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HeraU* 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Tuesday May 3, 1994 




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No. 34,578 


Mandela Claims Victory: 
South Africa Tree at Last 


For the Election Judge, 
Lots of Stretching to Do 


JiAn ParVm/TV Auooated Pre» 


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Nelson Mandela dandng with ins ANC supporters Monday night in Johannesburg before delivering his election victory speech. 

America’s Asia-Pacific Chorus Sours 


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By David E Sanger 

.Vw rant Times Service 

HONG KONG r- When Resident Bill Oin- 
lon first described his visnm of a new “ Pacific 
community” last summer, in which the (Jailed 
Stales would engage Asia more vigorously and 
creatively than at any rime since World War II, 
most of the region's leaden embraced the idea 
as a long-overdue shaft bran what they saw as 
Washington's Eurocentric view of the world. 

Bat in recent months the enthusiastic talk of 
harmony, which leaded a crescendo when Mr. 
Clinton pubexed Asian leaders at a .summit 
meeting ra$eattie,Il 0 fcqa^^ to a 

broad chorus of qstioarc&ted at the adnmis-: 

Iralirm. m , *. 

On topics as diverse as trade ©obey with 
Japan, human rights and the possible casing of : 


an American teenager in Singapore, leaders 
from Canberra to Tokyo are voicing similar 
critiques. They say Washington's approach has 
been arrogant, that the “community” it has in 
mind is bush in America's ima g e rather than in 
Asia’s, and that it is chiefly interested in impos- 
ing its own roles. 

Many erf the criticisms are self-interested, 
and sane came from countries that insis t the 
region needs a stabilizing military presence 
from the United States even while rgeciine hs 
political influence. But a result is that many of 
the administration's policies have been subth 
undercut byaome of iisdosest Asian allies.' ' 

“There las been a very shHip change of tone 
in recent months," said a senior South Korean 
official who deals regularly with high-level 
Omton administration officials. “There is a 


sense that America's approach to Asia has been 
very high-handed, too much preaching about 
hu man rights and too mnrh of a Mickey Kan tor 
approach on trade that may score a few points 
in the short term, but hurt the U.S. role in the 
Pacific for a long time ” Mr. Kamor is the U.S. 
trade representative. 

Since the Seattle meeting, Mr. Clinton’s 
Asian policy has been driven by three goals: 
opening Japan’s markets, brandishing trade 
threats to force China to respect human rights 
and insisting, that North Korea will never be 
permitted to become a nuclear power. 

Bnt its policies on Japan and China nave 
been under daily attack throughout the region, 
one of the reasons the administration is being 
foreed to back off and rethink its strategy. And 

See ASIA, Page 4 


By Bill Keller 

Sew York Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Judge Johann 
Kriegler casually uses (he word “break- 
down” to describe the election he is ru nning 

He concedes that many ballots never lot 
the warehouse, that polling places faded to 
open, that ballot boxes were stuffed “to a 
significant degree,’’ that voting places often 
had no impartial monitors and that some 
election officials were partisan, if not 
crooked. 

But there is no doubt in Smith Africa that 
within a few days he will baptize the new 
democracy by pronouncing the required 
four-word benediction — “substantially free 
and fair" — over the results. 

“From the outset the commission had no 
illusions that it could mount a really effi- 
cient election.'* the judge said Monday dur- 
ing an intermission from the crises that still 
beset the counting of votes. “It is an Africa- 
style election. It is not to be measured by 
European or North American standards. 
What we’re trying to do is put together a 
credible test of the wiD of the people.” 

In the end, he said, it is less important 
whether the election was really free and fair 
than whether people accept the outcome as a 
national verdict on their future. 

Judge Kriegler. 63, is a former trial lawyer 
and human rights advocate with a reputa- 
tion for fierce independence, dry wit, flashes 
of arrogance, and, in his work on the appeals 
court, a somewhat greater devotion to the 
spirit of the law than its letter. 

“If it is manifest in a given situation that 
the rules ought to be stretched because that 
would do justice, yes, that’s my approach," 
he said Monday in his office at the Indepen- 
dent Electoral Commission. “And I've ap- 
plied it here.*’ 

To his critics, who have proliferated dur- 
ing the chaos of voting and counting. Judge 
Kriegler is an imperious figure and a bad 
manager. The voting confusion has proba- 
bly not enhanced his prospects for an ap- 
prir'rrem :r the new constitutional court, 
although lawyers say he remains one of the 
lop candidates. 

Foreign observers and some candidates 
say that in his determination to validate the 


election be has blinked at irregularities that 
did not affect the overall outcome but could 
have cost smaller parties seats in the new 
Parliament. 

“It was just chaotic from the word go." 
fumed Tony Leon, a leader of the liberal 
Democratic Party. “The thing s that could 
have gone wrong with tins election didn’t — 
violence, murder, mayhem,'’ be added. “But 
then to be let down by a process that was so 
Fifth World is a disgrace.” 

Dennis Davis, a law professor who helped 
draf l the charter under which the election is 
taking place, said be was worried that the 
commission’s fail ore to prevent rampant 
abuses in the embattled Zulu province, 
KwaZulu-Natal could encourage the losers 
there to reject the result and resume their 10- 
year violent partisan conflict. 

Almost everyone acknowledges that 
Judge Kriegler took on one of die most 
impossible assignments in the histoiy of 
elections: four months to organize an elec- 
tion in a country where three-fourths of the 
had never voted, with no voter 


with any voter free to vote anywhere, 
and with no reliable census to teQ the com- 
mission where to send ballots. 

To satisfy the nati onal pride — and the 
black suspicion of the existing government 
— the commission was forbidden from de- 
pending on foreign organizations or the 
ministry that handled past elections. 

Many polling places were up unpaved 
roads in villages without telephones or elec- 
tricity. Anyone hired to moni tor the election 
was “likely to be the second cousin of the 
officer and the son-in-law of the 
chief," Judge Kriegler said. 

Halfway into the assignment, the rules 
were changed to indude separate ballots for 
national and provincial legislatures, requir- 
ing that the floor plan erf every polling place 
be redesigned. 

Then a week from the end, after 80 mil- 
lion ballots had been printed, the Inkatha 
Freedom Party decided to participate, re- 
quiring that gummed slickers be added by 
hand at the bottom of each ballot 

The voting became a giant improvisation. 
When ballot boxes got full because of unex- 

See RELIEF, Page 4 


A Graying Holland Votes, 
Fearing Welfare 9 s Future 


By William Drozdiak 
(Yiahington Pea/ Service 

THE HAGUE — After years of hying to 
cope with the social and political repercussions 
of a “baby boom" followed by a “birth dearth," 
. the Netherlands is now confronting a new kind 
of social uprising that might be called “the 
. granny revolution.” 

- As U million Dutch voters prepare to go to 
the polls in national elections Tuesday, a sense 
of Jarm is spreading, espedato among the 
elderly, over the fate of an elaborate welfare 

. and pension system that is regarded as perhaps 
• the most generous in all of Europe 

^earful of rising enme and lower hwngriao- 

: daids, 15,000 elderly men and women marked 


Dutch one,” tile party leader said. “In 20 years 
the baby boomen in Europe will be 65, so all oT 
the problems we have now are just going to get 
worse. We want politicians to start thinting 
about the long term.” 

Even more than other West European coun- 
tries, the Netherlands now confronts critical 
deridort* about the future s truct ur e of its soci- 
ety- - - 

With people living longer, having fewer chil- 
dren and aiding fewer jobs is the course of 
Europe's wool recession since the war, social 
welfare costs have soared in a country that 
remain proud of its reputation as a progressive 
social laboratory. 

Because of their Eberal approach to sick 


ia Eindhoven last month to demonstraletbar leave, disabiHQr allowances and retirement pen- 
arfitical finur and to want the governing cans- sous, the Duta are now spemfing almost $100 

bfi&an a year on health and social security 
costs, or about 10 times what they pay far 
defense. 

Faced with a potentially disastrous situation 
in which the number of people receiving bene- 
fits from the state will soon outstrip the number 
of those who weak, the Christian Democrat-led 
government of Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers 
has bed striving to rein in the ballooning cost 
of entitlements. 

But tile government’s attempts to freeze pen- 
sions and divert funds to create jobs for young 
people has triggered a rebeffion among the 
r - - - — *- •*— — T :tfcal 


• to leave their pensions alone. 

: " “The revolt of old people 3d! 

lave the kind of Pog^W* 

ttSosJpariv hopes to win at least six seals • m . gderty dun promises to shake up the 
S^Su^erlKWseofp^jJo^^j, landscape and possibly drive the l 
StS ■’wakening ^ dderiy *“ rap * Hy Democrats out of powerfor the first time in 

«*"• ‘ See DUTCH, Page 4 



2jam UMnaw/AyaccFimit- P iL B i 

GAIT-KEEPER — A cossack pointing his lance at a car as he asked for identification documents in St Petersburg. The mounted 
patrols have been organized in an attempt to deter criminal activity, which has been increasing in and around the Russian dty. 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG —Nelson Mandela, ac- 
cepting victory in South Africa's founding dem- 
ocratic election, urged South African blacks to 
proclaim themselves “Free at last!" as Presi- 
dent Frederik W. de Klerk said he was handing 
his office to “a man of destiny.” 

Hundreds of thousands of joyous blacks im- 
mediately took to the streets in downtown Jo- 
hannesburg and in townships all over the coun- 
try, singing and dancing in celebration of the 
end of more than three centuries of white mi- 
nority rule in South Africa. 

The transfer of power was symbolic and 
rhetorical since less than half of the nearly 23 
minion votes cast in last week’s election have 
been counted. 

But with the African National Congress as- 
sured of at least 62 percent of the vole and a 
co mmanding majority in the new Parliament. 
South Africans seemed to treat Mr. de Klerk's 
concession of defeat and Mr. Mandela’s accep- 
tance of victory — both televised nationally — 
as a signal to the end cf their long and painful 
liberation struggle. 

Mr. Mandela, the head of (be ANC. extended 
an offer of conciliation to his former adversar- 
ies, commending the security forces for laying 
the foundation for a free and fair election, 
ur ging his political rivals to work for national 
unity and declaring that South Africans were 
“onepeople." 

“This is a democracy,” be declared. “I hold 
out nty hand on friendship and ask all of you to 
join and tackle the problems that face us. An 
ANC government will serve all of the people, 
not just members of the ANC” 

Acknowledging the ANCs apparent elector- 
al defeat in the western Cape Province and in 
the predominantly Zulu Natal region, Mr. 
Mandela said be accepted those losses as a 
function of democracy. 

“We had a gpod fight, but now is the time to 
heal old wounds and build a new South Africa.” 
he said. He was referring to the bitter and often 
bloody struggle in Natal between the ANC and 
Chief Mangosutbu Buthelezi’s Inkatha Free- 
dom Party. 

As supporters cheered and wept with joy, Mr. 
Mandela said now was “the time for celebra- 
tion" and “for South Africans to join together 
to celebrate the birth of democracy." 

Bui as he often does, the 75-year-old libera- 
tion leader briefly revealed his disciplinarian 
side, urging his followers to celebrate peaceful- 
ly, respectfully and with restraint to mow that 
they have “the responsibility to serve in govern- 
ment." 

He also urged them to “go back to your jobs 
tomorrow morning,” and pledged that the 
ANC leadership, too, would be “back at our 
desks and rolling up our sleeves to tackle the 
problems” facing the new government 
Mr. Mandela’s symbolic proclamation of the 
moment of freedom for blades long opp ressed 
by the apartheid system of racial separation 
that was enforced for 46 years by the Ne-ional 
Party was underscored by the ANC national 
chairman, Thabo Mbeki, who noted that Cor- 
eiia Scott King, the widow of the U.S. civil 
rights leader Mania Luther King Jr., had just 
entered the ballroom. 

Mr. Mbeki gently chided Mr. Mandela, tell- 
ing him be should have attended his proclama- 
tion by quoting Mr. King fully: “Free at last, 
free at last Thank God Almighty, we are free at 
last" 

For his pari Mr. de Klerk, in a concession 
speech to several hundred supporters at his 
campaign headquarters outside of Pretoria 
three hours earlier, also celebrated freedom. 

“After so many centuries, we will finally have 
a government which represents all South Afri- 
cans,” he said. “After so many centuries, all 
South Africans are free.” 

Mr. de Klerk said Mr. Mandela had “walked 
a long road and now stands at the top of the 
hill” An ordinary man might rest on his accom- 
plishments, be added, but a “man of destiny” 
knows that beyond one hill lies another. 

“As he contemplates the next bill I hold out 
my hand to Mr. Mandela in friendship and 
cooperation,” said Mr. de Klerk, who, under 
South Africa’s interim constitution, will be- 
come first deputy president under Mr. Man- 
dela. 

While pledging to work with the ANC gov- 
ernment for national reconciliation and recon- 
struction. Mr. de Klerk said he would also try to 
make his party the largest in the country. 


Hatred Rends Asunder Israeli Lovers, Arab and Jew 


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wae sentenced b> months’ jad 

One .you* reprobation, two others 

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Hb court said the teenagerahdpcd two 
ringleaders — Shoo Eschricfc and Tnx> 
Vodked — trap Duncan Kennedy, a white 
member of theUS. Olympic fage team. Mi. 
Kenn edy was beaten after he tried to help a 
frfa ri- ffflfnnmte. Robot Pipkins, who was 
bang insulted by the neo-Nazis. 

Related article. Page 2 


Crossword 


Plage 24. 


By Gyde Habennan 

New Yeti k Tima Service 

YAHA, Israel — This is a story of two 
families thrust unexpectedly together and 
forced to navigate deep religious and ethnic 
divides. 

It is about anger and fear, mistrust and 
resentment abiding conflict and sudden death. 

It is a love stray. 

It is about an Arab man and a Jewish woman, 
both Israelis, who quietly conducted a year- 
long courtship and then were married a month 
ago in a Muslim c eremony, soon after she had 
converted to Islam. Only a few days after their 
marriage, Add and Ahuva Cohen Onallah were 
tom apart forever. 


On April 6, a West Bank Arab on a suicide 
mission for a militant Islamic group, blew him- 
self up beside a bus in Afula. 10 kilometers 
south of this Israeli Arab village near Nazareth. 

The explosion lulled seven Israelis instantly, 
including an Arab woman, and wounded 44 
others in the worst terrorist incident inside 
Israel in five years. One of the more seriously 
wounded was Ahuva Cohen Onallah, 37, who 
lingered for three weeks and died a week ago. 

As the pain ended for her. it began for those 
she left behind. They include her new husband, 
a former husband, three children, aging par- 
ents, four brothers, one sister and a country 
that sought through its popular press to frame 
her life and death against the relentless struggle 


between Arab and Jew that grips this land even 
as it strives for recandliation. 

The disconsolate new husband, Adel Onal- 
lah, saw nothing cosmic about the relationship. 

They met six yean ago while both worked at 
a bank in Nazareth, she a cloit and he a 
computer instructor. Ahuva Cohen was Still in 
her first marriage, but unhappily so. Finally, 
she walked out on it —and rai two embittered 
daughters and a son —and found comfort with 
Mr. Onallah, two years her junior and light 
years apart in background. 

He simply loved her, he says, and then he lost 
her. 

“I was doubly hit,” Mr. Onallah said. “My 


wife was killed, and die was killed by my own 
people.” 

For Mis. Onallah’s Orthodox Jewish family, 
which had not been close to her in recent years, 
the bomb blast exposed facts that its members 
had known either dimly of not at all — her 
romance with an Arab, her decision to adopt 
his religion for the sake of children they might 
have and the fact that she was already pregnant 

Through much of the week, they were cast in 
an unflattering light 

This is a period whai the Jews and Arabs of 
Israel and its territories are supposed to be 
coming to leans in new ways with each other. It 

See LOVE, Page 4 


Old Soviet Bear Hug Appears to Find the Kiss of Life 




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By Fred Hiatt 

Wasirngten Post Service 

MOSCOW — The collapse of the Communist East bloc 
bronghi joy to some and misery to others, but it produced one 
change dial it seemed everyone could cheer: the demise of the 
Kremlin kiss. 

No longer would our breakfasts be upset by photos of 
Commie bigwigs ntpyting each other's five-o'clock shadows 
and smacking each other on the bps. No longer would general 
secretaries faanEate U.S. presidents by folding them into bear 
hugs after signing anns-control pacts. No more doddering 
dictators mating out cm the evening news. Democracy and 
handshakes were in, and the Brezhnev buss was out. 


But now. in a development that has alarmed Kremlin- 
watchers here; it seems the Politburo smack may be back. On 
his recent return from 3 Black Sea vacation, in a clear depar- 
ture from recent protocol. President Boris N. Yeltsin was 
smooched by lot al aides who were lined up to greet him on the 
airport tarmac. 

And Leonid Parfyonov, a popular television host who wrote 
a book about the odd ways of Soviet leaders, confirmed that 
kissing had roared back into fashion at the upper levels of 
Russian politics. 

Suddenly, all the dire warnings about the Russian bear 
snarling back to life seem more credible. A few thousand 


Russian troops hanging on in the Baltics, a highly placed spy in 

Washington, the sabotage of NATO policy in Serbia OK* 

the West can live with that After afl, everyone has a few 
unattractive qualities. But if the wet Kremlin smart,- is reallv 
making a comeback, surely the bad old days cannot be far 
behind. 

A Yeltsin spokesman, quizzed about this latest development 
dunng a recent telephone interview, immediately tried to mss. 
the buck. 

“Somebody came up and smacked him," insisted AnatoH 
Krasikov, refusing to name the guilty party who made the fin* 

See KISS, Page 4 




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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. MAY 3, 1994 


A New Flash Point in Bosnia 


WORLD BRIEFS 


«5c:ss£- 


French Want to Make Corridor a Safe Area 


flintnn Presses Bering on 

WASHINGTON (R«ites) — Present BfflC%tonmciZbi^ \ 
* : aC rmna rm MAonav an A isilA Lmh a.* _ 


By Barry James 

Intermuuvtal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Foreign Minister 
Alain Juppe of France proposed 
Monday that the United Nations 
protection zone in the former Y u- 
goslavia be extended to a narrow 
corridor in northeastern Bosnia 
linking the two main areas hdd by 
the Bosnian Serbs. 

“I personally favor extending the 
protection that exists for the safe 
havens to this extremely sensitive 
rone," Mr. Juppe said. 

He said it should be made dear 
that "the First artillery shell fired 
will lead to immediate retaliation 
by the Atlantic Alliance." 

French military officials said 
Muslim forces were massing in the 
area north of the Tuzla pocket in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina. close to the 
strategic Bosnian Serbian town of 
Brcko. 

The officials, who spoke on con- 
dition of anonymity, said they had 
evidence to suggest that an attack 
would be launched by the Muslims. 

Although the corridor tradition- 
ally has been occupied by Serbs 
and Croats, and the Muslims have 
no interest in holding the land, it is 
the Bosnian Serbs' weakest posi- 
tion and therefore a useful bargain- 
ing chip. They said it could be the 
Last big battle or the W2r in what 
was once Yugoslavia. 

The officials said the Muslim 
forces on the ground were about as 
numerous as the Bosnian Serbs, but 
that they lacked heavy weapons. 
They suggested that the Muslims 
may be getting small arms and oth- 
er weapons from Eastern Europe 
with U.S. connivance. 

"When the war is over, we may 
(ind out the truth about this." one 
said. 




BOSNIA- 

merzegovina- 


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-Tihb/ 

fset 

S t a bn Wea 




.'GorazOa' e-s* 


Areas of control 1 

dJMuSKn aswtwui SSTOfaiKjn j 

a Sale area desuyutiri by ths 

Unrlad Njtpans ' 

.. .. 


The French chief of staff, Admi- 


Z~\ days, they said, the number of peo- 
i pie killed in the former Yugoslavia 
\ \ is less than in a large American ci ty 
" i like Detroit. 

• } They said that although it might 
^ be temporarily satisfying to puntdi 
• :J the Serbs by bombing them, this 
strategy would not lead to peace. 
t ‘ J The only action authorized by the 
Security Council, they added, was 
""j close air support for specific aims. 
v ; “If you go against the Sabs you 
*0j wiU have a war to the finish, a 
«-J} senior official said. “Those who 
J want to use force have no answer to 
the question of what they will do if 
I large numbers of UN troops are 
Jj taken prisoner." 
n At the same time, the official 
said, while the Bosnian Serbs clcar- 
ni- ly were the aggressors, "no one is 




ral Jacques Lanxade. visited Sara- looking at what the Muslims are 
jevo over the weekend, where he doing." 


met with the British lieutenant gen- 
eral who commands the United 
Nations peacekeeping forces. Sir 


“The Americans have From the 
beginning been encouraging the 
Muslims to expect outside help. 


Michael Rose. With nearly 7,000 while the Russians are playing thrir 
men. France has the biggest single cards with the Serbs," he said. “The 


contingent in the peacekeeping Croats and the Muslims play with 


force. 

The Clinton administration this 


these contradictions." 

The French officials said the 


weekend accused UN civilian and amount of disinformation coming 
military officials in Bosnia of fail- out of the Muslim side was "formi- 


ing to support a more aggressive uauic - 

policy toward the Serbs even 

though that policy has been backed a Reports of fxnloup 


by the UN Security Council and 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation. 

"The United Nations is not a 
belligerent and it has not the 
means to become involved.” a 


Tension increased in northern 
Bosnia on Monday, with both 
Muslim and Serbian media report- 
ing a military buildup near Brcko. 
Reuters reported from Sarajevo. 
Muslim-controlled Sarajevo ra- 



progress in Beijing's tan irfgijts record * retatofc .UMkSS! 
countries were to be improved, white. House 

The White House press secretaiy, Dee Dee Myers..^^ .- 
president told Mr. Zou that the Orated States wanted to 
Stable and prosperous Chin a." : • 'VtVvW&SSi? 

“The president emphasized that he -wants to arehgthea qStMjfeL- 
relationship, bat to achieve that' goal there naditobeprqgre»^ffi“ 
rights as called for in last year’s e xecuti ve order,*: M^Hyaj jjafcffi 
year, Mr. Clinton issued an executive order, that 
China’s most-favored-nation trade status coo^titmal on ^ovej^^^ 

ers andiilawing emigration- Mr. Clinton most decide by 
to extend the trading status. ' - 


V. > 

'JW'V 




***>■:■. 




Berlusconi Opens Talks on Cabin# ■ 


cabinet and the possible arrest of one of his top bDatosififl^^ 8 
Mr. Beriusconi, appointed prime mmister-d«s«nato last w 
meeting labor and business leaderc in ins first formal cqnsaliaKj£^^ 

government’s program. The partners in his efection-wnmmg 
were to meet Tuesday, and one of the politicians in«M, / Jtohmo 
Marom of the federalist Northern League, said cabinet minist^sWj 
be known at the end of the day. ... v 

Mr. Berlusconi brushed off concern about the presdicejtfhi^),^,- 
of the National Alliance, formed by the neofasast Italian Social 
meat, whose polices were long inspired by the ideals of Masstfifr .. 




French official said. “It is very dis- djo said Serbian forces were mov- 
persed and its vehicles are suit- jpg equipment and men from Gor- 


Ttfiw While' Agoct fmc*nns 

COUNTERATTACK — An Afghan soldier loyal to President Burhanuddin Rabbani dhnbing a 
ladder Monday at his Kabul base to fire at mujahidin forces. The base was heavily dama ged t he 
day before in an attack by the rebels led by a former Communist General A bdtd Rashid Dustam. 


able." 

The French military officials 
said LIN forces had succeeded in 
containing the violence. On most 


UN Chief Mocks U.S. 
In Bosnia Policy Feud 


azde to Brcko in what it said was 
the “strongest concentration of 

combat potential since the begin- TkJF ~§ o o If T <0 A • O ® 

Modernizing U.S. Air Safety 

Muslim forces massing outside the ** 

° f In Clinton Plan, Controllers Would Form New Entity 

By Richard M. Weimrauh citnev will be itoeattQrf oak* a agency. Under ibe admintenstiosTs 


By Paul Lewis 

fine York Tinier Serene 

UNITED NATIONS. New York — The UN secretary-general. 
Butxos Burros GhaJi. has said he shares the Clinton administration's 
“concern" over criticism of its policy toward the war in Bosnia- 
Herzegovina by senior officials of the organization. 

In a letter sent Monday to the U.S. envoy to the United Nations, 
Madeleine K. AlbrigbL the secretary-general said he had told his 
mediator in the former Yugoslavia. Yasushi Akashi of Japan, to 
conduct a full inquiry into her complaint and ensure that there were 
no recurrences. 

Mrs. Albright had complained in a letter to Mr. Bviros Chali that 
Mr. Akashi publicly called the United States “timid” and “afraid" 
because of its refusal to send ground forces into Bosnia. 

She also complained about news reports saying that unnamed 
senior UN military and civilian officials in Bosnia believed that more 


Commander Eric Chaperon, a 
UN military spokesman in Saraje- 
vo, acknowledged the reports of a 
buildup but said the area was calm 
for the moment. 

He said Gorazde was still tense 
and that there bad been fighting on 
Sunday between Serbian and Mus- 
lim forces on the edge of a three- 
kilometer exclusion zone around 
the Muslim enclave. 


and John Burgess 

Washington Past Strricc 


new way is found to run iL 
An administration proposal to 
remove the air traffic service from 


WASHfNGTON-ThcClmton A^ua- 

adimmstration has decided that the 


vast network of computers and 
people who guide 19.000 scheduled 


tion and turn it orer to a govern- 
ment corporation. long sought by 
the airline industry, will be official- 


if mm- . l 1 TI- Uil< Oil UUt lUUUOLI 1 , IY L .1 LA> ULiUlOi- 

airlmefhghtsaday across the Unit- , v ^ ^ accord ing 

ed States is so bureaucratically en- & 


crusted that both safeiv and effi- 


4 Arrested for Attack 
On German Synagogue 


NATO air strikes against the Serbs risked turning the Serbian forces 
against the United Nations and prolonging the war. 


against the United Nations and prolonging the war. 

On Saturday, a senior military officer and a senior civilian official 
with the United Nations ia Sarajevo said the Bosnian government 
had grealiy exaggerated the damage and casualties in Gorazde in the 


hope of encouraging NATO to attack the Serbs. 
Those officials' comments made it clear that 


Those officials' comments made it clear that the two top L'N 
officers in the former Yugoslavia. General Bertrand de Lapresle of 
France and Sir Michael Rose of Britain, also h3d opposed the N ATO 
air strikes. 

Administration officials complain that Mr. Akashi has shown 
himself to be too conciliatory- toward the Serbs, blocking an immedi- 
aUi renewal of NATO air strikes when they failed to meet a deadline 
tor pulling back from ihe^luslim safe area of Gorazde. 

1 They also say that he has become overly close lo the Bosnian 
Serbian leader, Radovan Karadzic, claiming that he has developed a 
personal friendship with him. 

The officials argue that it was only the threat of NATO attacks, 
not Mr. Akashi's diplomacy, that forced the Serbs to pull back first 
from around Sarajevo and now from Gorazde. They also say that 
Mr. Akashi is undermining this more forceful strategy by showing 
reluctance to approve military force. 

Also in her letter to Mr. Butros Gbaii. Mrs. .Albright stressed that 
it was he who had first requested NATO air strikes m an effort to 
stop the shelling of Gorazde and that such military action had been 
spoaficallv authorized bv Security Council Resolution S56. on June 
4, 1993. 

“In light of the above." she said. “I am writing to protest, in the 
strongest possible terms, the comments of United Nations officials 
who report, through Special Representative .Akashi. directly to you. 
It is not unreasonable for the United State' to expect United Nations 
officials operating under your aulhoniy to support publicly and 
implement as best they can the mandates of the Security Council." 


The Associated Press 

BONN — Four young far-right 
extremists have been arrested in 
connection with the March fire- 
bombing of a synagogue in ihe 
northern city of LubecL the federal 


to government sources. 

Thousands of aircraft fly at hun- 
dreds of miles an hour through 
crowded skies without bumping 
into each other in large measure 
because of 38,000 air traffic con- 
trollers, technicians and managers 
who operate the system’s radars 
and computers. 

But despite huge expenditures 
and a major improvement program 


plan 38,000 of the agency’s 5 2,000 
employees would go into the gov- 
ernment-owned ATC Corp. These 
would be the controllers who work- 
in the towers and regional radar 
centers, and the computer special- 
ists. the electricians, mechanics and 
others who maintain the system. 

What's left of the Federal Avia- 
tion Administration would contin- 
ue to be responsible for regulating 
aviation safety by setting standards 
for aircraft and aircraft parts and 
writing the rules for everything 
from pilot and flight attendant 
training to airport security to 
grants for airport improvement. 

Initial funding would come from 
the 10 percent ticket tax all airline 


Pope’s Fever Drops, and He fixenases 

ROME(AF) — Pope John Paulll's fever dropped, andh&Uj&^i^ 
light exercise on Monday, three days after surgery Tor aiMOored 
thighbone. 

Dr. Con-ado Manni said the pontiff, 73, should be able to get tombed 
later this week and stand with assistance. John Paul, s&i arffato a_ 
fracture of his right femur in a fall in his bathroom, had partof fbryw 
replaced with a plastic and metal prosthesis doling surgay Fd&£V 

The Pope had a slight fever Sunday, but doctors safd-tbtdi&iwas 
normal after surgery. The fever went down Monday, andJuiftinre 
exercises with his left leg to keep the muscles in tone; Dr. ManniisSLIfe 
is expected to spend at least two weeks in the hospital, that aadogn 
months of therapy before he will be able to walk without assistant 


Spain Fraud Suspect Vowsto.Givejjp 

MADRID (AFP) — A former commander of the (jvQ Gh^ riw 
vanished last week as the police prepared to arrest him on 
charges has pledged to surrender in the next few dt^ &jt^nper 


reported Monday. . ■ ; 

In an interview from his unspecified refuge, the former com 


and Europe, Reuters reported from dating from 1981. some of those 
Bonn. computers ran in part on techno- 

Mr. Kohl met with Israel Singer, logically extinct vacuum lubes that 


and a major improvement program uie iu percent ucxei tax an amine 
dating from 1981. some of those passengers pay. An important fea- 
computers ran in part on techno- if 1116 of die plan is that the corpora- 


prosecu tor’s office said Monday. 

llsaid the four suspects had plot- 
ted the March 25 firebombing “out 
of hale against foreigners and 
against Jews." 

The fire caused no injuries but 
burned two rooms where the city’s 
small Jewish community was plan- 
ning to hold its first Passover seder 
since the Holocaust. 

The attack marked the first time 
a Jewish house of worship had 
burned since the Third Reich era. 

The four suspects are being in- 
vestigated for attempted murder, 
said a statement from the federal 
prosecutor in Karlsruhe. 

Tenants were asleep in apart- 
ments on the two floors above the 
synagogue at (he time of the attack. 
A neighbor heard breaking glass 
and alened the tenants and fire- 
fighters. 

■ Jewish Leaders' Fears 

Jewish leaders told Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl on Monday that they 
were worried about neo-Nazi and 
other rightist violence in Germany 


general secretary of the World Jew- 
ish Congress: Ignalz Bubis. head of 
Germany’s Central Council of 


until recently could be acquired 
onlv from factoriis* in Poland and 


Lion could borrow money or float 
bonds rather than await the annual 
congressional appropriation from 


Lois Roldkn, told the daily El Mundo that be intended “toapji 
coming days" before the judge who ordered his arrest and<g 
reveal ail about what be called the scandal surrounding K3| 
warrant was issued for Mr. Roldan on Friday after he failed 
Madrid court bearing on Wednesday. ^ 

Mr. Roldan is alleged to have embezzled funds while he was| 
Gvil Guard from 1986 to 1993. But he has insisted that a so 
million increase in his personal wealth during that period was 
inheritance be received in 1993. 


Jews, and Jean Kahn, leader of the China. 

European Jewish Congress, as pari The aviation agency’s premier 


or a round of talks on racist vio- 
lence. the government said. 


Czechoslovakia. Gibers come from the aviation trust fund, which is 
China. regularly held hostage to deficit 

The aviation agency’s premier co ^ Lro '- .... 
nroiecL a multibiffion^ollar wo- . Congressional cnucs question 


project, a multibillion-doliar pro- 
gram to replace its entire aircraft- 




the administration’s funding as- 
sumptions. Other critics ask wbeth- 


Army Moves to Quell Pakistan K^S| 

KARACHI Pakistan (Combined Dispatches) — The army 
four districts of the southern city of Karachi on Monday after four days 
of rioting that has lolled at least 16 people and injured dozens, officials 
said. 

Armed gangs have burned more than 46 vehicles and set fire to at least 


neo-Nazi attacks on foreigners, the ^r - v, ’ _ .“XV ,u ^ 
si;*<,t,i~t w,,: officials have concluded that it 


i!wK Probablv never can be completed ™ lo 

ideology since unification in 1990. £5 presently designed protect the public interest is to 

“The Jewish organizations ex- According to both'the statistics ““““ 1 '* * ^ government func- 
pressed their grave concern at ris- and safety specialists, the air traffic H°“ “formed ovw- 

mg racist and right-wing violence control system is safe today. But «ie Aircraft Owners and Pi- 

rn Germany and in the whole of die argument for reinventing it in- !ols AssoaatJOD to,d task foree 
Europe." a government statement 5 j sls that, if it is to stay safe and **““ drew U P thc proposal The as- 
said. “The chancellor told the de/e- efficient as air travel grows, it must SOCTaUc ®* Ion 8 powerful on Capitol 
gation that the government and ihe escape the snail-like decision-mak- n® m P 30 because many members 
federal suits were doing all in their Ln & and procurement that many of Congress also are private pilots, 
power to combat the violence." reel have characterized agency represents 324.000 general aviation 

management P*!?*?- 

“The plan win cut red tape and , The aS5 °cia aon expressed fears 
make it easier to procure the most of 811 mcrease m taxes and fees 


“Air traffic control is a natural 
monopoly, and the only way to 
protect the public interest is to 
maintain it as a government func- 
tion with broad, informed over- 


two banks. The violence erupted Friday with a protest march by a bo* 
3,000 members of the militant People's Refugee Movement, represent^ 
Indian Muslims who moved to Pakistan in 1947. 

The movement has accused Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of discrimi- 
nating against iL It is demanding recognition as Pakistan's fifth ethnic 
group. Successive governments have refined. (Room AP) 


federal suits were doing all in their 
power to combat the violence." 


represents 324.000 general aviation 
pilots. 

The association expressed fears 
of an increase in taxes and fees 


Dr. Kevorkian 
Found Not Guilty 


up-to-date equipment," said Vice wwmpanyng a deterioration in 
President A1 Gore. “By improving W efficiency: «P«»Uy 

*_•_ J 1.1 9 diinnp a frantvfinn Tv»n.vi 


working conditions through the use a transition penocL 


Cambodian Peace Talks Postponed 

PHNOM PENH (Reuters) — Fighting between Khmer RoapgDcniJ- 
las and government forces is at a level not seen since 1989. forting 
postponement of proposed peace talks, senior government and 
officials said Monday. 

“The expected roundtable talks with the Khmer Rouge haw teen 
suspended," said an adviser to die prime minister. Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh. The adviser. Muong Saokhan, said die Khmer RotffickadO", 
Khieu Samphan. had asserted that Phnom Penh was not safe for the 
Khmer Rouge del ega lion and that there was no neutral location in the 
country where the talks could be hdd. 


of updated equipment, the plan al- Tbe . Mr - Oberstar 


their plan lo split the agency, it will 0 . ■* "»*• 

jet off a battle on Capitol Hill, V? a c °u n, .ws, assume, that the 
where kev congressmen are ques- will own this corpora- 

tion's whether the jdministra-1 bon. It won’t. .All the stock will be 


HOTEL DU RHONE 


The Associated Pm, lows air trattic en 

DETROIT — Dr. Jack Kevor- on the business of ^ 
kian was found not gudtv in ihe lfa . , pr everyone, 
death of a 30-year-oJd man last , . N 9! eveT Y“£ 1 
■ summer. It was the first trial under '^T e J an r ‘ ^ 

Michigan's vcar-<)ld ban on assist- Fedenco F 

ed suicide that was enacted ? pedfi- *® cir P* 33 spbt 1 
| cafly to stop Dr. Kevorkian. 5C ^ °T a battle 1 

j “Hie retired pathologist u« ac- J-mhi- whelh?* 

who had been suffering from Lou f n u_™ 

< Gehrig's disease, die K whaling . 

) carbon monoxide. The' jurv wa^ The dV,2ll S ,n c ™.umty has 
weighing technical legal ^lions ^ 

as weU as whether people rrs ould be 1,n *’ lh ,? do n ' n ?” on 
! allowed to help the terminally ill t 

] commit suicide. Reprcsentauvc James L. Obcr- 

The defense aitoracv. Ccoffrev Democ r rjl u '- ,f ^ Ir,nei0la 
Fieger. argued that Mr. H-de had ch P ,rn?JT1 of House aviation 
died in Oakland Counts and thai «id. "This «s just 


lows air traffic employees to focus bang designed to serve 

on the business of ensuring safer air ?f ^Jines- 


'In hard times," he said, “they 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Not everyone agrees, and when J ,US ^ r 10 CUt .f 665, J? 0,1 
Mr. Gore and Transportation Sec- { lu ^ , ® cr of conlrouers. That could 
reiaiy Federico F. Pen a announce ,e “* ° precanousness for safety." 


Restored Villa Panels Back in Rome 


“Obersiar’s argument," Mr. 
Pefla counters, “assumes that the 


lion’s volution is the safest pjth to c ^ rn ? d ^ , l * lc 8 ovc roment and we 


think wc will actually increase safe- 
ty because we can bring on technol- 
ogy sooner." 

Some controllers bristle at the 


suggestion safely would suffer. 
"Why do these people in Congress 
think 1 am going to be any less safe 
under a corporation? That bums 
me/" said Mark Meuwissen. a con- 
troller at Deiroit. 

And the controllers want new 
equipment as soon as possible. 

‘‘I've been here for years and I’ve 
never .seen anything done in less 
than three years with regular pro- 
curement." said Paul Jester, who is 
in charge of computer and radar 
maintenance at the regional air 
traffic control center at Leesburg. 
Virginia. “Everything is maxed out 
in this facility. We arc at capacity." 


Cent 




i he finest location. 


the Wayne County jun had no 1 u- Uie aT 1 0n S come, and i t would lake 
risdiction. Judge Thomas E. Jack- ;5 ar5 ,u rca ? er / l V. m ,L Shake up 
son instructed jurors that ihev must a ® cnc - v * don 1 dlsn7em ^ cr l( - 


one of 

e Ihtffeading-Hotebof ihrWbrki- 


Tot 

R> l.'.xIlR- 


be convinced that Mr. H’-d-r died in Oberstar said thc sheer dis- 


Wayne County if they were in con- rupiion of massive change to the 
vict the doctor. Mr. Fieger -iso ar- Federal Aviation Administration 


TEL. (41 22) 73 1 98 31 


FAX (41 22) 732 45 58 


gued that Dr. Kevorkian had been dial a new corporation would cre- 
acting under a loophole thai allows alc threatened the excellent safety 


doctors to prescribe medication 10 
ease suffering, even if the medica- 
tion hastens death. 


record. 

Mr. Pena said that tinkering 
around the edge would not fix the 


ROME ( AP) — Painted ceiling panels that were part of aRenawsntt 
villa were unveiled Monday back m their original setting after fntr jeats 
of restoration work. .. 

The 22 panels, showing zodiac figures and dearies from Roman 
ogy, were lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New YoA wicn 
acquired tbe paintings after they were removed in the ntid-19thctBWiy^ 
The painting were placed bag in a loggia that is all thatrematec !” 
Villa Slab Mattel The loggia is now part of a museum on die 
Hill near the Colosseum. Besides tbe normal cleaning <rf tte 
restorers had to refashion tbe painting s to fit in the curved catinp- 1 
panels had been flattened after they were removed originally, itsswu™ 
officials said. 


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.1*' 


BONN (Reuters) -— President Richard von Weizsicker h»t®K^d a 
leftist tarorist who was sentenced to life imprisonment for laHMdrtn, 
a 1975 attack on the German Embassy in Stockhoto; a ^toamow 
spokesman said on Monday. • ; V 'i' -. 

A spokesman for Justice Minister Sabine Leuthcnteq--Sfft ^ TE p 

boger said the mini 5 terhad proposed thepaidonfor BeamhardBi^r a 

Red Army Faction member who has saved 19 years of his sa^Se.^ 
Leutheusser-Sdmanmbeiger's spokesman said she had- si^gested in 
1992 that the guerrilla, who is mentally ifl. be tempora^ idea&jtaQ 
jaB for treatment inn dime. 

In the storming and occupation of Bonn's embassy iti Sbodd^bn, 

several people including embassy staffers were killed in exchange 
by police and terrorists. Mr. Rdssner was convicted in 1977^ ^ 
murders, kidnapping and attempting to coerce the state. -V'. 


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China is to open a new international airport July 1 in itesoud* 1 ®?®; 
aty of Sanya on Hainan Island, according to published reports in n™s ( 
Kong. (Af r ' 

ABhfa and Continental Airlines announced an agreement Moodsy^ 
share reservation systems and codes on some international route*' 
accord will give Alitalia, tbe Italian national carrier, access to a *7^ 
New York -area airport, at Newark, New Jersey, as wdl as connecoofr 
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tOl lTlCM NOTES 


^■ g?Mggis 

WASHINGTON TT^T : 

.were surprisinciv . ^ nue roost joumaHsis 

wxk’iten KlS ? * Bl “^’’^‘this 

range from "a nh rtn «- /io«. 


travel Office Affair Revisited 



York kES:S*?> tomS-sNw 
on’s K/e1S7^.7S “ fillaI may” of Mr. Nix- 
togely bn^bJ^ri ■" to maiia 




rr 2 *’ ^ «££rdS5 
•W!2 s! 5? NiM ” 

v£fSsM^ 7“*®% ^tor of 


lauch ^ sum van. "It’s his last 

Sw in^L , 0 ? lhatWEiU tois point would 
u*row in the towel seems pathetic.” 


ist^to Si ralh «? April 22 forced journal- 
3a2J2 t0 h ? baK ^ tong career and accom- 
EH?™ 8 agauist d^scandals that forced him to 
ra^fin 20 years aco. THp imnmi ,^,a, 


n>«M nr '“rcea mm to 

swJum r^ 15 as °' 7% nonna l tendency not to 
Si of the recently departed was reinforced by 

h«» ow " campaign to rehabilitate his 
mage and the embrace ofsucb former polilicaJ 
fee as President Bill Clinton and fomierWtor 
' j eorge McGovern, Mr. Nixon’s Democratic op- 
ponent in the 1972 presidential campaign. 

But the generally respectful tone of the coverage 
r Gels Hero’s Farewell” (Los Angeles 
Au ?^ii*'to e most raiportaut figure of the postwar 
era (Time); “the final years may have been Rich- 
ard Nixon s greatest triumph" (The WaD Street 
Journal) — has caused much grumbling among his 
attractors in the press. “A friend said to me: ‘Is 
this the saxne Richard Nixon? Did someone else 
dieT Mr. Sullivan said. f d'p) 


WASHINGTON — Government auditors said 
Monday that the White House had a right to 
dismiss seven travel office workers without cause, 
but sharply criticized the manner in which they 
’wre forced from the office that arranges presiden- 
tial and press travel. 

The General Accounting Office, while saying 
said the White House had the “legal authority” to 
dismiss the workers without cause in May, singled 
out for criticism three individuals involved in the 
White House travel office affair: Catherine Corne- 
lius, a distant cousin to President Bill Clinton; 
Harry Thomason, a Hollywood producer and 
friend of Mr. Qintoo’s; and Darnell Martens. 

The auditors said the three “had potential per- 
sonal business interests in the travel office opera- 
tions" and “created the momentum to examine the 
travel office by raising allegations about the man- 
agement of the office to White House officials and 
participating in actions that appeared to anticipate 
the removal of the employees.” 

The agency also said that on the basis of a 
private accounting firm's report there had been 
“serious financial management weaknesses" in the 
Operation of the office. 

The affair, one of the early major flaps that 
shook up the Gfriton White House, involved alle- 


f itions of cronyism and improper use of the FBI. 
ive of the seven staff members were ultimately 


rehired, but assigned to other government agen- 
cies. (Reuters) 


Quoto/Unquote 


Justin Dari, former chairman of the President's 
Committee on the Employment of People with 
Disabilities, appealing to President Clinton for 
health care reform: “we are willing to die for our 
countries but not for our insurance companies. No 
more excuses. No more exclusion. No more profi- 
teering. No more Band-Aid solutions.” f AP) 



AU (Political) Eyes Are on Ohio Senate Race 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

New reek Tima Serrla 

PARMA, Ohio — Joel Hyatt, who is running to replace 
his father-in-law, Howard M. Metzenbaum, m the U.S. 
Senate, worked his way through a shopping center, shaking 
hands in the final days before Tuesday’s primary Section. 

The lanky Democratic entrepreneur, who founded a na- 
tional of low-cost legal clinics, repeatedly introduced 
himself. Bui Ik is so weO known from his years promoting 
Hyatt Legal Services on television that most people seem to 
know him already. 

Harry Cndik), 70, a retired accountant, looks amused after 
meeting Hyatt Tm voting for Boyle," Mr. Cudilo says of 
the chief Democratic rival, Mary Boyle, as Mr. Hyatt walks 
away. “She's not as rich as he is." 

Score one for Mrs. Boyle and her latest television assault 
which has suddenly given shape to this dose election race 
with the clarity of a bumper sticker “The Senate doesn't 


need any more millionaire lawyers,” she says to the camera. 
“What it needs is more moms.” 


The Senate race in Ohio, which has long served as a 
microcosm [or national politics, is particularly significant. 
For one, there is a nearly equal balance of Republicans and 
Democrats. 

In addition, there is a mix of urban and rural areas and an 
economic standing that places it near the national average. 
Moreover, with Mr. Metzenbaum’s retirement, the race is 
bang closely watched in Washington as one of a handful 
that together could imperil the Democrats’ majority this fall 


Like voters in other states, people in Ohio are anxious 
about crime and health care. And at every turn, they express 
a deep cynicism toward Washington and a profound disaf- 
fection from government. 

The “Mom versus Millionaire" advertisement, which is 
being broadcast statewide, deliberately echoes the successful 
1992 Senate campaign of Patty Murray in Washington State, 
who converted a legislator's dismissal of her as “just a mom 
in tennis shoes” into a winning campaign slogan. 

Mrs. Boyle, the mother of four and a three- term Cayahoga 
County commissioner, has sought advice from Senator Mur- 
ray and other women in Congress. Also running on the 
Democratic side is Ralph Applegate, a business consultant 
who barely registers in the polls. 

On the Republican side, there is Dr. Beroadine Healy, a 
cardiologist who is a form director of the National Insti- 
tutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. During a recent 
debate, she said that voters often ask her why a doctor would 
run for the Senate. 

“Washington is rick,” Dr. Healy replied. “It needs a 
doctor” 

Later in an interview. Dr. Healy, who has raised over S2 
million, mar money than anyone else in the race and much 
of it from doctors, said: “The Senate needs someone from 
the real world. It has become a homogeneous ruling class.” 

In addition to Dr. Healy, the Republican candidates 
indnd* Lieutenant Governor Michael DeWine, state Sena- 
tor Eugene Watts, and George Rhodes, a businessman. 

The Republican race has come down to a contest between 
Dr. Healy ami Mr. DeWine, who is ahead in the polls. 


Mr. Metzenbaum, 76, one of the Senate’s most liberal 
members, is leaving after 18 years. Although he stood to the 
left of mains tream Ohio voters, he earned their respect by 
fighting for the average consumer — sometimes even against 
Ohio's important automobile industiy —as when he backed 
higher gasoline mileage standards. 

All of the Senate candidates suggest they would carry on 
his legacy as a fighter, even as they distance themselves from 
his liberal tradition. Mr. Hyatt, for instancy has staked oat a 
tough portion on crime, supporting the death penalty, while 
Mrs. Boyle does not 

Dr. Healy, whose husband is director of the Cleveland 
Clinic , has taken up the qiftgci against President Hffl Clin- 
ton’s health care proposals, warning that they wifi reduce 
Ohio’s strong medical tradition to “sodalaed medkanc.” 

David Sweet, dean of the Levin College of Urban Affairs 
at Gevdand State University, said he was “greatly troubled” 
as he watched the candidates on both rides “further their 
own interests by bashing Washington." 

The race has provided a good example of how deep the 
anti-politician fervor runs. 

“On both sides, you have experienced elected officials 
being challenged by outriders,” Mr. Sweet said. “Will they 
vote for an outsider with no experience? Or will they come to 
the voting booth saying, Tm not happy, but 1 want someone 
who knows bow to work within the system*?” 

The polls reflect that confusion, with a large percentage of 
voters undecided. 


New UN Haiti Sanctions 


Won’t Work, Many Say 


By Douglas Farah 

Washington Post Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 


Expected new UN sanctions aime d 
at forcing 


ircrng the military to allow the 
return of the exiled president, the 
Reverend Jean- Bertrand Aristide, 
are too late to be effective unless 
they are backed by a credible threat 
of force, according to diplomats, 
relief workers and Father Aristide’s 


total commercial embargo on this 
nation of 7 million if mDitaiy lead- 
ers — including Lieutenant Gener- 
al Raoul Cfcdras; his chief of staff. 
Brigadier General Philippe 


Biamby, and Colonel Francois — 
15 days of 


analysts said that if such a 
threat of force does not exist, the 
military officers who rule the coun- 
try in pari through terror wifi re- 
main in control while the poor ma- 
jority suffer increased hardship. 

A businessman said he was sure 
that lieutenant Colonel Michel 
Francois. Haiti’s military police 
commander, was not “shaking in 
his boots” over the prospect of wid- 
er sanctions. 

Debate within the Gin ton ad- 
ministration ova how to remove 
thenrilitajy without inflicting more 
suffering on Haiti has proved to be 
one of the most intractable U.S. 


do not step down within 
the resolution's passage. 

In addition, the resolution would 
bar 600 Haitian military officers 
and their family members from get- 
ting foreign travel visas and freeze 
the officers’ assets worldwide. 

“I think it is just too late,’’ said a 
diplomat involved in efforts to re- 
turn Father Aristide. “The army 
has its networks and structures in 
place to get around the embargo. 
The army has what it needs to sur- 
vive." 


Away From Politics 


• A female mountain Eon suspected of tailing and 
partly eating a woman jogger was treed and shot to 
death after a weeklong hunt in the Auburn State 
Recreation Area near Sacramento, California. 


• Khafid Abdul Muhammad, a U.S. blade activist 
barred from Canada on grounds that he had fraud- 
ulently used social-security numbers to secure a 
loan, addressed about 300 supporters in Toronto 
by speaker-telephone, the Canadian Press news 
agency reported. “What a shame for the govern- 
ment of Canada and Jews of Canada,” be was 
quoted as saying, to apply pressure that kept him 
from appearing in peraon. 


• Safety alarms at a shut-down nuclear reactor in 
Zion, Illinois, were disabled for four days, a mis- 
take only discovered when technicians began re- 
starting the reactor. The public was not endan- 
said a spokesman for Commonwealth 
Co. 


Cinco de Mayo (May 5th) festival in Los Angeles, 
leaving six officers and at least 12 other people 
injured. Ten people were arrested in the melee that 
followed a police decision to cancel a performance 
because the crowd of 200,000 to 500,000 was 
pressing too dose to the stage. 

• Two teenage prls killed a forapi visitor in New 
Orleans after “befriending” him, luring him to a 
deserted park near the French Quarter and then 
trying to rob him, police said. The man was shot 
while trying to wrest a gun away from one of the 
giris, a police spokesman said. Police were trying to 
confirm his identity. 

• The space shcUlie Endearour returned toils base 
in Cape Canaveral, Florida, after a cross-country 


trip atop a modified imnbo jet The Boeing 747, 
with the shuttle bolted on top, lai ' 


• Police dashed with celebrants at a Mexican 


i top, landed at Kennedy 
Space Center three hours after taking off from 
Little Rock Air Faroe Base in Arkansas, its last 
stop en route home from California. 

AP, Reuters, AFP 


foreign policy challenges. 
“The real pi 


I£AVINGTHEIJMO BEHIND —Mr. Cfinton ] 
Kflary, and a Secret Service agent They rode 


WH&ado UcSnp 4*ocned to. 

I from the White House with his wife, 
to a Potomac Mse path. 


problem is a lack of 
credibility said the Reverend An- 
toine Adrien, an adviser to Father 
Aristide. “The Clinton administra- 
tion has lost credibility not only 
with the Haitian people but with 
the miliiaiy. They no longer think 
the Qin ton administration is seri- 
ousabout anything they say or do.” 

This week, the UN Security 
Council, at Washington’s initiative, 
is expected to enact the basis for a 


Haiti is already under a UN- 
mandated embargo on petroleum 

S iroducts and weapons imposed 
oil owing the military's refusal to 
honor an agreement to allow Fa- 
ther Aristide to return Oct. 30. That 
embargo has proved porous. The 
Dominican Republic has allowed 
ofl to flow across the border, be- 
cause the illegal trade is lucrative 
and because the Dominican and 
Haitian militaries and business 
communities share strong ties. 

Instead of choking the military 
into surrendering power, the cur- 
rent embargo has thrown tens of 
thousands of people out of work, 
shut down most of the economy 
and increased malnutrition, relief 
workers and human rights moni- 
tors say. Military leaders have 
grown neb selling contraband ■ 


Singapore’s Lee Says Caning Is a Duty 


Retnfn 

NEW YORK — Singapore’s senior minister, Lee 
Kuan Yew, said that if the caning of an American 
teenager, Michael P. Fay, does not go through as 
planned his country would be shiritingits ethical duty. 

“If we do not cane him because he is an American, 1 
believe well lose our moral authority and our right to 
govern,” Mr. Lee told Time magazine in the edition 
appearing tm newsstands Monday. 

Mr. Fay, 18, was sentenced last month to six strokes 
of the cane and four months in jail for spray-painting 
cars. The case has caught the world’s attention as the 
American awaits a government derision on his plea for 
clemency. 

Mr. Lee questioned how Singapore officials could 
govern if Mr. Fay were granted a reprieve and not 
caned. 

“Can we then cane any other foreigner or our own 
people?” he asked. “Well have to close up shop.” 

He added that while Singaporean justice may be 


viewed as reactionary when contrasted with the U.S. 
system, it remained effective, 

“We don’t deal with crtmhmi behavior the way 
Americans do,” Mr. Lee said. “We don’t have the 
concept of ‘victim of society.’ ” 

“This concept has led to a situation where if you kill 
your mother and father, because you were victims, you 
are not guilty,” he said. 

In an interview from his home from Dayton, Ohio, 
Mr. Fay’s father, George, said, “AH we’ve asked for is 
for treatment that is fair and equitable, but they’ve 
singled Mike out for caning.” 

He referred to a May 1993 case reported by the 
Straits Times, in which two Singaporeans, who 
smashed the headlights of four cars and poured on 
paint remover, were charged under the mischief act 
but no caning was involved. 

“Caning in the past has been reserved for hardened 
criminals or for vandals of government property," he 
said, “Michael is none of tire above.” 


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Page 4 


INTERIS'ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. MAY 3. 1994 




lome Heavy News About Light Cigarettes ^ 


By Philip J. Hiits 

.Vat Jw* Times ArWcr 

WASHINGTON —Smokers of cigarettes 
labeled low in tar and nicoune may be gelling 
more of those substances than Ihsy think. 
Federal Trade Ccnunissioo officials and ex- 
perts in smoking now agree. And they attri- 
bute the problem to testing liiaL has not kept 
up with the changes in cigarette design over 
the last 20 years. 

