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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 






PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Monday, March 28, 1994 


No. 34,547 


1 tn Paris of Bosnia, No Letup in ‘ Cleansing 

Bv John PnmfrM c ........... ... .... - . ... . . . 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 

GASENCT, .Croatia — Ismet Hrustanovic 
had an mUmg something was going on in his 
badward. The engineer’s puppy started yelp- 
ing. Twigs and leaves crunched under the heavy 
■feet of men m boots. 

; Nod, a fusillade exploded into his two-story 
.house. One bullet passed through his nose, into 
■hiseye socket and out near his ear. Another 
bared into his wife’s ankle Several more 
punched holes in the wall near his 10-year-dd 
500- A final blast killed the poppy. 

This was how Mr. Hrustanovic, a Musfim, 
spent Jan. 31 —hunkered down with a bleeding 
face while his wife writhed in p ain in their 
modest house in the Serbian-held Bama Luka 
region of Bosnia. Last Wednesday, they were 


evacuated from the region by the United Na- 
tions and the International Committee of the 
Red Cross. 

By the time they abandoned their home in 
the village of Mrkonjic, a Serbian family had 
already occupied the first floor. 

Despite progress toward peace in Bosnia, 
“ethnic cleansing’' ranirnm-s throughout the 70 
percent of the country controlled by Serbs. In 
recent weeks, it has risen a g ain in the north- 
western Bosnian region of Banja Luka, the site 
of some of the fiercest cleansing by Serbian 
forces when Bosnia’s war began in 1992. 

According to United Nations estimates, 
there are about 1 millio n people in the Banja 
Luka region, including 50,000 Muslims and 
about 27,000 Croats. Whm’the war began, as 
many as 250,000 Muslims lived in the region. 


Interviews in this refugee camp in eastern 
Croatia with UN officials and with Muslim and 
Croatian victims of Serbian oppression indicate 
that, regardless of international condemnation, 
the Serbs’ efforts to drive out minority groups 
continue unabated. Serbian guarantees that if 
peace comes to Bosnia the more than 1 million 
refugees forced from their homes will be as- 
sured a safe return appear increasingly hollow, 
officials from the office of the UN High Com- 
missioner for Refugees said. 

In recent weeks, UN officials in the Bam a 
Luka region, the she of the biggest Serb-held 
dty and the only airport in the self-proclaimed 
Bosnian Serbian Republic, have reported a 
marked increase in rapes of Muslim and Cro- 
atian women, unsolved and nmnvesti gated 
murders and beatings of minorities, drive-by 


shootings, dynamiting of houses, looting and 
mutilations, according to Joran Bjaflerstem, the 
UN High Commissioner for Refugees’ chief 
protection officer for Yugoslavia and its former 
republics. 

Last week in Seber, a Bama Luka suburb, a 
Croatian woman was grabbed from the street in 
broad daylight and raped by a gang of Serbian 
mat, Mr. Bjallerstedt said. Several days earlier, 
he said, an elderly Croatian woman was at- 
tacked in the dry center by an assailant who cut 
off her ears ami poked out her eyes. 

“We are seeing a pattern of atrocities, and it 
is getting worse," he said. “Our only solution in 
this case is to move people out of the area. 
Hundreds of people’s lives are at stake." 

Adina, 19, said rite was raped on March 8 by 

See BOSNIA, Page 5 


EU Ministers Offer 
Take-It-or-Leave-It 
Voting Plan to U.K. 


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CLASH IN SOUTH AFRICA A soldier holding a man on the ground during a violent episode Sunday near Durban. Meanwhile, the campaign arrived in Sharpe rille. Page 4. 


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By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

IOANNINA, Greece — In a final bid to end 
the European Union’s paralyzing dispute oyer 
power-sharing and keep the bloc’s expansion 
plans qq track, EU foreign ministers on Sunday 
offered Britain a take-it-or-leaye-it compromise 
on voting rights that contained few of the 
concessions sought by London. 

Foreign Minister Douglas Hurd told his col- 
leagues the offer was reasonable but he offered 
no assurances of being able to sell the deal to 
Prime Minister John Major by a Tuesday dead' 
line, EU sources said, 
is critical to the Union' 
tively as it grows in si 

r an lee to preserve Britain’s voting power in 
Union, as the vociferously anti-European 
wing of Britain’s ruling Conservative Party has 
demanded. 

“We have to consider ourselves very soberly 
whether it goes far enough,” Mr. Hurd told the 
BBC. 

Failure to resolve the voting dispute would 
delay the EU membership of Sweden, Finland, 
Norway and Austria, now scheduled for Jan. 1, 
1995, and plunge the existing 12 members inti) a 
paralyzing debate over the bloc's governing 
structures. 

If there is not a solution with this offer, said 
Jacques Deltas, the president of the European 
Commission, “the community is in an absolute 
crisis.” 

The compromise left Britain isolated. Spain, 
which had supported Loudon in the dispute, 
warmly endorsed the deaL 
Finland ’s foreign minister, H eflcki Haavisto, 
warned Mr. Hurd that Britain would bear “a 
heavy responsibility if enlargement is delayed 
by six months or a year.” 

The dispute over voting rights and Macedo- 
nia dominated a meeting that was supposed to 
have focused on developing a common EU 
foreign policy. The outcome indicated that Eu- 
ropean integration remained as much as ever a 


hostage to the political pressures of its most 
recalcitrant members. 

’The whole Union has been embarrassed and 
frustrated by the delays over the enlargement 
process,” said Dick Spring, the Irish foreign 
minister. 

The voting compromise put forward by 
Theodore Pangalos, Greece's European affairs 
minister, was a classic EU fudge, satisfying 
almost no one but vague enough to allow every- 
one to interpret it in the best light Mr. Delors 
called it at once “ambiguous” and “ingenious.” 

With the addition of the four new members. 


ones) from the current 23 votes (two large and 
one email country). On issues where a minority 
of 23 to 26 votes was opposed, the Union would 
delay a decision for a “reasonable” period and 
seek a compromise. 

Countries like France, Belgium and the 
Netherlands wanted to specify a delay of no 
more than three months to prevent the Union's 
decision-making capacity from seizing up, but 
all agreed that a “reasonable” delay could not 
be indefinite, as Britain had sought. “Absolute- 
ly not,” said Niels Hdveg Peterson, the Danish 
foreign minister. 

“If people set out to obstruct, that would not 
he in the spirit of compromise,” Mr. Spring 
said. If a delay goes on too long, he said, any 
member state amid move to terminate the 
delay by enlisting the support of seven of the 12 
EU members, and then vote down the obstruct- 
ing minority. 

But such power plays, though legally possi- 
ble, are political dynamite in the Union and 
have never been attempted. 

Mr. Delors reserved judgment on the plan, 
which needs the approval of the European 
CommissioD when it meets on Tuesday. He said 
be wanted to be sure the declaration was not 

SeeEU, Page 4 


Will Appetite for Success 
Cause Hunger in Chirm? 


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Rallaflnr to Review 
Minimum Wage Plan 

Prime Minister Edouard Balladur, say- 
ing Ms conservative coalition gained a vote 
of confidence Sunday in local elections, 
hinted that he might modify a controver- 
sial plan to lower the nnnimnm wage for 

conceded that the law td- 
lowing employers to pay workers under 25 
less than the minimum wage on short-term 
training contracts “is seen as displaying a 
lack of attention for the young. 

He said he would try to (»en a dialogue 

in the next few days to deal with an 
appeal from the young, recently ac- 
cessed in large and sometimes violent 
demonstrations. (Page 2) 



Chinese Rely 

By Lena H. Sun 

Washington Pott Service 

BEUING — Tie sign outside reads “Beijing 
Supreme People’s Court Project 86.” But the 
innocuous name masks its real purpose. Behind 
the brick-and-barbed-wire walk lies the execu- 
tion ground for those condemned to die in 
Beijing. 

Prisoners are driven up the sandy path to this 
compound on a thorn-covered hill 
overlooking the capital Under the open sky, 
the prisoners, arms tied behind their backs, 
their legs in shackles, kneel cm the Mack earth. 
At the si g nal , a paramilitary soldier fires a 
single rifle shot It is usually to the back of the 
head, tie prisoner topples into the dirt. Death 
is almost always immediate 


Sometimes, the corpses are put into a waiting 
ambulance to be taken to a hospital where 
organs are removed for transplant. Often, the 
organs are removed without previous consent 
of the prisoner, according to former prisoner 
witnesses and human-rights groups. 

In some cases, the prisoner’s family is even 
hilkd for the bullet —the equivalent of about 6 
cents. “If you don’t pay, they won’t give you the 
ashes,” said one former detainee. 

He world's most populous country also has 
the largest death-row population. In 1992, Chi- 
na, which accounts for 22 percent of humanity, 
executed at least 1,079 pnsouera, representing 
63 percent of the world's executions, according 
to Amnesty International. 




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India Rebuffs New U.S, Move 
To Cap Nuclear Arms Arsenal 


By John F. Bums 

New York Times Service 

NEW DELHI — A new attempt by the 
United States to prevent a nuclear arms race 
between India and Pakistan has been re- 
buffed by India, which responded to initial 
discussion of the American proposals by say- 
ing that it would not accent the capping of its 
arsenal in a reciprocal deal with Pakistan. 

After meetings with Robin Raphel the 
assistant secretary of state for South Asia, 
senior officials said India opposed any agree- 
ment to halt production or deployment of 
nuclear weapons if the agreement was limited 
to India and Pakistan. 

The officials said India favored steps to 
limit and eventual!} 
ans, bnt 

including the United States, 
accept similar restraints. 

They also warned that India would oppose 
another element in the American effort to 
freeze the nuclear, arsenals erf India and Paki- 
stan, a possible deal with Pakistan under 



which the United States would deliver F-16 
jet fighters in return for P akis ta n ’s accep- 
tance of a verifiable ban cm further produc- 
tion of nuclear weapons. 

Administration officials have said that as 
part of the bid to cap the two nations’ nuclear 
arsenals they might ask Congress to approve 
an exception to a United States arms embar- 
go on Pakistan tha t would allow the delivery 
of 38 of more than 70 F-16s that Pakistan 
ordered before the arms embargo took effect 
in 1990. 

2c return, Pakistan would have to accept 
i nterna tional inspection of its nuclear plants, 
including monitoring to insure that no nucle- 
ar materials were being diverted for use in 
nuclear weapons. 

Foreign Minis ter Krisfanan Srillivasan Of 

-India was «id to have told Ms. Raphel that 
“any accretion of Pakistan’s offensive^ nnh- 
tary capability would escalate teusons in the 
region and seriously affect India’s security 
environment.” 


Last year, the number of executions rose to 
1,41 1, according to Amnesty — an average of 
nearly four executions a day. Because China 
keeps the total secret, rights groups estimate 
that the true figure is much higher. 

China’s increasing reliance on the death pen- 
alty reflects societal turmoil. Amid economic 
flirresK, corruption is at a record high. Even 
though the crime rate is far below that of the 
United States, it has been growing fast 

Police fool patrols are in place in major 
cities, like Beijing and S hanghai , for the first 
time in years, violent crime was up 175 percent 
in the first 10 months of last year. 

, While the attention to rights practices is 
increasing in the debate linking human-rights 
improvements to Washingtons granting of 
low-tariff trade status, pressure ty internation- 
al human-rights groups to limit China's use of 
capital punishment is not likely to change 
things. 

Authorities have especially turned to capital 
p unishm ent for economic crimes that do not 
involve violence, according to rights groups. In 
other countries, similar crimes would be pun- 
See CHINA, Page 5 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Times Service 

YITIAOSHAN, China — The frenetic eco- 
nomic boom and natural forces are shrinking 
the country’s farmland at an alarming rate, 
scientists and government officials say. As a 
result, Chinese and Western scientists are rais- 
ing new questions about the country’s ability to 
feed itself in the future. 

In the central and eastern provinces, China’s 
breadbasket for three miHenmums, farmers are 
abandoning the land to chase prosperity in Mg 
cities and towns. 

There, tens of thousands of new factories 
have opened under the economic reforms of 
Deng Xiaoping. China's paramount leader. 

In southern and coastal areas, provincial 
governments and local entrepreneurs, all racing 
to get rich, are paving over agricultural land for 
freeways and factories, plus shopping centers, 
golf courses and villas for the new nrilhonaires. 

Here in the arid northwest, deserts are en- 
croaching, and erosion is ripping away topsoil 
on milli ons of acres that once were fertile. 

In this dusty frontier town in Gansu Prov- 
ince, where tens of thousands of peasants 
p ush ed back dunes and tumbleweed to build a 
county seat in the 1970s, the battle to re cl a im 
and hold on to fertile land represents the largest 
part of work and expenditure. 

One day in February, a sandy gale was howl- 
ing off the Tengger Item and raking the man- 
made defenses of tree lines and hedges to pro- 
tect precious topsoil near the mud-brick 
settlements around Yi t iaoshan, whose name 
means “a row of mountains.” 


Huge aqueducts, dry until planting season, 
arched across the mountainous terrain to the 
Yellow River, whose spring flood will render 
tins barren landscape a verdant plain of pn* 
ductive agriculture. 

It is a plain of victory in a war that is being 
lost The gains here are being dwarfed by losses 
elsewhere and by the unrelenting press of Chi- 
na's population growth. 

A Princeton University scholar. Perry Link, 
observed last year that a 10 percent reduction in 
China’s rice harvest of 190 million tons in 1990 
could not have been covered by the 12 million 
tons of surplus rice on the international market 
that year. 

It has been 30 years since 20 million to 40 
mini on Chinese died in what may have been the 
greatest famine in history, induced by agricul- 
tural polities of Mao Zedong. 

China today is hardly facing famine. The 
country recorded a bumper grain harvest in 
1993. Bnt bumper crops will have to grow ever 
larger, as arable land declines, to feed the swell- 
ing population. 

The remarkable achievements of Chinese ag- 
riculture, one of the great successes of the 
Comm unists, stand on an ever-weakening 
foundation of natural resources. 

Scientists say the pressure on rural China's 
intricate tapestry of nee paddy landscapes and 
wheat field terraces has increased enormously 
since the Communist takeover in 1949. Since 
thm, the population has doubled to 12 billion, 
and since the late 1950s the amount of arable 

See HARVEST, Page 5 


White House 


By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Post Serrrce 

WASHINGTON — A senior While House 
official inquired last month about removing a 
prominent Republican hired by Resolution 
Trust Corp. to investigate claims arising from 
the failure of Madison Guaranty Savings & 
I nan, according to sources familiar with the 
discussions. 

The sources said two senior White House 
officials, George Siephanopoulos and Harold 
Ickes, were alarmed ami outraged when they 
discovered in late February that Resolution 
Trust an independent regulatory agency, had 
hired Jay B. Stephens to handle posable dvfl 
suits growing out of the savings and loan fail- 
ure. 

Mr. Stephen^ - severely criticized the Clinton 


administration after he was fired as UJS. attor- 
ney for the District of Columbia in March 1 993. 
The White House apparently dropped the sub- 
ject of reversing the hiring of Mr. Stephens after 
being told by the deputy Treasury secretary, 
Roger C Altman, and the Treasury chief of 

Representative Jim Leach can't produce al* 
kged tape of phone conversation. Page 3. 


staff, Joshua Steiner, that there was nothing to 
be done about it 

But the effort to find out whether Mr. Ste- 
phens could be replaced represents the first 

outspoken political opponent of the president, 1 
acfc velyattempted to affect the han^of tbi StSSer 1 aid, “audit was perfealy nature 
politically sensitive investigation. One area of „ . 


HabsSty of the Rose Law Firm, in which Hillary 
Rodham Clin ion was once a partner, for its 
representation of Madison. 

The White House counsel, Lloyd N. Cutler, 
warned Saturday against exaggerating the sig- 
nificance of the conversations. 

In a statement, Mr. Cutler said it was “per- 
fectly natural” that White House officials 
would be “surprised” by the appointment of 
Mr. Stephens. He said he did not know all the 
facts because Robert B. Fiskc Jr., the White 
House special counsel had asked the White 
House not to interview the witnesses while he 
was conducting his investigation. 

“What I do know is that Mr. Stephens was an 

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politically sensitive investigation. 

the civil investigation concerns the potential 


See PROBE, Page 4 



Larry Kins, CNN’s Kingmaker, Live and Suspenderedfi 

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By Maureen Dowd 

New York Times Service 
WASHINGTON —The distinction between 


_ c K „«m,.»» U K«hnntsof the with his guests, and an attitude of confidential- guy from Brooklyn domg smack inthe middle 

gioits roemqiaMha. 7^ ity Andakhtdof ordinariness, which is King’s of a dmying three-way race for this country s 


night of the peat NAFTA debate are now 
musedogically secure, safely a part of national 
patrimony. 

The invitation to last week’s lunch at Planet 
Hollywood was quaintly reverential: “You are 
cordially invited to Larry King's presentation 
of the telephone be used for his first radio show 
and suspenders he wore when moderating the 
Al Gore-Ross Pool dehaie to Planet Holly- 
wood’s collection of movie, television and 


garters that held up FDR's socks at Yalta, by 
contrast, is unknown, 1 ) 

animati on is how you migh t 
i journalistic style. And the tele- 
vision nost. wno is really the maitre d’ of na- 
tional p olitics (and seats only the best tables) >s 

^^MnddBMdfmght.of the NAFTA 
vote, ‘I owe you big time,’ ” King confides m a 
voice that carries through Duke Z&bert s res- 


has no aspiration to Edward R. 
His idols are Red Barber, Arthur 

j Bob and Ray. He has mastered 

the art of being small. I am a microphone, he 
seems to say- 

“I never use the word T in interviews," he 
says. “I am your interlocutor.” He does only 
ask questions, and they are not especially tax- 
ing ones. And yet he has wound up in the 


voice mar carnes mrou^ 1 ^ uKT® read mg ones. And yet he has wound up m the 
“1 told the president, ‘All I did was ask ques- S nf w laww hnnfc “Tin rk» 


! president, 

fi rms ’ " 

He is less hunched over than I expected him 
to be. On his show, the bunch denotes solidarity 


As the dust jacket of his latest book, “On the 
t inf.! The New Road to the White House,” 
modestly asks: “What was a baseball-loving 


highest office?" 

Hie previous book by King, who was bom 
Lawrence Harvey Zciger 60 years ago, was 
called “When You're From Brooklyn Every- 
thing Else Is Tokyo." This Brooklyn conceit 
really should be retired. Kids from Brooklyn 
have been running (he world for years. And 
what’s he got against Tokyo7 . 

“You know what’s lost nowT be asks, rueful- 
ly. “Innocence.” He is not referring to Brook- 
lyn , where innocence no doubt still reigns. He is 
talking about the tyranny of the camera and its 
assault mi the imagination. _ . ., 

L too, sometimes fed assaulted. I 
that I raim u> lunch with King m a mood that 




canjt 

the media’s Palm Springs, where politicians and 
other figures of controversy or celebrity can go 
to unwind, kick back and reflect on what a 
wacky and wonderful trip it has been. He is a 
master of verbal amenities. 

King doesn’t consider himself a journalist, 
which is just as well since he flourishes in an age 
of nonjouraalistic joumalisn. Thus politicians, 
or mod politicians, like Hugh Rodham, the 
first lady’s brother, who is running for the 
Senate in Florida, angle to announce their can- 
didacies on King’s show. Ross Foot wants to 
comeback on and have another nervous break- 

See KING, Page 4 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


** 


Q & A: Ex-Leader 
Says Chile Looks to 
'Potential of Asia 9 


Many Latin American countries are joining East Asian 
nations on the rapid economic growth track. At a recent meeting 
in Ku a la Lumpur of the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council, 
Patricio Aybwin, who stepped down this month after a four-year 
term as president of Chile, discussed prospects for economic 
integration in the Pacific and Western Hemisphere with Mi- 
chael Richardson of the International Herald Tribune 


Q. Why is Chile growing faster than most other Latin American 
commies? 

A. Chile started opening its economy before the other coon tries of 
Latin America. We have consensus between the government, busi- 
ness community and workers on the need for such a policy. We have 
a dynamic sod youthful entrepreneurial class. We also have political 
stability. 

However, we must not become complacent a- inward-looking. We 
know that other Latin American countries are following similar open 
market policies. Some of them have greater potential than ours 
because of their rich natural resources and larger domestic markets. 

Q. Your policy sounds a bit like the East Asian formula for growth 
and expansion. Is Chile looking westward across die Pacific for 
future trade and investment? 

A. Historically, although Chile faces the Pacific, its trade was 
concentrated on the American continent and Europe. Asia was 
largely unknown and there was hardly any economic interchange. In 
recent years, however, we have discovered the potential of Asia. 

Today we have one third of our trade with Europe, one third with 
the Americas and one third with Asia. That is why Chile, along with 
Mexico, recently joined the Asiar Pacific Economic Cooperation 
Forum. 

Q. As Chile and other Latin American economies grow, won’t 
they become a competitive threat to East Asia? 

A. We have very different natural resources. Essentially our 


economies are complementary, not competitive. So both sides of the 
Pacific will benefit 


from an increasingly free flow of trade and 


investment. 


Q. Latin America has a plethora of free trade areas, customs 
unions and other economic arrangements linking different countries 
of the region. Is it posable to harmonize them so that a powerful 
Latin American economic bloc emerges? 

A. That is the great challenge for Latin America. It will take time. 
The idea of a region-wide agreement runs into the reality of different 
national economies at different levels of the development. 

Nonetheless, there is today a greater similarity between the 
economic and political regimes of Latin American countries than 
there was before. The formation of the Latin American Integration 
Association with the participation of Mexico and all South Ameri- 
can nations has been a very important development in the process of 
linking regional economies. 

Other groupings are also moving toward the same objective. It is 
like a fabric bang knitted in different pans. Eventually it will 
become one piece. 


Q. Will Latin America become the southern tier of the North 
American Free Trade Area between Canada, the United States and 
Mexico? 

A. No one wants to be a tail end of NAFTA. What we hope is that 
the economic integration of Latin America will make it a comple- 
mentary partner. 

Chile wants a bilateral free trade agreement with the United States 
in the context of open regionalism. We do not think that our 
integration into the Americas should prevent us increasing our link* 
with Asia, or Europe if posable. 

Q. Isn't NAFTA a protectionist grouping? 

A We know that there are dangerous neo-protectionist trends in 
industrialized nations. However, I see no sign that NAFTA is a 
dosed bloc. It was not designed to exdude other nations. 

Chile already has a bilateral free trade agreement with Mexico. We 
are aiming for a similar arrangement with the United States in the 
next couple of years, and then with Canada. 


BaUadur to Meet Youths 
To Review Wage Plan 


Reutm 


PARIS — Prime Minister 
Edouard BaUadur of France, 
daiming a vote of confidence in 
local elections, hinted Sunday that 
he may back down on a controver- 
sial law cutting wages for young 
people in job training. 

Speaking on television after polls 
dosed, Mr. BaUadur conceded that 
the law allowing employers to pay 
workers under 25 less than the 
minimum wage on short-term 
training contracts was “seen as dis- 
playing a lack of attention fra- the 

young/’ 

“So it is my responsibility and 
my duty as head of government, 
responsible for social and national 
cohesion, to respond to what is an 
appeal from the young,” he said. 

Hundreds of thousands of high 
school and university students have 
held sometimes violent demonstra- 
tions in the last three weeks to 
demand the scrapping of the law, 
which many fed devalued and in- 
sulted (hem. 

Mr. BaUadur, a conservative, 
stopped short erf saying he would 
withdraw the law or suspend its 
application, as the newspaper Le 
Monde repotted be was consider- 
ing. He said be would open, a dia- 


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The opposition Socialists, swept 
from power in last year’s general 
election, staged a minor recovery 
March 20, winning 28.7 percent of 
the votes. 

Some 58 percent of the 14 md- 
bon eligible voters cast ballots Sun- 
day to elect members of local coun- 
cils in the 1,372 districts where 
there was no outright winner in the 
first round 

Some commentators said dec- 
lion success would strengthen Mr. 
Bahadur’s hand in his confronta- 
tion with the students. Others said 
it could, allow him to back down 
without losing face. 



WOULD BRIEFS 



Alg eria Opens Line to Banned Party 

ALGIERS (AP) — President Lamine Zeroual plans to indude t be 
banned Islamic Salvation Front in a dialogue started fast week to by to 
extract the nation from a cyde of violence, a moderate fundamentalist 
party said Sunday. * . 

Leaders of the Hamas party made the statement after meeting with the 
president as part of the dialogue. “The chief of stale affirmed that the 
dialogue will include Salvation Front leaders," Hanias said. 

It was the first dear statement that talks started last Wednesday with 
various political parties would indude the Salvation front, most of whorfl 
leaders are jaded or in exile. Mr. Zeroual had pnly hinted that the 
outlawed party would lake part. 




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For Mexican Gunman, a Pacifist Act 


TIJUANA, Mexico (NYT) — The man accused of.kfDiiig the heir 
apparent to the Mexican presidency said he had planned for years to 
snoot a political figure to publicize his pacifist views anddraw attention 
to certain unidentified groups, a lawyer who attended his interrogation 
said. 

The confessed girnrp an , Mario Aburto Martinez, refused to character- 
ize the groups or to say whether he was working with anyone when he 
assassinated Luis Dooaldo Coloao at a campaign rally on Wednesday, 
said the lawyer, Josfc Luis F&rez Candida. 

“His dear intention was to hurt the candidate in order to get media 
attention and express his pacifist ideas and to share some information 
about armed groups that work in several states around tin country,” Mr. 
Pferez said, summarizing Mr. Aburto’s statements on the night of the 

killin g 


Japan Coalition Wins Voting Test 


!P3 f-v* 

An* Dedal/ Rente* 


FAR FROM HOME — A protester flashing a victory sign as po&cemen in Mannheim, Germany, removed him from a harmed rally, 
called by the Knrritsh Workers Party to mourn two women who fataDy braned themselves to protest German arms sale to Turkey. 


Synagogue Arson Casts Pall on Passover 


TOKYO (Reuters) — Japan’s governing coalition won a narrow 
victory Sunday in central Japan in a dosdy watched regional election. 

The coalition candidate, Masanori Tanimoto, 48, defeated his nearest 
rival by less than 10,000 votes balloting fra a new governor for Ishikawa 
Prefecture. With 99 percent of the votes counted, Mr. Tanimoto, a fa nner 
deputy governor, won 283,993 votes as against 275,863 for the Liberal 
Democratic Party candidate Hiroshi Ishikawa, and 47,624 for a Commu- 
nist Parly candidate, election officials said. 

The vote was seen as a key barametere of whether or ora Prime 
Minister Morihiro Hosokawa’s eight-group coalition could resist elector- 
al attacks by the Liberal Democrats, who were ousted by Mr. Hosokawa 
and his coalition after 38 years in power. 


Rader? 

BONN — LQbedc’s tiny Jewish community 
of 27 began Passover cdebratiojis on Sunday as 
commentators criticized a far-right leader who 
said Germany’s Jewish leader was to blame for 
racial hatred. 

The police and shocked residents of the 
northern port, after an overnight vigQ, stood 
guard at the city’s fire-bombed synagogue, tar- 
get of the first such arson attack on a synagogue 
in Germany since the days of the Third Retch. 

German newspapers urged the government 
to act against Franz Schtahuber. leader of the 


far-right Republican Party, who said Ignatz 
tral Council erf Jews, was 


Bubis, head of the Central * 
inciting hatred by accusing rightist parties of 
bring the “spiritual arsonists" behind the Lfi- 
beck attack early Friday. 

“Schdnhuber has a pm taken off his mask 
and shown Ms true face,” fsaid the local news- 
paper Lubecker Nachrichten. "Now the time 
really is ripe for the protectors of our democra- 
cy to am. We 080*1018810- the far-right terror by 
tackling a few isolated militant neo-Nazi 
groups." 


Thousands of Germans held vigils and 
marched through rainy streets on Saturday to 
protest the fire-bombing of the synagogue. A 
meeting room and a stairway woe destroyed by 
fire, but six occupants, including the syna- 
gogue’s cantor, a Nazi Holocaust survivor, es- 
caped. 

The attack left Germany’s 40.000 Jews — 
compared with 530,000 before the Nazi era — 
and especially Lubedc’s tiny Jewish communi- 
ty, fearful of the future. 

A spokesman fra the federal prosecutor said 
no progress had been mad* in t racking down 
the attackers. 

In Lfibeck on Saturday, protesters observed a 
five-minute sOence. The synagogue was lighted 
vrith rows of candles and strewn with flowers. 
In Berlin, Heidelberg and other German cities, 
hundreds demonstrated against fas cism. 

In Berlin, home to Germany's largest number 
of Jews, some 1,000 protesters marched silently 
on Saturday. 

*Tve lived in Berlin fra the Iasi 25 years, but I 
won’t be staying much longer," said Sarah 


Avacov, 62, a Romanian Jew who survived the 
Holocaust. “It’s happening again." 


Ciller Party Leads in Turkish Voting 


■ 1953 Uprising Toll Grows 

More than 125 people — far more than 
previously estimated — were killed when Soviet 
tanks crushed a workers' revolt in East Berlin in 
1953, Reuters reported from Bonn, quoting a 
German newspaper on Sunday. 

The death count from the June 17 uprising by 
East German construction workers, which pre- 
saged an anti -Communist up rising in Hungary 
in 1956, had been covered up by the Commu- 
nists but was put at not more than 50. 

The newspaper Wek am Scnntag said that 48 
people were now known to have been executed 
when East Ge rman authorities and their Soviet 
backers clamped down an dissent after the 
revolt 

The paper said Manfred Kittlans, head of the 
Bonn office investigating crime by the East 
German officials, hnri a?<n come across evi- 
dence that more than 120 people died trying to 
escape from East Germany by crossing the 
Baltic Sea. 


ANKARA (Reuters) —1 

elections showed Prime Ministar Tansn eater's True Path Party in 
lead, with the pro-Islamic Welfare Party in second place. 

The True Path Party had won 262 percent of the vote for local councils 
across the country with about 2 percent of results in, followed by the 
Welfare Party with about 23 percent, state television said. The mam 

r ositioD Motherland Party was next with nearly 22 percent, poshing 
Social Democrat Populist Party, the junior coalition partner, into 
fourth place with 10.4 percent. 


U.S. Cites Cains in Israeli-PLO Pact 


WASHINGTON (WP) — The advance guard of what could eventually 
become an 8,000-man Palestinian police force could begin moving into 
parts of the Israeli-occupied Gaza- Strip and the West Bank town of 
Jericho within a week, according to a senior American officiaL 
In addition, the official said, Israel and the Palestine liberation 
Organization are dose to agreement on creating.a separate group of 
Palestinian police — probably numbering about 200 — who would patrol 
jointly with Israeli imlitaiy forces in the West Bank town of Hebron. At 
least 29 Palestinians were massacred in Hebron by an extremist Jewish 
settler on Feb. 25. 

Israeli officials who returned to Jerusalem for the Passover holidays 
expressed optimism that fufl-scale negotiations rat carrying out the Gaza- 
Jericho accord would resume in Cairo on Tuesday. Bat PLO negotiators 
were more cautious. 



Watershed in Italy? Some Aren’t So Sure 


on 


logue with young people in the next 
few days to look fra possible solu- 
tions. 

The second round of cantonal 
elections failed to produce the ex- 
pected swing to the right despite 
the center-tight coalition’s strong 
showing in the March 20 first 
round with 44.7 percent. 

The coalition captured only one 
of metropolitan France’s 95 admin- 
istrative departments [ram leftist 
parties, the central Grose district, 
and lost one, the Dordogne in the 
southwest It also lost the Indian 
Ocean island of Reunion to the left 

As a result, the rightist coalition 
will stiD control 75 erf the 95 metro* 
litan departments and the kft 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — Italians began voting 
Sunday in a two-day national bal- 
lot widely depicted by politicians 
and commentators, pundits and 
beadfino- writers as a watershed be- 
tween the old and the new, indeed, 
as the dawning erf a new republic. 

As she voted in Rome on Sunday 
morning, Luriana Vagnetti was not 
so sure. 

“There is a saying that in Italy, 
everything should change so that 
nothing will change,” the historical 
researcher said, quoting the most- 
quoted aphorism from “The Leop- 
ard” a papular 1958 novel by Giu- 
seppe Tbmasi di Lampedusa. 

If that kind of skepticism suf- 
fused the voting, so, too, did a sense 
that, having chased away their cor- 
rupt but predictable political old- 
guard, Italians are not quite sure 
what will replace iL 

“Fra the first time, I don’t know, 
in advance what the result will be,”' 
said Maria Antonietta Destro, a 
left-leaning high school teacher, 
evoking the memory erf elections 
that since 1948 have produced 52 
Christian. Democrat-led coalitions 
and 52 oppositions led by the Com- 
munists and them spiritual heirs. 

This trine , though, the Christian 
Democrats are not evm on the bal- 
lot. 

Their name has changed to the 
Popular Party, their support has 
crashed because of the corruption 
scandal and voters are facing a nov- 
el choice between fragile alliances 
that could put former Communists 
or rightist resurgents in power. 

“It wiB be enough fra me just to 
get rid of the rad system that 
robbed us for aO that time,” said 
Sergio CapariSi, an office deaner 
after be cast his ballot in the Roma 
Uno district of the city center. 


choosing a leftist candidate, Luigi 
Spaventa, over Silvio Berlusconi, 
the media ma gnate who has in a 
few short months become the tead- 


m: 


^standard-bearer of the right. 


ationaHy, Mr. Berlusconi is in 
alliance with a neofasdst leader, 
Gianfranco Fhn, and a northern 
separatist, Umberto BossL On the 
left, a former Communist leader. 
Addle Occhetto. leads an alliance 
called the “progressives” while a 


the country, far from breaking new 
ground, could find itself a gain in 
the familiar and protracted hold- 
ing-pattern of coalition-building 
among its new leaders. 


progressives 
third and smaller centrist grouping 
has been formed on the rump of the 
Christian Democrats. 

The last opinion surveys more 
than two weeks ago gave Mr. Ber- 
lusconi's rightist alliance a slight 
edge over Mr. Occhetto’s leftists, 
but suggested no one would emerge 
with a dear majority. This meant 


Some 48 million voters over the 
age of 18 were eligible to vote Sun- 
day and Monday for the 630 seats 
in the lower house — the Chamber 
of Deputies — while 41 million 
over 25 were permitted to vote for 
the 315 upper house sears in the 
Senate. 


The headlines did not miss the 
modal nature of things. “Gao, 
Gao, First Republic,” said L’lndi- 
pendente. “The -Second Republic,’’ 
declared La Repnbblica. “Italy — 
Revolution by Ballot,” said D Mes- 
saggero. 

Beyond the hoopla, though, 
there seemed more doubt than con- 
viction that some kind erf new and 
well-governed — if not squeaky- 
clean — Italy was about to be bom. 


minister. Prince 

Norodom Sirivodh, on Sunday strongly protested Thailand’s “forced 
repatriation" of Cambodian refugees fleeing fighting in the northwest. 

The Thai military continued sending the 25.0W Cambodians back over 
the. border into Khmer Rouge-held territory, but was encountering 
resistance from -some- refugees who did not want to-go, -according; to 


traders at the border. Phnom Penh had asked Bangkok to allow free* 


access to the International Committee fra the Red Cross and the United 
Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to dete rmine if the refugees 
wanted to return to areas controlled by the Cambodian government 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


They were voting under new, un- 
wieldy and untested laws that ap- 
portion three-quarters of the seats 
according to an American-style 
majority system and the remaining 
quarter under Italy’s traditional 
proportional representation. 


“The Italy of 1994 that is going 
'Is today* 
all point of refer 


terence," said Ezio 
Mauroin La Stamps. 

The country's new electoral sys- 
tem, be said, “is not able to guaran- 
tee the equilibrium needed to gov- 
ern a complex society.” 


Burma Tries to Woo More Tourists 


ju ask die buder.. 




S-l-N-C- A-P-O- R«E 


Vim irrtht u • jtm amm t it te it. 


A New Balloting System Begins 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times ’Service 

ROME — As Italians began two days of voting 
on Sunday to elect a new Parliament, they used a 
co mplicat ed new procedure originally intended to 
end Italy’s system of choosing political parties, 
rather than individual candidates. 

In part at least, the new electoral law allows 
Ita lians for the first time to choose from among 
ca ndid a t es named on the ballot. 

Up fra grabs are aO 630 seats in the Chamber of 
Deputies, the lower house, where the party or 
parties that win a majority of the vote wiD have the 
right to pick the prime minister. 

Also at stake are all 3 15 seats in the Senate. The 
campaign has come down to a fight between a 
leftist affiance led by Achifle Occhetto, leader of 
the Democratic Party of the Left, and a rightist 
alliance led by the media magnate Silvio Berlus- 
coni. 


The new voting system, which was *n*rieH ^ 
year by the departing Parliament, was prompted 
by the involvement of the political parties in the 
wave of corruption scandals that has swept Italy, 
and was intended lo foster clarity of choice and 
limit the old fragmentation of the political land- 
scape. 

At the same time, it was supposed to mak e 
individual candidates answerable to their constitu- 
encies, wink curbing the power of party bosses. 
Under the old Systran, the bosses were not required 
to nm for office in one-on-one contests, but were 


assured seats In the legislature that were allotted 
according to the electoral strength of their parties. 

Fearful of losing power, however, the party 
leaders in the old legislature pushed through what 
is, in fact, a hybrid electoral system. Under its 
rules, three-fourths of the seats in each house of 
Parliament -—475 in the Chamber and 232 in the 
Senate — will be derided by the choice of a 
candidate on the ballot. 

One-fourth of the seats — 155 in the Chamber 
and 83 in the Senate — will continue to be appor- 
tioned to candidates named by the parties accord- 
ing to each party's share of the vote. 

Thus, each voter has three ballots to fill out in 
the voting booth. One, to choose a candidate for 
the Chamber, and the candidate with the most 
votes will win. The second, to pick rate of 15 
political parties to determine which share of the 
proportionally allotted 155 Chamber seats each 
party will get. Only parties with 4 percent of the 
vote or more will be eligible fra additional seats. 

The third ballot wifl serve lo pick a candidate lor 
the Senate, and as in voting for the Chamber, the 
candidate with the most votes wQl win. The 83 
proportionally allotted Senate seats will be divided 
among the political parties under a complex for- 
mula according to their showing in the direct vote. 
■ A 2-Day Vole for Passover 

The general election is being bdd over two days 
to allow Orthodox Jews to vote while still observ- 
ing the Passover festival. Renters reported from 
Rome. 


BANGKOK (Reuters) — Burma has extended the length of its tourist 
visas to four weeks from two to try to attract more tourists. Btumese radio 
reported. The broadcast, monitored by the BBC, said the visa extension 
became effective March 14. At the same time, the Ministry of Hotels and 
Tourism increased the minimum amount of currency to be spent by r*** 
tourist to S300 from $200, the broadcast said. 

In another change, Burma wfll allow locally owned private banks to 
operate foreign exchange services starting next month. The official 
exchange rate far Burma’s kyat currency is six per UJS. dollar, but the 
black market rate is between 100 and 110 kyat per dollar, according to 
one Thai businessman who recently visited Rangoon. 



mult 


sfa 


fa visit visa to the 
visas issued by the 
(API 

op, but Italian 
is beginning to 


German citizens can now obtain a 
United Arab Emirates instead of the usual 
country, officials in Abu Dhabi said. 

Tbe Le&mg Tower at Pisa may be 

restoration officials are worried the mom 

crumble. A 30-oentnneter (12-incfa) chunk of the tower’s facade broke off 
Sunday, and experts said rain, wind and pollution were all taking a toll on 
the facade, whose restoration has been largely neglected since scientists 
began a project to straighten the tower three years ago. (Reuters) 

Tliis Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or services curtailed in 
the following countries and their dependencies this week because of 
national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Serfria , 




TUESDAY: Central African Republic, Madagascar. Taiwan 
WEDNESDAY: a Salvador. 

THURSDAY : Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, E3 Salvador. 
Gna i emria. Hw xW. Iceland, Malta. Mexico. Nkaragna, Norway, Paraguay, P&u 
Pbiljppioes. Spain, Uruguay, Vatican City, Venezuela. 

FRIDAY: Andorra. Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Bdjxe, Bermuda. Bolivia. 
Botswaia, Brazil, Bntam, Brand, Burma, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, Cotambis. 
Costa Rjca. Cyprus, De nmark . Dominican Republic, Ec uado r. El Salvador. Estonia. 
Finland. Gambia. Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar. G uatemala. fSnyam. fTmti , Honin' 
ras. Hoag Kong. Iceland, India. Indonesia. Iran. Ireland, Jamaica, g-nya, Lebanon. 

tJWhiennriii, Malta, Mexico, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zes^ 


Br ^ . Chac * Fraace ' Guatemala, Bong 
Iran, Israel. Mctco, Monaco, Panama. Spain, Uganda, Vatican Gty. Zambia, 





Sources : JJ*. Morgan, Reuters. 


o 

V 

E 

R 

H 

E 

A 

R 

D 



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THEAMERICAS / a 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Page 3 




Congress Gives Clinton a Boost 







rp¥^ WE 

^ a -ii- «5B raw * 


Education Measure Tops Pre-Recess Action 


POLITICAL NOTES 




a : a ^t A( , 


ty $5 biffion over five years lo en- 
courage school systems to meet 
them. 

After delays that forced an un- 


t-_ . -f.. 


-Tt-' 1 ' 


P 01 ® 0 **^ far-reaching ly $5 bflEoii over five years to en- 

h J^aUOT to tighten lobbyinglaws. ciumge school systaL to meet 

* WASHINGTON — Senate en- , The S” 13 * Passed its version of them. 

- actment of Presideai Bill Clinton’s ™ Flscal 1995 budget, cutting a Ar * , , ... ' 

bin to set national educational 53?k deeper into spending than Mr. Alter delaw mat forced an im- 
goals capped the most productive ^ton wanted but otherwise bon- usual posumdmght cloture vote 
week for Congress this year defy- orin 8 *** president's spending pri- “cmin&just as the Sen- 

ing predictions the Whitewater af- ^es. It also broke a Republican- {J®** supposed to be homeward 

* fair would stall legislative action nr led filibuster, holding up passage of ® oun “ j *** recess > Democrats 

stymie die presidS.'s a federal workers' votes more ito ll* 

Capitol fit 1 uauves on u w 60 rKjmred io breajc a filibuster lad 

' Even Democrats concede serious S’ 8 * araaridng savings for aefr j*« ‘gy.ESP ^ 

:3SS£= 


Clinton wanted but othenvise bon- «sual poMmdai^ii cloture vote 
oring the president's spending pri- Salurday momingjust as the Sor- 
orities. It also broke a Republican- ? te f»PP“ed to be homeward 
led filibuster, holding up passaee of bound , ,ts Tecess ' Democrats 
a federal workers’ twvyvwKm mustered two voles more than the 


a federal workers’ buyout bffl, in- mustereo^o votes more than the 
tended to force inclusion of lan- r? required lo break a filibuster Jed 
guage earmarking savings for and- ** a ™“ W* advocate, Sam- 
crime efforts. lor Je “ e Helms. Republican of 

But iK trHichpci ; rt K (ktrt«<M. North Carolina. It then passed the 


bearings expected later this year in 
both houses into ethical issues 
.-raised by the Arkansas land ven- 
ture and the president’s handling of 
■questions abqut it. 


Voting Tf 


off another Republican filibuster ^ toiz, andseotitto 

aimed at strengthening school - W“ le House for Mr. Clinton s 
prayer language in the “Goals sgnature - 
2000" education measure, which On the critical cloture vote, nine 
had gone through the House. Mr. moderate Republicans joined near- 
Clinton had promoted the trill as ly an Democrats in voting to end 
governor and president to set na- the filibuster, giving the president 






* ’■ -?!s* 

Turkish Votln, 




TV,. r n W j/iwuivivu UA UUI 1J Oil LS *. luuuau in vuuut 111 cuu 

o*' Republican at ^ ac k5 governor and president to set na- the filibuster, giving the president 

s bandhng of the tional achievement goals for his first big legislative trophy of the 
controvert have only redoubled schools, with federal grams of near- year. 

Democrats determination to show 
that Congress is helping the White 

■sSwSSSi Post Denies Killing ArticI 

news conference last Thursday. ^ 

In the Senate and the House, Howard Kurtz with a m 

some Republicans Complained that ______ Washington Past Service front-pagi 

" Democrats were just trying to help t WASHINGTON — In the six weeks since Paula Jones, a that such 
Mr. Clinton deflea attention from 5 rme S£f I 52? sas statc onployee, publicly asserted that Pres- article its 
, Whitewater problems and tried to ldent 821 01010,1 bad sexually harassed her when he was The Po 
apply the brakes, without much ®9 ve 2? r Arkansas, conservative critics have questioned paper was 
success. why The Washington Post has not published an article on article on 

the matter. “Our n 

A disa & re f Inent °ver Several major newspapers ran at least a short account of made by £ 

ground rales for consideration of a Miss Jones’s allegations, which the White House strongly care,” Mr. 

- “g anti-crime parage led House denied, after her news conference here on Feb. 11. The Post readers to 
T'Cr noct nts to put off acoon on that did not publish a news article, although it mentioned Miss print darn 
measure until after Congress re- Jones’s accusations in a Style section piece on the conserva- The IT 

- turns m mid-April from its two- tive conference at which she appeared. subject be 

, we “ spring recess. But the House a newsletter published by tire Republican commentator staffers w 

passed a second major education Kerin Phillips reported rumors that The Post was “sitting that Mr. I 





Mrs. Omton and Roger Clinton at a pre-wedding party. 


Mr, President, the Best Man 

DALLAS — It’s not every wedding where the 
president of the United States flies in io be your 
best man, trailing squads of Secret Service agents 
and a corps of journalists. 

So Mr. Clinton's brother, Roger, seemed extra 
thrilled here Saturday as he tied the marital knot 
with Molly Martin m a ceremony ax the Dallas 
Arboretum, while President Bill Clinton stood by 
supportivdy. 

The Dallas affair was about family and a couple 
of Clinton beys who forged their emotional bonds 
as half brothers amid the childhood trauma Of 
living with an alcoholic father. 

“Just a lot of love” is what brother Bill brought 
him from Washington. Roger told friends. 

The younger Clinton. 37, «*id he was nervous 
about getting married, “but I'm veiy excited.” 

The president, though he took time here for a 
visit to a children’s hospital and some other politi- 
cal business, also declared hims elf excited about 
the wedding. 

And Dallas, too. has been excited by the arrival 


of the president for a social event involving a 
homegrown woman. “Veiled in Secrecy," said a 
front-page headline in the Dallas Morning News 
over a story about the wedding, to wtetih some 400 
guests were invited. 

If much is known about Roger Clinton, with his 
dreams of becoming a pep star even as he contin- 
ues his struggle to overcome a past that included a 
cocaine habit, drinking problems and a prison 
term, less is known of the 25-year-old bride. 

But (his is known: She’s tight months pregnant. 
She and Roger have been living together is Cali- 
fornia for about a year where, according to the 
D allas Morning News, she worked at a software 
company in Cawarnia. (WP) 


Quote/ Unquote: 

President Bfll Clinton promoting his health care 
program at a hospital in Dallas: “Health care 
reform is about doing what’s right, about having 
compassion and bestowing dignity on each of us as 
God’s children.” 


on Sexual Allegation Ag ains t Clinton 


with a major story” that confirms the allegations. And a 
front-page headline in The Washington Times said Friday 
that such an article had got “the spike,” although the Times 
article itself did not go that far. 

The Post's manag in g editor, Robert Kaiser, said that the 


incident. Mr. Kaiser would not comment on what he called 
“internal editorial deliberations.” 

“We do not discuss personnel matters of any kind out of 
respect for tire privacy of our employees,” Mr. Kaiser said. , 
“But in light of the incorrect assertion in today's Washington 

TT TTJ i:i— .1- — . I 1 l. _ . * : 


You can never 


paper was continuing to look into the allegations and that no Times, I'd like to say that no one here has been disciplined 
article on the subject had been killed. over the handling of a stray about Paula Jones’s allegations." 

“Our role in a case like this is to examine an allegation Mr. Isikoff would say only that “I’ve worked hard on the 
made by a private citizen against a public official with some story, and I'm continuing to pursue i'l” 
care,” Mr. Kaiser said. “We have an obligation to The Post's Joe Goulden of the conservative group Accuracy in Media 

readers to do our best to establish the truth and not amply to said he was *just surprised it was written off the way it was 


print damaging accusations the moment they are made.” 

The Times piece described a shouting match on the He contrasted Tbe Post’s action with its heavy coverage of 
subject between a Post reporter, Michael Isikoff, one of three Anita Hill’s allegations of sexual harassment against Gar- 
staffers working on the story, and several editors, and said ence Thomas after be was nominated for tbe Supreme Court, 
that Mr. Isikoff had been suspended for two weeks over tire “I think it’s a double standard,” Ire said. 

Leach Has Accusations , 

pan Outrage jy ot a pj^j^ Tape 

1., j .. . — 1_ : i-i JL 


when the story first came out.” 



that Mr. Isikoff had been suspended for two - 


■rat-ii-PLOPaa 


2 L. A. Shootings Renew Japan Outrage 


iWujiee Action 


PI)ATE_ 

Mi . iff Tourist* 


By T. R. Reid 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — “This new tragedy shows us 
once again just what kind of a place America 
has become,” tire reporter on Japan's NHK- 
TV network intoned. 

Tbe “new tragedy” that received extended 
coverage on NHK and all other Japanese 
television networks on Sunday was a carjack- 
ing m Los Angeles in which two college 
students, one Japanese and one Japancse- 
American, were shot in the head and left near 
death in the parking lot of a grocery store in a 
Los Angeles suburb. 

The two victims, Takuma I to, a i 9-year-old 
exchange student from Japan, and Go Mat- 
sunra, also 19, an American citizen whose 
famQy lives in Japan, were bang sustained ou . 
Kfc-support machines in a hospital until their 
relatives could arrive from Japan to see them .. 
alive one: last. -time^ reports here said. 

Tbe case prompted , immediate Japanese 
government advisories about the risks of 
travel to the United States and other coun- 
tries considered dangerous. 

And it immediately brought to mind for all 
Japanese the “Freeze Case* in Baton Rouge, 

T miinana in October 1992 when a 16-year- 
old Japanese student was shot to death when 
he knocked on the door of a suburban home 
looking for a Halloween party. 

Whether the Los Angeles case will have as 
broad an impact is unknown, but the reaction 


in Japan on Sunday was much the same as the 
reaction to the Baton Rouge case: a mixture 
of terror and anger at U.S. society. 

“We had talked about the danger,” Mr. 
Ito's mother told NHK. “He promised me he 
would not walk down the street to go shop- 
ping; he would always use his car.” 

On Friday night at about 11, Mr. I to and 
Mr. Matsuura, both freshmen at Marymount 
College in Los Angeles, drove to a 24-hour 
grocery in San Pedro. 

According to tire police, a gunman, appar- 
ently alone, approached the two as then car 
stopped in the parting lot. Both students 
were shot in tire head and left in the patting 
lot; the assailant evidently drove off in the 
car, a 1994 Honda Civic bearing Mr. Ito’s “I 
Love NY” sticker. 

Hie Baton Rouge man who shot tbe un- 
armed 16 -year-dd said be was trying to pro- 
tea- his family; he was subsequently acquit- 
ted by a Baton Rouge jury. As a result, tbe 
“Freeze Case” tended to confirm all the worst 
Japanese stereotypes of the United States as a 
nation where guns and violence have turned 
even quia suburbs into kiHing zones. 

The Los Angdes shootings wfll most likely 

strengthen that view. 

“We were worried ack to have a child go to 
the U.S.,” said Rumik o Ito, mother ofTa- 
kuina Ito. “We said, *Why would yon even 
thmir of going to that country?’ But this was 
his dream, to go to college there.” 

In covering tire Baton Rouge tiffing, the 


be too glamorous 


Japanese press had to teach people here a new 
English usage: tire word “freeze” in tbe sense 
of “Don't move!” In the Baton Rouge case, 
the home owner shouted a single word, 
“Freeze!” before shooting his victim. The 16- 
year-old from Japan did not know that this 
was a command to stop. 

Similarly, the new tragedy has the press 
here teaching another English neologism: 
“carjacking.” 

“Evidently, this crime is increasing rapidly 
in the U.S^ n explained a correspondent on 
theTBS-TV network. “It means to approach 
a driver and steal his car at gunpoint.” 

Carjacking does not exist in Japan. 

For that matter, almost all forms of violent 
crime are rare hoc. Japan has extremely 
crowded cities — and ya it has largely es- 
caped tire scourge of crime that has become a 
major concern for Americans. With twice the 
population, America has more murders each 
month than Japan will have all year. 

As result, the Japanese are shocked by 
crimes that have become more or less every- 
day fare in the United Stales. Tbe Baton 
Rouge killing in 1992 was mostly ignored by 
the American press until the reaction in Ja- 
pan made it news. Similarly, a parking-lot 
shooting in Los Angeles would probably not 
gel any space in an East Coast newspaper 
unless, as in tins case, the victims were for- 
eigners and their home country reacted in 
horror. 




New Chef (and Policy) for White House Kitchen 


By David E. Rosenbaum 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Represen- 
tative Jim Leach says L. Jean Lems 
taped the conversation. 

Ms. Lewis is the federal investi- 
gator who maintains that a govern- 
ment banking official from Wash- 
ington visited her last month in 
Kansas City and tried unsuccess- 
fully to persuade her to say that Bfll 
and Hillar y Clinton had gained no’ 
financial benefit from a failed Ar- 
kansas savings and loan. 

Ms. Lewis's contention formed 
the basis of Mr. Leach's accusation 
in a speech on the floor of tire 
House last Thursday that “the in-^ 
dependence of tbe U.S. govern-" 
mentis regulatory system bas been 
flagrantly violated” to protea the 
president. 

But in an interview. April Bres- 
law, the official from Washington 
who Ms. Lewis says tried to ga her 
to gen the din tons off the hook, 
disputed Ms. Lewis’s account of 
their meeting. 

“I categorically deny the accusa- 
tion that 1 said anybody from 
Washington wanted any particular 
outcome,” said Ms. Breslaw, a law- 
yer for the Federal Deposit Insur- 
ance Corp., the federal regulator of 
tyinlf* and failed savings and loans. 

Ms. Lewis is a senior investigator 
in Kansas City for the Resolution 


Trust Corp., tire agency in charge 
of the savings and loan baflouL 

Mr. Leach, Republican of Iowa, 
said that Ms. Lewis had surrepti- 
tiously taped her conversation with 
Ms. Breslaw on Feb. 2, that he bad 
heard the tape and that it substanti- 
ated Ms. Lewis’s version of the 
meeting. But Mr. Leach said he did 
not have the tape. 

In his speech. Mr. Leach implied 
that be had several sources for the 
most serious assertions he has 
made about the Whitewater case: 
that political appointees in Wash- 
ington tried to muzzle the career 
investigators in Kansas CSty to pro- 
tect the Clintons from embarrass- 
ment. 

Mr. Leach offered no documen- 
tation to buttress the accusation, 
and be admitted that Ms. Lewis 
was, in fact, his only source. 

Mr. Leach said other officials 
had refused to talk with him or his 
staff about the Whitewater case. 

British Tourist Wounded 

The As s oci a ted Press ' 

NEW YORK — A robber shot a 
British tourist who surprised the 
g unman in his Manhattan hotel 
room. Peter Cooper, 46, of Bourne- 
mouth, was treated overnight for a 
shoulder wound and released from 
hospital Sunday. He lost $250 in 
cash, a watch and a camera. 



for the Peninsula 



Beverly Hills. 


THE PENINSULA 

BEVERLY HILLS 


Sh *r c T hi Exeeeit yet 

The Peninsula: Hon« tone • Manila • New Yo* • Beverly Hills 
The Palace Hotel Belling • The Kowloon Hotel Hong Kong. 


By Phyllis C. Richman ' 
and Donnie Radcliffe 

Washington Past Service 
WASHINGTON — Hillary 
Rodham Clinton has chosen Wal- 
• ter Scbeib, executive did of the 
Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur 
Springs, West Virginia, as the exec- 
■' utive chef of the White House. 
After serving lunch last week to a 
group of White House women, Mr. 
‘ Sdiesb was called back to meet 
with Mrs. Clinton. 

Afterward, Mr. Schetb found 
. himself in his kitchen- to-be, inter- 
■ viewing the staff of three, since he 
will be the one to decide who 
among them stays. The two-mem- 
j ber pastry kitchen is not affected 
by these changes. 

The word on Mr. Scbeib is not 
. offidaL “No one has been offioaUy 
-hired, and no one has officially 
accepted tire job,” was the state- 


mail carefully enunaated — twice 
— by Neel Lattimore, Mis. Gin- 
ton’s assistant press secretary. The 
present executive chef, Pierre 
Chambrin, who resigned early this 
month, has agreed to stay on until 
the new chef is installed. 

The White House was interview- 
ing chefs right up until Thursday, 
said Mr. Lattimore. Mrs. Clinton 
was “hands-on in this detiskm,”he 
said. Where the chefs were born is 
not important,” he said, allhough 
he said they had to be U.S. citizens. 

But creativity was crucial. “Tbe 
Hintons have talked about show- 
caring the best — entertainment, 
food, wine,” Mr. Lattimore said. 
American food and wine. “The 
menus were in French when the 
Clintons came to the White 
House," he said. 

Mr. Scbeib, 39, supervises an ap- 
prentice program and tbe banquets 


for La Varesme cooking school, 
which is housed at the Greenbrier. 

As a high school junior in Be- 
thesda, Maryland. Mr. Scbeib per- 
suaded a buddy to sign up for a 
cooking dass with him so he would 
not be the only boy in tire class. 
Both achieved their goals: “Hemet 
girls, and I cooked.” 

After working in Washington for 
Marriott and a steak house, Mr. 
Scbeib wem to tire Culinary Insti- 
tute of America. He went to tbe 
Capital Hilton as banquet chef 
when he graduated in 1979, and 
became executive chef within two 
years. Five years later, the twin 
brother of his boss hired him to run 
the kitchen of tire Boca Raton Re- 
sort and Gub. 

But bis wife did not like Florida, 
so they returned to Washington, 
where Mr. Scbeib worked as execu- 
tive chef of tire Madison Hotel for 


four months. “I was one of the few 
lucky enough to have the opportu- 
nity to resign,” he said. 

He moved on to the Mayflower 
Hotel, where be oqsected to xttte, 
in for good. But within a year, his 
old boss from Boca Raton, by then 
president of tire Greenbrier, invited 
him to take over tbe four kitchens 
there. Again he considered it a 
long-term job. But when he read of 
the White House opening, Mr. 
Scheib said be could not resist call- 
ing an old friend, Roland Mesnier, 
the While House pastry chef, and 
throwing his toque in tire ring. *Tve 
always been 10 years too young for 
the jobs I’ve been in.” be says. 

Mr. Scheib has introduced to the 
Greenbrier such dishes as tandoori 
scallops with raita, pasta salad with 
arugula and pancetta, vegetable ri- 
sotto with eggplant and ricotta 
tone, sea scallops with curried noo- 
dles and black beans. 


Away From Politics 

•SevorteMpiMplewerekffl«U«ia^^t90n^ed^en»^^^tio 

T^rotrf'at^oshen^Metitodis^Chnrch collapseddinrag 

troooer said. The same storm front also 
Church nearby and injured an 

undetermined awnbo" of people. 

. me inmates £ taMf- £-»*■ S SS 


Max Petitpierre Dies, 
Former Swiss Minister 


of two Egyptians who may have hnks to the 

• Id as uwesagtfwn ^ cooperated with the 

World Trade Ogg ^T^mn eeekerc 

Danrsh i^f^vember, Cop^ 

who were arrested tor arson numbers tire FBI says are 

found a list of namrii public television said. Tbe FBI 

connected with the the men, the newspaper 

cooperated m ^PZ**?* * Danish court has banned publication 
SKa reported Sunday- arrested in Aarhus, in 

of the three rum s setting the home of a Jordanian 

western Denmark and C ^ S N one ^ injured in the fire- 

° ali Rutgers Unhereity forad Not tewy to 

• A measles outta^“ ^ New Brunswick m order 

declare a state of ooei^ncy aitn More than 20 suspect- 


rreuno, ----- 

state Department of Heaim 


AP.NYT 


The Associated Press 

BERN — Max Petitpierre, 95, 
one of Switzerland’s most respect- 
ed statesmen and the foreign minis- 
ter for 16 years, died Friday. 

The government said he died at 
his home in Neuch&tel. No cause of 
death was given, but he had long 
been in poor health. 

Mr. Petitpieire was foreign min- 
ister from 1945 to 1961. He stepped 
down from the four-party coalition 
government in 1961 for health rea- 
sons but remained active in poli- 
tics. He held the yearly rotating 
post of president three times. 

Dmitri Turin, 32, the stepson of 
Alexander L Solzhenitsyn, died 
March 18 of a heart attack at his 
home in New York City. Mr. Turin 
was the son of Mr. Sofehenitivn’s 
wife, Natalya, and her first hus- 
band, Andrew Turin. 

