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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Monday, May 23, 1994 


No. 34,595 



OECD Op ens Door 

A Crack for Russia 


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But Moscow Faces Opposition on Bid 
To Enter Inner Sanctum’ of the G-7 


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HAl { I UAi> LINEUP — Black-market peddlers at a closed gasoline station in Port-au-Prince after the embargo that took effect Sunday shut filling stations. Page 7. 


Should U.S. Firm Finish Ex-Soviet Reactors? 


By Douglas Frantz 

New York Tima Sernce 

NEW YORK — In a plan chat is drawing 
diplomatic protests from abroad and political 
objections in the United States, Westinghonse 
Eke die Corp., with the backing of the nimon 
administration, intends to use its own tecfanol- 


tinghouse technology would increase safety at 
t Czech town of Teraelin. "and 


ogy to complete two Soviet-designed nuclear 
reactors in the ~ “ 


. — 1 Czech Republic 

In support of the firat attempt to graft Amer- 


ican technology onto a Soviet reactor, the ad- 
ministration rebuffed 


congressional and envi- 
ronmental opponents to approve S3 17 million 
in loan guarantees to finance the work. 
Administration officials said that the Wes- 


the plant, near the i 
was a step toward the broader goal of improv- 
ing safety at other Soviet-designed reactors. 
There are 16 uncompleted reactors in Eastern 
Europe, as well as more than 50 operating or 
under construction in Russia, Ukraine and Bul- 
garia. 

“Nobody is saying we love the project.” said 
Kathleen McGinty, director of environmental 
policy at the White House. “We tike a project 
that has a chance of being safe rather than a 
ticking time bomb. We are not going to be a 
to looking the other way while another 
abyl occurs.” 


The Temdin reactors, called the WER- 
1000, are the most advanced Soviet design. 
They are not the type that exploded at the 
Chernobyl plant near Kiev in 1986. causing 
billions of dollars in damage in the worst acci- 
dent in the history of nuclear power. 

“These are excellent machines and, with the 
investments, they should have a very long and 
productive life," said Nathaniel D. Woodson, 
president of the Westinghouse energy svstems 
business unit in Pittsburgh. 

Some critics say that the U.S. government 
could end up paying for an accident at the 
Czech plant. And environmentalists and the 
Austrian government warn that the Russian 


design may not be safe, even with Western 
technology. 

.An estimated 10 million people live within a 
100-mile ( lw> kilometer) radius of the Tcmelin 
site, and Prague is 60 miles away. Vienna is 120 
miles southeast — and downwind — - of Teme- 
lin. 

“An accident at Temeitn could result in dev- 
astating health, environmental, economic and 
social consequences for all of Austria’s 8 mil- 
lion citizens.*'' a panel of Austrian scientists 
warned earlier this year. 

For Westinghouse. which faces a moribund 


See REACTORS, Page 6 


By Alan Friedman 
and Lawrence Malkin 

Jmemaiiemal HeraU Tribune 

Die world's leading industrial democracies 
will take a step neat month toward meeting 
President Boris N. Yeltsin's demands for closer 
economic ties when Russia and the OECD sign 
a cooperation agreement in Paris. 

Western diplomats said the accord, likely to 
be signed on June 8 by Andrei V. Kozyrev," the 
Russian foreign minister, during die annual 
ministerial meeting of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development, is a 
low-cost way of helping to integrate Moscow 
into Western institutions. 

The OECD agreement, which calls for the 
Paris-based organization to assist Russia in the 
development of its economic institutions and 
reform programs, will be formalized one month 
before Mr. Yeltsin goes to Naples to participate 
in the Croup of Seven annual economic summit 
conference. 

Top officials from Group of Seven countries 
said it would be premature to agree to Mr. 
Yeltsin's request for full membership in the G- 
7. and described the OECD deal as an interim 
step. “The idea," said one British official, “is to 
encourage Russia to cooperate with Western 
institutions without having to bring them into 
formal relationships that might be too sensi- 
tive.” 

A senior U.S. official explained that while 
there is a desire to further engage Russia in the 
economic sphere, “they are not prepared insti- 
tutionally” for membership in the G-7. But G-7 
planners are grappling for a way to satisfy Mr. 
Yeltsin, especially now that Germany has en- 
dorsed the Russian president's application for 
full membership. 

One European finance minister suggested it 
might be pobible to reach a limited accord at 
Naples that “brings Russia closer without 
transforming the summit into the Group of 
Eight.” 

Under the present formula, the Russians 


meet witiuhe G-7 as invited guests, or the “G-7 
plus one." as it is described in diplomatic jar- 
gon. Last month Secretary of Slate Warren M. 
Christopher said Russia could work formally 
with G-7 leaders as they developed positions on 
political issues. But Mr. Christopher said Rus- 
sia could not take pan in meetings concerned 
with economic matters. 

Mr. Yeltsin, however, will be free io raise 
economic issues at Naples, and he is expected 
to discuss Russian demands for improved ac- 
cess to Western markets. He will not participate 
in G-7 discussions of traditional macroeconom- 
ic questions such as growth, inflation, interest 
and exchange rates. 

Another Washington-based official observed 
ihat "the Russians are beating very' hard on the 
door, and we want them to fed included, but we 
don't want to allow them all the way into the 
inner sanctum.” 


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Last week in Brussels, ambassadors of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization discussed 
ways to meet Russia's request for special ireat- 
lershii 


tnent within the Partnership for Peace. 
President Bill Clinton's initial policy of pub- 


licly embracing Mr. Yeltsin failed miserably 
last year to move Russia swiftly toward capital- 
ist democracy. U.S. officials are now under- 
standably hesitant about another bear hug, es- 
pecially 'in the full glare of publicity at the 
Naples summit talks. 

Yet, that appears to be what Mr. Ydisin 
wants to hdp demonstrate to his political foes 
at home that he is a person to be reckoned with 
on the world stage and thus help consolidate his 
position against nationalists on the right and 
old-line Communist industrial managers who 
seem to be gaining control under Prime Minis- 
ter Viktor S. Chernomyrdin. 

Senior U.S. diplomats and financial officials 
said over the weekend that their tactics for the 
summit talks still needed to be worked out, 
although the long-term strategy of rewarding 


See RUSSIA, Page 6 


100 Days Into the Sarajevo Peace , War Declines to Go Away 


V. A : By John Pomftet 

*. y ■ yWeahington-Prat Seritee- r y... 

SARAJEVO^ Bosma^eiiegoyma — ■ Up on the edge of 
MusKm-hdd territory jd ihd Jewish Cemetery, a 24-year-old 
platoon commander wondered if his photo was destined for 
the walls of the history room at theheadquanos of Saraje- 
vo's 1 15th Motorized Brigade, lined with the pictures of 318 
men and women killed in Bosnia’s 25-month war. Sixty more 
names and a few dog-eared photos sit in a cardboard box on 
the floor, awaiting a free patch of wafl. 

“When will this thing end?" Emir Hadzihalflovic said to 
htiwaJf as be peeked through two 19th-century tombstones 
at Serbian positions across an incongruous landscape of 
roofless homes, upside-down automobiles and cherry trees 
in full bloom. “Sometimes I think it will go on forever." 


One hundred days after the imposition of a cease-fire 
around Sarajevo; amid predictions of an impending peace 
deal, Europe's worst conflict since World War II heads 
toward another summer of death in the dust of Bosnia's 
meuatains. 

Despite new claims of unity among the United States. 
Russia and major West European powers over Bosnia’s 
future, and despite threats from Britain and France to pull 
out their United Nations troops, battles persist in several 
parts of Bosnia, with little chance of abating. 

And although U.&, Russian and West European officials 
have called for a four-month cease-fire to work out a peace 
agreement that would gjve Bosnia's Muslims and Croats SI 
it of the country, so far no official of the Muslim-led 
i government has backed it. 


“Opr army wants to fight" a high-ranking Muslim officer 
said. “And we have more weapons to do it' 

In recent weeks, the mostly Muslim army has registered 
some of its most significant gains in months. That is testimo- 


ny to its improved training and belter weapons supplies, due 
in part to a Mi 


fuslim-Croatian peace deal that has opened the 
road to Croatia's Adriatic coast, where arms are easy to 
come by. 

Among the army's most recent conquests vs Vijenac 
Mountain, a strategic artillery position used to shell the 
Muslim city of Tuzia in northeastern Bosnia. Muslim media 
also claimed gains around Olovo and Rladanj. south of 
Tuzia. 

UN officials here sav they are waiting for the Serbian 
military response, which usually occur?, swiftly, kills scores 


of civilians and until now has left the Muslim forces routed. 

“Soon we will get to the day where peace will be defined 
here as the absence of full-scale war but not conflict,” a 
senior Western officer said. “It could roll on and on." 

In addition, ihe prospect of Western troops* leaving the 
UN force here, and being replaced by soldiers from Muslim 
and Orthodox Christian countries, could add fuel to the fire. 
Next month, 1.000 Turkish troops and almost 2,000 from 
Pakistan are scheduled to bolster the 15,000 troops in 
Bosnia. 

"I have real concerns that we'll see a complete loss of 
objectivity in the UN operation here, with potentially grave 
consequences,” the senior officer said. “Islamic nations will 
send troops to the Muslim side and Orthodox countries will 
put men on the Serb side. That's a recipe for real trouble.” 


Swiss Red Cross 
Failed to Block 
Suspect Blood 


By Marlise Simons 

New York Times Strike 

GENEVA — In April 1985, in the early days 
of screening blood supplies for the AIDS virus, 
the New Yotk Blood Center sent a telex m the 

Red Cross of Switzerland, advising it that a 
small part . of its shipment of Swiss blood ap- 
peared to have tested positive for HIV. 

The Swiss Red Cross now concedes that that 

telex was the first wanting tha r the virus that 
cause AIDS was present m Switzerland. 

Yet for 12 months after the warning, accord- 
ing to a Swiss government investigation, the 
Swiss Red Gross continued to use and .distrib- 
ute untested Wood and blood products m Swf 
zeriand. And after the government made AIDS 
cc Hwiitig mandato ry on May 1, 1986, investiga- 
STsaSd, the Red Cross still failed to recall 
possibly contaminated blood products from 
climes and hospitals. . _ 

Now the Swiss Red Cross ts havmg to answer 

for these decisions* This month the government 
charged Dr. Alfred Hassig, * beautdoaslmd 
fonnerdirector of the Red Cross cmtral labora- 
tory. with inflicting grievous bodily harm for 
allowing the use of pOMifr tnfaad IWood 

According to health officials, the tainted 
Wood products infected 68 hemophiliacs with 
theAIDSvmis in the niid-l9Kk.Twenty-foar 
of them have died Die officials said an estimat- 
ed 100 to 200 others were 
through hospital blood bansfiiaoos between 
1086. Thev said half ot these 


1983^and eariy 1986. They said 

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Kiosk 


Knicks Advance 
To Eastern Final 


NEW YORK — The New York Knicks 
eliminated the Chicago Bulls, 87-77, on Sun- 
day, to advance to the finals of the National 
Basketball Association's Eastern Confer- 
ence. The Bulls forced a final game in (he 
best-of-seven series by stopping the Knicks 
in Friday night's sixth game, 93-79. The 
Knicks had won three straight in New York 
going into Sunday’s game. 

Earlier article, Page 17 


Fifty Years After D-Day 







In the next installment of the Trib’s 
special series, two analysts examine the 
way societies handle ethnic issues. Ameri- 
cans are embracing a multicultural vision 
of their national identity, ha Europeans 
are only edging toward this approach. 
Richard Reeves ; the syndicated colum- 
nist. , lived in Europe before writing his 
most recent book, u President Kennedy — 
Profile of Power." Jonathan Eyal is 
director of studies at the Royal United 
Services Institute in London. In Tues- 
day’s Herald Tribune. 



Md LmjJno' Rcinrf* 

D-DAY REMEMBERED — An American couple walking past grate markers in the American cemetery at CoBeriDe-sur-Mer, 
near Omaha Beach. Preadent Bill Clinton is scheduled to participate in a US. military ceremony there on June 6 to commemorate 
file Affied landings in Normandy, one of several the president will be present at for die 50th anniversary of die invasion. Page 5. 


By Michael R* Gordon 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A special mission from 
tbe Internationa] Atomic Energy Agency left 
Vienna for North Korea on Sunday to discass 
the handling of fuel that the North Koreans are 
removing from a nuclear reactor, raising hopes 
for a diplomatic outcome to a tense situation. 

The North Koreans agreed to receive the UN 
envoys after a Clinton administration decision 
to resume high-level talks with North Korea. 

U.S. officials said they were satisfied that 
North Korea had not diverted any of the fuel 
removed recently from the reactor to nuclear 
arms production, a question that is at the heart 
of an abrasive problem involving North Korea 
and much of tbe international community. 

[Vice President A1 Gore said Sunday in 
Washington that there bad been some progress 
in the dialogue with North Korea and that it 
was worth pursuing, Agence France- Presse re- 
ported. “We have laid out certain conditions at 
each step of the dialogue that we're having with 
North Korea and at cash stage of this discus- 
sion there has been some advance in the dia- 
logue," be said. He acknowledged that the ef- 
fort was risky but said tbe risks would be 
greater if the dialogue were discontinued.] 

Inspectors from the International Atomic 
Energy Agency are still seeking to measure fuel 
rods to determine if any fuel was diverted 
several years ago. 

North Korea's decision to meet with the new 
UN delegation raised hopes that the standoff 
on nuclear monitoring could be resolved at the 
negotiation table, after months of warnings 
from Washington that it might seek economic 
sanctions and a series of military threats by the 
Neath Koreans. 

U.S. officials, however, cautioned that North 
Korea still might be determined to proceed 
with its nuclear weapons program and that 
negotiations could collapse. 

“It could be a positive sign." an administra- 
tion official said of North Korea's decision to 
meet with tbe inspectors. "But it is also likely 
that the Noth Koreans are going to engage in 
more brinkmanship." 

North Korea's recent announcement that it 
had begun to remove spent fuel rods from a 
nuclear reactor at Yongbyon set off alarms at 
the nuclear monitoring agency, which feared 
that North Korea might be destroying possible 


See KOREA, Page 6 


The government's 

America to Clinton: We Hate You! ( Go Ahead , Take It Personally) 

(Si iww 


were Almost 


totfcnrwsofth, 

they thought tbe prob- 

See BLOOD, Page 6 


'Newsstand Pric es 


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By Ann Devroy 

Waskm pat Pea Service 

WASHINGTON —The caller was so an- 
she could barely speak. President Bill 
_iton, she aid, is "not fit to bold office." 
“He's scum," she said. “He’s worse than 
scam, and you all are protecting him." 

' And that message, left oil a reporter’s an- 
swering machine, was one of the milder ones. 

Across the radio talk show airwaves, in 
mail and telephone calls to the news media, in 
letters to the While House and in dozens of 
other anecdotal ways, Mr. Clinton’s enemies 
art making their hatred dear, with a burning 
intensity and in some cases with an organized 


Mr. Clinton are not all that different from 
those for other recent presidents and tha t 
i cannot measure passion. But even 


the prestdou's advisers agree there is some- 
thing about Mr. Clinton that reaches into the 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


emotional gut of some Americans and pro- 
duces a visceral reaction. 

|There are some bard, hard, hard-core 
Clinton haters,” said one adviser, James Car- 
vflte- ‘This jguy gins up more feelings and 

anv 


Most 

meats 


a pollsters suggest that their measure- 
of strong approval and disapproval for 


ville. uii$ guy gins up more feelings 
pulls them from greater extremes than 
politician I know ” 

David Gergen, counselor to the president, 
agrees, saying ihe closest thing he has seen to 
it across the four presidencies in which he has 


served were the early months of Ronald Rea- 
gan's. when his ideological swerve to the right 
created a depth of opposition on the left. 

Dee Dec Myers. Mr. Clinton's press secre- 
tary, who traveled with him through the cam- 
paign and does now. said. “There are a lot of 
people in this country who either love him or 
hate him." 

But it is noi those •aIk 1 love him who have 
become k* cop.'.pi’.jou.- lately. 

Ala town meeting la.-t nn. nth in Charlotte. 
North Carolina, a ’Ai*inan r-»c to her feci 
without a sign of self-OMiscwusness to sharp- 
ly question Mr. Clinton’* character and ac- 
cuse him of being a hypocrite. At ji focus 
group last week conducted h> The Washing- 
ton Post, a group selected iw years ago for 
its antipathy toward Washington .showed 


signs of having turned that antipathy on Mr. 
Clinton; the men and women used phrases 
like “con man” and “big fake" and "hypo- 
crite” in discussing the president. 

A White House volunteer who handles 
mail speaks of “letters so angry they almost 
feel hoL” The White House says it does not 
categorize its mail by approval or disapprov- 
al Ail that it will say" of the numbers, official- 
ly. is that Mr. Clinton continues to draw a 
virtual avalanche of mail at least twice what 
George Bush did. For (he first four months of 
the year, there were 1 . 1 million pieces of mail. 


Mr. Clinton ranks as the most criticized 
personality cm talk radio shows since July 
1990. with Hillary Rodham Clinton in second 
place. They lead President Saddam Hussein 


of Iraq, former Vice Preadent Dan Quayle 
and Mr. Bush. 

Michael Harrison, editor of Talkers maga- 
zine, the trade magazine for the talk-show 
industry, said that based on daily monitoring 
of every talk station in the lop 15 markets and 
monthly assessments of 200 other stations. 
“There is no question Bill Clinton is the most 
criticized individual in the history of the 
medium." 

Ai least three conservative syndicated talk- 
show hosts — Rush Limbaugh. G. Gordon 
Liddy and Ron Reagan, the son of the former 
president — have made Clinton-bashing the 
basis of their shows, Mr. Harrison said, with 
no comparable liberal or moderate figure on 

See CLINTON, Page 6 


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Pane 2 


INTERN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MAY 23, 1994 


f Doctor 9 Puts Puma on Right Path 


By Brandon Mitchener 

Frumunann! Herald Tribune 
NUREMBERG — Like his fa- 
ther. mother, brother and uncle 
before him. Jochen Zeitz, the 

black sheep" of his family, was 
supposed to hast become a doc- 
tor. 

As a restless youth, he began 
medical school in Florence and 
was averaging an A-minus when 
Tate — in the form of a change in 
German transfer credit rules — 
foiled his plans to finish his stud- 
ies at home. 

In desperation. Mr. Zeitz went 
to business school. Today, as one 

of Europe's youngest top manag- 
ers, he has no regrets. “It started 
to be fun." he said. 

Instead of curing sick people. 
Mr. Zeitz is the therapist for a 
troubled company, the athletic 
wear specialist Puma AG, where 
his home-grown elixirs have 
worked like magic. 

After just 12 months as chair- 
man. Mr. Zeitz, 31. has trans- 
formed Puma from an ominously 
delicate wraith of a once-famous 
name into a spunky, trend-setting 
competitor for the" likes of Nike. 
Rcebok and the local rival, Adi- 
das. 

“The first few months have 
been very promising and I expect 
a profit for the full year." 12 
months ahead of schedule, he said 
in an interview. 

As recently as March, when the 
company's annual earnings report 
was presented. Mr. Zeitz had de- 
scribed 1994 as a period of con- 
solidation following a year of re- 
structuring and heavy losses. 

The early turnaround testifies 
both to the professional energy 
that the unlikely manager devoted 
to his task and personality traits 


that Mr. Zeiu has displayed in the 
past. 

“You should try playing sports 
with the guy." said Jerry Vilioria. 
a former colleague who described 
recent encounters with his friend 
on the tennis court and golf 
course. “He’s very competitive. 
It's partly innate ability, and part- 
ly his drive." 

Though he has tittle time for 
sports these days, the husky Ger- 
man once played light end for the 
Mannheimer Redskins, an Ameri- 

Up and 

ComingyV^’^— . -Ss* 

.•!« tndi-.ii mil wit's 
nhnui the Ir. hlrr^ .•/ /■•»ifirn>ir 

can-style root ball team in the 
town where he grew up. He still 
enjoys tennis and skiing, bunting 
and flying and working out with 
weights. 

Manfred Bruhn. who was his 
academic adviser for four years at 
the European Business Scbool 
near Wiesbaden, also remembers 
the young Zeitz as someone who 
“always did everything fast" and 
was graced with" "healthy ambi- 
tion" and an ouigoing personality. 

That his protege rose as fast as 
he did, however, also included 
“coincidence and a lot of good 
luck." he says. 

Mr. Zeitz. however, quoting a 
maxim, adds that luck is "when 
preparation meets opportunity." 

Just before his graduation in 
1987 in the top 5 percent of his 
class at the business school, where 
he majored in marketing and cor- 
porate finance, he caught the at- 
tention of Colgate-Palmolive tal- 
ent scouts on a recruiting 
expedition. 

“He wasn't your classical grad- 
uate." said Elk von Reisswitz. a 


former personnel officer at the 
U.S. multinational’s German of- 
fices. "Most are loo smooth, too 
perfect. He had a few rough edges, 
but a lot of potential ” 

Mr. Zeitz turned down Colgate- 
Palmolive’s first offer of a job in 
Hamburg but later accepted an 
offer to start his training in New 
York and then return to Ham- 
burg. 

In New York, while enjoying 
jazz and discos by night, be quiet- 
ly rose to be the right-hand man of 
a" senior vice president. He was so 
well liked in New York that the 
company's German office had 
trouble gelling him to Hamburg, 
according to Mr. Reisswitz. 

Although Mr.Zeitz “could have 
been head of Europe for Colgate 
within a few vears." asserted Mr. 
Vittorio, he stayed in Hamburg 
less than a year." 

Instead, he went to work at the 
troubled Puma company in 1990 

as a vice president for internation- 
al sales and marketing. He quickly 
helped bolster the company's im- 
age abroad. 

AB Aritmos, the Swedish com- 
pany that is Puma’s largest share- 
holder, made him chairman just 
three years later, when he was 30. 

in his first year at Puma. Mr. 
Zeitz closed the company's lost 
manufacturing plant in Germany, 
cut the group payroll and costs by 
a third and raised soles, especially 
in Asia and the Americas. 

His success at Puma has not 
come without a hefty personal 
cost. As part of the restructuring, 
he ordered hundreds of layoffs, a 
process that has aged him mental- 
ly, if not physically. 

“It’s unfortunate and sad. but 
had to be done to save the jobs 
that remained." said the pragmat- 
ic Mr. Zeitz. 


Friends say a strong point of his 
personality is his ability to com- 
bine discipline with a love of a 
good time. “The guy used to party 
hard." confided Mr. Viltoria, who 
shared an apartment with Mr, 
Zeitz on and off for two years in 
Manhattan. 

One of Mr. Zeitz's lasting pas- 
sions is traveL He celebrated his 
30th birthdav with his wife and 
Mr. Viuoria In Morocco. In addi- 
tion to studying in Florence, he 
has worked for a German bank ia 

Paris, for Mercedes-Benz in Hol- 
lywood and for a glass factory in 
Brazil He met his wife, a German, 
in New York. 

He speaks Italian, English and 
French fluently, can make himself 
understood in Spanish and Portu- 
guese. and revels in the diversity 
of New York and the “savoir vi- 
vrc" of Florence. 

"ft's a long way from New York 
to Nuremberg." he said. 

In business. Mr. Zeitz disdains 
prepared speeches. “I say you can 
only present something credibly if 
you show people how you feel" he 
said. Bui he chooses his words 
carefully when discussing the 
company’s performance and its 
expectations. 

At the company's last press 
conference on earnings, Mr. Zeitz 
displayed self-confidence and 
poise. While most German com- 
panies have summoned one or 
more consultants into their offices 
to point the way toward profits, 
Mr. Zeitz has charted Puma’s path 
“my way.” 

That includes both inevitable 
changes in manufacturing and 
distribution and marketing moves 
such as a timely acknowledgment 
or nostalgic trends in fashion and 
promotion of a street soccer 
championship. 




Jochen Zeitz, bokting bis top priority. 


Co-workers describe Mr. Zeitz 
as “uncomplicated," but he is no 
lightweight. He relaxes by reading 
essays by Kurt Tucholsky, a polit- 
ical satirist, and cited Alfred Herr- 
batisen, the visionary former 
chairman of Deutsche Bank AG, 
as one of the few German leaders 
he admired. 


Q & A: Trade, Human Rights and Future ILS.-China Ties 


The future of relations between 
China and the United Slates 
hinges on a decision President 
Bill Clinton must make by June 3 
on whether to renew China’s 
most -favored-nation trade bene- 
fits. In Beijing. Robert A. Kapp. 
president of the U.S.-China 
Business Council, which repre- 


sents 250 American companies 
that do business with China, dis- 
cussed the stakes with Michael 
Richardson of the International 
Herald Tribune. 

Q. Is this a tussle that is just 
about linking trade with human 
rights? 

A. The problem is that the two 


countries have a long tradition of 
moralizing at each other. Both lake, 
it as axiomatic that their national 
existence has a moral dimension. 

The U.S. perceives itself to have 
been founded on transcendent 
moral principles which distin- 
guished it from corrupt and deca- 
dent monarchies in Europe. The 
Chinese, since the second century 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 


US$10,000,000 



B.C., have wedded imperial tempo- 
ral power to imperial moral ortho- 
doxy. That tradition has continued 
into" the 20th century. 

Therefore when the two coun- 
tries get together, they Lend rather 
easily to fall into moralizing, more 
so than other nations. When the 
Americans and Chinese get celes- 
tial mth each other, it can be very, 
very deadening 

Q. What should Mr. Clinton do 
to break this cycle? 

A. Our council’s position is that 
the U.S. should renew normal trade 
treatment for China, the so-called 
MFN, without condition. 

The core of the problem is that 
America is publicly bolding China 
up to criticism and threat. If that 
could be removed, and each side 
responds to the other, we could 
achieve greater cordiality. 

• 

Q. If MFN is renewed uncondi- 
tionally, won't the U.S. lose its le- 
verage for improving human rights 
in China? 

A The US. has been asking it- 
self how it should press China eco- 
nomically to make the Chinese au- 
thorities act the way America 
wants them to act politically. It’s 
the wrong question. 

The right question is: Under 
what circumstances will China 
most likely evolve politically and 
socially, as well as economically, in 
directions most compatible with 
deeply held American values. 

The answer is for the U.S. to 
increase contacts with China at ev- 
ery level including trade, invest- 
ment. education, training and cul- 
tural exchange. Thai is why Mr. 
Clinton should take the lead and 
renew MFN without conditions. 

Q. Would Congress allow him to 
do tha:? 


A If the president really exer- 
cises his prerogatives as the framer 
of foreign policy, most members of 
Congress will be glad of bis leader- 
ship. In the last year, larger and 
larger numbers or members of 
Congress have come to understand 
the importance and potential scope 
of the relationship with China. 

If MFN were to be elhmnaied, 
we would see a rather rapid and 
wide-ranging degradation of the 
U.SL-Chma relationship, way be- 
yond trade and commerce. 


Q. What form would Chinese 
retaliation lake? 

A. American products moving 
into China would be an obvious 
target. The impact on exports and 
jobs would be felt in a matter of 
days or weeks. When orders , are 
canceled, jobs are lost- With UJS. 
exports to China worth about $9 
billion in 1993, there are about 
175,000 American jobs at stake. 

If America kills MFN, the rapid 
growth in its exports to China 
would be truncated and passed to 
competitors. 

Q. Would U.S. investment in 
China also suffer? 

A. According to official Chinese 
figures. U.S. companies have in- 
vested more than $9 billion in Chi- 
na and that has been growing fast, 
particularly since 1991. Large firms 
are committing to very long term 
and substantial project work in 
China. That would all be at some 
risk should our economic relation- 
ship be crippled. 

American investors producing 
goods in China rely to a substantial 
degree on the import of compo- 
nents and other inputs from the 
U.S. If the market is closed ro 
American imports, it would be 
hard to run those businesses. 


He shuns politics and said en- 
tering the political fray was one 
thing he was certain not to do 
when his job at Puma ended. For 
the time being, the company is ltis 
top priority. 

“ft this weren’t my top priority, 
something would not be right," he 
said. 


HotuGets 
Offer From 
Socialists 


W0IjdLt> BRIEFS , 

North Claims South Yemen Province 

SAN'A. Yeuuii (Combined. Dispatches) — *•“**“ ' V j3Sn« 
have adzed the province of Siahwah in southern Yemen, 

mriraiol mniHl A tan n nrilitHTV snokfiSQUin. S8W jUflUa}* 


regional capital, Ataq, a ndlitanr spokesman, saw sunaay. 
could not be independently coofinnaL . of 

“The nriKtaiySeib Ataq was captured and the “5.825^ the 
Shabwah is now in the hands of the tones of san’a 

-s- -s* 

hold of Aden, Yffling four, dvffians and wounding nine Moos . 
workers sakL But the "south vowed to rcpel thc thrust ^pp\ 

mdepe&dtaice itded^ .. . . (Reuters, ac 

Mahathir Softens Tone T<wardU.K* 

KUALA LUMPUR (AFP? — Prime Minister MahathirbinMohamad 
a ck n owledged Sunday that the tone of media' coverage of Malay 

three-month boyemtof British companies. : 

“We notice an innjtovementparaailariy after the pos^i 
such reports had been transferred," Mr. Mahaihir was quot eapy^ 
Bemama news agency as saying. Ht was referring to Andrew Neu. 
was editor of TteStmday Trines of London Ha Feb ^O whm The paper 
ran an artide alleging iim>n^ linfa between Mr. Mahathir’s adminis- 
tration and a Bntish construction company. Mr. Ned ts tetnporaxiiy 
working in New York forFox television, winch, like The Sunday Times, is 
' ownedby Rupert Murdoch. • 


UWU 6 U l/T 1UIWU tnuuwui. ...... , ^ . nmml 

Malaysia has barred British concerns' from bidding, for government 
contracts since Feb. 25. Speaking of Mr. Ned, Mr. Mahatiur said: . He 
was the cause. If we find that the British media reports the truth and no 
longer prints Kes, there is no reason why we cannot resume business win 
them.".'- 


BONN (Reuters) ~ A day-care center tor Torkish and German 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches . 

TOKYO — Socialist leaders 
have dangled a potential lifeline in 
front of Japan’s floundering minor- 
ity coalition, hinting that their par- 
ty could rejoin it on condition the 
present government resgned. 

Prime Minister Tsutonm Hata 
has indicated that be would consid- 
er the Idea. Acceptance would lift 
the threat of snap elections. 

Speaking during a visit to C hina, 
Secretary-General Watara Kubo of 
the Social Democratic Party said 
Mr. Ha (a, who heads the first Japa- 
nese minority cabinet in four de- 
cades, must resign as soon as the 
long-delayed budget is passed 

“If the Hata government does 
not resign en masse so that a stable 
government can be formed," Mr. 
Kubo told reporters in Dalian, the 
possibility of the Socialists backing 
a no-confidence motion and top- 
pling it is “very high." 

Dun on Sunday, the Socialist 
party chairman. Tomb chi Mur- 
ayama, said that “if we can have a 
change to discuss the framework of 
a new coalition after the Hata cabi- 
net resigns en bloc," that would be 
one way for him to return to power. 

The Socialists, who joined the 
disparate alliance that took power 
id August after 38 years of Liberal 
Democratic Party rule, have 
walked out of the coalition, depriv- 
ing Mr. Hata of his majority. 

The break came over a decision 
by the nonsocialist panics to form 
a unified bloc in Parliament, effec- 
tively freezing the Socialists out of 
policy-making. (Reuters, AFP) 


been the work of the far right- . . . * 

A police spokesman said no (Hie was.hurt in the fire m an industrial 
area m Siegburg, east of Bonn. Investigators .were trying to find out if the 
fire had been set by far-ikht extremhts-. - ... . 

“Because this was a Turkish building we cannot rule oat anti-foreigner 
hatred,” a police spokesman said. Part of the one-story building wap 
burned down in the fire, which was reported by neighbors at 4:40 AM- 
Sunday. Damage was estimated at 1 motion Deutsche m a rks ($600,000^. 

Gore Rejects Shuffle of Clinton Team; 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Vice President AI Gore on Sunday 
discounted, but did not flatly deny,; published rqaorte^^R-^^nt Bifl 

increasing fire for its handling of such hot spots as Haiti, Bosnia, Somalia 
and Nam Korea. 

■ “I don’t think there’s any basis for those reports, realty," Mr. Gore said 
on a CBS television program. *T drink itfs an tscdOe&t, foreign policy 
tmm I think that they’re doing an outstanding job. I think that the 
challenges that we inherited are extremely difficult- 1 Think we’ve been 
making progress with them." 

However, U.S. News and World Report, in its Monday issue, said 
Democratic insiders were talking about “what could be the biggest White 
House shake-up m memory.” It speculated -that "the' “most realistic 
scenario" involved naming other dreifoose speaker, Thomas S. Foley, a 
Washington Democrat, or Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott tp 
replace Warren M. Christopher as secretary of state. 

TRAVEL UPDATE^ • I"! 
A Ride in London? Europe’s Costliest 

LONDON (AFP) —Public transport in London is the most expensive 
among European capitals, accartiiqg to b report published Sunday by a 
consumer organization. ■■ r . • • . \ 

The report, published by GtpitalTratisport Campaign, provides a list 
comparing tbeprice of a 10-kflgnaeter (6-mDe) try for suburban residents 
in 10 European countries. London, topped the list, with the rideon public 
transport costing S23.S0. No. 2 was Brussels, at S19.4Q. followed by 
B erlin, Amsterdam,' Dublin, Paris, Copenhagen, Lisbon; Homeland 
Athens. - v- ' ' / 

Taiwan wB fift its bn on package tours to China. the Economic Daily 
News reported Sunday. The ban was imposed March 31 in retaliation for 
an alleged cover-up by China of the facts surrounding the death of 24 
Taiwan tourists whose boat caught .fire on a lake in Eastern China!. 
Taiwan tour operators say the ban has saddled them with big financial 
losses. A government official tdd the newspaper that package tours to 
certain areas in China would still not be permitted, however- . (AFP) 

This Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be dosed or services curtailed in 
the following countries and their dependencies this week because of 
national and religious holidays: . . 

MONDAY: Andorra, Austria, Baha m as, Barbados. Belgium. Benin. Burkina 
Faso. Canada, Central Africa, De nm ark. France, Gabon, Germany. Hungary, 
Iceland, Jamaica, Liechtenstein. Luxembourg, Madagascar. Monaco, Morocco. 
Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Rwanda, Senegal, Slovenia, Spam,-Swwkn, Switzer- 
land, Togo. - 

TUESDAY: Be&ze. Bermuda, Bulgaria. Banna, Ecuador, Sri Lanka. * 

WEDNESDAY: Argentina, Chad, Gninca. . Indonesia. Jordan. Madagascar, 
Malaysia. Mali, Mauritania, Namibia, Singapore, Sri Lanka. Zambia. Zimbabwe. ’ 

THURSDAY: Georgia. 

FRIDAY: Sri Lanka. 

SATURDAY: Armenia, Azabagan, Ethiopia. 

• Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


High Beijing Party Aide Warns of Social Unrest 


U3S1 38.000 paid out at eacn 
draw. USS 1C Million won so 
far. In ’he world-famous Aon 
Dhabi Duty Free rarfle. Each 
ticket priced at USS 1 38 . Just 
1 .200 I'Ckets entered c. each 
draw. Approximately 6 draws 
every monte. Available 
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Abu Dhabi Airport. Notification 
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mail. Money paid in cash, by 
banker's cheque or directly 
into the winners bank account. 
US$10,000,000 hard cash. 
The easy way. 

_ Abu Dhabi 
Airport Duty Free 



■ijnnf Fnince-Pmur 

BEIJING — Public order in Chi- 
na has gravely deteriorated this 
year, and urgent steps are required 
to prevent serious unrest, a senior 
Communist Party official was 
quoted as saying Sunday. 

In a markedly frank assessment 
of current trends threatening social 
stability, the director of the parly’s 


! UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

; SACfS.OR'S • HASTENS • DOCTORATE 
i FsrY/oeK Uo and Academic ErperlBncB 
! TtiraugriCcrwenfert Hems Sa*y 
{ C51® *71-0306 rat 23 

! Fac (310)471-6456 

1 G^SSSjE# r« or aend delated reawne ter 


Central Committee for Compre- 
hensive Management of Public Se- 
curity, Ren Jlanxin. said particular 
attention needed to be paid to signs 
of unrest in the countryside. 

“Since the beginning of the year, 
the public order situation through- 
out China has become extremely 
grim," Mr. Ren said in a speech 
carried on the front page of the 
official People’s Daily. 

He especially warned of mass 
discontent in many rural areas 
where incomes have faded to keep 


pace with inflation and where re- 
sentment is growing over regional 
disparities in living standards. 

“We must never underestimate 
the effect that problems of public 
disorder in the. countryside wifi 
have on the country as a whole,” he 
said, catling on governments and 
judicial departments at all levels to 
take immediate steps to ensure so- 
cial stability. 

“Common law criminals most be 
punished swiftly and more heavi- 
ly ” he said, wink education re- 


garding stale laws and regulations 
should be strengthated for mino r 
offenders. 

In a dear indication that the par- 
ty has effectivdy lost control of the 
situation in some rural areas, Mr. 
Ren said major efforts must be 
made to strengthen “paralyzed or 


zations 


zed local party organi- 
mral committees.” ■ 


The way the world’s going 



Piadfic^ Western University 

603 N. Setti!v«Ja Stvi. D«ji. 23 
Lrs A/iaetes. ca sax s 



Senior party leaden warned last 
week that corr upti on and apathy 
among officials were exacerbating 
the destabilizing effects of unem- 
ployment, poverty and inflation. 

President Jiang Z emin and 
Prime Minister Li Peng lave both 
made speeches stressing the impor- 
tance of ensuring social stability. 
The theme has been hammered 
home at every opportunity in ad- 
vance of the fifth anniversary on 
June 4 of the crushing of the 1989 
pro-democraigr movement 


NewMoIawi Chief 
Voids to Aid Poor : 

The Associated Press 

BLANTYRE, Malawi — Bakili 
Miduzi, sworn in as Malawi's first 
democratically elected president 
vowed to combat poverty. 

The new president decreed the 
cfosiire of three prisons notorious 
for torture under the rule of the 
former dictator, Hastings Kamuzu 
Banda. Mr. 'Miduzi also ordered 
the i m m ediate release of the few 
remaining political prisoners and 
commuted -the death sentences of 
at least 10 convicts. 

.. “This is tiie day to be cherished 
by everybody," the president told a 
crowd of 100,000 at the swearing-in 
ota mnegy toe Saturday. “Ours is a 
government committed to the alle- 
viation of poverty " Mr. Muluzi 
and. He added that the nation’s 
potential would be exploited “for 
all Malawians, and not only a few 
families." 




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theamericas/ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, MAY 23, 1991. 



OQ 


South Gets Ready to Rise to Republican Call 


By Richard L. Berke 
wuniJ - .- Vflt >or * nmeijimrr 

£7?' Florida - tta South « not about to 
pity. Be “ ,nS d<Sei “ d dOSCT '» dKmi "S 

-JSriSSr ^ vvbcn Dcmocrati are bracing for 
r fw^fE 1 fS^ U 2 nM ? e * nowfa ere are ihe>- more vduer. 

jflSKS?^ wherc R ' puhto " s >-» -*■ 

Wbiie Democratic governors and Senators in the region 
“ *“ Wds for re-^Ieciion. the S 

£S^fe,r I ^, 0 T a,S »? e < - Housc mcmbCTS - D«««k 

"Sjfw- ** “ a V/ 0r - ,he first Ume since Reconsi [ruction. 
Rqwbtoms could gam parity with Democrats in Southern 
congressional scats. 

aiJS+i" ,* n !Um ’ ( SV. 1 ^ rause Democrats to lose their 
•already tenuous ability to win dose vows in Congress on 
many (faviavc issues, and make it hard to pass majoflcg^U- 

Aa [infusion of Southern Republicans could alsoacceier- 

4 le *“ agpraayc. confrontational politics practiced by 
Reoresentativ? N»vt m nn ^k ~r u‘ - - . 3 


Representative Newt Gingrich of Georgia, who is poised io 
epubucan leader next year. 


• be £2? e ^ Hou5C Repul~w«4 1WJC , next year. 

“There is a real danger thai if we lose the South, then that's 
■CDCTigfa to swing the balance of power," said RcpresematKe 
J. Nathan Deal, Democrat of Georgia. ".And it would be very 


>ia. uofoikc ui pow'er, 

}■ Nathan Deal, Democrat or Georgia. 

■difficult for the party to ever reclaim it/ 

If such a realignment develops. Southern Republicans 
could emerge as a powerful base for opposition to the 
president. 


“If the Republicans pick up 10 Southern seals,” said 
Merle Black, a professor at Emory University and an author- 
ity on Southern politics, “it would not only put them in a 
position where they can better check the Oimon agenda in 
Congress, but ii would also help io reshape the national 
Republican Party in a Southern, very, very conservative 
direction." 

Paradoxically, such gains could end up hurting the Re- 
publican Party outside the South. Republicans elected to 
House scats tend to be the most conservative and dogmatic 
in their party’s political spectrum, contributing to an image 
of the party a $ too right-wing and inflexible, a perception 

that hampered the Republicans in 1992 and could make u 

more difficult to recapture the White House. 

There arc now 50 Democratic House members and 34 
Republicans from the eight Southeastern states. Fourteen of 
those Democratic seats are already widely viewed as toss- 
ups. and many more are at risk. The most vulnerable are 
seats being vacated by eight conservative- leaning white 
Southern Democrats who are retiring from districts that 
almost all favored President George Bush for re-election hv 
wide margins in 1991 

By contrast, most Republican incumbents in the South — 
a dozen of whom were elected two years ago — are consid- 
ered secure. In Florida alone, 9 of the 13 Republicans in the 
delegation have no Democratic opposition this year. 

President Bill Clinton and his two Democratic predeces- 
sors were Southerners. But after each of their elections. 
Republicans have surged back in the region. While Mr. 
Clinton campaigned as a moderate son of the South, he is 


viewed as a liability among voters who disapprove of bis 
positions on issues ranging from abortion to gun control to 
homosexuals in the military. 

A popular bumper sticko* here in the Florida Panhandle 
gleefully predicts [he president’s defeat in 1996, proclaiming, 
"h It 19% Yet?" 

An even more telling measure of Mr. Clinton’s low popu- 
larity, perhaps, is that some of his own party's House 
delegation from Georgia chose not to appear with him 
during his receat visit to ALlania. 

Mr. Deal is one conservative Democrat who is considered 
safe this year because he has taken on Mr. Clinton more 


ferociously than many Republicans. 
*1 don't think there will be 


very many Southern Demo- 
crats inviting the president to campaign for them." he said. 

The president is not the only reason for the Democrats' 
unease. The 1992 rcapportionmems of congressional dis- 
tricts concentrated black voters — the only reliable Demo- 
crats left in the region — into relatively few districts and 
diluted their strength in many oLhers. 

Another factor is that people increasingly are registering 
os Republicans in the South, in pan because the region is 
drawing retirees and other conservatives who have not voted 
for Democrats historically and whose ideologies arc funda- 
mentally Republican. 

There also is the ami -incumbency sentiment, which is 
always most damaging to ihc party that holds the most seats, 
and the traditional midterm rebound against whatever party 
won the White House in the last election. 


'Ar POLITICAL NOTES + 


CIA Official to Move to Pentagon Post 


WASHINGTON — The chairman of the National Intelligence 
Council, responsible for drafting reports that reflect the views of the 
entire US. intelligence community on key issues, is quilting after 14 
months to go to the Pentagon, according to congressional and 
administration sources. 

Joseph S. Nye, a former director of the Center for International 
Affairs at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, is scheduled 
to become assistant secretary of defense for regional security affairs, 
the sources said. 

Mr. Nye was the major outside hire of R. James Woolsey, the 
director of central intelligence. In November in a public address, Mr. 
Woolsey angled out Mr. Nyefc role as representing a new effort by 
the CIA to “reach out to scholars and researchers whose insights and 
analyses we need and welcome.” 

A senior QA official said Mr. Nye’s departure had nothing to do 
with the turmoil following the discovery that the CIA officer Aldrich 
H. Ames isdd secrets to Moscow for nine years. He said Mr. Nye had 
come with a "clear charter to sharpen relations” between the 
intelligence community and government policymakers and had 
achieved that objective. 

At the White House, me presidential aide said Mr. Nye's depar- 
ture could open the way for the CIA to take a new look at overall 
intelligence analysis, which he said had drawn criticism from Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton and his top advisers. "They frequently say they get 
more accurate and timely information from the media," a senior 
presidential aide said. [W?) 


Convicted Ex-Mayor of P.C. to Run Again 


WASHINGTON — Less than four years after a conviction for 
cocaine possession forced him out of City HaQ and into prison, 
Marion S. Bany Jr. is running lot mayor of Washington again. 

He finished a six-month sentence In April 1992, but immediately 
tried to regain the political stage, winning a two-year term on the 
district council as representative of the city's poorest ward. Now, be 

and urban flLht, Washington needs the Idnd^strong leadership 
thatieprovided during his three terms as mayOr from J 978 to 1990. 

By Mr Barry’s third tom, the city was suffering with a budget 
deficit approaching $3Q0jnflfion and city employment rolls bloated 
with people who had won jobs; through political patronage. Further, 
in the five years through 1991, the homicide rate increased in six of 
the city's seven police districts, and crimes against people rose by. 
nearly 47 peremt. (NYT) 


AntMmmlgraiit Prhre Qrow» In California 


LOS ANGELES — A ballot initiative that would deny public 
education and nonemogency medical care to undocumented immi- 
grants in California is the latest and one of the most drastic attempts 
to curb illegal immigration and its costs. 

' Supporters of the petition drive, "Save Our State," say they have 
gathered 600,000 signatures, with those of 384,974 registered voters 
required to place the proposal an the ballot. If the re quire ment is 
met, the referendum would be an the November ballot. Voter 


registrars have until Tuesday to voify signatures. 

In addition to cutting off social services, the proposal would 


require teachers, health care workers and the police to report the 
presence of any “apparent illegal immigrants” they c 


r deal with. flVT7) 


Quote /Unquote 


Evan Thomas, Newsweek’s Washington bureau chief, recalling bis 

...a . <1. » UlnpliMt At/m n afwil Bon)u PnrKfrt 


remarks on the panel show “Inside Washimpon” about Paula Corbin 
Jones, the woman who filed suit against Prase 


juua, ure icuuiui »uu u»» -o -~ ident Clinton alleging 

sexual harassment: “I said she was sleazy and had big hair and came 
from a trafler park. I got a tot of letters and comments that said I was 

serist and didst and a jerk, and I don’t know about the sexist, but it 
was didst and I was a jerk, so I apologize.” fW7V 


Away From Politics 


• A device that tracks flying Mfett and identifies their source has 
been developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It 
could evmwaBy protect soldiers and police from snipers, and also 
monitor high-come areas, according to the project leader. 

• The police saaried rush-how traffic for hours in Deeffidd, Illinois, 

near Chicago, when they surrotinded a bus with sharpshooio^ 
evacoatedmd frisked passengers and fired tear gas to ferret outa 
murder suspect- The su^t^however. was already miles away; he 
was later arrested in Milwaukee. .. .... 

• a hehed a dying AIDS patient kill himself with 

morohme, DnJohfi Coe, wffl 

doXwas ruled a homicide. In Raiding, Cahfcuma, District Attor- 
SjpSSBEay said Pr.Cbe had been ^ved ly comp^sion. 







Upcoming 

Classified Features 


• Leisure - 

Summer to Fmnce: June 3 


Aft emotional Business Education: May-24 


Real Estate . • ; - • 

to and Around Pans: May27 

French Country Properties: June 24 


• Arts & Antiques . . 

Auctions: May 28 

” '^further information, 

Fred Ronan or Brooke Plltey m Paris; . 

Teh (££££» SI®' F “= 

^ ^wrnearestlHToflieeorrepresentalive; ... 


Drunken Driving Is Drying Out 

Tough Laws and Ads Help Cut Number of Fatal Crashes 


By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. 

.Vfli 1 York Times Senve 

LOS ANGELES —Although al- 
cobol-relaied accidents continue to 
lake a terrible toll on America's 
highways, the nation is nevertheless 
making substantial progress in the 
fight against drunken driving. 

Over the last IS years, the inci- 
dence of driver intoxication in fatal 
crashes has been cut by almost one- 
third through tougher, innovative 
laws, widespread public service ad- 
vertisements that promote temper- 
ance and designated drivers, and 
the growth of such aggressive orga- 
nizations as Mothers Against 
Drunk Driving. 

Perhaps more important, be- 
cause of the heavy emphasis in re- 
cent years on the consequences or 
drinking and driving, drunken 
driving has increasingly come to be 
seen by Americans as unaccept- 
able. 

Surveys indicate that not only do 
fewer drivers drink these days but 
that those who do drink tend to 
drink less. A majority of people 
who drink socially now say they 
have at some point been a designat- 
ed driver or have been taken home 
from a party by a designated driver. 

Of course, there are still drinkers 
who have one too many, then order 
”one more for the road." 

'But more' and more of ‘their 


friends are urging them to forgo 
that final sip. More bartenders ore 
refusing to serve them. And more 
police officers are -waiting just 
down the road for them, armed 
with sophisticated breath analyzers 
and new laws that set lowo- bfood- 
alcohol levels and sharply raise the 
penalties for exceeding them. 

Lower speed limits and safely 
devices like airbags have saved 
lives; motor vehicle deaths in 
America have declined to about 
40,000 a year since peakine at 
56,300 in 1972. 

But statistics compiled by the 
National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration show that, apart 
from other factors, alcohol is in- 
volved less often. 


Journalist Loses 
His Column After 


: Attacking Nixon 


HtoMngion Pwi Service 

Matt Coker, a columnist for the 
Daily Pilot in Orange County, Cali- 
fornia, minced no words after 
Richard Nixon died. “A paranoid 
liar who did irreparable harm to 
these United States of America . 
the same media that helped facili- 
tate his downfall are now giving 
teary-eyed eulogies to this wretch- 
ed, wretched man. ... Goodbye 
and good riddance,” be wrote the 
day before Mr. Nixon's funeral 

Hundreds of readers complained 
and some canceled subscriptions. 
Hie Tunes Mirror paper apolo- 
gized and ran a front-page column 
criticizing Mr. Coker's view. Then 
the editors ended his duties as a 
columnist but lei him remain as 
arts editor. 

‘‘While I can understand they 
had to make some kind of gesture 
to cod things down, I personally 
believe in the long run it’s more 
damaging to sacrifice someone’s 
free speech,” said Mr. Coker. 
“Headers can look at that and say 
that on the next issue that’s really 
hot, we can mount some kind of 
nfliTtpaipn and get the person run 
out of there. 

William LobdeO, the editor, who 
had approved the Nixon column, 
said: tty not to be mean-spirit- 

ed and vicious in our columns. I try 
to bend over backward to let a 
columnist have his say. But the 
minute 1 saw it in print I knew it 
was a mistake.” Mr. Coker’s writ- 
ing “didn’t fit in with what we're 
trying to do editorially," he said. 


involved in fatal crashes were 
found to be drunk. By 1992, the 
latest year for which figures are 
available, only 21.9 percent or driv- 
ers in fatal crashes were found to be 
drunk. 

Similarly, in 1982 either a driver, 
a passenger or a pedestrian was 
found to have been drinking in 57 
percent of all fatal accidents. But 
by 1992, that was down to 45 per- 
cent 

Final figures for 1993 are not yet 
available, but highway safety offi- 
cials and experts say they expect a 
further decline. 

Already there are more than 
1,200 drwdcen- driving laws on the 
books in the 50 states, plus a few 
federal tows, and most legislatures 
are considering adding stul others. 

Forty-four states have laws that 
mandate prison time Tor any driver 
twice convicted of driving while 
drunk. Some public officials are 
calling lor jail time for first-tune 
convictions. 

Eleven states, most recently Vir- 
ginia, have lowered the permissible 
level of alcohol in the body’s blood 
to right-tenths of a part per thou- 
sand, die threshold at which roost 
people begin to show signs or 
drunkenness. Massachusetts is ex- 
pected to follow Virginia, and at 
least a dozen other states are study- 
ing reductions. 

For many vean, the threshold 
was one part per thousand. Typi- 
cally, to reach that level someone 
weighing 150 pounds (70 kilo- 



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grams) would have to consume five 
beers or five one-ounce shots of 
liquor is as hour. (Four drinks an 
hour would bring this person to a 
.08 blood-alcohol level). 

Perhaps aware that the police are 
watching them closely, many peo- 
ple under 21 who do drink are 
choosing designated drivers, said 
Jay Winy.cn, director of the Har- 
vard Center for Health Communi- 
cation. 

Faced with a cutoff of federal 
highway funds if they did not com- 
ply, all states now prohibit sale of 
alcohol to anyone under 2!. But in 
many cases the reauirement to up- 
hold the law weighs more heavily 
on the seller than the buyer. 

Probably the most important of 
all the legal steps being taken by 
states to control drunk driving is 
the “ALR," or administrative li- 
cense revocation. 

Since the early 1 980s, at least 36 
states have adopted such measures, 
which generally call for automatic 
confiscation of the license, and in 
some cases Ihe car. of any driver 
who fails or refuses to take a sobri- 
ety test. 

In most instances, the driver is 
given a temporary license, good for 
3 few days or weeks. During that 
period, an appeal can be made be- 
fore a judge, though few succeed. 





Private Arlington Burial Monday 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dipatcha 

NEW YORK — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis 
will be buried Monday at Arlington National 
Cemetery beside the body of President John F. 
Kennedy, her first husband. 

The burial, which will be private, will be preced- 


cemeieiy most likely will be closed for the burial. 
Only relatives, a few close friends, and President 
and Mrs. Clinton have been invited. 


The White House said that the president would 


speak at the graveside ceremony, but that it was 
whethe 


ret his remarks would be bread- 


ed by a private service Monday morning at St. 
Ignatius Loyola Roman Catholic Church in New 
York City. 


Officials at Arlington said the entire 6 12- acre 


not known 
cast. 

Mrs. Onassis, 64, died of cancer in New York on 
Thursday. 

(NIT, WPj 


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China Has Not Complied 


By the end of next week. President Bill 
Clinton rnusi decide whether China has mei 
the modest human rights conditions tha! he 
■id last year for renewal of its favorable access 
to American markets. He should face up to 
the reality that these conditions have not been 
meL and propose targeted economic sanc- 
tions to Congress. These should be designed 
to send a strong political message while limit- 
ing the economic damage to both sides. Some 
damage is inevitable, but it is a cost worth 
paying for principle and consistency. 

Chinese leaders piead that this has been a 
difficult year — uncertainty over who will 
succeed Deng Xiaoping, problems with eco- 
nomic reform, inflation, new pressures for 
democracy, peasant and labor unrest. They 
ask the United Stales to suspend its human 
rights concerns and accept repression for the 
sake of stability and growth. To indulge this 
request would betray American principles 
and credibility and encourage Chinese leaders 
to ignore the political and social problems 
that now threaten economic reform. 

China's future course will be determined in 
Beijing, not in Washington. But as China's top 
trading partner and most important diplo- 
matic interlocutor, the United States has un- 
matched potential to influence Chinese deci- 
sions. Annual fights over trade privileges are a 
messy way to exercise this influence. But they 
were the only levers available to Congress when 
the Bush administration responded inade- 
quately to the Tiananmen massacre of l q 8 Q . 

The Clinton administration tried to offer 
China a reasonable way out in a May 1993 
executive order. But China, lulled perhaps by 
past American toothlessness and publicly aired 
divisions between U.S. economic and diplo- 
matic officials, chose confrontation instead. 

The executive order set seven conditions that 
China had to fulfill to have its trade privileges 
renewed this summer. Two were absolute: stop 
exporting goods made by prison labor, and 
allow free emigration for otherwise eligible 
dissidents, ft also needed to show progress in 
five other areas: accounting for political pris- 
oners, allowing Red Cross visits to prisons, 
easing repression in libel, adhering to the 
International Declaration of Human Rights, 
and ending jamming of the Voice of America. 


China has released prominent dissidents, 
allowed others !o emigrate and accepted the 
principle of Red Cross visits. But it has only 
made promises concerning prison labor and 
the Voice of America. And it has intensified 
repression in Beijing. Shanghai and Tibet and 
failed fo demonstrate significant progress in 
several of the specified areas. 

That mixed record might have narrowly 
justified renewal, had China not gone out of 
its way to show contempt for American hu- 
man rights concerns. Beijing has, in effecu 
called the president's bluff. 

President Clinton now needs to retaliate by- 
proposing selective sanctions that send the 
strongest political message at the lowest eco- 
nomic cost. Rather than revoking trade privi- 
leges across the board, he should propose 
higher duties on specific categories of goods 
— for example, those produced by companies 
run by China's army. Sorting out the origin of 
Chinese imports presents technical problems, 
but U.S. trade negotiators have managed to 
come up with selective lists before. 

Whatever Mr. Clinton decides to do on 
China, the consequences will be huge, ff he 
backs off in the face of Beijing's bullying. 
China's democrats, intellectuals and minor- 
ities will pay a high price, and American 
credibility on issues from human rights to 
nuclear proliferation will be nil. Tf hi s~ choice 
of sanctions touches off a trade war. China 
will be unable to sustain its present rapid 
growth rate, while profits nnd jobs in a num- 
ber of American export industries, notably 
aerospace, will be lost. 

But the real significance of Mr. Ginion's 
choice transcends even these weighty specif- 
ics. Balanced and respectful relations be- 
tween the United Slates and China are the 
key lo future peace, prosperity and democra- 
cy throughout the dynamic East Asia region. 
For the last five years, at least, those rela- 
tions have been anything but balanced and 
respectful. The way to repair the relationship 
is not by fudging real differences over basic 
issues like prison labor, torture and religious 
persecution. It is by consistently following 
through on the reasonable policies that Mr. 
Clinton announced a year ago. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Helping the Blind to See 


ff you were given SI 18 million with a man- 
date to use it for the greatest possible good of 
miserably poor people, how would you spend 
ill That kind of question is the central busi- 
ness of the World Bank, which for nearly half 
a century has been making loans to poor 
countries to support economic development 
and improve life. The bank has now extended 
a SI 18 million subsidized loan to pay for 
cataract operations in the villages and slums 
of India. The bank is the world’s main channel 
of development aid. and this loan is part of an 
important shift in its emphasis. 

Blindness, generally because of cataracts, is 
unusually common in India even by the stan- 
dards of other poor countries. This loan will 
train surgeons, nurses and technicians as well 
as buy equipment. The cost mil work out to 
about S15 for each patient. It means that in five 
years this project will restore sight to nearly 8 
million people, rescuing them from dependence 
and beggary. In economic terms alone, the 
payoff is enormous. It is hard to think of an 
endeavor that could transform more people's 
lives as completely at so modest a price. 

Over the years.’ the World Bank has experi- 


mented with many different strategies for 
encouraging economic growth. Since it cur- 
rently (ends about S22 billion a year, its deci- 
sions have a real impact Recently it has been 
swinging some of its resources away from the 
traditional construction projects, like dams 
and roads, toward environmental protection 
and, especially, health care. The bank's lend- 
ing for health" projects is rising faster than its 
support Tor any other purpose. 

The bank win continue to provide funds for 
big engineering projects, because a safe water 
system, for example, is often the cheapest way 
to prevent dangerous epidemics. But it in- 
creasingly chooses to attack directly the igno- 
rance. disease and disability that trap the 
people born into poverty. 

The current American contribution to the 
World Bank is slowly making its way through 
Congress’s appropriations process. The peo- 
ple who hare to vote on it may wonder what 
happens to the money that the bank raises in 
America and around the world. The answer is 
that some of it will go lo India, where it will 
literally enable the blind to see. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Stepping Aside in Malawi 


Few things have better become President 
Hastings Kamuzu Banda of Malawi. Africa's 
longest-serving leader, than the way he has 
left office. After losing a free and fair election 
last Tuesday, he handed over power on Satur- 
day to a competent and democratically cho- 
sen successor. Bakili MuluzL it is an example 
that wiD, regrettably, almost surely be ignored 
by other Third World Uberators-for-life. most 
especially Cuba's Fidel Castro. North Korea's 
Kira I? Sung and Zaire’s Mobutu Sese Seko. 

Most of Malawi’s 8 million people were not 
even alive when the former British colony, 
which was then called Nvasaland. attained 
independence in 1964. A physician given to 
vehement oratory. Mr. Banda fed Malawi's 
liberation struggle and served as its first prime 
minister. In what became a pattern in post- 
colonial Africa, he then promoted himself to 
president, instituted one-party rule and in 
1971 enthroned himself presidem-for-fife. As 
elsewhere, a cult of personality flourished and 
political dissenters were silenced, jailed or 
killed by security police. 

A threadbare excuse long offered for Afri- 
ca's Banda-style tyrannies was that one-partv 
rule brought stability and economic gains, 
while keeping new nations from fragmenting 
on regional and ethnic lines. In reality, in 
Malawi as elsewhere, absent accountability 
and press scrutiny, what has flourished is 
corruption and brutality. .After 30 years under 
Mr. Banda's Congress Party. Malawi's per 
capita income of S200 a year and its life 
expectancy of under 50 years are among the 
world's lowest while its infant mortality rate 
— one of five babies dies before reaching 5 


years — is one of the highest. This sorry 
performance explains the ground swell of in- 
ternal protest and the decision by Western 
donors lo suspend aid to Malawi until its 
human rights record improves. 

Under this pressure, and shamed by South 
Africa's democratic example, an ailing Presi- 
dent Banda did the minimally decent thing, 
agreeing to end one-party rule and call an 
election. Fortunately. Malawi's president- 
elart, a former cabinet minister who broke with 
Mr. Banda in 1982. seems a coirunonscnse 
leader with a strong political base. Malawi is 
luckier than other Third World autocracies. It 
is getting a promising second chance. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Commen t 


N EW YORK — What is the responsibil- 
ity of United Nations members for di- 
sasters such as Rwanda and Bosnia that do 
not directly affect their national security 
and other interests? In fact, is there an 
international responsibility that arises from 
membership in the United" Nations' 1 
At least in times of crisis, should the United 
Nations be more than the sum of its parts — 
the focus and agent of that common inter- 
national responsibility? 

If governments are unwilling Jo pay the 
whole bill for UN operations, what other 
sources of financing — if any — are available? 

Under what legal authority can an inter- 
national organization assume quasi-govem- 
mental responsibilities in failed stales, of 
which there is a lengthening list? 

Except when there is a dear case of aggres- 
sion. are there any circumstances in which an 
international force should take sides or fight 
in a civil war? If so. who is to do the fighting? 

These are a few of the questions that need 
to be addressed as the organization approach- 
es its 5tHJi anniversary next year. 

Today the United Nations faces a dilemma. 
The public assumes that it is. or ought to be. 
the police force and relief-and-rescue service 
of tiie “world community." But no such com- 
munity yet exists, and the UN members are 
increasingly reluctant to support such a role. 

Take the recent reduction of UN peace- 
keeping troops in Rwanda, a move that Mar- 
tin Peretz characterized in The New Republic 
as Ihe organization's “quintessential soul." 

The troops in Rwanda belong to members 
that may withdraw them at any time. The 
Security Council decided to reduce the force. 
Subsequent I v. Secretary-General Butros Bu- 
tros Ghali insisted that something must be 


By Brian Urquhart 

done about Rwanda. The Council later decid- 
ed on a larger contingent to protect civilians, 
provided that forces could be found. Now Mr. 
Butros Ghali and the Clinton administration 
differ on where the contingent might most 
usefully be positioned. In this typical situa- 
tion, what precisely is the United Nations? 

The truth is that no one knows what to do 
about the scourge of civil and ethnic violence 
that has infected the world — not govern- 
ments, not the UN Secretariat, not media 
pundits, experts or academics. The public, 
seeing horrors on its television screens, feels 
strongly lhaf someone ought to do something 
when'ihou sands of people are being killed or 
are starving to death. But there is no systematic 
national or international agreement about 
what that something is and who should do it 

Thus, today the United Nations has never 
been more in demand — and its performance 
has never been more severely questioned 

Throughout its history, the United Nations 
has often provided the fig leaf that govern- 
ments need to cover the gap between their 
publicly expressed policies and reluctance to 
cany those policies oul It is a place where 
action can be seen to be taken, even if the 
means to take it are inadequate. This is parti- 
cularly true of the operation in Bosnia. It is 
acceptable so long as the arrangement is 
clearly understood and the meager UN forces 
in the field ore not expected to take action far 
beyond their capacity and mandate. 

When something goes wrong, critics often 
can conveniently scapegoat the United Na- 
tions for incompetence. It was blamed for the 
killing of 18 American Rangers bv General 


Mohammed Farrah Aidid’s militia as they 
tried to hunt him down in Mogadishu cm Ocl 
3. Actually, the Rangers were solely under 
U.S. command at the time. 

Even if basic questions about the United 
Nations couW be answered, its role, resources 
and capacity to act would need: attention 
before it could systematically respond to the 
world’s needs. Today the United Nations bp 
virtually no means of its own to carry out the 
kinds of operations — 18 at present — that it 
is now being called upon to perform. - 

But it still struggles on, with some success. 
As the foreign minister of Australia. Gareth 
Evans, has said, it is “a miracle" that "the UN 
has done as well as it has in responding to the 
peace and security challenges increasingly 
hurled at it since the end of the Cold War." 