Since 1971. when the results of the tests 
were first printed in cigarette advertising and 
on packaging, cigarettes labeled low in tar 
and nicotine" have taken over the market. 
They now account For 60 percent of the 
cigarettes sold in the United States.^ 

National polls conducted by the Gallup 
organization have found th at smokers believe 
that the cigarettes labeled “light” are less 
hazardous and will give them less tar and 
nicotine. Bui evidence has accumulated that 
the measurements, which are carried out by 
tobacco company laboratories under the su- 
pervision of the Federal Trade Commission, 
bear little or no relation to how much nico- 
tine and tar smokers actually get from smok- 


“The commission has been aware for a 
while that the test has problems regarding the 
actual intake that consumers will get." said 
Judith D. Wilkenfeld, assistant director in the 
commission's Division of Advertising Prac- 
tices. 

She said the commission was studying al- 
ternatives to the tar and nicotine tests, and 
added that the pressure to make a decision 
had increased lately. 

The Federal Trade Commission cigarette 
tests are carried out by machines that hold 
the cigarette and draw air through them in 


two-second puffs, repeating the puffs once 
every minute until die cigarette is burned 
down to the filter. 

But cigarettes now include several features 
that make the machine tests meaningless, 
according to Dr. Jack E. Henningfield. chief 
of clinical pharmacology research at the Na- 
tional Institutes on Drug Abuse. 

For example, a majority of cigarettes now- 
have tiny, nearly invisible boles in their filter 
paper, or in the dgarette paper near Lhe filler. 
When the smoking machine draws on a ciga- 
rette. a large amount of air is drawn in. and 
this dilutes the smoke getting to the measur- 


ing device, making cigarettes appear to con- 
tain less tar and nicotine. 

But smokers do not hxndle the cigarettes 
the same way machines do. They find the 
diluted smoke milder, and to make up lor the 
“lighter" taste, or less satisfying amount of 
nicotine, they puff more or draw deeper, 
pulling in more total smoke, so that the result 
for the smoker is the same amount, or more, 
of nicotine and tar. 

In addition, the tiny filtration holes are 
often blocked by smokers with their lips or 
bands, thus cutting off the air that would 
have diluted the smoke. 

Outside experts said that ihc options for 
the commission included abandoning the test 
because it is misleading: trying to establish a 
belter test method, or shifting the testing 
responsibility to another agency better 
equipped to carry out the tests, such as the 
Food and Drug Administration or the Na- 
tional Institutes on Standards and Tcchnol- 


7*i' AssKian'd Press 


Scientific studies over recent years have 
shown that smokers ge: about the same 
amount of nicotine no mailer what kind of 
dgarette. 


ASIA: Harmom Fades in U.S.-Led Chorus for New r Pacific Community 


Continued from Page 1 

a widespread reluctance to confront North Ko- 
rea has created a particularly tense challenge 
for Washington at a moment when the North 
seems only days away from beginning an effort 
to harvest additional fuel from its nuclear reac- 
tors to bolster its weapons program. 

The most surprising opposition has come on 
trade issues. Almost even; Pacific country pro- 
fesses svmpathv with Mr. Clinton's complaints 
about Tokyo's trade surpluses and its slowness 


in opening its markets. But in recent weeks 
country after country — from Australia to 
Malaysia to South Korea — has attacked the 
U.S. insistence on “numerical targets” or 
“quantitative indicators" that would measure 
U.S. market penetration in Japan. 

Some join the Japanese in complaining that 
such agreements undermine free market forces. 
But the real argument is that political pressure 
to buy .American goods will make it harder for 
the rest of Asia to sell its wares to the Japanese. 

Among the most outspoken critics of the 
administration's approach is Prime Minister 
Paul Keating of Australia, who has accused 
Washington of using a “heavy-headed sledge- 
hammer number to crack Lhe nuL” 

Foreign Minister Gareth Evans of Australia 
said recently he feared that Australian-made 
auto parts would be squeezed out of the Japa- 
nese market. South Koreans followed with the 
same complaint about their computer chips. 
European officials have joined in the criticism, 
saving their goods are already suffering in Ja- 
pan because of “Buy American" campaigns. 

“They are right." said a senior Japanese trade 
official. “If we have a choice between buying an 
American product and one from elsewhere. 


political correctness says we should choose 
America." 

But recent evidence suggests that the Clinton 
administration may be backing away, at least 
temporarily, from its high-pressure approach. 

A few months ago, Mr. Kantor dismissed 
arguments that the United Slates should not 
press Japan's fragile government on market 
openings, saying not hing would get done for 
years if Washington waited for the return of 
political stability in Tokyo. 

Now. warned by the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo 
that the new, minority government of Prime 
Minister Tsutomu Hate is hardly in a position 
to negotiate, administration officials are all but 
pving up hope of progress before the Group of 
Seven meeting this summer in Naples. Last 
week. Mr. Kantor delayed by two more months 
any decision about talcing action against Japan 
for stalled talks on telecommunications and 
medical equipment 

Similarly, the administration's strategy of 
(inking preferential trade status to human 
rights in China is under broad attack through- 
out the region. Since Sen-clary of State Warren 
M. Christopher traveled to Beijing to deliver a 
warning to the Chinese six weeks ago. leaders of 
.America's two biggest allies in the Pacific — 
Japan and South Korea — have delivered very 
different messages. 

Before his resignation last month. Prime 
Minister Morihiro Hosokawa of Japan visited 
Beijing and told the Chinese just what they 
wanted to hear. That Western concepts of hu- 
man rights should not be “blindly applied" in 
Asia. President Kim Young Sam of South Ko- 
rea never even raised die issue when he went 
there a few weeks later. 

Last month, even as the U.S. administration 


struggled to back away from its threat to revoke 
China’s most-favored-nation trading status 
without appearing to abandon its human rights 
initiative, a former prime minister or Singapore. 
Lee Kuan Yew. warned that Mr. Clintoa was 
en g a g ing in a “fruitless endeavor" in trying to 
pressure China. He warned that the "United 
States would “find itself all alone in the Pacific" 
cm the issue. 

Japanese business executives often portray 
Japan as China's more reliable partner, saying 
their own country would never mix business 
and politics. That is a grim truth for U.S. 
diplomats in Asia, who point out that Japan 
holds considerable sway as China's biggest pro- 
vider of foreign aid. and now its second-largest 
trading partner. 

"This is an issue that the Japanese see a lot 
differently than we do. and that’s been true for 
some time." said Walter F. Mondale, the U.S. 
ambassador to Japan. 

Even Australia has spoken out against lick- 
ing preferential trade benefits Tor China with 
human rights. While stressing the need to press 
“universal human rights” Mr. Evans said last 
month that denying die trade benefits to China 
“would have a very adverse economic impact 
on the region as a whole, particularly Hong 
Kong, vrilh flow-on effects for Australia.” 

In Hong Kong, economic considerations 
have clearly won out. Last week. Hong Kong's 
chief secretary. Anson Chan, visited Washing- 
ton to leD Vice President AJ Gore and other 
officials that the territory's prosperity would be 
devastated by the withdrawal of trade privi- 
leges Tor China. 

“We do not believe trade should be linked 
with human rights.” she said. 


COX'S BAZAR. Bangladesh — 

A hurricane that gathered strength 
over the warm waters of the Bay of 
Bengal for two days struck the 
Bangladeshi coast Monday with 
winds up to 200 kilometers per 
hour. 

There were no immediate reports 
of casualties from wind-driven 
rains that reduced visibility to al- 
most zero when the storm lashed 
the islands of St. Martin's. Shapuri. 
Maheskhali and Kutubdia and the 
coastal towns of Cox’s Bazar. Cho- 
koria and Teknaf. 

The storm was heading toward 
the Chittagong region, which was 
devastated by a similar hurricane in 
199! that killed a bout 131.000 peo- 
ple- 

Enamul Kabir. the administrator 
of Cox's Bazar, said thousands of 
mud-and-thatch houses were 
blown away. 

Hundreds of trees and utility- 
poles were uprooted, he said. 

More than 350.000 people look 
refuge in shelters in the Cox's Bazar 
area, Mr. Kabir said. 

Hundreds of thousands of peo- 
ple fled the coast as the hurricane 
roared through the Bay of Bengal. 

Relief boats were used to evacu- 
ate some of the 7 million people 
who live on islands and along the 
coast. 

Inhabitants were taken to 900 
brick storm shelters built since 
1991 to hold 1 million people. 

Relief agencies said people were 
responding well to evacuation ef- 
forts. 


In 1991. after several false 
alarms, most people ignored calls 
to leave their homes. 



' ... 










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.Til I s " ^ 


((Surf 


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Bangladesh surfers from tropical 
storms, flooding and drought near- 
ly every vear. 


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Cootinoed from Page 1 


186 Boat Victims 


is a period ripe for morality play- 
lets in the press and on television 


Found in Kenya 


lets in the press and on television 
about love, death, suspicion and 
intolerance. 


Cuban Assembly Gives Go-Ahead 
For Economic Austerity Program 


RELIEF: Judge Shrugs Off Chaos 


MOMBASA. Kenya — Divers 
and rescuers have recovered the 
bodies of 186 people who died 
when a crowded ferry boat sank on 
Friday, officials said. The police 
said earlier that 71 of those aboard 
the ferry had survived. 


The ferry capsized shortly after it 
left the harborside village of 
Mtongwe. crowded with rush-hour 
commuters on a routine trip across 
the harbor to Mombasa island. 

Officials said it was impossible 
to say whether any of the bodies 
had been eaten by sharks, which 
frequently are seen in the harbor. 


The Jsseaeicd Pr&; 

HAVANA — A special session of the National .Assembly gave the 
government a free hand Monday to enact some of the most far- 
reaching economic reforms since the 1959 revolution, but vowed that 
the country would maintain its communist path. 

The legislators endorsed in general terms a blueprint for austerity- 
measures that are to be imposed later by government decree in hopes 
of wrenching Cuba out of economic crisis. These include higher 
prices, new taxes, a possible freeze on bank accounts and perhaps a 
new currency. 

The assembly members also demanded a government crackdown 
on the booming black market. In addition, they authorized the 
government to take any measures necessary to eliminate a huge 
budget deficit cut subsidies to money-losing slate companies and 
impose income taxes, although not on the salaries of slate workers. 


Continued from Page 1 

pected turnout poll officials ripped 
off the seals, poured the ballots into 
plastic bags, and reused the boxes. 

When Inkatha stickers failed to 
arrive, officials let voters write in 
the name. Rather than risk an In- 
katha walkout lhe judge autho- 
rized the write-ins, and extended 
voting a day in the Zulu province. 

When counting bogged down, he 
discarded the elaborate procedures 
designed to account for all ballots. 

Cheating, he said, was wide- 


spread but probably not enough to 
distort the outcome seriously. 


stort the outcome seriously. 

“To affect a national seat in Par- 


liament you need an error or 
50.0CO voles." he said. “And if a 
ballot box was stuffed, what have 
you got? Al the most 3.000 papers. 
If it wasn’t very skillfully done 
2J00, even a little less." 

The irregularities were trouble- 
some. he said, but not nearly 
enough to nuke him revoke his 
post-voting pronouncement that 
the election had gone “astounding- 
ly well" and his wry jest at the 
paranoia among his fellow whites. 

“The dear Jilile old ladies who 
were stocking up tinned food are 
probably feeling silly at the mo- 
ment and looking for a market" he 
said. 


Onto that stage strode unwitting 
members of the Cohen family, bom 
in Yemen, steeped in tradition and 
bewildered by the path their way- 
ward daughter had taken. 

At the funeral in Asbkdon, the 
Mediterranean coastal city where 
Mrs. Onallah’s parents live, an un- 
cle was reported to have said aloud 
near her grave that God bad pun- 
ished her Tor marrying an Arab. 

“Look, this is a religious family," 
said Eli Cohen, who was Mis. On- 
ail ah's first husband and happens 
to have the same family name. 
“The father goes to the synagogue 
every day. When he hears his 
daughter Is going with a Muslim, 
there is pain." 


The pain was p laved out by the 
Cohens and by Mr. 6nallah and his 
family in front of the entire coun- 
try. 

Mr. On all ah said in public that 
the Cohens had shunted him aside, 
that they physically threatened 
him, that they did not want him at 
the hospital where his wife spent 
her Iasi days, that be had to dodge 
them with the doctors’ help. The 
Cohens said that Mr. OnaQah 
stretched the truth beyond recogni- 
tion to present them as anti-Arab 
bigots — as “terrible monsters," in 
Tova Cohen’s words. 

!□ the end, Abuva Cohen Onal- 
lah, who died a Muslim, was buried 
as a Jew with the consent of both 
her husband and Ashkelon’s rab- 
binical authorities. Death notices 
pasted on walls and lampposts in 
Ashkclcm said only that Ahnva Co- 
hen had died. The name “Onallah" 
disappeared. 


Mr. OnaflahsakHwAdaohnot 
to make an issue of h. ft'swyed 
away from the funeral pos- 
sible trouble, he said. :{'"»■ ^ 
“It has to stop — tfthaeUf 
mgs have to stop," Be 
have a beautiMcocintiy aod bflK- 
tiful people, and"! doa’isoi m 
reason in the world why’weenn 
live together” 

In Ashkefoo, where" 
observed the Jewish seven-diy pe- 
riod of mourning, Tova GAea ech- 
oed those sentiments, 

“We want peace,” ske ssii 
“Enough with the figbtizai tkraffa 
with the wars, enonghx^lhtHP 
mg.” ■ 

But real change, she ad&aj,isfio? 
likely to come right aMfrpOlifat 
ing a week in a complex tovtat 
a Muslim intent on 1 offing Jew 
claimed among his rictmaJonA 
woman who loved a Muslim son 
and took his religion- 


's 

sd ascij: 

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SiM&'ul -- 

stass- 

miser.'. 






Bdeast Seli-Rul 


‘tUnm&d knif'd* .N?v ? 1 


3; 


SBC-- . - 




Suspicions That the Old Soviet Bear Hug Is Making a Comeback - ; - 


> EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


FRANCS 


BELGIUM/ FRANCE 


PARI S 




Continued from Page 1 

move. Mr. Krasikov also said that 
he did nol believe that the old ways 
really were returning. 

“For my pan. I think it's rather 
odd for men even to touch cheeks, 
even laterally. noL to mention what 
we used to see in Leonid Ilyich." 
the Kremlin spokesman said. "refer- 
ring to Mr. Brezhnev, the undisput- 
ed master of the art “I hope that 
this is not a habit and will never 
become a habit." 


sian people when they become too 
famous.” 


SUMMER PROGRAMS 1994 

May 24-Jtaac lO • June 13 - July 22 
June 19- July 9 0 July 25 -August 12 
More than SO courses from the University's curriculum, 
offered for credit or non-credit. French language Immer- 
sion programs in Paris and Biarritz. Excursions to historic 
regions of France. 


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FRENCH - GERMAN SPANISH - ITALIAN - JAPANESE • DUTCH . ENC.LiSi . 


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+ soeio-cultuni acm iues with the teachers nil 10..-0 pm. 


Mr. Krasikov said he believed 
that Lhe Communists reached back 
into Russian Orthodox tradition 
when they adopted the kiss-of-lhe- 
faithful as their own. just as reli- 
gious icons metamorphosed into 
Lenin portraits and holy relics re- 
appeared in Lenin’s mausoleum. 
Indeed, it was Dostoevsky who 
called kissing "a habit of the Rus- 


Nikitit S. Khrushchev is regarded 
as the modem father of Kremlin 
kissing, perhaps to seal the concept 
of collective leadership that the Po- 
litburo attempted under his reign. 
Kissing became like a fraternity 
handshake, a Mafia code, a kind of 
pledge and plea that one lop don 
would nol ship Lhe other to the 
gulag. 

For Mr. Khrushchev, the kissing 
may have paid off. since when his 
associates knocked him out of of- 
fice in 1964 they allowed him to 
finish his days peacefully as a gar- 
dener. Mr. Khrushchev's successor, 
Mr. Brezhnev, who ardently kissed 
Mr. Khrushchev not long before 
overthrowing him. then honed lhe 
hearty smack to a true an. extend- 
ing it to East bloc leaders. Western 


Communist bosses like Georges 
Marchais of France and strongmen 
from Third World client states. 


Mr. Brezhnev once got Burt Lan- 
caster, nearly hopping off the 
ground to reach the Caller Ameri- 
can star. He could not resist a light 
smooch for President Jimmy Car- 
ter after they signed the SALT- 1 
treaty in 1979. giving American 
rightists ready-made photographic 
propaganda to circulate when the 
Soviet Union invaded Af ghanistan 
And, in fact, the doddering Mr. 
Brezhnev reportedly kissed every 
Politburo member to commemo- 
rate the derision to send troops to 
Kabul and assassinate that coun- 
try’s president. 


A real Politburo kiss was far 
more than a French brushing of 
cheeks: for the innnermost circle, it 
consisted of three big smacks and a 


bear fang. In the event of afi-coa- 
stuning pasaon.it oould even be s 
kiss on the bps — as in lhe month 
(o-montb embrace between Sonet 
leader Mikhail SrGorbadievMif 
the ailing East German boss. End 
Honecker, which was csptotd ia 
nauseating dose-up and printed jd 
newspapers around the wceSl • 
That kiss, it seemedatthtdoe, 
represented the apotheosg ri CoHi- 
nnmist embraces. Gennannew^a- 
pers were not foaled 
out Love," one caption rad). ®" 
indeed Mr. Gorbachev so® aban- 
doned the East Germans. tefaL 
lowed the Boffin WaB 
down. . - 

By the time Mr. Ydhan"ca» W 
power, the East bloc was 
Soviet Union was goiqg 
Kremlin kiss was gone mAtoon, 
said Mr. Parfyonov, the.TYJt®- 
Now. be said, it’s coming- bs?*- - 


- - 

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DUTCH: Graying Population Fears for the Future of the Welfare 

Continued from Page 1 The leader of the Central Done- pear and that the country's tradi- lizsd a lot of old people againa^' 

nearly two decades. Other mam- cr . als : Hans Janmaai. is standing lion or tolerance would never per- The dilemma of me dm*. «*• 
stream parties, including the con- trial for inciting hatred against for- mit xenophobic feelings to flourish, de Vries acknowledged, is hrt y~ 
scTvalive opposition and the Labor f*5 n ^ rs * w* ^ at h;,s *oi stopped Similariy, the Christian Demo- ine to ret anv easier for 




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AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 
OF PARIS 


since 1975. Language courses for motiva&F people? 




THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PARIS 
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Tel.: -ui 02 5-1 43 


Continued from Page 1 
nearly two decades. Other main- 
stream parties, including the con- 
servative opposition and'the Labor 
Party, the junior partner in the cen- 
ter-left governing coalition, have 
found that pleas For welfare re- 
straint draw nothing but boos dur- 
ing a campaign that h& suggested 
that the country's vaunted toler- 
ance and social consensus may be 
breaking down. 

Opinion surveys show that the 
extreme-right Central Democrats, 
who scored big gains in local elec- 
tions in March by running on an 
anti-imm/grjnt program, may win 
up to eight parliamentary seats. 


him from leading a campaign based 
on :« xenophobic message that im- 
migrants. ethnic minorities and the 
50.000 asylum-seekers who come to 
the Netherlands each year are 

abusing the social welfare system. 

The populist revolt by the elderly 
and the far right against the politi- 
cal establishment is due. to a large 
extent, to tactical blunders by the 
Christian Democrats and their al- 
lies. For a long time, they ignored 
the far right, in the belief that a lack 
of attention would make it disap- 


■Tw* * " -u ^ 

'vS***’* »■ 


imixenoptiobtcfeeungstoflounsh. de vnes ackncwtea^u, u. ^ 

Similarly, the Christian Demo- ing to gel any easier for potior J USh §g\ t* 5 
crats believed that the Dutch popu- in Europe. Governments w® . V v/#/' fl ^ I ■«.*«_. 

lauon would respond to their calls faced with an agonizingd*^ . 


tor sacrifices, because dd people pay pensions to those peopcu^ 
would understand that die funds heavily for many yens . 

were needed to create jobs for a promise they would „ 

younger generation. share upon retirement, or ose 

“We made a mistake.’’ said So- that money to help tfae3fW ‘£| .. 
rial Affairs Minister Ben de Vries. “Ether way we face then*®*. 

“Mv party was so stupid as to wider disparity between ridJ. 
promise not to raise pensions for poor, and between young 
four years. It would have been bet- Mr. de Vries said. “WenRst®*^ 
tor to say we would deride what to whether we can accept less sona ^7 
do each year in light of economic ty in our society, asyoohave m 
circumstances. Instead, it rnobi- United Stales." 


Mr. de Vries said. 
wdrether we can accept las 
ty in our society, as you have a 
United Stales." 




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SUMMER PROGRAM J11.Y 4-JIXY 22 


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INTEBIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 





Page5 


Seoul on Alert Over North ’s Movements 




ti. > va-:-:.-'V LJ. :v. ... O • jt+y.-;:’” *•' . \ - . . st . r <&• ■*- 

• r- '• • <•. *V " ,• C 1 *#: ■ 


Compiierf Slegt Fran Dispaic/ia 

SEOUL — President Kim 
Young Sam ordered South Korea’s 
650, 000-member armed forces on 
Monday to keep an around-the- 
clock vigil following unusual mili- 
tary moves by North Korea in re- 
cent days. 

“The Defense Ministry should 
be fully prepared to cope with any 
eventuality, with all the soldiers ex- 
ercising a 24-hour watertight vigi- 
lance," Mr. Kim was quoted by an 
aide as saying at a meeting of cabi- 
net ministers in security-related de- 
partments. 

Mr. Kim ordered the alert as the 

United Nations forces stationed in 


about three hours on Saturday 
when about 20 North Korean air . 
craf twere monitored flying toward 

The South's Defease Ministry 
said the North Korean Air Force 
appeared to be on a regular train- 
ing exercise, but it was very unusu- 
al that it was conducted on a Satur- 


During Monday's security meet- 
ing, the first since South Korea 
named a new unification minister 
on Saturday. President Kim said 
North Korea recently withdrew 
several members of its armistice 


commission secretariat on resident 
duty at Panmunjom, 

Mr. Kim was quoted by his aides 
as saying North Korean soldiers 
equipped with arms and helmets 
appeared at Panmunjom on Fri- 
day. a violation of the armistice 
pact 

The number, movement and 
dress of North Korean and UN 
troops stationed at Panmunjom. 
the only crossing point on the inter- 
Korean border, is strictly pre- 
scribed under the armistice agree- 
ment 

The UN military command also 


said on Monday that it was holding 
talks with North Korea over re- 
newed Calls by the Communist gov- 
ernment to scrap the armistice. 
North Korea wants to replace die 
truce with a permanent peace trea- 
ty signed directly with the United 
States. 

South Korean officials view that 
as an effort to cut them out of 
decision-making on the divided 
peninsula's future and drive a 
wedge between Seoul and Wash- 
ington. 


(Reuters, AP) 



m 


: 

SS&fl 







m.i ■ 

v- * .. 


- > • 


j^S GOTTTOaK Xi i kNTION — G overnor Chris Patten marking the 150th anniversary on Monday of the Hong Kong police. 


muy*- 


Jakarta Vows to Rout f Street Criminals 


South Korea accused North Korea 
of violating the 41 -year-old armi- 
stice by deploying more soldiers 
and weapons than permitted at the 

tense inter- Korean border. 

But a Defense Ministry spokes- 
man said the presidential statement 
was not intended to increase the 
level of alert but to emphasize that 
troops should always be vigilant. 

“We are not seeing the unusual 
North Korean movements of re- 
cent days as a sign that they will 
commit a serious provocation 
against the South." the spokesman 
said. 

A UN Command spokesman 
said North Korea, which in recent 
days has described the armistice 
that ended the 1950-53 Korean 


12 Die as Rwanda Church Is Shelled 


7Tir rfssociairrf Pms 

NAIROBI — Mortar rounds hit 
a church crowded witb refugees in 
the Rwandan capital Kigali kill- 
ing 12 people and wounding 113, 
the United Nations said Monday. 

Two rounds hit the Sainte Fa- 
mille church, where more than 
2.000 people had taken refuge, dur- 
ing a brief firefight Sunday he- 


betate relief workers said the rebels 
closed the border Saturday, 
Officials fear another 250,000 
people could flee into Tanzania if 
the border reopens. 

Bradley Guerrant of the Worid 
Food Program said relief workers 
were organizing food distribution 


for the refugees, but that it would 
lake a couple of weeks to work out 
an adequate distribution program. 

The World Food Program has 
€3,800 tons of food for the refugees 
— enough to feed 1.2 million peo- 
ple for two months — but the first 
shipments will not arrive for days. 


tween rebel and army troops, said 
Moctar Gueye, a UN spokesman. 

He said many of the survivors 
had been very seriously wounded. 

UN efforts to arrange a cease- 
fire between the army, which is 
dominated by the Hutu ethnic clan, 
and rebels of (he Rwandan Patriot- 
ic Front, which is dominated by the 
Tutsi, have been fruitless. The rebel 
group said on radio that it would 
not attend peace talks planned for 
Tuesday in Arusha, Tanzania. 

The group said it “has no inten- 
tions to and will never negotiate 
any cease-fire with the illegitimate 
and self-imposed government in 
Rwanda." 

At least 100,000 people have 
been killed in nearly a month of 
savagery in Rwanda, and more 
than 1.3 million have fled their 
homes. The UN secretary-general 
Butros Butros Ghali, has said that 
the death toll could be 200,000. The 
rebels also claimed in their radio 
broadcasts that the toll had 
reached 200,000. 

More than 250,000 refugees flee- 
ing the slaughter and the advance 
of the rebels trudged into Tanzania 



iTij, h 

* 


.1^ ill 


a * -- r 



- 


.. t 


By Michael Richardson 

international Herald Tribute 

SINGAPORE — Indonesia has 
ordered its military to join the po- 
nce in ridding the capital of sus- 
pected law-breakers, another sign 
that some Asian countries are de- 
termined to take tough measures 
against crime and vandalism de~ 
sjmeraising human rights i ssues in 

“Jakarta must be cleared of 
criminals” before Asia-Pacific 
tewers, including President Bill 
Clinton, meet there in November, 
said the capital's police chief. Ma- 
jor General Mochammad Hin- 
darto. 

Some human rights groups are 
concerned that the operation may 
lead to rights violations, including 
the resumption of widespread aim, 
maty executions. 

Indonesian authorities say they 
will take tough measures against 


War as “a worthless piece of pa- 
per," had increased forces at the 


crime here," said a senior Jakarta 
police officer, Tisna Yoga. “We 
have no choice but to impose harsh 
laws." 


General Hindarto said the Indo- 
nesian armed forces had to “start 
cleaning up the city and its sur- 
rounding area of bandits, thieves 
and other kinds of street c riminals " 
to assure the security of the summit 
meeting of the Asia- Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum, known 
as APEC 

The 17 members of the forum 
comprise the United States, Cana- 
da, Australia and New Zealand as 
well as Japan and most other East 
Asian economies. 

Indonesian news organizations 
have reported that as many as 
16,700 soldiers and police are in- 
volved in the anti-crune sweep in 
Jakarta, called “Operation Cleans- 


from custody, the police said. One 
of them was wearing handcuffs 
when be was shot and killed 

Many Jakarta residents, worried 
about inadequate policing and a 
rise in violent crime, evidently sup- 
port the military crackdown. 

But the Legal Aid Foundation in 
Jakarta criticized the operation. 


m/m m m/m/m per," had increased forces at the 

Panmunjom truce village at the 
peeled c riminals were executed as border to unacceptable levels. 


soon as they were caught. 


“Early in the evening of April 29, 


Although the security forces the Korean People's Army for sev- 
were thought to be involved, it was hours had more men and 


only some years later that the gov- Wea P° n s in the Joint Security Area 
eminent acknowledged that the al Pa nm u nj om than permuted by 

t __ _ ° v«. lhi» nrmiciiro nnnwmant ” a I fM 


campaign, known as operation Pe- aremsiice agreement,” a UN 


saying that it increases military 
power, reaches only petty cr iminals 


trus, had been official policy. Command spokesman said. 

Referring to Petrus and the cur- _ Tension is always high in the 
rent anti-crime drive. The Jakarta Panmun J om a orele 


power, reaches only petty criminals Jfm anti-crime dnve, The Jakarta grj0 i-bom R7n vardo in 

and ignores underlying, causes of Post ****1 Saturday that the ques- j- c„L, ; r . ■ , ,A 

crime such as ^SSSrSluA *>ns raised were ’the same: Who 

the stark contr^SemSi and w marked for elimination, who £ tjnoM nulnaiy ^ ^ 

poor. made such decisions and who penmeter. 

rv> , . .. ... , . would guarantee that onlv crimi- As with similar violations in the 

^ ■ Uman p*" spokesman said, “the 

rights activists m Indonesia are _ UN Command is addressing the 

concerned that the operation may But Major General Hendropri- issue with the KPA through the 
become a pretext for arbitary exe- jono, the Jakarta military com- Military Armistice Commission 


nals would be eliminated? 


past," the spokesman said, “the 
UN Command is addressing the 


cunonsL mander, said he was determined to 

In a crackdown in January and make Jakarta “the most secure dry 
February in and around large Indo- in the worid in the near future." 


Military Armistice Commission 


mander, said he was determined to channel." the spokesman said, 
make Jakarta “the most secure dry South Korean armed forces and 


drugs, (X 1 committi ng vandalism. 

“Educating them u no longer, an 
effective means of bringing down 
the rate of student brawls or violent 


Since the operation began on 
April 12, more than 700 suspects 
have bets arrested. Three alleged 
criminals caught in the operation 
were killed Thursday when they 
tried to attack guards and escape 


nesian dries, soldiers and police 
shot and killed at least 18 suspected 
c riminals. 

Critics say the anti-crime cam- 
paigns raise the specter of a return 


U.S. troops were put on alert for 


Suite up-grades 
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Palestinians and Israelis Say They’ll Meet the Deadline 


\ ByQirisHedges 

- ■ . New YorkJInm Service 

CAIRO — Palestinian andlsradi negotiators, 
meeting in Cairo id ready fee relf-rale agreement for 
Gaza and Jericho for signing cm Wednesday, said they 
had settled most issues and would meet the deadtine. 


will be the first of some 5,000 who the Israelis have 
promised to release in the two weeks following the 


A brief history. 


. Bat the two sides have yes to agree on fee fate of 
some 3£0Q Palestinian prisoners, many of whom are 
followers of the Islamic militant movement Hamas. 


“As we approach these last boure,** said the chief ***** }&}**** 

n ««oriX. Naha Shaath. “I fed more comfort- negotiators for weeks wercnow cleared up. He gave 


PLO negotiator. NabO Shaath, "I fed more comfort- JrJgPv"; 
aWe that wc area the gates of a mq or achievement for 
our people and for all people in this part of theworid.” 

The FLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, and Prime Min- ana . Jcn T^ 1 


at of dispute was over who would 
ion over people arrested in Gaza 


4MV * WWMH M MI l * MW—* • » in V II 

ister Yitzhak Rabin are to meet Tuesday in Cairo. The ■ AsBact Counters Israelis 


two leaders, who are expected to sign the accord 


the size of the Palestinian enclave in Jericho. They 


John M, Goshko of The Washington Post reported 
from Jerusalem: 

President Hafez Assad of Syria has given a negative 


also decide whether Palestinians will be stationed on response to Israel’s latest peace overtures, but he 
feeAllenby Bridge linking the West Bank and Jordan, countered with a detailed counterprop osa l that Israeli 
Israeli forces are scheduled to begin withdrawal officials Monday described as a hopeful sign that Mr. 


from Gaza and Jericho within 24 hours of the signing - Assad might be ready for serious negotiations. 


and hundreds of Palestinian pohcewiU enter Gaza and Thai assessment was given by Israeli officials after 

Jericho to take control erf security, negotiators said. Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher reported to 
“Everything la geared to top speed towards the Mr. Rabin on the results of bis weekend discussions 
irmlonmitation of this agreement immediately after with Assad in Damascus, 
the y gp'ng on Wednesday,” Mr. Shaath said. ■ - - Mr. Christopher, who is trying to stimulate move- 




police are going to be ready. We have received meat in the 
( demited news about Israeli withdrawal" U ^.-sponsored 


now the detailed news about Israeli withdrawal. 

Mr. Shaath said that the new Palestinian leader sh ip 


1 Syrian-IsraeH track of the 
East peace process, went to 


1968 


Damascus Saturday to present Mr. Assad with fee 


for the civil adminis tration would begin to arrive in Rabin government’s new ideas. 


Gaza and Jericho this week. 


The central issue is the status of the Golan Heights. 


“They vriD all start to flow in as soon as we sign," he Syria has insisted on complete and immediate Israeli 
said. “If we are delayed a day or two, it's not be a withdrawal from the Golan, while Israel h as said that 


adviser to Mr. Arafat, told report- Syria’s willingness to offer Israel full recognition and 
Hx that Tar ffri had agreed to free 1,000 Palestinian security guarantees. 

Ssonere and aflow40 to 50 deportees into the occur Jhe land i proposals are bdieved to center on an 

^^territories on the day the signing. The prisoners offer to wrthdraw from the Golan m stages. 


the extent of any withdrawal most be determined by 


Gazarjericho Development Is Set 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

J Sew York Tima Service - 

WASHINGTON - He Wmw Baak mv nteJ on 


he Israei-ruj 

tnd Jericho to pa l es 5!^!^o I iBC program, designed 

The first steps u 

V the J~^ m C ^Xvolvc tf* laying 

lank and donor ^ waste disposal 

*■» a Other wasta 

aalittfs m G«* *** cemets, tdephones . 


Palesttnians need to see improvements in their living 
conditions very quickly," said Caio Koch-Wcscx. fee 
World Bank vice president for the Middle East and 
North Africa Region. 

“The program and die funds behind it are for the 
immediate-needs of the Palestinians and will help 
create a new physical and soda! infrastructure, pro- 
vided politicai-stafaality can be main tamed. But unless 
; there is a viable improvement in social and economic 
conditions. lit an equitable way, the very foundations 
of peace will be undermined.’’ 

Forty donor countries pledged a total of $2.4 billion 
in aid to the new Palestinian entity in October at a 
conference organized W the UnitedStates. SSnce then, i 
-the World Bank and FLO economic specialists have 
: befcn‘ working on a program that would take these 
diverse and often -vague pledges and forge them into a 
coherent, detailed phm for economic development. 

Thai plan, released on Monday, details how to 
spend half of themoney during the next three years. 




1982 



1985 


1989 




1990 




1994 


PARIS 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1994 


A Laboratory for Mideast Peace 

Self-Rule Accord Is a Test, Palestinians Say 

By David Hoffman than planned By comparison, the problems of ihe 

Washington Pan Service West Bank art immense, with more than 100 Jewish 

RAMALLAH. Israeli-Occupied West Bank — For setllCTenis scattered among 12 mOlioo Palestinians 
Sameh Qubaj, a computer programmer tbc advent of ““ 250 roads between the West Bank and IsracL 
Palestinian self-role in the Ctoa Strip and Jericho . “h’s not a mystery," said Daood Kottab. a Palestin- 
looms large, even though it will not come soon to the ^ journalist and docuramtary Hm prodacer in Jeru- 
streets of Ramallah and other major towns in the West- “This whole interim penod is a test-** 

Bank. For Israelis, security is paramount. On Orr, chair- 

'll will be a test for ns— for the entire Palestinian “an of the foreign affairs and defense pane] in Israel's 
nation," said Mr. Qubai, 26. “We have to take up the padjameoi and a retired general who is dose to Mr. 
challenge of those Israelis who said the Palestinians Rabm * sa «^ “The big, big ‘if is whether the Palestin- 


could never govern themselves. We have to prove we iaas ran rule the area. The Palestinian police is not the 
can." question. The question is can the PLO take care of 

When control of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank education, jobs, refugees and 800,000 people in Gaza." 
town of Jericho is transferred to the Palestinians in the The agreement wQ] succeed “if the refugee in Jaba- 

next few weeks, it will cover only two small, relatively lya sees some kind of light at the end of the tunnel,'* 
poor regions, and apply to less than half of the nearly 2 Mr. Orr said, referring to a Palestinian camp in the 
million Palestinians in the territories. But the expert- self-rule area. But if not, he added, “he can come again 
ment in self-rule is already the subject of immense with a knife,** 

curiosity and scrutiny for Palestinians and Israelis. If terrorist attacks against Israelis continue. Mr. Oit 
T he reason is that Gaza and Jericho are about to said, “there will be no solution." Self-rule will remain 
become a laboratory for evaything that Prune Minis- in Gaza and Jericho only, 
ter Yitzhak Rabin and the Palestine Liberation Orga- For Mr. Rabin, expanding self-rule in the West 
nization chairman Yasser Arafat, have struggled to Bank represents a troublesome political calculation, 
achieve since they shook hands at the White House in While there is an overwhelming national consensus in 
September. Israel to exit Gaza, the country remains torn over the 


At stake in the successor failure of the Gaza-Jericho West Bank, 
accord are two concepts that are at the heart of any “Rabin and Peres are hurrying from Gaza and 



0;S. Warns 
North Korea 


OverArms 

• By PaulF.Horvitz-:; 

International Herald T)Hrsne_ X 

-Washington — TheUmad 


tkjns. if necessary, to deffcctNorth 
r Korea from buDdiig nudea-.'weap- 
fVncgven if tte CptnOTOUstreginre 
views sanctions.** m act ai^ru, 
-X)ciV}ScScapaiyywi3mJ.x<^ 

- said Tuesday - V ." - \Y.- 

In a speech apparently aeagueo - 

to clarify VS. p o&y.and £3' 

Washington's resolve, Mn.ftrry 
aaidhis recent -trip -Asa : had 

convinced him that the United 
States and South Korea ware pre- 
pared to handle any mffitary con- 


Israel to exit Gaza, the country remains torn over the An aid worker hying to control a croud of Rwandan refugees as they waited for rationed beans at a camp near Rusmao, T 


u oic iw tuDwyo umi are ai me ncan oi mv ruu-m auu rtuo musyuig ^ p, _ w-i m — ^ ^'-• ' Meoared 

U.S. Steps Up Efforts to End Rwanda Bloodshed El 

other is the Palestinian desire for a homeland free of our government can go in the same tempo, in the same A X • \ ' - > 


Conqnkd by Our Staff From DupauAa (0 Stem tite bloodletting 


occupation. Speed, in the next step." CunpdnJby Our Staff From DupauAa 

For Israelis, the evacuation from Gaza and Jericho Ephriam Sneh, a Labor member of parliament who NAIROBI — The United Stales 
marks the fust time since the 1967 Middle East war chairs the subcommittee overseeing the territories, sieppcd up pressure on Tuesday for 
that they have ceded territory with a large Arab said that “it is not feasible or desirable’’ to expand remraai action to end the Wood- 
population dose to Tel Aviv in exchange for peace— Palestinian control immediately to the rest of the West sweeping Rwanda, but at- 
a far d ifferent proposition than relinquishing the Sinai Bank. tempts to broker talks between re- 

desert to Egypt in the Camp David accords. For the Mr. Sneh expressed concern that the new Palesiin- bels and the ramp gover nmen t 


_ The Tutsi-dominated front says the Seeurig Coundl last week .to; 

NAIROBI — The United Stales doomed. Rwandan rebels ruled out the Hutu interim government was adopt a more forceful approach' toi \ 
sieppcd up pressure on Tuesday for an early cease-fire on Tuesday and established illegally after the death Rwanda/ is tiyihs to oreamze an 

rarn nwal ttAtiAn fn tha mh/T o frwtfimt frww /wil /1 half- *J. — t t 1 tT- l • A - — — 1 " * 


■^We cannot take any chances on 
this" Me. Ptoysaid in a speech to 
the Asia Society. “We have to he 
prepared to help South Korea de- 
fend itself, as we' have for more 
than 40 years. The defense secre- 
^ tarv that North Korea’s poten- 
tiaT battlefield advantage in man- 
powerwoold be met -with superior 


regional action 


des ert t o Egypt in the Camp David accords. For the Mr. Sneh expressed concern that the new Palesiin- 
Palest in ia n s, too, it m a rts the first time in more than a fan authority may fail to attract international aid 
quarter-century that they have taken affairs into their it puis management in place. Palestinian 

own hands — a Tar different proposition than waging economists have complained lately dm nations that 
the six-year intifada, or revolt against Israeli pledged apasniTKy have failed to deliver. But others 
occop 3 ^ 0 ?- point oat that this is became the donors are not 


to end the Mood- said a foreign force could not halt of President Juvfeial Habyarimana African peacekeeping force that y. 

Rwanda, but at- the bloodletting. in a rocket attack an his .plane on could besentinto that comtiy with - i 

it talks between re- Jacques BOtozagara, bead of in- April 6. the dlmgaous task of restoring lavt * > 

ramp government ternatiooal affairs for the Rwanda Mr. Bihozagara said a new inter- and order. . Y- ; Y • Y| 
ss. Patriotic Front, said at a news ooa- national force proposed by UN _ : i 

said Tuesday^ that ference in Brussels that a cease-fire Secretary-General Botros Butros- .Tte sccxeo^-ynq^sm 


According to Israeli and Palestinian analysts, this satisfied the money will be spent correctly, 
grand experiment will take time for both peoples to “The money will not be afinraral to or ganizati ons 
digest. Although last year’s agreement envisioned Pal- run in the old manner of the PLO in Beirut," Mr. Sneh 
e si i n i ans holding ejections and extending their control said. While the Palestinian twhTKyr*** are qualified, 
to the remainder of the West Bank by July 13, few now he added, “I wonder if Arafat will let them work. 


on the eastern outskirts of the forces would lead to more massa- 
ndan capital blasted rebel eras. 


expect the timetable to be met. Some Israelis are “I don’t know how genuinely his mind and his way Sunday in the southern Rwandan "O YW7A T\TTY A mT 

calling for a pause of months, or even years, to see how of thinking has transferred from being leader of an town of Butare, the International fa, WA I w 1 * /ViJ 
the Gaza-Jericho experiment unfolds. organization to leader of a stale.” Committee of the Red Cross said c 

What lira ahead is a long period of the Palestinians* “No one will miss Gaza,” Mr. Sneh said, “but the Tuesday. Cautioned from Page 1 

and Israelis’ testing each other. The negotiations over Palestinians would be very stupid to make Israelis feel Washington, responding to ” 

just the Gaza-Jericho pullout took five months longer that leaving Gaza was a mistake.” nwnntmg criticism of the West and Etienne Krug, health coordinator 

the United Nations for doing noth- d’or the United Nations High Com- 

TCD A FT _ ing in the face of one of the worst nussioncr for Refugees here. 

ISRAEL: Army Restricts Use of Force as Pact Nears l S t 

OMta^dlhnFvl ejzia^te^^foraccdcr. ation Arm,, the PLO's nnlit*, £T3!5 

nrMppt tlw> vtllpmmn in lb* Tmvi aiea wIUKuawaL Wing- na«< fn, kmnMitanan rplwf AMviK if flwv rniilH «imnlv 


made no progress. 

UN officers said Tuesday that 
troops dug in near the Kigali air- 
port on the eastern omskirts of the 
Rwandan capital blasted rebel 
headquarters m the former parlia- 
ment building with a stream of 
mortar shells. 

Twenty-one children and 13 Red 
Cross volunteers were killed on 


between the front and government Ghali would be useless in slopping pMnpcd to aric 


• Mr. Perry said that while there 
was no area ofdisagreeuvait among 
Washington, Tokyo and Seoul cm 
policy toward North Korea, he rt- 
ported - csYy Ysmtcd progress" in 


ttabl^L ^ AMqp c b^ a opt -W 

“The international com muni t y rf noghbore, tojwyjpnat- the . temc Htplomaric stand- 


“Stopping the hostilities between cannot stop the massacres,” he Kz 451 off ova Nor* .Korea's suspected 

the hostile forces frees a part of the said. “It- is only the Rwandans tntmte to stHa a roEc^; and bow nrv^wiT antwiLTTixWm . Nortiv TLn- 
government army to increase mas- themselves who can do tins." . many troops u»y wjuld^prcnw,: . ^ not miscalculate 


government army 
sacres,” he said. 


Mr. Bntros Ghali, who called cm , ‘ ... NTJ1 - . W^Jm^ trihV poHttcat wTI, as it 

Yi'Y;- - irmybavedone.m; 1950. -- -; 

L , • ■ j n • r . - '--‘-t*-- j Yr» l ^ “Today; beno oemfu- 

Itmare and Jjcnwtl tit fJ,Jt$0rti€r ±v$t^^sian about^tht so&iarity^betwren 

■ the Uinted States and South Korea 

Rwandan refugees, whom just 25 displaced just on the other sdeof, ^the resolve of the tlmtedSlites 
hours managed to tum tins deso- the border." . ' ^ drfendSoutlrKorca,” Mr. Peny 

mt o S ,OT ° ty ^ Ao be nocobfu- 

bomb," she said. - : Y-. - sionaboiritiieiriflili^>qMi^ 

Relief wodeera say thqr arc for- • ;•/ i»e« of ri jjq aimKiiirf IT v-Rwmh- 

tmtare so far that the Rwandans Even as they straggled to. aoxnri-. K & Korea, inffiftiy fotc^Sd 


fRivim, NTT) 


Washington, responding to 


Gmtinaed from Page 1 


town of Butare, the International RWAM) A: Nightmare and Denial aZ &Bindi^^ 
Committee of the Red Cross said ° ,• -/ • 


mounting criticism of the West and Etiema Kiufe health ooordmator 
the United Nations for doing noth- 'for the United Nations High Com- 


Continued from Page 1 era) Ebud Barak, called for accder- 

protect the settlements in the Gaza ate< * ^todrawaL 

Strip, according to the September He said he feared soldiers could 

peace accord. be at risk because of a “lack of 

Iteimnytas^idyshifledUK 
bulk of equipment in the Gaza 

Strip since the redeployment began An advance party of 1,000 Pflles- 

late last year, according to the Is- tinian policemen will arrive in the 
raeti press. occupied Gaza Strip on Thursday, 

But no buildings have been 1 ” ” ,om 

handed over to the new police, and Tuesday, 
the army remains in charge of all The contingent, currently based 
installations. at El Arish in the Sinai Peninsula, 

Mr. Rabin has said the full rede- wU form part of the 9,000-strong 
ployment of troops could lake up P 04 *** forct 
to three weeks after the Cairo sign- ■ They will enter Gaza from Egypt 
ing ceremony. yia the Rafab border crossiiig. AH 

But the army chief of staff, Gen- are members of the Palestine laber- 


sent two envoys to the region. International Committee of the 
aiiM Armv th* pmv The White House said that John R«d Cross said the Tanzanian 

aaon Army, the PLOs military asasiant secretary of home affairs minister had asked 

0? the 9 000 Palestinian offices. for humanitarian affairs, and relief agencies if tirey could supply 
7 noo Yin hp S^SmPin David Rawson, U5. ambassador transportation and volunteer* to 

^ps^xSK^the Middle East ^ 

andtiie baknee from the West Rwa ^ m “> effort to But she said a higher pnonty 

Bank and Gaza. Some police offi- bl ^ CT P c f CIa ¥, now f ? the Red Cross was copmg 

cers will natrol inintlv Sih T^rfi Bat the latest diplomatic attempt with the unprecedented wave of 


^ajraintoabustiingnewcityof 

Relief workers say they arc for- bomb '” * e . .. Y! A Y 
ttrnate so fac that the Rwandans ' Even as they straggled to aooom- 


food, cooking utensils, even plastic tween Hntns an d Ttitsia in'aogh- yamgjtoanow ftaM SSmafiodf S- 


troops throughout the Middle East 
and the balance from the West 
Bank and Gaza. Some police offi- 
cers will patrol jointly with Israeli 
troops those roads used by both 
Palestinians and Jewish settlers, 
and others will be posted alongside 
Israelis at border crossings. 

Palestinians suspected of attack- 
ing Israelis will be interrogated by 
Israeli police officers with Palestin- 
ian officers present, and Israelis 
suspected by Palestinians will be 
interrogated in Israel with a Pales- 
tinian police officer present, Israel 
says. (Reuters. AFP, AP) 


sheeting to make tents. bpong ^Burundi aright- presage a j ipcZiom or ics mktear imtalla- 

"Wefre not dealing with a voy new refugee cnsB,:snnflai;to one' but abo is lxritfing out the 

SSTS?* 1 WSrf? prospect or quicfc^canostic and 

Sheila Wilson, of the Red Cross. 250,000 Buruntfians into Tanzania, ' potinCTl rewards for compliance 
"^Quite a lot of them have been rnastofvdxrahsrosuMXxetunied. '.Y^nn««ii«-"has tiv nhi»" 


political re wards for oonririiaince/ . 

Pyongyang has agreed to only 
limited ^international overs^itand 


from one of its reactors. 


w y M. --m . mm. . m 'W OI; IUU UVlil V 1 XV U 1 114 . 

Vote Count Is Stalled, but Not Mandela 

-7 North Korean news agency Toes- 


RAJ: Families of Princes Feud Over Palaces and Gems 


Comhmed from Page I beloved Rambagh Palace has been son of a prince should inherit all of 
lifestvle will no lomrer be availahlr tunicd » a botd "hen guests his father’s property under the cen- 
^Wlc^?hareS^ ^ K50 ran spend a ^dl^dprimog^ 

respect they used to have." ««5 m .** praufs® tor- aWings and wives 

thf! Mnhnrniflh nf Tninnr nierhr private suite; and the maha- should be given then; share under 


respect they used to have.” 


Wlu»n Ih. Milnnioh nf asaiy uuvaic 9 IUI 6 , U 1 U UK limits- auuniu Ub gi*cu UKU M 1 CUC Ui 

rajab’* dd« son and would^ more mod* Himta law. 
dnn in the loSfn Rriti«h neJ^L heir to the throne. Bhawani (Bub- As a result of thel^al fray, most 

£ WtetaST-Si ^ “ "coveriog ft™ a of dm.familrtiowd^dqis 
•TwSS. stroke that be says was at least paintings have been sealer 


Young Man Alive Comes to Britain 
— Vast Wealth — A Palace — And 
Two Lovely Wives ” 

Upon arriving at his Rambagh 


tat be says was at least paintings have been staled in 
brought on by the family strong rooms and storehouses for 
' r the past eight years, awaiting the 


By William Claiborne 

Was hin g to n Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
first meeting of South Africa's 
new legislature was postponed 
until Monday because of delays 
in coanting ballots cast in hot 
week’s first nonrarial election. 

But officials of the Transitional 
Executive Council, who an- 
nounced the postponement Tues- 
day, said it would not effect the 
scheduled inauguration of the 
new president, who is expected to 
be Nelson Mandela, leader of the 
African National Congress, the 
following day. 

The new National Assembly, 


Town on Monday, elect Mr. 
Mandda president and be in Pre- 
toria the next day for the inaugu- 
ration ceremony. . <- - 

The council also said that the 
first meetings of the nine provin- 
cial legislatures elected last week, 
which were scheduled for Thurs- 
day, wflj be moved back to Satur- 
day because of delays in coanting 
ballots. 

The Independent Electoral 
Commission said it had counted 
only 12 nriUkm ballots of a possi- 
ble 22.7 million cast for the 400- 
seat National Assembly. 

The ANC continued u> main- 


tain its OQmmandmg; lead, with 

by t£TbfatioiiaI Party of Presi- 
dent Frederik W. de Klerk, with 
222 percent 

Toe Zulu-based Inkatha Free- 
dom. Party, headed by Chief 
Mangosuthn Buthderi, was run- 
ning third, with 83 percent It 
was followed by the ri^itist Afri- 
kaner Freedom Front, with. 2.7 
percent; the predominantly white 
liberal Democratic Parly, 1.7 per- 
cent, and the militant Made na- 
tionalist Pan-Africanist Con- 
gress, 13 percent 

The two-thirds majority the 
ANC had sought appeared to be 


but.oT reach, since it woiild have 
to. win neatly three-quarters of- , 
the ' uncounted votes, assuming . 
.that all of the estimated 227 nril- 
Tltoririigible voters cast baHots- : . 
. A two-thirds m^'ority in the . 
tegislatnre would haw; aflowed ' 
ANC member? to amend South: 
Africa’s interim coastimtiaa m- : 
win.-. , •. . : ..- 

- Trends: in returns announced . ■ 
Tuesday by flw riaaoral cOTinris- • 
skm spggested that the ANCs ? 
majority was being trimmed - 
slightly by Inkatha, whose vote' 1 
share rose from 5.9 porcent to 83 ^ 
percent in 12 hours. The gam wa* ' 
attributed by analysts to results ; 
that continued totriddem from 


Upon amving at his Rambagh . To miderstand how the high omomne of rases thrn could lake 
Palacein Jarou? after her wedding falien so low, cacmoa exam- decades moreto wend through the 

in 1940, the maharajah's third wXl m ^ uneasy rdationshqj be- cumbersome Indian court system. 

Maharani Gayatri Devi, described *"?? ^ 

♦k- stricken natrons m the world and 


VOTE: For South Africa, Psychological Sea Change - Province. 

rnfin. I IW 1 onA Ac Km* . iUm ' It. j: .U r ' J . BUthekZT Tpefi- 


the Rowing cream-colored edifice 
as the “setting for some fabulous 
and imagined fairy tale.” 

Her private sitting room was 
filled with objels (Tart, which she 
detailed in her memoirs: “Small 
jeweled animals, rose quartz and 
jade, and curved daggers with 
white jade hilts carved to look like 
animal heads with jewels for eyes 
were displayed in glass cabinets. 
Jade boxes encrusted with semipre- 
cious stones in floral designs odd 
cigarettes, and heavy crystal bowls 
were filled with flowers." 

For the family that spent its days 
drinking gimlets on the wide veran- 
das, serving lavish meals at its 80- 
seat dining table and riding into the 
forests on tiger shoots, the fairy- 
tale existence has become a night- 
mare of accusations of theft, mis- 
management and money-grabbing. 

Most of the family’s jewels, 
paintings and carpets are sealed in 
six strong rooms and 17 ware- 
houses by orders of two coons; its 


stricken nations in the world and __ > ^ v _ v _ 

its princely past While London al- |4| |||A|4* 
lowed the royal families to main- Lfx T l i t 

tain their domains during British |j t > » • »r 

rale, the Indian government incor- tjU'Y€TS MJUfie UD 
porated their kingdoms into the ^ 
country after independence in Gontmoed from Page 1 
1947Jn return, they were allowed ^ UJS . ^ 

w keep their titles, some of thor undergoes reform. The re- 

palaces. many of thor jewels and form of the system is also attracting 
woe panted monthly allowances foreign buyers because they have 


called “privy purses/ 


more experience operating is Eu- 


Tfie U.S. international Marketing Center is 
sponsoring a complimentary seminar on: 

U.S. / U.K. Inheritance Laws 
and U.S. Estate Tax Planning 

Featured Sneakers: Jayne A. Hartley 
Attorney at Law 

David C. Hartwell 
Prudential Ins. Co. 
of America 

Nevin Overmliler 
Prudential Ins. Co. of 
America 


But, in the eariy 1970s, Prone rope's price-eon trolled environ- 
Mmister Indira Ghandi persuaded mcni. some aspects of which are are 
Parliament to enact a constitution- alreadv bane adapted lore, 
al amendment stripping the maha- * c 

rajas, maha ranis and nhaffn or Sanofi SA of France a part- 

their titles, privy purses and many subsidiaxy oT Elf .Aquitaine 

of their land holdings. .has a research alliance with 

About the same time, the Maha- Sterling Winthrop to devdop hean 
rajah of Jaipur died afer suffering a and cancer diagnostics, announced 
hean attack while playing polo in in Paris it was interested m taking 
England. He left no will, “P its option to acquire the pre- 

jlwjssws arggggf gyj 

dozens of other royal families, is a , qatmfilte wSSfuu 

' Separately, Bayer AG said it was 

interested in the over-the-counter 

— t ■-it-tt — dings, which would give the big 

I German chemicals company back 
Marketing Center tS 1 the trademark to its weD-known 

entsrysenumron: I 


Confimed from Page 1 
management and corruption in a 
government made up of people 
who have never before been al- 
lowed a whiff of official power. 
On that front, the foul-ups in the 
administration of last week's 
“people’s deed on” were not an 
encouraging start 

But some facets of South Afri- 
ca's transformation are already 
complete. Foremost is the lifting 
of a psychological albatross. 

