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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




London, Thursday, May 5, 1994 


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Concerned, 

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The Drive 
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No. 34,580 


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A Brief Glitch, Then a ‘True Beginning’ for Peace 

Arafat Raises 


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Sudden Rise of Mark 
Is Regarded as Threat 
.To Economic Recovery 


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By Brandon Mitchener 

. __ International Herald Tribune 

■j™™*' ~~ Worried that the Deut- 
marit s recent appreciation could slow 
«« 5 >anys economic recovery, the Bundes- 
omJc aim>orted the Federal Reserve and other 
central banks on Wednesday in concerted inter- 
•. venfcon to support the dollar. 

which bad fallen to 
-around 1.6350 Deutsche marks after several 
■•*. day® of weakness, jumped neariv 3 pfennia 
after the intervention, to 1.6626 marks, before 
slipping back in New York to 1.6545 DM. 

T™ dollar closed in New York at 101.845 
yen, op from 101 yen on Tuesday, which was 
; '■?£! f? ove U -S- currency's postwar low of 
100.35 yen. 

Hans Tietmeyer, president of the German 
antral bank, had lold bankers in Bonn earlier 
-that the mark's "excessive appreciation" 
against the dollar "wasn't in Germany's inter- 
est." 


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- Another Bundesbank board member de- 
•- scribed the mark's rise as “threatening.” 

^ • The U.S. treasury secretary. Lloyd Bentsen. 

speaking in Washington, said the Clinton ad- 
r ministration was also fed up with the dollar's 

- weakness, which had persisted despite repeated 
warnings. 

"This administration sees no advantage in an 
undervalued currency," Mr. Bentsen said. “The 
monetary authorities of the major countries are 
joining this morning in concerted intervention. 

•' These operations reflect our view that recent 
movements in exchange markets have gone 
beyond wfaal is justified by economic funda- 
mentals." 

.. The action on the dollar’s behalf Wednesday 
-• was begun by the Fed, which was then joined by 

- the Bundesbank and other central banks, in- 
cluding Ihe Bank of Japan, in what central bank 
sources described as the largest concerted inter- 
7- _ irwntipp' since the summer of 1992.: • 

The intervention underlined worldwide anxi- 
about the dollar's recent sharp decline, 
7 '* *mkh has been attributed largely to feverish 
V. _<kfiar sdhig^by ,lf.S.-based investment funds. . 
^ . - 'pOT.UxL^ooSfcsbaxik; thejn^'s unexpected s 

- .73 percent rise over the^last 10 .days was, too 

mmirof a good thing. “Trustiri the staHlity of 
the D-mark on international fmanoal inarkets 
. has been steady, as we’saw during the recent 
volatility in connection with a change of senti- 
ment in the United States," 1 Mr. Tietmeyer said 
in a speech. 

"Today the D-mark is stronger rather than 
weaker." he added, "but an excessive appreda- 

See DOLLAR, Page 10 



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Border Issue 
But Signs Pact 
With Israel 


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Yasser Arafat PLO chairman, right after he raised the issue of boundaries at the Cairo 
ceremony Wednesday. Conferring, from left were Foreign Minister Shimon Peres of 


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Israel Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kornev of Russia, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of 
Israel Foreign Minister Amr Mussa of Egypt and President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Tima Service 

CAIRO — Yasser Arafat, the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization chairman, and Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel signed a self- 
rule agreement Wednesday that ended T) years 
of Israeli military occupation in Gaza and Jeri- 
cho and turned authority over to the PLO. 

The signing, after six months of negotiations 
that were undertaken in Washington in Sep- 
tember, was greeted with applause by an audi- 
ence Lhat included President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt, Secretary of State Warren M. Christo- 
pher, Foreign Minister .Andrei V. Kozyrev of 
Russia and other dignitaries. 

“Today we declare that the conflict is over," 
the Israeli foreign minister, Shimon Peres, told 
the gathering. 

But the two sides must still resolve three 
outstanding issues, negotiators said, including 
the boundaries of Jericho in the West Bank, 
whether the Palestinians wQl place a guard on 
the bridge joining the West Bank and Jordan, 
and the manning of the Rafa border outpost 
connecting Gaza and Egypt. 

There was a brief glitch in the ceremony 
when Mr. Mubarak, Mr. Christopher and other 
dignitaries began a bealed discussion with Mr. 
Arafat on the stage, even as speeches were being 
delivered. The group had to retire to the wings 
to confer for five minutes before returning to 
conclude Lhe signing. 

Palestinian officials said Mr. Arafat wanted a 
written understanding from Mr. Rabin, with 
whom he met for six hours on Tuesday night 
and early Wednesday morning, lhat the bound- 
aries in Gaza and Jericho were still under dis- 
cussion. 

Mr. Arafat signed the six maps in the 450- 
page document with this notation. Mr. Rabin, 


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who agreed to the request, signed after calling 
an aide to read the notes Mr. Arafat had jotted 
in the margin in Arabic. 

“Nowadays you can watch how birth is being 
given on television," Mr. Peres quipped. 

Mr. Rabin also said Lhat Mr. Arafat had 
asked for a three-week delay in carrying out the 
handover of authority because Palestinian offi- 
cials were not prepared to assume power. 

“We are interested in a relatively short imple- 
mentaticn. but it became clear to roe yesterday 
that the chairman of the PLO is asking for a few 
weeks, two or three, for the changeover." Mr. 
Rabin said following the ceremony. "We will 
apparently have to agree to this." 

A Palestinian leader. Faisal Husseini. called 
the signing "the first stage for a Palestinian 
state." 


Gaza Family , Exhausted by War, Is Wary of Peace 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pm Senice 

JABALIYA, Gaza Strip — In the breezy 
cinder-block room decorated with drawings his 
sons made in prison, Mohammed Msalam fin- 
gered the Palestinian flag as it gently fluttered 
m the window on Wednesday, but his spirits 
were subdued on the day the Gaza Strip was 
formally given up by Israel. 

“This flag was forbidden for a long time." be 
said. “You can't find a Palestinian who dared 


fly iL But i know a flag is not everything. Wj 

need more, much more." 


?r> •:rir'- and mir.iv.tns careened _rantinuiRg economic hardship, the ceremony in 


His somber mood captured the low-key reac- 
tion in Gaza and the West Bank town or Jericho 
on Wednesday as Israel and the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization signed the documents 
putting Palestinian self-rule into effect 

Instead of the exultations that greeted the 
peace accord last September, the NLsalam fam- 
ily, exhausted by a conflict that has deeply 
touched two generations, found little to cheer. 


down the mam street'; with horns blarina. and 
shopkeepers brought out nev. stocks of ihe 
green, white, red and black Palestinian stan- 
dard. Crowds gjthcrcd to welcome home hun- 
dreds of prisoners released from Israeli jails, 
and a half-dozen leaders of the new Palestinian 
police force arrived quietly to make prepara- 
tions for I.0U0 policemen expected in the next 
Tew days. 

But after months of false starts and delays, 
after high expectations that were dashed "bv 


Cairo seemed to he just another milestone on 
what is turning out to be an excruciatingly 
difficult passage for the Palestinians. 

"Yesterday, I didn't believe they would sit 
and sign it." Mr. Msalam said. “Now. I’m less 
worried. I see that it*s for real." 

The Msalam family, refugees from the 1°48 
war, have long been caught up in the struggle 
with Israel, and even as they watched the Gaza- 


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See FAMILY, Page 4 


Bonn Overcomes Hurdle 
To Lufthansa Privatization 


The Doubts Can Whit: First the Miracle 


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■Affi-S-" 


Compiled by Oar Sutj} Fnm Dispatches 
BONN — The German awOTunent cleared 
the way Wednesday for the fun privatization of 
Lufthansa AG after agreeing to a deal with the 
unprofitable national airline on meeting its 
pension liabilities. 

Germany’s finance minister, Tbeo WaigeL 
said the government intended to sell its entire 
51.42 percent stake in the airline m stages. 

**It is not bur intention to sit on a arUin 
proportion or the shares or to hold onto them, 
Mr. Waigd said. . . 

Industry analysts said the privatization and 

U.S. carriers. 

“Lufthansa will become more competitive 

became they will be able to re*,ce theu ■ ««. 


ororctiban we have sera in AepasC' 


“SSKS an-** at the BHF-Bank 
^F^urt^Hltink they didn't take as many 

m rraniuuii. their 


SstStg Steps in the past beejm* thtnr 

shareholder is the government 
“S! X7, a n airline is straggly 
■ T ^Svenesi by VS competitor, cuiren- 
, ng aggreaiven^s oy expensive to 

cy fluctuations that make eSnotmes. 

flV to Germany and weak Europwn - 

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and 373 million DM in 1992. The cm in 1993 
losses was helped by laying off about 4,000 
Lufthansa workers. The airline's 1992 passen- 
ger totals pm it in eighth place among the 
world’s air carriers, way behind most UJS. com- 
petitors. But in terms of international passen- 
gers, Lufthansa is second only to British Air- 
ways. 

Analysts have long said that privatizing the 
German carrier would help restore it to profit- 
ability, not to mention offering a badly needed 
cash injection for the government. But a sell-off 
has been hindered by uncertainty over who 
would pay the pensions of Lufthansa's 45300 
employees. •• 

Under the complicated pension deal reached 
Wednesday, the government will pay a total of 
1.6 billion Deutsche marks to cover the pen- 
sions of existing Lufthansa staff and retirees. It 
also will guarantee pensions up to 1.1 billion 
marks in (he event of Lufthansa becoming 
insolvent. 

The airline also will build op its own pension 
reserves. Starting by setting aside 264 million 
marks in 1995, and will be liable for the pen- 
sions of staff who join after 1995. 

Mr. Waigel said the government would raise 
more than enough funds through the privatiza- 


By Bill Keller 

,V<m- Yi+A Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Soon enough the 
doubts will niggle at the new South Africa. 

“What unity?" someone will ask of the so- 
called government of national unity, which 
will try to harness the wild ambitions of rival 
politicians to common purpose. 

Graphs will appear demonstrating that so- 
cial justice and economic growth are irrecon- 
cilable. The rainbow memory of voting du> 
will dissolve in the realization that most utt- 
ers. once they got inside the booth, voted 
along racial Unes. The killing may resume. 

But this week. South Africans have been 


buoyed above self-doubt by the evidence of 
their own resilience. The same nation that a 
year ago watched rioters in the streets after 
the killing of a black liberation hero. Chris 
Hani, watched Mondav night as Mr. Huni's 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


widow uncorked a bottle of champagne and 
poured for Nelson Mandela, who toasted his 
former enemies live on national television. 


“I'm ai a loss for words, other than ‘mirac- 
ulous.' to describe how this country in spile of 
everything has pulled itself together jnd got 
on with il.‘‘ said the playwright Athol Fu- 
gard. 


Mr. Fugard tuned in to listen to the two 
main actors in this national drama, watching 
for a single mean-spirited note and hearing 
none from either President Frederik W. de 
Klerk, conceding power, or Mr. Mandela, 
accepting power. 

"I’m not exaggerating, but I was close to 
leans, sitting in my apartment and listening 
on ihe radio." the writer said. "Hearing these 
two men, one in a sense the loser and Lhe 
other in a sense the victor, and both of them 
passionate in their vision of a South Africa 
that embraced everybody." 

South Africa has endured a cannonade of 

See VOTE, Page 4 


"I would hope that it would be a bigger first 
step." he said, “but it is the beginning." 

Israeli troops are scheduled to begin with- 
drawing From Gaza and Jericho within 24 
hours. Most of the troops will be gone within 21 
days. The first contingent of a 9,000-roember 
Palestinian police force will arrive Thursday to 
take over security in the area. Israeli is also 
committed to releasing hundreds of Palestin- 
ians hdd in Israeli prisons. 

Mr. .Arafat called the accord a “true begin- 
ning to complete the march of peace and guar- 
antee the legitimate rights of the Palestinian 
people." 

The agreement gives Palestinians control 
over their daily affairs. Israel will, however, 
retain responsibility for external security, con- 
trol of the borders with Jordan and Egypt and 
foreign relations. 

The accord calls for negotiations on a perma- 
nent settlement for the rest of the West Bank 
and .Arab East Jerusalem. The Palestinians. 


iPage 1 

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See ACCORD, Page 4 


New on Job, Japanese Official Opens an Old Wound 




See LUFTHANSA, Page 4 


By T. R. Reid 

WinA/ngrivi Past Serein. 

TOKYO — Moving quickly to head off jn embarra^mem 
for his wobbly new government. Prime Miniver Tsutomu Hju 
publicly reprimanded a member of his cabinet on Wednesday 
who had declared that the Japanese Army's infamous "Rape of 
Nanking” in 1937 was a “fiction." 

Mr. Hata, who is visiting Europe, issued a statement saying 
it was “improper" for his newly named justice minister. Shi- 
gpto Nagano, to deny that Japanese soldiers brutalized resi- 
dents of Nanking during Japan's drive to colonize China. 

Mr. Nagano, a 71-year-old army general turned politician. 


told the Mainichi newspaper in an interview published 
Wednesday that reports of the Nanking massacre were “fic- 
tion." The paper also quoted Mr. Nagano as saying that “it is 
wrong to >3% that Japan's war against China was an aggressive 
war.'" 

Within hours after the interview appeared. Mr. Nagano 
retracted his comments. 

"The aggression during the war cannot be denied." he said in 
a statement issued Wednesday evening. 

“It is a fact." he added, that "many Chinese soldiers and 
civilians were killed by Japanese when Nanking fell." 

Bv Irving to siem the controversy before it had lime to grow. 


Mr. Hata may have headed off a political jolt for his week-old 
cabinet, which had a highly tenuous grasp on power even 
before Mr. Nagano's comments. 

The prune minister's quick action, and Mr. Nagano's quick 
retreat, demonstrated vividly how the political winds have 
shifted in Japan since Iasi summer, when Mr. Hata and his 
fellow reformers ended four decades of conservative one-party 
rule. One of the key changes brought about by the coalition 
governments — first under Morihiro Hosokawa and now 
under Mr. Hata — has been a willingness to face up to 


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See REPRIMAND, Page 4 


appropn; 




Kiosk 


4 Countries Gear Hurdle to EU Entiy 


After Senna’s Death 9 Grand Prix Tries to Slow Down 


The European Au s- 

whelmingly on Sweden to the 

Ida. FWa, ?f ^fe’ting cak for del ® y 


the Parliament J 


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ad four and 
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Qanmral Naurs 

The UN sent observers to a Serbian corridor 
in Bosnia. Page 2. 

Singapore reduced the number of lashes a 
US. teenager is to receive. Page 3. 

Rwanda rebels said only their victory, not 
UN intervention, wall end massacre. Page 4. 


Book Review 
Crossword . 


PageR 
Page 20. 




Cyprus -.1/- Norwov-“ p lots 

DertrnarkU n F-NL 8SU tols 

Finland.--- 1 1 R £ LOO 

| J D U-A.EL ■ .gy r j j i.io 


Down 

16.66 

3697.75 


Down 

1.35% 

110.86 


The Dollar 

Mg* VofV - 
DM 

pound "7^ 

Yen 

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By Brad Spurgeon 

huemanonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS —The governing body of Grand Prix 
racing, under pressure to enhance safety after 
the deaths of the three-time world champion 
Ayrton Senna and another driver at last week- 
end’s competition in Italy, said Wednesd jv that 
it was considering ways 'to reduce the speed i-f 
the racing cars. 

But, in sidestepping for the most pan the 
main issue — lhe crashes that killed Senna ami 
an Austrian rookie driver. Roland Ratztn- 
berger — the International Automobile Feder- 
ation came out of its special high-level meeting 
with only three relatively limited safety mea- 
sures intended to reduce accidents around the 
pit lanes. 

“After five accidents this past weekend, in- 
ducing two deaths, one must be careful not to 
cwetTeact," said Max Mosley, lhe federation's 
preadenL “We must not be tempted to force 
things onto Lhe teams and create other things." 

What killed Senna on Sunday at theTanibur- 
ello curve at Lmola, Italy, and Ratzenherger 24 
hours earlier, at the start of a curve just up the 
track, remain unknown. Senna died of exten- 


sive head injuries after hi> Williums-Renaull hit 
the circuit's concrete wall >traigiu on. Raizen- 
berger also died of head injuries after hitting 
the wall in his Simick-Ford. 

The Williams leant said no decision on a 
replacement for Senna would he made until 
next week. He was to be hurled m Sao Paulo on 
Thursday morning. 

Mosley, quoted b> P.ttuurv 'jid Wednesday 
that Senna had rejehed j ipeed of 3IU kilome- 
ters an hour 1 1°2 miles an hour) when he lost 
control of hi> car. "Why he lost control we don't 
know yet," he said. 

Mosley vu'd the e\aci reasons for ihe vrashes 
would not be known until the Grand Prix 
governing body, know n b\ ii.> Freikh aeronvm. 
FI A. and the drivers' lear.i*- were able t.-get the 
cars and equipmem bjik from li.ilian authori- 
ties. 

''The whole picture will not be known until 
the car is back with the learns and will be 
examined,'' he said, adding lhat it might be a 
month before more definite answers were avail- 
able. 

He and Simtek officials said Rauenberaer 

See RACING. Page 19 



responsible 
inge policy, 
view on the d 
countering sp 
l States was t 
;ls for the doll 
fves in floau 
Villiam McDc 
the Federal I 
w York, said 
ay. “You ca 
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tnge rale targe 
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that the G-7 v 
a floor under 


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lock and bo 
titling dollar-* 
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not constrs^ » 

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AirKiaiRann. 


Sao Paulo cadets carry ing Ayrton Senna's coffin to the Congress on Wednesday'. 




2 


Parliament 
Kills Move 
To Stall EU 
Expansion 













By Craig R. Whitney 

Se* Yitrk Tiiihl StrtltC 

STRASBOURG. France— The 
directly elecied but largely power- 
less European Parliament on 
Wednesday endorsed European 
Union membership for Norway. 
Finland. Sweden and Austria next 
year bv wide margins. 

Rejecting calls to rear up in a 
show of independence and vote 
down treaties of accession worked 
out by the European Commission 
and haggled over by the II member 
stales of the Union, more than SO 
percent of the deputies present vot- 
ed to accept the terms. 

Rejection would have thrown '.lie 
Union into another paralyzing po- 
litical crisis. It has only just 
emerged from one over the treaty 
that gave it its new name and tried 
to lay the foundations for □ com- 
mon’ European cunency by the 
turn of the century. 

The “yes" votes for the Nordic 
countries and Austria also gave 
Hungary. Poland, the Czech Re- 
public and Slovakia hope of be- 
coming members about then. 

“Enlargement will increase the 
peace by 'shifting the border east- 
ward." said Otto von Hapsburg. a 
German member of the Parlia- 
ment. Rejection, he said to ap- 
plause shortly before the balloting, 
"would be a most severe setback to 
the idea or freedom and democracy 
in Eastern Europe." 

The approval allows the four 
prospective members to go ahead 
with plans to hold rcfercndunis on 
entry into the Union on Jan. I. 
Austrians will vote on June 12. 
while Sweden. Finland and Nor- 
way will all vole in November. 
Some public opinion polls show 
that Norwegian', might well reject 
membership, as they did once be- 
fore in the early I97(l>. 

The Parliament vowed to fight 
another day with the Executive 
Commission and member states for 
more legislative powers. It will end 
its current term this week. 




iNTER-AATlQiN XL HERALD TRinvSZ. THURSDAY, MAY 5. 1994 

Russians 

fvvi HiiS And U.S. 

Set Talks 
Ill On Bosnia 






Berlusconi 


worldbme^j 

2 Dy.ki.tfc 






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Vr.xlvvii 


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C * T 11 a On Suspending urvernmei^p^ p- „ 

mmr- On Bosnia «***• *- B ? iuKom “ . ■ 

,h --kim Compiled fri Our Sufi From Di^tchs nowcrful Interior Ministry ‘ i i,s» ’ s- 

SHANNON, Ireland — The njcetiiSwith ibe National A ^: r p- ' ' 

Spi,*? United States and Russia are caU- gJ^SSSatio be suspended." Mr. 

ing for an urgent meeting of foreign ^“^^ Naliona | Alliance, and the federalist - 
i0r raimstets tender proposals for ^ that swept to victory in Mar* etaion^ 


Compiled fn Our Staff From Dispatch* 

SHANNON, Ireland — The 
United States and Russia are call- 


rammcis ‘V. Wiuamt. pi (Uo. gwepi to victory m Marat eteerans^-v 1 

ending the two-year war in Bos|^. ^ cajjgrf f or a kV paosc for reflection” to caiumitg 

The meeting is tentatively . ij «wicriinteH “within thp.franw iiiti it v ; 


jjtA- 


' -X ■ > t 

. ’• Kf - ;,; - ' *. 






The meeting is tentatively Sriihfo fccl 

anned for May 13 in Geneva. “Thet. 








.5jdr 
\ ■ *&■ 


** 


planned for May 13 in Ge 
with U.S-, West European 
Russian officials evaluating tl 
suits of their efforts to bring 
Urns. Serbs and Croats togeth 




The initiative was begun last ^ IT l&taSn 

week after North Atlantic Treaty 









mm 




Organization ultimatums con- 

siege of Gorazde. to hau the.r ^ roU |}|e tor spaiii^itp^^ r - 

Tensions are rising in Brcko. in MADRID (AFP) — The Catalan nationalists Jftfi 1 * 

northeastern Bosnian, which is at mmonty for Prime Minister Felipe. Gonz61e£^^S ‘ 

the edge or a narrow comdor con- Wedne ^j a y to withdraw their support over ^Joflti 

neclmg Serb-held lands. Tje area ^ his govemraenL And in another bkw. •, . I 

has seen a major military buildup apiculture mnister resigned over what be called a ; * rt »■ 

by rival Muslim-led government <; 'y.; ng a day after Mr. Gonziiez was ordcred to ^ 

and Serbian forces over the past pariiameot u> explain a corroption affair mvbIvhig'^lK^^^^^;» rfj. f 'njt 
.week, and France has proposed de- gj rf of ^ (jpanj, the Catalan party L 

daring it a United Nations-pro- * 3 ,^ of serious consequences “if the govenimaitddesiiafl^^^- r 
tccted “safe area. corruption.” Miquei Roca, spokesman for the pMly : whc«|^^^^ ^ T*- ~ 

Secretary of Slate warren M. , ^,L.? no for the 159 denuties nT . ' ... 


structure- Without the post. u» touidu ^.v- - -.j. 

Berlusconi government only “from the outside, ■ Dc sa 

Double Trouble for 


i^"s; 

fe 7 lpbBt° ?e * 
r^wjuciw* 


■-m 


* ~ * J.lOftlm- J I I* 1 - ^ 

Sarajevo residents with a goat enjoying the quiet snnshine Wednesday at a cemetery in the hills over sooting the Bosnian capital. 



onservatives 


Isri sh^: Facing Critical Test in Local Voting Jockeying 

" said Otto von Hapsburg. a O ^ ** ^ 


approach - separaung Musum ^ ^ ted news for Mr. Gonzalez came from 

and Serbian forces bv placing UN y lcenle Albero. He reagnod saying he had conmrined^^fe 
peacekeepers between them to |Q 3 J9 g ? transaction in which money be entrusted fo ararr^ 


separating 




By William Schmidt 

iV»n- }«*rA Times Sfffiti' 
LONDON — Britain's govern- 
ing Conservatives are bracing for a 
rough ride on Thursday in local 
elections across Britain, where can- 
didates allied with Prime Minister 
John Major's troubled government, 
risk losing their seats on town and 
county councils. 

With opinion surveys showing 
Mr. Major’s government holding 
the approval of barely one in five 
Britons, and with newspapers and 
television filled wrjth stories of bit- 
ter quarreling among top Tory offi- 
cials. both Labor and the Liberal 
Democrats arc predicting big gains 
in the balloting and a national set- 
back for Mr. Major. 

"There can be little doubt that 
these elections will be a referendum 


on Major and his government, 
said Jack Straw, a Labor Party offi- 
cial. 

But the Conservative Party 
chairman. Sir Norman Fowler, ap- 
pealed to voters to concentrate on 
local issues rather than national 
politics in casting their ballots. 

“What it all depends upon is the 
turnout,” said Sir Norman, who 
predicted the Conservatives could 
still make net gains. 

Just two vears after Mr. Major 
led the Conservatives to a fourth 
consecutive victory in national 
elections, there is growing talk once 
more within party ranks of a lead- 
ership challenge io the prime min- 
ister. 

Voters on Thursday will cast 
votes for seats in 32 London bor- 
oughs. 12 Scottish councils, and 


one-third of the seats in other local 
districts across the rest of England 
and Wales. 

Among other things. Mr. Major 
has been wrestling in recent day* 
with a renewed rebellion among 
Conservative skepucs of his gov- 
ernments £urop«m policy. The 
debate, sparked mostly by rightist* 
opposed to closer monetary ties 
with the Continent seems a monu- 
ment to bad timing. 

The renewed battle over Britain'- 
European ties not only comes, on 
the eve of the local elections, con- 
tributing to a growing sense of 
Tory disarray, but only Jays before 
Mr. Major joins Queen Elizabeth I! 
and President Francois Mitterrand 
at ceremonies opening the Channel 
Tunnel, the first land link between 
Britain and the CominenL 


AW 


• . * . ■ 1 . „ ■ r, IB a 1 70 f LlUlJMbUUU lit *fiuwu luuu 

make sure there isa t a gxownn D invested in government bonds, 
engagement there. a 


^S^VTSSS- New Fighting Breaks Out in 


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<*e:y- ■ • 


Compiled M t hn Sutf Fr.vn Dupau hc< 

WASHINGTON — Human-rights condi- 
tions in China have deteriorated in the last two 
months, according to a report released here 


cant progress has-been made on virtually none 
of the seven items specified" in the executive 
order, the report said. 


Wednesday by j watchdog group. 

The report, from the U.S.-hjseJ Human 


In a report in February. Human Rights 
Watch said that 199? was the worn year for 
human rights in China since mid-199fi and the 
aftermath of the crackdown on the pro-democ- 
racy movement. 

“Since the report was issued, the human 
rights situation in China has deteriorated fur- 
ther." the group void Wednesday. 

It cited the rounding up and imprisonment of 
religious leaders.jhe imprisonment of "peace- 
ful advocates of 1 iheian independence" and a 
dampdown on the arts. 

The only concession of real significance was 
the release last month of Wang Juntao. a lead- 
ing dissident who has been allowed 10 come to 
the United States for medical treatment. Hu- 
man Rights W ; atch said. 

“For hi*, release to be significant however, it 
will have to be followed bv releases of other 
prisoners." 


Rights Watch/ Asia, comes less than a month 
before President Bill Clinton must determine 


before President Bill Clinton must determine 
whether Beijing has made “significant overall" 
progress on human rights, enabling him to 
renew China's trading status. 

Mr. Clinton said late Tuesday that China had 
made "real progress" on some human rights 
issues but Mill hjd "a way 10 go." 

The Human Rights Watch report contained 
no such nuance. 

“If anything there has been a 'significant, 
overall' deterioration in the human rights situa- 
tion in China" since Mr. Clinton set the condi- 
tions in a presidential executive order in May 
last year, the group saiJ. 

"Con Iran to assessments expressed in recent 
weeks bv several senior U.S. officials, signtfi- 


The group also noted that while 25 political 
or religious prisoners have been released since 
the executive order was issued, "well over one 
hundred" have been arrested. 


Mr. Clinton told Deputy Prime Minister Zou 
Jiahua on Monday that Beijing had to make 
progress on human rights to win renewal of tne 
trade status, which permits imports from China 
at the lowest possible tariffs. Mr. Zou replied to 
the president that rights «as China's internal 
affair. 


A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman sug- 
gested Wednesday that the United State; had 
as much to lose a's China if the most-favored- 
nation trade status was not renewed. 


"The Chinese government has repeatedly 
and dearly stated that the mutual offer of MFN 
status between the United Suites and China is a 
reciprocal and mutually beneficial arrange- 
ment." the spokesman said. 

I AFP. Return. V)T< 


RoUcTT 

THE HAGUE — The Nether- 
lands began searching on Wednes- 
day for a viable coalition govern- 
ment after voters completely 
redrew the political map in a gener- 
al election. 

Because of the tortuous nature of 
Dutch consensus politics, it could 
be months before a new adminis- 
tration takes shape. 

Both parties of the outgoing co- 
alition. Labor and the Christian 
Democrats, lost heavily in the elec- 
tions on 1 uesday. though they re- 
main the two biggest parties in the 
legislature. 

But Labor edged ahead of the 
Christian Democrats, becoming 
the single biggest party and making 
their leader. Finance Minister Wim 
Kok. the favorite to head the next 
government. 

The Christian Democrats suf- 
fered their worsl-ever general elec- 
tion result and could be forced into 
opposition for the first time since 
universal suffrage wax introduced 
in 1917. 

But the conservative Liberal Par- 
ty and leftist Democraien bb were 
triumpnam after making big sains. 
The Liberals will be the third larg- 
est bloc in the legislature. 

Two parties representing the el- 
derlv made their debut in the legis- 
lature. with one of them emerging 
as the largest of eight small parties 
in the 150-seat Second Chamber. 

Ruud Lubbers, a Christian Dem- 
ocrat and the country'*, longest- 
serving prime minister, symbolical- 
ly closed an era in Dutch politics by 
publicly declaring his candidacy 
for the presidenev of the European 
Commission on Tuesday evening. 


ifT’ 


pher said. “Brcko does not lend SANA, Yemen jReutersj — Artillery fire was.heard!Wed^^ja^' f ./ *- 

itself to the same kind of treatment - m Aden, the capital of the former South Yemen, Tvhjfc:^ teaS-. .. : 1**77,.- •••7* s 
that the other dues in the safe areas b^e out between rival northern and southern Yemefi -*•' 

of Bosnia do." northern dly of Dhamar. ■; *5^ ” 

He and Foreign Minister Andrei jjj San 4 a, the capital of the united Yemen; jesidqittFaS^^^r •" s* 11 ® 3 '• ■ 

V. Kozyrev of Russia issued ajeant pjafoed power blackout hit the city shortly after iheanival r 
stateraent after a meeting Wednes- assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs; RjDberfftBfflat^' f - 

day in Cairo, expresang “serious j T .. - ; ic 0 ® 51 ' ' 

concern" over the continuing insta- Aden television announced a flare-up of fighting betweehsmAwnmj , . . 

bility in Bosnia. northern forces in Dhamar, 100 kilometers (60. mfleajSoiif&^SaV .*j - ' 

United Nations mrntary obswx f - Earlier, witnesses in Aden said residents were nnminghi i aStu^ xr ' . . 

ers have begun patrolling the edge streets of the Red Sea port city after the sound of artillgyfigv^ tei^ : ^joa - 




of the corridor near Brcko, accord- source of the fire and its targets were not irniDediatelytoii ^ ^ " 

ing to a UN spokesman m Zagreb. ; . -f 

Croatia. JL Jk-jjA • 

The spokesman said that seven . v^-TyT £ "jLi lfcl -.- l C.r " 

TRAVEL UPDATfe:*^? /: 


The spokesman said that seven 
observers had spread along the 
Croatian side of the Sava River 
across from the town and that the 
United Nations planned 10 station 
12 more in Serb-held territory 
around Brcko soon. 

With Serbs and the Bosnian gov- 
ernment accusing each other of 
strengthening forces in the north, 
the Brcko corridor is shaping up as 
the next potential bauleground in 
the Balkan war despite the present 
calm. 

Radovan Raradoc the Bosnian 
Serbian leader, has offered a cease- 
fire around Brcko that he said his 
troops would observe even if gov- 
ernment forces did not. 

In Sarajevo on Wednesday, an 
aircraft carrying Johannes Prei- 
singer. the first German ambassa- 
dor to Bosma-Herzegovina. was hit 
by three rounds of small-arms fire 
as it approached Sarajevo airport, a 
UN spokesman said. The shots 
were fired from Bosnian Serbian 
positions near the airport, he said. 

There were no casualties and 


damage was minimal. Airport of crude oil imports. 


Continental Slashes Fares to 

HOUSTON (AP) — Continental Airlines has annouavdlp^B^qp 
fares to Europe that cut some ticket prices up to 67 
refundable, unrestricted fares are available on every seat.^tWqjl^i. 
and do not need to be purchased in advance. ContaehtaLsa&v . 

A flight to London costs between $349 and S499 each' way. Jaato" ^ 
Paris range from $399 to $499; fares to Frankfurt, Mun&hil&lj&tai 
are from S349 to $549. Fares for weekend travel — FridayjSatnniqod 7 ? ! 
Sunday — are $50 higher. . O , \ 

American Airlines said it would match Continental'sfaRKlnta^ai M 
a round-trip basis and rally until Sept 15. Trans WoridAiifBatBjg : 
would respond with fuBy refundable one-way fares in ceemoittrim- . " 
al markets. Delta Air Lines said it is looking at the newfluestadhefot 
is not sure if it will follow suit. V: -.?•> ... 

A British consumers group said questions remained aboSttfiisfetvcf - -j 
the Channel Tunnel, which is to be officially openfil Ite ; 
Consumers' Association said it was concerned that results fll sday 
surveys had not yet berm made public. Nearly 50 percent oTpeepkni , 
survey conducted by the association were worried about usmglfietaosi 
the group said. ' 1 

Zimbabwe raised (be retail price of (fiesd fnd by lTpercaa ®dAf J 
price of gasoline by 3 percent, with the government dtmg a 17 'ehos J 
devaluation of the Zimbabwean dollar in January (bat increased &cs 3 


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M iV U F. kl 

* friti-r h* 44 


imsation of i 


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Cbrlt- z i* 
ad Shir: r 1. 




sources said the United Nations The Gafata bridge in Istanbtd has been restored at- a post of moreio 


and Red Cross immediately sus- S4.fi million after being destroyed by fire in 1992. Tbe ciirigmal twMBJ 


pended relief flights. 


(AP. Reuters, AFP) 1912. 


bridge over the Golden Horn, an inlet of tl«BosponisStjaiLda&dfnffl 


HEALTH £111 £©§Ti 


Verdict on Attali Book 
To Be Issued in Jime 


rtii e*ri| >'l ih^yruJLv.'j-'iii ‘.-iin nun ij)>- ,v.>ii'imv Pmit;. Anti 
ih>- expeiho lor ■-or-.-, dvmh-i? and s-ij'.iiih a in^unu-iu i-.ui tv n 

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'-j|iii - l**r:r.n i-y.ajii 1 : •.,<•; c'/.!**M i’i«.»-;ii. - :i: ' iii'-n;-n'V.ju*l oJIl'?. 
iV. r- 1 ; . > ! nlp-."U 1*} lv-:ir-.i «1 j*- 


THE CARD THAT GIVES CREDIT 
TO YOUR HEALTH 


COr~0'- 1 > 


r.—ic-m »>rr..il j-'J.i-'ih ri.^u-inre 


■lunuc Fwff-rww 
PARIS — Two French publish- 
ers are awaiting a court's decision 
over who had the right 10 publish 
renurks by President Fran^oi> 
j Mitterrand that appeared in a book 
I by Jacques Attali. the former head 
j of the European Bank for Recon- 
| si ruction and Development. 

The court, wh ich mi on Tu esday. 
will hand down a verdict on June 7. 

! Mr. Attaii's book. "Verbatim. - 
■ included 43 excerpts of remarks 
j Mr. Mitterrand had made »n c.->n- 
j vervutions with the Nobel laureate 
I EJie Wiese!. 

j Mr. Altai* is a former adviser to 
1 Mr. Mitterrand. 

j Odile Jacob, a publishing c*m- 
: cent that had hoped to brine out j 
; book of the Mitterrand- Wiese! con- 
! v-r sat ions, is seeking If million 
! francs iS2.7 million 1 from Mr. At- 


' tab's publisher. Fay ard. for "unfair 
! competition.'' 





l ntem£::cr,2i Health Insurance danmark a/s 

-. I .;i Ji 1T5 -• . • 'Iv!!' i ». it ’. I. r.-iu'i.. 


! Fayjrd is claiming 3.5 million 
j francs m damages from Odile Ja- 
j cob for what i>”aJleges is a "cam- 
1 paign of denigration." 
j In a s«om deporitioR to a com- 
I mercial court hearing. Mr. Attali 
1 said Mr. Mitterrand had approved 
I everv line of his book before publi- 


cation. giving his “vigilant atten- 
tion down to the smallest detail, 
from the first day l started w riling 
right down to the approval .-f the 
list proofs." 

Odile Jacob's lawyer. Bernard 
Jouanneau. said the publisher had 
found whole passages, "wurd for 
word" and "sometimes wr.oie 
pages." in "Verbatim" th^i w eri.- in 
a manuscript that Mr. Wiov! had 
submitted to her for pub!i^.u,i n. 

An attorney for Fayjrd. Henri 
Leclerc. pledged t..- hand u» 
the court the whole of the A’.:u!i 
manuscript, annotated by Mr. \|n- 
terrand. provided it was not made 
public. 

Mr. Mitterrand has made no 
public comment on the cu<o. hut 
Mr. Wiesel has asserted that the 
president supported his call f<ir Mr. 
Attali to wiindrjw the KwV from 
circulation, excise the excerpt, of 
Mitlerrand-Wief-el conversations 
and publicly apologize. 

"Verbatim" portrayed Mr. Mit- 
terrand ax deliberately coneejlme 
decisions on policy from cl».-e col- 
leagues. contrihuiing to policy con- 
fusion and abuses of power nv his 
aides, bur made no startling revela- 
tions. 


For 2 World War II Buffs, 

2 Great] v Different Outcomes 

Two World War II buffs who have tracked 
down the remains of fallen warplanes in Brit- 
ain and France have had vastly different 
experiences. 

Mark Kirby, who lives in Tonbridge. Eng- 
land. has. decorated his home with such arti- 
facts as a propeller from a German ME-10*> 
fighter, the tail wheel of an ME- 1 10 fighter- 
bomber and the control column from a 
Hawker Humeanc. recovered from some of 
the hundreds of Battle of Britain crash site* in 
the Ken* countryside. 

Now Mr. Kirby, a 2-J -year- old carpenter, 
faces possible prosecution for exhuming the 
body of a British pilot whose Spitfire crashed 
near Canterbury 53 vcar> ago. reports The 
Times. Mr. Kirby says he earned out the dig 
with the permission or the family and the 
landowner. Now. he adds, “a Battle of Britain 
hero will at last have j proper burial.*' 

But the RAF called the dig "illegal and 
distasteful." Veterans complained, and be- 
cause Mr. Kirby lacked a license from the 
Defense Ministry, he could be fined. 

Across the Channel. Michel Roinfrov. a 
butcher in the city of Fjlaise. has spent the 
Iasi five years, metal detector in hand, look- 
ing for some of the 3.000 Allied or German 


planes that crashed on Norman soil between 
June 5 and Aug. 21. 1944. His particular 
interest, says Le Figaro, the Paris daily, is 
tracking down U.S. P-47 fighter bombers and 
uncovering the fate of the men who flew 
them. 

After discovering one such plane near the 
village of Le Mesnibuls. he found the serial 
number of the badly rusted motor. After 
months of detective work, he determined that 
the pilot — who had disappeared after crash- 
ing in July 1944 — was alive and well in 
Aurora, Colorado. He had been arrested by a 
German patrol and spent 10 months in a 
German POW camp. 

A few weeks ago, the 270 people of Le 
Mesnibuls wailed with feverish excitement, 
flags hung from windows, girls standing with 
flowers, as the pilot, Robert Duffy, now 70. 
returned to a hero’s welcome. 

Perhaps almost as gratified as Mr. Duffy 
was Mr. Rainfroy, who after standing mod- 
estly aside, gave the reluming American a 
long, tearful embrace. 


may not be that easy a market todackTht 
German is still embarrassed to buy sad j 
magazine. He still feds shame over w^ 
unemployed.” • .. 


Francesco Ruteffi, Rome^ 
mayor, has made some progress in gettoa 
Eternal City’s 60,000 bnreanaab Jo. raan£ 
their ways. Building permits, which 
quired 26 signatures, will now need- fog. As 
Mr. Rutelii, who was dected in pecn H”- 
has approved plans for 15 undagnjcr yfoM fr 
ing lots to thin Rome’s dwdhc 
On Wednesday, he travded"to NesnWL 
where he hopes to gel pointers-Ofljg®^: 
recycling and more lofty mattexslrotp^^ 
the best-known I tab an- Americans,. Miff* 
Rudolph Giuliaiu. Mr. Rolelfi, 39 t i^^ 
national coordinator of the GrteK-Wy 
since 1990. . ; 


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Around Europe 

Two pubHcadoas rimed at unemploved 
Germans have had only Girited success. “Job" 
and “Pro Job" have each sold less than one- 
fifth of their initial press runs. 

Both publishers had been inspired by the 
French market, where five publications 
founded last year — partly to benefit the 
hungry and the homeless — now reach about 
a million readers. 


Clergy in Britain are tq i pweH tt^g^g 
the prayers of their flocks: Sund$||!8?® 
sermons there are getting shorter, 
to a survey. Signs of discontent 
have not always been subtle: Ho 
Derek Walmsley, from 
he was losing people's alteohton^ 

}vrc .,r 1 ,:, — rensniE w - 


Uwc Andresen, publisher of "Pro Job." 
says the 3.9 million unemployed Germans 


he was losing people's attenhOTTn® ^-i 
bers of his congregation began psssjpgg: 

tion photographs around the 3 

ford, southeast London, someoneffl?^ 
hymn book at the rector. Pari 
confirming that congregants see 
when the Reverend Kenneth 
Irigh, Hampshire, wound up 
pithy sermon, he was rewarded 
of spontaneous applause. "" 


Brian K^ fd0 


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mEAMERICAS/ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1994 


- ■ 






----- 



Page 3 


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Defending Foreign Policy Record, Clinton Challenges North Korea and Haiti 


By Gwen ITill 

»7V* Ttni.-i 


ing the 1^32 campaign jo put together an Under questioning by a South Korean 
jiieraatiojial coalition to pursue a com- journalist about North Korea's nuclear 


WASHINGTON 1 « r . 

Ameriwns*‘cannntiummi r a hV3r th u* m °u T P rP; ^ program, Mr. Ginion did not threaten 

world. President Bill Clint . , f on l ^ e MrCImion appeared Tuesday night military action or even refer to the dis- 


broad defend or hi s tnrSl° n °? ered a r program provided by the pule there as a crisis, 

datives and issued toueh «f n ini- , b * c News Network to beam his de- He did not discuss in detail onv Amcr- 
lenges to the gover^S, ?^ lng , chal ' £?“. ? f ^ I?*™* l0 . more lhan 200 «can plans. “The options are, 1 think, 
rea and Haiti. °is of North Ko- wuntnes and temtories around the clear, but they are not easy." he said. Bui 
“America » Vw S“‘ ri . , . he said that they “are largely, again, in 

and must qoIwT *T e ***>' Problem. trt , 0,1,10,1 «“«( on the opportunity the hands of the North Koreans them- 
man.” he said Uie , world ’ s police- JJJ? “ nswcr lingering questions selves “ The least that would happen if 


lion to an obliga- U®?.* 11 * 1 c 9 m PC l « 1 « ™ determining North Korea pursued a nuclear weapons 

can to rdipJTJu olbers 10 do what we ^ Uruted Slales dratM inlerv ene program, he said, would be its increasing 
ttn^rehwe the sufreriua ^ refilAr . in foreign conflicts and the consistency isdition. 

of Amencan policy abroad. 


peace. 


Lfadf, 


SEsiassSSS 

m0re difficult U.M he 


suffering and restore 
5 . C words, Mr. Clinioa 


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the pan -, 
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President Pauses 

On Plan to Set Up 

Air-Traffic Unit 


Mr. Ginton pointedly warned the mil- 
itary rulers of Haiti that he has not ruled 
out the use of military force to accom- 
plish his objectives, which he defined as 
But neither does one restoring democracy, bringing prosperi- 
noi only with nuclear ty to the island and ending “the kUUng 
’ and mutilations’' taking place there. 

In response to a question from a tele- 
vision reporter from Trinidad and Toba- 


_ Referring to the dispute with North 
Korea over access to its nuclear installa- 
tions, Mr. Clinton said, “No one wishes 
this confrontation. But neither does one 
wish to have a state not only with nuclear 
power but with a capacity to proliferate 
nudear weapons to other nations. It is a 
very serious potential situation.*’ 


go. Mr. Clinton said: This is the respon- 
sibility not of the United States but the 
people who are running Haiti tonight. 
They have brought this reign of terror 
and poverty on their people' 1 and they 
could end it tomorrow. 

He said the U.S. mission in Haiti was 
to “restore democracy, to start a multi- 
national effort io help Haiti grow again 
and craw] out of this enormous bole the 
present rulers have put it in.” 

Mr. Ginton was asked starkly differ- 
ing questions on Bosnia from Belgrade, 
the capital of Serbia, and Sarajevo, home 
of the Muslim government of Bosnia, 
and gave sharply different responses. 

When a correspondent from Belgrade 
wondered whether any change of Ameri- 
can strategy could be expected on- the 
Bosnian conflict, perhaps including 
equal treatment of all three sides and 
lifting sanctions on Serbia. Mr. CJinioo 


replied: “I guess the short answer is no. 
But not entirely." 

Bui when he was faced by a long and 
angry question by CNN’s correspondent 
in Sarajevo. Christione Amanpour, in 
which she asserted that the administra- 
tion had constantly flip-flopped. Mr. 
Clinton’s reply was terse with irritation. 
Mr. Clinton said, “There have been no 
constant nip-flops, madam.” 

He went on to assert that “we have 
been much more active than my prede- 
cessor was.” But he added, “I did not 
believe we should inject American 
ground forces" into the conflict in Bos- 
nia to affect the outcome of the civil war 
there. 


Mr. Ginton said the United States 
and its allies had stopped the Bosnian 
conflict from spreading, and be said he 
would try to get the parties to the con- 
flict to negotiate “a decent peace." 


“We have to resolve this through ne- 
gotiations,” Mr. Clinton said. 

Mr. Clinton denied Japanese asser- 
tions that his trade policy constitutes one 
of “managed trade” or that he was seek- 
ing special treatment for the United 
States. He said he had not asked for any 
access to Japanese markets that would 
not apply to other countries as well 
“We look to Japan Tor leadership.” he 
said. “People worry because of the fight 
over trade. But we are not only partners 
but friends. We must not allow differ- 
ences that reflect a mature relationship 
and debate to spoil a relationship impor- 
tant for the world.” 

On another trade issue, Mr. Ginton 
said cancellation of China’s “most fa- 
vored nation” trading status would un- 
dermine relations between Washington 
and Beijing and would Hamay the stan- 
dard of living of many people in China. 
“J do not wish that to naonen" Mr. 


ncir-wr. 

'POBititiec ■ • . 

StrosteJ 


New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON— Fa 


0 


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. wamiijnu-ION - Facing ob- 
jections from the chairmen of im- 
portant congressional panels, the 
Clinton administration has halted 
the introduction of legislation to 
create a government corporation to 
operate the nation’s air-traffic con- 
trol system so it could pursue nego- 
tiations with opponents. 

But the decision to hold up the 
legislation did not come until after 
Vice President A1 Gore and avia- 
tion officials had ushered the press 
and industry executives into a cere- 
mony scheduled as a celebration of 
the introduction of the bill. 

Transportation Secretary Feder- 
ico F. Pefla told the gathering Tues- 
day at National Airport that the 
administration would work with 
Congress to come up with a biB 
aimed at improving efficiency and 
reducing airline delays that would 
be acceptable on Capitol Hill. 


Instead of pushing its own bill, 
Mr. Pena said the administration 
would work in “a partnership rela- 
tionship with the Congress” to try 
to “jointly shape legislation.” The 


administration proposal to form a 
add affect 


corporation would affect 38,000 
Federal Aviation Administration 
employees and take 80 percent of 
the agency's $9 billion budget. 



/ fluid .Ur' Agent* France-Pnfv* 

ADVICE FROM AN OLD HAND — President Bill Clinton, left, with former President Jimmy Carter after talks at the Carter 
Center in Atlanta on policy toward Haiti. Mr. Clinton has called for tightening sanctions against the country’s military regime. 


Responding to Clinton 9 s Plea , 
Singapore Cuts 6 Lashes to 4 


By Michael Richardson 

l ru emotional Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Singapore said 
Wednesday that it would reduce 
the caning sentence against the 
American teenager Michael P. Fay 
from six lashes to four in an at- 
tempt to “accommodate” a person- 
al appeal for clemency from Presi- 
dent Bill Ginton. 

Singapore, which has close eco- 
nomic and security ties with the 
United States, also said that it 
would consider similar reductions 
in the punishment of three other 
foreign teenagers, one of them an 
Amencan, who were arrested at the 
same time as Mr. Fay. They, too, 
face caning for vandalism. 

[Id response to Singapore's an- 
nouncement, the U.S. Slate De- 
partment said Wednesday in a 
statement released in Washington 
that “we deeply regret the Singa- 
pore government's decision to doty 
clemency for Michael Fay's caning 
sentence,” The New York Tunes 
reported. “We continue to believe 
that caning is an excessive penally 
for the crime committed.”] 

Despite Singapore's move, the 


family and the U.S. lawyer of Mr. 
; 18. said the caning was a form 


Fay. 


I 


Accusation of Clinton Sexual Advances Detailed 


By Michael Isikoff, 
Charles H. Shepard, 
and Shaicm LaFraniere 

. Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Last Feb.. II, Paula 
Jones, a former Arkansas state clerical work- 
er, appeared at a Washington news confer- 
ence and accused Bill Ginton of making an 
unwanted and improper sexual advance dur- 
ing a brief encounter in a Little Rock hotd 
room in 1991. 

As Mrs. Jones told iu a slate trooper 
serving on ihen-Govemor Clinton’s security 
detail summoned her to meet Mr. Clinton 
while she was working at a state-sponsored 
conference. Alone with her, Mrs. Jones said, 
Mr. Clinton tried to kiss her, reached under 
her clothing and asked ber to perform a 
specific sexual acL She said she felt humiliat- 
ed and walked out within minutes. 

Asked by reporters to respond. White 
House aides said the stoty was untrue and 


ing it impossible to resolve independently 
what, if anything, happened between them. 

Mrs. Jones, who now lives in California, 
provided the names of two longtime friends 
and two family members who said in inter- 
views that Mrs. Jones had loJd them about 
the episode on May 8. 1991, the day it 
occurred. 

Key aspects of Mrs. Jones’s account are a 
departure from past allegations about Mr. 
Gin ion's personal conduct. Mrs. Jones 
worked for an Arkansas stale agency, and 
she contends that Mr. Clinton's conduct to- 
ward her constituted sexual harassment in 


as sometimes too trusting and instinctively 
talkative and outgoing. “A lot of people take 
that as being a flirt.” she said. “That's just 
me though.” 


At some point during the dav, Mrs. Jones 
r. Cli 


pulled it away, and tried to distract him by 
chatting about Mr. Clinton’* wife. But. she 
said, he persisted, kissing her neck and put- 
ting his hand on her thigh underneath her 
cufolle. 


of torture and insisted that he was 
innocent of the spray-painting and 
other charges broyght against him. 

“It's a barbaric punishment be- 
ing applied to an innocent,” said 
his father, George Fay. in Dayton. 
Ohio, “li is the most ludicrous 
thing I have ever heard that to 
accommodate the president of the 


the workplace. No woman has ever publicly 
accused Mr. Git 


, Clinton of the extreme behavior 
that Mrs. Jones recounts. 

Aides to Mr. Clinton have suggested that, 
aside from political motivation, Mrs. Jones 


could be seeking financial gain, and her 
icknowle 


described it as a cheap political trick engj- 
awed Clint 


neered by an avowed Clinton enemy. Cliff 
Jackson, who had- helped arrange Mrs- 
Jones’s news conference at a gathering of 
nntirical conservatives. They said Mr. Con- 


political conservatives. They 
ton had no memory of meeting the woman. 
“This event plain and simple dtdn t hap- 
pn ” Mr. Clinton’s new attorney. Robert S. 


Mr. Clinton s new attorney, 
wjnert, said Tuesday. 

In the last three months. The Washington 
Post has interviewed Mrs. Jones extensively 
about what she said happened in the Excelsi- 
or Hotd in Little Rock. She said she was 
alone with Mr. Ointoii in the room — mak- 


attoraey acknowledges that before her news 
conference be made an effort to negotiate an 
out-of-court monetary settlement in ex- 
change for her silence. 

Mrs. Jones's allegations revolve around 
the 1991 Governor’s Quality Conference, a 
one-day session on management at the Ex- 
celsior Hotd. 

At the registration desk outside the hotel 
ballroom. Mrs. Jones (then Paula Corbin) 
and a co-worker, Pam Blackard, whom she 
had known since childhood, were handing 
out name tags and literature. Mrs. Jones, 
then 24, had been hired two months earlier as 
a SI 0,270- &-y ear clerk for the Arkansas In- 
dustrial Development Commission. 

