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INTERNATIONAL 



Sri bu 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



** 


Paris, Monday May 2, 1994 


No. 34,577 


Mandela Envisions Regime of Reconciliation and Consensus 


By Bill Keller 

Ntv York Time Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Nelson Mandela 
has laid out a vision of his government as a 
grand negotiating forum in which every party 
will have a voice, past crimes will be forgiven 
and the power of the majority will rarefy be 
used. 

Rather than a dramatic break with the 
past, or a frantic first 100 days, Mr. Mandela 
said in interviews last week, the first themes 
of his new presidency will be reconciliation 
and consensus. 

Defenders of apartheid would be pardoned 
for crimes, be promised. Anxious ethnic mi- 
norities would retain their jobs and cultures. 
Big business would play an influential role in 
shaping economic policy. The departing pres- 


ident, Frederik W. de Klerk, and other hold- 
overs from the white government would be 
trusted partners in the cabinet 
Even the racist outlaws of the Afrikaner 
Resistance Movement whose members have 
been accused by the police in a spate of pre- 
election bombings aimed at sabotaging the 
transition, would not be banned but invited 
to the bargaining table, he said. 

He promised that there would be no dis- 
mantling of monuments or symbols cherished 
by whites, no renaming of streets and cities, 
without “very intense, patient serious discus- 
sion." 

And as for the yearning of some black 
nationalists to rechrisien the country Azania. 
Mr. Mandela called this “farfetched" 

Mr. Mandela’s concept of the new govern- 
ment sounded remarkably like a continuation 


of the negotiating partnership forged since 
Mr. de Klerk released him from pnson Four 
years ago. That process, involving more than 
20 parlies, produced an interim constitution 
and the first all-race elections. 

“Even if we may emerge with a landslide 
victory, we have to be very careful and not 
create the fear that the majority is going to be 
used for the purpose of coercing minorities to 
accept the policy of a particular party which 
has emerged victorious," Mr. Mandela said. 

Ou tlinin g his program of reconciliation. 
Mr. Mandela made these points: 

• Most white police officers and others 
who killed or tortured in defease of apartheid 
would be given indemnity for their crimes 
and would not be publicly named. Only au- 
thors of the roost recent crimes would not be 
eligible for pardon. 


• The new gpverament would continue to 
subsidize schools run for ethnic minorities, 
including white Afrikaners. Although the em- 
phasis would be on upgrading black schools 

and promoting "nonracial" education, he 
said, “we believe that by recognizing diversity 
we will actually be uniting the people of 
South Africa."" 

• He would support “a simple, low tax" 
because high taxes would scare off foreign 
investors. But if forced to choose between 
raising taxes and curtailing his party's prom- 
ises, he would raise taxes. 

Mr. Mandela said the African National 
Congress’s “reconstruction" program of 
housing, jobs and free education — which the 
party estimates would cost $12 billion but 
which critics say could cost twice that — was 
“the minimum policy." 


“It is inconceivable that at any time we will 
cut down on that policy,” he said. 

Many whites mistrust Mr. Mandela's talk 
Of a consensus-oriented Camel ot, and many 
Of his followers think it is a recipe for paraly- 
sis. 

But Mr. Mandela was insistent that the 
same patient negotiations that produced the 
constitution and elections could be used to 
balance the rival imperatives of his govern- 
ment — the need to raise the hopes of impov- 
erished blacks, and the need to prevent 
skilled whites from quitting or resisting. 

He said be viewed the unity government as 
a five-year expedient, after which the country 
should revert to majority democracy in which 

See MANDELA, Page 7 







Bosnian Serbs 


Report 9 Dead 
After Pounding 
By UN Tanks 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- He rzegovma — In one 
of the most serious dashes since the United 
Nations operation began in Bosnia two years 
ago, two Danish tank platoons pounded Serbi- 
an positions during a 90-minute battle near the 
northeastern Bosnian city of Tuzla, UN offi- 
cials said Sunday. 

The clash, which ended early Saturday in the 
town of Kalesija, left nine Serbian soldiers dead 
and five wounded, the Bosnian Serbian Army 
said in Belgrade. UN officials said there were 
no Danish casualties, but added that Bosnian 
Serbian forces had hinted they would “get 
even” 

Un officials said the Danish units hit the 
Serbian positions with 72 tank shells. 

[Two American journalists were killed and a 
third was slightly wounded Sunday when their 
ear ran over a mine sear Mostar. in southern 
Bosnia. Agence France-Presse reported from 
Sarajevo. A UN spokesman said two of the 
journalists worked for the rock magazine Spin 
and the third for a publication called Magnolia 
News.] 

The combat in Kalesija, which began when 
Serbian forces attacked a UN observation post 
with tank sheds and artillery, .is part of a 
stepped up series of Serbian provocations of 
UN’iroops that began when the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization imposed ultimatums bn 
the Serbs on Feb. 9 and April 22, first forcing 
them to halt thdr siege of Sarajevo and then to 
stop their invasion of the Muslim enclave of 
Gorazde. 

In a statement, the Bosnian Serbian Army 
said the dash was "proof of an open and biased 
engagement of the UN peacekeeping forces on 
the side of Muslims, which puts in doubt thdr 
peaceful mission.” 

UN officials said the provocations and the 
United Nations’ often contradictory responses 
to them provided a stark illustration of an 
enduring predicament facing the international 
operation in Bosnia. Despite tough NATO 
rhetoric and a clear UN mandate warning the 
Serbs of dire consequences if they break the 
terms of the ultimatums car attack UN troops, 
the UN operation appears both unwilling and 
incapable of adopting a clear strategy to force 
the Serbs to back down. 

The United Nations' inconsistency in a re- 
cent chain of these face-offs has in turn affected 
thc all-bui -moribund peace process, prompting 
a toughening of Serbian demands. Western 
diplomats said. 

Around Tuzla, for example, the Danish 
troops, part of the United Nations’ Nordic 
See BOSNIA, Page 6 



Ayrton Senna, the three-time world Formula One champion, being rushed to a hospital Sunday after crashing at the San Marino Grand Prix in Imoia. Italy. He died four hours later. 


Suddenly, Death Returns to Formula One Auto Racing 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

Ayrton Senna of Brazil, the 34-year-old 
three- time champion of Formula One racing, 
died from injuries suffered in a crash at the San 
Marino Grand Prix on Sunday. 

The accident happened 400 meters from the 
curve where Roland Ratzenberger. a 3 1 -year- 
old Austrian driver, was killed during a qualify- 
ing run Saturday at the track in Imoia, Italy." 

The deaths, the first at a Formula One event 
since 1982. destroyed the illusion built over the 
preceding 12 years that the Life- threatening as- 
pects of the sport had been eliminated. 

It was uncertain whether the weekend’s trag- 


edies should be blamed on (he Dino and Enzo 
Ferrari Autodrome at Imoia — among the 
fastest in Formula One — or, perhaps, on new 
rules to limit car engineering that are making 
greater demands of the drivers. This was only 
the third race under those rules. 

Former stars called on the drivers to form a 
union that would exercise control over the 
sport. 

“They will then be able represent themselves 
against sports authorities, and, united, they 
could refuse to drive on a bad circuit." said 
Jackie Stewart of Scotland, another former 
three-time world champion. “What happened 
at Imoia during the weekend showed the circuit 
was dangerous. At Imoia. you can go 150 miles 


per hour everywhere and when you spin off. 
you hit a wall " 

That is what happened to Senna, at 250 
kilometers per hour. Doctors at Maggiore hos- 
pital in Bologna said his forehead was crushed, 
causing widespread injuries mat made surgery 
impossible. The Associated Press reported. 

"Senna's heart stopped beating at 1S40." Dr. 
Maria Teresa Fiandri said. "We did all we 
could. These are events which upset us. too." 

Another Brazilian driver. Rubens Bani- 
cheilo, escaped with only a broken nose after 
his car vaulted from the" track and into a wall 
during qualifying on Friday. And still another 
accident preceded Senna's on Sunday, when J J. 
Lehto of Finland stalled his Benetton on the 


starting grid and was hit from behind by the 
rapidly accelerating Lotus of Portugal's Pedro 
Lamy, wrecking both cars and scattering de- 
bris. 

The two drivers were apparently unhurt in 
that accident, but at least five people were 
reportedly injured by a tire that flew into the 
grandstand. 

The race continued in a slow jog behind a 
safety car as the mess was cleared. For five 
ominous laps the other cars filed behind the 
leader, Sanaa, under pressure after having 
failed to complete the first two events of the 
season. 

High-speed racing had resumed for just one 
See SENNA, Page 15 


ANC Predicts 
'Big Victory,’ 
Gets 55% of 
Early Results 

But It Is Falling Short. 
Of Two-Thirds Majority 
Needed to Write Charter 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — The .African Nation- 
al Congress predicted a “big victory" on Sun- 
day in South Africa's election, but it appeared 
that it would not gain the two-thirds majority 
needed to write a post-apartheid constitution 
on its own. 

With 21 percent of the vole counted by mid- 
evening on Sunday, the ANC had 54.7 percent, 
followed by 31.8 percent for the National Party 
of President Frederik W. de Klerk. The Zulu- 
based Inkatha Freedom Party was a distant 
third with 4J percent, followed by the pro- 
apartheid Freedom Front at 3.7 percent. 

Officials said complete results might not be 
available until Monday. 

“We are heading for a very big ANC vic- 
tory." said PaHo Jordan, a spokesman. He pre- 
dicted a 58 percent majority but added that 
more gains were possible and “could result in a 
rise to 60 percent or more." 

He also refused to rule out a two- thirds 
majority that under the interim constitution 
would give (he ANC absolute power in the 
government of national unity. 

The result of South Africa's first nonracial 
election had never been seriously doubted. 
With 18 million first-time black voters swamp- 
ing 5 million whites, coloreds and Indians, (he 
ANC, led by Nelsoa Mandela, was always only 
a step from power. 

The size of the step, and who would come 
second in the coalition mat will govern for the 
next five years, was the big question. First 
results appeared to show a dear trend. 

The ANC was well in front, even though 
results were pending from most of the black 
townships where it is strongest. 

The National Party, which institutionalized 
apartheid 40 years ago but discarded it when 
Mr. de Klerk came to power, was running a 
solid second. The others in the field were also- 
rans. 

The initial results were heavily influenced by 
quick counts from the few areas where the 
predominantly while parties were strongest, no- 
tably the Western Cape, where apartheid’s lega- 
cy has left tiw majority mixed-race popuhlion 
fearful of black rale. 

Trouble was feared in Cape Town’s black 
townships at prospects of a National Party 
provincial government, perhaps the last mainly 
white administration in Africa. 

“The people in the townships fed betrayed, 
and they just want to fight it out," said an ANC 
regional official, Tony Yengeni. 

The mass of results were held back by bu- 
reaucratic delays and muddle at many counting 
stations, where officials were overwhelmed by 
numbers and their own inexperience. 

Poll analysts stressed that too few results hai 
come in to project a final outcome reliably, but 
were generally in line with the ANCs projected 
winning margin. They expected the National 
Party to slip back toward 24 percent as the 
black township results cascaded in. 

An ANC landslide of more than 66 percent 
would send Lremors through business circles 
still suspicious of the ANCs communist and 
labor union allies and socialist tendencies. 

The ANC led handsomely in six of South 
Africa's nine provinces and narrowly is one — 
the rural, remote Northern Cape. 

It trailed Inkatha in KwaZulu-Natal, which 
has been divided by a decade of virtually mwi 
war between Zulu followers of each party. 

At least five people, including a 6-year-old 

See VOTE, Page 7 


Palestinians Not Ready , 9 Israelis Warn 


By Clyde Haberman 

Sew York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — As Israel and the Palestine 
Liberation Organization pressed to wrap up 
their negotiations. Israeli leaders said Sunday 
that the^Palestinians were not prepared to as- 
sume authority in the areas targeted for the 
start of their self-rule: the Gaza Strip and the 
West Bank town of Jericho. 

The criticism was rqected by an adviser to 
Yasser Arafat, the PLO chairman, and it appar- 
ently had no died on both sides’ commitment 
to end months of negotiating and finally sign a 
self-rule agreement on Wednesday m Cairo. 


Minister Yossi Sand said after the weekly cabi- 
net meeting. “Unfortunately, they didn't do 
that But we are very much determined to leave 
as soon as possible, and a week or 10 days after 
the agreement, well be oul” - 

A key concern, several officials said, is the 
posabihty of dangerous flashpoints as the Is- 
raeli Army starts puffing back to designated 
areas around Jewish settlements in Gaza and a 
new Palestinian police force of 9,000 officers 
tvgim to move into the refugee districts and 
towns that the Israelis will evacuate. 

Assuming the si g nin g ceremony goes accord- 
ing to plan on Wednesday, IsraeG forces are 
expected to start withdrawing as soon as Thurs- 


Nonetheless, comments from Prime Mister ^ That same day, about 2,000 Palestinian 

■ - - • - ' 1 : — polks officers are supposed to enter the 

temtones— 1,500 in the Ga2a Strip and 500 in 
Jericho, officials said Since they will need some 
rime to become familiar with the terrain, it was 
not dear when those officers will actually take 
up their posts. 

According to Israeli radio, the army chief of 
staff. Lieutenant General Ehud Barak, told 


Yitzhak iuhw - ■ 

an unsettling note to talks whose imm inent 
conclusion have left Israelis and Palestinians 
nervous about what lies ahead- 
Mr. Rabin, who is supposed to sign the M 
Gaza-Jericbo accord wi* Mr. ArafeL^M 
quoted by other officials here as “qaessuig 
concern w his cabinet rmmsterc that 

arrangements were still incomplete fashing 
authoritv from Israeli authorities to the Pales- 
tinians. The fault lay whh the Pakstmians, ^ 
report edlv said, because they had not attended 
SS'deriSied to smooth, the tmsition on 
seeuritf md iril matters that have been in the 
Ebflf the Israeli military ^ 
the West Bank and Gaza m the 1967 Middle 

East war. , . . . 

“We ureed them to be ready to step into tne 

territories to start taking over," Environment 


cabinet members that the Israeli evacuation 
should be earned out as quickly as possible 
because, he said, inadequate coordination be- 
tween Israel and the PLO on transferring au- 
thority could present dangers to his soldiers if 
they stay where they are. 

Army officers say that since they have al- 
ready shifted huge amounts of equipment, they 
can clear out thdr troops in a day or two. if 
ordered to do so. Bui some civilian officials said 
that two weeks or so might be a more realistic 
target. However much lime it lakes, the officials 
made dear that they intend to leave Jericho fast 
and — even more eagerly — Gaza, a roiling 
area that relatively few Israelis will miss. 

Palestinian administrators have yet to be 
named, and there is concern among Palestin- 
ians as well as Israelis about whether Mr. Ara- 
fat will fill positions on the basis of competence 
or cronyism. Natal Qassis, who coordinates 30 
technical committee fanned by the PLO for the 
iransuon period, said, “As an academic, 1 

See MIDEAST, Page 6 


German 


;es 

BONN (AFP) — A former senior offi- 
cial of the Social Democratic Pam’s par- 
liamentary group has been accused of spy- 
ing for East Germany, press reports said 
Sunday. Charges against Karl Wienand. 
6 7 , have been prepared and he could be 
formally accused sown, the news maga- 
zines Focus and Der Spiegel reported. 

Bridge 
Books 


U.S. Delays Issuing Ultimatum 
To China on Electronic Piracy 



Zbigniew Brzczinski and Michael 
Stunner offer their views in the second and 
third articles in a series on the future of the 
American-Eurnpean relationship. Page 5. 


By Peter Behr 

Washington Peat Senm 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton administra- 
tion has pul off an expected ultimatum to 
China over piracy of music, movies and com- 
puter software, rather than risk aggravating its 
larger conflict with Beijing over trade and hu- 
man rights. 

U.S. trade officials repeatedly had warned 
China that it would be cited for its failure to 
crack down on companies that illegally copy 
and export 5800 million or so-called intellectual 
property, in violation of copyright and trade- 
mare laws and agreements, each year. 

Designating China a “priority” offender in 
this area would have led to retaliation against 
Chinese goods this year if the practices contin- 
ued. 

But, after an intense series of meetings and 
phone calls among U.S. officials, including 
President Bill Clinton, the action was delayed 
Saturday until July 1 — well after the deadline 


of June 3 for a U.S. decision on whether to 
continue Beijing’s low-tariff trade privileges. 

Mr. Clinton has said he would cancel China's 
mosl-favored-nation trading status if it had not 
made “significant progress” on respecting hu- 
man rights by June 3. Administration officials 
have said China has not yet met Mr. Clinton's 
conditions, which include an accounting of po- 
litical prisoners and ending mistreatment of 
dissidents and religious groups. 

The administration also gave Japan 60 more 
days to address U.S. complaints about its gov- 
ernment procurement practices. U.S. manufac- 
turers of telecommunications and medical 
equipment complain that they do not have the 
chance to compete fairly for government busi- 
ness in Japan. 

The delay on the piracy issue suggested an 
unwillingness to provoke China's leaders, 
whose next moves on human rights could either 
help salvage Mr. Clinton’s China policy or 

See TRADE, Page 2 


Newsstand Prices 


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I IvarvCoOSt .1.120 CFA Turkey -T 


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j jfiSr iugiff VwjM 


Kim PhUby’s Spy Memorabilia Come Out of the Cold at Sotheby’s 


By William E Schmidt 

New York Tuna Soviet 

LONDON— There’s a faded bombing hat 
and a ahw cocktail shaker, a battered ciga- 
rette box and piles of books and papas — 
citations f rom Soviet intelligence officials, an 
exchange d correspondence with a young 
field agent under cover in London, wrn the 
typedarafi of a speech delivered inside KGB 
headquarters 17 years ago. 

Gathered for cataloguing made Sotneby s 
here, these are the surviving pnwnai 
of Harold Adrian Russell (Kim) Philby, argu- 
ably Britain's most infamous traitor. 

"As a high-ranking British intelligence offi- 
cer, he spent the better part of two decades 


passing the West’s most closely held secrets 
to the KGB, before fleeing to Moscow in 
1963 just as he was about to be uncovered. 

"I nave had official passes to seven major 
intelligence headquarters,” Philby told his 
audience of Soviet spymasters in 1977, recit- 
ing an inventory of four British and three 
American agencies, including the CIA and 
the FBL where he bad access as the British 
liaison officer in Washington in the early 
1950s. 

“There, I always felt myself surrounded by 
wolves; here, I know that I am with com- 
rades, colleagues and friends." 

As the sum of a man’s life, the collected 
memorabilia of Philby, who died in Moscow 


in 1988. do not seem like much. Culled from 
his Moscow apartment for sale and auction 
by his Russian widow, the collection fills only 
a dozen or so shelves inside Sotheby's, where 
it wiil be put up for public auction in July. 

In an interview over the weekend with The 
independent on Sunday, a London newspa- 
per. Rufina Philby said she had decided to 
auction the maieriais because she needs (he 
money. 

“It will improve my life if I can buy juice or 
fruit or one lemon." she said, “f ihink 1 can 
very quickly cat the money.’* Sotheby's hopes 
the" sale will raise about $150,000. 

For someone whose life and career had 
been lived as a deep and abiding secrei. a 


Soviet double agent burrowed at the heart of 
the British-U.S. intelligence establishment, it 
is surprising, in another way. that Kim Philby 
has now left so much of himself behind. 

meats and boolos^a much more complete 
picture can now be drawn of Philby as double 
agenL and especially or the last 25 years he 
spent in Moscow, after British "intelligence in 
Beirut finally discovered his betrayal. 

What does seem clear from the materials is 
that Philby continued to spend his re m a inin g 
years in Moscow in the active service of his 
employers, using his years of experience in 
the West to brief young KGB recruits bound 
for service in London, and share counsel with 


his colleagues in the intelligence trade across 
the Soviet Union and the East European Mx, 
where be traveled widely if discreetly d a 
decorated hero of the Soviet Union; 

Among his papers are evaluation abas- 
ing the intelligence and skills of iaj £GB 
trainees, as well as thumbnail 
Western intelligence activitieuad 
ities, including a scathing masnent d ] 
Edgar Hoover, the FBI d§f 
aged to outmaoeuver ming hk ' » 
Washington. 

“He was so busy 





v; 


Pape ’ 


INTERN VT10NAI. HF.RALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY . MAY 2, 1994 




Young Impresario Opens Up China to Wester n Rock 


WORLD! 




Will 


W 



By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Going into business 
in China's fast growing free-nmricet econ- 
omy is dubbed xia hoi — - "taking the 
plunge" or "jumping into the sea " 

Tiffany Cbu. a former trainee for the 
national diving team, has been making a 
splash in China's entertainment business 
ever since a California rock band lowed 
Shanghai and Guangzhou in 1986. 

A favor for her American boss — help- 
ing his drummer-daughter's all-woman 

band, Sherock. during an international 
tour — has led Miss Chu. 35. into a career 
as an impresario and business partner 
with China's parliament, the National 
People's Congress. 

Engaging, quick-thinking, equally at 
heme in Beijing and Beverly Hills. Miss 


Up and 
Coming 


An occasional series V 
about the leaders of tomorrow. 


Chu has become a leading figure in Chi- 
na’s broadcast industry and a valuable 
contact for Western groups trying to pen- 
etrate the vast and growing market. 

“Over the years T ve gotten to know a 
lot of people." she says. “For me, it's 
pretty easy: You gel the best of the West 
and die best of the East; pick up the good 
qualities and drop the rest." 

With her access to China's top deci- 
sion-makers and a sense or what will and 
won't sell in the West, she could end up 
helping Beijing understand, and maybe 
tidy up, its negative image in the world 
community. 

As one Hong Kong media analyst put 
it; “Everyone says they are well-connect- 
ed, that they are the key’ to opening China 
for you. Tiffany appears to be one of the 
people who can actually do it." 

Miss Chu. bom in Shanghai to (wo 
professors. left in 1980 when, after gradu- 
ating from the Shanghai Fine Arts Uni- 
versity, she won a scholarship at the Los 
Angeles Arts Institute. 

It was the early days for young Chinese 
to be studying abroad, and the only Eng- 
lish she spoke came from translations of 
Chairman Mao's Little Red Book. Miss 
Chu set off alone but undaunted, with 
less than S20 in her pocket, the limit set 
by the government. 

“I’ve always been very independent, 
not really afraid of anything." she says. 
These qualities, along with her physique, 
had drawn her to the attention of scouts 
for China’s national diving team. 

Team camaraderie, freedom from 
school, and the then-rare opportunity to 


travel around China ended when her par- 
ents refused to lei her move to Beijing for 
continued training with the national 
squad. Bui the hard work and fearless- 
ness required of a platform diver have 
had a formative effect. 

So have the politics of the Mao years, 
although — except for her maternal 
grandfather, owner of the first commer- 
cial radio station in China, who was 
jailed for several years — her family 
escaped the violent soda! upheaval of the 
decade-long Cultural Revolution, which 
started in the mid-1960s. 

“When 1 lefL it wasn't to get away 
from China." Miss Chu says. “I was very 
excited to have the opportunity to learn 
about fine an. 

“Art in China at that lime was pretty 
limited. Every time you painted some- 
thing you had to explain it It was all very 
political, and there wasn't much choice in 
your field of study." (She selected ivory 
carving.) 

“But it was beuer than being sent to 
work as a farmer," she said. 

Study and survival in Los .Angeles 
proved difficult. Miss Chu found work at 
a Taiwanese-owned Mongolian barbeque 
restaurant in nearby Encino. 

“It was a buffet, so f didn’t have to talk 
much." she remembers. She also sold 
some drawings to a California gallery 
and decided to quit school. 

A gallery customer who needed a de- 
signer for a movie set in ancient China 
hired her on the strength of her drawings. 
That was her first encounter with the 
wealth and often strange ways of Holly- 
wood. 

“I was being paid $140 an hour to 
supervise a team of artists and prop peo- 
ple and 1. the drop-out, was the only one 
who hadn't graduated from art school." 
she said. 

Not long after, when she was working 
for a trading company importing cash- 
mere from China, her boss sought her 
help in inking Sherock to China. 

“I told my boss he was asking the 
impossible.” Miss Chu said. “The band 
Wham had gone to China in 1985 and it 
was a disaster. There were drugs, an at- 
tempted suicide, you name it. The Chi- 
nese went totally mazy, and canceled the 
tour halfway through. After that they 
said no more rock and roll." 

But, tempted by the challenge. Miss 
Chu repackaged Sherock for Chinese 
consumption. She showed a video of the 
musicians, wearing Chinese clothes and 
performing a Chinese scug she had 
taught them, to the relevant authorities in 
Shanghai and then Beijing. 

“Today, when foreigners are trying to 
sell a program, they still don't know henv 
the Chinese work,” Miss Chu says. 



China’s Snubbing of I^egai^|. 

HONG KONG (AF) — China;? ^ - 

affaiis arrived in the tenitoiy 


Chinese rule in 1997. 

Lu Ping, director of Begins China and ] 

celebrations Monday m arkin g the isapog-g 

the Rank of Otiiia, the Gist non-Brifcsfr baj 
Kong currency ia the colony. ; — - 




Kong currency in me wnmj. • -- - . v..~ ^ 

The official Chinese explanation :« .lhat'ifij ^ 
schedule during his weekloog 

hoc «ten noi been invited to the Bank of Qma' fh rw w ; ^^ 


tShorefusea 

for Hong Kong despate strong Chinese o^rctiffiis- j 





SEOUL (Reuters) — South KcraVann&ftgg 
about three hours after North Korean ^ueqNvere 
towards the South, a Seoul Defense Min&tiy 
He said the alert was caderedon Satnida%a&craba|t 
aircraft left Pyongyang and were tracked 
The spokesman added the North Jtarean pkiaa 



regular training exercise “but it was very imugi^IrHa t a 

aSaturday." .. . , 90 • 

Kohl’s Party in Lead For Fmi Tfe 

nmiW Th, nnnnlintv V 7 -l " ' _y - " - • / 


For Tiffany Chu, to sell a program in China if has to be packaged just right, “the way the Chinese want to hear it* 


“Translating the deal, which ofien foils, 
is not enough. I presented the way I knew 
the Chinese wanted to hear it — a cultur- 
al exchange, music is international, 
building bridges." 

It worked. Sherock made an album in 
Shanghai and played 16 sold-out dates 
there and in Guangzhou. The tour was 
arranged in three months. 

“People loved them." said Miss Chu. 
who thought. “This could be a big busi- 
ness." 

Soon after she met an American attor- 
ney doing business in China and they 
formed China Amusement and Leisure, 
to promote events in China. 

Miss Chu next took two beach music 
old-timers. Jan and Dean, to China — 
complete with surfboard and Frisbee 
scenes at the Great Wall. A movie crew 
made a documentary of the trip. 

Then, in 1987, she staged a Shanghai 
production of Champions on Ice. “Ev- 
erything that could go wrong did." re- 
members Miss Chu. She imported the 
first ice-skating rink to China and then 
needed last-minute help from the Chi- 
nese Air Force to get it from Hong Kong 
to Shanghai in time. 

“Face-wise the Shanghai authorities 
couldn’t have any mistakes." she said. 
“Senior leaders from Beijing were com- 
ing." 

With her abiliry to do the near-impos- 
sible proven. Mbs Chu was asked by 


Shanghai authorities for help in obtain- 
ing the latest in Western television pro- 
gramming — no easy task, for the city 
had virtually no budget. It was her big- 
gest break. 

Miss Chu turned to Michael Jay Solo- 
mon at Lorimar Telepictures, the compa- 
ny that made the Jan and Dean film. 

* A barter deal — Mr. Solomon supplied 
the progamming Tor a share with Miss 
Chu and the Shanghai authorities of ad- 
vertising revenues — spread quickly to 
ihree other Chinese cities. A similar ar- 
rangement was worked out for radio pro- 
gramming in 14 dues. 

The deal did not turn a profit until 
January 1990. This was only after Miss 
Chu had prevailed on Warner Brc*.. 
which had bought Lorimar Telepictures, 
not to pull out of China after the Beijing 
massacre in June 1989. 

“I told them, you've got your foot in 
the door, but if you pull it out you’ll never 
gel back in." Miss Chu says. To keep the 
deal afioaL she agreed to work full-time 
for Mr. Solomon, who had since joined 
Warner Bros. 

“She opened up the stations for us.” 
said Mr. Solomon, who became president 
of Warner Bros. International Television. 
“She knew who the decision-makers were 
and got me in to see the real players. If 
she left Warner Bros., they wouldn't 
know how to run their business in Chi- 


The partnership is making a steady 
profit, but Miss Cbu, now working for 
herself again, has expanded her scope of 
business. 

Her China Associates Ltd. is the exclu- 
sive China agent for Warner Bros. Inter- 
national Television, American Broad- 
casting Corp. Radio International and 
Tune Inc. Magazines. 

One of the keys to her business success 


has been personal relationships, she says. 
“The Chinese don’t understand how the 


BONN (Reuters) — The popularity of Qtai 
C h ris tian Democrats has risen abovethat.-of jtj 
rivals for thefirsi time in fins election year^atrea 
made public on Sunday. - ' e " ■ - f-:'_ ' 
Tbe Wkkert Institute survey of about 3,500'i 
the Christian Democrats would win 38.9 puoza 
elections, scheduled for Oct 16, were held now.' 
headed by the Rfaindand-Palatisate premies; Jh 
score 37.7 percent; the Free D e mocrats, junior cc 
get 7.1 percent, and tbe Greens were steady at i 
maigin of error was pat at half a percentage pon 
Mr. Kohl's party has been gaming in others 
off the year sevem points behind. Wfclwt'ai 
Christian Democrats more to create jobs,- r 








same business can have so many divi- 
sions and so many bosses.” At the same 
time, she continues, “Most senior Chi- 
nese leaders and managers just don’t 
know how to deal with the West." 


Miss Chu and tbe Bozell Jacobs Ken- 
yon & Eckhardt advertising agency have 
formed a public relations business with 
Zhong Da Yin Da. a company owned by 
the Chinese parliament. (Nearly 20 per- 
cent of the members of the National 
People's Congress head state-owned 
business empires turning capitalist con- 
glomerates.) 

The joint venture plans to assist for- 
eign companies in tbe Chinese market, 
where guanxi, or connections, are all- 
important 

“I have gain ed their trust." Miss Chu 
feels. “China really appreciates people 
who left and came back, but who still talk 
to them like their own people." 


Cuba Debates Stifi Auster^Jl^p^ 

ic series of painful austerity 
frozen bank accounts to help solve the 

early years of the Communist revolution. ^ v 

Finance Minister Jos6 Luis Rodriguez, spealriritrar j» 
session of the National Assembly, suggestedti^'^ .a#5E3S?TH?f 


dollar, brings a penny or less on the black maiiet. - ' • 

The measures include freezing bant accounts;, i;n£w dcgff&fe 
currency, raising nrices cm cigarettes. aWthnl 


currency, r ai s in g pikes an cigarettes, alcohol 
taxes on property and private income. anddiargii»fcff 

Pope Gives Message From iW& i 

ROME (Radas) — Pope John Paul H, 
spirits aha surgery for a broken thigh b<me^ad*ased r ^S md 
pilgrims in St. Peter's Square on Sunday from h« bna ptj : . 


said in a taped message that he was offering mssttfiantrfcr '^^^d 

f Ka Tf — H U-*_ -* - 


night when be slipped in the bathroom of his Vatican apartmaft£- J 
Doctors sod the Pope still had a slight fever laroj^iferihe 
operation, but that the rise in temperature was norma! :He wB 
tbe hospital for up to three weeks before h egmnmg pti yrirsTtiujn mc ' ; 


Hota’s Vows of Reform Are Met With Hope ( wid Cynicism) Sus g [ n Frand Va nish * 


Mot Thick* 


By James Stemgold 

.Vo* York Times Sen-uv 

TOKYO — When Morihiro Hosokawa took office 


last summer promising to dean up rampant corrup- 
tion and open up the minutely regulated economy, he 
was greeted with almost giddy optimism. 

Nobody expected change overnight, but just placing 
it on the agenda after 39 years of one-pany rule gave 


Week, and it will give Mr. Hata and his cabinet some 
respite after the bitterness of the succession battle. But 
once parliament resumes, one fact is likely to domi- 


nate public perceptions and political maneuvering; 
Mr. Hata is head of a minority government that can be 
brought down any time the opposition chooses. 

In short, his conservative government will be oper- 
ating on a knife's edge. The Japanese press has already 
declared that its lifespan may be measured in weeks, 
which means that the prospect of its producing strong 
policies on several pressing crises — ending lhe reces- 
sion. changing the tax structure and reducing the 
yawning trade surplus — are slim. 

“li is impossible to expect anything from the minor- 
ity Hata cabinet on big policy issues.” Nihon Keizai 
Shimbun. Japan's most respected daily business news- 
paper. said in an editorial. It added that a new election 
was likely, and soon. 

That means Mr. Hata is unlikely to have the support 
to negotiate a U.S. trade agreement soon, despite his 
stated intention of opening the economy in ways that 
Washington has demanded. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Mr. Hosokawa the highest approval ratings of any 
prime minister in the postwar era. 

One of his close allies. Tsutomu Hata. last week 


One of his close allies. Tsutomu Hata. last week 
became prime minister and pledged to continue the 
reforms, but the mood now is a mix of wary hope and 
cynicism. 

The realization (hat change can also mean instabil- 


ity has (eft the Japanese far more sober-minded about 
■vhai lies ahead in the remarkable reform (hev have 


week is a holiday period known as Golden 


That prospect is one reason the value of the yen 
soared against the dollar in New York on Friday, some 
traders said. The Clinton administration is believ ed to 
favor a strong yen as a weapon for attacking Japan's 
trade surplus. A strong yen makes exports more ex- 


pensive and increases imports by reducing their cost to 
Japanese. 


Japanese. 

So when trade frictions and the surplus grow, trad- 
ers tend to push the yen higher, as they did on Friday. 

On Saturday, Japan's largest -circulation newspa- 
per. Yomiuri Shimbun. ran lhe results of an opinion 
poll capturing the ambiguous public mood. A surpris- 
ingly strong 56.8 percent of those polled said they 
supported the new minority government, compared 
with 71.9 percent approval when Mr. Hosokawa took 
office. 

But the public responded negatively to the way in 
which Mr. Hata had forged his six-parly coalition 
government. When the conservative panics in the 
coalition sought to band together and overpower the 
Socialists, the Socialists quit in anger. That left Mr. 
Hata with his minority government. 


In the Yomiuri polL 57 percent said they thought 
Mr. Hala's methods for forming his coalition were 
“forcible." The reeling, even among some of those who 
disagree with the Socialists’ policies, was that Mr. 
Hata's power play against the Socialists violated the 
old political rules. 

The Sod alls is were a members of Mr. Hosokawa's 
government and proved unreliable partners. Some 
fought against bills reforming the electoral and cam- 


MADRID (AF) - — Felipe Gonz&le^sgoverinnenr waS inrn&jjSnwtg y . . 
as embarrassment increased over tbe disappearance of tbe CfaSKjgani 
chief, Luis RoldAn, who is under investigawm for^ Jriwd. 

Interim' Minister Antoni Asuncidn offered ins resignaik&a&er it 
became obvious that Mr. Rofddn bad vanished Mr. .’Gonzflt^nbtr, 
asked Mr. Astmddn to stay at his post while the search for Mpicittn 
continued. _ ■ 

Mr. RoldAn is under investigation for aOegedly haviqfpocfoed 
thousands of dollars from public funds and franatilent coSmissaw 
during hs 1986-93 term as Civil Guard chief. . -v 7 '■ 


lice Chief /n 


ByTodRfe- 

tatap. ' • 


JUANA. Nk:. - 


-,s Btniie'.- *... 




p3ign financing sysiems. But the public seems to have 
found them a buffer against the more rightward- 
leaning policies of Mr. Hata's core supporters. 

indeed, the Hata cabinet is considerably more con- 
servative than Mr. Hosokawa's. and even more conser- 
vative than some of the previous Liberal Democratic 
governments. 

Ultimately, the question is whether the government 
wifi last long enough for its security policies to be 
tested. Its first task will be to pass a long-delayed 
budget for the fiscal year that began on April 1. After 
that, the government’s existence could grow more 
precarious by tbe day. 


'aiaaw.'..':. . 

floisV.--' •. 

SiteJ.SL*:;.. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


U.S. to Ease Overseas Trsrdi liim^ 


* 

•Jp--.-..-. 


Inexperience Gted in Japan Crash 


Compiled 6i- Our Staff From Dispatches 

TAIPEI — Taiwan's flag carrier. 
China Airlines, admitted Sunday 
that (be co-pilot's inexperience 
could have caused the crash of one 
of its planes in Japan that killed 
264 of the 271 people on boaid. 

“The transcript of the cockpit 
voice recorder released Saturday by 
Japan shows that the co-pilot "was 
piloting the plane, and there is a 
possibility that inadequate contin- 
gence- tackling ability could be the 
cause of the crash." said an airline 
spokesman. Michael Lo. 

Mr. Lo stressed that mechanical 
failure had not been ruled out either 
os a cause, adding the recorded con- 
versation showed the copilot was in 
control but tiui he and the pilot 


were talking about an unspecified 
button that had failed to function. 

.Airline officials said it was not 
against regulation for pilots to allow 
co-pilots to take the controls from 
time to time to gain experience. 

A transcript of the cockpit voice 
recorder, made public by the 
Transport Ministry in Tokyo, 
shows the panic that overtook the 
pilot and the co-pilot as they lost 
control of the .Airbus A-3«X)-600R. 

The voice recorder does not pro- 
vide the final word on what caused 
the accident. Bui it does lend sup- 
port lo suspicions that the pilot and 
the co-piloL afier aborting a land- 
ing attempt, pulled the plane up 
tw sharply, causing it to Mali and 
plunge to the ground. 

The transcript shows the pilot. 
Wang Lo-chi. giving orders in Chi- 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • UASTH'S • DOCTORATE 
Per IVorfc LBo andAcaScfrt: Expcncnx 
Tftaupfi CavenortHonxi SZx*/ 

(310 471-0306 ext. 23 
fK (310471-6456 
UsSd FacrMrddefejMrasumatoi 


Pacific Western Universitvl 


KO N. SflpuHwCa SW, CepL 23 
Lss Angelas, CA 30M& 


TV Tower Is Asia’s Tallest 

Ket-nrrs 

SHANGHAI — More than two 
years of building work on Shang- 
hai's television tower, at 460 meters 
1 1.500 feeu the tallest in Asia and 
ihird-highesl in the world. wa> 
completed Sunday, the official 
Xinhua press agency reported. 


nese to his copilot. Chuang Meng- 
jung. who had 1 .629 hours of flying 
experience compared with 8.410 
for Captain Wang. 

About two minutes before the 
crash, one of the two — the tran- 
script does not make clear which — 
says “Too high, too high.” 

Captain Wang then orders his 
copilot to abandon the landing at- 
tempt and try again, an indication 
the plane may have been unable to 
land properly because excessive al- 
titude put it in danger of overshoot- 
ing the runway . 

Captain Wang then repeatedly 
ordered the cc-pilci to “push” or 
“conneci" some; hi ng. but lhe tran- 
script does not make clear what 
The co-plot says at c-ne point. “I 
can't push it.” 

The transcripi doe> noi indicate 
whether there were mechanical 
problems. 

Finally, afier radioins the tower 
that the landing was being aborted, 
one of the two say*. “At this rate, 
the plane is going to stall." 

On the tapes, me engine can be 
heard getting louder. An automatic 
warning system says “Terrain, ter- 
Jjtin* One of the piiots calls out. 
"Oh. it’s over, ii's over." 

The last words before the crash 

were. “Pow er. power.” i A FP. A P) 


William S. Wlaite, 
Dies at 88, Won 
Pulitzer in ’55 


: China Decision Put Off 


Continued from Page 1 


The Associated Frev 

LOUISVILLE. Ken tuck v - 
William S. White, a World War il 
correspondent, political reporter, 
columnist and Puliuer Pri^e-win- 
ning biographer, died Saiurdav. He 
was 88. 

Mr. White had been in failing 
health since a stroke about cizht 
years ago. 

He began his journalism career 
in the 1920s while a student at the 
University of Texas and joined The 
Associated Press at tbe age of 20. 
He covered Washington and World 
War II for The .Associated Press, 
then joined The New York Times 
in 1945. He was The Times s chief 
congressional correspondent in 
1958 when he left io write a syndi- 
cated column. 

"The Taft Story.” his biography 
of Robert A Tafu won the Pulitzer 
Prize in 1955. Mr. TafL a Republi- 
can senator from Ohio, unsuccess- 
fully sought his party's presidential 
nomination in 1952. 

Mr. White's other books include 
“The Citadel.” based on hi> experi- 
ence covering the Senate, and his 
memoirs. “The Making of a Jour- 
nalist" 


perhaps create an explosive con- 
frontation. 

The U.S. trade representative. 
Mickey K amor, told reporters Sat- 
urday that the piracy decision had 
been delayed lo prevent it from 
complicating the human rights is- 
sue. At a "critical" time in the two 
country's relations, he said. “I 
don't want the intellectual property 
issues becoming confused with the 
other questions of human rights 
and most-favored-nation renewal" 

But he wjmed China's leaders 
not to read the action as a sign of 
U.S. weakness or lack of determi- 
nation lo follow through on the 
piracy issue. 

“China knows ihe depths or our 
concern about ihc piracy that is 
going on." he said. 

Some industry representatives 
reacted sharply, however. 

“We are very disappointed with 
thib decision." said Jason Berman, 
president of the Recording Indus- 
try Association of America. “It is 
obvious that it was based on con- 
siderations other than intellectual 
property protection.” 

China “has made little or no ef- 
fort to take its immense piracy 
problem seriously." said Eric H. 


Smith, executive director of tbe In- 
ternational intellectual Property 
Alliance, representing tbe record- 
ing and computer-software indus- 
tries. 


WASHINGTON (WP) — Congress and the Onion adm imsw iia 
have agreed to eliminate most restrictions on travel by U5. citiaas ® 

hostile countries. 

The State Department authorization h31 approved by file Hcweiw 
Senate last week and signed by Pftadeni'KIltSntdn eUmuutenaidof 
the president’s authority to hmil travd by Americans. By 
between Congress and the White .House, other restrictio n s jrr Brc 
eliminated by revising existing regulations.. 

Existmg restrictions on travel to Cuba, Libya, North Korand Iraq 
are to remain in place. In the future, however, tfaetmtyres Mteft j e 
imposed on travel by individuals are those reqnned by 'WSWw 
Council resolutions. Several provisions of UJL tew Jtavej^jKywi 
allowed presidents to bar U.S. citizens from 
countries. Individuals have not been nhyacalty restrainea^roffiW 




. . 

ftiwy :■ 

Wtetw-T-. . . ■ 


• - - . 'i.‘ 




‘■•I : r- 


“Thjs is a mere postponement of 
tbe inevitable, and we fear it will 
send the wrong signal — that the 
U.S. statutory deadlines re main 
flexible." he said. Under U.S. trade 
law. designations of offenders on 
the intellectual property issue were 
to have been made by the end of 
April. 


anywhere, but have risked prosecution for spending USriaa^ B ; . 

proscribed countries. J * 

A Swiss company is tobaBdtefiisthnaBy resortin fljesrewiWw ^ol li*? 

H along Bay in northern Vietnam! the Vietnam &nrestinentitt»ff*5i 3? 9a5d;:- • '^ ' 
Sunday in Hanoi Hotel Finance and Management ■titan ^ 

million in a joint venture with Saigon Tourist. •' ; ~ 




The China derision forced some 
deep soul-searching within tbe ad- 
ministration. Contrary to several 
published reports, sources said. As- 
sistant Secretary of State Winston 
Lord and others concluded last 
week that the administration 
should not delay acting, saying that 
the case against China was clear 
and that Beijing expected the ad- 
ministration to act. Tbe sources 
said Mr. Lord and others argued 
that postponing the derision could 
inderif be interpreted by China as 
weakness on America’s part. 

Other officials said the stakes in 
the human rights debate were too 
large to risk having the intellectual 
property issue cause an escalation 
of tensions. 


■JtaS jSSftftee,.... 


Sunday in Hanoi Hotel Finance and Management "titan — - - r 

million in a joint venture with Saigon Tourist * . ■ * ?jjta»iliie _ 

lmfianAirftoeshasdromdP tast °fiy tolJ ? fee P® sl ?^SSSi : - 

rocket attacks over Afraamstan, reports said Sunday in 

Airline officials said a pLacned inaugural flight to "■ : * 

day has been put off after an advisory flat its jdam cwod ^ ^ i at .... 

by Mujahidin fightes over Afghanistan. ' • J. ■ - 

Gfitcbes in tbe $193 mflEon state^f-tiaHUt ■ 

likely force a fourth detey in the scheduled opening rf 1^ th« T''. " 

tional Airport on May 15. Tbe Rocky MountemNews <4^?^ fiwD. 0s > : : -' 
Wellington Webb as saying he is conaderingan indefinite ^ kik^i * j. 

to fix the baggage system. . • W?* w: 

Egyptians moved their docks forward one hw ; 

summer time. Egypt is now three hours ahead of GMT... .\'r~r 

This Week’s Holidays . 

Banking and government offices will be closed 

the foflowing countries and their dependencies 

national and religious holidays; ’AiL em ■■ 

MONDAY; Bdgium. Bhnian, Bo&via, Bri Bin," 
atia. Cyprus. Dremukaa Republic, Egypt, Ggorcia. dtaamT' i 

Guatemala. Guyana, Honduras. Ireland, Kenya, L ebano n . -3 

oia. Malaysia. Moldova. Romania. Russia, Serbia. Sngap we ’^ >w T\"^ 

Lanka, Sudan. Thailand, Ukraine. \ V •" 

TUESDAY; Japan, Poland, Russia, Serbia. ' 

WEDNESDAY: Japan, Namibia. 

THURSDAY: Japan. Korea. Mexico, T baDan d. - ■ 

FRIDAY: Phflippines. Syria. Sources:*?? 


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The Plot Thickens in Mexico 


Murdered Police Chief Whs Investigating Colosio 9 s Death 


. By Tod Robberson 

Washington Pou Service 

XUUANA Mexico — JosA Fe- 
derico Benitez’s mouth dropped 
open as be reached into his desk 
rawer mretrieve a. fife folder d-. 
information he had gathered on 
suspects in the March 23 assassina- 
tion of Mexico's leading presides*, 
tie] candidate. 


added yet another element to a tan* 
gled assassination investigation. 