There is already a efiebt for the 
new South Africa's self-image: It 
is the menial picture of a white 
woman and her black makL who, 
having spent their lives under the 
same roof, are Finally doing 
something together as equals: 
waiting in an impossibly long line 
to vote. 

For blacks, the attainment of 
dignity after centuries of struggle 
will not bring houses or jobs, but 
it may bring something even 
more important — a readiness at 
last to think of themselves as 
Sooth Africans. 

For whites, the lifting of the 
“white man’s burden” crackles 
with baric themes of redemption 


and liberation. As Ken Owen, the 
editor of Johannesburg’s Sunday 
Times, put it in his weekend col- 
umn: “One nation. Free. Free at 
guilt. Free, too, of a different, 
more crushing burden: the 
Northern Hemisphere heritage, 
the vanity and arrogance be- 
queathed to us by Europe.” 

Some of this may sound senti- 
mental; what is notable about 
South Africa’s makeover is that it 
is made of much harder stuff. It 
has been one of the most inielli- 

S tly managed political trans- 
nations in recent history. 
Frederik van Zyl Slabbert, 
Sooth Africa's leading white anti- 
apartheid politician during the 
1980s. remarked on television 
that what always bothered him 
about apartheid was its “massive 
assault on one's intelligence.’' 
The idea that a bureaucracy 
could keep the people of the same 
country together in economic ar- 
rangements but entirely span in 
all other realms, by testing the 
color of their skin and the kinki- 
ness of their hair, defied c omm on 
sense — never mxnd human dig- 
nity. 


The dismantling of apartheid day that (hoe were “irregularities 
has been fueled by more than all arounff! in the na^Sand. 
common sense; it has been apas- provincial elections, hot that :he 
ti£e of brilliant compromises. SJSdW^jndgment on > 
The most important was to ere-, whether voting was free and lair 
ate, for a period of at least five until afta the final results Were 
years, a government oT national known. ••• 

unity that wiH include all parties - „ . •' y m - a • 

that won at least 5 percent of the c , was grated that 

vote in the first post-apartheid Afnca s fon terocraxtc 

.election. Behind tins arrangement Pf®f*toPy» dc ^ te 

fies a new culture of rwoneffia- the aD^ iin«ukntK^juidJ» , 


lion, built up over a decade from Ire wwdd he wiOhm to 

a standing start by whites and ^ve m a ^eminent foar«d by 


bladCS * yypiniiltwri (0 talking lly-jr 

way out of apartheid’s blind al- 
ley. 

Postcolonial Africa's greatest 
political problem has been bow to 
accommodate the interests of dis- 
affected ethnic minorities. Here 
in South Africa, two minorities — 
white Afrikaner settlers and 
black Zulu traditionalists — 
threatened for a time to wreck the 
transition. The induceraenl that 
brought all but tbc most extrem- 
ist elements into the campaign 


was the realization that they did 
not have to win; they could have 


the rival ANC - 

Under the constitution, any 
party receiving 5 percent of the 
vote is entitled to cabinet repre- 
sentation, and Chief Butheferi 
has frequently been mentioned 
for one of the three deputy pres** 
dent petitions or some other cab- 
inet post. 

A group of Commonwealth 
election obsovers repeated that it 
found that the election was a 
"free and clear expression of the 
win of the South African people* 
and that the outcome was the 
resit of a “credible democratic. 


North Korean news agency Tues- 
day, a Foreign Ministry spokesman 
| a^earcdto rricct areqiKst by the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency fw fnfl access to fuel smn- 
pte during- tberrfnefmg operation. 
V ' ^rhc ^ncy secretariat “is raising 
an ameasanabie demand for select- 
ing, preservmg and measuring 
'smnematfitetimeiaftiKrexdace- 
ment <rf the fuel rod,” the ministry 
spokesman .said. Such measuro- 
1 meat “can never be allowed” and 
the demand was proof of partiality 
4gamMN(^th4porca,be said. 

. • : Unless North pamte rndni- 
- taring of removed fad rotfc this 
mcnlh,. Mb Perry . mid Tuesday, 
Watitington will goto ihe UN for - 
theconaderaticm ofsanctions-Thc 
• Umtcd^tales, :howe^1m“no 
mte&tiou af bang provocative," he 
said. Norfli Korea s reference to an 
“actof wm,”hesaid,“isprobably 
another .example of excessive 
North Korean rhetoric, bnt as the 
recretary^of defense,- 1 have a re-. 
qHMKibffity to provide for the ade- 
quate readiness of US. mffitaiy 
forces in the face of such threats. .. 

; “Onr. forces have bom, are and 
will be reacfy.-to siect aiiy-cootin- 
gmey,” he added. , 

CHINA: 

Alarm, on Unrest 

Cdotfemed from Page 1 
entrepreneurs box left much of the 
rural areas poor. 

*Tbe intense oonfrast between a 
rapd.expansioa of ponsthner con- 
sciousness and comparatively- low 
incomer has caused sonre - of the 
peasantry , to. lose their psycboioB- 


a tiure of power just by compet- process, whkfi^ was substantially. 


The cogntiyad 
lemsoT murder, 
prostitution, kidn; 
and clnldren and 
said. 


le now has prob- 
ejqdosons, rape, 
apping oTwomen 
theft, the article 


of (he collapse of authority to be- 
rame “vfflage wariords, land war- 
lords, water; wailortte and grain- 


SWEDEN: A Once-Proud Welfare State Retreats as Economy: 


The Kodak move bad been fore- I 

seen, but Mariola Hager, medical contribution 
industry analyst at Salomon Broth- fold because 


Continued from Page 1 


new government incentives, and 


ers lnc ? said she wondered whether private pension plans have mushroomed to sup- 


its timing may have been pushed 
forward by Monday's announce- 


ni a stale r etire men t system that is itself 
overhauled. Taxes have fallen, and finan- 


ment that Roche Holding AG of dal markets have been loosened. 


Switzerland would pay S53 billion Even the crown jewel of Sweden's old system 
to Syntcx Crap., a troubled U3. — heavily subsidized government day care that 
drug company whose most profit- encouraged one of the highest female labor 
able patents are running out. force parti cipation rates indie developed world 

“Once one big company makes a - h» come under assaulL Subsidized but pri- 
deal aU the otiiaTSicrw more ^ managed <fay care has bam mfroduced 
quickly than vou expect. Three » compete with ttegoverament’sfa^tira 
from now mavcctoo late," 

Ms. Hager said. “The* whole icdus- peture: jobs. A htdfmffliw 

try is npc for consolidation, and Swedish j<*s hare vanished m the last three 

ttes is a fidd Kodak doesn’t under- ^ JoWtss 00 ^govermnem 

stand" WOT k programs are indeed, stands at 14 per- 




U.S. Embassy, 

24 Grosvenor Square, 
London W1A 1AE 

Thursday, May 12, 1994 
at 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 


Phone; 071-495-2944 or Fax: 071-409-2927 
Write: Estate Planning Seminar, U.S, Embassy, 
24 Grosvenor Square, London WIA 1AE 


The article said there was “abso- 
midy rampant theft and robbery of 
important state engineering, oB 
field, decfiidfy and water conser- 
yancy equqjment, as wdl as rail- 
road and rngiswaymatmaL” 

-^Lbsl year, pstchcd battles dnrine 
about 600 dm folds resulted in 


tWth sodt large numbers of Swedes irisearch SSRS'SSmS^ 

■ SE3a?6H?Si*i 


&uui m auuusmng uonoic taxation^ company to-tfcw? it i*ui *vv 


y is troe for consolidation, and Swcdi^jobs havc vanished in the last three 

is is a fidd Kodak doesn’t under- ye ^ ^ J 0 ^ on ^govermnem 

S!K j - work programs are included, stands at 14 per- 

cent, a vast number compared with the virtual 
Ms. Hager said the larae Ameri- zero unemployment drat Sweden enjoyed for 
it drug companies, which have decades. 

en^comm| monitor the past Despite Mr. BiWt’s changes, the govem- 


can drug companies, winch have decades. 

been coming monnr for the past Despite Mr. BiWfs changes, the 
decade in the world's least con- meat's welfare-induced budget deficit 
trolled and most lucrative market, loaned to 15 percent cf gross domestic 
are already being forced to com- a kvd csually seen only on die etta 
pete by large managed care health Third World. That means no more jot 
companies that arc expected to be squeezed from Sweden’s longtime enm 
the heart of President Sffi Qin ton’s fountainhead, its public sector, 
health reform program. existing jobs win probably have to be 


means no more 


fountainhead, its public sector, and that n 
existing jobs will probably have to be cut. 


“Sweden has reached the end of the road," of paying welfare benefits for new wadsets, In^vramoaintteftaTvtv^hS^ 
declared an Organization for Economic Coop- smaBer^vcdah aMipanKS -«op growing and SSJ^SS*SriS ,ezy ^ 
eration and Deveknnneni analysis. “The need stop taking risks when tte toandhretenSy 60 

to rein in the public deficit effectively predudes acquires a good financial position, said Sven- °otucr- 

publk-scctor employment as a way oat of the Olof Lodin, an economist at the Federation Of 'road andMiw^v ? Ja “' 

corrent aitis." Swiedidi Industries.- tici vempS-dhntiw jj.. 

Moreover, Sweden's top4eavy private «e- - "Ift these comp a nies we have to gdgrow- - *bout ourmg 

tor, dominated by a relative handful of laige, ing." he sakL _ . • . ■ . ■ Se lOOdS^^^- 115 

croort-oricntcd cranpanfes, has been sla s h i n g . with such : large numbers of Swedes iasarch n, about 2.000 nSSt 

jobs at btmieaixl investing overseas to compete of woii for tte first time-in a germtion, te ■ -Air - j 

more effectively in the global economy. Boost- : adetoi, “it’s the moment, of .tmiijFili : theSticfc dcmaiSa^mSS? 
ed by a devalued Swemsh krona, profits and The BOdt government has tidten some steps down aaainst lawb^SS^S’ 
productivity are op at these multinational behe- : meam to eaooarage Swedish e ntrepr e iK airs. 'mpstlSdV 
moths, but even optimistic fmecasts see them such as abolishing doebk taxationrfcoiripaay to . rbr-W” it 
creating just 50,000 new Swedish jobs is the dividttda and lo<»taing some inv^^ not Vc mrft hthrT^i = an<b 

foreseeable future, a small fraction of the jobs trofa. But Sweden's overall tax burden ramaraS: _T J T a * L , 

that have been test since 1990. the highest in Europe. - V Y - ^ 

That leaves Sweden dependent on the capi- Sweden's body pofitic does not appe ar residy ^SS‘ st ^ WnxM ^ 

talbt wodd’s time-honored job^reation ma-.. to support many nwa .radicti.'eQonoimc 

dune: the risk-taking, swck-tradmg entrepxe- - qbanges. despate tbc severity ^f.4hc country’s CVcn 

neorial and snail business sector. /Tta.nnjht strncntrtii priftlems. ' . JC Y . : • . ~ tbe,r 

be fine— except Swedes does nert have sndta Opimoa pdls taken in. advance. rfAastatn- ^ to.bay 

sector. • Yber’simti<»iaIdectiaia|iorn^49wed®S^^: , ']^£^^ cr ^^ 

After decades of caw collaboration betweea.. lie that is fed up .witfr eyen^mode^ inaikrt- Y- . 

big labor and b^g business, “what you find Is " orieated.ctimge and d^nmingToc^-rdam to: ^ ™ 
that Swedish namifarinringislilaitelbrests-^^ paa. The ndOh Aar. fe loiHHy wt^nrtg last 

flare are a few big fir trees, but thaeVho' 1 nowK^oatSm * 
underbrutii,’’ jew! N ils Lundgren, due/ econo- theSrodidiWetfareslale,c6nrf^^^ Runl inmn^Twf rf , , 

mist at the giant Nordbanken group. But some analysts see the efcctkb asUnptafict- 7 921 7°*°. 

Because of high taxes and the heavy expense able at tins staff- V- Y;. '-;.Ty 


trofa. But Sweden's overall tax harden r rmain < 

the highest in Europe. - '* . *;« - ' . 


more radical economic 
sevoT^^thc couriry*s 


must not be soft in the least" 

amounts have been 

Mt oo nrhaaconstnBtioti imder 

thC Mw eamranic policies, many 
rannes, have been denied 


wiuign, ucafaic utc scmnyw.ioc country's 

structoral pn^ons. ' . Y •• ■’ ~ , ihatr ct ^. 

Optntoo-poBs taken in advanotof Septan^ w ™y 

ber'srmtiffliitideaioteiioro^nSwt^SE and other mate. 

Ec that is fed up .with., ewmodc^ mariat- v 

aneated.diange and d^aMmgfotAjetiini to: mm. 
tiie TfaT nnn, ■ £ 3- sy TMn ($270) fca 


Because of high taxes and the heavy expense able at tins stage. 


»• U "T.-- .— r--T' — -■ 
rr V-jrwi'T** 




".w.rv. * ~ 


, Jej)/ 







VJ- =■ X. . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 


OPINION 



Page 7 


m or Idealism? Effective Foreign Policy Needs Both 


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P brought renewed areumen!^ ^? Nuon has 
agreement in ^ °>d%t djs- 

that of ‘Realism’* vo^SLlS?^ R° Uc y debate, 
Mr. Nixon is idealism. 

toxncan national interest pul 

are idealists and J2S- ■ Hls ^““Kraifc 
himian rights during S?c£S , 2i etnpbasi ? n 8 
and in today’s QinS.- administration, 

^ulUlaS^^f^^nistrauon espousing 
responsib^^ “ ■*“ delation rf 

Nations or to the views hrid K° bcy 10 ** Uniled 
“international SESS? ^ a «***»* of the 


By William Pfaff 


“^»«auonai community ” 

aPSTv^S.^^'^ts.Mr.Nbton 


was certainly a bdievw ^ J r sa Tr ls - "*• iNDU » 
basis faS™ 7??? “ MtWDal ^terest as the 
•»** wr policy, and he was entirety 


what he Sd in 5° M *** en *Ws wpedieot in 

S 1 **** wfaat he 6on3£«d the 


national imen^. 51. T"^ 1 « tons acred u>e 

Tv briJ!!? However, how realistic this actual- 
* GSfl ■? &*? a that few are a*ET 

United Siatefm^d nationa! “*«** of the 

havS ** Vietnam War after 

vm to t0 v Cnd “• adding five 

y^to l and more than doubfing the AmHeu 
caa^ty total — not to speak of other victims? 

i realism, when it accom- 


plished nothing decisive for the Vie tna m cam- 
paigns and pushed Cambodia deeper into the civil 
straggle that was to end in Khmer Rouge genocide? 

Realism by definition is accommodation to reali- 
ty, the search for pragmatic solutions. Had Mr. 
Nixon ended the Vietnam War the year he took 
office, he could have avoided the humiliation of 
Americans scrambling onto helicopters from the 
Saigon embassy rooftop in 1975 and won a belter 
outcome for America’s South Vietnamese allies 
than the rout they eventually experienced. He 
lacked the vision to see this — or the courage, as 
displayed by Charles dc Gaulle in liquidating the 
Algerian War, France’s equivalent of Vietnam. 

Mr. Nixon was certainly a realist to end the 
absurd American nonrecognition of Communist 
China. He was a realist in looking for detente and 
firms control agreements with Russia. In other 
respects he was expedient in action but lacked 
vision. Nonetheless he was a student of interna- 
tional relations, more so than any other recent 
president, or secretary of state- 

It is a habit in the United Slates to make ama- 
teurs secretary of state (or president), in the belief 


that no particular experience or intellectual qualifi- 
cations are necessary to the job. 

A friend of Wairen Christopher's said to me 
recently that Mr. Christopher's performance 
should not be criticized loo harshly, since the end 
of the Cdd War has brought novel problems. But if 
Mr. Christopher had not thought about these new 
problems, and had no convictions about what 
should be done, why did be agree to become 
secretary of slate? He should have remained a 
Hollywood lawyer, or taken another cabinet post 
in which be knew what be was doing. 

I realize that Mr. Christopher is no worse in this 
respect than many of his predecessors. But the 
problem with amateurs is that they ordinarily do 
not know either history or the fundamental policy 
debates, and therefore become the prisoners oF 
slogans or of the ideas of the moment. 

Has either Mr. Christopher or Bill Clinton seri- 
ously considered this question of realism versus 
idealism? Democrats are inclined to associate real- 
ism with policy amorality, and international ideal- 
ism with virtue. They are inclined toward the 
Wilsonian tradition, which says that foreign policy 
should aim to make a better and more moral world 


by way of economic and political pressures and 
international institutional reform. 


This was Jimmy Carter’s position, and it seems to 
be Bill Qin ion's. George Bush and Ronald Reagan 
also belong to this tradition; both conceptualized 
world affairs in the abstract terms of a moral strag- 
gle by the United States against forces of evil 
However, as the political scholar Hans Morgen- 
tbau argued four decades ago. policy idealism risks 
producing immoral results when it jeopardizes the 
security or good order of national communities by 
pursuing unachievable Internationa] goals. The 
“moral dignity* of a policy of realism and national 
interest lies in its respect for and defense of the 
only communities capable of realizing and protcct- 
ra/truty moral society, the nation-states. 

Tins is an important debate. The whole argument 
ova Bosnia turns on the question of whether inter- 
vention there represents an ‘idealistic’* attempt to 
solve insoluble problems or is a realistic defense of 
the moral dahns of the national community. It is 
necessary that those who conduct policy understand 
the debate and justify their decisions in terms of it. 

This has not beat the case in Mr. Clinton's 
Washington. Mr. Nixon will have done Bill Clinton 
a posthumous service if be compels this adminis- 
tration to examine what it believes. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


The In-Your-Face Videos 
Bring the Censor Nearer 


By Richard D. Heffner 


N EW YORK — A whole new “en- 
tertainment" industry was born in 
the early 1 980s, one that in its extremism 
may now threaten American liberties. 
The new industry was home video of 
explicitly sexual and violent content — 
content that until then had been kept as 
far from Americans' homes as posable. 

On cable's “blue" programs a woman 

masturbated on the screen; another 


MEANWHILE 


joined her. An artist 

mother and her pubescent" daughter — 

not their portraits, their naked bodies. A 
dog was brutally murdered, the scene 
repeated again and again. X-rated films 
became accessible to anyone, young or 
old. who could turn a switch to “On.” 
That was only the beginning. 

The stunningly successful emergence 


Someone Tell the Vilifiers: 
He Was Chosen President 


By Anthony Lewis 

B OSTON — At her press confer- 
ence last month Hillary Rodham 
Clinton turned aside a question about 


vJinion turned aside a question about 
the politics of personal destruction. 
“I can’t really hdp it," she said, 


*if some people get up every dav 
wanting to destroy.” 

The way Mrs. Qin ton pot it reflect- 
ed the pain that she and the president 
have surely fdt at the level of personal 
attack leveled at them in recent 
months. Whitewater'is only pan of it. 

There is a flow of poison directed at 
the president and his wife; in the com- 
ments of talk-show bigots, in extreme- 
right magazines and newsletters. 

Again and again in America, those 
who disagreed with some person or 
group have painted them as not just 
wrong but treasonous: “the paranoid 
style in American politics," the histo- 
rian Richard Hofstadter called it 
The style was exemplified by Rich- 
ard Nixon’s tactics of smear and divi- 
sion. In his early political career he 
portrayed his opponents as pro-Com- 
munist He did the same lata as -vice 
president. As president, his hate 
showed in the Watergate tapes. 

At his death most people chose to 
empharize the positive in Mr. Nixon’s 
life, such as the rapprochement with 
China. Bm the bOe he injected did 
lasting damage to UJ&. political life, 
reducing trust and , making Americans 
mare cyrucalabootall leaders. 

He bitterness of the Red Scare peri- 
od, and even of Vietnam, had seemed 
to fade: Ronald Reagan, far one; cer- 
tainty <fid not have to cope with high 
levels dTpcraboal vSfiranon.- ■■■- 
Now tee we are -agatp. Scandal 
sheets print charges about Mrr Qin.*-. 
ton’s sex fife, and they are taken up by 
television networks andtene senous 
newsrapos. TaBc shows peddle ru- 
mors" that Vincent Foster; the White 

House lawya and Chntoa friend who 
committed sxmade, was actually killed 
m a secret hideout. 

As a general rule political leaders 
deserve no sympathy when they have 
a hard tune. After all, as Harry Tru- 
man pot it. “If you can’t stand 


the heat, stay out of the kitchen.” 

But thoe is a difference between the 
beat of policy criticism and personal 
vilification. I have criticized much Mr. 
Qin ton has done as president But it is 
another thing to attack him as a human 
bong, to question his good faith. 

“Pm afraid we’ve fallen into the 
bad habit of making our kings and 
then tiffing our km^,” David McCul- 
lough, the historian and biographer of 
President Truman, told Lloyd Grove 
of The Washington Post last month. 

“The president carries the world on 
bis shoulders. So for Ginton to have 
this kind of constant owning nntl 
growling at him, it’s worse than disre- 
spect. Because it's not disrespect for 
toe office, it’s disrespect for the nan, 
and if s lack of decency for another 
human being." 

Why the savaging of Bill Qimon? 
Some of it is his own fault for being less 
than straightforward. Some is conde- 
scension toward a Southerner, as with 
Jimmy Carta. Some is resentment of 
the independence and intelligence of 
Mrs. Gmtan. But modi is ideological: 
the anger of the right that a centrist 
Democrat is in the white House 

The extreme right has powerful 
voices in the United States today. 


it voice is the 


t important 
editorial page of the Wall Street Jour- 


ids away at Mr. Clin- 
thai h often 


talk. Its most 
orialpage 
nal, which poun< 

ton so shrilly that it often seems on 
the edge of clinical hysteria. 

The Journal's editor. Robot L. 
Bartley, was on NBCs "Meet the 
Press” m March- David Brote of The 
Washington Post told him that his 
editorials read as if “you really don’t 
accept the legitimacy of Bill dmion’s 
being in the presidency." Mr. Bartley 
replied: “Wtffl, he won the election 
with 43 percent of the vote." 

Mr. Bartley, here is some news for 
you: In your heroine Margaret 
Thatcher’s three great election vic- 
tories, her Conservative Party aver- 
aged 42 3 percent of the vote; Abra- 
ham Lincoln in 1860 had 40 percent. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Tbe D-Day Invitation list 


ing “ Invite Germans to Nor- 
>. for Europe's Sake" (Opinion, 
April 23): 

Congratulations for having published 
the comment by Dominique Molsi and 
Karl Kaiser, a French-daman reflec- 
tion that demonstrates why the presence 
of the new, democratic Germany at tbe 
D-Day commemoration is justified. The 
Normandy landing began the process 
that led to the defeat of Nazi totalitar- 
ianism and to the triumph of democracy 
in Western Europe, including Germany. 

Along with the official representatives 
of the democratic Germany, and Ger- 
man youth, born in democracy, there are 
other Gomans who have a tight to be 
present: those who were members of the 
Foreign Legion or of resistance move- 
ments. those who suffered in the Nazi 
concentration camps, those who tried to 
revolt against Hitler. Who can say that it 
was wise to exclude them from the D- 
Day events? Is it too late to correct such 
an ill-fotmded decisi on ? 


French civilian living areas in Le Havre, 
Cherbourg, Sl Brieuc, Caen, Rouen, Sl 
Ld and other cities in Normandy? 

Surety we mig ht now spare some 
thought for aU the innocent victims of the 
invasion, American allies, after all 

LESLIE SCHENK. 

CheviDy-Larue, France. 


on major crimes (murder, rape, 
, housebreaking and car theft) 


reports pa 100,000 


gapore with 1 
population 

with 254, Hong Kong "478, Ai 


An Earlier Nazi Crime 


Regarding “ A Genocidal Aggression, 
and No Churchill in Sight" ( Opinion, 
April 26) by Anthony Loris: 

Mr. Lewis should know better. The 
first great Nazi crime was not “the terror 
bombing of Rotterdam on May 14, 
1940," but tbe terra bombing of Warsaw 
on September 7, 1939. The bombing was 
restricted to the Jewish part of tbe city 
and aimed among other thing* at my 
home, which was destroyed. 

ISRAEL BORENSTEIN. 

Geneva. 


JACQUES JESSEL. 

Paris. 


The Singapore Debate 

Regarding “The Caning in Singapore 


wig i, 

Won't Make America Safer ” (April 6) by 


It seems lots of people want to hijack 
the D-Day commemoration to promote 
their own ideas of worthy causes. Thou- 
sands of men died on those French 
beaches, killed by Germans. Seme of the 
Allied veterans would like to take part in 
ceremonies that remind them of their 
good fortune in having been spared, 
while reawakening memories of their 
pals who never got home- They neither 
want nor need outsiders to mess with 
thar memories. 

If the Gomans want to celebrate, la 
them go to Rotterdam, London or Cov- 
entry, and lei their touering Luftwaffe 
pilots lay a few- wreaths around. Let’s 
wait another 25 years for those wonder- 
ful combined celebrations that Mr. 
Molsi and Mr. Kaiser hanker for. By 
then we can be a little more certain of 


Richard Cohen: 

Mr. Cohen is absolutely right- The can- 
ing at 18-year-old Michael Fay for acts of 
van dalism wiG do nothing to “make 
things safer in American cities”; I rather 
doubt that this was Singapore’s intention. 
1 have no doubt, however, that globe- 
trotting delinquents wiD now think twice 
before stepping out of line when there. 

1 write as an expert on corporal punish- 
ment, having been raised tty a “barbaric" 
father who neva failed to unpress on me 
— - and with a heavy hand — the differ- 
ence between “thine" and “mine.” A pity 
Mr. Fay was not so lucky. 

D.D. HARRIS. 

Cork, Ireland. 


the “victory ftp- deuxxaaity’” they speak 
will have 


of, and almost all combatants 
lost interest in the matter: 

G. WILLIS. 
Angresse, France. 


As we prepare our celebrations for the 
50th anniversary of D-Day, would it not 
be appropriate to reopen a pertinent 
ion that has never been satisfacto- 
r answered? Was ii realty necessary to 
“saturation bomb” acres and acres of 


quesh 

ntyan 


Philip Bowring ("Unusual Law 
Doesn't Bring About Criminal Order." 
April 20) describes Singapore as only an 
“averagely safe" city ruled as much by 
fear as by example. 

If this woe so. Singaporeans would 
have voted with their feet for greener 
pastures and foreigners would not seek 
to settle in Singapore. In fact, each year 
2,200 Singaporeans anigrate, while 
20,500 immigrants come to Singapore. 

Mr. Bowring cites United Nations fig- 
ures for his assertion that Singapore is 
no safa than “many other Asian coun- 
tries and much of Europe." Interpol 


2,841, Paris 3,510 and London 3,706. 

S. B. BALACHANDRER. 

Press Secretary 
to the Minister for Home Affairs. 

Singapore. 

In his letter of April 26, S. R. Nathan, 
Singapore’s ambassador to the United 
States, states that “the Singapore gov- 
ernment did not introduce caning; the 
British colonial government erf Singa- 
pore did.” This is correct insofar as it 
goes. But it gives the impression that the 
colonial government invented tbe prac- 
tice, whereas it merely adapted a form of 
punishment that had been codified and 
in use in China since tbe 6th century. It 
was under the Su Dynasty that caning 
or flogging was introduced as a more 
humane form of the “lesser punish- 
ments" of branding and cutting off the 
nose, fa- minor offens es such as harm- 
ing private property or vandalism. 

By the time of the last dynasty, the 
Qing, 10 different degrees of ramng could 
be sentenced. Grinnnak and thor fam- 
ilies often bribed the boor to pretend to 
strike with farce: Canine was discontin- 
ued only under tbe People’s Republic. 

Bribery would be unthinkable in to- 
day’s Singapore. Moreover, in old China 
the severity of the punishment depended 
on one’s standing and connections, 
whereas in Singapore the same punish- 
ment is applied to alL In Singapore today, 
a standard rattan cane is used in place of 
the split bamboo of the past, which was 
chosen for its strength. No doctor was 
present in old China, and the cane was 
not disinfected. These contrasts between 
caning in the old China and caning in 


year, Mr. Barker was convicted of drunk- 
en driving and refusing a Breathalyzer 
test. His sentence was a tight fine, lenien- 
cy having been shown on tbe ground that 
he had undertaken not to drive again. 
Trwtaari he would use bis chauffeur. 

Readers may judge which is the more 
serious offense, spray-painting of cars or 
endangering lives by drunken driving. 

RJ. SANDOANDS. 

Singapore. 


I think there is a good case fa using 
caning as punishment in all countries. 
But its use should be reserved fa crimi- 


nals who have caused bodity harm. To 
i has defiled 


beat a man because he has drilled some 
metal object is to me a vast ovoreaction. 

RICHARD HILL. 

Perth. Australia. 

When I see the beautiful historical 
buddings of Basel’s old city defiled by 
totally tin ar tistic mganwiglgss . and Out- 
right stupid graffiti, I have occasional 
thoughts that there is nothing wrong 
with Switzerland that a good dose of 
Singaporean discipline could not core. 

OTTO H. NOWOTNY. 

Basel Switzerland. 


Michad Fay’s transgression was a mis- 
. That 


demeanor. That makes the punishment 
completely criminal. 

CAROL PAGE. 
Munich. 


Nixon in History 


Even though I neva voted fa Rich- 
ard Nixon, I was able to agree with 
much of what William Safire wrote 


(‘How to Sum Up Nixon? An Inspiring 
ml 7 


Singapore today provide striking exam- 
id n 


pies of the island republic’s concern fa 
rifiaeucy. fairness and hygiene in apply- 


ing a system of punishments inherited, 
e British 


via the British, from (he dynasties. 

GEORGE STAUNTON. 

Brussels. 


On April 27, tbe Singapore Broadcast- 
ing Coro., in a documentary on vandal- 
ism, highlighted a speech to Parliament in 
1967 by the home affairs minister, EW. 
Barker! in which he justified ibe introduc- 
tion of mandatory caning fa tbe offense 
of vandalism of public property. Last 


Resilience, ” April 26). Nevertheless, to 
cati Mr. Nixon “America’s greatest ex- 
president" goes too far. Greater than 
Jimmy Carter, who has traveled so far, 
so often to stop conflicts and help pro- 
mote free elections? Grater than Her- 
bert Hoover, whose reports on tbe ad- 
ministration a government brought 
praise from Republicans and from 
Democrats led by Harry Truman.? 
Greater than William Howard Taft, who 
held the post of chief justice of the 
United States alia leaving the White 
House? Above afl, greater than John 
Quincy Adams, who served some 18 
years in the House of Representatives 
and did so much ro oppose slavery? 

BERNARD SINSHEIMER. 

Boulogne-BQkncourt, France: 


of a revolutionary “interactive enter- 
tainment” industry, with its video games 
and promise of “virtual reality ” today 
brings violence and sexuality into homes 
with a lifelike intensity that had never 
been imagined. Check out “Mortal 
Kombat" and “Night ’Hip.'’ 

Reaction is already setting in — not 
just am ong fanatics and know-nothings 
but in the ranks of America’s most 
thoughtful citizens and public officials. 

Unfortunately, too many of them now 
naivety turn to the movie rating system 1 
head as a modd cfiww to stem wnat may 

too tikriy become a plea fa government 

censorship. The video game and cable 
industries are now instituting ratings to 
assuage public and political concerns. 

Butmerdy to inmate what tbe motion 
picture industry lobbyist Jack Valenti 
led his colleagues to do a quarter-centu- 
ry ago won’t work today. 

We have made mistakes ova the 
years, but America’s out-of-the-bome, 

box -office-anchored rating system was 
designed to meet parents' concerns 
about their children's moviegoing, 
thereby spencmg cries fa movie censor- 
ship. It simply is not relevant to the in- 
tho-home — and in-your-face — nature 
of new entertainment industries, which 
can provide no effective intermediary 
between their harshest content and their 
youngest audiences. 

Every indication is that these technol- 
ogies will bring ever more outrageous 
material into homes — material that' 
Americans have tolerated until now only 
because it has been kept at a distance. 

In America, this seeming hypocrisy 
may have been freedom's saving grace. 
Extreme obscenity is tolerated only be- 
cause it is kept largely out of sight, far 
from homes and families. 

Make it more viable, thrust it upon 
children, and the risk grows that angry 
Americans will devise formulas of pro- 
test and self -protect! era dangerous to 
free expression and free choice for alL 

Short of censorship, what is the solu- 
tion fa the excesses of cable and the 
new interactive entertainment? 

It is to just say “no.” Don't produce 
degrading materials; don’t trade in 
than; don't seek merely to rate them, 
passing them off on parents and chil- 
dren; don’t profit from them, at such an 
enormous cost to national life. 

To all those who dismiss such an ap- 
proach as futile, reminiscent of Nancy 
Realm's maligned response to the drug 
promem, consider: Would these “eater- 
tamers” realty choose instead to risk the 
biggest battle ova free expression that 
America has ever known? 

It is unrealistic to expect a technologi- 
cal “fix” fa the invasive pornography of 
violence and sexuality. Electronic chips 
embedded in television sets will no 
doubt be bypassed before long, no more 
effective than unenforceable ratings. 

So will contemporary parents’ will- 
ingness or ability to control the games 
that their latchkey children play. 


SowfflacaUby media ethiosts, whose 
codes 


professional codes of conduct are only 
toothless urgings, drowned out by de- 
mands for laiga and larger audiences. 

So will the call to boycott offending 
products and producers.' 

Unhappily, as a result, what probably 
will not be bypassed any longer is gov- 
onment censorship — unless someone 
out there has a better idea. 


The writer retires next month after 20 
years as chairman of the American film 
industry's rating system. He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


BOOKS 


CHESS 


THE SECRET LIFE OF 
THE SEINE 

By Mori Rosenbhtm. 290 pages. 
S21. Addison Wesley. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


Reviewed by 
Ginger Danto 

T RAVELERS often first expe- 
rience their destinations 
through literature, from tbe suc- 
cinct, sales SRtcfa prose of ©tide 
books, to the more nuanced nan*- 
tives of travelogues. Thus sane owe 
to Henry James the discovotyo* 
Italy, or to V. S. Naipaid Indm. 
Cora dess works have evoked Pans, 
guiding us through a aty- 


• Kerin McGonm, chief execu- 
tive of tbe Irish industrial holding 
company Ktzwifron PLC. is read- 
ing De Valera: LongFeRaw, Long 
Shadow" by Tim Pat Coogan. 

“Eamon De Valera was one of 
the most prominent Irish statesmen 
of this centmy but he remains very 
controversial. It is quite a surpris- 
ing book. It says many dungs that 
' s have fdt but neva saSpub- 
(Eriklpsen, lHT) 




Bom are 

much a caplain a i log as a iffavej- 
ogue assiduously kept by fogt Ro- 
senblum, an inveterate J 

SiBSBgSS 


dns “separate arrondissement 


me spun - 

unfolds 

An Rosenblmn 

vten you took saw 


that span tbe Seine faun one end of 
Paris to the other By then I had 
most of it from car windows. 
Walking, T had savored and 
s nylferi it. This time, fromthe in- 
gde out, the wa; its sodas had 
lived it since the Stone Age boar- 
mm at Berry, I could feel it” 

An Associated Press coirespon- 
doii and fomer editor erf the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune, whose 
previous books have explored is- 
sues from cultural identity W jour- 
nalistic ethics, Rosenblmn is adept 
at conveying feefing without fore- 
saking facte. Written in a style that 
weaves idle conversation with in- 
vestigative reportage, tins book 
takes us from tbe Seine’s (alleged) 
sauce some 30 tales northwest of 

a - . _ .. — -i mile lu Ti n -in n ilir 


at the wheel of lhirt ^ 

house, steering anwng u* 

of stone and 


mto the sea at Le Havre. Notwhh- 
standing, the beautiful countryside, 


there is more to the Sane than 
meets the eye. 

Rosenbhnn seems to consider his 
subject Bke a Bqmd prism in which 
he gleans tbe present and the past 
From the Seine’s ally shores un- 
folds an entire riviTfrarion , from its 
murky water centuries of history. 
We accept these extrapolations be- 
cause erf the author’s copious detec- 
tive wai, and bocanseilus is after 
all France^ ^ where tradition prevails, 
and explanations for so many 
things become apparent to outsid- 
ers only through this kind of edu- 
cated observation. 

“From the beginning, the French 
soul has bobbed in the waters of the 
Seme," Rosenbhnn writes in the 
opening chapter, which describes 
both ms long love affair with his 
-subject and tbe circumstances lead- 
ing to full immeraon. “On its 


bridges love blooms; beneath them 
lives end. Hardly anyone can tell 
you exactly where the river starts, 
or much die about it, but it flows 
through every romantic's spirit. It 
nourished Maupassant’s pen and 
watered Monet's lily pond.” 

It initially proved more problem- 
atic fa Rosenblum, an Arizona na- 
tive and acknowledged klutz, with 
such cursory marine equipment as 
wrench and varnish. Once official 
owner of La VleiDe, however, Ro- 
senbhun had no choice bm lo allow 
bis passion fa the Seine to over- 
come his predilection fa steam 
heat and stable floors. Ultimately, 


piniche life provided a unique anti- 
;“ooty 2 ' 


dote to nrban living, as “only a few 
nylon ropes, a power cable and a 
garden hose connected us to the 
real world." Inured to the perennial 
odor of diesel fuel, a the infiltra- 
tion of strange expressions into his 
language, Rosenblum embraced 
the existential oasis afforded by the 
river. “I had discovered,’ 1 ’ be writes, 
“the secret life of the Seine." 

Some aspects of this secret are 
alarming, and Rosen Wum’s senti- 
ment does not spare the Seine's 
shabbier facts. These range from 
pcflntion — 57 known varieties — 
to police statistics on the number of 
bodies recovered — 13 in 1992. In- 
deed an the Stine, a cap tarn's log 
sooner shows sightings of styrofoam 
than sailing ships, and his mop wa- 
ter less savoy refuse than most care 
to find around their home s. For all 


its romantic symbolism, the Seine is 
am for the squeamish- Yet this too is 
pan of tbe river’s legacy. 

“For two thousand years the 
Seine was alimentary canal to a 
nation that took its nourishment 
seriously. Grain moved upriver, 
passing cargoes of wine beaded 
downstream. Most food travels by 
road and rail these days, but a look 
at the Seine suggests that it is still 
. . . France’s digestive tract." 

The text tracks the river's itiner- 
ary, digressing, like so many meta- 
morphlc tributaries, into stories 
about tbe surrounding country. We 
find the Gauls struggling on the 
shallow straits from Vernon to the 
picturesque port of Honfieur. 
traces of Flaubert in now teeming 
Rouen, the Impressionists at Gi- 
verny, and a trail of trysts on Pile 
d’ Amour, a tiny Marne island with 
the ruins of a brothel. 


Attuned to the humeurs of lock- 
keepers and keepers of other river- 
side establishments from bars to 
boat yards, Rosenblum shares his 
encounters with this indigenous 
population. These intimate profiles 
of those whose livelihood still de- 
pends on the river constitute, as 
much as scenery and statistics, the 
secret life of the Seine. They also 
suggest that we may neva fully 
know it. 


Ginger Danto is a free-lance jour- 
nalist based in Paris. 


By Robert Byrne 

Y ISWANATHAN anand 
faced Gaia Kamsky in the first 
round in the Linares International 
Tournament in Spain. Anand, 
more than anyone, has been reap- 
ing a harvest out of the 6 Be3 varia- 
tion of tbe Najdorf Sicilian. 
Kamsky followed the main path of 
tbe Nafdorf with 6._e5 7 Nb3 Bc6. 

After 8_.Be7 9 Qd2, it is still too 
early fa Black to play 9...d5 be- 
cause 10 ed Nd5 II Nd5 Qd5 12 
Qd5 Bd5 13 0-0-0 favors White 
no matter whether Black chooses 
1 3...Bc6 14 Nc5 or 1 3.3c6 14 NaS. 

On 10 g4, many players choose 
the preventive I0_.h6, as Kamsky 
does here, because it forces White 
to expend time regrouping with 1 ] 
h4b5 12 Rgl b4 13 Na4 d5 14 g5, 
and it also gives Black a moment to 
hit back in tbe center. But the black 
kings! de is loosened. 

Moreover. Kamsky was pushed 
into a sharp tactical skir mish with 
I4...d4 because a retreat of his f6 
knight would just lose the d5 pawn. 
And after 15 Bd4! Bb3 16 gf Bf6 17 
ab ed 18 OO-O, Anand strongly 
threatened 19 f4 and 20 e5, as well 
as the capture of the b4 pawn. 

Kamsky tried to counter with 
l8...Nc5, but Anand made an ele- 
gant exchange sacrifice with 19 f4! 
Nf3 20 Qg2 Ngl 21 e5. Since the 
blade position would have been 
disrupted after 21 ...Be7 22 Qg7 Rf8 
23 Qgl followed by 24 Rd4, 


KAMSKY/BUCX 



35 NfS. So tbe deroerate Kamsky 
tried 32~f5 33 Nre Rc5, praying 
that there would be no way for 
Anand to ward off the threat of 
34_Ra5 mate. But be had over- 
looked, 34' Ng6I Qg6 <34...Kh7 35 
Re5!) 35 Rel. 

After 39 Rg] , there being no rea- 
son to play out 39_.Kh5 40 Rg7 
Qe5 41 Rgl Qe4 42 Be2 Kh4 43 
Qg3 mate, Kamsky gave op. 


VUn 


SICILIAN DEFENSE 

WWW 


Position after Sl . . . Rac8 


it bis iHng into shel- 
ter with 21 C 

But after Anand's 22 Bd3!. 
Kamsky could not bring his bishop 
to safety with 22.„Be7 because 


Rgl g6 24 Bg6 ! Kh8 25 Bh7! R§8 


.Bg5 26 ! 


>! Kg7 28 


gf Kf7 29 Qb7 Ke8 30 Rg7 Rc8 31 
Nb6Rc532Rt 


Rc5 32 Rd7 is annihila ting) 26 

rfulfor 


2 NO 

3 44 

A MM 
5 Nc3 
S M 
7 NbJ 

813 
B Qd2 

SB 

12 Rgl 

13 MH 
1*8? 

15 M4 

16 gf 

17 at) 

IB (H>0 
19 M 


Kamsky 

c5 

d8 

cd 

Nre 

■6 

eS 

Bet 

Be7 

Nbd7 

M 

bS 

M 

<25 

<M 

BM 

BfS 

ed 

NeS 

M3 


sar* 

22 Bd3 

23 ft 
2A tot 
25 Kfal 
28 Nc5 

27 Qc8 

28 Kg2 
28 Rc2 

30 KA2 

31 Nd7 


”85 


33 L 
H HgB 
35 Ret 


Bg8 QgS 27 Qhl is powerfi 
Whi te; who is a pawn ahead while 
retaining his matin g attack. 

Thus, he played 2L Je5 23 fe 
Qb4 and after 24 Rgl Qf4 25 Kbl 
0e5. be had the material advantage 
of a rook and three pawns fa two 
minor pieces. But the strength of 
these pieces in the middle game 
because quickly evident After 32 
Qf3l, the black bastion had to 
crumble: There was no defense 
31..Rfe8 33 Re8 Re8 34 Qf7 


36 Qb8 

37 Bc4 
38QS6 
36 Kgl 


F°r 

investment 

information 

Read 

Hie MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in Ihe 1HT 



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.International Herald Tribune 
Tuesday’, May 3, 1994 
'Page S 


, ; r /? 




Will the French Wear 
Khakis? Gap Thinks So 


Imerrauonal Herald Tnhune 

P ARIS — William S. Fisher, in his 
lived-in khaki pants and wrinkled 
check shirt. is standing up for Ameri- 
can values. But downstairs in the new 
Gap store in haul- bourgeois Passy. Gallic pride 
is fighting back: A bent figure is slaving over a 
hot iron to put some crispness and Napoleonic 
order into a white cotton shirt. 

Relax! Not even for its first free-standing 
store in the world’s fashion capital would the 


51IZY MENKES 


purveyors of authentic .American sportswear 
abandon their cherished principles. 

“I'll make sure the sleeves are rolled." said 
Bill Fisber, president of Gap International and 
son or the San Francisco company’s rounder. 
On the rack, white shirts are reassuringly crum- 
pled from collar to turned-back cuff. The rogue 
presser was just a hired waiter readying himself 
for the coke-and-chocolate-brownies kids' par- 
ly at the store’s opening Iasi Wednesday. 

As an entertainer and imported video games 
kept the Idds quiet, their moms inspected the 
two-floor store with its blond wood and whole- 
some all-American image. They might even 
have registered the things Fisher bolds so dear: 
the ecologically correct packaging (“less cello- 
phane and pins”); the enlightened store plan- 
ning (elevator to help with the baby stroller): 
the tasteful color palette of tusk, black and 
white. f’Tusk” equals “ivojy" equals ecologi- 
cally correct beige for the caring 1990s.) 

Well-traveled consumers were turning over 


knowing that you are in the company of Hum- 
phrey Bogart, Sammy Davis Jr. Rock Hudson 
and Sieve McQueen. Gap's latest advertising 
campaign features stills of khaki-clad movie 
stars — just os internationally famous fashion 
folk going back to basics were the images on 
which the store built its reputation in the late 
1980s. Gap's image is as much about attitude as 
the clothes themselves. 

Fisher, who has seen Gap develop 38 stores 
in Britain over the last seven years, is not 
bothered by gripes about price differentials 
from expats or well-traveled shoppers. He is 
interested in the native French — at feast those 
who live in this upscale area or are likely to 
make the store a shopping destination. Previ- 
ously. Gap clothes have been available in 
France only at Gaieties Lafayette. 

“It's a fun. enjoyable place to shop — and the 
service we provide should set us apart from the 
norm in Paris.” Fisber said, referring to the 
sunny-side-up friendliness of the assistants 
compared to the more usual French hauteur. 


H E describes opening in Paris as "a 
dream come true” and sees it as 
pan of a pan- European develop- 
ment. More stores are planned for 
France and he is currently looking at other 
European cities, with Germany the next target 


the labels on the pick-your-size-and-length blue 
jeans or the cute denim baby booties and asking 
the $10 question: How much more do you have 
to pay in Europe than in Gap stores in the 
United States? 

The answer can be 50 percent more, account- 
ed Tor by high sales tax. rental costs and social 
charges. The basic $10 Gap T-shirt costs 83 
francs — or $ 1 5 — in France, a difference of 50 
percent, while men’s and women’s khaki trou- 
sers at 295 francs are 37 percent more expensive 
than the $38 charged in the United States. 

Khakis, according to Gap. are “the new den- 
im," and with each pair you get the kudos of 


“I don’t believe in shoving .America down 
people's throats,” said Fisher. "But 1 would like 
to be recognized as an American store. I would 
like to be perceived as offering the same kind of 
quality values. Everything comes back to price, 
quality and value." 

Gap was developed on this quality-drive ra- 
tio by Donald G. Fisher, chairman and chief 
executive officer, and its president Millard S. 
(Mickey) Drexier. The French daily Le Figaro 
predictably hailed last week the arrival of Don- 
ald (read Duck) and Mickey (as in Mouse). 

The fashion upstart may be more welcome in 
a country filled with stylish clothes, but where 
cheap usually looks it. Gap’s basics are good 
value and current fashion (they change every 
four to six weeks) and include apron dresses, 
drawstring pants, cotton knits with straw-beige 
accessories and an athletic range of active 
sports and leisure wear. The children’s clothes 




BUI Fisher in a reassuringly crumpled white shirt, the Gup store on Rue de Pussy, and. below, children checking out American kids 'fashim£:^ 


range from colorful scaled-down sportswear to 
pretty dresses in bright prints. 

“The jeans are fantastic and the khaki trou- 
sers.” said Pia de Brantes Pearson, attending 
the party with her infant daughter. Pandora, 
who was wearing Gap white hose thought in 
New York) with a pink smocked dress that 
looked utterly Parisian. 

Os Rue de Passy. you see fashion's cultural 
divide between French and American. In the 
United States, sportswear is all about ease and 
simplicity, with a built-in sioppiness that even 
the young French don't quite gel. ( Fisher has 
noted a tendency at Galeries Lafayette to buy 
small sizes for a trimmer fit). 


ir. this neighborhood, where the velvet bead- 
band is the tribal totem of polite society, no 
women are wearing sneakers. On a sunny early 
summer day. there are hardly any T-shirts in 
the loose, square American sense of the word. 
Pants are creased, jackets are pressed and shirts 
ironed to z gjaze. 

Fisher insists that the expansion in Europe is 
because "the liming is right now.” not because 
Gap is forced to look outside the United States, 
where he sees "tremendous opportunities." 

The company’s figures for the last quarter of 
I°93 moved sharpiy higher, but the previous 
year had been sticky after the heady growth 
that took Gap from SI billion in 1987 to $3.3 


billion in 1993. Psychologically, too, Gap’s 
ami-fashion clothing has peaked since its white 
T-shirts and jeans made the 100th anniversary 
cover of Vogue and Giorgio Armani launched a 
copy-cat basics line. 

Yet the company, now with 1,307 stores, has 
an impressive ability to mutate — and stay 
ahead. Gap (it s name was about bridging a 
fashion void) started in 1969 in thetmof flared 
pants and tie-died T-shirts. When yuppies had 
taken over from hippies, Gap promoted base 
quality and authentic values as a counterpoint 
to the lavish affluence of the 1980s. Gap Kids, 
started in 1986, focused on lifestyle and family 
values before they became key issues in the 


French Vogue’s American Accent 


not to say wrinkles, are ironed 

■ J ' m J:S£S.C 


International Herald Tribune 


ARiS — fs nothing sa- 
i l y ff cred? Make that s acre. 

For the Eiffel lower of 
-£L French fashion publishing 
has fallen to the Yanks. 

The takeover of Vogue by an 
American team — Joan Juliet Buck 
as editor in chief and Gardner Bd- 
langer as publisher — is being 
greeted in Paris with the same 
chauvinist distress as the wave or 
British editors in the New York 
magazine world. 

But nothing is quite what it 
seems. The duo. who Jake over on 
June I, have both spent more time 
in Europe than back home. Buck. 
45, lived in Paris from age 3. and 
spent formative years eyeing her 
mother' s couture gowns. Belianger, 
50. “fell in love” with a Frenchman 
in the 1960s and has made France 
“a country of choice" for 28 years. 

Yet the changes at Vogue are 
symbolic of the need for fashion 
publishing to look out from its ivo- 
ry tower — or at least to pick up 
some distant bleeps from cyber- 
space, the information highway 
and the global universe. Maga- 
zines. like high fashion itself, have 
seemed recently to be communicat- 
ing only with the initiated. 

“It is not only a great opportuni- 
ty — it is also to redefine what the 
word ’Vogue' means today and in 
the 2lst century.” said Buck, who 
admits that she personally has felt 
her natural enthusiasm for fashion 
“clouded" m the feminist era. 

“I hare had to settle a few scores 
with myself — that it is all right to 
want the best things, in life to be 
enhanced, rather than put aside as 
ornament" she said. ”1 have felt 
*Oh God. this embarrassing addic- 
tion to clothes.’ That I shouldn't 


enhance my femininity because it is 
either unfair or unworthy of me." 

The guilty thoughts came during 
the long period when Buck was 
outside fashion, working as a nov- 
elist in Los Angeles (“because it 
was L. A., it unfortunately turned 
into a film script") and as a movie 
critic for American Vogue. As well 
as publishing two novels, she has 
been a contributor to Vanity Fair 
(where the then editor in chief. 
Tina Brown, fed her sandwiches as 
she wTOte) and as roving reporter 
for Conde Nasi T raveller. 

Now Buck has come back — to 
fashion and to Paris — and she 
believes that it coincides with a new 
spring for style and the end of a 
period of penitence. 

"Grunge was the sackcloth and 
ashes, but after the end of Lem 
there is a period of renewal." she 
said. Easter bonnets in Vogue? 
Buck promises to "acknowledge 
the need For frivolity" that is part 
of her French upbringing. She was 
in fact bom in Los .Angeles, but 
moved to France and then to Eng- 
land. following the career of her 
film-producer father. Jules Buck. 


B ELLANGER’S role as 
publisher of Vogue — a 
new post — is sligh Uy dif- 
ferent: While Buck cre- 
ates the vision, she brings in the 
bucks, just as she did for .American 
Vogue in Paris, where she was asso- 
ciate publisher for 10 years. That 
meant responsibility for all the ad- 
vertising. marketing and promo- 
tion out of Europe. She now wants 
to bring to French Vogue the “cre- 
ative marketing" of special events 
that make readers Teel like mem- 
bers of an exclusive club, which 
“brings more to the reader than the 
magazine itself." 


38 Million Travelers In 26 Cities 
Turn To WHERE Magazine 
For Directions & Advice 


Belianger, too, wants Vogue to 
communicate a passion for fashion. 

“The magazine has an obligation 
to bring excitement, entertainment, 
excruciatingly beautiful pictures, se- 
duction (o the reader." she said. “It 
has got a wonderful heritage and a 
wonderful reputation — it has to 
evolve so that the magazine's clock 
is set to the time of its readers." 

The background to the changes 
is a magazine thai under its previ- 
ous editor had a strong point of 
view, an artistic aesthetic and an 
intellectual approach best summed 
up by the faci thai the December 
issue — traditionally planned by a 
guest editor — was handed over to 
Nelson Mandela. (The previous 
choice had been the Dalai Lama.) 

As Buck says, fashion has gone 
through a period of penitence after 
excess, but the result has been a 
minimalist style that for the initial- 
ed attains a fashion zen. but which 
is bewildering to the wider pub- 
licTo put it bluntly, most women 
do not feel their best when dressed 
in the monkish shrouds (at designer 
prices) that have recently tilled the 
glossy pages of would-be luxury 
magazines. 

'They axe the disinherited of 
Vogue who have to come back to 
the fold." said Belianger, who iden- 
tifies Vogue's worldwide commit- 
ment to being "No. 1" in beauty 
and fashion. She says that it also 
has “a visual commitment to beau- 
ty and the outstanding" and “a 
strong commitment ;o fashion — 
that's the vocabulary we shore with 
the reader." 

Jonathan Newhouse. chairman 
of Conde Nasi International Inc., 
describes the “evolutionary 
change” as important for French 
Vogue: *’l don’t want to say more 
than that." 

“Wc feel that Vogue has built on 
privilege, luxury, prestige, but it 
needs to be more modem and ac- 
cessible." said Newhouse. com- 
menting on the drop in cover price 
to 30 francs from 40 francs this 
month. 

In her persona! style. Buck ad- 
mits that "nay favorite color is dusi- 
bowi" and that her closet is Filled 


with “semi-invisible .Armani jack- 
ets." But she also has a yearning for 

-Vivipnnp i-rinnlin^ 


fill 


"Vivienne Westwood’s crinoline 
dress writh heavy decollete ' and for 
the glamour of John Galliano, and 
a desire lo find first and lorcmoA a 
manicurist in Paris. 

She believes that she is helped in 
her task as Vogue editor by having 
been distanced from the mcc.'iu-.u: 
intensity or the fashion world. 

“As 1 became oniy a consumer, 
my taste and style had to define 
itself more pointedly," she said. 
“I’m fr*»h and coi jaded.” 

Against a h-.:ckirc? of -..--creel 
luxury" in her clothes. Eel larger 
wears bold ethnic jewelry — a re- 
flection of her husband’s role as a 
leading dealer in terra-cotta sculp- 
ture. 

However Vogue’s key players de- 
fine themselves^ their public p:r>o- 
na is forcrer compared :c Diana 
Vrerland. the droll, didactic editor, 
famous tor her pronouncements 
‘.“Pink is the navy blue of lndia">. 
for polishing .he undersides of her 
shoes, and for being immortalized 
in the film "Funny Face." 

