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INTERNATIONAL 




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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Israel Signs a Contract 
r or Advanced U.S. Jets 

With McDonnell Douglas 
& Linked to Eventual Golan Pullout 


Paris, Monday, May 16. 1994 


No. 34 .589 


The Aandaitd Pr 


JERUSALEM — i srae i h« citm.vi governing authority now beginning to run Jeri- 

wih McDonnell DouKgSL T “ l? con ‘ ratn do and Gaza is no t a prelude to full inden- 
tion of advandediSrn P &^- rt5r,be P roduc - dencc - 

agreemem with the UnilSi «!?. 35 pan , ° r an - Nevmhe!ess ’ die Palestinian flag will be fly- 
for Prime Minister YiSS s££ c ??“?“ ,ng "'fl' Jericho wben Mr- Christopher arrives. 
.,!> spokesman, Oded S ^ da , y ‘ P robabI -V on Tuesday, and the Palestinians will 

.United States would ^ 1 . 1 ^ f 31 ^ tbe be responsible for security arrangements, 

plants as rnn of ?^^?J sraeJ 2 J F ' 151 ***■ officials said. 6 

announced in AnriT ® ram e * ce edmgS2 billion ‘‘1 think it will be very significant thai the 
ThfiF-lSIisanF-lSFecn^oii ^ pkstinian leadership 1 have been meeting with 

Israeli needs The n»iT des, 8ncd for m East Jerusalem, Faisal Husseini and Saeb 

Israel is askine ^ when Erekat, are now on the council,” Mr. ChriMo 

ine of anywi&SaSS?? M 6 ^S-defense back- pher said. “1 think they’ll both be in Jericho" 

in return fo? GoIm Hc] &' ls . Mr. Husseini and Mr. Erekat are members or 

The sale is the Br?i™ST a ' t . S e PaJ «timan governing council appointed by 

tica ted plane Sh^ °f such a sophis- Yasser Arafat, leader of the Palestine Libera- 

oW» nSdrf ^ if 0 ?" ^ Dlr y Israel ha s 51 hon Organization. 
capablerflnnB V,n« Ul **“, new P lane ^ be Mr- Arafat « not expected to be in Jericho 
allow Kraei 0n i« r ^ 8C k a!ia< ? ™ ss,ons and will w hen Mr. Christopher is there, officials saii 
adversaries k Ihm^im such . potoriial hut the two may meet elsewhere before Mr. 
Mr B/*n a *^ a °' ^bya. Christopher returns to Washington, probably 

pS'^V ^ tot ihe contract was on Thursday. 

Wmild Y ? rk that Israel The Americans warn to dramatize that the 

is to eei **“ P Ianes “ l" 5 - Israel long, difficult negotiations between Israel and 

vear* he *!5i? aMS over a P®*** of several the PLO have succeeded in liberating some of 

3 T&L**?! ■ ■ ' ’ . _ the territories occupied by Israel after the 1967 

rJ,0?, n ??t.J tpp 1 ian °l Washington Post war from Israeli military rule, and that now it is 
^oneet earlier from Damascus; time for the Palestinians to get serious about 

j ^ Warren M- Christopher running their own community. 
annouiiwJ Sunday that he would visit Jericho Mr. Christopher wants to see for himself how 

uus week for talks with Palestinian leaders, the Palestinians, who have no experience at 
turning a low-key Mideast visit into a potential- governing, are going about the business of re- 
ly enormous political and psychological symbol spending to the daily needs of ordinary citizens, 

fertile Palestinians. 7 officials said. 

a * UfP ° Se ° f ■ the ^ wil1 ** to Mr. Christopher casually mentioned the Jeri- 

««ssPaJwmuan progress in putting into effect cho visit, the fust by any American secreiarv of 

??f e ? Jen i r WIth ,sracI 11)31 6* ves the® sta ^ to the area seized in 1967 and the first by a 
Hr Jf. t0 seU-govemment in the Jericho prominent world figure to the fledgling Pales- 
^? of t ? e 30(1 “ Gaza Strip. tinian government, in a conversation ^ith re- 

raj^mtans are likely to regard a porters that dealt primarily with his visit to 
taat from a US. seortary of state to their de Damascus and his scheduled trip to Jerusalem 
facto capital as ratifying then belief that the jaua- hi the week. 
ar^rowMdertiimcontiTdisreallyanasciatt He is trying to broker a peace agreement 
•■! tt . .. between Syria and Israel but be and other 

Officials traveling with Mr. Qnistopfrer said officials have stressed that the gap between the 

there was no basis for such a. bdief. The Ameri- two nations remains wide and ihm nothing 
can position is that there should not be an dramatic is likely during the current round of 
independent Palestinian state, and that the self- talks. 



r/ 

: 5% ■ e ^ 

» • ■ • " jif fr 


Mr. Christopber casually mentioned the Jeri- 
cho visit, the fust by any American secretary of mm* s^ rcuict- 

«ate to thearea sraed in 1967 and the first by a BOSNIAN TREK — A woman carrying a sack of UN -donated flour starting the 18-kflometer walk back home in the Tuzla area 

wm^reatio^wi^re- ^ nncla >'- ^ officials, meanwhile, said they would begin pushing to get rival military commanders together for truce talks. Page 6. 

porters that dealt primarily with his visit to " " “ 

Damascus and his scheduled trip to Jerusalem 

Clinton's Court Pick: A Tough Moderate 

offidaJs have stressed that tbe gap between the ^ 

two nations remains wide and that nothing By Joan Biskupic the best judge in the United States, but every- Breyer would succeed, is the court’s most libe 

dramatic is likely during the current round of Washington PostSemce body knows iL Ted Kennedy knows it. Orrin al justice. 

talks. WASHINGTON — in luHw Stanhm fi Hatch knows iL” Judge Brever's record on abortion rights 




Clinton's Court Pick: A Tough Moderate 


Germany Ti^btening Laws 


Complied hr Our Staff Fiym Dispatches- 

BONN — The govemmem introduced & 
package of laws on Sunday to combat rightist 
violence, mcluding harsher jaB terms, ^ ^preven- 
tive detention and punishment for these who 
deny Germany’s Nazi rulers murdered 6 mD- 

ti °Drawuig oa outrage over police handfingtrf a 

"^sss^eSiBrafiSfi 


crime package will curtail aril liberties in the 
popdalknv at large. 

The Magdeburg prosecutor issued his first 
warrant on Sunday against a ringleader of 
Thursday’s hnut-and-bash campaign by drunk- 
en hooligans in Magdeburg, which Vat seven 
people injured. Police Chief Antonins Stock- 
mann said tire police were hunting tbe man. 

Politicians reacted with shock on Friday af- 
ter police released 33 right-wingers detained 


By Joan Biskupic 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In Judge Stephen G. 
Breyer. President Bill Clinton found a lawyer 
who has drived into the toughest, most ungla- 
morous areas of the law and tried lo write rules 
to make the nation and the courts work better. 

Mr. Clinton chose a button-down, gray-suit- 
ed former Harvard law professor whose special- 
ties. such as economic regulation and antitrust, 
are ho-hum but vital 

Judge Breyer’s colleagues call him brilliant. 
Democratic and Republican senators praise the 
policy-minded former Senate Judiciary Com- 
mittee counsel who drafted legislation to dereg- 
ulate the airlines and also helped create the first 
set of federal prison sentencing guidelines. 

“If anybody can help develop a Clinton 
court, it’s Stephen Breyer," said Kenneth R. 
Femberg, a longtime friend and Washington 
lawyer who also served on the Senate Judiciary 
Committee staff. “Stephen Breyer is not only 


the best judge in the United States, but every- 
body knows iL Ted Kennedy knows iL Orrin 
Hatch knows il" 

That may or may noi be the case in judicial 
circles and on Capitol Hill, where indeed Sena- 
tor Kennedy. Democrat of Massachusetts, and 
Senator Hatch, Republican of Utah, were ap- 
plauding the selection of Judge Breyer. But the 
truth is ihai this federal appeals court judge, 
unlike Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, a final- 
r* :hn rjn.rJ-ig for the Ugh court. :s hard!) 
known outside a" small circle of the legal com- 
munity. 

Judge Breyer has had a wide-ranging effeci 
on the business of judging. But as chief judge 
for a small New England circuit that does not 
see the toughest controversies of the day. he has 
written few opinions that stand out. 

Because Judge Breyer is such a moderate, 
albeit liberal-leaning, his appointment may ac- 
tually move the full court more to the right than 
left. Justice Harry A. Black mu n. whom Judge 


Breyer would succeed, is the court’s most liber- 
al justice. 

Judge Brever's record on abortion rights is 
scant, although he voted in 1990 to strike down 
the Bush administration’s so-called gag rule 
that prevented workers at public health clinics 
from counseling women on abortion. The judge 
has largely voted with the prosecution in crimi- 
nal cases, but is known for an evenhanded 
approach. 

While his pragmatic approach does not lend 
itself to broad statements about how judges 
should approach the law. he once quoted ap- 
provingly the notion that a judge's greatest task 
is “the art of interpretation." 

"Our greatest praise for a judge is to say: He 
is a lawful judge; be hears and understands and 
transmits how the law was meant io be." Judge 
Breyer said, quoting a colleague. 

The Supreme Court is dominated by Repub- 
lican appointees who believe in narrowly con- 

See BREYER, Page 6 


oreJUd tbe oppoation to pass the legislation. , during the dashes and said there was no evi- 
SI-Tmrtnth . dence with which to charge them. 


this month. . . . : • ■ 

“The riots in Magdeburg must be tite racen- 
tive to boost our anti-crime parity into 
said Mr. Kohl’s chief of staff, TnedncbBohL 
Passage of the laws would represent the gov- 
nuwt visible step to counter nght- 


enunent’s most visible step to a 
wing violence that has left thgjsands injured 
cint 3 » German unification m I9VU. 


ssSsasSSstfS-s “0 

^Tbe package includes a proposal to 
n»tlv to sav the Holocaust is a fictitra. 
Kms wy that' right-wing 

to create the impression that Jews 

S S5« «".«"* 

Efjcj sSISaT^sSS. 
gj £tSS3w by °pp° sino “ “ 

D ^^ a Sc rial Democrats say they 
. ^ Sties would hamper pneamt to 
^^.fSri^t-leaning mmors. They fed 
rehabilitate **8“ povennnent’s ant> 




Before Sunday’s announcement, the only 
charges being investigated were against a Turk- 
ish waiter who stabbed a neo-Nazi after about 
30 rightists chased five African men into a 
Tnrtasb-nm cafe and began trashing it. 

Presdenl.Ricbard von WeizsSdcer said it was 
“incomprehensible” that the bulk of the rioters 
bad been released so quickly. 

Tbe police moon rejected criticism of its 
members for releasing the detainees, raying the 
law did not allow riotere to be immediately 
arrested unless they had previous convictions. 

Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Sdmar- 
renberger also deflected criticism about the 
-release of the neo-Nazis, saying tbe fact they 
were not immediately arrested did not mean 
thw would escape prosecution. 

The incident began after 150 German right- 
wingers fought with foreigners and policemen 
onThursday after charing five Africans into a 
wife 

Four right-wingers wore injured. One was in 
hospital in a coma on Sunday. 

Also Sunday, the police arrested 21 rightists 
armed with baseball bm, knives and neo-Nazi 
propaganda as they tried to enter a concert by 
five neo-Nazi punk bands in the city of Rndol- 
stadt, 163 kilometers (100 miles) south of Mag- 
deburg. MP. Reuters) 


Few in Spain See Goimlez Surviving Term 


By Alan Riding 

Neve York Times Service 

MADRID — With a series of corruption 
scandals bringing loud demands for his resigna- 
tion, Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez has been 
reduced to a shadow of the popular and charis- 
matic young leader who swept to power here 12 
years ago. 

Mr. GonzAlez’s decline was already appareni 
in last June’s general elections, when his Social- 
ist Party lost its absolute majority of seals in the 
Congress of Deputies for the first time since 
1982. While he was returned for a fourth lerm 
as prime minister, it was as head of a minority 
government 

But over the last month, corruption scandals 
involving major figures in the Socialist estab- 
lishment have shattered much of the remaining 
public confidence in his government Today- 
few Spaniards believe that he can survive in 
office until the end of his term in 1997. 

Last week, JosC Maria Aznar. the conserva- 
tive leader whose Popular Party now leads the 
Socialists in the pods, urged the prime minister 


to quit "to save us from witnessing an indeco- 
rous agony.” 

The crisis has already forced the resignation or 
two ministers, the arresi of Lhe former governor 
of the central bank and the former chairman of 
the slock exchange, an arresi order for the former 
head of the Civil Guard, who is in hiding, and the 
resignation of iwo former government ministers 
from Congress. 

No less a blow, a popular judge renowned for 
fighting corruption stepped down as head of 
the government's anti-narcotics campaign. The 


judge, BaJtasar Gaizon, bemoaned Mr. Gonza- 
lez's “passive" response to corruption and said 
he now believed his inclusion on the Socialist 
ticket last June was “an election ploy." 

“It’s beginning to look like Italy," a foreign 
diplomat said, referring to the chronic political 
corruption that led to the collapse of Italy’s 
Socialist and Christian Democrat parties last 
year. 

So far. Mr. Gonzalez’s honesty has not been 

See GONZALEZ, Page 6 


Kiosk 


Senate Chiefs 
Speak Out for 
Sanctions on 
North Korea 

2 Party Leaders Angry 
Over Nuclear Actions; 
White House Hesitates 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Senate Democratic and 
Republican leaders expressed support on Sun- 
day for imoosition of economic sanctions 
against North Korea because of its new ma- 
nipulations of nuclear fuel, but a Clinton ad- 
ministration official said the government would 
await the outcome of an assessment by interna- 
tional inspectors before drawing conclusions. 

George J. Mitchell of Maine, the Democratic 
leader, and Bob Dole of Kansas called for 
economic sanctions. The Communist regime in 
Pyongyang has said that the imposition of eco- 
noraic sanctions would be considered an act of 
war. 

Mr. MJichdl called Pyongyang’s reference to 
sanctions as an act of war “bluster." and Mr. 
Dole said he believed China would not stand in 
the way of sanctions. 

“I believe that we cannot tolerate the actions 
that are occurring without any response at all.” 
Mr. Mitchell said. He called economic sanc- 
tions “the most prudent and likely effective 
response at the current time." 

Mr. Dole, who appeared with Mr. Mitchell 
on NBC. said: "We’ve been in this cat-and- 
mouse game with North Korea now for about 
the last IS months." 

He said he stQJ hoped the issue of North 
Korean stonewalling over its reported nuclear 
weapons program could be resolved. 

“But failing that," be said, “I think sanctions 
should be imposed.” 

The White House chief of staff, Thomas W. 
(Mack) Me Larry, said in a televised interview: 
“We simply need more information about this 
very concerning situation." 

Mr. McLarty was responding to an an- 
nouncement Saturday by North Korea stating 
that it had begun withdrawing spent fuel from a 
nudear reactor without international inspec- 
tors present, in defiance of demands from the 
International Atomic Energy Agency and the 
United States. 

“We dearly are concerned about this mat- 
ter,’’ Mr. McLarty said, promising a full evalua- 
tion. 

Mt. McLarty said UN inspectors were de- 
parting Sunday for North Korea and were 
expected to arrive Tuesday for an assessment at 
the North Korean nuclear complex. He implied 
that the United States wanted to determine 
whether plutonium-rich fuel was being re- 
moved for safety reasons, as the North Korean 
announcement declared. 

U.S. officials fear the spent fuel will be used 
to extract enough plutonium to create atomic 
bombs. 

R. Jeffrey Smith of The Washington Post 
reported earlier: 

The UN had demanded that its inspectors be 
present before any fud was withdrawn from the 
reactor. A UN spokesman. Da rid Kyd, told 
The Associated Press last week that the agency 
bad received no direct confirmation of the re- 
port from North Korea, but that, if true, it 
would be a very serious violation of the Nuclear 
Nonproliferation Treaty. 

The South Korean Foreign Ministry re- 
sponded to the report by issuing an unusually 
tough warning that North Korea “should not 
drive the matter to a catastrophe by unilaterally 
replacing the fuel rods." 

Washington warned the Communist state as 
recently as last week, in a meeting of mid-level 
UJS. and North Korean diplomats in New 
York, that the fuel's umnonilored withdrawal 

See KOREA, Pbge 6 




Japan's Inscrutability Is Starting to Fray 

>* .. ' J. r l .L. T.1 . If.I., I t _.L„. 


this year a court forced the Tokyo municipal 
government to hand over, a four-inch- thick 
folder of documents evaluating various con- 
struction methods. 

The residents still must battle to revise the 


, , rms year a win i iwwu u» i v&ju uiwuu)w 

By James StenigOlu government to hand over, a four-incb-thick 

tic* York Times Service folder of documents evaluating various oon- 

__.. V 0 — The residents of struction methods. 

T ? neighborhood of Kyodo never ^ st gj must battle to revise the 

jniddle-cj f . sefves as firebrands. But when buf their coart victory was a watershed. 

. rhfll ihe govenunenl planned to j ^ was the first time the bmmmerats here had 

^ commuter rafl line «ossmg the forced disdose that kind of data, and 

iraP r0VB !S» streets with a rnttitibOhaa-dmlar ( | nxs -j t became one in a growing number of 
area’s nat 1 ®" dtey somethmg extraordi- ^5 ^ dm tmravding of the behind which 

elev3t SS?dem , aSed to know why. . one of the most secretive governments in the 

nary ’ TK.-ny the government bureaucracy kdnstria&ad world has operated. 

such*judP»f, t ;“ Tbewonk are sciU quite fpragnhw ,tat a 


government 10 move swiftly because of wfaai is 
at stake. By keeping an enormous range of 
information secret — from the side effects of 
drags and tbe identity of products that have 
violated health laws to the contents of student 
transcripts — the bureaucracy and the corpora- 
tions that work closdy with the government 
protect themselves from close public scrutiny 
and second-guessing. 

But even if the government drags its feet on 
enacting tougher laws, the change is increasing- 
ly driven by grass-roots movements like the 
Kyodo residents’ association, a major reason 


: * ■?- i 



area 5 “r -wjy, they did somectmg exuuuiuj- pf ^ tmravrimg of the veil behind winch But even if the government drags its feet on 

e * cv3t ^S?dem , flnd^ to ^ fi0W v’ one of the most secretive governments in the enacting tougher laws, ihe change is increasing- 

naiy: pyr ^ government bureaucracy world has operated. ly driven by grass-roots movements like the 

Tbe woids are still quite foreign here, but a ^ * inajor ”5° 

hM rtSvS> 1 :? ^ freedom of information revofatioa is bubbling S 0 W«toscrfnew kgdation are tmeouraged. 

pcopl^- 1 *kj ng part m toe process w j ^ for _ "This has the potential for creating a revdu- 

ftw outcome. Bnt faced IJSbamere, SeSmentscfi openness hon m our bureaua^y," said Masao Horibe. a 

StlSSiwibwStt least m 

stnK ?^dSis wanted ^to ggS by the gownmem that ended four decades of Tbkjo.and a^ leadmg expert m one of l he most 
Ky°&?Sen over less dtfrtptwe altona- c g nser ^^^ r ^ ] ^ suninier .>nusisoaeof tbe 01 ^ schobirship in Japan. 

faad b Se tonnelin& ^ h bureaucrats sahstantive, if Httlc heraltkd, issnes behind the 

live, b^ ^uch meddhng. SJ3JES ■ calls for/jefinri that could have a profound a Liberties Union law- 

P ^ ha, bmqghmg for tougher to, on 

surtlmg, they won. tamer ^ abom Japanese Jsdosui^ added: “There is no single change 

sued, fcveu • nicy and what the people are up against in «5™d do more to weaken the bureaucracy 

^ — -fT^ ^nd Pric^_ nying to revitalize it ai^protect consumers Ihan a freedom of infor- 

— ^ W 2 difference' this ^ildSfw Jjln™ 

. Seoecy is an ingrained aspect m nearly even 

asssffiawffJSf-p 

Greece---^ Lire 'tlSSS ^ timehaato by^e vmr tbe nature of drugs being prescribed. 

Sr-sZSlScFA anention to rights. But that - Even the minutes of tarings of a ^ovem- 



chosen over less msrop conservative rale last summer. This is one of the 

&*} «ke tunuc^HB’ the bureaucrats sahsuntive, if Uttle heralded, issnes behind the 

yv rtoused to such ^ residents ' for.rcfmm that could have a profound 

share th®r Earlier inmacton ihevray Japan works. 

s iartbng, they won. Eanier “^visswssay mo£*bom Japanese democ- 

sued. c , nicy and 'wiuiL. the people are up against in 

Prices _ — _ — ttjing to revitalize it 

— - — r^ FF Luxembourg SO LFr “CMt^ared trith the United States and Eu- 

AndorrO ■’••y 2 o FF Morocco...--- rope, wbsremdividual rights have always been 
Ant'HST’i jooCFA Qcfor — J 8.WR»» unportanL it has been different in Japan." 

earner 000 V p .5000 9D0 d Kmdmp-lsitida, the government minister re- 

E ?!See" IKmoI— .WCFA sptmsible. ^ creasing greater public access, 

ETEn |Sm?._ja00 PTAS :> said in anfoerriewT^We felt we had to catch 

®2S-— lire Tunisia'— .1.000 -.rqjwith the West after the chaos left by the war 

Turkey and sod«frK>i pay anention to rights. But that 

jorri^-i-'ijSJ 1 -5° U-S. Mil. (Eu ■) • I . ,'Whflechangeis in the air, few expect the new 


AHEAD OF THE RACK — Michael Schumacher of Germany CLAY-COURT CHAMPION — Pete Sampras on ins way to 
heatfing for victory Sunday in the Monaco Grand Prix. Page 19, stopping Boris Becker to win tbe Italian Open. Page 19. 


UN Destrws Serb Bunker in Bosnia 


Lfibof^VrZ- — ^ — r — 


yiTEZ. Bosnia (Reuters — A British 
Scimitar armored vehicle JestroxeJ a Bosni- 
an Serb bunker »>n Sund»> ifter United Na- 
tions peacekeeper umw under fire. 

UN sources said the annnrvi! car fired 12 
rounds after being called m by si\ British 


soldiers of the UN Protection Force who 
were the targets of small arms fire near Mag- 
la} in northern Bosnia. 

UN officers say British troops have repeat- 
edly come under fire From Serb forces in the 
Maglaj area. 


Fifty Year* After D-Day 

James Fallows and Jean-Marie Guehenno on 
the American-European relationship. Page 4. 



fHtorir-rtffl 


See JAPAN, Page 6 


Bridge 
Book Review 


Page 7. 
Page 7. 


Crossword 

Weather 


Page 20. 
Page 20. 


A Swiss chef takes second place in the list of 
the world’s best restaurants, as Patricia Wells 
rates another country. Page 10 , 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 



Q & A: China’s Plan for Socialist Market Reforms § econ( i'r 0 p 

T _ T:, : I r '-I ■ • i u .... - .1 ■ _ I 1 • ■ l -u aU. 1 J nn (ltd diiln'Jd t Ja h«n nnp arich 


China Frees WORLD BRIEFS 


Li Tiering, u member of China's rid- 
ing State Council and a minister head- 
ing the State Commission for Restruc- 
turing Economic Systems, was 
responsible for his government's in- 
volvement in the 1994 "China Summit" 
held in Beijing and co-organized by the 
International Herald Tribune last 
week. The conference brought more 
than 500 senior Chinese leaders and 
industrialists and Western businessmen 
together to discuss Beijing's ambitious 
economic reform program. Mr. Li 
spoke with Jonathan Gage and Kevin 
Murphy of the International Herald 
Tribune on China's balance between 
reform and social stability. 

Q. What is the greatest misconception 
about the economic reform process now 
under wav m China? 

A. The Western side always tries to 
compare China’s reforms with their own. 
In its opinion, the reforms can only be real 
if they are the same as Western reforms. In 
China, we think we should conduct our 
reforms in a way which is suited to our 
own realities. We are going to build a 
socialist market economy, socialism with 
Chinese characteristics. 


Q. How worried is the senior leadership 
with reports of widespread discontent 
among workers hurt bv the reform pro- 
cess? 

A The Chinese government is vrrv con- 
cerned about suffering caused by' great 
losses or the dosing of state-owned enter- 
prises in China. Die government has taken 
some measures in order to give some sup- 
port to those workers. In the long run, we 
are going to establish a social security 
system. 

But. speaking frankly, all the enterprises 

or factories need to enter the competitive 
world. In competition only the fittest will 
survive. 

While China is reforming its industrial 
system, we plan to break up the old system 
of the ‘■iron rice bowl" (cradle-io-grave 
welfare curremly financed by individual 
companies) for all the people. Therefore, 
we have to pay some costs in this process 
and we also have to take some risks. Mean- 
while. we have to consider how much the 
masses can take. We need to maintain a 
stable society. 

• 

Q. How serious is the issue of increasing 
disorder and corruption in the provinces? 

A. If a party or government cannot get 
rid of corruption on its own. then it will 


lose the support of the people and it can no 
longer stay there. At the present, we have 
some corruption because some people are 
taking advantage of the reform process, 
using their rights and powers to make 
money. 

Opening up to the outside world, we 
have let in some flies and mosquitoes and 
we need to try to kill these flies and mos- 
quitoes. Meanwhile, in our own country 
we have accumulated some rubbish and 
we need to tiy to get rid of this rubbish 
also. 

In order to get rid of corruption, we 
need to improve our legal system, establish 
some supervising institutions and use pub- 
lic opinion to control corruption. 

Q. The West is concerned that Deng 
Xiaoping's death will affect China's stabil- 
ity as rivalries within the leadership will 
come to the fore. 

A. Yes. this is an issue which concents 
the international community. But we are 
going to stick to his theories for a long 
time. As long as we do. our economy will 
continue to grow in a rapid, stable and 
healthy way, people's living standards will 
be raised and our national strength is go- 
ing to be enhanced. 

I can tell you Comrade Deng is in very 
good health right now and paying a lot of 
attention to the developments in China 


and the outside world. He has one wish 
and that is to visit Hong Kong after ft 
returns to China in 1997. I believe, ft is 
possible for him to do that at that time. 

• 

Q. You have conducted your experi- 
ments with a market economy now for 
several years. Will there be any socialism 
left? 

A. China's economy is mainly public 
ownership. In terms of distribution we are 
dinging to prindple of payment according 
to work. The legal system is socialist, and 
our political system is still a socialist one. 

The basic political guideline for our 
country is "one center and two basic 
points.'* One center means all activities in 
cur country have to be conducted .along 
the center of economic construction. 

The two basic points means we have to 
uphold our four basic principles: slide to 
the Communist Party leadership, stick to 
the socialist system, stick to Marxism and 
democratic dictatorship. The other baric 
point is a policy of continued reform and 
opening to the outside world. 

By following these guidelines, we are 


going to liberalize and develop our pro- 
ductive Forces. We will let some of the 
population get better off first, then finally 
we are going to have the whole society 
become belter off. 


Vietnam Revisited: 
The Consumer Won 


By Robert G. Kaiser 

Washington Pm Service 

HO CHI MINH CITY —When 
helicopters lifted the last Ameri- 
cans off the roof of the United 
States Embassy in Saigon in April 
1975, they etched in Americans' 
memories the very image of defeat, 
their nation's firei defeat — or so it 
seemed for years. 

But a return to southern Vietnam 
puts that defeat in a new’ perspec- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Uve. Then, it looked as if commu- 
nism had triumphed in Vietnam: 
the light at the end of the tunnel 
illuminated a hammer and sickle. It 
does not look so simple today. 
There was a light at the end of the 
tunnel: the headlight on a Honda 
motorbike. 

In 1970. there were 175,000 mo- 
torbikes in Saigon, their whining 
engines and smelly fumes evidence 
of spreading consumerism fueled 
by American dollars. Today, there 
are probably a million motorbikes 
in the city (and nearly 3 million in 
all of Vietnam), consumerism is 


rampant, and the U.S. dollar is le- 
gal tender and accounts for half the 
money in circulation, according to 
a banker here. 

The Communis: Party still rules 
the country, but its old Marxist- 
Leninist doctrine has been trashed. 
The values of Western capitalism 
now prevail. The Communists won 
the war, but lost the peace. 

An old acquaintance from war- 
time Saigon, a man who turned oul 
to be a Communist agent who 
stayed behind to welcome the revo- 
lution. offered a comforting expla- 
nation of the ultimate outcome: 
“You won World War HI,** he said, 
referring to the Cold War. “So you 
lost a skirmish here — so what?" 

So plenty, or course — 58.000 
American lives. 120 billion Ameri- 
can dollars, lost American inno- 
cence. For a reporter who spent 17 
months here in 1969-70 writing 
about the hapless American at- 
tempt to win a war and foster a new 
■> nation called South Vietnam, a visit 
now is a dizzying experience, filled 
with haunting memories and mod- 
ern-day amazements. 

The most haunting memory is of 



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Tel.: 41 65/51 11 JI 
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the defeat America suffered here, 
despite the way things may look 20 
years later. For many of the Ameri- 
cans who lived through it, shaking 
off the Vietnam War has not been 
easy. But the people of southern 
Vietnam have surely shaken it off. 
or buried ft. Attempts during a 
two-week visit to draw out Viet- 
namese on their thoughts about the 
American war and its impact on 
their country generally produced 
brief remarks about the* many years 
of war that Vietnam has survived 
but no detailed reflections. 

“Most people here would like to 
forget what happened in the past," 
said Tran Phuoc Duong 54. the 
rector of Can Tho University, who 
earned a doctorate at Michigan 
State University. 

Whai matters now is making 
money and building a better life. 
This city of 5 million people swirls 
with commerce. 

New free enterprise is every- 
where. On many streets, every 
building has a shop on the ground 
level and more stalls line the side- 
walks selling dried fish, Pepsi and 
7-Up, straw baskets, plastic furni- 
ture. flowers, textiles, lottery rick- 
ets and pho. the ubiquitous and 
tasty noodle soup. 

According to Nguyen Sen. 
spokesman for the People's Com- 


mittee of Ho Chi Minh City, the 
ruling authority, more than 100.000 
small retail businesses were li- 
censed by the city at the beginning 
of this year. He readily acknowl- 
edged that many more operate 
without licenses. 

Bui the entrepreneurship of 
southern Vietnam goes far beyond 
street commerce. Huge new indus- 
trial enterprises are be ginnin g to 
sprout up. concerns like Huy 
Hoang (“Glory **) Co. Huy Hoang’s 
garment factory covers about 2 
hectares (5 acres) on the Bien Hoa 
Highway that used to connect Sai- 
gon to the U-S. air base at Bien Hoa 
and the annv base at nearby Long 
Binh. 

The first Huy Hoang garment 
factory opened in 19S9 with 100 
employees. Now 3,000 people work 
in two shifts from 6 AM. to 10 
P.M. six days a week, sewing stylish 
clothes for export to Eastern Eu- 
rope. Japan and other foreign mar- 
kets. They arc paid piecework rates 
and earn about S55 a month, big 
money in a country whose per capi- 
ta income is still less than 5250 a 
year. 

There also are several big for- 
dgn-owned businesses in southern 
Vietnam: Taiwanese. Hong Kong- 
owned. South Korean. Thai. Aus- 
tralian and more. 




Mipktk* Paiwm/AfUir Frafkr-Pvc^ 

LETHAL WAR RELIC — A Sunday shopper in Manila checking out a .45-cafi ber pistol left behind 
by U.S. forces in Vietnam and imported by a Philippines company to meet demand for firearms. 


The government has welcomed 
foreign investment, allowed the ne- 
gotiation of labor contracts that 
pay Vietnamese as little as S17 a 
month and permitted full repatria- 
tion of profits. 

Southern Vietnam has received a 
large share of all foreign invest- 
ment in the country. Its proportion 
is so large that the authorities in 
Hanoi have redirected some inves- 
tors who wanted to go south to rites 
in the north instead. 

A four-day tour of the Mekong 
Della south of Ho Qii Minh City 
revealed a countryside that is also 
prospering. Rice farmers in the del- 
ta have made Vietnam the world's 
third- largest exporter of rice, after 
the United States and Thailand. 

Use or new techniques intro- 
duced by American workers from 
the Agency for International De- 
velopment largely disappeared dur- 
ing the first years after North Viet- 
nam won the war in 1975, when 
farmers were forced into collectives 
and material incentives to work 
hard essentially disappeared. But 
now the collectives haw been aban- 
doned and land has been distribut- 
ed to fanners; though they do not 
ha%e legal ownership, the land is 
technically for their use and the 
right to “use" a piece of farmland 
can be sold or inherited. 


Tiananmen 

Protester 

By Patrick -E*Tyl<r 

.Ym York Times Service ’ 

BEIJING — In an; important 
gesture to the Clinton administra- 
tion. China has released on medical 
parole the second of two major 
figures skill serving -long prison 
terms for leading the Tiananmen 
Square uprising of 1989. 

A brief dispatch Saturday from 
lie Xinhua press agency said Chen 
Timing. 42, “has been released on 
bail for medical treatment^ under 
an aider from “Chinese judicial au- 
thorities.” 

Mr. Chen, a social srimtistand 
publisher, is a veteran of China's 
democracy movement. He and 
Wang Junlao were branded as the 
“black hands** behind the political 
demonstrations that paralyzed the 
capital five years ago. Each man 
received a 13-year prison tens in 
February 1991: 

The release came as a surprise to 
China's dissidents, many of whom 
have been predicting that with the 
April 23 mease of Mr. Wang, the 
Chin ese leaders would make no 
more concessions to Washington in 
order to win renewal of China's 
“most favored nation* 7 trade status 

The latest decision follows a 
trickle of actions that appeared 
timed to influence Pres id ent BH1 
Clinton’s decision on whether to 
renew the trade privileges. 

On Friday, five religions activists 
were released from labor camps for 
“good behavior.'* Last Thursday, a 
54-year-old woman imprisoned for 
four years for religious activities 
was released in Fujian Province. 

A longtime associate of Mr. 
Chen said this series of releases 
demonstrated the determination of 
the Chinese .leadership to avoid a 
trade confrontation with the Gin- 
ion administration. 

“Even if releasing Wang Juntao 
and Chen Ziming involves a great 
risk for the Chinese government, 
today’s action shows that the Chi- 
nese government is wilting to take 
this risk in order to win’' renewal of 
its low tariff privileges in tbeU-S- 
market, the associate said. 

In fact, he added, the risk of 
losing these trade privileges on $30 
billion in exports to the United 
States, is greater than the risk of 
releasing two ardent democracy 
campaigners. 

“China's politics and economy 
cannot bear this loss,” said the as- 
sociate. 

When Mr. Wang was released, he 
was put on a plane to New York, 
where be is receiving treatment for 
hepatitis. 

■ MrtcbeD Asks Sanctions 

The Senate Democratic leader, 
George J. Mitchell of Maine, said 
Sunday that be favored punishing 
China with trade sanctions unless it 
made further human-rights pro- 
gress in the next two weeks. Ren- 
ters reported from Washington. 

“As of now, I don’t think that the 
terms of the executive order have 
been met, and therefore the exten- 
sion of the MFN status should be 
conditioned with some sanctions,” 
he said on the NBC News televi- 
sion program “Face the Natron." 

Mr. Mitchell said he bad already 
begun drafting legislation that 
would impose sanctions. . 


10 Are Killed in TLiai Crash 

The Associated Press • 

BANGKOK — A trade collided 
with a van in northeastern Thai- 
land, killing nine teachers from a 
secondary school, the police said 
Sunday. The van’s driver was also 
killed in the crash on Saturday out- 
side the capita] of Airman Charoen 
Province. 


Lebanese Government Back at Work 

meeting forMonday, the first stocthc abruptly stopped tSJL: 

after President Elias Hniwi and the pariiamew speaker. Nab* uem- 
blocked cabinet changes he proposed. • • , 


Vietnam fcphntiug to ! 
Chi Minh City, formerly 
making it capable of hanc 
Investment Review said S 


$1.8 bGBori to i 
«L into rate of 


* M 



GBUUKlUKGUn&lUlUKWamj BIIBMB.IMMIUK***'—-*— - r 

of talks in Damascus ivith the Syrian president, Hafez Assaa. 

Ukraine Accepts Global Missile Pact 

WASHINGTON (WF) 7^ A seniorUkrainian < ^. c ^ e has r Pj^ 0 ^f 

ballistic and cniise missies, earing American fears that the country nugni 
sell off some of tbe Scvirt missfle-relaied leduwtogy.it inherited- 
Tb e-Ukrainian pledge to adhere to provisions' of .the so-called Missile 
Technology Control Regime was contained in a memorandum 
here by Deputy Prime Minister Valery Shnurov and Vice President ai 
G ore. Ukraine is; estimated to hoklrougbly40 percent of 'the former 

The is meant to restrict international sales of 

missil es, components or related technologies that would enable aMontry 
to hurt warheads more than 185 utiles. Twenty-five nations are offictaliy 
members of the regime, while others, tike' Russia, have pledged to adhere 

to its guidelines. 

New Drive on Eurojiean Security 

BONN (AP) —The German and Dutch governments announced an 
initiative on Sunday to strengthen' -the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe, a Iargdy toothless 52-nation forum. 

^ Tuesday inVienna byforeign^nigt er 

would allow the- the conference to request UN Security Council action 
and enforce Security Council decisions in member natiohs without those 
nations’ consent. At present, afl iroitia^ice iesolutionsjnust be unani- 
mous. - ‘ -■ ■ r . 

Tiro proposal would also expand activities in mediating conflicts iatbe 
former Soviet republics and in establishing aims control rules for its 
member, states, said a statement from tiro Foreign Ministry. 

Egypt Holds 98 in Sweep on Militants 

CAIRO (AFP) — the Interior Ministry announced the anest of nearly 
100 suspected Islamic mffiiams in a sweep against fundamentalists who 
have been leading a two-year campaign to topple the government ~ 

It said 98-people had been arrested following information received 
after a pottice raid on the home of Talaat Yassin Hammam, the head of 
l«d»mic Group's armed wing, who was shot and kflled in the incident 
Meanwhile, tiro bar association called a strike' to protest the death last 


*!ggg 

sllil-- 


said be died from.au asthma attack before being questioned. Last week, 
the prosecntoFs.o&iciB said autopsies showed he was tortured to death. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Frendi Airline lo Strike on Tuesday 

. PARIS (AFP) — Tiro French domestic airline Ah Inter said Sunday 
that it was canceling all flights Tuesday except those to Corsica due to a 
strike by enmloyees. The company said it would schedule extra flights 
Monday and' Wednesday to m a k e up for the.canceflatiozu. 

The unions cafied the strike to protest European. Union regulations 
requiring France to open its lucrative Joules from Orly airport to 
Marseille and Tonlouse to other companies. 




1 

-3 


«* ,y|!g. 


_i*y . J Vy^ 2 

Tara. 5 

• '£?5£'WS ; 

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s 


rule the airport of Ho t 
largest in the region, i 
rs a year, the Vietnam f , 

.. ( AFP > \ 


South Korea VcaoqHBga totee 4 eeSBou ttwriste s off to a slower-than- , 
expected start Figures from the Tran^ort Ministry draw the tourism 
deficit is tiring, not falling. A recent ministry report showed that 825,000 
foreigners, an increase of 20.1 percent from the comparable period last • 
year, arrived in South Korea during tiro first three months.- Bat 735,000 
South Koreans went abroad, up 33.8rpercent from last year, resulting in y 
an increase in the three-month tourist deficit to S3 15 million from 5196 
million last year. (Reutersl \ 

Le^sapartnrentmtheKremlm has dreed for temporaiy repairs, and f 
his possessions tine removed from ft, and from Moscow, for the foresee- 1 

able future; the Itar-Tass news agency said. It said the four-room . 
apartment, which has been a nauseam since Lenin's death, was shut by 1 1 
order of Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. Kremlin sources said 
tire museum was not likdy to reopen. - (Reuters) 

: This Week’s Holidays « 

Banking and government offices will be dosed or services curtailed in { 
tiro following countries and their dependencies this week because of I 
national and Tejjgious holidays: 

MONDAY: Cokmbia, Dominican Republic, Israel, Venezuela. 

TUESDAY: Norway. 

WEDNESDAY: Bnti, Turkmenistan, Uruguay. - 

THURSDAY: Ttnkey V 

FRTOAY: Cameroon. Korea. 

SATURDAY: Chile, Fnmce, Monaco; Singapore, Sri Lanya / 

Sources: JiP. Morgan. Reuters, j 


U.K. and France Reach Accord in Dispute Over Orly Access 


C-mpUtd by Oar 5 ft ?/ Fnxr D:-pju.r~ 

PARIS — France and Bntain 
settled on Sundav a potentially 
bruising dispute over acces> by 
British airlines to Paris’s Orl> air- 
port. 

Transport Minister Bernard Bcs- 


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sea said tiro accord was a victory 
for French-British friendship and 
that Orly would be open to British 
airtotes by the end of June at the 
iaresL The agreement came a day 
before Britain had threatened to 
test the French refusal of a Europe- 
an Commission order to open Orly 
to British-owned airlines. ' 

A spokesman for the French 
Transportation Ministry said Lon- 
don had agreed to ensure that Bril- 


ask the butler.. 


tfXC- y ' ^/ClrtU 
«-»!.-* :■ ja>: *i»| fit iii; jf :t li. 


ish Airways, its subsidiary TAT. 
and Air UK, would cancel plans to 
fly into Orly, south of Paris. Mon- 
day in defiance of a landing ban by 
French authorities. 

A joint statement said that on 
the French side, outstanding “safe- 
ty. environmental and congestion 
problems" would be resolved open- 
ly and in line with existing Europe- 
an Union regulations. 

Problems faced bv French carri- 


S-f-N-G-A-P-O-B- 


ers in gaining landing slots at Brit- 
ish airports, particularly Heathrow, 
would be examined with the same 
openness, in the context of EU 
rales, the riateoront added. *■ 

Tiro British Embassy said the ac- 
cord was reached during intensive 
telephone negotiations Saturday 
and Sunday between Mr. Bosson 
and his British counterpart, John 

Macgregor. 

France said Wednesday it would 
not comply with the European 
Commission ruling and that flights 
In' the profitable and private Brit- 
ish Airways, its French subsidiary 
TAT, and Air U-K. between Lon- 
don and Oriy would be iilegaL 

To justify- its refusal to follow 
EU orders. Paris had said that the 
European Court, of Justice must 
first rule on France's appeal of the 


ruling before Orly was opened to 
British flights.' 

France said wheat the controver- 
sy broke last week that it needed : 
several week* to comply with the 
commission deaskm. it. also want- 
ed reciprocal landhig rights for 
small French airlines at Heathrow. 
Thejom statement said British au- 
thorities would study the issue. 

Mr. Bosson said the agreement 
addressed French preoccupations 
and would allow settling of techni- 
cal and security issues at Oriy. 

He made no mention of fierce 
o pp ositi o n 'from personnel of Air- 
Inter. France's main domestic air- 
line and Oily’s main user, which 
has called a company-wide strike 
for Tuesday. . . 

Workers of Air Inter, a subsid- 
iary of Air France, fear job losses 


because the commission ordered 
France to allow British firms to 
compete with Air Inter on French 
domestic routes wi thin six months. 

First affected would be the Paris- 
London route, one of (he most lu- 
crative in. the world, with 3.6 mfl- , 
lion passengers a year, j 

All Baris-London fli g hts , indud- / 
ing Air France’s, are now from! 
Rcissy-Charies de Gaulle Airport, * 

north of Paris and twice as far from . 
central Paris as Oriy. { 

The opening of the Oiamvi 
Tonne! is also expected to provide 
conyetitioa. When full passenger 
. service (mens in a few months, trav- 
elers wift be. able to go as fast or 

faster from center to center 

by rail as by jur, wfthont hindrance 
fnmi weather or air traffic conges- 
wm- (Reuters, AFP, AP) 


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POLITICAL NOTES 


ByNeilAw W,CU,B 

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“ ^ ^gb (££" W °? d not "T “ w «sh region. 

- °«e a ^eri| S Jj l f 1 3 ld e . B “‘ “ tniih, officials acknowL 

: A^saLjw ^ 

SS£5Bffl?as 

sonal and political P*^ 2L from ■ concerted campaign by 

Mr.diiSoiLforS d f ra J ,ODS - influential friendstocon- 

J himself in lire <SrSj> ^ found ^ president that the matihe 

u . on Of CODd uctin^d^^K^ -P 081 ' s£ 1 £ t / U 2 C 1993 was not *he real 

■'Ks&SrMs Sa-Kte 
, r^<»*dJ£2K abo “ i SS^fSEc£J£SB ,,t 

Bn™£?£ d t 0n , Fr,da Y- Jud fie "^UngrranacoDapsedluna 

o/SenaS^ff fa ^ dhim 88 006 3? br ?f Cn nbs suffered in a btay? 

* ““e nations t0 p junsts. One even de accident y 

' StE mS?5 pe ^ eant 10 hQmfl n- if “«Ml friend of Mr. Clinton's 
Sfaf2TS tQBl “ fc,dl ^«- Ju 4ge Breyer’s, in an attempt 
" vacan 7 *»■ 10 demonstrat e that the pnSSs 

' “^be considered hini aloof and Pereepuon was inaccuE^ even 
“n^hng. sm a 20-mimue videota^ ” 

rasttsSSS *fe“S?F£ ^^i^^***-.**.**^^^ 

’SSSF5.S SSirirS^ Con f irn ^ion Expected to Proceed Smoothly 

advicArc n». u ■ . . Rut nn U>.. *r n - 7 


Fw Horth, Vertad Interests 

WASHINGTON — As Oliver L North cam- 
paigns for the Senate in Virginia, he has tried to 
exorcise Iran-contra and remake himself into a 
ampler figure-apostle for the lunch-bucket job- 
holder, Washington outsider, small businessman 

But a close look at Mr. North’s business — 
manufacturing bulletproof vests — finds ghosts 
from his complicated past. To sdi vests, Mr. North 
draws on fund-raising, the same method he used to 
snppon the Nicaraguan contras. And his company 
trades on his celebrity from a period that he now 
calls “ancient history.*’ 

Mr. North is co-founder, chairman and chief 
executive of Guardian Technologies International 


[heir appeal, but in the three campaigns Mr. Bvron 
has raised money only for Guardian vests. * 

Mr. North has promoted the fund-raisin® at 
news conferences and rallies. Donated money- 
less what Mr. Byron retains — has bought Guard- 
ian vests that police groups have given free to 
officers who ask for them and who. Mr. North 
says, could not have afforded them otherwise. 

But all has not gone as planned. In Chicago. Mr 
Byron ran a fund-raiser for Mr. North’s vests that 
garnered $10,000 — none of it spenL on vests An 
officer s widow who hired Mr. Byron to run the 
campaign said that bad liming undermined the 
fund-raiser and that she believed Mr. Bvron was 
due the donations to cover his expenses. I 

In Vireiiiia. an nnpnino vv-ct Fimrl k.. .l. 


i^moiogies international _ m Virginia, an ongoing vest fund drive bv the 
Inc. Since its i rounding m 1989, Guardian’s high Virginia Phtema] Oder of Police has sullied 
prices have hampered its ability to win bids to vests to officers who already had one throughiheir 
outfit police departments, according to industry departments, or whose departments could have 
^ecuuv^^d^govemmem proeuxemem agen^. ‘ afforded, vests but .c^TSS^iripmeS 

because it was free, said chiefs for the departments. 


Mr. North his had more success selling vests 
through fund drives organized by his staunchest 
supporters: police officers. TTie money in those 
drives comes from everyday citizens — bus drivers. 
P^s^edics and thousands of others — solicited to 
give $25 each toward buying a vest for an officer 
The approaches in three states have been made by 
a professional fund-raising company that retains a 
poruon of the donations. That company has paid 
59,000 to settle one state's complaint about its 
racucs, and it is under investigation elsewhere. 

The fund drives have worked like this: A fund- 
raiser named Jack Byron approached such police 
S rou P s as the Fraternal Order of Police and sug- 
gested he help them raise money for vests. His 
company, B&B Presentations, telephoned citizens 
for donations. The solidiors did not cite a brand in 


Quote/ Unquote 

, Gen«al Colin L. Powell, former chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, telling Howard University's 
graduating dass that African-Americans should 

hI^- a ^TW° 30P y ^ 00 etbDic OT rad *J 
hatred “There is great wisdom in the message of 

sdf-rdiance, of education, of hard work and of the 
need to raise strong families. But there is utter 
foolishness, there is evil and there is danger in the 
message of hatred or of condoning violence, how- 
ever cleverly the message is packaged or entertain- 
ingly it is presented.” r/vvn 


. . — uv ouu Uia *v ■ w — ■ M1W WlUL w X 

enmeshed 7 ^ began international HeraU Tribune 

- "rftSSffSsSs^ piLTa-ar r ^ 

cemed. for *» bmoTzIT nommat on. Sen«. rt r n. CrNTT 0 * ^ of approval on the nomination 


lop staff member of that committee in 1979 and 1980 
o to be a fairly easv confirmation process," 


. . - rr — v mciuD- I-, rv- . — , — ■>. v r ,l l l i n 1 win oanurmauon tins summer v^u.iunua. a uemo- 

bitt confirmation and, more imoor- ,{ ^ M 1 - Clinton know dunng a tele- Judae Brevet's annual . . cral ’ Judge Breyer for his “maturity, iuda- 

tandy, the acconroanying messv opnversation that he would Republicans and D«™v-r!»i ai ? on S 1 b°fh ment, skill and competency in the law" and labeled as 

search to replace him atKntaior ?*!?? ^ ^bitt’s nomination. Senate Jndiciarv Commit^ P 1 votal " nonsensc " an assertion bv Ralph Nader, the longtime 

Department. ^ And he said he would do so by SStodffiW T E^ n, . er advocale ' «*« Judge Breyer pSSJ 

A pnbBc debate over land and “* ament *■* Mr. Bab- impartial when he served as the big business at the expense of average citizens . 

water pcAdes in the West Sat at , the Interior — 

™*R*~ELiSi2: m , ^ 


Away From Po litics 

while on duty stealing at least J 1,475 and Itidnap- 

frora the annual average of tile 

the Justice Departmen t said Sunday. The depart- • ; h * l»*m»ny award beheved to be the Ian 

mem s Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that S* Unitcd “ Orange County Su 

handguns were used in 931,000 murders, rapes. W Ana, California, rule 

“ 1992 * U P from ibe annual Af** 0 ^ Maglic^ 64. must pay $84 milli 
average of 667.000 from 1987 to 1991. Claire Magbca, 60. whom he Iwed, woik« 

• A Chicago businessman spent about $20,000 to sbarcd ^ “amejwth for more than 20 year 

buy up most of the an worts of the executed killer r3 f VEr ^ couple turned a forme 

John Wayne Gacy. and he plans to bum them shop into Mag Instrument Inc., the mi 

“Wcwamibem wiped off the map," said Joe Roth] 

who bought more than two dozen of the 40 Gacv ^ P 0 ** officer f 

works at auction. Mr. Gacy, who was convicted o? T 5 nnnself m the head in front of other of 
killing 33 boys and young men, was executed ,? we re questiomng him about a car wred 
Tuesday. police said. Stephen Griffin. 25, collided wit 

• Two New OrfeaiK mEmm™, . , “ CT , . car ^ lc Saturday in Manhattan and 

Mow No “ w “ ^ Jr - 


— - ail widiigc county aupenor 

Court jury m Santa Ana, California, ruled that 
Anthony Maglica, 64. must pay $84 million to 
uaire Maglica, 60, whom he lived, worked and 
shared his name with for more than 20 years, but 
never married. The couple turned a former ma- 
enrne shop into Mag Instrument Inc., the maker of 
the popular MagrLite flashlight. 

• An off^tajy New York City police officer fatally 
shot himself m the head in front of other officers 


other car late Saturday in Manhattan and then 
shot himself. No one was injured in the accident 

Reuters. AP. LAT. NYT 


finnatfon fights could hurt Mr. 
Qint on’s dunces of getting the 
Senate to focus on healih care. A 
semor administration adviser 


Jberal judge who would legislate 
from the bench. 

Another senator, who asked not 
to be named, said Mr. Clinton 


mumrouauuu aoviser Sam 

Mr. CEnton had also feared that * Rc ^ 

the land and water debates would S? 7 E^?^J! 2 ereoduB ? ? a 

nMimfcly dmage his rwleclion “ d ^ 


dunces. 

r Tho pr eadent^ aides, said,' was 

- determined this time to make a 
? quick :and dean dedaon^ after the 
.. criticism he endured last year for 

. seeming indecisive in naming a Su-' 

. preme Court justioc. But in the 
. week before he announced his 
choice of Judge Breyer, his efforts 
to find a nominee had to wait on 
intricate discussions of, in the case 
Of one candidate, envi ronme ntal is- 
; sues intertwined with sensitive 
‘ Western state politics and, in the 

- case of another, the candidate’s 
' health. 

While Mr. Babbitt presented the 
president with unwelcome pohtkal 
side effects, the other finalisu 
Judge Richard S. Arnold of Little 
Rock, Arkansas, who sits on the 
U5. Court of Appeals for the 


West, and it could turn into a cam- ~ D __ 
paign issue two years from now." -LJrmnmond Ayres Jr. 

Interviews with several senior of- ■ Vw York Tina Service 

fidals provided an account of the NA PA, Calif oniia — la a land- 
oert few days that culminated in decision, a jmy has awarded 
Judge Breycr’aselcction. Mrs. Pin- $500,000 to a father vdio had ao- 


^Recovered Memory’ 
Faces Closer Scrutiny 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Eighth Circuit, presented Mr. Gin- sense of confidence that Judge Ar- 
tOTi and his advisers with an ambig- nold would be able to serve 15 or 20 
uous prognosis about his continu- years on the bench,” a senior White 


jpg battle with a fonn of cancer. 

In the end, administration offi- 
cials said. Judge Breyer, the chief 
judge of the Court of Appeals fw 


ton,- who had practiced law oftai c 9 se ^ psychotherapists of conning 
before Judge Arnold, spoke warm- I 1 * 5 sduh daughter into rcmember- 
ly of him and rgevenated his can- childhood inridems of incest 
didacy. that he said had never occurred. 

_ Mr. Qinton then braan inter- The case, tried over two months, 
viewing doctors in little Rock and was fr^t in which a nonpatient 
at the.National Institutes of Health challenged therapists who treat pa- 
in Bethesda, Maryland, where t “ nls with the much-debated teeb- 
Judge Arnold is a pattern. He spoke nique known as recovered memory, 
by raqphoneto Dr. Bill TVanum, a The technique involves the use or 
leading cancer specialist in Arkan- leading questions and other aggres- 
sas who had treated Judge Arnold, sivemBmoiy-enhandng procedures 
and to Dr. Paul Oknmcff. the ch ief 10 prod patterns into remembering 
of the radiation oncology branch at events that were so traumatic that 
NIH. their minds had repressed them. 

“In the end, it became more and Mental health experts said that 
more difficult to project with any 28 8 resu J t of .the decision by a 
sense of confidence that Judge Ar- Napa County jury, the relatively 
nold would be able to serve 1 5 or 20 , new technique, as well as those who 
years on the bench,” a senior White practice it, would probably come 
House official said. under closer scrutiny. 

By tins time, the campaign on The plaintiff in the case, Gary 
behalf of Judge Breyer was fairing Ramona, a 50-year-old former win- 
bold. eiy executive, had asked for $8 mil- 


viewing doctors in little Rock and 
at the.National Institutes of Health 
in Bethesda, Maryland, where 
Judge Arnold is apatiem. He spake 
by telephone to Dr. Bill TVanum, a 
leading cancer specialist in Arkan- 
sas who had treated Judge Arnold, 
and to Dr. Paul Oknmcff, the ch ief 
of the radiation oncology branch at 
NIH. 

“In the end, it became more and 
more difficult to project with any 


f cancer. House official said, 
alien offi- By this time, the «wnpnign qq 
the chief behalf of Jndge Breyer was fairing 
jjpeals fw hold. 


lond Ayres Jr. memory. Their patients have often 
7««s Settee been successful in lawsuits against 

rpia — In a land- alleged attackers, 
jmy has awarded the decision on Friday, in 

ther who had ao- 'diich the alleged attacker emerged 
apisis of conning victorious, provides new ammuni- t 
t into remember- tion for critics of recovered memo- ” 
indents of incest who are expected to contend 1 
never occurred. renewed vigor that the tech- p Q 

over two mouths, mque skews the give-and-take be- . 
hkh a nonpatient tween therapist and patient, bor- orf 
lists who treat pa- deni on quackery and underscores a mba 
jch-debaied tech- need for doser monitoring of the “a 
covered memory, ways in which therapists are 131 
nvoWestheuseor trained and regulated. aux 

and other aggres- Mr. Ramona said the therapists 
mdng procedures bad planted false memories of in- Rfo 
nto remembering CKtuous abuse in his daughter's _ 
so traumatic that tnind by wrongly telling her that 
epressed them. bulimia, an eating disorder from ■— 
experts said that w bich she suffered, is usually j 
ie decision by a caused by incest and other sexual / 
ry, the relatively molestation. Km 

wen as those who He also accused the therapists of 
l probably come planting false memories by giving *•<«. 
iny. his daughter a hypnotic drug and tot 

t the case, Gary then asking ha- questions about in- a.ga 
r-dd farmer win- cestuous molestation. 
asked tor $8 mil- According to Mr. Ramona, after A- 6 -*- 
from two there- it heramp Immvn thm A.&S- 


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Arms for Cambodia 
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Hi/ Phil in qhenon mate" fw the Cambodian govem- 
By ™¥£,2S£r ment “to seek such assistance from 
The. United the international community in or- 

BANGKOK - Thc Un^d 

territorial integrity. ” 


- suggested that they may soon 

supplying arms to the strnj 


Only three months ago, the army 
seemed to have the tipper hand 


Bon in da mag es from two tbera- it became known that his daughter 
piste, Marche Isabdla, a soda! had accused him of incest, his fam- 
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PS \? IHt S SL divorce, his three daughters refused 

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through their questioning of his The defendants, who have indi- 
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Ik sexually molested her in her sexually molested by Mr. Ramona 
childhood. from the time she was 5 years old 

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(nendons victory. This verdict supported that allegation, 
means that the jtuy saw what I’ve Until Mr. Ramona’s suit, which 
always known: that Holly's sup- was tried in Napa County Superior 
posed memories are the result of Court, most trials relating io the 
the defendants drugs and quack- recovered-memory technique had 
cry. not anything I did." involved victims of long-ago crimes 



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>• the arms have been requeMw ^ but later dropped out of the transi- 
Itjng Nwodom Sihanouk, wno n» and refused to take part in 

- jyuner Rouge, responsrole ^ February, the army ousted the 


rape .rely heavily on recovered event with the help of a therapisL 


elections a year ago. 

ona “. e r ^ In February, the army ousted the 
Imuhon Lam- ^hn^ Rouge from Anlwig Veng, 
ir rule to the ,-uAr 


• bodians during thwr nile in the ^ headquarters, and a 

’ iQTfis. could ovoTun the cwmnyu month later captured ihrir capital, 

the national army was nrt resup- a gem-mining dty near the 

- Sied ^with weapons and anunurn- bo^ wfthThailand 
E nn But within wedcs the Khmer 

• ° n/«rern diplomats in the region Rouge had taken back both poa- 

nf the anliy was not tfnna and moved dose to Baltam- 


But within weeks the Khmer 
n diplomats in the region Rouge had taken bade both poa- 
■ T^hTnlisht of the army was not tfons and moved dose to Battam- 
n-iras gi^g^ e*! the king, but bang, Cambodia's Second-largest 
** JhiKi the army was n™ - dty, creating panic among its tcsi- 

a ^ort of 3005 ? dents - 

nmS. ^mpped, demoralized sw- a senior U5. diplomat in Wash- 

jed training from foragu ington was quoted as saying, die 
«*?- “J -j visas. United States was also prepared to 

mil ltar ^jr,_i nats ^ the aims consider aims shipments to the 
« were needed in part to Cambodian Army, though he sug- 
shipnien is { ^ rogue mfli- .gested that it was unlikely to follow 

counie r tne •j^ tt jj a nd who. through without cooperation from 
tar y co ?!Sr reoorted, conlinue to other nations, 
it is calsupporl and sane- The diplomat Peter Tomsen, 
supply logj^ 1 K u^ ier Rouge along deputy assistant secretaty of state 
tuary^lJS qmbodian bt«da , - > Tne for East Asian and-Badfic affairs, 
the has no reliabte was quoted as having tdd a Con- 

(Qmbodian » ^pons and.am: gressional coumrittee that are 
supply “ ne 1 discussing the possible provision of 

munition- Australian for- lethal asas lance" to Cambodia. 

On Friday. EvaaS) one of He said toe United Slates would 
a cm itu^ tcr ' hiTecte of the W not act emits own, berause of the 
main resulted in free pauira of coc^ttonestabtisbfid 
cLt effort tW ^t year, during the UN peace effort. ’ . 
prions in bfThis government Diplomas said Fnuicei'Cambo- 
c 5o.mced ^L.c^mSderation” dia’s former ' colonial: ruler, was 


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annouo^ J^-Ls dia’s foraw'aJomaJ ruler, was 

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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 




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_ „ n where people increasingly lake it for granted that are the fundamental source of wealth in 

By James rauows ^ work Shop or communicate no this age. Here North America has its greaiKi 

Spend to the Henid Tribune miter when it is or where they are. New pas- advantage and East Asia its greatest vulncrabil- 

The writer is Washington editor of the A tlantic senger airplanes are equipped not just with ity. with Europe in between. America's two 

Monthly. His latest book is “ Looking at the Sun: telephones but with a data port al each scat, so related strengths in this field are its researyb- 

The Rise of the New East Asian Economic and ^ travelers can send computer messages as university system and its continued absorption 

Political System . ” they fly. Parents keep track of children at col- of immigrants. Each allows it. in effect to draw 

At a computer-industry conference in Arizo- lege by exchanging electronic mail E-mail has on a talent pool potentially containing the en- 

na this spring, a writer named Bruce Sterling become so mainstream a part of American tire world. 

described the! conflict between “Verne’s Law" culture than Newsweek ran a recent cover story Europe has milder versions of the same 

and “Moore’s Law " The first, proposed by on the differences between male and female on- strengths — and Japan acutely has ihe conre- 

Jules Verne decades ago, governs the writing of line styles. spoiling weaknesses. Its universities are ihe 

science fiction. It holds that the futuristic de- The fastest-growing type of software is for least impressive part of us educational system, 

vices in sd-fi stories should be exactly three “work groups" or “office networks." which and for reasons of language, tradition and sim- 
iles as capable as the machines readers use in allow people to collaborate on projects even pie overcrowding, it cannot easily suck in and 

daily life/This is a big enough difference to be when separated by thousands of miles. Terms use the taient of the world or even its region, 

interesting, but not enough to seem bizarre like “cyberspace" and “virtual company" were Decades hence China may be able lo draw from 

Moore’s Law, formulated by the American coined in sci-fi novels of a decade ago. They a trained talent pool larger than what North 

hieh-tedi executive Gordon Moore (a founder have survived in the American language be- America draws on now. (English, remember, is 


that are the fundamental source of wealth in 
this age. Here North America has its greatest 
advantage and East Asia its greatest vulnerabil- 
ity. with Europe in between. America's two 
related strengths in this field are its research- 
university system and its continued absorption 
of immigrants. Each allows it. in elTecL to draw 
on a talent pool potentially containing the en- 
tire world. 

Europe has milder versions of the same 
strengths — and Japan acutely has ihe corre- 
sponding weaknesses. Its universities are the 
least impressive part of its educational system, 
and for reasons of language, tradition and sim- 


• ■ , 71 

I,,]/ V 
Rtii j: 


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high-tech executive Gordon Moore (a founder 
of Intel), governs the development of real tech- 
nology. At the dawn of the semiconductor age. 
he predicted that the raw computing power 
available fora certain price would double every 
18 months. That is. the computer chip that costs 
$100 today is half as fast and powerful as the 
one that will cost S100 late next year. 

So far Mr. Moore’s prediction has borne up 
amazingly well — and has run right into 
Verne’s Law. Bruce Sterling, himself a sci-fi 
novelist, said he and his fellow writers were 
constantly being overtaken by events. By the 
time their books were written, edited and 
placed on sale, real-world technology had 
changed so fast that their whiz-bang creations 
seemed dulL The “cycle time" of modem inven- 
tions outstripped their imaginations. 

This complaint was meant as whimsy, but a 
serious version affects politicians and pundits. 
For years, they have said that we are on the 
brink of an “information revolution," and tbal 
big soda! changes lie ahead. While they’ve been 
lathing , the revolution has happened. We’re 
well over the brink now, and just beginning to 
realize bow profoundly societies have already 
been strained and changed. 

□ 


The industrial revolution of the 18th century 
diminished the importance of sheer physical 
strength in economic productivity. The infor- 
mation revolution of the late 20th century has 
reduced the economic importance of time and 


space. 

The effects are clearest in the United States, 


cause they describe real phenomena: systems 
that bind people together but are not based in 
any physical place. 

Much of this change is to the good. Early this 
year, when the biggest earthquake in decades 
toppled sections or the busiest commuter road 
in the world — the Santa Monica Freeway in 
Los Angeles — experts foresaw months of cata- 
strophic traffic jams. The congestion was less 
than expected because surprisingly large num- 
bers of people found they could “telecommute" 
— staying home and working via fax and com- 
puter line. 

