Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


«•#“ °L P^'ic^N . : 

**0f*&VB.azld n! *’ 


rawj^s.acd p! u -m 

>ite tone inio i54e 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


£>« 


r-j- ,~ *4 

mf. Otaris ua*,-? 1 ^ 
*’W«ay aloof fS^ajii 
«S*^^aihe cSfflfc- 1 
maaoe" * jj* dt 

SB} 1 ^SSp^"HefeN 

®flg Of English 




unc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Sr 

P 


.-S 1 f* 

% 

c - » 

’ s ' 

gk 

N 

r .' 

3 

& 

&cr 


** 


_ . Jaiglish 

&& parents cSj 1 ^'ia 


Paris, Tuesday, May 10, 1994 


COulH » H 

‘.«4blaaedJ> 

^-^ eyaici.sji.g;^ 
»waenceoR T\' a nH . ^so 
Satotmed bniubJ' 1 ^ 

LL-, ■ l.i rv w - uriw_ 


'****£££* 
.otipKA-m^, J. U- 




pwtes. who is 
fcNfcandh^bft^J^ 

&B#»d w a mania} u^ 

tycfieek. He\ h 8 5i, 

■ -'•• a mE. 


|»rnn and or. h- s ',*> 

tshpuld clcar-v •-„ JJ ck 

-"■ A " "-JkelfSy 

“r^iE 


eqe.-Atecss Dfci*T 
t jst&mcc stouq u.ne 
B& inspired u.%-; •■ n6 & : 


acquiree u 0: ;c '■* 

Wph* purported* ' S Q 10 
tacsi siffibaLh^s ^ 


wees* suno3iAa»s 

plf^J 

3pi.thcdau2h: e: 

*'•» dUrtSiH«C^ 

IWJ n — uun -Llo 


MCteno;F? Lto 

^Saioyfnerui '^' 


jltoe? Roseanoe ,y„ 
anSty her forme aSTi 0 
*■»*_** *£££ 


be«ja^n y ; L«^ 
SB*t like what \_-r,-'. 


BTinheraaiob!.:^ 




RSSte.h: 

trfctel the a. V -T2 
± Kart Cobain. -i. '< Z 


k: \z 

J -l-rj 


cst month 
-to beer. 

.Hbr lawyer 
e powder ::. k .s ?. 
Soda ppod-^.i 
ifigC5 wrrr re- 
oxfitr. p*>^. 




neax.\Tio\u 

CLASSIFIED 

i or* r«i- : ' ••• 




No. 34,584 


Strikes in China Hit 

Foreign-Owned Firm 

With Inflation Siting at 25 % Sate , 
Worries Cher Social Stability Grow 

D. . P. ___ Tv 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

DALIAN, China — A series of strikes has 
mt Joragiwjwned companies here, raisins 
onesbons about the climate for investment 
ai-fl underscoring the intensity of an infla- 
tionary spiral that many see as the biggest 
Jnreat to Chinese social stability. Japanese 
businessmen say. 

In March, nearly all workers at Mabuchi 
Motor Dalian Ltd., the (sty’s largest joint- 
venture, with 6300 employees, struck for 
two days before w inning higher wages and 
attended vacations and break time. Japa- 
nese businessmen say the strike was one of 
more than 20 so far this year, with a major 
plant owned by Japan's Canon Inc. the next 
possible target. 

“Mabuchfs salaries were relatively low, 
and this was (be cause,*’ Dallas's mayor, Bo 
XDai, said in an interview. 

The mayor, who said he preferred the 
tom “weak stoppage” to “strike,” added 
that the city had intervened to resolve the 
dispute. 

“We don’t agree with strikes,” he said. 
“We take great concern with the interests of 
foreign enterprises.” 

The mayor’s comments reflect intense 
government sensitivity to a problem that 
thr ea t ens to make the climate for foreign 
investors less appealing and to accelerate 
inflation and spreading unrest. Inflation in 
China has soared to its highest level since 
1989, when rising prices helped trigger the 
pro-democracy demonstrations in Beijing 
that were crushed in 1989. 

The central government, however, has ac- 
knowledged that, nationwide, the number of 
labor disputes taken to arbitration soared 52 
percent in 1993 to a record 12358 cases. The 
incidents, which include strikes and slow- 
downs and are most common at inefficient 
state-run enterprises, had “influenced social 
stability,” the official Market News newspa- 
per reported Friday. 

Fears of growing social unrest have led 
.Beijing to backtrack on its drive to make 
staltKiwnetf enterprises more dfirieni, a. 


a transition to a market economy. But 


continuing high levels of assistance io main- 
tain jobs at ibe enterprises, which produce 
about halT the nation's industrial output — 
and nearly half of which are losing money — 
is feeding inflation, analysts in Beijing said. 

In Dalian, a port city in northeast China 
that is a locus of Japanese investment, with 
more than TOO Japanese companies, the in- 
flation rate was about 25 percent in 1993, 
foreign businessmen said. The result has 
been growing demands for salary increases, 
especially in foreign-owned companies that 
often lack the government connections of 
CHnese- Japanese joint ventures. 

The strike at Mabuchi Motors, whose 
sprawling plant staffed mainly by young 
women churns out 17 million miniature mo- 
tors each month for cars, electric shavers, 
cameras and various gadgets, forced the 
company to increase workers’ basic salaries 
to 430 yuan (550) from 300 yuan a month. 
The salary represents about half of total 
compensation, with the rest made up of 
housing, food and benefits. 

Japanese businessmen said it was appro- 
priate to increase salaries, given the inflation 
rate, and most companies remained commit- 
led to plans to expand investment and pro- 
duction in Dalian, but executives said infla- 
tion was degrading the investment climate. 

“The sooner one gets here the better,” 
said Takeo Mmami, vice president of Dalian 
Sanyo Refrigeration Co_ which makes vac- 
sized air conditioners for office buildings 
and hotels. “It’s getting more difficult to 
find good workers, and prices for land and 
everything are being pushed up by infla- 
tion.” 

Japanese executives also said that ffl-de- 
fined labor laws were a major cause of the 
disputes and a source of corruption among 
government officials. 

The general manager of a major Japanese 
manufacturer here smd: “The major prob- 
lem is that while the basic laws concerning 
workers have been set, implementation is up 
to the judgment of regional authorities." 

“Our basic policy,” he added, “is not to 
get involved in bribing government officials, 
but it’s possible things like this might have 
i occurred.” 


• ifor' ’ * ;• i - • '/r - *- 





Mandela Sees 
'New Era’ as 
He Assumes 
Presidency 


Election by Parliament 
Completes Transition 
To Democratic Rule 


P f vli p pf Wopajr'&cuer* 

Nelson Mandela greeting Frederik W. de Klerk as the two headed into Parliament Monday for Mr. Mandela’s election as president 


Black Rule a Reality? Panic Among the Whites 


Reuter* 

JOHANNESBURG —Anxious whites are 
besieging South Africa's help lines in a post- 
election panic, counseling services say. 

They say telephones have rung nonstop ai 
crisis help centers around the country, days 
after the first all-race elections swept a black 
majority government to power. 

Despite repeated assurances by President- 
elect Nelson Mandela, some jittery Europe- 


ans a/e still worried about their future in the 
new South Africa. They are voicing distress, 
amid widespread acclaim at home and 
abroad for the end of white domination at tire 
southern tip of Africa. 

Help organizations like Lae Line and the 


Salvation Army say they are inundated with 
'ught 


calls from distraught whites, afraid of losing 
status as a privileged group. Counselors say 
fears of domination by the 5-to-J black ma- 


jority plague the insecurities of some whites. 
Some began buying before the elections. 

Affluent whites live in fortress-like homes, 
behind high voltage security fences, with bur-- 
glar alarms, barbed wire and ferocious dogs, 
to keep out intruders in a country where 
crime rates are among the highest in the 
world. “The walls that once were physical are 
now emotional," said Arlene Bernstein, clini- 
cal director of Lifeline. 


MoroixA> Ejrrierges as Barrier to Spreading Islamic Turmoil 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

MARRAKESH, Morocco — As its neighbor Algeria 
s&kstowaid chaos and civil war, Morocco is enraging as a 
vital bulwark against the spread of Islamic extremism in the 
Arab world, according to Western diplomats and senior 
officials. 


HOfflS. 

Despite Western qualms about past h uman -rights abuses 
under bis authoritarian regime, K&ig Hassan D of Morocco 

- r I.:. TUMI mmtnirmMl (n fin>Lirfflrtrf 


uuuw MMmv. ..... . P — B - J 

im« won praise for his new commitment to, tree-m ark et 
reforms, his support for the Middle East peace process and 


at least token gestures toward building more democratic 
institutions. 

His campaign to modernize his nation of 26 million 
people while retaining its Arab and Muslim identity has 
attracted interest as a development model for Third World 
oatioos straggling with the demands of exploding popula- 
tions, religious fundamentalists and unstable neighbors. 

Above ah, Morocco’s growing importance as a strategic 
partner for the United States and the European Union — in 
matters as diverse as drug trafficking, immigration and 
terrorism — is drawing the country out of its customary 


isolation by emphasizing its petition at the crossroads of 
Europe and Africa. 

“It’s no accident that this country was chosen as the place 
to sign history's most importan: agreement between rich and 
poor nations," said Andre Azouiay . the king s chief econom- 
ic adviser, referring to ibe conference here last month in 
whicb more than 120 nations signed a global trade treaty. 

“Morocco is the natural bridge between ;he Western and 
Islami c worlds,” he said, ‘a reution>nip that will be crucial 
in the years to come." 

With the governments of Egypt. Alamu and Tunisia 


facing political challenges from Islamic extremists, the Unit- 
ed States and its European allies are worried that fundamen- 
talism could sweep the Mediterranean coast and usher into 
power anti-Western regimes that would pose direct threats 
to the stability of southern Europe. 


i Algeria 

ter Edouard Bahadur of France has said, the risk of an 
Islamic takeover there — and the danger of a destabilizing 
domino effect across North Africa — has become his coun- 


Conyuled by Our Staff From Diapaicha 

CAPE TOWN — Nelson Mandela was elect- 
ed South Africa’s first black president Monday 
and emerged triumphantly from the former 
halls of white rule to dedare: “Today we are 
entering a new era for our country." 

On a day that completed the transition to 
democracy, the country s first multiracial Par- 
liament named Mr. Mandela to the presidency. 
He was unopposed. 

Speaking later to tens of thousands of cheer- 
ing supporters from the balcony of City Hall, 
Mr. Mandela said that “the South Africa we 
have struggled for” and in which all people 
“regard themselves as citizens of one nation” 
was at hand. 

Mr. Mandela raised his arms in triumph and 
delivered his first presidential address from the 
same balcony on which he spoke Feb. 1 1, 1990, 
the day be was released after 27 years in prison. 

Many in the crowd bad tears in their eyes as 
the sounds of “God Bless Africa," long consid- 
ered the anthem of the African National Con- 
gress, filled the air. 

In his speech, Mr. Mandela recounted the 
country’s tortured history, from the landing of 
white settlers in 1652 through the violence of 
the 1980s and '90s. 

"Perhaps it was history that ordained that it 
be here, at the Cape of Good Hope, that we 
should lay the foundation stone of oar new 
nation," he said. “It was here at this cape, over 
three centuries ago, that there began the fateful 
convergence of the peoples of Africa. Europe 
and Asia on these shores." 

Lifting his eyes to the horizon in Table Bay, 
in which lies Robben Island, the former politi- 
cal penal colony where he spent 18 of his 27 
years for fighting apartheid, Mr. Mandela 
promised change 

“You have mandated us to change South 
Africa from a country in which the majority 
lived with little hope, to one in which they can 
live and work with dignity, with a sense of self- 
esteem and confidence in the future,” he said. 

But he also warned, “The task at band will 
not be easy." 

On Tuesday, Mr. Mandela will be inaugurat- 
ed formally as the country’s first black head of 
state before scores of world leaders in Pretoria. 

The AN C won more than 62 percent of the 
vote in the national election last month. Mr. 
Mandela was the only nominee to succeed Pres- 
ident Frederik W. de Klerk, with whom he 
shared the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize for negotiat- 
ing the end of apartheid. 

“I accordingly declare Mr. Nelson Rohlihlala 
Mandela duly elected as the president of the 
Republic of South Africa.” Chief Justice Mi- 
chad Corbett announced after the Parliament 
made its choice. 

The members of the new 400-seat National 
Assembly dominated by the ANC then ap- 


See MOROCCO, Page 4 


See MANDELA, Page 4 




titr* 


*cf32i^y^ * 

= i o > A,r 




SR? 1 




Kiosk 


Clinton and Hata 


Want Moire Talks 

WASHINGTON (Reuters). — President 
Bffl Omion and Prime Minister isutomu 

work talks on trade soon. . 

A statement released by the While House 
after the two leaders spoke by tdeptoiesaid, 
-They expressed the hope that a 

found feroeogaging^ m the frtmwwMk talks 

before the G-7 summit m l# 
ti— ri.iMHir and the tdcpuor 


icsssaw— >* 

cd about 10 minutes. 


t io mmwes. . .. 

had a good conversation about bi- 

asficssffisaget 

^fcfSwS* ta&son St broke off in. 

5 s^tduttrial conttris 

EZifES* Vwtd sunt. 

— : " page 7. 

Book page 7. 

Chess page 20. 

Crosw&d 





w?*r- • 

• ... : 
. * *t • * A . y t , • 




v-:. 





n*.w DuLRvRculCTJ 


TBQE GOOD OLD DAYS —A World War II sailor puffing away Monday during celebrations in Moscow among Russian veterans 
of tbe victory over Germany 49 years ago. President YeMn said joint (J.S.-Russian maneuvers would be held in July. Page 1 


Crisis? Sea of Fire? Here? 
South Korea Shrugs It Off 


By Andrew Pollack 

He w York Times Service 

SEOUL — Signs everywhere in this city 
proclaim that 1994 is “Visit Korea Year." Nev- 
er mind that a North Korean official declared 
in March that Seoul might be turned into a “sea 
of fire." 

Even as the nuclear standoff with North 
Korea approaches its next showdown, people in 
Seoul are enjoying the warm spring weather 
and a reinvigorated economy. Many South Ko- 
reans say they do not believe that a war will 
come or that North Korea would ever use an 
atomic bomb, if it has one. 


“People talk about it so I guess it’s a danger- 
ous situation, but 1 really don’t “ 


fed it," said 
Bang Young Gyu, 24, in Yongsan Family Park 
the other day. 

Every few minutes, a military helicopter 
roared over the park, swooping in for a landing 
at the U.S. military base just beyond a wall. But 
Mr. Bang and hundreds of others proceeded 
with their picnics and dodge ball despite the 

deafening noise. 

In years past, people here say, erven a hist of. 
war sent consumers rushing to stock up on 
dried noodles. But this year, noodle sales did 
not shoot up even after the “sea of fire" com- 
ment when North Korean officials walked out 
of talks with South Korean representatives at 


Panmunjam, threatening war if Washington 
and Seoul mounted a pressure campaign. 

Young people seem especially oblivious to 
the situation. Bae Soon Hoorn, an electronics 
executive, said his 16-year-old daughter’s high 
school English teacher had asked the class what 
tbe initials NPT stood for. Tbe teacher was 
shocked when not a single student could identi- 
fy the nonproliferation treaty, which North 
Korea is suqiected of violating with a nuclear 
weapons development program. 

After being lectured about tbeir ignorance, 
the students countered by stomping the teacher 
with some initials more important to them — 
KFC, for Kentucky Fried Chicken. 

A senior official says the government has’ 
been (tying to avoid alarming the public to 
prevent panic and the h oarding of food. 

The government also does not want to scare 
away foreign investors or visitors as il pushes a 
campaign for tourism or to dampen celebra- 
tions marking the 600th anniversary of Seoul’s 
designation as the nation's capital. 

So far. South Korea seems to be surviving the 
scare. Some people have canceled their visits, a 
government spokesman said, but the impact on 
the tourism industry has not been devastating. 

The stock market weakened earlier tins year 
as foreign investors stayed sway, but it has 


See KOREA, Page 4 


-■ 2° 


'*****’-■ -■ 









‘Multiple Personality* Defendants Exponential Problem in the U.S . 


By Janny Scott 

Nr* York Tbnes Semce 

■ N£W YORK. — The unmapped territory into which 
MvcbiattY can lead American courts became apparent earii- 
Lf this year when a man ofl trial for rape in Arizona took the 
SSaand in nsk&VpWfc sweater, high beds and press- 

on nails. 


ion. 


the 


. wypIOI W11 M I HI*." B— 

2T»he defense called each one as a witness, 
lesbian prostitnw in the powder-pink sweater. 

^stasstssHoWs g 

earlier; a witness m a WIseoosm trial had 

tai«i on tibe posonafify of a dog. 

courts doiA know what to do with it," Dr. George B. 

Greavs.adimca] andforeasicpsycholo^st in Atlanta, said 
Jrftbe ffiagposis d nraltipb^eracmality disorder. ‘The fidd 

right now 


As the diagnosis has become popular among some psychi- 
atrists and therapists, it has emerged as a wild card ir> court 
proceedings and poses several curious Legal puzzles: 

Is a defendant with multiple personalities sane or inwne 
in the ercs of the law? 

Whatu me of his personalities meets the state's definition 
of insanity, but tbe rest do not? 

If a witness or a defendant is found to have multiple 
personalities, which personalities should testify? Should 
each be sworn in separately, or does that lend credence i" 
outdated stereotypes about the disorder? 

Precisely how many cases have occurred is not kn<?ur. 
since on ty appellate court rulings are published. But the 
number of appellate cases alone in which the disorder pla> v 
a partis steadily growing. 

John Fany of the American Bar AMociafion, who edit*, a 
journal an mental and physical disability law, figures there 
arc now six to right major’published cases a year — up f mm 
none or one just five years ago. 


One reason is simply that the diagnosis is more common. 
The disorder had been recognized for centuries, but it 
disappeared from the psychiatric literature in the early 20th 
century, resurfacing after 1970. 

The condition is seen as a response to childhood abuse. 
The victim s memory, identify and consciousness become 
fragmented. Separate personalities seem to spring up, creat- 
ing distance from the events. 

The disorder is distinct from schizophrenia, which can 
involve hallucinations and delusions but also severely dis- 
rupts J person's ability to think dearly and conduct every- 
day life. 

Some psychiatrists say multiple-personality disorders are 
relatively widespread, affecting as many as 5 percent of all 
m.'Umtionalized psychiatric patients. They say tbe condition 
has been ignored or misdiagnosed. 

Others insist that il is extremely rare. But because the 
di.dfn.ws is in vogue, they say, doctors are inadvertently 


creating cases by asking leading questions of patients who 
are highly suggestible and eager to please. 

A handful of critics wonder whether it exists at alL 
“This kind of thmlting about the powers of the mind is 
either the greatest discovioy of the 20lb century in psydiolo- 
gy and it's going to change all of our views erf the law and 
accountability, or it's a mistake," said Dr. Paul R. McHugh. 

mJt a* I -l H.J- 1 n , . ■ 


head of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medical School 
e. Dr. McHug! 


Baltimore. Dr. McHugh says he suspects it is a mistake. 

Many say the truth lies somewhere between, that the 
condition is real but has been both exaggerated and mini- 
mized. 

Alan Scheflin, a professor at Santa Clara University Law 
School in Santa Clara, California, said tbe battle “has turned 
into a n^thewy-wfll-eai-yom-theofy fight” 

And that fight is spillin g into the courts. 

Tt's the same kind of issue," said Dr. David Spiegel a 
professor of psychiauy at the Stanford University &booi 0 f 

See DISORDER, Page 4 


-age 


tllma 

■ecialbi 


makei 

hat w< 
' resti 


nd lac 
ften, 
ices. V 
ties- 
; of tty 
techtt 


bsstei^ 
they c, 
> such . 


have st 
st as t 
is far a; 
ai by c 
; Mfen 
auld dc 


i ck 


n the P 
iany oi 


col laps* 
In paid 
isveleft 


node of 
possible 
Palestii 
and Jeri 

now. 
re now 
offices 
obecoa 

. venting 


for 20 c 
>uL stun 
stgoaw 
Mr. An 
da’s inai 
aides. M 
rated ex 
fat's pai 
speaking 

3ud At 
: Comm 
B the |> 


was ' m 
at refusi 
ihraan? 
d aroun 
n mimsi 
letafls O 
iorehani 

io sign, 

wore Lha 
this wa’ 


diet 


i Paget 

teal in 
rear. Co 
uan, Vi 
: massag 
ping am 
uresofl 
na, has 
eral law 
ices for 
assays, 

iways in 

ion, tbe 

uch repr 
Ttnagaz 
that I 
at issue 
, with ai 
Mied to 
and ana 


it coadei 
ng budg 
ies.Thei 
eareadv 
by the in' 
Inch Nal 
ties, a ip 
aocoCo 
rth. Mr. 
us, whic 
and they 
)ttild up. 
:t I sold 3 
nsoftho 
es," Mr. 
K, I sold 
ally used 
could ha 
■s of sn« 
■ket out i 


geR 


: n appr< 


responsl 
ange pol 
view on 1 
counteru 
i States! 
slsfor tbe 
eves in . 
V illiam l 
the Fedi 
w York, 
lay. “Yo 
loatinge 
utgerate 
s said 
that the ' 
a floor u 


it 

ifdi 

SS! 

d. That c 
tock an 
tiuing d 
held by 












Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBLISE, TUESDAY, MAY 10 . 1994 


Big Guns 
In Zone, 
UN Says 

Serbian Defiance 

Of NATO Alleged 

By John Pomfret 

Washington Past Service 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia-Herzegovi- 
na — The commander of United 
Nations forces in Gorazde said 
Monday that he was convinced that 
Serbian forces, in defiance of a 
NATO ultimatum, were keeping 
heavy weapons within a 12-mile 
exclusion zone around the besieged 
Muslim enclave. 

The UN commander. Lieutenant 
Colonel David Santa-Olalla of the 
British Army, said Serbian refusal 
to allow unarmed UN military ob- 
servers to patrol in the area, anoth- 
er violation of the NATO order, 
and the discovery over the weekend 
of two Serbian big guns inside the 
exclusion zone, had Ted him to con- 
clude that "there continue to be 
Serb heavy weapons” within the 
zone. 

UN officials also asserted that 
100 to ISO Serbian policemen de- 
ployed inside a smaller 1.9-mile in* 
fanny exclusion zone around Gor- 
azde were actually soldiers and 
therefore violated another aspect oT 
the NATO ultimatum banning 
ground troops. 

“They are not policemen,” said a 
French -Navy commander. Eric 
Chaperon, a spokesman for the UN 
Protection Force in Bosnia. 

Thestatements illustrated theso- 
far unbridgeable gap between the 
letter of the NATO ultimatum on 
April 22 threatening air strikes and 
Un efforts to cany it out. 

While LIN officials say air strikes 
remain a possibility, all indications 
are that they are highly unlikely. In 
that case, it remains unclear bow 
the United Nations will cajole the 
Serbs into compliance. Bosnia's 
mostly Muslim government has re- 
fused to restart the peace process 
until Serbian forces fully observe 
the terms of the NATO order. 

Since the ultimatum was issued, 
the United Nations has gone to 
extremes to avoid a clash with the 
Serbs around Gorazde, abutting an 
important Serbian supply route 
into southern Bosnia. 

Last week, for example, Yasushi 
Akashi, the special envoy of Secre- 
tary General Butros Butros Ghali. 
strode a deal with the Serbs that, 
UN military officials said, adverse- 
ly modified the terms of the Gor- 
azde ultimatum and an earlier 
NATO order issued for Sarajevo. 

According to the Gorazde ulti- 
matum, UN troops and humanitar- 
ian convoys were supposed to have 
immediate and unimpeded access 
to the besieged Muslim pocket. In 
reality, however. Serbian forces in 
the Serb-controlled town of Roga- 
tica had been holding up a compa- 
ny of Colonel Sanla-OlaUa's men 
for weeks. 

So Mr. Akashi negotiated their 
release by letting the Serbs move 
between five and seven tanks south 
from around Sarajevo to the Serb- 
controOed town of Trnovo. Linder 
NATO’s Sarajevo ultima turn, is- 
sued Feb. 9, no Serbian heavy 
weapons should be moved from 
around a 12-mile zone encircling 
Bosnia's capital 

UN officials explained Mr. Aka- 
shi’s decision as a' “practical” 
move. But some critics within the 
United Nations say his actions hurt 
UN credibility. 



Northern Advance 
Seems to Bog Down 
tside Yemen Port 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Sandor Csintaian, 
rice president, Imre i 


AttiU (kpNsxtfc* 'Agmar Franct-Pirv 

die secretary of die Hungarian Socialist Party, leaning on the party's 
, while being congratulated Monday as the voting results came in. 


Hungary Socialists Ahead in Vote 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

BUDAPEST — The Hungarian Socialist Party, 
after a resounding victory m the first round of 
parliamentary elections, began laying the ground- 
work on Monday for a possible coalition with 
liberal allies. 

But the party’s only likely ally, the Alliance of 
Free Democrats, vowed to tight on in the second 
round of runoff elections in three weeks. 

With more than 99 percent of the voles counted, 
the former Communists, renamed the Socialists, 
led with 33 percent. As the leading party, they will 
be asked to put together a coalition government 
and name a prime minister. 

Second were the liberal Free Democrats with 
almost 20 percent 

The center-right Hungarian Democratic Forum, 
the senior government coalition partner, was a 
poor third at 12 percent 


Voters cast ballots for individual candidates and 
party lists (o fill the National Assembly, but most 
of the races will not be decided until runoffs for 
those gamering at least IS percent of the vote are 
held May 29. 

Of the 176 seats allotted to individual candi- 
dates. Socialists had won two with more than half 
the vote and were leading for 160 others, meaning 
that 174 seats are to be voted in the runoff. The 
Free Democrats were leading i n 12 and the Forum 
in one. 

A ample majority is needed to win in the second 
round. 

Voters will have to decide on May 29 whether to 
keep voting for the Socialists, creating a mammoth 
Socialist faction in the parliament, or to back the 
Free Democrats to give the liberals leverage in a 
potential coalition. { Reuters . A P) 


By Nora Boustany 

Washington Past Service 

DJIBOUTI — Westerners arriv- 
ing from Aden on Monday said the 
city was calm as rival Yemeni ar- 
mies of the south and north traded 
volleys of communiques. 

Northern troops were reported 
to be advancing in a crescent from 
the west and meeting southern re- 
sistance on the eastern front. 

The pincer offensive seemed 
bogged down in difficult moun- 
tainous terrain east of the besieged 
port city commanding access to the 
Red Sec end the Bab al Mandeb 
Strait at its entrance, according to 
French naval officers monitoring 
coded radio communication off the 

C025L 

An attempted thrust by die north 
was repulsed, and Aden radio 
quoted the southern military com- 
mand as saying that its lighters bad 
retaken Zinjibar, 50 kilometers (30 
miles) to the east of the city. 

But in the Yemeni capital. San'a. 
the northern military command, 
led b> President Ali Abdullah Sa- 
leh, predicted Monday that Aden 
would fall within hours. 

In the first major estimate since 
Yemen's civil war erupted early last 
Thursday, the San‘a-based English 
language daily Yemen Times re- 
ported Sunday that 12.000 fighters 
had died cm both sides. 

Aden was reported calm Mon- 
day, though without electricity or 
water. Men in the streets paraded 
with Soviet-made AK47s, evacu- 
ees said. 

Westerners who left Aden said 
that they could definitely sense that 
war was under way. but that they 
did not feel threatened. Hundreds 
of Westerners have been evacuated. 

Thousands of civilians in Aden 
volunteered under a general mobi- 
lization order issued Saturday to 


gather reinforcement troops in the 
Lahe) area north of Aden. 

At the same time, President Sa- 
leh urged southerners to desert and 
join forces with his troops before 
the fall of Aden. 

Bui the major ground battle did 
not appear to have begun. Military 
experts said that so far, (he fighting 
primarily consisted of air bailies 
and that, despite claims to the con- 
trary, the southern Soviet-equipped 
navy had not yet entered the war. 

“We cannot see anything from 
the shore, but we can hear,” said 
Lieutenant Colonel Daoiele Voiiot 
or the French Navy. “The horrible 
part wfll begin when there is street 
fighting in Aden.” 

The northern army has 36,000 
men and can call 10,000 reservists 
in action. Its southern adversary 
hopes to increase its ranks from 
23,000 to 45.000 with reservists and 
volunteers. 

Robert H. Pelietreau Jr„ the U.S. 
assistant secretary of state for Near 
Eastern affairs, said in the United 
.Arab Emirates that northern units 
had won some victories at the start 
of the fighting but that the south 
was putting up strong resistance. 

Independent verification of bat- 
tlefield cl aims was not immediately 
possible. 

The north pledged to battle on 
until Aden has fallen. A military 
communique read over San’a radio 
on Monday boasted that Aden 
would “fall within a few hours.” 

Foreign Minister Mohammed 
Salim Basindawh repeated his gov- 
ernment's opposition to outside 
mediation and said the north 
would Gghl until “the rebel group 
that has deviated from constitu- 
tional legitimacy” was crushed. 

Aden radio cited an unidentified 
Defense Ministry spokesman in 
Aden as denying reports that fierce 
battles were fought north of the 
city. 


Berlusconi Appears Ready to Present 
His Cabinet Selections on Tuesday 

ROME (AP) — Prime Minister-designate Silvio Berlusconi plan; to '>• ‘ 
present Ms cabinet selections Tuesday following two weeks of meetings > v ' 
and disputes on framing a government, an aide said Monday. ■ ^ 

This suggests that Mr. Berlusconi has decided on an in tenor minister ^ 

— the last major post still under consideration. • V ' 

Mr. Berlusconi plans to present the cabinet choices to President Oscar.V 
Luigi Scalfaro on Tuesday, according to a spokesman for Forza Itaha, ^ 

Mr. Bedusconfs group in the three-party coalition. The president most ' 
approve the cabinet selections. 

On Saturday a nationally famous prosecutor, Judge Antonio Di Pietro.*' - 
turned down an offer to bead the Interior Ministry. Mr, Berlusconfs ,--;/ : ' 
main election ally, Umberto Bosa of the Northern League, has dropped . ' 1 : ~- 
demands that the Interior Ministry go to a member of his party. ,:--v » 

Italy Seeks Arrest of Ex-Nazi Officer v : 

ROME (Reuters) — An Italian mSitaiy judge issued a warrant on 
Monday fra die arrest of a former German Nazi SS captain on suspicion 
of involvement in the killing of 335 Italians at the Anfeatme Caves v - 
outside Rome in 1944. y ■ 

The move wflT allow the Justice Ministry to begin extradition proceed- >r ; - 
ings against the former captain, Erich Pricbkc, 81, who has lived in . - ' . 
Argentina since he escaped from a British prison camp is Italy in 1948. ■ 

The Ardeatine Caves massacre was carried out by occupying German ’ 
forces in retaliation fora partisan bomb attack that killed 33 Nazi strain 
troopers. The victims included 75 Jews. Mr. Priebke acknowledged last -- ' 
week in an interview with the American television network ABC which. V’ ; 
traced him to the Argentine city of San Carlos de Barfloche, ihal be had ■; - ~ 
taken part in the killings. 

EU Defense Body Makes Offer to East 

LUXEMBOURG (AP) — The European Union's fledgling defense 
group on Monday offered dose and regular security consultations to ax if 
East European neighbors and the three Baltic republics. 

Foreign and defense ministers of the Western European Union, which 
comprises the 12 EU stales except Denmark and Ireland, offered “asso- 
date partner” status to Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, •' 
Bulgaria, Romania, Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania. This win enable these 
nine countries to attend die biweekly WEU ambassadors’ session at the V 
organization’s Brussels headquarters. 

As associate partners, the nine East European states get no security V," 
guarantees and cannot veto WEU decisions. But they will be able to raise 
their own security concerns and contribute troops to WEU missions. 

A Swiss Case of AIDS-Tainted Blood 

GENEVA (AFP) — A framer bead of the Swiss Red Cross’s central 
laboratory, Alfred Haesag, has been charged with causing grievous 
bodily harm by distributing blood contaminated by the AIDS virus, the 
Swiss news agency ATS reported. 

The agency, quoting Examining Magistrate Pierre Marquis, said Mr. 
Haessig, 73, him denied the accusations. 

Judicial investigations into the spread of AIDS-contaminated blood 
were begun two years ago. So far seven people, including five hemophili- 
acs, have filed complaints that they contracted the virus through tnmsfu- 
skms in 1985 and 1986. 



J* 

... j|' 

Vu* 

:v-V^ ■:* 
:',v- 

< . .- ’• WjI 

_ i v =. —-L- f 1 
T •.?. 

. . ?■':* 
• *■••*. 

_ 0> T.i ^ 

* a 

... . 


Yeltsin Confirms 
Joint U.S.-Russia 
Maneuvers in July 

Agenee Fnance-Presse 

MOSCOW — President Boris N. 
Yeltsin said Monday that be was 
maintaining joint Russian - A mm - 
can military maneuvers in July in 
Russia despite opposition by his 
parliament, the Interfax agency re- 
ported. 

Mr. Yeltsin said the maneuvers 
would “reinforce the spirit of 
friendly cooperation" between 
Russia and the United Slates. 

Mr. Yeltsin said in April that he 
was going to re-examine whether to 
go ahead! under pressure from the 
parliament. 

On Monday, he said he had de- 
rided to go ahead with the maneu- 
vers because the “spirit of partner- 
ship" was paramount on the 
international scene and because 
“Russia was trying to improve rela- 
tions with its framer enemies, espe- 
cially the United State." 

The lower bouse of parliament, 
the State Duma, which is largely 
conservative and hostile to Mr. 
Yeltsin’s reforms, has said it op- 
poses the maneuvers, which would 
mark the first time American sol- 
diers have been allowed to train on 
Russian soil 


Gaza’s Futile Day, Waiting for PLO Police 

TAIPEI (Reuters) — Taiwan's semiofficial news agency said M 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

RAFIAH. Gaza Strip — After a 
day of frustration and delay over 
the arrival of a Palestinian police 
force, Israel and Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization commanders 
agreed Monday night on a plan for 
bringing in the first policemen to 
the Gaza Strip. 

Brigadier General Yom Tov Sa- 
rnia announced the agreement, say- 
ing he expected the process of get- 
ting the Palestinians in and the 
Israelis withdrawn from Gaza and 
the West Bank town of Jericho 
would go quickly once it started. 

“The entire transfer of power to 
the Palestinians will be completed 
in a few days.” he said in a news 
conference with a PLO command- 
er, Major General Nasr Yousef. 


General Samia said the PLO po- 
licemen would arrive as early as 
Monday night, but other officials 
suggested Tuesday morning for the 
crossing. 

As darkness fell, a military 
spokesman. Captain Sharon 
Grinker, said at the crossing that 
the police had failed to arrive on 
the Egyptian side in time. 

The arrival of uniformed police- 
men would be the first step toward 
realization of the agreement last 
week to allow Palestinians to ron 
their own lives in the autonomy 
zones. And about 100 members of 
the fledgling force who live in Gaza 
eagerly donned their new blue uni- 
forms in anticipation. 

As about 10,000 Palestinians 
gathered in Rafiah to greet the ini- 


tial contingent of about 100 of their 
own policemen, some chanted 
“Hello and welcome,” but others 
hurled stones at Israeli paramili- 
tary troops. 

At least 23 Palestinians were 
wounded as Israeli policemen 
opened fire with rubber bullets in 
Rafiah and the nearby Deir al-Ba- 
iah and the Nusseirat refugee dis- 
trict — all on the read linking Gaza 
with the Egyptian border. 

Adrian Hamad, leader of the Pal- 
estinian Democratic Party, ex- 
pressed the frustration of people in 
the occupied territories as he wail- 
ed in Jericho for another group of 
policemen arriving from Jordan. 

“The police could be coming in 
an hour," he said. “They could be 


coming in two weeks. Nobody 
knows anything.” 

The first group of policemen was 
expected to take over an Israeli 
military base in Deir al-Balah. 

Palestinians initially posed fra 
pictures with Israeli soldiers out- 
side the base. But teenagers, mostly 
Islamic militants, started burling 
stones, and troops responded with 
rubber bullets, wounding five. 

(AP. AFP) 

■ Youth Killed by Settler ' 

A Jewish settler shot and killed a 
Palestinian youth who was throw- 
ing stones in the settlement of Neve 
Dekalim in the Gaza Strip on Mon- 
day. just as the strip was about to 
be handed to Palestinian control, 
Reuters reported from Jerusalem. 



use 


By Caiyle Murphy 

Washington Past Service 

CAIRO — Iraqi refugees, greet- 
ed as “welcome guests” by Saudi 
Arabia after the Gulf War in 1991, 
have been subjected to beatings, 
torture, collective punishment and 



rtf ■*■ 


. 




* 


VACHERON CONSTANTIN 

Geneva, since 1755 


,v.f 







Vsclwon ConsOnui. I rue das Mantas. Ch 1304 Cwftvc 


forced returns to Iraq, according to 
the human-rights organization Am- 
nesty International 

Based on interviews with more 
than 200 refugees, since resettled in 
other countries, the Amnesty re- 
port cites cases of individuals 
forced by Saudi guards to eat sand 
and drink urine. 

Others were reportedly given 
electrical shocks, beaten on the 
soles of their feet, rolled across the 
hot hood of a car while naked, 
dragged behind a vehicle and. in 
one case, sexually abused. In two 
cases cited, refugees died after ill- 
treatment. 

This abuse was reportedly in- 
flicted on people accused of criti- 
cizing Saudi administration of the 
camp, participating in hunger 
strikes against camp conditions, 
smuggling letters, being “trouble- 
makers” or “disobedient" to camp 
guards. 

“Far from being ‘welcome.’ the 
Iraqi refugees have been subjected 
to treatment unacceptable by any 
international standards for the 
treatment of refugees,” the .Amnes- 
ty report said. 

“It’s not true." a Saudi Informa- 
tion Ministry official. Shehab Jam- 
joun. said of the report. “Saudi 
Arabia is doing its best Besides, 
those people are human beings. We 
don’t torture anybody. 

“There is a school, a hospital” at 
the camp, be added, saying the Sau- 
di government “is spending so 
much money for the refugees." 

The Iraqis, who originally num- 
bered 32.000, include several thou- 
sand former Iraqi soldiers who sur- 


rendered to U.S--!ed allied forces 
during the Gulf War and declined 
to be repatriated. 

A larger number are civilians 
who fled to aided protection during 
the postwar Shiite insurrection in 
southern Iraq, and then were 
moved to Saudi custody when the 
allies went home. 

The refugees have decreased to 
about 23,000. A total of 6,288 were 
resettled in other countries, and 
2, 1 88 voluntarily went home, (he 
report said. Originally housed in 
two desert camps, they were later 
consolidated into one at Rafha, 
near the Iraqi border. 

In the most serious incident, 
camp inmates rioted to protest 
Saudi refusal to grant asylum to an 
Iraqi family fleeing Iraq in March 
1993, the report stated. Nine Iraqis 
were killed when Saudi soldiers al- 
legedly fired into the crowd. Four 
Saudis also died after being 
trapped inside a building set afire 
by the inmates. 

A Saudi military investigation 
reported that the Iraqis were killed 
when guards opened fire to clear a 
path to the burning building. But 
no independent inquiry was carried 
out, Amnesty said. 

The Saudi government has previ- 
ously underscored its assistance for 
the refugees, including the erection 
of temporary homes with running 
water and communal showers, a 
school, clinics, a technical college 
and mosques. It also initially gave 
each refugee a stipend of $60 a 
month. Bui this has been withheld 
since the March 1993 rioL Amnesty 
reported. 


Thailand’ ’sTum 
On Censorship 
Of 'Schindler’ 

The Associated Pros 

BANGKOK — Filmgoers 
in Thailand, which has a huge 
sex industry, may not have a 
chance to see “Schindler's 
List" because the Police Cen- 
sorship Board wants a brief 
seminude love scene cut 

Steven Spielberg's film 
about the Holocaust was sup- 
posed to have its premiere here 
last Saturday. But the censor- 
ship board interfered. The pre- 
mi ere was rescheduled for next 
Saturday while the distributor 
asked the board to reconsider. 

If the board does not yield, 
the film will not be shown in 
Thailand because Mr. Spiel- 
berg has insisted that it be 
shown in its entirety. 

The seminude scenes in 
“Schindler’s List” also caused 
censorship problems in other 
Asian countries. In the Philip- 
pines, it was screened in its 
entirety only after President 
Fidel V. Ramos interceded. 

In Malaysia, the film was 
first banned as “Zionist pro- 
paganda.” Later, the cabinet 
allowed it to be screened if 
seminude scenes were deleted. 

But in Los Angeles, Mr. 
Spielberg’s production com- 
pany said Monday that it was 
withdrawing its Huns from dis- 
tribution in Malaysia because 
of the government's insistence 
that the scenes be cut. 


TAIPEI (Reuters) — Taiwan's semiofficial news agency said Monday __ 

that a delegation visiting China to investigate the deaths of 24 Taiwan 
tonrists was prevented from seeing autopsy reports or interviewing four _ ... 
Chinese suspects. 

Chinese authorities rejected a demand to see autopsy r ep or t s and 
instead showed them slides and video tapes of the condition of ine bodies, ■" 
the Central News Agency said in a report from Hangzhou. The amhori- 
ties also denied the mission's request to interview the four men arrested 
and charged with involvement in the arson attack on a pleasure boat, 
which kOted die tourists and the eight mainland Chinese crew on Qiandao —/ 
l»lre in coastal Zhejiang province on March 31. 

China has said the three suspects and their accomplice were motivated - 
by robbery. But Taiwan has been skeptical after Taiwanese intelligence • ■' 
reports suggested that renegade Chinese soldiers were involved in the • ' 
murder ano arson attack. Beying has denied this. - - - 

Filipinos Vote in Village Elections 

MANILA (AP) — Filipinos voted on Monday in elections to choose 7- . 
v illage leaders in the first gran-roots balloting under the presidency of '. 
Fidel V. Ramos. The Commission on Elections said the voting was 
generally peaceful, although at least 26 people have died in election- 
related violence since March. 

The presence of aimed men blocked voting in 133 villages in the .... 
southern Philippines. That brought to 274 the number of villages where 
voting was suspended. There also were complaints of people unable to 
find their names on voter lists and delays in the opening of precincts, the 
Commission on Elections said. 

Filipinos elected chairmen of their barangays, the nation’s basic geo- 
graphical and political unit, and members of their village councils. These 
officials formulate village-level policies, ini dale livelihood projects md 
settle community disputes. There are 41,900 barangays throughout the 
country. A total of 827,742 candidates sought posts. 

For the Record 

A strike called by Mus&ra imBtants in Kastratir caused the lndiaiH^ed 
region to grind to a halt on Monday, the day the state government made 
its annual move to the summer capital Srinagar. The Kashmir militants 
have been leading a four-year revolt against Indian rule in which »ore v 
than 16,000 people are estimated to have been killed. (Bedov -. 

TRAVEL UPDATE T 





^ Out Hesd 




Paris to Enjoy a Triumphal Eclipse 

PARIS (AFP) — A partial eclipse of the sun on Tuesday will prodnos ~. 

rare right in the French capital with a spectacular view through the Aim :- r . " ' 

Of Triumni. ’ 





degrees above the horizon, was 261 years ago, when the monument ow ; «i{ ,v 
not exist The next lime is due on May 1 1, 2078. _ . 

A toB system for cars uring Gcnnu motorways is bring consdef^by ( 

the govemmoiL, Transport Minister Mat thias Wissmann said oa Men- .< 
day. But he said any such plan was still years away. He acknowledged that - 
Both was considering a toll system using hi-tech electronic momU« w ,jk. 
keqp trade of the distances traveled by motorists and charge the® - ..’Hi Pm:*. 
accordingly. He said tests of recording devices had just begun and 1 1C 

continue through mid- 1995. (Beiders ) , 

The new Pegasus bridge over the canal at Benouville in Normandy, the ■ t ^ 

first site liberated during the D-Day invasion of World War Xr ?. .7:-. 

opened to traffic on Monday. The original bridge; seized by - \ - 

paratroops in the early hours of June 6, 1944, was disman tied y : ' 

November because it was worn out. (Arn ■ - .. 

British Airways wiD begin service to Ortv airport in Paris May 16 ; 

four daily flights from Heathrow in London. ’ V" : ”. j ’ ' « ; - 

A record 455,000 Japanese took advantage of the yen’s 
purchasing power and traveled abroad during the nation's 
Week” hofiaay, the Japan Travel Bureau estimated Monday. ' ■ ; 


"■‘i • XP& 
■ V-- 
■-F. 

I- ■! i-ropa 
' ' 

r ib 

Nk 

r. 




•jfea Eh 
~ss,.Vssw« 



To call from country to country, or back to the li.S., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're calling from. 


Anugiu 

cVttitahb In 'tn pi 

Argentina* 
AuMrii'CC * 
Bjhinuy.'.C- 
Bahrain 
Belgium' iX • 
Bermuda* 

Bolivia* 

Brazil 

Canada 

Cavman Islands 
Chile 1 - 

Columbia 1 O '. • 
Cosia Rica* 


blic phone* or.l-. > ;2 

#00-002 

owe. loot: 

lrO-X-23-iMtH 

OW-2122 

ow-rfoi: 

l-’jOo-eitW-Stt* 

l-SftSK-MOiV 

OOV-OMh 

yeO-Jb-iXlOl 

162 


Cyprus* 

Czech Republic* c: 
Denmark' 1 ' k • 

Dominican Republic 
Ecuador!* 

Eevpi-iX * 

(OuisxJe viTCj.ro dal 02 lirsl, 

El Salvador* 

Finland' <-0-« 

France'XC * 

Gambia* 

GcmumyX k • 

I Limited .v.Jiuriltr. in *\iq.*m 
GtwceO: • 

Grenada -F 


Uvi.i.OiXV'i'' 

CHM2-0O01I2 

*\n-on:2 


JSS-5770 

|v« 

U '*ut>.l02-A.i 
J'iT-iV-IW 
00 - 1 - ,h » 
OIVUHM. 1 
Ccni.im > 

vj-av-iiu 

i-i>iv.fi2*'-H':i 


Guatemala* 

Haiti" ' S* 
Honduras 

Hunearv, C* 

Iceland* 

Ireland".'.* 

ItracKi* 

Italy iV 1 * 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

• AkJlljlA- ll-HII ITi-'jl 

Liechtenstein 1 ‘.i *• 
Luxembourg 

Mexico A 
Monaa* ki- ■* 


|. -to 

OOi-SiXMH 123-1 
t>»l MHti-o7*»-rrtV 
nOV.tHM-OHU 

*«-oo: 

I •* hi. -15-1001 
177-100-2727 
172-11122 
AWr, 7-4-7000 

it ics ' orttbM I 

I‘if > -i 1 222 
OtWMU !2 
Vi-WM>-b7-1-7li00 
I JT-00 IM 


Ncthcrlandsicu* 
Netherlands AnlilleslCCM- 
tviciraptad-'.' 

IOiii.IiIi' i't Miaigui. dial II' 
Norn ay i CO •* 

Panama 

Mtliurj Bjs-y 

Paraguay-4- 

Ptru\Oui-.uk >j( Lima, dial I'W 
Pnlandir «. ■ 

Portugal' v-k.' 

Puenn Rian CO 
San MarincoX)* 

Slovak RrpuhllclCO 
South AfncnCO 


t*o-022-oi-;; 

0PI-aW*ttMi)22 

lirsi i 

800-10912 
ItW 
2810- KW 
ftffl-ii -m 

00 > -190 


lira ) 
OV-OI- 04 -SOO 222 
05 - 017-1 2?4 
L-rtO-868 fiOth) 
172-1022 
00 - 42-000112 
osoo-kW.no 1 1 


Spaln'CC*- 

St. Lucia 
Sweden '-C 1 * 

Switzeriand'kO* 

Trinidad it Tobago 
tSPECUL PHONES ONLY 
United KingdomtCC' 

Hi call the i: S using BT 

VkJlIlhrL’S using MERO.HY 
To cdll anj-niiere -at her dun the 
Uruguay 

U5. Virgin bfinds'LC 1 
Vatican City =00 
Veneairb+4 


9PP-v9-00H 

020*79>' } 22 

155-n2l2 


0800^9-0222 
owwwva: 

KKV1II+^ 


Lse lour MCI Card,* local telephone ord i.r cull collect.. al the same Ion rate*. 

4ft eSS L C ■ C. ,, .rJr.a.-k. > jrjr.* i. Jl-r.e tjjiIjHIc Mr,’ b j. jl^hlr id4ii.ii ill inwin.il.ol likil.w. Cenjui 

■ ** "***■ ■ ■ _ ^*r.Hi--r- 3—I-. -J- Gt.-oi J- Jil.i ,l i; . V kW l. , „ vifl j j u |„,m A V-j-GN. It—. L'PMEI. 

ao-M ■ -B, f-Hfc rhime^.inb Juir Jtre-.J- .T. , ji: ..■i -i rr „ . r hicnun-iul. -eunm-.ai- n.-an**. 

- •**." puNi. r*-. .nn liqwr. .kp...ii.it., l in -i fi-n. ,.nJU Jut i.au 


W0%fi)PH0NE Let It Take You Around the World. 


From MCI 


Vi. 

k. 


.tV 
L V- 


>•.. . . • 
.''.Ml -■ . • •• 


Impnme par Offprint. 73 rue de I 'Etvnptlc. "'SOI* Part*. 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 





o 






Page 3 


gratae*/* 


,t«o weeks gf^io 
®id Monda; 

** *"■*-** 


Aft er Voters Glare, Congress Pares Its Lifestyle 


jpoMOBB for p 0 _ yity WASHINGTON To ‘ J “ v,ce inhuman senator, kiisscu u . rangoia, Lremocrai oi wjs* unpleasant aimospnere was caiu 

fr& tiai The preyrT ^ drafts ai the House hanl the furoi over over- “nan, said last week in pressing the Senate to tighten- members to leave in frustration 

¥- :/">• ‘ Ql 0JBy cheap haircuts, free I°^T lawn takers to give up their atejdy strict legislation to restrict gifts to lawmakers. Asked if there is a backlash ag 


By Helen Dewar 
and Kevin Merida 
WASfflNGTON^rv^'^ 


POLITICAL NOTES 


“The American people are fed up with some of the ways of bashing but that they feared the political consequences of 
Washington, and it is time to set rather than react," a failin g to address the complaints behind it. Some said the 
freshman senator, Russell D. Fcingold, Democrat of Wjs- unpleasant atmosphere was causing some of Congress's best 

CATlSm tPIfi TaCt um#b in nnKeii^a ika Ia tiaKt*n • ia Imu* in ffllCfffltinA 


A Leftist Talk Radio Offensive Legal Fund for CDntons? 


I&risuy. Mr Bw'-VX 


&&P haircuts, free ™ £££ 1° up their, a^y ^ legislation to strict gifts to lawmakers. .Asked if there is a backlash against the Congress-bashing, 

a*™ rejection, ^assumptions ™epubhcis not gorng to be impressed by “a Senate that Representative William D. Ford, Democrat of Michigan, a 

straight, someS? to draw hues - gy® we cannot mist oureelves,’’ responded the reunng congressman since 1965 and chairman of the House Sa- 
its lifestyle. —on how far it will go tn altering Sena [ or Malcolm Wallop, Republican of Wyoming. Law- don and Labor Committee, said : “There's a backlash with 

Free parking pWc a, yws havelakenover the concept aTlif e in tneSame,*’ he me. I’ve decided to leave this place." 

hobnob with Jkk! ■ tewns events that enable lawmakers to of the House and Senate; struggling to find an elusive J 10 ? 50 ^ !0 r n m t ^ e .^ ena12, , 


‘2£*“ ^cer 

IMpuned j fta ^. 
ficSsS captain o- 
SS » tbe Aidceij;:^ 


Xw, A >b UMJUGU LV lU'W Utu j/ l flW V. 

Many, like Senator Carl M. Levin, Democrat of Michigan, 


sponsor of the lobbying legislation in the Senate, draw a 

distinction between substantive reform, such as overhaul of 
campaign finance laws and lobbying rules, and what they 
describe as lesser issues such as the parking spaces at 
National and Dulles airports. 

“A reasonable case can be made that parking helps us 
perform our dudes,” Mr. Levin said, meaning that this helps 
rush members from late votes on Capitol Hill to an airplane 
that will take them home to meet with constituents. 

“For me, the gifts don't help us perform our duties." he 
mid , “and 1 don’t think it's related to our performance of 
dudes to spend three days at a golf tournament.” 

Another freshman. Representative Peter G. Torkildsen, 
Republican of Massachusetts, who has followed through on 
campaign promises not to use free airport parking spaces, 
picture-framing privileges or mailing of newsletters, said: 
“At large, the public is still concerned that the Congress isn’t 

in «K«» ram* nwiUtv Qr nrnrlnnP A rrtnrii '4 ir " 


the trash bm. W last_mmule amendment saved them from 


jl^d«Sradit!c Sr . r 
jjjjjj-®** w*o hii jjJJ 4 

psaearapiG j :a ! .. .-«q 
Yptof ffcupvir'a 
failed 33 

MSKXt network ABC >■ 
^Bmloche.^^ 


oftcn bitwri * over wheih «- 
iSSS^JSSL SL** or not far enough - in 


w V far ““’s* - * 

vSuaUy 


&Xktfer to East 

•Ghana's fletelr> 


diffoencT „ ■ ™ ^ **?*** » reconcile sticky 

MSSSTO&JKSr 001 ■“»' * a - 


defined by 30-second television attack ads. 

What drives most of the votes on these issues is “fear of 
those 30-second ads," said Senator Christopher J. Dodd, 
Demo crat of Connecticut, who several years ago led the 

campaign to ban senators from tatting fees for speeches but 
is now opposing the lobbying gift ban. 

As it ranted out, “60 Minutes" and other television 
magazine shows were even more compelling when the Senate 
got down to voting on banning members from participating 
in corpora te- financed charity events. Whenever senators 
SMmed to waver on the issue, colleagues would remind them 
ra how often and vividly they had been featured on the 
shows, cavorting with lobbyists on the beaches, slopes and 
greens. Little more had to be said. _ 


In interviews over the past few days, many members /u large, uw puouc is sun vouremcj mai ■ 

indicated that they were getting fed up with Congress-, in the same reality as working America is. 


fcnurify consul- l: ; ■ r. - ^ 

Grass Roots of Democracy in Haiti: All but Dead 

Cask Republic. 5i;,r w 


tenia. This »ii; 
fgbtssadors" ***,«£! 


«aa:5tttesgr. r.o^ 
iut Aey will be a ?:- .. 
«wp* to WEL' 


ibled Blood 


:S»ris» Red Cr>..\ ;r ^ 
^4 with cau»:.-.; 
Hfdbytbc AiDa .' r ‘ * 


tffenc-Mi:.-. 


A£DS-cor : ... 

LfliCludir^ C : rrzrrj.. 
|*k«nWLV._" T-~ 


liwan Sav> 


«ew5 i« BA :i: v. 

B t Jsrdcath* ; ' 1- 7^ 

iptirUar atsr.- - 


i,m W-T ; ' c 
Aeecssdttyr-f. t ir*-e 

prlfBDfrhw-.. 
gtf<h fee 

88a^* ^ 

|0 i»Mec:r* v-\. 

If ijSw-arj-i :rt •=: 

ttMMltre -r. 


pcuon? 

UBCte a *.:Wi ■ 


MU Oi.: 

jjjetac cai - -~ 


t%* ■»--* •- -: r • 
liiK*rf jrr:-A 


K, t3w -i 


(K v - - - v 

Ranp?f*^' ! 


jrCTTC»Cvi . 

Nfjnw a ' 
*r Thr a. 




teiEclip^ 


lar nr» >" 


•ftes 'a 
PL 

•i®** 1 * 


M 


iwsfc 


• <r» 


H»«*' r - 




By Douglas Farah 

WaikiRpon Post Service 

. C30NAIVES, Haiti — The Hai- 
tian Army and its allies have dam- 
raged democratic institutions and 
igras-roots organizations that had 
begun to grow in Haiti to such an 
■oaent feat they will take years to 
rebuild eves if Haiti’s militar y 
leaders surrender power, according 
to diplomats and human-rights 
workers. 

In fee 32 months since a violent 
c oup r emoved the Reverend Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide as president, all 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


efforts to negotiate a settlement 
have failed. In October, the United 
Nations imposed an oil and arms 
embargo that has caused great suf- 

tiansbut has fitfledtoMffl^odJpfeB 
military. 

New United Nations sanctions 
adopted an Friday indude a com- 
mercial embargo excepting only 
food, medicine and propane gastor 
cooking. 

Diplomats, analysts and sup- 
porters of Father Aristide agree 
that Haiti's 31-armed and pcoriy 
trained 7,000-oum army would be 
easy to defeat in and around the 
capital But the sources said feat in 
does like tins, 100 miles northwest 
of the capital, and in countless 
hamlets and viflege*, flip political : 
structure ortdrbrB^>«effbyfhe < 
military audits affies wmfl<rbe<H- 
ficuH to root out evm if there were 
an invasion. 

And, the sources said, because 
the terror and deep roots of the 
military-backed structures, it 
would be even more difficult to 
rebuild the nascent grass-roots po- 
litical structures that began to 
flourish across tire country after fee 
end of the repressive DuvaHer die- 



^.■7 


tatoninp in 1986. . 

The atuation is further compli- 


cated because there are no func- 
tioning government institutions 
left on a national or local level 
besides the army. Ministries are 
empty. Acting Prime Minister 
Robert Malyal resigned in Decern-, 
her but continues to cany out some 
perfunctory duties because Father 
Aristide has refused to name a re- 
placement. 

- Francois (Papa. Doc) DuvaHex, 
who ruudfmm 1957 to 1971, main- 
tamed control with the Ton-tons 
Macontcs, a feared paramilitary qr- 
gamzaticn was run by a net- 
work of “section chiefs," each re- 
sponsible for a city, town or 

hmwlct- . 

The Macoutes were formally dis- 
bonded when Dr. Dovalier’s son 


and successor, Jean-Qaude, fled in 
1986. In their wake, scores of “pop- 
ular organizations" sprang up, or- 
ganizing people in religious groups. 
Bteracy classes, cooperatives and 
political activity. The organizations 
werckey in decting Father Aristide 
and were the drivmg force of the 
democratic process. 

Now many of the old Macon te 
leaden have regrouped, with the 
hdp of the oiuiaiy. fanning the 
Front for the Advancement and 
Progress erf Haiti. Its members are 
accused by international human- 
rights organizations of initiating a 
wave of political killings in recent 
months. 


Coalition for Haitian Refugees and 
Human Rights Watch-Americas is- 
sued last month said. “Terror, in- 
timidation and the nightmare of 
reborn Duvalierism have become 
the Haitian citizens’ daily reality." 

Haitians and foreigners ' who 
work outside the capital said that 
not only the pro-Aristide move- 
ment. bat even nonpolhical local or 
community organizations had been 
repressed. Thousands of communi- 
ty leaders have been driven into 
hiding, effectively decapitating vir- 
tually all local organizations. 


A joint report by the National 


“The forced displacement oi 
tens, if not hundreds of thousands 
of Haitians is pan of the military's 
strategy to destroy all forms of or- 


ganization or opposition," the hu- 
man-rights report said. 

The Reverend Antoine Adrien, 
one or Father Aristide's closest 
supporters in Haiti, estimated that 
300,000 people were in “internal 
exile," hiding out or fear of the 
military or the front 

Because of this, a Leader of a now 
clandestine pro-Aristide group 
said, the “Duvalierisi system wifi 
continue, with or without the re- 
turn of Aristide." 

“Even if you send Aristide back, 
it will be too late,” he said. “Those 
returning will control nothing. All 
the militants are in hiding and the 
popular organizations are disman- 
tled. Youdon’t rebuild those things 
overnight." 


U.s. Sounds Out Region on a Peace Force for Haiti 


CanpUtd by Our Swff from Di&otdta 

MEXICO CITY -- Secretary rf Sato 
Warren M. Chnswphec sad Monday that 
fee United States was talking with other 
governments in fee Western Hemisphere 
about setting up an international pcaccxeep- 

“linC&ipto, on m offipal 

Mexico, aid ftesdent JKD Oman h£ di- 


Morico, said ncsmnu mu 
Sdfee chief U.S. ddeate to tteUmted 
Nations, Madeleine KTAlbrigR wdote. 
— • — — ««« numH mt other countries m 


Nations, ftiaaeranc **• 
diplomats “to soim^t oste cotmtoesm 
fee hemisphere” on whether they w ould b e 
tu* t is. in a ocacekeepmg 


the hermsDncrc onwucuiw — . 

fee U A in a pca^e^g 

ESrow&A mflhary Wers were 


ReW Jan-Bcrmnd Am- 


tide, “and the restoration of democracy 
would be a peaceful and positive one." 

Mr. Christopher said that the situation in 
Haiti was growing steadily worse and feat 
Ml Clinton had not ruled out any options in 
trying to restore democracy there. 

The secretary said that fee Haitian mili- 
tary and fee police were committing “the 
most extreme human-rights violations in or- 
der to try to remain in control of fee conn- 
try.” „ . , 

In Washington, administration ornoats 
said Monday that fee new U.S. policy of 
giving refugees fleeing Haiti by boat an op- 
portunity to seek asylum at sea would not 
result in new waves of immigrants flooding 
Florida's shores. 

The policy, spelled out Sunday by Mr. 
Clinton, also indudes stepped up interna- 


tional sanctions against Haiti's military dic- 
tators and the appointment of former Repre- 
sentative William H. Gray 3d as special 
adviser on Haiti. 

Economic refugees will continue to be 
returned to Haiti, out changes must be made 
to protect “some who gen ninety fear for their 
lives,” Mr. Clinton said. 

The president issued an executive order on 
Monday putting tighter sanctions into effect 
and sent an official notification to Congress, 
restating U.S. determination “to end the as- 
sault an democracy and human dignity in 
Haiti.” 

Officials said that it might take a week or 
two to hammer out policy concerning refu- 
gee processing. 

The executive order bans arriving and de- 
parting flights and overflights stopping or 


originating in Haiti, except commercial pas- 
senger flights. 

It also blocks funds and financial re- 
sources of military officers and (hose 
who took part in the 1991 overthrow of the 
Aristide government. 

Mr. Clinton’s deputy national security ad- 
viser, Sandy Berger, said that he did not 
think that there would “be overwhelming 
numbers" of Haitians who would he granted 
asylum because most would nut be consid- 
ered to be political refugees deserving of 
asylum. 