Authorities from competing fed- 
eral, state and local jurisdictions 
continue to spar publicly amid 
charges by officials here that die 
investigation is being manipulated 
for political purposes. 

For Mr. Benitez, as well as the 


"It's gone!" the Tijuana police 
' ied to find that 


federal special prosecutor, Miguel 
into Mr. 


itkm: 


chief said, astonished 
an information sheet devoted to 
one particular suspect -JosiRo- 
ddfo RivapaJado, a former local 
'and state police official —had dis- 
' appeared from the folder that had 
been locked in his desk. 

Mr. Benitez told an assistant to 
retrieve a separate file on the sus- 
pect from a huger basement ar- 
chive, but the assistant returned to 
say that file had also disappeared. 

“We have a real probian here,*’ 
the police chief said.’This isn’t the 
first tune it’s happened." 

Mr. Benitez charged that some- 
one deady had tampered with evi- 
dence he had been collecting in a 
secret, independent investigation 
of the killing of the ruling party's 
presidential candidate, Luis Don- 
■aMoColosia 

. Just 36 hours lata, last Thursday 
•ni gh t, Mr. Benitez and his body- 
guard woe shot and killed by un- 
identified gunmen near the ndgb- 
borhood where ML Colosio was 
[assassinated. Seven people have 
been detained in connection with 
the assassination but the police de- 
clined to give any further informa- 
tion about the detentions or specu- 
late on a motive. 

Mo evidence has airfaced direct- 
^ r. Benitez’s death to the 
"case, but the missing files 


Montes, the invest^ 

Cdosio’s death had focused on the 
45-member local security detail or- 
ganized by the governing Institu- 


charges against four suspects and 
ordered the release from jail of 
three others for lade of evidence. 
The federal special prosecutor has 
protested the actions and has 
vowed to pursue the conspiracy in- 
vestigation. 

Mr. Benitez’s investigation had 
turned up evidence connecting sev- 
eral members of the security detail 

with criminal ot — — : — 

mg in Tijuana, 


was 


tjanal Revolutionary Party, known 
as PRL to provide crowd control 



during the candidate's visit here. 
The security detail had been oiga- 
Mr. Rivapalado, a local 


sized 

PRI 


Mr. Colosio was shot twice at 
point-blank range as he passed 
through a crowd of 3,000 support- 
ers in the impoverished Tijuana 
neighborhood of Lomas Taurinas. 

Mr. Montes, using videotapes, 
professional Hp-readem and other 
photographic evidence, has 
charged that Mr. Rivapalatio and 
at least three other members of the 
PRI security detail assisted the 
gnrwnan, Mario Aburto Martinez, 
by conspiring to block Mr. Colo- 
ski's personal bodyguards and ob- 
struct the candidate's path so Mr. 


from his right side, bat the bullet 
mereahis 


Aburto could gain access to him. 

President Carlos Salinas de Gor- 
tari’s administration has main- 
tained that Mr. Aburto was the 
only gunman, and sources dose to 
the investigation said the govern- 
ment was trying to distance itself 
from Mr. Montes’s conspiracy the- 
ory. 

The sources said that Mr. Mon- 
tes’s evidence would not stand up 
in court and that because erf this a 
federal judge in mid-April reduced 


that entered his abdomen was fired 
from his left side toward the right. 
For a single gunman to have fired 
both shots, Mr. Colosio would have 
had to spin 180 degrees, with Mr. 
Aburto still unimpeded. 

Both Mr. Montes and Mr. Beni- 
tez had focused their investigations 
on the backgrounds of the 45-mem- 
ber PRI security detail, code- 
named T ncan , that was providing 
crowd control at the Lomas Taur- 
inas rally. 

Mr. Benitez asserted that many 
members of the Tucan force were 
corrupt former state and local po- 
licemen dismissed from their jobs 
for illegal activities. He said at least 
16 were former local policemen 
“who were not known for their 
honesty or professional integrity." 

All of the Tncan members were 
known as PRI activists, and Mr. 
Rivapalado for years has held 
prominent positions in the party. 


We Mourn the Passing of 

Our Former Partner 
and 

President of the United States 


RICHARD M. NIXON 

1913-1994 


&.FERDON 


MudgeRose Girmm Alexander 

■ _ . • vi fbm T,.fcy Warfnwun.DC Wea Palm Beach. FL 


A Lesson for Air Force Cadets 


General Acts Quickly on Sex Harassment 


By Eric Schmitt 

Nn- York Times Service 

COLORADO SPRINGS. Colo- 
rado — Over the last year, as the 
navy has reded under the Tailhook 
scandal, the Air Force Academy 
here has been facing up to its own 
sexual harassment crisis. But the 
reaction, and the results, could 
hardly be more different. 

Since February 1993, when a fe- 
male freshman at the Air Force 
Academy told campus authorities 
that several young men had sexual- 
ly assaulted her, a dozen other 
women have stepped forward to 
lodge complaints ranging from 
date rape to fondling. 

As a result of investigations into 
the complaints, an instructor and a 
cadet have been court-martialed 
and jailed for sexual misconduct. 
Three other cadets have resigned 
and three more have been disci- 
plined Sensitivity training has 
been increased. And a 24-hour con- 
fidential sexual-assault hot line is 
Up and r unning . 

All branches erf the military are 
struggling to eliminate sexual ha- 
rassment, with varying degrees of 
success. But the Air Force Acade- 
my’s experience shows what a dif- 
ference the top leader makes. 

Nine days after the assault, the 
academy’s superintendent. Lieu- 
tenant General Bradley C. Hosmer, 
gathered most of the academy’s 5 18 
female cadets in the campus audi- 
torium. He ordered his male aides 
to leave, and even ejected two men 
in the projection booth. 

Then he removed his insi gnia of 
rank and promised the women con- 
fidentiality in exchange for the 
“ground truth" about sexual ha- 
rassment on the campus. For near- 
ly four emotionally charged hours, 
the women poured out their fears 
and grievances in response to Gen- 


ing. thinking that we'd be protected 
by the people around us," said Ca- 
det Adelle Belisle, 21, a senior from 
Yarmouth. Maine, who is planning 
a medical career. "It was shocking. 
We all know of cases of sexual 
harassment here." 

General Hosmer, a Rhodes 
Scholar and former inspector gen- 
eral of the air force, was a member 
of the academy’s first graduating 
class in 1959 and the first alumnus 
to head the institution. He said in a 
recent interview that he had sensed 
“warning indicators" of problems, 
but was “stunned and disappoint- 
ed’' at what he heard. 

General Hosmer also said he was 
determined to avoid the navy's 
stumbling response after scores of 
women were assaulted by naval 
aviators aL the 1991 convention of 
the Tailhook Association in Las 
Vegas, Nevada, and a sexual ha- 
rassment episode at the U.S. Naval 
Academy in 1990. when a female 
student was chained to a urinal by 
several male classmates. 

A few days after meeting with 
the women, the general met with all 
the male cadets. More than 50 per- 
cent of the female cadets had said 
they knew of sexual harassment 


cases, but only 9 percent of the men 
did. 

The Air Face Academy acted 
quickly. Officials offered counsel- 
ing to harassment victims. General 
Hosmer summoned 10 additional 
air force investigators to assist the 
four permanently assigned agents 
to examine the complaints. 

A male senior was court-mar- 
tialed for assaulting a female civil- 
ian. A male instructor who was a 
major was cowt-manialed for hav- 
ing had consensual sex with a fe- 
male freshman. 

The 4,000-member cadet wing 
was divided into focus groups or 8 
to 12 men and women to discuss 
sexual harassment and leadership 
ethics. “I learned more about hu- 
man relations in the past semester 
than I did in the previous four 
years,” said James Davis, a senior 
from Millen, Georgia. 

In July, the academy created a 


center for character development 
lies, honor 


to bring fragmented ethics, 
code and human relations training 
under one department. Last fall the 
philosophy department offered a 
new course, called “Gender, Race 
and Human Dignity.*’ 

More changes are in the works. 


Singapore Responds 
To Critics of Caning 


J.'XKA A V, , • 4 

S&eras&i 

Enc Draper'll* AmKukiJ Prtm 

k *nj ttnMi mv iMrfiga»nr tmppftiwg flip pah of a pfcknp truck m which the city’s police chief was killed. 


By Philip Shenon 

New York Times Service 

SINGAPORE — Amid over- 
whelming signs that an American 
teenager is about to be caned here 
for spray-painting cars, the Singa- 
pore government issued its first of- 
ficial account on Sunday of bow 
eral "Hosrner’s questions on how the punishment would be carried 
many bad experienced sexual as- out 

sault or other forms of harassment, The American, Michael Fay, IS. 
or knew someone who had. is in prison here awaiting word on 

“Women were angry that the his appeal to the government for 
academy hadn’t done something clemency. Every indication from 
before this," said Cadet Rebecca the government is that it will reject 
Sonkiss. a 21 -year-old senior from the appeal. 


White Lake, Michigan, who will 
enter flight school this summer. 
u We came here naive and trust 


The description of a caning, 
complete with a diagram that 
shows a mart tied down bv his 


iguana po- 

ice chid suggested that two gun- 
men may have been involved. 

Among the questionable aspects 
of the single-gunman explanation: 
The official autopsy report says a 
bullet entered Mr. Colosio’s skull 


Away From Politics 


• Hunting a mountain lion that killed and partially ate a jogger, 
California park rangers closed the area where Barbara Schoener, 40, 
died a week ago. Rangers said anyone found in the Auburn State 
Recreation Area would be cited for trespassing. She was the first 
person killed by a cougar in California this century. 

• In the Michael Jackson child molestation investigation, a Santa 
Barbara County grand jury that spent three months on the case has 
disbanded without announcing any action, Mr. Jackson's lawyer 
said. Mr. Jackson remains under investigation by a Los Angeles 
County grand jury. 

• The number of U.S. murders rose 3 percent last year, but violent 
crimes edged lower, the FBI said. Preliminary findings said violent 
incidents overall declined 1 percent in 1993. That would mean about 
1.91 million violent crimes occurred, or roughly the same number as 
in 1991. There were 1.93 million violent crimes reported in 1992. 

• In the World Trade Center bombing, a New York judge postponed 
to May 25 the sentencing of the four men convicted. The four face up 
to life in prison without parole on their convictions last month for 
conspiracy in the Feb. 26, 1993, bombing, which killed six people 
and injured more than 1,000. 

• To tighten defense against Illegal immigration. Governor Pete 

Wilson oT California said he would more than triple the number of 
National Guard troops deployed at the California- Mexico border to 
hdp the Border PatroL *p. lat 


hands and ankles as he is caned, 
was published on Sunday in The 
Straits Times, a government-affili- 
ated newspaper, and appeared to 
be an effort to persuade critics that 
the punishment is not as brutal as 
some news accounts have suggest- 
ed. 

Until Sunday, the government 
had declined to answer detailed 
questions about the procedures fol- 
lowed in a caning, a punishment 
introduced to Singapore by the 
British colonialists and still applied 
for a variety of crimes, ranging 
from rape to vandalism to over- 
staying a visa. 

The statement from the Singa- 
pore Prisons Department said that 
“caning does not cause skin and 
flesh to fly, as alleged by critics — 
it may, however, leave bruises and 
marks." 

Prisoners who have been through 


a caning say the scars are perma- 
nent, and many go into shock from 
the intense pain of the caning, 
which tears open the skin and 
causes copious bleeding. 

According to the government 
statement, leather cuffs are used to 
strap a prisoner's wrists and ankles 
to a wooden trestle. A “pillow pad" 
is placed over his lower back to 
prevent injury to areas above the 
buttocks. 

The Straits Times quoted a 
spokesman for the Prisons Depart- 
ment as saying that while the jailer 
who performs the caning is not nee* 
essarily a martial am expert, 
“some officers may have taken up 
martial arts training to keep them- 
selves fit and for self-defense." 

The rattan cane is 1.2 meters (4 
feet) long and 13 millimeters (half 
an inch) thick. According to the 
government, it is soaked in water to 
prevent it from splitting during the 
punishment and is treated with an 
antiseptic. 


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APOLITICAL NOTES A 


Bentsen Knows HBs Guns, Good and Bad 


WASHINGTON — Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen took aim 
at the National Rifle Association on Sunday, brandishing a “street 
sweeper” shotgun in a televised appearance designed to press the 
case for banning such assault weapons and rhetorically blowing 
away a suggestion that he is naive about guns. 

Mr. Bentsen conceded that the move to stop production and sale 
of 19 types of semiautomatic assault weapons, which could come to a 
vote in the House this week, faces an uphill fight. “It's going to be 
Lough and it’s going to be close," he said on NBCs “Meet the Press." 

However, alter a representative or the gun lobby suggested that 
the president and other supporters of Lhe ban do not understand 
guns, Mr. Bentsen said: “1 was amused here that I’m not supposed to 

know anything about guns. I've had guns all my life. I quail 


expert on the range in'the military, l wem to the front lines and fired 
. World War II. In addition to that. I flew 35 missions over 


guns m 

Europe. I’m also a quail hunter." 

He noted that in Texas, his home state, guns “are used for the 
defense of the home and for hunting and for target practice." and he 
said he would not favor an eventual ban on all guns. Some 650 rifles 
and shotguns are exempted under the proposed ban. 

President Bill Clinton has launched an aggressive campaign to 
sway key lawmakers to support the gun legislation, which would be 
the second passed in as many years. In an “open letter" to hunters 
and sportsmen on Friday. Mr.' Hinton said assault weapons “have 
no place on a deer hunt, in a duck blind, or on a target range" but are 
prized by “drug dealers, gangs and terrorists.” (AP) 


Republicans Open the Drive Toward ’96 


ATLANTA — The last roundup is still two years off. but the 
stirrings here this weekend were unmistakable. For Republicans 
hungering 10 recapture the White House from President Bill Clinton, 
it amounted to the first cattle call for 1996. 

Five prospective Republican presidential candidates trooped 
through Atlanta to preen in front of party activists from across the 
South, a region crucial to Republican hopes in 1996. 

For now", Republicans are focused on winning more seals in 
Congress and the statehouses this fall, but when the Senate minority 
leader. Bob Dole or Kansas, was urging Republicans to do just that 
Friday night a voice from the crowd brought him back to the subject 
that was on everyone's mind. 

“Dole for president!" the man said. 

“Elizabeth hasn't decided yet," Mr- Dole replied . a reference to his 
wife. 

Senator Paul D. Coverdell of Georgia, whose election in late 1992 
began a string of Republican victories in major contests that ran 
through November 1993, said the two-day meeting of the Southern 
Republican Leadership Conference gave party activists an impor- 
tant forum to begin to evaluate their choices for 1996. 

“We're in an era when that review is fairly serious," he said. 
“These kinds of people in particular are going to be sizing and 
measuring who they think can best carry the mantle." 

There was much to choose from among the five who spoke here. 

Mr. Dole talked foreign policy and blasted Mr. Clinton's leader- 
ship. Jack F. Kemp, a former housing secretary, pleaded with 
Republicans to reach out to black and Hispanic voters and expand 
the pony. A former Tennessee governor, [.a mar Alexander, and 
Governor Carroll A. Campbell Jr. of South Carolina talked old- 
fashioned values and virtues. Senator Phil Gramm of Texas decried 
virtually everything Mr. Clinton has done or is trying to do. ( WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


President Bill Clinton in a radio address Saturday: "The pain and 
suffering of the Rwandan people have touched the hearts of all 
Americans, it is time for the leaders of Rwanda to recognize their 
common bond of humanity and to reject the senseless and criminal 
violence that continues to plague their country." (API 


994 


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Page 4 


MONDAY. MAY 2. 1994 





© F I N S 


iieralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sirthittti* Make the Rwandan Killers’ Bosses 

CVW-H'V; _ , ...... By Holly J. Burkhalter 



Ijii 


PUBLISHED urm THK Xfc» 1IIEK 1IMKS VNU THE HttHIM.HW rUST 


South Africa Reborn 


What might have been a nightmare in South 
Africa turned into a peaceful festival of de- 
mocracy. Having waited 300 years to vote. 
milli ons of blacks shrugged off threats of 
extremists and waited for hours without com- 
plaint during an election week when their 
country was literally reborn. On Wednesday, 
the old flag was struck and a new banner rose 
over a united South Africa whose first mo- 
ments shine with hope. 

“It's an incredible experience,’' said Arch- 
bishop Desmond Tutu, the Nobel laureate, on 
casting his first vote — “like falling in love.” 

Linda Khaba, a local magistrate in Durban, 
reported that ballots delivered on an extra 
voting day had been able to reach remote 
rural areas. “It's like the birth of a baby,” she 
said, “problems, anxiety and joy.” And all this 
was evident to millions of viewers watching 
the drama unwind on television. 

As dramatic and moving was the sight of 
blacks and whites standing side by side in the 
same polling queue. The Nazi-style Afrikaner 
Resistance Movement looked more ridiculous 
than fearsome in feeble protest rallies. With 
what seems to have been diligent work by 
police — now defending Tree elections rather 
than apartheid — 31 white right-wingers were 
arrested and charged with 21 bombing deaths 
on the eve of the vote. 

Full marks, therefore, to President F. W. 
de Klerk's interim government and to the 
Independent Electoral Commission for as- 
suring the security and integriiv of this wa- 


tershed election. Whatever ballot shortages 
or other mishaps occurred seem the innocent 
result of inadequate census figures or pre- 
dictable disorganization. 

Full marks as well to Nelson Mandela, the 
likely next president, for working hard with 
Mr. de Klerk to bring the reluctant Zulu chief. 
Mangosuthu Buthelezi. and his lokatha Free- 
dom Party into the canvass. 

Wide participation was essential to estab- 
lish the legitimacy of this first ever election 
open to all South Africans. Nineteen parties 
were on the national ballot, and 26 parties on 
nine regional ballots, a fair reflection of a 
diverse electorate of 23 million speaking a 
dozen languages. 

A weighted system of proportional voting 
in which runner-up parties are assured a share 
of cabinet seats puts a premium on hard 
bargaining and realistic compromise. 

Mr. Mandela, whose calm eloquence con- 
tributed mightily to this moment, is already 
touching the right chord for the next moment. 
While making plain that the first priority for 
the new government is to narrow the chasm 
between the privileged and the oppressed, he 
also declares: “We are building a country. 
Our slogan is let the past be the past ... Let 
us promote the spirit of conciliation.” 

And this is the man previous South African 
governments strove to silence and smear as a 
seditionist. History’s clock has truly moved 
forward in South Africa. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Sequel to NAFTA 


With fanfare, the three North American 
governments have announced a system of 
stronger financial shock absorbers to damp 
down the swings and lurches in the three 
exchange rates. It is a natural sequel to 
NAFTA, the North American Free Trade 
Agreement that went into effect at the begin- 
ning of the year. As a practical matter, it 
means more U.S. and Canadian support for 
the Mexican peso, which bas been sagging 
under the weight of political turbulence and 
an approaching election. It is not a new kind 
of help. The United States has for decades 
bad various arrangements to assist Mexico in 
steadying its currency. These new agree- 
ments only make the provisions a bit more 
formal and reliable. 

Why help Mexico? Because a stable curren- 
cy there is good for the expanding trade that is 
the whole point of NAFTA. And because, 
more broadly, stable prosperity in Mexico is 
good for employment in U.S. export indus- 
tries and cuts down illegal immigralion north- 
ward. The peso is somewhat overvalued and 
will probably decline as time passes. But the 
idea is to keep the movement gradual and 
predictable, rather than allowing it to bounce 
around wildly in response to political shocks 
— not only the recent assassination of the 


leading candidate for Mexico’s presidency but 
also other kinds of shocks as the dominant 
Institutional Revolutionary Party begins to 
recede from its long monopoly of power. 

Trade, as it grows, creates its own pressures 
for predictable exchange rates. As more busi- 
nesses buy and sell across a border, more 
people are affected by the risk of sudden 
changes in the rates. It translates into a cost of 
doing business. European- style currency links 
are not likely in North America, for they would 
require a sacrifice of sovereignty that would be 
unacceptable on this continent. But there are 
many intermediate steps that can make curren- 
cy disruptions less likely, and these three gov- 
ernments have just taken one of them. 

The three finance mini sters and central bank 
chairmen say they will meet regularly. It is not 
that they have not seen a good deal of each 
other m the past, but, again, this agreement 
makes the relationship a little more formal and 
introduces (be beginning of a structure. It is 
recognition by the politicians that across the 
continent’s wide open borders, the toleration 
for currency crises is rapidly diminishing If 
exchange rates shoot up and down, causing 
losses of money and jobs, governments know 
that voters will hold them responsible. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Clinton and Macedonia 


Greece is slowly strangling independent 
Macedonia's economy with a dangerously- 
misguided blockade. The collapsing econo- 
my, in turn, is generating explosive friction 
among Macedonia's diverse peoples, which 
could endanger the lives of 500 American 
peacekeepers dispatched to Macedonia to 
contain ethnic strife. The risk should have 
moved President Bill Gimon to press Greece 
to lift the blockade when he met with Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou last week. In- 
stead he reportedly bowed to the Greek- 
American lobby, well placed in Congress 
and the White House, and soft-pedaled his 
opposition to Greece's perverse policy. 

Macedonia is where Belgrade's ambitions 
to incorporate the republic into Greater Ser- 
bia run smack into competing territorial 
claims. Albania and Bulgaria historically 
have sought to absorb much of the same 
territory, and Greek nationalists also have 
their eyes on that prize. The Greek govern- 
ment fears that the intense rivalries could 
endanger Greece's hold on its own pan of 
Macedonia. But Athens is letting its hysteria 
over history rob it of sound judgment. 

During much of this century.” Macedonia 
has been divided between northern Greece 


and Yugoslavia. In the late 1940s. Yugosla- 
via. allied with Greece's Communists.” tried 


and failed to grab all of Greek Macedonia. 
In 1991. when Yugoslavia fell apart, the 
portion of Macedonia in Yugoslavia de- 
clared its independence. Greeks fear that the 
new republic may soon break up into con- 
flicting ethnic groups, with links to Albania, 
Bulgaria and Serbia, and that the trouble 
could spill over into Greek Macedonia. 

Although Mr. Papandreou says he favors 
the survival of an independent Macedonia. 
Greece's stubborn stance on recognition and 
its economic embargo are fast making that 
impossible. Playing to impassioned national- 
ists at home, the Greek government objected 
to the new republic’s use of the name Macedo- 
nia, as well as to its flag and constitution. 
Greece first tried to block recognition of the 
republic. When Greece's European Union 
partners granted recognition, Athens imposed 
a blockade. That not only makes landlocked 
Macedonia more dependent on trade with 
Serbia; it is also destabilizing the country as 
economic privation intensifies ethnic friction. 

President Clinton sent American troops as 
monitors to Macedonia in hopes of heading 
off ethnic conflict. They could get caught in 
the middle if the blockade pushes Macedonia 
into civil war. Mr. Clinton is pandering to the 
Greek lobby at his own peril. 

— THE NEK' YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Clinton Needs Expert Coaching 


[Bill] Clinton does not care for foreign 
policy: and. despite Warren Christopher's 
shuttiings, the president bas no Henry Kis- 
singer to do his leading for him. Like seeks 
like. But Mr. Gmion. bereft of instincts in 
foreign policy, needs to be coached by an 
expert to do the job the world requires of 
him. And. to be effective, expert coaching 
requires what the president is not prepared 
to give: time, thought and application. 

If the president could change — and this is 
highly uncertain — he would soon discern a 
middle road between hooking up his world 
view to public opinion, and paying no atten- 
tion to iL He could lead by' persuading and 


explaining. It is true that Congress (which 
bolds the purse strings) and the electorate 
(which gives the final mandate) are vital to the 
making of foreign policy. But they do not have 
to decide it and. indeed, they do' not want io. 
Presidents arc meant to do dial. 

Besides, the opinions of Congress and the 
public are not set in stone. By slim majorities, 
for example, they have now come round to 
supporting the use of American ground troops 
in Bosnia. In times of crisis Americans have 
historically rallied round their president, even 
in support of policies that were neither cost- 
nor risk-free. They long to be led. and that 
could be Mr. Clinton's vital first step: lead 
America first, lead the world next. 

— The Economist (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED /« 7 

KATH ARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Ti'Ctilnlfii 

RICHARD MeCLEAN. Fat i«4rr A Chief Etnienr 
JOHN V ISOCL’K. EimiarEiar it V ire Frmjtm 

• WALTER WELLS. Vnn Fdav • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES M1TCHELMORE Ojw fitovs • CARL GEWIRTZ, .Amur EJHar 

* ROBERT J. DONAHUE, Ed^Mrhc • JONATHAN GAGE. Asm jndFnmcc EJunr 

• RENE BONDV . Dtrun Pubiahr, • JAMES Ml'LEOD, Ath-enhmg Dtrrctnr 
■JUANITA I.CASPARLAarnaawu. , Onr<yr 9 wft^ ? re ROBERT FARRE CunLsiwiDtiraiw. Ew,^ 

Dmvtrur Jr it Pjhin r. • Ri^L.rJR Surmw 


IntuiLaaond Herald Tnhune. IS! A»cnurChai1e_de-GauIlc. , *25' , l Ncinlk-air r j:i. r n . . , 

V* 1 •* Crnrhcf A L v U .■*/ 1 T<i ‘V) T72-T7K Fat. rAS) rriti 

? v 5 IS5r T Td I am 72 (,? 55 Fa: iWi r 73% 

I K i Al, '~ w WE2 Tirt i2I2 I T5:-jWW Fax I2l2i 

-T. V;r f /' r s C ,, n»mi« l .«(s Punhnre .V. 6lJ.iT 

™ Hrn^J Tn'nmc. r.-o fry rvj. CSV »CW 




W ASHINGTON — The magnitude of Ihe slaughter m 
Rwanda is so great that the international community has 


alt 

resolution staling that a 

the bodies of hundreds of thotresbdijbfSsri^^^^a- tP ,-utf 


thrown up its hands and averted its eyes. The UN Security 
Council unanimeuslv decided 10 reduce its peacekeeping force 
10 a skeleton presence. Most foreigners have fled the county'- 
Incredibly, the government of France has received a delega- 
tion of the self-proclaimed “government of Rwanda. This tacit 
acceptance of one of the most extraordinary atrocities cu our 
decade is immoral, illegal and cynical. . . . 

The systematic extermination of the minority Tuih popula- 
tion in Rwanda is genocide, and the International Covenant 
on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide 
requires something belter. . . 

An appropriate and wholly realistic international approac n to 
this tragedy begins by recognizing that the violence that has 
engulfed Rwanda since the plane crash that killed President 
JuvtnaV Habvarimana on April 6 was planned and predictable. 

Rwandan human rights activists and opposition political 
figures had been under attack for months by hard-liners around 
General Habyarimana. Within hours of his assassination 
most likeN at the hands or extremists within his own govern- 
ment — barricades went up around Kigali, and targeted politi- 
cal and ethnic assassinations by the army and militia began. 

Another sign of die carnage to come was the creation of the 
militia by Rwanda’s ruling National Revolutionary Movement 
for Progress and the closely affiliated Coalition for the Defense 
of the Republic (CDR). Last year the army handed out guns to 
thousands of young militiamen, with orders to kill Tutsis. 

Official radio broadcasts throughout the country called upon 
listeners to attack political dissidents and all Tutsis. In recent 
weeks, broadcasts have contained such lurid incitements as 
“The graves are only half full! Who will help us fill themT 
Clear evidence of the direct responsibility of the Rwandan 
authorities may be seen in Butare Province in southern Rwanda. 
Despite the massacres in Kigali in the weeks after the assassina- 
tion of the president Butare remained calm for two w eeks. The 
person responsible for maintaining order and discouraging 
communal violence was the province's governor, a member of 
the political opposition and the only Tutsi governor in Rwanda. 


On April 20. the Rwandan anny «pja«d him wrth ihanHwe 
military figure, and mass murder of Tutsis and ■ 
figures began that very day. Since t hen the poteoflpww 
nuliiia. accompanied by the army, has earned out a frenzy of 
butchery that has continued day and night. 

Priests who escaped to neighboring Burandi «**»?«* 1° 
Human Rights Watch that the mililia and attacked a 
group or 6.000 Tutsis who bad taken refuge ai the church Of 
Cvahinda, of whom 200 survival. . . 

Clergy from the diocese of Cyangugu report JjOOO murdered 
in the parish of Shangi, 2,000 at Mibma and 800 
In Gikongoro. between Butare and Cyangugu. about 4.000 
were killed at the church of Kibdho. 

Since Rwandan political and military figures deliberately 
launched these massacres and many others, they must oe 

called upon to stop them. , . , 

Among those who have the power to halt the slaughter are 
Colonel Bagosora, the military officer in charge during the 
first days of the massacre. Colonel Augustin Bizunungu. then 
minister of defense and now commander in chief of the 
Rwandan armed forces. Captain Pasqual Simb&angwa. who 
commands the militia. Colonel Nkundiye. and Colonel Mpir- 
anya. head of the army's presidential guard 
On April 22. the White House took the unusual step or 
issuing a statement identifying these individuals by name and 
calling upon them to “do everything in their power to end the 
violence immediately." The international community should 
add its voice to Washington's. J . 

Heads of state around the world should denounce these 
individuals by name and call upon them to end the carnage or 
face an international tribunal. . . 

France, in particular, has a responsibility to use its signifi- 
cant leverage with the Rwandan army to press it to call off the 
killings, since France bas been its chief weapons supplier and 
military trainer in recent years. 

And' the United Nations Security Council should issue a 


individual & the staomeof Seei^aryC^ttS 
Organization of AfricanJJcitv-io 
command and deliver a stetn 
The current United Nations 
mat Jacques-Koger 




Diplomatic efforts 

Rwandan Patriotic ^ ■ 

President Alt Hassan Mwrnji ci :\ : 
should be supported- But -a .jy'',-' ■ ' 

parties is largely infant jto the ^ - 


trues is largely irretevaHi ; io toe ns,” ;[i r- * 

batants beiia earned - 
the battieieW —by the annyjgna^g^tiiL >i J- *■ :Z ■ . ' '*• - 



Would this message be’haatodf 8!^5fe3S8 £. ^; ‘M r ' 

wenunent representing the , 


civilians 


government representing the Rwahdgn __ 
mtemational acceptance and ecftabhufe 
Jerome Bkamnmpaka, -te - 5^, ^- ;. 

Rwnnda. and Jean-Bosco 



9* -Jed 




The scope of the-loflmgsin :■ 

has given up Irope. 

activists ana thousands of Tutsis tmder D 6^5. ■ 

militia and army troops who - 

United Nations has largely abandoned 5^^.^,;.- 
Rwanda, it is aO.the more mcmabatiitoon ’ n ~ 

nity to upgrade its political 
authorities to stop the genocide 

The writer, Washington 
contributed this comment 


v - wx 


For White and Black , a Hopeful Start in the Beloved Co 




ASHTNGTON — South Africa's aston- 
ishing elections end three centuries of 


By Jim Hoagland 


white rule in Africa. Portuguese explorers. 
British administrators. French legionnaires 
and others came and went. Now the .Afri- 
kaans- and English-speaking whites of South 
Africa attempt to endure by accepting Afri- 
can rule. South Africa is the only big country 
on the continent where ending white suprem- 
acy does not necessarily mean endiDg the 
sizable white presence that exercised power. 
The world, and South Africa, will be a better 
place if the whites survive and prosper there. 

The Afrikaners will try to save themselves 
by abandoning apartheid — the last and cru- 
dest Form of white rule practiced in Africa — 
rather than abandoning a country granted 
natural resources, scenic beauty and human 
conflict of biblical proportions. 

The 3 million Afrikaners had little choice 
but to adapt They have no European metropo- 
lis to which to return, as did the British. French 
and Portuguese. And. as President F. W. de 
Klerk told President Bill Gin ton at the While 
House last year, the white leadership finally 
recognized that apartheid's grand scheme of 
splitting South Africa's 40 million people into 
white and black “nations” would not work. 


He would have stuck with apartheid if it had 
worked, Mr. de Klerk admitted. But sticking 
with apartheid would have meant a race war 
thal the whites would ultimately have lost. 

The elections and their promise of an orderly 
transition to a multiracial democratic South 
.Africa were thus a victory for Afrikaner real- 
ism, however belated. Whatever follows — and 
there arc significant perils ahead — the elec- 
tions arc also a victory for English-speaking 
whites, the black majority and the foreign 
powers which helped bring about this change. 

The Afrikaners, who have held a monopoly 
on power since 1948. have seen the fiercely 
populist and agrarian traditions of their Boer 
ancestors steadily eroded by South Alan's 
increasing urb aniza tion and industrialization. 
In abandoning apartheid, they are not neces- 
sarily abandoning personal or group prejudice. 
But they are implicitly accepting the ethos of 
the 2 milli on other white South .Africans, who 
call themselves English-speakers. Part of a 
world culture that created empire and then 
commonwealth, the leaders of the English- 
speaking community have usually argued that 


rtigrrfmtnarrng by dass and economic power 
would be a more rational way of running the 
Beloved Country than discriminating by race. 

Hie Afrikaners, whose patriarchs arrived 
from the Netherlands in 1652, have for most 
of the past three centuries tried to have it both 
wavs. They have often portrayed themselves 
as historically unique, a tribe of white men 
who wandered into the vast and arid interior 
of their country to escape British rale and 

■ . # V . _ _ _ .L . LI. -t. J 


must besupporiediy 



who are as African as the black tribes they 
encountered. This is a sample of what sixth 


encountered. This is a sample of what sixth 
graders were long taught from the standard 
Afrikaans history text: 

“Then the Lord planted a new nation at the 
southern tip of Africa . . . This people was to 
stand on the verge of being wiped out in many 
cases and yet was to be saved in a wonderful 
mann er ... From the political dashes of this 
new nation, its special characteristics will 
become apparent — its striving for freedom 
and racial purity.” 

But Afrikaners also keenly felt their Euro- 
pean origins, however far removed in time. As 
the “winds of change” swept colonialism 
away elsewhere in Africa, the Afrikaners ar- 
gued that they were the guardians of Western 
civilization oil a threatening continent who 


tions aftenraid sfi^TOd-thafS|^‘ r 

disapproval of. the warid d viW^ w^- ' : 
Afrikaners claimed to rrorestntbelri^jte ? 
them to change, ^ 

sanctions created were 
force for changL. ^icSsr..$ 

Peaceful change would ncthave bttnpos-' 
sibte, however, without the eriiatHtfimry 
moderate leadership pHfdanifL kfri fld ajnd 
the patie n c e of the African^ aahritfc 1W 
patience was visible in ; 


kmany 


and 


fltftyAlliancc. 




pie waited eight hours of nxxefovca^V' - • 
One television comnxatato-caMtlB>e' 
scenes biblical, and for atteUbat vMm 
overstatement Whatha^h^xajedhiSfWh 
Africa since Mr. Mandek-»asTiwd,‘fece - 


geistzy* 4 • • ■ _ - 


• V ' 1 

aiwsstr: -- 


It does not make up forth?’ 
exploitation and repression ini 


to overc(Hiietiiecunenifetterkgag;^i4ite 


racial nation. Pray for them alT ; 

The Washmgtan PasL 


■' ‘if '‘‘Li: 

. . ;... :.r . .. •. 


kD-Bti* rsrc"-. 

rj.'.- -- 

job aat« .*■• • 
jiidifcfcraeirrr- 
*ddie»sr-::.: - 
jJnsmCTficr.-.’. 

1 ink kta - 

• - 

af ini 

jHUmCti-r 


Nixons Not Wrong About Detente, Not Right About Indocbiaa 


*:rc nqc. 

* A itHUvn: 


W ASHINGTON — Richard Nix- 
on’s death catches the evolving 


VV on’s death catches the evolving 
search for a true Am-rrican foreign 
pobey at a point of .vme embanas < - 
raent to the late preriden*. some of it 
undue The detente with the Soviet 
Union, including the opening to Oiina 
that helped incline “uie Kremlin" to 
detente in the first place, is no longer 
regarded as the bold breakthrough 
that it was considered at Mr. Nixon's 
White House lime. 

It involved formidable intellectual 
and political courage on both the 
Soviet and American sides, not least 
for Mr. Nixon, who had built a career 
on a dark domestic form of anti- 
communism. As he practiced detente, 
it did not end political confrontation, 
but it made safer the nuclear confron- 
tation that was always the rawest and 
most dangerous aspect of the Cold 
War. But nowadays Mr. Nixon's de- 
tente is increasingly ^een as a transi- 
tional time-buying phase. 

Besides its undoubted accomplish- 
ments, it added to the legitimacy of 
Communist power and lengthened its 
life. It helped a creaking, structurally 


By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


impaired, strategically overextended 
Soviet system to postpone its ulti- 
mate Taring up to reality. Meanwhile. 
Moscow used the 1970s to pursue its 
expansionist fancies. 

Richard Nixon was guided by a 
traditional, gut belief in balance of 
power. He built .American global 
strategy on containment of the Soviet 
Union, partly by confrontation and 
partly by partnership. Both parts in- 
evitably conferred status and prefer- 
ence on the partner. 

The real breakthrough came only 
with Ronald Reagan. He was a radi- 
cal who stigmatized the notions of 
coexistence, parity and partnership 
as artificial props for communism 
and the Soviet empire. He favored 
confrontation in ends and means. In 
enas. he meant to terminate the “evil 
empire.'' and in means to pile on the 
pressure — military, technological 
and economic. 

One side io the continuing .Ameri- 
can debate feels that the ultimate 
enemy was nuclear war. in which case 


detente in Mr. NLxod's harder version 
or in Jimmy Carter's softer version 
was an essential investment in dis- 
pute solving and nuclear sanity. This 
is where Mr. Nixon buili his reputa- 
tion Tor toughness and savvy. 

The other side feels thal the ulti- 
mate enemy was communism, in 
which case the purpose of policy was 
to find strategically effective and 
politically acceptable ways to do the 
enemy in. 

People rightly argue over what 
were the foreign sources and what 
were the domestic sources of the dis- 
integration of Soviet power. Mr. Rea- 
gan had the advantage of having the 
visible phase of the collapse begin on 
his watch. That trims Mr. Nixon’s 
achievement to doing the best be 
could in the different, earlier circum- 
stances where the possibility of an 
ultimate solution was simply oet 
wi thin mainstream imagining. 

But it was no small feat to open up 
with Moscow and Beijing and in the 
Middle East. Mr. Nixon's contribu- 


tion was large and needs no apology. 
He recognized and responded to the 
global nuclear anxieties that, dear 
young readers, were the con t ro l li n g 
high-policy reality at that time. 

He treated these anxieties by po- 
litical dialogue and by arms control^ 
The latter accords (including SALT-. 
I and the ABM Treaty) did not aH,' 
hold up well to later political weath- 
ering, but they provided valuable 
comfort at the time. 

Mr. Nixon's Vietnam policy re- 
mains a nest of ironies. Obsessed with 
avoiding defeat and national humili- 
ation, be thought cut-and-run would 
invite the Kremlin to maraud else- 
where. He devised a four-year with- 
drawal strategy meant to leave Sooth 
Vietnam standing, with American aid 
but defending itself. But what be had 
to do. in Cambodia. Laos, Haiphong 
and Hanoi, to make this strategy 
work exhausted his political capital, 
and Congress repudiated aid. North 
Vietnam lode over. 

Defeat did inflict humiliation and 
encourage further Kremlin maraud- 
ing (Nicaragua. Angola, Afgbant- 


■. m •*¥£#■ vi'.’''. 

stan). Those of us vriu f&nrilfae 
results ah acceptable prige hi jay far 
leaving an unbearable: wat decied 
Mr. Carter. Tbose who cBd not then 
elected Mh Reagan. ». 

• Mr. Nixon ^iras right in the short 
term but wrong-in the krtig; Defat 


did. cost Ameriea, ' but not penw- 
nenrlv or morfaHv. and Vietnam 


needy or mortally, and -Vietaan 
: Ktfcd tid’ttJpotyTrat not unman- 
ageable issue. Victory cost Moscow 


■fiidHwiL 
BpEft*;:: - 

steEs^:-. ..- 

(wteai-; • 

■ - 
;r ; • 

^WEafa;/’— 

3 *®B5 24 


naiqvastete^ wlndvhe^d hnae 

dowhcp mpnui i sui . -_ -j- / 




bpdift tdAow not Hs meW toe 
Kreadin America's atedjga^ fe 
own, as fcfc IBxbn mastedJJfcfimig 
then prance so sufflg^ ^^ - • 
But Ks war.pofiCT 
his end-thetwar 

mast enduring -pr al 

troublir® foraga 
has to be the American pwwgw* 
tioo that Ridard Nixon *2 
abide and that— 
newest prortgfe, B31 OunoflW 1 ' 
entty cannot escape. . ^ ^.5- 
The Washington P*%? ^ ' . 


Nixon: Back to California for Complexity and Graceful Feelings 


N EW YORK — On Tuesday, the 
dav before Richard hJW,-»n‘« fn_ 


IV day before Richard Nixon’s fu- 
neral. a reporter who covered him 
years ago took leave or Yorba Linda 
and journeyed southward to San Ge- 
raente. where Mr. Nixon had vaca- 
tioned during the good times and re- 
paired his shattered psvebe during tile 
post-Watergaie bad times. La Casa 
Pacifica. Mr. Nixon’s Spanish-style re- 
treaL is now in private hands. 'What 
was once the Western White House is 
now simply the grandest dwelling in a 
walled and gatol development called 
Cypress Shores, and its owner does 
not welcome snoopers like me. 

The visitor is definitely welcome, 
however, at La Casa Romantica. a 
downtown villa that once belonged to 
Ole Hanson, the Wisconsin Swede 
w-ho founded San Gemente in 1925. 
The villa houses two liny rooms be- 
longing to the San Gemente Histori- 
cal Society — the Ole Hanson Room 
and the Richard Nixon Room. 

They are lovingly tended by Doro- 
thy Fuller, the society's president. 
3Jid Belly Weatherholtz. who once 
worked as a waitress at a local eatery 
and who recalls people in the Nixon 
entourage by numbers on the menu. 
Frank Gannon, a Nixon speech writ- 
er, was No. 4 — “eggs over easy with 
toasL David Eisenhower was No. 7 
— "scrambled with bacon." 

The room is full of bric-a-brac that 
poses no epistemological threat to the 
Richard Nixon library and Birthplace 
in Yorba Linda. There are magazines 
with Mr. Nixon on the cover, photo- 
graphs erf Mr. and Mrs. Nixon on the 

beach, a check for 5350 made out to a 

weal chanty and, oddly, a program 
from the 1973 White House Corre- 
spondents Dinner in Washington — 
an evening trf great pain for Mr. NLx- 
on. because Watergate was in full cry. 

But there is also, under glass, a 
quotation from the president’s fare- 
well speech to his staff on Aug. 9. 
1974. 1 did not think to ask the two 


By Robert B. Semple Jr. 


women what they made of the quote, 
but to me it was a vivid reminder of 
Mr. Nixon’s rapacity to stir wildly 
different emotions, of the difficulties 
that await future historians, and of 
how little we really leam about a 
person at his funeral. 

“Never be petty." he said then. 
“Always remember, others mav hate 
you, but those who hate you' don't 
win unless you hate them — and then 
you destroy yourself." This has been 
cited often io recent days, usually bv 
Nixon loyalists to whom it is proof of 
his capacity to rise above the base 
level of political infighting, to for- 
give and forget and thus move on to 
another day. To me. however, it is 
yet another example of his impulse 
(not uncommon among politicians 
or even journalists) to touch up 
one's self-portrait. Richard Nixon's 


r — v hmuii ? 

downfall occurred precisely because 
he hated those who haled him or 
caused him political upset. 

There is no other way. even at this 
late dale, that ! can account for the 
fact that a sluing president with 


wide support among plain Ameri- 
cans like Dorothy Fuller and Betty 
Weaiherhoitz, and the thousands 


who endured driving rain to see his 
casket in Yorba Linda, encouraged 
the nutty, half-paranoid activities 
associated with Watergate. 

That said, [ am probably no closer 
to the core of this complex and rivet- 
ing man than any other Nixon- 
watcher, hence my hope that the eu- 
logists would enlighten me, hence my 
disappointment that they did not 

I should have guessed. Truth is con- 
ditional at memorial services Criti- 
cism is guarded. (Bill Clinton mpd r 
one brief reference to "mistakes" in 
Mr. Nixon's earthly life.) Praise tends 
to be profuse but incomplete. 

Much was said in Yorba Linda 
about foreign triumphs, especially by 
Henry Kissinger, whose tribute ought 
have been aimed partly at himself. 
Little was made (except by President 
Clinton, who had done his home- 
worit) of the Nixon domestic a genrt.i 
which attempted to improve but not 
dismantle the activist government he 
inherited from Lyndon Johnson 

All in all. though, I came away with 
good feelings. ITte peoolc who had 


pretty much escaped Watergate, were 
summoned back by Tricia Cox and 
Julie Eisenhower to put together in 
three short days an event that would 
be seen around the world. 

Having already interviewed Mr. 


nmwd him trouble 
Liddyfo^odyqg^^Jgj^ 
came rromi. spot ? m ri rWr 
bind the usual ta» 


Nixon on the subject, these people 
knew exactly what he wanted — a 
burial at home and no lying in state in 
the Capitol “I do not want those [ex- 


pletive deleted] people in Washington 
looking at me," he said to one of them. 


