting to snap her ■ v 
when she emerged with Prince W0- jL 
Rani, 11 .and Prince Hany, 9, from 
their hoteL Diana has carried out 
only one public engagement this L - 
year, after her announcement in ’ 
December that she was withdraw- - .V. 
ing from public life. • . . - 

□ >* ■ 

Luciano Pavarotti decided to 
open a private performance before •- 
Prime Munster Mahathir bin Mo- L . 
h jmmd of Malaysia whh the song L-. ’ 
“Paradise” because, he said, he was .L _■ 
so taken by the country’s beauty. 'L-._ 
Pavarotti was invited by the prime ' 
minister to the resort island of Pn- " 

lau Pangkor. 

□ f . 

Don Henley, tbe lead singer of . 
the Eagles, used to say that the : 
1970s band would reunite “when 
hell freezes over” So he has an- - 
notmeed the Eagles’ reunion tour 
with a news release headlined, “Ex- - 
trail! Hefl Freezes Over.” The tour, 
which start on May 27, will make K J.. - 

Japan. The lineup indu^lSiky, 
Glenn Frey, Joe Wa&L Don Felder :i. 
and Timothy B. Schmft; Henley 
and Frey were members of the origi- 
nal group. The band broke up in 1" 
1980, aim since then, Henley and ' 
Frey have feuded in public. 


INTERWAHOIVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears an Pages 8 & 14 


WEATHER 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Europe 


Forecast for Saturday thrau#i Monday, as provided by Accu-Weafaor. 


BufcpM 

Ocvnrfugan 

CMMSol 

DuHn 

Edttntfi 

SniDB 

FranMuf 

Own 

MM 


9L PManbug 

Stockholm 

Smboug 

Team 


Totey 
Mo* Low 
OF OF 
22/71 14/57 
11/50 307 

14/57 3/37 

20458 10/30 
20/58 11/52 
17/52 8/46 
9/40 3/37 

11/52 3/37 
11/52 7(44 

409 1/34 

22/71 14/57 
8/48 -1*1 
8/43 2 OS 

21/70 11/52 
13/53 5/43 

16/81 0/43 

-1/31 -7/20 
16/90 7/44 

22/71 14/57 
21/70 12/53 
11/92 3/37 

24/76 8/40 

19/06 10/90 
1/34 -3/27 
12/53 SMI 
19/60 11/52 
3/37 -2 OS 
19/88 12/53 
15/58 SMI 
9/48 3/37 

409 -1/31 
22/71 10/50 
-2/29 -6/22 
2/36 -3/27 
16/99 SMI 
002 -8/23 
17*2 10*0 
11*2 6/43 

7/44 2/39 

18/81 7/44 


Tomomnr 
W High Low W 
OF OF 
a 22/71 14/57 a 
ah BM8 2*5 PC 
pa 17/82 4/30 pe 

a 21/70 11/52 pc 
t 19*6 13/96 a 

pc 16*1 0*2 c 

ah 4/39 -3/27 pc 
7 3/40 2/25 ■ 

Hi 8/40 -1*1 pe 
ah 3/37 -4/25 pc 
a 22/71 14*7 a 
C BM8 3*7 a 
e BM6 3*7 a 
a 16*4 7/44 ah 

ah 9/48 1*4 pc 
■h 11/52 2*6 a 
an -101 - 8/18 at 
po 18*1 7/44 pc 

a 22/71 17*2 pc 
• 20*8 13/5S a 
ah 9 MB 1*4 • 
a 23/73 11*2 a 
pc 17*2 6/43 a 
al 1*4 -0/22 an 
ah 8M6 -3/27 po 
pc 17*2 7M4 a 

an 2/36 -7*0 pc 
a 19*6 13*9 a 
■h 11*2 3*7 a 
r 3*7 -5*4 pc 

pc 0/43 1/34 ah 

a 19*6 8M6 ah 
an 0*2 -B /16 al 
an 2*5 -4*9 e 
C 11*2 0/32 a 

■n -1/31 -8/19 a 
po 16*9 8/43 a 
Oh 8/40 0*2 pa 
ah 4*9 -6*4 pc 
C 12*3 1*4 a 




sii 


Today Tcawnow 

High Low W High \xm W 
C/F OF OF OF 


Wit 





, ■■ ■ 


,. v .* ;V’v-J 




Bangkok 
B«# n B 
Hong Kong 

Now (MM 
Seoul 

StrangM 

3sr 

Tokfu 


DapBi Mta. Ra»- Snow Last 
L U Ptatea Plata* Stem Snow 


Drat, Mta. Ram. Snow Loot 
L U PMea FUn State Snow 


C o mm into 


Pas da la Casa 90 140 Fair 
Sokteu 85 170 Good 


OpenSpmg 13/3 Resort fuBy open, spring sting 
Open Var 13/3 Resort Mly Open, good skxpg~ 