Early in this century, America's big. grimy 
dries were the centers of its population growth. 
For the last decade the most scenic parts or the 
country — Utah, the Pacific Northwest — have 
been the fastest growing, as companies and 
individuals have found they could succeed far 
from traditional work sites. 

□ 

Yet as with the original industrial revolution, 
the information revolution is producing casual- 
ties, which differ in number and nature with 
each society's ability to absorb stress. The in- 
formation age creates three great economic 
challenges Tor societies, which the three great 
industrial regions — in Europe, North Ameri- 
ca. and East Asia centered on Japan — are 
handling in different ways. 

The first challenge is simply generating ibe 
flow of ideas — for new pharmaceuticals, fi- 
nancial instruments, movies, advanced com- 
puter chips and the countless other innovations 


America draws on now. (English, remember, is 
only the second most widely spoken language 
in ihe world; Mandarin Chinese is the first.) 
For the moment, this remains North America’s 
edge. 

The second challenge is putting new- ideas to 
commercial use. This has been Japan’s distinc- 
tive strength through the last generation: The 
VCR, the memory chip, the computer-con- 
trolled machine tool and many other products 
were devised somewhere else but successfully 
marketed by Japanese firms. Both Europeans 
and North Americans should expect East Asia 
as a whole to follow Japan’s lead. 

Japanese companies have out-marketed 
Western rivals in part because they have been 
better financed. Japan’s savings rate is four 
times higher than America’s and twice as high 
as most in Europe. Koreans and Taiwanese 
save almost as much. Because capital still does 
not flow perfectly across national borders, 
these extra assets have allowed many .Asian 
firms to take the long view in building market 
share worldwide — rather than licensing tech- 
nology for quick returns as many U.S. compa- 
nies have done. 

Moreover, the Asian companies share a view 
of technology that has more to do with politics 
than with straightforward business-school the- 
ory. The memory of having been weak during 
the colonial era lives on, as an active source of 
humiliation, in Korea. China and Japan. It was 
because Westerners had better machinery that 
the Asians were forced to succumb. Applying 
technology, therefore, has benefits beyond the 


Asia May Offer a New Model of Politics 


By Jean-Marie Guehenno 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

The writer has been a French banker and civil 
servant and ir the author of “La Fin de la 
Democratic . " recently published by FUanmarion. 

Even as it is celebrated SO years after D-Day. 
the concept of “the West" has become a notion 
likely to be misleading in the future. 

Historically, this city on a hill has meant a 
democratic, non-Asiatic civilization — a vision 
abused fay Hitler and Stalin and used by men 
from the German historian Oswrfd Spengler to 
tbe Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov. Today, it 
designates an area reaching from Vancouver to 
Tokyo via Europe that would perhaps be more 
accurately described by another catchword: 
“the North." 

In toda/s world, both catdiphrascs are over- 
simplifications that owe their appeal to their 
suggestive power that there is a single, defining 
difference that binds a cozy world together. 

The beauty of it — and tbe trouble with it — 
is that this cozy club rests on an implicit as- 
sumption that democracy, freedom and pros- 
perity are three facets of the same virion. 

During the black-and-white decades of the 
Cold War, tbe Soviet Union afforded no de- 
mocracy. no freedom and no prosperity. Tbe 
West was in the comfortable position of pursu- 
ing strategic goals that neatly fit our ethical 
concerns and economic interests. 

It was a focused world, largely because it was 
an Atlantic world. 

Europe was no longer tbe main source of 
global power, but no one doubled that Europe's 
fate would decide the future of the entire world. 
Tbe building blocks of tbe world order were 
nation-states — an idea reinforced during the 
postwar years by the decolonized nations’ insis- 
tence on maintaining their colonial borders. 

It was an article of faith that the destiny of 
Europe would be shaped by political leaders at 
the end of tbe Cold War in tbe same way that 
Roosevelt and Stalin, Churchill and de Gaulle 
did in World War II. 

O 

Now a new model of power has emerged with 
the revolutionary impact of information tech- 
nology. In an era of data bases, it is more 
important to know how to research a subject 
than to master a hierarchy of knowledge. Insti- 
tutional position and authority are giving way 
to networking as the source of power. 

In our mind’s eye, we still see the famous 
photographs of the conferences Lhat ended 
World War II: A handful of great leaders are 
deciding ihe planet's future. Even in the early 
1980s, the Group of Seven was invented on the 
assumption that a messy world can best be 
sorted out from the lop by a face-to-face meet- 
ing of leaders who can circumvent the bureau- 
cracy and bold back any awkward market tides. 

Today, the leaders' decisions at a G-7 summit 
are less important than the message created and 
diffused by thousands of reporters covering the 
event So, G-7 meetings are dominated by a 
new priority: shaping the message. 

Political leaders must wage a daily battle for 
attention — not just against their electoral 
rivals but also against new competitors for 
media time from business and every other 
branch of Western societies. 

Governments have lost their monopoly over 
relations between nations. So, “leadership" has 
little to do with the practice of a Churchill, de 
Gaulle or Roosevelt. 


In some respects, these changes should make 
it easier to consolidate a trans-Atlantic rela- 
tionship now than it was after World War II. 
Relations have broadened so much that an 
American and a European of 1994 have much 
more in common than did their fathers of 1944. 

This is reflected in complaints that European 
culture is being “Americanized." that American 
events have become the only common ground 
of Europe. Biro Disney is as much a meeting 
place for Europeans as Arte TV, the Franco- 
German channel that strives to nurture the 
European root of events. 

In reality, however, it is no longer the old 


Are Asians better placed to 
become adept players in tbe 
game ot relational power, 
which requires extreme- 
decentralization and 
flexibility? 


Atlantic community that provides this common 
ground. The changes that have thickened trans- 
Atlantic ties transcend all borders, not just the 
Western ones, so this emerging community has 
no real political dimensions. 

Instead of creating a new political entity, the 
changes wrought by a world of hypercoramu id- 
eation potentially undermine existing tradi- 
tions’ sense of identity. 

□ 

The same changes that broadened trans- At- 
lantic relations have brought into being a new 
web of connections extending throughout the 
world, defying tbe old geographical terms and 
. overwhelming governments’ ability to manage 
even the politics of their relations. 

With the machinery to challenge any single 
repository of knowledge and authority, new 
power centers proliferate. Washington com- 
plains that there is no single interlocutor across 
the Atlantic, not even the European Union. 
Europeans complain that the American presi- 
dent cannot always commit his country. Con- 
gress has become, increasingly, an independent 


player and on some issues ranging from tax 
policy to environmental regulations, the states 
themselves have their own policies that are 
starting to contradict those of the White House. 

This trend wiD gather momentum as nongov- 
ernmental actors — credit-rating agencies, 
stock exchanges, professional organizations — 
set standards in place of more uaditional au- 
thorities. 


Of course, there is a case for arguing that so 
many actors will tend to cancel each other ouL 
Therefore, complexity makes it less likely that 
any single decision can create a fundamental 
change. This augurs for stability — conceiv- 
ably, even a sense of direction. 

But events are rapidly overtaking the tradi- 
tional alignments that have shaped domestic 
political Meinour countries. New. unpredict- 
able alignments may develop — in some cases 
transcending national borders, in other cases 
distancing a region or ethnic group from cen- 
tralized control. 

□ 

Just as the first information revolution bene- 
fited the 20th-century totalitarian*. tbe new 


wfil be self-doubt that is most easily vanquished 
with narrow-minded nationalism. If a function- 
al Europe lakes shape before it can command 
the deepest emotions of Europans, the politi- 
cal momentum of European integration and 
irans-Atlamic renewal will be lost. 

n 

These new threats to existing political institu- 
tions raise an urgent question: What can and 
should bind Europeans and Americans as the 
cornerstone of “the West"? 

Europeans and Americans have believed that 
our common values were true and beneficial 
not only for the West but for the whole world. 1 1 
was the condition for Western success beau se 
the West, unlike non-European civilizations, 
needs lo believe in its own universality. Thai is 
the source of Western self-confidence, perhaps 
even more so for Americans than for Europe- 
ans, who have long been suspected of a cynical 
capacity for cutting their values to meet their 
purses. 

Today, this self-confidence is threatened. 
Does the West have a mission and the means to 
carry it out? This new self-doubt has deeper 
roots than economic recession or even the 
growing difficulties of governance. 

. The rise of Asia puts in question the centrali- 
ty of the Western experience — and the cozy 
trio of democracy, freedom and prosperity. 
China gives us daily proof that economic suc- 
cess can be achieved without democracy. (Its 
size is a mind-boggling challenge to the idea of 
Western-style democracy.) 

In prosperous Asian nations, the cry for 
freedom is beard more often. In Hong Kong it 
is actually separated from the idea or democra- 
cy. Even in Japan, whose political institutions 
were borrowed from the West, there is a grow- 
ing challenge to the assumption that democra- 
cy. freedom and human rights should have the 
same meaning throughout the world. Singa- 
pore’s Lee Kuan Yew has openly asserted the 
idea lhat there is a special Asian way. 

The challenge does not arise from a conti- 
nent’s success in increasing its share of world 
production and trade. That is the way of the 
world: The United States grew from a colony to 
a superpower, thus eroding the European coun- 
tries share of the world economy but also 
blazing a path to growth Tor all. 

□ 

What is new in the Asian challenge is lhat it 
may reflect more: It might reflect a radically 


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immediate profit stream. European govern- 
ments and industrialists are better able to un- 
derstand. and therefore match, this strategy 
then are Americans. *to still debate whether it 
is possible for the Tree market to produce unde- 
sirable result. 

The third challenge will be the most distress- 
in® for the two Atlantic economies. North 
America and Europe. It is to absorb and buffer 
the purely social effects of an ongoing informa- 
tion revolution. 

Technology makes place less and less impor- 
tant —but people still live in specific places. In 
much of the world, they live in settlements or 
villages whose economic rationale long pre- 
dates ibe e-mail age. In nearly all of the world, 
they live within national borders that define 
their economic opportunities. Even in today’s 
Europe, the region where national borders mat- 
ter least, for most people the only job opportu- 
nities that count are those within their home 
country. The information revolution means 
that your economic fate is less and less closely- 
tied to your neighbors in your village, state or 
country. Yet they are still your neighbors, and if 
they are unemployed or unhappy, you inevita- 
bly suffer, loo. 


lap to bottom, so that aD are tbeoretiaHy 
dnrible for modem jobs, and then tt applies a 

=7 , _.i: u nonnraiH 


wherever they want — it can replace Atpaji 
invigorating ” middle-class s^f-image 
downed, Latin American feme of caste! 

‘ = ’ d '“ ■£" : 


pas worsen as mtcuucu — “ 

nancial crash, its unemployment rate is only -_d 

percent— yet it has rested OT an overau social 

contract of high prices and suppressed living 
standards that Europe and North America 
could probably not accepL 
America is wedl able to handle part of this 
social challenge: that of reshaping itself as 
economic and technical fundamentals chan ge. 
Even while fretting over its homeless problems, 
its bad schools, its gnus the country believes in 
its own resiliency. Tbe fundamental American 
self-image is of moving to a different town, 
starting over, (hanging your luck. Even though 
most people do not actually move to California * 
or the next frontier, they believe they could. 

At tbe same time, the information revolution . 
imperils two of the strands that hold America 
together. One is the national belief in more-or- 

less fair competition. Even if you bave lost out 

.1 lit. ... niokl ikinMti. 


Europe may have a harder 
America rollmg with tbegene 
nkal change. Buropeanspqc 


ning-fast malleability^o the trends of eaefaw 
age. Something in the AHistican spirit, j&jL 
when old mining or milling towns shut 
The market has spoken! Efceni aftec 

Yet Europe’s iask,;as-it ^rrapiS^ 

information revolnti on.^^^B 


wants to insulate from die iaaktei judgooif ' 
Many of the traits that 
an are precisely those > thai are7u<rt , ^£ 
rational" Continent-wide tOBformi^ on g^ 
North American scale, is dearly more efS*^ 


in the race of life, your children might theoreti- 
cally win. The other binding strand is the de- 
mocracy of daily life — citizens rubbing shoul- 
ders in the schools, on street comers, until a 
generation ago in the military. The information 
era weakens each of these strands. By increas- 
ing the economic value of education, it makes 
the rags- to-riches dream less believable. And by 
making it easier for successful Americans to 
avoid contact with tbe country's losers — the 
smart ones, after all. can now live and work 


This is the basic contradiction of the infor- 
mation age. The greal industrial regions ad- 
dress it in quite different ways. 

Japan’s solution is like King Canute's — but 

r #n .. T> l • JjuJ ft*x iUota nainfnl 


more effective. It has tried to will these painful 
pressures away. Japan educates its people from 


toms, quirky small pasKtrcs^and..gfeiB: v„ 
exactly those qniifcs are ^Whar 
something more than just a“maifcEt" Amem 
committed itself long ago to embradng ■whatev- 
er the market and the tedmologisfr faring fi* 
us there’s no turning back. Europe h&iy « 
more selective view about which parts (fife fo 
it will pm up for bids. 7 

From this side of the Atlantic, wewiH tatta 
about Europe's cautious and seliEcGw^to in 
the information age. In^ cm sodding ytffitgj 
hear a wistful note. - ' • TV? . r . 


**-*'★*> 
+ * ★ ★ 

* * * + * * 

, *.*•* * ★ * ’J 

★ ★ * * ' 




n r-*^ 


Fifty Years After D-Day 






These are the sixth and seventh articles in 
a series on the future of the 
American-European relationship. ■ . ; V 

Subsequent articles will appear 
weekly until June 6. V 




m-Sx-sAA 


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information revolution puts similar power into 
the hands of anyone who has the financial 
means (o reach out to a potential audience. The 
single-interest groups that will emerge will not 
necessarily coincide with the existing political 
flowcharts. 

This does not mean that citizens no longer 
identify passionately with their country or that 
nations have ceased to be the building blocks 
for a strong irans-Atiamic relationship. 

The problem is that, in emotional terms, the 
countries remain strong poles of attraction, 
while power, in functional terms, is shifting to a 
European entity. 

It is easy to see the potential danger. Ameri- 
cans’ real attachments are to individual Euro- 
pean countries — often the one from which 
their ancestors came — so it is easier to bare a 
special U.S. relationship with a country such as 
Britain. France. Germany than to have a U2S.- 
Europe special lie. 

In Europe, too, if nation-states provide iden- 


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titv but lose their functional power, the result 
will be self-doubi that is most easily vanquished 



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-■‘dEnJ, 


PIPING CN REMEMBRANCE — Bill Mfflin, 71, who participated in the Normandy bmsioii, leading a „ ^ 

weekend at tbe Eisenhower Memorial Chapel at Fort Riley in Abilene, Kansas. He is flanked by UJS. Army and Navy rq^^Ixfe 


. .Ofc.'V-v 


different — and better — approach to political 
institutions. Perhaps the Asian way is more in 
tune with the new world economy. 

Asians assign a secondary role to political 
institutions, which have been the highest con- 
cern in the West. Instead, Asian traditional 
inherited values are often rooted in strong fam- 
ily ties. Are they better placed to become adept 
players in the game of relational power, which 
requires extreme decentralization and flexibili- 
ty? 

Such questions him at a dilemma. Western- 
ers warn to be prosperous, but they also want to 
be Tree — in the traditional sense of freedom 
guaranteed by democratic institutions. But 
what if the new sources or wealth render tradi- 
tional Western political institutions irrelevant? 

That is the Asian challenge to the trans- 
Ailantic relationship. Not simply bringing a 
third player into a bilateral relationship, Asia's 
emergence challenges the West to redefine its 
assumption that political dignity and personal 
wealth go together, necessarily. 

There is a tempting shorthand response: lo 
see the Asian challenge as a new defining mo- 


ment for “the West" — this time, in opposition 
to Asia. In academic terms, this is safely de- 
scribed as a “clash of civilizations." 

But it would be a dangerous illusion to rede- 
fine tbe West by artifrei ally opposing it to other 
"civilizations." 

□ 

The West was able to use the Soviet bloc as 
its sparring partner because it was a mirror 
image, another version of the old European 
claim to universality. 

The new challenges are different and beg for 
a more substantive answer. If it wants to cany 
on shaping the world, tbe West must dig draper, 
go beyond its heritage of political institutions. 

For two centuries, the West has focused its 
best energies on tbe challenge of institutionaliz- 
ing power. Victory in the Cold War seemed to 
crown this crusade, validating liberal democra- 
cy as the supreme form of political organiza- 
tion- But final victory, at the same lime, re- 
duced those political values — to which men 
once dedicated their lives — to something tbal 
now borders on becoming purely functions! 
arrangements. 


Rather than narrowly identi^^te^es 
with its political institutiori^iafiralW?® 
radical challenges, the Westwilffgffife fflv , 
new vitality and self -axvfKfairafiwa ftffl® 
older, deeper source: a bdicfjljotb pMeM* 
cal arid religious, that freedomisoGtjwuifr 
product of institutions but an 
man nature and that therc.is. a froth * 
found. -V-i ' ft*-’ -■ 


relevant than ever. It <x»itHBieS:tofuoLnDW ¥J ' 
tioe and sdentific (Escovay^t ^bdH® 1 * 
Western peoples with. » 

participate in the redefmitiaurdC-dBtfBsBB 
community, a process that has ahawy.bfcgp? 
Asia. 

There are important pitfalls tffaswoy®? 
icking Aaans (30 years ago, ittmfaslum®® 2 

in Europe to miimc tbe United State^fe^^ 

Asia’s strengths, stibkmg- to «u. 
conviction that Western institiUkmslkiM ® 
key to everything. Instead, we mitst-stm? 
stay engaged on a global bassoon theTuss® 
our beliefs. Without that ambition, the®®* 
of the trans-AtlanOT Eok wiD perish. 



... 


U.S. Reportedly Aided Yeltsin in Coup 



By Walter Pincus 

Wai/nngton Part Service 

WASHINGTON — Al the time 
of the August 1991 attempted coup 


against the Soviet president. Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, ihe Bush admin- 
istration gave intelligence support 
to Boris N. Yeltsin that helped him 
emerge as a hero from the event, 
according to an article in The At- 
lantic Monthly. 

American officials in Moscow, 
with access to U.S. intercepts of 
Soviet defense . communications, 
were ordered by the Bush adminis- 
tration to tell Mr. Yeltsin, the Rus- 
sian president, that Soviet military 
units were not responding to calls 
by the coup leaders, according to 
the article by Seymour Hersh. 

In addition. Mr. Hersh wrote, an 
American communications special- 
ist was sent to Mr. Yeltsin’s head- 
quarters and was assigned to help 
Mr. Yeltsin and his followers make 
their own secure telephone calls to 
military commanders. Mr. Yeltsin 
urged tiie commanders not to join 
in the coup. Mr. Hersh wrole, 

Mr. Hersh wrote that Congress 
was not informed of the intelli- 
gence support given Mr. Yeltsin, 
despite newly signed legislation 
that required the president to do so. 

Although previously published 
reports have documented how 
President George Bush in June 
1991 warned Mr. Gorbachev that a 
coup was being planned against 
him, the Hersh article is the first 
indication that intelligence support 
was given to Mr. Yeltsin during ihe 
event. 

Michael R. Beschloss, a historian 
whose recent book on Bush-G or ba- 
ch cy relations. “At the Highest 
Levels," was co-written by Si robe 


Talbott, now the deputy secretary 
of state, said that he knew of the 
earlier coup warnings from Mr. 
Bush, but not the later channeling 
of intelligence data. 

Mr. Beschloss added that he 
would not be surprised if Mr. Bush 
ordered help given to Mr. Yeltsin 
m Moscow because Mr. Gorba- 
chev. whom Mr. Bush supported, 
was isolated at his vacation home 
in the Crimea. Helping Mr. Yeltsin, 
Mr. Beschloss said, "fit into the 
Bush administration pattern we 
wrote about.” 

In his book. Mr. Beschloss re- 
ported lhat on the first day of the 


August coup, the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency’s top Soviet expert 
had reviewed U.S. spy satellite ma- 
terial and communications inter- 
cepts and found there was no major 
movement of Soviet troops or tanks 
around the country, nor any at- 
tempt to round up political oppo- 
nents. 


denounced the coop anQ cau=u 
leaders traitors. ■ 

■ Concern Ovw Aractf. 

The Atlantic Monthly 

also said that 

crime eanes were-*«s®P“5-* 




gain contn 
of 15,000 


I- 


Mr. Beschloss also wrote that on 
the first day of tbe coup. Mr. Bush 
talked by telephone to the top 
American diplomat in Moscow, 
who had just met with Mr. Yeltsin. 
The diplomat reported on the 
mood of Mr. Yeltsin, who had just 


heads,' Ageoce 

ported . -yj.. 

firin g govenunenlsx^^j^ 

Hersh wrote thai 
surrounding the ^stockp 1 ^^^ 
now causing 

tration “a lot afi fcgB® 83 .®. 
deep concern." *- V-l" 


' J ' 1 ’ & 


Senate Vote Is Last Hurdle for Berlusconi 


Rouen 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio 

Berlusconi faces a crucial week as 
Italy's Senate opens a debate on 
Monday ot a key confidence vote 
for his new government — the final 
hurdle in his lightning rise to pow- 
CT. 

The two-day debate, which is to 

_ xmI n i • . 


begin after Mr. Berlusconi presents 
his governmen t's plans lo the sena- 
tors. will culminate on Wednesday 
with the vote. 

Mr. Berlusconi, who was sworn 
in last week at the head of a govern- 
ment that includes the extreme 
right for the first time in 50 years, 
must secure an absolute majority of 
voles in (he 326- member upper 
house where his coalition does not 
have a majority. 

The Freedom Alliance, which 


Alliance controls only 155 of the Oppostion' partis 
elected Senate seats. the Democratic jjiif 

The Senate speaker. Carlo Scog- and the Popular 'Party* ® aw 
namiglio, a member of Forza Italia, thev will vote against - 
is not able to cast his ballot, so Mr. LtRasz Russo Jcrvofioo-g 

Berlusconi would need nine more pooular Party ^ ^ 

senators to clinch the vote if all the d™ 1 ^ & 

, members are present. ed that members ^ 

Francesco Cossiga, a ronnerltal- former Christian t& 








rr.w(X5cu\_os5iga,aionnerluu- lurmcr ^ y- 

ian president, and Giovanni Ag- abstain, thereby 

nelli, the Fiat chairman whn an- ate majority and the Wf'Oj 



nelli, the Fiat chairman, who are aic majority 

both life senators, have said they votes (hat Mr. Beriuwwi 

will support Mr. Berlusconi. need for approval 


£ O.-o 




Irish Leader Briefs Clinton on 


P 


r ips Mr. Berlusconi's Forza Ita- 
Party, the federalist Northern 
League and the neofasdst National 


Roam Mr. Reynolds, in 

n -u N J^ ANAP ® L * s — President cerve an hoDonuydegr« 
.T 1 Mwkwt ire Dame University 

update on British-lrisb efrS to ground-brtakmg 

rad the sectarian strife in Northern memorial to Robert r. 

Ireland. and Martin Luther Ki dg,,. •' 



1 I 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 



Page 5^ 




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FOR THOSE 

SEEKING MORE THAN ONE DIMENSION 

TO TIME... 


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“A watch is just a -watch, so long as it tells the rime.” 
It’s the kind of statement that makes us all the 
niore determined to safeguard one of life’s irre- 
placeable pleasures — the mulri-dimensional rime 
of complicated watches. 

For more than 150 years we have been making time- 
pieces for men and women who see beyond ordi- 
nary rime. Einstein owned a watch made by us fig. 1, 
so did Tchaikovsky, Wagner, Marie Curie and 
Charlotte Bronte. Each of them - whether scientist, 
musician or writer - had the rare gift of being able 
to exploit time as a creative element in their work 

Today we are still recognized as the only watch- 
makers whose timepieces adequately convey a sense 
of outstanding personal achievement. We can rise to 
your greatest occasion with a total of 33 hoxological 
complications - for beyond the capabilities of any 
other watchmaker. Our Calibre 89, the most compli- 
cated portable timepiece ever built fig. 2, expresses 
the full scope of rime: astronomical time - horn a 
star chart geared to the apparent movement of the 
heavens, to the times of sunrise and sunset; seasonal 
time, sidereal time and the equation of time fig. 3; 
long time in the 400-year cycle of the Gregorian 
calendar; short time with a split-seconds chrono- 
graph; the sound of time in a Grand Strike, chiming 
the hours and quarters, in passing, on a Westminster 
carillon; spiritual time in the date of Easter; and time 
that escapes gravity in the tourbillon escapement. 

If you find the Calibre 89 a little inconvenient for 
everyday use, our watchmakers have brought together 


the more essential complications in a number of 
wristwatches. You can be assured that each represents 
the finest watchmaking in the world. 

You may find your most treasured possession in the 
handsome tonneau-shaped, perpetual-calendar watch 
fig. 4. The unique combination of a fly-back dates- 
hand showing the progression of the month, and a 
minute-repeater, is a refinement that took us about 
four years to develop. 

Ybu will appreciate that there are no half measures 
in complicated watchmaking. We are building preci- 
sion timekeeping instruments that you will expect to 
perform faithfully for a century or more. In our 
self-winding, perpetual-calendar wristwatches fig. 5. 
our own design and superlative craftsmanship ensure 
that the calendar mechanism absorbs an infinitesimal 
amount of power as it smoothly changes the day, 
date and month, records the quarters of the day and 
the leap-year cycle. The moon-phase in our perpetual 
calendars is extremely precise, taking 122 years and 
45 days to accumulate the hardly discernible variation 
of a single day. 

Our perpetual-calendar and chronograph combination 
fig. 6 finds particular favour among collectors who 

enjoy the finer points 
of mechanical watch- 
making. Through 
the sapphire-crystal 
caseback, you can 
admire the exqui- 
site hand-finish 


of our movements and bring into play the precisely 
coordinated actions of the column-wheel, levers and 
gears 7. 

Impeccable workmanship is taken for granted by 
those who wear our watches. But if you choose one 
of the half-dozen or so slim, selfwinding, perpetual- 
calendar repeaters fig. 8 that we complete each year, 
you can expect much more. We have encapsulated 
in our most sophisticated wristwatch the ancient and 
authentic sound of time. Celebrate a moment - 
any moment - by making the mechanism ring the 
hours, quarters and minutes with the pure, clear 
resonance that only we have been able to achieve 
in a minute-repeater. 

Those who consider a watch is just a watch, so 
long as it tells the time, will be gratified to learn that 
in this elegant wrist w atch fig. 9 , time is told both 
by a minute-repeater and by an observatory-rated 
chronometer. In it moves the most ingenious com- 
pensation device known to horological engineering. 
The rotating tourbillon cage literally absolves the 
watch’s regulator from the laws of gravity - remov- 
ing one of the last obstacles to the final frontier 
of mechanical precision. 

But if you seek that extra dimension to time, to 
mark your achievement, to inspire your creativity or 
simply to enjoy sublime watchmaking, you will 
almost certainly wear one of our timepieces one day. 
You will then come to recognize the touch of the 
world’s finest watchmakers fig 10, and know that 
the name on the dial can only be Patek Philippe. 


fig. 8: Ref. 3974. The confidence 
of a smoothly functioning perpetual 
calendar, and the pleasure of 
hearing the time, combined in one 
of Patek Philippe’s most 
sophisticated wristwatches. 


fig. 9: Ref. 3939. 

A minute-repeater which 
is also a rated chrono- 
meter. A tourbillon device 
cancels out the effects 
ofgravil 









,gy^i 






PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 



Should you require information on any particular Patek Philippe 


'll* 


Watch, or even on watchmaking in general, ue umU be delighted to reply to your letter of enquiry. And if you tend US your card 
of our publications. PatekPhilipfre. 4 1 rue Ju Rho ne. 1204 Geneva. Switzerland. Tel. ±41 22/310 03 66. 






















/ 






| a ' p - Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. MAY 16. 1994 


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By Clyde Haberman 

,Vfn- York Times Service 

AUJA. West Bank — U did not 
take long for the start of Palestin- 
ian sdf-nde to stand reality cm its 
head in a few basic ways for the 
people of Jericho and the Gaza 
Strip. 

Taisir Jarhoud, a young banana 
: grower here, noticed it over the 
weekend when he got into his car 
and left Aiija for Jericho. S kilome- 
ters (5 miles) south. For the first 
time in the Israeli cccupation that 
began in 1967. six years before he 
was born. Mr. Jarhoud discovered 
at an army checkpoint that Pales- 
tinians had certain advantages over 
Israelis. 

Not surprisingly, he liked the 
change. 

Auja. with mud houses and a few 
thousand people, lies in the north- 
ern sector of a crane-shaped area of 


62 square kilofneters (24 square 
miles) that forms the newly autono- 
mous Jericho district. Jericho, the 
town and the heart of this district, 
is a sunbaked outpost often de- 
scribed with adjectives like sleepy, 
tranquil, placid and dusty. It is 
enough to capture the feel of Auja 
to say that, by comparison, Jericho 
looks like Paris. 

Route 90. the main highway, 
makes it a short ride from Auja to 
Jericho. Bui the looping shape of 
the autonomous district requires 
the traveler to pass in and out of 
territories still under Israeli con- 
trol. and that means having to 
pause at two new army check- 
points. 

At one of them, the going was 
slow on Sunday. But at the other, 
Mr. Jarhoud found that with his 
blue license plates, reserved for 
West Bank Palestinians, he could 


: The Tough Moderate 


Continued from Page 1 


struing federal statutes and the 
constitution. Judge Breyer. too. has 
shown similar tendencies in his 14 
years on the appeals court. He was 
appointed to that post by President 
Jimmy Carter. 

Associates say his policy back- 
ground and liberal inclination will 
lead him to side more often with 
individual rights over government 
interests than current justices. Mr. 
Kennedy, for whom he served as 
chief counsel in 1979-80. when the 
senator headed the judicial’ com- 
mittee. said Judge Breyer looks to 
the law's “impact on the lives of 
real people." 

But it is in economic regulation, 
not individual rights and liberties, 
that Judge Breyer has a concrete 
record. 

As a special counsel for the judi- 
ciary committee’s administrative 
practices subcommittee in the mid- 
1970s, he helped draft massive leg- 
islation that led to the deregulation 
of the airline industry. 

“He has an extraordinarily keen 
sense of how regulatory issues af- 
fect individuals, who might need 
protection, balanced by what the 
burden on business would be." said 
David 0. BickerL on authority in 
administrative law and a former 
law clerk to Chief Justice Warren 
E. Burger. 

“He is a cut above most of the 
others, capable of going beyond 
where mere mortal lawyers go,” 
Mr. Bickert said. 


.Airline deregulation unleashed a 
flurry of new airlines, bankruptcies 
of old airlines and fare fluctuations 
that still are the subject of debate. 
But there is a consensus that con- 
sumers have benefited from dereg- 
ulation. 


Judge Breyer was an original 


«r --T. 

III 


member or the U.S. Sentencing 
Commission, which drafted prison- 
sentence guidelines for convicted 
criminals. Critics say the guidelines 
wrongly deprive judges of the 
chance to consider an individual's 
situation and often lead 10 harsh 
sentences for first-time offenders. 
Yet Judge Breyer generally has es- 
caped any of that complaint. He is 
praised for trying to reconcile ex- 
tremes in prison sentences. 

The one great complaint about 
Mr. Clinton's choice came from the 
consumer activist Ralph Nader, 
who called Judge Breyer “the cor- 
porate candidate for the Supreme 
Court” who “has the admiration of 
Orrin Hatch, Robert Bork and big- 
business lawyer Lloyd Cutler." 

Sensitive to the cost to business 
in government regulation. Judge 
Breyer also has argued that the gov- 
ernment spends a lot of money 
overresponding to health risks that 
it may not understand or have 
prioritized. 


JAPAN: 

No More Secrecy 


Continued from Page 1 

ment advisory board that has been 
discussing how to pry open the lid 
of secrecy have not been disclosed. 

The case or the Odakyu train line 
reconstruction is one of dozens that 
various groups have fought in re- 
cent years, so far with mixed suc- 
cess, but with growing vigor. 

The focus of the current battle is 
passage of a national freedom of 
information law. patterned after 
the American siaiuie. There are 
dozens of such laws at the local 
level in Japan: that is how the 
Kyodo residents won their suit. But 
the best guarantee of free access 
would be a national law. advocates 


Pro- Islamic Protesters 
Block Pakistan Roads 


77 ir Associated Press 

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — Up to 
30.000 demonstrators blocked 
roads on Sunday outside Mala- 
kand, in northwestern Pakistan, to 
demand the introduction of Islamic 
law. witnesses said. 


The former government prom- 
ised to promote such a bill, but it 
was forced out of office before it 
could enact the legislation. The 
new minority government of Prime 
Minister Tsutomu Hata is weak, 
and its life may be short, but it has 
renewed the piedge. 

For civil servants, it is not so 
much a matter of following explicit 
rules as a culture of secrecy that is 
driven into them from the moment 
they join the bureaucracy. 

"As much as possible, you sim- 
ply don’t give out information to 
the public: that is the first princi- 
ple,” said Dr. Masao Miyamoto, a 
Health and Welfare Ministry bu- 
reaucrat 


The protesters have been staging 
peaceful demonstrations and stop- 


ping traffic since Thursday. They 
belong to Tehrik Nifaz Sharia Mo- 


belong to Tehrik Nifaz Sharia Mo- 
hammadi, a group that wants the 
Malakand region to adopt the strict 
legal code of Sharia, or Muslim 
law, as stated in the Koran. 


"When I entered the govern- 
ment." said Dr. Miyamoto, an 
American-trained psychiatrist, 
“one of the most important things I 
was told was: *We conirol the in- 
formation. When you give informa- 
tion to anybody, you are doing 
them a favor. They have no right to 
this information.' " 


i At Jericho Checkpoints, a Role 




zip by while Israelis, with their yel- 
low plates, had to line up to be 
questioned about where they were 
headed. 

It was a complete flipflop of 
what had prevailed before, and 
which still does elsewhere in the 
West Bank. Waiting at army check- 
points — it can take a few hours on 
really bad days — has long been a 
galling experience for many Pales- 
tinians. especially when they watch 
Israelis go by without so much a*. a 
howdy. 

It may be a cliche to talk about 
the wails of Jericho tumbling down, 
but on Sunday they did. 

Overnight, in Jericho's main 
square, a chain-link fence disap- 
peared outside a stone police na- 
tion that (he Israelis had aban- 
doned on Friday and left to the 
new Palestinian force, in Israeli 
hands, the station was a hated sym- 


bol for local Palestinians. The outer 

fence that jutted deep into the 

square —erected by Israeli soldiers : ? 

to protect themselves against bar- jpjf|eF ' 

rages of rocks and bottles — wa> an f&g? 

inescapable reminder of the occu- jp* 

pation. 

On Saturday, newly arrived Pal- 
estinian police officers walked the 
beat for awhile, asking people what 
they wanted done first. Almost in- 
variable the answer was: Get rid of 
Ihc fence. f !..]./. /■■ f 

And so it was done. Sunday, the *t 4' f f / 
fenceless square had a more airy ■'?' : 
less forbidding look, although it 
was soon hopelessly clogged with , 

cars as people came from all over 
ihe West Bank to gawk. 

At the police station, the new 
commander. Lieu tenant Colonel JT 
Mahmoud Zaki. said residents had » 
also wanted him to tear apart a j 

prison cell in the building, another 
symbol of the occupation. Bui that 4 
was asking too much, he decided. ta&BSKBvffif'Qk 
"We are not angels. We are hu- 
man beings.” he said. Ip 

As the Palestine Liberation Or- eT 
ganizaiion seeks foreign funds to I 
help make self-rule work, it has 5r> ■ 

concluded that its chairman. BJTT^ * 
Yasser Arafat, is a money-making l ifc • 

attraction. ~ «ra- • ' 

Mr. Arafat says he will go to •: ■?:** 
Jericho in June, and while the date 
and his travel arrangements are 


m 



/if 

On ®S® ht# 


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Bosnian 
to arrange ^ 
commanders: fop- 
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sitter a 

ing which V pdBtS 


and his travel arrangements are punrt ,v^™.-c vnin«-pn>M: 

vague, his arrival is shaping up as Palestinian policemen escorting a Jewish settler to a synagogue in Jericho on Sunday. 

an extravaganza of epic proper- r 

lions. Predictably, presj. and [elevi- — ■■■ ■- ■ ■ ■ — ' 


sion interest is intense, and the 
PLO has made it plain that journal- 
ists accompanying the chairman 
will have to pay for the privilege. 

Figures are left vague. But Pales- 
tinian officials drop hints that 
SI 0.000 or more might be expected. 
That would cover the costs of 
flights, airports fees, security, news 
conferences and other items, they 
say. They argue, correctly, that re- 
porters in the United Slates who 


J0MEA: 2 Senators Express Support for Sanctions 


Continued from Page 1 

would halt planning for high-level 
diplomatic negotiations aimed at 
resolving longstanding concerns 
about North Korea's nuclear pro- 
gram. 

Secretary of Defense William J. 
Perry had also warned that the pro- 


North Korea, an action that could how long they were in the reactor. 

mrn. 1 ■ ■ r** ! m >L a -wf tk« fi<*l 


cause the dispute to escalate into a 
military crisis. 


Figuring out the age of the fuel 
rods is critical to determining how 


Mr. Perrv's threat to seek UN «*»& plutonium North Korea 


sanctions reflected U.S. concern 
that, without adequate inspection 
of the fuePs withdrawal and careful 


might have derived from reactor 
fuel to make nuclear arms. 

The Clinton administration has 


travel with presidential candidates cedure would cause Washington to 


also pay handsome fees to cam- 
paign chests. 


seek UN Security Council backing 
for economic sanctions against 


storage of certain spen tfu drods, <*4 °? North Korea 

North Korea could effectively ruin » allow the inspection, not only to 


anv chance that the fud rods might ensure jhat the rods are kept intact 
eventually be sampled to determine *hey are sampled, but also to 


• Few Think Gonzales Will Serve Out Full Term 


Continued from Page 1 

questioned, but he has been widely 
criticized for not cracking down 
more strongly on government cor- 
ruption. 

But if the 52-year-old prime min- 
ister is still able to hang on to 
power, it is only thanks to the sup- 
port of the Catalan and Basque 
nationalist parties. Jordi Pujol, the 
leader of Catalonia’s Convergence 


daily in recent weeks Spanish 
newspapers have disclosed new 
cases of official corruption or re- 
vealed fresh details about scandals. 

Perhaps the most damaging case 
involves Mariano Rubio who. as 
head of the Bank of Spain between 
1984 and 1992. served as a crucial 
bridge between the government 
and the financial elite. 

But last month that same news- 


v ensure that more plutonium is not 

diverted to make additional nude- 
— ar weapons. 

„ U.S. officials say the fuel rods in 

rve Out hull Term ^ reactor contain enough plutoni- 
um for North Korea to complete 
The case that has most caught another four O' five nuclear weap- 
the public's attention involves Luis ons. The North Korean official Sat- 


Roldan. a Socialist of humble ori- urday disputed U.S. allegations 
gins who reputedly enriched him - that the plutonium might be diverl- 


self through kickbacks and illegal ed to such weapons, however, and 
real estate while heading the said the withdrawal process would 


65. 000- member CivQ Guard. 


Inf M”"do. published dem- 

and Union party who now holds menIS suggesting that Mr. Rubio 
the government s fate in his hands, u. 4 ve n » c«-r?r h^ntc ncn>iinis r*n- 


The scandal turned into a full- 
blown political crisis two weeks ago 
when, fearing imminent arrest, Mr. 


be recorded by cameras insulted 
by the UN at the reactor site. 

U.S. officials offered two alter- 
native explanations for North Ko- 
rea’s action. Under one thesis, it U 


ute government state m ms nanus. had kepl ^ rel accounts, en- 
has Mrned that h,s supporl is Hot gageJ insider lradins „ aded 
unvondiuonal. tuxes. Two weeks ago. Mr. Rubio 

\ eu Mr. Gonzalez v mom worry ^ his broker. Manuel dc la Con- 
has to be that the run of corruption c ha. the former head of the Madrid 
scandals has not ended. Almost Stock Exchanw. were a-rested. 


Roldan went into hiding. T lying to trying to conceal forever how much 
shield the government From deeper pfiuonium it accumulated for 


embarrassment interior Minister 
Antoni Asuncion, promptly re- 
signed. His predecessor. Jos6 Luis 
Corcuera Cuesta, who was respon- 
sible for the Civil Guard until last 
year, also resigned from Congress. 


plutonium it accumulated for 
weapons, so the material can be 
retained. Under the other thesis, it 
is only trying to keep inspectors at 
bay as a diplomatic ploy aimed at 
exacting further concessions from 
the United States. ■ . . . 


Foreign mMsters 
ed States, 

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on Friday in- 

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Shows Signs 

Weakening in 
Yemen Civil War 


Chris Hedges , , 

». ADf>i' v * r ""« -W? W-/™! 1- lhe Arab L We. 

t **A*QUU, Yemen - a rad, ° Mi d- Foreigners 

avi] war in vS? Z^t ^ .^cuaied last week from 

ffl.^hn.SSr'Sa 55 *"!** . 


against a southern 3 h Sa,ch 

landed bSforme arrny Cnn> 
idem, AliSafemE^^ 

second 4C5 ftm 
that the South i< i , e . are 5 >gns 
a sustaineH 1 « s , fa . ,len ng under 

i^ sk b > ^ ^ 

Ih 2“ LNynJl h« mourned a 

^^aX he ™'' 7 ^ 0 “" f 

-iaKESS 

P^dded y im „ d d” u i'Vuo P nh n 

Northern leaders say ihev are 
^gforafi.nalS^ 
against the port city, that is The 

YS*£ S r 0r o ,he ■"‘tan 

wS^T yandIhdr 

“Adeo wiU Tail within a week. 

a?r r ra, v* ^ °t 

wl!^ WeStmi diplomats who 
~ bul if 11 does faU 
there will be a massacre here. It 
appears^ the North is slowlv 
fiaimng. Senior southern gov'- 
enunent officials, despite offi- 
cmi pronouncements of vic- 
I°n«, are increasingly gloomy. 

For every kilometer the 
Nonh advances there are thou- 
sands of dead and wounded," 
one minister said. “The cost of 
this advance is heavy, and even 
if the North takes Aden it will 
not impose unity by force. The 
South will keep fighting." 

The South, with one-fifib of 
Yemen’s 13 nuUion people, has 
called for a general mobiliza- 
tion, sending streams of cars, 
trucks and taxis to the front 
with volunteers dressed in the 
traditional Yemeni skin, the 
fouta, and old assault rifles. 

The superiority of the south- 
ern air force, and tenacity of the 
20.000 troops, have so far kepi 

the northern army of 40,000 sol- 
diers at bay. The North has re- 
jected southern attempts to ar- 
range a cease-fire and open a 
dialogue. 

“The rebellious clique in the 
Yemen Socialist Party’s leader- 
ship bears responsibility for the 
flaring up of lhe military situa- 
tion,” Aodulaziz Abdulghani, a 
northern Presidential Council 
member, told a team of media- 


r ,9 nl >' the Russian. Cuban and 
t-nmesc consulates remain 
open. The war began on May 4 
tier months of feuding and 
skjrmishft between forces loyal 
*? President Saleh, a conserva- 
tive military leader, and those 
£no backed Vice President 
»aid. who ruled a Marxist 
&outh Yemen before the two 
coumries merged in 1990. 

The southern leaders com- 
plain of domination by the 
North. President Saleh, who has 
vowed to put Mr. Raid on trial, 
says the southern leadership has 
mounted a rebellion. Like most 
Civil wars this one has un- 
leashed hatreds and rivalries 
that may lake years io heal. 

The prize is Aden, once the 
British bridgehead to colonial 
India and now Yemen's second 
largest city and its economic 
capital. Hde, in the old presi- 
dential palace, Mr. Baid exhorts 
southerners in daily broadcasts. 
With electricity cut, or only 
available pan of the day. there 
has been a run on portable radi- 
os so people can keep up with 
the news. Adolescent boys as 
well as grizzled old men are be- 
ing ferried io the from lines 
around Aden. 

The volunteers have an Alt- 
47 slung from their shoulder 
and a wad of kbat. the leaf that 
many Yemenis chew to give 
them energy and blunt hunger, 
bulging from one of their 
cheeks. In the afternoons, when 
Yemenis gather in small groups ' 
to chew the leaf, there are usual- 
ly battlefield lulls. 

Neither side appears pre- 
pared for war. Communication 
is poor, leaving commanders 
wondering where units are and 
what they are doing. There is 
often little discipline. Soldiers 

S home and come back to 
Jjl 

But the mood in Aden re- 
mains defiant. The steady 
stream of bombastic communi- 
ques from Aden and San’a, de- 
signed to bolster morale rather 
than impart information, seem 
to have worked. 

“The North will never take 
the city," said Waited Zeen, 20. 
“Our army is doing well and the 
minute they need us we will all { 
go join them.'’ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 

Rwanda Blood Lust: Not Just Tribal 



By Keith B. Richburg 

Waihin$U*i Putt SertKt 

BYMUBA, Rwanda — AimabJe Kaheiuka 
survived because the killers thought he was 
already dead, They killed his wife and three of 
his four children in lhe school building where 
he and thousands of others in Kigali had sought 
safety from Rwanda’s tribal violence. Then 
they shot Mr. Kaberuka in the shoulder and left 
him to bleed to death amid the pile of corpses. 

“It was terrible." he said, “it was terrible." 
describing how he stayed for two days without 
food or water in a room littered with bodies, 
including those of his own family. “They said 
we are the Tutsi. They said we don't speak the 
same language or belong to the party of lhe 
president" 

Mr. Kaberuka. 42, and his surviving 6-vear- 
old son were rescued when rebel forces of the 
Tuist-led Rwandan Patriotic From arrived and 
seized that aimer of embattled Kigali, the 
Rwandan capital. Mr. Kaberuka and thou- 
sands of other wounded from the city then 
made their way to a makeshift hospital m this 
small rebel-held town in northern Rwanda, 
where the first thing they discovered was that 
when the rebels entered Kigali, they saved not 
only Tutsis but also members or the rival Hutu 
tribe as well. 

"It doesn't matter," Mr. Kaberuka said. 
Whoever is in danger, the rebel forces save him. 
As evidence, he introduced Lhe patient tying on 
the next cot in the crowded hospitaf room. 
Hassan Twizezimana, 22, is a Hutu, but he, too. 
fell prey to roving, militia death squads in his 
village outside Kigali. His crime was that he 
was not a member of the ruling political party, 
and for that the party's Imerahamwe militia- 
men hacked open the back of his head with a 
garden hoe. 

Mr. Twizezimana was left for dead in his 
home. lying on the floor next to the bodies or 
his father, his older brother and his brother's 
wife — all of whom had been hacked to death. 


He said that he. too. stayed put for several days 
and thought he would die. until the rebels 
arrived and brought him to Lhis haven. 

Since Rwanda exploded into violence on 
April 6 with the downing of President Juvenal 
Habyarimana's plant apparently in a rocket 
attack, the bloodletting has been portrayed 
largely as conflict between majority Hutu* an- 
gry over the demise of the Hutu president and 
Tutsis who were immediately blamed Tor hi> 
death. Indeed, the huge majority of the 200.000 
people believed killed have been Tutsis. singled 
out for extermination by Hutu militia groups 
backed by Hutu extremists in the army and the 
government. 

But thousands of Hums have also been vic- 
tims, massacred by those some death squads 
out of suspicion that they sympathized with the 
rebels or simply because they were not card- 

carrying members of Mr. Habyarimana's party. 

the National Republican Movement for De- 
mocracy and Development. Some Hutus are 
believed to have been killed because they re- 
fused to panidp3ie in the mob violence against 1 
Tutsis. and some may have been killed simply 
because they had narrow noses and long necks 
more characteristic of Tutsis. 

Rwandan human rights activists were singled 
out for slaughter, regardless of their tribe. 
Rwandan journalists, too, were killed, while 
Hutu politicians opposed to Mr. Habyari- 
m ana's autocratic rule were marked for exter- 
mination after the president's death. At least six 
cabinet ministers, including the prime minister, 
are believed to have been killed, along with the 
four top officials of the opposition Social Dem- 
ocratic Party and as many as 10 of 1 1 senior 
leaders of the Liberal Party. 

Under an April 1992 political agreement Mr. 
Hahyari mana was forced to bring four main 
opposition parties into a coalition government . 
breaking his party's two-decade monopoly on 
power. When his plane exploded, senior Hutu 
opposition figures were systematically hunted 


down by Presidential Guard units and militia 
bands. * 

Many opposition politicians who managed to 
survive" found refuge here in Byumba with the 
rebels. Marc Rugenera. the Hutu finance minis- 
ter and a Social Democrat, said he escaped by 
jumping over a wall and hiding at the home of a 
neighbor when militiamen came to kill him. 

The Rwandan Patriotic Front ha.s often been 
described as a Tutsi-dominated rebel move- 
ment. The from was formed by Tutsi refugees 
living in Uganda uho helped President Yoweri 
Museveni of Uganda seize power in the }480s. 
Then they turned southward and invaded 
Rwanda in 1990. 

But the rebels have always included Hums 
among their ruling “commissioners." and offi- 
cer at guerrilla headquarters in Mulindi insist 
that they do not ask a new recruit whether he is 
a Hutu or a Tutsi. Still, from leaders concede 
that the majority of their members are Tutsis. 

But five weeks of blood lust has broadened 
rebel support across tribal lines. Many Hutus 
now see the Rwandan Patriotic Front as the 
only force capable of restoring order and bring- 
ing a hah to the massacre. 

■ UN Agrees on Peace Plan 

Paul Lewis of The .Yew York Times reponed 
earlier from the United S aliens. Sen- York: 

Two weeks after the UN secretary-general. 
Burros Butros GhalL proposed sending troops 
to stop the slaughter in Rwanda, the Security 
Council has agreed on a plan to send an ali- 
African force to Rwanda to protect civilians 
and aid workers. 

The Council is expected tc> approve the plan 
on Monday after the Clinton administration 
receives assurances from the United Nations on 
how it will carry out the plan. 

But it still remains unclear whether African 
countries will be willing to contribute the 5.500 
troops required for the operation, with the 
necessan- vehicles and other heavy equipment. 




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A woman in Rutare, a Rwanda village flooded with 50,000 refugees. 


An Angolan City Tries to Live With Deadly Standoff 


By John Damton 

Nr * 1 York Times Senice 

KUITO, Angola — Angola's unending 
cavil war has many shifting front lines, but 
one of the most fixed and strangest runs 
smack down the middle of Main Street in 
this provincial capital. 

On one side are the rebel forces of the 
National Union for the Total Independence 
of Angola loyal to Jonas Savimbl sometimes 
only boys of 10 or 12. They are ragged in 
patchwork uniforms but at least marginally 
disciplined. Their commander is a baby- 
faced 35-year-old known as “Terrible" be- 
cause of his propensity for killing with a 
knife instead of a gun. 

On the other side are the government 
forces and almost all of the civilians, reduced 
by death and starvation to about 60,000. 
They are surrounded by rebels and mines 
and hemmed into a decimated area of about 
Z5 square kflometenr (1 square mile) where 
not a single building stands unscathed. 

On good days, the enemy soldiers talk to 
cadi other, joke and barter. Once, they even 
held a bicycle race down a strip of road in 
no- man's-land. 

On bad days, they kill each other. 


This usually happens when the govern- 
ment supplies its troops through airdrops. 
When the green parachutes float down and 
miss their targets and fall into contested 
areas, they become tempting spoils of war. 

“The problems are all because or the para- 
chutes," said Francisco Massota, the police 
chief. “People fight to get them. And when- 
ever that happens. UN1TA shells the town 
and hits civilians." 

The governor. Esievao Cassoma, sat 
across the room in a large armchair. The two 
men received visitors in a pink pastel colo- 
nial mansion where crystal chandeliers 
swayed in breezes blowing' through a big hole 
in the wall. 

“We can't stay like this much longer." the 
governor said. ‘*No firewood. No tomatoes. 
Everything having to cross checkpoints, UN- 
ITA must open up the road." 

Conditions are desperate. But beginning 
in October, the UN World Food Program 
began bringing in emergency aid. and now 
the almost daily flights keep the population 
alive, if not safe. 

The situation is not comparable io the 
horrors of a nine-month siege last year by 
UN TT A. During that period, 15.000 died. 


Survivors cut down all the trees and chopped 
up doorjambs and windows for firewood. 
Tney ripped up banana trees to devour the 
roots, ate dogs and cats, leaves and grass. 

Residents even organized food runs 
through enemy lines. Most of (hem were 
women. They' dashed through at night, 
searched fields filled with mines for cassava 
plants and ran back iha'mgh sniper fire. In 
lhe first foray, people say. 150 left but only 
90 made it back. 

“Life is very hard." said Conceito Bairos. 
who lives with three other families in three 
rooms in a blastcd-out building off the main 
street. “I have 1 1 children: 5 boys and 6 girls. 
The father’s gone, killed. I have to provide 
for them all myself.” 

She pointed to her left leg. swathed in 
bandages, and the wound from a sniper’s 
bullet when she went on a foraging expedi- 
tion. 

Kurto is the capital of Bie Province. Mr. 
Savimbi's birthplace, in the central high- 
lands. For years, it produced grain to feed 
the rest of Angola, but it is clear that the 
fertile plateau will be dependent on interna- 
tional handouts for a long time to come. 

With the rains just ended, the corn should 


be high. But it is stunted. Agricultural offi- 
cials say the problem is that there is no 
fertilizer or new seeds. And people cannot 
safely reach the fields to plant or harvest 
because of sniper fire and mines. 

UN workers estimate that there are from 
800 to 1,000 amputees here. When Kuito first 
opened up in October, foreign doctors set up 
a rudimentary operating room in a bank 
without walls and sometimes sawed off limbs 
without anesthesia. 

The two groups or soldiers, meanwhile, 
live cheek by jowl in an eerie state of war- 
peace. 

For Hans Peter Vikoler, a UN relief aide 
who lives here, it is by now second nature to 
negotiate with cigarettes and small talk 
through an array of checkpoints, some only 
of bracelet-thin strips of chain or strands of 
tape strong across the road. 

But for newcomers it is confusing. So 
many different patches belong to the differ- 
ent sides. The airport is in the hands of the 
government. But the only road into town is 
hdd by UNITA. Once in town, the territory 
you are in depends on which ride of the street 
you are on. 


More Bloodshed 
In South Africa 
After 12 Killed 

Reuters 

JOHANNESBURG — At least 
six people, including a soldier, were 
killed in South African township 
violence over the weekend, as 
bloodshed marred the new post- 
apartheid democracy. 

The killings followed the massa- 
cre of 12 people on Friday in To- 
koza township, east of Johannes- 
burg. which shattered relative 
peace since all-race elections last 
month. 

A soldier was killed after troops 
moved into Tokoza on Sunday to 
foBowup reports of unrest between 
supporters of the African National 
Congress and its rival, the Inkatha 
Freedom Party. 

Meanwhile, police said five peo- 
ple bad been lolled since Friday in 
the volatile KwaZulu-Natal region, 
the Zulu heartland where 10,000 
people have (Bed in a decade of 
factional fighting. 


BOOKS 



CHARLOTTE BRONTE: - 
A Passionate Life 

By Lyndall Gordon. 4J8 pages. 
£17.99. Chatto & Windus. 

Reviewed by . . - 

Katherine Knorr 

T here is an annoying double- 
standard in literary biography 
today. Heterosexual men are re- 
vealed for the cads we all knew 

them to be - as witness »p 
Larkin’s trashing by Ins onetime 
friend Andrew Motion. Women 
and gay men, on theother hand-get 

their reputations pohshed 

self-esteem posthumously 
Lyndall Gordon's biographyof 
Omtorte BroatB is a good book. 
SfirSouW be a better ooeif it 

aSSEEre 

gSts-SS 

5 J^ E £tfS 53 i , £ 

that Mrs. ^ as K „ er ^ them, or 
that in jbose pr^FwP access 

day*. The 

fact is, however, luding two 

Sf= e Sc’lO show Bronte as the 

bl °^ P .^ine that she is. 
feminist herome a step fur . 

Cordon ver y pas- 

ther, and underi^ ^ ^ nCe ds 

sionatc Brooke ^ Eyre" 

P oa ? vd knd Ksmws l“ M ° 

SaWng of * “j? ‘^'an 
We » ,omM --S adversity. sh' was 

foaof'^tiTiBtbiiacham- 

nol her own end 

pion 013**““ v 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Nikolas Becker, a Berlin law- 
yer, is reading *7/i Europe's Name: 
Germany ana the Divided Conti- 
nent” by Timothy Gallon Ash in 
German. 

“This is a very interesting book, 
with views from important politi- 
cians Eke WDJy Brandi and Egotr 
Bahr about Ostpolitik. There's also 
an interview with the former East 
German oomma&isi leader Erichl 
Honecker.” 

(Michael Kaiknbach, IHT) 



sisters' work, she became tremen- 
dously eradi te against all odds, and 
she spoke up for women at a time 
when it was neither easy nor fash- 
ionable, as it is today. 

“Jane Eyre,” her greatest cre- 
ation, is essentially a long exercise 
in wishful thinking winch, when 
Bronte wrote it and published it 
(under the name Currer Bell), 
shewed willful disregard for con- 
vention: Our tortured orphan, 
truth-teller and moral thinker, is 
finall y rewarded with a family, an 
inheritance and the man she loves 
(though damaged). It is romantic, 
occasionally didactic, and much 
more painted and personal than, 
say, “Oliver Twist, where good 
also triumphs ewer bad people who 
starve children. 

Bronte herself, and her sisters 
Emily and Anne, had their moment 
of triumph. As the BeDs. they were 
successful novelists, and Charlotte 
got considerable pleasure from 
playing games with her admirers. 
Some writes gu«sed (not surpris- 
ingly) that she was a woman, and 
although outrage was predictably 
expressed, "Jne 'w* j}° 
three editions before Brantfe nked. 

The Gothic story of the Bronte 
family is veil known. Patrick 
Bnjnty was Irish, and through w3j 
and education, raised his soaal 
stature and changed his name. He 


and his wife, Maria, had six chil- 
dren and settled in the gloomy 
town of Haworth, where be was 
curate for bfe. Mrs. B'ront£ died in 
1821. when Anne was not yet two, 
the first of many calamities to hit 
this unfortunate family. 

Bronte apparently could not 
bear the company of children, but 
as his own got older be did dote on 
his son, Branwell. The older girls 
were sent to a charity school for 
clergymen's daughters (Lowood in 
“Jane Eyre"), where they were 
weakened by inhuman treatment: 
Maria and Elizabeth died of tuber- 
culosis ai the ages of 1 1 and 10. 

Braxrwell produced nothing of 
worth and died of drink and drugs. 
EmBy and Anne, after publishing 
“Wnthermg Heights” (Emily J and 
“Agnes Grey” and “The Tenant of 
WOdfell Hall” (Anne) died in quick 
succession, also of tuberculosis. 
Charlotte remained alone with her 


choleric father, she wrote to friends 
and publishers from a haunted 
house. 

In June, 1854, she married her 
father’s curate after a long, compli- 
cated courtship. She was happy 
with Arthur Beil Nicbolls, it seems, 
but she died, probably pregnant, 
probably of a contagious disease, in 
March, 1855. Nicholls destroyed 
many of her letters, and she had 
probably already hidden or de- 
stroyed others. 

Gordon is too smart to fall into 
the (rap of writing a feminist trea- 
tise, and this is an interesting and 
highly readable book, even for 
those who have read previous biog- 
raphies. Gordon is at her best when 
pursuing her theme through Char- 
lotte's infatuations, notably with 
Constantin Heger. her teacher at 
the Pensionnai Heger in Brussels 
and her intellectual mentor; and 
George Smith, her publisher. 

Gordon is reaching, however, 
when she makes the suffering of 
Chariotte Bronte, Mary Wolistone- 
craft, Virginia Woolf and Sylvia 
Plath (women who probably would 
not have bad much to say to one 
another) all a continuum. 

And why all the back and forth 
about whether Chariotte really was 
“plain," as contemporaries said she 
was? Why the surprise at Char- 
lotte's giving up her life as an inde- 
pendent artist, to gel married? Ni- 1 
cholls courted her assiduously, 
almost madly. Sometimes it works. 
Reader, she did. 

International Herald Tribune 


BRIDGE 

By Alan Truscott the i 


jp OUR Ufi feil 

gl pgtAT BRO WN 

l^. easier to subscribe 

-s never 


and 0 800 89 5965 


■rfr- 


O N the diagramed deal, played 
in the New York Winter Re- 
gional Championships, Martin 
Flasher brought home an “impos- 
sible” three no-trump contract by 
skfllfnl play. 

As South, he might well have 
□uit when the bidding reached 
three hearts, a contract that would 
have made exactly. However, be 
gambled with three no-trump, and 
West led Lhe diamond deuce, a card 
that he eventually regretted play- 
ing. 

East's vulnerable double of one 
spade, after an original pass, 
strongly suggested a singleton, 
probably in neans. After winning 
the first trick in dummy with the 
diamond quest. South did not fan- 
cy his chances. He finessed the dub 
nine successfully and followed with 
the dub king. East hdd up his ace, 
an error, and Sooth thought mat- 
ters over. 

He decided that the only heart 
holding that would justify the dou- 
ble and give the contract a chance 
was a singleton queen. So that at 
the fourth trick Flasher made the 
remarkable play of a small heart 
from iris hand. 

As hoped. East produced the 
queen, and now had the last chance 


for the defense. He led a diamond, 
and West took three Lricks in that 
suit. But that was the end of the 
defense: South scored two club 
tricks, a diamond trick, a spade 
trick and five heart tricks. 

East was left to regret that he had 
not taken the club ace at some 
point, and West bemoaned his 
opening lead. If he had led the 
diamond jack or ten. East would 
eventually have had a fourth-round 
entry and been able to casta bis club 
ace. 


NORTH (D) 

* A Q fi 4 

3*3 

OQ4 

4> Q 10 S 7 Z 

EAST 
*K JB3 
VQ 

0 9 8 5 3 
*A J53 
SOUTH 
472 

V AKJ634 
C* K76 
4K9 


WEST 
4 1085 
<7 10 8 7 2 
O A J 10 2 
*64 


East and west were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

North East South West 

Pass Pass 1 9 Pass- 

14 DM. 2t> Pass 

3 9 Pass a N.T. Pass 

Pass Pass 

West led the diamond two. 


The card 
that speaks your 
lanffuaee. 


... K <€*fa 





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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL 




pi'Ki isiiku with THh MK.n iurk times and hif. " vsiiim.ton piwt 


I, 

jfo: h 


A Crucial Time for Bosnia 


:* la 1 J 


ip 1 
ik | 

sfc 1? ' ' 

IP's!* I 


On one crucial point, the French are being 
prudent: They see the present moment in 
Bosnia as one in which either peace will be 
seized or the war will go on and probably 
expand. That judgment is the basis of their 
attempt to exploit ihe new diplomatic collec- 
tivity of the United States, Russia and Europe 
and to unite the three behind an urgent quest 
for a compromise peace settlement. This is 
what was done at Geneva Iasi week. 

The Bosnian Muslims are resisting. They 
are acquiring new arras from Iran and else- 
where and profitably making up with their 
erstwhile Croatian Foes. Tbev are being en- 
couraged to stiffen their policy by interna- 
tional political trends: by NATO’s first air 
strikes to protect UN-designated “safe areas" 
and by the U.S. Senate's vote last week order- 
ing the president to break the UN arms em- 
bargo — a vole that, incidentally, undercuts 
any criticism of revolutionary fundamentajisl 
Iran for embargo-busting. Sensing a gathering 
support or indulgence for a military come- 
back, the Muslims are becoming more asser- 
tive and expansive about their political aims. 

The Clinton ad minis tration is alert to the 
range of likely consequences of a wider war. 
especially one brought on by a breach of the 
arms embargo benefiting Bosnian Muslims: 
withdrawal of French and other peacekeepers 


(there are no American peacekeepers in Bos- 
nia), a split between the United States and 
Europe, the onset of Russian arms shipments 
to Bosnian Serbs, new risks in Krajina and 
Kosovo, disruption of Bosnian relief, further 
large refugee flows, the spillover on American 
global interests of American embargo-busting 
in Bosnia. But as the Senate vote and the 
whole American debate demonstrate, the 
Clinton administration is under heavy pres- 
sure. and understandably so, to enable the 
long-suffering Bosnian Muslims to make their 
own choices on whether they want to stop 
fighting and lalk now with the haled Serbs or 
fight on and lalk later. 

So severe are the possible consequences of 
an alternative that the United Stales could 
not have failed to join Europe and Russia to 
lest what opportunity may exist to settle 
Bosnia down now. There are real disputes 
over the percentage and quality or territory 
that go to each Bosnian party, but these 
disputes and some others lend themselves to 
bargaining. The Serbs alone still struggle 
under richly earned United Nations eco- 
nomic sanctions. With its new confidence 
and international favor, the Bosnian govern- 
ment has never been in a better bargaining 
position in its short and miserable life. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Europe’s New Frontiers 


’•sir* ? 

ts 1 i 


if: i 

■fe k ' I 


In an important vote the other day. the 
European Parliament opened the way to ad- 
mitting Austria. Sweden. Finland and Nor- 
way to the European Union. Thus, what be- 
gan in 1957 as a six-member common market 
can by next year grow into a European Union 
with 16 members and 370 milli on inhabitants. 