Ana so they put on a funeral thal 
was also a rally. It included four for- 
mer presidents, one sitting president, 
old drinking buddies like Bebe Rebo- 
zo. old colleagues like Rose Mary 
Woods and old political enemies 
like George McGovern, people who 


mat aamp 

ber of what . Mr- A gac*? ”7 ^ 
the “effete cprpsnfing*=*®r 
Newsweek ranawo ^i, 
Mr. Nixon’smain^gwj 
ation of absi mg'sfcg« ^^S 
Intimacy of 

assessment 

on’s final spectacular^-ati^g^ 

ton's 

—in 

by nature a poStkal heater 
The NewXork 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 


1894?: May Day in Europe 


good reelings. The people who had 
run Nixon’s campaign in 
1968. the advance men who never 
aspired to top jobs and therefore 



PARIS — “A dead calm" is (he re- 
port which reaches us from every part 
of Europe. But it must not be sup- 
posed that the dead calm means that 
the Socialists have abandoned their 
demands. It simply means that the 
working classes have come to under- 
stand that a civilisation that has exist- 
ed for two thousand years cannot be 
changed by abstaining bom wok for 
twenty-four hours. They have there- 
fore gone back to their workshops as 

usuaL Tlus is a blow to the high priests 
oT Socialism who called upon than to 
remain idle on the First of May. 


similar package^ 

where they ^ were hdoiornswg^j 

postage. He 

alarm, which resulted® rSSpjr! 
cry at thirty-six bomW 
sections of the cOBnUJ?'%.^r ,z 


1919: Assassination Plot 


NEW YORK — A nation-wide plot 
by the Reds 10 celebrate May Day 
with the wholesale assassination of 
jurists, members of the Cabinet and 
public officials who are opposed to 
their activities has been disrupted by 
the sharp eyes of a postal employ^, 
who. after reading the description of 


1944: 

LONDON-- fltag£§£ 
edition:] 
thewar on 
stand for an 
matters of f 
the dominions 

ing topics of the 

isfa Emp ire Prime 
opened in Londort- 
With New Zealand \ 
Australia m affing™: 
possible concentration 
the Pacific, the two 
Premiers wffl press-dc 
direction and the Far 
.ater , 

European invas5»'pl?^ 



(jpV 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 2, 1994 



Page 5 


The Untimely Exclusion of Germany and Russia From a Friendly Fete 




V* 


By Zbjgmew Brzeziiiski 

; S/,ec/a/ » Herald Tribune 

"IT"" « former national 
security adviser l0 p residait Jimmy 

Carter. His most recent book is “Out 

; . k.'tfts; ttt£SL2F* - * 


■si!. 




and a statement of fact that the of Europe for decades now. That 
freedom and security of both the acoolade must be emphasized. Ger- 
United Stales and Europe are or- many has loyally and generously 
Statically linked — nowadays and supported Europe’s security and i"s 
for the last 45 years in the North the only NATO member with all its 
Atlantic Treaty Organization. It is forces fully integrated into the joint 
essential lhai this link r emains vi- command. It has been willing to 






^ -->8 

: 


Anniversaries are hke birthdays: 
occasions to celebrate and to thinif 
ahead, usually among friends with 
whom one shares not only the past 
but also the future. That is why the 
exclusion both of Germany and of 
Russia from the D-Day commemo- 
rations is so inappropriate. Mil- 
lions of Russians died defeating 
Hitler. Millions of Germans have 
been born and grown up in a demo- 
cratic Germany that is now a solid 
part of the West. The stability of 
Europe hinges on the future con- 
duct both of Germany «n<f of Rus- 


tal. 


r- .'^of -- 


iV , 








: -‘h 




ajichn 


To be sure, it is American 
that assures the security of 
— '^and in that respect overshadows 
by far the role of Germany and 
Russia. So a reaffirmation of the 
centrality of the Euro-Atlantic alli- 
ance has to be the point of depar- 
ture for any reflections prompted 
by fee 50th anniversary « General 
Dwight D. Eisenhower’s simple, 
ringing message: “The liberation of 
Europe has begun.” 

As demonstrated that day, it was 
and has remained an article of faith 


Beyond that, the quality of Eu- 
rope's security — and Europeans' 
own subjective sense of it — will be 
determined largely by the degree to 
which Germany remains perma- 
nently anchored in an integrating 
Europe and the extent to which 
Russia is linked constructively to a 
bigger and more secure Europe. 

For nearly 50 years. Western 
policy has aimed at the fullest, 
deepest integration of Germany 
into as emerging community of 
West European nations and the 
Euro-Atlantic alliance. For the last 
five years. Western policy has 
sought to forge increasingly coop- 
erative holes frith Russia. 

These two goals reflea a double 
realization: both these countries 
are destined to continue playing 
major roles in European affairs, 
but neither is likely to play con- 
structively if ibe geopolitical con- 
text creates tempting options for 
national self-assertion, especially if 
nationalistic temptations are exac- 
erbated by a sense of exclusion. 

Germany has been a good citizen 


propitiate French pride in order to 
foster a far-reaching French-Ger- 
man reconciliation, which in turn 
became both foundation and cata- 
lyst for progressive unification in 
Europe. 


At the same time, Germany has 
managed to serve as the linchpin 
for continued U.S. military pres- 
ence on the Continent. The Wash- 
ington- Bonn connection has not 
been diluted or even strained by 
Franco-German political leader- 
ship in promoting Europe’s inte- 
gration. Last but by no means least, 
Germany has demonstrated a gen- 
uine commitment to democracy: 
For example, no country has more 
humane, liberal immigration laws. 
Germany must sustain that course 
if Europe is to enjoy stability in the 
new, post-Coid War era. 


Germany’s circumstances — and 
psychological mood — are chang- 
ing. The leadership will soon be 
renewed. The approaching 50th an- 
niversary of the end of World War 
I! in 1995 w31 mark a milestone in 
generational change. This year 
brings a major historical watershed 


with the departure or the last Rus- 
sian soldier from Goman soil. 
Without casting aspersions of any 
sort, there is dearly a risk, in some 
circumstances, that Germany 
could be tempted to diverge from 
the path it has so responsibly pur- 
sued for the Last several decades. 

Might not at least some Germans 
soon begin to resem the presence of 
American troops, claiming that 
Germany is the only European 
country still “occupied” (as dema- 
gogues wfli then say) by foreign 
troops? Will growing numbers of 
Germans then begin to take excep- 
tion to the remaining limitations on 

their national sovereignty? 

And what will be the German — 
and Russian — reaction to the suc- 
tion effect of a Central Europe that 
remains a geopolitical vacuum? Is 
that what Russia's minister of for- 
eign affairs had in mind when last 
December be enticed his German 
counterpart with the vision of a 
special “axis between Germany 
and Russia” in ’’the construction of 
a new Europe?” 

The answers will be shaped by 
what happens in Europe and in 
Russia and by how America reacts. 

If Europe enlarges, deepens its 

unity and widens its security pe- 
rimeter, there are good prospects 
for Germany to remain a good citi- 
zen as well as the leader of a Europe 
that becomes more truly European 











"y-zc 



Fifty Years After D-Day 


f; 


These are the second and third articles in 
a series on the future of the 
American-European relationship. 
Subsequent articles will appear 
weeklv until June 6. 




Germany and U.S. Need Each Other 

A Binding Alliance, Through NATO , Is a Key to Stability 


By Michael Stfinner 

Special to the Herald Tribune 


r 


Stiftung Wissenschaft und PoUtik, a think tank in 
Ebenhausen, near Munich, that does work for the 
German government and Bundestag 


The D-Day commemoration, obeying the 

vail sii 


.Joch 


% 


•_ I 




tew of unintended consequences, will surely 
impress participating leaders and the global 
television audience less with past gloria and 
more with the dramatic reversals in geopolitical 
fortunes of the warring nations. 

In June 1944, Grosadeutschland and Imperi- 
al Japan were waiting for the final crushing 
blows in the total war they would soon lose. 
They had justbeen officially cast as the “enemy 
. nations” in a new. wodd order embodied in the 
United Nations Charter. Today, these two na- 
tions are major, respected mainstays of the 
world’s well-being. 

Xtf all the the victors io Europe, only one is 
still recognizable as a major power: the United 
States. Three times in this century it has inter- 
vened, twice to till the scales derisively against 
Germany. Only the third time, at the outbreak 
ot the Cold War, did Washington construct 
stability in Europe around the centerpiece of 
Germany. Again now, the U.S. role wiH be 
crucial in salvaging what stability can be saved 
in post-Coid War Europe. 

- Fifty years on, the country that has changed 
-the least, the United Stales, and the country 


• Containment of Soviet expansionist ten- 
dencies, as expounded by George Kennan. 

• Construction of an Atlantic Community, 
incorporating the bigger chunk of divided Ger- 
many. 

Washington did not flinch from RealpoKtik 
in the Cold War. Today, many young people 
find it hard to fathom the dear, simple U.S. 
motives. They recoil from even hying to under- 
stand a straggle of such unpredictable ferocity, 
a struggle waged under the shadow of annihila- 
tion. 

American strategists made no bones about 
their needs. Without the strategic depth of 
German territory between the Elbe and Rhine 
rivers, any Western defense against a Soviet 
assault would have amounted to little more 
than a rearguard action on the beaches. 

When the Washington treaty pledging mutu- 
al defense was signed in April 1949, President 
Harry S. Truman and Secretary of Stale Dean 
Acheson bluntly told Allied leaders — no Ger- 
man were present since as yet they had no 
government of their own — that Germany and 
. Japan had to be given places in the democratic 
West because, without a satisfactory solution. 


More quickly than most 

Europeans imagine, 

American engagement in 

that has dunged the most, Germany, need to could become a 

recognize their overriding common interest m ir 

— i- — thing of the past, just an 


pation by Central and East European countries 
but rejected any extension of NATO guaran- 
tees eastward into the land mass. 

More quickly than most Europeans imagine. 
American engagement in Europe could become 
a thing of the past, just an episode in a 200-year 
history dominated by a powerful strategic con- 
cept of isolation. Americans could easily be 
tempted to rediscover the joys of living in the 
world’s safest place — on the world's largest 
island, a continent protected by three oceans. 
On a map, the Atlantic Ocean may look the way 
it always has for the last 50 years, but in real 
geopolitical terms, it can quickly revert to un- 
charted, turbulent waters. Europeans could 
find themselves uncomfortably sharing a conti- 
nent with a Russia which, to borrow Mr. Ach- 
eson’s phrase about postwar Britain, has lost an 
empire without yet finding a role. 

For America too, isolation is ultimately not 
viable. But for the moment the primacy of 
domestic affairs reigns unchallenged in the 
White House, Congress and American public 
opinion. As Toquewlle observed a century ago. 
the democratic character of the United States 
tends to make Americans inward-looking. 

But even the sole superpower, however dem- 
ocratic, has to confront the unpleasant interna- 
tional facts of lifeL The CUmon presidency's 
premise — that America's power can be rebuilt 
from within — simplistically ducks the real 
need for rethinking American power in the 
world. Hopes of democracy in one country will 
be as vain as dreams of socialism in one coun- 


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; . creating a new trans-Atlantic alliance. 

This new challenge requires that pubB 
ion in America, prompted by the political 
' recognize its wider interests in a reasonably 
orderly wodd where Americans travel, do bas- 
nets and live in peace. Without tins realization 
and a new commitment to maintaining a nrini- 

• mal international system, the United Stales 
may quickly revert to de facto isolation. An 

• insular America would leave all the Western 
democracies feeling, too late, a sudden nostal- 

•' - gia for the strange stability of the Odd War. 

A new Atlantic pact to avert that crisis needs 
to be rooted in the new realities of power. 
Throughout the period starting m Worid War n 
and con tinuing for most of the C old W ar, the 
nature of power changed only incrementally. 
•" Gtopohticals were defined by industrial capac- 
ily, pOEtical consistency and 
— sod UA superiority denied the Soviets the 
chief prize of both wars: control of Europe 

: D . , 

■ Moscow was still pursuing classical targets 
- Endear parity, tank armies, sea power long 
.after tie! turn* .of the game had changed. 
■ Emerging as part of everyday hfe, electronic 

ff t3ups were the symbol and sutertance of a revo- 

ta^ shifting dw sources of economic prowas. 

political legitimacy acquired new rules 

. . AH the IIM 

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try. Without US. leadership, there can be no 
“West” 


episode in a 200-year 
history dominated by a 
powerful strategic concept 
of isolation. 


to cope with strategic issues such as 
nuclear proliferation. Without leadership from 
Washington, United Nations mandates are 
dead letters. Europeans, whatever they make of 
their European Union, can play only a support- 
ing role. 

□ 


the Germans might be vulnerable to Soviet 
blandishments aimed at ^dnetnp the m and 
helping communism enslave the West irrevers- 
ibly. 

Washington found European alternatives 
soft-headed. France’s hopes of imposing per- 
manent neutrality on its down-but-never-out 
neighbor amounted to an invitation for Ger- 
mans to start playing off East and West a gains t 
each other. London nursed notions of inculcat- 
ing the ruling British Labor Party’s values in 
Gomans — mat idea was a nonstarter because 
American taxpayers were never going to subsi- 
dize the export of socialism. 

□ 

U.S. authority made the other Allies acqui- 
esce in Germany's gradual return to sovereign- 



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to economic recovery and eventually political 
integration. Starting with the Marshall Flan, 
economic cooperation became the formula of 
European integration — and inc id entally a 
handy answer for governments, including 
successive regimes in Bonn, for dismissing wor- 
ries about Germany’s growing weight. 

This approach to Europe's re-emergence car- 
ried a bidden price: continuing dependence on 
U5. leadership. West Gennany was not a coun- 
try in seardi of a foreign policy hut a by- 
product of US foreign policy. The other Euro- 
pean countries never developed a plausible 
design for iwatating a Europe capable of being 
a worid player, 

la contrast; Washington pursued an unwa- 
vering strategy on Gcnnany’s role in Europe. 
The reunification negotiations in 1990 — de- 
spite the misnomer of “Two-Hns-Four” to 
mean the two Germanys plus the throe victori- 
ous Western powers and the Soviet Union — 
actually had a simple political arithmetic: The 
United Stales pressed through unification, 
overriding other participants' objections and 
even some hesitations in Boon. 

□ 

Europeans need to grasp that the United 
Stales has always acted in Europe is ways that 
coincide with American interests. -When Wash- 
ington looks at post-Coid War Europe; it is not 
interested in a powtr balance among European 
nations or even between Europeans and Rus- 
sians. Only one risk arising in Soviet rains 
Washington.- Russia is the sole coun- 
try that could forcseeabiy threaten the United 
States whh nuclear destruction. 

As a maritime power, -the United States also 
has an interest in malting jure that the Europe- 

an coastline opposite its own eastern seaboard, 
does not fall into hostile hands. That explains 
why Washingtonr'in proposing to widen the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization's role in 

Europe, offered to open the alliance to partita- 


It taka a superpower to provide a minimum 
of global order, the basically benign planet that 
the White House seems to cake for granted. 
Washington seems almost to doubt the legiti- 
macy of American force — the opposite of the 
way a superpower needs constantly to use its 
geopolitical weight to maintain the internation- 
al equilibrium. Yl is not enough to undertake 
high-noon expeditions: many, especially when 
undertaken too late, will prove much harder 
than eliminating a swaggering dictator or con- 
quering a convenient island. 

Europeans, too, need to confront some pain- 
fill new realities. The most radical change is 
that it is no longer enough for European gov- 
ernments to manage the political implementa- 
tion of a U.S. protectorate — the comfortable 
assignment that most European leaders have 
confined themselves to. Today, Europeans 
must face up to grittier decisions about their 
destiny than the vaguely worded unity in the 
Maastricht treaty. The situation of Europe 
dearly begs the basic question: Who protects 
Europe against its demons once reasonableness 
is swept away? This dark possibility looms not 
just in ex-Yugoslavia bin more dangerously 
dose to the continent’s center in other former 
Communist countries. 

Central and Eastern Europe, currently ig- 
nored in security concepts, is a dangerous pow- 
er vacuum. From the bitter situation in the 
Baltics to the uncertainties in Ukraine, the 
region is slipping out of control. The peril is 
underscored by Russia’s openly proclaimed in- 
tentions of using military force to intervene in 
the so-called “near abroad,” especially in the 
southern republics of the former Soviet Union. 

As a Pentagon study said recently, Germany, 
the big winner from the Cold War, could wind 
up as the big loser if instability swamps Europe. 
In whai should be a defining moment, the 
Western allies are sh unning self-definition, not 
least Germany. Amid its growing pains. Ger- 
many has yeno find a new virion and voice to 
replace nuclear angst and the habit of paying 
reparations far the past and initiation fees for 
the future. German diplomacy was not yet shed 
reflexes conditioned by the need to defer to its 
allies' particular interests: a nuclear option for 
Britain and France! today devalued but always 
denied to Germany) and a ground army hold- 
ing the alliance's front line. 

This deference stemmed from Germany’s 
historically inalterable geography and history. 
Today, it b Germany’s new size and weigh i that 
dictates its acute need for U.S. involvement in 
Europe — to counterbalance the proximity of 
Russia and to reassure all concerned about zbe 

German agenda on its eastern marches. Of all 

£be European commies, Germany is ihe one 

that most needs a renewed U.S. alliance via 
NATO. 

The longer this imperative is ignored on both 

rides of me Atlantic, the sooner tremble be- 

comes unavoidable. 


irucpjieand in the way it thinks of and America's co-eqmd “strategic 


best design would be an partner" (even while pleading for 
enlarged European Union embrac- more financial assistance). 


ing the European Free Trade Area 
countries and eventually also 
reaching into Central Europe to 
include at least three Visegrad na- 
tions: the Czech Republic. Hunga- 
ry and Poland. These three nations 
should be enrolled by NATO » 
well. 

A Europe along those lines 
would emclop Germany while en- 
hancing ihe German role within iL 
Attaining that goal will require 
continued exercise of political lead- 
ership by France and Germany. 
Beyond that, it will call for pro- 
found and genuine — not just for- 
mal — German- Polish reconcilia- 
tion matching the existing 
German-French reconciliation. 

A French-German- Polish coali- 
tion would provide a mighty inner 
core for a larger Europe. It would 
further affirm a historically posi- 
tive role for an economically pow- 
erful, politically constructive and 
truly European Germany. Such a 
trilateral strategic coalition — in- 
corporating 175 million citizens 
(more than Russia!) — would be 
economically driven by Germany 
that was politically balanced by 
France and Poland. U would ex- 
pand the scope of Europe and en- 
hance security on the whole conti- 
nent. 

German leaders are aware of this 
historic opportunity. That is why 
some of them have been willing to 
take the lead in urging the eastward 
expansion of the European Union 
and NATO. France and Germany 
are actively exploring Polish mem- 
bership in the Western European 
Union, the military arm of the Eu- 
ropean Union — in all probability 
ahead of the day when Poland 
eventually joins NATO. 

The gutsy German minister of 
defense, Volker Ruhe, told a con- 
ference in Brussels early this year 
that it is Europe's interest to admit 
Poland to NATO and the West 
should firmly state that it is no 
provocation against Russia for the 
alliance to proceed accordingly. 
That is very much the case now that 
NATO no longer views Russia as 
an adversary and has opened its 
Partnership for Peace to Russian 
participation. 

□ 


Clearly. Russia cannot be all 
these things at the same time. Being 
part of Europe and NATO is not 


compatible with pursuing a unique 
fandseelar 


However, Russia — unlike Ger- 
many — has yet to demonstrate 
that it tndy means to be a good 
citizen of uirope. 

True, its leading politicians often 
speak of Russia as belonging to 


Eurasian destiny and seeking to op- 
erate as a global counterpart of the 
United States. 

Unfortunately, this is not some- 
thing that can be settled by a 
choice. The undeniable, politically 
decisive fact is that Russia bulks 
too large, is too backward currently 
and too powerful potentially to be 
assimilated as simply another 
member of the European Union or 
NATO. It would dilute the Western 
character of the European commu- 
nity and the American preponder- 
ance within the alliance. 

A Eurasian Union would be an 
oxymoron instead of a European 
Union. NATO with Russia would 
become amply another version of 
the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe, whose 
credibility has been undermined by 
a pretense of being able to operate 
effectively from Vancouver to Vla- 
divostock among S3 nations in di- 
verse stages of democratization and 
development. 

Reality must be faced: Instead of 
perpetuating the illusion that Rus- 
sia — someday, somehow — will 
join the West's core political insti- 
tutions, it is far more important to 
define what it means for Russia to 
become a good neighbor for Eu- 
rope and eventually a partner for 
the United Slates in the enhance- 
ment of global stability. 

This goal is not difficult to con- 
ceptualize or to attain in practice. 
Russia should: 

• Withdraw its troops from the 
Baltic republics on schedule, with- 
out claiming special privileges for 
its colonists. 

• Accept the reality of Ukraine 
as a secure, friendly neighbor, po- 
litically sovereign but economically 
a close partner. 

• Similarly, respect the political 
sovereignty of the new republics in 
the ex-Soviet Union while pursuing 
deeper economic cooperation with 
them. 

• Tolerate rather than obstruct 
the desire of Central Europeans to 
belong to both the European 
Union and NATO. 

A Russia that embraces such a 
nonimperial approach will auto- 
matically be a good neighbor to 


make it an extension of European 
civilization. In addition, this Rus- 
sia can be America's colleague in 
the wider quest for international 
security, which then becomes a 
more truly shared interest of both 
nations. 

A Russia willing to become a 
good neighbor should be given oth- 
er incentives: 

• An offer by NATO of a special 
treaty of friendship and alliance 
with Russia at the same time as the 
alliance expands its membership 
eastward into Central Europe. The 
treaty between NATO and Russia 
(even if Russia falls short of U.S. 

hopes for its democratic evolution) 
would embrace Russia within a 
wider framework of military and 
political cooperation, consolidat- 
ing security within Europe and 
even extending it into Eurasia. 

• An invitation to join the 
Group of Seven forum of leading 
industrial nations. 

These initiatives would provide 
ihe Russians with a gratifying rec- 
ognition of their country's status as 
a major power. Taken together, 
they amount to a truly significant 
Western option for Russia, making 
il more worthwhile for Moscow to 
eschew imperial ambitions. 

Russia will be more likely to pur- 
sue the good-neighbor option if a 
larger, more secure Europe 
promptly fills the potentially desta- 
bilizing geopolitical no-man’s land 
between Russia and the European 
Union. With German and French 
leadership, Europe should set a re- 
alistically early timetable for incor- 
porating die countries of Central 
Europe in the European Union, in- 
cluding its WEU security arm. 

O 

A European initiative of this sort 
would have the added advantage of 


to contemplate 
the possibility that European unity 
and security might be forged with- 
out active U.S. engagement — and 
thus at some cost to the intimacy of 
the U.S.-European connection. 
That prospect might reawaken 
American policy toward 
from the generally dormant i 
lion that has existed since the Sovi- 
et collapse. 

Just as President George Bush 
found his crowning achievement in 
overomning Soviet objections to 
the inclusion of a united Germany 
in NATO, President BD) Clinton 
could make his principal legacy in 



special treaty. 

A deliberate 


US. 


policy to 
will reqi" 

er strategic vision than demonstrat- 
ed so far by this administration. 
Mr. Ctmton’s antennas are more 
sensitive to domestic political sig- 
nals than to static from abroad. 
Happily, bipartisan pressures are 
mounting in Washington in favor 
of a more ambitious effort to define 
the scope of European security and 
its meaning for the United States. 

Early this year the U.S. Senate, 
tty a vote of 94 to 3, adopted a 
resolution favoring NATO's east- 
ward expansion. The upcoming 
congressional elections are already 
starting to generate further de- 
mands along these lines. 

Absent though they may be from 
the Normandy festivities, the Ger- 
mans and the Russians are likely to 
loom large in the thoughts of Mr. 
Qintofl and other leaders gathered 
there. They will provide a timely 
reminder about the need for greater 
geopolitical imagina tion in shaping 

Europe’s security. 


Trial of Ally Wouldn’t Upset 
His Plans, Berlusconi Says 


Europe, a solid regional and global 
leficia 


Europe and even possibfv joining 
NATO. ‘ '' 


But at the same time they 
make outlandish statements about 
Russia’s “unique Eurasian mis- 
sion " and assert a special right to 
use military force anywhere within 
the entire space of the defunct So- 
viet Union. Simultaneously they 
clamor for status as a global power 


trading partner and the beneficiary 
of growing Eurasia-wide economic 
activity, transportation networks 
and cultural ties. 

Even if not pari of the more 
integrated European Union, a 
good-neighbor Russia can and 
should be associated with Europe- 
wide cooperative undertakings. 
That would reinforce the aspects of 
Russia's history and culture that 


Cmptled by Our Staff Fro m Dispatches 

ROME — The prime minister-designate, Silvio Berlusconi, shrugging 
off a corruption case involving Umberto Bossi, a key ally, has promised to 
form a government within a week. 

“We will begin discussing the list of ministers on Tuesday evening,” he 
said in an interview carried by several Italian newspapers on Sunday. 
“The government should be ready within a week.” 

Mr. Berlusconi said he did not think that a request by Milan magis- 
trates on Saturday to try Mr. Bossi, the leader of the Northern League, for 
illicit party financing would upset his plans. 

The federalist League is set to enter government for the first time as 
part of the Berlusconi-led Freedom Alliance although Mr. Bossi is 
apparently not under consideration for a cabinet post. 

“1 don't think Bossfs problem should damage us," he said. “The 
political beliefs of our parliamentary minority aid people's desire for 
change remain unaltered." 

Mr. Bossi, who had no immediate response to the magistrates’ asser- 
tions. was accused of taking about SI 30,000 in illicit contributions during 
his 1992 election campaign. In the past, he has denied any wrongdoing. 
His Northern League owes much or its support to its condemnations of 
graft and promises of dean government (Reuters, NYT) 



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Pag«* 6 


Gorazde Horror Exaggerated, 
A Senior UN Officer Asserts 


ESTER N ATION \l, HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 2, 1994. 


** 


By Roger Cohen 

.Yen- York Times Srrttce 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- Herzegovi- 
na — After a weekkmg review of 
the Bosnian Serbian assault on 
Gorazde, a senior United Nations 
military officer here has concluded 
that reports by UN relief workers 
and others substantially exaggerat- 
ed Uie fighting and casualties there. 
, The senior UN officer said that 
damage to the Gorazde hospital 
and other buildings was not as 
great as had been suggested and 

that reports of 700 dead and up to 

2,000 wounded were inflated with a 
view io stirring up international 
outrage. 

“Reports on Gorazde were delib- 
erately exaggerated in order to 
shame the world into doing some- 
thing," said the officer, who has 
been to Gorazde and seen the UN 
reports, “The attacks were not of 


the dimensions suggested. A false 
impression was given to the inter- 
national community io help stir the 
vision of the Bosnian Serbs as the 
enemy and, unfortunately, all this 
very nearly went out of control.” 

During the three-week Serbian 
assault which halted a week ago 
Saturday, reports From Gorazde 
came chiefly from a handful of 
United Nations military observers 
and rdief workers with the UN 
High Commissioner for Refugees, 
who were there when the attack 
began, as wdl as from Bosnian 
Muslim ham radio operators. 

Journalists were not able u> 
reach the town and have been 
barred from it by Bosnian Serbian 
authorities since the fighting 
stopped. 

The senior UN military officer 
suggested that the military observ- 
ers were of a low standard, that the 


BOSNIA: Assault by UN Tanks 


Continued from Page 1 

Battalion, routinely take a robust 
approach to Serbian attacks and 
have little compunction about fir- 
ing in self-defense. 

“The Serbs didn't miss the tanks 
on purpose,” said Commander Eric 
Chaperon, a spokesman for the UN 
Protection Force. “They were try- 
ing to blow us away.” 

In Gorazde, UN strategy has 
been more inconsistent than in oth- 
er trouble spots. 

On Friday in Gorazde, British 
troops, also known for their aggres- 
siveness, fired on Serbian soldiers 
after the Serbian troops attacked 
them, UN officials said. The Bosni- 
an Serbian command said three 
Serbian soldiers died in the clash. 
At the same time, however, the UN 
operation continues to tolerate the 
presence of armed Serbian gunmen 
inside a zone that NATO's order on 
April 22 said must be cleared of 
Serbian troops and heavy weapons. 

Under the terms of that ultima- 
tum. Serbian forces were to with- 
draw 3 kilometers from the city's 
center while their heavy guns were 
supposed to be pulled back 20 kilo- 
meters. But several score of heavily 
armed Serbian “policemen" con- 
tinue to occupy a hamlet. Zupcici. 
inside the 3-kilometer zone. 

in Sarajevo. UN policy appears 
passive at best. 

UN officials in the last week 
have reported that Serbs have re- 
turned at least 15 Serbian heavy 


weapons, including three to five 
tanks, to areas around the city, in 
direct violation of the NATO ulti- 
matum in February. The officials 
said that negotiations were being 
undertaken to get the Serbs to 
move the guns back under UN con- 
trol. but that air strikes, authorized 
under the ultimatum, were not be- 
ing contemplated. 

According to the Sarajevo ulti- 
matum, ail Serbian heavy weapons 
ringing Bosnia’s capital were to be 
either pulled hack 20 kilometers 
from the city or placed under UN 
control. 

UN officials said Serbian forces 
were also blocking UN military ob- 
servers, who under the ultimatum 
should have complete access to Ser- 
bian-held territory within the 20- 
kilometer zone, including the most 
strategically important part of Ser- 
bian territory, to the north of the 
capital where the bulk of the Serbi- 
an heavy weapons bad been de- 
ployed. 

The United Nations' inability to 
adopt a consistent policy to con- 
front the Sabs on these matters has 
created an environment in Bosnia 
where the Serbs are encouraged to 
push and probe the United Na- 
tions. Everything appears to be ne- 
gotiable and thus ultimately up for 
grabs. Such an atmosphere has al- 
ready affected peace negotiations 
designed to bring an end to Eu- 
rope’s worst conflict since World 
War II. 




Kne 





relief workers were overly emotion- 
al in their accounts, and that the 
ham radio operators were not trust- 
worthy. 

“A big problem is that the Mus- 
lims believe they can bring the 
Americans into this war,” the of fl- 
ea said. “A dangerous overreaction 
was stirred up in international cap- 
itals. The talk of wider use of 
NATO air power, hitting ammuni- 
tion dumps and infrastructure watt 
well across the line that would have 
turned the UN forces here into 
combatants." 

The remarks by the UN officer 
were unusually forthright and 
amounted to a statement that Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton had been wrong 
to press for wider air strikes. They 
tended to support longstanding asr 
senions by the Bosnian Sabs that 
the chief goal of the Muslim-led 
Bosnian government is to steer in- 
ternational opinion to such a pitch 
of outrage over the suffering of the 
Bosnian Muslims that the United 
States and NATO will come io and 
Hght on the Bosnian side. 

On touring Gorazde. the officer 
said he found the hospital which 
had been described as being virtu- 
ally destroyed, operative with just 
one shell through the Tool There 
was no evidence of 700 corpses, he 
said. 

But the officer's account ap- 
peared at conflict with other re- SJswp-taMiaro iwite- 

ports stdi emer^ng from Goraroe LABOR DAY IN KIEV — A World War U veteran joining otber 
ing that seems to tare SfL- fenonstrators Sunday! in the: streets ; Ukraine’s ^capital maMay 
ed on the population of the town. Day protest against pofiaes of President Leonid M. Kravchuk. 

PH II, BY: Double Agent’s Memorabilia to Go on Sale 


Continued from Page 1 

American Communist Party," 
Philby wrote, “that he couldn't see 
what was going on under his nose.” 

While it has been nearly six years 
since his death, and three years 
since the collapse of the Soviet 
Union, Philby endures as a figure 
of consuming fascination > r . Brit- 
ain. the mastermind of the infa- 
mous ring of Soviet agents inside 
British intelligence, recruited dur- 
ing the 1930s among an idealistic 
circle of leftist students at Cam- 
bridge University. 

In addition to Philby. the group 
included Guy Burgess and Donald 
Maclean, both or whom fled to 
Moscow in 1951. and Anthony 


Blunt, the brilliant art historian 
who served Queen Elizabeth 1L 

Blunt was not publicly un- 
masked until 1979, when Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher told 
the House of Commons that he tad 
confessed in 1964 to being the long 
suspected hot never acknowledged 
“fourth man” in the Soviet spy ring 
in exchange for immunity from 
prosecution. 

But among the group, Philby was 
the star, rising steadily through the 
ranks of British intelligence, first, 
as chief of counterespionage in 
London and. then, bead of station 
in Istanbul. 

By the time the FBI began to 
raise serious alarms about him in 
the 1950s, Philby was already in 
Washington, after being given an 


assignment that he lata said was 
“too good to be true” — the British 
intelligence liaison with the CIA 
and the FBI. 

Among the Sotheby’s materials 
are odd personal bits, including a 
collection of photographs of Philby 
with distinguished Soviet and East 
European personalities. 


Mitterra 

Efr Adviser Asserts Pres 


By jpseph JFitchett : 

; ■■ IswTwimttd ■HmdJThbiiae ■ ■ 

WASHINGTON. — Hoping to . 
dispose of plagiarism allegations- 
that -have dung JO' him, Jacques 
Audi. - the lamer adviser to Pretty 
dent F nnqois Mnenaa^xis t^? 
tending, th aytte. Fre nch . 

private, scorn for many foreign . 
leaden - and ‘domestic political al- 
lies.- "1 • 

In a sworn deposition prelimi- 
nary to a French court esse to be 
heard this week, Mr. Attali says - 
tbathb book, “Verbatim,* received 
Mr. MfrtenamTs “vigDint; atten- 
tion down to the smallest detail, 
from thc-first day I started writing 
right downto the approval of the 
lasiwoofe." 

The lawsuit offers a rare glimpse, 
into the often troubled atm o s phe re 
in the French presidential office. 
Several of Mr. Mitterrand's princi- 
pal aides have been implicated in ; 
corruption scandals, and two of his 
closest colleagues have killed them- 
selves. . .. 

Although “Verbatim” brought . 
no explosive revelations when it 
was published, it depicts Mr. Mh- 1 
texrand as a cynical, manipulative 
leader, deliberately concealing his. 
pofiaes from dosc coUcagues w. ; 
order to preserve his own options. 

If Mr. Mitterrand approved of 
; this portrait of himself, it would . 
flesh out criticism that his enigmat- 
ic tiahrits of ruling have contributed . 
to episodes of policy confusion and 
abuses of poster by people around 

him. 

The troubled affairs of Mr. Al- 
lah rose to international promi- 
nence last year when he was forced 
to resign as hotd of the European 
Bank for Reconstruction and De- . 
vdopment in London. At the time, 
his ouster eclipsed accusations of 
literary mi sre p rese ntation connect-; 
ed with the just-pubhsbed “Verba- 
tim." 

In tins suit, the defendant is not 
Mr. Atiali but Fayard, his publish- 
er. Mr. Mitterrand and Mr. Atiali 




tthffct be compiled. to testify ra - 
the -scheduled Tuesday sessioB . af . : 
tbe paris Tribunal of Commerce.. 
Nonerof the Freoch protagomsB t 
could'bc reached for comment ;dnr-- - 
in» the weekend. ; 

\ Art ^maiag sources In; the 1- 
• amiliar withtbcjcvi-' 

defier iaaf the arguments -would. 
center on Mr. Atiati's oontattion , 
that Mr. Mitterrand helped fcmtd - 
add fresh strokes to portraits of. the 
presidential palace n s a p lace .of* 
unrelenting intrigue, evML against 
another of Mr. Mitterrand s- 
frieods, EEe Wiesd, the Ndbetlan- 

reate. . ' - . — . • . , -1 

Attacks 'oo ‘■'Verbatim” started 
with comphum$ that some of the' 
book's high’; pomi& : .mchj(&ng Mr. 
Mftierrand's views on spiritual is- 
sues, were -ta fceri from the manu- 
script of apartty completed ~book 
beingjointiy written by Mr. Mitter- 
rand and Mr. Wiesd. : “ V "' 


- If Mr. Mi««rand owisrated < & 
thisjroadure,it 


''si 


Attafi. 

-Mr. -Mtuorand ias. never com- 
muted wiBOdy >Tthe - outcry 
against Mr.-Attalis book ar about 
Saibsequcnt ^^wem.Lo^^- 

-has attributed hs .downfall at the 

Amftn cflri and. British, officials and 
ffgmft- fjams ihai that Ml Mittff- 
"raiid shares "tins view. 

: & stating. that. 

Mr. Miuenafld. bas privatay ex- 
presswfaager over Mr.AttalTs ac- 
(io ns , fea^dedined to sue for pla- 
marirnn/ mrfly because the words 
in ‘^Verbatim” are . Mr. Mitter- 
rand's side of die dialogue 

- Instead, the suit is baugbrought 

by OdDeJaoobb tiK.lParis.ow^^ 
that planned ' to publish, the Joint 
text • ’■■■ A*.-:-.’*-" -.O-'- '• 


MIDEASTi^incfo Fault PiiQ 


Continued frwnPsge 1-.>Y f 

don’t Jojow how tine Patestinkas 
can take ova the authority." V; 

• “1 :don’t see any reason io be 
optiriustifc" he said.' y .- 

atora resumed their tjdJK'ttvCmsL 
(he agreement. .Several contentious 
issues remain, including twq big 
nnfs -—thepredsesize oftheau- 
loomnous Jericho district, and. the 
Palestinian police role <m bo(iier 
crossing — that are bemgrleft T ot 
M r. K^tin andMr. Arafat tp wrak 
out wl»i they meet in Cairo on 

Tuesday. . 7 . 

“Fm sure that not. everything will 
go snoothly," an lsradi efikaal 
said. “Bat Tm alsosnre ttat,-afta 

all is said and dtme^^wr w3F.be. 
ri gnm j g an agreement Wednesday 
morning.”- v V >t‘ " 


Syria said on Sunday, after re- 


tsradi proposals, 'that it 

[ to makepeace m stages and 
inasted ona full Israeli withdrawal 
from the Golan Heights asa conefi- 

tioafar a peaceagrtaneitii Reuters 
' ri^tHTodTroml^mascus.“ . “ - 

"r pOTeign : hfijriaet Farouk ■ Share. 

i uaa^ Ketitias, * if tfi^lalk^tijit . he 1 
^ attended ^between Secretary . of 
Stole Warren M7Cbnst6pher and 
Presidart Hafez Assad pa the Is- 
nefi .proposals,, that they, i M^rsot 
rhanff t (fie Spranj)pffltk». 


Egyptian Prfioe Seize 81 .. 

- - • • •• &euien - r ■ 

. A$YliT; Egypl The police 
have drained cl people suspected 
of being Muslim mtikants m the 
sdu&emprorince ofAsyuLoneof 
-the centers of activi ty cf the mili- 
tant . Islamic' Group.- 


.J 

“V 


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SCOTT FITZGERALD: 

A Biography 

By Jeffrey Meyers. Illustrated 
400 pages. $27.50. HarperCol- 
lins. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

T HOUGH F. Scott Fitzgerald 
and Ernest Hemingway dis- 
agreed on practically everything, 
from their philosophy of life to 
their philosophy ot art, the two 
men had more in common than 
they liked to admit. 

Both grew up in the Midwest, 
both becune expatriates in Paris, 
both achieved early glittering suc- 
cess. Both wrote novds destined to 
become American classics, and 
both spent their last years in a sorry 
state of decline. 

Now, they have something else 
in common: a decidedly unsympa- 
thetic biographer in the person of 
Jeffrey Meyers. 

Myers's 1985 biography of 
Hemingway (“Hemingway: A Bi- 
ography") drew a sour, grudging 
portrait of the writer as an ill-tem- 
pered and accident-prone macho 
man who “never fully matured as 
an artist.” 

His new book, “Scott Fitzgerald: 
A Biography,” takes a similar tack, 
depicting the author of “The Great 
Gatsby” as a foolish, sniveling al- 
coholic. who spent the fim half OT 
his life squandering his talent and 
the last half paying the dire conse- 
quences. 

In his preface, Meyers acknowl- 
edges that numerous biographies of 
Fitzgerald already exist (including 
ones by Arthur Mizeoer, Andrew 
Turnbull, Matthew' Broccoli and 
James Mellow), and goes on to 
assert that his book wul be “more 
analytic and interpretive.*' 

"It discusses the meaning as wdl 
as the events OT his life,” Meyere 
writes, “and seeks to iUuarimnc (he 
recurrent patterns that reveal his 
inner self." 

As articulated by Meyers, those 
patterns have little to do with Fitz- 
gerald's literary achievement; rath- 
er. they concern Scon's drinking 
and extramarital affairs; tire mad- 
ness of his wife, Zelda. and both 


HEY RE READING 


• Hassjfrgen Rosenbaoer, head 
OT the ORB television and radio 
network in Brandenburg is reading 
“ Das zwdte Leben der Fibnstadt 
Babeisberg,” a book compiled by 
the Film Museum in Potsdam. 

He says Tm quite enthusiastic 
about tins book smoe it bringsthe 
f3m studios at- Babdsberg, near 
Potsdam back to fife again since .: 
the fall OT communism. This bode, 
is a must for all German film 
buns.” • 

(Michael KaUenbadu IHT). 



aso- 

In fact, much as Meyers’s biogra- 
phy of Hemingway devolved into a 
tiresome litany OT anecdotes that 
showed Hemingway being crud. 
spiteful and boastful, so this vol- 
ume devolves into a dreary chroni- 
cle OT the Fitzgeralds bang silly, 
obnoxious and eventually pathetic. 

Scott and Zelda jumping into tire 
fountain in front OT the Plaza Hotel. 
Scott and Zelda spending a haif- 

doors S *rf l ^| t G^roodMe Hotef 
Scott disrupting Sara Murphy’s din- 
ner party by throwing her Venetian 
wine glasses over a garden watt. 

Zelda throwing herself down a 
flight OT stairs. Scott malting a fool 
of hrmsefi in front of Janies Joyce 
and Edith Wharton. Zdda trying to 
drive a car off a cliff. Scott insult- 
ing his friends and then asking if 
they stOl like him. Scott- getting 


penchant for consuming as' inany 
as 37 bottles of; beer a day, "are not 
mentioned just once, but twree dr 
more for emphasis, and' large’, 
amounts of space are lavished on 

• such salacious suljects as Fitzger- 
.aldXsexna] performance and en- 
dowments. ' ■ 

• Such descriptions save no pur-- 
pdse,Hm> Dhnninating Fitzgerald^ 
work tot essential 1 , character, they 
are merely meant to appeal to the 
reader^ most prurient instincts,. 

Indeed, it quickly becomes clear 
that Meyers is interested in Fitzgex- 
aid’s writing only in so far. as it 
sheds light on his chaotic, ruinous 
fifc.. v ::, ' 


is not devoid 
OTcrincaf insight:^— luseXainma- 
txmot the tn&ueace that such writ- 
eraas Conrad, Poe and Biot had on 
^FitzgeraldVwiitingis gemandy in- 
teresting -7- he hurries through die 
-novds and short Stories, hiding 
out petfum^ory plot summaries in 
fiaiOT litermy analysis^ 

•- He seriously underestimates 
BfrSOTafd’r hasterpiece, “The 
Great Gatsbyr and turns **Tender 
Is the. into 3 simple road 

m^)OT Scotland Zdda'sdeterio- 
rating rdationshqrT V 

Oevrati-of real syn^adiy for 
Trtzgerald or Iris woik and ammat- 
od throi^hout by asmde,patroniz- 

ingt(Hie,tlnaAfolnnrestandsastiie 
latest and oneof the most egregious 
examples of what Joyce Carol 
Oates has diagnosed as “patho- 
gr^3hy”: afiMrmof.bwgraphy that 
demeansaoddeflaiesits subjeetby 
becoming a “reposhoiy of illnesses 
- and disasters and disappoint- 
ments.” - - - v'-» - -- - - - 

All in aE, aa ugiy and superflu- 
ous; book about a major American 
artist, wbo deserves a better bio- 
graphicalfatc. 


i 




a 


ri 


Michiko Kakutani d an the staff 
of The New York Tlmes. —^ - ' 


BRIDGE 


ter in front OT her friends. Scott 
inscribing a nasty comment about 
Sbeflah Graham on her pho to. 

And just to make sure the reader 
understands what a jerk Fitzgerald 
could be, Meyers repcaiafly dei- 
scribes the writer’s “narcissistic seH- 
absorptioo,” his “intellectual pre- 
lentknszress.” hb “sdf-inmottancc 
and striving foe inespcnsM K iy." 

The youthful Fitzgerald emerges, 
from this book as a vain, irritating 
buffoon; the older Fitzgerald, as a 
wiser but broken man, filled with 
self-pi ly and sdf-loa thing. 

Particularly depressing inci- 
dents, like Fitzgerald's reputed 


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I T students, are. majoring in - 
bridge and somethmg rise, it is . 
of some' interest to know what the_, 
sometiags are. There are no statis- ’ 
tics for North America bat there 
are for Europe. .. ... 

Fifty-five students competing in 
the E ur ope a n Gbonminity Unzver- ' 
aty Bridge Chamiaoiuhip in Sep- 1 
tember in Antwerp Bdgram. were 1 ' 
potted with the following reside 
engineerin g- 13; mathematics Kl;^ 
economics 10; law 5; comjjating 5; - 
earth, sciences 4;: medicine and. 
chemistry 2 each; philosophy, lan- 
guages ami anana 1 each. 

A German team .won in Ant: 
weip. narrowly : beating a British 
team from Cambridge University 
in da: finaL On the diagramed deal 
from ..a match against Israri, the 

NORTH 

? J1B876 32 
.0.7 4- 

• : *92 : . . 

WEST ' EASr(D> 

* KQ >9 8 5 ' * 10 63 .—. 

085 - v— , 

0 10 - . • O AK.Q 98 6 2 

*A-J84 . - *KQ7_ 

SOUTH - . 
♦-A7 

.' >. 9aKQ» 

: o J5 3 — ,' -■ ' 

. *10 85 3 


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- Hast and. West did not' believe 
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dutiful five-spade bicTover five dia- 
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showed three bqr cards. 

whm North in 

seven hearts over ax gades. East 
and West knew they could not at- 
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t It may be the’ first . time : in the 
history of tiie .^aine that a pair has 
used an oppopem's Blackwood re- 
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rest, in a small slant The British 
pair collected 1,100 points, and 
gpined 7 imps when, their 'team- 
mates were allowed to play -in six 
.hearts dcmbledi 7 . • ~ " ' 

Ease and West were vulnerable. 
Ite biddBigr: \-.. •_ .. 

East < * South West North 

1-6 ... 1 V I * 4 N.T. 

SO - - 5* * DfaL 8V 

6 * ? '-Pass- - : :Pass . '7 V - 

DbL : Pass Pass Pass 

West tad the spade king. 


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U.S. Cool on Direct Action in Rwanda 


Mike Penmn^Afeore Frjace-PicsK 


Aimed soldiers escorting election officials who were taking ballot boxes to Johannesburg for cowiting on Sunday. 

VOTE: ANC Predicts f Big Victory > 9 but May Not Get Two-Thirds Majority 


.- gfrL were lulled in the region over- 
^ night, but security forces were un- 
^able to say if Lbeir deaths were 


connected wth the election. 