Lffi Danuta, 92, a French-bora 
actress and framer wife of Errol 
Flynn, died March 21 in Palm 
Bach, Florida, after a lengthy bat- 
tle with Alzheim er's disease. 

Dame Whm Cooper, 98, a sym- 
bol of the modern Maori campaign 
fra- social justice and land rights. 


died Saturday in Pangura, New 
7~»i*nH She was the founder and 
first pres dent of the Maon Wom- 
en’s Welfare League in 1951. 


Mozambique Cyclone Kills 6 

Ageace France-Presse 

MAPUTO. Mozambique — Six 
people were killed when a tropical 
cyclone battered Mozambique’s 
northern coast late last week, flat- 
tening crops and buildings, accord- 
ing to reports reaching here Sun- 
Witnesses said at least six people 
were killed by the cyclone. 


The series of 
Supplements on Greece 
will continue on April 12, 
and not today 
as initially announced. 



APRIL 13 

APRIL 13 

APRIL14& 15 


InteraatloBal Travel Retafflng: New 
Technology - New Tactics 

The fourth International Duty and Tax 
Free Seminar will examine and assess 
the new developments taking place in 
the travel retailing industry. 

Contact: 

lane Benney, 

International Herald Tribune, 
TeL (44 71] 836 4802 
Fax:(4471)8360717 

Ftofeh Electric Power 
Industry Conference 

Polish Power Sector undergoing a dra- 
matic transformation has opened up 
to foreign involvement A unique event 
to discuss the latest developments and 
assess business opportunities In 
Poland. Speakers indude Minister 
Eugsniusz Morawski and representa- 
tives of tey Pol sh enterprises 
Contact- Jagoda Bak, 

Tel: 081-563 7187 

Polish Enterprise Centre 

Opportunities to Turkey 

A two day seminar for companies with 
an Interest In the Turkish market 
wishing to establish direct contacts bet- 
ween companies in the same or com- 
plementary sectors. Speakers will inclu- 
de Ministers and both countries' 
Ambassadors, as well as senior officials. 
Contact 

BethRoyney. LCO 

Tel.: 071-248 4444 

Fax: 071 4890391 


LONDON 

LONDON 

LONDON 

April lfc-20 

April 21-22 

May 17 & 18 

1UNE6&7 

LAFFERTVS INTERNATIONAL 
ALmNANZ CONVENTION 
Alffinsm Is rapafly becoming more than Retail 
Banting + Life Insurance. B now includes 
Investment Funds + General Insurance. 
Increasinely banks. Insures and fund mana- 
ger seek lo supply ALL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES Hence, this convention of three 
Inter-relaied conferences 

• £l Cffcrett 

• lit tatensoonl GeaenI taraace GKfcnace 

cmki Eliriw Fitsinums. 

Lafferty Conferences 

TeL- 1*353- 1| 671 8022 - Fae (*353-1)671 3594 

Washington & Worid Business: 

The Oodook for Global Partnership 

A distinguished group of speakers will 
debate the implications (A 
President Clinton's foreign and 
domestic economic policies for 
international business. 

Contact 

Jane Benney, 

International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

TeL: (44 7I| 8364802- Rr (44 7IJ 8360717 

FT Worid Pulp and Paper 

Arranged jointly with CEP1 this high- 
level FT forum will consider longer- 
term strategies for the industry post 
recession, restructuring, com petition 
and trade Issues and review develop- 
ments in emerging markets. It will also 
focus on toe Implications of the 
growing environmental challenges 
Earing the sector 

Enquiries: Financial Times 

TeL 081-673 9000 

Fax: 08! 673 1335 

FT Worid Cold Conference 

This important conference, which has 
been timed to coincide with the ter- 
centenary celebrations of the Bank of 
England will feature central bank pre- 
sentations, a review of International 
mining developments and a major 
forum on the role of the markets in 
the mid- !Q90s. 

EnfliMB: 

Financial Times 

TeL 081-673 9000 

Fax: 081 673 1335 

LONDON 

WASHINGTON 

LONDON 

LONDON 

JUNE 8 & 9 

JUNE 9-10 

[UNE 13 & 14 

JUNE I5-J6 

EJS 94: CSent Server Reporting for 
tiie Enterprise 

Europe's leading conference and exhi- 
bition on Executive and^anagement 
Information Systems. A unique 
conference programme which gathers 
many of the world's best thinkeis, 
practitioners and case studies, with 
the aim of helping orpnlsations link 
E1S to business goals. 

Cartad; Business IntelEgeuce 
Tel.: 081-544 1830 
Fax:081-544 9020 

Latin America: 

A New investment Partner 

This, the fifth biennial conference on 
Latin America, will focus on trade and 
investment opportunities 
in the region. 

Cwtact 

Brenda Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

TeL (44 71)8364802 
Fax:(44 71)8360717 

FT North Sea Ofi and Gas 

The conference will review exploration 
and production in the main sectors of 
the North Sea and consider the 
Impact of current oil prices on activity 
in the province. Expert speakers will 
also address such oudal issues as 
competitiveness and ways of reducing 
costs; operator-contractor relation- 
ships and abandonment 
Eiqidns Financial Times 

Tel.: 081-673 9000 
Fax:081-673 1335 

Oil & Money: 

Asia and the Padflc 

The conference, one of Asia's leading 
energy forums, will be addressed by 
experts in the oil industry from the 
worid over 

CmbKl: 

Brenda Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

Tel: 14471)8364802 

Fax: (44 71)8360717 

LONDON 

LONDON 

LONDON 

SINGAPORE 

JUNE 15 & 16 

fULY 12 & 13 

SEPTEMBER 21-24 


FT Transport In Enrope- 
Creatlng and Financing tbe 
Infrastructure of the Ftrhire Loudon 

The meeting will focus on the implica- 
tions of Community proposals for the 
Trans-European Networks and the 
prospects for public-private partner- 
ships to finance Europe's transport 
infrastructure. 

Enquires: 

Financial Times 

TeL 08 1-673 9000 

Fax.- 08 1-673 1335 

FT Multimedia - Vision and Reality 

This major business forum win focus 
on the key issues faring one of the fas- 
test growing industries, the regulatory 
and legal framework for industry de- 
velopment, financing the multimedia 
future, assessing realbusfness applica- 
tions and potential and the role of 
strategic alliances in responding to the 
developing multimedia marketplace 
Eitqutris.Flnaiicfal limes 

Tel.: 081 -673 9000 

Fbx:081 673 1335 

The Annual Oxford Summit 

A unique opportunity to assess the 
global business outlook with a 
distinguished group of academics and 
business and financial leaders 
Contact 

Jane Benney. 

International Herald Tribune, 
London 

TeL (44 71)8364802 
Fax:(44 71)836 0717 


LONDON 

LONDON 

OXFORD 







-UMMMUUnafcBU u«w#wr«iWMrS'N (A, 


Pi 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


** 


4 - 


South Africa’s Ground Zero 

In Sharpeville, History Hangs Over Campaign 

is the first white president soliciting 
black votes. But Mr. de Klerk did 


By Bill Keller 

New York Tima Service 

SHARPEVILLE South Africa 
— This is Lhc campaign venue from 
heQ, a place to make advance men 
swallow their tongues and report- 
ers think fondly of more sedate 
ways to earn a living. 

You enter Sharpeville past smol- 
dering garbage heaps and tumble- 
down homes, past graffiti scream- 
ing of race war against “settlers.*’ 
meaning whites, through an angry, 
gun-crazy town that is a testimoni- 
al to breakdown. 

Public services, which were never 
much, are at the moment nonexis- 
tent. Violence, which in Sharpeville 
is discussed as a mysterious com- 
monplace of nature, like the weath- 
er, has rendered the township un- 
serviceable. No electrician or 
grocery truck or sewer repair crew 
is willing to brave the wQd frontier 
just now. 

But politicians cannot so easily 
bypass Sharpeville. Sharpeville, 
south of Johannesburg, is a hellhole 
with a claim on history. The mod- 
ern calendar of anti-apartheid re- 
sistance starts on the day. 34 years 
ago, when police shot and killed 69 
protesters here for mounting a 
Martin Luther King-style civil dis- 
obedience campaign. Following 
quickly upon that spasm of blood- 
shed, the government banned op- 
position groups, and the struggle 
was on. 

Three of South Africa’s would- 
be presidents paid homage to Shar- 
peville on the anniversary last 
week, each in his way contributing 
to a larger portrait of the campaign. 

President F. W. de Klerk phoned 
in his homage — fair enough, given 
the trophy be would become if he 
set foot in the place. 

The fact that he issued a state- 
ment at ail was a reminder that he 


not suggest that Sharpeville in any 
sense advanced the freedom of 
black South Africans. 

And if you are not going to Up 
your hat to black struggle or de- 
nounce invidious white power, 
what else can you say about Shar- 
pcviUe? Mr. de Klerk chose this: 
“Let the memory of those who died 
at Sharpeville, and all others who 
died as a result of the conflicts of 
the past, be an inspiration for the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

new beginning — not a reason for 
dwelling in the past” 

Clarence Makwetu, the presi- 
dent of the Pan Africanist Con- 
gress, was the candidate with the 
most legitimate claim to attention 
on Sharpeville Day. The Pan Afri- 
canists initiated the campaign of 
civil disobedience that aided in the 
massacre, and it is their annual 
ritual to gather each March 21 at 
the township’s cemetery to clean 
the graves of tbeir martyrs. 

But this is not Mr. Makwetu's 
year. Since the deaths of the great 
think ers of the black nationalist 
movement — Steve Biko, Robert 
Sobukwe — the Pan Africanist 
Congress has drifted. In recent 
years it has been more famous for 
its terrorist army and its demand 
that all wealth be taken by the state 
for redistribution. 

There was a kind of pathos to 
Mr. Makwetu. standing before a 
couple of thousand loyalists at the 
Sharpeville soccer field and la- 
menting the unwillingness of “big 
business’* and “the overseas com- 
munity” to bankroll the Pan Afri- 
canists. 

Nelson Mandela’s rally was laid 
out on the closest thing Sharpeville 


has to a recreation area — the 
grassy bank of an industrial waste 
pond. Locals call it Miami Beach. 

Mr. Mandela descended in a he- 
licopter. to the music of an Afro- 
pop band playing through 30-foot 
towers of loudspeakers. It took half 
an hour for him to make his way 
through the surging crowd. 

Marshals battled to pan the 
crowd. Fans fainted in the crush. 

Gunfire crackled. A hapless MC 
led “Cease fire!" By the rime 
■. Mandela reached the stage, the 
candidate’s face was puckered with 
anger. 

If ever there was an opportunity 
to lambaste the police, this was it: 

Sharpeville, the landmark of police 
iniquity, and three days aftei the 
release of a judicial report implicat- 
ing top officers of the South Afri- 
can police in a campaign of jun- 
runmng, murder ana sabotage. 

Instead, he began by casti 
his organizers for letting the 
get out of hand — “It is lucky that 
nobody has died here!** he fumed 
— and then went on to shower 
praise oq the police. Don’t let the 
corruption of a few create a “dis- 
torted view," he said. “The major- 
ity of the police force is composed 
erf honest and dedicated men and 
women, black and white." he said. 

On balance, Mr. Mandela gave 
the impression of a man less wor- 
ried about fa is campaign opponents frnT/^ 

SZ * rSS KING: A Television Kingmaker — Live and Sus l 

about his own electorate. 


PASSPORT TO DEMOCRACY — A Russian Orthodox mm 
Florovslrf religions establishment Turnout hi the first round of the 


The events of Sharpeville, 1960, 
figured as little in Mi. Mandela’s 
spee ch as in Mr. de Klerk’s. The 
difference was that, having been 
here, he could see what Mr. de 
Klerk could not: the danger that on 
the road to democracy there are 
many off-ramps to anarchy. 


Yeltsin, 'Fresh,’ Ends 2-Week Vacation 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. Yeltsin re- 
turned to Moscow on Sunday after a two-week 
vacation on the Black Sea coasL 

Speaking to journalists before his plane took off 
for Moscow from Adler airport, near the resort of 
Sochi, Mr. Yeltsin scoffed at reports in the UE 
press that he was seriously QL 

“Despite the rainy weather, I had a good rime." 
he said. “I even played tennis and swam in the sea. 


although the temperature was only about 7 or 8 
degrees,” or about 45 degrees Fahrenheit. 

“Can a sick man swim in the sea when it’s 8 
degrees?" he asked, according to Itar-Tass. 

The news agency quoted Sergei Filatov, bead of 
Yeltsin’s administration, as saying the president 
was “in good spirits and fresh.” 

Mr. Yeltsin’s return could restore some clarity to 
the political scene after a murky week dominated 
by rumors of a coup plot against the president. The 
rumors have been discounted. 


Continued from Page 1 

down. Bob Packwood warns to 
bare his soul (only his soul). 

Journalists are famous for their 
ambition, but King breaks new 
ground The only mountain left he 
says, would be booking God on the 
show for sweeps week. Never mind 
that whatever week God appears 
will be sweeps week. And never 
mind that God already knows bow 
to beam up 22.000 miles, then 
bounce as far away as Saudi Arabia 
and as dose as the television set 
across the street U makes Larry 
King feel like God to do the same. 

King has already prepared his 
questions for Christ, assuming that 
Christ does not dedde to do Kop- 
peL “Do you think you were virgin- 
bora?" “Do you believe yon are a 
direct sot of God?” 

Jour nalis ts like to mutter that 
King is too gladly used. There is 
grousing that he has lowered the 
dignity of presidential politics, 


PROBE: 

Influence Sought 

Continued from Page 1 

that White House qffiaals would 
be surprised by his appointment to 
lode into the Madison Guaranty 
matter." He said that it “would 
have been better had these conver- 
sations not occurred" and that he 
was “confident that such conversa- 
tions will not be repeated.” 

“At the same time.” be added, 
“these conversations should not be 
blown out of proportion.” 

Senior White House officials 
raised die issue of Mr. Stephens's 
hiring in two, conversations with 
the Treasury officials on Feb. 25, 
just after discovering that Mr. Ste- 
phens had been retamed. 

Mr. Ickes, the deputy chief erf 
staff, and Mr. Stephan opouloos, 
Mr. Clinton's senior ad visa, called 
Mr. Altman, who was also serving 
as acting head of Resolution Trust 
and had just announced that be 
would recuse himself from its in- 
vestigation of Madison. 

Mr. Ickes and Mr. Stephanopou- 
los were furious that Mr. Altman 
bad announced his recusal without 
Idling White House officials. The 
day before, Mr. Altman revealed to 
the Senate Banking, Housing and 
Urban Affairs Committee that on 
Feb. 2 he had briefed senior White 

House officials about the Madison 

case. The White House bad spent 

priety of the briefing ana explain- 
ing why Mr. Altman should not 
remove himself from the Madison 
investigation. 

In ihe coarse of a conference call 
with Mr. Altman, Mr. Ickes and 
Mr. Stephanopoulos also raised the 
subject of Mr. Stephens, calling his 
hiring an “outrageous choice,” and 
asking, according to sources famil- 
iar with the conversation: “Can 
anything be done about it? Is H 
final?” The sources were uncertain 
whether it was Mr. Stephanopoulos 
or Mr. Ickes who raised the subject 
Mr. Stephanopoulos also spoke 
with Mr. Stoner, chief erf staff to 
Treasury Secretary Uoyd Bentsen 
and a friend of Mr. Stephanopou- 
los’s sauce the 1988 Michael S. Du- 
kakis presidential campaign. 

One source, describing Mr. Ste- 
phanopoulos as “pretty fired up," 
said the White House aide asked 
Whitewater. The press feeds off president, Pd keep right on doing Mr. Steiner whether Mr. Stephens's 
these stories tin it gets unfed, untfl Tany King Live’ from the White hiring was “final whether anything 

aimiIA ka W W- 



ItoOrnkta/Rertg 

_ to vote witb ho- passport on Sunday in Kiev at the St 
freepariiaroentaiy elections in Ukraine reached 67 percent 


tiutlt 


leredfor Posterity 


years ago, 
Line 


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though for this be deserves no more 
than what basketball playeis call 
an “assist" In King’s company, 

Billy Joel hawking his concert tour 
hlnrs into Bill Clinum hawking 
health care blurs into Rosanne Ar- 
nold hawking herself. The March 
schedule for “Larry King Live” 
showed Bob Barker on one night 
and Betty’ Ford on another. And 
Henry Kissinger’s booking did not 
follow far b ehin d someone called 
“Kathy the Nymphette." (She was 
going to come on, like some politi- 
cal figures, to discuss sex; except 
that she was willing to admit she 
likes a lot of iL) 

King shrugs and imputes such 
complaints to envy. He says be 
doesn't worry about becoming 
friends with the politicians he inter- 
views. And he believes what actors 
say is often as important as what — ^ ^ — — ^ ^ ^ — ^ — — 
potitirians say. (Alas, he is tight.) 

EU: Ministers Offer Compromise to Britain on Voting 

whip.** he says. Suddenly he is un- 


I would be sitting with 
icoUT and I would have had to 
say: ‘What's with the wife, Abe? 
Jesus, does she spend money. And 
what is with the fourscore?’ ” (In 
Brooklyn, a seme refers to some- 
thing dsa.) 

He concedes that his own celeb- 
rity can be a warping factor in 
interviews, tat that he can live with 
iL When asked about the blurring 
of tabloid and network news, he 
waves it off, saying, “It’s a moot 
point." 

“Mrs. Bobbitt was an exclusive; 
now she’s yesterday^ story," he 
‘Ethiopia. The 


says. 


contras. 


There is 

about King’s lack of reflection, just 
as there is about die service that he 
provides. The absence of agony 
about the ethics of jo urnalism and 
trivialization of culture has its re- 
wards. The people on his show are 
onfStered, even when they are 
pampered. They always show more 
than they mean to show. 

King may be vulgar, but vulgar 
derives from vulgus, which means 
the people The lowest ccmmon de- 
nominator that King peddles on his 
show has a strong whiff of democ- 
racy. He once told Tune magazine, 
“If — God forbid — I ever became 


we burp. When the Washington House." And it isn’t Ms fault that could be done about iL* Mr. 
press bmps, we wait a minute and nobody would notice the differ- Steiner told him there was nothing 
then move on to something else." ence. he could do. 


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expectedly cold-eyed. “She’s more 
involved in Whitewater than be is, 
and he can't fire her. 1 Kke them 
both. But anything's possible. 
What would have happened to Jack 
and Jackie if there tad been a sec- 
ond term?" He looks across the 
table at his attractive blond ex-wife 
(fourth of five), Sharon, who has 
joined him at lunch. “There's so 
much that goes into marriage," be 
muses. “Love, anger, tenderness. 
One night Sharon threw a plate at 
me and jnst missed my bead.” 
Sharon winces. “I don’t remember 
that," she mouths, embarrassed. 

He insists that, in his non pounc- 
ing way, he does ask the right ques- 
tions. “If I'd tad my show 130 


Cantinaed from Page I 

tantamount to a legally binding ac- 
cord, which Britain had demanded, 
and would not set a bad precedent 
for an intergovernmental confer- 
ence in 1996. Mr. Delors and most 
member states want that confer- 
ence to enhance the use of majority, 
voting to ensure the Union will 
remain capable of taking action as 
it grows. 

The co m p romi se also calls for 
EU governments to create a wise 
men’s committee to study voting 
rights and other institutional ques- 
tions in preparation for the 1996 
conference. 

Such a committee has long been 
opposed by Mr. Major, who 


warned EU leaders last fall lo leave 
such divisive issues aside and focus 
on presang problems like jobs. But 
Mr. Hurd said the committee 
would keep Britain’s voting con- 
cerns on the front burner, saying, 
“This whole relationship between 
the sire of countries and their votes 
cannot be brushed under the car- - 
peL" 

Mr. Ddora said the wise men's 
committee was aurial if the Euro- 
pean Parliament is to accept the 
voting compromise and allow the 
enlargement of the Union to pro- 
ceed on schedule. 

The foreign ministers also issued 
their strongest warning yet to 
Greece to lift its embargo on the 


forma Yugoslav Republic of Mac- 
edonia, but held off for another 
two to three months any legal ac- 
tion against Athens in favor of con- 
tinued diplomacy. Greece claims 
that the republic has territorial am- 
bitions on the adjacent northern 
Greek province of Macedonia. 

The other 11 foreign ministers 
rejected the embargo as a flagrant 
violation of EU law in “very frank” 
discussions with Foreign Minister 
Karolos Papoulias, EU officials 
said, tat the bloc was not ready to 
take the holder of the Union's ro- 
tating presidency to court or press 
any harder on a government that 
enjoys nearly unanimous support 
from the Greek people on the issue. 


BOOKS 


PARALLEL TIME; Crow- 
ing Up in Black and White 

By Brent Staples. 274 pages. 
$23. Pantheon Books. 

Reviewed by 
Michael Eric Dyson 

D EBATES about black males 
in the United Slates have in- 
creased in proportion to black 
men's rising social misery — in- 
dexed in withering numbers that 
barely detail the impact on their 
lives of informal drug economies, 
escalating unemployment and 
stunning rates of homicide. 

The plight of most black males 
has gotten so bad that some social 
commentators have come to refer 
forebodingly to blade males as an 
“endangered species.” Trapped be- 
tween statistics and stereotypes, 
however, the gritty textures ana un- 
comfortable truths of black male 
life are too often smoothed over to 
fit easily into pat explanations of 
either their prosperity or failure. 

Brent Staples's poignant memoir 
offers a glimpse behind and beyond 
the recitation of black male decline. 
The world in which Staples was 
aped, a world where workmg-d ass 
Uadi people brought value and dig- 
-: ty to their labor and lives, b vivid- 
nsaHzad. Staples is a writer of 
ifying eloquence whose hunger 


WHAT THEY’RE READING 


• David Tsfoatsky, American ac- 
tor and juggler living in Berlin, is 
reading “ Give War a Chance ” by 
P. J. O Rourke. 

“O’Rourke has a brilliant eye for 
political satire and the descriptions 
of right-wing anarchists are spot- 
on. I’m also rereading the Bible 
For me, the stories never get stale 
and they make my beard grow " 
(Michael Kallertbach, IHTj 



There he confronts the postindus- 
trial collapse of the job market, its 
harmful efferts on black males no 
more powerfully illustrated than in 
the life and death of his own brother 
Blake, a drug dealer killed by a 
vengeful rival. Blake’s life and death 
prewde the narrative bookends of 
Staples’s remembrances, a mournful 
reminder that, increasingly, black 
male life is arditypically embodied 
in its violent, premature end. 

With painful, pitiless honesty, 
Staples writes of bis refusal to attend 
hb younger brother’s funeral, and 
how Ins repeated, failed attempts to 
rescue his brother from Ihe inevita- 
ble consequences of his drag dealing 
exacted a costly moral tofl. 

“I mourned Blake and buried 
him months before he died,” be 
writes. “I would not suffer bis 
death a second time." 

At first blush, this seems a cal- 


lous, cruel act of bad faith, the ritual 
sundering of family ties by Unsuc- 
cessful brother" from a past too 
painful and embarrassing to bear. 

But as Staples’s narrative makes 
dear, events take on a second life 
when memory and wisdom mingle 
to give meaning and purpose to the 

D His decision to forgo his 
hut’s funeral became part of a 
hfdon£ attempt to torn painful iso- 
lation mto fruitful solitude. Escape, 
sometimes thwarted, sometimes 
painfully realized, is a common 
motif of these memoirs. 

When Staples writes of attending 
a college near his home in Chester 
— the only one of the family’s nin« 
children to do so — as a result of a 
chance meeting with one of its 
black professors, be underlines just 
how tenuously hi§ escape was con- 
nected to circumstance, how luck 
often allows talent to shine. 


A less successful attempt at es- 
cape — from the frozen regions of 
racial stereotyping — is symbolized 
in his strange, patently quixotic 
stalking of the novelist Saul Bellow 
after Staples became a doctoral stu- 
dent in psychology at the Universi- 
ty of Chicago. 

Staples jogged by Bellow’s apart- 
ment and tried to force a chance 
sidewalk meeting because he want- 
ed to be Bellow, to “steal the es- 
sence of him, to absorb it right into 
my bones.” 

But Staples came away only witb 
the harsh caricatures of blade male 
life that he found in Bellow’s fic- 
tion; he could not escape meaning 
far less to his idol than what Bellow 
meant to him. 

Staples’s frustrated quest ex- 
presses more than it intends; it 
speaks to the attempt of black peo- 
ple to somehow secure the approval 
of a culture that deadens itself to 
the variety and complexity, the 
sheer ingenuity, of blade life. 

With its army of metaphors 
marching across the map of the 
unruly tat rewarding terrain where 
personal experience reflects and re- 
fines national identity, “Parallel 
Lives” reminds us thiat the besL 
personal writing is born of the 
courage to confront oneself. 

Michael Eric Dyson, a professor 
at Brawn University and the author 
qf "Reflecting Black: African-Amer- 
ican Cultural Criticism , " wrote this 
for The New York Times. 


He turns time and again in his 


in Chester, Pennsylvania. 


to the blade male 


Staples, now an editorial writer 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott beans doubled would have been would be safe, since East had not 

O NE of the great players in the complicated after a heart lead, for made a Lightner double. Then 
early years of contract bridge. South would have known to finesse East’s restraint would have oaid 

the heart queen, guided by a double off. 
that implied a heart void. 


early years of contract bridge. 
Theodore Lightner, bad a brilliant 
thought when he suggested dial a 
double erf a slam contract should 
ask for an unusual lead. His first 
test of the idea more than 60 years 
ago was a failure, causing his part- 
ner to impose a veto, but other 
experts have been using tbe 
Lightner double ever since. 


In tbe absence of a double, the 
West player, Nancy McBean, chose 
a diamond lead, perhaps taking 
into account the fact that East 
could have doubled the three-club 
bid wirh strength in that suiL South 
won with the diamond ace, cashed 


of their employment in 


He returns years later to Chester 


In the diagramed deal played in the spade ace and had something to 

February, North and South were think about when West discarded 
Etsy Bailey and Mona ManseO. 


*QJ 

WEST 

A — 

9 K 10 8 6 4 3 
* J9652 
*63 


NORTH (D) 
* 10 6 2 
V AQ J872 
0 73 


EAST 
A J 754 3 
O — 

O KQ >08 
*8742 


They climbed to a sound contract 
of six spades after North had 
opened with a weak two-bid. 

The East player. Alice Lupton, 
briefly considered doubling the fi- 
nal contract but quietly passed. A 
double would have suggested a 
heart lead, and she was not clear 
that that was wtal she wanted. Six 


discarded. 

It was necessary to reach die 

dummy to pick up the tramps, and 
the chance that East would ruff 
either a heart or a club seemed 
slight, but equal. South guessed 
right by leading a dub. and picked 
up the trumps to make the slam. 

A world champion in the South 
seat might have gone astray by in- 
ferring that a heart lead to the ace 


SOUTH 

* AKQ98 
05 

O A4 

• A K 10 9 S 

Both sides were vulnerable.- The 
Wooing: 

North 
20 

3* 

A * 


East 

South 

west 

Pass 

2 N.T. 

Pans 

Paw 

3* 

Pass 

Paso 

6* 

Pass 

Pass 




West fed the diamond five. 






cV? c ^ 1 o- o 1 -a 5^ 


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■•■•. I...„ % s 
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'if air fin l ok 


South Korea Urges 
A Softer Approach 
On Nuclear Dispute 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Compiled by Ow Sttf Fnm Dispatches 

SEOUL — South Korea’s for- 
aga minister said Sundav ihai a 

‘ United Nations Securiw cSrfl 
resolution suggesting economic 
sanctions against North Korea 
might go too far as a first sum. 

Foreign Minister Han Sung Joo 
said a softer, non binding statement 
might be more effective in persuad- 
“g North Korea to accept thor- 
ough UN inspections of its suspect 

nuclear sites. 

“Before resolutions are adopted, 
China's suggestion of a statement 
may be effective,” Mr. Han said at 
a press briefing before leaving for 
Beijing to join President Kim 
Young Sam. Mr. Kim arrived in 
Beijing mi Sunday from .Shan g h ai 
but made no statement His taiiry 
with Chinese leaders begin Mon- 
day. 

The United Stales has an- 
nounced plans to move more so- 
phisticated weapons to South Ko- 
rea, and the North's official press 
agency, KCNa, said Sunday that 
ifie UJS. moves “are driving the 
situation to the brink of war.” 

The agency, monitored in To- 
kyo, said: “If the U.S. imperialists 
think they can frighten us with mfl - 


moving on to resolutions." Mr 
Han said. 

For ihe last year. North Korea 
has obstructed obligatory inspec- 
tions by the International Atomic 
Energy Agency while denying that 
it is building nuclear weapons. 

On Thursday, the United States 
presented the Security Council 
with a draft resolution calling on 
the North to permit new inspec- 
tions within a month. It does not 
call for sanctions, apparently to 
avoid China’s veto, but it leaves 
open the possibility by saying the 
council wu] “consider further ac- 
tion if necessary.” 

Pyongyang has threatened mili- 
tary action if the Security Council 
votes sanctions. Seoul has been try- 
ing to increase the pressure without 
provoking a military response. 

The Pentagon has been moving 
to bolster its forces in South Korea 
10 protect against an attack. To 
improve the ability to rush war- 
planes to South Korea, Mr. Perry 
has ordered the air force to build 
up its supply of munitions and 
spare parts there. 

(AP.NYT. Reuters) 



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Beijing on his arrival Sunday. He is in Beijing for talks with Chinese leaders beginning Monday. 


itaiy threat, it is, indeed, a foolish — ” 

^ World’s Most Populous Nation Also Has Longest Death Raw 

““ l S ai i S ■ .. - . f oatinued from Pa 8 e 1 Once charged, a person is almost always the People’s Armed Police pulls the trigger. He 

nc nao maae iuuy revealed the tshed with fines or imprisonment, according to convicted, and sentences are rarely overturned, does not wear a mask or hood. The nrisoner 
dangCTOUS scheme of the US. un- Amnesty International , k does not wear a blindfold, 

penahsts to unhesitatingly lead the In November 1992, a merchant was even [ n execution is a nw process, with . 

situation on the Korean Peninsula executed for making and selling ordinary spin is “ ttle 3llenuon P“d to digmty. Chinese officials The Communists use executions as a propa 

to a catastrophic war phase.” as MaotaL a liquor famous for its Dotencv ° rten P 0 *" 1 oul xiiRt prisoners’ feelings cannot ganda tool. In the Maoist era, executions wen 

In Seoul, the police arrested 83 About 65 crimes, or one-third ofall criminal * *“5“ ^ Performed in public. Pressure was put on peo 

students staging a protest in from offenses in China, are now punishable by death. de P nvcd of P° bucaI for We - P te t0 . Y* 1 ? 1 Att “ dan °e P roved °“ e s »folta 
of the U.S. Embassy on Sunday In addition to murder and armed robbery, the No atlempt fe made l0 minimize contact tocSemm 

Students holding placards and death penalty may be given for serious cases of »vtw«*n « JiirionM- and nri«w«r hen* Snme- ■ ,i- lOQa - i are repons oi mass- 
if S fists shouted “No Pattiot prostitution, trade in cultural relics, sabotage of prisoncre gat their Kast of siSS renSte^rolSS ^ P “ “ “ 

missiles in South Korea*” for about dikes and organizing secret religious societies, ombrrad with the soldiers who will shoot them P 

10 nnnutes before their arrest, the A wide variety of “counierrevolunonaiy” ^ hour w wo ]iUsr according to a former In the 1970s, some executions were broadcast 
police said. crimes also carry capital punishment. But most judicial employee who has witnessed about 100 on prime-time television. But in the last decade 

Last week. President Bill Onion P olitical prisoners fall into categories of “coun- executions. “ China has opened to the West and beeomi 

restored plans to send Patriot de- terrevolutionary" crimes not subject to the sensitive about its international image, it ha 

fensive missiles to South Korea death -penalty. A soldier of the paramilitary force known as moved executions behind closed doors. 


Iiam J. 'Perry of launching a weap- 
ons buildup, KCNA said remarks 
be bad made “fully revealed the 
dangerous scheme of the UJS. im- 
perialists to unhesitatingly lead the 
situation on the Korean Peninsula 
to a catastrophic war phase ” 

In Seoul, Ihe police arrested 83 
students staging a protest in front 
of the U.S. Embassy on Sunday. 
Students holding placards and 
shaking fists shouted “No Patriot 
missiles in South Korea!” for about 
10 minutes before their arrest, the 
police said. 

Last week. President Bill Clinton 
restored plans to send Patriot de- 
fensive missiles to South Korea. 


Once charged, a person is almost always 
convicted, and sentences are rarely overturned. 

In China, execution is a raw process, with 
little alien lion paid to dignity. Chinese officials 
often point out that prisoners’ feelings cannot 
be taken into consideration since they have 
been deprived of political rights “for life." 

No attempt is made to minimize contact 
between executioner and prisoner here. Some- 
times, prisoners eat their breakfast of steamed 
combread with the soldiers who wil 1 shoot them 
an hour or two later, according to a former 
judicial employee who has witnessed about 100 
executions. 


A soldier of the paramilitary force known as 


The Communists use executions as a propa- 
ganda tool. In the Maoist era, executions were 
performed in public. Pressure was put on peo- 
ple to watch. Attendance proved one’s solidari- 
ty with ihe people and against the people's 
enemies. Even today, there are reports of mass- 
sentendng rallies and even public executions in 
remote provinces. 

In the 1970s, some executions were broadcast 
on prime-time television. But in the last decade, 
as China has opened to the West and become 
sensitive about its international image, it has 
moved executions behind closed doors. 


China suggested Friday that the 
Security Council issue a nonbind- 
ing statement nominally from its 
chairman. Jean- Bernard M6rim6e 
of France, which could be adopted 
by consensus rather than by a vote. 
Resolutions are legally binding and 
must be adopted by a vote. 

As a permanent member of the 
Security Council, China can veto 
any resolution, and as the main 
remaining ally of reclusive North 
Korea, it is seen as likely to do so if 
sanctions are called for. 

“If North Korea does not accept 
inspections even after the state- 
ment, China would have to agree to 


HARVEST: China's Economic Boom Erodes Its Ability to Feed Itself 


Continued from Page 1 

land has steadily contracted; estimates of the 
decrease range from 15 percent to one-third. 

Intensified farming to increase crop yields 
has wrought widespread degradation in China’s 
soils, a condition agricultural specialists are 
now documenting. 

Erosion, poor crop rotation, over-fertiliza- 
tion and the loss of organic content of soils that 
once flourished from manure-based farming 
have brought a new plague to the land. So has 
an uncontrollable level of industrial pollution. 


A senior official of China’s State Land Ad- 
ministration complained publicly that China 
bad been suffering a net annual loss of nearly 
659,000 acres of farmland since 1991 because of 
“the overheated boom in real estate develop- 
ment.” 

Bnt in a more startling disclosure, the party 
newspaper People’s Daily said on Jan. 3 that 
new Agriculture Ministry statistics showed that 
in 1993, farmland used to grow the country’s 
baric grain crop had shrunk by 4.3 milli on acres 
and was 5.5 percent below the 1992 acreage. 

Agriculture Minister Liu Jiang said 50 mil- 


lion Chinese fanners had abandoned farming 
last year to seek better jobs in the dries. 

Disruptions to farming patterns touched off 
shortages and panic buying this winter, sending 
grain prices skyrocketing an average of 43 per- 
cent in major dues. In some markets, price 
increases jumped 70 to 135 percent before the 
government released 23 milli on ions from 
grain reserves to calm the markets. 

The head of the Academy of Sciences, Zhou 
Guangzhao. said in a recent interview in Beijing 
that Ulna's “ecological stability” was at stake 
in agriculture. 


BOSNIA: 

Atrocities Go On 

Continued bum Page 1 
four Serbian men in military uni- 
forms in Vrbanja. a Muslim suburb 
of Banja Luka. She said she was 
returning from ihe market when 
the men stopped next to her in their 
car. 

“Two men got out and they 
forced me into the car,” she saitL 
"They took me to a farm, and three 
men held me down and one man 
did it. Ihe other men laughed. 
Then they left i walked 10 Itimme- 
ters back borne. How can they treat 
us like this, like nothing, like worse 
than nothing?” 

Serbian authorities argue that 
“uncontrolled elements” are to 
blame for the upswing in violence, 
an explanation Mr. BjaDerstedt re- 
jects. 

“Knowing the high efficiency of 
the Sob police, they could do 
something if they wanted to,” he 
said. “But they are part of the prob- 
lem.” 

Mr. BiaHerstedi said the United 
Nations r only recourse has been to 
evacuate hundreds of Muslims and 
Croats from Banja Luka. Thus, the 
United Nations finds itself in the 
ambiguous position of doing the 
Serbs’ work for them, dealing 
Muslims and Croats from Serbian- 
controlled turf. The UN humani- 
tarian agency, along with the Gene- 
va-based Internationa) Committee 
for the Red Cross, has been busing 
60 people a week away from Serbi- 
an-hdd regions. 

“If we don’t get these people out 
of there, they could wind up dead. ” 
Mr. BjaDerstedt said. “It’s as sim- 
ple as thaL” 

The main reason for the recent 
upsurge in violence and ethnic 
cleansing in Lhe Serbian-held re- 
gion appears to be that the Bosnian 
Serbs are preparing for the end of 
the war. Only a small number of 
M uslims or Croats will be tolerated 
on their territory, UN officials say. 

In December, the mayor of Zen- 
ica, the biggest Muslim-held town 
in central Bosnia, agreed with the 
Serbian mayor of Banja Luka to 
begin a population exchange. Mus- 
lims and Croats are being tossed 
from their bouses in Banja Luka to 
make way for an expected tide of 
10,000 Serbs from Zenica, Mr. 
BjaDerstedt said. 

Significantly, however, Muslims 
are not conducting a similar deans- 
ing of Serbs in their region. Indeed. 
Mr. BjaDerstedt said the Muslim 
program was “quite correct” 

“We found no indication of vio- 
lence,” he said. 


Polish Train Mishap Kills 3 

Reuters 

WARSAW (Reuters) — Three 
people were killed when a train 
smashed into their car in eastern 
Poland on Sunday, disrupting traf- 
fic on the BerKn-Moscow line. 


Page 5 


Muslim Asia Eases 
' Schindler 9 Stand 

By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Indonesia and Malaysia are expected to affirm 
their commitment to a moderate form of Islam by allowing the film 
“Schindler's List” to be shown in theaters if the director. Steven 
Spielberg, agrees to some cuts involving sex and nudity scenes. 

Him censors in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim country, 
wiD view the film this week before announcing a decision, while the 
Malaysian government said over the weekend that it would review a 
ban imposed recently by censors. 

Local distributors of the film said Mr. Spielberg had given 
instructions to withdraw the film from any countiy where authorities 
censored parts of it 

Juwooo Sudarsono, dean of the faculty of political science at the 
University of Indonesia, said in Jakarta that authorities would 
probably want the movie to be screened to “emphasize that Indone- 
sia is not an Islamic stale and that Islam is not an official religion 
here.” 

. He said most Indonesian Muslims recognized that the Holocaust 
“did indeed happen and that, whatever Lhe situation in the Middle 
East and Palestine, they want Indonesia to r emain a tolerant soci- 
ety.” 

The film is the story of a German war profiteer, Oscar Schindler, 
who saved the lives of more than 1,000 Jews who would otherwise 
have gone to German death camps. 

Although more than SO percent of Indonesia's 185 million popula- 
tion profess to be Muslims, the stale-sponsored ideology, known as 
Pancasila, offers equal treatment to all major religious groups, 
including Hind uism. Catholicism, Protestantism and Buddhism. 

President Suharto has made it clear that he will not allow stability 
to be put at risk by M uslim pressure groups seeking to turn the 
country into an Islamic state. 

Nonetheless, the United States, evidently alarmed at a surge of. 
anti-American and anti-Israeli sentiment among Muslims in both 
Indonesia and Malaysia after ihe massacre of Palestinians at Hebron 
last month, took the unusual step on Friday of issuing a statement 
saying that “Schindler’s List” was an accurate portrayal of German 
atrocities against Jews “which should not be forgotten.” 

The State Department comment in Washington came after Malay- 
sian censors banned the film and a leading Muslim cleric in Indone- 
sia caDed for similar action there on the grounds that the movie was 
“nothing but Zionist propaganda.” 

In the Philippines, which also has a large Muslim population, the 
government’s Movie and Television Regulatory and Classification 
Board decided to cut portions of the film because they showed “too 
much breast” and a scene where Mr. Schindler has sex with his 
mistress. 

In protest, Warner Brothers, the film distributor, withdrew the 
movie, saying Mr. Spielberg wanted it shown uncut or not at all. The 
incident created a furor, and President Fidel V. Ramos intervened to 
keep the movie intact 

Islam is the official religion of Malaysia, although the country's 
constitution guarantees freedom of worship. 

Malaysian censors reportedly concluded that “Schindler’s List” 
was propaganda designed to gain support for Israd and the Jews. 

But in a statement Saturday announcing that the government 
would review the censors’ ban,' Anwar Ibrahim, Malaysia's deputy 
prime minister, dismissed allegations from Jewish support groups in 
the United Slates and Australia that the Malaysian government was 
anti-Semitic. 

“We have consistently condemned all forms of atrocities, past and 
present, be they by the Nazis against the Jews, the Zionists against 
the Palestinians or the Serbs against the Bosnians,” he said. 

Although the film was about the Holocaust Mr. Anwar said that 
its message was “a powerful moral voice against crime towards 
humani ty” 

In Jakarta, Soekanto, executive director of the National FOm 
Censorship Board of Indonesia, also indicated that Indonesia would 
allow the movie to be screened. 

But both Mr. Soekanto and Mr. Anwar said their governments 
would continue to reserve the right to censor movies with sexually 
explicit scenes, and ban those that were pornographic or religiously 
offensive. 


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I Washington & World Business 

THE OUTLOOK FOR GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP 
WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL 2 1 - 2 2, 1 9 9 4 


April 20 


Ronald H. Brown U.S. Secretary of Commerce, will be 
our guest speaker at the opening dinner to be held at the 
Corcoran Gallery of Art 


April 21 


A FOREIGN POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR THE POST COLD WAR ERA 

■ Warren M. Christopher U.S. Secretary of State 

A REPUBLICAN RESPONSE 

■ Senator Malcolm Wallop R., Wyoming 
BEYOND THE URUGUAY ROUND 

■ Ambassador Rufus Yerxa Deputy U.S. Trade 
Representative 

AMERICA'S GLOBAL TRADE OBJECTIVES: STRUGGLING 
TOWARDS EQUITY 

■ Senator Max Baucus D.. Montana 

THE CLINTON ADMINISTRATION: SUCCESSES & SETBACKS 

■ Senator Nancy Landon Kassebaum R.. Kansas 
THE CHANGING U.S. FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR 

■ Robert D. Hormats Vice Chairman. Goldman Sachs 
International 

THE INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS RACE 
& THE AMERICAN INFORMATION SUPERHIGHWAY 

■ Larry Irving Assistant Secretary for Communications 
& Information. U.S. Department of Commerce 

■ Gerald H. Taylor Executive Vice President. MCI 
Communications Services 

EXPANDING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES IN THE MIDDLE EAST 

■ Amnon Neubach Economic Minister. Embassy of Israel, 
U.S.A. 

■ Sari Nusseibeh Fellow. Woodrow Wilson Center. 
Washington. D.C. 

■ Toni Verstandlg Deputy Assistant Secretary. U.S. 
Department of State 

■ Moshe Wertheim President. tsraeMmerican Chamber of 
Commerce <£ Industry 

THE CHANGING BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT IN CENTRAL 
& EASTERN EUROPE 

■ John’Baltay European Counsel, Shearman & Sterling. 
Budapest 

m Marcelo Setowsky Chief Economist for Europe & Central 
Asia. The Work) Bank 

■ Frank Vargo Deputy Assistant Secretary. U.S. 
Department of Commerce 

HEALTH CARE REFORM: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS 

■ Gregory Lawler Head of the Health Care Campaign. 

The White House 

■ Dana Priest Principal National Desk Reporter on 
Health Care Reform. The Washington Post 

■ Tom A. Scully Partner, Patton. Boggs & Blow, 

Washington. D.C. 

■ Donald Shriber Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives 
Committee on Energy and Commerce 


T* | y ivniMnuM! m M 

licralOs^^nbunc 


April 22 


THE ADMINISTRATION'S DOMESTIC ECONOMIC PROGRAM: 

IS IT ON TRACK? 

■ Robert EL Rubin Assistant to the President for Economic 
Policy 

AN OUTSIDER'S VIEW 

■ Hobart Rowen Columnist. The Washington Post 

THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS: ARE THEY 
DOING THEIR JOB? 

m H. Onno Rudlng Vice Chairman. Citicorp/CiVbank 

U.S. ECONOMIC RELATIONS WITH EUROPE 

■ Lawrence H. Summers U.S. Under Secretary of the 
Treasury for international Affairs 

THE HEART OF THE MATTER: COMPETITIVENESS IN AMERICA. 
EUROPE & ASIA 

■ Peter J. Neff President & Chief Executive Officer. 
Rhdne-Poutenc Inc. 

THE PRESIDENT'S ECONOMIC AGENDA 

■ Roger C. Altman Deputy Secretary. Department of the 
Treasury 

Conference Location 

The Willard InterContinental Hotel, 

1401 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004. 
Tel: (1) 202 628 9100 Fax: (1) 202 637 7326 
To reserve accommodation at a preferential rale, contact the 
reservations department at The Willard as soon as possible. 
Please notify the hotel that your reservation is in connection with 
the ECACC/IHT conference. 

R egistration Information 

The fee for the conference is USS 1.250. This includes the 
opening dinner on Wednesday, April 20. both lunches, the cocktail 
reception and all documentation. Fees are payable in advance 
and will be refunded less a USS 125 cancellation charge for any 
cancellation received in writing on or before April 14. after which 
time we regret there can be no refund. 


To register lor ihe conference, plea**- complete lhe form 
below and send ii to: 

Sarah Wbhefield, International Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre. 
London WC 2 E 9JH TeL- (44 71 >836 4802 Fas: 144 71)836 0717 

Enclosed is a check for L'SS 1250. made pit able u» ihe 
International Herald Tribune. 28-3-94 

n Please humor. 

TiileiMa Mas Ms Mj«i_ — first name 

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Adtfu'ty 

Clin 

Telephone 


-On mi r\ 
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-KMUMWMn«k»U UW*>» 14. 




Page 6 


MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994, 

OPINION 



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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srilntne 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NF.W YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Lessons for Peacekeepers 


Except for SO marines left behind to guard 
diplomatic buildings, the last American 
troops left Somalia on Friday. The humani- 
tarian intervention that began in a burst of 
can-do confidence and prime time publicity in 
the waning days of the Bosh administration 
ends far more quietly and with decidedly 
mixed results. Ambiguous endings make poh- 
titians and military officers uncomfortable. 
No one any longer w ants to talk about Soma- 
lia as a prototype for post-Cold War military 
action. Yet in a world full of potential Soma- 
lias there are valuable lessons to be learned 
from this sobering experience. 

The U.S. withdrawal will be completed 
within the five-month deadline set by Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton after a deadly October 
firefigbt effectively ended domestic support 
for the Somalia mission. Waiting five 
months allowed the president to avoid the 
appearance of panicky retreat. And by dras- 
tically lowering the U.S. military profile, 
further American fatalities were limited. 

Hie phased U.S. retreat and United Na- 
tions efforts to coax faction leaders into 
a “declaration of national reconciliation” 
pointing toward a future coalition govern- 
ment create an aura of orderly transition. 
But few close observers are confident that it 
will last. Other Western powers are also 
withdrawing their troops, violence again 
threatens the streets and the latest agreement 
among clan leaders has yet to be tested by 
the nasty details of power sharing. 

In the perspective of the entire 13-month 
U.S. So malia mission, two main mistakes 
stand out The first was George Bush’s initial 
premise that it was a purely humanitarian 
intervention. It turns out that there is no such 
thing. America’s own motives may have been 
purely humane, but if outside force was need- 
ed il was because an armed local power strug- 
gle was already taking place. In such circum- 
stances the odds were high of getting caught in 
the middle — or, worse, on one ride of the . 


battle. The lesson is not necessarily to stay out 
of all such conflicts, but to know what you are 
getting into and that it will involve more than 
handing out food to grateful children. 

The second mistake took place under UN 
command, not UJS„ but flowed logically from 
Mr. Bush's initial error. Through gross insen- 
sitivity to Somali politics, the United Nations 
blundered into a mili tary confrontation with a 
major local warlord, Mohammed Farrah Ai- 
did. That battle raised the military stakes 
beyond what member states were actually 
prepared to support The United Nations 
should Have more carefully bunted its role to 
tha t of a neutral referee, protecting civilians 
and nudging all rides toward political agree- 
ment Thai approach is now being followed 
with some success by the current UN special 
representative, Lansana Kouyaie. 

A scaling down of UN peacekeeping ambi- 
tions reopens the question of American par- 
ticipation. Mainly as a result of the Somalia 
experience, the utopian multilateralism with 
which some Clin tonnes started out last year 
has already been sharply re-evaluated- Now 
there is a risk that Washington could go too 
far the other way, shying away from U.S. 
military participation in any UN peacekeep- 
ing mission, however carefully conceived, 
however clearly serving American interests. 

One lesson of Somalia is that the United 
Nations should now take a much harder look 
before leaping and accept that some situations 
are simply too volatile for successful peace- 
keeping. In others the United Nations may 
decide to go ahead, but the United States may 
choose to stand aside to avoid, presenting too 
inviting or too provocative a target. 

But there will be instances when America 
win want to do its fair share, and in numbers 
sufficient to protect its forces should they 
come under fire. Somalia has been a hard but 
valuable learning experience. There will come 
a time to put those lessons to good use. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Turks. Kurds and Allies 


The trouble in Turkey’s predominantly 
Kurdish southeast keeps sharpening, even as 
elections may weaken the party of Prime Min- 
ister Tansu Ciller. The confluence has created 
worry among U.S. government officials who 
know the value of Turkish stability. 

The dec lions yesterday were municipal and 
local ones that ordinarily would not matter 
outride the country’s borders. But they come 
on the heels of a series of economic and other 
mishaps for the Ankara government that have 
helped drive the prime minister's party low in 
the polls and rightist and Islamic forces up — 
a worrisome development in a country with 
wars along two peripheries (die Balkans and 
the Caucasus) and terrorist pressure from 
Kurdish “separatism” within. 

The most volatile recent move was the 
widdy condemned decision by Mrs. Ciller’s 
government to jail seven representatives in 
padiament of the legal Kurdish party. That 
constitutes suppressing the main outlet for 
Kurdish aspirations, short of the separatist 
terrorists. As if that were not bad enough, it 
required first stripping the deputies of their 
parliamentary immunity from prosecution. 

Even under stable political conditions, the 
spectacle of lawmakers being taken directly 
from parliament into custody, there to be 
tried for “advocating and promoting separat- 
ism” when they were supposedly immune 
from prosecution, would have no very happy 
effect on the international standing of a coun- 


try that has long sought with difficulty to 
convince Europeans and Americans that it 
conforms to the West's human rights norms. 

Since things are far from normal in the 
southeastern regions that many of the depu- 
ties represented, the bad effects go beyond 
image- tarnishing. Assistant Secretary of State 
Stephen Oxman, who happened to be in Tur- 
key when the deputies were arrested, testi- 
fied later in Congress that the United Slates 
did not believe that Ankar a would solve the 
Kurdish situation “by purely military means” 
but that it must also pursue “nonmilitary 
civil and social solutions.” He did not sug- 
gest negotiations with the Kurdish Workers 
Party, which nearly every government, in- 
cluding America’s, identifies as terrorist But 
whatever a “social" solution may involve, 
criminalizing legal Kurdish opposition is a 
step in the opposite direction. 

Implicit in questions about Turkish stabil- 
ity these days is the issue of what exactly the 
United States wants of this longtime NATO 
ally, which once represented the longest sin- 
gle land border with the Soviet Union. Many 
of the American officials engaged in that 
discussion are longtime supporters of Tur- 
key, sensitive to die difficulties posed for 
their ally by the southeast war. Turks should 
not underestimate the anxiety that is created 
when that ally takes actions that seem cer- 
tain to make matters worse. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Whitewater Developments 


The aim of President B31 Qmton’s prime 
time televised news conference and the release 
of his old tax returns was to demonstrate open- 
ness and willingness to cooperate with all 
Whitewater-related investigations. He certainly 
did himsdf some good. During the press con- 
ference on Thursday, be sounded confident 
People were asking why be had not spoken thus 
before, instead of responding this way only 
after weeks of extensive news coverage, the 
subpoenaing of 11 administration aides, the 
forced departure of a White House counsel, 
angry woids in Congress over Whitewater hear- 
ings and a sharp drop in the polls. 

The new information plus the release on 
Friday of the Clintons' tax retains for 1977 to 
1979 did address some of the questions that 
had been raised about their business dealings in 
Arkansas and their subsequent handling of the 
controvosy concerning those dealings. 

Hie president said that the couple’s claim 
during the presidential campaign that they lost 
$68,900 on their Whitewater investment was 
wrong. The loss turns out to be more like 
$46,000, the accumulated interest paid on their 
half-share of the $203,000 loan they took oat 
with James and Susan McDocgal to buy the 
Whitewater property. His explanation was that 
he had overestimated the loss by 522.245 be- 
cause that amount was mistakenly applied to 
the Whitewater account when it actually repre- 
sented a loan and interest payments Ik took out 
to help buy his mother a house. 

Mr. Clinton’s press conference did not, of 
coarse, dispose of an the issues that have been 
raised in this complex affair. One is whether, as 


has been alleged but certainly not proved, the 
Clintons’ Whitewater venture skimmed feder- 
ally insured deposits from the failed Madison 
Guaranty Savings & Loan and David Hale’s 21- 
fated Capital Management Sendees, which was 
licensed and financially backed by the Small 
Business Administration. L Jean Lewis, the 
Resolution Trust Corporation's senior investi- 
gator on Madison, asserts that “Whitewater did 
cause a loss to Madison,” which benefited 
James McDougal and “his business partners," 
the Clintons. Noting that Whitewater was 
showing no cash flow while its mortgages and 
notes were being paid, Ms. Lewis asked hypo- 
thetically in a note: If the Clintons “aren’t 
putting money into the venture, and you also 
know the venture isn’t cadi flowing, wouldn't 
you question the source of the funds being used 
for your benefit?” This, too, needs an answer. 

m addition, the way the week ended with 
reports of an attempt by a senior White House 
omdal to change the terms of a possible Reso- 
lution Trust Corporation civil prosecution add- 
ed to the Washington pan of tbe morass. There 
is still much nodw investigation concerning 
whether important White House staff members 
have behaved improperly in respect to the RTC 
investi gation. And there are the charges made 
by Republican Representative Jim Leach. The 
special counsel and probable congressional in- 
quiries still have much to do to resolve the 
contradictory assertions that have been made 
and to ascertain the extern to winch adminis- 
tration personnel may have trespassed into (he 
business of tbe Resolution Trust Corporation. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



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Asians 

Should 

Help 

By Gerald Segal 

L ONDON — Another crisis in 
r Korea, and yet again it is the 
United States and other Western 
powers who are in the lead, with 
China and most East Asian nations 


are France and Britain more exer- 
cised about the prospect of North 
Korea acquiring nuclear weapons 
than the countries of Southeast 
Asia? Can it be that East Asia is yet 
again to fail a test of leadership sad 
of farsighted strategy? 

Part of tbe explanation for tbe 
differing response is that Europeans 
and Americans worry that North 
Korea will spread nuclear weapons 
and technology to the Middle East 
and Europe, while East Asians wor- 
ry about a cornered North Korea 
lashing out in anger. 

Another part of the explanation 
is that East Asian political culture 
seems averse to discussing problems 
openly. The political culture of the 
Atlantic world stresses openness 
and directness. 

East Asians also tend to believe 
that once the benefits of economic 
growth permeate a region, messy 
matters such as ethnicity, religion 
and military affairs wiU not be al- 
lowed to upset stability. Many states 
in East Asia, especially the richer 
ones, have grown gun-sby. By getting 
misty-eyed about the power of eco- 
nomics, they develop an unbalanced 
sense of security ana strategy. 

These states claim to believe in 
“comprehensive security" rather 
than relying primarily on military 
deterrence. Unlike Europe, which 
worked with and fought alongside 
America during and after the Cold 
War, most East Asian nations have 
let the United Slates defend them. 

During (he Cold War, America 
was more prepared to shoulder 
most of the burden, but times have 
changed. The glue that held alli- 



ances and defense cooperation to- 
gether is coming unstuck. 

For the time being, the United 
States seems prepared to defend the 
stability and security of East Asia. 
It seeks to prevent North Korea 
from acquiring a nuclear capability 
that would threaten South Korea 
and Japan and set off a chain reac- 
tion of proliferation in the region. 
However, by appearing to find ex- 
cuses for inaction, East Asians risk 
sending a “Yankee go borne” signal. 

A United States (hat already sees 
East Asia as a place from which 
trade deficits come will not be 
pleased to see that it is also a place 
which will not defend itself or help 
America to do so. 

It used to be thought that the 
problem with post-Cold War securi- 
ty in East Asia was that tbe United 
States would go home. Now, at least 
in the short term, it seems that when 
push looks like coming to shove on 
the Korean Peninsula, key East 
Asian countries do net want Ameri- 
ca to remain as a defensive shield 
and strategic counterweight to re- 
gional bullies. 

To be sure, there have been signs 
that South Korea and Japan are 
reluctantly learning the wisdom of 
letting the United States, after a 


cy, take a 
tough line with North Korea. Wash- 
ington has wisely bent over back- 
ward to keep its Asian allies, as weQ 
as C hina, on board. But the main 
Northeast Asian response is still a 
call for appeasement of Pyongyang. 
Far from receiving offers of sup- 
port, Americans are accused of 
picking a fight. 

In Southeast Asia, which is fur- 
ther from the Korean epicenter, 
most governments remain reluctant 
to back a Finn line against North 
Korea. At least they are consistent, 
for these are the same states that 
decline to adopt a tough line as 
China continues to take disputed 
islands and effective control over 
the rich resources and vital lines of 
maritime communication in the 
South China Sea. The result is an 
easy time for those nations that are 
inclined to be ruthless, whether it 
be China in Southeast Asa or 
North Korea in Northeast Asia. 

The Korean crisis is shaping up 
as the defining event in post-Cold 
War East Asia. Those in tbe region 
who would prefer not to face an 
unpleasant challenge rightly point 
out that the North Korean p'roblem 
stems mainlv from a re gime that 
feels cornered. Thai was also part of 


the rationale for Fidd Castro ac- 
cepting nuclear weapons from the 
Soviet Union in 1961 But whatever 
ihe cause, the result is a challenge to 
regional and global security. 

The prospect of a nuclear-armed 
North Korea should be a matter of 
grave concern to all in East Asia. 
Nor should East Asians feel that 
proliferation is merely a problem 
for other regions. 

If they realty feel this way, they 
must contemplate a nuclear- armed 
Japan, a nuclear-armed South Ko- 
rea and a very dangerous standoff 
in the Taiwan Strait between Chi- 
na and Taiwan, both having nucle- 
ar weapons. Such a scenario would 
be profoundly destabilizing . and 
bad for business. 

Should East Asia fail the test 
and make it impossible for the 
United States and die rest of West 
to stand firm against North Korea, 
it must be prepared for the time 
when the West will leave the region 
to its own devices — and to the 
whims of local bullies. 


The h nier. a senior fellow at the 
International Institute for Strategic 
Studies in London and editor of The 
Pacific Review, contributed this com- 
ment to the Herald Tribune. 


America Can’t Approve Greece’s Balkan Mischief 


W ASHINGTON — Beware of Greeks Daring 
Rifts. There’s a motto to guide President Bill 
Clinton as he prepares for a crucial meeting next 
month on the future of the Balkans with Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou. 

Forced by nationalist sentiment into a bellicose 
position, Mr. Papandreou is pushing his nation's 
conflict with the young Balkan state of Macedonia 
to the breaking point. Doe in Washington on April 
22, the Greek leader is confident that America and 
Western' Europe will back NATO ally Greece 
rather than the fledgling ex-Yugoslav republic. 

But that is not the real choice that Mr. Clinton 
and the leaders of the European Union face. They 
need to focus on the growing danger that Greek 
actions could cause the Balkan war to spread once 
again — even as fighting lessens in Bosnia. 

Greece in recent 4 wedcs has embarked on a 
campaign that seems intended to destabilize the 
centrist Macedonian regime of President Kira Gli- 
gorov, who is committed to developing a free 
market economy and to conciliating Macedonia’s 
multiethnic population and the country's large, 
well-anned neighbors, Greece and Serbia. 

Even as tbe United States, winch has 340 soldiers 
in Macedonia, weighs sending more American 
peacekeepers. Greek mflitaiv planning is proceeding 
tor the Greek army to establish a “security zone" 30 
or more kQcuneters into Macedonia if dvil disorder 
erupts there, intelligence reports show. 