That would open frontiers for free move- 
ment of people and goods from the Adriatic to 
the Arctic Circle, from the Hebrides to the 
gates of Russia. Americans are only beginning 
to catch up with what this may imply. 

It was widely predicted that the vote in the 
517-seat Parliament in Strasbourg would be 
dose. In fact, it was a blowout: In ihe first of 
four voles, Norway was approved with 37*1 in 
favor, only 24 against and 58 abstentions: 
the approval margins were about the same for 
all other applicants. This bodes well for the 
next hurdles, four national referendum*, be- 
ginning in Austria on June 12 and concluding 
in Norway on Nov. 26. 

Polls show strong support for Austrian ap- 
proval, and Finland, worried about its un- 
steady Russian neighbor, is expected to follow 
suit. Swedes are undecided, and the prickly 
Norwegians, who have quarreled with Europe 
over fishing rights, may again vote down 
membership, as Lhey did in 1972. But in light 
of the Strasbourg vote, it is also possible that 
momentum and enthusiasm may build, earn- 


ing the day for a 16-state Europe. 
This would be more than a con 


This would be more than a common mar- 
ket All citizens in the Union would elect 
representatives to a Parliament with limited 
but real legislative powers. .All would share 
benefits land some of the constraints) of an 
interconnected monetary system. All member 


slates have votes, proportionate to their size, 
in a Council of Ministers that has final au- 
thority oo common legislation and that can 
speak for the Union on foreign policy. 

But moves to greater integration, embodied 

in the 1991 Maastricht treaty, have collided 
with popular fears of coding too much power to 
bureaucrats in Brussels. The unification of Ger- 
many increased Germany’s population by a 
thini upsetting the old equilibrium with 
France and Britain, stirring fears of too much 
German influence in a too-united Europe. 

There are. nonetheless, sound reasons why 
present members wouid like to broaden the 
Union by admitting Austria and the Nordic 
trio. The average per capita income of the four 
countries is 40 percent higher than the Euro- 
pean Union average, so the newcomers will be 
nei contributors to compensatory funds for 
poorer regions and subsidized fanners. 

Enlargement can restore sorely missed vi- 
tality to the campaign for European unity and 
prepare the way for membership of four new 
candidates: Poland. Hungary. Slovakia and 
the Czech Republic. 

Europe's self-confidence has skidded as its 
unpopular governments contend with stag- 
nant economies. .And long-buried nightmares 
were rerived by Europe's inability to stop the 
ethnic slaughter in former Yugoslavia. 

In this fallow season for Europe, suddenly 
there is something to cheer about. The over- 
whelming parliamentary vote is good news for 
those who believe in open frontiers, free mar- 
kets and democratic institutions. If for the 
moment. Europe's political union cannot 
deepen, at least it might continue to widen. 

— THE HE w YORK TIMES. 


Labor’s Loss, and Britain’s 


Only a week ago. John Smith, leader of 
Britain's Labor Party, was savoring his parly’s 
successes in local elections at the expense of the 
tottering Conservatives. After four straight de- 
feats in national elections, Mr. Smith's Labor- 
ites seemed finally headed for victory. 

But cruelly. Mir. Smith, at the age of only 
55, suffered a fatal heart attack Thursday. He 
has no obvious successor as opposition leader. 
British democracy is the loser. 

On form, it would seem Lhat even a medio- 
cre rival could beat Prime Minister John Ma- 
jor, whose dismal approval ratings are the 
lowest since such polls began. Not only is Lhe 
long-ruling party badly divided, but a succes- 
sion of sex scandals has made Mr. Major and 
his slogan. “Back to Basics,” the focus of 
ridicule. Hardly a day passes without hostile 
outbursts and rumors of plots against the 
prime minister, all gleefully reported in an 
otherwise pro-Conservalive press. 

Yet experience cautions againsl counting 
him out. As prime minister he has a vital 
prerogative: He can call an election at any Lime 
until May 1997, when the parliamentary term 
ends. And the very blandness of his character 
can sometimes work to bis advantage. 

He was elected party leader precisely be- 
cause he was unlike his domineering predeces- 
sor. Margaret Thatcher. In 1992. confounding 
polls and precedent, Mr. Major led his party 


to victory, in good part because he was unlike 
his opponenL the cocksure Neil Kinnock. 
whose defeat caused Laborites to turn to Mr. 
Smith, a solid Scotsman. 

As leader of the opposition to Mr. Major. 
Mr. Smith was a skilled unifier and fluent 
debater who even looked like a prime minister. 

Whoever is chosen as his successor among a 
half-dozen contenders will inherit an abiding 
conflict between “modernizers,” who would 
scuttle ideology, and “old Labor" sectarians. 

Mr. Smith had moved slowly on this front, 
and had yet to put together a credible alterna- 
tive to policies he assailed. 

The party needs to come up with a plausible 
economic and social program to forestall a 
draining away or protest votes to Britain's 
third party, the liberal Democrats, led by 
Paddy Ashdown. A surprise in last week's 
local elections was the surge to the Lib-Dems, 
whose candidates won 27 percent of the vote, 
putting Conservatives in third place, com- 
pared with 42 percent for Labor. 

Meantime, a kamikaze spirit seems to have 
infected Mr. Major's Conservatives. Remov- 
ing him as prime minister will not help that 
much if the party continues to slash at its own 
vitals. Now. lamentably, following Mr. 
Smith’s death the Labor Party too may plunge 
into the same demoralizing fog, 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 

No Jokes, Please, We're British 10 be J hu J rno 

it a nrnnfKp/1 unw 


From January, a new code cf practice for 
tobacco advertising will ban. among other 
things, any humor in the promotion of ciga- 
rettes. This is the first time, so far as we 
know, that any British government has 
tried to stop something on the stated 
grounds that it is funny. We wonder how 
such a decision will be enforced. Since ihe 
people bringing it in are proved, by their 


action, to be humorless, how will they know 
if a proposed advertisement is funny? They 
will probably lei all sorts of good jokes slip 
through and then ban the jokes, in a rage, 
when others have pointed out that they 
failed to "get" them. Tobacco advertise- 
ments will become more subtly winy, and 
therefore more alluring, than ever. The new 
code of practice would make one laugh, if it 
did not make one weep. 

— The Sunday Telegraph (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

FSTABUSHED /.W 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
C. i.'Vi.finK.-'i 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A One/ £»« utiir 
iOHN VINOCL ! R.£h.Wnvfi**ir A l arftraAw 

• lit ALTER WELLS. ,W Gfir, * • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR uixl 
CHARMiS \irrCHELMORE.LIeptfi hJihn* CARL ULWIRTZ. ,-tw.A.A4ic ELit/r 

■ ROBERT J. DONAHUE. EtHhinn 111? EJiL-mi! Pdycs •JONATHAN GAGE. Btauusx and Fstancv Edarir 

• RENE BONDY. /Aywn Pid'k'her • JAMES MCLEOD. .\divrtitmt; fMm*w 
•JUANITA I.CASPARU»a iLibmlneiitinieiarhn-.ii'r* ROBERT FARRE . ClKtJOkei Dim**, Europe 

Dinvunrde Li hddkWht v Ru'liinll). ij/nnrvy 
IVrriin^AJ^ h PiJ<lindaie Kathimr P. lJurmr 


; Irumudorul HeroU Tribune. 1X1 Avenue >12521 NonBv-««*Snic. Frame 

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MONDAY . MAV 16. 1994 

M H I O ^ 


i p a 


> .-'to-jt r.-: -- 






koFWSTiOTY 










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r Nou\ knock that off j down there, or I'm going to have to do something drastic! 


A Bmmsm 'Palestine’? Iran Muddies the Waters 


W ASHINGTON — News of Iran’s open deliv- 
ers' of a planeload of mihlan materiel to 


w cry of a planeload of military materiel to 
Bosnian Muslims last week is a stunning reminder 
of Iran’s persistence in seeking to champion the 
cause of Muslims on a global basis. THE'- delivery, 
both in symbolism and timing, is a coup for Iranian 
radicals, who have not onl> advanced Iran's own 
position in international Islamic politics but have 
placed the United States in an awkward position 
where, as rhe Ayatollah Kiiomeini used to sa\. 
“America cannot do one damned thing.” 

Other Muslim states, notably Pakistan. EgypL 
Saudi Arabia and Turkey, as well as the Organiza- 
tion of the Islamic Conference, have Iona urged 
that the arms embargo on the Bosnian Muslims be 
lifted, at least to allow them to defend themselves. 

Many Muslim states ha’ e sent humanitarian aid. 
But Iran has been the mu*: v.xiferous and active 
force in trying to get war materiel through, starting 
with the arms shipment from Iran in 19°2 impound- 
ed at U.S. request in Croatia. Iran’s actions have 
upstaged more cautious Muriim states. like Turkey, 
that are trying to play hy the international rales. 

The irony is tiiat nun’, statesmen in Europe and 
the United States have had private doubts about 
the wisdom of creating a Bosnian Muslim state In 
Ihe Balkans, precisely because that state could be 
seen as a foot in the door for Muslim power in 
Europe, or even, xs some might allege, a potential 
base for radical Warn to play a destabilizing role in 
Europe. Better to choke off the prospect for such a 
stale now. the rationale goes. 

Yet, the very one-sided and di*.proporiionate 
suffering of the Bosnian Muslim** may he the issue 
lhat will guarantee ihe e\->:envc of rich •h.ii lor 
Muslim radt.aiisni in the Balkans it: the future. 


Bv Graham Fuiler 


There has never been an effort in the past by 
Bosnian Muslims to have their own state — until 
the current conflict which has powerfully polar- 
ized issues along religious lines. Now we witness 
the emergence of a nascent Bosnian Muslim “na- 
tional consciousness." bom of suffering and dis- 
crimination and supported by an international 
Muslim community. Even moderate Muslims have 
nagging suspicions that rhe West is determined 
never to allow real Muslim power to emerge any- 
where. especially in the hear: of Europe. And if 
Muslims even in Europe are denied basic protec- 
tion. they may feel, then are we really seeing the 
persistence of the Crusader mentality ? 

There may now be a new “nationality" perma- 
nently on the scene in Termer Yugoslavia, insisting 
on its fundamental rights to safety and self-de- 
fense. Remember that the Palestinians never 
thought of themselves as j “separate people” with 
a right to statehood, until the confrontation with 
Jewish settlers From Europe bearing the Zionist 
ideal began earlier in this century. 

Harsh conditions create new national psycholo- 
gies and retroactive national myths. Thanks to 
Serbian excesses. Bosnian Muslims are probably in 
the process of acquiring a Muslim identity that was 
only weakly present in the past. The Bosnian 
Muslim dilemma is not likely to be solved anytime 
soon. A settlement seen by Muslims as unjust 
could well feed a decades-long guerrilla struggle 
for rights and land —one that outd even spill oyer 
into terrorism in Europe a.* a means of getting 
attention: a second “Palestinian" cause. 


UN resolutions and for upsetting a delicate process 
inching its wav to resolution. But that is not the case. 


in ching hs way to resolution. But that is not the case. 
The Ir anians have moved when policymakers are at 
wit's end. and the US. Senate has urged President 
BiH Clinton to lift the arms embargo against the 
Bosnian Muslims — unilaterally if need be. What 
position can be taken against Iran in such a setting? 

The ultimate irony is that it may now be Iran's 
action that will force the U.S. hand and make it go 
the unilateral route. Iran wQl have crystallized the 
agenda. The issue is no longer bow to keep the 
Iranians out of the Balkans — by discouraging the 
creation of a Muslim state there — but how to avoid 
a second Palestine. A desperate and besieged Mus- 
lim population in Bosnia may find dial one of its 
biggest patrons could be Iran. 

Is the international community about to deliver 
over to Iran a potential monopoly on embargo- 
busting, while ally Turkey, which has patiently 
tried to work through NATO and other interna- 
tional mechanisms to help the Bosnian Muslims, 
will have been upstaged? 

Multilateral action undoubtedly must be the 
wave of the future in international politics. But as 
we work toward lhat ideal, geopolitical realities are 
imposing themselves, threatening the creation of a 
broader “clash of civilizations” in the Balkans. 
That dash does not have to be. 


The writer, who was for mam • years the senior 
otfiaal responsiNe for long-range forecasting at the 
CIA. is a senior political scientist at the Rand Carp. 
He contributed this comment to The Washington Post 


n ' 


H’OTi 


7 i Reward Crntr®?, Tighten the Embargo 


G UTTENSEEG. New j.-r.-c; - 
Since the Unit’d Stales iiited 


Bv Vicente Echerri 


the trade embargo against Vietnam, 
many influential people have called 
for a’ similar relaxation toward Cuba. 

A bill calling for an end to sanc- 
tions, sponsored by Representative 
Charles Rangel of New York, is un- 
der consideration in Congress. 

Critics of the embargo argue that it 
has failed to topple Fidel Castro and 
has imposed unbearable hardships 
on the Cuban people. 

It is up to the United States, they 
say. to take the first step and lift the 
sanctions against this unrepentant and 
Inner foe. Everyone will benefiL 

Yet 1 believe lhe embargo should 
not be lifted, but tightened. Most of 
us Cuban exiles — more than 90 
percent, according to a survey las: 
year by the National Marketing Re- 
search Corporation — hold this view . 

The embargo wili either induce the 
Cuban government to understand the 
need to make real changes or it will 
help to undermine the Castro regime 
and accelerate its end. 

The U.S. embargo is primarily a 
political, not an economic, weapon. 


The substantial subsidies Cuba re- 
ceived from the late Soviet Union for 
three decades and the access it has 


always had to the markets of many 
Western countries have made life 


trade sanctions much less effective 
than is generally believed. 

Last year, for example. Cuba trad- 
ed extensively with Canada, import- 
ing 5133 milli on worth of industrial 
and farm goods and exporting 5171 
million worth of minerals, tobacco 
and fish, among other products. 

And it conducted SI 50 million in 
transactions with Mexico, including a 
joint venture in telecommunications. 

The U.S. embargo has been politi- 
cally effective, however, because for 
34 years it has underscored the illegit- 
imate nature of Mr. Castro’s rule. 

The trade sanctions have been a 
source of political instability for him 
and at the same time a gesture of 
solidarity toward the Cuban people. 

Lifting the sanctions now would 
give Mr. Castro a political reward for 
his stubbornness and send a discour- 
aging message to those who are proba- 


bly even now plotting to depose him. 

the miserable situation in Cuba 
results not so much from the U.S. 
embargo xi from Mr. Castro's ortho- 
dox devotion to Marxist-Leninisi 


policies, in which the laws of supply 
and demand do not applv and free 


and demand do not apply and free 
enterprise is considered a crime. 

These policies have an especially 
severe impact on small farmers, who 
are central to Cuba’s economy. 

Thus, the real embargo that needs 
to be lifted is that imposed by Mr. 
Castro and bis absurd rule. 

If the doors to a free market were 
opened in Cuba today — even with 
the U.S. embargo still in force — the 
desperate shortage of many basic 
items that people now suffer would 
be solved in short time. 

The end of trade sanctions, and 
even significant U.S. investment in 
Cuba, would not necessarily pro- 
duce real political change. The op- 
posite could happen because Presi- 
dent Castro could find himself in a 


would reinforce the people's servitude. 

We are often told that keeping the 
embargo in place could lead to an 
outbreak of violence and an uncon- 
trollable influx of refugees into the 
United States. I hope this will never 
happen. Yet such violence could be a 
lesser evil than the permanent de- 
basement of a nation. 

Finally, the campaign to end the 
American trade embargo is also a 
move directed against us, the com- 
munity of Cuban exiles, because a 
pragmatic arrangement between Fi- 
del Castro's Cuba and the United 
States would dramatically erode our 
political strength. 

This would frustrate our ambition 
to be pan of a democratic Cuba 
through authentic change. 

To lift the sanctions against Castro 
now would only favor him and those 
who are committed to his survival — 
as well as those who, attracted by 
cheap labor and easy profit, want to 
exploit my homeland. 


stronger position to pursue his “Chi- 
nese wav." in which American dollars 


Mr. Edierri is a Cuban writer living 
in the United States. He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


Haiti; When All Else Has Failed, Time to Invade 

TTT ASHINGTON — Haiti's mili- By John Kerry dSS mi'SSfora'S'* 

▼ t tarv rulers continue to thumb 


VV tary rulers continue to thumb 
their noses at the United States and 
the rest of the world. 

Since the ouster of President Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide in September 1991. 
the international community has 
tried to pressure the junta to step 
aside, but nothing has worked — not 
diplomacy, not tighter sanctions, not 
a partial naval embargo. 

By tolerating their defiance and 
unrelenting brutality, we have em- 
powered Haiti's military thugs. 

UJS. credibility is at stake. 

Haiti's military leaders must be put 
on notice that (he United Slates is 
prepared to take all steps necessary to 
restore democracy and prove to all 
renegade elements that Americans 
mean what they say. 

The Clinton administration needs 
to pursue an aggressive diplomatic 
course, to escalate sanctions and to 
impose a total naval blockade if nec- 
essary. But if those don't work, it 
must be willing to seek international 


The writer, a Democrat of Massachusetts, is a member 
of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. 


approval to use military force. 

My clear first choice fs to pursue an 
aggressive diplomatic course of 
lough, international negotiations de- 
signed to force the military leaders 
oul within a short time 


But precisely because there was no 
credible threat of force, prior U.S. 
efforts have failed. 

Opponent; of force argue lhat Fa- 
ther Aristide is so flawed "that he does 
not deserve U.S. help, that an inva- 
sion would be bloody and cosily and 
could involve the United States in a 
military quagmire. Bui the issue is 
not simply the return of an individ- 
ual. It is the restoration of the demo- 
cratic process in Haiti. 

Father .Aristide may not be perfect 
— what elected leader is? — but it 
makes no sense to discard whole de- 
mocracies because of one leader. He 
has demonstrated his willingness to 
compromise agreeing to share power 


with a broad-based coalition with 
safeguards for everyone's rights. 

There is every reason to think an 
international invasion would suc- 
ceed. Haiti's 7.000-man military is 
hardly a formidable opponenL h is 
an undisciplined collection of gun- 
wielding thugs with little training. 

In Iraq, U.S.-led forces decimated 
the world’s fifth -largest army in a 
couple of months. In Grenada and 
Panama, outlaw regimes were ousted 
in a matter of days. 

A show of determined resolve Trom 
a UjS.-led international force of pro- 
fessional soldiers, backed up with 
sufficient air power, could quickly 
subdue the Haitian military. 

Haitian history is filled with coup.-, 
and civil wars. There are deep-seated 
hatreds between the small, wealthy, 
ruling mulatto elite, which is in 
league with the military, and the 
poor, largely uneducated masses. 

That enmity is bom of decades of 
repressive rule and irresponsible so- 
cial policy. 

The prospect of a Victnam-like 
quagmire can be avoided by guaran- 
teeing at the outset that miliiary ac- 
tion will under no circumstances lead 
to a U.S. occupation or Haiti. 

Anv ini erven lion should he fol- 
lowed with the immediate insertion 
or a large international peacekeeping 
force at least through the next Hai- 
tian presidential election in Decem- 
ber 1995. The presence of a neutral, 
civilized power will allow Haiti to 
rebuild its political institutions, its 
schools and its health system, and 
provide some cooling-off lime for the 
hatreds to heal. 

This could be accomplished along 
the lines contemplated in the Julv 
1993 accord at Governor’s Island, 
which was supposed to have led to the 


return of the Aristide govemmenL 
Some will note lhat the last time 
U.S. troops went into Haiti, they 


stayed 19 years. But that invasion 
was in 1915 — an age of colonialism 


was in 1915 — an age of colonialism 
that has long since been repudiated. 

Now U.S. troops would be going to 
wrest Lhe nation from the grip of a tiny 
elite and return it to the vast majority 
of Haitians. The difference between 
occupation and liberation is dramatic. 

Some argue lhat intervening in 

Haiti is not worth Lhe loss of an 
American life. 1 disagree. 

American soldiers were at risk in 
Grenada. Panama and Iraq. Every 
reason given for those previous inter- 
ventions is present in the plural in 
Haiti — to protect innocent lives, to 
end chaos, to restore order, to root 
out drug traffickers. 

Mast important in Haiti. U.S.-led 
forces would be restoring a stolen 
democracy, human dignity and hope 
to a country's brutalized masses. 

In the absence of dear and present 
danger, the United Stales should not 


lure. But willingness to use force now 
does not mean that force wiU defi- 
nitely be used, unless diplomacy fails. 
But not signaling willingness now 
would significantly increase the 
probability that diplomacy will fail. 

Any intervention should use vast 
military power to minimize casualties 
and the time commitment. 

Once the coup leaders were ousted 
and the allied forces replaced by 
peacekeepers under the United Na- 
tions, the technical assistance and fi- 
nancial aid promised in the Gover- 
nor's Island accord should be 
expanded and undertaken to ensure 
the restoration of democracy. 

The people of Haiti need our help. 

The New York Times. 


s'*., v t ^ 


_ v v* * 


How 




• •; 1» ■ ; ’ 


UK-- 




By Joshua - ; 


Vt.--’ 




adnamstratian’s: 


paign pledge to taunhh. : 

Asia, when ihe Iron XSrtam^ 
lifted, we learaed&omud^jg 
Vaclav Havd and ootmikss oSgp 
of Eastern Eorcme that Radio, 
Europe and Radro Liberty had w 
more effective than had, b^ knd«m 
By providing listeners with a st^ •’ 
flow of uKtepeodenf i^oniaMw 
their countries, Jthesetstatioas wrafc. 


' • 

&?:: •; 

0-:V- 

Fuji- 

- .. 


dictatorship to plitia]isnL ^ : : ?7_ - 
In 1992, a presadmtid/conait •- 
sioual coratnisaon rec omm^iff^ ^ • 
tabUshing a radfc semde to da &e 
same kind of broatkasting ta'Ot^ 
and other repressive, societies fa- a^»v 
such as Vietnam 
Clinton, that a presKtaitial^ candi- 
date, endorsed the rect wtiiww&t^ ^ 
Last year.Tresid en t GKiUdn repeated , 
his support for-Radio Free As&Bqt 
so far, the idea has beof, slewed {w- 
bureaucratic and ' conSes^ocat 


m*"T, 


If the international community had a policy that 
was demonstrably effective in Bosnia, Iran could be 
singled out and nailed for its flagrant violation of 


The issne will now go tartheawwjp. 

alkms process, where die admKi- 
tion could still revwse itsdfamj sop-' 
port the full authorized mwwnt-ff- 
tbe appropriation is catbaiTo S10 
mflfion, it is likely the pngect^i 
never get off the ground. -> ^ • 
As a means' of promoting hianan ' 
rights and democracy^ Qwatf, R 
Free Aaa has important advantage 
over trade sanctions, the threat d 
whkiihassorofledChinese-Ajna&n r 
relations. The problem with sanctions 
is not that they make'tte^ Orinfise 
government angry, but ih&i\Qtbq's 
economic growth and Tweigh-cam- 
merce are engines of p teriga riffli,iQ 
it may be self-defeating to hbder 
them. And by retanfingnivateTxist- 
ness development, trade sanctions 
may weaken someQftfc vay efcaiQiti 
America hopes to strengthen.' -ft 
Radio Free Asia, bo the otter 
hand, will make Chinese rides jori as 
angry, but it contains no suck seff- 
da eating potential, and it does noth- 
ing but strengthen- those- toraica 
want to strengthen — mdepqndent- 
minded folks, both dissidents - and 
those inside the systentftV/ V.- 
There is a second reasonBatSoFiee 
Asia can be more fruitful that trade 
sanctions. With sanctkjn^ccpcKskjHS 
can be exacted, but onjyup tojwint. 
The regime knows 
much, it win cnrn^ WMstWotiy 
expect the leadership m 
operate in its own owertfa^ht,'^^; 

The hope for Qthu^mia^ 1 ^ 
that its aging Lamnst^o^i^' 3 ® 
change their ways- 
the empowerment of .Tpe heBig&rf 
mostly yoan^Orinesev^^kOTw 
s tra Led in Begum and ejsra&effl 
1989 and the naffions moire 
numerous party meqrfjere>*itota^ 
or actively saproorted theni 1 ' . 

Had Mr. umton libeady bundled 
Radio Free Asia, die issue nf raw- 
ing China’s most-fayarbd-natkm sta- 
tus might have been handled in alow 
key manner, without a visit by tte 
secretary of state, anif the. Uiw- 
minis tration might have settled lot 
some modest concessions. More- 
over, Beijing might have., been' KR 
eager to test U.S. mettle bad Aine£ 
ca shown the courage to -create >• 
radio despite China’s sharp protests. 
Fastidious readers of. 
men in Beijing were sm-uynobmo- 
ened to humiliate Secretary « State 
Warren Christopher by the wak- 
ness riuu has characterized 
ministration's foreign pcB^' iS 

president can strengthen his 
pressuring Congress to get T““ uJ 
Free Asia off the ground. ; 


The writer, a resident scholar tfdtf 
American Enterprise Institae, war 
member of the CommissioB on 
casting to the People's Jigwfe&fl 
na He contributed this aommnt tow* 
Los Angeles Times. 


Letters intended for 
should be addressed "hetunn^ 
Editor ** and contain the w®* 


signature, name ana ju b 
Letters should be brief and & 
subject to editing. We cannotin 
responsible for me retail jy 
tidied manuscripts. 


IN OUR PACES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Sailors Attacked 


PAWS — Three French sailors be- 
longing to the gunboat Vipfcre were 
recently attacked and roughly han- 


dled by natives in the streets of Bang- 
kok. During the time the Aspic was 


use force unilaterally. If needed, the 
' be similar 


force should be similar to the interna- 
tional one used in the Gulf War. 

It should consist of troops from (he 
“four friends” — the United Stales, 
France. Canada and Venezuela — 
and from other nations in the region. 

The military power should be mas- 
sive. to minimize casualties, and the 
intervention should be short. 

Granted, it wifi take leadership and 
persuasive power to build the coali- 
tion. But the United States succeeded 
in both regards- in Grenada. Panama 
and Iraq and there is no reason it 
cannot accomplish the same for Haiti. 

Some of those governments have 


ries now in the hands of ^ 

Bolshevists. The food ^ 

also become a serious prownn 
Admiral Koichat the more ii*« £ 
vances toward the west. 
suggested that, in spire °* —ft w* 

that the Kolchak GoventrwQi , 
not yet been reragnizeA sobfl^ 
pconomic aid should be girefl 31 
to him and his forces. 


on the station the men were refused not yet been recognized, sopsu^ 
shore leave, but when she was re- pconomic aid should be grren 31 
placed by the Viperc it was not to him and his forces, 
thought necessary to maintain such 

stringent regulations. The sailors. 1944: It’s Hiy Uni>oa*« 
who were perfectly sober and who _ , . __ tc ^ w-r York 
were linamwl wm fnr crimp rimp NAPLES — [From OUT N 


were unarmed, were for some time 
face to fac* with a threatening crowd 
and were more or less severely 
stabbed, while the Siamese police 
looked on without interfering. 


NAPLES — irrom w* aj 

edition:] A plea to break ?™ 11 j 
fjrohibiuomst naval tjamh<® 
pennit naval men to dra^^, 

ohnnnl Anwrinn chin! WAS 


1919: Aid for Kolchak? 


expressed reluctance to commit to a 
military Stiluiian hefnw. rhp mrrwnt 


military elution before ihe current 
diplomatic strategy has time to ma- 


PARIS — The progress of anti-Bol- 
shevist troops is watched with keen 
interest here, and the fact dial the 
Soviet Government now finds itself 
in an iron ring leads to the serious 
consideration of immediately supply- 
ing foodstuffs to the Russian lermo- 


newiiL inc aumuiu ^ 

unfavorable morale effect on 
on all alcoholic beverages 
American stamen. ^ 

crews also may fed somewhat 
erf British seamen, who get 
aboard drips operating m ^ 

waters with the American anPr^ 
raking part in the same cperenc (L 




fC- 

se': • 


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on its behalT from the White Host 
Now, the preisidenfs bodgei threat- = 
ens to kfll it off. . 

The White House. ; jirppafertn 
spend only S10 minion mi BaffioRtt 
Asia in 1995, abbot a third the 
amount that the comnriwKi eiairiiat- 
ed would be necessary and thar 
gross authcaized (all of which ,eo# 
come from cuts alreidy oid^ht 


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oilifop^lne f;^t. monev^:.- tiot -.the ;abo.ut.f||I 

CreMmjf-ite 

of c|tepves.eKM^ b^;:pteee:;,.ifef||Pout'. pfa||A||e 

s m i lllf §$• Craig Mejia vv, CEOtWIcCaw . GellulajfJis j 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. MAY 16, 1994- 


^ nca: For Once, History Offers Hope 

aN world sftH{«.«3 c ? 0 S K‘>U War - J M. 


Page 9 


■L ^ world, so ^Olc 

of barbarous eUinP’S? 1 !?!-? ,fK ' s, age 


« ^oarous ethnic .Vj'"' 61 ’ 1IR ' stage Heary Kissinger 

fGcts, has just wS d .J aLon;i1 »n- & 

Seeineraenw <5°? ho P ef »*l monS?^ ?™ ,n - g a ? ife ^tenee at hard labor; his 

^^.‘heAfricanNaiionalCon^ 

^Mo^ln 8 dS l e ^ 

sm !* *-® aa 


S "d"S? ei i °f Wha! «'Sun J', 0^’ 5 f^dc^asTteZu'i^riwffi'™ 

SSLfSJ™ 55*J0«niw.ConS£hI fi? n 6 i *5 S^emmem's olfer of a 

a baJaiS^J!^ etfiruc groups devisina fl0meland because he did not wish 10 
a Balance between central a ,J(~ cooperate with apartheid 

to®™-?, and the possible insCw Today ’ NeIson Majlde,a is president of 
ESP** «rfrant*is«i maiori^n?^' ? sovenunem of naUonal unitv in which 
aSS 1 Mr-de Klerk is a deputy pSSS 

^2?X?. can fear have the Wfflriif ^ Si*?® 5 P arty ’ dcs P i,e its belated par- 
“feat the hopeful pr«pec L An?J?L tS- ^ ,pabon ’ «« ^ election inTSs 
already sui^un t< ^l y ^.*J home province. Mr. Mandela has tran- 
of guarantee for the future. ^ d ^ nded a physical prison; Mr. de Klerk 
»cn years ago. Nelson Mand-i* Jas overcome a psychological one. Chief 
Mandela was Buthelezi, though he hasWsed a far 


shorter distance than lus compatnc 
does raise under the banner of federalism 
the key challenge 10 multiethnic societies: 
the relationship between central author* 
ity and local autonomy. 

South Africa encompasses more eth- 
nic groups than almost any other coun- 
try. And within (he African population, 
the Zulu leadership claims autonomy 
from the Xhosa-dominaied African 
National Congress, a federalism per- 
ceived by many in the ANC as the 
forerunner of secession and thus as a 
threat to national unity. 

Ethnic rivalries are complicated by 
what Mr. Mandela, in a television inter- 
view on May 6 . described as the tenden- 
cy of veterans of the ami-apartheid re- 
sistance to apply a definition of 
democracy relying on consensus and in- 
tolerant of opposition. 

Nor is prodivity to violence confined 


Sifting Through Today’s Success Stories 


y« h son,e ? f uie B y Ste P he «i 5. Roaenfeld 


capture the essence of wha ?*' 3 


Africa, and to a lesser but 


sun considerable extent in Israd and 
^ ^ bottle 

e ^ x, . r ,nt ° the disruptions 
toreii SP °r S which i burden American 
foreign policy in other locations? 


Having in mind a decent and public- 
ly supported ending point is what 
makes it possible for the parties to 
impari crucial intellectual and political 
discipline to their policies and their 
politics along the way. Having an end- 
ing point also offers a place of entry for 


The tnck U t*TVh , friendly practical intervention by out- 

what hrinos rtr ,n ^ cIear ly about side governments and agencies, 
wnat brings progress in some n\»r« !- 


and deniesTt mSfhS! tL 501116 places j- C o_ntrasI lh '“ posiiive“paiieni to the 
deniMtic^fJ?.. J_. r5 .' J!? ere ^ many d *5 array in respect to Haiti « and Bosnia. 


r »•* tiicicacnun 

SS™ 1 !' »»"*. they emerge iu 
^emhip i. 


fel JWitfnh AMwhSTa 


in 


high order, Israelis and Palesuniam 
the upper middle range. Timing can 
make the difference. Luck counts. 

But what matters most, I have come to 
think, is to have a broad legitimate con- 
sensus goal which, however difficult to 
a J““. 'would, if achieved, satisfy most 
of the key consti tuencies on all sides of a 
given question. The goal must have a 
grounding in political reality but at the 
same tune a link with a higher valued- 
laden vision. Otherwise it wVQ not attract 
the requisite approval high and low. 

The goal must also be something 
that, whatever its flaws, is arguably 
better than any feasible alternative. 
Otherwise the parties and Lheir friends 
may drift toward unfeasible alterna- 
tives. These usually involve the unbal- 


ln Haiti, the parties, including the 
elected president and the military thugs 
who won’t let him come home, are hope- 
lessly distant and disinclined to compro- 
mise. At one point there was an Ameri- 
can strategy Tor creating a political base 
that would bridge the gap but President 
Bill Clinton, under political fire, let it go. 
Whether he is commissioning his new 


man for Haiti to pick up the pieces of the 
suitable cos 


old strategy, with suitable cosmetic 
changes, or whether he has nailed him- 
self into a comer from which there is no 
escape except his own “Grenada” — an 
invasion meant to be quick and easy — 
is the question of the hour. 

In Bosnia, a similar dreadful zero- 
sum-game gap separates what the Serbs 
want from what the Muslims want, ter- 
ritorially and politically. The United 
States is being pressed by its European 


allies to do the heavy leaning, on both 
Serbs and Muslims, - that offers what 
faint chance there is at least to prevent 
the conflict from worsening. The Clin- 
ton team is resisting. It has token up a 
position in tentative emotional support 
of the Muslims but without either sign- 
ing on to their more ambitious goals (to 
restore something like Bosnia’s prewar 
status) or coming out unequivocally in 
favor of limiting them. 

In crises like Haiti and Bosnia where 
the prospects of domestic consensus 
seem so barren, the outsiders — if they 
are to be serious — must first decide 
whether the outcome is important 
enough to them to enter the lists and try 
to make a difference. Then they have to 
decide what particular outcome to sup- 
port and bow actually to support it. 

In both Haiti and Bosnia Lhe Clinton 
administration, against its initial incli- 
nation, has found itself pulled by polit- 
ical currents into the first stage' of en- 
gaging. But the administration has still 
not worked its way through the second 
stage of composing a coherent policy. 

In both places this is the right mo- 
ment to explore the portability — the 
capacity to be carried from the place of 
first use to another place of great need 
— of the consensus strategy followed 
in South Africa and the Middle East. 
Unless it’s too late. 

The Washington Past 


to one group. Inkaiha. the Zulu part', 
has a highly organized militia, and the 
militant wing of the white community 
has always rejected a multiracial solu- 
tion. Moreover, societies reared on the 
British parliamentary system find the 
concept of checks and balances alien. 
Even Mr. Mandela at one time ex- 
pressed perplexity — at fan in personal 
conversations — with regard to the con- 
cept of judicial review. 

South Africa is fortunate that these 
problems are being addressed by an ex- 
traordinary array of leaders. Nelson 
Mandela's career is the embodiment of 
endurance made possible by spiritual 
depth. As early as the ( ]9t4j speech in 
which he defended himself against the 
charge of treason — a truly moving 
document — Mr. Mandela affirmed his 
devotion to a multiracial society: “It is 
not true that the enfranchisement of all 
wilt result in racial domination. Political 
division based on color is entirely artifi- 
cial and when it disappears, so will the 
domination of one color group by an- 
other. The ANC has spent half a century 
fighting against racialism: when it tri- 
umphs, it will not change that policy.” 

Mr. Mandela has kept his word. Three 
decades of incarceration have left no 
visible residue of bitterness — certainly 
much less so than among some of his 
colleagues who spent the interval in ex- 
ile. Perhaps this is because, for the ex- 
iles. the memory of the struggle became 
the paramount 'experience and noi the 
realities of a multiracial society. 

The transformation of Mr. de Klerk is 
equally astonishing. Until he came to 
power, apartheid had reigned supreme 
for half a century — institutionalized, 
enshrined in law, and buttressed by not 
a few theological arguments. 

Like the demise of Soviet commu- 
nism, the end of apartheid occurred with 
a speed unimaginable even a decode 
earlier and with a relative minimum of 
violence. Philosophical idealism and 
practical insight forged a partnership 
between the imprisoned revolutionary 
and his jailer. By 1991. Mr. de KJerk 


could pronounce as an Afrikaner goal 
illegal: 


anced embrace of a principle like self- 

LearnFrom Tragedy, Buildon Triumph 


ing and no less worthy principle such 
as nationalism or self-detennination. 
And this is the formula for conflict. 

South Africa has bad a broad legiti- 
mate consensus goal, or more precisely 
its white minority finally came to such 
a goal after years of blindness tem- 
pered finally by bold introspection: 
South Africa decided to become a mul- 
tiracial democratic state. The Israelis 
and Palestinians, though they may not 
yet all grasp it, also have arrived at such 
a goal: to coexist as parallel states. 


K eeping Africa off the 

phy alone dictates that 


is going to get more difficult. Demogra- 
■e major powers take African developments into 
account For example, as of 1991, the population of sub-Saharan Africa was less than 
500 million, while the total population of all advanced industrial countries was about 
900 milHop. By 2025, this balance will change radically. The African population is 
projected to be more than 1 2 bfflioo, while the population of the advanced industrial 
countries wil] be 10 percent higher than what it is today. If Africa remains impover- 
ished and conflict-ridden, its troubles wil) inevitably be exported. 

Washington should begin a serious attempt to lean) from such tragedies as Rwanda 
and Somalia to head off impending tragedies in Kenya and Zaire, all the while 
smmgthemngaad building on the triumph represented by the South African election. 

— Midtael Clough, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. 

commenting in the Las Angeles Tima. 


what had only yesterday been 
“We want to make all South Africans 
proud; we want to build a South African 
nation in wiu'ch, yes, all the various 
composite parts can feel safe, in which 
there will be acceptance of joined and 
common goals ... A new vision for our 
country is crystallizing, a vision of jus- 
tice, fairness, equality and democracy” 
As an essentially tribal leader. Chief 
Buthelezi had less reason to change his 
position. His insistence on autonomy 
and some kind of federalist solution has 
remained constant. While the chief s 
tactics have often been intransigent and 
irritating, he deserves credit for raising a 
crucial challenge to South African de- 
mocracy: how to reconcile the rule of the 
majority with the rights of ethnic minor- 
ities. For so long as voting largely fol- 
lows ethnic or tribal lines, the minority 
can never hope to become a majority. 

At the same time, the ANC has reason 
for its concern that if the ethnic divi- 
sions are enshrined as sacrosanct, na- 
tional unity may remain elusive — the 


perennial nightmare of many new na- 
tions, especially in Africa. 

In overcoming its problems. South 
Africa has advantages which transcend 
personalities. In many developing coun- 
tries. the creation of the state follows 
independence. As a result, too frequent- 
ly political opposition is equated with 
treason. In South Africa, the legitimacy 
of the suite is well established -.'existing 
groupings have considerable experience 
in dealing with each other within a larger 
political framework. 

And while governments of national 
unity ore generally more useful in paper- 
ing over differences than in resolving 
them, the subtle interim institution cre- 
ated by Mr. Mandela and Mr. de KJerk 
— in which every party achieving a cer- 
tain percentage of the votes also 
achieves representation in the cabinet — 
creates a useful framework for the prac- 
tice of mutual cooperation in the crucial 


could not resolve was the issue of partic- 
ipation by Inkaiha in the election. Chief 
Buthelezi had asked for a delay: Mr. 
Mandela had rejected postponement. As 
mediators, we refused to address the 
issue on the ground that outsiders have 
no right to determine the date of a peo- 
ple's emancipation . Moreover, ill ere 
seemed no solution to (he election issue 
because, even if Chief Buthelezi had 


A moderate evolution here 
icould give hope to all of 
Africa and to every other 
region where men of good 
will seek to rescue cohesion 


early stages of power sharing. 
Fev 


r ew countries have as much to gain 
from a moderate evolution as does 
South Africa. It has vast resources, a 
well-established infrastructure, signifi- 
cant manufacturing base and a higher 
level of education than any of its neigh- 
bors — a level, moreover, which Mr. 
Mandela has pledged to improve rapid- 
ly. And the veiy multiplicity of its ethnic 
groupings provides a certain insurance 
against civil conflict For once Lhat Pan- 
dora's box is opened, (he consequences 
are ultimately unpredictable. 

This built-in incentive for moderation 
was brought home to me when Lord 
Carrington and 1 — together with ex- 
perts from five countries — were asked 
by Mr. Mandela and Chief Buthelezi in 
the month before the election to mediate 
the constitutional issues between the 
ANC and the inkatha (Zulu) parties for 
the five-year interim government 

We found lhat the constitutional is- 
sues for the interim period seemed capa- 
ble of fairly rapid resolution. What we 


from out of the hatreds 
history has spawned. 


changed his mind and decided to partic- 
ipate on the appointed date, there would 
□ot be enough time to prim the ballots. 

After Lhe mediators left, the prospect 
of dvO war produced m unexpected 
solution. Chid Buthelezi realizing that 
failure to participate in the election 
would deprive him of his political base, 
agreed to participate through the device 
of affixing stickers to the bottom of the 
existing ballots. For its part, the ANC 
chose compromise over the uncertainty 
of confrontation. As a result, the interim 
constitutional issues were settled along 
the lines the mediators had discussed 
separately with the parties — though 
federalism is certain to re-emerge as a 
principal bone of contention in the 
drafting of the final constitution. 

The elections seemed to confirm the 
trend toward moderation. Whether by 
p rearrangement or thanks to the good 
sense of voters participating for the first 


LATIN AMERICA 


A New Investment Partner 


Hear to Ri?np the Dividends of the Region s Economic Retrivtil 
LONDON • JUNE 9-10 • 1994 


June 9 


June 10 


CONSOLIDATING AND SPREADING THE BENEFITS OF 

ECONOMIC CHANGE IN THE REGION 

Enrique V Igleslas, President. inter-American Development Bank 

FUELLING FUTURE ECONOMIC GROWTH 
Eduardo Antnat. Finance Minister. Chile 
Fernando Cossio. Minister of Finance. Bolma 
JuJio Sosa, nnsnee Miniver, venau^la 


JUJIO Sosa, niwi's- 

turning the new investment enthusiasm into 

nrS ‘ BoSt °" L ‘ mited - LOnd °", 

£»«» *. Broek. General Marker. ING Bank international 

SOCIO-ECONOM.C HBTOBM .N ^TiN AMERICA: 

4 NEW SOCIAL AGENDA 

T0 H Rotes President. Solidarity Fund. Mexico- 

Executive Secretary. ECLAC. Santiago 

.^OVATiNGTO PROMOTE NEW FORMS OF 

« STJ3S* -don 

Sir « iCha t,NG ptlSvNCS .NTO FINANCING SOCAL 


REGIONAL AND SUB-REGIONAL INTEGRATION: 

AN ENGINE FOR GROWTH 
NAFTA 

Herminlo Blanco Mendoza, Under Secretary of International 
Commercial Negotiations. Mexico 
CENTRAL AMERICA 

Ana Ordonez de Molina, Finance Minister. Guatemala 
THE GROUP OF THREE 
Government Minister. Colombia 
THE ANDEAN REGION 

Enrique Garda, President. Andean Development Corporation 
MERCOSUR 

Jorge Herrera Vegas. Under Secretary. Economic Integration. 
Argentina 

SOUTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AREA 

Rubens Antonio Barbosa, Ambassador. Brazilian Embassy. London 
THE LINK WITH EUROPE 

Juan Prat. Director-General for North-South Relations. European 
Commission. Brussels 


CHANrvc.i-i-—'' 

NEEDS superintendent. Pension Fund Administrators. 

jalio Bnstamente. v 

unking Programme 

Hugo Varsky. ^ «miRE PROSPE< 


ROUNDTABLE: INVESTING IN MA)OR NEW 
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS 

Russell Herbert Managing Director, Global Gas. British Gas. London 
InaVl Santtflana, Chief Executive. Telefonica International, Madrid 


Hugo Varsky- n.-er- . FUTURE PROSPECTS 

Michael Brook. 

££ Equities. Klein*" Benson. I^ndon 

Bog er Palmer- D-tO-tor 




CONSOLIDATING THE GAINS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
FUTURE INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT 
ECUADOR 

Leonardo Stagg, Director. Ecuadorian National Finance 

Corporation 

PERU 

Jorge Carnet Minister of Economy 
URUGUAY 

Ignacio de Posadas, Minister of Economy 

■ InTtted. b«t cooflnaed 


" « d ’’ ““ 

P |. (44 71 >6*1 WIW _ _ Uo ,pi where a litmced 


Registration Form 


Teh (44 71 > *31 8000 Fa ** H ( where a limited number 


1 sTR ationJ^^ 


To register for the conference, please complete the form below 
and send it to: 

Fiona Cowan, International Herald Tribane, 63 Long Acre, 
London WG2E 9)H Teh (44 71) 836 4802 Fax: (44 7J) 836 0717 

. The conference fee is £650.00 *■ vat at 1 7.5* 

□ Pieow &raiar. 

Title .First name 


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time, the outcome is almost ideally suit- 
ed for reconciliation. 

The ANC achieved a preponderant 
vote that was nevertheless a Tew percent- 
age points short of the two-thirds need- 
ed to rewrite the interim constitution 
unilaterally; Mr. de Klerk's National 
Party transformed itself into a multira- 
cial entity (Lhough appealing mostly to 
Indians and nuxed-race “coloreds") and 
became the second larges! grouping, In- 
kaiha achieved about 10 percent of the 
vote and, surprisingly, a majority in Na- 
tal. assuring itself three seats in the na- 
tional cabinet and a political base. And 
Mr. Mandela has done his part in creat- 
ing a cabinet largely tilled toward mod- 
eration and inclusiveness. 

AU this is only a beginning. No one 
can foretell the outcome of power strug- 
gles between radicals and moderates m 
each political grouping: of the succes- 
sion to Mr. Mandela, on which so much 
depends; of the reaction of the white 
community to the inevitable modifica- 
tions of their social and economic sta- 
tus; or of the degree to which the hither- 
to disen franchised population may 
insist on economic gains beyond the 
country’s capacity. 

All one can say is that, in contrast to 
so many other pans of the world, there is 
reason to hope and cause for the maxi- 
mum moral and material support 

The industrial democracies can best 
help by encouraging private investment 
rather' than by go vemrnen t-to-govem - 
merit aid. And they must take care not to 
impose their own domestic experiences 
on the much more complex situation 
in South Africa. 

South Africa is not the place to test 
liturgies for either the radical left or the 
radical righL For a moderate evolution 
would give hope to aD of Africa and to 
every other region where men of good 
will 'seek to rescue cohesion from out of 
the hatreds history has spawned. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 




-uaiCsHll l 131 ' I _di ■ HUMS HIM 




wmm Page JO 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994- 


- Rating the Worlds Best Restaurants : 


SWITZERLAND 


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The following is on emtring Ust bf the i &fej? 
restaurants in the world and the 10 best asud 
restaurants, based on reporting so far. The Sb 
indudes reviews on Hong Kong, Tokyo, the Ifej. 
ed States, France, the Benelux canaries, Spain 
Britain and Switzerland With each report tkebt 

may change, as restaurants are re^vabkued eh a 

worldscale, and new conpetitim camaai btxtni 
The Top Tables . . V • ;; v^- ■- ; 

• No. 1: JoH Robucboa, 59 ATeoue Ray^ 
mwid-Poincart, Paris -1 6, let 47-27-}fty -T 

• No. 2; Restanraot Finedy GMetj 
iTYvcrdon, 1023 Crissier (5 lafcmetcas 
Switzerland,/^ (21) 634-0501 t ^y* 

• No. 3: Lai Oing Heen, The Regent SaEt- 
bury Road, Hong Kong; let 721-1211. . - 

• No. 4: Le Louis XV-Aba Daose, Ify^ 

de Paris, Place da Casino, Monte Carlo, Afoa. 
co. tel: 92-1&-30-0J. ’ . 

• No. S: Ki-Cho (KiteboX Choo-ku, Gina 1 - 

11-2, Hotel Seiyo (BI, basementLTcfcyAte/- 
3535-1177. • •''■■. y?. ■■ 

• No. fc Jiro, Cbuo-ko, Ginza 4-2-75, Taij- 
moto Sozan Building (Bl, basememVTokw. 
let 3535-3600. 

• No. 7: Guy Savoy, 18 Rue Troyon, Pan 

17, tel: 43-8040-61. '/ 

• No. 8: Ttfevest, 15 RneLamennais.ftrH 
8 , tel: 45-63-96-01 and 45-61-12-90. ~ 

• No. 9: La Taute Qrire^68 Royal Hospital 
Road, London SW3 4HP, let (71) 352-6045. 

• Nd 10: Restaurant Danid, 20 East 76ib 
Street, New York, tel: (212) 288-0031 : 


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A i 0ur of Swiss gastronomy; above left, chef Peter Baermann in the kitchen of La Grappe restaurant near Crissier: Iris ami Horst Petermann in front of their flower-decorated inn in 

d'Or in Lausanne: top right, chef Fredy Girardet in the kitchen of his world-renowned Kusnacht. just a short drive from the center of Zurich. 


With this page an Switzerland, the IHTs res- 
taurant critic, Patricia Wells, continues to rate 
the worlds top restaurants and to compile a list of 
the Top 10 A companion report focuses on more 
casual and affordable restaurants. In the future, 
we will look at restaurants in Germany and Italy. 
If you would like to share your favorites with 
Patricia Wells, please write her at the IHT. 




, - ; .} .tA- . 


Lafco,<2 
Constance ‘"Mf 


Zurich ^ Kusnacht 


The Top Tables 






... ^ Bern Luceme .™ 

Y AS, • ^ ; 

J s W I T Z E Ft L. A H O 

/\ . .•'••phin e 

> Cns sie^Lausanne / 


AUS TfUA\ 
•UECHTENSTEiN j 


• No. 1: Restaurant Fredy Girardet. 1 Route 
d’Yverdon, 1023 Crissier (5 kilometers west). 
tel: 1 21) 634-0505. 

oNo.2: Restaurant PSerroz, Hotel Rosalp. 
Route de Medran, 1936 Verbier. tel: {26} 31-63- 
23. 

• No. 3: Petennann's Kunststube, 160 Sees- 
trasse, 8700 Kusnacht, tel: (1) 910-0715. 


' Lake Geneva 


m jienwia J -.^^ion 

-Nhv Verbier 


W E L LiSI 


International Herald Tribune 

H OW rare to Find a chef who has 
reached the age of reason, maturity 
and experience without having lost 
his sense of enthusiasm and creativ- 
ity. That’s Fredy Girardet in a snapshot. One of 
the world’s greatest chefs remains in top form 
after nearly 30 years at the stove. Seated in the 
subdued dining room of Girardet in the village 
of Crissier, near Lausanne, it only lakes a few 
bites of his chaud-froid 
de foie gras au porto to 
realize that there’s no 
. . sense of ennui here, not 

a hint of repetition, uot 

a ^ ex ^ ldUS ~ 
tioo. Quite the con- 
trary: Trim, fit and a 
v ^ very youthful 57. the 
Swiss "master manages 
to reinvent hims elf, year after year, proficient 
as ever. 

While his current menu may read much like 3 
classic French text, the tastes, textures, combi- 
nations and execution all exhibit a fierce sense 
of maturity married to a passion for perfection. 
He takes fresh langoustines. dots them with a 
sprinkling of sesame seeds, pairs them with 
tiny mounds of mixed greens and herbs, adds a 
touch of curry sauce, a Tew mouthfuls of 
minced apple, and creates a gastronomic sym- 
phony. Everything you want' in a dish: light- 
ness. flavor, delicacy of texture, sweetness, a 
hint of acidity, punctuated by a haunting, lin- 
gering note of spice. There are no fireworks on 
the palate, just a gentle, soothing sense of 
satisfaction. 

He offers a classic royale de rruffes noires d la 
creme tf asperges. an almost explosive poached 
custard soup that shocks you with its texture. 



" rz> : .v • ! n., 

* - .■T'"- : A ■ « -t lJ : 1 • 



ImenuiionjJ Hvrjld Trihunc 


The smoothness of the cream, the crunch of the 
truffle, the firm bite and creamy flavor of the 
fresh green asparagus gather to form a trium- 
phant trio. 

Service, wine selection and ambience measure 
up to Girardet’s abilities at the stove, as a dozen 
or so varied, liny breads appear almost out of 
nowhere, to accompany each dish. The staff 
members seem to love what they are doing, as 
they weave through the dining room with a 


studied proficiency, pouring Swiss wines into the 
glasses etched wi th the degam “fg~ monogram. 


Girardet makes a solid statement with his 
saumon mi-cuit. rosy pink and melringly tender 
fillets of lean, wild Sourish salmon baked in a 
very low oven for just 10 to 12 minutes. It’s not 
raw. it's not fully cooked, and you feel as 
though you’ve never tasted salmon before. 
Again, the texture is astonishing, the flavor 
pure, the sprinkling of sea salt brings you al- 
most to the water’s edge. You instantly catch 
his respect for the ingrraient and his ability to 
extract maximum flavor with minimal med- 
dling. 

Raising a single ingredient to new heights. 
Girardet takes a small duck, roasts it quickly to 
rid it of excessive fat, then continues the roast- 
ing as he bathes it in goose fat and lime juice. 


creating a sauce that’s punctuated with acidity, 
a skin that's rich, crispy, an ideal contrast to the 
soft, velvety duck meat. 

For dessert, the classic Girardet homage, a 
sublime passion-farit souffli. a play of sweet 
and tart, a perfectly executed, sophisticated 
dose to a meal that demonstrates a chef in 
impeccable form. 

Closed Sunday. Monday : last week of July and 
first two weeks of August, and r-vo weeks at 
Christmas. So credit cards. Menus at 165 and 
185 Swiss francs (SI 15 and SI 30}: d la carte. 190 
Swiss francs, including service bur not wine. 

At first glance, one wonders what a “gastro- 
nomic” restaurant like Pienaz is doing in a 
place like Verbier. A Swiss ski resort about 80 
kilometers <50 miles) east of Geneva, Verbier 
boasts the largest cable car in Switzerland, 
some fine ski runs and those shimmering 
mountain views. It also exults in one of Switzer- 
land’s top chefs — Roland Pierroz. who has 
overseen the family hotel-restaurant since 1969. 

Bearish, outgoing, a bit of a mountain cow- 
boy-chef proud of his Porsche. Pierroz is a 
regular gymnast at the stove. His sources are 
dear: His grandfather brought the family from 
Italy to Switzerland and here they stayed. And 
so we see threads of his Italian mother’s heri- 


tage in the state-of-ihe art risotto, his studied 
use of mini ature purple artichokes, a generous 
dose of black and green olives, a palette full of 
peppers of every color. 

Yet his roots go more deeply into France, 
where he selects delicate baby Iamb from the 
Pyrenees, lender frog’s legs from the Dombes. 
sturdy duck from Nantes, unctuous olive oil 
from Maussanne les Alpflles. And then be twirls 
the globe a bit: He wraps chunks of frog’s legs in 
egg roll paper, twists them, dips them in a deep 
fryer, then serves them as a duet atop a bed of 
Parmesan-strewn risotto. Crunch dong with 
crunch, a rich play of flavors, his papillotes de 
grenouiUes sur risotto are just about worth a ride 
up the mountainside all on their own. 

He combines ultra-rresh langoustines with a 
spicy pepervnade. takes a fillet or veal and turns 
it into a pot-au-feu served with a herb-flecked 
vinaigrette: debones plump pigeon and stuffs it 
with a blend of black and green olives; adds a 
touch of curry to his salmon sauce; spices up a 
simple serving of smoked salmon with a tangy 
lemon cream sauce. 

Pierroe's enthusiasm clearly transfers from 
the kitchen to the staff and right to the table, 
with portions that are generous, dishes that have 
a natural and unfussy air. flavors that are clear, 
direct, satisfying. The assortment of village 
breads is honorable, his unusual honey tan (puff 
pastry topped with an astonishingly good honey 
cream) is worth a second trip up the mountain, 
and the wine list is thick, but expensive as are aD 
Swiss wins lists. We loved the unusually sweet- 
tan Perile Arvine (a terrific match for the risotto) 
and though the local Syrah packed a certain 
wallop. I can't sav it’s worth tbc 80-franc price 
tag 

The restaurant's decor is cozy and chalet- 
like, with a clientele that ranges from skiers in 
blue jeans to nonskiers in faux-Cbanel and fur. 
For more casual dining, there's Pierroz' s bistro. 


overdose of salt — would have turned a good 
dish into a great one. 

Petermann loves to play with zesty fruit fla- 
vors. and his grilled hup, or sea bass, bathed in 
an orange vinaigrette, surrounded with just 
about every ingredient from the vegetable gar- 
den. made for a springtime-perfect main course. 

Service is discreet, professional and attentive 
without being overbearing. The wine list fol- 
lows suit. wiLh some welcoming Swiss whites, 
including a solid Petite Arvine from the Valais 
rerion. 


Closed Sunday. Monday, and three weeks from 
late August to early September. Credit cards: 
American Express. Diner’s Club. MasterCard. 
I 'iso. Menus at 55. 65. 125, 160 and 185 Swiss 
francs ; a la carte, about 150 Swiss francs, includ- 
ing service but not wine 


Casual Dining 

• No. 1: A1 Forno, 577 South Main Sow. 
Providence, Rhode bland, let (401) 273-9761 

• No. 2: La Tnp&u, 6 Porte dels Moraak, 
Bordeaux, tel: 56-91-56-37. 

• No. 3: Frootera Grill, 445 Ninth Clnk 
Street Chicago, ret (312) 66T-1434. ' . 

• No. 4: Victoria City Seafood Rostand, 
Sun Hung Kai Centre, Wanchai, Hang Kim 
teL 827-9938. 

• No. 5: City Chin Chow Restanwt, East 
Ocean Centre, 98 Granville Road. Tam Shi 
Tsui East, Kowloon, Hong Kong, teL 723-6226 

• No. 6: Ca Flsidre, Les Flora 12, Barcdom: 

tel: 441-1139. - - 

• No. 7: The Seafood Restanmt, Riverade. 
Padstow, Cornwall PL28 8BY, England, tit 
(841) 532485. 

• No. 8: Virkfiana, Juan de Mena 14, Ma- 
drid, tel: 5234478 

• No. 9: Le Owdbn, 6 Rue de Cbevreux. 
Paris 6, tel: 43-20-6343. 

• No. 10: Caffe CroaxHe, 354 East 74th 
Street, New York, tel: (212) 2496619. 


1tiw~ : 
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JH1 THiB IN 


CASUAL DINING 


• No. I: La Grappe d’Or, 3 rue de Cheneau- 
de-Bourg, 1003 Lausanne; tel: (21) 323-0760. 

• No. 2: An Viem Valais, 1936 Verbier. tel: 
(26) 3169-55. 

• No. 3: Kronenhafle, RSmistrasse 4, 8001 
Zurich, tel: (l) 251-6669. 


C HEF Peter Baermann is a chef after 
my own heart and appetite. Salmon 
barely cooked, tuna lightly marinat- 
ed, gambas as huge as baby lobsters. 
And be does things that demand the freshest of 
fresh. It helps that he has traveled to Asia and 
has let a bit — but not too much — of its 
influence rub off. 

So settle into his pretty La Grappe d’Or. in 
Lausanne, and let him work his magic. He might 
begin with a refreshing, simple, carefully execut- 
ed salode de gambas, cloudlike, moist, almost 
sweet crustaceans barely cooked and anointed 
with olive oil, topped with a generous shower of 
finely minced aromatic Thai basil. A colorful 
arugulas salad, tossed with finely minn«*i radish 
and a grinding of black pepper, add to the 
creation of a welcoming, satisfying dish. 

Like so many Swiss chefs, Baermann has an 
affinity for Italian fare, and his giant ravioli 
stuffed with a variety of minced fish is a 
delight Bathed in a tangy sauce that blends 
both vinegar and cream, the dish offers a highly 
digestible, balanced midcourse. 

Taking, no doubt a cue from Fredy Girardet 
he loo ventures forth with a saumon mi -exit this 
version almost sweet buttery in texture, set on 
a thin and creamy bed of potato puree and 
crowned with a rich truffle vinaigrette. 

The rolling dessert cart lacks interest save 
for a decent lemon tart and a tangy tone au vin 
bfanc The wines are an outrage. One can only 
do a double lake when ordering a bottle of 60- 
franc local wine, as the waiter unscrews, rather 
than uncorks. Screw-top wines may be the rage 
in Switzerland, but let’s hope the habit doesn’t 
stretch beyond national borders. 

Closed Saturday lunch and Sunday. Credit 
cards: American Express. Eurocard and Visa. 

Menus at 54 and 69 francs ($38 and $48). hmch 
only; and 99. 115, 135 and 155 francs. A la carte, 
about 100 francs, including service but not wine. 

_ Everyone has his ravorile Swiss hideaway, that 
simple family restaurant where fondue and ra- 
deite a vokmte assuage big appetites without 
emptying the pocket book. The recipe for a great 
fondue is simple, but not always followed: Rub a 


International Herald Tribune 


La Pinte du Rosalp. with sucb simple fare as 
rabbit with oolema, sausages with lentils, and 


rabbit with polema, sausages with lentils, and 
an assortment of grilled meats served with a 
gratia dauphinois. 


Closed May. June. October. November. Credit 
cards: American Express. MasterCard. Visa. 

Menus at 115, 145 and 165 Swiss francs; a la 
carte, 120 to 180 francs, including service but not 
wine. 



Culinary Excellence at 
L E CORDON BLEU 


Rm-EsCOFFIER 

Ecole de Gastronome Franqaise 


PARIS - I 8 0 A 


The Ultimate French Cooking School 

Looted in tbc prestigious Paris Ritz. 

For cooking enthusiasts and professionals. 

One- to 1 2-week certificate and diploma courses 
in cooking, bread and pastry making, wine and table service. 


Demonstration classes 

Monday through Thursday from 3 to 5:30 p.m. 
Alternate Tuesday evenings 6:30 to 9 pan. 

Last Saturday each month from 10 a.m. to 12:30 pan. 
Gift Certificates available. 


All courses are taught in French and English. 


7b rveeire a 199- 1 brochure and details of the monthly 
demonstration programs, please call or unite: 


Hotel Ritz 

IS, Place Ycndomc. 7504 1 Paris. Cedcx 01, France 
TeL; (+33 1 > 42.60.38.30 - Fax: (+33 1 ) 40. 1 5.07.65 


S§ 

t 


•Weekly workshops. 
•Daily demonstrations. 
•Introduction ro 
French gastronomy. 

•Summer classes: 

iv 20 M'VIS and 9 S In 9/JO 


Decked out like the perfect country inn — 
with neat rows of bright, potted flowers lined 
up at the front door — Petermann's Kunststube 
is one of Switzerland's prettier, more welcom- 
ing restaurants. Just a short drive from the 
center or Zurich, this elegant spot with pewter- 
gray walls, giant wood beams, orchids at each 
table and elegant silver candelabras. offers an 
even balance of the old and the new. 

While Horst Petermann’s cuisine is not that of 
a Girardet or a Pierroz. his creative energies, his 
insightful combinations show definite promise. 

He offers a tempura or langoustines touched 
with vanilla butter and perfumed with fresh 
mint; potato gnocchi. crayfish and baby violet 
artichokes; shellfish pot-au-feu with leaves of 
coriander; a simple roast pigeon with a cham- 
pagne risotto, and a roasted peach, fresh apri- 
cots and lemon verbena ice cream for a dish 
that sings of the sunshine of Provence. 

A recent lunch began with a gentle risotto 
with a touch of saffron sauce, embellished with 
lips of fresh while asparagus, morels, generous 
portions of moist lobster meal, and liny 
shrimp. As delicious as I found the lobster and 
shrimp, the dish would have been just as satis- 
fying without them. And a bit more attention in 
the kitchen — the morels were marred by an 


ceramic pot with garlic, add thin sfices of Grc- 
y ire cheese, a gentle dose of dry and slightly 
acidic wine such as die Swiss Fendant. stir .inm 
the cheese melts, and add a touch of wad 
pepper, a few drops of kitsch, or.dmy 
via That’s the recipe at AuVkax VaUs, at® 
ski village of Verbier. Here, the decor is typicaSy 
rustic, with bare wooden tables, a tage tones 
looking out onto the valley and crisp service not 
suggests it’s been a long, busy winter. 

As much as 1 love fondue, Fve a weakneoW 
raclette, a dish that’s the star of casual.Sws 
cuisine. Here, order it k volontfe — all y ou 
eat — where it wflj be prepared with the cfe** 
Bagnes. the fatty Swiss cow’s-nnlk dteesenwH 
the Valais. The best seven-kilograin wteels ut 
aged until they become strong and froity — a 
good three to six months — kkalforasn^®" 
ous and rustic raclette. The cheese is sod w 




S ^®i5.e_rlcanjj 


into a fragrant, creamy pool, and 

by a tiny wooden bucket filled with steam* 


potatoes in their skins. The refills keep oonw? 
until you force a halt, and the idea of 
portion after portion of this succulent, szzang 
cheese as you overlook the sparklu« ***» 
below is one of Switzerland’s — and ntes 


simple gastronomic pleasures. 

