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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Taesday, March 29, 1994 


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No. 34.548 


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Mayhem in Johannesburg 

18 Killed in City Center as Zulus Protest Ballot 


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JoKumesborg policemen taking carer Monday as Zuhi protest mucbers from (he Inkatfaa Freedom Party (led sneers' bullets. 

Italian Right Is Poised for a Sweep 


By Barry James 

Internationa} Herald Tribute 

Early exit polls predicted a sweeping major- 
ity for the rightist Freedom Alliance dominated 
by the media tycoon SUvio Berlusconi, with the 
once powerful Christian Democrats tr ailing a 
distant third behind a leftist alliance headed by 
reform Communists. 

According to one poll of 25,000 voters on the 
state-owned RAI Uno television network, the 
rightist alliance could win 300 to 340 seats in 
the 630-seat Chamber of Deputies, with the left 
gening 217 to 257 seats and the remnants of the 
Christian Democrats and their allies 55 to 75 
seats. The poll said the right could get np to 47 
percent of the popular vote, with Mr. Berins- 
coni’s party, Forza J tali a. alone getting up to 22 
percent. .. .. Jl. • ' 

But' analysts said Seep dfiviaons among the 
three main parties of me right, would make 
forming a government an extremely complex 
process. One exit pell, reported on Mr. Berlus- 
coni’s television chaired, predicted that the left 
would gain control of the Senate, which has the 
power to block — but not make — leg i slation. 

Mr. Berlusconi, one of Italy’s richest men 
and the head of a vast television, press and 
commercial empire, allied with neofasdsts and 
the federalist Northern League to fight the 
election. The polls showed that most of. the 
principal political leaders in the election, in- 
ducting Mr. Berlusconi and the head of the left, 
AchiHe Occhetto, had won seats. 

If the exit polk are confirmed, Mr. Berlus- 
coni could emerge as a powerful contender as 
prime minister. He has not revealed whether he 
wants to succeed Carlo AzegUo Ciaxnpi and 
form Italy’s 53d postwar government 

The differences between the parties of the 


Tokyo to Unveil 
Plan to Widen 
Market Access 

By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tina Service 

TOKYO — In a bid to break the trade 
.stalemate with the United States, Japsu P 1 ®" 
pared to announce on Tuesday a package of 
market-opening measures that is wide in scope 
fart s omew h a t lacking in specific co mmi t me nts. 

The early analysis by some American offi- 
cials was that the measures do not go ’much 
beyond what Japan was offering on Feb. 11, 
when talks under the so-called trade framework 

collapsed at the summit meeting in Washington 

between President Bill Clinton and Prune Mm- . 
ister Morihiro Hosokawa. The new steps might 
not immediately lead to a resumption of negoti- 
ations. . 

“I would be a little sutprised if we see enough 
to say ‘Let’s go back to where we were on 
February II, one American official said 

^ the^ew package, decisions onteyej£ 
meats - such as tax cuts, ^CTea^ ^bbc 
works spending and deregulation —an eput wl 
until J^TSSioogh there are promises that 

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right were becoming abundantly apparent. 

Umberto Boss, the bead of the Northern 
League, expressed concern about a victory of 
the “reactionary right-” 

Gianfranco Fmi, the leader of the National 
Alliance, one of the components of the Free- 
dom Alliance, said that with the apparent vic- 
tory of the rightist alliance, “it’s time to put our 
cards on the table and sort out the differences 
that have emerged." ' 

To overcome these differences, the right 
might have to form a grand alliance with the 
Christian Democratized center. But one of the 
prominent center leaders. Mario Segni of Sar- 
dinia, said his party would not cooperate with 
any party that has what he called “oven ones of 
extremism.” Rosa Russo JervoBno. a spokes- 
woman for the Christian Democrats, now 
called the Popular Patty, ruled out any cooper- 
ation with nwrfasrism. 

The two-day elections swept from power a 
political dass shamed and demolished by two 
yearn of corruption scandals and hundreds of 
arrests. 

It was Italy’s best chance since World War n 
to bring new faces into a political system that 
for more than four decades was dominated by 
the Christum Democrats. 

Many Italians remained skeptical about the 

^“?voted JfE&r Rossana Ferrari, 64, 
said in Rome. “We already tried the right, and 


In Ukraine 

Ukrainians expressed a desire far change 
in heavy voting that showed discontent 
with the economic morass and high infla- 
tion under the government of President 
Leonid Kravchuk. (Page 2) 


In Turkey 

ter Tar^GIler’s Tme^^party ap 
headed for victory, but the pro*! 
Welfare Party led in Istanbul, the 
single prize in the voting. (Page 2) 


they were thieves. We tried the center and they 
were thieves. Let's try the left now.” 

Whichever combination of parties forms the 
government, Italy’s foreign policy as a member 
of the European Union and the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization is unlikely to change. Ana- 
lysts said that whoever wan, the election could 
lead to big domestic changes, including privati- 
zation of state-owned industries and an attempt 
to reform the bloated bureaucracy. 

More than half of the members of the old 
legislature did not run for re-election, including 
two former prime ministers, Bettioo Cnad ana 
Arnaldo Forbid, and the former foreign minis- 
ter, Gianni de Michachs. All have been dis- 
graced in the anti -corruption campaign. 

The differences between the partners in Mr. 
Berlusconis Freedom Affiance emgrged during 
the campaigning. Mr. Bossi dismissed Mr. Ber- 
lusconi as a “detergent salesman.” The North- 
ern League seeks to sever the rich and industri- 
alized north from the control of the Roman 
bureaucracy and the financial demands of the 
poor south and Sicily. 

Mr. Fini, the bulk of whose support is in the 
south, accuses Mr. Bossi of trying to destroy 
national unity. 

Mr. Berlusconi, 57, presented himself as a 
new face with fresh policies. He promised to 
reduce taxation and get the government off 
people’s backs. 

On the left, the reformed Communists, now 
known as the Party of the Democratic Left, are 
committed to market forces, privatization of 
state industries and Italy’s continuing NATO 
membership. 

The leftist affiance also includes a hard-line 
Marxist group, the Reconstructed Communist 
Party, that is opposed to these things. 

In addition, the left embraces the Greens, led 
by the former European Union environment 
commissioner, Carlo Ripa di Meana, and the 
anti-Mafia Sicilian group known as La Rate, or 
the Network. 

Under the new electoral rules designed to 
end the anarchy of small parties, three-quarters 
of the <530 seats in the Chamber of Deputies and 
the 315 seats in the Senate are reserved for the 
winners of each race. The remaining seats will 
be distributed under the old proportional repre- 
sentation system. 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Gun battles erupted 
in the central business district of South Africa's 
largest city Monday when 10,000 armed Zulus 
staged a protest march in opposition to the 
country's first democratic election next month. 

The police confirmed 18 deaths but unoffi- 
cial reports suggested the toB could be twice 
that high, with up to 400 wounded, in battles 
that continued from early morning to eady 
afternoon. The fighting pitted Zulus who back 
the Inkatha Freedom Party’s election boycott 
against supporters of the African National 
Congress, the party favored to win the April 26- 
28 election. 

While some of the carnage took place in 
outlying black townships, the bulk of the dead 
woe shot in the streets beneath Johannesburg’s 
glistening skyscrapers, under the noses of horri- 
fied office workers and pedestrians who spent 
their lunch hours diving under desks, sprawling 
behind parked cars or darting away from win- 
dows. 

It was first time in the blood-stained history 
of the apartheid era that a major massacre 
occurred in the commercial hub at (be subcon- 
tinent. 

But, as has often happened before when this 
country’s volatile transformation to democracy 
sustains a deep shock, the mayhem appears to 
have triggered a move toward political reconcil- 
iation. 

Several hours after the running battles finally 
stopped, the government announced that a 
four-way meeting would be held later this week 
between President Frederik W. de Klerk; the 
ANC president. Nelson Mandela; the Inkatha 
president. Chief Mzngosuthu Butheleri, and 
the king of the Zulus. Goodwill Zwehthini. 
They will discuss steps to control violence and 
ensure a free and fair election, as well as In- 
to tha’s objections to the new South African 
Constitution under which the balloting is being 
held, and King Goodwill’s demand for Zulu 
sovereignty. 

Mr. Mandela has been trying since his release 
from prison to meet with King Goodwill only 
to be frustrated by the king’s protective unde 
and senior adviser, Chief Bnthekzi. A meeting 
had finally been arranged for 10 days ago. but 
was canceled the night before when Mr. Man- 
dela received an assassination threat. 

Political and economic turf wars between the 
ANC and Inkatha are the major cause of the 
political violence that has claimed 20,000 lives 
in South Africa over the past decade. Each 
party called a press conferences late Monday to 
accuse the other of deliberately instigating the 
day’s kffiings. and to berate the police for not 
"doing enough to prevent It. 

Tne situation was so chaotic at the sites of the 
two worst shoot-outs that journalists, peace 
monitors and other independent bystanders all 
had difficulty sorting out where the first shots 
had come from, and what had triggered them. 

“I think there is a strong probability that 
agents provocateurs were involved,” said An- 
tonie Gildenbuys, chairman of the National 


Peace Secretariat, a multiparty, multiracial 
monitoring group. He was one of many witness- 
es at the marchers’ mam rally ate — a square- 
block concrete park in front the city’s astral 
library — who felt that the initial fire may have 
come from snipers shooting from office win- 
dows. At lost five people were ItiOed at the 
Library Gardens ate, most of whom appear to 
haws been marchers. 

The deadliest shool-out of the day had come 
an hour earlier, and eight blocks away, at a rear 
entrance to the ANCs 21 -stray national head- 
quarters building. ANC security guards shot 
and killed nine Zulu marchers and wounded 10 
others who they claimed were trying to break 
into the building. The ANC suffered no casual- 
ties. 

“Our security personnel behaved with impec- 
cable forbearance and patience in the face of 
extreme provocation.” the ANC said after the 
incident. It said it had received intelligence 
reports the night before that the Zulu marchers, 
would mount an attack on the ANC building. It- 
added that it had notified the police, who had 
promised to control the crowds. 

Instead, the ANC said, the Zulu marchers 
massed provocatively in front of the ANC na- 
tional headquarters building and a separate 


ANC regional headquarters several blocks 
away, while the police made no effort to either 
control to divert or disarm the crowd. 

”11115 was mayhem, it was not a demonstra- 
tion," said the ANC regional chairman. Tokyo 
Sexwale. 

The ANC chairman. Thabo MbekL added; 
“With all the warnings the police had, it is 
difficult to understand why they did nothing. It 
suggests a little more than incompetence.” 

A police spokesman, David Bruce, said Mon- 
day night that it was impossible for the police to 
disarm such large crowds, and he laid the re- 
sponsibility for the shootings at the feet of the 
warring parties. 

Also Monday night, the minister of law and 
order declared Johannesburg and outlying 
towns an unrest area, allowing for the imposi- 
tion of curfews and special searches. 

The Inkatha regional leader. Tbemba Khoza. 
who addressed the rally at Library Gardens, 
said afterward that he. too, had received intelli- 
gence reports the night before the march — but 
his said that ANC agents were planning to 
attack marchers with sniper fire. He said he. 
too, contacted the police, but received no help. 

“This was a well-planned, well-calculated ai- 

See MARCH, Page 4 


Backdrop to the Future: 
A 10- Year-Old Gvil War 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

ES1KHAWINI, South Africa — Alfred 
Mokwena sleeps with nine other young men 
in a dormitory room built for two in a work- 
ers’ hostel here in northern KwaZulu. His 
spot is beneath a bed, and he’s grateful to 
have il 

His home is in a village about 15 kilometers 
(10 miles) away. The last time Mr. Mokwena 
was there, six months ago, a raiding party 
paid a visit just before midnight. They strafed 
his family’s hut with automatic-rifle fire. His 
father and two brothers were killed. He, his 
mother and two sisters survived. 

The Mokwenas are among the tens of thou- 
sands of Zulus who have lost family members 
or homes or both in a low-intensity civil war 
that has raged for a decade in the black 
homeland erf KwaZulu and the surrounding 
province of Natal. It is a complex fight with 
many dimensions, but the most basic fault 
line pits younger, more progressive, more 
urbanized Zulus who support the African 
National Congress against older, more tradi- 
tional more rural Zulus who support the 
Inkatha Freedom Party. 

South Africa’s first democratic election has 
made this conflict more dangerous than ever. 


for there is an ominous skew in the political 
positions of the two blood rivals. The ANC is 
heading for a big victory on April 26-28. 
while Inkatha is boycotting the election. 

In the past six weeks, there have been 
about 350 deaths and thousands of new inter- 
nal refugees, such as the Mokwenas. in Kwa- 
Zulu alone. On Sunday, the ANC was forced < 
to cancel a major rally in the region for they 
third weekend in a row because heavily 
armed Zulus, presumably Inkatha support 
ers, occupied the stadium beforehand, j 
Many pro-democracy groups and monit j 
of the violence say the intimidation is so 1 
that it will be impossible to conduct/ 
balloting in many rural areas of Kwa f 
and perhaps in some urban townships as 
But Mr. Mokwena, who now lives/ 
ANC-dommatcd township, disagrees 
“Yes, it will be a little scary on J 
Day, but I have been scared before,’?- 
“I am going to vote. All ray friends / 
to vote.” / 

Bhelri Nluii, the ANC chairman for norm- 
ern Natal — the region that supposedly is the 
strongest Inkatha area — says he is expecting 
an 80 percent turnout on "Election Day. 
“Black people have been waiting for three- 

See ZULUS, Pbge 4 


China Resists Calh to Press North Korea 


Ctmpiled by Ou Staff From Dispatches 

BELTING — The Chinese government on 
Monday resisted requests from South Korea for 
stronger opposition to North Korea's nuclear 
program, saying that the crisis over the issue 
could be ended only through dialogue. 

“The nuclear issue should be settled through 
patient and constructive talks between the par- 
ties directly concerned,” a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Shea Guofang, said at a briefing 
after more than two hours of talks between 
President Jiang Zemin of China and President 
Khn Young Sam of South Korea. 

“We have made our due effort,” Mr. Shea 
said. "However, China has only a limited role to 

P ^esaid Beijing opposed anything that could 
complicate the issue, including U.S. plans to 


deploy anti-missile Patriot missiles in South 
Korea and the resumption of U.S.-Souih Kore- 
an military exercises. 

Pyongyang is involved in a dispute ova- in- 
spection of nuclear facilities, where intemation- 

Seoul’s defense minister says that if North 
Korea started a war, it would lose. Page 4. 

al inspectors believe it may be building a bomb. 

While many have looked to Beijing to influ- 
ence North Korea to end the crisis, Chinese 
officials have repeatedly said the issue can only 
be solved if the United States, South Korea and 
the International Atomic Energy Agency talk 
directly to Pyongyang. 

China, one of the five permanent members erf 
the UN Security Council and Pyongyang’s only 


major aBy, has said it opposes as counterpro- 
ductive any moves by the council to pressure 
North Korea. 

The council seeking to avoid a potentially 
divisive vote on tougher measures to force 
Pyongyang to open its nuclear sites, is consider- 
ing issuing a statement through its president 
urging the North to be flexible. 

Reports from Washington said that the Unit- 
ed States would settle for a Security Council 
chairman's statement, depending on its con- 
tent 

Mr. Shen said such a statement should be 
“constructive” and “should contribute to the 
resumption of bilateral talks” between the four 
parties — between Washington and Pyong- 


See KOREA, Page 4 


Balladur Yields, This Time to Students 


Kiosk 


By Alan Riding 

Wew York Tima Service 

PARIS — Bowing to student protesters who 
disrupted more than a dozen French dries over 
the last three weds, Prime Minis ter Edouard 
Balladur abandoned a controversial govern- 
ment decree Monday that allowed young peo- 
ple to be paid less than die minimum wage. 

After a meeting between Mr. Balladur and 
student leaders Monday morning, a spokesman 
far the conservative coalition government said 
the decree had been suspended for one week to 
allow time for a new policy to be developed and 
“toput an end” to tie so-called youth wage. 

The move was anticipated by Mr. Balladur in 
a brief television address Sunday night when he 
referred to young people’s anxiety about their 
future and noted that “we must start to restore 


Still, the retreat is embarrassing for the 64- 
yeai-old p rime minister, reinforcing the view 
that he backs down in face of protests. On two 
other recent occasions, he dropped policies — 
to cut staff at Air France and to increase state 
subsidies to private schools — after angry dem- 
onstrations. 

Student leaders vowed to stay on the alert 
until the decree was revoked. On Friday, 
200,000 youths marched through Paris and a 
dozen other cities to denounce the decree. Some 
protests continued Monday, and a n ot h er dem- 
onstration is scheduled in Paris on Thursday. 

With one in four French under the age of 25 
currently unable to find work, the government 
had argued tha t its measure would encourage 
employers to hire young people. But_ students, 
claiming the decree discriminated against them, 
said that, after years of study, they deserved a 
decent, well-paid job. 


Under the decree, employers would be al- 
lowed to pay young men and women between 
30 and 80 percent of the 5,900 franc (about 
SI, 000) monthly minimum wage depending on 
their qualifications. In exchange, employers 
would dc required to give intense training to 
those young people on their payrolls. 

The government was clearly taken aback by 
the strength of student opposition to the decree 
and, with violent clashes between students and 
poHceaccon^iaiiyingniany demonstrations, of- 
ficials began fearing an escalation comparable 
to the anti-government movement that shook 
France in May 1968. 

As at Friday, though, government officials 
said Mr. Balladur would make no more conces- 
sions — he excluded lop university graduates 

See FRANCE, Page 4 



Car Thieves Put England on High Alert 


By William E Schmidt 

Na» York Tones Service 
-NEWCASTLE, England — When Sinclair 
Seymour bought a new Ford Mondeo station 
wagon two months ago, he took no chances. 

Not only did he make sure his car had a 
factay-cquipped anti-theft system, including 
deadbolts inside the doom, aa alarm and a 
high-tech device that electronically locks the 
engine, but he also asked the dealer to install 
a backup alarm and mount a thick sted 
padlock over the gearshift 
Then, for extra peace of mind, he spent 
$225 more far a ydkwv wheel clamp, similar 
to the heavy metal boots some police depart- 
ments use to immobilize parirmg scofflaws. 
Now, whenever Seymour leaves his new car 


in a public parking lot he takes the clamp out 
of his trunk and locks it over his front wheeL 

“I know, you think it's a little over the 
top," add Seymour, 50, a quality control 
twh p iw fl n at a local factory. “But then ag a in , 
you don't live around here. If you don’t want 
your car to be stolen, you have to take every 
precaution you can think of.” 

Car security and anti-theft technology 
have become a kind of national obsession, 
drawing police, government regulators, insur- 
ers and manufacturers into a high-states 
gam* to stay at least one step ahead of the 
thieves. 

According to U.S. statistics, 650 cars were 
stolen per 100,000 residents across America 
in 1992 (foil figures for last year are not yet 


available). In Finland and Wales, the rate 
was 1,215 cars per 100,000 residents. 

The epidemic reflects not only a growing 
market for stolen vehicles in India, Pakistan. 
Nigeria and the West Indies, as well as East- 
ern Europe, but also the increasingly preda- 
tory tactics of young car thieves. 

Given a sharp jump as well in thefts from 
cars, as thieves snatch purses, radios and 
portable phones, insurance p^outs on theft 
claims jumped more than S0Q percent in a 
decade to more than $713 million in 1991 

At the mging of the government and insur- 
ers, British manufacturers Eke Ford and 
VauxhflQ are now arming their latest models 

See CARS, Paged 



EU Schedules Deadline 
On Macedonia Dispute 

ATHENS (AFP) — A European Union 
deduaon on Greece’s blockade of the neigh- 
boring former Yugoslav republic of Macedo- 
nia wi0 be made “probably just after Easter,” 
unless the embaigo is lifted, according to 
Hans van den Broek, the EU commissioner 
charged with seeking a solution to the dis- 
pute. 

Announcing the last deadline after a meet- 
ing with Greece's Prime Minister Andreas 
Papandreou and Foreign Minister Karo! os 
Papoulias, Mr. van den Broek said that if the 
blockade was still in place the commission 
would “draw its own conclusions.” 

EU foreign ministers on Sunday rejected 
Greece’s arguments in favor erf the six-week- 
old trade embargo and called on Greece to 
find a solution to the deadlock. Greece claims 
the name of Macedonia for its own region 
that borders the former Yugoslav republic, 
and insists that the latter be designated by a 
different name. 





Book Review 
Chess 
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The Dollar 


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playwright who championed the The- 
ater of the Absurd, died at 81. Page Z 


Mon, 4PM 
1 . 6722 ~ 
1.4961 
104.05 
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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 



Victor DradieW Apace FoHX-Pmc 

HELPING HANDS — Sokfiers carrying firewood Monday for a couple in Borisov, Belarus, which has been hit by flooding. 


Turnout Reflects 
Ukrainians 9 Anger 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Russian Official Is Slain in Algeria 


Setback for Leader as 7 5% of Voters, 
Sickof Economic Woes, Go to Polls 


Islamic Party Leads in Istanbul Vote 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ANKARA — Prime Minister Tansu Ciller’s 
party appeared beaded for victory Monday in 
local elections, fending off critics who blame 
her for Turkey’s economic woes and attacks by 
Kurdish separatists. 

But the pro-Islanric Welfare Party appeared 
posed for a d rama tic victory in Istanbul the 
biggest single prize in Sunday’s municipal vot- 
ing. The Welfare Party, led by a veteran politi- 
cian, Necmettin Erbakan, has never before won 
control of Istanbul Turkey’s biggest city and 

mnnnwrinl capitaL 

State television said Tayyip Erdogan, the 
Welfare Party candidate for mayor of Istanbul 
was leading with 24.4 percent of the vote after 
57 percent of the ballots had been counted. His 
nearest rival Titian Kesici of the Motherland 
Party, followed with 22.6 percent. 

The nationwide elections for provincial and 
municipal posts do not directly affect Mr. 
(liter's nine-month-old coalition government, 
but success for her center-tight True Path party 
would be seen as a vote of confidence m its 
policies. 

The results so far appear to support Mrs. 
Colei’s tough stand against Kurdish separatist 
rebels, which she has emphasized in recent 
months. 

Earlier this month, she pushed the parlia- 


ment to lift the legal immunity of seven Kurd- 
ish deputies and open the way for their prosecu- 
tion on charges of supporting the separatist 
movement. The deputies remain jailed. 

But the violence has continued. On Sunday, 
separatists exploded a bomb at the St Sophia 
Museum in Istanbul injuring three Europeans 
at the popular tourist ate. 

An anonymous caller to newspapers said the 
attack was carried out by the separatist Kurdish 
Workers Party. The rebels have tried to cripple 
Turkey's tourism industry and disrupt the elec- 
tions. 

At stake in the voting are more than 83.000 
local posts, including mayors, provincial assem- 
bly members, city council members, village 
headmen and neighborhood representatives. 

Results based on 65 percent of the vote from 
provincial assembly elections, showed True 
Path leading with 24 percent The main opposi- 
tion Motherland Party came second with 21 
percent and the Welfare Party had 18 percent 
according to the state teteviskm. 

The Social Democrat Populist Party, the ju- 
nior coalition partner, had 12 percent. The 
nl mi natio nalis t Nationalist Action Party got 8 
percent and the rest of the vote was divided 


In final results for some of the 76 mayoral 
races, the Welfare won 10, Motherland, 8, So- 


cial Democrats, 7, and the True Path and Na- 
tionalist Action each 6. Results were not com- 
plete for Istanbul and Ankara. 

If the trend continues, it will cushion the 
prime minis ter from critics who hold her re- 
sponsible for the nation's deepening economic 
crisis, which includes rising inflation and a 
recent 70 percent devaluation in the Turkish 
lira. 

Mrs. Ciller, an economics professor, said she 
inherited problems that had accumulated dur- 
ing the last 10 years. She was expected to 
announce a package this week to reduce public 
spending. Mrs. Oiler, 48, became the first 
woman to lead the country after winning the 
True Path's leadership in June. 

Political analysts said the public’s frustration 
with economic hardships helped explain the 
rise in the Welfare Party, which received 9 
percent of the vote in 1989 local elections. 
Many voters turned to the Muslim party’ in the 
southeast because the pro-Kurdish Democracy 
Party boycotted the election. 

Large groups of foreign election observers 
traveled to the southeast, where the army in- 
creased its troop strength from 200,000 to 
350,000. Observers complained that Turkish 
authorities denied them access to various 
towns. (AP, Reuters) 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Service 
KIEV — Parliamentary dec- 
dons in Ukraine, though with only 
patchy results so far, have demon- 
strated a sharp desire for change 
anvwig Ukrainian voters, who are 
angr y with the economic morass 
and high inflation that has fol- 
lowed independence under Presi- 
dent Leonid M- Kravchuk. 

That anger expressed xtsdf first 
in the turnout of nearly 75 percent 
nationwide after predictions of ap- 
athy, and second in the large votes 
in M $iem Ukraine and Crimea, 
dominated by ethnic Russians, for 
much closer economic and political 
relations with Russia, as well as for 
neo-Commnnist candidates who 
promise a return to high produc- 
tion in association with Moscow. 

The voting Sunday fflustrated a 
growing division between eastern 
a n d western Ukraine, which was 
Sovietized in earnest only after 
World War 0 and where Ukrainian 
nationalism is strongest 
But Ukrainians also gave sup- 
port to a so-called “new wave" of 
candidates — younger, non-Com- 
munist and business-oriented. If 
successful in a runoff round cm 
April 10, they will present a chal- 
lenge to the status quo of Mr. Krav- 
chuk and the almost unchanged 
preindependence elite. 

Some of Mr. Kravchuk’s possi- 
ble rivals in presidential elections, 
now scheduled for June but winch 
he would like to cancel did wdL 
They won their seats outright with 
more than 50 percent of the vote 
despite an average of 13 candidates 
for each of 450 seats. 

Former Prime Minis ter Leonid 
Kuchma, who intends to challenge 
Mr. Kravchuk for the presidency, 
won 91 percent of the vote in a 
Russian border district. Allied with 
a reformer academic and former 


even at times suggesting the use of 
the Russian ruble. 

Mr. Kravchuk has talked of mar- 
ket reform but has done little of it. 


ALGIERS (Combined Dispatches) — A Russian Embassy employee 
was murdered Monday at Saouia. south of Algiers, the fourth Russia 
slain in Algeria in six months, security officials said. 

Two Frenchmen were slam last week, victims of violence by Islamic 
fundamentalists against the military-led government. More than 3Q' 
foreigners have been killed in Algeria in the last six months. 

Also Monday, a Foreign Ministry official was shot and kflfasd by th^. 
gunmen outside his home. Security forces said Belkacem Touati, a depi& 
director of the ministry's African affairs division, was killed and his *§> 
was wounded. (AFP, AP) 



Russia Rents Baikonur Space Center 


Two of the reform economists he 
ftiwriMBeri — Viktor Pynzenyk and 
Votodymyr Lanoviy — won their 
seats outright, as did the old parlia- 
mentary speaker, Ivan Plyushch, 
who also may run for president. 

Moderate Ukrainian nationalists 
of the Rnkh party, which led the 
tight for independence, did well in 
central and especially western 
Ukraine, with its leader, Vyaches- 
lav Cbomovil also winning out- 
right. Mr. Chomovil ran against 
Mr. Kravchuk in December 1991 
and is expected to do so again. 


MOSCOW (Reuters) — Russia signed an agreement with Kazakhs^ 
on Monday to rent the Baikonur space center, the key installation of the 
old Soviet space program, for 20 years at an annual cost of SI 15 mi %^ 
the Itar-Tass press agency said. The deal with a provision for a 10-year 
extension, was signed at the Kremlin by the two presidents, Boris N. 
Yeltsin of Russia and Nursultan A. Nazarbayev. 

All of the Soviet Union’s manned flights, since Major Yuri Gagarin’s 
pioneering flight in 1961, have been launched from Baikonur. The Mtnre 
of the complex of launch pads and construction plants, which also 
produces the Russian Bnran space shuttle, had been in question since the 
collapse of communism and Kazakhstan’s independence. 

The uncertainty had taken a toll cm morale in the adjacent city of 
Leninsk. in northern Kazakhstan, built to house the workers of the space 
program. In early 1992, soldiers of a building battalion rioted at Leninsk 
m protest at pore: living conditions, burning down several buildings. 


But the real shape erf any new c . jo. . \r* •_ _ n 

parliament will depend on runoffs QlTIgapOre LiulGI otflTtS V ISlt tO ijUTlQB 

RANGOON (Reuters) — Prime Minister Goh Cbok Tong erf W 
candidates m districts b pore arrived in Burma on Monday, aiding the military junta's drpknnqfc 

isolation since it crushed an anti'-govemmeoi uprising in 1988. 

AH of the junta’s top generals, including Than Shwe, chairman of the 
State Law and Order Restoration Council, turned out at the airport to 
welcome Mr. Goh, and thousands of schoolchildren waved Singaporean 
and Burmese flags as the visitor was driven to central Rangoon. 

Singapore has identified Burma, China, Indochina and India as poten- 
tial investment areas. The Burmese junta has faced Harsh criticism 
soldiers opened fire on unarmed demonstrators in 1 988, killing hundreds. 
Mr. Goh became only the second head of government to visit Burma 
since 1988. The first was Prime Minis ter Khamtai ffi phanrinn of Tang 


one got more than 50 percent. 

On Friday night before the vote, 
Mr. Kravchuk went on television to 
say that be wanted special powers 
from parliament to deal more deci- 
sively with the economy and crime, 
while ftwirefing June’s presidential 
and local voting. Apparently ex- 
pecting a low turnout, Mr. Krav- 
chuk aid it was necessary to pre- 
vent “a vacuum of power,” 
especially if no new parliament was 
elected. ' 


“Although we do not have final 
results, it is dear that Kravchuk is 
the loser,” Mr. Lanoviy said Mon- 
day. “Thebig turnout is a big moral 
blow to him.” 


In the much- watched Crimean 
“opinion poD” on closer ties to 
Russia, posted by the secesaomst- 
rmnded new president, Yuri Mesh- 
kov, “between 70 and 90 percent" 
of voters favored a more indepen- 
dent relationship with Kiev and 

a iium riwai Rnsrian-Ukraiman citizen- 

deputy speaker, Vladimir B* Grin- drip, Mr. Meshkov’s office said in A nTlPTUatlfi Dowm*H PlflllP, Trail Sflvft 

yov, Mr. Kuchma represents many describing preliminary results. _ . _ ° 

business leaders and enterprise di- General Valeri Kuznetsov, Mr. 


UN Protests Expulsions by Thailand 

GENEVA (Reuters) — The United Nations High Commissioner foJj 
Refugees, Sadako Ogata, protested to Thailand on Monday over its 
decision to expel some 25,000 Cambodian refugees. 

Mrs. Ogatas agency said she wrote to the Thai foreign minister, 
Prasong Soonsni, to take “strong exception” to the weekend repatriation. 
The refugees, said to be relatives ana supporters of the Khmer Rouge 
rebel group, fled over the Thai border when government troops captured 
the rebel stronghold of Paflin, in western Cambodia, on March 19. 

They were sent back into Cambodia over the weekend in what Thai 
officials said was a vohmtaiy repatriation. UN officials said the refugees 
were believed to have been sent back to a Khmer Rouge-controlled am, 
but it said the return “was conducted in a manner contrary to internation- 
ally accepted humanitarian prinriples and practices.” 


ir.: 


rectors. But he has also spoken of 
closer ties to Russia to bolster pro- 
duction, inducting the easing of 
customs and currency regulations. 


Ugandans Are Flocking to Polls in a Return to Democracy 


By Donatella Lorch 

New York Times Service 

KAMPALA, Uganda — Ugandans voted Monday in 
the first national election in 14 years in what diplomats 
and many Ugandans say is a critical turning point for the 
country. 

After two decades of dvfl war, death and terror, the 
election is offering a welcome change. Enthusiastic crowds 
gather to listen to the campaign debates, often peppered 

with mud-dingin g, 

Many Ugandans were visibly dated by the prospect of 
voting, and 70 percent to 80 percent of those eligible have 
registered Yet, many say they are not quite sure what they 
trill be voting for. 

In fac 4 the voters will elect about 200 members of a 
consti tom assembly that will approve a draft constitu- 
tion. Only ben win Ugandans hie able to vote for a new 
pariiamer' md president. Most critical for the future, the 
assembly will decide whether (he country will adopt a 
multiparty system. 

“This election will determine Uganda's future and who . 


will be on top,” said a Western diplomat in Kampala. “If 
this deed on doesn’t go right, than the elections for presi- 
dent jmd parliament have a very small chance of success.” 

Other East African countries such as Tanzania and 
Kenya began the move about four years ago from one- 
party rule to a multiparty system under pressure from 
western aid donors and their own citizens, who were fed 
op with corruption. 

When President Yoweri Museveni took over power 
militarily in 1986, he began to bring back economic 
growth and stability to his country after years of war. 

But he has long maintained that political parties in 
Africa would be the basis for division on tribal and 
religious lines and that a successful transition to pluralism 
must come about gradually. The opposition, which is 
pushing for a multiparty system, did not press hard for 
years, lor the sake of stability. 

Mr. Museveni’s term wifl be over in 1995 and he says be 
wants to retire to his farm. But even opposition members 
agree that if presidential elections were held this year, he 
would be easily re-elected. 


“This is the first time we will have elections with a secret 
ballot and with people not polarized in camps," said 
Wafula Oguttu, editor in chief of The Monitor, an outspo- 
ken biweekly that has a greater circulation than the 
government-owned paper. “These are very significant 
elections. For the first time we will have a national 
document that will incorporate everyone’s opinions and 
ideas. That is not the case in many countries in Africa.” 

Yet, constitution-making is confusing. “The majority of 
Ugandans don’t understand what they’re voting for," Mr. 
Oguttu said. “Some think they are voting for maintaining 
Museveni in power. Very few understand they’re going to 
make a constitution because they don't know what a 
constitution is.” 

The draft constitution has been painstakingly put to- 
gether. About 100 pages long, it took four years to write 
and was completed rally after the government reviewed 
6,000 written opinions from around the country. It pro- 
vides for pluralism, proportional representation, citizen- 
ship, federalism, and the future of Uganda’s former king- 
doms. 


Meshkov’s military adviser, said 
the vote “showed once a gain that 
Crimea does not want to be pre- 
vented from living as Crimeans 
want to live.” Mr. Kravchuk had 
banned the poD, but let it go ahead 
as a nonbinding survey. 

In a similar survey in Donetsk, in 
eastern Ukraine’s ailing coal re- 
gion, 90 percent of the electorate 
favored doser economic ties to for- 


mer Soviet states, a more federal 
Ukraine and Russian as a second 
official langnagft 


NICOSIA (Reuters) — Tehran announced Monday that Armenian 
forces shot down an Iranian plane earlier this month over the disputed 
Nagorno-Karabakh enclave, killing all 32 people aboard. 

The plane, a military Hercules C-130, was flying from Moscow to 
Tehran and carrying a number of relatives at Iranian diplomats based in 
Moscow. The Iranian Foreign Ministry said investigators sent to the site 
of the crash, near Stepankert, the capital of Nagorno-Karabakh, had 
concluded that the plane “exploded in midair over Karabakh after being 
hit by a missile fired by Armenian troops based in the region.” 

Tbs ministry added that Iran reserved “the right to take legal action” 
over the March 1 7 incident. It also called on the Armenian government to 
“identify and punish those guilty of downing the aircraft.” Nagorno- 
Karabakh, located inside Azerijaijan, has bam at the center of an 
undeclared war between Azerbaijan and Armenia for the past six years. 


Strasbourg Flans New EU Building 


Majoi 


ir Tries 
To Sell EU 
Compromise 


Eugene Ionesco, a Giant of Modem Theater, Dies 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Dispatches 

PARIS — Eugene Ionesco, a gi- 
ant of Lbe Theater of the Absurd 
and one of (he world's most per- 
formed authors, died here Monday. 
He was 81. 

The Romanian-born French 
playwright died suddenly at Ms 
home in Montparnasse. 

One of a group of “absurdist" 





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writers whose work dominated 
postwar European theater, Mr. Io- 
nesco used the stage to portray 
mankin d’s lonely anguish in bi- 
zarre and often hilarious plays. 

He was rate of the most success- 
ful hiving playwrights- Two of Ms 
works, “La Cantatrice Chauve” 
and “La Le$on” have been playing 
uninterrupted in Paris fra 38 years. 

The director of the Theatre de la 
Huchette, Jacques Legre, said the 
company would play them Mon- 
day fra the 11,944th time despite 
their grief. 

“I am shattered,” Mr. I^gre said. 
“Ionesco was no longer just an au- 
thor to me, he was a parent” 

Taken to France as a child by his 
parents, Mr. Ionesco was brought 
up speaking French. He returned to 
Ms country when he was 13 but 
emigrated bade to France at 24, in 
1936. 

His taste for theater developed 
only after the war. His work played 
in deserted avant-garde theaters 
before he gained international 
fame with a handful of plays that 
used slapstick humor to show the 
emptiness of Hfe. 

His most famous plays — “Les 
Chaises” and “Le Rhinoceros” — 
were all written in the 1950s. They 
feature hilarious disconnected dia- 


logues that explore (he absurdity 
and emptiness of existence. 

Mr. Legre said Ms company 
mostly played to foil houses that 
included groups of young people 
from all over the mind. 

He said Mr. Ionesco often came 
to the theater to watch his plays 
and talk to the actors until he start- 
ed having problems walking two 
years ago. 

A militan t anti-Communist, Mr. 
Ionesco long campaigned from ex- 
ile against the regime of the Roma- 
nian dictator, Nicotae Ceausescu, 
who banned Ms plays. 

He was also sharply critical of 
French leftists and once accused 
Jean-Paul Sartre of taking intelli- 
gence out of French literature. 

Mr. Ionesco was bora in Slaxina, 
Romania, the son of a lawyer and a 
French mother. Shortly after Ms 
birth, the family moved to Paris, so 
French became his first l ang u age . 

He did not leant Romanian until 
after re turning to Romania at 13, 
by wMch time he bad already wriir 
ten Ms first play in French. 

Mr. Ionesco grew up on the Left 
Bank of Paris near the Luxem- 
bourg Gardens, where he would 
spend afternoons watching Punch 
and Judy puppet shows. 

“I could stay there, entranced fra 


whole days, spellbound by the sight 
of these puppets that talked, moved 
and dubbed each other,” he wrote 
in 1958. “It was the spectacle of the 
world itself." 

An anemic child, Mr. Ionesco 
was sent to live on a farm in La 
Chapefle-Anthenaise, a small vil- 
lage where he dreamed of becom- 
ing a saint, that a warrior. It was 
time that he first “played theater.” 

He finished high 'school in Ro- 
mania and studied French at the 
University of Bucharest He wrote 
poems, and dabbled in literary crit- 
icism, publishing two pamphlets 
with opposing views on Romania's 
leading writers. He became a high 
school French teacher, and was 
married. 

In 1938, Mr. Ionesco obtained a 
government grant to study in 
France and write a thesis on “sin 
and death in French poetry since 
Baudelaire." He moved to Paris, 
but never wrote a single line. 

During World War H, he worked 
for a French publishing house, 
reading fiction, going to movies, art 
galleries and concerts in his leisure 
tune. 

“La Cantatrice Chauve” was in- 
spired by his experience learning 
English. Much of its dialogue is 
taken from Ms grammar hoc*, such 


as “the ceiling is up, the floor is 
down.” 

The play, first performed in 
1950, introduced comic techniques 
that have become familiar to mil- 
lions: a family with all members 
called Bobby Watson; a maid who 
says “I am Sherlock Holmes,” and 
the scene in which a man and a 
woman deduce that because they 
live on the same street, occupy the 
same bouse, and share the same 
bed, they must be married. 

“La Legon” (1950) is a savage 
parable on lan guage as an instru- 
ment of power. As the play pro- 
gresses, an eager pupil is gradually 
emp tied of her vitality, as her timid 
professor gradually gains assurance 
and domination. 

“Les Chaises” (1951) also fo- 
cused on i?»ng»*gg| but on its impo- 
tence instead of its power. Two 
elderly people living in a tower on 
an island wait for their guests to 
arrive to hear the message that the 
old man has hired an orator to 
deliver for posterity. 

As the play progresses, empty 
chairs accumulate on stage, crowd- 
ing out the couple — who finally 
jump to their death when the orator 
turns out to deaf and dumb, gur- 
gling and gesticulating before the 
invisible guests. 

(Reuters, AP) 


By Erik Ipseu 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — In a furious round 
of high-level meetings with cabinet 
colleagues, Prime Minister John 
Major on Monday tried to win sup- 
port fra a compromise on Europe- 
an Union voting rights. 

The fate of the compromise now 
rests with the lull cabinet, which 
meets Tuesday before that day's 6 
PM. deadline in Brussels for Brit- 
ish acceptance. 

Approval of the compromise 
would cap years of negotiations to 
-enlarge toe European Union from 
12 to 16 member states. Bat it 
would represent a glaring defeat for 
Mr. Major. 

Die prime minister has staked 
mudi of his credibility in recent 
days on his government’s attempts 
to leave the number of votes that 


STRASBOURG, France (AF) — The mayor of Strasbourg, Catherine 
Trautmannm, said Monday she had reached an agreement with The 
president of the European Parliament, Egon Klcpsch, on buflding a new 
building for the assembly in the eastern French city. 

Die deal is to be endorsed by the dty council on Tuesday and the 
European Parliament's bureau on Thursday and signed by April 12. It 
should end a dispute, just in time fra the June elections, that has blocked 
the ratification of an increase in parhament seats. 

The French government had refused to ratify the increase in the 
number of European members of parliament to 561, from 518, mainl y to 
take account of German reunification, until Mr. Klcpsch signed a lease 
on a new building in Strasbourg. 


Eurofighter Test Is Called Successful 


MANCHING, Germany (AFP) — A prototype of the four-nation 
Eurofighter combat aircraft has made a successful first flight ova 
southern Germany, Deutsche Aerospace sa i d . 

The incident-free 45-minute flight was hailed by the company's chief, 
Jtirgen Scfaremp, as “a great step forward” He said, “With Eurofighter 
we have a tailor-made solution to air defense.” 

The Eurofighter was developed by Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain. 
The first flight was postponed last year because of problems in the 
computerized control system built by a British company, CEG Marconi 
Avionics. It was rescheduled to April, but a Deutsche Aerospace spokes- 
man said, “We were ready sooner, so we did it.” 


For the Record 


Seres perarie were kffled in refieious dashes during a Hindu festival at 
Allahabad, the Press Trust of India said (Raders) 








TRAVEL UPDATE 




Virgin Slashes Trans-Atlantic Fares 

of Ministers at 23. LONDON (AP) — Vugin Atlantic Airways slashed trans-Atlantic 

fares Monday in response to price cuts by British Airways last week. 

Die carrier took more than £100 ($149) off fares on its London-New 
York and London-Los Angeles routes. The price of a round-trip ticket to 
New York is now £238 and a ticket to Los Angeles is £31 8. Both prices are 
£1 below the new British Airways prices. Like the British Airways offer, 
the new Virgin Atlantic prices are available to passengers until April 15 
and must include a Saturday night stay. 

Indonesian authorities barred tourists from the Anak Krakatau volcano 
in the Sunda Strait on Monday after a week of volcanic activity with 
around 100 eruptions a day, an o fficial said (AFP) 

Delta Air Lines fierpian fliers can now accrue miles while staying at 
Inter-Continental Hotels. The airline joins at least a dozen other compa- 
mes, umludingAxnencan.TWA, United KLM and Virgin Atlantic. UnS 
May 26 the chains hotels will give 1,000 miles per night's stay to Delta 
frequent fliers. After that, the award is 500 milesa night (NYT) 

SniSif * topresons “* tourists with scams 

a Ttowspaper reported on Monday, 
said the scenic southern mountain town of 
Guflm had become such a haven fra tricksters that its future as a vacation 




Mr. Major's cabinet will face the 
risky political task of endorsing a 
compromise negotiated by Foreign 
Secretary Douglas Hurd at a meet- 
ing of EU foreign ministers Sunday 
in Greece. The compromise allows 
the blocking majority to rise to 27 
votes as originally planned, with 
the caveat that a 23-vote minority 
will be sufficient to win a “reason- 
able” but unspecified delay. The 
Conservative press has labeled the 
plan a “capitulation.” 

The treasury chief secretary, Mi- 
chael PortiHa insisted Monday 
that Britain should have no dilu- 
tion of its power within Europe. He 
said any compromise must make it 
dear that Britain reserves the right 
to say “no.” 







v, 

N <il 
- 




spot was in da nger. 


(Reuters) 


o 

V 

E 

R 

H 

E 

A 

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THE AMERICAS/l IBi 

-4 Friend of Bill’s, Just in Time 

Democrats, but Not Foley, Shun Whitewater 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. MARCH 29. 1994 


Page 3 



T FA 







H 



POLITICAL NOTES 


> 


>.^5 

“*t: * - rr-X 5 ^' 

• - - V s 


By Richard L. Berke 

Yor * Times Service 


Even John Podesta, the staff secretary whose job it 
is to mind presidential documents, has been dis- 


ui>Y; 


etC 41 ^ 


- 

' Jtaj. 


- WASTHTNf'TnNr -n. iu mma pitsiucnmu Botnnnems, uas octal ais- 

‘ ” iSnSV* V 1 ~ energetic defense of Presi- patched as a point man on the matter. Now he, too, is 

™ v °Jvement in the Whitewater case cau 8h l ® the Whitewater furor. He got his subpoena 
SLXLKf® “* H ««. Thomas S. Foley, was Jasl wcek - 

rw? at Mr ‘, Fole y but that he said il Tba* the president is fighting Whitewater in isola- 
" ‘ have not been reticent about ^ “ pediaps a predicament of his own making. 

“HHuHnnmg Mr. Clinton's Republican accusers, few Senator Bob Kerrey, Democrat of Nebraska, noted 

- r®!®* 818 0UI side the While House have been willing 111111 it was not a question of loyalty among his fellow 

V ro 4B5r out str °ugty °n the Clin ions’ behalf Democrats but one of not knowing enough to mode 

■WMe congressional leaders do defend the Clin tons, °°L 

tbCir “?? ni ®us are put in general terms. As “Nobody on the Hill knows the facts,” he said. “It's 
” r otcy said Sunday cm television, “There is no h*” 1 to defend the facts because we don’t know what 

. • evidence of auyagmficant carriage of misconduct" ^ fa «s are." 

' ' -°r* a r: tbe "puse efforts to paint Whitewater The problem for the Qmtons is that only they know 

~ ' the fuD de tails wr> d the trna Hiwiengrtns ^ 

The nature of the situation is also unusuaL Unlike 
the Iran-contra affair, where government policy was 
involved, Whitewater has its origins in the Clintons’ 


. . < vi «u uic Yvniie nouse efforts to paint Whitewater 

" th t orator y bas been much more 

Republican side of the 

" « ] - - left **“ President’s advisers trading hard- 
- luck stones over their mostly unsuccessful efforts to 










j “™y. Iloor speecnes m Congress from Demo- rew lawmakers want to risk their reputations de- 
.•aals defending the president on Whitewater lack the fending a president when they do not ready know what 
necessary impact, the advisers say. will ultimately be unearthed. 