"My friends keep calling m.' and 
telling me to 'Think Pink.’ “ said 
BuckT referring to a famous passage 
in the movie. 

Vreeland’s was another fa shion 
era — that of rigid 1950s couture 
glamour. And she. in familiar Con- 
de Nast fashion, was nigh-hcel- 
booted out when the 1960s made 
her grande-dame style obsolete. 

Buck has an echo of the be can- 
celing fashion style: 


gllgSgg 


mmm 




Bw 




fcv-T. :<\VaS! 


»'<iw 



















m 




• "Certain heels on certain >hoes 
make me nauseous." 

o"I remember as I chiic my 
mother's brown tulle D.cr satin 
dress and thinking what a pity it 
was brown." 

• “In America 1 am considered 
imported luxury goods much like 
camemben. But any French p-.-rson 
knows that cam cm ben is a .'laple.” 

It would be nice to think that the 
world of high fashion wo> still 
about role-playing, shiny sheets 
and greyhound elegance. The reali- 
ty is about raising the prof : fi- and 
sales at French Vogue. Circulation 
at 81.000 has dipped below that of 
old-guard rival I'Officiel. although 


Bnfjire Lwmbr i Mj.j Vid.® .-VFT l.\ rhe lilt 

Gardner Belianger in her 
office and. above . Joan Ju- 
liet Buck. 





3dlaoger is at pains to suggest that 
its rival’s circulation figure is 
fudged. 

Buck, preparing her new mission 
in Paris, and leaving American 
"political correctness” behind, sets 
out her agenda: 

“Men have sport and women 
have fashion." she said. “And 
much like sport for men. a woman 
finds herself, proves herself, shows 
herself, becomes herself in fashion. 
It is a fabulous expression of gen- 
der." 




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£V-’" 

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1990s. The acquisition of Banana jtegn&tc in 
1 983 sog^sts that litetxnqunywas.aioasnni 

then of a need for spicier or cfflxatfijj&s to 
complement basks. . . / 

Gap may not achieve, a cult fottoyi^ hi 
Europe or enter the language of .ftttijfof-fthe. 
Gap-ization of Main Street?) as it jefitf m ifc 
United Stales. But sound products mi. 
versa] appeal Hie French todcio MeE&dTs 
— once they had made it tbeirownby fiSaM* 
change in the formula to suit Ihe GafBc^fitie 
and re-christcning it 

surely be bought and absorbed uaojfejtettit 
culture — once the little fashion difl^ca 



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^vate Investment, Booming Exports 
Point to an Economic Recovery 


S fter two years of 

stagnation, the 
Indian economy 
is slowly show- 
mg signs of recovery. Ac- 
cording to a just-released 
forecast by the National 
Council of Applied Eco- 
nomic Research, an inde- 
pendent economic think 
tank, the growth rate for the 
gross domestic product in 
1994-95 is expected to be 
4.S percent, given the best 
scenario. Even if agricultur- 
al output were low and agri- 
cultural prices high, the 
growth rate is still expected 
to be 4 percent 
The main reason for this 


forms aimed to cut top rates 
and to rationalize excise and 
customs duty rates. The 
1994-95 budget of Finance 
Minister Manmohan Singh 
has brought down duties on 
imported raw materials and 
revamped excise rules. The 


when Prime Minister 
Narasimha Rao assumed 

power, foreign-exchange re- 
serves were just over $1.5 
billion. Today, three years 
later, the figure is a stupen- 
dous $15 billion. The 
money has come mainly in 


Exports grew by 21 percent 


peak rate of duty on imports 
is down to 65 percent arid 
corporate and income-tax 
rates have been cut. The 
government has also allo- 
cated more money for vari- 
ous development schemes. 


the form of equity and bond 
issues made by Indian com- 
panies, the flood of invest- 
ment by foreign financial 
institutions and country 
funds. Beginning with Re- 
liance Industries in mid- 




> A "■ ' 



• .*r 


P‘-r 

W- 



•r * c. -v '• «*; 





'■r : T~ : r 



Textiles and dotting are among ImBa’s key exports, which totaled $ 18.4 billion in 1992-93. 


optimistic scenario is that 
the economy is now led by 
private investment rather 
than public investment as in 
the past. In' 1994-95, the for- 
mer is expected to grow L by 
31- percent, white the latter 


grow by 8 percent. 
3 agricultural "growth 


With agricultural "growth 
projected to be between 2.6 
percent and 2.3 percent, 
overall industrial growth 
will be 6.8 percent, accord- 
ing to 'NjCAER. The most 
important component of the 
growth raay come from the 


capital-goods sector. 

Part of- the boost in the 
economy will also come 
from tax reforms. Started 
three years ago, these re- 


whicb had been cut earlier 
as part of an austerity pack- 
age agreed on with the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund. 

The negative signal is that 
for the first time in 74 
Weeks, inflation is up to 
double digits. It reached a 
peak of 17 percent in Au- 
gust 1991 and had been 
continuously falling until 
eariy this year. India, how- 
ever, has never before 
reached a situation where it 
had six months worth of im- 
port cover and record food 
stocks. With these two 
weapons, the government is 
in a position to buy its way 
out of trouble. 

In the middle of 1991, 


1992, about 27 companies 
have issued Global Deposi- 
tory Receipts and bonds 
fetching over S2.7 billion. 
Much of the money is being 
used for speculation, how- 
ever, and the money supply 
is getting out of hand; as a 
result, the government has 
recently become slightly re- 
luctant to give unrestricted 
sanctions to Indian compa- 
nies to issues GDRs. 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety by 
the supplements division of the Internationa] Herald Tri- 
bune’s advertising department • It was written by De- 
bashis Basu, a Bombay-based writer who runs an infor- 
mation services and consulting company. 


On THE 

Block 


O ne of the most 
exciting effects 
of the Rao gov- 
ernment’s liber- 
alization efforts has been 
the debut of Indian compa- 
nies on world financial mar- 
kets. Beginning with Re- 
liance Industries in 1994, 
about .27 companies have 
raised over $2.7 billion. 
Topping them all is the 5X 
billion offering from Videsh 
Sanchar Nigam Ltd ..India s 
monopoly international 
telecom operator. 

VSNLis attractive to 

_ Ko/'OllCP rtf 


fund managers because of 


the close -- 

tween economic growth and 
telecom tariffs. As India 
opens up more to the world 
?Snt revenues are bound 


^&venu.^bound 

to grow from a compound 
.,3 rv^ent n the past 


to grow from a 
rateof 43 percent mite pa® 
five vears to close to 50 per 
D «<»vt five years. 


five vean> <-» — - — ■ 
cent in the next five v - 
The ^cess of VSNLi| 




From a country 
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1991 and ***“• 


: — -L-. 


r Foreign financial institu- 
i tions were allowed to enter 

- the Indian market in late 

5 1992 and have been steadily 

s investing since the middle 

- of 1993. More than 100 of 
i them have been registered 
i by the Securities and Ex- 
. change Board of India; as of 

late April, they have put in 
close to $2 billion. These in- 
* siitu tions represent one of 
the many new sources of 
I funds pouring into the Indi- 

■ an capital markets. Four pri- 
vate mutual funds, includ- 

I ing Morgan Stanley, have 
r raised money. Alliance 
Capita] of the United States 

■ is next in line for setting up 
a domestic fund. 

Country funds meant for 
investment in the Indian 
market are suddenly popu- 
lar. Recently, Oppenheimer 
and Morgan Stanley each 
raised more than $500 mil- 
lion to invest in India. In all, 
close to $1.7 billion in 
country funds has been 
raised for investment in 
India. 

More than any other area 
of its economy, India's fi- 
nancial sector is rapidly 
finking up with the world. 
Companies like JP Morgan, 
GE Capital and Morgan 
Stanley are all running local 
operations. This has put 
pressure on the domestic ft- 
£ nancial sector -substantial- 
£ ly owned by the govern- 
| merit banks, insurance com- 
® panies and financial institu- 
tions - to shape up. The 
State Bank of India has just 
completed a public offering 
to reduce the government's 
holding and offer shares to 
the public. The Industrial 
Development Bank of India 
is expanding its services 
into credit rating, invest- 
ment banking and investor 
services. It is also promot- 
ing the National Stock Ex- 
change, a new countrywide 
electronic stock exchange. 
Nevertheless, several 


I 

| • - . ! 




m 

H ~ 


... -r*—*** " ’ ‘ 




Busy days at the new electronic National Stock Exchange; India's financial sector is rapidly linking up with the world. 


troubling factors have crept 
up over the past year. As re- 
vealed by the budget papers, 
the primary deficit - or ex- 
cess of all expenditure over 
all receipts excluding bor- 
rowings and interest pay- 
ments - was supposed to 
yield a surplus of 10.4 1 bil- 
lion rupees f$336 million) 
in 1993-94. Instead, Mr. 
Singh ended the year with a 
huge primary deficit of 
21.05 billion rupees, which 
was more than double that 
of 1992-93. A revenue 
shortfall of 60 billion rupees 
and overspending of 125 


billion rupees contributed to 
this situation. The budget 
deficit - the excess of all ex- 
penditure over receipts - 
was supposed to be 43.14 
billion rupees. It turned out 
to be 90.6 billion rupees. 
The fiscal deficit to GDP 
ratio is way above the 4.5 
percent target agreed with 
the IMF for the year ended 
in March 1994. Last year’s 
revenues were down, ex- 
penditures were up and eco- 
nomic growth was sluggish. 

This has resulted in a veiy 
high fiscal deficit to GDP 
ratio. Through an austerity 


package, Mr. Singh had 
managed to successively 
bring down this ratio from 
8.4 percent in 1990-91 to 
5.7 percent in 1 992-93. Fig- 
ures for 1993-94, however, 
show that this key ratio is 
climbing up to 7.3 percent - 
a level that was considered 
alarming just two years ago. 
Mr. Singh had promised a 
ratio of 4.5 percent to the 
IMF for 1 993-94. This does 
not seem to be bothering the 
government too much at the 
moment because it is confi- 
dent that it has various op- 
tions for meeting any crisis. 


The bright spot is boom- 
ing exports. In 1992-93, 
India's exports totaled 
$18.4 billion -- a rise of 3.6 
percent over the previous 
year. 

During the same period, 
imports went up by 11.9 
percent, to $21.7 billion. 
This was partly due to the 
collapse of the economy of 
Russia, one of India’s main 
trading partners. For the 


year ending on March 31, 
1994, exports have reeis- 


1994, exports have regis- 
tered a 21 -percent growth, 
and imports have marginal- 
ly declined. 



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Developing India - Through Innovative Finance 

IDBl Tower. Cotte Parads. Bombay 400 0(6, info. pft. ( 22l 2189111 Fax. (221 2180411/5188137 Trier. 0118-21BSM812 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBtiNE. TUESDAY, MAY 


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n d UBZ Liquidity Fund J_ 1 

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155880 

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BUCHANAN FUND LIMJTBD 
c* Bonk of Bermuda Ud: 1KMJ*** 

f Global Hedge USD -J 

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CAMPBELL (BERMUDA) LTD 
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CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP 
d Cl Canadai Growth Fd — C S 

d Cl Kqrth Amerlam Fd CS 

d Cl Ptsdflc Fond _a 

d Cl Global Fund— .,r» 


d Cl Enterg Mortets Fd. 
d ci European Fund. 


d Conoda Guar. Mortgage Fd C5 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

wamiM inn Fund s 

Capital Holla! 


COC INTERNATIONAL 
»r CEP court Ter 


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.FF 


CINDAM BRAZIL FUND 
a cindam Eauftv Fund— I 
d Cindam Balanced Fund 


.FF 


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POB 1373 Luxembourg TeL 477 95 71 


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d cimvesf fgp usd. 
d Of Invest FGP ECU. 
d Cftinvwt 5etec»or — 
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d Cttlcurrendes DEM- 
d ancurrericlesGBP— 
d ClHarrcncJes Yen. 


d CHIport NA Eaultv -J 

d Cttlnort Cont. Euro Emiltv~Ecu 

d atlaari UK Eoutfv— 3 

d CHIport French Emjltv FF 


d Ctrl port German Equity DM 

d CHIport Japan Eaultv T 

d □ If perl I APEC— S 

d CHI port Eamec S 


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d Convert Valor US - Dollar^ 
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a CS Tiger Fund. 


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d CS Gulden Band A - FI 

d CS Gulden Bond B FI 

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d CS H bream Iberia Fd B— Pto 
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d CS Prime Band B_ 
d cs Eiraa r 


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d CS Eurooa Bond B — DM 

d CS Fixed I SF 7°v 1/96 SF 

d CS FI*eO I DM 8% 1/96 DM 

d cs Fixed I Ecu 83/4% 1/96.ECU 

d CS Swiss Franc Bond A SF 

d CS Swiss Franc Bond B SF 

d CS Bond Fd lire A/B Lit 

d CS Band Fd Pesetas A/B — Ptas 

d CS German Fund A dm 

d CS Germany Fund B DM 

d CS Euro Blue Chips A DM 

d CS Euro Blue Chips B DM 

d CS Short-T. Band S A S 

d CS ShOrt-T. Band S B i 

d CS Short-T. Band DM A DM 

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d CS Money Martel RtS s 

d CS Money Market Fd DM— DM 

rf CS Matey Market Fd t 1 

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d CS me Market Fd Ecu— Ecu 
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d CS Money Mortief Fd FF — FF 
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d CS Oek»Pratec A DM 

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d CS North-Amertcon A. 
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d CSUK Fund A. 
d CS UK Fund B. 


a CS France Fund A. 
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d CSEureraol- 


d CS (My Fund A. 


dCS Italy Fund B. 


d CS Nemertona* Fd / 
d CS Netherlands Fd I 
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d CS Capital SFR 2000- 
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d Cl Cnolh.1 DM 1997. 


d C5 Capitol Ecu 3000. 
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EEC FUND MANAGERS (Jersey) LTD 
14 Scale SI. St Heitor . 0534-36331 
E8C TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 


INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
d Lana Term. 


d Lons Term ■ DMK DM 

ESMITAGE LUX (352487330) 

w Ermllaec Inler Rate STrat _DM 

w Ermitape Sell Fund S 

w Ermitogr Asian Hedge Fd J 
w Ermiigge Eure Hedge Fa —DM 
w Ermitape CnnOv asic Fq _S 
* Ermitape Amer hoo Fd— _s 

w Ermllage Enter mats Fd S 

EtIROPA FUNDS LIMITED 

d American Equity Fund i 

e American Oslten Fund— 5 


26121 

18221 


INTERNAT80NAL. FUNDS 

Tl. nra^eJSSaS^elq y atMtaniMWa M tfd).^ 


12*65 

119.76 


8SS7J1 | 

1543.16 

737*31 I 

111077 

SB067 

107*72 


tv Aston Equity Fd * 

w European Eaultv Fd— — S 
EVER 1ST CAPITAL (BUT) 273 » 
m Everest Capital Inti Ltd — 3 i«63 

PIDEUTT INTL INV. SERVICES (Lu*l 
d Obcavery firnd. 
d Far East Fund 


129X7 
141X4 
1249.9* 
9237 JO 
6261 
15366 


d FM. Amer. Assets — 
d Fid. Amer. Values IV. 
d FranKerFund- 


d Global tad Fund. 


d Global Setectton Fund-. — 1 
d ii u ernotian a i Rout S 


d Mew Europe Fima, 
d Orient Fund. 


911X8 


d Saedai Growth Fund 
d World Fund 


nun 

SU2 
501.19 
11279*00 
3178 
19.79 
2270 
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13Z76 

411.96 

4160 

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FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 
PD. Bex 2C0L HomRtan. Bermuda 

nrFMG Global (31 Marl S 

ntFMGN.Anwr.131 Mcr) — S 

m FMG Europe (31 Marl S 

m FMG EMC MKT (31 Mar) J 
m FMG Q (31 Marl 3 


120800 


FX CONCEPTS (BERMUOA3 LTD 
wConcncta Force Fund .A 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Gala Hedge ll. * 

tv Gaia Hedue ill — — * 


1427 

1063 

11.12 

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1804 


w Gaia SwlB Franc Fa- 
ir GAIA F». 


mGala Guaranteed CL I. 

GUtR7A60JLEINlhDSUEZFUMDS 2J/94rt4 
Tel: 1 352) 44 54 }4 470 
Fax : (352) « 54 3 
BONO PORTFOLIOS 

d DEM Band— Dls 5X0 DM 

d Dhrefbona. Dlsieo SF 

0 Dollar Band DI5125 » 

d Eurepean Bd—Dls 1.19 Ecu 

d Frunrti Franc— D)» 1033 — FF 

d Global Bom Dft 2)7 * 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
0 ASEAN — J 


132.19 

1190 

4894 

10*06 

84X7 

83X1 


d Aria Padllc- 


d Continental Euraoe- 


d Oevatepbig Markets, 
d France 


d taleii AU tent d . 
d Jauan. 


d North America, 
d SwttxartaniL. 


d United Kingdom. 


RESERVE FUNDS 
d DEM— _DB 1591. 
d Dollar- 


-DM 


d French Frwnc- 
d Yen Reserve. 


OEFINOR FUNDS 

London : 071-4774171. Geneva : 41-22355530 


wScottWi World Fund - 
» Stale SL American . 


GENESEE FUND Lid 
w (At Genesee Eagle— 


44*9740 

34*97 


w (Bt Genoa* Short. 


w (Cl Genes** Opportunity — S 
w IF) Genesee Non-Eoirttv — S 
GEO LOOOS 

iv II Straight Band B Eat 

w II Podfic Band B SF 


135X4 

71X2 

152X9 

13*70 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGE ME NT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
II AttWl St AugtasJ of Man 44*24X26037 


1060X7 

1451X8 


w GAM Arbitrage, 
■r GAM ASEAN. 


IV GAM Australia- 


ir GAM Boston. 


mGAM-Cararl Mtnmtanka. 
w GAM Combined. 


■vGAMCrutaMarket. 
r GAM r 


w GAM Franco _ 


w GAM FnstcvaL. 
wGAMGAMCO- 


tv GAM HWl Yield. 


nr GAM East Asia Inc. 
rGAM. 


tv GAM Money Mbts US 


d Do Start In*- 
) Swiss Fn 


d Do Deutsdiemali. 
d Do Yen. 


-DM 


w GAM Allocated Mltt-Fd S 

w GAM Emera Mkta MIH-Fd J 

tv GAM NUtt-Eurape USS S 

w GAM Mlti-Eunme DM DM 

iv GAM Mltf-Gtebaf USS S 

wGAM Market Neutral 1 

w GAM Trading DM DM 

wGAM Trading USS S 

■v GAM Overseas 5 


wGAMPocMIc. 


w GAM Selection. 


wGAM Singcnore/Malavski-S 

w GAM SF SpecM Bona — SF 

wGAMTvette S 

w GAM UX. S 


tv GAMut Investments . 
wGAM Value. 


tv GAM Whitethorn. 
wGAM Worldwide. 


wGAM Band USS Ord 

iv GAM Band USS Saeclai . 
wGAM Band SF. 


w GAM Band Yen. 
W GAM Band DM- 
■v GAM Band I. 


wGAM cSaeclol Betid. 
wGAM Universal USS- 
wG&AMCorm 


39133 

ms « 

21530 

335X1 

10135 

130X6 

107.15 

71.73 

171*08 

27*65 

20*67 

155X2 

697X7 

07665 

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101X2 
101.17 
101 JS 

10824 SX 

146X4 
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137X6 
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178X7 
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143.10 
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10113 
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140J0 
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SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1X222*36 
Mutaebocteflraoje 17XCH SOXLZurtch 

d GAM I CHI America SF 

d GAM ICH) Europe XF 

d GAM ICH) 

d GAM (CH] Pacfftc 


-SF 


SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 
135 East 57 rd StreeLNY 100222124 
wGAM Europe S 


153X? 

toms 

160X7 

2*5X6 


wGAM Global. 


w GAM Inter nollu n ul - 


w GAM North Amertca S 

wGAM Pacific Basin— X 
IRISH REGISTERED UClTS 
Eartstart TemiceiTubHn 1 253-I-474MJ0 


»nx» 

144X6 

191.93 

85X4 

19035 


w GAM Americana Ace. 
wGAM Eurapa) 
w GAM Orient acc- 
wGAM Tokyo Ac 


JIM 


WGAM Tabu Band DM Act — DM 
wGAM Universal DM Act — dm 
GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
BermidB.-fJD?) 27X4000 Fo»:l6D9) 29X6)50 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

w ICI Financial & Metals s 

w ID) Gtebal Diversified J 

w (FI G7 Currency . .1 


9005 

122.17 

15882 

17*16 

107J7 

173X7 


wlH) Yen Financial. 

w I J) Diversified Rsk Adi s 

w(K) Inti Currency & Bond— X 
w JWH WORLDWIDE FND . 


147X3 

10*45 

8*56 


GLOBAL FUTURES 6 OPTIONS SfCAV 


117X2 

115X8 

18.16 


m FFM Ini £W ProgrCHF axF 
GOLDMAN SACHS 
w GS Adi Rate Mart. Fd ll — s 
m GS Global Currency— S 
wGS Global Eaultv S 


10066 


wGS World Bond Fund — 

wGS World Income Fund S 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
w G. Swap Fund Ecu 


7.9J 

1237X6 

11.94 

1022 

920 


1149X9 ■ 


87827 

8*072 

0X7137 


GRANITE CAPITAL INTL GROUP 

w Granite Cart ral Eaultv 5 

w Granite Capital Mkt Neutrals 
w Granite Carttul Moving* -X 
0T ASSET MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
Tel : (44) 71-718 4567 

d GT Asean Fd A Shares S 

d GT Asean Fd B Sham 5 

d GT Asia Fund A Shares. — 3 

d GT Asia Find a Shares s 

d GT Aslan Small Camp A ShX 
d GT Aikm Saudi Con* 8 Shj 
d GT Australia Fd AShora-x 
d GT Australia Fd B Shures-X 
d GT Austr. smell Cp a sn— x 

d GT Avar, smot) Co fl 5b j 

d GT Berry Japan Fd A Sh s 

d GT Berry Jamm Fd 8 Sh S 

d GT Band Fa A snores s 

d GT Bond Fd B Shorn l 

d GT Bto * Ao Sciences 6 5hj 
d GT Bio &Ap Sciences B Sivx 

d GT Oolior Fund A Sh X 

d GT Dollar Fund a Sh X 

d GT Emerging Mtts A 5b — X 

d GT Emerging Mkta B Sh X 

d GT Em Mu l Smart Co A Sh j 
d GT Em Mkt Small CO B Shji 
w GT Euro Smell Co Fa A ShX 
wGT Euro Small CaFdB 5h J 
d GT Hang Kang Fd A snares! 
d GT Hang Kane Fd B Shares* 
a GT Honshu Pathfinder A ShS 
d GT Honshu Pathfinder B ShS 
w GT Jan Ore Slacks FS A Sh* 
w GT Jao ore Ltodn Fd B ShS 

w GJ joo smell Cg f«i a Sn s 

W GT Jao Small Co Fd B Sh s 

w G T. Lotte Amertca Fd S 

d GT strategic Bd Fd A Sh— 3 
d GT Strategic Bd Fd B Sh—J 
d GT Telecomm. Fd A Sharats 
d GT Tetecomm. Fd B Shams 
r GT Todinotaev Fund a Snj 
r GT Techno tegy Furei B Sd-J 


GT MANAGEMENT PLC 1*4 n 71* «S <71 
d G.T. BIcteetv'HeoItti Fund_X 71X9 

d G.T. Oeutechiano Fond j llta 

d G.T. Eurooe Fund X 524« 

wG.T. GloOol smell CoFd S 28» 

d G.T. Unrest mem Fund % 2S.9* 

w G.T. Korea Fund S 5X2 

w G.T. Newly Ind Countr K_1 *1.10 

w GT. US Small Camotmtes— J 24.12 


DU BIN & SWIECA ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Te* : 11871 945 1430 Fo» <809} 94} 1488 

b MlDhOrtuoe Corttol Cora s 12312.13 

mOverlaok Perform one* Fg_s 205C.9S 

mPoctfic RIM Od Fd * 107.13 E I 


GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAOEMEHT LTD 

I GCM Global SeLEa I 10560 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNQR5 (Gatafl LM 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

a Mourned Currency f 77X2 

dGtobWBana S 36*7 

d Gtabot High Income Band-X Z26& 

a GUI A (Bend 1 11X1 

d euro MWl Inc Bond : 2322 

d Gtebal Equity S !JK 

d American Blue Chle—X 37x5 

d Jeean ana Poeilie 5 i3ta 

d UK 1 76X2 

d European i »*■« 


GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL »CCUM FD 

d Dautecnemark Money »36« 

ti 1)5 Dollar Monov S 38366 

d US Dollar Mian Yd Bone — s 3423 

d Inn Qrtancad Grin S 3e28 


HASBtntCHkER ASSET MANGT OeunhM. 
wHOMtaHchterCamAG— S J99460 

w HaaonaicMer Cam Inc, s 1144a 

w H aetnrtcnter Me — 1 13.3? 

wAFFT S 136033 


HEPTAGON FUND NV I5***X1SSSS1 
; HeplaconQLB Fund S 

n Uta P ta uuwCMOr 


93X? 

n*9 


HERMES ASSET MANAOEME NT LTD 
Bermuda: (807129* 4808 Ui«: 1 S52M#4 64 41 
Final PrttM — 

mHiriMt European Fund —Ecu 
m Nerme* North Amerlam Fa* 
m Hermes Aslan Fund. 


MHcrmes Emera Mkti Fund J 
m Hermes Strategies Fund. — S 
m Hermes Neutral Fu n d x 
in Hermes GtoW Fund— — * 
in Hermes Band Fund — Ecu 


m Hernm Starting Fd 

IncSmepxStners iaxi a j Limited 
w Asian Fixed Income Fd — -5 laxta 

INTERINVEST (BERMUDA) LTD 

C/0 Bon* M Bermuda. Tel : 807 2*5 
m Hedge Hoo & Conserve Fd-I 
INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
1 Bd Royuf. L-2447 Liuembo/ra 
w Europe Sud E —Ecu 


INTERNATIONAL MGMT INCOME FUND 

dAnteflqueitaNert * 

d Europe ConKnentate — — DM }M7> 

d E4lremeOrl»niAngloia*anAS 10812 


d France. 


.FF 


d italic. 


_Ll» 


d Zone Aaialwuc. 


INVESCO INTL LTD. FOB 271. Jeraer 
Tel: 66 5U 73114 
d Maximum income Fund — t 

a Sterimg Mnsd phi. c 

a Pioneer Marketa 


50882 

10I13SJJO 

10017JH 


d Okason Glottal Strategy, 
d Axlo Super Growth— . 
d Nippon Warrant Fund — 
d Asia noer Warrant. 


d Eurooem Wtrronl Fund. 
d Gtd N.W. 1994. 


PREMIER SELECT FUND5 
d Amertcon Grawin 

a American Enterprise— 

d Ajle T low Growt h — 

d Dalfcr Reserve. 


0 . fR » 1 
22120 ' 
6JH50 
17X000 
236700 
2X000 
424 
3X100 
76200 


d European Growth. 


d European Emerartse » 

d Global Emeramo Manate-S 

d Gtebal Growth— 6 

d Nippon EMerprbe- 


d Nippon Grawih. 
d UK Growth. 


*0600 
92400 
11.7100 
52600 
5X900 
4X200 
88500 
5 7400 
*1600 
52300 

usn 


d Sterling Reserve. 


d North Aiwiaxi WarrwiI— J 
d Greater China Opps . X 

ITALFORTUHE INTI- FUNDS 
w Ocas A I Aoar. Grawih itaLlS 

w Class B I Globa/ FmltYI * 

w Class C (Global Bondi 5 

w Class D (Ecu Bondi Ecu 


42200 

7JJ500 


8971*00 

11.96 

1897 

11.10 


JARDINE FLEMING. GPO BOX 1T448 Hg Kl 

HJF ASEAN Trust S 54X4 

d JF For East Wmt Tr 5 2468 

d JF Global Cany. Tr S *.« 

O JF HOOO Konp Tnnl * 17JU 

d JF Joocvi Sm.Cn Tr T 522] ■« 

d JF JOOT Trusf — Y 12921X0 


d JF Malovsla Trust- 
d JFPadHe lnc.Tr. 
0 JF Thailand TniN. 


JOHN GOVETT MAKT IIDMJ LTD 

781:4*636-67943) 

w Govatt Mate Futures — 1 

w Goveft Man. Fut. USS S 

wGovctt S Gear. Oiitt. - . X 

m Govetl 5 Girt Bal. Hdge 8 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 
0 Boerhond — SF 


25 J/ 
12X0 
3425 


d Conbar. 


-SF 


941X8 


a Eauibaer Amwica- 


d Eautooer Europe, 
d SFR - BAER- 
d Stock Cor. 
d SwlKbcr. 


d Uqutooer. 


d Eureoe Bond Fund. 


d Dollar Band Fund, 
tf Austro Band Fond . 


-Ecu 


d Swiss Band F und- 
er DM BondT 


M 


d Convert Bond Fund- 
d Glaoal Bond Fund 
d Eura Stack Fund. 
d U5 Stack Fund- 


d Pacific Slade Fund. 
d Swiss Stack Fund. 


d Special Swiss Stock. 
d Japan Slack Fund. 
d German Stock r 


2432X8 
1717X8 
1117X3 
2472X6 
X3AJS 
99 44m 
15800 
12*40 
126100 
172X0 
11*20 
9*70 
9278 
I39J0 
12860 
13020 
167X0 


d Korean Slock Fund, 
d Swiss Franc Cash— 


dOMCashFund. 


d ECU Cash Fund. 


-DM 


-Ecu 


d Sterling Cash Fund. 

d Dollar Cash Fund 

d French Frmc Cadi FF 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
m Key Global Hed ge 5 

m Key Hedge Fund Inc -X 

m Key Hedge inyesimenfs t 


772800 

107X0 

8L70 

120800 

12S3J0 

1269X0 

109*00 

104800 

1107X0 


259X0 

157.95 

U5X3 


Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


mKJ Asia PoeWe Fd LW- 
KIDDER. PEABODY 
b Che sa peake Fltad Ltd- 
b III Fund Lid. 


1210 


b Inti Guaranteed Fund. 
O Sto ne henge Ltd. 


2692X8 

mrxo 

1305X1 

1645X8 


LATIN A66ERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel: London 071 638 1234 
d Argentinian Invest Co Slcov* 

d Brazilian Invest Co Slcov 3 

d Catembtan invest Co Slcov -S 
d Latin Amer Extra Yield FdS 
d Latin Amertca income Co — 5 
a Latin American Invest Co— S 

d Mexican Invest Co Slaw _ S 
d Peruvian laves/ CB Slcov —X 
LEHMAN BROTHERS 
d Allan Draaan Part NV A — 5 
d Astan Draewi Pari nv B — S 
d Glottal Advisors n NV A — S 

a Gtebal Advljors It NV B 5 

d Global Advisors Pori NV A_3 
d Global Advisors Part NV B J 
d Lehman Cur Adv. A/B— —5 
d Premier Futares Adv A/B-5 
LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/ F LiPPO Tower Centre. 87 QumswavJf*: 
Tel 1853) 867 6881 Fax (852) 596 0388 

w Java Fund J 7.05 

w Asean Fired Inc Fd ——5 *-38 

w IDR Money Market Fd -S 12X1 

w USD Money Marvel Fd S 10X0 

w Indonesian Growth Fd S 18.7 

w Aslan Grawth Fund S 18*J 

w Aslan War rani Fund 5 7.21 


10X2 

10X7 

7JM 

9J0 


LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (853} 645 4433 
w Antenna Finn s 17.11 

w LG Asian Smaller Cos Fd— X t*9=a) 

W LG India Fund Ltd— -5 14.17 


LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Ltd 
Ltertto Americas ForttoHo 180*) 327*71) 
w Balanced Moderate Risk FdS 
LOMBARD. OD1ER A CIE • GROUP 
OBLIFLEX LTD (Cl) 
tJ Mutrtcurrenev S 


d Dollar Medium Term. 

d Dollar Lang Term 

d Japanese Yen. 


d Pound Sterling, 
d Deutsche Mare. 
d Dutch Florin. 


-DM 


d HY Earn Currencies- 
d Swiss FrtxK- 


-Ear 


-SF 


d US Dollar Short Term. 
d HY Eure Curr DWW Pay — Ecu 

d Swiss Multi currency SF 

d European Currency Ecu 

d Belgian Franc BF 


d Convert tele. 


d French Franc. 


-FF 


d Swiss Muin-Dlv«end .. 

d Swiss Franc Short-Term — SF 

d Canadian Dollar. C* 

d Dutch Florin Mufti Fl 

d Swiss Franc Dlvld Pav 5F 

d CAD Mullicw. Div CJ 

d Mediterranean Curr SF 

d Convert [Wes — 5F 


33.U 

2JX1 

20X8 

4980X0 

27.10 

17X8 

1*70 

16X0 

13X8 

12X2 

1171 

17X0 

22X7 

atsn 

1*75 

161.06 

>812 

10*55 

13x3 

15.45 

10X1 

1121 

11X7 

10X6 


MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bcrinadn) LTD 
mMatabar inn Fund S 19.47 


MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

aiMidl limited -Ordinary 3 

mMInt Limited - Income S 

m Mint GW Ud -Spec issue —JS 

m Midi Gtd Ud- Nov JOBS J 

mMInt Gtd Lta- Dec 1994 s 

raW GM Lfd-Aua 1775. S 

mMInt Gtd Currencies S 

mMInt Gtd Currencies 2001 — x 

mMlnl Sp Res LM iBNPl S 

mAfhena Gta Futures—* 


m Athena Gta Currencies 

mAlhnno GW Flreeiclats inc-S 
m Athena Gld Flncndals CaoX 

m AML Capital Mkte Fd * 

mAHLCommodlly Fund $ 

mAHL Currency Fund * 

m AHL Real Time Trad Fd S 

mAHL DW Real Time Tra — * 

m AHL Gld Cap Morn Ltd * 

m Map Gu a rs pi l e ed 1996 LW— » 
mMa> Leveraged Reeav. LXfJ 

mMAP Guaranteed 3000 X 

m Mini G GL Fin 200 * 


MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Fran! Sf Hamilton Bermuda I0CRI292 »~19 
w Maritime AWt^eclor ILMJ 1012X0 

w Maritime GRP Beta Series -S 819X1 

wMartiimeGibi Delta SrrtgsX 01*65 

wMortihne Qlbl Tmi Series—* 91116 

MATTHEVfS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

m Class A — — J >1*73 

d Class B * >14X7 


a Poclflc Convert. Steas 
MAVERICK (CAYMAN) 110*1 747-7942 
mWovertck Fd 5 


147. 


MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 
m The Corsair Fond Ud * 51117 

MECSPIERXON 

Roktn 55. 10i»k. Amsterdam <n-sni18*i 

w Asks Pac Grawih Fd N.V * 

w Aslan Capital Hotalngs s 

w Aslan Selection Fd N.V Fl 

w DP Amer. Growth Fd KV.-S 

w EMS Offshore Fd N.V Fl 

w Europe Growth Fund N.V. -Fl 
w Japat Diversified Fund J 


60X7 

10X1 

35.19 

107.18 


w Tamro Poc. Mow. n.v 

MERRILL LYNCH 
d Dollar Assets Portfolio, 
d Prime Rate Portfolio. 


MERRILL LYNCH SHO»T-TE DM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

d Oass A 1 

d Clots B. 


MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR POPTFOL'O 
d Category A , _AS 


0 Category B_ 


CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Category A a 


1843 

1*10 


d Category e. 


CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

« CKOS A-T S 

0 Class A-2. t 

d C2ttSSB-l- | 

d Class ft- 5- , t 


DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
d Category A — DM 


d Crdeoan B- 


-DM 


1113 

12X3 


348X4 

292X3 

379X3 

131.10 

71BX2 

11125 

654X8 

1285X6 

10801 

43841 


EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO I DM) 

d Class A-1. * 

d Oass A-2 * 

0 Class fl-i^ — — ■* 

iu^^EAN BOND PORTFOLIO IUS*1 

d Class A-1 

tf Class A ? 


d Class 3-1 
d Class B-7 


POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 
d Category A- 


9X2 


US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
d Catecory A. 


0 caiegwY B. 


YEN PORTFOLIO 
d Caiegonr A. 


d cmegory B_ 


MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

0 Class A. 3 

d Class B — * 


US FEDERAL SECURITIES PTFL 
0 ana A — ■- A 

tf Class B . 


MERRILL LYNCH 
EQUITY 1 CONVERTIBLE SERIES 
BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 
d Class A X 

d Class 9. 


CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 
tf Oass A S 

tf Class 3. * 


GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL IU5S) 
tf ClaasA * 

0 Class B . 


GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOLIO 
d Class A 
tf Oass B 


EUP-O EQUITY PORTFOLIO 
tf Clan A * 

d Class B. 


LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A ■•-5 

d Class B- 


1 * 6 ? 

14X9 


15X1 

1*97 


WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

d Class A * I'X? 

tf Class B. 


DRAGON PORTFOLIO 
tf OossA. 
tf Class B . 


MERRILL LYNCH INC * PORTFOLIO 
a CJaSS A * 

tf Class B * 

tf Class C * 


1X14 

1562 


8X0 


MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

tf Mexican Inc S Phi a A * 9X9 

d Mexican IncSPtfl Cl B S IB 

rf Mexican Inc Peso Ptfl a AX 9.11 

tf Mexican Inc Pmo PHI Cl BX 7.13 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
w Momentum Novell ter Peru 99X7 

mMomentum RoMww Fd — s 122.12 

m Momentum RyR RD— X 87X7 

nt Momentum Stock master —5 154X3 


MORVALVONWILLER ASSET MGT Ca 


w Wilier Telecom. 


wWlltertands-Wlltoraond Cans 
te willertunds-Wlller&ond Eur Ecu 
wWmertanas-Wnieraq Eur— Ecu 
w WIINrtunds-WBlerea Italy _LJI 
te wmerfundsWlltoreq ha — I 
MULTIMANA9ER N.V. 

w Cash Enhancement * 

w Emerging Markets Fd X 

w Eirueean Growth Fd Ecu 

— * « 


»J1 
15X0 
12X5 
14X3 
1463100 
1AM 


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w Market Neutral, 
w World Bond I 


N1CMO LAX-APPLE CATE CAPITAL MGT 

wNA Flexible Growth Fd 5 14082 

w NA Hedge Fund S 1EJS 


NOMURA INTL (HONG KONG) LTD 

d Nomura Jakarta Fund S 

NOR IT CURRENCY FUND 
rrNCF USD S 


m NCF DEM. 
mHCFCHF. 
rtlNCF FRF. 
m NCF JPY- 


SF 


828*5 

89*69 

7X7? 


m NCF BEF. 


2267X00 

2703100 


ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grasvenor SUjjn WIX 9FSX4-rt-497 2798 

tf Odev Eurnoean DM 14*53 

wOdey European — * I46J6 

w Oder ElAOP Growth Inc DM 15895 

w Odey EureP Growfh Acc — DM 15150 

w Odev Euro Grth Star Inc — C 6827 

w Odev Euro GrthSIrt Acc — X 6849 


OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HMI1. Bermuda 
Tel : 809 272-1018 Fax : 809 275-2305 
w Finsbury Graw> S 


w Ofynvta Securlle SF. _ 
m OtemrtD Stars Emerg Mkfs S 

w Which. Eastern Dragon 5 

w Which. F rmUter S 


w Winch. Fut. Olvnwta Star. 
w Winch. Gl Sac Inc PI IA1 — s 
w Winch. G) Sec me PI f Cl — S 
w Winch. Hide Inri Madison -Ecu 

w Winch. Htag inrt Ser D Ecu 

» Winch. Hkta Inn Ser F Ecu 

w Winch Htag Oty Star Hedges 
w Winch. Reser. MuIfL Gv B«U 


» winchester Thailand S 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMEN' 


21*3* 
17847 
709X3 
17.00 
287 X0 
147X9 
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9JN 
1471X7 
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SENT 

73 Front SL HwnlltaaBermuda 807 2754658 
if Optimo Emerald Fd LM — S 10A4 


w Outlaw Futares Fund. 

wOotlma Global Fund S 

wOoilma Perl Orta Fd LM S 

wOutlma Short Fond S 

ORBITEX GROUP OF FUNDS 

rf Orbliey Asia Poc Fd 6 

tf Orbltex Grawih Fd S 

d Orbital Health A Emrlr Fd J 
d Ortritex Japan Small Cap FdS 

d Orbltex Natural Res Fd CS 

FACTUAL 

tf Eternity Fund Ltd— 1 

d Infinity Find Ud S 


*6920 

7.1549 

5JJ72I 

4.7851 

147847 


a Star hip Yield Fd I 
PAPIBAS-GRQUP 
w Linear. 


269.171* 

42*7735 

125X980 


a Purvey USA B. 
d Parvest Jaoan B. 


tf Parvesl Asia PocH l 
d Parvest Europe B. 


tf Parvest Hal land B. 
d Parvest France B. 


-Ecu 


1X2 

2161 

5761DU 

71X5 

2*96 

14894 


tf Parvesi Germany fl- 


it Parvesl Ott I -Dollar B. 
tf Parvest OtHLDM B- 


tf Parvest Ofaii-YenB— 
tf Parvesl DM LGuMen I 
tf Parvesl OOll-Franc B. 
tf Parvesl ObU-Ster B— 
d Parvesl Ortt-EcuB. 


tf Parvesl Obll-Brtux B_ 
tf Porvesi S-T Dollar B_ 
tf Porvesi S-T Eurooe B. 

tf Parvesl S-T DEM 8 

tf Parvesl S-T FRF B. 


-DM 


tf Parvesl S-T Bed Plus 8. 

0 Porvat Global B 

tf Parvest Inf Band B 

d Parvest Obll-UraB. 


tf Parvest Ini Eouiltes B. 
tf Parvest UK B. 


tf Parvesl USD Ptas B. 
tf Parvest S-T CHFB. 


d Parvesl ObttCanodo £ 
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PERMAL GROUP 

I Commodities Ud 

/ Dratkor Growth N.V.. 
f Emerging MklsHtaav 
I EuroMIr (Ecu) Ltd. 


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160.1B 
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PICTETA CIE -GROUP 

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w P.CF Horamvol (Lux). 
m P.CF valiber (Lux). 


1311.14 

1021X8 

1763X3 


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i P.CF VgirtaUo (Lux). 

w P.CF Vattrance (Lux) FF 

ir P.UF. VtSbcnd SFR ILuxISF 
w PU.F. vofixod U5D {Luy|J 

• P.U.F. VORMnd Ecu (LUX) -Ecu 
wP.U.F.Volband FRF ILuxl^F 

• P.UJ. ValBonC GBP (Lux) J 

iv P.U.F. VaRtand DEM (Lux) DM 
wP.ULF.USSBOPttl (Lux)— S 
w P.UJF. Made) Fd Ecu 


iv P.U.T. Emerg MkH (Luxl . 
ir PM.T. Bor. Oaaort (Luxl —Ecu 
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w P.U.T. Euruvul (Luxl— Ecu 

0 Pictet Voljutaw (CHI SF 

m Inti Small Cap IIOM) * 


6154 

101JJ2 

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1377.14 

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772X7 

95J9 

27*84 

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182X3 

tax* 

15140 


671X5 

477X2 


PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
C/0 PD. BOX 1108 Grand Covmgn 
Fox: 1B07) 9*9 X 793 
in Premier US Equity Fund — 5 

m Premier Inti Ea Fund * 

mPrenUer Soveieion Bd Fd— S 

m Premier Giabal Bd Fd I 

m Premier Total Return Fd S 

PUTNAM 

d Emerging Him Sc. Trust S 

m Putnam Em. Into, Sc. Trust* 

0 Pumam Gtab. High Grawih X 
d PutnemHIeti Inc GNMA FdS 
d Pubvom rnn Fund s 


1171*4 

1272x6 

894X7 

1475X2 

100259 


QUANTUM OROUP OF FUNDS 
■r Asian Development * 


w Emerging Grawih Fd N.V S 

w Duo Mum Fund NV S 

w Quantum Incus trial S 

w Quantum RgghY Trvsl. * 

w Quantum vk Redre Fund-t 

W Quasar Inrt Fund N.V -S 

w Quota Fund N.V.. 


QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Tetennone : 809 - »rtM»50 
Facsimile : 809 -947-0062 

tf Altos Arbitrage Fd LM I 

tf Hesaerli Fund m j 


180X1 

15553X7 

99X0 

131X6 

NMX3 

1*4X2 

15184 


tf Meridian Hedge Fd Lid vs 5 

d Zenith Funa Lid s/5 J 

RESENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

New Korea Grawih Fd S 

w Nova La* Pocluc Inv Co S 

w Pacific A rail roar Ca— 5 

m P.l_ Country Wml Fd S 

0 Regenl Gftl Am Grth Fd S 

d Regent Gibl Eure Grth Fd_S 

tf Pegenf Glbl tall Grth M S 

d Rrgenl GIW Jgo Grth Fd S 

a Regent Gita Pool Basin s 

a Peaem Glbl Reserve S 

e Regent Gita Resources 5 

0 Rrgenl Glbl Tiger. 


TBJ9 

10*90 
101X9 
66 XZ 


1256 

4.727 

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5.0673 
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23221 
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3X957 
1.9336 
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[AS -Australian Dollar* AS - Aualnan Schffings: BF - Beld 
I Lit -ItalLin Lira; LF-LiK&diBqiirg Franca; (WiMCB; Pto - B 

NctCemimjnica»d;o-N«r.S - suraerstdT&S -Sack TM 

o - misquoted earlier, x-nqi regteteretf wm regjitaiy authority. P=1 


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» Begem Moghu) Fg Lta I 

m Regenl Pntliic Hda Fd S 

tf Regent Sri Lanka Fa S 

" lindcrtraUtod Assels 5er I— 6 
ROBE CO GROUP 
POBfTUOOOAZ Ronerdom.131 <10 2241224 

d RG America Fund —Fl 141 jg 

0 PG Eurooe Fund Fl 136.7B 


11 . 1 / 


143X8 

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1(078 


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d RGMwvp;usFD M DM TOW 

0 RG Money Ph» F5Fw. SF 10*73 

teAsSlSStal'KldlraB HJ 

Ie Dalwa LCF RathschHd Bd-S 
w Doiwa LCF RBfhsdi Ea— * 
w Farce Cash TredWon CHF-SF 
wLrica 


irL u f fiw e tf Cap Holdings 

w «m- Valor, 


-SF 


13X9 

1115 


ft Pri OMltenae Swiss Fd SF 

ft Prleaultr Fd'Ewwe Ecu 

ft PrleauKv Fd-Hetveno 5F 


ft MwuMY_F(H^h/ 


ft Pri band Fund 1 


b Pri bond Fund USD S 

b Prtbond Fd HY Emer MktsJ 

w Selective Invest SA S 

ft Source. — * 


w US Bend Pta»- 


.Ecu 


ROTHSCHILD roROUP EDMOND DB) 

OTHER FUNDS 

tf Ada/ Japan Emerg. Crawtlil 
w Esprit Eur Portn Inv Tst_Eeu 
w Eurae srrafeg tnvssftn Id— Ecu 
ft integral Futures 


tea 
IBIS* 
1019X0 
1033*83 
234U0 
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98*63 
114172 
117X86 
110X52 
130.9)2 
123X09 
110X12 
11*189 
34 tSK 
1*43580 
958X64 
HOSTS 


ft Oaflaesl Global Fd General DM 
O Oattgest Global Fix incameDM 
0 PodffcNIes Fund s 


10X7 

10X1 


w Permal DraMwr Grtti NV_» 

I Sriechon Horton FF 

ft vickolre Artane 


17X1070 

1630X1 

10*200 

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19*946 

171X98 

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0112*75 

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ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CJ) LTD 

mNemrod Lwinmd Hid S 8*169 

SAFDIE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
m Key Diversified me FdUtLS 1U3414 

SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 
tr R0publle GAM S 


w Republic GAM America S 

w Ree GAM Em Mkts Gtabai J 
w Rgp GAM Em Mkta Lei Am* 
w Republic GAM Curette SF-SF 
w Republic GAM Europe USSS 
tv Republic GAM Grwth CHF-SF 

wHepubtic GAM Growth t 1 

w Republic GAM Grewth USSS 
tv Reputarc GAM Opportunity S 

W Republic GAM Pod tic s 

Mr Republic Gnsey Dpi inc — 3 
» Republic Gravy Cur Inc — DM 

w ReputHK Lot Am AfiOC S 

w Republic Lot Am Ararat. — S 

w Republic Lot Am Brail I S 

tr Repubik Lot Am Mexico — S 
iv Republic Lot Am Venez. — S 
w Rep Solomon Strat Fd Ltd-S 
SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
m On i Huan dw Frad S 

mExpkprer Fund S 


162:91 
113.17 
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1836 
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m» ■ 

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10*062 

107X94 


5KAND4RAVI54CA ENSK1LDA BANKEN 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 
0 Eorapa Inc S 


tf Flonai Otfgrn inc_ 
tf Global I 


line. 


tf Lokamedel Inc- 

d VartbenliK 

d Jmn me — 

rf AUfiafne 


d Nerdnmertka Inc. 
tf Teknaieal inc 


rf Srartge Ru ntatgn d Inc. 

SKANDIFONDS 
d Equity Inrt Ac 


d EouHy InTI lnc_ 


rf Equity Gtobol. 


rf Equity f6af. Rmaurcea Jt 

d Equity Jopcn.,,. — -Y 

rf Eoufty NorcBc S 

d Equity UX 1 


tf Equity Conlinenfot Europe^ 

tf EautlV Memterrarwcn S 

rf Equity North America * 

rf Eaultv Far East S 

rf inn Emerging Marketa — * 
0 Band mn ACC s 


tf Bond Inti Inc. 


tf Bond EuraoeAbC- 


tf Bond Europe Inc. 


tf Band Sweden Acc. 
d Bond Sweara 1nc_ 


tf Bond DEM Abe. 
tf Band DEM me. 


tf Bond Dollar US A cc_ 


d Band Dollar US Inc. 
J Curr. US Dollar. 


0 Curr. Sw edtRi Kronor Set 

SOOETE GENERALS GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND (SF) 
wSFBendiAUXA S 


ir SF Bondi B Germany DM 

■V SF Bands CFrjucr FF 

wSF Banos EGS_ 


vrSF Bands F Japan Y 

tv SF Bands G Empv— —Ecu 
iv SF Bondi H World Wide — S 

w SF Benda j Belgium BF 

ir SF Ea. K North America S 

nr SF E4LLWSUrape Ecu 

• SF Eo. M Pacific Bonn Y 

w SF Eq. P Growth Countries 3 

tv SFEa-Q Gold Minas S 

w SF Ea-R World Wide S 

nr SF Short Terms France FF 

w SF Short Term T Eur. Ecu 


1*32 

31X3 

127X1 

1211 

2377 

17X2 

1*40 


17 


SODfTIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


1*36 


If SAM Brad I . 


nr SAM Diversified. 


ir SAM/McGarr Hedge. 
iv SAM Opportunity. — 

nr SAM Strategy 

m Alpha SAM- 


w GSAM Campon te 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 
mSR European 

m SR Aslan. 


16*71 

13212 

7*54 

12241 

11*47 

127X4 

337X0 


mSR Internal kmc L 


SVENS KA HANDELS BANKER SJL 
146 Bd de la Petrvne. L-2330 Luxantaoura 


107X0 

99X5 

107X7 


ft SHB Band Fimd- 


» Svanska Sei. Fd Amer Sh— S 
w Svanxka Sel. Fa Gvrmony_* 
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wSvensko Sei. Fd mn Sh S 

w Sverakc Sel. Fd Jgpm Y 

w 5vdMka Set. Fa MltHAkt —Sek 

» Sverafca Sel. Fd Padt Sh 3 

w Svenaka Sel. Fd Swad Bdx_Sek 
nr Arena ka Se* Fd Svtvta Sh — Ecu 
SWISS BANK CORF, 


5*13 

lill 

11X6 

1253 

5953 

392 

115.17 

753 

141362 

1422X6 


d SBC 100 Inda Food SF 

stralto — as 


tf SBC Equity Pm-Anslrolk 
0 SBC Equity PHLCcmoda — CS 
0 5BC Eauitv PtBEurapdu—Ecw 
rf SBC Ea Pffl-Ncthertnnd* — Fl 

tf SBC Govern Bd A.'B S S 

tf SBCBand PttLAuairSA — AS 

tf SBC Bond PHI-Auatr S B AS 

tf SBC Bond PHLCeviXA CS 

tf SBC Bond PtfVCcHSB CS 

tf SBC Bond Pffl-OM A DM 

0 SBC Bond PtlLOMB DM 

tf SBC Bond PtfHJufdt G. A_Fi 
d SBC Bend PW-Duleh G. B-FI 

tf SBCBondPtfLEcuA Ecu 

tf SBC Bond PtfLEeu B Ecu 

tf SBC Bond P1U-FF A FF 

d SBC Bond PHLFF B FF 


d SBC Bond Pttl-Ptas A/B — Ptaa 
tf SBC Bond PM-Storflng A — c 
tf SBC Bond PID-Sler ling B — x 
tf SBC Bond Portfolio-SF A — SF 

d SBC Bond PentofiihSF B SF 

d SBC Bond Plti-USSA S 

0 SBC Bond PtfUJSSB S 

tf SBC Botkl Ptft-Yen A Y 

tf SBC Bond Ptft-Yen B Y 

tfSBCMMF-Al AS 


1787410 

212X0 

31*00 

287X0 

372X0 

106*57 

11*16 

121X6 

111X2 

127X7 

1*7.97 

11*54 

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188X6 

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57*44 

17*31 

915*17 

5*72 

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1137X7 

139SX3 

184X7 

10969 


tf SBCMMF-BFR. 
tf S8CMMF-C 


-BF 


rf SBC DM Short-Term A DM 

tf SBC DM Short-T arm B DM 

tf SBC MMF - Dutch G. Fl 

tf 5BCMMF-Ecu Ecu 


tf SBC MMF • Eac. 


dSBCMMF-FF. 
tf SBC MMF - LH. 


tf SBC MMF -Fisa. 


tf 5BC MMF - Schilling 

d SBC MMF -Starting E 

tf SBC MMF -SF SF 


115337X0 
431*28 
112252X8 
4191.15 
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0 SBC MMF - US • Dollor 

tf SBCMMF-lfSS/ll S 

tf SBC MMF - Yra. — Y 


rf SBC GW-PM SF Grtfi SF 

tf SBC GlbLPtti Ecu Grth Ecu 

tf SBC GtbLPW USD Grth S 

tf SBC Glta-Flfl SF YM A SF 

O SBC GIN-Pttl SF YW B SF 

tf SBC GI0FPHI Ecu YW A Ecu 

tf SBC GkU-Ptfl Ecu YW B Ecu 

tf SBC Glbl -PHI USD YW A S 

tf SBC Grw-Ptf I USD YW B J 

tf SBC GlbL PHI SF Inc A SF 

tf SBC ClbhPtU 5 F Inc B SF 

tf SBC Glbt-Ptfl ECU Inc A Ecu 

0 SBC GIDPPIfl Ecu Inc B Ecu 

tf SBC Glbt-Ptfl USD Inc A —J 

tf SBC Glbl- PHI USO inc B S 

1 s*£ E*- 0 "* Grw»th_DM 

tf SBC GRH PlfHJM YW A/B J3M 
d SBC Glbl Plft-DM Inc A/B-DM 
tf SBC Emerging Markets S 

tf SBC Smalt & 6AM Cans 5w_SF 
a Amerleavolnr * 

rf AnokiVotor. 