Mr. Berger said that Mr. Gray, a former 
representative from Pennsylvania and the 
House majority whip, would be working wiih 
Other nations in the hemisphere to put pres- 
sure on the present Haitian dictatorship to 
leave. \Rcurerx AP> 


Away From politics 


cancer and emphysema has sued the tobacco in- 
dnstrv in aFtanda state court, churning that addio- 


__ ,,i execution early Tuesday of, 

t J^wn^Gacy wmvSed of more murders 


don to cigarettes has caused their health problems. 
Six plaintiffs are asking for $200 bOHon in dam- 
ages for themselves ana all other smokers affected 
in the same manner. 


TUFTS UNIVERSITY 


• Health insmnee benefits to the live-in partners 
of homosexual and other unmarried city employ- 
ees will no longer be provided by the rity of Austin, 
Texas. Voters repealed fee policy by nariy two to 

One. Reuiers, NYT 


is proud to congratulate 


JOSEPH NEUBAUER 
AN ALUMNUS AND TRUSTEE OF 
TUFTS UNIVERSITY 


Qeotse Peppard, Actor, Is Dead at 65 

^ .ti,* wtmffir amefiL- trirrvimrm He starred in the 1 


Rotten 

parf. aT fflm classic. 

gg wg-a aM 

MmA rtf onsuaoma 00 


• But amoog-ma younger gpiHa- 
ti«L Mr. FBW*W is b«t taown as 
Cn|ond John Haiuubal Smith, 
fearless leader of fee A-Team, a 
band of do-gpod roercenraes who 
wreaked more carnage m pnn»- 
tijjg than any wms during the 

« AflA« 


television. He starred in the NBC 
detective show “Banacek” from 
1972 to 1974 and fee medical dra- 
ma "Doctors’ Hospital” from 197S 
to 1976. 


on receiving the 

HORATIO ALGER AWARD 


was 65. 


ay sm^cr, 


He was ad- 


spjolong u> 
aovedacan- 
5 right htngi 


more than 

. 1 n 


Boro in Detroit the son of a. 

l?W tote; 

n/-tm£ teacher Lee Strasbo^. t 
“®,^5s film debut rn-Ihe 

c v!«Ooe M inl95 7 andthfiaap- 

Chop HUT in 1958 

1S *} **>■ 

at Trifan/s.- .plgymg 

ehannec^to sweepsa 
I9 7teTMr. ftPP*" 1 rtt ‘™ e4 t0 


NBC introduced “The A-Team” 
in 1983 and it quickly became the 
netwofs most popular series of 
fee season. It was stemmed by crit- 
ics and fee National Coalition on 
Tldevison Violeoce, however, for 
its display of mayhem. 

Still, the scries was a huge suc- 
cess wife viewers, and il stayed on 
the air until 1986 and remains pop- 


given to distinguished Americans who have 
overcome childhood difficulties to make outstanding 
contributions to their profession and community. 


on Friday, April 15, 1994 
in Washington. DC 


AUSTIN. Texas — Angry about crime? On 
America's talk-radio circuit, conservatives have 
solutions, and they don't take up a lot of air time, 
either. The death penalty. Cane them like they do 
in Singapore. One strike and you’re out. 

Liberals typically take more time to explain 
themselves, offering eight-point plans, and they 
sound more defensive. 


WASHINGTON — The White House is study- 
ing ways that President Bill Grnton can pay 
mounting legal fees, including raising money from 
private contributors, a senior official said Mon- 


Or so say many talk-show hosts and radio 
industry analysts, advancing just one of many 
theories to explain a striking fact: So far, rightist 
talk radio has proved far more popular than leftist 
talk radio. 


Enter Jim Hightower, the fiery, funny Texas 
populist, in what may well be the left's most 
determined counteroffensive. His three-hour, na- 


tionally syndicated program win be broadcast on 
Saturdays and Sundays beginning this week on 


TUFTS 


Among his other film credits are 
M How the West Was Won,” “The 
CaipetbaggOT,” "Operation Cross- 
bow,? “House of Cards,” 'Tbs Ex- 
ecutioner,” “Damnation Alley” 
and “five Days ' From Home,” 
which he also directed. 

He was married five tones, in- 
cluding two failed marriages to 
'Elizabeth Ashley, his co-star in 
*7teChrpetbaggas." 


100 stations across the nation. 

Mr. Hightower has been on the air for more 
than a year with two-minute commentaries in 
which he regularly takes after heartless Republi- 
cans and Fortune’ 500 “welfare kings." And now, 
many of his admirers axe already promoting him 
os the lefi-of-center alternative to Rush Um- 
baugh. 

Tve spent years trying to find the liberal or 
even populist yang to Limbaugh's yin." said Jon 
Simon, an Atlanta-based radio consultant who 
helped in getting the show on the air. He thinks he 
.has found it in Mr. Hightower, whose sharp wit 
earned him a reputation as one of the more enter- 
taining figures in American politics when he was 
agriculture commissioner of Tcxas in the 1980s. 

Mr. Hightower has said feat Ronald Reagan's 
idea of a good farm program was "Hee Haw" and 
that George Bush was “born on third base and 
decided that he hit a triple." 

And he even castigated moderate Democrats: 
"There ain't nothin' in the middle of fee road," he 
scoffed in his East Texas twang, “but yellow 
stripes and dead armadillos." 

But now Mr. Hightower, 51. whose program 
will be syndicated by the ABC Radio Networks, 
faces a steep challenge. So do many other left-of- 
ccnter hosts of talk shows, none of whom remotely 
approach the success of Mr. Limbaugh. who has 
an estimated 5 million listeners. ( NYT) 


Bruce Lindsey, a senior presidential adviser, 
said White House lawyers began discussing a legal 
defense fund after a former Arkansas state em- 
ployee filed a sexual harassment suit against Mr. 
Ginton on Friday. The suit, coupled with the 
special counsel Robert Fiske’s inquiry into Mr. 
Clinton's Whitewater land dealings, opens Presi- 
dent and Hillary Rodham Gimon to massive le^al 
bills. Some legal experts say the bills could easily 
exceed Si million. 

Mr. Lindsey said the White House bad deter- 
mined feat a sitting president could set up a legal 
defense fund but that fee White House would not 
be involved in raising the money. He also suggest- 
ed that the fund would be structured to hide fee 
contributors from fee Clintons. 

“I'm not sure if legally you have to do that, but 
clearly feat would be an option," he said. "They 
would not know who was contributing, so there's 
no way people could give in return for a favor." 

Another option under consideration is to nego- 
tiate a set legal fee, rather than pay hourly rates, 
Mr. Lindsey said. 

“There is simply an attempt to try to outline 
what the various options are that are available to a 
president for the payment of his legal fees," Mr. 
Lindsey said. He suggested that the review was 
being done without orders from the president. 

Paula Corbin Jones filed a federal civil suit last 
week alleging feat Mr. Gimon sexually harassed 
her in 1991, when he was governor, during a 
meeting in an Arkansas hotel room. Mr. Clinton, 
through his attorney, has denied that the incident 
occurred. (AP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Senator Bob Packwood, Republican of Oregon, 
who is facing sexual misconduct charges in the 
Senate, on Mr. Clinton's difficulties: “The tiring 
that intrigues me most is fee way fee women’s 
groups look for a way to absolutely excoriate me 
and look for some way to attempt to exonerate the 
president. I find that an intriguing double stan- 
dard." (NYT) 


Businessman to Run Panama 


Perez Wins in First Democratic Elections Since 1968 


• t Paud Mael/Tbc Aiwcuncd Prcw 

A member of a Haitian paramilitary group brandishing a machete after an armed sweep in reply to an attack on a military post 


By Howard W. French 

New York Tunes Service 

PANAMA CITY — A left-of- 
cemer businessman who remade 
the image of his party after its dis- 
grace under Manuel Antonio Nor-, 
icga has won Panama's first demo- 
cratic elections in more than a 
quarter of a century. 

The victor, Ernesto Perez BaXla- 
dares, 48, an American-educated 
banker and former government 
minister, overcame the stigma at- 
tached to Mr. Noriega by recalling 
the image of another former dicta- 
tor. General Omar Tonijos. 

With nearly 90 percent of fee 
vote counted Monday. Mr. Ptrez 
was leading wife more than 33 per- 


cent. toe independent Electoral 

Trihiirsl said Ilndw Panamanian 


Tribunal said. Under Panamanian 
law, an absolute majority is not 
required for victory; whoever gets 
the most votes wins. 

“The elections are over now; the 
campaign is over now," he said late 
Sunday, adding that he would seek 
to assure that Panama is "a free 
country, an independent country, a 
sovereign country." 

Mireya Moscosode Gruber, fee 
widow of fee former president, Ar- 
nolfo Arias de la Madrid, who was 
elected in fee last open election in 
1968 before being overthrown by 
fee military, was in second place 
wife 29 penrent. 

Placing a distant third with 17.5 
percent was Ruben Blades, a salsa 
singer and cinema actor. 

The election comes just five 
years after Mr. Noriega's ouster in 


a U.S. invasion and is a defeat for 
Panama's elite, which was handed 
power after fee invasion. 

Mr. Pfcrez has promised a grow- 
ing economy with mere jobs and a 
greater role in public life for Pana- 
ma's middle and lower classes. 

In helping to rebuild Mr. Norie- 
ga's political base, fee Revolution- 
ary Democratic Party, Mr. Pfcrez 
carefully distanced himself from 
the former dictator, recently caning 
him the worst leader since Pana- i 
ma’s independence from Colombia' 
in 1903. Mr. Noriega is serving a 
40-year prison sentence in Flonda 
for drug trafficking. 

Mr. Pirez achieved success by 
taking up the mantle of the late 
General Torrijos, the party's 
founder and a former military nil- ' 
er, who remains a national hem 

Among those voicing hope in 
Mr. Perez was Pedro Garda, a 38- 
year-dd voter. 

"There is' runaway unemploy- 
ment and runaway corruption here, 
and Toro is the only one who can 
stop that,'' Mr. Garaa said, refer- 


Southem Illinois, who came to 
Panama as an election observer. 
"Now it is the process that matters, 
because if the process works right, 
it gives results we can live with." 

With recent elections marred by 
-wholesale fraud or by bitter and 
tense campai g nin g , Sunday’s vote 
seemed remarkably settled. Pana- 
manians turned out in large num- 
bers and the process was reported 
orderly. 

Among 1,200 international and 
Panamanian observers was a team 
of about 30 led by former President 
Jimmy Carter. 



***** 


HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 


Since 1054 


ring to Mr. Pfcrez by his nickname. 
Bull ‘Toro bore no responsibility 


Bull- ‘Toro bore no responsibility 
for the Noriega era." 

After decades of deep involve- 
ment in Panamanian affairs, the 
United States seemed to have no 
clear favorite in fee vote. 

"For 150 years, for the United 
States, the result was more impor- 
tant than the process here," said 
Richard Millet, an expert in Pana- 
manian history at fee University of 


A PRIVILEGED PLACE! 
The only Grand Hotel 


located in U^heart of 
Geneva's business 
and shopping center. 
Air conditioned 


M.quatGenera*Gutai 
1211 Geneva 3 
TeJ.: (41-22) 311 13 44 
Telex 421550 - Fax: 311 1350 


Christum Lacroix, Fashion Designer 


People at the top read the Trib. 


Boston, Medford/Somerville. Grafton 
Massachusetts. USA 
Talloires. France 


No local bias. No national slant. No partisan viewpoint. 
S imply a balanced editing of the news 
for people *ith a stake in international affairs. 


Mr. Neubauer is Qiairman and CEO of ARA Serz\tei. Inc., the 
international diversified services company of Philadelphia, 
tennsulpauia. 


KtralbX&ibune 


WU TW Nn. ftrf, Ubm aarflb VmU^db Pm 


makei 
hat we 
f restif* 


nd lan* 

hen," u 
rices, u 


exes. 

lof ibj 
• techn’ 


bsistet\, 
thcyji, 
s such 


have sti 
ist as u 
is far a; 
sd by ta 
: Mfenc 
ould deg 


n fee PS 

nany oit 


collapse' 
Jnpaid ' 
lave left l 


nacleof 1 
possible, 1 
Pales tin* 
and lent 
now. 1 
rs now 
offices 
o become 
. venting 


for 20 or! 
lULsnum 
st go awa 
Mr. Aral 
da's inau 
aides. Mi 
in ted exe 
fat's paw 
speaking 
Dud Abt 
: Commit 
g fee pea 


was mo 
at refused 
basing’ 
d around 
n minister 

letails of 
forehand, 
to sign, J 
wore feat 
this way. 


tS: 

idieri 


iPage 1 

ical in N 
rear. Com 

tian. Vug 
: massage 
ping ana 1 
urcsofM; 
□a, has a 
eral law fi 
ices for cr 
ne says, “i 


Iways ina 
son, fee p 
rich rep res 
t magazin 
feat 10C 
ml issue i 
.wife an a 
luted to ni 
and areas 


it made its 
ng budget! 
jes. Theclt 
eareadver 
by tbeindu 
Inch Nails, 
Ues, a pro 
•acco Co. 
rth, Mr. Si 
■ns, which 
and they c 
mild up. 
ri I sold 36C 
ns of thous 
es.” Mr. S 
;s, I sold to: 
ally used as 
could have 
-s of sneakc 
ket out fee 


geRa 


n approp: 


responsible 

ange policy 
view on fee 


countering: 
1 States was 
ds for fee di 
eves in fio 
Villiam Me! 
the Federa 
w York, sa 
lay. “You 
bating exd 
rage rate uu 
s said T to 
that fee G- 
afloorimdi 


it osycholog 
ufd trigger* 
ss the board 
tL That cool 
took and 
duiag dolls 
held by ovi 





Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. MAY 10- 1994 


Millions for Anns, None for Food, and 



acked Angolans 




By John Damton 

,V«r York Timet Service 

HUAMBO. Angola — When the sun goes down, 
darkness descends and this city disappears into an eerie 
void. No one surs on the streets. There are no lights- no 
sounds, not even the barking of a dog. Darkened hulks or 
crumbling buildings lie silent under the stars. 

Huambo. Angola's second-largest city, is headquar- 
ters of the rebel movement that roams across two- thirds 
of the countryside. Like Luanda, the coastal capital heiu 
by the government, it is a place to measure the havoc and 
suffering wrought bv nearly two decades of civil war in 
this country in southwestern Africa. 

Huambo has no electricity and no running water. It 
has one shop, but the shelves are practically bare, selling 
only vegetable oil. sugar, and Tour types oF beer somehow 
ferried in from Namibia. 

In the Central Hospital, looted in the course of an 
excruciating 55-day siege by the rebels last year, patients 
lie on steel bed frames awaiting treatment by doctors 
who have almost no medicine to dispense. A single 
blanket is so hard to come by that it can cost 1.300 
i pounds of maize. 

( Were it not for lie almost daily flights of emergency 
food aid brought in by the UN World Food Program and 


the International Red Cross, at times reaching a mam- 
moth 900 metric urns a week. 400,000 people would face 
starvation within a week. 

Life is not much better in Luanda. It is estimated that 
2,000 children live on the streets. Many are war orphans. 
Others come from provincial capitals in the thick of the 
fightings tossed into the holds of cargo planes by desper- 
ate parents. Dressed in rags, they spend nights in the 
sandy strip along the bay and their days begging and 
foraging for food through mounds of garbage. 

Luanda's 2-5 million people also lack electricity. A 
month ago, the rebels severed a major power line from 
the Cam bam bo Dam, and now aging diesel turbines 
crank out just enough power to feed the central district 
with rotating blackouts. 

Angola's agony is one of Lbe longest-running wars in 
Africa, and the only re mainin g serious conflict in south- 
ern Africa, now that South Africa itself is embarking on 
multiracial rule. Like other conflicts in .Africa — notably 
the recent massacres in Rwanda — tribalism plays a role 
here. 

But it is much more complicated than lhaL The fact 
that Angola has so much potential wealth perversely 
allows the conflict to continue. The government has 


access to oil to buy us weapons, and the rebels smuggle 
out diamonds through Zaire. 

Hardship, like suffering, is being equalized as the war 
ages. Ever since independence from Portugal in Novem- 
ber 1975, government forces of the once-Marast Popu* 
lar Movement for the Liberation of Angola have been 
locked in a struggle for supremacy with the National 
Union for the Total Independence of Angola, known by 
its Portuguese acronym, UNTTA. The Popular Move- 
ment has the crowded coast, and UN IT A is strong in the 
central highlands. 

Now. the government of President Jose Eduardo dos 
Santos is exhausted corrupt and ideologically bankrupt. 
It is meekly subservient to World Bank dictates to try to 
strike up a pulse in the moribund economy. UNIT A is 
more disciplined but ruthless and in the thrall of its 
charismatic founder. Jonas S 2 vimbi. now beginning to 
show his age at 59. 

Both sides spend huge sums on arms. No one knows 
how many weapons UNITa is buying on the illegal 
market, but its main income, from diamonds mined in 
the Lunda Norte region, is thought to be over SI million 
a week. 

The government buys much of its military hardware 
from Brazil. One report done for the British-based 


Research Institute for the Study of Conflict and Terror- 
ism, said that in Sts 1993 budget, $475 milljon went for 
the military, $18 3 million for health and S12 million for 
education. 

After a peace accord was signed in Portugal in May 
1991, hope reigned that after some 30 years of conflict, 
beginning with the guerrilla bands that attacked the 
Portuguese colonialists, peace might finally come to one 
of the continent's richest countries. Angola is steeped in 
oik diamonds, minerals and coffee. 

But the hope was sbort-Gved. Before erections sched- 
uled for September 1992, tendons rose dangerously. The 
two sides traded accusations and threats. Voter registra- 
tion was chaotic. UN observers were short-staffed, ill- 
prepared, and short of money ($132 mill ton was set aade 
for the Angola operation compared with $2 billion for 
Cambodia). 

Demobilization of the two force was never accom- 
plished. UNITA scaled down the estimates of its force 
from 70,000 to 50,000 and let only a small proportion go. 
The 100,000 government troops and militia, underpaid 
and demoralized, scattered to the winds. But some were 
transferred into a paramilitary police unit, which UN- 
IT A saw as a threat. 

By the lime the results were announced on Oct 17. 


X-UL . KS.mAMM. /T.M 

ghrm^Mr. dos Santos* plurality btrt'requniagi^^ 
rouno\ it was almost a foregone condbabq 
Savimbi would reject them. His suppbrterif £ 
imbued with an almost mesrianic'schse that, bt g'dc*. 
fined to role the country. Within days, UNITA forces 
attacked the airport and mtum 
and killed in Luanda. T ; ' ■ 





n alia oAAua . fi r • ■ » wuu 

or organization, UNTTA qtticldy cn/oian njucfr .of ^ 
territory: By m^-1993, it h^ mcst'^tiiciaqorjs^ 
inrey, forcing government troops inter besiffied psmfa^ 



already hearily populated coas l Tto figjfangvnis more ■ 
ferocious than ever, and the toll on an odtaostfed^ard 
was greater. . •' •••■.■'-t -i.'.-yr'iri-lj' 

At the war’s height last year, UK officials ^ esfemted- 
that 1,000 people a day were dying from; Wto-iefe&fj; 
causes, mostly famine. In the wotsi-mt area,(a rm^ ^ ; 
provincial capital of Malanje^ where rehetworkoc^fo^f' 
children with limb s nothhicr thain: sticksr^ ^ildieii r ' 
perished every day in October, reiirf offices' •• 
No one knows tow many people have died since the? 
fighting began 19 years ago, tot figures up t©50Q,QQ0 ate- 
commonly died. The laying of 10 minion to 15 miffibn - 
mines has made farming hazardous and created ampu- 
tees estimated to total 70,000. .• 



\\ 0 ]t 


id 1* 1 f 




hi*H 


MANDELA; The President-Elect of South Africa Declares a r Neic Era' 


Continued from Page I 

plauded and shouted with joy. Im- 
mediately afterward, Mr. Mandela 
emerged on the steps outside Par- 
liament with Mr. de Klerk and the 
ANC national chairman, Thabo 
Mbeki, his two deputy presidents, 
to hear the two national anthems. 

From among the onlookers came 
choruses of “"We Have Overcome." 
Military officers gave Mr. Mandela 
his rust salute as president-elect. 

Mr. Mandela, 75. was serving a 
life term for sabotage against the 
white government when Mr. de 
Klerk freed him in 1990. The two 
began negotiating the reforms that 
led to the April 26-29 election, the 
first to indude the black majority. 

Mr. Mandela and Mr. de Klerk 
had walked in to the chamber to- 
gether on a red carpet to a standing 
ovation from the lawmakers, many 
of them former exiles and prisoners 
in the ANC struggle against apart- 
heid. 

The ANC leader sat in Mr. de 


Klerk's old seat, while the outgoing 
president sat on the opposition 
benches for the first time in his 22 
years in Parliament. 

In a show of reconciliation, Mr. 
Mandela and his main black rival. 
Chief Mangosulhu Buthdezi, the 
Zulu nationalist leader, embraced 
and shook hands in front of the 
speaker's podium. 

Mr. Mandela and other top 
ANC officials, induding his es- 
tranged wife. Winnie, then became 
the first members sworn in to the 
National Assembly. They were fol- 
lowed by the ranks of new lawmak- 
ers from all races. 

The ANC has 252 seals in the 
assembly. Mr. de Klerk’s National 
Party, which had governed since 
1948 and implemented apartheid's 
laws, won 82 seats, followed by 
Inkatha with 43. 

The other seals were divided 
among the white, pro-apartheid 
Freedom Front, the liberal Demo- 
cratic Party, the black militant 
Pan-Africanist Congress and the 


African Christian Democratic Par- 
iy- 

Tbe assembly chose Frene Gin- 
wala. a women's rights acuvisL and 
head of the ANCs research depart- 
ment, as speaker. 

Security was tight in central 
Cape Town in preparation for Mr. 
Mandeia’s speech. More than 1.000 
police and soldiers, bolstered by 
800 ANC marshals, were on patrol. 

A Xhosa tribal singer dressed in 
traditional beads and animal skins 
sat outside the Parliament building, 
bellowing incantations as the new 
lawmakers arrived and calling 
upon the spirits of deceased anti- 
apartheid activists. 

More than 150.000 people, in- 
duding scores of foreign digni- 
taries. are expected at the inaugura- 
tion Tuesday in Pretoria. Guests 
include Vice President A1 Gore. 
Hillary Rodham Clinton. Prince 
Philip of Britain and the Palestine 
Liberation Organization chairman. 
Yasser Arafat. 

The new government’s main task 


will be to write a permanent, post- 
apartheid constitution and try to 
make good on the ANCs campaign 
promises to provide housing, elec- 
tricity and jobs for millions of im- 
poverished blacks. 

Despite the ANCs majority, u 
could face some major resistance 
during constitutional debates from 
Inkatha and the Freedom From 
legislators, who say the constitu- 
tion does not guarantee provincial 
governments enough autonomy. 

Also Monday. Mr. de Klerk ap- 
pointed six members of his old cab- 
inet, including his veteran foreign 
affairs minister, R.F. Botha, to the 
cabinet of the new government of 
national unity. Mr. Botha was 
named minister of mineral and en- 
ergy affairs. 

Mr. de Klerk said the appoint- 
ments had been agreed in consulta- 
tion with Mr. Mandela. 

Chief Buthelezi's Inkatha Free- 
dom Party will appoint three minis- 
ters to the cabinet. fAP. Reuters) 




* > 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


i ii 


The overall standard of education in Finland 
is extremely high. We have one of the densest 
networks of higher education institutes in 
Europe. 

All of our 21 universities offer a number 
of study programs that can be taken entirely 
in English. You cun also choose one of the 
22 polytechnics. 

Why not get acquainted ! CIMO is your 
link to higher education in Finland. Get in 
touch with us! We'll be glad to send you 
further details about studying in Finland. 

Centre for Intcnuiioiiul Mobility CIMO 
P. O. fiiKt 343 

FIN - 00531 Helsinki ^ . 

Finland 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
UNIVERSlTYiGQLLEG% 

. Sc hwab is ch, jGn^nd ,/Gerrna ny„ v ~ 


Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) • Bachelor of Science (B.SJ 
Master of International Management (M.l.M.) 

Study Abroad 

Academic Year • Semester • Summer 

Academic Concentrations 

Business & Management • International Studies 
German & European Studies • American Studies 
Computer Studies 

Residential Campus 

Dormitories • Dining Facility • Student Center 





Mxvan Mw*mi/RcMm 


NEW CRISIS IN LEBANON — Prime Minister Rafik Hariri smiling at his Beirut viUa surrounded 
by supporters Monday as his struggle with President Bias Hrawi over a cabinet shuffle stepped up. 


DISORDER; 

Personalities 

•Continued from Page 1 

Medicine. “It’s either beim dis- 
missed as ridiculous tod idtiewat, 
or it*s being taken too seriously” 

Most commonly, the disorder 
comes op in an insanity defense. 
People accused of crimes ranging 
from henna possession to marda 
have said the crimes were comnm- 
ted behind their backs, so to spetf, 
by “alter personalities.” 

In such cases, the defease jasst 
convince the jury not only that ihe 
defendant really has the disanfe; 
but also that it robbed him or ba <rf 
the capacity to distinguish r$b 
from wrong. 

Experts, however, often disagree 
on both questions. They disagree 
on who has the disorder, and sac - 
say there is nothing inherent in lbe ' 
disorder that should leave suffer® 
unable to abide by the law. 

In a few cases, nevertheless, dt 
defense has worked. One of Ac 
first and most famous cases" vs. 
•bat of Billy Milligan, an Ohionm 
said to have 10 personalities, nho 
was found not guilty by reason of 
insanity in 1978 in the rapeof fair 
women. 

In the Arizona trial, the jurats 
may have concluded that Mr. Carl- 
son was faking The prosecutor]* . 
bded him “a tod Tootsie" and sug- 
gested that be had discovered Ik 
diagnosis in jail - 

In the 1992 murder trial of a 22- 
year-old Minneapolis man accused 
of murdering a young girl two a- 
pert witnesses raid the defendant, 
John Jolley, had the disorder. 

His lawyer wanted to argue tint 
even if Mr. Jolley knew right him 
wrong, he should not be held ite 
sponsible because he could -not 
control himself. Bat Minnesota hw 
does not allow a “diminished a 
parity” defense. 


-.v. feri 


i Disrupted 

rain Brandi 


•• * K# 

-• - 


- . -. *nr, 

■ \ -f_ 

•v.T,-.-p » 

*• -Ms? 

■ 

'■ V C. 

• -*■ 

. T- -A'r .ri, 
. •: •- .^> ? 
'• --.if-; 
y _yi*rx 'j 

- 

' ■ : *«S*-CV 

• ■■■■•%& :i 
- f*.;4 

■ - • i- $ 


! Emerging as a Vital Bulwark Against Islamic Extremism 


phone + 35S 0 ~~4? “f»T 
fax + 35S 0 7~4~ ~0o4 
e-mail: cimoinfo'.q op/i.F 


CIMO 


For addttionid Mori 

Admission* Office. Bax 32B 
Unhmrsfflttspafk 

73SZ5 Sc hwBba c h BntDnd. Germany 
Tot +48(7171)18070 
Fax: +48(7171)37525 


i. contact UMUC at 

Internatio na l Programs. Bo* 4A 
University Bfwl at AdetpM Road 
CoSage Park. MD 2C74C-1SM, USA 
TeT +1 (301)085-7442 
Fax +1 (301) 985-7678 


A Major American University v 
in the Heart of Europe ; 




iS| MATTLIDENS GYMNASIUM 

i* J coeducational Stvtdish-jpeaking Upptr Secondary Scool 

foundrd in 1937 ami lAc IB uxtia* in 1990. Si&aitd in Espoo, 
12 bn lvtir of Helsinki, MTfc some 400 students. 

• International Baccalaureate 
■ Finnish Matriculation Examination 

For further information contact: 

Mattlidcns gymnasium • MatlgSrdsv. 20 - 02230 ESPOO 
FINL AND - Tel: +358-0-8040 839 • Fas: +358-0-8040 842 


"I'U.M-'M 


SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

International School ofTourism and 
Hospitality Management 


Study for a rewarding career 

in TOURISM and HOSPITALITY 

★ Programs leading to Associate. Bachelor and 
Master's degrees in Hotel Management and 
International Hotel & Tourism Management. 

★ Diploma Program In Hotel Operational Management. 
"Ar Hotel Management Term Abroad Program. 

intensive academic and practical instruction with the 

unique opportunity, depending on program, of dividing 
studies between the European and Florida campuses, 
with English as tho language ot instruction. 


PARI S 

SUMMER PROGRAMS 1994 

May 24-Jone lOeJune 13 - July 2.2 
June 19-JttIy 9 • July 25-August 1 2 
More than 50 courses from the University's curriculum, 
offered for credit or non-crcdit. French language Immer- 
sion programs in Paris and Biarritz, Excursions to historic 
regions of France. 


Make this summer your time fir new beginnings. 

Send for our 1994 Summer Programs brochure: 

. The American Unrre rahy of Paris - Summer Programs 
34 avenue de Ncw-York - 75 1 16 Paris 
TeL; (1) 47 20 44 99 / Fax: (1) 47 20 45 64 


THE 


AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 


OF PARIS 


Continued from Page 1 
try's most critical foreign-policy 
problem. 

As Algeria's former colonial 
power and with up to 100.000 Alge- 
rians claiming rights to French citi- 
zenship. France fears being over- 
whelmed by a huge flow of political 
refugees from Algeria at a lime 
when tensions over high unemploy- 
ment and immigration threaten a 
social explosion in France. 

Already, 2,000 to 3.000 Algeri- 
ans are arriving in France monthly 
as they flee the violence between 
Islamic radicals and security forces 
that has cost at least 4.000 lives in 
the last two years. 

Unlike the French. American of- 
ficials are optimistic about Moroc- 
co’s chances of containing the kind 
of unrest inspired by social, reli- 
gious or anti-Western influence 
that has traumatized other coun- 
tries in North Africa. 

American officials say King 
Hasson's descent from the prophet 
Mohammed and the political legiti- 
macy of a dynasty going back more 
than three centuries cannot be 
matched by other Arab leaders. 

“It's amazing how comfortable 
Moroccans feel about their day-to- 
day lives when people next door in 
Algeria are getting decapitated for 
not wearing the veil." said the 
United States ambassador. Mare 
Ginsberg. “It would be a mistake to 
equate the two countries. But Mo- 
rocco has about 75 percent of its 
population under the age or 35. The 
country needs to find jobs Tor 
young people or they will become 
"fertile recruiting ground for Islamic 
radicals.’’ 


In the last decade. Morocco etn- Soros, a Hungarian- American bil- 
barked on Draconian economic re- lionaire, is pouring in. 


ros, a Hungarian- American bik rooco derives from its loyal feetyin 
naire, is pouring in. the past Morocco was the to 

While Still retaining do* tie. S&SSXSSSSSS 


forms that are bearing fmiL AT ^ ^ , Arab country to contribute tnj 

though unemployment remains w to the coahbon that drove hag 

dangerously high, the coimtty has Kuwait Ithas Uken thcWm 

whitfied down its debt, mflauon ^ jo end the Arab b^f 

has subsided and a new middle n . Jv 5 ,. . brae! and companies that do baa- 

class is emerging lo narrow the dis- w rh Spun^ud a ^ „,h .heTSis. Apart tom 

parity betwen rich and poor. A P Egypt, it has developedTdwl 

long, costly drought has finally ““ uiuiea states. rditionj mth Israel, incld*g 

ended and foreign investment, in- In part the new importance the trade, banking, telephone and 0 ! 

connections, of any Arab country. 


bund Dissiflpr^ 

$edin Shannhdk 


ended and foreign investment, in- In part, the new importance the 
chiding $40 million from George United States is attaching to Mo- 


KOREA: North 9 s Threats Not Jarring People in South 




■ -fi 


Coatfamed from Page 1 
largely recovered. Despite the out- 
ward calm in Seoul political and 
military leaders say die confronta- 
tion with North Korea could get 
worse. On Wednesday, President 
Kim Young Siam, in perhaps his 
strongest warning to date, said his 
government's patience with North 
Korea “has readied a limit,” 

He said North Korea risked 
“sdl-destruction" if it continued 
its efforts lo develop nuclear weap- 
ons. 

On Saturday, Lee Hong Koa 
South Korea's newly appointed 
minister in charge of North Korean 
issues, said action against North 
Korea by the UN Security Council 


Tensions have also been rising not be &Q bad if North Korea did 
because North Korea declared its have the bomb because South 1 Ko- 
in tend on to annul the armistice rea would inherit it after the in*- 
agreement that ended the Korean itable reunification. 

War in 1953 and replace it with a «... , ... __ jj. 

peace treaty that it would negotiate . jj * 1 ,, g-jn. 
directly «ith the United liates. brothw wto s vejy good at hgte 

Washington and Seoul oppose this 

idea. Manv of the motile in the part- 


“It’s son of tike having an oMff 
brother who’s vay good at fight* 
ing," he said. 


Many of the people in the paL 




luva- Many 01 tnc peupw ui u«. »— -» .. 

In wkai was viewed here as a which 9°“ ^ *** 5**2 

show of its con temp 1 for the armi- ma ^ n U.S. base H1 .® K ™v w , 
slice agreement. North Korea bla- ^PPy 10 have the American m>cp ^ 
lantly violated the pact last week around just in case, . 

by sending two platoons of heavily helicopters do intrude on kwt F’ 


armed soldiers into a border zone 
for a few hours. 

It also withdrew its representa- 
tive from a commission that over- 


Korea by the UN Security Council "7 ‘‘ u J n a CWUTU 2? pn 1031 oveT ~ 
would be “unavoidable" if the i ees ^e truce. These actions 
North Korean leadership failed to Mr- Kim lo order South 

cooperate with international in- K°o»n troops lo increase their in- 
spections of nuclear installations. 1 rh* Kvtmz Hm, - 

Mr. Lee said it was unclear ^ut details of the tactical back- student at KanEnam^oOege- 
whether North Korea had already 2" d " l [ or,h between North and ™rL“! 

staned to change the fuel in the ■* )uin were lost on many people at 
reactor at Yongbyon. 60 miles from *be park. 


But many college stofents wgW' 

ously oppose the presence ® \. 
troops, saying the United States b ^ 

contributing lo tensions. I h 

“I really do think that we and ibe 
North Koreans are the mb* pf w 0 ‘jvN 


• - 

-■ I; - -wwqs* 


Pyongyang, the North Korean cap- 
ital. 


A man who works for a heavy- 
machinery company said it might 


taiweanav* ^ 

opposition 
S 3 f 3 * ‘he Budget 

at the to* 



SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

■ International School of Tourism and 
Hospitality Management 
' OtplHTTH. 51-SS 'Waterloo Read LondonSEI SIX 
Tel: (071) 923 8484. Fax: (071) 620 1226. Telex: 8812435 SCQL G 


GREAT BRITAIN 


. Air . 

EntJi-'h SunuiKr §chwl 

HrttOrartal Summrr H.nuLsr ynrlak lnttfxogr C-’ii-vs 

o 

1 ! Inti *.-l -.!•• '.-f I." I* -i.ir > " [• * iVtlli^l I •!.. rflij vifmr.|.n 1 I»J ^ullxlr-. 
K inliti.l fi-fit )>• •: r. O ’. .11 - i!i*N,-i " ,. 411(1- * 11 ( 1.11 1 inj n ,t».(vi[ l.iutiii- 

SEND FOR FREE OUR VIDEO! 

The PnncipaL Thi- Bur«r>a> "tununwr Sa'hii-i, Suite ’■ 4 L'ml Ktwi, 
CHturil 0\2 KU. EntLinJ -TrlTj\:: 144* INiil TI2I4V 


GREAT BRITAIN 


^ LONDON SCHOOL 
OF ECONOMICS 
AND POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

2Bth Jun«/dttl August 1994 
The London School of 
Economics is offering a 
selection of Intensive, 
formally examined three- 
week summer courses In 
areas of 

international Studies, 
Criminology, Philosophy, 
&tvbonment. 
Management. 
Accounting ft Finance 
Suitable for students and 
those working jn private and 
public sectors, seeking to 
update or expend enisling 
expertise. 

Contact: Nicola Mecttn. LSE. 
Houghton Street. London 
WC2A 2AE. United Kingdom. 
Tel. Q7 1 955 7533 
Fax; 071 955 7675 


Ecolc Interrwtiarrate ctefrtneau 


3 mb* Fre'Kh ftwierMn pn»grcns m ijeautful 
coasaiEkcanv 

KvaotaF taw 4, My 23 ant tagsstia 

HQUESTAY. INTENSIVE COURSES. 
EXCURSIONS AND AIL MEALS INCLUDED 

- - — r i.lt.ni 

22300 Latvian - FRANCE 
S:|39K»1JS.72Fjn:(33)SSA1J&00 
Hi inwiBfawl anro mspn gppmji 
kteostd fie bpettrat r L»ni 


Don't 


miss our next 


WTERNAUftm 

BUSINESS 

EBicvno> 

oil May 24, 1994 

7d aihenisp nr for fiirlhir information . 1 

p/rtw owiod Brooke Plller in foii: 

Td.: (38-1) 46 37 93 83 
Fax; (33-1) 46 37 93 70 


AUSTRIA 

C r Jk?- ) 


\RI M lit ■> 1*1 / tin 

A CiiB.il W inter Hold 
in the Alpine SuinnuT 
\-»*5XnSi Oinsi.-ph 
Tirr-I. \us|nj 
Tel .J.M 5AJi.2t.ll 
Fat :«■>.*! MJh 3545 


ITALY 


raF^UCIUDIA 

Swimmini; Pnulv Tcnn& Cmjrr . 
GxJf. Eiemiif EiHcmuitmem 
Bcsuly & himcss Center 
.15031 AtunmTmre.llalv 
TcJ : I.W-SR 1 8^6*7101 * 
Fai-.(.*M<liJKto977>i 


FRANCE 



S» imttnnt! P.vi|.Rcaul» 4 Fiiikns Center 
Shojv.-Ko'jjoranr.Nighi Q„|, 

A«. t*Jul Srenjc. HI'Wii S| Trim^. hVanw 

Fat , «1l ,, »4 *'7411 52 

OlK t-l TVf trarflira J flrMirfi 


MALTA 


SF.LMUN PALACE HOTEL 

»-** M»l.T» 

Luxury uml HMnry 
Cirnitnnnl in Mnlia \ 
Mnsi Charminp Hotel 

Sclmun SPBI0, Malta 
Tel: l35ni 521 040 
Fa*;lJ5fciS:i 15V 


MONACO 

HOTEL LOEV/S 
MONTE-CARLO 

Ttte M '.«1 Up-Ti'-Daw Define Resort 
«n ihe Rtvicrj 

Great Rcsiaurann. En:vndinrocni 
and fiincH-. Fjcilinc. 

1 2. Avenue de-, .Snrlucucs 
18017 Mnme-C.irlrt. Mnn.nn 

Td : f?3>*t3 ■kif.^rei 
Fu:t33i43 30ii| 57 

SPAIN 


was visiting Yongsaa part. f I 
if North Korea had the mind-saw ^ -kjl 
start a nudear war, the < ■ 

would not be us but the An® - 

cans.” - 

— . - 


SWU'ZERLAN"^ 

fiot/daus wttit mm*. 
monr r/taM Measure / 


■mwm 

much 






4I-27MI 55 53 
3W2 Montana 


Fj* 


MONTEf AST Jl.LO 
1Ih<! Si Ci. -I f Re%vtt 
Like 3 PjIjic Wuhin u 
Rinuuk Ci"lf Oiurve 
ua-ai Fond. Sighh jnd Sfuuiv 

Carrctera de Aiw:i 
1 1400 Jew. Spain 
Tei ■ 1 34.50 j (5 12m 
Fax :i:-4.5d) IS 12 0*1 




Sheraion Voyage 
Arualya _ 

HOTEL 
The B«» Rerat ■ 
in Turkey 
UML YU BuJvan 
Amain (77050, ToAej 
Td : r 242 J 2432432 ’ 
Fix: 1242 1 2 432 M-2 _ 


Fj>. 

S whsr 

s 

' :■ 

' V»Tll ,'n. b . 
" ’ '• 

-v. ^ ^ ’ 

■ ■' 

- irKV 

• ' ; 




.;■■■■ '• MVtoShfi* 

Y .[ \ :v 

’ ■■ " T ‘n*--’ 4 ‘*. ' 

- - • T’. 4*3*5?*^ 




r:j‘ : -r ^ 

:k'/“ "V vto: 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 



‘age 

Page 5 l 


&- 


ItjjcscLsr- 3 
*«ppon~r ; ,\r- 


Or.< 


JJWHe fc; 35 i: 

" ■* *-■ - V.-s 


roattan- . 

‘wsnan’ir.uct .!*> 

tfcc nii ; 

• ’ 1 ‘ :c ' 3 - 1 
k Wlfcra:> I 

Xnrr 

.. .Jly a. ar.-J.'?? 

Bitfccf v T 
* nicks. 

ffcJutt-ccfrc ! 

AUts m> m ! 

lijHBffitoi: *i> 


! bun Pjy* | 

i^jrUs «£.- 
Ui wfecui^ 
MHAcn t* 

B 'Cwuncr’J 1 .. 
r-«ytia jjs 

of err- 

bftrtsn poues>:,-» 
■Mlho mm:.? 
Wlbr bacij ■: 
pjptfiOQ&kue 

i&tfco. ihs „•■ 

** the jury sc: - 

tyaf.aafl? hi- 

- 

i ms U> da-: -: 


^iaw.-cr. ■ 
/qpMdD'U : 
ylwtk dr*.-*: 
Mfc*a«hK; .- 

Upitbik k v 

l eases, z: 

WT-ittsa ’ f*r. .• 

» yM^-...:- 
tnit li* sc-:. 
i*d wot : 

*tt Ut !h. 


*•• n. 

’ N 



H e Extremi 


h*ft«S 

fc/Stoftv:. 

-a' 

iitJ*. ite? *. 
sr.< ■ 


si- *.-*> »■■ 

atfe#*. w- 
&***-■* :/ • 


* I/! >' 


£f ftrf *'> 
v ~ ■ 

*i «acr ( • 


leap rif 'ii-i • - 
*£■' '* i- - ‘ 


*<f vK:^- 
wm ** :: ; 

n u s 
*J***>‘* ' 

JWK-2- 


■Hy*-*' 

gk3ftt *?■■ 


v-- 


<$*r * 
Swrt* trf- 

i**r 


South Africa 




ssrS 





5&.i 


■-s*: 


- yyf . - 

0 ”/A ,w. 


By Bill Keller 

‘ v »' "York Times Senfce 
CAPE TOWN — A fiery -eyed union lead- 
wth a Trotsky beard. Jay Naidoo is the 
chief proponent of Nelson Mandela's plan to 
ease the misery of South Africa's blara ma- 
jority by transforming the apartheid bureau- 
cracy inio an engine of houses, jobs and 
decern schools. 

Derek Keys, a boardroom wizard who has 
spent the last two years as President Frederik 
W. de Klerk's finance minister, is the ranking 
apostle of low-spending business-friendly 
government. 

At a glance, the two men hardly seem 
meant for the same planet. But they will be 
sharing the new government’s trickiest as- 


that you're going to sacrifice fair pans of it. 
You can't do everything." 

The African National Congress is no long- 
er the collection of Marxists and economic 
populists, nationalizes and redisiribuiors 
that once terrified white business. 

Mr. Naidoo, who is to be minister without 
portfolio in charge of the reconstruction 
plan, speaks with apparent conviction about 
‘sustainable growth ’ and the "disincentive 


There is also a stress on restitution in the 


ill ma 
wei 


new government that does not sit easily with 
the capitalists Mr. Keys represents. 

In SouLb Africa, said a 


Iteilenbosch Uni- 
versity economist. Sample Terreblanche. 5 
°f the population, mostly white, 
owns 88 percent of the wealth. That ’is nearly 
double the concentration of weahh in the 10 
richest western countries. 

Mr. Naidoo rejects, for now. the proposal 

rr>A nr Kir n « « r • 


■ v ■>& K e 




■ilrZ 


, ^vv" 




' ^ ,rosffly nex ‘ to ***>&* "»e, Winnie, nt the sweari^S 

Mrs. Mandela's Unacknowledged Presence 

_ . The Associate,/ P— ,, 


next to him. cvcn 

tt S“ ffj 5 ® 1 to ,wen look her away sh 
Afrimn from the inner dr 


tion parties and others." U1 ‘ 0pposi ’ 

“Me separated in 1992, after Mrs. Man- 
dela was convicted on a charge of kidnapping and 
linked to an extramarital affSr 


* 








to** 1 '; 

■A"-*"' 

M 


tiS 




V. '• 

r;c- - . v 


Wcaiinp Ki i juuim. 

Mjnd^ d S,r tateS ESJ® ' S-SfltaSta M 

ognt Others in the first group to be sworn in ^ y ‘ daughters with Winnie — Zindzi and 

Zenam — will escort him. 


UN flights Disrupted 
By Shelling in Rwanda 

The bombardments conceoirat- 


Reuten 


KIGALI. Rwanda — Anillerv JJ^ lbar f 1 ? ,ent ? concemrat- 
and mortar bombardments han? Sw °° rcbd P 0 ®* 1 ? 05 m a valley on 
meredtheeaS^rfiS^ ^ e^tem outskirts of Kigali,^ 


on Monday, stopping UN flights. 

UN officers said shelling erupted 
along the eastern front lines as 
Rwanda Patriotic Front rebels re- 
sumed an offensive on government 
forces holed up at the airport 
“There i« shellino 


, Kigali, __ 
lace and Kanombe 
base for elite gov- 


camp, a fi 
eminent 
The tribal slaughter was un- 
Jeasbed by the death of President 
Juvenal Habyarimana of Rwanda, 
a Hutu, and President Cyprien 
Ntaryamira of Burundi in a rocket 



are 


estimated to have been wn«rf in 
massacres, mostly of Tutsis by 
Hutu troops and militiamm xhe 
Rwandan Patriotic Front is domi- 
nated by the minority Tutsi tribe. 

Rebels have advanced on Kiga- 
fi's Kanombe Airport since 


sion in Rwanda’s executive direc- 
tor, Abdul Kabia. “The situation is 
wry tense. It appears that even if 
tha* ever was any cease-fire, it is 
definitely not holding at all." 

He said that at least one shell 

slammed into the airport tarmac v aiUKC 

but that there were no casualties. A w “ n “^ a y* threatening to cut the 
Canadian transport plane canyuut with the outside world 

UN troops andjcnSS^w^s £j,!?L£X inc ^^ r ^ /orcc 
forced to retxun to Kenya's capital ™5?[ I 
N«mbi, without luHSg «t ]8|»li. KiSK^«™Sv ‘ 

Askcd wbetba MP™ ^osures 1 

UN^ismnce Mission and gov- were making the position of the 
have refused UN face unteuafiT Mr, Kabia 
to withdraw, ...- .. said:‘*We.<lon , t|riantogoyet." 


U.S.-Bound Dissident 


Arrested in Shanghai 


Reuters 


SHANGHAI — Shanghai police officers detained a member of 
the locally based Association fa Human Rights as he prepared to 
board a flight for the United States, and some of his colleagues have 
also been picked up, a dissident leader said Monday. 


Ling Muchen, an artist, was detained an Friday as he was 


preparing to board a U.5.-bound flight, said the dissident, Yang 
Zhou. 


A U.S. consular official in Shanghai confirmed that Mr. Ling had 
been given a U.S. study visa. . 

Sources who have beenin touch with Mr. Ling's family said he was 
stopped as he walked toward the border police at Shanghai’s interna- 
tional airport. 

Mr. Yang said that on Tuesday last week, the police picked up a 
local activist, Dai Xuezhong. Two days earlier, be said, they picked 
up Li Guotao, fbairman of the rights association, which is involved 
in a long battle to officially register. 

Mr. Yang said the fust dissident to be seized was Wang Fucben, 
whose detention along with a fellow activist Bao Ge, sparked a 
diplomatic dispute during the visit of Prime Minister Edouard 
Balladur of France. 

The detentions come at a sensitive tuns on the Chinese political 
psiLidar, when the police are looking out for any hint of dissident 
fifth annr 


anniversary, on June 4, of the Tiananmen 


activity before the 
Square crackdown. 

Ad diti onally, President Bill Clinton has until June 3 to decide 
whether Beijing has made sufficient progress on human rights to 
warrant renewal of its most-favored-nation trade status for another 
year. 


Hata Presses Opposition 
To Help Pass the Budget 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Tsu- 
lomu Hata pfcged IwJ 

S 5 SSSS.S* 

■gsSS’SiSnr 

JSTafter a iWay break,. Mr. 
S^told a former 
Joboni Takeshita, and othw ¥> 
ial Democratic t 

‘our basic pdhacs are very 


Ssrmw 
ys?-— ' e » OTi ** 

’«L 



any time to tipple the goveriunrat 
by callin g a no-confidence vote 
Mr. Haia took over as f ‘ 

minister from Morihiro Hosd 

on April 25 after a lengthy feud 
within the nme-monlh-old gown- 
ing coalition over policies and per- 
sonalities. • 

But hours after the legislature 
approvoTMr. Hata’s appointment, 

the Socialists abandoned the coali- 
tion, depriving thenewprime min- 
ister of his working majority. 

Now, two weeks after taking of- 
fice as Japan’s first minwity gov- 
ernment ante 1955, the Hata cabi- 
net is reding from the resignation 
of Justice Minister Shijzeto Net 
gano, who was forced out 


3 try and narrow 

0 SiiUMdbmWL, 
M either for 38 





«-=SS SS 





^ter he sought to whitewash one of 
the worst Japanese atrocities of 
World Warn. 

Mr. Nagano had said in an inter- 
view that Japan was not an aggres- 
^Mntbewff aid that the 1937 
Rape of Nanking, in which tens of 
ihousands of civilians were killed, 
was a historical fabrication. 

HJs departure appeared uftiikely 
to resolve the issue; Tie ;Iibe^ 
Democrats and the Socialists said. 
they would mw demand that Mr, 

Wcran and postwar smy chdi 

of staff ip the cabinet. : : 


signmem: to lift Se lives of the newlv en- They” have retained mT Kejs 
2J5S®? without bringing down But many wonder how lone the ANCs 

■ . n ew-found market faith — and the spirit of 

pr^Un a w l? 1 ? m * J ie consensus government — will survive when 

±e demands of buAiness and poor begin 
velopment program which Mr. Mandela to conflict. ^ 

sajra is bis minimum promise to the wor. “One doesn’t know what the reaction will 
The program, scaled down after wide con- be to failure," said Mr Keys" w^Tasked if 

^ 1 ^ ess l 5^ blish p i “|,| >ut he mists Mr. Mandela’^itbi^SiS ron- 
stiil ambitious, calls for building 1 million version. F 

M*. Naidoo, in turn, does not want the 
lh f ft ncxi de f 10ns ’ “ 1999, mid new government to be taken for African 
10 ye™ of frcc education for Reaganites. “To think that we are going to 

-nSftS - , ,u j r solve our problems in South AfriS on a 

tne men agreed, too. on the danger of 

bleeding the affluent whites who run the 
economy and of scaring away investors. 

But as they talked, it was possible to hear 
the first strains of a debate that may soon 
lest the unity of this unity government. 

. “I have no difficulty with the program 
insofar as it represents a direction," said Mr. 

Keys, whom Mr, Mandela has invited to slay 
on as finance minister. “The biggest thing 
that has to happen is that it still has to be 
fitted into what can be done. In the course of 


effect" of high taxes. He and other economic some of his allies were floating lastvearto 
ministers in the cabinet listen to an eclectic narrow the economic gulf by taxing the accu- 
c horns of advisers, but seem most influenced mulated assets of the rich, 
by market -oriented mentors here and in the . But Mr. Naidoo makes clear the limits of 
United States and Europe. They have signed sufferance of what he rails the “selfish- 
international trade and borrowing commit- ness " of the rich. 


“We don't have low wages to offer " Mr. 
Keys said. “The Congress of South African 
Trade Unions" -—which Mr. Naidoo has run 
sinra 1985 — "set its face against that. The 
market in Southern Africa is likely to grow 
slowly. You have to get investment up. That 
means you have to attract entrepreneurs. 
How do you attract entrepreneurs if you 
can’t offer them low wage costs? 


“I 


makei 
hat we 
f restitn 
ho 


nd lan 8 


Tien,' 


** uu 


nces, u^ ! 
lies." *>’ 


“You can devise government programs. 

for invest- 


ments that bind them to honor free markets. “The rich need to look at what is their - thedlsadva ?. 1 ,?8® d ma ,‘ 

They have retained Mr. Kevs. contribution unim* m i,. -*55 J° m y- ^us offering investors a skilled work 


he said. “We 
rath- 


contnbution going to be. ... 
would prefer to do things by agreement 
er than being prescriptive.” 

The economy the African National Con- 
gress inherits is just emerging from 20 years 
of decline, battered by sanctions, drought 
and recession. Productivity is low, invesi- 


incentives, to create conditions 

merit. But it all costs monev. in competition 
with your social policies. So' that's the nub of 
the difficulty." 

Mr. Naidoo said the main focus would be 
to educate and enrich the disadvantaged ma- 


s of ih.“ 
. technpk 


meat has been neglected, unemployment 
mainly among blacks — is over 40 percent. 


blacks — is over .. 

Government has been bloated and wasteful, 
and the cartel-dominated economy has lost 
the habit of competition. 

On the other hand, the country is devel- 

• , , * L ; — r — — - °P ed beyond any other in Africa, and its 

sustainable basis through economic popu- economic system is. as Mr. Kevs observes 

xw i fauy Ude ’’’ he ““*■ loa & M 0,d boots.” It has weathered the 

‘We have learned from the experiences of economic eouivaiem of the Biblical plagues, 
the rest of the world," be said. “But at the yet economic activity and confidence are 
same lime, there’s no way you are going to higher than before, 
nave economic growth here that continues to The problem, everyone agrees, is how to 
benefit just a stnaU minority of people." make the economy grow faster and create 


Unbridled free-market systems have jobs. Mr. Keys estimates that 4.5 permit 

- — _£ , . . r 7 — ~ "*.ww wiuuiuuta Luuiu uroauce 

;ih of the economy is needed to goods for sale to Europe and North America. 
, ilhout even reducing the Mr . 


failed under Reagan and Thatcher. A gov- 
ernment has got to intervene to create an 
environment where people's basic needs are 
met." 


annual growl 

stand in place, without even - reducing the 
unemployment rate. This year, growth is 
expected to be about 23 percent. 


force and a great market of new consumers. 

Mr. Naidoo insists the social programs 
outlined in the reconstruction manifesto can 
be squeezed from the existing budget 

Tne new government will gel some money, 
he said, from an “apartheid dividend" — 
sweamlining the redundant bureaucracies 
that served the different races under apart- 
had. Segregated school systems and housing 
programs will be consolidated. 

Military^ spending, he estimated, would be 
cut by a third over two years, and the defense 
s hospital system and youth training 
ability would be turned to civilian uses. 

Mr. Keys questions whether the savings 
will be as abundant as Mr. Mandela's advis- 
ors think. Pan of the bargain that brought 
the congress to power is a promise to protea 
the jobs of white civil servants and soldiers. 

Mi. Keys favors business incentives like 
tax-free, union-free “export processing 
zones where companies could produce 


bsisiet^nj 

lheyL e 
s such ,g 
m. 

have ste 
ist as ijer 
is far a? t 
;d by tie 
: Mfcne 
ould deg 


ick 


n the P 
oany otll 


Mr. Naidoo strongly disagrees, seeing 
such zones as sanctuaries for “fly-bv-niehl 
speculators." ' 


collapse wi 

Inpaid L 
lave left B 6 


AT 35,000ft 


AN EXTRA lOins 


CAN MAKE ALL 


THE DIFFERENCE. 



The rarefied levels of service and comfort aboard Japan Airlines have 
always made the miles fly by. 

Well, now we've made the business traveller's journey to Japan an even 
more relaxing affair. 

From and May we're increasing the space between seats in our Executive 
Class on our daily London and Paris flights* by no less than 10 inches. This gives 
you a fuB SO inches to stretch out in. 


Nor have we stopped there. Our seats now recline by a further 15’ to a 
laid-back 57.* You might say we’ve bent over backwards to ensure your comfort. 

V>u may also be pleased to leant that new members who join theJAL 
Mileage Bank Europe and who complete a return journey on First or Executive 
Class before June 30th 1994 will be entided to a free Economy Class return 


ticket. 


So we suggest you book now and avoid the crush. 


*FGghr 401, 405,406, 406 



A WORLD OF COMFORT 

tendon 071-408 1000 Paris ( 1 ) 443M5S8 Frankfurt 01 3W58 78 Copenhagen W 1 1 33 00 Amsterdam «0S 


Mmirld.(Ol) 542-1108 Athens 525 2075 Moscow 921-6648 


(020) 626 8541 Zurich (01> 211 1557 Geneva (022) 731-7160 


or 921-6448 Vienna 535-5128 Brussels (02) 640 8580 Nairobi 220591 or 221737 Cairo 574 7233 Tehran 


823086 


nacleof 16 
possible, 6 J 
Palestin 01 
and Jerk 31 
now. Q S 
rs now i ld 
offices 
obecom^l 
, venting CT 
ie, 

for 20 or* 
*uL sruiiflb* 
st go awa 1 !? 
Mr. Aral 1 
da's tnau; w 
aides. Mr 1 
rated exe> 
fat's paw5“ 
speaking — 
Dud Abb 
: Commit 
g the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
phrasing v 
d around 
n minister 
letaiis of 
forehand, 
to sign. A 
■wore that* 
this way.” 


fS: 

i diene 


i Page 1 


ical in No 
vrar.Comi 
lian, Virgil 
; massager 
ping and ti- 
mes of Myi 
oa, has a h 
eral law fir 
aces for crii 
ne says, “D 


Iways in ere 
ion, the pn 
rich rcpresc 
t magazine: 
that 100,1 
an issue w 
.with an ad 
luted to nei 
and areas m 


>t made its w 
ng budgets 
ies-lbeclos 
e are adverti 
by tbeindusi 
loch Nails, a 
ties, a prodi 
iacco Co. 
rth, Mr. Str 
-ns, which c 
and they co< 
)uild up. 

A 1 sold 360,( 
-ns of thousai 
es,” Mr. Str 
s, I sold tom 
ally used as c 
could have s< 
-s of sneaker 
ket out there 


ge Ral 


in appropru 


responsible 
ange policy, 
view on ti»d 


countering sp 
i States was t 
:ls for the doU 
eves in float! 
VOliamMcDt 
the Federal I 
jw York, said 
lay. “You ca 
I eating exchai 
inge rale taige 
s said Tuesc 
that the G-7 v 
a floor under 


■l psychologies 
uld trigger afr 
s$ the board, c 
d. That could i 
lock and bo 
doing doHar-i 
held by overs 



Page 6 


TUESDAY. MAY 10. 1994 


INTERNATIONAL 

PUBLISH tt» KITII THF. NKW MIRK 7IMK» 4ND THK WASH INI. TON POST 



Sribtmc 


Stiff Sanctions on Haiti 


The Clinton administration has finally ad- 
mitted that its Haiti policy is failing. President 
Bill Clinton announced on Sunday that Amer- 
ica would cease sending Haitian refugees 
home without a hearing. The administration's 
most visible symbol, the U.S. special envoy. 
Lawrence Pezzullo, has been replaced by Wil- 
liam Gray, president or the United Negro 
College Fund and former Democratic whip in 
the House. Mr. Clinton has refused to rule out 
the use of force to restore President Jean- 
Berliand Aristide. And the UN Security 
Council has passed a U.S. resolution mandat- 
ing suffer sanctions to back up the current 
embargo on oO and weapons. 

The president's increased resolve is wel- 
come. But it would be disturbing if the admin- 
istration's long and fruitless experiment with 
weak sanctions led to a premature military 
adventure in Haiti. 

Real sanctions have never been given a 
chance. The oil embargo has affected only 
Haiti's poor; gasoline has been abundantly 
available in Port-au-Prince for those who can 
pay. Visas to the United States have been 
revoked for the military rulers, but their rela- 
tives have still been able to travel freely. 

Before even thinkin g of military adven- 
tures, the administration needs to make life 
very uncomfortable for the Haitian elite. 
While pressing for suffer sanctions in the 
United Nations, it can unilaterally cut off all 
air traffic between the United States and 
Haiti, both commercial and private (the reso- 
lution approved in the United Na lions on 
Friday mandates a cutoff of noncommercial 
air traffic only), and eiimiiiate aD exemptions 
that have so far allowed some Haitian indus- 
tries to continue exporting to America. 


The administration can present three stark 
choices to the Dominican Republic, whose 
border with Haiti is the hemorrhage point for 
the oil embargo: Police the border efficiently, 
accept international help to police the border, 
or face a complete cutoff or all U.S. aid. 

Such a policy should be accompanied by a 
definite deadline for Haiti's military leaders. 
Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras and Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Joseph Michel Francois, to 
allow Father Aristide to return. 

Mr. CLinton's hand may be forced if he is 
un willing to take such action. Legislation now 
before Congress would mandate even more. It 
would cut off all commerce with Haiti except 
h umani tarian aid. ban ah air traffic and forbid 
the repatriation of refugees against their will. lt 
provides for sanctions against third countries 
violating these bans. It would require the Unit- 
ed States to take a leadership role in Lhe UN 
Security Council to have the same sanctions 
adopted by the international community, and 
calls for a multinational force to police the 
border with the Dominican Republic. 

Some members of Congress have commit- 
ted acts of civil disobedience, and the activist 
Randall Robinson staged a 27-day hunger 
strike to protest the administration's policy. 

The change in refugee policy is heartening. 
BuL in the long run, processing Haitians' 
claims may prove an arduous task and create 
even more pressure on the administration. In 
such an atmosphere, with emotions running 
high and with the White House beset bv 
political problems at home, talk of sending in 
troops could prove tempting. But Lhe presi- 
dent can best lead now by giving real sanc- 
tions a chance to work first 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Mexicans Need Disclosure 


Six weeks after the assassination of Luis 
Donaldo Colosio, Mexico is gripped by end- 
less theories of conspiracy. So far there is no 
solid evidence to support any of them, or any 
motive for the shooting. Since Mr. Colosio 
was the chosen candidate of the dominant 
Institutional Revolutionary Party, be was a 
very good bet to become Mexico’s next presi- 
dent The atmosphere in Mexico now is remi- 
niscent of the period in the United Slates after 
the murder of President John Kennedy. Gear- 
ing up all doubts and questions quickly is 
impossible, and the country cannot amply 
dismiss tire fears that some insidious plot is 
attacking the government itself. 