- James Caryille, a Clinton political adviser, went as “The major Congressional figures are loath to go 

far to question the loyalty of Democrats to their 001 l * lere and be assertive because they don’t know 
president. what's there,” said Ted Van Dyk, a Democratic con- 

“ Certainly, when anything came up with Reagan or sultanL “Nobody wants to be humiliated. They’re 
Bush, Republicans down the line defended them very war y” 

•• tenaciously," he said. “It does seem that the culture of While Mr. Foley he said he expected some of his 
their party evokes more loyalty." colleagues to distance themselves from the imbroglio 

The absence of a rush of support from Mr. Clinton’s more 85 November approaches. “That’s just the nature 

- own party has helped force hnn and his aides to retreat of self-preservation mstincts,” be said. 

to the garrison mentality of the 1992 presidential For some politicians, the reluctance to speak out is 

- campaign, where they are besieged but have no one to heightened given that the Whitewater investigation 

turn to but themselves. coinc i de s with the midterm election season. Although 

As happened in the campaign, when Mr. Clinton 111611 excuse before was that their constituents did not 
was fighting accusations about womanizing and draft- care about Whitewater, some Democrats now worry 

' ' — ■* that the furor could affect their own elections. 

“1 am concerned that it spills out and affects my 
campaign," said Mr. Kerrey, who is seeking re-elec- 
tion this year. “Of course it could happen.” 

The administration’s adamant stance a gainst seek- 
ing a special prosecutor collapsed not under Republi- 
can attacks but after Democratic senators, notably 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York and Bill Brad- 
ley of New Jersey, suggested appointing one. 


Itsj 

x '■ 

t . . % f 




ions hv TU«*1 As happened in the campaign, when Mr. Clin ton 

, . x was righting accusations about womanizing and draft- 

: ’’r ‘ • K.«r r dodging, former campaign officials have been told to 

' - . - v .^^. ’ *! alert Harold Idee®, now a deputy chief of staff, and 

* Susan Th o m ases, an outside confidante, when they are • 

*• ■? -.r tv. ... ^ craitacted by reporters on WhitewatCT. 

: y~ u ^ ! Although he held the second prime-time news con- 

j • _ - - rSf- 5'- . I®*®®®® of his presidency to convince Americans that 

- j : r - i * Whitewater was not a distraction, the case is consum- 

•j- : : v r ing top White House officials, testing the patience of 

. . — ' everyone 







nahknVA|BnftB»ABR 

The first fanAy — Cbekea, BiD and Hillary — cheering on the Razoritadcs at the Arkansas-Micfatgan basketball game in Dallas. 


J Plane. Iran: 


A U.S. Apology for Slayings 

: 2 Japanese Students Die From Wounds in Los Angeles 


hi Buildi; 




, t niieti ?Ui’iW£ 




By T.R. Redd 

Washington Post Service 

~ TOKYO — Ambassador Walter 
, F. Mondale apologized to the Japa- 
nese people Monday for the slaying 
J of two Japanese students in the 

- United States, while the mass me- 
dia here launched another series of 

“caustic reports on M Ametica the. 
Dangerous.” 

The two 19-year-old victims, Tar 
'l mma I to and Go Matsuura, woe 
pronounced dead in Los Angeles 
chi Sunday after both were shot in 
h the head during a cagaddn^ in a 

- supennaricet pt^dng lot Friday. 
The students had ben maintained 
on life-support m a c hines to keep 
them alive until their parents could 

..arrive from Japan. 

Like other recent crimes against 
Japanese visitors to the United 
’States, the Los Angeles killings 
'served to strengthen stereotypes 

- the Japanese hold about the United 
States, a nation known in the news- 
papers here as the “Gun Society ” 

“America after 8 PAL — DAN- 
rt GER!” said a giant headline in the 
1 Sanlre i Sports newspaper on Mon- 
day. “One More Nightmare in the 
.Gun Society,” said the Mainichi 
Shimbun’s headline. 

“Isn’t it strange,” said a front- 
.page commentary in the Asahi 
. Mwmtn n, “that in the country that 
T. leads the dyilized world, you never 
know where or when somebody 
will be shot?” 

This unflattering picture was off- 
set somewhat by the image of Mr. 
Mondale, shaken and ashen, at a 
*' press conference here Monday 
" morning “to personalty extend my 
dearest sympathy" to the family 
aMfrignds of the “two young peo- 
ple who were shot so tragically this 
weekend in Los Angeles.” 

“This is the saddest day in my 
time here as ambassador," the for- 


mer vice president said. “I pro- 
foundly apologize." 

In previous cases of Japanese be- 
ing dam in America, U.S. ambassa- 
dors have generally restricted tbeir 
comments to private expressions of 
sympathy for the families. Mr. 
Mondale’s immediate public apol- 
ogy, replayed mi all TV news 
shows, may help assuage Japanese 
anger about this latest case. 

“The president and the Ameri- 
cas people join me” in the apology, 
Mr. Mondale said. He said he was 
certain that President BUI Clinton 
would . call the- victims’ families to 
express Ids sorrow. ' 

Japan’s media routinely depict 
the United States as beset with 
drugs, AIDS, and random violence. 
The America that appears on Japa- 
nese television is a country where 
everyone is at risk of violent crime 
or death all the time. 

This image is enhanced by 
American media as wdL The vio- 
lent movies of Sylvester Stallone 
and Arnold Schwarzenegger have 
been major box-office hits here. 

Japan’s government has a stan- 
dard advisory, reiterated after the 
latest shooting, that America can 
be a dangerous place for travel At 
Mr. Mondale’s press conference, 


The death of the two students, 
both freshmen at Marymount Col- 
lege in the Los Angeles suburb of 
Rancho Palos Verdes, prompted 
the Japanese media to look bade at 
the last trilling that shocked the 
Japanese: the shooting in 1992 of a 
1 6 -year-old high school boy who 
was searching for a Halloween par- 
ty in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Coincidentally, students and 
teachers from McKinley High 
School in Baton Rouge, the school 
attended by the slain Japanese stu- 
dent, arrived in Tokyo on a good- 
will tour just as word reached here 
of the shooting? in Los Angeles. 

There has been no speculation 
that the killings were tied toanti- 
Japanese bias. In fact, toe Nikkan 
Sports newspaper reported that the 
crime was the same “that hmpened 
to Michael Jordan’s father. 


How’s This for Downtime? 

SAN DIEGO — President Bill Clinton 
dim bed aboard Air Force One in Dallas in a 
suit and tie. Somewhere over the western 
United Slates, he changed into casual dotoes 
and beach vacation mode. 

The president arrived hoe Sunday night, 
fresh from his beloved Razorbacks’ victory in 
the NCAA Midwest Regional basketball 
semifinals, with a blank public schedule. 
Hell be spending toe^ week at a private beach- 
front estate with his wife ana daughter. 

“Their goal is to take some time oil, take 
advantage of the sunshine in Southern Cali- 
fornia,” said a White House spokesman, Jeff 
Eller. 

It’s a safe bet that Mr. Clinton will spend 
considerable tune playing golf. There may be 
a couple of public events — he has to sign a 
major education bill by Friday — but not 
until later in the week. 

For the president this is a brief respite from 
the intense Washington focus on the 
Whitewater affair. Mr. Clinton and Ids wife 
also are taking a breather from extensive 
travel to promote their health-care ref am 
plan. Both were on the road last week and are 
expected resume their travels next week as 
Congress moves along the arduous path to- 
ward a bill 

“It’s a pretty natural time for the president 
to lake a utile bit of a break before we get into 
toe crunch on health care,” Mr. Eller said. 

The Clintons are staying rent-free at.the 


Dallas with two major events: his brother 
Roger’s wedding and the Arkansas- Michigan 
basketball game. The president is such a well- 
known Razorbacks devotee that he was 
booed heartily on his arrival at Reunion Are- 
na by tho usan ds of Michigan fans. 

In his third-row seat, between Hillary and 
Chelsea, he was the picture of a fanatic He 
bit his nails. He chomped on ice. He laughed. 
He winced. He cheered. He pouted. He wag- 
gled his finger. And when his mam mio^d 
several lay-ups in a row, he erupted. 

“I really get into toe game,” Mr. CUntou 
explained in a halftime interview. 

The former Arkansas governor is president 
of all SO states now, and he tried to be even- 
handed. But when it was all over and Arkan- 
sas had won, 76-68, Mr. Clinton was overtak- 
en by home-state pride. He rushed onto toe 
court, hugged coach Nolan Richardson and 
gave him a high five. He slapped the backs of 
jubilant players and show their hands 

He said he’d see them in Charlotte, North 
Carolina, on Saturday for the semifinals and, 
if Arkansas beats Arizona, maybe even at the 
NCAA championship game “We’ve tried to 
work it out so that I can go to both games,” he 
said. Tm gang to try.” (AT) 


c^moves along the arduous path to- April Doesn’t Look Ea»y 
“It’s a pretty natural time for the president 

to take a tittle bit of a break before we get into WASHINGTON — For weeks. President 

toe crunch on health care,” Mr. Eller said. Clinton so deftly controlled the public debate 
The Clintons are staying rent-free at .toe over new crime and welfare legislation that 
home of M. Lany Lawrence, b major Demo- Republicans complained he was stealing their 
cratic contributor and the new UJS. ambassa- lines. But just before Congress began its Eas- 


cratic contributor and the new U.S. ambassa- lines. But just before Congress began its Eas- 
dor to Switzerland. The White House press ter recess, new pressures emerged that threat- 
corps is housed nearby at the Hotel Del ened the c o mpro m ises the administration is 
Coronado, a turreied 1888 hostelry also attempting to broker between traditional lib- 
owned by Mr. Lawrence. erals and moderates in both parties. 

Mr. Clinton began his vacation odyssey in On the crime measure, the administration's 


hope of completing House action was sunk 
by a wave of partisan and ideological wran- 
gling over the rules of debate, which forced 
toe De mo cratic leadership to delay final ac- 
tion — and foreshadowed a floor fight after 
Congress returns next month from its break 

On welfare legislation, toe administration 
and a potentially pivotal block of moderate 
House Democrats are moving in opposite 
directions on the question of how to finance 
reform. Even as some within the administra- 
tion urged that the financing rely on more 
taxes and fewer cuts in other soda! programs, 
last^week a group of House moderates un- 
welfare benefits to legal immigrants who are 
not yet citizens, an approach already en- 
dorsed by House Rqmblicans. 

Adminis tration officials say they remain 
on trade toward passing a crime bill and 
completing a welfare reform plan that can 
attract bipartisan support when it is released 
this spring. They point to widening consensus 
around ideas central to Mr. Qin tern’s agenda: 
from hiring an additional 100,000 police offi- 
cers to requiring more welfare recipients to 
work after two years on the rolls. 

But as liberals, moderates and conserva- 
tives pull in different directions and the 
Whitewater affair slinTpens partisan animos- 
ities, the administration faces a very complex 
legislative and political equation. (LAT) 


Quote/ Unquote 

Carol Scroggin, a worshiper at Goshen 
United Methodist Church in Piedmont, Ala- 
bama, where 21 people died as a tornado 
struck the church: “The power had gone off, 
but everyone just kept singing. Nobody had a 
chance to do anything. It was so quirk. (AP) 


Father Challenges Motive of Flogging Sentence 


Japan s government has a stan- Reuters 

dard advisory, raterated after toe new YORK —The father of an Amcri- 
latest shooting, that Amenca cmi can teenager whose flogging sentence for 
be a dangerous place for traveL At spraying paint on cars in Singapore has led 
Mr. Mondays press conference, |g a diplomatic dispute with its government 
the first question front a Japanese says tout he believes his son has bom singled 
reporter was, “What strategy oat for “special treatment" because he is 
should Japanese tourists use to American. 

avoid violence when in the George Fay said in a telephone interview 
U.S.A.?” from Dayton, Ohio, that there were instances 

The damage to the United States qJ people receiving mv** less severe punish- 
from this latest case may go beyond alth o u g h to nr of f enses woe as bad as 
suBying America’s reputation here, or worse than his son’s. 

Tourists and exchange students President B£D Clinto n has «f1ed the pun- 

from this rich country — more than icinn^ni extreme urged Singapore to 
3 million of than l ast ye ar — give ^consider it, but its Foreign Ministry said 
the United States a strong balance- toe government would not intervene, 
of-payments surplus with Japan in Michad Fay, 18, is free on bail pending an 

this area of trade. But cadi well- 
publicized killing tends to steer 
some Japanese travelers and stu- 
dents toward other destinations. 


appeal scheduled for Thursday. The teenager 
was sentenced to six lashes on his bare but- 
tocks with a rotan, a four-foot long, half-inch 
thick bamboo rod wielded with such force by 
a martial arts expert that generally toe skin is 
repeatedly ripped and the victim permanent- 
ly scarred. 

George Fay said Michael, sentenced in a 
plea bargain that also covered possessing 
stolen flags and road signs, had been sen- 
tenced to much harsher punishment than 
others on similar offenses. 

' He cited four recent examples from the 
Singapore newspaper Straits Tunes, includ- 
ing one where a jealous property broker had 
deliberately scratched a new BMW car and 
was sentenced to one month in prison and 
fined. 


In another case vandals damaged 10 cars used before in cases concerning private prop- 
in a puking lot, puncturing tires and putting erty. as with cars in this case, 
deep scratches on the fronts and sides, but Mr. Simon also said that under toe vandal- 


vandalism but as nnschii 
does not apply. 

Mr. Fay added that h 


S toe pQ 
inwfrii 


Mr. Fay added that his son suffered from 
attention deficit disorder and that the pun- 
ishment would be particularly traumatic. 
“The damage of caning is far worse be- 


“Tbe damage of caning is far worse be- 
cause erf the low esteem he has because of his 
disorder,” he said. 

George Fay’s lawyer, Theodore Simon, 
said in a telephone interview from Pbiladel- 


thfl f provides for flogging had never been cause they are American,’’ Mr. Simon said. 


Away From Politics 


High Court Curbs Insanity Defense 

Action Allows Other States to Emulate Montana Law 


The Associated Pros 
WASHINGTON — The Su- 


Joe Junior Cowan, described as a lenge to toe state’s abolition of an 
paranoid schizophrenic with a his- insanity defense. .... 
rnrv nf mental health treatments in The state court noted that Mr. 


(48 kilometers) east of San Francisco, swerved off toe fnOTra&hit 
vehicles parted on the shoulder and plowed mto a grwprf people 
up garbage alongside the freeway, the California 

Highway Patrol said. . 

• TramKfian man who described himself as a destrttte ttwrfca was 
rhirSnfiS^rito murdering a candy store owner during, a 


Z. torv of mental health treatments in The state court noted mat Mr. 
Sanative North Carolina, was con- Cowim's mcntdOlness was taken 

SPOUSE tne msarniy aacnse. i mfn unvumt when detemmnne fit 


Baa? J2S5 ^'^Ma^Cbgswdl with afish 

car, toe police ^^X^^SS^King, a spokes- 

3ori Bach Mia “H= 

tuum^loyed and that he bad. run out of money. 

• Two men neaww and paralyzing a 16- 

in Westmmsta, Cal ^ ornia i5r!J?> wounded. Police said they 


in Westimnswr. ^^rS ^wotmdeiPdice said they 
year-old boy. Two Vietnamese gangs. “That’s the 

suspect toe shootmg was ablazmgT said Sergeant 

ay&V* None ofTlS 

S SSi teenage EE* «« ^dfy the gun- 
Smor Key** 13 ' prompted the shooting. 


The justices, without comment, 
let stand Montana’s abolition in 
1979 of insanity as an affirmative 
defense for c rimina l defendants. 

Although Monday’s action is not 
a ruling and does not preclude the 
possibility the high court may some 
day consider toe issue, states are 
left free to follow Montana’s lead. 

Only two other states — Idaho 
and Utah — have similarly elimi- 
nate d any possibility of a criminal 
defendant’s being found not guilty 

by reason of insanity. 

Congress considered, but did sot 
enact, similar legislation. 


victed and given a 60-year sentence into account when deter min i n g at 
to assaulting a U.S. Forest Service trial whether he deliberately corn- 
employee in Missoula County, mitted the crime and again when he 


Montana. 

Prosecutors said Mr. Cowan at- 


was sentenced. 

In another decision, toe court 
left intact a ruling that let federal 


tacked Maggie Doherty on April prosecutors use an anti-arson law 
24, 1990, after she returned to her gpinst cross burners. The justices, 
residence at toe remote Lolo Work without comment, refused to hear 
Center. Mr. Cowan, who beat Ms. the appeal of two men convicted of 
Doherty unconscious, was convict- hnmmp crosses at the KeeneyvOle, 

a — f - - - - 3 <1 uli Virr ~i t n Kahii. yii* _■ t _P _ --- 


Tornadoes Kill 43 in U.S. 
In a Sweep of Southeast 

Reuters 

ATLANTA — A series of tornadoes in the southeastern United 
States killed at least 43 people and injured more than 250 as storms 
cut a path of destruction across five states. 

The biggest death toll occurred near the northeastern Alabama 
town of Piedmont, where a tornado slammed into a church during a 
Palm Sunday service; killing 21 people, including seven children, and 
injuring 90. 

Fourteen more died across scattered sections of rural northern 
Georgia, after thunderstorms spawned 19 tornadoes that destroyed 
bouses and meddle homes. 


ed of attempted deliberate homi- nhnoisT home of a white couple 
ride. who had entertained black guests 

His lawyers said he attacked Ms. WMt “ d “ ^ 

Dohmy m the Throes of ^ , 


defendant’s bring found not guflty His lawyers said he attacked Ms. 
by reason of insanity. Doherty “white in the throes of 

Congress considered, but did sot psychotic delusion." 
enact, similar legislation. ..... , . « . 

Many states have adopted in re- Initially found mentally tncom- 
cent years “guilty but insane” laws petent, Mr. Cowan was treated 
that mate it more likely even those with mind-altering drugs. He lata 
found to have been mentally ill was ruled competent to stand maL 

. . .... ■ i IT., mnulhhnn BMC lmhpjfl hV A 


when they committed their crones 
will serve some prison time if they 
ever regain sanity. 


His conviction was upheld by a. 
5-io-2 vote of the Montana Su- 
preme Court, which rejected a chal- 


free-speech challenge to use of a 
federal law banning interference 
with housing rignts to prosecute 
cross burners. Justice Department 
lawyers did not oppose that appeal, 
saying both cross-burning issues 
were likely to arise frequently in the 
future. 


Atlanta said several hundred people were believed to have been hurt 
as high winds and heavy downpours struck 1 1 counties in the state. 

The National Weather Service said toe steams erupted after a mass 
of warm, moist air, moving north from the Gulf of Mexico, hit a cold 
from, setting off violent weather patterns that also hit southeastern 
Tennessee, where authorities issued flash-flood warnings. North and 
South Carolina also wee affected. 

Witnesses said toe tornado that struck the Goshen United Meth- 
odist Church in Piedmont, 90 miles (145 kilometers) northeast of 
Bir m i n gha m , flattened the roof of toe brick structure, shattered one 
of its mils, and rained debris on 240 people inside. 

By Monday morning, 7,000people were still without power in 
northern sections of Georgia. Tflirtam shelters were opened to care 
for toe homeless, while utility workers struggled with downed power 
lines and washed-out roads. 


dice not as ism act the marking or graffiti have to be 
ch flogging indelible but in this case they were easily 
removed. 


rt zrJr The Los Angeles Times this month quoted 
tnai pun- ^ lawyer who attended the trial 

traumanc. M he believed toe Singaporean gov- 

rar worse b©- tint ncim. Ik* mm tn emit ■ numinii 


ernment was using the case to send a warning 
to its own citizens about the dangers of 
importing decadent Western ideas. 

“AH I can say is that we endorse toe 


A 2d Man 
Is Detained 
In Slaying 
Of Mexican 


Reuters 

MEXICO CITY — A second 
man has been detained for ques- 
tioning in connection with the as- 
sassination last week of Mexico’s 
governing party presidential candi- 
date, sources dose u> toe investiga- 
tion said Monday. 

Tranquitino Sanchez Vega was 
detained cm toe basis of photo- 
graphs that showed him advancing 
toward the presidential candidate, 
Luis Donal do Colorio, moments 
before Mr. Colosio was shot 
Wednesday in the northern city of 
Tijuana, according to newspaper 
reports. 

A source dose to the investiga- 
tion said Mr. Sanchez told investi- 
gators he was a former private se- 
curity guard who was hired by the 
Institutional Revolutionary Party 
on the day of the assassination to 
hdp control toe crowds during Mr. 
Colosio’ s campaign stop. 

Mario Abuito Martinez, a 23- 
year-old mechanic, was arrested 
Wednesday and charged with kill- 
ing Mr. Colosio. 

■ Challenge by Old Guard 

Tim Golden of The New Fork 
Times reported from Mexico G ity: 

As President Carios Salinas de 
Gortari works to build a consensus 
on choosing a replacement for the 
slain candidate wno was to succeed 
him, he has come up against an 
unusually open challenge from 
members of toe old guard of his 
governing party. 

After reports that Mr. Salinas 
might select Ernesto Zedill o Ponce 
de Lton, 42, the economist and 
former government minuter who 
was managing toe campaign of Mr. 
Colosio, party members began lob- 

S ; intensely for favorites of 
own. 

Their strongest push came on 
fahalf of F ernando Ortiz Arana, 
the party president, who might 
draw wider support than Mr. Ze- 
dillo but who would represent a 
dear turn away from the highly 
trained professionals who have 
dominated toe Seiima administra- 
tion. 

The growing struggle prints to a 
quandary for Mr. Sahnas. Four 
months after he indeed Mr. Colosio 
from a list of candidates loyal to his 
vision for Mexico, he now appears 
at a loss for one who can easily 
bridge the divide between the re- 
formist officials with whom he has 
run toe government and the aging 
hierarchy of a political machine 
that has been in power for 65 yean. 

Mr. Zedillo, for instance, holds a 
doctorate in economics from Yale 
University, is a favorite of Mexican 
businessmen and foreign investors, 
and won praise as both toe secre- 
tary of budget and planning and 
secretary of education. Yet, be also 
carries a reputation as a somewhat 
dogmatic technocrat, has never run 
for election and is mistrusted by 
many party traditionalists, 

Mr. Ortiz Arana, by contrast, is 
popular in the Institutional Revo- 
lutionary Party, but he has none of 
toe background in economics that 
is standard among Mr. Salinas's 
. closest associates, almost no expe- 
rience in the executive branch of 
government, and political debts to 
the party faithful whom the S ahnas 
administration has long worked to 
isolate. 

With demands for the democra- 
tization of the Mexican political 
tystem increasing since the peasant 
uprising that began on Jan. 1 in toe 
southern state of Chiapas, the pres- 
ident’s traditional control over toe 
selection of his party’s candidate is 
also bring questioned as never be- 
fore. 

With only eight months left in 
bis final term in office, Mr. S atinas 
may have to fight for a more con- 
tentious choice with less authority 
than he has exercised almost since 
he took office in December 1988. 

“Salinas is weaker as he nears toe 
end of bis administration, and he 
no longer has the power or the 
incentives to kero the party in 
line,” said Juan Mriznar Horeasi* 
las, a political scientist at the Cote- 
gjo de Mexico, a research organiza- 
tion. “The party is reacting very 
strongly against his candidate. He 
could lose control of this thing." 

In an effort to miiet speculation 
about who might be named to re- 
place Mr. Colosio, party offi cials 
issued statements ova the weekend 
insisting that they were still in 
mourning and had not yet made 
any plans for toe selection. 

Even as they did, however, 
prominent members of the party’s 
rid guard asserted a right to speak. 
out about who they thought should 
lead the party out of its crisis. 

“This is not a party of mates," 
said Auguste G6mez Villanueva, a 
former leading official of the party 
who argued vociferously for Mr. 
Ortiz Arana. 


A 


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Page. 4 


** 


Seoul Is Confident: 
North Couldn’t Win 


Compiled by Our Staff Firm Dispatcher 

SEOUL — South Korea and its 
U.S. allies would be certain win- 
ners in the event of war with the 
North, Defense Minister Rhee 
Byoung Tae said in an article pub- 
lished Monday. 

“Our armed forces' combat abili- 
ty and the performance of our mili- 
tary equipment are superior to 
those of the North Korean mili- 
tary.” Mr. Rhee said in an article 
for a civil servants’ newspaper. 

Mr. Rhee said that the “govern- 
ment's persistent position is to pre- 


2 Arrested 
In Japan for 
China Sales 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japanese police 
said Monday that they had ar- 
rested two executives bn suspi- 
cion of illegally exporting to 
China strategic technology 
that the Japanese media says 
may have been passed to 
North Korea. 

A spokesman said Nori- 
mitsu Sugiyama and Kat- 
suhisa hda were arrested on 
suspicion of violating the For- 
eign Exchange and Foreign 
Trade Control Law by export- 
ing image-mien sifier tubes to 
China from July to October 
1993. 

Export to China of the tech- 
nology, which can be used for 
military satellites, also violates 
rules of the International Co- 
ordinating Committee for 
Multilateral Export Controls, 
winch bans strategic exports to 
Communist countries. 

The newspaper Sankei 
Shimbun reported that investi- 
gators believed that the image 
enhancers, which could also be 
used to develop night-vision 
devices, were re-exported to 
North Korea from China. 

The police also said they ar- 
rested three executives of Yo- 
kohama Machinery Trading 
Co. for allegedly exporting 
about 300 used cars to China 
between April and September 
last year without government 
approval. 

I Reuters, AFP) 


vent North Korea from developing 
nuclear weapons and to resolve this 
peacefully." 

But he said that if North Korea 
misjudged the situation and waged 
war. it would see “only miserable 
defeat and war victory will be chi 
the side of combined Korean- U.S. 
forces." 

South Korea's 650,000-strong 
armed forces have been put on 
alerL Seoul says the North has also 
put its military on heightened alerL 

Mr. Rhee said there were no im- 
mediate signs that the Communist 
North will unleash an all-out war as 
it did in 1950, and that its tough 
stance against thorough inspec- 
tions of its suspected nuclear sites 
was a ploy to squeeze diplomatic 
concessions out of the United 
States. 

Lawmakers from South Korea's 
main opposition Democratic Party 
said Monday they opposed plans to 
bring in UJS. weapons, including 
Patriot anti-missile batteries. They 
cited the “huge economic burden" 
of such a move. 

North Korea said Monday that 
Patriot missiles could be modified 
to attack, and warned of “grave 
consequences" unless the deploy- 
ment was stopped. 

The North Korean Foreign Min- 
istry said, “It is known to everyone 
that its target can be changed by 
the kind of warhead it is tipped 
with." 

“The U.S. shipment of new-type 
Patriots in South Korea is nothing 
but an open aggressive act," the 
Foreign Ministry' said. “Though 
the U.S. authorities are now claim- 
ing that the Patriot is a ‘defensive 
weapon,' they cannot justify its de- 
ployment in South Korea with any 
pretext/' 



Israeli Troops Kill 6 in Gaza 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — Six armed Pal- 
estinians affiliated with the Fatah 
wing of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization were killed Monday 
night in a shoot-out with Israeli 
undercover troops in Jabalya, a 
Gaza Strip refugee camp, Palestin- 
ians and the army said. 

One soldier and two Palestinian 
bystanders were wounded in the 
exchange of fire, the most deadly 
since Israel signed the GazaJeri.- 
cho peace accord with the PLO in 
September. According to witnesses, 
the six were distributing leaflets in 
two separate care when the firefight 
broke out with the undercover unit 

The killings came at a delicate 
-point in negotiations between Isra- 
el and the PLO. which broke off 
talks on implementing the Gaza- 
Jericho accord after the Hebron 
massacre Last month. PLO leaders 
in Gaza called for a three-day gen- 
eral strike and mounting period. 


On Tuesday in Cairo, Israel and 
the PLO are scheduled to discuss 
creation of a Hebron security force, 
based on Norwegian and Interna- 
tional Red Cross members, as well 
as a Palestinian police force. If 
agreement is reached on Hebron 
security, it could lead to resump- 
tion of separate talks on carrying 
out the Gaza- Jericho peace agree- 
ment, Israeli officials said. 

But Monday night's exchange of 
fire could intensify pressure on the 
PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, to 
slow down the talks with Israel, 
especially since those killed were 
affiliated with Mr. Arafat's Fatah 
movemenL 

The Israeli Army confirmed that 
six armed Palestinians had been 
kitlwi in Gaza, but had no further 
information. 

Palestinians said all six were 
members of the Fatah Hawks, a 
loose Gaza-based coalition of 
armed gangs that have pledged al- 
legiance to Mr. ArafaL After the 


EU Might Press to Lift 
Sanctions if Serbs Act 




“This is a deliberate, dangerous -j. W • * .. . . ^ •, i 

military action to make the nSitaiy ^ ^ v-t* 

situation of the Korean Peninsula 1 : " " • : “ •*'" ' ■ • • v ' ' ’ * 


all the more unstable and, further, . 0 ._ .. .. , . . _ . , . . . , 

cause another war," the ministry A U.S. soldier resting Monday against a tank daring exerases near the denrifitanzed zone i 
said. ' (Rouen, AP) the two Koreas. Troops were on alert as tension over North Korea’s midear program h 


Reuters 

TIRANA, Albania — The Euro- 
pean Union may press for the sus- 
pension of sanctions against the 
rump state of Yugoslavia if pro- 
gress is made toward a negotiated 
settlement for the area. The Danish 
foreign minister, Niels Helveg Pe- 
tersen, said here Monday. 

Mr. Petersen said at a news con- 
ference that the EU would back a 
suspension of the international 
sanctions against Serbia and Mon- 
tenegro if the Serbs agreed to make 
territorial concessions in Bosnia- 
Herzegovina. 

“What we can offer the Serbs 
now is not the lifting of sanctions 
but the suspension of sanctions if 
we see a process towards a negoti- 


ated settlement,” Mr. Petersen said 
after a 24-hour visit to the Albani- 
an capital. “What we need now is 
that the Serbs make territorial con- 
cessions,” he added. 

The United Nations imposed 
sanctions on Yugoslavia for help- 
ing arouse the war in Bosnia. 

Mr. Petersen, who flew to Tirana 
after an EU foreign ministers meet- 
ing is Ioanmna in G re ec e during 
the weekend, said the EU had 
agreed on a common approach to 
the region of the former Yugosla- 
via. Part of that approach was to 
put pressure on Belgrade to grant 
substantial autonomy for the prov- 
ince of Kosovo in southern Serbia, 
where ethnic Albanians are in the 
majority. 


PLO leader signed the peace accord 
for Palestinian self-rule in Gaza, a 
);wwtffri number of the Hawks ac- 
cepted an Israeli offer of amnesty, 
and turned in their weapons. They 
were taken off the “wanted" list of 
Palestinian fugitives. 

But Israeli security forces contin- 
ued to hunt down other members 
of the Hawks who were considered 
fugitives, as well as armed fighters (E 
for Hamas Since September, four 
of the Hawks have been kilted in 
separate confrontations with Israe- 
li troops. At least one of them was 
caught in a crossfire after he had 
previously surrendered. 

The continuing search by Israeli 
forces, and the long delays in im- 
plementing the Gaza-Jericho plan, 
had prompted some of the Hawks 
who accepted amnesty to return to 
their former roles as armed street 
fighters. Palestinians in Gaza said 
it was not dear whether any of the 
Palestinians killed Monday had 
previously accepted amnesty, or 
whether they were fugitives. 

According to the witnesses, at 
the time of the shooting the Hawks 
were distributing leaflets calling on 
local residents to respect the orders 
issued by the Hawks. The leaflets 
were also wanting Palestinians that 
some renegade gangs were using 
the name of the Hawks to commit 
serious robberies. 

■ Jordan Acts on Searches 

King Hussein on Monday linked 
Jordans resumption of peace talks 
with Israel to an immediate end to 
searches of Aqaba-bound ships by 
U.S.-led forces policing a trade em- 
bargo on Iraq. 

The king acted after summoning 
the ambassadors of the five perma- 
nent members erf the United Na- 
tions Security Council, according j 
to a Renters report from Amman 
quoting the Petra press agency. 

Jordan, which bias suffered large 
losses because of UN trade sanc- 
tions on Iraq, requested two 
months ago that sea searches be 
replaced by less-disruptive land in- 
spection at its port of Aqaba. 


CARS: Auto Thieves Flourish Throughout England JAPAN; ZULUS: Backdrop to the Future 


KOREA: 

Chinese Resist 


S 


Continued from Page 1 
ang, between Pyongyang and the 
nternational Atomic Energy 
Agency, and between the two Ko- 
reas. 

North Korea’s talks with the 
United States, South Korea and the 
UN agency have broken down after 
it barred a team from the agency 
nuclear site earlier this month. 

The Chinese foreign minister, 
Qian Qichen, again denounced the 
idea of pressuring the North- 

“Exerting pressure would only 
intensify contradictions, which 
would be no help in solving the 
problem but make it complicated,” 
Mr. Qian said, according to the 
Xinhua news agency. 

Mr. Choo said China had as- 
sured Mr. Kim that any differences 
over how to handle the nuclear cri- 
sis would not stand in the way of 
good relations with South Korea. 

“President Jiang said relations 
between the two countries should 
not be affected by the nuclear ques- 
tion," he said, adding that Mr. 
Jiang had described ties as “splen- 

(Reuters, AP, AFP 1 


did. 


Continued from Page 1 

with sophisticated anti-theft tech- 
nology as standard equipment 

For example, the 1994 Ford Es- 
cort, Britain's best-selling car, 
comes with a factory- ins lolled elec- 
tronic en gin e immobilizer, which 
relies on a tiny microiransmitter in 
the ignition key. 

Unless the driver inserts the key 
programmed to match exactly a 
complex code inside the automo- 
bile's electronic control unit, the 
engine will not stan. An anti-theft 
system, including the electronic en- 
gine lockout, is also standard 
equipment here on Ford’s new 
Probe. 

Government officials, insurers 
and consumers in Britain say the 
equipment — coupled with grow- 
ing public awareness of the prob- 
lem — is making a difference. 
While car crime continues to grow, 
the rate of increase has slowed 
slightly. 

In the United States, only the 
more expensive domestic models 
come with alarms or other electron- 
ic anti-theft devices as standard 
equipment 

Part of the push in Britain comes 
from rising insurance premiums. In 
1987, according to data from the 
United States and Britain. British 
drivers paid about half as much as 
Americans for car insurance. 

Since then, the Association of 
British Insurers reports, the aver- 
age annual cost of a car insurance 
policy has nearly doubled, to about 
$638. In the United States, accord- 
ing to insurance statistics, the aver- 
age insurance premium increased 
just 25 percent over the same peri- 
od and is now about S710 a year. 

But in areas like Newcastle, 
which is one of the English cities 


where the risk of car theft is high- 
est, the jump has been much sharp- 
er. 

Even with a good driving record 
and discounts for installing anti- 
theft devices, for example, Mr. Sey- 
mour is paying the equivalent of 
about $1,250 for his basic insur- 
ance policy this year. 

In 1991 after car theft had 
soared by 42 percent in two years, 
the Home Office began a nation- 
wide anti-theft campaign intended 
not only to increase consumer 
awareness of the problem — a sur- 
vey at the time disclosed that one in 
three Britons still left the car un- 
locked overnight — but also to 
prod manufacturers to make cars 
harder to steal. 

But the police acknowledge that 
one problem has been the innova- 
tive skills of the thieves themselves, 
who have managed to stay one 
jump ahead of the technology. 

Last year, the police arrested a 
youth who was using an electronic 
grabber, a kind of scanner that can 
read the signal that is transmitted 
when a motorist uses a remote con- 
trol device to unlock a car. 

The scanner can then play bade 
the signal to unlock the car at a 
later point and give the thief easy 
entry. 

Part of the boom in auto theft 
and car crime is driven by criminal 
rings exploiting a growing market 
in Eastern Europe and elsewhere 
for stolen luxury cars and parts. 
Cars are often stolen to order by 
gangs and then smuggled abroad 
for resale inside shipping contain- 
ers. 

In Manchester, which has the 
highest rale of auto theft in Britain 
— 2253 care were stolen in the city 


in 1992 per 100,000 residents — the 
police say the problem has been 
complicated by new European 
Union regulations that have loos- 
ened border controls, making it 
easier for criminals to transport 
goods across Europe. 

Detective Inspector Roland 
Hewitt, the head of the stolen car 
squad for (he Greater Manchester 
Police Department, said that about 
30 percent of the 57,880 vehicles 
stolen in the city last year were 
never recovered and were presum- 
ably shipped overseas. 

“With the opening of the Chan- 
nel tunnel, and European single 
market, we can only expect : to see. 
more activity erf this sort," he said. 

Still, the police acknowledge that 
the largest share of the problem in 
Britain involves not organized 
crime, but casual crime among 
young people out for thrills. Ac- 
cording to police data, more than 
75 percent of car theft involves men 
under the age of 21, and nearly half 
of those are younger than 16, 
meaning they cannot legally drive 
in Britain. 

To fight back, the police and 
government officials have mounted 
a camp ai g n in recent years ranging 
from new police equipment to new 
laws intended to mete out stronger 
punishment to young offenders. 

In Manchester, for example, the 
police department helicopter is the 
first in Britain to be equipped with 
a U.S.-made scanning system able 
to pick up electronic signals from 
devices that drivers buy and then 
hide in their cars. Like a similar 
system sold in the United States, 
the device is activated when a car is 
stolen and enables police to trade it 
from the air. 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 





1994 

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Continued from Page 1 

administration's “results-oriented" 
trade strategy. 

Japanese officials sounded 
somewhat sheepish that stronger 
measures, such as additional tax 
cuts to spur consumer spending, 
could not be announced Tuesday 
morning. But they said the new 
plan represented a significant first 
step in a process of reform and they 
expressed hope that the U.S. trade 
representative. Mickey Kan lor. 
and other American officials would 
accept it. 

“I hope he looks a bit into and 
beyond what we will be able to 
announce," one Japanese official 
said. 

Mr. Kantor said last week that 
only a “bold* plan by Japan would 
be acceptable. Otherwise, he said, 
the United States would increase 
the pressure on Japan with more 
punitive sanctions. 

When the trade talks fdl apart in 
February, mainly over the issue of 
numerical targets, Japanese busi- 
ness executives and government of- 
ficials at first were dated that Ja- 
pan had finally said “no” to 
American demands. 

But then the yen strengthened, 
choking Japan's export industries, 
and the United States unsheathed 
its sword by initiating a lengthy 
process that could result in sanc- 
tions against Japan. Suddenly, 
businessmen and newspaper edito- 
rials began screaming that it was 
not enough merely to say no. Japan 
would have to oome up with i is own 
voluntary plan to open its markets 
and deregulate its economy, goals 
that Mr. Hosokawa has long pro- 
fessed to support in any case. 

Japanese officials nave hoped 
that the United States felt uncom- 
fortable with the trade impasse and 
would jump at a chance offered by 
Japan to resume negotiations. They 
are also hopeful that the United 
States will drop its insistence on 
numerical targets in response to 
world opinion, which generally op- 
poses die American approach. 

“If the U.S. still seeks numerical 
thing s l don't think this will satisfy 
them,*’ a Japanese trade official 
said erf the plan. “But if they don't 
stick to that, these measures cer- 
tainly meet their requests to a sub- 
stantial degree." 

At the moment however, Ameri- 
can officials like Mr. Kantor, who 
advocate getting tough with Japan, 
seem to be in the driver's seal be- 
cause firm tactics worked in forg- 
ing a recent agreement to further 
open Japan's cellular telephone 
market to Motorola Lac. 

The development of a plan by 
Japan has been hindered by the 
disarray in Mr. Hosokawa's coali- 
tion go vernment, which has been 
tom by infighting and has seen its 
public approval ratings falL The 
government has "not even compiled 
the budget for the fiscal year that 
begins on Friday, making it diffi- 
cult for it to consider other eco- 
nomic stimulus measures. For that 
reason, the government had previ- 
ously said that the new plan would 
be an outline. 

The government was unable to 
reach derisions on the two mam 
macroeconomic dements of the 
plan set for release Tuesday — an 
extension to future years of income 
tax cuts enacted tins year, and an 
increase in public works spending 
beyond the 430 trillion yen (S4 tril- 
lion) planned for this decade. 

The package prepared for release 
merely expresses the government's 
intention to realize income tax cuts 
before the end of the year. It prom- 
ises that a plan to deregulate priori- 
ty areas will be compiled by the end 
of June, with input from foreigners. 

(Renters, Bloomberg) 


Coathmed from Page 1 

and-a-half centuries to vote," he 
said. “1 don't care how much fear 
and violence there is. They will 
vote:" 

If IheANChad its way. the vote 
would be held tomorrow. It is the 
seen by the majority of black 
[fit Africans as haying destroyed 
the country’s apartheid system. All 
poDs show it is headed for a land- 
slide victoiy nationally and a dear 
win hoe in KwaZulu. 

Inlrwtha says it is boycotting the 
vote because the new constitution 
steering South Africa's political 
transformation is flawed Critics of 
Inkalha's decision to shun the vote 
say it is staying out because it does 
not want to be embarrassed at the 
polls. 

Either way, Mangosuthu Buthe- 
lezi, who is both the Inkatha leader 
and the KwaZulu chief minister, 
faces a bleak future. In the mid- 
1980s, he had cause to imagine that 
he might one day be South Africa’s 
first black president- Now be faces 
the loss of his political and patron- 
age base here in KwaZulu. 

The election also will end the 
existence of the ethnic homeland, 
which Chief Buthelezi has ruled 
since it was created two decades 
ago Along with the nine other trib- 
afiy based black homelands set up 
under apartheid to remove blacks 
from South Africa proper, Kwa- 
Zulu will disappear as a govern- 
mental entity the day after the vote. 

As a result, Inkatfaa’s future lies 
either in the resistance politics of 
“ungovernability,’’ in a guerrilla- 
style military destabilization of an 
ANC-led government or, more 
constructively, as a leading opposi- 
tion party that regroups ana pre- 
pares for the next election. 

Chief Buthelezi appears to be 
keeping all his options open, and to 
be waiting for the outcome of the 
vote to see how successful his boy- 
cott is. 


He denies ANC claims that the 
5,000 Zulu self-protection units his 
government has been tr ainin g at a 
camp outside the KwaZulu capital 
of Uhmdi will sow violence before, 
during and after the voting. 

Similarly, Chief Buthelezi reject- 
ed disclosures last week by an inde- 
pendent governmental investiga- 
tive body, the Goldstone 
Commission, that Inkatha man- 
hers received weapons and training 
over the years from rogue police 
generals who opposed South Afri- 
ca’s political transformation and 
saw the more conservative Tnkaiha 
as a bulwark against ANC rule. 

The Inkatha leader has made it 
clear that he will not go out of his 
way to help to smooth the doctoral 
process in his homeland. In meet- 
ings with President Frederik W. de 
Klerk and with members of die 
Independent Electoral Commis- 
sion, be reportedly provided only 
half-hearted conditional assur- 
ances that his KwaZulu civil ser- 
vice would provide the buildings, 
telecommunications, transporta- 
tion and security for polling sta- 
tions. 

Since February, the nominally 
apolitical Zulu king, Goodwill 
Zwehthmi, has been imploring his 
8 million subjects to heed the call of 
his uncle — ■ Chid Buthelezi — to 
stay away from the polls as a mat- 
ter of Zulu solidarity. Suddenly, a 
deadly political fight has taken on 
the added complication of ethnic- 
ity- 

Mr. Mokwena said he had lis- 
tened carefully to his king’s en- 
treaties and planned to ignore 
them. He said he was an ANC 
member, his father and brothers 
were activists, and that he was sure 
they were tilled by a hit squad 
working for the Inkaiha-kaning 
tribal chief in his village. 

“The king is the king of all of us, 
but he should not get involved in 
politics," Mr. Mokwena said. “It is 
wrong.” 


I talian Woman 

And Son Slain, 
Mob Suspected 

Reuters 

. NAPLES — A 67-year-old 
woman and her 25-year-old 
sen were slain near Naples be- 
cause they had denounced al- 
leged mobsters on television, 
the Italian police said Mon- 
day. 

“I am ready to die for this,” 
Anna DeD’Orme said on RAI 
stale television last year when 
she denounced the alleged kill- 
ers of another son, Domenico, 
20, who died erf a heroin over- 
dose two years ago. 

“The scoundrels who sold 
him heroin most be sent to 
jail" Mrs. Ddl’Onne, told 
viewers of “The Courage to 
live," a popular talk show, 
while accompanied by her son 
Carmine Amura. 

Mr. Defl’Orme was killed 
Saturday by gunmen who en- 
tered the supermarket she 
owned in the town of Secon- 
digliano, near Naples. Mr. 
Amura was killed almost si- 
multaneously in a nearby 
town. 

After Mrs. DeH'Onne and 
her son had appeared an tele- 
vision, the police arrested An- 
tonio Esposito, a suspected 
mob boss. He was acquitted 
on charges of c riminal associa- 
tion and selling dru^s after 
spending 14 months in jafl, but 
was murdered in Februaiy in 
an alleged mob killing. News- 
papers said the killing s could 
be part of a Mafia-style feud 
between the Amura and Espo- 
silo families. 


MARCH: 18 Die in Johannesburg 


Continued from Page 3 

tack by the ANC." he said, adding, 
“and the police and army gave way 
for them." 

The Zulu-based Inkatha 
claims it had nothing to dowii 
Monday's march. It said the event 
was staged by Zulus responding to 
the call of their king to oppose the 
election because it endangers Zulu 
sovereignty. 

Given the press of events in the 
run-up to the election, it seems 
doubtful that anyone will ever get 
to the bottom of Monday’s shoot- 
ings. At a symbolic level they rep- 
resent a form of spontaneous com- 
bustion in a country that becomes 
more of a tindeibox each day the 
election draws closer. 

On Saturday, nearly 100,000 


ANC-supporting Zulus staged a 
pro-election march through the 
streets of central Durban, and ru- 
mors were rife in that a bloodbath 
might break out there. As it hap- 
pened, the only casualties were two 
broken store windows. 

But the violence in the black 
townships around Durban and 
throughout the black homeland of 
KwaZulu has been escalating by 
the day. The police report that 55 
people have been killed in (hat re- 
gion since Friday, including a baby 
who was snatched from his moth- 
er's arms and tossed into a burnin g 
house. 

By those standards, the only 
t h i ng out of the ordinary about 
Monday's carnage was that Johan- 
nesburg was the venue. 


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FRANCE: 

Balladur Yields 

Continued from Page 1 

two weeks ago — and would stand 
his ground. But some time over the 
weekend he evidently decided to 
back off. 

A poll published Sunday showed 
that public opinion was not behind 
him, with 64 percent of those ques- 
tioned favoring repeal of the de- 
cree. Political experts said he was 
also eager not to mark his first 
anniversary in office on Tuesday in 
the midst of a bitter conflict with 
the country’s youth. 

He was helped by the results of 
cantonal elections this month. Af- 
ter Sunday’s runoff vote, in which 
the coalition look 52 percent of the 
ballots, losing only a handful of 
council seats to the opposition So- 
cialists, Mr. Balladur said the 
French had confirmed their confi- 
dence in his gover n mem . 

But with many French con- 
vinced that he harbors ambitions to 
be his coalition’s candidate in pres- 
idential elections in May 1995, be 
probably only has a few months in 
which to begin showing results that 
unpress both decision-makers in 
the coalition and the electorate. 

Polls still show tha t he would be 
a stronger flag-bearer than either of 
his main rivals, former Prime Min- 
ister Jacques Chirac, who heads 
Mr. Balia dur’s own Gaulhst Rally 
for the Republic, and former Prea- 
denl Valery Giscard d’Estaing, 
leader of the center- rig ht Union for 
French Democracy. 