0 AMaPDrftoHo- 


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d D-Mark Bond setacBan dm 

d DoIHrf Band Selection 5 

tf Ecu Band Setectlan Ecu 

tf Florin Bond SeiecHon Ft 

tf Frtmcn Valor PC 


tf GermantaVOtw- 

rf Gold Portfolio. 

d iberiavaior 

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tf Slerimg Band Seiectlgn C 

d Sw. Foreign Band Se tort Ion 6F 

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v«v 

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tf Univereal Fund- 


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73*78 

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TBMPLETON GLOBAL STRATEGY SICAV 


tf Giabal Growth, 


d DM Giabal Growth . 


0 Smaller CcmponJev- 


d E merging Martin 
d Global I 


d DM Gtebal Band. 
0 US G ov e rnment. 


tf Emerging iMkls fu Inc. 
d Haven- 


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TEMPLETON Rr.WIDE INVESTMENTS 

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dO™*-’— * 1111 

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0 Clan A-3 j 14,97 

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tf Class B-Z- 


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j bread an iegue prieag. 


THORNTON MMAGEMENT LTD 

if pDCHInvf FdSAt— * 

tf Inrt F d SA DM—- DM 

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tf Thorntan ngor l=d LM 5 

tf MoroflcdSeiecHcn.. j 


NEW TIGER SEL. FUND 
tf Hong Kong— 
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0 Q*i 




THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

tf Equity income, 
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tf UBZ worm Income Fund —Ecu 
tfUBZGoMFiM- 


d UBZ Nippon Convert sf 

tf Asia Growth Convert SFR -SF 
tf AMO Grow* Convert USX-S 

tf UM DM- tod Fund DM, 

rf UeZD-Fta W DM' 


tf UBZ Swiss Equity Fund SF 

d UBZ American Ea Fund — f 

d UBZ s- Band Fund. s 

d UBZ Southeast Alto fd S 

UNION BAMCAIRE ASSET MGT (URAM) 
INTERNATIONAL, NASSAU 

tv Arde Unrest — . — S 


ims 

1069 

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tv Mourinv^Eau^m 
I irPutaar.^^^H 


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ir Urelnvest, 


UNION BANCAIRE ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
tNTERNATTONAL LUXEMBOURG 


teUBAMSBond- 


w UBAM DEM Bond. 


w UBAM Emerakig Growth —S 

w UBAM FRF Bond FF 

tv UBAM Germany DM 


w UBAM Giabal Band. 

■f UBAM Japan. 


tr UBAM Sterling Bend f 

w UBAM SRl Padt & Asia— S 

w UBAM US Eaaktee S 


1158X9 x 
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1409.132 
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UNION BANK OF SW7TZERUUMV1NTRA0 
d Amca ,c 44X5 Y 


tf Band-trrvest. 


tf BrtMnvest. 
tf Car 


tf Ccmcrl-Uwuta. 

0 GMork-Inrest- 


5*70 y 
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7*75 v 


tf Daliar-ln*«*l- 

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d Gti Wen-Inveal, 
tf Hv i vvt Jj ^f J) - 


d HoBa nd-ltiyqst- 
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d Japan- Invert. 


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d Poclflc- Invest _ 
tf Sattt. 


SF 


d Sknnt2navterHnrea1 SF 

tf StertbiR-lnvgrt c 

tf Swiss Fronc-lmreit — SF 

tf Sima SF 


tf Swissreal. 


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tf UBS America Latino - 

tf UBS America Udtna 

tf UB5 Asia New Horizon SF 


tf UBS Asia New Horizon . 


tf UBS Smali C Europe - 
.Europe. 


ai 


cu 


d UBSSmaBC 
tf UBS Pert Jitv SFR inc. 
tf UBS Port Inv SFR CopG—SF 

d UBS Port inv Eoj inc SF 

tf UBS Pert Inv Ecu Inc. 

d UaSPbrtlnv Ecu Cop G — SF 
tf UBS Perl Inv Ecu Cop G 

d UB5 Port inv USS inc 1 

tf UBS Port HIV US* Inc SF 

tf UBS Port WV USS OOP G SF 

tf UBS Port Inv USS Cop G — S 

tf UBS Pori inv DM inc SF 

tf UBS Port Inv DM inc DM 

tf UBS Port Inv DM Cap G SF 

d UBS Pari Inv DM Cap G DM 

tf Yra-lnvert Y 


tf UBSMMHrvert-USS 

tf UBS MM invert-* Si 1 

tf UBS MM ImesFEcu E< 

tf UBS MM invert- Yra Y 

tf UBS MM Invesf-Ut Lit 1048782X8 


276X0 y 
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THE MONEY 


REPORT 
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Saturday 
in the 
IHT 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


World News. World Views. 

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with a scrupulous separation of reporting and opinion. 

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Bonn Says 
Tax to Last 
5 Years 


FDP Differs on 
Vilification Levy 


Reuters 

BONN — An income tax sur- 
charge of 15 percent being reintro- 
duced in Germany next year to 
help pay for unification will remain 
in force for at least five years, the 
country's chancellery minis ter said 
Monday. . 

Rejecting calls from industry for 
a clear time limit for the so-called 


“Solidarity surcharge" on income, 
ax, Frii 


and corporate tax, Friedrich BobL 
an aide to Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, said it would last five years 
or longer. 

“In the federal government's me- 
dium-term financial planning, it is 
seen as a source of income that can 


be taken for granted for five years," 
Mr. Bohl said. "1 can tdl you now 


ebteftetfenal Herald Tribuw comes 


that it- looks as if we will need it 
even beyond that" 

However, members of the Free 
Democratic Party, minority mem- 
bers of Mr. Kohl’s coalition gov- 
ernment, continued to insist tint a 
firm timeframe should be set for 
scrapping (he surcharge. 

“After three years tnere must be a 
review of whether the surcharge is 
still necessary,” said Klaus Kinkd, 
the country’s foreign minis ter and 
leader of the Free Democratic Party. 

The chancellor, who faces elec- 
tions in October, originally intro- 
duced a one-year surcharge in 1991, 
breaking a “no tax increase” pledge 
he made in the 1990 elections. His 
center-right coalition said last year 
that the surcharge would be restored 
from 1995, wise & the government 
takes direct responsibility for repay- 
ing about 400 billion Deutsche 
marks (S240 billion) of debts inher- 
ited from East Germany. 

Taxpayers will be taxed at their 
normal rate, but 15 percent will be 
added to their tax bill. The govern- 
ment has said it expects the sur- 
charge to raise around 30 billion 
marks a year in revenue. 

The opposition Social Demo- 
cratic Party has said it would scrap 
the surcharge if it wins power, re- 
placing it with a 10 percent levy 
that only people earning higher in- 
ss would have to pav. 


How to Sell the Plowshares? 

U.S. Tries to Aid Russian Military Conversion 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

Ne* York Times Service 

REUTOV, Russia — Inside a complex where 
die Soviet Union used to develop cruise missiles 
and spy satellites, Gerbert Yefremov is waging a 
different kind of battle. 

With orders for armaments having all but disap- 
peared, Mr. Yefremov is trying to turn the compa- 
ny toward earth-imaging satellites, solar-power 
cells, food-preservauoa equipment, water-purifi- 
cation systems, tinted glass, sailboats — virtually 
any commercial product its talented scientists and 
engineers can design and produce. 

At stake for the company he manages, Mashin- 
ostroyeniya, are its 6.500 remaining jobs, down 
from 9.000 a few years ago, in tins dty 10 railed 16 
kilometers) east of Moscow. 

For Russia, Mr. Yefremov's success or failure 
will be an early test of the country's ability to 
convert an economy that was largely directed at 
maintaining military strength into one that can 


support jobs and create wealth. 

have always had to compete," Mr. Yefre- 


“We 


mov said. “Now it’s just a different kind of compe- 
tition." 

But even with aid from the West, some of which 
is on its way, it seems that no more than a handful 
of Russia's military enterprises can be transformed 
into makers bf quality civilian products at a com- 
petitive price. 

As a result, even a relatively small company like 
Mashinostroyeniya may in the long run have to 
slim down a lot further. That means attempts to 
turn military industries to civilian use will barely 
alleviate the pain and upheaval that the miliiary- 


industrial complex seems destined to endure as 
Russia moves in fits and starts toward a market 
economy. 

To try to ease Russia’s conversion, an American 
program is just getting under way to encourage 
American companies to seek Russian military con- 
tractors for joint-venture partners. 

Mashinosiroyeniya was selected recently by the 
U.S. government as one of four Russian military 
complexes to participate in the First round of the 
program to create and finance commercial joint 
ventures with American companies. 

Under the program, which was developed by 
Defense Secretary William J. Perry and is being • 
managed by the Pentagon and the Commerce 
Department, the United Slates will provide a total- 
of. $20 million to joint ventures that it judges to be 
models for further deals. 

The other three Russian companies chosen for 
the program are the State Scientific Research Insti- 
tute of Aviations Systems and the lstok Electronics 
plant, both in the Moscow area, and the Lemuels 
plant in Sl Petersburg. 

“We would prefer that these factories produce 
commercial goods rather than weapons of mass 
destruction," said Barry Carter, an official who 
oversees the program for the Commerce Depart- 
ment. 

“These joint ventures help the economy of Rus- 
sia, and they help the U.S. and the rest of the world 
through more trade and investment." he said. 

Although no precise figures are available, Rus- 
sia’s military industry, which encompasses not just 


See RUSSIA, Page 13 


Roche to Pay 
$5.3 Billion for 


U.S. Drug Maker 


Bloomberg Business News 

PALO ALTO, California — The 
Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche 
Holding Ltd. took a big bet Monday 
on Syntex Corp.’s future, agreeing to 
buy the U.S.-based drug company 
for $5 J billion in cash. 


The price of $24 a share repre- 
itoSyn- 


sents a 57 percent premium 
lex’s market value- on Friday, 'al- 
though it still is well below the $56 
high for Symex shares in early 1991 


Syntex shares gained $815 to dose 
1 at $23.50 in heavy trading. 


Monday i 

Syntex had revenue of Sll bil- 
lion in the business year to July 31, 
1993, and Roche had 1993 sales of 
$9.7 billion. 

Roche’s bet is that while patent 
expirations are depressing sales of 
Syntex ‘s current stable of products, 
Syntex has the potential to turn out 
major new drugs in the next several 
years because of its strength in re- 
search and development Roche, a 
global company, could provide the 
most extensive marketing reach for 
Syntex drugs while minimizing its 
own cost of drug development 

“Product development is very 
costly now, so if you're forced to 


introduce as quickly as possible in 
major markets, you need a critical 
mass in development," said Max 
Gunner, a Roche spokesman in 
Switzerland. 

Roche agreed to pay a price 
equal to 15.3 times Syntex’ s expect- 
ed fiscal 1994 earnings of $1.52 a 
share and 20.5 times expected 1995 
earnings of $ 1 . 1 7 a share, according 
to estimates compiled by Institu- 
tional Brokers Estimate System. 

Other drug companies are trad- 
ing at lesser multiples of their per- 
share earnings. 

Mr. Gunner said Syntex's 
stream of products under develop- 
ment. known in the pharmaceutical 
industry as the pipeline, encour- 


aged Roche ((^pursue Syntex. Syn- 


tex in fiscal 1993 spent 19 percent 
of its sales on research and devel- 
opment, compared with an indus- 
try average of about 14 percent. 


Syntex by the end of June plans 
i file for Fa 


Mediobanca Girds Up for Privatizations 


AFP-Exie! News 

MILAN — Mediobanca SpA. Italy's leading 
merchant bank, is likely to use proceeds from 
its just-announced capital increase to partici- 
pate in Italy’s next round of privatizations, 
analysts said Monday. 

The capita] increase, announced Friday, is 
expected to produce returns of 1.5 trillion to 1.9 
trillion lire ($940 million to SIT* bOlion). 

“The operation will allow Mediobanca to 
maimain its central role in Italian corporate 
affairs and the privatization program, ’ said 
Fabrizio Mambretti, an analyst at Gamba Az- 
zonL He claimed (be market would be able to 
absorb the increase “without difficulty." 

Analysts said that Mediobanca would be 
particularly interested in the privatization of 
SotietA Finanriaria Telefonica SpA, Lfae tele- 
communications holding company, as well as 
IsiitutoNazionale Assicurazioni SpA and Ente 
Nazionale per l’Eneigja Elenrica. 

“I think the market will lake the capital 


increase news well because it’s so dearly aimed 
at the attractive privatizations coming up.” one 
analyst said. 

“It's difficult to see Mediobanca facing any 
resistance from the current government as it is 
handling (he placement of the Fininvest SpA 
unit Mondadori,” be said. “And Fininvest will 
need Mediobanca’s help to son out its own 
financial difficulties." 

Fininvest is owned by \ rime Minister Silvio 
Berlusconi. It is divesting its Mondadori pub- 
lishing business after Mr. Berlusconi’s allies 
said be should not dominate both the political 
and the media scenes in Italy. 

Recently Mediobanca has come under criti- 
cism for its role in the privatizations of Banca 
Commerciale Iiaiiana SpA and Credito Ila- 
Iiano SpA. Some critics maintain that Medio- 
banca and its allies have taken control of both 
banks without paying the cost of a takeover. 

The capital increase, which will be partly 


open to outride investors, will reduce the stake 
held in Mediobanca by its core shareholders to 
41 .3 percent from 50 percent, or as far down as 
40.6 percent if all warrants are exercised 

However, Mediobanca said the existing group 
of core shareholders would be maintained. A 
stake of 25 percent has long been held by three 
banks, Banca Commerciale Iiaiiana, Credito Ita- 
liano and Banca di Roma SpA, while an equal 
stake was held by a group of major Italian 
companies including Assicurazioni Generali 
SpA. Hal SpA, Pirelli SpA and Olivetti SpA. 

Mediobanca will issue 100 milli on ordinary 
shares with warrants. Part of the offering will 
be available to Mediobanca shareholders on the 
basis of one new share for 4 shares held. Anoth- 
er part will be reseiyed for outride individual 
and institutional investors. 

Analysts said shares offered to the market 


would almost certainly go to Mediobanca allies 
ive no effe 


and would have no effect on its control. 


to file for Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration approval for an oral version 
of Cytovene, a drug Syntex already 
sells in an intravenous version. The 
drug is for cytomegalovirus retini- 
tis, an eye disorder that strikes 
AIDS patients. 

Intravenous Cytovene generated 
sales last' year of $86 million. Hc- 
mant Shah, 1 an independent. phar- 
maceutical analyst in Warren, New 
Jersey, estimates that annual sales 
of the oral version could reach $75 
million in three to five years. 

By January, Syntex plans to file 
for FDA permission to sell myco- 
phenolate mofetii for the treatment 
of rejection in kidney transplant 
patients. Mr. Shah estimates annu- 
al sales of S125 million for that 
drug within three to five years. 

Syntex also has drugs in human 
trials for organ transplant rejec- 
tion. Alzheimer’s disease, osteopo- 
rosis and peripheral artery disease. 

Syntex shares have tumbled from 
their 1992 high amid expectations 
that its loss of patent protection last 
December on its two main products, 
pain relievers Naprosyn and Ana- 
prax, would depress profit. 

Roche also has a majority stake 
in Genentech. a biotechnology 
company based in South San Fran- 
cisco, California. 


/Commentary 


The Way to Get the Good Jobs Back 



Ify Reginald Bale 

International Herald Tribune 

■ ASHINGTON — The woritfs 
rich countries should not be 
afraid of change — on thecon- 
f t • - trary they should embrace it 
That Clintonesque (base is about to become 
theraflyiog ay of one of the leading voices of 
international economic orthodoxy, the Paris- 
based Organization for Economic Coopera-: 
tion and Development. 

After nearly two years of hard work, 4he 
OECD is approaching the end of an. exhaus- 
tive investigation into the industrial world's 
: West mysiery: Wherehave afllbegoodjobs 
«ose and how can we gel them back? 

In answer to the first pan of the question. 
the study, the brainchild of Secretary General 
fom-Qacdc Pave, finds that the grobfe a is 
onfi'lbe industrial countries have largdyin- 
flicted oh themselves, through then- mfleftwi- 

at three commonly dted 
aaoceoats: cheap imports from low-wage 
countries, the job-shrinking 
technology and intensifying global compen- 

condodes that technological innovation 
has a tuner impart on jobs than imports 
, ^ i^fietiKries. vScfa account for 
"only Id! percent 

ness to cope with it- • . . • • 


It is a fine distinction, but a key one. It 
tindttlines the futility of trying to resist the 
farces of change by the. kind of Luddite 
measures still favored by populist politicians 
and many labor unions. 

It also allows for much more optimism that 
techno! ogical advance Can Be ha r nessed to 
multiply wealth — a conclusion also reached 
by Prcadent Bill Qin ton’s Group of Seven 
jobs conference in Detroit earlier this year. 

The lemoning is that the imhjstnal coun- 


and education; and the introduction of new 
technology should, be encouraged, although 
the OECD is rightly wary of interventionist 
industrial policies. 

Wages should be made more flexible — for 
example, by eliminating minimum wages or 


lowering than for young people, as Prime 
‘ BaDadu 


Tike problem is not . 
change, but the rich 
countries 9 unwillingness 
to cope with it 


Minister Edouard Balladur tried unsuccess- 
fully in France — and nonwage labor costs 
such as social security should be reduced. 

It should be easier to shed workers for 
economic reasons. In the United States, people 
are fired more easily than in Europe, but they 
also find new jobs much more quickly and 
there is much less Jong-term unemployment. 

Working hours should be much more flexi- 
ble and governments should concentrate on 


finding new jobs for the unemployed rather 
to wore. 


tries; especially in Eoropei have for at feast the 
laatSOyeara aflenred their ecoonasc arteries to 
harden and their labor markets to grow rigid. 

Highly paid woricers are producing goods 
and services that people no longer want 'or 
cannot afford! Entrepreneurs and managers 
have fafled to respond to the potential of new 
prodticts.and production processes. 

Of coarse h is not the same everywhere. 
While Europe wants more jobs, the United 
Stales wants better jobs. Japan has done best 
in sHftgnan&ogemgdoyroent, bat it, too, has 
begun -feeling the pressures of change. 

So whai can be (tone to answer die second 
pan of the question, to create newjobs? Lots, 
the OECD says. 

Entrepreneurship can be frittered by re- 
moyingobstades to the start of new business- 
es and the expaosian of old ones; labor-force 
sHfa can be.honed through Belong training 


than paying them not 
Where wili the newjobs come From? They 
will be mainly in services and in the private 
sector, and they must be highly skilled if they 
are to last 


As the young protesters who so roughly 
r. Balladu 


defeated Mr. Balladur demonstrated, it will 
not be easy. For many, the change will be 
painful, and they will need help. 

But the main point is that most of the 
OECD’s proposals can be implemented by 
changing the rules of the game rather than by- 
distorting market forces. 

In some areas, particularly in introducing 
flexible wording conditions, John Major’s 
Conservative government in Britain is rather 
surprisingly leading the way — although it is 
hardly a model in other respects. 

.But a main implication of Mr. Paye's pro- 
posals, although he tactfully does not Say so, 
is that Europe should be more like America, 
which has always found change easier. 



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Cunpifci to Our Sulf Ft.™ DapMches 

NEW YORK — A stronger- 
Ihan-expected report on the econo- 
my and a drug company takeover 
pushed up slock prices Monday, 
allowing them to shrug off a drop 
in Treasury bond prices. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed up 19.33 points at 
3,701.02. Advancing issues oul- 


U.S. Stocks 


numbered declincrs by a 1 i-io-9 
ratio on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Trading was active on the 
Big Board, where about 296 million 
shares changed hands. 

A monthly survey from the Na- 
tional Association of Purchasing 
Management showed the U.S. 
manufacturing sector expanding 
rapidly in April. 

The data sent the price of the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 
down 8/32 point, to 87 1/32. and 
the yield up to 7.33 percent from 
7.30 percent Friday. Bond prices 
tend to fail on news of strong eco- 
nomic growth, which carries the 
threat of inflation. 

But stock investors focused on 
the potential positive earnings im- 
pact of quicker manufacturing 
growth rather than on the higher 
interest rates, which could choke 
off expansion. 

The purchasers' data sen: cycli- 


cais, in particular, higher. Cychcals 
are issues that tend to capitalize on 
an upturn in the economic cycle. 
Ford jumped 214 to 60ft and Gener- 
al Motors rase ft to57!4 

Also encouraging to stock inves- 
tors was news that Roche Holding. 
<rf Switzerland, will acquire Synlex, 
the pioneering U.S. drugmaker, in a 
deal worth S5.3 billion. Syntex 
shares surged 8ft to 2334. Other drug 
slocks rallied, including Merck, 
which rose Ift to 314, Upjohn 
which added 1 ft to 28ft and Glaxo 
Holding's American depositary re- 
ceipts, which added ft to 17ft. 

Fn«rm.in Kodak got an indirect 
lift from the news, rising 2ft to 44ft. 
because it spurred sentiment that 
Kodak may spin off its struggling 
Sterling Driig uniL 

Stock in Lehman Brothers Hold- 
ings rose ft to 19ft after it began 
trading on a when-issued basis. 

1 i-hman is trading as if it were a 
public company because its parent, 
American Express, is spinning ofT 
the securities firm to its sharehold- 
ers through 3 dividend on May 31. 

Oil stocks slumped, because 
higher interest rates make oil stock 
dividends less attractive, analysis 
said. 

Exxon fell 1ft to 61ft, Chevron 
lost lft to 87ft and Texaco dropped 
ft to 60ft, despite a gain in crude oil 
prices. g/ oom f )l i r ^ 



Standard & Poor’s indexes 


Indir&iftols 

Transp. 

Utilises 

Finance 

SPSXJ 

SP 103 


meti Law Close ChV 
S3l*2 S23-M S3U1 +w: 
4W.60 395-58 3*7.17 — 1*3 
1J9.49 1S7J2 15174 — Oaf 
AJ7D 43.22 Alftfi + QJS 
45157 4*f .05 45MC + 2i! 
4:8.69 414.43 417.96 + 2J16 


K VSE Sndexes 


1 jS »4J7 w.2J was r 

I 52 939i 9141 ’197 T 

M 93.85 9X75 WJs + 

Vtr 9J42 VIS’ ntu +1 

cy volume: 23.137. Own Ini.: 712.977. 
ID-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS IMATIFJ 

SF^-'SSTBU. UM -a 

£ sns IRS i&s 

sa. vciume: susi. Oocn tm itfos*. 




mZEBw 


Conocraa'c 
I industrials 
lronso. 
UU.r> 
Finance 


151. « 249 44 251 A0 - I 04 
3U9.7S 304./ 5 3U9/49 - 1.88 
253.74 751.24 251.9® —1*4 
71065 211.73 215 71 -OvH 
309.34 307 74 2«.» -0.77 


Slock Indexes 


N D J F U A M 
19 S 3 1394 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Wof! Low Lnsl OlB. 


Sunte* 
RJR OIP 
Merck 
RJR Nab 

UPiahrt 

G)q«0 

//JDiarta i 

EKoctok 

TOUMCa 

GnMoJr 

FordM 

Unisys 

Cocoa 

WolMcrf 

SchrPt 


Most Actives 

vat. 

Htoh 

La er 

U4 

019- 

3ieosa 

2J1* 

23" '■ 

23-* 

-IN 

49990 

4W 


6', 


36294 3IW 

29V. 

31 '■ 



t’-to 

6V* 



•WrtCT 

28H 

74V. 

28 V* 


29944 

14 

I7’.» 

171* 



44 te 

*3", 

44 



441, 

41 Vn 

444* 


224 45 

5444 

57’., 

57 v. 



57W 

54’. 


♦ '•$ 

22234 6Dti 

S9’^ 

«y. 


21492 

II 

lav. 

10V, 



42ta 

-n><* 

41 "■ 

” ’ ■ 



25 

2516 


19541 

44V* 

404* 

44 



Compos-ie 

Industrials 

Ban** 

insurance 

Finam 

Transp. 


740*7 7X2.99 739.94 -4.10 
771JU 764*2 7705? -6.13 
6*3.43 693*3 -4 95 

39440 668*3 8*3*6 -3.65 
704JI 901.34 903*7 - 2.03 
7J/.09 713.76 73549 — 146 


Hfeh Low C<A*c Clionse 
CAC 40 IMATIFJ 

S5" ,Perl gaM tt Q0 2149.06 + 16.00 
Jun 216300 ?I6!J» 2172X0 + 15JW 

Jul 217300 2174.00 2169.00 Ur.Ctl. 

Se n 319300 216333 2162-50 + leJO 

OK N.T. N.T. 221 fl* +16*) 

Mir NT. N.7. 2248.00 *■ 1600 

EjLvoiume; 13.173. Open In/.: 48*96 


Dividends 


P«r Ami Pay Rec 
IRREGULAR 


AMEX S Clock Index 


High Law Lost Chg. 

440.40 433.53 430.17 - 0JI4 


Sow Jones Bond Averages 


Sk Boston oClol 6 

3> Sos'anodlpiC 
CBL & Assoc 

Campania Tel Chile a 

Hit! Europe Oil 
Sun Enersv 
Unlmcr CO 

o-eavabie an class as>b. 
aopproA amount per ADR. 


a J* 5-14 6-15 
_ 1-39 Sit t-15 
_ J7S SI® >25 
D .9)05 5-4 S22 

_ -36 SI? S2S 

- *7 >20 6-10 

- M S13 S3I 


x ao/ufc 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


aose Ch'M 

98.18 —041 

9SJ3 —050 

10053 —OX 


STOCK SPLIT 

Am express 1 share of Lehman Bros tor eoch 
So! American Express held. 

DSC Communication 5 for 1 spill. 

Sonic Environ 2 tar I spin. 


NASDAQ SSostt Actives WVSE Diary 


INCREA5ED 

Scnr Stole Gas a J45 5-18 6-1 


Dollar Drops Further 
Against Deutsche Mar 


wiefs 

Ciscos 

mos 

Havens 

Oroacs 

MiCSHS 

NwbNKs 

TdCmA 

0 at «2000 

AlphaBto 

LIBcp 

5vbasas 

US wrtr s 

CottCps 

DSC 


Wgl l 

Low 

Lari 

61 

59L. 

40V, 

32 V* 

19 V. 

32 -i 

22 V* 



194* 

/SI 4 

19 


»V* 

3l T to 

95v* 

92 

95' > 



54W 

1«W 

(94* 

194* 

16'-. 

15V, 

15V» 

14 

11 V, 

17”, 



(J 

54 

49>rt 

53V* 



39 



19H 

63H 

60 

62t> 


Aovonccd 

Declined 

Unihcnoed 

Total issue s 
Now mans 
New Lows 


Chase Prev. 
1733 1297 

949 855 

608 624 

7770 2778 

39 26 

45 48 


Johnston Ind 

Preferred IncoFd 

Tolefle* Inc 


Q JDS 5--.1 5-M 
M .1025 5-23 5-31 
Q .135 5-25 6-15 


INITIAL 

Callawav GoH n ^5 .5-9 5-31 


Flrsl-Knox Banc 
I Harveys Casinos 
. HenryJock n 
Rock-TennA 
WV5 FrvJ 


_ *0 6-17 7-1 

. *4 5-ld 6-1 

- M 5-12 S-27 

. 03/5 S-7 5-20 

_ JO* 5-12 5-77 


The Aaonatei Pros 
NEW YORK — Tbe prcstdcoi 
of IBM PC Co., Roben Corrigan, 
will retire at the end of next month, 
IBM said Monday. 

Mr. Corrigan, 53, will end j 2 
years at IBM, the last three spent 
turning around its personal com - 

E uler operation. In recent months, 
owever, the unit has lost momen- 
tum and its proDtabflity problems 
have become more pronounoed. 

The PC Co n which is responsible 
for only about one-fifth ci IBM's 
: revenue but is the largest PC maker 
in the world, planned other top ex- 
ecutive changes, a spokesman said. 

IBM stock rose 50 cents to close 
at S58 a share on tbe New York 
Stock Exchange. 

Mr. Corrigan had earlier indicat- 
ed (o his bosses, including Louis V. 
Gerstner Jr., IBM’s cha irm an , that 
he would probably leave the com- 
pany this year or next. But bis de- 
parture was viewed as sudden and 
seemed to underscore tbe recent 
trouble at the IBM division. 

Mr. Corrigan will be replaced by 
G. Richard Thoman, who Mr. 
Gerstner brought in five months ago 
as corporate senior vice president m 
charge of both the PC Co- and an 
emerging subsidiary that will make 


Marcn. a rcaums . . 

economy is expanding. L L ii_T itLM j 3-^-^ - - 

Also on Monday, the governmen t rqwtea^ a spendfflgxgKQBa^. 
dan projects rose 0.8 percent m Mardi from Fwuary^readn^^ 
bilhcL Spending bad boa domM) pawumF*raaiyafld Z3j£jJ- 
in January after having increased for each of-the prwwos «ig&ni>®aL 
The recovery in March was less than most^analisS- apc^ 
severe winter prevented bidders frmn laying foundations 
roofs in many areas of the country. But analysts said-thsre yapjg| 
considerable momentum in the construction industry. / 

AT&T and Novell Plan New Service . 

vrrmf VODV TIT mnht-R iddrrl AT&T CoiD. and 




. , . ._£i- Vi 


NEW YORK (Kmght-Rtddcr) — AT&T Onp. sad NiwdHa£*£ 
Mooday they had f«med an alliance to ofte ««nputei-KHxto^ 
communicarions over AT&Ts longnjiaance tdephone Enes. 

The new service, called AT&T NetWare Connect Services, '^ ^ 
bine N oven’s Local Area Network software, called NetW^.j^. 

send data worldwide. . 

Tlie agreement is amflar to an earlier deal strodt ixasreen ATSTa^ 
Lotus Devdqmiem Carp, to offer Lotus’ network messaging 
called Notes, over tdeptone lines. - .-f v 


mi- 


... . 

■ r 

„ 

. ; . i. J*. 
-..-r-V 






Reynolds Buys Soviet Tobacco Want 

vrcni vnot' /ATY\ R T Pevnnlds Tobacon Itic Liht&l.-.' 


NEW YORK (AFX) — R-J. Reynolds Tobacco. Ihc^-the.i^, 
division of RJR Nabisco Holdings, said Monday that's 
contnAling interest in Yelets Experimental Tobacco Factay tn'^L 
Terms were not disclosed. R-J. Reynolds said it boo^it thelohuon 
p rocessing plant, which has an annual production capacity ^ 
metric tn"S with an agreement to refurbish existing equiptnedli^ ; > . : 
When refurbishment is complete, the plant will sase-tt'an^ 
processing facility for all of RJ. Reynolds’ cigarette 
ing in the former Soviet Umon and Eastern and Central Efflop&VY;;- 


kv--- V 

r- 


i.--— ^ ‘ 

' . o V -a: 

«_ Jk-'S 






fe?'- 


PCs based on a new computer chip 
I that was co-designed by IBM- 
After a restructuring in the suxn- 
i mer of 1992, tbe PC Co.’s market 
share climbed last year. Its rede- 
signed laptop computer, called 
ThinkPad, has been such a tut that 
the company has not been able to 
meet demand for some models. 

However, tbe unit has not 
changed its core line of desktop 
} models for businesses for more 
than a year. Technical problems 
thn t remain unsolved prevented a 
launch of systems in February. 

Tbe company had planned to in- 
troduce four new PCs for consum- 
ers on Monday but the announce- 
ment was put off until later in tbe 
week. IBM trails several competi- 
tors in the consumer market after 
years of providing machines that 
were not as powerful as tbe models 
it sold to businesses. 


AMEX Diary 


Air Transcon 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unc/waed 

Total issue* 

NemHiOto 

NMLOH 


327 372 

252 734 

211 235 

T9Q 777 

7 17 

15 16 


CotKpikJ to Our Sup F'cm Dispatcher 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the Deutsche mark for the 
seventh straight trading day on 
Monday os confidence in the U.S. 
currency waned further and the 
Federal Reserve made no effort to 
stem its slide. 


The dollar fell to 1.6474 Deut- 
sche marks on Monday from 


Foreign {Exchange 


1.6535 DM on Friday and was near 
the six-month low of 1.6430 DM it 
touched Friday. 

Tbe currency also stood at 
101.635 yen. up from 101.600 yen. 
It had rtached 100.500 yen Friday, 
its lowest since the postwar low of 
100.350 set in August 1993. 

“People are testing the Fed’s re- 
solve,” said Albert Soria, foreign 
exchange manager at Kansallis 
Osake Pankki in New York. “Right 
cow there’s no reason to buy dol- 
lars." 

In addition to general caution on 
the part of traders, the mark'd was 
thin with London trading closed 


for a holiday and Japan on the eve 
of a three-day break. 

Traders said that many market 
players bad soured on the dollar 
because it had failed to rally in the 
first four months of the year, even 
though German interest rates fell 
and US. interest rates rose. 

“Tbe doDar is a dog right now.” 
said David De Rosa, director of 
foreign-exchange trading at Swiss 
Bank Coip. 

Some dealers doubled that the 
Fed would intervene again soon 
unless the weakness of tbe currency 
further damages the market in VJ.S. 
Treasury bonds. “The Fed bought 
dollars to calm jittery stock and 
bond markets, not to defend specif- 
ic exchange rates,” said Lisa Fin- 
strom, currency analyst at Smith 
Barney Sheaison. 

Against other major currencies, 
the dollar was quoted at 1.4020 
Swiss francs, barely changed from 
1.4024 francs on Friday, but 
slipped to 5.6410 French francs 
from 5.6593. Tbe pound dropped 
to $1.5155 from $1.5190. 

(AFX. Bloomberg. AFP) 


AMEX Most Actives 


ivaaCp 

Cap LTV 

Audre 

TopSra? 

EcMaBav 

GtfCdaa 

Amdhl 

SPOR 

GicrtFd 

Cnevsns 


VoL 

Htoh 

Law 

Last 

dig. 

37503 

1791 

l&v* 

I7'.i 

—7 

15878 

IVto 

IV* 

19, 

* W 

4409 

1"u 

IVu 

lv* 

V >'11 

4711 

5Vto 

4V* 

5V* 

.. 

3679 

11V* 

11’-* 

11% 

—4* 

weo 

34* 

J*u 

3Vu 



2785 

7’/* 

4*4 

7 

* 1 . 

2745 45* e 

4J1V* 

4?Vn 

*'A 

2679 

22 V* 

JIT. 

22 

—4* 

2076 

2S4to 

24 ■* 

254* 

-4k 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uncrvs>oed 
Total Issues 
New Minns 
New Lows 


1659 1699 
1403 1403 
1927 1890 
4999 4993 

IIS 76 
n iii 


Spot Commodities 


MaricotSales 


NYSE 
Amu 
Nasdaq 
M rnt titans. 


Co in mod /tv Today 

Aluminum, lb 0581 

Cottoe, B/az_ lb 07? 

Copw eleOTotvIlc. lb 0?1 

iron FOB. Ion 21100 

Lead, B> 034 

Sliver, irov oz 5-305 

Sled (scran). Ian 137*3 

Tin, lb 16597 

Zinc, to 0.435 


Alex & Baldwin 
Ambac Inc 
A/n General 
Atlantic RWififl 
Baxter Inll 
Dexlor Cora 
Gen Motcn 
Gen Motor* E 
Gen Motors H 
Gtmon Greel 
Imasco Lid 
Jos/vn Corr 
Kavdon Corp 
Kennamelal Inc 
LNH Rdf 
Le ut iw ur ffl Ina 
Midwest Resource 
Mine Safc/Y Tool 
Oreson Sied 

Peonies Finn 
Pftllo Suburban 
Sanyo Elec ADR 
5onat UK 
Super Tr Co Mil 
Ollramar Carp 
Valero Nal Gas 
Wdnoarlen Rllr 
Wslotner Bna> 


5PECIAL 

, J» 5X 6-15 
REGULAR 

a 32 5-15 6-2 


Cl .12 5-10 6-1 

Q 2* 5-10 6-1 

G U75 S-20 6-15 

Q 35 6-3 7-1 

a .23 6-15 7-8 

Q JO 5-12 6-lb 

O .12 5-12 6-10 

Q 30 5-12 6-10 

Q .10 SCI 6-15 

3 Jf S-Jl 4-30 

O JO S-20 6-15 

O .iii 6-20 7-5 

Q J* 5-10 5-2: 

0 .14 6-2) 3-IS 

G .10 5-9 6-e 

1 31 5-> 6-1 

Ci 32 5-13 6-13 

G .14 S-U 5-31 

a .105 5-9 5-16 

G» 33 5-16 6-i 

d .13 5-27 0-16 

9 J6 6-15 6-2* 

At .12 5-5 5-13 

Q J75 5-6 64 

. .125 5-16 5-31 

C, 57 5-26 6-15 

G .15 7-15 8-13 


c-resular cnianetiy declaration of $10.00. 
d-auprax amovml per share. 


D-anasal; e-pnvabtc In Ccuadiaa fends; m- 
nuuiffitv; Q-qitoiierty; s-scmt-UBnital 


Merieux Can Keep Rabies 

WASHINGTON (Bbotnbag) — Pasteur Mfakox StxumF&S^ 


i&Zs- 

S5^* 


-■ ' -nf 540! 


3ft C8n ICUUl UIC 1 U/I» tau.iuv “ u ... -■ ■nn.i w i wa . 

which it acquired in 1989, because no one has offered 
reasonable price, the Federal Trade Commission said Monday.--^. 7 --. 

In 1990, the FTC ordered Mfaieux to lease the rabk^ necked 
another ccanpany for at least 25 years ance tbe two compares iwuiK 
main smypbas of the vaccine in the United States. Snre thGtfwkj- 

r^ mppwMHi iin diidmg Sfti tfhghne B mdiam PLCfiavebegiiiiiBiiHt^ff^i 

criiinp the vaccine in the United States. Merieux said. % v-'.V ^ J 
North American Vaccine Co., based in Bdtsville, Maryland, (g 
buy the vaccine buriness last year. Milieux rqected tbe bid, 
bdow “reasonable commercial value." The FTC mling mcaajSreth 
American Vaccine won’t gel the busnwss. • iVC- ;; 


.3. 
- ... 


v ... «. 


; T iX. -, *» 

-.‘3 7.-E4 




■ w.'.l •; 

■ '* O' 


jny-y • 

Zef 


SI &>:' 




For the Record 


Businessman Is Guilty of Cover-Up in BCG Case 


Fortme magazine said^ Walter Becbd 3d wili replace MacUftactis 
managing editor. Fortune is owned by Thne Warner Inc. * .(ip) 

Scriptel Hotdmg Inc. said Samswg Display Serrices bougjii.RJS 
mininn nf Smptel common stock. That amount would bavehomefatatoa. 
357.000 shares, based on Scriptd’s closing price Friday of $3 
companies did not disclose the amount of shares involved. SaipttSa 10 
million share outstanding. _• 

Microsoft Corp, and Texas Instnanents be. said they wer^ 
to develop a product aimed at easing the creation erf custom niiare 
qjplicatioas for busnesses. - > y fSjm£ 


ICS5U: i -v * • 




Reuters 

LONDON — A real estate ty- 
coon was found guilty on Monday 
of providing bogus documents that 
helped the now-defunct Bank of 
Credit & Commerce International 


conceal its poor financial health' 
from its auditors. 


Tbe judge at London's Old Bai- 
ley court deferred sentencing of 


Nazmudin Virani, 45, but told him 
to expect to serve a prison terra 
because of the gravity of the crimes. 

Mr. Virani, who built a British 
property empire after fleeing re- 
pression in Uganda in 1972. was 
convicted of one false accounting 
charge and six counts of providing 
faJje information to Price Water- 
house & Co- which audited BCCi's 


Montedison Cuts Loss Despite Large Writeoffs 


accounts prior to the bank’s closure 
three years ago. 

The Abu Dhabi-owned bank was 
shut down in one of the financial 
world's most notorious scandals af- 
ter its regulator, the Bank of Eng- 
land, learned of widespread fraud 
involving fictitious profits. 

The court heard that Mr. Virani 
signed a series of sham documents 
stating that his chain of private real 
estate'’ companies owed substantial 
debts to BCCI between 19S7 and 


1990. The “loans," classed as assets, 
inflated tbe bank's balance sheet. 

The prosecuting lawyer, Antho- 
ny Hacking, told the court the doc- 
uments were a device to hoodwink 
Price Waterhouse and allow BCCI 
to renew its banking license. In 
return, the court heard, Mr. Virani 
was given large loans , 

Mr. Virani denied trying to de- 
ceive the auditors and was cleared 
of other charges of conspiracy to 
defraud and thefL 


WMkend Box Office 


The Arsodaud Press . -Vf 

LOS ANGELES —“No Escape” dominated the U. S. bqx tffiswitfiY 
gross of $4 j 6 milli on over the weekend. Following are tfcjflpi'fft 
moneymakers, based on Friday ticket sales and estimated -iaks4ar 
Saturday and Sunday. . 


1. “No Escape* (Sava* Pictures) 

1 -Wliti Honors" tWOmcr Brothers) 

l -Four Weddlnss and a Funeral” IGnsnercy) 


£6 

05 

dfev- 

-s 

■ PjjariA- 
gHw - 

a 

hpii'- 
sqfejjBe- 
22£t ti. 
raBtar- 

issSafcr; 

thz- 


*4alV 


-' - *.v 

- j- s jfxit 

: >, .< • ,:->r 


' --i - ‘ 

.. .v * 


:.-..rar* twrtt 

r. j-.- r. wfr®.- 
rfiS^S 


.... '-pk 
\ ■ :yif# * 

. i Ai* -A few 

rr- .test besv 


A “Bad Gins- 
5. “Vod So Cm* 1 
4.-PCU- 
7. The Paper” 

X -D2 The MHWv Ducks* 
9. “Sdilndlert UP' 

ID. -The Favor^ 


invent teth Century-Pax) 
i Samuel GoHJwvrtCeJ . 
(Twentieth Century-Fox) 
{Universal} 
l Watt Disney) 
(Unhmsat) 

(Orton) 


atom 
SUmBta 
Slimrtto 
HjmJftB 
sis mm 


tii 


Compiled to Our Sup rrtan Dispatches 

MILAN — Montedison SpA. the Italian ag- 
rochemicals group, said Monday that its 1993 
net loss had narrowed to lJt/6 trillion lire 
(SS56.6 million), as a lower lira and stronger 
prices for chemicals compensated Tor large wri- 
teoffs on investments. 

The company said that it had posted operat- 
ing profit of 1.49 trillion lire in 1993, up 46 
percent from the year before. 

Tbe loss for 1993. which was 18.6 percent 
narrower than the loss of 1.679 trillion lire a 
year before, included charges of 1.002 trillion 
lire for writeoffs of investments in currencies. 


commodity futures and real estate, as well as 
for various restructuring charges. 

The company noted that its loss for 1993 was 
further swollen by 92 billion lire as a result of 
more stringent accounting practices. 

The company said that revenue had risen 20 
percent, to 20.415 trillion lire. Net debt fell 4 
percent, to 15.841 trillion lire. 

Last week Montedison's parent company. 
Ferruzzi Fin anzi aria SpA said its net loss wid- 
ened in 1993 because of one-time charges to 
write down hidden losses from investments. 

“Whatever they announced would have been 
accepted by the market, " said Michael lerubino. 


an analyst at Murchio & Co. SIM. “They wcuid 
be wise to lake afl the hits they can take now.” 

The entire Femrzzi group turned to its credi- 
tor banks last year to seek relief from its debts. 
The banks installed a new management, which 
arranged a rescue plan that included interest 
relief and selling a total of 5.4 trillion iire of new 
capital 

The new managers soon discovered hundreds 
of millions of dollars of hidden losses. Many of 
the company’s former managers, including 
members of the Ferruzzi family that founded 
the group, ore now faring legal action. 

(Blot-mbsrg. AFX) 


5? 

o Li <2-’ et V.27 i£to«? 

Vo Ai.wviracd Pldl 


ieaai Season 
►ann low 


Open Htfi Lot. dose 


Season Seam 
Ugh Low 


Low . Oom On GUI 


. bla< 'a Clo^.'no 

-r - . .• 


Seisan jeasan 
High Low 


Otcn Htjh Low Gos* Oo Op.lnt 


I1JE l(L57May?5 11.18 11.18 

11*3 10*7 Jul 95 11.15 11.15 

11*0 10570095 

I1JS 1 0*6 Mar 96 

Ett. soles 9*77 Fti s. sties 16,955 

Fri's open ton 103*15 att 805 


-41*5 2477 
-0*5 1J00 
-OQ5 344 
-DOS 39 




Grains 



COCOA 

1365 

(NCSEJ Mm* 
7» Jul 94 

trick** 

1738 

1 POT K«* 

1159 

1138 

1145 

♦ 17 38*26 





llri 


11*5 

1177 

1181 

1170 




1389 

lCIIGecM 

I2U3 

1710 

>203 

1216- 

♦ 15 

0867 







1332 

1077 MX 95 

1237 

12*8 

1237 

1243 

*16 1 0,677 

274 




1304- 




1078 May 95 

1120 


1120 

1137 


SO 









>225 Jul 95 






2^88 

3iH 



i40'.« 


IJTV, ,0*4’, 


1350 

1165 SeP 95 




1107 


546 









'TO Dec M 




1341 


679 












1356 


3 

3 II 

Jul 95 


US 

124 

JJril ■ O0l i.* 

77 


»22SAtor96 




1273 


4.903 


mmvt MARKETS 


Aganu* France Omw Ma- 
Q OS* Pray. 



RusatoT 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
Stool 
Weikam 


83 86 

97 JD «6 
NA 41 
25.75 25^5 
NA. — 


western Deeo 173 175 

Composite intteK : SJ39S* 
Prev ta w s : 5375*0 


Montreal 


Helsinki 

Ampr-vtirrma 

127 

131 


3050 3040 


213 


LO.P. 




10* 


metro 

205 

707 

9061a 

454 

456 

?ohlolc 

95 8IJSC 

V O I>31 □ 



5t5c6mcnn 

30 

22 : 

hex index ; isa.il 






A toon Abirnmum M'-n 79 

Bonn Monrrral 2SL 2S4s 

Bell Canaaa <Fn 43to 

BcnU3arr:\cr B 31 71 

CamWor 17*4 17V, 

Casctxfes 8 7~m 

Domtoitan Text Alt 
Dononue A 13Vj 26'i 

MocMJlIanBI 3015 29v- 

Nati Bx Canada * 

Power Cora. 2IH 21V, 

QveOoc Tel 24 34 

Ourtecor A 20* 30’- 

Ouefiecor B 30'4 30* 

Tclevtobc 70 20'to 

um»a 5*4 54. 

Vifieotran wa His 



Miktoo Securities 1350 1220 

Nippon Koccttu Wi 99j 

Nippon on Tl? 730 

Nippon Steel 344 347 

Nisaon virsen 59o oM 

Nissan £57 BaO 

Nomura 5ec 219U 22 IB 

NTT revo 86260 


Gr.mousOolicoi 1003 1610 


Markets Go&ed 

Stock markets in 
Brussels. London. Ma- 
drid and Singapore 
were closed Monday 
for holidays. 

Trading on the Mi- 
lan bourse was sus- 
pended because of 
computer problems. 




Pioneer 3610 2610 

o.can 856 SU 

Scn.o Elec «»6 SOI 

Sharp 165) 16«0 

SNouii 687 Ut~ 

StunetM Cfton*. 7070 Tjn 

SCO* 57 '.*9 £740 

SutnMcmaBto 7 til 3153 

iurrltomi citem 4V0 JV3 

Sami Vortne «i6 ?Ce 

Sunito*ti9 Metot Ml :« 

Tcisel Cera lS7 495 

Talsno Marine 812 074 

Tafcrao C«cn 17IW I3M 

TC.t 4<70 «SW 

Tenift 515 510 

Tot >3 !IC*lr 17“ 3 I .V0 

To. >3 Elec Pw 318.1 3730 

Too pan Prlr.Mrp ITT. I3W 

Teray ins. sT. 506 

TfcShlSe 71? 7T3 

Tcvaia I960 15M 

Yarrcim StC ue 855 

a. * »0C 

toUfcmn 225 19S73 


71? TTTi 
WoO lt» 
ue 855 


O^howa 51 - 

Poaurm A 

P.octir Dome 77*r 
Poco Petrelcvm 15 s 
PWACcra 54® 

Hayrack. Ifl 

Rcna.i^cncc XT-. 

Roecrs B 

ROKiintins Sl 1 - 

RoyOiajntCan 27’ . 
Sceolre Res 13L. 
Scott s mow 7 

Seasrcm 

Sears Coo f ■- 

Snell Con -V* 

Slier nr Ceraen *!■: 
SML Srsiemnse 
Scu'/ian; l fi '. 

Spar AerLSJtxc ■; 
Siem A 
Talisnsn Enerc 
TrC* B 23-- 

Thomson Cars. - 

T oromo Oemn 7 ■ 

TprsicrB ?: . 

Transons '<•" u . 

TransCeoPia- Is- 
TrltorFiiJA 4 :•) 

Trlrr^i; 

Tn;i c t 544 

Un ccro Energy 1 41 
TSZ W .r*8o» : 4732^7 
Pre»iou5 ' 4U7.1D 


jJL Su'd?) 33M'. UJi 134U 3_W iUtt*4 6,26? 
it5 3ilf uet >4 j 44 144 1JT/, -uiCV. 6.205 

154', lu7 l*jr« J.4»'» 1S6W 14:W 14H, -DJ2*i J9» 

1 * H6W.’4oy*S X«<o. 0 * 2 Vi 24 

14i«, 311 Jul 95 J*5 U5 134 -lUWU 77 

E«l sales 17*00 Pn-S. safes U*02 
Prrseoenirt 0 557 Oft 1000 
WHEAT (KBOT) seat Oj’ntr. men- aoBcr-.o*'Ov*Ki 
17*' > L« /.ViY94ie> 3*3'.7 3.0 2»1L« *0*4*. 1.735 

1A5 197 Ai 91 333 13b 137 »OB3 13441 

U5’- 302' ,5ep7l J3,'i J3 T '» lil’i 136*, -OJG'u 3.912 

a« 112 iOl-CK J*J’. 144 1409; 1C9j - 0.01 '.to lot/ 

3*3'. 125 M»9 5 lOito *103 351 

124 12H,.vicv95 120 .0.03 17 

cn.lOSJi NA Ftfvases SXF 
Put oast Ito T:-tm eft 770 
CORN (CBOT) S no Cm nwrwTRWTv AAixpcrbrnnH 
Hb'« 238’, MOV 44 ? *9'.; 2J0'-. 24T* -OJOVi ll.«n 

IVto 3.91 Jul M ITT'. 273'-. 3.70'‘ 271 v. -0*0 s, :j4*31 

7 ?’.' 1 1401: Sep 94 5A5 7 67 141*6 2i4‘4_0.0l9i 3I,«08 

-Tl 1 . 2Jt',>K«4 237 7S7\1 1H. IjS'to— OJEV. T7.737 

2J9'i 24) K'artS 2*7'. 1«3L UhV. 7rt'j— OOT'u *.n« 

gjn 157 ' ■ Mnv 95 2x7* * 747>* 74 s Ito'i,— OXOV, 74 s 

7K-. 339 jut 15 7.48 2 .« 147 2.47V, -0*2'- 1400 

1M'-. 2A4’.D=Clj 739 T57 ll7 2jfl — 801'.'. 1,130 

E,' tales 43.300 Pfi'i use- 734 S 6 

Fr. *.open«to 248.720 c*1 S4H 

lOTBEANS I COOT I ima.pv^m-iaiifvMiv 

Ml ay«J S.75-I 0 l74'j te7 a474.-0.07W 11689 

'j0 Sx- ■ 1 All 74 6 71 (.'iv. 446’, a*9V.— 0.06>. 41*73 

235 633 AmN 4»9 t. 70’1 442S *L4i.»— 0l»’. JUOi 

4 3-"-. 617 Sen-14 4 SI * «*• »C"« 444’i— 0JW9i i.310 

75”: 5to ,t<»/9J *yi *i>., 01D 1 - 4136-1 

4:3 all ».i9S 434- , l 3T.'. »J1 „ U’ ,-aD3'<» 7.9S3 

L'i 6 13 Mar*S *« 4 61' ; 4J4'i oJB -0JQ‘. 800 

ato 421 Ltovftitl ( JI ijn 302*1 4«? 

t:i 634 jm?s on, 4«*-« a*ovi 6 nw-aoiv, 742 

<«'. 5M-...IWVV5 Ml t 11 408 o.ia* r — OLdOVto 1,477 

E.: soles K'-Ufl Fri sute si 11 
htr- ooen Ini I ■“ ,»J7 n.1 777 
SO TOEAN M£*L (CBOT) iiamL-onnixr w 
--M 56i.or.Vx«94 lrt-n I'-SIJS io7ju) Ir040 -Ut 

T.Vth UiTPJ-JiM /9luJ I "I to lAito l*44P — 7.»»74? 


Est. sates H).t95 Fri’s. Sotos 4,955 
Ri’s ooen ill 81J91 aft 172 
ORAM2E.MCE IMCTNi ISM »«ra-< 


MT4 . OJOVi l|.«n 
771L— 000^, 134*31 
244‘4-fl.0lVi 31,te8 
7jS'-j— OJEV. 77.737 
7a9'j— OOl’it 6.714 
2.46'4— 040 v, 765 
247V,— CU12 1 - 1300 
2j0 —101 1,130 


13500 l«X0Mav94 1080 10140 
I3UXI KOJ5Jul«4 10625 10150 

I34JO 15400 Sep 94 10150 11030 

ilM.no 1 04. 15 Nov 94 109.00 11050 

132*0 10330 Jan 95 11000 11125 

1242S 104 00 MW 75 11145 11440 

'1425 11250 Moy 93 

119.00 119 00 Jul 95 

Sep 95 

Eal. sates 3*00 Frfs. safes «« 
Fri'snaenml 20**9 aft 1101 


*1J0 1*98 
♦1-5 13*44 
M.00 2J57 
*220 1,123 
*125 

♦ ZOO 641 
*1-50 20 

*150 1 

♦150 


9A530 71*10 SOP 95 «2 *“• -S1K5 

94280 91.1 B0 Dec 95 HMD «.!» OM 

94220 9UHMtr94 mM O* «*0 »»• -40UUH 
Eststte NA W*.*ete 
Frt-s open Ire 3JtSM> aB-'BI) 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 



Page 13 


Riva Takeover 
0i EKO Stahl 
Is Threatened 

C "** W & Ov Staff From /Wt*-, 

BERXJN — The Italian steel Rexrodl said be bad been in 


Henkel Says 
Cost Cuts to 
Help Profit 


Philips Profit Seen Surging 

Improved Finances Should Help in Quarter 


minwtn au ii l 


company earned 103 million guD- 


AMSTERDAM — Philips Elec- ders in the 1993 quarter. 


^-^tatives^EKOsSS 

SCO Stahl AG, vhe big s£2K Md T^odwndanstalL 
II , Germany, German gov- Gne German government offi- 
H" 1 Monday. aal smd that EKOSmSSi^S- 

10 throw in pul numerous hurdles m 


w* uerman government offi- 
cial said that EKO Stahl's managp- 
“eninad pul numerous hurdles m 

the WBY of Riva. irvtllirlina dpntrinit 


the tmwui » ,7- ** w in -r— «™ic ims nuioies in 

tw toweu a German government ^ way of Riva, including damns 

referring to Emilio U acc f s 10 financial and tSS 
«va, the owner of the Italian com- ^wds. 

EttifSS-JSJ! 


CKUhtahl in January and was due 
to take ova the r emainin g 40 dct- 

was postponed last week because of 
a disagreonent between Mr. Riva 
and the German labor union IG 
Metall over the composition of the 
rampants supervisory board and 
the pace of planned job tai ts. 

In March, Tretihandanstalt, the 
privatization agency for Easton 
Gomany, said that Riva had com- 
mitted itself to invest 1.1 billion 

gsisr* (S661 ^ m 

Germany’s economics minister 
Gflnter Rrarodi, urged the man- 
agement of EKO Stahl to fulfill the 
conditions for the takeover by Riva 
as soon as possible. 