The Greeks are pursuing a slaw-motion mflitaiy 
buildup on their northern frontier and a punishing 
economic blockade of Macedonia that has deplet- 
ed Macedonia’s scarce foreign reserves. These 
steps, which increase the chance for upheaval in 
Macedonia, give credence to reports that Greece 
and Serbia have already agreed to carve up Mr. 


By Jim Hoagland 


Gbgorov’s country if the conflicts of tbe other ex- 
Yugoslav republics spifl over there. 

The carve- up agreement, reported to Washing- 
ton by European governments, was supposedly 
reached in 1992 between the Serbian leader Slobo- 
dan Milosevic and the then Greek prime minister 
Constantine Mitsotakis. Belgrade and Athens have 
denied these reports, but the b rinkmanshi p by Mr. 
Papandreou, who replaced Mr. Mitsotakis after 
national elections last October, keeps them alive. 

The Clinton administration has a direct strate- 
gic stake in defusing that brinkmanship. Mr. 
Clinton ordered U.S, troops into Macedonia last 
year to deter Serbia from extending its war on 
Bosnia southward. The Pentagon plans to send 
another 2 00 U.S. soldiers to the Macedonian 
capital of Skopje soon if, as expected, Scandina- 
vian troops now on duty there move across the 
border to help keep onto in Bosnia. 

The U.S. presence is intended to shore up Mr. 
Gligorov’s government and bolster tbe public 
wanting given by Mr. Clinton and by George Bush 
that the United States would not stand by and 
watch the Serbs extend violent “ethnic deansing” 
into the Albanian-inhabited province of Kosovo. 

Those presidential warnings reflect U.S. fears 
of a nightmare scenario: trouble in Kosovo 
erupts, triggering massive refugee flows into 
neighboring Macedonia, which is overwhelmed. 
Albania, Bulgaria. Greece and/or Turkey could 
then be templed to intervene. 

Greece's contingency planning is centered cm 
the possibility that a tidal wave of Kosovo j 
sets off chaos in tbe region and threatens 


Greeks 
pie, most 


The Central Asian Scenario Hasn’t Turned Out Rosy 


T ASHKENT, Uzbekistan — Ex- 
pectations attached to the sud- 
den achievement of independence by 
the Central Asian republics have 
failed to materialize. 

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 
1991, many analysts and polituaans in 
Asia and the West believed that tbe 
new stales could form a strategic belt, 
united by geography and Islam, to 
provide a counterweight to Russia, 
which was bound to reassert itself as 
die strongest power of the region. 

Pakistan, for example, saw a poten- 
tial benefit to its national security. It 
hoped that the new republics would 
form a strategic rear area against its 
adversaries, particularly India. 

Others saw great economic vistas 
— opportunities for trade and invest- 
ment with countries of Central Asia 
able for the first time to turn out- 
ward. Politicians, planum and busi- 
nessmen from Turkey, Iran, Paki- 
stan, China and America looked at 
tbe region with expectation. 

Two years later, a much more realis- 
tic assessment is emerging. 

After a visit to four of the five 
Central Asian republics, and exten- 
sive discussions with leaders and or- 
dinary people, 1 would call it “Hie 
Ruined Empires Tour.” We were 
traveling through the broken pieces 
of the Soviet iu^erial structure, pieces 
no longer able to relate effectively to 
each other or to a disconnected and 
confused center in Moscow. We were 
also seeing spectacular shards of earli- 
er empires in tbe region, those of Gen- 
ghis Khan, Tamenane and the Mo- 
guls, all jumbled together. 

The visioa a united belt of Islam- 
ic states capable ofplaying a strategic 
rote is a mirage. Tbe practice of tbe 
Muslim faith has indeed benefited 
from the Ml of tbe Soviet empire: 
more mosques are being built, ana tbe 
educational institutions that go with 
them; more people are attending pray- 
ers. Bat Islam in the region has been 
split since tbe 7th ceotmy. and the 
opening erf the republics to outride 
influences has introduced contending 
brands of sectarianism. 


By Nicholas Platt 


Wahabis financed by Saudi Ara- 
bia, Suites by Iran, Sunnis by Tur- 
key, are all building mosques and 
competing for followers. What used 
to prevail in Central Asia was a mild 
Sunni form of Islam tempered by the 
benign influence of the Sufi poets. 
Now tbe situation is more intense 
and contentious. It is certainly not 
conducive to concerted action. 

The prospects for regional political 
unity seem dim. Ancient ethnic and 
tribal tensions lie just below the sur- 
face, particularly between Uzbek, Ta- 
jik and Kyrgyz, all Irving together in 
states whose boundaries were based 
on economic and political factors. Ta- 
jikistan is tbe most serious case. 

There a civil war has rained tbe 
country. Russian troops operating 

emmHit off t^etarieras 

best they can. Nonetheless, there is 
widespread concern that the Yugoslav 
disease will infect Central Aria. 

These old tensions are overlaid with 
concerns about the millions of ethnic 
Russians in tbe Central Asian repub- 
lics. In Kazakhstan this is a hngppmb- 
1cm, since seven million of its 17 mil- 
lion people are Russians. They are well 
educated and form the technological 
core of the economy. Russians are Dot 
comfortable with measures taken by 
tbe republics to make the Russian lan- 
guage second to Kazakh, Uzbek or 
Tajik. They fear loss of influence and 
position in the new order. 

In Tajikistan, the Russians have 
almost aD left In Kyrgyzstan, they 
are frightened by the future and de- 
parting. Moscow is demanding that 
each republic grant dual citizenship 
to ethnic Russians. So far, only Turk- 
menistan has done so. 

The nuns of the old Sovjet Union 
do not fit together in economic torn 
Tbe rich bits, like Uzbekistan and Ka- 
zakhstan. are mainly primary produc- 
ers. They had functional roles assigned 
to them by Moscow which are not very 

compatible and are difficult to turn 
into viable economic assets any time 


soon. There is potential — ofl. gas, 
gold, chromium — and investors are 
interested. Meanwhile, their econo- 
mies shrink and inflation is rampant. 

Russia is not sure what to do with 
these new republics. There is agree- 
ment that vital strategic interests are 
involved, borders must be protected, 
ethnic rivalries controlled, foreign 
influences checked, ethnic Rusrian 
rights upheld, and access to natural 
resources maintained. But bow? 

The former Soviet Union could not 
afford its worldwide strategic preten- 
sions; post-empire Russia probably 
cannot afford a more modest virion 
limited to former contiguous regions. 
Moscow’s economic policy managers 
argue that they do not have the finan- 
cial strength to include Kazakhstan 
and Uzbekistan in die ruble zone, In 
effect, Russia has cut them adrift. 

Yet (he infrastructure of all these 
countries ties them to Russia. Kazakh- 
stan, for example, refines oQ from 
Russia in its western region while pro- 
ducing oil for Russian refineries in (be 
east. In two years, its production and 
refining facilities wDl be joined by a 
pipeline, bur even then Kazakh oil will 
nave to use Russian pipelines to reach 
tbe outride world. 

Today’s problems in the Central 
Asian republics will continue for 
years. Half-measures and partial solu- 
tions wOl remain tbe order of the day. 
Russian troops will continue to guard 
the borders of these countries, with 
their acquiescence. But this alone will 
not provide Moscow with the leverage 
to have its own way in disputes over 
ethnic R ussian rights, trade and in- 
vestment flows, and monetary policy. 

Some republics wiQ retain enough 
independence to devise their own solu- 
tions to these issues. However, Rus- 
sia’s looming presence will mean that 
for years to crane tbe first priority of 
Central Asian states will be relations 
with Russia and the Russians. 

Outride influence, although limited, 
will be much larger than before and 
should continue to grow. Tbe combi- 


nation of U.&, Japanese and Europe- 
an investment, Turkish triecommoni- 
cations, Pakistani air services, and 
pobtico-rdigious activism from Iran 
and Saudi Arabia win slowly change 
tbe Central Asian landscape. 

America was a leader in establish- 
ing embassies in these countries. Hie 
policy of the United States should be 
to main tain and strengthen its pres- 
ence in accordance with realistic in- 
terests in nuclear nonproliferation, 
economic growth and political plu- 
ralism. But it should have no illusions 
about the extent of its leverage or 
bow long it will take to show results. 

The writer ; president of The Asia 
Society, in New York, is a former US. 
ambassador to the Philippines. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


A Slaying 
That Rocks 
Mexico 


By Jorge Mancfllas 

L OS ANGELES — Although I was 
t not there, the sound of the gun- 
shots still resonates in my head, the 
sight of a growing pool of blood stiQ 
haunts me and the sense of loss has 
not yet disappeared. 

I am not referring to tbe assassi- 
nation last week of Litis DonaJdo 
Colosdo, but that of Alfonso Peralta 
nearly 17 years ago. 

Alfonso was a friend and a col- 
league In the 1970s we worked 
unionizing employees at the Nation- 
al Autonomous University of Mexi- 
co, in Mexico City. 

He was assassinated in front of his 
students in 1977 as he left the class- 
room at the university where he had 
just finished teaching a class in so- 
cial sciences. Political assassination 
is not new or unexpected for these 
who have worked for democracy and 
justice in Mexico. 

Contrary to what many people 
may assume, Mexicans do not all 
come to the United States lured by 


The key issue that wiU 
determine Mexico’s 
political future is how the 


in Macedonia. Nearly 2 milli on peo- 
them Slavic and a sizable minority 


Albanian, live in the poor, mountainous region. 

But Greece's unrelenting hostility to Macedo- 
nia raises questions about its true intentions. 
Greece has refused for two years to recognize 
Macedonia on tbe grounds that the country’s 
name amounts to a territorial claim on (be Greek 
northern province of Macedonia. The Greeks 
demand that Macedonia change- its name and its 
flag, and eliminate phrases in its constitution that 
promise to defend Macedonians abroad. 

Greece has unsuccessfully sought to keep the 
United States and Western Europe from recog- 
nizing Macedonia. Mr. Papandreou said he was 
sending “a signal” to those who had recognized 
Macedonia with his Feb. 16 decision to dose 
Greece's frontier with that landlocked country 
and ban Skopje's use of the Greek port of Saloni- 
ka, which normally handles 70 percent of Mac- 
edonia’s imports and exports. 

“Murder without bullets” is what Macedonian 
politicians call the economic war that Greece is 
waging on their country, whose agricultural ex- 
ports and energy imports have ground to a halt. 
international aid and investment for Macedonia 
are hostage to Athens’ campaign, which threatens 
to bring Mr. Grigorov down and put in power the 
rabid Macedonian nationalist forces that Mr. Gri- 
gorov has sought to contain. 

Only Greeks blinded by territorial ambition 
could want that outcome. Hie April White House 
meeting will be a chance for Mr. Clinton to gauge 
Mr. Papandreou 's intentions — and to make dear 
that even old allies cannot demand U.S. support 
for destabilizing and dangerous policies. 

The Washington Post 


assassination of a figure of Luis Colo- 
rio’s stature — at least since July 17, 
1928, when Alvaro Obregrin was 
killed shortly after being re-dected 
president of Mexico. 

But then again, these are not nor- 
mal times. The rebellion in Chiapas 
shook the Mericanpobtical system to 
its foundations. Toe willingness of 
the country's disenfranchised to chal- 
lenge the status quo has threatened 
those who have skillf ully governed 
Mexico for 65 years. 

In spite of what tbe Institutional 
Revolutionary -Party, or-PRfc- is 
claiming in the aftermath of Mr. 
Colorio's death, he was far from a 
certain victor in the Aug. 21 presi- . 
deutial elections. 

. He was frequently greeted with 
protests along the campaign, trail, as j 
he became the target for dissatisfac- 
tion with PRI policies, and the spot- 
light remained on his chief rival in 
the governing party, Manuel Cama- 
cho Solis, woo was widely praised 
for helping negotiate an end to the 
Chiapas rebellion. In fact, Mr. Colo- ' 
sio was destined for almost certain 
defeat — if the elections were fair 
and democratic. 

Whoever was responsible for the - 
kfflingj.it cleariy buys time for Presi- 
dent Carlos Salinas do Gortari and 
the Institutional Revolutionary Par- 
ty to find a more viahle candidate. 
From being the party responsible for 
the conditions that led to the Chiapas 
uprising, the PRI' will now be the 
party of the "martyr of democracy." 

But the key issue that will deter- 
mine Mexico’s political future is 
how the investigation of the assassi- 
nation is handled. 

No one yet knows who was behind 
this dreadful crime, but few believe 
that the killer, a 23-year-old mechan- 
ic, was merely a deranged loner. 
There could be no better tribute to 
Luis Coloao than for Mr. S afinas to 
organize a credible, independent in- 
vestigation by an international com- 
mission into his killing 

In addition, the government must j 
work to disband private paramili- 
tary groups, such as the Guanfias 
Blancas of Chiapas, who are be- 
lieved to be responsible for many of 
the assassinations that have blood- 
ied Mexican life. We must see to if 
that Mr. Colosio’s death is Mexico’s , 
last political assassination. 1 


a 


mi 


assassination is handled. 

the irresistible prospect of standing 
on a street comer in Los Angeles 
hoping to get work for a day. Many of 
us have come to escape the kind of 
political violence which has just . 
claimed the life of Luis Coloao, the ' 
presidential candidate of Mexico's 
governing party, as well as the hves of 
perhaps hundreds of members of the 
leftist opposition. 

It is not only political figures on 
the left who are targeted. Take the 
of Mwiuel Rnsndfa, B p uimhu-nt 
newspaper columnist and a political 
centrist, who was assassinated in 
1984 by unknown gunmen, many be- 
lieve because of his frequent articles 
about government corruption. 

AH that is unprecedented is the 




,Y 

r V 




The writer ; a professor at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California School 
of Medicine, led a human rights dele- 
gation la Chiapas in January. Re con- 
tributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 


fc 


IN OUR PAGES; 100; 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 




1894: A Woman Mayor 

NEW YORK — Pleasanton Kansas 
is the only town in the United States 
now presided over by a woman may- 
or. She is Mrs. Annie S. Austin who 
was elected over Mr. J. W. Primer, a 
hardware merchant. Mrs. Austin was 
nominated on a citizen's ticket, and 
her opponent was the bead of a busi- 
nessmen’s ticket. Politics were ig- 
nored. Tbe issues of (Ik campaign 
were liberality with liquor-dealers 
and gamblers for revenue, against 
which predominating policy Mrs. 
Austin was, of course, arrayed. She 
was elected by only twenty votes. 

1919s Troops Decorated 

SEMUR (COte d’Or) — The 78th 
Division was reviewed this afternoon 
[March 25] by General Per shing, who 
decorated five officers and twenty-six 
soldiers for gallantly in action dining 
tbe lighting at the Saim-MIhid sa- 
lient, m the Amrane forest, at the 
assault on the Grandprfc and during 


the bitter machine-gun fi ghting and 
hand-to-hand encounters in which j 
tbe division lock, part up to five days ! 
before tbe signing of the armistice, j 

1944s Invasion Nearg .? 


LONDON—, 
edition:] Prime' 


rom our New York * 
iterCburdnlLin 



rope, promised tonight [March 27] 3 
that when tbe signal is given tbe 
whole circle of avenging nations will 
hurt themselves upon the foe and 
“batter out tbe life of the crudest 
tyranny that has ever sought to bar the 
progress of mankind.” Mr. Cburdiill 
taped upon die British to steel them- 
selves as their nation’s hour of greatest 
effort approached. In Ks guarded ref- 
eaace to the forthcoming invasion of 
the Continent, the Prime Minister in-" 
structed his listeners not to be upset by? 
the many false alarms, feints and dress j 
rehearsals which he said must bd- 
staged to baffle the enemy. 




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INTERNATIO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 7 


A Constructive, Long-Term Chinese-U.S. Relationship 

■ - _ _ ... . ’ dally as every oiher industrial nation will ea 

v mvAnw HI J . • . n. _ TT - _ 1 [Ua.MMAn “ v v . . . 


By Henry Kissinger 


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a “faflcd" to promote human rights. 

^ The ma consideration ought to be whether 
i Amoks overall political relationship with 

SSSffiSSS ^"SSSiSSiT- 

TheublicoonfzontadoninBemngwasaQthe long as hu man rights remain the principal sub- The fact remains thatn ^ 

moiechmaik because iioccurredf^the end of a jedof the ChinS-American dialogue, dead- that Umtod NWdM thasmw^rt 
period? steadily improving American-Chinese lock is nearly inevitable. . the United States 

rdadas. In October, President KH Clinton lift- Nevertheless, the dead! ode is not irretnev- vtataut & Nations document 
cd thf ban on cabmei-levd meetings that had able. The issue is not, as is sometimes churned, to .enforce every United Nan . 
been i effect since the Beijing uprising in 1989: whether America should abandon its pursuit of unilaterally, even when all the oiner signaio- 
sbortjr after, he met with President Jiang Zemin, human rights altogether, but how to pursue its "tt ignore n- human riehts ap- 

Marr cabinet-level meetings followed, including values in balance with other crucial aspects of In Amjmcan 

— * Mr fSBnqtar and the effi the complex U.S.-Qrinese idaiiondup. 3ST S 

Americans, the national interest cannot be sep- 
arated from some concent for human rights. 

On the other hand, America’s perception of 

ir i .1»Kal Human rivhB IS 


severil between Mr. 

nese areagn minister, Qian viuicu. 

He administration, using the formula that it 
was challenging certain Chinese practices and 
not the Communist system, significantly re- 
duced its terms for extension of most-favored- 
natioa status. The Chinese leaders had hinted 
at a willingness to accommodate concerns not 
found to be incompatible with Chinese law — 
an elastic criterion. 

What then went awry with a visit that had 
reasonably been expected to culminate this 

- -O TltJk ATAklam ni^o ArMABntlial 


SS, sccmcu lu innik mat luc Lumwt 

^owed” it h uman rights concessions in remm 
for restoring high-level contacts. 

The Chinese, implementing traditional di- 
plomacy, base concessions on reciprocity; they 
consider that they are entitled to the same 
unconditional high-level contacts extended to 


dl uuiuiiiauvu auihv him -- , 

America is blamed less than other societies. 

To base Chinese-U-S. relations ennrdy on 
progress toward human rights will therefore 
mortgage both the underlying relationship as 
well as progress on human rights. _ 

It is also a distortion of reality, since Ameri- 
can objectives go beyond the promotion of 

other major country perceives foreign policy as 


Appeasers of China’s Rulers Should Be Ashamed 

* • i _ 1 - ■ 1 nnth th*tf 1 









the prime minis ter of Japan had this to say: - 
told him that it is not proper to force a Western 
or European-type democracy onto others." 

According to press reports, the prime minis- 
ter of Japan, Morihiro Hosokawa, also said that 
the “Western” concept of human rights should 
not be applied to all nations. 

Wrapped up in those statements are the his- 
torical falsehood, ethical duplicity, human cal- 
lousness and political betrayal that the inter- 
national China Lobby now deploys to cany out 
its latest assignment from Beijing. _ _ 

The job is to pressure the Clinton administra- 
tion to renege on its pledge that unless Beijing 
shows some respect for the human rights of 
Chinese and Tibetans, the United States will 
end China’s low tariff privileges. 

What arrogance — for a Japanese prune 
minister to talk so. Does he think p«>ple have 
forgotten that milli ons of Asians, Europeans 
and Americans had to die to defeat Japanese 
imperialism and allow democracy to be 
“forced” on Japan — the system that allowed 
him to be elected, become prime minister and 
run about kowtowing to the Chinese Commu- 
nists and insulting our intelligence. 

Mr. Hosokawa is Japans business, out ms 
line is at the heart of the propaganda of the 
businessmen and politicians who make up the 
American branch of the China lobby. 

In Washington suddenly, people who believe 
in human rights are being pictured as cultural 


By A. M. Rosenthal 

and political imperialists trying to push around 
a bunch of dignified old Confuaamsts. 

The truth is that nobody is dreaming of Torc- 
ing” Western democracy on Communist Ctona; 
such a sinful thought. American human rights 
policy asks amply that Beijing pennit some of 
thedecencies to wind) it is already pledged as a 
member of the United Nations and simatoiy to 
a variety of international conventions. Forexam- 
ple: the right to dissent without bang arrested, 
tortured and imprisoned for years; light of 
Tibet to ne gotiate for at least partial freedom 
after a half-century of Chinese captivity. 

Please, please do these things, the United 
States begs. If not, at last we will have to do 
what Congress has demanded for years — remse 
to cooperate with Chinese despotism by continu- 
um the low tariff rales that oil its economy. 

Forget that sociodrivel about Confuciamst 
traditions being at odds with ^Vestern hunm 
rights. The Chinese dissident Fang L«hi « 
straight in the Los Angeles Times: TheCom- 

mimfsts fight human rights not because they are 

Confudanists but because they areLemm^ 
For all its increasing armed power, Beijing, like 
all dictatorships, knows the greater power of 

^I^heteoiie member of the China lobby wto 
respects himself enough to speak_ the mith^. 
Listen, American businessmen are rn China 
make money in a cheap labor market If U.S. 


human rights policy interferes with that by 
upsetting the Communists, to hell with it 
We art only the pious line about how a strong 
Chinese economy will bring more human rights 
presumably as under the economies of impe- 
rial Japan and Hitler’s Germany. 

Deasion time for President Bill Clinton is 
May or June. He is being pulled one way and 
another. A president arts paid to be puUedone 
wav or another — and remain true to his word. 

Rumors float: The fix is in for Beymg. the 
lobby has won. Government officials or honor 
sav that no, the struggle goes on, and I believe 
them. Maybe Beijing win make the concessions. 
Those low tariffs man a lot to them. The 
dictatorship will not change much. At least the 
United States will have kept faith with the 
people in the torture cells ; . 

But the American businesses in the China 

lobby — they have lost already. They have 
. J . -y M aor tn ll££ the 


dally as every other industrial nation will ea- 
gerly fill a vacuum left by America. 

More importantly, Asia is both the most 
dynamic region of the world and the one with 
the greatest potential to threaten world peace. 

Its nations have not developed the patterns of 
cooperation that emerged in Europe after 
World War H In Asia, there is no equivalent of 
NATO, the European Union or the Conference 
on Security and Cooperation in Europe. 

Like the nations of 19th century Europe, the 
Asian states eye each other as potential strate- 
gic competitors and conduct their relation- 
ships at least in part on the basis of geo- 
politics. Fostering an Asian equilibrium is 
therefore central to world peace and must be a 
key objective of American diplomacy. 

Stability in Asia is most tikely if China ana 
the United States participate. Conflict with 
China would require Washington to organize 
all the rest of Asia against Beijing. While an 
overbearing Chinese foreign policy could at 
some point drive American foreign po licy to 
such an expedient, nothing in the contempo- 
rary world calls for a policy of isolating China, 
especially at a moment when the United States 
also is confronting Japan over trade issues. No 
Asian country' wul participate in a policy of 
isolating China over human rights; America 
will only wind up isolating itself and losing its 
ability to shape a stable order. 

America and China have a parallel interest 
in equilibrium in Asia. As the Shanghai Com- 
mumqufe of 1972 emphasized, both countries 
have their reasons for opposing the domina- 
tion of Asia by a single country. 

china wants the united States to help bal- 
ance its relationships with powerful neijmbors 

Japan, Russia and India — at least until it is 

strong enough to do so on its own. The United 
States needs Chinese cooperation on these 
matters as well as on a peaceful evolution ot 
the future of Taiwan, on nuclear proliferation 
as in North Korea, and on the transfer of 
weapons technology. . . . . , . . 

These are the sort of issues which should be 
key dements of the Chinese- American dia- 



shown themselves pantingly eager to use the 
greatest American asset — the economic power 
created by free labor and capitalist strength — 
to bolster a government built on controlled 
labor and police strength. They certainly wiD 
not be respected in China. 

At borne? Certainly u has happened before 
— ihe arming of foreign dictatorships that 
urostitutes American idealism, endangers 
American security and produces anew genera- 
tion of American cynics. Bui that doranoL 
mays it anv easier for Americans who beueve in 
political freedom to watch, excuse or forget. 

The New York "nines. 


acuituu — 

logue at least for the next decade. 

If they moved to the center of Chmese- 
American relationships, they would fadlitaw 
human rights issues by providing a strategic 

.1 .U»r Mumtrv’s long 

y taken 

• counter- 

iruviucu such an action also served 
i interests. What they will not accept, 

:ceptonJ ' - 

ion that 

ion as a special io»mi w w- 
The dement of reciprocity has been sorely 
missing in current Chineso-American relations. 
The United Slates put forward a catatognc oi 
human rights in return for which it offers the 
extension of most-favored-nation states 
something which to the Chinese looks hke the 
tem porary lifting of t mi lat e r al bl ackmail . And 
although high-level contacts have been resumed 
and see m to be progressing on the econo™* 
side, they are dearly secondary in the political 
area to man euvering on trade states. 

In my view, the prindpal reason for the aura 
of confrontation during Mr. Chmtopber s vis- 
it to Beijing was the neuralgic Chinese reac- 
tion to unilateral demands, compounded by a 
publidty that focused neariy exdusrvely on 
human rights. In the prelude to thcvtsit — 
inducting at several stops on the secretary s 


trip — it was stated officially and repeatedly 
that the Chinese leaders knew what they hito 
to do on human rights, implying that the U.s. 
delegation came for the primary purpose ot 
evaluating Chinese concessions. 

The Chinese, having a tendency to consider 
every gesture as symbolic, interpreted the des- 
ignation of the assistant secretary for hunan 
nghts, John Shattuck, as “advance man for 
the secretary’s trip as a signal that human 
rights were to be its prindpal focus. The stage 
having been set for a confrontation, the Chi- 
nese side showed its own skill at devising 
provocative acts, such as harassing dissidents 
on the eve of Mr. Christopher’s arrival 

The basic challenge remains: if the United 
States’ interest in China is primarily human 
rights, the lactic of public pressures is appropri- 
ate. And it may even work. There is. however, a 
high risk of trapping both sides in a choice 
between capitulation and confrontation. The 
adminis tration may be tempted to continue 
watering down both its demands and its penal- 
ties until its apparent victories are largely pub- 
lic relations exercises. The Chinese may repeat 
their self-inflicted wounds of the 1950s when 
they expelled all Soviet advisers for being too 
intrusive. The victim of such a prowss wul be 
. 1 — tic rHflM* rustical relationship that is 


merely be a shopping list of U.S. priorities. 

At the same tone, such a document could 
e mphasize the need for each side to take into 
a^rtmtthe soecial concerns of the other ^ a 




oan stability. 

jjui u, as I believe, America has other objec- 
tives that it must serve simultaneously, then a 
more reciprocal pattern is necessary. 

An alternative approach would not require 
America to abandon the current reduced list 
of human rights objectives, although some 
may have to be modified in the course of 
negotiations. It does, however, call for clear 
presidential leadership outlining Amencan 
purposes and strategy with respect to China. 
Such a statement needs to set forth the impor- 
tance attached to U.S.-Chinese cooperation in 
specific areas and on specific topics; »t cannot 


believe that a reduction oi puuui. pi 
agenume broadening of the dialogue wfflprc- 
duct a solution compatible with the self-respect 
ofboth sides. China should understand that a 
concern for human rights in some form is not 
an administration idiosyncrasy but vnberCTi m 
ihe American value system as expressed m 

“XSSSLtion should recognize 
that China’s interest in American relations is 

based on iti expectation of cooperation on^obai 

or at least Asian strategy. Forthatobjectiv^it 
may well be prepared to make ] human nghts 
c oncessi ons, provided they can be presented as 
having emerged from its own free choice. 

The U.S. Congress should understand that, 
beyond a certain point public pressures trad to 
produce the opposite of what is mtmdot as 
was the case with the Jackson-Vanik Amend- 
ment. Congressional concern has bear deany 
demonstrated; the administration should be 
permitted to address it quietly on its own. 
^The short-term objective of a renewed Chi- 
nese- American dialogue should be to achieve 
sufficient progress to enable the administration 
to de-link human rights from trade states once 
and for alL Afterward, the United Slates would 
pursue human rights objectives in a manna 
compatible with Chinese dimity and via nor- 
mal diplomatic processes within the context ot 
an overall political and strategic dialogue. 

From my knowledge of the leaders ^ both 
sides, these goals are within reach provided me 
focus remains on fundamentals, especially on tte 
importance for both countries of a constructive 
long-term Chinese- Amencan relationship. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Credentials 


rtn^hiUtv and driveability of Mitsubishi cars on the highway 

The Mitsubis hi Pajero’s long lis^of_r2^class^virto^^P^^ Ma 

^ ' ' linn j nwwteMBrHiTiT^^aiWBE i WBB^ i #9WB more than survive: it conquers. The Pajero , nov t l ie sa me technology found in Mitsubishi 

the T2 ria«is at rallies proves iL 


1993' Baja Portugal 


1993 Baja Sardinia 


proton vehicles with oniy 
^ TO very ^tnilar to 
the cars you see on the highway, in long- 
distance rallies, these T2 cars are 
pitted against conditions no 
ordinary driver should have to 
endure — blinding sandstorms, 
bone-chilling stow, searing hear. 

Only an extremely durable 
vehicle can thrive under such 



trying conuiuuus. . — - ~ 

Sows the strength and reliability of ^ 
logy __ the same technology found in Mitsubishi 

vehicles on highways all over the world. 

So when you drive a Mitsubishi, you can just enjoy a 
relaxing cruise. -You don't have to conquer 
knee-deep mud, treacherous ice at high 
speeds or mysterious unmapped 
courses in the Sahara Desert. We ve 
already done it for you. But you 
always have that option. 

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International Herald Tribune ; Monday , March 28, 1994 


Page 9 


CAHTAi. MARKETS 


Wil the Next Domino Fall 
In Europe’s Rate Game? 

By Ciarl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

P ^rrJ^ ^onyin European bond markets shows no 
op. Yet another class of speculators was 
WBe % 1 *"*« Prices down particularly 
Swedai and Britain. Fears are running high that 
**** y* 1 ** drawn intoSe wWripool 

- HL S ^ 3 ^ oat “ “ driving up the Deutsche marie in the 

fwo^eachange market although other factors, including fear of a 
resuixenoe jn inflation, are helping to boost the marie. 

Not only is the dollar weak, trading at a five-month low of 1.6655 

DM and according to most ex- 

perts beaded lower, but the T , . , , 

mark has risen to 3.4291 French Leveraged lands and 

banks are oat; can 
are also watering against the other managers be 

The latest exodus from bonds far behind? 

was led by the proprietary trad- 

mg departments of the banim. In 

their view, last month’s flight by highly leveraged funds hq d driven 
bend prices to absurd levels not justified by economic fundamentals. 

But their effort to pick up bonds at what appeared to be bargain 
prices simply provided sellers the opportunity to unload more 
paper, driving prices lower and triggering more sales. 



and , , , vmm- it. 

c omplain ed. “Each time someone buys, two others are forced out 
We’re in a downside bubble.” 

“We’ve been lolled and told to close it down until the start of the 
second quarter,” admitted the trading adviser at one major bank. 
He added that the market was awash with rumors that teams of 
traders operating for the account of their banks had been dismissed. 

What happens next, analysts agreed, depends on what the profes- 
sional fund managers do. So far, they are standing pat. They are 
traditionally slower moving than the leveraged funds or proprietary 
traders, implementing strategy defined after committee meetings. Were 
they to join the fray, analysts warn prices could drop in a free fall 

But even if their nerve holds, a recovery is still some time away. 

“Real long-term investors are on die sideline,” said Jan Loeys at 
J. P. Morgan & Cam London. “We need to get to levels so far from 
reality, where there is such tremendous value that investors perceive 
there is no risk in committing funds.” 

that the market^ras **; massively misread its intoiti^^by^mow^ 
faster and with sharper cuts in interest rates thm seen until now, 
analysts said. Bat with its Easter rooess under way, the next policy 

See BONDS, Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX 


International Herald Tribune 
World Stock Index, composed Jj® 
of 280 intemationaBy investable 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 

Business News. 114 

Week ending March 25, !!? 

Jjjl. ■InnmiT ■!<£ 

dany closings. ^ 
Jan. 1992 = 100. 111 F 



129 & 

128 

127 F M 

Worth Alwerteal 

102 w ■ k 

'w; < i ;y < ’i'.~ 

- 7*;-. < 



101 4 131 

39 T * •. J I 29 

97 127 


113 
112 

111 IF 88 ? T 

Latin America 

J® 



Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 


USM VWM 


da— do— d— ig> 


Enemy 1 1133112^^13 Capital Goods 11225 11155 ^1.75 

Utffltlea 123-33 126.71 -2.G7 Raw Materials 12259 mi 1^0.42 

Finance 115.62 116.44 -0.70 Consumer Good* 97.40 99 J8 _-1j9 

Services 118.42 119.77 -L13 MscsBaneous 1289012798 48.72 



CURRENCY RATES 


Cress Rate® 


Mar. 25 


Fn— Wirt 
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Saudis Hold Fast Against OPEC Output Cut 


Compikdby Ow Staff From Dupwchn 
GENEVA — World petroleum prices 
seem destined to languish in the bargain 
basement after Saudi Arabia refused to cut 
oil production at OPECs weekend meeting. 

As a result of the derision by the biggest 
exporter, the best OPEC could do was freeze 
current output quotas until the end of the 
year, at a total of 24.52 nnQk» bands a day. 

The accord on Saturday might beta prices 
to a gradual, modest recovery from lieu col- 
lapse in 1991 But Saudi Arabia's resolve to 
give priority to keeping its share of the market 
infuriated Iran, its political rival in the Gulf 
and a so-called pricing hawk in the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting Countries. 

Iran and others in the 12-nation OPEC 
had wanted one million barrels daily taken 
off the market now, to lever prices up quickly 
and to aid their debt-laden economies. 


That 


“sipped through our 

Iran's oil minister, Gholamreza 
Aqazadeh, as the Saudis retained their jealously 
guarded quota of 8.0 jmffion barrels a day. 

Delegates said the Saudi oil minister, Hi- 
sham Nazer, had treated the meeting to a 


and others like Nigeria would honor lower 
quotas if they were granted. 

The Saudis blame last year’s price collapse 
on OPEC quota violators, along with high 
non- OPEC output from the North Sea and 
global recession. 

John Hervey, analyst with Donaldson, 
Lufkin & Janette Securities Corp., said the 
OPEC freeze might “knock a dollar off” 
prices over the next six months. 

On Friday, West Texas Intermediate 
crude for May delivery on the New York 


Mercantile Exchange settled at 535.13 a bar- 
rel, up 5 cents for the day. 

Nauruan Barakat, a vice president for ener- 
gy futures with Merrill Lynch & Co., agreed 
weaker prices “may be the immediate reaction 
of the market,” Bin he added, “T think prices 
will go higher in the second half of the year." 

Indeed, OPEC hopes that its freeze now will 
lead oil company buyers to decide that there 
will be a tight market when seasonal demand 
picks up towards the next northern winter. 

Delegates said Saudi Arabia seems to see 
its current quota as an absolute mmiirimn 
until the United Nations lifts its Gulf War 
embargo on Iraqi oil sales. 

The official Iraqi news agency ENA re- 
ported Saturday that Iraq had struck deals 
with French oil c om p and that would take 
effect once the UN embargo is lifted. 


Ofl Minister Safa Hadi Jawad told al- 
Qadisriya newspaper that “negotiations in 
Paris with French oil companies resulted in 
agreements that win be implemented after 
the embargo is lifted,” according to IN A, 
(Roam, Bloomberg, AFP) 

■ Geneva-Bound? 

ters from Vienna 1 ^ ^ Geawnu an^ol’EC 
source said Sunday, Agence France-Presse 
reported from Geneva. 

The source said that after 29 years in 
rented premises in Vienna, “We want to have 
our own headquarters.” 

Tlx: source said Geneva authorities had 
offered to provide a site for 90 years and help 
finance construction of a headquarters near 
the UN institutions in the Swiss city. 


Siemens 
Wins Deal 
For Italtel 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dttpauka 

ROME — Siemens AG, report- 
edly beating out French and U.S. 
competitors, was chosen as the 
foreign partner for Italy's state 
telephone equipment maker on 
Saturday and will form a venture 
that hopes to export 40 percent of 
its output 

Stet SpA, the Italian telecom- 
mumcations giant that is being pri- 
vatized, win merge the equipment 
maker Italtel with Siemens Tele- 
commumcazioni SpA, a subsidiary 
of Munich-based Semens. 

Siemens and Stet said Saturday 
that they would each control 50 
percent of the venture, winch will 
have annual revenue of 3.4 trillion 
lire (52 billion) and aims to hit its 
export target by the 1996-97 fi- 
nancial year. 

Siemens wfll inject cash into the 
venture. The partners declined to 
say how much, but Italian newspa- 

E estimated the sum at 12 tm- 
to 1.7 trilbon lire. 

The deal ends Stefs relationship 
with American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. ATI bolds a 20 percent 
stake in Italtd, which h will now sdL 
Stet had up to Saturday declined 
to comment on reports identifying 
AT&T and Alcatel Alsthom of 
France as leading smtom for Italtel 
; Italtel had revenue of 2j6 triffion 
Ere last year and profit of 40.2 
bfiHon Ere. About a fifth of its 

E * rion is exported. Siemens’s 
telecom unit had 1993 reve- 
nue of TOO bQEon lire, of which 
about a third was from exports. 

A foreign alliance is widely 
deemed essential if Italtel is to sur- 
vive in the compe ti tive European 
telecommunications industry. 

Last week, Stet finalized the 
merger of five domestic telephone 
and satellite companies to form Te- 
lecom Italia SpA. 

( Reuters, Bloomberg AFP) 


A Commercial Turn for Europe’s Arte 


By Daniel Tilles 

Special 10 the Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Art for art’s sake may yet be the 
battle ay in certain European quarters, but 
even a serious cultural highbrow such as the 
Franco-Gennan-Belgian public-television 
statical Arte is looting at the public relations, 
not to mention financial, possibilities of us- 
ing advertising from a few blue-chip compa- 
nies. 

As such, the cultural station that went on 
the air in May 1992 is planning to announce 
Monday in Paris the creation of a 1 



signed from 10 to IS “European-minded 
companies” that the station hopes will partic- 
ipate in a wide range of activities: from co- 
sponsoring cultural events across Europe to 
the eventual co-production of original Arte 
programming. 

Over the past several months, about 60 
companies, including Mercedes-Benz AG 
and Bayerische Motorcn Wetke AG. Pierre 
Cardin and the electronics retailer FNACSA 
have received proposals regarding participa- 
tion in the dub, explained Michael Scbroe- 
der, an Arte executive at the channel’s head- 
quarters in Strasbourg, France. 


Ultimately, a list of Arte-Club partners, as 
they will be knows, would be developed so 
that no more than one company in any single 
product sector would be represen ted llie 
partners will be offered a number of promo- 
tional opportunities as a result of their associ- 
ation with the channel 

Each company will receive a n umb er of 
Arte on-screen billboards, spots that focus 
simply on the company’s logo rather on spe- 
cific products and a kind of corporate televi- 
sion advertising seen on Public Broadcasting 
Service in the United States. In addition, the 
companies will receive the right to use the 
Arte-Oub logo for packaging and certain 
merchandising purposes. 

Moreover, the partners will be offered pub- 
lic relations possibilities at European cultural 
events where Arte participates, such as the 
Salzburg Music Festival, the Berlin Film Fes- 
tival and the Montreux Jazz Festival Part- 
ners win also be offered the opportunity to 
develop new cultural events with Arte and to 
assist in the production of programming for 
the rhannwl. 

Clearly, Artc-CIub membership is the kind 
of glamour program that could prove attrac- 
tive to certain corporations. Andrfc Hoch- 
berg, the director of communications at 


FNAC, was enthusiastic about the proposal 
“Given our business, we would be a very 
logical partner.” 

But he made dear that no final decision by 
FNAC had as yet been made. “This would be 
the first time we had a relationship with a TV 
channel that went further than just buying 
advertising time.” 

Participating dub partners will be asked to 
pay an annual dub fee and the total corpo- 
rate contribution is expected to be between 
10 to 15 million French francs (51.8 million to 
S2.6 million). 

"TV co-productions would of course in- 
volve additional investment by interested 
club partners,” added Mr. Schroeder. But this 
is a tiny amount compared to Arte’s total 
annual budget of about 1.7 billion francs. 
France contributes about two-thirds of this 
total, Germany roughly a third and Bdghim a 
fraction. 

Mr. Schroeder said that the network, with 
audience share of 2.6 percent in France and 
0.6 percent in Germany, was seeking to 
broaden its appeal beyond tbe largely upscale 
people it currently counts as its most loyal 
viewers. It can be seen in about 35 million 

See ARTE, Page 12 


Orders 
For Tools 
FallinU.S. 

One-Time Factors 
Cited for Decline 

Bloomberg Business Newt 

WASHINGTON — U.S. ma- 
chine tool orders declined 22.1 per- 
cent in February as demand from 
automakers and other manufactur- 
ers returned to normal levds after a 
busy January, according to a study 
released cm Sunday. 

Orders decreased to $280.75 mil- 
lion following a 9 percent gain in 
January, to 5360 JO million, the As- 
sociation for Manufacturing Tech- 
nology said. Compared with a year 

earlier, orders feu 0.7 percent. 

The decline in February does not 
suggest that the economy is con- 
tracting, said Patrick McGibbon, 
director of statistics for die indus- 
try group. January sales were un- 
usually strong, after the economy 
grew in late 1993 at the fastest pace 
m more than a decade. 

Economists study machine tool 
orders to gauge factory output and 
business expansion. Both acceler- 
ated as consumer demand picked 
up for cars and other durable 
goods, such as home appliances. 

But factory orders ror durable 
goods fell 25 percent in February, 
the first decrease in seven months, 
as aircraft and defense orders 
slumped, the government said 
Wednesday. Economists interpret- 
ed that decline as a slowdown after 
a big run-up last year. 

By category, metal-cutting- tool 
orders decreased 322 percent in 
February from a month earlier, to 
$183.0 million, while metal-fonn- 
mg-iool orders rose 8.1 percent to 
$97.8 million. 

Machine-tool shipments in- 
creased 21.1 percent during Febru- 
ary- 

Currency Market 


Mexico Wanted Off, but the Market Wouldn’t Slop 

7 1 Is Keservedfor 

By Brett D. Fromson key, the Massachusetts Democrat rues, can tbe SEC stop trading quotations for shares listed on Nas- e~nm n 
Weahinnm Post Service who is chairman of the House sub- promptly when necessary? daq. Officials said Nasdaq stops tihQMSSe ClTttlS 


By Brett D. Fromson 

Washington Post Service 

' NEW YORK — Although secu- 
rities regulators asked UB. markets 
to delay trading Mexican stocks the 
day after last week’s assassination. 
Wall Street dealers and profession- 
al traders con turned buying and 
selling them, according to regula- 
tors and congressional sources. 

The trading suspension had been 
requested by the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission to halt pan- 
icky selling after Mexico’s leading 
presidential candidate was shot 
and kQled. Mexican officials bad 
requested the U-S. government halt 
the trading out of fear that damp- 
ing of Mexican shares might destar 
bjhze their country’s economy and 
political situation. 

Representative Edward J. Mar- 


key, the Massachusetts Democrat 
who is rJuriTman of the House sub- 
committee on telecommunications 
and finance, told the SEC chair- 
man, Arthur Levitt, he was dis- 
turbed by Wall Street’s failure to 
comply with the agency’s requests. 

Mr. Marfcey asked the SEC fora 
report cm its conversations with the 
exchanges, a chronology of trading 
in Mexican shares ana “an expla- 
nation of why trading was initiated 
in these securities in light of die 
commission's request that the 
opening of trading be delayed.” 

The affair raises at least two pub- 
lic policy questions, according to 
ooogres&cnal sources. First, as for- 
eign companies list their shares in 
the United States and as UB. inves- 
tors buy shares of overseas compa- 


Serving Up Sports Anywhere 

TRZ Makes Your Favorite Game a Phone Call Away 


By Philip Crawford 

Special a the Herald Tribune 

AKRON, Ohio — Aside from family or friends, 
what do American business travelers and vacation- 
ers miss most about being away from home? Amid 
the sports madness of the 1990s, the answer might 
be tbe ability to tune into game broadcasts of thdr 
favorite basketball, football and hockey teams. 

That, at hast, is what TRZ Communications 
Services Inc. is counting oil 

With a lineup of six em- 
ployees and more than SI 
mfTH nn worth of highly so- 
phisticated telecommunica- 
tions equipment, and a never- 
give-up attitude, TRZ has 
brought to life a communica- 
tions network that gives 
sports fans access to the live 
radio broadcasts of their preferred teams’ games 


SMALL 

BUSINESS 




company pursuing tins particular 
constantly expanding telephone services market 
Demand for TR27s service appears solid, and 
president Thomas Zawistowska, still considerably 
m debt from launching the company, said 1994 
should be TRZ?$ first profitable year. Sales have 
grown steaffly, from about 5320,000 in the compa- 
ny's 1 990 rookie season to about $500,000 in 1993. 

Max important, said Mr. Zawislowski, first- 
time callers are calling back, and from far-flung 
locales, confirming tbe original belief upon which 
he founded the company: dje-hanl sports fans will 
do almost anything — like call the United States 
from Australia — to hear a few live minutes of an 
important game. 

Callers to TRZ’s central numbers bear a menu 
which allows them, through, touch-tones or direct 
contact with a company operator, to identify the 
event they want to Hsten to. After entering a credit 
card number, whose validity is electronically au- 
thorized on the spot, they are plugged into the 
broadcast- Charges begin at 50 cents per minute, 
gradually decreasing to a low of 20 cents, with a 
three-hour football game costing $36. 

After negotiating with leagues, iodividcal teams 
antj their fla g shi p radio stations, TRZ has acquired 
the rights to cany all National Basketball Associa- 
tion gamgR, nearly all National Football League 
and National Hoc&w League games, and scores of 
college contests, including the NCAA basketball 
tournament that concludes April 4. 

like manyentreprmeurial ventures, TRZ begat: 
with a small idea appSed on a small town leveL In 
the spring of 1982, when Mr. Zawistowski was an 
assistant director of athletics at tbe College of 
WfUinm god Mary in Wxfliamsbarg, Vir ginia, the 
school’s basketb all team received its first-ever invi- 
tation to a post-season tournament His office was 
deluged with calls from al umni rending in all parts 


of the country asking how the game could be heard 
or seen. But television coverage was nil and the 
radio broadcast could only be heard locally. 

Thai is when Mr. Zawistowski had bis seminal 
idea. Realizing the college's athletic offices had a 
total of 10 incoming lines, he called some ardent 
alumni back and told them to call his office at 
game time. When tbe hour arrived, Ik tuned in bis 
office ratio to the game and placed a telephone 
receiver directly in front of it The broadcast went 
out over all ten lines. Since many of the callers had 

tl^event, nearly 75 William and^Maiy^ faithful 
were able to bear the game longdistance. 

That is as far as the idea went for about seven 
years, however, as Mr. Zawistowski was discour- 
aged by telephone and software companies that he 
approached soon afterward to explore the possibil- 
ities of expanding the concept on a grand scale. “7 
went around asking people 2, theoretically, 10,000 
people could call a number, hear a menu, eater a 
credit card number, and be hooked into one of 
many available games,” said Mr. Zawistows- 
kL“Thjey all looked at me and said, Hey, neat idea, 
but it can’t be done.’ " 

But the ball started rolling again in 1989, when 
new feelers pot out by Mr. Zawistowski yielded a 
few “maybe” responses to the technical hurdles. 
Using borrowed money, Mr. Zawistowski then 
commissioned a marketing survey which revealed 
that people indeed wanteaand would pay for such 
a service. Some of tbe telecom companies he had 
long ago started to call him to rcoew 


TRZ officially kicked ofl in August 1990 with a 
schedule of college and NFL football games. What 
followed fra the next three years was a series of 
relationships with the heavy-hitters of the telecom 
world — inducting American Telephone ft Tele- 
graph Co., MCI Communications Corp. and 
Sprint Corp. — none of which lasted, says Mr. 
Zawistowski, due either to corporate lad: of fahb 
in the product or his own nnwiltmgiiess to sell his 
company. TRZ now uses caB-proctssmg equip- 
ment manufactured by NEC Corp., and has 
hooked up with Virginia-based LG International 
Iso, as its long-distance carrier. 

Michael EDmg, a telecom industry analyst with 
tbe brokerage Oppenhrimer ft Co. m New York, 
said that TRZ’s product was “definitely something 
new. But it has a very limited market and can be 
awfully expensive,” he noted. 

fMh tn TRZ from within the United Safes are 
free, bat those from abroad can cost many times 
ipry fh*n the servioe itself international cafes cm 
use a regular UB. number (1-216-374-6300), or use 
00c of the many globally available services that can 
: access to TRZ’s domestic toll-free tine (I- 


Mr. Zawistowski said he hoped to take tbe con- 
cept to the video level within several years. 

Articles in this series appear every other Monday. 


mes, can tbe SEC 
promptly when n 

Second, if some Wall Street play- 
ers continue trading despite a sus- 
pension, do they have an unfair 
advantage over other investors? 

An SEC scarce said the agenor 
moved promptly to delay most trad- 
ing ana that no investors appear to 
havr been disadvantaged. “In an age 
of global markets, computer trad- 
ing, faxes and instant telephone 
communication, it would be naive to 
think we can pull the plug and stop 
all trading,” the source said. 

Here is a rough chronology of 
the events, according to the 
sources: 

Early Thursday, SEC officials 
asked tbe New York Stock Ex- 
change and the Nasdaq over-the- 
counter market to delay trading in 
Mexicali securities. 

At 9:39 AJM, nine minutes after 
the opening, the NYSE halted trad- 
ing in Mexican shares. 

The National Association of Se- 
curities Dealers initially halted 
only the reporting of stock price 


daq. Officials said Nasdaq stops 
trading rally when the NYSE de- 
clares a “regulatory halt” 

The SEC called Nasdaq again to 
trading, bat by then, the 
fSE was about to resume trades 
on its exchange. 

NYSE officials, sources said, 
were trader the impression that the 
delay was supposed to last only 
until 10 A.M. When an an official 
of tbe SECs division of market 
regulation called a few minutes be- 
fore 10 asking for an extension un- 
til 11 AJ4^ fie was told it was too 
late. 

At this point the SEC yielded to 
reality. 

[On Friday, the IFC index of tbe 
Mexican stock market dosed down 
just 22.79 points, at 2,520.78, 
Kjright-Ridaer reported from Mex- 
ico City. 

[Overall, analysts said the 
Wednesday assassination of the 
candidate, Lois Donaldo Cdoao, 
and Thursday's national holiday, 
did not have tbe dire impact on 
trading that bad been expected.] 


Chinese Firms 

Bloomberg Business News 

BEIJING — China wQl bar com- 
panies with foreign investors bran 
its new bank-bared currency ex- 
change system and will instead keep 
swap markets open for them, the 
Economic Dafly reported Sunday. 

The decision, which appears 
aimed at s u ppor tin g the yuan and 
containing China’s trade deficit, 
constituted a change in the curren- 
cy reforms adopted at the first of 
the year. Beijing had originally 
called fra swap centers to be abol- 
ished on April l and replaced by an 
interbank currency market, with 
banks selling yuan to Chinese and 
forrigD-ftmded ventures. 

ty ^m^mmis^'aujRon^ex- 
dude foreign-funded companies 
from the provisions allowing Chi- 
nese companies to freely buy dol- 
lars at state-designated banks 

Foreign businesses in China are 
not happy with the swap centos, 
where m order to get foreign ex- 
change they must seek counterpar- 
ties with excess hard currency. 



THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation, 
k gold. 

Swiss made since 1848. 



Q 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 


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4: 




P; Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Oo*« of trading Friday. March 25. 


ftp Name Wkty 
FdName Last One 


'Name w &t 

8 Name Las# ar» 


AAL Mutual: 

Bandp 9.W — JJ7 
CoGfp 1446 —28 
MunBdp IXB3 —03 
SmCoSta 10.99 —M 
AARP Invst: 

BalS&Bn 1AM —.17 
CnpGrn 3109 —.99 
GtaleMn 152? —.10 
Gratae n 33.19 —06 
HOBdn 1508 —.11 
TxFBd n 1703 —.13 
AST Funds 
Emend 1139 —M 
PL HI 1031 — JJ7 
FLTF 10.99 —OS 
Gwthinp 1071 — 28 


^UlEtaCP ILT?— 18 


: LoCao n 9.95 ... 

AHA Funds 
Baton n 12.16 —.12 
FuB 902—06 
Um 1023 —Oil 
AIM Funds 
AcSGvn 9JS —ill 
Agrsvd 262* —46 
BtrtAo IMS —2* 
Chart p 090 —16 
COnstl p 1022 —.76 
GoScp 9.45 —Ot 
GrthBt 11-55 —.54 
Grthp 1159 —53 
HYIdAp 1003 — 06 
HYWBt 10.03 —05 
rneoo 7.93 —IT 
IntlE p 1245 —.14 

UmMp nun 

MuB P D27 —.05 
Summit 957 —34 
TeCTp 1084 —55 
TFmt 1073 —06 
u»p ms —.16 

UfflBt 1115 —14 
VafuSt 2176 —53 
Vafup 2100 —51 


WB taj»» I7J5 -54 


AMF ... 
AdiMtg 


9.93 -51 


GrpName WKty 
FdName Las# One 


HcrhBp 1470—32 
HFYMlnvAo*62— 01 
HIYhSp 453 —71 
MuBAp 10.17 —71 
AAunSBp 10.16 —02 
PoceA p 1159—55 
PocsBo 1153 — 55 
THUYA p 10.95 
TEHiYBpTO.95 


TaxExtApI127- 03 
:iBP 1157—72 


TxE... _ ... 

TXMSAp 9.97 —72 
UtrlAp 495 —.09 
American Funds 
Amsatp 12.16 —.14 
Amcpp 1257 -32 
AmMuHp2)53 —31 
BandFdp 1374 —10 
CooInBI 032.72 
cap W! dp ISA5 —T9 

COPWGf X1754 —33 
EoboCP 2120—24 
RRitvP 1407 —58 
Gavtp 13J2 —09 
GwlhFdP27.1? —73 
HITrsfP T*74 —.12 
IncoFdP 1379 —IB 
(nfBd P 1358 —75 
invCaAP 1441 —34 
LtdTEBd 1422 —.11 
NwEoon P3039 —38 
NgwPerpl&M —27 
SmCMVp2370 —37 
TaxExpr pll-83 — 78 
TxGxCA P1S57 —.10 
TxExMOpl553— 79 
TxExVAplSTS —78 
WshMuf p!753 —58 
AmGwttl 9.60 — 50 
AHeritan 1J4 — 74 
AmerNaftFuMs 
GrtMlh 432 —.07 
Income 21.42 —45 
Trifle* 1559 —59 
API &tpn I2 L88 —57 
Am Per tot in. 

Bond 958 —75 
Equity 1156 —53 


Boston Co RetaA 
AtocAp 15.12-31 
CopAAp 2432 —56 

!S? P !53=$ 


MudlAp 1108 —78 


SpGrAp 1759 — 33 
TffcdA 1175 —04 


IntMton 977—74 1 [ntBd 1078 
IntllJqn 1079 —71 1 AmUtlFd n 2178 —32 
MlpSecn 1072 —08 lAmwvMutr 7.74 —31 


ARM Funds 
CaoGrn 1074 —35 
Grtncan 1050— 18 
Income 9.82 —.03 
ASMRfn 1070 —31 
Accessor Funds 
MIFxtnn 1150 —.05 
AccMortfl 17-0! —73 
ShMnJFx 1279 —.03 
AComln 14.04 —30 
AcmFd 1169 —28 
AdsnCap 21.96—36 
AdvCBal p 10 M —31 
AdwCRetp 10.12 —79 

Advrif Advanf: 

Govt np 9 M —1 1 
Gwffjno 17.13 —54 
HYBdp 974 —03 
Inca no 1273 —.11 
MuBdNat 957 -79 
SPdrtP 2135 —12 
Aetna Funds 
Aetna n 10.75 —13 
Bond n 1410 — .03 
GrwIiKa 1499 —.18 
MflGrn 1174—19 
Alger Funds 
Growth t 20.94 —.90 
IncGrr IZ62 —30 
MidCpGrt12J7 —56 
SmCaPI 2246 —74 
OBinilce Cwp- 
Aliancep 6.91 —.15 
Bakmpx 1377 
BatanBt 1*79 —.19 
BOndA p 1356 —37 
Canada o 574—77 
Cnstvlnv 1467 —.12 
CpBdBp 1375 —57 
CpBdCP 1375 -57 
Count p 1738 —32 
GtaSAp 1174 —71 
Govt A p 8.16— .06 
GovtS p 8.16— 76 
GovtCp 416 —.06 
Groinc Px 236 —06 
GwthC 21.16 —39 
GwThFp 24.91 —46 
GwtaBI 21.16-38 
Grtncspx 235 -76 
GrinvB 11.96 —20 
InMAp 9.85 -78 
InsMuB 975 —08 
IruMCp 973—08 
IrrtlA p 1772 —57 
MrttAp 877 —08 
MrtaBp 877 —78 
MrfOCp 877 —0B 
AAtgTrA p 973 —31 
MfgTBp 9.83— 01 
MSbTtCp 973 —01 
MJflG 1400 —10 
MKtrtt ITS 
MM5AP 445—79 
MAAS B t 875-39 
MCAAp 1422—13 
MuCA BP 1072 —13 
MuCACpl022 —13 
AAuFLCp 976—11 
KATA 12.97 —.13 
AAullCAB 1X97 —13 
MINSp 1050 —39 
AAUOHCP 956 —09 
MuNJBp 957 —39 
MuNJCp 951 —39 
MNYA 955 -38 
MuNYBp 955 -78 
AAUNYCR 955 —38 
NArtuAp 1419— ID 
NHMwCpIXI? —10 
NEurAp 1255 -50 
NAGvA 946 —1* 
NAGvBp 976—14 
NAGvC 975 —15 
FYGrtflA p|206 —27 
PrGrthB pi 158 —57 
QusrAP 2*38-75 
STAAIPP 494 — 36 
STtMit 8.94 —06 
Tedip 2838—133 
Wkflrtcn 177—31 
AmSoudi Funds 
Balance 1176—18 
Band 1482 —34 
Equity 1*73 —36 
Gvttn 975 —31 
LfdMof 1071 —32 
ReoEq 1739 —37 
Amananc 1330—15 
Ambassador Fkb 
BdncF 1424 —52 
Bond n 9 JO —03 
CoraGrF nl6-95 —S3 
Growth n 1350 —60 
IdxStkn 11.92—26 
InfBondn 952—32 
IntCStan 1333—17 
SmCoGr nTAAO -53 
AmSassadar imn 
Bartdn v.70 —33 
CoreGrn 16.94 —53 
Grwftin 1379 —70 
liflBond n 972 —32 
InttStkn 1333— .16 
SmCoGr nlX39 —53 
TFlntBdnlOT? —33 
Ambassador Ret A: 

Band I 970 —33 
CareGr 1654 —53 
Grath 1379 —60 
Imflond 9.72 — 72 

irtKSric inn -.16 

SmCnGr 1479 —53 
TFintBcfl 1429 —33 


Analytic!) 11.97 —.13 
AnehCopf 2469 —34 
Aouita Funds 
AZTF 1074 —36 
CO TF 1071 -.05 
H1TF 1177 -34 
KYTF 1452—35 
NranstTF 9.73— .06 
OB TF 1052 -75 
TxFUT 971 —37 
Aquinas Fund: 

Balance n 974 —.14 
Ealncn 956 —12 
Fxlncn 9.70 — XM 
Arch Funds 
Bal x 9.94 —50 
EmGrth 125Z —18 
GwCOTP 1421 -36 
Gmlncx 1L99-30 
MOTF 1159 —37 
US Gov 1463— 36 
ArmstrtB n 8.77 —.16 
ARmtaGrpllTO —.17 
AHns Funds 
CaMuni 1132 —.08 
CAIns 1413 —36 
GvtSec 1051 —.07 
GralnC 1473 —34 
NaMuni 1738 —38 
BB&T Funds; 

BaiB n 1032 —.1 1 
GnHncTntlJ2 —51 
IrrtGovTn 9.79 —35 
SIGovTn 9.90—33 
BEAFuPds 
EAAkEf 2271 — 57 
UltlEq 1971 —73 
5rgF*tn o 1 456 —53 
BFMShDun 974 
BJBGtAp 1155 —.11 
BJBIEqA p 1274 *.14 
BNYHamamn: 

Eqlftcn 1157— 54 
ItdGovl 952 —35 
NYTEn 1007 —37 
BobRMGraupi 
BoridLn 157—01 
Bond Sn 1401 —73 
Enterp2 n 1753 —21 
Entrpn 1732 * 34 
Gwthn 1336 —54 
Inti 1676 —11 
Shadow n 12.73 —33 
TaxFrSn 10J>5 —7* 
TaxFrLn 871 —06 
UMBBn 1138 —75 
UAABHrtn 959 —09 
UMSSln 1675 —52 
Value n 2576—72 
SaAmlBMUKiuer. 
Diversan 1279 —56 
mtlEan 6.15— .11 
IrdlFIn 975 —72 
BaM Funds 


Boulevard Finds: 
BtOilPx 9.11 —51 
Manglncx 976 —05 
StratBat k 974 —38 
Bitaad Funds 
BrtnsfiGl # ton —li 
BrinsGIBl 9.73 —76 
NLCCdV 9.72 -50 
Bmdwmn 2670 —93 
Bruce n HU72- 174 
BrundnSl n 1051 —04 
BoB ABenrGp: 
Gblncnp 9.06 —55 
Go)dlrtvnpl75l *J1 
GovtSec r»1538 — II 
Mutnca 1658 —37 
QuatGthplSTS — 38 
SpEqp 2230 —79 
USOvs np 419 —.13 
Burnham p 2056 —54 
C&SRIty nx 3454 —.18 
CBM Funds 
Aider TF 950 —.08 
COPOev 02447—179 
F«t Inert 1078 —.16 
AAUtln 2445 —63 
OdmtBPx 1374 —J9 
CATFIn 1070 —04 
CaWomtaTnnt: 
Cotlncn 1274—78 
CoWSn 10.73—08 
SfcPSOOn 1176—54 
S&PMkt 1278 —70 
Catvert Group: 

Arid 3400 —74 
ArielAp 22.92 —78 
GlobEn 17.95 -78 
Incur 1675 —51 
MflCAJ 1056 — .07 
Munlntx 1416 —08 
Social PX 29 88 —57 
Sacfldx 1673— IS 
SocEq 22.10 —79 
TxFLtd nxlQTS —03 
TxFLf»xl652 —14 
TxF VT x 1417 —13 
USGavx 1474 —.13 
Cambridge Fds 
CaoGrA 1A96 —31 
GvWlA 1372 —89 
GwttlA 15.97 —77 
MutOCA 15JJQ —.18 
CouGrBI 14.93 —J1 
GvInBt 1374 -39 
GwthBt 1577 —76 
IracGrB t 15J1 —50 
MuUKBt 1572 —.17 
OwMkiaxn 11.06 —54 
CaprtotEqn 972 -.14 
CapitalFtn 1402 —35 
cnppHBo Ruitunore 


GrpName WMy 
FdName Last One 


DvGtni 19.12— .73 
DtvGih be 30.10 —79 
Dfvfnhc 9.90— .10 
Eat inc > 87? —15 

Eurat 1271 —36 
Gtwr 1.87 -.06 
GfcOivlX 10.98 -37 
FedSeci 974—37 
HtthSct 1154 —50 
HiYldbc 7. HS —37 
AAuAZt 1432—09 
intmett 974 —35 
LtdAAunt 9.83 —38 
MuCA I 1071 —38 
AAUR-t 1052 —38 


AAUNJt 14*5—08 


AAuOHp 1074 ... 