Unlike a sovereign state, the 184-member 
United Nations is not an autonomous, self- 
contained institution with its own army, tax 
system and independent power to make deci- 
sions. If the Security Council needed to de- 
ploy highly trained forces today, the United 
Nations could not do so immediately. Yet a 
delay in deployment — indeed, difficulty in 
even raising adequate forces — would send a 
disastrous signal to the fi ghting factions with 
whom the United Nations would have to deal. 

It is perfectly' understandable that govern- 
ments are reluctant to commit their forces in 
the early stages of a UN operation in which 
the outcome will be unpredictable. But the 
costs of delays and uncertainty can be very 
heavy, even disastrous. One solution would be 
a small, elite, permanent UN force composed 
of volunteers that could be immediately de- 
ployed as a spearhead fora later, larger opera- 
tion, if that proved to be necessary. 

Many objections to such a proposal have 


WDUIO pc UK UlUi V* 

nationalism; the volunteers migfatjK'Vfet^^ . 
as mercenaries; it would be expensive: - t-r^-Sr 
Hie overwhelming atgomtazr forstdr;.^ 
force is that it would give the United Nations^ 
a desperately needed capacity for 
action, unencumbered by the typttal 
dons of member governments abo ut ' 

mg their own troops in international yffltnregrfr 
A public authority that cazinotinnqaHat^i, 
send its police officers to the scene of®; 
di stu rbance wiB soon lose aH pubBc 
deace. The same applies to; the-Uoitea^f^X 
lions in international crises! . vr 

in the end, there are two basic questions^;' 
What is the United Nations supposed-!*) 
and, even more important, what is;k'T©3fc* !i 
come? Are we logo backward into an anaWr':. 
chic age in which countries and peoplearetircA ^ 
into themselves and put up walls in.& despfiF*^:'; 
ate attempt to keep the wodd out 
protect purely national interests? ■•'.'“••’Sfj.vi 
Or do we aspire to make a success of v t 
one wodd that our inventiveness and ingemi^l; 
ity have already brought substa nti ally .‘t™ 
being? ff we want to take the tatter courefc, flSt; t; 
phrase “world community," often mouthed^ 
by politicians, will have to take on a practical '?- 
meaning-— and its essential rales ana 
lions wS have to be developed --•> ■? 

For aB its shortcomings, the United 
lions provides the only existing basis for-/;; 
such a venture. . . ' 

The writer, scholar in residence at the Font-?? 
Foundation, is a former UN andersecretary^y 
general for special political affairs. Hecontrib 
uted this comment to The New York Times. . * 


International Capitalism Can’t Work Without a Strong Loader 


S ANTA MONICA. California — 
There is an inherent contradic- 
tion between capitalism and inter- 
national politics. Capitalist econo- 
mies prosper when labor, technolo- 
gy and capital are fluid, they are 
driven toward international integra- 
tion. But international politics 
drives states to ensure that economic 
power is distributed in their favor at 
the expense of rivals. That restricts 
production and markets and thereby 
fragments the global economy. 

Thus, in the normal course of 
world politics, in which states must 
compete for security, a global econo- 
my is impossible to achieve. 

International capitalism has en- 
joyed only two golden ages: the peri- 
ods after the Napoleonic wars and 
between the two world wars. The key 
to both those episodes of peace and 
prosperity was the same — the ability 
and will of a single state to become "a 
hegemonic power, taking over the se- 
curity problems of weaker states so 
that they need not pursue autarkic 
policies nor form trading blocs to 


By Benjamin C. Schwarz 


improve their international positions. 

This suspension of power politics 
through hegemony has been the fun- 
damental aim of American foreign 
policy since 1 945. 

Even though the Cold War has end- 
ed. America’s security leadership — 
for instance, its dominance of NATO 
and the alliance with Japan — is still 
necessary jo hold in check the rivalries 
that would otherwise disrupt the sta- 
bility that a global economy requires. 

Thus, the United States must con- 
tinue. as the Pentagon's 1992 draft 
Defense Planning Guidance argues, 
to dominate the international system 
by “discouraging the advanced in- 
dustrialized nations from challenging 
our leadership or even aspiring to a 
larger global or regional role." As- 
suming this awesome responsibility, 
the Pentagon asserts, ensures “a mar- 
ket-oriented zone of peace and pros- 
perity that encompasses more than 
two-thirds of the world's economy." 

Imposing a protectorate over two- 


thirds of the world economy means 
cot only that the United States must 
dominate wealthy and technological- 
ly sophisticated friendly states, but 
also that it must deal with such nui- 
sances as Saddam Hussein, Kim fl 
Sung and Slobodan Milosevic so that 
potential great powers need not ac- 
quire the means to deal with those 
problems themselves. 

This, in ram, dictates that America 
must spend more on national security 
than the rest of the world combined. 
Thus, stabilizing the international 
system is a wasting proposition. 

A hegemonic power forced to place 
such importance on mihiaiy security 
must divert capital and creativity 
from the civilian sector, even as other 
states, freed from onerous spending 
for security, add resources to eco- 
nomically productive investments. 

As America’s relative economic 
strength erodes, so does the compara- 
tive advantage over other powers 
upon which its hegemony is founded. 


America's declining advantage w01 
spur the emergence of great power 
rivals, requiring it to spend more on 
defense to maintain its preponder- 
ance, which only farther deteriorates 
its comparative advantage. Already, 
economic power has diffused from 
the United Slates to new centers of 
economic growth in Europe and Asia. 

Thus, a global economy bites the 
hegemon that feeds it, destroying the 
hegemon's relative dominance and 
shattering the very foundation upon 
which interdependence rests. 

Multilateral enterprises, from ju- 
ries to United Nations police actions, 
require a leader. The in dispensable 
foundation for integration among the 
advanced industrialized nations was, 
and remains, American hegemony. 

To hold that U.S. hegemony is no 
longer needed because the political, 
economic and military cooper a tion 
among the great powers now ensures 
stability and peace is to put the cart 
before the horse. 

Most everyone applauds the high- 
est stage of capitalism — today's 


onlyi 


complex web of global trade, produc- . 
tiem and finance — as the dawn of a 
new world, But a genuinely interde- 
pendent economy is extraordinarily 
Je. Today ~uie emergent higb- 
_ industries, for instance; 
are the most powerful engines of 
world economic growth, bat they re- 
quire a lewd of spedahzatioo and a 
b readth of markets that is posable 
j in an integrated world economy.' 
It is difficult to see. therefore, how; 
capitalism can survive the decline of 
the Pax Americana. 

Lenin argued that international 
capi talism would be economically.' . 
successful but, by growing in aworid 
of competitive stales, would plant the 
seeds of its own destruction. AT 
though the empire be built is in rtans 
and his revolution discredited,: he 
may have the last laugh ' * 

The writer is afor&gp policy analyst 
at the Rend Corponztian. TMs drtide 
was adapted by The New York Times? 
from 

humanities and 


• . / 

East Asians 9 Economies Need a Caucus to Promote Open Trade 


K UALA LUMPUR — Forty years 
ago. East A‘?a was generally 
seen, rightly, as an area of political 
turbulence, economic backwardness 
and serial and cultural decay. Today, 
what was once a region of dominoes is 
regarded as a region of dynamos. 

With the possible exception of the 
Korean Peninsula, EasL Asia is no 
longer threatened by any clear or 
present danger, although potential 
trouble spots are always noted. 

The rise of East Asia has been the 
result of a series of far-reaching 
changes. A political revolution with 
many dimensions has swept through 
the rqgion. There has been a pro- 
found shift away from the left, to the 
point where there is perhaps only one 
pure Comraanist-LenintsL centrally 
planned state — North Korea — re- 
maining in East Asia. Slates that were 
traditionally market-oriented have 
become even more so. 

There have also been remarkable 
advances in political pluralism and 
democratization. In the last decade. 
East Asia has seen progress in com- 
prehensive human rights perhaps un- 
paralleled in human history. 

There has been a peace revolution. 
For a time after World War II. East 
Asia was more bloody and turbulent 
than the Middle East.' There was civil 
war or great internal violence in Cbi- 


By Noordin Sopiee 


na_ Korea. Vietnam. Laos. Cambo- 
dia. Thailand. Burma. Malaysia. In- 
donesia and the Philippines. Only 
Singapore, Hong Kong. Taiwan and 
Japan were spared such conflict. 

The reduction in tension has en- 
abled countries to concentrate on de- 
velopment and economic growth. B> 
1990. East Asia's total GDF was 6b 

These countries are 
among the most 
dependent in the. icorld 
on trade for their 
economic future , 

percent of North America's, up from 
59 percent a decade earlier, and 73 
percent of Western Europe's. 

History is not so obliging as to trav- 
el in straight lines, but some projec- 
tions suggest that East Asia's econom- 
ic output will overtake that of North 
America and match that of Western 
Europe by the end of this decade. 

While gaining weight in the global 
economy. East Asia has become a ma- 
jor absorber of goods and services. In 


1980. the region's imports amounted 
to only S274 billion. By 1990, this had 
surged to 5653 billion.' compared with 
U.S. imports of $517 billion. 

It was not long ago that East Asia 
was a massive importer of capital and 
a serious debtor region. Today it has 
massive capital to export. East Asian 
investment flows to many parts of the 
world. So do East Asian tourists. 
They flood the boutiques of Paris and 
the Disneylands of America. 

East .Asia used to depend on tech- 
nology from Europe and America. 
The i hirst for technology remains: 
Europe and America have a great 
deal to offer. But East Asian techno- 
logy is now found almost everywhere. 

In recent years. East Asia has been 
the fastest integrating area of the 
world in terms of trade and invest- 
ment. and probably technology and 
tourism. The rate of integration is 
expected to accelerate, not slow. 

what is mosL remarkable is that 
this rapid integration has taken place 
in the absence of intergovernmental 
regional economic cooperation. Un- 
like Europe, East Asian integration 
has been purely market driven. 

Without a Treaty of Rome, intra- 
Easi Asian trade as a proportion of 
its total trade with the world rose to 


a Large British Underdass The Fed Rashly Endangers Recovery 

It is because of the operation of the welfare J C? J 


It is because of the operation of the welfare 
state — and the abuse of it — that a large- 
scale British underclass exists. This under- 
class is a political challenge of the highest 
order. Britain faces a future in which one 
group of society, [the] "new rabble. " is char- 
acterized by high levels of criminality, wide- 
spread drug use and child neglect and abuse, 
concentrated in grim, segregated council es- 
tates. Wc are moving toward American-siyle. 
middle-class "gated communities" protected 
by private security forces. This is the greatest 
long-term challenge facing this government. 
We ignore it at our peril. 

— The Sunday Times (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED J.SS7 

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’. ‘ I’** 1 . Inir-nim Henil Tnhm-. All n**nriL ISSN: rtNMnJ2 



W ASHINGTON — The critical 
point to keep in mind ahoul 
the Federal Reserve Board’s boost in 
interest rates last week, the fourth 
since February, is that it was aimed 
primarily at placating nervous trad- 
ers on Wall Srreet — not. as the Fed 
advertised, to “maintain favorable 
trends in inflation and thereby sus- 
tain the economic expansion.” 

You might expecL the AFL-CIO to 
worry that higher interest rates will 
choke off economic growth and boost 
unemployment. But when the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce agrees, and 
says publicly "We hope ihai Main 
Street is not 'being sacrificed for Wall 
Street." the Fed’s decisions need to 
be closely questioned. 

In all probability, the Fed has set in 
motion a series of events that will cut 
short a modest economic recovery. 
Mortgage rates already are up about 2 
percentage points. Other interest rates 
are rising, which wiD make it more 
costly for businesses, consumers and 
the government to borrow. 

Economic activity will gradually 
slow down, delighting bondholders. 
The rest of the financial markets may 
be in for a surprise. Stock traders 
were euphoric after the interest rate 
boost last Tuesday. They were led to 
believe that after Tuesday the Fed 
had promised to keep its hands off 
interest rates for a while and allow 
conditions to stabilize. But it made 
no such commitment. 

As Martin Regalia, chief econo- 
mist of the chamber and a former Fed 
staff member, said in a telephone 
interview, the Fed carefully left itself 
room for further rate increases. Mr. 
Regalia knows that every word in a 
Fed press release count*. In the latest 


Bv Hobarl Rowen 


one, the Fed said its ralc-hor-Mine ac- 
tions this year "substantially remove 
the degree of monetary accommoda- 
tion which prevailed through 1993." 
The operative word in “substantially " 
The Fed is holding its options open t** 
raise rates again this year. 

It made a serious blunder when ii 
boosted ihe federal funds rate (what 
banks pay one another for overnight 
loans) by a quarter of a percentage 
point on Feb. 4. It feared ihai a boom 
might lake over ihe economy after 
unusually rapid growth in the fourth 
quarter of IW. But that quarter re- 
flected unusual circumstances. “If 
they had looked below the surface." 
Mr' Regalia said, they would have 
seen that the economic data were 
mixed. “You didn't have an explosion 
In manufacturing. The demand For la- 
bor came in the services industries, 
and there was a tremendous excess 
supply of labor Tor thove jobs." 

When the Fed nonetheless raised 
interest rates, responding to its in- 
stitutional bios against economic 
growth, financial markets assumed 
that the all-wise central bankers 
were privy to some unique know- 
ledge about economic prospects or 
problems; the markets were wrung 
about that. They also assumed that 
with Chairman Alan Greenspan at 
the helm, a single quarter-point rate 
boost would surely not be the end of 
it, but the first of a series. The mar- 
kets were right about that. 

Doggedly, in pursuit of a policy to 
whip an inflation that didn't exist. 
Mr. Greenspan's Fed raised the feder- 
al funds rale three additional limes. 


and the discount rate (what it charges 
for loans to banks) from 3 to 3_5 
percent, the first increase in five years. 

Bui there was no inflation in the 
economy, then or now. It is not just 
that inflation is mild — there is no 
inflation at all. Unit labor costs in- 
creased a mere 0.8 percent in both the 
fourth quarter last year and the first 
quarter this year over the same peri- 
ods a year earlier. 

In a statement on May 17, the 
Chamber of Commerce said: "With 
virtually all indexes showing little or 
no inflation, and with many indica- 
tors showing that economic growth 
was already slowing from its rapid 
pace af (he end of last year, we are 
becoming increasingly concerned 
that Federal Reserve policy may be 
moving loo fast and too far. Wc are 
concerned that monetary policy not 
choke off an economy that only re- 
cently has begun to generate income 
and job growth." 

Said President Lane Kirkland of 
the AFL-CIO: "The country is far 
short of the goal of full employment, 
and inflation is nowhere in sight. We 
fear the only real impact of the Fed's 
latest actions will be to quell eco- 
nomic activity and keep people from 
getting jobs." 

The Fed has foolishly and unnec- 
essarily moved interest rates higher 
than (hey should be. given the fragil- 
ity of recovery and the absence of 
any inflationary pressures. 

The Clinton administration has 
put the best face it can on the pro- 
blem. not wishing to tangle publicly 
with Mr. Greenspan. But any further 
increase in rates is likely to bring an 
open break with the While House. 

77if Washington Post. 


nearly 42 percent in 1991, from 33 
percent in 1980. This despite the fact 
that East Asia accounts for only about 
one quarter of the global economy. 

As a destination of East .Asian ex- 
ports. the United States took one third 
in 1985 but only one fifth in 1991. Two 
years earlier, Japan's trade with Asia 
exceeded its trade with the United 
Stales for the first time. In the early 
1980s, intra-East Asian trade grew an- 
nually at an average rate of 8.6 per- 
cent. In the three years to 1 992, it grew 
by a yearly average of 20.7 percent 

Despite failing levels of Japanese 
Foreign investment since 1989, Japa- 
nese firms in 1991 alone are estimated 
to have poured S8.7 bith’on into the six 
countries of the Association of South- 
east Asian Nations, compared with 
S4.4 billion invested by the United 
States. After the recent sharp rise of 
the yen against the dollar, another 
wave of Japanese investment seems 
likely. This wfll tighten the web of 
interdependence and ensure even 
greater regional integration. 

The integration that has already 
taken place extends beyond trade, 
investment, tourism, technology 
flows, financial and capital move- 
ments and official aid. Management 
techniques, procedures and styles, 
and government orientations, atti- 
tudes and policies in many areas are 
moving toward convergence. A vast 
network of industrial, trading, tech- 
nical and administrative contacts is 
being knitted together. 

An East Asian culture and way of 
doing things has begun to emerge. 
Geo-economic zones of joint develop- 
ment that overlap national borders are 
sprouting in every quadrant or East 
Asia. And this is only the be ginnin g 
With the rise of a de" facto economic 
system in East Asia, a regional identi- 
ty. consciousness and sense of com- 
mon destiny is slowly emerging. 

East Asian regional cooperation 
on trade and dozens of other issues 
should thus be considered a natural 
development. Such cooperation now 
exists in almost every part of the 


world. The only major area where: 
there has been no intergovernmental 
economic cooperation has been 
Northeast Asia. ■ 

A Malaysian -sponsored proposal 
for an East Asian Economic Caucus 
has become an ASEAN proposal. 
Initially it could involve consult*- 
tions between trine East Asian econo- 
mies: China, Japan, South Korea and ■. 
the ASEAN states Indonesia^ Malay- 
sia, the Philippines, Singapdny^toi- 
land and Brand. Internally,- such 
consultations would be designed to 
expand regional earaomic coopert 
lion. Externally, the aim wodd be jo" 
act as a coalition to ensure an open - 
global trading system not to fonn an ■ 
exclusive trading bloc. . 

Underlying the proposal far an 
East Asian caucus is the convktipa; 
that the economies of the Rgisn; 
which are among the most dependent [ 
in the world on trade, for tbeir ecn- 
nonric future, should have a: tagger 
voice in making sure that the inter- 
national trading system is. as.opeais : 
it can possibly be. . " . .. 

The private sector most continue- 
to be the engine of economfcinteg^ ' 
tion in East Asia. However, gwoiaj- 
ments should play a larger and more 
constructive role in laying -down tie 
tracks and building the roadways of " 
collaboration, or, at the very teast&i 
malting sure that all usos agree oa 
which side of the road to drive. - ; 

The task of statesmanship is lota- . ,-j 
sure that East Aaan economic cocper- 1 
ation develops in the mist productive 
way possible, without in anyway fakt- 
ing trading partners elsewhere afid 
without limiting their fullest partSopB- 
tion in making a prosperous ttiluie 
that wfli be goal fear alt ?./ 

The writer is . 

Institute of Strategic i 
Studies in Kuala Lm'itpw, and Malay- 
sia s representatives theEmate^^K 

forum. He contributed das amnhnt k> 
the International Herald Tribune. - 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEABS AGO. 

agitators. From the usaal strike fo- 
menting and the well- worn scheme 
of distributing reading matter, ft# 
have had great trouble .digress®- 
but according to newspaper report*' 
there is reason to believe thtf J® 
terrorists are plotting the flotati® 
of a great amount of coaataW 
Bank of England notes. Thent^® 
the plot came from Russian ando®" 
er continental sources, and the 
port of it was that printing pre^* 5, 
in Russia, were being utilized W M 11 
oul the duplicate notes. - • - - 


1894: Servia Slays Calm 

BELGRADE — Up to the present 
everything is quiet, both here and in 
the provinces. A certain fear existed 
of an insurrectional movement. For 
the moment, however, the Radical 
party is very much discouraged. It 
will certainly be very difficult for it 
to continue the struggle under the 
former Constitution, which has now 
been revived. They have also to reck- 
on with the hostility of the army. 
The Radical party desire to abolish 
it and transform the armed forces of 
the kingdom into a sort of national 
militia. This, of course, has had the 
effect of causing ihe military party 
to support the dynasty. 

1919: Red Plot Reported 

LONDON — The air has been full of 
reports, for the last few weeks, of a 
Bolshevist coup in England along an 
altogether new line. Effective S[cps 
and drastic action have taken the 
spirit out of a great majoritv of the 


1944: 

LONDON —'[From ourNe??^ 
edition:] Malting the most..«t®s« 
low-level aerial attacks df tK 
against Germany, 500 to 7500®^ 
Stales 8th Air Force fit’ 
fighter bombers paced tt 
21] Allied air offensive 
Continent, which included a 
assault on battered Naa trafl#” 
facilities in northern FranS^:* 
giunj and Holland. ’ 



x 

-A'jb: 



•*r' 






INTERN VTION U. HERALD TRIBI NE, MONDAY. MAY 2.3. J994- 



r> zp i. 

fuK "N— ' 


Clinton in Normandy: A Tricky Act on the World Stage 


Utl’.htnel'H P^.if Si ft I, r 

N 'GTON — For President BiH Clinam. 
ww challenge on the coast at Normandy next month 
wll be daunting: to honor nnc of hitiorv'.s areal 
muitaiy victories as a president who avoided mill- 

IcngihTwM 311 * 1 pr0,ri,,?d a £ jinst lhe nation'^ last 

The thtw-day, iwo-coniiscnt production orchtv- 
mited by the U.S. mill tar. and its allies to commeoi- 
oraie the 5Uth anniversary or the invasion of Nor- 
mandy will offer one of the most i isibfe lett* of Mr. 
i-Unton s mastery of the ceremonial role of com- 
mander in chief. 

Memories are still fresh of the bravura political 
theater President Ronald Reagan staged at Norman- 
dy for the 40th anniversary of the June t. 1944. 

, But , Mr - Reagan represented the cenera- 
um that (ought the war. even though he spent it in 
Hollywood making training films. All the same, he 
represented a superpower with a cause, guarding 
Europe’s freedom from Soviet encroachment. 

.. T*n y®ars and the demise of the Soviet Union have 
auxmushcd the enthusiasm of many Americans for 
the superpower role in Europe and left Utile in the 
way of a rallying cry. And Mr. Clinton is still 
laboring under strained relations with manv veter- 


stjs over his avoidance of miliiarv service during the 
Vietnam War era. 


■*7 l c no * j usl l ^ al he’s of a different generation." 
said Stephen Ambrose, historian and author of a 


new book on D-Day. “It's Vietnam, too. It's the 
draft. It’s just awkward." 

White House officials are resigned to inevitable 
comparisons with Mr. Reagan’s performance that 
commentators and others will draw. (Mr. Reagan's 
speech writer, Peggy Noonan, has been hired by one 
oT the networks for color commentary.) But the 
While House communications director, Mark 
Gcaran, said such comparisons diminished the so- 
lemnity, making it a political contest when it should 
be a national observation. 

White House officials said Mr. Clinton bad been 
delving into D-Day literature and preparing to con- 
front the generational divide in his major D-Day 
address. Mr. Gcaran said the president wanted his 
appearance to make a statement to his generation 
and (hose younger that their freedoms were a direct 
result of the sacrifices of their parents nod grandpar- 
ents. 

The triumph of democracy “is a theme big enough 
for any president." Mr. Ambrose said. At the request 
of the White House, he sent a memorandum to 
presidential speech writers earlier this month devel- 
oping that theme and promoting ad additional 
theme of reconciliation with Germany. 

Mr. Clinton faces a world radically changed from 
Mr. Reagan's time, further complicating his task of 
delivering a clear, compelling message. 

It is a period of increasing American resistance to 
involvement in European problems and a presidency 


devoted to domestic affairs, not international leader- 
ship. Putting the man and the time together in an 
event such as the D-Day anniversay. Clinton aides 
Said, will not be os easy as it looked to be for Mr. 
Reagan. 

But Mr. Clinton has his advantages. His perfor- 
mances on the world stage have had excellent re- 
views. Each foreign trip has bolstered his standing at 
home. Some senior officials have even suggested 
they expect Mr. Ginton to get such a boost in public 
standing in June that it will help in negotiations with 
Congress this summer. 

One advantage he will have is the sheer scale and 
sweep of the D-Day ceremonies. Pentagon officials 
said so much had been planned that even skeptics 

were likely to be caught up in the enthusiasm. 

Mr. Clinton's schedule includes a ceremony at 
Nettuno, Italy, on June 3 to honor veteran* of the 
Italian campaign: one June 5 at Portsmouth. Eng- 
land, and a sunrise wreath-laying on June 6 aboard 
the aircraft carrier George Washington. 

Later that morning, in France, he will go to a 
ceremony to honor Army Rangers at Pointe du Hoc 
at 8:30 A.M., a joint ceremony with French leaders 
at Utah Beach at 10 A.M., a ceremony with nine 
heads of slate cm- government at Omaha Beach at 
2:45 P.M. and a u.S. railiiajy ceremony at Collc- 
ville-sur-Mer at 5 P.M. 

In a scheduling oddity that some of his aides now 
lament, Mr. Clinton plans to go to Oxford Universi- 


ty at the end of Normandy celebration to receive an 
honorary degree. He attended Oxford on a Rhodes 
scholarship at a time many of his contemporaries 
were being drafted to fight in Vietnam. 

While there, be wrote a now-famous letter to a 
draft board member explaining why his generation 
had come to loathe the military. He also helped 
organize anti-Vietnam demonstrations there, which 
George Bush attacked during the 1992 campaign as 
disloyal. 

The theme of generational passage is being woven 
explicitly into one of the centerpiece events or the D- 
Day celebration. President Clinton's speech June 6 
at CoIIeviUe. The president, 47, will be introduced by- 
Joseph Dawson of Texas, an 80- ) ear-old retired oil 
executive who commanded the first company to, 
penetrate German lines at nearby Omaha Beach. 

Most of the participants in the D-Day ceremonies 
would prefer to duck discussion of Mr. Clinton's 
past problems with the military. One exception is 
Mr. Dawson, who said the president should use the 
D-Day event to exorcise doubts ih-n have plagued 
him and the country because of Vietnam. 

“I thought Vietnam was a stupid war. the biggest 
mistake of our lives," Mr. Dawson said. “The whole 
purpose of this event is to show the world and to 
show our country that there was a rime when our 
nation moved forward as one unit." 

—ANN DEVROY 
and JOHN F. HARRIS 


Russian Army 
New Credibility 


da 


L« Uj 


ed 

4. 


By Sieve Erlanger 

JVinr York Times Service 

MOSCOW — General Pavel S. 
Grachev, the Russian defense min- 
ister. is to visit NATO on Monday 
and Tuesday as the embattled boss 
of a demoralized Russian military, 
which finds itself having to lobby 
publicly for money from a govern- 
ment it saved, however reluctantly. 
Only seven months ago. 

General Grachev will explain to 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation w hat sort of "special status" 


'thi 


ige 


may be more difficult in the mid n 1C( 
of a new crisis between Ukraine* 
and Crimea, the largely ethnic Ru & 
siatv peninsula seeking closer lies tk' hold- 
Moscow. But General Grachev c^ m . 
plausibly argue that Russia Q^ched 
done little to encourage the Crirnii^ Dur- 
an secessionists and has wameK er , e had 
everyone against the use of vhn 'as. 
lence. 

The weakness of states like BJtf£r nne ' 
lanis. Ukraine, .Azerbaijan, Geo | r lf . su, I h 
gja. Tajikistan and so on. the Ru; bs? nUc 
sians argue, has more to do with tbh tP *' w 


7 

e*- 


: e 




_4*t was 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Bonn’s Odd Presidential Vote 

Popular Favorite in PoUs Likely to Lose Assembly Ballot 


By Rick Atkinson 

U’askuigtan Past Srrrue 

BERLIN — Democracy mav 
come in all shapes and sizes, but 
few versions are more peculiar t han 
the electoral process under which 
Germany will choose a new presi- 
dent on Monday. 

Only a tiny fraction of the coun- 
try’s 80 milli on people can vote. 
The people's preferred choices are 
either ineligible or not interested. 
And of the four major candidates, 
the overwhelming favorite in public 
opinion polls appears likely to lose. 

The selection of a new held of 
state to succeed Richard von Weiz- 
s&cker may come down to a furious 
bout of closed-door horse- trading. 

Mr. Weizsicker.. 74, is complet- 
ing his second five-year term and is 
constitutionally prohibited from 
seeking a third me. Opinion polls 
show that he has been one of Ger- 
many’s most venerated figures, 
transforming a ceremonial position 
into a job with genuine leverage, by 
using the presidency as a pulpit 
from which to proselytize on issues 
ranging from Germany's Nazi past 
to tolerance of foreigners. 

Under Germany’s 1 949 constitu- 
tion, the president is chosen by a 
special parliamentary assembly. 
Half of toe 1,324 electors arc mem- 
bers of the Bundestag, the federal 
it; the other half are se- 
by assemblies in the coun- 


try's 16 states. An absolute major- 
ity of at least 663 voles is needed to 
win on either of the first two bal- 
lots. A plurality is sufficient to win 
on the third ballot. 

Of the four main candidates, the 
popular favorite is Johannes Rau, 
63. the avuncular state premier of 
North Rhme-Westphalia. A recent 
public opinion survey in Der Spie- 
gel magazine showed' 54 percent of 
those polled preferred Mr. Rau, 
compared with 20 percent for his 
nearest competitor, Roman Her- 
zog. president of the Federal Con- 
stitutional Court. 

Mr. Rau was badly beaten in his 
1987 effort to unseat Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl, but he has led his 
Social Democratic Party to an ab- 
solute majority in Germany's most 
populous state in three consecutive 
elections. Considered a moderate 
and an effective mediator between 
disparate factions. Mr. Rau recent- 
ly suggested that he would be a 
president “who speaks not only to 
people’s brains but to their hearts.” 

Yet, his party controls barely 500 
of the presidential votes, far short 
of a majority. Although the presi- 
dential selection is supposed to be 
apolitical, party loyalty remains a 
critical component. Mr. Rau said 
earlier this month that “there are 
days when I think it’s all over." 

That would seem to suggest a 
sure bet for Mr. Herzog, 60. the 


candidate of Mr. Kohl's Christian 
Democrats and their Bavarian sis- 
ter party. Respected if not beloved. 
Mr. Herzog has been a member of 
Germany’s highest court for 11 
years and its president since 1987. 

Mr. Herzog was Mr. Kohl’s sec- 
ond choice for the presidency. The 
chancellor, seeking an East Ger- 
man as a symbol of Western Ger- 
many's good faith toward the East, 
initially picked Steffen Hritraann, 
justice minister in Saxony. Bui Mr. 
Hei unarm was forced from the race 
in November after stirring an up- 
roar with his arch -conservative 
views on foreigners, women and the 
Nazi era. 

Mr. Herzog seemed to be sailing 
toward victory earlier this month 
until he stirred his own uproar by 
suggesting that foreigners who de- 
cline to became Goman citizens 
should leave the country. The judge 
claimed to have been misunder- 
stood, but the gaffe sent tremors 
through Mr. KohTs party, which, 
with 619 votes, still lacks a majority 
in the special assembly. 

Moreover, 121 of those Christian 
Democratic voters are East Ger- 


mans whose loyalty to the chancel- 
Theirleac 


lor is suspect. Their leading spokes- 
man, Gflnther Krause, hinted 
Thursday in an interview with a 
Bolin newspaper that his faction 
could consider defecting to another 
candidate. 



vast, nuclear-armed Russia wonts 
in order to join Partnership for 
Peace. He will also try to explain 
Russia's new military doctrine, 
which gives vital priority to limit- 
ing conflicts in the “near abroad" 
— the states of the former Soviet 
Union — and to protecting the 
rights of the 23 million ethnic Rus- 
sians living there. 

By "special status," Russian offi- 
cials say, they really want a com- 
mitment to serious political consul- 
tation and genuinely shared aims 
with NATO, including peacekeep- 
ing. that is more than merely rhe- 
torical. patronizing and placative 
toward wounded Russian pride. 

For post-Soviet, post-Cold War 
Russia, the military doctrine is a 
needed effort to provide new goals 
for an army that has lost its obvious 
adversaries in the West and that is 
completing, this summer, one of 


failures of domestic leadership w 

the residue of Soviet tt>mmunisi>1 0 gj ,0 *“ 
than with any neo-imperial desig, or 


COsj^ 

3S| 

>K h , 


of Moscow. 


Still, the deep ambivalence aboL a -g C- 

the West expressed by Russian po e he' ears ' 


es„ 


ui of 


Swi 


■ nd 


*s 


Mo'L 


iticians, especially after the strong 
showing or Communists and ultrsrir-. 
nationalists in the December par 
U3inenLaiy elections, is also prevaj aj 
lent in the military, said Alexande_j. 

M r?nll7 a iUmnvnlilnr fnr In', 


on 





Has £i 

■°C 


ITS 


tougher and frankly more hones A. ■ 
than some of our politicians," in^ w “ 
eluding President Boris N. Ydisulj, _ 
and Foreign Minister .Andrei V t- that 


s wi 
latn'i 
mil 
CO! 


eli 


La 


Crimeans Take 


the largest and most complicated 
— and least appreciated — miliiarv * • 

withdrawals in history, its peaceful JHe&SUreS AfftUUSt 
retreat from Eastern Europe and . __ ® 

Ukraine Threat 


MNtwd UdwRndci. 

The Social Democratic leader, Rudolf Scharping. right, welcoming Johannes Ran, the Social 
Democrats’ presidential before a meeting of the party leadership in Berlin on Sunday. 


the Baltics. 

But it is also an understrengih. 
over-officered army with enormous 
problems of money and morale, 
ranging from corruption and draft- 
dodging to delayed salaries and 
poor housing. And it is becoming 
more disillusioned with politicians 
of all stripes, wanting to stay out of 
their petty squabbling at nearly any 

COSL 

So what General Grachev also 
seeks from the United Stales and 
Europe, these officials and senior 
Western diplomats say, is “the ben- 
efit of the doubt" — that Russia's 
peacekeeping in the near abroad is 
a sincere defense of Russian inter- 
ests and not a pretext for rebuilding 
an empire. 

“What the Russians worry about 
is true," a senior Western diplomat 
responded. “They are getting most- 
rhetoric, and they're not getting 
: benefit of the doubt. Of course 
one reason is that one moment 
they’re banging their chests about 
how they’re a great power, and the 
next they’ve got their hands out 
and can't pay their debts.” 

Getting the benefit of the doubt 


lyrl 
the I 


Kozyrev, he said. “But the military 
are professionals. They understand nev _ 
the general direction' that Russii^ 
must move, and they unders tamin' 
that joint exercises arid Partnership j]^. 
for Peace hold no threats and som< f or _ 

obvious benefits." j 

f She 
t lion 
: New 
d as 
own 
; ding 
1 imo. 
. iio- 

Compiled by Our Stuff From Chspaicher ' 

MOSCOW — Crimean forces 
have taken “preventive measures" 
against posable attacks by Ukrai- 
nian troops in the escalating dis- 
pute over the Russian-dominated 
peninsula. Interior Minister Valeri 
Kuznetsov of Crimea said Sunday. 

But General Kuznetsov said 
there was no state of alert in Cri- 
mea and that the situation there 
was “normal." Interfax news agen- 
cy reported. 

Tension between the Crimea and 
the authorities in Kiev increased 
Friday when deputies in the Crime- 
an legislature voted to restore a 
1992 constitution that is tanta- 
mount to a declaration of indepen- 
dence. 

Ukrainian lawmakers retaliated 
by issuing a 10-day ultimatum to 
Crimea to withdraw the declara- 
tion and issued vague threats that 
force could be used if the secession- 
ist republic refused. The prime 
ministers of Ukraine and Russia 
are to meet in Moscow on Monday 
(AFP. Reuters) 


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INTER NATION \I. HER \LD TRIBINE, MONDAY. MAY 23, 199-t 


Zulu King Cot Land 
In a Pre-election 
Deal With De Klerk 


By Paul Taylor 

IVashingian Past Service 

JOHANNESBURG — South 

Africa's new coalition government 
/ill not officially gel down to busi- 
less until Tuesday, but it is already 
adng its first squall: the revelation 
‘I an election -eve bill that surrepti- 
iously transferred millions of acres 
>f state land to the control of the 
!u!u king. Goodwill Zwelithini. 

President Nelson Mandela and 
)ther senior officials of the African 
'Jational Congress, the dominant 
lany in the new government, say 
hey were unaware of the land 
ransfer. which was disclosed this 
veekend by a local muckraking 
ournal, The Weekly Mail and 
Guardian. They have questioned 
is legality and raised the possibili- 
y of having it nullified. 

[Mr. Mandela said after a two- 
lour meeting with his parliaments- 


Chief Buthelezi said there was 
nothing secret about the legisla- 
tion. noting that it went through all 
the usual legislative procedures. “If 
the media was not present, it is not 
our fault," he said. 


Mr. de Klerk told reporters in 
England, where be is on an official 
visit, that the transfer was not part 
of any deal to bring Chief Buthele- 
zj’s Inkatha Freedom Parry into the 
election. 


■y caucus Sunday that he would 
liscuss the land transfer and other 


liscuss the land transfer and other 
issues with Chief Mangosuthu 
Buthelezi who heads the Zulu- 
based inkalha Freedom Party and 
also is home affairs minister. Reu- 
ters reported. 

I'These aie very sensitive mat- 
ters." Mr. Mandela said. “We will 
discuss everything necessary to re- 
move (he tensions between us.’T 
No matter how the problem is 
resolved, the land deal illustrates 
the kind of internal tensions South 
Africa’s new multiracial coalition 
will face as it begins this week to 
redress the legacy or poverty left by 
apartheid. 

The land deal was worked out 
between former President F.W. de 
Kierfc and Chief Buthelezi. the for- 
mer KwaZulu chief minister. Al- 
though both men deny it, the trans- 
fer has the earmarks of a reward to 
Chief Buthelezi for calling off his 
boycott and agreeing, seven days 
before the balloting began, to take 
part in last month's election. 

If it is allowed to stand, the 
transfer means that roughly a third 
of the territory of the new province 
of KwaZulu/Natal will be under 
the sole trusteeship of King Zwe- 
lithini who is Chief Buthelezi's 
nephew, The land in question was 
formerly part of the apartheid-era 
homeland of KwaZulu, which went 
out of existence on April 27. Along 
with all other homeland territory, it 
was supposed to automatically re- 
vert lo the ownership of the new 
South African govemmenL 
But in one of its last legislative 
acts, the KwaZulu Legislative As- 
sembly passed on April 22 a bill 
transferring land ownership to the 
king, which was then approved by 
Mr. de Klerk on April 25. 


The effect of the transfer is to 
give the king far more than just the 
ceremonial power that the ANC 
agreed to in three-way negotiations 
that led to Inkatha's entry into the 
electioa campaign. 

Under the terms of the legisla- 
tion, King Zwelithini must admin- 
ister the land for the benefit and 
material well being of the 8 million 
Zulus, who form the largest of 
South .Africa's tribes. According to 
tribal custom and law, there is no 
such thing as private land owner- 
ship. .All tribal land is held and 
fanned communally, with alloca- 
tion of specific tracts nude by local 
chiefs. 



REACTORS: High Stakes Fight 





Continued from Page I 


Agent r Franci-Prew 

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, left, being pressed by reporters after he visited Pope John Paid II 
in a Rome hospital. The Pope has been recovering from surgery for a fractured thighbone after a fall. 


Andreotti to Be Tried on Mafia Links 


Mr. Mandela may choose not to 
disturb this arrangement. But hav- 
ing been confronted with a deal 
made without his knowledge or ac- 
quiescence, he needs to send some 
kind of message that such free- 
lancing will not be tolerated in his 
government, according to political 
sources. 


The land deal is not the only 
warning sign of the potential for 
internal fissures in the coalition. 
The ANC has so far chosen nor to 
take its seats in the Inkalha-domi- 
naled provincial cabinet of Kwa- 
Zulu/NataJ because it is dissatis- 
fied with the ministerial portfolios 
it has been offered. 


By Alan Cowell 

,V(v ftwfc Times Service 

ROME — Investigators in Sicily 
have decided to press Tor the trial of 
former Prime Minister Giulio An- 
dreoili on charges of associating 
with the Mafia, according lo judi- 
cial officials in Palermo. 

The decision is the most serious 
step yet in the authorities’ effort to 
substantiate assertions that Mr. 
Andreotti. 75, acted as the Mafia's 
protector in Rome. 

As he has done on many occa- 
sions since such accusations were 
first made last year. Mr. Andreotti 
denied the charges, culling them 
“debasing and incredible" and say- 
ing be would welcome a trial to 
clear his name. 


The accusations stem from the 
testimony of Mafia informers. 
They say Mr. Andreotti. Italy's 
dominant political figure for more 
than four decades, met with mob- 
sters and provided political cover 
for organized crime. 

The decision by ihe investiga- 
tors. Guido Lo Forte and Roberto 
Scarpinato. to seek Mr. Andreotti's 
trial does not automatically impute 
guilt but indicates that there is 
enough evidence to merit a hearing. 

The accusations center on allega- 
tions tw one informer, Tommaso 
B usee i la. that Mr. Andreotti was 
the Mafia's “point of reference" in 
Rome and on accusations by an- 
other, fiafdassare Di Maggie, that 
Mr. Andreotti met with Salvatore 


(Toiol Riina. the so-called boss of 
ail bosses, in 1987 and that the two 
men had embraced in a kiss of 
respect. 

Mr. .Andreotti has said such en- 
counters were impossible because 
he was under constant police 
guard. But in their 30 volumes of 
evidence, the investigators assert 
that he sometimes slipped away 
from his bodyguard. 

Other investigators in Rome 
have confronted Mr. Andreotti 
wjtb a photograph supposedly 
showing him shaking the hand of a 
mafioso he had denied meeting. 


domestic nuclear market, the pro- 
ject represents a chance to get a 
jump on European competitors in 
the fight for repair contracts that 
the World Bank estimates could 
reach $24 billion. 

But the Czech project and the 
administration's broader goals 
have touched off a high-stakes, be- 
hind-the-scenes debate in Congress 
and the commercial nuclear indus- 
try that will help shape the future 
of nuclear power in Eastern Eu- 
rope, Russia and Ukraine. 

Several influential legislators are 
concerned that the US. govern- 
ment could end up paying for dam- 
age in the case of an accident at the 
Czech plant, because the Westing- 
house work is being financed by the 
Export-Import Bank of the United 
States. 

“Any possibility that American 
taxpayers could be liable for a nu- 
clear accident in the Czech Repub- 
lic as a result of Ex-Im Bank guar- 
antees would be unacceptable,” 
said Senator Patrick J. Leahy, 
Democrat of Vermont. 

In approving the guarantee, the 
Export-Import Bank said it had re- 
lied on its own safety review and 
assessments of the International 
Atomic Energy Agency and the 
Federal Nuclear Regulatory Com- 
mission. Environmentalists and 
congressional investigators have 
challenged those reviews. 

Vice President A1 Gore, widely 
regarded as a strong environmen- 
talist, and his national security ad- 
viser, Leon S. Fuerth, were among 
the leading proponents of the pro- 
ject, according to a dminis tration 
officials. 

So goat is the Austrian anxiety 
that Chancellor Franz Vranitzky 


told President Bill Clinton last 
month, during a meeting about 
Bosnia, that his government was 
extremely concerned. 

Temeto is viewed as a break- 
through by Westinghouse, which 
beat European powerhouses Jure 
Siemens AO of Germany and rra- 
roatome SA of France to win the 
$400 million contract. 

Business is bad al home for Wes- 
tinghouse and others in the ifldus- 
tiy. Pan of the reason is the abun- 
dant supply of electricity and part 
is the effective opposition by envi- 
ronmental groups. The last license 
that led to the completion of a 
nuclear plant in the United States 
was issued in 1974. 

For Temdm, Westinghouse is 
performing extensive tests and 
computer modeling to adapt ns 
technology to the nearly completed 
reactor vessels. From the compa- 
ny’s perspective, the profitability 
toD come from replicating the work 
on other Soviet-designed reactors. 


Yes, You, Sip 




the other side.- Mr.' ijarsstil 
the notion that “tallr .radicf^ 
conservative, a tobKeftS 
cans, is just 
“It goes both vays^^; 
since Mr. Qmtra.ani^ 
the presidency; 


ms"-*'- 



It is not Mr.' Craton& 
decisions that produce the 
many analysts suggest* 
things; that peopfc i 
view bis characters too 
an office that; b &e-yis$£ 
revered symbdof-thChafij^ 
he has made himstff 
man that he has v^ped 
invisible barrier oftircatkL 
for the office; that distances, 
dents from the personafea&j^, 
opposition; that ihei&tigehe 
resents, in policies and in' 


TT7W rr rrrr ri . xtt, .. r-r 


Several congressional commit- 
tees are tramming issues related to 
Teraelin, but the primary investiga- 
tion is being conducted by the over- 
sight subcommittee of the House 
Energy and Commerce Committee, 
whicnis chaired by Representative 
John D. Dingefl, Democrat of 
Michigan. 

The subcommittee has demand- 
ed all documents relied on by the 
Export-Import Bank to approve 
the Temdin loan guarantee. 

The subcommittee also plans to 
ask the General Accounting Office, 
the investigative arm of Congress. 


Americans, and. that 

transferring to him thwJ3n»Qdy 
fort with Mrs. OmtoaVp^RM' 
role. 

The presidential historian 
pben Ambrose said he lif 
doubt that Mr. CfinUjtthad.an 


aligned against him. Bgt'be^nfl^ 
generational discomforted] 
with Mrs. Clinton's rolejjMc 
brase points to the public '.pttjSsjE 
lion that Mr. Ointori^ has gigwfig 
cant character flaws: 


to conduct an extensive study at the 
TemeKn site to determine the con- 
dition of work already completed 
there on the construction and me- 
chanical system. 


RUSSIA: Agreement With OECD 


Mr. Andreotti is now a member 
of the Popular Party, the successor 
to the Christian Democratic Party. 


BLOOD * A Swiss Scandal 


Conthmed from Page 1 


lent was largely confined to the 
United States, Haiti and .Africa. 
Other West European countries, 
including France and Germany, 
also minimized the threat initially 
even (hough European health au- 
thorities as early as 1983 warned 
against Importing American blood 
plasma. 


always been regarded as an unques- 
tioned symbol of Swiss probity. 

“This was done by our beautiful 
Red Cross, a national monument 
beyond suspicion,'' said Jacques 
Barillon, a lawyer for several in- 
fected people. “Distrusting the 
Swiss Red Cross was like saying 
that Mother Teresa starved chil- 
dren to death.” 


KOREA: UN Team Raises Hopes 

Continued from Page 1 verted enough fuel for one or twt 


evidence that it had diverted spent 
fuel to its nuclear arms program. 


verted enough fuel for one or two 
nuclear weapons several years ago. 
but the North Koreans deny this. 
On Saturday, North Korea sent a 


ft. 1 V*. ■ . r ° , UitkMIUUUIV, 

c 4r ecl0r "B cnc ^ idex to the agency expressing its 


j j-L », ° IMUUim IV* I VVVl T t dECULy 

manded that North Korea receive a consultation team." The agency ex- 


. ... VUU9UIUIUUII IUU1L 1 UG (UWUk J ba- 

cam of specialists to discuss steps pens who left Vienna on Sunday 
open ** possibility of fu- wcre scheduled to arrive in North 


The revelations have created an- 
ger in Switzerland, not only be- 
cause of the apparent negligence 
but also because the Swiss Red 
Cross, which is separate from the I 
International Committee of the I 
Red Cross, also based here, has I 


, « ..... _ / pt-l U» WUU ICU ” It 

to keep open the possibility of fu- wcre scheduled lo 
ture measurements of fuel .rods at Korea on Tuesday, 
the reactor. ,,,. ... 


To subscribe in France 


ujv icuciur. , , - _ .... 

of foiuTC measurement^ One 


just coll, loll free, 
05 437437 


, L_, , . ° m luiuTc raeasuremems. one 

Mdtacby cakuiaie hem S [" Nor ‘ il K °? a 10 st0 P 

oliMooium North Lw? S M rods °“ l . of "> c rracw - 


plutonium Nonh Korea might gW 1 ■ ™ 

&*JKKita 2 taJSh 

L1A believes dim North Korea dt- , s deiemantd to remove span fuel 





' : v' ; HtMr f<» Re<it» the Dividends of the Region’s Economic Revival 

• ‘ LONDON • JUNE 9-10 - 1994 


from the reactor. 

-Another possibility, the experts 
said, would be to obtain an under- 
standing that North Korea would 
leave the small number of rods that 
the agency wants to inspect in the 
reactor. A third approach would be 
to place the rods that the agency 
wants to inspect in special, sealed 
baskets, which would then be 
placed in cooling ponds. Monitors 
would retrieve the rods at some 
future point. 


Continued from Page t 

economic liberalization with West- 
ern aid remained unchanged. 

Lawrence H. Summers, the un- 
dersecretary of the Treasury in 
charge of international affairs, said 
in a speech on Friday that the re- 
cent slowing of inflation and other 
conspicuous improvements in Rus- 
sian economic policy “bear out the 
wisdom of a strategy of measuring 
the pace of support with the pace of 
reform while at the same time en- 
gaging as intensively and at as high 
a level as possible.” 

The OECD agreement, while not 
providing Russia with membership 
in the 25-nation economic think 
tank, will establish a forum for de- 
tailed dialogue on economic reform 
policies, according to Salvatore 
Zecchinl an assistant secretary- 
genera] of the OECD in charge of 
cooperation with the countries of 
Eastern Europe. 

The OECD deal with Russia, to 
be called a “Declaration on Coop- 
eration," will include; 

• An invitation to Russia to join 
a number of OECD committees as 
an observer. OECD committees of 
interest to Russia include those on 
financial markets, on industry, on 
agriculture, and on social and em- 
ployment issues. 

• A commitment to agree on an 
annual ‘'work plan" lor Russia that 
will include the preparation by 
OECD staff of sectoral analyses 


and policy options fra; reform. 

• A plan to being Russia into 
OECD advisory groups on privati- 
zation, foreign investment, indus- 
try and the environment. 

“We are aiming for a process of 
cross-fertilization, and 1 would 
characterize this agreement as one 
of the most important steps taken 
by Russia and the industrialized 
countries to have a more sharply 
focused forum for discussions," 
Mr. Zecchini said. 

He added that while Russia's 
participation in institutions such as 
the International Monetary Fund 
and the World Bank required the 
acceptance of rules on economic 
interaction in exchange for finan- 
cial aid, the OECD deal “means 
they are entering a process of poli- 
cy discusaon that is much more 
specialized, and where there is no 
counterpart in a negotiating pro- 
cess." 

Western diplomats said in inter- 
views that they also hoped it would 
be possible to make progress at 
next month’s annual OECD meet- 
ing on the requests for full OECD 
membership by Poland, Hungary, 
and the Czech and Slovak repub- 
lics. which they see as more ad- 
vanced along the road to economic 
reform titan Russia. “We hope to 
begin formal talks about member- 
ship, but it could take two years or 
more before they finally join,” one 
diplomat said. 


“A lot of people think 
totally insincere” lie saidffgTSfc 
everything he does is for 1 

litical motive. That fcewgnra 
bell to look like a oux gtijflh^l 
of just being a nice guy”- 
Glen Bolger. a Republican 
ster, said polling in. selected' 
gressional districts - 
him, even if national 
that the intensity otd 
Mr. Clinton was greater 
with recent presidents. 

“1 think it is the combination 
only getting 43 permit afihdyoie 


-people are less suxe ef his legilii 
mate claim to the White Housed 
along with the sense that, loot 
preaches in a moralisticioneabo^^ 
community and -greed andi valqesffi 
and his own Hfe reflects ncme ttS 
that,” he said. “1 think diaractef^ 
a major factor.” ' • - 
With Paula Corbin Jones’s 
suit accusing Mr. Clinton of sexuM*^ 


suit accusing Mr. Clinton of sexual 
harassment, the long investigation* 
of the Whitewater affair, and the 


revelation of Mrs. CTmtonVcdn£ 
modifies trading, doubts about the; 
presidential, character .are 
steep rise. ' 

Polls have shown that the pub^' 
lie’s perception that Mr. Clinton 
has a character problem has ebbed 
and flowed. But it is at high tide' 
this month, even at a time when the 
overall pubGc approval of the pres^ 
ideal is either edging down only 
slightly or bolding at slightly over 
50 percent approval : 

In a recent NBC-Wall -:Slreet . 
Journal poll, pluralities of Amen- 
cans ratel Mr, Clinton as “poor” in ; 
terns of bis ethical and moral val--;: 
ues, with 30 percent rating him ' 
poor, 29 percent mixed and 32 per- ; 
cent good- A Washington Post- • 
ABC News poll found that 56 per- ? 
cent said Mr. Clinton had the : 
“honesty and integrity” to serve..’ 
effectively as president, down from L j 
74 percent the week before he took 
office. . . V; 


BOOKS 


June 9 


June 1 0 


CONSOLIDATING AND SPREADING THE BENEFITS OF 

ECONOMIC CHANGE IN THE REGION 

Enrique V Iglesias. President. Inter-American Development Bank 


FUELLING FUTURE ECONOMIC GROWTH 
Eduardo AnlnaL Finance Minister. Chile 
Fernando Cossio. Minister of Finance. Bolivia 
Julio Sosa, Finance Minister. Venezuela 


TURNING THE NEW INVESTMENT ENTHUSIASM INTO 
LONG-TERM CAPITAL FLOWS 

David C Mulford. Chairman. CS First Boston Limited. London 
Ouno van den Broek, General Manager. ING Bank international 


SOCIO-ECONOMIC REFORM IN LATIN AMERICA: 
TOWARDS A NEW SOCIAL AGENDA 
Carlos Rojas, President. Solidarity Fund. Mexico* 

Gert Rosenthal, Executive Secretary. EC LAC. Santiago 


INNOVATING TO PROMOTE NEW FORMS OF 

SUSTAINABLE GROWTH 

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMERCIAL FUNDING 

Sir Michael Paillser. vice Chairman. Samuel Montagu. London 

CHANNELLING PRIVATE SAVINGS INTO FINANCING SOCIAL 

NEEDS 

Julio Bustamente, Superintendent. Pension Fund Administrators. 
Chile 

LINKING SCIENCE AND INDUSTRV 

Hugo Varsky, Erecutive Director. Boll var-En lace Programme 


REGIONAL AND SUB-REGIONAL INTEGRATION: 

AN ENGINE FOR GROWTH 
NAFTA 

Hermlnio Blanco Mendoza, Under Secretary of International 
Commercial Negotiations. Mexico 
CENTRAL AMERICA 

Ana Ordonez de Molina. Finance Minister. Guatemala 
THE CROUP OF THREE 
Government Minister. Colombia 
THE ANDEAN REGION 

Enrique Garda, President. Andean Development Corporation 
MERCOSUR 

Jorge Herrera Vegas. Under Secretary. Economic Integration. 
Argentina 

SOUTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AREA 

Rubens Antonio Barbosa, Ambassador. Brazilian Embassy. London 
THE LINK WITH EUROPE 

luan Prat. Director-General for North-South Relations. European 
Commission Brussels 


THE MASSACRE AT EL 
MOZOTE: 

A Parable of the Cold War 

By Mark Danner. Illustrated. 
304 pages. Paperback, $12. I'm. 
tage Books / Random House. 

Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupt 


WHAT THEVRE READING 


I N his marvelously lucid and 
fair-minded work of invesviaa- 


ROUNDTABLE: INVESTING IN MAIOR NEW 
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS 

Russell Herbert Managing Director. Global Gas British Gas. London 
lnakl Sand liana. Chief Executive. Telefonica International. Madrid 


LATIN AMERICAN INVESTMENT - FUTURE PROSPECTS 
Michael Brook, Director. Developing Country Finance Group. West 
Merchant Ban' 1 . London 

Roger Palmer, Director. Equities. Kleinwort Benson. London 


Conference Location 


CONSOLIDATING THE GAINS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
FUTURE INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT 
ECUADOR 

Leonardo Stagg. Director. Ecuadorian National Finance 
Corporation 

PERU 

lorge GameL Minister of Economy 
URUGUAY 

Ignacio de Posadas. Minister of Economy 


I T air- minded work of investiga- 
tive journalism. “The Massacre at 
El Mozote." Mark Danner, a staff 
writer for The New Yorker, re- 
counts a horrifying incident in ihe 
recent Salvadoran civil war that he 
aptly denotes “a central parable of 
the Cold War." 

Including both Danner’s original 
New Yorker piece and a lengthy 
section of document; connected 
with the incident, the volume sur- 
veys two overlapping aspects of the 
story. 

First, it explores inward to csiah- 
Itsh exactly what happened in De- 
cember ids I in ihe mountains of 
northeast El Salvador ro account 
for ihe presence of the many skele- 
tons that were exhumed in the 


• Julian Bond, the American civ- 
il rights leader, is reading "W. E B. 
Dubois: Biography of a Race, 1868- 
1919” by David Leavering Lewis. 

“I'm enjoying il just about more 
than any other book I’ve read. It is 
the most comprehensive look at 
Dubois and the start of the 20th- 


cemury civil rights movement It is 
richly detailed and thoroughly re- 
searched. It is just a marvelous look 
at Ihe man and his times.” 


(Barry James, IHT) 


never had a man, this girl had sung 
hymns, strange evangelical songs, 
and she had kept right on singing. 


ana sne naa kept ngtu on singing, 
too. even after they had done what 



The focus of this debate was a 
U. S. Congress divided over ideo- 


ly, from a terrifying passage about 
a woman who found her own way 


logical issues, worried about under- to transcend the pain: 


writing atrocities and fearful of be- “There was one in particular the 


ing accused of losing El Salvador to soldiers talked 3bout a girl on La 


communism. 

Given these crosscurrents of 
concern, the news of the massacre 
got wrapped in layers of ideology 
before the facts could be objective- 
ly examined. As Danner tel/s it. the 
pro-rebel Torres used ihe massacre 
lor propaganda purposes, while the 
anti -Communist side more or less 
denied (hat anything had happened 
beyond the normal misfortunes of 
war. 


Cruz whom they had raped many 
times during the course of the after- 
noon. and through it all. while the 
other women of El Mozote had 


had to be done, and shot her in the 
chesL 

“She had Iain there on La Cruz 
with the Wood flowing from her 
chest, and had kept on singing — a 
bit weaker than before, but stil! 
singing. A of the soldiers, stupe- 
fied. had watched and pointed. 

“Then they had grown tired of 
the game and shot her again, and 
she sang still,, and their wonder 
began to turn to fear —until finally 
they had unsheathed their ma- 
chetes and hacked through her 
neck, and at last the singing had 
stopped.” 

Throughout the remainder of 
this overwhelming book, you keep 
straining hopelessly to bear the 
sound of that singing, 


other women of El Mozote had Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is 
screamed and cried as if they had on ihe staff of The New York Tima. 


BRIDGE 


ghesi village of El Mozole in ihe 11 ‘ 

auJj.mni.r i9o;. lie tnos. devas.aling thing 

aK ™! u on J 1 * ™- -atom “The Massacre al El Mrv 


By Alan Tmscott 


H OW well extraterrestrials 
play bridee is a siihin-f rh.ir 


dence of these remains and on the 
testimony or a few survivors. Dan- 
ner concludes that in ihe course of 


I IIV IUV. 1 X UllllU 111 » • , . _ . 

about "The Massacre at El Mo- 15 a . subject that 

rote" is that it makes you see ihe "?*{*. a if5 nlJ °c- perhaps 

hopelessness of the logic on both ^ ” 1 . dcncc 


At another table, the contract 
and the lead were the same. A 
Greek player attempted the same 
line of play, but an L.G.M. named 
Shobote, sitting West, shrewdly 
played the diamond ten on Soutift 


1 Invited, but not confirmed 


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-o j 

Title iMWMas/M«rMiKi -Firet n.nme ^ • 


ner concludes that in the course of ^ comes from Warren Dix of Riyadh, P^ a y®ti the diamond ten on South s 

a campaign against rural guerrilla ' , . . Saudi Arabia, who reports on the deuce - When 9““° was led 

rebels, a Salvadoran government ,>J ™ cl.u n ^* 10 a PP €aran ce of some Little Green from dummy at the third trick 

unit known as theAilacail Banal- , J * Men wearin S metallized jump suits he diagnosed the auiafion exactly.' 

ion rounded up and slaughiered * a duplicate game at ieFrencb After only a short buzz be dropped ' 

767 people from El Mozote and ^rnrmned propaganda by broad- Bridge Cub in Athens. the diamond jack and Ihe conuaci - 

surrounding hamlets, many of ,hf wronwi^T °, n ^ diagramed deal the South “5 (f* ^ 

them women and children. S em 10 * ^ 01 nc cards were held bv Minnie a Utile hroDed the sujl There was no long- 

Of course, this account is agoniz- c *■ . . Green Woman, and she nlaved five any way for South to prevent 


Compare.. 


Address. 


.County- 


Telephone . 


ing to read and is redeemed only by 
the clarity of perspective the author 
brings to it You struggle to under- 
stand both the brutality of the sol- 
diers and the suffering of the vic- 
tims. and feel as if you are staring 
into the bowels of hell. 

Then Danner's account moves 
■outward to trace how (he news of 
(his massacre was received by the 
world. 

To complicate mailers. Ihe first 
reports were published al the time 
of the debate between, on one side, 
a Ronald Reagan administration 
trying to step up aid to the ruling 
military junta that backed the Alia- 
■cad Battalion, and. on the other 
side, human-rights advocates who 
were understandably eager to curb 
the excesses of what had become an 
extremely dirty war, 


At the same time, by adopting Sades 'wrih^ar^i^skn'l P a fr? 3 ^ 
jto siralegy of -rin-mj 

like fish in the sea of rural peasant- ^ a 6 routine JS? 5^8.® 


nxc iisn in me sea or rural peasant- mfr i rnmiru- ' ? 

ry they invited the only lojical re- vouIdL.t ffi At «£ 
sponsc of a determined enemy. , j ow . 


troDed the suiL There was no long- 
er any way for South to prevent 
East from gaining the lead and giv- 
ing his partner a dub niff. 


sponsc ot a aetemuned enemy. ta h!« vlw u.** TlTl' 2 \ 

which was. as the officers of the of spades, undwtei Sfhw^ 

nrmv mil if lo Infcp 9iu.iv ih>> un. . ‘ . . . . _ ,c •■carl uCc 


army put it. “to lake away jhc wa- 

ter from the fish, or get nd of the ____ f - , , . rui1 - 

peasants, even if. as Danner reports 


NORTH 
* A65 
“v S 7 6 4 
o A Q8S 
*63 


of El Mozotc’s inhabitants, they 


1 - , UIIUV 1 

her conical metallized haL Minnie 
won with the club king and led a 


happened to be born-again Chris- rij amrtl ,j frt „ “ng ana led a 
tians opposed to communism. - °-^ e acc al lhe second 


west (D) 

♦ Q74 
f A Q J JO 6 3 
■: J 10 3 


trick. She then led ihe diamond 


And if this strategy involved the queen ^ l0 disc ^ no ^ a 
daughter rtf innocent children, why heart, but had to ruff S 
this was the new rule of war as nrarincat rhf ^ 


tms was me new rule or war H produced the diamond Unt ffle 
imphcuN agreed upon by both glanced with interest at West's len- 
r r „ . spot, then crossed to the spade ace, 

in the face of Danner s account, led the diamond eight and hopeful- 
you can only stare m dumbfounded ly threw her heart five. WhenWest 
horror. There is no one to blame won with the diamond jack she 
,h . c u scds i 0r war Th* «»*y gaw him a Little Green smile and 
rdte for the reader comes, strange- made her contract. 


D) EAST 

* K 

13 T K 2 

:■ K 9 7 6 4 
*98754 
SOUTH 

* J 109 83 2 
?5 

2 

* A K Q J JO 


North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

West North East South 

5" l % 3 * 

’ » 4<fi ST S*.': 

Pass Pass Pass 


West led the club two. 


BC’V^ 

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INTERN \TION \h HERALD TRIBI NE, MONDAY. MAY 23, 1994 


tW’jn&ij 



Page y e *■ 


In Poorest Comer of Haiti, 
The Food Lines Grow Longer 

Aid Groups Fear New Embargo Will Aggravate Hunger 


Douglas Farah 

Watiugm pint Sen ne 

BOMBARDOPOLIS. Haiti - 
Every morning exctpt Sunday, 
hundreds or barefoot, skirnix. al- 
most naked children line tip in 
front of a smoky stick hut with a 

“ W, ?* r< J rtf 10 rewivc their only 
meat of the day. the one thing that 
Keeps them alive in the poorest cor- 
ner of Haiti, the Western Hemi- 
sphere s poorest nation. 

Without the feeding program. 
75 percent of these people would 
die, said Lessens Joseph, a Baptist 
pastor who works in this Nord* 
Quest department, referring to the 
feeding program run by CARE, a 
relief organization. “We have vetv 
little to produce now. Many people 
cannot plant now because they 
have no seed. They have eaten it* 

The Nond-Ouest has suffered 
four years or severe drought. Relief 
werkers and those who eke out a 
livit? in these steep, barren, eroded 
hills said a UN-mandated embargo 
on petroleum products begun in 
October greatly increased the cost 
of food and transport, malting an 
already bad situation much worse. 