The new, 400-seat Parliament 
will elect a president cm- May 6, 
setting the stage for Mr. Mandela 
to replace Mr. de Klerk. Mr. de 
Klerk is expected to> be a vice presi- 
■ dent 

While the vote-counting was 
' painfully slow — starting more 

than 1 2 hours late in some places — 

. the early results were a sign that 
\ fierce campaigning by smaller par- 
1 ties, could not compete with the 
powerful presence of Mr. de Klerk 
and Mr. Mandela. 

• . Together, the two men laimeiwri 
negotiations that dismantled apart- 
heid and led to the country’s first 
democratic dec lion. 

“In spite of die proportional yot-- 
mg system, we are heading for a . 
two-party system,'’ said the pohti- 


cal analyst Sample Terreblaoche, exposure, but their leader can't be 
referring to the proportional' repre- compared with Mr. Mandela.” said 
satiation method that allocates Eugene Tene’Blanche, the leader 
F^njamem and cabinet- seats ac- of the extreme right Afrikaner Re- 
c»rdmg to each party's vote total : sis lance Movement “And perhaps 
With 5 percent needed to win a their campaign was a bit too radi- 


cal. It was too one-sided, concen- 
trating only on land. It's of no use, 
in a modern industrialized country, 
lo talk only about land." 


Cabinet seat, the ANC and the Na- 
tional Party appeared headed for a 
sweep. ’ 

The Inkatha Freedom Party of 
Chief Mangos irthn Butbelezi, 
whose followers have been fighting 
a township war with their ANC 
rivals, had only 4 J percent of the 
vote, slightly ahead of the white 
separatist Freedom Front with 3.7 
percent 

One of the surprisingly poor 
showings came from the Pan^ Afri- 
ca nisi Congress, a militant black 
group that campaigned on promr 
ises .to seize land from the - white 
minority and give it to blacks. De- 
spite thuv the party, had less than 2 
percent of the national vote. • 

“1 thmfc they had quite a lot of 


(Reiners, AP) 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS., New 
York — Clinton administration of- 
ficials say they are examining the 
idea of helping to organize and pay 
for military intervention in Rwan- 
da by neighboring African coun- 
tries. But they have apparently re- 
jected any direct U.S. action. ' 

The UN secretary-general, Bu- 
tros Butros Gbali, made an appeal 
over the weekend for more “force- 
ful action" in Rwanda intended to 
“restore law and order and stop the 
massacres." 

But admin istration officials said 
that with the United Stales and 
other Western countries deter- 
mined not to become directly in- 
volved in the civil war, the only 
alternatives are to do nothing or 
encourage African states to inter- 
vene, possibly offering financial 
and logistical help. U.S. officials 
stressed that administration think- 
ing was at a preliminary stage. 

But it remained unclear whether 
other African states would be will- 
ing to mount any kind of new peace 
enforcement oporalion in Rwanda, 
particularly after the setbacks the 
United Nations suffered in Soma- 
lia last year. 

The fighting in Rwanda, which 
broke out after the country's presi- 
dent and the president of Burundi 
were killed in a mysterious plane 
crash on April 6, has left an esti- 
mated 200,000 dead and sent thou- 
sands of refugees pouring into 
neighboring countries. 


Most of the refugees appear to be 
members of the majority Hutu 
tribe, traditional enemies' of the 


Tutsi, said Sylvana Foa. a spokes- 
woman for the 


UN High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees. 

The UN Security Council asked 
Mr. Butros Ghali to consul! with 
the Organization of African Unity 
on ways of restoring law and order 
in Rwanda and asked him to take 
“diplomatic steps** to prevent cha- 
os from spreading to other coun- 
tries. It also asked him to propose 
ways of finding out who was re- 
sponsible for particular massacres. 

The secretary-general called 
President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt, as president of the Organi- 
zation of African Unity, on Satur- 
day. asking him to prepare a plan 
for ending the crisis that the United 
Nations could then endorse. 


Although African countries have 
said they were in favor of increas- 
ing ibe size of the existing UN 
peacekeeping force in Rwanda 
when the Security Council voted in 
April to scale it back to a token 
size none of them actually offered 
to send new troops. 

However Western officials say 
that if neighboring African coun- 
tries are willing to send forces into 
Rwanda to help restore order, it 
seems probable that their generally 
run-down armies would need out- 
side assistance with equipment, 
supplies and logistical support. 

Several Western diplomats said 
they thought it possible that nearby 
African slates might intervene io 
end the killing in Rwanda if given 
help, especially if the massacres 
continue. But they said it is incon- 
ceivable that any Western country 


would agree to send its own forces 
into Rwanda at present. 

Instead they saw the secretary- 
general’s appeal Tor more forceful 
action as an attempt to shift some 
of the pressure he is under to do 
something about Rwanda onto the 
Security Council's shoulders, since 
there is nothing he personally can 
do about the crisis. 

Several precedents exist for such 
regional intervention. A Nigerian- 
led West African peacekeeping 
force is currently deployed in Libe- 
ria as part of efforts lo end the civil 
war in that country. 

in addition, chapter eight of the 
UN Charter specifically instructs 
regional organizations, such as the 
Organization of African Unity, to 
try to preserve peace and security 
in their regions before referring dis- 
putes to the Security Council. 


Rwandan Refugees Inundate Camp 


The 4 ssonuieJ Press 

NGARA, T anzani a — Overwhelmed relief workers 
struggled Sunday to cope with a quarter-million rain- 
soaked refugees who found sanctuary from the blood- 
bath in Rwanda at a crowded camp in Tanzania. 

“It is quite a mess,” said Dr. Ettienne Krug, the 
medical coordinator at the camp. “Two hundred and 
fifty thousand people is like a small city, and we have 
nothing organized/* 

Thousands of refugees who made it into Tanzania 
before Rwandan rebels sealed the border Saturday were 
still nudging in the rain Sunday, walking the 17 kilome- 
ters (10 miles) from the frontier to the camp. Their 
destination was a rolling open field of scrub and head- 
high elephant grass, where the United Nations High 


Commissioner for Refugees has established the camp. 

On hand to care for the tens of thousands already 
there were only 30 to 40 UN workers and Tanzanian 
Red Cross staff members, the Spanish branch of 
Doctors Without Borders and the International Com- 
mittee of the Red Cross. 

Dr. Krug, a doctor with the UN. said relief workers 
were digging latrines and trying to set up a water and 
food distribution system, dispensaries and a measles 
vaccination program. 

“We can cope for the first week. - Dr. Krug said. 
“The food will arrive. But it is difficult. The roads are 
in poor condition. We need an enormous amount of 
trucks. We need a lot of help." 


i 


For Whites, Western Cape 
May BeFinal Stronghold 


geutai 


CAPE TOWNV-’Thc Western Cape, where .white settlement of. 


South Africabqjaii more than three centuries ago. may emerge from 

“ i of white control : 


the country’s all-face elections as the linaLtoe-hold 
in Africa.. i- ■. \'v. ■' 

President Frederik W. de Klerk’s predominantly white National 
Party is confident of winning the Western Cqre. Latest results gave 


the National Party 433, 110 votes and the African National Congress 
of Nelson Mandela 161. 


161,615 in the provincial race, according to the 
independent Section Commission. 


race, orcakxed. 


,' the. party’s harcMine law and order. 


minis ter, HenmsKrieL.sajd Sunday: “Yes, I'thtnk we’n: going to 
wm-Tm very confident’'- 1 “ ‘ • 


He will become regional premier if the National Party does win. 
Vote ixrating la Mtchells Plain, where nearly half the province’s 
23 million voters Bvein Mack and coloredxotoships. began only bn 
mfhnnming on Sunday. An election official said final results there 
might not be announce until Monday morning..:. 

The National Party, which institutionalized apartheid and was 


finally forced to dismantle it, targeted the votes of the “Cape 
Coloreds" in its campaign. They form nearly 60 percent or the 


in its campaign, iney rorm nearly 6t> percent 

Western Cape electorate. Better off and less harshly treated than 
Macks under apartheid* many fear they will suffer discrimination 
from an ANC-fed government. .. 


MANDELA: Laying Out Themes 


Continued from Page 1 
defeated parties form the opposi- 
tion. ... , , , 

“I do not think that we need a 
government of national unity be- 
yond frfc years, especially if we are 
able to build this environment ot 
mutual trust," he said. 

Askei how his government 
mould react if, as has happened in 
recent months, homeless blacks oc- 
cupied houses built for others. Mr. 
Mandeb said tiiis white fear was 
imjBStifed because Macks would 
no tonpr fed unfairly excluded 
from sue housing programs. 

On tit question of an amnesty. 


Mr. Mandela has divided offenders 
into three categories. 

Under an agreement with the 
current government, anyone who 
committed a crime with apolitical 


motive before October 1990 may 
obtain an automatic indemmty by 
applying to a commission. 

Those involved in political 
crimes up until last December must 
apply to the new paitiamenl case 
by case, but Mr. Mandela said he 
would personally favor absolving 
them. - ' -■ 

No one who continued ^legally 
obstructing the transition tins year, 
he said, should be pardoned; 


Jes Banned, 
Ubyahs Decide 
fcTake Camels 


aen 

i camel caravan 
westing a Unit- 
n on flights to 
r country, has 
cy to Mecca. 



h about 110 
ums. to nde 
would cross 
Egypt within- 


then'.'sail 
, the port 
m city of 

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a in-time 
*, which. 
i is more 
ns 1460 
m border 
y journey 
i Jidda. 

is banned' 

Libya in 
te Libyan 
to hand 


i lane 
iHed 
ould 
the 


A YearmPrfeon 


on- 


CAIRO — A militaiy court -in- 
the first such trial of ajbnrnalisjjm 
over a deo^ sentmcedTAbd^at- 
tar-Abu Pussefit, ania^e<fiibr 
for- the opposition -newspaper. AL. 
Shaabi to one year in poison for. 
revealing state seows in an. article; 
about Egjqitian^.Sk ni2itajy- eaten- 

The journafist .wa& also fined 
firirofian £500_fS143)m'the ruling 
mday. .There-is no weal. 
militafy,court verdicts, out 
Uosspn can petition the de- 
frrt.se piims ter for a rcatriaL He has 

been P®titng^smw^ 

ssAJsasssag:. 

SrVaB Egyptian pap^- “ 

Sasaasag- 

istsindoviliansm.inihtn’y courf. 



A great new plus. 


The more times you fly 


the bigger your bonus. 


(OVER AND ABOVE THE REGULAR MILES EARNED!) 


3 FLIGHTS PLUS 70% 


EL 



4 FLIGHTS PLUS 80% 



5 FLIGHTS PLUS 90% 


m 





6 FLIGHTS PLUS 100% 



7 FLIGHTS PLUS 110% 


BEI?" 

T 



8 FLIGHTS PLUS 120% 




9 FLIGHTS PLUS 130% 



10 FLIGHTS PLUS 140% 


10+ FLIGHTS PLUS 150% 



: ROYAL 
ORCHID 



. Thai offers its Royal Orchid 
Plus members one of the most inno- 
vative and exciting bonus offers 
ever created for frequent flyers. 

- This new bonus offer is available 
to members who fly a total of three 
First and/or Business Class inter- 
national flight sectors on Thai's 
worldwide routenet between April 
7 18 and September 30, 1994. 

The new bonus is over and above the miles you would 
normally earn. 

• For First Class, the normal miles you receive are the 
miles you fly, plus 50% for travelling First Gass. 

For Business Gass, the normal miles you receive are 
the miles you fly; plus 15% for travelling Business Gass. 

- We add the bonus on top of these miles. 

• And the more times you fly, the bigger the bonus. 
Here's how it works. 

;For example, if you fly just six international flight 
sectors we will .add a 100 % bonus, which will double 
your RbyaTOrchid Phis^rniles. For more than ten 
‘international flight, sectors flown, we'II add a 
bonus of ,150% to your Royal Orchid Plus miles.* 


It's a great opportunity to rapidly and substantially 
boost your mileage account and earn free 
flights or any of our unique Experience 
Awards faster. 

You can also earn or redeem 
miles with our credit card, hotel and car 
rental partners. 



OVER 70 DESTINATIONS WORLDWIDE. 


our world renowned Royal Orchid Service all the way - 
award winning food and wine, 
charming cabin staff and a fresh 
orchid for every passenger. 

If you're not already a member of Royal 
Orchid Plus, there's no better time to join. Pick up an 
enrolment form from your nearest Thai 
office or complete the coupon below. 

Membership is free. 



Thai can now take you to over 70 destinations around 
the world, including eleven cities in Europe, five in Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand, Los Angeles in the U.S.A., and 
more destinations in Asia than any other airline. 


THREE GREAT NEW DESTINATIONS. 


We've expanded our service into Qiina and now offer 
18 flights a week to the four key cities of Beijing, Kunming 
and now Guangzhou and Shanghai. 

Plus, we have also added Dubai to our 
rapidly expanding routenet. 


ENROL NOW IN ROYAL ORCHID PLUS 


Pick up an enrolment form from your nearest Thai office 
or simply complete this coupon and either mail it to Thai 
Airways International, PO Box 567, Samsen Nai Post Office, 
Bangkok 10400, Thailand or fax it on 66-2-513-0222. 



SMOOTH AS SILK ON THAI. 


But, perhaps rhe biggest plus of all is 
flying smooth as silk on Thai, enjoying 


! Please allow three weeks for delivery. Complete in English. 

i D Mr D Mrs DMiss 

□ Other Tide 


Name 

FIRST NAME 

Address 

FAMILY NAME 


1 

: POSTCODE 1 - 

1 *!" ■ 

COUMTRY 

Phone 


! 

HOME 

BUSINESS 

! 


“age 


ill ma 
ecialifg 


make 
nat ws 
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501 


nd lac 5 


ices, o'* 1 
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•To ttsurelbatyair irifesare sutnmatkdly and r vrf ralp ty afm mri tn ywr accouit • Please Quote your Royal Or chid Plus Membership htanber together with your name ri English (mist be the same as in your enrolment form) when making a reservation 
Membership Cat! when you chedwn » Please retain copies of you ar ticket and boarding pass for chedong your mileage statement "AS bonus mteage erwfits wi be autamaticafly added to your account, after September 30, 1994. 


bsistery 
UKys,, 
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have sic 
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i it 


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and Jcrii a lf 
now. 


rs now fldei 


offices vhe 
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for 20 o/f I 
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al in No 
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sold360,( 
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Mr. Str 
sold torn 
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onsible 
policy, 
on the d 
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r the doll 
in float 
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■tiidogica 

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at could i 
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. dollar-* 
by overs 




Pa»<* 55 


INTERNATION A I. HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. MAY 2. 199 A 


•*> #■ T- 


INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


Provided ty Credit Suisse Fits} 
Boston Unwed London. Tel 
322 40 00 Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. April 29 


TWlCC Dt 
TMCCJVI 
TMCCOCT 
TmCCOcI 


Tortom Jun II 94 


Canadian Dollars 


$06 

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11 94 101H 4A1 +44 

4% 48 94% 748 +3 

9 94 ICC ft 758 -Ml 

7% 98 Wte 8JJ3 +S 


Ektaerti aim i*h ** iBPt a* 3 +47 
Etsportf May 10% 9* I04> 748 +52 

EtSPortl Nov 7% 97 99% 7.99 +42 

EIPwr Jun 8% 97 182% 722 +25 

El Parr S«P 10H 81 109% 152 +51 

Eurollma HP* 94 106 744 +39 

EuraHmaAer 7% 98 97 IE +40 

Eurollma Feb 7% 98 99% 725 +32 

EurcdHneJul 10% 01 lllte 155 +5* 
Eurollma Nov 7 ra 91% Ur +it 
Eurotunad 6H 95 M% *29 +40 
ExlmtADc 8V* 97 101% 77! +31 


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F.E.K. Feb 
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7% 02 95% 854 +44 

7% 94 T9JS) 7 A3 +35 
18% 95 107% *83 +59 

10% *4 Mm 7*7 +51 
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7% 98 981* US +43 

7% 97 90 7.95 +44 

7% 98 98% 823 +58 

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Fora M Cr Vug 11 9* 104 7.99 +83 

Fort MCr Oct Hl% 94 101% 483 +4* 

FortCan Jul 8 98 98% 842 +18 
FordCon Jun 13% 95 10*050 *91 +58 
ForoConNav 9% 94 note sjh +77 

GaiOd 13% 94 IE 423 +54 


Gee Mr 
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13% «* IE 423 +54 
7% 94 9«% 72S +2b 

7 99 95% 114 +33 


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1DH 96 104% 422 +58 

11% 95 1651* 7.79 +55 

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Ibrd See 9 «6 ICCft 758 Ml 

IfC Ada 7% 98 93% 0JJ3 +3 

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JdbJiA 12% 95 105V, 487 +39 

JfC Mr Bid E 99% U4 +41 

Karod Air Jul 8 03 99% 103 -12 

KansaiEteDc 0% M 102% 729 +51 
Kettoaa Oct 4% *8 **** 7JB +13 

KrvinlFeb 7% 98 99% 728 +34 

Hh* Inti Aug 11% 95 M5% 70S +44 

v.talntlFeb *te 0* 88te 125 +30 

Khr/OfJMr B* 97 1D1% 7_*3 +2} 

KtwInttMr 19 01 107% BAT +51 

KtwinttMav 9te a> ksh 154 ++4 
Khar Inti Nov 6 97 95 TM +4 
Kyu9HiEieOctio% 01 loav, 1*3 +41 
Ltd APT 10% 94 105% 7AA +43 

UtbFInMav 7 97 97% 729 +34 

Atari COT MOV IDH M 104% 723 +64 
Manitoba 91k 98 104% 8A3 +79 

AHrteru 5et> IDH M 1D1H 4AS +29 
MCI Taranto 8% 97 rdlflSe 7.95 +52 

MtnmartaOct 4te 98 94% 7.91 +28 

Mobil Ausl Mov M% 94 104% 7.72 +48 
MabHCon 7% 98 97V, 133 +49 
Mobil Cm Jan 8% 98 99% M3 +51 

Mobil Can Mav 9 97 1B7V, 104 +61 

Mobil m Feb 8% 97 100% 795 +41 

Morrtre Dc 9 « 99% 983 +93 

Monfre Tst Feb 10% 98 104% 920 +157 

Montreal II 96 104% 781 +81 

Montreal Feb 9 97 10m 149 +113 

Montreal Mov lift 95 HXH 722 +44 
Montreal Mr 9 E 99JJ5D 9.15 +1E 
MorrtrlDVIl I 10V, 95 181% 7.U +71 

Mtubk Den Apr 7% 98 97% 105 +42 

NBmpwk llVi 95 104te 7JI1 +41 

N Brumw Feb M% 01 lllte 1*4 +51 
N UrunjwJam II f5 UDH *75 +58 
« 8nm Mar 9% 98 103% 116 +43 

NBrunswMr 9% 02 JOJte 142 +54 
KBnmmNov Mite 98 110% tdfl +is4 
NBrunswSep 10% M 105% 771 +5? 
N ZcalndOc 4% 94 97 722 +23 

NZeatnd Jun IDte 95 HUH ’M +46 
Not InvBkJul 7te % 98H 104 +*0 

NfecHov 9% 96 lOSte 113 +49 

rtestte HU Oct 4% 98 Mte 774 +12 


Norway Feb 7% II 97% 107 +45 

Normn Jan 8% 0) 9S% IS +45 

Norway Oct 7% *8 *4% 114 +49 

NovaSt 11% 95 IDJVj 4.7? +45 

NtTAgp 10% *4 104 7*5 +*» 

Nf T Jun 8h »7 »l% 7.79 +31 

NIT Jun 7% 98 77% 107 +43 

NIT Mr 10% 01 189% 140 +46 

HI Tact ID* 99 188% 120 +44 

OhbAug 11% 95 185% 7J5 +41 

OfcbDc Ite 71 101% 771 +31 
OfcbJut 10V. 99 HB% 117 +41 
DVB Jun 9 02 H7te 155 +47 

□*0 Mar 9 97 rate 7 a9 +74 

Ont Hydro Mr 10% 99 110 V, 119 +52 

I Ontario Pr Apr 10% 94 104% 753 +52 

! OrHortgPrApr 10% 98 106% 130 +57 

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Ontario Pr Feb 7% 74 89% uw +15 

Ontario Pr Jul HJH 98 188% 121 +57 

Ontario p+ Mr 8 M 9S% 136 +74 

Ontario Pr Del 9% at IMH 15? +57 

Orttorlo Pr 5*a HI 94 lOtte 7 JO +60 

Ontirta Pr 5*0 7% 05 91% 8AB +30 

Osaka Gas Od 10% 94 105% 723 +51 
Ottawa Jun IB* 01 10«% 148 +51 

Ottawa Peg Air Bte 03 98% 17* +62 

PeMMumcOcit* 01 UBte l«9 +47 
Procter Aua 10% 01 lllte 821 +73 
Prud Fund Dc 8% +5 101850 7A9 +55 
PruDFt/Maf IB M 104% 7jJ +43 
PfVdFdMay 9% 97 HU 794 +57 
prud Fund Oct 10 96 wt% 7.9] +n 
PskAug 10% 01 117% 179 +30 

Oueb HytiApr 9 97 101% 119 +1M 

OuebHvdFeb II 99 110JH0 6J3 +68 
Oueb Hyd Jut 9% « 102% 7 JO +47 

Oueb HrO Jun 7 04 *1% 14a +31 

Quag Hvcs May 10% 93 iouso 10 +*o 
Oueb Hyp Mur »te 01 147% 173 +77 

Oueb Hyd Mr lOte 01 1KLH50 8A0 +67 
Oueb Hvd Oct 11% 00 113 825 +88 

Quebec Apr lOh *4 im% 729 +78 

Quebec Aug liteoo 113% U3 +78 
Ouebec Dc 7V, E 91% 9.09 +*S 

Quebec Feb Ste CO 99te BA3 +03 

Quebec Jan 12 95 103% *25 +58 

Ouebec Nov lOte 98 107% 841 +78 

Quedeecity Pte » 1B3U. 7 JO +77 

Ouebec Clly 9 97 ICO*. 144 +134 

Quebec Prov 9 97 torn 100 +67 

Rabat* DC 7% 99 TeJbd IE +26 

Robot* Jun 8% 94 l(n% 7J5 447 

Robot* MOV 7 97 97% 729 +J4 

Rabat* Mr 7% M 97% 101 +38 

RbcJan 9% 97 lOTte 7 At +56 

SaloOct 7% E >1% 120 +Se 

SbabDc B 97 99% 114 +54 


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Toranio ju! 19% » 
Tamnla MOV 9% 02 
T oral lo Mr ite ID 
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ToVAM Auo lOte *6 
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TpyOlbMor 9 97 

TavuTa Can Mr 4% « 
Wn Ausl See *% *7 
UK Fin Sea 10 94 
varaav am 10% 94 
Vcnuv IIP* 01 

Vanover 11% 9} 

Vienna Mr 7'4 9f 
VIIOeMonl 11% 94 
VII Mam 10% 98 1 
VwJnllJun 10% »5 
West ID Cur See ID-1 97 
West 10 Ini iu>. 96 
Winnipeg May 8% U 
zim Ausl MOV 7+4 98 
Zib B* Feb 4% 94 


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CleNttr 8% *5 101% 

DO DC 13% 95 ’OS 1 * 

SfteMr 77 

DedNorVeJn 11% 99 01% 

Denmark Anr S% 02 “JJ 
Denmart. Apr Ote 82 104% 

Denmark Jun ftH »6 99% 

DAbI Jan 7% 97 101% 

DresdAua 'f* « 39J 

Dsi W Aug 0% 94 100% 

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IS 2 S » « 52 

Eac Jon ® S 'SS 

EcscOcl *% « .*?• 


ECU Straights 


5cd 

Con Mai Price. Id Trsv 


Attr/Aug 

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to 95 IEOH 6J2 +57 

SecvOa 7% ra 90% 198 +68 

Sok aa. 95 93% 4.94 +60 

S*k Apr 10% 94 104% 758 +58 

Set Aua I 98 99% U6 +47 

Sen aa 99 45 823 +60 

Shell Can May 11 94 100% 469 +52 

Snell CcmOd 11H9S ms% 7>1 +64 

Smitt* Apr 9% 97 )0J% LE +61 

SnetSm 4% 97 *5% 7A2 +23 

Sacsen Tv Jul 10% 9$ ia% im +62 

Shoe W% 96 104% 7J6 +47 

S«x* Aug 0% E 97 159 +45 

SoaeJW 9 D? 100% 197 +88 

StBkNswSep 7% 83 92% 820 +54 

SiockhotmJul MT4 96 MKflSO 745 +52 
SIDCkliaimOCt 4% 98 9$ 111 +47 

SumnxtAug 4% 97 96% 7A2 +J0 

Sweden 6% ft 98% 752 +23 

Sweden Jun 10% «8 106L0S0 821 +57 

Sweden Mara 8 03 96% KM +40 

TeteKdOct 7% 98 BIJts 1320 +605 

Tap Aug 7% 97 99% 713 +32 

Ten DC 10% 94 108% 7 25 +44 

TbPJMl 10% dl 110% 443 +45 

TMCCAug 11% 95 mste 7.1 9 +57 

TMCCDc *% *7 95% 721 +fi 

TMCCDc 8 95 100% 752 *V 


WoundidJul 9% 98 191% 199 +95 



BH 

97 

BnaAug 

ste 

9*. 

drip la Oct 

/L 

« 


IM, 


CHJ Feb 

5te 

1*1 





BH 

w 

Cno Jun 

T 


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Cncn Jun 

9H 

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9V 

9* 

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9ft 

re 


|S% 

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9 

Ul 

Cm Nov 

4 

01 

CaraancJun 

9H 

re 

CantaancJun 

7H 

98 

Cornea itc Sea 

6ft 

99 


CamboncJun 7% 98 *8% 

Correa nc Sea 6% 99 95% 

ComjBkSep 8% M 100% 
Cooen TetMr 10% 9$ loo 
C u cenboaen I 97 100' 7 

a Fonder Apr 7% *4 ICDDOI 
Cr Fonder Aar 9% *S ICCB 
Cr Fonder Apt Ti. »4 iwb 
C r Fonder Aug 10% •* 107% 

Cr Fancier Dc re *9 ?0*% 

Cr Fonder F«b s% 01 97% 

Cr Fancier Jul 9 9* 104% 

Cr Fonder Mr tte 04 104% 

Cr Local Aug 9 *5 HtU*l- 

Cr Loral DC 9% *4 HJilW 
Cr Local DC 5% 99 94% 

Cr Lccoi Feb 10% «5 ia?% 
Cr Local Jan 1% V 'OTi 
Cr Local Jim 8% 97 104% 

Cr Local Mar f% 94 I0QJJ3S 
Cr Local Od aa 01 5+ 4 

Cr Local 5eo 4 98 '5% 

Cr Local Sen 6 W 102% 
CrLyorwi Mov 9 9» 103% 

Cr Nall Dc 10% 94 t«H 


*40 +39 
*92 +4* 
6J7 +1M 
*» +29 
5*7 +5 

*43 +40 
*55 +39 
*38 +17 
658 +34 

-,J> +2S 
*59 +59 
7A6 +5* 

114 +230 
174 +19* 
*97 +39 

115 +Z22 

*57 +44 
Mt +55 
*92 -31 

*36 +29 
70 +40 
7J3 +24 
613 +24 
*22 +29 
437 +15 
*13 +19 
73» -14 

7 44 +24 
1A> +3 
731 +11 
7.15 +79 
75* +64 
754 +£r 
435 +35 
9.93 +403 
728 +171 
*75 +44 
*09 +20 
*59 +29 
613 +49 
7 JO +34 
*9* -18 

*76 +39 

7*4 +32 
*19 +19 
*11 +20 
*47 -5* 

*88 +» 
*87 +14 
*24 +32 

*os +n 

739 +10 

7J9 +34 
*u -151 
* 87 +54 
*16 +35 


Dll w Aug »*• 22 1WV 

ISSS? 2 5 1 ® 

IS2S » « S3 

eSc Jan I n 1BJ 

lac Oct 8% *S *J* L 

I«j5l Tte M 10M 

EdcFeb S5 2S 

Eat Aug 8% 99 105% 

Ed jun 10% 01 IJrt 

Eol Jun 10% O' 117% 

Etc Ah' 

EeeDc *% 97 1051* 

EecDc M V '05H 

EecFeb 7% 96 105"* 

Eec Feb 9% 9t 1*5% 

E«Ju! F* £ {** 

Eec Mr 

Ek Mr 7% H «% 

Etc Mr «% *8 107% 

Eec nov » 00 93% 

EecNov 5% 90 96% 

E»C NOV * 9B 9*% 

lie Apr 9% 95 103% 

Em Sr 7% % 19^ 

Eft Apr 9 J* 07% 

Elb DC 91A 99 198% 

EU, Feb 9% 95 102% 

Em Fib 8 « Iffite 

Elb Jon 8 » 

Elb Jul 7% 97 105- 

Imjil 10 99 IKJte 

ItoJ^ » 105% 

Em Jun 10 01 119 

ElbJul 9 E 'Cute 

Eiojan I* 01 1U% 

E ioMay 7H 95 101 1 — 

IibmT p « ;«% 

ElOM ai * 7T IBP* 

EttlMIJV 6te % 97te 

Eft Mr 7% M ]«* 

Fib Mr 7% 06 IU% 

Eft NOV 2% « 102.038 

Em NOV OH 97 104% 

Elb NOV 9% 99 106% 

EftOcl' 1IH 94 101% 

EftM * 98 103% 

E lb Sec Bte 95 103% 

Elb Fed 10 97. 107H 

Eft Feb 10 97 101% 

Ekipcrll Feb BH 96 103% 


iSSU t?r Car. OT« •«« r,d 

F intend Od 8H 01 jJS* ^ 

ForvaarfcsFM&f g SS Iff JS 

Gotnenburt 9% 97 SI +S 

jgg jfrSf k t* .w 
IliSSa 

‘[Ul'lrtlMay «»« 

. l ™“ frfi S 8 ' 


Issuer Con -vat Price- Vtf Trw '• J.' inss~tCtin 

Uk Tress Fe6 9% PJ U* ■' * * w 

Uk IrbtaFcb 9% (TI IW% 7.1i • -5 
Woshtn PS Mr 9% 98 103% Mi- Hf 


Pound Sterling 


.. iSaoC 

Can Mat PrkeTWTm 


AtorrNFeb ]}%« 


Sjm 10% « raw +« 

I reSd Jan »% « IO% ja +3B 

I retold May 7% « j»]% nik 

irfondMr B » J0>* J2 

I retold Od B% « «0« « SJ 

imivABr W*5» JM* IS 

Italy apt WM Hg 12 

Italy Jul M»k *7 109% 7.M yv 

Italy Jui iw* 2T ! 2S? +3 

Maly May te ,E£ »lS' 

Italy Mr 9% 11 181+ ™s 

JbpH*»JuI Th 9j 100% kZl «» 

JaoHghw Jul % « *gg HI TS 

JgpHghwOCf « 98 10« 7.K +» 

j do Jul 10% 95 10*% MJ +g 

JAOCt BH 97 104% *91 +U 

KtwinN Feb W jg g g 
Kfw nm Mav 9 96 104% M3 +29 

Kommuilnv V*W ^74 

Ft, 8% 97 ICOft 738 +M 


Add Apr 
MO Jul 

Aide Mr 
All L Apr 
ADLAtav 
AH L May 


Amp HI Now 13 15 
Ana Wot Jon 12 M 
AsdoGr Apr 9% H2 
AldoGr Apr 18% 18- 
A rtnapMr « « 
AtoeBrDe 10% IS 
ASirtaW* HM99 
BoeDc 111*08 
DC 10V. 97 


Btrctay NOV 125* 97 
KuuQMav 1BU 


9 K 10«% 

10 01 iu% 


7te 95 101% 

8% M 'Kite 


t 97 1BSH 
6% 98 97% 


7te 00 192% 

75* 06 103% 


7H 95 I02JD8 
BH 97 104% 


OH 99 106% 

11V. 94 101% 


8 99 103 'A 

B% 95 103% 


10 97. 187H 
10 97 Mite 


gr nrnUnn "' 1ST, 97 HB% 738 +W 

KarnmunbwJnJte « iSJte *A3 ++9 

Karamuntnv jn9 99 111 

urn Aug 9te 96 105% *48 +29 

Uftju? 9 95 102* *K +J4 

JjSoct 9 « 18M* *» 

LtCbDc BH 94 100% *C ^ 

Mitsui ASIOd A « IMH J” +“J 

Mtgbk Den Feb 7** *7 101% 7M +« 

Migbk Den no. « 97% *£ tri 

MuniFlpanOct9% J* H£% J* +M 

NocflnMr WA 2 1 SL ? » + 25 

Nat InvBkOd 6 98 95% 7.19 «4 

NOtLHvng Sec n? «» JOJto *-« +g 

MdsasDc 9% 94 TOIte 4^ +■» 

N Zealnd Jun 10% 97 110H *» +24 

NZectndOct 7* » 01ft +25 +»9 

NID Feb 94* 9* I05H *56 +34 

ttowav jul 9 »* »4% *46 +» 

Norway Jill 9 96 IDA *44 +8 

SSbAtlr HP* 95 10*042 *03 +15 

OdaNm » 96 101% +jX> 

Pwrgtac Bk JiH4 96 93V, 73 +99 

PanMpRft i 04 90040 746 « 

Oueb Hyd Jul 9% 99 M6% 7Jg +40 

ftabao* Jun 9 94 100% *23 +30 

RWW 9H 95 MJte 637 +W 

Rabobfc Mav 7% 96 WIH iil +» 

Safa Jon 7H 77 101% 7.18 +S9 


BPAmerMtry 9% « 

BP Ausl Am- 11 WBJ 

Sr aitwJur rm* 08. 
BrAirwMr. W 98 
or AlrwMov 9% 97 

Br Gas Fib. IM 9S 
Br Gas Mr • m* 0) 
Br Land Mr 12% 16 
Brtt AeNov Iffte U 


Bril Gas A 
B Fknfteo 


CccaMr Wte 01 
Crtf Feb IS 77 

Cr Loco Apr' 10% 94 
□ataiderMay m* 94 
DbFtn Feb no. 81 
Denmark Jon llteOO 
DenraartSep 118*98 
Dnut Jan KH 95 
EtMEMf 12 76 

EcscFeb 11% 96 


VteihSb^-i^ 


soro jan /%■ re ivm *.iw «» 

SarwaFInAuaf 95 T0t% 734 +U1 

SbcftAV- 8H 97 1BIH 7J9 +54 

SikDc 7H 94 lOTH *15 +25 

Set Feb 7 95 roote *12 +» 

skaatieijui 4 00 vojbi *09 +99 

SoctFeb BH a l»b 7A7 +M 

SndJun 9 99 107% 732 +20 

SncfMr 9% 01 110864 7 A3 +29 

5nd Mr ■ FH 01 110% 735 +22 

Soatevr Mr 7H 9S 100% *94 +104 

SocSvrTrb 11% 95 lOOte 10J9 +498 

Spam May IOH 95 104H *19 +09 

SDofnMcV 9 ft I04JW# *71 +44 

Soafn May 9 98 184% *41 +7 

SpMtatLJim TV, 97 HJ0H 733 +59 

51h Africa Ft* ?0te 97 99% HU2 +J99 

Stockholm Nov 9V. 96 K5% 432 +J4 

Swcdbany Mbl 9+t 94 HBH 735 +99 

SavedenDc 9% 94 101% AM +29 

Sweden Jun 7V. 00 eyi* 739 +29 

Sweden Jun 7te DO 101% 73)1 -7 

Sweden MOT <% <4 99H *£7 +J4 

Sweden May 6 V. 99 97% *81 -21 

Sweden Oct 5% 98 M% 734 +79 

Sweden Od 5% 98 96% 648 -3* 

Turkev May 11% 95 ion* 1089 +499 

UMSea 9 95 98 1031 +4% 

UfcGovI Jon 8 94 102H *24 +4 

UkGavUan 8 * 95 101% SOT 

UkGcxrjcn 8 96 1B2H *37 +0 

Uk Govt Jan Ste 97 94% *49 -4 


Ekstxjrrl Mav 10% « 1M% 

EIPwr jul 10'S 95 104% 

Si PwrSeo 8% « ran 
Eurntom Apr 7H 97 01% 

Eurotom Jul JH *e 10 lte 
EuraflmaFeb 5% 01 91099 
Eurollma Jun lOte 95 UWte 
EuronmaJin Bte 07 106% 

Euratfma Mr th *5 101*. 

Euroilma Mr 7% 97 101% 

EurotiniaS 8H 99 105% 

Eu'elscl Mr Ite 97 1W% 

Edetsol Mav 7% 98 ijite 
E.lm 0* Feb 6H 00 101% 


SbcteMr 
546DC 
Sen Feb 
Skoohef Jul 

Sad Feb 
SndJun 
SndMr 
snd Mr ■ 


Extent* Oct IDH 95 105% 

EAlmbkOd 9 *6 104% 


Fbo 

F.E.K. Jun 


aa. *4 133% 

9te 95 1B3J229 


Fwrovie Jan 10% 9j IDBH 
Ferravle Jon 10% 98 10^5 


Finland Feb 8% 99 KM 00* 
Finland Ffb 8% 07 102% 


Finland Mr 
FlnlcnaMr 
Finland Mr 
Fin (and Mr 
Fintand Ocl 
RnlonoOci 


9% 98 107% 

■ 90 102% 

9% « 100% 

8 91 103% 

IBte 95 latte 
«H 01 10*088 


Einaiim Now in* f* 
ExImBoMoy 10H 01 
nnkndJun Kr% 88‘ 
Finland Mr HU* 97 
.GeacApr WH 97 
C*ctr Sen 11% 94 
Get Sea Z • aa. 00 
GratadbJai 11% 1+ 
Gubin P Jan 12 96 
HdHaxJan u 14 
HouiaxMr 10H 97 
HmmenDc n 
Hansent Apr W 04 
Hmc 111* 98.. 

lata May 110*95 


John Le Jon- mu 
Jam Le May w* 06 
Land Se Apr 9% 07 

LnasBAar - WH 98 
Leeds B Mr 11% 96 
Lloyds Mr Wte 90 
Lucas 1 Jui m* 38 
Mine PI Apr 99* 84 
MaoePIAar tbv, 03 
NanonwMr ms 97 


NATIONAL 


T TTT r 77 


OTG Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday. April 29 


Sam 

Div Vld 10% l+atl,Low 


Sam AST Bid 

Or. llJ 1 00* High Law Qse CW ACC Co 
ACS En s 


1012 6'-* W- P« _ aEP; 

31*8 9 T J . 9 -llu acr En 

24S-/6'. Ml. 16% -t>* AESS, 

510 17% 1*', 17'-. .1 AE5CPS 


30 14 8$ 14% 13H 

- 15 * 533 % 22 
17a 4 1904 31% 20 
_ 781 IS*. IS 

_. 1152 35 33V. 

... 10205 42 % 39 
_ 581 17H 17 

-. in 8'-. 7% 
08 3 B43I7H I5 1 .. 

. 114 8% 8 

_ 81$ 13% 13% 

401 18 7986 18% 17*. 


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139 2ft 

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Dtv Via lGCsktgh Law Qse One 


- 63 5H 5% SH — ' % ASdCmB 

_ 3*77 **, 6 6'V —Mr Aswcs 

S 6939 38% 34*4 38% -3*14 ASKrtaF 
J *755 3* 22'.. 35 -2% AarMs 

_ 115427*6 24% 27V4 *2 Asfron 

_ 408 3% » 1* - % Astrasy 

_. 679 9 8% 8% — *6 AsystTdi 

_ 355 11 10% 107* +% AtdiCst 

_ 414 NPk 13H 14% — >A Athena 

- 22317% 16 1* —te Alhey 

_ 1313 Uli 17% >3 -% AMdnsn 


_ 1794 13% 13 13 

_ 250 3% J -J„ 3%, —V„ 

.9 416 21V. 21% 21% - % 


_ AHAm 
•/^ I AtIBev 
Attest Air 


_ 9954 4 19* 3% - % AUGutt 

_ 178 2% 2 Vh ></4 AHSsAr k 

_ 263 1 OH 10H 10% *'A Airraid 

_ 174 9% 8% 91* -H AlmelS 

.12 M 912 9 8% S+4 - V, AlrtxL 

_ 539 3% yvu 3 — % AfwdQc 


AKOm _ 44V J-v L’te, J % WWDUC 

Alcto 1 A9e 2J 4016 40% 56% 40Vi -3 AuBon 
AtamoGo J3e 2.1 *523 15+. 13% 15% —V* AuroSv 

AlonteC .. 149916% IS 1 .! 1* -V* Auspex 

AMten 1 JO *2 33 20 V, 19% 19% — % Aulolnf 

A EOT* ,10a £ 3193 20% 20% 20*>1, - V„ AutaORI S 

Altide i 62 9>/4 8% 9 - % AutOOv 

Akfllas —13504 18% 14% 18% -1% Autadk 


Et takes quite a while to carve out 
a solid position in South America. 


AMten 

After* 

AI cades 

Akfllas 

Aldus 

AlexBId 

AlexEng 

AttoCps 

ASasR 

AS CD 

Alkerm 

AHASem 

AllFDir 

AJICify 

AteaW 

AtaOrg 

ACanPh 

AtnSami 

AiBkCas 

AttaBks 


_ 12611 29% 26% 29 Vi -2 
M 3J 1258 25 7+% 25 -*.• 

_ 1382 5% 4% 4% *■% 


36 3J 351 11% 10% 11% T % Autolots 
_ 173314V, 14 14 -% Avatar 


_ 1733 14V, 14 14 -% Avatar 

A 302 20% 18*. 19% -1% AvkfTOl 

... *93 4 5% SH - % Avndto 

- 301! Sit- 3Vj 3% — V» AztcM 


- 30II3'v n 3Vj 3% — V« 

_ 240 1% 1%, 1% _ 

.. 16 10 10 10 — % 
_ 513 8% 7% 8% - % 

15 2 3C 34 34 -2% 

- 3979 10+1 9% 10% -% 

_ 772 13*. 11% 13% -1% 

_ 152 21 U 20% 20+9 — T* 

2J 1*14% 14% 14% — % 


44TJ 29 
9% <Pk 
2% TV, 2% 

4%. 4% 4% 

13 71% 12% - 

13% 13% 13% 

7% 6'A 7V* +1 
7% 7V* 7% 

9% 8%. 9% 

16%. 16% 16% 

2% m 2% 

5 4 6%. 

5% 3% 3% — 

10 10% - 
38% F 1 ■ ' 
10 % ' 

2294 1 
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12% 73 
18% 19% +i 
6% 7*1, +% 
5 » +% 

3% 3% +U 
17% 19'A- + 1% 

JlTte a%-^a* 

24% 14% — % 
16% 18% +1% 
35% 35% +% 
15% 27% +%. 
6% 7 — +t 

5% 5% — % 


1.08 3J 12+929% 29 29% — % 

_ 7837 10'A 9 10% +1 

1-2 82 6% 6% 6% +%l 

Li «OB 7% 7% — J%, 

- 21M6 1«fe 1SH _ 

L9 31 22% 20% 20%-l% 
I— 23417 9% 10: — W 

3x2948 17% 14% 15% — % 
_ 133 5% 4% 4% — % 

- 927J8%.im-l»w. + % 

- ■ IB 4% 4% 4% +% 

-23011*3% 59 40 —1 

_ 2527 29% 24V, 29% +3 

- 121910 9% 9% +% 


■08 1J 82 6 
J0 2 A 4308 










a \ 


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I AidHiPd 
AlldHldg 
AldLife 
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Aloetie 
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AlpMiCWT 
Alahal 
Aland «t 
AipncEia 
Aipnarl 
AftLce 
AMmM 
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Atoms 

AmDar 

AmerSlr 

Amcor 


_ 240 13% 13% 13% -% 

Ml 2A 808 25V, S% ZT-. -Ite I BUm 

JA U 50+16 14*. 15% 

_ 316 19+i 18% 194,-11, BHte 

■0*e 5 54612', 11% 11 V, ar.ic 

.. 364 5,. 4% 4.V., BMC 

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_ Z?6 18*, IB IB% - +, BNH 

— 53 4'm 3> m 4 * >4 BP I P+9 

: SS?!: ?•„ :'ir s Ip!^ 

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_ S408 1% r , 1*,. _ BT1J 

_ 4C«4'. 3% 3'. _ BWIF 

JI7e 7 3011% 9% y-Se -v. Baba 

4045 1% 1 1% * Bodi 

_ 30 3% 3% 3% -V, Bodd 

_. 239 B 7% 8 * Bdda 

-.41401 39 34% 38% *3% BoSt ’ 

- B343 18 15 15V, - BkHO 


Bl me 
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- 1134 1% Wv 14*. — 0U 
_ 536 S% 41* 5 +h -Mu 

124 1 «*C 4te -V* 

.76 3J 4034% 23 23% — % 

1.12 17 43 30% 29% 30 

_ SM 3% 3 3 -% 

_ 432 2Vh TV* 2% +«U 

33 1-8 463518 16% 17% • - 

_ B31 10% TVi 9+r — % 


% -1% IgTRn 




- 239 8 
-.41401 39 

- 8343 18 


_ IS? 7% 2% 3% .. - . 

BackSay - 32*16% IS 15 Lj.* 

BodwP - 212 12 19- j 

Bolk-y _ 1652 10% 8% +7* — 

BkHawl _ «*, *, ft -V 

Boke+J JM J 134621% 20 21% +1#- 

Boktaem .09 A 16 8% 7 7 . — 1 . 

aaldLys JO 1J 27 15% 15te I5%— 1% 

BldLyB 5 JO 1J 1 15% 15% 15% +1% 

BataPkJ _. 96 16 15 16 »1 . 

BofvGm - 832116 !2%15Wu+24M 

Bcftek _ I 7% 7% 7% — *4 

BanPimc 1.00 3.1 994 32’A 3IH 32% +% 

BcQrt? otC3.50 SJS 956 62% 59% <0 -2%. 