Mrs. Jones described taersdf in interviews 


said, she noticed Mr. Clinton standing near- 
by. answering questions from reporters. Mrs. 
Jones, who had never met Mr. Clinton, said 
she thought he was staring at her. A few 
minutes later, she said. Trooper Danny Fer- 
guson. a member of Mr. Clinton's security 
detaD with whom she had chatted earlier, 
approached the table and told her. “The 
governor said you make his knees knock.” 

She said Trooper Ferguson returned a 
short time later, at about 2:30. and handed 
her a piece of paper with a room number 
written on il “The governor would like to 
meet you up in his room and talk to you in a 
few minutes.” Trooper Ferguson said. 

Mrs. Jones said she bad recognized the 
suggestive flavor of Trooper Ferguson’s 
“knees knock" comment, but reacted to his 
words as a compliment, not a come-cn. She 
said she had no reason to expect what she 
said happened later. 

Trooper Ferguson has refused to be inter- 
viewed about Mrs. Jones's assertions. 

Mrs. Jones said she followed Trooper Fer- 
guson upstairs, and the trooper stayed in the 
hallway. Mr. Clinton met her at the door, she 
said. She felt comfortable when she walked 
in. she said, because the room was furnished 
as a parlor and had no bed. 

After asking her about her job, she said. 
Mr. Clinton took her hand. She said she 


Mrs. Jones said she objected, asking Mr. 
Ginton: "Whai's going ori?" She said he told 
her that he had noticed her downstairs and 
liked the curves of her body and the way her 
black hair flowed down her buck. “I will 
never forget the look on his face." she said. 
“His face was just red. beet red.” 

Mrs. Jones said she walked to the far end 
of a sofa and sat down, averting her eyes. The 
next thing she knew, she said, Mr. Clinton 
had dropped his trousers and underwear and 
was sitting next to her on the couch. Then, 
she said, he asked her to perform oral sex. 

“1 jumped up and 1 said: 'No. I don’t do 
that. I’m not that type of person. I need to be 
going back downstairs, - ” Mrs. Jones re- 
called saving, .As she left, she said. Mr. Gin- 
ton asked her not to mention the episode to 
anyone. 

She said she passed Trooper Ferguson in 
the hallway without speaking, and returned 
to the table where Mrs. Blackard still sal 
downstairs. She estimated she had been gone 
for no more than 15 minute*. 


Away 


From Politics 


■ Woman to File Suit 

Mrs. Jones’s attorney Daniel Traylor, said 
she would file a civil bwsuii on Thursday in 
federal court in Lutle Rock seeking damages 
for “severe emotional distress. ” Reuters re- 
ported. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


. rhood Beats Motherhood 

~~COLVMBVS. Ohio -Joel HyaU. fouader of a 

1*5. mSbi defeating a candidate 

uho asserted that the Senate needed more moth- 
ers. not millionaire lawyers. 


hunting and target shooting. Hie Senate passed a 
similar Dili ’ 


last November as part of its crime bill. 
Despite White House lobbying of members io 
support the ban. both sides agreed that the bill 
remained about 15 voles shy of enough for pas- 
sage. i .V YT ) 


re not millionaire , , 

■•This is mv flist election, and I have already 
ni i e of politics, which is never let 
b . rok “ S " M? Hyall said Wednesday. 


New Twist in the Health Debate 



430.486 

U pen*?‘J? r r RSJh^Awlcgatc, a Columbus 

commissioner. ^ *P^^ t Sor'9 percent \ 
businessman. '■ ero ffour, campaigned on 

Mrs. BoyMhe StateS Senate does not 

dliesTeS are oae of ** 


jrtain dereal WQC " 

V °Tite defeat oftbeMIT^-^^ 

gSKSSssw* 

this month. 


WASHINGTON — Taking a compromise po- 
sition on a central question in the health care 
debate, the American Medical Association said 
that companies with 100 or more employees 
should be required to buy health insurance for 
workers, but that smaller companies should be 
exempt from the requirement. 

James S. Todd, executive vice president of the 
association, reaffirmed the group's commitment 
to health insurance for all Americans, but offered 
a new twist. For several years, the association 
supported an employer mandate, requiring ail em- 
ployers to provide coverage for workers, but in 
December it backed off amid complaints from 
some of its more conservative members. 

Many doctors are small employers. A recent 
survey by Ihc association found that one in three 
doctors’ offices did not provide health insurance 
for employees like nurses, receptionists and lab- 
oratory technicians. 

President Bill Clinton wants to require all em- 
ploy-era to buy health insurance for workers, but 
this idea has encountered fierce opposition from 
many small businesses. Representative John D. 
Dingett. Democrat of Michigan, has proposed 
exempting businesses with 10 or fewer employees. 

(KW 


Appeals Panel, in Reversal, 
Upholds Literary Criticism 


Quote/Unquote 


us month. u n^hibit the manufacture, 

sale or ‘LSSdaltow curro] 1 owners 


■ "EZpoo of 19 typ«j owners 

sg§£2s£s*»* 

more than S 0 ™ 


Former .Vice President Dan Quayle. in his new 
book, “Standing Firm”: ”1 believe ihe executive 
order prohibiting assassination of foreign leaders 
should be .rescinded so that the president would 
have one more option in extraordinary circum- 
stances." .. .. { WP\ 


By Tamar Lewin 

iV«i - Knrfr Tunes Service 
NEW YORK — A three-judge 
federal appeals panel, changing its 
mind about the standard that 
should be applied to determine 
whether literary criticism u. defam- 
atory, threw out an author's libel 
suit against The New York Times. 

The ruling came on a suit 
brought by Dan E. Moldea, author 
of “Interference: How Organized 
Crime Influences Professional 
Football." In a review. The Ne» 
York Times Book Review de- 
scribed the work as "sloppy jour- 
nalism" and, Mr, Moldea charged, 
falsely characterized several pas- 
sages in support of that assessment. 

The decision Tuesday turned on 
the issue or whether opinion writ- 
ing, such as the unfavorable criti- 
cism of Mr. Moldea’s book, should 
be governed by the same legal stan- 
dard as news writing 
In February. Judges Harry T. 
Edwards and Patricia M. Wald 
ruled, with Judge Abner J. Mikva 
dissenting that defamation suit* 
arising out of criticism should be 
analyzed no differently front iho>e 
arising out of news accounts. 

But those same three judges, 
members of the U.S. Circuit Court 
of Appeals for the District of Co- 
lumbia. ruled Tuesday (hat al- 
though book reviews and other 
forms of criticism were not exempt 
from libel law, critics must have 
“the constitutional 'breathing 
space' appropriate to the genre." 
The decision, written by Judge 


Edwards, said the court now be- 
lieved that The Times, in its peti- 
tion for a rehearing, had cited the 
standard that should be applied in 
assessing whether reviewers could 
be sued for libel: that the critic's 
interpretations must he "unsup- 
portable by reference u> the « riiten 

work" being reviewed. 


• A Washington state law that 
bars physician-assisted suicide 
has been ruled uncon&titution- 

■ al on grounds that it deprives 
terminally ill patients of a lib- 
erty guaranteed by the 14th 
Amendment. In deciding a 
suit brought by a group of doc- 
tors and others who help ter- 
minally ill patients commit 
suicide. Judge Barbara J. 
Rothstein of U.S. District 
Conn said, "A competent, ter- 
minally ill adult has a constitu- 
tionally guaranteed right to 
commit physician-assisted sui- 
cide." 

• The Cfinloa administration, 
seeking a compromise between 
environmentalists and ranch- 
ers. is moving a step closer to 
bringing wolves back to Yel- 
lowstone National Park. The 
Interior Department is pro- 
posing an experimental plan 
to reintroduce a small number 
of gray wolves to the park in 
northwestern Wyoming and 
an area of central Idaho. The 
wolves have been absent from 
the park for more than 60 
years. 

• A Michigan man who had las 
ice cream store torched to col- 
lect insurance, blaming the 
blaze on anti-Arab sentiment 
stirred up by the Gulf War. 
has been sentenced to 21 
months in prison. Kareem 
Saba Khoury. 38 and of Pales- 
tinian ancestry, admitted hir- 
ing a former employee to set 
fire to the Dairy Queen in 
Blissfield, in 1991. 

L4T..4P. HYT 


PARI S 


SUMMER PROGRAMS 1994 

May 24-Jane 10 • June 13 - July 22 
June 19-July 9 • July 25-August 12 
More than 50 courses from the University's curriculum, 
offered for credit or non-credit. French language Immer- 
sion programs in Paris and Biamtk. E x cu rsions to historic 
regions of France. 


Make this summer your time. fir . new beginnings. 

Send for our 1994 Summer Programs brochure: 
The American University of Paris - Summer Programs 
34 avenue de New-York - 751 16 Paris 
TeL* (1) 47 20 44 99 / Fax: (1) 47 20 45 64 


THE 


AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 


OF PARIS 


United States they are reducing 
this mutilation by two strokes.” 

In announcing its decision on a 
petition for demency, the Singa- 
pore government said in a state- 
ment that it found no special cir- 
cumstances to justify commuting 
the caning sentence. 

No mention was made of medi- 
cal opinions in the petition from 
several U.S. and Singaporean psy- 
chiatrists that Mr. Fay suffered 
from a long-standing neurological 
condition known as Attention Def- 
icit Hyperactivity Disorder. 

Russell A. Barkley, professor of 
psychiatry and neurology at in the 
University of Massachusetts Medi- 
cal Center, said there was a “grave 
risk” that Mr. Fay would commit 
suicide if he were caned. 

Mr. Clinton appealed for the 
caning sentence to be commuted in 
view of Mr. Fay's youth, his status 
as a first offender and his personal 
circumstances. He made the appeal 
in a letter to Singapore’s president. 
Ong Teng Cheong, who acts on 
government advice in considering 
pleas for clemency. 

The Singapore government said 
that Mr. Clinton had stressed his 
respect for the competence of the 
Singapore judiciary and his belief 
that Americans overseas must re- 
spect the laws of other countries. 

In a speech Wednesday to an 
international conference of lawyers 
in Singapore. Shunmugam Jayaku- 
mar, Singapore's minister of law 
and foreign affairs, defended ihe 
decision lo cany out the caning. 


“If today we are told that we are 
not entitled to cane, then tomorrow 
we will be told that we cannot en- 
force the death penalty and on 
some other day, that we cannot 
enforce some other law,” be said. 

Noting that the vandalism case 
had aroused widespread public in- 
terest in the United Stales, the gov- 
ernment said that rejecting Mr. 
Clinton's appeal totally would 
“show an unhelpful disregard for 
the president and the domestic 
pressures on him on this issue.” 

Therefore, even though the cabi- 
net found no merit in Mr. Fay’s 
petition, the government “sought a 
way lo accommodate President 
Clinton's appeal without compro- 
mising the principle” that persons 
convicted of vandalism in Singa- 
pore must be caned, the official 
statement said. 

Although be pleaded guilty to 
the charges against him, Mr. Fay 
said in a statement he signed on 
Oct 20 after his release from deten- 
tion in Singapore that he had been 
beaten by the police into confessing 
to something be did not do. 

His American lawyer, Theodore 
Simon, said Wednesday in Phila- 
delphia that Mr. Fay had been 
duped into a plea bargain on the 
understanding there would be no 
caning, although the law says can- 
ing upon conviction is compulsory. 

Caning is a form of torture, Mr. 
Simon said. “Singapore will always 
be remembered for this heinous 
act” he added. 


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Ginton said in response to a question 
from a Chinese journalist but it is a 
possibility because China has not met all 
the criteria he set for renewal of China's 
trade benefits. 

“That is dearly an option on the ta- 
ble," Mr. Clinton said, referring io the 
withdrawal of most-favored nation sta- 
tus. “It would be a bod thing " for China, 
he said. 

Mr. Clinton said China had made 
“significant overall progress” in satisfy- 
ing some of his criteria, relating to immi- 
gration and prison labor, but had not 
satisfied all the criteria for renewal. 

The president said he was not idling 
“a great nation like China” how to treat 
its citizens or to conduct internal affairs. 

But he said, “Human rights is very im- 
portant to the United States." and he 
dedared that bis administration was do- 
ing “what I think we must do” to guaran- 
tee respect for those rights in China. 


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(cheo< appropriate boxes): 

d 12 months (364 issues in all with 52 barms issues). 

Q 6 months (182 issues in aU with 26 bonus issues). 

EU 3 months (91 issues in al) with 13 bonus issues). 

My check is enclosed [payable to the International Herald Tribune). 
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HcrulhSSribunc 








Page 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MAY 5, 1994 


It’s a New World for White Farmers 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Past Service 

WEI PE. South Africa — The 
Limpopo River Kommando, a 
paramilitary group of while farm- 
ers who for years fought skir- 
mishes with infiltrating African 
National Congress guerrillas 
along the Zimbabwe border here, 
has made some adjustments for 
the new South Africa. 

For one thing. Piet Esterhuyse 
got rid of the sis bull mastiffs and 
Doberman pinschers that used to 
roam the razor-wire perimeter of 
his farmhouse at night, replacing 

them with an overweight and 

somewhat somnolent family dog 
of questionable ancestry. Then he 
sold the armor-plated pickup 
trucks he used for minesweeping 
drives every morning over the dirt 
roads that cross his farm, which is 
just 300 yards from the border. 

As apartheid collapsed and 
Nelson Mandela began negotiat- 
ing a peaceful transfer of power 
to a black-led government. Mr. 
Esterhuyse put away the Israeli- 
made Uzi submachine gun that 
he bad kept constantly by his 
side, and his children began trav- 
eling to their school in Messina. 
45 miles to the east, without a 
military escort 

But the biggest adjustment 
may have come in the lead-up to 
South Africa's first all-race elec- 
tion. Instead of resisting, Mr. Es- 
terhuyse and his neighbors orga- 
nized a voter educauon day for 
their black workers and invited 
ANC canvassers to come to the 
farm to speak, along with cam- 
paign workers from the governing 
National Party. 

"1 don't think six years ago J 
ever thought I’d be inviting the 


ANC to my farm to canvass my 
laborers for an election," he told 
an American visitor, with whom 
he Iasi talked in June 1 988. short- 
ly after five ANC infiltrators at- 
tacked the house of another white 
farmer nearby with rocket-pro- 
pelled grenades and I hen escaped 
back into Zimbabwe. 

Even the ANC election cam- 
paigning in this heartland of 
white conservatism, viewed in the 
context of the dizzying speed with 
which South Africa is being 
transformed to a democracy did 


f Well, the world 
has got to change, 
and you have to 
go with it.’ 

Piet Esterhuyse, while 
South African farmer. 


not seem too extraordinary to 
most white fanners in the Limpo- 
po Valley, Mr. Esterhuyse said. 

After all, only two weeks earli- 
er. Joe Modise, the longtime com- 
mander-! n-exile of the ANCs 
Spear of the Nation guerrilla 
force, made a campaign appear- 
ance in Messina, not far from 
where he used to dispatch his 
fighters Tor terror raids against 
white farmers. 

Mr. Modise was accompanied 
by Mlhetheldi Ncube and Mzon- 
deldi Nondula. two former ANC 
guerrillas who in 1989 were sen- 
tenced in a Messina court to be 
hanged after being convicted of 
planting land mines on this side 
of the 175-mile border with Zim- 
babwe, the former Rhodesia. Mr. 


Ncube and Mr. Nondula were 
released under a 1992 amnesty. 

"Well, the world has got to 
change, and whether you like ii or 
not, if you commit yourself to 
change, you have to go with it” 
said Mr. Esterhuyse, who owns 
500 acres of irrigated land, em- 
ploys 300 black laborers and de- 
scribes himself as a pragmatic 
businessman and not a politician. 
“It's the only solution.” 

“A lot of people around here 
are from Rhodesia and have been 
through the war there,” said Mr. 
Esterhuyse, who grew up in the 
northern Transvaal. "They saw 
that after the changes there you 
still had to go on living. You have 
to look after yourself.' 1 

The 41-vear-old fanner and his 
wife, Bee/who have six children, 
made no attempt to mask their 
lack of enthusiasm for a black- 
majority govern menL 

“Frankly. 1 can't see us under a 
government like that ” he said. 
"If you look all over Africa, 
there's been an economic mess 
when this has happened. But 
then, things weren't right in 
South Africa either, so you 
couldn’t have done otherwise.” 

His resignation is a reflection 
of the mood or many white South 
Africans who have too large a 
financial stoke here to consider 
leaving and are relying heavily on 
what they perceive to be the mu- 
tual dependency of blacks and 
whites to allow them to stay and 
prosper after the remarkable 
transfer of power that is taking 
place. 

They may long for the white 
minis line that is promised by the 
rightist campaign signs that 
abound in this region, but most of 


them have grudgingjy accepted 
the reality that that is not what 
they are going to get. 

"There's no use being scared of 
a black government.” he said. 
"We have to work with each oth- 
er. and 1 ihink the most impor- 
tant things for this new govern- 
ment are establishing law and 
order and assuring economic sta- 
bility.” 

Mr. Esterhuyse. who said he 
paid his black farm laborers the 
equivalent of S60 to SI 50 a month 
and his stilled workers about 
S300. acknowledged that it would 
only be natural for a new black- 
led" government to seek higher 
wages and an improved standard 
of living for the black majority. 

“I can live with that.” he said. 
"If the work attitude is right, their 
wages can also go up. But ir peo- 
ple come and demand more pay 
Tor no more performance, well, 
that's anoLher thing." 

“What I worry about is that 
their expectations may be too 
high,” he added. "They may 
think that right after the election 
money is going to fall like rain. 1 
think even Mandela is trying to 
tell them now that they have to be 
more realistic.” 

Avraham Luruli. an ANC elec- 
tion coordinator in Messina, said 
he had detected a gradual shift in 
attitudes among whites in the 
northern Transvaal after a wave 
of panic in which many whiles 
stockpiled food and ammunition 
for what they feared would be a 
backlash of retribution and score- 
settling by blacks. 

"There seems to be an under- 
standing between blacks and 
whites,” he said. “They may not 
like what is happening, but they 
are learning to accept it." , 


C’si S ;iv~ i 


Vast Fraud 


UN Won 9 t Succeed, Rwandan Rebels Say 


Reuters 

RUSOMO. Rwanda — The 
commander of Rwanda's rebel 
forces said Wednesday that a Unit- 
ed Nations force would fail to bring 
peace to Rwanda. The only way to 
stop the massacres was a guerrilla 
victory, he added 

On a lour of areas captured by in 
a monthlong rebel offensive. Major 
General Paul Kagame, head of the 
Rwanda Patriotic Front said rebel 
forces were intent on saving inno- 
cent civilians from mass slaughter. 

“Our priority is to pacify as 
much of the country as we can.” he 
said at a press conference near the 


Tanzanian border. “We will keep a 
tight grip on Kigali, but our priori- 
ty is to try and save as many people 
as possible throughout the coun- 
try.” Kigali is the capitaL 


Asked about UN proposals for a 
strong international force to inter- 
vene in Rwanda to stop the blood- 
bath. General Kagame said: 


“Outside forces do not solve 
problems we have in Africa. They 
come in with little understanding 
of the si tualion or they take sides in 
the conflict.” Ultimate victory by 
the Patriotic Front "is the best so- 
lution for this country.” he added. 


He said he believed powers push- 
ing for such a force wanted to pre- 
vent the rebels from emerging as 
the clear winner. 

“Specifically, 1 talk about the 
French, who want to influence 
things to the benefit of the rem- 
nants of the regime.” 

The Patriotic Front accuses 
France of supporting the govern- 
ment of President JuvtnaJ Habyar- 
imana, whose tilling in a rocket 
attack on his plane on April 6 trig- 
gered the massacres. An interim 
government from the Hutu major- 
ity took over in Kigali. 

The rebel front is dominated by 


the Tutsi minority, which witnesses 


By Kenneth B. Noble 

New York Times Service 

DURBAN. South Africa — Un- 
certainty surrounded the outcome 

of elections in the volatile Zulu 
heartland of Natal on Wednesday, 
with new vote totals showing a very 
close race between the African Na- 
tional Congress and its adversary, 
the Inkatha Freedom Party. 

Even though the polls dosed five 
davs before, the battle for control 
of South Africa's most fiercely con- 
tested province intensified as offi- 
cials of the ANC and Inkatha ac- 
cused each other of across-the- 
board cheating and vote rigging. 

Siiil-incompiete returns showed 
Inkatha slightly ahead of the ANC. 
43 percent to 38 percent, in count- 
ing for the Natal provincial legisla- 
ture. 

“We believe Inkatha had its own 
pirate polling stations. 54 of them." 
said Ronnie Mamoepa, an ANC 
spokesman. Other alleged irregu- 
larities in voting ranged from tam- 
pering with the plastic seals used to 
close ballot boxes to chasing moni- 
tors from polling stations to intimi- 
dating people casting ballots. 

The Inkatha leader. Chief Man- 
gosuthu Buthelezi. described the 
accusations as “quite extraordi- 
nary.” 

Speaking in Ulundi, the capital 
of Lhe soon-lo-be defunct home- 
land of KwaZulu. Chier Buthelezi 
reacted indignantly, saying the alle- 
gations were made because “we are 
whipping the ANC' in Natal, a 
region of 6 million people. 

.Another senior Inkatha official. 
Them ba Khoza. said in Johannes- 
burg that the elections had not 
been free and fair. “We were 
robbed.” he said. 

It was difficult to assess the vari- 




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Palestinians in Jericho expresing their feelings after they heard that the accord hadtiee^ l^ ; 


and aid workers say has taken the ous cha rees. Members of the Inde- 
brunt of the campaign of mass pendent Electoral Commission, 


• ,j _\ •_ . i 

Main Points of Gaza-Jericho P<m : 




slaughter by government forces. w hile expressing concern, said they 
Hutu militiamen and mobs. were nol p^^ded that these inci- 

GeneraJ Kageme was speaking in dents, taken together, constituted 
the border lown of Rusorao, where proof of systematic election fraud. 


more than 250.000 refugees, mainly At the same time, however, Jo- 


Huiu. flooded into northwest Tan- hann Kriegier, the chairman of the 
zania within 24 hours last week, electoral commission, said that 


fleeing the advancing rebels computer sabotage was pan of the 

reason for delays in the ballot 
Asked about rebel refusal to counting. But Mr. Kriegier insisted 
meet members of the government that the incident had made “a verv 


REPRIMAND: New 


Continued from Page 1 


Japanese actions before and during World War 
II, and to apologize to the victims. 

The message Mr. Hata delivered Wednesday 
was that it was no longer acceptable for officials 
to deny Japan’s war crimes. 

For decades, rightist nationalists in Japan 
have defended or simply denied Japan's brutal 
colonization of East Asia. Their argument, in 
part, is that Japan's thrust into Asia was not an 
aggr es s ive war but actually a war of liberation 
designed to free Asian natrons from control by 
Westera powers. Hie nationalists, faced with 
historical evidence of Japanese brutality, have 
said the photographs and interviews were 
faked. 

The idea that Japan was not an aggressor is a 
minority view here. Bat it was at least respect- 
able enough to be espoused by some lawmakers 
in the Liberal Democratic Party, which con- 
trolled the government until last'summer. 

Indeed, the new justice minister expressed 
such views himself when be was a Liberal Dem- 
ocrat- Ip those days, there were no rebukes From 
the political leaders to people who made such 
remarks. 

But Mr. Hosokawa. Mr. Hala and most 


. Ultimate victory by government from the Hutu major- in Tanzania since Tuesday. Gener- trivial difference” on overall trends 
: Front "is the best so- ity took over in Kigali. al Kageme said it made no sense to in election results, 

us country.” he added. The rebel front is dominated by agree to talk peace with them. The contest in NataJ is being 

- - - - - closely watched because the prov- 

ince is believed to have been the 

on the Job « a Japanese Aide Opens an Old Wound political killings in the Iasi decade' 

. A victory by Inkatha. which has 

members of their centrist coalition have Japanese Imperial Array killed, tortured and its strongest following in NataJ. 


members of their centrist coalition have 
changed Japan’s official stance toward the war. 

Emperor AJrihito is scheduled to visit the 
Pearl Harbor memorial in Honolulu this sum- 
mer and apologize to Americans for the attack. 
Japan's political leadership controls the emper- 
or's travel. It is unlikely that this visit would 
have been permitted if the Liberal Democrats 
still governed Japan. 

The statement Mr. Hata issued Wednesday is 
characteristic of the new tone. 

"Our nation's actions, including aggression 
and colonial rule, caused unbearable suffering 
and sorrow,” the prime minister said. “All of 
us, one by one, must see this history as it is and 
share a joint determination that it shall not 
happen again.” 

Mr. Hata said he wanted to question his 
justice minister further about his view chi the 
Nanking massacre. "In any case ” he said, “the 
statement ‘the Nanking massacre is fiction' is 
improper” 

Japan invaded mainland China in the 1930s. 
hoping to bring the largest .Asian nation into 
the “Greater East-Asian Co-Prosperily 
Sphere.” Inculcated with the belief that the 
Japanese were superior to all other people*, the 


enslaved large numbers of Chinese whenever 
they gained a foothold. 

When Nanking, the great southern commer- 
cial center, fell to the Japanese in December 
1937, the army went on a rampage. The Tokvo 
War Crime* Tribunal found that 150.000 Chi- 
nese were murdered, and that tens of thousands 
were raped and tortured. Chinese estimates say 
that 300,000 were killed. 

The carnage can be seen on newsTeei film, 
and some of the footage was used in the movie 
"The Last Emperor" to demonstrate Japanese 
brutality. 

Mr. Nagano told the Mainichi newspaper 
that he thought lhe massacre was a fiction 
because he was dispa tribed there as a soldier 
“right after Nanking fell.” 

In fact, Mr. Nagano did not arrive in Nan- 
king until three and a half years after the 
massacre. 

In the statement issued after Mr. Hata re- 
proached him, Mr. Nagano said he meant to 
say: “From my personal experience. I could not 
believe that what had been reported, a mass 
genocide of 300.000, had occurred. But I had no . 
intention of denying the historical facts.” 


its strongest following in NataJ. 
would probably go a long way to- 
ward defusing many of the tensions 
in the region. 

Vote-counting has been a very- 
slow and tedious affair and is stDJ 
far from complele. In the national 
vote, the returns so far give the 
ANC a solid 62.5 percent of the 
vole and the National Party 211 
percent, with Inkatha in third place 
with 8.3 percent. 

In the counting for the nine pro- 
vincial legislatures, the ANC is 
ahead in seven, with the National 
Party ahead in the western Cape 
and Inkatha slightly ahead in Na- 
tal. 


M ashtngron Post Service 

Following are some of the main points in the Gaza- 
Jericho accord signed Wednesday m Cairo: 

• The new 24-member Palestinian Authority, 
chaired by the PLO chairman. Yasser Arafat, will 
assume authority in most civilian affairs. 

• Jurisdiction of the Palestinian Authority will 
cover a 62-square- kilometer area (about 24 square 
miles) around the West Bank town of Jericho and 
the Gaza Strip except for Jewish settlements there, 
main roads leading to those settlements, and Israe- 
li military installations. 

• A 9.000-member Palestinian police force wij] 
provide securin’ in the autonomous areas. Of 
these, 7,000 will come from outside the territories 
and 2,000 others will be recruited from within. 

• Israeli troop withdrawal is to be completed 
within three weeks from the signing of the agree- 
ment 

• A Joint Civil Affairs Coordination and Coop- 
eration Committee and two Joint Regional Civil 
Affairs Subcommittees, one for the Gaza Strip and 
the other for the Jericho area, are to be established 
to coordinate and cooperate in civil affairs be- 
tween the Palestinian Authority and Israel. 

• Legislation passed by the Palestinian Author- 
ity is to be communicated to a legislation sub- 
committee of the Joint Civil Affairs Coordination 
and Cooperation Committee for review. 

• If the subcommittee is unable to reach a deci- 
sion, the legislation will be referred the Joint Israe- 
li-Palestinian Liaison Committee set up under the 
Declaration of Principles signed in Washington 
last September. 

• Laws and military orders in effect in the Gaza 


Strip or Jericho area prior to tbe agra^ltf^ ' 
agreement shall remain in force, anless^potfgii - 
or abrogated by the agreement. 

• Israel will continue to have respbtijffiiBfidijr • 
defense against external threats and for-theowh! 
security of Israelis and Israeli settlements;::-" 

• Israel and the Palestinian Authority shifted 7 

to foster mutual understanding and ioferaflceW 
shall accordingly abstain from incitement, iudaf 
ing hostile propaganda, against each other.aod, -- 
without violating freedom of expresaon. shfllltAe 
legal measures to prevent such indtemeat by.iny 
organizations, groups or individuals within their 
jurisdiction. > 

• Both sides shall take all measures necessaiyio 
prevent acts of terrorism, crime and ho^er- 
directed against each other ... and- lake -legal- 
measures against offenders. 

• Both sides agree to a temporary iniernatibal : 

or foreign presence of observers in the PNA tori- 
toiy. which shall consist of 400 qualified penonnd J 
from 5 or 6 donor countries and be funded k 
them. ’ J 

• The Palestinian authority will control wis 
resources in Gaza and Jericho in principle, bat 
Israel will continue to pump water in the two area 

• Israel reserves the right to arrest and prosemtt 
all Israelis in the au tonomous zones. Except 'for 
certain cases, Palestinians and third-country na- 
tionals will be under Palestinian legal authority 

• The Palestinian Authority can print postage 
stamps, have an international telephone code and 
allocated frequencies for radio and television 
transmissions, and issue Palestinian residents trav- 
el papers, good Tor three years, which will sij 
“laissez-passer” and “passport” 


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FAMILY: Exhausted by War , Palestinians in Gaza Are Wary of Peace Air \ 

^ Continued from Page! vocabulary of the courtyard, where they remain. Watching on television as Mr. ™ ^*tTITL DE 


LUFTHANSA: Airline for Sale VOTE: Buoyed Above Self-Doubt 


Continued from Page I 

Jericho papers being signed by 
Yasser Arafat the PLO chairman, 
and Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
of Israel, the cycle of the conflict 
had not ended." 

When a reporter visited them Iasi 
Tall, they were awaiting the return 
of their eldest son. Moen, 34. whom 


Continued from Page 1 

tion to offset its costs of the pen- 
sion plan. 

The first step in the govern- 
ment's plan to divest the airGne will 
occur later this year, when it will 
not subscribe to a planned capital 
increase in which Lufthansa hopes 
to raise more than I billion DM by 
offering new- shares. That absten- 
tion will dilute the government's 
stake to less than 5U percent. From 
there, it will sell it* share* in staecs. 
Mr. Waigel said. 

"The federal government i«, 
opening up for Lufthansa e\cr\ 
chance after the difficult and mon- 
ey-losing years of maintaining it- 
self as a global player in interna- 
tional competition.” Mr. Waigel 
said in joint statement with the 
country'* transport minister. 

Analysts agreed that the plan 
could mark die start of better time* 
for Lufthansa, especially after the 

good news the airline received from 
the U.S. government last week in 
the form of approval of it* code- 


sharing agreement with United 
Airlines. The agreement allows 
both airlines to coordinate flight 
reserva lions to channel passengers 
onto connecting flights with the 
other airline. 


Continued from Page 1 


J Israel deported in 1991. accusing 

perhaps because the fiasco seemed a leader in El Fatah. 


crises — homeland coups, a turn 50 much e,6e of South .African ^ P V°i 

battle in the business district, frat- We - no one on ‘he failings as Liltal ‘K 

nridai nniiiirai uiniMm . ,.r an excuse in walk mu Moen worked for a while at the 


riridal political violence, a state of 311 escuse <o walk our. 
emergency, an expose of police s “"P i ? Terreblancl 


Bui the analysis .said more details ^trociues, car bombs — and that is 
on the timing of the government sale i UM ^ ,asl six weeks. 


Sample Terreblanche. an eco PL0 , in Tunis. Re- 

nomic historian at University of was aD10n S {Wi* than 


intense images and vocabulary of 
Palestinian nationalism. 

“The blood of the Fatah Hawks 
has not dried yet,” said Moen, 
mourning the death of one of his 
friends who was among a group of 
six Fatah fighters killed by Israeli 
troops last month in an incident 
that Israel has said was a mistake. 
The killing look place in Jabaliya 
as the Fatah patrol, some of whom 
were armed, were passing out leaf- 
lets in support of the peace process. 

”! really believe the six killed 
were the last victims of the Pales- 
tinian struggle,” he said. “The 


the courtyard, where they remain. Watching on television as. Mr. 
Back then, he said he would mea- Arafat and Mr. Rtjbiir weal 
sure the peace by the absence of through the final signing, Motan- 
conflict, and on Wednesday he med said: “They hadnochcwsb® 
seemed to be still waiting for' nor- to be partners.- It’s Bka two fricofe 


Stellenbosch, said the real expiana- ™ de P pne « fugitives who 
tion for South .Africa - * endurance r* v f relunied lo Gaza, sanctioned 


were needed before the* could judge Casting hindsight further back. u f on for So . u,h Africa'* endurance . fcrSl « Mrt 

the plan's potential impact on share across massacres and withering of , 50 " 1u J ch was ihai the J* JJ srad 85 of lhe JC_ 

prices. Lufthansa shares dosed at ^ rou Sh lai 'd20 vears of stead veco- fibers % had an impoverished black 

219.80 DM Tuesdav and were sus- nomic decline and the crudites of ^J 0111 ? 10 ™ it for them. oui the parents excitement at 


150 deportees and fugitives who will now be switched to 

r..... j legitimate nolitical stnir>pl^ ” 


legitimate political struggle." 

Beyond the Msalam house, the 
streets of Jabaliya had one distinc- 
tive feature Wednesday: the Israeli 
Army was gone. According to mili- 
tary officials, the Israelis have 
started moving out of the refugee 
districts into new- positions protect- 
ing Jewish settlers in Gaza. The 
soldiers have also been given orders 
Tor a “new concept” of their role: lo 
defend the block of settlement*, 
rather than patrol the narrow alley- 
ways of the refugee districts and 
towns. 

Mohammed Msalam. a W>-year- 
old gardener, joined his son in (he 
shade. In September, he had strung 
up small Palestinian flags across 


pended Wednesday! 

“1 1 could well be tricky persuad- 
ing investors to buy new shares 
w'hen the government could offload 
old stock without warning." an ana- 
lyst at a Munich bank said. “What is 
needed is some form of commitment 


apartheid itself, what reason was 
there to sus peel that South Africa 
not only would muddle this far on 
iu feet, but also would emerge from 
white rule with an eleeance of spir- 
it? 

One possible explanation is that 


majority to bear it for them. B ul *be parents' excitement at 

“The worst knocks — the poser- !“ return was tempered the night 
ty. criminaliiv in the towTiships. the ch that Israeli soldiers 


violence — were shifted io ihe ovcr cinder-block w'ali 

poorest of the black population ” arT “ ,ed their other son. Rafik. 

1 ■ i ■ ■ ' * * In lllii Ia.\L 1 > ■ ivt ■ iL.. L* “ . . 


— ,viui VI VVIIUIUIIIKIH _ _ — — - 

from the government or indication a P arlh ^ d gave South Afri- 


of its planL" ” cans, those who benefited from it country had put up with vn much , u,csu " D ya mosesmi! wati ofblan- 

While Mr. Waigel said the gov- those opposed, a useful ability out of 'fatigue and an innate pra-- S**- sm ? k l f d r and 


he said, a luxury the counirv can no ^ look him to the Ketziot 
longer gel away with. . ,n the Negev, where he is 

Bafana Khumalo. a critic at the SU 0l ^ 

Weekly Mail newspaper, said the .Outstde the houst shielded from 
country had out un with in mti.-h tiiesuH by a makeshift wall of blan- 


— — juju uib - , ■ - t t a , , — - — — vui vi iiiugm. diiu oji mnau: nrj**- . ■ rr . , o •* — — 

emmem could raise about 150 mil- 1 j hve theumhinkable and matism. Blacks, he said, are loo dra ?)L'i£ rree Wl,h fnends perched 


lion DM this year with the sale of adap ‘ lo liie im P erfe,:L 


Lufthansa shares, it remained un- election, for example, was a 


viuviiw. 1 1 \, auu, urc lOO i i m 

tired for revenge, and realize it will ™ from ors 

i_.: , . „ and vans. The friends MeneH uiih 


dear when the government would clumsy improvisation, so riddled 


sell its entire stake. with irregularities that the electoral 

(Reuters, AP. AFP. Bloomberg commission threw awav the rule- 
1 hook to validate the outcome. 


iicralh^Sc^ribunc 

i’Md«Arwuw^w. M n. n t—ji i h i 

LIVING m THE U.S.? 
Now Primed in 
New 1)rk 
for Same Day 

DELIVERY IN KEY CITIES 

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But here, perhaps because the 
overall winner was never in doubt 
and mas! parties are assured a seat 
in the new- government anyway, or 


not restore slain relatives and bull- 
dozed houses anyway. 

“The reason there hasn't been 
much of a call for Nuremberg tri- 
als, I suppose, is that nobody rcollv 
w-ams to go through all that aeain,” 
he said. 


and vans. The friends listened with 
respeci to his words, laced with 


malcy. 

“When the street will see Pales- 
tinian police, and no more Israeli 
soldiers, then there will be change,” 
he said. “We are going to get rid of 
the Israeli Array, get rid of the 
suffering and the pain.” 

“Israel wants to gel rid of the 
Gaza Strip forever ” said Moham- 
med, who fled to Gaza after the 
1948 war. He said his one regret 
about the Gaza-Jericho arrange- 
ment was that it appeared to close 
the door further on the hopes of the 
1948 refugees, some of whom still 
warn to return, or get compensa- 
tion for the lands they lost. 

“Israel got more benefits out of 
this than the Palestinians." he said. 
“They goi the land* of 1948 that 
they established the state on.” 


to be partner* It's Eke two front 
with a heavy sadk-of 'sadL One of 
them alone cannot cany if across 
the road But if iheyatoMjj* 
can cross. Rabin and Arafat 
never have succeed^; h 
peace alone.” ’ 7;_ • 

Mohammed Msala nr said he ^ 
not among those wbq=v( 0 nted 
Gaza wrili break dowtfwP 
non-style sectariari ; a«^ . 1 f r - 
does be share the feats 
Arafat win forsake danpera?- “f 
fully expects Mr. 
strong hand at the oeJSf . 

“Of coarse, Palcstiffir^^^ 
be a democratic 
“But when the autcMnystats. 
Pales tinians need a 
strong authority. 
mocracy from the first r* 

I _ - 1 ■ . . -«1 #_!1 «* *- 


ATI 


Israelis will also reap peace from whole thing will faiL 


the accord, he said. 

“Israel is going to get an end to 
the shooting of Israelis," he said. 
“And its borders with Gaza will be 
safe. The Israeli people were wor- 
ried about their existence in Israel, 
and now they will have nothing to 
wony abouL They will be safe in 
their place.” 


“We have been living 
years under otxspation* 
people have been vioJed 1**®“ 
“To change this people 

lence to democracy ahcpM 
strong authority. For 


seven years, the 

i. - rlbl/TL 


used to anarchy. and- 
want to end it" -- v. 


ACCORD: In Cairo , Brief Glitch and Then a True Beginning’ for Peace 

fl Mtrif l«*l f mW l mm, Hi, - ■ 1 . - ^ ■ 1 

of many Israeli rightists, who hoped to 


he said.' Continued from Page I 

self on u hip cynicism ^ha inlands b^lowed^asTl^ 1 ° f ‘ hC n 0Cumwnu wil1 
up well to national euphoria, has Ie 8 K,au ? n - collect taxes and 


Mexican Police 
Hold Tijuana Aide 


up well to national euphoria, has 
found his attitude hard lo hold. 

First, he told rriends he would 
not vote at all because he hated 


issue a travel document lhat will contain ihe 
word “passport.” 


new era. not without risks, not without con- 
reros, not without butterflies in the stomach. 

we . .. 3 ti-emendous step ha* been 

achieved. 


a greater Israel beyond its pie-1967 
And it has angered the Islamic militant gjw 


ft ffthiagm Post Stance 

MEXICO CITY' - Federal po- 
Jice have arrested a hiah-rankins 
law-enforcement of f.aahn tire bor- 
der siate of Baja California in con- 
nection with a major narcotics-iraf- 
ficking operation and possiblv the 
assassination Iasi week of the po- 
lice chief of Tijuana, 


not vote at all because he hated The travel document, however, will also eon- 
standing in line. Then he happened tain . lh e term "laissez-passer.” which » often 
upon a polling place with no line. ,0 describe the travel papers or those who 
so he voted, but insisted he Felt no do n01 havc Papons. 


«J*d by Mr. Rahin. “We 

! much lr ?P ida,ion 'bat the two 
peoples rould live on a uny patch or land, each 

" s “ UK P r, 'P h « aii' 


thrill of democratic sentiment. A joint Isracli-Palestinian committee will ap- 

On Sunday, he switched on the prove all laws and the Israelis will retain control 
television and heard the returns of Gaza's Jewish settlements. Israel will he 


The aoofd docs not call for ihccreaiion of a 
Palestinian state, and Mr. Arafat carefully 
avoided mentioning the establishment of □ sure 


rrom the Western Cape, the one permitted ,o more troops .nW £ in his remark, S^SSkSSSSi^ 
nrmnnee whnre Mr .ir iri^ri v v-. nmc-lmh* i , . full. : mvoi>ta m tnc 


province where Mr. dc Klerk's Na- ^ the eveni of the outbreak or general xaIks - including manv Israelis .said the 
Uonal Partv was wmnine. hostiliucs nr imminpni ihwt u meni mnlrt 1 ,-ict . me agree- 


The rederal attonwv- general. 
Diego Valadez, said he had ordered 
the arrest of Baja California's dep- 


tional Party was winning. hostilities or imminent threat of such hostil- 

"All I saw was this tally showing ities." 

Uie ANC getting pulverized by the Mr. .Arafat will he called “chairman” of the 
•Sj?? - hc Palestinian Authority governing Gaza and Jcri- 

i didn t understand, and the TV cho. rather than "president." Although the size 
dtdn t explain. I said. ‘Oh God. of Jericho has not been determined. Israel 
here we go again, ii really freaked nused in 62 square kilometers (24 square miles! 
me out. I spent the day glued to the tbe amount of land it would cede to ih? Pui^. 


mem could lead to the creation of an indeoen- 
dent state following the three-year interim^En- 
od, when the final status of the West Bank and 
Gaza will be negotiated. 


And it has angered the Islamic militant gn*! 
Hamas, which opposes the peace jdan. . ^ . 

Syna and hard-line Palestinian groups to#" 
in Damascus condemned the acoad. 

cial Syrian daily Ath Thawra.said Syn^*' 
lieved “such separate and partial 
would put obstacles in the. way fff a jusf 
comprehensive peace.” 

_ Mr. Rabin, who aim ed most of his retnafl*^ 
his Israeli television audience, caUcdtheJS*®" 
ment “a very daring prqect.” . 

“A century or bloodshed has forgpd in # ! 
core of mutual enmity,” he said. ~ . 

“Today we are extending a hand in pc** 
he said. 


. loday our relations so we 


Mr. Rabin concluded with an it 


utv aitornev general. Serrio 55 “‘.m T * 111 'be day glued to the *be amount of land it would cede to the Pales- 

Lora. as oari i5f an onaftin? 77 “"i* 1 , .? aw ,he ANC getting Oman*, an increase from 54 suuarc kilometers. 


Lara, as pari of on ongoing corrup- 
tion investigation among police of- 
ficials in Tijuana. 


I ‘ .. Inc aal getting unions, an increase from 54 square kilometers 

“rSht, r “J ,s a hisl " nc day” said Mr. Rabins 

Only then was it safe to go back spokesperson. Gad Bcn-Ari. “No question that 

lo being cvmcal. today, after the signing, we are emharking on a 


wiHmake borders 

The agreement will bring io a close Mr 
Arafat s nearly three decades of exile, alinwins 
Jura to return within a month. It will transform 
bimfrom a guerrilla leader, who often lived m 
secrecy, lo a civil admmiMratnr. 

Bui the signing also appears to end ihe dream 


^1 for reconciliation. “In the alleys dJrZ 
Tunis and in the streets of Raroat 
houses of Gaza, in the town square of 
Rafiah and Afula," Mr. Rabin said. 
there is a birth of a new reality- One.h^^S 
years of Palestinian-lsradi conflict 
over. Millions of people look to us in 


of leading normal lives.” 



liters* 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY. MAY 5. 1991 


Page 5 


O 



ADVERTISEMENT 






Founded in 1964 by Dr. Waiter Leibrecht, who 
continues to serve as president, Schiller International 

University has taken a global approach to education 
fan its inception t Today , ; it attracts students from 130 
oountries to its 10 campuses in six countries, offering 
a truly international education that prepares them for 
a global marketplace and a global future 


SCHILLER 


M- 

,$&■ 

•pi; .. 


NTERNATONAL 


UN VERS 



i n i 

J. t r 






■ • •'. ■ • w-:. • . P : ' : 


Thirty Years of Education 

F 









,. ..f. >Mav>. -J\ . • • «• '72-.' ~ : . I 


*♦ «' L. \ /■ ■!>*** ** 


. . . > •;iy, »'.., • ■ ■» 


^ student at Schiller 

International 
University might 
start out at the 
English Language Institute 
at Wickham Court, perfect- 
ing his or her English and 
gradually taking on addi- 
tional courses as proficiency 
improves. The next year 
might find this student in 
Heidelberg, continuing stud- 
ies in international business, 
with additional German cul- 
tural enrichment. In order to 
get closer to the heart of the 
European Parliament, the 
next stop might be Stras- 


bourg, with the final year in 
the high-powered business 
atmosphere of London to 
complete work on a Bache- 
lor of Arts degree in interna- 
tional business before going 


majority of undergraduate 
students spend at least one 
term at a second campus; 
many go to three or four." 

Says the university's pres- 
ident. Dr. Walter Leibrecht: 


‘We are not culture-bound in any sense ’ 


on for a Master of Arts de- 
gree in international rela- 
tions and diplomacy. 

“Not only is this possible, 
this is what students at 
Schiller actually do,” says 
Cathy Eberhan, vice presi- 
dent ibr academic affairs. “A 


min 





Johann Christoph Friedrich von 
SchSler (1759-1805}. 


An Aptitude 
For Innovation 


“Schiller has a niche filled 
by very few institutions: 
providing a truly interna- 
tional education, not just a 
few courses here and there. 
All courses, with very few 
exceptions, contain an inter- 
national aspect We are not 
culture-bound in any. sense.” 

The Heidelberg campus is 
spread over three buildings: 
the Villa Manesse. which 
houses administrative of- 
fices and undergraduate 
classes, with the Collegium 
Pal atinum language institute 
in an adjacent building: the 
German-American Institute, 
with its library, lectures and 
cultural events across the 
street; and the Palais 
Friedrich, which houses 
g ra d uat e programs and dor- 
mitories. 

In Strasbourg, students 
and faculty study and live 
together in the landmark 
Chateau de Pourtales, one of 
the smallest SR) campuses, 
with students from 19 na- 
tions. An additional 40 
MBA students are mostly 
professionals from the 
greater Strasbourg area. His- 
torically a feeder campus for 
Heidelberg and London, 
Strasbourg is developing its 
own identity, with a four- 
year BBA program in inter- 
national business and the 


first two years of hotel man- 
agement. 

The London campus at 
Royal Waterloo House is 
SIU’s largest, with students 
from 80 countries. Most are 
studying for international re- 
lations and diplomacy and 
international business de- 
grees, but hotel management 
is also strong. TTiere is a 
trend toward combining 
business with another field, 
such as engineering manage- 
ment or computer manage- 
ment. Programs unique to 
the London campus are pre- 
ened, pre-engineering and 
commercial art 

SIU's second Greater 
London residential campus 
is located in the 15th-centu- 
ry mansion of Wickham 
Court near Croydon. Here, 
students complete their first 
two years of preparatory 
work before transferring to 
another Schiller campus, or 
follow intensive English in- 
struction at the English Lan- 
guage Institute. 

Non-residential campuses 
occupy modern buildings in 
the hearts of Paris and 
Madrid. Paris remains a 
great favorite of Americans, 
who comprise about 40 per- 
cent of the student body. In 
addition to the regular full- 
time program, SIU Paris of- 
fers a part-time executive 
MBA program instituted last 
year. The business adminis- 
tration and international re- 
lations and diplomacy pro- 
grams claim the largest 
number of undergraduates. 
Madrid is the only large 
Schiller campus where na- 
tionals comprise a majority 


mmMamm 




-gi 

• *^1 *4 




!*j mm 

££.i! ' n i 



llgs 


Clockwise from top left of page: students at West Wickhan; American College of Switzerland campus; Honda campus; the library at Hei- 
defberg; computer lab at the Madrid campus. 


of the students: 61 percent. 
More Spanish students be- 
gan to realize the importance 
of an international education 
in 19S7. after Spain joined 
the European Community. 
The strongest field is inter- 
national business, followed 
by international relations 


and diplomacy. SIU's two 
specialized campuses are 
Berlin and Engelberg, 
Switzerland. Berlin concen- 
trates on preparation for the 
MBA degree. The Engel- 
berg campus is comprised of 
two working hotels, which 
offer its hotel management 


majors invaluable hands-on 
experience. 

The new members of the 
Schiller University network 
are the American College of 
Switzerland in Leysin and 
the Florida campus in the 
Tampa area. While the 
largest block of students at 


the Florida campus is Amer- 
ican, they comprise only 
one-sixth of the students, 
who come from 41 coun- 
tries. In addition to interna- 
tional business and interna- 
tional relations, Florida of- 
fers a degree in hotel and 
tourism management. 


Founded as an American university for the children 
of Americans living in Europe or for American students 
wanting to spend a year abroad, Schiller soon attracted 
young men and women from other nations who appre- 
ciated the flexibility, practicality and personalized at- 
tention of the American educational system. 

To its first location in a 16th-century castle, fnger- 
sheira were added, in 1968, campuses in Paris and 
Madrid One year later, the Ingersheim campus was 
transferred to Heidelberg. A cooperative agreement 
was signed in 1969 with the State University of New 
York to send groups of students to Schiller for one or 
more terms. This is the oldest of several cooperative 

study programs with American universities. 

In' 1970, SIU opened a campus m London, followed 
m 1973 bv a residential campus in Strasbourg. Schiller 
launched an MBA program at its London campus in 
1977 The next year, SIU London acquired Wickham 
' wh ich became another residential campus. In 
mTthe main London campus moved to Royal Water- 
i urvIL in Central London, which was purchased by 
loo House c tu]]e r also acquired the Collegium 

the u .n 1 ver ?!!y ‘ aeschools In 1 983, SIU was accred- 
S^the^ASolatioa of Independent Colleges and 
19 SU-ondon City College, a training cen- 
Kr^tbr S p rofessional qualifications, became a part of 

^^rnnus in Engelberg. Switzerland, emphasizing 
A hotel management, began operation in 

inI ^ a r ?QQn SIU KquiTed the Palais Friedrich m 
1988. In ^7 - l houses administrative offices and 

Heidelberg, wjn^ n^ business program . That same 

Heidelberg s S^d ^ to its present location m 

year, the of the city. 

titeW M °" ! SSsCSe United States optoed at 
In 1991, SIU scamp Tampa _ St Petersburg metro- 
Dunedin, s^iierpurch^ the campus of 

politan area, ^hen b opCT ed in Berlin with a 

fetyCdtege. £ In July, SIU ac- 

focus on College of Switzerland in Leysin, 

cjuired the Arnenp^n . g... imp oses to 10 . 

of ^ foun(fi n§ f Sch ?, ler to " 

The 30th an ? lVCr r^- y^q celebrSed on all cam- 
temadonal Lniv^ ceremonies this spring, 

puses dunng comrmnre’ d of ^umn. -anin- 

ind there are Pl^f businesspeople, erhieators, gov- 
netwer^ _ qi F ncrelbere. 


Pioneer in Multicultural Learning 


t was Dr. Walter 
Leibrecht's expe- 
rience as a lectur- 
er at Columbia 
University and a professor at 
Harvard University and the 
University of Chicago in the. 
1950s and early ’60s that 
convinced him of the 
strengths of the American 
college system. *T was very 
much impressed with the tu- 
tor approach at Harvard,” he 
says, “and felt that the 
younger students needed 
that personalized attention; 
students at large European 
state universities often get 
lost” 

Returning to Heidelberg, 
where he had received bis 
doctorate from the Universi- 


Schiller a truly international 
experience. Studying abroad 
was ‘in’ in the ‘60s and early 
’70s, a period when Ameri- 
can education was vety con- 
cerned with and optimistic 
about international relations. 
The Vietnam War put a 
damper on this, and Ameri- 
cans became more inward- 
looking, with students of the 
'70s working more in the in- 
ner cities than going to Eu- 
rope.” 

Between 1971 and 1977. 
the number of American stu- 


American in another. In 
1991, Schiller acquired the 
campus of Trinity College in 
Florida, which has become 
the home campus of the uni- 
versity. That means that 
most Schiller students will 
now complete pan of their 
studies in Europe and pan in 
the United Stales. 