The accused gunman, Mario Aburto Marti- 
nez, is a 23-year-old factory worker who was 
seized on the spot The only strange thing about 
him is that there seems to be nothing strange — 
no violent history, no unusual political associa- 
tions, no wild opinions. Along with several 
police investigations there is a presidential 
comnnssioa at work on the case. But it may 
discover, as the Warren Comnnssioa after tire 
Kennedy assassination, that it is very difficult 
to prove convincingly a negative verdict that 
there were no plot and no accomplices. 

At first the government asserted that the 
murderer was a loner. Then, a few days later, its 
special prosecutor dramatically announced 


that there was indeed a conspiracy and he had 
arrested four further suspects. Within a week 
that r.laim began to fade as a judge released lire 
most prominent of the four for lack of evi- 
dence. Kit last week in Tijuana, where Mr. 
Colosio was killed, tire police drier was mur- 
dered by three gunmen who ambushed his car. 

Two days earlier the police chief had told 
Tod Robberson of The Washington Post that 
some of the files on his own investigation of the 
Colosio assassination were missing. Perhaps 
there is a political conspiracy after ail. Or 
perhaps the police chief, a reformer, was killed 
by the drug dealers whom be was pursuing. Or 
perhaps by men in his own police force whom 
he suspected of collaborating with criminals. 

A political killing does great damage to 
even the most stable state. To limit that dam- 
age as far as possible, the American experi- 
ence three decades ago argues powerfully that 
the Mexican investigative commission ought 
now follow even the slightest lead as vigorous- 
ly as it can and promptly publish in detail 
whatever it finds. Full publication is essential, 
particularly in view of the closed and archaic 
nature of tire Mexican system of criminal 
justice. This commission has the crucial job of 
reassuring Mexicans that nothing is being 
concealed from the public. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Don’t Blame Immigrants 


Off and on since the great waves of immi- 
gration in the 1840s and 1850s. politicians in 
America have been tempted to explain what- 
ever happened to be ailing the country at the 
time by blaming newcomers for causing all 
kinds of problems for which the native-born 
could not possibly have responsibility. Native- 
born voters often like to hear that soil of tiring, 
which further encourages some politicians. 
The issue of immigration is surging a g ain , and 
the battlegrounds are as varied as tire Califor- 
nia governor’s race and the meeting rooms of 
Lhe House Ways and Means Committee. 

Take first Ways and Means. Last Wednes- 
day the committee rightly voted down an 
amendment offered by Representative Rick 
San tore in. Republican or Pennsylvania, to 
deny Supplemental Security Income benefits to 
most legal immigrants who are not yet citizens. 
The amendment was even more important than 
it sounded because the effect of denying SSI 
benefits was also to deny Medicaid.' This in 
turn raises the question of who would pay when 
a poor, legal immigrant walked into an emer- 
gency room with a severe illness. 

The vote went the right wav. but the margin 
was dose, 20 to 16. with Representative Har- 
old Ford. Democrat of Tennessee, abstaining. 
Three Democrats voted with the Republicans, 
but the most disturbing vole was Mr. Ford's. 
A liberal on many issues and the chairman of 
the welfare subcommittee, he threatened to 
join the anti-immigrant bloc. He was fin all v 
persuaded to abstain instead on the grounds 
that the issue of benefits to immigrants should 
be considered in ibe context of President Bill 
Clinton's welfare reform plan. Mr. Ford's 
petition is a portent of bow deep the anti- 
immigrant feeling runs. 

In California, meanwhile. Governor Pete 
Wilson, a Republican, has partially resurrect- 
ed his once sagging political fortunes with 
strong attacks on the federal government's 
failure to stem illegal immigration. Mr. Wil- 
son has gone to court to demand that the feds 


reimburse states (such as his) bearing a dis- 
proportionate share of the social service and 
health costs of illegal immigration that is the 
federal government's responsibility. 

What Mr. Santorum is trying to do in 
Washington and what Mr. Wilson is saying in 
California would seem consistent. Exactly the 
opposite is the case. As the National Confer- 
ence of State Legislators and the National 
Governors' Association pointed out, the ef- 
fect of Mr. Santorum' s amendment would be 
to increase the burdens on stales with large 
immigrant populations. The amendment, said 
Raymond Scheppach, executive director of 
the governors’ group, “would shift to states 
and localities millions of dollars in income 
assistance and health care costs now borne by 
the federal government." 

There are legitimate issues to be raised 
about immigration, legal and illegal, and also 
about abuses of social programs by immi- 
grants and nonimmigrants alike. But whole- 
sale assaults on immigrants are not only 
wrong, thCT also lead to bad policy. 

THE WASHINGTON POST 

Other Comment 

A Blow to Japanese Aspirations 

When will Japanese politicians understand 
that Tokyo cannot hope for Asian support in 
its efforts to become a global political player if 
it cannot bear the truth of what it did in 'Asia 
half a century ago? It would be strange for 
Japan to become a permanent member of the 
UN Security Council, founded on the ashes of 
fascist and imperialist defeat in World War IL, 
arguing that the atrocities it committed did not 
occur, Surely, the role desired [for Japan] by 
ordinary Japanese is a peaceful and stabilizing 
one. If so. they arc ill-served by the irresponsi- 
ble statements of some of their leaders. 

— The Straits Tunes (Singapore). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED 18S7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Ch-Ctuumm 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher £ Chief Exeaaivt 

JOHN V7NOCUR, Eaxusne Edsy X MxPresdat 
•WALTER WHiS.i'ftOT£2£zT •SAMUELABT. KATHERINE KNORRmJ 
CHARLES MTTCTfELMORE. DejMj'fidian'* CARLGEW1RTZ. Associate Edna* 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. EdSorofns Edearial Pages • JONATHAN GAGE. Businfss ani Finance E£sar 
• RENE BONDY. Depuy PubSsher* JAMES McLEOD. Advcnisir# Direcor 
•JUANITA l CASPARL hcemozard Dneippmtr: DurcKr* ROBERT FARRE Cradakwt IXnxxr. Euirpe 
DmcairdstaPiMbman: Richard D. Smmau 
DtrecairAe^oandela PiMasion: Kqhcnne P. Darro* 


International Herald Triune. 181 Avenue Charkanfe-Gaulk. 9252! NariHy-sur-Sane. Frame. KSSB 
Td:(l)4W7.9j.Q0.Fix:Grc»-^/.0Wl: Adv-.46J7.52I2 Internet IHr&curokonije 

Edaarpr Asa: Mdaei Ridanisx. 5 Crummy Ri Smgqm (SI I. Td i65l C2-776& Fox: ibSl 2?*-2i3r ISbSk 
M nc Dir Asu RoQ'D. KraiepyhL Sit Qauctsur fti. Haig Kong, Td 852-0222-II&L Fee &51N222-1 191 — 

Gen. Mgr. Gemarr T. Scttor. Friatndxr. 15, 6(823 Fra&MM. Td \(CA>7267 S3. Fee f060) 72 73 )P jnu? 
PnxUl: Mehad Cam. SSO 7 hnAve, .Vw Tori, N.Y. /'ft 122. Td. (2I2i 7S2-3S90. fin. (2l2t 7S3R785 • Wjjir 
U.K. Advenismi: Office: 63 Lnr, 4 err. London HC2. Tel (07b 836#S02. Fax: <07 It 2 40-2254. j 

S. \. du copual de !. 200.000 F. RCS Xaniem B 732021126. Commission Panxire No. 61337 

? 19#. bi^majidHeraLiTrikinc. AE ritfts ratmed. fSSV.-QXtf-AK! 



America and China: The Goal Is Human Welfare 


W ASHJNTON — Even among 
dedicated Washington evange- 
lists who want to place “human 
rights" at the core of the basic pur- 
pose of foreign policy there lurks se- 
cret discomfort about the prospect 
that Bill Clinton could wield the most- 
favored-nation sledgehammer to ad- 
vance their moral intention in China. 

A somewhat less secret discern! on 
over the sledgehammer possibility is 
growing in important quarters of 
Congress. American economists and 
business executives have been pro- 
claiming something akin to outright 
horror that the president could even 
consider making a decision, however 
well in ten honed, that would produce 
universally harmful consequences. 

Unless President Clinton is pro- 
vided with a new way to think and 
talk convincingly about China be- 
fore June 3, either he or Congress 
may feel obliged to take action that 
would leave scars from which (he 
United Stales, China and most of 
the world could not soon recover. 

To justify terminating most-fa- 
vored status for China, the United 
States would say that it could not 
allow itself to behave otherwise and 
still be moraL That “righteous" judg- 
ment would have been shaped hugely 
by the vivid memory of "Tiananmen" 
on June 4, 1989, which remains fixed 
in the minds of American congress- 
men, newspaper writers and broad- 
casters. For many of those who 
watched the Chinese leadership 
slaughtering its children, what more 
was needed to confirm China's brutal 
propensity to smash innocent dis- 
sent? “Tiananmen" became a meta- 
phor for Deng Xiaoping’s China. 

It is this Washington-fashioned 
mind-set that President Clinton 
should re-examine. Undertaking the 
exercise should lead him to remove 
thoughtlessly inflammatory code 
words from the vocabulary of the 
White House and from the private 
and public vocabularies of those 
most closely associated with Wash- 
ington’s China polities. 

“Human rights" comes first. Then 
'‘dissidents." 

To begin subsuming “human 
its" within the broader concept of 
Imman welfare" need not require 
any retreat from the president's goal 
of democratic enlargement. Directing 
attention to “human welfare" would, 
however, bring into American dia- 
logue with the Chinese acknowledg- 
ment of their historically unprece- 
dented 10-year doubling of wealth 
and productivity for China's more 
than a billion people. 

It would also establish the rele- 
vance to the dialogue of huge in- 
creases in individuaTmobOity, choice 
and productive output of the Chinese 
people resulting from Mr. Dengs 
guidance of China from Mao Ze- 
dong's matrix of social order — cgali- 


By Robert W. Barnett 


tarian. disciplinarian, auuukically in- 
trospective — toward the high-risk, 
often messy but widely liberating 
consequences of market orientation. 

Mere change of vocabulary would 
signify for China American readiness 
to acknowledge its positive achieve- 
ments, and in that context to be ready 
to exchange views not only on “hu- 
man rights" but also on the two coun- 
tries' differing approaches to a shared 
“human responsibility" to deal con- 
structively with other social problems 
such as education, health care, home- 
lessness, racial discrimination, drug 
abuse, criminal behavior — murder, 
robbery, rape — and needless pollu- 
tion of the environment. 

It may not be easy at first for 
Washington to understand that cer- 
tain words really do have different 
meaning and resonance when heard 
by Chinese and when used among 
Westerners. 

As to “human rights," those words 
have come to produce Tram Chinese 
instant apprehension that when 
Americans use them it will be the 
intention to demand that China bend 
to American moral hegemony. For 
Chinese, hu man rights emerge from 
the cultural memory, the history and 
the moral imperatives of a splendid 


own 


Western tivfiizaiion. However, when 
Americans declare that “human 
rights" possess universal authority, 
many Chinese resent the implicit de- 
nial of space for making their 
calculations of virtue and at 
within the framework of China's 
2,500 yean of highly moralist teach- 
ing — Confudan, Taoist, Legalist 
and, yes, even Maoist. 

Ji may come to many Americans as 
a surprise that “dissidents," in the 
Chinese vocabulary, is not a syn- 
onym for “reformers.'’ China’s re- 
formers seek improvement of the sys- 
tem without creating chaos. “Dis- 
sidents" would have us believe that 
the entire system must go. Dissidents 
are not loyal opposition. 

When Americans describe China’s 
treatment of dissidents as crimes 
which the civilized world cannot tol- 
erate, many Chinese regard it as an 
intrusive challenge of the very legiti- 
macy of China's government 

Many brilliant Chinese “dissi- 
dents" who fled from China after (he 
Ti ananm en tragedy began to analyze 
Mr. Deng's true motivation in allow- 
ing the tragedy to occur from the 
perspective, and with resources, of 
American universities. Had he be- 
trayed the good of the Chinese people 


na s 

after perceiving 
tpntial inherent 


The writer was U.S. deputy assistant 
secretary of stale for East Asia from 
1962 to 1970; he is author af "Wander- 
ing Knights, : China Legacies, Lived and 
Recalled" He contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


Clinton Has a Strong China Card to Hay 


W ASHINGTON — BiD Clin- 
ton's China policy, especially 
his linkage of the bilateral relation- 
ship to renewal of most-favored-na- 
tion status, has boxed him in. But 
bold action can extricate him. 

Specialists on China from diverse 
disciplines and political backgrounds 
are nearly unanimous in warning of 
the consequences of failing to extend 
most-favored status to China. Tie 
business community is putting out 
long lists of the short- and long-term 
economic costs. Other nations in 
Asia, the most dynamic region in the 
world today, are warning Washing- 
ton not to try to isolate China: they 
do not want to choose between China 
and the United Stales. 

Mr. Clinton should take the time to 
explain to Congress and the public 
that America has strategic interests in 
China and that he has resolved to 
pursue them. He might point out that 
China's position is comparable to 
Germany’s 100 years agp. As a rising 
power, Germany posed enormous 
challenges for its region and eventual- 
ly the world. It is in America's strate- 
gic interest to engage China in the 
early stages of its ascendancy and inte- 
grate it peacefully into regional and 
global economic and security systems. 
The president should stress that 


By Robert B. Zoellick 

America’s purposes extend far be- 
yond the economic opportunities that 
business people worry about China 
influences international security 
through its permanent seal on the 
UN Security Counci] and through its 
proliferation policies. China is a pow- 
er in Aria, with sway now in North 
Korea, in Cambodia and in the dis- 
pute about the Spratly Islands. In a 
lew years it will determine the fate of 
Hong Kong, and it must resolve its 
future with Taiwan. China's policies 
toward the environment, narcotics 
and migration can overwhelm actions 
that other countries may take. 

The president also should empha- 
size that the human rights of 12 bil- 
lion Chinese are of great importance 
to Americans. He can note the adjust- 
ments that have been made in prison 
labor, humanitarian releases and em- 
igration policies. He should explain 
that the best route for improving the 
lives of the Chinese is through open- 
ing their nation to the outside world. 
He could underline American efforts 
to promote this integration and expo- 
sure through burin ess exchanges and 
information programs. 

He should state that it no longer 


makes sense to place all these inter- 
ests at risk through annual measure- 
ments of incremental changes in Chi- 
na's bureaucratic behavior. Instead, 
America’s human rights agenda with 
China, as with the former Soviet 
Union, will be an ever present dimen- 
sion of its continuing engagement. 

The president would be backed by 
most foreign policy commentators, 
China experts, business people and 
the many workers whose jobs depend 
on trade and investment in Asia. He 
would again be taking the lead in 
international affairs. 

The danger for the president now is 
that by trying to juggle sta t e m e n ts, 
interests and facts, his administration 
will muddle through with half-mea- 
sures and oobblod- together compro- 
mises. Partial approaches like higher 
tariffs for some goods or slig htly high- 
er tariffs for aO goods wiQ phase no 
one and confuse America’s 

President Clinton needs to choose. 
Like the late Richard Nixon, he needs 
to act boldly and strategically toward 
C hina. This is his C hina card. 


The writer was an undersecretary of 
state and White House deputy chief of 
staff during the Bush administration. 
He contributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


Europe: The Institutional Debate Begins at Last 


B RUSSELS — Europe's moment 
of truth is fast approaching. Will 
it be capable of making decisions, or 
not? The European Union likes to 
present itself as a mature political 
entity developing along rational 
lines. Inwardly, its governments are 
in a ferment of doubt over its future. 

The bland sounding issue of “insti- 
tutional reform" is one that the Euro- 
pean governments have been ducking 
tor years, as it will make Europe or 
break it. Forget the newly ratified 
Maastricht treaty with its ambitions 
of still closer European integration 
and a single European currency to 
rival the doDar. Forget, too, the genu- 
ine achievements of the European 
single market. Until the collective de- 
cision-making question is resolved, 
the Union is going nowhere. 

The problem that faces the Union 
is twofold. First, bow can it stream- 
line the process of decision-making 
now that more and more political 
choices have to be settled in Brussels? 
Under the present system of qualified 
majority voting in the Council of 
Ministers, a measure needs at least 54 
votes or tiie 76 that are allocated to 
today's 12 member slates roughly ac- 
cording to their size. But only a small 
proportion of decisions are reached 
by this method. Should it be greatly 
expanded to cover sensitive areas like 
foreign and economic policy? 

Second, how should the majority 
voting system be adapted to suil the 
planned arrival in January 1995 of 
Austria, Sweden. Finland and Nor- 
way, and perhaps of Poland, Hunga- 
ry, die Czech Republic and Slovakia 
in 1999? When the Union numbers 16 
states. 1 1 of them will be smaller ones 
and the arithmetic of majority voting 
becomes hard to justify. Eight of the 
smaller countries, representing just 
12 percent of the Union’s population, 
could in theory form a blocking mi- 
nority in the council 


By Giles Merritt 

This is the first of two articles. 


The newcomers are not certain to 
arrive on schedule, but the die is cast 
Pushed chiefly by Germany, the 
Union has derided that it can be nei- 
ther a static organization nor a “rich 
men's club” made up only of West 
Europeans. It is to pursue the difficult 
twin goals of widening, to bring in 
Scan dm avia and the Central Europe- 
an states, and deepening of its political 
integration so as eventual! v to be some 
son of United Slates of Europe. 

Seen from outside Brussels, the 
Union looks fairiv coherent, at times 
even mtinudatingity united. The truth 
is somewhat different The Council of 
Ministers is a bottleneck that all loo 
often blocks adoption of useful EU- 
ievd regulations lor indefinite periods 
while gpvernme&ts squabble and bick- 
er. “It’s a zoo," was the candid com- 
ment of an American journalist speak- 
ing at a recent conference here. 

Strictly speaking, the thorny mat- 
ter of overhauling the Union’s creaky 
decision-making mechanism is not 
due to be addressed until 1996, when 
politicians and officials will look into 
K in the framework of the planned 
Intergovernmental Conference. But 
in fact the debate on derision -making 
has already started. Last month the 
British government, with lukewarm 
support from Spain, opened the Pan- 
dora's box by seeking change in the 
present arrangements for qualified 
majority voting in the Council of 
Minister when and if Austria. Swe- 
den, F inlan d and Norway join. 

Tie British challenge to a derision 
that would reinforce the voting weight 
of die smaller EU countries was tacti- 
cally fll-judgcd and ended in a humili- 
ating dimbdowo. But it acted as a 
starting pistol for a Europe-wide de- 
bate on (he future of EU deds'on- 


. In that sense, Britain has per- 
formed a valuable service. Voting ar- 
rangements are too far-rea ching an 
issue to be left to the Union’s more 
customary process of secretive behind- 
the-scenes negotiations. 

EU governments so far have a la- 
mentable track record on the deci- 
sion-making issue. The leaders of the 
Twelve were to have confronted the 
problem when they met in Lisbon 
almost two years ago. But that sum- 
mit was dominated by the growing 
backlash against the Maastricht trea- 
ty triggered by Denmark's “no" vote 
in its June 1992 referendum. 

The Lisbon summit therefore ig- 
nored the European Commission's 
warning that enlargement of the 
Union to 16 member states could 
overload decision-making to the 
point of paralysis. It was decided at 
Lisbon to press ahead with the en- 
largement without altering the major- 
ity voting system. The 1996 Intergov- 
ernmental Conference, the summit 
agreed, would tackle the issue root 
and branch, along with such other 
key questions as the future powers of 
the European Parliament and the role 
of the European Commission. 

The Lisbon decision reflected a re- 
luctance to confront so divisive a 
problem. As the present system delib- 
erately overlooks population sizes, 
the smaller countries have acquired a 
degree of power that they are unlikely 
to surrender without a struggle. Bel- 
gium's foreign minister, WiBy Claes, 
an articulate spokesman for tbc smaD- 
er member states, has spelled out what 
he feds tiwr price should be. 

"Only a very integrated decision- 
making structure," he warned, would 
persuade them "to relinquish some of 
their present advantages." He floated 


the idea of a new executive body that 
would operate alongside the Com- 
mission and have responsibilities in 
areas like peacekeeping, non-nuclear 
disarmament and international envi- 
ronmental policy. He also suggested 
that the European Parliament be giv- 
en some revenue-raising powers. 

In short, the smaller countries are 
thinking about institutional reform in 
terms that many will see as alarming- 
ly radicaL What Mr. Claes is saying is 
that smaller countries should be pro- 
tected from lhe bigger ones throagh 
the creation of a strong supranational 
EU system of government. 

International Herald Tribune. 



so gravely as to haw lost “the Man- 
date of Heaven”? Or had he bent, 
under stress, to hard necessity in 
resorting to an ugly show of power, so 
as lb sustain stnrctural transforma- 
tion of all of China, set in motion 
during the preceding decade? 

Many of the most gifted of these 
children of modem China now recog- 
nize Mr. Deng's genius to lave been 
to appreciate China’s capability to 
achieve very rapid economic reform, 
as a precondition for moving on to- 
ward eventual political reform. These 
young analysts hope that Americans 
can share their admiration for Chi- 

iy 

g the frightening po- 
rn any imitation of 
the Ydtsin modeL 
President QIn ton’s place in history 
is assured if he can perkiade Congress 
and the American media ihat there is 
no compromise of American virtue in 
replacing a stnde-minded advocacy of 
“human rights with ajoint UiL-Chi- 
nese quest to improve prospects for 
advances in global human welfare. 


On Bosnia 

Just Words 

By Anthony Lewis 

B OSTON is undo 

hpvy attack these _ days for his 

son why was ^^rct^TdmjQnstraw 
last Tuesday in his appearance, on 
CNN’s, “Global Forum. -• 

As a performance- h was impres. 
sive; President Clinton is neverat a 
loss for words. Bui- w&ta he was 
■ asked about the -war in Bosnia, the 
flood of wards revealed a. confosKm 
of substance, an emptiness of win. 

The president assured a repnaui. 
tative of Serbian television t&aithe 
United States was not going to take 
sides in the war. We had toM fe 
Bosnians, he said, “that they should 
not look to us to change the mOhare 
balance on the ground and that there 

has to be a negotiated settlement" 
When fUmstjane Amanpoor of 
CNN asked whether his “constant 
flip-flops" on Bosnia would not ea- 
courage aggressors elsewhere, he re- 
plied testily, “There have been m 
nip-flops, Madam.” Calling it “a 
dvfl war,” he said: “I ckwu think 
you can say that the world commun- 
ity . . . should have intervened on 
me side or the other.” 

The fecklessness of those com- 
meats is staggering. Aggressor and 
victim are morally equivalent Ibe 
world community is powerless to 
stop aggression. The answer is to 
apply pressure for a “negotiated set- 
uexncnt,” when an arms embargo 
denies the victims weapons, and 
pressure can only mean pressure on 
them to capitulate. 

Here is now Mr. Clinton could 
have answered: 

“A sovereign state, recognized by 
the world community, is under at- 
tack from forces encouraged and 
supplied by another power. This s 
not a dvfl war but a war of aggres- 
sion, planned and launched frost 
outside Bosnia although using the 
Serbian minority within it The le- 
gitimate government of Bosnia has 
every right to call upon our assis- 
tance in defending its territory." 

Tha t reply is not one I imagined, k 
is a passage from an article by Mar- 
garet Thatcher that appeared on this 
page last Thursday. 

Mrs. Thatcher gives us no slippery 
euphemisms, no moral equivocation. 
She sees what has happened and sayi 
so. She mams what she says. 

Moreover, she will go on meaning 
iL She called for bombing of Serbia 
forces and supplies in 1991, when the 
Serbs attacked cities in Croatia. She 
lock the same poation when they 
began their genocide of Muslims in 
Bosnia. If hear advice had been fol- 
lowed In the first place, the aggres- 
sion would have ended before the 
Bosnian tragedy. 

President Clinton could have said, 
when he took office, that the situa- 
tion in Bosnia was terrible but that it 
was too late or too difficult or too 
dangerous for the United Slates to 
get involved Or he could have car- 
ried cut what he suggested in bis 
campaign and resolutely poshed 
through NATO a serious program of 
action to stop tbc Serbian aggress® 
What be has done instead is to 
condemn Serbian acts of erneftf 
while insisting that America is v» 
tral, deplore Serbian advanUgs h 
weaponry while doing nowg » 
stop the Dow of those weapons, boat 
of using NATO air power while so* 
it so feebly that it nas no effect Aad 
meanwhile the Serbs consolidate the 
gains of their aggression, making » 
decent peace ever less Hkdy. 

In a state of such intellectual cos- 
fusion, there can be no poficy worthy 
of the name: a consistent, commitiro 
American position that others 
believe and respect. The CEnlonpofr 
cy certainly dots not impress the Scr- 
tnan leaders. Nor is it Hkriy .asCh nfr 
tiara Amanpour said, to restrain ik 
K im D Sungs of this wedd 
The waffling and confusion that 
mark what President Clin ton has 
done in Bosnia are there also ra 
regard to Haiti and North Kor«- 
Why? It is not lack of acoienea- Mr. 
Clinton is the smartest man m uk 
W hite House in years. 

Perhaps he really bdfeves tn»t re- 
assuring words are moo^b — uet w 

can salve his hbaalconsaea ceby g ^' 
hires to Bosnian victims, for otage- 

while keeping the real problem a 
hi an aggression at a distance. _ 

Or perhaps he thinks America^ 
are so ovowhehmngly a®*”*? 
with themselves now that a w* 
foreign policy will not hurt him P°^~ 
ically. If so, I think he is qmtt 
A voice of authority in the "W® 
House — a president who rafts 
acts with firmness — is crucial 10 T 
world we have. And that same qua* 
ty, authority, is what American ^ vows 
look for in a president. 

The New York Times. 



lr» 


Restore 


i-iA 1 -s A? 
■^1- 


Pi 




; -S 
r*- W 
. &*** 
^#£-•4 ii! 


SS- 

V C) it?/? 


rz - 




• ..V.Cifc 

'• *:• -si tff- 
-***»«'.■ 

■ : '-v.v sm a 

' iyffrd 
••-si* •*;?•! 

-• 

.. .UrySpfe 
• *.-* V-S 

-iium 

1 gfipii 

L 

- •V‘ W (9m£ 
■■ 

•*>?*' fljl? 

‘ • *HSdt ^ 





** — 








‘ aechao 

‘ *** 

; v ; v " ‘ 


' ■ -ifcrTf 

*■ ?? "W*** 

iT.vci?: op 

V- «*4SSS3..,i 
:::*r tUx.’sesto 

- - «s 

- ^ . 

■-*r 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Imperial Fireman 

BERLIN — Not a little sensation has 
been caused by the appearance of the 

Emperor in a new quality of fireman. 

The village of Gaton. tbe scene of the 
incident, is on tbe Spree, between 

Berlin and Potsdam. When His Maj- 
esty, on observing a Ore, stopped the 
steam yacht on which be was passing 
and landed all hands to assist, he at 
once look command of the opera- 
tions. The crew and civilians formed 
chains to pass water in buckets to the 
hand engine, while the Emperor and 
a general took possession of the hose 
and turned a stream of water on the 
burning building. Not until the arrival 
of the fire brigades did the E mp ero r 
abandon his efforts to master the fire. 

1919: Red Cross Activity 

PARIS — At a dinner given last night 
(May 91 at the Hotel Ritz for the 
Board of Governors of the League of 
Red Cross Societies, an announce- 
ment was made by Mr. Henry P. 


Davison, chairman of tire - — _ 

the future plans of the , 

headquarters will be estabteg . 
within a few days in 
purposes of the League. 
recognized in die Cdvaunro^ 

League of Nations, ar e the 

mem of health, tlw 
disease and the inWg. __ 
ing throughout the wond.' ... ^ 

1944: 

LONDON — [From our Neg 
edition:] Premier MaiAal , 

Bounced eariy toda 
capture by stonn of 1— ... 

tress port of Sevastoprawtog 


of Axis trows died at their 
perished in the Black Sea " 
escape by ship. The i " 
after a final three-day 
the exhausted Axis ^artjsws- 
two big Russian anmis •• *55? 
jor mainl and offensive. WyE 
soon in conjunction with ^ 
invasion of western Europe 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 



OPINION 


. . dcsvjrv. 

: 1W" 


£j» ,_ 

is Bos*:- “ y 


irji 


la* 


*9* 

*«rvcated a cwf, 

jfcT»'«Jpfe, nf 

•Uttenitt i rc-i" 

Wta'-ttoasaX^ 

•»W DOt toips ■•’ ■? 
■'. . -■ Q. ? ‘■Smu,. 


« W- We had lt .y 
kiswi. "that thex Z 'T 
>qSVyi±az§g 
ftcpwcd'ar.c 
«raud seuitc^.7? 
aratiintt Ama-^T . 
4; whether hii 
Q* tbsm& »ta;; 
8«*W5dse*>;e- C-' 


^ I 


Improved r Bay of Piss 9 Option Could Work for Haiti 


W ^5*25* - HO. k «* *™ Pian 1o 

politic*] asylum m°L Haitiao seeking 

America’s poww in ?! e Ability of 

bring Parliamenjarv^dSl^,^ 10 

Hemispheres mosi^— em ° CT ^ C ^ t0 ^ Western 


By William S afire 


asylum, but 
migrants; and (c) make veiled 


jtaiy threats with 


riie use of U.S. ground^UwDs nal * on — without no intention of, or support for, carrying them out 




That last dement of the Clinton approach — 
will not be pretending to flex military muscle — was ex- 


E ressed last week in the most nail-nibbling, pusil- 
mimous “threat" ever uttered by a president of 
—j****vu,%Hsjvns dues the United Stales: “We are domg our best to 


mt mean the notion of rett jJtfjia avoid dealing with the military option. 

an J ^ Mr. Clinton’s entreaties to the Haitian general 

Uil UUUTUl by arming a force of “d police chief fall on deaf ears because no real 


re /“? ees can never work. 


military threat exists; expending U.S. lives to save 
Haiti ranks low in the poll ratings that drive 
Clinton foreign policy. Needed is a coumerforce 
that does apt now exist 

My plan is known as “the Bay of Pigs option.'’ 
Three decades ago, that place became synonymous 
^Um^ , ^J m K- C T f ^ ] “^ Iead - with the word “fiasco.” The CIA secretly trained a 
economic hl/v-vSJ?^ p , m *2? l a ) “?l?ose military force of Cuban refugees in Florida and 


SS2nt Mir? thC ijicreased - a ^ lura Pbui that 

rSSLS! announced Sunday. 

era inSn d - t ii^ 5cn cri f? ctan fron] l«d- 

an econcmii^bliv+S^i^^^^L^ 1 ? 056 ““““T ,oroe °* uoam raugees m Mourn ana 
miserable maJSSu? LSi 10 ®^ av ^ an Haitians transported them to a Cuban beach to help topple 
nick un r^f-y. 10 r ^ 5e ^. a S a “ 3sl rile army: (bl FiddCastro. But when the decision came to pro- 
S,;^ Up L. , gees at 563 for interviews aboard " " 


shin* " cwa aDWUO U.S. vide the invading force the close support of air 

P reby encouraging more to seek political cover, President John Kennedy flinchedTloca] up- 


risings never materialized, and the anti-Castro Cu- 
ban patriots were killed or captured. Worse than a 
tragedy, it was an embarrassment. 

Just because the intervention spawned in lhe 
Eisenhower administration failed dismally then 
does not mean that the notion of retaking an island 
by arming a force of its refugees can never work. 
Washington can learn from past tactical mistakes. 

Where the Bay of Pigs was a secret enterprise, 
nm by CLA coven operatives who knew little about 
military operations, the Haitian Legion should be 
widely publicized, its t rainin g and equipment a 
challenge to the Defense Department. 

Of the nearly 200,000 Haitian refugees already 
in the United States, could not a few thousand 
able-bodied young men be found to volunteer to 
fight for their country? 1 suspect that there are 
more than that many patriots among them, and 
that, given the training and equipment, a serious, 
substantial force could be assembled. 

Every American who went from soft draftee to 
soldier in three months of basic training knows 
the transformation possible. 

Add to that three months for development of 
natural leaders into noncommissioned officers, 
with simultaneous indoctrination of democratic 


procedures, and by year's end offshore Haitians 
would have a proud, fierce, battle-ready unit — 
better equipped and trained than Haiti's. 

Then you put them on U.S. warships, backed 
up by an aircraft carrier loaded with helicopter 
gun, ships, saD into Port-au-Prince — and see what 
effect all that has on the band of hoodlums on the 
dock who chased U.S. forces away before. 

Even if the Haitian junta shows up with a larger 
armed force, the sight of oncoming landing craft 
backed up by an overwhelming show of tactical 
air power would contribute to a new willingness 
by the tinhorn generals to restore democracy and 
hold new, OAS-supervised elections. 

The object is to avoid a bloodletting with a 
credible show of force — and not a Yankee force in 
front, but a Haitian Legion ready to fight and 
trained to form a disciplined post-crisis constabu- 
lary. This plan will place stress on the Pen logon and 
is not foolproof; care must be taka to see that the 
legionnaires do not become a new junta. But it 
would instill pride and self-reliance, reverse the 
refugee flow, and generate popular support. 

what is the Qinton alternative? Ever mare 
refugees — a fiasco. 

The New York Times. 


Who Does She Think She Is? 
A Chat With Hillary Clinton 


By Anna Quindlen 


■JvJ EW YORK — In a suite at the 


Waldorf as big as all outdoors, HiJ- 
Rodham Clinton sits on a sofa and 
about Whitewater, commodities 
trading, her daughter, her friends, why 
most men favor long hair and whether 
she should give regular press confer- 
ences at the white House. 

“I can see people saying, “"Who does 
she think she is, having press confer- 
ences,’ ’’ said Mrs. Clinton, whose con- 


MEANWHILE 


venation is now liberaliy larded with 
anticipated objections to the wav she 
leads oct public life. 

It has been a difficult time in the 
difficult life of the woman who calls 
herself “a transitional figure" in Ameri- 
ca's political mythology. She gave a 
press conference in which she denied 
knowing of anything untoward in Lhe 
transactions that enabled her to turn 


Ipgjgg How to Restore Public Confidence in the Necessary Art of Peacekeeping 


M have ii\:erv-C‘ ' 

•ferother" 

It fcMCT C S S of !r,fw- - 

TBMafly equi^.c,L ^ 
wjaaily is pcw-y-.T 
mot)- The assw-r : 
rcrefoca > 

«1k$ as amb -rJ.Z 
rtitflUK *npor.s."J. 
jfrOtdy mean rre K 


- * 


Mr CLr:.; ; - . 
■■ 

Wga Stale, rc.:— - :: 
cocnmucj*., 1.- .. 

'■'km .e&sv-r-s:; J 
tf^nuRher 7:_' 
w#f bat * - 
mi and b.-. 
actia rfjbocih 
iaorey-v.rcr; ; Tv.. 
w e nanep '. of r.. ^ 

Anfera iri : - 

iortfeat 

iMnAav. 

mtoBcv'**---- 


SlUwfeii 


1 






jjgkif. "~r. : 

m***-'- - 

lEklnr« •«* 



K*X. - • 

•Nr t»>- - 

m t** 

iMr ikr . . ^ • 

iftrle 

tmi -nrv-- -•••• 

iTCM Hfir-v: -•••; 

hfw ^ - 

MjktXii A'-r - 

me. tx-r '■ -■ 

i? O kt 

tifiw e - '• r - 
dr'ScWr .= -•• •- 
ia ifji r T- -• - 
*«C£ f r*V 
r^ *ttcb i -- * 
tS»Npo=>- ■ _ 
£*««**.#■■■■ • _ 
f-- . - 

iWpevt- " 




a 



tytiK- - 


Is/. 


ipe, >- 


. v - ■ 


,• >•, 


rr ■ . 

V- 

*&&'- *■ : 

far* 

£l]| ■ k 

J 




m.-KPX : . 


!Rs r 

5-- . T. 


nr . --.t - 
^ . TV ' ' ’<• 


YlTASHINGTON — A backlash 
. . ^mst UN peace operations is 
bong felt m America, ft has gone be- 
yond the obvious fact that the United 
Nations was ill-prepared for this post- 
Uold War explosion of assi gnmen ts 
. The mood has turned ugly as an 
inexperienced U.S. administration is 
charged with over-reliance on a United 
Nations whose “failures" appear more 
dramatic than its successes. 

Gone is the 1992-1993 euphoria over a 
new, more assertive and, if necessary, 
more muscular multilateralism. From 
former Yugoslavia, UN officials slam 
American leaders as “timid and tenta- 
tive" while lop U.S. officials publicly 
remind them who pays their sarnies, ft 
is not an uplifting spectacle. 

If we Americans continue to s quande r 
our authority and credibility at this pace; 
a historic U.S. opportunity — to lead the 
way toward the next international system 
— could be lost And if it is? Well, there is 
always the law of the jungle. 

This is the backdrop for assessing the 


By Chester A. Crocker 


But up to now, U.S. "policy" toward 
UN peace operations has been a hap- 
hazard patchwork of funding shortfalls 
and financial threats, basic ignorance of 
the relationship between peacekeeping 
mandates and the resources required to 
cany them out, periodic bouts of UN 
bashing and a pervasive reluctance to 
uze the political effects of U.S. 


conduct on others who may be engaged 
in (or targets of) UN peace operations. 

These unhappy facts lead even Ameri- 
ca’s friends to question US. competence 
in shaping security mechanisms. 

Critics of the Qinton administration's 
record are on shaky ground if they point 


If America continues to 
squander its authority and 
credibility, a historic 
opportunity could be fat. 


week. In it the administration declares 
its continuity with the policies of previ- 
ous administrations and its sober aim of 
ensuring “that our use of peacekeeping 
is selective and more effective." 

To counter charges that the White 


House is turning U£L foreign policy and 
eckless UN bureau- 


aimed forces over to feckless 
crats, the repost recounts many things 
that the administration is not proposng: 
any m ptinupw of UJ& unilateral mili- 
tary options, any form of a standing UN 
aimy or eanmuking of UJS. units for UN 


operations, any expansion of “either tl% 
number of UN i 


1 peace operations or U-S. 
inv o l vement in such operations." 

^The shift .m tope is; striding, A few. 

ycasbai^UNj^eflceopCTatkmswerea 
growth industry.. There are now more 
than 70,000 blue helmets partic i patin g 
in 18 UN peace operations at a cost m 
more than S3 bfflion a year. 

This sodden expansion coincided, it 
should be noted, with tire Bush years. 
During the 1992 presidential campaign, 
Bill Cun ion seemed to raise the ante, 
proposing a “UN Rapid Deployment 
Force” to guard the borders of threat- 
ened lwytR, to protect and feed civilians 
in civil war ana to combat terrorism arid 
drug trafficking. 


srmplistically to continuing humanitarian 
outrages (as in Rwanda) or unresolved 
violent conflicts (as in Sudan). They are 
on safer ground, however, when they cite 
American miGtaiy proposals that serve 
only to feed false hopes on one side and 
destroy U.S. credibility (Hi the other (Bos- 
nia). And they are right to protest when 
delicate and dangerous problems are ban- 
died so as to create the impression of 
disorganization and weakness (North 
Korea), or when U5.-led initiatives turn 
out to be nothing but bluff, leading to 
national humiliation and a tasty redefmi- 
tian of mission (Haiti, Somalia). 

■Howwquld- the. Clinton ’Strategy paper 
.deal with tins disarray? The list of pro- 
posals to strengthen UN capabilities is a 
saftd, if hardly visionary, program that 
could, over time, make a substantial dif- 
ference. Especially important will be 
st^toslrerigthajplaniiin&mteffigsnce, 
logistics and comma&d-coutxot-canssu- 
mc&tions capabilities of the UN Seoetar- 


tions, as well as modest steps to create 
a UN quick-response capacity. 

The strategy paper offers criteria for 
deriding which peace operations to sup- 
port in the Security Council and which 


ones America should participate in mili- 
tarily. It establishes a checklist of ques- 
tions to be asked — relating to whether 
UN involvement would advance U.S. 
interests; the occurrence of internation- 
al aggression, humanitarian disaster, 
disruption of “established democracy" 
or gross human rights violations; wheth- 
er the objectives and mission are clearly 
understood and realistic criteria for end- 
ing the operation are in place; whether 
inaction is “considered unacceptable.” 

If U.S. troops are to become engaged, 
the list includes the risks to American 
personnel, whether U.S. participation is 
essential to success, the presence of ac- 
ceptable command and control arrange- 
ments, the prospects for public and con- 
gresaonal support, and, if major U.S. 
forces are likely to face combat, whether 
there is a plan and a commitment to 
achieve a decisive outcome. 

This is a commonsensc list that could 
help to guide policy deliberations in 
Washington and New York — provided, 
as the paper stales, that decisions will 
rest on the “cumulative weight of the 
factors.” The last thing we need are 
mechanical formulas and rules. 

None of this package is dramatic; it 
should not be stirring partisan passions. 
Nor can anyone argue with the proposed 
reduction in the U.S. assessed share of the 
peacekeeping budget from 31.7 to 25 per- 
cent (America's share of the regular bud- 
get) by the end of 1995, while Washing- 
ton continues to press for “dramatic” 
administrative and management reforms. 

And it is good to see the strategy 
paper endorse the concept of a unified, 
annual peacekeeping budget for all op- 
erations and an enlarged revolving re- 
serve fund (5500 million) funded by vol- 
untary contributions. 

The report deals with the emotive ques- 
tion of command of US. forces by restat- 
ing the president’s unbroken chain of 
command to the lowest commander in 
the field, while noting that US. forces 
r be placed under the operational coo- 
of foreign commanders for specific 
proposes arm that unity of c omm a n d 
must be maintained in the field. 

The peacekeeping review, however, 
reads as if the primary problems have 

beep adminis trative and manag erial In 
fact, the fundamental questions remain 
political and strategic: What national 
interests does the United States now 


consider important enough to put its 
political will behind and commit Ameri- 
can forces to? Is the United States capa- 
ble of guiding the evolution of UN peace 
operations toward wfaal Mr. Clinton de- 
scribed in December 1991 as “a new 
national security policy that buOds on 
freedom’s victory in the Cold War?" 

ft is ironic that Somalia should hover 
ominously over these deliberations. So- 
malia has become a grossly inaccurate 
metaphor for foreign policy debacle, a 
prime exhibit among the litany of reasons 
died for doing nothing serious to check 
the Bosnian Serbs or other aggressors. 
Yet a larger humanitarian tragedy was 
averted in Somalia. Externa) intervention 
was what was needed to knock a costly, 
stalemated clan war off dead center and 
open up the field for fresh political initia- 
tives to be worked out by Somalis. 

The “failure" in Somalia was not. in 
fact, a failure of either humanitarian 
intervention or muscular peacekeeping* 
it was a failure to apply them steadily 
and wisely. Much was accomplished 


during the U.S.-led phase (December 
1992 to April 1993), but it was promptly 
placed at risk when the second UN-led 
operation look over amid jolting discon- 
tinuities of leadership, tradition, mili- 
tary doctrine, operating procedures, 
command and control, policy instincts 
and bureaucratic systems. 

We should try to learn from the er- 
rors of U.S. and UN policy manage- 
ment in Somalia. George Bush was 
right to launch Operation Restore 
Hope and Bill Clinton was right to 
support that decision. It is not useful 
for Americans narrowly to confine 
(heir understanding of “the national 
interest" to defense of the homeland, 
access to oil. security of lines of com- 
munication or control of key industrial 
assets. There are categories of national 
interest that relate to global order (such 
as sanctity of borders! and to global 
standards (mass humanitarian catas- 
trophe) that need to be recognized. 

U.S. security policy cannot declare 
the world's bad neighborhoods as “off 


limits" for humanitarian peace opera- 
tions. The real issue is whether humani- 
tarian intervention is likely to be effec- 
tive at an acceptable cosl 
We also need to know more about 
successful exits from humanitarian in- 
terventions. The act of intervening, as- 
suming it is done effectively, has a 
decisive impact on the local 'balance. 
By slopping the factional strife, it 


thing^s^ about her trading profits. 


freezes in place the military situation, 
to the 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


D-Day: liberty and Death 

Regarding “Invite Germans io Nor- 
mandy, for Europe's Sake” (Opinion, 


April 23 ) by Dominique Moisi and Karl 
Kaiser and ' 


The Untimely Exclusion of 
Uv‘ 


Germany and Russia From a Friend 1. 
Fite" [May 2) by Zbigniew Brzezinskt:' 

Dominique Mcffa doesn’t get it. And 
Zbigniew Brzerinski seems not to under- 
stand either. The 50th anniversary of the 
invasion of Europe is notto be a love-in 
run by and for postwar politicians. 

Now, there is one problem with dis- 
cussing what June 6. 1994. “ought to 
be": Each of us is entitled to whatever 
celebration he or she wants. J may wish 
to quietly remember the fallen, while 
you may wish to loudly celebrate the 
beginning of the end of the war and the 
resulting birth of a peaceful and frater- 
nal Europe. Neither of us can be said, in 
the abstract, to be "wrong." 

But the real world is not abstract, and 
this event has a real center of gravity. 
That essential core is formed by the tens 
of thousands of living Allied' veterans. 


and. to an only slightly lesser extent, 
those French “of a certain age” resident 
in Normandy. Those who are alive mostly 
wish to remember the dead, not to cele- 
brate “Europa." A touching article in Le 
Monde a few months ago began fittingly: 
“liberty. Nothing less. liberty arrived 
from die sea that morning.” 

“liberty" arrived from the English 
Channel that morning in 1944, not 
“Peace," not “Brotherhood," and not 
“Europa.” liberty was accompanied, as 
usual by Death. Let us remember. 

The very real friendship between the 
France of" today and the Germany of 
today deserves io be recognized. But this 
friendship, the value of which no one 
disputes, was not bom on June 6, 1944; it 
was not created by the Allied forces who 
fought and died on that day. It is the 
creation of die postwar peoples of France 
and Germany who built it and nurture it 
today. Lei diem celebrate the friendship 
they created. But kt them celebrate it 
another day, in another place. 

DOUGLAS V. ELLICE JR. 

Paris. 


denying the initiative to the stronger 
and protecting for a time the weaker. 

But what will replace this new status 
quo? We must think not only About exit 
strategies but also about how peace op- 
erations will bridge into a political set- 
tlement strategy so that something more 
durable can emerge. In Somalia, the 
United States “solved” this one by a 
quick hand-off to the United Nations, 
evading the problem of a UN exit strate- 
gy under a vastly expanded mandate. 

The administration’s new strategy pa- 
per calls for avoiding "open-ended com- 
mitment” (as in Cyprus) and for termi- 
nating peace operations not effectively 
linked to “concrete political solutions 
(as in the Western Sahara operation). 
But in some cases, the linkage will have 
to be to future peacemaking. If America 
makes political solutions the precondi- 
tion of military action, it is only repeat- 
ing its Bosnian disgrace. 

The linkage between UN peacekeep- 
ing mandates and the resources made 
available by member stales simply 
must be better understood by Security 
Council members who approve these 
missions. There can be no excuse for 
grandiose UN missions (as 


tage of us in any way." 
She : 


re Ointon administration did in So- 
malia) that expose peacekeepers to se- 
vere risk and the United Nations itself 
to ridicule and discredit. It is irrespon- 
sible and dishonest for American com- 
mentators to blast "the UN” for prob- 
lems arising from ill-conceived or 
poorly drawn mandates. We need 
forcefully to remind ourselves ihai the 
Security Council is a mirror of the ac- 
tions, inactions, fudges and fantasies 
of its leading members. 


possession so that other people know 
now mu 


much I care about her.’ 

Noting her concern that her press 


The writer, a research professor of diplo- 
macy at Georgetown Vnrversitv, kbj assis- 
tant US. secretary' of state for African 
affairs from 1981 to 1989. He contributed 
this comment to The Washington Post 


BOOKS 


CHESS 


A REBEL IN DEFENSE OF 
TRADITION: 

The life and Polities of 

I>wight Macdonald 

By Michael Wreszin. 590 pages. 
Illustrated 530. Basic Books / 
HarperCollins. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


Reviewed by Christopher 
~ * i-Haupt 


Lehmann 

S EVERAL decades ago. The 
New York Review of Books 
ran an essay on Dwight Macdon- 
ald. the American social entm, tra- 
der a headline that read, “HesAO 
Dwight!" After reading Michael 

«—SSBSK5BSSS 

iSe’llfe and Politics of 

carried with bun impressive icstnoo- 
ten to an assooa e, but 


•Kktart’ ... 

and director of the British School 
at R ome, is reading “Murdoch,” 
William Shawcross’s biography of 
Rupert Murdoch. 

“Shawcross portrays remarkably 
well a businessman who is both a 
romantic and a complete global ad- 
venturer. The result is utterly en- 
thralling.” 

(Roderick Conway Morris, 1ST) 



in 1949, Pound won Mac- 

affection by writing him to 
say that Macdonal d was “certainly 
om* of the most ignorant apes that 
ever readied a typewriter.” 

More seriously, Wreszin write 
that in 1939, after Germany and 
Russia had invaded Poland, Mac- 
donald declared himself opposed 
to American intervention in a Eu- 
ropean war on the grounds that it 
would bring a fascist totalitarian- 
ism to America. He had faith, “reli- 
gions in its intensity,” Wreszin 
writes, in “a revolutionary uprising 
of the masses” in the capitalist de- 
roocraaes. 

. Although fiercely anti-Stafinist, 
his response to the dawning of the 
nocto age and the Cold War was to 
iqect die last vestiges of Iris Max- 


ism and embrace nonviolent paci- 
fism “as an activist political stance." 

And when he eventually recog- 
nized that such a position was un- 
tenable in the face of Stalinism, be 
retreated to what Wreszin de- 
scribes as an “anarchic libertarian- 
ism" whose main feature was con- 
cern that American high culture 
was in danger of bring debased. 

Yet despite such wrong turns 
and self-contradictions, Dwight 
Macdonald emerges as a hugely ap- 
p eahtig fi g ure m these pages. Wres- 
rin lends sense somehow to every 
step in his subject's sometimes er- 
ratic reasoning. 

A professor of history at Qjwms 
College and the Graduate Center 
of the Gty University of New 
York, he even makes a poignant 


drama out of Macdonald's gradual 
loss of faith in 19th-century deter- 
minism and his embrace of what be 
caned “those non-hisloriral Abso- 
lute Values (Truth, Love, Justice) 
which the Marxists made unfash- 
ionable among socialists.” 

In this account, Macdonald was 
ever after lorn between being the 
cultural critic who on the one hand 
could write marvelously witty at- 
tacks on what he saw as the de- 
structively leveling effects of the 
Revised Standard Verson of the 
Bible and Webster's Third New In- 
ternational Dictionary. On the oth- 
er hand he could support the insur- 
gent students daring the Columbia 
University uprising in 1968 and lat- 
er solicit contributions to Students 
for a Democratic Society. 

What Wreszin fails to explain 
satisfactorily is the source of the 
division in his subject between so- 
cial rebellion and cultural elitism. 


about the deeper faults in Macdon- 
ald’s being. Why was be unable 
ever to sit down and write a book 
'in cold blood," as he pul it 1 What 
led him to be forever distracted 
from writing at length, and. in the 
last decade of his life, w he com- 
pletely blocked? 

Why did he have such contempt 
for his second wife, to the point 
where he once physically assaulted 
her for pronouncing Joseph Con- 
rad boring? And what about the 
huge amounts of alcohol he drank? 
Did any of these flaws reflect the 
nearly absurd divisions in his be- 
ing? Although Wreszin lets us 
glimpse these darker sides of his 


subject, he fails to make them part 
of the 


He makes a pass at psyebobiog- 
raphy by suggesting that Macdon- 
ald revolted against his socially 
proper mother while identifying 
with his soft, impractical father, 
who died of a heart attack when 
Macdonald was a sophomore at 
Yale. But Wreszin, who presents 
Macdonald as a schoolboy aesthete 
who read voraciously at Exeter and 
Yale, doesn't explore this subject in 
any depth. 

You fin 


whole. 

To the book's benefit, the ap- 
pealing side of Macdonald out- 
weighs one’s puzzlement over his 
divided nature. You can’t help ad- 
miring his willingness to Mick his 
neck out even when all around him 
were wielding axes, and iheo to 
admit error openly whenever be de- 
cided that he was wrong. 

As an antagonist of cultural 
trash his judgment still seems un- 
erring; his critical prose remains 
witty, elegant and incisive. And so 
often his conduct feds right, even 
when its implications are dubious. 


find yourself wondering 


Christopher Lehmann -Haupt ts 
on the staff of The New York Times. 


By Robert Byrne 

J OEL LAUTiER raced Gany 
Kasparov in the final round of 
the Linares International Tourna- 
ment In the old days, when a game 
.began with the Giuoco Piano, 
•3.-BC5, there might have followed 
the Evans Gambit with 4 b4 Bb4 5 
c3 Ba5 6 d4 ed 7 0-0. 

Today, the conservative 5 d3 of 
the Giuoco Pianissimo has arisen, 
slowing the game to a positional 
pace in which the major action is 
postponed to a later stage. 

Both players delayed kingside 
castling in favor of 10 Qe2 QeZ 
Only after 1 1 b4, d5 12 a4 b5, when 
neither king would be safe on the 
queenside. did 13 0-0 0-0 take 
place. 

Lautier could not well answer 
Kasparov’s sharp 15 U4 with 
15...ae?! because 16 Ne4 ed? !7 
QW Bd7 18 Nf6 Qf6 19 Qd3 Qg& 
20Qg6 fg 21 b5 Ne7 22 Be4c6 23 
Ne5 BeS 24 b6 wins for White. In 
this hypothetical line, 16.JBc4 is 
also bad because of 17 Nf6 Qf6 18 
Qe4 Rfe8 19 Rfel Kf8 20 Ra7! Ra7 
21 d5 Ne7 22 Ne5 Rd8 23 Ng4 Qd6 
24 BH Qd7 25 Qh7 Bd5 26 Qh8 
Ng8 27 Nf6! gf 28 Bh6 male. 

Lautier saw through this and 
played 15...ed. 

Lautier discovered an ingenious 
resource: giving up a knight for 
four pawns with 16...dc! 17 ef Qf6 
18 Nb3 Nb4. After 19 Bbl d4!, he 


LAimSVSLACX 



Bed a 1 9 

KASPAROV/WHTTE 

Position after 18 e5 


21 Ra8 cb/Q 22 Rf8 Kf8, perhaps 
intending 23 BgS. Bui this would 
have led to 23_Qff5 24 Nbd4 Qbe4 
25 Be7 Kg8 26 Qd2 Qg6 27 Qb4 
Bb3 28 g3 Bfl 29 Kf I Qbl 30 Qbl 
Qbl 31 Kg2 Qe4, where the 
Frenchman would have a winning 
queen plus three pawns against two 
knights and a bishop. 

So he tried the desperate 23 Qb5 
Qb3 24 Qb8 Ke7 25 Qc7, but after 
25~Ke8 26 Bd2 Qd8 27 Qe5 Kf8, 
Lautier eluded perpetual check. 

After 28 Nd4 Nd3 29 Qe3 Qc4. 
Kasparov, with only a rook for 
Lauder’s queen, gave up. 


GIUOCO PIANO 


threatened 20...Bb3 as well as 
20—Bc4. 

Kasparov might have tried 20 
Qb5. but 20...C2 (20...RfbS 21 Ra7». 
Rb5 22 Ra8 wins outright for 
White) 21 Qb4 cb/Q 22 Rbl Rfb8 
23 Qa3 Qg6 24 Rb2 Qd3 25 Nbd4 
f25 Nfd2 Qc3 26 Qa5 Bb3 27 Qc3 
dc 28 Rb3 cd 29 Rb8 Rb8 30 Bd2 
yields black a pawn-ahead end- 
025...Q&3 26 RbS Bb8 27 Ba3 
puts Blade into a pawn-ahead 
endgame. Kasparov sacrificed rook 
for bishop with 20 Ra7. But Lautier 
played 20„c2!. looking forward to 
21 Bc2Ra7 22RdI Bc423Qe4d3 
24Bd3Nd325 Rd3 Bd326Qd3c6. 
which would yield Blade two rooks 
plus two pawns for minor pieces. 

To escape that, Kasparov chose 


vnetc 

Black 

VUM 

Stack 

KMP’nv 

Laothr 

Kaaptm 

tender 

1 e4 

eS 

IGeS 

dc 

2NI3 

N<* 

17 tS 

& 

3 Bel 

Bc5 

18 Nb3 

4 c3 

NIB 

19 Bbl 

M 

5 d3 

dS 

28 Ka7 

e2 

S Bb3 

h8 

21 Ra8 

Cb/Q 

7 b3 

all 

CTRffl 

KtB 

8 NtxD 

B Bc2 

BeS 

B*7 

23 Qb5 

S? 

ID Qe2 

11 M 

12 04 

13 OO 

r 

u 

tvo 

25 007 

28 Bd2 

27 Qe5 

28 KK 

Kcfi 

as 

ms 

14 ab 

15 44 

ab 

ed 

2# 003 

38 Rfidgnt 

Qd 


‘age 


ill ma 
ccialfa 


mat ci 
oat w«, 
' rcsrif 


ad Uut 
( ten," 1 


SI. 000 into nearly 5100,000 in the vola- 
tile commodities markets. 

And she went on “Larry King Live" 
and faced questioning about allegations 
by Paula Jones, a former Arkansas state 
employee, that the president, while gov- 
ernor, had sexually harassed her. Mrs. 
Clinton, who normally speaks in cogent 
paragraphs, replied with lhe negative 
semi grunt “nh-uh” when asked if the 
charges upset or bothered her. 

It has been difficult sometimes noi to 
believe that she has modulated her be- 
havior to make her strength un threaten- 
ing, that in terms of image she is still 
veering between making policy and 
making cookies: the seated posture and 
nretty-in-pink sweater at the press con- 
ference. the trip around the aisles of a 
Safeway store last week pushing a can. 

She denies the calculation or the con- 
tradictions. She says the sweater went 
with the longer skirt she chose because 
her shorter ones would have made for 
potentially embarrassing, camera angles. 

“I don’t know if I can convey to you 
what it’s like living in the White House 
when you're our age and you have so 
little control over your own life," 
she said of the visit to the market. 

“And you can't do something as sim- 
ple as going to a store without it being a 
major production. ” 

And it is not great talking to reporters 
who wonder whether there was some- 


tees, u’ 
Jes" 


;of th' 

tedur 


basing 

they*, 

; such. 


have si 
st as Is 
is far m 
xi by ti 
: Mfeni 
3uld do 


ick 


n lhe P: 

iany ot 


collapse 
in paid 
iave left 


L hear it all the time," she said, “but I 
don’t bear it from people who know 
about the commodities market in 1978- 
79, when clerks in back offices were 
making more money than I made." 

She says she and her husband invested 
through friends, Jim McDougal in the 
Whitewater development and James 
Blair in commodities, because they were 
confident that “these were people that 
we didn’t believe would ever lake advan- 


□acle of 
possible 
Pales tit 
and Jeri 
now. 
rs now 
offices 1 
Dbecom 
venting 


says it is ridiculous to think that 
her successful trades were linked to Mr. 
Blair’s position as counsel to Tyson 
Foods. Arkansas’s bipest business: “A 
year after I did it, Tyson Foods was 
supporting my husband's opponent in 
the 1980 gubernatorial election.” 

“I believe that I have created a lot of 
cognitive dissonance in the minds of 
people who are comfortable with the 
stereotypes," she said. But, unlike some 
or her supporters, she wiD not explain 
away criticism as sexism And she says 
she is not uying to have h att. 

“But I do want everything that I 
want,” she said flatly. “I want to be who 
I want to be and I don’t want to be told I 
can or cannot do something that is natu- 
ral and part of my life." 

As she always does, she sounds intelli- 
gent and straightforward. If she is dis- 
sembling about the couple’s invest- 
ments, she does it uncommonly wdL 
She laughs often and easily. Three 
times she seems prickly. Once she said: 
“I’m not going to tramp my daughter 
around and exhibit her like some prized 


for 20 c 
•ut, stun 
a go aw 
Mr. An 
da’s inai 
aides. M 
in ted ex 
fat's pas 
, -peaking 
?ud Ac 
; Comm 
g the p< 


was “m 
at refust 
jhrasng 
daroum 
0 minis ! 

letails o 
orehani 
.o sign, 
voretha 
this wai 


iS: 

diet 


conference fell unexpectedly ot the day 
aturn to the 


of a NATO ultimatum to the Serbs, she 
said, “It proved that I didn't know what 
was going ot in foreign policy, so put 
that to rest, i wasn’t sitting in the meet- 
ings, talking about what NATO was 
going to do. 

And of (he furor about her invest- 
ments, she concluded, “I now know that 
anybody can say anything.” 

The New York Times. 


• Pag* 1 

cal in 
rear. Co 
lian, Yu 
■ massag 
ping ant 
uresoffl 
aa, has i 
era! law 
•ices for ' 
ne says, 


fways in 
»n,’ the 
•ich repr 
t raagaz 
that 14 
nt issue 
.with an 
•tiled to 
and area 


•I made! 
ng budgi 
ies.Thet 
eareadv 
by the im 
Inch Nail 
ties, a pi 
•acco Co 
4h, Mr. 
ns, whic 
and they 
ntild up. 
:t I sold 3 

ns of they 
es,” Mr. 
is, I sold ' 
ally used 
could ha- 
's of snea 
■ket out t] 


geR 

a appre 


IPs easy Io s ub scrib e 
bi Untenbooeg 
just edi toll frees 
0 800 2703 



Wbahtf you’re tning to reach another country u\trwas.or call hack to the U.S.. bpnnr Hpics* cjii help. Jum dial the access code of the country yuu’tr in io reach an English-speaking Sprint operator. You don’t even hate to he a Sprint ' 
customer: All you need is a US. local calling card or WbrlJTravder FuNCaRI);'’ If t.m’re c.illing the U.5.. toil can even call collect. Bui next time yuu call, use Sprint Express. It can make foreign reunifies seem a little less foreign. 


America Sum 
o Antigua 
Argentina 

Autnlia 

Australia 

+Aastrii 


AUarfndos 


Belize I Herd I 

Belize i rrr pn pit am 

/Benvwda 

Bolivia 

Braril 


633-1000 

id) 

(KIWflO-777-1111 

m-ssm 

flOH-WI-XT? 

02240344 

mmm 

i-mw-m 

078-n-WH 

55ft 

*4 

Hffluavno? 