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TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 

OPINION 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



SribunC Turn On the Red Light for North Korea 


Getting Out 
The Vote 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


W ASHINGTON — Sometimes even ap- 
peasement doesn’t wort. When North 


An IMF Gamble on Russia 


Can the West provide more aid to help 
Russia with its crushing economic crisis? Offi- 
cials at the International Monetary Fund have 
been agonizing about this for months. The 
fund strict guidelines that demand con- 
crete evidence of fiscal responsibility from 
any nation as a prerequisite for aid. Negotia- 
tions between Russia and the IMF over a 
second large loan have been in deadlock, 
while the economy spirals dangerously down- 
ward. Now that deadlock may be broken. 

The SI .5 billion that the IMF has promised, 
.after months of dday, is much too little to tom 
the ec on omy around- But the agreement is still, 
crucial because it paves the way for Russia' to 
receive other international help. Whom IMF 
approval, Russia would have little chance to 
attract foreign investors, loans from the World 
Bank, debt relief or (he balance of the $43 

htltiftn aid pariragp. lhat industrialized countries 

promised last year but refused to deliver. With 
IMF approval, Russia has a chance. 

The IMF has been justifiably criticized for 
holding up aid to Russia in pursuit of budget- 
ary discipline that its fragile political system 
could not possibly produce. Proponents of 
Russian aid called on the IMF to take a risk — 
to put up money in the hope that it would 
sway Moscow toward market reforms. Since 
the IMF failed to cut a deal when reformers like 
former Deputy Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar 
and former Finance Minister Boris Fyodorov 
were in power, it seemed unlikely that it could 
conclude a deal after they resigned. 

Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin 


promised, despite the resignations, to keep 
reforms on trade. But that will take budget 
discipline, bringing expenditures in line with 
revenues so that Moscow can stop printing 
mountains of rubles that periodically bring 
the economy to the brink of hyperinflation. 
To achieve monetary stability, Mr. Grano- 
myrdin would have to cut subsidies to state- 
owned enterprises — a step that threatens the 
jobs of milliaD& The budget that he presented 
to the IMF last week pretended to be fiscally 
responsible, but did not convince anyone at 
the fund. What tuned the IMF around was 
the prime minister’s promise to return in a 
week or two with a new budget that would 
bring inflation under control. 

To its credit, the IMF is taking an unpre- 
cedented gamble. It would ordinarily pro- 
vide loans only if a budget with tight numeri- 
cal targets were passed. In Russia's case, the 
IMF would release the money merely if Mr. 
Chernomyrdin presented a responsible bud- 
get to the parliament. 

The gamble is worth taking. At worst, the 
Russians will move away from market re- 
forms and the IMF will have thrown away 
$1.5 billion. If all goes well, however, the 
IMF’s small vote of confidence will buttress 
reformers, encourage foreign investors and 
help convince the industrialized nations that 
it is safe to go forward with their large aid 
package. Market reforms are alive but not 
well in Russia. The IMF has finally taken an 
important step to nourish them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W peasement doesn’t work. When North 
Korea ostentatiously reneged on its promise to 
allow a onetime inspection of some of its nucle- 
ar facilities, the Clinton a dminis tration had to 
concede that its policy of serial concessions had 
reached a dead end. 

After a year of meeting every broken North 
Korean nuclear promise with infinite patience 
and yet another proffered carrot, even Secretary 
of State Warren Christopher appears to have 
reached his limit He warned North Korea that if 


By Charles Krauthammer 


The administration is acting now 
because not to actwovld expose 
Us containment policy as a farce. 


it does not “become a responsible member of the 
international community — fat chance — 
Washington “will have no choice but to pursue 
other options," and “these other options include 
progressively stronger measures.” Coming from 
Mr. Christopher, them’s rightin’ words. 

It is important to realize how much ground the 
ad mi ii k n li firm had given up before r eaching this 
impasse. It gave in on inspecting nuclear sites that 
North Korea deemed off-limits. It deferred the 
demand for comhnring inspections, accepting a 
one-shot inspection of seven declared sites. 

But when the International Atomic Enagy 
Agency was barred from one of even these sites 
after it discovered a broken seal indicating the 


the rig was up. The IAEA blew the whistle and, 
in effect, declared North Korea a nuclear rene- 
gade (in “noncompliance,” in IAEA-speak). 
Now the UN Security Council, led by the United 
States, is supposed to do something. 

What has the administration been doing up to 


now? The only person who has been able to make 
sense of its Korea policy has been my colleague 
Jim Hoagland. The policy, he explained (Opinion 
March 10), boils down to this: the administration 
is willin g to concede as “so much spilt milk” 
whatever bombs and plutonium the North Kore- 
ans already have, bat it is drayring a line in the 
sand, a new, more realistic line — It will not 
tolerate new bombs or rockets. 

Well, now we get to see whether the adminis- 
tration has the spine to hold any line. By sum- 
mer, write Gary MUboIlin and Duma Edensword 
of the Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Anns Con- 
trol, the North Koreans will be able to divert 
enough new plutonium for two more bombs. And 
when their new 800-megawatt reactor oomes on 
hue in two years, they will be producing enough 
plntoninm for 30 to 40 bombs per year. 

This is the ultimate nightmare. Unlike other 
nuclear wannabes. North Korea wants the staff 
not just for show or use bat fen sale. As CIA 
Director James Woolsey points out, Ncrnh Korea 
is In a league by itself ... the preeminent world 
prohferalor.” It already is rocket supplier to Libya 
and Iran. Its No. 1 foreign exchange earner is 
missiles- It will soon be a nuclear bazaar, a source 
of weapons of mass destruction fen every terrorist 
group and octlaw state with the cash and the right 
(anti-American) ideology. 

Which is why the Clinton a dministr ation is 
finally acting, albeit painfully slowly. The United 
Nations win not be asked to impose economic 
sanctions now, but only if North Korea does not 
repent by a later date. Patriot missies are being 
sent to South Korea not by air but by sea. There 
is a kind of desperation in this delay, a hope 
against hope that if me acts slowly enough 
maybe something will turn up. 

The adminis tration is acting now because not 


to act would expose its containment policy as a 
farce. For a year, a dminis tration doves have been 
praying that Kim D Sung would let them off the 
hook. He declined. Now the doves have come 
around to where the hawks woe a year ago: 
preparing to pressure Mr. Kim with sanctions in 
the face of North Korean threats to go to war. 

It is a fearful prospect that even administra- 
tion doves realize can no longer be wished away. 
Mr. Clinton has been president for a year. On 
North Korea, it has been a year of dithering, of 
farther North Korean bomb development, of 
American weakness and uncertainty. The year's 
delay did demonstrate American willingness to 
go the extra mile to avoid conflict. That could 
have helped the United States build an interna- 
tional coalition against North Korea. But Mr. 
Clin ion has done uttle to build that coalition. 

America’s two critical allies in such a coalition 
are Japan and China. The administration has 
succeeded in alienating both: Japan, with heavy- 
handed threats of a trade war; and, more serious- 
ly, China, with Mr. Christopher’s disastrous trip 
to Beijing. Moreover, the president has done 
nothing to prepare the American people for the 
riangw thnr lies ahead. 

To allow North Korea to flout the nonprolifer- 
ation treaty and become bomb supplier to every 
outlaw state on the planet would be Mr. Clin- 
ton’s most h umiliating and most dangerous for- 
eign policy retreat yet. 

The president urgently needs to explain Amer- 
ica's goals, its reasons For trying to stop North 
Korea from going nuclear, and the nature and 
magnitude of the threat. 9 he sets oat his policy 
with finnnaBi and explains its dangers with hon- 
esty, be can be assured of bipartisan political 
support and the begriming of public understand- 
ing. He wQl need both if he is to avoid making a 
mockery of his commitment to nonproliferation 
and his own policy of containment. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


In KwaZulu 


By Anthony Lewis 

J OHANNESBURG — The Sooth 
African Defense Force wfll soon 
move into KwaZulu to protect cam- 
paigning and voting in the upcoming 
national election. That is the predic- 
tion of people dose to both President 
F. W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela 
of the African National Congress. 

The troops would not unseat Man- 
gosuthu Buthekari as South Africa 
has replaced the rulers of other black 
homelands in recent weeks. Their 
purpose would be to put down the 
gan gs of murderous r uffians from 
Chief Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom 
Party who are killing and mtimidar- 
ing people to obstruct the election. 

In the light of South African histo- 
ry. what an a mating idea it is: send- 
ing in the army to make sure that 
black people can vote. Bui then the 
irresistible truth here today is that the 


country is turning away from its his- 
tory of racial oppression. 


A Chance for South Asia An Eyesore on the Border With a Chang ing Mexico 


ioqt of racial expression. 

The noise or white separatists and 
the depredations of Chief Buthelezi’s 
gangs cannot hide the central fact: 
the two major political forces are to- 
tally committed to carrying out South 
Africa's first nonradal election. 

The Independent Electoral Com- 
mission is conducting a massive pro- 
gram of education on how to vote. 
The commission’s chairman is a 
strong-minded Afrikaner judge, Jo- 
hann Kriegler. Its deputy chauinan, 
Dikgang Moseneke, was sentenced 
to prison on Robben Island for 10 
years at the age of IS for political 
opposition to apartheid 


The United States is cranking up a new 
approach to the threat of nudear war in South 
Asia. India and Pakistan could deploy nuclear 
weapons quickly if they chose. Both are said 
to be working up new missiles. Their percep- 
tions of each other are inflamed. Their dispute 
over Kashmir elicited nudear growls as recent- 
ly as last fall and remains dangerous and 
untreated. The new American thinkin g is to 
provide Pakistan with a plausible politico-mili- 
tary substitute for further nudear indulgence. 

fix return for Pakistan taking the steps (a 
ban on fissile material appropriate inspec- 
tions) that would cap its current program, the 
United States would permit it to buy new F- 
16 warplanes. Washington has withheld these 
weapons for four years under the Press ler 
amendment, which denies arms sales to bomb- 
building states. Other parts of the American 
initiative would wilier India in timilar nwW 
forbearance and draw it and Pakistan into an 
expanding web of dialogue on nudear, political 
and regional-security matters. 

To waive the Pressler amendment and sell 
F-16s involves an admission of failure in past 
American nonproliferation policy. In a sense, 
it rewards the gamble that Pakistan look in 


building a bomb to match India's. Many in 
the U.S. Congress wfll resist India is also 
balking. Unlike Pakistan, it has not been 
dependent on American aril arms and securi- 
ty guarantees and therefore is not similar ly 
vulnerable to American pressure. Regarding 
Pakistan as the subcontinents! upstart that 
continually tricks new favors out of its Ameri- 
can patrons, Indians are leery of American- 
sponsored regional nuclear restraint 

Congressional and Indian critics should 
look more closely. The F-16s could contain a 
Pakistani nudear program otherwise run- 
ning free. An India seeking regional stabil- 
ity, as distinguished from an India pursuing 
regional hegemony, would surely welcome 
that development. 

A year of diplomatic accidents and clum- 
siness in Washington has created new resent- 
ments in New Delhi. But efforts to redress 
this are being undertaken, including ap- 
pointment of a top-of-tha-line ambassador, 
Frank Wisner. AU that should help put India 
in a mood to judge the new initiative on its 
merits and to join the essential work of 
shaping it to Indian interests. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


T IJUANA, Mexico — People in 
the United States used to sav 


Transition in Mexico 


Political assassination can do terrible dam- 
age to a country, as the United States has 
good reason to know. Luis Donaldo Colosio, 
shot dead as he made his way through a crowd 
of supporters in Tijuana, was not only a 
candidate to be president of Mexico but, by a 
very wide margin, the front-runner. His death 
will not threaten the stability of Mexico’s 
political structure, which rests on solid foun- 
dations. But it throws into question all the 
commitments and intentions that Mr. Colosio 
might have carried into the presidency. 

The job for the nest president will be to 
manage the consolidation of an extraordinary 
wave of economic reforms, and to ensure that 
the benefits are widely distributed. It will be a 
time in which to toapt the country’s political 
system and its social policy to the profoundly 
changed economic circumstances that two re- 
markable presidents — the current one, Car- 
los Salmas de Gortari, and his predecessor, 
Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado — have created. 

Until a dozen years ago, Mexico had an 
inward-looking economy that cosily protected 
its producers from competition ax great cost to 
its consumers, while it pumped up the stan- 

from abroad When it was finally unable to 
meet its loan payments — setting off the great 


Latin debt crisis — the lending abruptly end- 
ed, and the country fell into a long and deep 
depression. Instead of succumbing to the 
temptations of big deficits (as the United 
States was then doing) and inflation, the Mex- 
ican governments of the 1980s got their bud- 
gets under control and stabilized the currency. 
They dismantled the protectionist barriers 
against imports and opened their markets to 
the world. The North American Free Trade 
Agreement, a Mexican initiative, was the final 
achievement in that evolution. 

The result is that Mexico is now ready lor 
rapid economic growth. When President Sali- 
nas chose Mr. Colosio to be his successes', he 
judged that the office would no kmger require 
a trained economist like himself but rather a 
party manager. He wanted a man wbo would 
keep policy cm its present course and, beyond 
that, help the country keep its balance 
through the rough and raucous process of fast 
growth. Now the country is preoccupied by 
the mourning for Mr. Colosio and the police 
investigation of his murder. Amid all that. 
President Satinas must choose another candi- 
date who knows how to take advantage of the 
broad opportunities that a decade of radical 
economic change has opened for Mexico. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


X the United States used to say 
that nothing short of budding a 
1, 950-mile iron curtain with Latin 
America could stem the flow of ille- 
gal Mexican immigrants. 

Wdl, the wall is going up, even if it 
has taken three years to erect the first 
14 miles (22 kilometers), a rusty eye- 
sore made of old steel sheets such as 
army engineers used to build combat 
landing sums in Korea and Vietnam. 
It stands 10 feet (3 meters) tall and 
extends on both sides of Tijuana, 
from the Pacific to Zapata Canyon. 

The steel sheets, pierced and 
ridged, are easy to climb. I saw sever- 
al young Mexicans in sombreros 
clamber over one mo rning. The big 
rush is at night, when hundreds scale 
the wall and crawl, guerrilla-tike, 
through folds and guffies, trying to 
evade the U.S. Border Patrol, which 
uses infrared scopes, radios and mo- 
torcycles to trade them down. Those 
who get caught are given coffee and a 
sandwich and put cm a bus back to 
Iguana, where most by again. 

Many migrants pay a coyote oc pol- 
len (chicken earner) $30 to smuggle 
them across; a $2,000 morduk (bhe^ is 
the rale for a ride to a guaranteed job 
in Los Angeles. On weekends since 
1987, Mexican sociologists have 
joined the swarm of smugglers and 
migrants, trying to get answers to a 


By Richard Critchfield 


socioeconomic questionnaire. This 
strange scene is made stranger by 
goings-on at the official border cross- 
ings the world's busiest, where 65 mil- 
lion people pour bade and forth each 
year. You enter Mexico in a huge 
crowd without ever seeing an official 
— just walk across the border 
through a long corridor. Going the 
other way, you simply say “U.S. citi- 
zen,” without showing a passport 

An estimated 850,000 Mexican ifls- 
gples enter the United States each 
year, half of them at Tijuana. 

So why the wall? Politics. When 
Governor Pete Wilson of California, 
a Republican up for rejection, 
blamed illegal Mexican migrants for 


to be cool to his idea of fortification. 

The poli ticians are playing with 
fire. Enough anti-Mexican xenopho- 
bia exists m these borderlands that 
you risk s t irrin g up sociopaths like 
the young rirrohead who went out 
and shot dead two quite legal Mexi- 
can farmworkers on a back road. A 
judge gave him 50 years, calling the 
killings “crimes of radal hatred.” 


Some say the media stir h up. The 
historian Carlos Cortes of the Um- 


cverything from the state's 
crisis and tax burden to drug 


thepolls doubled. 

The state's two Democratic sena- 
tors jumped on the anti-Mexican 
bandwagon, Dianne Frinstrin pro- 
posing a $1 border toll to pay for 
more patrolmen, Barbara Boxer 
wanting to call out the National 
Guard. Representative Duncan 
Hunter, a Republican member of 
the House Armed Services Commit- 
tee, whose district borders on Tijua- 
na, wants to militarize the whole 
border, although the Pentagon is said 


versity of California, Riverside, who 
is a direct descendant of Mexico's 
conqueror, has traced Hollywood’s 
treatment of Mexicans. He finds a 
long history of seeing Mexico as “a 
land of chaos and menace.” 

The classic American stereotype of 
a Mexican, says Mr. Cortes, is Gold 
Tooth in John Huston’s 1948 film 
“Tbe Treasure of the Sara Madre" — 
“a sadistic Mexican bandit who ma- 
chetes Humphrey Bogart to death and 
then scatters Bogart’s bags of gold 
dust, stupidly mis taking it for sand." 

Mr. Cortes maintains that Holly- 
wood's three current Mexican themes 
are “Anglo superiority,” a view of a 
“dearly pathological^ Latin Ameri- 
ca “whose decadence and subhu- 
manity pose a threat to Anglos who 
stumble into the south-of-the-bor- 
der Hades," and the “rise of the 


Time for Another, Different Revolution 


D allas — The pistol shots 

fired last Wednesday in a H- 


Bj Dick J. Reavis 


Other Comment 


A Coming Together in Asia 

To countries in Southeast Aria that look to 
strang strategic linkages between China and 
Japan to guarantee peaceable conditions for 
economic expansion, the most important re- 
sult of the visit [by Prime Minister Morihiro 
Hosokawa] to Beijing is the finning of rela- 
tions between the two sup er po wer s of tomor- 
row. It is better for the two to be dose than 
to be at daggers drawn. It is noteworthy that 
the warming of ties has been happening at a 
time when both countries’ relations with the 
United States are troubled, one over market 
access and the other over human rights. How 
American strategists expect to cope with the 
convergence of Chinese-Japanese inte r est s is 
for them to figure out. 

— The Straits Times (Singapore). 


The Permanent Campaigner 

You’ve got to hand it to BQl Clinton: When 
the going gets tough, he gets going. Put him in 
a hostile, campaign-like environment, and he 
displays a master’s touch. Trite bis press con- 
ference performance Thursday. It came in the 
wake of serious Whitewater-related charges 


made by Representative Jim Leach of Iowa. 
Mr. Clinton handled the crisis with erea 


Mr. Clinton handled the crisis with great 
skflL Even his critics agreed. The House Re- 
publican whip. Newt Gingrich, said, “I watch 
him with admiration just for the sheer tedmi- 
cal skill with whidi he points things out on his 
terms.” Mr. Leach said, “I thought the presi- 
dent did an absolutely fabulous job in terms 
of his presentation.” Nevertheless, the Leach 
charges still need to be examined more fully. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


L/ fired last Wednesday in a H- 
juana slum ended two political lives 
and, perhaps, one political era. corruption for decades, but if it can- 

Lms Donaldo Colosio, the presi- not control the desperados, they will 
dential candidate of the Partido Re- have little use for it 
vahxaonario Institutional, or PRI, Two weeks ago. when a wealthy 
died a literal death. Manuel Camacho, financier, Alfredo Harp Hdu, disap- 
tfae popular former mayor of Mexico peared, federal authorities revealed a 
CSty, suffered an equally unexpected recent wave of some 200 kidnappings 
but merely political demise. And the of ranchers and financial dona Be- 
shooting may well mark the dose of cause it wants to deny that rcvolution- 
Mcxkxts epoch of modernization. ary depredations are becoming wido- 
Had Mr. Colosio been felled by a spread, the PRI — without any proof 

streetcar or a heart attack, Mr. Cama- 
cho would have been tin favorite to 

takr his place. As the government’s MeXWO is headed foran 
peace envoy to the rebels in Chiapas, J 

be has won wide acclaim by giving epoch OS turbulent OS 
voice to the rebels’ complaints. Two 7n _. , 

weeks ago, opinion polls showed that I yOO-19 / 4, When 

if be bolted the PRI and ran (or presi- . , 

Hmt as an independent, he would be terrorists KwJWppca. 

industrialists, the police 

’nurdereddissidentsa.u 

headquarters cm Thursday, staff mem- guerrillas Sniped at 

bars and party stalwarts accosted him, ° r 

chanting, “Colosio, si! Camacho, nor soldiers Ul tile MBs . 

Nobody knows what motivated 

Mr. Colosio's assassin But when 

facts are absent, whar the parole be- —blamed a hypothetical band of m 
lieve counts. A poll published in the cenaiy thugs for the kidna p p ing*: N 
Mexico City daily Reforma indicated many Mexicans are buying the lira- 
that around 80 percent of respon- There are other causes of disco 
dents had leapt to the conclusion that tent. In the last 12 years, as pric 
the falling was part of a conspiracy, rose and wages stood stiR the pi 
Mr. Camacho is a primary suspect, charing power of working-class Me 
His career, inside or outside the PRI, icans declined by 60 percent As if 


murdered dissidents and 
guerrillas sniped at 
soldiers in the hills. 


The party’s victories — always rife 
with fraud — at least held out the 
illusion of democracy and provided 
an orderly transfer of power. But this 
year its victory claims will run head- 
on into armed disbelief and charges 
of fraud. The party’s best known fig- 
ures are not eligible to run because 
the constitution requires cabinet offi- 
cers to resign six months before elec- 
tion day, which is Aug. 21. 

Sixty years ago (or even six), the 
PRI would have resolved the consti- 
tutional pinch by hastily amending 
the law, but those days are gone. 
Anyway, (he party’s leaders are iden- 
tified with policies that are rapidly 
falling out of favor. 

Mr. Colosio's death is also unset- 
tin^ because assassination of leading 
politicians has not been a specter in 
postxevohitionaiy Mexican life. The 
country’s last major political faffing 
came in 1928, when President-elect 
Alvaro Obregbn was gunned down. 

Mexican commoners don’t shoot 
presidents. This is not because crazies 
are in short supply but because lead- 
ers have retained some of the rever- 
ence once accorded to Aztec god- 


Latmo menace in the United States.” 

Is there something to such fears? 
Mexicans are a contradictory lot: 
warm but distrustful, idealistic but 
cynical passive but violent, mixing 
suffering and joy. Mainly mestizos of 
mixed descent, they are, some argue, 
Spaniards in body, Indians in mhuti 

Some anthropologists say that 
what r emains of pre-Columbian In- 
dian culture out m the villages has 
never come fully to terms with urban 
Spanish ways. So we get Mayan 
peasants revolting in Chiapas 
against the modernizing reforms of 
the country’s Harvard-educated 
president, Carlos Salinas de Gortari. 
The trouble in Chiapas, cultural at 
bottom, will not be easily mended. 

Anthropologists are divided. Lola 
Romanucri-Ross of the University 
of California, San Diego, who spent 
three years in a Mexican village, 
says: “You never know what the 
rules are. You're playing a game in a 
dark room. Mexico is scary.” 

But George Foster of Berkeley, 
who has studied one hi ghland village 
for 45 years, says that "Mexicans are 
quickly leaving their Third World 
roots behind: “Peasants? They're no 
more peasants than I am.” 

Jorge Bustamante, a Iguana aca- 
demic who is the preeminent authority 
on Mexican migration, says that last 
year more than half tto migrants, legal 
and illegal, came from cities. More 
than 90 percent of farm labor in Cali- 
fornia, which produces one- third of 
American agricultural output, is Mexi- 
can, although it is increasingly Indian 
as better-educated mestizos head for 
city jobs. With per capita income close 
to $3,000 and the population — 71 
percent urban — stowing sudden, 
sleep drops in the birthrate, Mexico is 
no kmger the peasant society it was. 

American wages are still six times 
higher. Everyone agrees that greater 
wage parity is the only real solution 
to Illegal migration. 

The problem is likely to solve itself 


polling stations. There are 22 million 
eligible voters. 16- million of them 
blacks who have never voted in a 
national election. The IEC already 
has hundreds of monitors, local and 
international, to check on interfer- 
ence with cam paig nin g and voting. 

One of the extraordinary features 
of this election is that the two nugor 
contestants, the ANC and Mr. de 
Klerk’s National Party, are opposing 
each other with vigor and evem bitter- 
ness — but still cooperating. They 
work together in the Transitional Ex- 
ecutive Council, which makes the ma- 
jor decisions on such questions as 
how to restore order in KwaZulu. 

Mr. de Klerk may denounce the 
ANC in a campaign speech, but he 
knows that he win almost certainly 
be serving as a deputy to Mr. Man- 
dela in the coalition government to 
be set up under the interim constitu- 
tion after the election. 

Mr. Mandela does not offer his 
followers the red meat of campaign 
rhetoric that he might be expected to 
give people who have been domed 
their rights for so long. He sounds 
more like an incumbent dealing with 
the realities of governance. 

At Sharpevifie last week he told 
thousands who had been waiting in 
the son for hours that the country 
needed “political tolerance." He 
urged them not to condemn all the 
pohee because some were bad. "The 
majority of the police force is com- 
posed of honest and devoted men and 
women,” he said. Speaking of the 
army and the police, he said: “We 
need them. They need us.” 

Profound change has be$un with- 
out waiting for the election. One 
moving example is the fate of blacks 
who were forcibly removed from 
land they owned and dumped in 
desolate locations because their 
property was a “black spot" in 
“white areas. The government has 
begun to return their land to them. 

The South African Broadcasting 
Corporation used to be the voice of 


Ameen Aknalwaya and Max Du 


— blamed a hypothetical band of mer- 
cenary thugs for the kidnappings. Not 


many Mexicans are buying the line. 
There are other causes of discoi 


may have hit a dead end. 
The shooting heralds 1 


The shooting heralds the end of 
Mexico’s modernizing, neoliberal ep- 
och, and possibly the demise of the 
PRI, unless it reinvents itself a gain 



The party has preacted over the 
residency since 1929, in various ideo- 


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presidency since 1929, in various ideo- 
logical robes. It put on a neoliberal 
suit in 1982, when Mexico was bank- 
rupted by an oil bust and Miguel de la 
Madrid Hurtado became pRstdeat. 
During his six-year term ana the sub- 
sequent reign of his headstrong aco- 
lyte, Carlos Salinas de Gortari, the 
PRI removed the trade walls and safe- 
ty nets that it bad long ago raised to 
protect and pacify Mexico. 

The modernization gambit cli- 
maxed last fall, when the North 
American Free Trade Agreement be- 
came law. The strategy was mortally 
wounded on Jan. 1, when the Chiapas 
rebels came down from the hiHs, dar- 
ing the peasantry to knock the gov- 
ernment to its knees. 

In politics, when so mething dies, 
something else — sometimes the 
same entity in a different guise — 
takes its place. According to the Re- 
forms poB, many Mexicans believe 
that if the PRI did not order the 
Colosio shooting, he was failed by the 
criminals and revolutionaries who 
are greasing their guns everywhere. 
Mexicans have put up with the PRTs 


There are other causes of discon- 
tent. In the last 12 years, as prices 
rose and wages stood still the pur- 
chasing power of working-class Mex- 
icans declined by 60 percent As if to 
close an avenue of escape, in 1992 the 
government canceled the long-stand- 
ing promise of acreage to anyone 
willing to put it under the plow. 

It also opened Mexico’s doors to 
competing goods — from com to 
communications satellites — from 
the United States, the meddlesome 
power that Mexicans have held in low 
esteem since Sam Houston’s day. 

Although his term is not over, Car- 
los Salinas has earned a berth in his- 
tory as Mexico's third radical mod- 
ernizer. The first two are grants of 
infamy. Not a single public monu- 
ment stands in Mexico to Heroin 
CoruEs, who conquered the couxruy 
for Spain. Porfuio Diaz, wbo paid on 
the country’s 1 9th century debt, pre- 
sided over the laying of railroad and 
electric lines and_ drove peasants off 
their lands, is reviled as a dictator. 

Mexico is more like China or Iran 
than the Italy that pro-NAFTA 
Americans take it to be. Moderniza- 
tion — Westernization — ■ has never 
been popular in the Aztec homeland. 

“When you have the fand of break- 
down in the traditional way of doing 
things that we’ve had under Salinas, 
and you don’t replace it with any- 
thing but your own power, arrogance, 
schemes and talents, you get into 
trouble,” the political scientist and 
writer Jorge Castafieda says. 


than (even on television), the people 
take deep breaths, awed by toe pag- 
eantry and ponm. The bullets fired in 
Tijuana pierced that reverence, and 
the candidates are scared. At the start 
of the rampaign jn displays of dose- 


forma will be 40 percent Hispanic, 
with younger, tax-paying Latinos 
helping to support an aging Anglo 
population. It u quite conceivable, as 
Mexico's industry and services flour- 
ish under the North American Free 
Trade Agreement, that 20 years from 
now the problem will not be too many 
Mexican immigrants but too few. 

Most experts here in the border- 
lands argue that in the meantime mi- 
gration needs to be decriminalized 
and regulated by treaty as it was 
during the bracero program initiated 
after labor shortages in World War 
II, which continued until unions 
killed it in the 1960s. 

Otherwise, playing on media-en- 
couraged xenophobia to win votes 
will backfire on politicians. The new 
wall will rust away soon enough, but 
will the shame of those who built it? 


ness to the people (conducted against 
a backdrop of popular infatuation 
with the hug-happy rebel leader, Sub- 
commander Marcos), they spumed 
the usual security squads. Now they 
are changing their minds. 

“We will maintain OUT regime of 
freedom and constitutional order,” 
Mr. Salinas declared after Mr. Colo- 
sio’s death. And President Bill Clin- 
ton, referring to Mexico, the PRI and 
undoubtedly NAFTA, said, “Funda- 
mentally, they’re in good shape.” 

Both leaders are whistling in the 
dark. Mexico is headed for an epoch 
as turbulent as 1968-1974, when ter- 
rorists kidnapped industrialists, the 


The writer is author of "‘Villages’’ 
and the forthcoming “MXIogert*' He 
contributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


Ameen Aknalwaya and Max Du 
Preez — have joined the SABC. 

Among those who spent their lives 
oppoang apartheid there is a sense of 
the impossible happening. I asked a 
lawyer who spent years resisting the 
removal of people in “blade spots” 
whether at that time he ever imagin ed 
a South African government bringing 
the people back to (heir land. He 
said, “It never crossed my mind.” 

Helen Suzman, retired from Pariia- 

heid’s cruelties, is a member' ofthe 
Electoral Commission. She said it has 
“an awesome job” adding: “The first 
thing is to persuade people that the 
ballot is really secret — nobody will 
know how they voted.” 

Noting the tensions that have ex- 
ploded since Mr. de Klerk released 
Mr. Mandela in 1990, she said: 
“There's^ a lot of bad. But whenever 
rm feeling a bit desperate, I ask 
nqwtf^Woidd you like to go back 

The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


rillas sniped at soldiers in the hills. 

Fra* years, curious Americans have 
asked Mexican friends when the rev- 
olution might resume. The appropri- 
ate response has been a wry ** maria - 
no." If Mexico is lucky, maflana will 
crane in August 

But it won’t come peaceably unless 
Mexico's leaders can convince the 
public that the PRI can conduct an 
aboveboard — and, in Mexico, truly 
revolutionary — election campaign. 


1894« Europe Disarmed? 

PARIS — Revelations that the mem- 
bers of the Triple Alliance favor dis- 
armament, quoting the King of Den- 
mark as having vouched for the 
pacific intentions of the Emperor of 
Russia, the King of Italy and the 
Emperor of Austria, and of himself, 
have caused much talk in diplomatic 
circles in Paris. Potitirians are wonder- 
ing if the words attributed to Den- 
mark's ruler are simply well meaning 
generalities, or whether they really re- 
fiect an acme desire to cease ihe wor- 
ship of the God of War and beat 
swords into implements of agriculture. 


gime, Trotzky has the mili tary control- 
However, there are st rong forces in 
Russia wind) are giving Trotzky their 
utmost support on the theory that by 
standing benind the radicals they may 
be able sooner to end the entire Rns- 
aan nightmare. The ultimate support 
of the Russian Government is the Red 
Army. For that reason, the soldiers 
arc cared for far better that] any other 
part of the population. 


1944c Holland Hooded 


fleet an acute desire to cease ihe wor- LONDON — I From our New York 
strip of the God of War and beat edition:] The Ge rmane have started 
5wradsinio implements of agriculture, flooding Holland in anticipation of 
i A1A r . q, - an Alhed invasion, and if they cany 
1919: Lenin YS. Trotzky put their present plans the homes and 
.... . _ : livelihood of neariv fnnr million 


The writer is author of “Conver- 
sations With Moctezuma. : Ancient 
Shadows Over Modem Life in Mexi- 
co ” He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


WARSAW — Lenin and Trotzky, 
heads of the Russian Government, 
have come to a definite break. Lenin, 
allied with the “intellectuals," proba- 
bly is not so strong as Trotzky, wbo 
has continued bis appeals to the prole- 
tariat White Laim, who embodies the 
Bolshevist spirit, beads the present re- 


Dutch wfll be destroyei Matt de- 
? ru 2? , 1 . 0f valuable Land would set 
tto Dmch back more than three cen- ! 
tunes— to the early seventeenth cen- ‘ 
nny when they began building the 
vast network of canals and dikes ‘ 
wuch have made their country one of 
foe most colorful places in Europe. 


, 'iViil* 
^ til " 


G.VV- v. 







l1 *W 

K :^ 

' ' h,j m ■ 


This Train Isn’t Stopping, 
And Bill and I Want Off 


By William Safire 
andpuffingfi 

■ 2K5Sffflg&S?-S Mil 


mil ls' “5 *?«*“ *t was so smSt 10 
SSjSd tK?"^ < W l 8 nte “ to a crim- 
wouW be a way hiding 
a subpoena an thedocuinmtati!* 

Sf i^?L“t look ®* a greedy, unelS 

h was so easy for the staffers here 1 in 
Washington feeling ^ abo ^g 
transfer of files from Vince's office, to 
“UP “ t0 1116 Den »cratk; establishment 
and damn media. Even Benue, the only 
?“ t 10 £.« «ir interests first, was cer- 
tain that Fiske never went to indictment 
without an airtight case. 

And what really gets me is those sanc- 
timonious jerks who say “there’s noth- 
mg to hide; tf only Oraton had made 
full disclosure in the first place” and “it 
isnt the 15-year-old embarrassments 
that hurt, n s the cover-up.” 

What do they know about what bars 
P* 0 ™ T &ack then and how it would lot* 
now? Did they imagine I made 5 100,000 
on an m vestment of next to nothing in 
cattle futures, thanks to the advice of 
our poultry industry? We did what ev- 
oybody did in a state capital, and not 
just in Arkansas — but go try and sav 
“everybody did iL” 

If Bill had hang lough back in Decem- 
ber, as I pleaded with him to do, we 
would have bad a month of press huffing 


Invite fie wnany 

Tbe Normandy D-Day commemora- 
tion will underline the historic depth of 
the trans-Atlantic relatio nship . This re- 
lationship has been the baas for the 
postwar American contribution to 
Western Europe’s prosperity and Eu- 
rope's security, and has given the United 
States a seat at the European table. For 
many years, the Gennan-American rela- 
tionship has been at the heart of the U.S. 
engagement in Europe. By this logic, 
Germany belongs at Normandy. 

D-Day was a valorous achievement 
that led to the defeat of Hitler's Germa- 
ny. Whatever reasons validated excluding 
Germany from past commemorations o? 
this event, they have been overtaken by 
recent unis in Europe's history. Europe 
is no longer divided. Germany is unifiei 
Western Europe is reaching out to in- 
clude even former Warsaw ftet countries 
in its regional structures. 

A German presence at Normandy 
would have symbolic and political 
mwining that Germany is now as much 
the bearer of responsibility for Europe's 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 

OPINION 




Page 7 


and puffing and it would all be over. But 
now we're being haded into an iron 
triangle: the grand juries, the press that 
pushes the counsel to call witnesses under 
oath and the cowards in Congress caving 
in to a tetevised-hearing soap opera. 

That smarmy i-each, with his reason- 
able, nonpartisan, this-ratins-me pose, is 
killing us. He has alreaoy taken away my 
argument that this is all a Republican 
plot to stop health care. Now he is at- 
tacking our central position that wc lost 
money on Whitewater. 

BQl struck the perfect note in his 
prime-time press conference. No more 
fingers-on-the-chesl, “Who, me guilty?" 
and no more “no, no, no, no** pouncung 
on the lectern. Just the statesman who 
won’t be distracted. Sometimes he is 
just marvelous. 

I can’t do that; I know too much. For 
a few more weeks. I can give interviews 
to the gentler journalists but sooner 
or later somebody’s going to hit me with 
a murder drilL 

“When did you first learn of the crim- 
inal referral? What did you and your 
chief of staff fliRaws after her heads-up 
meeting with the RTC at the White 
House? What did you say to Berate 
Nussbaum about evidence m that long 
meeting after Vince’s death? Did you 
discuss the Whitewater or Madison files 
with Vince, with Bifl Kennedy, with 
Web Hubbefl, with the presdentT 

I can deflect those to die press, but 
when the grand jury calls — as sorely it 
wOl — what can I say under oath? And 
did anyone besides that Kansas Gty 



SU®ENACCNCIRNtN(S 

IWWTSWKreRVffinB*. 



investigator secretly tape conversations? 
Will Susan McDougal turn on us? 

The way the whole Rose firm is rat- 
ting cm web reminds me of time 
charges. Every lawyer has to detail the 
time, place, subject of meetings for tail- 
ing to clients; what did we submit to 
cover that 526,000 in billing to Madison 
Guaranty? What did Vince or Web or 
Bill or 1 hill Whitewater or McDougal? 
Were those records shredded at the 
firm? God. I hope so. 

What makes me sick at heart is bow 


perfectly normal actions now gain the 
color of cover-up. So what if George 
blows sky-high when be hears the RTC 
hired Jay Stephens for civil recovery? 
That prosecutor made a Republican 
name for himself by entrapping Wash- 
ington’s Mayor Barry with a sex lure. 

It’s as if we’re on a phantom train 
that 1 * gathering momentum and we 
can't get off. It is easier for Bill — he 
won't nave to face those hearings and 
grand juries as I win, and I cannot pre- 
tend I don’t know the details. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


future as any of the participants at Nor- 
mandy. This needs to be made dear, 
especially in a German election year. It 
will be reassurance that Germany’s 
neighbors and friends truly see it as a 
full, sovereign and independent partner 
p rep a red and wining to play a leader- 
ship role in Europe. 

MARTEN van HEUVEN. 

KJoslers, Switzerland. 

Long Hellenistic Memory 

Regarding " Help Macedonia and Pres- 
sure Greece if Necessary ” ( Opinion , 
March 18) by George Soros: 

Mr. Soros suggests that the United 
States ap^ly “heavy pressure” on Greece 
over Sbmc Macedonia and its name. He 
whim to think that memories over this 
name go beck only to the period after 
World War L 

But Macedonia, after its ancient Hel- 
lenistic period, became part of the Greek 
Byzantine Empire for more than 1,000 
years. All Greeks know this and so will 
never back down over the name. 

During those medieval years, barbar- 


ian invaders came and went, but Mac- 
edonia was always defended as an entity 
by the mainly Greek rulers in Constanti- 
nople, and it received its Christian reli- 
gion from Greek patriarchs. 

Thus the “compromise’' that Mr. 
Soros bones for over the name of a Tito- 
named Slavic province will be possible 
only when outsiders, meaning most of 
the West, scop trying to rob Greece of 
many centuries of justified pride. 

N.C CUMMINS. 

London. 

A Different Dimension 

It seems completely misplaced to 
lump Watergate, Iran gate ana Iraqgate, 
which involved the active subversion of 
the public interest by sitting presidents, 
together with the Whitewater case, 
which at most concerns a possible con- 
flict of interest by a governor long be- 
fore he became president — an affair 
that should have been settled once and 
far aO by the election campaign. 

HENRY BLUMENFELD. 

Gif-snr-Yvette, France. 




Credit Where It’s Dae 

Regarding “ Foreign Affairs Are Get- 
ting Attention*" ( Opinion, , March 14): 

Samuel R. Berger, deputy national 
security adviser at the White House, 
gives President Bill din ton credit for 
passing the North American Free Trade 
Agreement. But Mr. Clinton waited so 
long before doing anything about 
NAFTA that he had to make numerous 
nan-free- trade deals to get it passed. 

Mr. Berger also states that Mr. Clinton 
“ cond u deo a GATT agreement that had 
been stalled for seven years.” Credit for 
getting the General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade off dead center should go to 
the GATT chief, Peter Sutherland 

The claim that Mr. Clinton turned 
America’s attention to Asia would surely 
be contested by the many U.S. companies 
that have been in Asia for years. 

The North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion’s Partnership for Peace, which Mr, 
Berger bails as a Clmton accomplish- 
ment, is widely regarded as a nidge, 
dictated by Russia's objections. 


They Don’t Rattle the Cage 
But the Bars Are Stitt There 


By Anna Maria Tremonti 


Why is ibis nightmare happening to 
us? We weren’t rich, and money and 
political power always seek each other 
out; but now the usual quiet statehonse 
dealings are bang measured by impossi- 
ble federal standards. 

They tell me that after the Lance af- 
fair, mien things began to go sour for 
President Jimmy Carter, he called in 
Bob Strauss, win told him: “You know 
what your problem is? You used up all 
your damn luck getting here.” 

The New York Times. 


The “bottom op” Pen (agon review was 
Les Aspin's idea, not Bill Clinton's. 

Like NAFTA, President Clinton’s 
leadership in NATO came about one year 
(and 200,000 casualties in the former 
Yugoslavia) too late. 

SfRnalia is anothw example of hesita- 
tion: U.S. Rangers were sent in kit, after 
taking casualties, were pulled balk. 

Mr. Berger mentions the Middle East 
peace talks that were “celebrated on the 
White House lawn,” but neglects to say 
that they resulted from efforts by Nor- 
way’s foreign minister, not by Mr. Qmton 
or Secretary of State Wanea Christopher. 

K. W. EMERSON. 

Brussels. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer's sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters shotdd be brief and are sidfect to 
editing. We cannot be responsible for 
the return of vnsoSated manuscripts. 


S ARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
‘This is a good safari far you." 

I hadn’t noticed her and barely heard 
her. She was standing, watching as we 
set up our camera in the park bemud the 
Bosnian presidency. I lowed at her sow. 

’This is a good safari for you to take 
pictures,” she repeated. “There are lots 
of animals for you to see.” 

She stood in the fresh snow, in bril- 
liant sunshine, near a canvas sign warn- 
ing of snipers. But Sarajevo was quiet: 

MEANWHILE 

no machine-gun bursts, no thunder of 
heavy aitStey. Instead, 1 could hear 
birds — lots erf them, chirping loodly. It 
was the first time in two years I remem- 
bered hearing birds in thus city. 

Sadetta Ikovic is about SO. She wore 
gold callings and lipstick, her hair 
tucked under a fur hat. Before the war 
she was a university professor. Now, 
thin and drawn, she lives like everyone 
else, lugging water, waiting for humani- 
tarian aid, scurrying when outride to 
avoid sniper fire. I would have expected 
her to be grateful for the silence of 
Sarajevo, but she was not. 

She placed her hands together at tire 
wrist and held them at her chest “Be- 
fore, we were bound like this,” sire said 
She shifted, so her hands woe behind 
her. “Now, we are tike this, our hands 
behind our back.” 

While the rest of the world milts in 
urgent and sincere tones about the suc- 
cess of the Sarajevo cease-fire, the peo: 
pie who have endured two years of siege 
can only shake their heads. Urey are, 
they pomt out, like caged animals, un- 
able to move freely in and out of the city. 

The day after the NATO deadline for 
air strikes bad a mm namwi 

Vjekoslav Sadze approached us as we 
were filming. T speak English,” he be- 
gan. “may I make a comment?” 

He, too, was fed up and weary. Bat 
more, he was worried about an apathy 
that could Jeave his family — his city — 
in limbo. “This is better than having 
grenades and shelling everyday. But 1 am 
afraid of this silence, because it can last 


lrorhimfand 


For him, and many others, an agree- 
ment that makes the Serbs pull back and 
puis United Nations soldiers in their 
place is an uneasy peace. The UN is seen 
by many ordinary Sarajevans as a de- 
fender of the status quo, keeping them 
surrounded and deprived. Ejup Game, 
the Bosnian vice president, has called 
this a “blue siege,” referring to the blue- 
bdzneted peacekeepers who now occupy 
some of the spaces vacated by Serbian 
heavy artillery in the hills above the city. 

Sarajevans are especially suspicious 
of the Russians. Many have seen pic- 
tures or heard stories about Russian 
peacekeepers being filmed giving tire 
Serbian three- finger salute. 

“It is like prison," Amela Catovic 


told me. “We have 8 kilometers to trav- 
el up and down.” 

Sarajevo residents had grown used to 
scrounging for food, to writing in line, to a 
lugging backets of water up endless J, y 
flights of stairs. It was something they w « 
had to do: They fell lucky to be afive. But jf 

now, after weeks of unreal quiet, no thing T." v? 
in that rmserable routing hag changed " u 
On Vaso Mi skin Street, a few jewelers :. 
have reopened their shops, gold neck- , 66 
laces Rhyming behind new panes of „ **5 
glass. I watched a young couple the " “ 

other day as they stood, peering at ring s, H “ 
planning their wedding. A few cafes are ® 
open, too. You can buy oven-fresh * *} 
barek, flaky pies filled with potato or J 8* 
meat. There is coffee, but little else, - 
Too many erf os make the mistake of 11 : 1 
thinking that the silence of the guns G * 
means peace is at hand. But the voices t 1 
crying of oppression and deprivation, i } d 
which once mingled with the sounds of f d 
theguns. now grow loud and disturbing. 4 
Tnerc u an overwhehniirg sense, as one 1 r , 
walks the streets, that Sarajevo is not « 
tikdy to change much over tire next year, i ‘ n 
The black market win flourish, poverty 5 3 
will endure, the city will re m ain a jumble ^ 
of ruins and wreckage with shortages of 1 £ 
power, water, food and fad. ; ^ 

It wasn’t supposed to be tins way. -te 
Sarajevo should nave been able to just 
rebuild and begin again. But even an < j c 
outsider can see that Sarajevo has ! 3. 

changed forever. So people lash out, - ^ 

some at refugees, some at the system. , ^ 

some at the city they have helped to ' ^ 

defend by staying and surviving. T lave av 
this city, one woman tells me, “but I’d ^ 
leave in a minute, for my children.” $.> 

A soldier, 26, who fights on the front 
line sits down next to me and says he 
cannot bring himself to return. I have 
talked to him before, and he has never _ 7/ 
dared to voice his disgust. He fought for ’ 
Croatia against the Serbs a year before * 
the war in Bosnia began. Now, with a rr 
cease-fire, he can afford to be honest. \ “? 
This war has taken three of the best ; “* 
years of my life,” he says. “1 don’t want • - 
to fight anymore.” 1 r “ 

But as I write this, he is back on the u . 
front line, watching for trouble, hisgun • m 
ready. Weary Sarajevans are still in ' ™ 
their water lines, still hemmed in by ™ 
three tiers of checkpoints: those of the “ 
Bosnian army and government, which 101 
don’t want them to go, those of the 
Serbs, who restrict their movements, — 

and those of the UN soldiers, who w 
stand in the middle tacitly agreeing to || 
the restrictions of the other two. m 

This is no safari for reporters and 
cameramen. Unlike the animals yon see _ 

on safari, the people of Sarajevo are S 
not free to roam. g 

The writer is a correspondent for die I 
Ca n a di an Broadcasting Corporation, re- . 

sponsible for coverage 0/ Central and East- 0 

em Europe. She contributed this comment n 
to the International Herald Tribune. H 


• — . t 


BOOKS 




f s. ; ; 


THE RISE, CORRUPTION 
AND COMING FALL OF 
THE HOUSE OF SAUD 

By Said K. Aburish. 326 pages. 
£50. Bloomsbury. 