Condiments are excellent, indndwg toe 
didonal pickled offerings, an essential 
rich toudi that helps cut aD Uiai foLTiv 



\ : 


fine “cole slaw” of mustaitf-Iaced white mb®* 
Closed Mondays off season and the 
May and June. Credit cards: American 
Diner’s Club, MasterCard. Visa ronm. - 
Swiss francs; racieite, 28 francs. 


: 

-5 v 




History, art and a hearty do» ^ 
German cuisine is what youTI 5°“ orv 4 
lowed Krooenhafle, where for years focus 
travelers have flocked to the series o» 
rooms in Zurich. The wails are stifl «*. 
with the Braques, Chagalls, MWs ' 
course, Picassos. Come with a group 
and bring hearty appetites; dig into gatgj* ^ 


Goodi i 

- “7- 


"j-,. 


-■ 


ana onng neany appemes, tug ^ 

servings of maljes herring, mixed with »»» 
tangy apples, sweet onions and a halo m 


sour cream. 


swen imuous * “r V IW \ 

Portions of meaty, 


vored bralwurst are enough to serve a row*, 
four, accompanied by a wdHWBp^JrJSj 


tour, accompanwa nv a 
that crisp and gdden pancake a sbi*#*" 
potatoes. - ' 

Open daily. Credit cards: American r£>¥?J* 
Diner’s Club. Eurocard, A la carte. 

106 Swiss francs. 


\ i 

N ■*, ■> f e 


Rjv 




V. 27 ^ ■ 


•Catering : 

New count bifhv i;aertsrfuemjmm Novnnber 1-rJj to December 1 "th 

• The Classic cycle : 

Study cuisine and pastry in comprehensive 10-11 week courses 
tha begin four times a year. 



*7 * s' 

V J IT ~ - i- 

* 77 u--; . 


*_* R 1 s L O N DON - TOKYO 

8 rue LfPftpekt U-iMarylrbcnr i3inr 

~5<t / 5 /■ iiris London U 'IM6HH 


Phone 33/1 ^6 (Wi (V* 

Fj* 33/1 -iS V> 03 96 


Phone +in 9J5 35 03 

Far 44/71 03 s “6 2\ 


Oil I today for a tree school brochure or gift catalogue 
of our gourmet products. USA : 1-800-457 CHEF 


International Herald Tribune 

I N a nation where the food can be 
frankly frumpy (you’ll still see lots of 
veal cordon bleu on the menu), service 
can be crisp, aloof and off-put ting , 
where a prominent candy shop displays 
chocolate-covered Com Flakes as its newest 
creation, what’s a serious gastronome to do? 

You can always look to the mountains: in 
this country full of cheese villages like Gruvfere 
and Fribourg, you'll still find sweet Roman 
villages like Martigny nested in a valley, and 
crisp while wines from minuscule vineyards on 
terraced lands that reach for the sky. 

Or look to the Italians: The Swiss have a 
nice touch with Italian fare, and such influ- 


ences as artichokes with fish, excellent risotto, 
nice treatment of pasta, make for pleasurable 


oartri)^ 


dining. The Asian influence is equally strong, 
and if you like coriander, curry and Thai basil, 
you'll find much tc like in Switzerland. 
When it comes to price, there is no getting 


such simple whites as Fendant or 
DOIe, ablcod of aamay and piuot 
bets for other Swiss wines wOode** 


away from it — Switzerland is expensive. A 
meal made up of a simple planer of cured 


meal made up of a simple platter of cured 
meats, an order (0. 1C, all you can eat) of 
raclette. a very ordinary bottle of wine can set 
you back 50 Swiss francs (S35). The following 
are some cautions, a Tew words of advice: 

• When it comes to ordering wines, watch 
your pockeibook. And don't be .surprised — 
even with a bottle of Swiss wine priced at 60 
francs a bottle — when the sommelier un- 
screws rather than uncorks, if price is an issue. 


and fragrant Yvorae. the dry and am 

Petite Arvine. red Dfaaley, and 

(though larking finesse) Syrah. . 


• Most restaurants offer speoag? gj 
menus at lunch, and many also ou° ^ 
with a choice of three to five COW* 5 * 
tions tend 10 be ample 

• Go casual and lea™ V> ^ 

Good raclette and fondue. 
asparagus, ham and ^ arfd- 
Grisons are generally good bargains, 
ering the alternatives. 










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capi 1 al markets 


International Herald Tribune, Monday , May 16, 1994 


Page 11 


German Rale Cuts Shift 
Focus to the Long Term 


P 


% Carl Gewirtz 
Inenuimul Herald Tribune 


New Bids 
For EKO 
Steel Unit 


AR1S — F ‘ nDUne 

{““if? “pS’S'tavfeS'Si^' 5" b£,nd Withdraws, 

* 5oar d last week rollout,. ,iT^‘ *"9?? advanced across the 
cul . iD Gcnnany’s discount e surpnsmgly large half-point 
w most other mS * Whjch 8,50 P uIled officia] 


3^y m S^iF* 

baaa points, altnost one-dPh?h r ™i!L U1Versdy 10 prices — fell 1 1 

w * iat retail investors 
the b CT chmtt 1 S°'lt need to move back 
“ addition, m o„c y - milrkc[ *»» *e market 


Germans Return 


rfltfMc™»r — ' “oncy-markei - 

the discount 'SKiSpmd wfE* 1 * Bund ? banks laj ^ e 0111 « 
more in its weekly tendril? - lead £ *¥** o{ 15 basis P 0 ^ or 
about 5 basispom BfWrw^ a0nS ' the pace had been 

XtSxSisESZ off<Md ra .“ *? 



, C °?L p 9 llin& — particularly since the yield on 

wssri 11 now - e - 6 ~ 

rm rat« in Ik 3 ? 1011 Hi 31 P rom P tai the Bundesbank to cut short- 

Fates in the hope that fund*; would tv* milled mt rtf the moneu 



provide much 
prices. 


See BONDS, Page 15 



INDEX 


International Herald Tribune 
World Stock Index, mmposed 
ot 280 internationally invesfctbfe 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 
Business News. 


113 


Worfd index 


>'z -:'c!r?- vpi.?, 

1151 

’ * *?■' ■«£&*>&(? 

111 


Weekending May 13, 
daily dosings. 
Jan. 1992 = 100. 




115 


F M T W T F 

Bwp> 



114 


126 


F M T W T F 

North America 



Latin America 

103 - — r-rng t 



...« (Ml % 


S £L«e 


snaM skm 


Capital Goc^S 11 2.1711130 +03* 
Raw Materials 125.46122.30 ^ 
Consumer Goods 9532 8639 -090 


Ulgcallaneous 1253612425 +1.13 


Services ^ — Tr^-,, w York. London, and 

— ZZ7 uS i*** 9 ^^ D8nwartt i 

TTre ^ ^^Sa. ASUte. BeW^ ^^STNetheri-nd., «« 

and ****** For 



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CURRENCY^TK 


May 13 


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term rat« ,1^1“ ^ l P ro ™P«« me Bundesbank to cut short- 
n^iHror an rf!k dlal ^ uu ^s would be pulled out of the money 

&**&*£** contribute to a slowdown in the growth 


pnees. 

On a three-month basis, the diff eren tial could be wiped out by a 
rise of more than 5 basis points in the yield of the bond. For the 
trickle of money now moving back into long-term instruments to 
turn into a flood, analysts agree, bond yields need to be seen 
heading clearly down. 

“I see a slow, tentative change in sentiment feeding its way into 
markets,” said John Hall, London-based analyst for Swiss Bank 
Corp. 3 

Only professional investors will be borrowing three-month mon- 
ey to buy 10- year bonds. Banks are the most active players of the 
yield curve, but they are perceived to be hampered by their 
premature rush into the market in March when they mistakenly 


Complied by (ho Staff Fran Dispatches 

BERLIN — The agency entrust- 
ed with the privatization of East 
German industry said Sunday that 
it was not prepared to consider a 
Standing bid by Preussag AG and 
Thyssen AG 10 takeover the ailing 
EKO Stahl AG steelmaker after 
Riva SpA of Italy withdrew its of- 
fer late Friday. 

A Treuhand spokesman said that 
the bid by Preussag and Thyssen 
was out of date. 

Ekkehaid Schulz, chairman of 
Thyssen Stahl AG, had said the 
company was prepared to renew 
the offer, but Heinz Kriwet, man- 
agement board chairman of the 
parent Thyssen AG was quoted in a 
newspaper interview as saying the 
original plans would have to be 
revised. ‘The investments which 
we wanted to make at EKO Stahl 
have now been made elsewhere,” 
he was quoted as saying 

A Treuhand spokesman said Riva 
had informed the agency that its 
decision to abandon the bid was 
final and would stand “despite 

whatever new offer might be made.'’ 

Riva’s decision followed two 
weeks of intensive talks on an ac- 
quisition plan valued at 1.1 billion 
Deutsche marks ($657 million), one 
of the most ambitious privatization 
projects in Eastern Germany. 

The deal foundered on a dispute 
between Riva and union leaders 
over the makeup of the company’s 
supervisory board and over the 
pace of job cuts. The IG Metail 
union also questioned Riva’s finan- 
cial soundness. 


PTTs Shake Off Cobwebs 


Dutch Leading the Way to Privatization 


By Tom Buerkle 

Internationa f Herald Tnbnne 

GRONINGEN, Netherlands — Wim Dik talks 
of a bright future for Royal PTT Nederland NV. 
with advanced technology, aggressive marketing 
and international partnerships helping bis compa- 
ny thrive through privatization and the opening up 
of Europe’s telecommunications monopolies. 

There’s only one pro blem w ith Mr. Dik’s vision. 
It emanates from Royal PTTs headquarters in this 
northern Dutch city, more than 200 kilometers 
(125 miles) away from its two main operating units 
— the Dutch telephone company and postal ser- 
vice — in The Hague. 

Moving the headquarters four years ago to bol- 
ster the economy in this provincial capital was 
“one of the more stupid political decisions'’ affect- 
ing the company, Mr. Dik said. But he insisted 
there was no question ot reversing the costly 250 
million guilder (5134 million) move, even after the 
government sells off about one-third of Royal PTT 
next month. 

As Mr. Dik’s situation illustrates, the legacy of 
decades of state ownership, when Europe’s tele- 
phone companies were required to give a higher 
priority to providing jobs than a commercially 
compeu’live service, is not easy to escap e, even for 
fast-moving companies like Royal PTT. 

But with high telephone charges handicapping 
industry and Europe seeking the innovation and 
investment billions to build an information super- 
highway, governments are accelerating plans to 
privatize their operating companies ahead of the 
European Union’s 1998 target date for liberalizing 
telephone service. 

Last month, the Danish government sold 49 
percent of Tele Danmark for $3 billion. Portugal 
and Greece have appointed advisers to arrange a 
sale of their telephone companies, Ireland is seek- 
ing investment from a strategic partner and Bel- 
gium is eyeing a partnership and stock issue. 

These deals are just a prelude for the Continent’s 
two big privatizations, Deutsche Telekom and 
France Telecom, which the Germans plan to kick 
off in 1996. Altogether, analysts estimated that 


European telecommunications companies will 
float as much as $50 billion of shares in the next 
five years. 

“It is obvi< 


obviously a challenge because you will be 
confronting at some point a finite degree of invest- 
ment,” said Scott Mead, who handled the interna- 
tional portion of the Tele Danmark offering for 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

Given the impending crash. Mr. Dik is ha ppy to 
be one erf the first out of the gate. Royal PTTs 
privatization campaign is to start in earnest Mon- 
day with the publication of a prospectus, and 
analysts estimate that a one-third stake could bring 
the government as much as S5 trillion. The compa- 
ny posted an 8 percent rise in net income in 1993, 
to 1.8 billion guilders, on a 6 percent rise in 
revenue, to I6J billion. 

Bui more imp ortan t than the sale's timing, Mr. 
Dik said Royal PTT was ahead of its rivals in 
devising strategies to hold onto domestic custom- 
ers in the face of competition while attacking new 
foreign markets, a cl«m many analysis endorse. 

“Our efficiency and our aggressiveness in mar- 
keting certainly give us a lead in being among the 
players that will be left over early in the next 
century,” Mr. Dik says. 

At home in the Netherlands, Royal PTT has 25 
percent more lines per employee than Britain’s 
British Telecommunications PLC, a measure of 
efficiency, and it will replace its last mechanical 
switches with digital equipment this year. It now 
seeks to boost its low customer usage rate of 3J 
calls a day, half the U.S. level with promotions 
such as half-price calls on Mother’s Day, which 
boosted traffic by two-thirds. 

But since Royal FFTs domestic market share 
can only decline, especially if the government goes 
ahead with plans to authorize a competing tele- 
phone network next year, the company’s most 
ambitious efforts have been aimed at dr umming up 
international business. 

It has t ame d op with Telia of Sweden and Swiss 
Telecom PTT to form Unisource, a venture that is 


See PTT, Page 15 


Athens Gambles 
As Speculators 
Attack Drachma 


ATHENS ■ — Greece has taken a 
high-rid: gamble to stop a heavy 
speculative run on the drachma by 
removing all remaining foreign ex- 
change controls as of Monday, 
ahead of schedule. 

Economics Minister Yannos Pa- 


gandom ou, less than two weeks in 


Manfred Stolpe, prime minister 
of Brandenburg, the state in which 
EKO Stahl is located, said his gov- 
ernment was ready to work with 
the federal government, the compa- 
ny’s personnel and the Treuhand to 
preserve the steel works and to find 
another investor to buy iL 
“Through the mutual efforts of 
the last three years, EKO has be- 
come a joint task that requires all of 
us to play a part," he said. 

EKO Stahl is the key industry in 
Eiseahdttenstadi, a city of 50,000 
near the Polish border. 

(Rearers, AP. AFP) 


GTE Drops Korean Phone Project 


Agcnce Frattce-Prase 
SEOUL — GTE Cbrp. let a 
deadline pass for the acquisition of 
a 4 percent stake in Sinsegi Mobile 
Telecom, the consortium that has 
beat assembled to build South Ko- 
rea’s second mobile-phone net- 
work, and the consortium decided 
on Saturday to make the stake 
available to other companies. 

GTE bad been one of four US. 
companies chosen last week as for- 
eign equity partners in the consor- 
tium. Pactel Corp- was given a 10 
percent slake in the deal. South- 
western Befl Corp. was assigned 7 


percent. GTE was given 4 percent 
and Qualcomm Corp. was allotted 
1-2 percent. The total stake that 
was to be assigned to foreign com- 
panies was 22J1 percent. 

GTFs refusal to join the consor- 
tium was taken as a signal that it 
was displeased with the allotments. 
At one point GTE had threatened 
legal action unless South Korea en- 
sured it the dominant foreign equi- 
ty role in the consortium. 


action soon to assign GTE’s stake 
to other foreign companies. 


Die construction of the project 
led to 


Sinsegi, under pressure to speed 
up a project that has suffered ex- 
tensive delays, said it would take 


had originally been schedul 

begin two years ago and to have a 
value of S493 million for three 
years erf worL 

GTE has been embroiled in con- 
troversy ever since 1992 when the 
company’s local partner, Sunkyong 
Industries Ltd, won the initial bid 
for the mobile-phone license but 
withdrew it later amid charges of 
favoritism as a result of Sunkyong 
family connections to Roh Tae 
Woo. the president at the time. 


post, made the surprise an- 
nouncement on Saturday, appar- 
ently hoping to disarm speculators 
or at least win breathing space for 
the beleaguered drac hma 

The move followed a turbulent 
week in Greek markets. Rates 
soared, stocks fefl to lows for the 
year and investors fled the drachma 
during the attack on the currency. 

Mr. Papandoniou said “unsub- 
stantiated and unreal rumors” 
about a drachma devaluation 
ahead of July ], when remaining 
currency controls were to be lif led, 
had sparked a run on the currency. 

“For that reason, the govern- 
ment has decided to proceed to the 
immediate freeing of short-term 
capital movements beginning May 
16.” he said. 

That means that Greeks can open 
fortagn-currency accounts, change 
drachmas on short notice and bold 
whatever currency they like, Greeks 
have been severely restricted on the 
amount of foreign exchange they 
could buy to §0 on foreign vacations 
or business trips and were unable to 
invest easily dsewbere. 

But analysts said the Bank of 
Greece and the Economics Minis- 
try might face a battle with interna- 
tional speculators over the right 
price for the drac hma “If they’re 
smart, they’D let the market price 
the drachma and get it over with,” 
said George Georgiopoulos, a se- 
nior analyst at Sigma Securities. 

Mr. Papandoniou authorities 
would stick to their “bard-drach- 
ma" policy. 

“what that means is that they 
can raise interest rates or spend 


defend ihe drachma last week, 

amounting to 5 to 10 percent of the 
country’s reserves. 

Analysts said the first line of 
defense next week would be inter- 
est rate increases. One-month rates 
were lifted on Friday to 25 percent 
from 20 percent. 

The central bank’s favored weap- 
on against speculators in the past 
has been its overnight penalty rale, 
which now stands at 30 percent. 

Mr. Papandoniou is expected to 
try to boost confidence in his poli- 
cies this week by announcing a 
number of measures ranging from 
spending cuts to detailed plans for 
privatizing certain state companies. 


their foreign reserves to buy up the 
said 


unwanted drachmas." said a for- 
eign-bank executive. 

Analysts said the Socialist gov- 
ernment, elected in October, decid- 
ed to cut the drachma loose to 
avoid spending vital foreign re- 
serves in a futile fight (0 defend the 
currency. They estimated that the 
central bank had spent the equiva- 
lent of $500 million to $1 billion 10 


GM and Sprint Haggling Over EDS Computer-Services Unit 


By Susan Antilla 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — General Motors Corp. is 
didemng to sell its EDS compoler-services 
subsidiary to Sprint Corp., the nation's 
third-laigesl long-distance company. 

A sale or other business combination would 
combine Electronic Data Systems Corp.’s 
strengths as a contractor of corporate data- 
ofwmu mifatiAns systems and Sprat’s techno- 
ingtrarily advanced long-distance networks. 
The talks have been 00 and off for more than 
two years, but discussions became serious 
about five months ago, analysts said. 

An outright merger would create an infor- 
mation-services powerhouse with $19 billion 

in annual revenues, $20 billion in assets and 
120,000 employees. 


But many government hurdles would have 
to be overcome for a combination 10 take 
place, an executive familiar with the discus- 
sions said 


On Friday, executives from Sprint Corp. 
and Electronic Daia Systems Corp. were 
meeting “under guard” in an undisclosed 
location near Sprint's headquarters in 
Westwood, Kansas, according to a person 
familiar with the talks, who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity. Neither Sprint nor EDS 
would confirm the discussions. 


But people familiar with the talks said 
Sprint and EDS began their current discus- 
sions in the middle of last year, after British 
Telecommunications PLC backed away 
from a proposal to buy 25 percent of EDS- 


related stock, which trades as the class E 
shares of GM- 

The discussions have used the security 
codes that are typical of Wall Street deali 
with Sprint dubbed “Spur," EDS referred to 
as “Ranger,” and the potential combined 
entity known as “Princess.” 

Bui the companies have apparently had 
trouble striking a deal that addresses ’GM^ 

concerns about the tax consequences of spin- 
ning off EDS, which GM bought from Ross 
Perm for $2.5 billion in 1984. A wholly 
owned GM subsidiary, its current market 
value is $16 billion. 

The obstacles to a fuD merger, which 
would require a spin-off of EDS shares from 
GM, potentially indude receiving approval 
from the Internal Revenue Service and the 


Department of Labor, according to an exec- 
utive involved in the talks. 

One such hurdle has already been cleared. 


On Wednesday, a key ruling ^bv Pension 


Benefit Guaranty Corp. allowed GM 10 do- 
nate $6 bQhon m EDS stock to its under- 
funded pension plan for hourly workers. 

Pension Benefit is the federal agency that 
insures some private pension plans. It said in 
its ruling that EDS would be released from 
liability for GM pensions if EDS were to 
cease being pan of GM. 

At onepomt in their discussions earlier this 
year, the two companies had planned what is 
known as a merger of equals, with William 
Esrey, chairman and chief executive of Sprint, 
and Lester Alberthal Jr., his counterpart at 
EDS, serving as co-chief executives. 


Turks Urged 
To Send 


Cash Home 


Conpiltdby Oa Staff Fran Dispatches 

ANKARA — Prime Minis- 
ter Tansu Ciller on Saturday 
appealed to Turks overseas to 
hdp Turkey's economic recov- 
ery by sending money home. 

“Just imagine if each one of 
our 1 millian citizens who worit 
abroad sends 1,000 German 
marks," she said cm a state tele- 
vision channel that broadcasts 
to Western Europe and Central 
Asia. “Make this drive for the 
Turkish economy, it is a kind 
of an economic salvation war." 
Mrs. Ciller added 

The Turkish economy has 
been going through a crisis, 
with the inflation rate exceed- 
ing 100 permit a year. The lira 
has lost more than 60 percent 
of its value against the dollar 
race January, while the coun- 
try’s foreign-currency reserves 
have fallen to $3.1 bilhon from 
$6.2 billion so far this year. 

Mr. Gila announced price 
increases of up to 100 percent 
for the products of state enter- 
prises, new taxes, lay offs and 
privatizations as pan of an aus- 
terity package last month. 

The government opened ne- 
gotiations with the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund last week on 
an agreement to restore Tur- 
key’s creditworthiness in inter- 
national financial markets. The 
talks are expected to result in a 
standby IMF credit of about 
$400 million. 

On Sunday, a World Bank 
official said Turkey could get a 
structural-adjustment loan to 


support 11 s economic program 
by fate September. Fred Levy, 


a division chief said the loan 

could be in the range of “$300- 
$500 million." 


-.Levyi 

leader, Thomas Rerchmann, 
said they approved erf the 
goals of Mis. CUJer’s program. 

(AP. Reuters) 


Beijing Notebook 


Organic Mongol Burgers ? 


SasetTU Ahmentos Para el Mtmdo, one of 

turn’s top food cosnsanies, came to China 1 „ 

for the business of the future. What it has found so 
fax; is flash -frozen, organic Mongo! burgers. 

When the company^ executives recently arrived 
in F**png to shop around for Chinese j oinl-vcn lur e 
business partners, they were expecting to expand 
their wiamlme business, which focuses on wheat 
flour and edible oils that are processed at plants in 
South America and Europe. 

Along the way Sasetru was offered an invest- 
ment in the vast grazing plains of Inner Mongolia, 
irmrii nf ihem free of chemical fertilizer, said Jorge 
Martin Safwna, vice president of the company’s 
international department Not far behind came 
what Mr. Sahmea hopes is the bright idea of mar- 
keting flash-frozen organic beef patties and steaks 
in China and abroad from cattle raised on Inner 
Mongolia’s plains. . . 

The company and its prospective Chinese part- 
ners, whom Mr. Safimei would not identify, would 
invest about $100 million in the proposed project 
They hope for annual sales of between $300 mil- 
lion and $600 ntiBion, he said 
One problem: How to certify to picky organic 
food enthusiasts around the world that its Mongo- 
lian products are chemical-free. 


ambitious expansion plans at the Shanghai Securi- 
ties Exchange, where daily turnover has recently 
overtaken that of Hong Kong on a slow day. 

Reopened in 1990 since the first time since the 
Communist victory in 1949. the Shanghai market 
is planning for the big lime, regardless of the just- 
announced slowdown in new listings. 

The exchange is budding a 3.000- seat trading 
floor and headquarters that will allow it to move 
from the old hotel it occupies along with a karaoke 
lounge across from the Russian consulate at the 
end of next year. 

“At this exchange we have a maxim, we never 
wait and see,’ " said Li Qian, public relations head. 
“The market developed faster than the macro and 
micro planners thought.” 

The exchange, which now has on-line trading 
links to seven other cities in China, plans to expand 
to 20 cities within the year and hopes 10 buy its 
own satellite to facilitate country-wide trading and 
communications, said Miss Li. 


Hie Flip Side of Price Controls 


Awash in a Sea of Shares 


Rising domestic interest rates, an aggressive 
it bond-sales program and scarce credit 
to dim prospects te China’s A 


ave 


shares, the stocks restricted to domestic ownership. 

With share prices generally deteriorating. Beij- 
ing securities regulators closely monitoring Chi- 
na's two developing stock markets in Shang hai and 
Shenzhen have decided to temporarily halt the 
issue of A shares but accelerate the new listing of B 
shares, stocks open to ownership by foreigners. 

Doubts have been cast over both moves. 

Analysts say the trouble with the small B-share 
market, 49 stocks, is not its size, but a shortage of 
quality companies and a lad: of transparency in 
their activities. Doubling the number of issues is 


(nililc dv to solye ei ther problem quickly, nor arrest . 
a 40 percent slide in Shanghai’s B shares since the 

• nf i!v vMr 


.jig of the year. 

t^ays in the listing of an estimated S3 billion 
yuan ($634 million) in A shares do not square with 


The Chinese government’s derision to reinstate 
price controls and limit imports in its chaotic petro- 
leum sector is likely to bring order to a recently 
liberalized market, but the move has left at least one 
major proem in limbo: a $100 million investment 
by Total SA of France in the first Chinese refinery 
built to process Middle East crude oil. 

“Some aspects of the recentraliation of the nil 
sector and rigid price fixing might affect the very 
rationale of our investment into WEPEC.” said 
Hubert de Mestier. Total's chief representative for 
Northeast Asia, in Beijing last Wednesday. 

Total has taken a 20 percent stake in the WE- 
PEC refinery in Dalian, whose success is predicat- 
ed on open access to the Chinese market. 

“To meet reasonable rale of return targets and 
in order to compete on the international market. 
WEPEC needs maximum flexibility to optimize 
crude supply, refinery operations and product 
sales and no price distortion nor outride adminis- 
trative interference ” said Mr. de Mestier. 

Other international energy' concerns will be 
watching Beijing’s response to Total’s problem 
closely for clues to their own China expansion plans. 


Kevin Murphy and Jonathan Gage 



THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Seamaster. Self-winding 

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water-resistant to 120 m/400 ft. 
Swiss made since 1848. 



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[> * Page 12 

i F WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. MAY 16 . 1994 




BOND PRICES 


Provided by CS First Boston 
Limited, London, Tel: (071) 
516 40 25. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. May 6 


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Sales | 

Dtv YM IDOiHigh Law Ose Owe Stacks 


Div rid lOOsHeb Low Ose Cheel 3“*s 


Sales I 

Drv Yid lOOsHtan U>W Ose Chge | Stocks 


Dtv YU KXhHWl LOW Os* Chge | Stacks 


□tv YM 1005Htah LOW Ose Ose 


OTC Consolidated Iradina for week 
ended Friday, May 13. 


Div Ytd loos High Low Ose Ow 


Sales 

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233 7 Ift 2 -ft 

JO 30 465 9 8 8 —1 

.08 J 1076 121. 12 12' * ._ 

06 J 30 l3S-» IIVj 12'. a -ft 
. 1500 fl'S 6ft 8 
...12147 21ft 19’ * 10ft— IV.. 
.I0e .1 272 13 12 13 -ft 

208 7' j 6ft 7ft - ft 

.. 7438 12ft ID 12ft 2ft 

.17 7 1 39 54i 5ft Sft 

.. 26S 1 J’'. 15'.. 12ft —ft 
_ 1497 3ft 2‘fti 2ft —1* 
_ 138 S 4ft 4ft . 

_ lir 9+4 Bft ?■'; — 

^24234 15 ISft 13'-,— lft 

... 0^)8'; 7 7 — V. 

J2 2.1 75 IS 1 . IS ISft -ft 

10 8ft 8ft 8*. —ft 


- 74234 15 13ft 13ft— lft 

... 6^)8'; 7 7 — V. 

J7 2.1 25 IS 1 . IS ISft —ft 

10 Bft Oft Bft —ft 
_ 1*46 :4X. 23 ft 23ft —ft 

- 1051 1 1 10ft 10ft — ■ 4 

_ 75* 4ft «ft 4ft — 

... 23 ft ft ft _ 

_ I6«22ft 21 21ft -ft 
_ 83120ft 18ft 19ft — ft 

48 SJ 1351 oft Bft 9 -ft 
_ 328 5ft 5 5ft 
_M177 14ft 14ft ISft —ft 

- 2507 ISft 1 3ft 14ft— 1 

_ 1790 12*, 10ft lift —ft 
16 A 125 36ft 35ft 3Sft _ 
JO 0 42606 24 23ft 24ft— 1ft 
_ 596521ft ISft 20ft -Ift 

- 2992 24ft 22ft a*-, *2 
.. 176512ft lift lift— Ift 

- 1256 l'»„ l V„ | 

_ 532 5ft 4T S *’, —ft 

133 5ft 4ft 4ft _ 
_ 5571 4iV„ 4V„ 4ft —ft, 

- 577 6 S'h 5*.', _ 

.. 4010 7* . 6"» 6”. -ft 

77 2ft 2ft 2ft —ft 

1291 ISft 14ft 14ft —ft 

... t*0 5ft 5'.. S’,! -ft 

. 77 S’ 6ft 5Vl S’n — ft 
20 J1S669 41 38 39ft -Ift 

24 .7 9334 35V, 33ft 35ft - ft 

- 6*4 29ft 27ft 29 - ft 

- 294 JV„ 71, —ft 

M 9 Sft 0 _ 

_ 307 II*, ltjft 10ft ‘ ft 

_ 5J0I4 12ft 13ft 

_ 7 17ft 16ft 17ft 

_ 54a 12ft lift 12ft —ft 

tae .0 *&* lift II lift —ft 

_ 1937 14', 12ft 12 —ft 

... 31 4 J’S J'.j -ft 


_ 1796 4ft 3*Vi» 3Wu -'ft 
.80 1.9 166 41ft 41ft 41ft -ft 

_ 124 5 4ft 5 • »!. 

_. SOS 14ft 13ft 14ft 

_ 627 12ft 11 lift —ft 

20b 10 793 21ft 20ft 21 —ft 
46949 *5*74 42ft 44ft -1ft 

-. 80 V/k Ift 2 - ft 

_ 151 Sft 2 2 —ft 

- 162310V. »ft 9ft —ft 

*5 1ft 1ft tft -V14 

.08 A 9231 19V. 17ft '8 —1ft 

_ 570 10 Bft »ft —Ift 

JO 1.1 169218ft 16ft 17ft -Ift 
_ 106310 9ft 9ft —ft 
... 3567 9ft Bft • * ft 

_ 529 15ft 14ft IS —ft 

J4 10 195I5Vj 15 15ft -V, 

M 20 226 17 16 17 +1 

1. 00 e 50 5*9 179,4 17 17ft _ 

_. 151 2ft 2ft 2ft —ft 

.. 4956 ISft 12ft 12ft —ft 

J* 10 763 25ft 25* 4 25*'. _ 

_ 2556 15ft 13V, 15 +ft 
_ 99 5ft S 5 -ft 

J5e 1.9 924 18ft 18ft 1BH -ft 
I _ 4 l>V|| l‘Vi» 1«1» —ft. 

_ 7143 37 32ft 35 -1ft 
_ 6948 18ft 13ft 15V.— 3 
_ 606 4 3ft 3ft - 
_ 1724 7ft 6ft 6ft— Ift 
_ 36B7 2SV,22'V n 23 —I*. 

...11799 4ft, 3ft 4 -V. 

JO 2-5 751 12ft lift 12 

.48 1.6 56478 33ft 29ft 30 — 2V„ 
.02 I +9753 24 *', 21ft 73 ft -ft 

.04 2 2B9B7 16ft 14ft 15ft— Ift 

- 784 12*4 10ft 11 —1ft 
_ 1668 7ft bft 7ft —ft 
_ 3362 7ft *ft 7 — ft 
... 180 ft *'* ft - 

... 5152 24V. 20*4 20ft— 3*. 
„ 1823 ?ft 7ft 7ft— 1ft 
_ 2334 27 ft 24ft 24ft— 1ft 
..50615 45ft 4tft 43ft -I 
. 376 4’-, 4 4 —ft 

- 338 7 ift 6ft - 

_ 531 Ift ft »B —’‘e 

6 SV, 5ft Sft 


BeMBlk 
Belize 
BetlBcp 
BoilMc 
Bel I Sot 
Ben Jerry 
BFrur+R 
Ben hen 
Ben IOC 


_ 65 12ft 12 12ft -ft Carver 

.15+10 531 16ft 15ft ISft —ft Co sc do 

.. STJ 52 504. SI —I Casev, s 

_ 1585 14ft 13 13 —ft CasnCra 

_ 6180 30ft 27ft 28 —2ft CdsnC wt 
_ 1397 15ft 14ft 15 —ft CasAms 
_ HIV, i 4ft —ft COimoDS 
_ 30 2ft Sft 2ft - CosMags 

_ 7778 7 6V. fn - CosRs wi 


BcTVlBr .44 IJ 2277 39*. 37ft 38ft —ft CasnRsc 

BerSGs IJJ8 k.9 21 16ft ISft 15ft —ft CastlEl 

Bemro _ 1822 17ft is”, i, —ft caialSom 

BestPwr _ 2243 15ft 14.+ 15ft -1 CotaM 

Besfoo _ 1387 11ft 10*4 lift ‘ft 

Beltl/Bc J2 10 4 22ft JO'S 22 U +'1 

Be+tiS vw'i ^ 38 6'+ «'.t n'.'j „ 

BtaBs .12 1.0 755 1 1 ft lift lift -ft 
BigOTir _ 214 15*. 14ft 14ft —ft 

BtpRdc _ 598 lift 10>V B 11 -ft 

Bandiy .08 .7 ivao 12ft lift lift —Vs 

BtaLogic _ 196 3ft 2ft SV, — v„ 

BUMWst _ 701 7ft, 1>V U 2 -V, 

BiOMWwtB _ 112 ft ft 

AinCrwrH 97911’,! O’. 1IU! . ■/, 


_ 248 2ft 2ft Ift _ CdJCnm 

2.8 99471ft I9>. 21ft -ft CnnrFFS 
7 rj77flft IOft lift _ ConcHfd 

1720 8ft 7ft 8 -ft Concern 

_ 339 2ft 1ft 2 _ Connor 

-10381 7? ft 19ft 21 -1ft ConcA-Ctu 
_ 5310 27 21ft 23*. — 3ft Conestuo 
— 12303 9Vi, Bft 8V. — ft CcmfTc 
_ 119 Ift Ift l i. —Vi. Con m+a 


_ 3159 Tt Sft 3ft — »'>, DrctiHu 08 5J 41913ft 13 13 — >0 FstAlert - 2501 24 73 23ft +M 

_ 2764 23V, 20ft 21 ft - 2 Cuskd _ 46 12ft lift 12ft —ft FtATn 04 3JX4092 32 31 31ft -ft 

_ iriirrft m+ 17 —ift ootmix _ 139 iv» tu» m. +Vu ftbnc m u 76«ift t9*s ae 

_ 3041 2ft I*. 2ft -ft DoIsLom A0 2J 5418ft 18 18*0 +*A FBOtiS .94 40 1054 25ft Wft 23ft— Ift 


“ If? IJ , ** WsLom A0 2J 

118 Sft 4ft 4ft —I Dovc i ti i i _ 

_ 192 5V. Pi ft _ DroSe 

_ 355812ft lift 12ft -ft r— n 


_ _ rypejs 

1354 5V, SV U SV,,* — V„ j 
*S4 14 12 17ft -v.- 


139 IVw T</» 14ft +Vu FtBNC 

5418ft 18 18ft -ft FBOhs 

4DQ5 ZI 19 21 +T FtBSoG 

703 9ft 8ft 9ft +ft FstBtai 

01512 lift lift -ft FstBteJ 

700 1 0ft 9ft 10W _ , 

11*47 6ft 6ft— ift nctviek 


-1487 7 S’, 59. — Ift ConnWI 1.64 60 171 25 ’t 24 ft - DreveeG J* ll 56S17 24ft 21ft aft— Sft FlQirt A8 U 

- 3031 12ft 10' r l>g — COOO&-P _ 3 14ft 15ft 16ft ■ «Vw dtuSp _ MQi «T Aft FOzBA JOa IJ 


BestPwr 

Besfoo 

Betti /Be 

Betas wl 

BtaBs 

BJgOTir 

BIpRctc 

Btadiy 

BtaLogic 

BaMWst 

BiOMWwtB 

BtaSpeclf 

BUScjri 

BtaPhcr 

Biodr 

Btocrvst 

Biooen 

B<ogn wt 

Bioied 

Biemag 

Btamatr 

Biamct 

Btcmlra 


- 5338 ?’• I’ Vi. 2 —ft 

- 7168 6ft 6*. 6ft - 

00 4.6 17 14ft IJ 13 _ 

_ 5057 10ft 9'. 9ft —l 
.10 .913159 12ft lift lift —i ft 

_ 3929 1V„ Ui. r,- B — 


'IonaE>p 
Consec 
CtvisSv s 
Oxi sum 
CnnsaPd 


_ <21 5 4ft Aft —ft 

.12 10 A9 12*5 lift 12V: +1 

_. 1217 J’-r 7ft 0 —ft 

- 169 14ft 13ft 13H— 1V> 

1.28 ±3 2329 39ft 38 38ft —ft 

03101 964 10ft 9ft ID'! -ft 


— Jr.-. ,v„ -in — unni aii o.i -6- iu « ,'i iu->. - ■« 

_ 785 vu ft — V T Con Slain _ 563 7ft 4ft 7 

- 929 16ft 15 ISft— 1ft CansFn 05 2J 148 Sft 2 2 —ft 

.. 303 Jft 3 JV.. -ft ConWot l.l» A* 629 lBft 17> , 17V, — >i 


97311ft 9 x b 10ft 
I SB 2ft 2 2ft 
1351 Vft Sft 9ft 
466 IV, ift lv„ 


_ 3784 29V; 24ft 25 —4ft ConllO _ 8«S 15V: 14ft 15*. -W 

- 1696 18’. 15'. IS' 4— 2ft C’iMta 00 4J 6114ft 14 14 _ 

-812 6ft 6' . 61, _ OlSav of .72 33.4 IS? 2ft 2 r, B -V* 

_ 7332 14V. 11 12ft-2ft ClfiDI _ 637 10 9ft 9ft • ft 


Dnr«6 
Dryners 
DucdDri 
DurtjPh 
Dirocrft 
DirKn 
Durkran s 
DvTRsh 
DytchC 


2801 4ft 4ft 4ta M —ft, 
1161 14ft 13ft 13V, —ft 
972 9ft 9ft 9*i 
489 9 Bft Bft -ft 
185439ft 35ft 35ft— 3 
124218ft 16ft ISft +tft 


FTBNC 04 3J 76 20ft 19ft 28 

FBOtiS .94 40 105425ft 23ft 23ft— 1ft 

FtBSaGA JOe 1 J 118 18 IS 

FstBtapf 2JS 80 X4327 26ft 26ft _ 

FstBkshs JHe 0 6311ft 11 II —ft 

FstCxtl _ 841 4ft 4 4ft ‘ft 

FTChrtBk „ 998 Sft 4ft Aft — Vu 

FlQirt A8 U 77 18 17 IS +1 

FCTzSA JOa IJ 34 43 42 42 —ft 

FstCtzF 09 1 40 431 ISft 12ft 13 _ 

FCotBn 00 2A 1219 24ft Z3ft 34ft +ft 

PCMBwf 1J5 SJ 13534 32ft 33 +ft 
FCainGn 08 30 20 IB 17 18 
FComCs 1.00 3A B9 12 29ft 27ft 29 +1ft 


20 3MB 10ft is isvi— ift K2S-2* 1 -" U 063^ 34ft 35ft -ft 


401 1 lltftaft 1% 17ft +d FCmcCP* J2 35 131421ft 20ft 20ft _ 


_ 461 5ft 5', SV. -ft CetCmA 

_ 12113 35ft 331! 33ft —'I £r+CmPR 
_ HOIS'.! 13 13V, —V, CetlrTcs 

_ 503 3'. TUn. Sft -*. Ce^x„ 

_ 719 2i, r- 2ft —ft tencad 

_ 538 7 5ft 41. ._ ven*S , „ 


» > CentrtJl, 

' ft OenftTl 
♦ f CPnlgrm 
- Ciintocar 
1 V D Center wt 


531 II ft »» —Vp 
A SV, 5ft 5ft 
43 2ft 7ft 2»u — Vu 
121?'., 19V. 19*. ‘V, 


Aex»Jtm _ 294 JV,, 7 1 , —ft 

Aenovx _ 86 9 8ft o _ 

Autrium _ 307 11*', 18ft 10M. • V. 

Ahrmax _ 550 14 12ft 13'. _ 

AgSra _ 7 17ft lift 17ft -ft 

AgetcyR _ SAa lift lift lift —ft 

Arnica a (0e .9 *a«. in. n lift — ft 

Agaum _ 1937 14' , 17>., 12 —ft 

AgrflJvn ... 31 J J’i J'., —ft 

AirE>p .70 .9 2IJ8 31 V, 20'V:, 21* » - <\ 

AirtAem . 5103 3H ?ft 2*. —ft 

AirS+nw! ... B65 2*'i, ~r/ m 

AjrSm .. 1080 lift 10 10ft 

AirSvs _ SCO d 1 , 6», 7ft 

Airlron .12 347 9>. B .. B v, ,i-. 

6lcm _ 1006 Jft Ji4r h J 

Ak»0 I09P2.9 1331519 S+ft 57’.— Ift 

AiamoGo .36 ZI 856 17 is if 

Alan ICC _ 8392 17 15 IS’e —ft 

Aialen 1 JO 6.2 nS5 I9 1 , «*’ ; 19* , 

Ataanh ,10e .4 2SH3 53ft 12 ab-lh, 

AKido _. 171 Bft 8 8ft —ft 

AU.Us _. *72 1 I A 1+ 174. _ 

Aldus _. a8u8I8ft ?6*'i *6’,_ Ift 

Aio.EJd 08 3 6 3908 24ft 74’. 24ft ■ ■. 

Ata,Eng _ 1100 4*, 41 , j:. _ 

AllnCns 36 3J»IE95ll's KP. lOft — 
AbasR _ 1974 14’ , lift lift —ft 

Alice .15 0 119 19'., 15 19 . 

AJnerm _ 595 S’. 5 Sft -ft 

AilASem . ft?a 3 j't ... j' ,, it.. 


Aialen 1 

Abanh 

Akjae 

AU.U 6 

Aldus 

Aio.EJd 

Ale. Eng 

AlfaCn 5 

AbasR 

Alien 

AJnerm 

AilASvm 

AliFCUr 

AbCltv 

Aft-oa 

Altanun 

AlnOrg 

Allan Pb 

AlnSomt 

AIB+CdP 

ABdSk-s 

Ai*_ai>C 1 

AlldCoo I 

A local I | 

AldCan 

■yrna 

AiidGo ■, 
AlCHIPd 
AltaHI'Jg 

AlOLltV 

AWAslo 

A iiz/Fn 

Aliirisla 

AlK-tlu 

AroM.c 

AloM.c ai 

A'pnal 

Aiprmi At 

AID/vjFUo 

Alpha rl 

AlpLce 

AllaC.ld 

Alta. 

Allwin 

Altera 

Allbc-C 
Allron a 
A mbar 
ArrAwWr 
Amcor 
* mcarP 0 
Amr.an * 

Anv+t>C 
AFFF 1 

Amj-Kr I 

AFT.E 

am-.e: 

AnurOn 

Am5.cc 


1639 l»., ,1 

4 10 10 If 

... 3727 9ft tft 3-, 

- 6 9 9 9 

J2 10 JH 3? 3? — 2 

- Sfl?6 Il'-J 10 10' :— I 

_ 1998 I4’ t 13 ISft 

... 6T?2ft *2 12', -ft 

40 *.r .lie IS 13*, i*ft 

1.08 4 0 71 35 1 Aft 16'., lift -ft 

135+ 90 614 IJ'; 13ft 13ft — 
I72ca.4 554 14ft 13>, 141, -1. 

J3+ 2.3 602 15ft u : j 14ft -ft 
8?£»73'« 2T 1 . a .. -ii. 
00 7 4 57815*, 15 15 ' j - ft 

J* 10 357 15'. 14ft I4ft —4. 

.. ?9J3 19ft 18'- |gft —ft 
0»c J HI 12*. II • ., lift -ft 
_ 371 5ft 4’, j*. —ft 

i*S t ft 6'. ift ■ ft i 

. .*74 19 18* , 16ft _ 

.. 25= *ft Jft 3ft -ft 

_ c 54 I’. 1 ft : _ 

460 .. .. — 

Ii22* 4ft Ift Jft 
_ 109? 1 *, ft 

IWi ■■*■ t 11 lift— l', 

-24392 : ••• 1ft Ift. - -.ft 

.. 124 : 3;, js, 

3576 I*. ■•. u — >. E 

45 J r 3>, 3ft 

. 1558 ’ft Vi 6ft — >4 

. 19174 36', Jjft lift 
.. 4155 70', 1“*. ;o' : -2 1 ', 
.. 1795 15 13*- 14>-. — >4 

1046 5 4', 4ft —ft 

• 463 3 ’1, Ift 

09 c JJ 160 17 -I 26ft -I. 

04 L! Iltf 3'| 1C] *0'| -ft 

.00 4.1 364 14', 13,. IJ... _ 

- 7918 I 1'!., Tl„ — ft 

i«o 7j «5sr-, ;i»4 r?*i 

1.0* IIJ 7TS 9ft 9’ 1 *■., —ft 

.54 £3 354 ift 6' 4 ift — *, 

.73 3.1 305 +' 4 a;, 9'. - *., 

01+ .. ’SftSs’ftiJ 65", -Ift 
- - - «7'.* 3’t 3*. -ft 


Arameti — 12 l»ft I9v» l**» ‘ ' • 

ArtJOrDna J* 10 247017ft 17". 17Va -ft 
ArborHI 1487 aft 20ft 21ft -3 V„ 

ArbrlJII 4809 17V, 15*r> 17V, 

ArchCin - *63 15ft M 14ft —ft 

ArchPts _ 1920 2ft 2ft I": * ft 

Arclco J8 1.0»4764 28ft 26ft 28 *1 

Arden _ 1546 44ft 44ft -ift 

ArdenPd _. *58 12ft 12 12 

Ar+ttufto - 2196 IOV14 9ft 9ft — ft 

ArgoGp 1.16 *J 517 2B'. ?7i/. 27*', — ■/, 

Argosy .. 309920'/, 16ft 18'/. +\Vt 

An»U5Pn 531 Sft 4 ft 5 -ft 

Ansi 01 s 480 Sft 5 5V. 

ArV Best 0* J 10P09 ljft 1 1 ft 12 —ft 

Armor 64 3J 4993 20ft 19ft 20'! -ft 

Arnolds 00 20X1314 20ft 19*,. 19ft —ft 

ArrrtPh _ 565 6 5ft 5ft « ft 

ArowFn J2 20 241 12ft lift 12ft *v„ 

Arowlnt .12 6 513 a 19ft SOft -1 

ArrowTm — 150 9 8 8 —ft 

Artsft - 14618 lift ISft 16 — 2'A. 

Ar«s»C .10 20 2*1 51u 4V» 5 —ft 

Asonle ... 2205 2ft 6V. 7ft -ft 

AsoendC _.2*03SiSft lift 15 

Aseco - 580 7 5ft 3*4 — I Vi 

Ashwrtti _ 499311ft 10ft I Oft —ft 

AspdTl - 12655 29ft 25ft 2Sft— 4 

ASPenBk JO 1.1 2518ft 17 1BV, -1 

AsdBnc 108 3J 222 34'/. 33 34ft —ft 

AiOCmA _ 289 a 1 *, aw a — 1 

AsdCmB - 131 22ft 22ft aft —ft 

Aslecs 1216 17ft lift 17 —ft 

AsloriaF _ 9798 31ft 29ft JJ -1ft 

AstroM .12 IJ 3110ft 9ft 9ft -ft 

AblfOtl 01 e 4 389 2ft 2ft 7ft —ft 

ASITOS* - 35 4ft 4ft 4ft * ft 

AsvslTcti _ 22513ft 12 12 _ 

AlchCst 1014 13». 13ft 13ft -ft 

Athene _ 1892 Bft 61. ift —1ft 

Ataev _ 17 7ft 7'. 7*6 _ 

AtLmsn _ 609 9’A Bft 8% -ft 

Aitmd* J6 2.1 a I7*i 17 17 -ft 

All Am „ 119 2ft H a 2ft -ft 

AIIBev _ 15 4ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

AllClIAir „ 168 4 3ft 3ft —ft 

AltOult - 528 10ft 10 10ft -V, 

AlfSeAfr .33 1 J 149*6 28 26 26ft— Ift 

ATfTde _ 530 10". 9J! 10'/. ,Vi 

Atmei s _ 33630 27 77ft 74 — w„ 

AirUSfl _ 2201 5 I6 Vt 14*4 IS _ 

Atrt.L _ 365 6ft 6ft 6ft _ 

AlwdOc _ 72 13V, I3ft 13ft - ft 

AuSon -1353019 16'i 18ft -ft 

AuroSv - 10722 7ft 6ft 7 ft -’ft 

AuhK « — 4786 5ft 4ft Jft -ft 

Aulolnf _ 509 3ft 3ft Jft -*1 

Autcams _ 864 16’! 16ft 17ft —ft 

Aulodw J4 10 125 a* '1 7"i a -ft I 

Auioc* .48 .911548 54*5 51 ft 52* . —ft 1 

AutoGo _ 7477 17'k. 10ft lift — ft 

Autolmu -. 1045 7=. 7'A 7ft CBrewc 

Aulolnd _ 602? 76*4 J4ft 26ft —ft C-CUB4 

Autotni s -15104 18ft 16ft 17ft .. CAIWix 

4 volar _ 402 36ft 35ft 36 —ft CSBnc 

AvidTch -12272 29 77 S 28ft -ft CCA 

A-ndta - 1711 7W 7ft 7ft —ft CCBFn 

Ad CM .02+ A S08 5ft SV. Sft _ CCOP 


_ 5826 10 91, 10 -V„ 

_ 355 5ft 4ft Jft —1. 

_ 487 2ft 2ft 2ft - ft 

_ 7368 7"! 6ft ’ -ft 

_ 31 Aft Sft 6ft . ft 

_ 103S 6ft 5ft 6 -'t 

- 106 T» "ft 'Vu 

_ 4397 3‘.'4 ?Vu 3ft *V a 

5 _ 10 I 1 I 

JO 2J 117910 Bft 9ft —Ift I CFldBfc 

- 110 4ft 3ft T-i —ft C+nGarcta 

- 1203 1ft IV, 1ft -ft. OrtaS-. 

... *08 If'., 10ft lift -ft 1 - runa ' 

.. 105 ft ft ft 

... 125 1V. ft ft 

880 8 6ft 7ft —ft 

ll'l 4’, 4'.: -ft 

11801'Vu l'ft. l'V„ . 

104 0 3.* *531*. 30ft 31 

274 7ft 6 6*. — ' . 

IJ* 37 15400 33ft 30ft 33ft ‘7ft 

J7 IJX2237 7I". 70ft 20ft -ft 

757 7ft ift Aft —ft 

262 7ft Ift Sft ‘ft 

.. 163 11ft 10V. lift -ft 


-V, CellGefiS - 2332 16V. 11 12ft -2ft ClrlDI 

_ CeiiPra _ 3541 25”': 23 23ft— 2ft CnvSd 

Caileor _ 39* l’v, !•/,. 1ft _w CaoprD 

_l„ Cdlsiar _ 502511ft 10ft lift -ft 

CelCmA _ 789 45ft 4Sft 45ft -ft 

GrtCmPR -10568 22 20ft 21 V. - 1 1 , 

CellrTcs _ 5386 15". 12*. 12Vi— 7ft 

Celin - 168: 6ft 6 6ft 

Cencan - 3340 a", SOft 70ft — 2ft 

Cented JO l.» 169 18 17ft 17ft —ft 

CenitBcP JA 1.6 50 23ft 22V, ?3 -V, 


637 10 9ft 9*. • ft 

351 2ft Ift 2 
27 Ift Jft 2ft -ft 
108 7-1 7 7 — ft 

19 16 15 16 - "z 


1 .50 1 1 3.0 15111ft II 

_ 10601 70'-. 19' X 19". —ft 
.04+ 0 151 1C*. 10 IDt. _ 

_ 751 13ft 12ft 17ft —ft 

24*7 11 10ft 10ft - 

— 2000 36 19". 19ft -6 

-3183312ft 10 lift * 11: CorCswT 

_ 687 7*. 6 rft - 1 i^jrrecn 

_ 7*513V. lift 12ft — 

1.12 3.6 3021 J1 30ft 31 - ft 

_ 300 10ft 9ft 10’ . - ft 

.47 10 J7 16'. 25'.’ 2S‘i-l 
75 3.0 164 75 24*. 74ft -ft CcHCPS 

.40 2.5 2 16". 16'. 16'. -I Lourer 

40 2.8 34 15*! '*ft 14'-! —j, Cdvnlrv 


„ 19 16 IS 16 -ft 

JO 7 7 7118 19ft 18V, 18ft —ft 
_ 3197 16 1SV. lift - 
_ 151126 24ft TPs —ft 
_. 643811V: ?ft 1 0ft— Ift 
_ 3844 IOV. •'* — V, 

_ 3169 11ft 18ft 18ft -ft 
. 132 2'. 2 I 

7837 471, 44 46ft -2*. 
_ *661 23 20W 71ft— Ift 

63 5 *V; 4ft -ft 

17»8]?ft 17V, 17ft— 1 
2498 15'.X 14 14ft —ft 
... 2*5 9ft Bft Bft —A. 
_ 1868 9ft ift 8’. ‘I'l 
... 26? 3ft 3ft 1ft 

™ 817 25ft 24 24ft— 1 
-73 1>V; 17 17": — 

20 17 lift 1= 

.08 - 70138 18ft lift 17ft— Ift 

.10+ Jb 35 16ft lift 16’,— 1 
- 5654 51**48 49’.— Ift 


_ 1558 21*. 30ft 20 ft 


1 09 e 5J jB g» 20* . 19ft a ft _* ft 

_ 12^ 9ft 8ft 9ft - ft Oiorta 
00 2.6 117 18ft 16V, 16ft -ft ChrmSn 

J6 20 834 32 29V, 29 V, -3 

7646 38ft 15*. 35ft -3 OirlFffls 

- 6481 13ft 12ft 12ft.— OttSIls 

_ 60 16ft 15*. 16 — OvSftn 

- 608911 10 IO«u *V'u o£t3| 

_ 596J lift 10' . 10W _ Qvckrss 

- 2014 3ft Sft 3 W „ SeSonta 

- W5»4 l'Vu 2W dSS s 

_ S33 tVp =<b ajg -'/i. rhmTrV 

08 IJ 66 48 46 46 -Ift 

•» '-5 m U'/4 12"! Uft -ft om 

- 301 v.» Vu Vi, — Olmowr 

845 5ft Sft Sft _ OwvCp 

1985 Vi, ft V+ QtasEag 

JO 10 570 10ft 9ft 10 -ft oSjV s 

_ 485 2ft 1ft 2 -ft aic«e* 

04 13 95 19V. IBft 19 -ft QiSSTs 

JO 10 1911 9ft 11 -ft Oiki-Cmp 

- 7800 9ft 7ft 8ft —ft OiSkT 

02 e J 30 Bft ift 6ft Chtooorn 

- 652517ft 14 15ft— 1ft OWsTcT 

_ 1768 3ft 3Vp 3Vu — Vu Ch^dn 

_ 48911 10'« 10ft —ft cRjjSs 

_ 551 14ft 13ft 1 3ft -ft okDt a 

.16 1.9 231 9 8V, Bft —ft 

_ 176? 22’/. 19ft Sft -2ft OtaJesI 
_ 13389 41 ft 38V, 39 —2ft q,S» 

_ 2321 35ft 34ft 36ft ChSmrt 5 

- miSft lift IS' 4 -ft OBER 


arvd 
lr A 

IrS .... 

‘ .08 ..70138 18ft li", 17*. — Ift 

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44 20 89 27ft 73 77 — *- CmrBrt .02 .134678 25ft Q 73 — 2V, 

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109 ift 6'* ift -*• CrarCm 

.10 13 93 4ft 4 1ft .. CrBuMol 

37 17 77 1? lift 1? _ CrTcnLt 

... 3308 1?*. lift lift Cr+dSrS 

21f 2'r 7ft ?’» -ft CrdAEPS 

... 2904 30ft 28W 30ft - I OeeRsh 

... 173014 1?ft 12*T qSa? 

*3+11 1885 21 TOft 20ft -ft CresArwl .. Cl Ilk Ift I IX —ft 

1 - 41 *ft 4ft 4ft — «’d c.-stFn 

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*0 . _ 


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Chomp! s JO 8 671 26W 73". 34ft— 2ft 

QimpPr 346 Jft 3ft 3ft —ft 

asr- r s« a 4H 

s.iTWE&arft ST 

OlrtFcS s _ 70512ft 1 IV. 12 —ft 

OttOnFs 00 11 1278 20ft 19ft 19ft — J, gvmRs 

Oioltm _ 1426 ift 6 ift _ 

OikTctl ... 1224 *V» 31. 4U — ft 

CttacKrs« -77577 Sft 4ft 4ft — 

CheOonta _ 760 Bft 7ft Bft - ft v- u,ln ” 

Ch+scdis _ 8007 17 13ft lift —ft Culps 

ChmTrV _ 1405 6 5ft S’, -ft CumbFd 

Oimfob _ 840 1? 10ft 10ft _ CUPNBk 

OimFin 04 2.0 39 42 39ft 42 -2ft Cundle* 

Oimpwr _ 253 4W Jft Jft —ft CurTOl 

OwvCp _ 31131 29ft 30 —ft OrtlCn 

OtesEng 1904 7=* 5"! ’ -Ift CvbrOot 


114437ft JTft 37=6 -"4 

„ 7741 1ft Ift 1W — V H 

. 73* 4ft 3*. 4ft -ft 

_ 18568 76’* 73> ! ISft ■ ft 
_ 2023 Sft 21 21 — ft 
_ 6868 23*. Mft TOW— 1ft 
„ 468 8 6ft 7'.', -ft 

_ 12*7 4ft 3ft 4", 

428 1ft 1ft Ift -ft 

_ 684a lift 21ft _ 


Cryolile 


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1904 7=* S'! 7 -1*, CvbrOo. 

92 2pft 19 10ft -ft cvberonlc 
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25511ft II II -ft Cvrk 

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00 1.9 36 lift 31=4 31ft _ Ctoto, 

7 -f.'U Si, Isf 

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25956 20'4 18ft !»V, —l, 

196 17ft 12 17ft -ft CrS? 

558 13W 12ft UV. ofS/ 

2728 17'- I*.'., dv, . -v* 

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BE I El 08 

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Bailey 

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Baker J .06 

Baicm-m .03 


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_ 1359 8ft 7ft 8ft 

08 13 1E0 6= . 6 6 —ft 

JO 26 w a TV? 7ft _ 

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.600 28 TO’ 72ft 20ft 71 ft - I 

.12+ 1.2 188 9ft 8ft 9ft -ft 

.08 0 913 15ft 13 13 —7 

... 510 S'* 4ft 5ft -ft 

.. *328 19*.. 18' W, 187, —Jft 
... 29 SV. 4ft 4=6 _ 

... 18199 5S ft 51ft 54ft -1ft 
_ 3343 30'v 27ft 77ft— 2ft 
- 1743 10ft 9ft 10 -v* 

_ 228 Ift 1*6 Ift —ft 

... 912 5ft S Sft - ft 

_. 203 « ft ft .ft 

.„ 49 1ft ft 1ft ,v„ 

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M2 3.9 *96 30 38ft 29 —ft 

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_ SO 18ft 171. IE". — ainlG* 

_. 3658 72". l»ft 39’, Qmtrtatt 

... 1069 Jft 7ft Tft — V. Cota 

- 88 12ft lit. lift CJubCor 

00 20 2 72 7? 72 —’4 CoOpBV 

- 18 ?*1 2*k 2ft -. CstBnc 

. -. 15913*4 12 12*, -V, CstBnpf 

.40 2J I1218*. 18 18 -. r-aun,. 

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310 4 3": 3", — W S2E, 1 

_ 1412 9’, 7',i 9 -A. 

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Jib 2.7 103 10'*: 9ft 9ft —ft 

08 3-5 18151, 24*1 25 -ft gSffT 

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■lSe 1 J 418 13". 121, ir:ii —ft S®®'**’ 


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...50085*9', 63V, 68*. -3ft Cytocre 

» 77 '4 18'! 17*6 1f.» M CVW 

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_ 240 23 22'/. 22'-. —ft 

- 8797 16ft I4'.i ISft— 1 ft I 

_ 1534 8ft Bft 81, -ft 1 

_ 7170 17ft 15W la'.— 1W 
. ._ 180 6ft S= . 5ft —ft D&NFn 

1.28 70 *02S2ft 52 » — ", D&NFwt 

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.17 J 1921 31 *i 31 U 31ft -ft DRHOTl 

- 207 4ft JV. 4ft —ft DBA 

08 11 15 23 W 72 23 DCH 

.900 80 5311*1 lift lift _ DEPA 

_ 201 110' V„ 9ft 10 —ft DERB 

471 4ft ift ift —ft OP&R 

_3S188 3Tft 31*.| 33ft— Jft DH Teh 
... 675499 31 W 72 73 ft -8". DM Mot 

15+ 0 « 1 45 77ft 26+4 26ft _ ONA PI 

.. 225 Sft 4ft Jft —V. DNApt 

_ 14141, 14*1 JJft _ DNXCp 

108 38 Ml 29 28*4 78’k— *i OSStta 
« 31 30 JO _ DSC 

04 30 359 24ft a 24ft -7V r DSC Inf 

_ 320 Sft 5 Sft _ DSP Go 

04 20 4 29 Tift I7ft -1’., DSP 

- 257 5ft 5'* Sft — DTIndS 

_ 7381 8*4 61, 7-ft— l:v„ DOSA 
_ 907 7' j 7 7ft .ft DVIwf 

_ 3700 3ft 3V„ >u —Yu DuiCCdS 

1071 13 12=6 13 - ft Dtv Jour 

—ft DoirvB 

-ft CWrv* 

- ft Df*u 
— ■- D*adi 


_ 684 27 lift 21ft _ 

_ 183 7*« Jft 2*. -ft. 

opo _ 964 1ft 1*, 1ft *•!» 

opCpI .95 240 US *ft Jft 31. 

osCom _ 905? II’., 10 10"'u 'Vu 

T»smon _ 191 r.'i 8*, 81* —ft 

- 177 7 ift ift — V. 

.. 29 18 17 17*i — W 

_ 901 6ft Sft 5ft —ft 

_ 196 J’.V 2W Sft _ 

103 6"! Sft Sft — * : 
7380 3 Jft 7ft — * » 
■45e 1 J 738 37", 36 w 16' V,. .V, 

lip 5 08 0 1794 l?"i 9ft 9*, —2ft 

imbFd 08 10 74 54 53ft Oft —ft 

IDNet. 03t SJ 85 10 9 9ft „ 

irMIe* „ 1903 5 W 5 5 ~ 

Ft-TCh _ 1647 Jft 7ft 2*t>» — 7u 

ISIOI _. 421 27ft 2*ft 24ft —2 ft 

brOo. _ 259 Sft 5ft Sft —ft 

b+ronlc _ 73 aft 7ft 7** —ft 

gneo _ 3582 20 18 1 Bft— 2 'A 

onus _ 1981 8*0 7ft 8 —ft 

Tl.Cp _ 13676 24ft 20 ft 21ft _. 

Tk _ 4795 27 soft 22 — «V4 

Id _ 30SS 4ft 4ft 4V* —ft 

■tRdun _ 161 3ft 2ft 3ft *ft 

iocre .. soi 4ft 3ft 4ft -ft 

taon _ 6774 4 3ft 3*6 - 

tartar _ 3SS4 Bft 8 Bft * ft 

tRx _ 4369 ift 5ft Sft «ft 


I "SIS? 3 51 * T -ft 03+ 3.1 8613ft 13ft 13ft 

_ 30476 19ft 15ft 16ft — Jft FFdBnm 0Oa20 13 36 26 86 

I 619 2ft iV & +H WFOOT* 30 6321ft 19ft 21ft 

_ 1754 1! 10ft 10ft — Vt, ' -08 20 1539 M 38 

Aft 5ft 6 -ft FIFnBk 04+10 2 40 * 40 

9ft BVi, 9 -ft BFnCrs -52 30 X32614W 13ft 13ft 

7ft 7ft 7V, —ft FIFnCp 00 20 121216ft 15ft 16ft 

10 9ft 9ft —ft FtFnINs 54 li 52 36 34 35ft 

8 7ft 8 *ft PFnWMs 00 1} 7919ft 18ft 19ft 

9 Bft Bft 4ft FTFr+Ws 08 13 x63II5ft 1* 14ft 

nv, 21ft 21ft— Ift FIGM+dS _ 40 Aft Sft Sft 

15ft 14ft 14ft —ft FHarS S 00 1.9 521ft 21ft 21ft 


FIEStn _ 860 26ft Zi*A 26ft _ 

FtEsu .17+ 2J 1696 Sft 7ft 7ft —ft 
F1FCOP 02b 30 361 15ft 1414 15ft tlft 

FFdKYs 00 20 5 31ft 31ft 31ft —ft 

FtFMIs S3 7J 2890 23ft 72 23ft —ft. 
FFdEH 08 30 483 16 ISft 15ft —ft 
FFSLOH 03+ XI 8613ft 13ft 13ft "ft 
FFdBnm 00a 20 1336 26 26 +1 

PrFdCDv 00 30 6321ft 19ft 21ft _ 

FFncOHsl-OB 20 153* 31 38 —ft 

FIFnBk 04+10 2 40 40 40 — V? 