IWXkttH 

Om-xOln 

WOO-877SMO 


e*&BWbirta-Wrt22Q0 

(4804774008 


Ode 

0M03I7 

ikHnni: Kum 

nil 

o Macao 

ONQO-I2I 

TfVted 

OOKU8MHI5 

/+ China 

irXvP 

^/linnoan 

IKl^HJO-01477 

+ Msdna8 

800-0016 

+pHiugd 

050171477 

Cdoahb-Eoglkli 

400-134010 

r Indb 

INIft-LI" 

Mexico 

4>WVM77-MWll 

-PaMoRiro 

14004774000 

CoJwtbia-Spjnisb 

480-041110 

Indunofcj 

•W4UI-L5. 

+ Monaco 

mom 

+nRwmaja 

014004877 

+Gr4aRica 

lft.V 

■i-lnbrai 

UWW-V.3MII 

+ Neilierianck 

06A022-91B 

+1'iRbssu 

WB5455403 

+IC\prus 

WPaKMlI 

+ l>rai.-l 

I77-1U2-2727 

+ NrfJurkuuIs Amilks Oni-Hflff-715-ll 11 

+Rnssb| Moscow) 

mat 

+ Czech RqjnbBc 

OW2-OS707 

■^Irah 

n-vrn 

New Zealand 

ram-uw 

CSabao 

2154333 

■f Denmcri 

800MW77 

iJjpjn 


Micara^n 

03-16] 

+ nTinran and Kou 1-2154® 

ADaomcan ItefHiA 1 t-SKI-"'577877 


nwi4-.i.S™ 

°.Nieara^i| Mammal 161 

+ San Mirim) 

I72-B77 

Ecuadur 

n 

/Kviua 

rwNMJ 

tiVor»» 

050-12477 

Saudi Anhui 

VOH? 

+ El Salvador 

J 1 '! 

♦ ♦kurea 

lHB-16 

Panama 

115 

+Sint3pire 

MMkl77-r? 

+ Fated 

4SW1.W34 

tkma 

550-21 SS 

AOparaeoav 

tni-12-MW 

/ V.Somli Africa 

O-ttO-W-OOOl 

T France 

I9*WK7 

JhiMva 

5S(MY)NK 

✓Pom 

!% 

Spain 


T*Gennam 

llpftjxilj 

+K»rr3 

raw-ri 

PhSppnes 

SK-Ol 

ASlLbcu 

187 

+ Greece 

008-001-411 

ka»ai 

non"" 

(ETPIsatmBoahl 

+ Sweden 

020-79441 1 

+ Guatemala 


• liechiwwein 


/PhSppines 

102411 

+ Switzerland 

155-9777 

AHvndurai. 

tm[-Nm»-!2!2fKUt 

/Ijltnuuiia 

8*|4' 

l PM Coral 


o Taiwan 

OOMUWSn 

IkmeKom 

HW-UT/ 

ijnemhouig 

IMHI-UIL5 

PkSppuesiniin 

105-16 

✓Thailand 

tmi-^w-M-xr 


o Trinidad & Tuhasu 23 
+ Turkey ' 00800-14177 

+ Idled Arab Emkalo fflft-Ot 

United Kinjitfami .w . 0500490477 

i in i 


responsit 

angie poll 
view on t 
countnir 
1 States v 
ds For the 
eves in 1 
W illiam h 
the Feds 
w York, 
lay. “Yo 
loating et 
ingerate 
s said 1 
that the i 
aflooni 


'I'-SA M004774000 

- U& X lipn Wands 44004778000 
^Uruguay (100417 
t VaticfisCk) 572-1877 
Vfjiezuda-Ei^ljsh Mffl-Hll-A 
VcneaiL-U-SfunKh X0U-) 111-1 


uld trigg? 
ssthebot 
iTbato 
lock ani 
sluing dr 
held by 


^ Sprint 

Be there now. 


Cera* ntinrto&Mfr mas country ro 

c««yho»*»calfircw»*Mity — 

AHstwafetiekmiaypims. ■EiaEmDWianii^reQutfcstietQ'aKte Li* tod issuance ' Kw -y 


rwWufltrycrflmaauaiLiniy bang wmscmo clause Facirwiinumtus jl 

•‘'•FOMCAftO bitoq orty Use Gtnoaf S9i NunBfiriPtN.pervmCuieiiiii' 


V-** 1 " fMjnuneercufline 5<m Acc «s Nimtw of Ihc-courtry ««j ip n a W0M77-4W6 wto* n lhe U S BoJa newte 
iV.'rwi i.jjing whs awry ®tftn lew second twe -Putfcp»xvicsiTBYiWrfeaM-jfc»a /Ara tattle a: mag pu%s 
-tntonitBrmashmetoea'ttcmnfc'lDawwvouionwSpimCwrelM ** Frames 


WortdCupUSm^ 

« *W WaaoMOmciaCt^q^ 


Dtaie5.»5fli«lhUS)«l, wait tone. IhemjaltC* I z.*laoieal rwjrwiri A,aaA?int".inkat-;prv<’.'- i*, ■«» ■>■« ««ti» , miHSflWttiIv 1 1 Locai. iong riciaw mjv aoofv 






Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 


S XJ 


IT PROGRAM 


* 


★ 


* 


★ 

* 


IHT / SCRES 

19 9 4 

CHINA 

SUMMIT 

BEIJING 

’94 f ® ^ 


ifc * tt. 


Moderators: 


09:00 


09:10 


09:40 


10:10 

10:20 

10:50 


11:30 

11:45 


12:15 


14:00 


14:40 

15:00 


15:30 

15:45 


16:15 


16:40 

17:00 

18:30 


w E PNESPAY, MAY 11 

He Guanghui, Acting Vice Chairman. State Commission for Restructuring the Ecoitomic Systems (SCRES) 
Richard McClean, Chief Executive and Publisher , International Her ald Tribune (IHT) ' • 

WELCOMING ADDRESS . „ /crppci 

Li Tieying, State Councillor and Chairman , State Commission for Restructuring the Economic bystems {bCKtb) 

Richard McClean, Chief Executive and Publisher , Int ernational Herald Tribune (IHT) 

CHINA'S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC COOPERATION 

Li Lanqing, Vice Premier, People's Republic of China 

GLOBAL MULTILATERAL TRADING SYSTEMS: THE ROLE OF THE PRC 
Peter D. Sutherland, Director-General, GATT 

Question and Answer Session - Peter D. Sutherland 

Morning CoffeelTea . ' . ' , , • 

CHINA'S ECONOMIC REFORM AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF TFIE SOCIALIST 
MARKET ECONOMY 

Li Tieying, State Councillor and Chairman of SCRES 
Question and Answer Session - Li Tieying 

PANEL SESSION: THE FOREIGN PERSPECTIVE ON CHINA'S ECONOMIC REFORM AND 
ECONOMIC POLICY 

Goh Keng Swee, Former First Depuh/ Prime Minister of Singapore 
Vincent Tan Chee Yioun, Group Chief Executive Officer , Berjaya Group Berhad 
T. T. Tsui, Chairman. The Nezv China Hong Kong Group 
Hubert de Mestier, Chief Representative North-East Asia , TOTAL 

LUNCHEON 

Special Address: Wang Zhongyu, Chairman , State Economic and Trade Commission (SETC) 

THE SOCIALIST MARKET ECONOMY OF THE PRC: THE ASEAN PERSPECTIVE 
Mahathir bin Mohamad, Prime Minister of Malaysia 

Question and Answer Session - Prime Minister Mahathir 

STATUS QUO AND THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF REFORM IN CHINA'S PLANNING 

AND INVESTMENT SYSTEMS 

Gui Shiyong, Vice Chairman, State Planning Commission 

Question and Answer Session - Gui Shiyong 

Afternoon Tea 

REFORM OF THE ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF TFIE PRC 

Wang Zhongyu, Chairman of SETC 

Question and Answer Session - Wang Zhongyu 
Close Day One 

COCKTAIL RECEPTION AND DINNER BANQUET HOSTED BY THE CHINESE GOVERNMENT 
(GREAT HALL OF THE PEOPLE) 




Remarks: * Li Peng, Premier of the People's Republic of China 

* Mahathir bin Mohamad, Prime Minister of Malaysia 
Patrick J. Ward, Chairman & CEO, Caltex Petroleum Corporation 


* Awaiting final confirmation 





- S\i 


Moderators: 


08:50 


09:00 


09:30 

09:45 


10:30 

11:00 


11:30 

11:45 


12:15 

12:30 


14:15 


14:45 

15:00 


15:30 


16:00 

16:15 

16:45 


17:15 


17:45 


18:00 

19:00 


THURSDAY, MAY 12 

Wu Jie, Vice Chairman of SCRES 

Rolf D. Kranepuhl, Managing Direct or-Asia / Pacific, IHT 

OPENING REMARKS 

Wu Jie, Vice Chairman of SCRES 

Rolf D. Kranepuhl, Managing Director-Asia / Pacific. IHT 

REFORM IN THE FOREIGN TRADE SYSTEM AND PROMOTION OF ECONOMIC AND 
TRADE COOPERATION BETWEEN CHINA AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Wu Yi, Minister of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation 

Question and Answer Session - Wu Yi 

DEVELOPMENT OF CHINA'S INFRASTRUCTURE & INDUSTRY 
Percy Bamevik, President and CEO, ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd 

Morning CoffeelTea 

REFORM OF CHINA'S FISCAL SYSTEM 

Liu Zhongli, Minister of Finance and Director-General , State Administration Taxation 
Question and Answer Session - Liu Zhongli 

THE SOCIALIST MARKET ECONOMY OF THE PRC: THE WORLD BANK PERSPECTIVE 

Ernest Stem. Managing Director. The World Bank 

Question and Answer Session - Ernest Stem 
LUNCHEON 

Special Address: Liu Zhongli, Minister of Finance and Director-General, State Administration Taxation 
Guest of Honor: Ernest Stem, Managing Director, The World Bank 

REFORM IN THE FINANCIAL AND BANKING SYSTEMS 

Chen Yuan, Deputy Governor. People's Bank of China 

Question and Answer Session - Chen Yuan 

FINANCING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SOCIALIST MARKET ECONOMY 

Philip Tose, Chairman, Peregrine Investments Holdings Ltd 

INTERNATIONALIZING THE EMERGING CAPITAL MARKETS OF THE PRC 

Liu Hongru, Chairman, China Securities Regulatory Commission 

Question and Answer Session - Liu Hongru 

Afternoon Tea — — — 

A PERSPECTIVE ON SHANGHAI'S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Huang Ju, Mayor of Shanghai 

CHINA AND THE WORLD 

Helmut Schmidt, Former Chancellor. Federal R epublic of Germany 

CLOSING REMARKS 

Li Tieying, State Councillor and Chairman of SCRES 
Richard McClean, Chief Executive and Publisher, IHT 


SUMMIT PRESS CONFERENCE - CHINA WORLD HOTEL ~ ~ 

COCKTAIL RECEPTION AND DINNER BANQUET HOSTED BY IHT ~ 

(CHINA WORLD HOTEL) 


m ^ 

Vo Ik 


p Vo 4t 


Aft* 



Guests of Honor: Li Tieying, State Councillor and Chairman of SCRES 

Helmut Schrmdt, Former Chancellor, Federal Republic of Germans 
Remarks: Ronald B. Woodard, President. Tlie Boeing Commercial 1 Airplane Grouv 

He Guanghui, Acting Vice Chairman of SCRfq v ° rou P 




&ESi 


ti'SCREs, 


■max 


m 


ns* 




w— . 

MMENT 


h- 


n- 

f,. 


tw 


*»S e 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. MAY 10 , 1994 


U^rsi75 


Page 9 * _ 


Once in a Thousand Years 






-'-i 




t r • j - 








'V-tfr 

/\ w.\/\ •••/ 




\ $< . 





- W,. / 

,> ’ / _ ' » *S_/ ' ' \ 

v C.' - • " ■>-. 



\ x 


: v/ ; 


v-.rr 


.• \ 


WELCOME 


SUMMIT 


May 


--5 r ’ ■■ ' 






A* 



*4' 


9 


*’94 t g||^j| 



4 b 199445 J! 11 n -12 9 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


rUKLBHSD WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON 




Summit Sponsors : 


A lilt 

#WIP 




PEREfiRINF 


Corporate Sponsors : 



BANCO 

NAPOLI 



Pubic Cn&t Wutttyoon 


BERJAYA 




E'GEPHONAL RHSOuncts OBOuP 





New Cwn* How Kong 



TfWg- 

REL/OH) 

SBMCES 



BankVVustria 


Supporting Sponsors- 

© 

BANK EOTHPOTRA 


BOOZ-ALLEN & HAMILTON 


Burson -Marsteller 



China Worid Hotel 


Z 3 ££A£f 23 


DAIWA 


OahSugRuano® 



Jardine Fleming 

n. - um— . . 


BBJWC 

AT CHIN A WORLD TRADE CENTER 
A SHANGRMa WTERNATXMM. HOTH 


FIRST VENTURE CAPITAL CORPORATION 


FLEMINGS 


J 0 HNSON 

ELECTRIC 


International Trading, SA 



t h-.Al •?. U IM OTVIYT BANKING 


lHQLDINus LIMlTFn| 


M€TROPf£j< B®HN) 

' ‘ MAfcVSM.. 


MYCOM 

BERHAD 



mm $ 


< 2 B 

iffPO GROUP 


5dsetnj 

Pimentos 

drqentinoa 



Winterthur 


■r-.: 


ill ma 

eci 


“I 


makei 
ist we 
resiifb 
iio 


nd lar? 


uu 


ften, . 
ices, u® 1 
ies- w > 

-rfibjS 

lechm 3 ^ 

ne 


basie^ D 
they £„ 
> such 


have sie 
si as Im 
isfar a$ 
d by tie 
: Mfcne 

Mild deg 



ii 


i ck 


iro 
3ld 
[ u 

av 

:rai 

ma 


□ the Pi 

iany otll ne 

gne 

collapse we 

'□paid L 
ave left &e 1 


nacleof 1 ®' 
Mssible, 6 J 
Pales tin 0 ■ 


and Jerit al 
now. Q E 
rs now i’ d 
offices 
Dbecom^' 
venting CT 
ie, 

for 20 o/ e 
■uL stunn^ 
>1 go awa ] S 
Mr. Aral 1 
■la's inau; w 
aides. 
mted exe 
fat's paw&" 
peaking — 
Mid Abb 
: Commit 
l the pea 


was “mo 
at refused 
ihrasing * 
d around 
nminister 
mils of 
'orehand, 
.0 sign. A 
vote that v 
this way." 


iS: 

! diene 


i Page 1 


cal in No 
/ear. Comt 

lian, Virgil 
: massager 
ping and h. 
uresof Myi 
oa, has a h 

eral law fir 
ices for aii 
ae says, “D 


l ways in ere 
son, the pn 
Jcb represe 

.T magbane? 

that 100.C 
at issue w 
, with an ad 
luted to net 
and areas n> 


it made its w 
ng budgets . 
ies. Theclos 
e are adveni 
by the indusi 

Inch Nails, a 
ties, a prodi 
iaoco Co. 
rth, Mr. Str 
■ns, which c 
and tbev coi 


mOd up. 
n I sold 360,1 


■nsofthousai 
es," Mr. Sir 
s, I sold tom 
ally used asc 
could haves- 
? of sneaker 
■ket out there 


ge Rah 


m appropn: 


responsible 
ange policy, 
view on tfcd 


countering sp 
1 Suites was t 
ils for the doll 
eves in floah 
William McDt 
' the Federal I 
sw York, said 
lay. “You ca 
loating exchai 
mge rale targe 
s said Tuesc 
that the G-7 v 
a floor under 


it 


ss thebe 
d. That i 
lock at 
sluing c 
held by 









^International Herald Tribune 
Tuesday, May 10, 1994 
Page J O 




Kimono Couture: Kyoto Meets Paris 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — In the City of Light it’s 
cherry blossom time. Kimonos flow- 
ered in the Bagatelle gardens and even 
sprouted at the Louvre in a show held 
under the Louvre Pyramid. 

The 1200th birthday of Kyoto — home of 
Japan's kimono tradition — is the excuse for 
Franco-Japanese celebrations. At the Bagatelle, 
exhibits show not only the weaving, dyeing and 
embroideries of five Kyoto studios, but also 
how Japonisme infected antique French fur- 
nishings, from lacquer cabinets to patterned 
porcelain. 

The kimono is undisputably a work of an. It 
takes shape on the body but unlike Western 
fashion can also bang its beauty on a wall. 
Wisteria winds across a grainy surface, snow- 
flakes flutter, bamboos bend above a fishing 
net and almond blossoms sway against a watery 


reputation for fashion originality within the 
great tradition. 

The Toki Shisui label inside his kimonos is 
part of the Ichikoshi company that he founded 
in 1980 with three workers and that now pro- 
duces 60,000 kimonos a year with sales figures 
of $200 million. 

The kimonos in rich colors from eggplant 
and deep green though petal pink and lacquer 


yellow, with geometric and palm-leaf designs, 
were shown in front of an illustrious audience 


were shown in front of an illustrious audience 
that included the Japanese ambassador to 
France, Atsuhiko Yalabe, a kimono-clad Kar- 
ina Sukarno, daughter of the former Indonesian 
president, and Princess Yoko Nfiyura. who was 
in a Christian Dior ball gown embroidered with 
bees. 


blue sky — all vivid vignettes from a Japanese 
landscape captured within the T-sbape. 

The fiat robes sprang to life on the runway 
when the Japanese designer Shinobu Baba 
showed his modem collection — call it kimono 
couture — which united East and West. Using 
fine Italian silk. French embroidery and inspi- 
ration from ail over, the designer has b trill a' 


“His kimono colors, the tropical plants and 
Egyptian motifs are very avant-garde,” said 
Sukarno. “And that is important because tradi- 
tional kimonos are out of fashion with young 
girls.” 

Baba himself was overwhelmed by the expe- 
rience of seeing the models glide out under the 
glass pyramid with the Louvre palace as a 
backdrop, and then seeing the kimonos reflect- 
ed like gauzy butterflies on the glass roof as 
night fell. 

“It’s exceptional, it's more than a dream to 
show bar,” be said, explaining that he saw h is 


work as a culmination of a thousand years of 
tradition. In 1 99 !. he had a show at New York's 
Meiroplitan Museum, with the kimono designs 
based on (he collection of Japanese screens in 
the Met*s collection. For tbe Paris show, the 
theme was inspired by “Egypiomaaia,” a recent 
exhibition at the Louvre. For Baba, that meant 
the palm print and patterns inspired by classi- 
cal gods and animals. 

In homage to France, there was a kimono 
with its decorative obi sash woven in Lyon — 
home of the French silk industry — and an 
elaborately decorated kimono embroidered by 
the Parisian house or Lesage. 

“He is extraordinary — we worked together 
for 18 months,” said Francois Lesage. wbo was 
a guest at the Lenotre dinner. 

Lesage is also involved in the Bagatelle exhi- 
bition. where a demonstration of tbe variety of 
Western embroidery with its 40-plus types of 
stitch and varied techniques is shown alongside 
the traditional silk-thread Japanese embroidery 
that Lesage describes as “painting with nee- 
dles." 

The French embroidery house is currently 
clinching an arrangement to set up an embroi- 
dery school with a Japanese fashion college, as 
it has already done in Los Angeles. 

It is difficult for Western eyes and minds lo 
understand the symbolism of the kimono — 


and bow the modem versions challenge or rein 
force the tradition. 

The Bagatelle exhibition seems obscure and 
difficult to grasp, until you study the exhibits 
from five artists (three under 40) in tandem 
with the explanatory texts. It then becomes 
dear that the show is not just a celebration of 
an and visual fireworks, but of technique. 

There is ShJbori dyeing, when tbe effect of 
waves or peacock feathers is enriched by the 
knowledge that they are in fact created by tying 
the fabric into thousands of knots before dye- 
ing it. Or the delicacy of rice-glue application 
that is used to fix colors to make patterns 
precise. 

Even the cords used to fasten kimonos are 
works of art, and a large section of tbe exhibi 
lion is devoted to the band-made ties. 

Splendid though it is to see tbe living work of 
a 1.200-year tradition, it might have been good 
for the Western audience to see historic kimo- 
nos alongside. In fact, the exhibition will 
change on June 9, with the introduction of a 
display or Noh costumes 

The Bagatelle exhibition will move to Kyoto 
in October. Pierre Cardin will then present his 
own interpretation of fashion using the Japa 
nese craft, techniques. 

"Kyoto- Pans - Kyoto, 1.200 ans ef influences. 
Chateau de Bagatelle, through July 31. 



Shinobu Baba with models wearing his kimonos at the Louvre: { below right) Karina Sukarno in kimono and Princess Yoko A fivura m Dior gown 



.&» ft 




1 


.. ■** 


~ m, ti'S- 

^ ' .J*> 


• V** 






***** * 


'■’'SgggS 


-.t-T 






: VC 









i .i 




■<r: 




i,*' 




f , 




ma 




>*?>■ 


•K 







‘Womynists’and^Causeheads’iHollywoodTacklesPC 


ThtWm 

tnrmm 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Service 


L OS ANGELES — Zak 
Penn still remembers his 
first class at Wesleyan 
University in 1986. “It 
was a psychology class, and this 
guy got up and said Freud was not 
only racist, misogynist and cl assist, 
but also irrelevant.” Penn recalled. 

“f thought, ‘Whoa. who is this 
guyT This is the same guy who said 
he was a black lesbian trapped in 
tbe body of a white male oppres- 
sor.” 

Adam Leff, one of Penn's college 
classmates, recalled: “I remember 
being told early on that you were 
supposed to walk in a nonthreaten- 
ing way at night. Suddenly I was 


Fci mtermaiwi contciring rurKHVfnflvv m matpr ijdfmjfi coos cart Ion Finn fKT 
Gorman, .11 01 K44 &5 6S « lar .0691 ITS 413 Undot Oman nnulMons ,;. m> 
ireo pencu 6 grjnicd T-- an row craws 


possessed. Every night I walked 
home from tbe library I asked my- 
self. ‘Is my walk nomhreaiening?' 
How do I do this goofy, nonthreat- 
ening walk and not appear lo be 
coming on to a girl. I mean, wom- 
an.” 

Out of numerous such experi- 
ences, these two screenwriters have 
turned political correctness upside 
down with a very silly spoof. 
“PCU,” which opened to mixed, 
though nomhreaiening. reviews in 
the United States last week. 

It was also shown to a sold-oul 
crowd at Wesleyan, in Middletown. 
Connecticut, where it received a 
generally enthusiastic reception, 
despite some walkouts. 

Paul Schiff (Wesleyan, class of 
198 1 J. the producer of the film, said 
the university had aciualh turned. 


perish the thought, mainstream, 
perhaps even a bn conservative. 


“Wesleyan’s always been a bit 
ahead of the curve when it comes to 
political and social trends,” Schiff 
said the other day. seated with tbe 
two writers in his office at the 20th 
Century Fox studios. 

“The stridency and hysteria 
about PC has actually died down 
there, but on other campuses mi the 
East Coast and the middle of the 
country it’s fierce," 

Political correctness is ripe for 
Hollywood treatment, and it seems 
somehow appropriate that tbe first 
movie to deal with this potentially 
serious issue should be a ditsy one. 

The movie, directed by Han 
Bodmer (University of California 
at San Diego, dass of 1978). focus- 
es on Port Chester University, a 


fictional school that looks like 
Wesleyan. It deals with the arrival 
of a studious freshman (played by 
Chris Young) who finds himself 
surrounded by “womynists” and 
“causebeads” who are constantly 
shouting about a variety of issues, 
from saving whales and not eating 
meat to supporting gays in the mili- 
tary and freeing Nelson Mandela, 
even though everyone knows Man- 
dela has beat free for a while. 

The film insults just about every- 
one and everything. Men are op- 
pressors; black students protest tbe 
fact that walls are painted white 
and everyone is more or less com- 
pelled to cat. dress, speak and 
above all think the same way. Short 
people are referred to as “vertically 
challenged." 

“Give roe an issue and DJ give 


Yes, I wont to start receiving the HT. This is ihe subscription tern. 1 prefer 
(check opprepnate boxes): 


you a PC position,” said Penn. “Ev- 
eryone wears Birkenstocks and rag 
socks. 

“Men may shave their legs but 
women can't You wear baggy 
army shorts or pants. Medical 
pants are important too." 

Leff said: “Eggplant to artichoke 
is your color spectrum. And you 
have to wear a T-shirt that says, 
‘Censorship Is Un-American.* And 
carry a Guatemalan handbag." 

“I thought it was Peruvian," said 
Penn. 

“Guatemalan,” insisted Leff. 

Macrobiotic and vegetarian food 
are de rigueur, meal is out of the 
question, and coffee is problematic. 

"You have Jamaican Blue 
Mountain, but govemmeat -sup- 
ported field dusting is potentially 


harmful to the spotted slog °‘ 
plained Leff. 


“And Colombian coffee- 
Colombia supports troops tm} 
may protect cocaine harvester £6s>--.:v 

He paused. “It goes on and on U ; 

The two writers, - . 

26, came to Ho0jwod« I » **!■ - : , .J, 
shortly after graduating non -- 

leyan and writing a . ^ V 
about a cant rat that : 'v ,~~ 

tral Park. Mercifully that 
not made. Bui the script got n*® 
jobs in the movie business y.,.^ ■ 

The two then sold tbesoeogy 

that became “The 1*A 
Hero," tbe Arnold 

film. The two writers recchwd w v .. 
Leff and Perm are now worts* * iv. . .. . 

nmiHl. . X. 


n 12 months (364. iuun in all with 52 bonus issues). 1 tW-94 
lD 6 months ( 182 issues in cl! with 26 bonus issues). 

i I 3 months (91 issues in oil with 13 bonus issues). 

□ My check is enclosed (payable to the International Herald Tribune). 
■— I Please charge my: ~ American Express z Diners Club □ VISA 
_I MasterCard Eurocard .7 Access 


Collier or et brillams 


Credit cord charges **i U be mode in French Francs at current exchange rates. 


CARD ACC ND, 


E-vP DATE — . SIGNATURE 

fOP BUSINESS CODERS. FIE ASE INDICATE YOUR V£I NUMBS? 




(MTVATnixrixr RH73202ntel) 
_ Mr . Mrj . Mui FAMUr NAME 


PERMANENT ADD5ESS ' HC'V£ 6USWESS. 






Tl est des signatures auxquelles on tient 


separate projects. i N 

Schiff, who produced aidi 
as “Hie Vanishing and - 
Cousin Vinny," was stanW ^ • 
Leff and Penn came to ’ - 

“PCU," because of the Wcsle^ 
connection. \i 

“We set out to satirize the j 1 
fidal results of the PC open?*}, i ; . 
said Schiff. -We jnst 
make a comedy ih th e tnd fflff 1 

Americmi collie copwdo- 

Pam interrupted. “ Sotn ^5 ? ^ 

things in this movie t 

toned down from what tew. ?. < 
pened," he said. ji ? ^ 


- 4 wt* 

V s 

_ ■" i tir- 
I "‘ » 


Bague or ec brillams 



Jhn ofhrevpns Av&a 3 «. W4. and it awnb^r to new K&cnben aJy 


71 f k nnjntnnu m 4 i 

Hcralo»^k-(tnbunc. 


Van Cleef & Arpels Paris 22 . Pt« vendomc. ra = 42 61 58 58 - geneve 31 , R ue du res™, th ■. 311 eo 70 “b 






SPRING SUMMED 

COLLECTION 


-*v a/BL. 


ESCADl 


Marie-1 


8, rue de Sevre*, 

Parts 6® 



*•« --vttefc. 




























hr 


. 


k 


.i 

' _*i. • *•'" 


' >A 


flU* 
f*8 


!■■ .*! ,• .." 


i, • ->* 
... 

•-, * 





ekJe.-f 


fr*** 




im** 




»age 


International Herald Tribune, Tuesday , Afcry /0, 


//. 


KSDS® 'Ni>ex 


rTo&85P 



Genentech Lives 'Hi 

o y v **O wv,i 

s New Drugs Produce Healthy Profits 


By Lawrence M. Fisher 

New York Ttma Scrtice 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, 
California — Biotechnology 
companies do not me pop songs 
to hawk their wares as ihe makers 
of athletic shoes or sports coupes 
do. But if they did, Genentech 
toe. could well be singing Steve 
Winwood’s 1987 hit, “Back in the 
High Life Again.” 

As it happens, 1987 was the 
low point for Genentech, the 
world's first biotech company. 
That was the year an advisory 
panel to the U.S. Food and Drug 
Administration recommended 
against approval of the compa- 
ny's flagship drug, Activa sc, used 
to dissolve blood dots in heart- 
attack patients. 

Though Activase was ultimately 
approved in 1988, Genentech was 
unable to show that its $2^200-a- 
dose drug was any more effective 
than a competing drug selling at 
one-tenth (he price; and sales 
failed to meet early expectations. 
The result: Roche Holdings Ltd, 
the big Swissd drug maker, ac- 
quired majority ownership of the 
weakened Genentech in 1990. 

Roche, which currently owns 
60 percent of Gen ea lech’s equity, 
retained an option to acquire the 
remaining 40 percent at $60 a 
share, effectively putting a cap on 
the stock price. Meanwhile, 


slowed and many ana- 
lysts Stopped following Genen- 
tech. 

But free from Wall Street's im- 
patient scrutiny and liberated 
from the endless need to raise 
research money, courtesy of 
Roche’s deep pockets, Genentech 
stuck to its goals. 

The past year, and more partic- 
ularly the past six months, have 
been a vindication of the compa- 


ny’s long-term strategy: to develop 
novel, genetically engineered 
drogs to treat pressing medical 
needs, including a drug to treat 
cystic fibrosis and another to spur 
growth in children. 

Genentech now has multiple 
products, and profits, both rare 
among biotech companies. In 
1993, it earned $58.9 million on 
sales of $649.7 million, a healthy 
jump from earnings of $20.8 mil- 



NET INCOME 


. vV : H'v $ 75*«Hwi J: 7, v : ^,,/fv* 



lion on revenue of 5544.3 milUnn 
in 1992. It has a pipeline full of 
promising dreg candidates in ad- 
vanced trials. 

“Genentech is executing with 
perfection,” said Mark Simon, an 
analyst with Robertson, Stephens 
& Co. an investment firm in San 
Francisco. “It’s Hke an engine hit- 
ting on all eight cylinders. They 
have thoroughly learned from 
their disaster of 1987. They’re pa- 
tient, they’re methodical, and 
they don’t shoot for the moon." 
The question today is: Wfl] the 
life last? 

„ drug industry standards, 
Genentech remains small, and 
the cloud hanging over its future 
is whether Roche will exercise the 
option to acquire the balance of 
the company at $60 a share by 
July 1, 1995. It can still buy after 
that date, but only at market 
rates, which could go higher. 
Genentech shares were priced at 
$48.50 in trading Monday on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Roche has not said what it in- 
tends to do, although some com- 
pany executives have said they are 
not inclined to alter the current 
relationship as long as it is wak- 
ing wefl. Roche executives now fiD 
just two of Geneniech’s 12 board 
seats. A complete takeover might 
well submerge Genentech ’s entre- 


Dollar Eroded 
By Skidding 
U.S. Securities 


TteN«v Yoft Times See GE3VENTECH, Page 15 


rill ma 
pecialii^ 

Imakei 
that wc 
>f resiit h 

TO 

ind lai? 
jfwn," ? 
dices, n? 
i ties.” 2 
■S of th'*k 
t techn^ 


Alitalia Loss Wid< 




| Industrial Sectors 1 


Ite Pm. % 

dan dom ctong*. 


Mon. Pin 

don ckat 

.% _ 

EnH W 

tlOJB 111.19 -0 21 

CapM Goods 

110.71 11150 

-027 

UBUra 

T16JW 117.05 -0B9 

RnrlbMUs 

121 £3 12230 

-028 

Rnanai 

115J3 11&91 -0J0 

ConsnmrGooda 

9557 96.69 

-1.47 

Sanfcaa 

11151114.780 -1.11 

Mniwiout 

124.10 12425 

-0.12 

Formaaktamirfoa about the Mbx, a booklet Is av^tle free of chame- 

Wm to Trib index. 181 Avenue CTartas do Gaufe. 92521 Notify Cedox, France. 

O intofrauiarml HaraU T*m» 




Rouen 

ROME — Alitalia, the Italian state airline, 
said Monday that its loss for 1993 had widened 
nearly 20-fold, to 343 bfflion lire ($215 mflHon). 
and that debt_had risen sharply. _ 

Hit by economic recession, a cutthroat price 
war and overcapacity, the aiding also said it 
would shed jobs, reorganize its routes and time- 
table and reduce costs. It had incurred a net loss 
of 17.6 billionlire in 1992. _ 

In 1993, the airiine’s debt rose to 1.64 trillion 
Hre from 694 billion lire. 

“The results were affected by an internation- 
al economic depression, overcapacity and a 
strong contraction of demand in the business 
segment,” the company said. 

Alitalia said the restructuring plan, passed at 
Monday's board meeting, which also approved 


the remits, aimed to bring the company back to 
profit in the short- to- medium term. 

A spokesman refused to sav how many jobs 
losses had been approved in "the p lan, adding 
that a figure would emerge after a meeting on 
Wednesday between management and unions. 

Company executives said last week that at 
least 1,200 jobs, including those of flight crew 
members, would be shed through a mixture of 
early retirements and lime-sharing agreements. 

Industry analysts said that to ensure long- 
term profitability the company must also form 
international alliances. 

With only a small international network, 
Alitalia s best hope is to act as a “feeder,” 
pumping passengers imo the networks of its 
larger competitors, they said. 

The company took a first step towards forg- 


ing an intercontinental alliance this week by 
signing a strategic agreement with Continental 
Amines in the United States. 

■ British Midland-Air Canada IJnlr 

British Midland said Monday it has concluded 
a code-sharing agreement with Air rannWa 
AFP-Extel News reported from London. Under 
the accord, Air Canada wflU be able to cany 
passengers to five new British destinations — 
Glasgow, Belfast, Edinburgh, Leeds, Bradford 
and Teeside — via London’s Heathrow airport 

British Midland said that passengers wanting 
to travel from Glasgow to western Canada could 
now link up with Air Canada’s Hea thrown to- 
Vancouver flight, and use services from other 
British cities to Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatcka 

NEW YORK — Tumbling U.S. 
Treasury bond and stock prices 
Monday eroded investor confi- 
dence in owning doUar-denominat- 
cd assets and sent the U.S. currency 
lower against European currencies. 

The Federal Reserve Board's 
failure to raise U.S. interest rates 
was the demise of the dollar and the 
bond market, traders said. 

“It’s hard to get excited about 
the dollar when the stocks and 
bards are getting whacked,” gain 
Steve Geovanis, managing director 
of foreign exchange at Merrill 
Lynch. “The dollar is vulnerable." 

The dollar finished in New York 
at 1.6540 Deutsche marks, down 
from 1.6625 Friday, and at 5.6720 
French francs, down from 5.7003. 
The dollar also slipped to 1.4105 
Swiss francs from 1.4140 Friday. 
The pound strengthened to $1,698 
from $1.4930. 

The flight from dollar- denomi- 
nated assets was spurred by a 
plunge in Treasury bond prices. In- 
vestors bailed out of Treasuries 
amid fears that inflation, which 
erodes (he value of fixed-income 
securities, would accompany ro- 
bust U.S. economic growth. While 
the Fed already has raised interest 
rates three times this year as a pre- 
emptive strike against inflation, 
many investors had speculated the 
U.S. central bank might push rates 

up again this week. 

But on Monday, the Fed te mpo , 
rarily added reserves to the banking 
system at a time when federal funds, 
the rate on overnight loans among 
U.S. banks, were trading above the 
perceived target of 3.75 percent. 
That served as a signal to traders 
that the central bank endorsed a 
steady monetary policy, which 
stoked selling of bonds and dollars. 

Analysts said interest-rate specu- 
lation was likey to dominate market 
sentiment until May 17, when the 
central bank's policy-making Feder- 
al Open Market Committee meets. 

“Federal Reserve operations con- 
tinue to dominate the market," a 
foreign -exchange trader in New 
York said. “Everyone’s just trying to 
figure out when they wfli cane in.” 


jbsifiteqj, 

1 they tj e 
is such t g 

in 

i have sie 
jst as oe 
as far a; 
ed by ue 

_ e Mfene 

Some analysts debated whethe rould deg 
an imminent tightening of moot 
taiy policy would help or hinde 
the dollar. Although rising short 
term rates often encourage invest 
meats in a currency, they ca 
depress bond prices, causing a 
outflow of money. 

Adrian Schmidt, international c 
canomist with Chase Investmer 
Bank in London, said a 50 baa 
point increase in federal funds ever 
tually would bolster the dollar. 

*Tm one of those people wh- 
im thei 


1 


ich 


think, yes it would help 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


.. in the P> sl 

me ^’ many Oltii 


collapse w 

Jnpaid L 
have left 5® 


Foreigners Buy 
$12.5 Billion 
Of Japan Stocks ;iT5w5 


j made of * 

I ipossible® 1 
rPalesiin 0 
and Jerii at 


, offices r , 
to becomt^ 
v venting 


for 20 or* 


Agence France- Prase 
TOKYO — Foreign buying 
of Japanese slocks jumped to a 
record $12J> billion in March, 
inflating the long-term capital , • ■> 

surplus to a record high for the ' : ’ ut - stum V 
second straight month, the Fi- '“if 0 * wa , ' 
nance Ministry said Monday. 1 Mr ‘ Aral 
The capital surplus of $21.9 
bfllkm easily surpassed the 


Japan's trade sraphis hits a 
record. Page 15. 


ela’s inauj* 
'aides. 
[anted ex© 
■ifat’s paw^" 
: speaking — 
'.oud Abb 

Commit 

previous record of $173 bil- S| 8 ^ P™ 
lion in February, the biggest l - 
monthly inflow of long-term • was “ mo 
capital in almost two-and-a- : ‘ al refused 
half years. phrasing t 

Net purchases of Japanese ljd biouad 
shares by _ foreign investors f* 0 minister 
have now hit three consecutive °f 
records following purchases of "forehand, 

$1 13 billion in February and 10 ^S 11 * A 
$10.6 billion in January. -wore that v 
The heavy baying during the 3 this way.” 
three months helped boost net '■ 
purchases of Japanese shares to i 
a record of almost $50 btihon 
for the latest fiscal year, which 
ended March 31. 


Thinking Ahead / Commentary 


Time for a Bretton Woods Reunion 


>1S: 

J tdienc 


saPagel 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribute 

W ASHINGTON —Half a centu- 
ry later, the dream of the archi- 
tects of the postwar interaa- 
tianal economic order is almost 
coating true. Next year, touch wood, a new 
World Trade Organization win take its place 
alongside the International Monetary Fund 
and the Wold Bank as the third leg of the 
grand triad of multilateral institutions first 
envisioned at the Bretton Woods conference 
in July 1944. 

With the collapse of Communism, the in- 
stitutions ate becoming genuinely worldwide 
bodies, as the architects originally intended. 

But as the triad’s third kg is put into place, 
the other two are showing signs of age. They 
will not last the next half century in then* 
current form. 

With the anniversary fast approaching, the 
PbmV and the Fimd are coming under dose 
scrutiny as the international fin a nci al commo- 
nityjjrepans its venfict on .their first 50 years. 

The most common criticisms at the Bank 
are that it has become bloated and lost its 
focus; that it has tried to take on too much 
and n egfert sd the e n viron m ent 
The Fund is widely acknowledged to be 
too mean. Devel- 
accused the Fund 
a seams guw>«; — conditions tor its 
loans and lacking political sensitivity. Now 
these charges have burst forth with renewed 
vieor over the Fund’s handling of Russia. 

Some of ihe criticisms are petty; some are 
being fixed (the Bank is gjduafly jajPV 
more attention to the etrvmmrKCt); somc 
^ m^fixing (the Bank is stifl too bloat- 
ed); and some are just . 


imm and mean — . 
oping countries have 
of sett 



The record shows indisputably, for in- 
stance, that countries meeting the Fund’s 
conditions have usually prospered, while 
those rqecting them have not — and the same 
will undoubtedly hold true for Russia too. 

Bat the main challenge for the next 50 
yearn will be for the institutions to adapt to a 
radically different wodd. 

Over the past half century, the world has 
moved from fixed to floating exchange rates 

Hie World Bank and 
IMF are showing signs of 
age and will not last in 
their current form. 

and the industrial countries have long 
stopped seeking loans from the Fond, prefer- 
ring the private capital markets. The empha- 
8$ o f development philosophy has shifted 
from government aid to private investment 
Now, formerly developing countries, espe- 
cially in Asia, are fast graduating u»n the 
industrial league, and most ex-COmmunist 
countries have embraced market economics. 
The balance of wodd eoonomic power is 
inexorably shifting away from the Western 
countries that dominated the postwar era. 

These developments have the kmgfeon ef- 
fect of weakening the Bretton Woods instituti- 
ons. The IMF no l ;- gcx fulfils its original mis- 
gnyi nf s tahitrrnigtffrfiangp ratwt and it« fiKmty 

are now much the same as those of the World 
Bank: low- and middle-income countries. 

Both institutions ate gong to see their diem 
base shrink as man and more countries devel- 


op and the ex-Canmunist countries become 
properly functioning market economies. 

With fewer sectors now considered suitable 
for pubbe development aid, (he institutions' 
areas of operations will dinrinkh — just as 
their activities increasingly overlap. 

So why not a merger? 

There would obviously be some advan- 
tages: duplicated activities, such as analysis, 
research, sane programs and technical assis- 
tance, could be ratiaudized. Costs could be 
reduced and a merged institution might make 
money selling off some prime Washington 
real estate. 

But much of that could be done without a 
merger. Far more important is to get the 
institutions’ nrisaons right. 

There is still probably a useful role for a 
good cop (the Bank) and a bad cop (the 
Fund) in prodding many of the world’s coun- 
tries in the right direction. But the arguments 
fa a merger can only grow stronger in the 
years a h e ad , if the Fund, in particular, fails to 
reinvent its role. _ 

In an ideal world, the Fund might try to 
recapture its original function of bringing 
more order to exchange rates. It might en- 
force stronger surveaHauce of national eco- 
nomic policies and try to keep tabs on surplus 
as well as deficit countries. 

That is unlikely to happen any time soon. 
Meanwhile, a more profitable approach 
would be to use the triad’s three legs to 
support new forms of intergovernmental co- 
operation, perhaps in an expanded a re- 
vamped Group of Seven, that better reflect 
the world’s changing balance of economic 
power. Maybe the world’s best brains could 
go back to Bratton Woods and redesign the 
architecture for the next 50 years. 


Quite simply the Royal Oak 




Maya 

Cross Rflt*S Uro OF BLF. SJS. Yn CJ Panto 

* * arm uu lob* ua usss* 

,,, — IB® IM u® urn IMS* ana — ws ua ws as* 

3U28 si* ** JS »W)> UW 4 *M* utm uas* ran ur 

-***”-— "■ — — isui um van 

I32J5I * wn 


31228 ** 7Zu two* 1M UN* um ism* ran ur 

use m * 77 ril S-E umjj sun wui um mm 

riSraW I** 22 am un* ’“S 

UUB WO Jg BUS US* WUS-. ** «=» "£ 

isca \ar* i ma mm uus to* un uws 

aflBB SIMS 4UtS 1SMI* 4» *»* 

?r_ Yart «« w ® U« 1M 1 in H21UC1 

no 

TM 


Eurocorrsncy Dsposifls 


Smooths 4 l *4'h SSVk 


May 9 


Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

Frendi 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 


SHrSh 

S4te5lfa 

2te-2U. 

5¥>-5ft 

39te4 

5V4r5W 

51%-TO 

TMVt 

5 V5% 

mj 

SKtrW. ? 

QbHu 

2V.-TO 

S 

3 HUIY, 

5>WHi 

WoW 

2 «W-2 ^ 

5*4-5** 


M 

iUDEMARS PlGUFT 

The master watchmaker 


For information and lmi.i]i^<ul-. pli^iv; wniv iu- 
Audcman. t’ipiLi & Ck- SA.. 13-iK U? Hulssus. switseiLind. 
Td. mJ 21 JWi -19 3 1 Fax 2] ^3 ^ 1-i 


u>0o U* 3*9 a MS AUK 1SMI* 4HI 4J7* 

UOS VM W » ~~71 u* JS 9 S TLB M 31 »01 

S "i? .« !£r iS MB’ » LMO * “21 

uus vm oi» 1WI juju ua mm im vu* 





UW- — 

um- van war 

UUS 2.1M* ^ lua 3U3H W& TIMB UB» ^Ut I 

;St W” 5 9901 , X — ^ andlMMt mm POT a**™ Tenuta 

^ 3 X nS *'** a ' r 

toW*/ * Tb bay one doner 

oJebobfe. 

Ml! Mar wr * SSSk. VAAB SLKor.won 807.10 

KS-" ZStS* 7r i 7dS 7 MB 

laatrdLI ljW ^.nrW HB* — 27.23 TMwonS »43 

1W66 3us tots, raw 

ZSZul vam warn ™ mn«ra mu. 

S3£X ^ ^ ESSS j£S ^ 

s sssrss S. - 


Sources: Rautin. Uayds Book 
f&AesanpBciAtfctotiretLank&paritsatSlmlBksnmlQimvm for equivalent J. 


Ksy Mousy Rstss 


unnad state 
Ptna u a t ro to 


' MmbHiCDc 

.mparlNtknrs 


FmrTnmiyiM 

WnarTransiYMto 
HWTlHMTMte 
M w TlH LyacOJUtov naraya 


C ngayyr 
T-toaolta Met lank 


SL tbdar SSSranor 

TS W ^ 

1 — iSi 1(99 ' 

\S V*' T< ” C - CoaarwnM. tUUtmo 

Sl-rttfssssws-* w 


mko i am ums 

*244 WSU2 KU* 


Lnn i bn rd r ate 

rmnm er 
t-RMoHi MvMMl 


Ctosa Pm. 

aoo in 

« W6 

3 2% 

3J5 IBS 
470 
434 4.17 

SM 110 
423 m 
7J0 4ffi 
7JS 7jn 
MB 725 
743 7J4 
rail# m 

TO IK 
2 «. 21 % 
2 * 2 M. 

2 «< 2 h 
» 

4 n 4 .n 

iVi Vh 
SM JLffl 
S3S US 
520 520 

115 

441 iul 


BriMn 

Bmfc inn rah 
Call money 

Interbank 
3 mmAi Interbank 
4montta tatertank 



te ter vn l lon rate Scto SiO 

CBUmwnr 5% 5^ 

t-mantta lotertaak 5% 5 », 

S-toMtototertouk 5s, 5% 

4 toaani Inter taak 5V2 ¥*> 

*!»“ T 7.11 7M 

sources: Sealers. Bloomb.ro, Merrill 
Lynch* Bant at Tokyo, Commprrbank, 
Montagu, Lyonnais. 

Qold 


Zurtcb 


AM. 

pjm. 

ChVe 

382.15 

®1JB 

+ 7 JO 

381.40 

38100 

+ 7 40 

38200 

39230 

-220 


HnwYerk 

US. Sasemnacr ounce. Union official IU- 
UbsiZurkSt am new York euentop ana eta- 
tnoorias/ Now York Comm (June) 
Auerm: Novtin. 



real in No 
war. Comt 

hi an, Virgn 

£ massager 
•ping and h 
tures of Myi 
pa, has a b 
feral law fir 
rices for ern 

ne says, “D 
S." 

Jways incre 
son,' the pn 
oicb represe 
sr magazine: 

that 100.( 
an issue w 
V. with an ad 
9Uted to net 
and areas ni 

n made its w 
ing budgets 
ues. The clos 
ie are adverti 
by the indusi 
Inch Nails, a 
ties, a prodi 
jaccoCo. 
vth, Mr. Str 
>ns, which c 
and they cc 
?uild up. 

1 1 sold 360,( 
ais of thousai 
es," Mr. Su- 
es. I sold tom 
ally used asc 
could have s 
■s of sneaker 
*keL out there 


ge Ral 

.n appropri; 

responsible 
inge policy, 
view on (he d 
countering sp 
I Slates was t 
:1s fa the dol] 
eves in floati 
VQliam McDt 
the Federal I 
w York, said 
ay. “You ca 
ioating exchai 
mge rate targe 
» said Tuesc 
that the G-7 v 
a floor under 


is thebe 

i Thai 1 
lock at 
doing ( 
held by 





.2 


MARKET DIA RY 

Interest-Rate Rise 
Pressures Stocks 


Compiled tv Our Staff From Dispatdie 

NEW YORK — U.S. slocks 
jmbied on Monday, dragged 
owQward by a stubbornly bearish 
ond market, amid expectations 
tat the Federal Reserve Board 
■ould raise interest rates by as 
mch as a half a point to combat 
iflation. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
umped to 40.46 points, to 3,629.04. 
iHing to its loss of 26.47 points on 

U.S. Stocto 

riday, when the market was sirni- 
jly soured by weak bond markets. 
"The stock market is captive of 
le bond market,'' said Alfred 
ioldman. an analyst with A.G. Ed- 
-ards & Sons Inc. in Sl Louis. 
Everyone is waiting for the Fed to 
rop the next shoe." 

Trading was moderate with 
50.83 million shares traded, down 
ora 289.60 million at the close on 
riday. About three stocks fell for 
ich that rose on the Big Board. 
Traders said the market was dis- 
ppointed that the Fed had not 
used rates ahead of the Treasury's 
uarteriy refunding this week. Some 
ind of near-term rate increase is 
tmost universally expected, and the 
redii market wants il now, before 
ic auctions, dealers said. 

“Once we have the uncertainty 
f Fed policy out of the way, that 
as the potential to allow interest 
ties to stabilize, and that is one of 


COLLAR: Burdened by Bonds 


Continued from Page 11 

m term,” he said. “But the bond 
larket is dominating sentiment in 
re short term.” 

The dollar s downside should be 
ushioned by speculation that cen- 
*al banks, led by the Fed. would 
pring into action if the U.S. cur- 

Forujgnjfaohange 

racy fell too low again after last 
eek’s concerted intervention, 
ealers said. 

“The success or failure of central 
ank intervention, combined with 
ed interest-rate policy, are the two 
ictois determining where the dollar 
. going, and everything dse is im- 
laterial,” the New York trader sakL 
The dollar has failed to respond 
ith a rally to a barrage or positive 
conormc news in the past month, 
□d traders said it would be a very 
earish sign for the U .S. currency if 
speated intervention by central 
anks offers the dollar its only sup- 
ort The Fed and more than a 
ozen other central banks bought 
ollais last week to stem its slide 
gainst major currencies. 

‘The market is wondering how 
mg the central banks can keep the 
oOar supported without more in- 
reases in U.S. interest rates,” said 


John Nelson, director of global for- 
eign exchange at Barclays Bank in 
London. 

While this week's Bundesbank 
council meeting could provide the 
dollar with a reprieve in the form of 
a German rate cut. analysts said 
they saw few bright spots. 

“Then; is no doubt that the dollar 
is going to go down from here," said 
Hugh Walsh, a dealer at ING Capi- 
tal Markets. “The question is the 
pace. At the moment the market is 
trying to take it down slowly so as 
not to cause the Fed to come in." 

The dollar was able to edge up 
against the yen. helped by reports 
the United States and Japan would 
try to resume trade talks, which 
broke down in February. 

The dollar edged up to 10185 
yen, down from 102.465. The U.S. 
currency also was underpinned by 
signs Japan's trade surplus may 
have peaked. Japan said Monday its 
current account surplus soared to a 
record high for the fiscal year ended 
on March 31, but the strength of the 
yen was already starting to slow the 
growth by making Japanese goods 
more expensive abroad. 

The pound declined to 14770 
DM on Monday from 14855 late 
Friday. (Reuters. 

AFX Knighl-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


Y|0 Ah«W 


Dow Jones Averages EUBOPEAH RJTUBES 


the necessary conditions for stable 
or rising stock prices.” said Joscph 
Lira, chief economist at S. G. War- 
burg & Co. 

Nervousness about a Fed move 
drove the yield on the benchmark 
30 -year Treasury bond up to 7.63 
percenL. its highest level since No- 
vember 1992. It was 7.54 percent 
on Friday. The price of the bonds 
fell 29/32 point, to 83 29/32. 

A rate increase by the Fed was 
widely expected sine* Friday, when 
the Labor Department reported that 
267.000 new jobs ban been created 
in April, more than the 190.000 
economists predicted. 

The market was also struck 
Monday by a decline in tobacco 
company shares as a result of re- 
ports that some tobacco executives 
may have known 30 years ago nico- 
tine was addictive and that ciga- 
rettes were a cause of lung cancer. 

“This news is damaging to the 
cigarette companies, as it makes for 
a much easier case for plaintiffs to 
sue these companies if they will not 
have to prove that nicotine is addic- 
tive,” said Allan Kaplan, an analyst 
at Merrill Lynch & Co. 

Philip Morris dropped 2 to 50. 
RJR Nabisco Holdings eased to 
5^4 and American Brands fell 1 X M to 
32 Vi. 

Among blue chips. Caterpillar 
eased 216 to 105% and General 
Electric fell l Vi to 94V». 

(AP. Bloomberg, Knigfu-Ridderl 



Open HWl LOW L05* Oi9. 
i-h,,, 3448.77 364 423 3*25.18 367904 —40.44 

i$£«^rsCT.S2 

UM 1BSJM 188.70 183 W -|-£ 

Como I285J7 1790 31 1277.00 1 771 J7— 17X8 

Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


I ndus! r uns 
Tramp. 


High Law Clou CS’oe 
522.90 516.48 517-04 - L&s 

387.86 381.45 3B138-S30 
S>.99 13049 1BL5* -140 

Sfl 4307 4112 — 04* 

447.87 441.84 44232 —150 
41173 40844 40947 —444 


NYSE Indexes 


Composite 

Industrie*! 

Tronso. 

many 

finance 


High Lot* Lo»* 0*9. 

348.47 74114 24SJ3 —114 

20474 30144 302-76 — 3J0 
245-50 2*149 24141 —349 
200X4 201.84 201.95 — 4X9 
206.87 206*1 204.71 —118 


m '.If'. D J F M A M 
. 1993.,. . -1994 

or 

NYSE Most Actives 


Svntcx 

PJR Nob 

Onvsir 

PtxIMr 

RJR NO Pfk. 

QrcuSS 

AWT* 

FPLGP 

Cocoa 

GnAAOlr 
TeUAex 
■ BAA 
AT&T 
Knurl 

GcrtoPrd 


tfigfa 

LOW 

Las! 

73W 

23’. 

23V 

*'v 

5H 

SV 

*51, 

44V 

44'. 

50 'V 

49V 

49V 

*19 

*>.. 

• >.'. 

28 

25V; 

251. 

3 trt 

79 M r 

791 . 

31V 

27V 

27V 

39V 

39V 

39' 'I 

54*i 

53V 

51 

S5V 

54* ■ 

54V 

571. 

s*vs 

57 

52 '.V 

51V 

SI V 

15V. 

IS 1 -. 

15V. 

35* '• 

32V 

34 


1 NASDAQ Indexes 


K* Low Last Ota. 

Composite 730.30 722X5 72145—1041 

Industrials 758.43 750.44 750*6 — 10X3 

Bart-A 694.19 *9442 *95.47 — 1.*0 

I Insurance BW 14 era .41 888.41 — S.0J 

finance *0543 *0141 »l «l —3.88 

Tronsp. 725.12 717.09 717.09 —9.14 


AMEX Stock Index 

MB* Low Last Ora. 
439.73 435.01 435.42 —441 

Daw Jones Bond Averages 


30 Bonds 
io ummes 
10 Industrials 


NASDAQ Mast Actives NYSE Diary 


Mali 

Law 

Last 

Ota. 

21 

17'* 

17V 

— 3V 

4V 

2V 

Vi. 

—IV 

31 Vt 

29V 

30 

—IV 

245. 

22' i 

27V 

— «* 

29V 

2HV 

79V* 

— "A» 

59V 

58V 

58V 

— m. 

22V 

21V 

23V 

V 

25V 

24V 

25V. 

V 

38V 

37 

J7V 

—1 

18V 

18V 

18* A 

— V 

70 

18V 

IS'Vu 

— V. 

*2M> 

99V 

AOV 



93H 

91V 

97'/. 



8V 

7V 

Vi. 

—IV 

74V 

74 

74V 

—2 V 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Torn tissues 
New Hiatts 
New Lows 


509 558 

1751 1713 

551 524 

2871 2795 

18 11 

184 ne 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unctmaea 
Total issues 
New Hens 
New Lows 


AMEX Most Actives 



Vo* 

Mah 

Law 

Last 

ExpLA 

8607 

l'V 

IVm 

IV 

34SCO 

*49* 3’Vi, 

W4 


Han wlO 

5703 

■Vr 




5540 

18V 




5122 

11V 

11V 



490 

44V 

'K’te 



484* 22V 

21V 

2iv 


4523 

37V 

24V 



4257 

33V 

31V 


PooGte 

2957 

17V 




NASDAQ Diary 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prey- 


4 jun. 

cons. 

NYSE 

7S0C? 

34610 


1612 

20.46 

Naadaa 

mu 

288X0 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unaianged 
Total issues 
New mans 
New lows 


Spot Conuno dl tfa 

Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0 l 591 

Cottee. Bra*, lb 0.94 

Copper Heel roiyllc. IO 097 
Iran FOB, Ion 213X0 

L*od, a> (L34 

Silver, frov oz 14)5 

Stael (scrap), ton 13743 

me aa 

ZlUC. C> 044*8 


Metals 

Clow 

Bid ask 
ALUMINUM (High Grade) 
Dollars per metric Ion 
Soot 1 30 L00 130100 

Forward 132840 137948 

COPPER CATHODES (HW 
notion per metric ton 
SM> 203530 705430 

Forward 2Q560Q 2057X0 

LEAD 

Dollars per metric ton 
Spa! 44130 44233 

Forward <78X0 <79X0 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metiic ton 
5 pal 57&0XQ 577040 

Forward 5B353M 584030 

TIN 

palters per metric ton 
Soot 515500 534530 

Forward 5420.00 5*25X0 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 
□oOars per metric ton 
Sool 95530 95*30 

Forward 977.00 *7&00 


Financial 

High Low Closa Charge 
WrfONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
aeaeot - pti of toe pa 

Jun 9437 9435 943* — 033 


Prw tons 
BM ask 


130740 I moo 
133230 133330 
Grade) 

2019.00 2020X0 
2027X0 2021X0 


44830 44930 

484 JO 485X0 


5705X0 5718X0 
5775X0 5780X0 


5445X0 S450X0 
5505X0 5510X0 


Stock indexes 

High cm* awwe 

FTSEmiUFF*> 

EiS per index poM 

& w “ m =ts 

^si.vorum.^^gm-7 
Motif prices men oat available Mentor Am 
la praMdflB at me swim 
sources: Motif. Associate* Pres* 
London Inf I Financial Futures BMiavk 
Inft Petrvhvm Eediangt. 






Dividends 


Vi ■^•1*1' AM ■WVTi i 


Per Amt Pay Rec 

IRREGULAR 


AkKebotooet Sven 
Coles Mver Lid 
FkKH Magellan 
Palmer Tube 
OulncvSvasBk 
Philips KV 


b .4604 5-15 4-1 

B 322 5-T7 4-22 
_ 177 5-4 59 

b 32 4-30 7-T7 
- 35 5-20 « 

b MS 5-12 8-2 




9657 

9655 

965* 

(lOfl 

94X4 

94X0 

9623 

— 0.06 

93.73 

91*5 

03X7 

-009 

93.15 

90X5 

9108 

— on 

•257 

92-50 

92.52 

— 014 

92.11 

9203 

92X5 

— 014 

91.44 

91X1 

91X2 

-D.U 

9133 

91X8 

91X9 

— 014 

91.10 

91X5 

91.08 

— 0.13 

9092 

9057 

90 91 

—on 

90.75 

70X6 

90J3 

— 009 

9060 

70.51 

*040 

— 0X5 


b-apprax amount per ADR. 

STOCK 

Sun Bancorp - 554 5-27 

STOCK SPLIT 

Galveston Houston 1 Bettis Cora for e 
Galveston Houston held. 

Indiana F«d1 3 for 2 Mill. 

Patterson Dental 3 tor 2 split 


Johnson A John 
Sun Bancorp 






” K!?. 1 riRUrnr 


ll I. , . . , , 

• JjSlilfe lie ii 


Bsl. volume: 50.741. Open Inf.: 5B2J40. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS I LIFFE) 
si million - ptj of loo Pd 



9693 

9489 

9689 


94X4 

9623 



NT. 

N.T. 

93-72 


N.T. 

N.T. 

93-46 


N.T. 

N.T. 

9X18 


N.T. 

N.T. 

9X94 

Esi. volume: 811. Own Ini.: 9.933. 


Aerospace Credit 
Hoorn Systs 


Emehosr* Fin 
IndKjno Fed n 
Manut Home Comm 


3-MONTH EUROMARK5 (LIFFE) 
DM1 mlinoa - pis of 108 pet 


Jun 

•5X4 

95X1 

95X3 

sec 

95X3 

95.19 

95X1 

Dec 

95.1* 

95.11 

95.15 

Mar 

95.03 

95X0 

95X3 

Jun 

9430 

9675 

94X8 

sec 

•653 

94X9 

9452 

Dec 

94J9 

9625 

9629 

Mot 

94.0* 

94X7 

94,03 

Jun 

•3.94 

73.90 

91)2 

Sec 

9177 

9X72 

93.74 

Dec 

93X3 

9X59 

9X58 

Mar 

9U8 

9X43 

9X45 


EsI. volume: 48.961. Open hit.: 9*4X56. 