Reviewed by 
John K. Cooley 

F ROM beginning to end, this 
highly unconventional and ex- 
plosive book keeps up a running 
drumfire of condemnation, not 
only of the Saudi royal family but 
of alleged Western complacency, or 
worse, with what the author sees as 
too great a Saudi willingness to 
accommodate U. S. foreign policy 
and energy needs. His claim is that 
the Saudi people suffer os a result. 

A deliberate policy of producing 
large quantities of 03 in order to 
keep the price low, while commit- 
ting the kingdom's vast financial 
reserves 10 buying Western defense 
equipment it doesn't need, ea rn i n g 
large commissions in the process, 
harms the Saudi people and poi- 
sons their relations with others, the 
author contends. 

Despite an obvious lack of bal- 
ance and another major flaw, a lade 
of footnotes or references — the 
author says he intended to indude 
them, but that his editors (most un- 
wisely, it seems to this reviewer) 


By Robert Byrne 

J AN TIMMAN faced Jod Lau- 
der in the International Chess 
Federation’s elimination matches. 
Twenty years ago, the thrust with 3 
e4 was considered prem ature bc - 
cause it did not prevent aggressive 
counterplay. Lately, however. 
White has succeeded in obtaminga 
slight advantage against .the chief 
replies. Thus, in a Margeir Peturs- 
son-Ildar Ibragimov »n* Jjg 
month, 3~Nf64d i Nd5 5Bo4 Nb6 
6 Bb3 Nc6 7 Ne2 BK 8 «6 J 

fin 0*7 IQ Be3 Qd7 1 1 a3 Rd8 12 

Nc6 9 BdNK 9 !3 <6 10 Nc6 Bc6 

UNd2N^12RcIyi.^Wh J tea 

slight a«l-gaae superiority. 

Ata4Be3NK5Nc3Blad£can 

. n RyJ e5. vei 7 Qb3 Qd7 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Brother EnAe, a member of the 
interfaith monastic community at 
Taiafc in France, is reading the mem- 
oirs of Cardinal Lton- Joseph Saen- 
ens, Souvenirs et Espirances.” 

*The pm 1 like the most is where 
he writes about Pope John XXHL 
who had a profound influence on 
Taizfc. The book shows that the Pope 
understood that the Gospel in our 
time has to be announced with 
much love and mercy.” 

(Barry James, IHT) 



.ruled otherwise — this book de- 
serves attention. Whatever in it is 
mere scandalous hearsay, as wdl as 
what has been documented else- 
where, such as a questionable but 
rarely criticized Saudi recdd on hu- 
man rights, should be ctfspasskmate- 
ly examined by experts on the king- 
dom who are in a petition to know 
the truth, favorable or otherwise. 

The author, a Palestinian with 
U. S. nationality, has several previ- 
ous books to his credit, including 
“Children of Bethany” an absorb- 
ing account of the fate and fortune 
of ms family members, who like so 
many other Palestinians have most- 
ly left their hometown of Bethany, 
just outside Jerusalem, to estab&m 


CHESS 


LMIUEn/BLACK 


1 1 jva* nut »«. — - - - 

gives White the upper bani 

JgjoyfiSSSS 

1 W's exchange, 18 Nd6cd 

bm“ 23 rc * saafsr 

bridge-head on the open file. 


■ 

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SKI 

ri 

'c • 

■ 



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■ 

— 

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■ 

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m 

■ 


■ 

j 

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0 

0 

/• ; 

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.-Jilt: 

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themselves in the world's far cor- 
ners. He has ako written an at-kast- 
paitty fictitious thriller about terror- 
ists, arms dealers and Saddam 
Hussein; a light reminiscence of the 
old, pre-dvil war Beirut called “The 
Hotel SL George Bar,” and, most 
recently, “Cry Palestine,” an emo- 
tional and sometimes powerful ac- 
count of what it feels like to be a 
Palestinian living under Israeli occu- 
pation. 

This publication record may 
have helped to convince Blooms- 
bury to nsk producing a book that 
people who think about Saudi Ara- 
bia the way Aburish does will call 
daring, those who see good in the 
House of Saud and its accomplish- 


to infiltrate with 32 Qd4! Rb3 32 
Rbl Rbl 33 Nbl. 

Timman simplified with 39 Qb2 
Nd3 40 Bd3 Od3 and expelled the 
black queen with 45 Qb2 Qa7. But 
his winning process did not become 
clear until Lander omitted 47_h4 
in favor of the irrelevant 47._Ke7, 
which permitted Timman to bind 
the hS pawn with 48 b4! 

After 57_JCg7, Timman capped 
Ins fine technique with 58 Ne6J 
Ka6 59 Q£2 Kh6 60 Qg3 Qb2 61 
KS3. Seeing that 61._Bg662 Qd6 f5 
63 Qf8 Kh7 leads to 64 Ng5mate, 


IWMMVWHnE 


position after 57... Kg7 


After 25 Ra5, Tinman's siege of 
the queenside began in earnest 


QUEEN’S GAMBIT ACCEPTED 

VUK Bteck Wn Stack 
ItaM Under TlmiMB Under 


the distance of his knights from the 
beleaguered sector. So, before his 
position deteriorated further, he 
sacrificed a pawn with 2S_Nf4 26 
Rag Ra8 27 Bf4 ef 28 Qf4 to devel- 
op activity with 28.. .Ne5. 

On 30.-Qa8, Timman was not 
lured into 31 Nb5 (31 Bb5 Rc3 32 
Qc3Bb533Qc8QcS34Rc8Kf735 
Rb8 B&4 36 Rb7 Nd7 37 b5 Ke7 
may allow Blade to draw) Ra2 32 
R<2 Rc2 33 Qc2 Qa6 34 Nc3 Qb6 
35 Kfl Qb4, which increases 
Black’s drawing chances with all 
pawns on the same wing. Instead, 
he calmly nullified Lauder’s efforts 


1 d4 dS 

2ci dc 

Sri SeS 

4 Be3 m 

5 Kd «S 

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ments wOl consider in part scurri- 
lous, and cooler or more detached 
scholars will shake their heads at in 
wonderment, or disapproval 

This reviewer would have pre- 
ferred a more balanced discussion 
of tbe kingdom’s financial prob- 
lems and prospects. It needs to con- 
tinue borrowing money to pay the 
aerospace and nnhiafy bills that 
keep thousands erf people in West- 
ern industry in work, such as the 
recent purchase of about 60 planes 
from McDonnell Douglas of tbe 
United States. Aburish contends 
the kingdom is “teetering on tbe 
brink of bankruptcy.” having 
moved from what he says was a 
surplus of S140 billioo from its vast 
dl income in 1982, to a position 
where, be claims, there is an offi- 
cially acknowledged deficit of $60 
btflion. He predicts financial rain 
and takeover by Muslim activists. 

It is true, according to the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund’s esti- 
mates, that deficits could rise to 8 
percent of gross domestic product 
— $12 button by IMF figures —by 
1997. During that time the price of 
oil, falling since the mid-1980s, is 
unttkdy to rise very much. However, 
an important study released recently 
bv the London-based Center of 
Global Energy Studies, apparently 
not available to Aburish before his 
book was printed, examines tbe 
kingdom’s “Invisible deficits,” not 
sbown in published budgets, such as 
costs of the Gulf War, which were 
very large in the 1990-92 period. 

The study projects an average of 
$17 bDttou in invisible deficits each 
year in the near future and says that 
the Saudi trade surpluses resulting 
from its ofl earnings must therefore 
not fall bdow $17 billion annually, 
and tdeaDy should exceed this. A 
strategy is reco mm ended for the 
kingdom by the center, whose chair- 
man is no less a persona^ than tbe 
former Saudi oil minister, Sheikh 
Ahmed Zaki Yamam, whom King 
Fahd dismiss ed for being unable to 
increase oB production and oil 
prices at the same time. Tbe strate- 
gy: to reast pressure from fellow 
members of the Organization of Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries and 
other o3 producers to give up some 

of its huge share of the market, and, 

as the authoritative ofl journal Mid- 
dle East Economic Survey recently 
put it, “resolutely defend its share of 
OPEC oil production and exercise 
the requisite fiscal discipline at 
home" so that it should be “able to 
face the 21st century with equanim- 
ity." To winch one could add, with- 
out moving to Aburish s extreme 
position flat the Saudi regime is 
doomed by its own excesses, there 
could be even more equanimity if 
the Saudis could find ways to move 
a bit faster toward at least constitu- 
tional monarchy. 

John K. Cooley, an ABC News 
correspondent and author based in 
Cyprus who specializes in the MidtBe 
wrote mis for the International 
Herald Tribune. 



.J 







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r?r. 




* Ttr ' •» 

i" 







m 


lIM 


SPOT 




There he is. Fourth row, second from 
tbe left. The one with the moustache. 
Obvious really. 

Maybe not Hie unsavoury-looking 
character you’re looking at is more 
likely to be your average neighbour- 
hood sk>b with a grubby vest and a 
weekend’s stubble on his chin. 

And the real refugee could just as 
easily be the dearnaitfeBowon his left 

You see, refugees are just like you 
and me. 

Except for one thing. 


Everything they once had has been 
left behind. Home, family, possessions, 
aQ gone. They have nothing. 

And no thing is all they’ll ever have 
unless we all extend a helping hand. 

We know you can’t give them back 
the ffrings that others have taken away. 


We’re not even asking for money 
(though every cent certainly helps). 

But we are asking that you keep an 
open mind. And a smile of welcome. 

It may not seem much. But to a 

refugee it can mean ever ything 

UNHCR is a strictly humanitarian 



m mm® 

United N ations High Cnminfasiong for Refugees 


contributions. Currently it is responsible 
for more than 19 mSEon refugees 
around the world. 

UNHCR Public Information 
P.O. Box 2500 
1211 Geneva 2, 











International Herald Tribune 
P . Tuesday, March 29, 1994 

. J Page 8' 



Black Models: The Cover Gap 


By Jill Hudson 

Washington Post Soviet 


W ASHINGTON — Here they 
come down the runway, a Ro- 
boCop battalion in sling-backs. 
Some of their first names may 
be familiar to those who follow fashio n: Na- 
omi, Veronica, Tyra, Beverly and Brandi 
They are all black models, all big stars on the 
international catwalk circuit, and all, in the 
words of the American designer Byron Lars, 
“completely fierce.” 

Yet fashion shows are often attended only 
by the fashion elite: press, photographers, buy- 
ers. a sprinkling of amateur but hard-core 
dandies who appreciate the jazz of the whole 
thing. And as fiery and ferocious as many 
black models are on the runways — all lips, 
walk, kgs and attitude — IS seconds of fame 
on a runway does not a household name make. 
The medium, it seems, is all wrong it just isn’t 
enough to make them huge, to get than on the 
covers of magazines, for instance. 

Many black models complain of being 
overlooked or ignored for covers of the maga- 
zines while a white model like Daniela Pes- 
tova can grace the cover of Glamour maga- 
zine as many as five times in a 13-month 





Carina lem/The Nt» Yort Tina 


Naomi Campbell 


iod. Naomi Campbell told Cindy Craw- 
d on a 1993 episode of MTSTs “House of 


Style”: “I hate being told, 'We can't put you 
on the cover of such and such a magazine 
because you were on the cover three years ago 
and we just can’t have another black model 
on the cover right now.* I’ve been told that 
many, many times.” 

Some believe the multimilli on -dollar con- 
tracts with a major cosmetics company, like 
magazine covers, are out of reach because 
black models are not seen as having the 
selling power of their white supennodd com- 
patriots. Karen Alexander, another top black 
model who now has a contract with Oil of 
Olay, reports being offered a cosmetics con- 
tract a few years ago "and the money that 
they offered me was just insulting. It wasn't a 
quarter of what Cindy Crawford is making, 
I'm sure. I just couldn’t do it. I knew that 
there had to be something better.” 

And one or two successful black models 
have noticed that certain designers have pur- 
posely excluded visibly ethnic models from 
their runways. “I was in Europe a couple of 
seasons ago,” Alexander says, “and some de- 
signers felt perfectly free to say that they didn’t 


want to use any black girls. And they didn't” 

Many black models are quick to point out 
that there are a few notable e xcep tions to the 
“white is right” rule. American EDe, AD ure and 
Essence magazines stand out for featuring 
stories about ethnic beauty, fashioa and life. 

“What’s wonderful" says Linda Wells, 
editor of Allure, “is that race has generally 
stopped being an issue. Most of us don’t 
choose a black model over a Mute one. We 
just say, ’Let's have a great looking model 
regardless of her ethnicity.’” 

Shouldn't society be ready for black mod- 
els by 1994? Ellen Von Unwerth, whose pho- 
tography appears regularly in the pages of 
Vogue, Interview and in the Guess? jeans ads, 
admits to being “really fascinated by black 
models. I mean, Naomi [Campbell] is so won- 
derful because you can put anything on her 
and she looks incredible. She has the most 
perfect body. But it’s a little racist, in a way, 
that you just don’t see them [black models] so 
much. It's a bit of a scandal really.” 

Issues and ethics aside, using models of 
color in print is now just good business. In the 
changing times of the United States and the 
world, ethnicity in all its incarnations is now 


the norm. Advertisements using black models 
are at an alltime high, especially for cosmetics 
and beauty products. 

And success is at least attainable these days 
by models of color, thanks in no small pan to 
veterans like models Naomi Sims and Beverly 
Johnson, photographers like Richard Avedon 
and Steven Measd, and fashion designers like 
Givenchy, Yves Saint Laurent and Issey 
Miyake who regularly (and sometimes exclu- 
sively) have used black models on their run- 
ways and as their house models. 

The 1970s really made the difference. 
Models Hjce Sims and Johnson, Bethann Har- 
dison, Norma Jean Darden, DonyeUc Luna, 
Fat Cleveland, Grace Jones and Iman were 
everywhere: runways, magazines, television, 
advertisements. In August of 1974, Beverly 
Johnson became the first black model to 
appear on the cover of Vogue. But still their 
numbers seemed large mostly because than 
had been none only a few years before. 

Andre Leon Talley, creative director of 
American Vogue, says the editors at Vogue 
“don’t push for color; we push for point of 
view. The number of black models on the 
covers reflects the culture that we live in. 
Black people are still a minority. These num- 
bers reflect the way of the world. Society just 
isn't ready for it on a frequent basis.” 

Woody Hochswender, fashion editor of 
Esquire Gentleman, says: “At the top of the 
pyramid of the fashion world, there are inst a 


few people who have a very rarefied aesthetic 
sense. It all comes down to what they like, 
girls that are their “types.’ It’s these style 
mavens who make all of the decisions about 
what they think is beautiful” 

The phenomenal success of models such as 
Kate Moss and Kristen McMenamy, both 
“non traditional" white models who have 
graced the covers of Vogue and Bazaar, 
points to what some fashion editors see as a 
wider range of “acceptable” beauty. Liz Til- 
beris, editor of Harper’s Bazaar; thinks 
America can and will slowly call for a broader 
representation of beauty. 

“This business is about evolution and 
change. You have to go with the moment,” 
she says, her crisp British accent punching 
each carefully thought-out word. “We always 
want to find someone who is extraordinary- 
looking. I walk down the street every day and 


see gorgeous-looking black grds. Somehow, 
there just isn’t the right stepladder to get to 


there just isn t the right stepladder to get to 
those girls out there. They’re there, though." 


Creative Menswear From Tokyo 


By Joan Frawley Desmond 


T OKYO — There'S the 
“famous person” suit, a 
vermilion ensemble with 
a Nehru collar. There’s 
the black polyurethane “creative 
person” suit, designed for the es- 
tablished artist who likes to flaunt 
his success. And the hooded “trick 
jacket" suit for the striving anteur 
desirous of projecting a dynamic 
image. And, finally, the washed 
gray-blue wool suit; “A business- 
man can wear this,” we are advised. 

Excuse me, a businessman in To- 
kyo? Yes, minus the combat boots 
and the brown rayon shirt that 
were used as accessories for the 
show in Paris. And, yes, minus the 
relaxed fabric and sensuous drape 
of the design. 

Japanese salarymen, who typi- 
cally exhibit a lifetime commitment 
to sober navy-blue wool suits, are 
unlikely to set foot in the ultra-cool 
flagship store of Masatomo Ya- 
majl the Tokyo-based menswear 
designer. 

Yamaji uses luxurious -fabrics 
and high-tech textiles to make suits 
and separates that convey the indi- 



layering and for a flexible ap- 
proach. depending on the occasion 
and the season.” Once a Japanese 
man in his 30s or 40s has invested 
in a couple of suits, he can “try to 
make the basic dements more fash- 
ionable by adding trendy dements, 
such as a scarf or boots — touches 
that make the lode age specific.” 


Yamaji who also earns consider- 
able income as a fashion marketing 
consultant, approaches economic 
upheaval in Japan as an opportuni- 
ty for a far-sighted designer. 

“Fm seeing increased social frag- 
mentation according to economic 
class,” he predicted. “The fashion 
market will have more divisions 
and subdivisions, with throwaway 
fashion at the bottom.” 


Taking the lead from Western de- 
signers who have developed 
“bndge” coflections of accessible, 
midpneed clothing, Yamaji wants to 
design for every segment ctf Japan’s 
shifting retail market, including the 


Masatomo. Yamaji: a slightly unbalanced layered look. 


viduality, creativity — and success 
— of the wearer. Customers usually 


— of the wearer. Customers usually 
work in advertising, the arts or en- 
tertainment. where bring stylish is 
part of the job description. 

The designer likes to combine 
polyester with cashmere and silk, 
creating a slightly unbalanced lay- 
ered look that, in his words, “is 
practical and understated.” Com- 
pared with better-known avant- 


Yamamoto, the look is indeed “un- 
derstated.” But in the context of 
traditional Japanese corporate cul- 
ture, Yamaji's suits are no thin g 
short of subversive. 


“People feed you lack caution 
and sense if you overdo it and wear 


something that sticks out in the 
office. It has to do with harmony 
between people,” acknowledged 
Yamaji,. 42, wearing the day’s take 
on a “creative person” suit: black 
polyester jacket and trousers, black 
T-shirt, big black shoes, and an 
extra-long black cashmere scarf 
cradling his round face. 

Most designers on the cutting 
edge of style might he expected to 
downgrade or ignore the concerns 
of the humble salaryman, but Ya- 
maj i takes mainstream fashion seri- 
ously. He marli: his name as the 
head designer of Japan’s top 
sportswear line, Intermezzo, gross- 
ing SI 20 million in annual sales for 
its manufacturer, D’Urban. 


will be designed for adults who 
value a sense of freedom,” he said 
“Ifs not a conservative-liberal 
split, because the suits win have a 
classical fed. There will be both the 
traditional type of navy wool suit, 
as wefl as suits using the distinctive, 
high-tech fabrics — like polyure- 
thane — that are part of my present 
collection. “Some of the trendy de- 
tails will be dropped, but my sil- 
houelie, with the feeling of the 
body underneath, will r emain " 


a high-growth business. 

The designer seems confidant 
abort Ms marketing strategy far Ja- 
pan, but he concedes that his high- 
end, “creative person” suits attract a 
much greater following among for- 
eign customers. Grossing more than 
S3 mini on in arming sales, 80 per- 
cent of fate profits from the Masa- 
tomo line come from abroad 

The designer launched his first 
Paris show m 1991. Since then, be 
has struggled to carve out a niche for 
himself as an international designer 
offering a “unique combination of 
classical and avant-garde fashion , 
appealing to a wide age group.” 


R ETAIL fashion has tak- 
en a pommeling in To- 
kyo, and many would ar- 
gue that the mid- 1990s is 
no time to launch a new clothing 
line, whether couture or mass mar- 
ket. Yamaji acknowledges the dan- 
gers, but he has confidence in his 
fed for clothing trends. 


SPRING SUMMER 
COLLECTION 


ESCAIK 


Paris 

For orders 

FAX: (1) 42 84 24 15 


Ten years ago he left Intermezzo 
to strikeout on his own, bufldmg a 
pricey tine “aimed at the creative 
lifestyle.” Still while he relishes the 
thrill of developing a personalized 
approach to menswear and break- 
ing into the competitive world of 
international fashion, he has not 
forgotten his early success at Dur- 
ban. 


Marie-Martin 


8, rue de Sevres. 

Paris 6th 


Within the next year, he Mil 
launch a joint venture with a large 
men's suit manufacturer, produc- 
ing some designs that will fall with- 
in the range of acceptable office 


“When I first began designing 
sportswear, there was no market 
for leisure clothes," he said. “Inter- 
mezzo helped to create that market 
Growth in that area has stopped 
now, but there is a lot of opportuni- 
ty for designers who make clothes 
that serve a double purpose, dothes 
that you can wear to the office and 
on the weekend.” 


Boutiques carrying the Masa- 
tomo tine are scattered throughout 
the United States, Europe and 
Asia, and the designer’s suits have 
been snapped up by rockers and 
celebrities. Peter Gabriel wore a 
Masatomo design to the G rammy 
Awards, while Little Richard and 
Michael Jackson are among Yama- 
jfs “famous people” customers. 


In Japan, the 


is likely to 


face an uphill struggle to develop a 
clientele fra his high-end soils. Ire is 


prepared for that battle and remains 
committed to his original ilmign 
concept. “Here in Japan there are 
those who want to be the mub as 


everybody, and those who want 10 
be different. I want to design for 
those who want to be different.” 


“My MA-JT Masatomo brand 


Yamaji is banking on a shift “to- 
ward more comfortable dothes: a 
jacket-based style that allows for 


sf 

I' ' £fc& 













.Vi, 




Joan Frawley Desmond is a jour- . 

natist based in Tokyo. An Yves Saint Laurent design in “ Fellini : Costumes and Fashion. 1 


Fellini, 
Costumes 
And Art 
Of Illusion 


Designers Join 
In a Tribute 
To the Master 


By Ken Shulman 


P RATO. Italy — What’s in a dress? 
Wheat the answer to that question is 
Anita Ekberg, and particularly a 
young, fuU-figured Anita Ekbeig trad- 
ing voluptuously in Rome's Trevi Fountain, the 
contents of that dress tend decidedly toward 
immortality. 

Along with an eye for the surreal an ear fra 
the absurd and a nose for the ridiculous, the 
late Federico Fellini also had a strong sense of 
costume and dress in his films. The dothes his 
characters wore in his films were often as 
important as the lines they spoke, or as the 
settings in which they spoke them. 

In re-creating the atmospheres of aodem 
Rome, 18th-century Venice and ctf his native 
dty of Rimini in the 1930s, Fdiim was partic- 
ularly attentive to costume; of the director’s 
films’ six Academy Awards, three were in the 
best-costumes category. Gotha frequently 
madft the man in his filing, an d his characters’ 
costumes could be as eloquent and idiosyn- 
cratic as their faces and mannerisms. 

FeUmi’s sartorial splendor is now celebrat- 
ed at a show at Prato’s Luigi Peed Museum of 
Contemporary Art. Conceived and realized by 
the Florentine designer Samude Mazza and 
featuring costumes from many of Fellini’s 
most memorable films, the show re-creates the 
elegant and often decadent atmosphere that 
personified the director's angular film uni- 


“I have always been attracted to an ecumeni- 
cal art, to an art that communicates,” Mazza 
said. “And I believe that Feffini did modi to 
humanize our world, to show that afl sorts of 
people could coexist hoe.” 


A S A tie-in to the textile town that is 
hosting the show, Mazza and his 
collaborators have chosen to exhib- 
it a series of garments from leading 
designers — many of which were created spe- 
cifically for this exhibit — who have dreton 
their inspiration from Fellini. The aim is to 
demonstrate the osmotic l’mk between cinema 
and fashion and to examine Fellini’s specific 
contribution to con temporary garment de- 
sign. 

“Cinema is the art of illusion,” writes Fran- 
ca Sozzani in the catalogue. “And fashion 
feeds itself as well on dreams, on memories, on 
fantasy, on suggestions, on emotions. Both 
materialize the idealized vision that the artist 
has of the reaL In this sense F ellini is one of 
the greatest creators of fashion and fashions 
that cinema has ever produced,” 

Dolce & Gabbana are represented by sever- 
al creations based on the 18th-century Venc 1 
tian costumes from “Casanova,” elegant, am? 


ry V. auu k umw 

Working out of the grotesque sideshow ambit 
ence that Fellini conjured up in so many of his 
films, Cahigi e Gianndli have contributed 
two semi-transparent dresses with grossly 
oversized hips and bust. 

Taking tbeir inspiration from the church 
scenes in Fellini’s “Roma” (1 972), Gianfranco 
Ferrt and Kriria present a sort of clerical chic, 
transforming the unseeing sheer red cardinals 
uniform into a flattering billboard of femmm- 

«y- . 

Ottavio Missoni, Yves Smut Laurent, and 
Moschino’s creations are visual echoes of Fd- 
HnTs “The Clowns” (1970), colorful counter- 


C ts of style and strong colors. With two 
l transparent housedresses worn open to 
reveal undergarments that are a cross between 
prostitute-chic and circus-performer cos- 
tumes, Gianni Versace marries two important 
Fellini themes in his contribution to the show. 






- 


From Ginlietta Marina's tattered hat and 
topcoat in “La Strada” (1954), to Ekbog’s 
black satin wrapper in “La Dolce Vila” (I960), 
to Donald Sutherland’s lace-fringed cape in 
“Casanova” (1976), the Prato show evokes a 
shade of the dehghtful absurdity and heteroge- 
nous excesses that animated all of FdHnfs 
works. 


JO Dili l 


T HE most engaging part of the Fellini 
exhibit, however, is its physical 
structure. Designed by the Milan- 
based architect Massimo Vigndli, a 
wide, well-lighted runway — raised 150 centi- 
melras off the ground — passes through the 
entire exhibit. 

Tlbe Fdiim costumes and designer garments 
are displayed on opposite rides of the runway, 
set on faceless busts and mannequins that are 
suspended from the ceiling on nearly invisible- 
wires. The runway transforms the visitor from 

Snectlltftr Tfl I ,1 _ . 


spectator to protagonist as he walks like -a 
model down the aisle, with Fellini’s and fash- 


model down the aisle, with Fellini's and fash- 
!on s evocative creations hovering like well- 
clad, bodiless ghosts about him. 

* Fellini: Costumes and Fashion” runs through 
May 16. 


^K-cn Shulman is an American writer based to 


C VII. INC; ONI I OKI IC.N COUNTRY 
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THE TRIB INDEX: 112.17^ 

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M 

1094 


Approx. wegtitJng: 32% 
®4P.M.: 127-59 Prev.r 127.29 
150 — 

140 — 


Europe- 


Approx, weighting: 37% 
04 P.Mj 112.64 Prw.: 111.88 



North America 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting: 26% 
04 P.Mj 94.34 Prev.: 94.03 



Europeans Revive the City-State 

In Technology Era, Development Ignores Borders 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Peat Service 

LYON — A resurrection of city-states and 

regions is quietly transforming Europe's po- 
litical and economic landscape, diminishing 
the influence of national governments and 
redrawing the Continental map of power for 
the 21st century. 

As the revolution wrought by information 
highways, rapid means of travel and global 
capital flow gathers momentum, the tradi- 
tional dominance of capitals such as Paris, 
Rome and London is being challe nged by 
provinces whose location and infrastructure 
Seem better adapted to modem demands. 

With remarkable speed, the areas sur- 
rounding Lyon, Milan, Stuttgart and Barce- 
lona have emerged as four motors driving 
European integration. Since signing a cooper- 
ation pact in 1988, officials of the four areas 
have parlayed their skilled work forces and 
affluent markets into a partnership that tran- 
scends national loyalties. 

These poles of prosperity are puffing in 
investment and calling for greater autonomy. 
Some say they could transform the political 
structure of Europe by creating a new kind of 
Hanseatic League of thriving city-states. (The 
Hanseatic League was an affiance of northern 
port cities in Europe whose commercial mo- 
cess enabled them to become sovereign entities 
in the 15th and 16th centuries.). 

Stuttgart, capital of Baden- WOrttembnrg, 
one of Germany's wealthiest regions, has 
considerable autonomy in the country's de- 
centralized political system and has started to 
seek partners abroad. 

Mflan. the capital of the Lombardy region 


that has long served as Italy’s industrial base, 
is also the home of the Northern League led 
by Umberto BossL Capitalizing on voter dis- 
may at Italy’s corruption scandals and objec- 



ilpporti 

break Italy into three autonomous regions. 

Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, has 
long had substantial political autonomy in 
Spam and now wants the power to raise and 


These regional alliances 
could transform the 
structure of Europe by 
creating a modern version 
of the Hanseatic League. 


keep its own share of income tax away from 
Madrid. The city mined north to build a 
bustling economic triangle with Toulouse 
and Montpellier in France. 

Lyon, France’s second dty, is developing 
into a center of me of Europe's fastest-grow- 
ing regions by building links with Geneva and 
Turin. Lyon now does twice as much business 
with northern Italy as with Paris. The trend is 
expected to accelerate when a high-speed train 
tunnd is completed through the Alps, cutting 
travel time from Lyon to Turin to 70 nwmitafi- 

While talk of poetical autonomy from Paris 
is muted compared to its other regional part- 
ners, Lye® is slowly asserting its own indepen- 
dence as the capital of the Rhdne-Alpes region. 


It now operates nine offices abroad, as far 
away as Toronto and Shanghai, to carve out its 
own foreign co mm ercial policy. 

“In a way, Europe is returning to its roots 
by building again on the regions.” said Jean 
Chemain, director of Lyon’s Chamber of 
Commerce. “The Romans settled here bo- 
cause access to the rivers and roads made it a 
natural base for their empire. Business is 
doing h for the same reasons, and those 
enterprises are the key bunding blocks of 
Europe; not national governments," 

The process was hastened by the European 
Union’s announcement that it wanted to tear 
down national barriers by the end of 1992. 
Instead of worrying about delays and docu- 
ments at frontiers, companies could concen- 
trate on locating production and distribution 
centers dose to their customers. 

“It was a race to get to the hottest points an 
the map," recalled Jean-Louis Ouellette, distri- 
bution director for Ikca, the Swedish furniture 
chain with more than 120 stores in 25 coun- 
tries. “We wanted to serve as many as places m 
Europe as possible within 24 hours, and we 
think we found the most strategic spot.” Ikea 
executives pored over charts and maps until 
they settled on a piece of land for their main 
warehouse near Lyon's Saiolas airport, which 
offered express train connections and a mod- 
em highway system that put it within about 
five hours of affluent metropolitan centers in 
three countries: Fads, Barcelona and Turin. 

Other European dues also are reaching 
across borders for new economic partnerships. 
Antwerp and Rotterdam have forged an aDi- 


See REGIONS, Page 13 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribute 

TOKYO— In a project pouting 
to a substantial role for American 
companies in shaping Japan’s so- 
called information superhighway. 
Time Warner Inc. and U S West 
Inc. are considering setting up a 
nationwide cable and interactive 
television system in Japan with Ito- 
chu Crap, and Toshiba Corp. 

The prqject would mark the first 
time foreign companies had taken 


in a Japanese cable 
sion network and the first joint 
undertaking by Itochu and Toshiba 
since they bought a combined 13 
percent stake in Time Warner En- 
tertainment, a subsidiary of Time 
Warner, for SI billion in 1991 
The new project remains at the 
“feasibility study” stage, Itochu 
said Monday. But an outline calls 


for an investment of roughly 40 
ion) to buil< 


r The Max tracks US. doBar va/uoe at stocks «r Tokyo, Now Yorit, London, and 
•- Argentina, Australia. Austria, Belgium. BrozS, Canada. Chflo, Denmark, Finland, 
t France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Ns* Zeeland. Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland end Venezuela. For Tokyo, Now York and 
London, dto Max is composed a! the 20 top Issues in terns of modal capdaBadon, 
otherwise the ten top stocks arg tracked 


U.S. Digs In on Worker Rights at GATT 



R Industrial Sectors' 8 

— _ i 


Boa pm. % 

OIL dan dung* 


Hen. 

4PJt 

Pm. 

don 

% 

dang* 


• .Energy 

109.51 11153 -1.81 

CeM Goode 

112.74 

112-55 

+0.17 

: - 

~ 'Utaties 

123.40 12323 40.06 

Raw Materials 

12244 

12259 

+0.29 

'“" 7 - 

- Finance 

118.10 115.62 + 0.42 

Consumer Goode 

98.01 

97.40 

+0.83 


Services 

11834 11142 +0.44 

IfisceJIaneous 

128.12 

126.90 

-051 


1 For mom information about the tndm, a booklet is available froa of charge. 

[ Write to Trfo Index, 181 Avenue Charles de Gaulle. 92521 Neirify Certex. France. 


0 Intemataial Herald Tribune 


By Alan Friedman 

Inunuutonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The United States is 
threatening to hold up the declara- 
tion next month that wffl formally 
seal the Uruguay Round of GATT 
world trade t«T1rs unless other 
member nations agree to discuss 
what Washington sees as unfair 
trade advantages far countries that 
export cheap goods thanks to poor 
working conditions. 

Officials in Washington and Ge- 
neva said Monday mat America 
would not agree to die final ministB- 
rial declaration in Marrakesh, Mo- 
rocco; on April 15 unless it con- 
tained language introducing the so- 


cial elective of protecting workers’ 
rights into the context of free trade: 

While the Marrakesh declaration 
will be largely symbolic, the United 
States is also prepared to hold up 
the work of the preparatory com- 
mittee that is supposed to pave the 
way for the launch next year of the 
World Trade Organization, the 


successor to the General Agree- 
le. U.S. 


ment on Tariffs and Trade, 
officials said. 

Mkkey Kantor, the U.S. trade 
representative, has been telephon- 
ing his counterparts around the 
world in an effort to make sure the 
issue is placed on the GATT agen- 
da. an aide said. 


John Schmidt, chief Uruguay 
Round negotiator for the United 
States, said in an interview on Mon- 
day that it would be sufficient for 
minis ters in Marrakesh to simply 
instruct the World Trade Organiza- 
tion to study the issue of labor stan- 
dards in connection with trade. But 
he warned that having proposed the 
ida hem last week and again an 
iy at meetings of the heads of 


Halagfttinns to the General Agree- 
■ he U.S. 


meat on Tariffs and Trade, the 
would not back down. 

He acknowledged that the pro- 
posal had gotten a cool reception 
but said: “We’ve put the issue on the 
table, and we’re not about to fold." 


Any agreement to pursue the work- 
ers ngbts issue requires the consen- 
sus of all GATT parties, he noted. 

The United States, Mr. Schmidt 
said, would “not accept the final 
declaration or preparatory com- 
mittee documents at Marrakesh 
without some language." 

If no agreement is reached at the 
final meeting of delegation heads in 
Geneva on Wednesday, he added, 
“then we will go down to the wire 
and talk about this in Marrakesh.” 

Many developing countries are 
openly hostile to the UJ3. initiative 
and say they need the new revenues 

See GATT, Page 10 


billion yen ($380 million) to build 
10 cable television stations that 
would reach an audience of 2 mil- 
lion viewers. The operation also 
would provide video-on-demand 
and other interactive services and 
could begin as soon as early 1995. 

The U.S. companies have offered 
to take a stake m a loss-ridden 
cable system in Chofu, west of To- 
kyo, which is now 72 percent- 
owned by Itochu. 

The participation of Time 
Warner, the second-largest cable 
television operator in the United 
States, underscores a recognition 
that foreign expanse in program- 
ming, management and technology 
is essentia] to rehabilitating Japan’s 
deeply indebted and underdevel- 
oped cable television industry. 

It also highlights a determination 
by the government to promote 
competition in the industry and 
narrow the competitive gap with 
the United States in the multi-me- 
dia field. “They will bend over 
backwards to get things going," 
said Joseph Osha, an analyst at 


In December, in an effort to revi- 
talize the sector, the Ministry of 
Posts and Telecommunications in- 
dicated it would raise the level of 
equity foreign companies amid 
hold in cable systems to 33 percent 
from 20 percent. In addition, it said 
it would permit cable operators, 
now limited to single villages, to 
service broader areas and merge 
with other companies. Moreover, 
cable operators will be allowed to 
offer telephone services. 


Olivetti Wins 
Cellular Contract 


Baring Securities (Japan). “Their 
1 with Americans 


willingness to deal 
is driven by their need to catch ujp." 

Japanese officials and executives 
have grown increasingly anxious as 
they watched American entertain- 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


No 'Blue-Green’ Protectionism, Please 



By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

’ ASHINGTON — How times 
have changed. Not so long ago, 
it was politically correct to re- 
nd developing countries as 
victims of exploitation by a sinister coalition 
of big business and Western governments — 
notably the imperialistic United States. 

Fashionable leftists in Europe and Ameri- 
ca liked to compare Third World nations to 
oppressed 19 th-century. industrial workers, 
struggling to unite against unmoral bosses to 
improve their meager standards of living. 

Now the boot is on the other foot. Most 
developing and ex-communist nations are 
rapidly adopting Western capitalism and 
many have moved even further right than the 
West in embracing the market economy. If 
the 19th century is any guide, some of them 
look more like the robber barons. 

Now it is devdopmg-connny governments 

that stand accused of caUuaon vwth multina- 
tional corporations. They are charged with 
exploiting their own workers through low 
wages and dismal labor conditions, and flout- 
ing environmental standards, m order to 
drain jobs from the West. 

In last year's debate over the North Ameri- 
can Free Trade Agreement in the Umted 
States, Mexico was more of ten cast as * vflhim 
ihana victim. The strongest advocate of what 
Leon Brittan of the European CommusKm 

Washington is pressing { o rj? ev ^ opin £ 
countries roabide by stricter labor and ot- 
Sramen tal roles - or niP 0 ® ^ 
pendtte. The plan is understandably bang 


resisted by many developing countries as an 
assault on their national sovereignty. 

Of course, this is not pure American altru- 
ism — as you might deduce from the fact that 
the French government is taking mnnh tbc 
same tine. 

At one level the aims are eminently worthy, 
but the underlying motivation is economic 
self-interest — to protect American, or 
French, industries from low-price competi- 
tion by raising the cost of doing business in 
developing countries. 

The idea is that labor and environmental 
standards be enforced through the trading 


Legitimate environmental 
and labor concerns most not be 
used to block free trade. 


system, that it be permissible to apply trade 
sanctions against countries guilty of the new 
sins of social dumping and erf em-dnroping — 
or at least to raise duties against their exports. 

Of course this is a Pandora’s Box of protec- 
tionism, the opening of which could vastly 
extend the scope far impeding imports. One 
only has u> look at how wdl-m tended tradi- 
tional anti-dumping provisions have been 
twisted to save protectionist purposes. 

But it would be a mistake for nee traders to 
turn their backs on these demands. As Daniel 
G Esty of the Institute for International 
Economics wains in the latest issue of Eco- 
nomic Insights magazine, if legitimate envi- 
ronmental concerns are not promptly ad- 
dressed, “the cause erf free trade, particularly 
in the United States, risks an assault by 


environmentalists and, troubtingly, protec- 
tionists in green garb.” There vail be protec- 
tionists in bluc-cbflar garb, too. 

Representative Richard A. Gephardt of 
Missouri, leader of the Democratic majority 
in the House of Representatives; is already 
promising anew bill he calls “Blue and Green 
301” — modeled on Section 301 of U.S. trade 
law, which calls for sanctions against alleged- 
ly unfair traders. The bin, he says, would 
penalize countries that “abuse their workers 
and misuse the environment.” 

Few reasonable people would want the rules 
of worid trade to be set by Mr. Gephardt and 
bis protectionist friends. Nor, as new multilat- 
eral rules take shape, should erne country be 
allowed to force its standards on others. 

Far better to work out a sensible interna- 
tional approach before the more extreme ideas 
hold and fire trade gets a bad name. 

It should be possible to design environ- 
mental rules that do not destroy the compara- 
tive economic advantage of developing coun- 
tries, cannot be used for protectionist 
purposes and do not prevent countries trying 
to fight poverty from choosing their own 
legitimate policy priorities. 

There is nothing wrong with trade penal- 
ties in dear cases where countries are pollut- 
ing their neighbors or breaching international 
conventions. 

Interfering with labor practices is far more 
dangerous, particularly if it involves an at- 
tempt to equalize wages. Btrt there are obvious- 
ly areas where tighter enforcement is dearable, 
in limiting child labor, fra example. 

It is argent to reconcile demands fra politi- 
cally correct trade with continuing progress 
to Deer trade. 


Is the Fed Jousting With Phantoms? 

Global Economy Makes It Tricky to Measure Inflat ion 


By Louis Uchitelle 

New York Times Sendee 

NEW YORK — The Federal 
Reserve Board is putting interest 
rates on an upward path, for the 
first time since 1989, with the stat- 
ed aim of controlling inflation and 
queffing the market’s fears that it 
will surge in the near future. But 
those fears may be groundless, 
based as they are on theories that 
have worked in the past and may 
now be outdated. 

There is little argument over the 
present: inflation is rising at an 
annual rate of only 3 percent, as 
measured by the consumer price 
index, which is as mild as inflation 
has ever been over most of the last 
15 years. 

But the mild inflation rate today 
has not quieted the fears that the 
U.S. economy will soon be operat- 
ing at full capacity, running short 
of factory space, materials, ma- 
chinery and workers to produce all 
that people want to buy. 

“Everything may seem fine now, 
but we are in fact approaching a 
level of full employment and ca- 
pacity utilization that would repre- 
sent a point at which the inflation 
rate could be expected to climb.” 
said W iTKam Dudley, an economist 
at Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

Mr. Dudley’s view, shared widely 
in financial and economic aides, is 
grounded in two theories about the 
caus es of innation Thai originated in 


Economic Ups and Downs 

Percentage change in gross ttomestic product (annual rate). 

1» 

, J 

, 1 


5 

u a! 

L j 

t J ll 






and companies have to raise wages 
to attract people. Prices then rise to 
offset the higher labor costs, and 
inflation increases. 

The unemployment rate, which 
has been falling fra nearly two 
years, was at 6.5 percent in Febru- 
ary. suggesting to many economists 
that the nation is Tunning short of 
workers and the bidding up erf 
wages may soon begin. 

“we are essentially at full em- 
ployment today," said Martin 
Felds tein of Harvard University, 
head of the National Bureau of 
Economic Research. 

For the last five years, the prob- 


lems of measuring capacity have 
to tfie 


Source: Dataabeam 


The New Vot Time* 


an era when the U 5. economy was 
largely self-contained. 

They have not been fully tested 
in today’s more global economy, 
when a factory in Singapore or Ja- 
pan or Mexico can supply an 
American consumer as easily as 
one in Ohio or North Carolina — 
making the foreign factories and 
their workers in effect part erf 
America's production capacity. 

One of these theories holds that 
the gross domestic product, the val- 
ue of all the goods and services 
produced in the United States in a 
given year, can increase by only 
about 3 percent annually over a 
period of several years without us- 


ing up the available factory space, 
materials and labor. 

If the expansion is persistently 
greater than 3 percent, then the 
nation will run ont of capacity, and 
Americans will find themselves 
competing to buy more goods and 
service than corporate America has 
the capacity to produce, bidding up 
prices in the process. Since last 
summer, the GDP has been ex- 
panding by much more than an 
annual rate of 3 percent. 

The second theory, more impor- 
tant than the first, holds that when 
the unemployment rate gets down 
to about 63 percent, then the coun- 
try runs out of qualified workers. 


been left pretty much to the aca- 
demics. As long as the national 
economy was either in recession or 
growing weakly, no one doubted 
that the nation was operating well 
below full capacity, whatever that 
might be. 

Indeed, the Fed spent those 
years lowering interest rates to en- 
courage people to borrow and 
spend on credit, and thus use more 
of the country’s idle resources, es- 
pecially its idle workers. 

But as inflation fears have taken 
shape — fanned by the Fed’s deci- 
sion in early February to push up 
interest rates — the debate about 
whether (1 m economy was close to 
full capacity has moved to center 
stage. 

The statistics that measure capac- 

See INFLATION, Page 13 


CURRENCY & 


Household Debt Haunts U.S. Expansion 


Cross Rates 


Amlin dam 


FnrtWort 
LMHttnCa) 
Madrid 
M0» 


»■ 




M , 

* nr 


.F 


March 28 

. c PJ*. F.F. Lira DJ=1 bj. sj=. ym ci ratio 

* Au UW 0JW MM»* &«* UB 1*1 UO- 

IS 15a ads &48S iMSi’wm — jubs SB xn w 

_ am MW- u» *»«' «■ urn law 

■££ uuj tsas vast ana suo* am istsr u» ms 

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— - IMI aun W1J0 1.15148 W* -VWI TIM 

Mfl- »-«* E5 sw M»» “W SCO UM M£ UH BUS 

NewYOrttW U"* OKI* MM SMB- UU 

POrtl S»J® m Ml *» 

6BR 1*0X3 iUM 3HS» MHO VUU UBS U2» 

ISM tmdm and Zurich Ottos In other cenfwrsi New York rubs at 3 

CkabrnkiMorierr/onLimaananu 

pjn. Toronto rates ***? ^ m dollar; % Ur»* of MO; HJX: not mUM- N. A: not 

a: jo tnnr one pound, o- w 

ovodtatfe. 

OOMrUoBarVajuM 

Currency 


Eurocurrency P ap e ete 


March 28 


SWISS 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Starling 

1 maath SM'H. 5 T»-5 ■'V 5 WriV. 6 *V4 «• 

Smooths 5 V5 Hm 4fe-4K SMrflA MV. 

6 months SlwSVi. *«Vh SH-SHi SW-61* 

1 year 4*WK. 3*r4M. 5V5* SWr«K. 


French 

Franc 


Y«n 


ECU 


2V1-M 
S Wr2 y. 6 1*0 * 
a ttr2 >- 6VS-4V. 

214-0% MNt 


Ttinm 
ToraMo 
Zurich 
7 ECU 
I SDR 


Sources; Rioters. Ltovat BanK 

Roto&avBcabk: to imtrnank dnmUaafSI mUHen mWmum tareadualent). 


Key Money Rates 


United Stains 


7-;- ,rr pert currency Ptr* (tanner Part 

P-. Mbk-Pmo 135M S. Air. rood 3MtS 

JJJo* SSmioaS WWS nZBOnm* 1J» SKnr.ran SOLDO 

* n *H: t ?* fS! rnS norw-knxM loss SwwLkrana 7X6 


A XtroLS 

Anrir.KhH. 


11771 


rahHBf 

TtalbaM 2U2 
17302 Tamujltrn 71704. 


M js PUL mm 2M7 Tfltan* 2SA0 

I**"™*? JlZ POOih zMY BBS. TtalbaM 

an* 10 * Em* *"*+*** niSSI PMtracudo i*M2 reranim™ 

9*” * ** ” mnntit T742JJ0 UAdtirtam 3471 

HSi r.~ ss 


DUcmntrate 
PiUmnrie 
FMmd hum 
3-omatb CDs 
Comm, popar w dan 
Manm Traanry MU 
VnarTrnanrybBl 
Mtr Traanry non 
s^rnar Treasury otic 
7-yiar Treasury note 
»nar Treasury rertt 
S-raar Treasury bond 


Dose 

1D0 

«« 

Wt 

128 

402 

M9 

417 

5-12 

410 

423 


477 


Marrm Lynch SS-davRMdv amt 183 


Prev. 