And the near-total embargo that 
went into effect on Sundav. sup- 
ported by the United States and 
aimed at forcing the nation's mili- 
tary leaders to resign and allow the 
return of the deposed president, the 
Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide, 
is likely to make things worse. The 
only things exempted are food, 
medicine and propane gas for 
cooking 

Father Aristide, the nation's first 
elected president, was overthrown 
by the military in September 1991 . 
He asked for die embargo to choke 
the military into submission. But so 
far, with neighboring Dominican 
Republic allowing contraband to 
flow through, the measure has driv- 


needs have grown beyond the abili- 
ty of CARE and other organiza- 
tions to meet ihem. CARE cooks 
for 300,000 children, pregnant 
women and old people six days a 
week in the Nord-Ouesi and neigh- 
boring Artibonite departments. 

Last year, the program was ex- 
panded to include 320.000 more 
people, who now receive dry food 
>n large quantities to supplement 
their meager diets. CARE is one of 
the few groups to regularly visit this 
region. 

“A year ago. we were feeding 200 
kids a day here “ said Remdien 
Aramis. 34. who is in charge of the 
feeding center. "But now more and 
more come; and we have 250 or 300 
children, and pregnant women and 
old people. So the same amount of 
food has to go further.” 

Matt Anderson, a CARE worker 
familiar with the area, said requests 
for aid were pouring in, but “we 
can't help everyone because we 
have limited stocks.” 

Much of the food is donated by 
USAID in an effort to blunt the 
effects of the embargo on the poor. 
The meal consists of wheat and soy 
meal, cooked into a higb-prouen 
gruel, sometimes with sardines do- 
nated by the Canadian govern- 
ment. 

“We eat here now. then the chil- 


en prices u^, allowing the wealthy 


and the officer corps to survive, 
while making life increasingly diffi- 
cult for everyone else; 

[The Uoited Suites is pressing 
the Dominican Republic to cooper- 
ate in enforcing the new trade em- 
bargo, Vice President A1 Gore said 
Sunday. He declined to specify 
whether Washington was using the 
Dominicans’ lucrative sugar trade 
with the United States as a lever to 
bolster Dominican enforcement 
along its border with Haiti] 

President Bill Clinton and other 
world leaden say the suffering in 
Haiti is a direct result of the mili- 
tary's failure to allow Father Aris- 
tide to return, and die officers are 
responsible Tor the worsening con- 
ditions. 

But m this largely iBherate re- 
gion, where news from the outside 
is scarce, electricity almost un- 
known and even, radios are hardly 
available, many "people seemed 
only lb know Thai thar fives were 
worse now than before, and had no 
understanding of what the embar- - 
go was about. 

“I don’t know where the embar- 
go comes from,” said an elderly 
cook at the center. “It just falls on 
us from the sky." 

With the gasoline embargo, it 
has become prohibitively expensive 
to move anything to this mountain 
hamlet 290 Idlomeiers (180 miles) 
northwest of the capital, a gnieling 
9-bour trip in a four-wheel-drive 
vehicle. The three buses a week that 
used to make the trip have long 
since stopped, in pan because erf 
the gasoline prices and in part be- 
cause the road has almost disap- 
peared: The number of riders on 
the few vehicles that make the trip 
have climbed fourfold, making it 
impossible to bring in goods or 
move produce to market. 

“The situation here is critical in 
every sense," said Stanfield Ex el am 
Jr., the town’s mayor. “The etnbar- 
has completely crushed Bom- 


Rebel Units 
Get Control 
Of Airport 
In Rwanda 


Items that are already scarce like 
seeds, insecticide and pesticides, as 
wdl as the few consumer goods still 

available, will likely become com- 
pletely inaccessible undo - the latest 
embargo. 

“The land does not produce any- 
more," said Jean-Ribert Pierre, a 
fanner. “1 can’t buy insectiade. 
Caterpillars eat everything.^ This 
country has had it. It is lost- 
CARE and other relief agencies 
are able to distribute food because 
ihe United Nations has authorized 
fuel for humanitarian uses. 

But Gary Philoctete. deputy di- 
rector of CARE said increased 
sanctions would lead to more prob- 
lems in distribution because of the 
constant need for spare parts and 
other items needed to cany out the 
program. Rains and lack of mamte- 
Sance of ihe roads mem oat vehi- 
cles and increase the difficulty of 

distribution. ... . 

And, according to diplomats and 
relief workers, ^mtnaauQaJs. 
while exempted, will be more costly 
and scarcer because it is not yet 
dear whether private IWJ*. 
ed to bring in many of tbe goods, 
will be allowed to continue 
While the feeding program wil 
continue, relief workers said, the 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Pott Semce 

NAIROBI — Rebel forces in 
Rwanda seized control of the inter- 
national airport in Kigali the em- 
battled capital on Sunday, then 
routed government troops at an ad- 
jacent army barracks after three 
days of the fiercest urban fighting 
since the country collapsed into 
civil war and anarchy last month. 

United Nations officials in Kiga- 
li confirmed that the rebels had 
taken control of the airport, the 
main lifeline for relief supplies into 
the capital and the proposed stag- 
ing area for 5,500 peacekeeping 
troops scheduled to go into Rwan- 
da under a recent UN resolution. 

The airport had been shut for 
three days because of the intense 
mortar and- artillery fire^The fight- 
ing damaged the nearby UN conw 
pound. ... 

“It was the heaviest fighting I 
have seen since the civil war start- 
ed,” said a UN ntilitary officer, 
Captain Heraldo Garda of Uru- 
guay. 

It was undear bow the rebel 
takeover of the airport might affect 
relief efforts. The UN relied on the 
airport for daily food flights from 
Nairobi bin the International Red 
Cross had been taking supplies 
overland from Burundi. 

The takeover also calls into ques- 
tion the future dispatch or addi- 
tional UN African peacekeepers. 

The United States, which would 
be expected to use its airlift capa- 
bilities to support the UN interven- 
tion. had already expressed its res- 
ervations about sending troops into 
Kigali's airport ontil an assessment 
could be nude about security. 

General Romeo DaHaire, com- 
mander of tie small UN contingent 
in the capital was quoted by news 
agencies Sunday as saying that 
Rwandan government forces, 
mostly members of tbe Hutu ethnic 
group, evacuated the airport just 
before dawn, without resistance. 


After taking tbe airfield, rebels 
of the Rwandan Patriotic Front 
quickly advanced eastward to the 
government army barracks at Kan- 
ombe, which at the time was being 
defended by three battalions. 

Tbe fall of tiie barracks triggered 
a stream of more than a thousand 
fleeing civilians- Some armed refu- 


gees apparently sought protection 
with Ghanaii 


Jhanaian UN peacekeepers, 
who disarmed them. 

Rwanda erupted in . chaos on 
April 6, when President Juvfcaal 
Habyarimana was killed when his 
plane crashed, apparently shot 
down by a rocket Since then, rebel 
troops nave been steadily advanc- 
ing on. the capital and consolidat- 
ing their bold on other parts of the 
country. The rebels are a predomi- 
nantly Tutsi movement, but lately 
their ranks have bets swelled by 
Hutos who have also become vic- 
tims of the systematic campaign of 
extermination in the capitaL The 
ca m paig n has targeted mostly Tut- 
■ris, but also Hutus considered sym- 
pathetic to the guerrillas. 

The United Nations and various 


■ " - ii c relief agencies have estimated the 

Australia Holds snspeci w jj ^ ^ fighting a t a quar- 

In Killing of 7 Hiker* «r of . million to^UOD sh« 


bloodletting began. 

Tkr Associated Press ^ of thousands of corpses 

CAMPBELLTOWN. Aosmto ^ ^ damjxdiafo the Kagera 
—The police arrested a key suspect R j ver> which winds ns way from 
on Sunday in the hM Kigali through Tanzania and 

i i> I.i, the New South T into Ijilte VkioriiL 


SU d-*. 

him with armed robbery and refus- 
ing him bail. 




the 49 -year-old suspect m me 
«r mn Rnions. three yer 


Uganda mto Lake Victorn. 

The presence of thousands of 
bloated, decomposing bodies wash- 
ing into Lake victoria has caused a 
health emergency Jot Uganda. On 
Sunday, President Yoweri Muse- 


slayifl^ of two Bmons. veni declared three lake districts a 

and two Australian* t nu -r. 


SSrh> 1 5*r5s 

southwest of Sydney. 


disaster zone. The president's of- 
fice estimated that as many as 
40,000 corpses bad appeared in 
Lake Victoria. 


dren go to sleep crying because 
there is no more to eat." said 13- 
year-old Emmanuel Remilian, ax 
he waited in line along with several 
dozen children. “This is the only 
food we haw today, because there 
is no food at borne to feed us. Life 
is hard in this country.” 

Many of the children bore the 
classic signs of malnutrition, with 
large, shrunken bodies and hair 
turned blond from a lack of pro- 
tein. 

For a while, people tried to make 
ends meet by selling off their herds 
of goats, traditionally kept as a 
reserve to be sold few cash in tough 
times. Now those are gone. too. 

According to a February 1994 
report from USAID, the “average 
nutritional status of children 
weighed in the monitoring network 
continues to worsen.” 

“In March 1993, 15 percent of 
children weighed were ( moderately 
or severely) malnourished: in Janu- 
ary 1994. 20 percent were either 
moderately or severely malnour- 
ished.’’ 


But in the Nord-Oucst region, 
almost 30 percent of the children 
are moderately or severely mal- 
nourished. according to the report. 
And the proportion of low birth 
weights is the highest in the coun- 
try. about 15 percent. 



Israel Issues Alert After Raid 




% 


Shiites Vow Revenge for Abduction of Leadei 


By Clyde Haberman 

AW Far* Timet Server 

JERUSALEM — Israel on Sun- 
day put its overseas missions and 
its soldiers along the northern bor- 
der on alert against possible repri- 
sal attacks for its kidnapping or an 
Islamic guerrilla leader in Leba- 
non. 


I 1 -. V .i-.r.'d Pr. 


Israeli police arresting a rightist demonstrator in Jerusalem over 
the weekend during a protest over the killing of two Israeli soldiers. 


Shiite Muslim militants in Leba- 
non threatened a “spectacular" re- 
taliation for a daring raid on Satur- 
day in which Israeli commandos 
had flown deep into Lebanon and 
captured Mustafa Dirani. who 
heads a pro-Iranian group. Israel 
says he may have information on 
the whereabouts of a long-missing 
Israeli airman. He was bring inter- 
rogated at an undisclosed location. 

That there might be reprisals is 
accepted as inevitable in Israel Of- 
ficials keenly recall that soon after 
their last big attack against a Leba- 
nese Muslim leader, a helicopter 
ambush in February 1992 that 
killed the local head of Hezbollah, 
his wife and young child, the Islam- 
ic Jihad group blew up the Israeli 
Embassy in Buenos .Aires, killing 
two dozen people and wounding 
scores of others. 

So. with Buenos Aires in mind, 
the government sen! out an alert to 
all embassies and consulates, lt 
also ordered army commanders 
along the Lebanese border to pre- 
pare for possible rocket attacks by 
Hezbollah guerrillas a gains t Isra- 


el's northern towns and settle- 
ments. 

For now. however. Ihe battle was 
one only of words. There were no 
reports of military action at the 
border. And as for a possible effect 
on the Middle East peace negotia- 
tions, there was silence both from 
Lebanon and its patron. Syria, 
which dominates the Bckaa area 
where Mr. Dirani lived and was 
seized in the middle of the night* 


Israeli officials give a good chant h< 
of still being ah've. even though M £i 
Rabin acknowledged this weeken & 
that he had “no definitive prod et, 
one way or another. nold- 

Unlike the situation with Sheik tv . , 
Abdel Karim Obeid, an Isiam/o^P 6 ^ 
leader in Lebanon who was kic t& 
napped by Israel in 1989 and is stf j» e ““ 
being held. Mr. Dirani was nr .*?r 
seized to be used as a bareainin ecr™§ 
chip to obtain the navigators fret *- inne ’ 






s i. 

Vt 


The panache of the operation. £5 -l* ^ art work with Sbdk ^ “K 
plus the absence of casualties other lit certainly will not wot bs““^ e | 

ilvnn ah hnv Mr Ranm c^in i* J3 i lv 1QCC i 


than an Israeli soldier slightly 
wounded in a flurry of g unfire, pro- 
vided a morale boost to many Is- 
raelis, The presumed domestic 
boon for Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin prompted a few opposition 
figures to charge that the kidnap- 
ping was politically motivated, an 
accusation flatlv 
eminent 
gistics 

months ago, they said, and the tim- 
ing was based purely on “opera- 
tional considerations.” 

Lieutenant General Ehud Barak. 


this lime. Mr. Rabin said. 


sk 




Instead, he said. Israel wants Mj i&j 
Dirani to Find out what he know.igjfrj _ . n < 
about Captain Arad’s possibl ^ f 


whereabouts. 


es. 


In 1986. the Israelis say. Mr. Dir ge?^ ^ le 
ani was a leader of a group that ha* ae O' 6 
captured the Israeli, and tbei Xjj bv 00 1 n 
turned him over two years later t< -t-IT " 


m flatlv rejected by gov- lum “ ™ two years later t'T-^ .w 

and army leaders. Thelo- Eanian-supponed revolutions,- ^ u, g 

had been worked out § uar 'd s tor S300.000. al H -~ig 


Palestinian Police Action 


. . . . HtaL, 
high _ tyf 

Palestinian police officers set uj °* 1 “d ^ 
a roadblock in the Gaza Strip a*u _ tw c 
checked Palestinian cars for weap „ ““f Jaw'r 
the army chief of staff, insisted that ons Sundav. responding to Israel’: me “ jnte- 
he was guided by the “moral debt” demand for tighter security afie;? dlive anr? 1 
that be said was owed lo Captain two soldiers were killed by Island ' na S- ts c‘ 
Ron Arad, an air force navigator militants. The Associated Press re 1- , *s L.! 
who was shot down over southern ported from Jerusalem. 10 inc ® d i i 

In the West Bank town of He-, n ®jf* 
bron. Israeli troops using anti-tank 5 ” mds 
missiles raided a hideout of Islamic “ 
militants, demolishing several^ , “ n_ 
homes and killing one person, ra- j- ol r 
dio reports and witnesses said. 7 

k she 
n .tion 


Lebanon in 1986 and who is one of 
six servicemen missing in Lebanon. 

Tbeir fate is a highly emotional 
issue for many Israelis. Feelings are 
especially strong in the case of Cap- 
tain Arad, the only captive whom 


wer. 


Threat or Opportunity? 


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•ITTi 


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Ten Auo 8ft ft ’0* 
Ten Jul it* 03 ftft 
ThvwenAua 7ft ft ftft 
TMCC Aug 5 95 98ft 


Floating Rata Notes 


Ben Di Rom Aar 97 
Belgium Aw DO 
Belgium May ft 
Bk Greece Aw 97 
BnlAwDO 
era Aug 94 


C&g Jan 95 
Ccu Fea 06 
Cr Fonder Aw 96 
Cr Italic Jul 97 
EtaPp Mar 9ft 
Hub Tm Jun Jun 97 
levehner Nov 95 
Italy Oct 05 
Public Pwr Sep 97 
Sl-gabaln e Pcre 


HmcJaJulM 
HmetaseaS 
Hmcta Aua3* 

HMC BO Aug 34 
Hmcta Jun 34 

Hmc Redeemed May 13 
Hntc Redeemede Fee is 
Homer (Nall Sea S 
LKdsBHCDKft 
Leeds Bsoc Feb 97 
Leeds Bsec Mar ft 
Leetb B5ocOci94 
Ua lo I Jul 35 
Leo la7 Mt Jul 35 
Moes2Moy 17 
Maes Fund Jut 18 
MfC4 0l Jul3S 
MIc 1 a Mar 30 
Mfc Na.lb Mar 20 
Milo Oa 23 
Msinoa n 
MU Sen 28 
Mtg Fund Nov 35 
MID Fund Jul 35 
Mtg Fund Oct 23 
Mt« Fund Od 23 
Mto Fund Auo 33 
Nationwide Od 9t 
NatMriwfdeSeoft 
Nationwide Jul ft 
NattanwIdcjunK 
Natarw Bs Fcbft 
Motor ov Bs Mor 96 
NewZeatnd Aug97 
M7II4 DdllDct IS 
Northn Roc Od 9t 
Rasta No 1 May Mov 18 
Resld Prop Jul 18 
$11 Od II 
5ri Mtg la Mar 21 
Stars! Pic Dec 29 
TetnPtoNolMen'31 
Temple NolJanS 
T me 6 Ocl IS 
T me 7 NOV L5 
Tvnc 8 Dec 18 
TmcSa AugJl 

Tme 10 Mar 19 
T me 11 Mar 20 
T me No 01 Sea Sett 14 
Tmc No 03 Nay Nov |4 
Tmc No 03 Aw Apr 15 
Tmc Mo M May May 15 
Tme No 05 Sea Sen 15 
TmcNaWFebEebl* 
Tmc Plmby Aim 30 
Tmcn 151 2 Jul 19 
Tmco JftdrOd 39 
Tmca4Tli5Apr39 

T mcp 5Th 6 Aug 21 

Town 4 Count Nov 9* 
Woolw Bs JWI97 
Wooh* Emri Nov 95 
Wootw Eauf Joa ft 
Yorkshire b/SJul77 


BdJuofS 
Bel Jun ft 
BdJulH 

BCD Di WP Dec 96 
BCONapHkSMB 
B»NQp In Aug 97 
BcoScntonSeP " 
Belgium MavN 
Beigfari Jem 95 
Belgium Jul 96 

BeWumJpnW 
BdotumOdM 
Beta him Mt Feb 95 
Bergen Bk Auo 97 
BaryenBkAugft 
BfitHnBvMnrff 
BtkubenSepOO . 
BHbao Intt g Aug} 01 
BkO<lnaOd«7 
Bk China Jut ft 
8k Fur Ar Mar 00 
Bk Greece 3Bit Dec f# 
Bk Gnaca Fcb97 
B* Greece Dec ft 
Me Greece Mor 03 
Bk Greece Mar 99 
BkGrMceDtcft 
Bk Ireland Sen 89 

Bk Ireland Dk 49 

BkMantrlJulfa 
Bk Nova 5c Alta 89 
Bk Scot Nov 89 
BkSaMjndvPerp 
BkcmnmunJ Oct 01 
BOIAuot? 

Bd (Hfcl NOV 03 


998* 0A8 

97V* an 
991* 0A5 

Wft « 

v an 

99ft OM 
V7Yl U» 


DkbJpmSgt* _ 
DanoHrieSta} Feb IQ 
Drad ApAog OS 


Dread A* Mar oil 
W! 3 Ag Apr 03 
lOreadAaSepttl 

EhrriOclD2H 
Ecac Dec 0u 
EdlJun94| 

Foe Feb as 
ed novo? 

Edf 

tribunco Mur 'M 

ElbJanUH| 
EB>Od 
EksportflnAugDI 

Ekjportfln 5+ft«K 

Elders Res DecW 
Euratima Jan03| 
Exltrtk SCP 97 d 
Exterior Nov 0^ 

FjcJe. Aug 97|B 

FjttuDec94 
Fjtxoctra ■ 
FerravleMEnrW 
FlnOcSepftB 
RnacMarHl 
Fin Real Aua« 

■pintond Mov 99 ■ 
FqnjmCr Aug 988 
Full Int Fin S«P M| 
GeccFflbtB^Hd 
GeccJanttt 
GeccDecnHH 
GJJILniFgbffl 
GJJ.Ibnp) 5ep97l 
Giro Cr As Dec OB 
GctdmwLnNuyCB 
GaktmonLpOdM 
Goldman LP Auo Ml 
Gammon Lp May 03] 
Gotabanfcen SepOl | 
GoKKwnkenDecft 
Great Lakes Doc n 
Guangdong May ft | 
hlrtotxi Jun Q3H I 

HIwSiiimB 
■BiStinoet JdlS 
Hlfl Samuel Perp I 
HUI Samuel Feb VB 

HtaaanDAmerOctOt 


99ft OOO 
99ft 803 


9fti m 
991* 080 


99ft 8-03 
99ft 0.10 


^ & 
99V* «? 


99** !■« 

98ft 


tv* — 

99U, 049 


mi 1 . 2 } 

99H W? 


nv* os 

ft 1-24 


93ft 1-44 
K** 143 


98v* 

77ft 1-7* 


1J7 

feft iJ9 


9BV* U2 
989* 846 


IlMjKW® 




U.S. Dollars 


Pound Sterling 


TMCC Feb 
TMCC Jan 

TMCC Mr 


I* S3 90ft 

ft *9 9BV* 

95 »8ft 
ft 91 101ft 




Tahoku EbfAsr7ft 97 107ft 

Tokyo Gas Jul 5ft M 94ft 
Toyota Fin Dc 4ft ft ftft 
Toyota Fin JiPl 414 ft 97ft 
Toy uto Fin Mtn5 95 ?8ft 
Toyota Me Jeit 4ft 97 1HP* 
Toyoro Mr Mr 5ft 98 ftl* 
Uni lev Mery 8 96 io?ft 

UrHevMr bft ft 106ft 
unlievMr no 109ft 

Uswesuul 5ft 98 94'* 

Vattenfall Jim 6 H 96ft 
Vw l nil Aug 3 01 71*b 

VwInllOcJ 9ft 98 108ft 

Woi-MrtOct 5ft 98 »3ft 
WomerLApr 8ft 96 1D7V- 



Dollar Zeros 


Sod 

Mot Price Ykt Tre> 


AOb Auo 
Amer Hasp Auo 
Amer inti Aug 
Amex Bk Dc 
Ami inti Usd 
Austria Jul 
BPCOPJun 
Br Gas PIcNov 
CccelWr- 
CcceMav 
CcceP 

Ciiem Nv Feb 


04 

45 ft 

802 

-%0 

Don 

00 

(2 

7.98 

+101 

Ext 

04 

45% 

7.97 

+56 

Gdi 

00 

40% 

7.91 

+90 

Gtd 

97 

7\ft 

11.13 

+477 

haT 

95 

93% 

5J0 

+39 

Hal 

95 

•Jft 

tor 

+67 

Hal 

21 

10% 

850 

+68 

Hal 

01 

tOi* 

7J2 

+46 

Hal 

Mm 

07 

37 

7J9 

+40 

09 


HJ3 

+62 

■jn 

•5 

95% 

585 

+80 



*89* 028 

99 026 

99 0J2 

98ft 034 
99ft 034 
99ft OJA 
99ft 0JB 
99ft QUO 
99ft 043 
99ft 0.43 
98V* 023 

99ft 033 
•9ft OOO 
98 

99ft 0J4 
9T?b 07 
97ft 83? 
99ft 0.15 
99ft 
99ft 
99ft 


BnpFebOJ 
BwOdn 
BnpJlH97 
Bnp3*049 
B no Feb 95 
Boo Corn Jun OD 
Baa Coro Mar 99 
Boo Care Mov 90 
Boll cur) Nov 97 
BaPcri&Bs3eo4» 
BrCotumbFCBB 
Broadway Oct 99 
Bt Nv Core Apr 09 
BtirrcSepn 
eodOntortoHyMar99 
COriptoJul99 
CartptoFebta 
CnriptaApr97 
E verm Feb 99 
-.Jut 49 
Cba Feb 49 
Oxj Feb99 
Cba Jul 98 
CcdMm-97 
Cd Aug 03 
Cd Mar 04 

CdMavn 

CepmeJunfS 
CtdPebOl 
those Mon Sep 03 
OwmcorPAWE 
OrtnaTstAnrn 
Christ OaOdV7 
Christ Oo Sep 01 
Christ oa Nov 49 
OK Aug 49 
ClK Jd 41 
aHcRedeemeAwef 
CttkreNaSeoOS 
CmcreNoJieiBS 
attcrpNaAugOS 
CambaKSMOZ 
CoaiH Fin Novas 
Commz AbScpOZ 
ComzWa/SNavBS 
Camxbka/sAuaOS 
Comzbtr o/b Nov 98 
Conti Bk Aug 98 
Cr Du Nora Oct 77 
Cr Fonder Od 03 
Cr Italia Jun 03 
CrltattaAugM 
Cr Italia Feb 09 
Cr Italia Jun 97 
Cr Loral AW 05 
Cr Local Feb 93 
Cr Load Dec 02 
Cr Local Auo 02 
Cr Local Dec 97 
CrLvorniSoaDS 
Cr Lyonn Mar BJ 
Cr Lytwt Aun?7 
Cr Lyonn Jon M 
CrLyaretJuiOO 
CrLvannDect9 
Cr Lvoon Jul 98 
Cr Lyonn Mw *8 

8 


90 

92ft 0.93 


93V. 0.93 

97 1.1J 


100ft 020 

81 1J9 


99ft Off 

93 pje 


99ft 633 
UOft 029 


99ft 0J3 

79ft 1J7 


K 8J1 
9Bft 043 


U 1J1 

ms 143 


97 &S2 

99*+ a» 
88ft 1« 
m* 049 
taft 1.“ 
94ft 

94ft 0A4 
99 ““ 

92ft w? 
94 

rii 
«ft I.H 


Stt'SSTi* 5 






17 K2 

taft W9 


91 ft JK 
94 M? 


93ft 0-73 
99ft 


I MutrfleUaJanI8| 

^NOBOd® • mi 

NabJal9joi97^H 
Not BkConodo Jut 94 
No* invBk SeaSaa 

NananwMiJvlf7l 
Natfcnwf«Nov9^ 
Mat! Po w e r Ocl BO I 
HatyiesBvDoetfJ 
Natwost AuaOBte 
NotwestOdM I 
MatyrtStoJol4*l 
UatwesibMar«l 
McJwcStBv AprW] 
NotwOStc HovlTB 

NbeMorfflM 
NbcFeb4?H 




■wm 


Wi j;; 
99M 112 


iNevZottaimnOdV 
NtwZeaMMnJdft 
Now ZradM Junta 1 
IttawZertttaMfOettr | 


UOft M8 

92ft 1-1° 


1 m- 

.• v. 

•»- r-sE 


00 MB 

a g 
& Si 

19ft Mf 
99ft « 
97ft 047 

m gw 

•2ft M9 
92ft M? 


.-Mr .jbk;« 

■:iVj 

• - 


187 
L03 
142 
1J5 
91 1-33 

71 1J$ 

100ft 

um 139 
149 

- 1 


77ft in 


99ft 006 
991* 130 


HokwikuSreH 

HsbCS Dec4v 


UOft &3B 
9Wb 033 


999* 034 

99ft U2 


99ft 019 
99ft 110 


99ft 111 
99ft 130 


8fft 1JH 
92ft on 


9Zh 049 

91ft 1.M 

91ft 1-22 

99ft M2 

98ft 039 

99ft 844 

7Sft 2-07 

TWO 144 

03 1X3 

04 BOO 

n 137 

95 151 

MW 172 

99ft BJ4 

9 HE. EEJ 

95 066 

Bft 1.U 

t? l.U 

99 in 

HOft 133 

99ft 125 

99 1» 

99 028 

fn* oai 

no 037 

9VV) 129 

90 1.11 . 

90ft L31 

92 177 

90* 074 

NSft 122 

06ft 149 

92 IN 

ioum ai7 

no M4 

98 146 

99ft 100- 

100 127 

s s 

s* & 

971* 131 

SWs- 1 JOS 

1J1 

ms U2 ■ 

91 M2 

93 . 148 

99ft ua 

94ft 074 

78ft 143 


HsbcsDoc4f 
KS0CIAUB49 
HSDC 5 Jtfl 4? 
HYunddOccODecn 

Hvunool Motor Od 98 
IbrdNovB 
ibrdPore 
ibid Mw 98 
ibssNonKDv05 
lbspNossSep03 
i tap NOUS Jut 03 
i tap Turin Jul 00 
I tao Turin Feb 98 
1ml Bk Int May 99 
iml int) Dec 98 
1 ml Inti Jun n 
iml Intt Sen 97 
Indian OU Nov 9i 


94ft 1J8 

i i 

77ft 143 
HID UA 
HO 













9 » • ua;- -• • 

. ---sav. ^ - - 

■ fNtrtorK 7 ^' 

■' s Wfc- W ^ 

- '^vWv^- 
gfc is - 3 ". . 

■■ 

.. 97*i, ".tTE' ; ■ - 

- 

v;.n»:.Btt{vvr 


MW. 


91ft 179 
94 ft 
•718 


»9ft 8-13 

99ft 1» 
99ft ON 
99ft M2 
99ft 249 
99ft 022 
99ft M9 

mi oa* 
92 J-*? 

B8Vi 1JT 
IWb 1W 
041 
103 
99ft 117 
MS 
108 


75ft-,- .143 
\7J* -219: ^ 

Ml .~bSS r 

99 • IN-'- - 

91 - ?S - -. 
99ft' ta-lTiM- 
99ft 839 . 

99 •■■-.BJf-'-' • 

91ft -858. 

9214 . .IS8.V 
91ft - LH : . . 

S-:«: ■' : 

99ft- . 148 _ 

„ :BJ : - 

19* -Oft:-. 



97ft 113 
97ft 1M 
mi 057 
95ft 051 
B 130 


Kommoidnv JufH 
Kop 11/2 Ml Feb Ml 
iMoatrentayfeil 
Kop 15/ Mov MB 
Kop 2V Mov 9e 
KOpa/Morw 
Kop Jul 97 HI 
KraSapdl 
■Cop May hH 
Korea Exdi Mar 97 
Lovaroo/sStpH I 
Lb RhelnH Dec osl 
Lb Htieki M Moral 
UdiFeoBl^M 
Ltd) Oct 02 
LkDAuBlcH 
LkUFIoNvNovWl 
UunbslJun4fa 
UOVOAS2 Nov 49 
Liovdxl3Aw49 
Motayxla AwlS 
MoiovskiOdDsI 
MotylncMnuH 

sasssw 

MMlaidll Juni9| 


SvenskahNavHJ 
Swedtxmk Jut97| 
SwodtXjnkOct 49l 
SwedbankFebal 


l Takuotn OCIOCT 
| Tut Ltd Jul 96 
Toko) Bk Sen DO 


025 . 
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■ . 042 

5m i» 

m \ S' 

■ 147 
243 
048 - 
in . 
174 
Ul ' 
M4 ' 
99ft 120 
lift.. 148. 
01 . 144 

991* 126 

Wft 4UB-- 
1ft 049- 
136 


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Hii 5u»- ; 

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cone- 

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Ciner^*-;:: 

<pnrJJ 

nirr>’'- v — 
dtfff*’ 001 -"* 
if r>" v 

Ctfrw p -- * 

7 h ,p,,:.. 

I'urdiif 


148 
187 

197 | Urban iMgOdte 

Urban Mto May « 
. WesttbCurMovDl 

«m 101 

IJ7 


BM MS 
TBft 143 
— 1J1 

149 


US 
-WZ- 
1J5 

180 
105 
192 

083'. ■ 

99ft 122 
99ft 139 
TOO '04- 
1J1 

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839 
Ul 

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041 
022 
1.18 
J.8S 
IJH 
070 


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'ycr-'- :: T; 

IWk ^ I"- 7 ' 


l«» 5UBB 
74ft 204 
74ft 221 
M% 081 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Sales I 

Dtv rid 100s i-Ogfi low Ctt One Stacks 


Sates 1 

Dm Yin lOOsHigh Low ase awe Stocks 


Safes | 

Dtv V*j 10th HSgti Law Che Chge I Stocks 


OTC Consoiidaied trading (or week 
ended Friday. May 20. 


C*t rid lOOsHfrti Low Cisc Chge ] g£| p 


Div Yld 100s HWi Low Ose Choe sgiwh 
AHti+ cr i 


AOosVov .14 1.0 BI2 1«1*15 16 *1 

ACMakis 24 t j lsiilJ+E 13ft 14ft— i 

AmEaaie - Si bo 14 nv, 14 * 

AmEcoI .03 e J 123 10 Vft 9W - 

rumQJuc 563 4>* 4': J'Y — 

AmFB .20 2.0 1617 It 10ft 10ft — 
i AmFrgt 5 .. 784620 18ft 19»* * 


16 -1 1 8HA .17 

lift— ift- BHCFns JU 
U * i., 1 Bl Inc 
9ft -ft BUYS 
4ft _1. 1 SKCSem 


APeaPod 
A Pius 
AAONs 
ABC Bcs 
abc Ran 


_ 401 5V« 4ft i 

2905 11 «b »ft 11 


V* _v; BSBBcs 


“ S77S lift 13*. I5+. -9. Z,S BJ 7 / 

7*4 i5ft lit, i5 AmLcK — 15 S 

I llffl|7ft 15ft 17ft -1ft AMS .- ran Bft 21 


20 1 3 30616 


loss 23'., ?1»* sift ] ft ArruuioSat 

3419 19ft lift 14_J AMobile 


ACXTc 

5oi&A - 

A EL 

AEPS .08 .! 

AER En 

aUcds .681 3.1 

AFC CM 

AK Steel 

APS Hid 

API Net 

ASK 

AST 

ATS Med 
AW Ah 

Aomes JO 3.' 

AomRt B .08 .4 

AnronRI M i 

Atiaxis 
AbbevH 

Ailing SU ,IOO .1 

Abloma - 

AbieTei 

Ah rams .13 3.1 

Anra>as 

AOSlElTT 

Accel 

AcesHn 

Adnm s 

AeeCsn 

Ac eta J2 13 

ACMT 

ACMT A 

AcnwMet 

Adel 

AcIPerl 

AciPrwt 

AdVolC 

ACxwm ... 

AdacLb 48 4.1 
A stage 
AttOfHC s 
Adinotn 
Adelpti h 

AdloSv .Is ‘ 

AdobeS s 30 J 

AdvHIt 

AavRos s 

AdvCir 

AOvInt 

AdvLca 

AdMhSv 

AaN/UIR 

AdvPalv 

AdvPra 

AdvSem 

AdvTLb 

AdvTctl 

AavTiss — 

Advanra s .30 .! 

AowotitB s 24 .1 

AovBcp 

Aecurtm 

Aernwn 

Aetnum 

Afymox 

AgSvcs - 

AoncvR 

Aonicoa .10e 9 
A gaum 

AgriOvn _ 

AirE. to JO .9 
AirMeth 
Airten wt 
AirSen , 

Airtrt _ 

Atman .13 1.4 

Atom _ 

AKZO 1M e 7.9 
AlamoGe J6 2.1 
A/Onlec 


12a ,013419 19ft lift 16 — J 

„ 3475 lSft 14' : 15' ... ^[i1JDSrv, 

- 83736 34'i 3Sft -ft C'ri&l®'' 

- I49« 41ft 36ft 37ft -lft 

_ M0 IVv 17ft 13’ . -ft 

8 8?- 7ft "".i. -ivi, mPwrCvS 
08 .5 361 loft I5ft lift *gj'5' isn 

459 8 7'.- ARoar 

3069 13V. I’, 12ft - ft I A mPOC T. 

681 3.0 7053 18’* 6 T8 -I 1 -. ifmRrtd 
22211ft lft 11'. — ^ ft ; £"2***^ 
... 1767730ft fft 20ft - ft | 7?2^1- 
_ 7234 TO* 10ft 30** -2ft I 
.. 6715 7ft 5 S'. -ftif’S'V* 1 

- 92619 13’. B' : 12'*-, -S' 

63642 16’.. 14'.. 15ft -ft I J"''* 1 *. 
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JO 1* 763 8ft 7ft 7ft — ftlAUldGw 

.00 .6 1195 13ft 12 12ft - 1 | 


5 3012 

1430 S 
- 3103 20 


<ft 7'.« _• J A Wood 


14ft 13*, I4’a - lft ^HWrte? 


7 is. I Amrhost 

13H - ^ AmerCas 


Jv ; 5^ _ J A mgr aia C- 

I2 1 * i7‘ta — i Amfed 
2S, 3ft —ft *™hi 
4ft 4*i - ft Amstgr 

9 9ft —ft Amoex 
13' o 13ft -ft *'7’P ,CI1 
5** 7ft -ft Amrion s 


10513". I’ 1 . 12ft — 

3 2V, 3ft — 

5 4ft 4V. 

_ -.,9ft 9 9ft — V 

_ 33660 14ft 13' o I3ft -V 
2683 7V„ 5ft Tft - 
B3 IS 1 -. 14’ I 14ft — * 
2 12V. lift lift -1 


AmEduc 563 4». 4ft 4ft — k„ HKC5em 

AmFB .20 2.0 1617 U 10' . 10ft -ft BMC» 

AmFrgt 5 -.7866 20 18ft 19ft *ft S" cw,s 

AGreels JO 1J 13674 29ft 27’ ! 28 ft -ft BMJ 
AHH+CP S _. 19464 14ft 6’. 7ft —Tft gNH 

Am Ha id _. 84 tft II./- lft ... BPiPko 

I a Horn Pal ... 33 1 Tft 16 16 -ft 

AlrWF J4 U» 196 12ft lift 12 
_i,. AminPiwt _ 471 •<» v c ft, _v,, 

-|ij AmlnPts _ 4146 l'-B iv„ lv c —ft BTFtn 

'l. AmLIepf 2.16 8.7 35125 74ft 24 ft —Vi BTShp 
ArnLcSv _ 1 5 5 5 gTUlm 

AMS 3360 33 ft 21*. 22 —ft BW1P 

AMedE 6226 »ft 7*.* 9ft - 1 

AmMDSat _ 5590 19ft lift 17ft— lft godilnl 

A Mobile __ ... 1836 13ft 10". 13ft -3 B ock 

AMIRS 2.20 A5 462 48 ft 47 48 ft —ft BOOO 

AmCKltDV .. 1074 9*. 9 91* -ft gaOev 

flmPac .. 1305 15ft 14ft 15*. -ft 0RHOIM 

APhv-3 .. 226 lft lft lft — *4 BaktaJ 

APwrCvS -78157 31 ’ j I7ft 2t -1 Batdfiem .03 .4 

APubliSh _ 1304113** 13 13V. —ft BidLvB s J4 1.7 

ARo-x .34 3.7 530 6ft tft 6ft —ft B^dPta 

AmRecr ... 946 1 J*i 12ft 12ft —ft BatYGm 

AmResJd ,.12823 19*. 15', 19 —ft Bm-Pdiic 

AmSafRr _. 2871 11ft 11 II —ft — “ '* 

ASovFL _ 1907 22ft 22’.% 22ft _ „ 

ASaft J2 6A 6540 5ft 4ft 5 — ’% I Banctis _ - 

ASidSa J» 13 2576 3*. 3ft 3ft _ , BncGbli 

AmSuor - 1209 33 20i% 33 -3ft I BCPSpy 

AmTele _ H36 19ft TO 19ft - 1ft, BcbNJ 

ATraual _ 1130 13, 12*. 12ft - B22SS „ , 

Auutce? 1045 5ft 4ft 4ft — ft BandoM .96 A3 

AUtaGwt 662 |7Vr lft lft — Jft I Banda pf JI6e 3.6 

AVang 473 14 1 2ft 13* i - ft 

Am While ... 480 6ft Svi 6 

A Wood I _. 70 5ft 5ft 5ft —ft BnkNH 

AmAII ... 2420 4’.* 3ft 31 v„ — ’.% ] BkSuflk 

America .80 1.9 6141ft 41V. 4iv u —'ft BapkAH 

Amrhost 401 5 4H 4ft —ft 

AmtrCas 4622 14’* 11 lift— 3 

AmcrwO*. _ 31+0 13 9’., )S» .1'., | www 

A rated JObl.O 25T4 21'.i 20ft 30ft — ft i BkWorc 

Amgen ._661B047Vi 43ft 46>i -IVj Badrre* M 23 

Amislcr _ 25 2ft lft 2ft *'.* WS 

Amne* 42 2ft 7 2ft + ft ' 

ArtuHcn 83 21ft 20 21ft + 1ft. 

Anvions ... 3594 ID Bft 9ft — v{ , 

Amserv » lft lft lft — ft I BonySLJ 


JO 2.7 279] 8 7 7V; — 

- 103 4*i 3ft 3ft 

_ 39-1 »ft »' » -'.« 

.80 3.7 31 22 ft 31ft 21V* —ft 

12el4 979 9ft 8ft Hft —I”. 

-08 .6 1378 13*. 17*. 13ft -ft 

._ 2177 6'.. S S’, i -ft 

._ 239 19'.% 18ft 18ft —ft 

_ ?0 4ft 4’,. 4ft t ft 

...2B033 55 48*. 54ft —ft 

_ 4374 28'1 76ft 26V. —ft 

_ 1444 10ft 9ft 10ft 

1548 1”, lft lVi, • 'ft 

1687 5 ft 5 5ft 

719 n. r ft ft -’.% 

... 753 1 ** ft — •*! 

76 2.9 V3I3 26'. 74ft 25*. —ft 
1.12 3.9 45 29'.% M 29 _ 

_ 18 3’.% 3 3ft —ft 

_ 333 3 1ft 3 

.40 2J 11120 IHft IT 10 -ft 
_ 2589 10 ft Oft 10ft -ft 

977 2ft 3ft 2ft 

1373 13ft lift 11 W— H* 



Dk* vu lOUHiah Law Che Chge | Stacks Div Yld 100s High Low Ok Owe l Soda Dtv' Yld WOsHigti Law Oso Owe 


_ 17147 11ft 5ft 6'% —3ft 


•311523 22*% 30 JDft-l 
.4 23 7ft 4’, 7ft -*.i 

' 38 15*1 14 14 


CESati 

0=1 Pro 
1 CFSSs 


11 141, 14ft 14ft 
_ 537516ft 13 ft 15 


BaldPia 

, BatvGm _ 

_ft BanPanc 1.00 3.1 vn 32ft 33 32'.. — . 
—ft BcOne ptCJ.SO 5.7 1455 61*. 57ft 61ft -3',. ! 
_ EUlcFstOK J4 1.6 242 1SVil4ftU 


_ 1423 10ft tft 9ft —ft 
_ 4909 70". tB 70 - ft 

._ 886 lift 11 11 _ 

1J0B4J 103 31 30*r 30ft 

- 2363 6' « 5ft tft - ft 

1-28 X7 365 35ft 34’.. 341% _ 

._ 165331ft 18 21 +2ft 

_ 135731ft 18*. 21'. -ft 

_ 407 3 2ft 2ft —ft 

.. 698 I7ft lift lift —ft 

JO 13 S 22*. 22'% 22',b *'•% 

_ 487 13". 13ft 13ft -ft 

.40 2.2 402 19 IB 18 

_ I 7 »: u 7«ft. 7 .'.'h -j* 


EN*! 


_ . BncFstOK J4 1.6 242 15*1141.15 _ CNBFMY 

— ’ , | Banons .. 34 6ft Sft 6 * ft CNS 

•BnoGdic J3r .8 8425 38’. 34 W",, - 4ft CPAC 

*3’1 I BcoSoo 1.0Bb 17 141931 29V, 2ft, „ CPB 

- lft. I BojNJ St 33 36 25 23*. ?4’% . CPI Aero 

Bonaec _ 2346 23’. 21 •% 22>* -ft CPI wt 


23*. ?4’% -’* 
21ft 22ft -ft 


.96 6.3 224 15*. 141% 15". -ft 
■B4e 3.6 26 23V. 23ft Z3'% *'i 


B6el6 26 23V. 23ft Z3'% 
.44 2J 4198 19’., I8ft 18',% 
.44 1J 63 33ft 32ft 33 
■lie J 2155 23ft 191% 23 


-’* CPI Atjro 
-ft CPI wt 
-ft CSBFn 
+ ’i CSFHId 


— I Jr-u ,■«* — ** 

_ 1707 3ft 2ft 7*. —ft 

.. 774 4 2*. 3". 

_ 845 9 8ft 8ft —ft 

J8 U 168 33". 31ft 31ft 

_ 15 33 32ft 33 

_ 1206 7ft 6ft 65% -ft 

.260 2.7 739 9Qi, Bft 9ft -ft 

JB 3J B9 26 24”, ZS*', -ft 

_ 444 Tft 6ft 7i.% -IV W 

_ 245 3ft 11. 2ft 

■15e 1 J 10013 12W 13 -ft 


J5 IHft 18ft IB", -ft 


2ft +4% Bkntti 
21 ft + 1", , Banla 

9ft —ft BanyMS 


AmlcCns J» J 6790 IHft lo*. 17"’,, — V„ I BtanvRT 


Amtran 

1106 34’-. 23ft 73 ft -•* AmbOl 

6381 10ft Bft 9ft —ft Amvesl s 

1575 4*. 4ft 4ft -’% Amytal 

583 ’ft, ft >Vi, 

2196 21ft 205. 21ft *’% 

1989 21’, 13-, 21 -2i. 

48 4.9 1493 10 fl - % 9*% - v. Anwioel 

... I48S S*% 4ft S*% — 1 . Abweri 

,.34?4? 16”. 14ft lift AnraBco 

.. 2235 15 lift IS - ft A ncSWIS 
_ 260311ft 10 I0”T— "ft AhChGin 

.1% .4 31T3F. 35". 35ft _. AndrGr 

JO J 79261 29ft 24 28*1-4", ArWvBc 

.. 1389 21V. 20", 21ft -1 AndvTog 

576 74 22*. 23'* Andrew s 

MOO lift ll lift — 1 ft Andros 


4ft - '% Amyiin 
'ft. Artoje 


AndyTc J4 i 
Andys 48 3 
Ancxioel 1X0 e 5 

/norm 

AncnBa. 

Arv^Wri J4 

AnchGm 

AndrGr 


301 9>.% 8*. 8ft —ft BanvnSy 
JO 1.1 437 18V, lTft 17ft —ft Bonett 
-. 2598 10ft 9 9V, —ft Barm 

4065 9ft 7*. 9 „ 

_ 16271 S’*. 14V. 15ft -ft 


J4 1.7 933 14ft 13' i 14 -ft CWDMin 

.10 1-4 154 Tft T 7 — *1 Cnftlmai 

4610ft 9ft «ft —ft CabolM 

25 9ft 9*. 9ft -ft Caches 

JO A 182 33% 33ft 3T j -ft CAC 

M 2J 1U 181% 17ft 17ft CadnvS 

40 1.9 560 20*. 20 20ft -ft Cudstll 

JO 10 *325 21 19V. 20ft -ft Cadmus 

SI t.d 3285 34 ft 32 32 —2ft Caere 

_ 2948 2ft 1','u I - Cairn 
_. 2218 Hi, lft lft. -Vi, Caftene 

.40 9.1 K30 4ft 4'.. 4ft -ft E2alAn%o 

_. 1S9B0 75*. 13',. IS". - CdBnc 

_. 2114 35V, 34”. 3SV, -1 CalilCul 


J4 IJ 6T 15 
48 3Xi 18917 


BaretBus 

BOretPs 


2 7ft 7ft 7ft —ft CnfFncf 


15 —v, I BsTnBrt 


Andrews 

Andros 

Aiicrgen 


393 5ft 4ft 4*. —ft Arwsfn 

btt 5ft 4 4V. _ Amec 

6517 4"„ 3ft 4 — ft AoerTus 


2332 5ft 5 V. 5'.% —ft ApogEn 
.. 4610 6% 4ft 5h —lft AuoleC 

777 2ft 2*% 2", — ft AejIScus 

1020 15’.. 14% 15 


48 3X1 189 17 1 6 16 —1 ■ fcu l nfl 

JMeSB 791 17ft 17 l»’% -ft Bd5Ptr 

-- —2 :4 V 2% 2ft - ft BOSExul 

- 5779 13ft lift 13 • '% BasetFs 

J4 .9 629 26*. 75". 26'% *1 ’.% BOtToctl 

2809 isv, 14ft 14T% —ft BayRidge 
60 tft 5 6*. -lft BavVw 

35c V* 540 lBft 18 18V, — ft BovB+s 

1 ._ 46 2 >'V„ 1W U _. ! Baypn s 

_ 7081 36ft 34". 34*. —ft I BoauOl 

3573 15ft 14". 15ft —ft ! BcdBiti s 

- 625 4ft 3ft 4ft - ft 1 Beeoos 

- 3407 Tft 6”. I - % I BdFuse 

_ 26694 23ft 20ft 27ft —ft BekJBTk 
... 4439 4ft Jft 4 

JO 3.5 114512ft 12 12 


- 981 25 1 -. 73ft 24*. -ft CalMD 
_ 347914'.% 13ft 13ft — ft CalMic 

- 112 3ft 3ft 3ft —ft CalSBk 

_ 1043 8*4 Bft Oft — ft CallNM 

_ It 37ft 36 37 —ft Conan 

_ 1550 10 9 9ft ♦*. Cutaway 

JO 3.1 942 26ft 25ft 25*a — '<D Calumet 

_ 11916 4ft 3 yr * ’■"i. CamNt a 

_ 957B 13% ]jft J3iv r f3/ = Combe* 

JO 16 9A5 23 20ft 22 Vi ♦ IV. CamBio 

1 M 13 5204 40 58ft 60 "ft CtanbNe 

_ _ 722 4*. 4"1 4ft —ft CambSod 

It 2L1 1065 13ft 12V> 13*3 - ft CarrbTd, 
_ 26799 29> , 23 27ft - 1*4 CamrnAsh 
2105 4ft 3ft 4ft —ft CampoEl 

633 6ft 5’4 6 —ft CV/bwB 

72212% 12 12ft —ft CWineA 

I5e .9 78617 15ft 16',, -ft Candela 


.48 I J 72418 32 ft 28ft 31'/% - 1 BtfllMic 


12451ft 50*1 51ft - ft 1 Candles 


.„ 136 5ft 4% 4% 
- 48-1 6 SVr 5% 
.515167 41 38ft 40'.. 
.7 16585 37 34 36 


Artebces .04 
-ft ApIRecv 

-ft AodE.«lr 

516741 38ft 40'.. -ft ABtosci 

6585 37 34 34 - ft ArtCnTOn 

?M4 29 ?5 ... AbdDgtl 

594 3’% 2'%u 3'.% ADdlrmj 

1619 9 8 8—1 Apdlnov i 

16211'-. 10W 10'., — ’.% AaIdA.il j 

2191 13ft II' , 11*. —v, I AMAA-cr 

45 17'-I 16 17ft -'.lA«Kci 

3738 17ft 12". I2’", i »*.%'. AoaSciwi 

WMlJeftll 1 1 A# -ftlApIdS^ 

1635 13ft 12”. I3’.« - AraaSh 

246 3*. 3’;. 3‘. .. A named 


.1 6480 23ft 21*. 22ft —ft 

J 19346 16ft 14 V: IJ% -ft Ben Jerry 
~ Jff'1' ,v * H'i —ft BFronvR 

- 7186 7ft 61% 7ft Benhan 

- SX! 7 . Bento'S 

- 1042 "'c v u i „ —i u BerkJey 

_. 3274 21". 184. I**, —ft BerkGs 


«!% —ft Cartel 


1635 13ft !2". 13'.. -'. AraaSh 
_ 246 3ft 3'i 3‘. .. Anomed 

JO .9 1 540 21", 2I’% 21' I - ft I AreorOfg 
7764 3ft 7ft 3ft - I ArborHI 
1022 2'% 1% 2'. — rift ArtirNtl 
675 10*. 9*. 9». — ArenCm 
_ 334 7ft i>. 7'.« — ’..ArctiPTS 
.12 1.4 736 8*. 8 8ft _ Ardra 

- 443 3'1 2'V„ 3'% - ft I Arden 

1 Jte 2.9 2122 58''j 57ft 57’, —ft I ArdenPd 

J4 2.1 136 17’.. 16". 17V. - ft | Areihusa 

2188 16’% 141% 14*. —ft ArgnIB s 
, 47 19’.. 18’ , IBft -*. i AreaCta 

,T0c .4 7601 23*. 72' . 73'.% - ft Aracsy 

_ 110 9ft Bft 9*% -l'% , AreusPh 

_ 56li I8'w 16ft 17”. — '. I Ar,od 'jn 

_. 30570 29% 75 27'»-.,-lv,. Anslors 
8k 17 438814*. lift 14 — ”, ArS Best 

._ 1444 5 4ft 4U U -*u Armor 
J6 3.1 445 12 11 11*. -1 Arnolds 

_ 3907 14V% 13ft 14V. - ft ArrrsPh 

.IS JS 13619ft 18'/. 18ft — >, ! ArgwFn 

_ 921 5'. 4*. 5V. ,. I Arawlnt 

_. 7050 J'% 2ft 2'v« I AnrawTm 

_. 844 I 1 . V. 'ft — ’•% ; ArMh 

_ 34 101. 10 10 .. Artiste 

_. 273 8% 8 8 — ArtWay 

2 9 8', S': — A son re 

J1 1.1 >IM3 32 33 *1 Asccrv*: 

._ 6570 10ft 9'-, 10", —ft ASCCO 

_ 2525 14'% tl*. 13'. — ft Ashwrth 

_. 194 23V. 22% 73”. -ft Aswan 

AO 2.7 10 14ft 13ft 14ft . AsjwnBk 


ADtalmu . 2212 7". 7 7ft _ 1 _ 

Apdlnov s ... 3949 25V, 21 74 — % Best Pwr 

AofdMI s .. 83249 45 38 43% — '% 1 Beston 

AcdAA-cr _. 570 4*. 3>, ji. — <% eenis 

Ap^ci . 474 7 6". 6". — "j MB', 

AoaSciwi _ 745 1".. ft ~ 

Aplc&a _ 577 6 4ft 4ft — r.j 

AraaSh _ 411 2ft 2". 7ft - 

Anomed ... 240 19ft 10% IS'% —ft BtaLogic 

AraorOrg J4 1% UBilTft 16ft 16*. — ft > BidMWst 
ArborHI - M49 22’,. 21 21", -ft , BioMWvi 


Ji« — ■% . Bonis 
4". — "i Big B 
'• — ’ a , B.90T1r 


- 17*51 17*. 14 V, 16*i — * 


- 13MUft 14ft \4ft _ 

2470 31% lft : — 

J8 IJ 2385 19 7* 28ft - 

- II 40 40 40 —4 

JV9 I?V. IP, 11", _ 

_ 4419 10ft 9ft 10”: - 

80 <J 58 21ft F9ft 19*. 

1.14 4J 1303 28 27ft 37". 

- 4068 19 16 16% — 1 

- 673 S*v 5 F% - 

- 7034 91 i 9 9ft 

- 71 6 5 S — 

.04 jl ,9295 11"% 10ft 10ft 1 

.64 ai 1909 20ft 19*. 20% - 

JO 2.0 25? JO 19 19*. 

- 1583 6 5ft 5". -■ 

X 2.1 1428 15% 12”. IS’% -3* 

.12 6 466 21 18% 21 

777 9 Tft Tft — ■ 


16*. — *. ■ BioMWst 
21’ r * % , EUOMW wtB 
BioSceot 

B,aSur1 

- ... BtaPhor 

M% - % ■ HiOCir 
40 —4ft Btacr*if 
Bingen 


10”, - ft Biogn wt 


Bioied 
Biomoo 
Baomotr 
Biomet 
Btomiro 
BioSatetv 

Blow ora 
BiOSOh 
Stavrv 
BiOTIrt 
BloTcG 
EUOTG wT96 

BiraCn 


1023 13ft 13 13 - ConnEvp _ 

-11362 28'.% 25", ?B _ CarmExB 

I6&S 15% M 14*% — % Canon! J9e J 

— SOS 4!y IV. 4". -*% Canonic _ 

_ 1552 3% 71. 3ft -ft Can-star JO _ 

.. .1 ?55 S~ « 6'.% —ft Cwtel 
M |.l 1790 39ft 37 V, 38*, *ft Con [Dry _ 

1.08 6J 89 14W 15*1 14 ft -ft CanyRs 

- 660 17". 16 16*. *% Cany wt 

- 44? 15ft 14'%. 14*. —V. CCBT _ 

49 11ft 10ft 10% — % COOASC _ 

... ll 5*1 S'-, 5ft — % CaaBnc J8 3J 

.12 l .0 U42 12*% IV . 111. -ft C9BnBl 195 9J 

- 375 16 14ft 15ft -% CanS vas _ 

; -Jf?]!'* n >>'-• *’•« CaoSw 40aU 

7 2911 12*% lift 1?’.. n, CanflBc JB 2.9 

- ,134 3 2% 3 - ■% CnnTrm J2a 1.8 

- “’f **“ ,B/ = — *'= Carai^tr M 2J 

•- ft 'ft *"% Canffinc JOe J 

- ” 4l| ft '4ft "ft *% CrdnHIt .12 3 

... 2528 2”. 1% 2'% — '.% 0.15 

121 »'% 8% 8V. — Core Gp 

- 822 H. % l*. —v^ CareerH: 

- Careline _ 

..iiaMJT', 33',, 37'. *3ft Crerwwk 

- J ? I7 '- 17 -3’.4 OrriOn 7Bel7 

_ 7020 3’% 2ft Jift —'ft CoroPsl MB IJ 


S WJ Z-O i'/J l>l -'I 

Fn ,15elJ 100 IJ 12W 13 -*% 

CSFHId _ S9H22'.. 21 ft 23". * '% 

CSP _ 220 9T- e 9". 9n.ft -I'Tp 

CTEC -. 1674 26 24V: 24ft _% 

CTLCr _ 1010 II lOftlOntta— ar„ 

CTJBnC „ 572 6ft 4". 6% — ' . 

CWDsgn _ 338 12ft 12 12% —ft 

Cnblmos _ 4T06 B'i i'-k 4% — 1% 

CabOIM 2.22 t28J 1935 0'A 7% 7V, 

Caches _ 5 7 7 7 —ft 

CAC .. 200710'% 9% 9% —ft 

CadovS 1 JOe 4.9 1020 30** 29*% 30*% +** 

Cadstn _ 792 tv„ — v B 

Cadmus JO 1 J *1350 15 V. 14 Vi !5V% *Vi, 
Caere _ 2395 7*i 7 7% — V. 

Cairn ... 451 6*1 6 6V, -Vi 

Cataene _ 58633 13ft 10*i 13'% * T'.% 

CnlAme _ 480 4ft 3% 3ft — ft 

CdWnc A U 509 16ft ISV, 16W .ft 
CaejCW _ 055 5ft Jft 5V h *«% 

CnfFncI .44b 2.7 34217 16 loft 

CalMD _ 9951 21 18 70% +*% 

CalMic ... 2578 20V. 19". 20 + Vi 

CalSBk .40 43 133 9". 8", 9*4 -ft 

CallMel _ J 7*% 7«%. +4v% 

canon J5e 0.9 209 2*. 2^u 2U’u — V u 
Cataway _ 1B17 7% 2% 2ft - ■% 

Calumet _ 150 32ft 30ft 32ft + lft 

CamNt a 1313 tft 6 tv u — v„ 

Cambex _ 754 3ft 3ft 3ft _ 

CamBio _ 2803 lft 1% 1*4 — 

CwnbNe _ 1T22 7*4 6'.% 6ft _ 

CambSod _ 1972 Bft 7ft 7V. —ft 

CombTrh ._ 2111 Hft 15*4 16"4 _ 

CamrnAsh _ BUIlft 10ft 1DV, —ft 

Campo0 _ 1272 13ft 17ft 12ft —ft 

CWbwB _ 15 26V, 25 26ft *lft 

CWineA _ 5961 24ft 30'/. 23ft +ft 

Candela _ 355 3ft 3 "j Tft —V. 

Candles _ 577 lft lft lft +ft 

ConriErp _ 10912*% lift lift — *4 


_ 296 11 9ft 9ft —2ft 

J9e J 97 B2 80ft Hl'% _ 

_ 1045 3'% 2V. 21% —ft 

JO _ 709 9ft 9ft 9ft, —ft- 

_ 25 5 5 5 Z 


CdPSwr 
' 1 r ] Cart! Be 
- ft j CnnTrm 
— Vs Cartuslr 
* '■'% CanffiiK 


CareGa 

CareetM: 


- 2020 3ft 2ft 

- 904 2ft 1>% 

. 357 7 5ft 


-3*4 am Cm 
— caraFst 
— ’4 CarsPir 
— ft Carver 


-'UTs’P.'-* *> ”>ft -ft Casctac 
— 7367 Sw 4ft - lft, J Cascvs s 
508 3*. 2ft 3ft - ft 1 CasnCrd 


7*. - % | CasnC wt 

•’ - ft CasAm s 


— 25661 174, 14ft 16ft -ft BiraMo 


■ 1 T3 S’. X'% <’a — ft Birtcnr 
79 10ft 10 10*4 - ft ■ BlkHwh 

1299 7ft 6*4 Tft * % BJKH wt A 
8*60 15*4 U*4 14ft BB>HwtS 

79+3 7 5'% 7 • l'-4 . BUrroies 

9319 10*. 9ft toft ■ ft BlacDv 


.70 7.0 1807 10 
- S?l 4'. 


*41 1% 1 

721 11*4 It 
164 I « 
289 | 1 


Oft fcS. -\% 1 CosmoCTi 
t-'-c - v's 1 CosMag s 
2V, 2',. — i.-CasRswl 
11 _ : CasnRsc 

8ft •’,. -ft CasMEs 
3 - «■% • *. CmalSem 

1’, lft — *4 Catatyt 
10*4 10», — % CattiBCD 
ft 1 - % Catnstr 

>4 '< —ft CulnCo S 


_ 25 5 5 5 

- 1318 3ti 3% 34% - % 
_. 1913 3Vii 3»i. W« — Vi. 

50 ft ft ft —ft 

_ 127 25 23 23% 

- 74 >. V. 1% _ 

J8 12 42 2t 70ft 21 -ft 

1.95 9.0 *6 21*. 21V. 21ft +1 

_ 331 I4'l 13ft I3ft —ft 

JO* 1-* 5 38": J8ft 38ft _ 

JB 3.9 106 9*i 8 V« 9V, 4l 

JIa T.8 970 18*4 1 7*4 18 _ 

J6 U 1600 16% 15ft 16% .ft 

JOe 3 483 IB 77 28 _ 

.12 J 1874 48 46ft 47”. -ft 

- 1613 i'% S*. 6 —ft 

_ 7267 3*% 3% 1% -ft 

1954 20ft lift 19ft— lft 

- 337 11 70 70A% *'A 

_ AOS 8ft 7»« 8 _ 

TBe 17 160 79", 28 29’.% - 1% 

JOb IJ 184 13", 12ft 12V, —ft 
-.11379 171% 16% lift, tVy 
_ 75 7ft 2% 2% 

JO 2.9 «U5 2t*, 20ft 20ft ft 

M J 5704 171% I Oft I Oft —ft 

_ 571 0ft 71m 71% —ft 

1104 7% 1*. 3 „ 

-11808 23", 70% 22*. -1% 
_. 445*25 21*4 25 -lft 

- 9432 9 8'. 0*4 —ft 

_ 119 7 14% 2 -V,. 

531 6*4 5*4 6% 4ft 

941 IJ ]1 it — v H 

2334 2ft IV. 1% — '% 


— 6608 79*. 25 % 28ft -7ft BJd-D 


t - »»4 lft 1ft lft — >.% CdScvri 

IJktiU 502 32 79'-> 7?'%— lft Ceiadwi 


1.08 3.1 1078 35 


AMColl 
AIOC OP 

Aiwa 

AHd&PS 

AlOHIPd 

Alia moo 

AiaUR 

AldWae 

AJIsrFn 

Atttrisia 

Alaene 

AJpMiC 

AIpMic wt 

Aiahcl 

Atonal wt 

Aletioflra 

AJoharl 

Alehrwt 

JtoLio 

Altadd 

An oi 

Aiieon 

Altera 

Ah Re-sc 

Allrori s 

Amoar 

AmhrSir 

Amcor 


1 J2e 8 4 454 14": 13ft 14V, .. %sdCn 

.33 e 2.4 266 14”, 13% 13% — ft Asleci 

_ 1*91 23 22% 27'% — v„ Asioric 

JO 7.4 9B8 25’ i 24*. 24ft — ’ , AstroN 

J4 IJ 733 IS 1 '. 14ft 14'— — ■% | AsJran 

_. 235 19". 18ft IB", — | Astrojy 

JWe .7 97 12ft 11*. 17% .. AsvsiTcn 

_. 1299 jft 4'., 4ft — •% AlcnCsl 

_ 629 j". r, Athena 

_ (03 18ft IS”. IB'. —'-4 A*ne-> 

_. 62B 3ft 3'i 3"'u - »u AM-insn 

.. 4384 2’% 1'",. 2*t. -*i, AlrtdS 

_ 819 Vu *T. "i AflAm 

.. 4141 3", 21, 2", —’4 AtIBcv 

„ 2719 ft ft ", — *% I AOCsiA.r 

_ 1270 13*4 II 13*4 -Hi AUCutf 

_ 5699 nv, l'v„ — -t AltSeA 

_. 105 _ AIFTeic 


740 23ft 23ft 23ft - ft I BaaEvn 


-%'BaalBns 1J4 3J 47019 35 


6916 73 ft 22”. 27 
2564 17 V. 16!% 17 
5009 31ft 30ft 31 


.12 IJ 24 9ft ?ft 9ft 

Jllc J 356 2ft 2% 2", 

_ 278 4Vi. 4’.% 4Vi, 

_ 987 12 11 % lift 

_ 1913 14*. J3ft 14 


22”. 27' . — *4 BaCORs 
16!% 17'i -'4 BadvOr 
30ft 31 _ Boir.nacr 

9ft 9ft — . BonTon 
2% 2", - '% BcatvMIU 

4’.% 4*'i, — - BrMcB 
ll'% I lft — *: , Boomiwr, 
13ft 14 - ft ' Bc’i/’ 

6*4 S • lft Barlnd 

7ft 7% Barror 

Oft 9 Vi - % . Boil Ac 
10 18 -1 IBMtBC 


6ft 6ft — ft Cctotalnc 
32". 34", - 1 % 1 Cotas!, a 
30 20V: — ft | Cota, s 


4454 25 21ft 25 .1% 

M32 9 8*. 8*5 —1% 

319 7 14% 2 -ft. 