LONG GILT (LIFFE) I 

00X00 • Pts A Hods at 188 pd 

Jim 103-08 102-18 10342 -0-17 , 

Sep N.T. H.T. 102-04 -0-11 I 

Esi. volume: 51373. Oocn hit.: I24XD6. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 2SMM - PtS of 1M pet 
Jun 9434 93X6 94X4 —0X9 

Sep 9178 9150 9173 —078 

Esi. volume: 111*88, open Ini: 199 730. 

industrials 

High Low Lost Settle Chta 
GASOIL (I PE) 

U3. dollars per metric ton-lots of ISO foes 
May 15550 153X5 15475 154.75 + 2X0 

Juo 15425 15125 15J-5C 15150 + 775 

JUl 15430 152.50 15175 153.75 +1X0 

Aug 15530 15450 155X0 155X0 + 0-50 

Sen 157X0 15550 156.75 15675 +075 

Oct 15950 158.00 159X5 159X5 +050 

No* 16150 161X0 161.00 161X0 +075 

Dec 1*230 1*125 1*250 14230 +0X5 

Jan 14150 162X5 16250 1*250 +075 

Feb N.T- N.T. N.T. 14150 + 050 

MOT N.T. NT. N.T. 15*30 + 030 

Est volume: 15X30. Open fait. 181X87 
BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

U3. dollars per barrel-lots of 1X00 barrets 



- XI 5-23 

- .17 5JJ 


- .15 6-) 

- .13 J-T7 


M .10 5-13 
a 32 5-20 
O .05 5-2D 
O .15 5-1 

3 .to 5-20 

23 5-27 
M 228 5-15 
5 25 6-15 

Q .12 5- 14 

Q .15 4-1 

9 JO 5-T7 
O 22 5-22 

S .10 4-1 

.7025 5X0 
Q .1025 5-20 
O 23 5-20 
Q 24 541 
a .11 4-23 
a .15 5-10 
a J15 W3 
O .11 5-Z7 
Q 20 S-27 
O 25 6-1 

Q 20 4-3 

Q 378 5-M 


fcBE5^EEi51SIBSClESS 







6 k / . lIBvi 



(fvj! 



Mufti 


Prey. 


1633 

1608 

1622 

1877 



0-593 

Jul 

1610 

15X0 

15.96 

15 98 

— 

034 


1X98 

15X1 

1582 

1582 

— 

097 



1573 

1580 

15.75 


213X0 

Od 

1589 

15.74 

1575 

1575 

— 

034 


15.90 

1574 

1576 

1576 

— 

SX15 

Dec 

15X4 

1570 

1576 

1576 

— 

177-33 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1580 

— 

3X829 

Feb 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

15X2 

— 

04448 

Est. volume: 46587 . 

Ooen ini. 143.191 


TO OUR 

KABRS 

Si 

BBGRW 

It's neve- 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save. 

Just call 


)Mtfii.*a'S | ,. | .i i.w w.'i.iBieiwfflaniri 

M l v ' ii.-X f ! * " 1 * ~ tffrr?g¥S!Egl8Miaa 


EXE 




FT7> • Mn| ' i . 



miPpn 

1 * i TtJ 



0800 7 7538 




Federated and Macy Raise the Stakes 


iwma 


Waakand Box Oflaa 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

NEW YORK — R.R Macy & Co. and the 
rival retailer Federated Department Stores Inc. 
each sweetened the terms of their plans to take 
Macy out of bankruptcy court Monday. 

Macy and Federated each announced their 
revised terms shortly after the close of stock 
trading Monday. Macy said its revised plan 
would gjve enhanced stock-purchase rights to 
bondholders, adding $260 million of value to its 
plan for a total of S3.93 billion. 

Macy also said it had the support of “a major- 


ity of its creditor groups" for the revised plan and 
would move quickly to get its plan approved. 

Federated said it increased the total value of 
its proposal by $318 million, to a total of $3.83 
billion. 

The Cincinnati-based retailer said it would set 
a range of S21 to S26 a share for its slock — 
which closed at $20,875 on Monday — in deter- 
mining the number of Federated shares it would 
distribute to Macy creditors. Il also would lift the 
amount it would give to its secured bank lenders 
by $45-2 million, to nearly S1.69 billion. 


Federated said it would offer SI 80 milli on in 
Federated stock and warrants to Macy bond- 
holders, an increase of $105 million from its old 
proposaL The bondholders also would be enti- 
tled to an additional $90 mQboa of Federated 
stock if they decide to exeidse rights to buy up to 
$450 million of 6 W percent convertible subordi- 
nated debentures in the combined company. 

Finally, Federated said holders of general un- 
secured claims on Macy would receive $120 
million in cash. Federated stock and warrants, an 
increase of $78 million from the previous plan. 




NORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Sea-on Season 
Hflti Low 


(tan Hlati Law daw Oth Op.Ii* 


Grains 







im 












WHEAT (CBOT) MMBuinmv. MmwtusM 
J7J 3X0 May 94 Ul'-J 121 VS 119V. 3.19W— 0X3'* 29 

15* 2J* A* 94 JX* 3JTii 3X5 -L2SV.-0X! V, 29jn3 

357V LD1 Sea *1 129 '-i UO Vj XZSV. IXS’^i— <UIV> 4941 
3X5 109 Dec 94 U9Mr 148 111 139W-OX0 1 - 7 JJ 1 

35* V. in Marts 141 W 3X2N 3X1* XOV, ♦0.00'A S22 

3X5 XI*ViMay95 337V »U0V 30 

S47V ill JU95 321 V. 3X3 1X1 Vj 322 -OXI 106 

Ell. SOWS 8X00 Fn-s-sHes 17X00 
Fn'soponfait 

WHEAT (KBOT) S.9BBpgm*iiBW>- i O m ».rBuPM 
XrtY, 1.96 May 94 139V 3X3 3J8 3XS*» — OMS* 3» 

355 797 Jul94 324 127 325 325V-O01 1X800 

154V XQ2V. SeoM 3XT. 328V 3J4W 327V, -8X1 V 3X57 
360 3.12>5D«94 33* 131% 134 134 -001 <223 

3.53V 325 M»95 137 137V 135 13S -OX IV *11 

374 3XIVMOV9S 338 -OOIV 17 

JJ9S 1X6 *5 324 *> JJ4Vi 374 V. 

Est.PDes NA- Fyl'ista* S.rp 
Ri’inamlr* 27-724 OP 213 

CORN icsan IJBOttinMwiiff. n p. i pffbwn* 

114V JJBVI/tevM 2_58 258% 255V 254*4—0X24.. 7X91 

1«*W 141 A* 9* 258", 159 254 157 —OIO 137J82 

292V 149 250V X4B 249 -0.09,3X316 

7 J¥t. 136V Dec 94 142V 2X3 2>DV, 241 -ft02V 77 XM 

279V» 250 Mot 95 249V 2SOV 2X9 241 —0.05 7.938 

2X2 255 Mav 95 LS3“i 25*“. 253V. 253“. -0X2 V, OB 

2X3'« 5-SSV.JUI95 25* 256 254 25»y,_ 0X7V 1.980 

2-3 V, 253 Doc 95 2.45 2X6 2A4V 2XSV— 0.08V 1X15 

Esi. SONS 45X00 Pn'i jam 45, H9 
Rl 'iOP Q" fa* 747591 IB 45 

50 T BEANS (CBOT) VXNfau/ninmbavMvyMrpuPWI 
751 W-jMovM 4.65 444 651 453W -ftMV X987 

7JO S.949. Jul94 6X6 665V> 6X0V *4JK.-<105 64X57 

7X5 121 Aug 9* 4JIV: 6X0 455V] *5*'‘.-0X5V 12594 

689V 617 Sec *4 6J4 *35“, 6X2 *J7 -0X5 V, 4,922 

75 7V LSfliNovM 614 61* 61? 4I7V— OXa 4JX44 

670 613 JCT195 622 “i 6X2 V, 61V 619V,— 0X«4 4J*6 

673V 618 Marts 6X71, 627V *J4V *X4V-0X5V MM 

670 *31 MOV *5 629V 629V *37 62 7 — 0 059. 476 

675 *X* Jum 6J1 6J2V. 4X9 6X9 -0,05V. 770 

650V] UH-|Nov95 6X6 604'.', 4X2 v. 6Q2V-0X5V 1,531 

EstiOtes 40X® Fit's, wlf# 59.196 
Fa's own** (4(451 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) amKauuew 
222-05 I867B May 94 18*50 >8700 IK >0 16620 —150 2524 

7XJOO 165X0 Art 94 >36X0 18840 187X0 1K76X —160 38X45 

CTX0 ISiCSAug** 11753 187.70 1J*» 1K90 —140 lilj* 

210X0 14320 Sea 94 ItJXO 146JQ IW80 115 X0 — 1.10 8X08 

20600 10151OO9* 18350 18350 11120 ISIXO -1.90 S.1I0 

70900 660 Dec W 181.40 1*7-70 1*3.01 >80x0 -120 16539 

200X0 1805) Jan 95 182X0 18240 18030 18030 —150 1521 

194X0 10153 Mcr 95 1B3J0 I81B8 18300 18330 —1.10 ) 3*7 

17353 )B2XI3rxayfS 18220 —1X0 944 

NUB MUOJmtS 1 8150 IS, 

Es «Bes 15400 Pft\ totes 1588 
FrTS open ir* 87.171 an 90* 

SOYBEAN Ofi. (0807) iaaooWa-aDaanpwiWW* 

36*5 J13D May 94 2830 2652 78X0 J«X0 6952 

2920 2155X49* 2619 2SX5 28X9 28X8 * 602 33X05 

29-21 2145 Aug « 27 30 HJS 27X0 27.92 * 0X1 12J9J 

23.40 2250 Sep 94 27X2 2755 2719 77 JJ ,0 05 I0J32 

7760 2X10OC19* 262S 7*01 24X0 7*3S ,(301 8J29 

27 JB ITODecW 2S«J 75*5 2548 2557 -OBJ 167,* 

2*85 22. 65 Jan 95 25X7 25X0 2SX5 2543 -0X1 i»8 

76*5 MTXAVyTS 25.10 2S25 25.10 7516 *601 1X19 

7*60 26*7 MOV 95 3*95 25X0 2695 2690 -0X4 547 

2601 2465A495 74.90 7*90 2*15 36*5 .0.10 Isl 

Esi. sales lion Fri's.saes 16543 
Fn'iapenirt 95.237 on 72* 


U.4SS 

0X1 12X95 
0« 10X32 
0X8 61® 
JB IX«* 
0X1 2X98 
0.01 1x19 


»*77 *737 

090 6667 

7050 *932 

n JO 7040 
71X7 70.90 

7265 7207 


?6« 7530 

77.96 7642 

77 40 Ilia 

„ 2-S 7sJC 

37 79.56 7736 
.10 7*00 7657 

.» 77 OS 7580 


*048 27.918 
•075 16748 
•040 12X62 
.050 8X54 
•OS 3,192 
*0X7 1.4*7 
•8X2 <38 


•j-2 y*a 

*6X2 *j»t 
•8*3 UB2 
•Oil 1.257 
■847 1.288 
>0*5 <17 

•075 37 

•035 2 


49X7 4935 • (LU l*X43 

4«J5 50X5 >8X5 61® 

2-S * aw 

480 *635 • 806 2*51 

44.15 45.13 <087 7X52 

44.28 • 098 528 

4310 <3.87 *087 30* 

48X0 4095 ‘095 19 

4*35 >0JS S 



P *'*ta"fe+ 


■Mfcipj:. 

























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 


UM 


Page 13 


Poland’s LOT 

Plans Deal With 
American Air 


EUROPE 


Deutsche Bank Stock a Favorite 

German Giant Survives Schneider, Metallgesellschaft 


■'#**** Tv, «- j- 




iVPariS'.'^s: 


agreemem with Ameri- 
AMR Com 

f***™*> that lasted moreffi 
f 2L a Partner, 

^ DCSOliadOQs 


executives refused to coat- 


pother U^camer^bdta Air 
* _?■*? of airiines 


co 5P ctm 8 for the partnership. 

»k - e Partnership will include 
«anng communications, a reserva- 
hons network and technical sup- 
It is intended to promote effF 

Se^7rihf d k* ? om P etitiven ess of 
tne amines but involves no finan- 

oal dependence, a LOT source 
sad. requesting anonymity. 

iOTs cooperation with a US. 

earner is also expected t 0 improve 
connec tions with the large Polish 
community in the United States. 

LOT is also starting to cooperate 

tms year with Air New Zealand, 
leasing planes this year f or the sum- 
mer season. 

In 1988, LOT was the first East 
European ahiine to purchase West- 
ern commercial aircraft after four 
decades of operating Soviet-built 
planes that have relatively low fnel- 
effioaocy ratios. 


first Boeing 767 went into 
operatnm m March 1989 and most 
of the Soviet-built Ilyushins and 
Tupolevs have been withdrawn 
since then. 

.The state-owned airline flies 1.2 
nullum passengers annually to 53 
destinations around the world. 
American Airlines carries 84.5 mil- 
hon passengers a year and serves 
201 cities. 

In March, LOT emerged victori- 
from * conflict over a dispute 
about trans-Atlantic routes with 
Bn&sb Airways that idled traffic 
between Warsaw and London for 
four months. (AP, Reuters) 

■ KIM 'Open 1 for Accord 

KXJVf Royal Dutch Airlines on 
Monday rekindled speculation of a 
major European aviation merger, 
reiterating that it was open to part- 
nership proposals six months after 
the ambitious Alcazar merger col- 
lapsed. according to a Reuters dis- 
patch from Amsterdam. 

“We are not in talks with any 
company,” said Peter Wellhuener, 
a company spokesman, but he add- 
ed that KLM has “always said we 
are open for cooperation.” 

Mr. Wellhuener was comment- 
ing on Dutch newspaper reports 
that KLM may reopen cooperation 
talks, at least with Swissair, one of 
four partners in the failed project 
to create a European airline, which 
was codenamed Alcazar. 


By Ferdinand Protzman 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — Deutsche Bank AC’s extensive 
involvement in the collapse of Jfirgen 
Schneider’s real estate empire has tarnished 
the bank’s reputation with the German pub- 
lic, but not with stock analysts, for whom 
Germany’s biggest commercial bank remains 
a solid favorite. 


“The quality of its earnings is so different 
from its comped tors,” Mr. Wand said. “Some 


Deutsche Bank sriD rates either an outright 
“buy” recommendation or a strong “hokT 
from most analysts. Its size, myriad industrial 
holdings and ffaftiwaftl market clout at Wm> 


60 percent of its earnings came from interna- 
tional business. That and its size give it ad- 
vantages in arbitrage and other businesses 
that none of its competitors here has.” 

Even the Schneider scandal has been used 
as a reason to recommend Deutsche Bank, 
which is one of die principal creditors of Dr. 


INTERNATIONAL STOCKS 


nowmgs ana bnanaai mantel clout at home Jflrgen Schneider AG. Schneider was Genoa- 
and abroad, ana^sts say, are supply far greater nys largest real estate development company 
than these of its two closest competitors, until it filed for bankruptcy on April 1 5 after 
Dresdner Bank AG and Commerzbank AG. ju founder and namesake vanished. 

Deutsche Bank, based in Frankfurt, also is Jtiogea Schneider left debts totaling more 
coming off a stellar year of earnings that has than 5 billion DM, and about 1 2 billion of 
bolstered its predominance in German bank- his loans came from Deutsche Bank. 


ing. In 1993, its profits rose by 15.7 percent, 
despite a huge rise in provisions fa- bed debts. 

. Its group operating profit, after risk provi- 
sions, rose to 5 JO bilhon Deutsche marks (S3 
Wlion,) from 4.55 b3Ban DM, while risk provi- 
sions soared by 72 percent, to 3 J bflhou DM. 
The bank has assets of about 560 billion DM. 

Like most Goman banks, Deutsche Bank 
prospered during Germany’s recession be- 
cause of the country’s booming financial 
markets and declining interest rates. It 
gained from trading on its own account in 
financial markets, with net own-account 
trading income rising to ZOO billion DM 
from 1.13 billion DM the previous year. 

_ “In lams of quality of its trading opera- 
tions, meaning the skill, flexibility and inno- 
vative power of the traders, I personally pre- 
fer Dresdner Bank,” said Michael Wand, 
banking analyst with BHF Bank in Frank- 
furt “ftit in terms of volume, no other Ger- 
man bank even comes close to Deutsche” 

He recommended buying shares. 


Jtiogen Schneider left debts totaling more 
than 5 billion DM, and about 1 2 billion of 
his loans came from Deutsche Bank. 

“The Schneider collapse brought Deutsche 
Bank’s share price down to a very attractive 
level,” said Bernhard Tbees, banking analyst 
for Bankhaus GebruederBeihmaim in Frank- 
furt “We still recommend the shares,” he said. 
“The earnings power of the bank has not been 
affected and the credit problems arising from 
Schneider will be easily covered by risk provi- 
sions already in place.” 

After the Schneider collapse, Deutsche 
Bank’s shares fell to 747 DM, their lowest so 
far this year on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. 
The year’s high of 87950 DM was reached in 
January. On Monday, the stock closed at 
781.00 DM, down from 785.80 Friday. 

Hilmar Kopper, the manag in g board chair- 
man of Deutsche Bank, said that Mr. 
Schneider and his wife. Claudia Schneider- 
Granzow, had absconded with about SI30 
million owed to construction companies and 
craftsmen, adding that it was impossible to 
say how much of Deutsche Bank’s exposure 
would have to be written off. 


“It could be several hundred million 
marks,” he said last week, dismissing that 
amount as “peanuts.” 

The description was apt but the choice of 
words enraged the German tabloid newspa- 
pers and much of the public. Mr. (Copper’s 
gaff typified the kind of year Deutsche Bank 
has had on the corporate and pablic relations 
fronts. 

In January, MetaUgeseflschafl AG, Ger- 
many’s 14th-largest company, nearly failed 
because of losses of about S1J3 billion from 
oil futures trading in New York. It was bailed 
out at the last minute by a consortium of its 
creditor banks. 

Deutsche Bank holds 12.6 percent of the 
company’s shares, and Ronaldo Schmitz, a 
member of the bank’s managing board, is die 
managing board chairman of MetaBgiesdls- 
cfaafL 

Although more than 100 creditor banks 
had financed both Schneider and Metallge- 
sellschaft, Deutsche Bank has taken the brunt 
of the criticism, in part because it has such 
vast equity stakes in a plethora of Germany’s 
leading businesses and industries. 

The bank, for instance, has a 24740 percent 
stake in Daimler-Benz AG, die country’s 
largest industrial company, and stakes of 10 
percent or more in 22 other big concerns. 

That may irk critics but it can also be a 
tremendous boon to the bank’s earnings. 

“Most of those companies are forecasting 
substantially higher earnings this year,” Mr. 
Thees said. “That will benefit Deutsche and 
also acts as a powerful draw (or foreign 
investors, who see the bank as representing a 
broad cross-section of German industry.” 

Olaf W. Conrad, hanking analyst with 
Trinkhaus Capital Managemen t in Duessd- 
dorf, rates Deutsche slightly lower, calling it a 
strong hold. 



2 



tymr- 


rill ma 
pecialisj 

Imakei 
that w« 
>f restifl 


». ind lar 

*■ jfien,”“ 

inces. u 
i ties.” „ 
■sof thi® 
. 3 technr 








jbsistcr^. 

•' they % 
is such 


■ ' v ■ .. • ■ j 

:406£$ ■ '< V 4U.5&1 . \SLaai; 




■■^■ssasr 




ihavesti 
jsi as t> 
as far at 
ed by in 
e Mfenc 
anild dc| 


-'3t454 3M. 

'its 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


9774 a 


ttA. J ' - 
tnuarmfionil Herald' Tribune 


ick 


Very briefly: 


in the PI 
many oil 


Holderbank to Acquire 
Most of French Company 


Poland Unveils Plan to Reduce Debt 


Bloomberg Business News 
ZURICH — Holderbank 
Finandirc Glaris AG, the 
Swiss cement and building 
products company, agreed to 
buy 84 percent of the French 
company Cedest for 3.6 bfflion 
French francs ($632 milKnn ) 
Under the agreement, H61- 


Cnmpagnie G6n6rale dTndus- 
trie et de Partiriparious, for 1 
billion francs. 

A Holderbank spokesman, 
Roland Walker, could not ex- 
plain the reason for the two- 
stage transaction. 


Under the agreement. Hal- “Rwas just easier that way, 
derbank will take over only the ? “ ft 8 partethatwe 

cemenL readv-roixM ^ don’t want,” Mr. Walker said. 


cement, ready-mixed concrete 
and aggregates operations of 
Cedest, whose full name is CS- 
ments & Eograis de Dannes et 
de I*Esl • . 

The abrasives and fertilizers 
business operations of Cedest 
will be sold bade xo its parent. 


HokJerbank’s bid values the 
whole of Cedest at 42 biffion 
francs, or about 10 times sales. 

Cedest, France’s fifth-iargest 
cement producer, has produc- 
tion capacity of 27 million tons 
a year. 


Reuters 

WARSAW — Poland will intro- 
duce a broad program of debt-for- 
equity swaps to cut its internal and 
external debt, speed up privatiza- 
tion and boost foreign investment. 
F inanc e Minister Grzegoiz Ko- 
lodko said Monday. 

“By the end of the year, the gov- 
ernment will present apian of debt- 
for-equity swaps windi will com- 
bine debt reduction with 
privatization and new invest- 
ments,” Mr. Kolodko said. 

“I want to use techniques,” be 
added, “of exchanging defat for eq- 
uity on a large scale both internally 
and inte rnationall y ” 

Mr. Kolodko, an economics pro- 
fessor who filled the long-vacant 
posts of finance minister and depu- 
ty prime minister in charge of the 


economy two weeks ago, said the 
plan should speed privatization 
and boost foreign investment. 

Poland has recently won a final 
stage of a 50 percent reduction of 
its $34 billion official debt and 
reached an agreement with its com- 
mercial creditors on reduction of 
its $13 billion commercial debt. 

But Mr. Kolodko said the re- 
maining foreign debt end balloon- 
ing internal public debt, currently 
at about 340 trillion zlotys ($15 
trillion), remained a heavy burden 
threatening Poland's recovery. 

He said Poland needed to boost 
investment and budget revenue to 
be able to serve its debt efficiently. 
The Polish economy grew by an 
estimated 4 percent last year. Mr. 
Kolodko said it was set to expand 
by a further 45 to 5 percent this 


year if budgetary and monetary nesses in depressed, high-unem- 


stability were maintained. 

He said Poland had not taken 


ployment areas. 

Mr. Kolodko said Poland’s priva- 


• Royal Bank of Scotland PLC said it has agreed to purchase 122 million 
shares, or 2 percent, of Banco Espaboi de Gretfito SA from Banco 
Santander SA at a cost of approximately £46 million ($68.6 million). 

• Winterthv Verekbenmgs Cesefischaft of Switzerland said its net profit 
rose 31.3 percent, to 324.4 million Swiss francs (S228.9 million), after a 
year marked by a strong rise in gross premiums. 

• Lloyd’s of London is expected to announce a loss of just over £25 billion 
($4 billion) for 1991, said the Association of Lloyd's Members, an 
oigamzation which represents about 9,000 of the so-called Names, the 
individuals who back the Lloyd’s market in insurance. 

• Egypt's first corporate bond issue in more than four decades, a five-year 
issue for the joint venture Hoechst Orient SA, has been three tunes 
oversubscribed, said the Cairo branch of Banqoe Paribas. 

• Earo Disaey SGA will price a planned share issue between 5 and 10 
French francs a share, according to the text at a resolution to be proposed 
to shareholders. The resolution said that the capital increase would be set 
to bring from 3 billion francs (S524 million) to 6 billion francs. 

Reuters. AFX. BJwmberg 


: collapse 
..Jnpaid 1 
■■ have left! 


made of 
-[ ipossible. 

rPalestin 
.. and Jerii 
i now. 
as now i 
’ offices v 
m tobeconu 
I •. venting 


advantage of its broad pnvauza- |intion ^ ^ 

tion program to repair its public proving because its staloowned as- 


F 1UTm 6 I’VWUiJW XU JUUWnUtAl W 

, ■ sets, after four years of structural 

“Poland has one of the most dab- 


Taxing Problem for Schneider 


roiananasoneoi menwsiciao- adjuslmenls faad become more 

competitive and were gaining raloe. 


been largely neglected,” he said “I — — — > — » . , , . . , 

want wXe surTthe government with efforts to reduce Poland’s «- k su^^ cnmmaJ 

wfl] not end up with no assets and a ternal debt, the govwnmeni would 


ljustments, had become more Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispatches 

mpetitive and were pining value. FRANKFURT — Jflrgen 
Mr. Kolodko said that, along Schneider, the fugitive real estate 


editor's office, said the tax evasion 
investigation had arisen because of 


i< for 20 oi 
’out, st uni 
■-ist go aws 
_ t Mr. Ara 
. da's inau 
'.aides. Mi 
■anted ext 
« : ifat’s paw 
: 5 speaking 
_'oud Abl 
e Commi 
Jig the pe 

, was “mi 


uuu tuuvu uvvwu j u ui ■ , _ 

information gjven by a number of ^ :a i r 


Mr. Schneider’s employees at tax phrasing 
offices around Germany. - 1 * 1 ar . <M ? n . d 

Mr. Schneider stands accused of f>P t r V^ l l i it f 
defrauding his leading creditor, 

Deutsche Bank AG. by falsifying forehand 

declarations and forging docu- - 10 ■ 

meats. -wore that 

The spokesman refused to com- •° wa ^' 
mem on news reports that Mr. 

Schneider had slipped 240 million ■? 

DM to the Bahamas, and that he '*VrO 
was hiding out in Paraguay. - w 
{AP, AFP) ' y 


pnvate 


should begin flowing into Poland the public debt trap. 


annually thanks 10 the debt-for- This year, he said, bi 


equity swap plan and planned in- was pouring in ahead 


around Easter, leaving behind 5 
et revenue billion Deutsche marks (S3 billion) 
plan, and ra hank debt and a huge real-estate 


vestment incentives. the budget deficit was likely to be bankruptcy. His whereabouts re- 

One of main instruments lower than the planned 83 trillion main unknown, 
planned will be tax holidays similar zlotys, representing 4.1 percent of Hildegard Becker-Toussaint, a 
to those already offered to busi- gross domestic product. spokesman for the Frankfurt pros- 


JS: 

'idien 




D(* YBP6 UOB 


LgUggttW I HMLw Stock 


D<v WfflW tfnh LowU—aOi*or 


Tables Indudoth® nationwide pricesup to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


11 Month 
Hk* Low Stock 


Div YU PE 100s HUh LnwLotestOi'ge 



’Ml 


AGF Spurns Credit Lyonnais AUiance 




SS 85 


4- 8 2 

afli 

■“ E « 
% 15 

Jm - « 


Uk «3 
100 s? 


? 


33 H S 

i.«o ?3 - 

i SS 


dH U nil 
l.tie a3 n 
UI U fl 1 

m 33 2 . 


iS S 8 
38 1ST r 


73 * 


“Tfa 

m 

Ml 


Btoomhcrg Business 

PARIS — Assurances General es de France. 
France’s second-largest state-owned insurer, 
backed away on Monday from a proposal by 
the stale-owned bank Cridit Lyonnais for a far- 
reaching banking and insurance alliance. It 
plans instead to pursue a less ambitious cooper- 
ative venture with Soriete Generate. 

The move is a sign that the fashionable one- 
stop shopping concept of the mid- J 980s — that 
banks could sell insurance products and insur- 
ers offer banking services — has failed to make 
the headway its French supporters expected. 

AGF said Monday it bad turned down an 
offer by Crfalil Lyonnais to form an insurance- 
banking alliance along the lines of one between 
Union des Assurances de Paris and Banque 
Nationale de Paris. 

AGF said it ruled out Credit Lyonnais's 
proposal because the state-owned bank already 
sells non-life insurance. “We can’t form an 
alliance with another network which offers 
non-life insurance.” an executive said, adding 
that such an agreement would amount to AGF 
competing with itself. 


AGF said it had no formal agreement with 
Sodfeic Genkrale and was in no hurry to create 
one. “It really amounts to an expression of 
preference.” the executive said. 

Soci£t6 Generate, which was sold lo the pri- 
vate sector in the 1987 wave of state asset sales, 
said it wanted to increase its 1.64 percent stake 
in AGF when the insurance company is priva- 
tized later this year. Industry sources said they 
expected the bank to take a stake between 5 
percent and 10 percent. 

Michel Thibout, a Sotifctfc Generaie spokes- 
man, said the idea of an alliance between the 
two parties was “no secret.” 

Marc Vienot, the chairman of Soti&t£ Geabr- 
ale, said in September that AGF was one of the 
state companies in which be wanted to invest. 
Mr. Thibout, while refusing to say outright 
what size stake Society Gen6rale was looking to 
acquire, said the bank had taken a 5 percent 
stake in Rhdne-Poulenc SA, another recently 
sold state company. He added that “as a gener- 
al rule, if you look through SocGen’s portfolio, 
the stakes are always around 5 percent.” 

Mr. Vienot said then that AGF was the 


hank’s main insurer and described it as 1 ‘well- 
run.” AGF has between 2 percent and 3 percent 
of Soci6t6 Gfenerale’s capital. 

Frendb press reports have said another reason 
for AGFs reluctance to join forces with Credit 
Lyonnais could have been the size of the stale- 
owned bank’s losses and bad-loan writeoffs, 
which could have tarnished AGFs image. 

Credit Lyonnais posted a loss of 6.9 billion 
French francs (SI billion) last year and has 
placed 43 billion francs in bad real estate loans 
into a separate company, taking them off its 
bocks. 


siP»gel 

> 

Teal in l' 
■ wear. Con 
- hian, Vfo 
• j: massage 
•ping and 
, Tires of M 

a has a 

law l 
-rices fore 


ne says, 
5." 


The French government has 57.1 percent 
stake in AGF, while 303 percent trades freely 
on the stock market AGF staff hold 1 .6 percent 
and the remaining 1 1 percent is split between 6 
institutional investors: Aacbener & Mflnchener 
Versicberung AG, of Germany, has 258 per- 
cent, Caisse des Depdts & Consignations has 
223 percent, France Telecom has 2.18 percent, 
Banque Paribas has 154 percent, Crtdil Lyon- 
nais has 0.79 percent and Socifitfc Gfcnferale has 
1.64 percent. 


Iways inc 
son. the f 
••oiefa rep re 
;*sr magazii 
that 10 
; ent issue 
with an 
-louted to 1 
"*■ and areas 


t a 

»■ w 43) 1 


b js a i „ 


W CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERMCF.S 


M 


Currency Management Corporation Plc 

Winchester Honse. T7 London WaU - London EC2M 5ND 
TeL: 07I-3R2 9745 Fax: 071-382 9*87 


TORETCS'EXCHAJVGE 


HJ ; 
WiflS 
.-fi SI ® 


fse a 8 

n ZOO 92 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
Call for further information & brochure 



LONDON & GLOBAL 
FOREIGN EXCHANGE PLC 


PREMIER SPECULATION SERVICE 
QUOTE UP TO IOO MILLION USS 
Top Hoof, Cameo Howe, 1 1 Bear Street. Inndwi WC2H 7AS 
tel.: (071) 839 6161 fax-. [0 71) 839 2d U 


• m made its 
yiing budgei 

• lies. The cl 

- ieareadve 
JTby tbeindi 

ilnch Nails 
"•lies, a prt 
AxtceoCo. 

. vth, Mr. J 
;*ns, which 
. and they i 

- build up. 
;.7tIsold36 

ms of thou 
es,” Mr. i 
, a, I sold u 

• adlyuseda 
■ ’ could haw 
' rs of sneak 

• rket out (b 


r=a — M B X ««»»»■.. < — <- ”. 




13 a g 1 

L7S n If i 


European 

PRICEBUSTER 


tJ» ** g 

a a s 


Call Anytime 


© UVE Data Bom /«CW® SIO/OAT © 
© EOD Data for S 5/Day Q 
O 1 30+ Software Applications © 

Cau Signal 

On London 44 + 71 231 3556 


FtffureSource 


information 


Institutions 


preferred by m ?... w > j 
available to trader! ot home. Unrivaled coverage at an unrivaled 
price. Futures • Options • FX ♦ Energy • Commodities • Metals < 
News • Full Charting & Technical Anclysis from our Worlcfv/idt 


covercge - available via Saiellite through Europe. 

Call FutureSource Tel.: ^-44 71-867 8367 Fax: t 44 71 - 481 . 3042 


tn approj 


Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 1994 

TTie US dollar will soar; doflaHon will conlinue;.gold & mo st commodifies 
won't rise; Japan' j economy & stock maike) will be weak; You did 
NOT read lha tin FulletMcney - I he iconoclcslic investmenl loiter. 

Co try a Philfcpj.lor o:iamp;ci’Jt:u6 fc.-co cn!y) ot Chart A^clys's i.:d, 

7 Swc'liiv Streol lon'dcn’WlR 7HD. Uk Te loncbn 71 -CJ? STf.l 

■07l5iniUK>‘.orFa« 71-4394966 e t.vfr* Mc-rt« 



•FOREX *METAIS -BONDS -SOFTS 

Ohictfive analysis for professional investors 

(44) 962 879764 

Fiennes House. 32 Southqate Street Winchester. 
, Hants S023 9EH UK Fax (44) 424 774067 


ange 
view on tfa 


m i* S 

a B f 


✓ Competitive Prices 
/ Daily Fax Service 

JTR 071-931 9188 t FAX 071-931 7114 

-/ SOVEREIGN (FOREX) LTD 

/ 42-t Bvctjnfhjm Pabce Road. London SVVI W ORE 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 



- i Stales w; 
•• ils lot the i 

eves in fit 

- W illiam Mi 
' ' the Fedtar 

• w York, s 

* lay. “You 


i 


24 hours a day - only $100 a month) 

LIVE FINANCIAL DATA DIRECT TO YOUR PC 


1^1 


THE DAILY SPECULATOR 
THE COMMODITY TRADER 
THE WEEKLY INVESTOR 


inge raleti 
s said Ti 
; thatiheG 
a floor uni 


For more information 


Fax +45 4587 8773 


Tmefy, specie, proven mar- 
tetstrntBg&s, defrernddafy, 
beforn the markets open. 
PloeseceS for aFTtEB copy 
of the market &tsr of your 
choice. 


y iV 


FINANCIAL TEADEBSbLTD. 
3S0 Oser Avenue 


Hauppauge, NY 1 1788. USA 
TeL : 516^435-4800 


d. That o 
■lock am 
aloing dt 
hdd by 


TeL: 516-435-4800 
Fax: 516-435-4887 


2 A % 


i <s 8 m K 

Ca^nraedonPageM 


For further details on bow to place your listing contact PATRICK FALCONER in London 
Tel: (44) 71 836 48 02 -Fax: (44) 71 240 2254 

licralb^S.Sribunc 


r gb said in 
- a currenc 
it not const 

-v sd to cornn 
■’ last weA' 
.vSfuL 


r 


















































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 



ana. 


ordg 


r 


ton of w* 


w world 


ss of those 


|ly equivalent Tb 
r is powerless to 
The answer b , r 

rt 4- Mgotia:eds«. 

an arms embano 
ms weapons, ^ 
mean press 


es encouraged 


aoroneiucj 


Barter 


that apficared 


«•;<#* a* -■ -~ u 

iift i lc m Mf ; 

tft& A gfsr-: ir 
f d* Unite: yj:» r 
& fe «S*Ld 

* ••I*. - - 

utf ftwmr,- 
Dawhpbs rr:vr-. 
AeSraftur 
W: toe c*::- - 
rfenpi «ii * ~- _ 
t Ifci* Amr-i - "- 
Stow 

lit dou ' 

iMtowop-"- VL 
QhMr power 
tenha* r. 

OSto tfCV ? 

e**r ton iiir- - 

rto tHirl. r. — 

UWMto* 
tot* *h* • “ 

wmotjmr-- 

Bfjto wixl^ 

ft to* a:^'- v r r 
itoi i- '■■ ' 

Ik* of*'!*-:: 


<«•? ^ ; r 5 

*> 

i jwicto rr^ -- 

5f^3r-> : ‘ r v 

itogiftea*--' - 

!»;*»** 

Maaiftr’Y 


*to» ,- 

mm*~~ .Vs, 

toap^ ■- - ; . > 


itf ^ W :,V 


to* 


K V»\ 


Japan Surplus At Record 


But Yen Has 


33 ^"t 8 *“ ■* °v* the long nm, analyse «- 

4 bfflion « T*" 1 Th * u “ited States has raised ih- 25 U? f 0 ^ 5 ^ 00 Japanese 
1 Man*3i &* 1 of imposing iSll ““Pttitiveness to help 

saidMVtawI.. Finance Min- tionsif JaU dn£ niAi iaiu mm . _ shrink the surplus in both dollar 


&% compctitivenos io he^ 

wa ^M^^ F ^ Min - S^S P|US m 501,1 d0lhr 

^soreShade^S a broad Measur^,^^ 5 ^^ Lastwoek, the dollar approached 

™*s cwtafe ^ Ius by 10 ueiJS? i^K' World w fr D record low of 

amoa nted to^^on^G^ ^ 0ws ’ i^ 1003 die previous year as I™ 4 ® Y® 1 . reached Aug. 17 last 

•Mtt»*u5joa HOT , yar 

* n March, the surplus fell 16 per- 

betow 4e nSd SS 6 P™* 105 al »094 The smS hmL? 5 5/76 bi 5™' from 5 1®- 79 

plus in the year tn sur ' ,0 14 trillion yen frames fi & year eai i“ !r * the ministry 

ministry a ^on yai in fiscal^ 99^ 5 6 S**" ^ 3*“» March ’ s cunem sur- 


pms in the; Wjl . “f- lu **» uzliion ven fmm ISA ,7 j , J niinisuy 

nanistry .SP?*™ 1 *? — a trillion yen in fiscaUlW'* 5 6 ^ 3*“* March's cunem sur- 

^B^-ttS55 3& 8jn «S 

vohzme erf Japan's im- does not provide a 

awsarias sssS^i-ss 


said. “So it se 
of surp lus will 


yen worth of cap, 
would have been worth S8.7Cat 


— — — — fAr , . 

Consumers Boost Hons Rons GDP 

HOMri nS ^ O'* Staff From %aK*a service cmvmn . 


hong KONG “ I«n due to cuts in government 

nwmeed Monday thm mls fiSKJ? t an ' P™ 38 * 4 *** dqpartment said. & 

■to *>y an SaC-Eted^t^?^ ^ 8^ rale in external trade 

^th quarter of 1 993 fromX^pS?!^! ■“ ^ founJl t i uarter - following 

inmom CTwbv percent, while 

thidqSn? 00n ^ ares to 56 Percent for the P^™ 1 md 

’ quaner. (AFP AP} 

3150 a ■ l*iaii8 Set fw PabKc Homan* 
u. wuuuBiiy estnnate showme that rtnn . xv.. u ir 


“ v J Tr ■* a wnwe m 199 
An figures wen: adjusted for inflation. 


r«r‘ o . (AFP.AP) 

■ Plans Set for Public Housing 

Hong Kong government announced Monday 
that it was setting aside extra cash to build public 
housmg as part of its campaign to bring down sky- 
nxxeung property prices in the territory, according to 
a dispatch by Agence France-Presse from Hnno tfrSio 


tmortpr ^TTooi — H IW over the like -7 — juoooia isang said the govern- 

9 ^ termI992 - « billion Hmj Kong dollan 

ri ^ 80V Bn P ient expenditure declined marebally bv SrfrfSS? .? /5f b T m8 authont >'- banging the 
Wpcna^dDetotfomioraaiagmSSS! njttflhlT e ^ mzAcd <° 17 billion 


CENENTECH 

^ued from Page 11 •] 


^ dissdvers, be said. “What they 
age, and sailed through the FDA s did with Acrivase. nraTricm r! 
review process in inst nine month, u^Trr.L^y 35 ®' P«*™st°. to 


rec^ injust nine mouthy hdditwhereitTasf ^Sii- 
of what went right can be able." 


— ■ mui vii 

attributed to the conpny’s shift in 


a®ude wwad ihe EDA -fi mSSSSStSSSSSSZ 


lud ber 


at tbr 


gaus a.w a HsS3SaS ar-anissi 

sra«*s jasassssas 
Sasawst jSsssaSi 

ssg^Si ssiSs W.*3an™g; 

flat; we listened to then concerns.” Genentech should iSw. 


■week of Syntex Coip n based just 25 
udes south of Genentech’s head- 




tparters, .raised new peculation 
about Genentech’s future. 


Imtod,s«ne scientists and other 
biotech executives suggested that 
Genentech should lower Acti vase's 


IJ. , , , w-hmimvvwii ouuuiu IVWC1 JlUlVdSC s 

"R “5®S®B human price significantly after ihe Gusto 

^ P™** ™ Ii * ■¥”>• a»> !« ««id 


abonf fWjitj. li’- uui iu uo moiecn executives suggested thai 

hirfK. ^ ^ ^txl to thar concerns.” Gtmeatech should WA^vases 

sSSS&S asrarS’ss^tttts 

01 Mr. Raab said the company did 
oo^to^tec^^nirese^dhef- Whether the drug t&imdeed reduce some maHci-r rescarchmdfonnd 

SSTi^rATiSw?™ MT ai ^ Qald y to price cuts would have direrf- 

kfflmoaqysttc Chrom I «mem s ._ fects on profitability without sin 


requeste d ^that Genentech al- both play the hero and increase I 
ter the entenabmg measured, to market share 


Mr. Raab said the c ompany d id 


Roche could seek to reduce costs 
by consolidating. 

Roche is not talking about any 


fects on profitability without sig 


; 1 , , _ ,vv “ LnuuiOUUUJ W1U 

Ihe agency also asked that the nificantlymcreasmg salea. 

HIhIkt of nfltimtcin tilt, {Snnl H^al *c? - u. 1 1* . 


number of patients in the final trial 
be increased to nearly 1,000. to add 


sudi plans, bat its acquisition of to the statistical validity of what 

^tmtPT Ulllii4l Vine rtmmiKfin mrmM Wj, ** - -f _ 


Fran a “puhlio^riarions stand- 
ant, the point where it would 
ive m ad e a difference was S500, 


--- - , - -- — ■» — — — ■ rr ■ — uavc ma a e a ameience was MlXi. 

Syntex, wdm* has been struggling would be dw fim m^or trial of a cutting the mice to SI.700” for the 
fa hdt or *TOM nw produca, tygc-fflrosB dreg. ffljbdose^w drafter a 

fvnvrtQ tn ftnntrin 1 rnallrao^ fnrtno Pnr r>nMi4M«1i *K« aUA t i • - ^ 


far ladc of stra^ new products, cysti&filHosis ding, 
points to Mother challenge facing For Genentech. 1 


• ~ ^ “ww girtau auviuv m icf d 

.rar Ge ngrt e c h , the shift meant heart attack, Mr. Raab said. “Thai 
iwuflty seating up production, and would have cost ns $50 minion. 

(IK nmuimiiu (tirbvl a VT7 mifliM, -- — i. — .1 . _ — ^ 


. • . . _■ --r— V “r ^“VUUJJ, auu wotua nave cost ns 550 million. 

' company started a $37 million which is about the total profit Ge£ 

and 1970s, fafled to embrace the expansran of its manufacturing op- entech made last year And we 
emerging science of hwtcdmdogy erations even before begnming the could not find a doctor who said he 
4mdfdlbdm±Some(m^tSHQr toliW. ' would use it at $1,700 but would 

that Genentech. while dearly the The FDA liked what it saw. “It not al $2*200” 
industiy leader in devdopnig^ugs was a huge trial; it had cfinical Manufacturing genetically enei- 
from protrin znokcuies, has beai mdpomts of statistical power; and neered protans is more costly than 
stow to invest in second- and third- it was aWe to demonstrate unequiv- producing tr adition al drugs, but 
generation biotech developments, ocally that tbe drug worked,” said the real driver behind the high 
Ske an t isense and gene therapy, David A. Kessler, the agency's prices is the pheno menal cost of 

hnn .MmiuJiM (Kot tTMt llunv w mmi imnmw 1 I / T . .MM 


an ti se n se ami gene therapy. 


two approaches that treat disease commissioner. 

-x J 1 .1 rs 1 


at the generic IcveL 


research and development. Gotten- 


at the genetic levd- - Genentech began shaping Pul- tech's R&D expenses for 1993 were 

“Genentech has not done nearly, rnozyme commercially just two $299 rmTlj on. up from $279 million - 
as many deakas it could have or weeks after approval, and the drag “The anelc mosi mroorfant 
shtwddhav^" said Viren Mehta, an had sales for the first quarter of sou to «£toe RocheSvwiX 
analyst^MAta&^tmm- V* ^^toS^to^ 

vestment firm based a iNew Ya* completed mtemediate nizarion in research and devE 

thatspedafizes m health-care tech- trials oi nkaciywe for t he treat- m*ni ” Mr. Raab said. 
oology. ment of chrome brandntu,a l dis- In fact, several younger biotech 

GeneatediisinastrtHigposmon case commonly goffered by long- con,,^ have SoWed to 
to enter kait ventures wi& new tenn smokers, which mecte far partial acqumticms by large drug 
oompameain emerging fields, he more people than does cystic fibro- nianuf actnrezs as an alternative to 
aH,tat_te doner x, . toughing oat the public-equity 


Companies m emerging uems, uc iuuict»cupjc u«m uuq ^su^liuiu- 
said, but has deme retetivdy few sis. . . . 

compared with a competitor such Data from the tnal shewed -<ag- 


_ StiH, graleM to Roche as Mr. 


m odu, graiout 10 imcne as Mr. 

Raab is, be would prefer Genen- 

^a-^d^ompmedwith ? *,»rate entity. 


UD-andrcmmng icumiwi^w «• 

'dreg discovery, be said itmtends to 
focus for many ware on what it 
knows best: diroficaiiiig natnr^y 

oc«mng prot^Tto^ 

value: Such drugs will dnve Genra- 

tech wdl into me next century, he 


s completely their deri- 
Raab said of Roche's 
eroent. “If they do buy 
us,” he added hopeful- 


aErkRa^yGmnte^pre^ Raab isThe would prefer Geuen- 

Ment, said Genentedigets the deals recmvmgtedr^cOTqiared with tech to remain a separate entity, 
h wants and has passed “PS*””* n , . . “I have told them we do not want 

eheo the terms were not favorable- them to buy the rest of the campa- 

BmwhDcthecOTipanyhasmtfflmal Tuhmxymc,^ Gmentech aj 50 ny, but it’s completely their deci- 
and coDaborarive voitures m the sfou,” Mr. Raab said of Roche's 

ttn-andrcmmng technologies of tropm, wtncii was approveu lor toe top managanenL “II tiiey do buy 

Sg^S^besaiditintaKiste -iEr*2^<£ZZA ^^^headffiiopS 

foOTt for many years Ofl what it Protropm.^ Gmentahs fy.M think that win be fine, be- 

Irnows besL- dmmcatmg naturally ^ SCticttcally ngin<^cd cmse j jhcyTJ leave us alone, 

2?tStSX^«^^bc 1992, but the dreg wST soon face = 

tedi wdl mto the next . three generic .. • • 

“G^ttc^recent bring iwiewed UrnisnSTAres 

*e brnfat By introducing Nutropm fbst, Aebospace 

Wf Geneate^ajumpontbecom- V False Clums 


Gesen tech’s recent tr^ back to 
tfaelSt lights 


4, ,000- 


* ereai ^£ S ijSmMSeGtisto possiHe position to defend Protro- 
patknt sraty, kno^ ^ “« ^ pin,” said Kevin ^ WBscm, an analyst 
g* vrfiicfi -djjortto' to SSt sa Warbrng & Co. “Ihc 
more five* were saved wnDuw of their marketuut has not 


Urorren States 
Aebosface 

False Claims 


sf. ■ - 

15: 


with *“ tess ^^ taring ihe market fra gFawth hor- 

.j-b-dbaain nxmc or, for ttet matter, for Woock 


PACE and ROSE 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS 
WASHINGTON O C. 
(2M9T794SH 
PARIS 
44 28JS.41 

LOS ANGELES 
(310)3774900 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


^"PtedtpOH r $u4JFnimDtip a d la 

sttSsSSS z^^"** 9 * 0 * 

I os e 3.3 P^crs, imbalance are unlikdv ” *** ^ toysts ex- 

ii , a. "“Ui, to a rwA t-j ti.. t ■. Dect the rioiis^e .. i. 


'Made in China 
Spelb Trouble 
For Vietnamese 


GE Plans 

Big Outlays 

In China 


Agence France-Presse 

DONG DANG, Vietnam — 
At dawn each day, a thin con- 
voy of bicycles and motorbikes 
leaves this border town. With it 
trickles away a degree of hope 
for Vietnam's faltering state in- 
dustries. 

Precariously haiam-iq g every- 
thing from beer to televisions, 
traders make the trek down from 1 
border posts such as Dong Dang 
to dot the China frontier. 

Thar des tination is die market 
( town of Lang Son, where whole- 
sales snap up their cargo of 
cheap Chinese-made consumer 
goods for resale across Vie tnam 
Hundreds of mfliinny of dol- 
lars of goods flood across the 
frontier each year, mostlv 
brought in illegally by smafi 

traders growing rich as China 

dumps its suqilus production on 
V ietnam , which has found itself 
powerless to slop the trade. 

Wi th the Chinese stockpiles 
estimated to be worth as much 
as $34 billion, the trade threat- 
ens to swamp Vietnam’s light 
industries, which are struggling 
from debts and from dec ades of 
centralized mismanagement. 

“The Chinese are dumping 
goods from their vast stocks.” 
said a Western economist who 
insisted on anonymity. “And 
with the devaluation of the yuan, 
the products are even cheaper.” 

“What the Vietnamese get 
from China is basically a better 
product, and the Chinese are 
definitely not selling at cost,” 
he said. 

Vietnam's textile industry 
has been particularly hard hit. 


with high-quality Chinese cloth 
siting for around 15 percent 
wk than domestic material 
Qtrctftse products such as porce- 
lain, cooking utensils anj bicy- 
des almost completely domi- 
nate the Vietnamese market. 

Trade agreements between 
Vietnam and China appear in- 


Bloomberg Business iVfHT 

BEIJING — General Electric 
Co. intends to invest $500 milling 
in China over the next three to five 
years, including the establishment 
of up seven major new enterprises, 

iho- rtZL rv-n. *_ 


effective, moreover, as profi- 
teers ignore government diktats 
in the interests of enriching 
themselves. 

However, new domestic regu- 
lations in China can have a rap- 
id impact in Vietnam: After 


Beijing banned TV satellite 
dishes, traders began selling 
Chinese models in Vietnam at 
half-price, as manufacturers 
rushed to dear factories. 

Some officials and econo- 
mists in Vie tnam have suggest- 
ed that the competition from 
China is just the bitter medicine 
Vietnam needs to sort out its 
crumbling state sector. 

“It’s extremely difficult for 
the Vietnamese to compete,” 
said the economist “Thev just 
have to adjust to the fact that it's 
an open market and forget about 
producing the same goods.” 

Prospects for Vietnam boost- 


j — tyiyvi 

reported on Monday. 

“We are planning for the next 
100 years in China, and we want to 
be a Chinese company, an insider 
of the Chinese economy,” said Jef- 
frey Gannon, GE China's chief ex- 
ecutive officer. 

GE decided to increase its pres- 
ence in China “without hesitation,” 
despite ; uncertainty over the future 
of China’s most-favored-nation 
trading status with the United 
States, Mr. Gannon said. 

“We have confidence in this 
country and even without MFN 
there will be significant trade flow 
between GE and China, " he said. 
“We expect GE*s annual sales in 
China to reach more than $2 billioa 
by 1996 or 1997, up from SI.! bil- 
lion last year.” 

The proposed new eoieiprises, 
both wholly owned and joint ven- 
tures, are to be operational by 1996. 
The industries involved include 
lighting, plastics, locomotives, hy- 
dropower, gas and steam turbine 
generators, appliances and financial 
services, the China Daily said. 



rill ma 
perialh- 


Imaka 
lhai we 
»f resti^ 1 
20 

ind iai? 

*=-'J5 


inces. u“ 
.ties.” ® 
■s of tb*k 


rbsistennj 

r they tie 
is such ^ 
im 

i have see 

jsi as ber 
as far a; i 
ed by lie i 
e Mfene l 
:ou!d deg i 

■ f: 
ed 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


tM cna rin m l Herald Tribune 


ick 


Very briefly; 


mg its exports io Ghi'na a pp^r 
bleak, say analysts. The Viet- 
namese currency is overvalued, 
add some, and few Chinese con- 
sumers appear interested in 
Vietnamese products. 

“Chinese people don't want to 
buy Vietnamese products," said 
Choi Rufang, a trading-compa- 
ny representative in the the 
Guangxi province. “Their auali- 
tyisnogood." 


■ China Denies Venture 
China denied Monday that an 
American company would be 
building the country’s second na- 
tional telecommunications net- 
work, Agence France-Presse re- 
ported from Bei jing 
Nynex Telecom Network System 
Inc., a unit of Nynex Corp., said 
recently that it had signed an agree- 
ment with China that could evolve 
into a joint venture to build the 
second national network." 


• Post Pubfislaug Pnbfic Co, which publishes the Siam Post and the 
Engtfsh-langiiage Bangkok Post, withdrew from a consortium bidding for 
■ ” td ™ on s^tion, saying it did not make economic senseT Its 
partners and tnree rival consortiums remain in competition for the fust 
station in the country not controlled by the government or military. 


• Cfimas i electricity production fell far short of demand in the first 
quarter (rf 1994, des^te a 10 percent increase in output am£?££ 
period last year, the Power Industry Ministry said. Output topped 210 
hilhon kilowatt horns m the Januaiy-Mareh period. “vpw 


pm 

' in ihe Pfcts 
many otti re 
gne 

! collapse we 

' Japaid L 
’ have left BP 1 
■ w 

. made of 
[ ipossible® 
r Palestin 0 ° 
. and Jeri( a ts 

j i now. n g? 

* *rc TVYUf pUC 


• AnstraKs Meda Lid, an Australian pay-television company, formed a 
mme venture with TeJ^Cormunnicaltais Inc, aud^flftom iTspom 

channel wffh K thorfu M-iC, ti, it n ■ ■ |ajit& 


, i now. U B- 

!ars now P de 
] offices vhc 
lobecom^ e * r 


“ — lar-vAMHiBnnicaiKHis ina, and wijj rorm a SDorts 

ebannd with Liberty Media Cwp. The U.S^pames plan to m^T 

10 face L °PP«*'ti<» from the South Korean 

.^ G plans, to use its fisting in Singapore on Tuesday to 
CTeatea shareholder base in Asa. Daimler also plans to seek a lis ting in- 

SIUU1 « hiL AFP. AP. Bloomberg, KnigtoRMer 


\ venting 

°ie, £ 

t»for20oi*t 
-out, stunn™ 

-islgoawa’S ’ 
'i Mr. Aral' m 
ela’s inau^ 31 
'.aides. Mr 1 )' 
| anted exe> 
'ifat’s paw^' 
' speaking — 
‘oud Abb 
e Commit 
^ig the pea 
t 


^ was “mo 
c'ai refused 
phrasing v 
lid around 
Sji minister 
ijeiails of 
-forehand, 
to sign, A 
-wore that v 
3 this way ” 


THE MOST 

PORTABLE 


VS: 


* 1 ^ ^ 


w*.* vr ~ 





idiern 


ci Page 1 

‘ical in No 
war.Comt 

hi an, Virgji 

* massager 
ping and h; 
airesofMyi 
pa, has a h 
I'erai law fir 
rices for crii 
ue says, "D 
5.” 

Iways mere 
sou. ihe pn 
nich represe 
ST ma gariri e? 

• that 100,( 
cm issue w 
K, with an ad 
outed to ner 
J and areas n> 


n made its « 
ing budgets 
ties. The dos 
te are adverti 
iby the indust 
■Inch Nails, a 
<ttes, a prod i 
nccoO). 
wh, Mr. Str 
ons, which c 
'and they co 
build up. 
st I sold 360, ( 
msofthousai 
es,” Mr. Su- 
es, Isold tom 
ally used as c 
could have s> 
rs of sneaker 
rket out there 


NOKIA 

EllO 


ge RaL 


in appropri; 


SSS-BSW 

firs. drug nwrw«“ emeto 


fi^ttanatedng 

&2=WSS? 


tropin, ® ncw 1W 
— fcWnDat scientist. 



rUH^HUTVVWtT— ^Tt. 1. >S« -IL< 


tfVING IN THE U.S.? 

NOW PRINTED IN 
NEWDRK 
for Same Day 

DELIVERY IN KEY CITIES 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK. CALL; 212-752-3890) 











ft’s the right size to fit 
in your hand and the 
right weight to feel 
comfortable in your 
pocket. It gives you the 
right connections to a 
portable computer or 
fax; you can charge ft 
and use it conveniently 
at your desk, in your 
car, in a hotel room. 
The Nokia 2110 is the 
most portable phone. 


responsible 
ange policy, 
view on the d 
countering sp 
1 States was t 
ds for the doll 
eves in float 
Villiam Md> 
the Federal I 
w York, said 
lay. “You ca 
loating excfaai 
mge rate targe 
s said Tuesc 
that the G-7 v 
a floor under 


uW trigger 
ss the boar 

d. That coi 
tock and 
tiuing dol 
held by or 




NOKIA 

Connecting People 



gh said intern 
a currency ^ 

,3 


9 

















Monday's 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP. conasis ol the i 000 
mo* traded securities in terms oi dollar value » is 
updated twice a year 



| Mflh LOW Stw Dn 

n-* j" cacT' ~~~ 

I j3%75wCaaDv5 iJ0e 
1 1 ■ a S'/lCoene 
i?v, ia cowflf 

7'vCniWiD 
31% ISViCOlMIC 
3? l7'iCwlr»A 
niw 59'. C anom J9a 

jc 13>V co'ousrr 16 

K'.IV .crqnHii. .12 
31 U'-,Can/erHz 
• m-.i •'.) Carolina 

IB'-ilO'vClKSPir 

ijv, 7*iCaseYi* AS 
TS IO“>C<nAmS 
M 2 CoiinoDS 

28% /'iCBSWMS 

75 7% CO-,1 lE 3 
I9W10 CornSir 

74% 9/iCntoCPS JO 
H i> Ctiawjn 
M' . n^Ccovi'Si 
34' J 17'uCellPro 
20*i 9% Cel'ilar 
48*1 ISHMCmA 
76% 16 CelCmPR 
34W 3'lCellrTci 
4 S'-j 70' 'iCcncdl 
34% 134* ConlCel 
U'-« 4VjCemxTi 
43 lAWCenrorm 

15% ftWCenioair , 
33 l .3Si<.CHOBv 1.17 
19*1 BiCeonw 
49 Vj l.'AiCemer 
3a% I*HCcf>ecer «e 
IB'., 9WCTinn5ri JJ9 
25 17 cmonFs 60 

Ifllt S*)0’«Ar6s 
74 V, 14 C/ia&cK s 

19 a cwcps s 
AO’i 34-‘,cnipcom 
7*) 3 OWWTe 

«6 SlViOiiran 

71 "a JWCnrnmdl 
22% 15 Cldco 
«l> i SO CinnFni 1.21 
34’)34%CiniD4 .17 

16% B’ICIrcon 
44Va ISHCirrus 
40 >J 20% CISCO s 
2S 9 C'<n>om 5 
31’ a UYaCIUbCoT 
47 TO'.'iCSIHim 
31 35 Cairo „ _ 

41*6 19'aCoCoBII 1.00 
37% 16 CoHexlD 
71 1 1 Cooncx s 

I4'a a'lCoanosa 
ia'«> 1 1 concrni 

3P» l7VaCalooon 
75*6 liHCoIBCBS -50 
34'. 1 17 ’•»Comc*r -34 
38% 1 ■ *• Comal i .09 
74 ll'aCmcsos 09 

71% 13' aCnmumct 

33 77 CmBMOs 68 

78'*» P'vCmcFdi 
71 11%ComHlS/ 
riVa TOVaComoBnc .92 
10% V'lCmpriL 
6*i 3%CmBlr< 

7*/. T' nCmocm 

74 7*aCrru>OtS 10 

l2*ha't u CnfN«ifc 
£■'.*31 ComBLiwr 
20W a Comvm 

944 a'.iCcoCnm 
33’a irifcConcEFS 
15% 9V6ConcH'd , _ 
M'.jM'.aCDnPop 1.28 

n 13 CoriiCl 

37V. 14-nCoorSB JO 
53 % 71 ', Coploy % 

TO 1 , a'BOooviel 
ll 9'iCorTHnr 
14* a 12*«CnrGaoF 
54' ,74l5Coroli 
III, T'-.CorelCDS 
21 l2*aCorlmog 
11% IV.CordCo 
37% IaWCoUCbs M 

53'.a 24!nCovniry 

34'.. 23*'i Crt-rBrl 312 
37% 30% Cronin s 
39% 17V, CrTcrtLI 
78 10 CnktSv* 

76 f5V)CrdAcp& 

3i B'-aCroiCom 

39', J 30' aCullnFr .45* 

55 W.-iCumbFd ,B8 
71 U%CuVCh 

75 10 CVOTOO 
13*. SvaCyonu'j 
41 1. 1816 Cyrix Co 
3J'-a Id Cvrtc 

8% 4 CytFU 


.. IB lȣ 

i ,j : J!? 

. 1140 
_ 40 1234 
... 1/ 7?4 
,. 17 404 

3 i fa £ 

£ M .?S 

49i 

536 

.7 15 U£ 
... 17 3430 
... 30 371 
... 7 3«3 

„ 1 59 

..II 774 
•B IS 1164 
. .. S77 
74 341 

_ . MS 

. 14 695 

40 

... - ’4 

- .. 1457 

. _ ua 

_. -. HO 

._ 350 391 
.. IB 4689 
3027 

3.4 11 510 

... _ 543 

.. 29 372 
2.1 30 370 
.9 14 181B 

3.0 8 4*2 
. 29 3711 

.. 31 934 
.. 30 730 
... 3a I9C6 

417 

.. 137 1618 
_ 95 17B3 
.. . 37H 

74 IS 340 
J 59 533 
. 15 798 
.. 31 7797 
._ 3039144 
... 3S 6417 
_ _ 14 

.. 30 TOO 
.. 75 1136 

4.0 IB 131 

61 

... r 216 

.. . 33 

..25 14J 
*9 534 

3 0 7 1343 

1.4 17 I4K 
J ... 1484 
5 .. 6095 
540 

2.1 12 719 

... 7 7330 

.. 18 738 

3.7 10 2SS 
-- 64 546 

309 

... 13 401 
J 11 365 
- 423 
35 1192 

_ 15 1347 

_ 13 739 

_ 23 433 
... 16 238 
3.3 28 ^ 

2 H ■■■ 406B 
_ 26 307 
... B73 

_. 9* 

.. 12 333 
-. 19 569 
... 3042 
_ 74 507 

.. 40 506 
_ 45 890B 
... 22 9*6 
.1 28 7150 
... 15 3?B 
_ 11 2607 
_ 28 788 
-33 14 

11 886 
1J ID 974 

Z is m 
_ 21 1503 
- ... 366 
24 2364 
„ 17 1078 
_ _. 365 


High Low Ltftil Cl! 59 

10% 9W 9V» — *• 
29 Va 59'., !9i •. -'j 
5 7'.-. 8 - ' i 

IJVl lOW 11% —'a 
VI V. 20W7IV, -V, 
19% Ifll'a 19 — % 

25 74V, 244. 