IDO 

i<A 

3tfe 

m 

403 

147 

417 

5.11 

411 

424 

6J3 

701 

203 


Brftnfai 

Bapk ban rate 
Ctif mom 

imam bdwtxnk 
3-nwatti iaterhank 
traeatti Interbank 
tawarSUt 
Prance 

Itierventtaa rate 
Cad money 
VmmRi Interbank 
lacs** fnfertank 
ioaaHiMertnnk 
H-vuarOAT 


5Vt 5* 
5W Sb 


5L 5h 
5ft 5ft 


5* 5ft 
7.75 703 


400 400 

ih 4* 
4ft 4ft 
4ft 4ft 
4ft 4ft 
457 4» 


sisr 547 M-y.r~ 


MKwtfrete 
Call mam 


1ft 
2 ft 


lft 

200 


Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lynch, Bank at Tokyo, CommenbanK 
GnonmUMoamu. aridt Lyonnais. 


, V ■ 




toaui 

IJ9T7 

MW 

1,43*7 


fOtiOV 

1.4W3 

IAB00 

10347 


Currency 
Canadian delta 


U739 
W US 


1J75A 13m 
WLS0 WL3J 






Forward Rate* 

__ __^ L _ rT Xdar 

OmlHtT 14938 

pound St erflr w utw 

SHtaSi*: Bank (BnasoMf banco Commerdatv muano 

Saarcx: iso Bank '*"%S "!pS£^ (rMy0>t *"°’ B **« 


Mwntb WerboaH 

• luMVI KOtnKBK 
Wygar OavtntttMt band 


2ft 2ft 
2 Vi 2ft 


rut 2ft 
411 *» 


Chita 
— 205 


Caamaw 
l-manth totertank 

hwh interbank 


4ft 

5J0 


Cft 

575 


505 505 

500 500 


505 505 

602 437 


2£ S S -■ 

New York WM 305.10 ■” 1, ° 

dollars per ounce. London odtckdOx- 
laps;2urtch and new Yarkoneningandaoa- 

umnrieea; N0» York Comae (April) 

Source : Beaten. 


By Keith Bradsher 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — New figures from the 
Federal Reserve Board show a weak spot in the 
U-S. economic expansion: the heavy burden of 
debt being carried by the working middle class. 

Whflethe household finances of the rich and 
elderly have returned to normal levels, middle- 
class families remain stuck with unusually high 
debt payments as a proportion of their income, 
grarnriing to the Fed figures. Families that are 
not rich or old are paying nearly a quarter of 
their income to creditors, up substantially from 
levels in previous economic expansions. 

That high debt, resulting from stagnating 
wages while low interest rates have encouraged 
families to borrow, means consumers are ready 
to cut spending at any sign of economic trouble. 

But it is consumer spending that is fading 
the expansion, and economists worry that over- 
stretched middle-class families could put a 
powerful brake on the economy. 

Further, many savings are in retirement 
plans, which allow people to save money on 
income taxes but impose stiff penalties fra early 
withdrawal This reduces families' fmanriai 
flexibility — they are unHkdy to dip into sav- 
ings to continue spending when to do so is 
difficult and expensive. 

“What seems to be one of the best of times 
financially fra our country as a whole stands, in 


contrast, to what is arguably one erf the oddest 
times that huge pans of the household sector 
have faced in many years,” said Lawrence B. 
Lindsey, a Fed governor who analyzed the fig- 
ures in a speech in Baltimore earlier this month. 

“1 believe that the household sector poses 
rate of the most serious risks to the continuation 
of tins recovery." 

Interest payments and repayments of princi- 
pal claim an tmusoally high proportion of house- 
hold hvYwrtfs for famili es that earn less than 
$200,000 a year and have no rate old enough to 
qualify far Social Security or Medicare. 

These payments by middle-class families 
consumed 223 percent of these households’ 
after-tax income last year, down from apeak of 
25.9 percent in 1990, but still far above the 
average in the 1960s and 1970s of a little under 


18 parent, according to M 
sst,whenaderiyi 


By contrast, when t 

are fnrfndffdj the debt service burden fra an 
households fell last year to 162 percent, only 
..... ’ f than levels in the 1960s and 1970s. 

; Americans, wages and sala- 


rra 


neS nave staguBuju. out »™*>5 

and government assistance programs, tike Social 
Security and Medicare, have increased the in- 
comes of the affluent and the old in recent yea ; . 
Some prominent academic and Wall Street 
economists agree with Mr. Lindsey’s concerns. 
“The rale of consumer spending is not sustain- 


able unless time is a noticeable pickup in the 
pace of income growth,” said Michael J. Boskin, 
who was chairman erf President George Bush's 
Council of Economic Advisers and is now a 
Stanford University economics professor. 

Fed officials have repeatedly mentioned 
household indebtedness as one of the many 
indicators that has led them to hold down 
interest rates until recently. 

Americans owe more money on their homes 
than ever, with mortgages equaling a record 
42L3 percent of the value of owner-occupied 
real estate last year, according to Fed figures. 

Retirement savings accounted for 64 percent 
of all household savings last year, the third- 
higbest figure ever. 

Some economists play down the importance 
of household indebtedness. 

Robert Eisner, a Northwestern University 
economics professor, said that if the current 
economic expansion increased household in- 
comes soon, then heavy debts would become 
less of a problem. “If people have raised their 
debt-service ratios, I think they probably know 
what they’re doing,” he said. 

Neal Soss, an economist at First Boston 
Crap, in New York, said that there was, “no 
magic limit” to the level of borrowhw that 
American households could support. 


E 


Time, U S West 

See Opportunity 
In Japan Cable 


mean, cable, local, longdistance and 
cellular operators tying up bfflian- 
dbQar deals to wire the country in 
networks offering multi-media ser- 
vices. In contrast, heavy-handed 
regulation has stunted development 
of the industry in Japan, where few- 
er than 5 percent of homes receive 
cable, compared with 60 percent in 
the United States, and 80 percent of 
the country's cable operators are 


: i 


■P. 

«ee 

•it 

a 

mi 

tf 

ai 

>te 


do* 

Gi 

tfa 

iiei 

th 

av 

til 

s-i 


As Stocks Surge 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ROME — A consortium led by 
Olivetti SpA won a tender fra Ita- 
ly’s second cellular telephone li- 
cense, the government stud Mon- 
day, just an hour before the bead of 
a company in a rival consortium 
scored an electoral triumph. 

The venture, called Onmitel- 
Pronto Italia, is 35 5 percent-owned 
by Olivetti and includes Bell Atlan- 
tic Corp.; PacTel Corp, the cellular 
unit being spun off by Pacific Tele- 
sis Group; and Mannesmann AG. 
The group was chosen over Umtd 
SpA, led by Fiat SpA and Fin invest 
SpA, the media concern owned by 
Silvio Berlusconi, the frontrunner in 
Italy’s general elections. 

The perception that Mr. Berios- 
coni’s rightist alliance was likely to 
win the election sent stocks up 
sharply, with the MIB index in Mi- 
lan gaming 4 percent, to 1,104. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


ire 

lb; 

iec 

iso 

Ct 

tin 

ink 


fa 

ub 

tin 

rus 

*mv 

th 

tioi 


i 


X) 

in 

in 

rf 

ts 

9 


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m 


in 

of 

ur 


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to 


38 


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1 '»•**• 


f/; 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 


** 


market diary 


An Unsettled Street 

Gives More Ground 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK — US. stocks 
dosed lower Monday for the third 
straight session as evidence point- 
ing to stable interest rates failed to 
rally the market 

Stocks recouped some of Mon- 
day's losses in the final hour. The 

If. S. Stocks 

Nasdaq market which set a record 
ID days ago, fell the most. 

“The long bond being up over 7 
percent has shaken peoples confi- 
dence," said Barry Berman, head 
trader at Robert W. Baird & Co. 

Investors were disappointed that 
Treasury bonds, whose yield had 
been as high as 7.01 on Friday, did 
not rally more Monday in the face of 
plunging crude oil prices, a key com- 
ponent of inflation, traders said. 
Crude for May delivery fieD S1.0S a 
band, to 514.08 a band, after the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries failed Saturday to 
agree on a production cut 

The 30-year bond closed yielding 
6.98 percent Monday. 

“Lower oil prices should be good 
for inflation and good for the bond 
market” Jim Bcnning, a trader at 
BT Brokerage. But the stock mar- 
ket's failure to respond more con- 
vincingly caused some people to 
question whether the ihree-and-a- 
faalf bull market is nearing an end. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 


age closed down 12.38, at 3,762.35, 
after falling as much as 45.77 earli- 
er in the day. The Dow industrials 
now stand 5.4 percent below their 
record close of 5,97836. set Jan. 3 1 . 

Ihe Standard & Poor’s 500 In- 
dex closed down 0.58, at 460. The 
Nasdaq Composite Index slid 
10.95, to 772J0. It set a record 
dose of 803.93 on March 18. 

Thirteen stocks fell for every five 
that rose on the New York Stock 
Exchange. About 287 million 
shares changed hands on the Big 
Board. 

' Oil slocks led the decline. Exxon 
Corp. fell £ to 65, Chevron fell VA 
to 88 % and Mobil Coro. declined % 
to 7716. Texaco dosed down 15% at 
645$, Royal Dutch Petroleum Co. 
went down 16 to 10016 and Pennzral 
Co. dropped ft to 52ft. 

Software and semiconductor 
stocks also drove the market lower 
amid signs of heightened competi- 
tion in the software market. 

Lotus Development Corp., 
which set an all-time high March 
1 7, fell 3 to 73 W. lotus and Micro- 
soft Corp. have fallen since rival 
Novell Inc. announced two acquisi- 
tions last week- 

MTC Electronic Technologies 
Co. tumbled 2ft to 4ft. The devel- 
oper of cellular telephone and pag- 
ing networks in China said internal 
auditors asked for the chairman's 
resignation and called for an inves- 
tigation of his financial dealings. 


Via Auodatad M 


Modi 28 


Falling Stock Prices 
Undermine the Dollar 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Slumping equity 
prices and preboliday doldrums 
trimmed the dollar’s early gains on 
Monday but the U.S. unit still man- 
aged to trade above Friday dosing 
Ievds against most currencies. 

The dollar was quoted at 1.6722 
Deutsche marks in late trading, up 

Foreign Exchange 

from a Friday close of 1.6655 DM. 

The dollar got an early lift, rising 
as high as 1.6765 DM, after the 
publication of data showing a scant 
0.2 percent rise in German infla- 
tion in March. Many dealers inter- 
preted the news as a harbinger of 
German interest-rate reductions. 

But dealers said the proximity of 
Easter restrained activity in the 
market and dealers said trading 
was likely to be subdued all week. 
“The market is somewhat quiet be- 
cause of the upcoming Easter holi- 
day," said Chuck Spence, vice pres- 
ident at Standard Chartered Bank. 

Enthusiasm for the dollar waned 
as the Monday session progressed, 
especially against the yen. "There 


had been some precautionary' buy- 
ing of dollars on Friday on the 
possibility' of problems in Korea," 
said Bill Arnold, chief dealer at 
Chemical Bank. But the lack of any 
new developments in that counny 
Jed to the unwinding of speculative 
positions, he said. 

The dollar was quoted at 104.05 
yen in late trading on Monday, 
down from 104.85 yen on Friday. 

Traders said the dollar's strength 
was also undermined by weakness 
in the equity markets, as the Dow 
Jones industrial average trended 
lower again in the wake of sharp 
drops on Thursday and Friday. 

Looking toward the rest of the 
week, dealers said that the key event 
would be Friday’s US. employment 
report for March. Many analysts 
predict an unchanged rate of 6 JS 
percent but any surprises could jolt 
a market that has become highly 
sensitive to inflation indicatare. 

The dollar was quoted in late 
trading at 1.4215 Swiss francs, op 
from a Friday close at L4168 
francs, and at 5.7)20 French 
francs, up from 5.7100 francs. The 
pound was quoted at $1.4961, 
down from 51.4987. (Reuters, AP) 


The Dow 


Da8y etostrtgs of the 

Dow Jones industrial average 

4G00 



3400 


S O N D J 
1993 


F M 
1994 


(HT 

NYSE Most Actives 


VoL High 

Law 

Last 

Ckg. 

Te<Me^ 

46974 AZ'A 

60 

60ft 

—2 



53ft 




39663 35ft 

3) ft 

32ft 




50 

51ft 



32866 54ft 

Oft 

53ft 



295Z7 Aft 

6 

6 ft 


GnMdr 

27243 57ft 

56ft 

57V* 




79ft 




21 185 30ft 

30 

30ft 



20864 71ft 

19ft 




70794 29ft 




GTE 

20611 32 

31ft 

31ft 



20604 60ft 

S9ft 



FT Wire n 

20121 27ft 

21 ft 

72H 

“ 'f 

UtrUU 

19256 22 

2 t*i 



NASDAQ Most Actives 


VoL High 

Law 

Last 

dig. 



37 ft 

33 




23 ft 

23ft 



■rrr* 

67ft 

68 ft 




8% 

06ft 


WPODv 

35856 30ft 




32971 19ft 

in*. 


9 '/ll 


31341 7&ft 

77ft 




3)328 33ft 

31 

32ft 


TelCntA 

27710 22ft 

VI ft 

22 ft 



27304 16ft 

17ft 


— vv 



37ft 

33ft 








23755 25ft 

S'* 

35V: 

- 2 ft 


22117 21ft 

705* 

19ft 


3Com 

19078 61ft 

57*; 

S7ft 

—3ft 

AMEX Most Actives 


VoL Man 

Law 

Last 

an. 

ENSCO 

18603 3>V.. 

>/,. 

Rk 

—ft 

BATa 

11614 13ft 

1T-V 

13ft 

— v„ 

SPDR 

1I1S6 46V« 

49Vn 

46V E 

*I‘e 

EXPLA 

9998 IV,* 

1 ft 

1V« 


ViocB 

7566 29 

27ft 

27ft 

— 1 ft 

OK/Slta 

7070 41ft 

37ft 

39ft 

— 1 ft 




27V; 


EctiaBav 

6729 13ft 

13 

73ft 

—ft 

RavnlOg 

6365 4IV U 


+’/ u 

—V. 

TapVce 

3644 8 ft 

7ft 

7V. 

—ft 

Market Safes 


Today 
4 MB. 

NYSE 287JJ 

Amw 2008 

Nasdaq 27*10 

la millions. 


30C00 

18.75 

2B139 



Dow Jones Averages 

Open 

High 

Low Lost 

dig. 

Indus 3776 l 46 3779 JK 372838 376235 
Trcrtl I72SJ8 172*23 170*49 1710^9 
Util 207 M 205-51 202.08 7QSA4 

Camp 135X88 1351.90 1339.22 134930 

—1338 

—3.97 

“129 

-043 

Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Previous 

Today 

4 9M 
53*37 
41*31 
14044 
4322 
46000 
43&.91 

Industrials 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

3P500 

SP 100 

56*49 

419-30 

160.79 

4179 

46539 

430JB 

53944 53945 
41*85 417XQ 
159.12 159 J8 

iin rm 
46858 460JB 
425JS 425J7 

NYSE Indexes 


High 

Low Lost 

aw. 

Composite 

Industrials 

Tramo. 

UnClv 

Finance 

25*48 

37701 

26548 

214.93 

217-53 

253J4 »w a 
31310 315-271 
2*1 JB 242,47 
21131 31+91 
209 JO 210J1 

—0.79 
— 1J8 
—312 
-L7? 
—066 

NASDAQ Indexes 


High 

Low Lost 

aw. 

CBmpasltr 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurance 

Finance 

Transo. 

Telecom 

782-57 
823.14 
691.08 
909 39 
899.29 
79*93 
169.53 

768J7 77133 
805.19 B09J9 
68737 tSPSn 
90748 90300 
893.03 89+79 
78145 70314 
16*29 76*77 

— 11J3 
-14J8 
—14* 
—731 
-LOT 
—13.11 
—388 

AMEX Stock Index 


High 

LOW Lost 

aw. 


468.44 

661X2 46321 

— *22 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 

20 Bonds 

10 Utilities 

10 Industrials 


Previous 

Close 

10148 

99J4 

10363 

Today 

Noaa 

10136 

9930 

10336 

NYSE Diary 



Oosa Prev. 

Advanced 
Dectrned 
unoumged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


654 860 

1547 1198 

572 635 

2793 2743 

20 34 

123 87 

AMEX Diary 



Qrac Prev. j 

Advanced 
Detained 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHtaffs 
New Lows 


208 

444 

191 

163 

13 

27 

262 

333 

339 

B24 

11 

1 ? 

Previous NASDAQ Diary 

Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New lows 

Ctose 

1510 

1458 

T774 

4844 

73 

53 

Prev. 

1069 

2037 

1716 

4S42 

19 

74 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 

Clow 

Bid A 3k 


ALUMINUM IHtaD Grade) 
Dolton per uWtHetefl 
Seat W5JM Uiun 

Forward 1339.00 1339.53 

COPPER CATHODES UltSt! 

□e Dan per metric lea 

Spot T949J0 195050 

Forward 195X00 195MB 

LEAD 

Dollar* per metric Ion 
Spot 45X00 459.00 

Forward 47X5D 474.00 

NICKEL 

DeOara per metric lea _ 
5poi 5*7000 568000 

Forward 574000 575000 

TIN 


547SL0O 


Donor* per mttrtcr on 


5«rt 




130X50 1*9 JO 
T332J0 133300 
Grade) 

mono i947jo 

195*30 1957.00 


45X00 

4*150 


568000 569000 
575000 5735X0 


565000 IMTim 
551000 552000 


ZINC (Specie! HM Grade) 

Forward 77930 98090 M5JO 96*80 


Financial 

Mob Low 

3 MONT H STERLING (UFFE) 
EBOOM-ptsoMOOpct 

Jon 9«7 9*59 9U2 — OM 

Sep 9*49 9*38 9*40 —006 

D« 94.19 9*00 *4.10 —008 

MOT 93.7B 9X64 9X67 — 0OT 

JtUJ 9X32 93.18 9119 —0.11 

Sep 923? 9174 92 36 —013 

OK 92J1 9137 9137 —013 

Mar 9122 9109 9X06 —0.14 

Jon 91.90 91 SO 91J1 —(LOT 

Sep 9! .73 91.59 91-55 —012 

Dec 9L50 9144 9138 -012 

Mar 71.2B 9157 9120 —0.10 

Est volume: 60362. Oocfl bit.: 455585. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS CUFPE) 

SI million -pt) of 1 M pa 
on 9537 95. 

BP 9525 95. 

« N.T. N, 

lor 94J2 94, 

on N.T. M. 

N N.T. 10. . 

Est. volume: 367. Open ini.: 93SS. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS CLIFF*) 

DM) million -Pts of 100 pa 
Jan 9458 *452 

Sep MS) ML73 

Dee 9493 9484 

Mar 9S.10 9453 

Jon 9489 9x79 

Sen 9470 9450 

Dec 9453 9445 

Mar 9433 «<2B 

Jen 94.15 9410 

Sep 9403 9400 

Dec 9385 9185 

MOT 9X68 TUA 

Est. volume: 90930 Open Inf.: 937,100 
3-MONTH FRENCH FRANC IMATIF) 


High Law Las* Settle Ortte 
13825 737.25 137.38 WJ? -480 


139JS 137 DO 13735 
74 1 JO J4IJ3 74L» 
1*4.50 14425 V4450 
14450 14425 M4E 

14X25 M&DO 1482 
149 DO 1*9-00 14*80 


13925 — 375 
Ml JO —125 
1*450 —125 
1 4425 —ISO 
14025 — SB 
14930 — 325 


JM 
Ml 

Sea 

oa 

Nov 

Dec 

pS ' kt! "n.t! *njt! iS35 — Eg 
Mar NT. N.T. N.T. T«73 — 3M 

ESL volume: 1*835. Open toL 100338 

BRENT CRUD E OIL U W. 

UJ. donors per b aul lo t i of UE WuWi __ 
Mar 1140 lass HB 7102 — V£* 

jon iX40 nss hoi rtot — ojs 

Jol 1X69 1103 llDfl 13J* — 

Aoa 1341 1127 1127 1125 — Oja 

sS 132 lia 1142 1319 —071 

oa 7XB3 1X57 1160 1155 —065 

Nov NT. NT. N.T. 1155 — OJO 

Dec 13.98 USB 13JB tigs — 073 

Jaa N.T. N.T. N.T. 1182 —068 

EsL volume: 49JJU . Open Inf. T3740B 


Stock indexes 


High 

FTSE 100 (LIFFE1 
Oipaliidai 


low dose Change 


Jun 

9537 

9535 

9535 

Sec 

9525 

9522 

9522 

Dee 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*75 

Mar 

9432 

9*51 

MJO 

Jaa 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9*18 

StP 

N.T. 

N.T. 

919 r 


point 

Jon 3)453 31110 313X0 —AO 

Sap NT. N.T. J149D — 6 D 

Dec N.T. 14T. 31590 —60 

EsL volume: TZCZ7. Opal ML: 50913. 
CACAO (MATIF) 

FF2M per index Point 

Mar 216*00 212800 214100 +BJ» 

Apr 2T74J0 2 1 37 JO 2755J0 +800 

MOT N.T. N.t. 21 5900 +800 

JOB 216100 712150 7142J0 +800 

Sen 217900 715650 216000 + 800 

Dec K.T. K.T. 219150 +X00 

EsL volume: 44514 Open int.: 79,456. 

Sources: Motif. Associated Press. 
London ion F ln an da t Futures Exchange. 
Inn Petroleum Exchange. 


Spot Commodities 


9457 + OBJ . 
94 39 +004 i 



Commodity 

Today 

Pray. 

Aluminum, lb 

0597 

0394 

Cottee. Bros- n> 

run. 

076 

Coooer clecfntfytic. lb 

ora 

096 

Iran FOB. fan 

Lead, lb 

73X00 

634 

OTXO0 

034 

Stiver, troy ax 

StMl (scrap), ton 

5JS 

1725 

13*33 

run 

THUS 

hjl 

no. 

Zinc. lb 

04455 

04496 


9413 
9168 4-004 i 


Dfvtdands 


FFiraOBan 

-p« of loo pet 
9*03 9X93 

9*00 

SCO 

9*28 

9*T7 

9*24 

Dec 

9*45 

9*31 

9*43 


9433 

9*41 

9*51 


9447 

9*30 

9*44 

Sen 

9433 

9*25 

9*31 

Dee 

9*19 

«* 0 S 

9*16 

Mar 

9*01 

9X93 

9*00 


+ 006 I 
+ 007 

+ 0.11 I 

+au i 
+a«- 
+ 009 ; 
+oo9 ! 


EsL volume: 44061. Open int: 25+389. 
LONG GILT (UFFE) 

CSOOOO - ptl 8, 32ads Of ISO pa 
Mar 108-15 107-09 107-13 +0-23 : 

Jun 737 16 705-37 705-11 +G50 

see N.T. N.T. 105-75 + 0-20 ’ 

E it. volume : 89657. Open mtj 181691. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND CLIFFE) 

dm asaoao - at* or loo na 

Jim 9668 7139 96.76 + 037 

Sep 9178 9SJS KJB +03 5 ! 

Est. volume: 140658. Open Int: 200570 
10-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIF) ; 
FF5006IO - PtS Ofl80 PCI 
Jaa 72366 122.12 12M4 +050 > 

Sap 12274 737 JO 72234 +060 , 

Dec 12070 72070 72U4 +060 , 

Mar N.T. N.T. N.T. UnctL 

Est.vahime: 21X155. Open Ini.: 759 J 47 . 


Co mp any Per Amt Pay Roc 

IRREGULAR 

LL&E Rayattv - JHW 4-5 4-15 

Marina t_P. - 130 4-6 4-18 

STOCK 

Gt Lotus Bcneurp _ 2 % +1 4-15 

STOCXSPUT 

VdIvoAB ADR 5 ter i spEI proposed. 
INCREASED 

NH Penn Bncshn O .19 +29 5-T7 

CORRECTION 

x .43 4-4 +11 


Bunker HOI Ina 
x-mriManounL 


REGULAR 


Industrials 

him low lost setrie are* 
GASOIL (IPE) 1 

UA dollars per metric ton-tots at loo toes 
Aar 13735 73425 1J7D0 737D0 —435 : 

May 137 JO 13575 136D0 13400 — 42S I 

Jim 13625 13550 136D0 13eD0 — 42S | 


BradvWHA 
Dole Food 
Entergy Caro 
Fsf Fed Sv&Ln OH 
FlnkaCorp 
Konl Exp ft Jet Ea 
Kent Fixed Insa 
Kent Index Eouffv 
Kent Ltd Motor M 
Kent Med Term 
Kant Value Plus 
Laurel B uu e on > 
IWsss Health 8 < Ed 
Patrol set tMv 
Schwoh Charles 
ShJ Commercial 
IVesco Financial 


O .17 
Q .70 

- 65 

- .15 
Q .73 
M DOTS 
M 6 * 
M JJT75 
M D3 
M JD 

m mas 

Q JkS 
m m 
m .Tan 
G JO 
o jo 

Q .245 


o-annoai; 9-payaMe in rneoaon 
moatbtr; a-aaartcrtr; 


4- 8 4-29 

5-12 6-9 

5- 6 6-1 

+72 +27 
+» 520 

ss s 

3-25 +7 

3-25 4T 
525 +7 

3-25 +7 
4-4 +15 
+7 +29 
4-8 +22 
52 576 
60 513 
5(7 Ml 

foods; a+ 


GATT: U.S. Digs In on Rights 


Continued from Page 9 

that freer trade will bring before 
they can make major improve- 
ments to their own social struc- 
tures. They see the U.S. stance as a 
protectionist device to protect its 
'markets from cheap goods, and lev- 
el the same charge against France, 
which has said Li was backing the 
United States on this issue. 

In Paris, a government official 
said France was continuing to work 
closely ^ with the United States. “We 


accept and support the U 3. posi- 
tion on labor conditions and 
GATT “ the official said. “If we 
cannot obtain some agreement by 
Wednesday, then we win have to 
negotiate in Marrakesh.'* 

The subject also came up during 
a meeting in Rome last weekend of 
officials who were preparing for the 
Group of Seven industrialized na- 
tions’ summit in Naples this sum- 
mer. According to a French offi- 
cial, there was agreement among 
the United States, France and Italy, 


OPEC Undercuts Crude 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — World ofl 
prices took a pounding on 
Monday after OPEC ministers 
meeting on Saturday could not 
agree to curb production. 

Crude ofl few May delivery on 
the New York Mercantile Ex- 
change plunged to 513.98 per 
barrel in late trading, down 
51.15 from Friday. Brent crude 
in London also plunged. leav- 
ing prices in inflation-adjusted 


terms little higher than they 
were before the 1973 Middle 
East War. 

The Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries ended 
its meeting in Geneva acrimoni- 
ously after Saudi Arabia, the 
largest OPEC producerjield 
firm against demands for an out- 
put cut to impro ve prices, leav- 
ing the current 24 J2 million bar- 
rd-per-day ceiling intact 

(Reuters. AP) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


AseneePfuneePiene Mwth28 
OoMPrav. 

Amsterdam 

ABN Amro HM 6530 6490 
ACF Ho Id mo 4860 4460 
Aoaen 9* KUO 

Ahold 5030 4920 

Akxo Nobel 27SJO 21460 
AMEV 7660 76J» 

Bote-Wessonen 3*90 3960 
C5M 67 JO a 

DSM 130-80 129 

Elsevier 16BJ0 1A660 

Fokker 76.10 15 

Gtst-Brocodn 57 JO SiJO 
HBG 315 314 

Hctaeken 22 SJ 0 228 

Hoogovens 57.70 _57 
Hunter Oouolos 7170 7B30 
IHCCQtand 42.10 41^0 
infer Mueller 83 £70 
Inti Nedariond B 2 JD 8000 
KLM 46.70 4470 

KNP 8 T 47 JO 47 JO 

NocHlayd 66 6530 

Ot« Grin ten 84 klbo 

Poldhoed 5160 57jo 

PMnps 5360 53.10 

Polygram 75J0 7ieo 
RotMQQ 123 12260 

Rodamco 62 6160 

Rollnco 12SJ0 12520 

Rorento 9460 9450 

ITtWOJ Dutch T91J0 790JD 
Start 47.90 4660 

Unilever 272.70 20060 

Von Ommeren 5060 5060 
VNU I73J0 77360 

WOHen/Ktawer 17370 17150 
EOE 


ChuoPrwv. 


Helsinki 


Brussels 

Acec-UM 
AG Fin 
ArbriJ 

Borco 
Befcoert 
Cockerill 
Cobwa 

iffiSe, 

GIB 
GEL 
Gevoert 
Kredlelbank 
PefrofUM 


Rove] Beige 


NA 2995 
NA 2695 
4450 4400 
2240 2280 
24300 24200 
NA 188 
6110 6120 
NA. 1384 
NJL 6170 
1570 1595 
4395 4460 
9630 9610 
7290 7250 
70375 10100 
NA. 3160 


SocCen Banque 8510 8510 
: Gen Belgique 2700 2660 
14950 15000 


Soct_ 
Safina 
Scrtvay 
Trociebel 
UCB 


I482S 1 

10200 10025 
N A. 23350 
C^SJ^ge*:^ 


Frankfurt 

AEG 76X5014260 

Allianz Hold 2525 2476 
Altana 618 619 

Aske 7040 1070 

BASF 326.10 323 

Saver 38470381 30 

Bay, Hypo talk 459 458 
Bar Veretnsfcfc 49250 489 

BBC 700 690 

bhf Bank 429 42 a 

BMW 838 818 

Commerzbank 353 HI 348 
Continental 29529X50 

Daimler Benz 87650 832 

Drama 532 S15 

Dt Babcock 27750 Z73 

Deutsche Bank 7955078630 
Douatai 583 579 

DresdnerBonk 396 392 
Fetdmuehle 345 343 

FKruapHoesch 207 205 


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te[rjpj7 

Srfi, * 1 .1 ^ ^ 





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mrjMjT 


Amer-Yntyma 

Erao-Gutzeit 

Hubtonakl 

tco.p. 

Kytnmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohlota 

Repota 

Stockmann 


N ?0 


130 

38.10 . 

200 206 
17 JO 11-711 
175 720 
202 202 
410 «J7 

8850 90 

92 9130 
302 300 




Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 3125 3425 
Cathay Poclttc 11 1120 

Oteuna Kona -«L25 _47 
China Light Par 40J0 4050 
Dairy Farm Inll ll-XO it 
Hang Lung Dev VLflQ 1460 
Hang Seng Bank 52 5250 
Henderson Land 45 44J0 
HK Air Eng. 44 4425 

HK China Gas 1EL30 7830 

HK electric 2220 2220 

HK Land 21-30 7\ 

HK Realty Trust 2240 2260 

HSBC HoMtnas 87 VJO 
HKStwna Htts 
HK Telecomm 
HK Ferry 
Hutch wnampoa 


Hyson Dev 

Jordine 


87 VJO 
1120 11.10 
13 1290 
71 1060 
33 32 

r . _ f 25.70 2560 

.. ne Math. 5250 47.75 
Jartflne Sfr HkJ 26.711 2536 
Kowloon Motor 7520 1520 
Mandarin Orient 10 JO 7020 
Miramar Hotel 2320 __ 23 
New Work! Dev 2850 3860 
SHK Props 5* 5550 

Stelux 465 455 

SwtrePaCA 54 56 

Toi Cheung Pn» HJO 11J0 
TVE 150 150 

wharf Hold 3125 37 je 
Wing On Co Inti 12 11.90 
Wlnsorlnd. 11 JO 1160 


Johannesburg 

21 a jo 

94 93 

217 222 

29 JO 30J0 
NA — 



203 215 

«S 


London 


Aria Waglns 
Argyll Group 
Ass Brit Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Bardavs 

Boss 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Bools 

Brit Airways 
Brit Ga 
Brit Steel 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cattle Wire 
Cadbury Srii 
Caradan 
Coats vi vella 
Comm Union 
CauriauMS 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 
Eunalunnel 

Flson4 

Forte 

GEC 

Geni acc 

Gk»o 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guhness 

Gus 

Hanson 

Hlllsdown 

HSBC HUBS 

ICI 


469 

U4 

223 

351 

5J5 

70J13 

SJJ5 

1.92 

538 

521 

4J2 

126 

329 

723 

523 

467 

366 

4.17 

306 

729 

397 

324 

460 

424 
327 
226 
*80 
323 
428 
466 
560 
122 
255 
258 

425 
622 
4J8 
164 
425 
S 2 B 
220 
lie 
764 
413 


428 
568 
2.97 
259 
568 
9.96 
565 
168 
535 
523 
451 
127 
322 

7.15 
£28 
430 
322 
+17 
363 
160 
3.95 
378 

429 
475 
360 
225 
5M 

5.15 
5.13 
4.18 
520 
129 
2 JB 
2 59 
632 
624 
466 
169 
468 
562 
23b 
120 
7.70 
&I4) 


Incttcape 

Kingfisher 

Lodaroke 

Land Sac 

L oport e 

Losmo 

Lew>> Gen Grp 
Uovds Bank 
Marks SP 
MEPC 
Nali P ower 
Not w«st 
NttiWst water 
Pearson 
P 8.0 
Pllklngton 
PowerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
RecklttCoi 
Redland 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Roils Royce 
Rottmaitunll) 
Royal Scot 
RT2 

Salnstawry 

Seal 

Soars 

Severn Trent 
Shell 

OlohA 

Smith Nephew 
SmlttiKtlne B 
Smith <WH) 
Sun Allltxice 
Tate & Lyle 
Tescc 

Thorn £MI 
Tomkins 
T5B Group 
Unilever 
Uto Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3M 
Wellcome 
wtaiibreod 
williams Hdss 
Wtllts Corroon 
F.T.l 


Close Prev. 
5.12 550 


Madrid 


BBV 3210 3210 

Bco Central Hlsp. 2920 2918 

B-^Sontodder £70 « 

Draoadas 2370 2385 

Endesa 7330 7400 

Ercras 155 160 

Iberdrola I 1000 1070 

RWd 4500 4495 

T abaca lera 3890 3760 

Telefonica 1785 1790 


Milan 

Comm 


Ooo 
CIR 
Crodltol 
Etochom 
Fwfln 

Ferfin Rise 
Flat SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

Itotasm 

ItOtOas 

itolmablllare 

MedMbanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Rtoaseeme 

Solpem 

scxi Paolo Torino 

SIP 

SMC 

Snfo 

Stondo 

Stei 

Tore Assi RIsp 


5786 5722 

84 R25D 

27TW 

2514 2385 
18C 1885 
823 797 

5350 5125 
2100 2000 
40100 28100 
21380 20990 
13100 11965 

39300 38000 
16180 15205 
1347 1300 

2575 2589 
4405 4530 
Man 2x4BD 

1 1 in 

3350 3075 
10675 10570 
4555 4362 
3845 3845 
2115 2068 

35200 34250 

5460 5152 

27600 26256 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 32% 3288 
Bonk Montreal 27%u 27nu 
Bell Ganada 
' ibartXer B 


SOW 51W 
22St 2 » 
21 W 21 W 
7M 7* 
7» 7% 

28 2BW 
2 m 22ft 
9ft Oft 
Sft 22ft 
Bft 2216 
21ft 21ft 
ZIK 27ft 
23ft 23ft 
fift Aft 
15ft 16 


Bom b< 

Combi 
Cascodes 
Dominion Ted A 
Donohue A 
MacMillan Bi 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Corp. 
Quebec Tet 
rtMbecar A 
Gwebecor B 
Te l eglobe 
Unlva 
Vldeofron 


Close Prev. 


Paris 


Accor 


Air Lkaulde 
nicrai 


NA 712 
NJL 821 
Alsjlxvn NJL 67B 

Axo 1340 1303 

Banco ire (del NJL £6 

BIC NJL 73S0 

BNP 25860 248.40 

Bauyaues 705 694 

BSN-GD 864 855 

Carrefour TLA. i 

C.C.F. 25X60 244 

Ctnn NA 137 

Owgeurs 1*« 1444 

Omanis Franc 384 386 

Sub Med NJL 416 

Elt-AauJtalne NJL 400 

Elf-Sartofl 1040 \OCl 

Euro Disney 35 3S 34 

Gen-Eaux 2614 2641 

Havas 5US45850 

I metal 45 <06 

Lafarge Coppee 45745S6C 
Leorand NJL 6080 

Lyon. Eaux NA. . 

Oreo I (L’j NJL 1220 

L.VJWLH. 851 

Matro-Hachetfe 136 137 JO 
Michel In B NJL2S 

Moullne* NJL 139 

Parttxn 445J0 444 

Pechlnev Inti mjo mjo 

Pernod- RJcerd 2110 39460 

Peugeot sn rao 

Prlntamps <Au» 933 928 

Rodtotcrieilaue 582 599 

Rh- Poulenc A 74420 U5J0 


Raft St. Louts 
Redouts (La) 
Saint Goba In 

Sto Gener a l e 
Suez 

Tltomson-CSF 

Total 

klAP. 

Valeo 


NJL 1736 
51 868 

NA 665 
NJL 545 
NJL 637 
NJL 319 
NJL 77 520 
NJL 317 
NJL 180.10 
NJL 1340 




Sao Paulo 

Bunco do Brasil 21 2 
Boneipa 11J9 n 

BfMmco 15 1420 

gntamo 105 205 

E o r t *P °P on e » nq i960 2050 
Petrpbras 123 767 

as 

V«l0 IAS 1A5 

fcSSSS'.nf&i 14495 


Singapore 

Cerabos 705 7 

gSiOMr. iS 6.15 

Neove j+Jo 7 t» 

^HcPeP, ’HS'SS 
^Tfiiustries X} i HS 

^2SP® 5-15 464 

“PP+I 920 920 

266 226 
7J3 1J8 

830 820 
1120 1120 
£5 7JB 

6J0 OM 
1160 1160 
4M 5.70 
360 372 
7.10 720 

iiS,S 
g§M& T T , ?s§E 5 m § a 

s n 

2BS9JJ 



ueiiMUWtfl 

Shangrlia 
Slme Darby 

S pare Land 
S'eore Press 
Slngsteomsnto 

Straits 


Stockholm 


AG* 

Asea A 
Astra A 
Atlas Ceoco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 

Essstte-A 

Handslsbanken 

investor B 

Norsk Hvdrq 

PrucordloAF 

Sandvfk S 

SCA-A 

5-C Banker 

SkendlaF 

5kansfca 

SKF 

Stora 

TreUeborgBF 
Vohnj 


SSig5?lSai 


£3 399 

592 Sft 
159 758 

492 482 

365 368 

352 3 17 
110 170 

112 112 
174 174 

24050 243 

116 118 
ri* nr 

128 129 

54 5450 
152 153 

179 188 

138 138 

403 405 

9050 91 

630 636 
17576? 


a ass Prev. 


Sydney 


964 MS 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BMP 
Baral 

Bowoofanvllte 
Coles Myer 
Comalco 
CRA 
C5R 

GoodrreXI Field 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Cora 
Nine Network 
N Broken HHI 
Poc Dunlop 
Pioneer Inn 
Nmndy Poseidon 126 2JS 
QCTResourcra 1^ 1J1 
Santos 3J0 190 

TNT 2J1 2D9 

Western Minina 7.16 720 
Wg^Bonktna 488 5.10 

Mssrsii r M 


5J05 4.16 
17-08 1724 
495 423 
ora 0.92 
460 464 
S 5.11 
1764 1738 
462 49C 
161 126 
162 162 
1060 1120 
no 2.13 
112 121 
nra mo 

9 25 966 
+75 5 

367 3J6 
520 526 
230 365 


Tokyo 


Akat Electr 503 509 

Asatil Chemical 711 7« 

Asafil Glass JMfl 77£ 
Bcxik at Tokyo 1570 1580 
Bridgestone 560 1560 

Canon 1710 1490 

Casta 1340 7350 

Dal Nippon Print I860 IBS) 
Dahwa House 1570 1510 
Daiwa Securities 7630 1650 
Fanuc 4200 4190 

Full Bank 22 S 0 22B0 

Full Photo 2340 m 

Fujitsu 1060 1030 

Hitachi 966 953 

Hilo rid Coble 782 790 

Mm* 3S8 £8 

nines g g 
Kallma *81 

Karaal Power 2650 tm 
Kawqsaki Steel .364 3 g 
Kir hi Brewery 1Z1D 1 190 
Komatsu 917 890 

Kubota 659 09 

Kvacera 6520 6520 

Motsu Elec mas 1760 172 c 
MatSU EleCWks 7150 7 7 60 
Mitsubishi Bk 2 M 0 nm 
Mitsubishi Kasel 4S5 491 
Mitsubishi Elec 603 600 

Mitsubishi Hev 6M .670 
Mitsubishi Corp 11^ 1]2 
Mitsui and Co 379 770 

MIlIUkoM .937 911 

Mitsumi 2133 2700 

NEC 7150 HOD 

ngk Insulators ira 

Nlkko Securities 1300 1» 
Nippon Koaaku 1030 10W 
Nippon 0(1 77f VS. 

Nippon Steel 335 339 

Nippon Yusen SOT 581 
Nissan 854 m 

Nomura See 2300 .2280 
NTT 9320c 9200c 

Olympus Optical 106 O u pb 
P ioneer 2560 S80 

Riccti , 

Sonya Elec 


825 805 

495 498 

T730 1690 


aNrtwu 
Shlnetsu Chem 
Sony 

Sum ito mo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum! Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tatael Cora 

TokhsMari 1 * 

TgMdaQim 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pw — 

Toppan Printing 1368 1348 

Toray Ind. 691 692 

Toshiba 799 783 

Toyota 2000 1OT0 

Yomalchl Sec 870 879 

a; x tea. 

Nikkei 22 S 


2040 2060 
6330 6700 
2730 200 
480 492 

917 9S5 

275 Z76 

*67 6*0 

BOB 790 
ISO 1230 
4390 4350 
406 482 

1280 1280 
3240 3210 


Toronto 

Abtflbl Price 17 ft 

frcwS?* % 

Afterta Energy 20 ft nn 

Am Btrrl 

Bk Nova Scotia 2 gC! 

SC^cam 1S S 

BF Realty Hds 064 arri 

Bromoleo 0J9 047 

Brunswick 9ft yft 

CAE 7 7ft 

Comdcv 4JD 4JC 


C1BC 

Conodtan Podflc 
con Tire A 
Ccntor 
Cora 

COL Ind B 
Clmolex 
Comlncn 
Conwesl EaaN 
Denison Min B 
Dickenson Min A 


Dyta* A 
Echo Bay Mtlnas 
Enutty Silver A 
FCAtntl 
Fed Ind A 
Fletcher Chall A 
FPI 
Gentra 
GoWCarp 
Gulf Cda Res 
Heel Inti 
Hernia GW Mines 
HoJIlngw 
HorsJxxn 
Hudson's Bay 
I 


Irtferprov pipe 
Jannecfc 
Lotwrt 
LobtowCn 
Mac k e nz ie 
Mogna InHA 
MaNe Leaf 
Maritime 
Mart Res 
MocLean Hunter 
MOJson A 
Noma Ind A 
Noranda Inc 
Naranda Forest 
Moreen En ergy 
Nthem Telecom 
Nan Cora 
Oshawo 
Posurin A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWACorp 
Rayrodt 
Renalsaance 

Royal Bank Can 
Scntre Res 
Scott** Hasp 
Seaoram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherrttt Gordon 
SHL SvstemlBe 
southam 
Soar Aeraspoce 
Steics A 
Talisman Energ 
Tec* B ,, 
Thomson News 
Toronto Damn 
Torstar B 

TrtmsnfSa Util 

TransCda Pipe 
Triton Flnl A 
Trtmac 
Trtzec A 
Unlcorp Energy 


CTom Prey. 

33ft 33ft 

22 2 2ft 
lift lift 

46 46ft 
4ft 46$ 
9 9 

460 465 

20ft 2 Oft 

23 23ft 
an 0.41 

9 914. 
23ft 23ft 
ora 037 

13ft lffft 
0.94 092 
170 N.Q. 
7ft 7ft 
20ft 27ft 
5 5V. 
057 058 
13 13 

4JJ0 465 
IS 15ft 
14ft 14ft 
15ft 16ft 
20ft 21 
30ft 30ft 
38ft 39ft 
34ft 34ft 
31ft 81ft 
19ft 20ft 
22 22ft 
25ft 25ft 
lift lift 
71ft 72 
13 12ft 
25ft 26ft 
7ft 8 ft 
16ft 16ft 
26ft 27 
6ft 6ft 
25ft 25ft 
14ft 14ft 
15ft 15ft 
41ft 41ft 


366 3ft 
3$ 35ft 
70 10 ft 
1 ft 1 ft 
T8ft If 
28ft X 
22ft 23ft 
83ft 83ft 
28ft 28ft 
12ft 13 
8 Ift 
40ft 40ft 
8 8 
39ft 40 
72ft 12ft 


17ft 17ft 
9 9ft 
31ft 33ft 
27ft 27 
18 18ft 
21ft 71ft 
24ft 25ft 
15ft 15ft 
7* 18ft 
430 4ft 
17ft 17ft 
081 080 
160 165 


U.S. FUTURES 


Via 


March 28 




Zurich 

Adta Inti B no 236 

Aiusutsse Shew 662 649 

BBCBrvmBovB 110 1174 
Ctaa Getav B 913 902 

GHddlml *® M7 
EJektrow B OT 00 39T0 

Fischer B 1 » 

Inferdrscount B t« 2&B 
jeimoil B „ K ® 

)£Srt R B « S 

W* 1225 1216 

SaWr" ijfi & 
2 is 

Sender B 4050 4010 

Schindler B two 7778 

Sutzer PC 1008 995 

araffiwiee B „ 2 Jfg ^ 

SeitaeBnkCarpB 419 457 

Safes Retnsur ft 610 60B 

SwtaOlr R 760 7» 

UBS B 1208 1204 

2ES35 U iSS 

1 MRiar 


To subscribe in Franco 


jus! cdl, toil free, 
0 5437437 


Season 

Season 






rtoh 

Low Open 

HW 

LOW 

Close 

Chg 

OpJnt 


Grains 




WHEAT 

(CBOT) S400bun«ninM»-6»4w*»wt»«fi»l 



337 

3J0 Mm 94 132 

336 ft 

333 

33f*t 



336 

196 Ju(94 126ft 

112 ft 

334 V. 

129ft *005 

2U97 

J37ft 

302 Sep 94 339 

334 

338ft 

331 

-034ft 

17 S 

335 

109 Dec 94 337 

142ft 

137 

HI ft 

♦035ft 

AJJ1 

156ft 

134 Mar 95 138 ft 

143ft 

U 8 ft 

343ft *037 

n 

3J5 

J)6ftMoy95 



143ft *007 


342» 

ill to! to 



124 



Est. sates 13300 Frf s. sate 

6.912 





FWs Open int 4*420 UP 561 











2.90 MOV94 332 

135ft 

331ft 

335V. *005% 

9453 

135 

797 to (94 124 

131 

336 

1299*03614 77,176 

135ft 

i02ftSep94 338V. 

132 'A 

338ft 

3J\ 

♦OOSft 

3370 

160 

X12ftO(C94 335 

139 

135 

136* *006 ft 

1474 



141ft 

IriOV. 