MutIFA I 1447 —30 
NYTxFl 1135 —10 
Ntftst 11.96 —JO 
PaoGrt 1979 —36 
PrcAAt 1258 * 56 
Premier p 492 —32 
SetAAuP 1251 —08 
Managed BOB* —.15 
ST Bd 9.68 —04, 
ST US P 1405 — 32 i 
Strut tx 1*33 —74 
TOxEx 1171 —39 
US Gut I 8.94—37 
ItlUnfx 1372 —71 
VolAdt 2417 —70 
WWlm 


One x 879 —.06 


WKftVOI 18-44 —50 
9.78 — 36 


EmgGrn 1118 —37 
Grwiti 11.98 —55 
Cappietlttl 954 —.14 
CamAxte Group; 
FundSW 17.97 —31 
Gtfllnc 459 
AAedRs 1873 —52 
NZtand 11.37 —72 
tUapan 778 —.05 
US Trend 1355 —76 


Qndlncd Family ; 

» 1051 —58 


Adjlnc 9.93 
BKKPP 1851 — J8 


Amoore Vintage: 

' f* 10J9 —26 


Equity 

Fxlncn 9.97 
IntdTTFx 1008 —11 
AmerAAdvanl; 
Bdantt 12.16—17 
Equity n 1374 —71 
InflEqly n 1250 —.06 
LtdTrm n 9.92 —01 
Amer Cnpflafe 
CmstAp 16.12—70 
CmslBp 16.13 —40 
Ceafflp 6.93 -.03 
CorpBdA P6.93 —03 
EmGrC 25.90—137 
EGAP 2636—137 
EmCrBp2i60— 135 
EntAP 1272 —77 
EnfBp 1275 — 77 
EqtylncAB575 —38 
EqtncBf 544-39 
EqlncCp 575 -39 
ExrtlFd 111.94—237 
FdMflAp 1253 —32 
FMgBp 1255 —01 
GiEqAp 1173— .17 
GtEqfi on 1174 -.17 
GfGvAp 85S — 36 
GtGvfl Prt 859— 36 
GiGvCp 853 -36 
GvScAp 1432 —37 
GvScfip 1033 -36 
GvScCp 1071 —07 
p 1373 —39 
> 872—37 

IBP 871 —.08 
. TCP 461 -38 
Grlncp 1273 —54 
HorbA P 1475 —32 


CopOevp23J9 —12 
Bun Wet s T nut 


JnsfAMat 973—13 
iRStScm 1062 —53 
InvImTF 1050—37 
IrtvtnlEq 1332 —05 
InvUMn 1072—11 
InvEqlx 1050 - 

BoronAsln2L92 -.11 
Bartlett Funds 
BascVIn 1576 —72 
Fixed! n 1406 — D3 
VllntJ 1273 —20 
BoscomBal 2270 —31 
BavFDndSlltStfc 

& Yield 973 
tdn 970—03 
1196-57 


11 933 
Bond n 978—33 
Equity n 1056 — 57 




950 ... 
Benchmark Funds; 
Balanced nl 0.18— 32 
BondA It 1971 —52 
DivGrAn 1472 —71 


EqtdxAn 1477 —74 
FocGrAn 


’An 1462 —74 
InUBdA 
InffGrA 

SMOurn 1032 
SIBdAn 19.98— 39 
SmCotA 1176 —51 
USGvAft 1976 —.10 
USTldxA nl979 —.19 
Benham Group: 
AtfiGovn 976—31 
CaTFI n 1497 —06 
CdTFInn 971 —.11 


CaTFSn n 1417 —33 


-- 951 _. 

CafTFLn 1137 —39 
EqGrcn 11.95 —51 
EurBdn 1078 r.oi 
GNMAn 1445—38 
Goldin n • 1370 -71 
IncGroil 1470 —72 
LTreas n 950 —12 
NITF1 n 1472 —37 
NTTFLrt T177 —37 
STTrran 978 —31 
Tarl99Sn 94.14 
Tor2000 n7B79 —74 
Tar2005n 4779 —65 
TarSOlOn 3452 —65 
Ta-Misn 2578 —79 
Tc»2Q20nl779 —75 
TNofen 1052 -33 
unman 979 —39 
Berger Grant 
lOQpn 1473 -57 
TOT pn 1172 -39 
SmCoGr 279 —06 
BsnstehiFds 
Gv9tOun 1255 —02 
SttOurn 1253— 32 
InTDurn 1339 —37 
Co Mu n 1378—07 
DivMunnl372 —35 
NYMun n 1371 —37 
him/oln 1652 —10 
BerwynFd n 19.1 2 —51 
Berwynlnc nl 1.97 — 09 

Hwmoii punas: 
Batana*ixl426— .18 
Equity x 1071 —21 
Eqlndexxl43B —59 
Fixedlncx 955 —39 
STRxlncx977 —33 
SCMimi 1481 —36 
Biancbard Funds 
AmerBin 9.98 —70 
RxTFBd 1)4.93 —33 
Rexlncn 455 —35 
WSrnp 1074 — 30 
PrcM np 955 *53 
ST Gin 131 —01 
ST Bond n 2.94 —31 
BdEndow 1770 —10 
Boston Co bub 
AstMgrBnll77— 57 
COApBp 1872 —56 
ItOsBrtp 1272 —33 
Mod IB np 71 38 —38 


AggCttl _ 

Balanced 1418 —39 
Fund 1290 —23 
GovfObtrg 872 —73 
CariICa 1320 
CamegOHTE 9.70 —33 
CnKBlA 1S70 —39 
CnKflIB 1577 —39 
GentumGo 970 —23 
CntryShrn 23.19 —77 
OiCopBC 1135—50 
ChesGrth 1453 -57 
CHesfnt 14373—2.95 
OticMflwnl4377 
ChubbGrfn 1A98 —74 
ChutATR 1538 -24 
Clipper n 4931—131 
Colonial Funds 
imEqtp 1977 —17 
CalTEA 753 -34 
ConTE A 775—36 
FedSec 1079 —.07 
FLTE A 772 —37 
FundA 858 —.13 
GrathA P 1*28 —52 
HiYhJA 654 —03 
1r«orneAp676 —34 
tnfGrA 1056 —.19 
MATxA 773 —34 
Ml TEA 4»7 —35 
MNTEA 7.14 —33 
NatResA 12.90 *34 
NY TEA 737 —35 
OhTEA 753 —34 
SmStkp 1879 —19 
StnlncA 7.15 —06 
TxExAp 1374 —39 
TxlnsAp 8.14 —34 
USGrA 1231 -53 
USGvA 659 —32 
IffilAp 1256 —12 
CATEBt 753 —04 
CTTEBt 775 —36 
FedScB t 1469 -37 
FLTxBt 732 —37 
FundBt 858 —14 
GlEqB 1271 —12 
GwthBt 1452— 22 
HYMuBt 1032 — .05 
HYSecBI 494—03 
IncomeB 476 -3* 
IntGrB 1423 —50 
MATx8» 773—34 
NatResB 11257 *.0* 
NYTxBt 737 -35 
OHTWBI 753 -34 
SlrllnBI 7.15—36 
TxExBI 1374 —39 
TElnsBI 414 —3* 
USGrBt 11.92—54 
IfSGwBt 659 —02 
Utiiat 12.66—12 
CblumWa Funds 
Batancenl739 —18 
CamSflcn 1578 —54 
Fixed n IMS —37 
Govt 853 —31 
Grthn 2675 —66 
IntiSik n 13.12 —56 
Mumn 1212 — 36 
Spedn 2452 —39 
common Some; 

Gdil 1067 -38 
Groinc 1579 
Growth 1577 -76 
MitnB 1353 —34 
Compass CPpifot 
Eatvlneu 1265 —19 
Fxdln 1079 — .04 
Growth 11.11 —33 
IntlEq 1138 —19 
InflFI 1445— 34 

MutlBd 1054 —35 
NLIMun 1138 -35 
Shmnt 1071 —01 
Cornpasde Croupe 
BdStkpx 1156—30 
Growth PX12.42 —35 
IncoFdP 8.95—38 
NW50PX 14.99 —13 
TaxExp 7.62—05 
USGovp 1435- 
OoneUoga Funds 
Equity 14,94 —33 
Incmx 1435 
LldMafx 1056 —36 
Cum Mutual: 

Govt 1451 —07 
Grath 1535 —33 
Income 9.69 —32 
Tatfiel 1450 —20 
Cop ley n 2056 —50 
OrreFunds: 

BolonAn 1455 —.17 
Eqklx 2173 -73 
GlBdAn 950 —14 
GrEflAn 1423 -79 
IntBdA n 934 —33 
lnttGrA n 1352 —.18 
VUEqB P013.7S — 70 
CowenlGr 1496 —IS 
CowenOp 1337 —23 
Oubbe Huson: 

AstADp 1371 —14 
Equity p 1670 —20 
ORMun N1239 —35 
Speddn 1376 —.18 
CrastFunds Truth 
gondn 975 —06 
SlBdn 938—03 
SpEqn 11.93— 50 
Value n 11.18 —55 
VAMun 9.90 — 32 
CuFdArSn 1030 —01 
CuFdSTn 9.79 —32 
Ollier Truth 
ApvEqn 1035 —.16 
Eqty1ncon939 —13 
GovtSecnl033 —33 
DFAlntVal n 957 —35 

DG Investor: 

EduiTyx 1069 —59 
Gavtinca x 9.70 —38 
LTGovtx 9J9 —34 
MunUncxiOTS —.10 
Deauwntu: 

AmVal t 2130—89 
CdTxfrl 1271 —39 
CooCrof 1272 —70 


Eaton VTruflMHf; 
China p 1437 - 34 
EVStk 12.53 —74 
Growth p 830 —56 
incBos D 8.61 —34 
MunBd 1033 -37 
STTsyo 55.91 -33 
SccEqtp 858 —5a 
TrodGvt 11.14 —34 
Trodlnvp 755 —39 
TroaTottoaTJ —SR 
EcBpEU n 1*38 —54 
EdiPBOl 19.10 —IS 
EPtendd Funds 
Em EOT 11.77 —23 
EmrldUS 1434 —35 
FLTE 103*— 38 

SmCOPl n 1466 —56 
EmpBId 177* —09 
Endow 1694 —53 
interprtse Grans: 
CcoApp 31 J7 —.93 
GvSeCP 12.01 —11 
Gwlhnp 642 —32 
Grlncp 1600—53 
HYBdD 11-57 —35 
intIGrp 1738 —39 
SmCo 5-56 —10 
TE Inc D 1366 — 37 
EqfyStn 3130—2.75 
Evuwem Funds 
Evrgron 14J9 —50 
Found n 1199 —.18 
GtoRen 1471 —.16 
LMMid n 2124 —32 
MunCAn 1417 —34 
MunIFn 1052 — 34 
Munilnsniai9 —38 
Reliron 11JQ — 38 
TofRtn 18.92 —56 
VoTTriin 1572 —56 
ExcetMldas 457 *.16 
Exlrtvffip 7.82 —.04 
F AM Vain 20 AS —31 
FBI. Series 
BJChio I 1868 —74 
Growth t 1170 *.02 
HiGrfidt 1434 —33 
HiYBdt 1078 —36 
Mangdt 1126 


GrpName Wkly iGroNamn mdy tGrpName WMy GrpNome WMy;GrpNmm WWy GroNmne iMdy Gn»Nnn» .YSSL G Smi!SS» u«i^e ,C RfSJr» La« Chs» "FdNgme Lasted 

FdName Last Qi»j Fd Nome Las# Cfage 1 Fd Name Las# ame FdNune La*# QWt' FdName La*f Owe FdNune La*» Owe FdName Uu» Owe Fd Name Last awe i-a r«x™ 


wwy [GrpName 


WMy 


Retoifr 25-58 —34 InenSer 255 — 32 iHomtftadniU — 31 
Sottwrr Z679-2J3 IN TF 1173—36 HomsWVl 1A9I — 50 

Tectir 4170—171 1 instAdi " _ " " 

Telecom r3696 — *5 ~~ 


960 —32 


CaPApo 1161 —57 
Fxdln 1055 —34 
IntGv 10.17 —32 
SHVolueollTS —58 
FFB Eq 14/2 —57 
FFBNJ 1074 —06 
FFTWFonds 
intu da 

US Short 9.96 
WWHetM 939 —36 
WW Fxdln 9.60 —10 
FMBFunds 
DivECp 1171 —53 
DivE I 1171-53 
IrdGCp 1419 -33 
InlGI 10.19—03 
MITFd 7071 —34 
MiTF I UUt —34 
FPA Fund* 

CapH 2440 —63 


Newlnc 1077 — m 


Convtlx 1US— .15 


TCBalPX 

TC Cor t 1274 —33 
TC Inc RX 1069 —50 
TCLatl 1377 - 52 
TCNortPX 979 —38 
TCSCnt 1059 —.19 
Dei Grp loslt 
Dec! I 166* —.20 
Detwrt 1861 — 17 
DJCPl 2639— 66 
OteW 4.9a -36 
TsyRst 969 -33 
tefcmare GrouK 
Trend p 13.96 —53 
Value p 21.03 —.06 
Oeicaop 2678 —66 
Dectrt 1664 —50 
Dedrllp 1274 -.18 
DeJaw p 1860—17 
inttEqp 1253 —13 
QeJchp 6.9a —.06 

USGavtp 879 —36 
TneOSR 969 — 03 
TxUSs 1255 —34 
Txlnsn 11.16—02 
TxFfPap 877 
Obneroionflt Fds 
LfSLrg 1379 
USSml 8.B5 —37 
US 6-10 n 1233 —13 
Japan n 2575 — 53 
UK n 2430 —71 
Contn 1*93 -38 
DFAftlEstMT* —10 
Fiied n 10139 -33 
&Bd 10171 -81 
Govt n 10356 —53 
intGv 11401 —47 
IM1HBM 1173—06 
LCapIrrt 12.18 —14 
PocRffi) 1660 —36 
USLoVal 1060 —18 
USSmVal 11.96 -3# 

DodgeACoc 
Baton n *652 —70 
income n 1172 — 05 
Stock n $371 —158 
OamSockfl 1275—54 
Dremari Funds 
Gontrhx 1371 — 78 
HiRtnx 1691 —75 
SmCpVc#iU33 —62 
Dirytws: 

A Band n 146* —II 
Apnecnp 1*60 —70 
ASSCtAll 01268 —18 
Bafncd 1370 —.14 
ColTx n 1*75 —10 
Collnt n 1355 —.10 
CTiron 1350— .10 
Droyfusx 1102 —58 
EdBInd 1279— .16 
FL iron 1356 — 38 
GNMA HP 1476 —39 
GnCA 1375 —.12 
GMBd p 1*96 —.14 
GNYp 2414— .IS 
Crincn 1734 —54 
GwthOpnl068 —55 
InsMun np!793 —1 7 
Iruerm rt 1*31 —.11 
InMEQP 1559 -34 
invGNn 1*96—38 
MAtron 13.16—11 
MA Tax n 1654 —.10 

Munedn 1277—10, „ 

HJlrtln 1354 — 39 iRdeWymsfttuft 
NJ Mun n 1357 —.10 ; EaPGtn 2973 

NwLdr 3537—79 

NYlTxnp 1176 —38 
NY Tax n 1558 —II 
NYTEp 17.96 —16 
Peopindt 1S71 —55 
FenMid ml756 —72 
STOnGvn 1139 -33 
STIncpn 12.17 —.04 
ShJnTp 13.10 -34 
ThdCntrn &3A —16 
UST bit 1106— 37 
USTLng 1472—14 
WTSin 1558-33 
Dreyfus Comstocfc 
CapVatA 11.98 -57 
CapValBtU73 -76 


Tronsr 2232—17 
mar 1670—57 
Pidesty Spartans 
AgrMun n 9.95 —38 
CAHYm 1066 — OB 
CTHVnr 1132 -38 
FU Mum 1073 —.07 
GNMAn 9.B4— 36 
Gcvlnn 1059 —35 
rtswn m 1250 —35 
intMun t 9.9S —06 
iftvGrad nlQ.iQ —37 
LtdGv 9.8! -.03 
LTGn 11.12—19 
MDMum 9.82 —37 
Munir) r 1031 —37 
NJHYr 11.17 — 06 
NY HY m 1065 —07 
PAHYm 1062 —at 
SMIncn 937 —37 
SlntGvn 9.64 —.04 . 
ShtlnMun 9.88 —04’ 
FrduCopn 1970 —55 1 
59 WcrB Street: 

EuroEa 29.95 —37 , 
PocBsh 3950 —.20 i 
Sm Co 1270 —14' 


n 2058 


WYW 853 —33 

STG1 7.16 —35 

Shttnt 855 
SmCpEq 1230 —3? 


IwEbA 1876 —73 
GrthAp 1555 —58 
GrlnAp 932— .17 
W1AP 2737 —39 


&kl -. n d GIGJBt 10 93 — 5S MuHiA 1054 — .061 Growth fl zuxw — -J4 

B’ fe=a: m ts=8! & iS=8 

GAlTAn 1061 ” — J ~ B 

GviTAn 10. 

GvWCt 10. 

InMuTAr) 9,_. 

MEfaT : teen ,SJ1 

MDI r P 1073 —35 
MD1 TA 

Kt'8g=s ami a 3 jffi 

2£& M^Sr ggg?i*wi-a 


I— IS 


IntlEq p 1379—20.! 
KYTF 1051 —39 I 
LA TF 11 20 —36 1 


UwTF 1Z20 — 36 HudsanCopl3J8 1^8 _ 

NYtromrrnw* — ll Hummerlrxatl? —07’ TofRt 1*14—23 Mainstay FiPids „ 
— 20 HumrorG 21.95 —73 KeatFunds CaApt 2077 —68 

HypSD 932 - 31 ExEoIns 1237—17 Cww» 1133 -.07 

... _ HVCS02 951 -31 Fxtflnlm 977 —03 CrpSdt 8.16 -3! 

MD7F 11.11 —36 lAATrGr 1637 —23 ■ MxEqin 1055—fl Ea«x 1X90—50 

MassTF 1165 -36 IA1 Funds ITOETOns 1354—18 Ootrlt 1165—18 

MiehTxF 1230 — 06 Balon nn 1079 —50' UMflttns 936 

MNI115 1212 —35 Bondpnx 9.43 —16 ■ MedTSn 141* —JO* 

MOTF 1179—35 EmpGrpnliSS —33 : MIMiTns 972 —31 

NJTF 1166—06 Govt pnx 1034 —.12 VcrfEqln 1069 —17 

Grlncp 1*60 —3* 1 Keystone 
WUFdn 1X7* —53 1 OriSl t 

UtflBdx 933 —10 1 CusB2t 

Midoapn i**2 —58; 


NYlnS 1135 -38 
NY Tax 1138— 35 
NC TF 1174—36 
OhtoJTF 1215 —36 
ORTF 1133 —37 
PacGcwtt)W33 —19 


Retfen np 21-63 —23 , 0^1 » 


861 


Resrvnnx 9.98 — 33 _ 

PATF 1056— 35 1 Value n 121* —13 ' CusSIt 1354—— 

PremRt *34 —37 IBM Mutual Funds OfiS3f 970 —53 

PuerTF 1167 —05 LnrgeCon1*91 —53 
S> Gov 1054 —33 MuniBd 1038 —09 
SmCapCr/OM —57 SmcflConHAO -54 


Govt r 855 —JDS 
NtRsGatdtlO-93 -35 
TxFBt 9 . 91 —34 
ToWll 1579 —31 
Votr 1632—13 
15*9 —08 Managers Funds 
16*9 —.0* CasAsn 2576 —43 
558 —31 SpEqn 3955 — A? 
977 —13 mcEan 27*6 —71 
ShorrGvn 18.90 —39 
intMtgn 19.11 —.17 
51 Bond 2033 —34 
Bondi) 2165— 50 
bfflEon 3576 —54 


GrpName 

Fd Name La® ^ 


nt 1253—09 
Ifn 491 —35 


IB’ S3 W mr^ 


872 -57 
771 —19 


Ke- «$3t=f ; BS- B=s* iWW.W=e 

SIFTAn ?38 —34 emu. "J-Tf -fa intruir 7JW —35 


TA Gqv 1446 —11 1 ^ =fi SSSSo ^ S® « =» 


in. 11 


OisS4t 

KPMt 2A22 -35 Mariner Fuads 

. „ ... TxETrt 1469—37 Fxalnc 937 —04 

TxAdHY 878 —39. UlWv 
TX TF 7160 —35 . ID 

USGovSc 445— JM 
Utmifes 951 —.10 
... VA TF 1166— 36 

TxFSi 1419 — 32.FronUnMgdTr: 

FMtorGvt 1052 —36 ’ CorpQual p2*23— 31 
FtnHorMu 1471 — W > hwGrudee9JOO —JO 

First Anw Fds C: : RtoDIv P 1466 — 53 _ 

AslAilinx 1444 —51 I Frantdto Tempt 'IDS Group; 

Baloncel mOTfl — 19. GMblp 1334 _ BJuCpp 655—131 HrEGA 2*27—39: irtn-xm x 9J3 —Jit euarann — Jta in'*** 

- Hard o 1279 -34 1 &mdp S58 HrtGrA 2238 -73' VAMuBd xlftOl -J8 LtdMafn 10.14 -JR. LATF 

Wlncp 11.17 -.11 1 catep 5.29 — jo* ! imdA 9.1S -33 'Many * Funds - — 

Fremont Funds J q&p 731 — 38 Omega 

Global (1 1101—12' Dttcovp 11.94 —70 PtxA 
Growth n 1)31 —37 ; EouitPl p 11.16 —33 SICA 

CAInt 1079—36 EXhiflP *79—32 1 TxFA 

NiimBdl nx 10*8— .07 i FuwSTnrit: i Fedirc p *92 321 WrltSBA 

Aggres fp 1S.W —35 . GW>Bdp 538 -3 


TXITAn 1401—06 GflnDJ 1071 -10 ««#*, 79s 


i/u inn iu.ua — .uo v"*/ 1 ‘rr’ 7 Dc 

VAJTAn 1072— 05 fTfTWP JM -30 ■ Mo«B }*% 



loex3 1576— 60' FOAA 1474 —IB MmtutWatcti Fds Neuherqer Bcmro :Fo pcStx _ 1S30 

ZPtxInA D M ^ GK3A 1953—73 Equity x 1034 —.18 AM . BaJ nlS13 —51 . PnrUBOO Pt 


Eatdxlnx 1070 —31 
Fxdlncl 0X1479—38 
GovBdfnx 922 —35 
Wind nx 9.81 —36 
Lidlncfnx 7.94 —03 
MIBSed nx 10 07—39 


I GvSA 932 —34 ' FKxlriottx933 — 34 Genes* 85S— 06- GtfjB 

T3. HrEGA 2*27 —99 1 InlFxinx 953—07 Guarar n 1476 —36 irrtBo 


17.15 


1752 - JO GvtSecA 9J7 —32 
I15B —03 1 GlhblA 9.91 —.10 


fTonhStn H57 — 53. ST Gy 
MuST 1076 —35 I VatEq 
NYCDCn 10.19 —50 . VrfGr 


MuMdt 1039 —09 

MunMAt 1165— 38 

1057—06' MuMnt 1133—37 
1067— 35' MunMlt 11.93—07 

10.14 —32 I MurUM0dfl486— 37 

72.15 —50 ' MuNCt 1157—08 
1552 —50 j MunNJt 1133 —38 


834 —35 VtfEaAP 9.90 -.19 . Porlnrsn 2036 -58 Purlc^fWASItK ' 

939 —0? I Mantas Funds SeiSefct n 2J54 - 56 ■ BondFd 11%— j* 

953 -37’. Bcdn 1032 —50’ utJrcBCn 964—3!'. Ecu«yA 1465 —61 MvPdt ^ 

1065 -39 Ealnc 955—13 NecvAlter 3477 —46 «EqA 1*75—^. \SJ0 —11 

Gvflncn 964 — 34 NewCnttP 12U — .16, IntGav A 939 — 32 , 


SpecEqi ni679 — .10; Grain to 1536— .15; GioGru tS_3il RJABI 1076— «■ Gvtlncn 964 — 34 NewCnttP 1214—16. IntGav A 939 — 32 , Sttuasp iiji — ra 

Stock! nx 16.40 — 79 j Gwthfp 1412 — IB ■ Growth o 1736 —61 GKJpflt 1968 — .43 ! WBdn 977 — 33 Ne%vUSAs 1273 — *5 ■ IntlDisA 1355 — 38, S'5?l.'« , 2 “m 

irstArnar Funds ] 1007 -37 WYdTEp i# T m GvSBf 931 -35; MrdCapnI0.il -53 Wdjotos Group: ■ LWMTOA 957 -31 ■ (KGvtjln 9^ —07 

ASAllpx 144* —52 | ModTRIpll37 37 I lnsrTEP 561 — 34 i IttkJBI 9.14 — 34, ST Inert 9JQ _ tiicrioi n 53*5 — 78. MIMuA 1471 — 33 ■ 9. 3 8 50 

Bakin D 1P_(M —19 ’ r uTr' ^ I JSw p 1J1I 7? pTtFB t 17^5 —»JJ8 ! Stock n ICL 33—32 Mrfi li n 7478 JS7 Srr»CP A 2X73 —.90 i PruMfll I bsu 

10T8-19 )Fun£ta7Wrtnj F ^ MB JSrS SST 8 ' 4M-3S JSiqn lSf Sx&A -31 ArfSafn M32 -12 


CAMunnp 462 
NYMunnpl.— -- , 
US Gov n 134 —02 


Michn 


Baton cn 1160 —51 
BondCn 973 —.03 
EauirvCnl676 —SI ■ 
GvtlncC 975 —31 


Gtnsikn 1253 —43 
Income to 9J9 — 36 
rroisncn 1*46—52 
SikhJxn 1135— 34 


Panrint 1333 

Perer 21.91 —34 
FOrrmtn 2573 *.06 
Fascianon 1737 *37 
Federated Funds 
ArmSSpn 9.82 —31 
Arm I n 932 —31 
ExchFdn7233— 1.43 
FtottSn 1049 — 32 
F5TI Isn 493 —32 
FGROnx 23.65 —52 
FHYTn 955 — 36 
FITISn 1018— .04 
FITSSo 1418-fli 
FsigflSn 1040 -31 
F5»grosspia*o —,oi 
FSTiwc 2571 -70 
FSTISSP 493 —32 
GnmciSnlMS— 38 
GnmaSo 11.15 —38 
FcStSSP 1070—32 
IMTIS 1072 —37 
MaxCapxl179 —53 
Minlcap nxlXld — 54 
ShrtTemi 1052 —02 


USGovtnl03l —.09 


Equity px 1679 —.10 
Eqldxpx 1071 —50 
FxdlncPxlO/9 —38 

GovSdpx 952 —35 GAMFindv . mutt: n in ~ n! i TxFCI 939 —37 j Equity tpnll73 — 17 BdlGlhB itE — 57 

Inline px 931—36 99 - ) m /Ufi n p ~u I FtxC I 1456— 38 1 Income f 1470 —36 coreGthA 1*33 — X/ 

LtdlflCX 9.94-33 H"® !2-Z '«l JS?TC« — il FOACt 1477—16, Prism fen 1039 - 34 cSre&TO* 1336-77 - - 

MtgSecpxl037 —38 i'2)« “T’S | — S GvSCl 9.32 —34 MentGlh 1417—30 % HY!EqCnl*6S — 53 PubwmFimdR 

MunSdpxlO.48 — 07 fiESSclS"™ 1 - 1- q 2£ P 'J* ; 'ir>dCt 9.1* -34 I MeTOSfr n 1254 iws5? C n 938 -32 I AmGcrvp 460—05 

RegEq 0*1272 —18 “nSSiSixea — !• pH?Mt« Ini T"?i PTkl=Ct 1157 — .0# ' MeruerFd Dta3S -36 1417 — 56 IrTOCn 14*1—38' Adi An 1058 +31 

Stock px 14.41 —48 322t? 1*01 S ! ri Si la nil StcO 836 — 04 , Merkfion n 2i« -35 irr^rOMl 1272—53' LMM1C 956—31' AsWAp 1476—12 

Si?^ 5 tocSmeii 1VS2 — m 919 “ot KIARF 9J2 —32 .Merrill Lynch: IneSrt UJSS^UI’ fWNto C ID JO —34 i BIGvAp *81—31 

FsfEoglnr 1692 — .18; HSVS.wii'S nt ,I’I2 '■52 Kidder Groups ' AmerinA 9.45—52 1497 — jl MuBdC 1443—33; AZTE 935 — 35 

Bv <g^ S A ii=l' ^ ssauoca 

acre 1*20 —11 ■ GrowthA 1579 ~ 


Groinc p 6.66 —.11 
High Yd p 557 —33 
Income p *13 —32 
InvGnlp 9.92 —37 


L'rfcflCp 1437 -J7 


uteHYn 10.97 
USA ns 11.96-56 
MATFp 11.75 —.06 
M1TFP 1X26—37 
NJTFD 1269— .07 
NYTxFrp1468 —.07 
PATFp 1261 -37 
SpecBd 11.98 —.11 
5o9tP 11*8 —47 
TcxExpl plQ36 —36 
TolRetP 11.94 —51 
IffillnCOP 557 —34 
VATFp 1274-38 
FiretMuf 9.70 —51 
First Orrotac 


.11 I StrWGt S75 — 36 GtoFaC n i*ifi —37 1 CQlMnA 1179 .12 

incnmeCnll J4 — 37 [ TEBRdp 494 — 33 GtoEq* 1655 11 1 CapFdA 2811 31 

IntEqpn 1478 -31 ,' LWIPCP *56 —09 g£f2b 1236 . I C^Utt P 1X54 -39 


StrogC 1578 —22 
USEqDlt 1 


1636 -36 

GEUSE 1635 —36 
USEqA 1604 —35 
GIT Imufc 

EaSacn 2100—15 
TFNatln 1424—37 


61 Funds 


Gwtnp 1559—17. Nifty 50 1655—31: 

Grlncp H79 -.76 PaxWartd n 1X28 —13 . 

Munian 1051 —M j OvtAt 1*57 — 39] OrwGdA 117? — .11 ^SGyt »« 9jt> —37 ' gffwjaiii 12.16 —50 ; 

NoA/n d 9 61 —09' irrtciA it o7— ns • caITA 1 us — 10 MclnvCr n 24i7 —A7 Pwcon 12J33 — %2i 

tdOneqr 1032 —33 ; MuniBdA n jd — 09 | DrooA 1557 m ' 


DivGrpx 951 —2* 
DvrtnAp 1150 —07 
EnfeAp 14.19—16 
EqlnA px 461 —19 
EuGfAp 1150—13 

FedSnp 956 —36 
FLTxA 931 -37 
GeoAo 1452 -.15 
GdGvApoc 1450 — 30 
GtCrAp 9M —39 


TxFrVAn 11.12 —39 SlnlGvtp 952—31 
GTGtotak TRBdp 95) -38 

A mefP IBM —.11 1 TRGrp 12*7 —JO 
EroMkt 1*51 - .04 ; InvResh 459 — 36 

EmMfcJB 1676 - 34 ! tnvSer Opftfth 
Eixspep 1057 — 52 J CoDGrt 1448 —10 
EuroB 1451 -31 1 GoaiSHc Mil —27 
GvtncA 952-53 USGVtx 950—10 
GvtocB 953 — 52 StovescK 

px *13 —15 I Ovrone 1112 —71 
*14— 14 | Emgrthan 1256 —50 


Equity nx 1459 —.19 HlfCrB 1930 —71 Energy n 1031 —19 
FxdlnC nxlO.DI —ST>\ HHncBx 1178 —64 J Envimn 753 — 37 


GvtWCTr 958—351 InFICp 1415—36 WYdAp U.M— 37 


IndOneGT iiuw — jh 1 MuniBaA 1 1^« — u» . lxob« >ur - "TJi'SV '“SIS* m — -j- 

todependence Cop: 1 SmCaqA 1233—70) EaroA 1539 —16 AffiLST 9.W — ^ , Fwfwmonce TO: - ^ ^ 

OBwtp 1154 -57 [LMHn 1852 -59 1 FedSecA p 976 — 06 !-S nS ~~u ' 

“* [aDdnicirtc Ftmtfct ' FLMA 10J)1 w— ID COTr A txp — 4D • cQlnSIl iiJrr —^4 , rurnAP M JB — An 

Baton nx 1J3) -59 f FdFTA 1579 -57 

equity n 1456 —26 -. GtAlA 1X44 —11 

inttnc x 97* —.10 ’ GfBdA 
InttEa 1253 —17 GICVA 
NYTFnpxlOM— .121 GlHdA 
USGvnx 978 —05’ GIRsA 
Laurel Funds &U!A 

Bctncdn 9.97 —.18 \ GrtRA 


Sdiwab Finds 
CAS) n 9.94—03 
CATFn 1461 —36 
GovSl 1107—34 
Intllndx 1050 —13 
NHTFBn 1410 —36 
lOOOr 1257 —28 
SJTradP 9.97—33 
SmCptdx 1440 —.17 
ScatWdl 1*66 —14 
ScudderFUnds 

01239—21 
... 1056—11 

itn 2070—72 
loanKOl— 1J1 

*lnc115l —55 

GNMAn 1470—11 
GJabln 2*79 —57 
GtSmCa 1*29— 13 
Gown 1457 *74 
Grwlncn 1758 —59 
incornen 1X32 —09 
kttemat! n4354 —79 
inttBdn 1233 —Id 
LotAmrr 2X16 *55 
MATxn 1379 —09 
MetfTFn 1495 —07 
M MB B70 —39 
NYTxn 1071 —It 
QHTkn 1X94—10 
. PATaxn 1351 —11 
RacOws n 1 539 — 53 
OucHGrn 1539 — 54 
STBortJnllJl —35 
STGbtn 11.12 —06 
TXFHYn 1136 —13 
Vc6uen 1236 —54 
ZerXOOOn 1258 —.10 
SealbstMA: 

AssetA 1176 —50 
BO) 1776—58 
Bond 1037 —03 
Security Funds 
Bortdp 772 —04 
Equity 572 —10 
EqGLA 1456 —08 
Grtnc 774 —16 
TxEx 9.82 —06 
Ultra 753 —.11 
Setocted Funds 
AmShs tnXUO —25 
5pi5hsnp 1435 —.10 
USGavon 491 —05 





lintEqty n 2£79 

Seatrn IWI— w 

STWn 3940. — ^ 

SmCPEq nS091— 70 g^JJ. 

Star puntt* I ScTccn 

RtfVair 1IJM -3} i, 

SWJarFd x 1 1 J8 —.17 Un»^5«r^ 
USGvlnc * 3* — AllAm n 
ctaS^Gv 9Jff -J04 I Euron 

State Bond Groc GWStti 

Cam St 757 —13 ; Growth n 
Dtveraifd 9,oS — .17 • inasn 
12S -17 

TaxEx 1058—33 SpTTGvtn ' . 
IsSvp xS-34 USTxFrnlS^S 
smSrtRtS WridGldnlJ.4.3 

BrtSn3l.il —37 iwm 

Gwthn 2279 —5 I virtue Line 
Interim 1053 —JO 1 AcfiGyn 9) 

Muni n 857—34; Aoertan 7. 
jKhwtRestc convFdnl 

CAT7C7,14-« Fundn V 
CopitalA 1031 —36) tnaxne n l 

9Z&. S:?s=Sl ffi 

as; ffits 

1133 —11 I USGytn lllSj* 
1256 —37 Ivon Ec>e \ 

. WiB 1255 — 3* AstaDynB 1471^01 

GthCn 870 —22 AstaAP 1276401 

tnvTrB 874 —16 GoWtaP 67Sd^ 

htvTrAP 877 —.16 ITOUnv 13661*3 

tnvTrC 850 —15 VWWncp 877 








'j*'' 
r -= 


NYTFAp 435 — 06 i..Writfrmpt4«^ 


934 -39 
1053 —06 
1373 —19 
15.74 -58 
1237 —12 

la*: —75 


ITOminn 1072 —34, HeotmA 435—03 Nuroaa Funds 


GvtlncA 931—34' InRIn 1415—36, HYAdp la^O .. 
inaxneTrtOJJO —35 , MCpGrt 1031 —is i tncmAp *97—03 

tnauneA 10.01 —3S ; STFTCpn 938 —31 InvAp 419—51 

TFfncA 9.73 —.07 ; STRIn 938—31 MninAp 438 — 38 

TFhttT 952 -3T 'Perm Port Funds ) MoTjdl 957 —.06 
VaWSrA 1837 —56 1 PennPtn 1770 — 32 ; MITxtlp 939 — 35 

VatuGrT 1434—56. TBfflO 6530 >33 ( MurKAp 834—35 


SIFxinnx 936 —06 
FPOvAst p 1276 — J5 
FPMuBdp 11.98 —39 
First Priority; 

Equity T r rtfl.54 —.19 
FxdlncTr 1035 —36 
LtdMGv 933 —32 


SSFAn 1673—19 
FMefity Advisor: 
EaPGR 2971 —37 
EqPInc 1553 —55 
GWResc 1751 —56 
Gov In P 972 —37 
GrwOpp 025.es —57 
HIMup 12.00 — .11 
HiYfdpn 1135— 35 
IncGtp 1119—55 
Ltd TERpI039 —06 
LTtfTBR >468 -35 
LtdTEJ 1039 —36 
Ovseap 1X62—16 
ST R P 9.80—06 
StrotOpp 19.98 -39 


SBRSti®** 


957 *35 

Dreyfus Premier: 
CAMunAlXSO —.10 
MuA 1238-37 
j>Gth 1*12 —5* 
MuSt 1237 —38 
,MUnA 1453 —38 
GtolnvAnl574 —13 
GttJlnvBt 1152—14 
GronaA 1*40— .10 
GnmuBr 1*41 -.10 
MAMunAIUn —36 
MOMunA1X74 
MI MunA 1559 ... 

MNAAunA1536 — 09 
MOMUBM174— 38 
MuBdBl 1*28-37 
MuniBdA 1*28—07 
NCMUA 1X16—11 
NCMuSt 1115 —It 
NY MunA 1*43 — .12 
MY MuB 11*73 —.12 
OH MUA 1X97—38 
OHMuBt 1X98 —38 
PA MunA 1457 —.11 
PAMuBt 1657 -.10 
TX MuA 2038 — .14 
VA MuA 1656 —.12 
VAMuBt 1676 —12 


Qretdus StaMfllc 
G)Grp 3*63 —72 


Growth p 39.99 -78 
Income 0 1X93 —17 
IrtvA 2159 —75 
InvBt 21.10—46 
Dupree Mutual: 

IntGav n 1059 —10 
KYTF n 7.44 —35 
KYSMfn 553 
SI Funds 
Equity px 5956— 154 
Ftexpx 5X14— LIO 
Income px4755 — 59 
MultltU x 4076 —76 
iataoVOassic 
China p 412 
FLUdp 974—34 
Govtp 977 —33 
NaHMwip 977 —39 
Eaton VMoruthott 
OHLWt 939 —33 
snail 474— .16 
CALM t 1050 —34 
China! U0O *ja 
H-LMt 1423-34 
MALtdt 1412 -34 
MILMt 931 —33 
NrttLMt 1031 —34 
NJLIdl 1419—34 
ALTxPt 1446 —38 
NYLtd t 1050 —35 
AZTxFt 1075 —J09 
PALMt 1426 —34 
ARTxFt loa— 39 
CrtMunI! 9^8 -38 
COTxFt 1055 —38 
CTTxFt 1434 —38 
Eqlnt 11.12—14 
RaTxFt 1484—39 
GATxFr 1409 —37 
GovtObft 976 —33 
Hilnct 774 —34 
KYTxFt 1411 -.10 
LATxFt 1052 —38 
MOTXFI 1433 — 08 
MATxFf 1QJ6 —Of 
MtTXFt 1073 — .06 
MMTxFr 1058-38 
DM3TXF1 1071 —39 
NJTxFt 10J3— 38 
NYTxFl Ufli —37 
NotlMunt 9.92 —11 




1078 —08 
CXTTxFt 1059 —09 
PATxFt 1463 —08 
RITxFt 970 —07 
SCTxFf 1052 — 37 
TNTxFt 1426—39 
VATxFI 1076 -36 
WVTxFl 902 —08 


EqPIln 1571 —55 
IShiGv 974 —34 
UBIn 1079— OS 

d*. t.umit. 

* roewy 

AarTFm 1179 —37 
AMgrn 1437 —57 
AMi9rGrnlX99 —28 
AMGrinn 1486 -39 
Balanc 1339 -50 
BlueCh 2552-77 
CAlnsn 1055 —11 
CATFn 11 JO -.10 
Canada n 18*0 —18 
CanAoa 1635 —18 
Capmainr9.95 —34 
CangrSt >64752 -X90 
Contra 3158 —73 
CnvSecn 1*16 —23 
Destiny! 17*1 -72 
Desttoyll 2415 —50 
DfsEan 1478—79 
Otvertntl n 1230 —.15 
DivGfhn 1114 —19 
EmgGrorl757 —TO 
EntrMkt 17.12—34 
Ertitlnc 3451 -SB 
EQiln i486 —26 
Ealdx 1735 -57 
ErCapAn rill 21 —39 
Europe 1978 —57 
ExtfiFd n 99.98 —257 
FtoaiFdn 19.51 -71 
Fifty 1476 -50 
GNMn 1457 —37 
GtoBd 1151 -53 
GtaBrtn 1256 —34 
GvtSec n 934 — 36 
GroCo 2933 —38 
Groinc 2256 
HiYkf 1250 — 38 
InsMun n 1157 —39 
biiSdn 1437 —34 
InteGvtn 931 —33 
InftGrfn 1753 —71 
InvGBn 778 —35 
Japan n 1371 — is 
LoJtnAm 51575 *53 
UdMun 954 —35 
LowPrr 1405—53 
MITF n 1(35 —38 
MNTFn 1039 —36 
Mogedan 72.90— 2.18 
Mktlnd nr 3* 16 —56 
MA TF n 1179 —37 
Mtoe5ecnl057 —.02 
Muncpl n 421 —35 
NYHYn 1107 
NYlns n 1152— 38 
NewMWnlOTO— 71 
NewMiO 1272 —30 
OTC 24 J7 
OhTFn 1157 —38 
Ovrsea 242) —31 
PocBas 1429 —53 
Puritan 15.93 —79 
RedEsJn 1470 * 39 
RetGrn 1402 —30 
ShtTBdn 9.25 —36 
STWWn 952—11 
SmallCap 1152 — 50 
SE Asian 1X73 —18 
StkSkrn 1956 —52 
StrOcot 20.17 —10 
Trend n 5876—151 
USBIn 1072 —06 
UtiUncn 1*63— U 
Value n 4131 —56 
WrtdW 1375 —19 
RdeOy Selects 
Airr 1*80-59 
AmGotdr2X66 *.93 
Autor 3*95 —39 
Biotech r 2659 — 37 
Bntotr 2301 —76 
Broker r 1676 —74 
Owner 32.14 —31 
Compr 27J5— 157 
ConPrdr 1536 -50 
COHour 1951 —76 
DfAeror t9.t4 —53 
DevCom rl931 —T7 
Etectrr 18.07 —.90 
Energy t 1*98 —53 
Enssvcr 113? —38 
Envlror 1156—23 
RnSvcr 5456—55 
Poodr 3139 —71 
Health r 6157—156 
HcmeF 2532 *55 
IrtOEqpr 2457 —55 
indMatr 21.95—19 
Insurr 1492 —27 
Uhsrr 4*98 —51 
MedDelr 2449 —50 
NatGasr 939 — ,ia 
Pwerr iaro —79 
Prewet r 1775 +77 
PogBnkr 1832 —.15 


First Unoo: 


Bctftn 11.90—50 
BrfCtn 11.91 — 50 
BrtBp 1150 —30 
FxInBp 1411 —33 
FxlriTn 1411 —03 
HiGrfTFBpl073— .03 
HiGdTFCU073— .03 
MnBdT n 1402 —06 
NCMunCt 9.99 —31 
USGvtBP 9.68 -36 
USGvfCr 938 —36 
VrtueBp 1770 — 58 
VdueCfn 1770 —59 
VrtueTn 1759 —59 
FrsfFdFn 9.72 -35 
Flog Investors 
EmGtfiP 1X79 —71 
iroinp 1056 —M 
IntTrp 1X14 —02 
MMunlP 1451 —36 
OuoKSrp 1X86 —19 
Te»ncShPl350— .17 
TalRTsv 0 9.79 —35 


HilncAx 1259 —35) Europen 1259 —25) Equity 
HllhCrp 19.09 —71 I FtnSven 1579 —19 — 

Intlp 1072 —501 GaMn *96*56 

WIB 1036 -51 ( Growth np STS —13 

Japan p 1272 —10 . Himscn 3651 -77 
LatAmG 2454 +.I7| HiYldnp 754 —07 
Indlnca npl23S —.17 
IrtGwn 1171 — E3 
ITOIGrn 1653 —53 
Leisure n 212* —js 
PocBasn 1574 -58 


Lot AntGB 2*18 +.17 
Ptxifp 13.17 —55 
POtifB 1339 —55 
Strut A px 1154 —SO 
SttWBx 1154 —49 


S&P50O 10.17-53! ItStlnD 9.9S -32 
Stock n 1426—371 IrtKEoA 1155—17 
Lazoiri Group: I AAlMuA 9.96 —09 

1457 —53 MNMUA 1073 —35 
1252 — .15 LntAmAr 16.95 +.14 
1152 —.13 ! MftlrsA 8.12 —37 
1*97-15' MunLtdA 9.92—31 
1*15 -35! MutnTrA 1033 — SB 
957 —.03 * MNotlA 1438 —39 
750 —36 ; NJMA 1070 —07 
NYMnA 1173—10 


VBondn 5475 -33 


1056 —07 PerHCGn 1X82 — 3« 
1072 — 36 |PtdaFUnd *65 —ID 


totSC 

Smew 

SpEq 

SfrgYd 

LebenNY 


CAIns 

CAVdl _ , _ 

FL Vet 1407 — 34 IPboeaix Series: 

Inst AMT) K70 —44. BOGoFdx1573 —29 
MD Vat 1034 —35 : CaTTxE p 1X28 -SX, 


MA Ins 
MAVrt 
Ml Vd 
MuniBd 
NJVd 
NY bis 


MnTxtlp 494 —05 
NJTxAp 9.02 —05 
NwOpAp2554 —70 
NYTXAp 496—37 
NYOpAp 855 — B* 
OTCEd 1132 —36 
OhTxll p 857 —35 
PATE 9.18-35 
TxExAp 496 -38 


TeteB 1*76 —22 ( SeHnem np671 —34 
Telecom 1*84 —52 TxFregnpl559 — .11 
WWwp 17.04 -571 Techn 23.98—132 
tiltdwa 1*94 -51 TcKttri 1934 —26 
GeDepRMds I USGovtnp 7.42 — 08 


ABC p 1416—32 
Asset np 2358 —40 
ConvSc prill 79 
Ealnc p 1178 —.17 
GflroCPn 9.99—32 
GtCartvn 1052 — 33 
GfTelp 9.89 —.14 
Growth rv2X90 —JO 
SmCdpG 1773 —51 
Value p 1133 —IS 
Galaxy Funds 
AssetAB n 1082 —51 
CTMun 930 — 37 
EqGrttl 1378 —52 
&7fVot 1X95 -53 


Value p ll JO —13 j Eqincmn 1X42 —.17 


FtagsNp Group: 
AATEap 10.78 -38 
AATEC p 1077 -JOB 
AZTE Ap 1073 -38 
CTTEAp 1058 —37 
COTEp 9.79 —38 
FLTEp 1459—07 
GATEAO 1441 -38 
GkJRbox 1774 —43 
IntTEp 1051 —11 


HiQBd 1072-36 
IntBd 1416 —06 
Intern n 1X60—11 
MAMun 950 -37 
NYMun 1052—38 
STBdn 1031 —03 
SmCOEanlXdf— 21 . 
TE Band n1057 —36 f 
Gat ewuy Funds: 


urnn 1052 —.07 
VatEq 1758 -55 
IrrvPflnp 935 —32 
InvPfNY 1X07 —03 
InvTrGvtBt 953 -36 
WeiFdnp 1*93-53 
JP Growth 1*98 -55 
JP income 957 —36 


Bcrxtn 979 —04 
Diversifd n103S —.15 
Em«MJc&th41 —08 
InttEqty n 143* —.15 
ST Bond n 934 . 

SmaHCbnl490 -.17 
SelEatyn 1495 —51 
Jodrtan Naliofiafc 
Grawih 1494 -54 
Income 1037 —36 
TaxEx 1437 -55 
TotRtn 1468 —15 
Janus Fond: 

Botonced n1X30— .13 
“ rprn 21.96 -54 
xExn*91 -35 


10.18 —05 '. CaoApp 1879—57 
950—04 CvFdSer x1833 — 29 

1058 —04; EqMJpp 759—13, 

9.12 —32 | Growth 20.96 —44 [ TFtnAp 1*N —09 

10.15 —05.' H&Yreid 936 — 34 j TFHYA 1*56—10 

1032 —Ot . InGrAPX 970—24 TFHYBt 1*56—10 
1044—04; IrtGrBIX 9.60 —521 TFlnBt 1*95—09 
1432 —34 1 inti 1X47 —24 Texas P 936 —35 

1411—36 1 MutFlAp 1X86 —39 USGvA p 1235 —37 

10.17— 04- MUIRBP 1234 — 39 


LeebPern i486 +32 

LeggMosmt PocA 2133—55. NY Vd 

AmerLd P 9.95 —16 PA MA 11.13 —39 ■ OH Vd 

GtfGovtp 933— 03 PhnxA 1357—13 PA Vat 

GvtlndnplOlB —31 SpVlA 1*55-31 VAVd 

HJYldp 1435 — 31; SnDvA 1X77 — IE OVB Ftnxta : StOcJcFd 1356—54 

InvGrnp 1001-37- STGiAO 870-35, Co»ApoA405S —55’ TE Bd 11.12—07 
MdTFp 1*94—33; TechA 529—55 . EmGrmAtC56 — 58i TolRetP 1550—12 
PATFp 1*39 —091 TXMA 1459—39; GavtSecA n?70 —35 J USGvB 973—35 
Srtnvnp 2X93 -58; WktlncA 930 — .05 ‘OofcHalln 1*40 +38 9/tdOpP 1047—16 
TxFrtnf p 1*12 —37 AtSRB 978 —31 lOdanrit 2X74 —58 ' PterpanTFds: 

ToiRst np 1*00 —12 i AmorlnBt 935 — 52 Ocxmnft t*S8 — 57 • Bornln 1412—04 
VdTrnp 1954 — 76. AZMBt 1449 -39 .OberweN 2239 —80 TEBondnll33 — 35 
— Grp: | BdBt 1X11—11 OcEOnTEp 1079 —35 ' ErrisMEq If 59 —38 

n 1338 —181 BcSVIBI 2X32 —29 iQtSJtxyn 9 £7 —31 | Equilyn 1973—58 
1276—26 CWMnBt 1179— 12 OWlntl 1430—12. CcPAppn2X26 — 57 
GNMAtl 839-35. CAMS 971 —ID OtdDomm 1931 —281 IntfEqn 1131—16 

Global n 1192—101 CaPRfflt 2778 —3! Olympic 1*1* )PilBax£G 1356—32 

GoftWn *75 -58 I CPHlBt 856 —06 ■' Balanced n 1657— 19- PitoriraGrp: 

Gttilncn 16A4 —57 ' drtvGdB 1172 — ^ 11 • Eclnon 1S5B — 57 ARS111 752 
Sr Gowtn 934— 011 CptTBt 1175—10’ Win 17.41—15 ARS1V 75* — 31 
Stst 458 +.17 I Drcusp 1*17 -31 One Group: AUS l-A 732 — 33 

Stlmr 231 -39. EuroB t 1454 —16 Aset All p M.M —11 

TE Bd n 1070 —361 FedSecB t 976 — 36 ’ BluCEqA 1337 — 27 


GovtBdn 9.91 -35 ‘ FWncn 933 —35 


KYTEAp 1034—08! IndxPIn 1538 —24 | Fundn 1958 -51 


KSTEp 1405-39 
LATEAp 1467 —07 
LMTE p 1470—36 
MITE A p 113? -37 
MOTEAP10.T3 —08 
Ml TEC P 1130 -38 
NCTEAP 1050 —36 
NMTEp 937 -3B 
NYTEp 1073—39 
OHTEA pi 170 —36 
PATEAp 1053 —36 
TflTEAo 1499 -38 
IffllAp 1052—11 
VATEAp 1035 —37 
Flex Funds: 


SWRWG 1477 _ 
GnSecn 1279 —17 
Gintel Group: 

Erisanp 2635— 257 


GWlFdn^Kg-177 


Gteronede 

Equity n 1370 «-56 
tntGavn 1435—35 
Irtn 1X38-39 
Muninln 1057 —IB 
SmCcwn 1*62 -53 , 
OtreeintA 937 —33 


Grthlnc 1432 
IntGvt 530 —31 
Mercury 1X12—10 

Verern 4970 -57 
WrtdW 2559 —27 
JaPrtiFdn 1X0 
Jctui Hancndc 


CATEf 1135 —11 

DScvBl 953 -52 


GotoenoakDIBjM —55 
Gddman Sachs r ’ 


Growth p 1*96 ■ 


Bandtto 1972 —50 
Gtotoon 971 *36 
Growth rvIXOl —57 
Mutrfdton 573 — Ob 
Fontaine n 1473 —37 
Perth Fuad* 

AstAflp 1470 —50 
COPAPP 2*43—150 
CtaitlP 1750—70 
FrdUCTP 2951 —32 
GtoGrtho 1*78 — 50 
GovTR p 833 —07 
Grwth P 2832— 131 
HiYMp *83 —.03 
TF MN 1057 —06 
TFNct 1055 —38 
TFNY 1135 -35 
USGvt 9.45 —37 
Fortress Invst 
AdiRtht 954 —04 
Bond nt 978 —13 
GlSIrn 835-35 
Munlncl 1475 —00 
OHFortP 17.17 —10 
Utilrx 1276 —.17 
44 well Ed *62—34 
Forum Fund* 

InvSnd 1078 —07 
InvStk 2J0 — 35 
ME Bnd 1454 —.06 
TaxSvr 1044 —05 
Fduadere Group: 

Batnp 9.14 — 39 
BlueChp np653 —.13 
Discvp 2159 
Frntrnp 2753 — J6 
GavSec 932 —37 
Grwihnp 1232 — 30 
Passprtn 10.10 —51 
Spedpn 7.83-55 
WIdwGrp1733 —55 
Foutada Square Fds: 
BalancBdx93B —50 
GovtSecx 933 —36 
MidCapx 1455 —20 
QuolBdx 931 —09 
QurtGrx 937—18 
FrmfcSn Group: 

AGE Fund 232 —33 
AdrtJSp 975 —03 
ARS 935 —31 
ALTF 1136— 35 
AZTF 1152—05 
Bdlnvp 21.97 —08 
CAHYBdp9.97 —37 
Colins 1X07 —36 
CA Werml8J8 —05 
CalTFr 731 —02 
CO TF 1174—35 
CTTF 1096 —08 
Cvreec 1X73 —10 
DffTC 92 9 —JO 
Equity *95 —.17 
EqfriC 1197 —18 
FIST ARS P936 —01 
FedWerm 1039—35 
FedTX 1103 —04 
FLTFInp 9.72—11 
FL TF 1134—06 
GATF 1154— 36 
GKSvinc 830 —.12 
GiLtmp 1272 —.06 
Goto 1557 +78 
Growth 1*30 — J8 
HYTF 1133 —37 
HIMuBdelBJ? —10 


. . . . Sachs Fmty: 
CtaGr 1658 —17 


Gtolnc 1*24 —12 

Grtnc x 1*27 —25 

IntlEq 17.18 -JO 

MunillK 1335—12 
SetEq 1577 -54 

SmaQw 2031 +35 

Gafclmm) Sachs litsf: 
AiOGv 9.91 —31 

GovAfl 9.91 —31 

SJirtTF 9.98 — 32 

ST Gov 937 —03 

Govett Funds: 

DvinBd 855 —76 
EmgMk 1*63—70 
GlGVIn 956 —18 

IllftEq 1X53—27 
PfcStg *98 —18 

SmCOs 1753 —71 

GvtEqtyn 2379 


LTGvAp ? bS -32 


EstVdPn2371 —54 
GovlneP 1X87—10 
OHTFP 1236 —10 
OppVqTp T*68 -50 
GHMNTE 1407 —OS 
GHNatTE 1050 —03 
Greanspmsl471 t .13 
Guvdksi Funds: 
AstAitoc 1134—12 
GBGInfl 1X15 —12 
Bond n 1X02 —05 
PorkAv 29.12- 
Stocfcn 2972-70 
TaxEx 970 —07 
US Govt 1035- 
WnnsEqp 1X93- . 
HTMflRp 1037 —33 
HcnitnCotO 9.11 

Hanover bnrFdc 
BiDtGr 1026 —.17 
ST Gv 923 —01 
SmCoGr 1076—15 
US Govt 932 —35 
Hottax Foods; 

Band 1131 —36 
CopApp n 1675 — 72 
Grourttin 1375 —41 
Intln 2199 —28 
IntlGr 1078 +52 
ShtOurn 9.11 —3! 
Vatuen 1330 —18 
Heartland FdK 
LtSGvtp 9.96—38 
Value P 2S.lt —36 
WIW 1030 -31 
Hercules Rmd: 

Euro VI 1413 —II 
LAmrVal 1124 —14 
MAmrGrin 9.99 — 06 
PdBVrt 10.12—35 
WtoBd 979—08 
Herifaae Funds: 
COPAPP P 1*92 —26 
Divine P 1428 —05 
btcGrp 1170 —17 
LMGavp 952 
SmCcpSpl*90 —23 
HlghMarK Pitods 
Bdancen 933 —11 
eandn 1071 —M 
GovtBdn 976-32 
Growth!) 1436 — 25 
IncGrii 935—17 
tocnEq 1129 —15 
SpGrEan 1*56 —41 
HWardGr 1579 —27 


MATEf 1151 —39 
MqTEB 1174 -.07 
NYTElP 11 J5 —10 
STSfrntS 876 —02 
SaelEAp 1539 —SB 
SPdEBp 1*79 — J9 
SpOojA 876 —22 
SpcOpsB 874 -22 
Strtnetp 774-37 
TaxEx tp 1469 — 

J Hancock Freedm; 
AvTech 1128 — 
EnvmA p 827 —22 
GHnBt 9.01 —10 
GtobAP 1355 —21 
GtobBt 1X19—21 
GltnA 932 -39 
GiabRX 1727 - 
GiTedt 1*55 — 54 
| GddA 1532 -34 
GoJdBI 1528 —03 
' PacSas 1421 —17 
RBBtoA 2029 +35 
RgBkBt 2021 +36 
J Hancock Somm 
Ash A 1X09 — 24 
AdlBf 1X03 — 24 
BdAp 1071 —14 
BalBo 1450 —14 
BondAtP 1531 —08 
InvAp 1*82 —24 
invfle 1430 -25 
USGvA p 9.92 — 34 
USGvB I 9.91 — 33 
JiVBaf 1320 —13 
KSMun 1X41 —37 
KSIMunU 1220 -39 
Koufmroinr 374 —07 


WldEm 1271 

liberty Family: , FdFTBt 15J7 — 28 EaindxA T23« — 57 ■ ARSII 

AmLdr 1*11—28, FdGrBt 9.95— IS’ G.ArmAn992 —31 i AtfiUS 

'AD 1378 — .10 i GJAtB t 1329 — 12' GvBdAp 921 —06: AtfiUSII 

PX11A3— .18- GtBdBt 974—39 IncEqA 1378 —20 ; AU$111 
GICvBt 1497 —36. mcomeBd 978 — 35 , CcUflp 

GtRsBt 1*67—59- tnlFxl 1036 — 34 GNMA 

GtUlBt 1X81 -.13 InrTFA . 10J6 —34 ; WYMo 


ArfiLS IV 7.18 —32 
ARS I 7.12—01 


UtaApx 953 —T9 
VStDAP 777—19 
VpyAp 1135 
ACgBt 1436 
AStoBf 1X70—13 
BtGvSt *81 —01 
CATxBI *42 —05 
ConvBtx 1950 —45 
Dvrtrfit 1X47—37 
EuGrfll 1151 
GeaBt 1377 —.16 
FLTxBt 930— 37 
GK3r8t 955 —39 
GrtnBt 1352 —22 
HBhBt 2*90—69 
HfYltSBI 1X11 —37 
IncomeBt *95—03 
tovSt 41* —20 
MATxBt 927— 36 
MuniBf *93—36 


•2D; FLMBf 1031—10 DscVcdA 1233—21 ARS l-A 725 —01 ' NJTxBt 932 — 34 


EqJncCtxlLf? —191 
FTiefn 1*64 —19 


726 
*99—32 
7.10 —33 
7.10—32 
728 —07 
1117 —36 
*44—01 


NwOppB 12536 —79 
NYTxBI 495—07 
DTCBt 1174—36 
TxExBI 496 —38 
USGvB t 1X92—07 
UtrffitX 950—18 
VistaBt 773 —18 


Fur* • iojo —.14 ... __ ... _ .... .... ... 