Bl% 81% Bl'-a — % 
16”» 16 l#'.| - 

4* 45' 'a 41 

20'.4 I’ l*'l - '.a 

11 10% 10% 

IS* 1 . 15'. IJ’.I 

11% 106, 11 

20V, 19V. JOla - l‘.a 
27 21*4 2S'i— 1' J 

7*: 8% Bl 

17 IP* 11% —% 
10% IB '.a 10'., — ■* 
li"i 12 l2'.-a -'a 

11% 16 16'*— I % 

7»V, 3B% 39'-.— 1", 
:5V. 24% 24-t, _Va 
11V. 1Q% 10' • 

45% 45V. 45'.. — W 
20' * 30'i 70' . -V. 
15% 11 14% — 

23% 71 71 —2 

20% 70 30'-. 

KiSj 10% 10% — ' i 

M 20% 10';— S'-i 

10V. 10 1C; : — , 

31 30% 31 • 

13'/. 11% 11' a — ’-a 
30 Vj TB'.a 30 - ; a 

20% 70Va 20% — 
10V. 9% 91a — . 

70% 70 23 — 

s’*, os', s*' — 

17 I6‘a 16' i — % 
13 13% 12'- 9 — 

467) 43' i 43.4-2*4 

S'* 4% 45. — 

66% 43% 65 - 1 a 

16V. IS'* IS '• — •'a 
17% 16' a l6'*‘a— I ;</ 
S2V. S2'.« 52' . — ‘ 
3iv. 31'. 31 ' a — 
ICV.. 9% 13". — 
37% 3S*-a 3S% — 
31% 29 V. 30 — i;»i 
17 15% >6 - V. 

14% 14'i 14% —V. 
Jl'a 30'.t M'a — 
31% 31% 11 V. 

75% 24% 74% — I'.S 
23 71% 31% — % 

19% 18% 1 B'.'i — V, 
13 11% 11% — ■* 

12% IJ'.a 13% 

21% 20 M'.a— 1% 

30% 1914 19% — % 
!8%<J17 17'i — 1% 

17% !7'-a 176* —V., 
17% 17V. 17--,,—' 
16% 15% I 5% — % 
32% E E'.. 

21V. 70% 21 * — % 
72' a 21% 32 — % 

75*4 25 25 — Va 

12% 12 12-a ... 

4Va 4 4'1 — Va 

i 44a 41V„ —Ja 
14% 13% 13'-a — % 
B'-a 7'. 8% -% 
J6 1 '. 43'. i 44 V. — % 
10% 9% 9% —'a 

27a 2% 3% 

21 % 20% II - I V* 
13 12% 12% — % 

39 V. 38% 39 V. - 
15 V. 14% 15 — % 

19*'. liVl 19% -V, 

26 7 5 25% — % 

11% 10% 11% — % 
10% 10 I0*'a -*>. 

18% 16V. 18% -% 
44U 44 44*. 

VJ 21% 21%— 1% 
19% 17% 17%-— 1 
15% 12% 14% — % 
11% 179a 17%-—!% 
51% 49% 49% _ I 
25% 23% 73 Vi — I % 
37% 37% 37% - '* 
255a Z3% 25 -% 

23 71V. 31% — % 

?l% 21% 71% — % 
10% 10'* 10' a -V» 
37% 36' i E% .% 
aJ4a 

27% 27V* 77 '‘a 
20 IB !*%— 1W 
8% 7'S 7% — ' % 

23 20% 72% -1 

27 23 % 24%— IVa 
5% SVa SVa —'a 


39'.i 71 iaFosivnal 
70 .I3 %Fi*?IN v 
5J 45 FiMnT 
Ifli. 7'.FlOal.f6 
29'. 1C iF'i^llel 
12% e'-.P'iBsmi 
'•S'. 17 Pirsier 
35 a l7',Psl-IOH 
34 Vj " FliTn 

76 15'iPCoiBn 

3H.72' i FCfm- 

77 Il'iFIF.V.IS 

19’»13' aFlFnCS 
29'.? 73 '-r FIHOw 
2211 i'.FIPcMI* 
16’« l3%P*tPSm 
M'-lia’-iFSCcCi 
43'; 3S : -.FT0fir,5 
ri’-a l7*.RiWa 
73 17 Flo.r 

20*. H'.Ptorrm. 

7 - 5 % FOL'OS 
7% 5V.F0L'6F 
39'. 10' jFcrArr 
A 3'aFor^VO 
33". i»’-aFonnB 
;4'.a SVaFcSVl 
75 i'*4D Sen 

17' I S'-.FrsmTc 
53 -i i74iFryiCttc 
72 22'.'.Pr«» 

43' . 31 i Fi'IrHB 
JO'-a 9'aFunco 
IS': 4'aFuiu'H: 5 


20". 1C1.G.V.IS 

2l'..l7'-iGPFncl 

41". 7V.GT1 
E a iOo^j 
42>a JJ’.Gonnsr 
i6% I7 %IjCW-.iC 5 
23 IJ'.GOItFd 
24’. 15" lG-HtMM 
1?'-. S".Ga1*vFn 

36% X CflCrNii 
V i 13-iGnlJoTri 
2." 9>aGcocTnr 
491, 30 '■, Gene irn ;i 

31*1 ld%G«nv9 
35' . 16*. Genie, s 
S*. I *■ Genus 
41 74 Gena <m 
17V, 5-..GeoT! 

58 *a 27 GrmSy 
i?%GcinG 
78' : 19' iGldLfw 5 

19 8' iG'loaO 

55'. lAV.Gipnavr a 

13’ i 7 GIDWai 
70' 1 H 9 -GO04G/ 

31 1 1 GOvFom 

26% l9*iGoviidF 
12*-. 6'*Gro«P[T. 
36'-.15'';GmKrC 
I6-* 13%GnFnel 
14% 7'uGtLhL'Av 
E". IJx.Grenlio 
4% 2%Grcamr 
15% 12%Gr,pt>:n 
19 Va 7L.Gui.slS 
38’'J 19’'iGulll3U 
31 % 12 Guoie 
53% 34%Gymcroe 
30% 9%HBO 1 
29 18%H5F54 

40'. i 13' :HDggar 

30". 13 HamllnBC 
18% 12*iHarpGB 
77 EWHor.rel 
27 l3%HII-YISrS 
25% 12* iHilCmc 
25% 14 HoartT^ 
36% H'.HrHndE 

11% 8 % He ha A 
20V. llUHctofiTr 
31 ll%Hertjn<r 
12 7*. Honan 

12 "a 9'*Holln l ae» 
32% 7'.-iHJv-AtiCa 
XV. 7 Hoil/ndE 
35 15 , '.|Hlv*flPV5 
18% 9 Hc.tct// 
39 W.HomeOc 
70% 17 HwreTBs 
34 14 "1 Hwilno 

74*1 12'lMornDh 
15% ID'.HuqaiEn 
77% 14 Humljw 
25% I9 '.iHU( 1IJB 
U'-ils Huntca 
27!l 20% Hun'Bn 
41 19 HulCtiT 


1 J" *03 
1311 

I I 15 *5’ 
6 512 
.. 78 122. 
... 2li 

3.4 11 173 

.. . 535 
3.7 4 801 

7 5 21 !W 

3.6 6 3'B 

H * |2 

4.4 11 6d 

.. .. 

3*1 

1.6 i: 2 S 74 

4.0 10 7 5! 

74 J*! 

.2 ... 41] 

. Ii: 

1.5 333 Hi! 

I 1 384 7141 

2.5 17 J 1 

icei 

9 5 

34 936 
3 26< 
411 

• X? 4l - 

1 : 71 42 7 

51 

3. 6»7 


33% 37 37% 

K'4 18" . 18'; 
53 57' a 57 : 

O'-, 9' a <r. 

JS' .74 U 1 
9". 3% S', 

SS-i 4 j ‘ , 45 

73’ , 73 73 

31 • 1 31 31 

24% J3’- 2J’. 

78 7*'i 7’% 

•.'3% 23'. la- 
ri*. it 1* 

?: •. 25" I 36 I a 

lt% 16 ■ 16". 

:b'- ; 7B' .• 
j; 41' ; 41 ; 
30'.- 70' a 

19V. 19". 1?' . 


?-<) I” 1 

471 H-I 

i6Q« :s% 
6J9 19". 
j;n i»% 
JOJ3 15% 


•an ir-'i 
n%r. 
3:% 2: a 
23% 73% 

09% 9., 

43% 43> • 
17% 17’. 
l: V : 


1043 :9'-; 
3543 10% 
5 ji’i 
1 1’3 19% 
517 :3". 
59 '% 

257' 45% 
748 8% 

38:3 11% 


641 25"-a 
... 13 735.- 14* s 
.. 39 1*04 45* » 
40 '033 19% 

j: 74 71 a. 
7 11 4 r 3 78% 
. .. 22 IS 30 

U 16 TO >5% 
.. . jrju:7% 
... 26 2 * 

. 17 4S.7 Jen 

.. 15« T2SI IS% 
... 42 2I>2 33 
ia j«t i6*9 
9 la 14% 
3 3 14 725 21 * 
1.4 7? 439 9 

.. P IC’-v 
-. 35 53 «"J 

... 72 nOdJ’ 

_ *7 581 21 
... 27 147 14% 
.. 17 157 36". 

... 43 545 14% 
1.4 7* 171 33'.': 

I? Si" IV.» 
9 13% 
7a 17% 
9 7? 108? 77 
j 73 217 21V| 
12 10 1212 74% 

.. 31 191 15% 


0% e% 
10% ift'- 
8 8% 
29%lff H - 
19’ a 1'.%- 
41. 14' . 
36 36 

17% 13% 
32% 37%- 

14> a >4' . 

I3'.a 13'- 
17 17 

21 ?J 
20'., 30’ a- 
24 ‘.-a 24% 
35 3£ 


. 2 LTH 
:’U.LCn B ii 
iE%L0nC5lr5 60 
. !'% LOnCO _ .» 

, r-»,Lflmv%oh 

.13 canar/s 

. ;;i.Lon05ir 

:3 '• LOirmTe 
. 1 2' a LaH'06 5 
1 11-aU.vrrTII 1 - 13 

. 14' iUter^n 

a 14 LmnCo 

: 1 l_->Cn:orS 

i S' . Uflunl 
, t r Lcvd'Cn s 

I r Lior.’-eilA 

LIO'VlCICDflOO 
0%LieUSA 
15', L»IV In 5 40 

18? iLiriSm 

,17 L-ncorei m 

■ 1 3 LmcTl 5 .5. 

a 26' .LintarTC .?£ 

: 5' a Lionm 
a 4-.L8JE* 

1 17 LOcoEnr 

t Ii*.L«w6ri 5 Dt 
, i7%LneSSiB 
: 6'ai.naSlk 

*-* .lduc/vE 
; 33 LOTUS 

■ 4' a.VlHMOVOr .03P 

,11'.. via Com 

.31 ■■••VO* 10 

a 73' : V.F1 Ilm 
. 4' iMK Gold 
; ri'aivisCanr 
. r.MTCEi 
i 1 MocrwmJ 
I 3 Moanx 
, 4 /.lanPn- 

; J9’ j.MonmP 

. 15'iMOdC’B 76 

,11' MsinSiCH Ole 
: l9'./.inBin*3 
, 7' : Maroam 
j'-.MdrDrl 
, 1 1 MarinerH 
. 2;* : V * T«n s .96 
: 6 .Vlsrsam 

18-, varsnl 1 60 

■ 1S% viaiiana .06 e 

i .’.lair* 3/ 

; 7 ,*.Va>CrHI1 
, 2E IflCXilT! 

■ iilMQ'W 

. 79 alV^COW 

. 70 /.valor .48 
; ; 7 Moooati 

a 5 .".'L'dnr 

: 4 .'.lorf.'jfi 
. ‘-a'limGro 
, ;l'a.4Min .48 
S' 4’“.ooia»s 
.11% Mcauai 

, *■ J Mrnonri; 

■ ;o* .- MMilesi 
. i3%/.*enWr s 

, id uinor 
, 8-*McnlGr 
, i;%MrcBhs .18 
. a-».'.Vfrcer 
; :s’.MefCGn5 .70 
'.1 Mercini 
,;;%MlrdnBc I JA 
: 10%Meri5*l 
, IB /,'erilCo .12 

lI'a/.WSOAr 

< A'',r.i«inon> 

, lO'iraminaA Ja 
f : A'etTcm 
, 12% MiMroexul 
,15 -. MiCfiSlr 
, 51 ' : .'AiCflMI LOO 
9» .MiCV/nr A 
: J%/31iCrAas 
1 b%iMicrchns 
• i',M>cnc 

■ 4%M>c*er/ 

, 4'rWicroo 
I ! 3 '-a Mirras 

70% MiCSll 6 
, 4VaMicrt«sl 

■ 75 M,dOcn 
. l3*'*MldA1l5 
I IB% JVUalFn 

■ 17'.:/.Vd>Co .10 d 

22'aMillrHr J7 

1 IB’l.VIfliTnm 

1 17'a fAHOhSr 
15-IMCiTel 

■ 19% Modifies >U 

1 1 B VMtKtoh S 
,78%MOlOa 5 4U 
I 26' a MclPxA .04 

I I TMaircriM 

> 10% Mono 5 s .16 

■ tfi-sft/lonTPas 

1 5 Mosctrfn XU 

> 7"* MCOHCP 
,27 Mulrmdn 


. . 351 3' J J 1 * 

. 23 4958 31 S9 30 

I 18 9£7 45*1 64% 44, 

I 12 74 IB". 13J“ J?! 

655 2056 33% 37% 32 

4B5 22% 2t% 27, 

. 30 1754 27% 77 ?T\ 

. 38 910 12 

13 1151 16 

1 2 318 12 

189 23% 27V J 22 

. 33 818 11% 

19 Jll I3'.» .. . . 

. 21 118 5 29 % 29 29 

. 43 691 19 17% 18%- 

. S32 19V; 19 19% 

li 

. 15 £85 11 'OW 10% 

I 23 28 26'i 35% 25 


77 27'.* 

1 1*. 12W 
IS'-J IS" 
11% 11 
77 V 1 12 



70% 21% 
9% • 

IV* •)>* ■ 
24% 74% 
29' i »% 


... 15 £85 11 10W J0’ » 

16 23 38 26' . 25% ?5 

til HI'.) Ill 1H, 1 - 

.. 21 515 Z2% 23 71 "i 

3.1 16 732 IS 14"; 14 

S 34 3M7 4B% 46% 4 P. 

.. ... 522 5W 5% 5% 

. 713 1033 ?'.i ?% ?;■ — 1 

1M »W 1?% »?W 

.. 30 2153 22% J2W DH 

. 37 2369 »'■* 19% JW- 

23 113 10% 10* '* 10% 

.. 35 664 10% 9'S 10 

. 40 8609 63 59% 59% — 3% 

.7 16 864 4'.i 4’A 4% -‘a 

IB 4 19 19 19 — 

j 1921551 22T-i !ty. 22V) —44 

521 29% 78% 29'. . 

... . 1 1* 5* a 5"n T'l — 'r 

... 21 453 21V, 20% 20% — H 

2004 4% 4 4% -W 

... 45 J9 13 13% 13 

B14 13% 12% 13 — to 

22S S', S' 'a 5 Vh — 1-ji 

.. 1J 48 33 31% 31'S — % 

4.2 12 *407 IB'-) 18% 18% — a 

4 ._ 36 14% 14 14 — % 

334 21% 70 % 21% -% 

... 79 110 10% 9% 9Va — % 

. 14 55 5'* 4 V* 4%— W 

_. 50 307 25'. 24% 34% — % 

U 11 48 79% 29'i 39% -A', 

... AO 13? 13’. a 11 V. 12% *Jn 

19 II 5JI 20*4 20 Vi 20’'« —% 

J 13 irao 17'/. 16V. I ft W —1 % 

.. JO 291 10% 10 10 — % 

.. .. 1489 12% 12 If — Vi 

... 3B Ml 54V. S3 S3''a— 1, 

. ... 938 I'.V 1% I'* — % 

... _ 4509 491/3 48% 48%— 

?J 1 7 3741 21’a 71 21% ... 

38 330 33% 32V, 33% — W 

35 145 "% 12V. «W-I 

. 24X17 4V, U7Va 2!s— I ’m 

... 22 10 15% IS % -% 

23 14 OB5 23% »% 22% —35 

_. 31 3: 184. 18 18% — % 

X 338 15*. 14*6 14V. —‘a 

„ _. 1975 1M, 10 10W -% 

... 14 1S2I 17% 16% 11% -W 

_ 39 169 X M% 38% — 1 

_. a 311 14% 13% 13% — % 

3BM 1 1 V. 11% 11% — 4k 

3.6 11 153 19% 14% 19*6 — % 

. 7 3037 10% 946 9% _% 

7.7 ? 3165 264, 025% 21% — % 

. 97 708 1S% 1446 144i-4„ 

4.A 11x1764 »% 29% 29W— •%. 

.. 18 1102 174, I7V- 17% —Vi, 

.5 14 82 23% 22% 23% _ 

„ 7S 3291 13 6 13% 12% — % 

_. 73 7244 1 1 Va 10% 11 

.4 18 173 IS 14% 14% —4. 

. _. 374 X 19*a 19% — % 

737 15'* 14% 15 

38 27JB 44 43 43% — % 

3.0 IV 10441168% 67*4 67Va —Vi 

... 33 392 34% 23% 23%— 1% 

.. 20 1153 2l"a 25 25% -% 

“ 32 2971 »% 38% 29% _ 

_. ... 433 1% S% SV:. - v u 

... _ 431 6% 5% 6% — % 

.. .. 1334 1% 1% 6% — Va 

_ 2S 39 25% 2446 25% -V) 

„ 77 1469 1 93% 91% 92% - 

Z - 433 10V, 10 104k — % 

... 14 138 29*. 29% 29% -V. 

... 34 4706 52% 50'.. 50% -% 

_. IS 26 3Pa 25*6 21% -% 

A 10 XX 38% 31 28% — % 

2.0 17 472 21% 25% 35V a — % 

... _ 50S 37% 22' , 22' a — W 

... 17 12 14% 14% 14V, — % 

. 54 1097 17% I IV, )6% — '% 

1.7 19 2S3 X 27 Z7 -Va 

, 35 161 31*6 25V, 25% — % 

.1 27 1080 31*6 35% 36% — % 

.1 29 713 35% 34 34 —1% 

_ .. 2491 19% 1»% 18 — 1% 

.9 10 ISO 19 18% 18'.) -% 

_. 79 170 13% 13% 13% — % 

A _. 321 11% 10% 11% - 

_ 18 3045 15Va 13*. 15 - 1% 

. 13 199 29% M'a 15% — % 





Monday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wan Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 



12 Manm 

High Low ST*> 


Oitf YM PE 1 005 High LOWLmwtQl'Be 



’ 6Tr 
" iBc"/ 
} ■ P'J'C-v 


4V* 3V.MCSV 
IV, WMIPPr 
B 5’. MSA .60 I 

1 '.jMSfi 
15% il'-aMacNSc JbA 
31'- . 35% McPS 1.B4 

12 5 MumHrv 
3', 1 Marl ion 

ISSIl'iMOuHEn JHo 

4*. 3%Maiec 

44% 72% Max am 
10*. 5 V. McRoa A J5 
11*. 9% Me acR 
14'.J 5%Mcdeva JDe 

31%19'iAVocbo A4 

2C% 3*. MecTmLou 
3% IWMedPA 
2'i %• VVdCO re 

4 3% Media ,12b 

4% J'-jMedlq pi JJ7b 
T6 J%.Vlom 
7% 3%MentHln 
17% U" , MrchGo .lie 

IVi 2"<ii McrcAlr 
2% V r.M«rPt4 
IV: HMf-Pil 
4%2iV„MeTf>6 0r 
5% 3 MerP7pf 
5% I MerPtial 
9»i 5 MLUST wl 
5*. 2'w,.MLDM DW* 

13*. 7'aMomilC AO 
16% lOWMcIPrn JS« 
IB'all'.MoirBcs .14 : 

!5‘.) 9% Went* 60 1 

9% 4% Mien Ant 

11 a' .-MURlYn J6e : 
J'« UaMldtav 
47 1 iJ/'-iMjdtnd JS 

7% 6 MllwLd n 
15*. !2%MlnnMun J3 1 
11 Va 9’.MinnTr2 J9 1 
9*a A*. Moog A 

13 ?*lMOOna 
15% 9%MMod 

3 l'.MoranF 
3'., H .MovicSir 
11% 8’aMuniln Jao 
11", BX.Munvv O8o 
15*. IP iMonA'n .850 1 
15 12 MunAZ? n A7 

35' , H'.,WWin« .19 
H Vi It % NFC 668' 
11% 4'iNTNCom 
11% .* rivR 
J’i 2' illVRwl 
II A'.aNCXon 
9*. I'.Nanick 
18% I2V.NIG10 36b: 
»%I6’.NHJ1C JO : 
S'. 7> :,NIPoint 
13% 4 NaiAll 
10'.. 8%NM»Ar 
23'. IA%NVBCD1 JOB. 
II». 93.NYTE1 M 1 
79%22%NYTlm J6 1 
BV. 4%NicWiA 
7% 3%NkMiC 
41-. 3%NoisaCrn 30 ■ 

1% IWNABncv 
7% 4 NATril 
IS"; 8*. HA Voce 
17".l4%Mtnbv M> : 
3% :% Minn Ten oac i 
7% 4%NumoC 
IS' . IOViNCAPI n .780 I 
15V> IQ'iNCAPIJn J9a I 
15% ll'.NFLPI n .75 1 

15%17'iNGAPIn 74 ; 

15% M NMOPIZn M ( 
11% ll%NvMIP2 -74 I 
15’ . 12V, NMOPI n .70 ! 

IS 1 . ll*'.NNJPt3n .73 I 
13' • lO'i NNV Ml .76 ! 

IJ'.lOWNNYPln .74 ( 

la 11% NuOHPI .78 4 

15". KP'.NOHPiIn A8 I 
IJ% I l%NPAP13 n .76 ( 

ijv, ia%riVAPi7n AB ! 
16%11'aNwWA 71 4 


X172 3% 3V M 

25 1% lv„ 

31 6 6 

134 'V U 46 
17 11% 11% 

16 21% 36% 

184 7% 7% 

71 1% 1% 

72 13 Vi 13% 

6 31) 3*a 

89 34 33V> 

I 7% 7% 

1B6 19% 12% 
129 ■% 8% 

147 23 73 

276 3'Vi# 3'.) 

1240 2 2 

237 1% I Va 

111 3'Vi, 3% 
15 3% dJ% 

15 4% 4% 

25 5% 5% 

40 TS% 15% 

103 5% 4% 

13 2 1% 

1 HA l'A 
13 3% 3 

19 3Vu J '/» 
12 3 3 

5 u 9% 9% 

90 3 2'V„ ' 

12 94a 9% 

10 1340 1J46 

16 16% 11% 

84 15 16% 

291 5% 4'l«i, 

4 9% 9'.. 

4 3V) 3"/.. 

a x 37% 
it 1% t% 
57 13% 17% 
37 9% 94u 

28 8% B*i 

1 m> 11% 

41 11*. 11% 

*5 2Vn 7V|, 
25 1% lVu 

5 9V, 9Va 

454 9V. 9 

5 17% 174. 

12 17' a 13% 
99 »% 2D', a 1 

7 16' ad 16% 

968 S’. 5% 

10 7% 746 

51 3"% 3% : 

?»! 6 % 1 % 
X 5% 5*6 

S 17% 17% 

ir 21% 26% : 

717 3". JV„ 

178 9% 9% 

7 9% 9 

IS 19% 19% 

17 9% 9*. 

1537 35V, 35% : 

53* 5% 5 

90 4% 4v„ 

190 4>/ H 4 

I ?'•! 3% 

5 7% 7'.a 

114 9 8% 

5 16' 1 11% 

1 3% 3*. 

13 6 % 6 W 
*49 III* 11% 

* 78 10% 10% I 
*12 11% 11% 1 
*15 12% 17% 1 

>181 11% 11V. I 

*S7 12'* 12 I 
>7 12% 13% 1 
*10 17 17 

*6 ll'j 11% 
aI6 1146 11% 

• I* 17'. 13*6 
*33 11% 11 
*>] 1146dll% 
»X 11% 11% 
*33 11% 11% 


LowLaUrstOi'oo 



« » S’* 


--uOBncn _ 

17 I'-iOSullvn JB 2.9 
34% 72 CHdon 3* J 
3% IVi.OI-Jpnian _ 

3*. •■■■OmilcE n 
13% 5%Onm«n 
12% 8%Orio1H* 60 7.0 
I2 't B*iOrhalH B .70 8.1 
rwS'VuPLCSn 
31. 7 PLAJ _ 

it'.iiriPMC .90o A.i 

I4%14’.PSBP 140 ia7 

A5'6M PcEnp*B 44a 7.9 

68 53 PcFnrtC 4J0 BJ 

70*1 56 *6 PcEn ptD 4 75 1,9 
lOJ^iW iPcEn DIE 1M 8J 
23% IB'.i PluEplA l.» 8.1 
21% 16%PGEoie U? 84 
l9%15WFOEBfD 125 84 
W’.lJ'.PCEpte '25 8.4 

iv'., uwpoephj i.ro 8 4 

174. I3’.« PGEpII 109 B I 
rB'.r4 , LPG&plM 1.96 M 
2«".74'.PGEOK> 2 00 A I 

78%25%POEirfF 2.05 U 
I6 3 a 23% PGEDlO 186 II 
3A".I?'.PGEDlU 176 8.0 
J6'.2P.PGE0« „ 

iB'ilA'iFncGlln .18o 1.0 
6’ a 71 iPoacAm 

11% 4 PVVHKWt 
A'.3'*'.,PWHH£*4t 
J'i 4%B*VHK.Hh*1 
S’6 l'6,.PWHK 30TW91 
10' a 8"-. PVTSPMid n 
y. 2’aPWLrtJWt 

: f.-ajuai 


15% 't'.PWFin 11 5.9 

S'6 7'i.PgmHld 
81 II Port W 1 80 2.5 

16 Itv.ParPfr 1X079 

ID 13 PorPO 1.24 8J 

38' . IS'.PooGia .lOc A 

53', 43 PenEM 1 Uo 20 
45’. 34 PmnTr 
76% n PcnRE 1.88 8 3 

r.. 4% Ponce 70 39 

13'. r.Pw^H- 
75%?l PerrCot 7 17 »J 
W'lM'.MiLD 339 3 

a% 3 Prin-Ln • 

8*: I ' .Pn./Jpl 


JB 3.9 14 'u 9% 9% 9% 

21 J _. 403 31% X 30'.,- 

- .. 5 3%. P.i. 2"i. 

_. _ 176 IV, . 1 1 

ai. ,-4 13 13% 

S 3 !■? ■ 8 % ■% 8 % 

TO 8.1 13 8 8*6 8*6 8% 

- - 264 4 % 4V, 4% 

„ - J! U 3% 3", 3*', 

?0ll 6.1 17 772 14% 14% 14% 

60 iq.7 13 1 15 w 11% 15% 

4ft 7-? - rlOD 55% 55-I S5'-I- 

JO BJ .. IJW 5J 53 53 - 

78 8.9 4680 56*6 d 53% S3'<._ 

J4 87 .. 270 95% 92% 92%- 

80 S I _. JA 18*6 d 18% ]8*i 

32 B.4 _ 31 16V, d 16% lA'.i 

v5 B4 20 I5%dl4% 14 V. 

*4 .. 75 U dl4% 14% 

20 84 ... 32 14%dl4*. 14% , 

W Bl . I 13% 13% 13% 

96 8,1 . 4 ?4 , .id74% 34>. 

00 8.1 17 35". 074% 34% 

05 U 98 3t 075% 25'. 

B6 8 I -. 95 71%dE% 73 

76 8.0 ... 6 77 dJ1% 22 

„ . . U 22U 21* . 21%- 

18c 1.0 . 71 17', 17%17%, 

- - !? 4 31. 3% 

_ _ 18 4% 4*. 4% 

. .. 74 4»„ J", 4* u 

. .. 310 5% 5% 5% 

1 .. _ SO 1>. dl% n, . 

- _ 70 9% g% 9% 

- 393 7'*,, 2', 2'm 

2S 7*u 3% 1% 

71 5.9 .. ?7 13'.. 13 i 2 . 

.. . 457 5% 5 5'-, 

80 15 IS 1 73 77 17 


43% 354. SiW 3.10 5.7 

4Vu »n5ailnd 
15*6 WuSPIB _ 

4*6 3*aSPIrl _ 

19*6 ll%5PI PH M IJ 
21 % 1 1 SaoaCam 
18*. 7%S(*iGOTis 
1% HSonoGpf JM1 AJ 
'*':, ''i Saint wl 

16* a 9>a Satan* AO 3.1 
50*141 5afAMGNiS.I8 69 
40*6 33% SmDEC n 3-0 9.8 
85*. 7S»6 ScSHWP n 4J1 5J 
17% 6%5dMKwl96 
87% 76H50IMSFT 03.99 A7 
14% 28*. SalORCL n2 JO 7.4 
29’A24 Sal SN PL n 2.12 8J 
4 Vi 3% Sal PH 10 
13*6 10% Sam tan l.OOa 9.9 
36% 23% SOaa plH 141 7 A 

9% 4% Sandy .13 1.8 

10% AVhSMonBk 
46 SlVaSbamo .96 2 J 
17*6 7VaSceeirv 
P) 3%Scnrlt> 
IPAllViSdlul* .16 1.1 
746 173 SbdCp U» A 
»5% tMiMe! JM 1A 
4% ll6S0tnPck 
3% iv,, sendee 
7*. 3%Sarvica 
9% M6ShdMMd 
16*6 7% Shit Cm 5 .04 3 

8% SttShwdGa 
4% I'AStapca JO IS1 
4*. 7*65ifco 
9% 4V. Simula 
12% 3*. SkHKiSut, .79 11 J 


.12 1.0 11 23 

... - 95 

.96 2 J 17 171 

... ._ 10 

.16 !J fl iH 

I JO A 18 7 

JO 1 -A 15 135 

_. 74 13 

- 125 48 

_. 15 149 

_ - - Ml 

.04 3 10 116 

-. 5 41 

JO IS I .. J7 

_ .- 4 

_ 36 S3 

.79 11 J 3 


EH 37 37 — % 

2*6 2% 3% 

5% J9u 3%— 1*. 

3% 3*6 JW — *i 

17% 17 17 — *6 

14% 14*6 14% _ 

8% 8*a 8% -% 

'Vu U% ’*% — 1/1, 

V14 »„ Vu — Vu 


76*6 354* 25% — % 
78 77*6 77') —Vi 

7') TVj 7*i — ii 
84V. 84 84*. -W 

31% »*i 31% - % 

25% 25 25 — % 

37. 3’6 3% 

10% d ID 10% — H 

24*6 24 24 — % 

6 % 6 % 6 % — V. 

10 9*6 10 -% 

35*1 35% 35'.': ■ % 
9*i 9*a 9’) 

4% 4% 4*6 — «A 

14*6 14 14 — *. 

179 179 179 

1776 11% 127)—% 
4 J% 4 

2 *i 2*6 2*6 ■% 

6% *J 6W — % 
j 4% 4% — % 
13 11% 11% _% 

4*6 6 '-. 6 '. —v. 
J% 3"-'„ 3*'u— 'u 


?7 I2'-. 13 12'-. 

. 457 5% 5 5*., 

15 1 73 73 n 

13 9 13% 17% 17% 

13 „ .' IS IS IS 
51 7957 17*'| 17*. 17'-. 
■ 3 I 49% 491. 49>« 
54 256 41 40*1 41 

9 X 77>*. 73 V. »% 

17 3 5*. 5 5% 

51 49 12*. U’.i 1J*. 

■ 3 27% 73% 37% 

X 400 66' 1 46 64* I 

! .. , I"'. 7*6 

.. I-'I 3».. 3 31,. 


'_~T J»'.»WSmlltiAi A* I J 

-1 f?. MWSmltrn Jl ia 

Z 11.1 11% 9*fcSm«ln A0O5 9 

15*6 13*6 SmiBmM jua 6.0 

* * 7% I*. satinet 

-% IB 13 V, SCfid DtC 1.06 BJ 

J? '?% 13'VSCEd ptD 1.08 0.4 

19% 14%SCEda(E 1.19 is 

M'a l7%5C6dpfG 1.45 8 A 

37 73%SCEdOtP 1 .84 8.0 

J.,.* 74*', MDSdUCd* 

— 5v. 2 Hsoancn 

7"> 4 Sac Oim „ 

~ * 5*: 7*i50tSudwl 

* j sraac .17 2.1 

» 4B>/|a93"'s5POR l.!9e 2.7 

10'.. SWSlomH _ 

‘ 37'6 3S% SWBOn Jfl 19 

15*6 i%5twta 
7£ 7% 5 SrvGdA 

" ,6% 4%StwPr 1.00 MJ 

li'.<4<ari,smither 
“ H'" S'vWvteVld 

11%2’VuSotcus _ 

. ;r 17W!0*»5umlTK M 5.0 

3% !%Suno*r 
, ,? 5' i 2%5tmNur 

—a! ! *’ ■ 9%sundwn _ 

, , * 'I') ?■ a vi5un.fr 

M J. 3%Suormlnd 1 Mr .- 

2 v 'V, Suoln un 
.6 . 4"% SEHK PWt 
' ■ It*'. 4% Tils 

* iVTOCCD 

’WTobPrd .20 2JJ 

J a **v J? 36 

5% 3V. Team 

13*. B", TiCOnS JO 4.3 

17% 6%T6|irtPv- 

J7 36 Tatola ja i n 


W„ 3% 36,. _i/, 
9% 9’v 9’6 

7 7 7 — ■ , 

33% 33 33 — 

34 % 32*, 33 V» — 7 

0 -. iq 10*. - Va 

14% 14% 14*. — % 
4Vi 4% 6*: 

12’i 11*, 13", _ 

U'.v»dl7!« 17’« _w 
14’. id 14 14 

17'.dl7 17% .% 

33 73*. 33 ■ '., 

19% 19 17 

■I’. 4% 4', 

4*6 4') 4*. • % 

3*6 3= a 3% _* 4 

4*4 4% 4 J 4 

44% 44" r 44--’.%_"- 

BVa 8% S'" * 

2B 27*. j;i, 

13% 17% 13% 

4% A'", a*. •% 

4% 4%u 4% — 
S". 5*". 5*6 -*6 

14*1, 14 14% 

?‘i 2% ->z 

10% 10% iav, 

?■% 2ts 7% Z 
.3 7% 3 . 

10% Iqx, m% 

9% 9% 

i % s % *j; 

» ‘ 5*4 4 ' . r. 

9*6 9 9% . % 

J3 ‘2*1 17'.-, 

10') 10'-i 10% 

*5". 14*. 14*6 — 
4% 4% 4% 

•I 11% 11% 

7 . 17 17% 

14 l’% IJ1, 

37 'V 3S% 37'. 






















































HE'S jMemt 


ENTERiNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. MAY 10, 1994 




SSass?- 


Page 17 


' ADVERTISEMENT ‘ 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Tb. T*- 


May 9, 1994 


majCT pros 


sMtbbkes 


pgwasmc t 



to 15 mill. 







wjiftmiorltefFonj 


f ijtfomm imi a* 


WAslOr EootrvM l ia&AS 

wEuraoean Faulty Fd j 13045 

evehest capital (969) «bm 

D>Ev«rM COOIM Inll Ltd J MUD 

FIDELITY INTL I MV. SERVICES (Lux) 

B DtKOvery Puna « M48 

ac2T!" ,F, f ,a * ■“* 

JjEfJAraw-Aswfc S 19X49 

“ Fll Amor. Vofvcs w l . .» 1QSBUD 

g frontUr Puna « 34*3 

d Global ind fund x 7947 

d G tabgJ S ytectian P— m < an 

2 Interna lonol Fuim « a* 

g IfgYEumog Pmd « 1343 

S S**" 1 Fwa — — * 1J1X2 

315 

,mmo 

SS?!!® '!£! Gnwnn Fd j ijs 

pja*£^?5. K S!i!2. OROl,p »>w 

*Pl2rr?!L > *?" U,8n ' Bormwta 
StJJGglopolBUMM S I <27 

J2 b 2S e Amer - (31 *mn s iua 

™£££§ w £* w1Mor > * 1U2 

SS™ » 

SBSB!*; » 

;a fffeg=» ,ss 

gsg°g« *i : «wtw< ci.i J SS 

£S9fft Guaranteed Cl. n_ 1 JnSi 

™MIEZ PUmSSMSAN 

1352146 54 23 

JgSwuos 

-g 

g 

!BES&as=r «a 

^PORTPOUOS *- 

AUoPodfi T ~ . J* ; 

CortOwntai Europe r a ?j9 

D^golnoMomets^irj" xn 

Ge nrwn vII — "jg 

I nlernat Loner 

Jpunn -- 

££ &==*. g 

Utefntf KlnoSr T — r 

FI IUtM 1 !■» 


. Ibe defer: 

MKaoi’. 


obbedfcim 


h 

S ^ Rgn * n Fd f 

“ Fotrtmontol 

0 
tf 
d 

J5p.it 

rfBBL <L 
tf I 
tf 


OR FUNDS 

* won 

WnCnCtBl * Tutfr 

FUND Ltd 

IAI Gcneaen Ecsle 1 

JDI Genesee Sion J rej» 

(C) Genesee Opportunity _s ,5™ 

, .S2S WNon - E i un v--» imSb 


LOGOS 

Str^MBondB 
Pacific Band B _ 

**< »WTU. 


^tmanao^nt 
nwhshi of Man 444244USJ7 


o^r. cfter 

pcs. Thr- 


*wcAN_ 

Austral I n 

Barton 

Sorsfll Minnetonka. 

lomhlivd . ■ 

^raso-McrkEt—. 

European 

Fronce 


:&5gSft=ES as 
,BUI 

MmSE?" C “° Fwxl — s flUO 

ffi^ s .*“SMANAeEMBHTLTO 

Mnn*WNlWlIHGIMU«:l3S3)4BM(4i1 

m hermes European Fund Eat uiu 

rnMermui Aslan Funa____s 37943 

” EntcrgMk ts FUM.S Ut.lB 

mrtormes Sfrotogtos Fund 1 71453 

itt Henncs Neutral Fund 1 nils 

"MwnjoGtebalFund s J£S 

- ?PW[ Fund. .Ecu 17BS26 

m Herm es SlerHno Fa ll , 

«H*stt«OoW Fund % CT41 

ff^Jp-FARTNEM (ASIA) LIMITED 

FI— * 1 HT77 

,w 

tJ»W««Muro 

w turooa sud e o*« 

H 5ili KiMT »«COME FUND 

a Ainwiooedu Mart 4 iblc 

2 E nnwo Cnollnwilnle dm iS|S 

1 pjgf gy Orfatf AnskucwnAS 1D0.19 

d F ™E“ FF 58143 

ga^SE S^ - — b" l ™ 

2 SSE2r<M22fP^n — - 1 9JX3 

2 9jf?9 n G * J 5° I Slroleav s 172900 

d NtoconWarri^imd s ^jJSS 

tf AsfaTToerWBmnrt i Soo 

SSlWJBr-!=a s 

PRE MIER S ELECT FUNDS 

d Amertcon Grtwrtti ] « iin, 

J * c F®rtCQr | Es!SarTHl;e_. ._ ;i 9J7DD • 

1 1&S Tl g^G f1 W»Bt — 9 114700 

d Do Hor Re serve s 5^# 

d European Growth j s-n. 

d European Enterprise 1 SS, 

I3S gg=j ra 

2 N on ti Amertam War rad __i <sH0 

Gncrtir CMno 0PP3_ s tum 

'FALFORTiuNE ltfTL_ FUNDS 4 ‘ ®° 

5E>®?®*S3 “is 
i^oilSX^rzicu 

i*SlF**==* ^ 
S"S!M=i ^ 

2 JF Pacific Inc Tr. ? ?£S 

d JF Thailand Trusi ! j «!? 

“ v K,7™ Al,tTD 

sgeggEarm — f % 

wator- 1 


teoMhw»p«aMtedteiawF«piiteftB^-M. H nTtm ri minn nnntu linon uu ; - 

^(H-wM^fbl-U.i^iUdy.lfltertn^ (wery twute^jaj; M.regdteir.W-hrtw wp^y. W . 


S°r , !£55 A , T£ HI3H INCOME PTFL 

a class i.i g 

d Class A-7 ~ — i 

dOfl«B.i — ; 

d Clou Art — J 

OE UTSCH E.MAPr PORTFOLIO 

a udewryA^. dm 

BCrteanrvE — . n™ 

Sr£9ff A , N SQND PORTFOLIO (DM) 


asgffigsa.^ 8 


PW TOJOOOAZ Roltfruam.iD »1# 2Jtis?4 


d Class A-l ldi , 

d Class A-3 ~ — g JS 

d Qnga-1 . 

d Class B.? ? Jij; 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO 1USSI 
2 DM M9 


?£!5ffi— — — DM 9: 

gSfcl — w 

d Class B-i — ' — « 

5°r& 5TE ,' !L,NG PORTFOLIO 

d Category a. « !«■ 

a cotewrr B ? 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

g jiJ 

YEN PORTFOUO 

dCafeODf>A <r 135 

d Cnteanrv B y in 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 

to.PEDf Wl SECURITIES PTFL 

a Class A s is 

dCIOMB ~ « ,» 

MERRILL LYNCH 

SERIES 

BASIC VALUE PORTFOLIO 

HS?5 IAS 

° B * 111 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 

gassA s uh 

tf ntra b _ * iiji 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL IU5JI 

Sffii HUM 

a rkyw B « in An 

GLOBAL EQUIT f PORTFOLIO 


g Cm B . « dm 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

gCtoA S 1447 

a Class B S iim 

tATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

a Class A | ijm 

<t a ass b i rS 

WO RLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

2rE5?2 * n-s* 

a r.kw5 e _ t « 1M 

DRAGON PORTFOUO 

gCtaHA i ] 5t57 

0 U ™ K % ieit 

MERRILL LYNCH INC I PORTFOUO 
a cion a « » . s 

j^8=d SS 

a Qfm r c oi-i 

t»l*ni MBUCM 1 INC PORT 

d Mexican Inc spin CIA __S 947 

tf MrakonlncJPHiaB s 147 

d Mexlatn Inc Pcsu Ptfl Cl A J 8.SI 

tf Mexican Inc PessPttl a bj Bfl 

M OMENTU M ASSET MANAGEMENT ,,W 
ur Momentum Novell ler Peru 1604e 

m Momentum RdnbawFd I 122.12 

m M omentu m B*R R_U s 5739 

at Momentum Slock master S 13 #m 

MORVAL . VON WILL ER ASSET MOT Co 


d RG Amenta Fund — c , w , 

d RG Europe Fm xL cl 

d RG Padflc Fie riT- c l ig5 

d RG Divireflie Fm ^_ V , ’55 

d RG Money Floi r FL«^_F1 im 

d RG Money PMt F \ 

d RG Mow 1 Pta F D M — n u JKf 

d RG Monev Plus F sf Y fT j»JA 

Mon; Robeca see Aimierdnm Stocts ** 

u5^ , ^^ HJPEDMONDDE > 

n Asian Capllal HoftUnas Fd-S str 

NDalwBLCFRqmsdJiidBdJi !M*r 

w Oalwa LCF Rottcdi Ea s loux 

>y force Cam TntatlonCHFjSF loxai 

» LWa»n . — — 1 2nuu 

WDMlUnliv «|F Bf Sn c 

wPrl Challenge Swiss FC 5F IM441 

5 ^ etn l^ FO-Furooe Ecu 11739 

ft PrteauftY Fd-Hetvetlo SF 110.9S3 

ft Pricaifty Fd-Lnfln A m * istew 

ft Prjbood Fund Ec fen, liTjii 

2 ET.E2S Funtf ^5° * io9.no 

ft fTIftMO Fd HY Emor MfttsS 1IS8S9 

WSetecHvn Invest BA .. . % 23A4M 

ft Source — — « T1MB0 

vUSBor^P teT ^ w<7W 

w Irartaplijs Fn. 109547 

OTHER n!l«S GRtWP ED "° KD DE) 
d Asln/jgpo n_Einnt g. Gnantts 17JZMJ0 

w Esprit Ew Parm inv Tit Ecu 1417J9 

JJ EuropS tnrteo imnstm fd-Ecu 10SS» 

ft Itltegrol Futur es— « 1ID442 

2nS^SS£2S ,GeMrn,DM ,?U9J 

d SSSf^luK’lS* lnconwDM mj ” 

a POCtfk: Nt« Fund * ru 

NV-J 27707 

[ Selection Hortwn c b BIMlU 

£ Vldoirc Arum * MM? 

ROTHSCHIL D ASSET MGMT (CJI LTD 

?’ l ^?r | rpd LnvcraoCTj H k! % 53141 

UFDfE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 


JUKtE^StSi' 06 INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

a Decs A-I e 1 

a C30S5A I. s I 

d elm a-3- * 1 

d Class B-i t j 

a Class B-3 c 1. 

INCOME PORTFOLIO 

ti Class A . 9 1 

dChasa : t i 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

2 We* "vt Fd SA L £ j; 

dPaafinirtFdSADM dm * 

g Eastern Crusader Find S H 

0 TJier. LUH DruBcns Fd lw_j 31 
d Ttarwjw i Orlprf IncFdUdi y 

d TTwmto nTteer Fd Ltd s a 

d Mqnooed detection s 21 


m Key Diversified Inc Fd LttLS 
SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 


» RnHWfk GAM America s y 

ir Rep GAM Em Mkts dotwI-S 1; 

*> Pec GAM Em Mills Lai AmS 1| 

■v RePuMk GAM Europe SF^P 1! 

nr Retwbllc gam Europe U5SS II 

N^UWIcGAMGrwftiCHFJF It 

w-RwiWIC GAM Growth l [ ]( 

"'S^S! cGAMG ”»**l’USSJ U 

** £ wxfc l- tl: 9^ Opportunity S 11 

iv Republic GAM Pacific— _S U 

" Epw*” 1 : Gnsey Pol Inc S 1 

w gemMte Gregy Eur Inc —DM 1 

" , ^" J 5}[cl-3l Am AHoc S 9 

w Rccaaic Lot Am Aroeni—s y 

ivRewbllcLat AmBrmJI_j in 

w 5 epi 5 , ! e ^ Am Ntotat—S to 

w Republic Lai Am Venez.- s K 

w Rm Salomon Sfn>fFdLU_S 9 

SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

m Commander Fund 3 inn 

/B Explorer Fund t MJ7 


I d Korea — I , 

NEWTIGEpiTFUND 
2 g*,™ — i t. 

a Jarrm t 11 

a PhtHPPlnes -Z_ i i 

d Tho Hano i - c S 

d Malays lo~_ 1 I 

d Indanesta - . \ 

d U5S LilldHv « , 

d Oilna — 1 " 

d jlnocoore — t l 

twjrnton Taiwan FUND 5 

d Eoultv Income s r 

d Equity Growth j ti 

d Lloulnttv _ J 

UEBEKEEBANKZorid 

rf B- Fund . cp 1 -ns 

d E - Fm - i Z 'S 

d J * Fund — c E 

d M-Fund . c c lnxi 

2 ugf Eorertneome Fund — sf 16 

saag g^-f 1® 

g^oSssasSsFR^ jBg 

^ Aita Growtti Convert I|5S_S ma 

S 

0 UBZ D ■ Fund nu 11T 

2 Hal Swiss Eoultv Fund SF lit 

2 Hi? Amerleon Ea Fund S 95. 

gu^lJg^Sgra — l » 

w Artel invest 344.. 

Jt52ST a ~i m!?: 

nr pQurnn — _ c umi 

w BeckbivSr ? BSi 

iv Bntdnvesi i if!;-! 


Sing itAm 
-cuJJ 


GAMCO 

HtehYWd 

East Asht Inc. 


Ml rrver.n 
nrksd Or 



Judsttiu 


JHcney Mkn USI I 

Sterlmo r 

Swiss Franc SF 

Qeotsdieiiuu fc _ . nu 


Hang Koto Fowl-4 


*i itKis, 


Allocated Mltl-Fd % 

EmervMktsMHLFd J 

Mlll-f urope uss s 

Mm-Eorope DM DM 

MitFGfWtalUSS s 

Mortal Neutral 5 

— Trodlnfl DM DM 

Trndfcwuss - « 

Overseas — * 

PortHf . 

SPfnetldBi « 

Slnoopora/Mokiyslo j 

SFJfedatBana SF 

Tycfie s 

m— « 

Investment s s 

afue. e 

■JMWtMwa « 

worldwide j 


S&2? 1 li 

d EauJbaer America j 

d Eatrtbaer Europe sf 

d SFR - BAER s F 

d Stocktmr ? £ 
d Swfasbaj ~ g p 

d Lkuilhner » F 

2 |WT»* Bond Fund En 

d DoHor Band Fund J 

d Austro Bond Fund AS 

d SwlM Band Fu nd. c e 

d DM Bond f Sl p V . 

d Convert Bond Fund . c r 

d Global Band Fund— __DM 

d Eura Slock Fund. Eai 

d US Stock Fun d . 

d PactHc Stock Fond s 

d Swiss Stock Funfl SF 

d Soecloi Swiss Stock SF 

d Jman Stock Fund. Y 

d Swiss Franc Cash. SF 

d DM Gash Fund ru u 

d ECU Cosh Fund - c” 

d Sterling Cash FuwJ r 


w Wilier Telecam 5 « ti 

wWUtertundsMiiiterttondCt».s lijS 

wWllertunds-willerttondEurEcu 12S 

w WUierfunde-Wlllerea Eur —Ecu U3i 
w Wlltortunte-Wlllereq Italy _l« mtuboc 

w WUtertundS'WIItereq NA % 1 1 rn 

MULTIMANAGER N.V. 

ivCash Enhancement 1 eri 

w Emerging Markers Fd s ji Si 

Z w Ecu ISAS 

w Hence Fund *•- it 95 

w Japwtese Fund- y Bu 

wMarlrel Neutral . < mct 

w World Bond Fund Ecu \U4 

NICHOLASAPPLEGATE CAHTAL MGT 

- NA FtaWe GnSSlh Fd^j 

iv WA Hedoe rind .. s urge 

NOMURA INTU (HONG KONQ) LTD ^ 
g'gJ5 l 2ft Jofortn Fund __1 5.95 


d French Franc Cash FF 

“7 AjBjET M ANAGEMENT INC 
m Key Global Hedg e « 


ni nay Gtooat MfOoi" S tm 01 

y.Kftr Hedge Fund Inc s uy 

JJACtPICASSET MANAGEMENT INC 1 


a y ram. 


Bond USS Spcdot S 

Bond SF sf 

BondY m y 

Bond DM OM 



Eztremhm 


IQS3 * 
f 5.HSST 
tti »f' 

lair- 


ilif ' ' 


d*»*rtJfc’X 


jWs 7 e i r r S 


#fo in Sw! 


id if- \^-r. *- 


d 

a 
* 
d 
d 
t 
d 
d 

a 

d 
d 
d 
a 

a 

d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 
d 

a 

urn 1 d 1 

VJM Itf j 

d< 
di 

S! 
gi 

d 1 


'CHj Etiraoe. 
ICH) AAondlal. 


Global 

tntenwttaaal. 


n .Y UaiOD 

' — OM 11941 

- - — i uue 

Bond — i 139.71 

'jus* S 15040 

Jte- s -TKT 7 

RED FUNDS 41-W22 2S2S 
173£H HSAZuridi 
r»C0 — — SF 15135 

SF 9175 

T gol s f ^ 

Tunds 5 

NY TBtB!L2mWM20a 

— s «9J3 

• .1 :42S2 

J «933 

1 0540 

•- - 9 Uta* 

"CITS 

On 2.1SW 4010*30 


mKl Asia Padflc FdLrd 1 

KIDDER. PEABODY 

ft Chesapeake Fund Lid s 

ft IIIFundiht « 

ft Inn Guaranteed Fund—— _j 

ft Stonehenge Ltd j 

LATTH AMERICAN SECURITIES 
T»t ; London 071 A3B 1234 
a Argentbitai invest QtSicavS 


d Brazilian Invest Ca Starv S 

d Colombian invest Co Slcav^ 


Ort^Acc DM 

Tokyo Acc nu 

"CM Bond DM ACC— DM 


Wyerstd PM Acc DM 17(41 

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 




CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

s itopg 

DlWrstfled S U2J0 

Tmqr- J BUB 

TaS 

, . „ r URES * OPTIONS 5ICAV 
>nf Bd Pregr-CHF □ JF 97.14 


2 ■ L ^! n * !?^.E» trn Yleld_ FdS hunii 

d Lolhi America income Co-S 9.95 

d uwto Amertecm Invest Co_l 9jy 

d Meelcpn Invest Co Sicov — j 3Bjj 

1 ^SSB^jSS E c g 5 s,a,v - s M - w 

g^gSSSSKJSzi IS 

d GtoaalAovlsars 11 nva s 

0 Gjood Advisors II NV b_j 
a Global Advisors Fort NVAJ 1040 

d Gtooai Atfvlsurs Fort NVBJ lo5 

d Lehman Cur Adv.A/B s 749 

d Prera ter Futures Adv A7B_S 9j* 

i/^°J! n 'EST M ENTS 

w Java Fotvi « no 1 

w Mean Fixer! incFd S W4 

" , !K^l Bn,y * torte, W * 124ft 

tr indonKmn Gnmlh Fit— 5 15.99 

w Asian Growth Fund—— js 1043 

wMton WcHTant Fund — i Jjg 

L1DYDOEORBE MNOMT (tSaHSMSS 

w Anrema Fund S 1554 

WLG Arton Smaller Cos Fd_5 154995 

W LG Indio Fund Ltd t 14m 

^^£1“ «ANK I NTL( BAHAMAS) LM 

iSuF^Sc LTo“n aE ' CROUP 

<S Multicurrency I 3 2,n 

d DoHor Meiflum Term — 1 3J_1 4 

2 Dotor Long Term J 20 29 

d Jteicinesw Vwi — v 49MJBI 


I d ftomuro Jakarta Fund___* 595 

I N°R 7 CURRENCY FUND 

"tNCFDEM-Z^ i) M K 

SF 92429 

EEtf^bv -FF 446040 

IT) WCF JP V y {mnr m 

mNCF BFF b e SEH* 

MET ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
- SK’^ n0r S, - LOn Wl X »FE4*-n-4»9 2998 

i S2H g UrTOWW DM 14923 

w OdPy fcuropeem X 1 ®ki 

tWt* Eurott Growth Inc — _dm 1S43 

wOdeyEurap Growth Acc DM lS5l 

w Ddev Euro Grfh Star lnc_j *U5 

wOdev Eunt Grth Ster Acc t 4l_5» 

OLTMPIACAPn-AL | NTL- INC 

¥2. 'SEyjKS! J?* n,l !!SrJl WM ' Bermudo 
TrL.BIW 292-IQTS Fax: HP 295-2205 

w Finsbury Group j «*7C 

wOhrmnlo Seo/rtfe SF sf wig 

w gir"!N g Sfnr » Emcrg Mkti 5 9llS 

Z EE*!'- Dr dm — 1 1749 

“.'2ns , E ron ii* r - * a** 

J2? n 2h £1*1- olvm,> * 0 Slar * 1 40.90 

"'Sfjnch.GISecfncPIMl S 9 no 

w winch. Gi See Inc PI (Cl s 924 

TW'hdi. Hkfs inn Mad Ison —Ecu U7455 
w Winch. Hldg Inn Ser D—__Ecu 17342s 

wWnch.Hl03lnrtSerF Ecu 172352 

* Winch. Hiflg 01, Slar Hedge} l(«37 

Z «*i iBaO 

o^'mafundmaIKgement “ w 


UNO MANAGEMENT 

?tnd_ Ecu 

TAL INTL GROUP 
d Eautty s 



—5 awr 

an asm 

J 024493 

(IRELAND) LTD 


d Pound Sterling _j 

d Deutsche Mark DM 

tf Dutch Florin n 

d HY Euro Currencies Ecu 

d Swiss Franc SF 

d US Dollar Short Term S 

dHY Eure Cut DIvM Pay Ecu 

d Swiss Multicurrency __sf 

£ f'ras?? Cwwcy Ecu 

d Belgian Franc BF 

d Convertible S 

d French Franc FF 

d Swiss Multi-Dividend SF 

2 I**” f ranc Short-Term SF 

d Conodlon Dollar — CS 

d Dutch Flortn Mdtl tn 

d Swiss Franc Dlvkl Pay SF 

d CAD Muttkur. Dfv_— _cs 

d MeOtenanecB Curr SF 

d COnverhbtes sf 


MALABAR CAP MGMT (Bentade) LTD 

m Malabar ton Fund I 1909 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


.WkEd 

--- B Sh — S 

sliii 


MBCD ussemfl ConFw«J-J 




"^FdAitf 

-a Rt B5t> — S 

rtcoFd i 

dFdASn s 

d Fd B Sh— J 
Fd ASharess 
Shares! 

ASh_* 

BSh_S 

'LC 14471 71045 <71 
Fund— S 2139 

md S 1U9 

S 5307 

UCoFd S 2&B5 

Fund S 2550 

L 1 42) 

Stontr Fd— J 5059 

ampcnfes—S 2442 

TAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

.. . — Eft S KKUO 

FLIGHT FD MMGRS (Gosey) Ltd 
RJGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

_ 39AJ 

34.17 
2258 
lOJft 
23.13 

9122 

epllp — s 2758 

dflC 1 T2U0 

* 2U1 

11543 

FLIGHT INTL ACCUM PD 

BtaMY- DM 88.972 

!Y — 5 3UN 

nw< Yd Bond 3 2137 

S 3522 

' MANGT GeunbfL 

camAG J 06(100 

Com Me S 123.14 


ra Mbit LlmltMl - Ordinary 5 447 

aiMlnt Limited - Income 1 111 

ntMlnt DM Ltd -Spec issue s 274 

at Ml nr GW Lld-NDVIKC j 22j 

fflMMOMLM- Due 1994 S 1BJ 

mMim Gtd LM* Auo 199S S I5J 

mMJntGMCurrenoes-— S 75 

mMIW Gtd Currencies 3001 — js 7.9 

tnMbit Sp Res LM (BNP). J 1025 

PI Athena Gtd Future* . | |jr 

mARmnaGMCurranctes—S 9« 

PtAffwno GM Financials lnc_s 105 

P>Alh#naG« FlronclolsCupA |l_r, 

JnAHL Capita! Mkts Fd % 

r°AHL Cbramoalty Fund J bit 

n>AHL Currency Fund s 9 11 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd S lQn; 

WAHL GW Red Time Trd I U' 

WAHL Gtd Cop Mark Lid % 9P 

mMopGumanteed T996LM— s ail 

mMap Leveraged Recov. Ltd A hjb 

mMAPGummaedzooo— __s in 

mMMtGGL Fin an s 7 la 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front SI HomlHon Bermuda (809)792 9799 
wMarttbne Mlf-Sector I UaJ lffiiJ 

wMwmmeGWBotaSerles-S 

w M nrtljm e GIM Delta Series s 81025 

nrMarttfmeGibf Too Series— s SOiLSS 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MGT 
EMERGING A5IAR STRATEGIES FUND 
THSn ! H423 

a ti t 114 7n 

d PociBc Convert Strut 5 9755 

MAVERLCK (CAYMAN) OMHNMl 

maS&SuJ L " J8 * 7 

MEBPIERSOflT 01 ^ * 1,2,7 


w Optima Fund c 

w Optima Futures Furel j 

w Oollmu Giaoal Fund- s 

w Cpilma Perlcuto Fd LM 1 

» Of iima Short Fund s 

ORBIT** 6R0UP OF FUNDS 

d Orbjie* A;to Pot Fd 5 

d Orblte* Grawm Fd j 

d Orbllex Health b Envlr Fd_S 
3 OrtiitetJaBiri Small Cac Fdi 

PACTUAL Nah,n, l PBS Fa 13 

d Elernlr, Fund Ltd 5 

d Infinity FHxxJ Ltd 5 

fL s -S!L M 's n y, 9 | d Fd Ltd s 

PARIBA5-GR0UP 

W Luxor , » 

d Parvesr USA B < 

d Parvesl jofct b — v 

d Pprre;t Ask; Fcc.f B 5 

a Forvest Euiwe B Eci 

d Pcrvest Hslksto E FI 

d Pervest France 3 FF 

d Porvest Germany 3 DM 

d Farvtst OSii-Doiiar B 5 

d Porvest Obll-OM B DM 

d Parvest Obll-Yen B y 

£ Obb-Gukten B FI 

d Porvest OblFFronc B ff 

a Porvest ObIFSter B t 

ff Pervert OOll-Ecu B Ecu 

3 Parvest OWI-BeHiA B „|_F 

d Pcrvesi S-T Dollar B j 

d Pervert S-T Euroae e Ea.' 

d Pcrvesi S-T DEM 2 DM 

ff Ps.-VKt S-7FRF B FF 

d Per. est 5-T Bw Plus B BF 

d Pervert Stobci B LF 

9 Pervert Irrt Bend B 5 

d Portesl OMI-Lira B Lit 

d Porvest int Eowiies B 5 

d Parvest UK B l 

d Porvest USD PH* B J 

d Po.-vest S-T CHF B S F 

d Porvest OUl-Canoda B CS 

ff Parvest ObiFDKiC B— _DKr. 
PERMAL GROUP 

I Ccmmodl lies Lid s 

f Drakk or Growth N.v i 

/ Enwrsltt; MMs Hldgs^— 5 

f EuroMIr (Ecul Ltd Ecu 

/ Investment HM3; N tf 5 

/ Media & Com municai tons _S 

/ Nmool Ltd S 

PICTET & CJE ■ GROUP 
to P.CF UK Va> iLuv I [ 

w Ge-nwvoi ilusi — _dm 

wP.Cr Npramvai iLu*i s 

w P.C.F YalEter (Lun_ Ptas 

" P-S-r '•'cUlalla il-jt; i_>r 

" P C.F Votfronce ‘Lu»l FF 

w p.u.f. vaibonc sf ft ;lu») .sf 
to P-U-r Valband USD tLu*IJ 
w P.U.F. Vaibono Ecu n.u«j„E:u 
to' •fclbond FRF ILgv|.rF 

W aH E yaBondGBPau.W 
w P U.F. Vadwrt GEM ,'lu/i D7/ 


d Eurooo inc s n.i 

d Ffcrron Ortern Inc 1 n< 

d Global Inc l 

d Lakwnedel Inc S fti 

d yoriden lr»c-_ s 

d Japeei me .. v «o, 

d Mllto Inc .: s 

a Sverige ine i„j 

d WOOfamerilta Inc s g< 

d Teknokta Inc 5 H 

?tSssso f ssr° nt,,ne — ** 

ff Eauffy inn acc % pit 

d Equirv imi Inc S 1 Si 

d Equity Gtobal 5 f£ 

d Equity Nat. Resources s l| 

3 Equity Jonon _ v mi r 

d Eoultv Rcrril cZ- i ,2 

ff Equity U.K £ 

ff Eautty Continental Europe J 

tf Eautty ftAedlterroneai — — a jj 

ff Eautty North America « 1 91 

£ ES*? F»Eao 1 

d Inff Emerglno Markets j 1^ 

d Bond inti Acc I ijij 

d Bond Inti inr. j 

d Band Europe Acc 5 its 

dtandEttrapoinc 1 bjS 

d Bond Sweden Acc yj . ljij 

d Bond Sweden In r £T 

d Bond DEM Acr _ "SI Ti? 

d Bond DEM Inr 

d Bond Dotta (JS Acc 5 l2 

3 Bond DoIta-US Inc % k 

ff Curr. US Dnllnr c iiS 

ff Cu rr. Sw edfah Kronor ljj7 

1 wSF Bonds A UAft c | <Q5 

w SF Bonda B Germany dm ilw 

2^S2!*ur r 2 nCe FF 12823 

W5F BontHF f.B i lyi. 

to SF BotcIs F Jgpm T v jgjJ 

wSF Bonds G Europe Ecu 1790 

» SFB«i^ H World Wkto $ wS 

wSF Bonds J Belgium—. BF 8 mj» 

wSF Ea K Narlfi Anwrlcn__j 1719 

wSF Eq. L W. Europe Fn. ,7^ 

w SF E<L M Podfle Basin Y 1B6 

*'lBl l, -S6 rew,,,Cowrt,,, **A lS 

w SF Eq Q Gala Mines 1 mu 

w5FE^R WortdWUe S 1525 

to SF Short Term S France— _FF 1705707 

wSF Short Term T Fur Fn. nu 

A5SET MANAGEMENT INC. 

wSAM Brazir f 16853 

1* SAM Diversified 3 132« 

toStWMcGcei- Hedge— _j 105.93 

to jAM Opportunity 5 12142 

wMMSWWegy 5 flSJ3 

i-tAtalmSAM . T 12724 

wGSAMCompaslle 1 33557 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

mSH European s IObjj 

W5R Asian-. —5 10440 

m5P International e 11(147 

SVFNSKA HANDELS BAN KEN SA. 