531 6*. 5*. 6% - ft 

94117 11 If —ft. 

2334 2ft IV. 1% — '% 

2297 6ft 6ft 6ft —ft 

5413 12*1 12ft —ft 

- - 1907 10V, 9 I Oft + 7. 

.9 895312 11 11 — J* 

- *2! I .‘-» rv '* "• — vp 

“ .?• 'A* "u V-* -*■ 

- 1253 16"r 75ft It .% 


• % CfHIcw 

- ft Cdlslar 


2 — ", Basrcno 


3 % 3 *’. - ft I Atmet s 


._ 2191 lft 1*% IV,. - "d AlriaStl 
6 J’i 3", 3ft — % A1T..L 
_ 14962 7 5V4 6H ArwdOc 

...60043 35% 79*% 37% —3% I AuBon 
... 1926 71ft 19", 21 -ft | AurnSy 
._ IH.’ IP. 17". 15*4 - t’-'i Ausoo. 


Amcor .flfle J j 9438 27 

AmosrFs .5* 2.7 46IM 1 '* 

Amnons JO 41 167 14V, M 


AuroSr 

AITS DO. 

AuKMnf 

Autwms 

Auloctu 

Avaaok 

AuIdGp 

Aiuoimu 


_. 3080 rv,. ll*,, I *» ■ '. ,, J Auioimu 

1 JO 65 898 24*4 71*. 2«v, - ?'% t Aulolnd 

1.08 U.6 376 9", 9'% 9*% — V. jAutotols 

M tA 333 6% 6ft 6'% — *■ , Arolcr 

J5 8* 07 91. 8”, Bft — ^ '.iAv.rfy.rfi 

Jle - 97IJ77*. «*. 68*: 3’, Avndin 
,. 212 3?. 3% 3!- .. I A21CM 


_ 163 5 4'. 4% — '.% ; BoilTc 

_ 152 3% 3% 3% _ 1 Bn*Er A 

... 3199 10% to 10V. — *. . Eo»"Sn B 
-37 1J17367 7»”. 24% 27'% - I Bor dBms 
_ 1621 I Oft 9ft 9ft — ■ , . BrOdPhm 
_ 5S969 74*. 215. 23ft — ft 1 BrrJP wIA 
_ 10556 IS", 11 14V, — ’ , ; BrdP wtB 

.. 708 6'% 5% 6’. - . BrtadvW 

2 13 13 13 —ft ■ Brontn? 

. 8799 20ft TBft 19*'. - • BmWSv 

_ 17003 7' v u ('6 TV, ■ ”4. Brauns 
_ 4477 S'.4 4W 4”i —ft 1 Brkwl a 
.. 2397 4'/,. 3ft 3'Vu ■ "i» ; Brcnca 
932 17ft IS*, 17*'. viBrerd 

J4 3.0 377 9 6 3 ... BrartB S 

M 1.03*TO54'<i Sift SO'fii— 1 BrdBF 
.. 301! lift lfl'.i lO'.-i —Vi : BrileV 
. 570 7ft 7'v 7", —ft . BroadN 

.. 5840 28% 25*. Mft -?*• : BrttxJT 


IJ 7696 70'% 20 20V, — I Cota, s 

... 794 7'% eft 6*.- — ”. ! Getpenc 

.. 296 3% 2 2 -ft OHIGetu 

.. 409 11', 11 II", —ft CeOPro 

- 7548 10 Oft 9% - ft editor 

- 1173 77ft 7D'% 71', -*. Cdlslar 

... 528 79V. 7Tft 29'% - 1% CdCmA 

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IntermtiiMhil Herald Tribune. Monday. Mm 23. 1994 


r ’• iw'-, 

■ \ .: .•; ‘ . 


CAPITAL MARKETS 


Dollar and Mark Remain 
Under Clouds of Doubt 


By Carl Gewirtz 

Iniernarwnal Herald Tribune 

P ARIS -■ Prictein the major bond markers continued to improve 
last week, but the mood remained tentative rather than optimis- 
“ c :, '. he lw< ? benchmark sectors look especially fragile. The 
*wu J? ■ " 0UI]U « 1 ness after what should ha've been favor- 
‘j«iur na ^ eS 10 shon-ierm interasi rates restrains enthusiasm for U.S. 

BfvwfK^ ^ Cr< - W ^ e a overshooting of German money-supply 
growifl Keeps investors cautious about plunging into European markets. 

Views remain widely divergent about the likely rate erf growth in 
Romany and the implication this has for short-term interest rates. 

ine Bundesbank president. Hans 

Tietmcyer, strengthened the view 


' — me view 

of those who sew German rates as German IDOneV 
having bottomed when he said last i V ,, 

week that “the horizon Tor key rates ^PPv ™ «ie fed s 
has been settled for some lime to intentinns kp*»n 
come.” Meanwhile, reports that 1016111101,5 Keep 
April money-supply growth, to be investors OD edge, 
reported this week, will show an- ^ 


other massive overshooting of the 

offidai target are adding to the uncertainty and raising fears that German 
bond prices could suffer a setback. 

A rise in yields on long-term German paper would no doubt upset the 
ot her European nuykets. The dear trend over recent months is for the 
spread — the premium of other markets’ yields over German ones — to 
narrow as conditions improve in Germany and for spreads to widen as 
the mood deteriorates. 

In price terms, this means that when German bond prices rise, the 
improvement is bigger in the other markets, and when prices fall in 
Germany, the decline elsewhere is sharper. 

The Deutsche mark's performance on the foreign-exchange market is a 
further ingredient in the bond-market recipe, as weakness bv the mark 
against the dollar usually translates to mark weakness against other 
European currencies. Strength against the dollar, conversely, usually 
means a rise against the other European currencies — and a disincentive 
to buy into those bond markets. 

The dollar hit a high of 1.6765 DM early last week after the balf-poinl 


increase in U.S. interest rates but then rapidly lost steam. It ended the 
lid it would have 


week at 1.6454 DM. Traders said it would have gone lower but for the 
long weekend — many European markets are closed Monday — and 
widespread expectations of central-bank intervention. 


Doubts about the dollar's capacity to revive and lingering uncertainty 
over whether the Federal Reserve Board has achieved its desired tighten- 
ing or is simply pausing to assess the impact of its recent increases is 
keeping foreign money out of the U.S. bond market. Analysts at J. P. 
Morgan & Co. predicted the Fed would not tighten again before July, but 
they maintained the view that short-term rates, now at 425 percent, 
would stand at 5 8 percent by year-end. 

Another factor weighing on the UJS. bond market is the trade dispute 
with Japan, which keeps Japanese investors out of the market until they 


See MARK, Page 11 



THE TRIB INDEX 


■ Mema&xtai Herald Tr&urte 
Worki Stock Index, composed 
of 280 tntematjoredtymvestabte 
stocks from2S countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 
Business News. 


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U.S . Considers Selling Alaskan Oil 


Lus Angeles Timrx Semite 


LOS ANGELES — Negotiations behind 
closed doors have removed a major obstacle 
to lifting the United States’ ban on exporting 
Alaskan crude oil. 

Independent oil producers in California — 
where a decision io export Alaskan crude 
could also stimulate the troubled local oil 
indusliy and create thousands of jobs — 
estimate that ending the export ban also 
could trim more than S2 billion annually 
from the U.S. trade deficit with Japan, which 
would be the most likely market for the oil. 

Until now, U.S. maritime unions — whose 
tanker crews by law now ship the Alaskan oil 
to U.S. ports in California and the Gulf Coast 
— have opposed lifting the baa effectively 
blocking congressional action. But the unions 
have quietly accepted a deal in principle that 
would send the oil to Asian markets on U.S.- 
flag ships, sources close to the talks say. 

That agreement — reached in recent weeks 
by the unions and with British Petroleum 
PLC. one of the big Alaskan oil producers ■— 
means the U.S. Congress will prohably re- 
move the export ban when it extends the 
Export Administration Act a measure cur- 
rently under consideration in both the House 
and Senate, according lo officials familiar 
with legislative discussions. 

Independent California oil producers and 


oil companies working in Alaska — prtnei- 

Officials or the Seafarers International 
Union, based in Washington, declined to 
comment last week, and British Petroleum 
executives could not be reached for comment. 
Bui other sources close to the discussions 

confirmed the outline of the agreement. Most 
agreed that a pact between BP and the unions 
would have to be given force of law by Con- 
gress. 

Howard Marlowe, a spokesman for the 
Coalition to Keep Alaska Oil — a group that 
opposes lifting the ban — confirmed that 
some coalition members have told BP they 
would support the deal. 

Exxon Corp. and Los Angeles-based At- 
lantic Richfield Co., both big producers in 
Alaska, use their crude primarily in their own 
refineries and distribution networks. But BP 
has long wanted to sell its Alaskan oil to 
Asian refiners — sales on which the company 
could expect a bigger profit. Diverting the 
Alaskan crude to Asia would spur production 
by California refiners and almost certainly 
raise their prices, which they sa> arc de- 
pressed by an average of S2.50 a barrel. 

In both Alaska and California, oil special- 
ists say that lifting the ban would increase 
investment in the industry. But Tew of them 
expect it would have much impact on the 
local retail price of gasoline, as retail price? 
depend largely on world uil prices. 


pally British Petroleum — have long lobbied 
to end the ban, which they say floods the 
California market with Alaskan crude. 

That depresses oil prices in the region and 
makes it uneconomic to pump oil from Cali- 
fornia fields, the industry contends. Since the 
ban went into affect amid the oil crises of two 
decades ago. 32.000 jobs and $623 million in 
state and local tax revenue have been lost, 
according to estimates made by the Califor- 
nia Independent Producers Association. 

The ban is “a relic’* erf 20 years ago. said 
Dan Kramer, executive director of the pro- 
ducer trade group. "Hie export limits — and 
the assurance of L'.S. control of the shipping 
jobs — were embedded in the legislation ihat 

authorized construction of the" Trans- Alas- 
kan Pipeline. At the lime, oil prices were 
soaring and Washington was concerned 
about its dependency on foreign oil. 

At first, most of the crude made the Ions 
lourney from Alaska to refineries on the Guff 
Coast. Bui in recent years, as West Coast 
refineries have been modified to accept the 
Alaskan crude, most of the oil has ended up 
making the shorter, less expensive trip to 
Californio. 

That. California producers say. forces an 
extra 300.000 to 500.000 barrels a day of 
Alaskan crude onto the California market. 
Others, however, estimate that the “excess" 
oil is about half that much. 



Italy Agrees 
To Safeguards 
In INA Sale Plan 


“Sold- 


China Takes Aim at Copyright Pirates 


Bloomberg Business Vns 

BEIJING — Faced with the 
prospect of billions of dollars in 
U.S. sanctions. China has vowed to 
jail copyright pirates for up to sev- 
en years and lo execute serious 
trademark infringers. 

“To safeguard the integrity of 
ideas and the dignity of the law.” 
Minister of Justice Xiao Yang told 
an international symposium over 
the weekend, “criminal sanctions 
must be imposed on those who 
commit offenses against intellectu- 
al property rights.” 

Washington recently gave China 
until June 30 to prove it is enforc- 
ing its laws against widespread pi- 
racy of U.S. goods. Failure lo do so 
trill trigger a ax-to-nine month 
study of whether economic sanc- 
tions are needed to force China's 
hand on the issue. 

Determined to rid itself of its 
reputation as an Asia piracy haven, 
China also warned wayward pro- 
vincial governments to stop shield- 
ing pirates. 

“Anyone who dares to obstruct 


the fight against acts of counterfeit- 
ing registered trademarks is to be 
severely punished regardless of his 
post or status.” Li Bida, deputy 
director of China's Trademark Of- 
fice, said in a speech. “More severe 
punishments should be imposed on 
major criminals including life sen- 
tences and the death penalty.” 

Since July 1992, China has shot 
four men for selling counterfeit 
spirits, cigarettes, fertilizers and 
medicine. But until now, violators 
of copyrights only lost their illicit 
profits. 

Justice Minister Xiao said he 
supported a measure under consid- 
eration by Parliament that would 
allow jail terms or up to seven years 
for copyright pirates. The legisla- 
tion is due to be approved this 
autumn. 

Global industry groups said the 
legislation would make it worth- 
while for them to bring cases 
against pirates. The International 
Federation of the Phonographic 
Industry has yet to bring a case 
against pervasive piracy of com- 
pact disks in southern China be- 


Fish Gotta Swim , 
Fish Gotta Fly 


By Michael Richardson 

Ini emu iiona I Herald Tribune 


SMALL 

BUSINESS 



SINGAPORE — Tan Bok Yang divides much of his working day 
between two privately owned companies here: Red Sea Aquarium 
Pte. and Flying Freight Agency (Singapore) Pie. 

He is chairman of both, as well as of a third company firm that ha.s 
a substantial share in a goldfish breeding farm in China. 

There is a close link, he says, among these seemingly divergent 
small businesses that together employ several dozen people. 

Singapore is the world’s largest exporter of ornamental fish, 
accounting for about 20 percent of the global 
trade. The industry had 76 million Singapore 
dollars (US$49 million) in foreign sales in 1 993. 
up from 47 million dollars in 1986. 

Most of the 300 varieties of fish exported 
from Singapore — guppies, swordtails, ar- _ 

mored catfish, platys, tetras, angelfish, mollies. jjSySj JC. 
barbs, gouranoes, fighting fish and so Torth — 
end up in pel shops and household display ^ 
tanks m about 60 countries, mainly in Europe and North America. 

“Our ornamental fish are relatively cheap, good quality and 
beautiTul to look at” said Mr. Tan, who is also president of the 
Singapore Aquarium Fish Exporters’ Association. “Buyers like the 
variety of colors, shapes and sizes,” 

The association's 43 members are all small companies that are 
privately owned by Chinese Singaporeans. Although Mr. Tan and 
oilier proprietors will oat divulge their sales or profit figures, 
analysts said that the largest fish firms have a turnover of several 
million dollars a year. 

Since international demand for ornamental fish is growing. man\ 
of Singapore's traders and breeders are investing to expand and 
modernize their businesses. 

With scientific assistance and access to several agrotechnology 
parks provided by the government's primary production depart- 
ment, the number of fish breeding farms is expected lo double to 150 
by 1995. 

Mr. Tan said that at present only about 40 percent ol the 
ornamental fish exported from Singapore are locally bred. The rest 
are imported, mainly from Indonesia. Malaysia, Thailand. China. 
Japan, the Philippines and Sri Lanka. 


Being dose to many of the source countries, and having an open 
economy and efficient communications and air transport has en- 
abled the island-state to become a one-stop supermarket for bulk 
buyers of exotic fish. 

Packed in plastic bags with oxygen, the fish can survive for 
between 24 hours and 4$ hours, depending on the species. 

Hence the need for rapid and reliable international freight and 
customs clearance services. Singapore, a major air hub. has devel- 
oped such services. 

It lias become "the ideal logistics center," John Mullen, chief 
executive of TNT Express Worldwide, a leading global express 
distribution company, said recently. 

Mr. Tan's air freight, agency handles many of the ornamental fish 
exports. He said that his investment in goldfish fanning in China is 
to ensure the quality and reliability of hi$ supplies. 

High standards of breeding, stock checking and packaging for 
transport enable Singapore exporters to promise importers a fish 
mortality rale of under 2 percent 


To cot delivery costs, “we are constantly looking few improved 
methods to include more fish in a pack without increasing the 
mortality rate,” said Patrick Chin, managing director of Sunbeam 
Aquarium. 


While other Asian countries are contDetine with Singapore for 


competing } 

more of the international market for exotic fish and can supplv in 
bulk, they still lack variety, said Sia Hoy Chok. president of' the 
Singapore Tropical Aquanum Fish Breeders' Association. 

“And while they may enjoy lower costs, we have the edge in 
quality, M he added. 


Articles in ihis series appear every other Monday. 


cause the punishments are so le- 
nient. said Giouw Juichiare the 
federation’s director for Asia. 

“We’ve found that until someone 
goes to jail, no one pays attention.” 
Stephanie Mitchell, vice president 
of the Business Software Alliance, 
told the symposium. The alliance is 
only pursuing six cases, though it 
says that about 90 percent of the 
software in use in China has been 
pirated. 

Compact-disk and software pira- 
cy ore the main areas of U.S. con- 
cern. each accounting for about a 
third of the SS27 million in annual 
losses to U.S. companies that offi- 
cials in Washington estimate are 
caused by Chinese piracy. 

Mr. Xiao also said the Chinese 
government is about to publish a 
decree prohibiting the import and 
export of goods involving rights 
violations and will expand the staff 
at its enforcement agencies. 

Mr. Giouw of the phonograph 
federation said exports were the 
key problem since China has 26 
plants producing 75 million disks 


per year while domestic demand is 
only about 5 million per year. 

While he said he welcomed po- 
lice raids on pirate CD shops in 
southern China last month. Mr. 
Giouw said it could be six months 
before any factories were closed. 

That would be too late to stave 
off a U.S. investigation on June 30. 


■ Cellular Phone Forecast 

A Motorola Inc. spokesman said 
Saturday that his company expect- 
ed demand in China for cellular 
phones, especially in Shanghai and 
the coastal provinces, to grow by at 
least 100 percent a year over ‘the 
next three to four years, Reuters 
reported from Shanghai. 

The spokesman said Motorola 
and the Ericsson AB have about an 
equal share of nearly 60.000 users 
in Shanghai. 

He was speaking after Motorola 
signed an agreement with the 
Shanghai Post and Telecommuni- 
cations Bureau to double its sys- 
tem’s capacity, enabling it to dou- 
ble the number of users. 


Compiled h i Our Staff From Dxpjhn,* 

ROME — The privatization of 
the insurer Istituto Nazionaie As«i- 
curazioni SpA will go ahead a» 
planned, the government an- 
nounced over the weekend, but of- 
ficials agreed to add provisions to 
protect minority shareholders. 

The sale of the insurance compa- 
ny, owned by the Italian Treasury, 
is’ set for June 27. but Chairman 
Lorenzo Pallesi had said it could be 
delayed until October if the gov- 
ernment did not approve the opera- 
tion in time for a shareholders' 
meeting on Monday. 

“The government confirms its 
intention to proceed with the priva- 
tization of INA according to the 
calendar already established." it 
said in a statement issued Saturday 
after a cabinet meeting of Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi's new 
administration. 

The statement added, however, 
that some safeguards would have to 
be included in the plan. 

“The government supports modi- 
fications to tbe INA statute to give 
minority shareholders efficient pro- 
tection and to introduce incentives 
for the company management.” ii 
said, without giving details. 

The RAL television network 
quoted Budget Minister Gianc'arlo 
Pagliarini as saying the government 
would sell 51 percent of INA in the 
late-June offering. 

One of Mr. Berlusconi’s political 
allies, the Northern League, has 
been fiercely critical of the role 
played by the bank Mediobanca in 
the government's recent sales of 
stakes in Credito Italiano SpA and 
Ban ca Commerciale Indiana Spa. 

Purchasers in those sales were 
limited to acquiring stakes of less 
than 3 percent, but Mediobanca 
appeared to gain effective control 
of both companies by having cor- 
porate allies invest in them and win 
places on their boards. 

In the INA sale. Mr. Pagliarini 
said, the government may set a 
maximum shareholding of as little 
as 0.5 percent of the company and 
make it easy for private holders to 
vote on mailers affecting the com- 
pany without attending sharehold- 
er meetings. He said details of 
those measures would be decided 


’3*“ 

“ehad 

ip 


,re 

•fi 


cos- 11 

aratP* 


- was 

Monday at a meeting of ihccurre nSi ; l0 |<j 
shareholders of INA — the Tre^Sj^ pf 
5ury Ministry and several gover ^ 0 f 
mcnl-con trolled financial ins dissipa- 
tions. '^lears. 


The Budget Ministry, along wi ^ , , 
the Treasury and Industry- min;^." 
tries, is overseeing the Italian SOysi* 01 ?® 
ernmeni’s program of selling Cyj 310 , 
state-owned companies. u _ ® ul " 

INA has shareholder equity tn-j^d 
taling about 1 1 trillion lire (S7 b 
hum, I Reuters. B/ooniberxs j ;m g 

^ tried 


Va 

Ks 

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lyb 

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el 


Virgin Wins 
Paris Fight to 
Open Sundays 


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th:nag. 
nr dial 
to ined 


Jaucj^ 

rig 
COIEf ! 


Ratten 

PARIS — Virgin Group, 
which defied a French ban on 
Sunday retailing, has quietly 
triumphed after the govern- 
ment dropped the ban. 

“Our stores open seven days 
a week." said the recorded 
telephone message at the Vir- 
gin Megustore music and film 
emporium on the Champs Ely- 
sees. “On Sundays, we are 
open from noon to midnight.” 

Virgin Megastore, owned by 
Virgin Group of Britain, 
opened on three successive 
Sundays last summer, anger- 
ing unions and risking huge 
fines in its fight against the 
government for the right to do 
business on Sundays." 

1 1 eventually agreed to abide 
by the law pending a review. 

Despite opposition, the 
French official gazette on Fri- 
day published new regulations 
allowing Sunday trading in lei- 
sure goods in tourist areas. 

Unions argue that Sunday 
trading would not create jobs 
but would lead companies to 
deny workers' rights to a week- 
ly holiday. 

A Virgin spokesman had ar- 
gued that 20 percent of the 
store's annual 8 million cus- 
tomers came on Sundays. 


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The sun also rises. All he ever dreamed of growing up in 
Detroit was managing his own machine shop. Then one day he 
came to The Valley. And he had a vision. He saw a future where 
the network, not the PC, would be king. The workstation its 
mighty servant. With iron discipline (and a bag full of hockey sticks) 
he set out to build a new empire. Today Sun Microsystems is a 
multibiilion-dollar giant in Silicon Valley. And just minutes from 
the local ice rink. Scott McNealy is just one of over 857,000 
top American executives who read Forbes. 

Forbes 


CAPITALISY yool* 


■X. 

■fe 

a] 






INTERS. \TiON \i. HERALD TRIBl’NE. MONDAY. MAY 23, 1994 


I Gn> Nome WTilv •GroNnme Wkh 

I Pd Name Losi Oiw?! Fa name Lost Oig? 


Grpllcme WMr GrpNcdW 
Fd xm Last CJig e 


Wkly Grp Nome 


Wldv Grp Nomt 



Wkky Grp Noma 


wUv 'Grp Name 


F- Name Lasi a,ge Fa Name Last Chge Fa Name Lev Chge FdNcme Last Otoe FdNane Lari Owe 


^lose '3! trading Friday. Mfly 2Q 


snMaina Wkly j Grp Nome Wkly 
Fa name Lav Oise Fa Nome Losi Oiee 


GO> Nome Wkly 1 Gro Nome WMy 

Fd Name Lost a»c 1 Fd Name Lair oise 


lALMuluofc 1 

BonflP ? *0 - II | 
CaGrp I4JB -.15 
MunBd P 10X? -.Jl f 
SmCtr'jtk JJ* 

Util «/2 031 
SARPInvst: _ ( 

BdS&B n USA • .24 
CapGr n 30 81 ■ .50 
GinieMn I5JM OS [ 
Grwtnc n 33.04 - -48 | 
HQ Ban 15.54 *J0. 
T/FBfin 17356 -J2 | 
1BT Funds 
Emerap IJA0 - Ja I 
FLHi low *.«| 
FLTF 1033 -.14 1 
GwtWnp 10J.’ - 16 1 
UtilllK P 1 1.25 - J2 ; 
AF LflCas n 9.81 -Ja> 
AHA Funds.- : 

Baton n 1197 -.12 
Full 9.63 -.10 
um 10.15 -AS 
AIM Funds 
AdiGvo * 45 -.02 1 

A8 ""° itS -jJ| 

8 77 -.16 


Brinson Funds: 
BnnsnGI I HUS -.17; 
BhnjGIBf 7.77 -.!■ . 
NUSEqty 9.95 -.07 
IBrnarwrin 24.07 - 43 j 
Bruce n 99.24 - 16?' 
GvTg97oi3.0? -.07 iBnmegSl n 10 31 -.0° 
GjTIAp 8JI -.»; Bul&floarGp: 

3 « - .2, Gblncnp te? -.05 


GvTIBp 
GvTIC P 
Grind P 
Grtnc p 

Ham Ad 

HartjBP 


Hlin5c 1 
HiYWF 
MuAZI 
inimdl 
LldMuni 
MuCA 1 
MUFL I 
MU NJ I 
MuQHP 


25 


8«1 -.12 
12.44 -Jft 

T2XS -JS 

14318 -25 
14.0? - 25 


HIYIdlnvA Pi. 22 - .02 


Galdlnv nplo.lfr --5ft 
GovtSec nPlftXB -.19 
Mulnc d 16 14 - .25 
QwSCihPUXft -.37 
SoEqp N.14 -.36, 
USOvs np 8.00 -.1' ; 


I Troalrr. D »B> - .12 . 
1 TradTorl p«7.s? -.12 ! 
■ Ed'Pci 6 12.3S -,?i 
.EdipBd 1BJ3 -.'8 • 
10.15 - 0? | Emerald Funds 
7.53 - Bolins' n 10 ds 

10J2 -.14 EmFqt 1124 

'JJ -.11 Ealnsin 11.29 

9 S» - 1? | FLT-E* to*: 

FLTxEln iat3 
MgaBdi n ».« . 

SmCopf n ’4-J - Oi ■ 
USGarA 10 I* 'll* 
USGavl n 10.1c- 

17.S* -.15| 
16.93 -Jft 


10.12 -.16 
I OJA -.15 
1QJ3 -.14 
1QJ2 -.15 

MulfPAI I0J6 -.15 

NYTuFi 1 1-57 -.13 EmaBid 
NtPst 1177 -.19 I Endow 


*: - ij 


C*>F-'rn I0.U 
CTHVnr I0.S1 
FL Mil rn 10:5 
1 GH7/.A n * t k 
( Gavrin n 10 01 
i hlnhln m 11 88 

; int/Xun I 9 79 
Irv.’GrBd « 5 30 
LrtfGv «*: 
. 1 LtGn 10 b: 

.. 1 AID .Mu m ! 61 

Munlnr loo* 
njH'i r 10 97 
HYHV ffl ‘0.29 
PAH'i m 10.32 


- 1: 
. 1 ? 

• 15 

.(■3 


..Wc.-iT.-f 11*: -.53 

MNIT, ll»7 .57 

.MU TF 1147 • If 

I1JTF ilJ4 -.13 


- I* 


• ll 
- Of 

• 10 


-.14 
. .3 


I.’ 


If 

- 15 

- it 
• U 


ft -in-, 10.3s 

Nr' TJ. r. ll.-O 
fICTF 1 1.-4 
OnorTF 1191 
"iPT- I1.JJ 
PxcSr.XhSJi 
PfciF 10 13 
PremPls 6.1’ -.0’ 
Pu*r7F IIJ? 
y Gov I0.W - C c 


Ji 

-. 0 '- 


&a-isn ”B -.11 
(3-I.-1CP 13 *e -.25 

in'Fdn 14X6 - .18 

instep *.?’ -.11 

Mtocosn 13.5* -71 
RW on no2tl.75 - .1 5 
B K r. pf> r -.«r. - j] 
value n 11.75 -70 

13V. Mutual Fundi 
LarljCo nlc 72 - j# 


CusB-ti 
CusKl 1 
CusK2t 
CusSi t 
CusS3: 
CsnSat 
inn : 
KP-V. 1 


TgvFr i 


5.(30 -.03 
943 - 16 
J.13 -.15 

— "1 7 
T ?! -01 
rsj -.io 
23.72 - 1.19 
1M4 - .13 
-. 0 ? 


Gntiip U.r* -.19 
GrCiAo *79-12 
IntIA p 27 82 - ,35 
McrnSiay Funds: 

19 02 -^2 


.Vun-Bd 9*0 -.12 Keystone America: 


ImsilCo n 17 4^ • Jl 
•J3 7 r«s n 10 78 -.13 
Utility 10.10 - 34 


PocCrt 20J5 - J* I Enterprise Group: 
PrcMt 11 J4 -.63 | CacApa 297' -I 


HrViaB p t 30 - I ggmNjrp p 2o!or -'jo! SelMuP H75 -11 
MU BA P 7.98 - .10 j CA5PIW n 34.01 ■ 19 | tAonaart 1 10J9 - .0? 
MunBB c 9.°8 - .10 ! CGM Funds: 

PaccAp IU6 .231 AmerTF 97B -.14 


PoccB P M7* -73 
TEHTrA 0IOJ8O -318 
TEHiYB p 10.79 - .07 
7ttvE»IAalI.I0 -.02 
T>E IflP 1M0 -JW 
T/MSAo 9i0 -.11 
UI'IAp 8.« -.17 
American Fundi 
AmBain*i?07 
Aina d 1 1.82 


BalAp 
Oxrt c 
Const! d 
GoScp 
G nhB I 
Grflie 

HildAp 
HYldBi 
Incap 

InttED 
LimM P 
MLiBP 
Summit 
TeCTp 
TF Ini 
1110 O 

uiiis 1 
value 1 
Vaiup 
\We1n9p 

AMF Fluids; 
AdiM:e sat - 


CaoDev n 25 38 - 88 | 
Fidlncn 10^1 -70l 
Mull n 27 40 | 

Calmer; p I US -J4 
CATFIn 10.18 - 13 1 
CaSfamia Trust: 1 

Callncn 13-15 -.17 
Cmusn lOui* -.18 

5&P500n 10.90 - 77 

... S&PAAid IU3 -Jflj 

JVmA'utl n2l «2 • 43 I Calvert Group: 1 

BondFdP 13.40 -->51 Arid 28^9 -J?4 I 
CaplnBlpB.2? -.46; ArietAp >160 - 33; 
CopWldp 15.75 -J6l GlobEd 
CapWGr 17.94 - 29 I mat 


Premier o 884 -.04! Gvveca 
Owl nno 
Orlncp 
H 1 Bd p 
irniGrp 
SmCo 
, TEincp 

8 77 -.11 .'Evergreen Funds 
119* - “ ~ 


STBd 
ST US a 
5! ran 
Ta*Ex 
USGvtt 
U'il nt 
Valia I 
WW Inc 

widwai 

TCBrflP 
TC Carl 
TC Ihcp 
TC Lai 1 
Ta-iartP 
TCSCal 


jtilinc n 9 f4 - e© 

SlniG. n 9 4* JO' 7^*', 

ShllnMun *>81 -.0* “V TP 11.14 - 10 

1IJJ • .12 iFiCmlopn l?it- -Jl | U3Go*3c t U -.1C 

8 09 - J8 ;59WaU5lreei: I 'Jiilii>« ?.*? -.■- 

17 59 - .7? 1 EuroEa 534“ -.14 J- TF I1J7 - If 

I 1.0a —.04 | P»*sn 3* 27 -.4? FrjnklLi MqdTr: 

I7J0 - J? I SmCu II 60 - 11 ' 


jnvZsoJ* r a 43 - .iT, IDE7 Group: 

TACo* 10J? -18 Ido- l 7 <e5 -27 


05 1 T.-FJI 10.17 -05 in.-ir<jf© oi.Of -07 

-.18 |FinHarGy 1 I0.4B - lb PisDiva T42a • 13 

FinHorMu r 10 J2 • .1 A Franklin 7 empli 


;GU?t5iS 16 CO - Jl 
3Gr;^4 d 1687 - 35 
57a-E* 1 1 -22 -.M 
3inc?(A p» 10.0* -.34 
Ido 2 lii* -33 ■ 
2FI»fli CX9.C2 -.02 
C^aCual P2197 - .K IDS Group: 



*30 - 15 
4.97 -.04 


Aytric to 

C“PiF 

CPI2BJ 

Emb 

FIaA 

FCit 

GiOA 

GvSA 

KrEGA 

HrtGri 

imdA 

Omens 

PtvA 

Sl'li 


*y: -Ji 

vi 

9.74 


1: .Si - 15 

783-34 
13.78 -JJ 
ii .75 

B.U - 10 

r4:RsGaldil055 - 3» 

T.FBl 934 • i: 

Tejpr: 14.95 - j?c 


Con. : 

CmSd! 

Ec:r. 

t'CLl I 
L-OV1 I 


30J* 

£.9* 
li.4l 
il.Ci - 1: 



v'aJ : 

15X9 

_ J' 

-Jft 

Xanagers Funds: 


-.16 

CaoAc n 

24X2 

' -Jft 

-.37 

'DEan 

l’o; 

- 35 

-.17 

lnc=an 

27 tt 

- ’I 

-.12 

ShortGv n 1739 

-10 

—lft 

InlMIgn 

1-0’ 

-.5? 

• li 

51 Bona 

20J’ 

- 18 

- T» 

Bondn 

»X7 

- ?A 

-:xi 

intlEa n 

34X5 

-.49 


ATL3I 

BlueBl 

CalTBi 

CopABI 

CmTcB 

DvGrBt 

EuGrSI 

Grthfll 

GEnBt 

GlInBI 

GOBI 

HilnBnt 


Mariner Funds- 


iilB -]07 I T»FA 


16.97 -J4l 
9.C -.081 
10.76 -J6i 
I0J0 - 25 I 
»-57 

9.S7 - 01 1 
741 -3)9 
134)2 -J5; 

9.94 -.Oil 
6 U -3M ; 

9.38 -.20 
10.71 -.10, 

10 65 - .09; 

12.43 -.20 1 
12.43 - JO 
20J3 -A3 
20J7 - A3 AmGwiti 
1CJS - J9 I AHeritg n 


Eupocp 22 44 -.34 
Fdlny e |7.7, J J7 
Govt D 1JJ4 -.IB 
GwthFd P 26JJ3 -.*3 
HITrstp 14J9 -.10 
incoFd p 13.6i - -W 
IntBdD ISA* -.15 
invCoi 
UtfTEBd 
ttwEar o29 
riewPerp 1 5 JO -Jl 
SmCaWp22«y -J*| 
To-E'BtpU 61 -.12 
T.EvCAolSj; -.19 I 
T .ErMDPl4 93 - .17 I 
T»ErViol5.45 -.18 1 
WshMul Pl’J2 * J3i 
9.37 -.13 1 
'.Z2 -.02, 
AmerNatl Funds: 


MBCAI 
Munlnt 
Social P 
SacBd 
SocEo 


12.14 - .44] MuniFn 1022 - AS 
10.18 - 03! Muni Ins n *97 - 15 , 
12 85 ■ 91 ! Retire n ll IT *.15 ; 
9J“ -.10 Tatfiln 17.99 -JT 

_ 8.89 -.07 1 7al7m n !4.9e - JO 

18.19 -.33 J Del GtP 105*1: | E*»NMa AW -At, 

1£J9 - J4 I Decll 16.24 ■‘J2lE.lm.HiD 2.J6 — Al ' 
1816 -J4 FAMVain i9.r2 • '* 1 

2478 -.07 I FBL Series: j 

6.7D -.01! BICFid t 18/0 Ji 

9.38 -.04 


10.21 -.10' 

10.1 1 - 10 1 
28.91 -.39 1 
14.04 - 18 1 ... 

20 JO -J5 j Delaware Grows 
T*FLt*J n 10.4* - 01 | Trend p 
T «Fl_ng 14 J7 -.IS! Value 0 


Deiwrl 

Dla>l 

Dteni 

Ts/Psl 


Gro-mhi UOl JO! Balanp ;0.60 


•SouBdln 9U -.os 
Inllncl n 9.71 -.10 
Lldlndn 9.9'.' • 07 
Migieci n » 86 - 07 
MunBdln 10.47 -.17 
Re?Eain 11.70 -.10 
Soe-:E^i n 15.92 - jo 
S» 0 1 n 16.3" - .-3 
First A me* Funds: 
41IAII p it' ?J 


raua: HJGrfiflt "3 '4 -M\ SouJIvp 15*2 -J0 

ll*i - Oil Hi-BOl 1005 -.0 eoia- Cl 0J2 -Ji 

... 1V ^. .. 20.14 -.14 Manndi ll J 7 - to, F-dlaro 10/. - U 

Ad 1150 "ill T\FVT 15.90 -!l6| CMcdpd 24.6? - .07 j FFB Lexicon: 

iBd 1406 -Jl 1 uSGav 1A16 - I* Deem n 16J* -.2?. CapAtm 11J3 -JO 

DTP29.3J CamSdWFds: DecTRP 116? *■»! F-dln 0.03 ■ •'» 


Cambridge Fds: 
CaoGrA 14.76 -J8 
Gvtnd !i« *.I9 
GwthA 1 J.TO - J7 
MuIncA U 65 -.16 
CasGrBt 14/9 -J7 
GvinB I 133)8 - JO 
GwmBI 14.78 -J6 
incGrSI I53» - 3* 
Muincfi r !4/« -.15 
CaDMHd\nl0 90 - J 


9.14 
9."1 
« ©-■ 


DckfttP I8.IS - 34 1 imOr 16.61) -.10 
inllEa D 12JJ -.15 ; SerVoliivpl 1.4# -54 
CietcnAD 6 70 -XI • SmCaGmllJ? -.12 
USGavtp 8.08 -X3 FFB Ea 10.7? *.20 


-.10 


7 -X?| Growl n 4.16 - .09 IcppneOo BusJitnore 

IntMlg'n 9 JO - oe , Income 21. >7 *J4| EmaGrn H 07 -.12 


InRLian 10.58 - 04 TriHer 1SJ5 -.32 i Grv/tti 11.57 -.35 

MigSecn 10J3 -.17 |API C-r tpn 12 30 -.1?| CoPPrelUrl 8.7* -.17 
ARK Funds: ;Am Perform: 1 Capstone Group. 


Fund SW 15.40 - Jl 

Gvtlnc 4 73 -JJ1 
MoaPi mo - J* 

NZiand 1 1 J2 ■ .14 
NjQucn 7.74 - .09 
US Trend ri297 - jo 


CapGr n 10.2» -Ja| Bond “ 9.39 -.11 

Rrlncon 10.18 -.17 Eauity 11J8 -.25 

inavne “/5 ■ '0 intSd 10J8 -X7 

ASM Fan 9.0) - JB 1 AmL'ilFd n 20 03 -A1 

A VEST A: AmwvMul I 7J4 -.13 

Balcnced 16/9 - J7 1 AnalwSFTGv9.74 - 06 
EoGro 17.94 - J4 I Anal ylic n 1 ».88 - J0 Cardinal Family: 
EqUKom 17-=6 - .45 Anencapt I *.77 -30 AggGth 9J5 -.14 

income 1544 -.18 Aauila Fuads: Balanced VO -.10 

Accnsw Funds: I *1 TF 10 2* ‘.til Fund tj.71 - -23 

IntF'Inn 11/S - .15' C07F I0J1 -.12 | GovtOUiig 8 17 -Xe 

AccMiVtaliai -.14 HI TF 1 1 JO .ll,CorilCa 1X02 -10 

ShflntFr 11.95 -.08 KV TF 10 Ji - . CameaOHTE9 SI -.05 

Acamln 14 05 -.17 NrgnsITF 9.54 -.IS 

AcmFd 1X11 -0* OP TF I0J^' -.11 

AdsnCap 20J5 -.71 | T*FUT °J3 -,1c 

AduCBalp 10.13 * JO I Aquinas Fund: 

AflvCHel P 9.79 -.15 1 Balancer “J2 
AdvBst Advwil: , Ealnc n 

Gavrnp 9 13 -.15* F»!ncn 9.61 -.12 
Gwthno I6JI - J9 J Arch Fundi 
HVBdp 8.88 -.01 Bal 9.83 -.18 

Inconp 1144 -.18 1 EmGnti 11J2 -.19 

MuBdNaf 9J3 -.16 1 C-cvCnrp 10.02 -.11 

Sect no 19.73 - .1*1 Grolnc 12/7 • JI . 

AefnaFunds; MaTF IT.12 -.15 r 

Aclmn 10/0 -.18 US Gov 10J3 -.11 

AsJanGrn a S3 - J3 1 b/rmmx n 8.53 - J4 
Bond n 9.90 -JJ9 , AKontoGrplO.*? -JJ 
Growth 10J7 - .23 I Atlas Funds: 

10.87 -JO I CaMuni 10.84 -.15 


FFBNJ 1055 
FFTiV Funds: 

US Snort 9.95 

W/7HcdS 9.46. 
WW F.dln 9.46 
FMB Funds: 
Dn.EC P 11 J9 
DUE i 


Cnh BIA 1 SJ6 -2.7 

CnKBIB 15J2 * J* 

CenhjmGp 8.41 ‘X 7 
Cr.tr/Shrn 2106 - At, \ 
ChCapBC 12 *9 - JO 


TreosA p 9.38 - .04 
TrUSA P 12X9 - 09 
T.lroAD 10*9 • -06 
TjrFrlm p 1029 
T^FrPAAPB 32 -.0- 
Dimensional Fds: 

USLrp 1369 ■ 34 

USSml 8 33 - 02 

US 6-10 n IIJ* -.09 | infiCa 
Japan n 2671 -.19. IfllGI 
UK. n 24 Jl .MiTF p 

Coni n 1 5.72 - 23 I M.TF I 
DFARIEst 1083 - .0? 1 FPA Funds; 

FuMfn 101.14 - 25 Oartt 19J0 -Jl ' 
•3tBd 100 22 -1.00 Nevvlnc T0/I -.10) 
Govin 102.41 -1J2. Parmnl 1)4’ - 22 1 
InfGv 106.32 -US I Purer 2i.»4 -J*« 
InilHBM 11.72 - .12 ! Fomin 24.49 -.48 
LCoDlnl 17.61 -.1? jFasocnon 17J4 -X? 
PocPim 16.6? - JO Federated Funds: I 

USLg .'al 10 J2 - JO l ArmSS cm 9 71 - .01 


CovBdD 
Intlnc p 
Udine 

MtgGuC a 7.36 

■MunSd 3 12/: 
PenEc p 1 1 ’0 

Stock P 1&J7 - J) 

.13 Fust Amer Mutual: 

! DivrGr =01 - j: 
• XI Eel not *.e* ■ .1 1 
■ .12 1 ■Mont? Inc 9t / - X2 
- <ir IFsr&crJG *2* 

, FsicCCt nr Is 31 
_. -.93 Fr-JFdt 1071) - .20 
1129 - 23 ■FrslFdTol ’At -.11 
1001 -X* 'FIHwftW 10..’,’ -.10 
10.01 - .0’ i First investors: 

I0JI -.00 BIChiPC 15 23 - 3* 
“ GMUr LIT -.14 


Gtcr.vtn n IC ** - ?l 
IntiGm 9.7i -.1; 
CA Ini UJ j; -.:* 
FundTrust: 

Aggresta 15.1’ - 7-i 
Grclnlp 16.-1 -*S 
Gwtn» 15 f? • :© 
media *.6’ -.1-' 
r.rptfTP- teli.it . j; 
Fundamental Funds: 
CA.Vun np E Si - vi 
tr: .Vrt.inncl.04 -.01 
Ui?o«n T/J 
GA M Funds: 

GlcSal (J4.r2-2J4 
- 10 Inh 194 0.: . 4 41 

■ .0’ PctSos ITJ J9 - 1.33 
-.0’ GE Sdun 54 i 

CiversianlXK - J" 
G’chdin i*."4 - Jl 
income n I'. 12 -.12 
f-iSLugntl 05 • id 
SS.5 C M n 2&J0 - .95 
Ta<E- 11 4* -.12 
T-usrsn 33 JO - 7£ 
12 GE Funds; 

-.40 GkMC ',’.14 -j 
incomeCnii 53 - .12 
InllEaDn li«8 -.27 


WrtflBA 

riiBI 

FOABi 

GIOpBi 

GvSB I 
ImdBt 


7.63 -.14 
Disc W 3 10.50 -.1? ■ 

Tr;ijit?|p 10.07 - 14 
c/tfrln a 4.2 — XI : 

Fedlncp 4.85 -.02; 

GlotiBd P 5 83 - 07 
G'oGr p 6.77 - 18 
Gmvdhp I7K -.i* 

Hi- 3TB p 4J7 -.05 
inyTEp 5.42 - 00 , 
intlc lOil -.19! 

•V.aa P 3 lll> -.2* 

.".WsiP 5 Jr -X6 
'.Mi a 5-40 - .07 
<VN TE P 5 Jl - C7 
Mutlo i?04 -J2- 
N : 7=3 5.16 ‘0*: FT.*FC1 

N-v.Dp 138? -J8 sect 

Onlo 3 3J1 -X7IMAPF 

PreoiSI p SJi - .42 Kidder Group: 
Progrt-sp 665 -X7 
Wectp 8*8 -.tl 


’.14 

B.’e 

1021 


-.08 

F»Ginc 

?.ft9 

-.09 

-.13 

NY TF 

13X4 

-.11 

- O’ 

5T F-lnc 

9.6? 

-4n 

■,1ft 

TP Go 

Il’Xf 

-34 

-j: 

Mark Twain Fds 


-.17 

couih' 

97; 

-JO 

-.12 

F-dlncm 

’.’O 

-.14 

-.0? 

Muni 

lili'1 

-.12 


PT.FBt 

jicSt 

TrFSt 

GlOaCl 

TKFCf 
FnCi 
foac 1 

GvSCI 
imdC 1 


11631 
I0.s: - 15 

7.7? - 08 

9*: -.13 
IB.** - 1' 


fAprketWaldlFtlS: 
Eauitv * *.9I -.17 

Ficoncm s’.73 -02 
IniFsIn x 9J3 -.65 
.'AMuBdxVS 
a/2 -.1) Marquis Funds: 

10?: -.16 G.isecA -.11 

I0.c: -.32 GthlnA 9.6’ -.17 

4J* - 12 VcJEpa s 9j* - 26 
- .0* Marshal Funds; 

10” 


9.74 


1175 - J5 , 
«<1 - 16- 
*.07 • .05 
.9* - 01 ; 
5.65 -.10 1 
186 -.0*' 
6.40 - 13 


10JI -.1* 

9 J4 - .12 
*J* -.14! IcPE! 
9.K -.13 


CHDF 

Gvttt 

IntFtA 


10 )1 - 08 


Go-.-rp U'"J - 13 GrTInvsl: 

Grolnc p 6i3 - 14 1 EsSccn 1®J1 -Jl 

" - X2 

.01 


5 10 


USSmt'al 1IJ5 
DodgeS Co jl: j 

Solan n 46 08 -1X5. 
Incamt-n 11.28 -.13 
SIC"* n 53.88 - lJf I 
DomSccial 12.10 - J* 1 
□reman Funds: 

Conrrn 1172 -J4 


0B Ai 


1 -.01 

E«ehFCn71 06 - 1 74 
FkhIS n 10J* - .08 
8.91 -.52 | 


Acre: nD 14.6? - jr 
AssetAJinl2x0 -.1* ! 
Bctncd 1138 -.21 


Gnwinco 
inrtGr n 
SmCoGr 


11J7 

10.04 


9.95 -X3 I 
999 -.)* 
1X6? -.13! 
10X8 -.151 


-"l?! CAIns 
.. ' GwtSec 
Alger Funds: , Grolnc 

Growltl I 19X8 - .45 I NoMuni 
incGrr 1148 -.12 ! 8BAT Funds: I 

6A*dCP*jf 1 1 1 .64 - 17 BdBn “.B8 - .14 | 
SmCcpf 2D.*® - I* 1 GmlncTnll.13 -.19 1 
AUanoe Cap: 1 InlGovTn 9.*0 -.11' 

Afiancep 6J8 -JO I SIGovTn 9.76 -.CE 
Baluta 13J4 -.27 BEA Funds: 

BalanS 1 14.14 -.24 j EMkE ( ?liO-l.BI, 
BandAP 13.0? - J* . intlEa 19X5 - J7 i 

Cnstvinv UJJ“ IS | StaF-inp 16.07 - 14 ; 

13X1 -J* 7- r . 

BFMShOu n 9.75 - .04 , 
BJBGIA P 11X4 - 09. 
BJEMEoAd 1165 -.43, 
BNY Hamittaic , 

Ealncn 10.85 - Jl , 

InlGovt *52 -.12 1 

NY TEn 


CalT> n 
Cailnl n 
CTinm 
Drevfus 
EdElInd 
FLIntn 


14X6 -.10 
1J11 -.15 

1198 -j* 

1X76 - JI ! 

11 45 - JB 1 
13.0° -.15 


CaBdBp 13X1 -J6 
cpsaC p ixoi - Jt 
Count P 1683 --*3 
GIDGvlB P B.94 
GlbSAo T I JJ - J5 


7.99 -.10 | 
7.99 -.101 
7.99 -.11 


GO/t A p 
Govffi p 

GovTCp . . 

Grolnc p ? J? - XS > Bahspn Group: 

GwttiC 20.41 - J? ! Bond L n 1X3 -01 

GwttiFp 24X6 -J5, Bond 5 n *.C - .O’ 

GwlhB 1 20 41 -.64 Entcrp? n 16 77 -X? 


GrtncBp 
GrlrrvB 
InMAo 
IrrsASuB 
InsMC p 
mttAp 
MrtgAp 
MngS & 
77/1 gCo 


2JI -.05 
lii* - 13 
VI - 19 • 
961 -.18 ; 
**1 -.IB ! 
10J3 - -24 


9X5 -.15 ■aiesGrth iifl* -X^l HiPtn lS.*6_-.33. 
'■ CHesim i4i.il +2jo! SmCpVaimo.94 - i*| 
CWcMUwnl4142 - .8*. I Drevlus , ; 

OiubfiGrln loXO -.21 I A Bond n 1J 0« -.22 
ChufcfcTR 14.32 -.18 
Qippern 49J2-IX8 
Calontal Funds: 

InlEalP 17.28 
Cal TEA 7 07 -.08 
ConTE A e 7 30 -.11 
FedSec ia<3 -.17 
FL TE A 7.22 -.11 
FundA 8.00 - .10 
GrwntAp 11X7 -JO 
HiYldA *X4 -.02 
incarneAe6J3 - 0? 
iniGrA 10 JO - IS 
MAT »A 7.57 -.O’ 

Ml TEA 6XO -X* 

MNTEA 7.01 -M 

rtatRcsA 12.7? -J2 

NY TEA 6.91 -.10 
OhTEA 7.10 -.0* 

5m5rt p 17J6 
StrTIncA 6.93 - XS 
. T <E«A a 1115 -.1 T 

USCFUn 14*6 - JO | TjIrtsAp 7.9? +10 
.. USGr4 ))i8 

USG v A 6/5 - XS 
UlilAp 11.97 -J5 
CATEBI 7.07 -.06 
CT TE Bte7.30 -.11 
FedScd: 10/3 -.17 
7.22 -.11 
7 *9 - 10 
12J8 -JO 

_ 11X0 -.30! 

HVMuBI 9.77 -.09 • 

HrleCBt 6.64 -.02' 
inavneB 6.23 - .08 
InTGtB ID J7 -.16! 

MATjBI 7X7-09, 

NcrResBIlibe - J? I 
fJYT.BI 6.91 -.101 
OH T <B I 7.10 -.0*' 


FSTMsn 
FGROn 
FH*iT n 
FITISn 
=ITSSP 


2I.*0 - 4* ; 
6.82 - 03 I 
10.00 -.O’ I 
10.00 - 0° 


Hah 1 0 a 
income a 
Irr/Ord P =.* 4 
LifedC P 1 .73 
LileH T n 10.45 
U5A np 1 1 U 7 
■MATFu tlXl 
AM TF P 11.9* 
NJ TF D 12.44 
MYT rFr p 14 J9 
PA TF a 
EpecBd 


-.Of 


otOCK. C 

f IrAM t 
SFEc! 

Shine 1 
Str JT : 

Str-.VG 1 
T= Bndp 
Uiaincp 
IS1 Funds: 

;,\uni prt 
tloAm 0 
. .. Trsi p 

5iraiG 15X& - 20 IndOneGT 

USEsDn 15.90 -J9 independence Cap: 

GEUSE 15.59 -40 Gaovlp 10.97 -21'LMHn 17 »c - J5 
'-innfivi p ■) n • .05 Landmark Funds: 

TP Bao *X7 -.14. Baton n 13.°2 ■ J? 
TP Gm 1158 •.U 1 Ecuil.n 14. ’4 -j 9 
FfJailn 10x2 - 12 invPesn 4 53 -X4i 
FrvA nl0*3 -.14 invSer Oalita: , 

C»3r1 1244 -.?S] 

CuatSfr il"t. - 34 . 

US Gvt 


■Ilf 

Bain 

’te 

- 13 

-.1)8 

Eolnc 

9X4 

-.15 


Grtlnc r 

933 

-.10 


IrtBdn 

9X5 

‘ 08 

-.02 

InsT.E 

9X8 

-.0’ 

-4E 

MidCra 

»J4 

-.13 

-.03 

ST inen 

}J7 

-.03 

- J'. 

S»cd> n 

«X7 

- 18 

‘ J8 

VoiEq n 

10.17 

y» 


ASIA 113 13. 

EmMUA 11— 

EtnMKiB 11,14 - J6 , Mothers n 14/ft -.21 
Gfi?Ea3n 1* J 9 - 3* Maxus Funds: 

GfDEaCn To4« -3s Eauitv for 1X44 - JO 
GibEcA 1*42 -Js Income 1 10J9 -.11 
GthP*B HOP - IT. Laureat fpn9 J2 -.19 
lie* -.1’ MentGtn HU -m 

3424 -1* afiertSir n MX3 -.W 

1173 -.13 Meroer Fd DKJJ7 — OI NewUSAo 11.43 


MDI . P 10X5 - .12 
ME - ! T A 10l55 -.12. 

MBS TA n 9.46 -.11 
,‘JlulnTA 10.45 -.15 
AUtnIA o 10.45 -.15 
SiGvIA p 4X9 - 03 
SlGviC r 4X9-03 
jlijvTAn 4.09 »03, 

STinTAn 9 7ft -.CM 
STlm.'ll 9.73 -.04 
STiniC 1 *70 - JX 

SCITAn 10 J3 -.10 
CtFTfln 9.69 -J2' 

TXITAn 9.98 -.10; 
value) n 1 I3J2 -J8 
Value I A p 1X34 - JB; 

ValueTA 13 J4 - J8 ! 

\,AJTAP 10 67 . .11 . 

VAMAp 1(L47 -.11. 

Naliarwide Fds: j 

NlBoreJ 9X3 -.131 
NctnFd 15.M -M‘ 

NlGwtft 10.97 - J7 1 
TyFrel 5 87 -.13 J 
USGrin r 9X2 - 14 | 

Nctihener Seme 
AMT 8al nU.’l -.2?! 

Genesis 7X7 -XI 
Gucrdn n 1177 - iO 
LidMatn 1002 -X6l 
Manual n 10.96 - JO . 
must lex* -.10 ■ 

MYCDCn 9.94 -.17: 

Psrlnrs n 20J6 - 5! . 

SelSHan 13JJ -Ji I 
UirroBdn ?.J? -XI 
X9 New Alter 28X5 -.11 ! 

NewCnttp 11.82 -.17 | 

New Enskmi Fd£ 1 
AdftJSAp 7J5 -X3, 

Baton A p 11.84 -Ji 
BdlncA 11.43 -.13, 

CA TF AP 740 -.07! 

CacGrAalAjC -M\ 

GIOOG A p 1 1 48 -.16, 

GrOpAp 12^4 -J». 

GvScAp 11X5 -.12 1 
GwthA p 10.13 

HilncAp 9X9 -X3 1 

InlEcAc lbX4 -.1* PcmGtobn 1074 
LWTrm A (4.97 - .09 PaPOSlk 1462 


MossT A Pi 5.98 - Jl 
T xEjiA p 7 J? -.10 
VoiueAp 7.80 - 21 
Batons I 11.79 -J5 
CopGrS t 14J3 -.44 
InlEaBI 15.*ft -.15 
values 7.76 -JO 
13 


NTaiA cn UJ9 ‘13 
NYTkAp 10.43 -.151 
ReaFAp 1 7_75 -J2i 
STSvIADC 2J1 
SmCoDA 10J3 -xs: 
USGvApx 9.16 -.10 ; 
UIIApx 8 63 -.14 : 
AsstBt <1.08 -.IB ' 
15X9 -M 
14.43 -JB- 
1179 - .15, 
11.92 t Jl ! 
8.70 -.07' 
19X4 -Jl j 
9.81 —.10 1 
18.85 - JO 
1 1-58 *X8 • 
10J5 -.10: 
10X3 - Jl I 
8J7 — X2 

InvGSfX 10.16 ‘.13 i 
MHInfit 10.16 -.1? 
fiTaxBfxlUB -.12 i 
NYTxBt 10.43 ‘.15 ■ 
RegFSI 17X0 - Jl i 
STGvlB px 2J1 
SmCanfi r 10.19 -M • 
S71B 9.41 -.02 

Utffflp* 8X2 -.14 
CalTDp 10JB r.16 
USGvBtx 9.16 -.10 
AttO a 15.17 -.44 

CopAD 11X0 ‘JO 
Cam Tec p BJO -X7 
DvGDp 19X0 *J2 
EuGrD 9X6 — JI 
CC1D 10X4 *21 
NTxDnx 11J9 *.J3 
GrhiD 18.97 -JO 
GlInDt 10J7 ‘.11 
HilncDw O — X3 
InvGDx 10.16 6.12 
NYTxDo 10X4 *.15 
MHlOp 10.16 ‘.12 
STGvtODx 2J1 
jmCocO 10.19 ‘X5 
SKD p 941 - XI 
LtSGDpx 9.15 -r.10 
UtlpPX US *.M 
J3 
.12 


EautAp 

EaincA 

FICnAf 

GtobAP 

GLASA 

QUIA I 

GvPtAtP 


1173 -JO 
13X8 -J2 
11.14 +.17 
14.12 +J6 
1X5 - 

13 B9 -ST 

8.74 ‘.15 

GJOPAP 11X0 -.13 
WfltfAta 8.16 ‘X2 
mver* to 11X2 ‘ Jl 
MuWAp 113 

10.74 ‘.07 
i6X0 - ii 
9X2 -X5 
9X9 * J2 
11J7 -.14 


Poraaan 

Gulls 


Ph 


Intfld 
LATF 
ST Gv 
ValEd 
VotGr 


15AS ‘ J9 
10X1 *.12 
10.47 -.12. 
10X5 *X5 i 
11.94 *J5 
14X4 *M 


7Z.S1 ■ 31 . Meridian n 24.45 -.17 Nkhelas Group: 

- : 1 <1 • _ TQ MnrrM V >iin K- Mfrtwil n AO or 


MuniBdA 1 1 .04 - .19 , MerriB Lyrgft: 
Vrvlcpa 10 61 - .13 AmerlnA 9J7 -.14 


Parlutoae task 
Batoned nl!X3 +J3 
Baodn 9jf ‘.u 


'Jj Et;A 1545 -j: 


-.12 

- ii . 

• lr 


ScSitp 16% 

TarE-j>:p ’ 65 

TalFetp 114* 


17J3 - to 
114* -.05 


-.15 


. .1 : 
- 14 


?.«S - .10 I FL T ■ B i 
FundB I 
GIHaB 
G wins I 


Enlrpn I6J2 — 05' 
Gwth n 128? -.27. 
mrl Ia’1 -JB 1 

Shadow n 1 1.94 —M 
Ta»FrS n 10.67 - 07 | 
TaxFrL n S.cl -.12 
59 -.12 1 UMBBn 10X7 -11 
SJ9 -.12 U.MB Hrt n 9 J3 -.11] 
8X8 - .11 | UMEStn 1*.29 -J5 


StmnB i 
.E.“t 


GNMA np 14.47 -.1 
GnCA 13.12 -.1* 
GMBdP 1*42 -.1ft 
GWCP 19.6* -J2 
Grtr>;n loJ5 - J3 
GwlhOpn 10.17 -.15 
insMun npl"X2 - Ji 
imermn 13X2 -.1ft 
inrerEap 15J7 -.11 
InvGN n 14.75 * .17 
MA Ini n 12.91 -.15 
MATa»l>lS.*9 -.17 
MunBdn l?K - IS 
NJ in: n 1111 -.17 
NJ Mun n 1305 -.14 
NurLd r 37 J 7 - .27 
NVITx np 11 21 -.12 
riTTatrn 15X4 -.16 
MYTEp 1766 -JO 
Peootndf 15i67 -JS 

PeorAiamlDLJQ -39 
SninGvn 10 96 - w 
$T Inc pn 11.99 - 07 
ShlnTp 13.00 -.07 
TftdCnhn 7.79 - .10 
USTlnt 12X3 -.12 
USTLno 14.42 -72 
USTShn I5.1B -.07 
Dreyfus Comstock: 
COCVolA 1160 — X5 
CaoVolB f 1 1 .44 —.05 
PStgA o 9.33 —.03 


FiiailS n 1032 - iu | Uiiiinco p i I 

| VATFp 12 I* 

FlrV.MtH 3. 75 
I First Omahc: 

EQKlrn 10.54 
F'dincn 9.20 
, SiF/Inn 5.7: 
FPDvASIR 12X5 
FPMuBda ll.r" 

| First Pnorily: 

Eauih-TrnJOJj - i: 
F ■ dlncTr 1.5:'. -.11 
LIOMGv °.7J -.05 


FsnjhiSS PlO 32 -JH 
F5T n 25J» - 67 
F5TISSP 8.81 
C-nnxU5nl0 73 -.14 
GnmaS? 10.93 -.M 
RgtSSP 10J6 -.08 
\MT 15 10.4* -.10 

MtoCan 10 65 ■ .1* 

MojCop 11.60 -J* 

AdinicopniiJ* ‘.14 
ShrlTcrm I0.1& - 03 
US GOVt /I 9.78 -.Ii LIOMCrv 
STMTS5 PlO lb -.03 l<q IslU r.ion: 

SBFAn 1* J 6 - 31! BalTn 11.79 -23 


HKCr& 
H,r-.:S • 
HitncA ■ 
Hirr.Cr d 
fnlf p 
InilB 
Jcaon D 


9.99 -.14 . 

Errrsrin pnll j-4 - 09 1 
Enersvn 10X4 - .04 | 
environ ■vT* -.05 
Europe n 13.40 - .05 ' 
F,nS.-;n 15X3 - JB 


Gcldn 


HllhScn 37J1 -.07. Intmin n 
Hf-IUrp 6.53 - X3 S8.F500 n 
me Inca ns 11 61 -J4| SiocK 


RdeCtv Advisor: 
EgPGR 28J4 - M 
EqPInc 15.44 - Ji 
GlblResc 16.71 ♦ ?s 
Gavins ’jj -.is 


BaiC m 
BoiBp 
«: ■ inB o> 
F.InTn' 


MnBdTru ’.'5 -.0? 
NCMunCt *.4? -.i: 
USGV15C ’.4‘. - i: 
USG. Mr * 4o -.12 
VolueB i I'i5 • Z> 
vduTCm l'i: ■ — 
Vdue T n I ’53 


HI Mu p 11 JO -.15 
HiYld pn 1U1 -X4 
incCHP 14X6 .N 
Ltd TER d 9.99 - .13 
LldTBP 10X5 06 

LtdTEl 9 99 -13 
OvseaP 14.10 * .07 

IS? p nfs - .21 1 
’W.ra-xii 

EaPlln 15X4 -J5 
IShiGv 9X0 -.07 
LIB) n 1055 - 06 1 
Fidefitv Invest: j 

AgrTFm 11.44 - IJ I 
AAVun 14 68 - JJ 


-.14 GT GJtbal; 

-XS, 4j*vrP 13.32 -.12 
EnVAM 15.74 - jo 
E mMkiB 15.0 7 -.4- Invesar. 

Eurap,; s 10X1 - X7 O’mn, a 
EuroB 10X4 -.07 
G.-incA vOi - 04 
GvtncB 9.07 ■ .05 
GrtriJs 6.1* -.03 
3nnc3 6.19 -.OS 
1? 13 - I? 
ii2i - i: 

12.22 -.1* 
loJl -.17 
10.’* -JT 
10*’ - Jl 
17 I’ - 11 
jasanOrB i3.t0 .:e 
LCUmG :;j"‘ i XT 
LOtAmGB?’. I® - 137 
®cvlp 13."i - J" 

RocilB 13.o4 -J" 

Ssrouvp- 11.0* -.1? 

:traiB/ I1.W -.to 

T^lee lo 63 • J4 

Telecom is.*3 - ?5 

Vrldwp :7<13 - 34 In.TrV.cB t 9 0* -01 
V.TjwH 1A91 .33 ls:e:Fa ns 14.59 -JT 

11.76 - >? . GabcITi Funds: J? Growth Iftjl -33 

1176 -j: 4BCp 10.08—01 JPIrcome 9J5 -15 
Asset no T2j, 4 -j; JPM Instil-. 