HilncSd 1128 — 35 GrJRB t 1724—43: InflEoAn 1X37 — 15 MaoCcp 1278 —27 VbyBt 1175—56 
MnSc 1157 —07 HeoithBl XH -37 . LgCoGr 1176 —22; STMMH 772 — 01 )OtxnflimvB Grain: 

— *—• “ BostForGr 1024 — .10 

BostGratrUL29 —30 
BasNum01*44 —49 
1*58—50 


USGvtCp 7.97-34 
USGvSecA 7.98 -33 
LftilFd 1124—11 
UfflFdCt 11.M —17 
La*rty Fkaadak 
Gthrnc 1034 —13 
toSMunl 1455— 36 
TF Band UUS -34 
US Gov 930 —34 


Util 1124 —12 
LTMFtVp 935-33 


LmtTrmpx 9.94 —37 


Kemper Funds: 
AdlGcv 879 


BlueChp 1X73 —31 
Calif 756 -34 
Divlnco 436—03 
EnvSvc 1X91 - . • 
FLTx 1022 — 35 
Gfclnc 484—07 
Grlh 1173 - . . 
HfYIeld 1415 —03 
income 871 - . 
taiNFund 1071 —.14 
MuniBd 1410 —05 
NYTF 1027—06 
OHTF 978 —04 
Retiroi 1173 —17 
Rufina 1X0* —.17 
Re(ire3 1451 —15 
Retire* 973 — 1* 
Retires 873 —13 
ST Glob 7.16 -35 
SmCPEq *15—15 
Technol 1077 —S* 
TXTF 1022 —33 
TatRefrn 979 —23 
USGvt *85-34 
Kemper lawk 

Diwlncl 620 —02 

Gvtt 7.15 — 33 
Gwthf 1778—78 
HTYtot *31 -33 
STGCf 7.14 —OS 
snhntl 122-31 
SmCpEq 11134 -28 
TdRetf 1*09—23 


Wvn 2778—17 
Fundn 3*06 -52 
Uttln 10.95 —27 
Loomis Saytes 
Bond n 1138 —JH 
GtoBdn 1465—11 
Growth!) 1330 —33 
Gr&ln 1X80 —18 
IrttEa n llto—12 
smeopn 1*32 —27 
LardAbbett: 

AJHWP 1458-20 
BflndDebp?32 -35 
DevefGthp)074 — 4? 
Eh 1990 n 1*14 —21 
FdVatUP 7X87 -24 
GiEqp 1X48—13 
GflrtCP 878 —38 
GovKeep 233 -.02 
NatTFTr *77 — JM 
ToxFrp 1120— 38 
TFCTP 1023 -39 
TxFfCdlpiaSl —.10 
TF FL P 438 —05 
TFMOP *18—04 
TFNJp *18—04 
TaxNYP 1125 —08 
TFTXp 1035 — 37 
TFPAp *02—35 
TF HI p 428—04 
TF Ml *93 —04 
TFWAp *96—35 
VatuApp pi 106 —.17 
US Govt *77 —04 
Lutheran Bros 
BraHiYd 971 -31 
Fund 1779 —70 
Income x 8J9 —09 
Mlutl *38—08 
OppGr 1463—26 
MAS Fund* 

Balanced n 7 LS5— 18 
EmerGrnl773 —78 
Equity n 2132 —78 
Fxdlnlln 11.07— 37 
Fxdlncn 1172 —.08 
GiRdn 1002 —05 
HYSecsn 975 -37 
rrHEQH 1*75—25 
LtOOUTFI n!074 — 37 
MritfkFc 1029 -33 
MunFxl 1073—09 
SeiEqn 1737 —.<0 
SrtFln 10A0 —06 
SeJValn 1355—25 
5mCpVl n 1833 —24 
SpFIH 1239 -38 
Vrtuen 1273 —20 
MFS 
MITAP 1131 —23 
MIGAP 1138— 23 
BorxlAp 1338 -38 


InriEqBt 11 JO —17 ; LflCflVol 1158—17 ShrtTrp *74-31 
GWdB 1X19 -.19 UVolA 1457 -32 ■’ PSBar Rmta 
LtdAmB f 162! +.14 OHA/luA 1488 —34 I BaX^An 1077 —12 
MAMBf 1459— 08 1 SmCoGr 1777 -501 EqAoAn 1X64 -56 
MIMUBI 936 —.09 • TFBdA 9M-MI EqGrAn lOW —23 
MNMfil 1073 —38 . lllCorco 9.91—38 EqlnA 1034—18 
MnlraBt 412 -37 .lUCortC 1051 -35 FxdWA 1419-37 
MnLhfflt 9.92— OT;OppMtaimarFcfc MmGvA n!4l3-35 

MutatB 1403—08! AssetA nxH92— 25 1 fUMuA n 1072 — 05 
MNrttBt 1037 -39 r CATE A pi 004 —37 j STInvAn 938 _ 

~ P 1X95 -35 Pioneer Funtfc 
P 3835 — 130 Eqlncp 1*15 



_ . Tl 
bP 2234 —22 
rpx 1533 -28 
rp)038 —15 


NJMBt 1031 ... 

NYMnBl 1174 —10 | 

NCMBt 1052 -30 1 
OHMBt 1003 — 38 , 

PocBI 2136-24 
PAMBt 11.13—39 

PhrocBt 1X52 —14 * ... 

ST GIB t 830—051 «ObrtAp3*50 -SB 
5PV1Bf 16.14 .1 GtobIBt 3455—59 

StrOvBt 1174—19] Gotop 1*73 +.40 
TechBt *11—25' GvtSecA plOKJ — M 
TX MB I 1459— 391 HTrtdA 1428 —08 
UflklB ! *31—11 HYIdBr 1427 — 38 

WWtncSt 9.00—35) InsTEAp 1630 — 06 
MontiKmFds | mtrTEP 1*58—06 
ARAB nt 1)38 —33 ; InvGrAP 1470 —07 
CBpAppf 1493— 33 MnStCA 1X18 — 37 
FtexBdfnl426 _ MS1ncGrA3*68 —05 
Grin 1139 —JO * ! MfalncA 1171 —35 
MetLHe Stalest: l NYTaxAplXdl —35 

CcoAnA 1079 —73 NYTJtBtntX42 — 05 


PX 902 —25 1 Amertcp 1029 — 04 
tx 9 29 " - - - 


Bandp 973 —35 
CDPGTP 1637 —17 


Gold 854 +70 
Growth D 1X44—25 


CttoApe 1074 . _ 
CflpApC 1053 —73 
EatncA 1134 —07 
EoltxC 1133 —37 
EqhivsIA 1326 —31 
EalnvC 1329 —51 
GovSecA 7.19—04 
WlncA 6*6 —33 
HHncB 655—02 
lnt£qp 1058—17 
InttFxlnf *05 +32 
MgdAstB 927 —10 


MpdAstA 950 — 
ModAstC 951 — 
RsChBatC 975 — . 
TaxExA 7.99 —OS 
TxExB 729 —05 
MIMutoc 1470-38 


AaHJSGvt 9.97 +31 
Govtp 9.95 ~ 

WGvp 1474 —06 
Le&hUlilA 1475 
LesMTsyA 932 —07 
OHTF 1X06 —06 
TFWp 1038 —35 
USGavLM 838 —39 
Monefta 1*15 —2* 
MonettMC 1337 _ 


fA p 1907 — s 


Divin 

Gvt 

Growth 


*21 -32 
7.15 —.03 
17.96 —49 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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P 1152 _ 

GvUAp *76 —33 
GvMgAp *63—32 
GVSCAP 956—04 
HilncAp 555 —04 
IrtOpAP 739 —37 
LWMAP 725 — sn 
RschAP 1330—26 
SeolAP 1333 
ToJRAP 1X15—18 
UI8AP 738 —36 
VatoAP 1026—17 
WoGvAP 1154 — .12 
WoGrA .1*85—13 
WaTotApl030 —14 
MuBdA 1490 —07 
MllHiA 9^6 - 

AflULtA 753 —02 
JMtlALAP 1038 —Oe 
MUARAP 931 -35 
MuCAAP S59— 34 
MUFLAP 932—39 
MilGAAp 10*3 —04 

MuMAApll.14 —47 
MuMDA Pi 1.14 —07 
MuMSAP 9AI —35 
MuNCAP 11J3— At 
MUNYAP1473 — 06 
MuSCAP 1236 —06 
MVTNAP1446 —OS 
MuVAA DT131 —37 
MI4WVAP11A3 — « 
COpGBf 1*05 — 27 
BandB 1336 — 38 
EmGfBt 1931 —53 
GakSt 733 +24 
OvMBBt *62 — 33 
QvSCSt 935 —35 
HllnBt S-3S —04 
IrdmBt —37 

MAITB 11-57 - 

MuBdB 1039 —07 
Sects t 1101 —25 
TotRSf JIM 
WoEqB f 1*60—36 
WoGvB 1131 —11 
WaGrB 1630 — M 
WOTOfB 1027 —.14 
MulnB I 823 —35 


FxIrUp 2138 
Gwmtp 2*12 _ 
OhTflD 2131—07 
FxInT 2138 -39 
GratoT 3*n -05 
IrtEqT 2X66 -JO 

Mtoek 9.17 —09 
Oh TFT 2131 
stBcrr 2008 —33 
MDhttGtopllJQ +77 
Monitrtip 17.12—19 


Montgomery Fds 
EmaMW 1*35 —14 


1*54—28 

n1*22 . 

Growth n 1532 —17 
InstEMtct «t*69 —23 
Wf15mCaplJ34 —22 
ShOurGf 9.97 
SmCapn 1836 —55 
ALorg 5toa Rta 


Astori3rA15.lt —02 
AsianGB - 


15,10 

GtobEqA 1X11 —27 
GJob&jS 1233— 28 
MtorgnGreaWfc 
Emerg&q 935 —S3 
Fjcrnan 1028 —07 
lntSmCPnl(L53 —36 
MuniBd 1066 —35 
MroKoSP P ti-52 —17 
More San tart* 
ActCtryn U31 
AsianE4 n2033 —02 
Bal 959—09 
EmGr 1650 
EmMto 1733 —28 
EmM«M>f«3l 
EqGrn TX47 
FVtUnc 103T 
GEqty 1X63 —20 
GIFxinn 1038—13 
HiYIdn I0J5— 35 
blttSCn 1628 • 

IntlEq 1423 .„ 

RaplYldn 924—19 
VahMEqnllJl —XI 
SCVdn 11.14— 39 
MuhierUcmcWW —19 
MuirCATF 1*13 —12 
MunMIGB 1022 —28 
MuilBnft 1852 —13 
Mutual Series 
Beacon n 3XT2 —24 


Oppen 11.10 —18 
PATE A pi 221 —31 
ScedAP 2822 —M 
StrlneAP 531 —34 
SlrtncBI 532 — 34 
StgSTlAp *72—31 
ShnGrAp 536 —09 
SrlnvAp *«— 01 
Tafpetp 3*09—66 
TtfrBt 9.82 — 34 
TxFrAp 932 -34 
Tlmep 1826 
TorRtARX 824— 19 
TotRTBmxB39— 18 
U5Gvtp 953 —05 
Vrt51ApKU38 —33 
Overtand Bcpress: 
AslAUA 1179 — 23 
CATFA 1132— 37 
MrtncA 1020 —38 
StretGrA 1X60 —43 
ST Govt 5134 -33 
USGtoA 10*5—36 
VRGA 939 - 

PBHGGrn 1577 —49 
PFAMCaPdx 
Baton 1040 —13 
CapApn 1X70 —56 
DivLown 11.93 —23 
EmeraMKtUJO— 25 
EnrtStn 1128 —20 
Eqlncn 1136—37 
Intln 1170—10 
ModBdfn 935 —05 
MWCao 14*1 —36 
SmCpG 1? AO —40 
SmCPV 13J0 -.18 
UtlStfcn 925 —13 
PtMCO Funds: 

TotRetn 10J3— 38 
TR1II 923 —07 
LflwOurnlOO/ — 32 
LEW I 9.98 —34 
SwrrT n 9.93 —31 
Frenn 1X14 —12 
Gfatoafn 923— M3 
HTYld 1X77 —06 
Grata n 1*17—29 
LTUSGn 10.11 —09 
PNC Fuads 
SdancsSx 1 242—23 
Brtane 1242 —23 
CoreEql x 9.95 —23 
CoreEoSx 9.95 — 22 
Growthl 1024 —50 
WxEqX 1070 — Jl 
InimBtJSx 959 —07 
fnfGvfSx 1034 —38 
blfTBdlx 9J9— 37 
IrrfGovtl X 1034 —08 
InttEa 1X14 —17 
InftEqS 1X14 —17 
*4anao«fi»0J4 —10 
MBnaoe(tSR34 —10 
PATFP 7X17-36 
STBdl 931 -31 
SmC0PVS1192 —39 
SmCooVI 1X93 —09 
Vofuef x M38 —30 
Values x 1138 —29 
PRARtfyn 1X17 +38 
PocSfiCUS 959 —36 
PodfiaGrtti 90S —22 

fib ■ i iTtr ■ ■ — r — 

ruOifC nonzexv 
AgGr p 2534 —26 
CATFp 728 —05 
Coplncq 1520 —31 
USGv 936 —35 
PDCffiCOFdS 
APresro 1X13 
Balance 1225-15 
CA TF 1X76—36 
EqVOt 1X76 —20 


Income p 938 —36 
Europe p 1820 —27 
Wonrf=dp2125 —51 
PSnMBdpl027 —06 
infISr 2)24 
Piore-llp 1837 _. 
PioThreep2T37— 31 
ST Inc 190 —01 
TaxFreepiXOS — v06 
US Gv p 1X07 —37 
WnthREI 1X78 +.14 




Bdlricn ‘ 9.16 —11 
Stklncn 1031 —M 
StaGran 1149 —58 
StaApn 1*00—53 
MIMDC Foods 
ASStAfl 1169—24 
FXdlocm 1033— 09 

invl 1743 —33 

1X10 —10 


bMRM=S 

MMPxmtnx9M —36 
MSBFdn 1740-56 
MdcfceitrieGfw: 
AdKJvAp 974—01 
AmerFdplXOl —IS 
CAMun P1XI7 —37 
GwrtS 1X49 —36 
FUrtncP 1030 —07 
Glotxd 1X54—25 
LfflNaiP 1024 —34 
NY Mun p 93 2 —34 
NotMuP 938 —05 
N Amar p *96—38 

t— 

OlinoAt 9.77 +.13 


Drtpayry t33I — to 


Ouatfdn 2730 
Shares n 80.95— 152 
MCCFOadL 
EauitylP 1X69 —16 
FxtSncSplXSi —05 
OHTSp 1035 — 36 
EquifyR 01321 —16 
FxdineR 01032 —05 
OH TER pl03! —06 
NOTxFrtrn 941 +35 
NWM. Nartasfarc 
WYWA 533 —34 
tncGrAx 1X19 —24 
MuflfA 451 —06 
MYLtalBRta 
6AFS 1X58 —IS 
Band 927 —05 
GrEq 1*13 —44 
indxBd >002 —05 
indxEq 1325 — ’ 31 
MuffA 1I-S4 —.16 
ST Bd 1028 
ValEq 12-95 —39 
NHInd 1X55—22 
HafleasFisata 
ArtRflAp 9*2 —02 
AdiRlTA n 9.BJ — 37 
BOllCtX 1132 —20 
BCJTAnx 1136— 20 
CpGTATTxH- 53— «1 
DhrHCf 10J8—07 
OMTAfl 1058 —37 


ErnGTA H —46 


EolnaCtall46-51 
EtdnIA 1146 —21 


BrtancP 1230 —17 
EmertSr 2042—76 
Govtn 923 —.10 
Grtnc 1028 —19 
tnstGv 1X78 —.14 
InstGvAdi 933 —32 
MNTE 1X76 
NatlTE 1X74 —09 
PqcEwG 1*34 —21 
Sector p 1770—25 
Value p 1952 —46 
PlprTriD 972 " 

PiprTrShD 938—31 
PtartTNbc 1050—08 
Portias Fds 
Bal K n 2X99 
Bdldx 2752 —16 
Eqhxta 3165 —72 
Grtnc n 2324—44 
IntSdM 1033—34 
A4k7Grt.il 2253 —34 
STBandnl(LZ5 —02 
SoGrn 3434—45 
TIcEmBd n 1X03—32 
PtetetTed Group: 
AsuetAn 10J4 —21 
Fxdln n 1X07— 04 
Growth n 1334 —58 
Win 1226 —52 
ST Gov n 920 —07 
Vatuen 11*6 —16 
Price Foods 
AdiUS *73 
Balance 1179—14 
®OiG 1151 -20 
Carrxn 10.15 —OB 

CnpAOrn 1XM —08 
WvGron 1146—11 
Eqincn 1*66 -18 
Eqktxn 1358 -50 
Europe n 1X00 —18 
FEFn 1162 -.16 
FUnsIntnIXis —04 
GNMn 940 —07 
GATFn 1038—07 
GfcGv 903 —35 
Growth n 3025 —59 
Gwtatnn 1*42 —29 
HiYIdn X93 — U 
Incomen 8.96— 34 
InttBdn 932 —10 
InftDisn 17.18— 59 
IntSIkn 1127 —13 
JCM)I) 11.17—38 
LatAmn 949 +22 
MdSWft 535 —OT 
MdTxFrniXifl —07 
AEdCapn 15.14 —55 
NewAmt»27.9S —43 
N Ada it 1X19 —17 
New&u n2X17 —10 
NwHrznni*03 —42 
NJTFD 1035 — CB 
NYTxFn 1047 —37 
OTCn 1*59 —11 
SdTcJlII 19 Jl —78 
STBdn *94—32 
STGtbn *64 —03 
SmClri 1522 —07 
SpecGr 1139 —18 
Soecto 1080 —09 
TxFreen 941 —07 

TxFrHY n!126 —38 

TFindn 1042—06 
TxFrSIn *28—32 
US Ml 524 —31 
US Lang 1X16 —38 
VATFn 10J3 —07 
PrfcnrvTn 1158—13 
PrvtipIPresv: 


OhrAch 1326 — 33 


Govlnco 1X10 —09 
STCAn 1030 —01 


ASSAP 1128 —21 
ATLAp 1633 — 4l 
BtoeAp I5J2-JB 
CcfTAp 1135-39 
GoaAAp 1X35 - 
CmTCA 941 —15 


DvGrA p 2006 —56 
GurtW “ “ — 


__tGrAp 905 —56 
GEnAI 1171 —04 
GIMAP 


1X63—39 


GIG1AP 1134 — ^ 


GrthAp 2X75 
tfltaAP *92 —33 
mcAp 9.91 —39 
InvGiAp 1041 —09 
MHInAP 1X40 —10 
NTacA P 1107 —38 
NVTxAP TX70 —38 
ROQFAp 1742—05 
STGVIAP X46 
SmCapA 1075 —38 
USGvA p 9 j» —07 
UttAp 933 —36 
AsstBl 1154 —21 
ATLBt 1*77 -40 
Bluest 1*13 —28 
Carre 1 1134—3? 
CeaABt 1X74—40 
CitVTcB 958 -.15 
DvGrSl 20J8— V 
EuGrBI 9JQ —28 
GrthBt 2029—32 
GiEne T 1176 —04 
GnnBt 1039— .10 


GovtPrt 934 .. . 

InsTEx 938 —35 
SP100P1 1*97 —55 
TEPft *96 —05 
PrirtWBS 922 —.10 
PrincarFupOs 
BOW 1176 —56 
Bond 1132 —07 
CapAcc 2051 —37 
EmoGr 2531 —47 
Govt 1131 —11 
Growth 3077 —46 
Mamed 1207 — U 
TE Bd 1129— 36 

unim« 9.99 —10 

World 7.17 —.07 

mmw 1075 —20 

PlFFxdlnc n 9,9* —34 
PtFlnlMu IO10.90 —05 
PnwtoY Couuset 
EndvGtf 1146—55 
MdGrta 11J6 —34 
&1lCapGr 1X89 —47 
TYUdSpcnp 7.66 —13 
PNdHfidRMft 
JWjA 1320 —43 
NfctiB 1231 — 42 
AiRAf 9J9— 31 

BlackGv 944 
CAbiA P 1056 —06 
EOUlAp 1194 _ 50 
EdfncA x 1199 —58 
FICnAlx 1126 — 22 
GtObAp 1359—11 
GIASA 1.83 —31 
GWJAhi 1X96—25 

Gv^lto 8.93 —34 
GtOOAp 1*63 —27 
HiYMAlP X57 — oa 
InVcrA tp»17.12— 27 
MultiAp 1X51 —24 


NYTE 1X97—10 
Opoort 1807 —18 

SmCx» 1*95 —.19 
USGov 1141 —08 
RBB Gvt Ox 1032 -.11 
RCMFund 2102 +39 
RSI Trust: 

AcfSd 2641 —14 
Core 3501 
EmGr 3741 —97 
IntBd 2*59 —.05 
ST1F 1835 +31 
Value 2*35 —18 
Rdnbown *41 —11 
ReoGroP 1X52—13 
Regis Fund; 

C&BBal 1238 —la 
C3.fi Eq 1X93—23 
OSt Dv 1X94 —14 
DSILM 957 —04 
FMAspc 1041 —36 
iCMSC 1730 —.15 
SAMI Ptdn929 +31 
SrSoEq n 1726 —56 
SrGwTh n 9.99 —59 
S&STRft 1036 + 31 
SlrSdln 955—18 
SterSTFn 9.96—32 
SKYBIn 1U4 —.14 
TSWEq 10.96 —72 
TONRx 1X11 —36 
TSVVrmi 1255—13 
RchTanan 1X17 —19 
W a n bra ii i r Funds 
Asian 932 +34 
BotTrn 921 
GtFxlnTrnl0.15 — 36 
GwtaTrn 1042 —.19 
(OtlEqTr nlX07 —11 
SIGvFIT 900 -33 
SmCOPT 1046 — SK 
TEFTTrn 951 — 34 
Tax FiTrn 9.92 —04 
VatueTYniX06 —13 
Refte lav Trot: 
Botanced 1745 —51 
EqGro 1X68—46 
Eqtnaan 1X« —54 
Income 1558 —09 
ReYrtfWO) 1*46—47 
RaMlm Group; 
BJusOtp 32J0 —03 
RTFtfnfp35J? —36 
GovSeco 1X15 
Growth P.JX51 
MMCOPP2X13— 01 
SocAwp 2*59 
RlmcoBd 946—05 
RimcoStax1235 —5) 
RTverlnE 1&4S —36 
RrVUrtfGVI 9JB— 05 
RNereWe Cape 
Equity 1354 —19 
FXfflnx 954 —.10 
TNMuC*>xlD36— 39 
RoOertson Stephens 
Contra n 1X15 +54 
ErnGro 2031 —71 
VOlPtus 1*67 —57 
RacheserFds 
BdGrowpljJS —l. 
ttoMup 1*02 —.16 
LtdNYp X26 —32 
Radiey Square: 

Divin p 1X94—34 
Growth P 1*59 —29 
lullEop 1233 —10 
Royce Funds 
PennMu 832 —36 
EoMcx 540 —11 
OTC 642 —03 
Premier n *S7 —as 
Vrtuetn 9.94 —37 
Rush more Grow* 
AmGasn 11J4 —71 
USGLgn 943—11 
USmtn 9ji —06 
MOTFn 1028 —39 
VATFn 1135 — 38 
RydxNovo 1X28 —53 
Wldln 920 —08 
_ W MGf 1*15 -21 
SBSF Funds 
CaoGrn 7.95 —16 
Can «rrtbl n 1222 
»SFn 1*66—06 
sex Funds 
Brtoncp 1X17 —28 
Bandnp 1046 — 38 
Bdtrtox p 10.16 — 3s 
CopGrn 1X03 

QxoQlnpni.96 
GNMA p 941 —09 
IrTrrmdBd 6X15 —05 

ShiGv np 949 —41 

(nffMn p 1X41 —03 
mtGvfrjp 929 —02 
Inti p 1049 —22 
Eqlncnp 1325 —IB 
Eqlndx nplS37 —54 
KSTF 1035 —03 


FranrierA 1135 —50 
CapFdA 1654 
COTxA 754 — 33 
OrtStaA 1X17 —22 
ComunA 1500 —39 
CommunD 1*83—69 
FLTxA 744 —36 
GATxA 732 —07 
G«*mrgA126 —.17 
GfEmsD 11.19—18 
GroerthA 554— -IB 
InasmeA 1*09 — JO 
InaxneD 1*36 —.11 
IntIA 1654—22 
LATxA 829 —36 
MassTxA 7.95 —05 
MDTXA X05 -35 
MTTVCA 830— 34 
MlmTxA 7.94 —01 
MOTXA 723 —37 
NatTTxA 743 —07 
NJTxA 721 —05 
NYTxA 636 —35 
NOtXA 749 —36 
OWaTXA X17— 36 
ORTXA 749 —05 
PATxA 736 —07 
CAHyTXA 649 —33 
CAOTxA *70—06 
SCTxA 736 —36 
US Gvt A p *96 —34 
HiYBdAp 638— 35 
SenRnrt Grom* 
ABBGrth p 5J9 —.15 
BcBanced 0LB3 —31 
Bond cut 629 —06 
CanStk PX2X94— 25 
GvSecspx 93 2 —10 
Growth P 1757—40 
PATF me 1X13 —IT 
TF Inc px 1329 —13 
World p 1X78—10 
SenfryFdn 15.10—14 
Sequoia n 55*9 —50 
Seven Seas Seslas 
Matrix n 1106 —23 
S&PMidn11.99 —26 
SPSXJn 1051 —23 
ST Gvt n 9J5 —02 
YhiPIn 1X00 
1784 Raids 
GovMed 945 —05 
Groinc n 1138—17 
MATEtnn 925 —05 
TExMedn 9.97 — 06 
Sbawmut Funds 
Bcdtncfn pn938— OS 
FxdlnCTr n93B —35 
GrEqfTr 1046 —26 
GrtnCETrdOJ3 —.12 

OXM ^32 
n 903 —03 
.... K1PR03 —03 
LTUlcTr I) 9J3 -31 

SSWIS?^ 

Storm Trust 
CrtAAup 1080—08 

Growth p 12.16 —24 
inHGrp 1020 —15 
NrtMup 1153 -38 
STG)p 139—31 
USGovp 1031 —07 


NY TF C 836 — 36 
Steadman Funds 
Amlnd n 149 —35 
Assoc n 31 —05 

Invest n 152 —35 
Oceoign 241 —14 

Stein Roe Fds 

CanOppn3X23— 1.16 
Gvtlncn 934 —36 
HyMunn 1152 —or 
Incomen 926—07 
hrtmBdn 821 —05 
IntMun n 11.18 —05 
UdMlnn 931 —01 
MedMitn *93— 05 
PriraeEq n1443— 33 
Spedn 2X36 —29 
Stock n 2348—40 
Toffitatn 2600 —39 
sresdane Funds 
Baton px 1126—19 
GrEqpx 1422 —51 
IntBd x 1026 —0B 

LMGovA n 93* —02 
VoWo ffle»13c7 6 —27 
Stratton Funds 
Dividend n27J8— 19 
Growth n 2032—15 
SmCapit 2631 —38 
Strong Funds 
Actvtgne 1X13—04 
AmUtOnx 929 —24 
Asirf»acn 920 —21 
CmStane 1728 — 45 
Dtscovne 1703 —46 
GavScn 1028— 36 
Growthn 1149 —12 
VfiYIMue 905 —09 
Incon 902 —06 
IikMu n 1X87 —37 
frill no 1337—56 
Invst nx 1X79 —48 
MtiriBdn 934 —09 
Opptnty nx2B02— 7B 


STBondn 1036 —03 


MOMut tn1Q42 —36 
UStncI hi 1X21 —33 
USJncTn 1X21 —33 
VafEqJ lrwlX26— 31 
VrtEqT nxlX26 — 51 
VAMuT n 1021 —05 
VaMuntt 1021 —35 


STMunneiX16 _ 
Total nx 2429—52 
smAmarica Fds 
BcriASetA PIX85— 29 
BaiAsetB P1401 — 29 
DivKKBp 437 —.06 
EmGr A p 1746 
EmGrB 1740 —47 
FOcScBp 1029 —02 
GrawtaA pl*76— 47 
HOncBp 821 —JJB 
HBncAp XZ1 —37 
TEInsApIXJD —37 
USGvA X42 — .03 
USGvB P X*2— 03 
VcdueB 1546-28 
TARGET: 
interBdfh 1X02 —05 
WTEall 1342 —23 
LsCapGrn931 —.18 
LflCapV 1031 —15 
MfBBKdftl 906 -36 
SmCapG 1244—57 
SmCapV 1117 +.12 
TaiRtBd 900 —36 
TNEFuiub: 

AcfiUSAP 741 
BolanApx!Z3Q — 27 
BOtanBx 1107 —26 
BdlncAp 1121 —07 
CATFAp 700 —34 
CapGrA p 1*10 -AA 9 
CapGApnlSJB— 49 
GtObGAPllJO —39 
Gri)pApxlXS4 —52 
GvScAp 1127— 35 
GwttlA p 1X33—55 
HitflCAp 1X02—34 
IntBtAP 1*39—21 
lntEqB pn!553 —21 
LtdUSA 1X16—04 
MOKTAP1X36— .14 
TxExAp 704 —05 
VafueAp 736—23 
TRAK Fuads 
lntrFxrac XT2 -37 
WiftEan 1X12— 06 
InttFxnx R27— 37 
LsGran 936 —31 


VanKantPMI 

CATFAP17.15 wu 
GwttlA P 1932 ^ 
MYWAp W23>jS 
InTFAP 180* 
MunJnA p 15.19 -tj 
M ulncBt 1*17 4 
PA TFAp 17.1*42 
PATFB 17.13 -+V7 
STGiAP *50 -H 
STGffit BSD -.ft 
SMtaAP 1X98 -jr} 
stains t 1X97-28 
TxFHBt 1480 —fi| 
TxFrtHApUBl JZ 

USGvSt 1*86-5 
USGvAp l*B 33 
UWByAD 1X» -X 
Utlfflt . 1337 —x 
VasreExd) ans 
Cope 1712S— IB 
DepBsn 8*44— U5 
Divarsft 17X95— LQ5 
Btos 20326^-449 
ExFd 2CJJ-SS 
FtJEx 1*7.11-321 
183-M 
Vanguard Group: 
AdmlTn 1X04-36 
AdmLT n 1037 —lo 
AdmSTn W3* —.0? 
AssetA it 1*15 -27 
Convtnx 1136 —25 
Eqlncnx 1337—21 

Explorer n*632 - Jl 
Maroon net 700 -44 
Prmcpnel80O —46 
Quant ne 1506 —77 
STARn 13J0 —u 
TrWInx 3X30—29 
TrUSx 3141—l.U 


ir 


Mr: 


STTsryn HUS —SB 
STFean 


Laval n 9.13 —14 
MfaBkdnx73S —38 


Munin 850 —06 
SmGrwn 1137—56 

CaoACC 1555—15 
DevMktp 1*43 — 38 
Foraitp ‘ 943 " 


GtabOPP 1116 —15 
Growth p 1735-21 


nsr-**- 


.16 

1329 —.14 
SmalGoD 821 —08 
World p 1*01 —20 


Sky 5ne Foods 
Europe 1067 . 


-.14 


Montalvtn 907 —38 
SpEquitn 1X69 —39 
SpEquHII 1125 
SmBh Barney A- 
IttttC 1703 —28 
CdPApA 1400 — 43 
GIGvtA 1258 —15 
lncGraAsl336 —23 
IncRetA 901 
IrrtlA 170* —27 
MoGovtA 1248 —35 
MuCotA 1X49—04 
MuFLA 1X09—06 
MuLtdA *62— 32 
MunMA 1341 — 37 
MuNJA 1153—06 
MuNYA 1X10 —07 
SHTSY 4 37 —31 
USGvtA 1122 —06 
UtHAp 1249—12 
Smith Barney BXO 
CrnAce 1446—62 
Int® 1759—27 
MuLtdB 642 —01 
SmabBrnySbrsiA: 


AdJGvAp 938—01 
AdvsrAp 


MJdCGp 110Q —jo 


PA Mun nor 042 
5mcappnlS03 —43 
VUlue np 1068 —19 
Copa no 1*00 —56 
SlFETiVSt 3.93 
5TT Funds: 

Grthlnc 2400—44 
Gnwthn 1X63 —01 
Inti 1*78 —19 
TcuftWlI 929 —06 
US Gay 1003 
sn Classic: 

BdTrtl 9.97 —.14 
CopGHp 1141 —29 
CaoGrT 1244-29 
fnGBT 1X15 —05 
(oGrBJrlP 1X15 —06 
toGSIVP 1X65 —34 
InTradT nl047 — 34 
SuftaEaT 01X24— 21 
STBdTfn 9.94—32 
ShTTrTrn 9,90 . 

VollncT n 1040 -07 
VaUndo 1057 —08 
Satan Folds 
CalTFr n 1129—11 
Eautarn 1347 —29 
GNMAn 9 49 —37 


2635 . 

AflGrAp 2739—1.00 
AppfAp 1102-23 
TefGAp 1119—29 
Tel toe 103.12—127 
AzMuAp 1002 — 36 
COMUAp 1*75 —IS 
DtvsSttnCPXIS — 37 
FdVatAp 835 —16 
GOpAp 2942 —56 
HHncAfx 110) —16 
IntCAA 827 —03 
totNYA X30 —05 
LtdMu p X14 —03 
LWTTP 701 —03 
MgGvAp 1165 — 07 
MBMUAP150I —12 
MOMuAp1X64 —14 
NJMuAp 1X88 — 09 
NvMuAp 1601 —12 
PrMtAp 2114 +21 
SpEqAb 3X16—66 
PrTRA U05—26 
UWAP 1309 —1* 
WlPCA P *37—07 
VWPAP 120—01 
SnuftiBrnyShrsnBe 
AaGrBI 2603 —99 
ApprBt 1009 —23 
CdMuBt 1*75—15 
canwstx i*i6 —ta 
Dvsirfil XI 5 —07 
EuraBf 1*38—24 
FLMU61 902 —10 
RtVrtBt 834 —17 
GfBtBtX 1*61 —24 
GlOpBr 295) —55 
GvScBt 944 —36 
GrlnBtX 1036—17 
HflncBK 1101 —16 
InvGdBt 1X16 —13 
MaGvBtnl245 —37 
MpMuflt 1*81 —.12 
NJMuflt 1208 -39 
NvMuBl 160) —12 
fYAUBt 7101 +20 
PrntTRBnsos —3* 
SecfrBt 1503—49 
Srt=qBt 19.98—45 
SfrirtB tx 1705 —27 
TefGBt 1X07-50 
TxExBI 1706—12 
UWBt 1X99 —14 
WtacBt 657 —37 
SmihBniySmFds 
PmBet 90S —39 
Prim! P 709 —08 
PrlnlHp X12— .13 
SmBrShDfnlQ33 —33 
SmBrShGf 9 06—03 
SoGen Funds 
Gold 1131 +J0 
Intnl 2344 —OS 
Omwas 1140 —.05 
SadrtyFMNta 
Balance x 920 —17 
DvrsfdStxlXOB— 50 
GrStax 9.99—26 
JfrtlGr 1X57 —23 
Ttrtnrtncx 948—37 
tovOfBdx 941 —.10 


EmMSP 1X46-08 
ForEqS 1350—23 
FEfiafS 1002—15 
GrwthS 1109 —18 
ThYdAvV 1703—30 
Thomson Group; 
EqlnA x 1X73—31 
GwtaA 2X07—73 
InaaA 834 —08 
UdtA 1148 —12 
QpcrA 3053— 104 
PTCMTA 1345 +01 
ShlGvA 907 —02 
TcnetA 1208 —41 
TBjA 112* —08 
USGvA 920 — 35 
EqJnB* 1222—29 
GrwtaBI 2107—71 
tacameBl 709 —08 
InfiBf 1X18—12 
OporBt 2907—101 
PrscMrtBll13 +49 
5hlGvB 907 —02 
TaxExBf 1125 — 38 
Targets 1X76—40 
USGovBt 9.77—04 
T po rirtx n gFds 
InMJhr 1334 —07 
LtdTirv 1X1* — JM 
LfdCbl 1220—06 
LWGvtp 1245 —34 
LldMunpI344 —36 
NMInf 1X97—07 
TDeoiXri 1341 —23 
TorRtnt 954 
Tower Funds 
CopApp x 1309 —37 
LA Mun x 11 30 —n 
TfflrtRetX 907 —08 
US Gv x 1020 —09 
Trademark Funds; 
Equity n 1070 — ll 
Gmritnooit 908 —05 
KYMunn 9.98 -05 
SI Govtn 906 —03 


. n 1X14 —02 
STCorpn 1009—02 
ITTsryn 1026 —M 
GNMAn 1038 -JM 
rrcoron 90s — jb 
LTT srvn 903—10 
LTCarpn 801 —07 
HYCorpn 729—07 
PneWnx’ 9.T7 -^22 
KtxTrtBn 923 —05 
ktxSTBn 9.92— JB 
Idx/TBn 922— M 
IdxBdx 1022—23 
idx5O0rac*325— 10f 
IndxExt ne!921 —44 
KtxTrtroc 1105 —29 
IdxGrotwittflO —27 
tdxValnx 1108 -43 
UtxSmC 1652—23 
IrfxEurnxllJ* —16 
hJxPocn 1108—13 
Idxtnstnx4304 — 126 
MuMYdnllLSS — 87 
Mutant n 1X10 —06 
MuUdn 1043—03 
MllLarWn 10.75 —35 
Mutnfgn 1X14 —11 
MunSMn 1*51 —01 
CAInsLT nlOJS— ID 
FLInsn 1046— 09 
Njlnsn 1150—10 
NYlns n 1006 —09 
OOnsn 1151 —06 
PAInsn 1005 —07 
SPEnrg rxl*64 —55 
SPGoWrx1X83 +50 
SPHWitx 3309— 102 
SPSerorx2308 — 32 
SPTech rel90O —65 
SPlflflx 1024 —41 
USGran 1*95—29 
IntlGr 1341 —07 , 
WetWvnx18J8 -49 
Wefltnnx 1906 —50 
Wndsrn 1*12 —23 - 
WndsJJ 160) —26 

Venture Advism: , 

IncPl 520 +01 
Muni rtf 923 _ 

NYVen 1X03—21 
RPFBt *16-01 
RPFGRt 1507 —31 . 
RPFGI 1149 -38 . 
RPFCV 1744 —13 

Victory Funds: 

Abb/Gt 1025—22 ' 
CqrpBd 900 -37 ’ 
Equity 1026 —33 



C'- 






kJvz+ii 




—39 

SMGvtnn 927—02 « 
Vista Funds 
BalA 1123 —14 
Bondpn 1008 —04 
CAW 902 -03 
•.CapGr 3X96—63 
CopGrBt 3X90 — 63 
EquitVPnt3JB —28 \ 
Gotonc 1151 —35 
Grtnc 3009 -07 
GwWshp 1501 —H . 
GrtnBr 3000—57 
toftEqA 12JJ9 —09 . 
NYTF 1146 —06 
STBdP 1X05 _ - 

TFfncm 1108—06 
Votumef 1545 —29 


pitnRliH 


v ssr rF * 


LMtoX 10.19— M 


SpiGrSta *1X1 1 — J21 
SplValStxlX6S — 1* 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Page 11 


Wew Int ernational Bond 

Compiled fay Laurence OesvileHcs 


Issues 


(sstier Amount 

(mlHons) 

Flo » t> ngR«toWo|»m 

Borings Brothers " %\*q~ 

Cormt Fronde tn 

Persey) * ' 

9 South Australian $500 

Government 
financing Authority 

W*—*-Coupon» ' 

European Investment : dm 1JXX> 
Bar* 

Toyota Motor Gesc&t . Ff 840 
Carpi 


Mat 


Mip. Plbx 

* Price end 

nuCn 


2001 H 99.44 — 
*2W4 ft 99% IT 


1996 fibor 100 — 


20M 6ft 101.65 99 JO NoncoUobte. Fact 1H%. (DavtKha Bank) 


1995 7 £3 100 — 


Deutsche Bank 
Finance 


m. 500,000 2004 zero 43.15 4210 


KFW Inti Finance m. 200.000 

Abbey National ecu 100 

Treasury Services 

Crtcfit Local de ecu 150 

France 

General Electric ECU 100 

Capital Gorp. 

Rabobank Nederland C$150 


1999 m 
1999 6K 


IQQJO 9SL80 
100.12 97.90 


ECU 100 1999 6H 101.215 98.15 


1999 7ft 100 333 97.90 


ftmasonic Finance Y 10,000 199 7 3.15 100 — 


iw ^irlfl 

■W^xicoj 

incrpifj^ 


Equity-Linked 

Mitsubishi Oil 
Company 

Alcatel Alsthom 


1998 114 100 — 


Ff 5,000 2004 216 — — 


SHORT COVER 


Air France Gives Unions Deadline 

PARIS (Reuters) — Fourteen unions have until Thursday to agree io a 
plan that commits the airline to boosting productivity by 30 percent over 
three years, Air France said Sunday. 

C hn sdan Blanc, chairman of Air France, and unions wound up 20 
hours of talks early Sunday on a restructuring p lan designed to cut huge 
losses at the stale-run airline. 

A spokesman for the CGT, a onion whose delegation walked out of a 
meeting on Saturday, said the union opposed plans to cut jobs, freeze 
wages for three years and extend working houra. 

An Air France spokesman said Mr. Blanc insisted that all unions must 
endorse the plan and he would consult the airline's 40,000 staff directly if 
any of the unions refused to sign. 

Another German Union Settles Early 

FRANKFURT (Renters) — Employers and unions in Germany’s 
construction industry agreed Saturday to a pay rase of 2.4 percent after a 
third round of wage talks. 

Pay for East German workers in the sector will be raised on Sept. I to 
90 percent of West German levels, from 85 percent at present, representa- 
tives from unions and employers said at the end of the two days of talks. 

The IG Ban-Steme-Erden union had ori ginally demanded a 6 percent 


levels in the industry. Earlier this month ZG MetaE, the country’s largest 
-- union, reached au accord with employers. 

Lonrho Considers Noncash Dividend 

IX)hnX3NXBfo6r^ is txmaderinggrvmg sharchokl- 

- • ers the choice of a dividend in die form of corporate securities, instead of 
cash. C hairman Rare Ledezio said at the company’s annual meeting. 

The company has about 7683 nriffion shares outstanding and could 
expect to save nearly £30 million ($44.7 mBHon) annually at last year's 
. . payout level. Scrips offered by other companies have recently met with 
1- shareholder approval, including a vote of 92 percent for a recent move by 
^ Burmah Castrol PLG 

Broken Hill Unfawid by Weak Prices 

SYDNEY (AFP) — Broken Hffl Pty„ Australia’s largest publicly 
traded company, said Sunday that h could maintain production and sales 
-• at current levels even though commodity prices would continue to faH 
John Prescott, chief executive of the mining and resources company, 

- said that it would seek to maintain its high earnings level even though it 
would have “a real c halleng e" in sustaining its performance. BHP 
announced last week that its minerals division had lifted overall results to 
a net profit of 2842 million Australian dollars ($2023 million), up 26 

: percent from a year ago and higher than most market forecasts. 

“We are going into a period of lower coal prices, lower iron ore prices 

- and on top of that petroleum prices r emain depressed,” he said. 

k Disney Weighs Opening Animal Park 

• • ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) — Walt Disney World’s foiuth Orian- 
do theme part, which could open as early as 1997, wffl unx wild animals 
7..: with nature walks and elaborate thrill rides, the Odando Sentmel report- 

-X ed, citing a confidential marketing video. . 

Disney sources cautioned that although the basic concepts wffl remain 
the sanK, the part’s design is constantly being revised, the newspaper said. 

The Sentinel’s report, based on viewings of the marketing video, said 
lie animal park would have a strong conservation theme. 

- A giant Tree of Life, the park’s icon, would nse m the midst of the 
setting, in the style of the famous Cinderella’s Castle. 

C; Tbeiands may include a “Beastly Kingdc^. winchfeamres imaginary 

V animals from storybooks and fairy tales; a “l^^radDimey’saiiswiCT 

to Jurassic Park, winch invites guests 

V them back in time to rescue dinosaure from extinction; Africa, whoe 
‘ rtasts can see wild animals, and witness the. ^t^ ^ 

Threaten the environment; “Asia," vdndi features tides through snnulat- 

v ed rain forests. 

India Reported Buying Hawk Planes 

NarashnbaRac* 

newspaper said. The ^ueenwn expeewu u . i,n.nno thn sales 


Continued from Page 9 
meeting is not scheduled until 
April 14. 

The German central bank did 
shave short-term rates last week to 
5.80 from 5.88 percent, but the ti- 
midity with which it has moved 
over the past month has done noth- 
ing to reassure the market about 
the longer-term trend. 

Although analysts said a slow 
economic recovery and declining 
inflation this year would drive Ger- 
man rates to 4 percent or lower by 
year-end, financial mark ets now 
price the cost of three-month Deut- 
sche marks at 52 percent in De- 
cember This is nearly a percentage 
point higher than the end-year cost 
of 43 percent posted in January. 

Either this higher pricin g is cor- 
rect, in which case the sdl-off in 
bonds is justified, or it is wrong and 
the Bundesbank needs to bring the 
market back to its senses. This is 
necessary because the level of Ger- 
man rates sets the tone for what 


happens fw Europe. 
For market partial 


Hawks and may be followed by o 
total to £2 billion, the paper said. 


Singapore Airlines Weighs Orders 

_ _ V _» Airlines nlanS to Older UP 


CTwrlpfffiF fAFPl — Singapore Airlines plans to order up to 52 
r v next few months, the Bosmess Junes i reponjd & that ft had 


nm few months, skying that ft had 

> ^ < Md Air^^SSie to make bids to supply the 

■ • airline to continue to grow at 8 to 10 percent a year. 

> Li Ka-shing Sets Chongqing Project 

a Ti iTn-shina. a Hong Kong bflhonaire, is 


- ■ "W <f - Wa '*°^- bv a unit of Mr. U’s ftap*ip Owing Km>S 
Hong KongWd daily said. 

ToeHDn Con^ NEC tie 

■ -/SSftisSSSiwr 1 IOpo ““^ 

finanrial year of 1994, part fwxThai banks, raised their 


For market partidpams. it is not 
only the signal from the futures 
market that is destabilizing condi-' 
tions but also the daily activity in 
the foragn-exchange market. 

At the start of this year, the certi- 
tude on which trading strategies 
were based was that the Deutsche 
made would be sickly. It was to be 
clipped against the dollar by a scis- 
sors action of tiring UJ5. rates and 
faffing German rates. Also, it was 
to fall within Europe as recovery in 
Germany was expected to lag be- 
hind everyone else. 

Thus, the favored strategy was to 
buy non-German European bonds, 
particularly higb-yiclders from 
countries such as Britain, Sweden, 
Italy and Spain, where interest 
rates had the most room to fall — 
and potential capital gains were the 
highest — and to overlay this bond 
trade with a currency piay. 

The least expensive currency 
play was to borrow marks, whose 
short-term rates were the lowest in 
Europe, to finance the purchase of 
the bonds. The bond prices would 
rise, the mart would fall and the 
investors would be sitting on a bun- 
dle of profits, the theory went. Hie 
more adventurous leveraged their 
positions by selling marks for dol- 
lars, a relatively expensive opera- 
tion as the cost to borrow the Ger- 
man currency was higher than the 
interest received on dollars. 

This strategy backfired. Not only 
are bond prices worldwide down a 
bundle so far this year, but the 
unwinding of these positions re- 
quires that marks be purchased — 
driving up the value of the mark. 
That makes a loss on the bond 
hol dings and a loss on the currency 
play. 

Such unwinding would appear lo 
ex plain why the mark is strong on 
the exchange market while the Ger- 
man bond and equity markets re- 
main weak. 

At this point, it becomes less 
dear whether it is the loss on the 
bond holding or the loss on the 
currency play that is driving mar- 
kets lower. 

A new overlay in the currency 
market is the social unrest in 
France, the political uncertainty in 
Italy and, implicit in the rising U3. 
interest rates, concerns about infla- 
tion that appear to be helping to 
propel the mark upward. 

Commenting on the apparent 
anomaly of currency weakness in 
countries where growth is strongest 
— North America and Britain — 
George Magnns at S.G. Warburg in 
London said that investors were 
looking for refuge in Germany. 

“You’ve got a situation where 
people are concerned about eco- 
nomic growth mid tiring inflation 
and the feeling is therefr only me 
Bundesbank,” he said. “Maybe tire 
mart is the beneficiary from the 
fading that for cyclical as well as 
long-term reasons one could rely 
on the Bundesbank to secure and 
safeguard low inflation more than 
would be the case in the United 
States, Britain, Australia or Cana- 
da — all of which are the strong 
growth stories of the market, but all 
of which have weak curreocks.’' 


Is the Fed’s New Trumpet Deafening Markets ? 


Over 3-mofifh Libor. Redeemable at par From 1999. Feu 
Om |CS Finr Boson.) 

Below frmantti Libor- Minimum interest 5%. Fungible with 
outdancfing roue, rasing told amount to $150 mXon. Fee 
nor tfadosad. Pence Cocnmercicde IfcJanaj 

Merest wffl be the 3-emnih Ubor. NonceAsbh. Fees aiOSt 
Denominations 110,000. (Swiss Bank Carp.) 


Merest wffl be 7431k if Kwr « within a defined range. 
NonceSabh. Fees not dadoed. Denominations 1 ndEan 
francs. (Banque Porto.) 

YieU 9.02%. Beofierecf at 42.TS. NonaASbte. Proceeds 2T3 
baton Sro. Fees 1!£$. (Deutsche Bonk.) 

NoncoNobte. Fees >111%. (Deutsche Sonic) 

Reoffered at 9&S*S. Nona ffl obl o . Fees 15W6. (SodM GMt- 

*4 


ECU 150 2001 6K 100495 97m feofferod at 99.12. Noncdiobie. Fern tCrfeft tyorvxiv) 


Reoffered at 9959. NgncaCobie. Fees 1A%. (Crhfe Commer- 
cial de France.) 

Reoffered at 99.233. Noncokbie. Fees 1Mb. (Barclays de 
ZboeWedd.) 

Merest will be 3.15% urti July 1996, thereafter 3£0%. 
Nonco Bo bie. Fees 0.1875%. Denominations 100 mfflfcm yen. 

pillnnj 


Nonorilabla. Each 510,000 note with two warrants mcen»- 
ablo Mo company’s shares at 1,003 yen per share end at 
107.30 yen per dolor. Fees 2H%. [Yamachi M’l Europe) 

Issue price is 800 francs par note. R edemption at maturity wffl 
be at 1.098 fames. Convertible at 800 francs per shore, a 
I3J1% premium. Fees 240%. podfch GhnbroleJ 


BONDS: 

Next Domino? 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The Federal Reserve 
Board, after years of complaints, is finally 
trying to be less secretive. Unfortunately, 
both Wall Street and the media are finding it 
difficult to adjnst to the new openness. 

The problem is that the old way of looking 
at the Fed was to assume that it was trying to 
keep secrets. When a Fed chairman actually 
announced a policy, in unambiguous lan- 
guage, it was dearly an important event. And 
the financial markets reacted, or overreact- 
ed, accordingly. 

So when the Fed announced, first in early 
February, and then again last week, that it 
was pushing up the federal funds rate — the 
rate banks charge on loans to each other — 
by a quarter of a percentage point, it was 
treated as a big deaL 

The markets dived in February, and, after 
a day’s dday, did so again last week. To be 
sure, last week's causes included concern 
over Mexican instability, following the assas- 
sination of Luis Dooahk) Colosio, the lead- 
ing presidential candidate. But the Fed’s 
moves have clearly unsettled investors. 

In the old days, before this new burst of 
openness hit the Fed, moves in the federal 
funds rate were closely watched on Wall 
Street for signs of the Fed's intent. 

But there are a lot of other things that 


affect that rate, ranging from individual 
bank needs for capital to arcane technical 
and timing factors that can send the rate 
spiraling up or down temporarily. 

So the rate got reported in Ure business 
section of the papers, not on page one. 

When the Fed really wanted to send a 
message it did something else, most often 
move the discount rate, which is the rate it 
charges when ft lends money to banks. Those 
moves were announced, and were treated as 
big things. 

By announcing the federal funds moves, 
the Fed has created the perception it has 
made a major switch in monetary policy. In 
all probability, it has not, but is simply 
responding to criticism about secrecy. 

With stock valuations at very high levels, 
however, there is a temptation to dock and 
run, just in case tins is the big one. In all 
probability, Robert Barbers, the former 
chief economist at T-ehman Brothers, is right 
when he says this is a fairly typical stock 
market correction that begins after an eco- 
nomic recovery has picked up enough steam 
to start pushing up interest rates. • 

In the past, those corrections have ranged 
from 8 percent to 24 percent, but have been 
followed by rebounds as it became clear that 
r isi n g interest rates were not choking off the 
recovery. 

Last week, the Dow had its worst week 
since 1991, falling 3.1 percent, but it is off 


just 5.1 percent from its high. The SAP 500 is 
down only 4.4 percent from its high. 

Tire important point, however, is that the 
Fed’s moves are unlikely to spoil the party on 
Main Street, even as they dampen spirits on 
Wall Street Commodity prices are rising, 
notes David Shulman. the chief equity strate- 
gist at Salomon Brothers Inc, and that is a 
sign of economic strength, not w eakn e ss . 

■ Prospects for Still Higher Rates 

Keith Bradsher of The New York Tones 
reported from Washington: 

When tqp Federal Reserve officials decid- 
ed on Feb. 4 to raise short-term interest rates 
slightly, they debated not whether, but how 
hi gh, to raise them, according to a summary 
of their meeting released last week. 

The nation’s central bank raised the over- 
night rate for loans between banks — the 
federal funds rate — by a quarter of a point 
on Feb. 4, to 335 percent, the smaflesi move 
posable. The Fed raised it again last Tues- 
day, to 3.5 percent 

The minutes from the Feb. 4 meeting, 
released on Friday, depict a committee sur- 
prisingly enthu sias tic about raising rates. 
Some members of the Fed's policy-setting 
Federal Open Market Committee apparently 
wanted a large increase in February, the 
mining show, and it was not dear that this 
week's increase would satisfy them. 

Marc W. WansbeL a Fed-watcher at J. P. 


Morgan & Co., predicted after seeing the 
minutes that the Fed would raise rates at its 
next meeting, on May 17, and maybe sooner. 

"The debate clearly at the lime was be- 
tween those who wanted a large move and 
those who wanted a small move," Mr. Wan- 
shel said. “Since they got the minimum 
amount posable, you can assume there are 
others that wanted more." 

The increases, coupled with signs of strong 
economic growth ana the selling of bonds by 
investment funds seeking to cover tr ading 
losses, have driven long-term interest rates to 
their highest levels since last summer. 

The minutes say the committee believed 
that low interest rates were “highly stimula- 
tive’* to the economy. 

“In the committee’s discussion of policy 
for the iniermeeting period ahead, the mem- 
bers favored an adjustment toward a less 
accommodative policy stance, though views 
differed to some extern with regard to the 
amount of the adjustment,” the minutes said. 

The committee members compromised on 
Feb. 4 on a small increase partly because of 
concern that any increase at all might disrupt 
fi nan c ial markets, particularly given that the 
raise would be the fust in five years. 

Fed officials expressed concern cm Feb. 4 
that the economy was growing so fast tH»r 
companies would soon be bidding up the 
prices of labor and goods, feeding inflation. 


Clouds 
Thicken 
Over Bonds 

By Robert Hurtado 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Investor con- 
cern that the economy is continu- 
ing to grow at a fast pace caused 
interest rates to surge last week, 
p ushing the yield on the 30-year 
Treasury bond over 7 percent for 
the first time in 10 months. 

The increased cost of borrowing 
is Kkely to be felt by consumers with 
credit cards and fry those shopping 

UA CREDIT MARKETS 

for home mortgage loans, along with 
corporations venturing into the debt 
market to borrow cash. 

On Friday the yield of the bench- 
mark 30-year Treasury bond 
jumped to 7jDl percent, from 6.92 
percent a week earlier. This was the 
highest yield since it reached 7.04 
percent on May 21, 1993. 

“The fact that we’re through an 
important level will do some psy- 
chological damage to bonds," said 
Jack McIntyre, senior fixed-in- 
come analyst for Technical Data in 
Boston. 

In addition, he added, the breach 
of 7 percent exposes “the bond 
market to mutual fund investors 
who wffl now have to think long 
and hard about starting to with- 
draw some of that money out of 
bond mutual funds. 

“If that happens, we could easily 
see bond yields move to 735 per- 
cent, sooner rather than later." 

Among the forces working 
against the bond market, Mr. Mo- 
In tyre said, is the Commodity Re- 
search Bureau index, a closely 
watched inflation indicator, which 
is now at the highest level in three 
and a half years. 

Without fresh data from which 
to draw conclusions, traders and 
investors cannot conclude yet that 
economic growth is slowing down 
from the quick pace at the end of 
last year. But this week wffl provide 
some of the data investors are look- 
ing for, with most of the attention 
focusing on the March employ- 
ment numbers due on Good Fri- 
day, when the bond market is to be 
dosed. Bond futures will be traded 
in an abbreviated session. 

On Tuesday the Conference 
Board will release its March con- 
sumer confidence reading, and on 
Wednesday manufacturing ship- 
ments and orders data for Febru- 
ary are due ouL Another revision of 
the fourth-quarter gross domestic 
product wffl highlight Thursday 
along with the Chicago purchasing 
managers’ report for March, fol- 
lowed on Friday by the national 
associati on's report and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan's confidence 
measure to subscribers. 

Worries over Mexico after the 
assassina tion of Luis Donaldo Co- 
losio, the presidential candidate, 
eased last week alter the Mexican 
markets reopened without panic. 