Caurmayeur 

Selva 

Sestrffere 


30120 Fair Some Var 17/3 24/27 Itffts open, goad spring sM 
10 55 Fair OpenSpmg 4/3 64 /7SBBs open. arBBcal snow 
60~T65 Fair OpenSpmg 3/3 16/21 BBs open. ganeraBy good 




I Umaaaonahly 

COM 


North America 

The West Coast from Port- 
land to San Francisco win 
have dry. warm weedier this 
weekend. Locally heavy 
snows will develop over the 
southern Rockies Satuiday 
and continue Into Sunday. 
The Southeastern states wfl 
be quae warn, wWe tally 
heavy rains fall over the 
Ohio River Valey. 


Europe 

London to Pads wfl W dry 
and seasonable this week- 
end. Monday wfl be milder 
with some sun. Very warm 
weather will continue over 
southwestern Europe 
through the weekend. Cold 
weather In Scandnavtt this 
weekend w* shat Into north- 
western Russia by Monday. 
Heavy rain wfl soak Iceland. 


Asia 

Mlder weather wfl return to 
Befng and Seoul this week- 


end. Monday will be sunny 
and quite mwL Tokyo wfl bo 


and quite m*L Tokyo wfl be 
iky and chfly over ffte week- 
end. Monday wffl be sunny 
and milder. Locally heavy 
rains will soak Burma and 
central Thailand by 9 arty 
next week. Manila will be 
quta warm wfli some sun. 


Mglwa 

CkpcTown 

Ctadfa m 

Hirwa 

\33* 

Tut* 


13*5 • 20*0 
14*7 • 24/79 
13*5 • 23/73 
11*2 pc 29*4 
26/79 pc 32*9 
12*3 pc 26/79 
12*3 • 23/73 


Austria 

Ischgl 

Krtzbuhel 

Obergurgf 

Saafbach 

SLAnton 


25 180 fan 
0110 Fair 
40110 Good 
10 55 Fan 
25 340 Good 


Open Var 20/3 AO Ws open, good + 1B00m 
Soma Var 20/3 48/64 Bits open, tap slopes good 
Open Var 20/3 All Bits open, law runs poor 
SomeSpmg 18/3 ABSBsopen. s stapes patchy 
Soma Var 20/3 32/3S Cfts Open, -f 1900m flood 


lev 


150 155 Good Open Var 22/3 AlilSBfts open, exce«gnt sking 


North America 

Anchorage i«4 4 


MddleEast 


Lathi America 


Today Totmmuw 

High Low W Mgh Low W 


Today TonoRdW 

ft Low W wgh Low W 


Oceania 



OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Briar 

19*6 

12*3 ■ 

21/70 

14*7 ■ 

BuranAkwi 

22/71 

10*0 

pa 

23/73 

17*2 a 

Cmo 

16AH 

6M3 pe Z3/73 

11*2 ■ 

Caracas 

29*4 

19*6 

pc 

29*4 

19*6 • 

DramcuB 

14/57 

BM3 m 

17*2 

6M6 a 

Uma 

28/79 

21/70 

RC 

27*0 

21/70 a 

Juiurini 

1M» 