“The character of the 
school has also changed.” 
Dr. Leibrecht observes. 
“The first group were phi- 
losophy and literature stu- 
dents. Today, the most pop- 


'From the start , we wanted 
to make Schiller international' 


ty of Heidelberg, he pro- ■ 
Dosed to the German educa- 


Snd there are P^.‘ 0 f businesspeople, ettacatora. gov- 
ternatiCHial 9eyw , diplom ats ~ at EngeJberg. 

££** schfflf Tn ! en T n f 

London SEl 453 Edgewater Dnve. Dimedm, 

$71) gojuafcj' Te1.fn 8.3) 736-5082, fax (f 

Florida 346W, u 

s 1 3) 736-6263. ' ; 


posed to the German educa- 
tional authorities that they 
set up a network of Ameri- 
can-style colleges in small 
towns around Heidelberg. “I 
faded miserably,” he recalls. 

“It didn’t fit the system.” 

He decided to do it him- 
self, opening Schiller Col- 
lege in 1964 with 35 Ameri- 
can students in a 16th-centu- 
ry castle, Ingersheim. “At 
the beginning, the students 
did everything themselves, 
running the offices and 
kitchen, building die library, 
ft was a self-made college.” 

Why the name Schiller? 
“We were located across 
from the town of Maibach, 
where Friedrich Schiller was 
bom, and his philosophy of 
freedom and human rights 
was in line with our princi- 
ples.” Dr. Leibrecht says. 

“Right from the start, we 
wanted to make studying at 


dents at Schiller declined. 
Many study-abroad pro- 
grams collapsed. “Our en- 
rollment dropped to fewer 
than 400 students. That's 
when we started making an 
effort to attract students 

from other countries,” Dr. 
Leibrecht says. 

The strategy paid off. Eu- 
ropean students started com- 
ing in larger numbers, later 
joined by Asians and stu- 
dents from other countries. 
“Our student body has be- 
come increasingly interna- 
tional since then,” the presi- 
dent points out. 

While Schiller is becom- 
ing more international in one 
sense, it is becoming more 


ular fields of study are busi- 
ness administration, interna- 
tional relations and diversi- 
fied areas like hotel manage- 
ment and banking, hut all 
students still get a heavy 
dose of liberal arts." 

Schiller was a pioneer in 
business administration, of- 
fering one of the first Ameri- 
can MBA programs in Eu- 
rope. Now there is increas- 
ing competition from Euro- 
pean stale universities, 
which have started offering 
their own MBA programs. 

As for the strength* of 
Schiller, Dr. Leibrecht says. 
'We were truly international 
from the outset. The educa- 
tional system, the accredila- 


This advertising section was produced in its entirety by 
the supplements division of the International Herald Tri- 
bune’s advertising department. * It was written by Mary 
Krienke, a free-lance writer based in Geneva. 


tion and our base are all 
American: our students and 
faculty are international. 
Practically every student 
studies two languages, 
which enhances his or her 
chances of getting a job.” 

In addition. Dr. Leibrecht 
cites “our excellent faculty. 
We have professors from 30 
to 40 countries. We offer a 
rigorous academic program 
that is nevertheless practice- 
oriented. and we pay indi- 
vidual attention to each stu- 
dent. Students can study in 
four different countries dur- 
ing preparation for a degree, 
yet remain in one and the 
same university. This is a 
big plus, for instance, for 
those who study internation- 
al relations and are prepar- 
ing for a diplomatic career. 

“Yet our biggest asset is 
ihe over 15,000 alumni of 
the university, many of 
whom are now in important 
positions in countries all 
over the world. The alumni 
have become increasingly 
active for the university. 
They assist each other and 
can be of great help to the 
newly graduated students at 
the start of their careers ” 

Dr. Leibrecht admits that 
operating a private educa- 
tional institution in Europe 
in the face of a recession is a 
struggle, but this is not his 
first. “Our U.S. campus is 
growing. The appeal of the 
European experience, espe- 
cially for American students, 
N returning. We have recent- 
ly received letters from addi- 
tional American universities 
seeking to establish coopera- 
tive programs with us." 


A Campus Profile 


During the Gulf War. Kuwaiti. Iraqi and Palestinian 
students at the American College of Switzerland 
watched the conflict together on CNN, frequently 
erupting into verbal conflict themselves, then went out 
for a friendly snack. The Yugoslavian crisis triggered a 
spirited debate between a Serbian and a Croatian stu- 
dent. "One of our strengths is that any international is- 


sue takes on a real, personal perspective with our stu- 
dents.” says Nancy Carroll, provost of the most recent 


dents.” says Nancy Carroll, provost of the most recent 
addition to Schiller International University. 

ACS, which predates Schiller by one year, was 
founded in 1963 on principles similar to those Dr. Wal- 
ter Leibrecht sought to implant at Ingersheim: to make 
an American university education available in Europe. 
In 1991, ACS merged with Schiller International Uni- 
versity after the college had run into severe financial 
problems. Yet the American College continues its own 
identity, character and tradition while a member of 
SILT. At present, srudents from over 40 countries study 
at ACS, and the college has illustrious alumni, among 
them the actors Sylvester Stallone and Glynne Headley. 

In addition to the traditional American college pro- 
gram, ACS offers a prep program that prepares students 
on an individualized basis for entrance to American 



universities. 

As is the case with several other Schiller campuses, 
the setting is spectacular. Located above the vacation 
and ski resort town of Leysin, on the side of a hill over- 
looking Lake Geneva and the French Alps, ACS occu- 
pies the former Grand Hotel, a late- 19th-century bas- 
tion of elegant Swiss horellerie. Remnants of grandeur 
remain in the richly paneled dining room and in the 
baroque ballroom that now serves as an assembly hall 
and site of graduation ceremonies. By and large, the ho- 
tel has been transformed into an efficient, self-con- 
tained campus where students live and study in modem 
surroundings. 

Professor Carroll, who has been with ACS for 25 
years, emphasizes the core curriculum that gives all stu- 
dents. even those working toward a degree in business 
administration, a sound grounding in liberal arts, a tra- 
ditional ACS strength. Its library of 50,000 volumes is 
one of the largest English libraries in Switzerland. 

Professor Carroll stresses the esprit de corps fostered 
by studying in such a close-knit environment “Our stu- 
dents are our strongest selling point Most new students 
come by word of mouth,” she says. 


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Page 6 


THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1994 




Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune For Urgent Action to Stop the Massacres in Rwanda 


PUBLISHED WITH THK NHW YORK TIMES AND THE WtffflNITmN POST 


•& r&v_ - 

life: 




Clint* 


A Chance to Be Free 


G ENEVA — Since ihe tragic deaths of the 
□residents of Rwanda and Burundi, the 


It was a magical moment: the peaceful 
passage from an era of oppression to a dawn 
of liberation in South Africa. In Nelson 
Mandela's words, it was indeed "a joyous 
night for the human spirit." With a smile 
that would melt a snowman, and a jaunty 
dance that millions were soon i mil a ting. 
South Africa's president-to-be claimed vic- 
tory for his party, and his cause. 

Pan of what made this moment so special, 
and last week's election so moving, was the 
interplay between the leader and his cause. 
After 27 years in prison. Mr. Mandela 
emerged to' lead a people who were also in 
bondage. Their struggle was embodied in the 
unwavering persistence, physical endurance 
and almost mystical spirituality of this sin- 
gular man. He had been jailed years ago for 
daring to demand a nonracial parliament. 
Now he was presiding over the election of 
that very parliamenL 
It augurs well for South Africa that after a 
cleanly fought and entirely unprecedented 
election, winners and losers reached out gen- 
erously to each other. This is a promising 
prelude to five years of power-sharing under 
an interim constitution. Incomplete returns 
put Mr. Mandela’s African National Con- 
gress first with 62.5 percent of the vole, 
followed by President F. W. de Klerk's long 
do minan t National Party with 22.2 percent 
and the Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi's 
Inkalha Freedom Parly with 8.3 percent. 

As important as these figures are Lhe civili- 
ty and experience in hard bargaining that 
developed in four years of negotiations be- 
tween Mr. de Klerk's team and its National 
Congress partners. Should Mr. Mandela's 
party wind up with more than two-thirds of 
the vote, giving sole power to write a new 
constitution, it is reasonably expected that 
the power-sharing arrangement, a key (o 
social peace, would still hold. 

Meantime. Americans can legitimately 
join in the cheering. The protests of millions 
of ordinary American voters, black and 
white, emboldened the U.S. Congress to 
adopt, and then pass again over Ronald 
Reagan's veto, comprehensive economic 
sanctions against Pretoria's racist regime. 


Popular pressure induced American banks 
and corporations to pull out of South Africa, 
thereby bolstering the internal anti-apart- 
heid movement and further isolating a while 
minority government. 

There is every reason for Washington to 
strengthen its South African connection as a 
freely elected government tries tojump-start 
a stalled economy, seeks investments and 
loans to build roads and schools and ad- 
dresses the awesome challenge of narrowing 
the economic and social chasm that divides 
races. It is doubly in America’s interest to 
stimulate growth and stability since South 
Africa and its regional neighbors offer new 
markets for goods and services. 

Doubtless the euphoria mil swiftly pass, 
and soon hoi words will resound in a multira- 
cial parliament. A white exodus is always 
possible. But. in Jesse Jackson's phrase. South 
Africa wisely decided to negotiate a revolu- 
tion rather than have a civil war. After so 
remarkable and orderly an election, Ameri- 
cans are entitled to hope that South Africa 
will continue to confound expectations. 

President Bill Clinton chose aptly in send- 
ing Mr. Jackson, one of Martin Luther King 
Jr.'s lieutenants, to lead the .American ob- 
server team during the election, which in 
turn was aided by a $35 million U.S. grant. 
The presence of King's widow at Mr. Man- 
dela's side during the victory speech under- 
scored the special tie beLween South African 
blacks and African-Americans. Ln both 
cases, a poor and oppressed people tri- 
umphed over monolithic power to unite a 
society that misused and often despised 
them. Thar is why Mr. Mandela, echoing 
King's most famous phase, called on aU 
South Africans, white and black, to “loudly 
proclaim from the rooftops — Free at last!" 

For not only blacks have been liberated by 
this democratic rebirth. Whiles no longer 
need to lie about a system whose cruelties 
and contradictions shamed them before the 
world. Blacks no longer need to struggle to 
be heard in the councils of their ancestral 
land. An entire people, a nation, has a 
chance to be free at last. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


vJ presidents of Rwanda and Burundi, the 
people oT Rwanda have suffered unspeakable 
atrocities. Representatives of the International 
Committee of the Red Cross have witnessed 
the slaughter of hundreds of helpless civilians, 
including many women and children. The) 
have seen wounded and ill patients killed in 

shelters, hospitals and ambulances. 

On Sunday, 24 orphans and 13 Rwandan 
Red Cross workers were savagely assassinated. 

Red Cross staff workers have tried in vain 
to prevent killings. They estimate that more 
than 100,000 Rwandans have been massacred 
in the past three weeks, and that about 2 
million have been forced to leave their homes. 
Hundreds of thousands have fled the country. 

Within Rwanda, thousands are housed in 
public buildings, private institutions or tem- 
porary shelters. These are places of relative 
safety for now, but certainly no guarantee of 


By Cornelio Sommaruga 

The writer is president of the huemaiional 
Committee of the Red Cross. 


what they tan to alleviate the suffering in very 
difficult conditions. The constraints on our 
delegates are indeed severe. 

Our teams are currently active in the capital. 


Kigali, as wdl as in Byumba, Gisenvi. Kabgayi 
and Kibungo. They are caring for the sick and 
wounded and for thousands of displaced peo- 
ple of both Hutu and Tutsi origin, in aixor- 
dance with Red Cross principles of neutrality 
and impartiality. There are some encouraging 
signs that renewed guarantees of safe passage 
and promises to respect displaced minority 
groups will soon improve conditions. 

The work of Rwandan and expatriate staff 
has generally been facilitated both in Rwanda 
and in neighboring states, inside the country, 
the overwhelming majority of civilians and 
combatants have respected the Red Cross em- 
blem and have not interfered with our work. 

The few staff of the United Nations Mis- 
sion in Rwanda still in the country have been 
helpful, providing vital assistance to Rwan- 
dans, helping Red Cross staff to cross the 
front tine in Kigali and assisting with the 
evacuation of nonessential foreign staff. 

The governments of Burundi. Tanzania. 


long-term security. 
Fierce fighting coi 


Fierce fighting continues between troops of 
the former government and those or the 
Rwandan Patriotic Front. Attempts to stop 
the massacre and bring the warring faction* 
to the negotiating table, undertaken by Afri- 
can heads of stale and United Nations' repre- 
sentatives, have had no tangible results as vet. 

Red Cross stafr workers have remained in 
Rwanda throughout this tragic lime, doing 


Uganda and Zaire have been, with a few local 
exceptions, very cooperative, permitting Red 
Cross convoys and medical and survey teams 
to pass into Rwanda. 

But the magnitude of the tragedy has far 
outstripped the attention given to it by gov- 
ernments and media outside of Africa. The 
press, particularly in Western countries, has 
concentrated on developments in other parts 
of the world. The Internationa] Committee 
has undertaken to highlight this flagrant 
shortcoming through diplomatic channels. 

The ICRC wants to emphasize that all 
states concerned have a responsibility to act 
swiftly in order to end the massacres. In our 
view, the situation in Rwanda represents a 
direct threat to the region's peace and security 
and should be considered as such by the 
international community. 

Abandoning the Rwandan people to their 
fate would set a dangerous precedent, indicat- 
ing that the international community toler- 
ates indiscriminate warfare, killing and intol- 
erance of minority groups. 

The presence of the United Nations mis- 
sion in Kigali is essential to maintaining dip- 
lomatic efforts to restore peace. The Red 
Cross presence, and any increase in the dele- 
gation’s ability to assist the victims, provide a 
ray of hope in a bleak situation. 

It should be remembered, however, that the 


present work of the ^ 

on the one side aad-the 
other is not enougluo 

TbeUNSecnrityCotiaa^^^E- '.V 

30. winch called for r> f. . 


weapons to Rwanda, o aismtsife 
direction, butfair tooEtflMboMs>: 
statement, the SeauTty Gratae 


posals for more dcrisvetaaso^ 
An arms embargo alonen#%; 
little effect, as the coimnyitEB^jj 
a ter of civil war forj?xireuu&'tjg 
there is no sbortagrof weapons* 
decisive measures are urgently iw 






isolationist, inhuman mid wrasghea^T? - - 
Other stares — rich aBd ptxs^Sjtt^a^ 
elsewhere — face political, 
to varying degrees. To 

condemn the 

themselves is hardly ccaianaSiv^^^£^ 
tional community’s cote is, 
tip the balance in such 
universally accepted values, 
of others, solidarity, Itga% antfpesj^S^J 
International Herabt 

' ' ' V-f~ 


9*-' -il'w 

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Stop the 




N EW YORK — We have been here so 
manv times before in the Bosnian saaa: 


Yes to Drug Treatment 


The crime bill that is expected to become 
American law by summer allocates more 
than a billion dollars for drug courts. These 
arc intended to provide intensive treatment 
and supervision instead of incarceration for 
first-time drug offenders. The bill also au- 
thorizes expenditures for treatment of in- 
mates in state and federal prisons and for 
prevention programs aimed at high-risk indi- 
viduals in low-income neighborhoods. Treat- 
ing drug addicts has never been proposed as a 
panacea for the nation's crime problems, but 
effective programs would have a substantial 
impact not only on crime rates but also on 
the spread of AIDS and other public health 
problems related to addiction. 

But docs treatment work? Will all this mon- 
ey be well spent, or is it a delusion to expect to 
“cure'' individuals with such a severe pro- 
blem? The personal characteristics of drug 
abusers and the nature of the drugs involved 
vary widely, as do the modes of treatment now- 
available. The latter range from the relatively 
cost-free 12-slep programs such as Narcotics 
Anonymous to expensive long-term residen- 
tial programs. In fact, no single medication or 
program will work for all patients. But anyone 
who seeks help — admittedly, some do not — 
should be able to End the right treatment. 

Does methadone work? Yes, for heroin ad- 
dicts whose participation is sustained. And 
studies show that people who are forced into 
treatment by courts are as successful as those 


who participate voluntarily, it is the duration 
of treatment that determines outcome. 

How about long-term residential treat- 
ment? These programs suffer a high initial 
dropout rate, but of those patients who com- 
plete a program, about 80 percent do not 
relapse. Not everyone needs this kind of ex- 
pensive program, however. People who have 
otherwise stable lives, are employed and have 
a family support system may be helped by less 
intensive counseling and medical care. And 
since residential treatment often involves con- 
frontation therapy, it might be the wrong 
choice for women who have been abused. 

Researchers now know a great deal about 
chemical changes in the brain brought on bv, 
long-term addiction and are working to devel- 
op outpatient medical programs for cocaine 
addicts and others for whom methadone is 
not appropriate. Because of the nature of 12- 
step programs, there is only anecdotal evi- 
dence of their success. But they do work for 
many people and should be encouraged. 

Treatment will help individuals and save 
lives. Addiction is a chronic and unfortunately 
often relapsing disorder that may never be 
entirely eliminated in America. But success will 
be measured by every patient who is even 
temporarily in remission, every individual cop- 
ing through methadone or other medications 
instead or filling a jail cdL and every person 
whose focus moves from crime to stability. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


many times before in the Bosnian saga: 
acts of barbarism by the Serbs, the mobiliza- 
tion of a shocked international conscience, 
threats of air strikes — or actual air strikes, of 
the most limited kind — a tactical Serbian 
withdrawal, more talks aimed at persuading 
the warring parties to accept a caning up of 
territory that rewards aggression. 

Then the Serbs move on to yet another Bosni- 
an community, applying the same mixture of 
violence and intimidation to secure their aim of 
an ethnically pure Greater Serbia. 

The tragedy of Gorazde may for now at least 
be over. But there are other towns of equal 
strategic interest on which the Serbs are now- 
free to concentrate their forces. 

This week Lhe United Nations intervened to 
head off a Serbian attempt to expand the Broke 
corridor in northern Bosnia, bui such interven- 
tions merely divert Serbian aggression, h is 
time to halt it — late, but not too laie. We have 
the justification, the interest and the means. 

A sovereign state, recognized by the world 
community, is under attack from forces encour- 
aged and supplied by another power. This is noi 
a civil war but a war of aggression, planned and 
launched from outside Bosnia although using 
the Serbian minority within it 

The principle of self-defense precedes and 
underlies the United Nations Charter. Hie le- 
gitimate government of Bosnia has every right 
to rail upon our assistance in defending "its 
territoiy. Thai is ample justification for helping 
the victims of aggression. 

And both the United Slates and Europe have 
real and important strategic interests in Bosnia. 
Let me note four of them. 

First, after all that the West. NATO and the 
United Nations have now said, the credibility 
of our international stance on everv security 
issue from nuclear nonproliferation to the Mid- 
dle East is now at stake. 

Second, would-be aggressors are wailing to 
see how we deal with the Serbs. Our weakness 
in the Balkans would have dangerous and 
unpredictable consequences in the former So- 
viet Union, which has Slavic nationalist forces 
that closely parallel those of Greater Serbian- 
ism. And throughout Eastern and Central Eu- 


By Margaret Thatcher 

The writer was British prime minister from 1979 to 1990. 


rope there are minorities that aggressive moth- 
er-states might be tempted to manipulate to 
provoke conflict, if that is allowed Lo pay in 
the case of Serbia. 

Third. Serbia's own ambitions are by no 
means necessarily limited to Croatia and Bos- 
nia. Kosovo is a powder keg. Macedonia is 
fragile. Bulgaria. Hungary. Greece. Albania 
and Turkey all have strong interests that could 
drag them into a new Balkan war if Serbian 
expansion and oppression continue unchecked. 

Fourth, the floods of refugees that would 
cross Europe — particularly in the event of 


The UN mandate gives NATO 
full authority for the requisite 
launching of repealed large- 
scale air strikes against Serbian 
military targets wherever these 
may prove effective. 


such a wider conflict — would further inflame 
extremist tendencies and undermine the stabil- 
ity of Western governments. 

The West has the means — the technology and 
the weapons — to change the balance of military 
advantage against the aggressor in Bosnia. 

Since the start of the Serbian war of aggres- 
sion, which began in the summer of 1991 in 
Slovenia, intensified in Croatia and is now 
consuming Bosnia. I have opposed the sending 
of ground troops to the former Yugoslavia. But 
I have said that humanitarian aid without a 
military response is a misguided policy. Feed- 
ing or evacuating the victims rather than help- 
ing them resist aggression makes u> accom- 
plices as much as good Samaritans. So i have 
consistently called for action of two sorts: 

• Launching air strikes against Serbian 
forces, communications centers and ammuni- 


tion dumps, and lifting the arms embargo on 
Bosnia and Croatia so that the Muslims and 
Croats can defend themselves on more equal 
terms against the Serbs, who inherited the- 
massive armaments of the Yugoslav army. 

If such a policy had been pursued when 
I first proposed it in a New York Times article 
in the summer of 1 99 1, at a time when Saraje- 
vo and Gorazde were under serious assault, 
thousands of people would now be alive and in 
all probability the Milosevic regime in Bel- 
grade would have fallen. 

Because this approach was not adopted, we 
now- find ourselves in a far more complex and 
dangerous situation. 

We are trying to defend almost indefensible 
safe havens. We are maintaining a facade of 
neutrality when all our decisions are based on 
the knowledge that the Serbs are the threat, and 
with a large contingent of l/N personnel whom 
the Serbs may choose to use as hostages. 

The new joint effort by Russia and the West 
to persuade the Serbs to settle for 49 percent of 
Bosnian territory — down from the 72 percent 
they have now occupied — is hardly less rife 
with danger. The Serbs will almost certainly not 
withdraw, and once the guns are quiet the 
Russians may not wish them to do so — nor 
may the West be prepared to revive the threat 
of bombing to force them. 

Even if they were to withdraw, their 49 
percent of Bosnia would still represent a re- 
ward for aggression. 

And in either event, the ensuing peace would 
be an unjust and fragile one requiring a large 
contingent of Western — including U.S. — 
ground troops to enforce it on the victims. If 
hostilities resume, as is all too likely, these 
troops would become the target for attack. 

So the formula of air strikes and lifting the 
arms embargo is still the right one to apply. 

NATO already has the mandate from tbc 
UN Security Council not just to defend UN 
personnel but to deter attacks on the safe 
havens. This mandate gives full authority for 
the requisite launching of repeated large-kale 


air strikes against Serinan > ni]^^^j^- 
wherever these may prove 
matter for consideration VbetfiepiiJu* 
should go into Serbia itself; ^ 

Air strikes are effective, as w 

not on a small scale, hedgei'-ja^^S 
hesitations and 

severe and ultimately misiK i^Sg e 
But they have to be part-bf 
shift the advantage against th£ag^*4;, c 
Serbs must know that they 
with swiftness and detennmaiioiu -l^o^^ 
Nor may Russian objections', hr ffi fcfrfa 
stand in thdrway. If the 
to support such actum, all well 
NATO cannot have its policies 
by Russian sensibilities. ' '7. 

Lifting the arms embargo, 

Dole and Joseph Biden havecotffspfe^' 
posed (the Senate is to take up ^ie«iafej;. 
this Thursday), is also cruriaL :• . 

Thai embargo was imposed before 
Croatia were internationally recopnaa ^a^ ' 
legal standing is at least questicB^bfe'Mfi. 
ed States. Britain and France—' hi; iTimaA 
tbe United States acting riooe—dinj ^nB i. 
ly state that they do not intend to coptune«ilh ' 
iL Such statements tmght also be i 

resolution of the UN General AaanHju'r,, 
The confederation between BossIawG®. 
atia, so skillfully brokered by theUnfcft&gr 
now means that supplies of arms trill bend 
against the common aggressor, notagafetcih; 
other, and that they can easily besKppsd of 
through Croatia. A well-armed MjhS»rnj- 
atian alliance would confront the Sdsvita 
quite new and unwelcome chaflritgfcit^gbt 
even prompt the Serbs to settle. : ... 

I do not claim that this approach saioW 
dangers. Ft would require diploraatradnak- 
taiy skills of a high order. It is unfifitytoiotig 
immediate peace — although it nSat Scme 
disruption of the aid effort is meritafe.- 
But what the people of Bosnia riownadisi 
permanent peace that allows them to jmn to j 
their homes and live without fear. . What the j 
West needs is to restore its npodflifia nM 
secure its interests. This is the omy.ywLths | 
aims can be realized. "-V.- . | 

The New Font Toner. ' I 


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You Can’t Have It Both Ways in Bosnia 


P ARIS — Bosnian Serb forces, 
blocked at Gorazade bv NATO. 


Other Comment 


Foreign Policy Myopia 

The Clinton administration's tendency to 
compartmentalize foreign policy — moving in 
one area without calculating its effects else- 
where — has led to major contradictions in its 
running trade dispute with Japan. For months, 
the United States has been putting the squeeze 
on Japan to open its markets by allowing the 
dollar to fall in value against the yen to near- 
record postwar lews. It did so in "blithe disre- 
gard of the inflationary pressures that this 
couid cause domestically as imports rise in 
price. It is the fear of inflation, far more than 
upward nudges in short-term interest rates by 
the Federal Reserve, that has >cni up long-term 
rates. These higher long-term rates have the 
administration in a ti 2 z> out of concern that 
they could disrupt a booming recovery. 

Too often administration goals are pursued 
with a kind of tunnel vision. Even before the 
dollar's plunge last week forced Washington 
10 intervene lo prop up the dollar, some econ- 
omists were voicing concern over Trade Rep- 
resentative Mickey Kantor's in-your-face tac- 
tics with Japan. Mr. Kantordid well last year 
in winning congressional approval of trade 
treaties. But his tough tactics with Japan 
could contribute to inflationary pressures, 
thus hindering his own administration's plans 
for sustained recovery. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


Keep the Pressure on Saddam 

The United Slates and Britain are under 
growing pressure to agree to a relaxation of 
economic sanctions against Iraq. Turkey and 
three of the five permanent members of the 
Security Council now favor such a course. 
Ostensibly, it would reward Saddam Hussein 
for having complied with UN demands on his 
weapons of mass destruction. 

The hidden agenda is rather longer, howev- 
er. First, the resumption of Iraqi oil exports 
would offer tempting trade opportunities. The 
most obvious benefactor would be Turkev. 
but the French, Russians and Chinese also 
have commercial ambitions in Iraq. Secondly, 
the Lhree permanent members of the Security 
Council aspire to assert political influence in 
the region at Washington's expense. 

America and Britain argue that only the 
maintenance of sanctions has forced Saddam 
to make concessions, and that easing them 
would wreck any chance of Iraqi compliance 
with other UN resolutions. Behind this line 
lies the unspoken hope that sanctions will so 
weaken Iraq that Saddam will be overthrown. 

Of these two approaches, the second is 
both more honorable and more realistic. It 
would be folly to reward the Iraqis before 
they have recognized without equivocation 
their border with Kuwait. 

— The Daily Telegraph f London). 


A blocked at Gorazade by NATO, 
are moving northward toward the 
town of Brcko, commanding the nar- 
row corridor linking the two main 
areas in Bosnia held by the Serbs. It is' 
under threat of a Bosnian govern- 
ment offensive, and France proposes 
that it be made still another UN- 
NATO protected zone. 

The Serbs thus could benefit from 
the international protection that has 
done so much for the Muslims of 
Gorazde and TuzJo. and the Bosnians 
in Sarajevo — a proposal the Serbs 
will find cold comfort. The French 
want to head off what could, in stra- 
tegic terms, be the most important 
battle yet in the Yugoslav war. 

However, it is a proposal dial the 
United Nations and NATO are prob- 
ably too feeble and too divided to 
carry out. even if they chose io in*. 
The UN-proclaimed safe areas that 
already exist are largely undefended. 
The Serbs are taking back their heavy- 
weapons from the United Nations at 
Sarajevo and re-infiltrating the area 
with relative impunity. 

Profound disagreement continues 
among the Western powers about 
what to do. expressed again last week 
in die angry exchange between the 
United Nations' principal official in 
the former Yugoslavia. Yasushi Aka- 
shi. and the U25. representative at the 
United Nations, Madeleine Albright. 

Mr. Akashi said, in effect, that if 
the United States wants to tell the 
United Nations how to run its affairs 


By William Pfaff 


in Bosnia, it should put its own 
troops on the tine and assume Lhe 
same risks as the people now in the 
Protection Force and in UN and ci- 
vilian refugee and medical organiza- 
tions. He said that by refusing to do 
so. Americans reveal 'themselves to be 
“timid" and “afraid." 

Tne UJS. ambassador replied, quite 


properly, that it is not the business of 
UN officials to criticize the do lines 


UN officials lo criticize the policies 
of indjvidual governments. But Mr. 
Akashi not only spoke for the UN 
people on the ground in Bosnia, tak- 
ing a steady trickle of casualties from 
(chiefly) Serbian harassment, but ar- 
ticulated the absurd dilemma that the 
international community has created 
for itself in the former Yugoslavia. 

It has refused lo choose between 
the two courses of action open to it. 
The first is where it began: with a 
program to provide humanitarian as- 
sistance to the victims of the war 
while trying to bring the parties to an 
armistice and to peace negotiations. 

The second is where it rapidly 
found itself: lending sympathy, and 
irresolute and inefficacious support, 
to the victims of aggression, promis- 
ing 10 see that justice would be done 
— war criminals punished, people 
returned to their homes, prewar fron- 
tiers restored, civilians protected, etc. 
Fine words without serious content. 

It is impossible to follow both 
courses at die same time, even when 


the second one lacks commitment. 
The international military force in Yu- 
goslavia is deployed arid configured 
for the humanitarian mission, its 
members consequently are vulnerable 
when the United Nations and NATO 
make their intermittent stabs at doing 
justice. When NATO air forces struck 
Serbian troops at Gorazade. the Serbs 
promptly arrested or sequestered IfN 
soldiers and private relief workers, and 
some still are being held. 

This contradiction is producing a 
breakdown in the UN military system 
in Bosnia, which is losing such tenuous 
influence as it ever had over the con- 
tending forces. It is a contradiction 
exploited by the Bosnian Serbs and 
also by the Bosnian government, 
which wants engagement by the Unit- 
ed Slates and NATO on Bosnia's side. 

There has to be a decision, first of 
all jn Washington. There are two pos- 
sibilities. One is lo say that justice 
must be done, and therefore thaL the 
Bosnian victims or aggression must 
be armed — or at least allowed to 
arm themselves, which the UN em- 
bargo presently forbids — and sup- 


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ported in their effort to eject Serbian 
forces from territories former! v ncmi- 



Intemational Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED I SST 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Ci^Chairnurn 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher A Chief Exeaaht 
JOHN VINOCUR.E«ecimw££jiir A ViirPrraieta 
• WALTER WELLS, Newt Etbor • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES NinCHELMORE Deputy Edaors • CARLGFWTRT7 Amn^F.Sm 
• ROBERT J. DONAHUE Et&orcftheEdamal Pages • JONATHAN GAGE BusmmandFtraiaEiStor 
•RENE BOXDY.ntyw, PMuhtr*}AMES Md£DD.AAvrtinngDmcuir 
•SllANn'Al.CASPAStLInBrrkXiantfDrieiopmeKDuvav* ROreRTFARREtjaiamftm^.a^ 

DinxieurJcia Pubhasxic: RuNint D Sermons 
Dinaair Adjoint deb Pubdcman: Ktfcmc P. Danow 


A Showdown for the United Nations 

T T Nations forces have not prevented tile destruction of a series of 

Bosnian towns —Srebrenica. Tuzia. Sarajevo. Bihac. Goradze and other 
sate havens. Neither have representatives of the UN Secretarial negotiated 
cease-tires in time to prevent the destruction of one civilian peculation after 


“ u ™ lo prevent me aesmicuon or one civilian population after 
another. Instead they have waited and waited until finallv the threat of NATO 
intervention persuades Serbian forces —whose dirty work is neariv done— u. 


move their big guns on lo another town, another targel 
What ts the purpose of this “peace oneratinn" th.n 


" ls operation" that ends bv proteciinc 

a^ressors more than vicums* UN forces include many perjiKs of high 
herocs . c y en ‘ bui >hcy are usually limited lo showing 
restraint. The prob em is not with the soldiers, it is with their mission. 


forces from territories formerly occu- 
pied either by Muslim majorities or 
by mixed populations. 

In that case the humanitarian mis- 
sion must end and its personnel be 
pulled ouL The United Nations can- 
not support one side in this war and 
expect to be united as a neutral by 
the other side. The United Stales can- 
not support the Bosnians against the 
Serbs and abandon UN troops and 
civilians lo lake the consequences. 

Earlier this year the French and 
British governments were considering 
withdrawal of their forces. This not 
only is still an option but could be- 
come a necessity. Washington should 
understand this, and so should the 
Bosnian government authorities. It 
will probably happen if the United 
Stales supports the Bosnians. 

The alternative course is the policy 


Bill Chamberlain 


For 


gle to recover wbal they have lost. 

In the end there may be no real 
choice. The only real settlement may 
be the one arrived at through war. 
The international community may 
simply have to get out of the wav. 

The Western powers may have 


only the choice between *“*■ 
Bosnians or abandoning!®*®'' 
and everyone else in Ju- 

goslavia — to whatever fate two 
make for themselves; ■' ' 

International HeraldTrfanM- 
£* Los Angles Tones 


IN OlIR PAGES; IQO, 75 AND 50 YEARS AG O 
1894: Fight A gains t Vice sod in the woA of 


now followed by the European mem- 
bers of the UN Security Council. It 
searches for settlement at the price or 
rewarding aggression and doing injus- 
tice to the Bosnians. The Bosnians are 
expected to settle for what they cur- 
rently can get which h a territorial 
division roughly on present lines, in 
exchange for an armistice, policed by 
international forces. (The United 
States has agreed to take part.) 

The problem with this is that it is 
both unjust and implausible. Even if 
such an agreement were signed, nei- 
ther side is likely to respect it. 

The Serbs, determined lo consoli- 
date a Greater Serbia, have alrcadv 
demonstrated their contempt for in- 
ternational agreements. The Bani- 
ans. both officially and unofficially 
say they will never give up the sirug- 


Humanjtarian relief is not what civilians under bombardment most doper- 
siv np«t Thin.- rrvxi n.wJ krfir* , . . __ r 


a «ly nrcd Thcv raost need hdp in tartSEi tSM 

luch d f “ d themselves. They need allies u. help them. 

.h^iJSr Sl ?' e5 l ;. lhe Umle d Nations and NATO could go far in resmring 
thar credibility in this matter if they would- ' e 

i. Uui pre ' cnB ^ n,a obui " i "s > h ' «p«. 


httanaDaro] HcnldTnbunc. 181 Avxnjcauik!s-d»G3ullc.92STI NanDv-sur-Sare. Fcnx. 
Td:tIi46J753IX) nx : Qrc.46J7.06JI:Adv,-i6J752.11 lnemccIHT^ctiidcaiijc 


Edhnrfir Asia: Miduri Hambne. 5 Ccaahn Pd. Sw&uare 051 1. TtL (65 1 Fa: zfiJl Z4-2J.H 
Mng. Dir. Asia Poh'D. KnxcpuFl 50 Gkwxser Rd. Hans Koig Td JK7-5222-//SS. Far KMC2T //W. 


Cm. Mgr. Cmuiy. T. SMdrr. Frirdridatr. 15, 6C823 FrartfurfM TA |(M} 72 67 55. far fCW) 727310 
Pm-USs Miduci fmw. S5n Third -Iiyl Ne*- York N.Y. KXd Td i2I2i 752-3M0 Foe 12121 755JT7S5 


U K. Advertising Oflke: 63 Lmg Acre. Umdon WCZ Tel. t'0?h S36-4KQ2. Fax: (071/ MT2254. 
SA. an capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nauem B 732U2II26. Commission Paritairr No 613*7 
*5 19H. hatmoaonri HtnldTnbuK. AS righUmmaL ESN: (C+FljQ51 


^ * hm lh "' “ ,u 

it ‘i & T nuCS 10 aitack ^ ia 0T Quicks other states 

1 •(ES&ATniS 6 M suffcr the consequences, 

and lp no-night zones and Se havens. 

311 protect those delivering humanitarian assistance. 


Stop lhe Spf“d of violence in Central Europe 


i» Bosnia ril spoil .ha idaa of to 

-—Jeane Kirkpatrick, in a syndicated column. 


PARIS — M. Bercnger, the French 
Senator who has become famous for 
his crusade against vice and immoral- 
ity in Paris, undeterred by the satire, 
m prose and verse, which is contin- 
uatly directed against him. goes 
steadily on with fus work. M. Ber- 
enger rightly considers that youths 
and children have a right to protec- 
tion in the streets. He demands sur- 
veillance at the doors of the schools 
and colleges, where dealers in ob- 
scene pictures continually await the 
children who are entering and ieav- 
,n 8i offer them their nauseous 
wares. This is not all. He wishes to 
put down all those who make a profit 
out of the immorality of the public. 


first sod in the work tf 
the useless and Mtiquaurf ^®"" 
cations” of Paris. The 
er, began before this ceromW", 
it. A hundred navvies r?L. 
work yesterday at the Porte. 
nancourt, and already quiw */7 
spectable quantity of nndrtlar.®' 
found its way from the top ‘ 
wall into the moat below. 


every 


1944: A Soviet Warnaig 


LONDON — [From our New Yorij 

edition:] Russia today 


i . 

; "zzt:. r ii ii ■■ ■ 


such as 
series w| 


propnetors of cafes and bras- 
hich are frequented by women. 


1919: Defortifying Paris 

^ R r?T A -.? UmbCTof ^ Munici- 
N Councillors will witness this 
morning [May 5] the removal of the 


warned Germany's shaky 
Finland, Romania, HungaiJ 
Bulgaria, they must torn 's®* 
the Germans as a demonstraW® 
their faith in the Allies 
themselves from further desB^V 
The Soviet warning; broadcast.^ 
the Moscow radio, was 
here as a last minute effort 
eve of the next Russian 
and possibly the invasktft of 
Europe, to break up German? 
ellite forces in eastern Europe- . . 




. I_‘. 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MAY 5, 1994 


OPINION 



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ce to Clinton: The Less Said . . . 

By E. J. Dionne Jr. 


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the pronon^n ^ exam P le i fotmd that 

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effective wortd leader. 


Ciimon is not an 


PercepUons are involved 


tun. i< arc 

problems in foreign 


***% slalemcnts 
uunag me iy92 campaign do not square 


with oik*, u — -“h—fiii uu IDA auuai 

™hat hewas; actuaUy^ willing to do in 

SSS, wLif- 001 h®® to bring 
2^^ f ^ ecds mto hue with past words. 
^T.r;^ more words to raiional- 
Iw ? tave matters worse. 

°f Mr. Clinton's campaign 
wragn policy was to make sure r£dgn 
policy would n<H become an issue at aS! 
mce be knew that he could beat Mr. 
rhish on domestic issues. Because Demo 
crate suffered m presidential elections 
WbCn successfully branded as 


and Bosnia" and for ignoring "the warn- 
ing signs" that Lbe Serbian leader Slobo- 
dan Milosevic “was emerging as one of 
Europe’s bloodiest tyrants." 
fa Chun, he said that Mr. Bush had 
failed to stand up for our values" and 
pledged “to link China’s trading privi- 
^ru ^ human rights record. 8 

There was nothing particularly wrong 
with Mr. Clinton's campaign foreign poli- 
ty- But his promise of activism abroad 
was bound to dash with bis pledge to 
devote himsdf overwhelmingly to domes- 
tic policy — which is what he was dected 
to do. Once in office. Mr. Clinton was 
unwilling to take the risks that bis bolder 
campaign pronouncements implied. 

His pledge to let in the Haitian refu- 
gees went by the boards even before he 
b^ame president. On other issues. Mr. 
Canton tried to talk his way around his 
difficulties. That was a big mistake. In 
domestic policy, words can be a sooth- 
ing balm and ease divisions. In foreign 
policy, words are incendiary. They 
amount to commitments or threats 
which, when not acted upon, bring only 
grief to the one who speaks them and 
render future declarations suspect. 

On Bosnia, Mr. Clinton warned to 
keep ihe moral high ground by speaking 
against Serbian aggression and promising 
more help to (he Muslims. In practice, 
Mr. Clinton showed that he was willing to 
back off and use European reluctance to 
escalate as an excuse. In Haiti Mr. Clin- 
ton sent troops steaming toward the is- 
land to back his strong words on behalf of 


democracy, then pulled them back when 
a small mob gathered on the shore. 

Mr. Clinton's defenders are not with- 
out arguments to make. On many big 
things — Russia and the Middle East — 
Mr. Clinton has done reasonably well. 
He is far from alone in having trouble 
coming up with dear policies for a mud- 
dy post-Cdd War world. Mr. Bush's 
policy toward the former Yugoslavia 
was a failure; the Europeans have little 
to be proud of there, either. And it is 
easier for critics to clamor for interven- 
tion in any one place — say, Bosnia or 
Haiti — than for a president to adjudi- 
cate among all the conflicting demands 
for lbe use of American force, and then 
make the case for intervention to a coun- 
try that mostly prefers to stay home. 

But the sneer difficulties of the 
choices Mr. Ginton faces are not an 
excuse for compounding them with im- 


plied pledges be cannot keep. 
Characteristically, Mr. Oil 


limon tried 
to improve his foreign policy standing 
on Tuesday with a “global news confer- 
ence." Words, again. He admitted thaL 
be has had to “hack and fill" at times, 
but argued that his foreign policy trou- 
bles stemmed from his willingness to 
deal with “very difficult issues which do 
not have an easy soluuoa" 

True enough. But Mr. Clinton’s suc- 
cesses would loom larger — and the 
need to “bad and filr would be less 
pressing — if he had not repeatedly 
raised and then lowered expectations for 
action in those spheres of foreign policy 
where both he and his country are am- 
bivalent about what to do. 

The Washington Post. 


|4 . y, IMJJ in ailllfcVl no 

*yj*ak, Mr. Clinton had to look strong. 



Even Belter Than a Nanny,: 
Try a Three-Parent Family 


By Ellen Goodman 


B OSTON — For several years I have 
stood here quietly while an endless 
parade of Americans’ from every point 
on the political compass was arriving at 
the same piece of wisdom. A consensus 
has re-emerged — if it ever disappeared 
— that every child should be bom and 
raised in a two- parent family, 

Academics and think-tank ers who 
normally volley and thunder have ail 
declared themselves equally pro-family. 


MEANWHILE 


Or at least pro the two-par eni family. 
Any dissenters are left to mumble quiet- 
ly to ihemseh-es. 

Well, I am getting tired of this bit of 
recidivist nonsense. The two-parent fam- 
ily may have worked well for the Bradys 
and for the 1950s. But in the 1990s. the 
mom-and-pop child-raising business has 
become a dysfunctional relic. 

I believe we need a more realistic and 
updated solution to the problems of 
modem family life. So 1 would like to 


make another simple proposition: 

' d should be bom 


Every American child i 
and raised in a three-parem family. 

Consider the advantages. We all know 
that it takes two incomes to maintain 
one middle-class lifestyle. But in the 
collapsing, emerging, abjectly terrifying 
U.S. economy, jobs are disappearing 
and being created with alarming speed. 

The three-parem family would allow 


When Victims Boast of Their Victimhood the Better to Victimize 


^solattonist, he had to look internation- 
alist. Because Democrats were said to be 
areaicl of using military power, he had to 
show be would cany a big stick. 

So be embraced huge chunks of Mr. 

Bush’s foreign policy — tbe popular 
parts like victory in the Gulf War —and 
positioned himself to Mr. Bash's activist 
side on a handful of key issues. 

Mr. Clinton criticized Mr. Bush for 

turning bad; Haitian refugees and prom- 

The damage to relations between 

Bosnia, Mr. Clinton was careful to talk Murks and Imm »« n sarimstt /on 
about his fear of a “auaemire" words he macKsana J^ ^aseriOUS IOSS 


sure 

onger 


N EW YORK — The principle of making 
that long- repressed minorities need no lc.. 0 _. 
suffer discrimination has been so established now 
that, as can happen to good principles, it has 
become subject to perversoo. 

This comes not only in the jaw-breaking locu- 
tions of “politically correct" speech and the conde- 
scensions of “multicultural" aesthetics, but in the 


By Flora Lewis 


now rdies on as proof that be never 
promised substantial U.S. intervention. 
Bui Mr. Clinton's listeners during tbe 
c amp ai g n could be forgiven for getting a 
different impression. He spoke in 1992 of 
“doing whatever it lakes to slop the 
s la ugh ter of civilians" and insisted that 
“we cannot afford to ignore what appeare 
to be a deliberate and systematic extermi- 
nation of human beings based on their 
ethnic origin." He attacked Mr. Bush for 
giving “short shrift to tbe yearnings of 
those seeking freedom in Stownia, Croatia 


for die comity of American society . 


new American exaltation of the status of victim. 
Victimhood, even by association with bygone vic- 
tims. confers a claim to the privilege of breaking 
the very rules against discrimination and bigotry 
that were meant to wipe it out. 

It has shuffled categories in a mindless way. 
Minorities ain't what they used to be. In order to 
demonstrate compliance with civil rights laws and 
social standards, employers again ask questions 
that had been forbidden in the interest of fairness. 


Thus, U.S. government departments and big 
companies list minority workers. The forms pro- 
vide for noting whether a person is black. Hispanic. 
Asian, Native American. Even women rank as 
a minority. lews do not 
Everybody knows, but nobody seems to notice, 
that Jews have become honorary WASPS, the out- 
of-fashion acronym for White Anglo-Saxon Prot- 
estants presumed to be the dominating majority. 
I pointed this out to an editor who snorted. “There 
was never any affirmative action for Jews." 

That is true. There wasn't any affirmative action 
for anybody until a little over a generation ago. Bui 
there were quotas, quotas not intended to assure 
opportunity but to set a timh beyond which there 
was exclusion. Harvard, Princeton, Yale, all the 
“best" schools had them. And there were bans — 
dubs and companies that would not take Jews as 
they would not take blacks and women. This has 
been overcome. But it has not ended Jew-baiung: it 
has simply changed who presumes tbe right to 
indulge in it. It is a peculiar, and ugly, evolution. 
The most notorious example is the vicious ranting 


of Khaiid Abdul Muhammad, who speaks to college 
audiences for tbe Nation of Islam. Ihe worst is not 
just his open incitement to hale and violence, but 
the enthusiastic cheers and applause be elicits 
from large black audiences. 

He has made himself a celebrity in this way. 
sought after and well paid. The Canadian govern- 
ment recently denied him entry to the country 
for speaking engagements at the University of 
Toronto on Lhe ground that he could be expected to 
violate Canadian laws against hate-crime: That is 
his stock in trade. 

His success reflects, however, a much more wide- 
spread degradation in the relations between Amer- 
ican black and Jewish communities, which used to 
cooperate in the fight against discrimination. That 
is a serious loss for the comity of American society. 

There are more subtle perversions in the practice 
of who qualifies for the compensating benefits or 
victimhood. thereby establishing that employers 
are observing anti-discrimination rules. People 
cannot be compelled to answer the questionnaires, 
so the forms instruct the personnel officer to go by 
“visual evidence" if thev refuse to say. 

Of course, there are borderline cases, people erf 
mixed origin, people who do not choose to be 


categorized. When that happens. 1 was told by 
representatives of the government and of a big 
private company, the rule of thumb is to take the 
person’s word for his or her status. 


But it only works in one direction, self-promotion 

isiole major- 


out of the minority into the vague ostensri 
ity. I happen to know, because my son provided an 
example of the barrier agpmsi going the other way. 
Because he was born in Mexico and anyway chafed 
at the questionnaire, he mischievously put down 
Mexican-American when he had to fill out a form. 

He was severely reprimanded and punished for 
quite a long time by his employer. His idea of wiL 
he was told, risked undermining the whole report- 
ing system and showed irresponsibility. 

It ‘is a strength of America that people can be 
proud of their diverse ancestry and ot being Ameri- 
can at the same time. Half a century after the 
United Slates refused to admit more than a small 
number of European Jews to save them from the 
Holocaust, it is a credit that those who live in 
America have now become so fully accepted. But 
there is a new kind oT shame in the habit of making 
victimhood something to boast about with tbe 
privilege of vilifying. 

*:• Flora Lewis. 


one parent to be “between jobs" at any 
time without forcing the entire family to 
face foreclosure or the scorn of a sales 
manager when their Visa card tops out. 

More to the point, it would allow one 
erf ihe trio to serve at any time as prima- 
ry child-care giver. 

Tbe three-parem family has its own 
set of evolutionary or religious roots. 
After alL infant care is a 24-hour-a-day 
occupation. If God had meant babies to 
have only two parents, would He have 
made it a three-shift job? 

Parenting is vastly more complicated 
now than m the days when Adam and 
Eve took on the task, and look at the 

trouble they had raising Cain- Tbe beauty 
of tbe three-parem family is that it would 
allow for the division of labor. 

Remember ihe dirty little secret of sub- 
urban parenting? The house and the yard 
come with a curse: the automobile. 
Transporting children across vast dis- 
tances to school, soccer and assorted 
friendships is a job for someone with the 
skills of a chauffeur and the attitude of a 
Teamster. With three parents, we have 
one Designated Driver. 

Parents are held responsible for every 
conceivable danger their children may 
encounter, from asbestos in the school 
ceiling to the drug abuse, depression and 
gang activity. It requires tbe paranoia of a 
censor and the intuition of a psychologist 
to monitor the messages on compact discs 
and screen movies requiring parental 
guidance. In a trio, we can have one 
Designated Worrier. 

More than anything, what we need in 
family life is a resource for those mo- 
ments when the system goes down, when 
a child gels sick or school gets canceled or 
when a major appliance has to be deliv- 
ered. A third parent could be a Designat- 
ed Emergency Backup System. 

The advantage of my proposal is that 
three parents can live as cheaply as two 
or more cheaply than two parents and 


one nanny. And a parental trio raises 
lino 


the likelihood that one adult wifi un- 
derstand math homework. 

Yes, I know, the rwo-parem family 
was based on the biology of reproduc- 
tion. But, hey. this is the *90s. We have 
already divided parenthood into such 
new roles as sperm father and surrogate 
mother. Three can probably share the 
biological tasks. They may even offer 
another choice for cloning. 

As for sex in a parental menage a 
trois, 1 haven't quite worked that ouL 
But let's be honest. How many parents 
would give up a lover for a live-in help- 
er? If there is trouble, we can always 
move to that next step on the evolution- 
ary ladder — the four-parent family. ’ 
Boston Globe Newspaper Company. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nixon: Hero and ViDain 


“Someone Jjdlshe i'ilifiers: 
He Uto Chosen iVesafej/" (Opinion, 
May 3) by 'jrfntfcofry Lewis; 

Mr. Lewis. In {trat decryim personal 
attacks upon President Bifl Qmton and 
then gratuitously accusing President 
Richard Nixon of “eogaging in tactics of 
smear” and “injecting bile into public 
life," is practicing a virulent form of that 
which be preaches against 
By attempting to categorize aD those 
who attack the president and his wife on 
other than policy grounds as “bigots," 
“rumor peddlers,” and “verging an clin- 
ical hysteria,” he also smears citizens 
who would hold any occupier of the 
White House to reasonable standards of 
fidelity, veracity and integrity. There is 
an argument that the private lives of 
political leaders should not be taken into 
account when judging them Bui such an 
argument is tbe very stuff of sophistry. 

JOHN W. WOOD. 

Lond on . 

The wrtier is international vice chatr- 
oom of Republicans Abroad 

Richard Nixon's “Southern strategy" 
institutionalized the Republican Psrtys 
embrace of the Southern segregationist 
under the banner of stales rights. Hjs 

law-and-order theme, directed al the 
shamefaced racism of theNorthOT sub- 
urbanite; made a (deniable) racist sub- 
text respectable in national campaigns. 

Even if President Nixon’s administra- 
tions were “remarkably liberal," his un- 


scrupulous and irresponsible political 

tactics permanently undermined (he 
credibility of the country's leadership 
along tbe most serious fault Hue of na- 
tional life. So while I do not advocate 
speaking 33 of the dead. I cannot pretend 
tnai Mr. -Nixon’s political legacy is wor- 
thy of tbe respectful silence with which 
we usually pass over statesmen’s failings. 

TRACY ELLIS. 

Paris. 


dishonored himsdf and his country, he 
would have committed hara-kiri. 

Still, after all tbe platitudinous tributes 
and falsifications of the past days. 1 have 
to admire Mr. Nixon for managing to 
bamboozle lhe public again, to perfect an 
image as Nixon the sufferer. Nixon the 
comeback kid. Nixon the international 
sage. Thai he should tty to do so was 
nonnal; that he suocosded was a disgrace 
— our disgrace this time. 


nly 

(“How to Sum Up Nixon ? An Ins 
Resilience,” April 26): Richard Nixon 
does deserve an epitbk. “He was always 
explaining something" might do, but 
“he made racism respectable again" 


ROBERT SCHOLTEN. 

Paris. 


Should we now forgive and forget? 