Euromarls 
At u Glance 

Eurobond Yield* 

Mor2SMarU VrkMYrlnr 


US. s, teas Win 

&S3 

£B0 

£M 

£21 

US. S. mfea term 

Ol 

£31 

02 

US 

US. % [Oort term 

£53 

£70 

£73 

4JB 

Pwe Parana 


7JB 

724 

£26 

Freodi francs 

£57 

£56 

657 

£17 

Italian Ure 

to 

£42 

MB 

751 

DanbOkJoaa 

£45 

£56 

A *A 

£20 

SMdHi kroon 

7 M 

745 

748 

7JK 

ECU, Iona Mm 

£M 

£91 

AM 

£18 

■CU mam term 

£51 

MB 

£51 

551 

Cm. S 

7J4 

7ii 

7A4 

£31 

Ant 

7 M 

VS* 

7 M 

£50 

Nil 

£56 

US 

£77 

£09 

YU 

164 

U6 

167 

187 


Source: Luxembourg Stock ExOxmvtt- 

Weekly Sales 

Primary Martel 

Code! Em-odnr 

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HUM 5LS0 25J9 Mttfl BZ7J0 

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Cette) Eiredw 

s Haas I Maas 

StraigU* BAUD I&5SU0 324)9.19 314316 

Conwt. «WS 1,106X1 1404* V°5£ 

FWfc ixm 1454S0 2M&J0 URS 

ECP U87J0 B46M0 1MSU0 1MSW , 

TOM 2U»M0 aOBMO 7U31M 5&66V79 

Sounc*: Euroefear, Cede* 


Libor Ratos 


Mar 25 

l-oteotk 

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us.! jn/i* 

n 

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25/14 

SourxstST Ltovds Bank, RetMtJ. 



The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, March 28 - April 2 


A achaaute of this week's economic ana 
ttnanaai events, comptfotf for tfM Intama- 
Bor& Herald Tribune by Bkiotntierg Busi- 
ness News. 

Asia-Pacific 

• S o rn h 28 Hong Kang February 
provisional mercharxiiso trarfa 

Mow DcJhJ India to host throeOny moat- 
ing of the heads ot state from the G-15 
group ol developing countries, which In- 
cludes Algeria. Argentina, Brad, Chfla. 
Egypt Indio. Indonesia. Jamaica. Malay- 
sia, Mexico, hbgeria, Peru. Senegal, Venfr- 
zueia and Zimbabwe. 

Tokyo January household spending 
survey. 

• Marat) 29 ToKyo February Mgs 
scale retailers. 

Tokyo Obtusion indexes. 

Stag s pors Presentation on tha Shou- 
gang Group, a diversified business group 
based In China wHh Interests m seven 
companies listed on the Hong Kong Stock 
Exchange. The group is looking to estab- 
lish an Industrial conglomerate In South- 
east Asa. 

• March 31 Phiopplnes Maundy 
Thursday hofiday. 

Europe 

• Expected this week Bruasels- 

March consumer price Index. Forecast 
Up 2-4 percent in year. 

Frankfurt March preliminary cost ot liv- 
ing. Forecast Up 02 percent In month, up 
Si percent In year. 

Brussel* March unemployment rate. 
Forecast Up 13.9 percent In year. 

• March 28 Frankfurt March West 
German cost or Suing. Bloomberg Busi- 
ness News survey forecast: Up 02 per- 
cant in month, up 02 percent rise in year. 


Ea rnings expected Inchcape, Pearson. 
• March 29 Parts March (NSEE Eco- 
nomic Survey. 

Earnings expected 1NG. BMW. Casino 
e March 31 Paris February unem- 
ployment rata. Forecast Up 122 percent 
in month. 

a April 1 Europe Good Friday. Mar- 
kets dosed except for Italy, France 
(bonks only are open) and Austria 

The Americas 

•Expected this weak Earnings A.G. 
Edwards, Mark IV Industries, Quick 3 
RaHy.lWA. 

a March 88 Buenoa Aina Deadline 
tor RJR Nabisco and Argentine biscuit 
and pasta company Estabtedmiento Mo- 
deio Terrabusi Sale to reach ag reement 
on Nabtaco's proposed purchase of Ter- 
rabusi. Outlook: The price ts expected to 
be between $270 mHbon and S300 million. 





-O- 


Buaoos Aires Argentine government to 
sign contract enabling a group led by 
GTE to set up the first mobile telephone 
service M the interior ol the country. 


Washington Supreme Court hears argu- 
ments in two challenges to CaStorma’s 
unitary tax on multinational corporations. 
Earnings expected joy Technologies, 
Walgreen. 

a March 29 Now York The Confer- 
ence Board releases its survey of con- 
sumer confidence lor March. 

WMMpgton February new home sales. 
Tampa, Rorids Bankruptcy hearing tor 
American Ship Building Co, 

New York 1994 Laptop end Palmtop Ex- 
position and Conference features key- 
note talk by John Medea of DeB Comput- 
er Corp. end Cksptays by rivals including 
Hewlett-Packard Co. and Compaq Com- 
puter Corp. Through March 30. 

New York Newbridge Networks to pre- 
view products for enhanced computer 
networking. 

Toronto Financing for emerging com- 
panies Is the subject of a one-day seminar 
sponsored by insight Intormabon me. 

• Marsh 30 Ottawa January employ- 
ment earnings and hours report 
W a shin g ton February factory orders. 
Gordon, Crriorado Adolph Coore Co. re- 
leases first-quarter sales volume figures. 
New York ESPN and Prodigy Services 
Co. announcement ol interactive ESPNET 
that wiH provide on-flne sports Informa- 
tion to Prodigy customers. 

New York Ford Motor Co. Chairman 
Alex Trotmsn kicks oft the 1 BB4 New York 
International Automobile Show by ad- 
dressing an International Motor Press As- 
sociation breakfast at the Javlts Conven- 
tion Center. The ahow runs from April 2- 
TO. Pond, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota. 
Mercedes, Land Rover and Chevrolet 
hold press conferences introducing new 
models. 

New York Boston Consulting Group 
multimedia specialists Todd Htxon, 
Ranch KimbaU and Philip Evans discuss 


Impficadons ol the cottapoe ol the Bed 
Atlantic Corp. merger with Teto-Commu- 
nicatlons Inc. 

Ea rofaiga e x p ected Copley Pharmaceu- 
tical, Tote-Commurucattons. 
a March 31 Washington Final fourth- 
quarter GDP. 

Washington Weekly initial lobless 
Maims. 

Ottawa January real gross domestic 
product report 

New York Bankruptcy court scheduled 
to rule on request by former R.H. Macy A 
Co. Ine.'s equity holders to establish an 
offreiaf equity committee. 

Washington The National Master 
Freight Agreement, which coven 1 10,000 
Teamsters at 23 trucking companies in- 
clueang Consolidated Freight Corp. and 
Roadway Services Inc., expires. 

Castle Rock; Colorado DirecTV. GM 
Hughes's direct broadcast satellite ser- 
vice. holds news conference at its new 
digital broadcast center. DirecTV begins 
broadcasting 200 channels next month to 
homes with indhndual salefite dishes. 
New York Chrysler. BMW. Saab. Volvo, 
Mitsubishi, tsuzu, Saturn and OMsmbUe 
hold press previews at the Jacob K. Javits 
Convention center for the New York Inter- 
national Automobile Show. 

Wa sh ington The Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission holds a meeting to 
discuss derivatives regulations. 

• April 1 W a shin g ton March unem- 
ployment rate. 

Wash in gton February personal income 
and spending. 

Washington February construction 
spend ng. 

North America; Good Fnday holiday. Fi- 
nancial markets are dosed. 

• April * New York 1994 New York 
International Automobile Show opens to 
the pubGc. Through April 10. 


Mir// 



Jardines 


Highlights 1993 


Jardine Strategic 

Further Steady Growth 

■ Net assets per share + 79% 

■ Earnings per share + 6% 

■ Dividends per ordinary share + 9% 

“ The financial strength of each of the Company's strategic investments, the diversity of their 
businesses and the quality of their management provide good reason for confidence that 
Jardine Strategic will continue to benefit from the above average economic growth of the 
Asia-Pacific Region, where the preponderance of our business interests lies . " 

Henry Keswick, Chairman 
24th March 1994 


Turnover 

Operating profit 

Share of profits less losses of associates 

Net interest expense 

Tear ended 31st December 

1993 1992 

USSm USSm 

206.7 

385.9 

(26.9) 

196.4 

322.3 

(35.6) 

Profit before taxation 

Taxation 

— Company and subsidiary undertakings 
— associates 

565.7 

(34.1) 

(76.3) 

483.1 

(24.9) 

(64.4) 

Profit after taxation 

455.3 

393.8 

Outside interests 

(149.3) 

(131.5) 

Profit after taxation and outside interests 

306 J3 

262.3 

Extraordinary items 

68-2 

58.9 

Profit attributable to Shareholders 

374.2 

321.2 

Preference dividends 

(31.0) 

(11.6) 

Profit attributable to ordinary Shareholders 

343.2 

309.6 

Ordinary Dividends 

(90.4) 

(83.5) 

Retained profit for the year 

252.8 

226.1 

Net assets (note) 

7,506.4 

IIC* 

3,803.1 

1 io* 

Earnings per share 

— basic 

38.01 

34.53 

-fully-diluted 

35.55 

33.68 

Dividends per ordinary share 

12.50 

11.50 


US$ 

US$ 

Net assets per share (note) 

—basic 

8.47 

4.29 

— fully-diluted 

7J51 

4.19 

Note: Based on the market orfee ot the Company's holdings. FuHy^Hutoa net assets per share j 

assume full conversion of the outstanding convertible preference shares. 



Jardine Strategic Holdings Limited m A mambor ot the Jardine NUthoson Croup 

Incorporated in Bermuda with limited liability 

77m final dividend of USe8S0 per ordinary share will be payable on 9th June 1994, subject to approval at the Annual General Meeting to be 
held on 2nd June 1994, to Shamhoicten on the register of members at the cJo&e of business on 22nd April 1994, The ordinary share registers 
wffl be dosed from 25th to 298r Apt9 1884 metusbrn. The ordinary dividend wifi be evaH&bJe /n United States Dollars, Hong Kong Dotiors and 
Sterling. Ordinary Shareholders on the International branch register wiH receive Untied States Dollars while ordinary Shareholders on the 
Hong Kong branch register wff receive Hong Kong Dolbis, unless they elec t tor onset the alternative currencies by notifying the Company’s 
registrars or transfer agents by 20th May 1994. Ordinary Shareholders whose shares are held through the Central Depository System In 
Singapore fCDPl will receive Hong Kong Dollars, unless they elect through CDP to receive United States Dollars. 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Stock Ownership 
Comes to Beijing 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


Via Agcnco frcnca-PnMM 


Amsterdam 


Ratters 

BEIJING — A steady stream of 
Beijing residents lined up on Sun- 
day for the first public share offer- 
ing open to investors in the capital. 

Dozens of branches of banks and 
other financial institutions opened 
over the weekend to allow people to 
buy applications for a mini mum 
bid of 300 yuan ($23). The sale win 
last three days. 

An application conveys the right 
to buy 300 shares in one of four 
companies if drawn in a lottery. 
Even losers do not lose all, as the 
applications act like six-month cer- 
tificates of deposit paying 9 percent 
annual interest 


“I plan to spend 2,000 yuan and 
would like to buy shares of the 


would like to buy shares of the 
different companies,’' said one 
woman standing in line at a bank. 

“People wiQ not spend all their 
money on this but just a portion.” 
the man next to her said. “Share- 
buying is stfll new to people in 
Beijing. It started earlier in South 
China, where people are more fa- 
miliar with iir 

cw-1 The issue appeared to have 
been carefully prepared, with 
forms on sale at many outlets and 
police on guard to prevent distur- 
bances. In 1992, frustrated would- 
be investors rioted in the southern 
city of Shenzhen after applications 
ran out 

The four companies are Beijing 
Department Store. Briren Printing 
Machinery Co.. Beijing Light Bus 


Co. and Beijing Town County 
Trade Center Co. The prices of 


Trade Center Co. The prices of 
individual stocks range from 3 to 8 
yuan a share. 

The issue, of 175 million shares 


in total, is intended to raise 1.08 
billion yuan for the four compa- 
nies, the Beijing Daily said Sanday. 

■ Luting Delayed 

A Chinese generator maker has 
postponed plans to list its stock on 
the Hong Kong exchange because 
of the market's fall in recent weeks, 
securities sources said on Sunday. 

Dongfang Electrical Machinery 
Co. had been expected to offer 
class H shares worth about 350 
million Hong Kong dollars ($45 
million) by the middle of next 
month. The H class of stock is 
reserved for Chinese companies 
traded on the Hong Kong ex- 
change. 

But a securities source, who 
asked not to be identified, said 
Dongfang’s Hong Kong listing 
would be postponed to the end of 
April or May. 

Another source said a farther 
reason for the postponement was 
problems in completing the docu- 
ments for listing. 

Dongfang, which is based in Si- 
chuan province, is the eighth Chi- 
nese company to seek a listing in 
Hong Kong under Beijing’s plan to 
raise foreign capital for moderniz- 
ing its state industries. 

Most of the others were launched 
in the second half of 1993 in a bull 
market that came to an abrupt halt 
in January. 

The latest, Yizheng Chemical Fi- 
ber Co„ received a relatively muted 
response when it offered H shares 
in Hong Kong earlier this month. 

The Hang Seng index has fallen 
27 percent, to 9 ,23421 points, at 
Friday’s close from a record 
12J9923 on Jan. 4. 


Amsterdam stocks are expected to be vola- 
tile this week after falling in line with last 
week’s sinking dollar, a trend that hurts 
stocks of Dutch exporters. 

The CBS all-share index closed last Friday 
at 272.10 points, down from 283.60 points 
the previous week. 


Maiheson trading house to remove its stock 
from the local exchange. 

Analysts said the market would be shaky 
again this week with much depending on the 
direction taken by Tokyo. 

The blue-chip Hang Seng Index gained 
101.90 points, 1.12 percent, to dose the 
week’s trading at 9,234.2] on Friday. 


would be followed by a tense period of 
negotiation to form a coalition government. 


Gainers were led by Junmg Shipyard 
which climb ed 1.30 dollars to 13.10 dollars. 


Paris 

The Bourse turned down last week, de- 


pressed by the weakness of the Bank of 
France's initia tives on interest rates and the 
upward trend in long-term rates. 

Dealers said the room for recovery this 
week was limited with student unrest in 
France upsetting the markets, though a 
strong pickup in the United States could 
reverse the slide, they said. 

TheCAC 40 index fdl by 3-8 percent last 
week from the previous wed: to 2,136.62 
points, close to its lowest point of the year. 

The Federal Reserve raised short-term 
rates a quarter point Tuesday. Germany cut 
its re pu rc hase rate by 8 basis points Wednes- 
day apri the Bank of France cut its tender 
rate by 10 bass points the following day. 

Disappointing results from Credit Lyon- 
nais and the huge government rescue plan 
for the bank depressed shares further Friday. 


Frankfurt 


London 


Optimism spread in the stock exchange 
last week, with several companies announc- 


The D AX-30 leading share index ended 
Friday at 2.130.06 points, down by 1.17 
percent from tbe previous week. 

Analysts said the exchange was likely to be 
more buoyant this week with hopes increas- 
ing for further reductions in interest rates. 
Tbe Federation of German Banks said 
Thursday that German rates would continue 
to fall despite increases in U.S. rates. 


Shares plummeted after a series of poor 
indicators — including higher-than-expected 
2.4 percent inflation for February — dashed 
hopes of a cut in interest rates. But analysts 
said the market would bounce bark this week 
with bargain-hunters likely to be out in force. 

Tbe Financial Tlmes-Stock Exchange in- 
dex of 100 leading shares fell briefly through 
the 3,100 barrier for the first time in four 
months, before closing Friday at 3,129 — a 
weekly drop of 89.1 points, or 2.7 percent. 


Milan 


Hong Kong 


Hong Kong stock prices rose moderately 
in volatile trading last week despite U.S. 
interest-rate rises and a move by the Jardine 


Buying ahead of Italy's general election 
poshed prices up on the Milan exchange last 
week. The Mibtd index rose by 0.46 percent 
over die week, to 10,716 points. 

Analysts said all eyes would tom this week 
to the outcome of the election. Brokers said 
the poD was expected to be inconclusive and 


Tokyo 

Share prices fdl last week, depressed by 
tension in Korea, a fall on Wall Street and 
q>pn»m< over the assassination of the Mexi- 
can ruling party’s presidential candidate. 

The 225-issue Nikkei average closed at 
19,836.48 yen on Friday, down 632.97 points 
or 3 percent from a week earlier. 

Yasuo Ueki, general manager of equities 
operations at Nudco Securities Co., said deal- 
ers did not warn to make significant moves 
late this week with only a week until the new 
fiscal year, beginning April 1. 


Issue Terms 
To Be Set 
ForBanesto 


Compiled bf Our Stuff From Dapatdta 

MADRID — Shareholders of 
Banco Espafiol de Credito SA ap- 


1P<: 

p }tl 


proved a plan to rescue the bank on 
Saturday and agreed to sue its far- 


Zurich 


Singapore 

Singapore’s blue chip Straits Times Indus- 
trials index rode the roller coaster fast week 
before falling 20.60 points to dose the week 
at 2,083.42 points. 


Shares fell slightly last week after the dol- 
lar slipped, but analysts said they expected 
the market to stabilize this week. 

The Swiss Performance Index fell by 8.41 
points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,823.1 points. 

Nestle fell by 29 Swiss francs to 1.210 
deroite news of a 7 percent rise in net profit 
and an increase in its dividend. 


Among the chemicals issues , Cib 
rose by 51 francs to 902 and Sandoz 


Ctba-Geigy 
idoz rose by 


1 10 francs to 4,010. B anks were hit by inter- 
est rate worries. 


ARTE: Highbrow European TV Station Develops Ties With Blue - Chip Corporate Advertisers 


Continued from Page 9 
households. In addition to France, 
Germany and Belgium, tbe channel 
is also available in parts of Scandi- 
navia, Portugal, Luxembourg. 
Switzerland, Austria, Slovakia and 
North Africa. 

An ad campaign scheduled to 
begin this week in France uses the 
theme “My television is talented.” 

Arte needs to make clear that 


“the channel is for everybody," 
said Mr. Schroeder. “Making a 
show more popular doesn't have to 
entail an absence of quality.” 

But analysts note a danger that 
the station's basic demographics 
could be jeopardized if Arte decid- 
ed that tbe only way to broadest its 
viewer base would be by diluting 
the intellectual content of its pro- 
grams. 


Among tbe skeptics who doubt 
that Ane can expand much, Caro- 
line Olchanski, a financial analyst 
following media and communica- 
tions industries at Dupont Denant 
in Paris, d aimed that the French 
audience numbers were actually 
only about I percent rather than 
the 2.6 percent c laim ed by Arte. 

She said that this was far short of 


the 5 percent market share that 
Ane is aiming to achieve: At the 
same time, she cautioned that there 
was not much information avail- 
able on the channel. 

“In France, it’s more or less a 
fail ore,” she said, explaining that 
the c hann el's thematic nature was 
meeting too much competition 
from cable TV stations. “It's hard 
to justify the budget and maintain a 


channel with only a 1 percent audi- 
ence,” she said. 

Ms. Olchanski said the certain 
companies might nevertheless be 
interested in becoming partners if 
Arte could continue to deliver its 
upscale, decision-maker audience. 

"What interests these companies 
is the PR opportunity,” she said. 
“Sponsoring a program is nothing 
more than a form of advertiang.” 


Saturday and agreed to sue its far-/) . 
mer board far m is managemen t 
Under tbe bailout plan, the bank 
will cover its equity shortfall 
though a capital writedown and. a 
share of new stock. Banesto's old 
management, led by Mario Conde, 
was replaced by tbe Bank of Spain 
on Dec. 28 after audits found the ■ 
bank’s liabilities exceeded its assets 
by 605 billion pesetas (S4.4 bUhon). - 
As a result of the recapitalization . 
plan, Banesto will have a new ma- 
jority owner by May 9. Bids are 
expected from Banco Santander 
SA, Banco Bilbao Vizcaya SA and * 
state-owned Argeutatia SA. 

Terms for the auction of new 
shares will be published next week. 1 
said Alfredo Saenz, (he acting 
chairma n. 

The key issue will be the price * 
derided by the Bank of Spain. Banks ' 
view the current market level of 800 ; 

pesetas a share as too much. They ; 
also feel the cut in nominal share ' 
value to 400 pesetas from 700 under < 
Mr. Saenz’s plan, was too generous. 

But Mr. Saenz said care had to ‘ 
be taken not to alienate existing j 
small shareholders and forrign in- 
vestors. ; 

Mr. Saenz gave the board’s bad:- ' 
ing for legal proceedings against Ml 
G oode’s team, based on Spanish lav 
granting the right to demand com- 
pensation from administrators who 


break the law or infringe company.- 
statutes. (Bloomberg Reiners)',- 


NASDAQ NATIONAL 


77TTTT 


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OTC Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, March 25. 

(Continued) 


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- 2494 25ft 74ft 24ft— 1 HmawG 

- 31413 12% 12ft +% HrrowBc 

_ 40912ft lift lift —ft HomeTB 

1211 5ft 5% 5ft ♦% Hontnd 

- 1182 3ft 2ft 2ft +ft HorrgC P 

- 940 3ft 3 3 —ft Ho njfl k 

-1872334V. 21% 21ft— 3 H oniCk 

- 1036 8ft 7ft 7ft —ft 

_ 126 M 13 13ft ♦% 


Soles 

ttv YU KBs Mat) LOW Ctt Ott 


Hamate - 452339 37% 37V.— 1% 1 JSBFn 

HmawG JO 67 143 3 2ft 3 _ Jobfl 

HrawBc - 684 13% 12ft 13 ‘V, JaeJsHwt 

HomeTB s _1717919ft 16ft 16ft— 2% JacoSec 
Hanhid A* 1J 420 34 3T.4 34 _ Jacten 


29ft ‘ft | JacarCwt 


- 45%-lft 


HpFnc JO 2 3 4142795 21il 

HPSC - 109 3ft 3ft 

HSRsc _ 43623ft 22* 

HUBCO AS a 12 844 21V, 70* 

Hdch .16 3 19 20ft 19V 

H0dOO _ 446 7ft 7ft 

Hasaar JO 2 2893 39ft 37U 

HcVmAut _. 127514% 12ft 

HOko 32 13 2810% 9Vi 

HaHmkGo - 6511ft 11 

HtttrrfcHI _ 616)3 11V 

HahvdCn 32 24j 0 741 3% 2ft 

HkwdE _ 125 14 13 

HihbHm - 252 6ft 6 

HnmrtnBc 2886 22% J1V, 

Hamlpfl - 1422 A, 4ft 5% 

HampGp - 466 6% 6 6 

HancHd .93 3-1 71 X 39ft 30 

439 7% 7 7 


8 4ft 4ft 4% — % 

- 97 5ft Sft 5ft —ft tSS® 

_ 157 6ft 6ft 6ft —ft 

JO A 2956 51ft 49’ . 50% — % r!Y7?- tT1 . 

- 26726% 34V, 26% + 1ft 

- 11*8 6% 5ft Sft -% 

JO 23 41427ft 21ft 21ft 

- 109 3% 3ft 3V U ‘*4 HnrvJk . 
_ 436 23ft 22ft 23% -ft 

Ma22 84421V, 20ft 21ft *ft JjSJS- 
.16 A 19 20% 19V, 19ft _ 

- 446 7ft 7ft 7ft ‘ft LJL2I? S 

JO J 2893 39ft 37% 3T. —ft 

_. 127514ft 12ft 13ft -IV. HfcfST* 

32 13 2810V. 9Vi 9ft ‘ft 

_ 6511ft 11 lift ‘ft 


WmdYTc _ 126 M 13 13ft ‘ % 

HKhM - 20*6 7ft 6ft bft ‘ft 

HRtiwwtA - 2 Vb 1ft ft, _ 

HTttlwwtB - 15 ft) Vm Vs _ 

Hlttrwrcs _ 753 3% 7ft 3% * % 

HltwAm - 380 26ft 25 25 —1ft 

HearlTc -11267 19 16 16ft— 2ft 

HrtlndE - 76935 34 35 *% 

HchoB M A *5614% 13 14% ‘ft 

HChuA .1* 1.11938214ft 139k 14ft *1 
HecfOn _ 7 7ft 7ft 7ft — % 

H eklewi l _ 116812ft 11 II —1ft 

HetonTr _ 131414 \3’A 13ft _ 

HeSan - 3834 6 4ft 5ft ‘I 

HelUTcs AS 2 A 1893 20% 17ft 18% *1ft 

HnryJks .18 1 A 54011ft 10ft II —ft 

HerbHe .72 1413181 30ft 38ft 30ft -ft 

HrtoFds JO 2J 42 23 22 22% -ft , 

HrloFSs J6 Z2 15016ft 15ft 16% — % . — -, T 

HrtY _ 94* 7% 7 7 -ft | T 

HlTcPhrs _ 308012ft lift lift —ft 

HfcerSv _ 123 17% 15ft 16ft *1% 


jl, Horshd 

7. Hospos 

V. HufKoa 
HuoofEn 
“ HumGen 
i. HuntJB 
t? Humco 
77 HunIBn 
u Hurco 
^ HukST 
^ HytiPhr 
,4 Hvcor 

7“ Hvcor wr 

Hvd«A*» 
- HvdeAtB 
w HvdrTch 


3 2b 2J 17114ft 13ft 14 -% JocstCm 

_ 14193 18% 16% 16ft— 1ft Jorrtesnln 
.110 14 258 4ft 4% 4ft —ft Jasmine 

_ 104 7% 6*. 6ft _ Jasons 

_ 6*7 8ft 7ft 8 —ft JayJaCb 

_ 2903 lift 14ft 15 - jeenPhl 

_ 1882 20V. 17 17 —3 JettrGo 

JO J 5674 24% 22ft 23% -ft JefBshs 
Me 3 106130ft 28ft 28ft— lft jefSvLn 
JOb 14 6556 24V. 22 Yl 23% ‘Tk jeflSva 

- 107 3 2ft 2ft - 

_ 227639% 33*9 34ft— 4ft wfrms 
_ 1497 5% 5ft 5»% -ft 

- 1165 5ft 5 Sft -ft twa 


A 4 18 645 239. 22ft 22ft —ft 
_ 4771 8% 7ft 8 —ft 
_ 114 12 10ft 12 ‘1 

_ 255 8V< Sft 8% 

JO 3A 60515 14 T4ft -ft 

_ 6 7ft 6ft 7% —I ft 

_ 456 16ft 15ft 15% —ft 

- 1745 8ft Sft 8ft —ft 

_ 36* 4ft 3ft 3% —ft 

- 31615 14 IS ‘ft 


A0 21 326519ft 1 67b 19% ‘3 

AO 33 39 18ft 18 18 - 

_ 65113ft 13ft 13ft ‘ft 

_ 10*225 23 2*ft —ft 


MdsxWat 1JB 52 


M-Wove 
MG Prod 


35414ft 13 
12810ft 9 


Oft— 1ft 
9ft _ 


_ 1819 2ft Th. 2% - MHMever J3e J 3319 6ft «ft *ft 


_ 185510ft 10% 10ft *ft MAFBcS 
JO J 104* 43ft 40% 43ft ‘2 MARC 
AB 13 35121% 20% 20% _ MB Com 

_ 4 8 7% 7% _ AABLA 

- 128)6% 16ft 16ft — W MCI s 

_ 239314 12ft 14 ‘ft MDL Into 

- 319 8 7ft 7ft - MDTCO 

_ 54Z7 1ft 1ft lift. ‘V H 

- 64225% 34 24ft —ft MFSCm 

_ 4189 29% 2t»4 27 —1ft ^ 

JOelJ) 117 20ft 20% 20% - i5*p old 

- 126 ISft 14ft 14ft —ft 

_ 1367 15ft 14% 14ft —ft “S* „ 

.10 A 33813ft 13 13% —ft 

20 S.1 6*23% 22% 23% _ 

J4 IJ 510420 II 19 ‘ft J^Cnri 

- 2931 16ft 15 15ft *ft 

_ 1108 67k *ft 6ft —ft 

.16 131*3243 ISft 14% 15% —ft 


]■» “Y“ JahnstnA 


296 6ft Sft 6ft -Vi 

768 6 Sft 5ft _ 

1843 2ft TJu 2% _ jocSa 

i JamcM 
Jaslvn 
J uhoLT 

it!! ^ 


_ 308012ft 11% lift —Ml *il i&Z ££ zrl - ws,ins 

_ 123 17ft 15% 16ft ‘lft £2* '■* “ ^ ^ _,T 

_ 190012ft 12ft 12ft ‘% 


MNX 

AARiMOT 


261 22ft 21ft 27% _ JJJSI. is 

_ 14* 7ft 7% 7ft -ft M 

- 1587 19 17% 18% — % SEH?* 

JOe 1^ 281 14ft 14 14ft _ 

.10 ,4125870 25ft 24% 24ft— 1 

_ 1195 8ft 7% 7ft -ft fESoT 

_ 71* Aft 5% Aft —ft ffSS? 

_ 459 9% 8% 9 —ft 

-11107 35 32% 32% —Jft MOCN 

_ 666814ft lift 13 ‘ft M%diw S 
_ 3374 6ft 6% 6ft ‘ft Ztodtec 

.16 3J x55 5% 4ft 5 —ft 

_ 298 15 14ft 14ft —ft mS^Y 

_ 793 5ft 5 5% —ft 223*7* 


_ 105210% 9% 9% —I ft I 
MR VOn _ 265 Sft Sft Sft ‘V* 

AARVtot _ 46 lft 1% lft — Vb 1 

AAS Car _ 202227ft 26 26ft —ft 

MSB Bcp JOelJ 10318 17% 17% +% 

MTCEJ _ 9756 7ft 6% 6% —ft 

MTS J6 1J 28931ft 30% 31ft ‘ft 


,3 :5 as? 

:% JJS5 h 

4% 5% ‘ft HoLQP 


Centex & 

_ 10856 23ft 24% — 3 

Genus 

— 10184 5ft 

4% 

5% 


Genzvm 

- 954438% 27 

28 

-% 

Gera wl 

- 71211 

10 

IOH 

-% 

Genzv wr 

- 453 7% 

7 

7% 

-% 

GeravTr 

_ 87 8 

7ft 

7ft 


Geodyn 

Jfl 3J BA 9% 

8% 

«ft 

♦ft 

Geonex 

_ 244 lfa 

1% 

1% 

—to 

CMason 

J9» 1.4 6419 

18ft 18ft 

—ft 


_ 28813 ISft |3 ‘% 

1J4t 9J 42820ft 19ft 19ft —ft 

- 601 2ft H, |ft —ft 

I „ 161 10% 10 10% ‘ % 

J9e!.9 1643ft 41ft 41ft _ 

.13« 2.1 283 6% Aft «% — % 

- 2115 8ft 7% 7ft 

3A 1J 4819% 19 19% —ft 

-Me J 7339 22% 21ft 21ft —ft 


5B37>ft) 7% 7 *V d “4n 
_ 9163 1% lft 1ft 
20 U 15* 22V, 22 22 —ft 

3JS 1J 37193 187 190 +1 
_ 12* 9% 9 9% — Vb 

_ 4817 4ft 4% 4ft 


Hande* 

HtxbrFd 

HrdoAs 

Harteys 

HrlYNIs 

Harman 

HarpGp 

HaisHo 

HorisSva 

HarvFar 

Harvlnd 

Harvlpf 

Kaihwv 

HausOi 

Haver* 

HavrtW 

Havrlys 

Hawks 

HowkC 

HowIPn 


120 *v„ % *v n syKSf 

19110 9% 10 *% SIS" 15 

8210% 9% 10 *% 

144 21% 21 21ft — % 

*34 8ft Sft 8ft - ^ 

75 4 3% Jiv„ ‘I/. 

sail ioft io% *% iZsr 

J1A 1 A U. 


—ft I Hoenlo 


-. 439 7V. 1 7 —ft HTctyfiV 

- 17313ft 12% 12ft ‘ft toiler A0 I 

_ 1027 8ft Aft 7% —lft HtvwdCa I 

A* 2A 22125 34 24% ‘ft HoBvwdS I 

■» ,2! 21^*2 HlwdPk s 

- 1099 34% 21 24 *3 HhMdPpf JO 3J 

JO U 1461 17% 16ft 17 -ft Hototic _ 

^ S2B 7ft 7% 7ft * % Hotoohne 

-. 10919 18ft lift ‘ft HofenB _ 

- 1580 15ft 12 12 — 3% Horn Ben JS 17 

_ 61311 UP* 10% +ft HmFdWs JO 1J 

- 304 26% 26ft 26ft ‘ft H«MO J6 1.9 

JOe 5.9 561 3ft 3% 3ft _ HFW 

- 90* 9 8ft 8ft —ft HFtCvP J4bl4 

- 73312 lift lift „ HmeNl r - 

-560 3.0 16*19% 18 18% ‘% JO 5J 

33 1.7 172917% 15ft 1* —1 **1 | SyfT r J0b2J 

AS 2A 822 19 18% 18% _% HmeStO t 

■14b 11 *42 7ft *% 6% ‘ft H°™°M 

- 87 *% 6 6ft ‘ft MrnecrPS - 


_ 3811 10ft 10% “A 

.10a 2J *261 4ft 4 4 —ft Ss; 

.17# 1 J 3541 10ft 9% 9% —ft rs? 

Tli 4\a «/.. w.. JI V1 


: iS2i2ft n* i2% g; £ 

_ 2953 26% 22% 22% -Mk 
ik to « m * iri.ay 


_ 68816ft 14% l*%— 1% I 

_ 221 19 19ft 18% 18% —ft ■ 

_ 820 4ft 4 4ft, —ft, 

_ 9461 31% 27ft 28 -3% ! 

- 15435 19ft 14% 15% —3% 

_ 140 9 8' . 8% - <LA.. 

_ 99 7 6% 6% •% KU-M5 

_ 133V 11% 10% 11% «l. 

_ 2542 32 31 21 —ft Kohters 

8 3ft 3ft 3ft _ K tfaRsc 

- 3041 9 7% 8 —1 Kamon 

_ 117 9% 9 9ft *% Kamani 
_ 7335 2V„ 2 — <ft, KankokB 

_ 173426% 25% 25% _ KarcJrr 


, ***" H * ^ ** MTCEJ 

1 MTS 
MOrmd 

MBs 

-08 J 134225ft 23ft 23% —ft mSSi? 
— 31 7ft 6% Aft — % Macron n 

-1138*43% 38ft 40%— 2ft XvSor 
_ 137 17% l*% 17 —ft AtadGE 
-.39210 9 9ft — % Moo^ 

tcahlers JD8t JB 202 10ft 9ft 10% — % WSOTal 

KefisRsc _ 75 14% 14ft 14ft -% MooStt 

Kamon AA 4J 1065 ID 1 * 9ft 9ft —ft MogmP 

Komanof 3JS 6 A 951ft 50% 50ft -ft McviBs 

KankskB _ 31717 16ft 17 *% MapGp 

Korchr JOS A 5273 14 13% 13% — % AtaoCps 


AO 23 2B} 26% 25% 26 —ft 


AO _ 303 17 16ft 16ft —ft 

- 613 5 4ft 4% _ 

- 170 lft 1 — fti 

_ 12919ft 17ft 17% —2% 

- 11225 17ft 14% 15% —2ft 
1-86 53 20332ft 32ft 32ft —ft 

- 1621 13ft 13 13ft —ft 

- 302 6ft 6% *</» — % 
_ 1062 15ft 14ft 15% -ft 

- 2311 34ft 32ft 34ft ‘1% 

34 1.0 5635 34 34 —| 


MJdlFn 19422% 21ft 21ft _ 

ArtUTCo -.2130530% 28ft 2fft +1 

MktwGr JQ \A 917 32% 31 32 .% 

AAikofm _ 1464 17ft 16% lift —to 

MleHme -. 794 6% Sft 6% _ 

AAlb-BU _ 116 Sft 3% 3% -ft 

MttHr 32 U 8212 34 29% 29ft— 5ft 

MDcznln „ 764024% 23ft 24ft _ 

Mfftope — 595 4ft 4% 4% —ft 

M3wins _ 4) 11% 11 11% —ft 

ArtlneSf J2 2J 1842 41ft 42 ‘ft 

AAfewNt % 1JM 3J 89 29ft 29 29ft ‘lft 
ArtinnEdu _ 6921 13ft 12ft 13% ‘to 

A8MMC 8*3 12ft lift 12 +% 

MfeSVlv J5 1 A 321 14% 13% 14% » ft 

MinkSr - 1982 16ft lift 14ft— 1h 

MoMGs 1JU 16 2028ft 27ft 27ft— 1 

AAbTTei -553*0 20% 15% 20ft *4 

AAobtoy 158 2ft 7% 2ft —ft 

ArtOCN JO 2A 347 I'li 7% 7ft — ft 

Atodines A6 I A 215028% 27% 28 —to 

Afodfec _ 64 1% lft lft —ft 

Mohawks _ 4333 30% 27% 30 ‘lft 

MotecDy _ 288211 9 10% —ft 

Malax s JM .1 206337 35% 36% —'A 

MotoxA .03 .1 109634% 33% 33%—' 1 

MotfenM _ 3304 25% 24ft 25 —ft 

MomenCp _ 231 10% Vu 9'« w 

MonocoC _ 532 16% 14ft 15 —(ft 

MonocoF - 3486 8% 7% 7ft —ft 

MonocWT - 620 2% ! 2% —ft 

MortAvf _ 45 2% 2% 2% -% 

MahCasn - 15211% 9% 10ft —ft 

Mondovt _ 1625 9% 9% 9% _ 

MortovS s .16 J 1794 21ft 19V. 20 —lft 
rtrtonRE JO 63 24 7ft 7% 7ft 

MartroM _ 1678 18% 16% 16ft— lft 

MonIPos _ 166517ft 16% 17% ‘ft 

MooreP „ IT 16 16 16 ‘ft 

MoranGp J02e J 46 9 8% 8ft 

VomGp .15 23 898 7% 6% *ft —1 

Mascam J04 J 8591 12 10ft lift +lft 

Wasfcto 36 1.1 13232 30ft 31ft - 

VtotoflMs _ 51 17ft 16ft 17ft *ft 


MotecDy _ 

Atotexs JM .1 
MotoMA .03 .1 

ArtotfenM _ 

AAomenCp — 

ArtonacoC _ 

Monacof 1 _ 

ArtonacWT 
ArtortAwf 
MoftCtrsn 

Mondmt _ 

MortovS S .16 J 
ArtonRE JO 63 

MartroM — 

ArtontPos _ 

ArtoareP 

MttrartGp JOe J 
MomGa .15 ZJ 
Mascam JM J 
Marine 36 1.1 

AArttoWfc _ 


HtwdPof JO 3J 65 22 20 20 -2 

Holoatc _ 109 7% 6% 6ft — V, gg* 

Hotoohne _ 4018% 17ft 17ft -ft £?,!£ 

HotonB _ 182 7 6ft 6ft —ft ££ 

Ham Ben J8 17 6121% 20 31%—% 

HrtlFdWs JO 1J 244 20ft 20 30ft ‘ft VPof 

HgMO 36 1.9 «ffl%28 »ft 


_ 783 8% 7ft 8% ‘% KOVdpns A0 IJ 14(7125 23% 23ft— lft ArtogTefi, ~ 


_ 56 8ft 7ft Sft *ft WlvOil 


W=MO . 66 4ft 4 4 —ft 

HPdSvP J4b 3A 34 19ft lift 18ft — % 
HmeNlr - 713 7ft />%. 71%, _ 

HmPrr JO 5J 42311ft II IT _ 
HmSvR. J0b2J 23336ft 26 36 -ft 

HmeSW _ 63519ft 17% 17%— 1% 
HomcxM — T1730 18ft 15ft lift *2ft 

Hmecrps _ 612% 11 12%—% 


IWC 

lot 

IHniSup 

ImaeeAm 

bnaoBus 



Last Week’s Markets 


Ail figures are as of ctase «rf trotting Friday 


Currency Management Corporation Plc 

Winchester Bouse, 77 London Wall - London EC2M 5ND 
TeL: 071-382 9745 F«s 071-382 9487 


Stock Indexes 


Honey Ratos 


UnMed State* Mar. 25 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE & GOLD 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
CaU for further tnfortnaUori & brochure 


' Attention Futures Traders- 

US$29 On ZmESS round turn 

• Puce Oxnna Tou. Fra: World Wine • $9,000 B/tamam Mexxmrx 
• Daaoarr raa Touu Tunc • Ita Oms Sdsn Omx 
• Pus Moca Kosstlt Fat dalallaa« Boot taOat Have Pnllt Par Ttate and 
■awa n pkoM MU* toe, write, ybame or fax: 
rn o aKTi . T mbo w Ckootp »^. BooMoe Horae. 23 8r Srryapn Gkpot, 
DflBUr2 , Ukloid TD.+3S3 lfi 28SOM FKX+353 1« 7S6IZ3 


OJ Indus. 
DJ UHL 
OJ Trans. 
SfcPIOO 
SAP 500 
S&P Ind 
NYSE Cp 
flfllriB 
FTSET00 
FT 30 


<War.l8 arae 
3J95J5 —aw% 
30434 —1.98% 


Disco unt rote 
Prime rate 


Imucar 

Im uLoo 

l/rttnan 

ImunRsP 

Imunexs 

Imunxwt 

bnunmd 

irrtocJSv 

ImarBc 

ImpCrd 

inFoau 

■nHome 


_ 4507 lft 9b i% ‘ft, icetySA* 

_ 388 Aft 5% 59a ‘Vi. KOTnet 

_ 100 9ft 9% 9% —ft Kenan 

_ 379 2ft 2ft 2ft _ KendSare 

JO 16 A 1017 4ft 4ft 4ft +% iceneteeh 

_ 97 26% 74% 34ft — % Karra 

1 JO 6J 220 23 22% 22% —ft KrttcfcyQ 

_ 747 1% 1% W» _ K OriEnt 

_ 320 15% 14% 14ft —ft KyMed 
i _ 576 3ft 3ft 3ft — ft KCOtel _ 

- 2-rt. lft lft -V, Kevfin 

_ 3153 7% Aft 7 +ft KewnSc - 

_ 347 9ft 9ft 9ft —ft KevPrd 

^ i w =^- : 

- h ® « 

_ 1247 Aft * Aft _ KirnbaJ 

_ 1547 lift 10ft 10ft -H KndrLwt 

- 5306 16 14ft 14ft _ ESrU-T 

" ^12^ V* +* Kinenc 

- 3708 5ft 49b 5 — % Krmorrf 

_ 176 1ft lft 1ft —ft Kbrais 

I - 62915 14 14ft ‘ft KfSSi 

1.14110.9 274711ft 10 10ft— 1 KSS 

_ 2049 13 lift 12 _ JXJSw 

_ 17S2 3 2ft 7ft — % 


_ 4482 7ft fift 


J4 23 352827 

- 346418 16ft 18 +1 MabiSfCB 
34 U 2518ft 17% 18ft ‘ft Makita .l«e A 

- ms 5% 4% 4% —ft MaOan 

_ 154*27 25ft 26 — % Mcrrim I _ 

_ 316 2 lft 1% — % MonhLfc J4 SA 

• - 481 lift 11% lift _ MonuBitf 

_ 597 23% T9 19ft— 3ft MCPtofo - 

- 411 8 7ft 7% ‘ft MarbFn J)Se A 

_ 814 10ft 9% 9% —I Mrrccrn _ 

- 234 2ft lft lft _ Marie! _ 

_ 1392 Sft 3ft 3ft — % - 

- 329 4 3ft 3ft _ MwhierH - 

- 226 B 7ft 7ft —ft JO 3J 

- 489 7% *% 7 — % „ - 

I JB 4 A 66029% 28ft 29 —ft “'ll' 1 *"* M ** 

1.04 3J 44 32% 32ft 32% —ft „ - 


25ft -lft ArtaklSI 


- mnfaal J4 2J *26430 WA 29ft +lft 


3 Sft 9A 5ft _ 
_ 1394 15ft 14% 14ft —ft 


_ 1601 Sft» 4ft 4ft —ft 

- 248814 13ft 13ft ‘ft 
•16* A *61 19ft 19% 19ft —ft 

- 297 4% 3ft 3ft —ft 
I - 299 5M 4ft 4ft —ft 

34 SA 1 4% 4% 4% _ 

- 288 14ft 13ft 14 —ft 

- 136727V, 25 27% ‘2ft 

J»e A 166 0ft 8% 8ft — % 

_ 2377 13ft 12% 13 —ft 
_ 264 8ft ■ Bft ‘% 
-12051 6ft 6 «% —ft 

- 4931 76ft 25ft 25ft —ft 

JO 32 4615ft 15ft 15ft —ft 

- 614819ft 18% 19% ‘lft 

.96 3J 350 30 28ft 30 ‘1 

_ 13243% 42ft 43% ‘ft 

J8 16 5 8% 7ft 7ft —1 

- 28 2% lft ? — % 

- 484 16 15 15 -ft 


MCoftee 

Minor 

MulMwtB 

Muttcre 

Artuttmdli 


- 450615% 14ft 15% - 

- 36510 9% 10 ‘ft 

- 1733 ft % % - 

_ 1799 21% 19% 71 ‘1 

_ 857530% 28ft 29%— 1 


WAG NATi 


MutlAsr IJOt 4.9 16721ft 20 Vi 2Dft 


MuJSWS 

AAvaton 

Mylex 


S2S 16ft 15ft ISft —ft 
80211 10% 10% — % 
1995 Aft 6% Aft — Vb 


N-viroinr _ 333 6% 6% 6ft — % 

NAB AST 1JDB30.0 255 5ft 5 5 

MAC Re .16 A 323437% 26% 26%—' 1% 

NAtTCS J3t 3J 3278 7 Aft Aft —ft 

N8SC 32 2A 12621% 70 2D — 9VB 


NBTBCP J6b 2J 232 18% 17ft 17% —ft 


Kinenc .15 19*3616 4% 3ft 3% _ 

Kbmard .10a 2J 443 4ft 4 4ft —ft JHS,® « ^ 1?^ 

Xrnus _ 1649 Wu 4ft 4ft +V E « TlJtW 11% 11% ♦% 


1J32.74 — 1JB% Federal hinds rats 
436J1 -237ft Japan 


471J16 —222 ft 
5S2J6 —234ft 
26135 —1.94 ft 


Discount 
Call money 
>monfti Interbank 


amio —277% 
2541.90 —273 ft 


— iw i V* L'w,. 

btocom _ 136019% 1BV6 18% —ft ^.Vc 

Into ne *1 _ 238922% 21ft 22 — % HL,£| 

IncoHm - 1506 7ft 6% Aft — % kSwioI 

hxfficp 1.16 11 2240273, 37ft 37ft — % 

tadecHTd Me 3 31 3 3 3 - 

IruSkMA - 2091 5ft 5<A 5% —ft Kg' 1 

IndBkMI JO 42 196 19ft 18ft 18ft — % 

Inctirtsr J4 IJ 1(4 16% 15% 15ft ‘ft 

IndTriM - 3476 2 »m Itoi, 2ft 

tadlFdl 30a 15 1623 22ft 23 - 

J6 73 6 24*6 24% 24ft _ DtvSZLl 


7ft —ft 
25ft +Vt 
2Tft * VI 
47 - 


Nikkei 225 
Germany 
I DAX 

| Hone Kooa 

Haw Sens 


20J69L —009% 


21SJ1 —1.19% 


9,13231 +1.12% 


Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 1994 

The US dollai will ;ocr; de'laUon will ccnhnue. gold a moil commcd 'les 
won l rise: Japan j economy a slock market vvlfi be weak " You d,d 
HOT read that in fulletMoney - the Iconoclastic Investment letter 
CC *V '0 Ph. i.pj for c ic-rpio .ssue (or.co ot> 0 c - i-'-dys i Lid 
? Sv.c:'Ow.' 5'root London ¥71? 710. J< Te 1 LCniJan 7‘ -4iV4v61 

(071 mUO s' c c 71-43; 75*4 c ( V5=A 


Lombard Aft 6ft 

Cali money 6ft 185 

3-month Interbank 530 530 

Britain 

Bonk base rote 5ft 5ft 

Coll money 5ft 5ft 

3-month Interbank 5% 5% 

Grid Mar. 25 Mar. 18 arte 

London pm ft xJ 391 JO 38655 +U3% 


mourn 

(ndusHid 

IndHwlA 

InritwfB 


IndTrn 
mtnarts 
tnfoSotr 
1 rtfodal 
InfoAm 


u •*« tCrua 

- 2476 2^ 1 -ft, 2% *Y* 

13 1623 22ft 23 - 

L3 6 24*6 24% 24ft _ D-SLi 

_ 314 hW, 4% 4UT» _ SJSl* 

- 53 1 1 1 — Vk 

- 23 ft lft, —% KushLcv 

- 14528% Z7 28ft *1% 

_ 17 5 4H 4ft —ft I 

- 7791 29% 20 28 —1 1 

- 280023 21% 23 ‘ft . 

_ «4 1% ft lft, HxVdr 

- 317 4ft 3ft 39b -ft fgw 


_ 81 7 6% 6% — % Marohla J* 2J 271 5 22 21 22 t?* 

A6 3J 288 19*6 19 19ft =ft ^ j'J* J«ft ”W, -ft 

- 4142 15ft 14% 15 —ft - J® 1 !? If ’U 

_ 167 6ft 6ft Aft ‘ft „ ,7 S5«vL, 7 , 

- 1511ft 10% 11 ft 16 554 25ft 25 25ft +ft 

- 1973 % % 'V„ — S* 

- 164 to 6> k. -.1. wosonorxia 23 47 47 45 47 — 

-1*50 24% Jftfaft ^6 «« •** U 

- 17*1 ia 16% i6ft —% ; Si 5,^ 

- 5511% 10ft 11% ‘ft JKJS,, - A — J* 

- 483 17 16% 16% - 12u. IS? 

.171 SA 494 3% 2ft 3ft —ft ^ ” ” 1 

- 423 14% 14 14 % Mathew _ 365 3Cu Sft 3ft* — 

- 8587 14% 12ft 13 -ft - SU\VA 10ft 10% -% 

- 705 10% 9% 10 % — 294 9ft Bft 8A6 — % 

- 4075 1 Bft 'V- ,1ft -10672 1 5% 14ft 15ft ‘ft 

r II ft, % ft? -L JS j - 301*13% lift I3M ‘1% 


NO BdS 

NBC 

NFORSh 

NFS 

WAR 

NNBaH 

NSBa> 

NSAIrd 

NSC 

NVtEW 

NYCL 

Naham 


- 180 17 15ft 16ft -ft 
-46e A *82 52% 51 51ft —ft 

_ 2223 25 24 24% —to 

•48 2J 475 18% 16% 17% ‘ft 

- "If 3ft 2ft 3ft ‘ft 

_ - 2827 16% 15% 15% —ft 

■32 1.0 44331% 30% 31ft ‘% 

_. 181 Aft 6 6 

lJ0e27-0 353 4ft 4% 4Yu — V* 
_ 428 4ft 3ft JV. ‘ft 
_ 5385 %* %. ft —ft 

_ .239 2% 2% 2ft — 


NamTals Jlle .1 154712ft lift lift —ft 


Mathew 

ArtaxErs 

Mores 

MaxcrHtt 

ArtaxlmGp 

AAaxIGwt 


- 1(7 6% b A — % 
-1307742 39ft 4116 *1 


ArtavKGrp 

-AAaynOi 

MavsJ 


I -478 ? lft 9 *% A1 17W31ft Wft »ft -ft SKSe 

- « .sft 9ft — % H3L,. - ,D 4 i iT Artecow 


HtonW Index From Morgan Stonier CoVtot Inn. 


Fnfrasnc 

WMTech 

InglMkt 

Inmoc 


- 971722 19% 30%— lft H2FS* 

-39940 23% 21 7T%— 1% , L 21- t S. 

- 1460 4ft 4 4ft ‘ft 
_ 2140 Tr*. 3ft VU ‘V H 

A6 SA X5S5 12% lift 12% —ft 1 L Sj r " 

_ 061 8% 7ft 7ft —ft I-™.,., 

_ 537 r a 7 7% *% h*tr is 

_ 1KJ8 ft % ft - 

33 1.9 69517ft lift lift —ft 


-Jft mST 




_ O UVE Data From around $10/dayO 

EUROPEAN OEOD Data for $5/Ocy© 

PRICEBUSTER 

Call Anytime Onlowion a AA + 7\73\ 355<5 


44 + 71 231 3556 


F= FINTECH ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD. he 
14 High Street, Windsor, England SL4 1LD 

PROFESSIONAL CURRENCY MANAGERS 
Highly Rated C om p u ter Based Technical Service 
* Currency Fund Management |5.FA Members] 

* Corporate Advisory Services +14 Year Audited Trade Record 
GJ: Donald Lewis or PhipJones Tel: {441 753 842022 Fax: f441 753 833229 


This week’s topics: 

o Toyota: Back On Track 
o At Last, Global Growth? 
o IBM: Genstner’s New Plans 
o Saudi Arabia Companies Go Global 
o Guinness Isn’t Looking So Stout 


.■* . tntotwti 
tnrSrwtA 
* ■ WSrwtS 
•I?' IntlSrtS 


LONDON & GLOBAL 
FOREIGN EXCHANGE PLC 


Now available at your newsstand! 


- 578 2ft, lift. 2 +W “23*=" 

-1219841 42 45V, *Z% 

- 39222 21% 71Vr— 1 

_ 200216% 15ft 16 —ft 

- 767 10 9 9 — % Lk*gxe 

JIS lft 131 3% 3 3% - 

.14 J 67314% 14 14ft _ H” ln q_ 

- 3D0 15% 14% 14ft — % 

- 2528 33% 30% 31 —2 

- 35412V. 10% 10ft— 1% * 

_ 1328 15 13ft 14 —Vs Lonc» 

- 54278 34ft 29% 31% +2 “'"S' 

-2077910 8% 9% _ J-*"*, 

_ 1702 27% 25% 26ft ♦% “*T*GOh 

- 63112 11 11% — % 

_ 432 5% 4V, 5% —ft 

JO J 1051 56 73 69% 70V.— 1% !- m, *L 

-1710919% 17ft 18ft— l LO"«25 

- 80 2% 3% 3% ‘ft LratfPr 

- 448 2% 2 3 — % LttsrmTc 

_ 522 8% 7ft 7ft — % 

J201J 11666 26ft 25ft 26 —ft uSScs 

„ _ 4443 12% tl lift —ft LmSrfa 

JO 2.1 *192 13 14 14 —1 LtrwyT 

- 1085 Bft 7% 7% — % LwvrTs 

.18 IJ 392 10% 9% 9M— 1% Lra» 5 

- WS 9ft 9% 9% —ft t|Sdrf=n 

JO ^ 40819% 10% 19ft +% uZZco 
34 1 3 119514ft 14 14% —ft 

me TJ 328 4ft 4ft 4-Vu LtSSJT 

- 12Q2 4% 4 4 _ 

_ 1076 7ft 6% 6% - Lechier* 

_ 2020 to 9 % 9% —ft r Sg! !lr* 

_ 622 SS 53ft 54 —ft 

- 3218 27ft 25ft 26ft —ft KSJ, 

- 7329 Sft 7ft 7ft —ft lS»S 

- 959 Bft 0 8 -ft 

“ !?. — ^ L^ns 


Lancstrs AO IJ 2406 45 44 

Lance .96 4J 38720% 19 


PREMIER SPECULATION SERVICE 
QUOTE UP TO 100 MILLION USS 
Top Boor, Cameo Howe, 1 1 Bear Sheet. London WC2H 7AS 
Tel.: (071) 839 6161 Fax: {07l| 639 24M 


BusinessWeek International 
14, ard'Oucby, CH-1006 Lausanne Tel. 41-21-617-4411 
For subscriptions call UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2939 


LDI CP .16 2J 462 Aft 5ft 5% ‘ft 

LGFBc - 21732% 31ft 32ft ‘ft 

LSBNC JS 2 A 6022 21 21 — 1 

LSI Ind JIS J 1839 lift 10% 10ft —Vi 

LTX _ 5696 4 3ft M _ 

LVArtHs -Tie 14 250 30ft 28ft 29ft ‘lft 

LXE _ 18811ft 11% 11% — % 

LrtaOne J2 XI 720 24 23 23% - 

LactodeST _ 6218% 17ft 17H —ft 

LarXF r .12 IJ 2884 9% 8ft 9% - 

LadvLuck - 935 10% 9V» 9% —ft 

LafavAB _ 3288 3% 3% 3% *% 

Lkeshre J2 1.1 46530% so 30% *% 

LokidFt J0aX4 01 IB 17V, 17% - 

Lc*»lr»i — 77 3 2ft 3 ‘ft 

LakevwSv _ 74914% 12% 14% ‘1 

LamR*S -1254638ft 33% 34%— « 

Lancstrs M IJ 240645 44 44ft +% 

Lnn» .96 4J 5287 20% 19 17% —ft 

Lancft _ 60* 13 12% 12% — % 

Landotr _ 348 24% 23% 23% *U 

LdmfcGbh _ 4380 28% Z7ft 27% —ft 

Landrys - 4604 26% 25ft 25% —% 

Landsfr - 1496 25ft 25 25 —ft 

Lamw» _ M4 9% 0% 9 —ft 

Lanark: - 76710ft 7 7ft —ft 

LaierPr 883 6ft 6ft 6ft — % 

LaernTc - 575* 16ft 15% 16ft ‘ft 

Lasrscn _ 5194 7 6% Aft — ’ ft 

Lattices - 0977 19ft 17% 18% —ft 

LourlBcs J4a U 21 13% 13 13% - 

LawrSB — 1287 4ft 3% 4ft ‘ft 

Lcrwjn AS IJ 642 28% 26% 2*%— 1% 

LwvYTs .12 JS 211717 IS 15ft— 1% 

Lavne _ 448 6% 6ft 6% —ft 

LeodrFn _ 655 20% 19% 20 ‘ft 

LmoCo - 191217 15% 16 — % 

Lecwwav - 791 14 13ft 13% ♦% 

LWSoio _ 1271 10% 10 10% _ 

Lectoc J2I 5J 30 10 9ft 10 _ 

Lechren 8679 15V, 12 Vi 13ft— 2ft 

LMenl -1619132% 30 30<A— lft 

LetsCn - 444 rA 7 7% - 

LeoGrp - 945 ft. ft, ft, — 

Lescos _ 43915% 14% 14ft— 1 

LesPd - 202012% 12 12ft *% 

LoveOnS _ 331424ft 21% 23% — % 

LextopS AS XI 1373 14% IS TS% —ft 
LiKvSC AO 2A 495 23% 23% 33% ‘ft 


Lamer 

Lanopttc 

LaierPr 

LasrmTc 


_ 1652 4 Sft 5% —ft 

- 851 13 12% 12% — % 

- 1515 12% I Oft 11 —1 

_ 3653*4 3ft 3%, - 

- 569 l Oft 10% 10% —ft 

_ 394 9ft 8% 846 — % 

-10672 1 5% 14ft 15% ♦% 
_ 301413% lift 13% ♦?% 

- 1247 6% 5 5ft +% 

_ 3708 54% 49 49ft— Jft 

-35305 8ft 7% B ‘ft 

M9t 5J 200 9% V 9% 

- 15511ft 10ft lift _ 

- -21 5Vu 5%, SIA, ‘ft, 

1 7 7 7 ‘ft 

- 804 9ft 8 9% *1% 

-37083 51ft 50% 50%— 1% 

- 21 91k yy| ^ 

AS 2J 12973 23% 21% 21ft— 1% 

- 90 4% 4ft 4ft —V* 

„ _ 1336 15ft 14ft 14% — % 

AO 2 A 15117% 16ft 16ft —ft 

- 10 2% 2% 3Vb ‘% 

- 18 3ft 2% 2% — % 

- 1302 11% 10% 11 - 

- 537 7% 6ft 7 

_ 6913ft 13% 13ft —ft 

- 301236ft 34ft 3Sh ‘ft 

- 731 15% 14 14% —ft 

_ 2558 7ft 6 7ft ‘ft 

I - 1486 3ft 2ft 2ft t% 
.16 1.0 173 17% 16ft 16ft _ 

1.00OX7 547 37% 35% 37 *1% 

-162670 27% 9W 11 —15% 

- 947 1H 16% 17 —ft 

- 968 3 3ft 2ft — «u 

- 139 2ft 2ft 2% ‘Vb 

- 1035 5 6ft 4ft —ft 

_ 199 0% 7ft 7ft —ft , 

_ 318 V„ ft ft 

_ 170 27% 27 27 —ft 

- »7 3 34* 3 +ft 

- 1009 8% 7ft B ‘ft 

AS 2j 0 7129 33V, 22ft 23% _ 

- 9920 ft ft VL —ft, 

- 30 %r Vh Vb ‘V B 

- 30 Vy ft. vj - 


Narotc - 534 9ft 9 9ft 

Ncnomt - 1582 lft 1% lft, — V* 

Napco - 156 5 4ft 5 ‘ft 

NaJlF .72 4 A 953 17ft 16% 169,-1 

NaltWBM _ 1693 7ft Aft 6ft —ft 

NBAisfc ]J»aXD 39 50ft 50% 50% —ft 

N«BeV _ 7733 21ft 22ft ‘ft 

NCtvB 1.141 6J 222 1816 17% 10% ‘ft 

NCtySn J»bX4 117 36% 34ft 36% - 

NtOnBCS A0 23 374 22% 21% 22% ‘ft 

NtCrir J6 28 966 13 13% 12ft —ft 

Njcnvwt - 36 5>V,. Sft 5ft ‘ft 

NJJVCnv _ 143 17% 16% 16ft 

NlOenta* _ 59 9% 9 9 —ft 

NriGyps _ 362451 49 49ft— lft 

NriGvwl - 337 36% 34% 35ft— lft 

NatBme - 664 10 0 % 9% -% 

NIHHtl - 757 3 lft 2% — % 

wnneo JOr 1 A 11412% 12% 13% - 

NMns 32 2.9 8311 10% II *'A 

47 4% 4% 4% _ 

NJPriW J2 1.9 7 39 38 » —2 

WPfci _ W1 Oft 8 8 -% 

WPZOA _ 500 Aft 6% 6% —ft 

MPzaS - 171 6 5% Sft —ft 

MriWrt - 2704 13ft Ijft 13% ‘ft 

If2? R< S 0 .. 15® 4 5% 59b ‘ft 

■'HSanlt J4 X0 312% 12% t2ft 

7629 9% 8W BVb-VA. 
WTech j»e>j> 622 3% 3% 3 -V, 

«2Y*n S - 2099 5ft 5% 5ft -% 

_. 883 43 38% 41ft ‘2% 

Wwda - 447016% 15% ISft ‘to 

- 925 13 12 13 +% 

9«WWr 2602 10% 8% Sft — 1 


Ntcnvwt 

NttVCnv 

NlOenta* 

NriGyps 

NriGywi 

NalHme 

Ntm 

Nfllnoo 

Ntllns 

NtMerc 

NtPem 

lYWPfci 

NtPzoA 

NrPza B 

NrilRV 

NatReca 

NtSanlt 

NTeom 

NTech 

NMVsns 

NfWnu 

Nhwda 

NatMicr 

NriWhri 

NaturFd 

Natrets 

NatrSan 

Nauticos 

Navarre 

NavoCa 

Nallcor 

NrisnT 

Noorx s 

Neop ro be 

Neoprwt 

NOESiin 

Nettrame 

Notmmg 


18% —TV Netri* 


J2 LmgCo 
■" Leaoewav 
W, LsoSofcj 
- Lectoc 


16 l7 2 1 ti 96 ?J2 — w LexmaS AS XI 1372 16ft 15 ISft —6 

* 11 Siff ?»,. ?£ U»vBC AO 2 A 495 23% 23ft 23% *V 

— l” ~f!s i-toecaK jus u 2972 m 26 % 27% 


- 3155 4% 3<Vm 4 + % 

- 10445 25% 23ft 34% * ft 

- 5 2% 2% 2% - 


5* LbtyH A 
ft LbtvHB 
.- LtoMedA 



v' Competitive Prices 
%/ Daily Fax Service 


TEL 071-93 1 9133 ■ 

cd; 


FAX 071-931 7114 

G\ .FOREX: LTD 


24HR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


CONVERTFUND INTERNATIONAL 
SICAV 

Luxembourg. 1 ] , Rue Aldringen 
R.C LUXERtBOURG N°B 8.129 


ranif IM9WIV The, real-time information system 
preferred by Institutions ana now 
available to traders at home. Unrivaled coverage at an unrivaled 

B ice. Futures • Options • FX • Energy • Commodities • Metals * 
bws • Full Chartinp & Technical Analysis from our Worldwide 
coverage - available via Satellite through Europe. 