Cm "Sc onli.j? -.01 Bonn n ’3? -.11 
Ealncs I ■ Jl - 14 
GHntCPn ®.Vo -.03 
GlConvn 10.33 -.11 
C-lTei s ’ 27 - 20 
Gnr> - -1hnr21X0 -XI 
SmCssG li*7 . i? 
value a tut 
Gala tv Funds: 


Inline 9 3" -.15 
innEa ills -Ji 
fl'TFnp 10 "t --I* 
USGv n ®X* - .09 
9.51 -.05 -Laurel lirvesson 
AJoc p 
CapA d 
ttgso 
Inta 
•Modi p 
ScGrs 
TiBCP 


AdiRA P 9 jB 
AZMA 1034 t .16 
BOJA 11 25 - J7 
SnsVIA 23X4 -Si 
CAIA'iA *48 -.17 
CaLMnA 11JP -.19 
Coc FCA 28 TO - Xi 
Consults IZU ‘ J2 
CpHiA 7.85 - .02 


Etouftyi 

Gw Inc C 

HiYEqn 

InHDrs 

IntGvtn 

LldMIC 


15X9 ‘X8 
9X7 ‘X6 
14X3 +J6 
1X42 ‘.12 
9X7 +XB 
9X2 +X7 
MIMnC 10X7 ‘.10 
MuBdC 1034 *.72 
SmCapC 21 JS ‘X5 


6 26 - jv i Laurel Trust 


-.17 

-.08 

- ‘I 


iniGo/n 12J4 -XT Laiard Group: 

Jr.sGrr. 1*37 - 1’ 1 SauilY If 11 - J- 
Lei jure n 2132 - J5 "3&j ■ •'! 


FacSasn Iftji -J0i JfHvC 
Sellnan na*.?3 - .06 S^i-CP 
Tr Free np 15.43 - JO ! , 

7«hn 22X5 -.63 . 2SS.CS. 

TWPtn 18.11 - 34 ■ Leocn. tv 
LGGout np ,'JT -,io 
ijiiln 9.64 .‘3 LwgMason: _ 

'. clEa 17.34 -.40 "ii 


1Jj 8 -Jl ClnvC-dA 

11.13 


24.03 -X4 ' jITA 

ll. lo 

-.12 

t?J5 -.11 DevCoD 

1555 

-Xft 

13.7’ -.lft Or 09 A 

UJI 

- J? 

10X4 -.10 EiroA 

15X5 


I’.’? -.15 F«GecA 

> ’.ift 

-,IJ 

11 :: -.11 FLMA 

9J4 

-.14 

t; FOFTA 

M.fti 

-At 

9 .64 GI4LA 

134a 

-.14 

I0X: - JR C-'3dA 

9X8 

14 

’.” -71 GtCvA 


- 10 

1- a-’ - It GIHCA 

13JS 

X4 

up: GIRSA 

15x1 

- Ji 

T— . 1 J -J2 GIUI A 

12.74 

29 

13 21 -.19 Grip A 

l’.’ft 

-.IJ 

1133 -J7- MeallhA 

3J4 

-.02 

1503 - “ Instlnp 

’.61 

Of 

15 S’ —OS IntlEa A 

11X6 

- 14 

’.i? - j)8 MIMuA 

5.77 

-.15 

TXS -.1? r/.N/.'aiA 

122ft 

-.14 


10 ‘ 


G.B'* CZ 

•?.9° - .04 - 


p tHi i HGdTFC flS • .14 


Diversi'd n 10.03 -.17 
Emg.’AKEdhOO - 2* 
inftEar/ n lfl.72 -.04 
3T Bona n *.72 - X4 
SmallCon 9.9f -.05 

ielEaf n 10.91 -J? 

.1* Jedcson Nafionob 

Gmwlti 10.35 -.V 


- -.£ 


Jr 
.11 

1X47 -J" 


IruTrs 

Vbtunir I0J: - 1* 
OuciGro 1242 • JJ 

TeOncSn s 13.0? 

TarRTs- r oj> 
'alues 11.25 - 20 


+ sse|All n lC.o-S .71 incame °.79 -.13 

CT.VUin 9.6* - 14- TarE< 10 JO -.14 

EaGrfl: Ui* - JO TotRtn !0X5 - 17 

Ear.-al l’*5 - J? Janus Fund: 

Eolronr. 12.2* -Jt Eoioncedn 12.71 


:-yJ j 


AfjtgnirnlJ’J - jfi iFlogdjip Grocp: 
AMjrfnnlOJB -.11, AATEqn lO.tO -14. 


MlgTrAp ’.TO —.1)1 Value n 25.64 ■ _ c 5 TEinsBr '90 . .hj 
M taTB P 7 71 . .BoJortJBiehWKoHer: USGrBI 11X* -.25 I 

MigTrC P * 7 I - 1 Diverse n 124? - JO . USG vB r 6.45 - .05 1 

MIIIGC ®J9 -.18 InllEnn 6.1* -.02, UI0B: 1197 - J5 

TAilln l 1.85 -01 inllFIn 8X7 -.13 Cofumtiia Funds: 1 

MM5 A p 8.40 - 02 . Baird Funds: Balance n 1 7 *1 - 30 j 

MM3 B r 8* -.02: AOilnc ’.78 —,0B CamSrK n 15J3 - 32 1 

~ ' 1?.*8 - 16 1 


Bal one I2 7« - u 
Blued 281* ‘.*5 1 
CA ins n 9.94 -.16 
CATFn IIJ8 ! 
Canaan n 1737 -Jl , 
CopApp IfiXft - J9 ! 
■Caslnco nr 7.54 ‘.01 j 


AATEC J 10 
ACTE 4 c 10.41 


.13, 


H,C6a ’01* - JO 
kiisa 9.91 - .n 
InlEarn 12 83 -J* 
UAMun 9X2 -.15 
Nr. -Hun tftJT -.15 
57Bdn 9.09 -.06 
imCoc3 n I l.ftu -.0i 
r=&:-nJn,0J0 - 12 


EnremrnMXi -j: 
F«rr.£. n*.7S -.0.- 
Fl-lncn *J1 -34 


Gb»Ga-/1e*9?3 -.38 
Gvlind np 10.02 -.03 
HTYIdpt 14X7 — J)7 
InvGrnp *.'7 - 17 
MdTFp 1JJP -J6 
PATRp 15 SB -.13 
Spun- nn 20.P9 - J3 
T vFrlrs s 14.96 - .12 
TciRetnp 13X3 — I’ 
VofTrno 19.04 - ll 
Lexington Grp: , 

Cm- Seen 13X5 
CLte 12 *J -JJ 
GNMA n '.«i -JO 
Global n 13®* - JS 
Gotdfd n i J7 - j: 
C-mincns 15 84 -Ji 
man 10.6* • 72 
SI Govt n *.7* -t* 
SIS.1 4. if -jo 
Silt/ 2J1 -.£i 
TEBon 10.18 -.15 
'.VkCm iu* -X? 


LalAmA 15.73 -1.17 
r.ininsA 7.77 -.11 
MunLldA 9.M - C2 
iVormTrA 9.93 -.11 
fAH01|A 10 H -.14 
10X7 -.10 
11.12 -.1* 
22*1 -Ji 
10’4 -.12 


Wcftoln 49.ro -.97. 
r**lln 2173 -36 
Nichmcn 338 ‘.03 
HchLdn 17.94 —JM 1 
Nicholas A putesates 
BctGtne 1311 -.16] 

CoreGthA 13J3 -33. 

CoreGnhB 13.15 - J2 i 
Core-GrlnslUXT - .31 - 

EmoGTA 11.74 -.141 

EmpGrB lljl - .14 ! Potludm Im A: 
EmgGrinsllJM -.14 BondFd 9X1 

IncGrA 13X9 -.11 : 

IncGrB 14.00 ‘.111 
VVASre 14.95 - J? I 
wv.gr liOS -JJ . 

Nomura nl ifij? -.is 
North Am Funds: ! 

AsiAllCpnll.Oft — .15 | Ml Mu 

GIGrs UX3 -.13' SmCao 

GrwthCsnlJX7 -J2 IPamBdin 

Gr mcC on) 2X8 - J7 : Parnassus 3132 - M 
USGvIAp «.73 -JM:Pasadm Group: 
NelnvGr n 34J4 -X* 1 BaFRrnA 2IL73 ‘36 
NelnvTrni 1C39 — J4 Growth* 15.10 -34 
NOrtbem Funds: 1 Mttv 50 16X4 ‘XO 

Fi.lnn 9.88 - .11 | PtKWor1dnl3J2 *.12 
GrEan 10J2 - J3 PavsonBln 11J1 ‘jo 
IncEan 9 80 - .07 1 PeoChTBd 9X3 -38 

in'TcuEk n 10X0 - X0 1 BsochTEa 9X5 ‘Jl 
InnFHnn 1003 -.14 Peftcan 11X7 *32 
iri-c.r^a n I0J8 ‘.10 |PwjCojA 5X6 —SO 
inr'Xe.'Eq nlQ 40 -28'PAMunlp 10.93 +.15 
SeiEan 9.91 -.15 ! Performance Fds: 

EaCono 1139 -.19 


Equflv 

Govtlnc 

WEq 

IntGovt 

IntKKs 

LtdMal 


► .12 
15X8 *X7 
9X7 *M 
14X4 -37 
9X8 ‘38 
1336 ‘.13 
9X3 -JH 
10X7 -.10 
21.16 -X5 
15.95 +34 


HJ.VJ 

°acA 

MA 

PfuivA 

Ss'.V 

SrrD-.A 

STC-IA p 

TecnA 

T^7.»a 

ft iairvjb 

AciPe 


SmCoGr n 9*1 ‘.11 1 
’’•Exotn 10X3 -.14; 
USGcvtn 9.92 -08 
NorwMl Fundse 
AcBLCT ’JI -XI I 


IJJ5 - 1 1 
16.03 -J5 
12 44 - J6 

jj* - or 

5J9 - J5 
IG.45 - 14 
3.74 -.08 
>Xe —.71 


A4tGo-;A 

COTFA 

GvtincTr 

G/trncA 


9 JO 
9X7 -,I2| 


Fundn 1915 - 40 , Liberty Family: 
Grmlnc 14.18 - JO I Am lot 145* -Jc 
tntGvt 4.91 -.03 CopG’A p IJ— -J* 


MCAAp 9.90 -.14: SlChlc P lex? -4' I Fivedn 
MuCA B u 9.98 -.16 CapOe. p2J.74 -J8i C-cvi 


... K' 

insiEcH n!0 43 - ?* ; 
InrlntTFn 10.05 - ll 


0.1+ -JD: 
25X4 -X’ I 
U-23 -JU' 
11.96 * M 1 
1* 44 -J2I 


Grrhn 
inrlSiK n 
Mun n 
Sp«dn 

Ir viniEanUOO - 12 Common Sense 
InvUlflr 4.J* -.11 ; GatfT 1033 -.12 1 

Grolnc 15X0 - JJ, 

Growth 15.07 -JO! 

MunB 13 JO -.13 1 

Compass Copdafc ' 
Eatvlnca 12x3 -34 ; 


ln.cd!»nlOA2 ■ Ji 


-JT 

■X3 

-.38 


MuCA CP 9.96 • .16 . 3T: 

MuFLCP 9.oa -,|V lnsiAstV.n®.65 
iCATA 12X6 - JS 
MUUCAB 12X6 - JJ 
MINBP ®.92 -.15 
MuOHCP’Jl -.15 
MUNJB P -.16 

MuNJCp 9 78 - Ij .BorpnAirn 21 05 
MN VA Til - .1* | Boi-frlt Funds: 

MuN’Bp ?Jt - t6 Bcscvin 15J8 

MuNTCp 931 -.16 1 R.eam 9.34 

Uf/jjA p 9.92 - 16 1 VI loll 12X4 

NtIMuCP 9*2 -.16 i E'iscamBcl 2?X3 - 31 
NEurAp 12.78 -.12 ' Boy Funds lnsib 
NEurB 12X5 • TTi^lC 5X8 -tt 

NAGrA 9.12 - 0« Bond n 9.72 - 05 

MAGvBp 9.12 -.03 Eauirr 10X1 -.18 

NAGvC 9.12 -.0* 'BavFunds Invesl: - 

orGrpW PIIX4 -^t’ ST-rHIn VX3 — 9? 1 Composite Group: 
PrGrthBatlXJ - 41 ! Bonen 9JJ -05 BcCRApIIST - .17 
CrusrA a 2i.*9 -xa Eouinn kjXi -.i’! 

ST Mid P 3.93 - .71 'Be-XHill 29X5-57 
STMIbt 8*4 -.01 iBSEmgDbi ®X! -.2? i 
TechP 2585 - .01 ■ Benchmark Funds: . 

widincp 1X7 _• Balanced n 9. st, -.i* 

Banc A n 19J9 - 17 1 


Fxdln 

Growth 

imtEa 

milrl 

MunBd 

NJ .Mun 

Snnini 


*.93 -.05 1 PlSluvOr *.J3 — 0? J 
13.15 -.17 : Dreyfus Premier: I 

LA Mun A 12.63 -.If I 
CTVaiA 11X3 -.1? 

CarGhi 1S.64 -jjl 
CTMuer HX3 -.131 
FL MuflA 14 49 -.14 
GlblnvA n 15X7 - 15 
QDIrrvBI 15.44 -.15 
GnmaA IJ.I7 -.is 
GnmaBi IAI8 - .16 I 

MAMuriAllx? -.12, 

MDYAunA 12.49 - .13 I Eautlnc J2.49 
Mi MunA 1 531 -.16! EQIln IB«, 
MNMunA147T -.17 “ 

MDMuB 1 12.49 -.12 
MuBdBt 13X4 -.15 
MuikBdA 13X4 -.16 
NCMUA 12X1 -.19 
NC MuB I 12.60 -.19, 

Nt Mun A 14 18 -.16' 

Nt MuB I 14.18 -.17 j 

OH Mu A 12.75 -.11 ' GlPBaln 
OHMuBI 13.76 -.12 Gvt Seen 
PA Mun A 14.07 - IB 1 GmC® 

PA MuB 116.07 -.181 Grginc 
T* Mu A 20.30 - J4 I 
VA Mu A 16 D? -J6I 
VAT.iuB r 1* 0B -35! 

Dreyfus Strategic: 1 

GIGrO JA45 -30': 

Growth p 39.7J — 31 1 
Income o 1354 -.19 j 
Inv A 20X1 -45 
Inv b : 203? - 43 


10.26 - 13 1 
10.7* - JJ . 
1394 -.22 
10.68 -.11 
10.40 - 15 I 
10.94 -.13. 
10.28 -.07 1 


CongrSI r646X4 ‘ 2.J 
Conlro 3020 *34 I 
CnvStcn 15)1 - l 7 | 
Desliirrt 17 31 - 4 S i 
Deal mv 1 1 27.9? - .75 I 
DisEa n 18.28 - J9 , 
DivertnU nlll* - Isl 
DivGlhn 1145 - 17 
EmgGrorl5.Bfl ' JJ 
EmrMH 17X9 -.83 
58 

3’ 

Envfc JsXJ *.J1 
ErCaoApnllX? -.0i 
Europe 20X1 -.10 
EichFdn 99.82 ■ 1X5 
FiaelFd n 19.1’ 

Fifty 

GNM . 

doB-3 1103 -.14 
12X2 ‘.17 


15 Gcteway Funds: 

CTTcipiO:* -.1? Ina-PIn 158C -35 

COTE 3 ’ll -.'5 3V7-VVG 12 '1 -21 

■ GnSecn IJ44 -.13 

-.13 • Gintel Group: 

• Jl Erisanp ?*:: - u 

.IJ i GuidFdn 13.6; JC 

.i; Glcnmedc Funds: 

.i£ EauiTr n 11*1 - J3 


FlTEp :0J-7 

GATE. a p in j. - 

GldF-bP ITJ* 
inrTE p 1C. 14 
v V TEA p 10x) 
k S TE P 0 SO 
LATSA p ICA' 
LldTEu 111X9 
.MITE A O 11 JO -.13 
MCrTEAalO.4® .13 


ln*3o\. n 10.10 -.11 
lorn 13 72 -12 
Munlnt n 10.11 - 11 
SmCQO n 1J.70 -.06 


T.Wcirrv ITX8 - 01 
Overseas n 10.04 -..)8 
ShT-nBdn 2.*1 
T.,enn ^.<9 - 4? 
ventrn AiXS -A5 
•Vrltf.V ;i.56 - 42 
JapcnFdn II Xft —.04 
John Hancock: 

CATE I IIJ? ..Ii 
Disr-Bt 3.59 -X* 
Grov/mp i£Xi - .2t 


EaincA p II J4 -J4 
Eamcci ii.:: -J4. 
HilncBa 1|X?7 -.Cc 
HilnBdC* 10.77 -Xo 

inrlEa.T 1® 12 - JJ 
IntPnc 10X7 -Je 
MnSc lljl -.11 
U:GviCo 7.s: -XT' 
USGvSec* '.83 - 0® 
UtitFa 11*5 - Jl 
UlilFdC! II. *4 -22 


AmerinB : 9J? -.14 
AiMBI ICJ4 -.16 
Boi3i II.Ji -Jft 
Bcsvrsi -xj 
C ad-ms r HJ3 - .19 
CALMS ® 43 -.f 

ija>FaBr 27.1: -x: 

CcHiSl ’.c~ -.22 

Or. 4MB M.10 -.13 

CalTB I ■111 -M 
Drags v i*J3 - XS 

area 1 Js -.1: 
FeCbecS t «A* - 13 
FLAB 1 >.8i 


TFincT ’X9 -.11 Phil □ Fund 
VcleGrA 17.1* -M \ 

VoMGrT 17.13 -.44 . 

Nuveen Funds: 

CAins 


Ca V 3I 
R. Vd 
l.-isMun 
7.\C vat 
MA Ins 
MA y at 

Mun. Ed 

*IJ Vd 
fir ms 


. JC 

liJl -.14 
9.43 . 14 

ly’1 -.10 

12 JO -J9 


• a. 


OH -at 
PA vai 


'.•A Val 


ilArare 1 2c, 7 -.31 Uberry Financial- 
LTG.AP B.iS -.04 Glhlnc 10 77 -.17 


•Jl 


MITECcllJ* - i: OireenrA 9.’2 ■ « 
NCTEA O 10.06 - .11 * GdoenodDGJV - .79 
1* Goldman Sadis Fmly: 
.14 CosGr 15.7; 


NMTEd 9.55 

N-rTEp 10J7 
OHTE APlt.19 
P6T£A D 10.0* 
TnTcAc 10 77 
UI'IAp «.?j 
, VATEA 9 tOJJ 
76 I Flct Funds: 

10 36 -.20 1 Bond np 1® ?6 
10 J7 -.151 Gttjin pn o.JO 

Gnawihnpi ; ia — t? 
Muirtd tan 5.3i • 01 


InsAkinijr 10 37 
TF Bond slQJ7 -Oi 
US Gov i cX3 • X3 
Util • 10.7* 


-.13 


1? 

-•I : 1 

- 1* 
-.13! 


14.10 • 14 
16X1 -J? 
1740 -.!» 
13.58 - 1* 
1541 • Ji 


9.65 -.16 jFonioinen 105* 
2’.9t , .72 Furlis Funds: 


AmScuth Funds: 
Balance 11X8 


10X1 

14X4 


-.171 

-.14. 


GvrthAo 12.22 -.15' 

InFCAp 2 6* - 11 I 
NOV 50 AD 14.41 -39 I 
7-E-Ap 7.4e -.10 | 

USG . A p mil - .15 Dupree Mutant 
CotiMoga Funds: 1 inrGc.'n 9X5 -.01 


AsiAllp 12 ’j - J?, 
CopApp 21.Y* • .30 
'Tcpili P I ‘ K - .4* 
Fiducro :r.if 
•Gib-.vino 13*3 - 0= 

•jO.TR p 2 52 
•jrwfSit Xf.lS -.42 


9.47 -X9 
102? ■ .09 1 
16X3 -Jl j 

• .17 


Bend 
Ecuitv 
Gvt In 
LtdMal 
ReuEq 

Amanafnc 1247 - .,. . 

Ambassador Fat 1 
BalncF 9X9 -.15 
Bofldn 9.49 -.14 
CoreGrFnlS.80 - 35 
Growth n )2X» -J2 
IdiStkn 11.74 - J9 
intBondn 9X1 ‘.10 
IntlSi*. n 13.11 ‘.15 
SmCoGr n 13.27 -J4 

Ambassador Inv: 

Bond n 9.49 -.14 
CcreGrn 15.78 ‘J4 
Grwthn 12X8 -J2 
IntBondn 9J1 -.11 
intiSrkn 13.10 -.15 
MiTFBd 1J7 - .14 
SmCoGr nl326 ‘ 24 
TFInlBdnlOJJ -.08 

Ambassador Rei A.- 
Bardt 9.49 ‘ .u 
CareGr 15 JB - J4 


Grwth 

JntBond 

Ir-tftSrV 

SmCoGr 


12X8 - 72 
9X1 -.11 

mo -.15 

1176 - JJ 


Benham Group: 
AdjGovn 9X7— .02 
CaTFi n 10X0 - .1 1 
'ToTrinn 9.*4 -.13 
CaTFX n 10.08 - X2 
CalTFHn B.°B - 10 
CafTFLn 1079 - 15 
EoGro n 11.79 -J9 
EurBdn 10.77 -J2 
GNMAn 10J6 -.13 
Goldin n 12X7 -.90 
IncOron 14X7 -J4 
LTreasn 9.19 -.19 
NiTFIn 10X8 -.10 
NJTFLn 1IJ4 -.15 
STTrecs n ’.B0 - .05 
Tarl99S n 93.91 -A* 
TarTOOOn 67.*6-13ft 
TartOOS n 4*93 - 1 jo 
T arTOTPn 33>i’ -.95 
TcrMllS n 24X8 -.72 
. TarTOTOn lb.” - jrfi 
TFinlBdi 10J3 - 08 I TNoten 10X7 -.09 
Amcore Vintage: ] Utiilnaa n ’J4 - J’ 

Equity 10 JO -.19 I Berger Group: 

F%lncn 9X0 -.101 100 on 15J2 -J9 
IntdiTF 9.95 -.12 I 101 pn 11J3 + 32 
Amor AAdvanb I SmCoGr 2J7 
Bdann 1215 -J4 BcmstmnFds: 

Equity n 13.71 - JO I GvShDu n 1245 -.05 
fntlEatv n 12.4J - J4 1 ShlDurn 12A5 -S}* 
LiaTrmn 9.B0 -JOi IntDur n 12X7 ».12 
AmerCoptfat CaArtun 1119 -.to 

CmslAp 15 7B - J2 1 DivMunn 13.14 ‘.10 
CmVBp 15.77 -JI; NTMunn IJ.15 -.13 
CnBdBp 6.70 -X7 lnltVnln 17.iv 
COruBdA p 6.70 - .07 1 BerwvnFd n 1 7.9? —JB! 
EmGrC 23.97 - J5 |Berwvninc nllJ3 -X6 
EGA P 24.14 - J5 I BhirudMCG 10.30 - J? 
EmGrBp 23.68 -J4 BiBmore Funds: 

ErtlAp 11.94 -71 1 Balanced io.ll -.]9 
EntBp 11.86 -22; - 
Ecuvin.y;p5J3 -.10; 

EalncBi 5J2 -.10 

EalncC o SJ3 -.11 , 

E-ChFd 109J9-74.- I 
FdMqAaTZU -.05: 


DivOrAn 10.12 -.17' Equity 14X4 -Jl 

Eqld? A n 1 0X8 - Jft • lncn« 10.13 -.08 

FocGrAn 9.91 -.1*' LtdMal* 10 A? -.03 

inliBGA n 30X6 - J2 Conn Mutaafc 
InilGrAn I0J4 -.10 Gth-r 10,2* -.14 

ShtDur n lOOd . Grwth 14.77 * .36 

SiBdAn 19X7 -.13 Incume 9X1 -.08 

SmCciA 10?’ -.131 TolRet 1411 -j* 

USGvAn 19X1 - .14 I CG Cap Mkt Fds: 
USTIdy.A n!9.62 - .25 ; EmsMM BJ1 


InlrFi 
mrlEq n 
IntIF* n 
LgGrwn 
LgVdn 


7.9? - .09 
10A* -.O’ 
8J6 -.14 
»A3 - 21 
’X? -Jl 


Equity I0J3 - Jo 
Ealnder 10J9 - 25 
Rredlnc ■ *35 -.09 
CruanlEq ’J3 - JT? 

STFivInc X 9.6* -.01 
_ . ^ , SCMuni 10X1 -.12 

FMgBo 12.1s - .05 ■ Bkrnchard Funds: 

GIEcAp 11.75 -.13 . AmerEqn 9J9 -J3 

C-lEaBpn I lx I - .13 R.<TFBd n 4.0 -.08 I DvGihl 

GIGvAp 8.4i -.11 Flexmcn 4X2 -.021 OivGlht 

GIGvBpn 9.« -.111 GIGrnp 10.13 -.22) Divlnt 

GIGv.p 84? -.101 PrcMnp 9 JO - Jl Euro t 

uvScAp 10X9 -14 1 STGIn 1.79 -.01 
GvScBp 10.10 - .14 1 STBandn 2.93 -.01 
G-ScC & low - .1 4 1 RdEndowr i7.o* - j* 


MtaSKdn 7.77 -.09 
Munin BX* -.13 
SmGrwn 11.93 - JO 
Smvaln 8.76 -.11 
ThRtn n 7.V8 - .12 
Coolev n 1938 -J7 
CoreFunds : 

BatonAn 10.16 -.13 
Enlax 21.17 ‘XS 
GIBrfAn 9X6 -.17 
C-rEqA n 9.48 - 19 
IrtBdA n 9.71 - .06 
InilGrAn 13X9 -jq 
V aiEqB on 12.93 -.22 
CawenlGr 10.93 -.19 
Gowenop 12A4 - ji 
C rabbe Husoru 
AslAllp 1?X0 -.18 
Equity p 15X8 -72 
OR Mun NIUB ‘12 
Special n 12x1 ‘.16 
CrestFunds Trust: 
Bond n ’XI ‘.IJ 
SI Bd n 9 72 


7X4 -.C* 
5.3) -JJ 2 


ay.11 -1.41 1 rvuTFn 11.22 -.16. Muninci lax: -.12 ;i.<imnunn n.i* -_w 

53X5 -.’8 1 MtgeSecnlOXO -.12! OHForio 11 00 -.16 'Guardian Funds: 

46X4 -JJi MunaUn 30? - .13 i LOilr !2J J - :4 . AUAflOC 15*3 -.*4 

39X7 -J8I Ni-HYn 11X4 -10 1 44 Wall Eq I'.i - .04 GSG Ini 1 13.43 -.10 


K-rTFn 
KVSMtn 
EBI Funds: 

Equity o 59.11 
Fte. p 
income a 
AHuhiflv 

ESCStrlnA 111X1 
Eaton V Classic 
China p BJ4 - J7 

FL Lid p 9X4 -X9 

G<MP 9X4 -.07 

NatlLId p 9X7 -JT ' 
NatiMun p 9.24 -.13 1 
Eaton V Mur udrutu 
OHLld: 9j« ‘.0° | 

STGbl 1 0.81 - .07 


21.91) - J4 

HT, Id 12.0? -.15J 

msMunn 11.26 • .13 I 
miBdn ia22 • X7 
inlcrG vi n 9.4* - .0; 

InliGrt n HBf -.13! 

InvGBn 7r -.0*' 

JODonn 1175 ‘X«' Hi r Id R 
LatinAm tl J.--0 • 1 JO ! TF MM 
LldMun ’.3* -.11: TF Nai 
LowPrr 17.4.: ..O’! US G^I 
Ml TF n 1137 - 13 irarlress Invsl: 
Mi TF n 10. *7 -.1: AdiRlT «X6 
7-tawllan *6X1 - 1.45 i Bond r ?J" 
Mkiino nr D.1’ -X2! GiSIrn 8<-* 
MATFn 11.22 -.16 


Glbmc 
Grlnc 
intCa 
.•.lunilnc 
SdEa 
SmaCcr 

Goldman Sachs Inst: 
AdiG • '.95 • .’3 

Cavia v.B6 ■ T. 

snrtT* ”3 - ?i 

ji $7 Go-. ®:t -.c: 

Cover Funds: 


.MA TE f 1148 - .1 

MgTES 1127 - .14 

Nt TEla Tl.*’ -.13 

iTSirctB £J5 -.01 

SpcJEA r 14.11 .11 LTV.F IV : 9,7* 

SPOEBp 14.01 - 10 LmlTrmsi 9.76 
SPCmsA - .31 ' Lindner Funds: 

Sc*:Ods 3 7X4 -.20. Own 2575 

SwincA to ’J? -.04' Fundn 33X5 ... 

StrincB 7.22 -.04' Uliln ICX0 ‘J“ 

Tc-Exts IC'45 ‘.II ; Loomis Sarles; 


-XI 


• J3 


FJFT 31 
FQGrS: 

G;ai3: 

>y. BaBt 
C-IC-&1 
GPsE : 

Grj:5 ! 
ortr B " 

Me«ih5 1 3.43 —.01 Ocrjr.r* 
intiE^B: 11 A® -13 Oormnn 
CHcB ll.” - J 3 Dperwej 
-cnAmEilSx: - Lift OcecnTE 
ViAMS I 10X2 -.It OMIVm 
•Vt.MuS r 0 "7 ..15 (jwrrf 
MNMBl ,0 26 -.14 OldDemin 
MnmsBI 7*7 - 1? Olympic Trusts 
■VjrLldB I »£i -.02 Bclar.:«anlS?5 -.14 
V.vtn'6 ’.vs . n E :1.1cm lij: -.22 
/.WicrfBt 10.18 -.14 toil n 17 49 - J5 

NJMS • ;0«- -.39 LCwC'Trr. ’.’tf -04 

riYMnBt 1..'2 -.if OneGroup: 


ID IB 

-.19 

■0.17 

-.13 

TB? ■ 

+ .18' 

10 JO 

-.18; 

9X2 

-.lft 1 

10.01 

-.15' 

9J2 

-.16 ; 

1D4T 

-.17 : 

9.03 

♦■11 1 

9.94 

-.12! 

10114 

-.17 

10.19 

-.16 1 

10.14 

-.16 

9.29 

-.18 

?.?7 

-.1’ 

ro9X7 

+ Jft ' 

, r9 CO 

-.14 

n’JJ 

-.11 

iaoe 

-75, 

35T 

-J4 

IA05 

- 15 

l’Xft 

-ja. 

-10X2 

-.10 

«X5 

-Xl 

10J4 

- J6 : 

l?Jft 

-38 


0: 

- C-l 


I9X'- -?' J Hancock Frpcdm: 

ivTccn 10X5 • J3 
EnrvrnA o 8.29 • X 


».«9 -.17 
13J7 • J3 

i2.:o -.33 


CvfcBa 

Enw.lf 

•;-iG«tn 

miiEa 

Pi-lSra 

SmC« 

hEal, 


ca: ■ 

-.aOJ - 95 
’ 29 .10 

12.8* -J9 

-.39 
i5.7a -.:e 


10J0 
i ox: 

’.I? 


- .0? ■ Grodison McDonald: 

-.11 E:iYaisn 2226 

.14 GovbiCP 12*2 -.1® 
-.12 OPTFd I2.vI -.1' 
OapVaia i»4l ■ .0.' 

- 02 .GH.MNTE 9,'fl -.50 
-.11 iGHNMTE 10 1J -.0® 

. . - IO GnMhipmg!4J3 -.O’ 

/Aunlncl 10X4 -.12 'C-r.tfinGrln il.Ci -J3 


1*.S2 -.25 
ljJ7 -.41 
1524 -.41 
IS 17 -JE 
!iX4 -.44 

2)Xe -,-U 


SrEan 
value- n 
VAMu n 


10X3 - 13 
10.90 - J* 
9.74 - .13 


CALtdt 

Chiral 

FLLldt 

MALtdt 

MILldl 

NattLtd 1 

NJLId : 

ALT. FI 

MILldl 

AZTrFt 

PAUdl 


10X6 -.08 

12.13 - AO r 

10.13 -.O’ 
10X0 * 09 
9.68 - .08 I 
10.10 -X« 
10 07 -X8 
10.21 -.16 
10.09 -.10 
10J8 -.17 | 

10.14 -J» 


Mr Ins n I1J3 -.18 
NewMMnlO lO - 19 
NewMill 11X5 -20 
OTC 22X5 - 27 
OhTFn 11.1* *.1J 
Chrsea 29.12 - J5 
PacBas 16X7 -J* 
Puritan 15X3 -.10 
FealEst n 14.14 -.16 
RetGr n 17J2 - Jft 
3hiTBdn *12 -.05 
ST wldn 9X1 ‘X 9 
SrrwllCctp 10J5 +.08 
SE Asian 13X9 T .44 
SIKScn 1*02 - 42 
19.9ft - 48 
55X8 + 1 .05 
1040 *.12 
14.36 -.32 
41.60 -X8 
JXM ‘.17 


SrrOppr 
Trend n 
USBtn 
Util Inc n 
valuer 

wrtow 


APTiFt 10X9 -.18 I Fidelity Selects: 
CqlMunil 9X2 *15 | Airr 14 AS -.19 


COT »F 1 10.00 -.It 
CTTirFI 10.04 *.14 
Ealnt 10X3 - J5 
RoT^Ft 10X5 ‘.18 
GAT,Ft 9.83 -.14 
GovtOWt 9.43 -.07 
Hilnc t 7 JB 

KYTjfFI 9.86 -.I5| 
LAT'F I 10 04 -.17 
AAC'T rFt 10.05 -.17 
MATaFI 14J4 ‘.is 


ArnGald r 72J7 - 1 J4 
A too r 22-71 -70 
Biotech r 2A1» -J3 
B retest r 20J2 -73 
Broker r 15X4 -.20 
Chemr 32J8 -.42 
Compr 26.11-1.01 
ConPrdr 14JS -Jl 
CStHov ' 17.61 —.12 
CrfAcror 18.01 -.42 
DevCemr!7X7 —.08 


■ .13 


Forum Funds: 
invBnd 10.7? . . 

ME Bud 10 J’ - .11 | 
TacSvr 10J4 -.10 
Founders Group: 


GlInB T 
Gh.P -■ a 
Gtoos : 

GflnA 
r-iociR. 

OiTrCh 
■GoidA 
GoidB ■ 

P'^Bcs 
RsB’A 
R;ei5t 

J Hanccdc Savergtc 

AchA i:.02 -.27 

-cnB : 11.45 - J' 

SolAa 1017 - 17 
Bal3P 10.16 -.17 
Bondi IP 14X1 • 15 
BondB 1 4X1 -.15 
In. -A : 

In-.G p 

USGvAp 9.77 -.13 
USGvS I 9.72 -.13 I 
JA.Bol 1171 -.11 
1 1X7 ..u f.SMun I2X* -.08 
r 92 I.SIMtolU 11.96 -.O’ 
39.32 - .48 h- autoian nr 3 36 - .03 I 
*J3 -.16 'Kemper Funds; : 
9.8: -.09. ACiGOv. ’ 3.F 


Bonen 10.74 -.13 
GtoBdn lOii -.3* 
Graftinn :zxi - J 7 
‘3ft Inn 1L6-2 • Ji 
InllEo n lit: - 23 
SmCapn I’M -.0! 
«« • li Lord Af CounseL- 
liXv -.07 BdDftbTr i.r -.0: 

IvasTFTr 4i5 x: 
UXCo-.l 4 .b 2 - Cl 
LordAbbetl: 

AtfiirdD 1C A: -.14 

B*>ruDu3P?.ls - or 
DeyetGthD’J: -.02 
=ql”0p 13.97 - y. 
Fdft'dfP 1170 -JS 
Gi£c: 

Gil tics cJ' -.11 
GoviSeca 2 74 -.03 
Tc.Frp 10.35 -.15 
T=CTS *92 -.12 
uxo -JO • TxFrCalplOXa -.17 
U.49 - JO TF FLP J.74 -.09 
TF.MO P 5.03 -.09 


:?x s -.1* 

21X5 -J3 
13.44 

12.99 -.10 
37b -XT 
i'.i? • JA 
1142 -Js 
ill -JA 
•£.4« • 14 
672 -. 1 ; 


rCV.9 r 
OHf.33 t 
Pacs- 
pa ,v.B t 
Phn.BT 
ST GAB 1 
Sr VC 1 
3*0-5 : 

Tec ns : 

Tv MS : 

JBtaS * ___ . 

-VldtocSi 0.-1 -36 
MefTi-rrcr Fds: 

Asia*, r* ;iX2 -X' 
CdaArpt .0 25 • .0 
Fie.Bdfn *c:» • C- 

Gr - n 12 s : -31 

i?7J - 05 ' Mci’-iie SlcleSI: 

Cas-:A :.'4 - .17 
CosauB e. 0 e 

CjcA^; 

Eair.cA 11.12 -.C-ft 
EetocC 11.11 -.Co 
EqtovslA ::.9? -Jc 
Ecln-.C 13 *5 - 23 


10.14 PsetAIlp 9.64 


4 

Biu-IEs U 9o -35 
OSCVcl 1122 - U 
Ecinan ll S’ - J’ 
JvAr-nn ’.03 - 02 
G.Eao 9X0 
IncEo 


-.11 

-.22 


:n-:c-neSc -J9 - il 


’J 

HX’ 


-.:o 

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.r.TF.1 
!n:T 
i=q 1 

15C0*3r 1147 - Jl 

LfiToVd Tl *0 -24 
wl.’Ol >044 -.06 

CrE-VB ’-C7 i - 14 


MdHiA 
PocGrA 
STGlAp 
UH1AIP 
CdIIMwI 
Adi Bt 

EautBrtt 1370 +J0 
Ealncnt 13J4 ‘72 
HSirarr nx? *.]2 
FRlrAf r.J2 
FhrCnmi H.IO +.11 
GNMA Hn 14X3 +.18 
GIAStB _ - 

Gtobffil 13X3 +25 
GilftB f 1187 * J* 
GttGenntlBX9 *J4 
GfcHsrt I3J4 *23 
GyPfBtfn 8.74 ‘.17 
GvtScfpn 9X3 +X8 
GrthBte 1118 ->51 
GiOpet 11X3 +.12 
HmdBftn 0.1 S +JB 
IntGllI 7X4 +XS 
IntGlIBI 7X6 -XV 
inVerfi hnllXJ -J2 
MuttiB 13X7 +.17 
PacGre 16X9 *.12 
STGfcB 9X2 +X5 
AAursArz I 11X9 -r.15 
MuR-A 9X4 *.15 
MuGot 11.19 +.14 
MunHY I 10J5 +X7 
MulnsA 10J6 +.13 
Munlnt HL76 +.12 
AAuMdl 10X6 *.12 
MunMAT 11X4 -.14 
MuMnt 11-59 y.14 
MunMIt 11.73 +.14 
MwiiMudtlOTl +.11 
AAuNCt 11X7 ‘.17 
MunNJt 1077 *.11 
MuNYl 11J1 +.12 
MunOht 17X7 +.J3 
MuPal 10J9 ‘.12 
NIAAunl 15.06 +.15 
Sfroctfp 11 JS -xe 
SfTucJBf 11 JS +J» 
US Gvt lln 9X4 ‘.15 
UtilBfr 9X6 ‘23 
Prudenfioi tnsfl: 
AdSoin 10 JO ‘.19 
Bain 10.95 *.16 
OthSthn 11X9 + J9 
Income fn 9x2 +.12 
InflStkn 15X3 +37 
Slkldxn 10.99 * J7 
Putnam Fuads 
AdiAox 10.1B — Ja 

AmGvAp BX3 +.12 
AsioAp R10 -22 
AABolAp 8.23 +.10 
AACnAp 8X6 
AAGfhAp 8JI +.12 
BIGvAp ATI *X4 
AZTE 8X6 +.09 
CATKAp 822 +.11 
Convert plU8 +34 
CnAT 41X6 +33 
DivGrp 9X9 +.10 
DvrtnAp 12X8 +X9 
EnRiAp 1296 ‘33 
EcUnAp 8X9 +.17 
EuGrAp 12.18 ‘.IS 
Fedlnp 9X4 *.13 
FLTxA 8X4 +.11 
GeoAp 1134 +32 
GfGvAp* 13.92 ♦ X5 
GtGrAp 9X0 +.16 
GrlnAp 1331 +36 
HtthAp 26.35 +39 
HBYdA OX 12A9 — X6 
HYAdA px 9X8 — X4 
InanAax 636 +X3 
InvAp 7.89 +.17 
MMnAnx 8X4 +X1 
MaTidl 9X5 +X9 
M1TXI1P 8.90 ‘XV 
MunAp 874 ‘.11 
NWTXUP 879 ‘JO 
NJTxAp 8X4 +.11 
NwOpAp 22X8 +X0 
NYTxAp 877 +.11 
NYOuAp 8X3 +X7 
OTCEp 10.44 +30 
OhTxllo 8X0 *X8 
PATE 9X4 ‘.12 
TxExAP B7I +.11 
TFblAp 14X3 ‘.19 
TFHYA 1431 +.15 
TFWYBI 1432 +.16 
TFInBf 14X4 +.19 
USGvAp 12XS +.17 
UlilAp 9.09 -.19 
VstaAp 7.12 +.11 
VovAp 11 Jft +35 
AlfiBIX 10.14 —71 
Asset 14X3 +32 
AABalBI 832 +.11 
AACnBt 835 _ 

AAGthBt BJO ‘.13 
BIGvBI 471 +X4 
CATuBl 831 +.11 

BSYi SIS :35 

EuGrBt 12.17 *.1S 
Getei 13J0 ‘32 
GKJvBtx 1192 +X6 
FLTxBt 884 +.12 
GtGfSt 9XS +.16 
GrtnBt 1131 +34 
HtthBI 26.14 ‘39 
HiYklBtX 12X4 — X5 
IncomeB txft.74 +X3 
invBI 7X2 +.14 
MATxBt 7M ‘XI 
MuniBI 875 ‘.11 
NJTxBt 8X3 +.11 
NwQppB 122X9 +X9 
NYT *B I 876 +.12 
OTC Bt 10 37 *31 
TvExSt 871 +.11 
USGvBl 12X2 +.17 
UlilB I 9M +.18 
VrsrnBI 7X7 +.11 
— VevB I 11X4 *35 
12X0 - 39 Quantitative Group: 

7 .45 -.05 1 Sosrt=orGrlOX2 *.17 
ft.81 -OS'. BcsTGrwlnO.97 * JO 
Paar Funds: , BOftNumOlilD +30 

BctGrtn 10 JO -.1* BoSNumOlil/ +30 
EoAcA n 1 1JI - 1 7 1 Ones* For Value 
EaGrAn 10x0 -36 CATE 10X1 -.14 


USSR ". 0 iSS ill 

lnTffidTnl0A7 +^ 

SunbEaT n9.67 
Suri£o)0n9X6 ‘.09 
STBtfTm *-82 +XJ 

ShTTrTrn JXJ 

Valine T n 10.42 --JJ 
VaJInd P 10^ 
Sateco Fun*E 

CalTFrn 11X4 
Eauitv n 13X5 ‘J* 
GNMAn 938 +.15 
Growth n 1*^ 

HiYld n 877 -XS 
Incom n 173* +.18 
Municn 1338 
NWn lUO +■» 
anwGrplOXS +.23 


CA TF 1039 +.18 GMSm- , : 33t*Cx4'; 
CrpSIkn 3238 +38 Growrh^SXT.^. 


Dvslfl 

GNMA 

Glhlnc 

USGovl 

VRG 


1035 +30 1 fciran , 119J +.W 
!0X5 -.16 ReuEsInlSjT'-jfl 
1435 * 30 StfrrGW7t.9izrv-^ 
14X5 +.18 USGiinati 84S- ' 

10X2 +X7 j U5TxFrnllX5-+'j4 

Maytumdi tnsXt 1 WridGUnt&JS'* +31 •• 
^AXiT^ 9X0 +32 ViXRran -938 *^*. 
Bmdkten 939 +.n Vota^L8«F*- . 
GwtnSiknlOXd -38 AxSGvn 9.1? *xs 
X&PSOOn 1030 +34 MjiJBvff, 
UST AHn 9.19 +.13 ----- 

Stawfeh Ry* 



Soflamf© 
Soman Bras: 


Eqtnsn 1139 +.19 
InRCp 9.94 *.14 
InFI I n 9.94 +.14 
MCoGrtn 9 St +36 
STFICpn 9XO +X* 
. . STHIn 9X0 +.0* 

9.12 - 07 ' Perm Port Funds: 

9.13 -X7 i PermPtn 16J7 +3S 
mimeTr 9X0 -XI. TBOn 6537 +X4 
Income* 9X1 -XBj VBandn 54X6 -.17 
TFincA 9X9 -11 Peri ICG n 11.91 ‘XI 


6J9 ‘.08 


HTTreta 
InGrAP 
irtGrBt 
Inti 


Balcn Fd 1539 * 34 

corrxEp 1104 +.18 
CopApp 18X5 +35 
CvFdSer 17X5 -30 
EatvOop 734 -XS 
Growth 20.48 +37 
8X5 -X3 
■>A3 -.17 
9X1 +.17 
12X4 +.13 
MulFlAp 12X0 ‘.14 
MulFlBp 12X8 ‘.14 
Stack Fd 13X4 *35 
TEBd 10.91 ‘.14 
TofRetp 15.17 *.13 
USGvB 935 -.10 
WIdOPP 10X9 *32 
Pk-rpontFdS: 

Bond n 9.94 -.11 
TEBondnllXO +.10 
ErogMEa fOJB - 40 
Eauitv n 1934 *X9 
CopApp n 71 JO -.12 
InhEqn 11X0 *04 
BBa»EG 11X7 -37 


PRgriir 

AR5II 


Grp: 


Capn 17.« +34 
I rives n Mg +■* 
OPOOrt 30|0 

SrfSdtopn^a +30 

CASIn 9X7 +X5 
CA TFn 10J8 +■'* 
GouSI 9g 
kitftndx I0XJ +.14 
wrTrBn 9.94 +.13 
lOOOr 12X6 +30 
SITFBdP 9.91 +X6 
SmO»W« 9X9 +.13 
ScotWkfl 15X2 +34 
Scudder Funds 
Balanoednl1J7 +33 
CdTxrT 10XB + .17 
CctoGtn 1892 +32 
Develop n 2937 +X6 
EmMkincllJa +34 
GNMAn 1432 +31 
GfcBln 24X4 +ZD 
GlSmCo 15X9 +38 
Gakfn 13X2 +X0 
Grwtncn 17.19 +36 
Income n 12X7 +.16 
UiKmafln44J6 +X5 
bTtBdn 1173 +33 

L at Arnrr21J7 *t^ 

LtrfltmTHABI +.08 
0AATVK 1333 +.18 
MedTFn 1038 +.12 
MMB B^C +.10 
NY T*n 10X0 -.10 
OHTxn 12.74 +.17 
PA Tax n 1107 +.16 
PacOppsnl4X8 ‘31 
QutfGrn 15X5 ‘J4 
STBandnTlXi +X8 
STGIbtn 1133 -X5 
TrFHYn UXO +.14 
Value n 12X4 +.1X 
ZertOOOn 17X7 +32 
Seafinl IRA: _ „ 

AssetA 13X0 ‘36 
BICh 1731 +X1 
Band 1DX9 +.10 
Seat r9y Funds 
Bandp 7X9 +.10 
EquMy 5X1 +.12 
EqGIA 10X4 ‘33 
Grtnc 7.04 +.11 
TxEx 9X1 - .17 
Ultra 4X8 ‘.04 
saieettd Foods: 
AmSflSnp14X4 +X0 
SptShsnp 935 *.13 
USGav pn 883 +.11 
Hrinmtm Gnu nr 
FronHerA 10X0 rX2 
COPFOA 14X5 ‘Jl 
COTxA 733 +XB 
CmStkA 13X5 +34 
ComunA 13X9 +.11 
CammunD13Xl +.10 
FLTxA 7X1 +.10 
GATkA 7X7 +.13 
GtblEmroAflBS +J08 
GJEmoO 1077 +JM 
GrowthA 5X0 +.13 
TnccmeA 1370 *.11 
tncomeD 13X4 +.18 
UlHA 1898 +35 
Inti D 1891 +34 
LATxA 812 + SR 
IWlassTxA 7X0 +.0B 
MDTxA 7X7 +.10 
MiTxA 8X4 *X 9 
MJnnTxA 7X1 +X7 
MQFTxA 7X7 +.11 


EcuiNf 79M +35 
Fxdlnan n!9X8 * 36 
GIFXInn 1873 +36 
inHEatynJiXO +jjl 

■HlfxInnaM +-28 
VATEBO ttiJQ +.19 


ConvWnlln +XB- 
funop -rlMBSSj,: 

IncoTOTi • 8Q,+3J ■ 
tevGT ’ 22.96' 
NYTEn 93?-^-, 
MXS.yjO:. . 
TaxExa 'IOx! +33 
USGvt.i .11X7 ■v’flB' 


Securn 1937 +37 [l ftg»TB . g3j <l2 
S^n - 08 VnEtnrffl! 

SrnCpBin67i5 +31 IVflBfcOft 


Jill 
ARSIV 
AUSHA 

idiusrv 

APS l 

ARSI-A 

ARSU 

AdiUS 

AdiUSII 

—Usui 

GNMA 

HiYiap 

tAagCao 

STN1MII 

SnrfTra 


7.10 - 01 1 
733 +.01 | 
890 -Oi . 
7.04 -01 . 
7.00 - 0l| 
703 *Xl . 
7.14 -.Oil 
8S7 *X2 ; 
6.9? *02' 
6*9 -X! 
12X3 +.1J 
818 -.03 I 


Star Funds 
BfifVOi 11-57 +36 
SteiicrFC 11X1 .+'.13 
USGvtnc 929 *JJ9 
9Brtur5rRini& 
GOVfnai 973 +05 
Munllnco 10J7 +09 
Quartvin 9X9 
Stale Band Gtk , 

a& a 

rar 

US Gov p .433 +09 
StFonnFds 
Baton n 30X4 +01 
Gwttin 21X4 +X0 

SSSS is :5 

CaoihXA 939 +.16 
CapHD 9J3 +.16 
CopFdC 9X4 +.16 
CrofMB 9J2 +.16 
^Sd=drt0184 +iW 
EnergvA 1131 + JJ 
GEnovB 1136 *.IJ 
GvttnCA 12.14 -*.14 
GvtlnB 12.12 +.13 
GfhCn BX3 +72 
InvTYAP OAJ +31 
InvTrB 844 +30 
invTrC 8X9 +3T 
InVTrO 8X6 *31 
NYTFA p 7.« +.11 
NYTFB 7.92 +.11 
NYTFC 7.93 +.11 
SmCapA 8X5 -.14 
SmCapB 8X3 +.14 
Steadman Funds: 

Am tod n 1J2 +M 
Assoc n Jl +01 
Invesl n 1.19 ‘XS 
Oceans h 2X4 +05 
Stan RoeFrte 
CapOpP n 30-07 +37 
Gvtlncn 9 65 +.13 
HyMunn 1106 +.12 
Income n 9X7 + OB 
inimSdn 853 +JJ3 
InIMunn 1107 +.11 
Inlln 10.19 +30 
UdMlnn 9X9 +04 
MsdMun 877 +.11 
PrimeEan1432 +.19 
Spedn 22X2 +32 
Slock n 23.10 +08 
ToliRetn 25J4 +33 
StapalaneFBMte 
GovSecn 939 -.10 
Bdanp 11.47 +.19 
BIChGrl 

GrEqp 13X3 +34 
totBd 100ft +.12 
LMGovAn9X9 +04 
ValMonien13X9 +34 
SrWM Funds: 

Dividend n2AM +35 
Growth !> 2DX4 +37 
2603 +35 


AsiaDynBlMfr 
Astaftf- U3l>^, 

SSSLMig- 

IlnvGWp 14M -p» 


\3 


WrbUncp 833 +51 
WrtdT7flPl4J4 +37 


NatlTlcA 

NJTXA 

NYTxA 

NCTxA 

OMoTxA 

ORTxA 

PATxA 


7X3 +.12 
7X5 +09 
705 +.18 
7X1 +.n 
8X7 +.10 
7X4 +OI 
7.73 +.11 


CAHyTxA 838 ‘06 
CAQTxA 854 +.10 


SCTxA 739 +.10 
US Gvt A P 880 +03 
HiYBdAp 842 +03 


Bcdoncedplxx9 +.19 
Bond p 816 +09 
Com9kp2894 +X1 
EmGrp 5X2 +.13 


GvSecsp 975 +.14 
1635 +30 


Growth p 
PA TF p 12.77 +.12 
TF Inca 12.10 +.17 
World P 13X0 +32 
SentryFdn R90 +.19 
Sequoia n 5830 + 1.19 
Smn Seas Series 
Matrix n 11X7 +36 
SiP Mid all 32 +37 


10^ +34 


05 


9.*B 

17*4 FuodS: 

Gov Med 9X2 +.13 
Gratae n 10X7 +34 
MATEIn n 9X0 +.12 
TExMedn 908 -.11 
Sbawirmf Fds-tavest: 
Fxdtncto ok9X6 » 08 
GrEtSy1np9.94 +.18 
GrtnEqln PI0X6 +30 
irdGvInta px9Xl +05 
SmCpElnplOJO +07 
Stawmut Fds-Trust: 


TFEJA 

>liCdr^3 

lT-^'NC 


B-md n 
Pa-l.Av 
5IOO P 
TaxEr 

, US Govt — „ 

Bat no B.M -J0|H7lnsEap 11*5 -J9 BlueChc 
BlutOip npft.A) +.18 HTAlgFIPk °.*3 -.1)5' Cant 
Dfecvp 1S.74 ‘08 HanitnCCik) 9.07 -01 
Fmtr np 2539 - .15 ' Hauevcr Inv Fds 
GavS«C 737 -.17! BIChGr, 10X9 -.15 

Grwth np IUJ -Jo. STGvl ’ M - .W 

Possprt n 10X6 -.12 | SmCpGrl “48 -,C3 

Soed pn ’.Id ‘JO USiSvl 9.63 *.l? 

WldwGrpl7.17 -A2 I Harbor Fundi: 

Fountaln Square Fds: i Bond I0J2 +.13 
S danced 9.66 - .l*> COPAPP n 15.83 - 43 

“ Growth n 1155 - 7> 

tori n 2A5ft - X0 

ihftGrn 10X0 -.52 


TFNJp 5« -07, <3ftrSKAe'.v4 -.25 
Ta*7f> P 1090 -.15 HilncAe (,71 — .0' 


I? 19 -73 i 


C-ovtSo c 
MidCao 
OualBd 
OudGr 



TFT' O J.B? - 14 

TF FA p 4.3’ - 08 

TF HI p J.B3 -OS 

TF Mi 4X2 -OS 

TFV.’AP 4.63 -.09 

VaiuApppilJ3 - 13 
’30 -07 Lutheran art 
B05 *.05 J BroHJYd 9.20 ‘.Oft 

12.14 -34 I Fund 17.02 -.45 

10.19 -.10 1 Inccene 8.41 *.12 MiMuInc 
8.77 -.10, Mum 8J4 -.12 I Midwest: 

13.03 - Jft! QppGt 9X5 -.U' AdiUSG.1 9.54 -.01 
*77 -.Oft i MAS Fundi: 

3 JI -.04. 3ctancednll32 -.IS 
EnterGrnlSXl - J? 

Equity n 20.78 -At 
Frdlnll n 1033 -.11 
Fxdlncn 11J0 *.10 


Divine p 
ErtvSvc 
FL T* 

GtbtK < 

Grm 
hTi idd 
Income . 

InllFund 10x5 - 15 
MuniBdx ?.9i -04 
NtTF 1873 -oa 
9 49 -.12 
11X8 + Jl ! 


Hiin:B‘ i JC — 
inilEcCa 10.71 -.If 
InuFiln • i;c -.ic 

r.”?cAs;= — o; 

MgiC-JA+XS: -.02 
.\Vk3As:C e b.Bl -.01 
Rs.3iB.:IC “Jl - 15 
TarErA 7.84 - 10 
T-E.6 "Ji -JJ 
18X4 - .13 


Opaentreimer Fit 
AsseiAa i:x« -J2 
CA Te A SlO O’ -.141 
ChcHY P :ift2 -JS 
DiSCFjp 3433 -Jft • 
EctoiAp 5 -d’ - JO' 
Ecl.rcSt 0.45 -.20 1 
Gib io p 1+.S8 - ll 
GIGrp 15 :« -3' 


EqmA ICX5 -J5 

F.OlhA 9.93 -.IS- 

irumGvA n ’.WJ -.12 
NJ.VklAn 10J1 -.11; 

STInvAn 9.94 02- 

1825 -.16 Pioneer Fun± i 

»xe - 0’ Eclnco 1814 -33: 

Americp 10JJ -.14 | 

Bortop 9 IS *.1J 


0j>’ - 

10.13 -.14 


Fund 

GlEq 

GrtncA 

Inv Gin 

NatfTE 

NY7E 

Op part 

SmCao 

USGav 


1Z22 *J4 
1A23 -.19 
*82 ‘32 
1034 -.15 
10X2 -.14 
10.77 ‘.14 
18X5 +X7 
1«XS +.17 
11 Jl -.13 
9XS - .13 
JO 


Govto >4« 

IntC-v d 1143 -.12 
LemUrllA I0X T -.22 
LcsnTsvA a 77 - 14 

C-HTF 11.97 -.IS 
Trim p 13.74 -.10 


GtotErv siO.Ci —.0+ 

GicSdA c 37.10 -XJ 
G.£c:b: 3b.91 -xj 
C- 3i: o 13.90 - S8 
HiYldA 13.79 -X7 

Hi ‘705 r 13J3 *07 .Piper JoBray: ; 

lr.iTEAploJO -Jl; Bolancp 1132 *.2S| 
I-n-TEp 14J9 -.14; EmerGr 1836 -32. 
InvGrA p 10J7 -.13 ! Govtn 2X4 +.13! 
LTGOvA PlOXl -02, Grtnc 10J2 +32; 
MnSICA HX* -.1*! InsIGv 8X8 -J4| 


CapGr p ISX7 -.UPBBGvtp ... 

<3ata 7.7J - .44 RCM Fund 20 J» 
GrowlhP 11X2 -.19 ; RSI Trust: 
inccmeo 9.71 - 15; AdSd 
Europe p 19.00 -33 Coro 
FianrFdp 22.05 -XI i EmGr 
PinMBd 3 10 O’ -.12 intBd 
innGr 22J4 - M > ST1F 
PKBVilp 1BJ>I -JS| Value 
PioThree P19X2 -X8 Rednbawn 
ST Inc 3X7 ♦ .01 , ReoGro o 
To> FneepilJJ - .18 i Regis Fund: 

USGvp 9X7 -.13 ] C&BBal 11X7 +.15 
WntoREl 12X3 -.19 C&BEq 1182 ‘.15 


2827 + 47 
34.74 +.76 
33JI ‘.14 
2SJ8 +38 
16.12 ‘02 
25J8 +34 
508 ‘06 
1331 +05 


SrSTRn 10X5 +X1 
SirBaln 9X7 -.16 
SterSTFn 9X3 *X3 
SrerBln njo *.14 


GIFxin 10 Jft ‘.15 Manera 14.94 -.05 


FraiMm Group : 


12.71 -JS' HYSecsn »O0 -05 IMuneRMC 1LT2 -.0? 


IdiiEq n !4X< -.17 Atonitpr Fundi: 

IntlRrln 1004 +.14. F*lnT SXftO - JO' 


CuFdJdin 9.97 
CuFdSTn 9X3-05 
Culler Trust: 

ApvEan 9.95 -JO 
Eatvlnca n ’ 79 -.IB 
GavtSecn ?.B> -.OB 
□FAtalValnlOJ? - 11 I 
DG Investor: | 

Eauity 10.46 - Jl 
Ga>rtlnco t 9 !3 -.07 | 
LTGovt/ 9.68 *01 | 
Murrilnc v 10.09 - .IJ 1 
Dean Witten I 

AmVaff 21.59 -Jl I 
CaTT.Fr* 13>» -.IS 


MIT.*Ft 10.18 -.14) EJedrr 16.93 -X5 
MNTcFI 10.03 +.lfti Energy r I7JI +09 
MOTkFI 1022 -.17' Eng$vcr 11.19 -33 


NJTrF I 1046 -.1 
N-<T<Ft 1076 - .1 
NallMun I 9X9 +.1 
NCT%F t 10.01 -.1 
OHT *F I 10 J2 -.1 


Enviror 10.85 —.15 
RnSvcr 52.10-1.7? 
F«dr 28.73 - 33 
Health r fti’i - 71 
HomeF 25.12 - XS 


ORTkFt 1014 - JO i IndEqpr 18.92 -.19 
PATvFI 10J4 -14| IndMotr 21.99 -J9 


RIT^FI 

SCT.Ft 

Tt4T»Ft 

TMRtnl 

VATxFt 

WVT.FI 


?.3J -.15, 
9.94 -.IJ \ 
*99 -.IB! 
B.71 -.16 1 
10 tB -.13/ 
*jft - 16 : 


AZTF 11.15 ‘.11 
Bailnv p 21X3 -JO. 
CAHV6dp9.71 -.131 
Caitosp 11.84 -.!ft i 
CA toiermWJJ *09! 
CaiTFrp 7.11 -.0: 
CO TF 1139 -.12 


CT TF 
CvISecp 
DNTC 
Equity p 
E otnc p 


I0J7 -.13' 
1202 r.15 
9.41 -.19, 
6.46 -08 = 
13X3 ‘31 


Hercules Fund: . Tocnnol 9.92 -34 

Euro VI 10.42 -06, TX TF 10.13 ‘.12 

LAmrVal 9x8 ‘XT, TotFetrn ’Jr. -.15. 

NAmrGfln’.BO -J2' USGvtx 871 -.06 SpRn 
PcfBVat 10x0 - CS 1 Kemper In vsl: > Valuer 

AldBd 9X5 - 03 1 Divine I 5” -OjImF5: 

Heritage Funds: ! Gvir* 


LidDurFint0J9-O5! 
MtgBLFC 1813 ‘.13 I 
MunFxt 1032 -.18| 
SeiEan 1732 *J8 
5e/FI n 1814 -.07 


Grwth T 

in&aT 

MtpBk 

OhTFT 

SIBdT 


25.; 


-.60 
27 ?? -J9 
7.o3 -.16 
21.17 -.19 
t’J7 +.15 


7.0? - 05 I 
lex I - J7 
8.0G -OS 
MO —.03 
0.1? -OI 


SmCnVlnlftXB - 04 ; ManirOid o 9 Jft »xl 
11X1 -.13 MonitrSIP 170’ -.15 1 
1235 - J3 ! MontgometY Fds i 
EmglVWI 14 40 - .43 


CapC-ro > 1 1.74 -33 I Eaton V TTotfifionat 
Convt I 10X3 - .09 Chino p 144ft • Ad 
lft.90 -.13 EVSIk 
29X2 - XJ 1 Growth P 


GJbl: 

Wwl 


9.30 - OB 
12J7 -.13 
BX4 -02 
1105 - TO 
9.11 *12 


toeflosp 

MunBd 

STTsvp 

5or£atp 

TradGii 


tosurr ITX8 -J3 
Leisrr 3837 -X5 
YAedDel r ?0 31 - .09 
NatGes r 9 87 - 01 
Paoer r 18.00 - JR 
PrecMetrlsJI -X0 1 
RegBrrt r l’.u -xl ‘ 
Retail r 74.03 -.13! 
Scftwrr 23J2 — 15 
Techr 37 JO -.98 
Tefecomrj5x3 -.57 1 
Trans r 30X8 - jft 
Util r 34.83 -.87 * 
.7X5 -.18 IFkfeStv Spartan: 

10.1H -.08, AgrMun n 9J5 -.ill 


CapApppUXS -JT. Gwth l 
Divine P 9.27 -O’] HiYld I 
incGrp IIJ? -JO 5T(y r, 

UA G - iv p ’.ai - 05 Shrtr: i 

_ SmCap$Pl8a5 -.17 1 5mCpEqtl8’9 *.11 

FIST ARS 09.02 -03 ;HfctlMDr* Funds : ToKe: 111X0 -.24 

Fedtoterm 10.4S - .09 I Etdancen 9.73 -.14 Kemper Prcfrucr-: 

Bondn I0J1 -.14 Divir 5.99 -Of 
GovtBd n 9X1 - .0’ . 

Growth n 9.76 ‘.I* ; 
mcGrn 9.82 *.i7 I 
IncsEa 11-77 -Jl I 
5pGrEa ne 13.00 — JB 


FedT> 11.81 *13 
FLTFInp ’.43 -.19 
FLTF IIJ’ -.11 
GATF 11X5 -.14 
GlGvlnc 8X3 -.08 
GlUtilP lift* - 43 


MITAP 11X0 - J? ! 
MIGA P I0JS -40, 
BondAP 12X4 * .15 i 
EmGrA p 17.88 ♦ Jft ] 
GrOoAp 10.96 *.25 
GvLIAp 866 '.Ob' 
GvMgAp 6X0 -OS! 
GvScAP 9J6 *.11 


GtobCpm 15.17 -30 . 