340*6 

*035% 

Z16 

Est series NJL Fri's. sales 

1046 





Fri-sepenW 25429 oh 126 








116ft 

138ft May 94 234ft 

187 

237ft 

234ft *{Uu , Al12,l34 

3.16ft 

241 to194 234ft 

269ft 

235ft 

239 V4 ♦(uov.najio 


240ft Sen 94 U2ft 

135ft 

172ft 

2J5ft »0fl2ft 24331 



240ft 

260 

241 ft *00114 62478 


2J3ftMar9S L67ft 

168ft 

246ft 

24B 

*007 ft 

4452 

242 

269ft May 93 i71ft 

232 

231ft 

172 

*031 

TO 


170ft to( 95 233ft 

234 

233ft 

334 




250ft Dec 95 iSBft 

233 ft 

230ft 

Z5T4 *007 

930 

Est, sates <uno Fri's. sales 

2647; 





Wi Open int 32*02® rtf 30 





SOYBEANS (CBOT) ioaobu r^mwn-floto- 

PWBr+d 




*93ft 

*S7V» 

*91ft *(UO 

564W 



*94ft 

*89 

633 ft * 003ft 51.103 


638 riig94 435ft 

*88 

433ft 

646U 

<007% 

BJT 2 



649 

644ft 

*A4ft iOOTft 

4308 


£55ftNnv« *JT 

*58 

*50'* 

633ft *003 

33315 


AlBftJanto 6 J 0 

643 ft 

*58 

6 J 8 % torn 

2372 

6J3ft 

642 Mar 95 *62 

646 

*41 ft 

*44 

+033 



433 May 95 *64 

*66 

441ft 

*44 

+007 

15 


643 ft to! to 643ft 

648ft 

444ft 

*64ft *031 ft 

328 


5J) ft Nov 95 633 

633 

*20 

430ft * 001 % 

1386 

Est. safes 3*000 Frfto.sa»M 

27440 






alert pc 





lBSJOMay 94 19*70 

19*90 

mto 

19*30 

+ 140 24.920 

23QJM 

190.60 Jul 94 19530 

197 JO 

19530 

79730 

*130 24420 

22 X 00 

18930 Aug 94 19440 

195.00 

79*30 

171X7 

41 JO 

7.10 


1B8JDSW94 19100 

19430 

T92J0 

19430 

<U 0 

5 475 


187.10Od94 190-50 

19200 

19020 

19230 

+ 140 

3447 



19140 

109 JO 

19730 

+ 1JB 

8347 



19730 

19030 

19130 

*IJ 0 




192JQ 

19100 

WL50 




UAJOMoy 95 19150 

(9150 

19230 

T9150 

*230 


Est. scries 1*000 Fri’s. sates 

12471 





FrrsoPBiirt 79485 off 386 






n ivy lOQfes. 




21 30 May 94 28.98 

29.18 

2050 

*8.93 

— 0.15 32J74 


77 35 tot 94 2 B35 

79.13 

2035 

2030 




2030 

2047 

2848 




2240 Sep 94 3805 

ran 

2730 

200 * 


1 MOU 


22.1803 94 2740 

2730 

2735 

2738 





2*97 

3445 

2*45 



2245 Jan to 1640 

2*70 

2*40 

2443 

-027 

1355 


Z&JSMarto 26.50 

34JC 

2035 

3635 

—025 



2530 May to 2630 

2430 

1420 

2*20 

— 030 

10 

2*40 

2630 to) 95 



3435 

-025 


EstNrie 

15000 FfTv safes 

15314 





Fri's open Int 10UPO UP 1*4 






Livestock 





(CM01) woaoM.- 


■L 






77X0 

7625 

76,90 

+043 31.172 



7*40 

7*12 

7*50 

+ 015 74345 



7232 

7240 

7240 

<003 12416 



7332 

7335 

7345 

*0)3 N.101 



7U7 

7172 





7300 Feb 95 7342 

7330 

73J7 

7177 


1340 


7330 Apr 95 






Est. sates 

0401 Fri's. safes 

5.19S 





Fri's open W KLS5* Off 39 






HdmER CATTLE (CM0U 

soaanw-ayo. 


*010 

1444 



>137 

>130 

*1-55 

55.00 

7938 APT 94 aOJO 

BUS 

0030 

0097 


0125 


■102 

0045 

0090 


3482 

mflfl 


0130 

0135 

61-50 






8035 





793000 94 1035 

8037 

8045 

8077 

-ot* 

579 



8135 

81.75 

87.20 



00.90 

79O0jbi96 S0-5D 

BQ52 

8045 

8042 

+002 


Est.sdc 

1023 Fri's. scries 

594 





Fri's open int 0333 off 49 







J»-57 Apr’M 4SOS 

4730 

4*47 

47.13 

-ora 

7353 









O.IS 

5237 

J IS 

—i^ 

3409 

5340 

4635 Aug 94 5740 

5740 

5QJTJ 

5030 

— I-S0 

2490 


43.(0 Od 94 4730 

4730 

4*60 

6*60 

— >-50 

7373 


4530 Dec 94 4735 

4735 

4737 

47 JO 

—1.47 

2344 

SOBS 

4030 Feb 95 4730 

4730 

4730 

4730 

-2-50 

250 

4*80 

47.90 Apr 95 4530 

4530 

45.15 

45.19 







49 JS 



Est safer 

0389 Fri's. wries 

Utt 





r _ . i t i ' - ■ 






PORKBSJLES (CMER) ksxxi Be- twin osr 

X 







5730 



41 JO 

4030 MOV 94 5*50 

5*90 

5*15 

5*65 

-137 

43* 

62-00 

39 JO Jul 94 5*85 

57.15 

5*37 

5*95 

- 1-0 

3393 

59 JO 

WOO Aug 94 5450 

5*90 

5430 

5*50 

— 1J2 


61.15 

39,70 FoP to 5735 

5735 

5745 

5745 

—230 


61 JO 

59.90 May 95 



5030 

-050 









Fri's open to! 0.90 off 227 







1 Season Season 

'^ mm 



m ^ m 


Wgh 

Low Open 

«gh 

Low 

dose 

OW 

Opitot 

1247 

*30 May 94 12.15 

1X29 

1 X 12 

1X77 

—002 40342 


9.15 Jul 94 1235 

1X38 

1X32 

1237 

— O01 3*728 

lira 

9420094 1145 

1130 

1134 

1107 

-002 37422 


9.17MCT95 1145 

I1JB 

1143 

nra 

-002 T3492 

nra 

l&57May9S 1148 

nra 

1148 

1146 


1.919 

1143 

1037 Jul 95 1143 

1143 

1143 

1741 

-002 

1355 

lira 

10370095 1139 

1139 

1139 

1137 

-002 

334 

Est. scries *611 Fri's. scries 

lOJIt 





| Fit's open tot 145.912 off 407 





COCOA (NCSE) romwilcfen— suer 

sn 




1348 

97HAMV94 (178 

1I«7 

1144 

1153 

-54 5*286 

1345 

999 Jul 94 1J7D 

1217 

1175 

1103 

—54 22034 

1377 

1 COO Sep 94 1234 

1247 

T19B 

1205 

—99 

9.768 

1309 

1 Ml Dec 94 1241 

1270 

1235 

1244 

—52 

6425 

1382 

1077 Mar « 1303 

1312 

1275 

1280 

-S3 

9330 

MOO 

IIIIMoyto 1295 

1295 

1293 

1300 

-63 

MB 


1225 Jul 93 1339 

1329 

1320 

1322 

-51 

1160 

1350 

1275 Sep 95 



1341 

-51 

481 

1437 

1338 Dee 95 



1364 

—51 

205 

EsL safes 22343 Fri's. scries AJ1I 





Fli'SOPOJirt *3423 OH 426 





f ORANGE JUICE CMCTTfl i540fl 4 *k- erms ntr Sl 



13530 

8930 May 94 1W.10 

mm 

110.10 

17140 

♦ 105 

7.951 

moo 

10X50 Jul 94 11330 

17550 

11330 

7M45 

+ 130 

*727 

U4_50 


117J5 

11*80 

11*95 

+ 1 JD 

23V4 

13*00 

JOUDNouW 11430 

nsra 

11*50 

11530 

< 0*6 

1337 


KBJDJwi95 11525 

n*so 

11*25 

n*ra 

<746 

1,956 

12*2S 

1DS3SMcr 95 11730 

11*00 

11730 

11*00 

+ 135 

220 

Ed. sales 3300 F+Ts. scries 

70 





| Fri's open tot 19413 u> 184 






Metals 




Hi GRAD* COPPER (HOMO SSAOQ 

teffOlNWfe. 



107 JO 

7330MO-94 9730 

9130 

1080 

9085 

-058 

1341 

9335 

7*59 Apr 94 9745 

91*5 

9145 

9070 

-045 

7320 


7140 May 94 *|JD 

9145 

90-55 

9045 

—045 47036 


7*10 Jut 94 9140 

9140 

9060 

9040 

-040 

874 

102.95 

7*20 Jul 94 9140 

9130 

90*3 

9055 

—035 14,115 

1(030 

7*90 Sep 94 9140 

9140 

9030 

9040 

-035 

6476 

Ml 30 

75J50K94 9139 

9130 

9040 

9040 

-ora 

1912 

9040 

7*90 Jon 95 



9058 

-ora 



7330 Fed 95 



9040 

-ora 


7735 

6U0MOTVS 97 JD 

tIJO 

9080 

9070 

-ora 



7*85 May to 9130 

9130 

9040 

9010 

-040 


97 JO 

78-00 Jlri 95 



90.90 

—ora 


9735 

75J0Auoto 9045 

9045 

9045 

9050 

-055 


9135 

79.18S9P9S 9080 

9*80 

9080 

9130 

-ora 

292 

9940 

7530 Oct 95 



9040 

-OSD 

184 


77 JS Nov « 






9135 

B8J0DK95 




-ora 



Jan 94 




-ora 


| Est. sates 7 JOB FtTvsefes 

6441 





Frtsoaer int 713*3 up 37 






/ 5LVEK (ffCMX} SMmroz.'crnpa’htma. 



593 

36*3Mcr94 5723 

57*0 

5693 

567 3 

-102 

435 

5713 

5183 Apr 94 



503 

-703 

5 

HI 3 

3710 May 94 5723 

SOU) 

5493 

509 J 


5810 

3713 JW 94 SJ6JI 

»*5 

5733 

5738 

—103 1*557 

58*0 


58*8 

579 -S 

57*2 

-103 


59*8 


5953 

5*16 

58*7 


56*0 

40 19 Jan to 



58*5 

—103 


4108 

41 *5 Mar 95 S9SJ 

6005 

59*0 

5913 

—103 

5417 

40*5 

4183 May 95 4010 

60*5 

/fflt 

5973 

- 10 J 

1,941 

4033 

<203 JulW 



6024 

— 702 

415 

56*0 

4JX0Septo 



6083 

—101 


612.0 

S393D0C95 6233 

42*0 

41*0 

<1*7 


1382 


JwiW 




—log 


I Ext. sates 71 JOT Fri's. scries 

24423 





Fri's open tot 118470 up 91 






PLATMJM WMBU PtaOL-tWnwrnvK 



0830 

33530 Art - W 41230 

47*00 

47000 

47730 

-230 

54777 

man 

3^99 Jul 94 41530 

41/40 

41230 

41330 

-33015397 

41*80 

34*000094 41*00 

47*00 

41330 




41 7 JO 

37*80 Jan 95 41*90 

41*50 

41*30 

41*50 

—230 


41*50 

39000 APT 95 41 Bra 

421 JO 

41730 




Est. safes NA FrirtsoMS 

Ltog 





I ATS open tot 733*6 Up 1310 






NCMX) Unvu-Mnw 





38*30 

375.10 Mar 94 



30*00 



41830 

33530 Apr 94 38930 

39080 

38*00 

38*10 


39240 

37*30 M4T9 94 39030 

39030 

39QJD 

309 JD 



41739 

33940 Jlte 94 39130 

39140 

39030 



41*00 

341J0AUO94 JMJ0 

39609 

39X20 




4I7J0 

34*8000 94 3MJ0 

39*00 

39*89 




42*50 


40090 

39830 



41130 


49*50 

W4J0 




41730 


40739 

41*00 




C&5D 






4,969 

41233 

380J0AUO to 




— X 10 


47330 

4103000 95 






42930 

4QU0 Dec 95. 42030 

43000 

41830 




£*.sriss 45400 Fri’s. scries 

4*532 











Food 

COHFU'C (NCSE) njoau.- am parti. 


9030 

6L25May94 12.20 

era 

1135 

8135 

0730 

4*90 Jul *4 

era 

■US 

*085 

bud 

8838 

68rasep94 

6*70 

•SJB 

US 

8435 

nra 

77.10DK94 

0*80 

S*IS 

asra 

8540 

8*10 

78,10 Mar to 

0780 

0730 

8*25 

8635 

8800 

8X50 May 95 8775 

87X5 

1748 

*7 JO 

o»ra 

8500 Jut 95 

0940 

8980 

BS30 

1*50 

SstaOn 

*979 Frrosdes 

7325 




FrfsaecnW 576*3 up 1 9 
SUGAR- WORLD II (MCOSt ttlM iK-omwe 


Finanaal 


96J8 -OOl 37,226 
9571 —002 7,101 

9£3f — 002 UBS 
*506 -002 21 


US T-BILLS (CMBU ti i NPe e -mctmu. 

9*76 HWJunM 9*10 96.lt 9*06 

9*48 »U5SepM 9574 957S 9549 

ro.10 KJlOscM 9140 9&40 9SJ3 

Mar 95 9SW 950) 9504 

Esr.iMs 2J36 Fn-S-uMB 2604 
AfsoXflM 47325 in <38 
SYR. TREASURY CCBOT1 SI00M0«ei-nN mac 

112- 05 817-82 MlW 107-01 107-085 106-30 107-0] — 0| 171273 

770-79510+2? SipW 706-10 07 4J5 

Est.sries »6O0 Frissafes 30665 

Rfsonenke 191615 up 1110 

ieYR.TREASWY ICBOT) iieunpw-piiuiMpinn 

775-21 707-74 AH1 94 107-10 107-24 107-01 107-14 OZ 292622 

115-07 W+T9 SCDM 10+24 106-34 10+11 10+16— Q 

114-21 705-24 OacMIO+OO HK-00 fOS-7* lS^Z7- 0) M 

111-07 105-03 Ma-KIOS-ll 105-11 104-28 104-31— 0) 35 

105-22 10+13 Junto 10+11 0) 1 

Estsries 6*666 Fi+tsOes 69690 
Fn’sopenlnl 3 10623 up 1162 

II PO-SIRMN+aM»32MlDnDDMO 
119-29 97-06 Jut 94 IU7-11 101-05 187-06 187-24 » OS ML 

11+26 9+12 Sen 94 10+15 107-07 tj+ffl * ~ 

11+00 91-19 Dec*) 10+17 10+21 10+31 70+10 ► 

11+20 102-08 AT 9510+72 10+ 23 1D+I0 lS-27 - 

n+19 9+15 Jim 93 I0S-01 » 

177-15 10+29 Sep 95 jn+M * 

113- 54 103-73 Dec *5 10+» - 

174-06 99-04 MV-96 HS-U * 

EsL sates 325600 FiTs. soles 3)5"" 

FrTimnint 4IIJ16 up 731 

tCBOn lua.MMAiap.pwM 
10+07 »-2l AmA4 94.J1 «+!■ 03-74 93-27 — 11 3066S 

«W WMHI - II " 

E* . ROBS *000 Fcl LsGes 5.553 
FrTsoPBIInt 7*434 up 1389 

euroaJujjRs (men) n^eeipd 

95890 WJOOJmW 9*4*7 9MSB «659 I8LSZ7 


43682 

30650 

1634 

69 

u 

33 

34 


Season Season 
tfoh Lour 


Open tfigh Law Once dig ORJnt 


9*570 miaSepM 95670 95660 9S200 9U20 —1035*871 

95.100 SOTHIDkM 9*760 96790 9*710 9*701 —10286600 

9*500 9OM0MCT9S 94M0 9*SOI 94678 9*490 —10242609 

9*730 9*7106X1 95 9*220 9*230 9*168 94.180 —10195615 

9*520 91 610 Sep 95 9X960 95840 91900 91920 —10153600 

9*280 97.780 Dec 95 f*6B 93680 91600 93630 — 101ZI670 
94220 9O750Mfir96 91580 93J» 91510 91530 -20109,312 
EsL sates 281223 FiTl sales 267637 
Rt'sapeniM 2669,964 oH 2847 

BRITISH POUND (CMBO seerunma-l poMcwautADOOl 
IJ3B4 )6Hi7MarW __ 16836 — « 

1J7 SO 16474 Jim 94 169M 16940 16896 16918 — 16 27664 

\J*m 16640 Sep M 16870 16890 16B50 16080 —14 <29 

16950 16900 Dec 94 16030 16140 16820 16854 —12 31 

EsL sales *262 FrTs. sates H3U 
Frf* open Int 2*126 UP 1538 


Est. sates 2,533 Prf*se4es *S6 
FrrsmnH 4*270 up 1384 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) IMrirnft. 1 POftwmiaPnmol 
0J.W5 0J6J2Mdr94 DJ974 0J9» QJ923 0J931 —22 541 

ojm OAtarjunH asm ojbks turn 03955 - 32101,174 

0JAt5 QJ6005ep94 0.9938 OJMO 0J924 0J937 -22 2JB4 

0J9S3 8L5S90Oec94 QJ930 -22 115 

ESI. sates 3*649 FtTs. softs 50 JM 
Fri's open bit 10*367 off 591 

JAPAHgSBYEN (0600 (nrvm.| RHwhlim 
AmS^OamUunM QJ C^ ]ftg»M5060g5B0J09634 +63 4*899 

OJOWOM AOB»42^ W 800942906094197031096281609689 466 1,915 

06(790 l(A0D9SSDec 94 06094700609741860967081109747 tU 399 
ER. softs I7JV3 FfTLsries 22656 
Fri's open W 51jn3 

5WIS5 FRANC ICMBU interne- Mem muon town 
02082 Q65»Jun94 8J045 0JD45 02010 *703! —19 34622 

*7086 0.6600 S ep 94 *7030 82045 02019 82040 —19 272 

0J1Q5 *8950 Dec 94 82056 —19 45 

E-sL sates 73.170 FrTs. sides 12674 
FritoapenM 3*739 off 522 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 (NCI HD 604001+- temper lx 
7960 57 67 May 94 7*57 77.10 7*50 

5*30617 96 77.15 7760 77.10 
59J10C794 7*15 700 7*00 

5961 Dec 94 71.76 71.90 7165 

<OJOMar95 7265 7265 7260 

6460 May 95 7327 7360 7X27 

70JDJUI95 

Est. so Ins 4.000 Fri's.pdes *629 
FrTsopenm 54,956 up 11 
HEATM604L (NMER) 42X00 OM-raft per 0 
57 JO 41 20 May 94 «bs ck 

4160AXI94 4260 4165 4160 

42J5AH94 4160 3X20 41JO 

4325 Aug 94 4*30 4460 4220 

4*60 Sep 94 4565 4565 4360 

4520OG96 4660 4*10 4560 

4*70 Mov 94 4760 47.10 4*00 
47.55 Dec 94 4720 4760 «60 
4135 Jan 95 4858 4S6I 473$ 
MJO Feb 95 4960 49JJQ 4705 
4755 Mar 95 4720 4*40 47 JD 

436SAPT9S 4831 4&7S «t« 

£-n 47.11 47.11 

4720 Am 95 4*91 4*91 4*79 

f7JEM9S 

4*50 Aug 95 4760 4765 4760 
- 4920 Sea 95 4065 4B6S 4865 

f* sates NA. F rTirate 36JE 
RfsOMH HMD off SOBI^ 

1 “""lWTCHuiie (nmbu 1 pm- — i _ 
1 * 12 May 94 iSoilra iSo 

1426 Am 94 7425 1461 1469 

1464 AH 94 1421 1461 1425 

7465 Aug 94 7561 l£jji 1435 

1427 Sep 94 1503 1 4IB us n 

74.99 Ori H 7465 Ijjjy 14.45 
151 7 Nov 94 1525 152S l/E 

7 525 Dec 94 1SLS6 I5S JS i 
1547 Jon 9S 1560 liM 53 
1544 Feb 95 1558 1561 1520 

1525MOT95 1523 1523 1562 

1 566 Apr 95 1555 1555 1U 
1*05 May 95 1569 1568 lsS 

1*20 Junto 7523 1573 1573 

1*00 Dec to 1*70 1620 1*50 


8815 

7665 

7*00 

7440 

7560 

7*00 


5060 
960 
5540 
57.17 
5720 
5820 
5960 
4225 
5*75 
57 JO 
5560 


7*64 —063 71,920 

7765 — 874 1*174 
7*15 —865 2631 
71.70 HUB 14J1S 
7162 -801 736 

7X35 -063 228 

7320 -065 48 



U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Gr umman Sets a Bidding Deadline 

NEW YORK (API — Gnunman Corp. on Monday outlined anctron 

Corp. and Northrop Corp^ to try to avoid 
Grumman agreed this month to a merger offer valued at Sl^J^ion 
from Martin Marietta, but Northrop later made a 
In a letter to both defense-contracting companies, Grommansaid its 
board had decided that open bidding would be m the best interests of us 
shar eholders, employees, customers and suppliers. 

Reno Air Executive Moves to l WA # 

RENO, Nevada (Bloomberg)— Jeff Erikson, thepresident of fledgling 
Reno Air Inc, said Monday that he was leaving the stan-up earner to 
help lead the much-larger Trans World Airlines Inc. 

Mr. Eiflcson. who had been with Reno since it was incorporated m July 
1992, joins TWA four months out of bankruptcy, as the airline tries to 
rebuild its fleet arid regain its lost presence in overseas markets. 

As pres dent and chief operating officer, Mr. Erikson takes over a 
p osi tion that has not existed at TWA sinoe.1988- Mr. Erikson will report 
to Donald F. Craib Jr- TWA chairman and chief executive. 

Mattel Buying Maker oi Hula Hoops 

EL SEGUNDO, California (AP) '-Mattel lot said Monday i: will 
buy Kransco, a San Francisco-based competitor, putting Hula Hoops 
and Frisbees undo- tlw same roof as Barbie. The value of the deal was not 
disclosed. 

In 1993, Kransco sold about SI 75 million worth of goods, mdimmg 
Power Wheels battery-^towoed, ride-on vehicles; Hula Hoop mid Frisbee 
products marketed under the Wham-0 trademark; and Morey Boogie 
boards and other water sport toys. 

Mattel, niafcef of the Barbie doll, is the largest U5.-based toymaker. It 
reported revenue of $2.7 bfllion in 1993. 

Spectrum Reduces Board as 4 Quit 

MANHASSET, New York (Bloomberg) — Spectrum Information 
Technologies Inc. said Monday it was reducing its board to seven 
members from 1 1 as foar executives resigned. 

Peter Caserta, its president; Andrew Migtiorim, James Paterek and A. 
Werner Fleus have resigned from the board, the maker of wireless data 
communications products said. 

Mr. Casern took a leave of absence last week after five people 
associated with Paradigm Group, an investment company established by 
Mr. Caserta in 1988, were arrested on charges of mail fraud. 

For the Record 

Bell Canada Intematiwad Ido, a unit of Canadian tdeoommmucations 0 
giant BCE Inc, changed the terms of its deal to boy 30 percent of Jones 
Intertable Inc. due to looming U.S. cable rate cuts. BCTs investment will 
remain at $400 milli on but its pace wfll slow. (Reuters) 

Trizec Carpi, based in Calgary; Alberta, said that Horsham Corp., 
based in Toronto, would acquire a 43 percent interest in it in return for a 
600 million Canadian dollar ($436 mmion) investment (Bloomberg) 
A tlantic Richfield Co. said its president. Mil Bowlin, 51, had been 
chosen by the oil company’s board to succeed L.M. Cook, 65, as chief 
executive, effective July 1. (Xhighi-Ritfder) 

Eastman Kodak Col said it had established a worldwide business trait to 
serve digital -image users. ( Knight ■ Ridder) 

MetaHgeseflscfaaft Corp- a unit of Mctaflroseilschaft AG, sold its S3 
percent stake in Methanex Crap, for 124.7 mmion Canadian dollars (591 
million). The stock was sold through a private transaction cm March 10 to 
Gordon Capital Corp. and a syndicate of institutions, according to a 
filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. ( Bloomberg) 

Keoqier Coipk said it renominated four directors to its board and urged 
shareholders to reject candidates proposed by hostile suitor General 
Electric Capital Crap. (Bloomberg) 

Armco Inc plans to idle its Empirc-Detioit Steel Division facilities in 
Ohio and In diana, probably for aboot ayear, starting May 29. (Bloomberg) 


W— kud Box Offca ‘ 

The Associated Pros 

LOS ANGELES — U D2 The Mighty Dudes” topped the weekend box 
office, earning an estimated S10.5 milli on. Following are the Top 10 
moneymakers based on Friday ticket safes and estimated sates for 
Saturday and Sunday. 


1. T» The Mighty Durts- 

{Watt Disney Pictures! 

5103 million 



Z "Naked Gun 33a- 

(Paramount) . . -. 

.... 9> million 



1 "The Paper" 

1 Universal! 

57 ml man 

’ 1 


*-ScNntflertU*r 

{Universal) 

MJ million 

* 

• 

5. ~Atovc the Rltn - 

(New Une ammo) 

5X8 million 



* "Guanfing Te»" 

motor) 

5X1 million 



7. "Monkey Trouble- 

{New Line cinema) 

523 rallilon 


r 

* "PhTlodelphhr 

{ Tristar) 

*2 million 



9. "Mr*. Douhtfire- 

{ Twentieth Century-Fax ) 

113 million 



W. "LWttnlng Jot*" 

(Savoy Pictures) 

513 million 




03772 

077 90 Mar 94 07200 

0L72M 

073X7 

07194 


280 


07805 

07238 Junto 

07256 

0726* 

072S2 

07255 

+« 43.967 

- 

07740 

07210 SOP 94 

07340 

07366 

0723 

07231 


I486 

• v 

07670 

07200 Dec M 

07220 

07220 

07210 

07212 


903 

. 

07522 

07770 Jun 95 




07175 

+< 

34 

> 


k *' 


4121 

4160 

4)63 


4563 

4*38 

4*91 

4*98 

4*13 

43J* 

4463 

4453 

4468 

4143 

4*41 


-arasuio 

-26137256 
—233 23633 
-223 9.WJ 
— £73 8232 
-223 *513 
-223 4620 
— 2J31829S 
—266 3J» 
—263 2J» 
—250 1274 
-25Z25JB0 
— 2J8 _ 


— 2J8 


—1.1110*231 

—164 6*675 
-0913*117 
—023 79226 
— 885 20618 
-86312.137 
—884 9622 
—873X2260 
-875 *166 
-074 7690 
—871 662 
— *68 *747 
-864 *136 
—870 1*497 
’1 HJ37 


4250 

6 U 0 

<160 

4050 

4860 

5*00 

4*15 


43J8APT94 4565 4555 005 

«A20MO»94 4*05 «*K 5» 

4*95 ton ?4 4*30 4*30 4*10 
4S2SJUI94 4560 8 K 4*0 
45.VJ Aue 94 4400 4*00 

MMN SS ^ 

® ** 

Frracoanw 124626 UP 7115 


1*82 

14.12 

1*25 

1460 

1*58 

1*73 

1*63 

lira 

14U 

U 2 B 

1562 

15J5 

1568 

1523 

1*50 


4331 —3.77 22J20 

43J» —210 48,145 
4*67 -36321771 
4162 — 2J4 10600 
4467 —261 *448 
4*37 —264 *140 
ft-92 —843 1661 
nn —843 2665 


Stock Indexes 

fifeTO*/* 12 

otS S552 S 135 *sm» *** “K 

S-ff a * J5 S5U0 * aja 2 

■ 5 2£*i 2S76S >0Jb 17 

go.*— 25860 *058 

FfTl open lot 3^5! rtiSi 


Moody's 
Reulen 
DJ. Futures 

Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

Prwtow 

122*30 15205 

t«U 0 USA 

Jl A NA 

227^4 23075 




i 










* e -v^ -v 


^ r* 








jfce conference program 
will highlight the investment 

opportunities in 

Latin America following the 
region’s economic revival. 


Latin America 

A New Investment Partner 


LONDON - JUNE 9 - 10 - 1994 

wi n mw w 

Heralb3£n>_unc 0 

h-—. — - — — — • tEtBMMkM 


FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

Brenda Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax: (44 71)836 0717 





















































































































































] Cr* ixSa 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 


~Vot e 


Page 13 




> U.L 


Inflation Slows, 
But Bundesbank 

Unlikelv to Ram 


La Suisse’s Bitter End 


■ 

■■■ D;<v 
• s <. 

i . . 5, J: 
‘ ' 




Compiled by Our Staff From Dispaeha 

. — West German 

inflation slowed in March, accord- 
ing lo data released Monday, but 


month's inflation, but rents and 
prices for services rose steeply. 

Mr. Sindelsaid recent falls' in the 
rate of inflation were largely caused 


^ dui *«wcoi miiauon were larwiycausea 

S^S^“- oushu>prod!he by receding import prices. 
Bundesbank tocut interest rates any He and other economists said 

__ did not expect the Bundes- 

l nereaeraj Statistics Office said bank to change its diyyum rate, 
the consumer prices in Western which now stands at 5 .25 percent, 
Germany rose a provisional 0.2 for at least the next month. The 
percent m March from February next meeting of the central bank's 
ana SJ. Percent year-on-year. In policy-setting council will be on 
Februmy, the consumer price index April 14. The German central bank 
rose U_> percent from January and last lowered its discount rate in 
3.4peicent on the year. mid-February. 

Tte provisional index was com- “From the price side there is 
puted on the basis of regional data room for a rate cut, but this is not 
from Bavaria, Baden-WQmem- the only consideration for the 
bag. North Rhine- W estphalia and Bundesbank,” said Burkhard All- 
Hesse. geier, an economist with the Bank 

Economists said the figures af- in Liech tens tein, 
firmed that inflation was still fall- Moderate growth of the M-3 
big steadily and could fa H below 3 money supply and inflation control 
percent in the next few months. are the central bank's two key con- 
“This was exactly as we had ex- di lions for lowering interest rates, 
peeled,” said Lothar SindeL an A 21.2 percent surge in M-3 in 
economist at Bayersiche Vereins- January on an annualized basis 
bank. “But it’s not a sign for a worried markets because the cen- 
significanunteresi-rate cut It's not tral bank had set a target growth 
that good.” rale this year of between 4 and 6 

The Bundesbank’s target for in- percent M-3 jumped by an amnia- 
flation is 2 percent lized 17.6 percent in February, 

Cheaper heating oil prices played based cm provisional figures, 
an important role in suppressing this (Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 

Pearson’s Profit Soars 38% 
As Media Empire Grows 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Pearson PLC, 
publisher of the Financial Times 
and an aspiring television giant, 
said Monday that its pretax profit 
surged 38 percent in 1993, to £208.6 
million (S312 milli on), and that it 
would continue to focus on ex- 
panding its media empire. 

Lord Blakenham, the chai rman, 
said that 1994 had started out 
strongly but that it would be “a 
year of transition in which we do 
not have the benefit of the profits 
of the demerged Doulton and wfll 
only have the dividend on oar re- 
maining 41 percent stake in 
Cameo.” Last year Pearson spun 
off Cameo International PLC its 
ofl services unit, and Royal Doul- 
ton PLC its fine china business. 

The company said that it would 
also raise its dividend by 8 percent, 
to 13 pence per share. Revenue 


from continuing operations rose 12 
percent, to £1.28 billion. 

Lord Blakenham said that Pear- 
son’s concentration on media 
meant that it would continue to 
“build on the written word” but 
that it would also be “putting more 
money into screen-based business- 
es.” He also reaffirmed the compa- 
ny’s commitment to expand its in- 
terestsin the Aria/Padhc area and 
to Irak* “suitable” acquisitions in 
the United States and Europe. 

He said that Thames Television 
and Extd, which joined the group 
last year, have “already made a 
useful contribution to profits after 
fiiumdng costs.” Frank Barlow, 
Pearson’s managing director, de- 
scribed revenue and profit growth 
of BSkyB, the satellite television 
company in which Pearson holds a 
17.5 percent stake, as “full steam 
ahead.’* (Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


By Sarah Veal 

Sprout to the Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — The fall of one of Switzerland’s 
most prominent entrepreneurs has brought down 
with him La Suisse, the newspaper that was both a 
symbol and namesake of the country. Entwined in 

its collapse are the country's new economic realities, 
a race to dominate the local press, Geneva politics 
and the cantonal rivalries so dear to the Swiss heart 

La Suisse, on the newsstands for the past 95 years, 
was based in Geneva and reflected that city's lead- 
ing role in French-speaking Switzerland. But new 
competition from Lausanne, both the city itself and 
a rival press group based there, helped dethrone La 
Suisse. Its own management did the rest 

Jean-Claude Nicole was 27 in 1961 when his 
grandfather put him at the head of the family 
newspaper. But Mr. Nicole envisioned a bigger role 
for himself. In the 1980s, be invested in Alpine real 
estate with the idea of building a convention center. 
He reportedly lost 70 million francs (S49 minion) 
trying to bankroll his dream of a media empire 
including a private radio station, a Minitd system in 
Switzerland and a European satellite television sta- 
tion. An additional 65 million francs was spent on a 
state-of-the-art printing company. 

But io the 1990s the Swiss discovered that their 
economy was not immune to the European reces- 
sion. Rising interest rates began to take a heavy toll 
on those who had borrowed. Swiss companies 
moved across the border in search of cheaper 
operating costs and access to the European Union. 
Unemployment rose to levels not seen in Switzer- 
land since the 1930s. Advertising budgets in 
French-speaking Switzerland plummeted by 30 
percent. Mr. Nicole’s businesses, especially La 
Suisse, appeared dangerously exposed 

The paper’s losses began to snowball: 9 million 
francs lost in 1991; 15.4 million in 1992; 18 million 
in 1993. Current debt of the paper’s parent compa- 
ny, Sonor, is estimated at 200 million francs. 

La Suisse's rirculation at its height was about 
80,000; when it collapsed, that had fallen to 50,000. 

Meantime, another press group based in Lau- 
sanne was fast becoming a Goliath. In a wave of 
mergers and acquisitions, Edipresse, under the 
entrepreneur Pierre Lamtmi&re, gained control of 
43 percent of the daily press, as measured by 
rirculation, in French-speaking Switzerland 

In 1990, Edipresse created a new Swiss daily, Le 
Nouveau Quotidien. And two Edipresse publica- 
tions, Tribune and Le Matin, stand to gain 15,000 in 
arculation as a result of La Suisse's closure. 

Internationally, Edipresse has magazines and 
television stations in Spain and Portugal; its for- 


eign businesses accounted for 35 percent or its 
revenue of 350 million francs in 1992. 

In January, Sana's creditor banks, Swiss Bank 
Corp. and Cridit Suisse, took control of La Suisse. 
Edipresse offered 30 million francs for the title, logo, 
circulation list and printing contracL 
Mr. Nicole fought back in an announcement that 
two foreign sponsors had come forward with 24 
million francs to keep his newspaper alive. On the 
strength of this promised investment, he sought a 
loan from Banque Cantonale <tc Geneve. But his 

Debt and competition from 
a Lausanne- based rival sank 
the Geneva daily. 


sponsors remained mysterious; “an Individual who 
wishes to remain discreet” and a Liechtenstein- 
based company called Compagnie Financ&re Inter- 
nationale. No sign of them ever appeared in Geneva. 

So Mr. Nicole's creditors deaded to stop publi- 
cation. Edipresse returned with a take-ii-or-ieave- 
it offer: 5 million francs for the title and circula- 
tion list, 1 1 million for the printing contract. It 
withdrew this offer on March 13 when Geneva 
members of the printers union threatened to dis- 
rupt distribution of ah Edipresse papers. 

Days before closure, the editors and journalists of 
La Suisse formed a cooperative and launched a 
project for a new La Suisse to put before an expen 
appointed by the cantonal government. 

The Geneva city council promised to guarantee 
a loan of 3 milli on francs from the civil servants’ 
pension fund. The Banque Cantonale gave a tenta- 
tive green light to an 8 million franc credit line. 

But Gil BaHlod, the expert, rejected the first 
project as “tragically unrealistic.” His verdict on a 
revised and more modest project was no less harsh, 
and the city council and Banque Cantonale with- 
drew their credit offers. 

The political faOout of the collapse is bitter. On 
Thursday, the usually staid cantonal legislature rang 
with aneiiofttinnc Deputies of the Left Alliance 
asserted the rightist government had sold itself to 
Edipresse. The right retorted the left supported the 
employees’ cooperative only for political reasons. 

“The political issue was to have a Geneva-based 
voice on the national level That seems to be lost,” 
said Peter Tschopp, economics professor at the 
University of Geneva. “This loss could become an 
issue because there is a rivalry between Lausanne 
and Geneva in terms of attracting exhibitions, 
trade fairs and new businesses.” 


Volvo’s Bid 

ForBCP 

Is Richer 


Compiled by (hr Staff From Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Volvo AB on 
Monday relaunched its bid for the 
one-quarter stake in Branded Con- 
sumer Products AB that it does not 
already own. 

The bid terms remain as declared 
— one new Volvo share for each six 
BCP shares tendered — but the 
value of the bid increases to 7 bul- 
lion kronor ($887 million) from 4 r 7 
billion kronor, in line with the ap- 
preciation of Volvo stock since the 
bid was launched last au tumn 

Volvo suspended the bid when 
its planned merger with Renault 
collapsed late in the year. 

Volvo's class B shares rose 9 kro- 
nor on Monday to 635 kronor, giv- 
ing the bid a value of 105 JO kronor 
per BCP share. BCP stock jumped 
5.5 kronor Monday to 100 kronor. 

Volvo owns 73.7 percent of BCP, 
which comprises Swedish Match, 
Procordia Food, Procordia Bever- 
ages and Procordia Invest. 

Volvo also said it would propose 
a five-for-one stock split at its an- 
nual meeting, to be carried out af- 
ter the offering to BCP sharehold- 
ers has been implemented. 

Volvo said the spHi was aimed at 
facilitating trading in its stock, pri- 
marily by small shareholders. The 
par value of the shares will be re- 
duced to 5 kronor from 25. 

Some share analysts said there 
was also interest in Volvo after a 
report in the daily Svensfc a DagbJa- 
det that quoted a company execoti- 
veas saying Volvo was eager to in- 
troduce a small, inexepensive 
model into the key North Ameri- 
can market 

The paper quoted Mats-Olaf 
Palm, head of Volvo Cars of North 
America, as saying that to keep 
Volvo sales there at a level of at 
least 100,000 cars a year, the com- 
pany needed a cheaper alternative 
to the 800 and 900 series cars. 

( Reuters, AFP) 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2333 



ONDJFM 
1983 1894 

ange Index 


London 

Paris 

FTSE 100 Index 

CAC40 

3500 ' idi 

2400 

3«o m 

2300 JlA, ; 

3300 J k 


3200 . / \ 

m fU f\ : 

310o/W 

2100* W 

3000 O N D J F M 

m O N D J F M 

1993 1994 

1993 1994 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Frankfurt 

Hejgjjfcj 

London 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources: Reuters, 


AEX 

Stock Index 

DAX 

FAZ 

HEX 

Financial Times 30 
FTSE 1QO 
General Index 

MtB 

CAC40 

Affaarevaertden 
Stock index 
SBS 

AFP 


Monday 

Close 

41033 

7,53635 

2,161.42 

82230 

1,79434 

2,47930 

3,12930 

32732 

1,10430 

2,14439 

1,75739 

tLA. 

1,00134 


% 

Change 
406.83 -1-1.01 

7.565.47 -038 

2,130.06 t-1,47 

817.86 +0.53 

1,805.73 -035 

2.472.40 +039 

3.129.00 +0.02 

325.97 +0.41 

1.063.00 +3.86 

2,136.62 +0.37 

1.756.82 +0.02 

480.67 

993.79 +0.82 

InHiiuliiMul Ikf.VniihuiM 


Very briefly; 

• Cameroon won a rescheduling of its debt to government creditors that 
calls for a reduction In repayments of up to 50 percent; Cameroon's 
foreign debt, primarily to governments, was $6.55 billion at end-1992. 


• Bertelsmann AG said it was negotiating with Walt Disney u>. about 
taking a stake in the television station Vox Fite- & Femseh GmbH; 
Bertelsmann has said Vox will be liquidated if new investors are not 
found by Thursday. 

• Muncbener Ructeerskberungs-gesettsdnft AG said that in an attempt 
to draw more interest from foreign investors it would list its registered 
stock next month for continuous trading on the Frankfurt exchange: 
until now, the share has traded only at the official fixing. 

• lnchcape PLC a distributor of Japanese cars, said pretax profit rose 9 
percent, to £271.4 million ($407 million ), in 1993. but said it expected 
tittle relief this year from slow business conditions and the high yen. 

• lifiane Bettencourt and Nesdt SA are leaving unchanged their stakes of 
51 and 49 percent in GesparaL the holding company through which they 
control L’OrfeaL after their 28-year-old shareholders agreement expired; 
each retains a right of first refusal on the other's stake. 

AFP. Bloomberg, Reuters. AP. AFX 


REGIONS: Development in Wealthy European Areas, Driven by Technology , Ignores National Boundaries 


Continued from Phge9 

ance across the Belgian- Dutch bor- 
der linking two of Europe’s biggest 
ports. Maastricht, liege and Aa- 
chen have revived then medieval 
community in a prosperous trian- 
gle that crosses the Dutch, Belgian 
and German frontiers. 

Other regions where common e- 
cononric interests are conquering 
nati onal boundaries include the Atl- 
antic Arc (Ireland, Wales, Brittany, 
Basque country, Galicia and Portu- 


NYSE 

Monday's chains 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 

(Continued) 


Hghlwaott Phi YW P 6 IttK Kali LawtjwgOi-Ba 


UMonfc SS 

HMiLowBccfc OW VM PE ltlla Hah LnwlJQl«gOi-g» 

mjUiMie 

J Hi H * 3 * n 


gal), the Baltic-North Sea zone 
(Scotland, Scandinavia, Hamburg 
and Poland) and the Eastern Trian- 
gle of Vienna, Prague and Budapest. 

In Europe as elsewhere, cities are 
in many ways becoming more im- 
portant than Tuitions- By 2000, said 
Pascal Mara gall the urban econo- 
mist who is Barcelona’s mayor, there 
wiD be 19 metropolitan areas in the 
world with populaticHis of at least 20 
mfltion people each. “Gties. not na- 
tions, will become the principal 
identity for most people,” he said. 


YM PE 1005 Koh LowLOttMOfoc 

a - '8 ’S *8 1 It 

? = J 1 I « -5 


Regional affiances are increasing- 
ly seen as a pragmatic and logical 
approach to building a more united 
and prosperous Europe: 

The same desire to preserve local 
identity that motivated much of the 
opposition to the Maastricht Treaty 
on European Union is prompting 
many people to demand that nation- 
al governments yield more power to 
the regions. Indeed, an often-over- 
looked section of the treaty calls for 
a Council of Regions that many 
expect to quickly assume wider re- 


sponsibilities and possibly evolve 
into a kind of European Senate. 

Much of the criticism made by 
national governments and the Eu- 
ropean Commission against the 
Four Motors partnership is that 
those regions arc only interested in 
sustaining their own level of pros- 
perity, to the exclusion of poorer 
neighboring regions. 

The commission wants the richer 
areas to “adopt” a poor region or 
risk having their funding cm. But 
Europe's wealthier regions are 


looking elsewhere. They are reach- 
ing out to counterparts in Aria to 
lore investments, widening the dis- 
parity with their poorer neighbors 
in Europe. 

Alsace, for example, was so eager 
to capture Japanese investment 
that authorities hired a filmmaker 
to produce a soap opera for Japa- 
nese television extollmg the virtues 
of the region. The show, called 
“Blue Sides Over Alsace,” is credit- 
ed, along with the presence of a 
Japanese school in Mulhouse, with 


attracting Japanese corporate in- 
vestments that have created more 
than 5,000 jobs. 

“A lot of the attacks are based on 
the view that we are only a dub of 
the rich," acknowledged Thieny 
Bernard, general manager of the 
foreign relations department for 
the Rhdne-Alpes region of France. 

Those links are intensifying in 
different areas, including culture, 
education, environment and social 
policies as well as transport and 
communications. 


INFLATIONS Old Theories Have Not Been Tested in a Global Economy 



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Continued from Page 9 
ity, and how capacity is used, no 
longer do so with great accuracy. 
Robert D. Reischauer, director of 
the Congressional Budget Office, 
said; “Full capacity is not a precise 
point or an observable condition, it 
is a range and a condition that has 
become very hard to pin down.” 

One problem with the traditional 
theory involves factory-operating 
capacity. In the 1970s ana 1980s, 
when factories operated at more 
than 80 percent of their potential 
capacity, as they are doing today, 
they began to have trouble keeping 
up with orders. 

The big difference today is that 
Japan, Germany, Italy, France and 
Canada are suffering from weak 
economies and low factory operat- 
ing rates, said Nancy Lazar, a se- 
nior economist at the fSI Group in | 
New York. “Their operating rates ( 
have fallen from 88 percent to 79 
percent in tbe past four years," she 
said, “and in today’s free-trade en- 
vironment. this excess global ca- 
pacity wiB hold down inflation in 
the United States.” 

U.S. auto manufacturers, for ex- 
ample. are operating at more than 
90 percent of capacity today, an 
inflationary level. 

But Japan, for one has auto fac- 


tories without enough work to da 
and they arc standing Ity to make 
cars for the U.S. market, Ms. Lazar 
and other economists argue. Or cars 
can be brought in from a Ford plant 
or a General Motors plant in north- 
ern Mexico, factories that arc now, 
with tariff barriers almost gone, part 
of US. production capacity. 

The concept of capacity has 
changed in recent years. When Gil- 
lette Co. finds demand for its razor 
blades rising in the United States, 
tbe company is not forced to ex- 
pand a factory in this country. In- 
stead it often takes a less expensive 
alternative: the new orders go to a 
Gillette plant abroad that is operat- 
ing below capacity. 

SiraQaiiy, the notion that the 
current unemployment rate of 65 


United States 
Aerospace 
False Claims 


PACE and ROSE 

ATTOHNEY 6 AND COUKSELMS 
WASHINGTON D C 
1202 ' 775 - 2 C® 3 
PARIS 
AA 2 a IB 41 
LOSANCELE 6 
■ 310 > 277 - 29 QO 


represents full employment or 
nearly full employment is a view 
that dashes with the continuing 
layoffs and job cutbacks. 

It also dashes with the public's 
perceptions about jobs, percep- 
tions that make Americans more 
reluctant than in the past to spend 
or drive op prices, even if they have 


jobs, some labor economists argue. 

“There is not a sense erf comfort, 
even though the rate of unemploy- 
ment is relatively low,” said John 


Bregger, assistant commissioner of 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Tbe administration is similarly 
reluctant to embrace the view that 
strong economic growth since last 
summer is pushing the nation 
quickly toward full employment 
and with it. inflation. But neither 
has it criticized the Fed for raising 
rates, first in early February and 
again last week, to slow the econo- 
my by trying to discourage people 
from spending on credit 


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Page 14 


NASDAQ 


Monday's PtIms 

NASDAQ prices as of 3 p.m. New York time. 
This list complied by tfte AP, consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities In terms of dollar value, it is 
updated twice a year. 


12 Month 
Woh Low Stock 


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*7%mfcApSsous M 


_ - 337 
U 71 37 

_ 11 54 

_ 50 6771 


14*6 1446—1 
4944 048 4k 49W — 

1616 15*4 15*4 _ 

27 ’4 23V. 36*4 — V. 

“ B 837 u 22 'A 21ft 2l3i *46 
i6 1142 6 546 546 —ft 

X0 24 162 4ft 4 4 — Vl 

„ _ 42 34ift js 35 —1*6 

2J1 14 K252 41*6 41 41 —V. 