“There is no alternative to priva- 
tization through the Riva group,” 
he said. “Anyone in these bodies 
who tries to cany on cooking his 
own private or ideological soup is 


Mid, adding that Riva officials had 
been given office space at EKO 

S tahl 


Th p IG Metall metalworkers 
union, which according to the pri- 
vatization agreement would divide 
the 10 seats on the company’s su- 
pervisory board with representa- 
tives from Riva, supports a former 
finance minister, Hans Ape] for tbe 
crucial 1 1th seat on the board. That 
seat would cast a vote only in the 
event of a draw. 


Rewm 

DUSSELDORF — Henkel 
KGaA said Monday that its 
profit could rise more than 10 
percent this year as cost-cut- 
ting measures begin to have an 
impact. 

Hans- Dietrich Winkhaus, 
chairman of the chemical and 
detergent company, said it was 
posable pretax profit would 
show double-digit growth this 
year. Sales should rise by about 

3.0 percent, he predicted. 

In 1993, Henkel’s pretax 
profit fell 6.0 percent to 388 
million Deutsche marks (5354 
million). Hit by falling Europe- 
an revenue, group sales fefi 10 
percent to 13,87 billion DM. 

Mr. Winkhaus said sales in 
Germany fell 10 percent last 
year and sales in Europe feQ 

7.0 percent — declines that 
could not be offset by strong 
growth overseas. 

In the first three months of 
1994, parent company pretax 
profit rose about 3.0 percent. 


Ironies NV is likely to report sharp- For rhe full year, analysts predict 


ly higher first-quarter profit on profit between 1.14 billion guilders 
Wednesday, but the gains probably and 1 .50 billion, as much as 75 
resulted from improved finances percent above 1993’s 856 million. A 


rather than stronger sales, analysts 
said Monday. 


1994 dividend between 85 cents to 
1 JO guilders is predicted, up from 


The consumer -electronics con- a g'dlder paid for 1993. 
glomerate will probably report a' _ Investors also appear to be bank- 


gain of between 63 percent and 200 mg on higher profit Philips shares 
percent in profit, analysts sa id, al- have more than doubled on the Am- 


though they warned that the steep stodam bourse in the past year. On 


debt-cutting tngectory begun in 
1993 would not be sustainable 
through all of this year. 


But they said improving Europe- 25 guilders. 


Monday, Philips rose to 55.40 guil- 
ders from 5530 gufldera Friday. A 
year ago, the shares traded at about 


an economies would help operating Tbe bright outlook has come de- 

income in tbe second half of this spite no improvement in the mar- 
year. kel for consumer electronics, which 

“There is a lot of momentum account to more than a third erf 
ijlding up for earnings improve- group sales bat where profit mar- 
sat,” Bert Siebrend, an ana- gins remain wafer thin. 

U at Delta Lloyd Bank. The division was unprofitable in 


meat, said Bert Siebrand 
lyst at Delta Lloyd Bank. 


Analysts’ estimates for first- 1992 and for most of 1993. It re- 
quartet operating income ranged turned to profit in tbe final quarter 


from 165 million guilders ($88 mil- of 1993, but only because of the 
lion) to 300 million guilders. The usual surge of Christmas spending. 


Jocsl van Bode, an analyst with 
Van Meer James Capd, said he ex- 
pected the consumer electronics di- 
vision to post a small loss in the Qisi 
quarter but a profit for aH of 1994. 

The biggest unknowns for the 
company are its problem areas in 
Germany. At its Grundig AG con- 
sumer electronic subsidiary, the 
minority family owners receive a 
fixed dividend, but Philips funds 
all the losses — 350 million Deut- 
sche maits ($210 million) is 1993, 

Tbe company's other German di- 
vision, Philips R o mmu nflauioBS In- 
dustrie AG. has been bard-hit by a 

steep fall in telecommunications or- 
ders in Germany- Its p erfor man ce 
was mainly responsible lor the negli- 
ble operating return of 177 million 
guilders on sales of 9.4 billion in 
professional products in 1993. 

However, analysts said they ex- 
pected three other Philips divisions 
— components, lighting and other 
consumer products — to be strong 
contributes this year. 



Sources: Reut&s, AFP 


But a spokesman for IG Metall 
said that Riva opposed Mr. Apd 
due to fears that he would ride with 
the workers in contested votes. 
Riva officials woe not available for 
comment. 


despite a 1.0 percent rising in 
sales, he said 


taking on grave responsibility. 
There is neither any other investor 


for EKO Stahl, near is the European 
Union fikely to allow alternative 
aid.” 


EKO Stahl, which has about 
4,000 workers, was one of the last 
large companies that Treohaodan- 
stali was seeking to privatize from 
the list of 13,000 state-owned com- 
panies which it inherited from the 
former East German government. 

(Reuters, AFX) 


sales, he said. 

“The first months reinforce 
oar view that we should not yet 
bank on a thorough improve- 
ment in the consumer rfimatfr in 
Western Europe,” Mr. Wink- 
haus said But restructuring 
should lower costs to the point 
where doubk^figil growth in 
profit is possible, he said. 

He said the company spent 
241 million DM last year on 
steps to increase efficiency 
and that trend would continue 
ihk year. * 


Merck AG’s Profit Rose in ’93 


Compiled by Ov Staff From Dupatdtes 

ZUG, Switzerland — Merck AG said Monday its 1 993 net consolidat- 
ed profit rose 13 percent as sales surged in Aria, and it said it expected its 
business to keep expanding in 1994. 


Vnidanmark 
Takes Control 
Of Properties 


Very briefly: 


• The European Commission has allowed 16 brick companies in the 
Netherlands to jointly provide finanw'al compensation to companies that 
cut brick production capacity; the commission said the plan helped 
restore stability without using pricing or market share agreements. 


Profit was 155.4 mdlion Swiss francs (SI 10 million), compared with 
17.1 mdlion francs a year earlier, as sales rose 16 percent, to 5.71 billion 


IrancsL Sales were up 18 percent in Latin America and 37 percent in Asia. 

Merck said it expo: led further business growth in 1994 through a slight 
economic recovery and the expansion of existing business. 

Merck AG is the management and finance company for businesses 


outride Germany belonging to the family-owned German chemical and 
pharmaceuticals group E Merck of Darmstadt. It is not related to the 


pharmaceuticals group E Merck of DannstadL It is not related to tbe 
American pharmaceutical company Merck & Co- (AFX. Bloomberg) 


RUSSIA: U.S. Companies Seek Partnerships With Former Defense Firms StatoU Says Output Rise 

Co n t nwflJ fnw PUge 11 So the company’s fate may ulti- Masbinosttoyeniya — the name of nigh techno logy ” said dark 

n lOdnAHA i. vflflfAltl fimi Ofl vie aknifll to OAn_ man.ii> <■ AL. J.* r .1* r\ rw> , ArF'Exlft News 


Continued from Rage 11 So the company’s fate may ulti- 

weapons makers but nearly all maidy turn on its ability to con- 
technology enterprises and a por- vines American and other Western 
don of the nation’s heavy industry companies that Mashmosttoyeniya 
as well, directly employs some 5 is an attractive investment and 


milGon people — a decline of more joint venture partner. 


than 13 million in the last few 
years. 

Tbe industry also indirectly sup- 
ports tens of nplKp ns more in a 
country with a population erf 150 

milli on 

As they struggle to adapt, Mr. 
Yefremov and ms colleagues have 
ideas aplenty. Bui money is a dif- 
ferent story.Alsojjckmg is experi- 
ence in saks, distribution, market- . 
ing and quality control. little or no 
bdp is available within Russia mi 
those fronts. 


The hardies to attracting West- 
ern bdp are numerous. Among 
them are the same problems afflict- 
ing all foreign investors in Russia, 
indndmg the lack of an established 


lineal climate m which Westerners 
are increasingly branded as greedy 
carpetbagger 

There are also problems more 
specific to Russian nrifitaiy con- 
tractors, such as a lack of patents 


Mashinosuoyeniya — the name 

meant " irmeli in e-h i iilHin o" anH is a 

short form of the company’s full 
name, which means Scientific Pro- 
duction Machine-Building Associ- 
ation — has more erf a chance to 
sn ere ed than most Russian military 
enterprises. 

Representatives of several dozen 
Western companies and consulting 
firms have trooped through its labs 
during the last several years. Some 
of than, like Loral Corp„ a big 
military contractor and satellite- 
builder, have expressed interest in 
the Russian enterprise. 

“Mariunostroyeniya will survive 
and thrive because of the excellence 


of high technology,” said Clark 

Abt, director of the Defense Tech- » cm .... 

nology Conversion Center at Bos- . OSLO — Statod A/S said Mon- 
ton University. ^ ,ls first-quarter net profit was 

_ off only slightly, to 1. 1 billion Nor- 

Even outside the auspices of the wegian kroner ($154 million) from 
.S- government’s program. Amer- 1.2 billion kroner a year earlier. 


U3. government’s program, Amer- 


ican and other Western companies despite a 23 percent decline in aver- 
are combing Russia these days for age oil prices. 


opportunities to do deals with the 
once- mighty military industry. 


Booz-AUen & Hamilton, the 


The company said higher oil pro- 
duction helped cushion the effect of 
lower prices, as average daily output 
from the North Sea rose to 440,000 


New York consulting firm, is work- barrels from 380,000. Revenue 
ing on a project financed by the edged up to 19.7 billion kroner from 


Bank for Reconstruction 19.6 billion, and cmerating profit 
ipment to bring W estem was unchanged at 3.4 billion kroner. 

hn»U Bmpiham n. . . Y* .■ - #> 


companies together with Russian SialoiJ said the average price of a 


for most technologies and tbe slow erf their technology and their devo- 


pace of privatization. 


lion to tbe economic applications control system. 


radar and electronics producers to band of ofl in the first quarter of 
rebuild Russia’s aging air-traffic 1994 was $13.96, compared with 


$1823 in the first quarter of 1993. 


Bloomberg Business Mew 

COPENHAGEN — Uni- 
danmark AS, Denmark’s sec- 
ond-largest banking group, 
has taken over real estate in 
Copenhagen and London val- 
ued at an estimated 2 billion 
kroner ($310 milli on), 

The company said it was ex- 
ercising an option it had ac- 
quired from a Danish property 
developer who ran into finan- 
cial problems two years ago. 

The company’s Unibank 
unit was the chief creditor of 
the developer. Axd Johl- Jor- 
gensen. In return for refinanc- 
ing his loans in 1992, it set up a 
company, Danbyg Holding 
AS, to hold the properties and 
received an option to buy the 
company. It is that option that 
has been exercised now. 

“We expect tbe properties 
to increase in price,” the com- 
pany’s managing director, 
Lars Eskesen, said. “It would 
not be of interest to sell them 
now, but we can wait to quite 
a long time.” 

He said the properties had 
been independently valued in 
1992 and 1993 and that prices 
•had “certainly not gone down” 
since then. 


• Denmark's central bank lowered the two-week certificate of deposit 
rate, its key money market rate, to 5.8 percent from S.9 percent. 

• Sweden's new car registrations rose 44 percent in April to 15,750 units, 
and the country’s automobile association predicted that sales would rise 
13 percent for the year. 


• Adam Opel AG's share of the West European car market rose to 123 
percent in the first three months of 1994 from 12 percent in the 
comparable period a year ago. 

• BB Industrie Holding AG, a Swiss investment fund, has bought 4 
percent of the engineering group Landis & Gyr AG; the stake was part of 
a larger one held by Stephan Schmidheiny. a Swiss industrialist, that was 
listed in late 1993 as amounting to 38 percent of Landis & Gyr’s capital 

• Germany's Federal Cartel Office said it had postponed by one month a 
final decision on a planned takeover of Leybold AG, a unit of Degnssa 
AG, by a unit of OoSton BSbrie Holding AG of Switzerland; a spokes- 
man said tbe office had reservations that the merger might lead to 
domination of tbe market in certain sectors of coating equipment 


• AKranr AG Hohfing’s stock rose 2.6 percent to 2,655 Deutsche marks 
($1,610), buoyed by us announcement on Friday of a higher dividend. 


• Sues Arabia invited foreign and domestic companies to submit bids for 
a phosphate mining project valued at $1.7 bOhon. 

• Salomon SA. the French maker of skis and ski equipment, said sales 
rose 16 percent to 3.67 billion French francs ($645 million) in the year <0 
March 31, in spite of a decline in the world market 


1 Moody's Investors Service Inc. said it might downgrade the Aaa rating 


of Dtpartement des Haots-de-Seine, a wealthy administrative area in the 
Paris suburbs, because of its increasing use of debt to finance substantial 


Paris suburbs, because of its increasing use of debt u> finance substantial 
investments. 


• Kendra Oy of Finland has acquired a 51 percent stake in a chemicals 
plant in Prcrov in the Czech Republic for 20 million Finnish markkaa 
($3.76 miUion); the plant produces chemicals to water purification. 

Reuters. AFX. Bloomberg, AFP 


7TF. 1 


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145 

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Yes, I wont to dart receiving the IHT. This is the subscription term I prefer 
(check expropriate boxes); 

n 12 monflu (364 issues in wflh 52 bonus issues). 

□ 6 RKNdhs (182 issues in dl with 26 bonus issues). 

G 3 months (91 issues in ofl wilh 13 bonus issues). 

□ Mychedc Bendosed(ptyAbtolhelnlam(rfonol Herald Tribune). 

□ Heose chtige try: □ American Express o Diners GgboViSA 

□ MasterCard □ Euroaxd □ Access 

Gs£t cad chcrgeswiB be made in French Francs otQOTErtewhangenrfes. 


CARD tea NO. 


EXP. DATE SIGNATURE 

FOR BUSNSSCRDBS, PLEASE MSCATE YOUR yfilNLMBa; 


(HT VAT nmber FR74732021 1261) 

□ Mr. □ Mrs □ Mis FAMLY NAME. 


FIRST NAME, 


PSMAN0JT ADDRESS. □ HOME □ BUSINESS. 


OTf/cnx. 


« S | 1 


a 2 « 

S re 3*51 


1 .Jix 

0 -H O * 


'M .a ?: 


‘ For information concerning hand-delivery n mtuo* German olios call tad tree IHT 
Germany at 0130-Sd 85 B5 ct ta* (C6S) 175 4ii Under German regulations, a 2-wcefc 
free period Is granted foraD new orders 

^ST 4 k INTERNATIONAL ZZ 


Heralb 


getom yaw romdr ta d t oup o n to: Siiaakifan Mawaw, 

HT, 181 AmucOiaria^afc, 92521 CodaEFme. 
ffac 311^6 3706 51 -Tel: 311J6&9361 


~n. ofl. 

us -43. *J . 


OmtHmed os ftge 14 


KALE«E» »TIH THE WIKI, TWB Ohl THE W*JRWCTO> POST 


Jhh cfkr expire] Aupat 31. 1994, aid o ovoiife to new subscribe/* only. U 


J1 hMl 


have ste 
si as be 
is far at 
xl by tie 
: Mfene 
mid 


u the P 

mn y otti 

9 

collapse v 
inpaid L 
tave left 8 


nacleof 1 * 
possible. 6 
Pales tin 0 
and Jerii 3 
now. n i 
rs new PJ 
offices w 5 
p becorm? 1 
. venting £ 


for 20 ot^ 
)Ut, stunfl* 
it go awa 1 
Mr. Aral 
Ja’s inau 
aides. Mi 
rated exe 
fat’s paw‘ 
speaking " 
5ud Abb 
: Commit 
a the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
ihrasing « 
d around 
a minister 

Iciails of 
forehand, 
jo sign. A 
wore that * 
this way.” 


*S: 

idienc 


i Page 1 

ical in Nc 
rear.Comt 
tian, Virgil 
: massager 
ping and h 
urescrfMy 
aa. has a b 
era! law fix 
ices for cri 
ne says, “E 


ways mere 
on, the pr 
uch represe 
t magazine 
that 100,1 
nt issue w 
.with anac 

mted to ne 
and areas n 


■t made its v 
ng budgets 
ies. The da 
c are advert 
oy tbe indus 
Inch Nails.! 
ties, a prod 
laccoCo. 
rth, Mr. Su 
ns, which t 
and they co 
nuld up. 
n I sold 360,1 
ns of thousa 
es,” Mr. Sti 
», I sold ton 
ally used as c 
could have f 
s of sneaker 
-kel out then 


geRcd 


n appropn 


responsible 
rage policy, 
view oo the i 
counterings] 
i States was 
■Is to the doi 
rves in floa 
William McT 
the Federal 
w York, sail 
ay. “You c 
oaring excht 
nge rate larg 
i said Tues 
that the G-7 
afloorundei 


l psychologit 
rid trigger a ] 
is the board, 
i That coulc 
;ock and fa 
Juing dollar 
held by ova 


f^7assa« 
































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 199* 


advertisement 


sassisssr 


C*.Orow«lML«l 






For information on how to list your funU» fax Simon OSBOIWI ^.( 33 - 1 ) 4 B 37 21 


. . . Forjunher 

tnfoTmatumonikc conference: 

.>•" : Brenda Hagerty 

**.' Intenutioo^Jl«i^d.Tdbane 
■ k; 63 Long A<^ London .WC2E ?JH, England 

vf 1 " 7 " 

,• ; 71):83M717; 

• ;• S'- ; • ;:--v : v y y . • y 


OIL & MONEY 

Asia & the Pacific 

Singapore * Jttne l 5 C? 16 

Hcralb^^Snbunc The Oil Daily Group 








































































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 


NASDAQ 

Monday’s 4 p.m. 

This list com pH led by the AP. consists of the 1.000 
most traded securities In terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


Hftraow Slock D<v Yu PE 10ft Lo*UrteaOi'Be 




.'in? 


Slog av tg PE 10Q» Ha. Lm»Lnna»Oi'9c 

Siirtss*. f IS 


12 Month 
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Div YW P£ tVOa HW 


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Monday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
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7 :'. ' 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 


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© 


The 1994 China Summit Meeting has been convened by the International Herald Tribune (IHT) and the State 
Commission for Restructuring Economic Systems (SCRES) and will be held at the China World Hotel in Beijing on 
May 11-12, 1994. 


CONFIRMED CHINESE PARTICIPANTS TO DATE INCLUDE: Premier Li Peng, Vice Premier Li Lanqing, State 
Councillor and Minister of SCRES Ii Tieying, Chairman of the State Commission for Economics and Trade Wang 
Zhongyu, Minister of Finance Liu Zhongli, Minister of Foreign Trade Wu Yi, Mayor of Shanghai Huang Ju, 
Chairman of China Securities Regulatory Committee Liu Hongru, Deputy Governor of the People’s Bank of China 
Chen Yuan, and 140 CEO’s of P.R.C. state-owned enterprises. 


CONFIRMED FOREIGN PARTICIPANTS TO DATE INCLUDE: Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad of Malaysia, 
Director General of GATT Peter Sutherland, Managing Director of the World Bank Ernest Stem, Former 
Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany Helmut Schmidt, President and CEO of Asea Brown Boveri Percy 
Bamevik, President of Boeing Commercial Airplane Group Ronald Woodard, Chairman and CEO of Caltex 
Petroleum Corporation Patrick Ward, Chairman of Peregrine Investments Holdings Philip Tose. 


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Summit Sponsors: 


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Page 18 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- TUESDAY. MA* 3, 1994 


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Dragon’ Market Steps Out of the Shadows 



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rr^ 1 ’^ ast year. a*» China 
■ 3h - : * boomed, a new 
A V* "dragon" capital 
market composed 
of nev.lv industrialized play- 
er* outside Japan stepped 
out of the shadows, promis- 
ing a more competitive fi- 
nancial environment that 
should quicken the pace of 
industrialization in Asia. 

Once only recipients of 
foreign financial flows, 
emerging financial services 
centers fn Asia's newly in- 
dustrialized economies 
(NiEs) - Hong Ron z. Singa- 
pore. Korea and Taipei - 
kicked up the two-year-old 
bond market from S600 mil- 
lion to S3 billion, sending 


.stock indexes higher, from 
_su percent in Singapore to 
154 percent in Manila. The 
emergence of regional finan- 
cial centers and the opening 
■jp of huge nev areas for 
trade and investment in the 
region were powerful con- 


J he emerging 


■Imvieia! markets 


are stm mm 


verging currents that al- 
lowed Asia tc. outpace all 
other regions of the world. 

To moo Huyakuwa. who 
heads :he five-year-old 
Asian Finance and fnvest- 


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Over STOP billion has been invested in Asia in the past five years. Clockwise from top: Japanese yen. now only 
one of severs! Asian investment currencies; the Hong Kong stock exchange; Shanghais stock exchange. 


ment Corporation tAFIC), 

the commercial-banking 

subsidiary of the Asian De- 
velopment Bank, modified 
his lending and investment 
program late last year to in- 
clude new thrusts in capital- 
market activities and bond 
underwriting and syndica- 
tion and to increase flexibili- 
ty in dealing with the ag- 
gressive NTEs. 

~ China, which sped 
through its second year of 
double-digit growth (13.4 
percent), was the obvious 
key to bullish 7.4 percent re- 
gionwide growth, despite 
gloomy 1 percent marks in 
Industrialized countries. The 
opening of an additional 28 
cities along the Yangtze 
River and 13 border cities 
last year caused an invest- 
ment* stampede from South- 
east Asia to China, increas- 
ing direct flow's by 234 per- 
cent from an already high 
mark of SI 1 billion in 1992 
to S27.5 billion. 

A rapid shift toward in- 
traregional trade, mostly 
with China, kept most of 
East Asia’s export-fueled 
dragon economies afloat 
while boosting sales for 
Southeast Asia by 29 per- 
cent and as high as 35 per- 
cent for South Asia 

Regional growth is ex- 
pected to remain strong (7.2 
percent for 1 994) despite the 
slower 9-10 percent growth 
expected in China which is 
drooping from infrastructure 
bottlenecks, a surge in infla- 
tion and increasing deficits 
caused by the crush. South- 
east Asia led by Malaysia 
and Thailand, continued to 


improve its performance. 
Vietnam, which shares the 
Mekong River with China 
benefited tremendously 
from the rush. India, the 
biggest single market after 
China, has emerged from 
decades of protection, keep- 
ing prospecting in the region 
sky high. 

Asia's demonstrated ca- 
pacity to attract massive pri- 
vate investment flows will 
be crucial in the face of the 
pressures that faster growth 
will put on government bud- 
gets and the declining flow 
of assistance from the devel- 
oped countries. Increased 
portfolio investments, 
through new secondary mar- 
kets. provide opportunities 
for further growth. 

The entry of the dragon 
capital market reflects ongo- 
ing structural changes in the 
region. Powered by export 
surpluses and disciplined 
domestic savings, tbe NlEs 
are changing their previous- 
ly successful strategies in the 
face of recession in their tra- 
ditional industrialized mar- 
kets as well as maturing in- 
ternal stress due to rising 
wages and labor shortages. 

A growing part of the 
huge investment flows 
swirling through the region 
- estimated at over $100 bil- 
lion in the past five years - 
represents the relocation of 
industries from the NIEs to 
low-wage countries. 

Painful financial reform 
preceded the rise of the 
dragon bankers, and many 
adjustments toward more 
liberalization are still un- 
folding as the NTEs reposi- 


tion themselves 
nancial and serviced ■■ 
for the developing reS? 
Rising private firmhcefaS* : 
meant increased ppnfofifffoA 
vestment and reduceddeS-. 
pendenceoncommeftaaf 
bank loans to finance InVe#. ./ 
ment as well as a reduettoff 
in the cost of finance. ■ Am 
The ADB’s Asian 
opment Outlook cantiop- 
“The emerging financial' 
markets are still thin; ^ 
their speculative naturp - !^- 
not be discounted.” Mucfaof- 
the flow has conriste&of- 
residents’ repatriated fiSr 
capital and some. Veatote 
capital seeking hi^xetB^ 
in the face of Jow yields Jr 
developed counuy Tbaikes.: 

Still, ADB analysts W- 
the trend toward ponftifo 
diversification by latgeiastT 
tutional investors ctintimt 
mg, given the stabi%mi]fe; 
region, huge regional. suer', 
ings backing the develop- 
ment of the emerging fiW 
cial markets and impmv^d - 
inforraation flows. ^ '-A:;- 
The young, dverh'eatwL 
Asian markets began adjust- 
ing downward early .thls^ 
year. But increasing private- 
investor confidence and.ijhe • 
colossal financing require- 
ments of the region (up to Sl 
trillion for infrastriictmt 1 
alone up to 2000) fertadi • 
their continued growth. ' 

ADB estimates tha! tfie,-. 
power sector wiU'tKsedif 
vestments of $300-350)3-' ' 
lion, telecommumckioosi 1 
further $ 1 50 billioni "iransr : 
port around $300-350 #K 
lion, and water and stna^ 
tion, $80- 100 billion. : Z, "T 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety b> the supplements division of the 
International Herald Tribune's advertising depajtmeni.’* I; was written by Monica Feria. 
a writer based in Manila. 


Reducing Poverty and Upgrading Infrastructure 






From May 1 to September 30. (994. spend a nitjhc at 
Manila's most elegant lived for only US S°J’. for 
sing/e or double occupancy rooms. 


SSTTvSIOSaTO itsuo Sato. 
3^) ^ v >; -Hj o 1 . who took 
\ M over as presi- 
dent of the 
Asian Development Bank 
lu-i November, has ordered 
a sweeping review of the 27- 
vear-old bank's strategies 
and organization. 

When the bank's 53- 
member board holds its an- 
nual meeting on May 3-5 in 
Nice. Mr. Sato will seek a 
general capital increase that 
would more than double the 
regional fund base from 
S23.6 billion to S4S billion. 

Accelerated growth has 
generated enormous de- 
mands for infrastructure 
support in Asia, while 
povertv remains the region’s 


biggest challenge. Although 
East Asia's dragons have 
"graduated'' from ADB 
loans, and Malaysia and 
Th.iilund are on ihe verse of 


dropping out. concessional 
lending for China and India 


policy concerns raised by 
the United Slates, which 
shares almost equal power 
with Japan on the ADB 
board. The go-ahead expect- 


is up for consideration. 

Three Central Asian Re- 
publics - Kazakhstan. Kyr- 
gyzstan and Uzbekistan - 
have joined ilv bank, and 
Azerbaijan. Turkmenistan 
and Tajikistan have applied. 
Russia may join as a nonre- 
gional member. Develop- 
ment assistance flows 
worldwide, however, are ex- 
pected to be tight. 

The proposal for a general 
capital increase was shelved 
last year, reportedly over 


The bank's role 
as catalyst will 
be emphasized 


ed to be granted this year 
will come with instructions 
for increased cost-effective- 
ness and project quality. 

Indonesia, Pakistan, Thai- 
land and the Philippines 
have been big beneficiaries 
of ADB funding in the past 
decade, and Vietnam is a re- 
cent recipient. The bank is 


It's an unbelievably great deal. We 71 also coke care of 
your airport-hotel transfer Plus some iirtie extras for 
you ro enjoy. 


Ha? k 


The 59^ Super Sever Rc-cm Package. It's a deal you 
simply cannot refuse. Cniy a: The Manila note; 


E£Ei© o o 


"Pore 15 iv - c^mniissvnaNc beryfide travel cvKnf o"-J 
subiecc ro servi-te -.■ncr.;:' a:-2 :-r government :z ■. 


Eviro M^rS'On Shij/i ne C^ar.je.l US f I!:' . jr 

mace c/rectiy with V.c ncrel. r i.2 of/er conr.or : : e cc-^or-ei: 

:>:her rroTorrmc: vt-x r ::r-:a«. ViIjC :;r in 
brcidr.js- :-nUj. 


You may also need to look a t these source books on economic 
and social development in the Asian and Pacific region, 
published by the Asian Development Bank: 


now shifting its concentra- 
tion to India and the rest of 
South Asia. China, although 
still grappling with external 
debt policies, is also expect- 
ed to increase its borrowing 
in the coming years. 

“Doing more with less," 
Mr. Sato acknowledges, will 
likely mean a slower lending 
pace that would increase 
lending levels only slightly, 
firom $5.3 billion last year to 
S6 billion this year, and keep 
concessional lending un- 
changed at $1 5 billion. 

But Mr. Sato adds that the 
bank will increase its impact 
by zeroing in on priority sec- 
tors char can help “unblock 
the potential for growth." 
More than half of bank lend- 
ing this year will go to infra- 
structure projects - particu- 
larly power generation, 
transport and communica- 
tions - and supervision of 
borrowers’ economic poli- 
cies and institutional 
strengths will be tightened 
up. 

Since the bank can offer 
less than 5 percent of Asia's 
annual $100 billion external 


financing needs, it will con- 
tinue to emphasize its “cat- 
alytic” role in mobilizing 
both official and private cap- 
ital. .*•' 

With budget deficits 
growing in developing na- 
tions, the ADB believes that 
commercialization or priva- 
tization of infrastructure pro- 
jects may be. viable alterna- 
tives'. At)B loan and project 
evaluations will favor Build: 
Operate-Transfer schemes 
and other arrangements tot 
allow increased private-sec- 
tor participation. Technical 
assistance for public-sector 
reform, deregulation, market 
pricing and other reforms 
that enhance tins trend will 
be supported. Support fw 
capital market developing 
is definitely on line. ■ 
Three-quarters of t&C: 
world's poor live in Asife 
and the ADB wants 1 W*»y 
poverty reduction, enyawh. . 
mental protection, human, 
rights and women's de> ,c1 ' : 
opment incorporateti'Btp 
most of its projects, “rfi** 
bility is very, very impor- 
tant," says Mr. Sato. " 


H Aslan Development Outlook 1994 (US$ 28)* 


A J \ . l.nCr J K r.< r,_r ; r — i -V , . c, . 

evrensi >n j : .'6 


Key Indicators of Developing Asian Pacific 
Ccun tries (US$ 30)* 


Energy indicators of Developing Member Countries 
of ADB fUSS 45) 




Electric Utilities Data Book for the Asian and Pacific 
Region (US$ 55) 


Water Utilities Data 3ook (Asian and Pacific Reeionl 
CUS$ 20) ^ 






Gender Indicators of Developing Asian and Pacific 
Countries fUS$ 25) 


Cc-p-.j^.’ished Wl, h Oxford 

•Ali pn.,.55 are indusiL'C of mailina cos:. 




To order uhc.se titles and to obtain a full list of ADB publications. 


For ASIA In ASIA 
By ASIA 


writ? to: 


-yiimfa - , 




One Sira' r.i-. P0 Eiv 'Ll' X' ; o. 1 . tr. 7.;: ’•z: - : i_- 

5 * - T 1 r - V.'.vr l-J "fw-? 1 . ■ ”. *. * :: i>: r> :r 


Publications Unit, 

Information Office, 

Asian Development Back 

P.O. Box 789, Manila Central Post Office, 

0960 Manila. Philippines. 

Or fax: (632) 741-7961. Telephone: (632) 632-4444. 


equity ftwesfmsnf 
Medium or Long- 
Term Loots 
Underwriting 
Guarantees 
Syndications and other. 
Investment Banking Services 


tje* Me crae: 


! W HXSiT - 
! 1KIM.- 'J: : 


>-*U \p 


j al Fundi 


.^trsenis as 


r» E 


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!ji® Ih j‘l 


eradi. Kec pih 



Asian Finance and Investment 
Corporation Ltd (afic) ■ 

Manila Singapore < 


Oflicul Hotel fl the l‘K*- Mi;-’. Universe Dclcy-ics 


Asian Development Bank 


Shareholders: 

Asian Development Bank and 






mam 

















W •••• 





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Progress and Projections 


d 


espite the reces- 
sion in Western 
industrialized 
• i . ■ countries, 
ml<m "V developing Asia 
m -7 percent -was 10 
times as high as in Africa 
ana more than twice the av- 
crage in Latin America and 
the Middle East 
But development was un- 
even across the vast region. 
r?fi ^ ,an development 
Outlook, published annual- 
ly by the Manila-based 
Asian Development Bank 
(ADB), profiles country de- 
velopments. 


market raised growth 
snaiply from 6 percent to 9 9 
percent lasL year. The city- 
is also moving toward 
high-technology-based in- 
d us tries and a more service- 
onented economy, particu- 
larly financial and business 
services. Further liberaliza- 
tion is under way. Projected 
growth, 1994-95: 7 to 8 per- 
cent 


Chinn ami Monkniia 


_ Kong (per capita 
GNP: $15380). Exports de- 
clined by 5 percent last year, 
but service exports and the 
outward processing of Chi- 
nese products increased by 
20 percent, allowing the 
colony to. post 5 3 percent 
growth, a slight improve- 
ment over 1992. Prospects 
are linked with develop- 
ments in China. More infra- 
structure, labor shortages 
and monetary stabilization 
within a system linked with 
the U.S. dollar are pressing 
concerns. Projected growth, 
1994-95: 5.7 to 5.9 percent 
Korea (per capita GNP: 
$6,790) was the slowest- 
growing of the‘~ NIEs in 
1993. A difficult transition 
from light to heavy indus- 
tries and chemicals is under 
way: domestic political un- 
certainty and low investor 
confidence pulled Korean 
growth down to 4.4 percent 
New tax reforms ana social 
programs are being intro- 


duced. Projected growth, 
r. 6.7 to 


1994-95: 6.7 to 6J9 percent. 

Taiwan (per capita GNP: 
$I0,21G)aiso stowed down, 
although its 6.2 percent 
growth was stiff appreciable. 
With rates of domestic 1 in* 
vestments and savings drop- 
ping, Taiwan is in transition 
toward greater financial-ser- 
vice dominance. Further Hb- 
eralizatioiLis ongoing as the 
island consolidates itself as a 
regional high-technology 
center. Projected growth, 
1994-95: 6.4 to 6.6 percent 


China (per capita GNP: 
$380) shined its policies in 
1992 from curbing inflation 
to encouraging growth and 
investments, leading to two 
years of spectacular 13.2 
percent and 13.4 percent 
growth, and unprecedented 
levels of foreign direct In- 
vestments. The crush has 
created bottlenecks in trans- 
portation, power and com- 
munications while fueling 
inflation and trade deficits. 
Widening differentials be- 
tween die special economic 
zones cm the border and the 
inland regions has created 
migration and political prob- 
lems. Reforms in the huge 
state sector are slow and 
controversial.Projected 
growth, 1994-95: 9 to 10 
percent. 

Mongolia (per capita 
GNP: $550) suffered severe 
economic crises following 
disruption of tradelines with 
Russia and the transition to 
an open market after seven 
decades of central p lanning . 
The slip seems to be abating, 
with last year’s negative 13 
percent growth an improve- 
ment over contractions of 
9.9 percent and 7.6 percent 
in 1991 and ’92. Mongolia is 
still developing basic legal, 
marketing mid banking insti- 
tutions. No projections 
available: 


Southeast Asia 


Singapore (per capita 

— ~ ^ Tt 7 5 p) r - •- 


GNP: $15,750) saw in- 
creased electronic sales; and 
a boom in the local stock 


' Malaysia (per capita 
GNP: $2,790) continued to 
be one of the fastest-rising 
countries in the region with 
8 percent growth. Despite 
unfavorable conditions in its 
major industrialized markets 
that affected its large rubber 
and cocoa exports, gains 
were noted in palm oil, elec- 
tronics and other manufac- 
tured goods. Domestic 
spending was buoyant as the 


A Fresh Look at 
Regional Funding 



here is momen- 
tum," says To- 
moo Hayakawa, 
head of the Asian 
Finance and Investment 
Corporation, the merchant 
banking subsidiary of the 
Asian Development Bank. 
Countries that have so far re- 
mained on the periphery of 
Asia’s industrializing trend 
may be absorbed sooner 
than expected, he says- 
Last year, tire 61 -year-old 
Japanese banker, formerly 
anADB executive m indus- 
trialized capital centers, 
broke away fromtfce crush 
of investors in Chiiia. In- 
donesia and v «toamand 
led the five-year-old AFic 

*°Nfr^Hayakawa, whowas 

tionofnetvttogontocte, 

to also .moved qm<*iy » 


^vestments into capital- 
arfcet activities. Although 

^AHC lately 

sffssssiS 


w^izedeco"^ 

^® assis S^ 

“ ■sjjesaTSE 

ive ? th ^Munited 








ar, helped — 

With loan ap 

spikes 


rise, last year’s animal report 
showed a gain in income, 
from $6.8 miTti on in 1992 to 
$8.7 mflBon- 

AHC finances have large- 
ly been concentrated in In- 
donesia mid Pakistan, bat 13 
project approvals in India 
worth oyer $32 million 
place the subcontinent on 
top of the institution’s list. 

Mr. Hayakawa believes 
the present $3 billion so- 
called dragon coital market 
will deepen in the coming 
years. He notes that up to 40 
percent of European and 
American issues eventually 
find their way to Asia" and 
that the region bias huge for- 
eign reserves -$90 billion in 
Taiwan, $30 billion each in 
Malaysia and Singapore. He 
sees an- upswing in regkmal 
investments as a whole. 

. increased competitiveness 
will be demanded of die re- 
gion’s growing ranks of 
bankers and financial insti- 
tutions. Bottowcts, onthe 
other hand; are maturing. 
"Many are ready to negotiate 
mi ctjwl terms with lenders, 
Mr. Hayakawa notes, warn- 
ing that even established re- 
gional played "to ^ 

keep in step may fall by the 
wayside. 

“Wipe away preconcep- 
tions, look with fresh eyes, . 

he advises investors ana fi- 
nanciers. But he confesses 
that old memones are also 
behind Ws bullishness^ 
-When I see bicycles gpwj\ 
ine through dre dirty, dpsty- 

I see my boyhood 

. - -.-ctwar Japan and: am 

Ssft'ssp 

the comer.” 


country consolidated its 
newly industrialized status. 
Inflation and a labor short- 
age are pressing problems. 
Projected growth, 1994-95: 

8.6 to 8.4 percent. 

Thailand (per capita 
GNP: $1,840) continued to 
post strong 7.8 percent 
growth. Despite increased 
trade deficits, rising income 


from tourism and portfolio 
ital inflc 


investment capital inflows 
helped keep the balance of 
payments sound. There was 
a budget surplus, but prob- 
lems of urban congestion re- 
main. The textile and gar- 
ment industry of newly in- 
dustrializing Thailand and 
other low-value-added man- 
ufacturing have now reached 
a point where competition 
from cheaper sources is cut- 
ting into their market share, 
challenging authorities to 
upgrade technology and effi- 
ciency. Projected growth, 
1994-95: 83 to 83 percent. 

Indonesia (per capita 
GNP: $670) reversed its 
downward trend last year, 
posting 6.5 percent growth, 
compared with 6.4 percent 
in 1992. Despite lower 
prices for oiL the country’s 
biggest dollar earner, 
deficits and debt ratios have 
improved, and stronger per- 
formance is expected. In- 
donesia has begun substan- 
tia] deregulation and struc- 
tural reform to open its 
economy to more private en- 
terprise. But protection lev- 
els are high, geographical 
monopolies prevail, the 
state-run sector is still exten- 
sive and infrastructure lack- 
ing. Projected growth, 1994- 
95: 6.7 to 7 percent. 

The Philippines (per 
capita GNP: $770) is recov- 



ture and forestry were 
firmed up with the assis- 
tance of neighbors China, 
Malaysia and Taiwan. Bu- 
reaucracy, slow reforms and 
an- underdeveloped legal 
framework present prob- 
lems. No projections avail- 
able. 


South Asia 


MgMech Industries In Singapore are key to growth. 


ering from two years of re- 
cession caused by the break- 
down of its power sector. 
New power plants came on 
stream last year, and in- 
creased political stability be- 
gan to posh growth upward, 

1 .7 percent last year. Gar- 
ments and electronics are the 
biggest export items. High 
fiscal deficits, debt and a lin- 
gering inward orientation 
beset the country. Structural 
reforms are slow. Projected 
growth, 1994-95: 4 to 5.5 
percent 

Vietnam (per capita GNP: 
$140) received a significant 
influx of fresh capital from 
abroad following the end of 
the U.S. trade embargo. 
High growth marks (8 per- 
cent) followed more open- 
market reforms, and Viet- 
nam is now expected to be 
one of the fastest-growing 
nations in the region. Rice 
and crude oil are export 
mainstays, while other prod- 
ucts, including coal, coffee, 
marine products, textiles 
(primarily silk) and other 
light industrial goods, are 
expected to increase sales. 
The transition to market eco- 
nomics is just beginning; tax 
and legal frameworks have 
yet to be put in place. Pro- 


jected growth, 1994-95: 9 to 
10 percent. 

Car 


'ambodia (per capita 
GNP: $200) slowed down 
from 7 percent growth in 
1992 to 53 percent last year 
amid political and economic 
uncertainties surrounding 
last year’s elections. Grow- 
ing confidence in the new 
coalition government seems 
reflected in domestic invest- 
ment growth from 10 per- 
cent to 14 percent despite 
power shortages and lack of 
communications facilities. 
Transition to a market econ- 
omy remains a major objec- 
tive of the war-ravaged 
country. A financial struc- 
ture law tfaar would central- 
ize tax collection took effect 
only this year. No projec- 
tions available. 


Laos (per capita GNP: 

from 7 per- 


$250) slumped 
cent to 4 percent growth last 
year, mainly because of 
near-zero growth in agricul- 
ture, which accounts for 60 
percent of its production. 
The introduction of a new 
foreign investment law in 
the late 1980s led to some 
inflows, mainly in the hotel 
and tourism industry. Last 
year, more long-term devel- 
opment projects in agricul- 


India (per capita GNP: 
$310) responded to a bal- 
ance -of- payments crisis at 
the start of the decade with a 
structural reform and stabi- 
lization program. Liberaliza- 
tion of foreign investment 
laws led to tbe doubling of 
foreign inflows last year; 
growth was 3.8 percent. 
Trade deficits were on the 
rise throughout the subconti- 
nent. except India. But more 
far-reaching and politically 
sensitive changes, such as 
the abolition of subsidies, 
are necessary for India to 
capitalize on its enormous 
economic potential. Project- 
ed growth, 1994-95: 4.8 to 
53 percent 

Pakistan (per capita 
GNP: $410) buckled from 

7.7 percent growth in 1992 
to 3 percent last year be- 
cause of high fiscal and bal- 
ance-of-payments deficits. 
Floods reduced agricultural 
output and a virus cut cotton 
production, greatly affecting 
the spinning industry, which 
was already reeling from re- 
cession in world markets. 
Political instability last year 
caused a slump in business 
confidence. The outlook for 
the coming years is better, 
but diversified industries 
and more policy reforms 
will be needed. Projected 
growth, 1994-95: 53 to 63 
percent 

Sri Lanka (per capita 
GNP: $540), like India, is on 
the rebound from economic 
crisis. The past three years 


have seen rising growth, 
reaching 6.1 percent last 
year. Following structural 
reforms toward increased 
private-sector operations 
and foreign investments, 
. manufactured goods now 
account for two-thirds of ex- 
ports. Inflation has been run- 
ning at double-digit levels. 
More reforms and a devel- 
oping private sector are ex- 
pected to attract more for- 
eign investments. Projected 
growth, 1994-95: 5.9 to 53 
percent. 

Bangladesh (per capita 
GNP: $220) increased 
growth slightly, from 4.2 
percent to 43 percent Lim- 
ited natural resources, high 
population density and vul- 
nerability to natural disasters 
are formidable obstacles. 
Nonetheless, self-sufficien- 
cy in rice has been achieved, 
and manufactured exports 
now exceed primary prod- 
ucts. Projected growth, 
1994-95: 5 to 5.5 percent. 

Bhutan (per capita GNP: 
$180) recently privatized its 
manufacturing sector. 
Growtii declined marginally 
to 5 percent from 53 percent 
the previous year. The eco- 
nomic potential of tbe coun- 
try has yet to be developed. 
No projections available. 

Maldives (per capita 
GNP: $500), a small econo- 
my based on tourism and 
fisheries, grew 6.1 percent 
last year. Rising inflation 
and public deficits require 
structural and administrative 
reforms. No projections 
available. 

Myanmar (per capita 
GNP: $890), formerly Bur- 
ma, is still a highly regulated 
economy, with the state mo- 
nopolizing key industries. 
Good agricultural output 
contributed to last year’s 5.8 
percent growth. The country 
lacks basic infrastructure. 


particularly power, trans- 
portation and communica- 
tions. Inflation is rising. For- 
eign direct investments have 
involved the purchase of 
major shares in tbe national 
airline; renewal of oil explo- 
ration contracts by Western 
companies and improve- 
ments in tourism facilities. 
No projections available. 

Nepal (per capita GNP: 
$170) is struggling with fis- 
cal imbalances and power 
shortages. Growth was 2.9 
percent. Tourism is the 
mountain nation’s bright 


S got . ^Projected growth. 


-95: 6 to 5 percent. 


Pacific Islands* 


Papua New Guinea (per 
capita GNP: $950) actually 
had a higher growth rate 
than China in 1993. A for- 
mer Australian colony, the 
island made a killing on 
crude-oil sales as production 
from its Kutubu oilfield 
reached full capacity. But 
growth is deemed unsustain- 
able. Huge fiscal deficits, 
lack of growth in non-min- 
ing sectors, high unemploy- 
ment, an exchange-rate 
regime that militates against 
the development of competi- 
tive enterprise, and poorly 
developed physical and so- 
cial infrastructure need to be 
addressed in the next two 
years, as economic growth 
could virtually cease. No 
projections available. 

Fyi and other Pacific is- 
lands like Cook Islands, 
Kiribati, Tonga, Tuvalu, 
Vanuatu and Western 
Samoa are small economies 
largely based on tourism, 
offshore financial services, 
remittances, agriculture and 
fisheries. Growth has been 
positive, but serious deficits 
plague their governments. 
No projections available. 



y % 


ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK 


, The Hotel Okura is the first choke 
of executive travellers from aU over the 
world. Why? Yk invite you to 
come see and understand. 


HOTEL OKURA 

2-10-4 Tonmomon, Msnato-ko, Tokyo 105, japan 
TH: 03-3582-0111 fee 03-3582-3707 Telex: J22790 


HOTEL OKURA OFFICES WORLDWIDE 
New Mark Tel: 212-755-0733 
Los Angeles 213-488-1477 
Amsterdam Tel: 020-6761160 
Hong Kong TeL- 895-1717 



The Aslan Development Bank is an international development finance institution established in 1966 to foster 
economic and social development in the Asia-Pacific region. The Bank, which is based in Manila, Philippines, is 
owned by 55 countries from Western Europe. North America and the Asia-Padfic region and is seeking to employ 
highly qualified professionals who are nationals of its member countries for the following professional staff positions. 

Women are particularly encouraged to apply. 


ARCHIVIST 

The Bank’s Archivist will implement an Archive Program and be responsible for its maintenance. 


QUALIFICATIONS: 

• an advanced university degree in library/information science 

• eight years of experience in information management, including five years recent experience as records 
manager/practising archivist for a large corporation or government agency 

• expertise in new information technologies that affect records as well as archival holdings and practices 


INFORMATION OFFICER - AUDIO VISUAL SPECIALIST 


The successful candidate will be responsible for producing audio-visual products of international broadcast quality, 
which will reflect the Bank’s activities and priorities. The specialist will produce video news releases; undertake 
audio-visual editing, conversion, and archiving activities; and conduct audio-visual interviews of management and 
other resource persons. 


QUALIFICATIONS: 

• recent experience in video scripting, shooting, production and editing, preferably with a large corporation 
or government agency 

• exposure to working with people of different nationalities 

• degree in communication arts 


YOUNG PROFESSIONALS PROGRAM 


The Bank s Young Professionals Program was established in 1 983 to recruit and assimilate annually a small number 
of exceptionally well qualified younger personnel. The Program is intended to lay the foundation for a challenging 
and rewarding career In the Bank. 


QUALIFICATIONS: 

• must be 30 years of age or below 

• hold a Masters Degree or its equivalent in economics, finance, management, business administration or 
other fields related to the work of the Bank 

• relevant work experience is highly desirable, especially in developing countries 


Prospective applicants should note the following: 


Proficiency in written and spoken English is essential. 

ft is expected that the above professional staff positions will be recruited at entry level. 
Bank staff generally reside in Manila but may be expected to serve in a regional office. 
The Bank offers a competitive salary paid in U.S. dollars, normally free of tax. 

Those who have applied previously need not re-apply. 


Interested persons are requested to either send their curriculum vitae to: 

HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION (REF. NO. 9402), ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK 
P. O. BOX 789, MANILA 0980, PHILIPPINES 

or, alternatively, fax directly to: 

(63-2)741-7961, (63-2)632-6816, (63-2) 631-7961, (63-2)631-6816 


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and Jerii at 
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, (id< 

offices w 1 ® 
obeconH 1 ^ 
venting 611 
ie. 

for 20 oi* 
<ut, stunn”* 
>t go awa’S 
Mr. Aral ® 
da’s inau; w 
aides. 1 
luted ex® 
fat’s paw^“ 
speaking — 

xid Abb 
•Commit 
g the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
ihrasing v 
d around 
a minister 
letails of 
forehand, 
:o ago. A 
vore that \ 
this way." 


i diene 


i Page 1 

jeal in No 
I’ear.Comt 
tian, Vugii 
: massager 
ping and Jl 
ures of Myi 
ia, has a b 
end law fir 
ices for oil 
ne says, “D 


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lich represe 
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that 100.( 
si issue w 
.with an ad 
iuted to net 
and areas o< 


it made its w 
□g budgets 
ies. Thedos 
e are adverti 
by the indusi 
Inch Nails, a 
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rth, Mr. Str 
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and they coi 
mild up. 

:t I sold 360,( 

ns of thousai 
es," Mr. Str 
s&, I sold tom 
ally used asc 
could have s> 
■5 of sneaker 
■ket out there 


ge Rat 


a appropn; 


responsible 
rnge policy, 
view on toed 


KHinierings 
i Staves was 
Is for the dc 
rves in floe 
Ifilliam Mcl 
the Federal 
w York, saj 
ay. “You < 
oating exch: 
age rate laq 
; said Tue 
that (he G- 7 
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!S the board, c 
1. That could > 
:ock and bo 
Juing doUar-H 
beW by overs 


pi said intern 


a currency g 
not 
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ast wcdc’i 
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^ Sii00 0-r hou46 ,r D 
* V SaB onvnre peaceful ond -ery refaermol street c* 
“ - ' “ ' i iSjffl Ncu'lly. often o aamhintfO" ol thorn 2 "d 
aH spate A bge receptor room opens onto or. 

3 ' jWjfa W" ® 9~ T etJorfd garden with southern ecocide 

Garage and mod's room 

KAU NELHLLY -frcr-rfe. Tel. (331 I 47 45 23 60. • fax. |33) J 46 41 02 07 


■gg „ 

■V 3 - MJSi 


■ 


l" ■ Superfa oppartnrem Z40m2 fatted « a 

“•si ' itr? 2®r i3A century budding with character Very 
r.ite entrance hall Sunpiuous reeepi'On- 
rporr chaining drcwrnc room and 3 
bedrooms Pariuna facilities 
n cc seMEURES DE FRANCE 132. SU Hauumann 75008 Pwli * France. 

Tel (33) 1 40 08 10 38 ■ 40 08 10 00. Fax. |33) I 42 94 98 65 





PARIS 

HBL! 



■ 250 m original aporrment and 20? m 


teroKe m a 1930 »wn house 

J-.v *=.'• 


| IMBAOARCM. IBnwdel'r 

iniveriM 75007 Paris • France. 

| TeL (33] 1 4261 7331 

1 - Fax (331 1 42 61 75 48 


LAKE GENEVA 

■ Magnificent 18th- century Ftwch-styfe pro- 
c&t r laedoofang late Gerwi wth vmeyartk 
Wondafa! 3m high ceilings 3U bedrooms. 
3/4 bcrixocms 3 salons weh 2 fabulous spot 
fireplace. Fnce on opplicafton 
CREATIVE MARKEITNG GROUP - Swbi red Estate. 26, chentin thi valon, 1030 
Busiigny-pres -Lou tanne. Switzerland. TeL (41) 21 701 50 35 • Fax. (41)21 701 2967 




;,>« •• . ..asi -cl 


LAKE GENEVA 

■ Belli m 16CM tha wanderU demeure a a lis- 
ted property tatAy renowted and redecorated 
to highest standards is situated in a part of 
100.000 m . Four outbuildings, coretaler's 
house, undl km superb restored orangerfa 
CREATIVE MARKETING GROW - Swiu red Estate. 26. cheoni *J vdhn, 1030 
Basugny-pras-Lausonne. Swftwd and TeL (41) 21 701 30 35 - Fax. f41) 21 701 3967 



GREECE 

■ Tradtiond style house on Kea blond. 

Full service mate agency providing advice, 
recommending favywa and finding hna» to 
spedRaaon. h the cose of hotels p oss ibl e to 
find doff and prawfo modeling fanfares.. 


HELLENIC PROPERTIES & INVESTMENT SERVICES LTD Salamaa 18, 
lyfeovrllli, 141 23 Athom. Grooco. TeL 1 Fax. |30) 01 - 2845060 - 



t gR£, 

iT' T 3 * 


i m W.f *■ LONDON 

On tfa hutnidioiu of Ihe Crown Estate 

“! • - -j ■ The gothick «Da. Regent's park: 9v year 

•1 Crown !«.ise far sole Join sole agems Kmghi 
FranckS Re*? Tel (44)71 629 81 71 

LA5SMAN5 35-37 Davie; Street Mayfair landers WIT 1FN ■ TeL [44) 499 3434 . 
Fax. |44) 71 491 8171 


CAP DANTIBES 

■ He*» property d the extreme up of the Cap 
Acprox. TOO nv living suttee Thermal baths 
wdt scuta and jacas Swnvning pwl. -der- 
front with prude dock Asofcfcfe , cor -round 
far short term rental Ref 212333 
JOHN TATUM - Jocquu Chctafaiimr. 55. la Crefaette 06400 Cannet - France. 

TeL (33) 93 38 00 66 - Fax. (39| 93 39 1 3 65. 


M 0 UGINS 

■ Supero eveto m the South of Frcnce. se^cd 
times rers*?ured kwedes c 17+ arvy coA. 
o typ'd 222 m prorened house, a bom iron-, 
farmed into c house 9 ha park win a ggE cour 
se. swiTT.RG peel and temH coun F.i HZiOZ 
JOHN TAYLOR. 55 La Crooetfe 06400 Cotsnae • France. 

Tel. *33) 93 38 00 66 - Fax. (33) 93 39 13 65 


MEGEVE- FRENCH ALPS 


■ Secemiy fa _-.!• £?Z m ^hale* iociro 
:Sc Von: E'cnc spscisus 'n.ing «icms 

l tecrcarr.-, • bltnrocms. "r.e-roon. 

-o d's slu;.; sScr-a E»cepr,ono( ; ec- 
lu-cs 

CAU IN PARIS. France. Tel : 133] 1 40 72 69 15 


PARIS NEUILLY 


■ I'Jr ra. situated «•. c t grd?r 
spec 'Sul r-.ing-rwns .fad fa efitenavi.fi] 
2 spseiiia SL'-es raid's s'uqo pcfk.-.p i®;i 
!•' es *c* 2 er-s tove.y desyatic-i 


CAU. IN PARIS. Franc e-Tet : 1331 1 40 72 69 15 


FRANCE 

■ l?r ““lied ■amicjvs * tr orre* 
w o w, -- 5 r; o 1 -osaed :ro.'o-. -lit- a 
K”p tc'oc'.s »•©% s*et jr-, mired »-*t 
c v ;; c': "i Ted s » n 

mow'*. ^rr-rr:, w • 'Tie*'; /stems 
5EASHOR! RLUTS8S- Gveetr TeL J30i I 895 2212 e, 89S 6733 ■ Fes. 89S 2317 
Pans - France TeL (33) 1 6* 07 66 66 - Fan. (33) 1 64 07 66 23 


FRANCE South Brittany 

■ £«!•■*¥ T.toree JS?5 w -■ ■ Lx-se 

- S'tC'CCri 3 CC“- corns i-S..-g 'Oar mA z 
i>iri«e 3 -»'3 •5 :t fa-y ' nci i.:;ne- 
c-.Jrry enj s--r;;T ~ *\v so h r , :bvra 
'■:< -dwased a-i.-Ui “ c; 2 M-0 TX ?? 
CUUDI G8AIRT RN7 Us Sraneni ■ 45210 Fa n renay s/Loing • France. 