GlohOpp n 1 3.°B -Jft I Ovenond Express 
Gre-wthn ISX4 -14 AftlAUA 11X1 -37/ 
m^tETAVI OftJS -1.43. CA TF A 10X2 -.13' 
IntlSmCopB.li) ‘JO, MuIncA 10J9 +.151 
ShDurGt 9.B3 *0«. | +rrtoGrA 12.48 ‘J7| 
SmCaon Ib.lO -.20 ST Govt ^.03 ‘.12: 

Mom St Bn Fds: '. USG/tA 10 JO +.15 


Gvt 

Growth 
HfiTd 
STGli 

Shtlnl » 8.14 

Gatin' 14.65 ‘ X3 1 HiliiardGr 15J5 ‘Jl ! SmCaEq ll.le +.11 l 
- - 1 - ~.l TolR. 1157 - J4 | 


HilncAp 504 - 0I| AbianGrA 15.94 -.45! VRG A 9.72 -03 1 

7.02 -04 | LldMAp ’.IS -.04 A^ianGB 15X6 - .44 ' PBHG Gr n 13X7 *32 

14X0 - J’ | OTCAP 7.00 -l GIcbEqA i.’Jt ♦ JO ! PFAMCo Fds 


Growth 14 Jl - J4 ! HomstdBd n SOft - 03 I 
HY TF 10X1 - .09 , HomWdVl UXS - Jft ! KwUFundv 


12.17 -35 I 
7 65 -.16 
A7I -OI 
9.79 -.16 
5414 - 03 1 


HIMuBdplOJS -.17 ;HorocMnn 20.1’ - 54 
■ncaSer 233 - .02 I HudsonCao 12J0 - JO 
1NTF 11X2 ‘.i:;HunYnerinc«86 -.18 
InslAdi 9J9 - 04 HuromrG 21.03 -.15 
IrtsTF 11.99 -.12 , HvpSO 8.93 -.01 

NYinhnlTKSl3 -.13>HvpL02 .. _ 

IntlEa p 13J) -JSjlAATrGr 15X3 -J7; MIMuIn-, 
KYTF 10X7 * U (lAI Funds . VolEaln 

Baton cn 10J6 -J4 Kcyslone: 
Bonden 9J7 - .14 CusBl t 
ErogGr pn!A19 - J5 . CuiB2 1 


E/Edlns IJJJ -.13 
FratoWii 9.70 *.13 
idxEaln 1079 *JS) 
inlEatos. 13.66 -.15* 
LlMaltoi 9.79 -04 


302 -.05 1 RichAp 1308 -J7i Glo6EqBnl?J3 -.20 
7.17 —Of I SedAp 12X9 - J7 | Morgan GreafeE 
StlnAo 7.70 -.06 EmergEq ’16 
TotPAO 12.83 ‘JO 
IJIIIAP ’ll -.18 1 
VoluAP 9.76 —04 | 

WoEaAp IftXJ 


Ftlnar, lO.i: -.11. 
GIpbaiFx a ?.’l 
tnlSmCprlOb) -.16 ! 
MlfUBcJ 10X1 • .07 l 


DSIDv 10X3 +J1 

051 LM 9X4 t.l 

FMASPC 1034 ‘07 

1CMSC 1X94 +04 

SAMI Pfd n9.42 — 02 

. SirSpEan IS77 +.13 

MS'ncGrAjljft - JO] InstGvAdi «X3 +08 1 SrGwthn 9X0 +.16 
MtatacA 13.42 -.12 MNTE 10X2 +.12 ' - — — " 

rnTaxApl2J8 -.17' NatlTE 10X5 *.17 

ffrTkBto 12J0 -.17 PocEurG 15.22 ‘Jl 

Oooer |0X7 - J2 1 Sector p 1737 - .17 

PA TE A pi 1 .77 -.16 ; Value p 18XS -X6 1 TSWEq 10X7 +.14 

Spc-cXAp 2.7.45 -X? PiprTrlD *X4 -.10] TSWFU 9X9 +.13 

StrlncAp 4X8 - .04 , PiprTrShD 9.77 +05 . T5Wlrdt 13X3 +.13 

XJrtocBt 4.88 ‘.04 ;PlaraTNhr 1BTB ‘.13 
SigSTlAp 4.63 +.03 Portico Fds 
StlnGrA a 4.95 -.IB • BalK n 21X4 +X1 
' Bdld> 26X2 +34 
Fnlrxta 3231 +.79 
Grtnc n 72J0 -AS 
IntBdM 9.86 +.09 
MidGrt. n 21.12 +X3 
ST Bondn 1113 -.05 
SoGrn 31.10 ‘33 
. T»EmBdn9.94 - 08 
- J5 ; P r e ferr e d Group: 

AssetA n IPX7 *35 
Fvdlnn 7.90 -.11 
Growth n 1307 * 33 
Intln 1274 -JB 
ST Gav n 9.82 * 05 
Value n 11X7 +32 
Price Funds: 

AdiUS A 66 
Balance 11X8 +J1 
BIChG 11.18 -.20 
CdlT»n 9.93 +.13 
CapAorn 12X4 +.13 
DivGron 1IJ9 +.13 
Eatncn 16X1 ♦ JS 
Ealdvn 13.15 ‘32 
Europe n 12X0 - JI 


STlnvAp 4X1 -04 
Target P 2533 -J2 
T/FrBI 9X0 -.12] 
TxFrAp 9X1 +.12 ! 
Time p I ft Xl - Jft , 
TotPtAp 8.21 -.11: 
TtoRrem 8.17 -.111 
UjGwp 9J2 +.10 
ValS, ’ c 1431 


WoG/Ao 11.45 -.15 'MrgVgCap 13.19 - ?0 
WoGrA 1638 * .20 ! Marg ston Insfk 
WoTolA p 10.75 -.18' AcJClrv n 12.15 -.17 


H.yj -.ui • Liroaiau v.rv - jm , MuBdA 
9J2 -Oil MedTEln 1004 -.10' MuHiA 
9.89 *05 
10X7 +31 


LATF 
MO TF 
MassTF 


1100 *.lt 
10X8 -.13' 
1134 -.11 , 


15.08 -.17 1 
15.68 +.lft 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 


ORCHIDS 


LONDON PARIS ESCOAT AGENCY 
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 


UK 071 589 5237 


TAHTHA'S 

LONDON - PARIS ESCORT SERVICE 


071 266 0586 


, ELITE - REGALE 


UK 071 586 9298 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

.r> :? l 'v 

M: 212-76S-7896 New rari,. USA 
V.VY +- ■ 4 .:orrt»- 


PEACHES 

LONDON ESCORT SB! VICE 
071 938 2641 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 12) 


MISS GBBVA & PARIS 

Escort Afjfnc, 344 00 89 ■?«!,' «>* 


OfEIXEA ESCORT SaVHX. 

7! BeavJvrrip Pi r-. 5>vt 

Te! 584 651? 


TOKYO 

T 0+ FJP TO* ‘ ■ 

E5CC*T AND GUIDE *Gcf*:r 
m.- TQr.VQ IT?, 3588 W 


R1ANNA 

LONDON ESiTCPt 

I'tadon Heoifro* 

Te^>jn? QBM ;.7?7>4 


BASEL 


ZUISCH r BERN 

CSCC+I S-rv+re 
TeL- 077.'8& Oft hi. (I’,’ 8? Oft ’9 


AMSTBU7AM BUTTERFLY 

Semce T«4 [r»2Yi-^Tl 520 
C’«Sl Cqd: 


AMBIENCE* * ■ * 

■ ■ LONDON ESCORT Sct’vtCE ■ 
TEL- 07 1 m 5006 0*6, Ovdi 


‘ ZURICH * SUSAN * 

Eicyi Ser-.’W 

Tel: 01 361 9* 40 


TO OUR READERS 


PAUS-SALZBG-SWITZ -BRUSSELS 

Fine tot Ee-**;e 

Tei mi * izrzr-x-x 


’• GOffVA INTERNATIONAL * * 

Escort Ser-'Ct 

U- 032 V-l »3 ?: f~ .’5 >250 


10J0 - IS 
8 92 +.09 1 
MuUA 7.47 -.BJ . 

Mu ALA P 1032 *.10 | 

MuARAd 9 7B -.10: 

MuCAA P 5X7 - X0 1 
MuFLAP 9A» - 11 • 

AftuGAA P 10X2 -.10 [ 

MuMAAPlO.92 -.11 
MuMDApl0.93 -.12 •' 

MuMSAp 934 - .09; 

MUNCAP1IXI -.11 I 

MuNYA P 10X4 *.l? 

MuSCAP 11X7 - .13 
MuTNAp 10J1 -.10 
MuVAA p 1 130 ‘13 MuhlerXmplto78 


Baton 1033 ‘.17 
CapApn 13.04 -J9 
DrvLOwn 11.13 ‘.I? 
EmergMkl 14X9 +.80 
EnhEon 11X7 +JJ 
Eilncn 11.25 -.12 
rntln 1231 +.13 
f.vjaBdln ’At -.13 
AVdCao 13X3 -.IS 
SmCdG 1838 
SmQtV I7J2 
, 'TIC* n 8X4 
14.94 -.27 fRIMCO Funds: 

IftXl -.S3 1 ToTRctn 10.11 
TRIII 9 03 
L'+wDur n 9.95 
LDII 
ShortTn 
Frann 
GtobtS n 
HTYld 
Grwm n 
LTUSGn 


RctiTangn 17 JO +M 
Rembrandt Funds: 
AsiaTI 9J9 +33 
BalTr n 974 + .14 
GIFeinTr nlOJft - Jl 
GwthTrnlOX? +.19 
tiMEqTrn 13.03 +30 
SIGvFlT 9X4 +X7 
SmCaoT 9X4 +X8 
TEFITrn 9X4 +.11 
Ta* FfTr n 9.71 *.ll 
VaiueTrnl0.il *.14 
RemBIOi 14.18 +X0 
Rrghfime Gruuic 
BlueChp 32X1 —.01 
RTFdnfp3SJ7 —.11 
Gav5ecpxl3.?4 +.19 
Growth prf4.16— 1.20 
MidCoop 28.1’ — J)1 
SOC’wP 26X1 —.99 
Rimcoed 9.47 +.10 
RimcaStk 11.89 +JO 
RiverlnE 10X2 -.17 
RiverttGVI 933 +.14 
Riverside Cap: 

Eauitv v 12.71 *.09 
F>d,n> 9X5 *J)6 
TNMuC*» » 9.92 * 09 


AiianEan?! 48 - Xb 
Bal «78 -.15 

EmGr 

EmM+i 

EmMtDbinBXr • 77 
EqGrn 11 7ft . J5 , 
Fcdlnc 10.12 .14 

CJEalV 11X3 - J2 I 
GtF+ton 10 79 - .22 1 
Hi Yldn 10.37 - 02 | 

tntlSCn iftio -jil 

fnllEq 1SJI -.19 
PealYfd n ?.70 ■ .75 


-.17 
* X9 , 
-32| 


*.H I 
-.07, 

.041 


+ 04 -X4 
9X9 *xt 
10.00 -.021 
9X6 * .16 j 
1037 -X4 
13X3 -Jft 
9X0 *.19 


FEFn 14X4 ‘ J7 [Radertwi Stephens: 
FUnslnt nlO.OS -.10 Comran 124J3 -.02 
GNMn VJD -.09 EmGrp 18.14 +.18 

GA TF n 9X2 +.121 VolRus 13X8 ‘35 
GfOGv 9.58 + .12 I Rochester Fds: 
Growthn20.lt - J7 , BdGrowpl2.77 +.10 
Gwrhinn 16.04 -J6> roMud 17.43 +.18 
Hi y kin 8x2 _ Ltdfrr p 333 +xa 

tncomen B.71 +.09 1 Rodney Square: 
IrfflBdn 7X5 *14 1 Divlnp 12.74 +.12 
Growth p 1X97 -33 
IntlEqp 12X3 ‘32 


inlGvlTrroflX ... 
LTIncTrnrtXO +X4 
SmCpCT 10X1 +JJ7 
Seira Trash 
CalMuA PlOXl *.15 
CpIncAP 10.14 +.18 
EmGrA p 1331 +.13 
FLInsA P 9X9 +.15 
GrtncAp 11X4 +34 
GrowthA pi 134 +j09 
InttGrAp 11X2 +.12 
NatMuAp 10.96 +.12 
STGlAp 2J8 +.01 
USGovAp 9X1 +.08 


VBiKanweaMa+ 
AdRtGvBt8xa*Xl-- 
CA-TFA p IftXJ: +-J5- 


GrwfhA^ j|17 +30 


GrwfhBt. lB.te.-6J0 
WYMAR VZ'^tEL' 
HItVJB. 

InTFAp ». 

UlTFBf-.UM7 
MurdnApMSS. fj]?- '• 


MuiAiApMXa. ■ 
MuntaBf 1491. •‘-'.19 
PATFAol6iH. >.» -. 
PA TFBf 14XD- *,1R ; . 
STGlAp 

STGBt BX0 - + X4 . 

SBmAp izARijg . 
ShfinBt 12X4 +32 
TxFHBr.MX7>X9. 
TxFrH!Ap14X8 +X9-- 
U5GvBf 14X0 *34 ' 
USGvAp 14X1 +34. 
UtMtVAo 1330 * JS ' 
UliKt 13JB +J5 •_ 
Vhnft Fn 1 Iw i inn -* * 

CODE 1672*299: 


Advfgn 10X3 
AmUtan 9X9 +36 
AuoPacnlOXS ‘.14 
CmStfc n 17X1 +30 
DlSCOvn 16-35 +.16 

Govscn 10.01 +.1J 
Growth n 10x1 +.12 
HiYIMu 9X4 +X9 
9X4 +.12 
10X3 +31 
1433 + 30 

1831 +32 

MuniBdn 9X1 +.14 
Oup>ntyn2B32 +X4 
STHcndn 9J9 +XS 
STMunn 10.10 +X8 
Total n 23X8 +X5 
SunAmsrica FdK 
BolAsetA pl4XS +30 
BofAiefB pl4X9 ‘39 
DhrircSp 4X9 +X3 
EmGrA p 1435 +.13 
EmGrfl 1X18 +.13 
RkScBp 10.11 +.12 


Incan 

InsMun 

intln 

Imatn 




X3 


s» p , 

HUncS-p .. 

FBncAp 7J3—ja 

wrr&is 

USGvB p 838 +X5 
VakwB 15.14 ‘33 
TARGET: 

InterBdta 9 JO +.10 
toMEqn 14X0 +37 
H9X7 +31 
9.94 +.19 
n 9X1 +.13 
11X1 +33 
1230 + 30 
___ 9J4 +.10 
TnwWanGram 
AmerTrr 13X5 +38 
GapACC 15X3 +33 
DevMktplSM +31 
Faranp ».72 +.14 



GfotoO|»P 13.14 +35 


p 1X04 +35 
Incom p *30 +.09 
REdP 13X4 ‘Jl 
SrradCaP BX7 +30 
World P 1432 +33 
itaraWM tesNh 
EmMSP 11X2 +31 
FarEaS 13X7 +39. 
FEsafS 11.18+32 
GnwttlS 11-95 +3S 
TMrdAYV 17.18 +37 


Thomsen Gtome 
E qtnA 12X6 


SgnoiSalech 
MOMull 


talOJS +.1S 

USIndto 10X2 +M 
USlncTn 10X2 +X6 
VdEaltn 12X4 +J8 
ValEoT n 12X4 +38 
VAMuT n 10X9 -.17 
VaMunl 1 10.49 +.17 
Skyine Funds: 

Europe 1039 — X5 
Month Ivin 9X4 +X3 
SpEouiln 16X7 +.13 
SpEautll 10.43 +X8 
Smith Bamav A: 
CapApA 13X3 +32 
GIGvIA 12.17 +.16 
IncGroA D12.95 +35 
incRelA 9.48 +X2 
IntIA 18X8 +33 
MoGavtA 1234 +.19 
MuCalA 1232 +.16 
MuFLA 12X1 +.18 
MuLMA 6X3 +X6 
MunNIA 1330 +.17 
MuNJA 1331 +.19 
MUNYA 12X3 +.18 
SHTSY 4X3 +X3 
USGvtA 13.10 + 30 
UMAp 12X7 +.19 
SmUh Barney B&C 
CapApB 1338 +32 
toriB 17.90 +32 
IntlC 18X7 +J3 
MuLtdB 4X2 +X5 
SmMiBniyShrsn A: 
AdlGvAp 9X0 +X4 
AdvsrAp 25.44 +X4 
AgGrAp 24X4 +37 
ApprAp 10.96 ‘Jft 
TefGAp 11X2 + X4 
Telln 105X1 +3.70 
AzMuAp 9X3 +.13 
CoMuAp 15X1 +33 
DrvsSHncp7.95 +X6 
FdVcftA p BXB +.17 
GtOpAp 29X8 +33 
GrtnAp 9X2 +30 


HIIncAt 

InICAA 

IrtNYA 

LWMup 

LtdTrp 


1133 +X2 
B.IS +X7 
830 *.10 
8X9 +X4 
736 +X8 


IntEXsn 
intjtk n 
Japan n 
Lot Am n 
Masiun 


17J8 +X3 
1232 * J6 
1135 +.07 
9X0 ‘.76 
SX3 - X2 


VraueEa n iVs? - J7 I PNC Funds: 

SCVtd n 10.W . 10, Balances 12.18 -.24 


RANKFURT KOIN DUSSEIDORF 

all area. &<•>' V">rf 
0+9XT2W 


MUNICH ‘WELCOME 

ESCORT 8 C-i."CE ’C-ff Cf 
KfASE C’LL OR* * : 3? 14 


SONY ANGELS OF LONDON 

ESCORT rES\V.:= 

0’l-:73--’ l >J < -t-ed'i 'tt h ■vreoi+d 


■JtilB 

CORGBl 

Bond B 

EmGrBI 

GallSt 

GvMgB 1 

GvScBt 

HilrtB I 

InlmB I 

MAITB 

DTCB 

migb 

PwiB 
SedB I 


42 Bal one 


7.10 -.18 M*JirCATF'1557 -.15| CoreEql 
1 1B1 -36 (MunMIGB 1036 -jg- CoreEqS 
12X2 -.M ( MuTIBrrtl 18X5 ■ .14 " 


17.79 -js Mutual Scries: 

642 * J7 Be<»wnn 32.11 -.24 
4X9 ♦ XB , DlSCOvrv USB - 07 
’Jft - .1 1 I QUOH.J n 27 41 - JJ 


5X4 ♦ 01 
BIB +X8 
1136 *32 
7.74 -.13 
10.17 -J9 


-.95] 


Snares n B! 50 
NCC Funds: 

Eauit/lp 13X0 - J4 i 
F.dlnclPlOJI -.13 ' 
DHTE10 10X7 -,l 


Grpwlhl 
Idj^Eo 
InimBdS 
imCvfS 1 
IrUTBdt < 


12.17 -34 
’.S3 -.21 I 
9.82 - 30! 
10.(3 -.15 
IOX3 -J? 

9 19 +.06 
9.81 +.06 
9. IB - OS 


IntGovli x 9.8t * Xft 

IntlEa 1143 -.18 

InltEaS 11X1 07 

ManopediM.07 -X9 

■U.I. - -r* . wiilib ,UJ, -.11 Manc+wdSAO/ +.09 

13X4 -J?l Eouit.RplSM -34 | PA TF p 10.01 -.16 


MdTkFrn 9*4 +.1! 
MafCoon 14X8 * J9 
NewAm (176.14 -.47 
N Asia n 19X8 + XS 
NewEra n20.42 -.35 
NwHrznn 1531 +.16 
NJ TF n 10.40 *X* 
WfTjrFn 1038 +.11 
ore n 14X3 -ST2 
SoTchn 17.B4 - .07 
ST Bd O 4X7 - .02 
ST Gto n 4X9 ! 

SmCVl 14«0 -.09 1 


Roulstan Funds: 
GvSecn 9J7 -.14 
Grin 10.68 +.17 
MidWGr 11X3 -.00 
Rove* Funds: 

PennMu 112 -X4 
Eqlrrc SJ8 +X5 
OTC 434 
Premier n 4.44 -JD7 
Value In 9X4 -X4 
Rush mere Group: 
AmGcran 10.97 -.15 
USOLg n 9J9 + JS 
US ini n 9.07 -.15 
MOTFn 10X7 +.12 
VATFn 10X4 +.15 


MgGvAp 12X2 +.13 
AAgMuApl5X7 +32 
AAoMuAp 1233 *.l* 
NiMuAp 12.63 +.17 
NvMuA D 1X48 + 32 
PrMlAp 20 JS +.B8 
SpEqAp 18X2 +X2 
PrTRA 15X9 +3* 
UWAp 1333 +32 
WlncAa 6X1 +X1 
WVYPAP 1J1 
SmHhBravShrsn B; 
AaGrSt 74X0 ‘37 
AporB 1 1092 *37 

CaMuBt 15X1 +.23 
Comrflt 14X3 +.17 
DvsInBI 7.9S +X6 
EVPBI 14X4 +X1 
R_Mu8t 9J2 -.17 
FdVaBr 8.06 +.17 
GtBOBt 15X6 +.16 


.17 

GwttlA 21.17 +X8 
IntIA 12.72 *3* 
OporA 24.99 +35 
PrcMIA 1223 +40 
TarartA 1224 -.14 
USGvA 9Xt +.11 
EqfnB 12X3 +.17 
GrwtoBt 20J6 +X7 
incomeBt 7X9 +.13 
tnttB i 1239 +J4 
OparBl 2639 +34 
PrecMe«n.93 +x? 
ShJGvB 9X0 +X3 
TaxExBl 11X9 +.18 
TaroefB 1211 +.14 
USGauBI 197 +.10 
ThorabwgFdfc 
IntMu 12X9 +.13 
LWTln 11.92 +X7 
LWCa 12X9 +X7 
LtdGvtp 122B +.12 
LtdMun p 1331 +X8 
NM Ini 12X3 +.11 
Tacquov 13X5 +30 
TOW Funds: 

CopApp 13X1 +30 
LA Mun 10X4 +.14 
TototRet 9J3 +X9 
USGv 10X3 +.12 
Trademarii Funds 
Equftynx 10X0 +32 
Gav1lna>ru937 +.12 
KYMunruc9Xl +.11 
SIGavrnx 9X0 +X4 
Transamericu: 


DepSsmM.!9£Lg- 


Divers n 12034 ■ .... 
Ebas 202X4 + 4.14' 
EkFd 244X1 i-S JB 
FdEx 142X3+100 
SCFM 124X9 + 1X8 
MBDB8 GfMfe : 
AdmrTn 9X4 >.U 
AdmLTn 9.70 
AdmSTn 9X1+36 
AssetA n 13.95 - 32 
Convtn 1L05.+.I7 
Eqlncn IJjOO ‘ 3ft 
BiPtarw 04377 +39 
Morgan rrlTXJ +39 
Prmcpn 18X1 +X6 
Quanfn 15X4 +37 
STAR n 1339 +33 - 
Trtorin 32X0 +XS - 
TrUS 29X4- +X4 
STTsrvn 1004 +X6 
STFedn 9X9 +JS7 
STCorpn 10X6 +X7 
rrrsryn 10x5 +.13 
GNMAn 9X0 .+.12 
rTCorp ll 935 +.14 
LTTsryn 9X2 *.16 
LTCorpn 8XB +.14 
HYCaron 7X0 +X3 
Prefdn 8X3 ‘JOB 
idxTcdBn 9X3 +.12 
IdxSTBn 9.79 +X7. 
tdxlTBn 9X2 +.13 
IdxBal 10X2 +.19 
IdrfOOn 42.90*1X6 
IndhEkf ll 18X8 ‘31’ 
IdxTot n 1134 +36 
IdxGron 9X4 +33 
MxVain 11X7 *30 
IdxSrnC 1S37 +.17 
idxEurn 12.15 +.16 
UxPacn 11X4 +.14 
Idxlnstn 43J0-+IJW 
AftuHTYd nlCL37 +.11 
MurtfMn <297 +.12 
MuLldn 10X4 +JM 
MuLongniOX4 +.13 
Mutnlan 11.94 +.15 
ABunShtn 15X7 +X3 
CAtaslTniaBl +.10 
CAinsLTniaxft +.15 
FLtosn 10J4 +.13 
11.14 +.14 
10XS ‘34 
11X5 +.12 
10X2 +.14 
.12 
X3 


NJ Iran 
NYlnsn 
OHInsn 
PAtasn 
SPEargr 1539 
SPGokJr 12X9 


SPHlttir 33X9 +37 
SP5ervr 2233 +X7 
SPTechr 17X4 +34 
SPUIR 10X1 +38 
LiSGron 14X5 +X2 
IntlGr 13J2 +.13 
Welbfvn 1832 +35 
WMItnn 20.00 +.40 
wndsrn U.15 +34 
Wndsll 1698 +33 
Venture Advixorv 
IncPI - - 4.99 +J01 
Munira 9.18 +X4 
NYVen 12.00 +xi 
RPFBt 405 +414 
RPFGPf 14X4 +31 


11X1 +33 
1472 + 


JB 


PPFCV 
Vcturr Funds: 

AggrGr 9X4 +X3 
GorpBd 936 +.12 


%s% WiS 


9J9 +JR 

i iuni law + 4i2 

NYTxF 1232 +.11 

n 9.43 +4M 

IsnGrtnc 104)9 
isnNYTF 9X2 - 

^BauT^ioJi '* J2 
Bandpn 10X7 +.14 


as 

. CopGrBt 314)7 +38 
Eoudvpnl2JB +32 
Govtnc 11.10 +.16 
Grtnc 29X0 +X6 
GWWSftp 15.17 +31 


29 Jl +X6 


kMEqA 1231 +.17 


11.29 4 .14 
STBdp 9.99 +4)4 
TFlncm 11X4 +.17 
Vokimel 14X5 +.16 
VoywewFds: 

AZlns 10X9 +.16 
CO TF 1035 +.15 
FLlnsd 1110 +.M 
GroSlkP 17X3 *35 
lATf 932 +34 
MNtas 10.18 +4U 


MimM 

MlnnTF 

Moira 

NoflTF 

NO TF 

USGv 


10J3 +4» 
11.95 +4J7 
9X3 +.15 


948 ‘.17 
1033 +.1T 
104)0 +.18 


AtSGvA 9X3 +4Q 
BKMpt 11X7 +.15 
CapGr p 11X4 +XB 
CATFB 10X5 +.15 
EmGAp 24X1 +JB 
EmGBt 2398 +37 
11.13 +30 
11.15 +3& 
14X2 +.19 
9.15 +J09 
CATFAp 10415 4.15 
GvIntTr 7X5 +.10 
777 +.1B 
7X5 +X1 
938 +J09 
2118 +4» 
8X1 +X6 

iai2 +.16 


GrtnAp 

GrtnBt 

NatRst 

Gvlnct 


GIOpBi 

GvScfll 

GrJnBt 

HTIncBI 


CHRISTINA 

* LONDCN ■ ESC :.?T ■ 5ERV1>^ - 
* ? e l 0 ~ = 4 - ’ :e9’- 


l?Xft - J7 INDTvFr Im 9.43 - OI | 

MuWVAplI.53 -.11 [NWNLNorthitaw 
MuBdB 10.69 ,.M, H.YIdA 6.78 .. | 

TolRB! 12X8 - JO IncGrA 9*1 +JI 


JA 1 MulliA 4.64 -Jl 


TOKYO ** ' ESCORT SSTVICE 
Vavw feat ;rT* >v+erivd 
Tel- 103) 343+45*1 


IA ! NYL InstR Fds: 

13X7 


A TOUCH Of CLASS 

• '?CGR7 * Star: 

ifL iCf-C'Ct.-'v 1 -.-5? 


l “KMGHTSBRlDCt ESCORTS" 
••••fw* *:»i ICS"” 

Tri ?< 2 J 47 A. : .rd«^ 5 


IN LUXEMBOURG 


It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free: 

0 800 


2703 


MASK FOR MB< NEW YO*h 

EfC! ?+><+ 

Tel :!2 34t‘~Oj 


' ZURICH * CAROLINE 

Exo-: Sr 
T+! jT yiic 


; woEaBI 16X4 

WcGvS UXO , _ 

! WoGrB 1431 +.19: EAFE 

l W0TM6 I0J? - .17 1 Bona 

I Muir® 1 BXa -.07] filft 

IMIM Funds , I tnd.Bd 

; Bdlnc n 911 + 11 j IrKfaEO 
i siklncn IttlO -J7i MultA 
SikGnvfi 10.69 +.J8| STBd 
1 sikAon 143J -36 Vot&a 
j Mi ML 1C Fund*: 'NtHM ' ^ 

AvJAII UJ? ■ 22 NahoraFund: 
F.dlncm 9.*3 -29 Ad.PII-o * 
invl 16X6 J JS 

: MtgSees 9 77 -01 ! 

MMPrGin 9C - 19 I 

;MMP*lritn 9X9 +.121 — - - 

MSBFdn lfcS4 - J3 ■ CPGrtoP 11.05 

- DivIN t THUS 


STBdl 9.72 -JOS 
SmCtw\75134» • .10 
SmCaoVI 13.09 -.09 
Value, 1 1.S2 - JJ 
. values 11X1 ‘34 
iPRARtlvn 9X7 ♦ .19 
.15 'PacrticUS 9.06 ‘.17 
9.*7 -.13 IPocificGrth 9b8 >.,8 

1199 - IS , PodHc Koriznn.- 
10.70 -.U | AgGrp 73.73 
CATFp 
Caplnco 
CoroBd 
USGv 


13 64 
1 1 .4-1 
1025 
12.56 


17.47 - JJ | Paohca Fds: 


-.47 
7.13 >.09 
U.,9 -.19 
I5JJ +.17 
*X4 -.10 


AdiRITAn 9.71 
BCIIN I 10X1 
BoTTAn 10XJ 
CcGTbn 11.10 


as 


.03 

-32 


loan 
II. S3 
laxu 


.'.'3 


0RB4TAL ESCORT SERVICE 
■OK+jN 

^ifASE FHQtg r- ui« 


WftAN - ELITE ***' 

FSCOfT 5 T?avR SHVi'F 
Tri r - : 40’ ’+ r 


[MaekemfeGn* I 

• AdIGvAP 9.73 ‘ in 1 
. AmerFdR 12.14 ■ 32 

■ CAMUPP 9.9B +.10 1 
I Canada iax? -.10. 

• Fiiincp 9.65 ; 

I Gfebd »2-« *-30i 

LJdMuD '0.H 


■ JOB 


■ I I 

DivlTAn 10.05 -.11 
EmGTA lOoO -.17 ' 
EatnciNi 11 34 
EqtolA Ij JS 
EnlnTA 1IJ7 
ElnuTA *.8S 
FlainlM 10 14 


Pre r jil 
Balance 
<2A TF 

EaVal l?J3 + 73 
Covinco ’.74 ‘J» 

STCAn 9.96 -.04 
23 ' Paine Webber: 

->'.E5o I1JU - IS 
ATLAo 15 36 * X5 | PranroVl 
Blue A p UXI 
CalTA a in ’9 
Copaap 11X6 
CmTcA B.73 
DvGrAp I960 


SpecGr 11.71 -30 RvtbNava 10.11 +J6 
Sprain 10X7 -X9 Rvt*.URS«ft28 — .25, SaEqBl 
T^Freen «JI + l? SBCvVJdln 9.&4 -.02/ SlrlnBI 
TjFrHYnll.71 +X» (SBCWldGr 1637 -Jl ; TolGBl 
TFlnoln ia» +.11 iSBSFFandK 1 TxExB> 

TjFrSI n 5J5 - 02 I COPGr n 7.44 -JO' UHIBI 

US [nt S.14 -JJ4] CanvrtBln)1X2 +.15 j WlncBt .... _ 

Hi 1 ^ 0 ,2-^ * •« SBSFn 15JB * J’ , SmahBrnvShrsa Fds: 

VATFn 10X7 -.12 |SEI Funds: I PmRel n 9X0 +.13 

PrmryTn 11.14 +23 '■ Bolancp 11.73 -Jb Prtniip 7X9 +.14 

Band no 10X1 +.22 Pnnllip 7.H3 +.14 

Bdtndxa 9.’5 +.1? SmBrShOta 9.9B *4)4 

CapGr n 11J5 -39 SmBrShGf 9.90 +X5 

CorpDIn pnl.97 -iSaGenFendK 
GNMA p 9X0 +.15 Gold 11.17 +X1 

lnlrmdBd p9.’5 -.16, mini 23 XB - JJ 

SmGvnp 9.80 - JS5 1 Ovseas 11X0 +.13 J lTTE 

!"!£!'" *y*=» - M SratatyRmih: M«S 

IntMn d 10J4 +. 10| Balance x 9X1 +.14 “ 

tohxvmp 9« -.a?. Dvrotasi 12.11 +33 

J?". D !9*S 'XS; GrStk 9X8 - JB 

|°, l " < i"P * -'4 1 IntlGr 12X3 + JJ4 

Eqlndx no 15.36 +.J7; mmiincK *X1 -X5 

wlvv-n 1?™ tnvO'Bd* 9.42 +X7 

MidCGO 11.09 -J3l Ltd Inx 10.06 +.04 


•* LONDON ** CARIBBEAN 

LrrA," 5 H-orhr.jw ‘yr.i 
O'! ttiH’’.;,+ . : . T + 4v.: f . ( „ 


i N>'Munp 967 - JP» ! GAlTAn WJ5 

; NalMup 9.69 -.10 GvITAn ’.w 

I NAmerp tx 7 -.091 

; Modienric Ivy: 

OwioAl 9X8 - JS 

InilB 27X3 -JS, 

! IvVEpA 1645 *.18 


>:a 1IN I 9 09 
InMuTAn 9.72 
intEflin t i?Ji 
Ir.iEaTAni; 31 
MuBfA n 10.06 


Ia ; 

• -'7 ; 

• t; 

- J4 ; 

• 10 
'.1?: 

.13. 

• IJ ' 
•.W | 

• is! 

. ia . 
-.1?! 


PmopIPresv: 

DivActl I3JB *39 
GflvtFrt 9J3 -.12 
ln-,TE« 9.78 ‘.,5 

5P lOOP, !4_B2 -.40 

TEPrt 8L79 - .13 
PreiMBS 9X3 +.17 
Prin ax- Funds: 

BIChp 11 JS ‘34 
Bond 10X7 -.19 I 
CapAct 19 93 ‘J/> 

EinpGr 74.06 - JB 
Govt 10 74 - 33 
Growth 3908 - Xft 1 
Monogea I7J7 *.|9 [ 

TEBd 11X9 -.17 1 
Utilities 9.S2 ‘30/ 

World 7.30 ‘.13: 

I0J3 **.04 1 

■28 PJFF+dlnc n9.49 - .08 ! 5IF¥ Trust 4.10 -.li 
.14 ! PIFIntMU ta 10 7* -.11 'SIT Funds. 

.70 1 Prav Inv Couraet | Gminc 74.20 - M j 


GvSecp 
HTfUSB 
HYTFt 
InsIGv 
litvQAp 

TFBdA ..... .. 

TFBdBt 10.12 +.14 
Trust For end Uk 
GSP 9X3 +4)3 
MSP 9X9 +JS 
TMP1994 9X7 +415 
TFEB97 9X3 ‘Xft 
TumerGE nl2X5 +36 
TweedvGV 12X5 +4)6 
2SUI Oratory: 

Bdtrrvn 15XB +X1 
Gtfln 16.12 +31 
Gnwmn 22X4 +X7 
Hertnvn 10.11 +4)8 
lnttEmGrn5X3 +J2 
inffEqn 775 +X5 
LTBandn 93ft +.11 
Sdecfn 37.17 +30 
TicESTn 9.98 +X2 
TxElrt n 10J1 +J» 
TvELTn 1114 +.12 
Lfflran 204)9 +34 
USGvShT r,9J8 +JH 
Vafuun M0 +40 
\Astan 935 +.15 
USLorgeSHc n5X3 +.10 
USAAOraUP: 

_ AosvGlh nlXlft +X2 

2*J3 + J3 1 Balanced n)2Jl +.14 
9X6 +.11 ! CA Bd n 104)9 +.15 
Comstn 2339 ‘Jft 
GNMA 9X5 *J* 
Gold n 8X0 +X7 
GrfUncn 1034 +34 
Grwtnn 1639 +SS7 
IncSHcn 13X1 ‘JB 
Incoman 11X9 +30 
win 14X8 +36 
NYBdn 10X4 +.15 
SMTBndn 9.76 +X4 
TxFIn 9X6 +.17 
TxEITn 12X1 +.17 
TxELTn 1112 +.16 
TxEShn 10X8 ‘414 
VA Bd 10X8 ‘.11 

WkJGrn 12J6 * JJ 
UST Master: 

Asia 10X5 ‘30 
EtyLife 8x1 +.13 
EmgAmr X99 +J1 
EquBy 19.19 - J9 
IncGro 12413 +33 
intMadin 4X2 +.09- 
InrtFd 1034 +.17 
IntTE 8X4 +XB 
8.93 +.17 
BJO +.12 
NY TE 831 +X8 

PanEuro 033 -X4 
STGvSec 6.92+413 
STTaxEx 7.00 +X2 
(Mud Funds 
Accunultiv 7.16 +.13 
Bonax 5.94 +JM 


9X4 -30 
11 J 8 -.02 
InvGdBI 11X4 +35 
AftgGvB In 12.42 +.13 
MgMuBl 15X7 *32 
NJMuBI 12x3 +.17 
MyMuBt 14X8 ‘ J2 
PrMIBr 20.12 +X7, 
PrmTRB 115X9 +36 I 
Sectrfit 14X4 —.10 | 
17.83 -X0 
14X6 +35 
11X9 +X3 
1732 - JO 
13.33 tJ? 
6X1 +01 


WKkMMeed; 

T0«rf 12.11 +36 
Growth 13X9 +.12 
LftfTerm 9J6. +4)9 
Mum 10.18 +.75 
Gtabd 9X4 ‘ .09 
WoBSt 7.19 t.l? 
Wntwgnacw 
Grtnc n 1174 +X9 
CopApp n 13X6 +.23 
ErnGHtn 2036 +XS 
Futfflncn 9J5 +JC 
GtobiFkdnlOXS +.12 
IntEgun 19J0 +X2 
tro^qn .15X0 + J4 
InlGvtn 9X8 +JB 
NY Muni al 031 +4» 
wasaWiAgittsfl +X5 
Weta Peck Green 
DMnc 12X5 +X1 
Govt 9.47 +j)t 
Grtnc 2273 +J| 
Gwth T05J0 + X14 
OuantEqn 5X4 +.n 
Tudor n 21.19 +X8 
WeitzPVal n 9X9 +.11 
WeBzValn 15X9 +.is 


AZTFj, 


10.45 +418 
14X3 +.10 
LT'Bdx 9X1 +.12 
ModVal 12X6 +X0 
ORTE* T6X9 +.15 
Bdlnton 1734 +35- 
BasVUn 2073 +J4 
Eakil n 10X0 +37 
GNMAI tVil5J8 +.15 
krtBdlnx 1005 +X7 
MtOCOinlSXa +37 
5TGovH 15X4 +X3 


9oUlwRfpl7S7 +3| 


GNMARWL36 
A41dtBRfpl4X0 +37 
STGavtR 9533 +4C 
WetfweodFUadsc 
BoHnsr 74B +.17 


Eqtosr 

totem 

BotSvc- 

EaSvc 

Int&Gv 


5X4 +.16 
9J1 +.10 
7X5 +.17 
533 -.17 
931 +.10 


WJSohiBknr: 

Growth n 9X5 + 35 
income j, HUB +J0* 
InflGtfm 1X36 +36 


PtemSQP 1066 +32 
PATxFr . WX5. +419 
Quafity IBM +.10 
USGav 10.19 +X0 

WW tawFdqtB 
WioFl tn 935 +.11 
WlnGrtn-lOH 
WtoMTP Y3T +X9 
WinGim UX2 -31 
WinAGto 15X4 +06 

Woodward f*: 

Balance 936 +.13 


Brad 
Eatdx . 
GrVal 
totBd 
Intms 
Ml Mun 
MunBd 
Onoort 


9J1 +.12 
10« +26 
11.19 +30 
9X7 +.12 
10X8 +.75 
9.97 +.15 
10X8 +.17 
1199 — X5 


OtGrp 

Otlne 

QBaC 


9.99 - 

11X5 +J0 
10.16. +.66 
1038 +.16 


TfiWfe *s 

VaatEP .14.91 +JJ1 
VartWVnll^'* jffl 
MrMitE«iFd& • 
BetoLux nlQXf +.16 
Dufehn MJ4 +J1 
HongKongKL5T +61 
Japan n 1JT3 +J* 
Nonfcn ^035 +.W 
SoaniShP JXf +34 
Swto n 9X9 + J3 


WrteM 

CUrin 

GvObn 

toBJOl 

JrBICh 


MU3 +.18 
12.99 -35 
13X0 riV 

1139. 


SMSSPStttw -.n comine 2094 +xa! Itofldniaa +.10 


SmCrapnlljg -J6 
Value np 10X7 - IB 
Coda no 15J2 - 4; 


07/ 

■3*1 


EurGr A r 9.9’ -.11 


EnavGt I 10X5 -25 
InsiGrth 10 94 >26 


OHTFy 10.49 -.10 

SolGrSik 8.94 — xi , 
SplVatSf 10.14 -.13 1 
Sttlru ft.84 -34: 
USGottn rtaxft - .10 i 
V01SI+ 9.91 -34 1 


Growth n ll.ftjj _.oi , SauuShn 14.49 -.12 
toll 15X9 + 33 , SAM SC 1143 + .IS j 


GtEnAf 

G+lliAp 

GIG, a D 
GrthAp 
H.lnA c 
Invjb u« 


1 1 


/XHInAp 10.16 -.M 


9.9t —.11 ■ SrnCaoGr 11.40 -.30 | TaxFnwn 9 ’2 - X» I SAM vX| „ ts? 

1X5 ■ .08 I PnidSoc nn 6 74 -.02 1 USGav 10 39 - cE ■ SOTrOtonBrfw'ftl ^ 
OJ0 -.111 Pradrafial Funds, 'STlOrasic •ISTroSS , S?J 1& 

772 • «: ApnGrrn 9® ■ J2 I SoPtLlk ^ ^ 1+ 1 

1X3 -.17 1 BalTi n ’ 13 - Jl SoPicash 

9X4 -.07, CopGrlp I, .88 - J’ . StaoeS&ta ^ * 

9.33 -.07' CnoGrT HE? - J? . AsetAfe 1 7 M - 

0.05 -.12 InGBT ’.’ft - n CA^to taXS t 


10 J8 

I0ft5 . 
19.30 - JO! 
BJ/ -.02 
101ft -12 


NichA 
H'CW) 
Ad, At 
BlacSGv 
CAinAp 


GOkCvf 934 -X8 
GvfSee S.17 +4M 
Hrlncfl 44)7 +X1 
Hwhlncx 8.98 -M 
Inaime 2471 *.72 
inJIGtti ’X5 »J9 
MumaH* 7.03 -XS 
MunHJ 518 -46 
NwCatl 10X2 +X8 
Rtolre 7X7 +.18 
ScTech 14X2 -72 
vangwid 7.19 -33, 
unhed Serview.- 
AHAmn 2037 -X3 | 
Euran 4X9 -.07 | 
GtoRscn 6.10 + 18i 


QutCar .am + 3 ». 

SetBOin TJ 2 +.W 
TaiRetn IUB 
YaddntonpJXl +.13 
YamCtao 9-13 ’•?* 
ZwrtgPuB*.; ■ 

StratA 029 +.15 
ZSApcA 143B +X1 
ZSMAA12W +.W 
ZSGvAP 9.98 +^ 
ZSPAP IIS +J3 
Sir atC 1239 +.M 
ZSApaC .U.1* 'XJ 
ZSMAC 1J« *-W . 
ZSGvC 9.96 +«. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. MAY 23. 1994 


Amount 


Tennt 


# ». 

— "TO 

Floating R«t« Notes 

Trust 

$900 

2001 

0.25 

99.5063 

— 

Over 1 -month Libor. Marimm coupon 12%- Average ife&09 
rears. Fra not dndened (Merrill Lynch tnr'L| 

Bayerische 
Umdesbank fur 
Aufbaufinanzierung 

Dm 200 

1999 

0.05 

100 

— 

Surfchonbj 

DG Bode 

DM250 

1999 

0.05 

100 

— 

Over 6- month fibor. Neneafabie. Feel 070V (DC Bonk.) 

Fbted-Coupons 







General Electric 
Capital Corp. 

5250 

1997 

6’A 

1 0Q-B87 

100 JO Rcnfforad at 99.70. Noncofabk. Fcca 1H%- (Goldman Sochi 
ta'J.) 

General Bedric 
Capitol Corp. 

$250 

1999 

m 

99 a 9 

— 

NoncaHabia. Fem 075% Denonwnotiom SI 0.000. (Lehman 
Brother (nfl) 

Grand Metropolitan 
Investment 

5400 

1999 

7 

100.294 

99 JO 

1 ReofJoreci af 98744. Noncaflable. Fees 1 (GoJdmon Sarin 

Inr1.| 

Japan finance Corp. 
for Municipal 
Enterprises 

$300 

2004 

7V, 

99.85 

100m NmeallaUa Fm 0.225V pBJ htl.) 

SBC Finance 

$250 

1997 

6tt 

100.887 

100.60 Hoofiered m 9970. NtancdBofab. Fms 1WL |Swu Bonk 
CmpJ 

Credit Local de 

France 

£150 

2004 

8% 

99.82 

— 

Noncoitablfl. Feel 0.325%. (Faribai Cnpiwl Markets.) 

Eurofima 

FF 1,000 

2004 

6 K 

9976 

— 

Noncalable. Fees 0725%. (OfcdW Commercial de France) 

Finland 

FF 6,000 

2004 

7 

98408 

_ 

Noncalobfe. Fees 0725%. (Paribas Capital Markets.) 

Span 

FF 6,000 

2001 

W> 

98-69 

99.50 

NancaUablo. Fees 030%. (06d4 LyanncML] 

Bonk of Austria 

m 150,000 

2004 

954 

101 

99.40 

Convertible in 1999 into a floawg-rase note paying 0,10 over 
bmanlti Lbor. Fees 2%. (Banco Canmerdole Itabona.) 

Bar days Bank 

nx 150,000 

2004 

920 

101.05 

98.60 

Convertible m 1998 into a floating-rote note paying 0.40 over 
6-month Libor. Fees 2%. [Banco d Rama.) 

Eurofima 

m. 300,000 

2004 

914 

101 Vt 

99.40 

Calloble at par from 2001 . Fees 1ft%. (btitiito Banoario San 
ftsob i Tonno.) 

European Investment 
Bank 

m 200,000 

2004 

95% 

100.325 

99 JO 

CaBable al par m 1999. Fangpble with outsiandng awe. 
robing KCat to 500 biikon be. Fees 1 SWL (Banco d Rama) 

MeesPierson 

df 250 

1999 

616 

100% 

10Q.OO 

NoncoBobb. Fees IV [MeesPierson.) 

SNS Group 

Df 250 

2001 


9916 

98 jo 

Reoffered or 98.80. Noncoflable. Fees 1%. (SNS Bade] 

Credit Local de 

France 

ECU 65 

1998 

6 

98.23 

— 

Noncalabie. Fungdsle with outstanding issue, raising total 
OTOuni to 300 mil ion Ecus. Fees 0.20%. [Swiss Bank CorpJ 

General Electric 
Capital Corp. 

ECU 100 

1999 

614 

97.90 

99.80 

Noncalable. Fungible with outstanding issue, raising total 
amount to 200 mAon Ecus. Fees 0.25V (Crbdt Commercial 
da France) 

De Nationale 

Invested ngs Bank 

v 20,000 

2002 

4 

100.20 

— 

NoncaHable. Fees 0J0%. Denominations 10 ndtion yen. (Nk- 
ko Europe.) 

LB Rheinland Pfalz 

Y.15,000 

1997 

3.10 

100 

— 

NoncaDable. Fees 0.1875%, Denaminatiani 100 mBon yen. 
[1EU tm'L) 

Mitsui & Company 

YlOJMO 

1999 

4 

101% 

— 

NanedbiUe private placement. Fees not dsdosed. Denomina- 
tions 100 million yen. [Sumitomo F nance lntl) 

SBAB 

Y 10,000 

1997 

3 

10014 

— 

Noncalable. Fees 0.1875%. Denominations 10 mdion yen. 
(Morgan Stanley Inti] 

Sweden 

Y 80,000 

1999 

zero 

8345 

— 

NoncaHabte. Fees 0.45V (Darivo Europe.) 

Swedish Export Credit 

YlO^XX) 

1997 

270 

100 

— 

Interest wi# be 270% until May 1995, when issue is adloble at 
par, and 3J5% thereafter. Fees not dsdosed. (Morgan 
Stanley Int'l.) 

Swedish Export Credit 

Y 35,000 

1997 

3K 

99.98 

— 

NoncaUable. Fees 0.1875V [LTCB Inti) 

Treasury Corp. of 
Victoria 

y 35,000 

1997 

3 

100 

— 

Semionnuafly. Noncalabie Fees 0.1875%. Denominahorw 10 
nation yen. (Namao tnt'L) 

Urban Mortgage 

Bank of Sweden 

v 20.000 

1996 

250 

100.20 

— 

Noncalable Fees OJOV Increased From IS bilion yen. 
(Marrfl Lynch lnt\) 

WestlB finance 

Y 20,000 

2001 

4 

100.175 

— 

Noncalable. Fees 030%. (Sanwa Inti) 

Equlty-Unlrad 

United . 
Mkroefedranics 

$160 

2004 

open 

100 

— 

Coupon indcated at 1 W to 1 % V NoncaUable- Convertible at 
an expected 5 to 10% premium. Fees 2)4%. Terms to be set 
May 23. (Bond ays de Zoeto Wedd.) 

Bank of Austria 

.pV.-llhA" ' . 

DM250 

■■j ■ '■ 

2001 

354 

i * Xj • 

10016 


NoncaHabte. Bach lJSOO-sncirtc note with six warrants exertis- 
ble until 1999 into company's shares at 1,020 Austrian sd* 
Bngs per share and at 7.0345 schWngt per mall. Fees ZMV 
(Morgan Stanley.) 


MARK: Questions Unger Over U.S. and German Rates 


CootinoedfromPafic9 ’ 
can be confident that the yea's ap- 
preciation is completed and that 
it's safe to buy U.S. assets. 

Paul Gberttow, a London-based 
analyst at Union Bank of Switzer- 
land, predicted Washington would 
intervene in the foreign-exchange 
market this week in an effort to 
buoy the bond market and. “to pre- 
vent the decay of the dollar from 
becom in g a crisis of confidence.** 

Mr. cEertkow insisted that w the 
pressure on the dollar is the result 
of short-term speculative positions 
of a technical character, not the 
product of asset-allocation deri- 
sions by. institutional investors in 
tight of change in economic funda- 
mentals.'* 

But Neil MacKinnon, a London- 
based analyst for Citibank, was less 
sanguine. He said he saw heavy 


doHar-seOing by U3. funds as in- 
vestors begin “to re-rate the pros- 
pects for the German economy and 
the Deutsche mark.” But he agreed 
with Mr. Chertkow that “interven- 
tion could be forthcoming.” 

As the doHar-yen rate is key to 
what the Jraanese do. the relative 
stability erf the rate last week was a 
striking contrast to the dollar’s 
weakness against the mart Part of 
that was probably due to the Bank 
of Japan, winch is estimated to 
have spent about $80 billion on 
intervention so far tins year. 

But the movement of the yen- 
mark rate appeared to indicate that 
Japanese investors were buying 
dollars in Tokyo —helping to sta- 
bilize that rate — and selling them 
for marks in Frankfurt 

It is unclear what they are doing 
with the purchased marics. Short- 


term German interest rates provide 
a hefty differential of three per- 
centage points annually over levels 
in Japan. 

Geariy, the Japanese are also 
buying yen Eurobonds, which pro- 
vide! investors with a substantial 
pick-up in yields over domestic 
government paper and provide is- 
suers with floating-rate funding 
costs about 20 basis points below 
dollar interbank offered rales. 


Issuance of Euroyen has been 
running at the equivalent of about 
$2 trillion a week this month. 


Although issuing activity picked 
np in most other Eurobond sectors 
last week, bankers reported that 
demand was barely keeping pace, 
as investors are not yet convinced 
that a sustained rally in prices is in 
the offing. 


Markets Caught in U.K. Crossfire 


Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s top eco- 
nomic policymakers are engaged in 
an unprecedented war of words 

over the future directi on of interest 
rates, yndmg shivers through Lon- 
don financial markets. 

The diancdJor of the Exchequer, 
Kenneth Clarke, and foe SPvajwr 
of the Bank of Endand, Eddie 
George, have tried to play down the 

rift, but economists say the two are 

heading for a showdown ovct who 
runs the British economy. 

Reduced to its amplest toms, 
their dispute is that Mr. Clarke 
wants to cut interest rates, while 
Mr. George is determined not to. 
^Eddie George is taking issue 

with the cfcmcdlw fflahta- 
' “ said John Sieppeia, 


file way,’ 


duff economic « * ~T~uxj„ 


t aijiuft . i 

oppojeyou on 
Mr; dark* who hasnevcrhich 

dm his ambition to smsmi 
Minister John 8 ^ 

"»ss«Ss- 

sassssasss' 

15 years. 

Despite his own pt<mn *g 

fEd gLeraie a vote-whming “fed- 
apod faibtor." ■ 

Mr George, whose nickname of 
•4E*3br is buaraimmd 
k*es that be -has opposed every 

work at the central bank m 
Eta no opponm^y £ M 
weeks to speU ontfas fe«r™ a 

rate cut would spmk inflation- 

ai -iw- nMwnaiL. economists say 
^SSnns to .be winning the 

^SSM^ Ae - lh<5rsa,, * ,V 


pears mifikely to be able to cut 
rates soon without risking the Trea- 
sury’s credibility. 

Financial markets already have 
the jitters. The pound is vulnerable 
to every nuance in Mr. Clarke’s or 
Mr. George’s comments, and while 
government baud markets have 
f alien worldwide this year, prices in 
Britain have fallen far more than 
elsewhere. 

There is more at stake than the 
level of interest rates needed to 
sustain recovery. The argument is 
essentially about power. 

The constitutional position is 
dear. The Treasury decides on the 
levd of interest rates, and the bank 
gives advice and carries out the 
Treasury’s instructions. 

' But in reality, in the year of its 
300th anniversary, the Bank of 
England has more influence than at 
any time sjneeits nationalization in 
1946- 

“ Over the past few mouths, the 
Treasury has sought to counter al- 
legations that it manipulates inter- 
est rates ftv political gain and has 
yielded a number of important 
powers to the bank. 

While Mr. Gaike has die ' final 
say on interest rales, the bank can 
now dedde^oo the tuning of a 
move. In-addition, its quarterly re- 
port on the outlook for inflation is 
no longer subject to review by 
Treasury officials. 

hi April, the. Treasury started to 
publish minutes of monthly meet- 
ings at' whiefr -Mr. -Clarice and Mr. 
George review rates. 

Mr. Cfankehas declined to gram 
the' Bank of England full indepen- 
dence, a much-coveted status held 
by its German counterpart, the 
Bundesbank. But economists say 
the bank is no w flexing its muscles 
and out. to prove.it is better quali- 
fied to set interest rates than the 
Treasury. 

Friction betwam governors of 


the Bank of England and Britain’s 
political leaders is not new. Marga- 
ret Thatcher, when she was prime 
minister, clashed with Mr. 
George’s two predecessors, Lord 
Richardson and Robin Leigh-Pem- 
bextoa. in the 1980s. 

The Garke- George dispute, 
while more good-natured and 
based on mutual respect, has seen a 
series of tit-for-lat exchanges: 

• April 13: The first batch of 
minutes from their meetings con- 
firmed what markets had suspect- 
ed. A cut in interest rates is Feb- 
ruary was a classic compromise. 
Mr. Garke wanted half a point, 
Mr. George wanted no cut, so Mr. 
Garke ordered a quarter-point 
cut. “1 did not lose the argument, I 
lost the derision,” Mr. George 
said later. 



re 


Buy Beans, Not Bonds, Say the Bears 


• May 10: The bank’s inflation 
report pointedly stated that the fall 
in (he government bond market 
“suggested revised perceptions of 
the authorities’ commitment to 
monetary stability." 

• May 17: Mr. Garke protested 
in a speech that “Eddie George 
and I share the same aim of tow 
inflation and sound money.” But 
minutes later he said: “Central 
bank governors always advise cau- 
tion. So far they have been overes- 
timating inflation during my 
chancellorship for as long as I 
have been in office." 


• May IS: The next minui#^ 
showed Mr. George ready to con- 
template a rate cut only if there was 
“hard evidence" of a slowdown in 
the economy. ML Clarice said wan- 
ing fra- “cast-iron evidence* could 
risk too long a delay. 

The Treasury has-shown no sign 
it is ready to grant the bank full 
independence;. But it is dear where 
the markets’ sympathies lie. 
“George is winning the argument,” 
Mr. Shepperd said. 


Srw York Timet Senne 

NEW YORK — Has the Fed finally gotten 
through to the bond market? 

After the Federal Reserve Board's fourth 
interest rate increase in four months, designed 
to slow growth before it triggers a new outburst 
of inflation, the bond market finally rallied a 
bit last week; bringing down long-term in term 
rates and at least momentarily boosting the 
value of bonds across the board. 

For a while it seemed that nothing short of 
grinding the entire U.S. economy to a halt 
would bond traders that inflation, 

which is still no where to be seen, was not going 
to roar down Wall Street. 

All of this left some wondering; Is what the 
bond market really needs a psychiatrist? Is it 
Freud, not Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan, 
who holds the key to lower interest rates? 

Despite the bond market's settling down a bit 
last week, there was still gloom and doom 
abounding on the trading floors. Having pock- 
eted the Fed's latest move, traders worried 
aloud about the continuing weak dollar, which 
was keeping a lot of foreign money from com- 
ing into the bond markets. 

Traders were also warning that if the next 
round of employment statistics, due out in two 
weeks, were too robust, and if the dollar contin- 
ued to slide, the drumbeat for more rate in- 
creases by the Fed would begin again on Wall 
Street 


But something else is going on here besides 
Econ 101. Henry Kaufman, the veteran market 
analyst, thinks that the nervousness, and the 
seeming gap between the performance of the 
economy and the behavior of credit markets 
today, has to do in pan with structural changes 
that have made financial institutions and mar- 
kets much more oriented toward near- term de- 
velopments. much more able and willing to 
trade on a whim or a worry, and much more 
easily buffeted by economic and noneconomic 
winds of change. 

He pointed to the fact that there are now 
many more marketable credit instruments 
available for trade and many huge institutional 
groups that have to record their performance 

each day — meaning that if they buy a bond in 

the morning and it loses value during the after- 
noon, they have to acknowledge that unrealized 
loss in their portfolio statements, giving them a 
strong incentive to quickly unload losers. 

Add to that, said Mr. Kaufman, the number 
of new high-octane portfolio managers operat- 
ing with huge leveraged positions, a global 
market place that allows managers to move 
funds at breakneck speed in search of the 
highest yields, and CNN issuing good news and 
bad every 30 minutes, and you have a long-term 
prescription for short-term jitters. 

If all that doesn't make you nervous, cast a 
glance over at the Commodi ty Research Bureau 


index, which has been edging steadily higher 
since the first of the year, as the price of many 
base metals, soybeans, cocoa and coffee have 
all marched upward, due to spot shortages and 
increasing demand. 

For many bond traders, the index is a leading 
indicator of inflation and a favorite source of 
anxiety when they run out of other dungs. 
Which brings us to the real lesson of die week: 
buy beans, not bonds. 


Toward die end of last w ed; the market was 
f reused m particular on the dollar’s sharp drop 
against the Deutsche mark amid signs dint die 
Bundesbank had little intention of lowering in- 
terest rates again soon. Despite the Fed's move 
this week to push up rates by half a percentage 
point, German rates remain up to a point higher. 

The bond market has also begun to register 
concerns about big auctions of Treasury bills and 
notes this week, said James Hale, a fixed-income 
analyst Tor MMS International a Wall Street 
research and analysis firm. “One of ibe reasons 
the market is particularly nervous is its memory 
of the May 1 1 auction of 10-year notes, one of 
the worst auctions in a long lime.” said Mr. Hale. 


The price of the benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond postal a solid gain in the course of last 
week, rising to 87 9/32 on Friday from S3 10/32 
a week before. That reduced its yield to 7.31 
percent from 7.49 percent 


Mocy Gets a Respite in Takeover Battle 


By Stephanie Strom 

Nete York Times Service 

NEW YORK — R.H. Macy & 
Co. appears to have won the upper 
hand, at least temporarily, in iu 
battle to emerge from bankrupts 
protection as an independent com- 
pany — and S10 million worth of 
gift certificates may have helped 
give it the advantage. 

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Burton 
Lilian d, who is shepherding Macy 
through the proceedings, asked the 
retailer Friday to file a plan of 
reorganization as soon os possible, 
giving the company at least a brief 
respite in its efforts to fend off an 
unwanted merger with Federated 
Department Stores Inc. 

The order essentially recon- 
firmed that Macy. at least for now. 


has the exclusive right to propose a 
plan of reorganization. 

The judge made his decision af- 
ter Cyrus R. Vance, the court-ap- 
poiniai mediator in the cose, re- 
ported Thursday that his efforts to 
forge a consensus among Macy's 
creditors in support of a single plan 
had reached an impasse. 


Some creditors said the judge’s 
decision and the bondholders’ sur- 
prise allegiance gave the company 
at least some advantage over Fed- 
erated. which has been seeking a 
merger with Macy since January. 


Although Macy has failed to win 
the support of its senior creditors, it 
has won over its bondholders in the 
last two days with a package of 
goodies including stock, warrants 
and even Macy's gift certificates — 
a novel bargaining chip in bank- 
ruptcy. 

Federated has gained the alle- 
giance of Macy's senior creditors 
but failed to entice bondholders. 


But others speculated that the 
judge might be trying to pressure 
Federated, which has succeeded in 
winning the support of Macy’s in- 
fluential senior creditors, to im- 
prove its proposal enough to win 
over junior creditors. 

[Dillard Department Stores Inc. 
said Saturday it was interested in 
acquiring some of Macy's assets. 
Reuters reported from Little Rock. 
Arkansas. 


[“I can only tell you there are 
parts of Macy's we would like to 


talk about if it's ever available,” 
said William Dillard, chairman and 
chief executive, adding that the 
Macy properties most attractive to 
Dillard's were in his company's ex- 
isting market territory, primarily 
the southern United States.] 

in February. Mr. Lifland extend- 
ed to Aug. 1 the period during 
which Macy has the exclusive right 
to propose a plan of reorganiza- 
tion. “Regardless of what came out 
of the mediation process, Macy has 
exclusivity until August,'* said one 
lawyer f amili ar with the case. 

Although the new judicial order 
amply reconfirmed Macy's right to 
exclusivity, creditors were sur- 
prised because Federated's latest 
counterproposal places a higher 
value on the company. 




Fed Hawks 
Make Push 
On Rates 


By Keith Bradsher 

Sev York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Some 
of the Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem's top officials 
pressed their colleagues this 
spring to raise interest rates 
foster than the central bonk 
chose to do, according to sum- 
maries released Friday of their 
March meeting and a tele- 
phone conference call in April 

The disagreements show 
how strongly the Fed was 
committed this spring to high- 
er interest rates. Wall Street 
economists said. 

“Insofar as there’s division 
at the Fed, there are more peo- 
ple wanting a more aggressive 
stance than a less aggressive 
one,” said Marc W. Wanshd, 
an economist at J. P. Morgan. 

Two of the 10 active mem- 
ber of the in teres i-rate-policy 
panel — J. Alfred Brcaddus 
Jr., the president of the Feder- 
al Reserve Bank of Richmond, 
and Jeny L Jordan, the presi- 
dent of "the Gevdand Fed — 
dissented at a meeting of the 
Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee on March 22 from the 
decision to push up a short- 
term interest rate by a quarter 
percentage point, feeling that 
a bigger increase was needed. 

The FOMC groups the sev- 
en Fed governors and five of 
the 12 regional Fed presidents. 

The committee has raised 
rates four times this year, most 
recently by a half point on 
Tuesday. It approved in- 
creases of a quarter point on 
Feb. 4, March 22 and April 18. 

On April 18, some members 
of the committee argued unsuc- 
cessfully for raising two short- 
term interest rates that the Fed 
controls instead of just one. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE- MONDAY, MAY 23, 1994 




The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, May 23 - May 27 


A scnedub W week's economic ana 
financial M« campled far the InhMia- 
Ural HenKl Tribune by Bloomberg BuSl- 

nessN*** 

Aala- Pacific 

• May S3 Sydney Reserve Bank 01 
Australia Governor Bern* Fraaor to ad- 
dress Australian Institute ot Bankers on 
currant issues in (tie Industry. 

Hong Kens Consumer once index fig- 
ures tar Anrii. 