No! To do so is to invite a repeat of 

V w illiam 


might do better: It was Mr. Nixon's 
Southern strategy, after aU, that made 
appeals to fear and hatred — what we 
now know as Willy Hononism — an 
apparently permanent pan of tbe Re- 
publican campaign arsenal. Mr. Safire 


mpaign 

v;he wa 


history. Nor should we allow 
Safire to rewrite history, making Mr. 
Nixon into some kind oS beloved father 
figure. He wasn't He came closer to 
destroying American freedoms than any 
other force in modem history. That is 
the true legacy of Richard Nixon. 


should know; he was there. 


ARTHUR LINDLEY. 

Singapore. 


JOHN ALLAN. 
Himeju Japan. 


Regarding ** Nixon's 'Peace' Strategy 
Had a Heavy Price in Blood " ( Opinion, 
April 30) by Neil Sheehan: 

Thank you, Mr. Sheehan, for setting 
the record straight I was beginning to 
doubt my own memory about Richard 
Nixon after (be plethora of eulogies. 

This was a great president? This man 
whose entire political life was geared to 
the furthering of his own career at what- 
ever cost? If a Japanese politician had so 


In 1 975, 1 was a studenL at the Uni*, sr- 
sity Of California at Los Angeles. It was 
not long after the Watergate affair and 
the resignation erf President Richard 
Nixon. 1 fell so sad for him. 

Although I was only a young student 
from Thailand, I wanted humbly to 
show him be was thought of in a special 
way. I wrote him a letter, asking wherher 
I aright come visit Three weeks later I 
received an invitation to San Clemente. 

May 9, 1975, was a warm and dry day. 


I arrived al the “Western While House" 
half an hour early and was escorted to 
Mr. Nixon’s office by the U.S. Coasl 
Guard Service, which continued to pro- 
tect the premises. 

1 entered the secretary's office and 
suddenly Mr. Nixon walked in and 
greeted me. He invited me into his of- 
fice. He made me feel veiy much ai ease, 
almost as if I were visiting an uncle. We 
sat and talked for an hour and 15 min- 
utes. One of the first things he said to me 
was that "tire is nothing without chal- 
lenges." He emphasized that one should 
always stand out in life and must “never 
blend into the walls." 

He told me how nervous he had felt 
before he first visited Leonid Brezhnev 
in lhe Kremlin; he had not slept well the 
night before. In a lighter moment, he 
told me he had visited 101 countries. I 
told him I had only been to 72. 

We took pictures together and then 
went for a walk near the shining Pacific. 
It was a day I shall forever remember. 

Now that he is gone. I fed an impor- 
tant sense of loss. He experienced the 
greatest victory, and then an equally 
great sense of pain. What remained with 
him throughout SI years was his incredi- 
ble inner strength. He was a person with 
a warm and caring heart. 


About the Ambassador 


Regarding " Pamela Harriman Biogra- 
phy Focuses on Famous Men in Her Life " 
f April 28) by Martha Sherrill: 

It astounds and saddens me that a 


herself as a capable representative of 
the United States to France. 

R. VIRTUE. 
'Paris. 


serious newspaper would give front- 
wtal 


The Critic Got It Rigbt 


page space to what at best is a bad book 
review. The tabloid treatment given this 
non-story is offensive and disappoint- 
ing. Pamela Harriman has proven her- 
self an able ambassador and should be 
given the respect that the International 
Herald Tribune normally gives people 
of her stature. 

PHYLLIS MORGAN. 

Paris. 


The first time 1 saw Pamela Harri- 
man. the U.S. ambassador to France. 1 
warned to form my own impression of a 
woman said to have lived the exciting 
son of life that most only dream about. 
What I encountered then and the two 
other times I encountered her was a 
woman who not only fulfills her duties 
but gives far more time and eaergy than 
required by her job, a woman who bv 
her presence, bearing and looks exudes 
class, grace and humor. 

OLGA URRUTlA BRUNO. 

Paris. 


Regarding "A FlhjJ Critic Plays the 
‘Honesty’ Card" ( Features . April 25) by 
Christopher Petkanas: 

The article takes the food critic Gilles 
Pudlowski to task for his "protectionist 
and blinkered slamming of America," 
and says that it makes Mr. Pudlowski 
seem “small and silly." To thus insult 
Mr. Pudlowski. an acknowledged food 
critic. Mr. Petkanas must consider him- 
self to be an even greater critic. 

In fact, Mr. Pudlowski is not alone in 
his views. Almost everyone who lives in 
Europe finds American food disgusting. 

JOHN MAORIS. 

London. 


hooliganism, the police will reclassify the 
case as vandalism. , 

This happened both in the case in- 
volving Michael Fay and in the case 
highlighted by Mr. Shenon. 

S. B. BALACHANDRER. 

Singapore/, 

The writer is press secretary to the 
minister for home affairs. 


The Pain Jb Quite Real 


Regarding "Spare the Contempt 
Please, for Suicide Is Not Painless',' 
\ Opinion , April 21) by Anna Qumdkn: 

When 1 was in my early twenties.- I 
was highly motivated, in perfect healrh, 
and ray pimples were going away. But 


every night I got into bed and prayed tq 
’ I die 


Mischief or Vandalism 


KANTATHl SUPHAMONGKHON. 

Bangkok. 


77ie writer is director of the policy and 
planning division of the Thailand Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs. 


One would expect to see an article like 
this in a supermarket tabloid, not on the 
front page or a well-respected, presti- 
gious newspaper such as yours. 

Ambassador Harriman has proven 


Regarding “ Another Caning M* Singa- 
pore” (April 22) by Philip Shenon: 

The artide quotes the allegation of an 
anonymous diplomat that Singapore 
practiced a double standard because die 
police had classified a case where a car 
was spray-painted as mischief instead of 
as vandalism, which carries a caning sen- 
tence. But in Singapore, it is standard 
police practice to initially classify an iso- 
lated incident in which private property is 
defaced by paint as mischief under the 
penal code. If related inddents later sur- 
face to show a pattern of indiscriminate 


a God I didn't believe in to let me die 
mercifully as I slept, so I wouldn't have 
to face another day of psychic agony. 
My father, in good faith, sent me to the 
family doctor, who told me mv fears 
were "sophomoric" and advised me to 
stop drinking coffee late at night. 

Finally, after two years, like a fog, the 
depression lifted i still don't know what 
caused this black hole in my life. Fortu- 
nately. I never had the courage to try 
suicide. But anyone who has suffered 
from acute depression wifi tell you that 
there is no difference between the cander 
patient who wishes to die because he is 
convinced the agony will neveT abate 
and the depressive who chooses suicide. 

MARTIN AMADA. 

Roquebrane, France. 






T Hf/E 


M"; 




v ■■ ■ 

: ■»' “ — * 


IHT. 







‘THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1992" 


A BOOK OF GREAT FRONT PAGES FROM THE 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUN E. THURSDAY. MAY 5- 1994 

HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Arching Neck May Lead to Strokes 


Bv Jane E. Brody 

\Yn Vi«! Timet Service 

N EW YORK — A year ago. a neuroi.*- 
gisi described five cases of serious 
neurological problems, including 
four strokes, in women aged 54 10 84 
after shampoos in beauty parlors. 

As is common practice when beauticians 
shampoo hair or neutralize a permanent wave, 
the women's heads were lipped back over the 
edge or the sink. 

Now. after a year of detailed studies of blood 
flow to the brain, the neurologist. Dr. Michael 
Weintraub. believes that the risk of stroke and 
lesser forms of brain damage when the neck is 
arched or [wisied in extreme positions is much, 
greater than he had originally believed. The 
hazard, he says, is not limited to older people 
and extends well beyond those who visit beauty 
Salons. 

Also at risk are young people bom with a 
hidden malformation of a main an cry leading 
to the brain. Damage from extreme neck posi- 
tions can affect them if they undergo prolonged 
dental work, paint ceilings or do other work 
over dteir heads, are subjected to extreme chi ro- 
practic manipulations of ihe neck or are fined 
with a breathing tuhe in surgery. 

Each of these circumstances can pldcc ihe 
neck in a position that greatly reduces blood 
flow through one or both of ihe vertebral arter- 
ies. Dr. Wcintraub's studies have shown. The 
problem i.x especially likely to affect older peo- 
ple who have complicating factors like high 
blood pressure or diabetes, which make them 
more vulnerable to stroke. 

When blood flow- becomes sluggish, clots can 
form that are earned into the brain when nor- 
mal blood flow is restored. These clots can 
block cireuljuon to a pan of the brain, causing 
a stroke. Dr. Weintraub suggested that this 
might account for the disproportionate occur- 
rence of strokes during sleep or just after awak- 
ening. 

In a report that, was presented to the annual 
meeting of the American Academy of Neurol- 
ogy. Dr. Weintraub called for doctors and po- 
tential patients to be alert to ihe warning signs 
of interrupted vertebral circulation, like dizzi- 
ness or loss of balance when the neck is bent. 
He is also warning the elderly and anyone who 


Extreme Neck Position and Blood Flow 

Vertebral arteries, which run through bony tunnels on either side of the cervical vertebrae, 
carry blood from Ihe heart to the bran. Extreme positions that arch the neck backward or 
twist it sharply to the side compress the arteries, reducing Wood flow, and can pose a risk 
of stroke for the elderly and people with certain malformations of the vertebrae 


Cervical . 
vertebrae X 


Vertebral arteries 
carry blood from 
heart to brain 


A 

I *. 

T * 

* I 

/ A 


« Arteries are 
■ compressed 
at points ot sharp 
angulation 


Source. Dr Michael l. Wemiraal? 

already faces a higher than average risk of 
stroke to avoid extreme neck positions. 

The two vertebral an erics carry oxygen-rich 
blood from the vessels leaving the heart up to the 
back of the braid — the brain stem, cerebellum 
and thalamus — as well as to parts of the spinal 
column. They ire called vertebral arteries be- 
cause where ihey rise through the neck they are 
housed in bony tunnels formed by projections 
from the sides of the cervical vertebrae. Together 
they are responsible for earning 20 to 25 percent 
of ihe blood that reaches the brain. 

Because the vertebral arteries are next to the 
bones of the neck, they are easily twisted and 
compressed when the neck is bent in extreme 
positions. 

The elderly are especially at risk because with 
age all major arteries tend to become clogged 
with fatty deposits (hat reduce the passageway 
through which blood must flow. The elderly are 
also more likely to have arthritic changes in 
Lheir necks and irregular bony spikes on their 
cervical vertebrae, both of which can increase 


Male Hormone’s Effect on Women 


.\Vu 1 'tA 7/«:ls ScrrUv 
EW YORK — Try as humans may to 
appreciate life's complexities and 
half-tones, we often resort to dual- 
ism. dividing the world into conser- 
vatives and liberals, rich and poor. and. or 
course, men and women, with their comple- 
mentaiy genitalia and their characteristic hor- 
mones. Men have androgens, most notably tes- 
tosterone: women have estrogens. 

“Androgen" comes from the Greek "maker 
of males." and “estrogen" signifies the maker of 
the esirus cycle, which rcguljies ovulation and 
menstruation, the essence of womanhood. 

However, men and women each have a fair 
amount of the opposite >ex > hormones in their 
blood. Scicnti>L> have long played down the 
implications of that hormonal kinship. e\pe- 
cially when studying how tcsifMerone and oth- 
er androgens work in a woman's body. 

They knew estrogen to be indispensable to 
the growth of all embryos, regard I es> or >e>. By 
contrast, testosterone has been viewed as a 
luxury, needed mainly to shape a male's form 
and sexual function, and only vestigially and 
irrelevantly present in women. 

Now. with the explosion of inierest in wom- 
en's health issues generally, physicians and sci- 
entists from a broad cross section of disciplines 
have begun to consider the role or male hor- 
mones on the making of a female. 

They are trying to determine how closely 


testosterone is linked to a woman's .sex drive, 
and whether the hormone is necessary to main- 
tain female muscle mass and bone density into 
old age. These preliminary and often conflict- 
ing investigations have sharply divided physi- 
cians over the wisdom of giving postmenopaus- 
al women small doses of testosterone along 
with the esirogen-replacemem therapy they 
may receive. 

Doctors in Britain and Australia are much 
more likely to prescribe low-dose testosterone 
pellets or injections for women complaining or 
flagging libido and depression than are U. S. 
doctors, who are hesitant to begin treating 
women with a potent hormone that is linked to 
men's comparatively early death. 

W ITH even greater trepidation. 

some scientist* are seeking to 
leant the extent to which andro- 
gens influence a woman's person- 
ality. energy levels, ref alive aggressiveness or 
assert ivenes-i. and any other traits commonly 
described as masculine. 

“The borders between classic maleness and 
femaleness are much grayer than people real- 
ized.’’ said Dr. Robert Wil’d, professor and chief 
of the section on research and eoucalion in 
women's health at the University of Oklahoma 
Health Sciences Center, in Oklahoma City. 

Men have between 300 and 900 nanograms 
of testosterone for every deciliter of blood. 


BOOKS 


COTE D'AZUR: Inventing 

the French Riviera 

By Man- Blume. Illustrated. 20$ 
pages. Paper. $14.95 (£?y? in 
U K.). Thames and Hudson. 

Reviewed by 
Angeline Goreau 

P LACE is notoriously difficult 
to define: it exolxo out of a 
complicated play ...f history and 
weather, character jnd accident, 
rarely standing still l.inc enouch 
for one to jrnve at unyihir.u more 
than observation. The Cole J‘ Vrur. 
however. a.« Mar. Blume tells u*. 
did not - 1 mueh c.oive M Trim: 
forth whole I rom the imagination 
of surt-s tarred northerner- who 
saw if as j place of “escape from 
winter'- cold and >.iciai re-iunt-: 
the place to jet „w.i\ from it al! 
and. even I ua lb . to get a«;n with 
every thing" 

The raw material from which the 
Cote d'Azur as conjured ftjsj nar- 
row strip of seaside, no more than 
125 miles ili» kilometers i long, a 
brief but brilliantly illuminatcc'in- 
lersliee between the Mediterranean 
and three mountain ranee- Before 
the railroad arrived, i: wa- virtually 
inaccessible: a collection of pover- 
ty-stricken villages who-c ci-mmon 
trait was 'Uspiuon of the world 
outside 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


® Henri Chauchat. a blind pro- 
fessor of English, has been listening 
lo "One Flew Over ike Cuckoo's 
S'est." by Ken Kcsev. horrowed on 
tape from the English Language 
Library for the Blind in Paris. 

"I'ni not too fond of all these 
subtleties about life in a psychiatric 
hospital and all these thoughts and 
afterthoughts, f find it a" hit too 
intricate for ny way of thinking. 
But it’s jolly well written. " 

(Ram James. IHT> 



The English were the lirM to 
seize upon the imaginative possibil- 
ities hardscrabble natives haa un- 
accountably overlooked. Blume. j 
writer for the International Herald 
Tribune in Paris, tells us in “Cote 
d'Azur." Dismissing England as 
Tog-land. " Lord Brougham, the 
reputed "inventor" of Cannes, be- 
gan wintering on the Riviera in the 
ISoOs. He exerted himself consider- 
ably to persuade others to join him. 
even gome so far as to interrupt the 
"Dialogue Upon Republican and 
Monarchical Government" he was 
writing to insert a passage extolling 
the Rjvicrj's ■■delightful climate." 

Lords and ladies in flight from 
chilly drizzle wore presently joined 
by the French. Germans.’ Polish 
and Russians: all fashionable Eu- 


rope flocked to the Cote d'Azur. 
The Riviera. Blumeobser.es, "be- 
came a place to invent life in terms 
of one’s dreams of it.” 

The natives, suspicious by na- 
ture. initially greeted the invasion 
of their terrain with a certain wan; 
confusion. In 1851. Alexandre Du- 
mas was informed by a local inn- 
keeper that his new guests were Jcs 
Anglais. but he wasn't sure whether 
they were German anglais or 
French. Wariness gave way to wili- 
ness. however, and before long 
Nice had established a chamber of 
commerce and hired Gustave Eiffel 
to design a thermometer showing 
exaggerated temperatures. “When 
the sun shines in Nice it is real 
sun." that city’s bc»osiers an- 
nounced. “not the big round Dutch 


T Cell Dysfunction: A Theory of AIDS Progression 

Frpe radicals - highly reactive oxygen-based molecules - «* 3f a nydemat may „ / 
lead to the dysfunction or death ot T cells, which help regulate the Immune s^em. uj 

Researcher/ theorize that the body's normal inflammatory response to Infection triggers a /y 

cycle that leads to T cell death. j t tj 






¥■ A 




Messenger 

molecules 


vv 

XX 

XX 



Glutathione 
Free radical 


Free radical Glutathione 


A healthy T cell's pnmary 
defense against free 
radicals is the antioxidant 
glutathione, a molecule that 
binds with and neutralizes 
lies radicals before they 
harm the cell. 



/**. 


■> »\ 








K p, 
■■■& 


When Infection occurs. 

the body stimulates messenger molecules '.Jy 
to signal cells that infection is present and 
an inflammatory response is under way. 

These signals stimulate the production of free 
radicals, which are then disarmed and transported 
out ol the celt t>y glutathione. 


T cell function deteriorates \ 
as the cycle continues: 
messenger molecules send " S 
more signals, producing more _ / 
free radicals, depleting glutathione. - 
Overwhelmed by so many frmming . ; 
signals, the T call grows hypersensitive: 
and unable to respond as ft should- . 


faction, and stay - 
«»goaittt»-v ; 





Facing forward, arteries in neutral position Arteries twist when head is fumed 

nr I VJA.runut Badxa c.npWThc Vd To*. 


Source- Stanford University School of Medians 




the risk of vertebral artery compression when 
their necks are turned in wavs that caused no 
trouble in their younger years. 

In Iasi year's report in’ the April 28 issue of 
The Journal of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, Dr. Weintraub described the cases of the 
women who required hospitalization for severe 
neurological disturbances and stroke after 
shampoos in beauty parlors. He attributed the 
damage lo “mechanical impingemenf of blood 
flow through one or both vertebral arteries 
when, during the shampoos, their necks were 
arched back so that their chins pointed toward 
the ceiling. 

Jus! a month before his report 10 cases of 
stroke after anesthesia administered with the 
neck in an extreme position had been described 
in the journal Neurology. When anesthesiolo- 
gists insert tbe tube that maintains lung Function 
during surgery, they temporarily arch the neck 
far back to straighten out the airway. But some- 
times the neck is kept in that position throughout 
the surgery, which could East for hours. 


Why Do a Body’s Defenses Fail? 


i " .Y r. ,VjV£-_ * 


much of it generated by the testes, but some 
originating in the adrenals, the small glands 
abutting the kidneys. (A nanogram is a bil- 
lionth of a gram.) 

In women, a high measurement of testoster- 
one is l(X) nanograms. but the average is around 
40. said Dr. Geoffrey Redmond, president of 
the Foundation for Developmental Endocri- 
nology and a physician at Mount Sinai Hospi- 
tal in Geveland. But the testosterone level var- 
ies significantly with the menstrual cycle, as do 
the more stereo typically female hormones. e$- 
Logen and progesterone. 

The impact of fluctuating testosterone on 
the body is not clear. Researchers have a good 
idea of whal testosterone does to males. During 
fetal development, it shapes the growth uf the 
male genitals and possibly influences brain cir- 
cuitry. When a boy reaches puberty, androgen 
production in the testes swings into gear' to 
sculpt the secondary sexual characteristics: the 
thickening of muscles and vocal cords, the 
widening of the shoulders, the growth of the 
penis and the beard. 

In adolescent girls, testosterone 3lso makes 
pubic and underarm hair grow. It could help 
their muscles and bones develop, although how 
it interacts with estrogen — which is known to 
be necessary for calcium absorption and bone 
strength — is unclear. 

Natalie Angier 


cheese one sees elsewhere at this 
lime of year." 

Casinos at Monte Carlo and 
Nice competed viciously: The 
Ni^ois made it their business to stir 
up ugly rumors about the many 
victims who had taken lheir lives 
after losing fortunes at Monte Car- 
lo’s gaming tables. “The suicides 
are carefully wrapped, put in cases 
and sent out of the principality by 
ordinary mail" a newspaper in 
Nice reported. 

By the latter part of the century, 
the Cote d’Azur had become, as- 
Somerset Maugham put il “a sun- 
ny place for shady people." 
Among them were famous courte- 
sans like Liane de Pougy and La 
Belle Otero, who numbered 
among her lovers Kina Edward 
VII. Czar Nicholas II of Russia. 
King Alfonso Xlll of Spain. Reza 
Shah, William K. Vanderbilt and 
Leopold II. King of the Belgians 
(who took daily swims at Cap’ Fer- 
mi with his white beard lucked 
into a rubber envelope). 

Bui, as Blume astutely points 
out, “the contiguity of mvnde and 
demimonde required a strict new 
code of conduct.” Henry James's 
fictional American in “The Ambas- 
sadors." Lambert Streiher. learns 
that one might bring a woman of 
dubious character to raev Nice, but 
not to the aristocratic Cannes. 

In the 1920s. America discovered 


By Natalie Angier 

,Ven' Y<*k Times Service 

EW YORK — .As the virus that 
causes AIDS slow ly and brutally dis- 
assembles the body's immune sys- 
tem, it causes confounding turmoil at 
every node of the defense network. Some im- 
mune cells overreact to the infection, while 
others fail to respond when called. 

The molecules called cytokines that normally 
control the body's battle plan, signaling the t 
cells, B cells, macrophages and antibodies when 
and where to strike, start to send all the wrong 
signals at the wrong times. The confusion is so 
great that scientists have just begun sorting out 
which defects in the immune system are central 
to the progression of AIDS and which are 
relatively minor disruptions. 

Now researchers from the Stanford University 
School of Medicine propose that so-called oxida- 
tive stress may play a critical role in the gradual 
decay of the immune system: the damage 
wrought by too many dangerous oxygen mole- 
cules inside immune cells may disrupt the cells' 
performance and eventually cause them to die. 

The researchers believe that an important 
feature of AIDS is a sharp drop in the body’s 
concentration of glutathione, a major mecha- 
nism Tor absorbing excess oxygen and thus 
protecting against oxidative harm. 

They also suggest that replenishing the 
body's stores of glutathione may help retard the 
progress of AIDS. A clinical trial is under way 
in San Francisco, testing the usefulness of a 
compound called N-acetylcystdne. or NAC. a 


IN BRIEF 

Getting in Sync 
With Sleep Cycles 

WASHINGTON ( WP) — Scien- 
tists have discovered that there is a 
biological-dock gene in mice, and 
therefore, probably in humans. 
And they have found that without 
that gene, the clock slops — leaving 
the rodents with no internal mecha- 
nism to tell them when to wake up 
and when to go to sleep. 

It is said to be the first time a 
gene governing circadian rhythm 
has been indicated in a mammal. 


precursor from which glutathione is made, in 
blocking the malig nant course of tbe human 
immunodeficiency virus. 

Scientists cau tion. however, that it remains to 
be demonstrated that glutathione depletion is 
central to progression of AIDS, or that the 
compound will do any good against the disease 
at all. At its best the researchers said. NAC 
would only slow the pace oT immune deteriora- 
tion. rather than act as a cure. 

“We think the idea is promising, but we have 
to be cautious,” said Dr. Samuel Broder, direc- 
tor of the National Cancer Institute, which is 
involved in tbe studies of glutathione depletion 
- and its possible role in AIDS and cancer. 
‘There are a lot of times when we think we 
know the answer, but then we’re hit with a 
disappointment We have to defer to tbe clini- 
cal trials process.” 

A NUMBER of scientists have stud- 
ied glutathione deficiency and its rel- 
evance to AIDS, but Dr. Leonore A. 
Herzeoberg and Dr. Leonard A. 
Herzenberg, a husband-wife team at Stanford, 
have been at the forefront of tbe investigations. 

Reporting in the current issue of The Pro- 
ceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 
the Herzenbergs. Dr. Frank J. StaaL Dr. Mi- 
chael T. Anderson and their colleagues signifi- 
cantly expand on initial work in the area. 

Going beyond the observation that AIDS 
patients display diminish ed levels of glutathi- 
one. the scientists offer new insights into how 
that depletion disturbs T cells and a model of 
why the protective compound begins declining. 
Glutathione is ordinarily abundant in all 


cells of the body, taking up qtdteh.b&afc*i 
in the cytoplasm, the cell’s walerylnt® 0r :^ 
one ctf the body’s main aatfatidaint wwfa --; 
nlsxns, intended ro mop up loose osjgeun^ 

coles, called free radiraKr that are 
during ordinary metab ol ism, - beforeffiefa:. 
radicals start poking holes in the gen^W; ‘ 
terns, or fats of the ccD. fOthen jhhm'fa^jfa. 1 
antioxidants include wtammstike A, GandB' 
Beyond its protective duties, 
a role in shuttling amino arids anraodl^ 



SSEOS**--" 


0* w ’ — 


— _ 




the Cote d’Azur and reinvented joie 
de vivre. “The Americans.” Blume 
recounts, “came with their swinging 
gaiL their jazz records . . . their 
way or making the impossible look 
easy, and above ail lite briefly conta- 
gious national mood of expectation, 
the belief, in F. Scott Fitzgerald's 
words, ‘that there were gay, exciting 
things hovering in ihe next hour.’ ” 

Gerald and Sara Murphy, on 
whom Fitzgerald based characters 
in "Tender Is the Night.” visited 
Cole Poner one summer and decid- 
ed to stay. Until this time, the Rivi- 
era had been a strictly winter affair. 
But now the shore became beach, 
and the craze for sunbathing was 
unleashed. 

The Cote D’Azur’s idyll, as all 
dreams do. eventually came to an 
end. the exquisite natural beauty 
eventually spoiled by crowds and 
freeways', corruption and over- 
building. In the end. the Riviera 
devoured itself. 

Mary Blume. in her highly enter- 
taining and wonderfully illustrated 
account, has given us a definition 
more ambitious than most of u 
small place that has for a long time 
played a large part in our dreams of 
night. I still sec blue skies and bou- 
gainvillea when I hear the name. 

Angeline Onreau. a luerar • critic 
and trove) writer, wrote tins for The 
Hew York Times Bonk Review. 


.Although the gene has not been 
found — only very strong evidence 
that it must exist — the discoverers 
lost no time in identifying great 
potential practical consequences. 
Joseph S. Takahashi, a neurobiolo- 
gisi at Northwestern University in 
Evanston. Illinois, said his group's 
finding could someday allow better 
treatment of human sleep disor- 
ders, jet-lag problems and certain 
types of seasonal depression. 

Gene Mutation Yields 
Clue to Thrombosis 

LONDON (Reuters) — Dutch 
researchers say they have found out 
why thrombosis tends to run in the 
family. 

Writing in the scientific journal 
Nature, they said they had identi- 
fied a single mutation in the gene 
responsible for producing the 
blood-clotting factor known as 
Factor V. The mutation means that 
the body’s own anti-coagulant, ac- 
tivated protein C. which keeps the 
blood flowing freely, could not 
break Factor V down as usual. 

The research into thrombosis — 


BRIDGE 

By Alan Truscott 

O N ihe diagramed deal West 
heard his opponents charge 
into six diamonds. 

The audience and commentators 
saw that (he slam would easily 
moke alter any lead but the spade 
ace: South would quickly maneu- 
ver a discard of dummy’s spade 
singleton on a heart winner. 

West did lead the spade ace; and 
faced the second stage of the prob- 
lem. Looking at 52 cards on the 
screen, the audience realized that 
East was in grave danger of being 
squeezed. Suppose a passive play of 
a heart at the second trick. The 
declarer would then draw three 
rounds of trumps ending in his 
hand, cash his three major-suit win- 
ners and ruff a spade. Another dia- 
mond lejd could produce this end- 
ing with the lead in dummv: 


the formation of a blood dot in tbe 
vessels or heart — was carried out 
by Rogier Berlin a and colleagues 
Leiden’s University HospitaL 

Microwave Effect 
In Oceans’ Depths 

LONDON (Reuters) — The 
•oceans seem to be warming up, not 
as “greenhouse" theories predict 
but as if they were in a gam micro- 
wave oven, with waters midway be- 
tween the surface and floor gaining 
heat fastest, scientists report in the 
journal Nature. 

Britain’s James Rennell center 
for ocean circulation concluded 
.this from the results of a deep- 
ocean hydrographic section taken 
along the route Columbus* sailed 
502 years ago roughly from West 
Africa to Florida. 

Harry Bryden. from the research 
center in Southampton, said that 
between 1957 and 1992, the tem- 
perature of the ocean 1.100 meters' 
riown rose by 0J2 degree centi- 
grade lo 45 degrees (about 40 de- 
grees Fahrenheit). 


NORTH 

♦ — 

* 5 

4Q 10 


WEST 
♦ — 

X? i 
0 — 

*87 


EAST 

Si 

0 _ 

* K J 
SOUTH 


The lead of the last trump would 
then destroy East, who would have 
to unguard one or the black suits. 

But this did not happen because 
West shifted lo a club at the sec- 
ond trick. He knew that this could 
not hurt his partner and might 
help. Since the contract was five 
diamonds in the replay, his team 


.fenri 

A Botanist’s GaUe 
To Tropical PtaMT 

NEW YORK (NYir^Tk 
plant may be shrubby, .ntlboia- 
nists are eagerly searching far iL 
Only one example is knotra, ad ii 
was in an area of Honduras vtat 
all the trees were cur down. Sofa 
ho mare have turned up. *. 

The missing plant, Haptastis 
haziettii, was one of the majerfr 
coveriesmadeby botanists ait ft? 
prepared a catalogue of;ihe-lW06 
plants of the rkhtropkalanafiw 
southern Mexico to Panama. Un 
first volume of the seven-vote* 
work, “Flora Mesoamericana,'' « 
complete. - : : • 

The plant, which .has separtf 
male and female flowers, was Ifc 
collected at the baise of the CndD-. 
lera Norabre de Dios akmg h* 
north coast of Hondhns. Fran ibe 
single specimen collected, bctfansB 
determined that it bdotged to a 
new genus and spedes. but ttey an 
not sure whether it bdongs to » 
existing family or should be pfecw 
in a new one. . '. 


gained 12 imps insfftd^ ^ 05 ^ 
13. ' 


north: 

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The bidding: 

East South West 

Pass to J* > 15 

Pass 5 0 Pass' 

Pass Pass Pass:. - . 

West led the spade 


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affects T-ceR performance^ the StanfMd ai»." 
tists isolated the ceQs from healthy imBvkkEfe 
and used cbeuncais to lower the cd^-s^iertf 
glutathione artifiaaDy. Ihe resoha 

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signals that normally would stimnhttrdtesu 
divide into the potent clones needed BHoge 
war against microbes. i 

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became inappropriatdy responsive tq^fast 
nals. They grew hypersenstnu tD ispb 
molecule called tumor necrosis~fadri^ ^^ 
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body as part of an inflammatory jeatSfltv ad 
one that would not ordinarily arouse the wiri- 
ty of these T ceQs- EventuaHy-the xc^saJ, 
overstimulated T cells commit SDadei Di: 
Leonard Herzenbeig said, unde^oang^pnes 
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International Herald Tribune ; Thursday, May 5, 7994 




€B€L 


rchitecfs of ti 


Page 9 



Scandals Weigh on Spain’s Markets 


SSS™» WMX: 110.86® 

S? ex ®* con H»wdof 
l ^5 Uoon ^^ ^ ^^ln0^NS«l.^Jten! S 1f1^2=^oO^ rieS, C ° mPi ' ed 




World Index 

■ '■• ‘ < ;.3o; I - ..^ 
?'*. c_y. '.'2 3j 


Asia, ''pacific.. 


Approx: weighting; 32% 
Ctoec 126.67 nwjisus 


Eurotie 1 


Approx, weighting: 37% 

CJosk 11350 Pibvj 11£L93 




Compiled by Our Sufff From Dispatches 

MADRID — Spanish bonds, stocks and 
the peseta all fell sharply Wednesday, hit by 
Tumors of a debt-rating downgrade triggered 
in turn by a chain of corruption cases shaking 
the government. 

The peseta fell through a support level of 
82 to the mark and the 10 - year government 
bond widened its differential over the Ger- 
man Bund to more than 300 baas points for 
the first time in nearly a year. 

Traders said the loses had been set in 
motion by rumors (hat Moody’s Investors 
Service Inc. and Standard & Poor’s Corp. 
were lowering the 001010/5 debt rating. Both 
agencies denied they had made any changes 
to Spain's sovereign rating or put the country 
on their special watch' UsL 

Political scandals involving former offi- 
cials of the Bank of Spain and the country’s 
police force have shaken the markets in re- 
cent days and made foreign investors nervous 
about the stability of the government. 

“The worst thing about all this is that the 
■ markets are left at the mercy of rumors and 
nobody knows what’s going on,” an analyst 
said. 

Interior Minister Antoni Asuncion ap- 
peared before a parliamentary committee 
Wednesday to explain the disappearance of 
the former head of the Civil (Wrd. Luis 
Roldan, who is wanted on embezzlement 
charges. 

Next wed, Mr. Gooz&lez will answer ques- 
tions in Parliament on the case, which led Mr. 


Asuncion to submit his resignation Saturday. 

“I want to express the government’s strong 
desme to get to the bottom of this.” he said to 
the committee. But he offered no news of the 
whereabouts or Mr. Roldin, who failed to 
turn up in court last week. 

The security forces' failure to find Mr. 
Rolddn, who has given a lengthy interview to 


rise in the yield of Spain's 10-year bonds to 
thdr highest level for seven months, while 
shares hovered at their lows for the year. 

While European bond yields generally 
have risen in recent months, the rise in Span- 


ish yields has outstripped other markets in 
the past weeks as details of the political 
scandal emerged. Ten-year bonds on the Bar- 
celona exchange have dropped almost three 
points in a week to trade as low as 94.60. well 
below the year’s high of 107.09 reached Jan. 
31. 

“It seems Kke we’ve got the political uncer- 
tainty and corruption scandals that we're 
used to seeing in Italy,” said Kirit Shah, 
market strategist at First National Bank of 
Chicago. “And it seems to be on a larger scale 
than expected.” 

The Spanish stock market has also taken a 
beating as investors bail out. The General 
Index of leading stocks in Madrid feD 2.63 
percent to a reading of 31 1.09 after it had 
posted a drop of 1J2S percent on Tuesday. 

“The market wil] continue to be very 
tense,” said Marco Pianelh, analyst at Nomu- 
ra International. “People are waiting for the 
next revelation of political corruption to un- 
dermine GonzAlez.” 

Local elections in southern Spain, tradi- 
tionally a Socialist stronghold, are scheduled 
for June 12. If the ruling party fares badly, 
the government's troubles will begin to look 
even more serious, catling into question key 
economic policies such as labor-market re- 
forms. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


'The markets are left at 
the mercy of rumors, and 
nobody knows what’s 
going on.’ 


.'North.; America' 


El Mundo newspaper from his hiding place; 
has lent the scandal an element of farce. 

A Madrid court has issued an arrest order 
for Mr. RoIdAn, who is suspected of taking 
bribes and emhealing Interior Ministry 
funds, and frozen bis assets. 

The case, which coincides with an investi- 
gation into Mariano Rubio's personal fi- 
nances while he was governor of the central 
bank, has worried foreign investors. 

Mr. RoldAn’s statements to the newspaper, 
in which he alleged widespread corruption 
and pledged he would not go to jail alone, 
were received with a measure of cynicism at 
home but with alarm abroad, dealers said. 

Fears of a rating downgrade helped spur a 


U.S. Economy 
Is Expanding, 
Fed Report Says 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting: 28% 
Close 93.08 PfBVj 83.48 


Appro*. weighGng: 5% 
CIOSK 105S7 Pm.: Ml 







Philips NY Seeks to Expand in Media 


WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
economy is growing solidly in most 
of the country, the Federal Reserve 
Board said Wednesday in its so- 
called Tan Boole report on regional 
economic activity. 

The report showed that econom- 
ic growth gathered pace in the 
spring after two months of excep- 
tionally severe winter weather. It 
offered a much stronger assessment 
of the economy's vigor than last 
spring, when only moderate expan- 
sion was reported. 

Expansion is being driven by ro- 
bust factory production, home 
building and retail sales, the report 
said. 

“It looks like a pickup after a 
rough winter,” said economist 
Cynthia Latia of DRl/McGraw 
Hill Inc. in Lexington, Massachu- 
setts. “Business is running along 
pretty strongly, and I wouldn't 
really look for any weak spots until 
summer, when we may see some 
slowdown in bousing.” 

Price rises were restrained by 
competition, the report said, an en- 
couraging sign that inflation was 
under control so far. 


D J 
1993 

Wold Index 


The index tracks U.S. doMar vakm of stocks ire Tokyo, Nw York, London, and 
Argentina, AutfraEa. Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chfla, Danmark, Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, IWy, Mexico, Natberiands, Naw Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden. Sw itz erland and Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York end ] 
London, the index is composod at the SO top issues in terms of market cepkaBzadon. 
othenriso the ten top stocks era tracked. \ 


Industrial Sectors 


Pm. % 
dam dang* 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — 
Declaring an interest in expansion 
in - the media business. Philips Elec- 
tronics NV said Wednesday that it 
might issue new shares this year if it 
needed cash to finance a major ac- 
quisition. 

“We have made die decision that 
we wish to grow in media, and this 
has to be via acquisitions, with the 
object of adding value,” said Dud- 
ley Eustace; Philips’s chief finan- 
cial officer. 


marked an undefined amount for mg it was cautious about the rate of 


acquisitions. 


earnings improvement because of 


Philips wiB r emain active in capi- lower consumer spending in Eu- 
' markets, ' 


L? J.L/UJU1 “It's more evidence the economy 

is on a brisk growth path and that 

Investors and traders have re- " 
peatedly said in recent months that m ^ ^tDe, said Rc ^} 
J Dedenck, an economist with 


Mr. Eustace said, as it rope. 


converts substantial chunks of Sales fell to 13.65 billion guilders 


short-term debt to longer maturi- from 13.75 bi i Uon because of a tod °so- 


they believe Philips plans to raise a “ win 

money by selling new shares be- North em Trust m Chicago, 
cauaete share pnee is high enough 


number of divestments. Philips 


Philips is already active in the sold its stakes in Matsushita Elec- 
media sector. It owns 75 percent of tronics Corp. and the video rental 


up in March by 1.1 percent to a 
“The share price now represents seasonally adjusted 5274.7 billion 
a significant premium over the — more than double Wall Street 


music and film concern Polygram chain Super Club last year. On a 
NV and has a business unit that comparable basis, sales were slight- 

rXPA^HAJT intafflANlhh mixzlin 1 * _ I a f -ft 


produces interactive media prod- l y higher. Mr. Eustace said 


book value of the company,” Mr. 
Eustace said “Shareholders should 
be reasonably satisfied” 


ucts. That unit, however, is still in 
its infancy and is unprofitable. 


“The results are very good, very 
solid” said Kerin Brau, an analyst 


Philips's components and semi- 


Eneqy 108:66 11QJ2 -124 

Ua»s 116.91 118.99 -1.75 

Hnance ( 14.91 116.72 -155 

Santa* 115J50 t16.7S.-0J9 


Capital Goods 
Bar Materials ~~ 
Consumer Goods 
MtoceSaneous 


11230 11146 -0.49 
12351 12525 -139 
98.1 D 99.70 -1.60 
123.31 12533 -151 


Ffr mow MbtmsBon abort Ihe Index, a booklet eava&bleljBe of charge. 

Write to Trib Index, 781 Avenue Charles deGautie, 92521 NeioSy Cedes, Francs. 


i“ -• * . ’.‘jy+m *£„ 


© (rtfomallonol Hflrald Tribune 


“We are prepared to spend but 
we are not prepared to spend at any 
price.” 

Mr. Eustace spoke at a news con- 
ference after the presentation of 
Philips’s first-quarter results. He 
said the company had budgeted 3 
billion guilders ($2 billion) for cap- 
ital expenditure this year and ear- 


I _ . 14- umui uu nnni jjt 

Philips profit in the firet quarter with Credit Suisse Frrsi Boston 
came mat the high eaid of analysts who tracks international election- 


conductor division moved the most 
profitable one in the first quarter. 


forecasts, helped by lower debt and 
an unexpected improvement in the 
consumer electronics division. 


uwpvu uy luvra ouu lcs companies, 
an unexpected improvement in the ... , ... 

consumer electronics division. As with many other multination- 

al companies that have reported 
Net profit soared 152 percent to sharply higher first-quarter earn- 
260 million guilders, from 103 mil- ings ui recent weeks. Philips’s prof- 


lion guilders in the depressed first 
quarter of 1993. The company 
made no forecast for the year, say- 


its were helped more by cost-cut- 
ting than by economic recovery in 
Europe, analysts said 


profitable one in the first quarter, 
with operating income of 372 mil- 
lion guilders, up from 189 million 
last year. 

Components and semiconduc- 
tors are among the few Philips ac- 
tivities with a cyclical nature, where 
earnings depend heavily on fluctu- 
ations in the economic cycle. 


Kluge ’s LDDS Bids 
$2 Billion for WilTel 


( Bloomberg. Reuters ) 


INTERNATIONAL 


A Trucker Branches Out 


Lopez Peijury Inquiry Is Dropped 


W! 


By Simon Bradwell 

Reuters 

W ELLINGTON — Graeme Hart, an 
entrepreneur truck driver turned 
mtdtimilHonaire bookseller, is un- 
Hkdy to remain a passive investor in 
the Australian grocery retailer Food] an ds Associ- 
ated 1 id . analysts said Wednesday. 

Mr. Hart bought a 15 percent stake in Food- 
lands last week through a share swap, and analysts 
saw the purchase as a likely first step toward a 
longer-term goal, figuring he was unfikdy to be 
satisfied with a passive stake in the Australian 


“It’s been said that he’s not seeking any manage- 
ment controLT an analyst said. “That seems very 


strange to me. . 

Aside from the obvious retail connection, the 
move is seen as a departure for Mr. Hart from his 
core business, WhitcouDs Ltd, which operates 
book and stationery stores. 

Mr. Hart, 38, who has risen in four years from 
relative anonymity to become one of New Zea- 
land’s richest men, wasnot available for comment. 

He his name as an opportunist entrepre- 
neur by buying the Government Printing Office 
from me government in 1990 for 23 million New 
Zealand £>Uare (USS13 million). The price was 
described by analysts at the time as a steal. A later 
government inquiiy confirmed it was far too low. 

In 1 991 . Mr. Hart, through his hddmg company 
Rank Group, bought the Whitcouils chain of book 
and stationery retailers from Bnaley Invotmous 
Ud. for 71 million dollars. For the seccmd hatftf 
1993 Whitcouils reported a net profit w 13.7 
SndbUars, almSSt double the year-earlier re- 

^Analysts said Mr. Hart could be interested in 
cJSSds' New Zealand department-store eham. 


Food! an ds' New 
Farmers Deka. 


“He’s been looking at Farmers Deka for at least 
a year” an analyst said. “Two years ago he tried to 
buy Fanners and just missed, so I imagine he’s still 
■interested. It does seem strange if he's just going to 
sit on !5 percent.” ^ 

up die Farmersd^'wCTddcome if Foodlands is 
the subject of a takeover, in which case his 15 
percent might prove leverage enough to secure 
what be wants. 

“You can paint any number of scenarios, but 
really it bangs on someone wanting to come in and 
puD FAL apart,” another analyst said. “With its 
price where it is, it’s really open to that.” 

Foodlands shares traded at 5.02 Australian dol- 
lars (USS3 .55) Wednesday, down from 5.10 Tues- 
day and well below the year’s high of 8 . 00 . 

Share prices fell after the resignation of David 
Fawcett as chief executive. Mr. Fawcett quit in a 
dispute over board restructuring and amid doubts 
over Foodlands’ ability to become the third force 
in the Australian grocery market after Coles Myer 
and Wodworths. 

Hong Kong-based Dairy Farm International 
Holdings, the retail and food arm of Jardine Math- 
eson Group, is seen as a candidate to take over 
Foodlands. 

Hie market is also in the dark as to Mr. Hart’s 
intentions with his fla g shi p company, Whitcouils. 
In taking his stake in Foodlands, he essentially 
swapped holdings with Sydney-based NRMA In- 
vestments. which now holds 15.9 million shares of 
WhitcouDs, or 13.2 percent. 

WhitcouDs also spent 34 million Australian dol- 
lars to acquire the Angus & Robertson bookstore 
eham last December and bought London Books 
for 20 million New Zealand dollars. 

. Some analysts said Mr. Hart’s retention of the 
majority holding in Whitcouils was indicative of 
his commitment to the group. 


Reuters 

BONN — Prosecutors in Ham- 
burg on Wednesday dropped an 
investigation of the Volkswagen 
production chief, Jos 6 Ignacio Lo- 
pez de Arriortua, for possible per- 
jury after he agreed to pay 75,000 
Deutsche marks ($46,000) to chari- 
ty- 

But German and US. prosecu- 
tors will continue to investigate 
more serious industrial espionage 
allegations against Mr. L 6 pez by 
his former employer. General Mo- 
tors Corp. 

The UJS. vehicle maker alleges 
that the Spanish-born executive 
and his associates took confidential 
information with them when they 


“Mr. Lripez had wanted the case 
to proceed and thereby clear his 
name but agreed to settle in the 
interest of the company.” the Ger- 
man car group said. 

Last week, prosecutors in Darm- 
stadt said they had found evidence 
suggesting that VW managers had 
been in possession of documents 
and computer disks belonging to 
Opel, some of which were classified 
as secret, when they changed jobs 
last year. 

But the prosecutors said they 
could not decide whether to file 
charges against Mr. Lopez until in- 
vestigations were completed. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP ) 


l Schneider Case Weighed 

JDergen Schneider, the German 


last month, is being investigated for 
possible bribery and systematic 
evasion of value-added tax pay- 
ments, a spokeswoman for the Fi- 
nance Ministry in the stale of Hes- 
se said, according to a Reuters 
report from Frankfurt. 


Bloomberg Business News 

TULSA, Oklahoma — LDDS Communications lnc„ the fast- 
growing telecommunications company headed by the billionaire 
John Kluge, has offered $2 billion in cash or slock for rival WiiTel 
Communications. 

Shares of Williams Cos., parent of WBTel, rose almost 13 percent 
on the news. 

The “alternative offers” for Willel were disclosed Tuesday in a 
filing by LDDS with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The 
purchase price would be $2 billion minus Wiltd’s debt. Williams 
Cos. said in a statement. 

LDDS, the fourth- largest long-distance service company in the 
United States, is a Wiltd customer. It is currently negotiating a new 
long-term contract for services, said Willi ams Cos., an operator of 
pipelines and natural gas gathering and processing systems. WilTel 
provides both telecommunications and services, and acts as a carrier 
for other long-distance providers. 

Williams shares rose $3375 Wednesday, to $28,875. and LDDS 
was up 25 cents, at $2325. Trading volume in Williams was nearly 2 
million shares, about four times its recent daily average. 

Keith Bailey, Williams’s president and chief executive, said the 
LDDS offer “will be taken into consideration along with a number 
of other alternatives.” 


Mr. Schneider, who left his com- 
pany with no access to funds, is 
already being investigated on 
charges of falsifying documents, 
and he faces bankruptcy proceed- 
ings. 


These include continued ownership of WilTel, alliances with one 
more partners, a spin-off of WilTel to Williams shareholders, and 


i Williams shareholders, and 


or more partners, a spin-off of WilTel to Williams shareholders, and 
the issuance of a targeted slock. 

WilTel created in 1985 by a Williams pipeline unit, had revenue of 
$958 million last year. Wflliams ’s total revenue was $2.43 billion. 

Last month, LDDS President and chief executive Bernard Ebbers 
told investors the company plans to continue making acquisitions. 


left GM to join VW last year. Mr. 
Ldpez, VW’s purchasing and pro- 


ig and pro- 
Volkswagen 


i.9' million shares of 


Lopez, vw s purchasing and pro- 
duction manager, and Volkswagen 
deny the allegations. 

The Hamburg public prosecu- 
tor’s office said Mr. LGpez had 
agreed to pay the 75,000 DM to a 
charity foe handicapped children. 

“There was sufficient suspicion 
against the accused,” a statement 
from the office said, “of negligently 
making false and incomplete state- 
ments* on two points. 

These concerned his possession 
of a draft speech and photographs 
of the new VecLra model developed 
by the rival carmaker Adam Opel 
AG, GM^ German subsidiary. 

However, the scope of Mr. Lo- 
pez's guDt in the matter could be 
regarded as minor, according to the 
prosecutor’s statement 

VW stressed that although Mr. 
Ldpez would pay the money to 
charity, be had not been officially 
charged with any offense. 


REPUBLIC 
NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK 


A SUBSIDIARY OF REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 
Consolidated Statements of Condition 


Assets 


March 31, 


Interest-bearing deposits 

with banks 

Precious metals 


Trading account assets.......... 

Federal funds sold and 
securities purchased under 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Loans, net of unearned 

income 

Allowance for possible loan 

losses 

Loans (net) - 

Customers' liability on 

acceptances. 

Accounts receivable and 
accrued interest 


Other assets 

Total assets ................. 


1994 

1993 

5 537,749 

(Dollars t 
3 409,923 

5,273,550 

1.509,188 

7,124,687 

419,242 

864,213 

9.415.474 

10,279,667 

2.887,254 

10,022,891 

336,362 

10,359,273 

760,478 

2.772,861 

1,769,200 

6,001.206 

3,928.909 

(233^16) 

5.767,690 

(177,415) 

3,751,494 

1.314,033 

1,287,836 

664,302 

581,395 

296,782 
237,707 
$32,122,198 

500,558 

565327 

296J99 

157,093 

$27,402,512 


Liabilities and 
Stockholder^ Equity 


March 31, 


Noninterest-beering deposits: 

In domestic offices 

In foreign offices 

Interest-bearing deposits: 

in domestic offices 

In foreign offices 


977,644 

142,566 


812,229 

106,032 


mak a 
hat ws 
: restii faa 

301 

nd lair* 
ices, 

ties. - ™ 

i 0 fth, 3te 

techn^ 


economists' expectations for a CL5 
percent increase in business. Or- 
ders fell 0.3 percent in February. 

The Fed survey, which covers the 
period until the end of April and is 
more current than the Commerce 
Department report, also said busi- 
ness was booming in the manufac- 
turing sector. 

“Production or autos, vehicle 
parts, steel and building materials 
is near capacity,” the report said. 

The report will form the basis for 
discussion when the Fed's Open 
Market Committee meets May 17 
to decide whether to raise interest 
rates again. The Fed has raised the 
rate on overnight loans among 
b anks three times since January in 
an effort to prevent inflation from 
accelerating as the economy grows. 

But the policy-making commit- 
tee should find few signs of infla- 
tion in Wednesday’s report, ana- 
lysts said. 


bastes 

$ such ,g 
in: 

have ste : 
st as tier 
is far a; t 
id by tie i 
s Mfene 1 
ould deg i 
• fi 


The report said improving 
weather in March fueled retail 
sales, with apparel sales particular- 
ly strong. Auto sales also were 
strong. 

Although mortgage rates have 
crept higher, “home rales activity is 
reported bride in most parts of the 


country and improving in the 
Northeast and California.” the re- 


Northcast and California,” the re- 
port said. Concern that home mort- 
gage rates have already bottomed 
drew many potential buyers off tbe 
sidelines and into the market, the 
report said. 

(Reuters, AP. Knight- 
Ridder, Bloomberg) 


pai 

n the Pfcu 
nany otU rt 
gne 

collapse we 

Inpaid t * 
iave left SP 1 
- w 

nacleof w ° 
possible.® J 
Palestine b 
and Jeru a l| 
now. 

rs now ,lde 
offices , 

o become 
venting *** 
»e,i 

for 20 l 

iul stunn^ 
st go awa’S ' 
Mr. Aral m 
da’s inauj^ 
aides. J 

inted ex© 
fat's paw.* 1 ® 1 
speaking — 
aid Abb 
: Commit 
g the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
yhrasing v 
d around 
d minister 
letails of 
ibrehand. 
:o sign, A 
voreihat* 
this way.” 


IS: 

idienc 


i Page 1 

icaJ in No 


■'ear. Comt 
tian, Virgil 
• massager 
ping ana h 
ures of Myi 
ia, has a h 
eral law fir 
ices for crir 
pc says, “D 

Jways incre 
' >on, the pn 
liefa rcprese 
t magazine: 
that 100,1 
ot issue w 
, with an ad 
>uted to net 
and areas n> 


Total deposits 

Trading account liabilities. 

Shot-term borrowings 

Acceptances outstanding 

Accounts payable and 

accrued expenses 

Other liabilities 

Long-term debt, 

Subordinated long-term debt, 
primarily with parent 

Stockholder's Equity: 

Common stock, $100 par value: 

4.800.000 shares authorized; 

3.550.000 shares outstanding.—, 

Surplus ............. 

Retained earnings 

Net unrealized gain on securities 

avail aJ be for sale, net of taxes .... 