TeL (33) 38 95 76 M - Fox : (33) 38 95 70 12 


mm* I 

#* -j 


■ i> rv O-zrr Ci no: tedy tfa^F+r. 
asna' lawn house i<"e «*»■ c* ne c *fs! Tc**' 
ani z irer ac'-r,-. to re a=> ; 'Pt * • 
reuse an erteporo 1 ’evir^t 4 iiottis ir- 
;05m akjicga.de'- 
FEAII RIVE GAUCHE 83. Avenue de la Bourdon nail 75007 Paris - France. 

Tel. (331 1 47 05 SO 36 - Fax : (33) I 45 55 58 31. 


x-'s: -«r?y 


PARIS 

■ 9 e C' ■ Town house in 'eudcmicl neighbcjrh-aoa at 

- g, rteuilh. »>" n 2e«ne 5 WM ar 

xproa 4^0 m cn sDC 1 - arsundt £'.s»o':r 
swimr.-rg-pcd gy- Jaaonese =-’=!•' ^7 
acl.ncfa.Wsrorjcar-, 

EUROPE PROMOTION 1MM081UER 88. rue do Proven to • 75009 Pwis • France, 
tot i33l i 44 41 95 15 • fax. (33( 1 49 95 02 62 






T P 4 »- ^ PARIS 

?; h. 4 O £»cepior*7 n>m faux d ( leuill* 'E'cred to 

-V die original dsi'Jft ;f 'he Sen da 

j£k Soubgne arid amd 'ewer £25 m anayycy; 

I MS JlSJ ■ -Tid cne urdcro-jund. f bedrooms graces 

Jut fi •■ aJffl garden, roonyoro. eUdor pafana 

EUROPE PROMOTION 1MM08IUER 88, rue de Provence - 75009 Paris - Franse. 

TeL (33) 1 44 91 95 IS - fax. |33> 1 49 95 02 62 


a Septet -jparonern. ZdC'a . iaxred m j 
1 0 th century build mg wnh crcrjcrs: »V» 
nice entrance hoi! Sumptuous receaiior. 
room cnarning drawing ream, end 5 
bedrooms Parking bcTities 
IB MHK OEMEURES DE FRANCE 132. Bid Hauumann 75008 Paris - France. 

TeL (33)1 40 08 10 38 - 40 08 10 00. Fax. (33) I 42 94 98 65 


CAP D'ANTIBES 

■ iupero property. Sigh quality cxistrucncm 
livmg surface 290 m . 2 spaocus receptor 
roam. 5 bedrooms, crefaken aeon . summer 
drawing room arer iie sat. garden of laOOrr: 
end iwimmrrg pool joac Ret 3 7 5 
JOHN TAYLOR • Jocquos Choforgnier. 55. la Croisette - 06400 - Cannes - France. 
TeL (33) 93 38 00 66 • fax. (33) 93 39 13 63. 





GREECE 

D FuBy restored windmill in die Cyclades 
Holds hetday homes, offices, (end far development, isfands 
town houses, industrial buiW ngs. Cocjaeraficn posjrWe with 
dher oewto 


HEUEMC PCQPSniS & MVESTMBIT SIXYKSS UD Room 
417, Vauhaiiresiiaa 3. 105 64 Athens, Graeco. 

TeL (30) 1 - 3254140- Fax. (30) 1 - 3254120 


■J* 

r> " 1 ” ™ r 

}.- • - — 

• . - --Sfe -.j 


mougins 

■ Pro«er>xl slyfa property weh > ww otthe »ea 
and vdogr? L«ng surface 450 m on wounds 
u : :5sV^ 3HOK of 4200m Otrnnc roam. famg raon. dmetc 
^ ” ‘ iron f ° 001 mM,Bf h e ^' wr . 3 bedrowns. i bath 

- M B rooms, swimming-pool, pod house Eel jr5 

CLAUDE MU1ER 24. la Crnisrtto • 06400 Comes - Fraira. 

TeL |33) 93 99 42 00 • Fax. (33) 93 39 52 30 


CAP D'ANTIBES 


■ A unique beoulrf Jly rsn>«ed tom if tnt 
century home far sale Beautiful garden: 
swimming-pool, small private cecrn c 
bedrooms and bathrooms, tv: recepnan 
rcom and independent summer ve'anic 
G9I BETEtNADCNAl IS bd A9iert !'• 06600 Antibes -Id. 133] 93 34 05 76 - Fax. (33) 93 34 14 23 
41 bd Kennedy • 06600 Cap c!’An*« - Fraree. Tel (33) 93 67 99 00 • Fax. |33J 93 67 60 92 


i BEAULIEU SUR MER 

| ■ tiLiepond florerrfine- .TyU vtSa :~.r- 

veehr fisrtojr Appian-ncie 1 ; 2z-J ~'i .j! 
hv.ng space win refine; cEO'T?'. 1 : 3 

tecr corns 4 b^n.-Mms ‘*eWCC 
pool wrri roasaic hln; 

FRANCE PROMOTION 3. Avenue Gustave V 06000 Nke • France. 

TeL .33 03 87 46 00 • Fox. (33) 93 16 19 29 


| . NICE 

■ r-.oero preaerv rr ne rj; r t- Sec 


— — 1 -aoms trvaeperdem &«s “ius* 

FRANC POOMOnON 3. Avenue Gustave V 06000 Nke - France. 
TeL |33i 93 87 46 00 - Fax. (33) 93 16 19 29 



■ Ucnncrt aroce”> 'ly-.ies end 
and !' Trope; Ma.iaqrt ard"tor.r» prestr- 
9*vS hiBSPC house ■« 5?0C n- jn> lord- 
xcpsc per*. .Vy.yr s tw iw-r-^g pads. 
cjo- i house ttf.is s fc.'is wr t aaroge 
CAB.NET RAVEYRE Restoenre Miramar 93600 Pari Frepn - France 
TeL 1 33; 44 S3 35 37 Fax. (33) 94 52 10 95 


-y- . FRANCE Chateau de la Loire 

1 ^ f ■E - reh restored ras ,- e Isijw. -.-e-cr <*> ^ 

j£ £- v? { • ’ jjB I ha cf park: L^.--a«,; ok:- :-i id-, per 

* ■:■: tteves Sw-m-rg-ps- V-:aurt j 

, ~ . . 0 -r- fr a;;. ■ - 3 r- <nb 

703 FVRTHcR INFORMATION. copracTOwner's atfira m Frame, Francme Bracard. 
TeL .33', 1 47 06 00 40 -Fax. |33) 1 47 4Q 07 77 


AiX EN PROVENCE 

■ Sn.:. i : a 15 ha aa-.:rdici^ l^fac: 
:-.-trt^e -rz » vr.- rr/red la- -, (. rc.i- 


:c - r “’ K ^ 
r “ i ll t •al* iOtsariOijcr^. ee—ae .--wfiungpeo 

FW Mil IT OWNER .TeL ;33) I «7 66 92 00 lefficej - 1 4} 20 15 93 /home) • 

Fox (3311 47 6611 34 






. V ‘ PARIS 

’ /> ■ Etqjtirte early i?th-CBn*ury town house 

^ Tt^y resirupjred wtd remodelled Sutface 
■ abou 1 *70*3 m c 4 Boers wuh a 240 m cwrrt 

‘ J >V;^|lf ycd and 1C U'-dergraund parting 0'6B1 
^ far 0 pnw rasdere w cn errbensy 
^TU9E SUFFREN. Transoctiafli Imnsebilieras de PreJtige 61 bil AwffiM de 5«*w 
75007 Pons ■ froncc. Tel [33| I 45 67 88 38 Fax. [33( I 43 67 16 08 


■ v-Vn 

V'V-vy ' 

•w-Rtto.-^ 


£**/^reg 


PARIS 

a E»oj.sft ajdy 19m centu-r/ cwn house Totofiy restroOwred 
cm) rercdctTec Vxface ahovd ' 7 CiG m- an 4 ibors with a 2 a0 

m cou'’ jrod and 10 jndergrer.na parking tttas Smteble far 0 

pnurSe resident a» v- embasr/ 

ETUDE 5WFREN. Transcttions tmmob»6ru de Pretrige 61 
br> Avenue de 5irffren 75007 Paris • Franco. Tel. (33) 1 
45 67 88 88 Fax. |33) I 45 67 16 08 


PARIS Triangle d'Or 

■ Hauss.Ton.i pericd town house on 1500 
o . with t> floors, -auld make prestigious 
head eh..;* far a :orpony ?o;sibrli*y for 
cr:h'-.« cn 3 unaergrour.d !erel» wun safe 
proikirg faaJitift, far 3 cars in the courtyard. 
ETUDE SUF7REN. Traniactrons Immobirieres de Prestige 61 bis Avenue de Strffrm 
750C7 Paris - France. TeL (331 l 45 67 88 88 - Fax. (331 t « 67 16 08 





'* * " •V v<>t ''~?ir 5i yj ■ If mra ham Cc-rnes hfiscnc 27ccreest«e 

' *-t ,* iff y] wrtiile far private sdert. hafa resort or de«e- 
'-SglSy^S Jopraent. o edritonj burldmas remodellad 

i •- " into favurejus apartmeras Heoted swimming 

• - . . • ) pcolond^nr.iscocrt Ref * ' v 1 

PEcSTlGE LMMOBIUER. -Los Jordim du Majesties- 9 La Croisott* 06400 CarniM - 
France. Tel. (33) 93 39 73 73 • Fax. |33) 93 39 1 3 89 




| CANNES 







GREECE 

■ 7 bedroom-house 600 sqm in Athens. 
foil sarvice estate ogency providing advice. 
nao etnt ni ng lawyers aid Mvo heusa to 
speakcHcn. In de aae of hotebpcuffiirto 
find staff and proridfe mcHrefing fecifoo. 


HELLENIC PROPERTY & INVESTMENT SERVICES L70 Safamou 18, 
Lykovrissi, 141 23 Athens. Graeco. TeL & Fax. (30)01-2845060- 




aNNES 

B OveHookrrg the boy ol 'lonrte: and the 
rl Estcrel prapery in c 2700 m londsccped 
wooded pork Vgst reception: rooms. 6 
bedroems and badtrowns Carrtde« s lodging 

i rwiirvTur^ prd Mtri oc.-ib« syvan Ref 177 

CLAUDE MULLER 24, la Croisene - 06400 Carmen - France. 

Tel. (33) 93 99 42 00 - Fax. (33) 93 39 53 30 


CAP D'ANTIBES 

For seasonal rentals 
■ Superb medtro name decorated to a regh 
ttxidord. Imury hnishmgs pnwdmg breedto- 
fang sea views, a/edfaw swemung paaf. i bed 
roams, i bathroom. pnve*e rocky beads front 
GOT INTSNAIBNAL 15 bd Albert !*• 06600 ArdiMS -TdL (33) 93 34 05 76 • lax. (33) 93 34 14 23 
41 bd Kennedy - 06600 Cep d'Anftes - Fnxa. TeL (33) 93 67 99 00 ■ Fax. (33) 93 67 60 92 


6 ISSUES/ 1 YEAR 





located-fabid mni ^ 

Manta Carb'M-fc> dteMOfiMit." ' 


fajtll main vdfa 3d0 [ m , itfisaJideKcia^ • 
Dootmcntatton and bradtura «i 8ttMO«M»T» <Ae>«ou8ng^>. ^Ibir^. 

in* Princexse ABer MC 98000 Monaco TJ. (33)93 25 58 23 ■ Fox, {33)933695^' 


VIUEFRANOff-^.. 

■ Brond-nsrr nflfa. hi^s quottyfijii 
c aia decorollcit. Sihialedjt 
«DomoiTte». 340 nr on 31tyeb£ 
fawn 1900m Foot 13x6. Dm«|^ 

sea ondlhe bay of Acs: .Ref-122 

BifiMOND-OCmA «Lm ioaUnffrtare 3 bb avenM PriiMHirAfce MCRMOOti^b 
TeL (33) 93 U 50 2S Fox. (33)93 30 95 8* .* : . 





■ At the enhance oflhe Cuff 
Bui on 31erek S nfeptetdert 
bedrooms wtlh private 
badutwra. Mooring far pi 

tonnage. Gwtoftw's anriei.- ' 

ETUDE SUFFREN, Tnmeactiaas Im ma NBera s de Prestige 61 bb Avretsa dc Silbw 
75007 Paris • France. TeL (33) 1 45 67 83 88 Fax. (33) 1"<5 671608V:': 



RIVIERA pak k umtmt 


oaune. cneriodang tte sat. 
and pfnde pontoon, edoWtetJ* ' 
truing roam (41 nr), txmred terrace, 
ehen. rater*, spans genge. A’ * " 

1£S PARCS DE BCAUVAUON - SeouvdtomGraaaud - 83120 Sdefe Nkodne-Fwi 
TeL (33) 94 56 48 48 -Fax. (33) 94 56 48 82 ■’ 



VSK Ty:. 


■ VVcisr front prepefty, between Onfa gfa 
tmd S< Tropes. Mouresque ord eM t ^ Rh: 
giaus historic house in 5800 ar.lunnui}: 
■mprri peak Master’s house. 5winnigire^ 
guest’s house. ccraciBr's house, baafs gsgi 
CABHffT RAVEYRE Residence Miramar 93600 Part Frejui - France .• T TlJ 
TeL (33J 94 S3 35 37 Fax. (33) 94 52 10 95 . !f 






K 

' /■ ? 



U Looked n f« cafatof a 
estole. beauriul ttarevfc of hyi ifa^ifl 
g rounds of 2500. W, dft»tg fxa. cinipg ' 
room. 4 bedroawlMnw* 
ganeroan, DlkWitl^ItM™® - 
AOENCZ LATOUR. 20 roe larawr Moubetvg OAADOCaww Fronre ^ - 

TeL(33) 93 94 40 S3. Fax. (33) 94.43 » W - tj''-. * ' . v V.v 







■ A mod dq*t 450 w 2 -W 11 

mom iroonKj recepkto' rooms, 6 bnicc“»d 
bodtrooms. otrixi^^S- Gwd fa* wfa. 
fart house; gasBiwm. sta*d * 7Wx& 
gauti faatg fa b^’rf6w» 






OUV1B DE ROSE - 94. la Ciabetta - 06800 CANNK 
Tel. (331 93 94 OB 88- Fax. (33) 93 « 00 97 -• 


.-CUSS VOSMBI' 

h-rau:iu ( ar MPt 

B ' ' .‘.AT .**JH 

■ • ~:r.t ’ 

~ • -rot nr 
' ~ -itrurivvi 


ro./i- I .. ' ■*~ e * r T ’ 1 " 
■ t- “ ” - e . :: : e jo *5 


a PRIVATE y< 

* - - •■--J -i r .«v «• 


FF 150 
£ IS 
DM 60 
SF46 
BF T 150 
Lit 50 000 
Pta 4000 
USA $ 36.00 
Can. US $ 46.00 
Other countries 
US $ 50.00 



'a \ 

• <. - * ■- ; ■> •. ' , - ' ~ . . 'UL 



■ VLtetgagrC&A rj 









c. SUBSCRIBE TODAY- AND UNIQUE WILL BE DELIVERED DIRECTLY TO YOU! , 


. year/6 ,„ue. sens by a™,* f-rap..'E*« US S 30.00 -1 USA: US S 364W J Canada [inriuding GST,.- US 5 46.M J Other ccreaTrrei: U5 3 50.08 J 

Nome Mr/Mrs/Miss 


Address 

■_ity Slate /Country 2p 

Payment by creeir cant only Plaasa ^rge my J'/i„ J Mas;er Cord JAmex -.Di^sC 

Card number c ■ . 

■ Expiration dote Siqnahjre 

L - ■ 1 1 ■ ' I ( L_J_ 

L 65 ‘ n,f ^Wo, ' lj wch*. 75m Paris, franc*. 



J LUE WF 8 AO 10 K 






















;r . 

: ’ :u 
..-.• ' - 
Mt- r -"' '- 

!* • «**. 2: 


HOMS T . fob. ns, ^ ratio* 

■ *4261 6677- Fox. {33] | 42 974358 

* W M«22 n<0 . h , Wtta| 7 B 




*V : \: i 


nSV-* 


■ mu; 

Hi! 



I LEGEND OF TINTAGEt 

■! 43* (43,5 m| Oman poaoge making lu*ir 

L a 4 »> f A«omferl2in6suitejpKBCTew.5un¥*w)us 

rtB ^ f - kltef "» «W. Except Chate 

™»iiiwMMiiiB»i«^ 

• Of France Tal (33) 93 3* 01 00 fat. (33) 93 34 2040 


H EL BRAVO 208J4'(6iS0mJ,I»l 

FOR SALE AND SHBCT CHARIER 

* Pots&fy the most ending modern large 
yodtto become avalable fa recent fenes: 11 
dmfalecnbfas, 3 bars, 2 saloons, swimming 
pool, Wrapter deck. efc... 

HKH. KKGE55 Mama. _Tefo (33) 93 50 22 *4 - Fax. (33) 93 25 15 89 

U»ia. T«! (44) 071 839 4346 -Fax, (44) 071 K» 4329 




PHILANDERER i3t.*F(4aoomk 

1992 FOB SALE AND CHARIER 


T -.-1 | 


" A w f’®* ) ^g^P g fan « tn ce scSng yacht 
avalcble in be Mediterranean fe sonrner 
6«efiertaca>remalofai(tf 8 to 10 guests. 
MOK BlMfiESS Monaco. TeL (33) 93 50 22 64 • Fax. (33) 93 23 15 89 
U»*m. Id (44) 071 839 4366 - Fax. (44) 071 839 4329 




49.6m (163*) C0DECASA 

■ Erapfcncf *91 Baku joeft Aasra fbr 14 ) 
to M fad fail width owner's stateroom attaxfao 
an) oomf dsxal int Seaworthiness combined 
wib soph madrinery + systems aid a «ey long 
nmge (5000 N bfcrestfag for prospedi- 
'•eCMiw'mbbng tfetona awing in maid 
C6M7B ft MOKM5QNS lOfBOft TeL (44) 71 491 29S0 tac (44) 71 629 2068 




lfrccsAjh or yuufog tyscfafari ond monogfnnt pugmovne. Ftemcol todbeus. 
DA MAM1ME RANGE tcL (33) 93 65 63 56 - fax. {33} 93 65 07 78 


MOORINGS Wry doo 

7 * TSytodfcfexn ttetewkfs i.aadbaautfiisdljiodfe. Alba 
^youcoddvreh for mte tanfao. ftato-fcofcVtoaadati 
indushe charter, aeon. m be best and of comfort semes for 
8, pampered ty 3 new. Brochure, info, res 
MOORMG5 krtenitaiand franco: T«L (33) | <261 6677- 
iax. (33)142 97 43 58 

TJfc TdL(44) 843 22 71 40 - Fax. (44) *43 22 *7 14 


KLASS YEiSHEDA 

Seriously for safe 

: ■ 17% {29 m. Unique chore* to buy one fan 

«xU's3e»s^>Clasjn9331 , iidwficr»s- 
tadfan. kfcrior may be raxified. Al dewyH 
«*1 bids hw* *w** : shfyords mriabfo. 

For foHb«r fcforaufioo, aMHMt oFBoe in Franco, Fim fcacmrl 
Fa*. |33) 1 47 40 07 77 - TA {33)1 47 40 00 40 



RENT A PRIVATE YACHT 

■Oase.itoMfldcfqwipiw, Aoowrbs 

ansi foqgic tefeways on bqard one of oar. 
J5T •y — bwry privately owned metoyoehb. WgWy 
__ " cpxfifadflrfwahdpToototoy^ 

stag puxpaMm andw4meel rfyJuriHFm' 
rr^-canWourr^iiMxniSeo/faKa 
TOC AVAOU, TA {331 *» 4974 04 - fee. (33) 9297 64 47 


ST- * JONGERT20DS 

4M M wauEowotniurr 

WM BtoenAiespadousyadtcoufUwAU* 
• B bss woodwdL Mod car^ileto tetruortfcn 

ond eqoipirt ewr to be buitt mtaoJongerl 
jo* »Qndendb of Hanble^ is q* s«ply 
aSqaa 737/22^6^*1 3 cefcm. 


V 


I M.Y MIDSUMMER 

■ iOm mo»yod«t^ W«d * *• 5«A of 

fitM far sde ond rfator in be Med 1994 
jeoson. CaBiforlaU)' 0000 m 12 in 2 grand 
mate- *fc morts mi 4 gnd aim era* 
\ninatM. Unive sonefed: attend bge 

jurf^atalflpspwdowrabieto. 
ftL |44J 071 400 5516 - F«- f44) 071 5830 


j P^ M I? 93 ' 


JONGERT 2100S 


reBSUftfCAVMlMUroMCHABa 


• , .j 5core«r 


^TenBent ante**** *%*****> 


gj N^" irt ^ ( - atl «64030 
^ltnflsss 103-teW^^ 


INTERIVATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 



SELEaED IN UNIQUE 


131' MOTOR YACHT 

For sale by tender 


" ' " ‘ ■ Launched 1992. Tronsocean range. 

Comfortable oc co —nfaion for 14 guests 
cmd 8 crew. For more dstds, please contact 

our office. 

05 MMEIME LTD. uc -TeL (44) |0) 703 456 90S • Fa*. (44) (0) 703 454 031 


> V . ' .'T: ^ ferrto/2 « 216 kW |2 » 292hp). Madmun. 

- ■%'rr . •-**'*' ■■ Speed 1 l^Skn. 8 berths in 1 cabins. 


MQONEK72 

FOR SMC 

■ This bcunan motoryod* has been dfS'- 
gned for v^rfowjde awing witho high fowl 
o! comfort. 72’7'/22,T8m, 2 x Volvo 


dahm nriamrtienel Germcmy. TeL (49) 21 1 3555103 - Fox (49) 211 364030 


.1 : COLOMBAIOSUN 


doe eledroni^ com.. Very o*ix>ivb p«r 

YA4MM6MKINBSVOBNAnONALUC.Td{44)0273 571722-Fax.f44)0ZF3S7l720 

or From TA (33) 93 34 OS OB Fa. |M) 93 34 30 40 


SEA CREST 

3tm\W 

■ The douk grtfenons yxk Sea Cresl « fe/ 
sob and obo mabble b: diana Fa U intir- 
malion. please unttt our office in Anttes ficnce - 
Peter hsJts Yodtf Mating 


RIB WSUU*S YACHT MAKETOWTeL (33) 93 34 44 95 • Fax. |33) 93 34 9274 


udy suffolk h 
FOR SA1C AND CHARTS 

■Afirodive Terence Dadtie interkr, sproous 

•, j dedc creas ond very avn fertile aaanmodo- 

tiai far up to T 2 guests. 

MKJfl. U8GCS5 Monaco. Td. (33) 93 90 22 64 - Fax. (33) 93 29 15 89 
London. Te) (44) 071 839 4366 - Fax. (44) 071 839 4329 


PRINCESS TANYA 

Luxury charter in the Med and Carib 

■ 188.99* (57,60m) lux maorynd* wry high 
spec 1961 Austin ond PidangiB Ltd. Edens 
refused rebuih 1992. 2x840bhp Sufaer dad 
ec^Cn»speedl2bats.Superb<raad{)onel- 
led oaxxn. far 18 in 9 stefcrooms, plus ow. 


Contact your Charter 1 


AZIMUT 86' FLORIDA 


sep orw quarter far A Ch sho^ 

CONTACT: AZIMUT SPA TeL (39) 11 9367271 - Fox. (39) 1 1 936 7270 l Mn ONATO 


AZIMUT 90* AKOttfA 

■ 27 «0m fcwpfcu boos kdy AZIMUT 

I n 1992. ABSGoss. FuB eledronia. 2 x 1525 
hpMTU cruising speed 23 knots. Aanm for 8 
n 4 double cabins with private bab, s^i crew 

7 ■ ' _ . . . ! ' • 3 B 3J0r*v far 4 m 3 cnbrr. 6 morths wanerty 

cmerage. On show in Hong Kang. 

CONTACT: AZIMUT SPA TeL (39) 1 1 9367271 Fax. (39) 1 1 936 7270. Mrs CMATO 



46.95a (154*) HITACHI ZDSEN 

■ Mognd 15B7 lesfedi line soing ap axrbined 
'■ah oomf of foge nxstor >ndl Rs& ]992extev 
ded yacht’s taraxn to odd cpm air rfreng recred 
$oa. fiaom 8 in 4 staterooms ind onrart site, 
well -equip gym, (fang sofoon, fcbrory. Man 
xfocn on tep deck . Corned dona foor. 

CAMFBl A NKHOtSONS LONDON. TeL (44) 71 491 2990 Fax. [44] 71 629 2061 


132* HEESEN / D1ASHIP 

■ Remarkable yacht, 3 MTU 10.500 
hpapeeds approaching 50 knots. CoSed faaesl 
megoyadrt in the wnrfd. Speed + canfort. |r* 
design Frank Milder. 4 corf guert Mataraare 
aid o masts suite, on he mom deck. Every 
posstafa omenity far keaxious livfag aboonL 
CAMPER « MCH0I50N5 UMSON.TM (44) 71 491 2950 Fax. (44) 71 6292068 



THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE 
FOR HOUSES , CARS , YACHTS , CRUISING , AIRCRAFT, 
ARTS, AND UNIQUE PEOPLE ... 


]p-r?k 


i sar 

■ 5cfcd 6rope rwres. 2JXX) sq B bage. fax 
3&&S lot by fan designer. Huge sitting + dining 
&H| room, mom cab w. dressing + bathroom, 2 
|H|fi dbie cci (+ btArooms). Uy equ^j lath, crew 
cob, oir con. VAsUefVxis or A imr. 5500,000 
(BNg) : TeL 32 3 231 79 10 'Fax. 32 3 234 1289 


FOR SALE GUY COUACH 


■ I °89. Volvo diesel engines 2x306 o. 
VHF. bran C, automatic pilot, 70 000 FF HT. 
For foil infomdion. pleose contact V/inner. 

our orhee m Monoeliei b u tcofaj spe- 
oobst of motoryodto fa Mefanonean sea 
FNANCt TeL (33) 93 49 74 04 - Fax. (33)92 97447 


^ JONGERT 22D 

FOR SALE 

■ 'Foe Two*, comfortable, safe, beautiful, 
enduring. W afanondVp of (igheri qutfey buih 
by one of the worlds mod renowned yards, 
fed) made far every type of veeder and sea 
75 , /23^0m,8(I1)befain4mbim. 

I Senary: TeL (49) 211/3SS5103 - Fax (49) 21 1/364030 



A & R LUXURY FAST OPEN 
POWERBOAT 

■ 120 Lmvprafifa(pb53lmmobrvtod*bu)d 
fa AL a FW Two cferi one turbine woterjs!. 
Great funfeod from as experienced sfapyard. 


ABEKMG & U5MUSS£N.TeL (49) 421 733 532 - Fax. (49) 421 7 33115 
US office in Fl loudenMe. TeL (I) 309 522 4007* Fax. (1| 305 522 1161 


AvxAAJe for charter 
■ See at dose quarters sunken treasures, dol- 
*• I phfas swimming, ycxf* ec^rip wiSt undpwder 

kgfofag syst In your canfart ccb or fa Jceuzzi, 
jjsi - vokfi fah talas your Ixaf , chtfean scuba ctvfag, 

foendsIcfongarMb^rtpinosedudedbay. 
KARADMZ TACHWG A1SUBSM MC W. 90212 2206965 - Fax. 90 212 22083 83 


BENTLEY TURBO COUPE 

by rhe Royal Coodhbuflden Hooper 
& co. London 

■ A h an dcrafted one oil motor car fa die Rue 
pursuit of erceSence • for the very few who 
seel only he very beset 


Far detals serious enquiries to Gennary. TeL (49) 6403 71791 


THE BEST OF THE BEST. 


PULUONO CLASSICS 


■ 1959 Rolls RayoeSiW Cloud I.H.j. 

Mflner Conwrtifa. 100 part ax, rancours 
wmer, restofEd by otTseks. Oe of enfy six 
monufodured. CI45/XX) 

lfce CMsea WorWtop Neil Gwym Hwn, Drayeelt Amaa, Oabaa SW3 3ALL 
Uatad Rfagdoav TeL (44) 0 71 584 8363 / 64 - Fax. (44) 0 71 5813033. 




■ If you ere linking of buyvig or idling o 
left or right hand drive Ferrari oi 
lanborghW, please rontad PuDiano Oossia 
for fnendy advice 


FtAllCMO QAS5ICS. UK. M. [44) 81 877 0157 - Fax. (44) 81 874 7733 


B almaviva 

H 143' (43m) aluminium M/Y, built in 
Holland, Peter Beefosmjer design. Komewo 
werferjets, 2 x 2.500 hp MTU, 20 lm. 
tuaras nc o ae mufaq p for 10 guests in 5 
double cobras, 8 crew. Plenty of erriertain- 
metf space, for sde «j chatter. 

TlfesN YACHIS 5poi». Tat (34) 71 700445 Fax. (34) 71 700551 


^ ^ mjc "“faTadi far charter In 
*«e h«tic dap of fa* Wng, here area fow 
mdevioys ndwe one can Buly relax ad reran 
to the quiev poce of Ke by bygone eraTravd 
J. ’¥-j r V ' . "' j| | | g g bock ^ tme to f'e dorjus doys of he 1 930* s 
e^enarakfaoboadROSfi^CAVAlBL 

Contort your Charter htfar for foil fafomutfoa and calowr bradxn. 


AMBRE MARINE 

. * 3 ?^ To mdre yotir duns come true 

k AnAre Marine aSen yw J fadusiw ovi- 
_ 1*8 pw g w g in Medftemreon on board 
fool sa&g yachts. .AS your yochts are pri- 
tody owned aid Uy crew«j or avdefofe fex 
bcreboatdoie(5.eootad:.- 

AMntiUUBFa.TaL (33) 94 38 80 27 Fa*. (33) 94 38 80 38 


x*» I- 



Page 21 



-W Viy;. % M PRINGSS ZEYNEP 

’ 'J3tj - Avefloble for charter 

.$T ‘ . ■ ■ See ot dose quanets sunken treasures, dal- 

‘' r T5j^.^’'jp , y‘ 4 phins swimmrg. yacht eqap with undenwte 

- Jlil d ^**3*)^ h vw comfort atb or in Jaaca, 

- ■lJ 3H MAh foh tote your bad, diUcn scuba fang, 
* i w rriiii(MNB^RP‘ | Iiitani foendskfongamxfoigltdpinosedKiedbc^ 
KARADMZ YACHONG A KXflBSM OK. TeL 90 212 230 6965 ■ Fax. 90 212 22083 83 




MA1ANTHAR 




38 metre - 124 feet 
■ This Feoddip is offered fer sale and is obo 

available for charter. 


PET® OBUU‘5 YACHT MARKETING TN. (33) 93 34 44 55 - tax. (33) 93 34 92 74 


LUXURY CHARTER 

MedrtcrraQHin saason 

■ 42 metre motoryodit currendy auising the 
Mediterranean Modern Fast - 26 knots. 
Comfortable acoommodotion for 12 guesb in 
6 double owte staterooms. 6 new. 


D5. MAJBTMS FRANCE TeL (33) 93 65 63 56 - Fax. (33) 93 65 07 78 


141.90* (4&3ftn), 1991 
FOR 5ALE AND CHARTER 
■ Modem motor yaftvAfec^tedmiaJ spec, 

fc-rn wateqtf faes arable cf x»wh of about 

22-2Blmotsondjfeepsie>to12in6cobnL 
NttXL BURGOS Momco. TeL (33) 93 SO 22 64 - Fax. (33) 93 25 15 89 Umdan. 

Td (44) 071 839 4366 ■ Fax. (44) 071 839 4329 


41 


32m (105 1 ) GERMAN FRERS 


■ 1993 neo-dassc. elegant 105* last afam 


□using sloop. Be quality workmanship stan- 


dards. A dbie guest cub, ocean for 6 crew 


American cherry int, Audi deck centre guest 


cockpit, alt steering cockpit. For worldwide 


famSy ousing or as foe lAfacee dialer yacht. 


CAMP® A MCH0I50N5 IONOON. TeL (44) 71 491 2950 lax. (44) 71 629 2068 


FIFE 105 

■ 32 x 5.20 x i^fat. bolt 1920 by Wilian 
Fife. A Unique Klass, once owed by Prince 
Rdnier of Monaco. 350 SqMsoil. 2 x Rob 
Royce 185 hp. 12 knob, generators, Akron, 
Radar, GPS, Autopilot, SSB, Accommodation 
far 10 pax + crew. 

FOR SALE A CHARTER. SEAHORSE Oraeoe- Td. (30) I 8952 212 -lax. (30) I 8998 317 


FEADSHIP 116 

'. ■«*> lent Haloid 1973, exceOemcond. 35 JO 

* W2x 2,16m, fleel, dun apentaxl, 2 x Cat 
Vm*. ‘ 61Chp, 1 200 hour, 12/U kn, iaige 3200m. 

^8^, • 2 x gen / 90I0M, 3 flderoanv dining t mofa 

djw|^mra^^ynJ saloon, study, puffer room, captain v crew 

quartos, 2 xgafcy. S 4,400.000. 

SEAHORSE Greece. Td (30) I 8952 212 - Fax. (30) 1 0998 317 


V.' ■/. >, & & R CRUISING KETCH 

* * , , - ’• •* \ ■! 18’ semi custom fast aluminium world 

? . •. '/--v\ cruiser, launching sept 94. Design Bon 

. Holland. FuBy copthre soil handling. Three 
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maket 
hat wt 
re$Li* h 

TO 

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Tien,"™ 




bsisienn, 

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nacleof 161 
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a minister 
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that the G-7 v 
a floor under 























Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1994 


SPORT 



Olajuwon Is I 
Trail Blazers 


The Associated Press 

The Portland Trail Blazers first 
tried double coverage on Hakeem 
Olajuwon. That didn't work. 

They then tried single coverage, 
to put more pressure on Houston's 
outside shooters, and Ofajuwon 
burned them with 46 points and a 
late shot-blocking display as the 
Rockets beat the visiting Blazers. 
1 13-104, on Sunday night to take a 
2-0 lead in the best-of-5 Western 
Conference series. 

“ft was a surprise at first, but J 
made some adjustments." 
Olajuwon said said of the latest 
strategy. 

When the Blazers double-teamed 
Olajuwon in Friday night's opener, 
he still scored 26 points, and Ver- 
non Maxwell added 24. 

This rime, he got 10 points in the 
first quarter erf a game Lhat Port- 
land led only once, at 4-2. He also 
had six blocked shots and eight 
rebounds. 

The Trail Blazers staved close in 
the fourth quarter, but every time 
they threatened to get the deficit 
below five, Olajuwon was there to 
stop them. 

With 1 :38 left, he blocked a shot 
by Gyde Drexler, his former team- 
mate at the University of Houston. 

With 1:11 to play, he caught up 
with Rod Strickland on a fast break 
and swatted away a layup that 
would have cut Houston's lead to 
104-100. 

“He probably saw me. but he 


didn't have any idea 1 could cover 
so much space so quickly." 
Oiajuwos said. 

The closest Portland got in the 
late-going was 98-93 with 4:38 left. 

“With the Dream in the middle 
blocking every shot, and shooting 
15-foot fadeaways there’s nothing 
you can do." Ditaler said. “We\e 


NBA PLAYOFFS 


got to come up with something else. 
We've got to do something differ- 
ence in Game 3 and 1 don't know 
what it is.’’ 

That game of the best-of-5 seres 
will be played Tuesday night *n 
Portland. 

Of the eight best-of-5 first-round 
playoff series, only two were tied at 
a game apiece. 

The Orlando Magic and Denver 
Nuggets faced elimination Monday 
night, while New jersey, Cleveland 
anil Golden State as well as Port- 
land could depart Tuesday or 

Wednesday, having put themselves 
in lhat predicament with losses 
Sunday. 

Early in the day, the Nets fell to 
New York, 90-81. then the Civs 
lost co Chicago and the Warriors 
were beaten by Phoenix. 

Bolls 105, Car abets 96: Chicago, 
playing at home, went with the 
strategy that worked in Game I: 
shutting down Mark Price. 

Price, held to nine points Friday, 
managed just 54 on 5-cf-l4 shoot- 


ing. He is Cleveland's main offen- 
sive weapon because of injuries to 
big men Brad Daugherty. John 
Williams and Larry Nance. 

“The way Price goes, the Cava- 
liers go," Scottie Pippca said. 
“We’re focusing as a team on 
Price." 

Chicago had a three-point lead 
beginning the fourth quarter and 
bum it to 10 with 7:06 left as Pip- 
pen sank a jumper and BJ. Arm- 
strong made a 3-pcinier. The Cavs 
•weren’t able to mount a Serious 
threat down the stretch. 



Rangers Roll On 
Routing Capitals 






‘£' ; - --St-’ 


nClirT-, 










Game 3 will be played Tuesday 
night in Richfield, Ohio. 

Suns 317, Warriors 111: Guard 
Kevin Johnson took over the game 
in Phoenix, scoring 15 of his 3$ 
points ic the final 5:02 of the third 
period, most on layup*. 

"He literally said. ‘Don't shoct 
uiy more jump shots.' and stuff 
like. ‘Get some layups and get peo- 
ple involved.’ " Johnson said of a 
halftime lecture he received from 
the Suits’ coach. Paul Wesiphal. 

Phoenix trailed most of the 
game, but Johnson made a three- 
poifl ! play, sank two more shots 
and then tied it at 86 with a techni- 
cal foul free throw- with 56 seconds 
to go in the third. A.C. Green made 
two free throws ic pul Phoenix 
ahead for good S8-86. 

Game 3 will be p ! aysd Weunes- 
dav in Oakland. California. 





’ • ?- 






v 


SSB- 

.# -gmm ± w 


m- ■ - ? i 

% ;# V 

Bair> Iamm.lTc -V.'-xoii.-d Pro. 

Toe Bulls' Horace Grant, ie-L. and Bill Heomogton doubling up on 
Mark Price: when he was shut down again, so were the Cavaliers. 


The .issoadted Press 

The New York Rangers, with the 
best regular-season record in the 
National Hockey League, continue 
to flex their muscles. 

Coining off a four-game sweep 
of the New York Islanders and a 
full week's rest, the Rangers began 
their second-round series with a 6-3 
victory over the Washington Capi- 
tals on Sunday night in Madison 
Square Garden. 

The second game of the best-of-7 
series will be played Tuesday night 
in New York. 

The Rangers put the game out of 
reach with three straight goals, the 
first Brian Leetch’s tiebreaker at 
12:47 of the second period. 

Brian Noonan, obtained by the 
Rangers in a kite-season trade with 
Chicago, that scored his second of 
the game at 15:45 to make it 4-2. 
and Greg Gilbert and Mark Messi- 
er added third-period goals as the 
Rangers continued to dominate the 
Capitals, whom they beat in five of 
six games in the regular season. 

“We made some mistakes in our 
defensive coverage." said Washing- 
ton’s coach, Jim Schoenfeid. “We 
had situations where we were out- 
hustled and outmuscled." 


Miller and Mike Ridley sooted for 

Washington. 

min an earlier game, reported in 
some Monday editions: 

Brians 2. Devfls 1: Bryan Stno- 
l icski and David Shaw scored early 
and goaltender Jon Casey and the 
goalposts made the lead stand op m 
Iasi Rutherford, New Jersey, as 
Boston took a 1-0 lead in that se- 
ries. 

While the level of play wasn't 
spectacular, there was plenty of ex- 


World Cup Set® 
Stitt Available 
By Catting V.S. 


STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 


The Rangers, who have out- 
scored the opposition in the play- 
offs 28-6, got another §oal from 
Siephane Matteau, obtained with 
Noonan. Micbal Pivonka. Kelly 


citement down the stretch as New 
Jersey tried to tie. 

Casey, who finished with 34 
saves, stopped Claude Le mie o x on 
a shorthanded breakaway early in 
the thir d period, then Randy Mc- 
Kay hit the right goalpost on a 
breakaway. Five minutes later, 
Bruce Driver hit the left post with a 
shot from the blue line and Bemie 
Nicholls, who scored the Devils' 
goal, was stopped by what ap- 
peared to be a combination of Ca- 
sey's glove and the crossbar on the 
rebound. 

“Jon Casey won us the game," 
said the Bruins’ captain, Ray Bour- 
que. “He played an outstanding 
game. He made the key saves down 
the stretch. We didn’t open it up 
and they poured it on us at times. 
We bad to have Casey today be- 
cause we didn't play that great a 
game. It was sluggish at times." 


nma^T^s for 

most of this summer's WonS 
Cup mauhes, .indodioz ^ 
two semifinals and three of the 

quarterfinals, are still on «u 
FIFA said Monday. • ^ 
It said tickets Ear 35 of a. 
52 matches could be otfeS 

ggsaws 

The final in Los Angeles m 

July 17 is sold out but titict* 
remain for the - 

New Jersey and Los Ana*. 

The only qnanerfimT^. 
aB seats taken is the os h 
New Jersey on July JO. 

Among other matches som 
out, FIFA said, were Gem*, 
ay’s two in Chicago, Araaai. 
na’s two in Boston and 1 W 5 
three in New Jersey and tyj^- 

ington. 

AB Mexico and- tiehuft 
group matches are also fully 
booked, as is.the Bred-Ca* i 
eroon match in SanFranchm. 


Finns’ Pros 
Rout Those 
(MILS., 7-2 


Compiled by Otr Staff From Dapt&j 

ALBA DI CANAZO, lul, _ 
Team USA was handed its second 
straight loss Monday at die Wofrf 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEACUE 
East Division 



w 

L 

pa. 

GB 

Boston 

18 

7 

.720 

— 

Baltimore 

15 

9 

■A2S 

2Vj 

New York 

15 

9 

a25 

T--. 

Toronto 

14 

II 

-5*0 

4 

Detroit 

8 

14 

■3A4 

BW 


Central Division 



Cleveland 

13 

10 

-545 

— 

Milwaukee 

13 

11 

-542 

'•S 

CHI capo 

13 

11 

-542 

Vl 

Kansas City 

11 

H 

-S» 

)»a 

Minnesota 

10 

1A 

JOS 

4to 


west Division 



Seattle 

11 

13 

.458 

— 

Texas 

ID 

12 

.455 

— 

California 

* 

17 

Mi 

3 

Oakland 

■ 

17 

J20 

3lk 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



East Division 




W 

L 

Pci. 

GB 

Aiionia 

IS 

* 

-625 

— 

Montreal 

u 

10 

-5E3 

1 

New York 

12 

11 

-522 

2's 

Florida 

13 

12 

-520 

r-s 

Phllodelpnio 

10 

14 

J17 

5 


Central Division 



Cincinnati 

IS 

0 

652 

— 

SI. Louis 

13 

9 

J*1 

Hr 

Pittsburgh 

13 

19 

-565 

2 

Houston 

13 

11 

J42 

2to 

Chicago 

• 

It 

zn 

BVi 


WM Division 



San Fran aid 

l 12 

12 

-500 

— 

Colorado 

)/ 

13 

A70 

to 

Los Angeles 

11 

13 

-4SB 

l 

San Diego 

7 

18 

-280 

5to 


Milwaukee ooo as aco— a t 3 

Kansas City 409 M2 COx — 6 II 1 

First Game 

EUred. Men rr (II ana Mlsson; Cone. M*j- 

chom (9) and Moyne. W— Cono. 4-1. 
L — ElOrod. 2-3. 

MUmNwe W 120 6*0—3 B 0 

Kansas O hr 309 300 »t*— 7 14 • 

Second Game 

Htouorn. Scanlon (41. Fellers (Bi and 
Hareer: Gablca. Moanonte (61. Mon room 
err (9) and MocfaMane. w— Oubfaa. 2-2 
L— Htooero j.j, h R s — >VII Iwcukee. G.Vaugnn 
(21. Kansas Clfv. Joyner (31. Mocforfane <41. 
Taranto mo Mi lot— 3 9 0 

Minnesota 1G0 10* 41*— 7 10 • 

Stottlemvre. Williams (71 and Borders. Ma- 
honMA Willis (71 and Watoeck. W— Willis. 1-1. 
L— Wflftoms, 0-1. H R— Minnesota. Lotus (51. 
New Tor* soo eoa oi» — 1 ? i 

Oakland no w »*— § n o 

Parer. Gibson (6). Wlck.rtan |7I. Howe l3i. 
KamlenleCkl (8) and Stanley; Win. Tavlor >8) 
and StelnaactL W-Wlft. Z Z L-Peros. 1-2 
Baltimore 0M 009 OHS— « 7 0 

Seattle 200 »l 92*— 4 12 9 

Rhodes. Oaulsl (5). EicWiom (A). Poole (B> 
and Hailes. Bosla TJIc-.ls (Bi, AyqIo [9} and 
O.WIIsaa W — Bosio. l-i L — Rhodes 1-4. 
HR— Sealllo. GrlHer jr. (St. 

Boston SI7 im in-id is I 

California M0 one 919- i 7 I 

BIAnderson. Lewis ;3|. Dcoyar. (o*. Greta 
(St and CTurner: Host am. Suanimi (SI and 
Valle. W — Heskelh. 1-1. L-BIAnderaon. 3-1. 


Soo Francisco 903 coi 000—1 S o 

paUadefeUa 12: 200 oo=— i ic 0 

SwIK.MonicIcans (4). Rogers (5). Bursa <71 
and Rood; Greene. West t si. Slocums t?l. 
Jones (9) ana Daulian. w — S locum a 3-0. 
L — Swift, 3-X Sv— Jones (41 HPs— Sen Pron 
chcD.Wllnamsill).PrrilcdeiDh<aOr6stra(3i. 
San EH 090 NO 009 ISO 09-2 B 3 

Montreal SCO W ',39 3t-3 10 I 

(II Uiniass) 

WtiltcnuiSI. Davts !7|. Harris <91- Hoffman 
(Ai. Mauser 1111 end Ammus: Fessero. Henry 
1 8), Scon (81. Boucher (*>.Sr«» r.o: and Fletch- 
er. Spefir ,*/. iV-S7kiw. 2-1. L— Mauser. 1-1 
SL Loots 211 009 013-4 IS • 

Houston 101 OtC OSO-j 10 1 

Tewksbury. Rodrtsuez (fli. Habvan iSJ. 
Smith (91, Murphy (9) andMcGrttf; Williams, 
Janes (43. Edens (o(. Hampton <?l. Hud e* l Ol 
and Eusebio, w — Tewksbury. 4-0. L — Homo- 
ion, 1-1. S*— Murphr Ml. HRs— Si. Lews. 
Lankford 14). Houston. Garaatez 17:. 




NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Sunday's Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
CMcogo 091 ON 923 — 5 9 2 

DetroH 8SJ 020 00*— « I 2 

McOowWL ScfTYicrc (4). Cook (8). Heman- 
an (SI and Karkavico. Lavodiero (St. Do- 
hertv, Kruesor (Bl.Henncman (81 and Tedle- 
torv w— Oohenv. M l— M cDowell. 1-4. 
Sv— Honneman (S». H R-Oof roll. Gibson (Si. 
Tnas 110 Ml 993— s 12 1 

O B dwd toe m to*— i s i 

Holllno. Coraenter (7). Hanke (*1 and Ortiz. 
Rodrloun (9); Clor*. Linguist (*». Mesa (9», 
Barnes (9) and Pena, w— Corocnter. 14 
L— Mesa 3-1. Sv— Henk e (41. HRj— Cleve- 
land. Murray 2 (Ai. 


Chtdmxrtl KB WO M-4 II 2 

Florida 360 099 OOF— 9 10 2 

PuatwSchourek (21. P-jffln (71 am Tavfanv 
sce; Rapp. Pere: ni, Aaulna 19: and ScniKJ- 
00. W— Rapp, 3-1. L — Puofi 2-1- HRs— Clndrv 
natl-MItchaii tel. Boone Hi. FJorMa,5nof !lc>a 
Oil. Canine (71. 

Atlanta we oao Ml— 1 3 1 

Plitsbarvti 000 W DO*— 4 9 I 

Glavlne. Wohlers (0). Mercher 17). McMi- 
cfwi (II and Lane:; Wacner and Slcusir. 
W— Wanner. 2-2. L— Gtowtne. 3-3. HR-ai- 
lanta. Justice I3i- 

LMAnsetes *10 912 9*9—1 6 0 

New York OOO 12 IBS— 7 9 3 

Astaclo. McDowell (Jl. Gaft 17;. Oaal (71 
and Plozn; Smith, Masco IE). Franco (*» ana 

Hundlov. W — Smlih. 3J. I McDowell. 0-2. 

Sv— Franco (Ai.HRs— LJV.Mcndesl *31. N.Y, 
Hunaiev 2 (81. Orsulak (21. Burnlt: i3S. 

Cotoroda no 000 400-4 0 O 

Chicago 108 001 OM— 1 A 8 

Freermm. Reed (71. Ruffin (91 and Girardl; 
Yeung. Crlm (71. Builineer (*1 and WUkins. 
W— Freeman, 34. L— ' Young. 9-2. HR— Color- 
ado. Johnson (21. 


BASEBALL 
American Lrs^ue 

MAJOR LEACUE BASEBALL PROPER 
TIES— Front Siir..o. . Ic? president oi nnor^e 
and odinlnisiraiion, .-Kianed io tccjme vice 
presIdenMar Hcilona, Sasmall «a lof Fame 
effective Ai*. :i 

MILWAUKEE— Put Pci Llstacn-lmielaer.on 
ISdov dlsefcleo IbL rcfrpgcJNe 10 April 34 Co- 
Ikvted Mark Kieicr.pllcner.raNcwOrlcam.AA. 
Actrratcd Coug H«nr%. oiichcf. orrf Gre-; 
Vpvgfm. autftfiier. Srart ISdor discslrd H3l. 
■ViINNESOTA— Pu* R'3> BcOer Sulf'eicer. 
on iS-Co aiccbJaa 1I11. raircccil»e April 
P tea; led Brels Mcrrlman- pH Cher, irpm set: 
Lcke Clt‘ . PCi-SlarhiC Kelly Dani cliche. 
ta contract with Sc it Lc*e Clfv. Released Jet • 
1 rails. Plicncr. irom Saif La«e Clta. 

N.Y. YANKEES— AcllvclM Paul Gibson 
oltcner.f rom lSdCv dice bled list. Deslcnctea 
Bob Oleda. ai letter, tor assignment Put Mcri 
Wakes, cafchcr. 1 J-dovdrscdied itsi. signet 
Bob Meivtn. col eher to cantraoi with Colum- 
bus. il. Recoiled P.obcn Eenhosm. i.-.itvider. 
from Coiumbus- 

CAKLAHD— stored siere 3 -ca. rdkeer. 
Cor jed sa M met Jimmcz. at IChcr. r: a m Taco- 
ma. PCL.C- signaled Junior Noboa. in.lcICrr. 
tor csslgnmcnt. Pur Stove Karsar. c.'crcr, 
15-Ccr QlscCied list, roiroacrve lo .April X. 
Released Dare Rlgreti:. PUcncr. P.ccsned 
Vfrux Hcr-mar, alfchcr. (rr-n Tacoma. 

5EATTLE— OwlonGd Cc'rcn ercao. out- 
Holder 31— K.e«in King. pUcher. to Ca’ssrr. 
PCL. Bouohi can tract of Cate s»eum. Int.eia- 
or. Irom Caijarv. ReecDea Roger Sctaeid. 
oltcher. from Caigar*. Sent Mac Ac - Sasser. 


catcher. toCalaar r tor 29-dey Inlurv rchebiii- 
lotian c&sifinmcnf. 

TORONTO— Sold Kno.vilie.SL.lo Don Bea- 
vor ol Nann Carolina oendln 7 approval ol 
minor ontf maicr leagues. E .tended Mover 
devoloonen: contract to Beaver tor 4 veers. 

National Lesaue 

PHILAOELPHIt— Actlveled Ttrnm. 

Greene, caterer, tram is-da- disabled Ws\ 
Deslgnotcd SoTor Mason. piIctht lor asiton- 
moni. Assigned Royer Mcscn. pitcher, to 
Scranton Alike* £orre ol tne IL. 

PITTSBURGH— sougni contract ot Lan^r 
Permit cjtcr.cc. (rert Tsleca . »(_ Dk i?njtea 
Jerry Go! t. catcher larouranment. Exlendea 
connracfsal Eli* v,rdan. Par M-ller. Rich Don- 
nellv. Tommy Send' Mill May end Sain Wil- 
liams. cccches. itircvoh l«5 season. 

ST. LOUIS — Put vart Whiten, uuffieider. an 
ISdov dlscc led ltd. rclruoaiv.-te April 14 Pc- 
CBMd -'jnr /Iter', ourtn-u-.r. erd Freni C! 
morel II. adavtr, Irom Lauisv-he. A*. Assigned 
Torr. Pcgnscsi. catcher, to Louisville tor viiurv 
rcnaftliltofion. Pul Mike P-.rer rts Risk SU- 
diffc. ctcreri. jr. i-Adoy j-satleo «5L Eousht 
controcl o' Willie Smith, pitcher. Irom LOuls- 
vl!«. Recoiled Brr3hE .trr?erd. pilcner irom 
LauisvilK-.Wcirtd :i:r.iDcvis audwr. rar put- 
jx~? of gfvi-K r.im hit gncsr.d.f'oncl reltcut 
QpiJcneo T c'r. L'rbo,. slta-xr. ir Loc- cvilie. 

SAN 5!5G0-?-. t Craig Staple. inCtiocr. 
an li-ca/ Axsxi nit. rcraarii-vf. Af.-IICS. 

R3ca.lad*:cv r ,;-;;--..n<.e.'S.-c i'en- Laj .-c- 
aos. PCL rUcslk-3 Ccnn.’e Slf-eit, «,i7*r. 
ana Luis Loot: infrsicer. trim lbs vccas. 
Oolioneo Brian Jonn- on rotsher. tc '--J Vt- 
y«B. Ass* an* d Hectrr Cargos. oitcrwr raPan- 
cho CuccRiciga CL. Pui Tim //crrell pitch 
or. on 15-dt- d -so tiled ; iji reYoccilve to April 
1?. >.i! BcL'br Bc.ioi. Jvttl.'Jdf.ircm Fjfc-.r* 
Cucaxor.g.v. il c-tcnd.-C ionr.. tralnini m 
Poor la. Ariconc. and M‘k* T homos. Dudieic- 
er. fretn Peoria la Roncno Cucan.arga. 




Sunday's NBA Playoffs 


Houston Open 


Final scores S-.'eday In the S1J minion tour- 
nament or I JC-tor 0 ,4.338-niclcr',. par-72 
course In Tar wood to .ids. Tcxl: : 

«u*e Helner, ii 6L-4^-tS— 271 
Ha. Sutlc.-i ci-TKe-rf— T3 
jeff A:tKii 70-o«-r»— 

Tom File *'>aS-7l-7l— 275 
Bob 3':cer c4-re-i" :J-C7j 
Viler Sir.gh 

Gil Morgan 75-7I-7C 6A— 2T! 