, . 4 *gfflte la PemjBe. L-ZOO Luxembourg 


to Dktfu lures s \i£ 

rvDIrrvert n «2£ 

■> Dlnvesl Astn s — j ?5£ 

n> PfrrvBSt Inti Fix Inc sirat. . S 91S 

ivJ aglrtves t — ^21 

to Lormilnwst j nlA 

wMcnsinvesl l ™ 

WMCrtlnvest » 

wMourlnvesf c 

w Moor Invert Combmtea t 04? 

IV Maurtnvr s , Few . 

to Pulsar s i«v 

IV Putsnr Qvrtv : y 

■vOuantlnvert. « iS 

wOuant Invest «3_— I 1™ 

iv Slebi Invert — ? 

wTud invert. 3 inn 

toUrrtnvert s Jtr 

UNIO N BANCAIRE ASSET MGT MB AM) 
INTERNATIONAL. LUXEMBOURG 

WfUBAMS3e.nl . * 1155 

WUBAM DEM Bond DM 1J09J 

■rUBA/A Emerging Growth _s 9SL 

toUBAM FRF Brnuf. cc wi 

to UBAM Germany ru u 1305, 

w UBAM Global Bond cn. j^n. 

w- UBAM Japan Y 97! XV 

to UBAM Sterling Bond C 9$/ 

to UBAM Sift Padfi Asia 1 1915 

to UBAM US EouiTies \ , Si 


d Eml Noth. Index Plus b FI 

d Eml Spain Ind. I’hn a r >tn 

2 121 f&PJI*£! a 

9 Emi UK Index Plus a c 

d Eml UK index Phts n . t 
ntEqulstar Offshore Ltd— _s 
w Esetr. Sto inv. M Eat Bd FdEcu 
toESPto.Stalnv.Sth EurRJ-S 
d Europe uw « 

d Europe Obflganons Eot 

wr F.r.T. Fund pb- 

to FJKLP. Portfolio 

w Folrtltfd inti Ltd. j 

to FaiTfiM Sentry Ltd - s 

wRjtrfleld Strategies Ltd $ 

mFafum Fimtt .- « 

m Firebird Overseas Ltd— _s 

toFlfMEogteFund j 

■r Flrrt Ecu Lid — c — 

m First Frontier Fund 5 

ir Fonlus 1 Money 5F 

to Fenlux 2 Devise SF 

» Fontux 3 - Inti Bond SF 

to Formula Seteaion Fd sf 

ra Future Gentrot xxi Ltd—— 5 

raGEM Generation Ecu Cl i 

in GEM Generation l m % 

m Gemini Coys LM 5 

in Gems Proermlvo Fd Ltd_S 
m German SeL Assedaree — dm 
mGFMC Growth Fund— 5 
iv Global 93 Fund Ltd S S 

* Global Arettrape lm . 

ft Gfoftot Cop Fd BV) Ltd S 

w Gtobal Futures Mgt Ltd— 5 

m Global Monetary Fd Ltd S 

wGonnoiTj SF 

d Grten Line Fmnew FF 

ra Guaranteed MW Imm 94 LF 
>v Harbinger Latin Amer— s 

t Houssmmn Hugs N.V. s 

to HB Investments LW— 8 
rattan bteiere Neutral Mar 315 
ff Herita ge Cap Growth Fd UrlS 

to Hertta Fund S 

* Htahbrkfoc Capital Carp J 

rag aisf 1 * f 

:XSS£ r-»~ y 

6 ILA-IGF j 

ft I LA-INI 

iv Indigo Currency Fd Ltd s 

ilSHSM r™ — f » 

d Inverta DWS rm 

w Japan Pactflc Fund — 5 

m Jopoi Selection Am. v 

to Japan SeteCHnn Fund 5 

iv Kenmar GM. Series 2 s 

w KBnmar Guaranteed i 

>v KM Gtabnl — j 

ff KML-II HMlY Md. c 

» Korea Dynamic Fund— s 

w Korea Growth Trust 

ir La Favetle Holdings Lid s 

mLaJaiia Int Grth Fd Ltd s 

b Laterman: Offahcre Strol-S 

wLeof Slaiv_ S 

mLeu Performance Fd 5 

* LF International S 

m London Portfoflo Servfczs_s 
mLPS intt H.P H i 

mLinc Inti Met Fd Ltd ] 


UNION BANK OF SWI7ZERLAND/INTRAG 


d Amen SF 

ff Bond-timed— 5F 

d Brit-Invert <f 

d Conor SF 

d Convert- Invert cp 

ff D^wk-lnvest DM 

d Dollar-Invert 5 

d Enerale-inwrtf c c 

d Egor. . n p 

ff guyH - « 

d Fansa SF 

d FremcI LZ — 

ff Germnr c c 

ff Glotrinvert __SF 

ff Geta-lltvrrt g F 

ff Gutden-invest. FI 

d Heteetimitort e e 

d Hoiland-invcst— — SF 

ff Ucc. c c 

d Japan-Invest SF 

d Padflc- invert — — _sf 

O Saflt < c 

ff Skmdlnovlen- Invest SF 

d Sterllno-invert— — j 

ff Swiss Frame- invest SF 

tf Slmn K 

ff Swtarenl i c 

ff HH * mer * co L -nt* n a — - SF 

d UBS Amer ico Latina s 

d UBS Alla New Hariatn SF 

d UBS Asia New Horizon 5 

tf UBS Small t Eurnop ? r 

£ S* f ! C- Europe DM 

d UBS Port Inv SFR Inr c c 

£ i™' Sfr « cooTgZZIf 

ff HSf 5S?2 l,w Ecu me — — sf 

2 HSS £52 l"* Eeu ,nc - Ecu 

ff HSf Port nv ECU Cap G_5F 

ff HSf r** 1 Inv Ecu Cop G Ecu 

tf UBS Port Inv USS 1nc_ A 

tf UBS Port inv USS Inr c c 

tf UBS Port Inv USSCgeG SF 

d UBS Port Inv USS CosG. 5 

d UBS Port Inv DM Inc— SF 

d UBS Part Inv DM inc DM 

g UBS Port Inv DM Cap G SF 

ff UBS Port Inv DM Cap G_4>M 
ff Yen-Invert v 

d UBS MM lnvert-u « » 

ff UBS MM Invert-1 SI. _£ 

d UBS MM Invert- Ecu —Ecu 


d UBS MM Invert-Yen 

d UBS MM Invert-Ut Ui 

d UBS MM Invest-SFR A SF 

ff UBS MM lltvesMFR T 5F 

ff UBS MM Invesi-FF— .FF 

d UBS MM Invert-HFL c i 

d UBS MM Invert-Can S— a 

d UBS MM Invesf-BFR BF 

ff UBS Short Term Inv -DM DM 

2 HSf f on ff "*v-eai a ew 

ff UBS Bond lnv-£cu T —Ecu 

£ Hi! IZS . ,,w -f FR SF 

£ HSf '"Y-RSl DM 

ff UBS Bond Inv-USX s 

d UE5 Bond tnv-FF c c 

3 UBS Bond inv-Cai « rx 

d UBS Band InwLII rS 

tfUBSB.WJSSErtraYield-J 
ff WBS FI* Term nv-USSM_l 

2 HSf R* I" 1 " lnv ‘ isl 94 — t 
£ HSf 5* I*™ Inu-SFR fltt_SF 
5 HSf 5? I* 0 " ‘"Y-DM 9* — DM 

d l/BS Fix Term Inv-Ecu 96_Eaj 

£ HE? E l *. Ter P ,n »-Ff : 9ft FF 

£ HSf 12 lnv-€ urope A DM 

£ HSf 12 ! nw f s™** T d* 

d UBS Ea lnv-5 Cap USA 5 

ff UBS Port I Fix Inc (SFR)-SF 

2 HSf ! E!* Inc <°mi —dm 

ff USs Port I Fix Inc (Eat I— Ecu 
ff UBS “«! I Fly nc (USS) S 

d UBS COP ImeWGOSFR — IsF 
d UBS Cos Inv-varao USS 5 

««a. S iiS. l 5f! 0/1D G ® rm DM 

WO^DFOUQMUTUALRINDS 

£ PyPftlfr liwme DM 

d 5 Bend Income I 

d Nan- S Bonds j 

d Glohel iL wi^ J 

d Global Balanced s 

3 dotal EtalllK — c 

ff US Cmervatlve Eaulllw J 

d US Agresslve Eaulttes 5 

ff European Fouittrs 9 

ff Podfle Equities 1 

d natural R anu w « 


ft 5HB Bond FumJ ] 

to Svenska Set. Fd Amer Sh S 

» Svenska Set Fd Germany _5 
» Svenrtr, Set Fd Inti BO 5h A 

w Svenska 5el. Fd Inti Sh 3 

■.* SvercJ-p SeL Fd Japan— _Y 
» >»*nw>a Sel. Fd Mill mju _ Sek 
•r Svenska Set Fd Pad! Sh 1 


1290.15 I wSvenikqieLFosvieaBds-Sefc 


wr Svenska Set. Fd 5>Ivkt Sh_Ecu 
SWISS BANK CDRP. 
ff SBC IOC Index Finn cc 
a SBC Eautty Pm-Austroiia_Aj 

g SBC Equity Ptfl-Conatk! CS 

2 1 5£ lauftvPtft-Europ. Eiu 

ff fS5f° PWH#etnerlands_F1 

d sec Govern Bd <L’B * 5 

1 f SS £»"iA«»r S A AS 

ff Bend PrfVAurtrS B — AS 

ff SBC Bond PtfLConjA <3 

ff SBC Bond otb-CanJ B CS 

ff SBC Bend °m)M A DM 

ff SBC Bo-id PTH-DM B DM 

£ fS£ 5°"ff FMMJutCh G. A_FI 

£ f Sf 5 3nd p, 'l-DvtCh G. B— FT 

d SBC Bono Ptn-Eco A Ecu 

d SBC Bond Plfl-EevB -Ecu 

ff S8C Bond Ptfl-FF A b f 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-FF B FF 

ff SBC Bond Ptn-PtosA/B—Ptoft 
2 fK5 onr,pw - s * er1ln 9 ^ ' 

ff SBC Bond PHt-Stertlno B _ x 
£ SS£ 5 Dna Porttolto-SF A—SF 

ff SBC Bono Portfolio- 5 F B sf 

d SBC Bond PtIMJSS A _S 

ff SBC Bond Pffl-uss B _s 

d SBC Bond Pm-Yen A .V 

d SBC Bond Ptfl- Yen B Y 

ff SBC MMF - AX .. 

a SBC MMF • BFR BF 

o SBCMMF-rn .. —ri 

ff SBC DM Short-Term A d m 


** S 5d £• DS S Bd Plil (Lu. l_! 

w P.U.F. Model Fd Ecu 

*• F-U-T. rmero MtTS ILu« I _S 


:s sstfaawwsa* 


to Tokyo PocHobL M.V S 

MERRILL LYNCH 

d DoHor Atttta PorHulia 5 

3 Prune Rote PortWtalZZs 

SHORT-TE RM 

WORLD INCQMe PORTFOUO 

d aassA t 

dClo!gB _. ; 

MERRILL LYNCH 


I S'EH-I'li'jDww 1 •LID*. Ecu I 

fc P D.T.G'abai vokw (Luri-Ecu I 

■ P.U.T. EurovaiiUi.i —Ecu 2 

tf PSfif'ValrataeccH. :f \ 

m mu Small Coo dOMt j 4 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 

&PS S&S™* CJ " nc ” 

mPrerrier U5 Eui-ttv Fund— s >13 

ra Premier intlEaFuro i |)t 

mFrern er vovereljn Ea Fo_« 5; 

m Premier Global Bd Fd s w 

PUTH l ftM r ^ R ' :ur71 Pt - J n 

d Emer ju>n HlthSc. Trust j 3 

» Pi'jncm Erl Into. i-z. Tnu- j j 

£ SS 1 Hl » OrowlhS I 

ff Putnam High ins. GNMA F3‘ 

tf Putaam I.rtl Fund t , 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 

wAnai Derefapme n l s «■ 

ir Emerging Growth Fd N.V _S IB 

w Quan lum Fum N.v S 7577. 

to Quantum Industrial S in 

w Quantum Rwttty Trusi 5 13' 

wQuonfumUK Rftaiiy Fund_l mi 

to Ouasar Inrt Find u.V S |4f 

to Duo 'a Fund N.V._ S 

0UARHY MANAGEMENT LTD 
TeHotane : B» - 949-3C50 
Facsimile ; 839 949-flgor 

ff *;•» VteiTO rd Lid 1 n 

d Ht'fterrs Fund I I d 5 igo 

ff Meridian Hedge Fd Lid 5. • 1 tot 

C ^Kllltl Fund Ltd «M : S; 

HE ® E, f T FUND MANAGEMENT LTO 


tf GatMory I 

caimSwn DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

o ™mvi pi 

tf Cntaonrv tL ~ 






to New Korea Growtti Fd J 

tv Move Let Padflc lrtv Co 5 

ir Pad Ik Arbitrage Co J 

m RJ_ Country Wmf Ftf j 

ff Regent gim Am Grth Fd s 

ff ©Jbl Eure Grth c o _s 

ff Regent C-IW Inll Grth la i 

ff Rwsm Gib! Jap Grth Fd_J 

tf Recmi Gibi Podl Bosxi 5 

tf Regent Gun Reserve S 

tf itegenl GUN ftemn rt 

d Regent Gfltt Ttaer .. j 

d Regent GIM UK Grfn Fd S 

w Regent Moghul Fd LW 1 

mRftgeni PocHk Hdg Fd s 

tf Regen! srl Lanka Fd— S 


d SBC DM Short-Term B DM 

d SBC MMF - Dutch G C I 

d SBC MMF - Ecu Eci 

d SBC MMF - F- ?~ Z eS 

d SBC MMF ■ FF FF 

«? sac .MMF ■ tit .. . 

d SBC MMF ■ Pins PIQ 

d SBC MMF - Schilling^ _AS 

e SBC MMF - Starting c 

3 SBC MA1F - SF SF 

3 SBC MMF - US ■ Dollar $ 

0 SBC MMF ■ USS/IJ t 

C SBC MMF -Yen Y 

a SBC Gitrf-Ptfl SF Grttl SF 

a SBC Glbl-Plfl Era Grth Ecu 

d SBC Gibf-Pffi USD Grth S 

ff SBC G Rtf-Pin SF Yld - SF 

3 SBC G Rtf- Ptfl SF Yld 3 SF 

d 5BC Gibl-Plfi Ecu Yld A Ecu 

ff GRtf-Ptll Ecu VIO e Ecu 

ff Glbl-Pin USD Y« A 5 

" SBC '5RH-PT1I USD Yld B 3 

J SBC GRJ|-Ptn 5F Inc A SF 

3 secGUtf-ptnsFincB sf 

3 38C GlW-Ptn Ea; Ine A F ry 

- jEC GtaLPill Ecu Inc B Ecu 

d 3BC G to I- Ptfl USD Inc A t 

d sac Glbl-Ptfl USD Inc B 5 

£ SBCGRtf Pth-DM Growth _DM 
ff SBC GIM PM1-DM Yld A/B -DM 
3 SBC Glbt Pttl-DM Inc A7B_DM 

c SBC Emereing Markets S 

ff SBC Small a. Mid Ceos 5w_SF 

d ArnetlarVoiar 5 

ff AngtoVolor r 

d J 513 Portfolio S 

g Convert Bond Selection sf 

c D-Mork Bond Selection ___DM 

d Donor Bend Selection s 

g Eat Bond Selection Ecu 

ff Florin Band Selection FI 

tf F ranee Vn Inr cr 

d Germ an Jo Va (or rj/u 

0 GotaPorttotlo i 

g Itwrlavotar f*ta 

a Itatvator Lil 

3 JqpgnPortlnlln Y 

o Starlino Bund Select Ion— _I 
- Sw. Foreign Bend Selediun.SF 
d SvHMVnlar— . tc 

tf Universal Bono Setec1lon_5F 
ff Universal Fun H ee 

tf Ten Bond Setedkm y 


-* l«»2ft 

-A* 11043 

-AS 11957 

-g nai9 

-O 1 2534 

—DM 1ft«5D 

-DM 7 BOW 

-FI 1HLB 

—FI 179.1J 

-Ecu HIM 

-ECU 12952 

-FF 58J.W 

-FF mS7 

-Phtft 951 1 JO 

-1 5403 

-t 59.13 

-SF 113450 

-SF 1W.1t 

J 10179 

5 15595 

.Y 110307X10 

-Y 11533200 

-A* 4317X15 

-BF 112351 XH 

CS 449242 

■DM 10245S 

DM 132903 

PI 736159 

Ecu 376251 

Esc 4Sft544J)0 

FF 2521424 

UI 535712200 

Pro 3*1760.00 

AS 3202954 

C 2831.10 

SF 5287J6 

‘ 722154 

i 209242 

r 59839500 

IF 119SJB 

=Ol I29S53 

11807 
(F 111247 

f 121356 

:at 12)141 

-Cu 133458 

106954 
117444 
F 1054.11 

f 110441 

CU 113521 

CU 1155.70 

1001.75 
102551 

M 706244 

M 105325 

M 1039.19 

. 109JAS 

F S3200 

33641 
22547 
44753 
107.12 
W 11550 

135.19 
3i 13143 

1BUJ 
: 215954 

A 55545 

35520 
a 5T7V950 
SS33i4J» 
248461)0 
11125 
11025 
5(5.75 

77.75 

120.63 


44 UO V 

mSH 

as s; 

231X10 

’JMSy 

4924 V 
9440 V 
4454 y 

a; 

iES; 

tu 2y 
Tilly 
10380 y 
mtov 
7X84 y 
9UM)v 
HAIOv 

nn.wv 
1194)0 V 
90011410 y 

10I4XH 

4M47 

sE 

509424 

5809412 

5155.18 

1027J4 

1010.98 


iWLvnxStoLHnhfl nM cc 

»M I Muftl-Stntfegy 5 

w 0fl5hofB - H-V_-S 

m Master Cop & Hedge Fd 5 

w Matterhorn Offshore Fa t 

toMBE Jaaan Fund I c 

'"McGInnh' CW»1 (Mar Jl | _J 
hiMCM Int. Lhnura $ 

w MB temttorn Intarnafkmai _* 
mMJM Internarional 1 t o * 

mManenturi Gufld Ltd 5 

ntMonl Bktnc Hedge 5 

to Mu !f I tatar«_! ^ r r 

ff New MUlennlMn Fut. Lld—S 
tf Neitbank Debentoroi_s 

mNMT Aatai SeL Porttalta J 

to Noble Porfnen Intt Ltd 5 

IWNSP FJ.T.Ltd J 

'"Ocean Strategies Limited-* 
to Old ironside Inn Lid s 

m Omega Overaen Partfien-S 

raCtapanhchncr uxAik S 

ra Optimum Fund c 

to Oracle Fund I t n t 

ra Overtook Performance { 

raPocif RIM On BVI May 025 
!w Ftt(Jan3ll-S 
m PAN Intemottmtf LM__s 

to Pmcurrl Inc j 

iv Panda Fund Pic 3 

ra PnotaB Offshore IMorJIlS 

m Paragon Fund Limited % 

m Parallax Fund l m t 

fflPeqtxtf Inn Fund l 

to Phnrma/Whentth 1 

to PiurtaMhe n PturHorex ff 

"'EJwftaSten Pturtvalwr FF 

to Plurhiart Slenu et 

mPomboy Overseas 1 to % 

mPorfueucH Smatter CO— 1 
m Prime Cowltal Find Ltd— S 

m Prime Mum-Invert * 

m Primes Fund S 

tf Praflrent SJL_— DM 

to Pyramid InvFOCnr n % 


49251 

1180450 

ty ffffl W 

12954 

14051 

11115 

107.98 

7JJ5 

11.17 
10U7 
14623 
fUOTD 
217JS 
J28J0 

B4JJ5 
1 13554 
14822 
60501.94 
35J1 

64.18 
XVI 

15522 
HUB 
85.95 
957 Jl 
945.12 
9V2.11 
5127 
97178 
W153 
W5« 
546185 
159945 
197123 
14HT 
1X31 
159039 

1B42D4JI4 

137139 
86355 
27J1 
95639 
59035200 
167 JH 
4M5T 
144043 
105 Ti) 
7575 
22450 
1231X13 
24X72 
8857 
24B3TJB 
1X54 
115V 
1U0 
94,19 
3234 
4125 
B75S 
269 Jl 
47m 
214.7ft 
11414)0 
1280 
9853X10 
67Q51 
2144X0 
3624 
15X16 
1S&82 
1888412 
116959 
1014269 
118648 
1253 
11544 
1000418 
13448 
15454 
105256 
1751 
10O2S 
1500949 
201200 
110541 
22324 
1824 
90443 
9529 


rill ma' 

peciali^ 

1 makei 
Lhat wc 

if resuf bi 

TO 

ind lai? 

jfien,"™ 


” 

■s of 

? lechni 5 ^ 


Jfcasteum 

• tow he 

15 such !g 

ID! 

ibaveste 
J5L as ber 
as far as i 
cd by tec t 
e Mfenc 1 

XHild deg t 

• f 


wk 


d HAD Ink Inv. Fd 

d Regal Inll Fund Ltd s 

7 Rlc Inovcrt Fund B S 

to RM Futures Fund Statv— _S 

to Salters Inti Equity. Ecu 

to Saltern inti Fixed Ecu 

ff SanypKIeSpofn Fd s 

tf Sarokrecit HoMng N.V. 5 

to Saturn Fund S 

m Savoy Fund lm 5 

™ JC Pundwik Vat BVI ud_J 
tf SCI /Tech. Sa Luxembourg* 
m Scimitar Goor. Curr F ri s 

raS dB>tte r_GuBimrtaedFd--3 

mSeterto Gtobot Hedge Fd_s 
|^f»v*P^-f^flLtd 1 

nitoUiioag t 

wSlitaair Mufflftnd Lid s 

■'fJOOtaba' 1609)921-4595 5 

toSmtthBantoyWrttfwdSec-S 
» SmRbBanita Wrldwd Specs 
wSP I rtfemattonafSA A Sh_S 

raSIngne Offshore Ltd _s 

tf Sunset Gtebar ill Ud s 

d Sunset Global One _s 

wSutmctof « 

to Techno GranflTi F und s F 

tf iimptefon Global Inc I 

mThe Bridge Fund N.V _5 

ra The Ge&GfabaJ Offshore _S 
tf The Insttt Multi A(Msors_l 
m The J Fund B.VX LW—_4 
toThejagaor Fund w t 

ff The Latin Equities Fd s 

ff The M’A'IPS Fd Stajv A 5 

ff The M-A-H-S FO Skav I DM 

raThe Seychefles Fd Ltd j 

ra The Smart Band Ud SF 

i* The Yellow Sea Invt Co s 

* ThemaM-M Futures 5 

mTtoer Setae Hold NV aid— 4 
ft Jll c f07CJ Fd Staav_s 
ft Tokyo WTO FUnd 51cnv_5 

to Trans Global Invt LM 5 

d Transput) Be Fond, Y 

iv Trtnlly Futures Fd Ltd S 

ntTrlumuh i- « 

mTrlmm* ll « 

mTrtomoh III j 

m Triumph IV e 

d TltoWtolga Bto.. . « 

m Tweedy Browne Intt ilv s 

w Tweedy Browne n.v. Cl XI s 

to Tweedy Brewneav.a B_S 

tfUbaFutures ... c c 

ff U taFu tures DoHor- S 

/ Ultima Growth Fd lm s 

£ H m £!212 

d Umbrefla Fund LM s 

w Uni Band Fund Ear 

to Uni Capital Anemaune p m 

toUltf Capital Convertibles Ecu 

toU^-Gtatal Sicov DEM DM 

to Unl-Global Skav Fn . m , 

IV Uril-Glatal Stare FRF FF 

vIM-Gtobal Sicov FS SF 

to Unl-Global Stare USoZZZs 


10IJ9 v 

11 84437 JM y 

10X12 y 
10152/ 
10450 y 
10823/ 
10691/ 
10748/ 
24292/ 
24744/ 
12825/ 
9945/ 
inusy 

10288 V 
9870/ 
10644 y 
10542 V 
12747/ 


v Ten Bond setodten Y 1181150 

TEMPLETON GLOBAL STRATEGY 5IGAV 
a Global uru/rfri j \u/ 


d Global Growth 

0 DM Global Growth 

e Smaller Companies— . 

0 American 

tf Far Ecsl. 

tf Emerging Marten 

3 EiY8«an- 

1* Globa: Income- 

ff DM Global Bond 

0 us c-ovem mom 

ff Emerging MWs Rx Inc 
d Haven 


DufchFWn; 


Other Fu nds 

toArttarotoarcB Stare FF 

to Acttflnonce Sicov 4 

to Actllllturei LM c 

w Arttgertion Stare FF 

w Actives! inn Stare 4 

w Adelaide _ff 

m Advanced Latin FO Ud 5 

m Advanced Pcctfk Sirat % 

w tahranced Strategies Lld_S 

w aig Taiwan Fund 5 

raAnna Invertment • 

w Aqulta International FuM-4 

re Arm fin Invertment 5 

to Argus Fund Dairated —SF 

T Arras Fund Bond — — _sf 

d Asia Oceania Fund S 

to ASS (Derivative] AG DM 

w ASS 'Zeros! AG_ DM 

raAssodaftd Investors Inc. S 

* Athena Fund Ltd t 

to 470 Nikkei Fund 5 

to Banco! Hwloed Grawtn Fd _1 

iv Beckman Int Cop Aoc 1 

w BEM International Ltd 5 

d Blkrten-Marval EEF Ecu 

2 !£“!» Fff (Cayirwn)S 
ff Bteanar Glohal( Bahamas) 5 
re Brae IntemoHonei c c 

d C.C.I.L. « 

m Cal Euro Leverage Fd Lid_8 
m Capital Assured mate Fri ,,5 
ff CB German index Fund__DM 
mCervIn Growth Fun d— I 

m Chilton mil (BVI) Ltd 4 

ir CHadeJ Limited - « 

a CM USA — « 

to CM1 Invertment Find % 

m Col ambus Holdings. s 

mCraconteinv Funo . « 
w Camtvea Actions Inn n r 

w Conllvert ODD Beta* CT BF 

to ConlivestO&a World nu 

w Convert. Fd Inti A Orf s < 

to Convert. Fd Inti H Certs— S 

m Crete Drill Cno j 

^C^ntArta" Hedge Mar 311 
raCRM Fuium Find lih 

II Cumber Inll N.V..^ S 

* Curr. Concept 2W®__ t 

» hftr"* r WW WMe ,w Tst -* 

tf Dalwa Japan Fund^^_Z.y 

tf DB Argentina Bd Fd S 

ff gBSC/Naffn Band Pund-S 
to Derhnntw Assel Altoe— _j| 
tf Dreyfus AmerienFurel t 

' 5 vt Fxrtormance Fd S 

m Dynasty Fun d « 

w Egs Overseas Fund Ud j 

mERte world Fund LM SF 

tf Em! Beta. Ini Plus A BF 

tf Eml Beta. Ind. Plus 0 BF 

tf Eml Praia Ind. Pius A __FF 

tf Eml France ind. Plus B— _FF 
tf EmJ Germ. Ind, PlusA.^_DM 
tf Eml Genn. im Plus B—J)m 
tf Eml Neth. index Plus A— jq 


53152 
89753 
101741 
407.74 
2633 
1067 Jl 
106*5 
9858 
1S7.1961 
110.483 
934X11 
55X71 
991.13 
1251 JV 
111X39 
1X78 
1954 
37743 
91141 
10X4012 
88050 
57B1J6 
158 
11.15 
11838 
37X85 
34947 
982884 
4859 
2244294 
858 
155.42 
. 8856 
10802.17 
14754 
241.16 . 
126758 1 
209X4 
II7J79 
994159 
185368® 
471 JS 
2854 
7618 
I40J0 
102-51 

mw 

50153 

10614 

2852 

31656 

6935 

936346 

W29687 

126650 

217S 

1D5JS 

1JB 

10IS80 

7SBU5 

1144950 

1221600 

100155 

182856 

11048 

11629 

678J7 


d unlco Equity Fund- 

tf Unlco Inv. Fund 

mUnttrodesCHF, 

in Unf trades CHF Rev_ 

mUnttrodesFRF 

m Unltrades USD 
wursuslnfl Ltd 


105698 
1H5.72 
5880 
27752 
1343X13 
952B7A6 
14X51 
9757 
7554 
141555 
956855 
1302) 
24051 
85381 
2*141 
imoo 
«OS 
X50 
1X49 
112954 
104458 
93BJ6 
- SS5.17 
2I05JB1* 
195954 
30OL4S 
990.94 
92X74 
957 
120850 
9284 
11JB 
18-33 
20254 
2156850 
999527 
98951 
55618 
53640 
51X44 
I70L5S 

215X48 

1787 

17X5 

3657611 

537950 

680 

131X3 

I32A 

2XBJ3 

376686 

149X28 

1245X8 

124237 
445151 
117X28 
111237 
7285 
6458 
132109 
114959 
14381.16 • 
121386 


I ftj^BONhreSmSrtsPic-J 

to Vulture LM 

mWeites wilder inti Fd s 

nr Wilier Japan v 

"'W™?; Sooth East Arto—_s 

to WWowbridoe hot CFM s 

ff Gtobm Fd B«L Ptfl Ecu 

£ 2& JH53 Bft PHI-— Ecu 

ff WtaBtebjl F d Res Ptfl 

ffj^BrtgicedFund sa_j 

ntWoridwkle Limited S 

to WPG Fortwr (fteas Part _S 
mww COpHut Grth Fd Ltd-ZS 

niVremn c c 

mZrahvr Hedra Fund s 

reZwete inn Ltd — s 


TO OUR 
READERS 
N 

iuxemSdurg 


ft's never 
been easier 
tosubscribe 
and save. 
Justasll 
tofl-jree: 

08002703 


For information on ftow to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


For expert advice on personal investing. 

International Herald Tribune publishes The Monev Report, a weekly section that provides 
oalysis of fmanoal products and services available to tcWs high-S SST 

For timely investment information, read The Money Report. 


pai 

‘ in the PS gK 

many 01 U K 

' gne 

: collapse w c 
’ Jnpaid *■ 

1 have left 5 e 1 

■ w 

[made of 
[ ipossible, e “ 
r PaJestin 0 b 
. and Jerit 3 *^ 
\ i now. “S? 
'tts now ij“ e 

* offices v^ e L 
1 lo becomd 6 ' 1 

•, venting 6111 
ie,: 

»• for 20 or* I 

*Dut. stunn® e 
lsi go awa 1 ^ ’ 
~t Mr. Aral m 

da’s inau^ 33 
aides. Mr 1 J 

* anted exe>_ 
: ifat*s pav L 
i speaking 
" oud Abb 

e Commit 
3tg the pea 


4 was “mo 
c‘al refused 
phrasing t 
around 
sji minister 
details of 
-forehand, 
to sign, A 
-wore that v 
3 this way." 


VS: 


5 idienc 


<3 Page 1 

"leal in No 
vear. Comt 
hi an, Virgii 


ping and h. 
suresofMyi 
ina, has a h 
feral law fir 
rices for erb 
ne says, “D 
S." 

Jways mere 
son, the pn 
nich represe 
sr magazine! 
;■ that 100 ,( 
bnt issue w 
fl, with an ad 
riuted to net 
‘and areas n< 


3 i mad e its « 
ling budgets 
lies. The dos 
ie are adverti 
:by the indusi 
dneh Nails, a 
lies, a prod i 
3BCCO CO. 
■vth, Mr. Str 
ons, which c 
'and they co< 
build up. 
etlsoldSfiOJ 
ms of thousai 
es," Mr. Sir 
es, I sold tom 
ally used as c 
oo'uld have s< 
rs of sneaker; 
rkel out there 


ge Ral 


in appropri; 


re^ionsible 
ange policy, 
view on tbed 
countering qi 
1 Slates was I 
ds for the dol] 
eves in float 
jVffiiam McD< 
f ihe Federal I 
jw York, said 
lay. “You ca 
looting exchar 
ange rate Large 
s said Tuesc 
that the G-7 v 
a floor under' 


GSthebc 
d. That 
■tock ai 
aluing ( 
hdd by 


Heralb^Sribuue 


rt'BUSHEU Hr ™ TIH .SEW KHVh TIMt.v 4SU n.t II (4HIM.THS /.wl 



■jff.t'V- 











































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 


SPORTS 


lUL 


'm 



evived Finley 
And Angels Ron 




& 



The Aiwcrjtcd Press 

At first. Chuck Finley looked 
like he might be in for a long day. 

He had not woo in his first six 
5Larts of 1994. and was going to be 
facing the Oakland Athletics, 
whom he'd beaten only three limes 
in 15 career decisions. 

But Finley knew one important 
thing: Entering their Sunday meet- 
ing, the A's were tn even worse 
shape than he was. 

“I wanted to establish an edge 
early, because any bad team can 

AL ROUNDUP 

play like a great team if you give it 
momentum." said Finiev. who 
pitched a three-hitter that gave the 
California Angels a 7-0 victorv over 
visiting Oakland. 

Finley was in complete control in 
pitching California's fust complete 
game of the season. He struck out 
sever, walked none and faced only 
three batters over the minimum. 

Oakland fell io its 17ib Joss in its 
last 19 games. 

Jim Edmonds and Bo Jackson hit 
run- scoring singles in the first off 
Ron Darling and Chad Curtis hit 
into a run-scoring double play. Jack- 
son's hit ended an 0-for-21 slump. 

Twins 5. Rangers 2: Dave Win- 
field broke a sixth-inning tie with a 
two-run. two* out homer and visit- 
ing Minnesota's Scott Erickson 


scattered seven hits in his second 
complete game. 

Winfield. 42, hit his 456th career 
homer off Kevin Brown after Ale\ 
Cole led off with a single. The 407- 
foot drive was the third of the sea- 
son for Winfield, ISth on Lhe career 
home run list. 

Erickson struck out six and 
walked two as Minnesota won for 
the fifth time in seven games. His 
other complete game was a no- hit- 
ter against Milwaukee on April 27. 

Royals 9, White Sox 7: Wally 
Joyner hit a three-run homer and 
Felix Jose added a two-run home: 
at Cemiskey Part where Kansas 
City took a 9-3 lead. 

Chicago made three errors that 
led to three unearned runs, raising 
the team iota! to 36 errors in 2^ 
games. 

In ea riser games, reported Mon- 
day in some editions of the Herald 
Tribune: 

Yankees 3, Red Sox 4: Dancy 
Tartabull. Mike Stanley and Ger- 
ald Williams hit consecutive home 
runs in the sixth as New York sen: 
the Red Sox to their first three- 
game losing streak of ifce season. 

Stanley bantered twice as New 
York completed its first three-game 
sweep of the P,ed Sex at Yankee 
Stadium since June 14-16. 1932. 

Blue Jays 3, Brewers !: Paul Mo- 
litor hit a’ two-run homer and Pat 












Shortstop Ozzie Guillen leaping over Kansas Gty's Dove Henderson to turn a double play in the third imring, bid Chicago stffl lost, 9-7. 
Hentsen onched six-hit ball for Yards. He retired the first 12 bat- a Ditch from Chad Oeea. Leo Go- as visiting Seattle stopped a feur- 


Hentgen pitched six-hit bad for 8^ 
innings at the Sky Dome. Hemeen 
struck out nine, giving him' a 
league-lead in-g 49. and walked 
three. 

Griolcs S. Indians 6: Ben Mc- 
Donald allowed six runs and nine 
hits in 6'? innings at Camden 


Yards. He retired the first 12 bat- 
ters. then allowed 1 1 of the next 18 
to reach base. 

Mike Devereaux bomered and 
drove in four runs. He hit his sev- 
enth homer of the season in the first 
off Mark Clark, then left in the 
sixth after be was hit in the face bv 


a pitch from Chad Ogea. Leo Go- 
mez also bomered for the Orioles, 
who led 84) after three inning s and 
held on for their eighth victory in 
11 games. 

Mariners 4, Tigers 3: Jay Buhner 
had three bits, including a go- 
ahead, two-run homer in the sixth. 


as visiting Seattle stopped a four- 
game losing streak. 

Dave Fl eming ended his three- 
game losing streak, allowing three 
runs and five hits in six inning s 
with five strikeouts and three 
walks. Bobby Ayala got six outs far, 
his third save. 


The Associated Press 

Matt WSliains got himself in 
trouble saying' the .Los Angeles.. 
Dodgers vrauldiiave' trouble' win- 
ning one game this season off the 
San FnmoscQ Giants. . 

The Dodgers almost won three 
games in toe . season’s; fust four- 
game series between baseball's hot- ; 
test rivals, bta Williams saved the 

NL ROUNDUP 

■day with ia ninih-imung single Sun- 
day togivetheGjmitsa54wn£ay 
-and a 2-2 series split at home. 

with a vralkaff the^DOdgers’ relief 
ace, Darren Dreifon, moved to 
third oa a ande.by Darreu Lewis 
and scored on John Patterson’s sin: 
gle to left. Williams, who fhed (6 
right with the bases loaded m the 
seventh, then grounded a hit to left, 
that scored Lewis; 

The victory gave the Giants the 
only winning record (16-T5) in the 
National League West; 

Rodkies 1, Padres <k Mike Kin-" 
gery drew; a bases-loaded walk . 
from Mark Davis with, two outs; m 
the top of the.nxnihi and .visiting 
Colorado got past San Diego. ' 

David Niea gave up six hits in 
eight innings and Steve Reed got 
his first save. They combined for; 
the second shutout in team history 
as ihe Rockies ended a three-game 
losing streak. 

Pirates 9, Cabs 3; Andy Van' 
Syke put on another top perfor- 
mance, S-for-9 and soonng seven 
runs as Pittsburgh swept visiting 
Chicago in a doubleheader. 

Van Slyie, who began the day 


baiting just 227. iwnrcred. 
drove in four runs in a « wW 
in the opener. He was 4-for4 in la* 

day in some editions of ibe 
-Tribune: _ fr 

Astros 5, Bedafc 
pitched his Erst shutout re almost a 
year, and Houston hit three home 
runs in winning at Cinci n nati. 

Drabek won his fourth strsJgW 
decision. He gave up five hib. 
walked none and street out seven 
for his first shutout since May *7. 

Pfciffies 9, Marims 2: RWty Jor- 
dan bomered, doubled and singled 
. twice as Philadelphia beat Florida. 
The Phillies stopped their eiMt- 
earne road losing streak and ended 
the Marlins* longest -ever home 
Winning string' at five. 

. • Lenny Dykstra was ejected Tor 
arguing a called- third strike to open 
the game, but the Phillies went on 
to' score in. of the first six 

lTimilO fL- 

Mets3,Canfinafe 2: Bobby Bon- 
illa hit a solo home run in the 
eighth inning in New York's tri- 
umph in St- Louis. 

Mariro Gozzo earned his first 
viettsy in the majors since Aug. 22, 
1989, when he pitched few Toronto. 
Hr held th& Cardinals hitless for 
5V6 Inning s , and allowed only two 
hits in seven innings. 

Expos X Braves 0: In Atlanta, 
Ken HHj and .John Wetteland com- 
bined oh a three-hitler, and Mon- 
trealeaded the Braves’ three-game 
winning streak. 

- Pinch-titter Randy Milligah had 
a sacrifice fly in the eighth timing 
off John Smoltz for the only run. 


m 


8-w 


Wt- J>’ 


SIDELINES 


?■ 


im Fmks, NFL Official, Dies at 66 

NEW ORLEANS iAP) — Jim Finks, the New Orleans Saints' presi- 
dent and general manager who nearly became National football League 
commissioner in i 959, has died of lung cancer. He v as 66. 

Finks, who learned two weeks ago that he had an advanced case of the 
disease, died Sunday night at his home, said a Saints spokesman. A front 
office dealmaker for the Bears and Vikings as well as the Saint-.. Finks 
also had success in baseball, helping the Chicago Cubs win the National 
League East title in 1984 — their first division title since 1945. 

Five years ago. he was the choice of a six-man selection committee to 
become commissioner of the NFL. a league he had served for 40 year? as a 

f ilayer, coach and manager. But he was able to get only IS o: 2i votes 
rom the owners. The job, given up by Pete Rozelle, eventually went to 
current commissioner Paul Tagliabue, who made Finks chairman of the 
league's competition committee. 

Finks, a heavy smoker, had battled lung cancer since April 19°3. 
Doctors diagnosed an advanced case of the disease when he went to the 
hospital after the NFL draft. 

No Senna Replacement in Monaco 

LONDON ( Reuters) — The Williams team will enter only one car for 
the Monaco Grand Prix next weekend as a mark of respect to the former 
world champion Ayrton Senna, who died after crashing in the Ssr. 
Marino Grand Prix on May 1. 

Ip. a statement, the team confirmed that Damon Hill would be its only 
entrant and also said that investigations into the cause of Senna’s crash 
had not revealed any system or component failure. 

In a special tribute to Senna and to Roland Ratzenberger. the Austrian 
who was killed in a practice crash the day before Senna died, the 
International Automobile Federation will leave the first two positions on 
the starting grid empty for the Monte Carlo race. 

For the Record 

Alessio Di Basco of Italy upset the favorites Monday :o win the 15th 
singe of the Tour of Spain between Santo Domingo de la Calzada and 
Santander. Switzerland’s Toni Rominger kept the overall lead. / Reuters ) 

The Dutch soccer star Ruud Gullit, 31. on Monday returned io A C 
Milan, signing a one-year SI million contract with the club. (A Pi 


Major League Standings 


AM 

CRICAHLCASUC 

Cost Divuioa 



W L 

pa. 

OB 

Boston 

M td 

647 

— 

Up* York 

19 10 

-455 

V7 

Baltimore 

ie 10 

.643 

1 

Toronto 

17 li 


3W 

Detroit 

12 18 

central Division 

■429 

7 

Cmcag-) 

:e 13 

£52 

— 

KofliOS CUT 

15 (3 

j:-. 

•1 

ClDvtiond 

14 U 

■SI9 

1 

Miivrauzcc 

15 14 

217 

1 

.VimwMia 

13 :a 
wesi Diylnon 

^1« 

4 

T«*m 

17 18 

A21 

— 

aqatiie 

IJ 17 

^114 

'a 

Coil tom la 

11 19 

43) 

1 

Ou^tor-o 

! Z 

sm 

4lj 

HATIOHAL L5AGUB 

Soil Oivcwn 



W L 

pci. 

OB 

Align >0 

18 ll 

411 

— 

Montreal 

17 12 

267 

IVs 

Flortoo 

U 

S4S 

2 

Hew York 

18 14 

J33 

a» 

PhlloSrlDblC 17 18 

Ccafrat Di*:ston 

.400 

45-I 

Ciiiclnrsll 

19 11 

MS 

— 

Hauitan 

17 13 

567 

I 

Piitiiursn 

.5 13 

-K 4 

3 

51. Louis 

IS 13 

224 

: 

Chicago 

3 20 
west Divhion 

234 

10 

Son Franel&co 

16 IS 

JI8 

— 

Colorado 

13 15 

Mi 

i'.y 

Los Angles 

U 17 

4S2 

7 

S^Olpoo 

10 to 

J33 

F-s 

Sunday'9 Une Scores 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
scum ca eta loo— « s a 

No# YJrt 102 CC3 n»— 9 11 o 

Hssicth. Cimirlll 131 . Mist's =rv»- 
wlrtft {7}. Ruoscli (3i and Rswicra: M^lhgl. 
tarn Pell (S'.. Hilcficscn 15> ortj 5 isrfrv 
W— M-jlPfllluna 4 - 2 . L-QV 3 Mri:i. 1 - 7 . 
5v— HHO»W< 121. HRi— Bostat, Vc-jsPn 2 
111. NOWriitfl ISJ. ;lt. new earK 

Tartobi;li '4;. Slonle- 2 >*1. OVVii-.an-j nj. 


SMifia aio 011 a»-4 9 1 

Dctroll 012 on 00fr-3 5 I 

Fiernina Davis <7 ), Ootsoo* ui. Amo Hi 
and Hcseimoa wiben (9); Merer. Krueger 
m. Boner IM and Flalunv. »— Flemino- J-t 
L — BlHcrer, 0-8. s»— Avolo (21. HR; — Sooltta. 
T jwamnoz 121. Sutwer ( 7 1 . Ocrroir. F wider 1 1 0|. 
Milwaukee 091 006 960-1 i 0 

Toronto 003 000 Ifcl— 1 M 0 

Mlwera Pe tiers 17) ana Nliuen; Hantgen, 
Hell 19) ortf Bar4en-W—Meni9ea.S-aL—Hl- 
9uora. 1-XSv— Holidl.HR— Tor^MclltortSI. 
Mlimeiota 100 103 UA-1 9 1 

Tims on 000 000-2 7 3 

Erickson ono welbeck; Brown, Henke (0) 
one Ortiz. W— Erlckoan. w L— Brown, 2-5. 
H Rs— MlnnMcta, Winllekl (1>. Walbock (31, 
Ctcnuuut 009 010 JO*— 4 12 0 

Mil more 1C 060 00x-fl 10 0 

Ciam, Oeea (3i, Mesa [7i, snwov <A) ana 
Pern: McDonald. Mills (7). Poole (7), Elch- 
ham (7). Ballon IB). Smlik If) and HoUos. 
W— McDonald. 7* L— Clark, 2-1. Sv-SmlW 
I!!). HRs— Clove kmd. Baeraa («). Belle (7.’. 
Baitimcre. Demrestfs (7), Serws (2>. 
Kansas Cllv Ms Mi »o— 9 ll a 

Chicago 102 oec 019-7 13 3 

Apoler. Piehorda I7j. Belinda IH. Mont- 
gomery (oj ana Madartcne; Pomander, 
Cock |7|, Scfrwar: IBi and Karkevlcc. W— Ap» 
Pier. 3-1 L— Fernandez, 3-4. Sv— Montgomery 
Ml. HRs— Kansas Citv. Jose (3>. Jonier (S). 
Chicasa Ventura (7). 

OaUaed 0C3 CM 000-0 1 0 

California 119 02 01*— 7 12 0 

Darling. Nonas {7}. Horsman (0) and He- 
mend; Flniev and Pabrcaos. w—FInlar. 1-1 
L— Darling. 2-4. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Montreal 000 000 010—1 « 0 

Atlanta 090 on 000-0 j 0 

Hill. Wetteland IBI and Fletcher: Smelt 
McMMwel <91 and O'Brien. W— Hill, e-L 
L— Smelt*. 3-4. Sv— Wetteland ill. 

ChlCBBO 300 000 000—3 « 0 

Pimoargh in 101 D3*-e 13 0 

First Game 

Banks. Eullinsw (SJ.Otte (61. Cnm 18) and 
Wilkins; Wegner, wnifo 191 ana Parrlsn. 
■.T— Wegner. 3-2. L— Scnks, 2-4. HR— Pitts- 
Duron, van Slyke <2). 

CMceoe 000 300 0C0-3 « 1 

PIltsiKrrgh 290 C30 23a— 9 It 1 

Second Gome 

Morgan. Plesac (7). BcufWo 17) ond Parent 
cnCWIWm (7); ZSmlth. De«ey ^.Bdlord |9' 
end S!=ugM rt-ZSmrtn, *-Z L-Morm. 0-S 
HR-oiltssurgh. Marlin (4): Chicago. 5csa (*1. 


PBDadediMa 111 113 610—7 U 9 

Florida 006 091 109-0 W 0 

Jackson, Sfocumb (H ana Pratt; Hough. 
Mutts (A), Non (7), Hernando* 191 ond Ting lev, 
Johnson (7). w— Jackson 4-C. L— Haunts, >1. 
HR*— PhltodirWhla, Jordan (1), incaviglla 
12). Florida. Desfrode 151. 

Hauitan 919 393 900-5 9 0 

Cincinnati 010 600 KM S 0 

Drabek and servala; Hanson, Schourek (7), 
Carrasco (91 and Toubentee.W— Drabek, 4-1. 
L — Hanson. :-z H to— Houston, Game* (31, 
Camlnltl (4). Servai* (31. 

New York 060 111 016-5 4 0 

St. Laolt DM 161 000-2 3 0 

Gozzo, Manzanillo (B1 and Stinnett; Pala- 
cios. Rodrtoooz (71, Smith W and McGrtff. 
W—Qom t-A l— S mith i-J. Su—Maiuunllla 
HI. hr— N ow York. Bonilla mi. 

CeMrado 000 000 001—1 7 9 

Son Dlooo ON ON NM A 0 

NIM MMuna (9). Stood (Fj and SMafler 
and Girardil9) Ajftbv, G* Harris {?), MDovla 
19). Elllon (9) and Ausmuo. w— NM. 4-2. 
L— GcHarrlL 1-1. 

U» Angelot 6W 3H 000-4 0 3 

San FroMlccB an on ia— 5 i« 0 

HorshMor. Osima IT). Gott (7). DraKon (0) 
and Piazza; Torres. Frey Ml. Burba (71. 
MJackson (8). Beck <91 and Manwarino and 
Jtoed. W— flock, 14. L — Dreffdrt. 0-2. 
Hto— San Fnmdsai. flenzlnoer (1); Las An- 
gales. Wallech (9). HRoarlguez 14). 

: ■ mJ, 

Sunday’s NBA Playoffs 

Miami 27 D 19 M— 91 

AHanta 24 U 23 28—103 

Atlanta win drat round series 3-2 
Miami: Rice 4-14 (Hi II, Sailer 7-1A 3-4 17, 
Seikalr 3-4 1 -2 7, Show 8-12 1-2 17. Smith 3-1 3 4-4 
10. Lang 5-15 12-1 4 22, Coles 3-6 7-2 7. Totals 32-S2 
23-23 91. 

Atlanta; Monnlnw 8-192-4 18. Willis ID-1744 
24. Ksneok 5-9 1-3 11. Au*moft4-&8-0 14 Blay- 
lock 5-14 1-1 U Lons 4-10 9-0 12, Etna 4490 9. 
What lay 0-1 040. FemHI 0-2 1-1 1. Totals 42 88 
15-23 102. 

3-Pafnteoals— Miami 4-19 (Rice 3-9. Cates I- 
i Shaw 0-3, 5ml ih 9S). Atiomo 34 ( BlaYtcck 2- 
5, Ehto 1-31. Reooundo— Miami 52 (Long 10), 
Adanta 54 (Willis 121. Assists— Mlomi U (Sd- 
Kui* 4), AHonio 38 ( Biav lock Wl. Total fouls- 
— Mlcml 23, Aiiarito 25. Technical*— Miami 
livtocl delensa 2, Wll'lg. 


CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS 
Phoenix 17 30 34 30-91 

Moulton 37 n 21 3V-0 

Phoeats Mods earn* 14 
Pbaanbc Bander B- 21 «43I,Cabanaafr)0D- 
012. Ml liar M M4. Johnson 9-21 2-3 2ft Matane 
4-130412. Klelne M 042, Croon M l-2i Alnge 
4-10 34 IS. TgtoN 3fr47 1914 91. 

HMsfao: Horry 5-1304 IX Thorpe 917M 1ft 
Otalvwan 1994 443ft Ma«welM*9 941 Smflti 7- 
U04 1ft Horrere 1-2043. Brooks 04910, EHel- 
5 04 2, BulMrd 9) 44 ft Totals 394* 44 37. 

3- Point go at* -Phoenix 9-23 (Malaria 4-lft 
Aina* 4-10. Barkley 14), Houston 5-1* [Harry 
34, SmlHi97. Max wall 1-4. Thor»e91. Bullard 
91. Ell* Ml. Foufea oot— Maxwell. Re- 
bound*— Phoenix 52 (Barkley IS), Houston M 
(Oktlmiotl M). Aisto ta Pftg entk 30 (Johnson 
13), Houston a (Horry, Maxwell 8). Total 
foot*— Phoenix IS, Houston 18. tacbalcato. 
—Barkley. Houston coach Tom Ionovich. 
Chicago S3 27 19 13-88 

New York W 13 30 39-90 

Maw York leads writs 14 
CMcbaa; Grant 99 1-1 13, Pieswn7-lf 9-1024, 
C ar lwrtata 3-i 34 T, Armstrong 9-!4 4-4 17, 
Myers t-3042, Lonoley 3-7 1 -1 7. g.wiiitami \ -4 
04ftKnkac>7049, Kerr 9394 S.PaxMFt929 
0 0. Total* 31-73 1920 8ft 
New York: Bw**ri-a043.OeKley 4434U, 
Ewrfng 7-1844 1ft Oovts 34 04 ft Harper 3-4 1-2 
8. Smith >4 1-27. Starks 3-13 11-11 17,Anttmy 
24 1-2 ft KWHUomS 92 90 ft MOSOfl *-7 W 11. 
Totals 3248 38-29 9ft 

3-Polaf goeie— CMcaga 8-13 (Kukac 9ft 
Kwr1-2,Armstrongl-2iPIP<>an 1-ftMyorsO-t, 
Paxsan 911. New York Ml (Horpor 1-1 An- 
thony 1-3. Davis 91, Starks 04). Rtboondt- 
— CMcaoo43 (Lonsfey &), now York 42 (ew- 
Ino 12). Assist*— Qilcoso 38 IPHipan 7). New 
York 30 (Ewtns- Davis, Smith, Starks. Anttw- 
nv 3). Total touto-Chlcaao 2ft Now York 27. 
Techn i c als - Har per. Ftaarnntfoa i * ■ s rarkft 


Batglurn,Map*LClofts.L; ft GwsePP* Pvtltav 
I lot y. soecoMercatonwiiJ ftokmliica Pier- 
obaa Italy, Amerwft vita, sx; 1ft Paolo Lan- 

h-ancM. Italy, Batcw M orcakw; «J. 

OvoraB SNomBmS! l Tony Romlnoer.SwU- 
jertatA Mas# Kto, 49:1* :17i LMlketZarra- 
betila, Spain. Juneeta . * J0 Bonlnd; ft Alex 
Zutte, Switzerland, ONCE, 5:42 behind; ft Pe- 
aro Detooda, Spain. Baneital^M boMndr ft 
Luc LeSianc, France. Urtut-FesKna KU be- 
hind; ftOllvarto Mncan, Colombia. ON C&ft 13 
behkldl 7, VtaasUe Aoarlchj, Spain, BanestCL 
U) 36 behind; ft Luis Rem. Spain. CdsWft- 
batch, 10:38 behind; ft Fernando tocortm, 

EetHn.Mapfll-Ctae.il :39 behind; IdAIberhiCa- 

marea Colombia Artiacn.ii:9behtod. 


HOCKEY 


Tourof^>aln 


Rasolts(reaMondarkiSinslagr.20ft3kito- 
matora IHf J miles) between Santo DamiMe 
de la CazadQ and j Mitond w : 1, Alessio Di 
Bcnco. I taiv.Amora ft Vita, 5:44J9; z Laurent 
JotaaerL France. Once, same time: ft Ro- 
berta Paonm. na(y. Navtaare. sj.; 4, vassiu 
OavWanka. Georgia Navtaare, sj.; ft A. No-, 
ves Silva Parlagal. ArUach. U.; ft Juan Gan- 
zatan. Soatn, Euskadl, si.; 7, Nleo Edmond s , 


Sunday’s NHL Pteyotte 

DNldS 010 o-i 

Vancouver 1 4 1 v-2 

Vancouver lends nrfae H- . 
First per i od— 1, Vancouver, Linden • (Ad- 
am*. Bure), 2:09. Penoltlee—oXourinaU, Von 
(roughing). W3; Madam, Dai (rroewdwck- 
InaL 9M; H td ta m, Van f roughing); 9:43; 
EXfuna Dal (noakiiw), ?2t2S; Modem Ota 
UntartarmN 15:27. 

Second P ert ed -ft - Da Una, GlicnfM 3 
(PJVoton, Ludwtg). 15:11. PanolHes— Lin- 
don, von llnierfarencel, 2:i4: Modm. Oal 
(trtonliigkSMii Oagner. Dal. (Mgh-aUdUng), 
16:34; Hatcher, Dal tcrau-dteddna), 19:34. 

Third peri od No n e. Penalty— Cravwv Van 
(hooking), 535. 

Overtime— 3. Vancouver, Mamessa 2 
(Luma, GetbxxL 11 aft P en u l U eg W uno . 

Shot* oe goal-Dolto* 1VT9109-J8. Vun- 
cauvor d-ism-^u oamrotar enegr mg t- 
H m Polios 6 of 3; Vancouver OotS.-goefles- 
— OoUow Moot. 1-2 ’(34 shots-aE soyas). 
Vancouver, 'MctLson, M (3947). 

Toronto 3 3 2-0 

San Jaso l 1 W 

Series Had 24- . 

First pe ri od 0 , Taranto, Mironov 3 IGD- 
mour. An dr eychuk). 10:15 (pp). ft Toronto. . 
Eastwood 2 (Oartc. GHI), icoi 3. Taranto, 
Andreychuk 3 (Eltotf, Borschovskv). 20-M. 
PwW W o ai Baumaartn a c, ' Tor ' (tripping). 
2:1ft- Cronin, SJ IhoWtag). 9:53; Eastwood, 
Tar (rawMng), 12:28. ' 

2«cnrNIP0rM-ft San Jas«h Ellk ft4 :N (pp) . 


ft Toronto. Clark* IGaringr. GUmaur >. 5:S1 A. 
Toronto, Gllmour ft lEiik, Mironov), 9-.13 
(gp). 7, Torantce Gartner, l (GUmaur, Ellki, 
U:2S.Penome»— Eastwood, Tar IreugHngl. 
2:19: Norton. U (rautMna). 8dUi Osborne. 
Tor, mbcendad, 9:J3j GUL Tar (hocking;. 
16:51; Errey.SJ IskndihH), U;51; Oartnor. 
Tor, fleubie minor tgaallo totor f fnco. 
rougMng), 19:08; Baker, SJ (roeaMha), 19:08. 

Third po rt ed ft Toronto, AndnrvcMik 4 
(GUmaur), (42 (di). ft son Jose. BHk 3 (Ozo- 
Itnsto Norton), 4:05. 14, Son Jasa-Gaudreau 2 
'(LorionavV, 14:15 (ttii.)l, Taranto. Osbazno 3 
(ZtiaL Ls N Ovi- s) , NiS) (in). Ptnoftia*- 
— dark. Tor (trigpInB), 5:2ft- Clark. Tor.dou- 
- ito minor (glbawtos. rauahhig), 9i«3; nrsvi 
SJ (twotaito>,9:42: en*t:, Tbr, major (Ught- 
Ina), 12:25; Bowngorhier, Tor, misconduct, 
12:21; Odgon. SJ, malar (flOMina). mm 
Fed loon, sj (Hashing). 12:2ft Cronin, &J mis- 
conduct 12-Jft oebornw Tor '(raugMno). 
H-J3; GUmaur, Tar (IkahMoli )«:«. 

ibofioagoa*— Taranto 13-13-9—34. San Jose 
ft 1 l-io-ai; gowsrwlov . a v n uilu nU te* — Tor- 
oMo 2 at 5; 9cm Jose 1 of 81 aooues— Taranto, 
PWVIILM |Mihat»J7 nowto). Son Jaso, (rba. 
*4 13919), WOlle. »:N third. 9-7). . 


lEFroaEEE 




3m 

. VUustl 

2&SSS&: 

•'ms®: 


0:1m 

Lb n •.■ > p v? 





BASEBALL 

~ ' ■ Amortcon Leogw 

BOSTO N to co fled Gcr FlmvokhPitcrer, 
from Pawfuckat. iL 

. CAUFORNm-Put Brian Afldeeaan,P<lch- 
or, on 15-day eDsablad (1st. Recoiled Mike 
Butcher; pitcher, frwtF Vancouver PCL. 