4,196.995 

13,137,764 

18,454,969 

2,484,101 

4,157,051 

1,314,964 


4,384,669 

11.6B1.992 


•t made its « 
□g budgets 
ies. Thedas 
e are ad rati 
by the indusi 
Inch Nails, a 
ttes, a prod i 
»acco Co. 
rth, Mr. Sir 
ns. which c 
and they co 
raOd up. 
n I sold 36Q,( 
ns of ihousat 
es,” Mr. Sir 
is, I sold tom 
ally used as c 
could have s> 
5 of sneaker 
-kei out there 


16,965,122 

114,558 

3,689,749 

1,289,154 


ge RaL 


721,447 

57.653 

2,303,214 


932,648 

42,590 

1,825,662 


580,674 


581,238 


355,000 

1,161,652 

528,322 


355,000 

1,160,656 

426.135 


3,131 

2,046,105 


$27,402312 
$ 1,281,406 


The portion d the investment r precious metals not hedged by forward sales 


REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 

Summary of Results 
On thousands except per share data) 


Total stockholder^ equity 2.046,1 05 1,94 

Total liabilities aid ™ 

stockholder’s equity ........ $32.122,196 $27,40 

Letters of credft outstanding $ 1,395,791 $ 13 

33 ms S1B.1 mffian aid SIM mJBon ki 19M and 1993, respectively. 


Three Months Ended 
March 31. 

1994 1993 


1,941,791 


N&t income 

Cash dividends declared on common stock 
Per common share 
Net income: 

Primary 

Fully diluted 

Cash dividends declared 
Average common shares outstanding: 
Primary 
Fully diluted 


1994 __ 

79,779 r 
17,317 $ 


World Headquarters; Fifth Avenue at 40th Street, New York, New York 10018 
(34 offices in Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Westchester & Roddand counties) 

Member Federal Reserve System/Member Federal Deposit insurance Corporation/Member Naw Ybrk Clearing House Asso ciation 

NEW YORK * GEfSVA * TOKYO • LONDON ■ ZURICH • LUGANO * LUXEMBOURG * IWUS * MONTE CARLO * GIBRALMR * MILAN • GUERNSEY ■ MOSCOW 
BEIRUT • MIAMI • LOS ANGELES • BEVERLY HILLS * NASSAU - CAYMAN ISLANDS • MONTREAL • TORONTO - SNGAPOR6 • HONG KONG • TMPB^ 
JAKARTA • BEIJING • SYDNEY • PBUH - MONTEVIDEO ■ PUNTA DEL ESTE ■ BUB«S ABIES • SANTIAGO - MEXICO CtTY • CARACAS » WODE ^JVBRO 


appropri. 


responsible 
inge policy, 
view cm the d 
countering sp 
I States was 1 
Js for the doll 
;ves in float: 
Wiliam McDt 
the Federal I 
w York, said 
ay. “You ca 
loating exchai 
mge rate urge 
> said Tuesc 
that the G-7 v 
a floor under 







10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl'NE. THURSDAY. :VLV1 5, 1994 


• ... ... . 


aj£«’ 


. .. 

in-** ' • ' 


MARKI? DIARY 


Precarious Dollar 
Burdens Stocks 


I \\n AjujCjflM Pnh 


t"i mtfiihii fn Our Stuff Fnm Dirpulihes 
NEW YORK — Slock prices 
slid Wednesday <?n concerns that 
persistent weakness in the dollar 

would pul! funds away from dollar- 
denominated assets. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 


age closed down lb-W> points at 
3.697.75. Declining issues outpaced 


U.S. Stocks 


advancing stock* by a 4-10-3 mar- 
gin on the New 'i ork Stock Ev 
change. 

Stock investors w ere discouruacd 

by the fact that repeated interven- 
tion by central banks »as necessary 
to support the dollar against the 
Deutsche mark and yen. 

Recent weakness in Treasury 
bond prices and the resultant high- 
er yields also damped buying en- 
thusiasm. The price of the bench- 
mark 30-vear T reasury bond edged 
up 4/32 point, to 87. with the yield 
slipping io 7.33 percent from "-'5 
percent. 

But yields have been trending 
higher this week, and strong eco- 
nomic data released Tuesday 
spurred sentiment that the Federal 
Reserve Board may raise interest 


rales again soon a> a preemptive 
strike against inflation. The Fed 
has already nudged rates up three 
times this year. 

Takeover talk continued to influ- 
ence stock trading. A widespread 
belief that further consolidation is 
ahead for the drug and health care 
sectorand speculation about acqui- 
sitions concerning other companies 
have affected trading in recent 
days. 

Syntex was the most actively | 
traded stock on the Big Board for a 
second straight day. drawing inter- 
est from news this week that Roche 
Holding would acquire the drug- 
maker for S5.3 billion. Syntex fin- 
ished stead) at 23h>. 

Time Warner shares slipped 1 j to 
39*4. buffeted for a second day by 
speculation that the company's 
largest shareholder was planning io 
increase its stake, possibly in prep- 
aration Tor a takeover bid. 

Broderbund Software rose 3' i to 
44^ continuing to draw *uppon 
from its decision Tuesday to call 
ofra merger with Electronic Arts, a 
maker of video software. Electronic 
Arts fell 1 7/16 to 18 !, s. 

lAP. Bhamibergl 


Central Banks Unite 


Continued from Page I 
lion of the mark against the dollar 
isn't in our economy's interest." 

Mr. Ttetmcyer did not directly 
explain his statement any further, 
but early in his speech he said he 
hoped that a recent rise in demjnd 


Foreign Exchange 


for German exports would stimu- 
late domestic investments. 

Economists said Germany's fee- 
ble recovery from recession would 
depend heavily on exports, which 
suffer when the mark appreciates. 

“We are row in a situation where 
the recovery depends on exports" 
and “could be in danger" if the 
dollar's decline continued. Gunter 
Albrecht, chief economist at the 
Federation of German Chambers 
of Commerce, told Reuters. 

Economists have said for months 
that the rapid growth of the U.S. 
economy and rising interest rates 
justified a higher dollar, and some 
foreign -exchange market traders 
said Wednesday thjt a further cor- 
rection was needed in spite of the 
latest intervention. 

Contrary to recent market .senti- 
ment that the Bundesbank might 
already be trying to slow down in- 
terest "rate reductions to stave off 

inflation. Mr. Tiameyer also >aid 
Wednesday that the Bundesbank 
would "continue to use our room 
Cor maneuver. jUowing a reduction 
of key interest rates without endan- 
gering the currency's -.lability." 


broad-based as a range of smaller 
central banks joined the Fed. the 
Bundesbank and the Bank of Japan 
to prop up the dollar. Bloomberg 
Business News reported from New 
York. 

Officials from the central banks 
of Italy. France. Switzerland. Bel- 
gium and Denmark all said they 
had bought doll are. 

Traders said that the Bank of 
England, the Bank of Spain, the 
Bank of Portugal, the Swedish 
Riksbank and the Austrian central 
bank were also buying. 

The last time the world's central ! 
banks acted together to support the 
dollar was August 1992. when the 
U.S. currency fell to a record low of 
1.3860 DM as rising German inter- 
est rates boosted the mark. 

The Fed had bought dollars for 


The Dow 


Dafly closings of Rw 
Dow Jones -industrial average 

.4005... . 



'37W- 


3500 


3400 


N D J F 
1993 


MAM 

1994 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own H>gh cm* Lnu Oig. 


NYSE Most Actives 


?V nle. 

VgL 

High 
.^3' . 

LOW 

n j - 

Last 

73*. 

cn*. 

HJPtXKk 

i»?12 

h' 2 

b • 

b-i« 

— * •• 

R jp p' a 

Jin#} 

d^** 

6'ti 

6' . 


T.rnekVn 

JJ760 

JC 1 ■ 

13' * 


— 1 * 

PJRrlPoiC 

31)11 

J.S. 

& 1 - 

b' . 

- 

Ouk'P 

31121 

16 - 4 

1b'. 

Jfr'H 

— 1 t 

T t I.V..,. 

? T d$6 

jT « 

ba.- . 

5b’- 

— 

’A'KI.on i , 

?4l)6 7 


:s'n 

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Chr, sir 

?3*6> 

j? 1 , 

4fr= e 

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AirTcnn 

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7? JT? 

4-1 4 

44 

44* • 

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4:>0 

1 1 * 

-.VaiMan 

18613 

A 

74-0 

75 

m 

For CM 

18015 

t.1 . 

59 v 

bOa 

1 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


mien 

EDcAn 

□seas 

Unite* 

ATTMTtK 

VoiTecn 

AOOfeC 

JefSmrt 

MCls 

TelCmA 

InvTech 

Mksfls 

US Him s 

DaUCutr 

Aiwa 


VaL 

High 

Low 

Last 

dtp. 

57783 

60'v 

S7V* 

58*'u 

— *v„ 

53216 

M*-* 

U's 

18*6 

. — 1 ’’i. 

38645 

3) *4 

30 V; 

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37881 

SHi 

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t'*. 

2 

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6*4 

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33'* 

30 V, 

33 

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13’* 

13 

13’. 


rr? 

2JW 

22 W 

27 J * 

-H 

23027 

2D’S 

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2Crt* 



ifr*v 

I3*i 

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Indus JN S.U8 371540 ]6S4.*6 3*9 7 ?J _ 1 6 a* 
Tran'. iawLM 1*47.11 i*J7.T6 16D03 — ■* -H 
Util I9SJW 19a. 14 '93.98 I ■>' 9rj —1.48 
Conip 13I5JJ 131579 13W.W 111040 —5 J4 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Industrials 
Ira run. 
Utilities 
Finance 
SP 500 
SP 


High Low Close Ctrae 
32177 524JS S.'4*l - 1.95 
2*606 393X17 39X71 — 2S* 
158.19 I56.U 157.93 —004 
4.76 fljt 4in + am 
453.11 4495; 451 J2 — IJ1 
418.16 4155-4 417.00 — - 0.97 


NYSE Indexes 


Kish LAw Lost Old 


ComPvwru 

Indijjiriftiy 

Trans.* 

Uii'-rr 

Pn»irv 


.>4133 149 3* ?sn75 —oti 

379 to vr us.tr — (j *e 

-SI 41 348.91 349-7 —1.48 

911.84 71041 ill 25- — U 43 
KI9.M 70829 709 S3 -0 13 


NASDAQ Indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Previous 
Bid Ask 


Close 

Bid Ask 
aluminum (Htoh Grade) 

CWtors per mwrlcwm^^ ]2B100 ,39130 

Forward 132400 132450 131730 131050 
COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Dollars per metric ton 
5S1 1*5100 195100 194780 194000 

Forward 196450 1969 JO 196400 1WM0 

LEAD 

Delian per metric ion „„ 

SKI 46450 4(450 <57.00 458.00 

Forward 48050 481.00 47150 474JD0 

NICKEL 
Delian a 
5»i 

Forward 
TIN 

Delian per metric ton __ „ 

500! 540400 541500 5J7SJM 5300 JM 

Forward 5470JX) 5480.00 5440.00 5450 M 

ZINC (Special Hrtn Grade) 

Donors per meirtc tan . „ 

Scot 947 JK) 948JJ0 931 jQQ 93200 

Forward 96? JM W50 9jn.oq 954 JX 


"^^"WOO 5515JO 5525 i)0 
571 DUO 571100 559000 559500 


Financial 


Mian low Close change 
3-MONTH STERLING (LlFPE) 

CSOO-BOO - Pis Of 100 PCI 


HrBh Low LoSI Oig. 


CoraposiJw 
Industrial . 
Banks 
insurancv 
Finance 

Tianjj 


7JI« T’.AJ ’4U.26 -08* 
m.r» 6 1 7491a _a 02 
497. S3 4«S3S 497 1- 1 70 

698 «S 894.53 S98.95 - 1.31 
907 53 'TOJ.iU 907.13 . I JJ 
736.04 7J9.U 736.06 5 00 


AMEX Stock Index 


Hi Ok Law Losl C3>g. 
447 n 441 M +0 ?« - I 40 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unctioivtea 
Tmal issues 
No.. Hi-m:- 

r J I- T. Lnws 


Close Prow. 

993 


938 
171 J 
473 
2794 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


IvoxCa 

Ulflds 

ExpLA 

viacB 

EcnoBay 

SPOP 

EM&CO 

CheySIf s 

Chiles 

Rocdmst 


VaL 

HMi 

Law 

Last 

CML 

19757 

20 

19'.. 

199. 

• te 

9210 

10'.. 

5 

8 

— Mk 

7B0k 

r/ to 

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IM> 

— +8 

4799 26 

241; 

ZS7. 

• lMi 

4437 

11 v. 

It 

mv 

-i. 

4009 iSr’/u 

45V- 

45 < v u 

— "n 

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3468 

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23 W 
J'v 

24 V* 

— 'ii 

3261 

r - . 

4S|, 

— >*M 

3117 

3'Vi. 

3V-. 

3*^14 



Market Sales 


NYSE 
Amex 

_ . Nasdaq 

marks and for yen on Friday after i mm/iien*, 

the dollar feUto six-month lows 

against the mark and tumbled to- 
ward post-World War II lows 
against the yen. 


Today 
4 p.m. 
167.94 
1533 
256 91 


Prev. 

cons. 


35254 

7131 

302M 


An.jryied 

D&cJi>u:-d 

Unmon-jM 

TrUol iSSUL-j 

UCwHtem. 

Mew LO.VS 


767 

365 

73J 

SOS 


3*2 

nr 

2D6 


Jun 

94.60 

94-55 

9406 

-0JU 

SeP 

94 29 

*4 22 

9423 

— 0.01 

Dec 

9301 

93.71 

•3J2 

— 0.10 

Mar 

njs 

93.M 

93.15 

— 0.12 

Jun 

9171 

9259 

7160 

-ais 

Sen 

9125 

92.12 

911* 

— 0.16 

Dec 

9103 

91 71 

91.74 

— 0.16 

Mur 

910s 

9IJ5 

9101 

— om 

Jim 

91-18 

9120 

7120 

— 024 

Sop 

*1.25 

91.06 

91 JM 

— 027 

Dec 

91.12 

9087 

9007 

— 130 

Mar 

90.90 

90.77 

9022 

— 029 


E-,*. volume -. 66.998. Ooen Ini.. 496.628. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

SI million - pts of 100 pci 


jun 

9520 

951* 

9515 

— 0JJ7 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

915(1 

— 007 

Dec 

94JH 

9400 

9100 

— 0.00 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

9327 

— (UM 

Jun 

NT. 

N.T. 

9309 

— las 

Sep 

NT. 

N.T. 

9325 

— 0.05 

Esl. 

volume: 190. Open mt.: 

10226. 


3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 



□Ml mil IK>(1 

- pis Of 100 pet 


Jan 

94.96 

9187 

919J 

See 

95.15 

95.02 

*5.12 

Dec 

9506 

91*3 

95.01 

Mar 

9l*5 

94.84 

*1*3 

Jun 

9171 

9*JO 



■>4.40 



Dec 

94.15 

9409 

9114 


9194 

93.90 

*3.*b 

Jun 

9303 

93.79 

9303 

See 

93.73 

9306 

9308 

Dec 

9160 

*307 

9308 

Mar 

9304 

9302 

9147 


•MUD 
+ 007 
+ 0.04 
+ 0103 
+ BUM 
+ 0.04 
+ 0.04 
+ 005 
+ 003 
+ 002 
+ 0.02 
+ DID 

Esl. volume: 71443*. open Ini.: 966097. 
3-MONTH FI BOR (MATIF) 

FFS million - PIS OM88 PCt 


NASDAQ Diary 


Close Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewHtohs 
Now Lows 


1608 

1608 

1519 

1554 

1872 

1833 

4999 

4995 

72 

97 

104 

107 


Jun 

*149 

94J8 

94.42 

+ 002 

5ep 

9168 

9157 

9164 

+ 0.04 

Dec 

9*4,1 

*156 

9661 

+ W33 

Mar 

9151 

94.4? 

94,47 

LincJi. 

Jun 

942B 

94.19 

»422 

— 00* 

Sep 

9100 

9188 

9193 

— 004 

Dec 

93 7* 

91*6 

*321 

— 004 

Mar 

»354 

9307 

*355 

— 0.0* 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


70 Bonds 
io utilities 
10 Industrials 


Close 
97.97 
9555 
IDO. 40 


Ctrae 
— CIS 

— Ss2 i Jan 


Spot Commodities 


Esl. volume: 77,400. open ml.: 214.469. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 
csaoao - pts A 32nds of 1H pet 
Jutl 1D4-21 103-11 103-27 —1-06 

Sep 103-06 107-24 102-26 — 1-04 

Est. volume: S0L577. Open Ini.: 730.930. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 2SB.OOO - pis o) 1M PCI 
JIM 94 88 «4J]7 9426 — 0A2 

Sep 9430 9160 9176 - 0.70 

Esl. volume: 167600. Open ini.: 180.937. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF580JM0 - pts of IN PCI 
Jim 17044 11930 II9JW —04)6 

Sea I19J7 118.70 118.70 — 0.90 

Dec 11032 I1BJ0 1 1730 —0.90 

Esl. volume: 764.928. Open Ml.; 157.425. 


Co m modi It 
A luminum, lb 
Coi i«. Brai.lb 
Copper eleclrol* lie. lb 
Iron FOB. Ian 
Lead, id 
S liver, troy or 
Steel (scrap), ion 
Tin, lb 
Zinc, la 


Today 

0391 

ninr 

0.96 

21100 

034 

5.165 

13733 

1407 

04433 


Prev. 

0586 

0405 

0.94 

2I3.G0 

034 

524 

13733 

16609 


Industrials 


Low Last Settle Ch oc 


0.135 ! Oct 


High 

GASOIL tlPE) 

143. dollars per metric lorHois of 1M tons 
May 151 4)0 1494M 150410 150.00 -025 
150.75 I4PJJ0 1S04W 150.25 Unch. 

15130 149.75 151 4)0 151.00 +02S 

I51i» 1SZ00 152-50 15330 Unch. 

15425 1533# 15425 154.00 Until. 

157.00 15625 15630 15630 Unch. 


Jun 

Jill 

JW 

Sep 


HKM LOW 


Lost Seme Ctfpe 


Dec 

Jaa 

Fee 


iSnS Hji !Sw iS yjjcfc 

tw w w sa 

_ S.7. I*.T. N.T. iaJ0 +W5 

Ell. volume: 10343 . Open W. 11288 


ulTdoJl^ Pti wrre+ltis of 1 4*0 toTtis 

BS !iS !t§ 

1535 1533 1536 li* — 

1533 1532 1539 1539 —006 

1S33 102 1537 1 537 — OM 

1AA3 1A4S 15143 1543 — OBJ 

1543 1543 1543 1543 —002 

i «m 19 m 1JJ0 1549 Until. 

llS S3 15J0 UJB un*- 


Jap 

Jui 

AW 

see 

oct 

NOV 

Dec 

Jon 

Feb 


Esl. volume: 47237 . Open Int. 152340 


Stock Indexes 

Low cuae amove 


Htab 

FTSE 1M (LIFFE | 

QS per index paint 

Jim 30913 30474) 3Q57 J) — 349 

5» 31074) 3O96J0 30743 — 343 

rw 3105.0 31050 30853 -350 

ESI. volume: I4A52. open imj 54.119. 

CAC *0 (MAT I FI 

5^“" ifSirtSisM n»* -« 

Jon 21534)0 2121410 212130 -4000 

Jul 21474M 212930 21IJ» -40» 

cm N.T. N.T. 213830 —4000 

rS N.T. N.T. 716030 — 48JW 

Mbr 270940 22074)0 219500 — 424)0 

Esl. volume: 254)92. Open ini.: 69.930 
Sources: Mat it. Associated Press. 
LOMtan InTI Financial Futures Exchange, 
inti Petroleum Excttonga. 


Dividends 


Per Anil Pay Rec 
IRREGULAR 


. .13 5-T3 6-1 

b 2728 5-6 5-31 

D 2225 6-21 6-30 

b AO* 5 54 6-7 

b 2984 56 5-24 

bopprox amount per ADR. 

STOCK 


CoBancorp me 
Como CcrvUnkh 
Kaneb SvcadipfA 
KanM Ahold 

PolyGram NV 


Del Electronics - 3 9b 5-18 trW 

STOCK SPUT 


Enron Oil A Gas 2 lor I split 
Fti Find BUisftrs 5 for 4 split. 
Home Svw Bs 7 tor l wilt. 
Jason Inc 5 far 4 soil). 

51 Paul Cos 2 for I spilt. 


M JBS 5-16 527 
O .18 6-10 6-30 
O .18 5-16 530 


INCREASED 

Am Heritage Lf 
PepsiCo Inc 
Utd SvBAManluna 

CORRECTION 

Mams Qtl shore -U 511 

Correct ino name ol aunpany. 

INITIAL 


Amll Resldenllal c 21 512 5-ffl 

Emp LoModema b 2 678 51 523 

SI Paul Cas n _ 375 517 6-6 

b-aaerox amount per ADR 
C -covers quarter ended an 3-31 


REGULAR 


AioTenn Resource 
BkA/ner adlni A 
BkAmer adlpf B 
Carr Realty 
Ea-Joroup Prop 
Eastnver Carp 
Fedl Screw 
Fit SvasBX SLA 
Georgia Pac 
Gerber Prod 
HorlevsvIUe Svg 
Indiana Energy 
Ingeraoll Rand 
iraquoK Bncp 
Kiddie Pdcts 
Liberty Coro 
Medicine Shoppe 
Parkway CO 
Peoples Bk NC 
Resource Mig 
Room & Hass 
Source Capital 
UtiliCorp united 
westcoasl Energy 


Q JB 516 6-) 

. 3125 512 531 
. 130 512 531 

Q 3375 513 527 
Q 33 513 53 

O 22 513 5U> 
O .10 517 7-1 

Q .1625 513 5-31 
O 30 5-70 513 
Cl 215 5-17 510 
.10 511 52S 
2S5 513 51 

.175 518 51 

.14 5 T0 531 
.17 516 51 

.155 515 6-30 
.12 513 527 
.15 7-31 529 
.12 51 510 

26 51* 531 
25 513 51 

30 527 515 
32 519 512 
22 58 530 


M 


o-ammal; ewniMt In CanadMM funds; Bi- 
monthly; q-quarterty; s-seim-amuol 


A^tomakere’ April Sales fJ5,i| 

nPTRnrr (AP^ — The Bia Three Afl jl 



DETROIT ( AP) — The Big Three automakeji 
to report an April sales gain of about"*' 
sales at General Motors Corp. 

Chiysler Cotp. said the moot 
t^) 10 percent from 1993. Ford 

higher than a year ago. • •.« 

Bui GM said its car sales fell 43 percent for. ./ 

truck sales grew 4.9 percent from a year eariiet^fora , I 

of 0.9 percent. - 

Computer Sciences Geis Gto^^i 

EL SEGUNDO, Cafifomia (APj — 

awarded a $1 billion, dghi-year contraa Wedne^ytop8 :^^^^'> .. 
and telecommunicatiotis support to NASA’s yW 

Center in Huntsville, Alabama. ; . 

CSC beat out Boeing Co. and Harris Corp. fw 



S >'~ ' 





Corning to Acquire a . . 




CORNING. New York (Bloomberg) 
it signed a definitive agreement to acquire privatdy hatf 
Medical Laboratoiy Inc. for at least $140 JaUtioa^ - Vte . . ni 

involving 43 million Coming shares. 

The transaction would merge Maryland MedicaI int&:CwB^^£_ 2 
Path clinical laboratory' testing operationSi tme 
testing bustnesses in the United States. - ■ +* 

Maryland Medical a Baltimore-base 
group of doctors, performs clinical tests for 
Maryland, the District of Columbia, Delaware, 

Pennsylvania. 




A r 


NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — Nynex Corp.-and 
Wednesday said they had signed a letter 
entertainment services together in the United 
Kingdom. . 

The joint projects between Nynex and Viacom wouldbe’ teBst 


Nynex and Viacom Sign NewPa&|./ 'i j{M T nin 

7 JFW YORK /Tf m'pht-R idder I — Nvnes Corp.^and f 

01 

nm dmulfflip ^ jfcc' 1 V ‘ - 

- m' \ - - 


entertainment prcjjects of the recently formed Nynex EniC na?n^ ^- 1 pjaS-"V‘ 


Information Services Group. Nynex helped Viacom finaoce.h^hJS---: 1 
don of Paramoont Communications Inc. 

The companies also will work together to create : -‘ 

Viasan’s caWe networks, includiDg MTV: 


on and VH-1, as well as interactive multiplayer garaesl ' , 5 


Time Warner Cable Slashes Cosfef 


ini in “■ — 


STAMFORD. Connecticut (Bloomberg) — time: 
second-largest American cable television operator, said -Wednestofog 
freeze hiring and slash 1 994 capital spending by SlOti inaKwLafpifQf 4 | ‘^r > - 

sweeping cost-cutting program. . ".= ; ;. J 1 - -- • - ' 

The austerity is a reaction to the new govcTnnient-impcsaiiac^ 
on cable TV service, the company said. In February, thtFakati C^: • 
nicatioDS Commission ordered cable TV operators to roti badrraiesiwv 
percent, on top of a 10 percent rollback that went irite effei a- ■' 

September. 


j£ 

: i- ..aJ r 

. . 






- 

Jim . . 


T.-i’ 


:-r ill 


„ J. W 


gij&r '“*•'“ .'. . . 

|srtopi' ;: " : ; 

1 In *4^-""- '* 


1 1 


by the federal government to micromanage our business,” saiffaq* 
Gjllins, chairman and chief executive. The FCC hafshru^ed ^ai ^ 
criticism. “Cable enterprises continue to have very attrattrir o^wisi. J 
ties to obtain a fair rate of return,” FCC Chairman Reed HawksEilM 4 
month. . 


Fox to Start Animated Film Unit 


- • m 


“This is an attempt to chan, 
market perception that the 


EE 


Pan Am Says That Delta Helped Clip Its Wings 


doesn't care about the dollar." said 
Peter Glovne. manager of institu- 
tional foreign-exchange trading at 
First Chicago Bank. “They had a 
muted reaction because ihev didn’i 


The A\w.aieJ Press 

NEW YORK — Delia .Air Lines breached ib 
dulv and caused the .shutdown of Pan Am 


Corp. by withholding crucial financing in Pan 
Am s filial days, a Pan Am lawyer said Wedncs- 


catch the market short" of dollars, court. 


day at the opening of a nonjury trial in federal 


£3 Banks Join Intervention 

The intervention campaign was 


he said. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar rose to 1.4063 Swift, francs 
from IJ9sjj francs and io 5.hb4u 
French francs from 5.M08 francs. 
The pound -.lipped in S 1.5020 from 
Si. 5 1 35. 


said Delta had been actively involved in living 
to save Pan Am in 1991 by taking part in 
management decisions and arranging Financ- 
ing. Part of the arrangemeni was that the air- 
lines would merge, with Delta operating Pan 
Am's Northeasi shuttle and its trans-Atlantic 
routes. 


and enriched itself by taking over the shuttle 
and trans-Atlantic routes. 


Dennis Glazer. an attorney for Delia, said he 
would show that “Delta did’more than anyone 
expected to fight to keep Pan .Am alive." 


Pan Am is suing Delia for at lea>t S2.5 


billion, claiming that the Atlanta-based airline However. Brodsky said. Delta engaged in 
backed util of promises to lend monex for a wh *> «* "realized .is 


own opera- 

reorganization and to pay for Pan Am's rein- Jj 01 !® w dc ‘ mUch ^an it had 

carnation as a Delta subsidiary flying routes in P r °J eLieo - 


ihe Caribbean. 

An attorney for Pan Am. Da\id Brudskv. 


Mr. Brodsky sa;d that evidence would show 
dial Della withheld crucial funding in late 1991 


U.S. District Judge Robert Patterson on 
Tuesday denied a Delta effort to throw oui the 
suiL Della had wanted the judge to decide in its 
favor on several points, including Delta’s claim 
that there wasn't a final contract promising to 
fund Pan Am. 


LOS ANGELES (AP) — 20th Century Fox wants-’lp-^iewitlir n 
creators of Mickey Mouse and his pals in a high-stakes rontdstftfinwe '■ i 
dollars. / '-j 

On Tuesday. Fox announced it win start an animated rame^vna ^ 
with S 100 miliiofl and the help of “An American Tail" creators DoiiBfaiJi 
and Gary Goldman. The aim is to duplicate the fortunes th^nwrWsli ' 
Disney Co. has made with cartoon musicals like^Beau^i^t^Gasi' >1 
and “Aladdin.” •-“ v-t-- • .= 

Fox, a division of Australia's News Corp.. plans to hire jtp-tt 200- 1 
people for the animated unit and turn out one film a 
1996. The First will go into production this fall 


draai 
Vasu.i - 


m 

m 


M 


ramF 


p' 
Istffl 

B 




For the Record 


••L'25?/rY52tT7: . 's| 

The Comptroller of the Currency approved Mellon Bank's q^ffim 
to acquire Dreyfus Corp., America's axth-largest mulnalhuidEanf>nj. - 1 


Pan Am slopped flying in December 1991. 


Motorola Inc. has increased its stake in Tefute- Gxp. to 20ip«<ai 
from 16.6 percent. ■ '(Kni^v-RUkr) 



WORLD §7©€X MARKETS 


Ft oner Pinic Ma- 4 


CIOM Pw». 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Mia 61.80 62.10 
ACr HofdrlW 4780 AS 
Aeuon 
ABOW 
to Nobel 
AM6V 


VS'D »»J3 m 
47.70 40 50 
724 277.35 
7050 


BcJs-Wey^ntfi 3930 J980 


C5M 
DSM 
Elsevier 
FaH'er 

Oist-Bracact-i 
HBG 
Heine) cn 
Hooaoveno 
Munier Doogioi T9gj eoro 

(MCi^alond « 39 70 

Inter Mueller 8850 88.90 

inti Nederland 75.10 77 80 

KLM 5i 53.60 

KNPBT 5030 SOM 

NedllOrd 79 70 79.;0 

pee Grinlen THjiO 88 87 


64.90 65.^0 
14230 145 

16630 169 70 
1»J0 UJ0 
S" saw 
J35 336.50 
337 215 70 
70.50 7IS0 


Amer-Thlrma 

138 

U* 

Enso-Ortren 


JH. 11) 

Huhlamakl 


213 

7LOP 

17 

i; 

k’vmmene 

105 

107 

Metre 

1*1 

l»J 

Nokia 


45U 

Pahloln 

90 

VS 

Peoaio 

95 


Slockmarm 

20 

* JT 

HEX Index : 1876.33 
Previous : 183*55 



PaklwM 

FDiflpS 

Polygram 
T’obeio 
Podamca 
Rolinca 
Rerenia 

»ayai Duicn 
Sior* 

Unlle_ver 
Van Ommercn 
-NVI ... __ 

Wallers Hirer lie EO 103.60 
EOE Inaor - 4U74 
Previous : 414.37 


49 SO 4O.B0 
5660 57 

71 °0 ft 

114 70 117 9(| 
S’H? 5940 
117 10 130.30 
9JJ6 9270 
178 149J0 
48J0 ^30 
304.90 30t 

mo si 

177*0 1“S0 


Arbed 

Bern 

5rt=cM 

Cacvenu 

■ICDeM 

DflliO'M 

Eietiicbei 

OlB 

GBL 

Oc.aen 

* rediemaiii 

Pelrai-nc 

F'ancrlin 


Brussels 

3644 ?aet 


Close Ptoy. 


Close Prev. 


Helsinki 


Hong Kong 

Bl E<KI AilO ]I 50 313 

Osina* Potific M li 
Ctirurvo k.orn 33.75 3SJ5 
China Uahl Pwr 38.75 39 Jo 
Dairv Farm mfl 11 li 
Hang Lung Dev 1130 1240 
Hang Seng Ban) 40.25 so 
Henderson Land V.S4 37.3 
HK Air Eng 41.25 4150 
HK China &as 15.30 16 

H7. Ele<*ris 2 1 JO 72 
HK Lana 19.60 20 40 

HU PealN Tiuil 20.70 31 30 
HSEC Hclcinpo B0 SO 83 JO 
HKShangHiis 1130 tl 30 
Hh Telecomm 14 14.40 
HKFerrv 9 70 9 90 

Huich wnompoa 28 JO J«.70 
H»san De. 19 60 2arc 

.'arsine 7.V:ri 5050 513*3 
Jerome Sir Hid 27 JO 27 60 
r.cwilocn Mo:or 14.80 14.90 
.'.Umcarin Orieni 9J0 950 
Miromcr Haul :o."0 31 10 
:ie« d.ondDev 2230 2290 
•nr. Fran-. j3 4J2J 

5rjlu. J 48 350 

l-vifp Pac * 


i Ta. Chewng Pnrs 10.1c ia« 

,:;|g J& 1 1 343 uo 

. SCO ..,cc | ..hen Held v«i ?n 


.60 3J0 
2» UJJ 
lO 1 ^ 1U0 


i’SO 1 V.msor Ind. 

<313 >|:2 069.44 

ibiw ;ri 

4440 4405 


Previous : 8*79.13' 


+j!'no 

Sji.a. 

Tracieocl 

Lee 

'-n.on Mimere 


15ISC l52tC 

"6500 >6«S0 

nice II10C 


Prevaos . 776L57 


Frankfurt 


‘t43 1 or 


Sit S.T53 


AEG 

Airion: hcio 

Allonc 
■»S)0 
BASF 
Bo»er 

bat. H.eaOan 

Bo. Veromsak 
BBC 

BHF Bank 
BMW 

Ccmmeriaanr 
Ca+linenlai 
Doimier Bcnj 
Degussa 
Oi Bab c ock 
Orjfsche Ban* 

Dou oios 
Orndner Bar* 

Feiomueme 
F ► ruca Hceien 31850311 53 
Hoft+ner 2’C C« 


AECi 

2ff 

IS 

; vilecfi 

150 

IDO 

lAnpio Amer 

ro 

33! 

Sariows 

35 

3550 

! Si, . aor 

NA 

S 

Butte's 

O 

4J53 

De Beer^ 

10550 


JDrietaniem 

5? 

5* 




|gfsa 


102 

, HC/TTKJTi / 

242S 

?4 

Hionveid Steel 

21 

?» 

| vicoi 

48 

49 

ricaccnk Gro 

3050 

MW 

Ccmjioriicin 



Ps-miai 

S' 

81 

5A Brews 

9"2S 

“32S 

St Helena 

N 





1 weikom 

r: L 

— 

'.‘.esltrn Deco 

n 

177 

Composite inde* 
Previous . 53175 

52*154 


443 44; 

97; 9:3 

3w3o4SC 


London 


595W «r M 

2+450 363 

79? 

S+i sis 
391 J9.- 

247 345 


Hennrl 

Ho«ni<ei 

rioacnsr 

MSlimflllli 

Horierv 
IWKA 
dal' Soli 
r.orslcdl 
Kauinof 
khO 


» loectner .Veriritrjl 


657.5- 
UM S’a 
iy 3S4 

»es via 
24? 

43*50 J2.1 

147 ,4,. 

C?4 5N 

527 53“ 

151 ^?*-4J3 


Linde 
uimnH 
MAN 

r.'-snnevnann 
.'.leioilgeseli 
.'Aueneh Rucch 
Porsche 
Preussag 
P.Vfl 
RWE 

Pnetnmciai: 
5<:hering 
5EL 

Siemens 
Tn>ssen 
Vartg 
vetsa 
WEW 
Viaa 

valksMjaen 

vVeiia 

OAX Index : 23*902 


FAZ index . 

Prrulogj : 8S2.H 


I rial 1 

I Aided L -005 
. Aria '.'.1431ns 
I Arc -II C'Ouo 
J AiiBrn Foods 
. BAA 
. E4f 

• Eon* Seoiiana 
1 Barcia*; 

I 6dS5 

iIet 

I Slue C'reip 
' BO*2 Oroua 
I BUK 
J Bcvraier 
BP 

Eril Mir.vj," 

! Bril Gas 
J 8ni Si{+i 
}S -i! Telecom 

BTR 

: Cos ip Wire 
I Concur, ic*l 
Carodon 
I Casts Viveiia 
' Cfi-im Union 
1 CoiinouMfs 

— lECCOrguo 

MS 5« En'crnruc o,| 
<*«X4-eM iejra! U nS?l 

4'5<4JT 1 Fcj't 

3-? J“ i G EC 
• 173 lljJ .Gen i *cc 
403 40" 1 &i j, 0 

'43 749 JT : Orono 7.1pl 

iGRE 

luuinneit 
iOUS 
IMonson 

IHHIsdanm 

I HSBC Hidos 
1C: 

1 i-Lnccee 
I •’■ng Usher 
[LdCIiroKe 
;LO.-a 5ec 


4.14 
5.75 
3JT> 
CJ“ 
5.99 
9 73 
4.78 


133 


415 

183 

3.U 

601 

067 

48* 


953 »Si 
f. 7 ?H'S< 
<57 it? 

HI SC 4*0 

21 ? “3 
1m £2. 


5a5 

4JS 
1.26 
:.®J 
6. 98 
548 
4^2 

JA2 

4J4 

130 

1J3 

4 74 

J.40 

zn 

1*5 
5*3 
4 53 
41a 
4.70 
148 


50? 

5*3 

4J8 

IJ» 

2.99 

706 

55! 


jst 

4 25 
281 
123 
169 

j.p: 

4*3 

480 

3 45 
11’ 
144 

i.' 9 

4j; 

4 15 
4.90 
1iJ 


lopotIp 
L asmc 

Legal Gen Grc 
L lo/ds Bank 
MarVjSp 
MEPC 
Nal) Power 
Norwesi 
NltiWjl Water 
Pearson 
PIO 
PIIKington 
PawerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Org 
Reckill Col 
Rediand 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
PMC Group 
Polls Royce 
Ratnmn 1 unlit 
Roval Seal 
RTZ 

SalnsDurv 
Scot Mewcos 
Snii Power 
Sears 

Severn Trenl 
Shell 
Siooe 

Smith Nephew 
SmilhKIIne B 
Smith (WHI 
Sun Alliance 
Tale & L/le 
Tesco 
Thom emi 
T omkins 
TSB Groua 
Unilever 
Uld Biscuils 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3' ; 

Wellcome 
WhJttircoa 
■viiiiomsHda-j 
Willis Corrccn 
F.T.20 Index 246S.I1 
Previous : 2J05JSC 

F.T5.E. 100 index : 3070JW 

Previous : 310006 


015 

Uf 

440 

SJ9 

A-31 

4A9 

4.15 

•L38 

477 

6J8 

6.93 

194 

4.77 

3.01 

437 

4.74 

524 

14) 

4JI7 

9.07 

I. 90 
4.10 
X89 
8-44 

MB 

5.U 

3.J0 

130 

4.9| 

7.04 

6.12 

MS 

398 

J. 9£ 
120 
JJ3 

3.14 


6.12 

145 

4 13 

4.95 

218 

4^3 

213. 


1C4 -11 

10-53 KL66 


3 AS 

546 


42.94 43.94 

522 5.45 


549 

159 

2-2o 


Madrid 


BBv 3Q9G 3145 

Bco Cenlrol Hisc 28T0 2910 

Banco Santander 5810 5650 

BanCSIO 1155 1280 

CEPSA 7855 2925 

Dr road v, 2170 I19J 

Endesa 6430 4530-1 

Ercros IS5 157 

Iberdrola 932 9<7 

Reovcl 4250 4400 

TaMcolera 2850 3850 

Telefonica 1735 1 775 


Previous : 311.4* 


Milan 

Banco Comm 5520 1*55 


Bastoot 181 19? 

Benehon oraua 771M 28606 

CIR 

Cred not 
Enichem 
Fertin 
Fertin Rlsa 
Flat SPA 
Firmecconica 
General. 


noiewn 

iie:aa5 

iMimot'liorc 

/MdfcbanQ 

AtantMison 

Olivetti 

Ptreii) 

PAS 

Pmasetnle 
Saioein 


True n;. 

7JMS 3MO 

31+3 3256 
3773 3310 
1151 1425 
6640 6840 
3240 2360 
44950 44 TOO 
35750 :seco 
■6550 17340 
5000 


■ 7300 17790 

1490 isa 

JT75 ?8T> 
VTAt 5BW 
MOB JIJ50 
10430 10910 
3725 3W0 


Son Poolo Torino I09SO II2J9 


SIP 
SME 
Snip 
Sltsnda 
S:*t 

Toro Ar.ji Rise 


4495 46 PC 
3BIC 3°35 
2495 ?5CS 
40730 4100(1 

5*60 ens 

13W342SC 


Montreal 


Aiean Aium.num 3®+ 29 > 

Bex* Mon: reel 74 

. Bell Canada 

I Bombardier B 


.. .’’j. 
3»:si- r : 

52-53052 
!82 "t 
46947352 
S6J0356JJ 
925 W 


299 

5oCi 

572 

464 

134 

4.75 

5.95 

2lS 


1 'Cascade - 

J j peminton Tp.f 


4Tt 4J"9 
?! - 21 r 
tr - .- in. 


IjM 


A01 

B.t6 
5Jj 
5J0 
! 5 
9 SO 


4 70 
1£1 
A‘5 
5.97 
268 
I 79 
701 


1.17 


IJO 

534 

183 

tt! 


Donohue A 

//CiAVlIgn Si 
Noll Bk Conodj 
Power Cent. 
Quebec Tpi 
GueDecc'.- A 
Ouebecor D 

Teteaiooe 

Unl ,0 

Vtirarran 


6 1 . f. 
13' « 13': 
73'u M'. 


9'j. 


?i^: ?:■ j 
>- :» 

M TO-.. 
i9'» ?g 
t* : * X t 


1* d 141, 


Industrials Index : 1907.79 

Prtnrtout : !f0?79 


Close Prav. 


Paris 


ACCor 

fclr Liouide 
Alcalef Alsihom 
Axo 

Bancaire 1C*) 

BIC 

BNP 

Bourques 
BSN-GD 
Carretro r 
CCF. 

Orus 
Chorgeurs 


712 743 

799 815 

879 690 

1375 1420 
557 570 

1305 1315 
257 266 JO 

669 681 

834 850 

4130 4l9n 
240 246 JH> 
11540 11260 
>455 1464 


Ciments Franc 3S1J0 357 


Dub Ued 
Ell-Aaultoine 
Ell-Sanoll 
Euro Dlsnev 
Gen. Fau* 
Havas 
■melal 


44290 431 

408 M 41120 
951 975 

Ulfl 33 JO 
2590 2619 
45440 465 

610 625 


La large Capped <59.90 46150 
Lear and 6430 &rvo 

Lyon. Eau< 598 o00 

Oreo I IL'i 1250 12^ 

L.VJAH. 919 rjj 

■AAdtra-Hocttette 139.40 140.91) 
-UiCttelln B 248 24* 

rAsmine* 137 1 39.90 

Paribas «j.50 437 

Pecfilnev (nil 159.70 15B.ID 
Pernod- Rlcora 3«25n j «0 

Peugeot «B 9 15 

Prlnlemps lAu) 1(C0 1037 
Radiol ecnmouc s*0 S57 

Rh- Poulenc a 
R ati. St Louis 
Red oule ILal 
Soinl GcOoin 
S.E.B. 

Sle Gene role 

Sue: 

Thaimcn-csF 
Total 
IJ.6.P 
vaieo 

CAC 40 index : JM1J7 
Previous : 217999 


155 156 

1T33 I7fl 
«!2 9?1 

t a t T» 
SW 553 
62? 641 

3l«_W r»30 
169 ia 171 jo 

334.30 332.70 
I5£ ICC 3? 
1479 13+) 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil 7150 23 

Boncsro IJJi 14.40 

Braaesca 1679 it_ff) 

Brahma 300 31 

Paranaeonem': '9 20 

Pelrobras MOJO I!7 
Teieeras 44.9c „ 

vale Rio Doce 1015011650 
Vcrig 160 1M 

Bovnaa index : 15738 
Previous : 16*83 


Singapore 

Cerctws 825 853 

Cilv De- 

DBS 

Fraser Heave 
Gem nvs 

Golden Hoee P 
Ha* Pa 


813 tii 
11 40 11 *3. 
10 80 IS50 
l ? 22 >7.40 
23* 

Id) 


Hume industries «0 5+3 


Sydney 


Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 

Baryl 

Bougainville 


Coles Mver 
Coma Ico 


CRA 
C5P 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
<Ci Australia 
Mage lion 
MIM 

Na! A ust Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pac Ci unla» 

Pioneer lnl‘1 . _ 

Nmndy Poseidon 20 1 2 

OCT Resources 1.77 177 

SOihJS 199 197 

TNT ?09 210 

Western Mining 6 79 7J2 
Westeoc Banking 4.76 451 
JUOadsIde 4JS 420 


959 9^9 
459 A63’ 
16 A0 1688 

155 34)3 
0-60 0.70 
4^1 9 

449 455 
15.92 1626 
4AI 4.75 
126 12 ? 
151 151 

1052 1050 
l.W 1.90 
255 292 
71441 1156 
951 949 
520 S.16 
115 120 
4.7) 454 

2.72 179 


Ail ordinaries index : 7011*0 
Previous : 2*M30 


Market Closed 
The Tokyo stock' 
market was closed 
Wednesday for a holi- 
day 


Toronto 


16V. 16-v 


)5'< 


12». 13'* 
27 22V: 


1 rumens*? 
k'eoocl 

P.L k.roong 

Lum Churio 

Mala* on Banks 

OCBC 

DUB 

GUE 

Samoa wrong 
Vtnngriia 
Simp Garb* 

SI A 

Vaore Lana 

S'Dore Pwi 
Sing S’eamsMo 


Asitibl Price 
Agnlco Eagle 

AirCancdo 6kj 6»s 

A.Ueria Enera* a> + Ml* 

Am Bcrrick Res 31-S Jl'g 

BCE 49'^ «+Vi 

Bk NOva5C0»a 77 V 773* 

BC Gas 15V- 15"; 

BC Telecom 25% 25V 

BF Peait. h« N.T. 054 

Brcmokea 054 034 

Brunswick 

CAE 7 V, 73. 

Comdr. 455 455 

C1BC 3D-i 30' ■ 

Canadian Pocilic 2?v- 

Can Tire A 
Can*or 

Caro 4.0S 

CCL tnd e 9'.* 9 

CinetHc. <J0 4.15 

Comlnco 71 31'* 

Conwest E*pt 21“: Jl'* 

Der.ison Min B 013 O.OG 

Dotasco 2IH 2H* 

D.leiA 0.70 0.73 

Ecr*) Eos 7/lnes If; IP) 

Ecjif* Silver A o.EO 055 

FCA Inti 

Fee ind ft 

Fla jaw Cnati a 

Gcntra 

. _ .. . Gull Cda B« 

S.-5 iil J Mces inti 

it<0 M 40 j nemlo GIC Mines T2Vi I2‘i 

’ • Hgiimger I5 Vi t5Vi 


3V. 365 


19 


19 

•PH 

0 46 047 


455 tM 


IS’- 3 


2.9C. 

’ .66 ! 73 

055 oes 
11 M 1910 
7 40 7SC 
790 7£5 
12.ro UOf. 
5 ‘5 La 
J’ei i>e 
740 715, 
7*n 7.7c 

'» 60 1440 
4 0" 4.17 


Case Prev. 


Horsham 
Hudson’s Bov 
imasco 
Inca 

inlerprav oiue 
Jan nock 
LoboU 

LnblawCo 

iwackercle 
Mog no mil A 
Maoie Leaf 
Maritime 
Mark Res 


IffV) Iflig 
29 Vi 2* 


36> « 
33’. 


J6V. 

3J 1 


30ks 305+ 

19 >9 


21 20 r S 

23"> 23> 


10 9’t 
614* 62 1 ; 


121t) 12V* 
24'* ?4 


9*; 9H 


25' 4 25 


IJVfc 1 3V* 

16' •* 16'v 


10 "- 

21k; 2|CS 


3". 355 
28> 2BH 


1D'+ UPk 
053 052 


1BV, I* 
30'+ 3IH 


tcif ICS, 


81' 


•rn 


27'a 27+ 
13V* 1JV* 


MacLcan Hunter N.T. 17 
Mo I son A 23 •+ 23k» 

Noma Ind A 
Noronda inc 
Naranda Forest 

Nar«nEnetg» 

Nthern Telecom 40 v* 40'* 
Nava Caro 
Oshaura 
Pagurln A 
Placer Dame 
Poca Petroleum 
PWA Coro 
Ravrack 
RenaWsance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Roval Bonk Can 
Sceatre Res 
Sam s Hasp 

Seaoram 

Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sheer Iff Gordon 

SHL Svstemhse 

Southern 

Soar Aerospace 
Sielco A 
Talisman Energ 
Tuck B 

Thomson Coro. 

Toronto Damn 
Torslor B 
Transaito Utn 
TronsCda Pipe 
Tnlon F\nt A 
Trtmoc 
Trliec A 
Unicoro Energy 
TSE 300 Hide* : C349J0 
Previous ; *28360 


7"! 

ay 


B'i SHi 
40’-: 43 't 


|9 |9 

18'* I8't 

8 V, 8V* 


32 32', 


23' 

ITS* 1+: 


14'-, 141, 


18k* tS", 


4 5S 4'-: 


16' 


16' r 


0.45 054 
.46 1W 


Zurich 


Adla mil B 250 247 

AlusulSSe B new 683 658 

BBC Brwn Bav B 1J31 tJ27 

’ 90S 90a 


Clba Gala* B 
CS Holdings B 
ElektrowB 

Fischer B 

Inlerdlscount B 
Jelmoll B 
Landis Grr R 
Moevenoick B 
Nestle R 

Oerllk. BuenrieR 
ParaesaHid B 
Rome Hdg PC 
Sutra Republic 
Sanaox B 
Schindler B 
SuUer PC 

Surveillonce B 

Swiss Bnk Coro B T~S Jkf, 

Swiss Retnsur R «e? M7 

Swissair R ryj 77V 

UBS 8 H> 1156 

Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 


604 617 

.le2 365 
1450 1490 
2130 2230 
C® OO 
*05 907 

435 435 

use 1185 

»SS 154 
I6J0 1640 
6615 6690- 
179 129 

J700 3760 
8750 8650 
980 994 

2120 21J0 


^BS Inden ^961.97 


,666 687 

»77S 1317 . 


evlous : 975.0* 


TO OUR 
READERS 


S’oare T eieeamm 130 3«« 
Sitoiis Trading 2» 154 
COB 10 Afl :g -■ 

UGL 20h :\i 

Smuts Times ind. : 2301 « 
Previous ; 231056 


Stockholm 


416 413 

t55 its 


n: 


411 

3+i 


15£ 

va 

24155 


«SA 
Aseo A 
Aslro A 
Allas Ccoca 
Elcctralu, S 
Eriessan 
EsseHr-A 
Nonfleisbonkef' 
investor B 
Norsk H><lro 
Procardtc AF 
Sfiftivlk B 
5CA-A 
S-E Barken 
SkanaHi F 
Skanjka 
SKF 
Staro 

Tre:»*Borg BF 
veins 

Afftwrsvoenuen 1906.44 
Prev logs : 1903.78 


IN 

VEVEY/ 

MONTREUX 

AREA 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vio Ainuied Pres* 


Mat 4 


*4 (car, s-jasan 

rfgn Lon 


ilwvi High Low Close Chg Op int 


Grains 


:s» 

3 57'. 

145 

356': 

IS 

7.J3*. 


WHEAT (CBOT) kooot-, mei4iun-a«ar.i*?rDuiJi.4 
3 72 100 Mo*94 1JI'. : 3J4ks J32--: XJJ'.i -O.Ol'l 626 

2«6 Jut 94 X29'> 3J6 JJ1V1 10 04%, 28. BOB 

10? 5ep9j lJiv, 3JJ9 '.j IT. )JU 0JI5 6.142 
1(7* Gee 94 3 4l‘<.- J49', X37 14gi, .0jk, 4.73s 

127 Mar9j 1.44 351'.- L»l 351 .COS'- 404 

3 l6'-.M<r>95 U8 145 138 A4J .0D3V* 24 

ill Jul 95 125 12? 122 JJ4’. tOB4'.. 9» 

Esl tales ha Tue's-sows n.*ss 
Tuesanenint njns on 784 
WHEAT IKHOT) 5 JOB ». rn.newjrp- micnorr Duihd 
179“: 2 *B Mav 94 145 354 l«2'.i 3.S3'-. -006'+ 1.285 

355 297 Jul 94 3J9 138V, 17* 3J4 i8.05 13^46 

LS5': 102’ :SK>94 130V, 140 3-77>k 157 1054’. V707 

360 IK' iDvCM 3J7 24t'* 134', L44W < 0.05'.. 3^94 

3S3 ■ 355 Marks 13**; 147 136V, 143 H -OJM 408 

324 3?l",Mar95 3J8"* -0JH 17 

Esl. sales U a Tub's soles 4617 
Tue's own in| C.SI I oh *20 
CORN l CBOT) srobumiiwiwm-Ma,-. per Ouiim 

7 64'h lOJQti 12.743 
267*.. - am W 136.347 


Season Season 

High LOW 


Open High Low dose dig Op. mt 


SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSS M 1060 IK.- cenn.ncr 


1250 

H.98 

1152 

1148 

11^? 