BnrftefOK J4 U 340 13 14% M% +% 


- B3AJ18 15 15% _. S*™ V 1 

- 49 4% 4% 4% — V, BofcetJ -06 

- 664 3% 2% 9% — v. Button jg 

•BSe 3J 184 ZB 27% 27% _ SrtdLys JO 




Arrar Mac 164 ZB 27% 27% _ wawi 

AmoarFs ^4 2 A 882 20V, »T% n % -2W BloLyBs 

Amnans M 4.1 143 )4V, 13v> 14% ~ n, BalaFSa 

A mert ac _ 1106 1% l"a,, r.« BohaCin 

**** '-J? .J-4 724 22% 21% 21% — Beaten 

AmFPr 1.0 b na *354 9% 9% 9% - BanPoax; 




[■'Xfei 




AfTWrpc _ 1106 | v, l",„ ir, 

1-60 M 724 22% 21% 31+1 — 
AmFPr 1.0 b 11 Jl x354 9% 9% 9% - 

AFTxE J4 BJ X372 4% 6% 6% -I* 

AFTkS J5 83 »I32 8”i 9 - % 

AmerOrt .Ola ..15737 72 S?!*n - ,| 

AmSvca IS ji /, ji A j. 4 

AmBcos JO 3.1 23 18 16 16 _ 

ABr*r JB 3JI 652 22% 22 22% . % 

-,,25 J”* 3,< -% 

AmBldB -13288 10% 10 10 

AmBusin _ 962 ly.i 13+i >4 — % 

»'/. 20% —vs 

AOalm _ la 3% 2> 71 + 

ACt^S J4 1J 2806 IS 13% 14 

AmEogle _ 3377 1«, 15U, 15% 


.03+ J 1620 10% 9' 


-620 10% ?■', 10%, 1 BankAll .... .... 

AmgvK 199 4% 4% 4% _% BnkUM ,10b U 179 7% 7 7% 

AmFB JO 1.9 1330 11% 10V, 10% —14 BrikUtPl _ 29 10% 9% 10% +W 

AFTtorn ,H U I Jl 2* 29 _ BkUIFot _. 5 10% 10% T0% »% 

AmFrylS _ 3632 19% 18% 19 +V. Bkwarc JO J x27B 33% 33% 33H% +!% 

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ca pital markets 

Japan Is Holding the Dice 
As the Markets Get Jostled 


By Carl Gewirtz 

P ARK - Herald Tribu* 

sfa»i~?3 ia&aaE 

opensive — but rarelv liSl? America * 10 * ds *^ e most 

atangwith a s 2b„ ^ I^“ ded on T Boardwalk and Park Place 

and qj,. - c " ea P properties at the bottom of the board 

^E^^iiS mOI ^, m L renl ’ Particularly to Japan, than he collects. 
Europe, holding all the utilities and the rmd^^ora^ 

cdored landings, barely covers - 

spending with income. * ■ , 

• .™ frustration of the game is Ask an J trader vhy 


%Bad£er Travelers: Beyond Truth J^P an to Make 

Tiink prl Insurer’s Hard-Sell Tactics Draw Scrutiny BlggCF Effort tO 


To Omni 


I tv««uug who mcome. . , , 

TTie frustration of the game is Ask an J trader why 

er. BuS * e dollar is weak and 

t'si^pTnTSS ^efsweristhatllie 

Boardwalk and Park Place, and yen is the nexufi. 

rardy landing on the orange 

properties. 

Now move from an imaginary game to the real world. 
i* accumulating an enormous trade surplus — as it has for 

*. J?™ °* , P 35 * decade. Whether it plays fair in die way it amasses 

“* P? r P lus 18 mooL But up to now it has managed to cinailate its 

wealth not through the ideal way of importing foreign goods, but 
• by means of capital outflows investing in plant and equipment 
. abroad and purchasing foreign financial assets. 

Today, even that once mighty capital outflow has trickled to 
. magnifjcance. 

;•/ Ask any foreign-exchange trader why the dollar is weak, and the 

answer will start with the doflar-yen relationship and worries tha t 
the U-S.-Japan trade dispute weakens the dollar. 

Washington is perceived ^as encouraging a lower value of the 
dollar as a means of prying concessions from Tokyo, while worries 
about the unending appreciation of the yen oblige Japanese inves- 
tors — who have already suffered huge exchange losses on their 
foreign assets — to now keep their money home. 

The dollar’s performance against the Deutsche mark is influ- 
enced by the yen. The dollar cannot fall against the yen and rise 
against the mark without completely distorting the yen-mark rate. 
In addition, an ongoing reappraisal of German growth prospects 
and expected (rismg)UJS- mid (falling) German inflation rates is 

wei ghing pq the dpUar. 

yen would hdCn te a rise against the mar k and all die" other 
European currencies linked to it. 

1 I nlike Monopoly, where frustrated players can call it quits or 
start agahvtbe pressures in the real world continue to build. 

“It’s a veteano waiting to erupt,” warns Brendan Brown, Lon- 
doc-based, analyst at Mitsubishi Finance. Japan canno t go on 

See MARKETS, Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX 


; : Jnternrionaf Herakl tribute 
■ V/cxid Stock Index, axrjposed ne 
of SStWrrtwn^torafly fnvestabte - 
stocfct&omS countries, -v. 
compiled by Bloomberg 
Business News. 

112 

Weekentfing April 29. 
daily closings. 

Jan. 1992= 100. 110 


World Index 




Asia/Pidfic 


Europe 


T W' T F 

North America Bi g 




F M T W T F 

Latin America 






■ r*f 


; industrial Sector^Weekend close % 

fflWg ^ d£T cto. d»y 

. cmww met 110.61 +0.90 Capital Goods 1UL95 111.53 + 12 T_ 
■■ S S riaOSMW" S ' «"***»*» 124^7120^45 

115.43 *0J9 Consumer Goods 9a82 97J9 

jHscateneous 12824124.75 M 

SSm. ot*aZO top 




fURWENCT BATES 


.. — — ’ * April 29 

„ M. u»»» •£.£, S-S.'S 1 - 

SET" aSS b* ® £S SS- ow T.lffl t«5** 7 - ZBS 
=£• S2?1SSS®.«5!!SSS.S- 
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SJ* Ukft I4«a *■ i34 jD t*** »* £»• S *»£ 

— Ii»« £». 2? 5S- yg, lMB urn u» tna 

yra was wre — ^ o«J • ^ _ w- 

(ri u« oaul* - w uas **•* 

w- ^2 um u® W "’ w ,jo 7 ua n u* '■» '*■?? 

2 SS 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

BERN — A former bank direc- 
tor facing trial for his alleged role 
in Switzerland’s largest corporate 
collapse has killed himself, police 
said Saturday. 

Kurt Meier, chief executive of 
Berner Kan tonal bank until late 
1990, was found dead on a railway 
line near Bern on Friday night. He 
had been hit by a train and a suicide 
note was found in his car nearby. 

Legal proceedings had been 
opened Friday against Mr. Meier 
and another ex-director of the bank 
in connection with a security swap 
with Omni Holding AG, a holding 
company that folded in 1991 with 
debt of arotmd 2 billion Swiss 
francs (SI billion). It was forced 
into bankruptcy by creditors, who 
reportedly felt the company had 
overvalued its assets and who thus 
moved to protect their loans. 
Among the charges against Mr. 
Meier, it was alleged that be violat- 
ed banking law by fading to notify 
the Federal Banking Commission 
of risks that had aeanmiim^H as a 
remit of the Omni exposure. Mag- 
istrates said he had faced a possible 
prison sentence if found guilty. 

It has been estimated that the 
bank lost as much as 77 million 
francs in the transactions. 

Werner Rey, the former head of 
Omni who has fled to the Bahamas, 
is wanted in Switzerland for fraud, 
forgery and other charges. 

■ Schneider in Paraguay? 

Jflrgen Schneider, the fugitive 
German property tycoon, has a 
bouse in Paraguay and may be in 
that country, said' Georg Krupp. a 
board member of Deutsche Bank 
according to news agency dispatch- 
es from Frankfurt. 

Paraguay does not have an extra- 
dition treaty with Germany. 

Speaking in a radio interview, Mr. 
Krupp also said that he did not 
expect any derisions regarding tire 
case to be made at an extraordinary 
meeting of Deutsche Bank's super- 
visory board on May lO.Thebankis 
owed about IJ. bQEon Deutsche 
marks (S720 million) as a result of 
thccollapseof the Schneider empire. 

There has been no trace of Mr. 
Schneider since he disappeared 
three weeks ago. 

Mr. Krupp also said that Deut- 
sche Bank was in the final stages of 
acquiring holds in Wiesbaden and 
Munich as wefl as a mall in Frank- 
furt, projects started by Mr. 
S chneid er and mainly financed by 
the bank. (Bloomberg Reuters! 


By Michael Quint 

New York rimes Sernce 

NEW YORK — With two dozen gleaming 
wood-and-brass awards for sales and recruiting as 
a backdrop, Theodore M. Roussis was firing up a 
dozen or so prospective recruits with talk about 
making money selling insurance for Primerica Fi- 
nancial Services. 

Within minutes, however, his pitch had turned 
into a mix of fact and half-truths. Travelers inc^ 
the parent of Primerica Financial, is indeed a 5 100 
bOKon company, but it is not, as he said, America's 
second-largest financial services corporation in 
terms of assets. By that measure, in fact, it is not 
even among the 10 largest. 

Sanford 1. Weill, Travelers’ c hairman, is one of 
the best-known names on Wall Street, but he did not 
“run American Express” earlier in his career. And 
Mr. Roussis, a national sales director at Primerica, 
attended Columbia University in the early 1980s but 
did not get a master’s there, as be claimed. 

If the half-truths had ended with trivial distor- 
tions of a few resumes, they might have been 
dismissed as the talk of an overly enthusiastic sales 
executive. But they represent a companywide pat- 
tern of exaggeration in the recruitment of agents 
and the selling of policies to hundreds of thou- 
sands of Americans. 

What is more, it is a pattern that is little changed 
from the one practiced by Primerica Financial's 
controversial predecessor, the AX. Williams net- 
work of life insurance agents. 

This time, however, the questionable tactics are 
not occurring under the banner of the flamboyant 
W illiams organization but the respected umbrella 
of Travelers, the name adopted by Primerica Corp. 


after it bought Travelers Corp. last year. 
In New York State, where Primerica 1 


In New York State, where Primerica F inancial 
has grown rapidly in the two years, the company 
has caught the eye of regulators, who say they have 
been investigating its training and sales practices 
for several months. 

Kevin Foley, deputy superintendent for insur- 
ance, said his department has concluded that some 
Primerica Financial agents, following the advice of 
superiors, have been s ellin g insurance without be- 


ing properly licensed. Among the early findings, he 
said, is that some agents were provided certificates 
from a school in Syracuse, New York, that they did 
not attend. 

Executives at Primerica said last week they were 
aware of questions about the school, which is 
owned by a former company agent, and were 
cooperating in the investigation. 

The fact that the company’s sharp practices 
continue, however, brings into question whether 
Mr. Weill is meeting his goal of building a first- 
class financial-services company. Travelers also 
owns Smith Barney Shearson and Commercial 
Credit Corp. 

“Over the years since Sandy Wefll took charge, we 
have beard talk of cl eaning up the old A.L. Williams 
image, but there has never been a fundamental 
Co mmitmen t to cl eaning up the act,” Said Alan 
Press, who, although a competitor of Travelers and a 
principal in the New York insurance agency of 
Press, Fishman & Rappaport, is also a well-known 
specialist mi life insurance and a former head of the 
National Association of Life Underwriters. 

Indeed, while Primerica Financial has pul more 
controls on the Williams network in the four years 
since it took over the highly decentralized opera- 
tion, the New York executives brought in to run 
the Atlanta-based company have never tried to 
change its basic structure or operational method. 

That structure has many of the elements of a 
pyramid organization built around a huge army of 
agents — 1 10,000 nationwide, more than 90 per- 
cent of them part-timers with little training. Armed 
with a simple sales pitch that says one type of 
policy, term insurance, is always best for middle- 
income families, they sell mostly to relatives, co- 
workers and friends. 

At a recent Saturday morning training session, a 
group of these so-called termites shared their expe- 
riences with new recruits: 

“Never use the T word if you can avoid it," re- 
commended one agent- Rather than mention insur- 
ance, trainees are advised to set appointments with 
f amily me m b ers and friend*, perhaps using scripts 
that talk about a “business opportunity” that could 


Support Dollar 


Conqrtledby Our Staff Front DapaKhes 

TOKYO — Japanese financial 
authorities say they mil step up 


their buying of dollars to prevent 
the yen from rising further against 


See TRAVELERS, Page 12 


the yen from rising further against 
the U.S. currency. 

The chief cabinet secretary, Hir- 
oshi Kumagai, said Saturday that 
the decision by the new govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Tsutomu 
Haia had come in an emergency 

ministerial meeting called after the 
dollar skidded last week to nearly 
its lowest level since the modern 
system of exchange rates was set up 
in the late 1940s. 

Government and business lead- 
ers in Japan say the economy’s 
budding recovery after more than 
three years of recess cm could be 
cut sbon by a sudden rise in the 
yen’s value. A high yen tends to 
reduce Japanese exporters' sales 
and profits while making imported 
products less expensive. 

The U.S. Federal Reserve Board 
bought dollars on the New York 
and London foreign exchange mar- 
kets Friday to help keep the dollar 
from slipping below its record low 
of 100.25 yen touched in August 
1993. Hie dollar closed in New 
York on Friday at 101.60 yen. 

The United Slates has been 
viewed since early last year as fa- 
voring a high yen to help narrow its 
$60 billion annual trade deficit 
with Japan. 

Its action Friday marked the first 
time the Fed, the U.S. central bank, 
had intervened to prop up the dol- 
lar against the yen since August. 


In Tokyo, the ministers at the 
meeting agreed (hat Japan would 
take “appropriate measures at a 
right lime” in coordination with 
outer members of the Group of 
Seven industrialized nations to uy 
to prevent volatility in foreign-ex- 
change movements, Mr. Kumagai 
said at a news conference. The oth- 
er Group of Seven members are the 
United States. Britain, France, 
Germany! Italy and Canada. 

A report in the Nihon Keizai 
newspaper said the Bank of Japan 
planned to sell about S3 billion a 
day of yen for doll an in the for- 
eign-exchange market, compared 
with $1 billion a day recently. 

The yen’s latest rise began after 
Japan angered the United States in 
February by rejecting numerical 
targets for trimming the trade im- 
balance. Japan's prime minister at 
the time, Morihiro Hosokawa, told 
President Bill Clinton in Washing- 
ton that such action would inter- 
fere with marketplace decisions. 

Mr. Kumagai said the ministers 
also agreed on the need to cany out 
swiftly the 1525 trillion yen ($150 
billion) economic stimulus package 


the Japanese government an- 
nounced in Februarv. 


nounced in February. 

But Mr. Hata’s cabinet, which 
only took power Thursday after 
three weeks of quarreling in the 
governing coalition over leadership 
and policies, lacks a majority in the 
Diet, Japan's parliament, and 
many analysts expect it to be weak 
and ineffectual. (AP, Bloomberg) 


Maxwell Fund Trustees Accuse Goldman 


Bloomberg Business News 


Mr. Maxwell, who died while 


NEW YORK — Trustees of the ennsmg near the Canary Islands in 
Maxwell Communication Corp. November 1991, controlled Max- 


and Mirror Group Newspapers well Communication and Minor 
PLC pension funds have accused Group Newspapers PLC and about 


Goldman. Sachs & Co. of helping 400 private companies. Subsequent 


Robert Maxwell and his son Kevin investigations determined that he 


loot almost 5100 million from the had been responsible for stock tna- 


two funds. 


nipulation, fraud and the theft of 


The pension funds charged hundreds of mini ons of dollars from 
Goldman and one of the f inan cial his employees’ pension funds. 


services company’s general part- Kevin Maxwell has been charged 


nera with fraud, negligence and with eight counts or conspiracy to 
breach of contract in two lawsuits defraud. 


filed Friday in New York State 
Supreme Court in Manhattan. 


The two lawsuits accuse Gold- 
man of cooperating with a Maxwell 


Goldman said the claims were scheme to steal 25 million shares of 
“invalid" and “misdirected” and Maxwell Communication stock 


assailed the suit as “an expensive from the pension fund by selling 


and time-consuming distraction.” them to two Swiss shell companies 


controlled by the Maxwells. The 
proceeds of the stock sales, which 
look place in the spring of 1991, 
allegedly went to Bishopsgate In- 
vestment Trust Lid., another Max- 
well-controlled entity. 

Bishopsgale then paid the $94 
million back to Goldman. Sbeldon 
Elsen, a lawyer for the Mirror 
Group pension fund. said. 

A Goldman. Sachs general part- 
ner, Eric Sheinberg. who also heads 
the company's international equi- 
ties trading operations, is named as 
a co-defendant in the lawsuits. 
Each suit seeks damages of about 
547 million plus punitive damages 
from Goldman. 

In its comment on the lawsuits. 
Goldman said. "If these two pen- 


New Charges 
Of Corruption 


know why the lawsuit had not been | if %jOrrUOtlOli 

filed sooner. » * 

■ Spin-Off of Lehman 1 b Set At Coles Myer 

American Express Co. said it Reuters 


would spin off its Lehman Brothers 
Holdings Inc. securities subsidiary 
in a distribution to shareholders 
May 31, Bloomberg Business News 
reported. 

The distribution will consist of 
one I^hman share for every five 
American Express shares owned as 
of May 20. American Express said 
it expected to distribute about 98 3 
million Lehman shares. 

The Lehman stock is expected to 
start trading on a when-issued basis 
on the New York Stock Exchange 
on Monday, under the symbol LER 


sion funds lost money because of ^ mc3ias ^ ^ 

their trades, they did so because o ^ s^tics they wifl not actually 

ihp wav Inal ihrrv anil ihr: Mavww : .n i- . .. J 


St- Petersburg Notebook 


Financial Tomes on Top 


the way that they and the Maxwell Ttcdve ^ ^ ^ HiMrifrrtinr, 

companies were managed, not be- . c r . , 

caui of any aclion ofGoldman Amen ™ 1 a nnan ^' 

Sachs or its personnel " a™* 5 - uavd “ d 


Goldman said it made a ,olun- ““““ d pin-off. 

™ wirinknhAii which had been under discussion 


tary contribution to the Maxwell ““ u “ u J"'*™ ''**2*™? 

Pensioners Trust two years ago and ™ cc ^ Sea ^’ 


The sidewalks of Nevsky Prospekt, Sl Peters- 
burg’s Fifth Avenue, are filled with people in a 
hurry. Thar bustlings belie accounts of Russian 
life that pwi phasiyg only stagnation, looming un- 
employment and hyperinflation. 

Along the Prospekt, the gears of life still mesh 
and hum; at flower stands, long-stem roses sell 
briridy at 4,000 rabies (S2) each; even on a cod 
spring day, ice cream stands are mobbed. 


100 rubles. “Then 200. to 250, then 300. then 500. 
to 600. then 1,000 in October, and not long ago 
1,500. Now it’s 3,000 rubles,” Vasily Shigaev. the 
e xchang e’s deputy chairman, said. 

The price e^alatiou caused the exchange to stop 
selling monthly passes in August 1993. "How can I 
estimate what the ticket price would be some 
weeks 1*161?” Mr. Shigaev asked. 

But what determines the price of admission? Is it 


HrS- Ji Bjchange Commission 
signed to ensure that MaxweE pen- IST* 


sion funds are able to satisfyall ^ board 10 a PP roveiL 


pensi oners’ needs.” 

A total of 17,000 employees of 
Maxwell and Mirror Group were 
covered by the iwo pension funds. 
Mr. Elsen said. He said be did not 


The 144-year-old securities firm, 
which has about 9,300 employees, 
would have an initial market value 
of about $2.7 billion, analysts esti- 
mated last month. 


Reuters 

MELBOURNE — A sec- 
ond former executive of the 
Australian retail company 
Coles Myer Ltd. has been 
charged with corruption after 
an internal investigation that 
lasted three years. 

A police spokesman for the 
State of Victoria said that Gra- 
ham Lanyon. 49, a former na- 
tional maintenance manager, 
was arrested on Saturday and 
appeared before a hearing 
where a total of 93 charges 
were listed. 

The charges included con- 
spiracy, obtaining property by 
deception, false accounting 
and the acceptance of secret 
commissions. 

This week Brian Quinn, 58. 
the former chairman of Coles, 
was charged with 49 counts of 
theft, which amounted to a 
combined sum of 4.8 milli on 
Australian dollars ($3.42 mil- 
lion), as well as one count of 
conspiracy to defraud. 

The police spokesman said 
both men had been released on 
bail- 


On one comer of Nevsky, diagonally across pegged to the dollar, perhaps? “No, it is simpler than 

i . T.. e. l M.. thnt " U, ciH “We haw an nld Ruvaan 


fr om what was until recently Sl Petersburg’s Mu- that,” Mr. Shigaev said. “We have an old Russian 
scum of Religion and Atheism, stands the House expression that explains: *the feeling and the floor. I 


scum of Religion and Atheism, stands the House 
of Books, die dry’s largest bookstore. Inside, Ana- 
toly Ivanovhdi Sedoi, 41, recently established a 
shop selling computer programs. Ins sales, tallied 
in dollars to factor out the tumbling of the ruble, 
grew 5 percent monthly for the last six months and 
were $40,000 for March. 

Despite Russia’s c haos, Mr. Sedoi is an optimist 

“You have to be hopefbl, you have to spring up 


from the dead zone, the zone of passivity ” he said. 
“You have to look for a new job, or an extra job. 
And if you do that, you are O.K.” Mr. Sedoi and 
his shop are evidence that even as commu n is m 's 
rotting timber topples, seedlings sprout. Of the 200 
programs Mr. Sedoi stocks, accounting programs 
outsell all others by 5 to 1. 

Just across the aisle, customers stand two deep 

along a five-meter (16-foot) glass counter filled 
with books on finance and business. The counter’s 


best seller, priced at 13,000 rabies and called 
“Accounting at Enterprises With Various Forms 


mg at Enterprises with various farms 
ty sells 35 to 40 copies a day. Also 
for 13,000 rubles: a copy of the New 


York Yellow Pages. . . 

And there is a Russian translation of a book 
published in Sweden called “Snack Bars the Amer- 
{can Way: How to Make Money on Them.” The 
6toage book offers explanations of American 
“funfocdT attempting to translate into Russian 
8 ^ 1 * concepts as radge puppies, com dogs, Ger- 
man pretzds, Belgian waffles and tacos. The book 
costs only 7,500 rabies, but only a couple of copies 
have been sold. For now, apparently, St Peters- 
burg is happy enough with ice cream. 


w atch how many visitors we have chi the floor, bow 
many privatization checks have traded. From (hat I 
can teD if we have ibe right price." 

Few securities were traded at the Sl Petersburg 
e xchange until the beginning of 1993, when the 
Russian government finished issuing 144 million 
privatization vouchers. The vouchers, one for every 
man w oman and child in Russia, represent shares in 
one-third of the country’s estimated industrial ca- 
pacity; their distribution has made almost every 
Russian, at least once, into a securities trader. 

The population of Sl Petersburg is 5 million, 
and last year at the city's stock exchange there were 
more than 17,000 trades in 4.9 million privatiza- 
tion vouchers. On the other hand, there were only 
392 trades in equities. 

In other ways, too. the atmosphere is not quite 
Wall Street yet “No criminal events took place on 
our floor, but some of the brokerage firms were 
robbed elsewhere,” Mr. Shigaev said. “We have just 
d ec i ded to introduce special rules.” Metal detector* 
will be installed, and cameras are now forbidden. 

“The members of our brokerage Firms don't 
want to be pictured, they don’t want such publicity 
in the newspapers. We haw a Mafia here, you 
know,” he said 



i 




THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Scam aster. Self-winding 

chronomerer in 18 k gold and steel, 
p| water-resistant to 120 m/400 ft. 
Swiss made since 1848. 


This fei’t Wall Street Yet 


ti& “g ££ SS* *** Originally creati 

S *** Jf? JTw*. Toronto iheSL Petersburg* 

inJuoe 1991 inside 

: To bur Found, a- haU Bmldinx No. 


Pq lllf YSjSo Mr* Carrwtct 5S0S 

SLs .E&S SS:S BBSS 


Originally create! by Peter the Great in 1703, 
tbe Sl Peteirixrra stock excfaange^ was reincarnated 
in June 1991 inside a multitiered glass and concrete 
Building No. 6 of the city’s mammoth and 


SKSrg sr.~ S£ 

B w*« 

- — m-duf W® 

R|W auto* tt ni un c f 130 12901 


- — iMjaY IMW 

f8*tas tann e r .jmj 12883 t®* 1 

" L5»* IS *’■" . . _• : : 


^^ffSTatSfSSSSSi^ 

l^sssss^* 


Sx afternoons a week, 600 to 800 customers pay 
3.000 rubles to enter the exchange’s trading floor, 
where they wander among a maze of white ply- 
wood Most customers are men in their early 
20s. Their umfonn is a leather jacket and jeans, not 
pis-striped suits. 

They come to dicker with some of the exchange’s 

170 or so brokerage firms, seeking a good price for 
a position— perhaps iniubk* perhaps io dollars 
or privatization vouchers — that they have them- 
gejves accumulated at informal securities markets 
outside the dry’s subway stations. 

In January 1993, a ticket to the trading floor cost 


Great Place for a Health Clinic 

“I love Sl Petersburg,” said Shannon Slusher. 
director of the privately owned American Medical 
Center. "For me this is the ideal place to be 
running a business right now.” 

The six-doctor clinic serves the estimated 5,000 
to 10,000 expatriates doing business here, as well 
as a swelling Russian clientele attracted by the 
clinic’s “user-friendly” service. Mr. Slusher said. 
Since the dink opened last AugusL tbe proportion 
of Russians among its patients has grown from 5 
percent to 30 percenL 

Stress underlies many of Lhe ailments of St. 
Petersburg’s expatriates, said Dr. Paul Spiegel, one 
of the dink’s three Western doctors. Long hours, 
the lack of a support network, increased drinking 
and smoking, and a lack of exercise ail make life 
here more stressful he said. 

Thai there is the need to deal with the city's new 
criminal elemenL “We sit around at night and 
exchange war stories that can range from getting a 
fax out to dealing with you-know-who.” Mr. Slusher 
said. H I have a friend here who runs a business, and 
that business as been bombed three times.” 








Henry Copeland 


Q 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 


make) 
bat wt 
• restifh' 
w 

nd la i? 
ften,"™ 


i ibii. . 

ices. u“ 
jes." J 

; of tb^ b 

technr^ 

ue 


; such ,g 
ini 

have ste i 
st as ben 
is far a; tl 
rf by tie t 
: Mfcue 1 

mild deg t 
• fl 
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par 

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ia ny otU re 

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col lapse we 

Inpaid L 
iave left SC < 

■ w 

nacleof 1 ®^ 
possible, 9 
Pales tin 0 01 
and Jerit 31 s 
now. Qg? 
rs now ijda 
offices w 10 
o become®* 0 
venting 6,11 
ie,a 

for 20 oif t 
iul Sturm 06 - 
st go awa 5 8 ' 
Mr. Aral m< 
:la*s inau; wai 
aides. Mr* y 
rated ex© 
fat's paw* un 
speaking — 
lud Abb 
i Commit 
g the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
jhrasing v 
d around 
a minister 
letails of 
'orehand, 
.o sign. A 
vore that i 
this way." 


IS: 

idienc 


i Page 1 

.cal in No 
'ear. Comt 
tian, Virgji 
: massager 
ping and hi 
uresofMyi 
ia, has a h 

* ’a] law fir 
f -es for oil 
i says, “D 


l rys mere 
\ l. the pn 
ich represe 
r magazine 
that 100,( 
nl issue w 
with an ad 
uied to nei 
rad areas n> 


. madeitsw 
ig budgets 
es.TbecJos 
areadverti 
y tbeindusi 
ich Nails, a 
es, a prodi 
iccoCo. 

h, Mr. Str 
s, which c 
nd they cc 
nld up. 
Isold 360J 

sof thousax 

i, ” Mr. Str 
. I sold tom 
liy used asc 
juJd haves 
of sneaker 
etout there 


e RaL 


appropn. 


sponsible 

ge policy, 
rwonthed 
unteriogsp 
■tales was t 
for the dot] 
s in floati 
liam McDi 
e Federal I 
York, said 
“You ca 
ling exchar 
e rate targe 
said Tuesc 
it the G-7 v 
loor under 


jychologicE 
trigger a fr 
he board, c 
Tiat could i 
k and bo 
ng dollarn 
d by ervexv 


said intervi 
airrency ^ 

t constifag 

’commtm i 

weekYgj 


s 









Pag«* 10 


INTER NATION VI, HERALD TRlBlNE. MONDAY. MAY 3. 1994 


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c>r 















Issuer 


Bond Issues 


Amount 

(nrifflons) 


Yellow Lights Are Flashing for U.S. Bond Markets 



Twins 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Treasury 


Secretary Lloyd Bemsea said Sun- 
“inflatii 


day that “inflation 


to be 


^±5?«Pon» 

il^Coprtoi 


O"' 6-monfh Itxx. Non caOode proof? placement. Fern 
0425%. Denominahortt 5500.000. (Fuji Wit I Finance.) 


1 00.887 


I! 



— Beoffeted d 99.337. NorcdltsWe. Fee* 2%. (Wartwfl.) 


Reoffend a! 9746V NonedtaMe. Fees 256%. Denominations 
£10,000. ($qmuel Montagu.) 


™“ Reoffe^ed at 99J9d. Critahlf anytime. Feet 7%, (Bodays de 
Zoefe WedeLj 


NoncaSahta. Fees QJD5L (Cridrt Commercial dm Fmce.) 


fiteffered at 99J05- NoncaOafaie. Fees 7%. (5oerfcf* GMr- 
de.) 


— Reoffefed at 99 JO. Noncofabte. Fees ? ML (CtUa Lyonias.) 


' National 

Treasury Services 


m. 50,000 


1QQ.OO Reaffefed a t par. NcmoaUable. Fees IV {Sobabrak.) 

99 JO 


Coflabie at pen from IW6 Fungible wilh ou ittam ing mm, 
icbing total amount to 200.000 b*o n ire. Fees 2V (Oetfito 


A 


ooyensche 

%portiekfiiiund 

WechselBonk 

m. 150,000 

2004 

9% 

100w45 

99.20 

— — — — — 7 — 

NonuJLiJo. ices 2fc. (Banco Cotame/ ode Itaicua.) 

rtJ Schleswig hofaein 

m 150,000 

2004 

9* 

100 JO 

99 JO 

CnUfiWe ca po> front 1997. Feet 2%. [Banco Conwrbalc 
lldfonaj 

wecit Load de 

France 

ECU 100 

1999 

5% 

94.81 





out. rdung total amount ta 400 mMon Bern. Fern 1ft%. 
tSoofcto Gtntfde.) 

Toronto 

CS 165 

2004 

7% 

8 Yt 

100.949 

100% 

99.88 

9875 

feaffered a 99.949. NonodtoUe. Few 1 MV (Noowa I«1J 
Roofferad af 98V Noncnflabie. Fee 2V (Soofia McLeod.) 

4 

1 

o 

| 

Au475 

1999 

8 

101 jo 

98.13 

Sooffered a> 992 25. NoncoBabJe. Feet 7%. (AfflMnro.) 

Sdnwppes 

Australia 

Aw »75 

1999 

8 fc 

10149 

98 J» 

HoncrfttJte. Fees 2V [Bardcys de lathe Wedd) 

Deutsche Bank 
Australia 

Ai*5l50 

1997 

7 

100% 

9840 

Nonedfofele. Fees 2V (Deutsche Bank.) 

National Australia 
Bank 

AwS75 

1999 

8 

101J7S 

98J8 

Noncdlobie. Fees 2V (Hambros Bent] 

DSL Bank 

‘ Y 10.000 

1999 

190 

99.88 

— 

NonasAabie. Fees 0.25V Pttomiealiora lOmlton yen. (Mm- 
rill Lynch Wl) 

DSL Bank 

v 30,000 

1999 

3no 

100 

— 

Norccaobfo Fees 075%. Dcnominotions 10 ndSon yen. (No- 
mura tntlj 

Inter-American 
Development Bar* 

Y 10,000 

2006 

AY* 

100U75 

— 

NonaaOable. Fees not dsdated Denoranabora 100 nuKon 
yen. (Bank of Tokyo Capital Markets.) 

Inf'l Finance Carp. 

r 10,000 

1998 

4% 

102.95 

— 

NoncaOafale. Fungible Mth outstanding issue, raising laid' 
amount to 50 billon y«v Fees ra* dsetosed. (Swta-o Ml.) 

Mitsubishi CorpL 
Finance 

YlO^OO 

1995 

2jo 

700^7 

— 

NoncaBoble. Fees 0^5%. (Merrill Lynch Ml) 

Oesferreichische 

Kontralbank 

r 15,000 

1999 

165 

100 

— 

Nancdkfole. Fees 035V Denonwiraiora 100 iriKon yea (EU 
fort) 

Sweden 

Y 75,000 

1999 

334 

99J7S 

99.95 

Seraonnuaffy. Noncdlobie. Fees (L25V Deno—woirara 100 
nsRion yen. {Goldman Sachs Ml) 


a appears 
well under control" but the mar- 
kets, reeling from a second week of 
falling prices for U.S. government 
bonds, did not seem convinced 
Mr. Bentsen died indicators of an 
annual inflation rate between 2.7 
percent and 3 percent, depending on 
the yardstick, and said it compared 
favorably with what be said was the 
current growth rate of about 3 per- 
cent in the gross domestic product. 

“It’s a great time lo be secretary 
of the Treasury,” he said 
His confidence contrasted with 
markets where the dollar and bond 
prices took a pounding last week as 
traders warily scanned the horizon 
for signals of resurgent inflation. 

As prices fed the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond dosed the 
week with a yield of 7J1 percent, 
up from 123 percent a week earlier. 
7116 10-year note rose to 7.05 per- 
cent from 6S2 percent and the 
three-year note climbed to 6.07 per- 
cent from 6.00 percent. 

The focus this week will be on 
the April employment report that is 
due to appear on Friday. 

“Anything that smells like infla- 
tion has hurt us,” said Fred Leiner, 
a market strategist at Continental 
ftawlt in Chicago. 

Economists predicted the econo- 
my would show an addition of 
about 200,000 jobs in April and 
that the unemployment rate will 
remain the same at 6.5 percent. 

“There is fear in the market- 
place, there’s no question about it,” 
said William Gross, managing di- 
rector at Pacific Investment Man- 
agement Co„ referring to the em- 
ployment report. 

Any surprises in the data could 


cause a rout similar to the one suf- 
fered by the bond market when the 
March employment report showed 
an additional 456,000 jobs, almost 
double expectations. 

On Thursday , investors had been 
initially cheered by the report that 


U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 


the Commerce Department had re- 
ported economic growth in the first 
quarter at an annual rate of 16 


percent, less than half the 7 percent 
rate recorded in the fourth quarter 
of last year. But bond traders and 
investors soon focused on figures in 
the report that showed prices had 
risen more than expected. 

A weak first quarter “doesn't 
mean the expansion is over” and 
will not calm fears about inflation, 
said William Stevens, a managing 
director at Montgomery Asset 
Management. He said that growth 
of 2.6 percent was “not that weak. 


considering what wem on in the 
first quarter,” referring to the ef- 
fects of winter storms and die Us 
Angeles earthquake. 

in addition, the weakness of the 
dollar has weighed on the bond 

markets. 

“The dollar is the story" behind 
the rout in the bond market, said 
William Shea, head trader at Nikko 
Securities Co. International. “It's 
very negative for the bond. A lower 
dollar equals inflation." 


Finally, the conviction was 
growing in some sectors of the mar- 
ket that the Fed might again move 
soon to raise rales fora fourth time. 

Nothing in recent economic re- 
ports would “sway the Fed from its 
course” of raising rates, said Brad 
Tyk manager of bond futures trad- 
ing at Aubrey G. Lanston & Co. 

“The bottom line is a very Jong, 
drawn-out bear market." (Reuters, 
Bloomberg, Knighi-Ridder ) 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, May 2 - May 6 


A schedule of tha tveefc's economic ana 
evens, oompriat tor Bto imams- 

ttona) Herald Tnbune by Ooontoerg Bust- 

nesaNaws. 


Asia-Pacific 


• Maya Tokyo Aprrl new automobile 


Haag Kong XTte Bank of Chins to begin 
issuing banknotes in Hong Kong, becom- 
ing tM third Issuer after Hongkong & 
Shanghai Banking Corp. and Standard 
Chartered Bank. 

Hong Kong trader Dealing Tribunal to 
being an lnqm/y into the trading of Suc- 
cess Holdings, winch Is now known as 
Wslsfn Hong Kong Corp. 

Earnings expected Coles Myer. South 
China Morning Pom. 

• MagS WeSJngton Km Zealand bal- 
ance of payments data lor December 
Quarter 

• May 4 Canbarra Prime Minister Paul 
Keating to launch white paper on employ- 
ment and Industry policy. 


Europe 


April 


• Mays Cu m Genes) Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade holds monthly meet- 
ing ot nstng council 

Ha M InkI March unemployment rate. 
Forecast; i S.4 percent 
London April M-0 money supply. Fore- 
cast Up 1.6 percent in month, up 5.9 
percent in year. 

Mce, France ZTth annual meeting of the 
governors ol the Asian Development 
Bank begins. Through May 5. 

Earnings expected DSM. Watta. Asea 
Brown Borari. 

• May* Strasbourg European Parlia- 
ment votes on whether to admrt Austria. 
Flnuno. Sweden and Norway to the Euro- 
pean Union. 

Bu Sta gamMMd BAT industries; Phil- 
ips Electronics. Tate & Lyle. 

• Mays Frankfurt Wee German April 
unemployment rate. Forecast: Up. 23£00. 
East Gamun April unemployment rale. 
Forecast: Down 2D.OOO. 

Earnings ex p ec te d Body Shop, British 
Petroleum. 

a May 6 Bruaaaia EU ComtHsaon 
President Jacques Dolors meats Japa- 
nese Pnme fchnteter Tsuiom© Hate »dl»- 
cuss trade relations. 

Porta French fourth quarterly preduo 
ton. Forecast Up 05 percent m month. 


is expected to announce measures to 
boost exports, reduce Imports and in- 
crease employment In depressed seed. 
• May3 Washington Maren construc- 
tion spenring. 

Buenos Abas Apn! inflation. Outlook: 
Up about 0.1 percent. 

New York Kmart Corp. executives will 
hold a briefing at the Miflentam Hotel to 
dtanusn the company's plans to issue 
stock w its specialty retail dMsJora. 
Anchorage, Alaska Exxon Valdez cw« 
trial opens. 

New Orleans Sucercomm W expo fea- 
tures new switches and computers trom 
major manufacturers including AT8T 
Corp.. L.M. Ericsson Telephone Co., 
Northern Telecom Ud. and Hewlett-Pack- 
ard Co. Through May 5. 


unemployment rata. 

Frankfurt March industrial production. 
Forecast Up 0.5 percent n month. 

Rnma Apn) consumer price mdax. Fore- 
cast Up 4.1 percent in year 
Zurich April unemployment rata. 

■ May 2 Frnkkai Bundesbank Infor- 
mation seminar for the press. 

London Chartered institute of Purchas- 
ing Managers survey for April 


•May 1 Abate The National Associ- 
ation at Purchasrvg Management begins 
its annual conference. Through May 4. 
Buenos Alraa Argentine President Car- 
los Menem to make Traditional May Day 

speecb to Congress. Outlook: Mr. Menem 



Toronto Anderson Consulting wilt re- 
lease a survey of Canadians' attitudes 
toward infor ma tion technology. 


• May 3 Washington March leadmg 
economic indicators. 

Attante The National Association ot Pur- 
chasing Management releases its annual 
economic forecast. 

New York Trial expected to open on at 
legations Delta Ak is responsible for Pan 
Am Corp s 1991 bankruptcy because II 
withdrew a financial commitment. 
Toronto Accounting firm KPMG vrili dis- 
cuss gettsig rid ol Canada's 7 percent 
valued-added goods and services tax 
Santa Clara, Cstfbmfa Israel hosts a 
roundtable luncheon cm growth in tha 
country's technology industries. 
Earnings expected Chlqulta. General 
Re, MB1A. Snapple. 

• May 4 Washington March factory 
orders. 

Detroit Automakers report U.S. aaiac ol 
cars ana trucks for Aprfl. 

WHUngt u p The Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem releases its Tan Book report on cur- 
rant economc conditions. 

• May S Washington Labor Depart- 
ment reports productivity and costs for 
the firta quarter. 

Various efttes Mcyor U.S. retailers report 
Apnl sales results. 

Sao Paulo April inflation. Outlook, up 
from 45.43 percent a month. 

New York Colgate-Palmolive Co. holds 
Ka annual meeting. 

• Mays 

Washington Federal Reserve Board re- 
ports March consumer credit. 
Washington April employment report. 
Mo De Janeiro state-controlled mining 
company Mlneracao Caraiba end com- 
puter company Cobra Computadores arc 
scheduled to be auctioned to Investors. 


China’s Bond Sale Makes Fast Start 


MABKETS: Traders See Yen as Nexus of Volatility 


Continued fro® Page 9 
accumulating surpluses and at the 
same lime refuse to spend the cash. 
“Something has to give;” he says. It 
is a mau« of “economic arithmetic 
and logic.” 

With no immediate prospect of a 
coDapse in the trade surplus, Mr. 
Brown argues that there are several 
possible outcomes: 

• The yen has to rise so high — 
say. to a rate of 80 to 90 yen per 
debar Jctiar-tbe cucrenrlOl.fiO — 
tint Japanese investors perceive do 
exchange ri& in exporting capital 

• Japanese inter est rates and 
bond yields faff so kw that Japa- 
nese investors are ready to accept 
the exchange risk for much higher- 
yieWing foreign assets. 

• Worries about the exchange 
rate are riirmnaied by a resolution 
of the simmering trade dispute with 
the United States. 

Awaiting the outcome has led to 
terrific upward pressure on theycn 
as exporters cash foreign earnings 
for local currency, domestic inves- 
tors stay home and foreign inves- 
tors continue to buy Japanese 
stocks. The appreciation of the yen 
has been resisted by heavy daffy 
intervention, by the Bank of Japan, 
which fears that a higher yen will 
price goods made in Japan out of 
world markets and add to the slow- 
down already plaguing the econo- 


ulated by US. banks, which bor- 
rowed low-cost short-term money 
to buy much higher-yielding bcods. 
As short-term rates moved up, the 
banks naturally moved oul 
The banks should have been re- 


sake,” insists Neal M. Soss at CS 
First Boston in New York. 

Simon Crane, a London-based 
adviser to bank traders, agreed and 
said that the style of the interven- 


CompHtd bp Our Staff From Dupattka 

BEIJING — Only a third of the 
way into the issuing period, China 
has sold almost half of its huge 
1994 treasury bond issue, the offi- 
cial China Daily reported. 

As of Wednesday, 41.6 billion 
yuan ($5 billion) of the 87 billion 
yuan issue of two-year and three- 
year bonds had been bought, the 
paper said Saturday. 

But a government official still 
said the issue had to be pushed 
hard if h was to be completed on 
schedule. 

The issuing period is from April 
I to June 30, but the paper quoted 
Luo Gan, secretary-general of the 
Slate Council China 's cabinet, as 


don — only once against the yen 
placed by foreign investors rushing and four tunes against the Dcut- urging finance officials not to let up 
to boy U S assets on the expcaa- sche mark — confirmed ihai Wash- rn their promotion work, 
tion that higher interest raxes 


my, 


.. Meanwhile, the U-S-j administra- 
tion, apparently oblivious to the 
effects of the globalization of n- 

naKialxnaikets.haspuisuedcouii- 

terprodoctive pcAides in the course 
of the trade dispute because the 
weak performance of the dollar has 
coutnbDted » the confusion m 
'American finance markets. 
The U-S. bond market hm been 

badly rattled ever since the Federal 

Reserve Board began raising inter- 
est rates in early rebniary anaibat 

r^rv^jssessisecho^inihep^f^ 

mace of the stock market The 
bond market bad largely been pop- 


would mean a higher value cox the 
dollar. 

Not only has that not happened, 
but the Fed’s water-torture pbficy 

hasl^taff potentkl^md market 
buyers adorned by uncertainty 
about just how far it intends to 
push up rates. WrasesriB, the weak 
dollar — by stimulating growth as a 
result of increased U3. exports and 
raising inflation fears as a result of 
import prices — threatens to re- 
quire even stiff er Fed action on 
interest rales. 

The resulting volatility in the 
U.S. bond market is exceptional, 
with daffy price declines of about 2 
percentage points. Yields, which 
move inversely to prices, have risen 
sharply — up 163 baas points, or 
1H percentage -points, since the 
start of theyear on two-year paper, 
up 126 basis points on 10-year pa- 
per, and 97 basis points on 30-year 
bands. 

It is this volatitity — which risks 
nnsettlmg the stock market — that 
prompted the United States to in- 
tervene in the foreign e xcha n ge 
market last week, analysts said. 

In unusual public comments 
confirming intervention on Friday, 
Treasury and Fed o ffi c i al s empha- 
sized the aim of reducing “exces- 
sive volatifity” and taming “disra- 
dedy markets" bat faffed to specify 
whether they were talking about 
the currency market or the bond 
market 

“The intervention was aimed at 
trying to calm domestic financial 
markets rather than at mmspulat- 
ing exchange rates fra its own 


ington was not signaling special 
concern about the yen exchange 
rate. 

This is worrisome, added Mr. 
Cranes “It says Washington is wor- 


“The issuing plan of treasury 
bonds must be completed on 
schedule in order to maimain the 


sustained, rapid and sound growth 
of the national economy." the pa- 
per quoted Mr. Luo as saying. 

The bond issue is the cornerstone 
of Beijing’s battle against inflation. 
Starting this year, the central gov- 
ernment will not print money to 
finance its deficit, which is forecast 
to double from last year’s level to 
around 67 billion yuan. Instead, it 
will issue bonds to cover increased 
spending on energy, transportation 
and agriculture. 

Chinese people interviewed at 
banks said they had bought the 
bonds because they paid interest 
more than a full percentage point 
above that paid on bank deposits 
— 13 percent for the two-year 
bonds and 13.96 percent for three- 
year bonds — and because the pro- 
tracted dump in the nation's new 
stock markets has made them wary 
of investing in equities. 


The interest rates, however, still 
run well behind the 20.1 percent 
rise in Chinese retail prices in the 
first quarter of 1994, compared 
with a year earlier. But the Finance 
Ministry’s promise that bonds can 
be cashed in before tbeir expiration 
dates on reasonable terms seems to 
have reassured many investors. 