-307910 9ft 9ft -ft RflN 

418 8 7ft 8 ift PFttW* 

_ 687 9 8ft Oft 4ft FJJrrHd 

10OO4J 1 21ft 21ft 21ft— Ift FIGoHd 
_ 34 15ft 14ft 14ft — it. gtoB: 

- 554 10ft 10 10ft —ft RHOW 

JOB 40 40 S *ft 5 -ft FtHrrS' 

J0b A3 40 4ft 4ft 4ft -ft FstlruS 

56ol.7 100 33ft Bft 32*1 +ft Hlntflc 
00 30 303V1 22V1 2Jft -ft FTUrtv 

= 4Uft^i%=3t ^ 
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FFnWMS 00 1 1 7919ft 18ft 19ft - 

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FIGc4+dS _ 40 Aft 5ft 5ft —ft 

FHarBs 00 1.9 521ft 21ft 21ft —ft 

F1HOW 1.18 A3 2328 aft 26ft 27ft -ft 

FlHmSvS 00 30 313ft 13ft 13ft - 

Fsflrdis 02 3J 40/16*4 lift 16V! _ 

FilntBC .40 IJ 42 23ft 23 23 —ft 


390 13ft 13ft 
7935 4ft 4ft 
725 18ft 16ft 


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03 2-3 1 00 14 13ft 13«Vp— W H 
100 30 20129 28ft 2Bft *\k 
08b 11 360 22 Jlft 22 


.» .* 725 lift lift 17ft _ FIMIM8 

_ 274 Ift 1 1ft —ft FMWA 

_ 2799 3ft 2ft 3 ift. JJItGj 

08 8.6 M I Oft MV6 10ft _ glDrtg* 
00 2.1 841 2«4 28*6 29 —ft 

_ 723 5V, 4*4 5V- -x u H2 1 * 5 

_ 2722 6’- Sft 6ft *ft FTPcWw 

.. 130 2 1ft l'Vu _ F"'Pp*m 

_ 421 7ft 6=6 6=6 —ft MSBKNJ 


08 20 1247 27ft 26ft 27ft -ft 
_ 135 IS lift 15 *V> 

- 101 ift 5ft 5ft —ft 

JOb 1.7 111ft lift lift— 1 

J 7 30 144 21 TO 20ft —ft 
.98 40 45 23 ft 22 22ft —ft 
02 17 76 14ft 13ft 14ft —ft 

00 10 41 29ft 28 28 


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05b 20 >5 28 26ft 26ft— 1ft 

_ 219 15 14ft 14ft —ft 
»0* 30 10263 29V6 2BV, 28ft —ft 
-18e 13 32 14ft 13ft 14ft —ft 

-40b 10 13623 22ft Uft —ft 
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00 10 18522ft 21ft 21ft —ft 
_ 10911 lO'A 10ft -ft 
_ 33 33 » 32 — 1 

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l7’-4 14V. ISft —ft 
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29* Sft 4ft 5 _ FTSoye 

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= 6 


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.701 SJ 1800 I Jft I3ft 13ft —ft 

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_ 1196 77 2S'u 25*4—1 

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2JS 9.9 321 24ft 22 22ft— tft 

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814 31ft 31 J1 V. ?ft 

-54585 67ft 57ft S8ft-2ft 

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- 478 4ft 3ft 4 - 

_ 1306 16 14ft ISft * ft | 


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- 9580ft .& 3ft' 

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1041 90 14920 19ft » •• r-_ 

- 438 2ft 1' -2 ^1 

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103.20 19245V, 4PA *»+» 
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125 IJ 60190ft W MOW —Hi 
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- 271715 ; 1218 Rft— Ift 

- 2295 U DVTJft - 
_ 2550 16 WfcWJk *V 

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J5+10 38255=6 54ft S5ft -ft PlFdFns 00 ii 9 25ft 23ft 23ft _ 

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_ 79 BV Tft Tft — ft Ftechlm _ 1310 4ft 3*8 4ft +118 

10 10 5 5 5 —Vi Fberv - 60*721 20% 20ft - 

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- 1422 14 12ft 13ft —ft Rosdrs . _ 221B10 9ft 9ft —ft 


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_ B71 5ft 4ft 9ft. -Vu Ra=H1 08 11 27015ft 15*8 15ft —ft 

_ 204 Ift Ift 1ft - Ffexfm - 136713 12 T7ft —ft 

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- 4685 5ft 318 4'Yu+ltt, Ftowlnt _ 3709 5ft 4V 5’A -ft 

_ 214 13ft 12 13 - Foamwc _. £78 14ft 14 14 —ft 

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_ 2330 9ft 5V 9% -V FdLlaA 09 10Z3533 598 5ft 5V —ft, 

_ 6501 5 4* ft, 4 Wu —ft, Foaslnd .40 b 5.0 116 8ft 7V | 

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108 60 12618*8 17ft 18 - Fflrsetl -110115=6 13*8 15*8-2 

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852 a Si M - g£2?N 0 

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- 4610» 21% 71ft -ft Dotta+y 

- 60“ 19ft 16': 1»%— |ft Dctmctr 

- 1047 17ft 10ft lift —ft Dot SCO 

J2+I.5 105 IS 14*. 14ft -ft DBStl 

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_ 3618 V, 18 18ft “ft 

_ 44 6’.! Sft Sft —v 

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_ 474 17’., lift 12ft —ft 

_ 646 4", 4 4V —ft 

_ 367 8ft 7% 7* , _t 

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02 + 0 611142 40A' H 40ft— Ift 

.. 1847 4 ft 3". 31. —ft 

.13 J 66 03 79 T9 —4 

. 7650 7ft 6ft 6ft _ y„ 

.. 419 2*x„ 2V 2% —V 

- 50 ift 4 4 _ 

_ 54 9ft Bft Ift 

.. 1200 2ft 2 Jft - ft 

2298 7% 7% 7ft —ft 

72513ft 12V, 13 —ft 

- 289 27*, 21 *8 2118 -V 

- 634 Tft ift 7 —ft 

_ 105 Jft 2ft 3% _ 

- .155 S 5 S —ft 

_ 2483 14 13ft lyi.u— i/u 

746 S’ i ift 4»8 - % 

_ 1004 10% 9ft 10 —V, 

” ,JSI£ !> *%. 


124 1ft IV HVu — Vu F romT c 

.. 11* 7ft 7% 7>* —ft Fratfir 

688 7V8 IV IV _ FrumS wt 

2667 2Vu 2V 2*8 —ft, FmWd 

- *64 »■ ft) ft, —ft, FmkBk 

_ 30 2% 2ft jft —ft FrtcBk of 

- 576 3*8 2% 2ft —% FrokS 

_ 3344 19*4 17ft 11*8 —V FrkEPO 

_ 4765 19% 17ft ISft— 1 ft Fr+dS 

- »294 3% J% 2% —48 FrshChC 

- 779 17 16 16% —% Fritter 

- MO 5 Aft 4ft _ Frrym 

... 776 2’Vu 2*8 2ft _ Frfedmrr 

- 272 Sft S'/. 5ft „ FrtsBav 

06+ 0X1387 14 12ft I2V— 1 Frtlz 

- 4« 5ft 5*8 SV —ft FrzFdS 

- 62 2 4 3*. Jft —ft Fulcrum 

00.10x270821 50ft 42% 48ft -3ft FutrHB 

_1 - 14 7ft 7 7 —ft FutJan 

JO 1.1 MS 19% 18*6 18ft _ Funco 

. — — TOO 8ft I Sft — % Furun 

10? 4.1 36 26% 34V 34V — % FUsionSy 

_ 77 Bft 8 8 —V FutarFHt, 

- 2S217% lift 17 -ft FUtNaw . 


- 63 3*8 3V 3ft _ Rjtrmdte 

_ 763 Tft 4ft 6 —1ft FutmOwt 

_ 4Q 14ft 13V T3*6 —ft 

- 275514ft 12% 14 +1 


F romT c _ 296012ft 11V 17 

Frmfiv _ 469 3ft 3V. 3ft —ft 

FromSwt .. 119 h ft ft _ 

FrnWri 101 17 90 38% 37% 38 - V 

FrnkSk Jlr 20 152 9 8*8 9 

FrtcBk Pt .90 70 80 12ft 11V 12% — % 

Frol® 02 10x37827 25 25ft -V 

FrtcEPb _ 733 12% lift lift —ft 

Fred! 00 10 1032 14ft 13ft 13V -ft 
ErohCh C _ 7266 Z5V 22ft 23*8-3 

Fretter 19 4Y, 4ft 4ft — ft 

Freym _ 11 5 4% 5 -ft 

Frfedmrt _ lira 13 12, I2M —ft 

FrtoBav _ 168 Sft 4 V 4V —V 

Frd* _ 420 31ft 2flft 28ft— 2ft 

FrzFdS .12 0 49716V 15V 16 -ft 

Futaixn _ 36011ft 10 10 —3% 

FutrHB 08 10 1005 35ft 34-A 35ft -ft 

Fulton 00b 30 5927 36 36% -V 

Funco _ 707 17V 16ft 17 — V 

Futxm 04 1.7 6215ft 14ft 14ft _ 

FusIonSy _ 31761 lift 16 16% _ 

RtarMIs -1164112 10 11 —1 

R/Mtaw - 136 13% 12ft 12V ♦ ft 

Rltrotoe _ 265 6 5V 6 —V. 

FutmOwt - 68 2Vu 2V8 2% —ft 


mm.: 




= M 

— BOOB 
_ 734 S 


23 23% — J 

SV L"3 


V- 




BV 7Y, 8V -*ft, 
17V 14ft ISft— 3V 


— 77S2! 17ft 14ft 15% 
_ 914 25% 24ft 25 


I 844 0% 8% 9 —1% SKS -SZ A SS3W^ > 4 14 

1 ‘ESS ffl fS =K MPZ 3 B 35 3 S 5 


J5® 4J 315 f \k 

_ 314523% 
.10 0 4030 18% 


00 2.9 ??30Mft 19=i _ Datum 


75 Jft 2 31. . Cache S — 28 7ft 7 ta 

316 2% I’i J CACI _ 2552 I Oft 9ft 10 

.9 BS2B17V lift 17% CottavS 100+50 913 29ft 7=’, 39ft -1 

... 2198 9=7 9% Cottoln _ 544 ft :'%• — 

’" ‘T? 1- J 5 . Z.= — * r ww. « VI It 1+164 141. 14, .1 


_ ! CBcgpA 00 3.7 814 21% 20ft Jl ft -% DovCO 


CatnrGdS 106 6.1 3*7 21 % 20% 20% —1 


- 613 2ft 7 3% Z% codmus 00 10 243 15% 14ft 13-... - V,, gXFit 

.. 779 13% 12 I Jft Tft Caere _ 1709 8 7’-. Tft ■ % i 

154 13V lift IJ _ Cdkm 1 SIS, TJU Si n,. "I' 


56t I0>, 9ft 9*8— 1 
175 y K U* 


AmBcps 00 3 0 38J If’, I* 


ABnkr xi 3.1 
AmBiogn 

AmBl.la 
AmBucin 
AtrClrv 4 
ACIa.m 

ACuib^i ?j , j, 

Ameaak- 

Am&:ei He 3 

AmEduc 

AmFB 70 1 9 

AFiltyn .96 j s 

AmFrgt l 
AC rf+el a jo i b 

AHItaea c 
AmHold 

AindF ?■ jo 

AmirPt wt 
AminPt; 

AmLfepf ?.I6 8 6 
AMS 

AMedE 

Am.M65ot 

AtUlabJc 

A*ptn, 2 ro 4 5 
AmO.IIDv 

amPac 


APtv* 

APwrCu ■ 

APUfalrtb 

AP+cr 

ArtiRtu 

AmRp-^j 

AmSctRr 

ASOWFI. 

A V-t 

Ajlud.0 

-niSucr 

Am r+ti> 

ATiav+l 

AUtdiStb 

iLidGwt 

AVcna 

AmWn.ta 

•V.Voud 


x* 3.1 8?l ?2ft 21’., 21% — ft 

2344 5% , 4ft .*, 

. 4SC0 111'. 9' , 9*-j — I 
. 16*4 15 IJ" *, 14 

82 IS': I4>, 14% . ft 
275 J', 2-u 2*. -'ft 
24 10 ID'Sle', 15' , 15ft —1. 

.. 4715 is* , IJ'. 13’,— Ift 

53+ 1 5'C 13 r , 9% _ =, 

2*3 J’, 4’-, 4" ft 
70 19 570 II 10*1 10ft 
96 is SS^’.TB ?B -Ift 

10334 I9>, left io _i, 

50 1.8 16545:8’ : 7'% 28' ■ -'8 

. 2256 IS 14'. 15 I, 
»l I ■, l v r 1ft ""t 
?i 3 0 101 13 12 12 -V, | 

.. 7*9 -g f . <•« 

. ?Biii - 1-. i»_ _ 

■I* 8 6 s::5". ?5 :s T 

47’ja'., 20" : 23", ift 
3115 9*4 8=4 gft _ >8 

... 50? I?'. 19 19 _ ", 

43*11". 10'. 10' > • ft 

?0 4 5 64$ » 4-ft 48ft . 

6’» 9'.j 8i„, Bft , . w 

- 3653 16 14ft 14=# ft 

■K' I’, J % 

402K 7?ft 18=! to —T 
8T56 13’, IJ 13% _ 

7 - 3J «('. ift ift .. 

371 I3=, 13 13 

’’?) *9% IT', ljft • |ft 

::9 1 .=, n in, . i, 

I 47 23ft JT' - ?J' . _ % 
.32 5,8 Vi ift s j .; „ft 

o« ?j 13=3 1% j , S’; 

»6S32 J*'./ 7?*»— Jft 

' IB' — I'" * 

302 13", 12% lift 

- I5SO 5ft jft 4ft ._% 

*96 l’« Ift !■ , 


J 39=8 21% 19% 21% -V, 
A S3 8 7 8 -1 

1.7 «3 14 14 14 

— 35616 14% 14%— IV- 

- 2022 I}*, Uft 14ft — V 


" ?2S2 7? s? T' • ?* 5nc«s .W 

— 8 V A' ! 4 -ft r—nn 


02 30 327 16 IS 1 , I5=» 
- 183 5V SV 5",. 


Comtna 
CmolMdi 
Como « I 


60 *0 274 T4V 24 24 —V, DowObnA 

.— 80 1 1 '.! 10’.*: 1 1 — ft Dcr.xix 

— 810 08 35=4 37", -ft Dawson 

04 1 014424 18V 17 18% — ", DavPun 

— 673 5=: 5 5ft — ft DeVrv 

£» 0 '*3861?* 4 1P8 16'/. — Ift D+WtaM+ 

09 46844017ft ISft 14*8-1% D+Sw 

— 7*1 14W 1 JV 14", - % Deck Out 


BaMjm _ 3022 15". 14ft 14ft — V CrtMfc 

Batin* _ ja B'.. ,=6 ■ V, CoISBI: 

BonPxmc 1.00 3.1 713 32% 32 BV) - % CoOon 

BcOnc rtC350 4.0 S46SBV S7ft 58 -V, Cotowov 

BncFitOK li 10 145 15 14ft 15 _ C tfume t 

Banons 3044k# ]« 5ft ,i, C omw tp 

BrwGalic 02r .9 6430 34*8 31%33'Vu - Tiu Ca/IbB. 
BcaSau I HD 3.7 384 31 29 39 W _% C omg, 

BoNJ 00 3 3 109 24% 23'.. 24% - 1 % CwnbNe 

Bancl+c _ 1368 23V 21 72*’, — % CcmOSnd 

BanaoM 9+ 6.6 207 15*8 14ft 14ft —V CambTdi 

gOtatopf 06+3.6 92 23ft 22ft 23=8 -ft CommAsn 

BkSoum 04 2.4 831219ft 17ft ir<„_at M CunvoB 

BhCrorai *4 IJ 9333V 30 72*, -2% CWm+fl 

BrucNH .16+ J 310 30 19 70 -I CWincA 

.24 10 165 13% I3"J 13*8 _ Condok) 

.10 1.3 172 7% 7ft 7% * ft Cannes 

210'., 9V 10ft _ CatmEAP 

55 10", 9ft 9ft _i CannExe 

JO 0 503 WVu 33ft 33% _ Carton I 09 

*0 3J 2133 18ft 17ft 18 -ft canon* 

.40 20 189 20% 19*4 70 - % Candor 00 

00 3 1 797 19V 19ft 19'., - % Canlab 

0? 10 739535% 33V 34V — % Cental 

- 529 1 % 1 = # ‘ =8 Canlbry 

- 757 1 % IV 1*5 _ 5wJb« 

.40 9.4 491 4V 4% 4*. -ft 


CctFncJ 04b 2.7 739 t*>-, 1* lift - % 1 

ft COMM3 - 9801 21=8 19ft 19=. _% 


- »200 Tk 4% 7 —1 

_ — 7 ?6 3ft 7'»u 2'V-, • "<u Detnlnc 

convnn+t 773014ft 15ft lr-, -vT o+ScSii 

— mm 3\f I'» J'.ii * b DcidbE 

SSmie nilSft 17% ittxZuS bSSov 

CmSNJ of 100 5.7 4 26*4 26' i 76% - I*. DOWlm 

CmBMO s 08 2.1 788* 32ft 31 % U", - % OettCotr 

CmcfiVA Mb 70 377 25% J4 —( P+tef^l 

5m Or JO 4.0 813 IB 17 I’W— 1 2^5 lrtf 

Cmare 79 4.1 75* jru, ti' , 17 — S«*Jta= 

CmcjCa _ Tori 14% 13ft 14 „ DenPine 

CmcfiOft 00b 2.0 12 16 15 15 —I D+ltNC 

Cm cBN r .15+ IJ lOSfll", 0 v, 8ft —2% CwrtlOn 

CrtiCBsn _. 63 11% 10% 10ft Dtntsply 

Cros^tf - *799 21*1 XV 21V, -ft DwOtV 

CultRS 08. 0 307 14% 13% 13ft _% D+Omq 

CmQrfNC .931 8.9 74 10ft 10 10'-: DCWF1SS 

Comlrtl * 097* 1% J'u I"., —bZ DitIDt 

ComFnt *77914+ I". l-t 3 " O+tSya 

LXmEnA _ s ri t z - r..„ _ Otr*C 


3", — 
79*.— J'- 


l=W 14 : 13 tj _ % I 
IM4 6ft Jl. 6 — 

• -K >■? sv S’. . V ; 


BkSoum 

BkCroni 

BructiH 

BanhAd 

Snvt/Td 

BnkUtpt 

B5UTF of 

BkWorc 

Bankrss 

BnkFsl 

Bkntti 

Ban la 

Bony M3 

BdnvSLJ 

BartvRT 

SanvrtSy 

Baretl 

Barra 
Bar +t Bus 
BaictRs 
BsTnB rr 
BsTnA 
BasPtr 
BtBEZM 
BasatF 5 
EatTcch 

BovK'OOP 

BavVw 

BavBks 

Bgyprt s 
B+auCtl 
BedBta x 

IWrljui 

BetF use 


_ 1451 20'.! 10=. 19ft _ 

00 4.7 65 9 I' . 0V . % 

J5+ 80 1036 3 J’., 3 . ft 

_ 917 2*4 2% 2ft 

70 31V, 33% 301: —ft 

- 2 Sf Ilf *'» •*» —ft 

= tS r JS\ 

1- AU ft r 

_. 913 loft la I,'., —ft 
_ 926 lift 10ft 10ft —V 
187511% 12ft 13% 


CmnUSc 

CrncSCA 


11 

26 

25 

25 

1915 

35 

3ji , 

22% 

-TO 

4't 

4% 

ii. 

904 

1% 

1*: 

i"> 

213 

13 

IP; 

17% 

34 

17 

10ft 

12 

21? 

31*1 

e«jft 

81 % 

*90 

3", 

3% 

3 


.. 4477 6*8 4=; sw — 1% 

130 9% 8ft 8=8 —'A 

... 324 4ft 4", 4=4 - li 

.92 3.7 148 5 2 5 24% 24*8 —ft 

109 17 16". lift —ft 

-• '0% 10V— IV 

“ — 1 ® «Vu 17*'- - V, I 

- 725 3 % 21. 2‘8 % I 

_ 146* 9*4 9 9 

~ i* H —1 F80TBn 

- ’2? 7 ??ft —ft F&MBc 

- JW S?‘ *’• 6< ‘ F&MBo 

- 20 11 . 4 > 7 * % P&MDrt 

- 770* l6*.i 14' , u=i —ft FM Not 

■ fi0olfl T?.' 4 — % FCB Fn 

... 1658 S' i Tft 0% -ft POP 

- ! 7 '* 17V — % FFBcs 

. 119 14=. 14 14 ft FFBS 

80 70 Hi 37 30% 32 i-ft PFCC BC 

■10b 10 66 10 9% 10 _ FFYFn^ 

.*« 2.0 742 Q* . 21 i 21V -H FHP 

. .66052 26ft 22ft 74V,— IV PLIR 

- 5 U’t-r.i 


315 9V 7 TV -V 
26*6 Sft 7 7V, —Ift 

6492ta). 2*8 2*V+ -Vu npenn 
314S23'4 20 20V— 2*5 OPFna 

*030 18V 16 1BV -2V 
7258 10V 916 9fa —V 
1 184 64 V 57V 59 V —’4 rJ £L 
348 Bft SV BV - 

774 4V 3ft 4V -ft gStSt, 17 r n 
1528 12V lift lift -ft £552, ■ i3r 13 


07 J 553 14ft 14 14 — V 

•7? 20 2231 29ft 31 +1 

02 20 2614 13ft 14 -ft 

_ 641 12% 10ft lift -ft 

_ 521911ft 9ft 10ft —ft 

. _. 301 3ft 3ft 3ft 

JO. 1.02584420ft 18V 19ft -ft 

_ 134111ft 10ft lift -% 

- 138 4V 4ft 4ft 

_ 359 ift SV 6ft -ft 

~ 1W7 19 V 17ft 17*6 -ft 

_ 607 4 3ft 3ft —ft 

•62 f 10 30 49 48ft 49 —ft 

_ 1099 6ft 6 6 — % 

— 10682 7 JV 5ft _ 

_ 7427 IV, ft 1 “ 

_ 1177 1ft ft | -u„ 


jo d'SS!t-££ 

2 JTBP'-BP 


“ w Sf ** -* 


-a* •' --j - 

■if* feS? 


OarrKttA _ wn m 6 6 % 

GamtaOW — 10682 7 SV Sft _ 

OamWwt _ 7497 IV, V 1 

CcndHB 

Conder 

F&CBn 00 O 3.3 8518 17V 18 -ft vtGantOG 

F&M Be 00b XS 24 23 22V 23 -ft GardDen 

F&MBrt M 1 A *13321% 19V Sift -ft Garnet 

PlMDB _ 2558 5 3ft 4 ft «. Gartner 

g*Nat 08 30 314 16V 15ft 16V Tv g^onlcs 

FCBFn ,12e .9 110 13V 13ft 13ft _ CotefA. 

— 549 J% 4V 4>V h —Yu got+2000 - 38133 ISft 17V Uft— Jft 

FFBcs 06 f? 296 14ft 13ft 14 —ft GhyBcp 04 1 4.1 _ 5 10V 1DV lOftTfft 


’ 7 "! siffi 

“ I'MhPis ' 

- iVifrp r > 

*«? % h,^ cy 

-dlXSS^ ‘ 


- g !«• 13V 13V -it 

- .489 3ft 3% 3V —ft 

- 7998 9ft 8ft 9 -ft 

- 353 A, 4 4 .ft 

- 3090 32 V 34ft 36 -IV, 

_ 155014V 13ft 14 — >4 

_ 2570 19ft 18ft lift — ft 


_ 1097 3'!+ 3% 3ft _v e SSJtTS? 
- STWIBft lift 17 — liyf 

0 203518% 17V la -ft gills 


W -15* I 1 ’ 40 'S' 1 15 15*0 - 

FR^CBC J6 10 27415V Mft ISU -ft 

^YFn JOe 1.4 Ml 14V 14V 14V -ft 

- *p8 MV 22ft 22ft -2 

PUR - ’36515 MW 14ft -ft SSSlk 


GlwvCm 

GCwyFfi 

Gew 

GnCrHft 


9007-17'.. 14 V 15V— 7 CCBT 

'Sja*-' « ?;■* -‘T cSIic 


153 9ft 9% 9% -ft 

178 6% 

231* 3% Jft 3% 

1V1 3-u 3ft aft _ 
30/ i, ft J. . ' „ 


774 8 7*.h 7ft —ft f~l M ,[1, M Hi i'l 

- 348 25*4 26% 24", -ft SjEJrL .*? “ 

. 101514ft 14% 14ft — ", ^ ,A 


_ M2 3V 3*1 3ft -ft „ pJ % 

1848 9ft 8ft Bft —ft "*C6 

: ,m?Vw¥i., T‘ ^«=” 

00 3 1*313474", 25% 2SI» B _»■„ cSSSne »n 

.. 4a» 3ft 2% a -% §5^= l 

... I3ZSB13** 71V r7H .(ft HJ?s J 

M 7.9 9J6 21 20% 21 -ft 

1« 2 4x6834 59*i 57": 59*, -Ift SS+rtti 
_ ... 7317 4% 4ft 4% —ft rSreJw 

78 3.2 173 13*, 17V Uft 

... .0695 271. 25% MV -2 , B „ ai 

-. «j£2v is. 6% ««■» 


0 - .. 30 / >, % j. . - „ 

■J; ™ ”V ”i* '.=s 

CnpBnc a 30 37 21% Jn% »% 

-% 9j * >M». JOVWi ' 

7./ Coos #01 _ 364 14V. 13' , 14'.. .ft 

ft SEES? 00+10 *S3» 30", 38" -=* 

7% CODlBe 08 3J 30 9’.. 8'.. 

12 CoBTms J2e 1 6 211 18% 17% IB 

JZ S2“* Ir 0* ?0 59316V# I5». IJ., _k 

-ft PSSS? ‘“If ■' 31 1 28 76ft 21. 1 

7ft go?® 3 0*14 47 ') 

CVI5 _ 6=7 6>„ u, 7-- 

1% - 091 4 3ft 3% —ft 

-ft £° fT T rHr - 2?33 20ft 19 yj’- .2 

- “5" 10’., 10% -ft 

Crcxtwfc _ 7 S3 aft r ‘ a .. * 

. ? v C artCr n 78+2.8 «:» j/’. m. * 

: £ j Cotofm nb 10 ?I n- . ij% n . •.” 

I CansBu ..12742 16*. I5-, , # ft 


CrncSsn 4311% 10% 10% Dtntspt 

CmcflS - *799 31 Vi XV 21V, -% DW=GtV 

CultRS 08. 0 *7 14% 13% 13% — % D<W9 

CmQHNC .931 0.9 7410ft 10 10'-: DCWFES 

Comlr+I - BOT4 1% 1' „ i".. —6“ DttIDt 

ComFiit *77914+ I". |te a “ OcfStn 

ComFnA _ 5 r. t z „ r..„ DctrxC 

ComOrt .. ?I83 13% 11V 11=1— 1 v, CScvcnn 

TO 10 842 12 11% 11% -ft DOVBul 

CgmBcMY 00 1 28 16'.. 14». 16% _ Devon 

CBNr* J] LI 312 13 12 —ft DXHP90 

Cn«YBS 108 10 59 X 78% 28% _% DtaJoutC 

■«? H 34 34% 35% -ft Dtonon 
Cmf!g£>_ 04+10 137 15 13", 14% .u, DtaUltr 

CmtyFBFi. S2l0‘i 10 10': -ft OftTOfl 

C^gB* .** 30 «3«4 13 13% _ DOorX 

" 31*26% 25 25% -v DWtntt 

C“7rttta - 138 4ft 3*i 3ft —ft DrDuUO 

ComHfty _ 343534% 21 V: X*', - (ft DtolBto 

— .-2 . 1? * 7% 9 -ft OwrtCT 

Cwr^nc .92 30 7542 ?£■■, 25 25 % — % DbIIU* 

CttctlL .. 554313ft I? 13 -% DwMIe 

- 1*7? 4ft 4 4% _ DWPdw 

VJ259J1 .. -S f” 3 S * *V 4% — Vu DtaPdw 

,0 f 'ssKJi'srrr* s® 

S ^ ^ sss^n 

sag sa ffiTaBSgfc 


.08+ 0 2035 18ft 17! 
1.10 6 1 69 19% 18 

.16 t.l 2585 15V 15 
... 459 5 37% 35 
100 IS 1 539 78% 36 


18 -ft 
IS 

35% -1ft 
28% ... 


260 22ft M% 22% -V GboHd 

: 13 &v i sr i 6 *v ;ss 


■' 1-#? 10ft -ift 

I iSi'fe n v & ,% tX 

- 881 ift 4% 6ft Z 

- '3g53*£ »w 33ft -IV 

- ..87 1QV, 9 9V -ft, 

- I2S4 aw 5V 3 —ft 


tjdAlfKes 1543 15 1314 k -iu 

GnBnd 00 20 741 17ft 16 16*6 —ft 


“ S. Sft SV ♦ V 
_ 1324 3V Jft, 3W —ft 
- 21 Oft fl 9ft —ft 


10+ ... 3895 1% 1% 1+/+ ->7, SWf? 
_ 5699 M". 12=i 19 1 FOWlsc 


,s a'lrLSTJS ■“•fiJSfcS 


- 286 5 4ft 3ft Tft SSS; 5 , -.4894926V 1?" «V-B 

< fSiu. 3 GnPtm 06 ia.1 zm 7ft 3% mT 


iy [*i 


1253 2 V. 2 91.- __u u 

BV —I, SSte 


47 11% 11 11% -ft 

709 9V 7ft 8ft - I 
1579 7% 1ft 1ft —ft 
1 108 19ft 19 19ft ‘ft 


MV-2V F*r 


ptdisc .16 J 10236ft 2SV Mft -ft r.T^r. . 

FokhPr 07 c J /SJ 10 9ft 9ft “ ^ gnB .. ■ 

FwnBc 00 2.6x1110 30V 18V 19W -ft nSlrtl^S 

.. 371 tu «. Vu ‘£ rSHS~ r!r^ 

gSg* ,-S !■? ” Vj 3 i'''* *'V qSJS 

FonnBr 200 1 0 3129 139 139 —Bft 

"crmMcfi M4 iu i9ii lax- . oen*to 


GnPt»o 04 10.1 

G+dcsCp IX03.I 


_ J987 16ft 14% 15% , 1 

.. 1093 4V, 31b 4% , ft 

1036 3ft 3% 314 _ft 

■72 50 2440 15ft 13% Mft -2 

_ 768 10V, 9 gft .% 

_ 87191* 13 13% -ft 

_ 579 I3'i lift 12ft —ft EffS 1 * 

_ 8181 9ft 7 8% -ft 52I2? 1 

_ *95 4ft 4ft dV. —ft 

_ IMS 17 IS*', lift -ft SF'P'As 

.. 3?38 10 Bft 9 

_ Jos vs ’.+ —1% 5s?y T 

IS «b "d '% FHthT 

w. 1424 l'Vu 1ft Ift — % SrPf*. 

1 1300 7 I*'.. 1ft ‘ft 

... 13H3H J 3ft . % &2SE® 

.. 3002 OVi. 7ft ■+, .1ft 


13 -ft OWUC 
4% _ DtoPowtA 

4% — V„ DroPdwtB 


ft I CmpPr 
■ ■ 1 Camouwr 
J u 1 Comshr 
- . CmiiRs 
•s 1 Cwmch 

x 1 Camv+ri 


5178 5% 7*.i 7% — % Dtonex 

- 711 5*-, 5% 5% .ft DiSCZnei 

- 10*3 :% 7% 7% — „ DtwtTC 
..17458 44ft C 43ft— ift Dixie Yr 

- naaisv II 13% - JX, DtrGnlv 

- 32Di 3% 7-v,, 31-, , . ft D+mng 

- -*i» *';: *'•« 4'., — % Donegal 

- =12 «0% 6'. 9v., Dank+nv 


-. 39413ft 13V 13ft -ft 
- « Sft SV Sft -V 

■Me 0 109 7 6'/, 6ft 


Gensio wt 
G+nta 
Cant ex 5 


4164 9ft 6ft 7W —Ift 
.1 1114833% 29 29% — 3V SUSS. 


04 |.7 39 1 4V, 14 14 — % 

*0o 20 TT 17% lift lift— 1 
.. 859 5ft 5 Sft - ft 

_ 1282 11 10ft I Oft —ft 

JJ 10 13l5'A IS 1 * 15*.i— Ift 

.1? 10 23 HV, SV BV, —ft 


Genzym 
Gm«r 
Genzv wt 
G+rtzyTr 
Gcodvn 


LI 288 2ft Sft 3ft 
11 __ *40 39ft 39V _ 

4844 1016 9 916—7 

- ,335 IS* 15" ,5%fc -v 

1583 44% 43 43ft —ft 

- 576 ift 1ft 114 —ft 
464 4ft 4ft 4ft 

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Fattvmn 3*30 —3. 
Fosdanon 1777 — 14 
Federated FunOs: 
ArmSSpn 9 JO —32 
Arm In 9J0 —32 


FiduCapn 1875-72 PnuUfllMgdTr; 
nWaUSnert; CorpQuai o2195 +32 

Eurofei ®J4 +77 lrwGrudep04O -31 

PacBsn 38.79 *45 RKotvo 1*70—37 

SmCo J149 -40 ) Frenkln Tempi: 

TxFSI 1038 —31 CWn IMS 

RnHotGvl 1072 +32 1 Hortox 1278 -.15! 

Frt+flrMurlW2 —SO \ Klncpx 1173 -32' 
First AimrPdsC: Frentom Faadt 

AslAUIn 10.12—34 GMialn 1232 +34 
BdancM nt8*l — Os Growth n ia*8 — *11 
pSSdn 1^24 WGrn 9.15 +30 

j n1043 +33 


Cov&fln 935 +34 
Intlnan 941 +32 
Ltdlndn 9.B5 -31 
MtuSedn 9.79— 35 


MunBcll n 1070 

" " 1140—72 


ReoEqln _ 

SaecEof n1642 —.14 


STOCKID 163* —.14 
Flrff Amet Funds; 


• 31 


• 31 


*493 —36 

Income n 11.10 —31 
Stock n 5279—49 
DomSocM 1141 — >16 
Dreman Foods: 

Cortim 1X48 —35 
Hoan 1543 — 39 
SmCnVcd nlOJB— 33 


ExdtFdn 69.32 —45 
1071 +31 


ISn 

FSTI Is n 8.79 —32 
FGPOn 2141 
FHYTn 879 —34 
FITISn 9.91 
FTTSSp 9.91 __ 

FsiflftSn 1828 +31 
FsltfVSSplcm +31 
FSTn 2472—71 
FSTlSSp 879 — 32 
GnmoISfllOJ? —32 
GnrmSp 1079 — 32 
FtotSSp 1078 +31 
IMT IS 1039 _ 

Mid CW 1839—72 
McocCat 1171 — 38 


ftSJSKP*' 


1813 —31 

USGovtn 943 +32 
STMTSSP1813— 31 

An 1X95-36 

' AdtmOR 
2773 

„ HL1? . _ 

GtolResc 1645 —.15 


Gov top 939 +33 
GfWOPPP2534 —72 


HIMUP 1145 
WlYktltn 1177 
tocGIc 147* +39 
LW TER p 936 —33 
LMTBft 1049 _ 

LtdTEI 936-32 
OvsooP 1433 +.10 
ST HP 943 +44 
StralOpp 1977 —.12 


1171 —31 


COTG+h 1541 —32 
CTMuBf 117D —32 


FLMunA 1475 +31 
GMnvAnl542 +30 
GWnvBf 1579 +33 
GamoA 1431 —31 
GnmaBf 1432—31 
MAMunAllTS 
MDMunA1237 —31 
MIMunA 1X15 — 31 


MNMuaAU^r— 


MOAAuB 11277 — 31 
MuBcBt 1349 —31 
MurffldA1148 — XO 
NCMoA 1242 —31 


NCMuBt 1241 —31 
NYMunA 


... . ... 1430—31 
NY AAuBt 1431 ' - 
OHMuA 1244 +31 
OHAAuBT 1244 +31 
PAMunAI&JB 
PA AAuBt 1539 +31 
TXMuA 2826 +31 
VAMuA 15JO 
VAMuBt 1533 
Dreyfus sratevic 

GIGrp 34.15 +.11 
Growth p *03* +70 
lnamep 1235 +32 
InvA 2808 
InvBt 1939 


IntGovn 

KYTFtl 

KYSMfti 


934 +31 
778 +33 
ilS +31 


&Mhrp gTD -X 
Flex P 5107 —.11 
toenmep *631 +38 
JUOBBx 79.09 —.12 
■otanVckasic 
Qinop 837 +.19 
FLUdp 945 -31 
Govt p 977 - 

NtXBjdp 930 —31 
NgHMun p9.il —31 
VIAmtMHK 

949 — 32 



^,-SI 


978 

1173 +77 
180* —31 




AAHJdt 940 
NafflJdt 1810—31 
NJLJdl 939-31 
ALTxFt 1035 — 31 
NYLMt 939 ~ 

AZTxFt 1021 
PALtdl 1006 
ARTxFt Ml ... 

flt 977 -35 

* 93* — 02 
t 930 —32 
t 1022 —.16 
. _.xFt 1077 — 35 
GATxFt 949 —31 
fifivOdl 976 —m 
t 77* —31 

971 —31 

LATxF t 947 —31 
MDTXFt 938 
MATxFt 1009 —34 
AATOrEl 1034 -31 
MNTxFt 937 
MOTxPt 1035 

wr 


OHTxFf 70.14-32 



VATtft 1035 ->« 
WVTx Ft 970 - r ~ 
EtxnnVTrtitWoni* 

CMno p 1JW + J2 
EV» 

SSS?P p 7 «|^ 

SrrSK» 

SpCEqtP 777 —39 


EciPG In 2737—79 
n 1529 -37 
ISJiJGv 943 +31 
LS Bln 1049-31 
FxtoCtvmvesfc 
ABfTFm 1171 —34 
AAtorn 1444 + 31 
AMorGr nl346 —33 
AMortnn 1047 +31 
Bdonc 1X65 +35 
BtueOi 2451 —45 
CAInsn 971-34 
CATFrt 11.13— 33 
Ccnodon 1736 —75 
CoPAdd 1817 — 18 
Gjptoco re-933 —34 
CcnorStfl143.97 *79 
Qxrlrn 2946 —36 
QwSecn 1X14 —22 
Desttoyl 1635 —22 
OesHnyll 7333 — *38 


DHEqn 1739 —70 
DtwinMnl230 +.07 


DIvGtttn 1173 —.19 
BhBGn>rl544 -32 
EnvAVd 1526 +73 
EquWnc 3131 -38 
EOtln 1877 _.il 

EqtdK I6X* —.11 

ftCBPApnll37+.10 
Europe 1973 +38 
Ex<7lFdn9737 —72 
FidelFdn 1833 —75 
R»V VU4 —.14 
GNMn 1022 +31 
Weed 1889 +.18 
WcBWn 1X40+70 
Gvtsecn 949 
GroCO 2734 — 30 
GrotoC 2146 —33 
HTYM 1137-32 
tosAAunn 1136 —32 
miBdn 1015 
InferGvtn 979 +31 
inuGWn 1772 +73 
InvGBn 736 +31 
toaenn 1346 + 3* 
LoHnAmnlSJO +39 
UdMUR 975 —33 
LowfYr 1775 —.15 
AAJTFn 1174—33 
MNTFn 1855—33 
Mooston 6546 —131 
Mkftndnr3335 —34 
AAATFn 1136 —3* 
AAtpeSecnl838 +37 
Muncpln 739 —33 
NYHYn 1146—33 
NYWn 11.15-32 
NewMWn 971 +.17 
NewMifl 1175—27 
OTC 2278 — 44 
TFn 1133 —32 
7030 +74 
1841 +.16 
Puritan 1545 -31 
ReaEtfnlMI +32 
RetGrn 1746 —39 
SMTBdn 937 +32 
ST Vito n 942 +35 
SmaBCto 1817 —71 
se Asian 1335 +47 
sSscn 184B — 75 
Sttoppt 1948 —.11 


AStAflP 1812 —34 
Baton p 1041 —35 
Eauitvp 1542—14 

EaiOvp 1077 —37 
FxtUncP 1853 +33 
GovSdp 936 +34 
lnttoCP 941 +32 
Udtoc 935 —31 
MJSSeCP 979 -32 
MunBdP 1030 —33 
ReoEpp 1140-72 
StaCX P 1631 —.15 
FWBOMG 9.17 * 31 
FstEoaf nr t*M — 1* 
Ff5lf=«E 1030 —39 
FrstFdTtt 943 +X0 
RHwAAu 1067 —32 
First Inwjfqrs 
BKJnop 1434 —.15 
GtaPJp 598 +35 
Govt p 1X30 
Grp (TIC P 679 — 36 
HtafiYcTp S3* —32 
Income p X95 —31 
fm/Grdp 940 +31 
UfeBCp 1343 —12 
LJfeHYn 1040-35 


CAim 1039—33 
FundTrosh 
Aouresfp 1456 — S 
Groin fp 1136-71 

Gwthtp 1X57 —32 
toco ip 9.73 —39 

AAstrrefpia.«8 — la 


CAIMunnp&IV— 32 
NYMunT»133 
US Gov n 148 —33 
GAM Funds: 

GUxd 14138 -44 

toH 18947 +.12 
Poefice, 19236+51* 
«EXapS8& 
OIWTsUnll62 —37 
Gtabdln 1641 +32 

rnaxnen low 


S83Uwntas2 
i PM ft 3X27 


USA np 1883—77 
MATFp 1179-32 
MI TP p 1139—33 


NJTFd 1247 __ 

NYTxFrPl4J4 —01 
PATFp 1X17—31 
SpecBd U4i —37 
SPMP 1675-79 
ToxExutp 974 — 32 
TotRet p 1172 —.10 
UlUlnco p 533 —.15 
VATFp 1X01 _ 

HrslAAut 842 -.19 


Equity n 1835 
Fxdlncn 943 + 31 
SFxlnn 947 +33 
FPDvASt p 1272 —38 
^^1176-32 

EaultyTrnl823— 36 
FxdlncTr 974 +33 
UflMDv 949 +31 
First Uaoo: 

BofTn 1146—34 
BaJCtn 1146— 34 
BoBb 1146 —34 
FxInBp 935 +.02 
FxInTn 935 +32 
HK3tfTFBpl822— 32 
HrGtfTFCtl072 — 32 
MnBtff n 947 +33 
NCMunCt 940 —01 
USGvtflp 976 +31 
USGvtCr 976 + 31 
values p 17.17 —38 
valueC in 17.16 —09 
volueTn 17.17 — » 
Flos Investors: 
EmGthp 1175 
imtnp 9.96 +31 
InfTrn 1335 +.13 
AAAAuniP 1015 +31 
OucOGrP 1X19 —15 
TeUncSh P1X59 —12 
TWRTSVP 945 +34 
Value p 1131-38 
Flagship Group: 
AATEaP 1046 . 

AATECP 1046 +31 


AXZEAP1076 


CTTEAp 1 . 
COTEp 946 +31 
FLTEp 1825 
GATEAP1039 + 31 
GldRbp 1674—10 

KSTEp 9.65 +32 
LATEAp 1074 +31 
LWTEp 1852 —SO 
MITE A p 11.17— 31 


WVr? . 

+ *. 


p 935 —02 

d 10X3 +31 

Apll37 

PATEAp 975 „ 

TnTEAp 1065 
UtBAP 949 —23 
VATEA p 1822 +32 



1877 +32 


toccmeCnll4D 
imrE«tf)n 


n 1476 -33 
1826—35 

1571 —.13 

GEUSE 1549—14 
US EM 15-0 — .1* 
GTrunra 

EaSncn 1970—26 
Tr3«1ii 9.90 

JtfrVAnHW-d 

Amerp 18.19—71 
EmMkt 1574 +.18 
EmAAJdB 1118 +.18 
Euronap 104* +37 
Eurofl 1877 +37 
GvtncA 932 +34 
GvtocO 932 + 3* 
GrtncAp 811 +37 
Gflncfl 811 +36 
HUCtfl 17.96 —19 
HitocB 1X15 ♦ 
HSIncA 1X16 + 
HlthCrp 1804 —.19 
mtip 1044 +39 
UMB 1848 +.10 


Idex 1778 —55 
KtobAP J549 +.m 
2GWNAPJ8H -50 
2 TokEx ll.U +33 
HncPIAP 1032 + 31 
Utex 3 14.17 -46 

2RxklAP 930 —31 
nsenxr 
BtoCDP 815 -34 
Bgpd p 893 
CATEP 511 - 

D£lP 749 -36 
Disblvp 1063 —45 
E»P 1853 -18 
Extrtnp 473 —03 
Fedlncp 443 - 

576 +& 


-JO Gtaoll 1142 *. I? i AABSTAn *75 _ 

tVM) 2X53 *35, Covtt B37 * 32! MutnTA BL30 

TxCTrt 1071 -.03 ! NfRsGNd 11016 +35 ; MunlAp 1070 

TaxFri 742 —32 , TxFBl 942 —31 1 SfGvIAo *36 -m 

TMPlI 1470 -721 SGvtCt 806 -31 

Volt 1525 -71 StGvTAn 806 -31 
9.71 — 32 iAAonopMvFuadK i STtoTAn 946 
974 —31. CacApn 2806— CM ' 

1230— OS SoEgn 3676—551 


KentotwAmenos 
Aulncto 9.16 *36; 




GtaOEdP 
GtaGrp 
Growth P 1679 
MYdTEP 882 
InsrTEp 57* . 

totl p 1833 -.16 
ModRp 1139—13 
VosS P 522 - 

Mfcflp 533 
MNTGP - 

Muffp 1137-33 
NYTEp 510—01 
NewOp 11*4-78 
OWoo 524 

PrecMIp 743 —37 

Pn,oreap Tin 

1091 -37 
1340-42 
975 -33 
632 —32 
.98 

543 +38 
Bndo xbo 
U imnep 627 —.10 
IS/ Pottos: 

Muni on 1815 +31 
NaArnn 972 +34 

Trsip 945 +3* 
IttoQneGT 9.73 +32 


CAPlF 

CPI2Bt 

ETnA 

FhcA 

FOAA 

Goa 

GvSA 

HrEGA 

HriGrA 

imdA 

Omega 

PfXA 

5tcA 

TxFA 

WfldBA 

FtxBT 

FOAflr 

GOaBt 

G+SBt 

imaBt 


1818 — m 
971 -37 
1549-44 
9.44 -31 
19*0—177 
19.90 -75 
834 -31 
1639 —76 1 


toeEnn 5632 — 
ShcrtGvn 1779 —22 
WMlsn 1570 —47 
SI Band 2039 +34 
B»dn »31 -31 
inHEan 3676 *44 
Mariner Funds: 

FxdlrK 940 +31 


1886 —Jl I Art 7F I0J3 — 02 


743 STFxtnc 946 
-01. TREd 


StcBl 

Tk FBI 

GJOoCI 

TxFCt 

Ptxct 

FOACl 

GvSCt 

PTxFCr 

Sicet 

KIARF 


971-01. TREa 1271-33 
139 - 01 1 Mark TWaiB FdS: 

1015 —32 1 Eouity 942 —.14 
~ Fxdlnan 976 +32 
Muni 9 JS 
MaifceWtotcP Fd*j 
EautfV 974 —10 
Rexlncm 9J1 +31 
totFxm 948 + 33 

sn 


948 -37 
1833—48 




834 


PTxFBl 1083 —31 


745 -31 


949 —31 ‘ VPMuW 9A8 — JC 
1879 — 4j;MoraultFwidB 

9.(9 —41 j GvtSecA 948 +0 


STWNt 946 
STMCt 946 
SOT An 1813—31 
S^TAn 957 +31 
TXITAn 938 
voJuewr 1J34 —39 
V0IUBIAP1336— 39 
VdueTA 1336 —39 
VAITAn 1076—32 

.V/UjAP 1(U6 -32 

NBWTWWna. 

WB and 639 —31 
NfltoFd 1528 -.12 
Itt&wtn 1078—33 
TxFret 97* —32 
USGvinr 948 +32 

HutoMrBMie 
AMTBd nl*42 —25 
Genesis 736 -.13 
Gowdnn 1877 —17 
UdMctn 936 +31 
Mtmmn 1046 —77 1 



NVTxAp 1828 
RMFAP 1743 _ 

ip 271 —31 
1018 —07 
... IP 936—01 
IMAP 849—19 

asi as-* 

Bh*Bi u.15 —2 
1064-32 
1171 ... 

853—12 
1973 

9.91 *37 
1855 . 

1150— m 


10.16 —01 
259 - 07 ' 
944 -31 
834 + 31 I 
1034 —01 | 
7.65 

9.74 —31 


. . 021 

_ . 952 —37 1 

VflIEqAp 970—17 


MUST 1044 _ 

NYCOCn 977 —06 



—06 
' —SB 




848 


1M2-33 


931. 


SetadP 
Stock D 
StfAUBt 
Slr&it 


Shi net 
StrSi t 
StrWGt 
TEBnd 


Oooortp 1DJ1 —37 
SlrnGVIp 946 —31 
TR BdP 943-33 
TR Grp 1142—31 
InvRedi 449 —04 
tovSerOpflU: 

CopGri 1X16 —76 
QudStfc 
LTSGvt 


1342 —.11 
946 -31 


JCPCXip 1336 — 31 
JopenGffi " 


J13J0 

LotAmG 1970 +34 
LolArnGfl 1*42 +jm 
P od fp 1376 +71 
PocHB 1X27 * 31 
StrtdAP 10.96 *30 
Strata ia.96 +70 
TeteB 1519 -.05 
Telecom 1678 —05 
WdWB 1649 -.01 
widwe 1678 —31 


ASCp 1039 
Asset np 2241 —18 
CQnvScanU76 —37 
Eqtncp 1177 —10 
GimtCPn 938—01 
GtConvn 1027 — 34 
GfTtfP 947—32 
Growth RP21 79 — 7] 
SmCtoG 1654 —16 
vmuep 1172 —05 
Gtdaxy Feeds: 

Asset AflnlQA3 __ 
CTMun 952 —34 
EqGrth 1136 —36 
Eqtvm 1X37 —73 
Eatoan n IXS — 31 
HJQBd 9 76 +31 
InlSd 933 
totem n 1247 +.16 
MAMun 977 —33 
NYMun 1022—33 
STBdn 933 —31 
SmCc&j n!155 — 77 
TEBondnl027 
G towwiHmdc 
IndxPIn 1545—34 
SWRWG 1346 —15 
GflSecn 1271 

Gfatel Group: 

Gfeumede Ponds 
Eauffyn 1XS— 1* 
IntGovn 9.99 +32 
Inin 1340 +36 
—01 


Munlntn 1030 
SmC»n 116* 
OtrartntA 94* 




Bwft 

Band 


np 197* —12 


SSSffm iSS^" 


MuMd/pn S77 _ 

FoaW«n HUB— 08 

Forth Fuads: 

!?. 

PPillP 165* — JS 
. idUCTP 27.16—54 
G83Gt1hp 118* —30 
GovTRp 006 +31 
GrottiP 3676—171 
HlYldP 842 —07 
TFMN 1039 
TF Nat 10*3—31 
TFNY 1030 
USOA 099 +31 
FOrfresstowh 
AdiRTf 944 —01 
Bondr 9.28 —31 
Giant 059—01 
Muntoct 1042 + 32 
0«=crtP 1034 *31 
IWlr 1X05 —73 
4* Wall En 622 —.16 
Forum FttralK 
tnvSnd 1039 
MEBnd 1078 
TaxSvr 1026 +31 
Founders Grnwc 
Bdrtp 854 — >13 
BtueOv np675 — 17 
D&cvp 1846 —JS 
FrrurnP 2511 —95 
GCNSeC 9.10 +32 
Grwthnp 1148 —43 
Pdssprtn 9.94 +32 


Ttendn 

tiSBin 

Utatocn 

vefuen 

Wridw 


5*53 —75 
1078 +31 


*132— 16 
1333 + 36 


Airr 


1423—38 
AinGoidr 21.13 —53 
Autor 2279 ~ 




Broker r 1574 —15 
oiemr 31.96 — 04 
Cnmpr 2510—135 
CprPrdr 1434 —19 
CstMour 1773—56 
DfAeror 1739 -30 
DevCnm r)7.15 —40 
1648 —41 
r 1772 —36 
__ r 1096 —36 
EnvVnr 1130 
Finsver 5033 +32 
Foodr 2E40 —17 
Health i- 6X71 +7* 

HorneF 2447 -Ug 
totEqpr V87X —32 
InttMttf r 2140 —38 
insurr 19.15 —12 
Leisrr 3772 — M 
MetDeir 2072 -.11 
NcdGasr 956 —09 
Paper r 1771 +23 
PrecMot rlifli —22 
RegBnkr 1653 +.11 
fetdlr 070-56 
Softorr 2147—157 
Techr 3672—173 
Telecnmr35.11 —37 

Tronsr 2042 —& 

unir 3376—58 
ndeStv Spartan: 
AgrMurin 944 —32 
CAHYro 1032—03 
CTHYnr 1049 —33 
FL Mu m 1040 — 32 


wfcto£rpl675 +3l 


tomUiSwnFto 
Bdcxiced 947—05 
GovtSee 942 + 31 
MJdCop 734 -.18 
OuWBd 949 + 31 
Qua*Gr_ 940—05 


iFltodXM — 31 
.... .pot 971 —34 
ARS 978 +31 
ALTF 1173—01 
AZTF- 1134 — 31 
SaUnvp 2143—14 
CAHYBdp958 —32 
Crfirup 1148 —03 
CAMermlB.15 —02 
CafTFrP 7.0* 
COTF 1177 — jQ 2 
CTTF 104* —01 
CwtSecpatlW —16 
DNTC 9 22 —13 
EdOvv 658 — -11 

Eqfncpx 1342— 16 

FBTARSP979 + 31 
FedtotermlOT*— xn 
FecTTx 1148 - 

R.TF&IP 97* -34 
FLTF 1126 -02 
GATF 1141 —02 
GBrtxxW +31 
GAJtOp 1X26 —.10 
Gold P 14.12—19 
Gnmta 1377— ta 
HYTF 1072 —32 
HIMuBdPlUl —32 
221 —02 
1140 —01 


SET 


jnstAdl 


teTF 1137 . 
NYWtmlTFpl030 . 
lnHEdP 1346 +.15 
KYTF 1041 
LATF 1097 —31 
MDTF 1075 - 

McesTF 1173— M 
MieKTkF 1148 —02 
MNins 1130 —01 
MOTF 1173 — XB 
NJTF 1121 -32 
NYlflS 1046—31 
NY Tax d 1156 +31 


CopGr 1550 —15 

13 

GovAb 934 —31 
»rm= 938 -m 


Dvnmp 943 —28 
Emar1hpnn27— 74 
Enerovn 1050 —08 
Envimn 6i74 —31 
Europe n 1375 +.12 
FtoSvcn 1575 +33 
Gofdn 579 —09 

Growth np 534 — ll 

HtfhScn JX14 — S4 
HTYkfnp 630 -33 
lndtnconpll37 —.06 
totGcvn 1117 +32 
lnhGrn 1670 +.19 
Leisure n 2037 —m 
PocBcon I4.1M *73 
Sed nan np 6.17 —32 
TxFreenplSTS — 33 
Tedin 2152 —31 
TctRto 1777 -33 
USGovtnp 7.12 +32 
U»r> 941-23 
VolEq 16.94 —11 
InVTrGvtBt 937 —32 
isreiFdnp 106 —.19 
JP Growth 1578 —26 
JP Income 9.10 *32 
JPMtostBt 
Bondn 941+32 
Dfversifdn936 -JO 
EmaMkEdtdl +33 
MIEqtynia&B +.11 


Kidder Group-. 

ARM GvAl 138 —32 
ARiMlnstA 1 1.99 
ARM WSIB1 1.99 — fll 
A51AUB 1230 —10 
EmMJclA 10J9 
EmMirta 1X77 *3) 
GtaGgBn Ii93 +31 
GfcEqCn 14.10 +31 
GfcEqA 1636 * 32 

GtoFxB 

CAJ-.xA 


11.91 -31 MemGto 
11.91 +31 MertStrn 


Bain 
Ealnc 
Gvttncn 
IntBdn 
tnITxF 

S¥S8' 

Stock n 

VcSEan ... _ 

Mathersn 1*75 -35 
Maxiis Funds 
Equity Ion 1324 —25 
income t 1028 —37 
Laureot fpn943 — OS 
1X1 1 — 41 
1149 —31 


955 —11 
949 —32 

923 -31 
9J7 —31 
941 -31 
921 —28 
9-7* —31 
949 —70 

924 — OS 


Pamirs n 1949 —17 
SetSeian 2X57 —32 
unra&dn 94a 
NewAfcr 2X74-75 
NewCntfp 1145 —17 


AdiUSAD 772 —01 

1158 +3) 


BolonAp ._ 
BdlncA ^11 J +32 


CATjFAP : 


-31 


coc&apiu 6 —a 


IAP1I72 *32 

GrOpAp 1X17 -37 
GvScAp 1093-31 
GwIhAp 933 —05 
HUnCAp 956 -33 


imtaAp.lSg*^ 


GvtAt 1188 +32 i Merj»erFd p*fl3> -3B| 


IntFIA 1140 _ MerkScnn 2*48 

KPEl 2243 -37 Merpa Lynch: 
MunffldA 1045 -.02 AmertrtA 9.13 
SroCaaA 10.48—55 
LMHn 1771 —28 


AdiRAt 

AZMA 


Bctonn 1140—0*1 
Equity n 1X35 —.11 1 
Inrinc 922 -.0? 


BoiA 

BosVTA 

CAIMA 

CdMnA 


— .131 

958 — 31 
10.10 —31 
1148 —.06 
2110 —.OS 
9J1 -32 
1139 —32 


IrrhEa 11.95 —05 j CopFdA 2746—35 
NYTFno 1041 —31 ! Coratotp 1244 —32 


USGvn 
Laurel li 
A10C P 
CapA p 
ttys p 
Inin 

^P D 

■n&jp 


950 +32 


1437-36 
2fi.DC *31 
1224 +.02 
1143 + 07 j 
1044 *.02! 
1543 —471 
1142 —32 1 


ST Bondn 948 —02 


Smaacon 9.93 

SeEqtyfi 1043 — .11 


Growth 

income 

TaxEx 

TatRtn 


1058 -38 
946 +31 
1036 —31 
1038 -31 


BtXonced n\232 — 35 
Enterorn 2034 —33 
FerfTxEx r*648 - ./ 
Rxtocn 9.17—02 
Fundn 1879— .14 
Grlhlnc 1338 —32 
IntGvt 438 +31 
Mercury 1259 —.19 
Overseas 09.96 
ShTmedn 191 
Twenn 2X50 — <0 
Vmtrn 4510—1.11 
WrfcAV 2554 +33 
JdPtmFan 11.90 —36 




11.11 —32 


Growth p 1525 -52 
IIAcure 1X36 —14 
LTGvAp 851—02 
MATE! 1134 . 

NY TEfp 1156 — 01 

P 1191 —97 
746-26 
- 744 -26 
to 7 .18 —01 
7.18 -31 
+ 31 



ST Gov 


B 

GIGvlni 

InHEq 

pfcao 

■ srrCttl 

GvtEqtyn 


11ft :a 
£S 4 +ft 

9.11 +36 


EsrValPn2I33 —41 
GdvtncP 1X37—03 
OHTFP 12X2—31 


OppVdB 1834 -39 
MMNTE 948 


GHMN. .... 
GHNafTE 1033 + 31 
Greensprng1423 — 35 
GrtlKnOrin 1076 


Bondn 
PrrtAv 
Stock n 
Tax£x 
US Govt 


1049 —37 
1138 +.09 
1173 +33 
2744 —38 
2734—37 
9.17 

975 + 31 


££I?P P '|S +32 


9.05—31 


BtChGrl 

STGvl 

SmCPGrl 

USGvl 


9.94—38 

940 

940 —15 
951 +32 


Band 1040 +31 
CatApon 1545 
Growth n 1126 


brtjn 
htIGr 
ShtOurn 
Value n 


2436 + 49 
1028 + 70 
0.95 +31 
1X80 —39 


US Gulp 
Value p 
WITXF 


949 +31 
2371 —.16 
955 +31 


Hercules Fund: 

Euro VI 1036 + 36 
LAmrVal 9.11 +34 
NAmrGrto 948 —02 
PefBVal 1072 +.17 
WtoEd 957 +36 
HerBage Funds: 
CapApppl478 —11 
Divine p 978 —35 
IncGrp 1132— 38 
LMGovp 9.1* —31 
SmCap5Pl538 —14 

H gSS£nN$'-3. 

Bondn 1037 + 34 
GovtBdn 944 + 32 
Growton 957 —17 
tocGrn 945 —04 
tocoEQ 1136—05 
SpGrEa n 1278 —31 
MSredGr 1X14 —ID 
Hcmsttfidn 533 . 