CaU FutureSource TeL: +44 71 -867 8867 Fox: +44 71 -867 1 364 


Notice is hereby given to holders of class “A” shares of 
CONVERTFUND INTERNATIONAL that on or after March 30. 
1994, payment of a dividend of USS 0,50 (SO cents) per share will 
be made against surrender of coupon N* 25 with one of the 
following paying agents: 


- 43 17% 17ft 17ft - 
IJBt 4J 22 32ft 32% 32ft _ 

- 4467 17ft 14ft 17 —ft lKT 

- 40 8% 8 a _ LWck 

_ 2230 6% S% 6ft ‘H uSSwl 

_ 5538 1ft I 1% —V* uriSkvrtC 

- 181 lift 11% 1186 ‘% S?Ch 

m 23 218 3ft 3Vi* 3*4 — Vb SImSI 

.10e - 241 13% 12% 13% ‘ft ttoCW 

_ 1333 12% 11% 11% — % LfaSf 

- 1350 9ft 9ft 9% _ Lh«ne5 

- 34 5 4% 5 _ uhoSU 

- 446 6 5% 5% —ft UcicSd 

- 46411% t% 9 %— IYj nSTir,. 

_ 766 10 % 9ft 10 ‘ft LJnBrt 

- 675015% 13 14% *% tSSoma 

_ - 92B5Wu Sft 5ft —ft lJS? 

JO M 206315 14% 14% —ft u|S2 

- JS» »! SSL 


74 10% 

10% 

10% 

TI 1091 

TOfa 

tOfa 


22 

22% 

340 79 

78 

79 

595 31 

30 

30% 

596 9ft 

9 

9ft 


426 2ft 2% 2% —ft 
vm Sft 4 % «rvi, _*fc. 
1864 3%, 2ft 7ft —ft 
1» 4% 3ft Sft —ft 


- KREDiCTBANK SA. Luxembourgeoise, 
43, Boulevard Royal. Luxembourg. 


For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact ; 
PATRICK FALCONER in London 
TeL (44) 71 836 48 02 
Fax (44) 71 240 2254 


- WEST DEUTSCHE 1 .ANDES BANK CIROZENTRALE. 
He n ogt tnw r 15. Dusecidorf (Germany). 

Fried richstnosr Munster (CermanyL 


_ 462413ft 12ft 13% ‘% 

_ 514044 42 42% —ft 

_ 486929% 28% 29 ‘ft 

JO 2J 270 18% 17ft 17ft —ft 

M .9 70 9% Bft Bft — ft 

- 2484 2ft 2ft **■ ‘Vu 
AA X5 12936% 23% 34 

56 17 95 17 15 1S%— 1% 

36 1 A 023 22% 23 

JObXO 10810% 9ft 9% —ft 

- 2222 8% 7% 7% —ft 

- 36718% 17% 17% —ft 

_ 8 23 19ft 19ft— 1% 

_ 517 17 IS 15ft— 1% 

ljtte A 20716% 208ft 208ft— 7% 
_ 84317 16% 16% —ft 

_ 508026ft Z3ft 24ft— 7 


JO IJ 45216ft I* 16 _% 

_ 974011% 10% 10% —ft 
_ 13C ■?« 7% 7% —1 
_ 437 10% 9% 10 

_ 305 4% 4%. 4%, 

_ 21011% II II 

- 338 14 13 13ft _ 

AO 1A 1619 25% 34% 25 ‘% 

1190113ft 109ft 112ft ‘2% 

— 140S3 34% 23ft 24ft ‘fa 
_ 45214% 13% 14 

140 XI 67 53 51 52 ‘ft 
32 3J*3880 16% 15ft 16% _ 


* * Lindsv 592 37 35 35 

— 7^ LlnearTc J4 J 8757 4ft 43ft 44 
| Usoom _ 1857 6ft Aft M 

( Upsmpf 1-94 10J 19019% 18ft 19 

._ 1938 8% 7ft B 1 / 


J 91 S>A «fa Sft -ft 

13 *!» >ta —ft 

-■ J*V37 35 3S —1ft 

A S7g«ft 43ft 44ft— 4H 

- 1g E M6 Aft 6ft —ft 


5538% 35% 36% 


A IBB 13ft 12% 13% _ 

- 221325 237. 24ft +ft 

- 48017% 17 17% — % 

- 009 7ft «ft 7% 

_ 2347 8% 7ft 8 ‘ft 

- 74592 IT Bft Bft— aft 

- 25012 lift lift —ft 

- 2S!SS m i»+iw 

flt _ 2B51 27ft 26ft 26% _ 

- 4511% 10V. 10% — % 

- 200 7% 6ft 7% ‘ft 
~ 1296 0ft aft 0% —ft 

JOe BA 101 10% 10% lo% ‘fa 
_ 5042 27*6 25% 26 —1ft 
-. 1524 0% 7% 0 —ft 

- 610112% 11% lift _ 

- 1934 12ft llfa lift— 1 
_ 93772 M 77% 80ft— 3V. 

5 9% Bft 9V, 


Itcralb^&i^ribunt 


As a result of tile distribution, the net asset value of “A" shares vrill 
reflect the decreased proportion oT the Fund’s net assets allocable to 
“A” shares as described in the offering prospectus- 


_ 70 19 IBM 18% —to 

_ 2073 8% 7ft 7ft —fa 
_ 26 1% lft ito —ft* 

±So J 36332% 30 31ft —ft 1 
JleAS 497 5% 4ft 4ft — % | 
_ <3 13% 12% 12% —ft 


_ 966 3ft Sft 3fa —fa 

- 147 12% 11% llfa 

- 4185 19ft 18 18% - 

- >81 2% 1ft lft —ft. 

- 59*5 Sft 7% 8% ♦ % 

-10991 Mft 13ft 13% —ft 

- 298323% 31% 22 —1 

- 173 6 5% 5% _ 

J6 7J 519 5% 5 5 — % 

■me J 4 12fa 11% Ufa —ft 

- 323 lfa I i _ 

- 2511 ” 31% 32 to —fa 

- 1379 16% 15% 16 ‘ft 

„ ,-s 3 $£2!T A ,5Vj 15 * -Wi 

J8 15 358820 18% 19ft —ft 

~I*1M1M* 15% lift -fa 
.. 127 10% 9% 10% —ft 

* 47 0% 21ft 21ft _ 

1 AO 10 6 53 53 S3 .ft 

JO X4 6593 X 28 28ft— lft 

i* 3*58* 8 

.12 U 38710 9% 9% fa 

.24b 11 10011% Ufa lift — <4 

- 1J3 5 4% S ‘ft 

-2311 4ft 3ft 3ft —fa 
-23622 22% 21ft 22 ‘ft 

-. 4*2 5% 4ft 4ft —ft, 

.12 A 2713 31 29ft 29ft —fa 

- 9367 23 21ft 22% ‘fa 

- 24 2fa 2ft 2% -ft 

- BBS 13ft 12ft 12ft —ft 
-2670510% 9ft 10% ‘fa 

JM A 2098 16ft 16 16ft —fa 
. - 908530% 26 2646—3% 

■llr IJ. 2*10% 9ft 9ft —fa 

- 2794 20 18 19% ‘1 

_ 43 Mft 13fa 13% _ 

- 5961 3% 21%, Jfa ‘ft, 

JO XI 5756 946 9% 9ft —ft 

- 406344ft 42V. 43 —1% 

1-00 XS 328ft 27% 28ft ‘2ft 

X00 3J 4972 64 63 ft 63ft— lft 

- 063 10ft 10% 10% _fa I 

- .903 17ft 15% 15ft 

- 1682 14ft 13ft 13ft —fa 

- 227 6% 5fa 6 —fa 

- 7488 5* 52 54ft ‘2ft 

- «m 32% 30ft 31 — lft 

_ 2025 5% 4ft 5 _% 

I - 946 146 1% lft —fa 

- 4212*6% 42 43 —2ft 

- >203 5% 4 SVu ‘ Vu 
_ 655 5fa 5% Sft —fa 

- 7892 9% 8 Bft * ft 

- 10*1 1% 1V« Ufa. 

mi 2031 FA 44. 5Vm +vj 
-14511 Sft 7% 71? -v? 

- 397 27V, 26% 26%—' | 

- 60S 4% Aft *ft _> 4 

-10330 87% 87% 87% ‘2fa 

- 260 6ft 5% 5% — % 

- JfSliS? 6 ,0 ’ A '0% ‘Vb 

- 124317% l*ft l*ft * ft 
_ 8179 21V. 27% 27ft +fa 

.73 4.9 239 is 14% 14ft — % 

I® *•' Mft 29ft T% 


JSS?* - 5690 23 21% JlJb — 

NoWim JO 1.1 3299)8 17>A T7ft ‘W 

_ 3830 27% 24 Z7 ‘3 
Nta«are _ 120 7 6ft 6H -ft ' 

NoyvCn _ 468 20% 19 19V, — % 

Nriteor - 2516 29 27% 27%— lft ... 

NrisnT .16 A 1105 22% 21% 21%— 1% 

- 19W 7 6H 6% ‘M ' 

Noopmtoe _ (214 6% 6% 6% + to ■ 

Naoprwt _ 260 lft 1% 1% _ % 

[^”0" - 973PA 37 37 -% 

Nritrame _ 111 17 17% 15% 14% —ft ' 

Nrirnoia ._ 2719 47 42 43ft— 3 

Nririx - 2174 7% 6% 64* ‘to > 

NtoKOnP _ 1065 7% Aft 6% —ft 

WtokG - 18371 22% 18% 19% -3ft 

Nwklm p . _ 4723 I Oft 10% 10% —to - 

JtoricJmvri _ 1*9 7% 6% 7% +to 

NwtcImptXOO 8J) 47 26 25 25 — T ' 

NJftfcSbc — 1904 15 12% 14% +1 

NfefcSy - 5016 8 % 7% 7fa 

- 853 13% 12% 12% —to 

Neyre* _ 21 4 % 4 «h ‘ft 

N«*T>Tc _ 104 84* 8% 8% —to 

Nftvon - 650 9 a a% —to \ 

Ngwra 37 1JS 1608 18% 17% 18 —to • 

- 334 7% * 6ft —ft 

-!2 fS 1389 20% 19% 20% ‘to • 

NHmoTh ,48c 5J 21 9ft 9 9% ‘to - 

NBwHre ,J2e IJ H9 B% 9 
Nmmoo 927411% 9fa 9M— Ito 

NJSJt _ 75 T9 IB ISft ‘to 

Nrt«Bc _ 142 4V, Jft «Vt 

Nv*WrW - 18194 12% 10% lift - 

J™™?"' - 2S«12to 11 11% —to ■ 

N^fcNkS —30220 62 58 61 —ft 

Newo*- JO U 211 lift 11% 11% —% 

KJSSU ■?!* H . • 9% 7% 9% ‘to 

J5e 3 *145 35% 35'A 35% - 

ryg*” 3 ' • - 254514% 13% 14% ‘to „ 

« .7 272 Sib 5% Sfa - 

- 94 9fa 9% 9ft —% ■■ 

-1091844% 47V. 43% —ft ' 

- 36913% 12 12 — >% 

SS* 338 B% B a - - .- 

J7t X3 16612 11 lift— l ■: 

-- .>=2524* 8% 7 7ft -ft * 


Ntwksy 

Nafworm 

Neure* 

ISSSJ C 

Nautro 

N Bruns 

NEBua 


N>rimoO 927411% 9% 9% —Ito 

NJSn _ 75 19 IB 18ft ‘to 

Nrt«gc _ 1C 4% 3ft 4% 

JJV-WW -18194 12% 10% lift - 

_ 2S* 12% 11 11% —to 

N-«toMk s _ 30230 62 58 41 —ft 

Newcor JO IJ 211 lift 11% n% —ft 

nSm? ■?!* ^ 7Vi 9V * *** 

J5e 3 *145 3546 35% 35% - 

rjygy 3 ■ ■ - 254514 % 13 % 14 % *% 

XA .7 272 £% 5% Sfa - 

rftfpqyi — 94 9% 9% 9ft —% 

-1091844% 42V, 43% —ft 
- 36913% 12 12 — 1% 

KESaL. - 338 B% B 8 - - 

JJWWvh J7t a3 16612 11 lift— 1 

"grp! 2J5 55^r 

^ ^ -iBsk r- a =s 

EESS -««« Jfa s% » ‘j? 


NortdCr 

Nthrbns 

NthaCF 

NttnirM 

NwstAhl 

Nw=iu 1 

NwNO 

NTrioa 

Nwsnwr 

NorlArtc 

****** 

Norvamt 

Nwmx 

Novel * 

te; 


to*: - M73 34% 30% 31%-3% i 

rE™ 1 -56 A 31463 61% 62% - . 

U .828515 44% 39ft 44% ♦ « ■ 

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. - 4820 7% ri»- 6*7* — *S ■! 

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(Continued ai page 13 ) 




Issue X 

To Bp*; 


Forfi 


e Sei 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Page 13 


SPORTS 

Shooting for the Moon, Kenyans Win AU but 1 Cross Country Gold 


- v. ;• By Ian Thomsen 

.V-fY International Herald Tribune 

" t bu P APEST —■ The Kenyan team manager 
i ■ stepped forward from the crowd and, gmflino 

: toward tifi dag pole. The six teenage girls saw 

• • this and, layered shoulder behind sinwlderon 

the victory stand, they turned as one to face the 
V Kenyan flag as their national anthem was 
played. 

pen Gilbert Sen shrugged the other way. 
and they responded by turning back to fare 

him. He raised ins arms and they all waved their 

boi^uds for the cameras. They smiled when he 
toughed. After the ceremony, through a win- 

• dow, they could be seen with their anus around 
each other, hugging him all ai once. 

“They are my first team, but we have so 

- many runners.*’ explained Seii, whose runners 
■ r - ;• . won all but one of the gold medals at the 22d 

lAAFWorid Cross Country Championships on 
Saturday. If I had brought my second team, ah 
-• • r ' J .would have finished in the top 20, and we still 
i-. win the team championship.'’ 

- ■ ; The gold medals were presented to the Ke- 
r - nyans as surely as if Gilbert Seii himself had 

wrapped them in Christmas paper the night 
' before and laid them beneath the tree. The 
. morning began with the six teenagers finishing 
"l' : . among the top seven in a junior field of 143 
women. The champion, in a tone of 14:04, was 
16-year-old Sally Barsotio, the youngest com- 
petitor ever to get a medal in a woridwdde senior 
: ■■•£;. competition when she won the 10,000-meter 
bronze at the World Championships last Au- 
' : gust And she was the only Kenyan to ran these 
-r^ 4,300 meters in shoes. 

She was followed to the poditnn by her corn- 
's.- patriot, Helen Chepngeno, the first African 
~ • - .. 5 woman to win a senior race at these champion- 
ships. She completed her meters over 
" "-s grass, dirt, hills, hay bales and a fallen tree 
trunk in 20 minutes, 45 seconds. With all their 
successes these days, it is a rare joy for die 
Kenyans to achieve something for the first time. 
“It’s the big one for us today,” said Mike 
Kosgei. the Kenyan coach. 

■ Cbepngeno’s performance presented her 
country with the chance of sweeping all eight of 
the team and individual gold medals — the 
■least reliable of prospects, as Kenya has applied 
itself to women’s athletics only in the tort five 
. years. Chepngeno, 26 with a 4-year-old son, had 
• not even worked her way op through the junior 
level. She had been a high jumper and thrown 
javelin, without great results, until an injury 
convinced ha to ran. Kosgei suggests that 
.Kenyan women mil achieve the international 
dominance of their brothers in five years. 

There are five rimes more women running in 
Kenya than there were five years ago " Seii said. 
“We encourage diem to form women’s sports 
commissions, and we are letting them train with 
' the men. They go for a shorter distance, but 
they go running with the men. My boys have 
' become a source of a lot of encouragement to 
the women. They know they are training with 
- champions.” 

It is easy to cheer for the Kenyans. Seii looks 


nothing like an active nnmer — his belly is full 
— but he was wearing the Kenyan track suit, 
and Hungarian children were constantly tun- 
ning up with T-shirts and posters for him to 
sign. 

He was autographing something or other 
when a shorter man in a suit and raincoat, an 
official of the Kenyan federation, squeezed 
Seifs arm and told him in their native tongue of 
the failure. The senior women, with no results 
among the top 17 after Chepngeno, had failed 
to win the team gold mortal — and not even the 
silver. They had finished behind Portugal and 
Ethiopia and they would have to accept the 
bronze. He broke this news as if there had just 
been an explosion and he was awaiting the 
report of casualties. He kept pulling at Seifs 
arm as if wanting to blame or to hug. 

The official left and Seri explained their con- 
versation. He concluded, “So now Tm a bit 
disappointed, brother.'' 

This lasted the time ittakes to walk from here 
to there. Over there, approaching the start of 
the junior men’s 8,140 meters, he was ap- 
proached by a quiet 14-year-old with a knap- 


sack, who explained carefully that he had trav- 
eled from Slovenia with his athletics team and 
that he would very much like to have a cap from 
Katya. Seri patted his own bare bead — he bad 


the front, were advising g peh other in mid- 
stride. 

Today is very easy for us,” Seii said. “At 
home we run in the rain, we run in the dust — 


handed out all his cap&Jtve ctftbem --but they 

began to talk and the boy offered him a candy ^ in the hills. They ran going to school, going 
ont of a small bag and Seii said they would meet home, mine to the market primp wherever We 


at the boxy Communist apartment blocks and 
industrial chimneys surrounding the green runner had contributed to the victory, enf ore- 
fid d. “Where else would you expect a Kenyan ing a fast pace that took the finishing kick out 
to be?” of the Ethiopian, HaDe Gcbrealasie, who fin- 

He turned to see die runners churning past, »sheri third m 3*32. 
their shoulders and torsos and heads quite stDL wfaeQ 

“Well done; Philip, wefl done!” Seii shouted, theathletcs are m shap e. Kosgosaid. 
i . —jr v.- «r u v -a, Gelnesflasesbronre was enough to give him 
ckppmg and laughing. To the finish, David, to 0* overall victory in the season's 1AAF World 


American football coach, explaining bow each 
runner had contributed to the victory, enforo- 


Iafer to arrange for a cap. 

“So I follow you,” the boy said. 

“You will follow me?” said the manager. 

“Always,” the boy said, and Seii broke down the other ones are new.” 
into his big hearty faugh. Of the 27 runners. 19 

The boy did follow as Seri wandered the 


borne, going to the market, going wherever. We 
have so many runners I cannot teD you. In the 
whale team, out of 27 runners, there are only 
two who ran in this championship last year. AD 


He turned to see die runners chur nin g past, 
their shoulders and torsos and heads quite stilL 
“Weil done; Philip, wefl done!” Seii shouted, 


Of the 27 runners, 19 are from the Kalenjin 
tribe, which is just one of about 40 tribes in 


course, which on any other day is a horse race Kenya. According to a one census, the Kalen- 
irack. In the distance he pointed to the juniors jins make op 11 percent of the national popula- 
approaching their first lap. “They’re there,” he tion— this is thougbtto be an exaggeration, the 
sbomed. “■fhey're there, two of them, doing result of Kenya's president. Darnel arap Mot, 


exactly what we toid them last night." 

He explained how the Kenyans had hdd 
their strategic meetings Friday night, which is 
no scoop. He said two coaches were stationed in 
the infield, r eminding each r unner where he Of 


two of them, doing result of Kenya’s president, Daniel arap Mol 
i last night." being Kalenjin — but there is no doubt that this 

v ... tribe, living more than 6,000 feet above sea 

fjfv: level has produced the era’s roost dominant 
group of alhJcLes, perhaps in any spon. 

, runner where he or Seii was asked where tbe coaches were poa- 


she should be ar each distance in the race. He ^oned. 


the finish!” 

He took in the races Kke somebody watching 
a movie for the second time. He predicted that 

would overtaftfthe lrad^^add^omen^ on 
the final lap — and he did, to finich in a time of 
24:15, two seconds ahead of Komen. In the 
senior men’s 12,060 meters, Seii predicted that 
tbe defending champion, Wriham Siged, would 
win a nedc-and-neck race with Simon Cbe- 
moiywa, whose time of 34:30 indeed turned out 
to be a second behind SSgeTs. 

“Are you going to tell oar secret?” Seii said 
mud! later, seated before a group of reporters. 

“Why not? It is done. We can tell it," Kosga 


said his athletes, most of whom had bolted to They are in the bush!" he la u g h e d, waving said, and be drew a series of aides, as would an raoon. 


Cross Challenge standings, cross country’s 
equivalent of the World Cop. The leader gome 
into the race, Kenya’s Ismael Kirm, had 
the deadline for entries. 

Catberi n a McKicman of Ireland, havin g fm- 
ished second to Chepngeno in 20:52, clinched 
the women's title. 

By now a crowd had gathered outside the 
Kenyan tent just beyond the finish line. People 
with cameras and pads of paper appeared. A 
boy from Slovenia smiled beneath a cap that 
read KENYA, and a man unfuried a large 
Kenyan flag and let the wind take it And Seii 
said to a reporter, “1 tell you what we will do 
three years tram now. We intend to ran to the 



Germany Rallies to Edge Austria 


Compiled by Oar Suff From Dtipatdxs fined $1,1 000 for the outburst, said 

GRAZ, Austria — Marc-Keven match spokesman Miguel Luengo. 
Goellner, himself down a set, sur- He said the team — and not Bra- 


fined $1,000 for the outburst, said won with some fine pasting shots. 
match spokesman Miguel l-nengn “1 wanted to keep going, but my 
He said the team — and not Bra- body said no,” Mansdorf said. 


vived to defeat Horst Skoff, 3-6, 6- guera — would be assessed the fine. prance 4, Hungary 1: Arnaud 


As that match entered its fifth 
hour and fifth set, Carlsen, narrow- 
ly beaten by Gusiafsson m a four- 
hour singles match on Friday night. 


4, 7-5, 6-1, on Sunday and put do- T 
fending c hamp ion Germany into top 
the quarterfinals of the Davis had 


The 23-year-old Brugnera, the 
top player on the Spanish tann, 
had a hand in all three Spanish 


Boetsch beat Jozsef Krocsko of ^ ““to 10 continue supporting 
Hungary, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1, in Besan- to weaker partner. 


Cup’s world group tournament victories, 
with a 3-2 edge in matches against Russia 4, Australia Is Russia 
Austria. eliminated last year’s beaten final- 

Germany will next play Spain on ^ when it5 ^ playcr> Alexander 
Ju £ l ^ ]1 : , , .. Volkov, beat Pat Rafter, 6-4. 7-6 (6- 

Earher m the day, Thomas Mus- ’4). 6-3, to give his teaman unassail- 
ter had outlasted Michael Stich, 6- able 3-1 lead in Sl Petersburg. 

4, 6-7 (8-10), 4-6, 6-3, 12-10, to pull Volkov, capitalizing on his own 
Austria even in the best of five powerful serve and Davis Cup deb- 


Rusaa 4, Australia 1: Russia 
eliminated last year’s beaten final- 
ist when its top player, Alexander 


■ 


on the bpamsn tarn, Hungary, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1, in Besan- 
d in all three S panish ^ ^ w famm hi; team tn 

the second round. 


United States 5, India 0: Jim 
Courier recovered strongly from an 


Wi* Botfsch’s 1*2 52W 

Utt viclnry. Fnmcc got to play tot brat LamdcrPa«, 6-7 (5-7), 6-1, 6- 

i?SS^Sl 

^ ... 

winner over Sander Naszaly. Then „ McEnroe and Richey 


match competition. 


viant Rafter’s errors, handed the 


Muster played emotionally be- Australian his second singles defeat 
fore the wildly cheering Austrian 0 f soies. 



fans, while Stich, who was nearly 
invincible in leading Gennany to 
the title last year, struggled all 
match with a shaky backhand, an 
erratic serve, and the noisy crowd. 

Tbe match, which took nearly 5 % 


10 was nearly “Pat gave me a chance to win 
; Gennany to through his own mistakes,” Volkov 
811 said. “Australia has been a leading 
backhand, an tmni< force for more than 100 
ntoy crowd, years. Tune has come for a change.” 
ook nearly 5Vi Russia wfll play host to the 


on Saturday he teamed with OliviCT J* CDeber S tod beaten Paes and 
Delaine to beat Lazak> Markovits Ganrav Natiiar, 7-6 O-Of 6-4, 2-6, 
and Viktor Nagy, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3. 7-6 f 7 - 4 *- m Saturday’s doubles to 
That was a key point, with Henri give then team an unbeatable lead. 


Leconte having lost to Krocsko, a The Unittri Stales wfll play its 
25-year-old ranked just I79th in second-round matches m the Neth- 
the world. eriands. 

Leconte was pulled out of the Netberiands 5. Befehun 0: A re- 


• 'Hr#?*. 

* >. T> 

'*«, ‘-rxp. it. 


hours, ended when Stich returned a r w h Republic in the next round. 
Muster serve too long rwi. 1, P«, 




Metad Lcckd/XeMDi 


Spun 4, Italy I: Scrg Brugnera 
rallied for a 6-4, 1-6, 0-6, 6-2, 6-3 
victory over Stefano Pescosolido 
that gave Spain a 3-1 edge in Ma- 
drid and a root in the quarterfinals. 

In tbe fifth set, with Brugnera up 
by 5-3, tbe Spaniard got into a 
shouting match with a line judge 


doubles after playing so badly. 

Sweden 5, Dennaric 0: In Lund, 
Sweden. Stefan Edberg beat Ken- 
Czecfa Repubfic 4, fend 1: Petr noth Carlsen, 6-7 (4-7X 6-1. 6-2 and 
Korda gained a 3-1 lead by beating Magnus Gustafssmi finished off 
Amos Mansdorf, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7 (4-7), Fredrik Fetteriein, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 
6-1. 6-1, in Ramat Hasharon, Israel with Sweden already having won. 

Mansdorf led during the crucial Jan Apefl and Jonas Bjorimum, 
70-minute-loog third set, only for making their Davis Grp debut, 
Korda to break bis serve twice, beat Carlsen and Morten Christen- 
Then the Israeli saved a set-point in sen, 6-7 (9-1 1), 7-6 (7-4), 7-6 (7-4), 
breaking back to 4-5, battling all 2-6, 6-2 in doubles to clinch the 


Netherlands 5, Belgium 0: A re- 
laxed Paul Haarhuis made short 
work of beating Bd gram’s top 
player, Xavier Danfresne, 6-2 6-1 
and Jan Siemerink took even less 


Tfromas Muster beat M5diael Stich, 6-4, 6-7 (8-10), 4-6, 6-3, 12-10, to ptti Austria even, 2-2 over a cafl. The Spanish team was the way to the tie break, whim he quarterfinal berth. 


neth Carlsen, 6-7 (4-7), 6-1. 6-2 and and Jan Siem erink took even less 
Magnus Gustafsson finished off time to thrash Bart Wuyts, 6-1, 6-1, 
Fredrik Fetteriein, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 in the last match in Eindhoven, 
with Sweden already having won. Haarhuis and Jacco Eltingh 
Jan Apdl and Jonas Workman, needed just over 90 minutes to beat 
making their Daws Cup debut, Daufresne and Filip Dewulf. 6-3, 
beat Carlsen and Morten Christen- 6 - 4 , 6-2 in Saturday’s doubles for 
sen, 6-7 (9-1 1), 7-6 (7-4), 7-6 (7-4). an unbeatable 34) lrad. 


(AP, Reuters) 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


OTC Consolidated trading tor week 
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13*6 — 1 % 
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26% —46 
7*6 _ 

11% —46 
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WCTCm —11574 7 5% 5% +% 

WD40 ZjOOo A3 377 4346 42'/. 43 —46 

WUJFd JB IX 4*79 32 3046 30% — % 

WPIGrp - 20 3% 3 3% +% 

WPPGp J8011J 3789 346 3%, 3%. — *6 

WRTEn - 142711 946 10% — *6 

WRT P» 2JS 8L7 141 2446 25% 24 —46 

WSFS _ 384 4% 396 346 — % 

W5MP _ 4 5% 5% 5% _ 

WTD -13687 4 346 3W» +V» 

WVSFn - 47 15% 14% 1546 — % 

WoMBk _ 175 4*6 3>l/ii 4% +46 

WW>rt> JO 1J 28830 29% 29% — % 

Mint _ 2*72 1246 12% 12% — % 

WaUDotn -45641 58% 43%4446— 12% 

WoBSDI - 13013% 13 13% ♦% 

WWsftr 24 2X 197 1146 11% 114* _ 

WBOBLOb -10071046 17% 17% —% 
WanoLwt _ 30 9% 946 9% _ 

Wamte - 1373 5*6 5%, si/u —46 

Warren - 402 8% 8% 8% 

WshBcp - 278 14 13 13% + 1 

WFSL 88 b 4.1 2833 22*6 2046 21% —46 
WShFDC 1 - 1484 3% 314 3% + % 

WMSOs 6* 3249469 22% 19% 1946—2% 

WMSBPJC228 8X 1602*16 26% 26% —46 
WMSBpmwn «X 2344105% 99% 100%— 5% 
WMSB pfE1.90 7X 12424% 24% 244* — % 
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watrin - 7 2% 2% 2% 

WMsnP*, -1978318% 15% 16 —1 

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WbsfFn -S2b 2_5 584 20% 1946 20% _ 

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wants —Szjm ai% 7246 73% — 12% 

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WKbncs X4 3.1 145 28% 27% 27%— 1 


WslCstCA - 46 'Vb 'Vb >Yn — %, 

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WJMoSC 28 1J 761*96 16 1«% + V6 

WNewIn M 12 931 23% 22% 23 +% 

WsfOne* 22 24 4353 27% 26% 27% — % 

worfenn .tj e j iso ia% 174* is +% 

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WtBcrtcs XOr 1A 55 17% 16% 17 — % 

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WFtf*R 200 2.9 14 28 26 28 +*6 

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'-«ni>lu>l<l^ , aMU aloiuM* U«N)<IK<KVtliri)^l.'tN lit. 


P; 


Page 14 


O N 


A Y 


SPORTS 



til*; 

P l 


Sato’s Victory Angers Bonaly 


Compiled by Our Staff From DispatdiB 

CHIBA, Japan — Tom between Yuka 
Sato’s artistry and dynamic footwork 
and Surya Bonaly s gymnastic jumping, 
the judges gave the women's world fig- 
ure skating championship to Sato. Bona- 
ly gave them 3 temper tantrum. 

The French skater first refused to join 
Japan's Sato and bronze medalist Tanja 
Szewczenko, of Germany, on the awards 
podium. Then she quickly took off her 
silver medai 

The vice president of the Internation- 
al Skating Union. Lawrence Demmy, 
said Sunday that no punitive action was 
planned by the sport's governing body. 
He said the ISU council had received a 
letter of apology from the head of the 
French team, Didier Gailhaguel, and 
“that’s the end of the matter.*’ 

Gailhaguet said earlier that Bonaly 
could face a one-year ban for unsports- 


man -like behavior because “the ISU of- 
ficials were very angry." 

Asked later what message she meant 
to convey, Bonaly declared: “It’s not 
right." 

■ When she tried to succeed with tech- 
nique, she said, she had been told she 
wasn't artistic enough. 

“When I c hang e to just normal skat- 
ing, that’s not good, too. I don't know 
what I have to do. It's crazy," she said. 

The vote was dose. Sato, a stylist with 
dizzying footwork, received higher artis- 
tic marks — six 5.9s of a possible 6.0 and 
three 5.8s — and the first-place votes of 
five of die nine judges. 

Her technique was rated 5.7 and 5.8. 

Bonaly won mostly 5.8s and 5.9s for 
her technique in an ambitious program 
that included a four-jump and back-to- 
back triple jumps. But she touched her 
hand to the ice on one later triple loop. 


Her artistic marks ranged from 5.5 10 
5.9. and four judges ranked her first. But 
one rated her third, behind Szewczenko. 

She arrived late at the medalists' news 
conference and said she was “fed up." 

For both skaters, it was a great oppor- 
tunity for a world title. AH three Olym- 
pic medalists were absent. Champion 
Oksana BaiuL of Ukraine, was recover- 
ing from an injury in Liilehammer. Sil- 
ver medalist Nancy Kerrigan, of the 
United States, was resting, and bronze 
medalist Chen Lu, of China, withdrew at 
the last moment with a broken foot. 
Bonaly was fourth at the Olympics and 
Sato fifth. 

Michelle Kwan. 13, represented the 


United States. With a nearly clean pre- 

skai- 


gram, she placed eighth in the free si 
ing and eighth overall, moving up from 
1 1 th after the technical program. (AP, 
AFP) 



Norman Flawless at Players 


r Mivcsa'Beiicri 

Surya Bonaly taking off giver medal: “It’s not right" 


The Associated Press 

PONTE VEDRA, Florida —Greg Norman 
has the best players in the world talking about 
asking for strokes. 

Playing flawless golf — no bogeys in 54 
holes — Norman finished three rounds at the 
Players Championship 19 under par, four 
strokes ahead of his nearest competitor, Fuzzy 
Zbdler. 

“Give me a 10-sbot handicap and IH have a 
shot at him." Zoeller said. Virtually no one 
else in the strongest field of the year has a 
shot. 

Norman, who was among 72 players strand- 
ed on the course by darkness after a lengthy 
rain delay Friday, came bade at 7:30 A.M. 
Saturday and birdied 3 of 8 holes to finish off 
a round of 67 and a course record 130 for 36 
holes. 

At that point, he held a 3-shot lead over 
Zoeller. But there was more to come. 

After a brief lunch break, Norman returned 
to carve another 67 out of the pines and lakes 


and sand of Sawgrass. finishing up at 6 P.M 
“I just hope it goes another 18," Norman 
said of his brilliant play. 

The British Open champion completed^ 
three rounds at 197. 19 under par and a record 
on the home course for the PGA Tour. He 

only needs a final round of par 72 to break the 

72-hole scoring record of 18 under par set last 
year by Nick Price. 

Norman opened the annual championship 
of golfs touring pros with a 9-under-par 63 
ana has made virtually no mistakes. When he 

has erred, he has recovered. Norman's bogey- 

free streak now stretches back through 80 
holes. 


Hi- ! 


7 1 

/ • * * 


P 11 : 




t fc 1 


.‘it i 


Only Zoeller. who had a third round 68 and 

a 201 total, remained within reach going into 
Sunday’s final round of the chase for a 
$450,000 first prize. 


Jeff Maggert, with a 69, was a distant thinl 
at 203. Nick Faldo, with a 68 , and Davis Love 
UL with a 70, were tied at 204 and were the 
only others within shot of the runaway leader 


SCOREBOARD 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

PCt 

GB 

»-New York 

48 19 

J16 

— 

Orlando 

48 27 

.597 

8 

Miami 

37 31 

J4I 

im 

New Jersey 

36 31 

537 

12 

Boston 

23 42 

J54 

24 

Phltodetahla 

21 47 

-309 

27W 

Washington 

19 49 

Central Division 

379 

29W 

x -Atlanta 

48 20 

.706 

mm 

Chicago 

45 24 

452 

3 VS 

Cleveland 

38 30 

599 

10 

Indiana 

35 32 

.522 

12Vj 

Charlotte 

31 36 

M3 

16ta 

Detroit 

19 48 

284 

28 Vi 

Milwaukee 

IB 49 

m 

sm 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

PCt 

GB 

x-Houston 

48 18 

m 

— 

x-San Antonio 

48 20 

706 

1 

Utah 

44 26 

iV 

6 

Denver 

35 32 

522 

I3to 

Mlmefioto 

19 49 

m 

30 

□alias 

8 68 

Pacific Dhr tel or 

.118 

41 

x-Seattie 

50 17 

.746 

— 

pnoenix 

44 23 

557 

6 

Portland 

41 27 

603 

9 l b 

Golden Stale 

39 28 

-582 

It 

LA. Lakers 

28 3B 

.424 

21V; 

LA. Clippers 

25 42 

J73 

25 

Sacramento 

23 45 

338 

27ia 

>. -clinched playoff spot 



FRIDAY'S RESULTS 

Chicago 20 24 24 12— gj 

Now Jersey 21 u as 31— 1W 

C: Plppen B-15 M 19, Grant 7-12 3-3 17; NJ; 
Coleman 7-14 74 21, Newman 10-15 2-2 22. Re- 
bounds— Chicago 50 (Grant 13). New Jersey 
41 (Coleman, Gl i Horn 11). Assists— Chicago 19 
(Armstrong 5). New Jersey 2V (Anderson 9). 
Cleveland IS 24 22 21— IIS 

Philadelphia 24 It II 30— It 

C: Williams 5-10 54 11 Mills 7-10 M 15; P: 
weattwrspoon 7-14 34 17. Dawtcins 8-14 1-1 21. 
Rebounds— Cleveland 56 (Mills 12), Philadel- 
phia 49 (Weattierspoan 13). Assists — Cleve- 
land 30 [Price H ),Pniiodoipfiki22<Dowkins5). 
LA Clippers 21 24 22 30-97 

Atlanta 22 31 21 20-94 

la: Wilkins 13-27 10-12 36. Harper 10-24 34 
25; A: Willis 1 1-22 1-2 23. Augmon 6-16 10-10 22. 
Rebounds— Las Angela 57 (Outlaw 111. At- 
lanta 51 (Willis 14). Asstet»-Las Angeles 10 
(Jackson 6), Atlanta 27 l Blaylock 14). 

New York 22 23 21 19- 15 

Indiana 14 24 19 25— 82 

NY: Ewing 1-179-1225, Harper 44 64 14; I; 
DXWvfe 6-10 3-7 15. Miller 7-17 2-3 Ik Re- 
bounds— New York S2 ( Ewing 15), Indiana 48 
(AJTavis 121. Assists— New York 20 (Anthony 
6). Indiana 21 (workman 6). 

Charlotte 31 26 29 26-106 

Detroit 27 17 20 28 — 92 

C: I — Johnson 8-92-2 Ik Booties 0-14 2-318; D: 
Thomas 9-15 0-2 19, Hunter 0-15 1-2 15. Re- 
bounds— Charlotte 53 (Mourn big. Boones 10). 
Detroit 43 1 AndersonB). Assists— Charlotte 26 
(Bos ues 5). Detroit 36 (Hunter 7). 
Milwaukee 24 If 23 30— 96 

Utah 22 26 27 26—163 

M: Edwards 9-10 2-2 24, Murdock 6-153-4 21; 
U: Malone 10-21 7-9 27, Stockton 6-9 5-5 17. 
Rebrands— Milwaukee 45 (Baker 81. Utah 45 
(Malone 10). Assists— Milwaukee 16 (Mur- 
dock 8). Utah 33 (5lackton 14). 

□alias 18 19 25 23-94 

Phoenix 23 16 23 33-99 

D: Mashbum 6- 19 34 15, Jadaon 13435431 ; 
P: Barkley 5-7 4-5 14, KJotman 11-15 6-7 26. 
Rebounds— Oalta 48 (Smith 9) Phoenix 51 


(Barkley 14). Assists— Dallas 23 (Lever. 
Jackson 7), Phoenix Z7 (K-lohnson 10). 
Sacramento 19 23 25 24— 91 

Portland 28 22 22 28—100 

5: Simmons 1-1444 20,' Tisdale Ml 44 WPj 
CR abtnsan 6-20 44 is, orextar nt 7-9 23. Re- 
bounds— Sacramento 56 (Polynke 8), Port- 
land 67 <B.W11ltoms 14). Assists— Sacramento 
19 (Webb 8), Portland 21 (Strickland II). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
New Jersey 26 26 27 24—103 

Wash in gton 33 25 26 14—10* 

KJ: Coleman 6-16 89 3A Gilliam 6-109-11 21; 
W: MocLean 9-19 1-1 19. Choamon 11-21 14 25. 
Rebounds— New Jersey 52 [Coleman ill. 
Wa sh ington 46 (Duckworth 12). Assists— New 
Jcrsevll ( Cofcmcxi 4 J. Washington Z1 1 Price 8). 
I— A. CUPPerS 35 21 22 3*— 1W 

Charlotte 36 34 IS 33—131 

LA: Wilkins 11-23 44 28, Spencer 10-T4 3-5 23. 
Harper 8-11 3-3 20: C: Mourning 10-14 68 26. 
Bogues 7-13 44 IS- Rebounds— (_A. Clippers 43 
(Spencer 9). Charlotte 44 (LJohnson 9). As- 
sisfs— la. cuppers 24 (JocksonlO). Charlotte 
36 (Bogues 12). 

Miami 21 31 21 15— 91 

Atlanta 32 21 34 23—108 

M: Smith 6-19 44 17, Coles 4-7 64 14; a: 
WIlUs 10-23 34 7X Augmon 7-9 11-13 25. Re- 
bounds— Miami 59 (Long, Smith 11), Atlanta 
52 (WIUb , Blaylock 11). Ais tett -MInml 16 
(Long 5). Atlanta 32 (Blaylock 14). 

Indiana 18 B 25 17-88 

Chicago 31 27 20 ij— w 

l: Smite 4-564 14, K. Williams 6-9 0-0 12; C: 
Piapen 7-185-730, Grant 5-934 13. Rebounds— 
Indiana 41 (DJTavte 12). Chicago 44 (Plppen 
11). Assists— Indiana 21 (Richardson 7). Chi- 
cago 22 (Armstrong 8). 

Utah 19 14 16 

Houston 12 28 26 

U: Malone »-23 56 23. Stockton 7-172-2 17; H : 
Olaluwon 12-25 12-15 37. Maxwell 9-21 2-4 2X 
Rebrands— Utah 57 (Spencer 121. Houston 56 
(Olaluwon 1*1. Assists— Utah IS (Stockton 91, 
Houston 35 (CaeeeU 8). 

Danas 25 20 14 40— Ml 

Denver 23 34 33 33—112 

D: Jackson 9-192-22XLegier 6-11 3-4T6; Dv: 
Ellis 8-12 04 14 Mulombo 10-14 7-11 27. Re- 
boeods— Dallas 54 (Smith n ), Denver 57 (Mu- 
tamtaa 19). Assists— Dallas 18 (Mashburn 6). 
Denver 20 (Pock 7). 

Minnesota 21 27 22 23- 93 

Seattle 26 26 31 26-113 

M: Laettner 4-1012-14 2XRhtor7-l4l-215.S: 
Kemp 6-14 60 22. Schrempf IO-16 M 23. Re- 
bounds— Minnesota 39 (Laettner 10). Seattle 
49 (Kemp, Schrempf 7). Assist*— Minnesota 
IB (Rider 4). Seattle 29 (Gill 9). 

San Antonio 24 32 31 25-112 

Golden State 28 27 If 27—101 

5: Robinson 9-27 11-M 29. Kn(ghr7-T2 74 21. 
Cum mines 10-2024 22; G: Webber 11-16 1-1 23, 
Sprewell 8-14 34 20. Rebounds— San Antonio 
62 [Rodman 25). Golden Slate 44 (Webber 6). 
ABists— San Antonio 31 [Del Negro ID). Gold- 
en State 30 (Mullln 13). 


Ottawa 


12 55 8 32 174 354 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 


Montreal 8 1 2-3 Lr‘ -t ■ 

» • a-4 

First Parted: B-Knloscdieer 2 (Donate); B- 



W 

L 

T 

PtS GF 

GA 

x-Taronto 

40 

24 

12 

92 

249 

215 

x-Delralt 

42 

2S 

6 

•0 

314 

247 

x-Oallas 

3B 

26 

10 

86 

2S7 

230 

x-St. Loute 

36 

29 

9 

81 

236 

250 

Chicago 

35 

31 

9 

79 

229 

zn 

Winnipeg 

22 45 8 

Pacific DMsioa 

52 

224 

306 

x-Catoary 

37 

27 

12 

86 

274 

338 

Vancouver 

36 

35 

3 

75 

353 

143 

Son Jase 

77 

33 

15 

69 

216 

339 

Anahgfm 

28 

J2 

5 

61 

207 

232 

Los Arweles 

25 

38 

11 

61 

265 

287 

Edmonton 

20 

43 

12 

52 

23427B 


x-cf inched playoff spot 
FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
0 


1—3 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AttonHc Division 


Hartford 0 2 

Buffalo 1 1 4-6 

First Period: 0-Oawe3 (Khmylev.Bodger) 
(pp). Second p or t ed: B-Bodger 6 (Plante, 
May) (pp); H-Pronger 5 (Cassell) (pp); H? 
Petrov teky 3 (prapp. Ranhelm). Third PerL 
PC: B-Presley 13 (May); 8-Dawe 4 (Hawer- 
chuk. Khmylev) (bp): H-Petrovlcky 4 

(Kron); B-May 14 B-Preslev M (SmehUk) 
(en). Shots an aoal: H (on Fuftr) 13-134— 32. B 
(on Burke) 10-14-12—36. 

Washington 2 0 0 0—2 

OetraU 8 8 2 0-2 

First Period: W-Cote 12. W-MIlier 9 (Jo- 

hansson. Ridley). Third Period; D-Sheppord 
4V (Prtmeau. YzermaO (pp); D-Prtmeau 34 
(Sheppord, Howe). Shots on goal: W (an Os- 
good. Essansa) 5-5-5-1—16. D (an Beaupre) 2- 
M 1-3-21 

Danas 1 1 V— 3 

51. Loots 8 2 3-9 

First Period: D-Courtnoll 19 (Klatt Hatch- 
er) (pp). Second Period: SL-Duchesnc 10 
(Houslev, Netfyed) (pp); SL-Hull49 (Nedvea 
Duchesne) (pp); D-GIlchrtel 16 (Cavahlni. 
Gaoner). Third Period: SL-Hull 50 (Du- 
chesne); SL-Hull 51 IHrtac, Karamnov); D- 
McPhea 17 (Hotcher, Courtnall); 8. St Loute. 
stastny X (Miller) (en). Shots an goal: D (an 
Joseph) 15-12-7—34. SJ_ (an Mora) 12-1 0-9—30. 
San Jose 2 2 4—1 

Winnipeg 1 0 2—1 

First Period: SJ .-Larionov 14 IGarpentov. 
Oznlbish); sj.-Larionov 15 (Makarov. Nor- 
ton); W-Mansan 4 (Tkaehuk, Emerson) (pp). 
secoad Period: SJ.-Ellk 20 (Damon) (pa): 
SJ,-Lartonov 16 (Duchesne) (Wi). Third Peri- 
od: SJ.-Ozolinsh 23 (Makarov, Garnenlov); 
SJ.-Gaud reau 14 (Larionov. Oahlen ) (pp); W- 
Tfcodiuk 37 (Steen. DivShannon) (pp); SJ.- 
Whlfnev 9 ( E Ilk. Rathle); SJ.-Ellk 21 iDah- 
len, Norton); W-DtLShannan II (Ulanov, 
Romanluk). Shots on goal: SJ. (on Chevet- 
dao) 15-7-13-35. W (on Irbe) 7-17-12-36. 

LOS Angdtes 2 8 11-4 

Bdnmatoe 112 I 3 

First Period: LA--Granoto 7 (Sydor. Todd); 
E-Thornton 3 (Merchant); UA-Sydor 4 
(Granola, McReynokte). Third Period: E- 
R Ice 15 ( Weight. Olousson) (pp); E-Kravchuk 
II (Weiatrt) ; LJL-Doitneliy 19 1 ZMhilk). Over- 
turn: Las Angelas, OameUy a (Gretzky. 
Zhltnlk). Shots aa goal: l_A. (an Brathwoltel 
13-13-5-1 — 31. E (on Hrudev) 6-8-12-1—27. 
NY. n oager s 3 2 0-6 

Vancouver 1 1 t-J 

First Period: V-C raven 13 (Bure, Odllck) ; 


Smoilnskl 26 (Oates); B-Wesloy 11 (KvartoL 
nav). Second Period: M-DIPfetro 9 
(Schn ei der). Third Period: B-Oates X (lo- 
Frete. Kvartolnov) (pp); B-Ootos 3i,(sh)M- 
S avogc 1 (Oalgnoauit) ; M-Fogorty i (Petrov, 
DJ Pietro); B-Murrav 15 (latrnte, Donato). 
Shots on goal: M (on Casey) 2-7-10—19. B (on 
Roy. Tugnutt) 17-8-12-37. 

PNItadelphto 0 1 1—2 

New Jersey 1 2 3 7 

First Period: N J.-RIcherX lMacLnm.Sto- 
vens I (pp). Second Period: P-Brind’Amour 29 
(Redne. Recchl) (PP): MJ.-Guerin 20 (Zrie- 
pukln. Milton >; NJ.-Albeiin2(Mlllen,Nleder- 
mayor) (pp); NJ.-Ciwpenter 10 IChonto 
Driver) (sh). Third Period: NJ.-Chorske II 
(Lemleux, Carpenter); Nj.-NlcteJts 18 
(MocLean, Peuno); NJX3wrsk* 19 (Car- 
penter); P-Renberg 34 (BrimTAmour. Fhv 
lev). Shots oa goal: P (on TerrerU 1044—27; 
NJ (on Soderstrom, Chabot) 16-7-16-31 
Anaheim 1 3 8:3 

Hartford 8 2 8:2 

First Period: A-Van Allen 7 isti). Second 
Period: H -Cassell 12 ish); A- Von Alien I 
(Sweeney); A-Ewen 9 (Dourts); H-Oniry 6 
(Verbeefc. Lemleux). Shots on soal: A (on 
Roose) 6-169—33. H (an Hebert) 11-10-13-34. 
Quebec 3 0 1-3 

Toronto 2 1 3-6 

First Period: o-Ricd 26 ISoklc Sundtn) 
(PP); T-Gartner 29 (Gill); O-Yeuna 33 (Les- 
ctivshyn. Ricci) (pp); T-Andrevchuk 51 (GIL 
mourl. Second Period: T -Mironov 9 (GJL 
mour. GUI) (pp). Third Period: T- 
Andrevchufc 52 (Gartner, Gllmaur); O- Ricci 
27(Sondln, Lechyshvn) iPP);T-Oark40(An- 
drevchukl; T -Gartner X IMandervilto, Mo- 
coun) (en). Shots on goal: Q Ion PotvJn) 7-8- 
6—21. T (on Flset. Cloutier) 194-10-37. 
Pittsburgh 3 8 0-4 

Catgary 3 8 3-5 

Firs! Period: P-Lemleux 12 Uogr); C-Mo- 
cl rails 25 (Sullivan, otto); C-Roberts 37 IZo- 
ktoskl, Relchei) (bp) : P -Stevens X (Jaer. Le- 
mleux) (pp); P-McEOchern 17 (5ai xltfi um . 
Mullen). Third Period: C-Fleury X (Zo- 
Ippskl); C- Roberts 38 ( Reorv, Nylander): C- 
Relchei X (en). Shots on goal: P (on Vernon) 
154-10-31. C (on Bammo) M-KL13-33. 


Davis Cup 


. . .■ . 

“•S' MT «■’. - IMf leW) 

Major League Scores 



W 

L 

T PtS GF 

GA 

N.Y.-Leefch 19 (Messier. Graves) (sh); N.Y.- 

X-N.Y. Rangers 

46 

22 

7 

99 

270 

209 

Leetch 20 (Kovalev, Zubov) <pp); N.Y.- 

x-New Jersey 

43 

Z1 

11 

97 277 

198 

Noonan 16 (Lertch) (pp). second Period: V- 

Washington 

34 

31 

9 

77 237 

226 

Murevn 5 (Adams. Courtnall); N.Y.-Lormer 

Florida 

32 

X 

13 

77 

210 

206 

18 (sh); N.Y^Nognon 17 (Messier. Zubov) 

Philadelphia 

33 

35 

7 

73 

268 

285 

(pp). Shots or anal: NY (on wnnmore) 6-6- 

N.Y. Islanders 

31 

34 

9 

71 

251 

238 

2— IX V (on Richter) 9-13-10-32. 

Tampa Bay 

25 

40 

10 

60 

199 

231 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 

Northeast Division 




Florida 1 2 6-3 

Pittsburgh 

39 

34 

13 

91 

275 

299 

NT. Ufa Oder* 1 0 8—1 

Montreal 

38 

24 

13 

89 

240 

218 

First Period: N.Y.-Thomas 36 (Turgeanl; 

Boston 

38 

25 

12 

68 

260 

222 

F-Lomakims I Anderssan, Mel kmbvl. Second 

Buffalo 

38 

28 

9 

85 

252 

199 

Period: F-Houoh 6 (Sknxflimd); F-Brown 2 

Quebec 

30 

37 

7 

67 

243 

253 

(Skradtond). Shots an goal: F (an Haxtail>7- 

Hartford 

2* 

41 

8 

56 203 

257 

12-7—26. N.Y. ion FHznatrtCk) 17-9-7—33. 


PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAMES 
. . Friday's Resatte. . . 

Baltimore 11 Mirawsoto 6 
Boston 7. Toronto 6 
Kansas a tv 7, Cleveland 4 
Cincinnati X Philadelphia 5 
Atlanta A Florida 4 
St Louis A Houston 4 
Las Angeles i Montreal 3 
Pittsburgh 7, Texas 4 
San Diego (si) 5, Chicago Cubs 3 
Milwaukee & Cokrado 0 
Seattle (sal 6. Son Diego (ss) 3 
5on Francisco A Seattle (ss) 5 
New Yurt Mats 7. New York Yonkees 3 
Chicago White Sox A Detroit 7. 10 Innings 
Cat Horn la vs. Oakland at Phoenix, cal, rain 
Saturday** Results 
Attonto i Montreal 4 
New York Mets X Houston 1 
St Loute 7. Philadelphia 3 
Cincinnati X Detroit 5 
New York Yankees 4, Florida 3. 18 Innings 
Pittsburgh 6. Chicago White Sox S 
Kansas City & Los Angeles 3 
Baltimore i Texas l 
Minnesota li Boston 9 
Toronto 2. Cleveland 1 
Colorado (ss) X Chicago Cubs 1 
San Francisco (ss) A. Colorado (ss) 0 
Sew Diego 4, Oakland I 
Seattle & San Francisco (ss) 7 
Milwaukee 13. California 3 


AMERICA ZONE 
Group 1, First Round 
Pwti X ChHe I : Jobno Yzoga, Peiudef. Ga- 
briel SmwrstBiisOdto.fr-4. 64 44,61; Sergio 
Cortes* ome, det Jose Lute Norefga, Pera 7*3- 
K 74 (74),3-66l; Jolme Yzaao end Jose Lute 
Noriega, Penj.deLMareeio RtbrttodoondGo- 
tww SUbensMn. CMte 34, 74 (7-41. 64 64. 

Uragnay X Babamos 1: Morceto FillpphU 
Uruguay, del. Roger Smith. Bahamas, 6-4. 62, 
64; Diego Perez. Uruguay, bef. Mark 
Knowles. Bahamas. 14 61.63.6? (3-7), 64; 
Roger Smith and Mark Knowles Baham as 
det. Morceto FUtpalnl and Diego Perez, Uru- 
guay, 7-6 (7-5), 63, 64. 

Second Roasd 

CeloenMe 2. Canada 1: Sebastlen Loreau, 
Canada det. Miguel Tobon, Colombia 74 (6 
5). 61, 63; Maurldo Hadad, Colombia dr f. 
Daniel Nestor. Canada 64 24 74 (6-6). 7-5, 6 
2 j Maartco Hadad and Miguel TiR>on, Colom- 
bia def. Dankrt Nestor and Sebcatlen Lantau, 
Canada. 64. 34 74 (74). 67 (4-7), 6L 
Venezoeto X Ecuador D: Maurice Ruoh, det 
Lute Adrian Moreioa 64, 74 166 63; Nicolas 
Pereira del. Pablo Camaana6l7-& 7-5; Nico- 
las Pereira and Maurice RuatuzeuIadeLNlco- 
las LaaenSl and Pablo Campona 62, 63. 61. 
Playoff 

Mexico X Cow 0: Lute Enriws Hererra, 
det. Armando Pens 44 6-2, 64. 60; Leon ar do 
Lovalla net. Morto ivan TatarH-6Z 6X61; 
H errera and Lavatle, det. Tabares and Juan 
Antonio Pma 44 62, 61 

Group X Playoffs 

Pwugouy x Puerto Rico 1: Ramon Detoo- 
da Ponsuay.def. Joey Rive. Petto Rica 34 
62. 74 67 (3-71. 61; Ricardo Mena Para- 
guay, def. Jorge Gonzales 44 61.6X 67 (3-7). 
64; Joey Rivv and Jorge Gonzalez, Puerto 
Rica def. Ruben Atvorenga and Ramon Del- 
soda. Paraguay. 74 34 64. 7-6 (74). 

Guatemala X jamafea 1: Jacebo Chavez. 
Guatemala, def. Nicolas Motcoim. Jamaica 
64, 64. 64; Daniel Chavez, Gu a te m a l a del. 
Cart Hooke. Jamaica. 74 6X67,6*; Douglas 
Burxe and Karl Hate. Jamaica det Daniel 
and Jacobo Chovaz. Guatemala 146474 7- 
X 61 

WORLD GROUP 
First Round 

United Slates X India 6: Patrick McEnroe 
end Rlchev Reneberg. det. Leander Poes and 
Gourov Nutekor, 74 (741. 64. 24 74 (74); 
Jim Courier def. Poes 67 (577). 61. 64, Todd 
Martin det. Zeeshan All 62. 7-5. 

Swgdwi x DenaMtok # : Mranus GuhMhaoa 
det. Kenneth Carbea6X74 (7-2) >466. 11-9. 
Jot Apod and Jonas Blorfcmaa det. Ca risen 
and Marten Christensen, 67 (9-tl),74 (74). 7- 
6 (741,24 64; Stefan Edberg det Cortsen 67 
(67) 61 62; Gustafasan def. Fredrlk Fetter- 
leln 74 (7-5) 6Z 

Nettwriaads & Belgium g ; Jem Slemerink. 
def. Xavier Doufresne, 64. 67 (3-7), 64, 64 
Paul Hoarnuls and Jocco Elttogh. def. Filip 
DewuH andDoufreSM.6X64.64; Haartuiis 
det Doufresne, 62. 62; Stomerfnk, def. Bart 
Wuvts Brio I urn- 61, 6L 
Czech Republic 6 tswel 1: Petr Korda and 
Cyril Sufc. Czech Republic, def. Amos Mans- 
dort and Eyol Erflch, Israel. 34 74 (7-3). 74 
(741.61; Kordadef.Maneclart643467 (67) 

61 61; Karel Navaoek, Czech, def. GHad 
Bloom, Israel. 64 63. 