While the response has been es- 
pecially warm in inland provinces, 
the bonds’ reception has been less 
enthusiastic in the more developed 
coastal regions, where the inflation 
rate is generally higher than the 
national average and there is a wid- 
er choice of investment opportuni- 
ties available. ( Bloomberg, AFP) 


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Venezuela's Currency 
Plunges 5% in One Day 


major instability currently stems 
from the absence of capital out- 
flows to offs* the huge Japanese 
trade surplus. 

“The longer there is a chance of 
the dollar below 100 yen, the worse 
the instability said Mr. Grant “If 
it goes bdow 100, the Japanese will 
repatriate thdr ftmds.^ They win sell 
bonds, stocks, land — all U-S. as- 
sets. Ibat will escalate the pressure 
in U.S. fiiwTiciai markets and will 


A genet France- Prase 

CARACAS — The Venezuelan 
bolivar dropped about 5 percent 
against the dollar on Friday, the 
sharpest fall since currency con 
trols were lifted in 1983. 

Banks, foreign exchange offices 
and other financial institutions ran 
out of dollars even though central 
bank officials had pleaded for 
moderation and asked that banks 
dispense dollars only to people in 


require ever greater intervention to special need. The currency’s drop 
stop the dollar from going down to apparently_arose from rumors that 


the arid-SOs.” 

Mr. Crane warned that a dollar 
valued at less than 100 yen would 
“set off triggers for people to do 
t hin gs- There are a lot of currency 
options that have been written and 
if we break below 100, the impact 
of those options would increase — 
it would accentuate the amount of 
dollars th at would have to be sold 
in order to neutralize those options. 
Therefore the amount of interven- 
tion that will have to be done will 
be greater as wdL” 

He conceded, however, that “if 
we are headed fra the mid-80s. then 
the faster we get there the better 
Intervention aimed at slowing the 
move “only increases the agony,” 
be asserted. 

Is any event, he forecast a vola- 
tile week in the foreign exchange 
market as operators test for a clari- 
fication of U.S. intentions. 


President Rafael Caldera planned 
to resume controls for the flow of 
foreign exchange. 


Federated Raises Its Bid for Macy 


NEW YORK^ 

.SfssseLJM, -aay; 

rnraelban det™- 

** An,enc&s 

• on its stock 

• . the fc F jJf! t f u ^ d Usi^Sy' s closing pnoe 

Ijwon* Pta would 


pay Macy creditors with a combination of $1.8 bxffion 
of debt and $925 million of its stock, retaining $556 


minion of its shares to “wpay” itself for S449 million 
: it boras through a subsidiary. 


of Many’s debt that 
Although its plan values Macy at about $150 hnl- 
Eon less than a competing proposal that Macy submit- 
ted Friday, analysts and traders said Federated’s pro- 
posal was inherently stronger because the market has 
already qtBfrfrrheri a value for its stock. 

Macy gave its creditors a revised plan of reorganiza- 


tion to 


to 


enrage some junkir creditors but was intended to neu- 
tralize opposhoo. The total valued the revised Macy 

al changed little from the plan it submitted 
23, but it was apportioned differently among 
creditors. (NYT, Bloomberg) 


Euromarts 
At a Glance 


Eurobond Yields 


Asr.BAff-.a trtasti rrtow 


U5.&ta«tena 

7X2 

726 

742 

421 

OlLotelm 

tst 

US 

6.77 

545 

LLS.S, start tone 

6 34 

6.1* 

07 

441 

Peseta stmties 

m 

743 

648 

6 3* 

Preach Macs 

LM 

434 

U* 

547 

ttotitaUre 

ast 

8 M 

ass 

7Jt 

Doahh krona 

6Ji 

6J7 

471 

420 

Stoedbbknaa 

uo 

an 

132 

744 

ECU. Icae term 

7J0 

13* 

745 

4U 

ECU. maa term 

US 

647 

477 

54) 

OW.S 

M0 

LSD 

LS6 

4X 

Ass.} 

US 

LX 

LX 

457 

NX.S 

13k 

737 

&27 

W7 

Yta 

171 

179 

LOT 

247 


Scare*; Luxembourg Stock Exc h ange. 


WMidySalM 

PrWnrMertrat 


Apr. 28 


Cedel 

EunOtar 


s tom 

s 

Hoes 

Sfntabts 

66J0 74BJ0 

40206 

76146 

Comrt. 

— 270 

— 

40140 

FKWs 

746 — 

77460 

42160 

K7 

5*840 Vote 1248540 

X4W50 

TWd 

5U2L30 3.1S7X 1346240 

6467 JO 

ta«tai|tellBI 




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Eeroctenr 


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s 

Meta 

StraMtt 

UW JO 2O366J0 JS46160 2945740 

Cranm. 

S6U9 61160 

143540 

IMS 

FSW 

imm 148140 3MB9.10 

47S7J0 

ECP 


74SL60 2241740 


Tata] 31.WJ0 2U»UD M2 VJO SUI240 

Source: Eurodear. CMH 


Libor Rates 


Apr. 29 


P — 4 M u tt* 


ecu 

Yea 


sint, 

sznt 

513/16 

515/16 

2snt 


MWK 

4 snt 

9b 
55 nt 

5 13/16 
515/16 
isnt 


411/16 
5Vh 
5 7/16 
5T3/14 
ft 
17/16 


Sourcas: uevas Bank. Reuters. 



o^y Rotes 

■ted «2*S 
count rote 

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jerol funds refe 


Apr. 29 Apr. 22 , 
100 1D0 

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69* 

600 

SJS 

545 

SAS; 

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ftpr.22 

OT' 

36945 

+ «.*. 


PRI-CHAUENGE 
Swiss' Small and Mid-Cap Fund 

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1994 risant 1 modifier le prospectus, revaluation dc la valrar de Tariff 
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FINANCIAL 




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Pape 12 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


INTERNATIONAL HERAT,!) TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 2, 1994 


Dir TIB lOOsMsh lm DM 


OTC Consolidated trading tor week 
ended Friday. April 29 

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TRAVELERS: fasurance-SalM 

Continued from Page 9 mericY Financial uses techniques, jtfcii “But. m ; w!? 


Continued from Page 9 

E oduce S 1.000 a month working part-iizne and 
id to a management Job. 

The opportunity is selling Primerica insurance 
—and those offered the chance are expected to 
buy some for -themselves. The big bucks, they 
bdxcvc, come from spreading the gospel of term 
insurance as they sefl, rccromm other agents and 
encouraging them to recruit still more, with each 
recruiter taking a stare of the commissions from 
all those who sign on later. • 

But those who sign up with Primerica Hnan- 
dal may not get as sweet a deal as they expect. 
Mr. Roussis assured the recruits they would not 
be asked for any money other than a S350 fee for 
desses needed to meet state licensing require- 
ments, “and we reimburse you S225 of that" 

In fact, the S225 reimbursement comes from 
a $75 credit given for each of the first -three sales 
made by licensed agents to prospects recom- 
mended by the recruit. Those agents and their, 
superiors set to keep the rest of the commis- 
sions, winch typically range front $200 to $700. 

Peter M Dawkins, who was brought in to 
revive the sagging spirits of the sales force in 
1991, conceded some agents may go too far in 
their pitches. But he said Primenca Financial's 
basic approach was legitimate and represented 
a good dal for customers. 

“This is a remarkable institution with a prod- 
uct for the vast middle class, which is the right 
product of real value to them,*' he said. 

Tq fact, however, the company appears to be 
up to many of its old tricks. Visits torts training 
and recruiting sessions as well as an examina- 
tion of its sales brochures and customer de- 
scriptions of sales presentations show that Pri- 


merica Financial uses techniques at hat 
regulators have tolerated but that some spedm- - 
fets gay are misleading and sometimes daagSv, 
ous to a customer s financial security; ' ' V' 

Term life is often recommended for jmddlt: 
dassTamilies by insurance specialists because 
its lowoost allows than to boy far mean cover- 
age lhaii with other kinds of insurance. The low ' 
premium is possible because rim 'insurance, 
does not build op a cash value that could be 
tapped m.ia*er years. . ' 

But Primerica ^nts try to get enstomers to 
switch from other forms of ksnmnce ihat do 
have cash-value provisions — -and thus cos t 
more — -no matter what the circumstances. 

When Louis D. Trani of JHHlsborough, New 
Jersey, was approached th&year by a Primerica 
F inancial agent to buy insurance, hewas will- 
ing io listen, even though be had coverage from 
his employer and New York life. 

“Right away he started talking about how 1 
should buy term insurance and invest die dif- 
ference,*' Mr. Trani said, noting that there -was 
no discossimi of the future financial deeds of • 
his Family nor of his investment habits and . 
financial planning. . . 

He gave the agent copies of has existing ' 


yuuuu <UiU ivwi* w a t! Y . , . • 

. prepared by Primerica Financial. Bui 1 after re-~ 
viewing the comparison, Mr. Tram, ^certified 
public accountant who i$ more educated than 
the average Primerica Financial agent, was not 
willing to buy the pp&y he had betm offered. 

The premium on the Primerica Financial 
poHcyserined low -— S477 a year for a 20-year, - 
5200,000 policy, compared with $1,240 for a 
$100,000 whole life policy. -. 


true, but Twbeen rsceifctg *«» ewnr 

Primerica Fmanci^ is often enhozed for nyi 
mclotSng dividends paid do cash-yalit e pq licie j 
when cqmparingiboso policies wilb'Fnnienca 

insurance. " . 

That is the practice, said Lyndon L. Olson 
ir n a group executive vice presidfinrat Primcr- 
ica Financial and former, head of the Tews 
Departmentof' Insurance. because "dividends 
are riot guaranteed and “other insurance awt- 
parties won’t give us their dividend history- 
. . Agents ai cither companies sooffed ai Mr- 
Ofomfr aq HaatihBt swig. that dividend his- 
tories arecasfly obtained by-having the_cnston> 
er ask. the insurer for tterij- ' 

As .it happens, in other parts, of their sale- 


OUU1TO B 

from a 6 percent annual return to 12 percent 
■J While some ag»» use an_8 percent assump- 
tion, othcrs arriioclmed to tajlc about fire higher 
rate, *We umaify use LZperagnti* said one 
agent at A training session.: ••_. • 

: Tire agents' single safes pitch — . Bi t>juy tern* 
. "and invest tbe.difference' 1 — also glosses over 
Or ignores the fact-that a change to another 
policy ebold result in the loss c£ somebuilt-up 
: cash ^vahie ormighi not suit the seeds of aD 
familie s, am many wfco buy anew' term policy 
never do invest die difference and thus lore the 
savings feature they had before ... . 


■QH 1 ' 




Stocks Dtv Via 100* Mah Low Ow ' 


CfOwOb - 2X1714 12% 14 

Gordon _ 2134% 13% 14 

C«MS _ *47 17% 14% 14*1 ■ 

OuUSou _ 2771 «V, 2X% 24% < 

Gtftnrk _ 22 12% nv» 11% • 

Gupta .92934 23'A 12 15%- 

(MWl JO ft4 12 2PA 23% SIV, 
Gvmbrae » 40(444% 4M 45% h 




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^ed, led the New 

5- ■■'25 . Jers f> °o Sunday and a 2-0 

their best^fivTpIayoff 

^ 25 points in the 
£*■?““ «x minutes of the second 
jpy ter. Ten of those points were 
wmeentrated in the three mimjus 
Ev ^g was qjected from the 
mto - drawing his second 


nbaplayoits 


*.:•- tfidmical foul The bum gave New 
/ASS* Paying at home, a 55-33 
lit halftime lead 

US;--' ^ .5 e!s a & aDe of « in 

• -the thud quaitex, starting with a 
714 sport m the first 5:10 to pull 
1 within 5. It was 70-64 after three 
..^quarters, bat the closest the Nets 
• jpl in the fourth quarter was 70-66 
as they missed their first eight shots 
•of the period. 
w-J.’New Jersey shot just 29 percent 
' ,ftOm the field, an NBA playoff 
;nsoofdk>w. 

' Ewiitg was gected with 5:21 left 
jn the second period when he and 
-Derrick Coleman exchanged 
.bumps after a Kindts’ basket gave 
-diem a 41-30 lead. Both were called 
■- lor technical fouls, but because Ew- 
- mg also was pari of a double teeb- 
t . l . afcal with Benoit Benjamin in the 
• : ‘.;first quarter, he was tossed from 
^ ; the game. 

'• Kenny Anderson scored 21 
■>. 'points and Coleman had 15 points 
; and 21 rebounds for the Nets, who 
> -play host to the Knicks in Game 3 
of the series on Wednesday. 

Placers M3, Marie 101: Indiana 
earned a crucial playoff road vie- 
• lory Saturday by Cutting down 
: one of the NBA’s highest scoring 
{ players: Shaquflle CYNeaL 

" Reggie Miller scared 32 prints 
and the Pacers limited O’Neal to a 
season-low 15 points in a victory 
-that moved them closer to winning 
their fust NBA playoff series. 

The Pacers continually sent 
O'Neal to die frec-throw hne. He 


finished 3-for-8 from the field and 
Mor-18 from the line. 

The Pacers, who play host lo the 
Magic on Mondav night, led by 9 in 
the fourth quarter before the Magic 

rallied, despite playing tbe first 
four minutes of the period without 
OTSeal who had five fouls. 

Dennis Scott, scoreless with sev- 
en minutes left in tike game, made 
three 3-pointers and bad 11 prints 
down the stretch, including a 3 - 
printer that cut Indiana's lead to 
103-101 with 31 seconds remaining. 

Four teams in NBA history have 
come back from 2-0 deficits to win 
a five-game series, but only one — 
the Phoenix Suns last year — were 
able to do it after losing the first 
two at borne. 

Jazz 96, Spars 94: The Jazz limit- 
ed San Antonio to 25 points in the 
second and third quarters — in- 
cluding a 16-minute stretch in 
which they were 0-for-25 — and 
evened the best-of-five series at 1-1 
with a victory in San Antonio. Da- 
vid Robinson, who scored 71 
points on April 24 to win the scor- 
ing title over O'Neal finished with 
just 12 points on 2-for-I4 shooting. 

Utah, which beat San Antonio 
five straight times in the regular 
season before losing Game 1, out- 
scored the Spurs, 30-9, in the sec- 
ond quarter for a 50-33 halftime 
lead. Tbe Spun’ second-quarter 
performance was an NBA record 
low for the second quarter of a 
playoff game and their final pro- 
duction of 94 points was the record 
fewest points scored in a playoff 
game. 

“We just fell asleep,” said John 
Lucas, the Spurs' coach. “The)’ 
flat-out beat us.” 

The Spurs made just five of 34 
shots in tbe two middle periods, for 
14.7 percent shooting, 

Robinson twisted bis right knee 
early in the third period, but re- 
turned to the game after a brief 
period on the bench. He is expected 
to play in Game 3 Tuesday at Salt 
Lake City. 

Hanks SM, Heat 86 : In Atlanta, 
Duane Ferrell came off the bench 
to score 23 points. 10 of which 



Bruins Outskate Devils 


Behind Casey’s 34 Saves 


Cempthd by Our Suff From Dapeucha 

Bryan Smolinski and David 
Shaw scored early and Jon Casey 
and the goalposts behind him made 
the lead stand as the Boston Bruins 
defeated the New Jersey Devils, 2- 
1, Sunday in Game 1 of their East- 
ern Conference playoff semifinal. 

The opener of the best-of-7 se- 
ries, in New Jersey, was a disap- 
pointment in that both teams 
seemed to be a little off their 
games. But maybe that was to be 
expected with both coming off 
emotional seventh-game wins Fri- 
day, whoa New Jersey knocked off 
Buffalo and Boston beat Montreal. 

Game 2 will be played here Tues- 
day night. 

While the level of play wasn't 
spectacular, there was plenty of ex- 
citement down the stretch as New 
Jersey tried to tie the game against 
Casey, who finished with 34 saves. 
The Devils came close at least five 
times. 

Casey stopped Claude Lemieux 
on a short-handed breakaway early 
in the period and then the goal- 
posts came into play. Randy Mc- 
Kay hit the right one mi a break- 
away with 15:15 to play. Five 
minutes later, Bruce Driver hit the 
left post with a shot from the blue 
line and Bemie Nicholls. who 
scored the Devils’ goal, was 
stopped by what appeared to be a 
combination of Casey’s glove and 
the cross bar on the rebound. 


Devils goalie Martin Brodeur, 
who gave up just two goals in ihe 
final two games of tbe Sabres' se- 
ries, gave up two in the opening 

7:22 

Sharks 3, Red Wings 2: San Jose 
stunned Detroit to win tbe seventh 
game of ihdr Western Conference 

quarterfinal series on Saturday, 


STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 


completing the greatest single-sea- 
son reversal in NHL history. 

The victory in Detroit sent the 
Sharks, who won just 11 games last 
season and finished 18 points be- 
hind Detroit this past regular sea- 
son, to tbe Conference semifinals 
against tbe Toronto Maple Leafs. 
Thai series begins Monday night. 

Jamie Baker gave San Jose the 
winning margin when he fired a 
slap shot into a virtually open net 
with 6:35 left in the third period. 
Baker took advantage of a bad 
clearing pass by Detroit’s rookie 
goal tender Chris Osgood to score 
the winning goal 

Kevin Constantine coached the 
Starks to victory in his rookie sea- 
son and defeated Detroit's Scotty 
Bowman, who has more Stanley 
Cup playoff victories titan any 
coach in NHL hisUMy at 140. 


the second overtime; gave tbe Ca- 
nucks the victory ova- Flames on 
Saturday night in Game 7 of West- 
ern Conference quarterfinals. 

The Canucks will now travd to 
Dallas to take on the Stars, who 
have been idle for a week after 
sweeping St Louis in four games. 

Bure took a lead pass from Jeff 
Brown and beat Calgary goal tend- 
er Mike Vernon as the Canucks 
became the 10th team since 1987 to 
rally from a 3-1 deficit to win a 
playoff series. 

Vancouver’s Greg Adams forced 
the overtime by scoring with 3:37 
left in the third period. 

Brians 5, OmacKens 3: In Boston 
on Saturday. Ted Donato and 
rookie Fred Knipscheer each had a 
goal and an assist as the Bruins 
ousted the defending Stanley Cup 
champion Canadiens. 

The Bruins never trailed after 
Glen Murray fired a slap shot past 
Patrick Roy from the top of the 
right face-off circle at 3:43 of the 
first period. Donato made it 2-0 

J ust over eight minutes later when 
le beat Roy with a blast as he 
crossed the Montreal blue line. 


Canucks 4, Flames 3: In Calgary, 
Pavd Bure's second goal of the 
game, on a breakaway at 2:20 of 


Devils 2 Sabres 1: At New Jer- 
sey on Saturday, the Devils won 
their first playoff series since 1988. 
Claude Lemieux served the game- 
winner with 6:11 left in the second 
period, just two seconds after Doug 
Bodger’s hooking penalty expired 
for Buffalo. ( Reuters, AP) 


Italy , the Host 9 Advances in Worlds 


Retaen 


Nbriud Wibm/A^wc France-Picur 

ShaqmDe O’Neal, who was held to 15 points, faring Rick Smits during Orlando's loss to Indiana. 


came after his basket and a hard 
foul by Grant Long ignited a brawl 
as the Hawks evened the series, 1-1. 

Long fouled Ferrell 234 left in 
the third quarter, Ferrell pointed at 
Long and said something, Long be- 
gan choking Ferrell players cm the 
court started pushing and shoving 
and both benches emptied. Order 
wasn't restored for at least seven 
minutes. 


Reserves Keith Aslans of the 
Heat and Doug Edwards of Atlan- 


ta exchanged punches and were 
gected, as was Long. 

Fared then made his free throw 
to rive Atlanta a 74-66 lead, and 
Craig Ehlo got 6 of his 17 points in 
the final 1:28 of the quarter as 
Atlanta went ahead. 82-71. 

Atlanta led, 90-81, with. 7:29 left, 
and FeneU scored six points in a 1 3- 
2 run that widened the lead to 20 . 

Game 3 is Tuesday night at Mi- 
ami. 

SnperSonics 97, Nuggets 87: 


Gary Payton scored 18 points and 
Sam" Perkins hit a critical 3-pointer 
in the final three minutes as Seattle 
overcame 27-for-42 free-ihrow 
shooting to beat Denver. 97-87, 
Saturday night. The Super Sonics. 
playing at home: took a 2-0 lead in 
their first-round playoff series. 

Seattle, the No. 1 seed in the 
West with an NBA-best 63 regular- 
season victories, can win the best- 
of-5 series Monday night at Den- 
ver. 


BOLZANO, Italy — Italy, the 
host team, qualified for tbe quarter- 
finals of tbe world ice hotkey cham- 
pionship by beating Austria, 3-1, on 
Sunday, thanks to a moment of in- 
spiration by Lucio Topaiigh. 

The right winger scored what 
proved to be tbe winning goal in 
the 25th minute when he received a 
pass behind the net Before anyone 
could react be pushed the puck 
forwards with his stick and sneaked 
it into the comer by the left post 

The victory gave the Italians four 
points and with one game to go. 
they cannot be caught by Austria 
or Britain, the two bottom teams in 
Group A. Russia and Canada have 
already qualified and Germany 


need only draw with Italy on Mon- 
day to join them. 

On Saturday, the Swedish team, 
tbe Olympic champion, finally dis- 
covered its form, easily defeating 
the previously unbeaten United 
States. 6-2 


Canada and Russia, the defend- 
ing world champion, both main- 
tained perfect records ahead of 
their game on Monday. Canada 
beat Britain, 8-2, while tbe Rus- 
sians dismissed Germany, 6-0. 


The Swedes, who had lost. 5-3. u> 
Finland and drawn, 3-3. with lowly 
Norway, cracked in five unan- 
swered second period goals in less 
than 10 minutes against the Ameri- 
cans on Saturday. Tbe defeat left 


tbe U.S. team in second place in 
Group B, a point below Finland, 
which beat France, 8-1. 

Left winger Jlri DolezaTs late 
equalizer gave the Czech Republic 
a 2-2 draw with Norway, which 
should be enough to see his team 
through to the quarterfinals, 

Russia, hardly recognizable from 
the jet-lagged team mat struggled 
to beat Austria, 4-1, on Friday, 
locked in fine form against the 
Ge rmans, Alexei Zhilnik, Igor Fe- 
dulov and Dmitry Yushkevich 
scored within five minutes at the 
start of the first period. 

Canada scored in the first 20 
seconds against the hapless British, 
who had conceded 26 goals in their 
previous three games. 


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_ In; 44* 4ft 4V* 

„ 6057 lift Win 11% -Vj 

xno 3 1023* IB'* 25ft 27 -1 

_ am 5 < 4 —to 

.. 1504 ft- % 

_ 0809 4ti 3% 4' i — '.* 

\oo ts a«69'-* *7 &a -1 1 
.10e 4 o37 1.’to 13 13 —ft 

Sf» Aft *% i: % 

18 Eft 21 31 —ft 

336914-1 13ft 14ft -ft 
61 Bft X 73 ■ 1 

maftav, »% .% 
2801 36toJ2 35 *3 

137 4to 4'-. 

$90 7ft 6% 

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766 20ft 20 

158 1714 17 


M 33 


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7% 


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_ 86 8'i f, 7ft 

- 452 S’-* 5ft SV., 

SunSvpl 1 JO 10.0 x25 12 12 17 

SundHme ._ 1417 IDto 9 9'.* 

SunGrd .. 4841 Eft 34'i 3’ 

_ 9110 37V, 35ft 37 

.151 SJ 41 2f. r.r Jft 


-1* 


.NY 
SunLifl 
SunrTc 
SunAAnwi 
SunwTs 

to 1 SuaRte 
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_ 109 16V 
_ 742 5% 

- 6814 S J'.* 4to 

_ 167S to 'ft, .'•••r 

_ 613 «’• B', 9' , 

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—to 


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_ 38 4ft 4 4% “% 
_ 2 773 5% 5% 5% “ft 

- 3022 IB 16'., 16% — ft 
_ 4939 73ft 69%73ft*“3«J,, 

- 721 19 to 18% 18% “ to 

_ 471 4% 3ft 4 — % 

_ 713 3 2ft 2% “to 

- 1080 to ft, % +%* 

... KD24-A Eft 24% *1% 

- 9*6 5ft 5W 5ft —ft 
.. 3301 12ft lOft 11% - lft 
_ 5901 IBft 17ft 17% — % 

SI 1(7 lift 11 II _ 
.. 710 12V* II 11% “ft 

._ BB9 Bto 6% Tto— lto 

- 1439 *% 6ft 6% _ 

- 165214ft 13% Uto +% 

- «57 6ft tft —ft 

.800 1-4 306 58 55 57 —to 

SO a 1.6 2643 SOft 40 to 49 —to 

_ 5468 3V,, 3ft 3V M — ft, 
_ 349 9ft Aft 8ft *1 

_ 814 7 5V. 6ft “to 

_ 1937 13% 12% 12% — % 
_ 2021 <V B % 'to “ft: 
_ 116957 70ft 18% 19% +% 
_ 0691 11% 10ft lift “to 
.. 1918 14% 13ft 13% —ft 
1606 3% 3ft 3% —to 
_ 8440 65% 60% 63% “3U 

- 5696 4% 3% 3Mto “V* 

_ 2W014 17% 12to “to 

.? 5657 16% 14% 16% “1% 
_ m 11 % 10% 10% “% 

.. 17697 19to ICto 18% “III 
1 .38 30 ia*3ft 47 *2 

_ 61 3% 3ft Uto —ft 

395 20ft 19% JOto “lto 

2115 Bft 7% 8% “% 

JO# .7 3482 a 2SW!6to“lft 
a 12ft 12 12 —V* 

- 1062 13 11% 13 “to 

_ 393 4ft 3% 4 *% 

_ 372 5% 5% 5% _ 

772 15% Uto 14to —to 
217 T7 17 “ft 
165 18 17 18 “% 

39*30% 28ft 30% “to 
1.1 l«b*24ft Eft 24% “lft 

- 59444 S9Vi* SOftSS’Yu +9to 

- 839 2 1ft ' 

_ 5288 21 

- 1520 12 

- as 2 ft 

_ 134 ft 

3 7 

- 4578 12 

- 845 Uta 13ft 14% 4% 

J7e A 6 Wto 63ft 63ft “ft 

_ _ 2191 3% 3% 3ft “ft 

Tmk olcs JOe 12 92515% 15 15ft “% 
Tomphn IJKIbll 1137 16 37 *1 

JS 4.1 3100 6% A# u 6% “to 
_ 1289 7% 6ft 7to 

_ IBS 4% 4 4 ", + ft 

... 115813 10 12 +1% 

za 16ft 15 16ft -to 
269 9Va 9 0% ♦ % 

- J£S gjb 5to 5% +% 

„ 2038 8V» 7V. 8 “ft 

- 2693 24% 21% 74% “lto 

8 13% 12% 13 “% 

2W 14% »'.* 13% “to 
2 3% 3% 3% —ft 

- 4513 17 to lJto .. 

- 105 7to lft lto 

- B257 3% 7ft 3ft 

- IIS lft 1% lft 

- 5397 lil'A 10 lOto ♦ V* 
32 4ft 4ft 4ft “Vu 

4788 15 II 11% 

.. 1387 19% 17% Uto tft 

- 107B 7’k 3 3Vu “Vu 

284 13 12% 12% 

4 15 15 15 “1 

156 7ft 7ft ?to —% 
188 16% lfcto 14’A —ft 
*59 3*% 35ft 36'. V “to 

.. 470* 3ft 2'i 3 “ft 
. 446 15% Uft 15ft “ft 

. 3147 Sft 4%u S 

32910% 9% 10 —ft 

- 8928 17% lift 11% —to 

-40b 2.1 4019ft 19 19 —ft 

1 00 4J W21 15ft 71 T 3 

478 IS", 13% 15ft • 1 

... 0933 13ft I!'., 12 _% 


US Can 
UFBcn 

UMBFn 
UNR 
UNR W1 
UMSL 
USHmcr 
usume 
USLono 
US Wire 

USA CIS 

USA MW 

USATrs 

USMX 

U5TCP 

UBPOC 

UKrcftS 

UltroBfe 

UirroSMP 

UnlcnA 

UnTOe, s 

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JO 1.9 
JObTJ 
30034 


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826 17% 17V. 17% —ft 
705 264* 25ft 26ft *1% 
207 37ft TOft TOft - 

B64 5% 5% 5%. “ 'ft 

13 4% 4to 4ft 
8 26V, 26ft 26ft— 1 

- 1716 4% 3% 3Wu — ¥„ 

_ 35 4% 4% 4% —to 

_ 861212V, 11V. 12ft “1%. 

- JB4 3ft 3% “% 

_ 994 4% 4% 4% —to 

_ 321 9 Bft Bft 

- 120 17 16 16 —1 

- IS* 3ft 3% 

_ 4736 13% 13ft 13% + 

_ 420 5VV 4% 5to 

_ 40B 6ft 5to 6to 

_ usoiift Wto uft ♦% 

- 11TO»to 21to 23% “lto 

J)7e 1 J 108 5ft 5% Sto 

_ 39 5% 5 5to 

.12 1J IBM M 10% 10ft —ft 

- 15*8 3 2% 29* 

_ 4728 5ft 5to Sto “to* 
_ 130 3ft 2ft 3 

UnBnk 1<40 5L2 1353 27% 26ft 26ft —ft 

Uiflnkpf 2M 03 573 24ft 23% 24ft “ % 

UnekCp 1 JOe '4.1 3 74to 24’to 24to —to 

ItonBSh IJMelfJ 198 7 AVi 7 “to 

UPlntpfE TJX SJ X69T 36to 35% TOft —to 

UnSwtch _ 333 19ft TO TOft —ft 

UntewBB _ 690 8 Tto 8 “to 

UfYyfTC _ 517 4% 4 4ft 

UBWV MU AO 294 26% 26 26 —ft 

UCorBfc JO 34x1001 22 51 to 22 “to 

UCItCs MM 63 183 17 I* 16 

UnCosF& .40 1.1 2894 37% 35 TO —to 

UFlnSCS J2 I J 2577 71% 20V, 71to “1 

UFlreCS MB 18 26 3816 37 TO —to 

1317 6to 5% 6ft “ft 

1 4ft 4ft 4ft _ 

250 77 26 »% 

2345 14% 12 13ft— lft 

6132V, Eft 32 to— IV. 
289 9ft 6% B% —to 
. _ _ - ... 66 I*to WA 18ft —to 

US BcOR M 15 10509 25% 25 25%. — v u 

US Bn pf 2JO BJ 35B 24% 24ft 24ft “to 

US Err - i5D4n/„ 4% 4*v M +V M 

US Fad _ 23583 Uto loft 13ft +3to 

USKHTls JB lJ20B42142nft TO 37V,— Sft 
USPo&Sna _ 211 5ft 4ft «U —to 

US Ron _ 7690 33% 31 31% _ 

US Tnt 2.00 3J 1184 53 ft 52 57ft —ft 


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VisionSci 

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Vltlnn 

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Me 3 K612V, lift 11% — % 

_ 120 TA 2ft 3 _ 

_ 1533 5% 5 Sto - 
- 304517 16 16% ♦% 

_ 49711ft 9ft TOft “ft 
_ 70 Uft 10% liv* “% 

_ 1443 Sto 4ft 5% “to 
_ 291 15ft 14to 15ft _ 
_ 7109 21 TOft 20 _ 

_ 1517% 17 17Y> “IV, 

97 e Ml 427 93ft 891b 93% +4to 
» 1270 4Vi 4to 4% “ft 


w 


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WD40 2LO0a4J 109 4TA 42ft Oft “ft 

WLRFd 32 TJO 1344 32% 31 37 *% 

WFJGrp » 101 3to 3 Sto “to 

WP£GP JSelOJ 2102 3*%* 3"^. 3n,'i* -to 
WRT&1 _ 111 8% 8 8% —to 

WRTpl 7J5 iai 37427A%7lto 72V, “ft 


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UnBcpMJ 1.00b 11 
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ThmMA S 36 
Thmsn 
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TV*NWk 
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Todhunrr 
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17V, 19 -to 
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TOMApl 

TwRov 

TotCont 

TotITel 

TowrAir 

Tracer wi 

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TrnsFin 

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Tranm 

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Trnmods 
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Trnwt* 
Tr«:or«* 
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Triads, 
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TriCoBn 
TrieoPd 
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unvStdM 

UnvNII 1 TO] 63 

URenEl 1.17 69 
UranRes 
UftmOul 
Uramed 
USBPq 
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UfTK 


3% 3% 
2 2 
6ft 6% 
1% 1% 


rl 

“ft 

rft 

“ft 


2J 3H 1*ft 13% 14ft *ft 

_ 25045% 43W 45% “2to 

_ 620 13Y, 12% 1316 _ 

_ 413919% 18% 19to “ft 

<48 I <4 388 34 32 34 “2to 

,10ft A 47 54% 2* TOft “to 
1-40 34 1511 3? to 38to 39 —ft 
_ 7DU Sft 7 Bft 

„ 7932 6to 5to 61k 
<4 628 7% 7'h 7% 

- 47 4 

- 1 i 

- 168 7 

- 221 2 

_ 3202 Aft SV» Xl H 

- rm m 7 % b% 

16 31V, 29 29V4 —ft 

M 17% T6U IT 1 * “ . 

16 3% 3% 3ft —ft 

1540 25ft 22 23%— lft 

2700 6ft 5ft 6ft +ft 
22223ft 22% 22ft — % 
856 8 7% Tto “ft 

867 5ft 4% 5ft “ft 




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VLSI 

VSSBcs 

VSE 

VWH I 

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Vdmnt 

VolAdCm 

VdLn 

VcriVoA 

VydCI 

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VarBm 

Vaien 3 

VorSprt 

Vauaim 

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VeetnsTc 

VenexSld 

Vetrirtt* 

VettCtv 

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Veriftie 

Verriizs 

VtPn 

Versa 

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VertecC 

VemPtv 

VetO Am 

Vet Am wt 

Vkwene 

Vied l 

Vieor 

Vlcoro 

Vlafin 

VksFits 

VWDw 

VldeoL 

VSedoFr 

Viewto 

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- 7143 4% 4ft 4Vi - 

- 1057614ft 13ft 13ft “ft 
38 1J 1820% 20% 20ft - 
20 U *3 12% 12ft 13% + to 
40 16 18812 lift lift “ft 

... 1364 12% 11 lift - 
_ 200 1316 13 13 “ft 

.96 17 32035% 34ft 35ft “ft 

- 232 2% 1% 2Vk “to 

33 16 x524 13% 12 12% -1 
JO 1.9 68016 ft 14% 15V, - 

„ 321 4Yi 4ft 0% —ft 
JO 23 5536 34% 34% -ft 

- 7381 6 % 5ft 5% —1 

- 860633% 30% 33 “2ft 

-. 341 4% 5% 5% - 
_ 69 8% S 8% “ft 

<10 2.1 703 21ft 18% 18% —2ft 

_ 31 15% 15 15to -ft 

_ 120 5 4% 5 ♦*« 

_ 1744 9ft 8% 9ft “to 

- 155 7% 6% 7% “ft 
_ 968 9ft 7% Kfa “ft 
-15407 18% Uft 18V* “1% 
_ 375 2to 2to 2to 

38 4,1 2 7% 6% 6% —to 

- 3229 17ft 17 17% r% 

_ 7820ft TO 19 

.48 23 1218 1TV* 17V, —ft 

.370 23 *35 Uft 14 14 —ft 

401 6to 59* Sto —to 
_ 873 14U 13V* Uft *% 

_ 37513% 12% 13% “ft 
_. 303 7% 7ft 7% “H 
_ 156 lto l*u Uft -4ft 
_ 207 7ft 6% 7 —to 

- 56510% 9% 10% “ft 
_ 2514 57 54% 25% “ to 

- 96816% 15% U — 'Vu 

J7 33 *52 24% 24 74 - 

_ 77 7% 6% 6% -M 

- 3*6 2V> 2 2ft “ft 
.. MTV 15V, 13% 15% “to 

- 205 4% 4 4tt —ft 

- 619126% 23ft 24% — 1% 

- 5*45 51to 47 «7'>i— lft 

4 B 7V, 71, — Vk 


3141 


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WSMP 
WTD 
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Walshr 

WandGf, 

wonoLab 

WongL wt 

W am tc 

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WdiBcp 

VWF5L 

WS«=DC 

WMSSs 


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- 125 S 5 5 —Vi 

- 34S3 3ft 3 3ft* _ 

- 5615ft Uft 14% “ft 

- 12 3to 3% 3% —ft 
AO 1 J 395 28% 27% 27% — % 

- 5562 9V, 8ft 9 “to 

- TOO 40ft 36% 37ft— 2ft 

- 9313V* 12% 12% —ft 
36 73 3010% 10ft 10% “% 

_ 722 10% 10% 10% _ 

-20217 14 11% 17ft -Ilk 

- 237 7% 6% 7% - 

- 1118 491* 4Vn 4% — Vu 

_ 372 8 7% 7% 

_ 10 Uft 14 14 

■88b 4L1 5761 "lft Wft 21ft “ft 
t _ 1391 3to lft Sto “ft 
M 3^X915319% 19ft left “to 


WM5BpfC£2B BA x372 »to 25ft 26 —ft 
WMSBpfD6.00 6A *304 93% 92ft 93% +3 
WMSBsrt£l.90 BA *245 2216 22% 22% —to 
WatWW _»9 B% 9 “to 

Warm _ 71 2 2 a _ 

WtrisnWi - 9098 17 1516 16 “to 

VVaRslns 33 9 7463 24ft 23ft 23% —ft 

VWousPs 34 9 2718 26% 25% 2* — % 

waver <44 15 77 17% 16% 17% “to 

wkbemnd - 3086 16% 16% 16 “ft 

WbOFn -52b 25 190571ft 23ft 20% “to 

MfedQO 1.101107 105 10% 10ft 10ft —ft 


WeMc 
WetoOt 
We«Mat 
WUHRi 
WeUsJds 
lNemri 
Weobne * J4 
WstCSJCA 
WTOCslFL JO 
wstMar 
Wtftiasi <40 
WNnvtn 


.12 


- 4204 6to 4% 6% “lto 

- 81 17% 17 17% +% 

- 157023. TOft 20%— 3% 

-44*99 74 % 68 73% *<to 

- 5 Aft 6% 4to —to 
J 2601 28 V, 25% 26 V, — 1% 

11 *3 27 25to 27 “1% 
_ 238 Vi. Yu Vu - 
1.7 £7 12% Uto Uto - 

- »5W% 18to 20% “1 

TA 1116% I6to 16V« —ft 

1J 153 231* 23ft 23% “V. 


32 74 276229% 28 28 —lto 

-56 1.9 329 29 28ft 29 “to 

.13* 3 4*16% IBft 18% +'L 

WSkWs _ 24363 19% Uto 16% —2 

Wtalerted J»o <4 926 12to 12ft 12ft —to 

WIBcr* s JOr 3.2 x!716ft 15V, 15% —to 
WstBoaf _ If B 7V, 8 “to 

WMfcTc _ 2279 9% 8% 9% “to 

W-JnPb _ 4423 12ft lift 12% “to 

WstWbfr - 2057 22 TOft 39% — I 

westal - 394 7ft 6% 7 —Vi 

WstSta _ W1 16% 15% 16% —to 

WshvOn - 467 8% 8% 8% —to 

WetSeal >. 133 4 3% * ♦ % 

WetrPr 134a U 10 21% 21% 21% “ft 

Wharf .10e _ 54 9% 9>V, 9V„ **>/+ 

Wheat Iv M 3k 221612 11 11% “Vu 

WhBeRvr — 710 32 30 32 — 

WhBHId* M 24 44423ft 22% 23 —ft 


WhlFds 
WholCaU 
WhWtys 
WickUi 
WitvJA 1,10 

WOiamis 

W«ml 
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- 6343 18% 16% 1716—1% 
_ 14» BVi r.i 8 
_ 335319% 18 18% “% 

.. 1252 ?7to 16% 16% -to 
IJ 110 86 85 B6 “1 
.94 7.1 15863 46ft 44% 45% - 

_ 66 2 2 ? 

_ 434036 33ft 34V, - ft 


WllmTrs 1.06 4 . 4 x 1080 25 ft 74 % 24 to ♦ ft 


WtodRivr 
WrilSlR) 

wantipRx jin 

WlscCr 
woiohn JB 


Wbodhd 

WrfcCap 

WUACD 

WortFOs 

Worths 3 

WYrnan 


_ 145-5 6% 5ft 6% “Vu 

- 370 IDto 9 lOto “Tto 

J5 448 IJ 1 /* 12% 13 —to 
_ 1075 73 70% 73 *5 

U 226 14% Mto 14% “% 

- 636616ft 13% 13% —to 

M 33 91 15ft 15ft 15ft —ft 

J6 2-3 1224% 23ft 24% -. 

_ 176 17ft 17to 17ft —ft 
.« 1.6 176 9V, Bto 8% -to 
36 1.9 3693 20 18% 18%— 1 

- 2272 6ft Sft 6ft “ to 


XOMA 

XRiie 

XcetNet 

Xk*r 

XXm 

XkCDRt 

Xperfto 

Xotor 

Xyktec 

Xyptox 


.16 


- 3707 3ft 3to 3ft “to 
J 05279, 21«A «% -% 

- 175614 13'/. 13% “lft 

». 7143 2ft 2% 2 V 14 —>l„ 
-150756ft 50ft 55% +4ft 
_ 873422% 21V, 22V, ♦% 

- 547 16% 15% 16 “ ft 

- 30 lft lft lft —ft 

- 469 31ft 20% 21 “ft 

- 311 16% 15% 16% “1 


YeUQWCP .94 4Jx171 68 21ft 19*20^ _v u 

YorfcPn 40 2.9 x52 21ft 20ft 20ft —ft 
YorfcRs _ 2123 4% 4ft 4ft —ft 

Yaunker - 261916ft 15ft 15% -ft 


- 1317 17 17 “to 

9 9 -Vi 

~ 10 7% 2% 2% 

-23*11 8to 9 —t% 
— 18501 79% 26% 28ft +2Vj 

- 9803 17% 16 17 -ft 

- 1273 3% 2ft 3 -ft 

- UTOWto 31 33% -2ft 


ZScvn 
ZoftCp 
ZUeCPM 
Zarfcts 
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2™ — 286 2“ lto 3 " 

^f«CO 1.12 19 50239% *% 38% ~ 

»*• „ I0W2H 2ft 2% “ij 

-1708018% I S 17% “% 

- 179 8 7% 7ft + S 

- 194212 10% I Oft —2 

- 3348 2ft 2% 2q£ 725 

- 1 0 6 ft A % —if 

- 140 3 2ft 3 

- 20a 9ft 8% 8ft * % 


25W 
ZoiiMed 
Jottefc 
ZoomTT 
Zvcoo 

Zvao 

XynoxH 

Zviec 


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hdd by ovc 






Page 14 


O N D A 


SPORTS 


•. • - : .v, '.:Vr 

S'V/ . ^ 


SCOREBOARD 






Major League Standings 


(Through Saturday) 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 



East Division 

W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Boston 

17 7 

.708 

— 

Baltimore 

15 B 

AS2 

1’..- 

N»w York 

>5 B 

AS2 

19; 

Toronto 

M IC 


3 

Detroit 

7 14 

■333 

S'* 

Cleveland 

Central Otvtslen 
13 9 

591 


Milwaukee 

13 9 

-S9I 

— 

Chicane 

13 ia 

545 

Vi 

Kansas Cirv 

9 11 

-450 

3 

Minnesota 

9 14 

-340 

sit 

Seattle 

West Division 

IS 13 

-435 

_ 

Ttteen 

9 12 

427 

— 

Caiiiarnia 

9 14 

M3 

2 

Oakland 

7 17 

29! 

3ta 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 

W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Annua 

IS 8 

-4S2 



Montreal 

13 ID 

5*5 

2 

Fttrido 

19 12 

500 

31; 

New York 

n it 

50b 

3W 

PhUoeelnMa 

9 U 

491 

4 

Cincinnati 

Central Division 
15 7 

.482 


5t. Louts 

tj 9 

477 

2^i 

Houston 

\3 lb 

-565 

T9 

Pitlsburgh 

12 IS 

MS 

3 

Chicaoo 

4 15 

484 

Brt 

West Division 
San Francisco 12 11 

422 

_ 

Los Angeles 

11 12 

478 

1 

Colorado 

10 12 

-455 

V's 

SonOieso 

7 17 

.292 

IW 

Friday’s Line Scores 




AMERICAN LEAGUE 
CMcoeo OH 020 HI— 3 ft 1 

Detroit 009 «Q Dt«— 4 0 0 

Bore. Cook (7), McCasklll (71 and Karko- 
vlcn; Guiitckson. Groom (l>, Hetinemon (9t 
and Tetlslton and Krautar (9). W— Guide*- 
San. 1-1, L — Bore, 3-1. 5v— Herawman. 4. 
HRs-Chicoon. Rclnes (A). 

Texas M M HI 000-4 7 a 

OmtaH MO 301 HO Ml— 3 I 1 

(12 (nnftrasl 

Read, Oliver (6). Carpenter 19), Hone rcutt 
ttO), Howell (101 aid Rodriguez: NoBV, Farr 
(91. Lliuqtrisr (10), Mesa ( 10) and Moral la, Pena 
IS). W— Mesa 3-0. L— Howell. H. HRs— Texas. 
Gonzalez (4). Cleveland. Lofton (». 

Toronto 031 M0 031—12 1ft 0 

Minnesota DM ON 020— 7 10 1 

Guzman, Cadorot 17), w.wiinams <B) aid 
Borders; Tapani, Guthrie (S). winis (at. Ca- 
slan (01, ASu l (era (91 and Wolbeck. Parks (9). 
W— Guzman. 3-2. L— Tapani, 1-1 HRs — Min- 
nesota Puckett (2). Retaoulet (2). 

Boston 400 ON 020—4 9 2 

Cailiomta on oh 120-4 9 l 

Sale. Bankhead (7). Harris (Bl. K-Rvtm <») 
and valla; LeftwKtt, BJ>attar»<i (ei and Paoro- 
aaSi W-Stit. 3-0. L— Letter las IK Sv-K-Rw 
(ft. HRs— Boston. M. Vaughn (51. Cooper (7). 
California Easier (3). COavts (3). 