HOmsKJVl M49 —39 
HorocMnn 1945 — .12 
HudsonCailX40 —19 
Hurr*nertndM48 +31 
MummrG 2038 —.16 
HVPSD n 822 —01 
HypSJZ 921 —31 
lAATrGr 1526 —19 

1X12 —09 
Bond on 9.13 —31 
EmgGrpnlXM— 90 
Govt pn 947 +34 
GrincP 1X70 —20 
WFdn 1188 +.19 
msffld 9.16 +31 
MJdarnn 1355 —42 
Reoktnnp2Q57 —33 


ToxExto 1X34 +1 

^ iwntow riutuiiL 

AVTecti 932 —A 


EnvmAp 822 -35 
GO n6t 832 + 32 

1X04 +35 
1X87 *35 
833 +33 
15.73 —36 
1X57 —in 


GtobAp 

Global 


GTTech 

GoWBt 




• 33 
1439 +30 
7120 +.10 
21.13 +.10 


Act! A 
AchBI 
BrtAP 
Bcfflp 


1175 

1148 —38 
1030 — 34 
979 -34 
BondA to 1436 -31 
BondB 1436 —31 

ZZ&S {JftzS 
t^ir «ft ;S 

JXVBot 1X60 —.13 
KSMun 1X01 —04 
KSlMunU 1137 -34 
Kauftnanvl73-.il 
Kemper Fueds: 
AdiGov flJ9 —at 
BhwOtP 11.97 —22 
a*r 7.P — 32 
Dfvlnco 530 -Ml 
EnvSvc 11.92 —.15 
R_Tx 1030 —31 
Gtolnc 847 +34 
Grth 1277 —JO 
HTYletd 971 f 
Income XI7 +21 
toUFund 1050 +31 
MuniBd 935 


NYTF 

OHTF 

Retinil 

Retfro: 

Retina 

RertrM 


ST Glob 

SmCPEq 

Tethnci 

TXTF 

Tc*Retm 

USGVt 


DtvWCt 
Gvtt 
Gwtht 
WYW1 
ST Git 


1045 —01 
9J7 

1087— .11 
1246 —.06 
939 —77 
B.W — Mi 
036 —3* 
776 +33 
542 -20 
946 -23 
1031 —32 
9.11 —14 
845 +3t 


TotRet t 


5.93 —31 
6.97 *31 
16.14 -50 
7.95 -31 
7.13 +33 
X10 

11X88 —38 
1326 —32 


5.95 -31 
6.98 +31 
1651 -51 
7.97 

7.16 +34 
XI* +31 


Divfn 
Gvt 
Growth 
HiYId 

SR 

SmCpEq 1135 —38 
TotRt 1323 —22 
Ker* Funds: 

ExBdns 1X10-20 
Fwlintos 957 +33 
rdxEoto 1054 —37 
WEqlns 1351 +36 
Lt Matto * 975 + 32 
MedTSn 9.94-31 
MiMutns 9.84 - 

ValEatii 1026—11 


Keystone: 

CUS81 f 


Cus82t 

CusS4t 

CustCIt 

cusiat 

CusSM 

Cussst 

QJSS4t 


1891 +.04 
1552—03 
8*7 —04 
925 -31 
7.98 —.14 
2X33— .18 
8.95 -.14 
7.71 -24 



B&GRAV1A 

ORCHIDS 


tat 071 589 5237 


«HD0B*f«S 


lAWW^^ 


iff} 366 0586 



Jra ■ -1. igA 


international classified 


(Continued From Page 3) 



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SOPHBTtATHI • B038T ’ SBMCZ 
TB^IOTCON 071^7 7 *7252 




Latael Trust: 

Botocdn 942—39 
Intrrtlnn 10J4 -31 
s&psaon *75—08 
Stock n 1741— 73 1 
Lozord Group: j 

Equity t 1379 —16 
InhEa 13.0? -251 
inttSC 1026 * 38 > 
SmC® 1431 —70 
Sofa 1545 —13 
SrroYd 954 —.02 
LebenNY 726 —01 
LeebFern 1049 —39 
Lew Masco: 

Ameri-dP 975 -32 
GblGcwip 930 -.10 
Gvtimim 9.95 
HJYld p 1*J9 —33 
IrtvGrno 940 —31 
MrfTFp 1554 — 31 
PATFp 1578 +31 
Spiny np 2046 —40 
TxFrlnt p 1886 —31 
TotRet np 13J0 +38 
Vamrnp 1829—17 
LmiaelanGne 
CnvSecn 1155—15 
CL. dr 1225 —38 
GNMA n 7.83 +31 
Gtatxdn 1371 +36 
GokJfdn 521 -36 
Grtilncn 1549 —38 
Inti n 1044 +39 
SI GoVt n 947 
S*SU 336 —37 
Stlnv X26 -38 
TEBdn 1033 
WldEm 1X33 +38 
Liberty Fandhn 
AmLrir 1*59 —12 
CapGrA p 1X15 — 26 
EnfncAo 1130 —35 
ERlncCI 1029— 35 
WlncBdx 1071 -.12 
htlOJI— .11 
_.n 1879 +.12 
IntUnc 1041 +36 
MnSc 11.10 
USGvtCp 773 —31 
USGvSecA 7.74 —01 
UMFd 1144 —21 
UTilFdCt 1142—22 
LawrtyHnmSafc 
dhlnc 1044 * 31 

¥^5!gft : 

USGov 875 — 32 
Ulil 1044 —09 
LTMFIVP 9.72 +31 
LmfTrmp 977 —32 


LmtTrmp 97 
Uretoer Foods: 

Divn 2554 -37 
Fundn 2X75 —29 
UtOn 10.18—13 
LMutibSttyteK 
Bondn 1042 -32 
GtbBdn 1021 +37 
Growth n 1X14 —32 
Gr*lnn 12J7 -35 
taMEan IXM —35 
SmCapn 1X93 —22 
Lord Ate Counsel: 
MTeOTr *7* —01 
NatTFTr *51 
US Govt 457 + 31 
Lard Abbott: 

Affiltdp 1020 -32 
BontCebpVT? -35 
DevelGtop92* -25 
Eq 1990 p 1345 
RlVokj p 1245 —37 
GEAP 1X66 +31 
GUncp 626 
GovtSecp 171 +31 
TatcFrp 1073 —.03 
TFCTp 930 -33 
TxFrCaiplOXfl —32 
TFFLp *45— X31 
TFMOp 4.94 —01 
TFHJ p 899 —31 
TaxNY p 10JS —32 
TFTX p 949 — 32 
TFPAp 881 —01 
TFHlp 875 —32 
TFMI 8?4 
TFWAp 87* —32 
ValuApppllJO— .13 
Lutheran Brtfc 
BroHiYd 9.14 —35 
Fund 1657 —28 
Income X29 * .02 
Mure 112 —31 
OppGr 941 —44 
MAS Fends: 

Balanced nll.M— 33 
&nerGrnl55J —58 
Equity n 2027 —15 
Fxdlrtlln 1042 +35 


735 —37 
QnvGdA 1X97 +31 
CpfTA 1134 +31 
DevCap 18» +32 
DropA 1573 + 20 
EuroA 1573 -.17 
Fefl6ecAp923 +32 
FLMA 970 —33 
FdFTA 14.19 —24 
GtAlA 1324 +36 
GtBdA 924 
G+CvA 1056 —05 
GlHdA 1331 
GIRsA 1526 * 23 
GKJtA 1245 —.14 
GrlRA 1734 —22 
HeatthA 376 —35 
tostin o 975 + 31 
toMEoA 1142 * .13 
MIMuA 942 + 31 
*\N*AuA 10.12 -31 
LolAmArl856 +23 
MnmsA 736 
MunLldA 946 —31 
MulnTrA 942 
1034 

1047 +31 
1076 —34 
2227 +.10 
1042 +31 

IXM —or 
1578— » 
1X18 —11 
824 

534 —II 
1021 +31 
846 
9-99 


MNctflA 

NJMA 

NYMflA 

PQCA 

PA AM 

PhttxA 

SPVIA 

StrDvA 

STGlAp 

TectiA 

TXAHA 

WVttocA 

AdiRB 


EuroBI 


FdFTBt 

FdGrBt 

G1AB1 

GIBdBt 

GtCvBl 


AmerlnBt 9.13 +.13 
AZAUt 1X18 — 31 
BafB t 1155 —36 
BasVIBl 223*— 35 
ColMnBt 1139 —32 
CAIMB 921 —33 
OsFdBt 2720 —36 
CpHIBt 735 —07 
ClnvGdB 10.97 +31 
CpITBi 1134 +31 
DropS P 1545 +.19 
- f 1X13 +.16 
_ t 923 + 32 
I 970 —33 
1806—26 
978 —15 
1X17 +35 
924 . 

1041 -35 
1528 +22 
GlUtS t 1241 —.14 
GriRBI 16.93 —31 
HectfhBI 244—04 
Int&Bt 1126 +.13 
GOKS 1X76 _ 

LmAmB 11851 +21 
MAMBt 1076 + 31 
AAlMuBI 942 + 31 
AANAABt TQ.I2 +31 
AiknlnsB I 735— 31 
MnLtdBt 936 -32 
MuWB 932 
AANOtWr 1034 - 

NJMBt 1048 +31 
NYAAnBt 1097—33 
NCAABt 9.9B —37 
1X29 +31 
2145 -39 
1032 +31 
1239 — 37 
BJI 

1538 -28 
1X16 —.11 
4.95 -.11 
1021 +31 
Xl» -27 
—31 


OHMBt 

PocBI 

PA MB! 

PhnxBI 

ST GIB t 

SpVIBI 

SlrOvBt 

TectiBl 

TXMB1 

UttinBt 

WkuncBt 


LtdTrmAH _ 

MassT APIS76 —34 
TxExAp 7.18 —01 
VoktoAp 739-36 
BatonB r 11.54— 35 

CanGrBt 1379 —53 
IntEdBt 1541 +.14 
VaiueB 746 —06 
NewUSAp 1120 —21 
NKhoka Group: 

NicJ>Ol rar 48.93— X44 
Ncfifln 2527—45 
Mermen 325 —31 
NchLdn 1778 —27 
tr-hntriT nrrtaunta 
BatGmfi 1X95 —26 
CoreGthA 1X90 
CereGr1hBlX& 
CoreGrtnst 1221 — 
EmpGrA 1140—49 
EmpGrB 1157—48 
EmpGrirB 1 192 —46 
IncGrA 1X7B —.13 
incGrfl 1339 —.14 
WWGfS 1473—19 
WWpr 1833 —.19 
Nomura nf 1057 +.15 
North Am Funds 
AstAUCpnia91 — 06 
GIGrp 1440 + 38 
GrwihC pn)44S —12 
CrlncCpnlX31 —34 
USGutAp 947 
NetovGrn 2827 —27 
NejrrvTrn 1023 —06 
Northern Fuads: 
Fixlnn 977 
GfEqn 939 —.13 
IncEqn 973—09 
MTaxEx n9.92 —03 
toMFxlnn 939 +22 
WGreqniaiS —31 
UittS«EanlXi2 +33 
SeiBjn 976—19 
SmCpGr n 920 —21 
TxExptn 939—01 
USGovtn 934 +31 
Norm* Pints 
ArfiUST 9.70 —HI 
AdlGavA 970 —31 
COTF 8 955 

GvrtnCTr 935 —02 
GvIlncA 9.06 -31 
IncomeTr 952 +32 
tocameA 953 +32 
TFtocA 948 
TFIncT 948 
VaiuGrA 1672 
VoluGrT 1659—29 
Nuveea Funds 
CAInsx 979—35 
CAValtr 9.99 —35 
FLVcdx 971-34 
InsMunx 10.12 —33 
MDVdX 946—04 
AAA Ins K 936 — 33 
AAA Val x 928 — 34 
Ml VC4 X 950—34 
MuniBOk 072 —33 
NJ Val* 934—02 
NY Ins x 9.97-3* 
NY Val x 1033 —05 
OH Val x 938— XO 
PA Val X 971 —34 
VAValx 930 — 34 

OakHcMn 1231—47 
Ookmrk 2325 — 37 
Ortrmnll 1870 +71 
Obeneeis 19.17-175 
Oc*wTEp1022 - 
Offlthyn 954 —02 
OWMt 9.90 +.18 
OWDomin ISLB8 +.10 
Olympic Trust 


^ IS 


1034 

1176—31 

1X28 
17.19 

P 221 -31 

1 1 HL15 —07 

SHBx 
Ufi 

D 

USGvBI 
AMD p 
rwpan 

§SP i 9 ai:S 

NTxDp 1176 —01 
GrthD 1147 . 
GKrOt 102* +35 
HSncOp 841 —35 
UNCO 1034 —02 
p 1079 +31 
O tnn 

STGvtDp 221 —31 
SmCflpD 10.1* —07 
SODPX 940 —36 
USGOB 935 —31 
LUO P 848 —19 
PtWSJobn 1051 +37 
... Slk 1*50 +.10 
P u roeeoPt 
Guts 1526 —65 
WBd 939 _ 

LATF 1025 —02 
STO+ 1030 
VatEa 1149 —13 
ValGr 1804 


AtenftnanFds: 

AstAII nt 1146 +32 
CapAppi 10.81 *31 
Flex&d to 1025 +.01 
Grtn 10.97 
MetUto Stalest 
CapABA 957 —35 
Cop APB 951 -36 
CupapC 9.61 —26 
EqlacA 1157 —.12 
EqlncC 1137 -.11 
EdtovstA IXM —.14 
EalnvC 1X68 —.15 
GovSecA 899 *sn 
HilncA 829 —33 
HilncB 677 —34 
inflEoC p 1061 +38 
totlFxInf 7.9*—32 
MgdAstB 831 —3* 
MadASlA 6B4 —34 
MadASlC B34 —35 
RschBme 9.05 —36 
TO»EaA 7.7* —52 
TxE»B 7.74 —51 
MIMutoC 1041 —02 

AiSUSGvl 9.93 
GOV! p 92S —.13 
kntGvp 1036 +3* 
LeshUliLA 1035 —.18 
LeshTsvA 843+37 
OHTF 1172 +31 
TFlritP 1064-33 


Fxdlncn 11.10 +36 1 USGovLM 16* + 32 


GIFjdn 10.19 +.03 
HY Secs n €.95 +3* 
IndEa n 1845 —31 
KitlFudn 9.90 
UdDurFl R1Q74 ♦ 52 
AAtoBkFc 1030 +.04 
MunFxl 1014 
SdEqn 1694—10 
Semn IQ.07 +57 
SmCpVI n 1864 —40 
SPFIn 1149 +.06 
VtXue n 1232 —11 
MF5> 

MITAp lt.18 — 3* 
MIGA p 935 —37 
BondA P 1249 -34 
EmGrAc 1752 —42 
GrOuAP 1071 —39 
GvUA p 840 
GvAAaAp 642 +3! 
GvScAp 975 +37 
HilncA P 533 —03 
inOpAP 744 + 32 
LIOMAP 7.11 +01 
RkhAP 1236 — .11 
Sect A P 1252 —07 
TDJRAP 1248 —04 
UlBAp 693 —.12 
VdtuAp 930 —33 
WOGvAP 1120 +36 
WoGrA 1638 —.13 
WoT atA P 1057 + 33 
MuBdA 1055 —.03 
AAUHiA 683 —31 
MuLTA 74* 
AAuALAp 1072 —37 
MuARAp 9.68 —31 
MUCAAP 529 —.02 
MuFLAp 956 —36 
AAuGAAPlIU? —02 
MuMAAplCLBl —34 
MUMDAP10J1 —31 
AAUAASAP 9.15 —32 
MuKAPlI/H —32 
MuNYAp 1042 -.02 
MuSCAp UJ4 -Stt 
MuTNAP 1071 -Ml 
MuVAA P 1 1 37 —33 
UMB 692 - .12 
CapOS | 1355 —.09 

Bonds 1X48-3* 
EmGrBt 1744 —.62 
GoUBI 615-10 


GvMBBl 

GvScBI 

HitnBt 

rntmBl 

MAITB 

OTCB 

MIGB 

Rsena 

Sects t 


641 

975 + 32 
553 —53 
8J0 +34 
IU4 -34 
741 —.18 
978 —77 
1XB2 -.11 
1279 —MB 
MUWVAP11.11 -33 
MuSdB 1055 -32 
TOJRBr 1248—34 
WoEuBI 1620 +.11 
W6C-VB 1174 * 05 
VTOGifi 1632 —.13 
Wo TofB 1055 + 34 
MolnBt 851 —32 
MIM Funds: 

Bdlncn 932 —.02 
Slklncn 933 —11 
SifcGrwn ioji -23 
SKApn 1808 —59 


Monerta 1889 —41 
MorwtlMC 1X21 —73 
Monitor Funds: 
Fxlnfpx 20J1 —34 
Gwthl Px 25.17 —.17 
OnTflP* 20 98 -39 
FxlnT * 20 JO —34 
GrwlhT * 2612 -.17 
inEaTx 7133—33 
MtoBkx 745 —27 
OhTFT x 20.98 —39 
SI9UT X 1942 —35 
MortrGWP 861 -74 
MoniltSI P 1692 —33 
Montoomerv Fds 
EmaMkt 1197 +.10 
GWtoCopn 1467 —.14 
GV5bQaon(372 —32 
Growth n 1540 —.13 
InsJSWKt (4892 +40 
irnGmCopnliao - 
ShDurGf 933 +32 
SmCoon 1570 -71 
MOTS Sion FOl; 
AsianGrA 154* +79 
AiionGB 1542 +79 
GtoOEoA 12JI +.13 
Gtob€aBnlil3 -.12 
Meryon QrenWfc 
EmeryEd 869 + 37 
Ffcincm lllfll +31 
inJSmCp nl0 4S —34 
MurriBd 1044 —61 
MrykB5oplX99 —.16 
Mors SI or ln*lt 
AcICtryn 11.99 +73 
AsjcmEq n2077 +J5 
Bar 9.13 -JO 
EmGr 1*7* — <6 
EmMM 1568 +.16 
EmMkDbt nSJQ + .19 
fcaGrn 1144 —JO 
Fxdlnc 9.99 +31 
GlEBlV 1131 -34 
GIFrinn 1057 +34 
HiYtdn 1075 

InriSCn 1847 - .13 
IntlEu 15.1? t .10 
RMYMn 9.45 -34 
VpfueEq n 1 1 40 — *1* 
SCvaln 1Q.M —.16 
i MuWenkmrttoae —4? 
Ml/irCATF t542 -32 
MunMlGB 1X06 -.16 
MuflBrft 1».»1 —08 
Muturt Series: 

Beacon n 316? +31 
1351 —31 


DiSCdvrv 1351 —.01 
Quatfdn 27.18 -.04 
Shares n 8055 -.05 
NCC Funds: 

EquilVlP 1374 -39 
Fxdlnci p 10.18 +32 
OH TCI p 1X« —.02 


EouitvR pl374 -.09 
FvdlnCR pl07i + 02 


SKApn 1401 
MIMUC Funds: 

AsslAfl 1330 — 15 
Fxdincm 934+32 
Iren 164] —Jo 
MtoSecs 978 + 31 
MMPrGln 963 —.11 I 
MMPxlnln 957 +.02 
MSBFdn 1831 -37 
Mar k e cz ie Grp: 
AdrGvAp 9.1D +31 
AmerFdptl 92 —.16 
CAMunp 9.88 
Canada 1074 + 32 
Fixlnco 95* + 51 
Global 1X37 +H7 
UOMUp 1X03 +31 
NYMunp 953 +31 
NatMpp 959 - 32 
NAmerp 658-32 
Mditelriehrv: 
OitooAl 963 +70 i 
IrMB 2748 +48 I 
tv VESA 1627 -.79 ; 
GtohAP 1447 —.13 
GrtoAP 9.16 —.17 
krtlAp 2748 +.4g ! 
MainStor Fuads: 

CflApt 1859 —70 
Convt 1241 —.17 
CTOBdl 7.78 -35 


OH TER P1042 —.02 
NDTxFrlm 942 — 3B 
NilYNL Norlhstur 
WildA 678 —34 

IncGrA 970 -33 

MulhA 863 -33 

NYL toSTif Fds: 

SAFE 


Ealnon 1815 — > 
Win 17.14 _ 

LowDurn 944 -31 
One Group: 

Aset Ally 9.10 — 34 
BlueCEn 1X41 -36 

DSCVol !2J» —.15 

ndx 1160 — j* 
•Atm n 936 —31 
_ Z » ?JI +31 
IncEn 13-22 — 35 
IncomeBd 978 + 32 
inlFxl 9.77 +33 
InTTF 1046 —32 
IrmEqn 13L63 +38 
LaCoGr 11.16 —33 
LflCoVc* 11-36 —36 
LtVal 1X26 +32 
OH Mu 1059 
SmGoGr 1839—34 
TFBdA 961 
lUCorco 958 +jn 
UlGortaC 9.99 —JO 


AssetAP 1X47 —33 
CATEAp 935 
OVHYP 1154 
DiscFdP 3452-1^ 
EqtoCAp 949 -35 
EflincBt 94S —35 
Gffitoo 1947 — J3 
GIGrp 1692 +34 
GtobEnvpl035 — 36 
GtabdAp3646 +.11 
GWrfBt 3637 +.10 
Goklp 1132 -31 
HTYldA 1272 —32 
HGYldBr 1366 —32 
In&TEAP 16J9 +32 
IntrTEP 1*25 
InvGrAn 10J4 +32 
LTGavA P1049 
MnSlCA 1173 
MSlncGTA 30.94— 53 


MtatocA 1130 
NYTawAPlXll- 


NYTxBtnlXn 
Oppen 1065 —39 
PATEAP1141 — -02 
SnedAp 3663 —40 
SfrincAp 434 + 31 
SlrtncBI 684 


SlySTlAp *60 
SflnGTAP 437- 


.. —31 

StrinvA p *77 
Tarsetp 2451 —42 
TxFrBte 9-38-32 
TxFrApe 9J9 -31 
Timep 1615 —.71 
TafRtAp 111 —70 
TotR !8to 606 —30 
USGvl p 922 +31 
VcSWA p 1436 —35 


AstABA 1124 —35 
CATFA 1069 -32 
MuIncA 1074 +31 
SfrerfGrA 1271 —50 
ST Govt 50.91 +32 
USGvLA IQ. 35 - 

VR&A 969 —.05 
PBHGGrn 1X65 —78 
PFAMCoFtto: 

Baton 1036 — 35 
CitaApn 1X75— .19 
DivLown 11.01 -72 
EmeroMklI379 + .19 
EnbEon I1J3 —.11 
Eqlncn 11.13 —.19 
hltln 12.08 +33 
MMBdln 954 +31 
MatCW 1375 —JS 
SmCpG 1X11—56 
SmCpV 1273 —79 
UtlSlKn 852 —75 
PWcoFtiadK 
TotRet n 1030 +31 
TR11I 696 +32 
LowOur n 9.91 
LDll 932 -31 
ShartTn 938 


Frgnn 

Gtadatn 

H1YUJ 

Grwthn 

LTUSGn 


9.98 +35 
9.70 +31 
1033 -32 
1357 — .17 
961 +33 


PNC Funds 
BdreiceS H.M -.08 
Batanc 11.93 —09 


Bond 
&r&? 
to*Bd 
maxEa 
MutlA 
ST Bd 
ValEc 
NlUnd 


CsreEM 
CoreGOS 
Growfhl 
tdxEa 
intmBdS 
wiGviS 
InfTBdi 
WtGCNtl 
totlEq 
WIFqS 

Managed! 9.98 +32 
ManqoadS9.98 +32 
PATF0 935 -32 
STBdi Ul *31 
SmCapVSlX98 — 74 
SmCopVI 1330 —32 
value! 1178 -JO 
, values 1177 -.10 
12.9? ■ 10 PR A RDvn 968— 32 
954 32 PadficUS R» +33 


961 -03 

962 -32 
938 — 76 
1056 —36 
9.13 -36 
97S +31 
9.13 -36 
9.7S +32 
1375 + 39 
1374 *37 


PobfiOGfTh 950 -38 
PuuK HOrtwrc 
AoGrp 2376 -41 
CATFo 736 —31 
CoPlnco 1*30 —-IS 
CnrPBd 15.07 -33 
USGU 9J4 
PactficoFdfc 
APresnf 1035 + 31 


116* -56 
1056 -.03 
13 J I —39 
11. a - 03 
1017 -3? 
t?37 -.18 

Nations Fund: 

AdiPflA D 9.68 - 03 I 
AtSRtTAn968 —03) 

Balirjt 1079 —13: 

BoTTAn 103? -13; 

CpGTAn 1067 - l{1 

'Sli-W iPWtoWWben, 
DivlTA n 9 9* — 07 . AS51A p 1035 —38 
EmGTP PIJ « —45 . 

Ealnc IN t II 18 -06 
EatrtA H.lt-flJ 
EalnT A |i.70-0*! 

ElrxJTA 9 b) - 0? 


Balance 
CA TF 
&JVC6 
Govtnaj 
ST CA n 


1163 -.05 
1049 +3S 
13.10 — JOB 
966 — 33 
9.92 -32 


FltfnlM 10 « -31 
GAITAn 10 23 —-0B 
GVlTAn 9 76 - 07 

Gvllfl I 9.74 - or 
InMuTAn 96* -.W 
IntEqin I 12 06 *.« 
IntEoTAnlXlS • 07 
MOST An 9.94 • « 
MCI I P 10.43 -W 


Ealdx 1344 — 10 ! MDIT* I04J-O7 


ATLAp 14.91 .35 
BlueAa 1453— 79 
CafTAp 1063-32 
CapAAp 11J6 —37 
CmTcA 846 —.13 
DvGrAn 1978 —31 
EurGr A p 1038 + 38 
GIEnAt 1147 —31 
1077 + 35 
1X43 +33 
1930-44 
879 — 36 
1034 —32 
MHIpAp 1035 + 31 
NTaxAp II J6 —31 


GflriA p 
CtGlAp 
onnAp 
HilnAp 
lnvGAn 


Batancdnliao 
Bondn 978-32 
Eoultyn 1531 —71 
GvtlncC 941 -35 
wr&in 1177 — >1* 
Wpis 1X30 +36 
totGvtn 939 —£0 
LMMlC 955— 32 
MMnC 1047 —31 
MuBdC 1072 — 32 
SmCOPC 2070 —71 
PorkstooetovA: 
BondFtl 979—33 
Eouitv 15.17 
Govtfcic 941 __ 

H&q 1377 — >13 
tolGovt 960 — 32 
tot vy* 1123 *36 
LtdMaf 955 —33 
Ml MU 1047 —34 
SmCon 2041 —77 
PtxnBan 1577 
Porn osaa. 31 J 8 __ 

GrowthA 1476 1_ 

Mfty 5D 1814 -71 
PaxWoridnlilQ —3a 
PoySonBln 1151 —39 
PooChTBd 945 +32 
PeoOlTEP 944-34 
Pefictxi 11 J5 —.70 
genCopA 558 —37 
PAMunlp 10 78 
PHtormuxs Fds 
EqCcnp 11,70— .13 
Efltosn 11.10 — >13 
InFICp 930 +32 
InFlIn 930 + 32 
MCpGrl 0 978 —76 
smew 9J6 +31 
STFlIn 976 +51 
P er m Port Funds: 
RermPT n 1672 -36 
TB3n 6573 +36 
VBondn 5449 +36 
OritCGn 1130 -J4 
PhaoFUnd 671 —.13 
Phoeaht Series 
BotonFd 75.13—31 
CafTxEa 1X88 —35 
CapApp 1770-38 
CvFtS- 1745— JM 
EqtyOpp 775 —34 
Growth XUl — .16 
WYieVd 852 . 

InGrAp 97S —31 
InGffit 934 —32 
mu 1273 +33 
MulFTAp 1X36 +31 
MulFlSp 127* +31 
StockFd 1371 — 36 
TE Bd 10^7 —32 
TotRet p 1534 — XS 
USGvB 9.15 +35 
WldOpp 1077 -^05 
PferpantFdB 

. n 21.18 J. 
inflEqn 7756 +.11 
FUBaxEG 1150—57 
PSarWGiK 
ARS III 739 — 33 
ARS IV 732 
AUSLA 639 —32 
' 735 —33 





ARS 11 

AdtUS 

AdiUSM 

AUSill 

CPU71P 

GNMA 

WYldp 


639 —M3 
732 — 33 
7.13 — 32 
635 — 32 
691 — 32 
638 -32 
6J9— 31 
7230 —31 
475 — 31 


MoaCap 1X21 —31 
STMMII 740 + 31 
ShrTTrp 676 +31 


BcUGrAn 10.11 —35 
EaAOAn 1154 —75 
EpGrAn 10J4 — 36 
EataA 1050 —35 
FwStoA 97B 
IntmGvA n978 
NJMuAn 1070 —02 
STInvAn 9.94 


Eatocp 1537 - 
Americp 1050 
Bandp 938 —31 
CanGrp 1543—32 
Gold 739 —Ml 
Growth p II J3 - 
tocrxnep *56 — 36 
Europe P 1877 +.13 
PWwFdB2X*t — X19 
PinMBdp 9.97 - 
htttGr 2234 +72 
Ronrllp 1B76—.U 
PiOTlrWPl954— JO 
ST toe 336 
TaxFrey P1174 —31 
US Gvp 974 +37 
WrthREJ 173* —38 


Ba»nc p 1156 -31 
EmerGr 1X14—85 
Govtn 870 —33 
Grtnc 7030 - “ 
ItotfGv 8214 - 

NaJfTE 1DL28 -3* 
PacEurG 1537 +.12 
Sectorp 17.10 —.70 
Value p 1X19 -JO 
PiwTrtD 944 +31 
PtorTrShD 972 - 

PtanrTNtx 1035— 32 


BalKn 

Bdtdx 

Eqindx 

Grlncn 


2143 —40 
26.18 +37 
J142— 2* 
2275—35 


TrtBdM 977 
MidGrt. n 2X49 ■ 


ST Bondn 1038 


SpGrn 3077 — 735 
TxEmBd 


n93£ —33 
Preiemd Group: 

Asset An 1032—37 
Fxtfin n 979 +31 
Growth n 1X84 —75 
inti n 1246 +.19 
STGctvn 977 +31 
Vatuen 1145 —37 


Atfus 

Balance 


toflQfen 
tntsan 
Japan n 
Lot Am n 
MdSmn 


456—31 
TU7 —33 
7076 -34 

930 —Ml 

CapAprn 1233 —04 
DlvGron 11.16 +31 
Efltocn 1X16 —36 
BHdXfl 1X83 —09 
Europe n 7X19 +33 
FEFn 1375 +.12 
FUnsWn 9.95 —31 
GNMn 9.11 
GATFn 970 
GUGv 946 +3) 
Growth n 1974 —32 
GwtNfln 1578 —33 
WYldn 842 -32 
Income n 852 
InfiBdn 971 +32 
1X95 +37 
1236 +.11 
1778 —08 
X26 +.16 
531 —32 
MdTxFrn 935 
MidCap n 1X1? —34 
NewAmn2547 —72 
R Asia a 1X0 +48 
NewEron2D77 —36 
NwHrW rtl5L35 —49 
NjTFn 1037 
NYTxFn 1X27 +31 
OTCn 1X81 —14 
SaTdin 1779 -58 
STBdn 435—31 
STGtofl 459 +31 
SnOrt 1451 —13 
SpecGr 1151 —37 
Specin 1048 —31 
TxFreen 939 -J» 
TYFrHYnll52 . 
TFinsIn 1X1P-J1 
TxFrSl n 573 -31 
USW 5.10 +31 
US Lang 976 +32 
VATFn 1X40 
PttmrvTn 10.91 —35 
Fmctolnesv: 

OvAch 1X99 
GoVlPrl 971 *32 
tosTEx 953 —31 
S* 100 PI 1442 -36 

TEPrt 858 —01 
ftlnMBS 9J6 +32 
Preieir Funds: 

BtChP 1151 +31 



Bond 
CopAoc 
EmgCr _ 

Govt 11 
Growth 59, 
Manta 1X18 
TEBd 11J2 +31 
Utilities 932 — H 
WWd 7.1/ +39 
PrapVI 1X27 —33 
PIFFxdtoc n 957 +32 
PIFtotMu ip!058 —33 
prow low caunarie 


EnayGtf 7060 — JP 


InstOrth 1058 _. 

SmCdpGr 1150 -51 
PrudSucnp 672 —19 
PnntaflU Funds 
MchA 1234 —33 
(i*se 1156 — J2 
AtSAf 953 -31 
BiaacGw 9J1 >31 


Cm Name I _ 
FdNane LTOOm 



mverAto lui —35 
MuMAp 1X95 -.13 
MuHA 1057 -3! 
PucGrA 1659 +.15 
STGlAp L97 +36 
UNAto 837—21 
CaiMut 11.13—33 
Arfl B I 956 _ 

ftwtsre 1140-38 
EqtoCrt 1132—10 
RarBtt UTS— .10 
RStoAf 1142 —39 


Rxcnrto 10.99 —3* 


GNMA fin 1358 
GtAstB 1.90 +31 
GMUBt 1357 +.11 
GAJtGf 1151 —33 
GbGenntlX25 +38 
G&Rsnl 1X01 +38 
GwPtBHn BJ9 — ai 
GvOCton 945 +31 
GrtflBt 1359 —19 
raOpGI 1131 —11 

HtYMBUn X13 -35 
IntGlIf 776 +32 
MGIIBf 7.77 +32 


IrVerfl toil 140 —05 

Mutt» 7X90 —13 


POCGte U47 +.1* 
STGOB X97 +36 
MunAat 1144 —32 
MuFLA 979 —32 
MuGat 1135 —31 
MunHYt 1058 
MutnsA 1X63 
Munlnt 1054 
MuMdl 1X54 
MunMAI 11 JO —01 
MuMnl 1145 
MunMlt 1159— JIB 
MunlMcd n050— 02 
MuNCt 1X9Q — D2 
MunNJI 1056—31 
MuNYf 1159 
MunOhl 1154—07 
MuPat 1037 — m 
NtMunf 14.91 —32 
SJniOtP 1177 
SZTOOBf 1176—01 
US Gvt tot 949 
UMB (1 853 —22 

AdBrtn 7071 +30 
Bat n 7079 —05 

amsuen 1140—32 
tocometo 950 +32 
InttSIkn 1456 +76 
Stkkfxn 1072—38 
PtdnamFwKb: 
AmGovp BJI +33 
ArSAp 1X20 —04 
AsJaA p 1X88 +35 
AABcdAP XT3 —35 
AAGftlAP X09— 07 
BIGvAp 45? 
AZTE 877 -J01 
caTxap xn —33 

Convert p 1854 —13 
C&AT 41J3 —33 
DtvGro 949 —05 
DvrtnApxllje —JO 
EnRsAp 1373—10 
EaMAp 842 — MS 
EuGrAp 1HQ +32 
Fedftiooc 95T —0* 
FLTulA 873 — 33 
GeaAPX 1X12— T8 
GTGvAp 1357 +32 
GIGrAp 944 +33 
~ * 1335 —07 

US IS 

9.92 -31 
673 

772—16 
853 — 33 
836—03 
831 

MureAp X6S— 02 
MnTtolp 859 —31 
NJTxAp 873 —31 
NwOpAp2X38 —30 
NYTxAp B56 —OS 
NYOPA P 856—01 
OTCEp 1074 —39 
OJiTxJlp 872 —02 
PATE 852—02 
TxEXAP 850 —05 
THnAp 1*4* — 33 
TFHYA 1436 —35 
TFHYBt 1*36 —05 
TFtoBl 1445 —03 
USGvA » 1248 +32 


GrtnAp 

WtflAp 

HYdAp 

HYAdp 

IncmA p 

InyAP 

MrtlnA p 

MaTXII 

Mmdlp 

MureAl 


«P 


870—71 

731 —29 

VoyAP 1131 —34 
AiEBt 1X18 —33 
AsiaBf 1X81 +35 
AABaBt XU -3S 
AAGthBl 837— 38 
BIGvBt 457 
CATxBl X10— B3 
CorrvBt 1855—13 


DwrtnBtxT 



1X9S —38 
2575 +32 

1151 —02 

incemeBi 671 +31 
InvBt 756 —16 
MATxBt 8.96 —M2 
MurtB I 85* — .07 


tUTxQt 8J2 —82 
12X20 


NwOppfll 

NYTxBt 

OTCB I 

TldBcBt 

USGvBI 

UHBt 

ViStaBI 


854 
1X76 
850— 35 
1245 +32 


Grp Name Wkfy 

FdNamy Last Chye 


InGrBtnp 938 +32 


InGBIvp 1X58-32 
’nixi? 


'—02 
.‘n9J9 —22 
Jpn957— 23 
■n 978 +31 

rn 932 +31 

VoBnCTn 1X24 — 36 
Vdtodp 1072—05 



■R 1U3— 06 
EquBVH 1X29—08 


SwUto" 193? —45 


WYWn 872 —33 
tarnn T736 — .11 
Mun&fi TUB 
NWn 1X18 —14 

pia« +jn 

Bras 

17J9 —42 
trtves n 1449 —10 
Oooort 2939 —71 
SchaferV 2572 —32 
Schroom cn2270 +72 
Sender X26— 14 
Schwab Funds 
CASin 932—32 
CATFn 1x22—33 
GOVSI 931 —31 
tofltad* 10J8 *« 
MtTFOn 931 
iWOr 127 6 —13 
STFBflp 935 —01 
SmCWdx 946—25 

acuaarr Funds 
Botorweanl 154—116 
CoTTx n 9.97 —Qs 
CDPGtn 1840—J9 
Develop n29Jl— 151 
EmMMneiOM +71 
GNMAn 1431 +31 
Gtoblrv 2*32 +.16 
GOmCB 1551 —37 
Goton 1X92—10 


Grwtacn 1633 + 3* 
1X71 +33 


toeomen t_ . 
intomed rv*X71 +J3 
lnttBdn 1250 +.10 


t^Aw_rJ978 +J9 


crPNome Yr 
Fa Nome LutCW 


1X20— S3 
3150-73 
1075 —32 
1X49 +31 
1415—3* 
1477 * 34 
1X45—05 


—02 



. _ iTFnllJl _ 
MATxn l: 

MetfTFti li 
MMB 

NYTxn li 
OHTxn I: 
PATaxni—. 
PacOpp»n1677 + 48 
QualQrn 15.1? —14 
ST Bondn 7143 —02 
STGtu n 11.18 +38 
TxFHYn 1146 —02 
Val pen 1251 —08 
ZtrtOODn 1175 +36 

SoafinflRA: 

AssetA 1X21—07 


BK31 1650- 


Band 1X59 +32 

Security Fmdv 


ggj 

GrS? 

TxEx 

Uttro 


679 +31 

iS Tsa 
673—14 
944 —31 
632—11 


AmShsnpl434 — 14 
SntShsnp 952—79 
USGov pn 872 + 32 


FrortierA 1X48 —47 
CapFdA 1474—66 
COTxA 7.15 _ 

CmSfkA 1279—03 
ComonA 1358 —73 
COmmunO 134T — 71 
FLTkA 741 

IT* 75.^ 


GfenaD 1X69—75 
GrowthA 457—11 


tncameA 1152 +-36 
■ncameD 1X48—06 
totlA 1X73 +.15 
tot! D 1657 +.15 
LATxA 833 _ 

MassTkA 772 
MDTXA 7.77 
MJTxA 8JS +31 
MknTkA 774 
MOTxA 746 
NanTxA 7J1 —31 
NJTkA 746 
NYTkA 775 
NCTxA 739 — Q2 
OhtoTxA 737 
DRTxA 748 
PATxA 751 
CAHvTXA 632 —01 
—31 


—31 

HJYBdAP 659 —34 
SeeftodGrouft 
Bakncedpl440— 03 
Bandp *37 +31 


Bandp 

ComSUtP __ 

EmGcp 679 —.13 
GvSccsp 941 +31 
Growth P 1635—45 
PATFp 1255 
TCIncp 1273 . 

World P 1278 +37 
SenftYFdn 1471 —38 
SeaUOkm S5.11 —05 
pvm Seas Series: 
Matrix n njl —14 
S&PMtdnll35 —34 
SPSOOn 1X16-30 


ST Gvt n 
YldPfn 

1784 FWnd 

GavMed 



953—01 

9.90-31 


AN- _ 
1051 — J3 


BoStForGrl065 +.12 
BadGrwlri057 —19 
B0SNumO1433— 43 

Bo5t*jm014.»7 

V 5oS— 31 
11.98 —ID 
1434 —01 
950—07 
1039 “ 

1048 

1043 .. 

1X38—13 
1558 —30 
1138 +J» 
972 +32 


CATE 

Fund 

GEq 

GrincA 

InvOln 

NaflTE 

NYTE 

SrrCao 

USGov 

RBBGvfp 


RCMFuwJ 2X19 —32 
RSI Trust: 

Acted 2570 +38 

care 3198—09 

EmGr 3X17—141 
totBd 25.10 +35 
STTF 1X10 +31 
Value 25.12 —47 
Rairtoown 5.02 —37 
ReaGrop 1X16 
Rests Ftm* 

CABBal 1177 
CgJB E a 1247 
DSIDv 1X52 —37 
DSI LM 943 +33 
FMA5PC 1077 -31 
KMSC 7558 -73 


+31 


SAMl_Pttn?54 — ta 


nlS5* _. 
n 9J6 —17 
I 1X04 +31 
937 —39 
n 950 

„ 1UM —14 
TSWBS 1X51 —03 
TSWFU 976 +32 
TSWlrtl 1130 — O* 
RrfiTtnon 17.14 —17 


AiiaTI 

BafTrn 


946 +77 
950 — 03 
nixis— m 

n 9.90 —15 
flTTEaTrnllKl +.10 
SXSvFTT 957 +32 


1176 —39 

VAMuT n 10J2 —JO 
VaMurdt 1QJ2 —02 
SkyOee Foods: 

Europe 1X*4 — 31 
Morentvto 943 —06 
Saewnn 1676 — 36 
SpEqumi 1X35 —37 

CawSSTxn — >57 
GJGvtA 1131 -37 
mcGraAplTTO — 34 
IncRetA 946 _ 

MIA 1775 +.10 
MoGovtA 1235 
MuCalA 1236 —01 
MuFLA 1X63 
MULTOA 647 
MunNtA 1113 
MuNJA 1332 
MUNYA 1X65 
5HTSY AM +31 
VJSGvtA 1330 
UftlAp 1138—27 
Small Bareev B*e 
IrthC 1774 +.10 
CWApB 1X96 — 58 
InttB 1758 +39 
MuLWB 647 
SmMBntySbrmA: 


SmCapT 958—77 
TEFTTrn 953 


Tax FrTrn940 +32 
VakieTrn 931 —08 
RemHCh 1372—15 


—05 


RTFdntp 
GPvSeCP 1X95 *39 
Growth p 2536 +39 
MMCapp2870 —01 
S0CAWP 2653 +31 
RlmcoBd IS +33 
RimcoSik 1159—16 
RivertoE 1035 —04 
RhcrttGVI 9.18 +34 
Riverside Oipe 
Eautty 1242 — 25 
Fwfln 949 +33 

TNMuOb 953 +3* 
Robertson Stephens: 
Contra n ixoi —33 
ErrtGrp 17 J* — ST 
VoWus 1133 —57 


BdGroWPlxg —}4 
RoMup 1750—33 
LhJNY p 121 » 

Rodney Swore: 
Dnrtnp 1X62 +31 
Growth p 1554 — JS 
IrrtEqp 1251 +38 


+54 

Grtn 1X51 —02 
MMWGr 1175—11 
Ranee f towte: 

PetmMu xn— >06 
Ealnc 133—OS 

CfTC 6J4— m 

Premier n 6J7 —32 
Value to 942 —00 
Rishmare Group: 
AmGasn Txs — 20 
USGLBD 934—0 
US tot n 8.72 +31 
MDTF n 1IJ45 +3) 
VATFn 1071 +31 
RvdkNovo 975 —08 
RYd&dJRSflX53 +33 
SBCWUOfl 952 +35 
SBCWWGT 1636 +J07 
SBSFFuKte 
CapGrn 774 —17 
ConvrlblnllJT —16 
SBSFn 1X11 -.14 
SBMte 
Batanc a 1147—14 
Bandny 1X19 +33 
BcBN&cp 973 +33 
CapGrn 1136—31 
CoroDlnpnl.97 „ 
GNMA p 975 
tofrmd&dpSTV 
SMGvnp 975 +31 
toifftonpnlXU— 33 
intMnp 1074 
ImGvtnp 9J4 +32 
hittp 1X67 +.12 
Eqtocto* 1349 —36 
Eatnrfx ttplXQl —10 
KS TF 10J3-31 
MidCGp 1X86—31 
PAMunnp)042 +31 
SmCdPPnlUD —74 
Value np 10J9 —fid 
CopAnp 1470 —71 
SIFE Trust 379 _ 

STTFuodss 

Grttunc 2X86-.14 

Growth n 1159 — J9 


inti 1436 + 38 
TaxFreen 954 


USGov 1X33 —32 
STiansic 
AWGrTn 9JB — 31 
BafTrn 9S2 —36 
CvGrlp 1156— li 
CopGrT 1177 —.15 
IftGBT 935 + 32 


979—01 
1073—71 
n 958 —01 

It 977 —31 

SfeaiwnutFds-Iavesfc 
Fxdtocftt p 9.5B +33 
GrEotfyin p976 —.13 
GrtnEqtopi046— 32 
tol&rtnln p956 +33 

s gSS-pg&s? 

RuOncTrnSTB +33 
GreqfTr 976 —13 
GrlneETY6046 —32 
totGvfTrn 956 +33 
LTlnCTrn 95* *32 
SmCFET 1044 —38 
Stem* Trust 
CatM*iAPlX36 — 02 
CnincAp 978 +33 
EmGr A p 1X18 —79 
FLHKAp 974 —36 
GrtncAp 1138 —38 
GrowthA P 1135 — 74 
WIGrAp 1(150 +.13 
NntMuAplXB* —03 


DVSUl 
GNMA 
Gmiftc 
USGovt 
VRG 

StogecoPdi . 

As umn 958 —01 
Bondktxn 976 +33 
GwthStonlXU — J7 
S&PSDOn 9.96—07 
UST AN n ?36 +33 
Staadabbwri! 
EdUTyn 2979—41 
FrdtoOTnl?52 +34 
GFxlnn 1X47 +38 
(nt£qtyn2573 +71 
bltt FxIn n 2X16 +.15 
MATESOM-ll -33 
Securn 19.10 +33 
STARn 1975 -33 
SmCpEq 04744—738 
Star Fundi: 

Rental njl —08 
SMtorFd 1178-32 
USGvl nc 9.50 +31 
St UI b uM run ds: 
Gewttnco 947 +31 
Munilncn 1X18 —02 
Quaky In 949 —31 
We Band Ore; 

QUhS *62—05 
DlversiM 873 -32 
Pronress US —11 
TaxEx 1X54 —01 
US Gov p 434— 31 
gFu rniF OK 
Baton n 3033 — 1* 
Gwthn 2174—78 
tmerim ixoi +31 

Murtn X19— 01 

StShref Resh: 

CA TF C 7JO —01 
CapiMA 973—71 
CrerffO 9.1/ —31 
CopFdC 930—31 
QWtaB 9.16 — J1 
ExrtFdrl 9842— 133 
EnertrvA 11.14 
GlEngyB 1139 > 

GvttocA 12J» +31 
GvtinB 1139 +32 
GthCn X 21 —39 
InVTrAp &26 — JM 
tovTTB BJ4 — JQ 
tovTrC BJ8 —36 
IrvvTrD BJS 
VYTFAp 731 -31 
NYTFB 731 
NYTFC 732 —31 
SmeopA 851 
SmCaoB 849 — 29 


Grp Nam* KAfy 

Fd Name Last Os* 


442 —31 
572 —11 
230— 08 
542 —09 
.1276 —72 

man — o» 

_.tn 9,91 
USTxRrtll47 +32 
wrtdGWnl532 —21 
VoTorgn 971 


Euro n 

GljRscn 

GMShn 
Growth n 
Incon 


V S^ f t,4-29 


Aoortnn 7J6 
ConvFdn 1X14 — JN 
Fundn 1679 —S3 
Income n X31 —35 
LevGT 7237-38 
NYTEn 935 + 3! 
SndSrtn 1JJ 
YewExn 107 
USGvl n 112 
VNSfTEl 94 .._ 

VatSfarlBI 934 +31 

vanEdc 


I— 53 


-34 


AsiaDynBK75 +71 


Amman 138 —JS 
Assoc n 72 —31 
invest n 1.14—02 
Oceana n 1.99 —32 
Stein Roe Pds 
QsOPPn29JO— 1J4 
Gvttncn 9J2 +3T 
HvflAunn IXM —01 
Income n 9J9 —01 
intoiBdn 845 
lntMunn 1076 —01 
Win 9.98 +39 
UdMlnn 953 
AtedMun 856—01 
PrimeEniM.13 — li 
Specfn 22 30 —14 
SHAA 2X22 —49 
TotBZe9nx2S3l —44 


GovSeen 9.19 +33 
Balcmp 1170—09 
GrEnp 1349 —42 
InlSd 974 +32 
LMGovAn945 . — 31 
VG4MomeftX25 —10 
strotkw FandK 
OMdondtCUS— 122 
Growth n 2X27—07 
SmCapn 2578 —34 


Advtart 1003 —02 
AmUtnn 9>a —20 
AsaPacn 974 +.19 
OnSikn 1741 —15 
Discovn 1X19—18 
GovScn 938—02 
Growth n 1X59 —.18 
KYlMu 955 —04 
I neon 9.44 —34 
7052 —01 
1433 +.14 
1839 —10 
MunBdn 947—03 
Oprtnty n 277B —39 
STBondn 974 —33 
STMunn 1032 —03 
Total n 2X13—29 
« — Amert MFrte 
Bc6AsetApI4J5 - 
Bc4Asm&Pl4JO - 
DtVlncBp 456 —02 
EmGrAP 1X12 — 51 


tosMut 
Inti n 
bivstn 




^m^AplXn— 71 
HQncBp 777 —37 
HlUiCAp 776—37 
TE1WAP1137 +31 
tA 823+32 
IP X23 +32 
MJfl —03 


STGiA p 
USGpvAp 


953— 31 


MDNMtnlX23 — M 
UStncttn 9.96 +32 
USJnCTn 9.96 +32 


VOTED! In 1174 —39 

vreenTn 


AtfiGvAP 97J — m 
AdvsrAP 2478 —21 


ApGrAP 2459 — 68 
ApprA P 107D —05 
TelGAp 7IJ8 —.12 
Tdto 10X11 —74 
AzMuA P 970 —01 
CaMuAP 1578 — 03 
DtvsSlInc P758 —01 
FdVatAP 777 —07 
GOOAP 2935—32 
GrtnAp 952—06 
H3ncAl 1IJ6 +31 
trtCAA tUB— 02 
IntNYA 810 -37 
LtdMup 835 —01 
LtdTrp 7JB +32 
MaGvAp 12J9 — 31 
MOMUAP1SJ5 — 07 
MOMUAP 12.14 -33 


NWtoAp 1246 —02 


NyMuAp 1X26 _ 
PrMlAp 1947 *39 
SoEaAp 17 JO — 1.12 
PrTRA 1543 +32 
UIBAP 1X31 —32 
wmcAp M0 +32 
WWPAp 171 +31 
smihBnwShnaB: 
AaGrBt 2633 —68 
AppfBt 1X65 —06 
CaMuBt 1538— 33 
Convei 1X26—07 
OrsKfil 748 —31 
EiepBt 1443 +39 
FLMuBf 955 - 

FdVoBf 739 — OS 
GIBdBt 1540 +35 
WOpBt 2930 — 33 
GvScBI 9J5-31 
GrtnXt 954 — Mi 
WfncBt 11 J6 +31 
InvGdBt 1141 +31 
MoGvBtnl2J9 — 31 
MaMUBI 1545—07 
NJMUBI 1246 —33 
NyMiBt 1X26 —01 
PrtWBl 19J5 +78 
FYmTRBt1553 +32 
SectrSi 1X54 +33 


1733— 1.11 
1X61 —37 
1U6 —12 
1732— 01 
1331 —32 
X40 +32 


SaMBmfSBm Fdc 
PmRe* 947 . 

WWIP 77S +31 
PrkUIlD 759 —05 
SmBrShDto 9.92 —02 
SnfflrttrGr 935 —32 
S8G*n Funds 
Gold 1X76 —11 
Wrt 2X16 —oe 
Dvseas 1157 
Society Funds: 
Baionca 947 
DvreftSt 1138—02 
Gr»c 950 — 39 
MtGr 1X39 
Wmlnc 946 + 32 


invQBd 
Ltd In 
OH ( 
OH" 
Sf*GrSlk 
SfHVolSf 
atclrw 


.. +31 
1032 +32 
1X00—40 
1059 + 32 
X95— » 
1031 —11 
950 -36 
USGvttn 1058 +31 
VaJSk 957 —34 
SoureSin 1647 —13 
SAM SC 1378 +31 
SAMVdn 1755— .16 
SoTTVlatBd 934 +33 
SoTTVIei6t 9.92-37 
SoPtStk 300—150 
SpPtCash 954 +31 


AMlAJc 1757 
CA TF to 977—75 


WerBdtn 930 
InUEnn 1373 *77 
LaCapGr n9j6 —12 
975—36 
fn 958 
1148 — » 

.... 1X00—29 

TotRtBd 954 +31 
TetnpMon Group: 
AmerTr r 1X37 
CcpAcc 1570 +.15 
DevAUdp 1X65 +32 
Forynp 958 + 39 
GlobOpp 1281 +37 
Growth p 1771 +.12 
Inctenp 971 +33 

World D 1539 +.10 
TempietaitlasbC 
EmMSp 1141 +31 
ForEaS 1X28 +.17 
FEsafS 1X84 +71 
GrvrthS 1157 +.M 
TWedAvV 1X91 —10 
Thontsoo Group: 

EnlnA 1139 —72 
GwthA 2X69— 3J 
fncoA 752—03 
MIA 1246 +.12 
OporA 2X64— 150 
PrcMM 1153 —07 
A 947 
IA 1X10 _ . 

1141 —33 
870 

_ _ 1136—23 

GrwthBt 7039 —30 
IncameBt 757 —33 
totter IZI5 +.12 
Oporfll 25J5— 157 
PrecMetBU44 — 09 
SWGvB 947 
TnxExBtlUl -33 
TswiB 1137 —34 
USGovfit 837 +31 
Thernb ul yFdP 
IntMu 1276 —31 
LJOTIn 1135 —31 
LWCol 1152 -32 
LfdGvtP 1X16 +31 
LtdMul P 1373 —04 
NMM 1272 —02 
Tocnuev 1375 —32 


AsMAb 1230 

GJSoBp 

GfBaiA 974 +31 
GoKResp 573 
IlnvGtdp 1X31 —28 
Wrtdtace *79 +31 
wneTTrnplAB +33 

VnaKnmpwfcMr 
AcRtGvBt 9.4? —31 
CA TFA p 1X42 —08 
GrathAp 1757 -75 
GrwthBt 17.98 —25 
HTYldA n 974 —08 
l-KYUBI 973 —09 
In TFA p 1X27—02 
IflTFBt 1874—33 
MunlnA p 1X74 —01 
MunlnBt 1472 —01 
PA TFA p 1652 -33 
PATFBt 1651 -JO 
STGlAp HJ6 +31 
STGfflt X36 +32 
StOhiA p 1X22 *M 
StylnBl 1272 +.10 
TXFHBt 1448 —07 
TxJ=rHIAp109— 36 
USGvBI 1476 —02 
USGvAp 1*77 — 32 
Unity A p 1X95 —7* 
uraar 127a —25 

Vance Eech on ae : 
CftoE 164.74 —98 
Depest n 8X55 — 7B 
Divers rt 767.92 —7.88 
Bx» 19X28—1.10 
ExFd 23X64—171 
FdEx 13933 —52 
ScFSd 12X39—1-32 

Vtanguord Group: 


AdmlTn 973 +33 
LTn 


AtknLT n 954 + 34 
AdrrCTn 93S +31 
AssetAn 1353 —33 
Convt n 1038 —IB 
Ealnc n 1X74 —.15 
EXPlonffr n4X38 — 44 
Nttaann 11.13 —71 
Prmcpn 187S —20 
Quanta 15.1? -.16 
STARn 1336 —36 
TrlnBn 3253 +71 
TrtJS 2930 — .90 
STTsryn 958 +37 
STFadn 972 +JJ1 
STCorpn 1049 
rTTsry n 972 +33 
GNMAn 978 . 

rrcoron 977 

LTTsryn 946 + 34 
LTCnron BJ4 —31 
HYCorpn 7J7 —33 
Proton X75 — jm 
kbtTWBn 941 +37 
IdxSTBn 972 +31 
IdxITBn 947 +31 
IdxBal 1X33 


UkSOOn 4754 —37 


IndxExtn l_ 
kixTotn 11.10—15 
idxGran 951 —37 
iCbcVdn 1177—08 
JdxSmC 15.10—36 
WxEurn 1179 +37 
WxPacn 1140 +39 


khdristn 4X22— 32 


MurtYdnlOTi _ 
Mununt n 1235 — 31 
Muudn 1051 —xa 
MuLona nlX4l 
Mu Won 1131 +31 
MunSMn 1544 —01 


CAinsrrn 971 —in 
CAlnsLTt ‘ 


¥11049—33 

FLInsn 1071 
NJinsn 1732 +31 
NYimn 1X31 
OHtnsn 1073 
PAtosn in 58 
SPEmur 1557—05 


SPGoldr 



re 

Wrtdsrn 1379 — 39 

va-agr* 

IncPl 4.98 —31 
IMunint 9.14 +31 
NYVen 1157—08 
RPFBt 631 _ 

RP FG R1 1X1S —35 
RPFGI 11.18 —.13 
RPf-Cv 1644 —10 


Victory Funds 

> 941 —37 


AugrGr 

coroBd 


974 +32 


Equity 1X11 —70 
GovIBd 9Jt 


CdpApp 
kMun 


1X11 —10 
7070 +31 
954 +33 
USGv 971 +32 
Trademark Feed*: 
Equity n 1070—08 
Gavtlmon97S +32 
KYMunn 9 JO —MI 
SI Govtn 9J4 +32 


B^P* 

EmGA p 

EmGBi 

GrtnAp 

GrtnBf 

PMRst 

Gvlnct 


^ —01 
1072—14 
1156—24 
970—02 

7073 —17 
1075 —18 


1X53 —39 


936 

CATFA p 970 —02 
GvtncTr 775 
GvSecp 757 

73J —04 

9.19 —03 
25.10 +32 
845 -JO 
9.96—02 

976 -32 


HTYWB 

HYTFI 

InstGv 

InvQ Ap 

TFBdA 

TFBdBt 


Trust For CmtUta 
GSP 930 —a* 

MSP 954 

TMP1996 9J2 
TFEB97 957 
TVnwranllT? -J5 
TtreedyGV 1X59 +33 
2Mb Century: 

Boltov n Ii57 —38 
G*ft 1571—71 

Growth n 2XT7 —34 
Hertnvn lOJQ —18 
InHEmGrnSTl 
totean 770 +35 
LTBondn 9.15 +31 
Select n 3622-44 
TxESTn 9.96 
TxEWtn 1X12—02 
TVELTn 1032 
Uttron 1935 —63 


Dtvlne 1234 —16 
Govt 946 —03 
Grtnc 2277 -79 
Gwftl 7Q2J4 — JUO 

OuortEq n 5J3 —06 
Tudor n 2X57 —69 
WeftzPVat n 978 —.06 
WfitzVatn 1554 —15 
Weston: 

AZTF 1077 
BdgPt 1X23 +33 
LT Bd 9.19 
ModVat 1X26 —09 
DR TE 1574 +32 
Bdinvtn 1749 —34 
BasVtl n 20J9 —10 
Eatoln 1X23—16 
GNMA I n 1573 +32 
IntBdln 978 
MIDCOI n157l —12 
STGovtt 1SJ1 *JU 
BTOlnvH to 7 7.67 —34 

GNMARIP1571 +32 
MldCBftitil573 — 52 
STGovfRtpl5J0 +32 
Westwood Foods: 
Brtlnst 671 —07 


Uttron 1955 
USGvShT rt9J4 
Vcduen 532 —05 
Vista n 9.10 —54 
USUryeStkn493— 36 
USA* Grom 
Aasv6ihn7754— 09 
GoknxdnlXl?— 34 
CABdn 974 —02 
Comstn 2273 +33 
GNMA 977 —01 
GOWn X33 —10 
GrBJneh IXM —36 
Grwthn 1X92—13 
tncSHcn 1373 —14 
toeomen 1149 —09 
Min 1672 +.12 
NYBdn 1059 -31 
ShTTBndn 972 „ 

TxFto 8 K _ 
TxErTn 1X38—02 
TxELTn 1X96 —02 
T*£Shn 1X44—01 
VABd 1057 -34 
WUGrn 1154 —31 
USTMaftor: _ 

Asia 1X35 +.14 
EMJtC 848 —70 
EmgAinr XJ8 +72 
Ereffly 1X80 —42 
inoGro 1130 —39 


HMgdln 673 +37 
InfFd 1057 +33 


WtTE 

LTTE 

Matin 

NYTE 

PttoEuro 

STGvStc 


ajB 
876 +31 
838 +32 
113 - 

817—33 

xn +3i 


. STTaxEX X98 +31 
UnBedForete 
Acaimulttv733— 37 


Band 

Cora tnc 

GaldGvf 

SvtSec 

hfitodi 

Hightne 

income 

MfGth 

MuniCPl 

MunHi 

NwCCDl 

Retire 

ScTech 


538 
2051 —ST 
XM—12 
i« +31 
436—02 

9J6 +.17 
X95-31 
X13 —01 
1044 —39 
759—32 
1180 —49 


vanguard X96 —38 
United Seroi 


' Services: 
AllAmn 1934 —74 


'J6 +33 
Income 970 
lntrt 1X07 +JB 
NYTkF 1271 —03 
ShtGvtnn 959 +31 
Visto Funds 
BolA 1074 — 3S 
Bondpn I0J3 +32 
CAlnt 951 
COpGt 3X86 —43 
CooGrBl 30J9 —62 
EoutypnlXM —07 
Gwtnc 10.94 +JJ3 
Grtnc 2974 -JO 
GwWshp T436 —21 
GrtnBr 29.15 —JO 
IXM +35 
11.15 


9.95 +31 
1149 ■ 


,.... — XO 

1X39—17 


IflfiEqA 
NYTF 
ST Bd P 
TFinon 
ITOlumer 
Vemeurl _ __ 
AZtos 1033 
COTF 10.10 —ni 
FLlnsd 10JD +32 
GroStkp 17JS— 03 
IA Tf 938 —04 
MNJns 1X13 
Altonlnt 1055 — JD 
MfttoTF 1138 +37 
MO fan 958 —03 
NotrrF ?7i _ 

1«3TF 1072 — JO 

USGv 932 +32 
mwdeaaitaecfc 
TotRet 1175 —12 
Growth 13.57 —25 
LWTemt 957 +37 
Muni 7033— 31 

Global 975 _ 

WaltSt _ 738 —IS 
Wartura FSncuK 
Grlncn 1X17 —71 
CapApp n 1374 —04 
EmGthn 2071 —57 
FouJIncn 937 —51 
GtatUFkdnlOJ3 +32 
TrUEqun 1978 +J6 
bedEqn 1576 +75 
IntGvt n 930 
NY Muni nl<U2 —07 
lew 


BalnsJ 

inieai 

BaCwe 

EqS«C 

irtmasv 


118-37 
951 +33 
638 —07 
‘ 38 

+33 




Growth 17 
Income 


970 — V 
1X12 


InttGthn 1X50 +32 
WBamFtoaB: 
RennSdP 1044 —36 
PATxPr 1076 
QuaHy 1056 —34 
USGov 1X11 +33 
WMnpPms 
WinFim 934 +33 


WtoGrtn lose— 16 
WlnMTp 952 —31 


WinGttn 1X11 —10 
WinAGto I5J0 —25 


Woodward Fd£ 


Balance 

Bond 

Eqttx 

GrVal 

fnfBd 

totms 

MlMun 

MunBd 


9,63 — 34 
939 +31 
1X64—37 
1099 —36 
975 -31 
1X43—36 
932 +31 
9.91 +31 
IXM— 25 
feasts: 

9.99 tin 
GtGro 1135 -.19 
CHInc 1X10 +32 

died 1052 —jo 

World Funds: „ 
Nwpmg 1X93 +46 
VoroEP 1651 +24 
VontWVnll57 —32 
Wright EquEHE; 
BdoLux nlX43 +3S 
Dutch n 1X73—06 
HongKoneUTO +36 
Japan n 1X09 —.11 
Nordic n 1037 +.17 
Spadshn 670 +.17 
Swiisn 956 — 02 
INrigH Funds: 

Curin 9.95 —32 
GwObn 1276 +35 
InBtCh 1344 +J» 
JrBlCh 1U9 —70 
NearBdn 1X18 +33 
OutCor 11.90 —10 
SeffiOtn 1436 —19 
TotRet n 1131 +31 
Yacfctmnno 9J8 +35 
YtmGtab X97 +31 
2W*ia Funds: 

SlratA 1244 —12 
ZSAPPA 1477 —14 
ZSMAA 11.94— S3 
ZSGvAp 9.91 +.02 
ZSPAp 1X11 —30 


StoMC 


ZSAppC 

MAC 


251. _ 
ZS&vC 
ZSPC 


1245—12 
1X15 —14 
1132-33 
938 + 31 
1231 —06 


r j 


T. " 

5 

Z i 
_ < 


°a 


a*, 

XA 

5 


-star 
uiM 
ei a 
Uea. 
» 74 


1 - 
nee. 
kdn 


Tefa 


a 


35, 

AM 

we 

36 


3 


086 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 


!fc: m 


mi i 

is i 

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i 


*e r* 


SOLID VALUE 


OM THE GRO U N Df « 






Understanding what makes good investment instruments tick is not always easy bu|^|^j; 
hard to see why German Pfandbriefe - bonds issued to refinance mortgages and public loans - r -nk mating 
today's top D-Mark investments. Consider these simple facts: First, Germany's |jQ| 26 private inott- 
gage banks pay Pfandbrief investors a daily average of DM 100,000,000 j| * n interest, an 

amount generated by a time-tested system that accounts for 40% of all bonds S outstanding in 

Germany Second, German Pfandbriefe usually provide higher gf yields than Ger : 

man Treasury bonds (Bunds) while offering equivalent safety Ja Third, no investorkas 


Third, no investorkas 


ever failed to receive 100 % repayment on a 
The only thing complicated about 
Mortgage Bank Act that are designed to ensure 
briefe are secured by 



German Pfandbrief held to maturity. 
Pfandbriefe in Germany are the regulations of the 
asset quality for investors. For instance, Pfand- 
mortgages or by public-sector loans. They must be - 



7/MX 






covered by e 

maturities. What's more, Pfandbrief issues are monitored by a sta 
designated trustee. And the banks are fully liable for each issue. 

These and other legal requirements make Pfandbriefe attractive 
investors seeking safety. And they are easy to buy. Pfandbriefe can 
purchased at any mortgage bank or commercial 




■ ■ i i ■ ■ ■ i j 

German Pfandbriefe are officially quoted 
German stock exchanges. Issuers acfiv 

bank in Germany, or their correspondents abroad. I maintain a well-functioning secondary 


{iii li, M*' 
fe ■ !" HIM 

’*• \1. rial 
;••• r " y i 

SB 

I i ’ i; : AA 

■j> v. 

?■: i, , . 1 « n » 
.!'■ j-.s orcl> 
i; ■ ns 

Ar 

V. J '.; et 

:!'• .1 • luff 

*•: >' -occ 

non 

ft. 

ij’: :«•'«’ 5i a 

iS* 1 ;*r»G 

<?-. j- 1 ;rli SI 
iS;* : ^ritT. 