6M6 I 

17*2 

10*0 ■ 

MrateoC*/ 

26*2 

11*2 


39*2 

11*2 PC 

Luxor 

IflflS 

409 • 

27*0 

6/43 a 

HodaJanafcn 31*8 

23/73 

• 

31*6 

24/76 a 

Ffiyacti 

s&m 

1SSB ■ 

26*2 

13*6 ■ 

Sratego 

sum 

12*3 

• 

27*0 

13*6 a 


B«*on 

CKcago 

Drawer 

Octroi 

Honolulu 

Houdon 

Loo Angola 

lararf 


21/70 12*3 o 22/71 18*1 ■ 
23/73 1SAB pc 24/76 17*2 ■ 


Lsgentfceeunv. pc-paiur doudy, odoudy, atvarwwnra, t-hundBreJorma, r-rah, * sodw S uites, 
srvonow, Uce, W-Wwtier. Al mop*, lom cat » and data tawklod by ActxhWeadwr, Inc. 0 1994 


i c - 1*1 
I pc 21170 
I po 9/48 
' a 7/44 
c 2*5 
I pc 6M6 

I O 26*2 
1 C 25/77 
* 16*4 
ih 29*4 
pc 2*6 
i * 4/39 

I * 26*2 
i pe 12*3 
po 19*6 
«h 17*2 
a 17*9 
PC 9M8 
a 14*7 


Ram 

Alpetfnuez 

Lae Arcs 

Avoriaz 

Chamonix 

Courchevel 

Lbs Deux Alpes 

'sola 

Mflribei 

LaPlagne 

Serre Chevalier 

Tlgnes 

Val d-teftre 

Vai Thorens 


Open Var 
Open Spmg 
Open Var 
poor 5pmg 
Open Spmg 
Some Var 
Open Spmg 
Open Spmg 
Open Var 
S*h Hvy 
Open Var 
Open Var 
Open Var 


12/3 7U '06 Stts open, good +!900m 
17/3 57/64 ns open, best + 2000m 
17/3 AtitSsopon, spring snow off piste 
17/3 40'46 Mrs open, n stapes good 
17/3 AH B4BTO open, good poteskang 
4/3 SO/63 6tts open, poor -2000m 
1/3 24/26 ms open, spring condinons 
17/3 48/49 Bits open, good skBng 
17/3 103/ 112 Bits open, ntlapet best 
28/2 74/ 77 Ms open, lap slopes goad 
17/3 SO-’SS BBs open, spring skiing 
13/3 <S/5ins4aan.cucatenrrm>gUS 
17/3 AB 29mis open, generally good 


Spate 

Baqugira 

Sra lUartau l 

Anna 

Crans Montana 

Davos 

Grtndelwald 

SLMorHz 

Vert tor 

wengen 

Zermatt 


Open Var 13/3 AM Ms open, spring suing 


Open Spmg 
Ctod var 
Open Var 
CM Var 
Worn Spmg 
poor Var 
CM Wei 
poor Spmg 


20/3 AB 16 MBs open, good piste skBng 
20/3 AB BBs open. Plelne Uorta good 
20/3 35/38 KBs open, good + 1900m 
17/3 28/33 BUS open, top slopes blr 
16/3 AH 64 BBS open, good spring siting 
20/3 36/39 m Open, good + 2000m 
17/3 16/23 Bits open, hard arm 
20/3 70/73 Bits open, top are good 


Garmisch 

Oberstdorf 


0 280 Good Ctsd Var 21/3 26/36 Bits open, open pistes good 
0180 Good CM Pwtor 16/3 22/27 Ms Open, up slopes good 


UJS. 

Aspen 

Heavenly 

Mammoth 

Park City 

Steamboat 

TeHuride 

Vaa 


155 160 Good 
100105 Good 
145 175 Good 
120 240 Good 
115175 F6k 
135 150 Fat 
125160 Fair 


Open Pwdr 23/3 
OpenSpmg 23/3 
Open Pckd 19/3 
Open Pwdr 23/3 
OpenSpmg 21/3 
Open Spmg 23/3 
Open Spmg 21/3 


AB 6 His open 
20/22 Bits open 
17/30 Bits open 
AB 14 Ms open 
AB 19 BBs open 
AB 10 Bits open 
AB 25 m open 


Bomnio 

Carvlnia 

Cortina 


5 140 Fall Some Var 21/3 13/17 mis open, best + 2000m 

40 310 Good Qaen Var 17/3 AB im open, hard snow m areas 

0 60 Fair Ctsd Spmg 6/2 33/40 Btts open, open pistes ok 


80320 Good Open Var 21/3 AB Bits mdpism open, great sld 

Key: Mh.Depth in cm on lower and upper slopes. Wn. PtatewMountamside pistes. Res. 
Plates: Runs leadtog to resort village. ArtArtrtictel snow. 