A 6 277 24% 24 ft 34% -% 
_ 15 7716 30 38. 3BW -.% 


A 26 9560 a^dlTVj IB'A— 14# 


1.1 12 

_ 4 


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36 97* 946 9*4 — Vk 

134 11 'A 10 V, 10% — ft 




744 7ft»i 

25V# SUApdlmu 
52 lBftApWMtS 
21*6 15*6 Arbor .24 

l3 

mk'BVkArSsnt J4 

31 4ft 15 Armor A4 

224o 13ft Arnolds AO 

24*6 SftArttft 
44 16 AspcITl 

DV. 14 AsdCmB 
39 25W AltSftAT S 31 

17ft 944 AlrTele 
SO 'ft 1616 Atmol 
374# IB AuBon 
yv u 3*6AuroSv 
IS'ft 6V6AUSPOX 
614637 AufodK M 

I 2Vl 444 AuTOfrTXJ 
*4*# 194* Alltalnd 


_ . _ 34*# 244# 2446 -ft 

_ 29 1390U 3446 33 , 33*# - 

_ _ 599 23*6 221ft 221ft —9* 

14 _ 231 72 34 324. 23V, -4# 

J £3 1963 27*6 Sft 25*1—1*6 

J 52 1054 24 ft 23*1 23*4—1*# 

_ _ 1333 646 4 6 —*6 

„ 182 10 9'ft 944 — 'A 
_ 31 19967 46*6 4246 45 ’ft —46 

1A 14 522 18 17 17V6 —*6 

1 20 234 77 26 24 — V6 

3J " 100 30*6 274* 29*6 -W 

_ 69 256 26V, 26*1 2646 -’ft 

J 15 1030 1316 174y 13 - *6 

3J 20 320 20'ft 1946 20 - 

’f H ^ ^*6 19W 21*6— l"** 

zS }n l s ^:32 

131 24 813 34 32*4 33 — *4 

_ £ W 12 10*4 10*6 —ft# 

I 30 5987 44W 4346 44*4—2*6 


*4 9*#Autqtots 
16 AwWTCtl 



Z IB ‘846 7*2 6*6 7^ —46 

i %A ^ S T- 1 - 

Z 21 108 30'ft 29*6 30 -’A 

■399 2144 1B4* 2041 - *6 

2799 244* 23V* ZS —1*6 


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J2 

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144* 7*Bol!ev 
25*6 1 546 Baker J 
24 B*6Bah “ 

32*ft 24% Banl .. 

Bi V. 6244 BcOno . . 

8Mi 

3346 1746 SIC Wore 
19’d 11 46 Banters s 
38V6 2646 Banta s 

3S W ^S5? SV 

16 916BciretRj 
I9V6 9'ABasExpt 
43 27V6BasefFs 


■i»i 


3746 38 
49*6 27 


32 J4!ftBonJar ■ 


. iBlncfly 
524* 2544 Blooen 
13V. BWffiamot 
6*6 4VuB*lTcG 
22*610 CHkHwK 
laVS ByiBlyth 
331ft 264# BoatBns 1J4 
231ft 149. BobHvn J7 
1444 5'A BaCORS 
2|4# 1346BoakMffl 


321ft 14** I ^ 
27*613 Bor Old 
41 Vi 29 BottBe 
14W 6*6B01tTc 
141ft 946 BaxEnB 
521*19 BntodTC 






* Z%2 


13*6 - 

31*# 

43'A _ 

33*6 — *6 

3346 — *6 

5|*_*s 
_ 36 3^— 1*5 

14*6 14 14 

ntt S 

Sg 22 

46 
341ft 
17*4 

364» _ — 

1646 * 644— 1 
1746 1746—1*4 
ll#k 11V. lllft —1ft 

13## 13 13 — V# 

354# 3346 T ‘ 

II 'A 
5 

13*6 13 
9'A d 7*# 

3016 2945 

22*6 22’4 

54# d 516 
23 2t4# 

1946 181ft 

14*6 13*6 




AMEX 

Monday's 3 p.m. 

i Include the nationwide prices up to 
jina on Wall street and do not reflect 


Tables 

the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
(ate trades elsewhere. Vis Ttie Associated Press 


w . 

Moh LOW Stock 


c*v Yld PE 100s Hlah LowLctostOrcw 


946 BViAlMSfr 
37 1446 ALC 
IVit 1ft AM In wt 
1416 746 AMC 
24V62146AMCPf 
5 'Vu ARC 
446 llftARIHld 


JB AS 




7 

995 

_ _ 4 

_ 16 19 

„ _ a 

_ 71 T22 

J3014J Z 82 

2J0« 4.1-25 
- 47 16 


JO 


AHooenn 37 


- 14 1 

_ IV 75 

- _ 140 
_ - *0 

- - 47 

_ iaa 

.9 14 422 

- IS 100 

- IV 7 

AS - ■« 

- - 25 

- 3 10 

- 14 93 

- - 23 

- _ 98 

- - 2D 

- - 2047 
_ - 357 

1JS 1X9 - 
1.120 6J - 
1-22 5.9 8 

.15 J 16 


.63*4 ATT Fd 
846 3V6AckCom 
3*6 lift Action 
61ft 4 AdmRsc 
6*6 2V„ AOvfln 
1516 946 ActvMna 
6 IkAdvMadT 
546 3'AAdvPhot 
16*6 BVftAirWat 
2316 18*6 Air Exp 
746 5*4A>cmco 
114# 846A8MW 
1B1616 
lUr,, >Vi.Alfln 
17Vft 646 ABdRSi 
114ft 8 ABouH 
646 24»AlptKHn 
12*6 MkAipinGr 
196 IftAmooiGwt 
74ft 44ft Amen 
1V U ViAmMth 
164ft 1 116 AFWP2 
21V6 17*ft AFstRn 
25Vi 1BH ABkCT 
494624 AmBffl 
BVft 24ft Am Eat* 
l'Vu 1 AExpi 
14*6 346 AIM Bi 
16*613 AIM 55 
144ft 11 *6 AIM B6n 
15 lUftAIMBBn 
47 31 4* A Israel 
164ft 11 AmLtsf i 
224k 1446 AMmA 

22161 416 AMzeB 
1416 1046 AmPaon _ 

716 7V* AREInvn JO 107 - 

1516 9 ARastr lJDalAO 7 

84# 346A5dE _ - 

5 2VuATechC - 14 

13*6 7V.Ampal - 61 

24# lVftAmsaiwr - - 

14*6 V44 AmwOSt -36 2J8 B 

534# 616 Andreas - 88 

3*6 lVftAneMlg _ - 

1546 WAnoPor 14J0c _ 1 

516 3WH AnuhCO - 16 

1446 SlftAPTOOnn 
«ftt 3*6 ArtCLd 
11*4 54nArkRst 

346 ‘VuArmlm 
70 JWArrdwA 

121# 5'AArhyth 
446 246Astrotc 
lift *6Aslrt«rt 
1246 ift Atari 
64# 444 Altond! 

4# lAAMsCM 


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146 

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246 

516 

3 

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lift 

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231ft 


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34*6 3546 —16 
1 1 

1046 1016 - 
234* 224# — Vk 


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1J2 9A 10 
J36 5J 10 
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1.050 U 15 
JOb A9 18 X26 
M 101075 10 

M XI 1031 


11 

9 

23 

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5 

227 

54 

218 

33 

28 

30 


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18*6 

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746 

10 

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7*6 

96 

696 

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12 

1BV6 

22*6 

47*1 

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14 

126 

12 

13 


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1246 

124ft 

41*6 

164k 

214k 

211 * 

1196 

74* 

1056 

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13 6 AurorS 


1 
5 
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26 
132 
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- — 215 
JS 9 113 
_ - 4V 

- - 70 

- 12 203 

_ - 504 

- 28 106 


944 

1*6 

1314 

1816 

346 

lift 

5W 

141# 

4*6 

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71ft 

6 

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146 

916 




146 146 +W. 
6416 65*# - 

7*ft 7*ft —16 
2> 246 _ 

516 5*6 _ 

24# 296 +1A 
151ft 15*4 - 

IW. lVw— *> 
39ft TVu — Vi. 
BJ6 9V, — *ft 
2296 23 —M 
*46 616 — *6 
10*6 10W +w 
1796 1796 — *6 
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71* 7*4— Vi 
9W 10 - 

396 316 — *6 
6*6 616 — *6 
W W + Vu 
6*ft 646 „ 

..H »lft. *Vu 
1196 12 * 16 

1796 I8W -W 
Z2W 22W - 

47W 47*6 _ 

4W 4*6 — *6 
IVft 1tfn _ 
396 316— Vu 
1344 14 —'A 

12W 12W - 

12W 1246 *!ft 
41 W 41V# -1*6 
1616 16W _ 

21W 21W —46 
20H 2046 — ?6 
11W 111* —4ft 
7W 7W — Vk 
1044 1044 — *6 
4W — W 
aw* — 
... 9*# -1ft 

1*6 IW - 
13 13 — Vk 

irw i7w — w 

34# 344 _ 

IVft IV# -Vft 
5W 5W — W 
13*6 1346 — Vft 
4W 4*6 —1ft 
9*6 9V# — W 

ay* 1 

« 7»A +V* 
3W 3>Vft +V M 
46 H - 
7 7 —46 

n* in _ 
3 46 -Vft 

3J6 346 — 1# 
1346 1346 — I 
IVft 146 +Vi» 
M6 816— VI 


a 


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SVk 246 BA HO 
17^ 12*6 BATs AOk 
B244 6746 BHC 
25*4 16 V# Bonds! .16 

24W1V BodorM M 

ll«4 B Baker 
544 3WBaldw 
234# 2044 BmFd 1.91 e 
134# BtkBanttra 
2Wu 4# BkSP ran 
254# 234# BT cv7WnlJ8 
2<W 234# BT CV746 nl 50 
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24k IVftBanvnSTi 
27 IBWBamwi .15e 
24*#1296BarrL3l 
19W 64#BarvRG 
1846 lOlkBayMM JO 
6'6 3WB5HK wt 
74k 446BSHK PWt 
361632 BSJMRKnXOl 
346 14kBfllmoc 
26W15 BenchE 

1016 ClftBenEye 

110 8616BemCO TSOg 
19*. 64#Betawis 
26 3196BlnkM( 33 r 
1«* 10 Biol? A 
3W l BJophm 
3<v M lVkBfscHd 
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15*6 11 WBCA1Q n 39 O 
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56 36WBIatfCp 2J»« 
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32V. 12V. Blount A JO 
16*6 13WBodcfle IJ4 
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54k IWBowmr 
72 2V BowmrpC X00 
2BW 1646Bowno JO 
I0W TWeroORE M 

16 744Brandn 33 

|4 746Braeno 1 SA 

446 2 Ik Brock CP 

3Vu iftBumon 
27W 64* BUIh s SB 


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IS 11 
3J3 17 


38 1*6 tW 1*6 - 

3 34# 346 346 


41 1316 mu 1»« — >4 


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B 25 2696 2496 —16 

9 2246 22*6 22*6 -V, 

117 BW 844 846 —46 

38 546 516 546 _ 

7 2116 21*6 211k - 

58 U 14*6 134# 14*6 -ft 

101 lVi. 146 146 —ft. 

B2 2446 24ft 241# -ft 

33 24 Vft 24*6 24ft —ft 


J 12 

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1 22*6 22ft 22ft —ft 

7 1496 14*6 14*6 —ft 

139 1496 141ft 14ft — W 

2S 1796 1716 171k — ft 

23 31# 3ft 3ft. —ft. 

98 4 546 5ft -V# 

28 33Vkd3IH 32ft —ft 
219 116 146 14# —ft 

52 24*6 24 34 —ft 

39 716 ?W 716 +1* 

5 BVft 39 89 — 1 

365 I29a IS 1 * 12*6 —ft 

2 22*6 23ft 22ft —ft 

95 I3W 13ft 1316 -1# 

40 116 1ft 116 _ 

327 3 SWit 2>H. -Vu 

14 lift lift 1116 —ft 

A 12ft 12ft 1246 —ft 

2 12ft 1216 12ft —ft 

42 45 45V# 46 -ft 

4 Z4W 24ft 24*6 —ft 
199 39ft 29ft 29ft —ft 
19 14V6 13ft 13ft —ft 

11 Vft 916 Vft _ 

55 3Vh 3Vi| 3 Vk— V u 

1 43 41 43 -7 

97 27 26W 25V# -4# 

45 596 Bit 596 -ft 

58 15*6 14W 144# —ft 
71 13 12W 13 


28 316 3ft. T/M — ft 


341 35ft MW24W—1W 


7W 5 OIFkl 


_ 9 175 546 S’# K -W 


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25ft 17 OFHd5 
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3 « 1076 "ft 12W Taw -ft 

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z ” *8 

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XI ft 34ft — - 
34ft Sft— 1 ft 
15 1516 —ft 

_ 59k AVk —ft 

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17ft 15*# 16ft — W 


26ft 12ft HH 
4516 20 WCkncaW 


2#ft llWCeniCM 
11 aftCWtxTi 


... 67 30V. 29ft 30ft -ft 

Z 877 26V. 2SV1 25ft — ft 

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18ft VftQrcon 
44ft ISVkOmiS 
40ft 1916 CISCO & 
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131k 6JkOoni 
42 UftCstHlth 
36 25 Cohra 

4116 17ft CbCOBtl 
8 4ftCooaEn 

28 IDftCosnexs 
16ft it Conornl 

3lft 20W Col open 
25ft 15ft Col BCCS 
34ft 20ft Comoirs 
28ftllftCanxsts 
26 10ft Croc ops 
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43 1213 45ft 43’, 43 Vk — lft 
17 23 979 Sft 24 »ft *W 
19 2325 13ft 12W 13 —ft 
JJ 1328 12 lift lift — ■# 
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IS 831 10*. 


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39 3129 58ft 55ft 56ft— 1,J6 


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70 309 5‘. 

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lift 12 


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28’.* 17% 


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21 1156 46ft 45ft 46 —ft 

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25 1675 25 
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39 720 24 23ft 337k —ft 

125 3874 8ft d 7ft 7*i — 

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11 10*6 Oft -ft 

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20 470 17ft 17 17 

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36'* 26ft. 
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34ft 15 EMPI I 
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41 ft 30 V, Earn Von 
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60*4 34W 
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30ft IlVi 
27 ft 28 ft 
... 11# 9 

12ft 12ft 12*6 
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... 14 1306 33 Vr 29M 31 • 

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.. 195 ift 4W 4ft. 

_ B 330 ITW 17W 171. 

1J 58 3411 44ft 4314 44ft 

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_ 27 2225 2116 20ft 20ft 

_ 12 174 25V6 24ft 2SW 


— y* 


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10 3% 316 3% — % 

90 23*6 22% 22% — % 

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39 lft lft lft— ft, 
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1J 17 55 207k 20ft 201# _ 

230 18& lift lff5?t^{S 
211 13ft 12ft 12% —ft 

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15761 2ft MoettSc A4 4J 15 561 

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44%2lftMaxsn - _ 3B 

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17*# lift MrcfrGp .I5e 1 J 7 13 

6% 2ftMarcA£r - S 123 

21# HMeroAwt - - 166 

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34*6 3346 23ft —ft 

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141* 14% lift —ft 
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29ft 27*6 27*6—1% 
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101* 10% 10% — % 
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25% 24% 24% — 1 
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17% 17 17 —ft 

12% 12V# 12% — % 
6% 6% 6% _ 
19% 19 19 -% 

8% 1*6 Sft — % 

10% 10ft 10*6 _ 

13% 13% 13% _ 

10% 1016 10ft -% 
S% Bft Ift — % 
12% 12% 12% -ft 
14% 14 14 —AS 

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1% 1% 1% _ 
9ft 9% 9% — % 
Vft 9% 9% _ 

21% 21% 21% _ 
17% 17% 17% -ft 
7% 7 7% —ft 

8% a 6ft 8H — % 
3% 3% 3% —ft 

7 6% 5% — % 

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27% 27% 27% —ft 




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11% 1T% Tl% _ 
9% 9% 9*# — *6 

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161# l*ft 16*4 —ft 
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1116dll% 11% —ft 
11*6 11% 11*6 — % 
12 % 12 % 12 % +% 
12 % 12 % 12 % _ 
12 % 12 % 12 % — % 
12% 12ft 1216 -96 
lift I1H 11*6 *% 
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13% 13% 13% _ 

1VW 11% uw -% 
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14% 4 OOktap 
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1246 8%OS«iltvn 
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3*4 IHOnsttaER 
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J40 J 35 2 

J4 J „ 429 
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- 22 
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19 

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29 29 —1 

34 34% — Vi 

2*6 2% —ft 
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12% 12% —ft 
25% 25% -16 
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15% 15% — % 
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64% 55 RfrtptA 4J6 LI _ £20 53ft d 53% 5316—1% 
701# 59% Pt£n RfD 423 8J - X40 39V# d 5? ft 59ft— 1% 

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2B%26%PGEBfM 1.96 7J _ 9 2«96 26% K% — % 

2H*6 33'A PGEptP US 74 . 1 27% 27% 27% +% 

261# 24 PGEptQ 7J6 7A 33 25*6 25ft 25*4 —ft 

26%24V6PGEpfU IJ6 7J _ 15 24% 2496 34% _ 

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70ft IftPoCWSt 
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6% Wu PWHK pwt 
396 4ftPWHK30wt 
5% 2HPWHK30pwt 
70% BWPWSPMIdn _ _ 

31# 3V6 PWUSJ wt _ _ 

5% 2%PWUSDwt 

15%12HPWPln JI SJ _ 

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16 1JHPlVPf2 - 

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246 2% 2% _ 

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451434 FWinTr _ SI 

301622 PwtRE 1 JB 73 9 

M% 9%Perimc _ 56 

25*621 Pemcpf X12 9J _ 
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59 13% 13% 13% —ft 

.... 2 23ft 23ft 23ft _ 

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74 ZWu 21# 2% —ft 




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98 4% 4% 4% —16 

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389 1% 1% IVu — % 

S74 1% 1% 1% -W, 

64 «fe 4Wt 4Wt -Wt 

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1J6 BJ 11 
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.. ^ 12% 13 

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ASIA/PACIFIC - 


'? '■> A A 


Firms Criticize 
China’s Shift 
On Currencies 


In Japan, U.S. Suppliers Feel Unwell 

Makers of Medical Equipment Gte Market Barriers 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 


Singapore 

Straits Times - 


tefcyo : . 
mk£225 


_ Compiled by Ow Staff From Dupe, ^ 

“■BEIJING — China’s reversal of 
a pledge to aDow foreign compa- 
nies to buy dollars at banks, forcing 
than to continue using swap cen- 
ters to exchange yuan, was greeted 
with disappointment but little sur- 
prise by business leaders Monday. 

a little bit disappointed," 
said Anne Stevenson, director of the 
Beijing office of the United States- 
■Chma Business Council “We were 
told to expect a swift move towards 
partial convertibility.'' 

• Forrign business have been ap- 
prehensive for months about the 


-Brokers Pay 
. Chinese Widow 

Reuters 

- SHANGHAI — A brofcer- 
.. age concern has made a small 
payment to the widow of a 
market speculator who com- 
„ mitted suicide, a newspaper 
reported Monday. 

The widow, Xu T jnfsmg 
bad sued brokers in Hangzhou 
after her husband bad run up 
.huge trading losses. A note 
. found after his death in No- 
vember said: “Because I’m 
bankrupt, I can’t live as a man. 

■ Death will finish everything." 

. Although it was not dear 
where and bow all his losses 
.had occurred, the Shanghai 
J "newspaper Wenhui Baa said, 
the brokerage arm of Zhejiang 
. .Trust & Investment Co. of- 
fered a settlement of 50,000 
„! yuan (55,760) “for humanitar- 
ian reasons.” The widow had 
* sought about 325.000 yuan. 


terms under which they would be 
allowed to trade yuan earned from 
sales in China for dollars or other 
bard currencies. 

China's currency is not convert- 
ible on international markets, mak- 
ing it useless outside the country’s 
borders. Companies needing other 
. currencies to do business are forced 
‘ to exchange yuan through a drawn 
out and sometimes fruitless process 
at official swap centers. The pro- 
cess involves seeking counterpar- 
ties with excess dollars or other 
currency to exchange. 

When floating its currency on 
New Year* s Day, China promised 
to abolish the swap centers and set 
up a western-style interbank for- 
eign-exchange market for Chinese 
and foreign comp anies 

But over the weekend, the ad- 
ministration said purchases of hard 
currency from state-designated 
banks for current-account pur- 
poses, such as importing, would be 
limited to Chinese companies. 

“We won’t abolish swap centers 
on April 1 as we had said,” said 
G Liang Tao, a drafter of exchange 
rules for the State Ad m i ni s t r a tion 
of Exchange Control “Foreign-m- 
vested enterprises will continue to 
use them. 

The Chinese government prefers 
foreign investors to make goods in 
China for export, thus generating 
their own hard currencies, rather 
than seeking to sell in the domestic 
market for yuan and competing 
with local manufacturers. 

The weekend shift bars Chinese 
companies from the swap markets 
and instead steers them to Chinese 
banks. But Chinese companies can 
only buy foreign currency for capital 
spading, and they must change 
their hard currency profits into yuan 
at banks. (Bloomberg AP) 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Semce 

TOKYO — Medtronic Inc. of Minneapolis 
had high hopes when it received approval 
from the Health and Welfare Ministry in 
1982 to seD an implantable pain-killing de- 
vice in Japan, But the joy proved short-lived 
when another division of the ministry ruled 
that Japan's national health insurance system 
would not reimburse patients who used such 
a technically advanced product. 

“Without reimbursement you can't sell the 
unit," said Lowell Jacobsen, chairman of 
Medtronic Japan. It took 10 years until reim- 
bursement was approved and Medtronic 
could begin active sales. 

The incident is typical of the difficulties 
that American foreign companies encounter 
selling medical equipment in Japan. Such 
problems helped prompt Washington to 
make medical equipment a priority under the 
so-called framework trade talk? with Japan 
that broke down last month. 

But Mr. Jacobsen, whose company is one 
of the largest vendors of medical devices in 
Japan, said he did not think that the market 
hoe is dosed. Japanese companies, he said, 
have had similar problems. 

While some American executives grumble 
about trade barrios, others say they have not 
experienced discrimination. American com- 


«n d government telecommunications pro- 
curement, the three other areas that were 
focuses in the basic trade talks. 

Many executives say the biggest problem is 
heavy and capricious government regulation, 
which affects Japanese companies as well as 
foreign ones. To the extent that over-regula- 
tion slows the introduction of new devices 
and treatments, it tends to affect American 
companies more because they lead the Japa- 
nese in most areas of medical technology. 

“What we face is a lot Of rnimtenrinnal 
discrimination," said Edward M. Rozynsia, 
vice president for global strategy and analysis 
of die Health Industry Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation in Washington. “I think they do a lot 
of things cm the grounds of controlling health 
care costs. But what really irks us is that a lot 
of the stuff that comes out happens to hit us." 


The latest example was the Japanese gov- 
ernment’s plan to impose price controls on 
four kinds of medical devices made primarily 
by American companies — heart valves, arti- 
ficial joints, oxygenators and catheters for 
undogging arteries. 

The United States, while not taking issue 
with the price controls as such, protested that 
American companies were not given enough 
wanting. So on Monday. Japan postponed the 
introduction of ibe controls from Friday until 
June ! and agreed to provide the companies 

Many executives say the 
biggest problem is heavy 
and capricious 
government regulation. 

with more information about how reimburse- 
ment rales wiQ be set in the future. 

The health ministry maintg^hv; tha t tbe con- 
trols are intended to cut costs and that the four 
products wot selected because they represent 
big expenditures. “We never chose those four 
areas because those are mostly foreign-made," 
said Masaharo Nakajima, planning director of 
the ministry’s health insurance bureau. 

But American executives wonder why such 
controls are not placed on more products sold 
by Japanese companies. They suggest that 
one motive is to cut the profit of American 
concerns, making it eaaer for Japanese com- 
panies to catch up in technology. 

“I would not go so far as to say this is a 
conspiracy and there is a smoking gun,” said 
Mark C. Throdahl president of Nippon Bee- 
tan Di ckins on and chairman of the mistical 
equipment committee of the American 
Chamber of Commerce in Japan. But “there 
is no question this will depress revenue and 
earnings,” Mr. Throdahl said, “and no doubt 
it will make it more difficult for other foreign 
companies to set up shop in Japan." 

The Japanese have chosen advanced medi- 
cal technology as an area for government 
development support. Tokyo has begun, for 
instancy a project with some companies to 
develop pacemakers, a product now supplied 
almost completely by Americans. 

Price controls were placed on pacemakers 


two years ago, although a protest from Wash- 
ington prevented the controls* being too 
onerous. About the same time, there was a 
series of highly publicized arrests in which 
Japanese pacemaker dealers were accused of 
bribing dooms to win sales. 

Some evidence of market-access problems 
can be found in data on market share. Ameri- 
can companies have 52 percent of the worid 
market for medical equipment and 40 percent 
outside the United States. But in Japan, the 
American share is only 21 or 22 percent. 

Japanese companies have less than a 10 
percent market share outside Japan. But in 
their home country, they control more than 
70 percent of the market. 

A similar pattern exists in public procure- 
ment, the focus of the recat trade on medical 
equipment. Washing ton maintains >h»* for- 
eign companies are not told in many cases 
what is bong procured. Part of the problem is 
that many medical purchases are under the 
threshold of about $140,000 for which com- 
petitive bidding is required. 

American negotiators also pointed to the 
case of Biomagnetic Technologies Inc, a San 
Dkjgo company that makes an advanced 
bramscanner. Although it had the only sod) 
machine approved for medical use in Japan, 
the company lost in two bids for such ma- 
chines from research institutes affiliated with 
Japan’s Ministry of International Trade and 
Industry. Thai ministry is backing a consor- 
tium aimed at developing similar technology. 

International Trade Ministry officials said 
the American brain scanner did not meet 
specifications. The machines that won the 
bids were made by companies from Cm*A» 
and Finland, they said. 

The U.S. government asked that public 
hospitals in Japan release more information 
on what they plan to buy, even for purchases 
well below the current threshold. It also 
wants to see foreigD sales for Japanese public 
projects grow 25 percent a year, a little faster 
than the current rate. 

Japan has agreed to some of the requests 
on procurement procedures, but has resisted 
sales-growth targets. 

Most problems cited by American execu- 
tives concern the national insurance system, 
which, like the new price controls, were not 
discussed in the basic trade talks 




1 ®o~HD*rm “otto 

■ 1093 #» .;■: - ...,1Sa3 -- \ 

Exchange foctex ’ ..f s . 

Hon g Kong ; Hang Seng - ■ • • ~ 
Singapore 1 ' ‘Sttaite Tiroes ’ • 
Sydney ; . ; ; AfrOfdtoaties ± 
Tokyo 4 . «•' ' 

KuaieLo mpot Composite 
BEg^roiic ^ ‘[ SET ' "'T 
Sawn ; •" =a>omptga6Siock. 

■ Taipei ’ . .WeiBbtech a ape • 

MapBa ' : Pse'H w : .-7? r .'y 

■; ' “■:. stock HWjsx "" ? 
Mew Zealand . NZ^-40-. . '■ 
SondJav inttex^T 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


i F.M ' 

; VI9M:' 



9.197.03 


2,ijOaaO;. 

<951.43 

"pdisr 

3*aa#., 

2,119.1* 

1,785.22 


1993 1994 

Pmt. . .... % /v 

, Ctoee - Change 

5i234.ar *o.«r 
■ &G83.42 -fcIS- 
31S1.6D;- - -taa-. 

1555SST r-Kx&f 

970.10 -1.32 ■ 
t.280,07 -264. 

■872.68 ;■ *1-21 ■ 

■ tf.01 

.-2,681.0? ' r +22Q - 

49084 ■ " • 4G.04 
2,15010 _ . -1,44'. 

- ' ^158 . 

Imcmjlloaa] Herald Tnbnne 


Very briefly; 

• (Irina and South Korea agreed to set up a high-level committee to plan 
joint production projects, including one for car parts and (me for aircraft. 
South Korea’s trade minister announced. 

• ririn» Overseas IjwI & Investment lid, the Hong Kong arm of 
Beijing’s construction ministry, said profit rose 23 percent in 1993, to 
3483 milli on Hong Kong dollars ($71 million). 

• Vietnam said it might issue treasury bills in June or July but said current 
interest rates of about 20 percent would have to come down first. 

• Hanoi is talking to banks about a loan of as much as 51 billion to 
finance oil and natural gas development and building its first oil refinery. 

• MIM Holdings Ltd. is negotiating to boy one-third of BHP LhL’s 
proposed 225 milli on Australian dollar ($160 million) silver and lead 
mine in Queensland, the companies said. 

• Hutchison Whampoa Ltd, the Hong Kong-based trading bouse led by 
Li Ka-shing, said it would set up a subsidiary, Hutchison International 
Port Holdings Ltd, to run its ports in Britain, China and Hong Kong. 

• dwna plans to build a 757-meter (825-yard) bridge over the White Nile 
in Snrian, linking Khar toum and Omriii rmnn, for about $51 million, the 
Sudan News Agency said Construction is to start in six months, and the 
bridge would replace one that has been in use since the 1920s. 

Reuters. AFP. Knight-Rldder. AP 


Developing Nations’ Group Calls lor Fair Trade 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Complied bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW DELHI —Six leaden of a 
group of 15 developing nations 
opened a delayed summit meeting 
Monday with a call for fair trade 
and a warning that a cnnfKct be- 
tween rich and poor nations might 
replace the Cold War. 

- Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha 
Rao of India opened die meeting 
by voicing concern over what he 
chlled Western conn tries’ protec- 
tionist barrios. 


Mr. Rao warned of possible at- 
tempts by developed countries to 
“introduce new protectionist agen- 
das,” particularly in disputes over 
“noneconomic concerns” — an ap- 
parent reference to the linking of 
trade and business opportunities to 
such issues as human rights and 
protection of the environment. 

President Suharto of Indonesia 
called for removing “unacceptable 
injustices in international econom- 
ic relations.” 


He said there was “widespread 
apprehension” in the world that the 
old East-West ideological and po- 
litical conflicts might be replaced 
by “an equally pernicious econom- 
ic and developmental divide:" 

Mr. Suharto said one-fifth of the 
world’s population — the portion 
living in the wealthiest countries — 
controlled four-fifths of the plan- 
et’s resources- 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin 
M ohamad of Malaysia, President 


Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, 
President Sani Abacha of Nigeria 
and President Abdou Dioaf of Sen- 
egal we re also at tending the three- 
day summit meeting. President 
Carlos Menem of Argentina, desig- 
nated as the next chairman of the 
group, is expected to arrive 
Wednesday. The group, formed in 
1989, also included Algeria, Brazil 
Egypt, Jamaica, Mexico. Peru, 
Venezuela and Yugoslavia. 

{AFP. AP) 


REPUBLIC OF PERU 


Interbanc 


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COPRI 


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Page 16 


SPORTS 



In Russia, a New Spin on an Old Game: Hockey, American- Style 


By Alessandra Stanley 

New York Tuna Service 

MOSCOW — To tftc sound of pulsing rock music, a 
shiny red Jeep Wrangler was driven into the rink that 
belongs to the legendary Central Red Array hockey team 
of the former Soviet Union. 

A few minutes later, after a dizzying “Let's Make a 
Deal" style elimination contest on the ice — as well as a 
photo session with the corporate sponsor that donated the 
jeep, Aviatika Motors — one lucky Russian spectator 
drove away with the prize. 

It was the halftime show of the Russian Penguins. And 
while it had almost nothing to do with hockey, it had 
everything to do with the Americanization — and some 
say resuscitation — of the game in the new Russia. 

Once the Soviet Union's most revered sport, hockey fell 
into decline after communism collapsed and its best 
players defected to the National Hockey League in North 
America, driving bored and discouraged fans to smy 


home. The army team, which won 1 3 consecutive champi- 
onships from 1977 to 1989. is now ranked 13Ui out of 24. 

The new American owners of the army team are using 
money and marketing to fight the downward spiral, and 
they have renamed the team the Russian Penguins. 

The once elegant, almost gentlemanly sport practiced 
by Russia's best players is long gone. The only sign left of 
the army, in fact, is the military band that trots out on the 



sweeping machines across the rink during a break. “The 
important thing is to get people back in to see the games. 

Last year. Howard Baldwin, chairman of the Pittsburgh 
Penguins, put together a small group erf investors, which 
includes the actor Michael J. Fox. and bought a 50 percent 
share of the Russian Army team for a reported $1 million. 
The other half belongs to Valeri L Gushchin, a trainer, and 
Victor V. Tikhanov. the team's famous coach, who togeth- 


er manage, operate and control the team they leased from 
the Centra! Army Hockey Club. 

Fireworks, rock music electronic billboards, pennants. 
T-shirts, sweatshirts, soda, beer and hot dogs tin pita 
bread), prize giveaways, and above alL corporate advertis- 
ing. have all but taken over the game While the level of 
play this year has improved a little — in 1993. the 
Penguins were in last — the team's promoters say atten- 
dance has increased tenfold. 

At a recent Saturday game every seat in the 5.000-seat 
hockey stadium in central Moscow was taken as the 
Russian Penguins were 1-0 winners over the Soviet Wings, 
a team named for the factory that once produced parts for 
Soviet aircraft. 

“Everyone wants to come to the games now " Reed 
Salwyn. the Moscow-based marketing director, said hap- 
pily. “The Mafia community is coming. The corporate 
community is coming The expat community is coming" 


There was only one fight in the game, but it delighted 
the crowd. , 

“We didn't teach them that.” said Mark W. kelly. 
Pittsburgh's European scout and assistant general manag- 
er of the Russian team. “They picked it up themselves." 

In the owners' box. Baldwin, dressed in a black cash- 
mere polo shin and black blazer, bantered easily with 
American and Russian corporate sponsors, it was Ins first 
trip to Russia since he bought the team. Baldwin said he 
was impressed by what his Russian partners and Ameri- 
can sports marketing team had wrought. 

Virtually everv cranny was crammed with ads. from the 
panels around the rick hawking Chrysler. Iron City Beer. 
Delta Airlines and Little Caesar's Pizza fnot available in 
Moscow yet. but on sale in Prague) to the players uni- 
forms. which carry Coca-Cola badges on the sleeves, and 
Milka. the name’ of a chocolate bar, on the helmets. 
Tickets, which cost the equivalent of 12 cents, are not a 
source of revenue. 


Even the most dedicated fans don’t seem to mind the 

circus-like atmosphere. « . . . 

“I haven't missed a match m 12 years, said Igor A 
Belkin. 27. who wore a San Jose Sharks jacket m honorof , 
his favorite former Red Army player. Sergei Makarov. He 
added: “Of course, it's not the same game, buuhe show 
helps make up for iL it’s fun — like a holiday. 

The players don't seem to mind the distraction, either. 

“I love this,” said Jan Golubovsky. 18. a new player who 
was benched while the Penguins negotiated his contract 
with his former team. Dynamo, the KGB team that was 
the army's great rival. “You can’t beat the Jeep.” 

The managers of the Russian Penguins say Golubovsky 
could be an NHL draft pick, which could earn him a three- 
year. S3 million contract — and $500,000 for his owners. 
The average Russian Penguin salary is 512,000. 

“It’s not my taste," Dimitri L. Ryzhkov, editor of the 
Russian magazine Hockey Today, said ruefully. 

“But without show business, our hockey will not snvive." 



i 

t f ’ 


Norman Blazes 
To Players Mark 


AV* York Times Semce 

PONTE VEDRA. Florida — 
Under all the spectator mounds, 
lakes, humps and hollows of the 
minefield that is the Stadium 
Course, Greg Norman buried the 
last skeleton. 

Finally and with authority, be 
laid to rest the one remaining cen- 
sure that had haunted him like 
Marley’s ghost — the one that held 
he could not win with the lead. 

With a singular performance in 
the final round of the Players 
Championship on Sunday. Nor- 
man turned the proceedings into 
the PLAYER Championship. He 
was alone in this one. With his third 
straight round of 67. he obliterated 
the tournament scoring record and 
the best field of the year, cruising to 
a mind-boggling total of 24 under 

P ar and a four-stroke victory over 
uzzy Zoeller, who also shot 67. 
“There are some records that will 
never be beaten." said Deane Be- 
man, PGA Tour commissioner. “I 
think this 24-under is one of them.” 
Norman broke Nick Price's re- 


cord of IS under par on Saturday, 
after 52 holes of the tournament 
Sunday, all he had to do was keep 
from self-destructing, the way be 
had in the Tour Championship last 
year when he bogeyed four of the 
last seven holes to lose. 

It didn’t take long for Norman. 
39, to dismiss any lingering ques- 
tions about his resolve and his 
courage under pressure. He started 
with a birdie on the first hole to 
Zoeller’s bogey and followed that 
with another birdie to Zoeller’s par 
at the par-5 second. That gave Nor- 
man a quick seven-stroke lead. 

Norman didn't bogey a hole in 
the tournament until the I3th hole 
Sunday, breaking a streak of 92 
straight bogey-less holes that 
stretched back to the 10th hole of 
the third round at the Nestle Invi- 
tational last week at Bay Hill. 

“It's great, a good win. an impor- 
tant win," said Norman. *Tve had 
a great week here. When you go 
around a Pete Dye golf course 72 
holes without a bogey — I think 
I’ve even impressed myself." 



SIDELINES 





> rJ 

SAFELY HOME —Mario Diaz sliding into home as Montreal's Danin Fletcher dropped the ball in Florida's exhibition victory. 


Tapie Named in a 3d French Inquiry 

MARSEILLE (Combined Dispatches) — Tbe French entrepreneur- 
politician Bernard Tapie confirmed Monday that he had been placed 
under investigation for fraud and embezzlement relating to the accounts 
of his Olympique Marseille soocer did), and be denied tbe accusations. 

Tapie, already the focus of two other inquiries, was placed under 
investigation by Judge Pierre Philippon on Saturday but the fact was only 
disclosed after Tapie won a landslide victory in local elections on Sunday. 
Tapie, in a statement, described the charges as “totally false" and said 
they resulted from a “new judicial-media plot” to discredit him. 

Olympique Marseille's accounts have been under investigation by 
Philippon since 1990 as part of a government-ordered inquiry into the 
financial affairs of nine French soccer teams. Investigators accuse Tapie 
of involvement in under-the-table financial arrangements linked to the 
transfer of players. ” (A P. Reuters) 

Inter’s Schillaci Set to Play in Japan 

MILAN (AP) — Salvatore (Toto) Schillaci, the 1990 World Cup hero, 
prepared to join a Japanese team as his Italian club, Internazionale o ( 
Milan, began a major reshuffle for the next soccer season. 

Tbe first move of the process announced by the club's president, 
Ernesto Pellegrini, on Monday was the signing of a new coach, Ottavio 
BiancfaL Schillaci, 29, said Monday he had readied a general agreement 
to play with Jubilo Iwata in the Japanese league. He said he expected to 
Inter officials in the next few days and leave for 
; was offered a two-year, S3 .2 million contract by 
tbe first Italian player in the Japanese league 

For the Record 

FI re of Cfauia's top women long-distance runners, including Wang 
Jmuria, the world 10,000-meter champion and worid record-holder, were 
confirmed Moixiay as competitors in the April 17 London Marathon. (AP) 




SCOREBOARD 


1 


m 

m 

NBA Standings 



II 



f 


Attantte Dlvlsten 



IS 


W L 

Pet 

GB 


x-New York 

49 19 

721 

— 

s 

Orlando 

40 28 

588 

7 


Miami 

37 31 

544 

12 


New Jersey 

36 31 

537 

12Vfi 

Sj 

Boston 

24 42 

JM 

24 


Phitodoiphla 

21 48 

504 

281* 


Washington 

19 49 

577 

30 

5 ^ 


Ceotrat Division 



} 

x-Atkuifa 

48 20 

704 

— 

* a 

Chicago 

45 24 

552 

3t* 

KJ* 

Cleveland 

39 30 

565 

71* 

sa 

Irwtana 

33 32 

522 

12V* 


Charlotte 

31 30 

463 

16V* 


Detroit 

17 49 

779 

29 


Milwaukee 

18 SO 

765 

30 


WESTE RN CONFERENCE 




Midwest Dlvlilon 



fete 


W L 

PCt 

OB 


x- Horn ton 

48 17 

716 



x-Son Antonio 

47 20 

710 

— 

jjfe* 

Utah 

44 26 

527 

Jl* 

SI 

Denver 

33 32 

522 

13 

Minnesota 

17 49 

777 

29V* 

rS 

Dallas 

8 40 

.118 

40V* 

la 


PacHtc Division 




x-Seattto 

50 17 

746 


r 

x-Phoonlx 

45 22 

542 

5V* 


Portland 

41 28 

594 

10 

15 

Golden State 

37 28 

582 

11 

“““ 

i-A. Lakers 

29 38 

433 

21 

xm 

L-A.CHpears 

25 42 

773 

23 


Sacramento 

23 45 

731 

7Pft 


x-cttndwdPtoyoff tool 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
New York 21 at 21 20—171 

Orlando 22 20 XI 17— *0 

N Y: Oak lev 6-13 2-21 A Ewing 13-23 4-4 31 ;0: 
Scon 7-30 4-4 22 O'Nial 12-22 6-13 30. Re* 
baends— Now York 40 (Banner, Ewlno 11), 
Orlando SI (O'Neal 161. As*lsts-N«w York 21 
iHarper I). Ortnnda 20 (Hardaway 5). 
Philadelphia SI 26 12 21 5-121 

Horton 25 21 37 27 7—124 

P: woattwrapoon 6-167-1025. JJWabnell-21 3- 
3 23: 8: Radio 12-15 12-12 36. Fa* 8-14 1-2 17. 
Rebauiute— Phltaaeiahta 65 (Parry, Weather- 
men 101. Barton 4* ( Radta IT). AMlsts-PMto- 
ttotohtaa (Dawkins 10), Barton 32 (Daualatll). 
Detroit 34 23 33 16- 77 

Clsvetaad 30 12 23 36-111 

D: T. Mills 7-10IM 20, Dumara 6-18 4-5 22; C: 
Wilkins 12-17 1-2 28. HIM 5-11 S-T3 IL Re- 
h o un d s D etroit 37 (Mills. Anderson 8), 
Cleveland 37 (Hill 13). Assfrts-DetroH 36 
(Thomas 10). Otvalond 23 (Price 8). 

Hearten 18 27 33 30- 71 

phoenix 30 S3 36 36-113 

H: Olal uwon T-16 3-6 21. Smith Hi VI 201 P: 
Barkley B-16 2-3 20. Caballes 8-15 44 20. Re- 
bounds— Houston 30 (Olaluwan 11). Phoenix 
47 Hartctev 12). Assi sts -H o u s t on 30 (Thorpe 
I), Phoenix 33 (KJohnson IS). 

Milwaukee 14 31 33 41—101 

LA. Lakers M 36 30 34-110 

M: Strong 3-10 0-10 18 Day 7-10 7-7 25; LA: 
Lynch 12-17 6-10 sa Christie 74 m 20. Ro- 
bouads— Milwaukee 31 (Baker 11), Los Acs*- 
let 56 (DIvac 17). Assists— Milwaukee 21 (Lo- 
ftous 5). Las Angeles 33 (Von Exei 8). 

San Antonia 33 25 31 37—107 

Portland 31 23 33 26- 73 

S: DJtaWnscn 13-20 10-10 36. Knfght 5-12 8-8 
18; P : Strickland 5-13 64 16, Dnxler 7-146422. 


Rebounds B on Antonio <8 (Hodman 16),Port- 
/and 50 {Williams 7). Assists— San Antonie 30 
(Anderson 91. Portland 20 (StrkSUond 8). 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DW Is Eon 



W 

L 

T PH OF OA 

x-N.Y. Ranoeri 

46 

23 

7 

99 271 212 

x-New Jersey 

44 

21 

11 

99 282 200 

Washington 

34 

32 

9 

77 241 232 

Florida 

32 

30 

13 

77 210 206 

Philadelphia 

33 

36 

7 

73 270 288 

N.Y. Islander* 

31 

33 

9 

71 252 242 

Tompo Bov 

25 

40 

11 

61 201 233 

Northeast Division 


x-Ptrtiburoh 

39 

25 

13 

91 278 364 

x- Boston 

39 

25 

12 

90 266 226 

Montreal 

38 

24 

13 

87 260 216 

Buffalo 

39 

28 

9 

87 236 200 

Quebec 

30 

36 

7 

67 243 238 

Hartford 

24 

44 

8 

56 202 2S7 

Ottawa 

12 

35 

8 

32 176 354 

WESTERN 



Centra) DfyisJos 



w 

L 

T PH OF QA 

x-Oetrolt 

a 

26 

6 

92 317 248 

x- Toronto 

40 

24 

12 

92 249 215 

x-Oatlas 

38 

26 

11 

87 2S3 232 

x-St. Louts 

36 

30 

7 

81 239 254 

Chlcooo 

33 

32 

9 

77 230 214 

Winnipeg 

23 45 1 

Pacific Dhrtofon 

54 227 307 

x-Colaarv 

37 

27 

12 

86 274 ZB 

Vancouver 

37 

33 

3 

77 254 346 

San Jose 

21 

33 

15 

71 220 20 

Anaheim 

29 

42 

5 

63 210 234 


Los Angeles 25 39 11 61 268 291 

Edmonton 21 43 12 56 2)9281 

x -cl Inched playoff spat 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 

Detroit 1 1 1—4 

Chicago 18 0-1 

Pint Period: D- Fedorov 52 (Ciccarrtll. Koz- 
lov); CiCurxiavwartfi 13 IB. Sutter. CheliM). 
Second Period: D-Prlmoou 23 (Yxernm 
Sheppard) (op). Third Parted: D-Proberf 6 
I Burr. Konstonrinev). Shots on goal: D (on 
Hockett) 7-9-15-31. C (on Essensa) 7-8-10-23. 
MO* 2 2 3-6 

WartUneton 0 2 1—4 

FkSt Ported: B-3 mol Iraki 27 (Knlpschosr) 
WWi B-Oofei32 (Shaw) (sh).SfCond Period: 
W-Cate 13 (Hunter) (pa); B-Smolbakl 28 
(Donato) (rti); w-Juneau 16 (Anderson 
Jones); B-lafrete 13 (Sweeney, Oates). Third 

Period: W-Konowoldtuk 9 (Peox*. Milter); 
W-Poullr 5, B-lalrate 14 (Kntascnser. ReM); 
EMteslev 11 (en>. Shot* ea goal: B (on 
Beo up re) 8-7-0-21 W (on caiay) 7-13-7-27. 
Doilos 0)10-4 

Tempo Bor 0 1 1 w 

Second Period: D-McPtwe 18 (Courmcdl); 
T-Eiyrulkl3(Bredfey. Tucker). ThkTI Ported; 
T-anmbers 11 (Kilma Sovora); D-cmmo 6 
(Kiott). Shots on eocl: D (on Bergeron) 6-6-14- 
8-32. T (on WOktduk) 6-104-1—25, 

N.Y. R o w er s 0 1 0—1 

Winnipeg 8 2 1—1 

Soand Period: N.Y.-Kovaltv 17 (Lormer, 
Tlkkanenl ipp) ; W-Tkachuk 38 (Darrin 8han- 
non) (pp); W -Drake 11 (Ulanov. Steen) (rti). 
Third Period: W-Emorson 27 (Quintal) (pp). 
Shell an ooel: N.Y. (on Owveldoa) 1-15 
11— X W (on Healy) 7-6-5-18, 

Lot Angelas 1 ^ j_j 

VteKouver 031-4 

Plrst Period: ULrOnmoto 1 (Qratzky. 
McSortev) (op). Socond Period: v-Bure 31 


(00): V-Bur» J? (Corson) (pel; LA-Conoctier 

13 (Todd, Stoke). V-Buro S3 (Corson. Court- 

noil) (pp). Third Ported: V-Under 32 (Ron- 
nine. Courtnall) (pp); LJL-Oomrttr 21 
(Gretzky. Blake). Shots on oaal: la (on 
McLean) 6-6-11 — 23. V (onstauber) 16-184-43. 
K.Y. islanders B d 1 — 1 

Boftelo 3 I 1-4 

First Period: B-Audett* 24 (May. Sutton); 
B-Moollny » (Khmvtev, Howarcfwck) (pp). 
Second Period: B-Hawerchuk 32 (Moeilnv. 
BodoerJ (pp). Third Period: B-Preslev 15 
(■hi; N.Y.* Doloa mo-10 (Hogue. Vovkei (pp)-. 
Shots on eocl: N.Y.ion Fuhri 74-13-27. B (on 
Me Lennon 1 10-17-6-31 
Anaheim 8 0 3 1—8 

PfiltoMteMa 8 8 2 0-2 

Third Ported: P- Conroy j (DIMalo. Rec- 
ehl): A-Oourls 11 (Combock, Emm; A-Vaik 

14 (Corkum, Ultov); P-Renberg 33 (RecehL 
Qoltey) (pp). Overtime: A- Volk IS lUltey). 
Snots on goal: A (on Roussel. Chohot)2-l2-il- 
1 — 26. P (on Hebert) 7-12-10-0-61. 