FmceAHoegarvl: Amaud Boetsrti and 
Ofivter Detoifre, Fnmca def. Lazsfo Motto- 
vlts anti Viktor Naov. Hungary, 63. 61 60. 
Boetsdudef. Jeasef Kracska6X64, 61; Hen- 
ri Leconte, France, def. Sander Nastily, Hun- 
gary, 64 63. 

Rama 4. Australia I: Yevgeny Kafelnikov 
and Andrsl Okhavskv. Russia, det Todd 
WWdbrtdge and Mark Waodforde, 6460.34 
44 63; Alexander Valkov, Russia, def. Pot- 
rick Rofter, Australia, 64 74 f7/4), 63); Ko- 


feinikav.deL Jamie Monas Australia 6X 67 
168), 7-5. 

Germany X Austria 2 ; Michael Sttch and 
Patrick KuehneftO tnnn lit. deL Thomas Mus- 
ter and Alex Aidonltsrii, Austria, 64 34 6X 24 
61; Muster, det Sttch. 64 67,44 6X CMX 
Spain 4 ttnty 1: Sergi Bruguera and Tomas 
Carbanell, Snn ln. det. Diego Norglso and 
Poo la Cane. Italy. 63. 34 61, 61; Bruguera. 
det Stefano Peseasoikta, ltoty.44 14646X 
63: Alberto Berasategut Sacrin, def. Andrea 
GaudenzL Italy. 74 63. 

A5UVOCEAHIA ZONE 
Group 1, Rrat Round 
[odooeslo X Hoag Kong 2: Suwondl and 
Bonlr Wlrvawan. Indonesia, def. Michael 
Walker and Thorden PoeizL Htsig Kongu 74 
62. 7-5; Melvin Tong, Hong Kona. def. Benny 
Wllaya Indonesia. 64 62; Thoreten PaatzL 
Hong Kang, det Suwondl, Indonesia 64 61. 

Japan 4 PMBpptms 9: Thomas Shimada 
and Rvusa Tsoltox deL Robert Angelo and 
Satranlo PatotxxtG346a6X63;ShuzoMo- 
tsuoka.def. Joseph Lh»rdo>6L63; Yasutumi 
Yamameto, def. Robert Angelo, 34 61. 61 
Group 2 Reand 

Taiwan X Paklstaa Z: Lien Yirhul and Chen 
Oiflv-tuna. Taiwan, def. Hamid ul-Hoa and 
Muhammad Khada. Pakteton, 6X 6X 74; 
Chea Chih-iune. Taiwan, def. Omar Rashid, 
Pakistan. 67 (65). 67, 64 64 64; Muham- 
mao Xhaila, Pakistan, del. Lien Yu-huL Tai- 
wan. 74 154). 63. 

iron 4 Thailand i: Mansour BohramL Iran, 
At Varaabol Thon aklxi maxi. Thailand. 6X 
6 L 04. 64; Ramin RoalonL I ran, det Narath- 
orn Srichanhon, Thailand, 61.2434 6X 62; 
Mansour Bahnxnl and Kamhfz OeratefdJa- 
van. lrcxi,def.Wttava SamrelondThanakarn 
Srichaphea Thcttofid. 64 6X 6X 
Mansour BohramL Iran, det Thanakom 
Srtehaphaa Thailand. 34 63. 61. 

Varaphal Thcns khamcha Thalkmd, def. 
Ramin Razlanl, Iran 67 (79). 61. 61. 

Playoffs 

Singapore 1, Malaysia 4: Adcxn MaJDt csxt 
R oroatab R anxs iiandranMatayshi,detOMn 
Chee Yen and Shman Um,Stogapore,74 74 
61 ; Adam MoUk. Malaysia det Chen Chee Yen 
Singapore. 64 62, 62; Wlson Khoa, Malania 
det Sherman Linu Singapore, 64 67. 74 
Sri Lanka 5. Saadi Arabta 8: Rohan da Silva 
and Jay endrawilevesekera, def. ZuHfaar Ah- 
med end Tawfto IbraMm, 74 6X62; Wlleye- 
sekera def. Forah at Somali 6X 63; de Silva 
det Ahmed 74 (74), 62 

EURO-AFRICAN ZONE 
Creep 1, First Round 
Portugal 4 Brittao 1: Jeremy Bates end 
Mark Fle t cher. Britain def. Nura Marques text 
joaoCunhoeSItva. Portugal 746467, (671.6 
X 64- Maraues, det Bales, «4 6L 64 60; 
Emanuel Cautn Portugal def. PetOiev. 61, 62 
Zimbabwe X Switzerland 3; Byron and 
Wayne Black, Zimbabwe, det Jakob Hlasek 
and Marc RoseeL Switzerl an d 6X 63. 64; 
Rossef det Block 64 34 74 (84) 74 (64); 
Hlasek def. Block 44 74 63 64 
SoathAfricoXRoamniaO: Wayne Ferreira, 
det Rczvan Sabau. 64 6X 63; Marcos On- 
druska.def.Dlnu Pe9cartu,67,6X 61,34 61; 
D«tle Vtefler and Ferreira, def. George Casoc 
and Option Porumb, 64 64 63; Ferreira, 
det Pescariu, 44 6X 6X‘ Ondnnka. def. Sa- 
bau. 34 74 (64), 63. 

CrocrttaXNorwayliGaronlvanteevt&Cro- 
afta. def. Anders Hasettu Norway, 6X 6X 61 ; 
Christian Ruud. Norway, det. Sasa Hlrszon, 
Croatia 14 74 (74), 67 (64), 14; Goran 
Ivanisevic end Sasa Hlrszon. Croatia def. 
Benf-Ove Pedersen and Christian Ruud, Nor- 
way. 24 67 (74), 7-5. 64 il-9. 


Cambwjr/Leeuwarden 1, V) tease Arnhem 3 
Feyenoord Rotterda m X Max Amsterdam I 
FC Groningen X GA Eagles Doetlchem 1 
RKC Woalwllk X FC Utrecht 8 
FC Twente 4 MW MaastiicM 2 
Volandam X SC H eerenv een 0 
S t an di ngs: A tax. 44 paints; Feyenoord, 40; 
Rodo JC PSV.34; NAG 33; Vitesse, 21; WW- 
lem II, 30; PC Twente. 29; Sparta MW, 27; 
Gj 4 Eagles. 2 *; fc Utrecht, 23; Votendom, 
WV and Heerenveen, 21; FC Groningen. 18; 
RKC 15; Camtxiur, 14 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Arsenal l, Liverpool 0 
Blackburn X Swindon 1 
Cheteaa X West Ham 0 
Coventry X Norwich 1 
Everton X Tottenham I 
ipswldt l. Queens Park Rangers 3 
Oldham X Manchester city 6 
Sheffield United a Southampton D 
Wbnhtoden 1, Leeds 0 
Standings: Manchester United, 73 points; 
Blackburn, 70; Arsenal 61; Newcastle, 60; 
Leeds, 55; Liverpool. S3; Queens Park Rang- 
ere, 50; Aston YUta.49: Norwich. 47; SMfleM 
Wednesday and Wimbtodoatt; Coventry. 41; 
lpswtch.40; Chelsea and West Ham, 38; Tot- 
tenham and Everton, 36; Southampton, 31; 
Manchester atv. 32; Oldham, 31; Sheffield 
Untied. 28/ Swindon. 25 

ENGLISH LEAGUE CUP 


AJtaocoteZ Lie Ida 1 
Zaragoza X Racing de Santander 0 
Osasuno X Afteftoa de Madrid 1 
Valladolid X Oviedo 0 
DOMMvsde La Coruna 4 Attilftlcde BRbaei 
S Iw hII i mi De n orttvp Coruna, O 00M3; 
Barcelona 41; Real Madrid, 40; Real Zarae* 
za36j AlWetfcBDboaJ*; SevHlaJ3; Albacate 
32; Tenerffc^l ; Sporting Gllwv Valencia, Real 
Soctodod. 30; Roclna Saitaretor, 29; Ovtodn 
2B: Raya Vallecona 27; Ahettoa Matekl 25; 
Gotta Vigo, 24; Logranas,24; Real VMtaMU, 
23: Lnrtda, 22; Osasuna Pamolano, il 




BASKETBALL 

National BasketbaH AMChdtaa 
NBA— Fined Haywaode Workman. Indtana 
guard, 8U0X swpmdad Mm lor I game hr 
head-butting Grog Anthony, N.Y. KnKk* 
guard, and lined Anthony OSOX lor retaflet 
Ing In game March 21 Fined Chartoi Smfm, 
Derek Harper, Relanda Blackman, Eric An- 
dereaa Anthony Banner, Corev Gahxn and 
Herb WlOtame. N.Y. KnJcks Ptovers, S2JBB 
each tor leaving bench during Incldmt. 




INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Bolivia Z United States 2 
Saudi Arabia a Chile 2 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Rode JC Kerkrade 4 PSV Eindhoven 0 
NAC Breda 1, Willem II T 
WV Venlo 1, Sporto R o tterdam 4 


United 1. Aston Villa 3 
FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Parto-SG 1, Metz 0 
Monaco X Auxerre 1 
Nantes X Sochaux 0 
Toulouse x M art i ga e s 2 
Le Havre X Lwi 1 
SalirNEttenne Z Angers 0 
Cosines X Lens 1 
Bordeoux X Coen 0 
Marseille 1, Montpellier 1 
Lille I, Strasbourg 1 

Standings: Paris S.G..4B paints; Marseille, 
42; Auxerre. 38. Nantes and Bordeaux, 37; 
Montpellier and Cannes 35; Lyon, 33; Monaco 
and Lens, 32; Salnf-Ellenne 31 and Stras- 
bourg, 31; Sochaux. 29; Matz,28; Caen 25; L* 
Havre, 24; LHle and Martfgues, 23; Toulouse, 
It; Angers. IX 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Karlsruhe SC Z SC Freiburg 1 
FC Kaberstautern X Dynamo Dresden 8 
Winter Bremen X FC Schatke 1 
Elntracht Frankfurt X Vf B Stuttgart 0 
FC Nuremberg Z Bayer Leverkusen 3 
Barussla Dortmund Z Waffsnschdd 0 
FC Cologne I. MSV Duisburg 8 
BorussJo Moenctienalodboch 6. ViB Leipzia 1 
StoodtoBs: Bayern Munich. 33 potots; Eln- 
tracht Frankfurt, 32; KiwtsrutH SC 31; Ham- 
burg 5V. 31; FC Katearelautoni, 30; MSV 
Dutsbura. 29: Bayer Levertanon VIB Stutt- 
gart, warder Bremen and FC Calogna 26; 
Borussta Dortmund. 27; Boresski Moench 
and Dynamo Dresden. 26; Schalim. 25; SC 
Freiburg. 22; FC Nuremberg, 30; Wutton- 
sdwia 18; VfB Leipzig. 14 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Parma X Atakmfn 1 
Intomazlunole L Genoa 3 
COBtlarf x Juvantus of Turin I 
Cremonese 1. Regglana 1 
Napoli I, AC Milan 0 
Romo X Lecce 0 
Svnpdarfa of Genoa 4 Foggki 0 
Torino 1, Lazio of Rome l 
Udlnese Z Piacenza 2 
Standings: AC Milan. 46 points; Sampdorta 
and Juventus.39; Parma and Lazlte 37; Tori- 
no end Napoli 3D; Infer, 26; Fagglo, Cagliari, 
Genoa Cremon es e and Piacenza 27; Roma 
26; Udlnese, 53; Reaskma 22; Atotanta 17; 
Lecca 11. 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Sevilla 4 Loeranes 1 
Real Madrid X Valencia 2 
Barcelona l Tenerife 1 
Sporting de Gltan Z Cetta 1 
Real Soctodod 1, Raya Vallmmo 1 


Brazilian Grand Pfix 


Results Sondoy of Brazil km Fen auto one 
face at interMoos circuit hi Sae Poets: 1. 
Michael Schumacher, Germany, Benettan- 
FOrtLSIDJDSkm Ini hour 35 mlnufes and 38791 
seconds (1926kPh average); X Damn hbl 
B ritton. VHiikvns-Renault, at T km; 1 Jm 
AlesL Franca Ferrari at 1 lap; 4 Rubaa Bon 
richtlfa Brazil Jordon-Horlot I lap; X Ukvo 
Katayoma Japan. Tyirril-Ywixma at 2 lore 

4 Karl Wen d ll n oer, Austria Sauber-Men 
UHhn.2 lops; 7, Jotoary Herbert. Britton. Lo- 
hn-Muge»Handa2 tope; XPIerLuhri Marti- 
ni. Italy. Mtoaitn Scudaria Italia 2 tops; i 
Erik Comas. France, Lorrousse-Ford, 3 kns.' 
IX Pedro Lamy, Portugal Uetus-Mugen- 
Handa 3 laps; 1L Ottvtor Pvils. France, U- 
ator-Renaatt.3 laps; 1Z David Bnfeham, Aus- 
tralia Stmtefc-FanL 4 laps. 

Driver Naedtaas: Michael Schumadwr 
loots. Daman HTTl 4 Jean Atosl 4 Rubem 
BarrlchetloX Ukyo Katayoma 1 Kart Wen6 
linger 1 




SECOND ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL 
India w New Zealand 
Sunday le Auckland, New Zealand 
New Zealand: 142 (49,4 avers) 

India: MM (2tt avers) 

RcMdt: India won by seven wicket* 
Four-match series stands at 1-1 
THIRD TEST 
West indies r*. England 
2nd Day, Saturday, hi parttof-Spatn 
West Indies Ural Inning*: 252 
England first Innings: 236-5 

THIRD AND FINAL TEST 
Austral* Y*. Sooth Africa 
lad Day. Saturday to Durban, South Africa 
Australia 1st Innlnss: 269-all out (101.2 avers) 
South Africa 1st timings: 14M (73 oven) 




Flnto results of W o me n ' s world Figure 
Skattog Championships to Chiba, Japan: I, 
Ytfw Safa Japan, 1J factored placement; Z 
Surya Bonoll France, 3J); X Tania Snwc- 
zenka Germany, 50; 4 Marina Ktoknans 
Germany, 6J; x Josee Cheufnard, Canada 
AS; 4 Elena Uashenko, Ukraine, ZD J 7, Marie 
Ptorre Lerey. Fnstcx I3J); B. Michel Is Kwrm. 
United States, us; 9. Susan Hvnnelvevs, Can- 
ada. 140; IX Olgo Martova, Russia, 141 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




that ern**mi rn worn same 

bfHWKmHlMI 


mw p mw tour J u P u f T&uWnJIliWwftPWr 


NEMOD i 


□ i 

TH 


[ UPYTT 



LL 


MULEHI 

ujnn 




mmmm 

■hi 


HE NEVER FCU0HT 


WrtH HI5 WFE 

eewuee-Sfe 

KNEW HOWTO - 


ntx x imrm 


%uii. 

na^ i h 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


Pla 






3?az-.>-!-3-wc? r!I 




Schumacher 
WinsPrix 
As Senna 
•-C Spins Out 

.''Sy. The Associated Phxs 

SAO PAULO — Michael Schu- 
• ttacher fought off Ayrton Senna to 

wm the Brazilian Grand Prix on 
: - . • Sunday, with the Br azilian a ban- 

' doning the battle after spinning out 

: m a curve with 15 laps remaining. 

■ Schumacher completed the 71 

laps around the 4j254aIometer 
(2.678-mfle) Interlagos drcuit in 
-; : V. 1:35:38.759, averaging 192.6 kflo- 

• meters per hour (119.7 mpb) and 
beating Damon HID, of England, 
by a full lap. 

“There’s nothing better than 
winning not by luck, but by fight- 
®&” the 25-year-old Ger man said 
after earning his third Formula 
One victory. 

Senna, the pre-race favorite in 
the world champion Williams-Re- 
nauit car, locked himself in the 
team's motor home and refused to 
speak to reporters. 

Hfl] carried the Williams-Re- 
nault banner to podium, standing 
with Jean Alesi, of France, who 
finished third in his Ferrari. 

“I thought I could catch Senna, 
but it would have meant risking a 
fatal accident,*' said Alesi, turned 
in a strong performance despite 

- racing in his backup car. 

Brazil's Rubens Barrichello was 

fonrlh in his Jordan-Hart, with Ja- 
pan's Ukyo Katayama in a Tyirdl- 
Yamaha fifth and Austria’s Karl 
. WendHnger in a Sauber-Mercedes 
Sixth. 

The anticipated duel between 
Senna, a three-time world champi- 
* on, and Sch umacher , the up-and- 
coming wunderkind, lived up to 

- expectations. The two d omina ted 
time trials, fining the front row. 

Senna took the lead al the start, 
while Schumacher dropped to third 
on the start behind Alesi. Schu- 
macher got past Alesi in the 21st 
lap and set out in pursuit of Senna. 
By the 19th lap, Schumacher was 
Ires than a second behind. 

Two laps later, both drivers went 
to the [tits for fuel and new tires. 
Benetton appeared to adjust better 
to new rules this year requiring 
mid-race refu eling , and sent Schu- 
macher back on to the track first. 


' r SC 1 1-g. 



Florida Puts Away Boston College 
To Advance to NCAA Final Four 


__ Mat Haapbrcj/Tlie Anoriucd Van 

Cherokee Paries and Duke were riding high as they Mew by Purdue and info file NCAA semifinals. 

Duke Shuts Down Purdue 


The German driver quickly opened 
on Senna and put a lap on H3L 

After a second pit stop, the Bra- 
zilian began a last-ditch pursuit 
' and cut the gap to five seconds. It 
ended ou-the56thlap“when*hewetit - 
into a curve too fast, spun out and 
abandoned the race. 

As Schumacher passed the pits, a 
team member hdd out a sign read- 
ing “Senna out,” and the driver 
relaxed. 

“I thought, “Now I can take it 
easy. I don’t have to push the car or 
take any risks,’ ” Schumacher said. 

The next race is the Pacific 
Grand Prix at the Aida drcml in 
Okayama, Japan, on April 17. 

A spectacular accident nearly 
stopped the Brazilian race on the 
-34th lap. 

Eddie Irvine and rookie Jos Ver- 

- stappen both dived inride to pass 
• Eric Bernard's Ligjer. As they went 

three abreast, Irvine bumped Ver- 
’ stappen onto the grass. The Dutch 
driver spun sideways, flipped over 
Irvine’s Jordan-Han, and they 
both smashed into Martin Bnm- 

- die’s McLarcn-Peugot. 

B run die was hit in the head by a 
wheel but was not seriously hurt. 


The Associated Press 

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — 
When the statistics show Purdue’s 
leading scorer was Matt Waddell 
you know the Boilermakers had a 
rough day. 

Duke shut down All-American 
Glenn Robinson on Saturday, 
bedding the coon try's leading scor- 
er to a season-low 13 points. The 
Blue Devils also contained Cuonzo 
Martin, Purdue’s second most reli- 
able offensive weapon, limiting 
him to 12 points. 

Waddell scored 16 pants, but it 
wasn’t enough for the Boilermak- 
ers, who lost to Duke 69-60 in the 
Southeast Regional final of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion tournament Duke will face 
Florida next week at the Final Four 
in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

“Thar defensedida grreijob on •_ 
“Glean and 31 our kids," said Gene 
Keady, the coach of Purdue. “We 
played good defease, but theirs was 
just a little hit better ” 

Robinson averaged 30 points a 
game in the regular season and was 
avenging 36 m the tournament 
Martin was averaging 20 in the 
tournament and had 29 Thursday 
night against Kansas. 

But the Blue Devils denied Rob- 
inson and Martin the ball whenever 
they could and harassed them re- 
lentlessly the rest of the time. 

The result was a 6-for-22 shoot- 
ing day for Robinson and a 5-for- 
14 performance by Martin. 

Purdue led 27-17 in the first half. 
But over the next three minutes, the 
Boilermakers were whistled for six 
fouls mid hit with a technical as 
Duke scored 11 straight pants. 

“We thought halfway into the 
first half we had a shot at taking 
control of the game, but that’s not 
the way it was.” Keady said. 


“We had a 10-point lead and all 
of a sudden the bottomland of falls 
out," he said. “You’d like to get 
some calls go your way, but that 
didn’t happen. You have to make 
something positive happen, and we 
didn’t do that.” 

Keady said the fouls “certainly 
killed whatever momentum we bad 
They thought they were rods, so 
they called them fouls. We didn't 
think they were, but that’s basket- 
ball for you. Life gore on.” 

The game was tied at halftime, 
but Duke scored the first seven 
its after intermission and the 
lermakers never caught up. 

“They didn’t really change any- 
thing. I just think they took it up 
another level and we weren't ready 
for it,” Waddell said. 


Duke's Grant Hifl, who guarded 
Robinson most of the time, picked 
up his fourth foul with 9:54 left and 
the Blue Devils five points ahead. 

Eight seconds alter HUl sat 
down, Robinson scored a basket. 
But he didn't score another point 
during the six minutes HUl was on 
the bench, and Duke increased its 
lead to six 

“We were trying to get the ball to 
Glenn, but they were doing a good 
job keeping it away from him, '' 
Keady said. “I don’t think we 
stayed spread like we should have 
and made hard cuts, because they 
did a good job overplaying him. ” 

Robinson said he bad hoped not 
to have a bad game in the tourna- 
ment. 

“As far as we went, though, Fm 
not ashamed at afl," he said. 


The Associated Press 

MIAMI — Florida is no longer 
fust a football stare. 

Craig Brown hit 3-pointers on 
three consecutive possessions to 
break open a close game, and the 
Florida Gators earned their first 
trip to the NCAA Final Four by 
beating Boston College, 74-66, on 
Sunday. 

The third-seeded Gators (29-7), 
champions of the East regional 
will play Southeast regional cham- 
pion Duke (27-5) in Saturday's 
semifinals of the National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association tourna- 
ment in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Boston College, which at No. 9 
was the lowest seed remaining in 
the tournament, finished 23-11. 

Basketball has always a 
bade seat to football in Florida, 
partly because the Gators had 
made only three previous NCAA 
tournament appearances. Just four 
years ago they were 7-21, but the 
Gators had a partisan sellout 
crowd roaring Sunday at Miami 
Arena. 

Brown's big baskets turned a 56- 
53 deficit into a 62-56 lead with 
3:50 remaining The turnarond 
marked the 15th and final lead 
change. 

Boston College squandered 
chances to close the deficit. The 
Eagles missed four fine throws in 
the final 3:24 and committed three 
turnovers in the last minute. 

Brown led Florida with 21 
points. Andrew DeClercq added 16 
points and 13 rebounds. 

Bill Curley scored 20 and How- 
ard Eisley 19 for the Eagles, who 
shot just 38 percent. 

Gerrod Abram’s steal and break- 
away dunk gave Boston College its 
biggest lead, 51-45, with 11:27 re- 
maining. The Eagles scored only 
three field goals the rest of the way. 

Florida scored the next eight 
points, taking a 53-51 lead on Jason 
Anderson's fast-break layup. Bos- 
ton College tied the game at 53 on 
two free throws by Danya Abrams, 
ending a five-and-a-half-minute 
scoring drought. 

Curley’s 3-point goal gave the 
Eagles a 56-53 lead Before Brown 
put Florida in front to stay. 

Boston College missed 1 1 of 15 
3-poiiit attempts after sinking 22 3- 
pointers in back-to-back victories 
over North Carolina and Indiana. 
Malcolm Hockaby was 0-for-4 on 


3-pointers and scored just one 
pant, 9.5 below his average. 

Huckaby was a mong four four- 
year starters who played their final 
game fa Boston College. 

Free- throw shooting kept the Ea- 
gles in the game. In the first 32 
minutes they outscored the Gators 
13-1 at the line. 

Florida, co-cbampiou of the 
Southeastern Conference, hdd a 
35-33 halftime lead, thanks in part 
to 12 points from DeClercq, who 
quickly surpassed his season aver- 
age of 85 per game. 

The Gators and Eagles reached 
Sunday’s regional with surprising 
victories over Connecticut and In- 
diana in Friday night’s semifinals 

Bt Miami A rena. 

Florida beat UConn 69-60 in 
overtime, despite shooting only 37 
percent from the field. Boston Col- 
lege pul Indiana away 77-68 by 


outsebriog the Hoosiers 10-0 in the 
final two minutes. 

Craig Brown and Dan Cross 
each scored 17 paints and Dametri 
HUl had IS for Florida, which 
trailed 44-34 six minutes into the 
second half. Bnt UConn made only 
two field goals in the last 14 min- 
utes of regulation and was limited 
to just (me — Doron Sbeffcr’s un- 
con tested layup with 15.6 seconds 
remaining — in overtime. 

UConn All-American DonyeD 
Marshall had a chance to win the 
game with 3.4 seconds left in regu- 
lation and missed two free throws. 
He finished with 16 points and 13 
rebounds, but disappeared from 
the Huskies offense when the team 
needed him most. 

“DonydTs such a great player,” 
Kruger said. “If there was an un- 
fortunate thing about this ball 
game; it’s what be experienced at 
the cud.” 


On paper, U Conn’s path to the 
Final Four figured to be easier after 
Boston College upset top seal 
North Carolina last weekend. Flor- 
ida, however, has flourished in the 
role of underdog all season. 

UConn’s coach, Jim Calhoun, 
said it would be unfair to blame the 
loss on Marshall missing the free 
throws or his inability to pick up 
the offense while the Huskies were 
bang outscored. 

“Danyell Marshall is a large rea- 
son we won 29 basketball nines,” 
Calhoun q»ri- “DonyeB Marshall 
has made a lot of shots for us.” 

Boston College advanced to its 
first regional final since 1982. The 
Eagles blew a 14-point lead and fdl 
behind 64-59 before finishing with 
an 18-4 nm against a slows- Indi- 
ana team that was overwhelmed by 
Boston College’s quickness and 
ontscored 13-4 from the fool line. 


Arizona Eliminates Missouri 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — It was over 
at the opening jump. Arizona's 
ball, Arizona’s game. 

The Wildcats never had any 
doubt they would tear apart Missou- 
ri, and if that sounds presumptuous, 
their 92-72 victory in the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association 
West final Saturday justified that 
faith and will cany them to Char- 
lotte, North Carolina, next week for 
the nati onal <wmfrna?s against ei- 
ther Arkansas or Michigan. 

Damon Stoudamire, Khalid 
Reeves and Reggie Geary, arguably 
the best hackcourt in the country, 
shredded Missouri from the out- 
side, inside and on defense; Asked 
when they knew the game really 
was over, Geary didn't hesitate a 
second: “Tip-off,” he said with a 
smile. “I looked at our eyes, and 1 
saw our confidence.” 

The Wildcats also looked at Mis- 
souri’s slow legs and wide bodies 
and realized how they could win. 

“Missouri is a team that we 
thought didn't get back well on 
defense,” said Stoudamire, perhaps 
the best little man in college bas- 
ketball at 5 feet. 10 inches. He 
scored 27 points, grabbed 10 re- 
bound s and had four assists. 

“We felt if we got the rebounds. 



Lot Bctwcin/Asuciucd Pre» 


SIDELINES 




A 



French Set 2 World Swim Records 

PARIS (AP) — Franck Schott of France set a world record in the 50- 
meter backstroke for the 25-meter pool Sunday by swimmiM the distance 
in 24 60 seconds in the short course Wodd Cup swimming finals. The ad 
mark was 24.66 by Russia's Alexander Popoy in 1 994. 
r , Schott’s teammate, Franck Esposito, broke^e 2 ^m^_buiterfly 
x worid mark on Saturday with a time 1 :53.05. The old marie, of 1 -54-21, 
was set by New Zealand’s Danyon Loader in 1993. 

Russian Charged in Mogilny Threat 

BUFFALO New York (AP) — A Russian who helped Alexander 

shootand stab the NHL Sabres wmg imless he came up^ with $15(1000. 

Mogilny told police that Segei Pavfosky followed hnnfrompr^^ro 
a restSrant on Friday afternoon. Speakmg 

ly demanded $150,000 and threatened “to shoot farm m the back and stab 

“prf^’^another Russian wm unarmed wtolhg 
Satmdayoutside the Sabres’ locker room, according to the Ene County 
chief of detectives, Gerald Mack. 


Magic Johnson, the coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, talking with players after ins first practice. 

Magic Has Lakers Sweating 


Cowboys Have Owner-Coach Rift 

DALLAS C API — Is the Dallas Cowboys’ coacKTimmy Johnson, mad 
enouah at the NIT. team’s owner, Jerry Jones, lhaihe d be willing toqrnl? 
“CSd Sakuday he will bold a news conference m a few d^ to 
hell be_ back ran «•»> ■ *5 


By Rick Weinberg 

New York Times Service 

LOS ANGELES —The Los An- 
geles Lakers' first practice undo- 
bead coach Magic Johnson was so 
long that “I feel 1 aged a year,” said 
James Edwards, a veteran colter. 

Colter Vlade Drvac said, “I fed 
like I just played two overtimes. 
I'm going home to sleep.” 

Johnson's first practice ran 3 
boors 20 minutes on Saturday — 
by far the longest Lakers practice 
this season- He was to make his 
debut on Sunday night against the 
Milwaukee Bucks at a sdd-oui Fo- 
rum in Inglewood, California. 

“It was easily our hardest — and 
most intense — practice of the sea- 
son,” said forward George Lynch. 
“The man means business.” 

Hie practice— watched by near- 
ly 50 journalists — featured full- 
cotin layup drills, fast-break 
sprints and an abundance of teach- 
ing by Johnson, the former Lakers 
superstar who retired from the Na- 


tional Basketball Association after 
laming he carried the. virus that 
causes AIDS. 

At times. Johnson worked his 
players so hard that Bill Bertka, _an 
assistant coach, had to remind him 
that they were playing a game on 
Sunday. “Riles will get a laugh out 
of that,” said Bertka, refaring to 
Knicks' Coach Pat Riley, John- 
son’s forma Lakers coach who is 
known for his tortuous practices. 

Johnson said he wished he could 
have run the players more but that 
Ire backed off because they were 
not in top condition. He said he did 
not mean that as criticism of the 
man he replaced, Randy Pfund. 
But he added: “I wish 1 bad more 
time,” referring to the 16 games the 
Lakers have left in the regular sea- 
son. “I almost told them I wished I 
had them in training camp to get 
them into shape.” 

Fqc amae be does not consider the 
Lakers to be in condition, Johnson 
said he could not expect them to 


play the kind of defense he pre- 
ferred. “But we’ll be up on the ball 
and wen pressure the ball” be 
said. “You won’t see us laid back 
defensively” 

Johnson said he would not 
change the starting lineup — “not 
yet at least” — or the offense be- 
cause it was so late in the season. 

He installed just one play for 
Sunday night, but said he wanted 
his team “to work the ball made, 
then outside.” 

“We’re shooting 44 percent,” he 
added. “Why? Because we’re 
shooting all jump shots.” 

Johnson met with the players for 
the first time on Friday for an hour 
in the locker room, where be 
warned than about Saturday’s long 
practice. When Johnson spoke, sev- 
eral players said, there was an aura. 

“It was Hke when Dean Smith 
spoke," said Lynch, referring to his 
college coach in North Carolina. 
“Magic’s a powerful person, a leg- 
aid. He'll turn things around here: 



- year contract. 

: FortheRecord 

: 

' S 6 ’ sSredtwice in the final 15 minutes. (Beutm) 

or grand champion, from Hawaii, defeated 
; mfSqSaSB* win the 15-day Spring 

■ G N° d buSSS EricRush scoring two tries, beat Dvc-iimc 



Babe Ruth’s I93U --* 1 coon*-* T -lM*Vn rir (AP\ 

sold for almost $ 30,000 at an ^ ^ Gfeea packers who is regarded 
Tony aged a four- 

SSS5!K3®g(5jfSSWS2SI3 

said she hoped to compete in the Citizens 


in Hamburg. 


(AP) 


Cambridge Beats Oxford by &/2 Lengths 


LONDON — A stronger, more experienced 

Cambridge ctw, with two Goman world chans- 
ons in its boat, took the lead on the first bend and 
rowed toa 6&-tength viooty in the 140th Orford- 
Camhridgp Boat Race. 

Cambridge, seeking to end nearly two decades 
of Oxford domination in the race, won Saturday 
fm the second consecutive year. It leads the overall 
series 71 to 68, with one dead heat 

“It was a good performance by the guys,” said 
Ion Bernstein, the American captain for Cam- 
bridge who was rowing in his second Boat Race. 
“It’s a great day for Cambridge. It’s been a long 
time in coming.” 

Cambridge took the lead early despite rowing in 
the outside lane around the first bend on the 4'A- 
mile S-shaped course up tire Thames River. Oxford 


wot the toss and chose the inside lane to gain some 
quick momentum, but fdl behind after oily a few 
strokes. 

Cambridge led by one fuD length after one 
minute, tire one-mile post with a five- 

second advantage. Oxford never threatened. 

The winning margin was three lengths bigger 
than in last year’s victory. The winning time, 18 
minutes, 9 seconds, was wefl off the record for tire 
event due to choppy conditions on an otherwise 
perfect, sunny day. Oxford clocked 18:29. 

The Cambridge crew included four rowers and 
the coxswain from the team that upset heavy 
favorite Oxford last year. The crew also included 
Peter Hfiltzeubon and Tharswn Strcppdhoff, 
World and Olympic medalists from Germany. 

The Oxford crew featured only three Boat Race 
veterans, including Joe Michds, who became the 
first American to row in the event four times. 


In Midwest, 
Top Seeds 
Advance 


The Associated Press 

DALLAS — The seedings in the 
National Collegiate Athletic Asso- 
ciation basketball tournament fi- 
nally held true to form in the Mid- 
west regional. 

No. 1 seed Arkansas and No. 3 
seed Michigan were to play in the 
final Sunday night, having ended 
surprising tournament runs by Tul- 
sa and Maryland, respectively. 

Arkansas had its way insure and 
outside Friday against 12th-seedcd 
Tulsa, winning 103-84 behind the 
play of Corliss Williamson, Clint 
McDaniel and Scotty Thurman. 

Michigan got another strong 
game from Juwan Howard to beat 
the lDth-seeded Terrapins, 78-71, 
and move within one game of its 
third straight Final Four. 

Tulsa (23-8) used excellent out- 
side shooting to beat UCLA and 
Oklahoma Stale in the first two 
games of the Midwest RegionaL 
But then the shooting touch aban- 
doned the Golden Hurricane, 
which hit only 35 percent. 

Al the other end of tire floor, 
Arkansas was shooting a season- 
high 66 percent, including 72 per- 
cent in the second half. Williamson 
and Thurman scored 21 points 
apiece, and McDaniel came off the 
bench to tie his career high with 19. 

Coach Nolan Richardson said 
his team (28-3) played “an excep- 
tional game,” but also said the Ra- 
zorbacks could play even better. 

“Some of our kids haven’t 
scratched tire surface of how good 
they can become,” he said. 

Tulsa started the game tnatring 
four of its first eight shots. Then tire 
Golden Hurricane missed right 
straight and Arkansas grabbed a 
12-point lead. Tulsa would get no 
closer than right tire rest of the 
way. 

Michigan’s Howard continued 
his outstanding tournament play, 
scoring 24 points and grabbing 11 
rebounds before fading out with 
2:49 remaining. Howard also did a 
good job on freshman Joe Smith, 
who Had just two points at halftime 
and finished with 12 

Maiyland (18-12) trailed by only 
5 points in the second half, but then 
Howard took over. He converted a 
three-point play to start an 18-6 
nm during which he scored 11. 

Michigan (24-7) went at to lead 
by as many as 21 with just under 9 
minutes left. Maryland fought back 
and twice got within six in the final 
minute, but would get no doser. 

“We had about 23 or 24 minu tes 
where we played exceptionally 
well” said Steve Fisher, Michigan ’s 
coadh. “The last seven or right min- 
utes of tire first half and the first 15 
minutes of the second, we did wfaai 
we needed to do to be successful" 

The rest of the time, be said, tire 
Wolverines played poorly. 


we could push them on the break," 
he said. 

All of Missouri's size and strength 
meant nothing when Stoudamire 
rank his first four 3-pointers. Mis- 
souri couldn't stop Reeves from 
dashing through the middle for 
most of his 26 points, and it couldn't 


of Geary, who scored 14 points 
had five assists. 

But more than putting on an of- 
fensive show, the three guards pes- 
tered No. 5 Missouri to death on 
defense, swiping balls, denying 
shots, getting in tire way of drives 
and sneaking in for rebounds. 

Arizona, ranked No. 9 and can- 
ing off two straight years of first- 
round losses in the NCAA tourna- 
ment, is 29-5 but hasgptten tittle 
respect this season. That win all 
change if Stoudamire, Reeves and . . , 

Geary keep playing the way they of the year, 

did against Missouri (28-4), the Big 14 - 
Eight champion 

“We knew we had that burden,” 

Stoudamire said about Arizona’s 
previous early exits from the tourna- 
ment “But we knew if we got past 
that first game we’d be dangerous.” 

This was the most satisfying of 
victories for a team that had been 
pommeled by critics. 

“We knew tire sky was the Hunt 


this year,” Geary said. “But the 
Final Four is not a pleasure trip. 
We’re not gong to be happy just 
being there. We're looking to be 
playing Monday in the champion- 
ship game." 

Stou damire , the smallest man on 
the court, scored 18 points in the 
first half to take Arizona to a 48-34 
lead The Wildcats broke it open 
with a 15-5 nm in just over three 
minutes that put than ahead 40-27. 

Missouri got as dose as eight 
points twice in the second half, the 
second time at 58-50, but Arizona 
Mew the Tigers away with a 13-3 
nm that made it 71-53 with 7:25 
left At that juncture, Missouri’s 6- 
foot-9-inch center, Jevon Cradup, 
fouled out afro- scoring 14 pants, 
and the game was all but over. 
Guard Melvin Booker, Big Eight 
also was hdd to 


Arizona beat Missouri from the 
field shooting 54 percent to the H- 
gere’ 36 percent, and from the free 
throw line, with 33-for-41 shooting 
compared with Missouri’s 7-for-15. 
That 26-point difference on free 
throws, largely because Missouri 
couldn’t hdp but foul Arizona’s 
quick, hard-driving guards, was 
greater than the margin of victory. 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 28, 1994 


Bringing the Flavor of Brazil to Japan 


LANGUAGE 


By Andrea Fomes 

T OKYO — When Lisa Ono began losing at the Blue 
Note here, the Japanese audience was not fully pre- 
pared. On stage, they saw a 31 -year-old Japanese singer, 
guitar rested across her legs. But what they heard were 
sensual renditions of bossa nova melodies in flawless 
Portuguese. 

Lisa Ono is pan Brazil, where she was born, and part 
Japan, where she has lived since age 10. Yet, while not 
fully at home in other country, her music whispers lessons 
of the nearly negligent lifestyle of Brazil that is unobtain- 
able in Japanese society. 


“Thanks to the recession, Japanese will accept a lot 
from Brazilians,” she said. “They have to learn how to 


Tastemakers 


An occasional series 
about people for whom 
style is a way of life 


enjoy life, because everything here is so square and preor- 
dained. Through my muse lean show them another side 


darned. Through my muse lean show them another side 
of life. As one of my songs says, ‘My house is always open. 
There is beer and no luxury. But certainly nothing will be 
missing.’*' 

Ono feels that the Japanese are becoming more recep- 
tive to things Brazilian. The stars of Japan’s new profes- 
sional soccer league are mostly Brazilian, and the reces- 
sion has given the Japanese the task of figuring out bow to 
spend a growing amount of free time with a dedining 
amo unt of money. “Brazilian music conjures up visions of 
freedom,’' she says. 

Lisa Ono was born to Japanese parents in SSo Paulo, 
the country’s richest and biggest city. Like many other 
nisei, or second-generation Japanese, she spoke Japanese 
at home and Portuguese everywhere else. Ono doesn’t 
remember why the family emigrated. “Perhaps it was 
because Brazil was ibe only country open to immigrants at 
the time. My father also might have wanted to discover a 
different world.” 

In the 1960s, her father, Toshiro Ono, owned a bossa 
nova and jazz spot called Ictriban, or “number one” in 
Japanese. When Lisa was 3 years old, he began to lake her 
to rehearsals at the dub. Several years later, she realized 
that instead of studying piano she would rather become a 
singer. 

She moved with her family back to Japan in 1972. Her 
father opened Sad Perete, a traditional Brazilian restau- 
rant with live music, which r emains a popular hangout in 
the busy Yotsuya district- Ono, who bad kept up her 
Portuguese by listening and singing Brazilian songs, made 
her vocal debut there when she was IS. 



Throw-Offs and Whitewater Lingo 


By William Safire 


W ASHINGTON — “All of us got hired here to 
work fee the American people,” President Clin- 
ton told reporters who were badgering him about 
rharg es by Republican leaders in regard to the 
Whitewater affair, “not to throw off on each other ” 
Lexicographic Javerts have homed in on the Sooth 
Midland regionalism. The Oxford E n glis h Dictionary 
doesn’t have throw off in the Clintonian sense, but the 
En gl ish Dialect Dictionary, by Joseph Wright, pub- 
lished in 1905, has this Dorsetshire usage from before 
the turn of the century: “Volks be thro wen off 'bout it. 
Vather made vim 'bout it at tea-time.” The contextual 
meaning: “to make fun of.” 

Mark Twain used it in his 1876 novel, “The Adven- 
tures of Tom Sawyer,” when Tom tells Huckleberry 
Finn in Chapter 25: “But I bet you I ain’t going to 
throw off mi df moods.” 

The phrase is in steady current use: Joan Hall at the 

Dictionary of American Regional En gli sh notes that 
DARE defines it as “to say uncomplimentary things 


about somebody,” as in a tape of a Georgian: “Some 
of ’em thought I was throwin’ off on the bus driver, but 
I didn’t mean that” 

The standard En glish synonyms are “disparage, 
denigrate, belittle”; a slang variation is “damp on.” 
Clinton's was colorful, appropriate, and timely; 
be can expect political partisans, as weD as those goo- 
goos hong up on ethical standards, to be throwin’ off 
on him for years. 

□ 

To lovers of political discourse, the Watergate era 
was the Golden Age of Political Cranage. Never have 
so many memorable phrases been enshrined in our 
lan guage La such a short period: The Big Enchilada at 
CREEP led the cover-up, as the hardball and dirty 
tricks played on those cm the enemies list created a 
firestorm after the Saturday Night Massacre; the trail 
of \hephanbers led to a stroking gun that no stonewall- 
ing or limited modified hangout or claim of executive 
orivilege or deep-sixing of evidence could contain, and 
the administration was left twisting slowly, slowly in the 
wind. 

WO Whrtewateigate be able to rise to such heights 
of original metaphor? I don’t want to throw off on the 
new crowd, but most of the terminology today is 
derivative. Some usages bear watching. 

Gin ton rejected any Watergate analogy, “except any 
hysteria that they can gin up around it” This is no 
reference login, the alcoholic beverage, but is a shorten- 
ing of ginger up, which Farmer and Henley reported a 
century ago meant “to make things lively or hum.” 

Few words have root as a root, but ginger is from the 
Sanskrit word for “antler-shaped root/ 1 Some engi- 
neers dispute this etymology of gin up, claiming its 
origin was a locution of workers at Eli Whitney’s 19th- 
century cottcra-pidring engine, or cotton gin, but the 
ginger origin is reinforced by the memories of some of 
my correspondents who recall placing a piece of the 
root under a horse’s tail to make the animal more 
sprightly at shows. 

Cover-up: Gin ton bridles at that word. (I bridle, 
too. at its hyphenation; can't we gin up some hysteria 
to drop the hyphen?) To dissociate himself from 
Watergate memories, Clinton said: “We’re not cover- 





r*‘J' +++. \~v • • 

W0* ■ 


Lisa Ono says Japanese “have to learn how to enjoy life, because everything here is so square and preordained.” 


‘I was accepted at Sad Per ere because it was a typical 
taurant where people expected to eat Brazilian food 


restaurant where people expected to eat Brazilian food 
and hear Brazilian music,” she says. Exposure at the 
restaurant led to gigs at jazz clubs, but often she was asked 
to sing in English. 

“The owners said they preferred ‘authentic* Portuguese 
from a Brazilian. They didn't consider me one.” Ono 
describes herself as half Japanese and half Brazilian, 
switching between the two extremes according to the 
ambience. 

To market herself better in' Japan, Ono took the advice 
of her husband, Heiio Celso Suarez, and focused her 


repertoire on the most obvious bossa nova tunes such as 
“Garota de Ipanema,” “Mania de CarnavaT and “Samba 
de Uma Nota So.” Her performances also included old 
sambas, popular Brazilian songs and a growing number of 
her own compositions. 

Her big break came in 1989, when she released her first 
single, “You're So Unique:” Her first album, “Catupiry,” 
came out a few months later. She also was featured sin g in g 
in a wine commercial on television, Knee then, Ono has 
released six CDs in Japan. Two of them, “Nana” and 
“Menina,” wot Japan’s Gold Disk Award in theja 2 Z and 
fusion category. She also is coor dinating a series of record- 
ings for release here by Brazilian stars, including Carlos 
Lyra and the Quartern em Cy. 

Ono has never considered trying to make a name for 
herself in Brazil. Comfortably established in Japan, she 
has had little desire to struggle anew in her native country, 
where few artists survive without an outside source of 
income. 

Yet she travels to Brazil whenever die records. “If I'm 


making B razilian musi c I must go there to do research and 
work with B razilian m usicians, " She is in Brazil now 
recording her next CD, which win be released in Japan this 
June on BMG. Her first Brazilian release, a compilation, is 
due out next month. 

‘‘Br azilians don't listen to their own music anymore. 
Instead, it's consumed abroad.” she said, adding that there 
were but a handful of female vocalists interpreting bossa 
nova as Astrud Gilbeno and the late Nara Le3o did until 
several years ago. Last year, she expanded her audience 
with a performance at the Ballroom in New York, al- 
though half the crowd was Japanese. 

The Japanese listening to her at the Bine Note may be 
more receptive to bossa nova than Br azilians, but here 
Ono must explain the lyrics in Japanese before ring in g . 
She also has to take pains to instruct them to slow down 
and enter the music's mood. 


Andrea Fomes is a Tokyo- based journalist. 


ing up or anything; we are opening up.” Used loosely, 
the noun cover-up means "an action to conceal a 
mistake”: used with more intensity. -the word means 
“obstruction of justice,” a federal crime. The word 
appeared in a Raymond Chandler story in a 1935 
Black Mask mystery magazine; it entered the lexicon 
of political scandal in a 1968 recording made by the 
financier Louis Wolf son of a conversation, with Abe 
Fortas, in which the Supreme Court justice said; * 
“Yoor giving me, and my accepting, the foundation w 
post was nothing but a cover-up." 

When the president heard cover-up in a question, he 
cautioned: “Be careful how von use language.” In ihi^ - 
matter, dose listeners can tril hew careful he is being. 

He uses credible as a modifier in protestations of no 
wrongdoing: “There is no credible evidence and no 
credible charge that I violated my criminal or civil 
federal law eight or nine yeans ago when most of these 
facts that are bong bandied around are discussed.” 
Note; also, the use of federal in that sentence. . ' 

Firewall in his New York limes column, Frank 
Rich wryly asked: * Firestorm meets stonewall, T No, 
“We have literally erected a firewall.” the president 
said after the firestorm about tip-offs to White House 
aides from regulatory officials caused initial stone- 
walling at the White House, “between tin; White 
House and other regulatory agencies." The “wall of 
separation” has long been a trope to describe the 
American relationship between church and state, aqdr.- 
the metaphor gains emphasis by being able to naap. 
fire. (The Clinton use of literally in this case-vriBfe 
mistaken, unless carpenters and plasterers have 
brought in; he meant figuratively.) 


m 


And what of whitewaier itself? The unsuccessful .'k&z' 
estate company adopted as its name a tom first xttajifc 
1586 by William Harrison, an English topographer, Ml. 
describing the swollen torrents erf a river dak d its 
direct course: “The water must of necessity sneQ wift 
the white waters which ran downe from the land.” 1 

The picture of a couple in a raft or canoe that runs 
perilously through breakers and rapids, nearing " 

tous falls, has been seized ot by canocanstsaodmiBha- i-.- 

tors of magazine covers. “White Water is also the name 
of a man’s cologne and after-shave from Revlon,* . U* 
James Conroy, a senior vice president at Revlon, pdatsi'# \< £-’ : 

ran. “Its name, crafted more than a year ago, had- I J&x 


refreshing, casual, outdoor scent." Perfect Father’s Day 
gift for a sweating White House aide: ' : 

Whitewoergate, a natural coinage, is too long to fit 
in a headline; the Whitewater scandal seems excessive- 
ly critical, at least for now. That leaves us with a 
neutral borrowing from the French, who last centuiy 
dealt with Caff cure Dreyfus, and most reporters are 
now calling the Clintons’ latest time of troubles the 
Whitewater affair. 


"L.. 


New York Tima Service 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page 4 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 



Todw 


Totuurruw 


Mgh 

Low 

W 

Hkjh 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


C/F 

OF 


10450 

1203 


21/70 

1305 pe 

Anatwdwn 

BUB 

4/39 

■h 

11/52 

6/43 ah 

Ankn 

1203 

2/35 

1 

10/50 

2/35 • 

Altera 

17/B2 

4/41 


1702 

em a 

8«cdm 

17® 

1102 

pc 2008 

12S3 pc 


1102 

-209 

pc 

1203 

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Br:*l 

0/48 

3/37 

c 

1203 

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Brussda 

10/50 

4 m 

oh 

14/57 

7/44 til 

ButHura* 

5/40 

0/32 


9/46 

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8 m 

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e 

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CataDeiSol 

1900 

1305 


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8/48 

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1501 

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■ 

1702 

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Fruitful 

1102 

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1102 

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1203 

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-2/29 

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PC 

1/34 

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1102 

4/39 

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1102 

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LmP«*™» 

23/73 

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Urton 

1702 

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1905 

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Laaftn 

1203 

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r 

1407 

7/44 ih 

Uw*« 

2005 

5/41 

a 

22/71 

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*Man 

1500 

6/46 


1804 

6/43 pc 

MW" 

-101 

-0/16 


-209 

-502 a 

Munich 

11/62 

4/39 


1203 

3/37 o 

Mca 

HM81 

9/45 

a 

19*6 

9/48 a 

CJato 

4/39 

1/34 

HI 

7/44 

1/34 f 

P*iw 

1702 

1102 pc 

1906 

1306 pc 

Part* 

1203 

8/45 


1702 

BM6 pc 

P»gu« 

9/45 

205 


9/45 

2*5 til 


3/41 

2/35 

r 

4/39 

- 1*1 pe 

Hoow 

1601 

S/41 

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17*2 

6M3 ■ 

SL Mntoii -3/27 

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1/34 

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Stockholm 

400 

■2/23 

c 

5/41 

104 r 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu- Weather. 



awgta* 


Tod a> T ammy 

|h Lew W Mgh Low W 
F OF OF OF 


32 m mm i 3301 mm pc 
1S«1 409 I 15431 SMI 9 

lies 1708 #1 30/SB >7*2 r 
31 m 21/70 pc 32/n zsm a 

3507 2008 9 37/95 2005 ■ 
12/53 -3/27 ■ 11/52 1/34 pc 

1407 9M5 til 1508 IMS pc 
85/85 24/75 I 3108 24/76 pc 
22/71 <407 r 23/73 15/81 T 
1305 3/37 pc 12/53 2/36 pc 


North America 

There w* be some showers 
tram Boston to Washington. 
D.C-. Tuesday, then Wed- 
nesday end Thuraday uriB be 
rather coot for the season 
wBh sunshine. Chilly Tues- 
day through Thursday In 
Chicago. Detroit and Toron- 
to. Bather mid much of this 
week to Seattle and Vancou- 
ver. 


Europe 


Bouts of stormy weath e r wil 
hit Iretand. the UX, Norway. 
Sweden and Denmark. 
Windswept rains wtH alter- 
nate with limited sun and 


lighter winds. Northern 
France through northern 
Germany aril be breezy and 


mild with showery spells. 
Sun will warm Southwest 
Europe most d toe rtna 


Asia 

Showers may wet South 
China as wefl as Tahwt and 
Kong Kong at any lime. In 
Shanghai, any rains should 
hold off til tale Wednesday. 
Be»ig and Seoul wll be set- 
tled with chfly moms. Wind 
will buffet northern Japan 
Tuesday; the south and west 
wIB have little rain through 
Thursday. 


NO*** 

Cape Town 


18/88 1203 s 18«B 1306 pc 
23/73 1305 a 26/79 1501 pc 
tWO 1000 • 22/71 12/53 pc 
21/70 1203 c 2802 1102 pc 
3208 2700 pc 33/91 2700 I 
24/75 1102 pc 25/79 1306 I 
2100 7/44 ■ 2100 9/48 pc 


ACROSS 

1 Artistic skill 

G Card game also 
called sevens 
12 Holed out in two 
under par 

14 Warned 
18 English essayist 
Richard 
IT Burglar 
is Cools, as coffee 
18 Pumpkin eater 
.of rhyme 

21 Summer drink 


22 Employee 
health plan, for 
short 

23 Horse trainer's 
equipment 

25 Black cuckoos 

26 Long, long time 

28 Like some 
schools 

29 Sweetens the 
kitty 

3Q Smart alecks 

32 Traffic cirde 

33 Charlie Brown's 
"Dam!" 


34 Ex-Mrs. Burt 
Reynolds 

35 Charge with gas 
38 Adorned 

42 Vineyard fruit 

43 Kismet 

44 Snick's partner 


2 Army grub 

3 Ripening agent 

4 Butler's The 

Way of All “ 

5 -Aviv 

e Observed Lent ' 


37 Knocking 
sound 


l Forbids 
i Bootee maker 


41 Doyen 
43 Smithies 
48 Dwindled 


62 Prefix with 
masochism 


40 Most 

HaJknveenlike 


47 Hlgh- 

muck-a-muck 


i Item of office 
attire 


96 Fuel efficiency 
rater; Abbr. 


7 Change the 
hemline 


Solution to Puzzle of March 25 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


SMtixug 

T8m 

Vance 


1305 5/43 A 1702 5/43 pc 

-3/27 4122 pc MB ■*/» an 

1306 7/44 pc 1407 7M4 pc 

1305 3/41 pc TO0O 3/37 ah 

8/43 -3/27 a 5/43 206 til 

1305 7/44 til 1702 6/43 pc 


Oceania 

Auddand 


23/73 1601 • 23/73 1601 a 
22/71 17/52 pc 24/76 1702 s 


Today Towaiuw 

Mgh Low W Mgh Low W 

OF Ur C/F OF 

Ban* 21/70 1509 pc 22/71 1407 pc 

Cta 2700 1508 pc 25/79 1203 pe 

Oanaacoa 1504 8/46 a 18«S 9/48 pc 

Jauaafam 1905 1102 a 1908 1102 pe 

Luaar 3801 1203 a 3301 1203 pc 

Riyadh 26/79 1601 * 2904 1702 pc 


Today Twaanow 

Mg* Low W Mgh Low W 

OF C/F C/F OF 

BuanoaAJma 8209 2009 a 31/98 21/70 pc 

ewacaa 2904 23/73 a 2904 23/73 pc 

Uma 25/79 21/70 c 2700 21/70 pc 

MaafcoCly 2802 1000 a 24/75 8/46 po 

ncdoJanate 3108 22/71 c 29/84 23/73 pe 

Swtiago 2700 1102 a 2700 8/46 pc 


LcaAngataa 

Maid 


Logan* Mm, pc-paiCydoudy. ixfcudy. aft-ahnwere, Hhunaarrto nm . r-ndn. st-anow Buries, 
siwsnow, Hce. W-Wotahor. AS mapo, torocaoto and data provided by Accu-thwher, he. 0 199* 


0D00O □□□□ □□□□ 
□EEEE snsn □□HQ 
□EQDD HQUE Enas 
Icjanoan □□□□□□□□ 
□□□□hd aaacDa 
□□□□□h taaa 
inaHa □□□□□□ Hsai 
□□□□ □□□00 □□□SI 
Idee □beebb qbdqI 

□HE Q0GJBUE 
□QELJE3 □□□□□□ 
□□□□EEDE □□□□EE 
□□□U □□□□ DQlDUQ 

shed aasQ Ejaana 

HEED UQQE □□□□LI 


46 Alternative to 
eggdrop 
48 A Gershwin 

48 Drunk 

skunk 

so Analyze a 
sentence 
si Actor John ot 
TVs “Ad dams 
Family" 

S3 Locale 
ss Money-back 
deal 

87 Boot camp 
denizen 

ss Noted family In 
china 

manufacture 
ss Arabs 


8 do-well 

a “La-la" 


eo Cancel the 
launch 


1 "L'6taf — 
Louis XIV 


preceder 

10 Home of the *96 
Olympics 

11 Poorer 

13 Arranges 
strategically 
is Smart 
18 Sullivan's 
“really big' one 

ao Summers. In 
Haiti 
24 Sharp 
ss Clowning 
achievements? 
27 Mexican shawl 
29 Top-flight 
si Arena receipts 
32 Drive in Beverly 
Hills 

34 Epistles 

35 Shocked 
38 Pencil ends 



Pa&W Uy WUBwn P. Bufay 

© New York Times Edited by Will Shone. 


Itavel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AKT Access Numbers 
How to call around the world. 

1. Using the chart below, End the country you an- calling from. 

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COUNTRY ACEESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCES S NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACIFIC frefand I-8P0-550-000 Colombia m mma 1 

0014-881-011 Italy 172-1011 777 

10811 Munantisr IgVOfMl Hoi 


^ >•: J _ ‘ ' •• 


Bong Kong 
India* 


Malaysia* 

New Zealand 


Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* 
Thailand* 


018-872 yitlin* |jm 
800-1111 Luxembourg 
000-117 Malta* 

0 01*001-10 Monos* 

0039 -111 Nctbedsnds* 

009-11 Norway* 
ii- -maanr*- 

900-0011 poet ««a* 

000-911 

105-U Knaria-Qloecow) 
235-2072: Slovakia 


800-0111-111 Spafa 
430-430 9vm 
0080-102800 9wtt 
00I9-991-H11 ILK. 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
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EUROPE 


Belgium* 

Bulg/ria 

Croatia** 

CteehBtp 

Den mar k* 

Finland* 


Ger man y 

Greece* 


Iceland's 


8*14111 Bahrain 

022-903-011 Cyprus* 

073-11-0010 tend 

OO-iaOO-OOlQ Kuwait 

99-3S-OQ11 Lebanon OBdroO 
00420-00101 Saudi Arabia 
8001-001 0 Torkey* 
990*100-10 AMlrii 

Argentina* 

01300010 BdUze* ’ 

00-000-1311 Bolivia* 

ooA-eoo-omi 

999-001 Ckfc 


— ** 196 a Salvador** 

^ -Gunenab* 

0«X>S90-nft Gn ya i ia*-* 

* 9 * r0(ru Honduras** 

!»<*_ 0M91VL — 

I 0*010-4800111 :^ quaaa 

: — ggggg pSF 

01-8004288 . — 

^ 

00420001 01 

9009900-11 - g ^ uda " > — ; 

020-793-611 — — ^ 

nti* 135-00-11 - 

0500890011 'Be°a«fa* 

MmarUBteT ■ -British VX 

800 001 Cayman Islands 

080-90010! . Grenada* 

iT7.inft.irrT 'llaftl* 


177-100-2727 

800-288 Janaka** 
426-801 Area 

1 - 800-100 i Sl Ptta/Wevia 

00800-122771 


Colom »*« 980 - 11 - 001 Q 1 

<CostaRfca *0 114 

■Ecuador* 119 . 

El Salvador** 190 ' 

■Guatemala* 190 1 

Guyaira— 165 . 

Honduras^ 12 V 

haeakonAA 9 SS 0 Q 46 Z 424 O ' 

174 

Pa n a m an 109 

Penr 191- 

Suriname 156 

Uruguay QQ-0410 

Venezuda** BPQll -130 

rABTRIWAPJ 

1 - 800872-2881 

I aecnzida^ 1-800872-2881 

lBatahv J- 1-800-872-2881 , 

Cayman Islands 1 - 800 - 872-2861 

Gtenatto * 1-800-872-2881 . 

001 - 800972 - 28 ^ 

Jamaica** 0-800872-2881 1 

Wgfc-Aatfl QWffgggasn 

StJDgS/Ncvfa 1-800-872-2881 


00-800-12277 * AFRICA 

AMBMCAS EgyprcCidtol 

00 1 - 800200-1111 Gabon* 

S55 555g - 

0800-1111 Kenya* 

0004Q10 ifcj. : 

Malawi** 


ART 


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301-1992 




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