Baltimore IN 012 000-4 A 1 

Seattle 001 3M Ota— S 9 1 

Mover, Mills (BJ and HoHes; Hibbard, Rta- 
lev (61. AvQla (9) and Kaieiman. W— Rlslev. I- 
a L — Mills. 0-1. Sv— Ayala (2). HRs— Balti- 
more. Palmeiro (0), Hotin IS). Seattle. 
Grifiev Jr (7). B Ulmer (SI. 

New York 3U 002 063-10 15 0 

Oakland 003 910 Mo-t 11 2 

j-Abbotl, Pall (A). X-Homanaez |7) and 
Stan lev; Welch, Ontiveros (21, Nunez (ft). 
Taylor (SI. Horvaen (St, Briscoe IV. Rena 
(91 and StatabOCh. W— J-ADOOfr. 3-1 
L— Welch. 0-1 Sv— XJtomondez (41. 

HP— Oakland. Brosiua »). 

NATIONAL LEAOUB 
Colorado ON 312 000-4 12 1 

Chicago ON 221 001-5 1 0 

Nlod. Reed (ft). Rulftn (7), Holmes (9) and 
Glrnrdl; Tracbsol. Beulista (7). Otto (9i and 
Wilkins. W -Me* 3-2. L-Troefnet. ZZ 
Sv-Hoimes (3). HRs-Cotorada, BICMtln 
(9). Haves (2), Mello (2). CMcaoa. Sandberg 
13), Wilkins (1). 

San Oieto ON Mi 000-I ft 1 

Montreal ON 0(2 Ols-3 A 0 

Bene*. PAMartlnei (0) and Ausmus; 

Ruonr. Rotas (#1 ana Fknehw.W— Ruetar.2- 
0. L— Bones. 1-5. Sv— Rolos (61. 

Atlanta IN MO HM 6 f 

Plltsoareti IN 021 31X-0 11 0 

Avert. WoWen (A), Bodraslan (7). Stanton 
IB) and Loner: Cooke, white (9) and Sumstit- 
w— Cooke, t-x L— Avery. 1-1. HR— A noma. 
McGrfff (SI. 

San Francisco ON ON MI-3 3 0 

PMtadelMta 001 021 DOS— A 9 2 

Hiekerson, Frev IA). Burpo (7) ana Manwar- 
tog; Rivera, Stocumft ibi ana Doulton. W— Ri- 
vora. 2-1. l— H lckerson, 1-1. HRs— San Fran- 
cisca Bands (6). Phiicaelptila Duncan 14). 
Cincinnati ON 111 120-0 13 0 

Florida OH 120 )I0 — S W I 

Browning. Ruffin (ft). Brant lev (7, and Dcr- 
sett; Hammond, Nen ial Aaulna (3), Muns 
IB) and Santiago. 'tJ—Brownkio,34L l— H am- 
mond. 1-3. 5 v— Bronllev (2). HRs— Florida 
Renteria (1), Sheffield (9i, Destrcde (41. 
Las Anon 2U on ooa-4 11 2 

New York ON IN kta-A 0 I 

Candlottl. Drolfort (01. Wayne (fll.TO.Wqr- 


ret( Ml mid Pfozza; Saocrnogen. Franco tn 
and Hundlw. W— Saoemogen 3-t. L-wavne. 

1-3. 5 »— Franco (3). HR— LA- Karros (2). 
St. Laois 2N 010 NO 0-3 < 0 

Houston see 100 COS 1—4 8 0 

(10 IirHobsI 

Ando, Hoovan (Bl. Rodriguez |9) and 
McGrUf; SwInaelL Hudek (0). Homnton (lO) 
and Servab-W— Hampton, Vfl-L — Rodrleucz.1- 
1. HRS-Sfc Lout. Ze*IO in. Houston. FhUev (61. 

Saturday's Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
TWOS IN AID 436— >4 1* • 

Cleveland 310 ON IN— 4 t 2 

Drever. Honeycutt 17), Henke If) and Ro- 
driguez; Martinez. Plunk. (71. Turner <7|. 
Swan (Bl and Mendla Pena (Bl. w— Drover, i- 

I. L— Ptunk. 3-1. HRs— Texas. Gonzalez (5). 
Cleveland. Lewis 111. 

Mew York ON 430 106-7 8 ) 

Oakland MO 0M in— 5 II 1 

Key, Reard o n <?) aid Leyrltz; Jimenez. 
Rem (4), Briscoe (0). Eckcrsley (9) ana 
StelntXKh. w— Key. 61. L— Jimenez, 0-1. 
HRs— New York. Levrttr 2 <£l. Oakland. Al- 
drete (3). 

Milwaukee on on m t— « 7 e 

Kansas, City an Olt 610 O-a « 2 

(10 innings) 

Bones. Orosco (B). Bronkcv (f ) and Nilsson. 
Mo then y 110): Gordon. Belinda (71. Brewer 
(7). Pichardo IB) and Mactarianc. w— Bron- 
key. 1-0 l L — Pichardo. 0-1. hrs— M ilwaukee. 
NUsson (41. Kansas Ctrv, Homelin (A). 
Toronto Bit 2N OK— 9 15 1 

Minnesota 040 526 OOs— II IS 1 

Stewart. Castillo (4), Brow (5). Halt (Si and 
Border;; Destales. Tramtdev (4). wiiJIs <Bt. 
Aguilera (Cl ana Perks. W— Oeshafes, 2-2. 
L — Stewart, 2-2. Sv — Aguilera (A). HRs— Tor- 
onto. Carter (9), Ole rut) (4), So rogue (I). Min- 
nesota, Lems (4>. 

Baltimore M9 301 700—6 73 • 

Seattle IN ON 030—4 10 1 

Mussina, Poole (Bl, LeSmlth (9) and HoHes. 
RJotraon. Converse (7), Gcssceo (9) ana ho- 
salmon. w— Mussina. 5-1. L— RJoftflscn, 2-2 
Sv— LeSmlth. 11 HRs— Seattle. Buhner lot. 
Plrtl (51; Baltimore. LGcmez (1). 

Boston in 120 ON— 4 7 0 

California N1 ON 000—1 5 3 

Clemen* fCRven (?),MorrJs (?) end Berry- 
hill; M-Lriier, Lefterts (9> and Fobreoes. 
W— Clemen* 3- 1. L— Mieller,2-lSv— C.Har- 
ris (2). 

MATIOMAL LEAGUE 
San Diego 830 233 ON— 3 B 1 

Montreal 084 NO I Ox— 5 11 2 

Sanders. Sager (7i. Harris (4). Mauser 161. 
Davis (A). Elliott (0) and Ausmus; Martinez. 
Henry (6). Rotas (9) and Fletcher. Seehr (81. 
W— Mcrtfnez. 1-2. L-S09er.c-2.Sv— Rotas (7). 
LOS Angeles ON GO] 241—12 H 3 

New York 012 01] 200—10 11 0 

Martinet McDowell Ml. Goal Ml. Cart (71. 
Drolfort (B) and Piazza; Hillman. Linton (7>. 
Manzanillo (7), Sc rn Inara (8) and Hwdtov. 
W— Goh.3-l.L-Maiaanlllao-l.5v— Orellart 
(2). H Rs— Los Angeles. Waiiach 2 (Bl. Gwvnn 

(1) . piazza (4). New York, Bonilla (21. Hund- 
ley (A). Buraifz (2). 

San Francisco ON 010 008-1 S « 

PftltodolpMa ON ON 000-0 8 0 

Burke rr. M Jackson (Si. Beck (97 ana Man- 
waring; Schilling, Bask le (8) and Daullon. 
W— Burkett, 3-1. L — Schilling, 84. Sv— Beck 

(2) . HR— San Francfsca. Mo.Wlllloms (10). 

Cincinnati uo aw on— 3 9 e 

Florida M0 010 Ota-4 II I 

R»o and Toutmnsce; Wool hers. R. Lewis 
(BI.Y.Parez (Ol.JJfamondez (91 end Santia- 
go. W— Weather* 4-1. L— Rllo.1-2.Sv— J.Her- 
nansaz (4>. hr— F iorlaa snefNoid (101. 
Atlanta ON 610 DN-I 4 0 

PittaburgB aa too Ota— 3 7 0 

G Maddux. Stanton (I). Bcdralon (0) and 

J. Loftez; Neogle, BOltard 19), While (9) and 
Parrish. W— Neoale, 2-1 L-GAftaOduk. 62. 
Sv— White (S). HR— Atlanta. J. Lopez (4). 

St. Loafs HI ON 201- S 11 I 

HOOStfla ON 214 22X-I3 20 0 

WMson. O morel U (51. Ever ward (A), Smltn 
(7), Murphy 10) and Pepaos; Harnlsch. Reyn- 
olds (7I.MI Williams (91 anaServois. A— Hor- 
nlsch. 2-2. L— Watson. 2-1. HRs— 3r. Lou a 
Raver (t). Houston. Ftnfev (7). Beg wet) at. 

The Mlchart Jordan Watch 

FRIDAY'S GAME: Jordan wont O-tar-4 and 
struck out twice in a 2-1 has to Huntsville. He 
hod no choncos in tno outileld. 

SATURDAY'S GAME: Jordon went O-lor-4 
and s-ruck out twice In a >5 victor, over 
Huntsville. He had an error In right field, but 
also made two outstanding defensive plays. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is lB-tor-AB 
12651 with four runs scared, two doubles, nine 
RBI* five walks, 2>t strikeouts, seven sfotan 
bases and two errors. 

Japanese Leagues 

Central Lemma 



* / 


. . AfOMr Fner-newe 

RETURN TO DEN BEN PHI —About 195 men and women set out Sunday from Hanoi on Vietnam's first international cyde race, 
a 19-day, 1437-kBometer ci eni that *iD take them to Dien Ken Phu, where nationalist forces orerwhdmed a French garris<min l954. 


Soedoys Resells 
Yomtun 4. Honshtn X 14 irnmgs 
Hiroshima 8. aiunlehl 3 
Yakut! 7. Yofutnama c 

Pacific Leaaoe 



w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

Satbu 

13 

7 

0 

450 

Dgiel 

12 

B 

0 

400 

On, 

10 

9 

0 

424 

Nippon Ham 8 

11 

1 

-425 

Lorte 

5 

it 

0 

•in 

Kintetsu 

l 

10 

• 

-382 


Saturday's Results 


Dole! 6. Nippon Horn 3 




Seiou 9. Kintetsu 3 
Orix 5. Latte 4 

Saacay's ResuNs 
SflrtXJ 14. Kintetsu 7 
NioDon Hem s. Dafel 2 
Orix 9. Latte 3 


7T*-. '.- t —* 


NBA Playoffs 



W 

L 

T 

PCI. 

OB 

Yomluri 

14 

4 

a 

.70 

— 

Clumictil 

It 

3 

0 

-579 


YOkult 

10 

» 

0 

42* 

S‘‘t 

Yokohama 

9 

11 

0 

-450 

5 

Hiroshima 

S 

11 

0 

.421 

S’-; 

HansMn 

i 

13 

0 

JI4 

7vy 


Saturdays Results 
Yomluri 4. Konshin 0 
Chunlcnl 7. Hiroshima 4 
Yaeuit X Yukenama 2 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
First Round 
BOlKtFFIre 

Mew Jersey 13 20 28 19— B0 

New York 19 H 28 20-91 

NEW JERSEY (N): Brawr.82 0-0G.Cole- 
maa7-i7 181237. Beniamin 3-A84LAfidarson 
3-11 A-9 IX Edwards 615 3-4 IS. Morris 3-980 7. 
j.WHIIgms 83 8C0. New men 82 820. Gilliam 
64 4-5 11 Totals 2671 23-32 SO. 

NEW YORK (91): Benner 8]3-27,OakiC'/ 8 
9 t-1 7. Ewing 7-23 )>-!4 25 Oavls 5-9 041 If. 
Harper 612 1-2 U Smith 7-10 3-5 17. Starts i-S 
80 Z Mason 1-3 802. Cuilnonv 24 80 A. Totals 
35-77 I7-24 91. 

3- Petal goals— New Jersey 616 tCalemon 8 
5. Morris 1-4. Anderson 1-5, Edwards 61. New 
man 81). New vgrk 69 | An then v 2-4. Harper 
1-2. Davis 1-3). RebMMS— New Jersey Si 
(Coleman. Gllliom 10» New York 52 I Ewing 
:3l. Assists— New jorsey it (Andcrjcrt ei, 
New York 17 (Ewing j|. Total Or, Ik— New 
Jersey 24. New York is. Teehnita:*— J.Wi:- 
liamv Gilliam. Harper. Mason. Ewing. 

Oe vetoed Z2 29 28 25- 94 

Clllcogfl 21 M E 28—144 

CLEVELAND (94): PnlllsMI 1-211. Hlg- 
plns 1-4 1-2 3. Hill 67 18)4 14. Price 2-11 659. 
Wilkins 81 83-4 23, Branaac 5-1 1 -1 lt.Kemotcr. 
3480 A Mint 610 63 15, Fee r , 80 M G. Be: tie 

I- 1 60 2. Tofow 3675 2631 96. 

CHICAGO U04i: Plpocn 1824 6435. Gr=r 

612 85 13. Cartwrlont. 61 60 0. ArmstrarB 34 
60 6. fMr > 87 80 1. Lavl ct 2-361 A W#n- 
nlngtan 60600. English 1-1 1-28Kerr3-4 1-1 7. 
Kukoc67 82 1 1. Paxson 60660. Williams 614 
64 21.T010IS 4241 17-23 1W. 

3-Point gocta— Clovefona 3-11 'Wilkins 84. 
Mills 1-1. Higgins 83. Price 631. Crucega 87 
(Kerr 2-3. Kukcc M. Piseen63i Rebaueds- 
-Cleveland 43 (Hilt 8J. Cnicoso U (Pipsen 
12). Assists— Cleveland 18 (Price Sl.Cmcnga 
24 (Mvers SI. Total foulA-Ctevetanc St, Chi- 
cago 28. Technicals— Cleveiana ceacn Fra- 
telta Chicago illegal Co terse. 

Portland 22 32 30 19-109 

HOVStaa » 25 24 24-114 

PORTLAND (109): Gror.t 6(3 80 6 Wil- 
liam l-l 4-4 & CRoeinscn 4-1284 11. Grader 

II- 202-4 25, Sfrt cfclona 7-18 3-5 17,D-jdl?v 8180 
6 Parta.-612 t-l 21, Horse, 1-71-41 Yvrav 2-2 
80 A J-Rcemssn 1-7 l-S fl, Brva-r !•: 6C 1 
Jackson 60 86 0. Tatcis 41-92 1624 IX 

MaUSTCN:il4):Ho--r,54*416.Txa-Ae6 
132-2 1A Otal iiwon 81® 1-9 -JL. M3» wrii «•» 1 1 •: 
24,5m)tn 4-H «-« 15, Herrera 84 1-2 7. Ckki: V 
5 61 i Elio 1-1 4-4 A Til-fs 4875 S8r "4. 

3- Point ooais— Portions 6:: -Psrter 4-S 
j.RatUison l-l. Cettler :-E. CRssinsoc 62i. 
Houston 814 e Max won 61 Harr- l-L Sm.m 
4. Cassell 6!i. Reboanos— Porr.src 57 
(Drexler 111. Hsustan 43 .Therae I2f. »»i:- 
s— PoriMra is (Drexter ti, M w itan 31 (Mar. 
wfii,5mitn7i Total taule— Peril and Si hc--> 


ton 21. Tetfialcals— Portland uieral defense. 
r.iarweiL 

Got ora State 23 27 30 29-104 

Phoenix JS 24 29 IF— til 

GOLDEN STATE (IN): Owens 13-231-227. 
Weboci- 7-1462 K Gatilag 84 4-416 Mviita 6 
U2-3 14. Sorewell 7-2064 21 Graver 1-4 80 1 
Jennings 1-43-45. Houston W262ZAJatmson 
67 80 8. Totals 4892 1625 IX 
PHOENIX (111): Hartley 16247-11 34. Ca- 
bal h»6 1580 16 West 62806 K_fotasoo 1621 
4-024.Malerle6l064 l9,MHtar80 80 8 Green 
61) 64 74, F Johnson HMg AJnee 6f 60 
ITotOlS 4685 21-29 lit. 

8 Point goals— CoKfen Slate 613 (SorewelJ 
61QL Jennings 6). Mullln 82). Plxtentx 2-A 
(Maierie 1-2. Barklev 1-3, K-)ohnsen 611. 
Hobsohds Golden State *2 (Owens 171. Pbo6 
nix 47 (Barkley It). AsdsK-Ootaan State 3A 
(Sorewetl 10). Phoenix 29 (KJahnan, Bark- 
lev 7). Total fools— Golden Stole 28 Phoenix 
24. Technicals— Ceballas. west. Phoenix 
ooacn westptai. 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Utab 20 38 25 21—94 

San Antonio 29 9 ft 26-99 

Stftas Usd Vi 

UTAH (T9): Corbin 66 600. Malone 7-2S 614 
ZZ Spencer 69 83 15, Stock ton 611 1-1 17, 
Horaacek 84 87 1 Humetuias 11-14 61 25, 
Chambers W604, Benoit 21 ML Howard 62 

1- 2 1, Crafty 0-0 0-QQ.RuueK l-l 802, Bona 80 
80 0. Totals 57-09 1628 94. 

SAN ANTONIO (54): Ell Is 1-7 1-21 Redman 
7-12 83 14. Ratrinson 2-1 4 61 0 U 06 Neore 2-5 

2- 3 7. Anderson 1-4 80 2, Cummings M 4-4 L 
Carr 8080 X Knight 68 80 14. Reta 6282 Z 
OenielsSA 80 IX Floyd 1-31-2X Holey 1-3826 
Totals 25-71 3830 N 

8Mef coals — 11 rati 87 (HumoMot M 
Corbin 61. Chambers 61). San Antonio 69 
(Daniels 84. Dei Negro 1-1. Eiils 68 Rodman 
63). Rebee n ds U tah 60 (Malone 14). son 
Anton La 55 (Rodman 17). Assists— Utctfi 19 
(Stock tor 5), San Antonio IS I Del Neare 51. 
Total fgals— Utah 24, Son Antonio 21. Tscfisf. 
cat*— Roaman 2. Cummtngs, Mstone. Cham- 
bers. Utah coach swans. San Antonia coach 
men. Son AtitonW ufsaal dstanss. ■lectfod*- 
— Chamber*, Rodman. 

Indiana U 23 29 23-101 

Orlando 21 39 10 a— Ml 

Indlene isod* series 34 
INDIANA OtH: Me Key 2-4 44L D.Dovtl 6 
13 60 16 Smits6l4 34 IX Workman 614 64 15, 
MJIterlT-21 7-4 S2. Mitchell 85 604, ADovH 64 
l-29.Conner80 001 BJcori 1-3 1-28 Fleming 8 
3 63 6. Williams 80 80 XTotati 2940 2146 101 
ORLANDO (101): D-ScotT 610 60 11. 
KrYslkewtak MMl O'Neal 81 Ml IS, 
Haracwav 1827 84 31. Andwson 7-11 64 21 
PdiHits M 60 X Bowie 6) 80 X Avert 3-7 74 7X 
Royal >6 84 7. Totals 31-75 20-42 101. 

3-Polfit goats— Indiana 612 (Miner 87, 
Workman 1-3, McKey 62), Orlando 11-19 (An- 
derosn 66 Hardowov 67, OScstt 84). Re- 
aosads— imflana 53 (DAavts 9). Orlande 51 
(KmnoeMak. CNeaL A vent 7). Ass i s t s in- 
dtara 27 1 Workmen Wl.Oriando If ( HOrtJanw 
7i. Total teals— Indfane 27. Orlando 21 
Miami IS ti 23 IS— M 

Atlanta 29 27 24 25-109 

Serfs* Med l-l 

MIAMI (843: Lend 85 64 IX Rice 610 049, 
Ssllev 1-72-4 4. Show 89 6414Smtth 9-1584 34, 
Seiknly 0-3 80 X Cole* 69 87 IX Miner 7-13 M 
15,Ge(oer62 1-71, Burton M600.Tota*i 3»-75 
2834 06. 

ATLANTA (UN): Manning HI 4-420, -muiz 
61 J 80 !& tcencmi 84 60 L Auonton 84 60 6 
B«viack8lt 1-IXWhoiiey 24606 E rue 611 
85 17. Lang 1-3 1-3 X Ferrell 610 1 1-12 23. Keefe 
62 1-3 I.Tctab 4878 21-28 104. 

8 Point go als— M iami 87 1 Smith i-L Rice 1- 
X Burton 61. Show 63). Attar.M V» ( Ehle 81 
Biortack 1-L Willis 61, FerroM 6M Jta- 
boueo* — ttlrml 55 (Smttn 9), Atlanta <e ( WH- 
!:S 14). Assists— Miami 11 l Long. Rice. Salley. 
Cc>e* 2) Atlanta 27 (B lav wckl). Tem tautv 
— Miami 29. Atlanta 27. TecMcals— Miami 
legal defense. Long. Asklra. Edwaraj, Fer- 
re; L Flagrant foot*— Seiko tr. Manning 2 


B W ctloa ■ Long. Edwards. Ask Ins. 

Denver 19 IS 25 25-17 

Seattle 27 23 22 25-97 

Seattle teads series 54 
DENVER 07) : Ellis 61* 1-2 IX R. Will lams 
81S607,Mwfeaibo6B612 16 Abdul- Rout 515 
64 IX stub 34 24 X awimoms 2-3 60 6 
Rogers S-T084 T7. Peck 86 04 6 Hammonds 6 
0 60 X Totals 3241 1625 87. 

SEATTLE 07) : Kemp 614 5-71X Schremaf 
610 60 ]&CO9e82606Glll811441l,POYlon 

7-H 2-6 IX McMillan 83 14 6 Perkins 810 3-4 
IX Planer 6467 !Z Askew 2-7 2-2 t.TotOh 31 -79 
27-42 97. 

3-Pobrt goats— Denver 7-15 (Rogers 67. El- 
Hs 1-XR.WIlltantsl-X About- Rauf V3I, Seattle 
615 (Perkins 3-6 Payton 2-4. Schrempf >1. 
McMillan l-X GDI V3).Rebeand*-- Denver 54 
(ElUL 8-wiiUams 10). SeatUe 67 (Kemp 12). 
.Assist*— Denver 23 (Mutombo 51, Seattle 1* 
( Kemp 61. Total fouta— Denver 2L Seattle 22. 
TecMcols—ttwnilemA Mirfotmto, Pierce. 
Flagrant foot— RJNUItams. 


Davis Cup 


CUROAFRJCAN ZONE 
Group X First Roand 
MoracaX Egypt X- Karim Ataml AAoracco, 
dei Karim Zbtwr, Egypt 6i 6X62; Younew 
El AynoauL Morocco, def-4; 

El Avnooul. del. ZOher, 04. 63; AlamL det 
Menomsd El Sokwv, 68 4rC. 

P S la ad X Bataarta v. Bortlamlel Da- 
brawskL PatanX det. Mlika Petkev. Butaarta. 
6L 61 62; Model Kasr. Poland, <J*t Marts 
Markov. Bulgaria, 61, 63. 63; Kramlmtr L» 
zarav and Roaoslav Radez. Butoarix defeat- 
ed Model Rastond Tomas iwanskL Poland. 
86 6X74 1)04), 68 68 
Ntaerta X Senegal B: Emmanuel iMorozh, 
aeLAbou Berthe, 67 (641.61.6X6X62: Suit 
Lodtaa oeL Et Hadl Oiednlau. 6ft 6), 61; 
Lodkao and Udorash. dot. Berthe end Moildt 
Ndaye.6861,62; Ladlao.deC Berira,6L6ZI 
udorash. det. El Hod) DMhtaU.61,7-4 164). 

OtWBalMoaaci2: Frank Otari. Ghana, det. 
Qwlitophe BogoM. Monaco. 616861; ie- 
bosheti Graeff, Atanecx dtf. Mldml Ameaiv 
Ghana, 7-X XX 87.63; Otari ad Emmanuil 
PaddLdeLGraeffwid Bopa^tL 68 74 (7-21,6 
7 (743.74 (64) 1 Otart.det. 0raeft.64.6X 60t 
Boggettk del. Arm n, 4-4. 68 
Finland X Estoeta I : Vllie Llukka, nnlona 
dpf. Andres Vvsand. Estonia 8X74 (74). 68 
6a; Tuomas Ketata. f lntand.de(. Rene Busdv 
Estonia 64. 61, 7rt (74); Vvsand end AIN 
VahkaldOt. KefPioandTommlLenhaertM. 
686X64; Ketata. Oef.Vysand, 686X86 44; 
Llukko. dot. Busch, 68 7-4 (7-4). 

Latvia 8 Kenya 1: Girts Dsekta*. Latvia, 
del. Ena Poto, Konya, 7-4 (74), 6X 64; Paul 
Wekesa, Kenya def.Andrst Filimonovs. Lat- 
via, 67 (871, 61. 66 61; DMlder and FIU- 
monov, def. Wekesa and Polo. Kenya 68 67 
(7-4), 7-4 17-1), 63t DnUer.det.WekMa64.7- 
4 (7-41.74 (7-41 ; Fnfmotwv, vs. Pota, ccd, ra/a 
stovaeiaxoreecil: Iztak Bazla staventa 
def. Konstantin Efremoptou.Grsecey61.686 
4; Tassos Bavetoa Grsecadef. Bias TruoeL 
Stoveota, 66 66 67 (87), 61/ Elramootou 
and BavefaaittLTnjpei and Marka Par.7-X1- 
X 4-6 68 64; Bnlaoef.BavetaX7-4(64).68 
60; TrweL dot. Satan Peaces. 68 7-5, 61. 

Ukratae X Ireland 0: Dimitri Poilokov, 
Ukraine. 0*1. Mark Farrea iralona 67 (64L 
74, 68 64; Andrei Rybalka Ukraine, del 
Eotti CoIHra. Iretana44,67 (878686864; 
Poilokov ana Vklor Egorov, def. Forrcn and 
Calllnx 6 7 (6»>, 67 (87), 64, 66 J7-14 
ASIA-OCEANIA ZONE 


Steven, deLStnizoMotsuakaOX 4X68 6X6 ■ 
Yamamota deL rwimrtnn. 7-X 7-4 (64). \ 
GROUP TWO 

Tatsran X Iran 1: Chen ChhkJanx Tafwuiu. 
del Ramin Roztanl, iron 2X66 87, 64.6*; 
Uen Yu-HuL TolwoadetJitansour BehramL 
I ran. 86 4X687-6 0811), 83 ret Irad; Uon 
YiEtwt end Chan CNh-JuiixdeL Bahramtond 
DeratsM-Javan Kemblz 68 7-4 (74), 63; Su 
we*-yu, dtk BatutmiL iraa688X63; Ro- 
zkaairaadet Tsoi CMmvea Taiwan. 4X68 

AT&T CbaReage 
In Detain. Gearwa ' 

Mtaar* SlogNs. StsnWaol*. - 

Michael Chm (1 1. US. det. MaNVal Wash- ' 
Inpton (SLUA-61,68 Todd Marita 12), UA. 
def. Wane McGuire. US* 68 84 (7-41. 

MADRID OPEN 
Men's Singles, serntfunis 

Serai Brueuera (3). Smdn. det. Alep Cnr- 
relfa.Sbom.7-4 (74), 68 Thomtn Muster (4). 
Austria deL Jaime Yzoea Pent, 6X 54. .68 

Final 

Muster del. Braguera 68 86 66 7X : 

. BMW /BAVARIAN OPEN 
In Munich. Germany 
Meat StootoX Senxflnats ’ 

Michael Stlch (2), Germany, det. Aaarei 
Chesnekav, Rmsto. 61. 2X 60; Petr Korda 
(5). Czech Republic, det. Bemd Korbadw, 
Germany, 68 63. 

Final 

SMch deL Korda, 68 2-6 68 

CITIZEN CUP 
in Hamburg. Garmaev 
Women's Singles. SemHtoa)t . 

Staff! Graf <l). Germany, def. jonoNovotno 
(3). Czech Republic. 68 4-3: Arantxa Sanchez 
1/tcoria (2), Spain. deL Sabine Hock (4). Ger- 
many, 61. 61. • 

Ftaal 

Vkarto del. Gref. 4X 7-4 (74). 7-4 (64). 


FRENCH F»«*T DIVISION 
Cannes X Nootes 0 ” • V . 

Le Havre 1. Monaco 0 ' 

Parta-Sa ), Ttotawe « . 

LOB XBOtokCtfsnnc 1 
Morttauas a Bordeaux ft 
Auxam.-Z MarseRto 2 
Lyon 8 UOe 0 
MIC 8 Staaaboura-t 
Sodtoox 6 Cotn 0 
Anadrs 8 ftjw mt l it. J • 

- SktadingK PM 6Sd a points lORWtad: 
tongue tiltol; Awrsrilto, «/ Bortenux.44; ; 
Auverre and Nantes. 43; Comtes ood Mw ilPri- 
neK4l,-LanL39; Manocoand LwxWf *«<"► : 
Eltsin, 3ft; Motz3 ^and Shxoboorg, »I So-.. 
chattLoad Cmk' 31; Jmie. Wi'te Havre, 2»- 
Marttgupx 257 ToulcueerZL' Angers. _ : 

• gbrmAn'first division' ; 
fiavnr Leverkusen 1, vie Stuttgart l - ‘ 

Barnsdo Mocmientfladfaach X cs<a«M l *. 
ElMracnf Fnmklurt V Hamburg 1 
KaBgyta u fgn=8 Bortzsslo Dortmund . » 
Nuremberg- 6 w nt tonsc h eld 1 
K nrisnj be I. Bayern Munich I 
Schatae t, DuKbbcg 3 ■ 

FrM&unrt. VSB Uppzta 0 - 

Dynamo Oraadeq VWmNm' B rafflewO . , 

■ stto nBu gs: Knhers i ou tare. 41 POiots; Bov- 

•m Munlctv 40; KorfHnM. 3ti Boyer Levjir-, 

. kusenand Bocussta Dortmund. 37; Etatradit 
Pronkfart aid Duisburg, 34; EerusBla and 
VtB stuttnarL 35;Ytantor Bramen. Cologne. 
Hombutv and Dynamo DrasdwviX 
29;' Nuremberg. 28; FreJbura.'26/ VWjttaP- . 
cdtota.27; LeteMh'IT; '. 

iTMJMi FIRST DIVISION. 
Atatartfaef Bergamo 8 inter Milan L . , 
cre imn ese I, Genoa 1 
Foaota 8- Napair t 
Jiwentui of Turin- 1, Udhiese 9 
Lecce 8 Cagliari T 

AC Milan a Repo Iona T ' ' ‘ • "'"^7 V-' 

AS Roma 8 Torino Q- '• - 

Sanwdoria of Genoa 8 Lozta-dl Rome 4 
Parma 8 Ptocenzo 0 . • ’. ' 

. . Plata ataottm AC Milan, 5D paMi lewi 
ftftoir Juicatas. C; Sanxtarto andtMorttt 
Parma, 41 : NapaH-54; Rama &; Torino,*; . 
Feggfo.33;O m nonese. Genoa omT CaeUari. 
38- mter h az tot i ato and Reggtana 21. -•' : - 

Retogatad: PlacniBa.XrUdbwee.28: Ato- 

tonta, 21; Leccx TL 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Denorttva drLo Carano X Raya VaUecana e 
Real Soctodaa X SevDJa 0 
Ataoaete L Real Madrid 4 
Barcefano X Scarfing de GHon 0 " 

Zaresoao X Gelto T . ' ’ ... 

Oeasuno 8 Vatoncta 3 ’ 

VottodalM 8 Lagrones 0. , ' - 

Oviedo 8 Ltotaa O * • . 

AtfeHco de ktadrtd 8 Tenertto 0 . 

Raring de Santander 8 Athletic da BilbgoS 
Stundlim; OapoHtvo La CarancvSlpoMs; 
aereetona.52; ReotMadetxtSrZengaca^tt 
ASPettc deBBbao and Sevilla 40) VaieackL37; 
Oviedo and Roctag de Sahtander.SA: Sooritne 
deGDon.35; Rata SodeflBd.Tet w1 (e di id Atbo- 
cete.34; AttottcodrModrtd<mdU>anxwa.'31; 
Cettaoei Ravo Vtaleeonx X; VntkntoUd. 29; 
Ltokto, 27; Oeasuno, frr (ra toa otod). '• ‘ ' 


HOCKEY 


mbn wto- mwe — - 

IWIk rlijOu* 


SOCCER 


New Zealand 8 Japan 2: Suuztj Matsuoka. 
Jaaaadef. Keflv E verndan. New Zealand. 68 
68 67 17-2), 641 Brett Ilcvwv New Zeal ana 
art, Yasufuml Yamamoto, Japan. 61 66 2x 
7-4 183); Sloven and Evernden. del. Thomas 
SNmada and Rvuso Tsuilno. 68 3X 68 61; 


INTERNATIONAL FRIBNDLIB5 • 
United States vs. Chile 

DUTCH FIRST DIV1W6N 
RKC Waahtalk 1, Willem IT Tfflwra 0 - 

Ata» A mta erd am 8 SC 1 leer on v sen l - 
MW Maastricht 8 OA Eagles Deventer Z 
Sparta Rotterdam 8 FC Groningen 0 
VHmse Arnhem Z votondam 1 
PSV Eindhoven 8 MAC Breda 1 
FC Utrecte 8 Feyanoard Rotterdam* - 
RadaJCKerkrade 1 FCTMnta Eraeiisde* 
camhour Leeuwarden 8 vw vtntol 
Sfandhtss: Ah» Amsterdam, 14 palms;. 
Feyanoard Rotterdam, 47 f PSV Elndbaveiw 
44: Vitesse Arnhem, 39; Rada JC Karkradx : 
X; FC TvMnta Enaciwde and NAC Breda, 37i 
Willem II TUburg, X; MW MaastriOrt, 32: 
Sparta Rotterdam. »; Ga Ahead Eagles D6 
venter and FC Votondam, 21; SC Heerenvean. 
2ft; FC Utrecht and WV Venia 2$; FC Gra- 
ntaaen, 23; RKC MsofwfluZ; Cambow 
Leeuwarden, 19. 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE - 
Arsenal 8 West Mam 2 
Leeds X Evprtao 0 . 

Uvereooi. 0 Norwich l 

Mancttoster city 8 Owl sea 2 
Oldham & Stwfflem Wednesday 0 - 
Quean* Pork Rangers 8 Swindon 3 •.• 
ShaflWd U rifted Z Newcastle a 
Southampton x Aston ViUa 1 
Wlrabtodon 8 Tottenham 1 
■ aswlch L Monctwstor united 2 
Stgadtats; Mo w ta i eota r Lteltad B8 Points; 
Btoddwm, 83. Newcostte, 74; Araenol.71; 
Leeds. M; Wlmbtadon. 45; SwftWd Wednes- 
cknt.58' UveroeoLW; Quamt Pork Rongera, 
5ft; Aston VliW. 54; Norwich.52; West Horn. 
S; Coventry. 49) Qtetsea 48; Manchester 
Ctt*. 44; Tattcnttam, Southampton and IP6 
wlch. 42; Sheffield muted and evartan, 41; 
Oidnam. 3t: SiModotv 30- 


fmoayis Results . 

BoHota l : i - '5-l 

New Jersey ' 6-2 

• • New Jersey wkw aartoaXI - 
First Period—), Buffalo, Boudwt1(No«er» 

chu(cMag(tflr),4:C0(bP).ZNawJeraiY.Drtv- 

er Z 9\SS (pfH.Paaatttm AlidattfcBuHtrtP- 
pitta). ZiZir Nldmix NJ (hooktngx Sr»i 
Hamm. But (tripuing), 8:16- 
Secoad Mrted-X Naw Jersey, LafiBiwr 
IHlditals^ Mac Lean), 13:49. PenoBy- 
— Dodger, Bui (hocking), 11:47. ' =‘- 
TMrd Period Rons . Penal ttee-Oowe. But 
ctrigplna) 2:44; Khmritv. Buf UrwgMnt),. 
19:4*1 Lemtaux, «J (reugblna). 1*4X - . 

- Shots so r od - Bu ffalo 646-48 Mew Jer- • 
eer t*-TM&-44; p u rer pto r opp orttwMe *- 
— Buffalo loti; New Jeraey lot 4; ge aH e»- 
— BuffakvHnipk,>4 (44 shofa-M loves). New 
Jersey, Bradew. « (IB-171.- " . . 

2.1 W 
2: 2 W- 

First Period— 1. Beaton, Murray 2. 
tS«mnay,Stantaol),3ri8 8 Boston, Donato 3 
(Shaw). 11:47. P ano l Haa- N o n X - 
S2ceod Farta d 8 Boston. Oates 3 Ismo- 
UnyfcL Donato), Jj» ,( pp>. L Poston, KRta6 
cheer 2 fStoworti, 432. x Montreal, Dam- 
PhousM^ (Saws). 5:46F«nalt t a»- Moltar, 
Mon (unsportMnoftliM conduct), :29; Dam- 
Phauasa.Mon (croaa-chacking),12U7( Boston 
bench, served by Mwrev (too mony tnoii). 
12:99. ' 

Third P srt ad XBoa fa n, Bourque i;(Knte6 
cfwer), 5:01 8 MontraoL Moltar 1 (Brttaboft.; 
Damphousot), IlrliXMoftfraar, Keonei(Se- 
vlgov. Corbcrvwou), 14K8 F enoHto a W oift - 
Boo ( Interference ) r 2:57j tofrote, Borfhtota 
suck tne). SM 

Mebei poot-Montreta WM6-29- Boefan 
1669-31; Powe r p i er u ptwrhp HHa ktan - 
treoi Oof 8 J Boston lot 8 go o n e s Mo ntr i wL 
Roy.3-3 (31 ShoteX saves). Boston. Co*ey, 3-2 
OMU. -J . . " 

SATURDAY*} RESULTS 

tan Jose . !* ». W 

Detroit . 11 6-2 

sag dess wfas series 4d - 
First Parted— L S«JeexGcrpe«tov3 (Lar- 
ionov. Ozollndi), :47. 8 San Jose. Makoray ft 
tLnrtooov .Norton), 13^9. 8 Dehdlt, Drapers, 
19:47. (sh). Fsnatftas-Duehaanto SJ.inook- 
tag), 13rt5r Burr. DeMelbowtag); 13:05t Fe- 
dorov, Det, double minor (crai6chedUng), 
19:34) Mars. SJ (roughing), 19:34; Eltk. SJ 
( cra s 6 c ha ck1ng). 2W0; Cottar, Det (c 

checktna), 20UXL 


v tecaod PertfGrX Petra! i. Koaou 2 
stanHnov.JotataOdLZrMPefttaBe*-^*^* 
.SJ lefaowtngh 3:42; GtaMROM intadfa*)- 
7H& FhdersbRt'&ft {bo&nal-J??. 

TWrf Period— 4 Stoi J0S6»)ker 8 13-» 
P a nu t W e* - Hon e,-.-- ' ' - . • , 

Shots on ^gonl-Ain Jusr5^6-i7 
• w-tt— J B CP oww . rt g r apPo rt w»r^s-^qnJ«* 
' 2o48Wfroftl>af2;«apue6-SonJafX 
»tato»«*Dv2sJ.Oain)ft.09Wod,R.< T ^' 

■ V a nco ov rr ^:. . ... .V •. 

- ChfaWT ‘ ; ; -.18 a s S-* 

■ ' fiMWMir'infaiM- 

First Rerio6-LCottarv, Floury 5 (Roberts, 
4to(riMf).X84:2LVanbwYor,Bura'2 

Z-A icmwuLofmtatto). PwoWea-CrtP 

vfaciax iwSPtot). 9W *“p«>ni corirtwon- 
taB'5;^^u«nne. \nto (roug«nB) 74:41- 
' Tirdw-Coft iDPtafansiL to:«L, . 

Second P erto d . X COttaT, Sfam 2 fKtoto. 
PutrtcW. 6J(L5.-Coloo<Y, J=>WY 4 (MOCI6 
nts),»?l4. ftoHto^^MtlrtKXVBn. double 
ndnoYfraugiMotaUWPorlsmistBkeriJrtfatfl* 
7.-2B; AntuskLVon. mtscMKkiCb 708; Yew 
newcoi lrwjtaito«8T^McCariiir,Coi.m*s- 
. conduct. TJK Aftortwaws Von= tofbowtae)- 
. TEJ51 ZatopaU. Cafc.|ldi2MilHGlngi;'i4:'4e; 
: Ycnwwyi cor thooWnol, t» at- . ■ 

Third Period— X Vancouver. Ad am 2 
(Bum Lummr), 14J3. PBoaffr— TRoYr Cal 

IhWMdleWngJ. WL • '• , ' 

- Rest Grant aw wans. -FandE tos.. Nano. 
Second Overtbns-8. ^ifaneouvar, Bure 3 
(Brawn, BatwdiL Mt F eh at tfes lto hfc 
.. Mots op iwta ;vun i .n irver'B»6163-a. 
Cotoorv 1616612-1—49; powdKptor owwr- 

- toolttop voncowy l Of 4t (tatoorv 0 of 3: 
'gaaaes— vanatdver-, McLean,** (49 shetsJi 

■ wnas). Ctagmy-.yarnon, 3-4 dratl. 

WoildChairrmtonshtp } 

• 1 FIRSTROONO 
Group A' >: 

Pridoyta Ramtt". r -"i 
. Ruario. X Austria 1 ' ' ' \- 

(lory HL Britain, 2 " r" 

Softruort Res^t; . 

Russia X GennanT:b_ 

Canodo B Britain Z 

Oraep B. 

Fridfars Resott • 
Fintaod X NarwoV 1 / 

satordoF* Remit 
Fin keel x Franco 1 ■ 

Czech RepuPHc Z Norway 2 - 
Sweden X Untied Statas 2 


BSZ3GEB5I 

San Marino Grand Prtx 


nnulteta tto Grand FrixWtrid 6tCttam- 
ptonsbta it inula, Itatr: T, Mktwri Schu- 
modwr. G srraa n vrBeneHqp Ford. 5B tans or 
292J kttonwtarx T hour. M mtauto. 284*2 
seconds or 1982 kntu.8. Ntcota Lartm, Italy. 
Ferrari ill seconds behind : 8 Mika Hak- 
Wnen.T=lAtand. McLaren PeuaeaLT :R14 min* 
utoi befand; X Karl vtomfllnodr, Austria. 
Smtoer AAarcades. 1)7*4; AUkro Katnvama 
-jeexm, TyrraN YVmuna, aaaiap htatoid; X 
Dnsnn-HRi. Britain.' WUItomi Renault, one 
lag; 7, Hetnx-Haraid Frentzen, Germany, one 
■ton: X*to«nBrw«lltoBritaln.McLafan Peu- 
geot one ksrt 9, Marti BfandalL/Brltaln. ten 
tops; «L Jtamnv Herbert. faHtan. Lotos Mu- 
gan Moodo^two taps; 7 -18 Oltotar Ponte, 
Franco, kjgter RanataUiP* loos; .78. Eric 
Bernard, PranofeUtaar. Rewit, tw» lops. 

• ft oo ai | B4 (ottar» races): t.Schumqcfaer.ao 
points; 8 (Ha) Hlltndd Rubens Borrlchella, 
SRnH2^(ltarGai)MUtfBaraariAostrixond 
LortnL ft; X (Hal. Joan Atari. Franca; Hok- 
kinaa Kotonma and WendJtagor, 4; in, 
Clirlattei rntttatadL BnalL I 

rvcten*«fand)M0S:;'L BaatatwFbrd. 


»i 8 Ferrari, M; 3r<lta) WllHnmsRenouli. 
wn Jordon HorL7r& Soubdr Mercedes, ftj X 
(HalMcLaran PaugeaGanSTYrra(lYvntato, 
4i 8 Footwork Fard.il % LBrjvMe ford. 1. 


| CYCLING 

;v| 

TourofSfMfao 

:V: ; 


: R tag( t s5otor da»lt gm ftw9lKlhstagx (5L7 
Mtonatiirs (7U totloe) from Gradodklo Sier- 
ra tanodi: 1, retry Jtomtftoerttwltzerkmd, 
MopoKtax 4:ia»9i 8 Loudiftna Cud no. 
SacHKMmKMtapig: XMlktaZorn^talta. 1 
Soafa,«anaM2*wind;XOHvafio Rincon. 
Ctaombta. ONCE, l :19 baMmu X AtakJhiUe^ 

5urttzertand,ONCE.l:>9b#hfna; XLucLeB- 

tonCr France, Itaus Fatatha, 1^7 btadnd) 7,. 
Fetau briawto. Spahv BanesterliSI Behind; 
1 Jan unxaga, Scrtn. Ma w) Oo l .1-J5 be- 
Mod; 9, Paata LanfraxM, hohe, Mn rcu tonx: 
3 J* behind; IX jose Manuel UrbuSptan, con- 
taffafaneh,3:34b*WoA ■. ■- • 

. Reeatte tuo d wr h a m the i t eeaHi 1M 1 . M 
kitama(ers(i4iJ Miles] taoABoxo to Adcotr- 
IK L Shnone BfascL - Italy, .Mereototw, 
ftM^BiXAntoab-Manuri DtoSoobvCas- 
falBlantfi, eame hme; 8 MkM Vormota. 
Btagfum.LataaHs)ttia,T:09baMndjXMde- 
simoStrazzer. itahb Novtoarnl^N behind; X 
Laurent JaiataertFrance, ONCE, 1:D9beMnd; 
X EndHb L rant (fata, JaUr, I.-29 behind.' 7. 
Jasper9k)bbv,Dawnork,TVM<Btaoivl:D9Ita- 
hlnd; X Fobta JtoacML ltdiy. Brasdotot, 1 :09, 
behind ;9,Luboi Lam. Stank la, Navtoare,i^)9 
behind; 2X Otos Chudla Ukraine. Castellb- 
kmch. 1:09 behind. ' 

OveraU Standloas: 1, Rominger, 33:04:47: 8 
Z or rqhe(tta.1^»banlndj8JulleA(»P9Htiid; 
XCubinxzas behind; X Rincon, 2.*Z4 behind; 
X Oe to odo.aat bobfadt 7. ueflionc SWB be- 
hind; X Erik BrauMhk, Nsthortoodsi ONCE, 
3M5 behind; XJoxaMoidcrx8p ate .Bgne8to, 
3:4ft betafad; IX. Uraaga, Qax 3:53 behind. 