John Ogl- tS-74-Td-c 7— J79 
Paler jaegbsen !S-73^7-At— in 
Dev* Barr kl- “'51-71— TIC 
Curtis Strange 7:-72-et-71— IK 
Fred Pc-ni 7i-.r-7i.7i— rre 


New Jersey !9 13 31 17-41 

New York 3A 29 IS 2D— 90 

New York foods sertes Ml 
New Jersey: C demon 4-17 7-11 IS. Morris 4- 
14 A-6 15. Beniamin 1-10-92. Anderson 4-159- 13 
21. Edwards 3-13 5-S 11. Brown 2-» 44 10. J.Wil- 
ilams 0-4 1-2 1. Woslev 0-1 <M> 0. Gilliam 1 -52-34. • 
Ne wman <■ 1 7-12 fltahorn 0-4944 Totals 71-72 

38- 48 81. 

New York: Bonner2-«1-2S.Oaklev 10-1854 
25. Ewing 5-11 l-211.Davto54t-2 12. Harper 2- 

12 04 5. Smlih 1-4 3-55, Storks 1-45-57, Anthony 
34 944. Masai l-5I-3XH.W(NlanTs5-11 1-1 II. 
Totals 3545 16-24 *0. 

l-Peint coals— New Jcrsrv 14 (Morris i-A. 
Coleman 9-1. E dwonfc M 1, New York 24 IDO- 
vis 1-2. Harper 1-3. Anlhorw 9-1, Starks 9-21. 
Rebounds— New Jersey AS (CPfemanlll. New 
York 9* (Oakley 24). AisUts— New Jersey 13 
(Coleman. Morris. Anderson. Edwards 31. 
Hew York 23 (Harper 3). Total fouls— New 
Jersey 78. Nev York 33. Technicai*-- Ewing 2. 
Beniamin, axeman, Anderson. New York il- 
legal defense X New Jersey Illegal defense. 
Flaarant few— Brown. Elecllnn— Ewing. 
Ctovekaul 23 27 25 21-to 

Chicago usa =7-195 

Chicago loads series S4 
Cleveland: Phills 2-5 M 4. Higgins 2-3 MS. 
Hill 34 5-W 1 1.WI Iklns 8-13 8-8 28. Prf c* 5-14 34 
14. Mills 3-1 1 54 1 1. Brandon 34 i-l 7. Kamplon 
5-0 4-6 ]A. Ttuotl 31-73 28-35 96. 

Chicago; Plppen 9-1*8322. Grenl 7-11 *418. 
Lcngiey 34347 Armstrong 5*3-4 It. tf.ver 1*- 
7 i~ R Wennlngtan 81 0-0 a Kukoc 2-* M A 
SVIiilams 3-7 539, English 3-52-2 9. Kerr 1-2 1-1 
A Per son 0-094 a CartwrtBtlf 81 90 O.Tolats 

39- 79 23-2* 105. 

3-Polnl seals— Clevetaia 6-11 (Wilkins 4-4 
H logins 1-2. Pries l-Jl.Ch Koto 4-8 (Armstrong 
1-1. English 1-1, Kerr 1-1, Flppen1-3.M vers 0-1, 
Kukac 9-1). R *900(141 — Cleveland 40 (Hill I0>. 
Chicago 44 (Grant 121. Assist*— Clewetond 17 
(Fhtlls. Price 4] Chicago 27 (Kukac 111. Total 
touis— Cievelona 2L Qilcagc 2i Tectmlcalv 
—Price, Anrjtrong. Williams. Clc-uekmd llle- 
aa( defense, Cnicago Illegal Oaten sc. 

Gstoen Stole 25 31 39 25-111 

Phcenls 29 33 48 25—117 

Phoenls toads series 9-9 
Got doe Stain: Owens Ml MO R Webber 8 

13 14 17, Houston 3-3 2-2 B. Mullln 13-21 44 32. 
SPTirwcl 1 9-24 94 19. Grayer 4-581 K A-lannson 
81 M 0. Jennings 1-5 3-3 5. Galling 1-2 44 8, 
Grant 80 94 0. Totals 4885 22-28 111. 

Ptioenl* : Barkley 9-21 7-3 2a Ccbal tos 24 82 
4. West 34 44 18 K.Jannsan 1831 89 38, Mo- 


lerie MB 80 17. Atoge87 1-2 13, Green 89 54 9, 
Mt I ler 2-3 8 1 4. FJohnsmi 81 800. Henry 80 8 
0 a Perry 94 94 Q. Totals 45 IE 22-27 117. 

3-Patatpppfe— GoMffl StotoM A (MulIJn 24, 
SerewoO l-Evltobber 81. Jennings 0-3). Ptnenlx 
513 (Mo tor Ie57. Alnge 24, Barkley 81, F John- 
son 81). Rebound*— Golden State 50 (Webber 
101. Phoenix 60 (Green 10). Assist*— Golden 
State 28 (Webber 9>. Phoenix 25 1 KJtfstsen ?J. 
Total foals— Golden State 27. Phoenix UTech- 
nlcats — spnjwelL Ceballos. Phoenix n lego I de- 
tome 1 Hggraiit foul Webtw. 

Portland 24 23 31 26—1*4 

Houston 2? 28 II 27— IIS 

Houston teods series *4 

Portland: Bryant 1-9 80 1 Wllllcens 40 2-2 
10. C Robinson 1520 2-2 28. Or e* tor 4-15 54 13. 
Strickland l81A872t.Dudlev l-3841Gn»lt7- 
12 80 R Porter 1-5 2-2 5. Kersey 24 84 A 
J. Robinson 84 80 8 Totals 42-92 17-1* 104. 

Houston: Horry 3-890 8 Thorpe 81024 19. 
Otoluwan 1839 1511 46. Maxwell 7-14 54 17, 
Smlth2-3I-17, Cassell 51044 9, Herrera 2-3 44 
8. Bvllara8i 808 E lie 1-20-01 Total* 41-01 27- 
34 115. 

3-Palnt uouto— PartiMM 1 (CRablneon55 
Purler 1-2. Brvara 0-2, Drexler 82), Houston 51* 
(Smith i-l. Elle 1-L Thome l-l. Otaiuwon 1-2. 
Cassell 14. Horry 8L Bullard 81. Maxwell 831. 
Rebeends— Portland 50 iDrexler 9|, Houston 49 
(Thoroc 121. Assists— Portland 27 i&rlCMond 
12), Houston 32 (Cossell 9). Total fouto-Porv 
(end 22. Houston Zi. Tecnolcots— Kersey. 


HOCKEY 


Sunday’s NHL Playoffs 




Davis Cup 


EURO/AFRICAN ZONE 
Group X First Round 

Poland 4, Bulgaria 1: Bartlomlel Do- 
brows* I, Potana. det. Marfca Markov, Bulgar- 
ia. 51. 81.52: Model Kost. Poland, del. Mltka 
Petkov. Bulgaria. 6-3. 54. 

Ukraine X 1 reland 9: Toros Belka.dH. Stew- 
art Doric. 2-6, 54. 52; Andrei Rrbolko, def. 
Scoff Barron. 87 (7-Tt, 84. 82. 

ATAT CHALLENGE 
lo Dututh. Georgia 
Men’s Sing! as, Flool 

Michael Chong 111. UJ5-def. Todd AAariln 
(2). U.S, 87 (4-71. 74 (741, 5C. 

Doubles Final 

Jared Palmer ond Rietwv Renebors. U.S. 
ID det. Franc toco Montana and Jim Pugh- 
UJL 86. 74 (84). 64. 


SOCCER 


INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 

Chill Z United States 0 


CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
(Best-af-7) 

Boston 2 • 0-2 

New Jersey 1 9 8-1 

First pe ri od 1. Boston. Smallnskl 3 
(Heinzs, Stewart I, 5:02. Z Boston. Shaw I 
(Stum pel, Murray). 7:22. X New Jersey. NL 
esmts 1 1 Lem leux. Mac Lean), 13:22 (pp). Pen- 
alty — Huecraff. Bos ( hipping). 13:03. 

Seaaad period— None. Penatttes—Huscraft. 
Bos (Interference). 3:00; Murray, Bos (hook- 
ing). 14:33: Zetopukln. NJ (tripping). 1 S:OOl 
T hird Period— None. Penotttos— Ntodor- 
mayer. NJ ( Interference), 2:31: Nicholls. NJ 
(stashing), 7:04; Donato. B. Unterierenc o 1,8:94. 

Shots op goal— Boston 17-11-1 — 29. New Jer- 
sey 151810—35: powerptay op Portu n Wes 
—Boston 0 of 3; New Jersey 1 of 4; gocAes- 
— Boston. Cmev.4-2 (3$ stiats-34 saves). New 
Jersey. Bmdeur. 44 (2827). 
wu ihlu gt o n 1 1 1 — a 

N.Y. Rangers 2 2 2-6 

First period-1. New Ycrk, Matteau 2 I Ko- 
valev), 3:51. 2. Washington, Pivonka 4 1 Jones. 
Cote). 4:13. X Now York. Noonan 2 (MocTa- 
visn. Zubov). I6:» Penalties— MJlAesstor. 
NY (Irlpplna). 5:53; Reekie. Was (hotalngj. 
10:38; Richter. NY. served t. Gander JorUln- 
t er terence). 17:10; Beaupre, was served bv 
SJknderson (Interference). 19:40. 

Second period 8 Washington, Miller 2 
(Rldtov. Cate). 8:51 (PP).S,NewYork.Leetrii 
3 (Zubov. Kovalev), 12.47 (pp). 6. New York. 
Noonan 3 (MocTovlsh, Karpatsev). 1545. 
Penalties— Bondra, Wes l tripping). 2:14; 
MJWessler.NY (boordlngj.7:0l; Hunler.Was 
(roughing), 10:08: Kocur. NY (roughing). 
10:08; SAndereoa Was (triFPfngj. 11:05; 
Lowe. NY ( hi ah-st Irking). 17:08; Hatcher. 
Was. double minor (attamotod spearing), 
20:00: MacTavbn. NY (stashing). 20:08 
TWrd Period— 7. New York, Gilbert 1 
(Lcrmor, Nemchlnov), 3:06. 8 Washington, 
RUtoy 3 (Cote. Burrldgei. 13:321 9, New York. 
MMossier 5 (Kocur). )4:3a Panalilos— Ber- 
ube, was. maior (fighting). 4:53; Kocur. NY. 
malar ( (taming). 4:55; Hunter. Was (elbow- 
ing),*^; janes. Was ( roughing), 8: 27; Korn- 
chlnov. NY (roughing), 4:27; Hatcher, Was 
(htetFsticMng), 8:32; Reekie. Was. miscon- 
duct,B:S2: GAndeTaan,NY.m(scanduct.8:92: 
Beukoboam, NY (tripping). 11 :30; Jones. Was 
(roughing). IA:>1; MocTovlsh, NY (rough- 
ing), 18:31; MecTavksh, NY fhoWtng). 18:43. 

ShaH 0* goal— Washington 81511-30. NY 
11-54—34; power-p l ay eppartunitieg— Wash. 
1 of Aj NY 1 of 7; goalies— Wcsti- Beauprw 5) 
124 shoto-ie saves). NV. Richter. 80 (3827). 


handling of the Los Angtis Kings' 
Jari KurrL 

Germany, with a 3-1 tastolnfy, 
had its chances of reacting the 
quarterfinals badly denied, wide 
Norway now faces a Kfcggtjoa 


playoff after a 4-1 loss to Fnace. 
Kurri had a goal and ntoasssu. 


Kurri had a goal and ntoasssia 
while fellow NHL veteran Rare 
Helminea had three a 
goal as the Finns the 

hard-hitiirg styk of the Unhed 
Stales' NHL pros, then am-dried 
them oo both ends af die lager 
European rink. 

The U.S. finish ed 3-2 Mtf Fin- 
land 4-1-0 in Group B. Batkquafi- 
fied for the medal round, which 
begins Wednesday in Mflan. 

The Germans only needed i ne 
but never recovered from Italy's 
two quick goals at the end of the. 
first period. A deftasreonrasihe. 
third period ended ibdr dam. 

Italy’s Lurio Topatigh scored on 
a breakaway in the ISth mimne. 
Less than a minute later, Stdan 
Figliuzzi netted a speculative ta? i 
range shot Hen. m the 52d an- i 
ute. German defender AndraH 
Niederbdger lost cotIto! of h | 
puck near the net, and Mario Ct ] 
tarroni easily made the score 3-0. j 
Austria mh get the final quafifr- ] 
ing spot from Group A on Tuesday i 
beats Britain by five onn« 
goals. Hie British have conceded 'A 
so far. • 

Whoever gets the last Croup .a 
place in the quarterfinal will have 
vo face the Finnish team 
In later games, Sweden played 
the Czech Republic in Group B. In 
Group A, undefeated Rusaa a® 1 . 
Canada faced off. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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INDOWS 

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II 


MCu 


l P -ecjfs 


T.'ii 1 


Amilabif, 


Schedules Ei 


fci’r: 


SH - 7,. 

this fecJ 
Hthes, r ^’ - : * : *i 

bib, irt t 

1 ■ - : .- 


iergency Meeting to Examine Formula One Safety 

Cause of Senna’s Fatal Crash Still Unclear 






bet a 


3Sl.'ta .v; I7: : . 

as jj l 1 -..* 
aitr.-.-v - 


US’ Pros 


itTiios 



j ^ -9 

J «K?I 5 i *Z 


Mommas caused traffic jams as they gathered Monday in front of the Istitnto Di Medicma Legale of Bologna, where Ayrton Senna’s body had been taken. 


Ladcuo Mdhct/ Hanoi 


•> i-v 


I V 

.. 1. 


1 r. 


Dykstra, With Hon ier and Injury, Inspires Phillies 


fcJVi 
*» 
hd a 


iii*. 

2v' 

tt 

iL;, 


__ . The Associated Press 

_Lenny Dykstra was involved in 
two hard bus. He ted off the bot- 
tom of the first by hitting a home 
Tim, then two inning s later hit hie 
hade trying to make a catch. 


T**i 

fb-. 


6-4 victory over the San 
Franci s co Giants with his third 
homer of the season. He hart him- 
sttf diving trying catch Matt Wfl- 
■fiams’ bascs-knded triple in die 
third, and came oat in the bottom 
fcatf af that inning with a contusion 
of the tower back. 

■^“Ihit the lower part of my. bade 
fufi speed into the wall, but FD be 
affright,” Dykstra said. 

: The PfaQlies tagged BiQ Swift — 
who had won all five previous deci- 
. boos against than — for 12 hits in 
^failings. . 


“Dykstra’s homer seemed to set 
the tempo,” Swift said. “After that 
the hits just kept coming.” 

The Giants continued to slump 
at the plate. In their last five games, 
they’ve scored only 12 runs on 27 
hits. 

“1 really have no answer,” said 
their manager, Dusty Baker. “1 


NL ROUNDUP 


might have to change some thing s 
around tomorrow. The effort is not 


first pitch of the game, then in the 
eighth was hit by Mike Hampton’s 
pitch with two oats and later scored 
the go-ahead run cm a single by 
Gregg Jefferies. 

Tewksbury won despite allowing 
five runs and nine hits in seven 
innings. Luis Gonzalez tied it at 5 
for Houston with a three-run 
homer in the sixth. 

Expos 3, Padres 2: Mike Lansing 
made up for a costly error by sin- 
gling home Montreal's winning run 
in the bottom of the 1 1th inning 

Lansing let Ricky Gutierrez’s 


walked. After a wild pitch moved 
them up, Lansing hit a grounder 
through the legs of third baseman 
Keith Lockhart. It originally was 
scored as an error, then changed to 
a hit after the game. 

■ In earlier games, reported in 
stone Monday editions: 

Pirates 4, Braves 1: Paul Wagner 

S 'tched a three-hitter to beat Tom 
L&vine, and tut a two-run double, 
as Pittsburgh swept a three-game 
series from visiting Atlanta for the 
first time since August 1986, in the 


his 1 1th home run and Florida im- 
proved to 13-12, just the second 
time the Marlins have been over 
300. 


a nmM..., W_* V - L. . M I I . HI I K 164. 1VV4Y UUUtllti 3 JUl— > «*, 4*1 4116 

aproMcmbut I might have to try grounder to second base go manager Jim Leyland’s rookie sea- 

mnerent plans — A. B, C and D — u:» i. * .u uJZ PtiicVuiroh 


{dans — A, B, C and D 
and maybe go bade to Double- A.” 

Cardinals 6, Astros 5: Bob 
Tewksbury became the fiist ax- 
winner in the majors as & 
wen in Houston. 

Ray Lankford homered on the' 


through his legs for a three-base 
error, setting up San Diego's two- 
run rally in the eighth that made it 
2-2 

Butin the 11th, Sean Berry dou- 
bled off Tim Mauser with one our 
and pinch-hitter Randy Milligan 


son with Pittsburgh. 

Glavine took a four-hit shutout 
into the sixth, but Jeff King and 
Orlando Merced got RBI angles 
and Wagner hit his two-run double. 

Mariks 9, Reds 4: Against visit- 
ing Cincinnati, Gary Sheffield hit 


Mets 7, Dodgers 4: Todd Hund- 
ley hit two bases-emptv homers,. 
Joe Orsulak hit a three-run homer 
and Jeromy Bumitz hit a two- run 
shot as New York defeated visiting 
Los Angeles. 

Rockies 6, Ciibs 2 Chicago fell 
to 0-10 at Wrigley Field this season, 
matching the longest home losing 
streak in team history, after pinch- 
hitter Nelson Liriano and Mike 
Kingery each delivered two-run 
singles during Colorado's four-run 
seventh. 

The Cubs are the only dub in the 
majors winless at home this year. 
The only other time they lost 10 in 
a row at Wrigley Field was in 1974. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 
PARIS — The International 
Automobile Federation said Mon- 
day it had scheduled an emergency 
“top-level” meeting Wednesday at 
its headquarters Sere to discuss 
Formula One safety following the 
deaths of Ayrton Senna and Ro- 
land Ratzenberger at the San Mari- 
no Grand Prix. 

A statement said “FIA is gather- 
ing reports from its lechaicM, med- 
ical, safety and supervisory staff, as 
well as from the relevant team and 
circuit personnel. As soon as these 
reports are received, they wflJ be 
studied as a matter of urgency.” 

The statement added that “only 
when all the facts are known will it 
be possible to determine if the addi- 
tional safety measures introduced in 
1993 and 1994 need to be extended, 
those already agreed for 1995 
brought forward, or whether further 
measures should be introduced" 
Senna, the three-time world 
champion from Brazil died after a 
high-speed crash during Sunday’s 
race, 24 hours after the Austrian 
driver Ratzenberger was killed dur- 
ing qualifying for the race. 

In one of the most tragic week- 
ends in Formula One history, the 
34-year-old Brazilian failed to 
make the Tamburello turn on the 
seventh lap at the lmola track and 
hit the concrete wall head-on at 
more Lhan 300 kph (168 mph). Rat- 
zenberger, a rookie driver, was 
killed in a similar accident 
“At the moment we really don’t 
know anything about the cars in- 
volved in the accidents or the dr- 
ain safety which we didn’t know 
already,” said FIA’s spokesman, 
Martin Whitaker. 

He said the black box from Sen- 
na's Williams Renault would be 
flown to Britain for e xamina tion 
within the next few days. In addi- 
tion, a FIA safety commission 
would examine the lmola track, 
one of the fastest on the Formula 
One circuit 

S enna was among many critics of 
FIA’s decision designed to elimi- 
nate electronic drivers' aids, partic- 
ularly the phasing out of electronic 
“active” suspension. 

In an article for Germany's big- 
gest Sunday newspaper, Welt am 
Sonntag, which appeared on the eve 
of the race that killed him. Senna 
wrote about “the technical weak 
points of my WflUams-RenaulL 
“My car reacts a bit nervously on 
this kind of race surface. This stems 


from its special aerodynamics but 
it's also got to do with a difficulty 
in the r- — “ i — ” 


is very useful and will save some- 
one’s life in the future. 


Michael Schumacher of Germa- 
ny, who won Sunday’s race, was 
behind Senna at the time at the time 
of the crash. He said he noticed only 
that femin had uncharacteristically 
looked “very nervous from the first 
lap” and that the car took “two or 
three bunps and went off.” 

Max Mosley, FIA’s president, 
said in London that the two deaths 
were unfortunate coincidence, not 
a sign of slipping standards. 


re can get a very high level of 
rer be able to 


safety, but we mil never I 
guarantee it,” he said. “It’s still not 
possible to run it at a level that’s 
exciting for the participants and 
the spectators and to guarantee 
safety. 

“I think we have to look very 
carefully at what has happened and 
maybe something will emerge that 


“But it may be we will turn 
round and say u you want to race at 
this Speed, every now and then tins 
is going to happen.” 

In Brazil President Itamar Fran- 
co decreed three days of mourning 
and ordered the flag flown at half 
staff. 

Foreign Minister Cdso Amorim 
said Senna's body would be flown 
to Brazil on Tuesday night, 

A 28-year-old spectator, struck 
by a wheel the came off during a 
crash on the starting grid, remained 
in a deep coma on with massive 
bruising to the brain, doctors in. 
Bologna said. 

That crash was caused when the 
Lotus driven by Pedro Lamy of 
Portugal hit the back of the Benet- 
ton driven by J J. Lehto of Finland. 

(Reuters, AP, AFP) 


Lauda: Technical Faults 


Likely Caused 2 Deaths 


Reuters 


BONN — The former world champion Niki T Ji ud a said Monday 
he believed technical faults had caused the two deaths at the San 
Marino Grand Prix and called for drives to have more say in making 

ihesport safer. 

“One thing is dear about the high-speed crashes of Ratzenberger 
and Senna,” the highly-respected Austrian told German television. 
“Both were, in my opinion, caused by technical defects. None of 
than had a chance to control their cars anymore 

“The problem is that the lmola track is terribly fast, relatively 
bumpy and the cars are under enormous pressure 

“The speed at lmola is very high and if you lose control of your car 
you don’t stand a chance. The question must in reality be asked if 
you should take risks at aO on such tracks.” 

Lauda did not speculate on the nature of the technical faults. 

He said drivers must pay more attention to safety and a system 
had to be worked out in which drivers helped create safer tracks. 

“A driver used to speeds of 300 kph can naturally judge race tracks 
differently from officials,” Lauda said. 

“Drivers in the last few years have not done anything because they 
have been spoiled by the safety in Formula One with the new cars, 
that there were no accidents. 

“Bnt driving Formula One is an extremely risky job. You can only 
do something about safety if you continuously work on n.” 

Lauda said that in the case of Ratzenberger’s death, people migh t 
have argued that his Simtek team was new and perhaps did not have 
the same technical resources as a more experienced team “and 
therefore the car brake down. 

“But the same thing happened to the W illiam? team and the 
Williams car is one of the most successful race cars ever. 

“The same thing can happen anywhere” 


BENTDORM, 


r 


#■ . 


V- 




ft.-. 


(AP) -i- Two-tinie de- 
["ony Robinger of Switzer- 
land continued to make the Tour of_ Spain a 
one -man race by winning Monday’s time trial 
and stretching hits overall lead after eight stages 
to more than four minutes. 

- He finished the time trial 53 seconds ahead of 
Mdchar Mauri of Spain, the 1991 Tour of 

rh»mp KHyand 2: 17 ahead of Mid Zar- 
rabdtiaof Spain.' 

Rominger’s overall lead is now a whopping 
4:10ovm2^arrabeitiaandibaiTingacatastro- 
the Swiss rider appears ahnost impossible 
to beal in the 21-day, 3^20-kiloineter (2,182- 
&3e)raoe. 


A % Still Last, Beat Yanks 
And Find Cause to Cheer 


Harding: Cheap Fame 

' PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) — About 100 
people bought figure skater Tonya Harding’s 
mtogranh at the O>0ector Mania show andsale 
Sunday, with a few paying S15 for a signature 
on a 3-by-5 index card, but most waUmg for 
signed 8-by- 10 glossy photos that cost 535 each. 

Cindy Stare, an entreprenem who! m urn 
octesive autograph contract with Harding, who 
tkaded «3ty in March, to helping cover up the 
attack on rival skater Nancy Kerrigan, said that 
S35 for a signed pbrtowas >■*■9 . 8 J?* 
because the “regular mail-order pnee is3ou. 


. The Associated Press 

Having the American League’s worn record 
didn’t slop the Oakland Athletics from party- 
ing. 

They ended their second-longest losing 
streak since moving to the West Coast in 1968 
with an 8-2 victory Sunday over the visiting 
New York Yankees. 

“This is the first time we've had music in a 
long time,” Troy Ned said above the pounding 
beat of rock music in the A’s clubhouse. “When 
I came in, I asked where the champagne was. I 
was waiting 

AL ROUNDUP 

to pop one. 


and Bobby Ayala dosed out the Orioles, who 
were shut out for the first time this season. 

Arthur Rhodes, the loser, matched a career 
higi with right strikeouts. 

Red Sox 10, Angels 1: Billy Hatcher singled 
hone the first run of a seven-run third in 
California and later capped the inning with a 
two-run angle for Boston. 

Boston, which owns the majors’ best record 
at 18-7, sent 12 batters to the plate in the third 
to knock out rookie Brian Anderson. 

California has lost five straight games and 
nine of its last 10. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


PERSONALS 


may THE SACKS HEART of jaw be 
MJorcd. glorified loved and preserved 


rtraighouJ ihe world row 'and fa- 
■wr. Sacred 


, . - Mean af Jetm pray fc* 

if* Sam! Jud( warier o* mnodss pray 
far ib. Scmt Jude help of (be hopeless 
ptay mr ib. AMtH AMC. 


5AMT JUDE AM) SACKS) WART 
W J“W. Ifo* you far everything. 
INIW. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS^ Erjjfah 

(FirS wttRiaSwioJzv. 

KJME 6780570. FRANKFURT 5W4265. 


ra*IG taw? — hoeing 

505 HELP cnssJne *i Entail 3 pun.- 
II pun. Teh Paris (l| A7 73 80 80. 


DUTY FREE SHOPS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Royals 6, Brewers 2; Royals 7, Brewers 3: 
Mark Gubicza and David Cone pitched Kansas 
to the doublebeader 


been writmgsuKe April 17 for their eighth 

1 !!? 0 P r ^ Guhfcza won for the first time as a starter 

A s rare spraymg^ champagne for some- s j nce 1992, giving up seven hits and 


• 4&' - 



For ibe Record 

-UFA s»M it would not intervene in to® con- 
^ trowrsv surrounding the decision to order a 

■■^eagaasstgs 






Hemen beat Hal Sutton, Tom 

Totrr. 


thing much more significant, their fourth divi- 
sion flag in five years. 

But even with Sunday’s victory, which halted 
tfarir longest losing streak since a 14-game slide 
from Juiy~ 29-Aug. 12, 1977, the A’s are sriD 
bringing op the rear in the AL West, baseball's 

“We’re just gad it clicked today," said Neel, 
who drove in four runs. 

Bobby Witt allowed one run over 735 innings 
in liis best outing of the year and Geronimo 
Benoa had three RBIsfar Oakland. 

Witt, who pitched oat of trouble in the sixth 
hming by stoking out the side after giving up 
consecutive smgtes, took a shutout into the 
eighth before Paul O’Neill Ml a run-scoring 
double with two oats. 

Mariner* 6, Orioles <k Ken Griffey Jr.’s two- 
nm homer in Seattle helped Chris Boa° get his 
first victory erf the season, against Baltimore. 

Eric Anthony went 4-for-5 with a run scored 
for the Mariners, who have won six erf their last 


three Tuns in five innings. He received home run 
support from Mike Mac far lane and Wally 
Joyner. 

In the opener, Cone won his fourth straight 
start and Gary Gaetti and Felix Jose each had 
twoRBIs. 


1 gave up seven angles, struck out two 

and walked one in sewn innings. TTm Davis 


fll In earlier games, reported in some Monday 
editions: 

Twins 7, Blue Jays 3: Scott Lei us hit a key 
homer for the second straight game, this time a 

three-run shot to cap a four-run seventh with 
which Minnesota beat visiting Toronto. 

Tigers 8, White Sox 5: Kirk Gibson hit a 
three-run homer out of Tiger Stadium in the 
third, the drive off Jade McDowell giving De- 
troit a 6-1 lead over Chicago. 

Ranger* 5, Indians 4: WQl Clark’s sacrifice 
Oy capped a two-run ninth fra visiting Texas as 
uevaand*5 bullpen Mew a save for the eighth 
time in 16 chances this year. 

Cleveland’s Eddie Murray homered twice, 
dying Mm 2,848 hits to tie Brooks Robinson for 
32d on the c are e r list. They were teammates 
briefly in Baltimore in 1977. 


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Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TKlBl^^ TUESDAY . MAI 3, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Heard on the Highway 


Zen and the Lasting Art of Tony Bennett 


PEOPLE ^ 

FTmchArduteciWm, 



I 

I 


W ASHINGTON — The ex- 
citement about the electronic 
superhighway has many people 
perplexed. There is no question 
that the technology is there Tor us 
to communicate with anyone in the 
world in a matter of seconds. But 
what would you say to a person in 
this new world especially when 
you could easily be wilting to some- 
one you don't even know? 

'‘Hello. this is Minnie Broderick. 
Who is this?" 


“It is Jose Ji- 
menez of Argen- 
tina. Are you 5 
calling collect? " 

"No, sefior." 

“Good. J hate & 
people who call |>5j 
me collect by £4 
olnhal rnmmn- 


egfJIf 





they are. everyone knows everyone 
else. What are you doing? ' 

“I'm marinating steak." Jose 
said. 

“Why?" Minnie asked. 

“Because for seven generations 
my family has been marinating 
steak.” 

"Now I think that information is 
worth the ca ll- Do you have any 
questions for me?" Minnie asked. 

“Do you blow how to marinate a 
steak?"* 

“I don’t even know how to video- 
tape a program off the television." 

she said. 

“Good-bye, I have another glob- 
al call waiting for me. I'm glad we 
bad this con versa lion." 

Minnie sighed. “So am I. It was 
very meaningful to me." 


By John Marchese 

,Vn York Times Settee 

-JA T EW YORK — It seems there is nothing that could 
IN keep Tony Bennett from having a happy day. As he 
strolled through the Baltimore airport to catch an early 
flight, this man. the sunniest of singers, shrugged off lack 
of sleep, ignored an oppressively gray morning and belied 
out “Happy Easter !" to an audience of baggage handlers, 
desk cierks" and surprised travelers as if it were the refrain 
or his favorite tune. 

But as the plane he had boarded climbed through the 
thick soup of clouds, a flight attendant approached him 
and said. “You don’t remember, but we met about five 


global commu- • 
motion. Wfia: 
do vou want?” _ . 

“Nothing. I BuchwaW 
just wanted to say hello." Minnie 
said. 

“Do 1 know you?" 

“No. we've never met. but now 
with communications as fast as 


Juast One Taker 


Fragaie Cosaeert 


Reuters 

RAGUE — The Czech Phil- 


P RAGUE — The Czech Phil- 
harmonic offered special tick- 
ets for a charity concert by the 
opera stars Jos4 Carreras and 
Montserrat Caballe, but even dip- 
lomats and foreign companies 
balked at their price. 

The diplomatic corps and select- 
ed foreign companies were offered 
seats for the concert on Sunday to 
raise money to set up a foundation 
for blind children. 

A spokesman for the Czech 
Philharmonic said Monday that 
only one of the 80.000 koruna 
($2.7001 tickets being offered had 
been sold — and that to a corpo- 
rate sponsor whose identity was 
not revealed. 

Some of those approached for 
the tickets said the price was out of 
line in a country where the average 
monthly wage is less than 7.000 
koruny! Regular tickets for the con- 
cert. at up to 1,500 koruny, were 
almost sola out. 


“Hello, this is Joe MacKay. I’m 
on the Super Electronic Highway, 
exit 12. Is anyone there?" 

“O’Brien of the IRA. Are you 
calling about the guns?” 

“No. Fra not calling about the 
guns." 

“Then get the hell off the phone. 
Fm wailing to hear about the 
guns.” 

“Listen, O’Brien. I barely picked 
up the phone and f got you in 
Ireland." 

“Fm not in Ireland. Fm in Eng- 
land — underneath Buckingham 
Palace." 

“Thai’s exciting. Would you like 
to be ray superhighway phone 

pal?" 

“I would very much, but right 
now 1 have important work to do 
with some dynamite." 


“This is Tattle Manufacturers. If 


you want to order a Tattle, press 
one: If vou want to return a Tattle. 


one: If you want to return a Tattle, 
press two. If you warn to speak to 
the Tattle Charge Department, 
press three. If you want to hear the 
entire works of Stravinsky played 
by the Tattle Employee String 
Quartet, push all the buttons on 
your phone at the same lime.” 

“Listen. I just want someone to 
talk to." 

“There is no one to talk to on this 
superhighway except Gerry." 

“Then let me speak to Gerry.” 

“Gerry is not at his desk. You 
can leave a message for him on his 
voice maD by sticking your index 
finger down your throat." 


years ago. ... 

it was in Florida where she had helped him find a tennis 
partner when she was working for a resort in Boca Raton. 

“I didn’t even know who you were then." the young 
woman confessed. “But now I do, with your comeback 
and ail." 

Tony Bennett had been smiling through her story, but 
then his eyes widened and his big chin dropped and he 
seemed to shrink into his seat. A wave of pained impa- 
tience rushed across his face. “Comeback." he said in the 
smoky rasp that is his speaking voice. “What comeback?" 

Maybe what we have here is simply a failure to commu- 
nicate. Perhaps it’s semantics — “We don't like to use that 
word ‘comeback,’ " said Bennett's 40-year-old manager 
and son. Danny Bennett. 

But through a combination of serendipity and savvy 
marketing, something is happening to the 67-year-old 
singer that looks remarkably Uke a comeback. Except as 
Bennett insists. “I never went anywhere." 

By doing what he has done for 45 years — “I sing the 
songs of the halcyon days" — Tony Bennett has won a 
Grammy the last two years: one for an album of torch and 
saloon songs dedicated to Frank Sinatra: the latest for 
"Steppin’ Out.” a collection of tunes written for Fred 
Astaire. For the first time since ibe mid-1960s, when the 
singer’s rich, emotive baritone and sure feel for phrasing 
could be heard everywhere singing “I Left My Heart in San 
Francisco.” Bennett's records are approaching gold status. 

By successfully navigating the shifting currents of hip- 
ness, the gray-haired and dapper Bennett has made the 
transition from icon of Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show” 
to David Leiterman regular. 

He has been caricatured in “The Simpsons.” After his 
appearance with the Red Hot Chili Peppers on last years 
MTV Music Awards ( on which be wore a velvet top hat and 
shorts), Benneu became popular with a new generation of 
listeners. 

His video of “Steppin’ Out" — shot in any black-and- 
white with up-to-the-minute, jarring camera angles — 
made it onto MTV rotation. 

Later this month, Bennett will join a select group of 
more likely MTV habitues (including Nirvana. Eric Clap- 
ton and Mari ah Carey) when he stars in his own “Un- 
plugged" special. . 

Two years into senior citizenship. Tony Benneu seems 
poised to become (he Sinatra of the slacker set. a crooner 
with a brand name for the generation without one. 

What’s the appeal? “In generaL a lot of people our age 
are looking for performers who really know what they're 
doing," said Mark Conley, a 25-year-old automotive elec- 
trical technician, whose girlfriend. Gail Burt, 24. had 
gotten tickets to Bennett’s sold-oul concert in Baltimore. 

“Most of the young performers just want to get out 



It took a few years, but Danny Benneu got to fathwa 
— t — uu nrhiw wi.TnnMT7iEOt bad CD3ftZ6u 


Ub(u 1MIU wiuuiv.-, — ■ -W' . , 7 . 

in the years since the break. “I sold them on the idea flat 
here was a catalogue artist, and there was gold in them 
thar hills," said the son. " 

“I told him, ‘Look, marketing isn’t a bad word. Top 
wanted to do to music, and he had grown up with the 
premise that you perform for the entire family. He tow 
me, ‘I hate the notion of demographics. Why can 1 1 be on 
MTVT And be was right-’* Proving i it also took a lewyears. 

The Brat thing that happened, Danny Bennett said, was 
that Bob Guccione Jr. the publisher of Spin magaz i ne , 
cited Tony Benneu and James Brown as the two greatest 
influences in rock musk. 

The magazine later did a long, admiring profile of Ben- 
nett, andtberinger appeared along with the Red Hot Chiu 
ftppets and Ice-T in Spin's swimsuit issue, in 198S- “I told 

Tony that would be a really cool thing to do," the son said. 

Around that time, Bennett began appearing regularly 
on Letterman’s NBC show, which was a staple of college 
students and hip young professionals. 

The guest spots showed Bennett’s easygoing sense of 
and helped give him the same youth culture 
imprimatur as the show’s more common musical perform- 
ers. ’60s-era angers and emerging rock groups. 

Recounting the process by which his image was updated. 
Tony Bennett seems bemused, which is how he often seems. 

—n , — w. ■Cl'TV with Irthn f'arwtv ” he said, “m 


chitect-ef Ihei 


of apartment ^"p tWu 
beat awarded 

tectuttftfaefck 1994,acca^^ 

mimvVmnet nmnin.* * 1 r®’ 


can$ has a^boy. ^Txj?^ 

camp was both WednxS&l!; 

Bloe ming ton .faidrara/ ' 




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r,wboWisin& 


Tupac ShakBr.-wboWisfe^? i . * 


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in the shoot 
lice officers. 


mgmxm 





Kent M.inr MTS' f«ir Tbr YoA Tunes 


Tony Bennett taping an MTV ■’Unplugged.” 


there and get it over with, hut with Tony it’s the energy 
that he puls into his shows." And. he added. “He’s cool." 

When Danny Bennett, a former rock guitarist, assumed 
control of his father's career in 1979, he was getting an 
aging hipster who had had a prolific recording career but 
was a! a personal and professional crossroads. 

He was cool, but so was his career. Benneu still bad a 
busy performing schedule but no recording contract His 
long association with Columbia Records — which pro- 
duced more than 80 albums — had ended in 1971 because 
he refused to sing rock music. An attempt at forming his 
own company to record himself and other artists had 
largely failed. 


Were in Love Again.’ The one thing I insisted on was always 
doing good songs — something that was timeless. 

“17101 we started doing Lettennan. and I finally said to 
my son, ‘Hey, what is this? I usually do a TV speaai every 
year.’ He told me to crust trim. Danny said, ‘I see something 
you don’t see because of the huge generation gap.* " 

That gap was most dramatically bridged late last year, 
when Bennett performed at a series of benefit concerts 
organized by alternative-rock radio stations in a half- 
dozen does around the country. 

“He came out, and people went nuts," said Tom Calder- 
one, program director of WDRE on Long Island, which 
sponsored two of the concerts. “There were several thou- 
sand young people shouting ‘We love you, Tony.' It wasn't 
sarcastic at afl. The other bands were Cowboy Junkies, 
Catherine Wheel, Teen-age Fan Club. They all came out 
on the side of the stage, and I heard a few people say, ‘Oh, 
f don’t want to follow Tony Bennett ' " 

While he seems happy these days to cavort with die 
latest bands, Bennett is dearly of a different era. For 
instance, when asked about the Chili Peppers' antic star. 
Flea, Bennett says, “I love him; be reminds me of Jimmy 
Durante." 

His friends and family say that, through his interest in 
Zen philosophy, be has pared his life down to basics — his 
singing and his p aintin g, which he studies seriously and 
has turned into a profitable avocation. (He finds time to 
play t ennis, too. and after two divorces is dating a manag- 
er of jazz musicians and promoter named Susan Crow, 
who is 28.) 

“Everybody is consumed by this whole business of 
who's making more money than the next artist," he says. 
“Fm really not impressed. The last guy I was really 
impressed with was Nat King Cole. When I grew up, 
whoever made the best record was the best artist —not the 
biggest record." 


nee officers. " N-- ( ‘ 

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tioa last 


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house, office . . : or • 

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to doy his way;. initf * ~ 

hcarts, becoming tbe&a'j far^Q : 

country snL the.Vieti^^^ d ^ r. , - 
ed with the U.S. withdrew ra ym- p ^ i-„: : -- 
Denver sad he esqp •' 
because hes missing isp lfe -m "* -■ -* 

cheapest ticket Haia . 

for die average i 

last Cohahfs suicideisi vi -r- •' 

Veddter cross. “Iwafidibotd^^'-T. 
room in Washington^ Iltaid I 
just tore the place to statist aiH - - 

Vcdder, 29, lead ss»er(£ftaj] 
Jam.’TbcnljustBiad&infts^tr ' -. » 

nibble, winch soatek&i1&ijS fa *‘ 



Prince Wffina, U auLs^oodm rJ- ■- ‘ 
line to the Britirii throasina to g&z ^ - 

become the &st fttturetojrfit 3^: 
tend Eton Cdkge^thciS&Dai. ga 
ly Express reported.. 

- • M •- -s 


INTERNA 


CLASSTOp^f^-:;; 

Appears an. Pags4£ W | /if; —T' :: 


IdBE -- 


a 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Today Tomorrow 

High Ln W Htfi Lorn W 

OT OF OF CF 

AIjit.l i4/5? a SLP I VI51 pc 

AiraMrivn J1f70 «I»M pc law 9/48 sh 

iB-Cl 6-43 ah J 7J6? 307 ■ 

CI .-70 1407 m 27/71 14/57 pc 

Barxtevi 1 fl.Hl a IS. '00 1 «A 7 t 

9 c«araT* 21/73 ’ ■ 3 T - 19 .W 9*48 ■ 

°*tc, : 0 .» S -35 » n M 6/43 » 

amaaota XH9 1«/57 pc 1 B/GJ fl /<3 pc 

Bulca-S 18 /r-C ’.35 » 17/82 S #48 ■ 

CW«'US-" 1 B --64 3-37 a 17/62 5 ( 4 | o 

Co.« 4 n>l 6 «l 2 7 ’BO 10(64 a 21/70 16 A 1 ah 
n-Jt«CT 17 02 9148 5 h 13--65 C '43 r 

10*4 8/40 sft 13*55 7/44 oh 

fumore 25.77 B'« a T2.n\ 11/92 pc 

FrahWWI C 2/71 5/41 a 23/73 B' 4 fl pc 

G®«J»a 24.75 11/52 pc 10 -W 0/46 pc 

Hrtw*. 10(50 2/35 pc 10/50 104 a 

Idantii 17.82 3/48 an 17/82 0/48 a 


» m 

■VL 


Today Toowroa 

tosh Lorn w High Lew W 
OF OF OF CF 


Bangkok 
0«*B 
Hong Kong 


35/95 24/75 pc 34/03 25.77 pc 
12/53 10/50 r 18-61 5-41 pc 
28/82 23/73 I 28 . 8 ? 23.73 pc 
34/03 23/73 pc 34/03 24/75 1 
41/100 27/00 PC 41'108 27 /n pc 
20/08 15/59 I 18 *4 G '43 pc 
25/77 1437 pc 21 .70 14 —7 pc 
3239 2271 pc 3235 2373 pc 
20 /B 4 21 .70 1 25 "W K '68 PC 

23.73 13 » pc 23 73 15-59 7 h 


Jciaroam 


i UratasanaClv 
CoW 


i Unaaaanablv 


Stow 


Un Palmar 24.75 1752 9 24/75 10.«4 pc 


LBf»n 23.71 14/57 a 19/M 14/57 all 

Unfed 22/71 12 53 Hi 14.57 7/44 ah 

f.lacrtJ 28-62 13.35 9 13.W 1C/50 ah 

26.73 I3<55 a 23/73 11/52 pc 
Uooma 10/50 2.35 ah 13A5 400 c 

hairich 22/71 8*48 a 18/84 7/44 pc 

NCe 23.73 13/5^ a 18«4 11.52 pc 

Oslo 17/82 6.43 ah 10/64 8/43 a 

Puma 24/75 10.^4 9 17/62 14*7 r 

Parts 24.75 1152 a 1988 8 '40 pc 

Pragua 21/70 2/35 a 1058 8.48 a 

Rayvrk 5.’4fl 7/44 ! 1253 0'43 c 

frxm 23/n B.44 a 21/73 1152 a 

SI PrtWfeiag 9/48 077 pc >: S3 3,37 • 

rtockhoht 12*3 J-37 c U ST 409 ■ 

SWeBowg 28*79 12.53 > 19-66 5'«1 pc 

7aC*vi 11.52 337 pc 10.50 235 a 

Vanee 24*79 13 55 a 22 71 11.57 pc 

V*ma 20.00 fl'43 a 1B*4 id I 

Warsaw 12/53 ZQ9 9 14/S7 3.37 a 

24/75 1353 pc 20-88 0/43 pc 


North America 

Rein will dampen the aid- 
Atlantic stales and me 
Southeast Wodnocdsy s> 
Wednesday night, then turn 
northward Booss New Eng- 


Europe Asia 

Shower ow tlaly Wednos* Cools/ weather will cattle Caaah 
day an? Bkeiy 10 bvoivo mio a southward through Beijing n* 0 * 
sioady mai Thursday Friday end Seoul later tWs week. A JfV* 
will be cW*y with aod'lrarral few shower »4 1 aocompanv 


AJgtefa 


Wednesday night, then lum wrtl be cW«y w/ih todd zonal lew shower *4 1 accompany 
northward books New Eng- rain. A separate storm will {he cool weather In Seoul, 
land Thursday. Behind ihu. bring woicomo rains to ‘he Saopore will bo windy end 
siorm. Friday will bo windy Volga Valley Thursday and cn.Ky wi|h periods of ram 
and Chilly with some sun Friday. London through while Tokyo 19 windy with 
(rum Boston Jo Washingfent Frankfun and Munich win be some sunshine. The rew- 
D.C. Anothor stem wiu wing mild with |usi a low stray ranis of a tropical cyclone 
rain la the Won Coast showors ! ai?r lh!s week will reach Myanmar. 


26/74 16.61 1 24/7E 15*1 pc 
24/75 11*2 I 22*71 136S pc 
24/75 1407 ■ 24*» 15*59 pe 
22/71 9 '40 pc 24/75 11,52 ce 
30/58 28/70 I 31*50 ft.T? 1 
21/70 12*53 «h 22-71 '3.56 pe 
24/75 1305 ■ 24.73 1205 sc 


ACROSS 

i Whip end 
5 Mystery wnier's 
award 

1C Sassy young 
un 

i« * silly 

question . . .* 

15 Painter AncJrea 

daf 

16 Portnoy'S 
creator 

17 Hmm? 

20 Dame 


21 Packwood. lor 
ons 

23 Curse 

23 Purse fastener 

36 Jeweler's 
weight 

28 Some ol the 
Brady bunch 

31 Eat like a 
Chicken 

34 Blend 

3fi Utah SwHatch 

37 D D.E.'s 
command 

33 Hmm ... 


Solution to Puzzle of May 2 


North America 


0/48 0/32 pc 11*2 104 pc 
17/82 12/53 r 21/73 15-59 * 


will reach Myanmar. 


1008 8/48 pc 17-er 6.40 * 
19*56 5/41 c 21/70 s/43 pc 


Middle East 


Latin America 


1966 7/44 ■ 19/ PC 10-30 e 

29/82 21.70 ■ 3156 77771 pc 


Oceania 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Lew W Htfi Ln w 

OF Of OF OF 

23/73 10-M oh 34/75 17« pc 

29/84 Ml pc 29.-78 1253 pe 

34/75 14/57 ah M/70 10. 'SO pc 

3373 17/B2 wi 23/73 13/» pc 

42/107 19*8 pc 37/78 17/62 l 

41/108 24/75 ■ 41/100 23/73 « 


Today Toraamro 

Wgh Low W High Lew W 

OF OF OF OF 

Buenoi«]m 24.75 tfl*i 1 24/75 14/57 i 

Coroau 31.88 29 77 pc 32/89 29/70 pc 


Z7/K 10.88 I 29.84 Ij.flC pc 


lOOAngdm 24/75 '4/57 pc 23/73 14.57 pc 


31 ZBB 23/73 PC 


18*1 7/44 c 17 . or 8*43 Ml 
13.5S 3/37 pc 14-57 4 09 pe 


17.-02 '1-51 rft 17.82 1152 pe 
20.738 tl-52 » 10.56 12*33 pe 


Douwscuo 34/78 14/57 oh »71 10SO pc Un» 22.71 17*2 pc 22/71 1752 pc 

JarueakrtTi 3373 17*2 Wi 23/73 13/35 pc W«Cc3 3"y 2"B3 14/57 pc 29/B 13*35 pc 

Imv 42/107 19*8 pc 37/98 17/62 i B«J -toJarrfcp 27.0a 10*8 pc 29*54 20-58 pc 

Hywfi 41/106 24/75 ■ a |. -100 2373 9 Sanpagc 23 -73 9/48 ■ 23/73 9 '48 pc 

Lagond; womny. pc-oorty OovJy. e«x-Jy. eN*vwmra. MniMorcicrro. r^aln. oMnew flumom. 
wvsnow. Mce, W-Wealher. Afl maps, lorecaa^ and data provided s, Accu-Waaihor. he. S 189* 


20*4 23/73 pc 30*86 23/73 pe 
18*4 9/48 t 20-30 10/50 PC 

34/93 21/70 • 34/03 19-66 • 
10*6 11/52 pc 18*4 11/52 ah 
17/82 6/48 c 10*4 9,40 ah 
18*1 4/30 pc 15*59 2*7 pc 
20*8 3/48 PC 21-70 12.53 ah 


AGnaan 
ananas 0030^ anna 
nDaaosaaaav asau 
oaiii ^aa niB^aaaaaa 
annana^aanaa 
QOEHsaQ^aaaana 
Bans^aaraaa^. aaa 
□QBnoaa^Haatoaaa 
□bb '□p bhb naao 
^aoinnaQ -aaoaaa 
□□boh s aQUjaaa . : 

QHQHQa^saaa' □□□ 

hqhh- aaauaanaau 
antaa^auum aaHua 
uqqb? aaaa aaaaa 


40 Volga tributary 

41 Writer Tetkel 

43 Requisite 

44 Porch adjunct 

45 Arab capital 
45 Ignoramus 

*a South African 
statesman Jan 
91 Gospel singer 
Jackson 

E5 Many TV shows 

57 Cathedral 
displays 

58 Hmm! 

si Mttch Miller's 
instrument 
83 Mountain 
nymph 
53 Electricity 
carrier 
64 District 
•s Don Knotts won 
five 

05 Actress Young 


i Suburban 
greenery 

s Seeing 

(since) 

3 Do figure eights 

4 Where to hang 
your chapeau 


5 Biblical verb 
ending 

• 'Zip-a-Dee- 

Doo ‘ 

7 Alum 

a Relics collect 
here 

• The-R- in 
H.R.H. 

10 Pugilistic 
muscleman 

11 Famous 
debater 

13 Rat chaser? 

13 Tatese's "Honor 

Father- 

10 Word repeated 
after "Qua" 

19 Speaker 
33 In a line 
as Eagle's nail 

27 Like Neptune's 
trident 

29 Adidas rival 

30 Break sharply 

31 Annoyance 
3# Famous last 

words 

ssCampV.I.P. 

35 Concert hall 
38 Debate subjects 
99 Irish novelist 
O'Brien 

43 Uha a golf Pall 


44 Manatees 
47 Word sung 
twice before 
"cheree" 

49 Lake near 
Carson City 


A fearr-L-.r. 

SO urangs partner KK&ftffflra, iTo--'- - - ' ' 
B3 DeVito's "TaxT ssOw^Mr s ^ ^ ' 

raIe ■•'Faroftf ^v Sivpr>:.-"=' . 

sa Venous u*cfc 

opening OSftiriagte ’ XVAtiZ .. . . • • 

54 Gray ooGeinjtJrOrA j,,:- - ■' 


mu 
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PuzzWby LoWSdnay 

O New York Times Edited by Will Shortz. 


sstie r— .•» . ' ' ' ■ ■ 

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Hmel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ART Access Numbers. 

How to cal! around the w ork! 

1 Using che chart below, And the country vou jre calling from. 

2 DL-ti the corresponding APa - Access Number. 

.An .-’QkT English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wish to call or connect you 101 
customer scrvfce reprcscnativc. 

To receive your free waDetcutl of Access Numbers, lust dial the access number of 

itic country you’re in and ask for Customer Service. 


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COUNTRY 


Aujtralia 

China. PRC*** 
r. nam 
Hong Kong 

India* 

Indonesia* 

Jjpaty 

Korea 

Korea** 

Malaysia* 

Xuw Zealand 
Philippines* 

Saipan* 

Singapore 

Sn tanka 

Taiwan* 

Tlultand* 


i osonsosra t Imagine a ^‘orld where yo-j car. call county ro country as easily as you can from home. And 

! - re3Cil 1116 L ' 5 '' ^ recli - ’ fron ’ : over 1 2= countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak vour 

| ]anguase - since it s BaR5tee « ins^ntiy Coll your diems at 3 slitl knowing theyll gei the message in 

K : ■ 0ur VOiCe 3t a ni0re po1 ile h,3ur ' [his is now possible ^ith ,-m 1 

To use ihese sen ices. diJ the .XKJT Access Xumberof the counoy you're in and vouil get all ihe 
>' ou need xx>5th Access Numbers and your ART Calling Card, imemational calling has ne-s'er been easier, 
if you don? have an AKT Calling Card or you'd like more information on .^TgiobaJ services, jusrcaU us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


| S2b, 


Armenia** 

Austria**** 

Hflghwi* 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

F inlan d 

France 

Germa ny 

Greece* 

Hungary 

Iceland** 

Ireland 


ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA 

1-800-881-011 

2 10811 

018-872 

800-1111 

000-117 

001-801-10 

0039-111 

009-11 

ir 

800-0011 

000-911 

105*11 

255-2872 

800-01 11-111 

430-430 

0080-10288-0 

0019-991-1111 

EUROPE 

8414 ill 

022-903-01 1 

0800-100-10 

W- 1800-00 10 

99-36-0011 

OtH2fr00101 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

~ 194-0011 

01300010 

00-800-1311 
_ 004-80001111 

999-001 

1-800-550-000 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

Italy* 172-1011 

Liechtenstein* 155-00-11 

Uthuantoo 8*196 

Luxembourg 0-800-0111 

Macedonia, F.YJL of 0»«K>-4288 

Maha* r.rSOQSPO-llO 

Monaco- 194-0011 

■Netherlands* 064)22-9111 

Norway 800-190-11 

P”b«i*>~ 0*010-480-01 1 1 

Portugal* 05017-1-288 

Romania 01-800-428 8 

Russla-TMoseoiv) 155-5042 

Slovakia 00-420-00101 

Spain* 900-99-00-1 1 

Sweden' 020-705-611 

Switzerland* 1554)0-11 

U - K - 0500-89-0011 

ufarail »c‘ 8*100-11 

MIDDLE EAST 

8Qi.mii 

050-90010 

3T7.1QQ.2727 

SPQ-2SS 

ftdrui) 426-801 

0800-01 1-7T 

1-800-10 

00-800-12277 

300-121 


Bahrain 

Cyprus* 

brad 

Kuwait 

Lebanon (Bcfa-ui) 

Qatar 

Saudi Arabia 
Turkey* 

UAE* 


COUNTRY 

BrazO 

fMl# 

Colombia 

Costa RlC3*i~ 

Ecuador 

HSahadorit 

Guatemala* 

Guyana*^ 

Honduras^ 

Mexico*** 


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Nicaragua (Managm) 
Pananaa 

Peru* ■ 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Venezuela** 


rrriS. 

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165i^ 


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C'-'ii-.i- since At 

"fee j 

is >ul ‘■••-■I?: v ■ ■ - d 


■•Vgcntina* 

Bdlzeo 

Bolivia* 


AMERICAS 

ooi-awMoo-im 

555 

0-800-1112 


Wa 1 i « n>M 1- 

Bermuda* • ■ 

British VJ. _J 

Ca\-man Islands 1 

Grenada* I 

Haiti* 001 

Jamaica** E 

Neth.Antfl 001* 

& KJos/Nevis 3 

AFRICA 

EgypC (Cairo) 

Gabon* 

Gambia* 

Kenya* 

Liberia 

South Africa 0 


CARIBBEAN ^ ‘’-■■Ir -rf c : 

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