Hoag Kong The Hong Kong trade De- 
vdopiMnt Council and Chine's Ministry 
of Foreign Trade ft Economic Coopera- 
tion to hold a seminar entitled "Hong 
Kong '94 Chits Wde ana Economic Co- 
operawn 

Mhl Indian Prime Utastex P.v. Nara- 
dmha Rao to inaugurate tfirewMy con- 
ference and eapoaibon, India Power '84, 
which will tocus on Indie's power sector 
Earnings expected Komatsu Construc- 
tion, Toyo Constnjctkm. Daito Kogyo, 
Nippon Daneetsu. Mppan Deram She 
sets;. Nippon Chemical. Fujisawa Phar- 
maceutical. Komatsu. TEAC, Unlden 
Corp-. Kyocera. Nintendo. Niaaho iwa. 

• MqM Kong Kong Ratal sales fig- 
uras for March. 

Tokyo Japan's Finance Minister hkratnsa 
Fu|U and Berk ot Japan Governor Ya&ushi 
Mtono to speak <n annual mwtrng of the 
National Associate*) ol SWnkin Banns. 
Eamlnga expected Mitsui Mining. Toyo 
Chemical, Yamancuehi Pharmaceutical. 
Shows Chemical Industry, Toyo Tire ft 
Rubber. Nomake, Nihon Seiko, Sumitomo 
Electric, MrtsuWaW Cable. TOK Carp., Sa- 
sebo Heavy Industries. Hino Motors, swn- 
maywa Industries, SifituW Motor. several 
Japanese Are end manna insurer. 

• Hay 29 Canberra Australian new 
car registrations tor April Forecast Roe 
at A percent 

Tokyo April petroleum import figures. 
WaOngtor New Zealand merchandise 
trade data for April. 

*K*M Canberra Australian inven- 
tories and manufacturin' sates in the 
March quarter. Forecast Rises. 

Sydney Wwstpac Banking Corp. and 
Melbourne Institute to release testing 
economic indicator 

Hong Kong Government to auction two 
ptecas 01 land. A residential ana ratal wte 
In FanHng In the New Territories a finely to 
be sold tor 2.9 billion to 3£ billion Hong 
Kong dollars. 

Hong Kong Director-General of GATT 


Peier Sutherland speaks to the Horg 
Kong Du si ness community at a luncheon 
Organized by the Hong hong Trade Dove*- 
opment Courted ami General Chamber ol 

Commerce. 

Hong Kong InKmawmi Travel Expo 
Hong Kong 139*>. ihe biggest event m 
Aria tor bw swat tnausny and consum- 
ers. Through May 29 
Tokyo SWmaro Isnmata. cnarman g; 
Ihe Liberal Democratic Party s Zlst Cen- 
tury Committee, to speak on Japan-U 5. 
relations at tho Foreign Correspondents’ 
C>vb at Japan 

Eteniaps espoctad Nissan Gnomical. 
Nippon Carbtdo, Hitachi Chemical. To- 
shiba Chemical. Dwnippon Phaimaceuh- 
cri. Fup Kosan. Japan Energy Carp., ku- 
bota. Fujitec. T tehi&a. MMsuhisni Eluctoc. 
Mitsui Engineering ft Shipbuilding, Min- 
olta Camera, ma^u Japanese banka, han- 
sa Electric Power. 

• May 27 Sydney Oon Argus, manag- 
ing director dt national Austrd/3 Sank, to 
address the SecunUes Institute oi Auatrj- 
tia on tutu res prospects. 

Hong Kong Government to release Its 
first-quarter economic repan tor 1994 
and me first update or me grass domestic 
product end price forecasts lor 1994. 
Tokyo Ministry erf international Trade 
and Industry releases Apnl large scare 
readers' safes. 

Europe 

» Expects- Site wmk Brussels May 
consumer pree mdea. Forecast Do C 2 
percent in month. up 2 * percent <n year 
Copenhagen April Consumer Price In- 
dex. Forecasr. Uo 0 1 percent m month, 
up 1 7 percent m year. 

Frankfurt March trade balance Fore- 
cast A 7.0 bihion duutsche mark surplus 
in monm. Also March curran; account 
Forecast A i 0 Billion mark ceficu in 
month. 

Frankfurt April M-3 money supply Fore- 
cast Up 13 a percent tn month. 

Hebfnfcf Apuf trade balance Forecast. 
A 3.3 billion marfiKa surplus in month. 
Oslo May unemployment rata. Forecast 
At S.i percent ot population, unchanged 
from Apnl. 

Rama Apnl balance ot oa/menls. Fore- 
cast A 1 & rnllion lire deficit in month. 

• May 23 London UK. Secretary ot 
Stare lor Trade and Industry. Michael Mo- 
aelone, oriels foreign press association. 
London U.K. April balance o> trade twin 
countries outside the European Camtnu- 


nity. Forecast A deticii ol E700 million 
<Si.1 Minxi) m month 
London Expiry oi Juno t9« London Fi- 
nancial fiirures and Options Exchange 
Duno and gilt options. 

Oslo Hans Tietmovar, ine Bunoesbanr. 
Drostoem, visits Finland. 

Earnings ejected Srtnsh Airway* 
o May 24 E&nrtngs expected C>ga 
SpA, Thorn EMI. 

• May S3 Amsterdam 1993 Foreign 
Trade Statistics. 

SiusaeiE Meeting of European Union 
energy ministers. Agenda includes dis- 
mantling ot ;rate gas ana ei ectn c tly mo- 
nopolies. 

London Firsi-quanar grots domestic 
product, second estimate Forecasr Up 
0.7 percent in the quant* Unchanged 
Iron) tt* previous estimate. UP 2.6 per- 
cent in year. Unchanged trom (he previ- 
ous estimate. 

London UJf-'s Eddie George, qww/wr 
ot Ihe Bank Ot England. 30 give evidence 
to a Treasury select committee on BOE 
and the economy. 

Parte Apnl household construction 
Fcro&st Uo 0 5 oerceni <n month 
o Slay 27 Amsterdam Apnl industrial 
order position. 

Brussels May consumer price index f*9~ 
utes. 

Americas 

• May 25 New Orleans National Ca- 
ble Television Association annual con- 
vention. Began May 22. ends May 25. 



Adams Spnnp Comdex and Windows 
World trade shows display Ihe latest in 
personri computers and software trom 
leading companies. Through May 27. 


e May 24 Washington International 
Trade Minister Roy MacLaren will meat 
win U.S. officials to discuss tefewrai and 
multilateral trade 

Rte de Janeiro The government com- 
mission on sefimg state assets to deerde 
whether to kouidate w try again to self 
shipper Oompanhia de Nauegacao Uoyd 
Braailelro. 

Toronto Toronto Stock Exchange annu- 
al meeting. 

Earnings expected American Stores. 
Circus Circus Enterprises. Dell Computer. 
Van ly, Weovaco Corp. 

• Hey 29 Washington Apnl durable 
goods orders. 

Washington The National Association 
Ot Realtors releases existing home sales 
lot April. 

Ottawa March's international transac- 
tion* in securities report. 

Calgary Insight information Inc is spon- 
soring a conference on trading straiegies 
lor natural gas. 

Earnings expected SaiVt ol Montreal. 
Gomair Hotomps. Hamtechteger Indus- 
tries. Litton industries. 

• May 2« Pittsburgh jftL Speed* 

Steel Inc. annual meefir.g 

Weetbo rough, Massachusetts Kopin 
Corp. opens its Rat panel display manu- 
facturing fine, one of first US. plants to 
deploy new chip technology 
Washington The Labor Department re- 
ports initial weekly stale unemployment 
compensate*! insurance claims. 
Vancouver Pnme Minister Jean Chre- 
tien will announce an Infrastructure pro 

MaxfcPCRy The Cato insvtote sponsors 
a two-day conterenc* 'Monetary Ar- 
rangements m tne Americas alter 
NAFTA." 

Earnings expected Computer Asso- 
ciates international. Farah. Gerber Prod- 
ucts. Gerber Scientific. National Bank ot 
Canada. Novell. Ton Brothers. Toronto 
Dominion Bank. 

e May 27 Washington Pratt mmary es- 
timate of gross domestic product grawrn 
lor me first quarter Also, preliminary esti- 
mate ol corporate first-quarter altar-tax 
profits. 

Washington The Labor Department re- 
ports April imponr export prices. 

Ann Arbor, Michigan The Untveraity ol 
Michigan releases its consumer senti- 
ment index for Mav. 


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Grocery Carts Set to Roll 


By Lee Hockstader 

tt ashtrt£inn Pmt Service 

VLADIVOSTOK. Russia — Dick Schindler 
could have set himself a more modest goal in his 
golden years. He could have memorized the 
complete works of Shakespeare, say. Or hopped 
around the planet backward. 

Instead. Mr. Schindler, a retired American 
grocery executive, decided to build Russia s first 
American-slyle supermarket and revolutionize 
the way Russians buy food. Moreover, he set out 
to do it in Vladivostok, a navy town in Russia's 
Far East that was off limits to foreigners — 
especiailv Americans — until 1992- 

- Somebody's got to do it, and 1 know how." 
said Mr. Schindler. 65. the former president of 
Gristedes. the New York supermarket chain. 
•This will change the style of living in this 
country for the next 25 years: no standing in 
line for hours and hours, no bang ripped off by 
opportunists and middlemen." 

With SI6 million in investment capital, a 
management team that includes some former 
Communist bigwigs and a line of patter that 
would make Lee larocca blush. Mr. Schindler is 
planning to open his store. Giant Vladivostok, 
this autumn. He said he would not be cornea! 
with bunting, streamers and the usual speeches 
by local notables ai his grand opening: He 
wants President Boris N. Yeltsin to give the 
keynoie address. 

Mr. Schindler's plans, if he can carry them 
ouu will produce a store that will be generally 
familiar to shoppers in the West — big, afford- 
able and professionally managed — but anr 
phatically unlike anything the average Russian 
has ever seen. 


“When you go into a typical store berj vou 
wait in line to see what iney have, said Rtf. 
Schindler, launching into one of his good-na- 
tured tirades about communism s 
Russia. “Whan you see what they have, then 
you gw into another line for the cashier, and 
you tdl her what you want and what the pnee 
is. Then you pay your money and get a receipt 
and go back to stand in the first lure again to 

inefficient as you can make it- But it was P 6 ™*” 
few Russia under the communist system be- 

°3 SSm -a ^ 

produce and dry goods, all available for shop- 
pers to handle and select on their own, plus 24 
checkout registers, 500 parking spaces, daily, 
specials advertised on television and. a public- 
address system is likely to leave more than a few 
Russians wide-eyed with amazement 

But Mr. Schindler's Giant Vladivostok, and a 
sister store to open shortly afterward in the 
nearby city of Nakhodka, will be different from 
its American model in sane important respects. 

For a start, the 1400 products oa sale, al- 
though a colossal number by Russian standards, 
will not begin to low* the variety on display ma - 
typical supermarket in the United States, which 
averages at least 25,000. At least half the prod- 
ucts vnB be ctf Russian ori^n. Bar codes have not 

yet come to Russia, so there will be no scanner 
price-readings. As protection against organized 
crime, security guards will near bulletproof 
vests, and (he store win be a hrick-and-concrete 
shell with no external windows. 

“Probably long after Pm dead there’ll be 100 


Mr scnmaicr. v,eer" — - — »-■. w 

Ure fii* two up and running. 
SSeivmn hasn't been enwT- 
tSTmt. Schindler has ^ 

eery bXess his entire working hfehefol? 
g2ij project be had never set foot \a4h& 

f0 ^.o mS; to 1991. , !« 

had retired and moved w Florida, with lhc idea 
that an American-style ^penttaAetcwiM fiKa . 

d» United States ajrear cariier -^. 7 

. : •’ * in_A:,mrtAV mat »ii tincmTVeiir 


minoscaays, xux «*»«**» ~ 

tionai destnumon. to say the least -™. honre 

uumu _IWUI«U«W CUuJ, ,1 one orm- 


ggfjssssS^ 

was nearly three years ago. .. ? . 

to ] Sr a Siflgers:- ^hfitt; 

Mr. Schindka- advertised to ftfl siA-iop pasm£S& . 
induding directore of security, penrand suid. 


UAAv ixa q ift iw yw y— T -■ 

The six finally chosen included the former; 
ideology chief for (be local Commum^ Party: 
(as personal director), a former top. pQlwft 
officer (as securi ly chia) and the foimcr T^on- 
al foodprocaHement czar (as purchasing boss)-’: 



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Southwest Bell Ignites 
Phone-Sibling Rivalry 

r^ m i i fUA L. a. .. _ 


Page 13 - 

p ;e 5" 


£e i 


, ^ J — V ifc IVUUWCU 

by several days a Tuesday agree- 
ment for competitive service in 
Rochester, New York. Rochester 


equipment would be invited to bid 
on manufacturing the equipment. 

The company plans to spend 
5100 million to install switching 
equipment so the cable system can 
provide telephone service by late 
next year. A spokesman said pric- 
ing will be competitive with Bell 
Atlantic’s regulated rates. 

Southwestern BeQ purchased a 
Montgomery County cable televi- 
sion operator earlier this year. 

A federal law now prevents the 



the old American Telephone^ & 
Telegraph Co„ agreed to allow 
Time Warner Inc. to compete with 
it in its home city. 

In that case, suite regulators 
signed off on a preliminary agree- 
ment. However, the Maryland reg- 
ulators have yet to consider the 
application. 

“That was a joint announce- 
ment," said Mr. Gilliam. “This is a 
singular announcement that we in- 
tend to get into the phone busi- 
ness’* in southern Maryland. 
Southwestern Bed’s cable sub- 


sidiary already passes 99 peromt of 
the homes in the area it ‘ 


have local phone operations. But 
that law was successfully chal- 
lenged in federal court by Bell At- 
lantic last year. Southwestern Bell 
and the five other Baby Bell com- 
panies have launched similar court 
challenges. 

Federal permission is not needed 
Tor Southwestern Bell to make the 
change to its Maryland cable sys- 
tem since the San Antonio-based 
company operates local phone ser- 
vice only in Texas, Oklahoma, 
Kansas, Arkansas and Missouri. 

Southwestern BeQ bought cable 
systems in suburban W ashin gton 


„ — -*»-**-* muuiUgWU 

hopes to partly to demonstrate to federal 

serve and Mr. Gilliam said people lawmakers and regulators the di- 
would be aide to purchase cable rection telecommunication systems 
service, telephone service or both, are going. (Reuters, AP) 


WLR Claims Success 


In Fending Off Tyson 


Bloomberg Businas News 

BROADWAY, Virginia — WLR Foods Inc said over the week- 
end that it successfully repelled Tyson Foods Inc.'s efforts to get 
voting rights for shares acquired in its hostile $30-a-sharc tender for 
the poultry-processing company. 

Tyson, acknowledging the defeat, claimed the contest was not 
conducted fairly and said it would to press a lawsuit over WLR’s 
efforts to fend off a takeover with a stockholder rights plan. 

WLR held a special shareholders' meeting on Saturday to vote on 
Tyson's proposal to obtain voting rights for shares acquired in its 
S328 million hostile bid- Virginia law prevents Tyson from voting its 
WLR shares unless outside holders of the stock approve. Results of 
the vote, tallied by an independent inspector, are expected in a few 
days. WLR said. 

• - “Our preliminary tabulation of management's proxies indicates 
broad support of WLR shareholders against the Tyson proposal, 
which appears soundly defeated,” James Keeler, WLR president and 
chief executive, aid. “We now call upon Don Tyson to live up to his 
promise to go away if he loses the vote and look forward to the 
immediate termination of his inadequate fender offer.” 

Tyson, howerav said its review, of- the vole indicated that the 
results would have been different if “voiles b( only the truly indepen- 
dent shareholders" had been counted. 

Tyson said it remained interested in negotiating with WLR. It 
launched its takeover attempt after the WLR board rejected Us offer 
in early February as inadequate. WLR wants to remain independent 
to reap the rewards of a recent restructuring. 


SHORT COYER 


Bosch to CntaFnnher 7,000 Jobs 
This Year, Mainly in German Plants 


FRANKFURT (Combined Dispatches) — The German electronics 
company Robert Bosch GmbH said it will cut 7,000 jobs this year, mainly 
in its 94,000-strong Goman work force, German newspapers reported 
Sunday. 

Chief Executive Hermann Scholl first made the comments to a local 
newspaper in the company’s home town of Stuttgart, The latest cuts mean 
Bosch wfll have diminaied one in five jobs in its German operations in 
four years. 

In the 1993 business year, the company shed 13,300 jobs worldwide, 
reducing the number of its employees to 156,500. Last year, a 6 percent 
3 in sales left Bosch with a 1993 operating loss, although it has not 
how Large this was. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Li Ka-ehing Targets London Firm 

t nwrvtu raw w ii w oi — The Hone Kona billionaire Li Ki 


LONDON (Bloomberg) — The Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-shing 
Asians with Stuart Upton, chief executive of Stanhope 


has had Marais m* — — • -- — ; . 

Property PLC. about bu^ a^s 50 modern s 



to gain 


three 


is also 


Mr. Li, who first tried to acquire — 

considering buying the 50 percent Broadgate ownership of 
partner, Rosehaugh PLC, which is currently m receivership, the Times 
reported. 


Eurotunnel Denies Share Discounts 

LONDON (Bloomberg) - Eurotunnel PLC dismissed on Sunday as 
“Jmp wtwlafmn" newspaper reports that as much as a 44 percent discount 
SSSSSS"- as pm diu new fuad-,*^ 

1 tomes recoils, a lack of interest m Eurotunnel shares from 

in^SSlSS^ to offer the new shares at a tat of 
htfwJen 30 Dcrcent and 44 percent to the current pnee. Sarah Rogles, a 
H«srooman, saidtha! those reports were ^pure speculation. 
El ^We I mav S ^^^ 3 ^ details of our funding package sometime next 
^aSStonne 1 ^ has untfl June 20 toinmil its package. 


New Chief for German Union Group 


"SSTL&ri D icier Schulte « Sunday as its 


■S* 54, , a 

Hans-Weraer Meyer, 61, whodied May 9 


of a heart attack- . M q-jnjiie said, “I would like to see the 
Following his n0 5 , S“S, ite ^vice unions jointly opposing the oigy 


aSKSife * 1 ** * tbKe - mP ° lh d “ dIod£ “ 

..it — rn j - n*. 


uJki , J Trade Representative Charlene Bar- 

The UiL team, 1«1 by for a third day with Japanese negotia- 

shefsky, met bnefly here Sa^riOT ^ a{ fCS{ar ^ ng ^ so-caUed 

tors to consider Japanese p*op°?“ - by president Bill 

ftanwort oiks. * inate‘- 0 P olin S a™" 

Gin ton last July. 


much fanfare, . 
between Mr. C3inu® 



minister. 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 




WASHINGTON — 5^ Southwestern Bell plans to build 
cm Bell Coro said a m ^ r ‘®P l,c backbone that would 

applied toS‘(S?e^£, d y V™ p ?? nd *“ coaxu] “We, the kind 
tSwe^thSLi^ 1 l ,^f , ? n > es °. f to* used to carry cable televi- 
in piSdina ^S UQ - Cbrp ‘ s 1 *®- Each fiber would tenninate at 
32Q 000 ,^ n « e scrv,ce to a node that would connect to 500 

l£? t0m 'Z' Sr 5 cabte. A 

tween Babv BelU war be* box at each customer’s borne would 
“We intend rn" . , W * e signals between telephone 

cm everv residenr#.*^™^! anc ^ ^ ocus cable, with no outside power. 
County,’ a Maiyland^wbiub^ docs 001 e * ist 

Washington, m 3 cKlliam. ^ Ginj am said. However, 

presidem of SBC Media VmhUS’ s&d "‘“^cturers of telephone 

the cable subsidiary of Sot! SS “ u,n^,M, 
cm Bell. 

“We’re really exciwd," he said. 

For the first tune well offerthe 

reademial customer choice with 

Although the move was the first 
among the Baby Bells, it followed 


Amsterdam 


Prices edged higher Iasi week, with the 
EOE index rising to 412.77 from 41 1.58. but 
irading was light and investors shied away 
from several big exporters likely to be hurt 
by the persistent weakness of the U.S. dollar. 


Among the international shares, the Akzo 
Nobel chemical company fell to 212.70 guil- 


,-nyrel 

ders from 215.10, white Royal Dutch 
dropped to 201 from 207.90. 

Philips Electronics fell half a guilder to 
53.30. while Unilever slipped 1.80 guilder to 
193.70 after having fallen below 200 a week 
earlier. 

Hoogovens, the steelmaker, fell to 73 JO 
from 76.20. hurt by the apparent collapse of 
the European Commission's plan to [rim 
excess steel capacity in Europe. 


Average daily volume rose to 6.96 billion 
Hong Kong dollars from 4.99 billion. 

The market's sentiment was boosted by 
optimism that Britain and China might soon 
reach an agreement on the financing of the 
controversial multi-billion dollar new airport 
for Hong Kong. The issue has been used by 
Beijing as a test of its influence over the 
colony it is to recover from Britain in 1997. 


approved by the senate and chamber of dep- 
uties. 

Dealers said they expected the markets to 
continue to fall this week before eventually 
recovering as Italian and international inves- 
tors return. 

In the banking sector. Comii fell by 3.58 
percent and Crediio I tali an o tost 7.1 j per- 
cent. The insurer Generalli lost 2.23 percent. 


Tokyo 


China Shutsw, 

4 Financial t 


03 : 


London 


Paris 


Prices were mixed in cautious trading on 
the Tokyo Stock Exchange last week, with 
market players watching U-S. interest rates 
and the dollar-yen exchange rate. 

The Nikkei Stock Average of 225 selected 
issues gained 7 1 .42 points, or 0.35 percen t. io 
20.342.17 points. It rose 408.28 poults the 
previous week. 


Journals 


catsd 

> 

in tiu 
ivino 
: the) 
ifeet. 




Frankfurt 


The DAX 30 index slipped 0.01 percent 
fall, to 2^49.65 points last week after start- 
ing out at a record high of 2J71.il points. 

Banking bouse West LB said neither the 
cut in Germany’s key interest rates nor the 
increase in U.S. rates and the corresponding 
rise in German bonds had supported the 
stock market's peak, and the lack of confi- 
dence caused profit- taking. 


Commerzbank, however, predicted the 
inis we 


market would bounce back this week, with 
chemicals, machinery and steel benefiting 
from perceptions of a recovery in the indus- 
trial sector of the economy. 


Positive economic news pushed prices 
higher last week. The Financial Tuncs-Stock 
Exchange 100-stock index rose 8.1 points, or 
02 percent, to 3,127 J. 

The market strengthened after the Federal 
Reserve Board pushed U.S. interest rates 
higher at the beginning of the week. A batch 
of British economic statistics then encour- 
aged the market: Retail sales rose 0.4 percent 
in April and 4.4 percent over the year, while 
unemployment fell to a two-year low of 168 
million people, down by 36,800. 

A weak rise in the M-4 measure of the 
money supply, which was up just 0. 1 percent 
in April, and a record low for underlying 
inflation at 2.3 percent last month also 
boosted sentiment. 

Among active stocks, Eurotunnel, whose 
Channel Tunnel opened to freight business 
Thursday, dropped 57 pence to 375. affected 
by worries about its forthcoming rights issue. 

British Telecom rose 16 J pence to 387 
after announcing a 40 percent rise in pretax 
profits. 


Stock prices fell last week, depressed by 
the rise in U.S. short-term rates, the sagging 
bond markets and the weakness of the dollar. 

The CAC-40 index dropped 1 J percem. to 
2.15S.43. as dealers questioned the solidity of 
the European economic recover, and over- 
seas investors spurned the market in favor of 
London and Frankfurt. 

Analysis said the market's fall was surpris- 
ing given a rash of good economic figures 
from the IN SEE economics institute and the 
OECD predicting sound growth this year. 

Medium- value shares held their ground 
better than the internationals, continuing a 
trend started over a year ago. 

Lagardere and Eurotunnel fell. Pernod- 
Ricard lost ground sharply Thursday after 
Patrick Ricard, the company’s president, is- 
sued a pessimistic outlook. ' 


The broader Tokyo Stock Price Index, 
however, slipped 0.66 points, io 1.642.54, 
following last week’s gam of 27 J 1 points. 

Dealers were worried by the rise in U.S. 
rates but cheered by Washington's concilia- 
tory statements on trade relations wjtfi Ja- 
pan, spurring the hope that the yen mav fall 
against the dollar, brokers said. This would 
aid Japanese exporters. 


Sony, which reported a 10 percem group 
profit rise this week, gained 40 yen io 5.920 
yen. Matsushita Electric Industrial rose 10 
yen to 1.720 yen despite a sharp 24 percem 
group profit decline. 


'tyve France-Pmse 
BEIJING — Chinese authorities 
have closed four stock mark el-re- ■vent- j, 
lated journals in Shanghai for oper* k ol” 1 
ating illegally, an official of the irists 
Shanghai Press and Publications onen^™ 
Bureau said over the weekend. "P: 

The official said Shanghai Stock estet ^^ 
Information. Shanghai Stock Ex- 3 
change News. Shanghai Stock Ex- “ ac- nLic 

f iress and Caitong weekly had been [0 

ined and dosed down recently, but was 
he gave few other details. ^ ^ 

“The main reason that they were *S“ , Sje S 0 f 
banned is that these newspapers u( of 
did not register with the authorities ' sees sion- 
— that means they were illegal f^ieais, 
n ciiH Inc 


;c 


si - 


rei 

fu 


co> 

aratgj 


Swi 


■nd< 


Mo 


■« 


idi 


publications." the spokesman said. 


The China Daily said Saturday 


Zurich 


Singapore 


Hong Kong 

Overseas investors, optimistic about an 
casing in political tensions, pushed the Hang 
Seng index up by more than 5 percent, to 
9.631.63. 


Milan 


Profit-taking sent the Milan market's 
Mibtel index down 3.64 percent, to 12J64 
points, last week after the government of 
Silvio Berlusconi was finally installed and 


Sharp economic growth pushed prices 
higher last week, with the key Straits Times 
Industrials index jumping 50.89 points, io 
2,337.01. The broader SES All-Singapore in- 
dex firmed 8.15 points to 574.88 points. 

Volume was light, but sentiment improved 
on reports Monday that die Singapore econ- 
omy had achieved' an 1 1 percem growth in 
the first quarter of 1994. 


The Zurich stock market rose last week in 
active trading with the Swiss Performance 
Index gaining 33.61 points, or 1.9 percent, to 
1,788.43 points. 


fy.teV 

ly b 
OT, m S 
n tL WO 

house in Shanghai and confiscated ?®®}fnob. t taH**! 
1 00 .000 copies of the three daily cul- HasllJ 

-soapers and 7.000 copies of the ^gb . QgjJ 

V ‘ elii 


that inspectors raided a publishing !^^ son ? e 


news 

wed 


Analysts said the market was excited bv 
the U.S. rise in interest rates and the expiry 
of contracts on the Soffex market Friday. 
Overseas institutions had invested heavilv in 
the market, they said. 


Banks ended higher last week with UBS 
up 60 Swiss francs to 1,174 and CS Holding 
up 17 to 620. 


It said that illegal Financial pub- 
lications had mushroomed since 
Shanghai opened its stock ex- 
change. spreading false informa- 
tion and causing disorder at the 
exchange. 

The ciaropdown comes as the 
frenzied demand that recently fu- 
eled the markets gives way to low 
volume and fears of a slump. The 
Shanghai exchange opened in 1990 
and Shenzhen in 199 1. 


lilting 
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row Qtive 

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jen- [hat 
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WWF World Wide Fund For Nature 

(formerly World Wildlife Fund) 
International Secretariat. 11% Gland, Switzerland. 


Outside the industrialised west, no-one 
has to be cold to respect their ciders. It’s 
simply the way society is organised. 

Which is why WWF - World Wide Fund 
for Nature tries to work with older people in 
the villages of the rainforests. With WWF’s 
help, they learn ro reach the younger mem- 


Noi that we don't believe in catching rhem 
while they're young. WWF also organises 
special training courses to help teachers incor 
porate conservation into the curriculum. 

211,000 primary teachers in Madagascar 
have already taken part. 

And WWF produce teaching aids as well 
as teachers. 

We commission educational 
factshects, booklets, posters 
and videos in over twenty 
different languages 
These are discri- 


hclp our work with a donation or a legacy 
please write to the membership officer ar the 
address opposite. 

You only have to look around you ro see 
that the world still has an awful lot to learn 
about conservation. 


le- 

de 

by 

ir- 

ur 

er 


ness 

for 

She 

She 

ind- 

ite" 


edy 

ave. 


bers of their communities about conservation. buted to schools 


In Kafue Flats, Zambia, it’s Chief 
Hamusonde (93). 

Chief Bakary (78), is our man in Anjavi- 
mihavanana, northern Madagascar. 

In Ban Klong Sai. Thailand, we invoke 
the Venerable Papasro Bhikkhu, seventy- 
three year old chief Buddhist monk. 

This isn't just expediency, it's how WWF 
believes conservation projects should be run. 

Before you teach someone, we believe 
you have to learn from them. 

Wc spend years visiting village after 
village, talking to the people, listening to 
them, living with, them, understanding how 
they live their lives. 

Only then are we able to gain the confi- 
dence of the village ciders. 

Once they realise wc’rc on their side, our 
elderly converts promote conservation with 
a zeal that belies their years. 

“Uncle” Prom (68), another of our Thai 
community leaders, cells us chat he frequently 
gets scolded when he starts telling people in 
the market that they should leave the forests 
alone. But he gets results. 

Uncle Prom and his fellow villagers 
recently managed to prevent a new logging 
concession, and set up a community forest 
where tree felling is now forbidden. 

Ninety-three year old Chief Hamusonde 
also makes things happen. 

Income from the Kafue Flats game reserve 
in Zambia is funding a school, a clinic and 
new water boreholes for' the local villages. 

In Madagascar, seventy-eight year old 
Chief Bakary's village makes a profit by 
selling fruit grown in their new tree nursery. 

More importantly. Chief Bakary's village 
now takes fewer trees from the rainforest 


and colleges ^ 
all over the 
world. 

If you 
can 


because the nursery can provide firewood 
and poles for construction. 



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FOR OUR TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMME. 


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NATIONAL MARKET 


OTC Consolidated irading lor week j ^ 
ended Friday. May 20 

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1.40 7J 


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158 20'-, !SW 20'-. 
57231'i 19'A J9W — l'V 
1439 l’A 1'*, 1W 
56J13W 12W 13'.* 

748 2'-» 2'* 2W 
1403 

... 2039 7W 
. 510 BW 

- 563? lv u 
.. 3032 3W 
_ I IBB 5V* 

- 4063 SW 

_ 32*9 1'.* 4' 

„ 9796 1 1 '« 10 
.. 7S26I4W 12W 14'*' -I W 
_ 560 13W 13". 13W -'* 

_ 6067 5V* 3W JW -7 

_ 271 1W VA IV* -l. 

I _ 1155 17V. l6"i 17V. -1'-, 

1.14110.1 3969 12 11 11 W 

_. 898 14 I3W 13W _ 

_. 7783 JW 

- 2325 12 

. 1333 28 

- 2640 J 
1.16 29 16163«W 38W 39W -.v. 

02e .7 8 3 3 3 — W 

4488 SV, Si* 5W . W 

258 21 19W 30W -IW 

81 lP.i IS 1 -. 15V, - *4 

4851 31'.. l'V a 2": 

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7 33' i 33'* 23V. _W 

- 70C. 3 V. 3V* JW - '.* 

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93 4 3 Vi 4 -'i 

..12807 24% 23W 24 V* - 

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-. 14 34h 34. 34* _ 

_. 779 41. 3H 3V* _ 

10 B 8 8 

109 9% 04* ?W — W 

.. 536615 14 14 — W 

_ 43974 15V* 14% ISW - I W 

-. 324 1 5", 4 W 4V. -Vi 

_. 613 TV. 3<v a T'Vi, — i'u 

5.8 1768 11 Vk lO'l | IV* —V* 
._ 2072 8 W, 7V ; -V a 


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189 7". 
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127 »W 
1281 Jl. 
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237 IV. 


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- 73868 26 
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2.0 173 2W 21* 2 * —4* 

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- 37! I0W 0W I0W - V, 

- 1643 11 w II 11", ♦ 4-. 

- 59162 78’. 22 V. 28W >3’-, 

... 397 B 7W 7V, —V, 

J713 271* TOW 30'.— 4W 
_. 3017 12 II W Il'« _W 

- 2011 3W 2 1 '. 31* _ 

A 172910 6UW 561, S9W-1W 

- 18882 UW 171. UW-l'-a 

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_. 1407 9 Vi 94* 9*i -W 

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_. 8267 25W 22' . 25'-. *3 
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_. 4070 6 v» SW 6". 

... 37 2", 7 li, — V, 

... 722 7 SV, 

... 534 9W TV, 

898 9 7 W 

4671 11 W 10 
f.6 216313 II W 12 

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_ 8761 lHt ID 111* -V, 

... 6186 33V, 10', 321. -Hi 

._ 1300 29 27 W 77W -4* 

._ 7470 13‘4-„ 13 U' , - '■* 
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171 j 8 
517 .’-8 
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817 2 
1090 10' ■ 
550 C2V.» 
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9879 14W 
1741 ?W 
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2330 1'j 
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20795 39 

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7.1 1646 

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_. 3340 54. 

. 1185 25V. 

7.7 7164 37' t 
.. 1946 1? 

I. 4 6 1? 

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„ 3315 20W 

545 IW 
... 2253 10", 
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60 C4, 

. 736 II*. 

72 2 

. 81 3W 

_ 1074 4’, 
.. 326 Hi 

_. 436 4W 

4.3 496 30V, 

J. 5 384 74- , 

_ 319 4 Vi 

_ 1050 IT, 

3.8 rTM 4'., 
18 7088 4 

_ 3493 54 U 

61 6W 
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3.7 *45 18 

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463 7 
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Krug 

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... 1677 161, 
_ 544 12 

_ 829 17 

4 J 416 4 
_. 390 14 

_. 5396 UW 
_. 1670 6 
.. 3510S l’=.- e 
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19 21 W 

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10'."i 11W 
16'* 16', 
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LSBNCs 

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LVMHs 

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35 W 38 W 
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720 6". 61* 6W — W 
306 70", 24% MW - 3 
711 4 3V* 4 • W 

57 111, raw 111, -W 
2.6 3965 25W 24', 24V. — W 
_ 6575 TV. 41* SW — 1W 
1 UW 11 W 11 W —Vi 


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LandBnc 

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Laser Pr 

LasrmTc 

Lcsrsca 

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LdUriBcs 

LOwrSB 

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1.1 1464 171* 

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... 3325 5 
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59 11". 

406 13 
.. 950 24 

..4976 H5WI11’'. 
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3.2 77 40' i 47 

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_. 501 5'. 4'i 
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1.94 11J 801 17V* 157* 

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_ 1257 22'* 27 
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_. 506 6W 5H 

-. 17029 SW 7W 
_ 1027 12 II W 
3377 IT', I0W 
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5209 B’.« 6 H 
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_. 1*93 ev. TV, 
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58 e M 16 9 8'* 

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... 193711 10 

_ 3000 11 W 9 V* 

- 140226 60 4?% 

-. 190 6W 6 

M 19 957?r/>2(l’* 
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- 31713V*, 12W 

- 536 17W 15V* 


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35'-* 26 W 
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MG Prod - 173 0W 6W 

MAP Sc S - an 21>* 2QW 

MARC - 11 0Vt BVS 

MB Com - 3025 21V. 10V* 

MBLA 30c 1.3 100 15 W 15W 

MCJ* 10 hI 88156 74 W 22W 

MDL Info - 13S3 7'a B'-V,, 

MDTCd - 1336 5W 5 

MFBCP - 2412 13 UW 

MPRI _ *53 8W 8W 

MFSCm _ 10T98 3IW 25W 

WllPhr - 701 11 W 10W 

MHAiever me A 7168 4'v« JW 

MK Gold - 2758 SW 4’i 

MK Roil - 4109 15V, 131* 

ML- -. 44 6U 5W 

M7AI .16 12 287 5W 5 

MNI _ 1482 12 W 11”. 

MPl Mflt _ 483 4W 4W 

MRSTch - 1454 ID 0 

MRVCm — 618 61, JS 

MRVmi . 1565 IW 1 

MS Con- -.1X04 10'. , 17V. 

MSB Ben .40 1.9 93 21 Vi 21 

MTCEI -.12186 4W 3V, 

MT1 Tt2i - 7670 9". T; 

MITS M 11 853 26’* 25W 

MDfrryj 1 C 2.4 1 1SW 25W 

MB g .60 - 364 14W 13V* 

MooeScc - 448 4 W a 

MochTc _ 744 1'-. l'.'u 

MockFn - IS) 6A„ 

Mncremd - 1372 12W 10'* 

Madge - 5552 12W IT* 

MdOGE 1.86 5.7 J77 33 32% 

MogPnr - 1I7B SW 4’.* 

Mag at . J04 6W 5W 

MogStt _. 84 12W IT* 

MogrnP _ U63 31W XL 

MaanB s JM 1.0 194 36 32W 

MagGp .76 3.9 12Q05 I9V, 17W 
MagTcb i - 172 5'.* at* 

MailQ* -. 668 BW 7W 

fMnSi - 39p 4W 4 

MbinStCB .06 e A 121BI4W UW 

Mat-na .16 e A 917OW20 

Median _ 2)8 JW 31* 

Manim : - 83 aw av* 

Monuyfst - <502 9 6 

Mopflta - 674 23' i TOW 

Mown 10c 1.1 171 aw e 

Marcam - WWW 9\. 

Marie) _ 471 8'i r 

McrDri -. 7230 5 

MarlnerH _ 4840 25 

MorCao 40 3.? 136 16' 

Mk Tam S .06 3-2 197 30 

Mar kd _ 446 41 

Maras, _ 222 2'-. 3 

Mara El _ 245 16'* 15Vi 

Mjrsam -. 1513 II ??« 

MrshS S M « 68 9W 9", 

Mrsnsu .44 4.3 70 low low 

Marsnls .60 2J 4285 22 TOW 

MorsnFn _ 315 BW 8W 

Mcnek _ 580 11 W 04. 

Marten -. 34 10 18W 

MartCol .. 1165 12’. 7'* 

MOFoBc A3 1.S 1017 30'-j 26V, 
Masland lOe 6 <7475 UW 1SW 

r/asonDi* 1 29 2.8 6S46V, 44 


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INTERN \TION M. 1 1 ERA IT) TRIBUNE. MONDAY, MAY 23, 199-t ) * 



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Devils Battle Back 
To Tie Series, 2-2 


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Tabasco Cat Outduels Go for Gin in Preakness Stakes rE M , ? 

Derby Champion’s Hopes 5 *sj§ £ 
For Triple Crown Dashed ; r 

By Joseph Durso knw lfw >' "°“ ,d J* fadn 8 arafc'5 

v« ft* hmnsm superaars <rf .fl» **2 
BALTIMORE — Go for Gin slon who had skipped die Preak^nN was «ai sh 




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duoriiun/ Piwi 

. If there’s an attitude that has 
characterized the New Jersey Dev- 
ils under Coach Jacques Lemaire 
it’s us-against-them. 

They fed they get no respect 
’ from anyone and definitetv no 
breaks from the National Hockev 
League. 

Faced with a 2-1 deficit in the 
Eastern Conference final against 
the New York Rangers and the 
league’s one-game suspension of 


v^ 3 sa 


STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 








their center. Beraie Nicholls, the 
Devils reached inside and came up 
big Saturday in New Jersey. 

Martin Brodeur stopped 20 shots 
and 'he fi red-up Devils beat the 
Rangers, 3-1, behind goals by Ste- 


Rang^rs at bay the rest of the way, 
with his best stop coming on Sieve 
Lanner early in the third period on 
a give-and-go with Adam Graves. 

Zdepukin eventually put the 
game away with 6:42 lo play after 
the Rangers' backup goalie, 'Glenn 
Mealy. and the defenseman Alex- 
ander Karpovtsev had u mivcom- 
munication behind the net ZeJepu- 
kin got the loose puck, came out 
and tucked it into an open net. 

Matteau goi the Rangers back 
into the game 8:47 into the second 
penod by scoring in Front on a 
power play off a setup by Mark 
Messier, who has at least one point 


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in all 13 playoff games. 
■ In Friday's game: 


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phane Richer. Bill Guerin arid Va- 
leri Zelepukin. 

The victory sent the best-of-sev- 
en series back to New York City's 
Madison Square Garden tied 2-2. 
Game 5 will be played Monday 
night. 

“That’s been this team all year 
long," said Ken Daneyko. a Devils 
defenseman. “We don’t have two 
'or three guys who can carry- us for a 




• -yrxn. n Ca r : ; 


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•game. We count on everyone." 

[. And everyone came through for 
.'New Jersey in Game 4. 

The performance was the Devils' 
best in the series and h came in a 
game in which they might have had 
a letdown. Losing Game 3 in dou- 
ble overtime was bad enough, but 
having the NHL suspend Nicholls 
for cross-checking Alexei Kovalev 
of the Rangers made it worse. 

But New Jersey dominated from 
a the start, scoring two first -period 
goals to drive the Rangers goalie 
Mike Richter from the game. 

The Devils played so weQ they 
had the Rangers' coach, Mike 
Keenan, scrambling all night. He 
shuffled his lines aim benched sev- 
- era! players, including the star de- 
fenseman Brian Leettih. 

Leetch wasn’t alone in sitting. 
Center Craig MacTavish and the 
wing Brian Noonan didn’t play the 
second and third periods and the 
defenseman Jeff Beukeboom sat 
when Leetch sat. 

The Rangers did get within 2-1 
midway through the second period 
on a power-play goal by Stephane 
Matteau, who had the game-winner 
Thursday mgbL 

However, Brodeur kept the 


■ m truuzy s game: 

Canucks A Maple Leafs 0: Pavel 
Bure scored twice for Vancouver at 
home, leading the Canucks ton 2-1 
lead m the best-of-seven series 
against Toronto. Games 4 and 5 
were to be played in Vancouver on 
Sunday and Tuesday. 

The game deteriorated into an 
ugly brawl at 16:50 of the third 
period after a check by the Vancou- 
ver wing Tim Hunter on Doug Gil- 
mour of the Leafs. Several fights 
broke out and the referee sent both 
teams to the dressing room after 
fans littered the ice with debris. 



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By Joseph Durso 

■Vot Ytirk Tunes Seixne 

Baltimore — Go for Gin 
came to the end of his quest to 
sweep the Triple Crown when he 
was outrun in a stirring stretch duel 
by Tabasco Cat, who won the 1 19th 
Preakness Stakes by three-quarters 
of a length and redeemed two and a 
half years of misfortune for his 
trainer, D. Wayne Lukas. 

Lukas, the most successful train- 
er in the United States in the 19S0&. 
not only thwarted Go for Gin but 
also rose from a series or personal 
and professional setbacks. 


jwn uashed ^ 

540 ^sura- cos-® 1 

knew they would be facing som re ^antic aral'P, 1 


ness in order to regroup. uz “ s noId 11 

The chief absentees Saturdr^S^^esof g w i DC 
were Holy Bull, who won sever ut of 
races wire- to- wire before running secs si on- A v .’ ,c 
12th in the mud of the Derby ^"pitars, j y b e 
Brcxxo. who won the Breeders 0 * 106 L , , 
Cup Juvenile and the Santa Anil; 1 ? ““sd by “ 
Derby and then ran fourth in Ken- v1 £ or 'some n ^ 
tucky’. and Strodes Creek, write "“mob. , tJS 1 
chased Go for Gin home in the 1 ™ 11 ®* cul- xj^S 
Derby but then sat out the heak- ra ? u “ high . <V^ 
ness to rest bis talent for closim; ir 6 i and " 


long races like the Belmont Stakes t w e 


Until Tabasco Cat won the race « a mile and a half .. SS 

Saturday to the wire. Lukas hadn't Z,t ? a,so ad k m, Ji: d , tha! . hl jihrow ante aij 

countdown to the Preakness had‘£fy, uQve 


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won a stakes ance October of 1991. ^ ■ Dinh ^ 

He became the target of criticism a wh l" 2 l f ,e ' 1 D s,on .S 

venr no n wh**n hicTi-tr entr t in inn ^ showed up at the Stakes Barn* S™ 7 that 
■ - ■v- w 3:30 A.M. Fridav. The crew dis- e in «* ined 


rartuied an ankle m the at 3 '-30 A-M. Friday. The_crew d 


Preikness and did not sunive. And 
in a searing family accident in De- 


regarded the protests of the securi- ne y- 
ty guard outside Stall 40. where Go ‘ ends 

for Gin was sleeping, turned on 1 


cember. his son and deputv trainer. 7 , n fire dan 

fefr r„k.« P... 1 S mvU iniur^A glaring spothghis and proceeded to 11 ,ire 




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I abasco Cat, wit, crossing the finish line by less than a length ahead of Go for Gin. the favorite, after a stretch duel in the Preakness. 


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Klopas Shines as Not-So Stellar U.S. Falls to Bayem 


Jeff Lukas, was severely injured ^.iT-Tr 5.X '^7 for- 

when Tabasco Cat broke loose in | hC a •• u fiery efuL ud * cl 

ihe ban area a( Sanui Aniia. ^ ,2^ S ^ ? ?a< 

Bui oa this sunny dav ai Pimlico T l " 

Race Cdurse. the ante cult ouuun nS 

S’nL™h ra '^ W !S E 'rh S ! Un ’ °“' r “ WhSprcaluKS Da, dawned. “ “ 

Wta to slantag sate flew ™ rc w ? od f’,, t ’ Jrri “Sl“ H«k«l at ^ icalai 
open, only one hone in the field of 5**J2 r s and ,, far Gln “ d SS ' ACd 

lOhad a chance to make it two in a *?™ d cal . m ™™B h - Bu ' hc Bud-. ™ “ 

row in ihe racing classic, and that ° neho r f' ,° lhe 9“ “ ho . m '^' ™W • ■ AF 

home was Go lot Gin. But he slill J t *5 h: “ , *“ ness _B 

niD five times in mud and had won ader 


By Steve Berkowitz 

H'askmgioH Pest Service 

CLEVELAND — On the surface, the 
U.S. national soccer team’s 3-2 loss to 
Bayern Munich at Cleveland Stadium 
looked bad 

A national team four weeks from its 
opening match in the World Cup finals is 
not supposed to lose to a professional dub 
that is without six of its top players, even if 
the club did just win the German first 
division championship. 

"If (he VS plays tike that, it will be 
veiy difficult for them," said Bayern Mu- 
nich’s coach, Klaus Augen thaler, whose 
team erased a 2-1 halftime deficit with 
gpals in the 56tb and 60th minutes Satur- 
day. “But in the World Cup, they will play 
totally different, 1 think. 

Slill moving toward its World Cup form 
in terms of personnel and strategy, the 
US. squad certainly played differently 


Saturday than it did in its other recent 
tune-up matches. 


Four foreign-based players — the de- 
ciders Ge Kooimon and Brian Bliss, and 


fenders Ge Kooimon and Brian Bliss, and 
the forwards Eric Wynalda and Ernie 
Stewart — saw their first national team 
action this year. The Americans also 
switched from playing with four defend- 
ers. the alignment they have used so far 
this year, to playing with five. 

One important aspect of the U.S. team’s 
recent play remained constant, however. 
Goals by the forward Frank Klopas in the 
21st and 32 Lh minutes gave the Americans 
leads of 1-0 and 2-1. They also gave Klo- 
pas at least one goal in five of the U.S. 


team's past six games and a total of six 
goals during that span. 

Tve never had a streak like this," said 
Klopas, 27, who returned to the U.S. team 
in January after playing four seasons in 
ihe Greek first division. 

“When I played in Europe, I played as 
an attacking midfielder and I was used to 


scoring eight to 10 goals in a season." he 
added. 

Klopas s career has been in doubt for 
most of the past two years. He tore the 
anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee 
and underwent reconstructive surgery in 
the summer of 1992. But the knee became 
infected. That destroyed the repair work 
and forced Klopas lo have the surgery 
redone in July. 

Klopas now appears on the verge of 
assuring himself a place on the U team's 
22-man Worid Cup rosier, Tor which 25 
players remain under consideration. 

The Americans are down to three exhi- 
bition matches before their World Cup 
opener on June 18 against Switzerland. 
Two games remain before the U.S. team’s 
coach. Bora Milutinovic. plans to an- 
nounce his World Cup roster. 

All of those matches will be against 
national teams that are in the 24-team 
World Cup field; Saudi Arabia on 
Wednesday in Piscaiaway. New Jersey; 


Greece on Saturday in New Haven. Con- 
necticut. and Mexico on June 4 in Pasade- 
na. California. 


row in the raring classics, and that 
horse was Go for Gin. But he still 
had lo cope with (he extreme odds 
dictated by racing history: Only 11 


horses have swept the Triple „ . - . . , ^ 

Crown, none since Affirmed diSit ra^After a weA of owreast t de- mdr 
16 years ago with the teenager brokeArough Satur- ,ade 

Steve Cauthen small in the saddle began shining on t by 

and ihe great Alydar flying at their muddere and fast-track types alike, ifor- edy 
heels in all three races. S°* die stage was set for a nidi- four avc _ 

How extreme the odds? «Uy different environment than nger 

"You need an extraordinary i he ra in and slop that embroiled the 
horse," said Nick Zita who trains *~jby* 'J™ n borses were crowded bu- — 
Go for Gin, “and a lot of luck." ^d J 05 ^ “d only Go for Gin tuna 


three times, including the Ken- osa 
lucky Derby. However, he didn’t ct,_ 


Newcastle Signs U.S. Playei 


Brad Friedel. the starting goalkeeper for 
the 1 992 U.S. Olympic team, agreed Satur- 
day to a three-year contract with Newcas- 
tle of England 5 s Premier League, The As- 
sociated Press reported from Cleveland. 

Friedel. 23. will report to Newcastle 
following the World cup. He has 24 ap- 
pearances for the U.S. national team and 
is competing with Tony Meola to be the 
World Cup starter. The transfer fee was 
said to be more than $500,000. 

Newcastle, which finished third this sea- 
son, already has two goalkeepers: Pavel 
Smicek of the Czech Republic and Mike 
Hooper of England. 

"There’s a berth open, hopefully for him 
to take it.” said Paul Stretford, a British 
agent who negotiated for Newcastle. 


and the great Alydar flying at their 
heels in all three races. 

How extreme the odds? 

"You need an extraordinary 
hose,” said Nick Zita who trains 
Go for Gin, “and a lot of luck." 

In the last four years. Zito has 
bad both. He won the Kentucky 


free of mud bogs and traps. 


Derby in 1 991 with Strike the Gold And that was fine with Rene La- 
and came back to win it again two marque, the high-spirited owner of 

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weeks ago with Go for Gin. Then Kandaly, the winner of the Louisi- 
he headed into the Preakness sad- ana Derby and an absolute enemy 


dHng the favorite but admitting of rainy race tracks. In fact, the colt 
that his eyes were straying three was scratched from the Derby 


weeks down the road to the Bel- about two hours before post time 
mom Stakes, the third and final because of the rain. But on a sunny 
challenge on the road to the Triple Preakness day, he pranced while 
Crown. Lamarque sang “The Kandaly 


Crown. 

But win or lose in the Preakness, 
the colts going on to New York 


Lamarque sang “The Kandaly 
Song" on camera for a never-end- •esi- 
ing series of television teams. • or 


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(Continued) 



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,D TBJBl'NE. MONDAY. MAY 23 . 1994 




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■Alive and Well in a Paris i 


f* Alive and Wet 

&-III 

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gS Bv Robin Finn 1992 Wi 

/VpC y«* Tmms 5*to« * court TV 

gSTar : PARIS —The film was ' : House of the Spirits." proof ih 
^^The viewer was Andre Agassi, not a noted culture become 
^■^critic. and lately not even a particularlv noted So — 
c^wfiennis player, despite his innate genius for the venientJ 
Gdrf^sport. Shouldn't he. with the French Open beckon- darken e 
owning Monday morning, be outside sweating on a superaa 
oSS^ciay court someplace instead of lounging inside a union u 
cinema drinking in that singular process where life just a fl 
imitates art? In f 1 

Not to worry, insisted the 1 9th- ranked Agassi, ^ounde 


/. i ” 

S .-n-vr^ /Ter 


.1 

$ 


1992 Wimbledon title with nary a visit to the grass 
court warm-up circuiL is nothing if not living 


Insert .\aawi. his hard-driving and driven fa- whenever I was in a match where I was Icsing 


'1 Is DoiTl@ It HlS JH&y* Germany 


validate their own existence," be said. “Bui if you 
do it the other people’s way and don’t succeed. 


instead of building myself up toward a level where do it the other people s way and don t succeed. 
1 was at least playing better at the end than I was then it’s a complete loss. At some stage you ve got 
when it started. I inevitably only got worse.” to put your eggs in the basket, and if 1 turn out W 


“I speni so much lime beating myself up out 
there. 1 almost cheated myself out of the game." he 
added. 


to put your p gg s in the basket, and if 1 turn out to 
be not (me of the best, at least Fll go down trying 
— and be able to live with myself later." 

Agassi's older brother, Phil, remains, the glue 


:-ward the factors — and 


In the saga of sinmgelv twined spin is. a wife institution he can r.c longer Jj witnout: his only 
wounded to the quick by her domineering bus- condition in r?;ymira _to it a voyv io slop looking 


' Bui' now. savs Agassi, be has remratd .o die bthind ttegUtier. H c saffold- 

.ame *hh an 'alDuSTimspoM ouiiook on Ihc “6 <"> ^ piaigys oompeahve psyebe 

-spun » had piously slewed as dnnmanial to nf wuraamHlu w* j. ^ 


rises or fails. 

personality. Sure, tennis brought him the op- . “He ^ 
porlunirv to switch gears Trom his Bronco to his M 

Lniiev at the nick of a caraae doon to point his [don i think be went mto his career betng bard on. 
nrivafejei twaSd L* Abells for a concert or to himself. He got that way bytryr^wfulfill expec- 
New York for a date «Uh the actress Brooke Cations thal ^5e werea . 

Shields on a whim, and to create a half-mercenary. Agass s 1 994 mentor is BrwKjflbat, a play^ 
half-charitable corporation called Agassi Enter- “f re 

pnsusandnamehimsrt^uMnxncuteoffen ^ 2S5lSh?JS. ! While John 

3ut until this year, when he found himself on McEn^r^ajns a consultant (hence Agassi's 
ibe rebound from wnst surai? and a breakup aJ/reQI ^ towaT d the U.S. Tennis As- 

with his longuroe companion. Wendy Stewart, tn scxHation). and Jimmy Connors loaned him the 


— is against Mats wiiander. a tnree-tims rrenen 
c Sto jOpcn champ. 

U A few times fear took over in ihe slam Finals. 
Gensuj which means you go oul there not believing you 
oSrtSwcan do iu but hoping your opponent can';," Agassi 
g£"v. said. "But 1 can’t picture nie not playing the best 
3^,' match of my life if I get to the French Open final. 
S? 1 ?'' It’s iust a Question of gelling there.'' 


Graf Hopei 


Fm 


Agassi 's 1994 mentor is Brad Gilbert, a player 
laden with more tenacity than talent, just 1 the 
opposite of the athletic ingredients that distin-. 
guish Agassi from the bulk of the pack. While John 
McEnroe remains a consultant (hence Agassi’s 


££££ It's just a question of getting there." PARIS — Steffi Graf said Sunday she hoped 

And for Agassi, an uninspiring 5-3 on clay this Jennifer Capriati s arrest would help the former 
GcnM. season, that’s a major question. teenage teams star wrn her life around. ^ 

This is. after all. a guy who compares himself On the e%e of the French Open. Graf, the 
cajsrf! with an lost library book when the issue of Grand world’s top-ranked woman player, spoke for the 
g££ Slam titles — he owns just one — is raised. first lime about Capriau’s arrest last week on 

SES "I’m overdue." he said earlier this month in Las charges, of marijuana possession and her admis- 
&Sb Vegas, Nevada, where the bulk of his preparation sion to a substance abuse dime in Miami. 

SJ2S for his second-round Joss on clay at last week’s "In a way 1 was upset and in a way ! was sad. 
' 3,eT *f Italian Open consisted of an animated photo ses- said Graf, who turned professional as a teenager 
oibvii sion for Nike on the suburban hardcourts. and grew up in the media spotlight just as c.apnai: 

His critics, and they remain legion, wonder did. “Thee I started thinking a bii more, and 1 
££ipS whether Agassi, with his on-agaio. oFf-again reia- thought it was hopefully not such J paa thing. 
§£££ tionship to tennis and his invariably high-decibel Maybe it makes her look back on wnai she ha? 
g*« r roDer-coasler results, has run cui of time. done and wha 1 . she has achieved and what dtrec- 

&oitw’ But Agassi, who prefaced his campaign for the ticn she is going to go. ‘ 

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C-iLKi CrUrtKioM Saturdayl 2. HPS— Boiton. Dawson f*|. Afllnriesata. Glrordi. W— Ann. S-l. L— Rev 

GIL>J AMERICAN LEAGUE Pucka H (4). HRs— Allan la, C-allanhcr <3|. J.L< 

S[bk Easl Division CMCO90 080 103 100-13 13 2 

GiSot w L pct - OB Oakland OOO 250 513-4 7 2 Saitifdav’S Lille SCOrQi 

Gtiw New York 28 12 7D0 — tFerncnaei. CeoL l*i. De'«in P.Her — 


The AsjficuteJ Press Graf, who waa cn’v 15 when she played in the 

PARIS — Steffi Graf said Sunday >he hoped French Open for ihe firtf time in !A93. «as reiuc- 
nnifer Capriati's arrest would help the former lam 10 apportion an; bli..e for Capriati » irou- 


**! don't knov.- how jhs gre-A up.” she said. “1 


new Agassi had tended to view tennis as his own 
private cross to bear. 

“First. I was playing for my dad. then for the 
oeople who told me 1 could be the best, and l 
started to resent iL” he said, sounding much like 
the energetic convert to psychotherapy that he is. 


said Graf, who turned professional as a teenager ihe minimum age for turning pro Iron: h to Id 
and grew up in the media spotlight just as Capriati and downplayed the nsks o. bumoui on the wom- 
did. ^Theo I started thinking a bit more, and i en's lour. 

thought it was hopefullv .not such j bad thing. **i don't think it's mat 011 or a problem, sne 
Maybe it makes her look back on what she has said. “You can grew u? and have proplems. it 
done and what she has achieved and what direc- doesn't really have ary mine to do v»;;n lennis. 
tion she is going 10 so.'' There are v&y fev. who h.r.e problems." 


mistakes after that were above forgiveness.” 

Agassi rose iike a bullet to No. 3 in the world by 
reaching seven finals and claiming six titles at 18. 

But his biggest mistake, according to the tennis 
establishment, lav in his not taking the tennis 
establishment seriously enough. 

•'A lot of people want you to do it their way io 


social! on), and Jimmy Connors loaned nun toe 
doctor wfao rebuilt his wrist, Agassi has enlisted 
the loquacious Gilbert to script the tennis portion 
of this latest rejuvenation. 

But Agassi be did not expect Gilbert to be 
responsible for taking him from No. 19 to the top. 

That quality seems to be coming, perhaps sub- 
liminal])’, from Agassi's rapt interest in the impres- 
sive, impassive reign of his quieter contemporary. 
No. 1-ranked Pete Sampras. 

"When 1 look at Pete, it inspires me," Agassi 
said. "Four years ago he couldn't keep a ground 
stroke on the court, and now look at him. Abso- 
lutely he’s got great talent, but he’s also worked 
pretty hard behind the scenes to be where be is 
now.' Pete’s maintained his good results for a 
couple years now, got tea himself to a place where, 
week after week, he’s in such a groove with his 
ability that people respect him and fear him." 


Boston 

LrriJOl _ ... 

Grerr Baltimore 
Grnw Toronto 
&SS Detroit 
Grev 

C' ri JI Chico so 
Minnesota 
GraP Cleveland 
Kcnsaiciiv 
Gral Milwaukee 


(TB rough Saturday} 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dlvlskm 

W L P 

28 12 .7 


Grvr 

Gue; Terra 


74 IS 

27 17 j 

:i 20 j 

IS 21 J 

Central Division 

23 17 ; 

22 IV J 

20 IV J 

v 20 20 J 

17 24 
Wait Division 

20 34 / 

18 22 

ie 23 

M3i 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 


BMItm OCT 1 OB Ml— 3 6 1 I2> and 

Minnesota IS4 0111)0 0t*— 21 22 0 L — Gcrdne 

HMkethi Ouantrill (7i. Frenvirm i2>. Hor- Aiiaata 
rls I Si. Rvcn (5). Tomherlln >7) end Voile: Colorado 
Pulido. Steven s |8:. Merriman (») ana Wol- Averv. w 
beduParks 14). w— Pullda.2-3.L- Hnkotti,2- os& Moore 
2 HPS— Boston. Dawson (»). Mlnnesaia. Glrordi. VI 
Puekall 14). HRs— Alia: 

Chicago 080 >03 100-13 12 2 

Oakland 000 250 013— t 7 2 SaiUfd* 

A.Ferncruj-1, Cook ri. DeLeon >S>. P.Her — - 

nendv; '9) ert ‘Icrkcvlcc: Doriin-j. CWtiverts • 

(Sl.'/eeicfi >7* ano Steinaach. W— A.F-rnandor. Milwaukee 
*!. Corllng. 3-5. h 3;— -Cnieaso. Dr Jackson a,rralt 

to). LJotmsun II). Oo^ lend. Sierra ill I. Navarro. 

Kansas City 014 lou 000-6 7 : Woor , 

California 178 111 CGI — 7 10 0 ‘ n < 9 i Dn 


IJ> and Somlaao. w— EvtrsBcrd. 1-0 
L— Gardner. M. 5v— ALPcre; (41. 

Aiiaata *30 ioo 503—7 i 9 

Colorado 001 WO 000—1 7 T 

Averv. McMicftoei IV) ana J.Looei: Revn- 
asa Moore lei. Mjv.utwji (Bl.Harkev (81 and 
Glrordi. «— Avert. S-l. L— Revnoso. 3-4. 
HRs— Atlanta, Gallagher I2i, J.Looe: 1*1. 


Saturday’s Line Scores 



East Division 



W 

L 

Pct. 

Atlanta 

26 

14 

A50 

Montreal 

23 

18 

.561 

Florida 

22 

20 

524 

New York 

<0 

21 

488 

Phiiadetphic 

1? 

72 

.452 


Central Division 


Cincinnati 

2e 

(5 

624 

St. Lout* 

22 

18 

5ft) 

Houstan 

23 

19 

548 

Pittsburgh 

19 

;i 

J7S 

Chicago 

10 

24 

.400 


West Division 


Los Angeles 

24 

19 

5SB 

San Francisco 

:i 

21 

500 

Colorado 

17 

73 

425 

San Diego 

10 

r 

.233 


name 19) and Mac tor lane: Moor one. 
M. Letter 141 and C.Turner. w— M.Lellar. 3-3. 
L— Belinda, 1-2. HRs — K.C« Gaeltl (7), Shum- 
oert (2). Callfor nig. Healer i7i,BJockson (4i. 
Tents 000 011 BOO— 7 t 0 

Seattle 543 500 30x— 1? 21 0 

Pgsllk. Felcrao t3j. Hr«e!l <?t. Ol'ver 17) 
and RoarlgueA J.Oril: is) - Rjannson. P Ion- 
ian bera (7). A-ala 19; nna D .Wilson, 
w— Ajahnaa 4-3. l— P avlik. o-l 

HRv— Texas, C James (2). Seattle. GrITIev Jr 
(18). Jellerson 151. E.Vlarfiner 121. T Mar- 
line: 141. Lavullo (1;. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
San Francisco m 000 too so— 1 10 o 
ChlOTO 0C3 600 010 Cl— 2 f 0 

01 imt.'oci! 


BiTken.Jcckson iBi.Burta (91 onaMonwor- M-:Cosluli 15) and Lavallicre: Von Poopei. 

«v TnvWl ,-nn 'Al fVln ^nirilMn iCi .a. ... ... . .a. 


Friday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cleveland one 0M ooo— o a o 

Toronto 200 800 OCX— 7 8 0 

Nogv and S-Alomarr Hentgen are Borders. 
W — Hentgen. 6-1 L— Nogv. 3-3. HP— Toronto. 
Carter (13). 

Milwaukee GW 301 ooo- « 10 i 

Detroit 002 021 14s— 10 IS 0 

igroslc*. Henry (51. Brmkev (7) one Haroer; 
Doherty. Gardiner 18). Grocm 19). Her.reman 
191 and Kreuier. W— Doherty. 5-1 l— M enrv. C-l. 


ina: TrochseL Crim IS). Ctlo :2|. Sauttsia 111 
and Wilkins. W—Bauiisio. 1-3. L— Burba. 0-1 
New York 000 OOl 200—3 5 1 

PMladelphhi ooo 4M 01= — 5 « o 

Gazzo. Linton 151. Semlncrn (al. Hlllmon 
(7i. Mason IB) and Hundley Williams. 3lo- 
cumS 17), DJoncs tVi and Daullun. >V— Wil- 
liams. 2-0. L— Ga=o. S-l. Sv— D.Jone* 131. 
Mantreal 001 Ola ess— S !a o 

Plttsaorgh D00 310 3»-3 7 1 

Hill. WCftClona 13) and wos'er: Cooke. 
Pena (Bl. Tomlin (8). Mtccil (31. aallara i!}. 
Hcse (91 ondSlaughl. W— Hill.7-1 L — Pma. I- 
I. Sv — Well eland Hi. 