I;-. »{'.90bu 
R . ”■ 3.001 
«•. h'. JOM 1 
l* («■ • imm 

.v • .?,.CG 
ji -l jiterc 
;«• f i;- ' iWl 
>V ;c; ; sons 
!■ IJ' ■ 

J?.; :C 
jF- wi a 

*1 o*o 

I'J- -j . 

ie 

j-.- ' i; • Jim* 
JS 


WE PAY PFANDBRIEF INVESTORS AN AVERAGf 
OF DM 100,000,000 IN INTEREST EVERY DAY 


GERMANY'S MORTGAGE BANKS 

DEPFA-BANK, WIESBADEN 
BAYERISCHE VEREINSBANK AG, MUNCHEN 
HYPO- BANK, MUNCHEN 

DEUTSCHE HYPOTHEKENBANK FRANKFURT AG, FRANKFURT ‘ 
RHEINHYP, FRANKFURT 

DEUTSCHE GENOSSENSCHAFTS-HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, HAMBURG 
FRANKFURTER HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, FRANKFURT 
DEUTSCHE CENTRALBODENKREDIT-AG, KOLN 
BAYERISCHE HANDELSBANK AG, MUNCHEN 


WESTHYP, DORTMUND 
BERLIN HYP, BERLIN 

SUDDEUTSCHE BODENCREDITBANK AG, MUNCHEN 

mOnCHENER HYPOTHEKENBANK EG, MUNCHEN 

HAMBURGHYP, HAMBURG 

WURTTEMBERGER HYPO, STUTTGART 

NURNBERGHYP, NURNBERG 

HYPOTHEKENBANK IN ESSEN AG, ESSEN 

DEUTSCHE HYPOTHEKENBANK (ACT.-GES.), HANNOVER 


BRAUNSCHWEIG- HANNOVERSCHE 

HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, HANNOVER^ 
ALLGEMEINE HYPOTHEKEN BANK AG, 
RHEINBODEN HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, KQlN ■ 

LUBECKER HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, LUBECX- 
NORDHYPO BANK, HAMBURG . 1 # 

BFG - HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, FRANKFURT ' 
WL-6ANK, MUNSTER : - ; ■ 

HYPOTHEKENBANK IN BERUN AG, BERUN-' ? 









I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. MAY 16, 1994- 


Page 15 


isw 3aat@?saeit§®iasi H@b?cS Sssues 


Corr.pi led b/ Laurence Desvilettes 

Issuer A ™ un! 

(millions} 

Mat. 

Coup. 

% 

Price 

Price 

end 

week 

Terms 

Fteailng Rate Mot as 

Falcon 9- 

Si 05 50 

1999 

030 

99?? 

— 

C"»« 6-mvnih Libar. Callable or tar trdei !®*5. Alia 
million due MCI paying 070 over bta<. fees '3 7 5 j a Dwromi- 
nQfiOi'i 51 million. jradlov Ini l.i 

//erril! Lynch Inl'I 

S250 



99 w 

— 

O.*. VmenlK Libor r-lorucallahlo Feet no 1 d'S'OCied jfyfe.-ri-l 
L.ndilrltl 

Deu'sche 

Aucgieicrcbanl - 

c- u 200 

1999 

L'bor 

100 

— 

Imofeii -"'i b- rt>e 3-n>gnrf Libar. Nonealfeb-e Fees L CC n - , » 
(Tnntaut e* 5i.<khcrtir] 

So*jth Ausiraliar. 
Gavernm-enf 
nnanang Aathont/ 

dm 350 

l rj 9i 

Utor 

100 

— 

lr.'ei«:t will be »h? I mnntfi L-bo. MoncaUalXi- '"eel nor 

5«kiv?ri j5 Ban! Ct.pj 

Cheltenham ft 
Gloucester Building 
Society 

£200 


0.05 



fn!«[«i Mill be 0 05 aver J-manik. Lib?f jiiJ 1®?: -kben -sr.e 
caliacle n> p-y. =nd 0 15a»e' rfiereafre* net d-se-osea 

D-.-.-anxia'-i^-s EI0C0O0. ftJtnnwv Bonur. | 

Lloyds Bonk 

cm 

2C0' 3 

^5 

K«0 

— 

Inie-eil -ill bo 0.b2j over 2-moroh Libo> unnl 1 ‘ 3 Y > •*F-en -iwe 

O cd latte a' pr». > h < Mirer 1 c-of' Peafiered V 5^ 49 Fees 

0SC-% jC-Olcn-.a" :-3cliS Inrl) 

72-ed" Coupons 

Brody Income ft 

Go >ernment 
jecurities Trust Nbr 2 

Si*x> 

2023 

1 

open 


I'Jwrijliriblij Feet nor -Itc toted ?i«:e ic C«* mi ntey ! i 
iLehrmn Brctiiort 111 L| 

L3 Si-.nles-wig-Hoblein 

S200 

1996 

6-^ 

iOO.fcS 

— 

ieeliacd a. 99 39 f*>rtdlabte Fees I!*** (Le^ny- 3»o+eri 
Ini 1 ) 

• -.-.eden 

S500 

1995 

5'-> 

9 1 ? :<? 

— 

r-Aani-alloble Fun^bte wiih outranding istur. tenmg 'c^o- 
amount to S' 5 bill mi Fros noi dudned IJ ? Morgen 
Cecjuiei J 

Deu::che Bonk 
nr.cmce 

£100 

\m 

77. 

— 

— 

Itsoe teice and f«! nor disclosed Noncollaote Fui'-gitie -ai* 
oul -.landing uue. * rating lord amounr ro C4G0 mJIion {De-,*- 
iche ELan>.! 

Llo.-d; Bank 

£100 

2009 

?!■> 

100. 74J 

— 

Ecofrerird ai °9 0*». rJoncdtoble Feet 2 '.jX (G-atemor Joens 
In 'J 

• Cortpagme Bancaire 

Ff 1,000 

1995 

5 1 . 

9?.w 

99 j9 

Nanoallabte. Fees 0.1 5*» (C-edn Cormwreol de France.; 

Credit Local de 

France 

FF 1,000 

2003 

7'-. 

99.se 

1007ft 

1 4c ncallabto Feet 0 K5'«. (UE5.| 

Unifever 

FF1.500 

2004 

71-51 

100.&76 

99.i3 

F«.“ercd or «SI rioncallable Fees r% (3N? C«r-r=! 


- -EE Inl'I Finance in. 150.000 

Fun: pean Investment iti 300,000 
Ban!- 

icoete Nationals des ni 150,000 

Che-Tins de Fer 

rrjncds 


CoflcWe « F-3T from Few Th. ICvifSoI 
CoUoWe ai par >n 1W9. Fees D)\ (Sants <4 Roma) 

Nt«ccHfcd?lc Feel 2%. (Cr*^rto ltd>3<to ] 


Mortgages 

Rattle 

Treasuries 

CompUed n Oar Staff Frrrr Pupatcha 


NEW YORK — The benchmark 
30-year U.S. Treasun bond closed 
ai 85 I0*’32 on Friday, up 16/32 
from a week earlier, in a tumultu- 
ous week capped by rumors that a 
leading Wall Street* firm was in fi- 
nancial (rouble and was selling 
morigage-backed securities and 
Treasury issues to raise capital. 

Traders said the market contin- 
ued to be chappy and was vulnera- 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

ble 10 such rumors in spite of data 
issued during the week that under- 
pinned optimism about low infla- 
tion. 

Dealers said that the rumors ex- 
panded in the course of Friday 
trading from the possibility that 
one company had sold off mort- 
gage-backed securities to the possi- 
bility that half a dozen firms or 
hedge funds had taken such action. 

Although these were only ru- 
mors. they did affecL the market by 
raising concerns, traders said. 

Although inflation data had 
caused a bond rally of as much as 1 
1 'S points on Friday, the rumors of 
a sell-off of mortgage- backed secu- 
rities caused a retracement of 3/8 
point. By the end of Friday trading, 
the bond was showing a gain for the 
day of 5/8 point. 

Dealers said that some of the 
rumors about mortgage- backed se- 
curities claimed that a hedge fund 
may have sold a block of such secu- 
rities. 

-*i would not be surprised at all" 


U.S. Rate Rise: How Tight Is 



By Carl Gewirtz 

huemalirmii HeraU Tribune 
PARIS — The regularly sched- 
uled policy-making meetings ol 
central banks always generate anxi- 
ety in financial markets, but Tues- 
day's meeting of the Federal Re- 
serve Board's Open Market 
Committee looms as a decisive date 
for the dollar and the bond market. 

It is a foregone conclusion that 
the Fed will again raise short-term 
U.S. interest rates. But will it be a 
quarter-point rise, as in the three 

previous increases since early Feb- 
ruary, or will it be a half-point? 

Opinion is sharply divided par- 
ticularly since last week's reports ol 
unexpectedly modest gains in the 
core producer and consumer price 
indexes for April showed that infla- 
tion remains subdued. 

“Those reports increase the 
chance the increase will only be a 
quarter-point," said Avinash Per- 
saud London-based analyst at J. P. 
Morgan & Co. who said he feared 
that such a move could be interpret- 
ed as an insufficient assault on tam- 
ing growth. “It would be the worst 
of all worlds. I think the bond mar- 
ket wQl carry the dollar down quite 


significantly to retest its recent lows 
and require intervention that will 
haw lost much of its bite." 

The issue as he sees.it is that “the 
Fed's gradualism has failed" io 
calm markets. “What's needed now 
is a modest version of cold turkey, 
signaling a period or shori-ictm 
stability'' in interest rates. 

As John R. Taylor Jr., head of 
International Foreign Exchange 
Concepts Inc. in New York, said: 
“High interest rates are good for 
the dollar, but rising rates are bad. 
There's no chance of a rally in the 
bond market while rates are in the 
process of rising — and unsettled 
bond and therefore equity prices 
are no good for the dollar.” 

The house view within J. P. Mor- 
gan is that the cost of overnight 
money, currently 3.75 percent, will 
need to continue rising to 5.50 per- 
cent by the start of next year. But 
Mr. Persaud argued that on the 
back of the weak inflation data, “a 
strong move” by the Fed now. cou- 
pled with a statement that it has 
arrived at what it considers, a neu- 
tral policy stance, could be greeted 
in the market as a signal that the 
lightening has ended. 


HYibe Fed's policy of gradual- . 
ism that keeps postponing invb-. 
tors’ entry into the bond market," 
he says. An impression that the 
lightening process is finished, at 
last for a while, would “provide a 
window of opportunity for the 
bond- market to rally and for the 
. dollar to be suppon«L" 

John Lipsky at Salomon Broth- 
ers Inc. in. New. York said he be- 
lieved “it would be too optimistic 
to assume that the relatively mod- 
est steps ’and vague policy pro- 
nouncements will be sufficient to 
eliminate pressure bn the currency. 
It's reasonable to expect, there will 
have to be more intervention." 

Official attempts to limit curren- 
cy volatility- “should be taken seri- 
ously," he added, “because none of. 
the key central banks faces a policy 
dilemma between domestic and in- 
ternational goals.” . . 

Mr. Lipsky saw the dollar under- 
pinned by : the '-US. administra- 
tion's shift away from a policy of 
talking the currency down and by 
the continuing increase in interest 
rates. But any real advance can-, 
only come after Investors become 
convinced that growth is “deceler- 


ating to a rate cons' steal with J 
' stable tohg-terai expanSML 

Neil MacKinnon of Citibank in 
London, however, .reman* con- 
vinced that “the Dousd* 
will outperform" all the other cur 
renews this year. “The mark if m 
.’the process' of being re-rawd. he 
asserted “Growth in Germany ft 
being revised up. Interest-rate cuts 
will have been completed by mid- 
year instead of the middle of next 
year as many experts had assumed, 
and inflation will remain low.' 

- He said he believed that this, 
along until a widiming U.S. currem- 
acconnt deficit, would pull th £ dol- 
lar as low as low i.57 DM this year. 
It ended last week at 1.6733 DM. 

M Ben teen Plugs the Dollar 

■ US. Treasury Secretary Lloyd 
Ben isen raid Sunday that any im- 
pression that Washington was con- 
tent- to see the dollar dropjn value 
was a “misrepresentation.’’ 
'•'''“That was a misiriterprew tion 
that we wanted to see the dollar go 
down," Mr. Bemsen said in a tele- 
vised interview. "He added that the 
administration “saw no value in 
.'undervaluing the dollar." 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, May 16 - 21 


i. BN- AMRO Bank 

DF500 

2001 

t?* 

99.W 

99 s: 

Rcaffei-dai I ' l} 'u. H-incaU-afe' 1 ? Feci (ABN-AMSO 3ori> } 

if a firm dumped mortgage secun- 

. : Ft/ Int’l Finance 

CS 150 

1999 

8W 

101.60 

??.tC 

Fec-ffm-d ai i»r. 6tor>:allnye Foet {*BN AM80 Bw.p | 

Hirscb. head government bond 

Baden -Wuerttem berg 
L-Finance 

y 50.000 

199? 

3*4 

99.85 

— 

rJont-aHoble Fe« 0 25'V. (McmU L»i*--n inl'LJ 

trader al Salomon Brothers Inc. 
■‘People own a loi of new securi- 

Crecfit Local de 

France 

y 30.000 

1999 

V/a 

100 

— 

t-Jonoaltoblo. Fe« 0.35% [Nonnehuim Inrl.) 

al fray lity of the markeL “And 
when nveslors don't materialize. 

De Nationals 
Investerings Bank 

r 15.000 

1998 

3.65 

100 

— 

r-lc-n-ioftobte Feet J 2£Ta Denomman-tnt IC mflicin yei. (IBS 
In l| 

they start lo seli." 

Investors were largely absent 

Export-Import Bank of 
Japan 

y 30,000 

2003 

4*» 

IQUi 

— 

Ucncdkfcte. f unable unit, oo'riandmj .stue, rovng to'd 
amouni to 105 bullion yen. Feet 0 5)25% [Nc»nu*a inr'Lj 

from the market this past week, 
which partly accounts for why a 10- 

Heller Finance 

y 15.000 

199? 

3.ao 

99.% 

— 

ItontaHaote Fee5Ci^\ [Merrill Lynch Inf 1.1 

went badly. The notes were sold al 

Ireland 

1 20.000 

2004 

4'.; 

100 

— 

rJo*v:aHable Fees 0 325^^ (&tni el To<-o Capatol Morkeh | 

an average yield of 7.36 percent 

KFW Ini'! Finance 

Y 10.000 

1999 

3.65 

100 

— 

Semiarviuen-r t Jonaiflabte. Feet 025V Dwtommohont 100 
million >en (Dor^.a Europe.) 

and a fifth of the securities were 
sold aL 7.40 percen t because of light 

Merrill Lynch & 

Com pen/ 

v 15,000 

••1999 

414 

1C0.W 

— 

r Jen-xid-able. Feet 0 J0%. (Memll Lynch In I.J 

bidding, 

(Bloomberg Knighi-Ridder. NYT) 

Sony Ccpital Corp. 

> 10,000 

1997 

3.05 

100 

— 

Semumnud imereti will be 305V until Aug W5, rbereofter 
3.^5%. Pnvaie placement oaUoote or pot -n Feet rvM 

clitcioved Dtnonunawns 2C0 million yen. (IBJ tor 1 1 

India Acts 

Toyota Motor Credit 
Corp 

Y 50.000 

1 997 

3te 

99.36.’5 

— 

MancaJIable Fe» iJ.1875?x (Memll Lynch Inrl.) 

Urban Mortgage 

3arir of Sweden 

Y 10.000 

199ft 

3.io 

100 

— 

IJone.Jlabte. fret nor dodoied. Crenonuncrtions 100 miB.on 
yen. (Hernura Ini l.| 

To Curb 

Urban Mortgage 

Ban! or Sweden 

Y 15,000 

199ft 

2*0 

100 :£• 

' 

r -tone all able Feet 0.20V (Merrill Lynch In! 1 1 

Inflation 


A schedule at tfus weed's economic and 
hnanoaitnertia compiled tor the Interna- 
ttonat Herald Tribune by Bloomberg Busi- 
ness News. 

Asia-Pacific 

• May IS Singapore 10th ASEAN La- 
bor Ministers' Meeting. 

Singapore Apple Computer Inc lo how 
news commence announcing its plana lor 
expansion in Asia 

Ewntnga exported China Strategic in- 
vestment. Meijl Milk. 

■ May 17 Melbourne Australian Fi- 
nance Minister Kim Beasley to address 
Business international on [he budget and 
the International economy. 

Melbourne Robert Campbell, managing 
director ol Mevutan group Seven Net- 
work Lid., to address Securities Institute 
ol Australia on the future at Australian 
leievrton. 

Hong Kong Jobless figures tor the three 
months Irom February to April. 

Hong Kong Deutsche Welle Radio and 
TV International and Asia Sateflite Tele- 
communications Co. 10 sign a lease 
agreement giving Deutsche Welle space 
on AsiaSat 2. 

Hong Kong Vietnam "Think Tank." a 
one-day conference organized by the 
Vietnam business Association ot Hong 
Kong. Speterera Include Vietnam's Vice 
Premier Tran Due Luong 
Tokyo March machinery orders and 
April wholesale price index 
Earnings expected Hankyu Department 
Stores. 

• May IB Jakarta Modembank offers 
20 million shares, tentatively priced at 
2.100 rupiah each, for Usnng in Indonesia. 
WoMngton Retail trade data for March 
quarter. Forecast: Roe of about 12 per- 
cnmi. 

Earnings expected Damippon Ink. Clari- 
on. Caao Computer Rohm. Kono Mtg.. 
and maior Japanese brokerage houses. . 
e Mag IS Wellington Employment 
data for the March quarter. Forecast Job- 
less rate to (ail ahghtly 
Earnings expected Sony, Marubeni. Ni- 
chimen. Mitsui a Co.. Sumitomo Corp-. 
Mitsubishi Corp- National Australia Bank. 
Westpac Bank. 

• May 20 Eamings expect e d Snow 
Brand Food, major Japanese chemrcais 
and electronics companies. Komca. Su- 


mitomo Cement Mtnebea, Matsushita 
Electric, Kenwood. Pioneer. Honda Mo- 
tor. Yamaha Motor. Nikon. Ricoh. Hong- 
kong Telecommunications. China Mer- 
chants China Direct investment. 

Europe 

• Ex pec tad -this week Amster- 
dam Unemployment rale for three 
months through Aprs. Forecast Rise u> 
82 percent of population. 



Basal Swiss Apnl trade balance Fore- 
cast: Surplus of 100 ml bon Swiss francs. 
Madrid First-quarter unemployment 
rate Forecast- Down lo 23 pe>- e >- 1 ol 
population 

Copenhagen Apnl consumer puces. 
Forecast Up at percent in month, up 1.7 
percent in year. 

Frankfurt April producer prices. Fore- 
cast: Up O.l percent In month, up 03 
percent in year. 

Rome March industrial production. 
Forecast Up 09 percent in year. 
Frankfurt March trade balance. Fore- 
cast Surplus ol 7.0 billion DM in month. 
Also, current account Forecast Deficit of 
1.0 Difeon DM m month. 

Frankfurt German April M-3. Forecast 
Up 13.4 percent in monih. 
e May is Brussels European Urfron 
finance council 2-day meeting starts. 
Helsinki April consumer pnoes Fore- 
cast: Up 0.4 per cent m year. 

London April producer pnees. Forecast 
input up a3 percent m month, down 2.0 
percent in year. Output up 0 3 percent tn 
month, up 2 1 percent in year. 

Paris February current account Fore- 
cast Surplus of 7.4 bilkon French francs 
in month. 

Earnings expected Lufthansa. Whit- 
bread. 


>0NDS; German Rate Cuts Revive European Bonds 


Continued from Page II 

thought prices were set for a re- 
bound. 

The big unknown is what retail 
investors — the ultimate long-term 
holders of bonds — will require 10 
jiio’-e back into the market. The 
obviously reed something more 
compelling ihan a mere count of 
basis points. 

"There r nothing scientific 
■ about how much of a gap between 
three-month and 10-sear money is 


needed to pull in retail investors.'' 
one analyst admitted. But be 
guessed that at the least three- 
month Deutsche mark deposit 
rates, currently 5 percent, “will 
need a four in from of the decimal 
point" before retail clients began io 
consider buying bonds. 

Meanwhile, bankers agreed, the 
buying they have seen in recent 
days has been from domestic inves- 
tors taking profits on short-term 
placements and moving into long- 
er-term investments. 


The Hood of Euroyen paper is 
exclusively aimed at Japanese do- 
mestic investors. Ditto for Italian 
lire, French francs and sterling, 
bankers reported. 

By contrast, the dollar market 
remains traumatized by the pros- 
pect of further increases in interest 
rates and only short-dated paper 
can be placed — IS months in the 
case of the $500 million issue for 
Sweden, and two years in the case 
of the S200 million issue from 
Landes bank Schleswig- Holstein. 


PTT: Stale Telephone Companies Are Going Private 


Continued from Page 11 

targeting the budding European 
market for pri'-a'c network service- 
for corpora lions. 

With BT prowling the Continent 
DeuLicne Telekom and Franve Tele- 
com teaming up for lt- -- border 
ousinet-s and American gjants like 
AT&T Corp_ Sprint Corp-. and the 
regional 3el! com para :? loolung for 
inroads, the venture is [he bc:t hope 
tor a med ium-sited operj; •: hke 
Ri.ya. 1 PTT l»> be one of the three or 
four major niaj.fr., in Europe in a 
decade's lime, asserted Vie* iur- Vu- 
c.ns. the Duichmar. who is C re- 
source's prciider.t 

"Everybody knows that it's go- 
ing 10 be i he big boys' same.'' Mr 
' V'jcin ■ said. 

Lt; source - : cored some big 
point; Iasi month when a group of 
:<i corporations awarded a comma 
■h j: could evcmuailv be worth 500 


million European Currency Units a 
]car f$5W) million l to BT and a 
partnership of Unisource and 
AT&T. Mr. Vuaas says such cor- 
porate contracts are to Unisource 
what Michael Jordan was lo Nike 
In*..: a marquee endorsement, it can 
use to become a mass-market !ong- 
di stance operator when Europe al- 
lows ,-iper, competition. 

Mr. Difc -.-aid a merger of the 
'.•resource partners was possible 
iome years from now but wa s not 
planned. Meanwhile. Royal PTT 
also has ••eruured abroad on its 
o»n. ini-feimg sn mobile telephone 
networks in Ukraine. Hungary and 
Indonesia and routing imeroaiion- 
ai traffic via satellite for Bulgaria. 

Evan Miller, an anaiysi at Leh- 
man 3:others in London, said Royal 
PTT j domestic and foreign strate- 
gies were wrii-stMed ic meet grow- 
ing competition while the compa- 
ny’s regulatory guideline? were 


favorable. The Dutch government 
has set a cap on the company's 
prices at ihe rate of inflation, com- 
pared with 3Ts government-man- 
dated requirement to cut price- 
percent below inflation each %;ar. 

Royal PTT s biggest disimitior. 
from other European rri.auzan:- 
cundidai* :s iLs posiiI-.ier.ic,:? di- 
vision. a business that non goverr- 
menLs have separated from their 
telephone companies. “It's a:*- 
something that investors jre at ali 
familiar with." Mr. Miller : aid 

But Mr. Dik said the postal .-er- 
vi*:e was a bosu:. not a i:ab:i;ty. 
Royal PTT it promoling direct- rr.a:'. 
advertising to nffei the dec! me 
mail volume caused by fuscirriie 
machines and Lirgeung Lntemarior.- 
al parcel service through the CD 
Express Worldwide venture with 
four other postal companies ar.d 
TNT Ltd. <-,f \u'ira!ia. 


Compile J by Our Staff From LHspairhts 

BOMBAY — India has acted to 
rein in money supply and curb in- 
flation, saying the current rate of 
more than 1 1 percent a year is un- 
acceptably high and that it intends 
to get inflation down to 7 percent 
during the coming year. 

Rather than raising interest 
rates, the central bank raised re- 
serve requirements, the amount of 
money it requires commercial 
banks to deposit with it. 

“The paramount objective or 
monetary policy in 1904/95 would 
be to ensure a sharp reduction in the 
inflation rale by about four percent- 
age points from the present level" 
Chakra varty Rangarajan. governor 
of ihe Reserve Bank of India, India’s 
central bank, raid on Saturday. 

Mr. Rangarajan said there had 
been a buildup of inflationary pres- 
sure over the past year, partly be- 
cause of an inflow of foreign money. 

inflation, which hit almost 17 
percent in mid-I99f. was reduced 
so 7 percent a year ago, but has 
iir.ee ri>er sharp] > jn the third year 
of India’s economic liberalization j 
program. ! 

Mr. Rargorajan said the cash- 
reserve ratio, the araouni of money 
commercial banks are required to 
keep in reserve, had been raised | 
from. 14 to 15 percenL The lending 
and deposit rates were unchanged 
at ’4 and iO percent. 

( Reuters, AFP } 


Euromarts 
At a Glance 

Eurobond Yields 


Despite Wall Street Jitters, 
U.S. Executives Are Upbeat 

Compiled by Our Stuff From Pi spur dies 

WILLIAMSBURG. Virginia — The financial markets may be jittery- 
over rising interest rates and inflation but leading U.S. business execu- 
tives expect healthy growth for the rest of 1994. 

Nearly 100 executives from Fortune 500 companies who spent the last 
three days at this resort community hobnobbing with government offi- 
cials and lawmakers say they are selling more cars and computers, fast 
food and pharmaceuticals. 

"A lot of us were here six months ago and never would have predicted 
the euphoric state we're in today.’’ said John F. Welch Jr., chief executive 
officer of General Electric Co." 

Strong U.S. auto sales, propelled by pent-up demand, should continue 
for several years, the Ford Motor Co. chairman. Alexander J. Trot man, 
said Saturday. “We’re looking for several years of very strong automotive 
sales." he said. “We still don’t think we've hit the peak" in the current 
business cycle. 

Oil prices will remain relatively low. despite their recent rise, according 
to H. Laurance Fuller, chairman of .Amoco Corp- He said the spike in oil 
prices should be only temporary. 

The executives were speaking at the iwice-yearly meeting of the Business 
Council. MP. Knight-Riddcr) 


m Mm 17 Earnings expected AH fed- ' 
Lyons, BOC. Hanson. 

• May IB London Minutes from the 
March 30th meeting between Kennem - 
Clerk, chancellor ol the Exchequer, andj 
Eddie George, governor ol the Bank or 
England, released. ' 

London April retail prices, forecast Up 
tj percent in month, up 2.7 percent m 
year. Excluding mortgage Interest 1 pay- 
ments, up IS percent in year. 

London April pubUosector borrowing 
requirement. Forecast: At 5.4 billion 
pounds for month. 

London . April unemployment Sgura*. 
Stockholm April, unemployment rate. 
Forecast 7.7 poreont. 

Eantingx xxymetad Bass. National Pbw- . 
or. 

a Hay IS London April retail safes. 
Forecast Unchanged In month, up &8 
percent in yaw. ' 

Eanttnga e x pec te d British Gaa British 
Telecommunications. 

• May SO Peris March trade balance. 

Forecast Surplus of 6.6 btiOon French 
francs In montit. ■ ■’ 

- Paris Apnl consumer prices.- 

Americas ' . 

a May IB Washington The Federal 
Reserve Board reports April industrial 
praduction.and capacity utilization.. 

Wo da Janeiro The government com-- 
rmssion on selling state assets to decide 
fete ot shipper Companfoe de Naxagacab 
Uoyd Brasttelro. 

Buenos Abes A mission from the Inter- 
national Monetary Funds, examines Ar- 
gentines first quarter .fiscal accounts. 
Though press reports have said the IMF is 
concerned at rising pubflc-eecWr spend-' 
frig, Economy Minister Domingo Cairallo 
said IMF-agraad targets were met 
Mexico city The Latin American Associ- 
ation of Devetopmem Financial tnMitu- 
Boris opens Its annual general aasamWy. 
More than 300 bankers from different L^- 
m American countries are~ expected to 
participate !r the two-day gathering. 

New York Bankruptcy court hearing 

- scheduled on pastebtedfernissal of United 

Press International case,- status of Pen- 
sion Benefit Guaranty Corp- claims. 
Earnings exp ec ted Castle Energy, Fi- 
lene's Basement. K mart. Wal-Mart 
Stores. - , . ’ 


fry-. 


• May 17 -Washington- Apnl housing 
starts. 

Ottawa Marti! monthly survey of manu- 
facturing. ... 

Kansas City, Missouri Manon MerreH 
Dow annual meeting 
. Basse HaUtourton annual meeting. 
Deltas- Mesa Inc. snnuaf meeting, 
tamings expected . Dayton Hudson. 

- Hewtoti-PBckard. Home Depot 
e May 18 Ottawa April consumer 
prices 

New York Control Oata Sysfema Core - 
the computer systems m tegratkm compa- 
ny that was spun-ofl of Cerauan Corp - 
tarmerlyConfrol Data Corp. holds Its sec- 
ond annuel meeting. - • • • 

New York U^-Surglcar annual meeting. 
DaBss AMR annual ineetmg. 

TDrorto Gtobd equity inueeting ctrate- 
ges will be dtsaBsed at a fwo-day semi- 
nar sponsored by instgM information Inc.' 
and The Globe and Mai. 

Toronto Under stavtoig options semi- 
nar sponaored by Tho.OpMorto institute. 
E ar ning* e xp e cte d Caesars World. 

■ campomrsoup^ .. 

•May 18 WsaMngton Commerce Do- 
ponment reports March merchandise 
trade 

Toledo Chrysler annual meeting. 
thtei So u th west Airlines annual megl- 
>"S- . . - 

. Hxidro City ' Bidders Interested In pur- 
chasing the state-owned seafood prod- 
ucts. firm Ocean Gotten Products Inc. 
present their bids * 

Ottawa March intern ati onal . trade re- 
port. ‘ 

Ottawa Mach retail trade report. 

DHtas Xerox annual meeting. . . 

Eemtoga expected ' Hamel Foods Corp. 
■e May 20 Washington. The Treasury 
Department reports Apnl budget .- 
Caracas Venezuelan government ex- 
pected to sell state-owned artlne Lmea 
Asropqetal Venezolana. Mne companion 
are expected lo present bids tor the air^ 
line, which is seifing at » bawprice of S62 
mfltion-.. - :. 

Stwwjwrt, Lo ui siana General Motors, 
annual me eti ng. 

Pittsburgh Allegheny Ludtom annual 
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Chicago Dean wider Discover annual 
meeting. ■ 

Cincinnati Fedr.ated .Department 
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This week’s topics: / 

O Vietnam: Asia's Next Tigei? 

O Europe Nips Ahead In Mobite Phones 
O Clinton’s Ailing Foreign Policy 
O Japan: Capitalizing On The Cheap Dollar 
O Companies Strive To Become Truly Stateless 

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limited psnod. a spokesman 
.srf Sunday 

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fiiit he said ibis was icmporjrv. and | 
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turn t.-» a London bank he had used ihe bank, but he never luraed up. 
to transfer money to ine Bahamas, ihe magazine report ec. 



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Page 16 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 



So** I Sates 

Mocks DN YXJ lOOlHtfi Lw CUT Qve | UMU Dtv YU lnaHrah Law Cjk Q i$* 


MHdh U» OseOOt 


hn mm. j' - . t.jSv, zjv. Ml* 

=Wlr»*-=s 




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A great new plus. 

The more times you fly 
the bigger your bonus. 


(OVER AND ABOVE THE REGULAR MILES EARNED!) 


3 FLIGHTS PLUS 70% 

4 FLIGHTS PLUS 80% 



I3Vj— 1'A 
151 . —5V. 




CoofiwicdooPage I T 


f 

a 


p f\VA I Thai offers its Royal Orchid 

. __ Plus members one of the most inno- 
\-s r\Un I *-✓ vative and exciting bonus offers 
ever created for frequent flyers. 

This new bonus offer is available 
to members who fly a total of three 
First and/or Business Class intcr- 
narional flight sectors on Thai's 
worldwide routenet between April 

1 8 and September 30, 1994. 

The new bonus is over and above the miles you would 
normally earn. 

For First Qass, the normal miles you receive are the 
miles you fly, plus 50% for travelling First Class. 

For Business Class, the normal miles you receive are 
rhe miles you fly, plus 25% for travelling Business Class 
We add the bonus on top of these miles. 

And the more times you fly, the bigger the bonus. 
Here's how it works. JL 

For example, if you fly just six international flight 
sectors we will add a 100% bonus, which will double S 

MV j 

your Royal Orchid Plus miles. For more than cen ^ 
international flight sectors flown, we'll add ? 
bonus of 150% to your Royal Orchid Plus nuly 

To that you 1 mites are auwtutttafly and accu-at-Jy > / 

.Uembersfep Can} when you civxk-m • Please rn&n Wp* * 


It’s a great opportunity to rapidly and substantially our world renowned Royal Orchid Service all the way — 

boost your mileage account and earn free award winning food and wine, 

flights or any of our unique Experience ijfPB aa charming cabin staff and a fresh 

Awards taster orchid tor every passenger. 

You can also earn or redeem If you're not already a member of Royal 

miles with our credic card, hotel and car Orchid Plus, there's no better time to join. Pick, up an 

rental partners. enrolment form from your nearest Thai 

office or complete the coupon below. 

OVER 70 DESTINATIONS WORLDWIDE. . J 

Membership is free. TholW 

Thai can note take you to over 70 destinations around r . 

the world, including eleven cities in Europe, five in Aus- ; 

rralia and New Zealand. Los Angeles in the U.S.A., and i n . , , . r 

: Pick up an enrolment form from your nearest Thai office ! 

more destinations in Asia than any other airline. j or simplv complete this coupon and cither mail it to Tha. j 

! Airways International. PO Box 567. Samsen Nai Post Office, i 

THREE GREAT NEW DESTINATIONS. j Bangkok I WOO. Thailand or fax it on 66-2-5 1 3-0222. . j 

xw • j j <r-i_ i tt i Please allow three weeks tor delivers’ Complete in English. i 

vC eve expanded our service inro China and now offer ; ■ ■ 

1 8 flights a week to the four key cities of Beiimg, Kunming ; Q Mr . D lV, l D _ QM iss_ □^‘ JihL-r Tiilg | 

and now Guangzhou and Shanghai. : Name I 

A Plus, we have also added Dubai to our j AASm ”*' r ' MU j 

kljli rapidly expanding routenet. 

SMOOTH AS SILK ON THAI. j fwcopf | 

, : o»jvr?i | 

But. perhaps the biggest plus of ail is • Phone . j 

• i . ■ ii tl ... : cuSSTV I 

riving smootn as silk on lhai. enjoying > — — ...~i 

4 pile. MemfiersKD 'irnfce: tagatter wiSi your name m Engfiai (must be the san-s as in your enrojnwnt forml when making a tes«V3Mn • Present your 
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ENROL NOW IN ROYAL ORCHID PLUS 


Pick up an enrolment farm from your nearest Thai office i 
or simplv complete this coupon and cither mail it to Thai i 
Airways International. PO Box 567. Samsen Nai Post Office, i 
Bangkok IU400, Thailand or fax it on 66-2-5 1 3-0222. i 

Please allow three weeks tor delivery Complete in English. i 

□ Mr □ Mrs □ Mj» D Other Title i 


Address 




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Yes, 1 wonf to start /ecavang ihe'WT. This blfwsubscr^tian term I prefer 
(check appropriate boxes): . - ^ . 

[13 12 months (364 issues in oH with 52 bonus issues). 

d 6 months [182 issues in ofl with 26 bonus issues). 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 


Id* 


Page 17 


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Strong Pitching Lifts the Braves 

Avery Strikes Out a Season-High 9 for 3 rd Straight Win 





K&'-iy 


U^y:'«zr;.'p& A 







The Associated Pres 

Steve Av«y pitched eight strong 
innings and Javy Lopez hit two 
borne runs as the Atlanta Braves 
atoned for their worst performance 
this season with a 6-1 victory Sun- 
day over the New York Mels. 

■ Avery struck out a season-high 
nine and allowed five hits in win- 
ning his third straight game. The 


NL ROUNDUP 




, • ... o *»* 

, ■■ 

.. ’A .■ 


;X, 




m > r, V< :‘'~f •* lx > *+ 

a K n ^ V _ e *. •' *'*■ 

** ’ ■* 


over Boston’s Scott Cooper to turn a double piay. The Red Sox handed Toronto its fif A straight i^llX 


visiting Braves, who lost 1 1-4 Sat- 
urday, took out some frustration on 
Elk Hillman in the first 

Fred McGri/f, who went 3-for-4, 
homered for the third lime in four 
games. Lopez, who drove in three 
runs, followed with his first home 
run of the game. After McGriff 
singled in the ninth, Lopez hit his 
second borne run of the game. 

Avery, staked to a 3-0 lead, gave 
up a run and two hits in the rust 
but settled down and held the Mets 
in check over the next seven in- 
nings. The Mels scored on Kevin 
McReynoids’ one-out RBI double, 
but Aveiy avoided further trouble 
by getting Jeff Kent to ground into 
a double play. 

Expos 9, Cardinals 8: Lenny 
Webster drove in the winning run 
as Montreal rallied for four in the 
ninth inning to beat visiting St 
Louis. 


Wil Cordero led off with a dou- 
ble off Mike Perez, took third on a 
grounder and scored on Mike Lan- 
sing's sacrifice fly. Clifr Floyd drew 
a walk and scored on an RBI dou- 
ble by Marquis Grissom before 
Rich Rodriguez relieved and gave 
up a run-scoring double to Larry 
Walker 

After Moises Alou was walked 
intentionally, Webster lined a sin- 
gle to right to end the game. Gris- 
som and Lansing had two-run 
homers and drove in three runs 
each for the Expos, who had 13 
hits. John Wetteland pitched a 
scoreless ninth. 


the victory and a four-game sweep 
of visiting Pittsburgh. 

Shawn Boskie allowed four hits 
in six innings. Doug Jones, the 
fourth Philadelphia pitcher, 
worked out of a jam in tbe ninth for 
his seventh save. 

■ In Saturday's games: 

Miets 1 L Braves 4: Ryan Thomp- 
son’s first career grand slam was 
fallowed by a pitch from John 
Smoltz that hit John Cangdosi in 
the lower back. Cangdosi immedi- 
ately charged tbe mound, precipi- 
tating a bench-clearing brawl in 
New York's victory over Atlanta in 
New York. 


Marlins 3, Cribs 0: Chris Ham- 
mond extended his scoreless streak 
to a club-record 22 innings and 
helped himself with a double a nd a 
suicide squeeze to lead Florida to 
victory over Chicago at home. 

Hammond held Chicago to four 
hits in five innin gs and didn't per- 
mit a Cub to reach third lose. Al- 
though he has not allowed a run 
since April 29, Hammond was re- 
moved for a pinch-hitter in the 
sixth for precautionary reasons af- 
ter experiencing stiffness in his 
lower back. 

Pb36es L, Pirates tfc Lenny Dyk- 
stra, the National League’s leader 
with 39 runs, scored in the first 
inning, and Philadelphia hung on 


Both Smoltz and Cangdosi were 
ejected after the fight, which de- 
layed tbe game for several minutes. 

Left fielder Ryan Klesko 
botched three straight plays that 
led to three unearned runs in the 
third inning. Thompson's seventh 
homer made it 7-0 in the fifth 


Marfins 6, Cubs 4: Mark Gard- 
ner gave up three hits in 616 innings 
in his first start of the season and 
Kurt Abbott tripled in two runs to 
lead Florida over Chicago at Wrig- 
ley FidtL 

Gardner, makin g his first start 
since July 6, 1993, gave up a leadof f 
homer to Tuffy Rhodes in the first 
before retiring 15 straight Catcher 
Rick Wilkins ended tbe Cubs 1 
drought by leading off the sixth 
with a double. 

Giants 3, Reds 1: Rookie Salo- 
mon Tones brake a personal sev- 
en-game winless streak as San 
Francisco beat visiting Cin cinna ti 
for the 10th straight time. 

Torres allowed one run and sev- 
en bits in 6tt innings for his first 
victory since Sept. 25. Since then, 
the right-hander had lost four 


Cardinals 6. Expos 3: Ozzie 
Smith homered for the second 
straight game and Mark Whiten hit 
a two-run homer for Sl Louis in 
Montreal. 


Smith, batting left-handed, bo- 
mered to open a three-run fifth off 
Ken KB. The Cardinals shortstop 
connected from the right side Fri- 
day off Jeff Fassero, hu first home 
run since May 30. 1993. 


Yankees Extend Streak to 10 With Sweep of Slumping B rewers 


The Associated Press 

The New York Yankees won their 10th 
straight game Sunday as Don Mattingly, 
Wade Boggs and Bernie W illiams ho- 
mered in a 12-1 rout of the Milwaukee 
Brewers. 

• The Yankees' winning streak is their 


Scott Kanrienieckigaveupone run and 
five hits in eight innings. Brian Harper hit 
an RBI double in the Milwaukee sixth. 


AL ROUNDUP 


longest since they won 10 straight in 1987. 
New York won all three games at Count y 
Stadium, hs first sweep in Milwaukee 
since 1971. 

Paul O’Neill went 2-for-3, raising his 
major league-leading average to .467 as 
the Yankees won for the 20th time in 24 
games. Tbe Brewers lost their fifth in a 
row. 

Mattingly had four of the Yankees* 17 
hits and drove in two runs. Boggs also 
doubled and drove in three runs. . 


The Yankees scored five times in 
fourth riming for a 7-0 lead. O'Neill led 
off with a double against Jaime Navarro 
and scored cm Randy Velarde’s single, 
Mike GaHego hit an RBI double, Luis 
Fotonia had a two-run triple and Boggs 
hit a sacrifice fly. 

Mattingly led off a four-run seventh 
with his third homer, off Mark Kiefer. 
O’Neill, who extended his hitting streak 
to 12 games, singled and later scored on a 
double by Jim Leyritz. and Williams hit 
his sixth home run. Boggs hit his fust 
home nm in the eighth. 

ftUania and Boggs doubled in the third 
for foe first run, and Mattingly followed 
with an RBI angle for a 2-0 lead. 

Athletics 6, Royals h In Kansas City. 
Todd Van Pqppd broke a five-game los- 


ing streak and Oakland won consecutive 
games for the first time in a month. 

Van Poppel who began tbe game with a 
9.59 ERA. gave up extra-base hits to the 
first three batters. But he allowed only 
two more hits before leaving after 
innings with a 4-2 lead. 

Dennis Eckersley got three outs for his 
third save, giving Oakland a two-game 
winning streak for tbe first time since 
April 16-17, 

Twins 5, Orioles 2: Kevin Tapani 
pitched a five-hitter as Minnesota com- 
pleted a three game sweep of Baltimore in 


Tapani, who came in with a 7.78 
earned-run average, strode out four, 
walked one and retired 16 of the last 17 
batters. He pitched bis first complete 
game of the season and won his second 
straight start. 

The Twins have won seven of their Iasi 


eight. They improved to 9-3 in May after 
a 9-16 April and climbed within one win 
of 300. 

Dave McCarty hit a iworun homer in 
the fourth to extend Minnesota’s lead to 
5-2. McCarty's homer, his first of the 
season, followed Pedro Munoz's lead off 
single off Jamie Moyer. 

■ In Saturday's games: 

Yankees d, Brewers 2: Wade Boggs 
ignited a ninth-inning rally with a two- 
run double as the Yankees won their 
ninth straight game, this time in Milwau- 
kee. 

The Yankees, whose 25-10 record is 
baseball's best, have won 19 of their last 
23 and are off to their best start since 
opening the 1958 season 25-9. 

Indians 9, Tigers 3: Two days shy of his 
39th birthday. Cleveland's Jack Morris 
struck out nine batters in six innings to 
beat visiting Detroit and end a personal 
four-game losing streak. 


Morris, foe career strikeout leader 
among active pitchers, yielded two runs 
and four hits in his first win since April 7. 
Jose Mesa struck out three in two innings 
and Paul Shuey struck out four in foe 
ninth — one retched on a wild pitch — 
giving Cleveland 16 strikeouts. 

Red Sox 11, Blue Jays h In Boston, 
Andre Dawson hit a pair of two- ran 
homers as the Red Sox handed Toronto 
its fifth straight loss. 

Dawson homered into foe center-field 
bleachers to cap a four-run fifth inning 
and then completed a three- ran seventh 
with his another bone run. 


Twins 8, Orioles 5: Dave Winfield ho- 
mered twice and drove in five runs in 
Minneapolis, moving past Frank Robin- 
son into 12th place on baseball's career 
RBI list and carrying the Twins past 
Baltimore. 

Winfield, who has 30 two-homer 


games, has 1,813 RBIs — one more than 
Robinson. 

Athletics S, Royals 4: Sian Javier ho- 
mered and foe visiting Oakland Athletics, 
despite hitting into foe first triple play of 
the season, heal Kansas Gty for just their 
third win in 24 games. 

The Royals retired George Brett’s 
No. 5 before foe game. It was the first 

Rangers 5, White Soxl: Kevin Brown 
pitched seven effective inning s and Jose 
Paw won drove in two runs as Texas, at 
home, beat Chicago. 

Brown, who leads the league in runs 
and hits allowed and started the game 
with a 7.07 earned-run average. left with a 
5-1 lead. Cris Carpenter got the last out 
for his second save. 

Maimers 10. Angels 7; Pinch-hitter 
Jerry Willard hit a three-run homer, cap- 
ping a four-run rally in tbe eighth inning 
that lifted Seattle over visiting California. 


PbOfies 3, Pirates 2 In Philadel- 
phia, Lenny Dykstra scored mice, 
knocked in two runs, and hit his 
fourth home run of the season as 
the Phillies won their third straight 
game over Pittsburgh. 

Mike Williams made his first 
start of the season for foe Phillies 
and gave up seven hits in seven 
innings. 

Rockies 4, Astros 2 Andres Ga- 
larraga had three hits and drove in 
two runs as Colorado beat the As- 
tros in Houston. 

The Rockies have won 12 of 15 
games against Houston since join- 
ing foe major league last season. 
Colorado is 1-1 against the Astros 
this year. 

David Nied won his third 
straight start. He gave up one run 
m seven tunings. 

Dodgers 2, Padres 1: Jose Offer- 
man singled home the winning run 
with one out in the ninth and foe 
Dodgers extended their winning 
streak to five games with a victory 
over San Diego in Los Angeles. 

The Dodgers have played eight 
straight one-run gam e s , winning 
six. San Diego has lost six in a row. 

Tim Wallach and Henry Rodri- 
guez opened the ninth with singles 
off Trevor Hoffman, putting run- 
ners at first and third. Padres man- 
ager Jim Rjggleman polled in cen- 
ter Odder Derek BeCf or a five-man 
infield against Eric Kanos, who 
grounded out 

After an intentional walk to Raul 
Mondesi loaded foe bases. Offer- 
man lined a 3-2 pilch to center. 
Bell, moved bade to foe outfield, 
missed with a diving attempt- 


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INTERNATIONAL HJEJRALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 


O N D A Y 



Manchester United Adds 
FA Cup to League Tide 


Compiled by (Jur Staff From Dispatches 

LON DON — Eric Can lona fired 

home two penalties in six minutes 
as Manchester United clinched the 
elusive league and cup double by 
beating Chelsea. 4-0. in the FA Cup 
final at Wembley. 

French striker Cantona capital- 
ized on fouls by Eddie Newton and 

Frank Sinclair during a spell or 
United pressure Ic score in [lie S9lh 
and 65th minutes on Saturday. 


proud or the players if he cotilii 
have been here today," he said. 

Cantona, the first Frenchman to 
play in on Fa Cup final, was eager 
for more success. 

"The best trophy to win is always 
the last one you lifted." he said. “I 
believe that United can now go on 
lo become ihe kings of Europe. 

Why not? Jf you don'i have dial 
ambition you mighi as well slop 
your Career." <AP. Reuters! 


Three minules liter Mail ■ Barcelona TaktS Tllle 


Hughes, pounced on an error by 
Sinclair 1C- fire United'* third goal 
post Chelsea's Russian goalkeeper. 

Dmiiri Marine. A substitute, Bri- 

an McClair. lapped in the fourth 

during injury Lime. 

United, which already had 

clinched the league title for the sec- 

ond season in a row. became only 

fhe fourth leant ibis century to 
complete the double. The others 

were Tottenham ( 1961/. .Arsenal 

11971 ) and Liverpool ( 1986 ). 

United's manager. Alex Fergu- 
son. said it was sad that Sir Malt 

Busby, the Manchester United leg- 
end who died in January al 84. was 

not able to share the triumph. 

"Sir Matt would have been very 


Deponivo Coruna missed a pen- 
ally a. minute before the end of 
their last match or the season to 

hand a fourth consecutive Spanish 

league championship to Barcelona 

on Saturday. Reuters reported. 

The penalty miss bv the derender 

Miroslav Djukic consigned Depor- 

livo to a 04) draw al home by 

Valencia, while Barcelona beat Se- 
villa. 5-2. in IS’ou Camp stadium. 

Dcportivo had led the league by 

one point before Saturday s games 

buL Barcelona's superior goal dif- 
ference gave them the tide. 

■ Auxerre Wins French Cup 

Auxerre won the first major title 
of its 8 9- year history on Saturday 
night, defeating Montpellier. 3-d, 


in a French Cup final mulching two 
young, unheralded teams, The As- 
sociated Press reported from Paris. 

Moussa Saib opened the scoring 
in the 17th minute, capitalizing on 
an error by the Montpellier goal- 
keeper. Claude Barra be. Gerard 
Balicle scored in the 48th minute 
and Corentin Martins added a goal 

in the 86ih minute, 
a Bremen In Cup Victor 

Australian Wynton Rufer's pen- 
alty slot with two minutes left Sat- 
urday cupped Weirder Bremen's 3-1 
defeat of Roi-Wois Essen in the 
German Cup final. The .“VP report- 
ed from Berk 

Wcrder Bremen, the 1993 first 
division champions, appeared to 

have the surprise finalists oui- 

classed, dominating the first half to 

take a 2-0 lead. 

But Essen, in 1 9th place among 
the 20 second division teams, 

charged back after the break. Es- 
sen's leading scorer. Christian 

Dondera. stunned Bremen five 
minutes into the second half by 

culling ibe margin 10 2-i. His duel 

with defender Dietmar Beiers- 

dorfer ended with the bait trickling 
into fee goal. 


” • Rominger 

Ballesteros AUeges Ryder Cup Bribery h» 3d 




Compiled to Our Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — Seve Ballesteros said Sunday 
that he had been offered about S! million by 
the Valderrama Golf Club to support the 
course as fee venue for the 1997 Ryder Cup. 

Ballesteros, who has openly backed anoth- 
er club for the prestigious event, said Valder- 
rama sent him a letter last year offering him a 
percentage of the greens fees and plots of 
land for his support. He said the offer was 
worth about SI million. 

"I do doi like to be bought and I want only 

what is best for Spain." Ballesteros said ar the 
Spanish Open. “ I have always had my princi- 
ples and I do not intend to change." 


d« Cup Committee on May 4 amid a dispute 
about where the event should be held. 

“The Technical Commission, which ad- 
vises the Ryder Cup committee, agreed with 
me that Valderrama did not have the mini- 
mum facilities that are necessary to stage the 
Ryder Cup,” he said. He added that he re- 
ceived the impression from other committee 
members that Valderrama would be named 
as the host on May 25. 

Ballesteros, who is likely, to be the Europe- 
an team captain for the biennial event be- 
tween the United States and Europe, has said 

that the Novo Sancli Petri club near Cadiz is 
the best place lor the event. He called Vgldcr- 
raraa one of the world's most exclusive clubs. 


rama, but offered toso, Valderrama club 
officials could not be readied fw comrocnt 
Cm Sunday. • . .. ( Reuters, AP) 


Cohn Montgomerie, with a superb birdie 
three at the final hole, won the Spanish Open 
on Sunday. Reuters reported. 

The Scot, whose final round of 70 gaye him. 
an 1 1-under-par total of 277. took- fee title by 
oae stroke over Richard BoxaD and Mark Roc 
of Britain and Mark McNulty of Zimbabwe. 


| The Spaniapj reigned from die 1 W Ry- ^ did ^ i^ igr from vawer- a 

Leafs Finish Sharks to Gain 


aZreajdty botncoa Z78. BaDesterofrlioj 

strokes behind Montgomerie. ' 


came to . 
Locwore 
(bod five 


jl; 

.' The Asaoataed Press 

■ MADRID — Tony Romingerof 
Swiowiarid rode to a recotd tfurt- 
ctmseentive. victory in the Tour « 
Spain on Sunday, sending a loud 
warning to the world's top cyclist, 
Miguel lndurain of Spain, as uk 
two prepare to face off in the Tour 
de France. , , , 

. Ronringef, 33i widdy regRrdeias 

the wtarURs No. 2 road cycbsL nn- 
iatacd 21-iu*ac, WSO-lrilomeier 
r=.IS2-milexraoc in 92 hour, ' 

U1C3 and 48 seconds, 7:28 ahead ot 

. - . I 1 1L* 



Ihe A uociateJ Press 

TORONTO - The Toronto 

Maple Leafs have taken nothing 
Tor gran led. and that perhaps is a 
major reason why they will play 

Vancouver in the National Hockey 

League Western Conference finals. 

Two goals by Wen del Clark and 
outstanding goal tending by Felix 

Potvin gave Toronto a 4-2 victory 

over the San Jose Sharks on Satur- 
day night in the seventh game of a 
Western Conference sennTmoi. 


The finals open Monday against 

Vancouver. 

Toronto led 1-0 at the first inter- 
missioa on Clark's goal at 3:58. 

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

Clark made it 2-0 at 9:30 of the 
second period, only 18 seconds after 

a penalty against San Jose ended. 
Mike Gartner knocked the puck 

toward the San Jose net and Clark 
was standing at the front of the 


crease. Clark batted at the puck ' Sharks at 5:2i, workingInio the slot 


lift the pock under the crossbar. 

Doug Gilxnour. cruising into- tho 
.slot, finished off a 3-on-l rush 

when be took a pass from Clark 
and scored at 12:15. . . 

. San Jose got a fluke goal, in the 
last second of the game. As a Leafs 

defenseman attempted to dear the 
puck from behind his net, it hit a 

teammate and glanced bade into 
the .Toronto neL. .. 


Arturs Irbe, m goal for San Jose, 
‘was kneeling c*n the ice and the puck 
dribbled along his left leg. As San 

Jose defenseman Jay More knocked 
Gaik to. the ice, the Toronto captain 

had an ice-levd view of the puck as 
it crossed the goal line. 

Mark Osborne applied the back- 
breaker, beating Irbe with a btne- 

line blast 3 : 19 into the third period. 
Igor Larionov scored for the 


M5ra.2aiTal>^^ AM 

Bwieno leam- who w second. 

Sunday's -165.7-Wtooieter One } 
Stage,'- ending on Madrid's famed 

JPmj jte.k .CastA 1 ^ w 

Laumai J^bertof Frahce. • 

■' Ronungar, who rides for th e M a- 
pftGas.tpun, won with the largest 

I960, when ’(Re Belgian Franz Do- 
milkier Gmsfted. 15 minutes and 27 
seconds ahead of his nearest chal- 
lenge Jtominger grabbed ibc oyer- 

aflleadin thefifct stage —a nine- 

kBometer time trial. — : and never 
relinquished it. 

: Induram, 19 , skipped the Tour of 
Spain, but will be seeking his third 

consecutive Italian Giro title begin- 
ning May 22. . 




Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

East Division 


New York 

Bolton 

BaHimam* 


Kansas Cltv 


Pet. OB 
.714 - 

Ml 1W 


Central Division 


18 18 .3 n 


17 IV XT3 
Wnl Dlvttloa 


15 18 .455 - 


wy (8) and Macfarlone. W-Gubiaa, M 

L— Witt, 3-1 HRy— Oakland. Berroa (4). Kansas 
Ob. Mactarfane (j>. Gaerf l (4;. Shumport (1). 

NOW Tor* CIO n, coo ooo—io tt o 

Milwaukee DM oco 013 MS— 4 9 0 

(12 ImUrai) 

Mulhol land. Wick man (9) and Levrili; H<- 
guera, Henry (At. Bronkrv (It. Orosco it). 
Potters HOI. Lloyd 1 12} and Me Ihcnv, Nilsson 

(ID). W— Wtekmon, 2-0. L-Ferfen. D-2. 

HRs— Now York.Tartabull (ai.O'Noill (91. B. 
Wllllom, 1ST. MIlHavtn. MJoWO 191. 

Oinniw MO 071 300 — V 1* ■ 

J. McDowell, Satvrar; (51. Cod' (41, DeLeon 

ni.temte (tl.MrMII IMWol- 

Itara, Korfco wteo m ; Poors. VI/hlMCl dO 171,0 11. 

W H.O.n.T-1 I J. ucDoW-)4.Hin-CM : 

an Timnm 117;. Trr.cn. Palmer lit. 

contomio soi wo 123-11 22 1 


Whitehurst Elliott (4), PA Martinez (71 cid 
Ausmus: Ke. Grass. Dreilbrl (9) and Ptasta, 
W— Kc. Grass. J.L L— Whitehurst. 2-4 Sr— O re I- 
lan til. MRS— SanOiooaT.Gwymi*). Planner 

(101. Los Angelos, Pkmo (71. Mondesi «!. 


Saturday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Tnranlo 100 010 000- 2 12 0 

BMIOA ON 040 32*— 11 t2 a 

Latter, Timlin «*i. Codorirt n, WUlifl — ta ( n 
and Knorr. MtenflX (B). Frot mim i **i 

ana BernniiL W—Darmn. 6~z L— Letter. 2-1 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

East DtviKofl 



W 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

AffOhfO 

23 

IS 

447 



wontrral 

1* 

14 

S43 

7** 

N9W Yorfc 

It 

1* 

349 

3VV 

Florida 

It 

17 

S2B 

4 

Philadelphia 

15 21 

Central Division 

417 

B 

Cincinnati 

23 

13 

j>n 



St. Louis 

It 

U 

sr> 

JV, 

Moulton 

n 

17 

AM 

4 

Pittsburgh 

17 

17 

JN 

** 

Chicago 

11 23 
west (MvUttn 

J24 

lOVk 

San Franctsco 

3D 

IB 

SM 

_ 

Lea Adeem 

1* 

17 

_578 

1 

Colorado 

IS 

18 

A55 

3V2 

SanDleao 

ID 

25 

284 

yv, 


Friday’s Una Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Detroit 000 MB 000—0 4 0 

Clmtand Ml OM lft*— 3 A 0 

Beicner and Kroutor; Clone and AJomar. 
W— Clark. M. L— Belcher. 0-7. 

Toronto 000 101 OW— J • 0 

Boston 110 102 Nx— 5 14 2 

Hcntaen, Cast Ilia I71and Bar dera; Hesketn. 
Ouantrlll (71, Horrls Hi. Howard (0). Froiv- 
mirth (01, Rywi 101 ond Rowland, w— Hes- 
koih. M. L— Hentacn. 5-1 5v— Rvon (31. 

HP— Taranto. Molllar 141. 

BqHlmOr. SOS IN 1 S I 

me Donald. Ballon (7). Eicnnarn Hi ana 

Wto; Mohomes. Qvttiri? w, Trammer 10), 

Caskjn (B) and Watbock. W— Mtriomes, 3-1. 

Ur—. McDonald. »■! Sv— COIUNI »l». HP— «»ln- 
Oauand boo OM 040— I II J 

Kansas arr ns oil »*— i* « 1 

Witt, OnttvefM (5). Eckeisiev (7t, Acre (8) 

and Sfdntxxn. Hettond (71; GutHcza. NWrnsom- 


Srdtte ON ON Ml— 1 3 1 

FtaiHr* and Paareoas; Fieml*^. Converse (tj. 
Avala 1*1. Rliln l9IMHMImn.w-|i|nln. 
N. L— Piemma. w. HRs— Caliiarma. Salmon i 

tl), C Davh t?i. Seattle. Amaral (31. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Florida 000 DM 202-4 A 0 

CM COM DUO loo 3d— 4 It I 

Hauorii Prw 171. Lewis I7>. Marta i«' and 
Tina lev: Banks. Plesoc IBi. Mrers t»l and 

Wilkins. W-flonks K L-Hough, 3-2. 
Sv— Myers IT). HR— Chlcaga. May (2). 

Si. Lean oao too OM— I * 0 

Montreal oca >10 04* — * 10 1 

Palaclas. Eversaerd (71. Aroan (fli ana 

Pognozzi; Fassero, Show (7), Wertcland (B) 

and Fletdm. Soehr <91. W— Fassero. 2-2. 

L— Palacios. D-2. Sv— Wetteland (21. MFto — Si. 
LOUIS. Smith ill. Momreal. Lomlnti 121. 

pmsBuran oao ora 000— 1 t i 

POlhKjdPtrta 1M 003 Mlf— I] 14 I 

WaBflor, Ballard Ui, Pena (7) and Parrish; 
Jackson and Doulton. W-Jacksoa HL 

L — warmer, s-x HRs- Phllaaelieila. Duncan 

IS). Jordan IM. 

Atlanta 210 401 111—7 17 1 

New York Nl OW 810-2 3 I 

Glavlne. McMkhaei IBI and Lopo:; Jones. 
Monxanillo (71, M. Maddux (4| and Stinnett. 
W— Glavlna, L— Jones. 4-3. s»— mcMI- 

chael (B). HRs— At Ian to. McGHH (101. New 
York. Seoul (5). Rivera (11. 

Colorado BIO OM 100-2 4 2 

Houston Ml 010 20*— 4 12 0 

Freeman, Minn (7), Holmes 17). Peed IB) 
and Girard); DraMk ana Servals, EuseOto 
(81. W— Orafaek, 5-1. L— Freeman, 3-1. 

HR* — Colorado. Calarraoa 1171. Burks 1 171 
Hatfftfon. BQflB»8 ll |V>. 

CtRdliMItl OlO IN BJR fl to 4 

SM Fr ontiK fl 140 0M »* — 9 13 a 

Smileft Spradlin (7), fortupno (8) and Dar- 

sett; Portugal. M. Jodtson (81, Beck (81 and 

Man won™. «y — Pprtu uol. s- 7. L— Wnl l ey. «-* . 
(9>, McGee IM. OndnnolL MSOWJI i IOI. R. 

Sanders (Si. 

Son Diego 8» 181 HI-4 18 0 

Los Anodes Ml 004 Mi— 5 u 2 


DC IrOjl 000 011 010—3 7 I 

OullLcpun. Kivw., ,41 Hor,n ■ *1 ana 
Kreufcr: Morris. Mna in. SJiuev t*i ana 

Atotnar. W— warns, i-a. l— O uliicKsan, 2-i 
HRs— Detroit. Fryman (5). Cleveland, Ra- 

ml max 88*. 

nw York OM atn DOS — a ID 7 

Miw wmmm «oo did mo— a 9 0 

AD&on. Pall (7), Gibson (9J WTO Lorlfz; 

Ignoslak, Bronkey 14), Orosco (7), Scanlon 

(Bl. Kiefer (V) and Harper. Mother,, to), 
w — Pull. l-Z sconkm. 0-z 

Dalthnam BID OOO am 5 ID D 

Minnesota IM 2S0 BO* — B II B 

Fernandez, Mills (5). Williamson (8) and 
Holies, Tockett (7); Erickson, Trombley (81. 

MorrtmantS!. Willis (91 end Wolheck. W— Er- 
Icluoa 4-4. L — Femontti. 9-1. Sv— Willis 171. 
HRs— Minnesota. Winfield 2 151. 

Oakland IN IN 000-5 15 0 

Kansas City 828 OCO 820-4 7 0 

Dorllno. Taylor | B). Brl me I Bl. E cktnlev 19 1 
and ShwnOacn. Anucr. wow* l»i. Brewer 
(Bl and Mom. Mocfanane i «t. w— oarilne.3-4. 

L— Anoier. 3< Sv— ECMndev I2J. HRs— Oak- 
land. Javier (51. Kansas atv. Hgmelrti (7). 
CalHarnla S2n ooa NO- 7 7 2 

Seattle 022 BM 24*— to 14 0 

M. Loiter. Lefferrs (31. Bulctter (Al. B. Pol. 
lemon 1 71. Grohe (71 and C. Turner: HlObard, 
Gassooe (j), RWev (Bl.AYalo i»l and D. Wil- 
son. W— RIslev.M. L— Grate. 0-1 Sv— Ayda 
(51. MRs— California. Salman t*l. Seattle, 
Critter Jr. 113). Jefferson 14 1. Willard (1). 
emcoua mo mi mi — 2 » a 

Texas 101 111 B0*-5 » 1 

A. Fernondei DeLeon (7) end Karkovla; 

Brown. Hanevoitt (8). Carpenter !»i and B> 
drtauex. W Br owrv >A. L— A. Fernandez. S-S 
5v— Carpenter (21. HR— Texas, Rodrloun; (3). 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

JUknm BOO DOS 210— 4 |g 3 

*e» Von* BM 04# ,*4—,i is i 

mens mil im. bmkii I4». BMrmun ,ti. 

VM W n IBI n* CTBrlon; (Moo. Lln-on I’l, 

JYlflsofi (Bl# Franco I?i ond Humfty. w— coao, 
24. L— SmottL W HRs— Attonla Klesko (71. 


Cormier. RoOripue; iai. Hcdrrtn m. Perez 

(9) and PwnazzJ; Hill, Scott (6), Hernia !8) 

and Webster. W— Cormier. 2-1. L— Hlil. A- 2. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 




Fro nr the day I w as 

pom my life ha5 been 

hard. 


/TrilS IS A 
RIDICULOUS! 

YOU HAVE 

ANEAS^ j 

^ LiFE! J 




Sv-Perez (7). HRs-5r. Louis, Smilh (2), 

Whiten (2). Montreal, Walker ISI. 

Florida 012 BM 020— A IS 1 

CBKaao im on no — « s e 

Goraner. Mulls (7), Lewis (7), Perei (B>. 
Hernandez (8) and Sanilcgo; Trachsel. Otlo 
(4), aim (71. Bautista (9) raid WllkirtA. 
W— Gardner, l-O. l— T racnsei (4Ji. Sv— Her- 
nandez (7). HRs— Oiictrao. Rt»o» (7J, Grace 
(II. 

aacJnMtl MO 0M IBB— 1 J 2 

r tiT^iri5o J !»r and Manwwlng. 