11.40 

1155 


11.11 


0.15 50514 
0.13 32.181 
011 16.143 
Oil 2*802 
0-11 1,197 
0.11 344 
011 39 


123 

1263 

MU 


1212 

1249 

11)5 


Hi' * 

’3»' 


165 


IIS': 

: Ji 

J1494 

163S 

J M 

760*; 


ufl' 

1 Sen 94 





?J6' 

iC.c 94 





ru 

Mor *5 

253' , 

256*. 



)57' 


2-60 *j 


ZB'- 

159 

Jui95 


7.67 



7 

Dec 95 

244". 

206 

243 


248V, >0 01'.-, T£456 
256 '04II40 6.729 

1.60V, . oj)| i, 78< 
269 .0.07 1.928 

245 > 0.00 V. 1,230 

Esl UUCi NJV Vl ^SOS 76470 

Ti^'s ooen w!l 766-104 oft 1677 


7 3S 
>K' 
7-17' 
». ’a 
6 73' 
+70 
+ T5 
6 50' 


*24 Aua-M *S7'v i.»5 
617 >094 *17 644 

5 Si'. Nov W 670 676 

4 11 J»l45 126'; 6J4 

610 Marks # X'| 6J) 
0?I Alar 95 6 36'; 6 39' 

6 74 Jul *5 6 38 647 

S«l';No/4S 68? t II 

£•' ■JV'. 0 4 Tuc - '. -JOlh k 5*440 
Tl* luviinl 14? .455 in "59 


9)7 00 


730 30 

moa 

’13 00 

.-OJJO 

mao 

19 JIB 

i»:« 

18820 
Eli au-, H 


L6l'-j 

6*9*7 * 0 OfrVj 

6.611 

■ A6l 

609V, -OO*' , 

66056 

, *54’-. 

6*4 -atH'i 

11.757 

*36'': 

6.44 -005V, 

*M0 

- 419', 

8J6‘. * 004’, 

4X177 

6.?*', 

653'. Q.05"i 

4071 

■ 6J?i; 

6J9'. O05'9 

997 

4 36', 

6 W’J . 0 D7V. 

463 

bib' , 

6 47 ■ D.03 

780 

4.0* V, 

1 

All -002 

1.518 

OWrr-.ni 

‘trwr 


1 186 0Q 

18M) -IJQ 

3470 

1 H»M 

189 90 - 150 38-3M 

1 I8T 40 

189 70 . 1 40 17.651 


lei 50OCI94 184.30 IB 550 184 20 185.M 

j 40Dl,: 94 181 SO 184.70 113 00 1 84. SO 
lftj.50 Jan 95 <83 60 18420 TSUfl 18440 
IS'^Ma, *5 *180 SO I Be JO I&LS0 ItoJo 

I27O0.-A3.95 1 8a 60 

187 SO Jul 95 106 W 18*50 IttaJO 18*50 

Tue's sales 70 636 


1 1 00 1.100 

i on $021 

- a. 90 15.738 

- I 00 1.507 

- D80 984 

r 1.00 744 

154 


Tt* :• oorti int So in an m 
sot BEAN OIL (CBOT] u oeo*r . ( 


jt) 45 

.'I JO May 94 

7325 

78 64 




?i 55 Jui 94 

2820 

70 V. 





27 86 

7S.I9 




7? JO ice 94 

2 f 25 

77 55 




?7 ID Get 9( 

7620 

JAJlJ 

?62I 



1' WCK’J 


75 83 




7? ii Jon 95 


7540 



?& &'• 

:j ?f)rj\ar ac 

2S 10 

JSJS 





ISO? 




WUJ 

E-.i sole: 

74 AS Tui 95 74 95 

N Ty,. i iti,-. 

14 l»7 

74 85 

75 no 


UI4 6.718 
0 17 J9.774 
009 172)15 
0(0 (IJ23 
0 03 8-070 
0 02 lS.474 
0 02 2.379 
00S 943 

■ 0 0 5 525 

0 05 126 


te..''.»,6iiii Bi.M-- an 2 ?s 


Livestock 


CATTLE I OVER | 

■Ml 6907 Jun 74 69.40 tfi J? i’W 688? 

«0?A„g14 MM *Sjfl *>40 
A *Oti«4 70 95 71 09 7010 ’0 » 

’Sn’C-.i.*) 71 JS •! « 70*5 7 ij; 
I TiF-.-hkl ?l ]s <14- TQ SO 'in 

7*10 72 41’ Ip, 66 77 U '? -11 

71 58 

ESI tnv*. L 46J Tu* 6 unes 
T»* -.OOsTiinl *'0<0 ,j|. i;» 

FEEDER CATTLE ICMERi 


9 15 All 94 II J7 1123 (US 11.65 

9470.1*4 II JT 11 JS 1125 11.48 

9.13J4UF9S 11.13 IIJ1 1UH I US 

iaS7;Anv95 11.11 1U7 1t.ll li J25 

10-57 Jul 95 II.1J 1IJ0 11.13 IIJ3 

l3J7Ga95 1120 1125 1I20 11.21 

I0-38M«F 96 

Est. sales 14.945 sates (0J79 

Tuc so&ot mt 103.140 up 418 
C O C OA (NCSE) lOrrmnc nm-tcpm 
1345 999 Jul 94 1155 1167 1147 

1377 1 020 Sep 44 1179 1191 lin 

IMIOecM 1719 

1077 Mar 95 1749 

1078 May *5 1140 
1325 Jul 95 
1265 Sep 95 
1290 Dec 95 
1350 Mar *6 

1225 Mar 9* I2E* ... 

Ed. sate 6AM rue's, soles 10.989 
Tue s open int 8IJ93 oil 962 
ORANGE JLBCE (NCTN) IG00G u.- amviw «. 

13500 BOJ»Mav94 I0ZJ0 10250 1 00 JO 101 .S —225 840 

100.75 Jul 94 10525 105.75 102.75 1O3J0 -225 1115* 

1 04 00 Sen 94 10725 107.75 105.10 106.10 —240 1A9S 

lOLlSNch, 94 100 DO I OH 00 I06JJ0 106.95 -I JO 1.118 

1 03J0 Jan « J 09.00 10925 107 JB 10065 —085 2247 

10600 Mar 95 11000 1 10 J)0 110 00 11025 —125 6S0 

1 12.50 Mas 95 T1L25 _)J5 

I19JM Jul95 112.25 —125 

Sop 95 II1J4 — 1J25 

Em. saws 2.500 Tue's. sates 2J7W 
Tue's open hit 30 57’ ud 3 


Season Season 
Htoh Law 


open Mah Cow Close as am 


IJB9 
1382 
1400 
1407 
1350 
1437 
1 385 
12H7 


1289 list 


1151 

1176 

1216 

125D 

1115 

1300 

1111 

1)67 

1375 

1279 


-17 39,043 
-15 13403 
-14 U1B 
—14 10.657 
-45 353 

-14 2.783 
—17 546 

-13 679 

-10 3 

-17 4.909 


135-00 

13450 

IMJJ0 

13200 

12425 

11425 

11900 


Metals 


MOTAOEODPnEKJNCMX) 

93-50 

102.95 
10130 

101.90 
90 40 
99M 
I0> 50 
9125 
71 70 

92.90 
9125 
91.00 
M3) 

91.95 
89 JO 
9224 


73. SO May 94 

93-10 

9320 

92-35 

74.10 Jun 94 

9120 

9320 

9250 

7420 Ju* 94 

9120 

9X70 

*1 to 

’4.90 ieD 94 

92.40 

9200 

9120 

7 i?5Dec 94 
76 90 Jan 95 
7X00 Feb 95 

9200 

91.10 

"0.90 

73 00 Mar 91 

9150 

9150 

91 JO 

7685 May 95 

*1 ia 

"IJQ 

*1.25 

>800 Jul 95 
7130 Aim95 
79.1056095 

fl IS 

91.15 

90*5 

T S 2003 95 
77 TJ Mo/ 95 

9120 

9120 

9] 70 

88 00 Dec *5 
88.50 Jtii 96 
62.70 Mar 96 

90 90 

W90 

9090 

Anr 9j 





9125 —030 
9130 —0.70 


685 

479 

417 


’KiW — 0-70 
90.90 -0.70 


Tur'soocn HW (7.30) up 14 46 
9LVER (NCS4XI lUii.Hu.im.Mhnni 
SEJ) J7I0MCV94 520 0 520.0 510.0 517J 

5l55>in«4 520.0 5300 5300 519 i 

371 0 Jul 94 573 0 524 J 5130 42) J 

l?45Sep9J 4270 579.0 5I».0 S76J 

3800 Dec 94 SH0 S3 46 525 0 5334 

*010 Jan 9} ijsj 

4 16.5 Mur 95 5410 5410 S370 win 

4I8 0MOV95 5460 5460 542.0 546.3 

4200 Jul 95 54+5 5465 5*6 5 S53.I 

49105CB9J UBI 

S390DCC95 5660 566.0 566.0 567.1 

J01 96 544^ 

McrW .580.0 5800 580.0 S7&.7 


•mu 

m*a 

.acuu 


•* 

*1 


94570 90J»0Seo94 94548 WJ90 94.470. 9453B -, - g fig 

95.1B0 TQJIODecH 94040 94.1 N 93570 M06O -NSW 

94590 «540Mor95 918M 93J6B 9X730 93000 JM 

94.730 90 710 Jun 95 93020 91590 HAH) H5« 

94520 9t.jl05ep95 91290 ' 98330 91220 93300 

94280 91.180 Dec 95 93070 93.10. 92M0 H0M 

*4220 90250 Mar 96 99010 930SD 9X9» «jn 

Esl. sties N-A. Tue -i sties 4310S '. . . ■ 

rue’s open in 2089341 up 4I6_ ’ . 

BRITISH POUND (CMBR) tpwi««Fl^'»-tol'W* ' 
15236 I >474 Jun 94 15112 10124 14Vg )5g(8 HH*g 
15200 1+140 Sec 94 1 JB50 15060 1M. ' -Ilf .WJ 

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Unilever Shares 
Slump on Hints 


EUROPE 


Of Weak Results 


Reuters 


_ LONDON— Shares of Uni w , “ Thcre ‘ s “*■*« that would at- 

PLCshpped Wednesday aft.*?™ us to buy t£e shares,” said 

^ ^ an analyst at James 

111311 W to speciUation^S 7^^’ Capel & Co„ who said there were 
2S“"S» it*J?isS2S t ^ i f S li*. onS i over company's 


eanu 


mines ne?n week " “"“"^“ liricr growth and competitive pressure. 
Unilever PLC, ‘iam. _ .^.alysts also said Sir Michael's 


““W Unilever Gro^J.h? ly Cnbc,sm j 0 f look-ahke products 
3«ver NV of tfceiShSaSS ?W* 0,tri Concern that Un- 
to £10.53 (SI 6) a nSzSV* 11 Uev 7 V f* vulnera Ne to such 
from Tuesday afti R2??}- £ °P 8«>ds. Sir Michael called compa- 

said any «W H* packagh7°f 

nomic coudi lions *ht^ >e0t m eco ' * ea ^ n 8 branded goods parasitical 

“I havenookiJti 




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Cost-Cutting 
Helps Trim 
Bull’s Loss 


Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — Groupe Bull, the 
state-controlled computer 
company, said Wednesday 
that rising sales and cost re- 
ductions helped it nearly halve 
its first-quarter Joss, compared 
with the similar 1993 period. 

Bull reported a loss of 942 
miDion French francs ($167 
mi Dion) for the quarter, nar- 
rowed from 1.72 billion francs 
a year earlier. Sales rose 20 
percent, to 6.15 billion francs, 
as orders increased 27 percent 
for hardware and 33 percent 
for professional services and 
systems integration. 

Nonsalary costs were ro- 
wed by 453 


duced by 453 million francs in 
the first quarter, including a 
240 minion-franc reduction in 
fixed costs and a 213 million- 
franc reduction in financial 
costs, the company said. 

The French government has 
said it wiD sdl Boil shares to 
help the company’s financial 
recovery. Bull has lost more 
than 17 billion francs since 
1989. The government has ap- 
plied to the European Commis- 
sion for permission to inject li 
billion franco of state money 
into the company. Other Euro- 
pean Union countries are pro- 
testing French subsidies to 
state-owned companies. 


objection to sitting at 
the same table as my competitors, 
but I do object to them eating off 
my plate," Sir Michael said, noting 
that Unilever had spent £518 mfl- 
hon on brand research and devel- 
opment and £3.3 billion on promo- 
tion last year. 

“Look-alikes which set to mis- 
lead are a parasitic form of compe- 
tition, feeding on the investment in 
research, innovation and market- 
ing expertise of others," he said. 


■ Profits Jump at BAT 

First-quarter profits jumped 
nearly 20 percent at BAT Indus- 
tries PLC, the British tobacco and- 
financial services company, AFP- 
Extd News reported. 

BAT, which last week an- 
nounced plans to buy U.S.- based 
American Tobacco, earned a pre- 
tax £424 mflhoD in the' quarter on 
revalue of £5.84 billion. The com- 
pany said trading profit cm finan- 
cial services rose 16 percent to £220 

mil li nn 

Tobacco profit rose 13 percent 
from the 1993 quarter to £268 mil- 
lion, exceeding expectations, par- 
ticularly in Germany and the Unit- 
ed States. 

Also cm Wednesday, Tale & Lyle 
PLC, one of the world’s biggest 


Telecoms Want Faster Deregulation 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS —Less than a year after the 
European Union set a 1998 target for liberal- 
izing tdecotmmmi cations services. Lhe indus- 
try and some governments are pressing for 
faster and more sweeping deregulation to 
bolster Europe's competitiveness. 

The most urgent push comes from the 
industry. Major players like AT&T Corp. and 
British Telecom muaicarions PLC are posi-. 
boning themselves to offer pan-European 
services, while business users are flexing their 
muscles to fight charges that can run as high 
as double the comparable U.S. prices. 

In a landmark deal last month that could 
be worth 500 million European currency 
units ($586 miDion) a year, a group of 30 
major companies awarded a contract for cor- 
porate network voice services to British Tele- 
com and a joint venture of AT&T and Uni- 
source, a Netherlands-based consortium. The. 
companies say they hope to cut costs by as 
much as 40 percent and obtain new services 
such as call switching, which allows execu- 
tives to take their phone numbers with them 
when they travel. 

This commercial pressure is reinforced by 
a European Union drive to build a trans- 
European information superhighway. Like a 
similar U.S. effort, this network is considered 
crucial to Europe's ability to compete in a 
future where telephone, television and com- 
puter technologies are converging. But tele- 
phone monopolies in every country but Brit- 
ain are deterring potential suppliers and users 
of new services. 


es. said, “Private industry is never going to 
put a single Ecu in this thing if they realize 
they’re going to be stuck with very rigid 
regulation.” 

Responding to those pressures, the Euro- 
pean Commission is considering a directive 
that would allow cable tdevision operators to 
use their networks to offer services such as 
voice and data transmission for corporate 
groups. In the deregulated British market, 
cable-based service is the fastest-growing sec- 
tor of the telephone market, with Mercury 
Co mmunicati ons serving more than a third of 


oping; 
the en 


; information highways, people close to 
He group say. 

“There is broad agreement that operators 
should be allowed to use the existing net- 
works." the commission official said. 


But those proposals will face stiff opposi- 

mturo- 


Business users of 
teleeommmucatioiis 
services in Europe are 
flexing their muscles to 
fight charges that can 
run as high as double the 
comparable U.S. prices. 


its 780,000 residential customers via cable 
companies rather than British Telecom. 

Karel Van Miert, the ElTs competition 
commissioner, said the move would hnro- 


lion from the less developed southern 
pean countries, who bloated a s imilar EU 
initiative a year ago, and from state-owned 
telephone monopolies seeking to delay open 
competition. 

Despite that opposition, some national 
governments may be prepared to move faster. 
The Netherlands is seeking to get cable oper- 
ators and utilities to unite to form a nation- 
wide network next year to compete with Roy- 
al PTT Nederland NV, winch the government 
will privatize next month. Germany has ad- 
vanced its target date for selling Deutsche 
Telekom to 1996. 

The fear in industry is that such moves mil 
entrench the current patchwork of different 
national regulations and impede the develop- 
ment of pan-European services. 

“There is a real need out there,” said Vies- 
turs Vucins, president of Unisource, a con- 
sortium owned by the Dutch, Swiss and 
Swedish telephone companies. “European in- 
dustry has to be competitive in lelecoms- 
Anything that’s not opening up markets is 
wrong." 


duce a dose of competition and help Industry 
prepare for a full litx 


“The main obstacles are high telecom- 
munications costs,” said one European Com- 
mission official working on the network plan. 
“Deregulation is the most urgent thing to 
do.” 


Eric Vaes, a General Electric Co. executive 
who heads the telecommunications panel of 
the EC Committee of the American Chamber 
of Commerce in Belgium, which is the main 
lobbying group in Brussels for U.S. business- 


iberalization of Europe's. 
$12Q billion market for telecomm uni cations 
services while not yet undermining the mo- 
nopoly that Europe's state-owned companies 
have on bask telephone service. “I think we 
need to go ahead,” he said. 

That proposal, as wen as a separate plan to 
allow utilities such as railroad and elecLric 
'companies to offer similar services over their 
internal tdecom networks, is likely to be 
endorsed Friday when a group of senior tech- 
nology executives appointed by El' Industry 
Commissioner Martin Bangemann meets in 
Brussels to make recommendations for devel- 


Industry officials and analysts say liberal - 
i — the ac 


ization of infrastructure — the actual cables 
and switches that carry voice and dam traffic 
— is essential to developing true competition 
in telecommunications service. They say any 
competitive edge they may have is dulled by 
the fees they must pay u> connect their clients 
to the telephone networks of the national 
monopolies. 

“The next major front will be how the 
system allows for infrastructure competi- 
tion,” said John D. Foster, brad of AT&T 
Communications Services in Brussels. “The 
system will change because essentially it's an 
uneconomic system.” 


’ ~-£ : .t 


Investor’s Europe 



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Sources: Reuters. AFP 

iMemaiional Hctald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Foreign Sales Buoy Schering’s First-Period Net 


• EJectrohnc AS, the Swedish appliance maker, said it had reached final 
agreement with AEG AG of Germany to acquire AEG> household 

S ipliances unit for about 730 million Deutsche marks ($444 miFioni. 
aimler-Benz AG owns 80.2 percent of AEG. 


sugarjaroducers, said pretax profit 


and Sobering has 40 percent. That company said. Sales of Lhe drug 
means that Sobering now receives totaled 41 million DM in spite of 
only part of the profit from the initial difficulties in distribution, 
business. The company said the strength 

its financial year, which ended sche marks ($75 million), boosted Schering said the venture’s profit of the dollarand yen also helped its 
March 26, Bloomberg Business in particular by sales of pharma- had been undo - pressure because of results. (Bloomberg, AFX, Return I 
News reported. ecu ti cals abroad. seasonal factors. 

Stronger earnings from Austra- The German pharmaceutical Faming a from the company's 


rose 22 percent in the first half of 


Coaptfed by Oiu Siaff From Dupaxha 

BERLIN — Schering AG said 
Wednesday its first-quarter profit 
rose 2 percent, to 124 million Deut- 


wegian pharmaceutical company, 
said pretax earnings in the first 
quarter fell 21 percent, to 302 mil- 
lion kroner ($42.3 million), Reuters 
reported from Oslo. 


ban and European sugar 
tions lifted six-month profit to 
£130.9 million on sales of £1.99 
billion. 

Sales rose to £1.99 billion from 
£1.85 billion a year earlier. Earn- 
ings per share increased to 17.9 
pence from 15.9 pence. The compa- 
ny raised its first-half dividend 7 
percent, to 4.6 pence a share from 
4 3 pence a year earlier. Analysts 
had expected the company to raise 
the dividend about 10 percent 


company repeated its forecast of an 
increase in profit for the full year, 
backed by rising earnings in Eu- 
rope, Latin America and the Unit- 
ed States. 

But earnings did not keep pace 
with sales, which surged 19 percent 
to L15 billion DM, because the 
company transferred its agrochem- 
icals operations into a joint venture 
with Hoechst AG late last year. 

Hoechst holds a 60 percent stake 
in the agrochemicals joint venture. 


core pharmaceuticals division grew 
in proportion with sales during the ' 
quarter, the company said. 

Overseas sales were up 22 per-, 
cent while domestic sales rose by i 
only 6 percent reflecting the reces- 1 
sion in Germany. 

Betaseron, Scbering's drug for 
multiple sclerosis that was 
launched for sale in the United 
States late last year, accounted for 
four percentage points of lhe 19 
percent increase in group sales, the 


I Hafstiind Profit Slips 
Hafslund Nvcomed AS. a Nor- 


But the company forecast that its 
profit for 1994 would be in line 
with its pretax profit of 1.57 billion 
kroner for 1993. 


• Creditanstalt- B ankrerein. Austria's largest bank, said it had record 
operating profit in 1993 of 5.43 billion schillings ($469 million), up from 
3.43 billion schillings in 1992. The bank said the gain resulted largely 
from strong trading profits. 

■The European Commission said it had blocked part of a subsidy package 
awarded by French authorities to Allied Signal Fibers Europe SA. 

Return. 4 FX.AFP. Rlooniberg 


Klockner-Werke Had 
'Slight’ First-Half Logs 



WwtoMdajr’a Closing 

Tables include the nationwide priesa up to 
the dosing on Wail Street and do not redact 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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DUISBURG, Germany — 
KlOckner-Wetke AG said Wednes- 
day it had a “slight” operating loss 
in the six months ended in March 
but affirmed its forecast that it 
would return to profit in the full 
year ending in September. 

The steel and plastics manufac- 
turer provided no figures but said 
the first-half loss was “within 
plan." U said group sale* in the first 
half fell 12 percent. u< 105 bilhon 
Deutsche marks ($1 billion), from 
230 billion DM a year earlier. Sales 
were down 23 percent at its domes- 
tic operations but only 4.8 percent 
in its export divisions. Sales at the 
company’s foreign divisions rose 
6.8 percent. 



Weekly net asset 
value 


on 29.04.94 
US $ 60.50 


Listed on the 
Amsterdam 
Stock Exchange 


Information: 

McesPicrson Capital Management 
Rofcw 55 , 1012 KK Amsterdam. 
Tel.: + 3 1 - 20 - 52 1 1 410 . 


FOREIGN 



SOCIETE FH5MCIERE PRIVEE S.A. - Geneva 


Net Income and Dividend Increase 



Fiscal Year 1993 

Swiss Francs 
in mio 

1993/1992 

Trading activity 

4,654.0 

+ 4215.8* 

Incomes 

11.9 

- 4.7 

Expenses 

6.6 

~ IU- 

Gross Profit 

5J 

+ 43 

Amortizations & 

Provisions 

3J3 

+ 2.7 

Net Profit 

2.0 

-*■ 1.6 


'•‘I9V2 iJire«- 
activity 

In a transition year when we became a quoted public company, listed cm the 
Geneva Stock Exchange, the company has increased net incomes and reserves 
by Sfr 8.4 milliona. 


The Board has proposed to the Shareholders ‘Meeting to set the dividend at 
i nearer shares and Sfr !•- for the nominative shares. The paid- 


Sfr 10,- for the bearer snares and sir I.- lor tne nominative snares. I he paid- 
up capital of the company will be increased by the issuance of Sfr 23’215 lM) 0.— 
convertible bonds during May 1994. 

The preliminary report is available since April 12th if you wish to receive it. 
please telephone or write to: 

SFP, chemin da velours 24, P.O. Box 360, CH-I21I GENEVA 17 
TeL: (41) 22 347.90.2J 


Q^BREXQ 7 AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVTCES 


Ciuweno' Management Corporation Plc 

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• Saab Automobile AB reported a pretax loss for the first quarter of 63 
million kronor ($8 million}, compared with a loss of ibl million kronor in 
the same quarter a year earlier, but car sales rose 24 percent and the 
company said it expected to return to profitability this year 

• France's sale of shares in Union des Assurances de Paris, the «uue- 
comrolled insurance company, has been oversubscribed, and small im es- 
ters mil not receive the full allocation of 70 shares for which they were 
entitled to apply. The company said demand lor the shares wa> neverthe- 
less not as strong as in earlier sales of state-owned assets such j> that of 
Hf Aquitaine SA in February. 

• Rupert Murdoch said the editor of the British newspaper The Sunday 
Times, Andrew Neil, would be transferred to New York in June to launch 
a current-affairs program for the Fox television network. 


• Interbrew SA, a Belgian brewer, said it had agreed to buy 23.S percent of 
Zagrebacka Pivorara. Croatia's largest brewery. 


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Page 13 ■ i — 


Ufe- 


Australia 

launches 

Jobs Plan 



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®* Of Shares fell IJ percent to 
dose at 2,018.4 points. 

'nuS 6 ^® 1 ? 00 “ e l<yyeA: govem- 
surged io a 1 Smooth 
^hof 8.78 peranup from 8.49 
percent Tuesday. The Australian 

SKwm? quoted “ **“ trad ing at 
/W.50 U.S. cents, down more than 
naif a cent from Tuesday. 

“It’s an absolute debacle today," 
Oamian Heonessy, an investment 
manager at HSBC Investment 
Management. “What’s tipped it 
over the edge," he said, were signs 
ornsmg government spending. 

The bulk of the cost of the plan 
would finance an ambitious pro- 
gram to guarantee .a job to all peo- 
ple who had been unemployed for 
more than 18 months. Assistance 
would be stopped only if they re- 
fused to accept reasonable job of- 
fers. 

The package, announced just six 
days before the country’s next bud- 
get is to be outlined, aims to reduce 
Unemployment to 5 percent by the 
end of the decade from current lev- 
els of more than 10 percent. 

Australia's economy grew about 
4 percent in 1993, and the number 
of jobs has grown by 230,000 since 
April 1993. But official data show 
that the adjusted unemployment 
rale in March still stood at 103 
percent, representing 902,700 peo- 
ple. 

The package fulfilled Mr. Keat- 
ing's election promise, made last 
year, to help the unemployed. 

Employers would be offered in- 
centives to take on the long-term 
unemployed, with a subsidy of 200 
dollarr for each employee for the 
first 13 weeks, 100 (Mars for the 
next 26 weeks and a bonus of 500 
dollars for retaining workers after a 
year. 

The government said outlays 
would be “consistent with our tar- 
get of a deficit of around 1 percent 
of gross domestic product by 1996 
and 1997.” adding that the budget 
is “well set up” to return to surplus 
later in the decade. 

(AFP. AFX. Bloomberg) 


ManttaStocks 
GmnasIl.K. 
Equities Fall 


Coapikdby Our Staff From Dispatches 

MANILA — Philippine 
stocks recorded their biggest 

gam of the year Wednesday, as 

Philippine Long Distance 
Telephone Co. broke out of a 
prolonged dump. 

The Phi li ppi ne Stock Ex- 
change closed at 3,064.05 
points, up 429 percent. PLDT 
Finished at 1,995 pesos ($74), 
up 8 percent. 

PLDTs surge was triggered 
by a government announce- 
ment Monday that, in line 
with a plan to end PLDTs 
m ono poly, awarded remaining 
telephone service area con- 
tracts to competitors. 

The announcement focused 
investors on telecommunica- 
tions stocks and highlighted 
PLDTs strength, analysts 
said. 

Meanwhile, stocks in Hong 
Kong plunged Wednesday, as 

the blue-chip Hang Seng In- 
dex dropped to a 1994 low of 
8.359.41 points before closing 
at 8J69.44, down 3-6 percent 

Brokers cited a list of rea- 
sons for the bearish mood in 

Hong Kong, ran&qi 
that Chinese painarcfc Deng 
Xiaoping was mortally ifl, to 
the postponement of a laip 


( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


l- — 

Richard Li’s Firm 
To Take Control 

QfSeapowerAsia 

BtonfrrtBuB * , f; 


BloomturgBuaeessS^ 



FAR Tv announcea 

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Sltf Singapore rules. 


Kia Aims for Worldwide Car Sales 


Rewen 

ASAN, South Korea — Kia 
Motors Corp., which started life 
as a humble bicycle manufactur- 
ers now approaching its goal of 
becoming a major force m the 
world car market by the end of 
the century. 

Kia, South Korea's largest car- 
maker after Hyundai Motor Co., 
has embarked on a S6 billion dol- 
lar expansion plan. 

Han Seung Joon, Kia's presi- 
dent, said the company planned 
to double its production capacity 
before 2000. 

. “Expansion is necessary to sur- 
vive and grow,” be said. “We 
hope to become one of the 
world’s top 10 producers by 
then." 

Kia was founded in 1944 by 
Kim Chul Ho, an engineer at a 
Japanese steel -processing compa- 
ny, toward the end of Japan’s 


occupation of Korea. Mr. Kim, 
whose personal mission was to 
implant industrial machinery in 
impoverished South Korea, made 
bicycle parts until 1952, when he 
and his 50 employees made the 
counuy's first complete bicycle. 

Thirty years later, working 
with Japan's Mazda Motor 
Corp., Kia turned out its first 
passenger sedan. An additional 
technical tie-up with Ford Motor 
Co. in 1986 led to the largely 
homegrown Sep Kia and Spoilage 
passenger cars. 

“Spoilage is uniquely designed 
to attract foreign buyers,'' said 
Lee Dong Ki, a car industry ana- 
lyst at Barclays de Zoete Wedd. 
“Kia's partners — Ford and 
Mazda — are lined up to sell the 
model in Australia, Taiwan and 
Japan.” Sephia, meanwhile, is 
targeted at the upscale domestic 
market. 


It is with these and future mod- 
els that Kia aims to make its big 
splash overseas. Analysts say the 
company stands a good chance of 
success. 

Koh Young Jong senior ana- 
lyst at the Korea' Automobile 
Manufacturers’ Association, says 
Kia’s design and overall perfor- 
mance compared favorably with 
any in the world. 

“In quality and price, Kia's 
Spoilage and Sephia are very at- 
tractive," he said. 

The aim of the $6 billion ex- 
pansion program U to establish a 
world market share because of a 
sharp slump in overall domestic 
demand, from an annual increase 
or about 40 percent in the late 
1980s to 18 percent Iasi year. 

Kia said it was negotiating with 
Rover Group PLC of Britain to 
jointly develop a large gasoline 
engine for sedans. A Kia official 


said the two companies were ex- 
pected to sign the contract before 
the end of June to produce en- 
gines of 2,000 and 2J0Q cubic 
centimeters. 

He said Kia also wanted even- 
tually to develop diesel engines 
for passenger cars in cooperation 
with Rover, which has been taken 
over by the German carmaker 
Bayerische Moioren Werke AG. 

Last year Kia accused Sam- 
sung Co., South Korea’s largest 
conglomerate, of planning a hos- 
tile takeover. Instead. Samsung 
announced last month it had en- 
tered the automobile industry, 
not by trying to lake over Kia, 
but by going into partnership 
with Japan's Nissan Motor Co. 

Kia’s exports were 158.415 
units last year, 26 percent of its 
total sales of 600.986 units. It 
plans to increase exports by 61 
percent this year. 


Ssangyong Oil Challenges Seoul on Price Controls 


Co.’s 

[very 


Xnight-Ridder 

SEOUL — Ssangyong Oil Refining ( 
surprise move to cut its gasoline deli.-. , 
price has upset government officials, who 
w ony that cutthroat comped (ion among lo- 
cal oil companies could threaten the recently 
introduced petroleum-pricing system. 

The government is expected to pul strong 
pressure on the company to conform to in- 
dustry standards to prevent an unraveling of 
the structure of domestic and international 
prices. The cuneni pricing system favors in- 
dustrial development at the expense or pri- 
vate consumption. 

The Ministry erf Trade, Energy and Indus- 
try, which controls petroleum product prices. 


cannot openly require Ssangyong Oil not to 
undercut the competition at the retail level, 
because lowering prices is not against the law. 

Oil firms have traditionally sold gasoline at 
the government-set ceiling prices in order to 
maximiw* profits. 

The controversy was set off last week when 
Ssangyong Oil, one of five local oil compa- 
nies, reduced its gasoline price by 15 to 20 
won (about 2 to 2.5 cents) from the govern- 
ment-set ceiling price of 614 won a liter for 
the April 15-May 14 period. 

“The price cut is to benefit our customers," 
a Ssangyong spokesman said. “And we also 
hope to expand our market share.” 

Ssangyong is currently ranked third in do- 


mestic market share with 12.2 percent, far 
behind Yukong Ltd.'s 39 percent and Honam 
Oil Refining Co.’s 30 perceni. 

“The government doesn't approve of Ssan- 
gyong’s move," a ministry official said. “This 
might result in cutthroat competition, which 
is not good.” 

The company's unilateral price cut may 
prompt the government to speed up price 
liberalization, according to industrial and 
government sources. 

In fact the government may accelerate the 
lifting of controls. Oil price liberalization is 
one part of a planned deregulation of most 
aspects of the South Korean economy by the 
end of 1997. 


China Scraps 
Licenses to 


Import Oil 


Coupled by Our Sufi From Dispatches 

BEIJING — China has canceled 
all licenses to import crude oil and 
refined products to try to combat 
what it called “chaotic” prices, trad- 
ers in East Asia said Wednesday. 

Chinese authorities have told 
holders of import licenses that the 
licenses are no longer valid and 
that they must reapply for the right 
to bring oB or oil products into the 
country, the traders said. 

A spokesman for the State Plan- 
ning Commission confirmed that 
the government was considering 
“administrative measures” to con- 
trol the oil market, but he did not 
say what those measures might be. 

“At present, the prices on China's 
oil product markets are not reason- 
able and relatively chaotic,” the' 
spokesman said. “The government 
is implementing reforms for the cir- 
culation of crude and finished oil 
products according to the demands 
of the socialist market economy and 
will take administrative measures on 
crude oil which are now in the pro- 
cess of bong set.” 

Traders said the commission 
would issue new import licenses 
but that the paperwork could take 
several weeks to process. 

Other traders said price ceilings 
have been mentioned. 

China is a net exporter of petro- 
leum products. In 1990, the most 
recent year for which such data are 
available, C hina imported $1.05 
billion of petroleum products and 
exported $4.47 billion. (Bloomberg, 
Reuters, Knighi-Ridder) 


Investor’s Asia 


HongKongr 
HangSsiigf : Straits 

13080 




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. ti02&25',.;.1,042JJ2-, ■ 

Bangkok : 

SET ■ 

ijszjs? . "fjsefit '&W-; 

Seoul 

-Corap««e Stock. 

9Z2L33 ; 

Taifiei 

• Wetted Price- 

5,90734 ■ : • 5JJ0G3S ' | 

Manila 

PSE 

a.064.06 £s& 7J& ' ,+4.29 v ! 

Jakarta . 

Stock Index 

4®L60. - 46034' 

Now Zealand 

N2S&40 

' WW 2.085.58 

Bombay ■ 

National Index 

1,760.67 ' 1.79767.. 

Sourcas: Reuters. AFP 

InMialiooi] Herald Tribune 

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Tokyo Investors Hitch a Ride With Ford via Mazda 


By Andrew Pollack 

Nr* York Times Scnice 
TOKYO — Investors in Japan have been 
placing their bets on Ford Motor Co. in a 
novel way. They are bidding up the shares of 
Mazda Motor Corp„ the ailing Japanese auto* 
maker of which Fond owns about 25 percent 
Japan’s automobile industry is experienc- 
ing its worst slump since World War II. and 
Mazda is one of the sickest of the companies. 
Its sales in Japan last year plunged at twice 
the rate of the market as a whole. The Hiro- 
shima-based company is expected to report a 
loss erf 45 bfiHon yen ($445 million) for the 
year that ended March 31, and the losses are 
expected to continue for at least another 
year. 

But Mazda's stock has risen more than 30 
percent since its low point of 397 yen in 
January. It dosed Monday, ahead of this 
week's three-day market holiday, unchanged 


at 528 yea. What has propelled the stock is 
the belief that Ford, which went through its 
own restructuring in the 1980s to become 
one of the world's most successful automak- 
ers, mil now work the same magic on Mazda. 

Ford shares, meanwhile, have risen to just 
above $60 from about $55 just two weeks 
ago. 

“It lodes tike Ford is taking a strong hand 
in leading Mazda down the recovery path.” 
said Peter Boardman. auto analyst for UBS 
Securities, who has recommended Mazda. 

Enda Clarke of Baring Securities in Tokyo 
has recommended Mazda as a “speculative" 
buy. “We fed that with the influence of 
Ford, Mazda will be taking steps in restruc- 
turing beyond what the other manufacturers 
are doing." he said. 

Three Fond executives have been workin, 
this year in senior positions at Mazda. Fo: 
is expected to include Mazda in the global 


rationalization of its operations announced 
recently. If the companies increase their 
sharing of pans and automobiles, it would 
lower Mazda's costs. 

Mr. Boardman of UBS said Mazda expand- 
ed its product line too much during the boom 
of the 1980s, straining its resources. Bui now 
the company is expected to cut by half the 
number of basic models it makes. He said 
Mazda has also announced a 13 percent re- 
duction in its workforce by March 19%. com- 
pared with cuts of 3 percem for Toyota Motor 
Coup, and Honda Motor Co. and 9 percent for 
the unprofitable Nissan Motor Co. 

“This year and next year there’s going to 
be a snowballing effect from their rational- 
ization," he said. He predicted Mazda would 
return to profitability in the year that ends in 
March 1996. 

Other analysts were far more pessimistic 
and said it was too earlv to buv the stock. The 


recovery will lake “a very, very long time," 
said Mashu Kato of Morgan Stanley & Co. 

“At over 500 yen. you're paying a very 
large premium just belting on what Ford will 
do," said Jonathan Dobson, analyst with 
Jaiidine Fleming Securities. “Mazda has 
three problems, and Ford is addressing only 
one of them,” he added. 

One or the problems not being addressed, 
he said, is that Mazda has five dealer chains 
in Japan, far too many to be supported by its 
meager sales. The third problem is that Maz- 
da produces relatively few of its cars outside 
Japan, compared with the other major Japa- 
nese companies. 

Meanwhile, the overall auto market in 
Japan remains weak. Sales rn April fell 6.6 
percem from a year before, defying expecta- 
tions that sales would increase" because of a 
reduction in the sales tax that took effect at 
the beginning of the month. 


• South Korea's leading trade association predicted the country would 
run a 1994 trade deficit of $3.5 billion due to rising imports, which were 
forecast to increase by M.6 percent to $93.5 billion. 

■ Vietnam is sending a team of economic officials and business executives 
led by its deputy prime minister. Tran Due Luong. to the United States to 
make a pitch for U.S. in vestment money. Delegation members are to 
address conferences in Washington. New' York and San Francisco from 
May 19 to 26. 

• Jardme Fleming Broking Ltd. has reduced die amount of Hoag Kong 
slocks it advises clients to hold in a model equity portfolio for tile region 
to 19 percent from 22 percent; the territory's property market is ripe for a 
fall, a company spokesman said. 

• San Miguel Corp~ the Philippines' largest food and beverage conglom- 
erate, said its Hong Kong subsidiary would seek bids for its brewery site 
in the Sham Tseng area. 

• Japan's recession should end by December and corporate profits should 
be boosted by restructuring, in the consensus view of Japanese business 
executives polled by the Tokyo Shim bun newspaper. 

• Thailand's cabinet approved a 715 billion baht ($28.35 billion) budget 

for fiscal 1995, a 14.4 percent increase from the 1994 budget, a govern- 
ment spokesman said. AFP. Reuters. Bloomberg 


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TO OUR READERS 


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IN LUXEMBOURG 


It's never been easier to subscribe 
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FT FOR BUCHAREST] GtfOtoftC. 
35, fem ofe, sn^r . Genwx 
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hfoT&a&r o ho Brwrf, "°J?' 




Fonds de 

DEVELOPPEMENT 
SOCIAL DU CONSEIL 
DE L'EUROPE 


Institution fmandere intergouvemementale 
regroupant 22 Pays Membres recherche : 


2 INGENIEURS 

ANALYSTES DE PROJET 


Ranadids au dircctcur des projets. Us auroru la responsabilJ- 
ie technique el financiere de projets depuis F instruct ion 
jusqu'i la realisation finale : faisabililii technique, coordina- 
tion. montage financier, contacts avec les Administrations 
des pays c once rads, tnesure des rdsuiials dconomiques et 
sociaux, reporting. Le posts convicndraii h un candidal de 
natinriali rf europ6eime, de 30 ans minimum, de forma- 
tion it^akur et a yarn des competences financieres. 11 aura 
rexp6rience de la conduite de projeis et sera parfaltemem 
btiingue fran^ais anglais. (Ref. Ry216I/2i62H). 


ADJOINT AU RESPONSABLE 
DE LA COMPTABILITE 


Avec ie respmsabie de la compiabih'le, il prendra en charge 
l’ensemble des operations de comptabilit^. II parti cipera a 
l'anuSIioration des systftmes d* Informal ions icomptabilites 
auxiliaires. reporting, dials rdglemeniaires....). Ce posie 
convicndraii k un r-aivKHai de naxionaliid europdenne, 3tg& de 
35 an< minimum, diplom£ de i'enseignement superieur, 
ay ant ime experience conftnnde de la comptabiliid dans une 
banqite Internationale. D aura acquis une bonne mail rise des 
outjls inf ormatiq lies. (Rif. R/2 1 63Hj. 


Ces trois posies relfivent du sratut de Fonciionnaire 
tntemaiionaL Merci d’adresser votre dossier de candidature 
a Hugues CELERCER en prccisant la nfftirence choisie - PA 


Consulting Group - 3, rue des Graviers - 93521 
c _ fa. 40^8.79.75. 


NEUnXYCedex 


13^ Consulting 
JLn. Group 

Creating Business Advantage 



DIRECTEUR DES SYSTEMES 

D 1 * IN FORMATION ET DU CONTROLE 


40 ans ou plus, formation suparieure avec MBA ou expertise comptable, 
vous maftrisez la comptabriite des elablissements financiers et les systemes 


d'information et de controle (audit ou inspection). Vous avez dirigd des 


LE FONDS 

DE DEVELOPPEMENT SOCIAL 

DU CONSEIL DE L'EUROPE, 


unites administralives et financieres dans un conlexte international. Vous 
6tes rigoureux el syntbebque. organisaleur. bon animateur. et reconnu pour 
voire resistance et votre capacrte de travail. 

Sous I'autorite du Gouvemeur. vous rejoindrez et dirigerez une equipe 
(19 collaborateurs. 6 cadres) pour prendre en main I'organisalion des 
systemes d'information et de controle. tref. 541/DS) 


INSTITUTION FINANCIERE 
INTERGOUVERNEMENTALE 
REGROUPANT 22 PAYS MEMBRES 


rt’rherrhv 


3 cadres 
haut niveau 


SPECI ALISTE DE L’AUDIT INTERNE 

Age de 32 ans ou plus, vous avez une experience confirmge de ('audit ou 
du contrble interne d'elablissements financiers internationaux et de 
I’informatisation de leur fonclionnement. Rigoureux. bon organisateur. on 
vous reconnait de I'autorite et le souci du dialogue. 

Venez prendre en charge ('amelioration peunanente des procedures internes 
de rinstitution ef en controler I'application el la parfaite comprehension par 
tous ses membres. (ret. sji/sai 


POUR RENFORCER 
SON SIEGE A PARIS 
BILIIMGUE FRAN^ArS-ANGLAIS 
NATIONALITY EUROPEENNE 


RESPONSABLE DU DEVELOPPEMENT 

De formation superieure. vous avez une experience de plus de dix ans des 
relations intemationales de haut niveau dans le domaine economique et 
financier avec les pouvoirs publics de nombreux Etats et les orgamsmes 
internationaux (BEI, BERD, Banque Mondiale. etc...). Combatif, vous 6tes 
reconnu pour votre ouverlure et votre capacite a convalncre. 

Venez promouvoir les activites de rinstitution et developper la qualile et le 
volume des projets qu'elle soutient. Vous aurez a developper les contacts 
avec les Administrations des Etats Membres. tret. 541 /rdi 
■ Les trois posies reievent du statut de Fonciionnaire IntemationaJ. 

Merci d'adresser votre dossier de candidature (CV + remuneration actuelle 
+ n° de telephone) en precisant sur I'enveloppe la reference du poste 
choisi a COMMUNIQUE - 50/54 rue de Silly - 92513 BOULOGNE 
BILLANCOURT Cedex - FRANCE. 


' Page 1 

cal in No 
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' ma-«flprer 

ping and h. 
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ices for crii 
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, with an ad 
mled to na 
and areas n> 


irtef- 


BMBl OBOIST, 
f^f fl in tf«rt ae i gnmenfa 

Ifatan. Dr. Doran, brad Fas 


SECRETARIAL 
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Fora 144 09 99 22 . 


YOU SAW THIS AD. 


So did nearly half a million well-nrittcalpd, 
influential and successful readers. 

Shouldn't you advertise your rmmncrrinl properly in the 

INTERNATIONAL HE&4LD TRIBUNE' 


EDUCATIONAL 

POSITIONS 


LH^cole des hautes etudes 
commercialcs (H£C) dc 
lUnivtrsilc dc Lausanne 
met au concours un poste 
plcin temps dc 



Professeur de 
Marketing 


Exigences, dixnnrar. avoir 
pubiie des travaux rclatifs aux 
matiCTCS enfcignees, 
experience profession nc llc 
dans les metiers du marketing, 
de la communication et/nu du 

commercial, si possible Jans 
un comextc iniemait**nal 
Avant depot dc candidature 
(avec deux refereni es sur 
qmiitrS seientifiqucs et 
pedagopiques). Uemander le 
cahier des charge' vie ce poste 
au pnrf. O Blanc. Doyen dc 
l'Ecolc dtsllliC. BWI I. 

101 s Lausanne. 

Switzerland. 

TtfL- +41-21/6^2 3.4 40. 
Dtlat de cmtUdtiturcs: 
20 )uln 199^ 

(entree en fn in. i ion lAV***' 
cs'entuelfenicnl t/.W'i. 


Our client 

one of the largest companies in the Middle East 

is seeking to appoint an experienced 



Reporting fo fhe senior management, you will be responsible for setting up the 
property and services division and creating efficient systems lor me management of 
o significant portfolio of existing properties and properties scheduled fo r ienovotion 
and urban services. 

You will have o major role m defining the division's organization structure and 
procedures, managing Budgets and Cash Flows and supervising social actions. You 
will have an active lend in defining scope and marketing for rental promises and 
supervising a learn responsible tor operafing concessions, marketing, maintenance, 
services ond local odministiotion 

You hove a higher education and of least 1 5 years experience of property 
management within a major group in senior position 
You are used la taking initiatives, ore well organized and have strong management 
skills. You will contribute your expertise and professionalism to this position. 

Position Dosed in Beirut, working language english Knowledge of french on 
advantage. 

Please send your handwritten letter and CV under ref. M/71 53/B to COOPERS & 
LYBRAND Consultant Recruiement 32. rue Guersani 75833 PARIS ceaex 1 7. 


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2 „2*S2? C S !!?** 5 tu }? !S NO* 17 CURRENCY FUND 

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mKe! \ OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL INC 

2!k? 1 KLrH 1«!5 W^ms House. Hamilton HMII. Bermuda 

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d Latin American Invest Co _j I02S OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 

d Me ..COT In vest Co S.aiv _5 4031 n From Si. HomXr VirtH* 

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iv Aslcn Warrcnl Fund S 721 

LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (1521 M5 M33 

w Antenna Fund S Ib24 

‘ir LG Asian Smoller Cos Fd S 184*95 

nr LG India Fund Ltd _5 14 1* 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS! Ltd 
UortE Americas Portfolio 180*1 32471 1 




w GAMwI m % 437 JH 

dfGAM Arbitrate 5 39325 

wGAM ASEAN S 4172* 

iv GAM Australia S 21520 

wGAM Boston $ 34140 

mGAMFCoroW AWnneionka_2 1(035 

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iv GAM Crass- Market S 107.15 

iv GAM European S *1.93 

W GAM France FF I91UJB 

iv GAM Franc -vo! SF 23645 

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nr GAM East Asia Inc s 6*749 

w GAM Irmnn C 87645 

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O Do Sterling t 1012* 

d Do Sndss Franc SF 10122 

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d Do Yen— Y 10074X10 

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w GAM Emery Mlrte Mitl-Fd-S 16521 

nr GAM MilLEurooe USS s I3b.lb 

w GAM Mlll-Europe DM — _DM 13623 

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w GAM Martel Neutral s 11246 

iv GAM Trading DM — DM 13847 

» GAM Trading USS. i 161w 

tv GAM Overseas. S i«j* 

Hr GAM POCNIC S 900** 

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w GAM SlnoapQre'Molovsio_s 71*21 

nr GAM SF Special Bond SF 131.* 

iv GAM Tydle S 35*.lb 

W&AMU2. Z 2C0J3 

Mr GAiftul Investments S at 747 

nr GAM Value S 1211* 

w GAM Wide I horn- S 196J4 

■v GAM Worldwide S 6*742 

w GAM Bond U 55 Onl S 14173 

GAM Bona USS special S 1S227 

GAM Bond SF SF 102.13 

GAM Band Yen Y 14601X& 

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EuroogACC.- - DM 13217 

Tokyo Acc DM 17646 

Tom Bond DM ACC— DM 107 J4 

hwh-toidMAcc DM 17<81 

TAL NUSNAGEMEKT LTD 
29S-4B30 Ft»»: (8091 29^6180 
nwM GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

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(H) Ten Flnonooi S 171.95 

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oral FUTURES 8 OPTIONS SICAV 

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_ Gtobcu Equity S 11.94 

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““ Fond Ecu 114929* 

. CAPITAL INTL BROUP 

Capital Equity S 0.9829 

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mob I MANAGEMENT (IRELAND) LTD 
. 1 (441 71 ■ 710 45 47 

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GTAsHmSmaQ Comp ASh2 18B4 

GT Aston Small Come B Sh2 1829 

GT Auuratta Fd A Snares _4 M24 

GT Australia Fd B 5hores_S 32Jb 

GT AlBlr. SmeU CP A Sh S VM 

GTAustr. Small CO B» 5 28X0 

GT BWTV Japan Fd A Sh—S 24B3 

GT Bern Japan Fd B Sh — 5 2417 

gt Bond Fd A Shores S 19J6 

GT Bond Fd B Shane 5 19.42 

GT Bio &AP Sciences A Sh_S 194] 

GT Bio SAP Sciences 8 StLS i*4i 

GT Dollar Fund A SO S 34-12 

GT Donor Fund B » 5 3*30 

GT Emsrgino MUSA5h S 19.50 

GT Emerging MBS BSh_S 1943 

„ GTEuiMk! Small CoA5h2 LB5 

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wGT Earn Small Co Fd 8 Sd-S <324 

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rf GT Honshu PaltTfindor A ShS 11SS 

rf GT Honstw PaMnder B SiS 1359 

w GTJ»OTC stocks Fd A ShS U*f 

T JOpOTC StackaFd BSiiS 14X 

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■v 6.T. Latin Am^ico Fd S 2tt*t 

tf GT Strategic Bd Fd A Sh — 5 LB 

0 GT Strategic Bd Fd B 5h— 2 ,854 

d GT Teiecnrnm. Fd A Shores* 145* 

d GT Telecomm. Fd B Shores S 1447 

*T Technology Fund A Sh-S 5191 

JT Technotasy Fund B Sh_S 542D 

MANAGEMENT PLC (4671 718 4S SO 
6J. B10MctVH«iltn Fwid_S 2149 

(LT. Deutsdttand Fund J U» 

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T v~— , Fimri 1 5J2 

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ran Companlos— s 

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

NSeLEd. S 10540 

BUGKT FDMN5RS [GnSCTl Ltd 
FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

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S 3644 

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Gilt A I Bend i "« 

* Euro Htctt Inc. Bond. - * £321 

GMbol Equity » g21 

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i.v - t 2663 

- - - — 11743 
FLIGHT INTL ACCUM FD 

mork Money DM OMt 

us Dehor Money a 38J69 

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S 5*9400 


wOP’inioFu 

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» Oolirra Gbxcu Fund J 

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a Grtuie> Growth fo_ } 


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LOMBARD. ODIER A CIE - GROUP 
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d Japanese Yen 1 4*8840 

dPouKSSivrl.no l 27 .» 

d Dnulsctw Mart -DM 1 T4e 

d Duicn Fiortn Ft I8J4 

d HY Euro Currencies Ecu 1*4* 

d Swiss franc SF 13-35 

d US Dollar Short Term S 1281 

d HY Euro Cure Dlv.d Par Ecu 11.70 

rf Swfcs Mufiicurrencv SF 16** 

d Eurooean Currency Ecu 2248 

d Beaten Franc BF U*.12 

J Convertible S 1500 

d French Fr one — F F 16 UB 

d Swiss Mulli-DIvrteflC SF lfl.ll 

d Swiss Fronc Short-Term — SF 10628 

d ConodJon Dollar CS U6l 

d Duicti Florin Multi FI 1527 

0 5wt*s Fronc DkkI Par 5F 10.71 

d CAD Multicut. Oiu CS 1130 

d Meaner roneonCurr 5F 1105 

d Convertibles SF lOffl 

MALABAR CAP MOMT 1 Bermudo I LTD 

mwiator mil Fuia s l*j? 