»fi; 


k 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 





MYSALH I 

rnr 

1 j 

RALLUP 



rrn 



^ .^axroLTrrD 

Ami tervyroei 

__ . I JumLUfl. PaO«4 CHOKE CHA^OE 

I 4r.orar Yrym»etr*4rc*Q’A> "Ft**- - 


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Read 

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iEBEfS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 2, 1994 




Page 15 


% : writ-' 
is-L-rfci; 





Cubs Extend Home Losing Streak 


The Associated Press 

The Chicago Cubs dropped to 0- 
10 at Wrigley Field this season, 
matching the longest home losing 
streak in team history, when they 
Tell 6-2 Sunday to Howard Johnson 
and the Colorado Rockies. 

The Cubs are the only dub in the 
majors winless at home this year. 
The only other time they lost 10 in 


a row at Wrigley Field was in 1974. 

Anthony Young took the loss, 
giving up four hits in 616 innin g 
Pinch-hiner Nelson Uriano and 
Mike Kingeiy each hit a two-run 
singles during a four-run seventh. 

Marvin Freeman gave up five 
hits in six innings. Steve Reed 
pitched two hitless innings and 

Bruce Ruffin worked the ninth 
Mets 7, Dodgers 4: Todd Hund- 
ley hit two solo home runs and 
Jeromy Bumiiz and Joe Oreulak 
also connected, leading the New 
York over visiting Los Angeles. 

Bumitz hit a two-run in the sixth 
inning for a 6-4 lead. His third 
homer of the season came after 
Jose Vizcaino singled with one out 
off Roger McDowelL 
Pete Smith ended his three-game 
losing streak. He allowed all four 
.runs and six hits in seven innings. 
John Franco pitched the ninth for 
his sixth save in six tries. 

Pirates 4, Braves 1: Paul Wagner 
completed Pittsburgh's three-game 
home sweep of the slumping Atlan- 
ta Braves, pitching a three-hitter 
and hitting a two-run double in the 
Pirates victory. 

Wagner had a shutout until two 
ouls in the ninth, when David Jus- 
tice hit a home run. 


-- o- Tim WaDach on his two-nm homer during Las AngeteN rich*, Satan^e^T^ 




Not When , but Whether 


The Associated Press 

Is the brilliant tennis career of Monica 
• Seles over, destroyed by one moment of in- 
ninths of namJ angmsh m 

A year after she was stabbed in the back bv 
an obsessed fan of Steffi Graf, the question of 
when Sdes will return is less discussed among 
tmnis players and officials than the question 
of whether she ever wflL 

“Nobody really knows,” Graf said last 
week before this year’s tournament in Ham- 
burg where Seles was attacked on court last 
Apnl 30. “I th in k it is getting more and more 
unlikely. 

Women's Tennis Association executive di- 
rector Gerard Smith, at the WTA office in 
Florida, phrased it a Kale tfifferanly. 

“I would say the longer die’s ant, the more 
difficult it will be for her to return.” Sririth said. 
“I can only imagine that the traumatic impact 
that the attack must have had on her put 
everything dse into a different perapectivt” 

The WTA,. which is seeking new sponsor- 
ship for its tour to replace Kraft and Virginia 
Slims, desperately needs Sdes and other mar, 
quee players. Jennifer Capriati left the tour to 
&> hack to high school, and thoe are doubts 
about her motivation to return this summer. 
.Martina Navratilova plans to redreai the end 
of' the yes-. Gabriela S&hatmi hasn ’t won 
anything m a couple of years. 

Without Sdes, wometfstennis has virtual- 
ly ttnied into the Steffi Graf Tour. Before 
GraFs defeat Sunday by Arantxa S&ndtez 
Vicario in Hamburg, she had won every 
match she had played tins year, and she has 
captured four straight Grand Slam titles. The 
last Grand Slam event Graf lost was the 
Australian^ 1993, when Sdes bait her in the 
final for her eighth Grand Slam title in a 
career in Hindi she has won $7.4 nrilHoiL 
- Yet. despite the WTA’s desire to have Sdes 
hack, relations with her have been strained 
since it declined to protect her No. 1 ranking 
daring her absence. 


Graf is Beaten 
By Second Seed 


Compiled by Our Stttff From Dispatches 
HA MBURG — Arantxa Sdnchez Vicario 
dra m a t ically restored interest in the women's 
farm s circuit on Sunday with an upset victory 
over Steffi Graf in die Hamburg women’s final 
Graf, unbeaten this year in the absence of 
Monica Sdes, wait down 4-6, 7-6 (7-3). 7-6 
(8-6), to the second-seeded Spaniard, whose 
boundless energy eventually prevailed. 

“Ifs definitely my most satisfying comdiack 
beca use she’s die number one player in the 
world and didn't lose a match for a long time,” 
said Sinchez Vicario, who slumped to the 
Court in delight after the three-hoar mara tho n 
After the match, Graf said die had not 
been happy with her performances on clay so 
far this year. “I should be further along con- 
sidering the extent of my training in the past 

weeks,” she said. (Racers, AFP) 


*T would hope h would not be a factor in her 
staying away, but at this stage no one rules out 
anything," said Smith, who hasn't spoken to 
Sdes since the days after the attack. 

"We did what we thought was best for 
women's tennis and for the tour. We tried to 
evaluate our decision with regard to her re- 
quest for a co-ranking at No. 1 in the context 


of how it woaJd affect everyone. We came to 
the oondusion that providing hex with a co- 
- ranking for an unlimited amount of tune 
woald be inappropriate. And if anything die 
length of tune die’s been out suggests thai 
decision was correct.” 

At the U.SL Open last summer. Smith sug- 
gested to the WTA board of directors t ha t 
Seles be given special seeding considerations 
if she returned He’s since changed his mind 

“I now believe that even a special seeding 
consideration is inappropriate,” he said “As 
of this week, she's been off the tour ior a year, 
and now shell have to play her way back, in 
my view.” 

Sports psychologist Jim Loehr, who has 
worked with Sdes and known her since ber 
early years in tennis, believes she’s feeling 
uncomfortable with the way the endue epi- 
sode was handled 

"First of all, that a fan could get to her that 
easy, some nutso, she fdt that wasn't right,” 
Loehr said ‘Then the WTA didn’t protect 
her ranking the way she fdt it should, and 


then thirdly, the guy that actually committed 
the diabolical act received a suspended sen- 
tence, and she fdt almost like three strikes 
and you're oul” 

A German judge derided on OcL 13, 1993. 
to sentence Gunther Parcfae, Seles’ assailant, 
tojt mere two years’ probation. 

“I think it left a very bitter taste in her 
mouth, and she already had reached her 
greatest dreams." Loehr said. “The only thing 
that’s left is a Grand S lam, She’d reached the 
No. 1 spot in the world, her whole life had 
been tennis, and this kind of took the jov and 
fun out of it” 

Loehr believes that "the longer she stavs 
out, the greater the risk is that she won't come 
bade.” 

The one-inch (25 centimeter) wound just 
below Seles' left shoulder blade is long 
healed, she has regained mobility in her aim 
and she is physically stronger overall as the 
result of intense rehabilitation and workouts 
with Olympic track gold medalist Jackie 
Joyner-Kcrsee. Still, Seles wrote recently in 
Tennis m ag azin e, “There is definitely some- 
thing ra me that I haven't tapped. I look at 
Steffi and Martina and it makes me realize 
that somehow. I’m not there yet.” 

Seles practices tennis at her home in Sara- 
sota, Florida, working on aspects of her game 
that she had never developed. like volleying. 
She talks about coming back, acts as if she 
w3L Yet, like the resi of the tennis world, 
even die wonders whether she still has the 
drive and tenacity that distinguished her 
game, separating her from all her rivals in her 
sheer refusal^ to yield on court. 

At 20, she’s catching up on things in life 
that once eluded her, tackling James Joyce's 
povd “Ulysses,” painting, going to die mov- 
ies, traveling to visit friends. And, as much as 
anything, looking inside herself for direction. 

*Tve had a lot of time to think since that 
day, and a lot of time to decide what my 
priorities arc,” she said. “So when 1 play 
tennis ag ain , I have to play h for the right 
reason. 1 don’t want to play to get my No. I 
ranking back. I don’t want to play for the 
attention, or to earn more. I don’t even want 
to play because the world wants to see me do 
it, even thought it’s nice to know that the 
world is interested. I only want to play be- 
cause I love the game; which is the reason I 
began to play at age 7 in the first place.” 


The Braves have lost eight of 10 
since starting 13-1 and Pittsburgh’s 
young pitching has been a major 
contributor to that slump. The Pi- 
rates have a 1.83 ERA while win- 
ning five of six from Atlanta, but 
their overall 4.95 ERA ranks 
among the bottom five in the Na- 
tional League. 

■ Martins 9, Reds 4: In Miami, 
Gary Sheffield hit his major league- 
leading 11th home ran as Florida 
took a nine-run lead after two in- 
nings and beat Ciurimmi, giving 


with a solo shot, all during an 
eighth-inning rally that sent Los 
Angeles Dodgers over the Mets, 12- 
10. on Saturday in New York, 

Wallach also hit a two-run 
homer in the sixth as Los Angeles 
began to rally from a 5-0 deficit. 
The Dodgers trailed, 10-5, in the 

eighth and had two outs and a 
runner on before breaking loose. 

Bobby Bonilla, Todd Hundley 
and Jeromy Bumitz each homered 
for the Mets. Bonilla had four hits. 


NL ROUNDUP 


the Marlins a winning record for 
only the second time ever. 

The Marlins are 13-12, their best 
record since a 1-0 mark after the 
first game in franchise history last 
year. 


Pat Rapp allowed seven hits, no 
walks ana two runs in 6 2/3 in- 
nings, his longest outing of the sea- 
son. Rapp had a shutout until the 
SCTenth, when Kevin Mitchell hit 
his seventh homer and Bret Boone 
his first. 

Tim Pugh, who pitched a five- 
hitter Wednesday against Chicago, 
gave up nine runs in I 2/3 inning 
After retiring the first two batters 
in the second inning , he hit Chuck 
Carr with a pitch, received a warn- 
ing from the plate umpire and canu» 
unraveled. 

Min Saturday's games: 

Dodgers 12. Mets 10; After 
watching Mike Piazza hit a three- 
run home run and Chris Gwynn a 
two-rnn homer, Wallach followed 


Expos 5, Padres 3: At Montreal, 
Pedro Martinez touched off a 
bench-dearing brawl by brushing 
back Derek Bdl with a high fastball 
but wound up as the winning pitch- 
er in the Montreal’s victory over 
San Diego. 

Martinez won for the first time 
as a starter in the majors. In his 
previous start at Olympic Stadium, 
a fight broke out when he hit Reg- 
gie Sanders of Cincinnati after tak- 
ing a perfect game into the eighth 

innin g 

The Expos scored four runs in 
the third against AJ. Sager, who 
came on after Scott Sanders 
strained his left ribcage while 
swinging the baL 


er in the day, pitched the ninth for 
his second save. 

Curt Schilling allowed three hits 
in seven innings, struck out six and 
walked one. He retired the first 12 
batters in order before Williams led 
off the fifth inning by hitting a 1-2 
pitch over the fence in right-center. 

Williams has homered in seven of 
his last 13 games. 

Martins 4, Reds 3: At Miami, 
Gary Sheffield's 10th homer 
snapped a 3-3 lie in the fifth inning. 
Sheffield has hit home runs in sev- 
en of the past eight games at Joe 
Robbie Stadium. 

Dave Weathers won his fourth 
straight start He gave up three 
runs, all of them unearned, and 
nine singles in 7 2/3 innings. 

Pirates 2, Braves I: At Pitts- 


burgh, Denny N eagle autpitched 
two-time Cy Youne Award winner 


two-time Cy Young Award winner 
Greg Maddux as the Pirates beat 
the Braves for the fourth time in 
five games. 

AJ Martin and Jay Bell drove in 
third-inning runs as the Pirates 
continued to baffle both the Braves 
and Maddux. 


Giants 1, PUffies 0: At Philadel- 
phia, John Burkett allowed seven 
hits in 7M innings and Matt Wil- 
liams hit his 10th homer as the 
Giants snapped a three-gam losing 
streak. 

Burkett struck out four and 
walked two before being relieved 
by Mike Jackson in the eighth. 
Jackson worked out of a two-on 
jam and Rod Beck, activated earli- 


Astros 15, Canfimris 5: Jeff Bag- 
well and Steve Finley each ho- 
mered, drove in four runs and 
scored three times, powering a 20- 
hit attack for the Astros at home. 

Pete Haniisch gave up one run 
and three hits in six inning s before 
leaving because of the flu. He 
helped himself with a double and 


single, and scored twice. 

For St Louis. Allen Watson last- 
ed only four innings, giving up five 
runs and seven bits. 


Leius Comes Up Big as Twins Beat Jays 

The Associated Pros cu i „n j .... * 


The Associated Press 
Scott Leins hit a key home run 
for the second straight game; this 
time a three-run shot to cap a four- 
run seventh inning Sunday, leading 
the Minnesota Twins past the visit- 
ing Toronto Blue Jays, 7-3. 

Carl Willis allowed two runs in 
three innings in relief of Twins 
starter Pat Mahomes. 

Chuck Knoblauch began Minne- 
sota’s seventh with a one-out single 
off Woody Williams. Alex Cole 
and Kirby Puckeu walked to load 
the bases, and Dave Winfield gave 
the Twins a 3-2 lead with a sacrifice 
fly caught in foul territory by left 
fielder Carlos Delgado. 

Leius followed with his home 
run to left on a 1-2 pilch. Leuis’ five 
homers match his career high set in 
1991. Knoblauch added an RBI 
double in Lhe eighth. 

Winfield's first-inning RBI sin- 
gle and an RBI double by Pedro 
Munoz in the fourth gave the Twins 
a 2-0 lead, 

Toronto made it 2-1 on John 
Olerud’s sacrifice fly and tied it in 
the seventh on Pat Borders' RBI 
double. 


Eldrcd allowed nine hits and six scored on Oddihe Mrrv*i»»ir , c P , ^ 

ns in seven innings. field single off 5“ I ^ rntz - The Athletics’ skid is 


Kirk Gib- "rCSTMeW — 

son hit a three-run homer out of to third — Canseco's third hit — , “ Illcd down dto - a 

Tiger Stadium to lead Detroit past and Clark followed with the win- S? d 2 t st ^ rt f ? e ? ve two . runs m 
Chicago and struggling ace Jack nine fly ball off Brian Barnes, u f n m the first three innings, 
McDowelL also had threr him cs. Lee but allowed only one more ran be- 

L .Gibson's towering homer in the Cris Carpenter faced four baiters fo ?L Ieav f S the eighth, 

third inning, his third, off McDow- and got five outs, including a dou- from 

ell hit the right-field roof and ble play for the win tS? Henke l ^ e . ™, in , ors tne Same, 

tounced over to give Detroit a 6-1 pjtdbed the ninth for his fourth 

is * Jum 

— Gonzalez drive in six runs with a two runs and Scott Leius followed 

AT Dmivnirn homer, double and single as Texas with a two-run homer, highlighting 

AL nUUUIfftJF beat the Indians in a cold persistent a five- run fourth innin g f OT ^ 

downpour in Cleveland Twins. 

the third time Gibson has done iL r The ,. six .woe two away The Twins, who have allowed 10 


le off Jose Mesa, 
mseco singled McDowell 


AL ROUNDUP 


the third time Gibson has done it 


— — V.wwu uuo UL'ill. IL . . - _ J 

He accomplished the feat against , e career high Gonzalez set 
Boston's Mike Brown on June 14 1351 ^me at California. The home 


Boston's Mike Brown on June 14 ^ UDe al California. The home 
1983, and Milwaukee’s Chris Bosio ™ n w _f* his °f the year and 


on Sept. 10, 1986. ~ second in two days, after an eight- 

McDoweU, who won 22 games S 2 ™ Jwnwfcss stretch, 
and lhe American League Cv WlU had four hits, and 
Young Award Iasi season, lasted van Rodriguez hit a tie-breaking 
just three innings, allowing six two-run double in the seventh in- 


jusi three innings, allowing six 
earned runs and seven hits. 


irned runs and seven hits. ru ^- 

John Dobeny scattered six hits The Rangers, who oulhil Cleve- 
rer 7 2/3 innings as the Tiaers , “ *9-9. scored 12 times in the 

Kurlr.in r ® last ihrw. inrrinac 


uouDie. v w min us* as me i leers : * ' ** umca m uic 

Royals 6, Brewers 2: David Cone won back-to-back games for “the 
won his fourth straight start and this season. Bill Knie- . Cleveland, ^ to 

Gary Gaeui and FeSx Jose each walked in a run in the eighth „ 

had two RB Is to carry Kansas Citv befor ? Henneman worked ®, osed to j-2 on Jose Can- 


Gaiy Gaeiti and Felix Jose each g er f waik “ J In , a , njn In the eig 
had two RB Is to cam, Kansas City De or f M** e Henneman wori 
past the visiting Brewers in the first ou * “ a bases-loaded situation. 

game of a doubleheader. Rangers 5, Indians 4: U 

Lone, who did nol win his fourth Clark's sacrifice fly capped a n 
gaxneuntil May 31 last season, gave run ninth inning' as Texas b 
up five bits and two runs in eight Cleveland for their fifth win in 
innings. He walked two and struck past six games. 

OUl fOUr. The Initiinc fsvilr mil 1^. — i 


Texas closed to 4-2 on Jose Can- 
seco’s RBI groundout in the fifth, 
and Canseco singled home the fust 


u . , . •***« smgicu nome me iirst 

angers 5, Indians 4: Will run off reliever Eric Plunk in the 
Clark s sacrifice fly capped a two- Rangers’ four-run seventh. A walk 

mn ninth lnnma it Tavi/ . 


-„, 1 _ • . - *-r iMui-.iiH acvGULU. WJUJK 

rwEi h? 1 moved Canseco ^ second, and be 

Cleveland for their fifth win m Lhe scored on Doug Strange’s doubk. 

n.1 Cl Cl* oamne n _ u D 


Rodriguez then greeted Matt 
Hie Indians look a 4-j lead into Turner with a two-run double. 


Cal Flrtrmt onl rnr+rnA ‘WA * i-j fcau mio I UTucT wim a two-run double. 

LaJ tldred got rocked for four the ninth, but their bullpen blew Turner has inherited 12 nmnm 

MAferastt tes&r**-" isi&I 

9 a !“i CaJifofiia, Us AfclaicX 


walking five in a four-run fourth. 

Twins 1 1, Blue Jays 9: At Minne- 
apolis, Kent Hrbek doubled home 
two runs and Scott Leius followed 
with a two-run homer, highlighting 
a five-run fourth inning for the 
Twins. 

The Twins, who have allowed 10 
or more runs right times, had their 
fust double-digit output of the 
year. Jim Deshaies took the win 
despite allowing nine hits and six 
runs in 5W innings. 

Orioles 6, Mariners 4: Brady An- 
derson drove in three runs and Leo 
Gomez hit a two-run homer to back 
Mike Mussina for the visiting Ori- 
o!e& Mussina gave up seven hits — • 
ail singles — in seven innings. He 
struck out one and walked one. Lee 
Smith pitched a perfect ninth for 
his 12th save in 12 tries this season. 

Jack Voigt went 3-for-5 with an 
RBI for the Orioles. 

Randy Johnson struck out 1 1 but 
look the loss, allowing nine hits in 
six innings. It was the 40th time in 
Johnson's career be has struck out 
10 or more, and the second time 
this season. 


S2S»“- * -ttESSSs* 


SENNA: A Deadly Crash at Imola 


moved to third on a fly to right and 


Red Sox 4, Angels 1: At Ana- 
neun, California, Roger Clemens 
gave up four hits in right innings 
and Boston convened two errors 
by third baseman Damion Easley 
into three unearned runs. 


Ctafioned fnm Ptoge 1 Senna excelled bad not experienced 

tragedy; the last death in a Fonnu- 

tep. the seventh lap overall when SftlSSS i,? 82 

mr of Ricardo Paletti at the Can ad i a n 


■mm 




/OHW/CXHr.V > 




'3"* • o&K If..*. - . •• . S.Ka - 1 


Senna’s WDliams-Renault car 
finled to negotiate the left-hand 
Tamburriio corner and crashed 


Grand Prix. 

This season, in a controversial 


into a conaetc banka-, shredding aUcm P l t0 «?Sl5^ nQla - 0 “ 
both right-side wbeds. Senna wai m^ofa “toera dtamraoi^.” 
- .... racing anfhontes banned the 


pulled amonsdoas bom lhe cock- 

St ar around 2J0 P Jvl Rescue tIve ?^ ) ^ 0 ?“? d ^®?^ c dnv ' 



SIDELINES 


reams treated him on the scene be- 


er aids that ^ maria WHfiams 


lato^ospital^Ratzen- 

hiri rii^ri the dav before. *9 rc P* acc Erost, last years world 


beiger had died the day before. 

Dr. Frandri said Senna had tost a 
lot of Wood and “for some mo- 


champian. 

“A dream has become real/* Rax- 
zeaberger had said after the sew 


meets” had no pulse. A ' “nnmtxa- ■ Smtdc-FtMid team signed him for 
cheotomy” tod been perfonnea to ^ firq half rf this season. A for- 
idhrvc bleeding in the ato^ys. mer engineer, he had been driving 
‘'There fa a serious head iqjtny Tnfnnr formula races in Japan for 

. . . . c ^ rh# Cftlfi . .. . a ti 


^Tiicrc is a senoos nminr fonmiia races m JaMn lor 

with bleeding problems sm sato. - ^ pjeviop® two years. Ratzen- 

**He is in a state of shock and nas a berger did not qualify for the sea- 
« nrum mninM Droved rZ : im. 


besoontogc.” The hquries proved sorH jp en j 1 ig Brazilian Grand Prix 
fatal. in March, but he finished 11th in 


fatal. m March, bur be brushed inn m 

.After a one-hour delay, the dog- the Pacific Grand Prix in Japan 
a^race was resumed yet again. It three weeks ago. 

won bv Senna’s heir, 25-year- Eariier Saturday, at the same 
nW Michael Schumacher of Ger- enrve that would daim Ratooi- 
manv^toracc was reduced from berger’s life, Simd: tomnmatc Da- 
S thsT ' vid Brabham collided wuh hmi af- 

“iSn”ftd s>usfie4I<2”’ tfe81 tg tn modyMmic wag ap peal 
L * said. “It was McomeoffotKaaenbagB’scte- 


iaEir7" SdHUMclw said. “It was acomeonofUaaentwgB-scna- 

sa H outsl«tB;tteWtade<>f«^ 


^'^r^wtodwassodra- 


the fast iU 

4m raw. a mech “^23? 
Ki^Sartd wbo he was.sOTdt 


his 315-kflometer-per-hour cofli- 
sion with thewafi. His less could be 
seffi throurii a hole in the cockpit 
« narameScs rushed to pull him 


U.S. World Cup Team Is Struwliim 

ine^wSri^r ^ < ? UE ’ i lexico lAFP) — Seven weSbeforeopen- 
mg World Cup play, the U.S. soccer team is in dire straits 

Barrera scored seconds before halftime and Pedro Gonzalez 
added a chnchmg goal m the 8 9th minute Saturday in Chile’s 2-0 victory 
over the struggling U.S. iwm - 

The U.S. squatfs record fril to 2-4 with seven draws this year. 

Gullit Will Play Again for AC Milan 

GENOA, Italy (AP) — Dutch soccer star Ruud Gullit announced 
Saturday he is leaving Sampdoria to return to AC Milan, the powerhouse 
club that won this season's Italian League crown. 

Gullit said he planned to play next season for the team owned by Prime 
Minister-designate Silvio Berlusconi. bui a formal contract has not yet 
been signed. Gullit, 31, said he has discussed a one-year contract with AC 
Milan managemeoL Gullit played for AC Milan from 1987 to 1993. 

Marildo Wins Prix Ganay in Upset 

PARIS (Reuters) — Marildo upset the big guns in the Prix Ganay at 
Longchamp on Sunday, proving too good for a star-studded field ihat 
included last year’s Arc de Triomphe heroine Urban Sea. 

Sevm-year-old Marildo, owned and trained by David Smaga. proved 
as sprilely as ever under an inspired ride from Guy Guignard. 

Marildo scored a length and a half victory over Iasi year’s Oaks winner, 
intrepidity. Urban Sea was the same distance back in third. 

Numerous Takes the Derby Trial 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (LAT) — Numerous, trained by 81-year-old 
Chariie Whittingham, won the $111,600 Derbv Trial on Saturday at 
Churchill Downs, but will not enter the Kentucky Derby next Saturday. 

Nirmpmuc tuiTT inctMrt ha ia 1 _j • . n • 


— IT “wl bu m un. ixt'ULiH.A.jr ucujy ucAk MluraaV- 

Numerous win instead fp to Pimlico. Maryland, to run in the Preakness, 
the second leg of (to Triple Crown, on May 21. Whittingham, whose horses 
have won the Derby twice, will saddle Strode* Creek for this year's race. 

Mister Baileys Burns Up Newmarket 

NEWMARKET, England (AP) — Jason Weaver, making his debut 
appearance in an English classic, rode Mister Baileys to a photo-finish 
victoiy Saturday m the £150,000 ($225,000) 2,000 Guineas race. 

Mister Baileys, a 1 6-1 shot, was awarded the victory by half a nose over 
Grand Lodge, also at I6*l,in the one-mile (1. 6-kilometer) race for 3-vear- 
olds. The winning time of 1 minute. 35.08 seconds, set a record for the 
fastest mile ever run at the Newmarket track. 


car as aujoi 


Security workers sunwafoig the wreck of die car driven by Ayrton Senna In the San Marino Grand Prix. Seira MoffafeinJ 
before eventually, bang taken by . . 


Apeifcv Fiamf-Pitwc 

Ms injuries. 


Tm- 


"P ^ fiiStf ofSl Grands Prix Senna.l^ ,a ^ ] u ^ r ^ Ratzenberger’s place in the start- I was shaking all over ray body. 
: Senna. leader of teainnM^ ^u^^^iiifving ses- inggrid was left vacant as a makof Then I told myself that the ques- 

< ^ Can fSRiSa^&»>’ m a 25-car field, nonwianot whether I was going to 

Formula One j Fremh rival aons after ^r^S^STvilleneuve A fdlow Austrian driver, Ger- today- The question was 

tord.Betger, decided lo resume wtotho- 1 would drive tomorrow 
• -Wain Prep- circuit. In turn, VHkncuve. quafifying Saturday after his coun- 111 the i future, of if 1 was not 

ireatcs* was braver, if Fenan dnvor practicing Hyman’s death. He started in the »»igtodriveat alL I decided I was 

XT Senna, «*o M thhri position befamd Schnmadter. fi«ngtoracc." 

’ .^-jaore fodbaid^ jp f or the Bdg»n Greno ^ ^ “I fdt sick aslsaw lhe aoddenC Before the race on Sunday, for- 




pole position — the 65ih of his injury at a major crash at this track called for Senna to create a new 
career — with his time from Fri- m 1989. “And it was another Aus- drivers' safety group, raying the 
day’s session, trian driver, thus it was even worse, drivers had no voice in the soon. 


day’s session, 
Ratzenherg 


drivers had no voice in the sport. 
“They are all too lazy.” Lauda 


poriiy, did not want to listen. ” he 
said. “You also have to take into 
account team chiefs, the sporting 


Then I told myself that the ques- said of the other drivers. “It needs a 
Tion was not whether I was going to strong personality to lake care of 
drive today. The question was this and at the moment I think this 
•bettor I would drive tomorrow is Senna. He should come and do 


powers and commercial interests. 
There has been a total deeraftari.vi 


There has been a total degradation 
in relations between drivers and the 
establishment. 


; SQl-jn0re *“Tv!i.i«,mnnshios m 


wbo tool Yet. the era of 

WB. which 

4^-toch safety design 


« "iXS- track too Upset to * rett suae as taw tneacaaent,” a 
^ retail the said Berger, who escaped serious mer 


Before the race on Sunday, for- 
ex world champion Niki Lauda 


Prost said he had tried to restart 
the Grand Prix Drivers Association 
while he was active. 

“Many drivers, and noi the mi- 


"When I talked about safety, 
about the dangers of driving in ruin 
I was called a coward. This week- 
end has shown us that security is a 
major issue in Formula One and we 
cannot afford to neglect iL” 


Woosnam Caps Cannes Comeback 

CANNES (Reuters)— Ian Woosnam blitzed his way to an asionishinp 
victory in the Cannes Open on Sunday. 3 onismng 

wds 5 **° fc*** 3 to miss the cm after eight holes 

of Friday s second round when he was 14 strokes off the oace JStbUS* 
shots after adding a 66 to his superb third round of 63' ra SaturdS? f 
In the final 46 holes. Woosnam had an eagle and 19 birdies fL- 
toumament-record total of 271, 17 under oar Unifn - a 

Scotland took second place, five strokes back^ fiotnene of 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 2, 1994 


Success and Survival in the Movie World 


By Cynthia Rose 

L ONDON — For someone who has 
spent the last five months tending a 
flock of vampires (Torn Cruise, Brad Pill, 
Stephen Rea, Antonio Banderas;, the film 
producer Stephen Charles Woolley looks 
deceptively healthy. His brown eyes are 
clear, his prominent cheekbones glow. 
Even his trademark ponytail exudes folli- 
cle health. 

The English producer of “Interview 
With the Vampire" has a long-standing 
ability to rise from the dead. During 14 
years of professional connection with cine- 
ma, Woolley has survived the loss or two 
movie houses, of separate distribution, 
film and video enterprises, even a recent 
movie that collapsed when River Phoenix, 
its star, died Says the 36-year-old son of a 
London construction worken“My critics 
in Britain see these kinds of things as 
‘embarrassing.’ But in the real world of 
movie-making they’re just hiccups." 

At the moment there is nothing more to 
surmount than a hangover, product of last 
night’s launch for Woolley’s new movie. 
“BackbeaL” Made for a minim al $4.8 mil- 
lion. it centers on the m&nage-a-trois in- 
volving the original Beatle Stuart Sutcliffe. 
Sutcliffe's German girlfriend and the late 
John Lennon. With its tunes performed by 
an all-siar U.S. grunge band the unpreten- 
tious film is inventive and engaging All 
signs indicate a hit. But Woolley learned 
the hard way not to rely on anything Only 
18 months ago, he liquidated Palace Pic- 
tures. the feature film company he had 
nurtured over eight years. At the time, it 
was the end or Britain’s biggest film inde- 
pendent. 

Woolley lost everything: the Palace 
name, a staff of 80, even the fax machines. 
Yet nine months later, he was holding a 
1993 Oscar. He and his partner, Nik Pow- 
ell, had launched a new company. Seal a. 
They also managed to finish three final 
Palace films: “Water land” “Dust Devil” 
and “The Crying Garnet “The Crying 
Game” became the highest-grossing inde- 
pendent Him ever made in Britain. It got 
six no mina tions for Academy Awards, 
winning the Oscar for Best Original 
Screenplay. 

That Oscar brought Woolley into the 
big leagues. Just as Scala started settling 
into its new offices, David Geffen tele- 
phoned “Crying Game" director Neil Jor- 
dan. Geffen wanted him to (Urn the novel 
“Interview With the Vampire." Although 
Jordan was interested be had just made 
another commitment, so Geffen changed 
his tactics — making Woolley his co-pro- 
ducer. 

“I’m just lucky,” shrugs Woolley, to 
whom power-dressing means T-shirts, 
plaid flannel and torn leather jackets. Yet 



’The Crying Game" put Stephen Woofley in cinema big leagues. 


he has earned every scrap of his expertise. 
From 1983 to 1991 his life was consumed 
by Palace, an entertainment conglomerate 
whose business ranged from the local 
(health-food shops and software compa- 
nies) to the international (Palace Video. 
Palace Distribution and Palace Pictures). 
In its movie empire. Woolley was the front 
man. always visible, voluble and forceful. 
Nik Powell played a much less public role. 

Yet it was Powell who detected Wool- 
ley’s potential. Back in 1980. the 22-year- 
oid ran a London meviebouse called the 
Scala. This was a money-losing item in the 
Virgin leisure empire, where Nik Powell 
was an influential partner. Under Woolley 
— hyperactive, c unning and persuasive — 
the modest dnema soon started turning 
impressive profits. He screened at least 
five movies every day. plus frequentall- 
night sessions. Woolley also wooed pop 
stars into holding gigs at his cinema, and 
turned its bar-care into a fashionable 
hangout. 


During 1982, the Virgin empire split, 
with Nik Powell inheriting its video assets. 
In the oreak-up. Woolley’s cinema pre- 
mises were sold from under him, but be 
received £10.000 in compensation.**! made 
them pay.” he savs now, “just to keep me 
quiet”Woolley then built a new Scala in 
die King’s Cross Odeon. a vintage movie 
house be had visited as a child. Powell, 
seeing a future in Woolley’s brand of 
chutzpah, took him on as a partner during 
1983. 

Their success began with the Palace 
Video label but, by 1984, they were mak- 
ing films: “Company of Wolves," “Abso- 
lute Beginners,” “Mona Lisa." Out of the 
18 movies Palace made during the next 
nine years, 12 were personally overseen by 
Woolley. 

To raise investment for their projects. 
Woolley developed two basic strategies. 
Either he would cast a lead“who meant 
something in America.” or he would build 
the film a salable pop soundtrack. He 


launched “Company of Wolves" by cast- 
ing Angela Lansbury. in a deal clinched 
wuh her husband behind her agent’s back. 

Woolley remains a firm believer in hands- 
on wheeling and dealing. “I'm involved 
with -everything: deals, development, 
scripts, casti n g.” 

Even the death of Palace had a maverick 
cause. After his sjrfit from Virgin, before 
be toudied a movie, Powdl purchased a 
diversity of holdings: record labels, satel- 
lite-dish companies, editing centers. When 
Britain's recession hit, the businesses bled 
Palace profits. By 1992. Wool! ev says,” We 
were hemorrhaging. Then we had a box- 
office flop, coupled with a mediocre year 
in distribution. And our banks pulled the 
plug/Ten months after Palace Med. the 
second Scala closed. 

This time, however, Woolley was more 
than a cocky upstart He is married and 
the father of two daughters (his wife, Eliz- 
abeth K arisen, also produces films). Also, 
despite Woolley's sdo flight with Geffen, 
he sees Scala as a “very British” compan- 
y.*Tt's more important to be here than to 
be in Los Angeles. There’s an incredible 
pool of talent, even when we do choose to 
co-produce with Hollywood, we can bring 
a European aesthetic to the projects.” 

“Interview With the Vampire" could 
well make Woolley’s case. It has an Italian 
ttoagnw (Dante rerretti, responsible for 
“The Age of Innocence"), a French cine- 
matographer (Oscar-winuer Philippe 
Rousselot). and an English costume de- 
signer (Sandy Powdl, who did “Orlan- 
do"). Plus, of course, the Irishmen Neil 
Jordan and Stephen Rea. “Europeans 
pitch their eye, their feelings differently,” . 
Wooley says. “Their formative years are 
still a different experience." 

Yet he continues to mix and match with 
America. “Jonathan Wild” is being co- 
produced by Jodie Foster. A script oiled 
“History Is Made at Night" is a Michael 
Douglas co-production. And, in June, 
Scala stans to film “The Neon Bible," 
from the novd by the late Southern writer 
John Kennedy Toole. Although the movie 
stars an American actress, Gena Row- 
lands, it will be directed by the art-house 
idol Terence Davies. Britain’s Davies is 
almost the opposite of bankable. But such 
gambles remain central to Woolley’s vi- 
sion. “Bigger films should always feed 
your smaller, more adventurous projects.” 

He smiles across the flashing phones, 
his personal neon Bible. “For me. that’s 
what gives making movies an edge. I love a 
‘Backbeat’ just as much as an ‘Inter- 
view.’" 


Cynthia Rase is a London-based journal- 


at. 



Trophy Wife: More 



.By WOlitiin Safirc ' ~ 

W ASHINGTON — The ultimate ambition of a 
gold digger U to end up as a trophy wife." Lynn 
Barber writes, in The Times ‘of London, Using that 
phrase in h* most pejorative sense, she qretfes Saily 
Barton, who married the actoi Richard ftartta. a. year 
before he died, as one whovraabi a tropfcytetseltbut . 
seemed to kn 0 Wpientywhower& “ThegoJ&hiule if 
you are a trophy wife is that yrxi do oot stray w^leihc 
oldman is stUTaKw.” " 

’ A somewhat less insulting sense of tire pStraSt ap- 
peared in an interview with the actress RiF-Derdfat 
-The Chicago 1 Tribune.- Bait Mffla, describing her 'jofc- 
in a ^ hydeviaon: movie, ■’She 

^^The revised second edition of the Random House 
Unabridged Dictionary provides this cauripus defiai- 
rina: “the .young, often second, wife of a rich. middle- . 
aged man.” But that sKjps past the controversy: Is the 
trophy wife ameic armpiece, or even a bonds? Gris sire . 
a new and attractive partner in power. smxes&ful in', 
her own right? Must she be veiy thhx or at l^ist- 
physically attractive? Is it asewitilaft'-: r V.'- 
A trophy is an award or honor given for sons 
victory. The meaning of the Greek root is “turning,** 
specifically a turning away from battle, as when an 
opponent is routed and his battle flags become tiro- 
pares, symbolic of victory. To have a trophyis£ne^bti( 
to be a trophy is usually considered demeaning, " . 

.The term trophy wife, was coiiredby JuBeConnefly, a 
senior editor of Fortune maggrine. to a cover stayin' - 
1989, she wrote: “Powrafnl maTare beginning lO de- 

mand trophy wives . . . The mote money men make , 
the argument goes, die more sdf-assurfid they becoma 

and tire easier it is for them to think: Idetercra queen.” 

' .□ 

in the initial coinage, the term was in no wjysyhosy- 
mous with bunb a. “Enter tbesecond wife: aTJecadeor 
twoyoun^tlmherhu^)and.soa)«imasewralmch- 
es tallar, beautiful and very often accompfobcdT wrote 
the unmarried CaaneUy. “The second wife certifies her 
husband’s status and, 2 possible given the material she 
has to work with, dispels die notion that meat peak 
sexually at age 18. This trophy doesnaihang on the wall 
tite a moose head— sbe works. Hard. Par starters, she 
often has her own btanress.” . : v 
The w oman chosen for Fortune’s cover to exemplify 
this career woman whose husband is pari of her career 
was CaroJyne Roehm, a dress deagner whose business 

had revenues of $10 rnfflinh, then mamecT io die fever- 

aged-buyout king, Henry Kravis. They have since di- 
vorced; Roehm has retired from the dress business and 
win be spending the summer in Britain stufyn&Shake- 

spearean tragedy at. Oxford University. I wa$^eated> 

next to Rodunai a recent dinner party andSttzeAdit 
opportunity for lexical research. 

“Women considered trophy wires arc accomplished 
and ambitious,” rite reported, “in both did: careers 
and their lives. They have some looks, bur are neither 
glamorous norstiq»denougblo~becalleda%iznbo'; - 
they attract husbands who generally see second wives 
to be a kind of reward,- tat who want more- than a~ 
prettyface.” : : 1 

Thus, the term has two deariy differentiated senses. - 


at thd 


Ok what was wbed. as-they sayat M 

Supreme Court? T_o0odieSlf- !*Wben 1 

Bbteijin^ York. 
abdT femned nqctar wiftbased bn that 
What about tfcenatural folIow-up?^Tttau^t tftaj 
trophy husbands,”. ConneQy S^ys. In ftaLdj® : f. j 
issre of Woi&tfrWobim does daqiss.thaL tat * 
decided Mains it" Ybuhn^bt describe Ted Turner as 
trophy tomly * 

someone yt* 

'..X-.'. ■- ;?m. 

. That. .suggest ?&lfeotarer of trophy, wif^ who 
•j yigmall y ^ve tbir tafffl aoittiotatfon ofcaaxenpusn' 
meat ahd'taaneffl aflMpat,goy seq 

ascmphaszingite^-j^dHin^^D^^^^^ 
quality t<> trophy" she atoms, ^and-thai docsn t 
late inioTbe male imagt-A trophy Aa&flKfwouldbe a 
CE O or a rcallv ponerfuf guy. not stare sttai.muffm- 
)& 9 oS^^ttaSnc^ or^.'sttad." w® 
applied to male animals- used far breeding: muffin, m 
: modem dang^ft d&jrag endearment for a wman, was 
Comtosed withstnaby yengcfiflfqnato to mean “sexy 
Tta'anheadcd^unkrof man.”) ---.V - - ^ 
i 'StOT'dioiii8lj,:itaV^ of Wo^ gWgnaaextm^ 
tbenretaphcU'icf hx.orignta, nomnsukmg sense/ .^Tro- 
phy Hn3>ands" is the headline; with a subhead of 
“Access . and S«V When a highi»wered tspman 
meets be? inatch. he’s got to be.more tfaaitatV^tivc 
irrtrfKgmt rmmg He must bc ric^ powerful 

and Y 7,7 

- - AWta^ 'ta^ttributmg coinage trophy wifi to 
• Toin W^ -i^dtaaflred dfserinirredly emaciated 

spouses iis. u X^ngf r m bis apvd ‘'Tbe Bbnfire of the 
. Vanities,” the magaane defines trophy husband with 
ttm qtMvratwr this gny amf she barimes oo^ 

■ Aaw and craft^^^bits 

' artist^ oftiffl pufi^a Hus- 

band.” At^l if ^he Thtn^rij thS-atnibativc noun 
bvpf, sropBed, Hdmejretted iky Ekhd arid skid, “Of 
conrse, 5car,” in a tone that ihchcates the tenn never 

- describes veteran husbands. -_v : \ ■ 

Working Woman attends the mete^idf ^^everi further, 
to baphy dates: tfrese -tramartad escorts cf high- 
: powered cavtalemed womea art not boy toys. a deroga- 
jj ta pta idmizied ta Mattonna^ TIiea; derirables include 
Peter J pjming S j ' David Lettaman. • Meal 2IuAennan. 
Bob Kerrey and the Wlnte House aide Geocge Stephan- 
optata C^otkahtac tat great dresser”). , : V ; is 
V As a‘ modern; modifier; then, trophy most, often 

- means ‘TumbOTic” when applied to women, though h 
1 second .sense remains of “acconi|dished.”- Applied to 
.•iMn,. however, 'trophy; is almost always ctamlimen- 
taiy. Not fair? “Life is tafah;" Said Prcstckm John F. 

‘ Kaiiredyi'a tropbyTiustand. v- : - • 

. - - -fifew-Tirk Thaes Senior - .• 


EVTERNAllOi^AL 
1CLASSIIIED / 

, : Appears an ‘ .-- 


WE.4THER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


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Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. Asia 



North America 

Dry and seasonable weather 
will stretch from New Yo»k 
City to Washington. D.C.. 
through Thursday Mild, but 
damp, weather will cover 
Chicago by midweek, wtille 
dry weather Is found In 
Detroit. Some rain rs rfcety m 
Sen Francisco Thursday: 
otherwise, the West Coast 
w* be dry. 


Europe 

Showers wiB wet Ireland, the 
U K.. western France and 
the northwestern shores ol 
Spain Into Wednesday atone; 
»rth tvnes ol wmd Thors will 
be weimmg sun Tuesday 
from southern Spam to Italy 
northward through Gem-ony 
to Denmerv and Sweden 
Rams win bieak on: It the 
north a! midvkec*- 


Asia 

Showers wi? wet Chma horn 
3eiimg to Shanghai Tues- 
day. It vrtl also ran m Kcrw 
and southwestern Japan 
Throughout Japan and 
Korea, sn c«ers win be likely 
at midweek. South China 
and Taiwan wit! be hot and 
muggy with the threat of 
thunderstorms. Mioweek anl 
have modest c3cJ«j 


Asia 


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ACROSS 

* Outbuildings 
c Hobgoblin 

io" sesame’ 

14 Mischievous 
sprite 
is Selves 
ie Nucfear reactor 
17 Ahead of the 
times 

i# Prefix with 
marketing 
ao Sleep stage 
21 Accurate 


22 Made an 
incursion 
m Medicine that's 
not all It's 
promised to be 
2SBewaits 
27 Fictitious - 
so Trigonometric 
function 

32 Sashes - 

33 Oil city of Iran 

34 Memorable 
period 

37 Melts 


Solution to Puzzle of April 29 



QBEaDHSgQQSSlBQ 
□HESS CJEEIIIQ ana 
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BEUQHaaua aasaQ 
BQDUUEa aOIUQOliB 

□Qaayua auiaauaLa 
QEEOuy asaoaaa 


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pemdedin 

42 Ott or Gibson 

43 Appraised 
4siniand sea east 

of the Caspian . 

4« Rephrased 
48 Lord Peter 
Wimsey's 
creator 

M Caper 
32 Uproar 
34 Evades 

Se of arms 

57 Small amount 

«o Woodwind 1- 
instrument 

M Restaurant 
special 
•4 Add-on 
as Swearword 
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T Monstrmrsiy 
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12 Actress Burstyn 

13 Desiderata 

» Electric power 
network ; 
23 Astound ' 

M Noted lioness, 
as Take new vows 
27' Froth • : - 

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ecclesiastic • 
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.© New York Times Edltedby. Will Shortt 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


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flreox»nltyyoiriretoataBskftaC>38tonierSentae. ’ 



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COUNTRY 

ACCESSNUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA • Baljr 

172-1011 Braxfl 

• — '. . 0008010 

Australia 

X -800-881 -Oil UfchtrosB-to’ 

1550W1 Chile , 

- . 00*0312 

China, FKCwm ■ 10813. ttimniw 

8*196 Coimnhb . 

980-110010 

Guam 

018-872 Luxembourg 

0-800-01U- - Coot* thorn - 

m 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 Macedonia, F.YJLof 998004288 Ecuador 

•’ 119 

India* 

000-117 Mater ; - 

OS0M9O-11O BSahvdorw : 

• - ' ' 190 

Indonesia* 

001801-10 Monaco* 

19a-OOU Guatemala* ' 

’ 190 

Japan- 

_0W: il . Netherlands* ‘ 

» ' 0&O22-91H Guyana*” 

- ' . 165 

Korea 

009-11 Norway 

800-190-11 . Honduras** - 

123 

Koiom . 

11", Wfcad***”.- *. 

0*0104800111 Mexico*** 

* ' "95-8004624240 

Malaysia*, 

8008011 ponugar 

05017-1-288 Mcansn<Wau8ia) • 174 

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