BellSoutti Atlanta Cl— te 

Wool sesras of ihe 213 oBHIm hwriiomaat 
ideyadm Nw7Ji9y(mft por-72 cwrae in BAor- 
Mta, eeoraler' 

John DotV. U JL 89-8449-72—274 
Natan Henke. Uft, 7047-4989-275 . 

Brian H e n n lngar, OA. 8987-4971— 27S 
Bob Estos, UJL 71-494849-274 
David PWwka, Uft. 73858318 276 
Lsnrte Clements, UJi 4949-7340-277 
RUN Cochran, lift. '894989-70— 277 . 

BNriM McCoflMcr, U-5* 89404971— 277 
Tom Kite. UJL.89724971— 277 
Clark DwrmJx UA. 7146-7249—778 


tew 

rat jP» 

m- 

M 

v'-H- 

?tsr 5 

r-TS'-r. 

V.'.?L’v 

IS 

t.:.vr-*r.- 

p-t-s*-'- 

vjv- 
^ V 


v 



For investment 
information 

Read 

ihe MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 

































it 


VP- 





V* r "• ' • " 



*■ 


®RTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MA Y 10, 1994 



Page 19 


Romania’s Ham Hopes His Time WiU Truly Come 


1 "p in j ^ 

flpoer. 

[»twe. 

jj^rRa.^ r,. ...... 

WBesrtdUn - j V>. 

' ' - *V; 

*5, fcttfc fe D 


» ea ^tollman 

— It is a moEMn^fha^ nu. u u ■ nK ? u, - in *** United Stato - nia had afforded him, Hagi was overwhelmed by his first 

2L B ?y f W and probaWvwnr Ha S* .£» wmderfcind who made his debut exposure to Madrid and to the Spanish league. His talent 

pays before his eyes like an buZmi US? • acap S M Mth ** Ron^uuan national team al 18 and was named still shone through enough to remind his Fans —and Hagi 
. second round of 0,0 uuw m teleytsion replay. It captain at 19, Hagi came to Italia *90 as a 25-veai-old VimwJf tK*l )u line MU nt fhp ajnrH’f Inn nliuarc Rot 


chance to play in the 1994 World Cup, which begins next 
month in the United Stales. 


field. Used to the protective shell that Sterna and Roma- 
nia had afforded him, Hagi was overwhelmed by his first 


ms eyes like an inr««n. , 7 - “ 11 ” lUi ^ ivomaman nauonai team at ib ana was named stii 

of the SoSSmcTSS feiil J 9 * Hgi CMte to Italia -90 as a 25-yeax-oU himself- that was Z* of the world's top players. Bm 

1 1 meters from of defends* m hie m»w .1 _1 - " IMA^ I ’ll _j!l O. ^ 


ffcM&ttsitu-.- ' J: “- 


. • , ■■‘Sj 

MWfflffi; a: C - 
Ns/ms* ti'. 


S*'He j^vt 
[How ssd ; • •*' >i 

fewssti:^' -r. 


understand that my destiny was not with ReaL It was 
something that just wasn't meant to be” 

In 1992, Lucescu convinced Brescia's owner. Luigi 
Cononi, to bring Hagi to Brescia, where he would be 
reunited with his compatriots loan Sabau and Borin 
Radidoiu. Again, Romania's golden boy failed to shine. 

“Like all great talents, Cica has trouble being consis- 
tent,” said Lucescu. “It is his only defect I hope he can put 
it all together for the World Cup. Soccer has need of a 
lent to admire. And Gica has all the means to be 
it talent” 


“We are a Latin people;” Hagi said. “We like to play 
with the ball to put on a show. We are not concrete, like 
the Germans or tike the English. We want to play an 
exciting soccer. We want to score goals. For this, our 
matches are fun to watch.” 


hriLMani 


Unv 2- ;•.. ■ 

ajered. dote . : ‘ 
jfcFiakcejs - . ‘ :S\ 
hitiies 


“It ^m\TS^SrH *■*«« of tournament 

Soccer team a^si^r Sft ?* °? Romania's 

Brescia. Slar ° r “ e Italian second division iwm 


After narrowly missing its qualification for the 1992 
European Championship, Romania put together an im- 

nrpccivt* ct Ana nf m a U/atM Am 


aadloKn* 
fehas-’ ;7.r--7'. 


-~x 


g^neg Jl 
jy Dviiira - . 

licaJ&iCv.:-: 
at hi: the 
tp hx 

l3;Cm£nnI > I - 

;'-a'.«uh* h„ 

!v. 


JjEJfL 1 ®* U *** J AfaSw* and a left foot ihat rivaled Diego m^goatatalS^SSh^Tscored 3i7thSeaiHk 

Jere, in thegrtj^ ^ ***** ^ odc **** dWlBe more than protect its owfgSl™ *[ f 0 *' 1 *»■ sta y wtil R«U Madrid was very good 

Pat ^ fl jas,3fg as 

After nuking' inbnmS^ne oT^ “ over - 3 «b im^fhim from Sie^ftudjarest, tlwRoma- riwidd been his brightest moment, at the peak of his 

groupsrftfc ^vi-round nian club ^STwhich he u^tbwwn^ilive league wth a solid mtcrnabonaJ Kpencnce already under 

quarterfinal pia y 120 of scordess championships. ^ tits belt Instead, he was left too alone. iv uivj ^ ^ 

“It wacn’i r®:- « ^ as _9 ut of **•« tournamenL Haw had time dreamed of otavine abroad, and had “Gica has a great need for affection and understand- presave strmg of matches in a World Cup qualifying J f 94 . Ca P ma y he Hagi’s Iasi 

beaicourted by many top EuroDW E cIuhs. Gianni Ae- he added, referring to Hagi by his nickname. “He group that also included Belgium, the Czech Republic and realize his potential he prefers to concentrate on 

nelli, president of Juvm to ofTuOTand of Fiat, allegedly didn’t gel it in Madrid.” Wales, earning a spot in the 1994 finals. bisteam. 

offered to build a car factory in Romania in exchange for Hagi’s second year at Real was better: He scored 12 “We have jtfayed extremely well for ibe past two years,” “Until ji few years ago, Romania had an inferiority 

the rights to Hagi. But until the 1990 revolution, Roma- goals in league play, and another six in cup competition. ' T 

man players were not allowed to leave the country. But Real again failed to win the league championship. 

So when Hagi, Romania's top soccer star, was signed by jp»°g die title on the final day of the season when it fell 3- 
ooe of the world's most prestigious dubs, it seemed that 2 to Tenerife after having taken a 2-0 lead on a goal and an 
his time had come. It hadn’t. assist by Hagi. 

In Madrid, Hagi had difficulties both on and off the “It’s hard to lose tike that.” Hagi said. “But it made me 


Hagi sees Romania's first-round opponents — Colom- 
bia, Switzerland, and the United States — as a difficult 
and unpredictable group. 

^We could win the first round, and we could just as easily 
finish last,” be said. “There are no easy teams. Even the 
United Stales, because it is playing at home, and because 
the United States athlete has a vexy strong trill to win.” 

Although the 1994 World Cup may be Hagi’s last 

ia«W!9 frs (nt AAnMVnWmi* An 


tittUli to ***? . Irish did *” tie added. “We 

said that™. °PP°rt*«ut«s- Even the Irish players 

mouth from d i^^tS? m ‘ 1 51111 havea Wtler ^ “i my 
SP ° n , Morris a second chance And 

Hag, can t deny already having had several -Sdin^a 



said 

years. 


, hepla^ , 

together. Toe atmosphere is like that of a family.' 

Considered one of Europe’s most talented sides. Roma- 
nia, like Had. has suffered from a lack of consistency in 
international play. 


untu a rew years ago, Komama nau an uuenoniy 
complex,” be said. “We were afraid of our opponents. Not 
any more. Now we know we can play with anyone. Of 
course, 1 have my own ambitions for this World Cup. But 
it’s too early for me to speak of than.” 


“I'm keeping them to myself,” he added, “the way one 
keeps a precious dream.” 


P 


tfr 


tO ttfZZ.- r_r 
Otter*:;-.:. 
rher. be p . 
jacCtfu;.*. 
toji and v: ... 
sevtti 

iff l Biaies j- ' 

ilaniJc-hr. .. - 
X a thfee-c.::.- 

to 'JK 1:^ 
gstrenk. 

line :: • ■ - : ; 


Canucks Win 
In OT Again, 2-1 


The Associated Press 

When it’s overtime, it must be 
time for the Vancouver Canucks. 

After three overtime victories in 
urn first round, the Canucks con- 
tinued then mastery in such gamfg 
with a 2-1 victory over the Dallas 
Stars on Sunday. 

“It was a tight game, and I just 
happened to be there at the right 
time,” Sergio Momesso said 


STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS ries^by four games 


»vVi‘ r - ••• 


■war.-* c - • - 
WfHr-? ■■ -■ 
r*«^. • 

niki 1 1 
■fir V •.*-.• ' 

, '.w*5* *. •/ 

Hrm-*- ’ 

■?- ■*: .v > : 

* ft 
v- 

r*r\-' 

r r 

; • 

fc 

to’’- • 

'114*, ■ — 


-1 



■~lv 


scoring at 1 1:01 of overtime to give 
the Canucks a 3-1 lead in tbeir 
foor-of-seven-gaine Western Con- 
ference s emifin al 

“Finally we got same luck at 
home,” he said “I guess we don’t 
mind over time.* * 

Vancouver is 2-3 at home in the 
playoffs, winning both games in 
overtime. 

The Canucks can wrap up the 
soks and advance to die confer- 
ence finals with a victory Tuesday 
night cm home ice. Huy would face 
the winner of the Toronto-San Jose 
series, which is tied 2-2 after the 
Maple Leads’ victory Sunday. 

Momesso lifted a high shot past 
the Dallas goahender, Andy Moog, 
after a point shot by Jyiki Lomme 
was blocked by the defense 

Dallas controlled the first five 
minutes of overtime with its fore- 
checking before the Canucks 


seemed to gain a burst of energy. 
Moog made a brilliant save on 
Momesso and another on Cliff 
Rousting before Momesso finally 
got the winner. 

Trevor linden scored for the Ca- 
nucks in the first period and Brent 
Gilchrist tied it for Dallas in the 
second. 

The Canucks beat the Calgary 
Flames three consecutive games in 
overtime to win the first-round se- 
ries by four games 10 three. 

e had a lot of people playing 
with a lot of heart today” said the 
Canucks’ assistant coach, Rick 
Ley. “Now we want to grasp the 
next game and not let it get away 
from us.” 

Maple Leafs 8, Shirks 3: Dave 
Andreychuk's two goals and one 
assist keyed Toronto's rout 

Andreychuk, who had 53 regu- 
lar-season goals, got his first points 
of the series after being hooted to 
six shots in three previous games. 
Doug Gflmo nr added a goal and 
four assists for Toronto, which 
chased the San Jose goal tender. Ar- 
turs Irbe, after two periods. 

The Maple Leaf goalie, Felix 
Potvin, who gave up five goals in a 
5-2 loss to me Sharks on Friday, 
withstood several good San Jose 
chances early and had a solid out- 
ing despite riving up two third- 
period goals. He tin 
30-sfaotfc 



Canada Celebrating 
Devalued Victory 




turned back 27 of 



HAH SattiM M/Aywcr Francc-Pres* 

Nefaoo Enrerson Hied to stop Vffle Petoneoof finbnden route to Canada’s shoot-out victory in the world championship final in Milan. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MILAN — Canada celebrated 
its first World Ice Hockey Champi- 
onship in 33 years on Monday, bat 
its joy could not hide the fact that 
the tournament is becoming in- 
creasingly devalued as more and 
more of the best players Slay away. 

In an incredible replay of its loss 
in the Olympic finals, Canada this 
time came out on top, beating Fin- 
land in a shoot-out to win the title 
cm Sunday. 

The game aided in a I-I tie and 
neither team soored in overtime. 
Then came a five-cbance shoot-out 
Canada led 2-1, when Paul Kariya 
missed, with goalie Jarmo Myllys 
deflecting the puck over the cross- 
bar. His missed shot in a shoot-ont 
in Lifiehammer had given Sweden 
the Olympic title. 

F inlan d scored, Canada didn’t 
and it was up to Los Angeles King, 
forward Luc Robitade, who put it 
past Myllys to make it 3-2. Finland’s 
MDca Niemmen then missed. 

But the victory came in an event 
that is devalued by bring held at 
the same lime as the National 
Hockey League's Stanley Cup 
playoffs, depriving it of much top- 
class talent 

And as top European players 
continue to sign up with NHL 
teams, the tournament's prospects 
become more uncertain. 

“I don't think it’s the real world 
championships any more,” said the 


U.& coach, Don WDson, before his 
side’s 8-0 mauling by F inland in the 
semifinals. “The caliber has been 
watered down. So many of the best 


players arc in the Stanley Cup.” 
Tbesi 


standard of many games was 
low, and the one-sided scores in the 
latter stages of the tournament 
were a further sign of deteriorating 
standards. 

The championship relies heavily 
on the NHL contingent In ail 65 
NHL players took part this year 
and produced four of the top 10 
scorers and the top two goalies. 

“If you take the NHL players out 
of this, you have nothing but an- 
other duD European toumamau,” 
said Andrfc Boudrais, chief scout 
for the Montreal Canadiens. 

Wilson and the Canadian coach, 
George Kingston both favor hold- 
ing the championship in Septem- 
ber, before the NHL season starts. 

But the president of the Interna- 
tional Ice Hockey Federation. 
Gunter Sabetzky, opposes the idea 
of a September tournament, saying 
Europe-based players would not 
have enough practice. 

The NHL, on the other hand, is 
highly unlikely to sanction a 10-day 
shut-down at the height of its sea- 
son so that players could lake part 
in the world championship. 

“All the NHL players here 
would much rather play in the 
Stanley Cup,” Kingston said. 

(AT, Reuters} 


Mason Helps Knicks 
Slip Past the Bulls 


The Associated Press 
Two weeks ago. when New York 
finished the regular season at Chi- 
cago with its third straight victory 
over the Bolls, Anthony Mason was 
not around. 

Suspended in a conflict with 
Coach Pat Riley, Mason missed the 
last three regular-season games be- 
fore bring reinstated for the play- 


NBA PLAYOFFS 


offs. He 
Knacks’ 


a small role in the 
to-one ’ 


victory 

over New Jersey in the first round. 


QbC8S0'S uwi— - 

jST tot the Sacks 


Then came Sunday, and Mason 
a pivotal role in the Knkks’ 
victory in the opener of the 
Eastern Conference four-of-seven- 
semifinals against the Chica- 
go Bolls. 

He made two big plays in the 
final minute, scored 9 of his 11 
points in the second half and 
helped hold Scottie Fippen to 3- 
for-13 shooting after halftime. 

With the score tied at 86-86, Ma- 
son took a tong pass from John 
Starks ahead of the Chicago de- 
fense and scored with 48 seconds 
remaining, riving New York its 
first lead since the first quarter. 

After B. J. Armstrong missed for 
the Bulls, Greg Anthony’s long 
shot with the shot dock running 
down just grazed the rim, and Ma- 
son grabbed die rebound with 8J2 

_ a . seconds left Oticago fouled Statics, 

Jafljed to overcome the BoDs, 90-86. who hit the dinchmg free throw*. 


The Bulls, behind Michael Jor- 
dan, now the world’s most famous 
minor league baseball player, have 
eliminated the Knicks from the 
playoffs for three straight years en 
route to the NBA title. Chicago led 
by 67-52 with 3: 15 left in the third 
quarter, but New York outscored 
the Bulls, 3B-19, the rest of the way. 

Sons 9L Rockets 87: Kevin 
Johnson had nine prints through 
three quarters, then scored Urn the 
fourth as Phoenix won the opener 
of a Western Conference semi fin aL 

Houston’s 39-21 first-half lead 
was cat to 45-37 by halftime. The 
Suns used a 15-4 run at the start of 
the third quarter to get back in the 
game and a 13-0 fourth-quarter 
surge to take the lead for good. 

Hakeem Olajuwon had 36 points 
and 16 rebounds for Houston. 

In an earlier game, reported Mon- 
day m some editions of the Herald 
Tribute: 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. ! 


Hawks 102, Heat 91: Atlanta, 
down two games to one to the Heat 
despite being the No. 1 seed in the 
Eastern Conference, avoided the 
upset bug that stung top-seeded 
Seattle in the West, beating Miami 
to advance to the next round 
a gainst In diana 


ir 



If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get if at home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
in key Ui. cries. 


CdlJ^HX) 882 2884 


[b NcwYoifc caS ?1? 7S2 3890) 


Hcralh^ ^j Eribunc 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 


speobng martn u. defy 
fh46* 59«.tVlC€J*) 

8 QWE 6760321. BUJ-KfU 


let 

...9344 3929. 
fURT OT4J&5. 


a* Soto*/ A sm ! 

Neff York's Anthony 


Moritie Blaylock had 13 points, 
18 assists, 8 rebounds and 4 steals 
for the Hawks. With a loss, thev 


would have joined the SuperSonics 
No. ] seeds ever to lose 


as the only 

in the first round. 



r 

* * 


b&gravza 

UK 071 589 5237 


*. t-/ * : 
? 


FERRARI 



MU0>OBKCMBS< 

071 589 8200 


?ABnH££&r cannes 

. pans cscow s SIV, “ 


0712*60586 


«r:'* ' •; 












international classified 


aJTE-KGAI£ 

Btart &3a WbHdw*. Oath 

UK 071 5869298 


RonsawM wares 

EwortSenm 

Wasu«**fr W 


botssksw 


•*S!SP* 


JSSSW»* 


PKETrr WOMAN 
GENEVA PAHS 

I£t£v«32199 61 aufiau*. 


TOKYO 

bcort / Guide 

Strvire 

M Ntx xa 3351-2278. 


*•— milan-juiia:; 

* BOOT & GUKSBVKX 1 


QB DIAL Nil BMI 86 5<. 

BANNA _•••••**• 

ICroONBCOTfflWCE 

T«tata»0B gi*93TU 




„«©T*AVa 

pum n jUo^n 71 3W 5121 
fzunorstBAM' 5 
fo?m /38) 99^8 


WltaSuBMimm. 


ZUKKH *BBN * UJZ9N 

NAUMjEEKOrtSmica 
TefcDl/461 7639 


•PAktS A LONDON* 

— pesnee — escot sawicE 

London (71J3W 5M5 


imwfra warn 

bretataa 6wt + TroW Sar v ia. 
Cri Wa*o +43-1-370 63 19. 


*• lONbON ” C MKW 
Imdon & Heorivar Extol Service 
mmmCnd)CiuA/aeadd 


MW 1AM BCW SBNKZ 

“LONDON ••••• 

THi 0956 279219 or 0860483236 


TOKYO ESCOfT SarWCE 

Nqer credl conk ocopiad. 

Td: ca K&m. 


• * * CLC. MBS * RAOUE • • ■ 

BOOT SStWffi - CN1 BaouM 
ON -322 -435- 8 -51 


'*•••• CHIISTINA 

• LONDON * BC0KT • 
•T6L:071-499-28?9 


At ip REAPERS IN GREAT BRITAIN 

— |y s never been easier to subscribe 
rtnd save. Just call toll-free: 

0 800 89 5965 


MOOSON CUB - VBMA ESCORT 
Service. 5. E acta Wfenzefc 2a 
0222/56 86 8i 


FS/NG loaf? — having problem? 

SOS HOP enurire in Enabh ? p.m. 
11 pmc T* Pore p) 47 ® 


PERSONALS 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


MAY THE 5AGEED fCACT d Jews be , 
adored, gtenfied. loved end preserved 


throighcM fte wld now and tor- 
w. Soaed 


Heart of Jests pray lor 

us. San Juofc worker a/ mu odes pray 

tn. Sort Jude help at the hopSess 
y for is. AM9<L AMC 


_E2L 


KANSAS, USA - 159 Fufy sensed 
home buUng lots an Ua near goff 
corpse. MuB saL Value 2 mfflon dol- 
lars. Orfy ssoomo edi somu- 
0M0. Froc BOB-ecS-l 228. 


AM94. 


THANK YOU SA(3B> HEART Of' 

JcSUS, Sant Jude, and Bkssed Vagin . 
•toy for helping me find the nghr ' 
jot> It took longer than 9 day*, bm 
war wefl worth rf* wait. MiG. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


SANT JUDE AN) SACRED HEART 
aLteM thenfo for prayers answered. 


••••* GJS APARTM9ff5 long 
& Short Term Leases for (sen) fw- 
t +31 20 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


mhed houses & flats. Tefc 
6250071. Foe +31 20 6380475. 
Kebersyorfit 33. 1015 CD Amsterrfan 


PARIS AREA FXIRNLSHED 


PARIS i SUBURBS 


PARIS - 16ft - 6 AV9*E MG8S 

acephonal loarion, hah dost. 126 
sq.m o p artn e r* + cafcony, 2nd 
floor, faana south, fang + 3 bed- 
rooms. bamroores, shewer, 
krtcfiea Chss 

Phone: 

') <778 85 33 


PARIS 

‘BEITS THAN A NOTH” 


MONTAIGNE 95 SOM. 
fbkct atomoN 


Refined dsaocaton. 

Ptrtmg - F32JX30 mdurfcg threget 


BORL CHAMPS B.Y5B5 

Duptat 130 sqA Perfert conrfcon. 
Calm. Pohm. F30.OOO. 


. Ptarimg. F30.000. 

COREPf Tab 111 45 89 92 52 
or Fa* p) *5 65 44 13 


PARIS LA DBASE 1 


RESDB4CE CARTE 

SpadoiB 2 or 3r»om q+itaiutb 
to rent for 3 days or man. 


colei 


Tel: (33-1] 41 25 16 16 
Far 


33- 


1141 

I>41 


2516 15 


DISCOVER 

LEARNING 


FOR YOUR WORLD 
IN TUESDAY'S 

EDUCATION 

DIRECTORY 


Today on page 4. 


ON CHAMPS HE MASS, recepeon + 
k»»ioi2EMi«SY Teh 


AGB«E CHAMPS HYSffiS 




y/srr.) 


■ nlernnllonal 


SWITZERLAND 


LET US nap YOU fated a terete 
‘ Udte Gacen, Sooftern 
Attractive 


price*. Co mpl ete con fid enc e . Scot 
F fntstdd Tol: 41-21-329 00 


49. 


Fa*; 41-21-329 00 52 


ofpa you N 

APAPIA®4n 


QUALITY 
• Unury fgrnfted 


.ISvr** 


. Snen service 

'.WSTt 

• Close to the B1W Town- 
_ and “Trocretere" Square 
starhm at USS709 per »eeJ 
For furftto odommlion S raronartiu. 
oJ 1-4525 9501. Far 1-42882991 





READERS ARE ADV&3) 

that Him /af«ntafiORaf 
Hendd Tribune eamof bo 
hmU nspansAh far lots or 
dtmgos burned as a re- 

tub ef transactions d i m- 
ndng Ann o fter fa meift 
wfvdt appnrin our paper. 
It is therefore ntonettomS 
md that readme* make ap- 
propriate Inquiries before 


feting Into 

e ea ue fb eea M. 


my binding 



IMPORT/EXPORT 

u |NI 1 

US. TRADMG COMPANY offas uted 
rob oul of Block Sda Pori. S-nom 
nqufoe. Fa»: 510.73MM9 IJ5A 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

p'f 'P' r \m 

OFFSHORE COMPANIB 

• 7® READY MADE COMPANIB 
■ SAMt MTROCXJCT10N5 

• ACCOUNTING. IKAL & ADMIN 

' lCj a t€s trade documeniahon 

• tamfOC & MAIL FORWARDING 

Tefopris* » for for viuTtoiS^e vvice 
ond 100 pogs oobur 





OC2A ASIA UMHBD 

24412 Bank of Anwca Twrei 
ftaoowrt Rood, ffonq kone 

Tri. +052 5220ft 

Fax. +85? 521 i 1«0 

r. 

hr * } 

w ■ . * j i r*. r 

OfKHOH COMPARES 

* Free prrfeuioita cortufftmonj 

* Wotkhiflde meopoiahoto 

* fcwntftBto UrafotJly 

" Full cPflMtmd tervees 

* London raprwenresvfl 

* Fufl odnansfe-anon ternccs 

ASTON CORPORATE TRU5TSS LTD 
19, Feet Rea* Doogfoi, kfo « uten 

Tet- 0#74 626591 fa,. 0624 62513* 

2UBQt/BBN/BASa 

EusrtSenrica 

Tot 077/88 06 60. 077/88 06 70 

msmmi 



TEXTUE MACHDOY 
Tampon Prcduction Mariner/ 
Cotan Swab Faming Marine 
Cotton Pod Machne 
t fasbrndiudwig & Co. AC 
i!X-8646 Wogen b. Jono 

Tet [55| 28 31 41 Tb 87049 FALU CH 
TrieFax- 55 28 C 60 


YOUR OWN COMPANY IN 


SWITZERLAND 

ZUBOi-ZUG-UJZBBf 

AEIK-GCUMU 

COhiRDESA AG. BAAROSUMSSE 36 
CW300 ZUG. Tet + 41 42 21 32 88 
Tea.- + 41 42 22 10 49 


OH3H02E BANK with Cl«4 A r«nco. 

rj mneriant or coocwiaaf bant 

powers. Tax free venue. Immeiato 

trarefer US S25J300. London 44 71 

394 5157 Carafe (604) 942 6169, 


COMMERCIAL/ BUSINESS FINANCE 

avabfcfe for <m yk&C pcaiecb 

worldwide Fox brief syncpie m 
Enqksri to Corpoarto Advanced. 44- 
271421300. Ctoofo Kel; H 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


$AVE ON 
International 
Phone Calls 


tom WOI 

US. one save as raudt as 
65% compared to loco) ptione 
camporie or aArg aao pkre. 
Cd from home, office or hotels 
rrrt mod surcharges. 
AvnttJe ,n tA axjrfmtL 


Coll rrw for nnd see how 
you am begin swing today. 
Lxies open 24 fours. 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES: JPCE. 1/5 

Church Sheet, Douglas, tie of Mac 

id. fSWl fotafefeW mm 


OFFSHORE COMPANES Fa free 
brochure a odwee Tat London 
Ift 81 741 1224 Fra. 44 Bl 748 4558 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


td'Suioioa Oosi neque* Truvenert 
to C»ien:'AixIi(<>a- Afros/ Mo. & So 
Amer<u fore up «■ 50V No 
rm ita resMcnys Fmpmol Canada 
514-341 7227 Fee 514-341 790& 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


RMJS AVAILABLE 


TO PURCHASE 

Letip, -:4 G«h* 

' foil Guai-xrlsn 


1 C"t*< teeptobfc :_<***> o! 
! by Pr««e fnrestori 


’ ftsebed i, 

THRU MAJOR INTI BANK 


CAPITAL SUPPORT COR 

US (714) 757-1070 Fob 757-1 270 


kallback 


Tel: 1/206-284-8600 

Fm: 1/206-282-6666 


417 Second Arenre West 
Swnle.WA 9311? USA 


Agert mqianes meksme 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
FROM £150 


ViMwoourenei- fi dl Krtoces. 

tNTBWAIlONAL COMPANY 
5SVKE5 | UK) UMTTH2 
StondxoofcHouje.2.5 
Old Bond 5treet. London WlX 3TB 
Tel: + 44 71 493 4244 
Tot + 44 71 491 0605 


WfOEVH ATTB4DAIICE of o HU5- 

BANDNQ AG84T tv ryqtnA « 
G&tfVA ni y to J-P. Mordtond, 36 
Cr«s de CJwmpel, CH-1206 Geneve. 
TcLfan <1-22347 0) 01 


U j oric f flI S m Fwwfted ryfetft. 
re adereid erects, 3 m on th, and mors. 


Teh 

ifox 


111, 


42 25 32 25 

45 63 37 09 


AT HOME M PARS 


PARIS PROMO 

opartmerto to rant furnished or not 
Safes & ftoparte Mannert Secwoei 
25 Av Mode 75C08 Paris Fa. 1-45611020 


Teh (1) 45 63 25 60 


74 CHAMP5 ELY5BS 

CLAB1DGE 

TOR 1 WEBC OR MORE high dm 
rtuda 2 or £roon apartments. FUUV 
EQUIPPED. IMheXATE RBSVATtONS 
Tot (1)44 13 33 33 


TO RENT 

Hondpiaed r petty «rtwt dl 
am Pore tmd adxns. CAfVALE 
KBTSia HI 46 14 82 IT. Fat 
(1147 72 30 W, 


NEUU.Y, BO DE IA SJUIKATE, Ugh 

cfcm, 1 '' 

bods, 
a«. 


Obs, forge i seeptorv 3 b»tepam ^~2 

Widen, ti 


net let I 


. 65 
631777. 


VICTOR HUGO, (l&ft). doming 
opteimenl. parquet Boon. frtfJace. 
fang, 2 bedrooms. 75 sam. Beouifii 
fortSire. FT3J0Q. Twfc 1-^23 53 14, 


WUB5 8BWRJE 
■atrviee & fienohod rardds. 3 ■ 
2yegi.Ten-42124D4QFml.gr 


MONTPARNASSE 


bedroom. F8306. Td: 


S AREA. 70 sm 
‘ FaBrfiiy fomried 1 
QJttU5 5329 a 


IATOUR MAIBOURG) modem 

tm. tans rtuda al awfyyri. 

F6mond.tam^»wia 


3 bedrooms, ... 
(1|47 2P 3005 


AUSIballUBCf, agrreabis fang 
+ bedroom, teghfy mnrforiorilo. 
F6J0a Sagekarsa Teh 1-4329 6060. 


PARIS ABEA UNFURNISHED 


Embassy Service 
YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT N PARIS 
Teh (I] 47.20.30.05 


5f^LUXEMMURO GARP6N5. beau- 


, svmr, 2 bocfeoooc, 

iSnfog room, fireplace, 

fW«! floors, i 

fo'. Parfo^ Fniwa Avafofale May 
15*1 Tet iXa ni- M 07 15 01 


16*. BO EXHJHANS 3 term rooms, 
l.lff sqm, sunny, odm. FFTfyOOO + 


chorpct & Pttone. Tet 1-46 51 05 80 


SUPSmiOFT, I6SSOJN.H 

■view caoaf Si Mcrtn. 
iRiLOO^Jirtijfted. Td 4? 7B^7 


Mfh 


AUTO RENTALS 


RENT ROM DBMI AUID 

SPECIAL OFFER ■ 7 DATS FF 1000 
NUB TEL- [1)43 87 27 04 


BOATS/YACHTS 


COMPLETE BHXONCS for venal - 
Stardvd 'A srsfoonv PAW, Roden, 
S5B. VHRGro. Pita Sounder, Wta, 
Ifiren. GrSete. Iretofocion. worronfy. 
Price £40,000. Fox UK 44 243 378311 
fartfetaSj 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


SCHEDUM) dofy {Ufe 1st, buaness. 

It Tore, dso Orfoy 


economy at lowed . 

spud TdffT fas 111 47 55 13 13. 


lieralb^^Sribune 


PLANNING TO RUN 

^ A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quickly and easily, contact your 
nearest IHT office or representofive wilh your text 
You wifi be infarmed or me cost immediafdy, and 
once payment is made your ad wifl appear within 
48 hours- Afi major C— 


EUROPE 

RANffMCflSS 

TiLm4637W^ 

Foe [1)463793 7u 

ISCBOUk 


NORTH AMBOCA 


GBRMNLr. 

EUROPE f 

li:P63 72«57'.. 
fac 06917273 10. 


NEW YORK: 

Tel: f21 2) 732-3890. 

Sfa:4^5 572 ' W,Z 

fact2l2)75M7fl5 


ASIA/PAORC 


aWZHUMfc Pufa 
leL 021)728 5621, 
Foe to2I)7a 3091. 


UfIB)NNGDOHklmdba 

rar 1 

fac (071) 240 2254 


HONGKONG: 

U: (853) 9222 1188, 
Use 61170 MHX. 
Fas 052)9222-1 190. 
SWGAPORfc 
lci.2236<7B. 


fee (63224 156& 
caz49.nrsK 


Tefoc 


>agc 


villjna 

pecialiij 

tmakei 
that wt 
tf restif* 

3 


ad lar 


.iften. 


- o 


rnces, u 

- 19 )l 

i ties- 


■s of ih |fi 
3 techn? 


jbsiste^i 

f they 
is such ,, 


i have sii 
usi as u 
as far as 
ed by u 

e Mlenc 

:ould dtj 


wk 


' m the Pt 

_ many oil 


' collapse 
’ Jnpaid 1 
’ have left! 


. made of 
i ipossible, 
rPalestin 
. and Jerii 
> i now. 

' .*rs now i 


offices v 


lobecomt 
i, venting 


ti for 20 oi 
-dul stunr 

■isigoawz 
"L Mr. Ara 
da's inau 
'.aides. Mi 
\ anted exc 
Rifat’s paw 
5 speaking 

" oud AW 
e Comini 
S|g the pe 


i was “UK 
t’ai refuse 
phrasing 
tid around 
&□ ministc 
ijeiails of 
^forehand 
to sign, 
-wore that 
3 this way 



3 Page l 

’ical in ? 
wear. Coe 
hian, Vir| 
- massage 
■ping and 
tunes of M 
pa, has a 
teral law 1 
rices fore 
nc says, * 
5.” 

Jways inc 
son. the \ 
rich repre 
srmagazil 
; that 10 
tint issue 
^ with an 
Puled to i 
•’and areas 


tt made iu 
uig budge i 
lies. Thed 
teareadve 
ibytheindi 
ilnch Nails 
tttes, a pn 
racooCo. 
vth, Mr. J 
tos, which 
and they < 
build up. 
?l I sold 36 

ms of thou 
-Cs.” Mr. ; 
es, I sold U 
'^Qyuseda 
could haw 
re of sneak 
rket out th 


S eRl 


to appro; 


respoosibl 
ange polic 

view on th 
countering 
3 States ws 
risforthei 
eves in fl< 
ViBiam Mi 
‘ the Feder 
w York, s 
lay. “You 
loating exc 
mgeraieu 
s said Ti 
that the G 
a floor uni 


ll 

Id trigger 
ss the boat 
d. Thalcoi 
took and 
airing do] 
held by cr 















"ITITr r 




Ji 


Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1994 


r _ 


ART BUCHWALD 


Vive la Cigarette 



P ARIS — Tbc reason the 
French drink so much is to help 
them forget what they are doing to 
themselves by ■wnnirjng 
Because they are French they are 
not intimidated by warnings on the 
Outside of cigarette packs that the 
contents are hazardous to liberie, 
egalite and fra- 
temite. 

Unlike the 
majority of 
Americans who 
consider ciga- 
rette smoking a 
filthy habit, the 
French are very 
defensive about 
their vice. 

The French 

cigarette indus- Bucnwald 
try is producing record profits be- 
cause the people- are among the 
great conversationalists or the 
world. They always keep a cigarette 
in their mouths so that they will 
have both hands free to make a 
point. 

□ 

The cafes of Paris are filled with 
deadly fumes as both men and 
women discuss the intellectual top- 
ics of the day such as. what role, if 
any. the Marquis dc Sade played in 
France's office sex abuse problem? 

What makes the smoking scene 
unique is the fact that women 
smoke more than men. I have a 
friend named Ursula who main- 
tains that she only consumes one 
pack a week. By chance, she 
smoked her entire allowance while 
we had a drink together at the Cafe 
Deux Magois. 

Ursula believed that if the 
French were not permitted to 
smoke, they would chew tobacco 
and then sprit it out in their favorite 
three-star restaurants. 

“Cigarettes stimulate the senses 
and produce great ideas that can 
only originate from noxious fumes. 


U.S. Directors Visit Vietnam 

The Associated Press 
HANOI — A group of American 
filmmakers is in VieLnam to assess 
the country's movie industry and 
its merits as a filming location. 

The Americans met in Ho Chi 
Minh City with officials from Viet- 
nam's Cinema Department, the 
Saigon Giai Phong newspaper re- 
ported. 


Without oral satisfaction, France 
would be nothing but a poorer ver- 
sion of Portugal." she explained. 

The French have made some 
lukewarm efforts to cut down on 
cigarette pollution. They have insti- 
tuted smoking and nonsmoking 
sections in their restaurants. 

The sections are divided by the 
width of a wet noodle, and are so 
close together that the smokers are 
constantly asking the nonsmokers 
for a tight. 

□ 

One of the main sources of reve- 
nue for the government in France is 
the tobacco tax. This presents a 
quandary. If the government cam- 
paigns for good health, it will lose 
the revenue needed to take care of 
those who keep gelling sick from 
smoking. 

It is not just the taste but the 
odor of French tobacco that makes 
it so appealing. The country manu- 
factures cigarettes that smell like 
burning automobile tires. Once you 
develop a taste for them you never 
want to go back to Lifesavers 
again. 

Of course, the question that con- 
stantly comes up is, has smoking in 
bed increased or decreased since 
the nicotine scare? 

Ursula assured me that it had 
remained the same. “When both 
lovers are smokers pillow talk con- 
tinues as it has in the past and the 
couple share the same ashtray. Dif- 
ficulties arise when one person is a 
smoker and the other isn't. Some 
couples are dividing the bedroom 
into smoking and nonsmoking ar- 
eas, and after lovemaking they re- 
tire to different sections of the 
room with their backs to each oth- 
er. The tough cases are where non- 
smokers insist that their partners 
go outside the building and smoke 
in their night clothes. This is not 
too romantic or healthy in ihe win- 
ter time.” 

□ 

Health authorities estimate that 
at the current rate of cigarette and 
cigar smoking, France I as a nation i 
wm survive for just 10 more years. 
That's about the same time as the 
Russians whose tobacco consump- 
tion is greater than any other coun- 
try in the world. 

French smokers don’t seem to be 
concerned. As one friend told me. 
“If smoking wasn't safe Paris chim- 
neys wouldn't do iL" 



By Diniiia Smith 

N EW YORK — Mia Farrow is sitting 
in her large, dark, paneled apartment 
on Central Park Wes;. The light shines 
through net blond curly hair — hair she 
says she cuts herself. She is neariv 50. with 
12' children, 3 cals, 4 birds, a hamster, a 
guinea pig. She has been up ias; night with 
her new adopted daughter. 3-monih-old 
Keih-Shea. 

Yet she seems eerily younger than her 
age. Her skin is luminous, seemingly with- 
out makeup — or makeup applied so ex- 
pertly it is undetectable. 

Her familv has occupied this apartment 
since she was IS, when her mother, the 
actress Maureen O'Sullivan, first rented it. 
Almost ever* wall is covered with family 
photographs: O'Sullivan as Jane in “Tar- 
Tan"; her' father. John Farrow, who direct- 
ed “The Big Gocfc." John Wayne westerns 

and won an Oscar for his script for 
“Around the World m 80 Days." 

The apartment is so dark that Andre 
Previn. Farrow's second husband, is said 
to have once joked; “You have to be 
careful where you step in Mia's apartment. 
There might ’be a baby." 

Behind F 2 ttow is the window from 
which she can see the apartment of her 
former lover Woody Allen across Central 
Park. Today, she prefers not to talk about 
Allen directly. “I have tried to take the 
high road," she says. 

*But she has a new movie coining out cm 
Friday, “W idows' Peak." She is being in- 
terviewed again, and inevitably questions 
turn to Allen. 

For the past two years, the drama of 
Woody and Mia's 'breakup has been 
played out in newspapers. Woody and Mia 
were generational" icons. ?. quintessential 
urban couple, endlessly self-absorbed, in 
endless psychotherapy, simultaneously 
knowing and childlike, seemingly able to 
take what they wanted from life, when 
they wanted, how they wanted iL 
Then W'oody began having an affair 
with Mia's 19-year-old daughter. Soon-Yi 
Previn. Woody .Allen had reached too far. 
Then Mia accused Woody of molesting 
their adopted daughter. Dylan, now S. 

Farrow's new film is her first in 13 years 
without Allen. (Another film. “Miami." 
written and directed by David Frankel, 
has not yet been released.) 

Set in Ireland in the 1920s. “Widows' 
Peak" is about a woman who. like Farrow, 
appears helpless and fragile — but who 
has a secret. Joan Plowright plays Mrs. 
Doyle-Counihao. a wealthy widow who 
rules the fictional village of fa! shannon 
with her gossip. Farrow plays Miss 
O'Hare, a mysterious, impoverished spin- 
ster. One day. a glamorous, young widow 
fNatasha Richardson) arrives in the vil- 



* •- 

• Hdk*. 1 Bur Lit* C-cnura 

Mia Farrow with Jim Broadbent in “Widows' Peak” — for the actress the film is a retail to her Irish roots. 


lage. Miss O'Hare takes a dislike to her. 
And nothing is ever the same. 

For Mia Farrow, the film is a return to 
her Irish roots. Her mother was bora in 
Roscommon, in northwest Ireland, and 
her aunts still live in Dublin. Farrow’s 
great-grandfather, Daniel O'Sullivan, was 
Lord Mayor of Cork. 

It has been two years since Farrow' 
found photographs o'f a naked Soon-Yi. 
taken by Allen, and nearly a year since 
Elliot Will, acting justice of the New York 
State Supreme Court, denied Allen custo- 
dy of his natural son, Satchel (whose name 
has been changed to Sheamus), 6; his 
adopted son, Moses, 16. and Dylan, 
(whose name has been changed to Eliza). 

A team of experts from the Yale-New 
Haven Hospital said they did not believe 
Allen had molested Dylan. But Wilk fault- 
ed the report and called Allen's behavior 
with Dylan “grossly inappropriate." 

“He did not bathe his children." Wilk 
wrote. “He docs not know- the names of 
the children's dentist. He does not know 
the names of his children's friends. He 
does not know the names of their many 


pets." WQk said that Allen was “self-ab- 
sorbed, untrustworthy and insensitive." 

When Farrow- is asked to list the names, 
ages and preoccupations of her children, 
she readily complies, but Soon-Yi' s name 
is conspicuously absent. 

Farrow’s children cons from many back- 
grounds. The new baby is African-Ameri- 
can. Isaiah Justus Farrow, 2, is also Afri- 
can-American. There are Efoa (Dylan). 
Farrow and Sheamus (Satchel) Farrow. 
Tam Farrow, a girl, either 12 or 13 — her. 
adoption papers are. not clear — is blind 
and adopted from Vietnam. Moses Farrow 
was bom with cerebral palsy and adopted 
from Korea. Daisy Previn, 19. and Lark 
Previn, 21, were adopted from Vietnam. 

Farrow’s biological sons with Previn are 
Fletcher, 20. at college in Hamburg, and 24- 
year-old twins, Matthew, trim is at George- 
town University Law School and Sascha, 
who works in electronics in Colorado. 

Then there is the child Farrow had to give 
up. In October 1991, she had adopted San- 
jay. a Vietnamese child who appeared to be 
about 6. Farrow thought he had polio but 
discovered be was profoundly retarded. 

“It was a very, very difficult thing to do. 


But given the ages Of the other children, 
how many there are and all the prof essioa- 
a! advice, we Jet him go to another famfly: 
with two parents who were enthusiastic 
and waiting for such, a child," - 
When Farrow is asked about Soon-Yi 
Previn, she says; “L stifl love tier. 'You 
always love your chad/’ ; 

hischfldien was over, Farrow wasimder- 
standably distraught. She -had been 
dropped from Allen's aew film, “Manbat- ;. 
tan Mulder Mystery," having been re- 
placed by Diane Keaton. Then came the 
opportunity to film “Widows' Peak.” 
“There was a sense of putting It all 
and going forward.” she says, 
a film in Ireland was so far 
from the courthouse. After all 
that had gone on. it seemed a monumental 
leap, almost surreal: But 1 have children to 
support To my real delight, it was a plea- 
sure." ' _ ”■ - 


Diniiia Smith, who writes 
about the arts and culture, wrote t 
New York Tunes. 


PEPP LjL 

For CottegP Graduates* 


For those young 

cat* quite an 
: enuga X. “No* 

alternative: 

foryomgpoet^D?.rooM * ^ 

yon jusf want jot». Uni- 

feWcheenngSyfac^um 

■xnentemeot address. * 
dedare you Generation A, asmuc 


lODJSUUIg - ,_ n ' 

Adam and "Eve were so long «£ ■ 
Xnd so it goes, generation 4fw 
generation. 

□ . 

Bobcat GoMftwdt was on d* 
prowl again, and Jay Law was no 
amused. A week after Oddthw^t 
spray-painted the setrf A* 5 **?® 
late-night TV talk show, the 
comedian sprayed his chair with 
tighter fluid and set fire to it on flu. 
set of “The Tonight Show With Ja> 
lino ” “It’s really no big thing- J 
perturbed Leno said afterward. 
r, Kccpt when you have fire and 5 w 
people in Ihe audience and a set 
thats made caitrof. paper and- balsa 
wood." 

□ 

- Donna Rice, the femme fatale of 
ihe 1987 Gary Hart political deba- 
cle, has entered a new chapter ot 
her life —-marriage. Rice wed 
Hughes of . Washington in Missis- 
sippi, the Natdiez Democrat re- 
ported. Details were kept secret. 

The directors Steven Spielberg 
and George Lucas and the singer 
EHa FftzgemH' received honorary 
docusates from the University of 
Southern California. T gpess this 
means that after 25 years I’m final- 
ly out of college," sakl^pidberg, a 
university dropout 

Les Aspin, who resigned in Janu- 
ary under pressure as secretary of 
AeSemr- has been hired as a partici- 
pant in Marquette. University's 
program 1 of international studies in 
Washington. Aspin was an eco- 
nomics professor at Marquette be- 
fore he was. elected to Congress in 
1970. - : . ' : 






lit 

£*Sh 


liYTERlVATIOIYAL 

; CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 4 & 19 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 



Today 





Wflh 

Low 

w 

HVi 

Low 

W 


CJF 

CIF 


OF 

OF 


tlyjr/o 

2-.no 

12/5,1 


19.56 

1152 

eh 

^msfenism 

IBrtW 

115 2 


20/68 

12/53 s 

Mibb 


7 1*4 


22/71 

9 48 (h 

Airmro 

21.70 

16/61 

Jh 2058 

14/57 

ah 

B-lrOtDIUi 

2373 

14/5.7 

a 

23/73 

14/57 

1 

&-ICTS* 

31-70 

12,13 


23/73 

B.4B 

c 


I7W 

9/46 


19/M 

9.148 

8 

0TJ5W. 

to.ra 

9/4« 


21/70 

11/52 



15<M 

9**46 


T 8 /W 

9/48 


OnwllJX* 

CasuMSoi 

n 74 

8 46 


I9« 

6/48 » 

25/77 

16161 

s 

22/71 

14/57 

on 

Cut*i 

14.-57 

11.52 

r 

17*63 

B«3 «ft 


13,55 

9M8 


17/62 

0/48 9 

Flcmcs 

21/70 

11 «? 


23/73 

13/55 ■ 


20.58 

1253 

9h 23/73 

11/52 


Gmra 

ts«e 

1152 

PC 83/73 

11/52 

0 


17, T2 

7/44 


19/64 

7'44 


taunuui 

19.W 

1253 

pc 22/71 

12/53 oh 

La. P.-rtmaj 

24 75 

17.13 

9 

23.-73 

IBM 

» 

Liston 

20 ™ 

12/53 


1954 

11/52 ah 

LcnJm 

19.96 

ll/ST 


20/M 

11/52 


tArtnd 

24.75 

12*53 


21/70 

5«l 

art 


32<7I 

13/5 S 


84/75 

74/57 

« 


14.57 

8 '43 

c 

17/62 

7*44 

» 


15.-51 

0/46 

aft 

20/66 

3/4H 

a 

Mcf 

21.7-3 

W55 


32/71 

14/57 


Mo 

21-70 

9. ’48 


21/70 

9 '48 


Palma 

22,71 

15/59 


22 , T 1 

15<59 

1 


22/71 

11/58 


33,73 

10/30 


Pnvjo 

1-57 

7/44 



7 '44 



j-48 

7 '44 

9h 

11/53 

5/41 

c 

Ftmn 

175.3 

105-1 


73-73 

1 W 

9 

SL P*;»-sbur 5 IS.« 

8*46 


19*6 

7'44 

a 

Stoe..<3lm 

21/70 

4 38 


20/68 

6'43 

a 


18-54 

9 '46 


24 '/i 

11 « 

5 

Y.i Hmti 

17"52 

7/44 


18/64 

8/48 


V»nlw 

21-70 

14-S7 


2373 

15W 

a 

V«mrj 


9/46 


16-51 

10«0 


War xrx 

IJ.55 

7/44 

gh 

ie /61 

9«0 

a 

Zu"Ch 


H-50 

PC 

24/75 

M/52 

1 

Oceania 

Au!*Jara 

17.62 

1050 

9 I 1 

16.-61 

9 ' J B 

ih 

sm 

17«? 

1050 

9»1 

19.54 

11/52 

P4 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 


^8§r 

a i0 4 




V>J 


Jeutrmm 


i Unsanonatiy 
Odd 


m 


Uir wj j qna bfy 

HX 


}HewV 

Jaalr. 


Hw»y 
5nc m 


North America 

A slow-moving siorm will 
bring snowers and Haavy 
thunderstorms from San 
Antonio to Dallas later this 
week Very warm a)> in me 
western Canadian praines 
wffl extend southward toward 
Omaha. Neb. Chffly weather 
and a lew showers will 
remain over eastern Canada 
and New England. 


Europe 

Very warm weather will con- 
tinue later this woefc from 
Copenhagen. StocMiri-n and 
Oslo Ihrouqh Helsinki. Lon- 
don and Pans wii: nave 
warm weather Wednesday, 
but showers and cooler air 
will amva later m tho week. 
Turkey will have dams, coo) 
weather laia- this week 


Asia 

Selling through Serai will 
hive warm weather User sib 
week with some sunshine. 
Sunny, tranquil weamcr >s 
lAely in m Shanghai through 
Nagasaki ic Tokyo A iev. 
showers mil campon Hong 
Kong Locally heavy reins 
will move ac-osa me Pniks- 
pnes arto pans d Vie-am 


Asia 





rash 

Low 

W MBh 

Low W 


OF 

OF 

OF 

CJF 

Banish 

vsn 1 

23/73 

e 33 >91 

2475 pc 


27/30 

a '40 

S 3M88 

IE *£4 * 

t*w>B Kong 

28,-82 

25 77 

1 29*82 

24,75 oc 

l/XU 

3S/35 

24 75 

PC 34/53 

24,75 pc 

He*. D*c« 

4& I04 23 73 


Seoul 

21 CO 

IBfll 

1 33/73 

1457 pe 

Shanjftn. 

24 m 

’0/61 

* 28/79 

ie/84 pc 


22/ID 

22 71 

tr. 32 -39 

23/71 | r. 

Tb?44 

2984 

2271 

^ 29/04 

21»70 pc 


25.77 

11.12 

5 ?ara 

1J --57 s 

Africa 

Algwre 

22.7ft 

14/57 

9 24 75 

16*61 y 

CaecTown 

23/71 

9/48 

s 3170 

11/52 pe 

Cmabtmca 

23/73 

13/56 

* 22/71 

12/53 * 


21/70 

US? 

pc 24-75 

M/52 pc 


30/66 

26-73 

1 3i /ea 

* 79 pc 

r^k-ob- 

21-70 

12.13 

as 22.71 

13*5 pe 

Tain 

1864 

MS? pe 2475 

14/57 1 

North America 


ACROSS 

1 Masquerades 

0’Fe, fi.fo. 1" 

s Batman toe. 
with -The* 

14 Native Alaskan 

15 Prince Hirobumi 
is Sheeplike 

it Irving's "A 
Prayer lor Owen 

is The lambada, 
once 


it Grand mountain 
20 Dr Seuss title 

23 Actress Skye 

24 Ho Chi 

25 Car job 

25 angle 

(Crosby) 
w God. Almighty 

34 A year in Mexico 
3a Put to the 
grindstone 
37 Studio prop 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Sana 

Cake 

Oamasna 

JmtBakKn 

Lm 


Today 
High Low 
&F OF 
2SI77 ir«J 
30VBB iem 
sane n« 
20173 I16S 
38/100 13 W 
381100 22,71 


High Lh w 
CJF OF 
2S52 20-W pe 
3:. *88 13 '56 9 
31 « 17-02 1 
29192 17/82 » 
33/102 Z2'-71 ■ 
391100 22- 71 9 


,KSay 

High Low W Kfcft 

C.7 67 C.r 

Buroiin-J 22.71 S-« i '.IW 

Cw=eo» 30 ae 20 W sc Al'26 

Una 2:.7T ::*U i 22 7; 

MomtC:/ 29 'M 13 M m 29 ?2 

RcOaii-ar: 32.V3 ISW sc 3i« 

Sawajo <i 377 9 •a-'i: 


Lsgwut Mwwy. pc-partty ocudy. c-doufy. t L-urdcrKrmx . ' •*?. < srva 7; 

grunow Wee. w.-.voatnet AH macd, forec a «« and deo provided by Aocu-WesSw, 1 


Urn W 
OF 

3'i9 sc 
2i-M pe 
T7.M e 

«h 

i»t» pe 
<73 pe 

iT*L 

trs. ;t99« 


AndYjagi 

12/M 

4/39 

PC 

1497 

4-38 


*3ort» 


14/57 


27V3 

18/01 


Booon 

2173 

7,44 


21.-9 

9/48 


CSifcess 

29.-E6 

7-« 

9 

20-j3 

9'« 

pc 

Zamir 

23-73 

8/« 

a 

23.73 

'/« 


DaL’*1 

1B<W 

4/?3 

s 

1*1,96 

9.48 

MT 

tTOjt; 

29 94 

21.70 

DC 

29 0J 

201 

d: 

Hwolpr 

SOW 

1956 

1 

20.52 

19-68 

c 

Lea AnjiAn 

24-75 

14/57 

■ 

27 ?0 

IE-51 


•-ton 

32 ia 

23*73 

5 

3i.*3 

29.73 


Ltwwrapria 

PPM 

10.50 

1 

8T.7P 

9 '« 


Utraml 

14«J 

4.-39 


18.61 

8.4C 


ftavr-i 

29,04 

24/75 


30*58 

23-79 

vc 

Kw. YofV 

21/70 

10-50 


Ji/70 

12.53 



23- 54 

2170 

c 

393 

2’ *70 


San Fmn 

2271 

M.52 

1 

21.70 

11*52 



2176 

M.-52 

PC 

21.70 

9'48 


Tronic 

14.57 

4.33 

se 

16-01 

6'43 


Auahn^i 

24*75 

10,50 

pe 

24.75 

1253 

rr 


Solution to Puzzle of Mav 9 


BHC3S0 ZJI3QI3 [□□□ 

□hodh oaaa □□tam 
□□□□□□□□aci 
bso aaiaaBB anaa 
tv. asam aaaaa 
Dn3Haa EiasQaaa 
OOSQ [3000 000 
HnQQBBtn □□0LD300 
0Da HEiaia aaaa 
□000D00 00030 
an00Q 0000 
□000 000000 aaa 
0Q □□□□□□aaaa 

UQ00 □□□□ 00030 
□0OQ 00300 


IEIS1TM 


35 Dr. Seuss tide 

41 Plant seeds 
again 

42 scanan 

43 Coach 
Parseghtan 

44 Shakespearean 
oath 

4a Smidgen 
«7 Love of Greece? 

45 Dance or 
hairstyle 

90 Calf s maal 
sa Dr. Seuss titte 

MOna- (short 

play) 

eo Crystal bail. e.g. 
•i Keep busy 
52 Vfofintsf Isaac . 
53Partof R.S.V.P. 
54 Wrestling's 

the Giant. 

sc Western Him 
title of 75 and' 
■93 

so Golf peg 
S7 Relaxes 

DOWN 

1 Like venison 

2 Out of the wind 
a Carroll 

contemporanr 


4Em.ag. 
sPen.forPienra 
•About mid- 
month, wtth 
■the’ 
r Brigham 
Young's home 
e Computer- - 
phone fink 
e Norse land of 
i giants 

.to Make out ala 
party? 

« f 


sslnterable 
35 Dinner chickens 

4SMoretika 
'-.Shirley Temple 

45- — Sob of 
. . "Star Ware" 


47 Sir Galahad's m Kvds. and rds. 

moawr ...' 55 . Toledo's vista 
45 Popular weed seHHchee 

game •- ■ ; *yWHBamof'Ttie 
*1 ‘ — —is Bom’ Doctor* 

: s* Fastener ' ' is Unlocks, fit a 
ss VOL, to Virgil sonnet 


12 Organic - 
compound 
.laPhHosopher - - 
Descartes . 

21 Condudewtih 
22 Sraati.bird' 
as Dens . 
ss Hungry 
27 Idaho city 
2 S Betty Ford 
program 
ai 1891 Stallone 
comedy. ... 

32 Brain surgeon's 
prefix 

33 Columnist 
Maxwefletai. 

35 Author from ' 
Salem. Mass. 



Paata By DmMI 

© New York Times Edited byWiU Shorn, 


AOS* Access Numbers. . : r 
Hoy.' locafi around the work! 

L'Mne the chart below, fiod the country you are calling from. •„ • 

2. Dud (he corresponding X£SH Access Number. 

5. An English-speaking Operaior or voice prampr will askforihe phone number you wish to caD or connect you to a 

customer service reptesarcuh'e. 

To receive your freewalkM card ofABg^ Access Numbers, hta dial the aocpgt miroh wnf 

the axjnto'>Txi're in and ask fee Otacrner Service. 


Timid in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 



Imagine a v- orld where you can call country to counir/ as easily you can from home. .And 
reach uie US. directly from over 125 cour.ir.es. Converse ^ih someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it's translate jnsrandy. Caii your clients at 3 a. m. knowing ihey’Jl get Lhe message in 
your voice ar a more polite hour. Aii this is new possible with .aIST 3 

To use these services, din! dir AI5T Access Number of she country you're in and you'll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your ATiiT Calling Card, iraemauond calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an XIST Calling Card or you’d like more information nr. .icST global services, jus: -cal] us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your righL 


ATsT 


1*0, .lTi5T 



COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMtaR '• COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Italy 

172-1011 Brazil 

000-8010 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

Liechtenstein* • - 

155-00-11 Chile 

004-0312 

China. 

10811 

Lhhnania* 

- 8*196 Cohanbia ’ 

980-11-0010 

Guam 

01B672 

Luxembourg - 

O^OOfllll Cosraiaca>. 

114 

Hang Knag 

800-1111 

Macedonia. F.Y3L of 99-800^288 Ecuador* 

119 

lfl<WCMt 

000-117 

Maha- 

0800^90-110 S Salvador^ 

190 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco’ .. 7 

19a- 0011 Guatemala’ 

190 

Japan’ 

0030-111 

Netherlands’ 

06022-9111 Guyana*** 

165 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 Honduras** 

123 

Kotcsaa 

11- 

Poland**r 

0*010-480-0111 MexkofcAA 

- 95-80CM62-4240 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 POatragm (MamiRiia) 174 

New Zealand 

OOW»1I 

Romania. • - 

01-800-4288 . Panama*.. 

109 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Rnfisla~(Mo«ow) 

1555042 ^Pfeni* -' • 

191 

Saipan’ 

. 235-2872 

Slovakia 

00-420-00101 - Suriname . 

196 

^injtiEore 

800-0111-111 

Spain* 

900-99-00-11 Uruguay 

00-0410 

Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

Q20-795-6U Venezudahi.: 

804)11-120 

Taiwan* 

0080-20288-0 

Switzerland* 

155-00-11 CARIBBEAN 

Tltaiiaiid* 

00 19-991-111 1 

DJL 

0500-89-0011 Bahamas 

1-800-872-2881 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* ' - 

84100-11 Bermuda* ' 

- 1-800-87^2881 

Armenia** 

• ’ . 8*14111 

MUHJLEEAST British vx 

1 -800-872- 28Rl 

Austria*" 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 1 

'800-001*.' Cayman Islands 

1.-800872-2881 

Brlgimn* 

0800-100-10 

Cyprus 

080-90010 .. Grenada* 

1-800-872-2881 

Bulgaru 

00-1800-0110 

lsrarf 

177-100-2727 Hard* . . 

00I-80O972-2ftfw 

Croatia'* 

• 99-3640U 

Kuwait 

800-288. 1 Jamaica** , . 

■ .4W£XW72-2»i 

Czech Rep 

. 00-420-00101 

Lebanon (Beina) 

-426-801 Kctti. Ana 

tWl-800-872-2881 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

060W511-77 ScKMs/Nevfa 

1 -800-877, 

Finland . 

9800-100-10 

.Saudi Arabia . ...- 

.1-800-10- s . AFRICA • 

TracCe 

I9*-0013 

-Ihrkey • 

00-800-12277 Egypt* (Cairo) 


Germany 

0130-0010 

UAL.* i-- 

800-121 Gabon* 


Greece* 

00800-1311 

AMERICAS Gambia' 


Hungary* 

WL-WMim 

Araentini*: 

-OW-WMOO-lUl. Kenya’ 


lc«and*a 

9994301 

BeBze* 

555 Iibcrta 


Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

BoU^" . 

‘ _ 6-800-1112 ;* Saadi Africa 


, 4a7Cj>ar^ji«rcBriilir«e i jagaBu«Boim-'WMMCduiMBer*to»4i« 

■*««■ owbeanM*. fans esaj- phone 



f-err^3 , 3u»>ai x, M«iy edtag hrtwAM ohc Seb, 71 minUa. bcCdiqi 4t»w 


-‘CnBfacdasEfliy. 


XBnridCocMtcr pixaMoMrfaag.lMMMfea* qaaptom^ikyyalduay--. ♦ Noe n ftrw. . *“5ft (be can iiu*uun. 

h*vrf.-.ai*anoBVTOnBirijEBK 

XXt L-LU34jHT*Vfv«fl*jrtf!^J(r<aAaiJ>efelW5nCTS«iaJlt»W: 

<tsr Lt*«!>r» ia , L^ i u » g <fae-pijene iK tiiwsu teafettweT-KOIw*- 

n-Mei " “ 

Tuak pt»^w retire deyaaefterui {tone end fadBanf... 

J-i: p*oQe- riquatefveu^ptawcsdbrdtaltuta.tUCUt-tBlKin 
hranuw*jiw > ictiji • • - • - - 









! Kts. 

|F9g 

ia-£V* 

im 

; a 


i 

•?' -'.-V r 
■ • ; - . j-wit- 

\ *S£si a/2A 

rcirOi-". 

' 

■ 

• 1 r. f. -v > 

•' • "-'■A*. 

• f 

■ 

« >; v, 

■ 


4 VM 


I 

I 

i m 


'»■ 

/. s \"v 


•r.-n..- 

AS 


im. 

w 

M 

3 <ii> 


; 

i 

: 

3St 







-irW