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mMMiGid Lid -Dec 1*94 — s i*:j 

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m Mint Gld Currencies 2001 — 5 982 

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ro Athene Gld Futures S 111* 

m A Bieno Gld Currencies S *21 

mAihenaGra Fmonclois mc_S I87< 

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, mAHL Currency Fund i 9.48 

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mAHL GW Real Time Trd $ 1(L4S 

a* AML GM COP Mart Lid S 1022 

situs Guaranteed 194* Lid S 848 

m(MP Leveraged RectwUas <Q.°e 

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mMdlt G GL Fm 2003 5 787 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 From 51 Humility. Bermuda 180912*2*78* 
w Maritime MU -Sector J Lid_s 10124s 

■vMor.HmeGtoJ Beta Series-3 82B.H 

w Mor.iime Gtai Delia Series s 8UU5 

ir Maritime del Tou Series s 811 ta 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

m Cass A S II4D 

d Class B S 11*27 

d Poe I He Convert. Slrul S »8J! 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN! IBUT1 M7-7M2 

mMovertck Fd — — -2 1493867 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 
m The CarS4iir Fund Lid — J 11117 

MEESPIERSON 

Rokln 5S. 10126k, Amaierdom 120-S2II18I) 
iv Asia Poc Growth Fd N.V — S 40Ai 

w Aslan Capital Holdings 5 6020 

wAslan Selection Fd N.V — — fi 100.95 

nr OPAmer. Growth FdN.V .S 35 9< 

w EM5 Othnore Fd H.V Fi 10445 

n Europe Growth Fund N.V. -FI 6723 

n Joeon DiyemfiK) Fund — S 5*25 

w Leveraged Cop Hold S *050 

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MERRILL LYNCH 

d Doltor Assets Pwl lol.o 5 1J» 

a Prime Rote Portfcita — __s 10.00 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

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FACTUAL 

sjk d E remit. Fund ua I 272454 

*38 fl lpHn.1. Fund Lid A 42I4BII 

1244 d Sior High yield Fd Ltd S 13&46IS 

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10.92 d Porveil USA B 3 23*1 

721 d Porvnl Jooan B — r 5765 U 

j d pprvesi Asia Pool B s 703« 

1524 d Parveoi Eutoee B Ecu 2*.*t 

14*95 d Par vesr Hrtiand B — — —FI I3*XK 

14 jc J Parvesi Front* B ..FF 17*9.44 

d Porvesl Germany B DM *40.11 

d Porvesi OhlvDoiiar B 5 175451 

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0 POTvesrObli-Yen B Y 167334 U 

a Porvesi ON l-Gulden B FI 162234 

nil d Porvesi Obi i- Fronc B FF 2046*1 

2a*7 d Porvesi Obll-Sier B 1 16021 

20.7] d Pdrves CDil-Eai B Ecu 13446 

ham d Porvesi Om.-BehuB LF 17125 W 

31 10 d porvesi VT Dollar B i 124*6 

i7M d Porvesi 5 T Europe B Ecu *J' H 

1474 d Porvesi 5-T DEM B DM 541 12 

d Porvesi S-T FRF e — FF telJjn 

ITW tf Porvesi S-T Bel Plus B_ — BF 104*7X10 

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11 70 d Porvesi inf Band B 5 71 -si 

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14103 d Parvesi S-T CHF B. 5F 251*0 

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i ftTa d Porvesi Obli-Dnt.B DkK 970jj 

ii4l PERMAL GROUP 

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1(178 I Drotkar Growin rl V S 2774 J7 

1 1 vi 1 Emerging Mils Hians S 876A4 

,rs I EuTOMlr lEcul L10_ -Ecu 1704.71 

I8H 1 Inveslmem Hidgs N V. 1 1296T 

, 1 Medio & Commute cal. wc_s 103427 

ICrt I NoStal Lta S 4971 92 

PICTET B CIE • GPOUP 

44 jn ■» P.GF UP Vol iLii'l 1 632* 

(447 •» PX.F Germa.ai lLu* * DM 10115 

36 -j w PC.F Norom»oi ILi'.l ! 2625 

2173 nPC.F Valitnr. 1 Lu • > Pios ■*6*lXfi 

19 ]] * P.C.F Vdlltalla iLuil Lil IJjT f9XB 

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4 BJ » P.UJ. Vo I hood USD 1 Lu- IJ 22948 

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lil* m P.U.F. VolLond FRF iLu*. FF 97IJ7 

422 » P U.F. VOIBond GBP ILu.i.i *4.** 

Til7r 1* P U.F. voieond DEM 'Lu.l DM 2*647 

1-1* * P.U.F. US 5 Bd Pill 1 Lu.l . S 797M.MI 

13J2 n P U.F. Model Fd — ..Ecu 12325 

111? w P.U.T. Emerg Mtls ILu- 1 -S I82.C 

948 •? PU.T. Eur OBOOrt ILu> I _Ecu 15290 

10 38 b P.U.T.GIonol value iLu*; ..Ecu 15140 

1(L4S wP.UT. Eurovol.Lu-l - — Ecu 733.43 

1022 0 Piclel voisuisse iCHi SF c-ibM 

p Ftp minn Small Coo 11DM1 S 48* 1< 

(dog PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 

q tn <z’o PO. Bo« 1 100. Grand Cotmcn 
frj Fa*‘ (889) *4*84*3 

m Premier US Equiiv Fund._S ii)8«4 

r» mPromter mil Ea Fund S l«A 

i s hr --n Premier Save. Ckm BdFd_S 8*4 j> 

tan m Premier giomi Bd Fd S rrt5*: 

irji mPremier Toiai Peiurn Fa_ s KB:j>4 

,ni PUTNAM 

d EmeratagHlihSc Trusl. -i !!H 

w Putnam Em into. Sc TrusU 1768 

j* d PirtnomGloo HlonGrovrthS I’ 43 

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^J7 d Pulnam Inl'i Fund 5 15 45 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

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w Quanlum Funs ii v J 15724 V 

l ‘- , ‘ wQuWUum industrial 5 idiA* 

nr Quantum Reoiiv Trud S 13181 

- ,. w Quantum UK Reon. Fund-C 10121 

Scf *• Quasar Inn Fund n v * W-i* 

w Qiatn Fund N.V 2 1*9*7 

* £ I3UAH RY MANAG EM ENT LTD 

T«teotvw:S09 9J9 00SO 
Facsimile so* ■ wait! 

d AII05 Arbllroje FC Lid s -479 

’i-ii (/ Hesgeris fund LIB 5 10*** 

d Meridian Hedge Fa Lid s. s S id-« 

"M' 0 d renilh Fund Ltd 5-5-^ * «*« 

lm REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

I-jS w Now Korea C-rowin Fd i 1?2f 

R* 1 w Nova Lai PocHic invCo — * J 

w Paclllt Arturwt Cn A * 0* 

mR.L Counln Wrm Fo I ?59<4 

r?l d Regutl Gtar Am Gi bi Fa — S s00 : 5 

s- 57 1 d Pegent Gloi Euro Grth Fd .i * i-CS 


> quotas b as ed on l*«tte priewo, 

M * rogutarin ft) - Iwtea waektyi |m) - tuunUdyL 

d Rtgenl Gttt mn Gnn M i symo 

d Resent GfMJdP Grth Fu_J 10024 

d Regent GOD PdeH Bo$m J L4752 

d Resent Gltu Reserve % 2.15*4 

J Regeni Glfat Resources S 26624 

0 Itevw r-as. TJW v JJOn 

d Regent GU UK Grtn Fd s 1.9397 

ir Regent Moghul Fd Lid s 920 

in Regent Pacific HdgFd 5 1110791 

d Resent Sri Lnn*a FO s 925 

n Undervatard AssetsSer l_S 11.17 

ROBECO GROUP 

POBWWW A? Rotterdom.l3l)tD»4H2« 

d RG America Fund FI 14L50 

d RG Eurese Fund Ft 13620 

d RG Poetic Fund _F| ]4Ug 

0 RG DlvVeme Fund FI MOB 

d RG Money Plus F FL FI HUB 

d RG Money PtusFS——S 10U1 

d RG Money Plus F DM DM 11L60 

d RG Money Plus F SF SF 1B6JB 

More Robeco see Amsterdam Stocks 
ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOUSE FUNDS 

19 Asian Canitui Holdings Fd_ s east 

it Daiwo LCF RottcdtlU Bd-$ 101684 

n> Odiwo LCF Rathsch Ea l 10)930 

0 Force CdSti Trcomoa CHFJF rams 

wLeiconi S 25*026 

■v Levcroned Cot Homings S eftSO 

iv OWI-Valor_ SF 98109 

w Prl Challenge Swiss Fd— SF 114322 

B Pr tenuity fo-Euvot* Ecu 1 172*6 

b Prieaully Fd-Hetvrita SF 1W.952 

D PneauitY Fd-Lotm Am S 130.912 

b Prl bond Fund Ecu —Ecu 121256 

0 Prtoond Fund USD S 109.920 

D Pribond Fd HY Emer MtKJ 1 lie* 

iv Selective Invest SA S X3449S 

O Source S 1636*60 

W US Bond pure S 950J164 

wVonooiuv Ecu 110635 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 

OTHER FUNDS 

d Asla/jOTon Emera. Growths 17J0640 

» Esoril Eur Partn Inv Tst Ecu 143615 

» Euroo Slraleg Investm M Ecu 106570 

b truesrai Futures s 1012.77 

b Opt inert Global Fd General DM 1M246 
O Oplroesi Global Fix incomeOM 171A90 

d PnCHic Ntes Fund S 826 

w Permai Dretikar Grtti NV_S 27707 

r Selection Hgruon FF 8119M1 

0 Vlctolre Anurv . ... t 4900.99 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (Cl) LTD 

m Nvmr&d Leverooed Hid S >614* 

6AFDIE GROUP/ KEY ADVISORS LTD I 

171 fey Dlversiried inc Fd LtcLS 115*16 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING I 

w Republic GAM S 141.91 ' 

1* Reoublic GAM America S 11117 , 

w Pro GAM Em Mkts Global J 13720 ■ 

n> Reo GAM Em MKts Lot AmS 10922 

■v Reoublic GAM Europe SF _SF 12119 
m RePutolK GAM Eiurooc USS J 168.15 

w Republic GAM Orwth CHFJF 10902 

w Republic GAM Growth E t ID222 

w Republic GAM Growth US)5 152X6 

NT Republic gam Opooriunltvs 11248 

W Republic GAM Podnc S 14625 

iv Republic Gnsey Dol Inc 5 10J3 

h Republic Gusev Eur inc DM 1637 

w Republic Lot Ani Alloc S 9787* 

n Republic Lot Am Argent 3 94 J4 " 

nr Republic Lot Am Brazil 5 10L68 * 

w Republic Lot Am Mexico S 99-56- 

w Reoublic Lot Am Venez. i 8708 * 

w Rip Solomon Stral Fd Ltd J 9143 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD (NY. 
m Commander Fund * 100082 

mEnPtonvr Fund i 107J94 

SKANDINAVISKA ENSKILDA BANKEN 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

d Eurooa inc S 107 

d Finn an Dstero inc % OJA 

d Global Inc s 102 

J Lakamedel inc S (L95 

d Vorlden Inc S 1.08 

0 Japan me — Y 98.75 

tf Mllio inc S 100 

0 Sverige Inc Sot. 18.70 

d NordameritiD Inc S 094 

d TeLnotosl ME S 106 

0 Sverige Rantetond inc Sek 1045 

SKAND1FOND5 

d Equity inriAct I 1720 

d Eautiy IM 1 lnc_ 5 1119 

d Equity Global S 12* 

d Enullv Not. Resources^— 2 127 

d Equity Jooan — Y 10906 

tf Equity Nordic S 144 

tf E caii tv UJL l 158 

tf Equtty Conlmentol Euroo* J 176 

0 E unity Mediterranean S 108 

tf Eauiiy North America S 1 97 

tf Eauit* Far Easl— S 444 

tf Inl'i Emerging Markets S 124 

d Bend :nri Ad S 1244 

rf Bond mn me % 741 

d Bores turope Acc S 158 

tf Bond Europe Inc S 6*8 

tf Bond Sweden Act Set 17.D 

tf Bond Sweden Inc. Sek 10.74 

tf Band DEM ACC DM 1 28 

tf Bond DEM Inc DM 075 

tf Band Dollor US Acc S 129 

tf Bond Dollar US tec S 105 

tf Curr. US Dollar — S 158 

tf Curr Swedish F.ron or Sek 1226 

SOCIETE GENE RALE GROUP 
50GELUX FUND ISFI 

w SF Bonds A USA S 1605 

wSF Bonds B Germany DM 31.91 

w SF Bondi C France FF 12823 

W SF Bonds E GJB. 1 12.11 

iv SF Bands FJiioot Y 2394 

wSF Bonds G Europe Ecu >7.90 

M SF Bonds H World Wide S 1658 

iv SF Bonds J Belgium BF B7t.SK! 

»5F Ea 6 North America — S 1729 

wSF Ea LW Europe Ecu 17JM 

w SF Ea M Pod fie Basin Y 1536 

w SF Ea P Growth Coimtries5 1725 

w SF Ea Q Gold Mines t 3204 

n 5F Ea R World Wide S 1S3S 

wSF Snort Terms France FF 1765707 

w SF Short Term T Eur Ecu 1*28 

SOPITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

w SAM Brazil S 1*671 

* SAM Diversified S 13126 

wSAM/McGon Hectoe S 10127 

w SAM Opportunity S 12341 

» SAM Strategy S I1S.7J 

.71 Aloha SAM— S 127.74 

» GSAM Compovle. * 32527 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

mSR European .5 10601 

mSP Aston S 10207 

mSF international S ‘1000 

SVEN5KA HAN DEL5 BANKEN SA. 

146 Bade la Pelrirese. L 2330 Lu*amaourg 

b BHBBtfnOFunO. S 56.13 

wSvensloSel FdAmerSh — s 1411 

W Svenokn Sel. Fd Germany _S 11.76 

ir Svenska Sel Fd Inti Bd Sh.S 1253 

» Sverako Sel Fd Infl Sh S 5903 

it Svensko Sel. Fd JaPwi— — r 292 

w Svensko Sel. Fd Mlli-Mkt —Sek 11117 
w Svensko 5el. Fd Poctl Sn_S 753 

w Svensko Sel. Fd Swed Btb_Srti 141162 
w Svemka Set. Fd SylvW Sh_EOr 14220* 
SWISS BANK CORP. 

a SBC 100 Inde- Fund SF 181500 

d 50C Equity Plfl-AuSlrollo_AS 21200 

<1 SBC Equltv PIII-CarFOdD CJ 21100 

tf SBC Equity PIlFEuropn Ecu 20600 

tf SBC Eq Pill -Nether lands — FI 18900 

d SBC Govern Bd A/B S S 100503 

d SBC Band PlU-Aurtt 1 A AS IU28 

tf 5BC Band Ptfl-AurtrSB AS 120.4* 

tf SBCBontf Pl(kCan5A CS 11092 

rf SBC Band PHKotlS B a 13107 

tf SBC Bond PtfFDM A DM 16906 

tf SBC Bond PIH-DM B DM IB64J 

tf SBC Bond PlIFDuldl G. A_FI 169J0 

d SBC Bona PtlFDulCh G. B-FI 18024 

0 SBC Bond Plir-Ecu * Ecu 1 1*00 

d SBC Bond Pit! Ecu » Ecu 13054 



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0 SBC Bond Pin Ecu B Ecu 13054 

J 5BC Bond PMLFF A FF 595J9 

tf SBC Bond PHI-FF B FF 67825 

tf 5B C Bond PtH-Plos A/B — Mas 96374)0 

d SBC Bond PHI- Sterling A c 55 JO 

tf SBC Band Plll-Stefling B — 1 6007 

tf 5BC Bond Porttolia-SF A SF 113743 

tf SBC Bond PorHoltaSF B — SF 1392.75 

tf SBC Bond PI IF USS A S IW01 

tf SBC Bond PTIHISS B S 10921 

tf SBC Bond PIH-Yen A Y 1102*400 

tf SBCBondPm-YenB. _Y 11532500 

tf SBC M7AF - AS AS 4J1448 

tf 5BCMMF.BFR-. BF 1122*800 

tf SBC MMF - Can5 CS 46*1.17 

tf SBC DM Short-Term a _ — _dm 102505 

rf SBC DM Short-Term B. — -DM 137706 

d SBC MMF - Dirth O FI 725*51 

tf SBC MMF - ECU — ECU X766M 

tf SBC MMF - ESC ESC *5621900 

tf SBC 7AMF • FF FF 251*626 

a SBC MMF • Lri Dl 5376*1700 

tf SBC MMF - PTOi _PTa 36336400 

tf SBC MMF Schilling AS rOO*J2 

d SBC MMF - Slc-riirrt 1 2B2923 

tf SBC MMF - 5F SF 5*0454 

tf SBC MMF - US Dollar S 7219.17 

tf SBCMMF-USVII $ 30*163 

tf SBC MMF Yen V 5*836900 

tf SBC Glbl-Rtll SF Grth SF 1206.7* 

tf SBC GlbFPill Ecu Grth Ecu [30204 

rf SBC G (01-Phi USD Grth S I19*.47 

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tf SBC GIW PHI USD Yld B S I IB* JO 

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tf SBC GIDI Pltl-OM Vld A/B J3M 105904 
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tf D-Mark Bond Selection DM 11620 

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TEMPLETON GLOBAL STRATEGY SICAV 
tf Global Growth _J 12*4 


■t made its w 
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A 1 sold 360,( 

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For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the 1HT 




For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


Tl,e conference program 

«.Ul highHgM < l “ invaW ‘ m ‘ 

opportunities in 

L a,i„ A«erir« foU«""« ,h ‘ 

region’s economic revival 


Latin America 

A New Investment Partner 


LONDON - JUNE: 9 - lO ■ 1944 


Hcralb^^lSribunc 



FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

Brenda Hagerty 
Internationa I Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax:(44 71)836 0717 


last week; 



















































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1994 


ADWEimmm 





i has been a long 
courtship. In 
1963. Turkey 
signed an Asso- 
ciation Agreement with the 
Chen European Community 
in order to become, one day. 
a full member. 

If at various points in the 
intervening decades Turkey 
itself shied away from the 
relationship, lately it has 
seethed with frustration at 
the various setbacks. 

Yet suddenly, and through 
an act of political will, the 
romance is on again. In No- 
vember of last year, Turkey 
and its European partners 
agreed to keep to a timetable 
agreed on back in 1970 to 
complete a customs union 
on manufactured goods. 

This is short of full politi- 
cal integration into the Euro- 
pean Union, but it is a far 
from trivial step. 

ft means that Turkey will 
enjoy, in the words of one 
Eurocrat, “the most intimate 
relation of any nation not ac- 
tually in the Union with 
member states." 

With consummation set to 

be completed by the end of 
1995. sentiments on both 
sides are, not unnaturally, 
wavering between great ex- 
pectations and cold feet 
For Turkey, making a suc- 
cess of customs union 
means leapfrogging its way 
up the ladder of Europe's 
political agenda when the 


EU debates its own future 
enlargement in 19%. “There 
would be no meaning to the 
alliance if Europe excludes 
Turkey and allows Central 
European states to get in 
first." says Hikmet Cetin. 
Turkey's foreign minister. 

Turkey already conducts 
over half its trade with Eu- 
rope. A confirmed footing in 
one of the world's great 
trading blocs would allow 
Turkey to make good its 
claim to be a growth pole at 
the center of overlapping 
economic zones in the Mid- 
dle East, the Black Sea re- 
gion. the Caucasus and Cen- 
tral Asia. 

With membership in the 
EU a possibility, Turkey 
would also have a concrete 
incentive to end its tolerance 
of human rights abuse and to 
rid itself once and for all of 
the antidemocratic practices 
embedded in a constitution 
bequeathed by a departing 
military government in 
1982. 

Customs union will have 
its price. Whereas Turkey 
has enjoyed free access in 
Europe for its own manufac- 
tured goods ( with the excep- 
tion of the quotas on textiles 
and apparel), it will now 
have to expose Jong-protect- 
ed domestic industries to 
competition. 

This means lifting a re- 
maining 12.8 percent aver- 
age level of protection, with 


an even higher figure for 
some industries, such as au- 
tomobiles. 

Sections of the Turkish 
pharmaceutical industry 
have also benefited From 
Turkey’s non-adherence to 
international conventions 
protecting intellectual and 


union but rather on surviv- 
ing the current prohibitive 
cost of borrowing as well as 
a decline in domestic de- 
mand. 

Theoretically, customs 
union will further discipline 
Turkish industry in the di- 
rection it already needs to 


The agreement 

would give Europe easier access 
to its ninth-largest 
trade partner 


industrial property. To recti- 
fy this, the Turkish parlia- 
ment must commit itself to 
an intensive legislative pro- 
gram. 

These structural changes 
must occur at a time when 
Turkey is trying to cope with 
other ftindamental problems. 
As recently as April 5. Tan- 
su Ciller, Turkey's prime 
minister, was forced to intro- 
duce a major austerity pack- 
age. 

Her government is now 
pledged to reining in the 
profligacy of the state sector 
and has effectively pulled 
the plug on an import-led 
and externally financed con- 
sumer boom. The result is 
that many Turkish firms are 
now not focused on customs 


go. After years of complain- 
ing about the King Kong- 
sized presence of the state in 
the economy, industry finds 
it difficult to argue that it. 
too, needs to hide behind the 
skirts of state protection and 
a de facto subsidy from the 
consumer. 

“The government should 
not seek to shelter 'infant' 
industries if they cannot 
compete after 22 years," 
says Haluk Kabaalioglu. 
professor at an institute spe- 
cializing in EU affairs. 

Cem Duna, the Turkish 
ambassador leading die ne- 
gotiations, confirms that 
Turkey has not asked for 
continued protection for sen- 
sitive sectors, lest the whole 
project unravel. 


Turkey's Most Profitable Bank 


Year 


after Year 


BALANCE SHEET (USS 1.00 0) 
ASSETS 

Cash jnd due from hanks 
Reserve require mems 
Loans 

Overdue kuns 
Panicipjiion> 

Premises and equipment 
Other assets 

Total Assets 
LIABILITIES 

Deposits 
Borrowed funds 

Other Liabilities 

Total Liabilities 

STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY 

Capital* 

Reserves 

Profit « after tax es) 

Total Stockholders' Equity 


31/12/1993 


1.311 136 
323.908 
I 788 3111 
)"8 

It—.-*-* 1 
210.984 

3.882.648 


2 22S.rwo 

f3“ 109 
4 SO.-Q3 

3-342.967 

1-2.914 
PA. 59 * 

190.1 72 
539.681 


Return on Average Equity 34.40 *.,1 

Return on Average Assets 0.3 1 

■tapual tus been mocKcd in UN * I~0 u) * oi March Wi 


1993 results bear out what the 
international financial community has 
known for years. 

With net income of TL 2.750 billion 
f 5 190 million). Akbank is lung and 
away Turkey's most profitable private 
sector commercial hank. Return on 
Average Equity of 5-i.-H> "0 underlines 
Akbank's record of productivity and 
achievement in an intensely 
competitive environment. 

Akbank was recognized as Turkey’s 
best bank in 1993 by Euromoney for 
the quality rtf its management and 
the soundness of its financial 
structure. 

The 1993 balance sheet confirms the 
general opinion of Akbank in 
international financial circles, 
evidencing our consistent record of 
qualify performance. 


The more serious threat to 
customs union would be a 
continued absence of macro- 
economic stability, accord- 
ing to Ali Tigrel, who coor- 
dinates government policy 
on the issue. But this is a pri- 
ority independent of any 
trade regime. 

"Customs union offers 
more confidence and a more 
important rating than either 
Moody’s or Standard & 
Poors.” says Michael Lake, 
the EU ambassador to 
Ankara, in reference to the 
international agencies' re- 
cent downgrading of Turk- 
ish debt. 

While some investors will 
now shy away from a 
Turkey that no longer pro- 
tects its internal market, oth- 
ers will be inspired by that 
confidence and a realistical- 
ly valued Turkish lira to use 
the country as a production 
base. 

Final proposals must be 
completed for approval by 
November of this year, un- 
der the German EU presi- 
dency. Those involved in 
negotiations describe them 
as "technical" and without 
disagreements in principle. 
The real probability, there- 
fore, is that Lhose in Turkey 
and Europe who anticipate 
delays or a fudged deal may 
find themselves surprised. 

For Europe, more liberal 
access to what is already its 
ninth-largest trading partner 


is an attraction. Securing 
Turkey's dependability as a 
secular and democratic ele- 
ment of the European al- 
liance remains an equally 
important objective. 

Many European diplomats 
following the negotiations 
concede privately that 
Turkey has a right to the sort 
of funds that even Sweden 
receives to soften the impact 
of economic integration. 

Those who disagree are 
from Greece. A Greek veto 
now ensures that progress on 
talks over Cyprus is set as a 
condition for the freeing of 
some 600 million Ecus 
pledged to Turkey as far 
back as 1980 - let alone the 
more ambitious figures often 
mentioned. 

Discussions of these fi- 
nancial protocols will now 
occur independently of the 
customs union and will re- 
quire a compromise aX min- 
isterial level. It is in no one's 
interest to see Turkey's pro- 
ject of coming closer to Eu- 
rope fail. 

Turkey’s claim to be Eu- 
rope's bridge to Central Asia 
and the Near and Middle 
East belies its anxiety about 
being stranded on an uneasy 
European frontier. Both the 
commercial realities of cus- 
toms union and the political 
commitment it represents 
would help vanquish this 
sense of isolation forever. 

Andrew Finkel 


- ,5 

•V' * v ' : $4 



I®*; 

l?>Vv > 

v . ' 

v 

. . <*- - U ffv 


-jf/v f 

L ■ 

‘V 


From top: Prime Minister Tansu Ciller in 
fine, a mix of ancient and modem; a — 

This advertising section was produced in its eh 
the supplements division of the Internationa] 
bune's advertising department • It was written; 
Bodge ner. a writer based in the United Kingdoi 
Andrew Finkel, a writer based in Istanbul. 



jlarg 
























Cyprus: Large 
Stakes for a 
Small Island 


jbimii F y hen the Berlin 
KftJ Wall cr'um- 
K JH bled, the artifi- 
*Jfr4 M** cial divisions 

of a small island somewhere 
in the .Mediterranean looked 
like just the sort of problem 
i the New World Order 
should have been able 10 
solve with one hand tied be- 
. hind its back. 

In the 2 loom that has ac- 
companied the collapse of 
the former Yugoslavia, an 
ethnic conflict in which no 
one actually gets killed 

miaht seem a sleeps dog 

best left undisturbed. Yet 
Cyprus is not a problem that 
wifi disappear - certainly 
; for Turkish policymak- 

" er rhev lave been forced to 
• meet a real price ttg ‘ n con- 
tinued economic and null- 

E-ssrsss 
■ ttssssagfj 

damaged relations with 

: ’v We^em allies. . 

Cyprus is soon to 

«heMth anniversary of cle 

fSgsSfflg 

^‘ThaildX 

ish north juo 1 to ae i 

Wh, arc struggling to 

offlhegnumd- with 

tolh ihe GreeV. a " t monlh _ 
- prime C |j n ton 

• : us. President p*“ ^ on 

ut f'cdflinfi 

; with the both 

: ; untied 

Buropeand an 

States. Cy pnwjJP 0 * 

wfc^f Lirtableiesi. 


Since Greece joined the 
EU, Cyprus has been a glass 
through which Europe sees 
Turkey darkly. The EU has 
posted an official observer 
to oversee progress on talks 
that it sees as a precondition 
for political rapprochement 
and for the freeing of the no- 
torious Fourth Financial 
Protocol — some 600 million 
Ecus pledged long ago to 
soften the blow of customs 
union. 

One of the very attractions 
of customs union for Turkey 
is that it allows the country 
to upgrade its relations with 
Brussels under already ex- 
isting treaty regulations and 
beyond the reach of a Greek 
veto. Of the new proposals, 

the most important are those 
that would give Hellenic 
Cypriots access to Varosna, 
the potential holiday 
that is now a fenced-off 
wasteland. The Turks would 
be able to use Nicosia air- 
port for direct access to the 
outside world. 

Ankara is currency cteci* 

ing whether to back North- 
ed Cypriot objections to 
amendments to the « 

agreed draft of confidence- 
tef0re ompleTThe a Gree“ 

side^also* wants control of 
find access to Varosha. and 
Sets to an immigration 
Sfement in the airport 
Should imply recogm- 

u X f ScS may we " 

SSsS^I 

intransigence. 




ADVERTISING SECTION 


Banking Ahead 

In Complying 
With EU Norms 


urkey's banking 
sector is the 
country's most 
advanced in 
complying with European 
Union norms, most bankers 
based in Turkey would 
agree. 

This applies not only to 
regulatoiy reform, but also 
to technical and market so- 
phistication. where great 
strides have been made 
since the early 1980s. In re- 
cent years, banks have in- 
vested so much in automa- 
tion that the manager of one 
leading institution claims it 
is equal to. if not better than, 
many European counter- 
parts. 

Advances include auto- 
mated teller machines 
(ATMs), telephone banking, 
credit cards and point-of- 
sale terminals. Credit cards 
have mushroomed since 
their widespread introduc- 
tion in the late 1980s. All 
this is in response to and is 
attracting a more discerning 
customer, who is looking for 
service and is not bound by 
traditional loyalties. 

Although the state sector 
lags somewhat behind the 
private sector, it too, with 
government encouragement, 
has established much 


stronger financial founda- 
tions during the past decade 
and has introduced far more 
transparency in revealing its 
operations. 

Banks have made the 
sometimes painful adjust- 
ment of complying with the 
minimum capital adequacy 
ratio of 8 percent set by a 
phased operation ending in 
1992 and have modeled 
their operations on the 

guidelines set by the Basel- 
based Bank of International 
Settlements. 

Some are comfortably in 
excess of this. An end- 1992 
ratio of about 14.6 percent 
was established at state- 
owned Ziraat Bankasi. ac- 
cording to Coskun Uiusoy. 
the bank's chairman and 
general manager. 

Free competition in trade, 
particularly of manufactured 
goods and processed foods, 
is the main purpose of the 
customs union, but banking 
is covered among other ser- 
vices in an additional proto- 
col. Last year, the govern- 
ment introduced by decree 
amendments to the banking 
law designed to bring the 
sector into line with the 
EU's Second Banking direc- 
tive. 

Although the decree has 



Istanbul's stock market Banking reforms are me favorable economic development 


been invalidated by a case in 
the Constitutional Court, 
few doubt that the govern- 
ment will push its provisions 
through parliament before 
the six-month grace-period 
granted by the court expires 
on June 22. 

The decree's main provi- 
sions are the following: to 
distinguish between devel- 
opment and investment 
banking; remove the distinc- 
tion between foreign and do- 
mestic institutions: intro- 
duce far greater freedom for 
the establishment of new 
branches: increase lending 


ratios to net worth to 20 per- 
cent from 10 percent for any 
one transaction, while per- 
mitting 25 percent in priority 
areas like exports and pro- 
jects. 

The decree also tightens 
up limits on equity participa- 
tions and real-estate hold- 
ings to make banks sell un- 
profitable subsidiaries or as- 
sets. contracts permitted lev- 
els of non-cash credits and 
raises the minimum paid-up 
capital level to 250 billion 
Turkish lire ($7 million) 
from 50 billion Turkish lire. 

Bankers are generally in 


favor of the reforms. “They 
are useful.’* says Unai Ko- 
rukcu, general manager of Is 
Bankasi. “We had some dif- 
ficulties with the limitation 
on participations, but we 
have time up to 1999 to con- 
tinue the adjustments.'' His 
institution has around 5 tril- 
lion Turkish lire in participa- 
tions. which in general are 
performing well. Despite the 
crisis, for example, the bank 
is continuing to invest in 
glassmaker Sise Cam, the 
largest industrial organiza- 
tion in Turkey. 

The decree also recog- 


nizes that the problem of 
Turkey being overbranched 
is past after a decade of 
streamlining, according to 
Ozer Guney, general manag- 
er of Eskisehir Bankasi (Es- 
bank). 

But the decree’s most im- 


portant provision is to 
strengthen tbe treasury's 
powers of intervention 
against banks threatened by 
insolvency. The treasury 
demonstrated its new teeth 
when it moved in April to 
ban the ailing TYT Bank 
from banking operations. 

Jhn Bodgener 


'% j&r 

3'./. «• • - ■s-rz- - \ w.-s 


on par with 
the best anywhere 


“We were probably the first large financial institution to foresee the foreign 
investment community's current interest in Turkey. Since tbe inception of 
Istanbul Stock Exchange , we bate been very! active in serving the needs of 
foreign investors. We offer full brokerage services , discretionary and 
non-discretionary fund management, and custodial and safekeeping 
sendees which incidentally are on par with the best anywhere. On tbe 
investment banking side, we concentrate on underwriting and M&A. Good 
research is of paramount importance to tbe foreign investor ; so we are 

bolstering our ven> strong research capabilities by reorganizing our various 
research departments to produce tbe most comprehensive analyses 
ai'ailable. We will continue to search for ways to better serve our foreign 
and domestic clients. In this effort . we will develop new products and 
sendees and do whatever is necessary to respond to the changing needs of 
the foreign investing community." 


From an interview »-»lh Burhan Karapam, 
President and Chief Executive of Yapt Kredi Bank. 


“On par with the best anywhere". 
These words are so unquestionably true 
and therefore probably not worth 
mentioning to those who bank 
with us. Yet ads are made for those who, 
we assume, have not banked with us. 
This is why we took the liberty of quoting 
the words of our Chief Executive 
who himself would never consider 
underlining what is such a natural remark. 


YAPI KREDi 


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Page IH 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY. WAY 5, 1994 


SPORTS 

Hawks, Spurs 
Facing Ouster, 
Bulls Advance 




The AuociuicJ Tnrx 

The Atlanta Hawks are on the 
verge of going from first place in 
their conference to a far more dubi- 
ous first in the National Basketball 
Association playoffs. 

Steve Smith scored 25 points, 
three on free throws in the final 18 
seconds, on Tuesday night as he 
clinched the Miami Heat's 90-86 
victory over visiting Atlanta for a 
2-1 lead in their first-round piavoff 
series. 

With one more victory. Miami 
would become the first No. ?• seed 
to beat a No. I seed in NBA histo- 
ry. Game 4 in the ihree-of-five- 
game series is Thursday night. 

“We haven't won anything, bur 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

we’re happy to go up. 2-1.” Smith 
said. 


making 53 percent. The Spurs 
made just 32 percent, and avoided 
matching the lowest-scoring game 
in playoff history by getting a bas- 
ket in the final seconds. 

Trail Blazers 118. Rockett 115: 
Rod Strickland scored 25 points. IV 
in the fourth quarter, and lied a 
team playoff record with 15 assists 
as Portland beat visiting Houston 
to avoid elimination. 

Vernon Maxwell sank two 3- 
poinlers in the final 27 seconds, one 
from 40 feeL to pul! the Rockets 
within one point. But Clyde 
DretJer deflected Maxwell's forced 
3-pointer with three seconds left 
and the score 117-1 15. Maxwell ad- 
mitted afterward that he thought 
the Rockets were behind by three. 

The Blazers withstood a 36- point 
performance by Hakeem Olajuwon 
to prevent a first-round sweep. 

Buck Williams had 22 points and 
10 rebounds on 9-for-10 shooting 




entgen’s 2-Hitter Tops a 3- 




The Avi-iuttil Pre*\ Minnesota's pitcher gave up nine 

Pat Hemgen picked a good game hits and seven runs in five inmn&. 
in which to have all of his pilches Erickson, who led the majors m 
u-orlcino hits allowed and losses m IW. and 

He struck out a team-record 14. brought a 7.48 ERA into the previ- 
pilching a two-hitter for his first ous Wednesday's 6-0 victory over 


major league shutout as the Toron- - 

to Blue Jays beat the visiting Kan- AL ROUNDUP 
sas City Rovals. 1-0. on Tuesdav — - — - 

night. ’ ' Milwaukee, still has not won con- 

Kevin Appier lost despite pitch- secutive decisions since September 
ing a three-hitler and striking out 1992. 

It). Joe Carter drove in the only run His chances of duplicating John- 

wiih an infield single in the fourth ny Vander Meer’s 193S feat of con- 
inning. secutive no-hitters ended on the 

“The key for me was moving the second pitch, when Danyl Hairul- 
haii in and out. and the fact that 1 ton beat out a high-chopper to the 
was able to throw my breaking ball mound. Turner wand singled with 
over fur strikes pretty much at one out before Vaughn lined Erick- 
wi!!.“ Hemgen said. son’s 0-1 pitch over the left-field 

He broke the club record for wall for his third homer of the sea- 
strikeouts of 12. shared bv Pete son and a 3-2 lead. 


Vukovich. Jim Clancy and Tom 
Cundiotti. He struck out the side in 
the first and eighth innings. The 14 
strikeouts were the most in the ma- 
jors this season. 

Hemgen gave up a two-out sin- 
gle to Jose Lind in the third, then a 
double to Felix Jose in (he fifth that 
put runners on second and third 
with one out. He struck out Lind 
and Greg Gagne to end the threat. 


White Sox 

streak 

three runs 
Stadium 
ing the 




winner in the AL, and Mike Dever- of . ^ 
eaux homered twice as Baltimore st^jptf ipn. 
won in Oakland. ■ was OX.V.- 

McDonald pitched a five-hitter 

and struck out eight in hissecond hit J 

straight complete game. The tot si njfio as 
Orioles pitcher to win six straight ^ 
to start a season was Mike Fiona- -Teiy 
gan in 1983. iead mto : 'Ae ^^5r ^^£A > ^l1 

Devereaux hit two solo homers vis’s, g ratia 
and an RBI single. Harold Baines rahy. - ’ 'V 1 . '• 
also drove in three runs. '-iww#a 3 

Red Sox 7, MaiiMri 6: Boston 
lost two pitchers to injuries in the 
third inning and still beat visiting 
Seattle by rallying five runs in the 
third, when Andre Dawson hit a. 
two-run single. 

Frank Viola re-injured his left Rang as 7, >1 


Frank Viola re-injured his left 
elbow, and X-rays were inconclu- 
sive. Paul Quan trill relieved and 
threw a pitch dose to Eric Antho- 
ny. starting a bench-d earing brawL 


Orioles 9, Athletics 1: Ben Me- ny. starting a oenco-cieanng ora»L 
Donald became the first six-game Quantnll wound up on the bottom 


Cubs Still Perfect at Home (Ofl 


The Associated Press 
Wrigley Field was built in 1914 
on die site where a seminary once 
stood. Eightv years later, the Cubs 


said. 10 rebounds on 9- for- 10 shooting Appier, who walked one. struck cnu |.V L ,c e 5 some Drovers 

H was a cleanly played game, the for Portland. Drexler also scored pjmen trumped die 25 points and 10 rebounds of rookie out the side in the third and fifth \ b k a H 9 J J. v J u<1 |d c j u b 

first between the two teams since 22 for the Blazers, who beat Hous- a layup that gave the Bulls an overtime sweep, innings. “1 had greai stuff tonight. ^ 0 n Tuesda v W losing their 

the brawl during Atlanta s 104-86 ton for the first ume in seven tries * " * but the other guv was just a little bit c» ra iohi « ihe Fripndlv Cnn- 

vir-inn; '5'imn'l.n Three nhiverc in- fhi< Mun - h- cJl.4 I^.UI Straigm at me r nenujy VAUI 


victory Saiurday. Three players, in- 
cluding a Heai starting forward. 
Gram Long, were serving suspen- 
sions that resulted from the fight. 

John Salley, playing all 48 min- 
utes. with the help of double- and 
triple- teamming, held Kevin Willis 
to 2 points. 17" below his regular- 
season average. The 7-footer 
missed all eight of his shots. 

"They were coming from the 
weak side.” Willis said. "They were 
coming over the Lop. They were 
coming from the baseline. They 
wen- coming from ail angles. It’s 
lot. to see the basket when 
they ? triple-teaming like that.” 

Mot-kie Blaylock, the Atlanta 
guard, tailed to compensate, mi»- 
r ■ hi.s first 1 1 shots and finishing 
3-. 

In i. I 7b seconds. Blaylock 
did hit u>. ^-pointers, his only 
poinu. cutting Miami's 85-77 lead 
to 87-86 with IV seconds left. 

"It was a little too late." Blaylock- 
said. 

Smith hit two free throws with IS 
seconds logo. Blaylock missed a 3- 
point try. Miami "got ihe rebound 
and Smith sank the second of two 
free throws with 6.7 seconds to go. 

Jazz 105, Spurs 72: Karl Malone 
had 24 points and 13 rebounds as 
Utah, playing at home, rolled past 
cold-shooting San Antonio lo push 
the Spurs lo ihe brink of fiiM- 
round eli mi nativ-n. 

Utah can wrap il up with a vic- 
tory ai home in Game 4 on Thurs- 
day night. 

The Spurs, who lost for ihe 2Uih 
lime in 21 games in Sail Lake Cin 
— and for fourth lime this season 
— ■ played without Dennis Rod- 
man. The leagues three- time re- 
bounding champion was suspend- 
ed for one same, and fined 5 lu.Q(R>. 
for flagrant and technical fouls in 
Utah's 86-84 win in Game 2 rn San 
Antonio. 

Terry Cummings, who started in 
place of Rodman, finished with b 
points and 11 rebounds. David 
Robinson, his team's scoring main- 
stay. made only eight of 21 shots. 

The teams were nearly even in 
rebounding, but Utah was far 
ahead on its field-goal shooting. 


this season. 

Bulk 95. Cavaliers 92: It took 


bounds. Toni Kukoc scored 18 


overtime, but Chicago did again points for the Bulls, who will meet 
what it has done on the way to the winner of the New Jersey-New 
three straight NBA champion- York series in the next round, 
ships: sweep a first-round playofr Mills, a rookie, had a career-high 
series. 25 points and 10 rebounds: Mark 

Scoitie Pippen sank the go-ahead Price scored 22 points, and Tyrone 
basket on a driving left-handed Hill had 15 points and 13 rebounds 
layup with 1:25 left as the Bulls before fouling out with two min- 


eliminated the Cav$ for the fifth 
time in seven years. 

Pippen committed eight turn- 
overs against the smothering de- 
fense ofthris Mills, but still led the 
Bulls with 23 points and 11 re- 


ntes left in overtime of what turned 
out to be the last game at Richfield 
(Ohio) Coliseum. 

The Bulls appeared to take con- 
trol with a 12-0 run that pul them 
up. 83-75. with seven minutes left 


_ , belter.” he said, 

in the fourth quarter. But they went Appier was perfect through three 
scoreless for the final four minuus. innings, but Devon White led off 
letting Cleveland us ton Mills's two lhe founh a single to 
free throws with 1 :43 le/r. right, then stole second and went to 

The final ue was at g ~ "hen on Rp^nc Alomar s ground 
Cleveland s Bobby Pnilk sank a out _ He scored when Carter, who 
layup with 1:49 left in overtime, had nine home runs and a major 
Pippen answered with the basket league-record 31 RBIs in ApriL 
that put Chicago ahead for good. beaL out a bouncer roshortsiop. 

• Jim Lynam. who rose thr«<ugh 

the ranks to become coach and Brewers 7, Twins 6: Greg 
then general manager of the Phila- Vaughn, who made the final out in 


fines as Tonv Fernandez and Hal 
Morris each drove in two runs to 
help give the Cininnati Reds a 5-2 
victory. 


record goes back to 1902, when the 
Cubs played at West Side Grounds. 
The Cubs are two defeats away 
from matching the 1911 Boston 
Braves’ league record of 14 straight 
home losses. 

Martins 6, Braves 3: Chuck Carr 
got Florida’s first five-hit game. 

NL ROUNDUP 

while Charlie Hough held host Ai- 




“We are trying, hard, but nothing I an la to four hits over six innings 
helps.” said Jose Bautista, a Cubs’ before giving up a two-run homer 
pitcher. "When we pitch good, we in the seventh. 


don't hit. When we hit, we don't get 
the pitching.” 

Nor spectators. Of the fans who 


The Braves have lost four 
straight and 9 of 11. 

Giants 6, Mete 5: Barry Bonds's 


ddphia 76ers. became the Wa>h- 
ington Bullets' new coach on 
Wednesday. 


SCOREBOARD 


Portland: C.Pobinsan«-210OlEt.Wlilioms'>- Bov (Inpoingi. 2:42; Dfww. NJ (holding 
104-521 Dudley 7-3 <H) 4. Strickland 11-193-525. slick j. 4:39; Hushes. Bm (eJbowInai. 1-.06. 


Or i> >ler«-lf 3-5 K, Br van) 2-30-04. Porter 1-97. 


Third period — *. Boston. lalrale ~ ' 


Tuesday’s NBA Playoffs 

Anemia IB 28 i» 24— « 

Miami H 21 If 24— fO 

Miami Mads series 3-1 
At tan to: Manning 7-14 2-3 >4. Willis Oft J-?2. 
Koncak J-t 0-0 i, Ans man 5-9 0-t 10. BIO v loci' 3- 
15 M 9. Enio9- W7-2 2ft Ferrell 3-84 4 10. Lang 
3ft 1-1 t.Whallev 2-62-26. Totals 35-91 13-ISBft 
Miami: Pice 8-15 2-4 19. saliev 5-12 2-2 a 
Seikoly 4-7 -ift Ift Shaw 2ft0O4,Smllti9.24 56 
IS.Coles5-44-4 14. Burton 1-20-02. Miner T-20-0 
2. Geiger 00 00 ft Tolais 35-79 12-2* 90. 

>Paint Booh— Atlanta 3-11 (BwvlucV 3-0. 
Ehto 0-31. Miami 3-t6 tSmittt 2-7, Rice t-t. 
Coles 0-t. Burton 0-1. Show 0-31 Rebountf- 
5~F|lanla SO iWillis I3i. Miami 59 (Selkalv 
Ml. AssJsit— Ailamo 22 (Manning Bi. Miami 
15 ( Srtanv 41 Total louls— Ailanla 74, Miami IS. 

Chicago 35 If 27 l« 8-fS 

Cleveland 78 20 27 12 5-fa 

Chicago wins series 34) 

Chicago: PiDoen IB-22 3-a a C-ranl S-12-l 1 14. 
Long ton 4-fl 4-4 12. Mvers I-4J-44. Armi/rong 541 

4- S 14. EngliUtH 04) 0. 1.uloc 6-1) W IB. 5.WD- 
lloms 2-9 7-36. r.erT 1-2 M 4, weinirmlon 04)041 
ft Pa»san 04) 04) ft Totals 7*-n 25.34 »s. 

Cleveland: Aims I0-17 m 25.hiii5-i 25-13 15. 
Kemptan 2-90-B*,WilHns3-1454 Ift Price 8-10 

5- 5 22, Higg ins 1-2 04) 3. Brandon 4-50-1 ft Phills 
241 04) S.Tolal', 3505 15-25 91 

3- Paint goals— Chicago 3-s (Kukoc l-l.kerr 
1-1. M vers 0-1. English 0-t. Pippen 0 h». Cleve- 
land 7-16 (Mills 34L Phills M. Higgins l-i 
Price 1-3. Wilkins 1-61. Fouled mil— Hill. Re- 
bounds— Chicago 491 Pippen il). Cleveland o3 
(Hill 13). Assists— Chicago 17 (Plooen 6). 
Cleveland To (Wilkins 71. Total tools— Chi- 
cago 2ft Cleveland 23. Technicals— Chicago 
Illegal defense 2. Price, Hill 

Houston 38 38 38 25—115 

Parttaad 38 32 34 22—118 

Houston leads series 7-1 
Houston : Horrv tO-13 M 34. Thorpe &■ 10 04) 12, 
Otaluwan 1 5-27 67 3ft Atamell 5-14 W I9.5mlln4- 
92-3 11 Herrero 01 MIL Cassell 1-31-23, Bulk>rd0 
0 2-2 2. Elle 36 00 7. Totals *W2 17-21 115. 


99. Granl s4l 04) 12, J. Robinson l -l D-02. Totals NJ. Oowd I (Zeieouf in. Albelim. 8:27. ft Bos 


5093 17-24 lift 


Ion. Dona 10 4 (dales. Bourauel. 11: T7 (ppl. ®, 


J-Polnt go als. Houston 1022 iMa.well 4-lft Boston, Holme 2 (Smatinsku. 13:55. 10. NJ. 
Horrv 3-ft 5mrlh 2-4, E lie I -I. Cassell 01). Pori- Driver 3 (Lemleut. Slevens). )9;56 Penaliv- 
landl-B(Dre>lerl 1 CRDthnson 02. Porter D-31. —Driver. NJ (hooking). 10:38. 


Scott Erickson's no-hitter last 
week, drove in five runs with a 
homer and a double in Milwaukee. 


DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Ala, Amsterdam D. PC Groningen 2 
Fe/enoord Rotterdam 2. PSV Eindhoven I 
GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Barern Munich 5. Nuremberg 0 


have fimhfully packed Wriglev- Field 

Sat gave L^ciscoits^oty 
paid attendance was 25.430. inNew’Vork. 

The club’s previous home futility Joe Orsulak pinch-hit a grand 


a 5-4 lead 


TVs 

LosAngdesfl^pW^^ 
aTs six-game - ■ 

AstrosT.-Fkates^^ff^ 
deno ini 
Houston, and. r 
vived a scare 
in Pittsburgh lor. tiieJ&snH 
being trad« j ^ 

Rockies 

Hayes hit a.'.threeflS-lMarrf 
Armando R^aosofetii^fe 
Sl Louis to nwhS^iilE Gin.' 
do pounded odt J6^fii;'4 : i. ) 

~mm 


Rebounds— Houston 42 (Thorpe II). Portland 


-11. Boston. 5weene, 2 tOaiesl. — 


51 1 C Robinson. Williams ID). Assists— Houston 9:0ft Penalrles— Murra*. Bor- trougnmgt. 
28 lHorr>.Oknuwon A), Portland 32 (Strict kmd 7:14; Driver. NJ (roughing). 7:14. 


Major League Standings 


151. Tola! fouls— Houston 22. Portland 1ft Tech- 
nicals— Horrv. Herrera. CPobinson. 


Son Antonio 15 17 i« M— 72 

Utah 23 M 32 27—105 

Utah loads serins 3>i Washington I 1 0—2 

5an AMoalo: Ellis 7-100-05. Cummings 2-57- N.Y. Rangers 1 1 2—5 

J ft Robinson 071 00 16, Del Negro 2-8 0-0 4. New York leads scries 2-0 

ftndorson Ml-4 7, Retd 7-9004, mighlM 1-7 Flrsi period— I. Washington. Halcher 2 

5. Daniels 1-4 2-24. Carr S-90-7 lo.Flovd04 1-2 (Ridle/. Bandra),a:lft 2. Non ‘iork. Kocur l 


Shots on goat— Boston 50-11-5-27. NJ 12-9-*- 
4-31: power-plat opportunities — BcsJon 1 g( 
2. NJ 1 at 3: goalies— Boston. Casey. 5-2 ill 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 


23 14 33 27—105 shaisJo savesi. NJ. Bradcur. 4-5 1 27-211. 


I. Haley 1-1 2-2 4. TolalS 2B4W 1023 72 


(f-'arpavlsev. Nemchmovi, 16:42 Pcnaine-s- 


Utah: Corbin 2-6 2-2 6. Malone 1017 *-4 24. — Nemchlnov. N’t untarlercncci. 3 03. 


Spencer 3-4 03ft5locl'Ion 4-9 t-l IXHamacek 
0-92-315, Humphries 07 1 -2 1 1. Cnamaers *-10 


Pealo. Was nmenerencri. 11:77. 

Second period— 3. Mr. Zubov 3 (Noonan. 


4-7 11 Benoil 3-11 1-2 7. Bend 01 0-0ft Russeif 0 Tikkanenl. 1 :38.4. Washington. Riaie/4 1 Pau- 


1 2-2 1 Howard 0-04-64, Crony 2-3 00 1 Totals : 
41-78 21-32 105. 


Hn, Miller). 4-35 5. NY. Tlkkanen 2 tALMe'r 
sJer, L seich). 10:44. Penalties— ALMessier. 


3-Painf goals— San Anioruo 1-7 tEliis 1-S. NY fcrass-checi-mgi 7 57 Kono/.-aicnul. 
Robinson 01, Daniels 011. uian 2StCroll> l-l. Was Iroughingl. 11:39, Gilbert. N 1 trough- 
HomaceV 1-2 Chambers 02). Rebounds— San Ing). 11:3«; MAlessler, NY tholdlngl. 12:25: 
Anionlo57 (Cummings. Robinson ID, Utah 59 Rldlev. Was [holding slick). 15:01. 