San Jose 1 3 1—4 

St, Louis 3 8 0-3 

Flnt parted: SL-Hull a (Stostny, 5- Du- 
rtwsne) (pp); SJ-Norton 6 (Whimsy); 5L- 
Shonahan 41 (8. Duchesne, Prokhorov); 5L- 
Korolev 6 (Jonney, Shonohon). Second 
Ported: SJ-Lorlonov 17 (GarperWav, Ozo- 
llosh) ; S*Ellk 22. Third Ported: SJ-Mokorov 
27 (Larionov. Norton) (dp). Shots on ooaCSJ 
(On Joseph ) 74-7-22. 3L (on IrM) 124-4-27. 
Pmsbaroh 0 1 2 2 

Edmonton 1 1 3-6 

Phot Ported: E-Moittov ? (Mark, Arnett). 
Second Period: P-McEochem 18 (Murphy. 
Tocchft) (sti); E-Olaussan 7 (McAmmendl. 
Third Parted: E-Grleve II (Stapleton); E- 
Wtloht 24 (Rieo, Ptarean); E-Peorson 18 
(Weight) (pp); P-Mullen 37 IS towns, Fron- 
ds) (pp); P-Fronds 27 (Joor, Hawaood). 


Shots on goal: p (on Ranterd) 9-13-21—41 E 
(on Wrtooet) 15-14-13— tt 
Quebec 8 0 3-9 

New Jersey 4 0 1-6 

Pint Period: NJ, -Guerin 21 (Milton. Ste- 
vens); MJ.-MIlien 20 (Danayka Guerin); 

N-L-Lemleiix 16 (Semak, Fetisov); NJ^Pe- 
■wso 3 (Stovers, McKay). TMrd Parted: Q- 
UOOlrttf 9 (Werenka, Karpa ) ; NJ^RICtwr34 
Mil); Q-Komersky 25 CRIcd). Shell an tool: DflWfB Clip 

Q (an Bradeur) 846-23. N J. (on Ftsct, TW- — 

bourn T2-6-I3— 31 


THIRD AND PINAL TEST 
Aartralla vs. South Africa 
4th Day, Monday In Oarbaa. South Africa 
Sou* African* brings: 42Mlout (205.1 overt) 
Australia M Inn Enos: >7-2 (46 overs) 



PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAMES 
Sunday's Resorts 
Baltimore 4 . St. Louts 3 
Philadelphia 8. Chlcooo While San 4 
Houston 5. chrveiond A 10 Innlnes 
Kansas City ll, Detroit 7 
Minnesota & Boston 7, 10 Imunes 
Atlanta A Los Angeles 3 
Montreal 7. Florida 3 
Pittsburgh 14 Cincinnati 10 
New York Yankees 7. New York Mats 3 
Toronto 7, Texas 4 

San Dleao 5. San Francisco 3, 11 inmnos 
Oakland 8. Chlcooo Cubs 2 
Colorado 7, Milwaukee 3 
Californio 15. Seattle 4 


THIRD TEST 
Wert indies vs. Bos land 
3rd Day, SoMteV, In PortwFSpalo 
Enotond first innings: 32S-aN out 
West motes second innings: M3-6 


AMERICA ZONE 
Oraup 1 . Pint noun* - 
Peru & Chile I: Jot me Yzaga. Pen, def. 
Sergio Cortes. Chile, 64, 62, 6-4; Gdiriet Sit* 
barsteln. Chile, def. Jose Luis Noriega Peru, 
V6.6A63. 

Uruguay X Bahamas 2: Marcsto PilteolnL 
Uruguay, def. Morit Knowfes. Bahama* 6-1, 
40,4-3; Reger SmlHi.BahamoAdef. Federico 
Danda Uruguay. 6-A 6A 6-1. 


Guatemala A Jamaica I: Jacaba Cham. 
G u at em a l a def. fCori Hate, Jamaica 6-7 (641 
7-6 6-7 (76). 6-A TO-fl; Daniel Chevez. Guate- 
mala def. N Irakis Malcolm, Jamaica 6ri2A 
WORLD 8ROUP 
First Roam) 

X Austria 3: Maro-Kevsn 
Goaimer, Germany, def. Herat SkoH, Austria 
6A 6-A 7-6. 6-1. 

■uro-african zone 
O rauo 1. Pint Robed * 
Croatia X Norway 3; Christian Ruud, Nor- 
' way.def. Goran ivanlsevla Craatta,3-A 4A2- 
A 43. 7-5; Saw Hlrszoa Crowte. def. Hetee 
K oil Ffoflord, Hor»or, 43, 41 76 (15-13). 


GOLF 


Colombia X Canada 3: Sebastian Laraaa 
Canada def. Maurldo Hodod, Colombia 16, 
6-A 6-1. 43; Daniel Nestor. Canada def. ML 
one! Tofaon. Colombia 74 64, 43. 

Venezuela a Ecuador I: Maurice Ruah. 
Venezuela Oaf. PobteCampofla Ecuador, 66, 
5-7. 66; Nicolai Peralta Ecuador, del Luis 
Morel on, Venezuela 64 7-4 

Ptayeff 

Mexico 4 Cube 8: Lula Enrique H orgrra 
def. Morto TabareA 61. 7-3 (74); AMandra 
Hernandez, def. Alexander TabareA 61 64 

Onwp 2, Piavoffi 

Paretoav a Puerto Rico 1: Ricardo iMana 
Paraguay. def. Joey Rive. Puerto Rico, 67 (6 
7), 64 6-A 61; Ramon Deteoda Poroouav, 
def. Jorge Gonzalez. Puerto Rica 7-4 7-4 


IAS. PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP . 

Scares ofixs minion fovmamMri pteyeqaf 
Saworou' AM-yad (Ai M-matar), vaefli 
Stedtom Course to Ponte Vsdra PtarMR: 

Gres Norman 646767-67-264 
Fuzzv ZooltoT 6667-6667-266 
Jeff Maooort 6 6676766-271 
Hate Irwtfl 67-747067—276 
Nick Faldo 676768-73-277 
Steve Lowery 66-766767-273 
Brad Faxon 6666-70-72-278 
Devil Love III 6866-70-74-278 
Notan Henke 74676766—279 
Colin Montgomerie 45-7471-70-377 
Tom Kite 65-71-7473-277 
QOTY HollberB 666767-73-277 




E5E5H 


GERMAN HIRST DIVISION 
Hamburg SV 1. Bayern Munich 2 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


IHOPE you're not eONNA GIVE H6R EVEGLA59ES. 
She sees too much already. 11 


UwnNH Omu bu. Jumb(B& 
aw «w to mao' wiuera. 10 tarn 
VHJ, anSnary *ORb 

I OSKET 


rr 1 

; t i 



STUCO 


ifx: 




HACTLE 


rrr 

1 




1 u 


THAT 8CHAMSU3} WOftD Okie 
& VIMJUMMI 



^cnniimu 


junpHs demon puttt heuum sizzle 


To our reoders in Get m a n y 

Ys never been easier 
to subscribe and save 
- just caB our 
Frankfurt office 

toll-free 0130 - 84858 5 
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From Austna 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 

SPORTS 

Stopping Michigan, Arkansas Completes the NCAA Final Four Grid 


Me 


Page 17 ^ 


' . '■ 


1 - ' X v 

■ * • 


Ftal Round 


tt.HC.MT7B 


Second Round 
[talmas 


1994 NCAA Menfc Basketball Tournament 

Regwrafs Somlfinata Cnimiptorer*) Semdinate Regkmats 


B. Gaoraaum 84 

2G«>nwtowi73 p 

5. UCLA 102 

~~\ lUa >82 

4, Oklahoma Sl ss 

J 

TtAmB4 

13. Nm Umdco Sl 58 

~j o«rt»o»aSLes 


«g35» 

\NCAJ 


Second Round 


North CwoGnft 72 


Bo«on College 77 1 


Boston College 75 


Boeton College 06) 




16.Lbertv5l 
B. weehlnalon 
I ft Boston Cell 
5- IrxlxnaM 
I 12. Ohio 72 


Aftan*ePM) CMA kiXKtt Florid. (2 M) ^ 

March ZS and 27 1 I MarcEzS and 37 




t t ” F!a .' in Japj, 


1*.Pwpi»«dln e7« 

7. Bt Louie 86 

iailMetai*l74 

2.Ha TO c hueean 78 

15- SWTcaae Sl 60 

1. UaeourtTB 

16- Hew 53 

6. Cfarinntf 72 

9. Wacoceinao 

5- Cegtoftrfe 57 
iZWi*sGr*mB*vm 
4. Svracuae 92 

13. HWMB78 

a. Mfooaaota 74 

tl. Southern Mnole 60 
3- Louteirflte67 

14. BaiaeSLSS 

7. Virginia B7 

10. New Mexico 54 

2. Aitama 81 

15. Loyola (Hd.) 55 


MkJilgaoM 


i Maasachueette 87 


jWjcowlnBS 


LSMbmIbM 


HcNguTB 


I Maryland 71 


I Michigan 68 


CHARLOTTE (N.C.) 
COLISEUM 
April 2 


CHARLOTTE 
(N-C.) 
COUSEUH 
AprS 4 


I Connecticut 60 


I Connecticut 75 


CHARLOTTE (NjC.) 

COLISEUM 
April 2 


Write Foraet 58 


| Syracuse 88 


|SfTBCUM64 


LOS ANGELES ArtaoiMi (2frS) 
March 24 and 26 


DUha(27-5) KNOXVILLE. TENN. 
March 24 and 26 


Virginia 56 


I Kentucky 63 


MdihmSL74 


7.UA846 

[ ID. Geo. Waehlneoon 51 

2. ConnecticBt 6* _ _ 

l 15L«rtf4B 

I.PurtueM 
IB. Central Florida 67 
aftpridnce70 
9. Alabama 76 
5. WMcb Fweet 68 
[ 12.CoLo<Ch«rtB«tDn58 

4. KmamUB 

I 13L TiMiit-CtHinooaa 73 

5. Marquette 61 

| Tl- SW. LouMana 58 

3. KntUdwS3 

1 1LTenneeeeaa!?a~ 

7. IPcfaitan SL B4 
pH LSeton HaB73 

z.om »«2 

I IS. Hum Southern 7D 


si Source: AP 


The WKbmglon Poa 


By Steve Berkowitz 

Washington Past Service 

DALLAS — In the morning, he 
won national coach of the year 
honors. In ihe afternoon, his team 
earned a place in the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association tour- 
nament Foal Four. Then he got to 
celebrate it an with the president. 

“Thar’s one heck of a day, fel- 
las,” Arkansas’s coach. Nolan 
Richardson, said. “One heck of a 
day." 

That it was for Richardson and 
the Razorbacks, who defeated 
Michigan, 76-68, Sunday in the 
NCAA tournament Midwest re- 
gional final before a crowd that 
included President Bill CKnion. 

Richardson said he thought 
Clinton was “as proud of his Hogs 
as I was." Richardson also was 
named N&ismith national coach of 
.the year by the Atlanta Tipoff 
Gab. 

“I think that’s what it’s all 
about," he said. “When you be- 
comes Hog — aRazorback — they 
can cot yon open, and you're going 
to bleed little pigs. That’s just the 
way it is." 

This is the way it was Sunday, as 
Arkansas joined East regional 
champion Florida in what will be 
the first Final Four with two South- 
eastern Conference teams. 

After missing its Gist six shots 
and falling behind by 6-1 and 8-3, 
the top-seeded Razorbacks (29-3) 
made another of the lopsided runs 
that have bees carrying them all 


season. They outscored third-seed- 
ed Michigan 20-1 during a span of 
a little more than six mtnnte s, 
budding a 23-9 lead they managed 
to defoad the rest of the way. 

It was Arkansas’s 13th consecu- 
tive victory in Dallas, where it won 
the 1989, ’90 and *91 Southwest 
Conference tournaments before 
moving to the SEC as well as the 
1990 NCAA tournament Midwest 
regional championship. 

The Razorbacks win play West 
regional champion Arizona m a na- 
tional semifinal Saturday in Char- 
lotte, North Carolina. 

“This is a hard time for Michigan 
basketball,” said the junior guard 
Jakn Rose, a part of the Fab Five 
reennting class that led Michigan 
to the Last two national champion- 
ship games only to lose both. 
“We’ve been spoiled by making the 
finals the last two years." 

The third-seeded Wolverines 
(24-8) did make a composed — and 
nearly successful — comeback. 
They patiently and repeatedly 
worked the ball inside to junior 
center Juwan Howard, who totaled 
30 points and 13 rebounds after 
committing two fouls during the 
game’s first minute-and-a-half. (He 
was named the regional's most out- 
standing player.) 

Although they never tied the 
score after Arkansas’s early rally, 
they did have two chances to do so 
during the game’s last five minutes. 

With the score 63-61 and a little 
less than five minutes to play. Rose 


made a steal and took oft on a fast 
break. With open teammates trail' 
mg him, he miarat an off-balance 
shot from the lane. 

“1 saw my teammate there, but 
that was a three-foot shot I make 99 
percent of the time," Rose said. 

With the score 71-68 and 37 sec- 
onds remaining, Robinson missed 
a one-androne. But with 22 seconds 
left. Rose missed a three-point try. 
Arkansas’s Scotty Thurman 
grabbed the rebound, was footed 
and made both ends of the one- 
and-one. 

Michigan missed 3-point tries cm 
its next two possessions, and Ar- 
kansas’s CEnt McDaniel made 3- 
oM free throws to finish the game. 

“We’re used to being on the oth- 
er end, where the other team tried 
and tried and tried, but couldn't do 
it," said Fisher, whose teams re- 
main 12-0 in NCAA tournament 
games decided by five points or 
fewer or in overtime. 

Arkansas came into the game 
having outscored its opponents by 
an average of nearly 20 points a 
game. Many teams who are used to 
winning so big get frustrated in 
situations such as the one (hat 
Michigan’s stubbornness harmed 

the Razorbacks. But they remained 
composed. 

“We knew they are an excellent 
balldub and they were going to 
stay in the game," Thurman said. 
“But we’re the ones going to Char- 
lotte.” 




;t:.» 

; - « 

:• : *.r-i : *- 


s . i . .** 

, . . •- r i ir 


. ■ 


• - :• i.-<rre 


« j" 


A Touch of Magic 
Revives the Lakers 


By Jay Privman 

New York Tunes Service 

INGLEWOOD, California — The Forum had become a lonely 
place since Magic Johnson retired as a player, and the Los Angeles 
Lakers slowly receded to the lower depths of the National Basketball 
Association's Pacific Division. 

The Lakers, the hottest ticket in town during the 1980s, when they 
won five championships, had become an afterthought, with rows of the 
Forum's ydlow and orange seats blooming like flowers in the desert. 

Bui the place was alive with exdtanent on SundHy, when Johnson 
made his debut as coach of the lakers, a position to wind] he was 
named last Tuesday. The result of tire game, the Lakers’ 110-101 
conquest of the Milwaukee Bucks, seemed almost secondary. If the 
Lakers were looking to generate interest in a team with a 29-38 record, 
they knew they needed the most popular sports figure in Los Angeles. 

The Lakers had sold out only seven games lan season, and this 
season they had but two sellouts before this g«nv Bui the Forum 
was packed on Sunday night. 

A video highlighting Johnson's career was played before the game. 
Johnson was greeted by a standing ovation when he emerged from 
the locker room and strode on the court. 

- When the starting lineup was introdoctd;nhe publji<raadi^ ai> 
nounccr made it sound as though the Lakers were contending fra a 
division title instead of a lottery pick. He passed after the Lakers’ five 
starters were on the court, then, like a boxing ring announcer, said: 
“And ladies and gentlemen, introducing to yon the new coach of your 
Los Angdes Lakers . . . Earvin . . . Magic. . . Johnson!” 

Johnson was a bundle of nervous energy during the game. He 
paced constantly, shouted encouragement and often wandered onto 
the conn when play was at the end opposite the Lakers' bench. 

Johnson promised the Lakers would ran, and they came out 
flying. The Lakers fait their first five shots, built a 30-14 lead after 
one quarter, were up 66-35 at the half and held a commanding 86-60 
lead after three quarters before the Bucks made a rout look some- 
what respectable with a late rally. 

■ Sims Gindb Playoff Berth 

Charles Barkley and Cedric CebaJlos scored 20 points each and 
Kevin Johnson had 15 points and 15 assists as the Suns Qualified for 
the NBA playoffs by defeating Houston, 113-98, in Phoenix on 
Sunday, The Associated Press reported. The Rockets traded by as 
many as 17 points in the third quarter, then got as dose as six, but 
their chances of coming back were da ma ged by the ejection of 
Hakeem Olajuwon. 


Underrated Florida Makes 
A Believer of Boston College 



The Associated Press 

MIAMI — For much of the sea- 
son they were described as over- 
achievers, a team without a star. It 
turns out the Honda Gators were 
just underappreciated, a team des- 
tined fra the Final Four. 

“People may not have had a lot 
of confidence in us or thought we 
could be a prominent team," said 
the junior guard Dan Cross. “But 
we believed in each other and here 
we are.” 

East Regional champions. Win- 
ners of a school-record 29 games. 
Ready to face Southeast Regional 
champion Duke (27-5) in Satur- 
day’s national s emifinals . 

“We’re excited about the oppor- 
tunity,” Coach Lon Kruger stud af- 
ter &mday’s 74-66 regional final vic- 
tory over Boston College. “Duke has 
set the standard for college basket- 
ball fra the last seven, eight, 10 j 


7) in control. He finished with 21 
points and Andrew DeQercq, the 
Gators’ unheralded forward, 
scored 16 paints and grabbed 13 
rebounds in his best all-around per- 
formance of the season. 

“After everything we did to get 
here, people stfll doubted ns," De- 
Gercq said. “They were already 
saying Boston College was going to 
{day Duke. We’d been in that posi- 
tion so modi, it just didn’t matter 
what people said any more.” 

BC, at Na 9 the lowest seed left 
in the tournament, finished 23-1 1. 
The Eagles reached the regional fi- 
nal by defeating three higher seed- 
ed opponets, including No. 1 
North Carolina and No. 5 Indiana. 

The team’s surprising run 
stopped speculation about Coach 
Jim O’Brien's job being in jeopardy 


and enabled a senior dass that 
went 1-15 as freshmen in the Big 
East to go out on a positive note. 

“We’re trying to buQd a founda- 
tion for years to come," said 
Brown, the only senior in Florida’s 
starting lineup. 

The trip to the Final Four is the 
first fra Florida, which has a rich 
football tradition but was 7-21 in 
basketball just four years ago — 
the season before Kruger arrived 
from Kansas State. 

Brown said the Gators would get 
better at celebrating. 

“After we cut down one net, we 
got in the locker room and Coach 
told us we forgot to cut down the 
other net," Brown said. “I told him, 
‘Hey, we’re new at this.' " 


Dwd Ungnnwb/Tbr Annum! PKs» 


Scotty 'nHHman charged past Michigan's Jimmy Bang, leading the Razorbacks into the Final Foi*. 


years. I don’t think We’D be favored, 
but we’re looking forward to it.” 

So what dse is new? Critics and 
skeptics have questioned Honda 
all season, and even a victory over 
second-seeded Connecticut m the 
regional semifinals didn’t change 
the opinions of some who thought 
the Gators were in over their beads. 

“These ptayere have not been dis- 
tracted at all by the low expecta- 
tions," Kruger said. “We’ve read the 
papers and seen dm everyone has 
played badly against us. We appre- 
ciate that Today, we won a game.” 

And the Gators did it in convinc- 
ing fashion, BC shot 38jperoenl and 
was held to just three field goals in 
the finu l ! 1 minutes of the game. 

Craig Brown provided (be spark 
offensively, coming off screens to 
make 3-pamtens on three consecu- 
tive possessions to put Florida (29- 


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By Timothy W. Smith 

New York 7 tmes Service 

NEW YORK — Bobby Hurley and 
Christian Laettner left Duke fra the Na- 
tional Basketball Association, and every- 
one thought that the Blue Devils were sup- 
posed to fold their Final Four road maps 
and be content to sit out the fun of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association 
- championship. 

But there they were Saturday night, ait- 
ting dawn the nets at Thoxnpson-Boung 
Arena in Knoxville, Tennessee,, as the 
champions of the Southeast 
headed for the Final Four in Charlotte, 
North Carolina, for the seventh time mtne 


H5H, after shutting down the star Purdue 
forward Glenn Robinson and paving the 
way fra Ihe Bine Devils’ 69-60 victory, 
showed! op at the postgame news confer- 
ence wearing the nets around his neck. He 
is the last vestige of Duke’s back-to-back 
national championship teams in 1991 and 
1992, and not many people expected that 

• 1 J taalA 


UUW vunuvuwi V— - 

Florida (29-7) in the seunfinate, wfflhave 
what amounts to a home-court advantage 
for a national championship run. 

The senior aB-America forward Grant 


With Hurley and Laettner gone, even 
HOI noticed that Duke had been rele gated 
to nonsaious cons derail on when it came 
to talk of reaching the Final Four this year. 
Before the start of the Southeast Region 
final game against Marquette, H31 
s aid that he didn’t think the Blue Devils 

chance to ma^e the Final Four. 

“AH year long we didn’t get the votes in 
the poll,” he said. “And an CBS you heard 
them talk about Arkansas, Carolina arid 


Purdue. I think maybe people were just 
sick of Duke.” 

With North Carolina, last year's nation- 
al champ ion, and Kentucky in the same 
region, Duke took a tack seat as a favorite 
to advance to the Final Four this year. But 
with the Tar Heels and the Wildcats elimi- 
nated in the second round, Duke, the regu- 
lar-season champion in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference, pushed forward as a favorite. 

The Duke coach, Mike Kiryzewski, was 
ncfcpri whether he thought he’d get to the 
Ftnal Four this year with a less- talented 
group than he has had in the past. 

“We’re not devoid of talent” he said. “I 
knew we had always had a chance. I’m a 
little shocked — not at this point — but 
looking bade. When we won at Mi chigan 
and Iowa, I thought we’d be a good team, 
because good teams win games like thaL 
We were the regular-season champions in 
the ACC After we beat Maryland, for 10 


days we were .just happy to be the regular- 
season champions." 

A blissful complacency engulfed the 
Blue Devils and they were beaten by Vir- 
- gjnia in the second round of the ACC 
tournament. That might have oven the im- 
pression that Duke wasn't ready to make a 
serious tun fra (be NCAA championship. 

But Hill, Antonio Lang, a senior for-' 
ward, and Cherokee Parks, a junior — the 
nppe rdasan en starters — have elevated 
their game fra the tournament Hill aver- 
aged 17.4 points during the season, but 18 
points ana6 assists during the tournament. 

i-ang averaged 12.4 points during the 
season and 17 in the tournament. Parks 
averaged 14.6 points daring the season and 
17J during the touraamenL And the three 
upperclassmen starters have fed off the 
infectious energy and excitement of the 
two younger starters, Chris Collins, a soph- 
omore guard, and Jeff Capd, a freshman 
guard. 


“Whenever I need a lift i just look at 
Jeff " Hill said. “He’s always excited. That 
kind of gets everybody going.” 

In the two victories that propelled them 
into the Final Four, the Blue Devils have 
been helped by that combination of experi- 
ence and youth. In the semifinal game 
against Marquette, Hill scored 22 points, 
including 16 in the second half, to break 
open a tight game. 

It was H3Ts defensive pressure that shut 
down Purdue’s Robinson, holding him to 
just 13 points, his worst game of the season. 
But it was Capd who took over off esavdy 
in the second half and scored 15 of bis 19 

two" minutes to push Duke ahead,^7-32, 
and put the Boilermakers on their heels. 

“In the four days of the tournament, Jeff 
has handled himself Hke a veteran," Krzy- 
zewski said. “I thought his performance 
against Purdue was one of the best I’ve 
seen at Duke." 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Making Guns Safer 


m 




W ASHINGTON — It had to 
happen sooner or later. More 
people are now being killed by guns 
m the United States than by auto- 
mobiles. 

Safety officials in Washington 
are very concerned, and a meeting 
was held at the White House to 
discuss what to do about the situa- 
tion. 

Zerkin, chief of National Gun 
Safety, said, 

“Guns are un- 
safe as they are 
right now. I rec- 
ommend that we 
put air bags on 
them." 

“That could 
add a great deal 
to the price of a 
weapon. Be- 
sides, how dowe 
know that air Bucfawald 
bags will prevent fatalities?" said 
Louise Webermacber of the Food 
and Drug Administration. "Our 
tests show that airbags on guns can 
save a person in only Cve out of 10 
instances.” 

Zeridn asked, "What about seat 
belts? We could attach one to the 
barrel of the gun and you'd have to 
buckle up before the trigger would 
work." 

Louise said, "Most people hate 
seat bells on their guns. They say it 
restricts them from firing at their 
target. I wouldn’t be against bump- 
ers on pistols so that when the gun 
goes off accidentally you^ don’t 
.gnash up your entire hand." 

Luger, a lobbyist with the Good 
Luck Gun Company, said, "We’re 
willing to do anything to make 
guns more safe, except pay for it. 
The guns themselves are not un- 
safe, it’s the people who use them 
that cause me accidents. What 
might solve the safety problem is a 


Swiss Nuns Prohibit "Hair’ 

The Associated Press 

APPENZELL, Switzerland — A 
New York theatrical group was 
scheduled to perform "Hair” in the 
auditorium of a local school here. 
But the St. Maria der Engel convent, 
which owns the school grounds, said 
"no,” that the musical, with its mes- 
sage of peace and love, was influ- 
enced by the "pagan" new age 
movement and incompatible with 
Christian beliefs. 


collapsible pistol grip so that when 
the gun hits something, the handle 
automatically falls span." 

□ 

Hie group broke np for refresh- 
ments and then went back to work. 
They were joined by Horace Bates, 
an automobile expert. 

"We experienced the same prob- 
lem with auto safety as guns are 
now having — we kept injuring 
innocent people with our cars. So 
we decided to use reinforced steel 
so that when the auto hit somebody 
the person inside the car wouldn't 
get hurt." 

Zerkin said, "That’s not a bad 
ideal Why can't we make gun man- 
ufacturers add reinforced steel to 
.the semiautomatic barrels? It 
would be cheaper than airbags and 
save thousands of lives." 

Louise said, "It sounds good on 
paper. But most of the wounds 
from guns are around the neck. If 
we’re talking safety for weapons, 
we have to deal with whiplash.” 

Luger, the gup representative, 
claimed that his industry was not 
responsible for whiplash from 
guns. 

"If people would wear bullet- 
proof vests and drive low in their 
seats there wouldn't be so many 
accidents." 


Zerkin told the group. "The pres- 
ident wants a report on this in the 
morning. The question we must re- 
solve is, do we want air bags on our 
guns, or have them strapped to seat 
belts, or put stronger bumpers on 
than?" 

Luger said, "If we do anything to 
make guns safer, it wflj raise their 
price and cost 10.000 jobs." 

Louise added, "Then we recom- 
mend that the statistics stand as is. 
I don't see what the big deal is 
about guns killing more people 
than automobiles. No one com- 
plained when automobiles were 
No. 1." 

Zeridn asked, "Has anyone ever 
thought of building a semiautomat- 
ic with front-wheel drive?" 

Louise replied, "We haven’t, but 
the Italian manufacturers tried it 
and discovered that they were no 
safer than an UzL” 

Luger wanted everyone, "If you 
suggest air bags for guns, the Na- 
tional Rifle Association will go 
through the roof, and then nobody 
will get any money for the next 
election." 


The Comeback of John Frankenheimer 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Service 

L OS ANGELES — He was one of the 
top young directors of the 1960s, a 
craftsman who moved from television dra- 
mas to studio films that endure today, 
including "The Manchurian Candidate," 
"Budman of Alcatraz," "Seven Days in 
May." "The Train" and “The Fixer.” 

Yet despite this formidable track re- 
cord, John Frankenheimer, at 64. is now 
trying to pick up the pieces of a career that 
went awry. 

"Do I miss doing the big Christmas 
picture for Paramount?" Frankenheimer 
said quietly. "Yes, of course I do. But 
television is a way of gening back to doing 
that I have to rediscover myself, reinvent 
myself. And this is a way of doing that." 

With unusual candor and without a 
trace of bitterness, Frankenheimer says he 
is hardly embarrassed about returning to 
television, the medium in which he began 
his career shortly after leaving the air force 
in early 1950s. 

His new film, "Against the WaU." about 
the bloody prison riot in 1971 at the Attica 
Correctional Facility in upstate New 
York, wfli be shown on U.S. TV next 
month. 

The film is based on the real-life experi- 
ences of a prison guard named Michael 
Smith. It stars Kyle Mac Lachlan as a 
somewhat innocent and well-meaning cor- 
rectional officer taken hostage at Attica 
and facing a terrible ordeal, and Samuel L. 
Jackson, as a leader among the inmates. 
The two develop an intense relationship 
and understanding of each other in the 
carnage of Attica. 

The prison rebellion ended horrifically: 
32 inmates and 10 guards who were hos- 
tages died. 

Frankenheimer. seated in his Spanisb- 
styie home in Beverly Hills, said that the 
appeal of the script by Ron Hutchinson 
was its focus on the two men. 

"It could have taken place anytime men 
are under life and death situations,” he 
said. "I wanted to do a picture about two 
men facing the decisive moment of their 
lives.” 

The film does not deal in any substan- 
tive way with Governor Nelson Rockefel- 
ler's decision to send 1,500 state troopers, 
sheriffs deputies andprison guards storm- 
ing into the prison. “That’s not the picture 
I wanted to make,” said Frankenheimer. 

Sipping tea in his living room, Franken- 
heimer, tall and craggy-faced, discussed 
his career and Hollywood with unusual 
frankness. He said personal difficulties, 
including alcoholism, left him tormented 
for years and plagued his career. 

"The 1980s were meat putting my life 
bade together,” he said "But look. I don’t 
want to cast myself as a victim in any way 





At 64, Frankenheimer, who directed “The Manchurian Candidate, 1 " is now making TV films. 


; . * . r w 

1 

I'- ♦ J 

w . * . * ** 


Jm Samondcr far The New York Tvh 


because I'm not I’ve had a terrific career 
and a long run. And if you keep stepping 
up to the plate, sooner or larer you geL a 
hit- And sooner or later you get a home 
run. The important thing is to be resilient 
enough to keep stepping up to the plate. 
And Tm stepping up to the plate." 

"I had a dr inkin g problem,” he said 
softly. "I also made a lot of bad dunces. I 
straightened out in 1981. And from that 
day on I haven't had a drink.” 

Frankenhehner's films were a fusion of 
stylish action dramas ("The Train,” 
"Black Sunday," "Grand Prix”) and inti- 
mate psychological portraits (“The Ice- 
man Cometh,” "The Manchurian Candi- 
date"). 

But the combination of his personal 
difficulties and a decline in (he number 
and quality of scripts he was offered led to 
a downhill professional slide. 

And in recent years he has directed 
films that virtually disappeared at the box 
office. These include “Prophecy” in 1979. 
with TaHa Shire, “The Challenge” in 1982, 
with Scott Glenn, "Dead Bang” in 1988. 
with Don Johnson, and “Year of the Gun" 
in 1 99 1 , with Andrew McCarthy and Shar- 
on Stone. 

“1 know the system hoe and 1 know the 
way that I am going to get movies is to do 
good work,” he said. "A lot of people who 
make the decisons now weren’t bom 


when I was making some of my films." He 
shrugged and smiled. "Yon can't blame 
them. You have to do work that’s good 
now.” 

Frankenheimer views his current weak 
for TV at HBO as a career turning point. 
He is now directing a film about Francisco 
Meades Filho, whose efforts to save the 
Brazilian rain forest led to his murder. The 
film stars Ran] Julia as Mendes. 

After this, Frankenheimer plans to un- 
dertake a project especially near bis heart: 
a drama about Robert F. Kennedy, from 
the time of President John F. Kennedy’s 
murder in 1963 to the former attorney 
general’s assassinati on in 1968. 

In some ways, Robert Kennedy’s death 
played a significant role in Franken- 
hdiueris troubled career. Frankenheimer 
developed a dose friendship with Kenne- 
dy, and spent a good part of 1968 traveling 
with him during his presidential cam- 


Kenncdy was, in fact, staying at Fran- 
kenheimer’s in Mafibu when he vis- 
ited Los Angdes on the last day of his life. 
Frankenheimer drove him to the Ambas- 
sador Hotel to celebrate his triumph in the 
California primary, and it was there that 
he was slam. The memories are still raw. 

"He wanted me up thereon the podium 
with him, but I said I didn’t think this was 
the kind of image he wanted — a movie 


director beside him on the night of the 
primary,” Frankenheimer recalled. 

"It was a tremendous sense of loss,” 
Frankenheimer said haltingly. "I had 
spent my life dealing with make-believe. 
And here was somebody trying to make a 
hum difference in people’s lives. I was 
really left very disillusioned, and went 
through a period- of deep depression.’’ 

Frankenheimer moved to France for 
about five years, took cooking classes as 
an escape and eventually directed some 
films, including "The Iceman Cometh” 
with Lee Marvin, Fredric March, Robert 
Ryan and Jeff Bridges, and “The French 
Connection II” with Gate Hackman. 

But he said Kennedy’s death, his own 
personal problems and the disappointing 
audience response to "Black Sunday," his 
1977 film about terrorists at the Super 
Bowl, deepened his depression. 

"Everyone thought that film would 
make money like ‘Jaws,’ " be said. “It got 
good reviews, bnl it didn’t go through the 
roof.” After that, he said, “my drinking 
problem got bad.” 

But Frankenheimer remains upbeat. 
Pouring another cup of tea, he said: "I 
don't think I’ve been shortchanged at alL 
Tm not bitter. I’ve had a wonderful life, 
traveled places I never would have gone. I 
fed Tm on an upswing. I do think Fm a 
very lucky guy.” 


PEOPLE 


Box Office Is Mobbed 
For Streisand Concerts 

The luckiest people in the worid? 

The chance to see Barbra Streisand 
in concert was irresistible to thou- . 
sands as they stood in long lines at -'ll 

box offices and tied up telephone , \ , , s I 

circuits trying to reserve tickets.. f I l\ * 
Demand for tickets to her 12-show |\ , > 

U.S. concert lour — her first in 22 ,** f « 

years — was so great that six show® ' Lp| 
were added, and all IS sold out is T | [ v 

less than an hour, an estimated ,» r L 
250.000 tickets at prices ranging jl ^ 
from $50 to $350. The firstUS . Y » y 
show will be in Washington on May . 

10. Streisand will have four London 
concerts, beginning April 20. :L^ 

D f 

Elegance is beck, declared the f F V { r 
fashion consultant Eleanor Lambert jl) P'l 
in releasing her 1994 best-dressed r * 
lisL The women honored for 1994 .1- 

include the actress Sharon Stale, -..;hpU 
the comedian Joan Rivers and a > , 

sprinkling of European nobility — ■ r ■ 
Princess Caroline of Monaco, for ‘ 
example. In the men’s category: the V rv.'.Y ■: • 
actor Denzel Washington, Andrew 
Ijw wi, son of the designer Rafyh ' 

Lauren, and Pat Riley, coach of the 
New York Kuicks. 

□ 

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Iris -i* - 
wife, Endjy Black, have divorced in 
the Dominican Republic, a news- ' 
paper there reported. Kennedy and 
Black married in 1982 and separai- 
edin 1992. They have two children. 

□ 

The Kennedy Center in Wash- 
ington announced Monday the ap- ' 
pomtmeni of Leonard Station, oao- — ■ 

doctor of the SL Louis Symphony 
Orchestra, to succeed Mstislav Ro- 
stropovich as director of the Na- 
tional Symphony Orchestra. ■/ 

□ 

Amy Carter, 26, daughter of for- : 
mer President Jimmy Carter, has - 
set the date for her marriafy to M--'- 
chad Antonocd as May 28, at an 
outdoor ceremony at the National : 

Ornamental Metal Museum is 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

□ 

Loni Anderson has a new man in 
her fife, after her weD-pubHdzed <fi- ' 
vorce from Bart Reynolds: Geoff 
Brown, a Los Angdes lawyer. 


INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 4 & IS 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 



T ( 



Toe 



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W 

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17/82 

9/46 

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17/62 

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22/71 

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23/73 

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17*2 pa 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu- Weather. Asia 



K^jl hwwm o 
-Mtnn Bsd 08 * 

North America 
The North Ban wfU be dhllly 
and dry later this week. Cold 
weather will funnel south- 
ward from Ontario through 
the Greet Lakes stem. M*j 
weather wO surge eastward 
from Denver at midweek, 
leeching Kansas City Thurs- 
day and Chicago by Friday. 
Phoenix will have dry. warm 
weather ail week. 

Middle East 


Unaoaaanridy gg 

Europe 

Very strong winds wfll sweep 
across Ireland and northern 
Great Britain Wednesday 
and across the rest of Greet 
Britain Wednesday night. 
Bursts ot heavy rein will, 
accompany the strong 
winds. Paris through Frank- 
furt and Borin wfll nave dry, 
mild weather Wednesday, 
then showers by Thursday. 


Asia 

Shoewa across South Chtaa 
will wet Taiwan and Hong 
Kong on oocastoa In Shang- 
hai, rahs wB probably arrive 
Thursday. Beijing and Seoul 
will have dry, seasonably 
mild weelhar. Tokyo will 
have dry weather until Friday 
when a few showers are 
possible. Manila will be 
warm wth a stray shower. 


Today 
Mgh Low 
OF CIF 

mn 26 m 

17*3 e ms 

so an i 7 *e 
an 23/ra 

33/81 18*4 
12/53 -1/31 
16*9 9Ml 
31*6 M/73 
31/70 10*1 
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2*" nl 
Capa Tom 


pc 33*1 
• IB *6 
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PC 33*1 
S 34*3 
S 12/53 
PC 10*1 
pc 31/86 
Ml 22/71 
PC 12/53 


80*8 13*5 I 20/88 14*7 pc 
27*0 14*7 s 37*0 18*1 pc 
31/70 12*3 s 22/71 11*2 pc 
M/73 11(52 c 37*0 11*2 pc 
32*9 28/79 ■ 33*1 27/80 pc 
23/73 11*2 pc 26/79 13*5 all 
22/71 6/46 a 33/73 12/33 pc 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow _ Today , Tomorrow 

Mgh Lee W Mgh Low W Mgh Low W Htfi Low W 

OF W W OF OF OF OF C«= 

Baku 22/71 16*1 pc 22/71 13*0 pc BwraMoa 26/79 16*1 a 28/78 19*8 po 

Cake 27*0 13*3 pc 28/77 12*3 pc Caracas 28*2 23/73 • 29*4 23/73 po 

Dmrwcuo 18*6 10*0 pc 19*8 9M0 po Lkna 28/79 21/70 pc 37*0 21/70 e 

Jwuwlam 19*8 12*3 e 18*4 11*2 pa UrnknOly 24/78 11/52 pc 24/78 7/44 pc 

Unor 34*3 11/52 l 32*9 11*2 po nodaJBMto 29*2 22*1 o 29*4 23/73 po 

Hyatt) 29*4 19*5 pc 31*8 18*4 pc Sariigo 28/79 11/52 a 28*2 12*3 pc 

Lagwid: s-omy, po^xs^dkxjdy.iMioudy.eh-showenhteiwKlmBlonixLMaln.sHsxrwIhirkw, 
irwnow, Hen, w-wismr. ABmnpa.foie caef a i d da t a p roWJ a d byAncu W dsihar, Inc. C 1994 


North America 


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r 7/44 
a 29*4 
c 16*4 
pc 17*2 
e 2/35 
r 8/46 


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0/32 pc 
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19*8 pc 
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11152 s 
18*4 po 
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-8*2 */ 
*1/70 pc 
104 pc 
14*7 a 
9/48 pc 
6/43 c 
-8*7 at 
0/32 po 


ACROSS 

t Actress Winger 
6 Park, in 
Monopoly 
it 'Honest' fellow 
14 Where Gauguin 
visited van Gogh 
is Funnyman 
0‘Bnen 

ic Bloodshot 
17 'Cheers!" in 
Cherbourg? 

is Chang's 
Siamese twin 
n Brand of lemon- 
flavored dnnk 


2 t Daydream 

23 Koch and Wynn 

24 Pampering, for 
Short 

26 It's heard in a 
herd 

27 Ganbaldt in 
Genoa 7 

33 Pickle 
as Subject for a 
supermarket 
tab 

37 Avaricious one 
as October gem 
40 Beam fastener 
421963 Oscar 
winner 


Solution to Puzzle of March 28 


□□□□a Hannan 
eqhhhh aaaaaaa 
ehqqqhq saaanaa 
□naan □□nan ana 
nnH nannan anna 
asna Hsaa annaa 
nnaaanna Hannan 
□□aa naan 
□□□ana aaaaaaaa 
□□□□a nana anaa 
□ana nannan nna 
□an Hanna aanun 
nananna uaaana 
□Hannan auaaaa 
heibbhh aaaan 


43 Arose 

45 Danger 

47 Hang in the 
breeze 

48 Madrid's 
equivalent of a 
Texas university 

so Performance 

51 Had lunch 

52 Montana and 
Moon, in brief 

ss Gladstone rival 

60 Real 

62 'Poppycock!' 

63 Pre-photo 
pronouncement 
in Geneva? 

65 Some 

66 Skirmish 

67 "Dallas’ Miss 

SSSimonize 

« Classic theater 
name 

704-Down again 


1 Peri opera 

2 Made a boner 

3 Post-sneeze 
word 

4 Taka money for 
a spare room 


5 Loner 

eAgt's share 

7 Creator at 
Lorelei Lee 

8 Med. subj. 

8 Winter melon 

10 Competitor 

11 Vicinity 

12 Early German 
carmaker 

is Barely beat, 
with ’out* 

is Woman's top 

22 Cartoonist 
Wilson 

25 Islamic leader 

28 Crowbar 

28 Portugal and its 
neighbor 

so Barely managed, 
with'ouT 

31 Raise 

32 Alternative to 
Charles de 
Gaulle 

33 Clinton's runs 

34 Each 

35 First name in 
spying 

39 Moon-based 

41 Alternative to 
Certs 

44 ‘Desmalselles 
d’Avignon’ 
artist 


46 Bloodletting 
practitioner 
40 Potted 
52 Put down 
sa Count in music 


55 Extract 
58 New Rochelle 
college 
57 Charon's 
domain 


so Relationship . 
words 

81 Prefix with play 
or scope 

84 Favorite relative 


54 Winter weather sa Kind ot beer in politics? 



Punfe by Merit Dm 

© New York Times Edited by Will Shorn. 


Ttavd in a worid without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AOS’ Access Numbers. 

How to caff around the world. 

1. Using the chan beJow, find the country you are calling from. 

2. Dial the corresponding AE£T Access Number. 

3. An AKT English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wish to call or connea you to a 
customer service representative 

Torecdve your free wallet card of ABST* Access Numbers, fee* dial the access number of 
the country ycxiYe In and ask far Customer Service 


•make 

fent 


COUNTRY ACCTSS NUMBER 
ASIA/PACmC 

Amenta m 4 -« 8 l- 0 ll 


CMmJPMCbww 

Cnmi 

Hong Kong 
India# 



Bam* 

Malaysia* 

New Zealand 


Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* 
Thailand* 


Imagine a worid where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
_ reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 

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To use these services, dial the AT&T Access Number of the country you're in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your AIST Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don't have an AUSET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AK3T global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 







AT&T 


C 199*1 ABET 


. Bdgluni* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 


Denmark* 

Hnljuxt* 


Greece 

t hu i fl i i y * 

Iceland** 


►* 10811 

018-871 

800-1111 

000-117 

001*^01-10 

0039-1 II 

009-11 

rv 

aoo-ooii 

000-911 

105-H 

235-2872 = 

800-0111-111 

430-430 

0080-M3S34> ' - 

0019-991-1111 

EUROPE 

8414111 

02Z-903-011 

078-11-0010 

00-1B00-0010 

99-38-0011 

00-420-00101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

19a-O011 

01300010 

00800-1311 

00*80001111 

999-001 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Ireland 1800^50000 

Italy* 172-1011 

l i ftchtmw clgr 155-0011 

lithaMiila* 8*196 

IvxenhcnuK 08004)111 , 

Malta* 0800-690-110- 

M n*wcn * IMWl 

Wetlierhmda* 06-0229111 

Mt*w*y* 80019011 

Poland*#** OAOMH BP-Maa 

PortPBl’ 05017-1-288 

01-8084288 ! 

135-5042 

gtowiMa 0042000101 

Si” 10 900-99-00-11 

^reden* 020195411 

Hwlumlami* 155-0011 

P-M- 050089-0011 

MIDDLE EAST 

Bahotn 800-001 

cypw oeopodiot 

177-1002727 

Kwfc 600-288 

IebanonOBefanQ -420801 

Saudi Arabia 1-800-100 

Taektf 0080012277* 

AMERICAS 

Argentina* 001-6002001111 

555 

MMar 08001111 . 

0088010 

CMte 0044312- 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

.qdmnbfc 98Q114W10 1 

kSoBBilHcrti iu 

Ecuador* t!9 

H Salvador lpQ ‘ 

■ G u at em ala * igp 

Goyna*^ 165 

Honduna** 125 

Mczfcnaaa 95-800462-4240 

Wctwgp8(M8«i*pM) 174 

Panama* 109 

Pent* 191. 

Suriname 156 

Uruguay 000410 

Venezuela** 80011-120 

CAtiUtigAN 

B a ham a 1-800872-2881 . 

-Bermuda* 1-900872-2861 

■British Vi. 1-800672-2881 , 

Cayman Idanda 1-800-672-2881 

. Grenada* 1-800872-2881 . 

Had* 001-800-972-2883 

ftunicr* 0800872-2881 1 

N e t h . Aatil 001-80087*2881 

■SLKhn/Nevfa 1-800872-2881 


AFRICA 

‘(Cairo) 


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5108200 

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797-79 r 7i | 

101-1992 


IflM World Oo m e cr -t M vfcf r*a apply t 

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hum m«Mt Vm, hivh 


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