W— Torres, l-Z. L-Hansoo, w s»—flffcK i«. 

PUfeburak ill 11 Mi -3 I 9 

PtdtadeMdo 009 M l O O—l 7 0 

Ihwi i*l and Pratt, a — Wlinarm 14 

l— C ooke. 1-4. s*— /ones tot. hr— P hntkHrt- 

pWft Driatra w. 

Colorado 2U 028 BW-« 7 8 

Houston aaa BBI era— 3 » a 

NIM B*M IB*. Ruffln HI M MWlW ' 
Kilo. Hnimitnn iai. Hudek IS). Mt. wimarn 

(?) orra servats. w— Niea, 5-2. l— K ite 3 -z 

Sv— Ruffin (2). HR— Houshm. Gonzalez (4). 

San D4MO 001 0M 00O—1 B 1 

LU 44MM BOO BOB IOI 1 * B 

Mliby, Horfman (*i ana 4inmui. Hrr- 
sMSer, Oort <*1 and Piazze. v* — Oatl, 5-t. 

L— Hoflmafit 2-1. 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

FRI D A'riS GAME : JordCBl was l-tor-4 with 

one ran scored os Birmingham tost 7-5 to 
Jacksonville. He ms credited drift a hil when 
his bunt was mish an dled bv Jacksonville 

tnlrd basanwa. UP» Nava and ne scared an 
Mine Rnperbnn's homo not. Jordan pra u nded 
out twice and popped out. Dafansivelv.he rea- 

Istered hum cutout? in right field. 

SATURDAY'S GAME : In his first pinch-Wt 
appearance ot M» season, Jordan struck out 
In the ninth Innlne In the Baram'9-71au to me 
Jacksonville Suns. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan is taffing JSS 
(29-114) tn 30 gomes, with six doubles, no trl- 

pies.no home ruu ana IS RBI. He Has stolen TO 

bases, se c ond-best In Ihe Saulttern League. 

Japanese Leagues 


Central League 

W L T Pet. GB 
Ycmluri TO 11 0 445 — 

Chunlchl 15 U 0 il7 4 

YObull 14 IS 0 31* 4 

HontNn 14 IS O 44/ SW 

vekanumo 13 1? o 43X ***, 

Hlrpvilma 12 17 0 .414 7 

SflTtfrflcr'J Rcswis 

Yokchama 1 Yotniuri 0 

voicuri 4. Mortshln 2 

OHJnKJll 2. H il GJU lrite 1 

3tmaow , y ebmui 

Honstim 10, Yakvtf 4 

Yckchamo vs. Yomkirl, opd. rain 

OumchJ vs. Hiroshima, dad. rain 


PndflC Leagoe 



W 

L 

T 

Pa. 

GB. 

Setau 

it 

n 

0 

A33 

— 

Dalai 

IB 

H 

0 

431 

— 

Orix 

15 

14 

0 

J17 

3ik 

Nippon Hom 

13 

11 

1 

A22 

6 

Lotte 

12 

17 

0 

A14 

4 

Kinletw 

11 

17 

1 

M7 

AM, 


Saturday's Results 
Lotte 1 OaM 1 

Klnfimu 6. SHbu 9 

Ortw 11. Nlepon Horn 7 

moeovi RCMiti 

Settw 9, Klntefsu 7 
Lotte 9. Dcriei 4 

on- 4L Nkteon Mam 3 

Friday's NBA gemjftwto 

Mew York nun p-na 

CUCB9D 99 27 32 15— TM 

New York (ends series H 

Mew VBrik— Bonner 1-3 041 2. Dak lay 4-4 44 
13. E wfno 14. IT 4-7 S4. HWW 1 -3 7-2 4. DovtaM 
Z-24. SmUn3-4 3-4 7. Stories 4-10 1 1 -14 31. Moron 
1-72-3 IR. Anthony 2-50-0 6, H. WlHlamitH>0-Oa. 

BloduiKBtMMILGfllnesMMO Tofols3*-<7 

30-38 1IC. 

C ftl eago Ptam i M 1020 3-325. Grant B-l I M 
It. C or twrnoit 5-114^14. at m str u n g A-B 5-0 IK 

Myersa-5 2-5 a, K«t 1-4 Ml Kukoc2-*J-A8. s. 

Williams 24 ML Langley 2-22-24, English D-1 

(Ml 0. Waimlnatan 1-2 1-2 X Paxson 0-1 (HI 0. 

Totals S»-7S 25-34 104. 

3-roUff wxm — New York 4-n IStartLSl-AAn- 
thonv 7-4. Harper 0-t. Davis 0-L Gaines 0-11. 

Chicago 4-10 (Ptppcn 2-4 Annstrong 1-1, KdaK 
1-1 Myers M. Kbtt ML Footed ouI-None. 
Roboands— New York 41 (Oakley. Gwtno *). 
Chicago 48 (Grant Bl. Assist*— New York 18 
(Starks Al, Chicago 28 (GrraM *1. Total looto- 
— NewYort3ftOdct»o».Tectalcot»-«inmi, 
Ptopea &. Williams. Flagrant foul— Gaines. 

Houston IS » 38 27 — TIB 

Piwenlk 27 20 20 IS— 102 

Fhoonle team series *1 
HoustUB— Horry 3d 7-8 11 Thorpe M2 44 1A 
Oialuwan 1 1-17 « 24, Maxwed 14-MW 3t SnUth 

3-7007. Cassell 5-11 10 K.EJIe3-530&HeiTara 
0-1 DO a Jait V2 OO 2. Totals 46-OS 20-28 111 
Phoenix— Hartley 9-22 M IS, CctMItoS 4-10 
M Ift, West 1-2 M2. K. Johnson 12-25 13-14 38. 

Ma le, le V1J 1-7 13. Miller 0-0 O-Oa Klein* 0-20- 
PftCr m i»<MiT.Alnoa 1*9 M4F.JoHmqn 
04 0-0 ftTaTab 39-09 2*-I* VOX 

fr P O H l W Bl i I PPU Bt on 0-19 (Mamrfl 4*7. 

Smllfi HCnu W» Horry H ENeHM 

8-1, Otahjwnn D-1), Phoenix A-lfi (Green 1-1 

Mtalseie 94L K. Jennsan I -2. Mnae 1 -2. Bari, lev 
0-41. MIN eut ■ w« n« HPBPUMP— Mausmn 
44 rotalvMvi 157, nnownlr M toon, lev >4}. 

Assists— Houston 38 (Cassell M). Phoenix 27 

(K. Johnson 12). Total totts-Houstm 21 

Phoenix 71. Tedmlcotj— MoxwelL Green. 


Saturday's NBA Semfflnate 

Adoota 22 2B 17 22— SI 

Indiana 2A 27 M 25—101 

Indiana leads series M 
Afianfo— Manning 3- 127-8 13, Wilfts 7- 150-014, 
Kona* M OO Z Ammon AO 1-3 U Btovtoeh'M 
2-2 A, Lang 44 3-4 II. Etta 4-8 DO o, FeneH 2-3 *4& 
Whatley T-3T-21 KeeteM MIL Eduards MM 
& Graham 1-2 DO 2. Totals 31-75 18-25 ». 

Indi an a — D. Davis 2-4 7-4 A. McKrv 1434 2 

ImHall-TI 3-4 Tt. MU l ev n14-i1Mwnuw » 
frt 041 11. 4. Owls 441 1-5 T. k»n 4-11 r-4 IS. 
Ftaml n o 5-40010. Conner 0-1 0-0 A Ml tenon 1-2 

M2, Williams W «a Totals »-77 28-31 181. 

3-Potert gods— Atkmta 14 (Ehlo 1-1. Ferrell 

O-l. Onmni 0-1. BkrvlecU Ml. InBm 3-7 


ty, BrescWahit;^ 4, Antonio FonaA i Wy, Amit- 

raeVHo^.i&RobertoPaniinUofViNavIgarB. . 
sJ.; A Rotarid Meier. Snttzdrlaridl TVHV-BIson, 
Ui 7, Jose L on SOtltos. Spaitv Banda A4J A ■ 
GtanhicD Gorfnt, Itatv. JaitwCasK.aX; 9. ANMta 

dl Bosca, Amore e Vita sA; Hk Panto Fomo- 
dari. Way, Mercotane. jJL 

Final ow cr oH stasOhm: 1. . R otnkioer, 
ri.07.-4S; 2,Zarrabeitld.7;28babin(t7% ttatoa- 

do, y.*27 behind; 4, Alex Zuller Switzerland, 

ONCE, 1B:5A behind,- 5. Oltaerio Rincon. Co-. 
tamMaONCC IkWtoMndiAUKUSlMC 
FrencfyuiuvFOTHMk ia:VMNMi M >wW t 

OG, 1S:4» MiKkdi 7. Lute tegrae, (ftaln. Ow e - 

lairuoncfv W:46 MMn S; ?. Ctcorm» r 16^4 


TENNIS 


Mach. 20:35 behind. 

y.->. v-.ar.pjjtsV 


SS”2SaSS£"!S5 Monaco Grand Prh 


7) . Total fovts— AHonto 7L Indiana TLTwCM* 

ca^iovzodL 

Utah Z7 W 31 to 13-111 

Denver m a » » VI-119 

\M Isfldt jalej M 

Utah— Corbin Ml M W, Malone 1 1 -!4 *4 %. 

Saenosr 5-5 20 8. Stack Ion l1-1«2-224.Hon»- 
ceft 1 1-T4 3-32T. Mont enrtasO-4 0-3 Oi cnoMei 
3-7004. Benoit 04 1-2 1. Howard POMO-TotaH 
4800 12-1* 111. 

Denyef-Ellls 10-19 H 25, R.Wi!lio ms 4-12 1- 

1 Id. Mutambo 9-12 2-2 20. Abdul- Rauf 8-1S 3-4 
2ft. SMth BO 4-7 14, Pock 3-n 2-3 B. B. Williams 2- 
84-4 B. Room 0-2 24 2. Total* 41*024-33 10*. 
3-PoM Boob— Utch M (Homacuc 7-4. Cor- 

Un 1*1, Malone H Humphries B-l, Sfocktoo 0- 

2). Denver 3-11 (AMU -Rauf M. R.WUI Earns 1- 

«. POCK 0-1. Rawno-ll. Pouted eat — Mama. 
Pmor, EHta. ttBbo timlm— Utah 40 livtatm 
13). Donvar SA (Mutombo ta). Assists— utidi 32 
(Stockton 13), Denver TO (Pack B). Total toal- 
v— Utah 28, Denver IB. Tednicoh— Malone. 
Hornocok. Utah Illegal defense, Abduf-RaU. 

Tour ot Spain 

Rentfts from Sa tur d a y * sen Stage, a SB- 
Utonstamu-aifleJ (tone trial aroraHl Sego- 
via: 1. Tony Rwnlnger, Swttzertand, Mnpei- 
aa& 1 hour.a minutes. 5* seconds: X Mehdier 
Mowrl, SpoIiv Banesta, 1:35 betilnd; 3, Abre- 
hamOtano, Spate MapeKkn, 2:0* oetitml; 4, 
Erik Breuktnk, Nelherionds. ONCE, same 

lime; 5, MUtal Zarrnbettta, Spain. BdnestakS :M 
a«nlnd.- a. nsm Dead* Swain. ■«» ta. 2 ri« 


HMMN OPEN 

. - ip gorop- . 

Wanttn’s Stogies. SemHtaUs. 

Break) ScftBlte (111, terihertandidef.Anke 

Huber m.Gormony. 7-A. (8-41, *-3; Staff! Grot 
(ll.Gonntxry.dsL Jana Hovatna (3). Czech 

Republic, 4-1 toX : 

" Fftml 

Grot oat. sUiudx. 74 UMJ. 44- ' 


(vnntoevk Ui. Croatia, S-2. U (7-51; Pete 

S orww (1 L UMMS mu* BM. Dm B»l 

ml ewe, nwusi ii L .ukV*. 

Samara oet. Backer, A-2. A-2. 

PRAGUE OPEH 


Monte cam: 1, Mkhaot Schymodter, Ger- 

vm. BmettofrFoni 1 hour, <9 minu te 

sun Burnnrtii HUM Mi (BB0A1 mah) avtr- 
om sused; 2. Martin Drwnoie., Brnain. 


Gerhard aoraar, Austria. Forrari.'l : I AA24 be- 
hind; 4, Andrea de Cesarls, Hair, jonkm* 
Hurt.1 lap bdilnd; i Jean Alest France, Fte- 

rorLl km: A Michele Alboreta. Itatv. Minardi. 
Scudetia- ttarkx. 1 km; 7, JJ. I4M4 Finland, 
Benetl on-Ford, l lap; B. Oitvter Verona. 

France, Larousa-Ford, 2 laps; 9, Olivier 
Panls. France, Ltafer-Ranou((,2(aps;I(l Erik 
Comas. Franco, LorrouBBe-Ford, 3 km*. ' 

p» Iw i - f -s igpdtao s Coffer -taur.rooeals T, 
SdunocMr. 4C 2. Bnscr.lkl Mel Rubens 
Borncheito, BradL and Demon hhl Brttaln7; 5, 

(He) Nicola LnrW, I fdv, Akstbod Brundtefc 8 
(lie) Mlto Hakklnea Finland. Ukvo Kalavrana 
Japan, and Karl Wend M ngw 1 . Austria * - 
C onst r u ctors' staaMags; 1, Bcnenuru.40; 2, 
Farrar 1, 24; 1 ( Ho) Jonkm, and McLaren, TO; 
& Williams, 7; & Sautwr 6; 1. TyrrriC 4; 8, 

Foot»vork,3;7, (tto)LarrousseandMinori8,r. ' 


Saturdays NHL Swnlflnal 


AinoisaaCmiiBn ID.SeumAbrlcMLOsC.PwoBo 
MCMxxrwmxM.**; xwoin—n im 
dm* dftL 5Hke Fronkt Gerawtry. A-2. 6-1. . 

m 

Coftizer del Cortarai *4. 7-4 (14- UI. 


SPANISH OPEN 

'Uocfflig scores Sender’S Hwotrosod of the 
dlrx TIB ie> takikuiiiuta at Ib wA UB- 
. nwd.CAXis-aMBer) Clob de Camtn coarse Jn' _• 
kkxtrW; 

Colin Moirfwnierle, Scotland 70-71-66-7B— 777 


6W9-70-7I)— 27H 
7Mfl-*t-n — 37B 
AB-4P-JP-71— 278 
7G*F*»-7t— 27T 
67-74-73-47 —231 
74-7WW-281 
74-4*-7T-«8— TO2 
7T-70**-T2— 382 
IMMI^WTO 


2:2i Domna; a. viamu Apaneta Spain. tg» 

esta 2;3l behlna; P; Wtes CnudfQtT/hralne^ De- 
poripuhJlcA43behWr1i, PeraandoEscortln, 

Ssdn w a sp dm. 3:0* behind. 

ns TT L'j.’ ia m oiMfZiM uy- 
via OM Madrid: 1, Laurent JaMMrr, France, 

Wrt£4 M l Eric Vbnderaentei BeWm 

BretchUaLsaraeHme.-l Roberta PeUlconL ito- 


Saa Jose 

Toronto 


(Gormeff UfeOvreJi 

ThW Porhd-a, Toronte Osbomo t <Zs- 

Ml), 3:19. 4 b Son Jana. Lorkmov 1 (Nolan. 

. O o r yti nfo v in 9 : 91 . 9 u Toronto, onmour 4 
£Oor*.Gflf/. IL’ll 4 tor Jgm. fWf &.rf' 4 r, 

SMI DO Wtf-'Son JOM 1 D-1 6-S-01. Toronto 

7410-71; gooflcf-Scm Jose. Irbe. Toronto 

Potvin. 


Richard Baxall England . 
Mark Roe. ehaiana 
MorV McNulty, Zbnbabwo 
O w tai B Lo n g e r , Ger m anv 

Ernie Ete Sooih Africa 
Jonathan Lamas, England 
Staen Tlnritna, Denmark 
Jaw Morld Otambat, Spain 
PWnip Prtcft. WWee - 


SOCCER 


.EtHMklSN PJL CUP 

- Pinal • • 

Manchester United 4, Chebeo 0 . 
FRENCH CUF 

Auxerre 3. jiiwrtpcmor 0 

GERMAN CUP 

. - - -Hncri 

Wtawssr Bnma X tr ot Weill euu, I 

■rsmsH. FIRST DIVKKm 
Owtiw as to Coruna a. vBtancta o 

Barcelona % Scvltta 2 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


& 


Starting now, 77iy 

life has t?een very 
hard, r— \ 


ChWtGOiuv SomEBoD* 

BRDtE INTO CJR WUSE-r 


tfjniou. 

RNJCE 1 








IS i 


' Yup.Joey. moodle soup is realm food.* 


ItatwrmHNkuJuitM I 

cMMarSBBenKBPn.Bbnn I 

tamCNfninr wards I 





OW UULvt , 

HUS. Kt HAWSfUMj! HOBBES! 
VOW- FI TrflG I OH, I 

— /IT ao*» i 

- - -JSPgn 


HOM. I CAHl rft OK. OUW 
Find. HOBBES' CALK DOKH. 
H£lPiEFB« 1V91S. 

m m if. wobbess 

WW IF WR. MSS 9ME - 


Afijocete L Real Sadftdod 1 

b m wi 4. mm Madrid i 
omwm a amn« ohm o 
-Voflodund B. Cotta do vtao O 

. Oviedo 1, Louronea 2 
Atteflco ch Madrid Z Rayo VaUeccaw i 

Roetao de Santander X UeMa I 


1 PONT TMP At. ANIO ME. YtOULP 
STEM. A SUFFCD' TIGER.. 

i£is ntaoK. 


BUT HOBBES 
, ^ 5D 

L itorsmt. 


GARFIELD 




*UL_J 


WIZARD of ID 

l r M YOU A 6£M*AR. THAT WILL* PIC? 

You cp Anv Fop- 5 ix motm* 


VAfv 

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aoaSatrroonk. j \ / / I 1 — 1— L 

W^n -rZk B EETLE BAILEY 


GIRRO 


WY1HNN 


GREENE 




r „9\ iT WHY voe* IT 

HAve TO Ttc.fc FOP- 

^ M0N1H9? 


WOW THAT YC7U'R£ 
FEELINg BETTER, ( 
BEETLE, THERE ^ 
ABE SOME OLP (i. 
FBI ENPS WAiTlNGyr' 
TC SEE YOU A V 


WH01 TWE HJ3M 
CL OCK fBJ. N THS 
v*TSi IT W 

Nta snsngs Re dftM M Ib 
fctn ra itra taB «nB»r, ■ nc 
Qmd Df cw Mm cstcon, 

7TTN* rwi 1 


Janetta. NOSE FENCE PCNCHO SBCTON 
Armc TilHtaUaNMeftidBfnjmeaH 

■BSMMra > cay Hb« — OCWECTCNS 


TOOUBREAPaS 

INGMATBRIDUN 

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great! , 
WHO ARE I 
THEy? i 


- 1 

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V Ksr&xstes 

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f f ««&■ 

A ,-wojr 

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' .i\ "£■ 

AJTjFS.. 


K.P., &\1 ABP 
PUTV ANP 
GARBAGE 

PETAIi. 


THE FAR SIDE 


Ax: 


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THE VTOHsr CASE 
SWING 
YNE EVERS 


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M O 


ESTERN ATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16,1 994 


page 19 


D A 

RT 



Schumacher Cruises to Victory in Monaco as Formula One Carries On 



By Ian Thomsen ing. Everyone but the drivers; by 
/tfernaiiona/ HtmU Tribune definition they aren't allowed. 

NTONTE CARLO — They kept The from row was held symboli- 
handing trophies to Michael Schu- ^ vacant. in memory of the de- 
matAer In his grasp they were like ^ ch^pi™ Roland Rai- 
the brads of fomwrly wild animals, ^berger. the first driver in 12 
He laid two of them down 00 the >xar5 ^ dic m a Formula One 
victory carpet he was sharing with CTenL day before while 

the local royals —and looked up to quaUfv for ^ San Mari- 



see two more held out before him. 
useless and shiny, 
for me? His smile began at the 


no Grand Prix. At the appointed 
time, with a mechanical war cry, 
the 24 survivors were trampling 




■ 

SL . • 


eyebrows. He couJdn 1 believe this symbolically over Senna's vacancy. 
ISSEF He thC Within seconds, Mika Hakkinra 

■^t wTiris spun, his life." said smiting behind Schu- 

Schumacher, who on Sundav won m f her ' was spinning, with all Ae 
Ayrton Senna's favorite rati, the 

Monaco Grand Prix. Senna, the McLarai Peugeot was ndden hann- 

three-iime Formula One champi- ^ bin 

on. was lulled two weeks ago. "I ^ ^ day -safely - for 


_ . .... career — as nwnV hs 

rari was the only other car not session stopped to . allow ambit- t6( j 0Q this street 

lapped by Schumacher; . lances and doctors on the track — Sen 03 Overall Senna had 

SchumatAer had earned his first by poshing through new rales, to ^ twice as many races 

pole spot with a Motaoo record lap reduce speed and m^jrove shinty, Odd combined. Senna 

of 1 minutel8J60 seconds Salur- banning with (he Sjwt^Grand “JTi^es.Betger.theoewacuve 
day. beating the 1992 time of Nigel n> two weeWFor the first won 41 Jfa. 

Mansell (1; 19.495). ‘ ' rime, a driver — Pedro Lamy of leader, has w® * 

SlSSSspsi. 

Sw me gravest change of alUo far 

blown engine at the end of the pit as Schumacher was conoeraedwas destruction of ano 
straight. Schumacher’s battle was the death of the driver least likdy Hakkinen and ScnumaLjcr 
morosely private; Seventy-eight -to make a fatal mistake. Before the footed like sons of the ndh “ iney 
lima: he bad to jerk his wheel left, race, . the 24 drivers gathered ^ebrated qnahfying Saturaay. 
then right around the barrier that on around a small banner bidding between them, 

farewell to Senna. Among them, mechanic who put 

Schumacher had teen closest to “«£££. His thhJng 
overtaking the BrazOian. on top of his 

- ?For all of us, the two weeks after b e ad, he was stamped and his face 
Imola have been .very, difficult, 7 * he wa5 . dark- where- he- should have 
said. “Nobody has been really sure . shaved bin didn't bother — te- 
what to drink, what to feel I waaat he. more than anyone, has 

sure I could continue racing like been working two jobs. He' is the 


m 


'*fc 


think he would wish to continue J?. ^, Dam0Q f&s ofcerebral contusion and 

. this sport. That's what we're here Hill, who had stoned fourth. brain swelling cm Sanirday. attord- 

y for — to continue in this spon and Schumacher, 25, has won all four “8 *9 doctors at Princess Grace 

mnlrr lh« Ivcf nf it PnF all ue ihkvmrin hie Rratttnn Fivt). 


then right around the barrier that on arotmd a ■ small banner tndamg 
Thursday had been dipped by Karl farewell to Senna. Among them, 
Wendlinger of Austria, . whose Schumacher had been closest to 
Sauber-Meicedes spun and crashed, overtaking the Brazilian. 
Wen dling er was still showing - ^*For all of us, the two weeks after 











make the test of it. For all of us, races this year In his Benetton Ford, 
what has happened has been un/or- He finished 37 seconds ahead of the 
lunate, but 1 think even he would McLaren Peugeot of Martin Hrun- 
wisb to continue on in this sport." die, the Briton whose mechanical 


Hospital. He will be kept in an sure I could continne racing like 
artificial coma on a respirator for normal; I wasn't sure of myself. On 
the 8 to 10 days. The long-term Friday, I was just able to- at in my 
prognosis remained uncertain. car and ride in my car. I didn’t have 


ftiipf representative in the drivers 
new mission to control their fates. 


# m 


The 260-kilometer (16 l-mile; problems saw him drop from second Max Mosley, president of the In- 
race. the first Grand Prix si nee Sen- to eighth in qualifying Saturday, ternational Automobile Frdera- 
na's death, was completed without Brundk overcame that deficit to fin- non, , or FIA, reacted Friday to 


the son of terrible interruption ish almost 40 seconds ahead of Ger- Wendlinger's accident — the 
against which everyone was brae- hard Berger of Austria, whose Fer- fourth consecutive Formula One The victory was poly the sirth of families survive. 

Eyeing Paris, Sampras Storms Past Becker in Rome 


fore, I had made . this point to my- the spare free moments to 

sdf; H there is any feeling of being t hmV, and the nKwrornfc He has 
afraid, I will have to stop." become the hero- around whom 








7t am ■■ 







Jcan-Pwl r'ffm-rtT'Rfukrs 


Michael Schumacher got a hog front his team manager, Flavio Briatore, after his victory Sunday. 


Unser Leads Indy 500 Qualifying 


The Auoaated Press 

rNDIANAPOLIS — AI Un- 
ser Jr. survived a scare he de- 
scribed as "like looking down a 
double-barreled shotgun" and 
tentatively won the pole for the 
Indianapolis 500. 

The 1992 Indy winner turned a 
four-lap average of 228.01 ! mpb 
Saturday to lead the first day of 
time trials for the May 29 race. 

Unser was the fastest of 21 


drivers who qualified on a day 
twice interrupted by rain. 

"I got caught in the rain this 
morning when I went down into 
turn one,” Unser said. "I was 
going for a 229 because I knew it 
was out there and I went into 
turn one and 1 ran into a down- 
pour and almost crashed." 

Raul Boesel of Brazil was sec- 
ond among Saturday's qualifiers 
at 227.618, followed by rookie 
Jacques Vilieneuve of Canada at 


226.259. Michael Andretti at 
226.205. Lyn St. James at 
224. 154, Nigel Mansell of Britain 
at 224.04 ] and Arie Luyendyk of 
the Netherlands at 223.67 3.* 

On Friday, Paul Tracy, who 
had been expected to contend for 
the pole position, escaped seri- 
ous injury in a crash. 

The 25-year-old Canadian ap- 
peared to bse control as he drove 
off turn four on the oval. 


By Ken Shulman 

iVnr York Times Service 

ROME — On the eve of their 
day-coon final at the Italian Open, 
Boris Becker had said he didn’t 
think Pete Sampras was superman. 

On Sunday. Becker bad to recon- 
sider. 

“He is playing tennis like they 
wiB play the game in the 2 1st centu- 
ry.” said Becker after be suffered a 
6-1. 6-2, 6-2 thrashing at the hands 
of the world's top-ranked player. 

"He's doing things I've never 
seen before on a tennis court.” the 
German added. “I can only com- 
pare him to the greatest of the 
greats. He just beat the bdl out of 
me today." 

Sampras, 22, may not be super- 
man. but he is undoubtedly the best 
tennis player in circulation, and ar- 
guably one of the best ever. Ranked 
No. 1 since September. Sampras 
has won 27 consecutive matches, 
and is 39-2 this year. Induding the 


Graf Prevails Over Schultz for 8th German Open Victory 


Reutm The set fell to Graf in an 8-6 lie-breaker after the 

BERLIN — Steffi Graf, the world's top-ranked German passed her opponent with two powerful back- 
woman player, won the German Open clay-court handers. Graf had conceded that she could have 
tennis tournament on Sunday for (he eighth time with trouble with her opponent's powerful first serve, and 
a 7-6 (8-6) 64 victory over Brenda Schultz of the at the start few of ter returns landed in the court. 


Sampras, whose toughest match in 
the 'Rome tournament came 
agains t the Spanish clay-court spe- 
cialist Aka. Corretja in the second 
round. “I also felt much better at 
net I had my balance. This is the 
result of playing a week on day." 


Netherlands, the Uih seed. 

“It was an unbelievable performance.” said Graf 
after completing her 85th tournament victory. 
Schultz had seemed a formidable opponent after 


But she made sure that her Gist serves went in. 
lowing, her to win her sexvice games comfortably. 
Schultz, whose game is best stated to faster surfaces, 
ve the match away with several unforced errors at 
e start of the second set After ronverting a break 


powering past the Ger man s eventh seed Anke Huber. 7- point at 1-1 in the second set, Graf headed toward 
6, 6-3, in Saturday s semifinal, and in the first set of the victoiy and after 85 mmntw slammed Rn n y her sec- 
final neither she nor Graf could force a break point, cod mat ch point to win.' 


Slam titles if he triumphs in the 
French Open, which begins May 23. 

“I played really wefl today," Sam- 
pras said. “I made veiy few.emns, 
and 1 was pretty much in control 
from the outset. Boris was never 


Kalian Open, he has won seven of able to accomplish his game plan, or 
the nine tournaments he has en- to work into any sort of rhythm." 
tered in 1994. Sampras outplayed Becker in ev- 

He could become the first man in ery aspect of die game. Although 


had been earlier in the week, Sam- 
pras won all of bis service games, 
and broke Becker six times in nine 
games. The American was especial- 
ly aggressive on Becker’s second 
serve, winning 27 of 44 second re- 
turn points. 

On the baseline, Sampras's play 
could only be described as master- 
ful. He repeatedly opened up the 


comer with biting groundstrokes 
that landed inches from the outline. 


mo n t h workin g out on day in Flor- 
ida. played the Rome tournament 
as a preparation for the French 
Open. And his Italian victory 
makes him one of tbe. favorites at 
Roland Garros. 

“He thinks he's invincible now," 
< 3 i id Becker, wbo. with three Wim- 
bledon titles, knows about feeling 
unbeatable. “The way he is playing 
right now, he has to be considered 
the man to beat m Baris."- 

His confidence soaring with his 


KUIUW UMIQ IIVU1 UI6 WUUt^ , *2,1- A* 

then Bring bullet-lib" winners 5 0 S T 3E^ W . 

down the opposite side that left the Wimbledon, US. Open and 

German ^Tjudidoas in his 
choice of approach shots — and 

incredibly effective when he came ' P rand aam “ that haS dnd ‘ 


to the net — Sampras looked - like a 
natural day-court player. - ; - 

“I was moving much better to- 


“I have to think of myself as one 
of die favorites,” raid Sampras, 
wbo has never advanced beyond 


25 years to win four straight Grand his serve was not as effective as it court, sending Becker deep into the day dnm 1 had been all we*,” said the quarterfinals in Paris. 


Indiana Takes 3-1 Lead Over Top-Seeded Atlanta in East 


The AaoaateJ Press 

■ The Indiana Pacers continued their trip 
through uncharted playoff territory Sun- 
day. beating top-seeded Atlanta. 102-86. 
for a 3-1 lead in the Eastern Conference 
semifinals. 

Consecutive blocked shots by Antonio 
Davis to stan the fourth quarter and con- 

NBA PLAYOFFS "" 

secutive 3- pointers by Derrick McKeyand 
Reggie Miller enabled the Pacers to puli 
away in the final period, when they out- 
scored the visiting Hawks. 24- 14. 

The Pacers set a team playoff record by 
connecting on 1 1 3-poini shots, including 


four by Miller, who led Indiana with 25 
points. 

While Danny Manning scored a career 
playoff-high 35 points for Atlanta, the 
Hawks were hurt by a knee injury to Kevin 
Willis, who returned to the game out 
scored just two points on 0-for-5 shooting 
in 23 minutes. 

Until this year, Indiana had only four 
playoff victories since entering the Nation- 
al Basketball Association in 1976. The 
fifth-seeded Pacers, who reached the sec- 
ond round by sweeping Orlando, can end 
the series by defeating Die Eastern Confer- 
ence regular-season champions Tuesday in 
Atlanta. 

Game 6. if necessary, would be played in 


Market Square Arena on Thursday. 

For the game. Indiana treated a sellout 
crowd of 16,561 to 513 percent shooting, 
including li-for-I7 from 3-point range. 
The Hawks shot only 42 percent. 

■ In Saturday's games: 

Pacers 101. Hawks 81*. It took Indiana 
just 34 minutes to score their first 69 points 
against Atlanta — equaling their total in 
setting a playoff record for futility in Game 

The Pacers consistently sent the ball 
inside to Rik Smits. who had scored only 
22 points in the first two games of the 
series, and the 7-foot4-inch center made 
the move payoff by making 12 of 21 shots. 

Jazz 111, Nuggets 109: The pick-and- 


roll is one of basketball's most elementary 
plays, and the Utah Jazz took host DenvCT 
to school with it. 

Jeff Homacek and John Stockton hit 
crucial overtime baskets off that play as the 
Jazz outlasted the Nuggets to take a 3-0 
lead in their Western Conference scries. 

Homacek and Stockton finished with 27 
and 34 points, respectively. 

Game 4 in the best-of-seven series was to 
be played Sunday night in Denver. A fifth 
game, if necessary, would be played Tues- 
day ni«hl in Salt Lake City. 

Kari Malone added 26 points and 13 
rebounds for Utah, which extended its 
playoff winning streak to a club-record six 
games. Utah has beaten Denver in seven of 


eight meetings this season, including four 
wins in the regular season. 

Stockton said the pick-and-roU — in 
which a forward or center sets a screen near 
the key to free a guard to roll to an open 
area if the defense doesn't switch assign- 
ments — “obviously is a lough play to 
guard." 

“Fortunately, the shots fell for us on 
those plays,” be added. “A lot of attention 
was being paid to Kari, and that left some- 
body open. It happened to be Jeff and U 
happened to be me.” 

LaPhonso Ellis, who fouled out in over- 
time, led a late Nuggets surge and finished 
with 25 points. Dikembe Mulombo had 20 
points, 13 rebounds and six blocked shots. 


Pippen the Pouting 'Punk 9 


By Michael Wilbon 

WnMngHwi .Sen/rf 

C HICAGO — There's a phrase that follows Scoitie 
Pippen around, and it’s anything but flattering. 
Pippen was a heavy-duty contributor to three NBA 
championship teams' here. He was regarded highly 
enough to be named to the Dream Team. He was the 
most-valuable player of the 199a All-Star Game. Few 
players of his generation have as many skills or are 
capable of changing a gams in so many different ways. 

Still, there's this phrase you hear when Pippen's 
name is mentioned. It's uttered most often by players. 
You can bear it in any gym in the NBA: "Scoitie 


; Pippen is a punk.” 
In locker room pa 


In locker room pari once, a “punk" is somebody who 
— — — y— can '[ deliver in the 

Vantaae dutch * somebody 

vantage Who either can't 

Point ^ 9 nil the big shot or 

' “ ~ doesn't want to 

take it. A "punk" in the NBA glossary is a quitter, 
somebody looking for an excuse or a way out. 

Y on know whai they're calling Pippen after Game 3 
here in the Siadium. don't you? 

It's hard to disagree. Trying to get a handle on 
Pippen is like riding a teeter-totter. One day you swear 
he can bold his own with the game's greats. Another 
day he can’t play Game 7 against Detroit because of a 
headache. 

In case you missed it, here's what Pippen did Friday 
night against the Knicks with 1.8 seconds left, the 
game tied at 102, the Bulls having blown a 22-poim 
lead and on the verge of going down J*0: Pippen quit. 
Rather than run a play that called for a shot by 
teammate Toni Kukoc. who'd already hit three game- 
winning, buzzer-tea ting shots this season. Pippen told 
his coach. Phil Jackson, he'd rather sit and watch. 

Why? 

Because Pippen resents Kukoc. the rookie from 
Croatia. He resents him to the point that he would risk 
an entire season and the NBA title, it's unfathomable, 
really. Pick a sport, any sport, and try to figure out the 
last time a star player, a Hall of Fame candidate, 
simply removed himself from the field of play on the 
most crucial play of the season. Can you imagine .Art 
Monk, on that fourth-down play against Miami in the 
Super Bowl, saying to Joe Gibbs, “If you hand it off to 
Riggo, I’m ouiia here."? Not only did Pippen basically 
tell off his teammates, but it was about the biggest act 
of insubordination imaginable. 

The fact that Kukoc nailed the shot at the buzzer 
makes Pippen look like an even bigger fool. 

It’s unfortunate that a man at the lop of his profes- 
sion would be so selfish, so evil toward one of his 
teammates. It is the story not only of Pippen's own 
fragile nature, but of an ongoing unnecessary feud. 

Ever since 199*3, when the Bulls drafted Kukoc and 
made signing him a priority, Pippen has fumed. At 


first, Pippen was only following Michael Jordan's 
lead. The two accused Jerry Krause, the Bulls' genera? 
manager, of spending too much lime chasing an un- 
proven European while he should have beet- trying to 
sign somebody who could help the Bulls overcome the 
Pistons. Pippen made Kukoc's life miserable in a game 
at the Olympics by shadowing him as if his life 
depended bn it. He then had the nerve to trash Kukoc. 
Jordan, after a second game against Croatia, apolo- 
gized and said he'd welcome Kukoc os a teammate. 
.Anybody who could pass and shoot it that weM. 
Jordon said, deserved a sboL There would be no mere 
barbs from him. 

But Pippen continued trashing Kukoc. saying he 
didn’t deserve to be an NBA player. Every shot that 
Kukoc took was a shot Pippen should have had Every 
dollar that went to the unproven Kukoc w as money that 
should have been in Pippen's bank account In a recent 
magazine interview. Pippen came right out and said that 
if Kukoc, a restricted free agent made a penny more 
next season, he would demand to be traded. 

This is why the two biggest lies in sports are; “i'd 
play for nothing." and "All 1 want to do is win.'' if 
Pippen ever utters either phrase, he's a liar. He'd 
rather not participate than win with Kukoc. Ke cared 
about his own shot more than winning. 1 dare you to 
find a more selfish, egotistical act in sports. 

So what's a coach to do? If Pippca is suspended, the 
Bulls don't have a prayer. Would Pj: Riley suspend 
Patrick Ewing" Of course not Not in the" playoffs. 
You tell the player publicly, that he owes his "team 
tetter, but you say that you're not about to punish 1 i 
other men by not giving them a chance. That’s what 
Jackson is doing. Asked why Pippen wasn't oc tbs 
floor Friday night. Jackson quipped. “Scoitie had a fat 
hp and looked ugly at that time." 

N EVER HAS Pipper, looked uglier and not be- 
cause of a fat Up. but a fat head. True. Kukoc 
struggles on defense and he sometimes fo.Tsts to iet 
screens or clear out when he's supposed to. In fact. 
Pippen was angry with 5.5 seconds left Friday when 
Kukoc failed to clear out, bringing an extra defender 
in Pippen's path on what resulted in a 24-secocd shot 
clock violation. But how many people have four buzz- 
er-beaters in a career, much less a "rookie season? 

Twice this season I wrote that Pippen deserved the 
NBA MVP award. A wise dub executive told me he 
would agree, except that Pippen had undermined 
Kukoc all season and that would ultimately undo the 
Bulb in the playoffs. 

Defeat with honor in these playoffs wouldn't hurt 
Pippen. Nobody's asking him to be Michael Jordan, 
because he can't be. But acting so dishonorably only 
adds to a legacy that, unfortunately, includes a Game 
7 headache. During an NBA season marked by what 
George Karl, the coach of the Seattle SuperSonics. 
calls “a crisis of attitude," nobody’s attitude is in crisis 
as much as Scoitie Pippen's. 



. . The Associated Press ... 

NEW YORK — New York’s Derek Harper was suspended Tor 
two games and fined $15,000 and GricagoYJo Jo English was 
suspended for one game and fined $10,000 for their pans in a fight 
during Game 3 of their seamd-routel National Basketball Associa- 
tion. playoff series, the league said. 

Seven other Knicks p Layers and eight other Bulls were fined $2^00 
each for leaving the bench during the mdee Friday night. Each team 
also was fined $50,000. 

The total of $162^60 in fines was die second-largest in NBA 
history, topped only by the" $163,500 levied after a fight between 
Hriladelpma and Detroit on April 20, 1990. 

The Knicks-Bulls brawl occurred daring the second quarter of the 
104-102 Chicago victory in the tesi-of-seven series, which the Knicks 
lead 2-1. Harper wffl miss Game 4 on Sunday and Game 5 on 
Wednesday. Engfisfa will be out for Sunday's game. 


SIDELINES 

Turtle Island Wins Irish Guineas 


THE CURRAGH, Ireland (Combined Dispatches) — Turtle Island 
pulverized his opponents to win the Irish 2,000 Guineas horse racing 
classic by 15 lengths on Sunday. 

Just a week after being narrowly beaten in the French equivalent at 
Lon g cha m p, the oolt showed his true odors, reltsbmg the heavy ground to 
stretdrtoan impressive victory. Settled in last place by John Reid, Turtle 
Island, the 5-io-4 favorite, cruised up to. the leadens 400 meters (435 
yards) out, trouncing 50-to-l outsider Guided. Tour, wbo short-headed 
Ridgewood Ben for second. . .... .. 

•pneday after it lost Brocco, the Preakness lost a star of even greater 
magnitude when Holy Bull was withdrawn: from the May 21 race with a 
mild infection on Saturday. . (Reuters. NYT) 

U.S. Golf Got to 36 Holes by Storms 

DALLAS (AP) — The weather-battered GTE Byron Nelson Classic 
was reduced to a 36-hole format Sunday, scheduled to end with the 
■ completion of the storm-interrupted second round. 

Resumption of play in the second — and now final — round was set for 
early Sunday afternoon with 147 players scattered over two rain-soaked 
tpurses. It marked the first time a Tour event had been cut to 36 holes 
since the 1986 Pensacola Open. 

Hay was suspended late Saturday afternoon when a severe thunder- 
storm. and later a tornado, swept over the TPC at Las Colin as and the 
adjacent Cottonwood Valley course. No injuries or damage was reootted. 
When play was baited Saturday. Bra .Crenshaw, David Ojmn. Brad 
Bryant and Mark Camevale shared xhe lead at eight under par. 

FIFA Trims Sales of Clip Tickets 

. ZURICH (AP) — Ticket sales feir the World Cup soccer finals in the 
Untied State haw bceosojmsk tharotgamzers have begun trimming 
^ marketing efforts, and international telephone safe have 
halted, according to soccer's world governing body, FIFA. 

Thirty-five of the World Cup’i 52 games have been sold oul and FTCa 
S fl td th fltouly 5to 10 percent the tickets were left fwtte^SSg 


^ <* ^kets. AU 
10 *?***”• ^ 

For the Record 


lit 






Federation mmi-nyweigbt title on Saturday by knS£°!!r f ^ ^®" n 8 
EsptmdarfttePh&in 

Jnfan. Dm* Jackson of the United State was v- 

g™, BeSS*frIohBson of the Um[ed 

iaw^aiSt Sectional Fo^^2^TSSgti5^ new? 2^ a 

^ ia S ua ” ^.k^e.lw^mlar to the ^tomaker^pounSr;®^' 

I Malone pulled down a rebound over Dikembe Mutombo during Utah's OT victory in Denver., Jag SS^ 9 -:- ; tcai ? rneht to .•* known as the 

- ‘ ‘ •’ (AFP) 













Page 20 


Sabina Guzzanti’s Divine Missions Satire 


INT ERNATIONAL HERALD T RIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 16, 1994 

Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda, Didn t 


By Ken Shulman 
LORENCE — “J promise, if you set 
this film, that if you are unemployed, 
you will be employed. If you are sicL you 
will be well. If you are homosexual, no one 
will know." Sabina Guzzanti is imposon* 
ating, Italian television mogul and new 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, exagger- 
ating Berlusconi's open “a" and decisive 
hard “c" as she plugs her laiesi Him “T top- 
po Sole.” “If you are blind, then you will 
see. But if you are communists. I’m sorry, 
you’ve got the wrong guy." 

A graduate of Rome's Accaderoia 
d'Arte Drammatica with solid experience 
in comic and dramatic theater. Sabina 
Guzzanti first burst into prominence two 
years ago as a timely satirist in Italy's 
popular alternative weekly television re- 
view "Avan#" (Leftovers). When pom 
queen Moana Pozzi was hired by an Ital- 
ian television call-in program to offer ad- 
vice on romance to frustrated housewives. 
G uzzan ti transformed her into a stentori- 
an schoolteacher imparting lessons on the 
theory and practice of kinky sex to two 
cowering elementary school students. 

When Italy's nationwide corruption 
scandal exploded, she presented former 
Justice Minister Claudio Manelli as the 
jilied, bitter wife of former Prime Minister 
Betlino Craxi (and Manelli 's Socialist 
protector). She even took on one of the 
country's most revered figures, medical 
researcher Rita Lev, Monukino. port rav- 
ing the Nobel Prize winner as a good- 
natured but shortsighted, aging scientist. 

This year, with the birth of Berlusconi's 
Forza Italia party, the majority parly in 
Italy's current ruling coalition, the 31- 
y ear-old actress bas made “his broadcast- 
ship” the subject of her latest and most 
successful caricature. 

“Political satire is son of a divine mis- 
sion for me,” she said at the Goldini the- 
ater here, where she had come for the 
Italian debut of “Troppo Sole." “Especial- 
ly in a period like this one. It’s almost like 
bring a politician, because with satire I 
become a point of reference, the banner 
for an allernaLive mode of thinking and 
living. Politics as it is presented here on 
television is pure idiocy. Anything you do. 
or nearly anything, appears intelligent in 
contrast!" 

“Troppo Sole" — the title is a play on 
words meaning both “too much sun" and 
“too alone" — is an experimental Him in 
which Guzzanti plays 13 roles. The only 
other bodies, because they cannot be 
called characters, that appear in the Him 
are those of the male and female weight- 
lifters who surround the various settings to 
form a tableau of living statues. 





in “Troppo Sole,” Guzzanti plays 13 roles: "Working in film is more continuous than doing political satire on television/ 


The ductile story line follows a scatter- 
brained but determined television journal- 
ist named “Latla" as she tries to shoot a 
documentary of the popular singer-song- 
writer “Ma tilde." The film’s satire is so- 
cial. not political, and Guzzanti 's multiple 
characters range from “Mara." Maulde's 
heroin-addict sister, to “Am bra." a psy- 
chologist who practices psycho-shampoo- 
therapy and is Mathilde's childhood 
friend, to Malilde's rival “Stella dt Papa." 
a cyberspace-age. packaged rock star who 
purchases hundreds of thousands of her 
own records in order to insure her popu- 
larity. 

“It's s«art of a parallel universe populat- 
ed by idiots.” said Guzzanti. laughing, as 
she described her first film." The overall 
view is ironic and melodramatic. “Troppo 
Sole'* is a film of delirium, a sort of obtuse 
imaginary fable populated by both good 
and bad. 

.Although inventive and imaginative. 
“Troppo Sole" is rather fleeting as a film, 
hovering inconclusively between surrealis- 
tic theatrical experiment and weightless 
visual improvisation. It is. however, a 


powerful and convincing vehicle for Guz- 
zanti. who exploits her solitude to demon- 
strate a c astonishing capacity" for charac- 
ter immersion, and an equally impressive 
dramatic range. Each of her 13 characters 
is distinct and complete. Incredibly, they 
all are memorable. 

“I had worked with Sabina in theater.” 
said “Troppo Sole” director Giuseppe 
Bertolucci, the brother of Bernardo. “And 
1 had also seen her on television. Sabina 
has the kind of presence that generates 
ideas in a director. And she bas an amaz- 
ing ability to identify herself m different 
characters." 

“Sabina has the same djaatnic presence 
on film as she bas in the theater.” said 
David Riondino, who assisted Bertolucci 
and Guaanti with the “Troppo Sole” 
screenplay and has collaborated with both 
in theater. “Hers is a son of bypenrealism. 
She shows whai these characters might 
have become if pushed to their absolute 
extremes.” 

With only one actress, one whose vari- 
ous roles forced her to spend hours in the 
makeup room before each day’s shooting. 


the atmosphere on the set of “Troppo 
Sole” often resembled that of an operating 
room. “It was a sort of scientific experi- 
ment," said Riondino. “For Sabina, and 
for all of us. Sabina is very rigorous and 
demanding, with herself and with others. 
In theater, she is always the first to learn 
her lines, and to get her blocking and 
gestures down. She has an unusual talent 
for physical transformation, for creating a 
new personality that the audience accepts 
immediately." 

Guzzanti. who along with her brother, 
Corrado. wrote the songs for “Troppo 
Sole,” hopes to continue working in cine- 
ma, although she has no current fihn pro- 
ject. “Working in film is more continuous 
than doing political satire on television,” 
she said, looking most unremarkable in 
her neck-length blond hair, beige turtle- 
neck and blue jeans. “It is like the differ- 
ence, I imagine, between writing a daily 
column in a newspaper and working on a 
novel.” 


Ken Shulman 
based in Itabt. 


is an American writer 


useless excuses.” 1 reached M^. C ^ cSW xJ. D atured 
aides. e«* of whom was suipnsed 

ASHINGTON — A hard-edged question was .nature of my.follaw-up beard the 


By William Safire 


, , pwu to Hillary Rodham Clinton at her Mrs. Clinton passes u* w 

Whitewater news conference: what about “the sugges- expression often in Arkansas, ana miw ^ or 

non in the R.T.C. memorandum ... you and your mean: “People can .tell you that you . . pjj 
husband knew or should have known that Whitewater «xrid have,of-xrouldhaye. but .the quesu 

was not cash-flcwing and that notes ot debts should yonw.didn’tyour - . , .. 

have been paid”? _ in this way .all wStid call 

“Shoulda. coulda, woulda,” the Fust lady replied- arc overridden mwhat the Houywooo nrtt 

“We didn’t” 


no Patriots football team: “The «nv brother 

and woulda been ahead of the b^wth 

Cowboys by at least 1W u-hdftinie . . . tw-three -Whe^he^ manv that 

field goals were blown.” '■ -say.lltttisJfce ubap* grijM* ■«>» ***? 

man if be proposed. : 

The shoulda, coulda, woulda phrase (accep ting 
Chhion's order as standard) has a wistfuhy res* P* 


Eleven yean later, in a United Tress International 
account of another footbaS game, the phrase again led 
with coulda, as a shamefaced kicker was quoted: “1 ' 
should have kicked the extra, point, but coulda, 
shoulda, woulda doesn't do it.” 

By the ’90s, football players were fumbling the 
order. Said a Notre Dame tackle, Aaron Taylor, off- 
side on his subject-verb agreement: “There’s no ex- 
cuses. Woulda, shoulda. coulda is not going to cut it” 
We have hoe an elision field. Ehde, rooted in the 
Latin for “to strike oat,” means “to omit”; in speech, 
an elision is the omission of letters and sounds to 


connotation that was evoked in 1854 by the poet h 
Greenleaf Whittier io “Maod Muller 0 : - 
For of ad sad words of tmgue or i 
The saddest are these: a It might < 


When NATO planes dropped six bombs (two of 
them duds)!on Serb forces anackmg'the Muslim town 
Gorazde, the meager nature of the allied response was 
■' ■■■.-«- -L „„ ku 7Vlio- 


-tmmediatdy characterized as pinprick boobing by Zbig' 
njew ftzezwski oa “Qneon. One” (John"McLanghlin s 
teteviaon interview program). Dozens of other cotn- 
tneniatras promptiyincxcd up tire phrase. . 

, . Pinpoint is praiseworthy bomboig. evoking adxnira- 
tionirir a surgical. strike;, it now bas an antonym. 
pinprick bombing the haflmark of contempt for fedt- 
.less re^xjnsc fronitheair. 

-fiew York Tima Ssrricc 


IIYIT5 RJVATIOIVAJL 

v classified 

Appears on J\tge3.- ’> • •' 


* 4 .* 


tea. arcovemaaen tnvraai uk thniidt not 

• “catting U) the chase.” A' 

Some journalists narrowed their eyes at this airy iffr-ques- 

dianissal of financial responsiEEty in land, specula- ddle^rfte J; ae the «i^uoctive 

tifitL My own investigative-lust was instantly replaosd, turn. Hypoth^dl^queaMis, a ^ oUlica l 

however, by linguistic conoaty: Whence the rednpb- iT, ■ ;• would the 

cation shofabuida, woulda? • .figure .mlo deepwater;^ ” 

The order of words in this delicious morsd of pohtiaan WUh FDRs ke< j if 

dialect varies with the user. On the sports pagesof The ^Jncariy on 

Washington Post of Dec. 7, 1978, Cferakl Strine wrote te woWvxept a- vice 


about the New England Patriots football team: “The 
Pais coulda. 




We have a oew type of bombing. BombardieR of 
yore sprtre c $ saturation bombing, which was foUoweu 

produce compressions like don't and couldn’t, or as the 

would-betaxer played by Marloa Brando in “On the SvLhSoS 

Waterfront” saioL *T coulda bon a contender.” ' •; . dciOStf 

In this rhyming compound, a triple disiCHi does the • iunitea wm - . . • , , 

hat trick: although cadi elision expresses something • W l5,^ ^ P recisiarr . 
differcnL wh^lScn together, thclrio conveys auni- ^ ^ ^ 

fied meaning. ShouldtTtoxtlor should hare, (and not _ ff* bombmg, taken from a previous generaucm 
should of. which feriescaB & variant (niti call a mistake), I napomtaccara^,.. . 

carries a sense of correctness ra ob&gation coulda -‘lii 1989. a Reuters dispatdi from Istanbul coined 
implies a possMity, and woulda denotes ^.conc&tional' new- tern: ^^SpatK of lotist ‘pmpnek' bombings *p' 
certamty , an oxymoron: tire stated intent to have taken punctuated Turkish political Bfe.”- A pinprick is a 
an action if only something had not intervened. - • . minor irritation, hardly noticeablt. 

These meanings were explored separately in a 1977 
g by the country singer. Jammy Wynette, whose 
fier song “Stand By Your Man” was uninianSanaDy 
derogated by Mrs. CUntoo during the 1992 campaign. 

In “That’s the Way It Could Have Been.” Wynette’s; 
chorus goes: . \ 

That’s the way it could hate been [possibility). 

Oh, that’s the way it should have been [correctness]. 

If l had met you way back then, ./> . 

That’s the way it would have been [conditional 
certainty}.” -V- - 

Lexicographers have been tracking the individual! 
elisions fra- decades. First came woulda, translated into 
Standard English in Dialect Notes in 1913: " Would a 
went, would have gone.” Theodore Dreiser introduced 
coulda and the solid wndda in his 1925 novel. “An 
American Tragedy”: “I coulda chucked my job, and 1 
woulda.” A 1933 book on crime used the third elision: 

“You shouldda seen him. ” - - 

Taken together, the term means “Spare me the 







- r -«:AP 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



High 

Low 

W 

HW, 

L jam 

W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

CJF- 


Algor, c 

le^T 

11/52 

c 

16«4 

11/52 

1 

An-rJ-ttiun 

17«3 

13/55 

*h 

IB/64 

11-52 


Ankara 

2*'7i 

3 '48 

B 

27/*1 

13.-S5 


Atfwna 

J9f84 

17/62 

5 

29/84 

21/70 



82”l 


ih 

25/71 

13« 


9"fcprn(fe 

Bmtn 

M.1M 

1«».1 

n 

-M-WJ 

18-64 


run 


Vi 

24/75 

12/53 


&UWB 

19/W 

1355 

Ml 

31/70 

5-48 


eodoj»*i 

nm 

14.~.7 

S 

37.W 

10/61 


C-T»r*a5-n 

17 *2 

10/50 


20/88 

9.48 


«.iWW 

I9«6 

1457 

c 

21.70 

I35£. 1 

C-uPfc, 

14157 

8.4« 


1457 

4/39 


EJrtwgh 

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7/44 


12/5.1 

6/43 pc 

fbHCT 

27<m 

15.-59 

1 

26.-79 

13-55 

sf. 

PnmWwi 

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13/55 

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12/53 

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<>n>*»a 

27/71 

14-57 

1 

2271 

9-40 

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KcU«kJ 

li>52 

3-37 


1 1/52 

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7*/7) 

16*1 

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27.-80 

17/62 

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Lukawm 

22/71 

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11/52 

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20/68 

6/43 

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LUn. 

25.79 

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26/77 

13.-56 

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l‘w» 

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13.-55 


21,-70 

12 53 

a 


27.71 

1355 


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1 

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22*71 

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Wii 

14.57 

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c 

1559 

6/43 

pc 

Pofcra 

7170 

17*82 

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21*70 

14.57 

1 


VtfiX, 

I4/T7 

»h 

21. TO 

9-48 

c 


22/71 

12-53 


23.73 

12 53 1 


10/50 

3' 37 

s 

8« 

3/37 PC 


27, HO 

14<57 

5 

28/79 

14«T 

1 

5< PwBeurg 14/57 

3/3/ 

3h 

13/56 

3/37 

c 


11/52 

J.-35 


13-53 

5'41 

* 

Strastojrg 

.-3/73 

I4.-S7 

1 

34/75 

9 /» 

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*1-52 

3/3/ 

PC 

1152 

4/39 

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25/7? 

1762 

1 

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Vienna 

2577 

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5 

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14/57 

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2475 

13/55 


33T3 

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AucMond 

17-S? 

9/48 

Pr 

17/&2 

11.52 

pc 

5y*»» 


12-53 

1 

30/W 

11/52 

PC 


Forecast (or Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



North America 

Cool lor Ihe season Tuesday 
tfrough Thursday Irnm New 
York City to Washington. 
D.C.. to Atlanta. Showers 
and thunderstorms In Miami 
and perhaps Orlando A cou- 
ple of showers Tuesday and 
Wednesday m San Francis- 
co and perhaps Los Amje- 
les. a ranty m mid-Msy. 


Europe 

A lew sh.jwers and perhaps 
a thunderstorm in Rome 
Tuesday and Wednesday A 
b« o* ram and dnnie « Lon- 
don Tuesday: partly sunny 
Wednesday ana Thursday. 
Somewhat unsealed m Pans 
Tuesday and perhaps 
Wednesday, then mostly 
sunny Thursdev 


Asia 

Tranquil in Tok>o Tuesday 
and Thursday; chance for a 
shower Werfriesday Turning 
ra^er warm In Beijing and 
Seoul, though 1 could ffiun- 
dersrom Thursday. TypcaRy 
warm and muggy tgr the 
season Tuesday through 
7hursdav in Hong Kong and 
Hanoi Sizzling Sunshine m 
New Delhi 


Middle East 


Latin America 


B-w* 

Cam 

Ownsscus 

JonrtrOom 

UitV 

Pvadh 


Today 

High Low W High Low W 

ctr of cir or 

xrn 17 vs » rnw ta « b 
k<m ie-vi i xim 17.^3 b 

37 WJ 9 ‘*a s MhE lJ-TiS 1 

Ii .75 u . -56 B reTS IS-» 1 

J3.-I02 I7!M S 4I-U»ia%4 s 

J)MQ2.-S,77 tx JlHM.’l'TS s 


Today 

t«eh Low tt HVjh Low W 
CF CF CtF OF 

BnewKims 27.00 1J.» s 9 43 pc 

Caracas 3:B8 19« 9 TOW a 

Lna Jl'h) , =7~i 17»7 pc 

UcnaCcr M-79 tJ.?7 ! t 

RoMkwi IF -00 IMP pc S»!SI oe 

Sjnwao rir 7 *4 % :asj *-19 sc 


Legand: S-Suntr/. pe-wnty Ooudy. C-CMUOy, sh-showers. t-thunpKrsiC'ms. r-ra^i st-jnow 'lumes. 
sn-snow. i-ce. W-Woidwr AO maps, forecast* and <Ma proclded by Aocu-Weadtcr. Vx. ' IS3« 


Asia 


Todw 


Tomorrow 


ttgh 

Low 

W 

High 

Low w 


OF 

OF 


OF 

or 


344« 

23/73 

1 

33/91 

24/75 t 


22/71 

B-4tf 

B 

23/73 

13*55 pc 


31-88 

38/79 


31/00 

26/79 pc 

14on4a 

33.91 

24/75 


34*93 

24.75 pc 

Now MX 


a 

42*107 24/75 , 

Srol 

27-71 

B/48 

5 

21*70 

8-48 ps 


28^3 

I0«4 


10/81 pc 


33-SI 

24/75 c 

33.9 1 

24/75 pc 


32/09 

19/88 

■ 

30/B6 

22/71 pe 

Tokyo 

23/73 

12*53 

s 

22/71 

11/52 pe 

Africa 

*i?m 

24.75 

10/81 

0 

23/73 

15*59 J 

CapoTo»»i 

19-66 

1355 

pe 

22/71 

B*4« pc 

Cao«6l«nco 

10/54 

12.53 


19*68 

12/53 pc 


21/70 

11/52 

pc 34 75 

11/52 pc 

Logoi 

30.86 

2579 

*h 31/88 28/79 pc 

Ncw«*» 

21/70 

1152 

DC 

22/71 

13/55 kh 

Tund 

32/89 

17/82 » 

29/64 

17*3 ■ 

North America 


14*57 

5*41 


15/59 

7/*4 pc 

A**r»a 

28.82 

1559 


27*0 

14/57 ■ 

aorJcn 

20/88 

9(48 

ih 

17*62 

0 .-40 Ml 


13-64 

0/43 

• 

20*88 

g,40 g 

Dunvy. 

31. 8B 

1253 pe 

24/75 

0/40 pc 


19/86 

5*1 

PC 

16«1 

6*43 pc 

HonoMi: 

27-80 

21*70 

c 

29*04 

22/71 pc 

TteuSon 

31*00 

1956 

1 

31. 80 

1 8.-04 pc 

Loo <o/y*n 

21 /TO 

1457 


21.70 

14/87 pc 

1 Sar. 

31-88 

23/73 

pc 

32*89 

22/71 (*1 


21/70 

1133 


33/73 

9 48 pc 

Urrord 

15/53 

7 *44 

HI 

14/57 

6/43 9h 


29/84 

23*73 pc 

30/08 

23/73 DC 

IrfW- 1C* 

2*75 

1253 

C 

le-eo 

12*53 * 

Phorrw 

37/98 

2 1*70 

9 

32*89 

18*4 • 

SarCror 

16.51 

11.-52 

PC 

18*64 

9/40 oh 


|A^7 

0/40 

oh 

15.59 

7/44 »h 

Tcxyri 

13/55 

4/39 

DC 

14^7 

6*41 «h 

.’/aslwigon 

25.77 

11/52 

pc 31.70 

12/53 Ml 


ACROSS 

1* Without e 

Cause' 

• Musical scale 
letters 
ii Joker 
14 Smell 

is Of great scope 
is Electric 

it Proverb 
ia Old-fashioned 
picture taker 
20 Elevator name 

22 Victory symbol 

23 Morse Zeus 


24 Candidate 
Land on 
2 e Was sore 
2> Having 
divergent lines 
21 Backside 

31 DNA shapes 

32 Letter getter 

33 Seize 

*e That lady 
3* Make into a 
spiral 

40 Book after 
Deuteronomy 
42 Opposite SSW 


Solution lo Puzzle of May 13 


□0C0I3I3EIQE10B 
QiidQBQEaEjacHina 
BBDHanigsnaaaBHni 
□□ranBQQ Sanaa 
□□□□am □□□ □□□□ 
naan ncaanasaa 
□□□□□□aaa 
oaaaQaaaaanaa 
asaanaaaa 
QBaaDuaQ □□□□ 
□aaa ssa sasaina 
asana □□□□saa 
□oaaQQQaaaaaaau 
aQauauaasuaas 
□saaaaauaaa 


I 


43 Mahal 

4512, at dice 
45 Leisurely study 
45 Eric of ‘Monty 
Python* 

«l October gems 

52 Rouge 

540Sve 

55 Sushi go-*vftfi 
85 National 
anthem 
contraction 
5T Author Irwin 
55 Intercom 
52 Smoldering 
mark 

55 Unfashionable 

«5‘ a Rainy 

Mg W (1981 Wt) 
st On top of 
55 Formerly named 
55 One of life’s 
certainties. Ine 
saying 
78 Deep- 
(discarded) 

DOWN 

tTypeof 

computerchfp 

2 Historical time 

3 Ticket booth 

4 Discharge 

5 Keats poem 


s Recede'.. 

7 Beg - 
- shamelessly 
■ Trapped 
• European 
freshwater fish 

10 Medicine 
watchdog: 
Abbr. 

11 Uncarad-fbf, as 
a.laiwn 

12 Eagle's nest ' 
12 Liver, or thyroid 
18 Extinct birds 
*1 Rhodes- — 

24 Jingle writers 

25 Greg Evans 
cartoon 

27 Uae voodoo on 
is Crate up again 

so Jo. of the 

*88 Olympics 
32 Coaxes 

34 Mosquito marks 
25 Train for tha 

ring • 

57 -burly 

35 Artist’s prop 

41 fl . * 

44 Diner music 
maker 

45-Kapowf 

45 Entreaty 

47 Tuesday 


48 Director Wakes, 
■o Irritate- . 
si Hot obtuse 
u Three-toed 
: birds 


M Neighbor of 
' Aik. - 

SO Both: Prefix 

50 Acumen 


« bUtarates' 

' signatures 

83 The day before 

••Ruby 


.O New York Times Edited by WUl Shorn. 


w 

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Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

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ABT Access Numbers . 

How to call around the world 

1 . L'sins thd dun bdow. find ihe counny you are calling tiom. 

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1-800-881-011 Uccfarcnstrin- 


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nrm mam ixw bu»U 








8*100-11 


800001 


080-90010 


177-100-2727 


0600 - 01 1-77 


1-800-10 


00*800-12277 


-0^0^1112 


♦Ite Mitt kran‘ 

***NatwiaR 
***a» mam . _ . _ 
**fnm»pda6Epkoi» 

*AAWlwt3«™' 

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jo tab* teipcan Awntim