(Malone 13). Assists — 5on Anionlo 13 (Del Ne- Third period— 6. n ,. Graves 4 (Lcrmeri. 
gra Kmghl 4). Ulah 27 ISfockron III. Total 10:47. 7. NY, Matteau 3 (r.ovtrtev. Larmeri. 
tools— San Antonia 25. Utah 7ft Technical- 11.06. Penalties — Wool lev. was (IriDDlngl. 
—San Anionlo coach Lucas 1:46; KhHslich. Was 1 Interference I. 17.38; 

Larmer. NY (tripping). 13:08; Ridlc. Was 
5 i ' ■ n 1 ^ (hagktng), 19:23; Karpovisev n i tslasnmg). 

19:23; wells. NY (cross-cneckingi, 20:oo.- 

Tuesday’s NHL Playoffs 

York 6-1 J- 7 — 25. power-ploy oaaorTunilies- 
® 0 * ,0,, 1 1 1 1-4 — Washington 0 d 14: New YorMJai 4. goalles- 

Nni Jprse T s 1 * °~ 5 —Washington, Tabaraccl. 01 (25 shais-20 

Boston leads series M saves). New York. Richter, 00 124-221. 



w 

L 

Pci. 

GB 

Boslon 

w 

7 

.731 

— 

Bd II more 

16 

9 

.640 

2': 

New York 

16 

9 

640 

2 l : 

Toronto 

15 

11 

577 

4 

Detroit 

9 15 

Central Division 

J75 

« 

Chicago 

14 

It 

5*0 

— 

MllwauKme 

U 

II 

5*0 

— 

Cleveland 

13 

11 

542 

’7 

k.ansasCitv 

11 

12 

A78 

2 

Mlmesolo 

10 P 

West Division 

370 

5 


<1 

t) 

458 

— 

Seattle 

11 

14 

.440 

'•j 

Cailtomto 

4 

18 

333 

3' : 

Oakland 

a 

18 

JOB 

4 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Boston 113 1—6 

New Jersey 2 I 3 0—3 

Boston leads series 7-6 
First period— 1, NJ. Zdepukin 1 lAlbeiln, 
GuetiiH. 2:21 1 Bos. Smoiinshi 4. 13:0ft 3. NJ. 
McKay 1 (Hotlk, Stovan&i, 16 2S. Penallle- 
S— owes. Bos Itrlprtng). 13:45; Stewart. Bos 
tsJoshi. 19:74; Zeieaukln, NJ (slash;. 19:24. 

Second period— 4, New Jersey. Stevens 2 
( Zelepuk in. Dri ver), 4 :09 (pp).5, Boston. We v 
ley 7 (Reid. Bourauel, 9:03. Penalties— Show. 




ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Leeds Z SnetfhMd Wednesday 2. lie 
Oldham 1, ShetlleW United 1. tie 
Queens Park Rangers IL West Ham 0. he 



East Division 




w 

L 

PCt. 

GB 

Atlanta 

15 

10 

MO 

— 

Montreal 

15 

n 

577 

: Y 

Florida 

14 

12 

538 

l«7 

New York 

12 

13 

.480 

3 

Philadelphia 

11 

15 

■423 

4Vi 


Central Division 



CincinnalJ 

17 

B 

.680 

— 

St. Louis 

13 

10 

565 

3 

Houston 

14 

II 

560 

3 

Pittsburgh 

13 

11 

542 

3ii 

Chicago 

6 

18 

£50 

1D V ‘: 


West Division 



San Francisco 

14 

12 

53d 

— 

Colorado 

1? 

12 

500 

1 

Los Angeles 

12 

14 

A62 

2 

San Diego 

8 

19 

•2«0 

0Vt 


Tiipcrinv's I inf* Scdcrs CM» Crim 17), and Wilkins. W— Hanson, 2-3 

utowpj 9 umc auuioo l— M organ. 04. Sv— Brantley (3). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE *" FranciSO) 388 180 *07-6 18 i 

T ,„, AMERICAN LEAGUE _ _ _ New Yor1[ m m 406-5 7 i 

MH 8ia M 0 8 Tones. Free (7). MJocksan (7). Back (9] 

Brown and Rodrigos: Belttlr Dovi" IS) Manwar'na Je.R~d «»*«-«. ^ 

Umo 181 cmd TetMeton. W-Brown. 74. ^ (aLFranCTlfl ondHunatev 

■ n »■ «*,*- At up. Tagm I,, vMMJadcsoaM L— Franco. 0-1, Sv^Bodi 

™ rewe^ ^ ,,, ' , l^L Y ' Rv T !r , Sr 

Kansas City BOI DM MM — 0 3 a 2 Si'! * 

Toronto DIM 100 BOX— 1 3 8 < ' Awrtrenl *•* •*“ ^ * 1 

Appier and Mcctartaoe. Hentaen and 

Knarr w-rtentgen, 4-2 L-Appler. 2-3 Heredia (4|. Bauctier (6). Shaw (8) and 

^rj^tgea^L-App^.l _ QjFle^er - ^ £££"£* 

Milwaukee 300 040 00»-7 9 J L-HgndersaMM.HRs-LA. Plano tSI.Mow 

Erickson. Tram bier (Aland Walbeck; Weg- h^L^'hB 
maa Orosco 16). Fetters 17), Scanlon (ft), SJStaLh m ,5 • 

Bronkev (9) ond Nilsson. W-Wegman. 00. P ^!^I! h Hn „ lD , r _ rni* 

Pucke " 

ilL Wtwoukee. Vaughn Tam.ln 171, Manzanillo (8). A.Peno (8), 

Boston 105 010 Ottolj 10 1 Ballard 191. Dewey if) and Staught. W— Ora- 

Flemino. Converse ;JI. Cummings (5) and »* ^ * 

Wilson; Viola. Quonrrill o. Bankhead <31. Cami "^ “J*"® **»■ 

Harris (71. Fosses (9), Pvan (9) and Valle. m 7 ] 

w— Bank head. 3-ftL— Fleming, 2-4. 5v— Ryan r “L "" * W— 3 ./ \ 

f 21 HR— Vtriflp Grlffcv Ir PoJKlfllllnCL SOV^f (3). Mottser IS) Odd 

awrtJnd 2? W Sli- « 8 l Ausmus; Juaen. Baskie (4), Carter 17). West 

Chicago OH 023 0#*-»2 14 0 m and toiler. W-Sager. 1-1 L-^udea 1-1 

Morris. Barnes (5), Osea (61. Ulliauts) 8) and H 1 ^ 5 0 " D,efla Gw T^ 1 !AL' 5 JS°" . (3 „' . 
Pena; Femandet Hernandez (9)andKarkovice. ~ ’ * * 

LoVairiere (9). W— Femandez. 33. 1 Morris . l riflW 208— 3 6 1 

l hr«— ri Thnmr t4i a Tv™,, ret Houoh, Yjtorez (8). JJternantfez (9) and 

TT»n« (4L Chj^Th^n^ (91 Ttaglev; Smoltz. NLHIII (2). Meraker (3J. Ble 

Cat Horn la ON ON sso— 5 1 0 tecki t4J, Bedroslan (6). Wohlers (7). Stanton (81 

Mulhatland. X-Hernandez (8). Hifcncock on ' 1 °' Br| en. W— Hough, 3 ft L— Smoltz. 2-3 

(91 and Siontev; Fmiev- Lewis (7), B.Patler- Sv--J.Heniondez(5).HR^Altaitfn,C7'Br(en{II. 
ion (9) and C-Tumer. w— Mumolland, 3-2. St. Loan 108 0M ©®— 15 4 

L— Fimev.015v— Hitchcock [11. HRs— New Cdtorado 823 Ml Mx— 18 It • 

York. Levrltz (61. California. C Davis te). Fawctos. Clnwelll (3). Hataran (6). Smith 

Baltimore 3t0 1D0 311 J 14 1 Evtrsoerd (&) and TJWcGrlff r RtynoGO 

OuMiiod 001 ON 088—1 s 1 and Glrardi. W — Reynoso, 2-2. L— Patodas. 0 

McDanaWand Halles; Dor ling. Hors man (7), Lcnkfort (7»- Colorado, Bl- 

Tavlor (71, Nunez (81. Briscoe (9) and HemoncL cheMe * ra, > Burks (ID), Haves (3), Melkt (3). 
Sfelnbohc C8i . w— McDonald, 00. L — Dari ms. 0 


3. HRs— Baltimore. Devereauv 2 16). 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Ctactanoft on 0*1 no— a n i 

Chicago ON 280 888—2 6 • 

Hanson, Ruffin (ft), McElroy (7). Brantley 
(9) and Darseilr Maroon. Plesac (5). Bautista 


(6). Crim 17), and Wilkins. W— Hanson, 2-1. SEA50N TO Oj^TE: JorgntiuiWjfe 

L— Morgan. 04. Sv— Brantley (3). tl9-for-7s) wtth three"oo«rteta« tt .i,n 

Szn Francisco 308 in 883—6 18 1 mnllii TBitrnimiitoiPiiiiiiaiiiliBiii W |F 

New York 0« 801 4S8-S 7 2 11 attnmata. Halv»»P«At«fewa*irti; 

Torres, Frey (7J. MJocksan 17). Beck (9) two errors In rHrttf.fWtt, ' c -. ' J 

and Manwarlna Je-Reed (9); Gazio. SerrHn- • ” .„% •- -j i 

aro (7). Mason (8). Franco (9) and Hunaiev. JapaiWSeLeflgUtf : -•.-H 
W— (MJacksoa 2-0. L— Franco. 01. Sv— Back 1 "■ . 1 ' r-. 

(3). HRs — NY.Rv .Thompson (6), Orsulak (3). Central Leagee , 

Los Angeles 828 421 801—18 XT 2 .88 -■ ftiv? 

Montreal m SM 828-4 I 1 Yotnluri 15 7 JB -'-'rd 

Hershlser.GotUBlandPiozza; Henderson, anmichl "12 . 9. ••»,'/ JD -Bffl 
Heredia (4). Bauctier (6). Show (81 and Yaftult n W-.ft' at 

D Fletcher. Websler (7). W— Hershlser. WL Yokohama M r B v •- JM 

L-— Henderson. 01. HR&— LA. Piazza (5). Mon- Hiroshima 9 ^12'‘ '8^ 

treal, Lansino ID. Hanshin • .7 T< r 8-\-‘JB -Ri:J 

Houston 808 2tn *n-T la a eMmaSofi Mti ' V 7'i 

Pittsburgh 018 MM 128-4 12 2 Yomlufl ft Yokohama ?-- v'. iV-", 

Drgbek. Hamplan (Bl.Hudek (8), Edens 18). Yakut) X ChunlCtU 1 . :. -‘i" v ' ' '/■ ' 
Ml.Wllllams (91 and Servals; z. Smith, Miceli Hiroshima 4 Hanshwri "... 
tit. Tomlin 171, Manzanillo (ft). A.Peno (ft). PddficTe^8&!'- t - jv 

Bollard 19). Dewey (9) and Staught. W-Oro- W -*«|* 

bek.3-l.L- 2LSm«h.01Sv— Mt.WOltamStol. &e(bu 14 ' ft J: U 

HRs— Houston, Caminltl (3). Cedcno (6). Qalel M’ 0 ' 1 : r~ 

son Diego IN 823 181— B 9 I Orix n irVr -ai :.»j 

PMladeiphta 2«i mo I0B-S 7 3 Nippon Ham 9 j&rtS. •» (*;! 

PaJMartlnez. Soger (3), Mouser IB) and Lone 8 ti 8’ ■* RS 

Ausmus; Juaen. Baskie (6), Carter 17). West Kintetsu -7 3* R 

171 and Daullan.W— Soger, 1-2. L — Juden, 1-3. We t)ueH)g y* i IN tri h : j 

HRs— San Diego. Gwvnn (3), Slaton (3). Nlpoon Ham 1, Sefixt 5 .] 

Fforlde 820 m 088-6 9 8 DaM 4 Lzitta 1 10 --S - 4 

Atlanta SIB BOB 288-1 ft 1 Ortx 5, KlntetM 3 • * •' .] 

Houoh, Yj>erez (8). JXernandez (91 and 

Tina lev; Smoltz. MXtll (2), Atarcker 13). Ble- . j 

leckl 14). Bedrastar, 161. Wohlers (7). Stanton (8) HT lrr rtfwflBmr ”Y 1 

and O’Brien. W— Hough. 3ft L — Smoilz. 2-3. JI^WlHwi 

Sv — J.Hemondez (5). HR— Atlanta, CBrton (I). - Jl-r.'.Vi 4 

st. LouH iBi 888 nb— i s 4 Tourof St>afn. r •*:* .‘O' - a 

Colorado 823 Ml 84x— 18 1ft 8 ;i... 

Parados, Cimorelii (3), Habvan (e>. Smith RewAts from ff uk i sAki rt ttMlNft* j 
(81. Eversaerd (8) ond TMcGrlH; Reynoso kllometen [T27J nmbtOtlrepi iB it M wj M 
ond Glrardi. W— Re vnasa, 02. L— Faioctas.0 dloo Arams. Andtxia: LAnoef Catta^O 1 
l.HRs— St.Loulft Lankford (7). Colorado, B I- lombtO, Kdme, SinrSf/a^M* J 
diette (10). Burks (10), Haves (3), Melkt (J). Switzerland. Mopd-CWftftJ-M** | 

Zulle. Swlfzerfond,ONCE,75ti«W*'8 # * . 

Ttie Michael Jordan Watch 

„ ”17 OvetdMSMadtaw:L«w** f -^j ll S: j 

TUESDAYS GAME: Jordon went 1-torJ Zor rabel mvz : 12 behtad: ] 
wllh a ttiree-nm double In the Birmingham a. Pedro Ddgqtlo, 5P<*w. ~ gDM * a :- y rJ^ i 
Barons's 4-1 victory aver Orlando. He was hind; ft Luc Lr Blanc. W**' j 
catigfd stealing and siruck out once. naA:l5 behind. T- • } 


SEASON TO 04TEr JN*wjifl«ig 
(19-f0r-761 with ttvee MOtoi’aa&M 
wotmv 28 strikeouts end 
11 attemots. HelMoKikMS^eataMdi 
two errors In right Heltt; ■ a-j V.. . ' t. 

Japanese League^r-y- 

Central l e 08 N ~' i -V.--? 
.(■_• UCvT >7Wv8|r 
Yotnluri 15 7 -JK-'-’-h 

Ghtmkhi 12 . 9 --*,..jn -Dt 1 

Yakult -'iBi *i 

Yokohama lO.U-ft; -JB 

Hiroshima 1 ^iZ ’’ 0 ig 

Hanshin ■ J (j ; 5 

VfedendaYl kw8i ■ V '*• 
Yotnluri ft Yokohama T-- 
Yakut! X OiuntotU 1 . ' V- r 1 
Hiroshima 4 Hanstiwri ' , t'.. * . 

Sefbu 14 - ft: J:* * 

Da lei 1ft .' 0,l : »:r.. 

on* nTr/.r.-ai:* 

Nippon Ham 9 JZri'rty. 4® ftk.l 

Lotte 8 »;•£-'» R> 

Kintetsu -7 K 

WMlHUiWV"! ■ j 

Nippon Ham 7, Seaxt.SJ';'' 

Dafei 4 Latte X IB tonlRBri ; 

Ortx 5, Kintetsu 3. • * ■ 

• . -S'. T-r^r . — 



Tour of Spain. .y - j 

Results Aram w musfdu rt j 

kllometen lUM mlW) fnm 
dloo Arcntls. Andorra: tA«el0arim» 2 


The Michael Jordan Watch 

TUESDAY'S GAME: Jordon went l-tar-1 
wllh a three-run double in the Birmingham 
Barons's 01 victory aver Orlando. He was 
caught Stealing and si ruck out once. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


Aor i 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



H~rr 

m 

r BELLI 

3 

nun 

BANCOR 

. i .1 

i i 


CUSCOT 


tUTt-REGAU 


investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in lhe IHT 






























Cl 


** 



SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1994 


Page 19 


S*9Vi_and h.s 




: UuliM^ h 


^ ^tra zil Mourns 
As Hero Returns 


s 


,|VV 


* S* “■ IlKfiifc , 


zil's largest city with a population 
of IS million. Streets and overpass* 
es were a mass of people as a fire 
truck carried the flag-draped coffin 


5: p^jhiiiStaJjssSs; 

-r-p=o a >.. _ ^ “J* 8j“npse Of ihe flag-draped 

1,15 along a 25- ra ik'(*S™li t ;i 

borne to be f° ule to thestaLe legislature, where 

of a national hero honors it was to lie in state until burial 

-Ttearfrmbeofag^^^ Thursday. Morr zooo police- 
Fixmula One driving champion ar- 
tWBd from Paris as dawn 


■f l* 3 iRsiTc'. 

Cmered;n ^ r^;;; ^ 


■■Jflc 


? f 7, 2 - ' 

1 h !*> 

» as Tev:, » 

5* ^,r. ^ 

dangers* ■ _pim. 
if season. 


■Jc|< 


L 


12 ) 


^seventh t.-. ... 

before 

— ' ^ 


— as uawn was 

Mcafemg and was met at Ctiinbica 

airport by crowds of mourners, 
who, wg>t and applauded softly as 
theooffin was carried off the plane. 
Brazil is m a sea of tears today ” 

old Hugo Mendes Pacheco. Who 
drove 22 hours from southern Bra- 
zfl. rstnna was more than Lhe king 
of raang. He was a god." 

Mlitary police estimated that a 

ranhon people lined the 
Sao Pai 


through 


lined the route 
Paulo, which is Bra- 


1 Ml E*po, J:,-, 



RACING: 

to Safety 


(W w>Qmr.» 

*. Phillies V.* - 

ended its i 


Piratev 4: s - . 

i l!*v-r-_ : - -~> 

fld 1X,ul :> l.~ " 
t r*v •' 

i as ^ . : 

ft CardiEjj, ). .. 
‘brer--. 

five ? t, .. " • 
ini: ‘>f *■ • 


B»N 


«a$L'es 




» 


Coutimied from Page 1 

■ cradled during a qualification run 
- - after bis car suddenly lost traction. 
- The initial hypothesis is that a front 
. wing on the car was weakened 
when he went off the track on a 
previous lap. He, loa crashed at 
about 300 kilometers an hour. 

- F1A said it would take urgent 
■ - steps to cuL the speed of Formula 
One cars. It did not announce how, 
although one of the most favored 
methods appeared to be the intro- 
duction of a system to restrict the 
rate at which fuel enters Ihe engine, 
thus limiting power. 

But doing that in a sport built on 
~ power and speed is sure to run into 
opposition. 

. , The federation also said it would 
consider fitting cars with air bags 
and introducing oilier measures to 
restrict the head movements of 
drivers, protecting them from the 
sot of injuries that killed Senna 
and Ratzenberger. 

r ,; --Uoth the Ferrari driver Jean 
. : Afesi and the Benetton driver J. J. 

Lehto had neck vertebrae crushed 
. .in similar accidents during private 
test runs earlier in the season. The 
protective cell of a cockpit is so 
solid that it is only the neck of the 
driver that absorbs the shock of a 

| " Mosley said several other possi- 
responses — including the can- 
cdaiioo of the Monaco Grand 
Erix.OflMay 15 or even the whole 
season . — were mkd- out at the 


men were deployed to keep order. 

Confetti rained down from office 
buildings as the fire iruck drove 
through downtown, accompanied 
by a state police honor guard and 
thousands of cars, motorcycles and 
bicycles. Many people waved Bra- 
zilian Hags with a black sash and 
held up signs in Portuguese saying 
“Thanks Senna" and “Good-Bye 
Senna." 

Major TV networks interrupted 
their regular programming to show 
the arrival of Senna's coffin and the 
funeral cortege. 

At the legislature, the line began 
to form on Tuesday. By early 
Wednesday it stretched nearly a 
mfle through downtown Sao Paulo. 

Several people were carried away 
by firemen or police after fainting 
outside the budding. 

Inside, the main hall was be- 
decked with dozens of floral 
wreaths with banners in English 
and Portuguese. 

The family was to hold a short 
religious service presided by an 
evangelist minister before opening 
the haD to visitors. 

Senna was to be buried Thursday 
morning in a local cemetery that 
will be closed to the public for the 
day. 

Charles Marzanasce, a spokes- 



>sets 

Parma, 1-0, to 
Win Cup Title 


Li nrett RdwarsjThe Aranaucd Pitts 

Max Mosley, FIA’s president “After five accidents this past weekend, including two deaths, one must be carefiil not to overreact.’* 


The Associated Press 

COPENHAGEN - Alan 
Smith's goal early in lhe first half 
Wednesday night proved to be the 
winner as Arsenal upset defending 
champion Parma, 1-0, in the final 
of the Cup Winners’ Cup soccer 

tournament. 

Smith, the London team's lone 
frontrunner in the game, capital- 
ized on a mistake by Parma sweep- 
er and captain Lorenzo Minot ti to 
score in the 19th minute. 

Smith picked up Minoiti's slop- 
py pass inside the penalty area and 
fired borne a shot past goalkeeper 
Luca Buccl 

More than 12.000 singing Arse- 
nal fans, many dressed in their 
team's colors of red and white, cele- 
brated the victory at the Parked, 
Denmark's new national stadium. 

Parma, which finished fifth in 
the Italian league standings last 
weekend, was trying to become the 
first team to win successive titles in 
the prestigious toumamenL 

Its loss ended Italy’s chances of 
sweeping the three major European 
club tournaments this season. Inter 
Milan leads Austria Salzburg going 


U.S. Upsets Russia, Sweden Also Gains Semifinals 

Bruins and Rangers Take 2-0 Leads in Semis 


mantor“esSSiy a sSd ) St But Americans Lose Top Scorer to Drug Test 

among the racing celebrities who 


\ " special meeting. 


were to attend were Jackie Stewart. 
Gerhard Berger, Emerson Fitti- 
paldi and Alain Prost. as well as the 
owner of the Williams team. Frank 
Williams, and the McLaren team's 
Ron Dennis. 

President It&mar Franco de- 
clared three days of national 
mourning and ordered flags flown 
at half staff. He also decreed that 
Senna posthumously receive the 
Grand Cross of Merit, one of Bra- 
zil’s highest awards. 

Fellow drivers Christian Fitti- 
paldi, Rubens Barichello and Pe- 
dro Lamy arrived in Sao Paulo on 
Tuesday to pay their last respects 
to the man considered one of the 
best Formula One driven in histo- 
ry- 

“I am convinced the accident 
was caused by a mechanical failure. 
Something has to be done about car 
and track safety.” said Fittipaldi of 
the Arrows team. 

.-“We race to compete, not to 
die.” (AP, AFP, Reuters) 


The Associated Press 

MILAN (AP) — Team USA. fired up by 
Canadian allegations that Russia had taken 
a dive earlier in the week in order to play the 
supposedly weaker Americans, stunned the 
heirs of the Soviet hockey machine with a 3-1 
victory Wednesday night in the quarterfinals 
of the World Ice Hockey Championship. 

It was the first time an American hockey 
team had beaten the Russians or their prede- 
cessors in an international match since the 
famous victory in 1980 at the Lake Placid 
Olympics, when the United States won the 
gold. 

In a later match, Olympic champion Swe- 
den blew past Italy, 7-1 Italy held off the 
Swedes until 17:16 when 

Fredrik Stillman took a pass in the air and 
batted it into the net at 17:16 of the first 
period to open the scoring, but by 9:52 into 
the second the Swedes bad poured on four 
more goals. 

In Saturday’s semifinals. Sweden faces the 
winner of Thursday's Cana da- Czech Repub- 
lic match. The .United States w-Q] play the 
winner of the Finland-Ausiria quarterfinal. 

But not without top scorer Bill Lindsay. 


After Wednesday's game, the International 
Ice Hockey Federation said Lindsay hud 
failed a drug test for ephedrine. which the 
team said existed in tiny amounts in an over- 
the-counter vitamin supplement the Florida 
Panthers' player was taking. He was banned 
for the rest of the tournament. 

Craig Jannev of the Sl Louis Blues assist- 
ed Quebec's Scott Young on two goals in the 
second period to propel the American* into 
ihe semifinals. 

Russia failed to capitalize on five power 


The Associated Press 

The Boston Bruins and New York Rang- 
ers both have 2-0 leads in their Eastern 
Conference semifinal series. The Bruins 
have it a little better, though, as they bead 
home while Lhe Rangers go on the road. 

Don Sweeney's goal 9:08 into overtime 
Tuesday night gave the Bruins a 6-5 victory 

over the 

New 


Jer- 


plays, stymied throughout by a brilliant per- 
rGu\ 


sey Devils, 
with that 


STANLEY CUP 


formance by goalie Guy Herbert of the Ana- 
heim Mighty Ducks. He had 53 saves, com- 
pared to 25 for Anaheim teammate Mikhail 
Shiaienkov. Both are coached at Anaheim 
by Ron Wilson, who is the coach of Team 
USA. 

“Our motivation tonight was that we hon- 
estly believed the Russians allowed Canada 


to win by pulling their goalie in the third 
period," Wilson said of Russia’s 3-1 loss in 


the preliminary rounds. 

In this game, the Russians looked sluggish 
and far unlike the team that played Canada 
brilliantly for two periods. 


best-of-7 series that resumes on Thursday 
night in Boston. 

Adam Graves and Stephane Matteau 
scored in a 19-second span in the third 
period to lead the Rangers to a 5-2 victory 
over the Washington Capitals in the series 
that resumes in Landover. Maryland, on 
Thursday ru'ghL 

Sweeney was robbed by goahender Mar- 
tin Brodeur in the opening minutes of over- 
time. but he converted a great setup by 
Adam Oates for the aame- winner. Il came 


The Bruins had come within 3.S seconds 
of winning in regulation, but New Jersey 
forced the overtime on a goal by defenseman 
Bruce Driver, who capitalized on a mistake 
by defenseman Ai Iafrate of the Bruins. 

Stephen Heinze had put Boston ahead, 5- 
4, with 6:05 to play, just over two minutes 
after Ted Donato tin! the score with a pow- 
er-play goal from in close: 

The Rangers broke open a close game with 
the rapid-fire goals by Graves at 10:47 and 
Matteau at 1 1:06 of the final period U> win 
their club-record sixth straight playoff game. 

The Rangers had previously won five 
straight playoff games in 1972 and 1940, the 
last year they won the Stanley Cap. 

Esa Tikkanen gave the Rangers a 3-2 lead 
at 10:44. With a penalty delayed because the 
Rangers had the puck. Pat Richter left his 
net so his team could add an extra attacker. 
It turned out to be Tikkanen, who jumped 
over the boards and joined the sustained 
action in the Washington end. 

The Rangers, who have outscored the op- 


just seconds after Boston goalie. Jon Casey position 33-8 in their first six playoff games, 
stopped Bill. Guerin on a 2-on-l with the didn’t shake off the Capitals until their 
teams skating 4-on-4. third-period bursL 


into the second leg of the UEFA 
Cup final and powerhouse AC Mi- 
lan meets Barcelona in the Champi- 
ons Cup final this month in Athens. 

Parma, which beat Milan in the 
SuperCup finals in February, start- 
ed weD and was unlucky when 
Swedish midfielder Tomas Brolin 
hit the post with 14 minutes gone. 

Brolin, who scored three goals 
for Parma en route to the Cup Win- 
ners' Cup final had also headed a 
ball just over the crossbar four min- 
utes into the match. 

Brolin dominated the midfield 
for Parma for most of the match. 
But Colombian striker Faustino 
AspriHa. who missed last year's fi- 
nal at Wembley because of an inju- 
ry, had a disappointing game 
against Arsenal’s lough defense. 

In the second half. Parma strug- 
gled and Tor the most pan put little 
pressure on the English team. 

Alessandro Melli, who came in 
as substitute for Gabriele Pin in the 
71st minute, had a goal disallowed 
for offside in the last minute. 

Arsenal was missing several in- 
jured key players, among them 
Danish midfielder John Jensen, 
who had been injured here last 
month while playing for Denmark 
in a friendly against Hungary. 

And star striker Ian Wright was 
suspended after being booked for 
the second time in the semifinals 
against Paris Sl Germain. Thai got 
him an automatic one-match bah. 

Earlier in the day, six persons 
identified as British fans were ar- 
rested with forged bank notes and 
stolen credit cards, while six others 
escaped after robbing a watch 
shop, police said. 

The six, who were otherwise not 
identified, would be charged with 
forgery and fraud, a police spokes- 
man said. The six had attempted to 
change false £20 notes and tried to 
use stolen credit cards, be said. 

In another case, he said, "A 
group of six British soccct fans en- 
tered a watch shop and stole 20 
watches worth up to 80.000 kro- 
ner." or about $12,300. No one was 
arrested. 

“It’s mainly the British fans who 
create problems." the spokesman 
said. “The Italians arc more quiet." 

It was estimated that more than 
12,000 British fans and 9.000 from 
Italy had came to the Danish capi- 
tal to watch the final at the Parken 
Stadium. Police, called in massive 
reinforcements to restrain possible 
violence. 



Tbe measures that were enacted - 
appeared to be odes intended to 
■ ’ avoid a recurrence of the pit lane 
accident that occurred at Imoia 
when a wheel flew off the Minardi- 
^ Ford driven by Michele Al bore to 
and hit five mechanics. They were 
f not seriously injured, 
j' • ' FIA said these new safety mea- 
( ' sores would be instituted at Mona- 
j co: 

l • Entries into and exits from the 
\r pits will be controlled by a slight 
!- curve to force cars to reduce their 
speeds. 

• No one will be allowed da the 
_ driving surface of the pit lanes ex- 

cept those directly involved in 
. working on race cars al the t ime . 

• A draw will be arranged to 
; detennme in advance the order in 
^ winch cars will make their pit stops, 
i > Stops made oat of the designated 
fv order will be limited to emergencies 

f- and cars will not be allowed to take 

Ft on fuel or new tires then. 

& “Let’s see what happens in Mo- 
K- naco." Mosley said. “I don't thmk 
r anvone can be worried about Mo- 

h naco. It’s a special circuiL 

E£::- He said that FIA also wanted to 
k take further steps to ensure specta- 
tor safetv after several peoples 

££ crowd at Imoia were injured by 
debris Dung into the stands by^an 
^accident on tbe starting grid. M«- 
t fcy higher fencing would be 
£ .considered, although the Kcnang a* 
S-'-Suack in Italy was already al- 

T r mo 5 t four meters high- . .. 

*Mosley fiercely denied allega- 


FIA, he 



'S' from S Formula 

&Sus»ss. 


New Roland Garros 
Set for French Open 


The Associated Press 

. PARIS —The Roland Garros ten- 
nis complex unveiled Wednesday by 
the city’s mayor, Jacques Chirac, will 
have a dramatic new look, and a new 
court, for this month’s French Open. 

Chirac, in describing the new 
10,200-seal stadium court, practice ar- 
eas and ultramodern multipurpose 
gym. called it “a sports center worthy 
of the world’s best athletes." 

Those familiar with tbe old Roland 
Garros and its sleepy but elegant ambF 
eacc will lordly recognize the new one. 

The elliptical new stadium — a high- 
tech design of gray concrete, glass and 
steel that will be known as Court A • 
replaces the 4,000-seal Court 1 as the 
second-ranked showcase behind the 
16 ^ 00 -seat Centre Court. 

Several outside courts have been re- 
placed by the new stadium, with walk- 
ways widened and trees planted to 
provide shade for the 27,000 visitors 
experted daily. 

■ A parking garage for nearly 600 
vehicles has been built under the new 
stadium, along with seven training 
courts, the indoor gymnasium and a 
players’ lounge. 

The 63-acre extension was complet- 
ed in a record 14 months, despite de- 
lays caused by local residents opposed 
to' the project 

Eric Deblicker, a coach affiliated 
with the French Tennis Federation, 
said Court A played much like Centre 
Court, but needed a few weeks to 
“break in" and become “faster. 

The French Open starts May 23, 
with the women's final on June 4, the 
men's on June 5. 


100-Meter Showdown in Russia 



PERSONALS 


ST. PETERSBURG (AP) — British sprinter Linford Christie, 
already the reigning Olympic, world. European and Common- 
wealth 100-meter champion, said Wednesday he nil! trv to add j 
the Goodwill Games title to the list this summer. 

Christie, 34, said he wiQ compete in the July 23-Aug. 7 Games 
in Sl Petersburg in which American rivals Carl Lewis and Andre 
Cason have already confirmed their participation. 

“There’s always something very special about my races 
against Carl and Andre,” Christie said. “1 know that they will be 
at their best- So will I." 


I «A? THE SACKS) HEART s.; leu,. K» 
ixfcred jLyWwd, ln*ea ivi prmrwi ! 
rticoujyhwj' -x iwU nM cad 10 - 
mer. Soced Hkti ei Jews ptoy :<? 
us Sort Jude woief oi mructe* par. 
tor io. Sen Jude heJp oi the hopeless 
pcay fits us. AMEN AMC 


INTER5TS3 IN HELPING rose murwv 
foi >DP PAAC-lhi Phi! A/nencan 
AIDS Corcnnee vrluiuetti. 

Fir 'tr tie: isloimonon Tel. 
&7JBJZ fci ATT. O&tP 


For the Record 


Angd Canmrgo of Colombia won Wednesday's mountainous 
10th stage of the Tour of Spain while Tony Rominger of 
Switzerland finished second. 23 seconds back, to easily retain his 
overall lead of more than four minutes. (AP) 

Gabriels Swhatmi, seeking to end a two-year run without a 
victory, was beaten. 6-4, 6-3. by unherald^i Romanian Irin3 

S a in an error-strewn performance at the Italian Open — 
she got her last title, in 1 991 (Reuiers t 

Hiroshi KawasMmi of Japan floored champion Jose Luis 
Bueno of Mexico in the- 11th round in Yokohama to win the 
WBC junior bantamweight title by unanimous decision. (A P> 
Tokio, a broken mast haring dropped it from first to last place 
in the Whitbread ’Round the World Race, finally crossed the 
fifth-leg finish line in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 

Rodney Peete, a part-time starter at quarterback for Detroit 


for the past four years, signed a one-year contract with the 
iCowb 


Dallas Cowboys. „ , , , f ^ p> 

Shawn Eckardt, Shane Slant and Derrick Smith, tbe last three 
rharyd with at tacking figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, have 
reached plea agreem e nts that will send them to prison for IS 
months, according to sources. That would mean that none of ihe 
defendants will stand trial (API 


Quotable 

• Mike Brown, general manager of the Cincinnati Bengals. on 
reports that the team’s practice field is contaminated with lead 
and other noxious materials: “It’s not a safety risk unless you are 
on the property, and only then if you are down on the ground 
and cat a yard and a half of soil-" 

• Tom FitzGerald of the San Francisco Chronicle: ‘"Well, the 


m.: 


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— JL 


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Attention visitors 
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INVASION BEACHES DAY TOURS 

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maria* value • 570,000 + . Cdl 24 bn. 

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INTERNATIONAL 

RECRUITMENT 


Appea rs on Page 13 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGB4TN PARIS 
Td: (1) 47.2030.05 


AG6NCE CHAMPS EYSKS 


spBodfaa m furnshed apartmenb, 
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Td: . 

fax 


I: {1)42 21 

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25 32 25 

37 09 


AT HOME M PARS 


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apartments to rert hrmdied or nor 
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25 Ay Hoche 75006 Par*. Ft& 1-456)1020 


PARS BSWB4UE ctwm pnvocr with 
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MONTPARNASSE AREA, 70 sam. 
dec, opCTtmenl. latfaSdlv turmshed, I 
bedroom. F8.2M. TeJ: 1-45 06 54 91. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


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ran*™ 5 rooms. 135 sqjn., 6rti 
floor. r!7 f li3 nei. Commi&on. 
f 11.0V. Superb 7 rooms. 279 sam., 
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F23J6a AGIFRANCE Td 1-4903 4304 


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Teh (1) 45 63 25 60 


74 Champs h.Vsees 

CLABXDG& 

TO* 1 WfflC OR MORE high das 
2 or 3-HXm qntmenh. FULLY 
EQUPPB3. IMMajIATERESaVATICWS 
Tab (1) 44 13 33 33 


LAMY, 75116 PARIS 

5 Awe. nerre ler de 5ert>e 
TeL 1-40 70 18 8< 0 / 1-47 23 S3 14 
Short and tong Term feritofc 


RUE BARBET DE JOUY J7ft|. 
Luxurious buddng, modem 130 son. 
on garden. Ir/mg, 2 bedrooms. 
FIWMO/morth, PasttJs ham May lo 
October. Tefc til 47 23 53 U 


TO B84T 
tt n dpct ed quafcly apartmenb, aH 
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PAR1NBS Teh (1) 46 M 82 II. Fax;' 
fl|47 72 30 96- 


peffliY, BD DE LA SAUSSAYE. I*gh 
das. large recepfion, 3 bedroom, 2 
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sqjh. F20®0 neL Teh I-G63 17 77. 


hgb cfass. vrrf modem vita. Encjfahi 


Amonam. Gar man vJxjob 
F34.000/montt\. Ttt; l-eo 03 13 30 


AT HOME ABROAD, a relocation team 

dedcored *° ^ Sy 


M 1-40 09 0B 37. Fbx 1-4009 90 16 


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FOR SALE & WANTED 


EXCUSIVE IAMNA1ED PHOTOS of 
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Idxtetkt. IS'.W + S4.95 dirppng 
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CNadable. Grtemy, PO 
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Ear 79J, 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 

French Country 


FUNDING PROBLEMS 7 

Ventire Gapfa - Equity Lem 

Seal Estxtfe - Business 

Puicmang ■ tang Term 

CoSawd Suffwied Gmmfees 

BcnkoUe ouaorteo to secure funding 
for vine propels arranged by. 

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ConuMEran earned only upon Funding. 
Broker's Convnson Assured. 
ha (63-218 10-9284 

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Properties 

Friday, May 6 

For more information, 
or to place an ad, caB Parts: 

Tel.: (1) 46 37 93 85 

Fax: (1) 46 37 93 70 


*agc 


ill ma. 


raakei 
iat w« 

' rtstiF“ 
30 


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they 
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r Mfcne 
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Inpaid L 
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possible.® J 
Pales tin 0 « 
and Jerit 31 * 
now. 

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for 20 o/ e 1 
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>t go awa^ ’ 
Mr. Aral m 
.■la’s Lnauj wai 
aides. Mr 1 > 
rnted exo 
fat's paw*“” 
peaking — 
>ud Abb 
; Commit 
g the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
ahrasing? 
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d minister 
letails of 
’orehand, 
sign, A 
vote that v 
this way." 


&s 

diene 


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teal in No 
-’ear. CoraL 
tian, Virgii 
massager 
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ices for erh 
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rich represe 
t magazine 
that 100,( 
ail issue w 
, with an ad 
) tiled to no 
and areas m 


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e are adverti 
by the in dust 
Inch Nails, a 
ties, a pFOdi 
>accoCo. 
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and they co< 
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rt I sold 36Q,( 

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could have Si 
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view on ike d 
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As for the doll 
eves in float 
Vniiam McD< 
' the Federal I 
■w York, said 
lay. “You ca 
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that (he G-7 v 
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V® i • 

w:-'- - 




JjU'NE. THURSDAY. MAY 5. 1994 




ART BLCHWALI) 


A French Welcome 




Arab Museums 


P ARIS — I have eome to Pari> 
to see (he chesinuL' in htoom. 
There K a knnrt cn the do»*r. A 
heautil'ul French woman in a Cha- 
nel suit and a pillbox hal is stand- 
ing there. “I wish to take you to 
TaillesenL >.*ne uf the greatest res- 
taurants in the world."" 

"Bui 1 don't have a reservation." 
I sjy. 

“You are an American. You 
don't need a re.s- 
ervation. We 

have noi forgot- j '?$|§ 

ten what you did 

for us in the 

French Rev. Mu- L; 

tion. 

I put on my 
jacket and fol- "*« 
low her down- is J|i 

stairs where her Sj> 
souped-up Peu- ' _ "' 

eeot in u jmng. BuchwaW 
• Like must French people she 
■doesn't drive too fast or too -low-. 

“Are you sure you have the right 
person'?*' I ask her. 

“You are from the United Slates 
and that's ,i|| that count*.'* >|te re- 
sponds. “VVe French will never be 
able to make it up to Americans for 
giving us airbags." 

We arrive al Taillevent where 
there is only one parking place. A 
Frenchman is backing into it when 


M ilshlW'i Pi-.i SVnin- 

W ASHINGTON — The John 
F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Art' and the Austra- 
lian govern mem have learned up to 
present a festival of Australian cul- 
ture in October. 

The Australian showcase will 
feature performing artists such as 
the ae tress 7.oe Caldwell, lhe pia- 
nist Michael Kicran Harvey and 
the Aboriginal rock group Y.ithu 
Yindi. The festival will take place 
Oct. g - lb. The kickoff for the fcMi- 
v:il will he « >pen House Artsiralia. 
j free community arts celebration. 

James D. VV'olfensohn. the Ken- 
nedy center's chairman, said the 
festival's budget would he SI. 5 mil- 
lion io S2 million, with lhe Austra- 
lian government contributing “a 
very large, large proportion." 


Europe 


my escort explains to the driver 
that I am an American who saved 
the French franc from going down 
with the Russian ruble. 

He gladly gives up his spot. 

The owner of TaUlevent and his 
entire staff are waiting Tor me. 1 am 
ushered to a table where the som- 
melier suggests that 1 have a glass 
of Dom Perignon champagne from 
the same bottle as Eiie Rothschild, 
who is sitting al the next table. 

□ 

I order a simple meal — a dainty 
cream of caviar soup on which are 
floating truffles and tiny hearts of 
goose liver. This is followed by 

baby lamb cooked in an alligator 
Hermes handbag, followed by a 
souffle prepared with unborn 
strawberries from Provence. 

As 1 am earing. Lhe sommelier 
brings over a bottle of Chateau 
Latour 1 949 and says. “This is with 
the compliments of President Mit- 
terrand. He wants you to know Lhai 
he has not forgotten bow the Amer- 
icans saved Christian Dior from 
going Communist in 1948.“ 

I say. "It was the right thing to 
do." 

My guide say*. “Don't look now 
but Catherine Deneuve is coming 
over to the table. " 

"But I'm eating." I protest. 
Catherine stops by and grinds 
pepper on my iamb. She looks at 
me with her gorgeous eyes. "We 
will always remember that it was 
lhe Americans who gave us our 
own Disneyland." 

“If we hadn't, the British would 
have." 

D 

My guide says. “Things might be 
.get ring complicated. Here is a note 
from Jeanne Moreau. She heard 
that you were in town and wanted 
to give you a party at the Louvre. It 
will follow the ceremony where you 
will be presented with the Legion of 
Honor fur giving France j free Bar- 
hra Streisand concert." 

The check comes and written 
across the top is: “With lhe compli- 
ments of the director and everyone 
else in Paris.’* 

1 can't believe any of it. Just then 
the phone rings in my room and the 
operator says, “It's 8 o'clock. This 
is your wake-up call." 

I say in her. “Was I dreaming?" 
She replies. “I don't know, mon- 
sieur. You'll have to ask the con- 
cierge." 


By John Rockwell 

Vfw Vi*# Time' .XYm. « 

A MMAN. Jordan — The world of di- 
plomacy is suffused with genteel lan- 
guage that hides, just beneath the surface, 
roiling passions. 

Especially, it would seem, in the Arab 
world where the passions sometimes 
break defiantly through the surface. But if 
one knows the context, one can discover 
impassioned meanings in even the polite*! 
of formulations. 

Or so it seemed last week, when >* «me 80 
museum directors and related government 
officials from J.S Arab countries gathered 
for the first nearly comprehensive confer- 
ence of the Arab mu.seum world (only 
Kuwait and Saudi Arabia boycotted the 
proceedings, presumably on political 
grounds). The conference — organized by 
the International Council of Museums, a 
10.000-member. 1 2l>- country organisation 
founded in the United States and based in 
Paris — was entitled "Museums, Civiliza- 
tion and Development." TeehnicalK pri- 
vate. the council operates out of L'nesco 
headquarters and partakes of diplomatic 
as well as mu>co logical manners. 

In the Arab world, riven just now hy 
fundamentalist hatred* and confronted 
with a potential calming of tension- with 
Israel, the exact nature of "civilization" 
and “development" — what tho-e terms 
embrace, what they exclude and whose 
values (Arab? Islamic? Western? univer- 
sal?) ihev can be .said to represent — 
remains intensely controversial. 

Malika Boudbdclbh. the director of the 
National Museum of Fine Arts in Algeria, 
described the conference’s background 
most succinctly in a paper submitted be- 
fore the sessions began. 

“The economic, political, moral jnd 
spiritual crisis that we are living through i> 
pulverizing our standards of value*, and 
our very beings." she wrote. "We despair 
and tear ourselves apart. We regress in 
believing that we are realizing our hope-., 
we impoverish ourselves, we lose tuck *.4 
our roots." 

Bouabdellah named no specific source 
for the crisis she described. Bui given Al- 
geria's torment jum now — at least two of 
the Algerian delegates had either been 
threatened with death by fundamentalists 
or had their museums physically jiiavkeJ 
— her meaning wjs clear enough, and 
formed the m<*'i imposing of the confer- 
ence's several powerful subtexts. 

On the surface, the conference pr. 
ed in a smooth and orderly manner. 

Apart from a visit to the archaeological 
site of Petra, one i-f whose 2.000- year-old 
sandstone facades served js a set in ”ln- 
dianti Jones and the La -I Crusade." the 
fivc-da> even) was devoted to public *o- 


jSy.„. V V. J,..; 

• V' 


!h si'/.; .... 


SHT V 

m.** 

> ■ . Wf*/' 

&&£*& i..? . 

y <• . 

■■ 

. '.rJc-* • sVs , 

■ . ' ... 


-.'A 


r.'ji 



HP I .-> (hr V. Y.«t r.mo 

Members of the* ]r;ernaifc*Rai Counci? of fvi use urns touring Petra, in Jordan. 


•l< r • • n J .• • hii;'-- ti'!i.e T ned 

■ r.i; rr.a; , -.T. .•) i - ,e pra.n.ji nripor- 
- - 1 ■ ■ i "• 1 •m.'I-: the iraining n| 

curator - restorer-, the management 
of museums, the • tardardizaiion of ter- 
minology. the development of computer 
software and the compilation of person- 
nel directories :-nd register.* of stolen 
artworks. There v..*> also ,t call to Jnrm an 
Aran regional mi: --cum • Tea ruia turn. 


But the underlying agenda was more 
interesting than the official agenda. Any* 
>uch conference — the council's first in the 
Third World took place in .Africa in 1991 
and another may be in the works for Asia 
— is meant to forge personal bonds that 
lead to regional cooperation. 

Here, however. **unie of the issue* were 
too sensitive for formal expression, and 


found more frank and bested expression 
privately. _ . 

The Palestinian delegation, for instance, 
was determined to include in die formal 
recommendations a stiff demand .that 
Unescoand the council be more active in 
the recovery of tost Palestinian cultural, 
artifacts. 

Mouyad Mohamed Said Damerdji, the' 
Iraqi director-general of antiquities, ag- 
gressively sought language demanding In- 
ternationa] help in restoring artworks 
looted during the Gulf War. 

“The language of Ultesco is very bland: 
it has no taste,” he grumbled. 

But the most troubling concern, always 
implicit and sometimes explicit, was about 
the impact of Islamic fundamentalism. 

This is a tricky issue, because Arabs are 
convinced that Westerners stereotype 
them. Unless they are directly subjected to 
death threats, they are unwilling to seek 
outside assistance or even comment about 
their problems. Indeed, when they have 
been threatened, they may be even more 
shy. 

“If there's a feud going on, it’s a family 
feud,” said Kristina Davies, an American 
who directs the Ford Foundation regional 
office in Cairo and who channeled 
SI 25.000 of Ford money to the Amman 
conference. 

If the Arabs are suspicious of the West, 
they had ample reason to be suspicious 
here, since a healthy portion of the budget 
f along with contributions from the Jorda- 
nian government, the Ford Foundation 
and Unesco) came from such Western 
institutions as the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion, the J. Paul Geity Trust, the French 
Foreign Ministry and the British Council. 

The most outspoken of the delegates 
was Aicha ben Abed ben Khader. a cura- 
tor and former director of the Bardo Mu- 
seum, Tunisia's oldest and largest, who 
wrote in her paper of the "horror of the 
extremists that seizes us daily.” 

These “forgers of hatred.” she added, 
purveyed “demagoguery, pure and sim- 
ple.” which seeks to “obliterate civiliza- 
tions preceding the Islamic conquesL" 

She said, “The role of museums can be 
basic for not only presenting diverse civili- 
zations, but also for introducing to the 
public an idea of tolerance and a respect 
for differences.” 

One of her projects is a traveling exhibi- 
tion illustrating the diversity of Arab cul- 
tures before Islam. 

Her ideas found a place in the final 
recommendations of the “research, ethics 
and legislation" workshop, which call for 
museums to be “a privileged forum of 
transcultural exchanges" that “should 
fight agains t all kinds of extremism and 
promote tolerance." 


Amt* 


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Now fork 10 Boston will 
have cool weather This weefc 
end while warm weather vrfl 
prevail from Danas to Orlan- 
do. Hot weather will surge 
northward from eastern Mex- 
ico 10 South Tenfls Rem and 
thundomloims wilt dampen 
the Southwest '.Vei snow 15 
po<sitrle over the higher 
mountain peaks 


Europe 

A Stow-moving storm writ 
brmg ram to Athens Friday 
imo the weekend Damp. 
cniRy weather from Moscow 
to Kiev Friday wtll gradually 
<jve -way 10 dry. seasonable 
v/eaiher by Sunday London 
and Pans will have see vari- 
able weather irdo the week- 
end A lew showers are pos- 
sible Saturday 


A warning -.rend will begin in 
Beijing Friday and spread 
eastward 10 Seoul and 
Tokyo over lhe weekend 
Sapporo and northeast 
China will remain chilly into 
me weekend Hong Kong will 
be warm with a lew seal- 
lered tfiDnti'i Shanghai wilt 
be dry and warn f.’an*. 
b wffl be hot ar.d hv.rr.--J 


Middle East 


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sn-sno*. vos. W-Weauxs All maps, korecasU and data provided by Accu-Weather. Inc. • 199a 


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5 Cramped 
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dwelling 
9 Renaissance 
beauiy 
isaSe/ia 

14 Anenl 

15 r 01 lew the 
gome 

Send packing 


17 'Dark La< 3 >‘ 
Singer 

IB Tallinn native 
is Actor Reach 
20 Hollywood 
palmist' 

23 Make chensned 

24 Ump s purview 

25 Rogers anrry 
A&br. 

st Percussion at a 
oovywow 
31 Actor Davis 
35 Well oiled grp 


Nil utii m io Puzzle nf Mav 4 


■■■sganEj^ywianiaa 
^gggBHogBgiEiaacna 

■aaaaaaaaa 

HCTBaBB^ttiaaasfrr,. 
sK^oniafesaiawiaaa 
□□oa^Bnaa^aEinHa 
HDniiaQaanaaziaaaa 
Bonam^oaaa rciana 
HQBSHana^cia mx*.. 
mi^aaiamm^aBiaaaa 
Qiusaaaaaaaaaana 

□BnaH^aHaafj^aaa 
□□QQaMjiauua ^□au 
aaa 


38 New Rochelle 
college 

39 Hollywood 
quack? 

42 For takeout 

43 E* of 1 7 -Across 

44 He wrote "The 
Proper 
Bostonians" 

4 5 Available tor 
47 West Point 

subject 

49 Yield slightly 
S 2 Sports jacket 

57 Hollywood’s 
leading 
undertaker? 

60 Originated 

61 The last Mrs. 
Chaplin 

62 Member of 
35 -Across 

63 fn accord (wifhl 

64 Skidded 

65 Scottish longue 

66 Heavy of old 
comedies 

67 Location 
68 M-G-M 

co-founder 

Marcus 

DOWN 

1 Mother-of-pearl 


2 Pale faced 
a Bed frame 

4 Genghis Khan's 
mass 

5 Jerez product 

6 Silence 

r Ready if needed 

8 Word on old 
gas pumps 

9 Mississippi 
discoverer 

10 Ultra credo 
tl Minor dispute 

12 Georgia 

13 TVTarzan Ron 
21 Canvas prop 
2a Do guard duty 

26 Say (refuse) 

2a Kansas pooch 
a" about . .' 

30 Lots and lots 

31 Teiraxa 

32 The Old 
Curiosity, e.g. 

33 Nestor 

3 * Unyielding 

36 Review a flop 

37 Adequate, way ■ 
back 

40 Domicile 

41 Confederate 
general Juba] 

46 Dempsey's 
nemesis 


«a Scrape 

50 Luster 

51 Carlo Levi's 

"Christ Slopped 
at * 


53 Swiss diarist - - ; 
Henri 

• -at. .- • - •• 



54 Man In a mask ■ -i . 




65 Get rid of - ":.«tStngU 
56 Freshen . T ! 


Pue*» by «W Tout. , V. ■*£., 

•••-Vv3p 

« Mnr York Times Edited by Will Skort&g 


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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

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