Sports svvBed by the Ski Club at GreaiBrtum 


i»C 0 lf P(lj 


Uwel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


/DKT Access Numbers 

How to cafl around the worid 

1. Using the chart below, 6nd the country you are calHag from. 

2. Dial the corresponding AKT Access Nurnber. 

3- An ABET Eqglhn-spcaMqg Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wfeh to call or con nect you to a 

customer service representative. 

To receive your freewaBet card of flHTb Access Numbere, iust dial the access raurtoerof 
the country youtre m and ask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
ASIA/PACOTC 


OOmsmiY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Australia 

Cbbttjn&C*** 


Ho n g Kong 

Indfae 

todormria*' 

JapW 


BWM* 

Matoyata- 

New Zealand 


Singapore 
Sri Lanka 

Triimt* 

Thailand* 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 am knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AESE 1 

To use these services, dial the ARST Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your AR3T Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an ABET Calling Card or youd like more information on ABET global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


Bulgaria 

CrcMtlar* 


HnlftnJ* 

Prance 

Ger man y 


kdand*w 


0014-881-011 

» 10811 

018-872 

800-1111 

000-117 

001^801-10 

0099-m 

009-11 

• ir 

8000011 

000-911 

105-11 

235-2872 : 

aoo-oin-m 

430-430 

0080-102884) 

0019391-1111 

EUROPE 

8*14111 

033-9QSQU 

ore-i 14)010 ' 

00-18004)010 

99-384)011 

00-420-00101 

80014)010 

9800-100-10 

19*4)011 

01304)010 

00800-1311 

oo*-8oo-oiiii 

9994)01 


Ireland MBPgjMMO Calm 

172-1011 ^ 

l^edmcre ie far* 15300-11 

8a 196 gjsSb 

U/xcmhoury 08004)111 

Mritf 0800 - 890-110 • 

Mtirmoo* 19 * 4)011 

Wtehe riMMl d* ogongm 

800190-11 Hfcj; 

wurtv*" q*mp4SPQm 

05017 - 1-288 -jgjT 

R omani a 01 - 800 -4388 

Hnwfa^Moogm) 155-5042 

SkmUsi 0042000101 

9009900-11 

020390411 — — - 

g wjagjtef 155 -oou =!“ 

OJL 0500894)011 52 “ 

MmirafHFA«r Bri dflfa 

Britain 800001 Ca YQta 

Cyprus* ~ 080-90010 

1 tend 177-1002727 

Kuwait 800288 

Lebanon QBcfanQ 430801 

Samfl Arabia 1-800100 ' StKHa 

Tnritey- 0080013277 

AMERICAS HOT? 

Argentina* 001 - 800 - 200-1111 Grabot 

Britoe* 555 Cmh 

BoMvia' 08001111 Kenya 1 

gtafl 0008810 Ifcal 

QriBe OOwOSlg ■Malawi 

***•7 “o' flora new ntane 


‘ Poland**" 

Pnrti^iT* 


980114)010 

1M 

119 

190 

190 

165 

125 

95-8084624240 
t) 174 


Calom b*« 980114)010 

Casta Bc3*ra 114 

Bcuador* 119 

HSalvadorti 190 

Guatemala* 190 

G**y***r* 165 

H oo d u n nf te 123 

Mexknaaa 95800462424 Q 

WBcaragpa tMmftpaO 174 

Panama* 109 

Peni* ~ ~ 191 . 

Suriname 156 

Uruguay 000410 

Venezuela** 804111-120 

CAWWRBAIQ 

BAbmmm 1 - 808872^881 

Bcanuda* 1 - 800 - 872-2981 

British VX 1 - 808872 - 2881 . 

Ca ym anManda 1-8088702881 

Grenada* ~ 1 - 8088722881 , 

Hritt* 001 - 808972 - 2883 - 

Jtenakat** 8808872 J 8 B 1 

Hah. Altai 001 - 000 - 873-2881 

■ St-Knq/Nevia 1 - 808872-2881 

AFMCA 

Bgypr (Cafaoj 5100200 

QW 00 * 4)011 

firambl** ooiii 1 

080818 

Mrerte 797 - 797 1 1 

Malawi** 101-1992 


^Ap pro . 




Mu - . - - ^ 


! C 1994AI sar