San Diego 000 OOO Ml— 1 7 2 

Houston 101 060 00s— 2 6 0 

Ashbi.Hotfman (8) end Ausmus: Swindell. 
Hu3e> l c ) and Eusebio. W— Swindell. 4-1. 
L— Asnsv. 0-4. J.— Hudel i3r. HR-Son DlT- 
ua. Plantler (12). 

Let Angeles iro w mo— 2 7 o 

ctrslnmnl COO 100 181—3 7 0 

Canalotli.Gch (71 andCaHsrnande*. Plat- 


HRs— Mllwouke*. Harper 13). Detmil. PWJIIPS a (v; - r,i 0 . Fortugn a (77. °urtin IB) end 
IS). Whitaker (81. Tetnelon ti). Darselt. Taueensce ll). W— Rutlln. >Q. 

BaINmare 0« 050 100— 1 6 o l — G afl. 5-2 

New York coo soo ooa— 5 12 o si. Louis ooo in 000—3 t 0 

Mover. Williamson i4>. mitij (7). Elchhorn Florida era ora coo— 2 » l 

18) and Hollos: Abbott. Wick man (8) and Cormier. Eversgerd (li.Haovan 16). Mur- 
Levrltt w— Abbott. 5-1 L— Mayer, l-l pny (71. Arooa (8). M.Pe-e: ("i and P09- 
HR— New York, Velarde III. noBl: Gardner. Aauino (A). Mull* (7), Lewis 


Tavtor IS). Briscoe lll.Horsman Pl.Acrc l«i 
and Hemanaw— DeLeon. i-LL— Tailor. 0-1 
5 v — AkcCosk I J 1 121. HRs — Chicane. Thomas 
(14), venr.-ra ■ I0i. Ootlora srelnoaOi 171. 
Boston 000 000 D0O— 0 8 1 

Minnesota 000 010 Nx— 1 6 0 

Finn V 3)4 Ry<m IS) end vull*; T aoanl. 
Aguilera (7‘ ana WalbeO. vy— ■ r aoanl. 4.3. 
L— Finn»okL o-l. Sv— Aguliere ivi 
K acjra Ci:y 003 KO coo— C 4 1 

Call. “am lc 001 oo) six— 3 1 a 

Gordaa Brewer IB), Meacham Ifi! and 
Mu/nc; Lcftwlch, Lerleris (8). Bgicher (8) 
and Fauregtn. W— Lcttwlch. 2-s. L— Gordon. 
3-1 Sv— Butcher, 111 

Texas 200 000 BOO— 7 7 2 

Seattle 071 271 00*— 13 14 0 

Helling, Oliver Ml. While side 16 1 and Rodri- 
gue: adnOrtU (8): Bash), TX)a vis <81. Rlsley 

I-) and D. Wilson. W — BcS! 0.2-4. 1 He 11 in?. > 

J. HP*— Seattle. Anmony M.Soloili Gr:(lcv 
i: :V*J. Bur.ner :?], TJVlarline: IS;. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
San Francisco 203 110 033—10 12 0 

Chicago 531 801 2te— W 15 2 

Hlckerson. vonkmdlngnom 12). Fre* (41, 
Gome: (7) ora Monwarlns; Castillo, But- 
llnger (4). cha (7). Crlm raj or>d Parent. 
W— Bullirger. 1-0. L— Hlckerson. 2-1 

Sv— Com 1 1). HRs— San Frcndsco, Williams 


2117) 3jndii;2:.;srrcon:ii.Ct>!cago.Srss3 Cbunichi Hanshm 2 


t s J. Euecnelf v okenam3 3. Hiroshima 0 

Atlanta ill :24 1 7t— £ li 2 Sundov's Resulti 

Colorado M 0 CM 3)3—: 7 1 Yokutt <, YOfnhPl 3 

Mercker. Wtflleri 14 ,,9cdrs;!gnt6>.MclVU- Chunlcttl 5. HohShin 1 
chaei Hi end Lose:: Harris, Butterfield (6). Yokohama *. Hiroshima 2 
AAunar t T l. Reed (8) ana Glrordi. PoclOc Leo 

W— Mercs rr. >0. L— Harris. 2-3. HRs— ai- W L 


Pacific League 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Milwaukee O’.S 010 MM— 4 11 1 

□ 7 troll 201 011 OSx— 7 la 0 

Navarro. Orosco 17], Sconlan (3) and this- 
fon; Moore. Krueger (71. Harris 16). Henne- 
man (91 and Krevter. v.— Moore. 4-3. L— No- 


Blcheiis H7i. 

Mont red! 000 072 722—4 4 2 

PiltSbunli 510 300 U»— 4 13 0 

Ruyirr. Lear 17). lJ eredle 13). Boucher iBl. 



W 

L 

T 

PCI. 

GB 

Selbu 

73 

13 

0 

aj» 

— 

Dale) 

r 

IS 

c 

JW 

I’T 

Latte 

18 

19 

0 

457 

t‘: 

Crii 

14 

1« 

a 

457 

8’t 

Klnncn Ham 

14 

:i 

i 

MH 

7’i 

hinlelsu 

14 

20 

i 

AU 

I 


SiCL-an:. ft— Letter. M. suvrer. 2-t. Satcrdar's Results 

HRs— =*l: Is. King -l). Hunter (3i. Merced (ll. Selbu 8. Lolte 7 
SI. Lqc.s 000 r» 753—7 11 3 Dciel 4. Orix 2 

Florida 300 DO) 072—5 11 0 Nlsoon Ho m 7, Mnlrisu 5 

Tewrsbur*. JW.Prrer IV). Arocno ivi ana SunacYs Res 

Pagnoa:): Hammond. Men 131. YJ’eroz (7|. Lotte E Seibu 4 
Mulls (ft and Somlage. W— ' Tewksbury. 8-t. Orl» 11. Dolei 5 
L— Nsn. 7-7. S<— Arecm (2). HRs— SI. Louis, tilBccn Ham 3. Kintetsu 5 
Glt/.ev (3). ZeDt ( a ). Florida, samiaon iC). 

Los Asnjlra 3:c 3&1 540 — i 9 1 ; . ' V * 

Chctnnali 3C£ Oil A ~. — l 12 I . . . j‘ . * ' ; 

RJUtarUnex. DreitS't (Bl sr; Plaara: Rooer " — — — 

McEirov r?i. j.« rmnev >i ,. FarrrjiM ivi and CHdav’s NBA Plan 

Dorser. W— Rjutortmci H L— J.Brcrder.H 7 * 

New York HO 030 ioo-? M 1 

Philadelphia OM 120 0C*-» 15 1 

Soberhegen. L.nlon (51. Mo: on (41. JAloh- tntCB90 ■ 

ranllia (7) an 9 Hunaic-: aosvis. Wells (5). M v . rmkI#ii fT: ” ' 

•;r B “J? 9-19 WO 2. 3'orXs ^*12 22 11 

Sy-0 Jones 

zsr s s ss * : 

Senes. 7aca,.a )7. moAuimus. Pr- noids. r a ,tw-laht >9 j-3 «' Arms" 

7 c Janes i»l. Ml .'.VI I hams ,7. and EuseB.o. sin 

W Pf (Tolas. 2-1. L-Benel 7-L 4v_M..W... wSSTaSt 

Mams If). HR— Hca?:od. ConlntM (7). ST- SZll m 


Grcnger, Plchcrdc IN. Belirwc (81. Moo- varro. 2-t. HRs— Milwaukee, vauatm HI. 


Nilsson (5). Ward (5). Dciroil. r.reuler ill. 
Ballirnore 300 010 100 — I 1 I 

New York 500 000 OO*— 5 9 1 

Rhodes. Oquisi 17) and Tackett; Perea. Ka- 
mlcnleskl (nl, Howe (V) and LewUr. 
W— Rerctl-i L-Phoaos. T-5. Sv— Howu (3). 
hr — M ew fork, Melvin (It. 

Cleveland 001 183 103-1 12 I 

Toronto S12 Ml OOx— * 11 1 

Nubhob. Barnes ll). Farr 14'. Shuo 13! ana 
Pena: Leber. cast il la (71. Williams i81. Timlin 
(vi.Cadarel (9), Brow ivi aid Knorr.W— Letter, 
30. L — Nabholi.C-1. Sv— Brow (ll.H Rs— Cleve- 
'and. KIHrr III. Toronto. Molltor ; <6). 
Chicago OOO 301 811—4 7 1 

Cali kind 813 509 Ml—} 9 1 

Atvorer. CrLcO.i (7). Asscnmochcr (81. 


Nls>oon Horn 7, klnlrrsu 5 

Sunocv's Results 


- ’ - .f.oa 

Friday’s NBA Playoff 


ekM ‘ I ‘ New York 17 14 ll IV— 7V 

Phllodclphio OM 120 OCx— 9 15 1 — — 

Soberhcgen. L.nlon (5).Mo:on Ml.JJWon- Ch!cn, ° f, 22 M ,7_w 

™ *•’ 3 "™n' e r, « “- Y - : Ookier IkSrrtta 1-4 1-21 Ewmg 

‘ M w A r,r * ^ +n « u. An*,™ m m i 

P. , ,r -" 1 ' haroer 4-v 33 il. Meson G2 M 0. Do vis 0-7 r-i T. 

SOI oTe « H.Wlllioms MMiBlackrr»nM«J Bonner 

7,“,'^° ”, T_: ! . M M) n. C-ataK 0-1 M 0. Totals 23-75 17-r:?. 

-n-a.a .* -a - L-mu- "p^- rdl^ ChtCMO: PtaPenS-Js^O 13. Granl 6-144-J le 
Tr S !?n»7 -VII u.fnZ -T nn/p » CarfwrlBhl 3-V 3-3 V. ArmsTodO 6-14 7-V TO 

W^p^ notfl^ * ‘ L - ■ « V M.wn' W "T***- * '0- Lonalev 5-62-28. KukoC 1-2 4-t 

Terns H , HP ‘ Ue-T-nr -nrntam 4. English 1-2 M2. Kerr 3-7 M 7. S.WIIhams 1 -5 

l.cms It). HP.-. .C..,t>r.. ^onlnill (7|. q -0 z Parson M 0-0 3. Totals 3383 25- Jl 7J. 

>Pa!at seals— New Yor. 4-ls (Starks <•?. 
Ths frt ,’o'iaci w 5 refer: Watch SiccJtiran M.AnW.jnr 1-2. Ewirg (M. Davis fr 

• Z Her »er 0-3'. Chicago 2-ll (Armstrong (-3 

SAT’JROAY'5 GAME. Joraon went l-fe-< K«rrl-4.5i»llih0.|.PIoi»n0.3i.FDUle«0Ut- 
with an P9I (net came an asreundou' 'n me —utarks. Resounds— New rc-k Jt 'Ewing 
taurta ir.'.ing. He slruck cut one:, sratnded *4'. Chicago a tG-cr: 12). Assist*— New rerk 


Ths gvJcfsaet w'sr tfar. Watch 


out twice, mxt hed on* error. 

SEASON TO DAT C : Jcrcan is betting ZP 
(33-tor-ls;i wirh 11 rurs.7cauaiss.2i S3ls 12 
vmirs. 4-' imi.eok.f5 end ll sts'en mi« m (7 
DftWl Jcrdcn ncs So Pu'CUt*. on- OS5l*t 
and live errors. 

Japanese Leagues 

Cen:r=( Licnuc 


17 (Starks 7). Chicago 23 .’Pipped Si. Total 
fouls— New York 30. Chicago 17. Tuchnlcal- 
— Piopen. Flagrant taut— Storks 

Saturday's NBA Piayoffs 

Pftosate 21 24 2? IS — 94 

Hasstan 12 70 27 2s— 104 

Housion wins series 4-3 
Ph.aoalx: Bor Hoy t-19 tx -3rcan i-1?b 8 
14. Miller 1-2 C-c 2. v._’ahison »-77 7 ~ 75. M0- 



W 

L 

T 

“Cl. 

GB 

icrlgS ll i-1 8. Kieine 65 :-2 1. Amge 6 12 1-7 18. 

rartiwi 

22 

M 

3 

.611 

— 

CeboCos !■:«: F_'chnu)n 60600. Totals 36 

Chumchi 

23 

IS 

0 

571 

l-.s 

83 94. 

>oluli 

19 

ie 

3 

51J 

2’z 

Ncuston: Horrv 67 2-t 15. Thorpe 6S 62 4. 

rotohema 

lo 

T« 

0 

.457 

S’: 

Olaluwan 1633 I-J 37. Ma/weli 614 67 IX 

Hansh'n 

18 

20 

D 

.444 

4 

Smith 2-8 60 4. Elle 65 1-1 5. Cassell 612 4-4 22. 

Hirevuma (3 

Saiuraa 
Yakuh 7. Yomli.wi 5 

'.-o 0 

ft Results 

394 

74: 

Curefon 7-1 60 ITorals 4485 1613 UH. 

6 Point goals— PhoenH 627 lAlnge 610. 
Bor) lev 2-7, Malerfe 1-5. K. Johnson 61 Green 


Friday’s NHL Playoff 

Toronto 8 8 8—8 

Vancouver 1 I 3— i 

Vancouver lead* sort** 2-1 

First period— l. Vancouver. Bure 11 (Lin- 
den). 13 :2S. Penal lies— aork.Tor ( roughing I . 
i:A»: Claris, To- (elborlnp). »;»: Satnch. 
Von imjtv-si icklng), 10:J1 : G'rnn.Van (ntah- 
Silcking'i. 11:12; Court nsll. Von (IDgh-sflCk- 
Irgl. 14:U. 

seeshd period— 2. Vancouver. Adams 3 
'Browa Bure). 4.S4 (pc). Penalties— Baum - 
gortner.Tor (charging). 3:2*; Cavrtnall.Van 
I hooking), 4:20. 

Third period— 3. Vancouver. Bure 12 (Cro- 
ren). 15:*9.4, Vancouver. Gellnos 4 (Babvch. 
Didvck). 19: J7 (pp). P mollies — Ostramo, Tor 
(roughing). 13:58: Glvnn.VOfi (Interference). 
11:58: Pearson. Tor. malar-game misconduct 
(Oshlinal. 14:5D: Rouse, Tor. malor-9ame 
mlsconduci (ftgnllng). 16:59: Gllmour. Tar. 
nr.:nor-rR(sconduct-gonte misconauct (rough- 
ing), 16:50: Hedlcan. ven ( roughing', 16:50: 
Momesso. Von. minor-game mfsconducf 
Iraughlng), 16:50: Brown Van molor-game 
misconduct (fighting). 16:50: Clark, Tor 
(roughing). 17:23; Potvin, Tor, served bv 
Mandervlile (slashing)- T9: 17. 

Shots oo pool' Toronto 15-8-4—74. Vancou- 
ver 9-1 1-5 — 73; power-play opportunttla- 
— Toronto d at 4; Vancouver 2 ol 6; gaefles- 


BOLOOMA OPEN 
in Bologna, Italy 
Men's Semifinals 

Atoerto Berasotraul (1), Spain def. Slava 
Dosedel (6). Czech Republic. 7-5. 4-2; Javier 
SantHez (3>, Spain, def. Slefuno PescosolkJo, 
Italy, a-3. 62. 

Final 

Scxichci def. BerasateguL 7-4 (7/3), *4 6-3. 

STRASBOURG OPEN 
In Str asb o u r g . France 
Women's Singles. Semifinals 

Mary Joe Fernandez (31. ILS-del. Klmlko 
Date (2). Jopotl 3-4.6-i. 61; GobrtataSobatln) 
(1). Argentina, def. Judim Wlesner f»). Aus- 
tria. 64. **. 61 

Final 

Fernandez del. 3oballn1 2-4, 64. 4-0. 

WORLD TEAM CUP 
in DuesseMorf, Germany 

Germany \ United States 0: Michael Ittch. 
dtf. Pet* Sampras. 34. 7-6 19 V. trl; Bemd 
Karbocher, def. Michael Chang. M, P-2; Pat- 
rick Kuehnen and Korslen Braaich. def. Pat- 
rick McEnrue and Richey RenaOerg. 4-4. 63. 

Spain 3 Sweden 8: Carlos Costa ana Tomas 
Carbone ll del. Jonas Blonman trU Jon Apo» 
6-t 67. 6-3. 

Final 

G erm an y X Spain I: Stich. def. Sergt Brv- 
guera, 2A 6-4. 63; Cories Casta. Spain, del. 
BenmiKarbQcticr.Gerninny.fr 2, 4-4. 60: Si left 
and Patrlk Kuetinen. del. costo and Tomas 
Carbone] I. 7-5. 66. 4-4. 


Behind 

^ : Raien- : y^gi 

DUSSELDORF —MCdife'' 
Stich enjoyed a donWe^pgSita^ 
day on the 

cfaored Germany to ' 

. the World Team'Q^ otfafc;- 

day. - ' '''■v v C.''-.'.”tr-r : i^S 

A day afte- ij 
worid’s No. f player, ' 
Sampras, bis first 

S^BlSmi .j 

he has dte varied game! to beats: 
the best on day wnbn^ji^^ 
6-3 victory over BhigBcsi'ferf 
- -After 5pain puBed 1 bttckVtpTr 
M when Carlos Costa 
Bemd Kaibacfaer; 6-2, vW; 

0, Sticb leaned wth his 
Ciq> doubles partner, Pair&* - 
Kuehneu, for a 7-5. 4-6, 64 - 
triumph over Costa and Tb-J 
, mas Carbondl.irittie doubles.'/ 
It was Germany’s second " 
success in the event The Ger-, j 

mnne beat Arg ftrtfrna in. Hw».: 

1989 final. The best remit foe. . 
Stich. ranked second ‘in .i!# - 
world, on the slow amiis at - 
Roland Garros was & semif£0 ' 
nai place in 199L. He lost 'hrj 
the fourth round last yeac 


0- 3J, Houston 6)4 fHorrv 3-4, Cossofl 201 Max- — ^ Toronto, Potvla 9-7 (38 anoMo sown), 
wot) 1-2, Etta O-l. Smltti 0-4). RabOBMta- Vancouver. McLeoa 10-S (29-29). 

— Phoenix 48 (Barkley 151, Houston 50 Rafimlmi 1 * A1I4I Blawmff 
(Ota)uwon 17). Assfsfi— Pboonix 21 f/uofm- _ . 

ion ill- Houshm 32 (CoshII 7). Total taut*- . . . . 

—Phoenix IS. Houstan 22. Tacbnlcolp-Cra- !T*' ["* J ! ["! 

rail, fringe. Barkiev. Maxwell. Flagrant "■* JWW * 1 1 5 

touta-Moxwetl, Barkley. EHwiora-Max- jSrrau auemr J 

lj a BorkHty ■ hfll P0TlWr“li NW JftTJlVi Rlcnbr 

Denver II 34 21 2>-« (Dowd. MocLmp). >0:17 fpp>. 2. New Jersey. 

Utah 19 27 28 17—91 Guerin 2 (Stevens). 16;S4. PowHItt-LMMi. 

Utah whM serin 4-3 riY (hooking), 18:01 : Baukeboam, NY, malar 

Denver: EMU 2-4 1-3S. R.WUIIanwS-145-9 17. ’f 22 *' P *! 10 a WJ ; ‘ ffoW ‘ 

Mutambo 2-7 612 IX Abdul -Rauf 614 2-2 14. Kig). 15:2 2; U~NY 1 trt wtaal. 17;-51. 
Sttth 3-9 2-38. Pack 4-9628, B.WIII lams 5-4 3J ..r 0 ’?” P Wl °*~T Ti .S’ 

Utah: Corbin «M1 Malone «MS 7-9 31. i lP Mrai ‘ ,2: U: 

SPencer 618 63 11. SlocAtan 6* 2-2 6, Homo- J 1 * 1 *™ 1, U lt - - . 

rak 7-13 63 18. Chamber* 2-4 614. Humotirlm 

1- 31-11 Benoi 14-4 1- 1 10. Crorty 61 600. Totals I,’ 1 . ' 

3^.79 J7.2J ei 3:16; LoWe wy (noramg/# 

T- Point ivrit nrnurr n J! IRWIIlioma w StlOtl OH OOOl NWf York 

Jpr ^ y 1144-* woriurthef 

awu i- Rod 0-1. Rogers M MJtoH 24 IHorno- i^idu 

cek 1-2. Bench 1-2). Rebounds— Denver A3 l 1 ** - J yyl Pl . 4 l WO * > !^ 

: Mutambo IT). Utdi 43 (Malone 14). AuMv fiSril «T 

—Denver IS (Pock 3). Utah 29 fstockran 9) ■*"*. * N ™ **• 

Total foots— Denver 25. Utah 27. Tactmicaf- oeur ' l l - 

s— AbduFRouf, R.wllllams, Stockton. Denver 

Illegal aetarae. 


soccer: 


Rwea Pint Dtvlaien. 

Monaco l, Nantes 0 

La Havre L Toulouse 1 

Comes a Salht-Ettofme 0 • 

Parte S.G « Bordeaux 1 , 

Lens X MatwriUe 3 
Mnrttouw X U(f» t 
Aumrre 2. Strasbourg l 
Lyon 6 Montpellier 3 
Metz X Coen i 
Angers 1, Sodiaux 2 
Ftoo) team stand) mis: Parts ao. 9 
paints; Marseille, 51 ; Atutce re and P «<r .tw»., 
M: Nantes. 45; Cannes. 44; AA»tpdller,41^- 
Lvon. 42; Monaco, Jl; Lens, 39; Mrt-gnem - 
and Mali. 37: Strasbourg, S4; Sochmrn, 33i 
Urn. 32; Caen, 3); lo Havre, 29; Marttaun, 
27; TautauM. 23; Angara 21. • 

SCOTTISH PA CUP ... 

Final 

Rangers a Dundee United 1 

BELGIAN CUP. 

Final . 

AndertechtZ FC Brugge B 

INTBRMATIONAL FRIENDLY ~ 
Germany (Bayern Munich )X United 8 rm«s 2 
Norway ft England 8 

’ KIRIN CUP ; 
Australia I. Japan 1 ’ •" 


Touroftedy f V 

ptadmSeiMayietM am part of tMflni - 

stage, an 86-kD« meter au MM taw frm ~ 
BoIobwl Hals: 1. Endrto Lwnl, Italy, Ihothv 
0.10 mlnvtn or 4ZUB kpft <24427 
Giovanni LumOardi, Itatv, same time; i 
Aariano Baffl, Italy. sJ : 4. Fabta BMdataCHp- . 
ly. x-t; 5, Samueta Sctpavina, Itatv. 6tf 4yG«o- 
vonrH Fktanza Italy. sJ; 7. Strtano ZpnhiL 
Italy. s.f; & Uwa Raab, Gennanv. if; 9, Jur- 
gen Werner. Germany, sJ; VL Omttrl Konv ' 
chov, Russia sJ. 

Second part-7 kBametor (65 mile) nratart- 
liw-ctack tost: i, Armond De Las Cuewa 
France, 7:52 minutes gr overage 533» up 
133.102 mohi 

2. Euoenl Berzin. Russia 2 seconds bBhbsftV 
Miguel Indurafn. Soa)a5; 4 Fneicraoe Gesw 
gronde. I tot v. 12; & Gianni Bum Haty^M; i 
Moreno Argentta llalv. 17; 7, Refi Saranm . 
Denmark, 2i: X Thierry Marie. Fnmea22;ft 
Andrea Cthirafa Italy, 23; 16 MawMBon 
Lem, Italy. sJ. 

OvertMstamfiaoi: 1,Do Los Cnevaa2IMn' 
8:13 mlmdas; X Berzin. 2 seconds behlndfl 
indundaS; 4 Bafff, sJ; 5, Cas o gr ande. 12; k' 
Buona 14 ; 7. Maxlml Ilian Sciardri, ItahotAlB 
Moreno Argentta. Italy. 17: 9. Lend, XU IS, - 
Soren se n. 21. • 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


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CALVIN AND HOBBES 










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INTERN \TION\L HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. MAY 23. 1994 


SPORTS 




Pape 1 


?<* 5 


Red Sox Stop Twins 
As Clemens Holds 
The Hits to Five 


Kfc ; 





TT T- 


Thr Associated Press 

Rx^cr Qcniens limiied Minne- 

RW ’ n innings 
Sunday as tbe Boston Red So* 
stopped the Twins' winning streak 
at seven games with a 9-2 wtory. 

aernens, who has now allowed 
only right earned runs in 61 innings 
over bis past eight suns, walked 
four and struck out seven in hand- 
ing the Twins their first home loss 
in 10 games. 

Jim Deshaies allowed five runs, 
loar earned, and eight hits over six 


It was the fifth straight loss and 
26th in 30 games for the .Vs. who 

are off to their worst start since 
coming to Oakland in 1968. 

Jose DeLeon worked a scoreless 
eighth to pick up the win in relief of 
Wilson Alvarez. Bill Taylor took 
the loss. 


tow, 

ts. an/®’ 
seated 

* ?* dh » 

Jazz and Rockets!. 

Gain, and Bulls §jS 
Force 7th Game sli 


n 


The *fc Wrarf ^T W u the 8 conference seed tc ^Slf } was 

The Utah Jazz and Houston beat a No. I seed told 

S2S3=?s= 


roristSL? ut 7 

soner} eha< * 

as. 

S^g 


AL ROUNDUP 


u 


. innings. He struck out four and 
walked none. 

; Damon Berry hill, Andre Daw- 
son and Mo Vaughn hit home rims 
• for the Red Sox. Vaughn scored 
. three nins. BenyhilJ’s homer, his 
first, in the third made it 1 - 0 , and 
[ ■ the Red Sox added three runs in the 

fourth. 

Vaughn. Mike Greenwell and 
Tun Naehring hit singles to load 
the bases. Scott Cooper hit a iwo- 
run single and Carlos Rodriguez's 
run -scoring single made it 4 - 0 . 

Clemens retired nine of the first 
10 Twins before Alex Cole opened 
the fourth with a triple and scored 
on Sham Mack’s infield out. Dave 
Winfield’s double scored Mack to 
bring the Twins to 4-2. 

The Twins threatened in the 
fifth, loading the bases, but Qenv 
ens got Chuck Knoblauch to hit 
into a double play and struck out 
Shane Mack. 

Boston made it 5-2 in the sixth 
when Greenwell doubled and 
scored when Deshaies errored on 
Dave McCarty's loss while cover- 
ingfiraL 

Dawson’s two-run homer in the 
seventh made it 7-2. 

Berryhill hit an RBI double in 
the eighth and Vaughn hit his Uth 
homer in the ninth 
Indians 8 , Blue Jays 0: Dennis 
Martinez pitched a seven-hit shut- 
out as Cleveland snapped a seven- 
game road losing screak with a vic- 
tory in Toronto. 

Martinez struck out three and 
walked three for his first shutout 
this season and the 24th of his ca- 
reer. He allowed only two runners 
to reach second base. 

Albert BeQe homered and drove - 
in two nms and Carlos Baerga add- 

■ ed two RBls for the Indians, who 
won their first road game since a 
May 6 win it Baltimore. a 

Juan Guzman allowed five runs j, 
and II hits m five imring^ striking a 
out three and walking One. In tire ^ 
second. Belle hit Guzman’s 3-2 u 
pitch over the fence in left for his 
1 3 th homer. ^ 

Tigers 9, Skewers 6 : Travis Fry- 0 
man drove in four runs and rookie a 
Chris Gomez went 3-for-4 as De- 
troit sent Milwaukee to its Uth s 
consecutive loss. D 

Fryman wen 1 3-for-4 with a two- V 
run homer and Gomez singled, " 
doubled and hit his fifth home ran 
in May as the Tigers wot their sixth “ 
straight home game. f< 

The Brewers’ 1 1 -game skid is the d 
second longest in Milwaukee histo- 
ry and one shy of the club record bj 
set in 1987. in 

Urn Belcher gave up four runs e> 
and six hits in S 2/3 innings for his 
second straight win and first at b< 
home after starting the year 0-7. Si 
Mike Gardiner, Detroit’s fifth gj 
pitcher, got the final out for his fa 
third save. 

Cal Eldred allowed seven nms ga 
and 10 hits in dropping his third ft) 
straight decision and fifth in bis ru 
last sax outings. He struck out right tw 
in six inning s. 

■ In Saturday’s games: pu 

Twins L Red Sox 0: Strong gfl 
pitching by Kevin Tapani carried 0. 
the Twins to victory over the visit- so 
mg Boston Red Sox. 

Tapani allowed seven hits in 816 hit 
inning * w alking three and striking Df 
out five. lec 

Gar Finn void, in his second ca- nix 
reer outing, took a one-hitter into , 
(he fifth for Boston and held the Sn 
Twins to five hits. To 

Ymfees 5, Orioles 4: Bob Mel- bai 
vin hit his first home run. of the adi 
year, a three- run shot (hat capped a daj 
five-run first inning , and the ran- hoi 

kees held on for their ninth straight dg 
home win. I 

New York has the best record in nez 

the majors at 28-11 Ne 

Rafael Palmiero set an Orioles tire 
record by extending his hitting ree 
streak to 23 games. ™ 

Bine Jays SUriians7:PaidM* I 
htor hit two home runs, singled feaj 

twice and drove in four as Toronto, 22 1 

after opening a seven-run lead, Ma 
bong on to beat visiting Cleveland- Am 
The Blue Jays took a 5-0 lead m dea 
the first against Ghns NuMkmz. gan 
Roberto Alomar and Dick Scho- h 
field had RBI doubles, Molitor and ceni 
John Oterud hit RBI singles, and 0-fc 
DaradJ Coles hit a sacrifice fly. "in, 

r^os 7. Brwersfc Travis Fq- tra 

man drove in three runs and Cp a “ ho * 1 
Krenier hit a home run out of Tiger seoc 
Stadium, helping Detroit hand and 
Milwaukee iu 10th straight loss., £ 

Milwaukee’s losing streak is its Jem 

longest since a dub-recoid 12 - fWK 
game slump iu May 1987. 

Sot- 6 , Athletics 5: Lance victi 

Johnson’s RBI single broke a ue in B 

therighih inning and Robin V emu- bom 
ra hadlowRBb as the White Sox tngg 
rallied from four nms down in- ^ 

Oakland. L ™ 

Ventura hit a three-run homer Jei 

and added a ninth-inning sacnfta auo 

fly. Frank Thomas also homered anq? 
and scored three runs to increase , 
his league-leading total to 49. anuu 


„ ^ 8 * 3i Royals (fc In Anaheim, 
California, Phil Leftwich allowed 
four hits in 7?S innings as the An- 
gels remained unbeaten under 
Marcel Lacbemaxw. 

The victory was tire Angels’ 
fourth straight and third in a row 
since Lachemann replaced Buck 
Rodgers as manager on Friday. 

Mariners 13, Rangers 2: Ken 


L5SM 


i 

Si 


SB 

^‘ 5 

3 P a, ,iii 


Association playoff aaroes, ,k a . _ „ . . j, . ***- 

. J* ■JS-rtfc ^ 4 -' “ qi "“^by 

forced a decisive seventh game by - - - y ' 1EOr_ — - 

Knatinn ilu Moa.. \Z—_a. 


SrtJ* 

M»So 

ly b 






Griffey Jr. hit his major-league- 
leading 19th homer and Luis Sojo 
hit his first career grand slam as 
Seattle pounded the visiting Rang- 
ers for the second straight game. 

Jay Buhner, Tino Martinez and 
Eric Anthony also hit home runs 
for the Mariners, who increased 
their American League-leading 
home run total to 63 in 41 games 
The Mariners also hit five home 
runs on Friday in a 19-2 rout of 
Texas. 


llPpj 


scored 31 points as Utah halted its 3 l - rJSu 7EE\lJS n ‘" S * 
skid against the upstart Denver w 

” Nuggets were plagued byl^!^? 

NBA PLAYOFjFS Srotaj, ending^ ™ 

— with just 38 percent to Utah’s 46 Djnh 

Nuggets with a 91-81 victory in pe S? lt ' u. ,« . ^ cen- iSf i 

Game 7 of die semifinals. ^ . E 5° wn . b y 19 P«J“is midway m e fn!o 

. In Houston, Hakeem Olajuwon, I 88 ? 5 ^' ^ 

'•irtuaUv unstoppable inside had ^ in each of then 1993 , 

17 points and77rebounds to Iwd » ut » **?!£”* 

he Rockets to a 104-94 victory ^ paUenla >lan- 

>ver the Phoenix Suns in their sev- * U r? , ll rt °*‘ c ^ se '. , , for, 

nth and final game. . scor f d , six of the second fig™ -/„i 

w. tcdX series, » be- Et? ^ "S a e 


m nuuaiuu, naxeem uiajuwon, 
virtually unstoppable inside, had 


.woi 

•°ital 

elk 

1 wi 

hunui; 
igh 
. bi 
» Jura y. 
5 luim 
d i 


Sdhott Issues 
An Apology 


The Associated Press 

CINCINNATI — Marge 
Schott has apologized for her 
latest inflammatory remark. 

The Cmdnnali Reds owner 
said she didn't mean to offend 
anyone by saving “only fruits 
wear earrings." Her remark last 
week angered gay-rights activ- 
ists; “fruit” can be used as a 
derisive term for homosexuals. 

Schott, banned last season 
by baseball’s executive council 
for racial and ethnic sluts, 
tried to end her latest contro- 
versy on Friday by having 
team officiate distribute an 
apology. 


Joe Heine of Phoenix, right, mold only mtch ns Hakeem Otajnwon's shot dropped in for two of die Houston center’s! 7 

Barkley Weighs Ending His 'Great Ride’ 

HOUSTON — ^Charlas ^ Pf 8 ™*! 10 meet w *^ lf,e Suns ’ my option is to have major back surgery, then 

68 ? a V dey answered Physician, Richard Emerson, and two back I’m done." 


La Angela Tims Service 

HOUSTON — Charles Barkley answered 
the question before it was asked. 

“I know the next question is, "Was this my last 
gameT " the Phoenix Suns' star said after the 
Houston Rockets had eliminated his team from 
tire National Basketball Association playoffs on 
Saturday. “I honestly can say 1 don't know." 

The Rockets, who advanced to the Western 
Conference finals for the third time in franchise 
history, will face the Utah Jazz in a best-of-7 
series beginning Monday in Houston. 

But Barkley’s agonizing season is at an end, 
and so, perhaps, is his 10-year NBA career. 


He said he planned to meet with the Suns’ 
physician, Richard Emerson, and two back 
specialists. If they recommend major back sur- 
gery, he said he would retire. 

i "If the doctor can make me feel betier. then 
I'm going to play again," Barkley said. “.And if 
be can’t — bey it’s been a greai ride. It’s that 
simple. Td love to win a world championship, 
but I feel that I’ve accomplished everything 1 
set out to do as a basketball player." 


Barkley was a shell of himself as the defend- 
ing Western Conference champions on Satur- 
day became the second team in NBA histoiy to 
lose a seven-game series after winning the first 
two games on the road. 

Although he took a pain-killing injection 
before the game and two at half-time, Barkley 
maintained that he was ineffective. 


“If I can play without being in pain. I'll be 
back," he added. 


He was 9 for 19, scored 24 points and 
grabbed a team-high 15 rebounds. 


37 points and 17 rebounds to lead 
the Rockets to a 104-94 victory 
over the Phoenix Suns in their sev- 
enth and final game. 

The Jazz led the series, 3-0, be- 
fore Denver rallied to square it 3-3. 
As the I7th straight home team to 
win a Game 7, Utah avoided the 
embarrassment of becoming the 
first team ever to lose an NBA 
playoff after leading 3-0. 

Malone hit 12 of 23 shots and 
pulled down 14 rebounds as the 
Jazz earned their second trip to the 
Western Conference Finals. In 
1992, Utah lost in six games to 
Portland. 

Jeff Homacek scored 18 points 
for the Jazz, who travel to Houston 
for the opening game against the 
Rockets ort Monday. 

Reggie Williams" had 17 points 
and Brian Williams 13 for the Nug- 
gets, who were making their first 


lead, and after Mutombo gpi his « an 
fourth r_..i j £7. .. *• an .lion 


fourth personal foul and left the SZ 
game at the third quarter’s 7:09 * « 

mark, the Jazz rolled. . “Jf 


Malone’s hook sparked a 13-5 at . , 
ran, and Jay Humphries’ three- “id 
point play with 3:10 left in the B“d- 


- on 
weraye, 

“d.cket 
> aglool 
ight you 
and 

talkg ic 
it ideal 
icahhqt 
ACdle- 


tage, its largest. 


ton, it was a satisfyiu 
for the Rockets, who 


victory. 


Game 2 and lost, 124-1 17, in over- 


“Tm relieved that this year is over because I 
don’t want to play in the pain I played in this 
year,” said Barkley, last season’s most valuable 
player, who has been plagued by a back injury 
all season. 


Barkley said he had talked to the former 
Boston Celtics star Larry Bird, whose career 
was cut short by a back injury. 

“Larry told me that it was going to get worse 
before it got better," Barkley said. “I’m never 
going to have major back surgery. If they can 
do somethingwith laser, then that's great. But if 


“I was just in the way.” Barkley said “I 
couldn’t run and I couldn’t jump. A couple of 


times I wanted to make something happen, but 
I just couldn’t do it physically.” 

He was ejected from the game with 7.4 sec- 
onds remaining after he intentionally shoved 
Hakeem Olajuwon to the court as the Rockets' 
center was going in for a layup. 


since 1988. Difcerabe Mutombo got 
12 points, 17 rebounds and two 
blocked shots to extend his NBA 
playoff record for the series to 38. 

The loss ended a remarkable 
playoff run for the Nuggets, who 
fell to a 2-0 deficit to Seattle in the 
first round, only to win and become 


quarter. 


Phillies Rack Up the Homers for a Weekend Sweep of the Mets 

7 Tu* ffam /t/A# Arm w-v ■ . . *"■ 


The Associated Pros 
Lenny DyLstra, Pete Incaviglia 


Destrade. who had a two-nm 
double in the first inning, charged 


and Darren Dauhon each led off the mound. Watson threw his glSve 


addphia Phillies routed the New 
York Mets, 8-3, Sunday to sweep a 
three-game series. 

Starter Tommy Greene allowed 
three runs on four hits and struck 
out six before leaving the game 
after 516 innings. 

In finishing a 10-game home 
stand with an 8-2 mark, Philadel- 
phia dosed to within a half-game of 


NL ROUNDUP 


fourth-place New York in the Na- 
tional League East. 

Philadelphia's Dave Hollins 
broke his left hand while sliding 
into first in the third mning and is 
expected to be out about six weeks. 

Mariano Duncan’s three- run 
heuner in the fifth off starter Pete 
Smith put the P faTKes up 6-1 and 
gave Philadelphia a season-high 
four home runs in the game. 

The Mets' Luis Rivera hit the 
game’s fourth leadoff homer in the 
fourth, and New York added two 
runs in the sixth on Bobby Bonilla’s 
two-run double off Bobby Munoz. 

Dykstra’s hoax; ran in the first 
put the Phizes up 1-0, and Incavi- 
gilia’s shot in the second made it 2 - 
0. It was the fifth borne nu of the 
season for both players. 

Rivera cut the lead to 2-1 with 
his home run in the fourth, but 
Daulton got that ran back when he 
led off the Phillies' fourth with his 
ninth home run of the season. 

After Duncan’s homer chased 
Smith and pul the Phillies up 6-1, 
Tom Quinlan and Daulton hit 
back-to-back doubles to score Ptril- 
addphia’s seventh ran. Ricky Jor- 
dan^ single in the seventh knodted 
home Quinlan for the Pbfllies’ 
eighth mn 


the bridge of his nose. Destrade 
then landed a solid punch to Wat- 
son's face and the benches emptied. 

In the ensuing melee. Cardinals 
left fielder Bernard Gilkey and 
Martins reliever Luis Aquino tan- 
gled, with Gilkey accidentally land- 
ing a punch an the bade of umpire 
Charlie Retford’s bead 
Destrade, Aquino, Watson and 
Gilkey were qected. St. Louis man- 
ager Joe Torre then played the 
game under protest. 

Dodgers 18, Reds 3: Bren Butler 
singled, tripled and homered, and 
Mike Piazza hit a three-run homer 
as Los Angles Dodgers beat Cin- 
cinnati at home. 

The National League West-lead- 
ing Dodgers have won nine of their 
last 11 games. 

■ In Saturday’s games: 

Braves 5, Rockies 4; Kent 
Mercker retired the first 12 batters 
he faced to lead the Braves to tbdr 
15th straight victory over the Rock- 
ies. 

Tony T&rasco homered and 
drove m three runs for the visiting 
Braves, while Merckers perfect 
game was spoiled when Andres Ga- 
larraga singled to lead off the fifth 
for the Rockies. 

Cubs 12, Gants 10: Steve Bue- 
chele had a home ran and four 
RBIs, Sammy Sosa homered twice 
and Chicago withstood visiting San 
Francisco’s ninth-inning rally. 

It was the fifth straight victory 
for Chicago, and Mark Grace had 
three hits and three nms to lead the 
Cubs’ 15-hit attack. 

Pirates 6 , Expos 0: In Pittsburgh, 
Jon Lieber combined on a four- 
hitter for his first major-league vic- 
tory while Kiit Rueter finally lost 



Tbe Cabs’ catcher Mark Parent had to leap for a late throw as the San Francisco runner Royce Clayton sfid safely into ^me ^tote^ 


' to fold, and took a 90-80 lead with 

7: 12 left, only to have Phoenix fight 

bad: once again. 

t 'Hie Suns pufled to 97-92 with 
1:42 to ga but Olajuwoa waded 
■ through heavy traffic for a din^ ^ 
with 1 :30 to play. Then rookie re- 
serve Sam Cassell, who scored 22 ^ 
points, added a pair of free throws -esP 

with 23 seconds left, sealing the : nr 
Suns’ fate. ‘ 

Charles Barkley was ejected , 

along with Vernon MaxweO with 

7.4 seconds left and the Rockets 
safely ah ead. With Houston ahead 
by 7, Barkley fouled Olajuwon 
bard while he was dunking. Max- 
well charged in to object and Bark- 
ley shoved MaxweD. 

Barkley screed 24 points and Ke- 
vin Johnson finished with 25 for 
the Suns. 

I In Friday's game: 

Bufls 93, Kaicfes 79: B. J. Arm- 
strong scored 20 points and Horace 
Grant had 16 with 12 rebounds as 
Chicago forced a deciding game 
with New York in the Eastern Con- 
ference semifinals. Game 7 was to 
be played Sunday in New York, 
where the Krncks have won three 
straight in the series by a total of 10 
points. 

It was tbe Knicks’ ninth straight 
playoff loss at Chicago Stadium, 
the 65-year-old facility that is dos- 
ing next month. 

Patrick Ewing scored 26 points 
with 14 rebounds for the foul- trou- 
bled Knicks, who trailed by 16 af- 
ter three quarters but staged a 
fourth-quarter raUy. They got with- 
in 9 points with just under 8 min , 
utes to go when John Starks hit a 3- 
pointer to cap a 9-2 run. 

But Bin Cartwright then scored 
for the Bulls after grabbing a loose 
ball and Starks was called for his 
fifth foul seconds later. Chicago's 
Scottie Pippen, who had 13 points 
and 11 rebounds, then tipped in a 
miss by Cartwright just before the 
shot dock went off. extending the 
Bulls’ lead to 13. 


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t£5os 3, Phases 2: Pedro Marti- 10 career-opening wins, 

nezoutpitebed and outhit Denny .Ueber. who gave up three hits m 


Neagle, tripling in three runs with 
(be first hit of Ms major-league ca- 
reer to lead visa ting Montreal past 
Pittsburgh. 

Both pitchers got their first big- 
league hits — Martinez was 0-for- 
22 and Neagle was O-for-40 — and 
Martinez overcame home nms by. 


Miami Investigates 
Payoff Allegatio ns 


Romero Takes 
Italian Open 
Coif by a Shot 


EluM i- 


Indurain Falters in Giro Time Trial 


eight innings for the Pirates, sur- 
vived a pair of inning-opening dou- 
bles to make his second excellent 
start since being recalled from 
Class AAA Buffalo 10 days ago. 

Canfaals 7, Martins 5: Bob 
Tewksbury became the majors' 
first dght-game winner, allowing 


The AxsoriuieJ Prtyj 


MIAMI The University of Miami has begun investigating 


Andy Van SlykeandTom Foley to nine hits m eight innings in Miami. 

i t I. _:_L<L V ! lA — •WL* An! nZv -J 


deal Pittsburgh its eighth loss in 10 


Martinez seemed to lose his con- 
centration as Van Sfyke ended an 
0-for- 17 streak with his third home 
ran, and Foley followed two bat- 
ters later with his second. The two- 
homer inning was only the Pirates’ 
second of the season but their sec- 
ond in as many games. 

Cardinals 10, Martins 9i Gregg 
Jefferies' two-run double capped a 
foor-nm ninth inning comeback 
that gave Sl Louis a brawl-filled 
victory over Florida in Miami 

Florida tot a dub-record three 
borne runs in the second innin g, 

^fSS^Ca^&^t^d Rick 
Renteria homered, Jeff Canine hit 
the third homer of the inning off 
Allen Watson to put the Marlins 
ahqad 7-1 Witsan hit tbe next bat- 
ter, Orestes Destrade, on the left 
shoulder with a pitch. 


Tewksbury struck out six and 

walked one. Tewksbury, who was 
lifted before the ninth for Mike 
Perez, has more than a third of the 
Cardinals’ 22 victories, Robb Nen 
took the loss. 


Dodders 6 , Reds 4: Brett Butler’s 
bases-loaded single launched a four- 
run eigh th inning for visiting Los 
Angeles in a game featuring two big 
fielding emus and a lineup gaffe: 

Each team made a run-produc- 
ing error and tbe Reds hatted out 
of turn in the second inning, negat- 
ing a walk and prompting both 
teams to play under protest 

Ptdfies 9. Mets 8 : Milt Thomp- 
son's three-run homer sparked a 
six-run second inning as the Phila- 
delphia, playing at home, outlasted 
New York. 

Phil addphia got IS hits, includ- 
ing five doubles and a triple in 
winning for the seventh time in 
nine games. 


damB by former football players that they offered and received cash 
19^9 and 1991 *** Winn,nS nauonal championships in 19(47. 

“We are going to find out what the truth is." said Edward Foote, 
the president of ihe university. 

10 t ? c actions, players won cash incentive* ranems 
fo™ 50 . for a fumb,e . recovery to $500 for a touchdown. Some 
termer Payers said their teammates, now earning millions in the 
rational Football League, bankrolled the incentive pools, with help 
mmunther Campbell, a rap music star from Miami. 

Hasablc infractions of National Collegiate Athletic Awociation 
rates troml 986 to 1992 surfaced in a story published hv The Miami 
neraia, whose reporters interviewed marc than 30 former plavers 
uurtng a two-month investigation. 

“ t0 allegations will be led by the *houl\ jitornev. 
witn trap from an outside law firm. Foote said Fridav. 

Jimmy Johnson, a former coach of the HurricuVi. declined 
wmmenL Dennis Erickson, who has been Miami's head football 

KS ^ aan8 j0hnS011 ‘ n 1989, Bid hL ‘ 14 JS unaWdrt of Jf1 > 

J£™“rjSyera told The Herald that Campbell established a P ;iv 
22 “ . 5 50 2 “ "Wmg or recovering a fumble: S 100 for a >jck. an 
o uwaqa ing block, an interception or a touchdown, and S20G for an 
m *FT c *Ption returned for a touchdown, 
rJL™ Hu ™ ncs 'MU nobody collected. Stephen McGuire, a 
back ’ Ihe reward reached $500 for a touchdown 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ROME — Eduardo Romero 
of Argentina shot a 5-under- 
par 67 to win the Italian Open 
golf tournament Sunday by 
one stroke over Greg Turner 
of New Zealand, the defend- 
ing champion. 

Romero finished at 272. 16- 
under. to earn his first victory 
on the PGA European Tour 
since the 1991 French Open. 
Turner kept the heat on die 
Argentine, carding the day’s 
low round of 65. 


BOLOGNA (Reuters) — Arman d de las Cuevas of France took the 
leader s pink jersey on the opening day of the Giro d’ltalia cycling race on 
Sunday by winning the afternoon time trial, with Miguel Indurain of 
Spain, seeking his third Giro title, managing only third place. 

Yevgeny Berzin of Russia was second-fastest, two seconds behind the 
Frenchman, who covered the seven kilomeiere (4.3 miles) in seven 
mrnuies, 52 seconds. Indurain was a further three seconds behind. 

De las Cuevas took over the overall lead from Endrio Leooi of Italy 
who won the 86 -kilometer first half of tbe opening stage in the moraint 
Leoni fell to ninth place. 


ITF Weighs Raising Age for Women 


Turner's 12-meter (40-foot) 
putt found the heart of the cup 
on the 17th. moving him to 15- 
under and a lie for the lead 
with Romero. But Romero 
went ahead with a 2.5-meter 
putt for birdie at the ]5tb. 


LONDON (AP) — A special committee has been formed by the 
International Tennis Federation to consider raising the minimum age 
limit for players on the women's tour. ° 

Deborah Jevans. director of women’s tennis for the ITF. told BBC 
radio that the committee — comprising child psychologists, doctors and 
players — would meet during Wimbledon in July and make its recom- 
mendations to the organizers of the women's tour in September. She said 
the panel would consider recommending that the minimum age for 
women players on the tour be raised from 14 to 16. ^ 

The current limit has come under fire following the arrest last week of 
Jennifer Capriati. 18. who turned pro at 13, for marijuana possession. 


For the Record 


De l? re ™ I Notre Dame game, which Miami won. 


P - I- ■ ’ ■’iiiwn iviiuiiu vti’U. 

V^pbdl^leader of the group 2 Live Crew, denied inn'll 


njeatin NCAA infractions. But he ad mu led being close to mum 
players and be enudzed i hr- mU-v h* niUi~.ii.. uu 


P criticized the rules he alleged I v broke. 

e,cr),bod ' ,;mjiing ” ,n " " llim 


• Tom Lehman overcame a 
bad case of stomach fiu to in- 
crease his lead ai the Memorial 
Tournament as he posted his 
third successive round of 67 to 
hold a four-stroke lead after 
the third round in Dublin. 
Ohio. Lehman stood at 15 un- 
der, with John Cook second at 
i ! -under following a round of 
6**. (AP. Reuters) 


Onis Eubank of Britain retained his WBO super-middleweight boxina 
title with a split decision over Ray Close on Saturday in Belfast. (A Pi 
Jutio Cfear Vasquez of Argentina retained his WBA light-middle- 
waghl crown when he stopped Ahmet Dottouev 0 r Russia in the 10th 
round in Belfast. /: "j 

Istanbul officially announced its candidacy to stage the 2004 Olvmnic 
sough ‘ 10 slase ,h ' 2000 whi ^ 
The Ath aod fiM] leg of the Whitbread Round die World vachl^raS 

&S^aT 1H ™ E F0rt 





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18 


INTEHN VTSONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. MONDAY. MAY 23, 1994 





OTC 

ended 





ilton McConnico 



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By Suzy Menkes 

tnienunmal Herald Tribune 

13 aRI S — Hi! ion McConnico si is surrounded by object* & 

i to which he has gjven life. There are round glass bowls - 
on a streamlined painted table The dining room is laid with ? ■ 
a sky-blue cloth, bright napkins and colorful ceramic crock- g-'-" 
cry." And from the watery green wall glare a magnified pair !&■ . 
of cat's eyes painted by the magical Mr. McConnico. 

Across town you could find many more traces of his 
polymath designs: an exhibition at Hermfcs capturing the 
essence of the sun in a burst of a bright breakfast cup 3 nd 
an empty space glowing crimson: or the leather baas he 




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designed as his first foray into fashion since he was a 
teenage couturier in his native Tennessee; or the shop on 
Paris's Left Bank that reunites all his design disciplines 
from floor rugs to porcelain. 

Yet this is a man. 50 years old. who says lhai his 
philosophy is. “I don't feel you really leave a trace” from 
the cradle to the grave. “Everything is passing," he say's. “I 
am not bogged up by pretentious things — what will be 
my imprint. It gives "you freedom. I do what I feel at the 
moment and hope it works." 

The result is a range of objects that display a sunny 
disposition — literally in the case of the fresh sky-blue and 
sunshine-yellow colors that decorate his small house in 
Bagnolei. a suburb of the Paris that he came to nearly 30 
years ago. The clean shapes and clear colors are the 
signature of his work, whether it is packaging, displays or 
his for-the-home objects. Within a clear framework, deco- 
ration might be vividly enlarged as in his signature cactus 
designs with their echo of Georgia O'Keeffe, or rugs with 
whimsical, surreal slogans & (a Magritte. 

McConnico downplays the idea that he is an artist, or 
uses art as a reference, saying that he found his metier 
when his first painting exhibition at age 1 6 freed him from 
the confusion or a dyslexic childhood. {“At that time, they 
didn't know’ what it was and kept asking me if I had 
troubles at home."! 

He came to Paris in 1965 after making debutante gowns 



Rrniek ikntua 


McConnico: “!t has taken a great while to be accepted in my variety/ 


asks any questions," he says. “You shouldn't prevent an 
artist from exploring his tastes." 

The move into decoration began when McConnico 
created special events to promote product launches. They 
might be — as for a Lanvin’s men’s collection — window* 
on a universe of style, in which the clothes are frozen into a 
still-life contexL that expresses the spirit of the wearer: or. 
as in the man y collaborations with Hermes, something 
more abstract and philosophical. (“La Soleii est deja li" 
the current multimedia exhibition at the Hermes store on 
Faubourg Saim-Honore includes a gray flannel room to 
contrast rain with sunshine; scarecrows in a country 


in Memphis. Tennessee, and found w-ork as a stylist for 
i fashit 


garden; a futuristic space-age scenario filled with metallic 
piping; and closets tnat 


French fashion houses. But his interest in decoration swept 
him into film, and throughout the 1970s he was a movie 
designer, notably in collaboration with Jean-Jacques Beneix 
tn the arrestingly colored “Diva." Fora second Beneix film. 
“La Lune dans le Caniveau” {The Moon in the Gutter) in 
1983. he received a Cesar — the French equivalent of an 
Academy Award. And then and there he stopped. 

“It was the point at the end of the phrase — 1 warned to 
turn the page," he said. “1 had reached a pinnacle with the 
Cesar and 1 was a little afraid of being repetitive. 1 didn’t 
want to become important. It weighs you down like an 
elephant, and I want to be a butterfly. One of the problems 
is (hat I am taken as a dilettante and I have suffered from 
that. It has taken a great while to be accepted in my variety.” 

But nobody, he says, would think it strange to choose to 
eat chocolate" mousse one day and something else the next 
or “that one day you wear blue and the next red." 

"When this varieiv is in the taste of individuals nobodv 


open on. to videos of children to 

express the future.) 

McConnico’s products, made for a variety of companies. 
Started in the mid-1980s, but hit their stride with a collection 
of cactus designs lor Daom crystal in 1 98”. Noj only 
the numbered edition immediately bought by modem an 
museums, one was also selected by President Francois 
Mitterrand as an official gift for President George Bush. 

Chin a, table and bain linen, furniture, rugs, lamps, 
paintings and writing paper followed pell-mell, so that by 
1990 the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis staged a 
retrospective of the local -boy-made-good in self-impo^d 
exile in France. 

McConnico. wearing a shin with a surreal prim of 
camels in a snowstorm. Bermuda shorts and canvas shoes, 
looks like a caricature of an American in Paris — even if 
be now gropes for the English wore! to express a thought 
that comes more naturally in French. What has he brought 
to his designs from his Tennessee background? 


' Abstract roots.” he says. “There are smells, there are 
sounds, not particularly visual things, but certain smells 
curt evoke colors. There is the sound of the first fall leaves 
scrunching on the campus and the smell of the oil paint 
when the art room was first opened up after the weekend." 

The leaves are re-incarnated as pressed-flower pictures 
used iike "brush stokes” on vivid -coin red sheets. 

"I'm ’■cry inspired by nature, but I'm a city dweller. 1 
always was — and I never try to reproduce the country in 
the city," he says. "! find those bouquets of wheat tied 
with raffia kind of sad. People are frustrated in the city 
and feel (he need to redo a kitchen like the middle of 
Provence. It's like having an animal in a cage." 

His home and atelier, beside a cityscape of skyscrapers, 
nestle in a garden bushy with rhododendrons, inside, the 
colors are in contrast with nature — although McConnico 
would not agree. “It all boils down to the same thing — 
liberty and freedom w put ali sons of colors together/ be 
says. "There is a tendency to say beige is ‘natural’ but 
Schiaparelli didn't invent chocolate and pink — lock at 
tropical fish. Nature puts ev erything together and it works.” 

Hi* next projects? A real return to fashion in a line erf 
clothing for which he has already hit on a slogan for T- 
sh«rts: “I love jogging, but I prefer chocolate/ 

Oh yes. and he would like to redesign Popsicle sticks. 
Popsicle sucks? Because they are wood and rounded and 
could he made in dazzlina colors. 


“And because of my roots in .America. I dig in my 

*' hi» cai c "AnH vhinr?c tuev aia *' 


Boutique Hilton McConnico . Rue Madame. 75006 

Paris. 




LANGUAGE 


What’s Near Russia 




By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — Who are. or wfaat is, the near 
abroad ? Who coined the phrase in Russian, and 
who first translated it into this English phrase? What 
does it mean, and is it important? 

The answer to the last is: You bet it’s important, 
because the words deal with the new relationship 
between Russia and the other republics of the former 
Soviet Union. Tension on die border of Ukraine and 
Russia, for example — with Moscow claiming influ- 
ence over ethnic Russian brethren within Ukraine — 
cannot be reported without the use of this term. 

A fishhook in this space last month, citing a few not- 
so-eariy uses of near abroad — the best translation of 
the Russian blizhneye zambezhye — drew some nibbles 
from sources more adept than me at the use of data 
bases. 

The earbest use in Nests, Fred Shapiro of New 
Haven, Connecticut, writes, is an article in The Rus- 
sian Press Digest of June 9, 1992, tilled “Near Abroad 
Wants to Be Far**; by Dec. 7 of that year. Strobe 
Talbott — then a Time magazine columnist, now 
deputy secretary of state— had picked up the trouble- 
some phrase: “Many Russians nave not yet been able 
to accept the idea that the 14 non-Russian republics of 
the U. S. S. R. are today independent foreign coun- 
tries. Russian politicians have even coined a new 
phrase — the near abroad — to distinguish between 
the former republics and the rest of the world/ 
Meanwhile, Mary V. McGlynn, of Brussels, search- 
ing News Retrieval a Dow Jones product found; 
“With regard to conflict situations in countries of the 
near abroad, *' wrote Savmfobhk, The Soviet Press 
Digest, on Aug. 20, 1992, summarizing b English a 
piece in Nezavisimaya Gazeia, “{Russian Foreign 
Minister Andrei] Kozyrev is critical about attempts to 
threaten neighbors/ 

An earlier Kozyrev use was found by Paul Brock, a 
consultant for Dialog, Knighr-Ridder’s data retrieval 
service: “Foreign Minister Kozyrev warns that every 
Russian gesture of ’heroic patriotism’ will trigger Rns- 
sopbobia in Ukraine,” Marie Frankland wrote in The 
Observer on April 26, 1992, “and the rest of what 
Moscow now rails ‘the near abroad,’ that is die old 
Soviet Union.” 

That’s the printed-citation winner so far of that 
phrase in English. Other translators in early 1992 were 
reaching for the best way to handle the Russian idea. 
Roger Donway; managingeditar of Orbis, in Philadel- 
phia, culled the Foreign Broadcast Information Ser- 
vice for its translations of the Russian phrase. Chi Jan. 
15. 1992, lzvestia referred to “the concept of ’abroad 
close at hand,’” putting the phrase m quotation 
marks. Tass, on April 9, 1992, used “nearby foreign 
lands”; three days later, the Moscow Russian Televi- 
rion Network spoke of what the broadcast informa- 
tion service reported as “countries not far abroad, as 
they call it.” Later that month, Interfax, in English, 
wrote of “the emergence of a new geopolitical entity, 
which is often referred to as the Near Foreign 
Countries." 







East is Blizhniy Vostokf hat "zarubezkfe [ is-a 'Sfts&cr' 
with no English equivalent,’* writes Kenneth -Ka hre^ --"". \ . 
of Washington, author of the En^i^Rtasaar^^/ 
staa-EngUsfl Dictionary, based bn 
“It is built around wb&h, a word - 

The prefix za means ‘beyond/” ■ ' ^ 

Christian CaiyL of Beilin, say^lie'n 6 tedhi , ^di&^ 5 ? 
on June 7, 1991, this eeptaita* fife; " ■ " 

Russian: “ ‘The term origmftUy badani 
said the historian Ivan 

nastoyashchyeye zambezhye, “the ,pre§ept^ 
abroad” But now fie words lave 
informational me aning; in order to dfstmguishttfe^wir^. 
states of fie C L S. [Stfnraonwealfi of-. 

States, a title now in fie dustbin ofTristWryJ-tr^c^j- - 
“origtoaT abroad.'. " ; ■ 

□ .O. 

To.foHow up the- history of fie^phrast^JhH^^tr/- 
wi thorn citations: "Near abroad wasiised'tScle^iiWy ?'v : ; 
by Soviet disridemsin the 1970 s 
Thompson, of EDicoh Ciiy, ~ 

der Brezhnev used the expression^ ^chhcr ‘ 

wistful, tones. The.serious codiaotalM^ ’ 

was that fie Russian people had W sratfee ’ v > ' 
standard of livbg to support their ‘ navjijti Frondes 1 '' T ~ ■ 
everywhere.” . - . .. v 

Williain Bodie. of Los -"Angeles; 
expression in January 1992 -frtoi ftiil^obfcifl£i£^ 
Carnegie Endowment, -as*a tena :m use thrbuakwf ^ 1 

“oKtical ll ~ — - — r — =-- wa - ' - 


poll Oct 

lies of the _ ^ ~ 

phrase as political raiher/ f 

demographic. ’ - - • . ' 

“Rightly or wrowohf ” 
cal classes have 


near abroad in addition to n Tl __ . 

deuce, signifies to fie ‘far abroad' fiat^nssja 4 ^fe .' 
certain rights in fie region that banstxtiilin^daa^:-'-. 
diplomatic conventions/ • . - • ; 

Many of fie people in those afiacent ccmah^^";; 
especially the noo-Rnssians, rqect this hcavy-lantfef’ ;:- 
Russian version erf fie Monroe Doctrine fiat'' 
Moscow officials call a “hen gafii 

Bodie notes: “In Riga, Kmv, 


i 


* 6 a»'. 



Tenibk. 1 

Thus, what we know so far about this v. 

cam diplomatic coinage since the. popnlarizarkffl^ ; ■ 
detente in the early. ^Os is fiat it made fie, jtunjtBtKi / 
English in early 1992, and that nearabroad meaf5^^ :: . s . : 
daun by Russia of political mtaesrand-inSueae^;-.-;..' 
states adjacent to it that were once part 'cCihe Sbvjeti : 
Union.” Some political lexkx^raphers (namely,-!^ • 
insist that it has a second sense of “etlmic RaHsa^ 
living as a minority, sometimes apposedfy oppressed; ^ 
outside the borders of Russia/ . f; 


New York Thna.Serikt . 


The seminal phrase, blizhneye zarubezhye, was obvi- 
ously giving translators a hard time. Blizhneye is the 
neuter of btizhniy. an adjective meaning “near” (Near 


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I4<57 

9 

2271 

12/53 

pc 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. Asia 





;Ceisro. 


North America 

SunsWna In Mew York City 
end Wasnwgion. d C.. Tubs- 
day: partly sunny Wednes- 
day. then a chance at show- 
ers Thursday At least partial 
sunshlno Tuesday through 
Thursday in Houston and 
Now Orleans. Ha*y aunsMne 
In Mexico Ciiy. but whh lale- 
day thundersnowars possi- 
ble. 


Europe 

Rams Ifcely m Paris and Lon- 
don during |ho middo ol the 
week. Rainer warm Tuesday 
through Thursday In Rome 
end Naples, is well as 
Athens Showers In Warsaw 
Tuesday: showers could 
reach Moscow Thursday. 
Rather comfortable weather 
this week in Oslo and Stock- 
holm. 


Asia 

Unsonled Tuesday inrouqh 
Thursday in Shanoha> wilh 
episodes o» ram. hoaw ai 
limes. Warm Tuesday and 
Wednesday in Bailing, lhon 
a bil cooler Thursoay. Typi- 
cally warm end muggy In 
Hong Kong 1 M 3 wo ok Snow- 
ers and ihundorsnowcrs in 
Bangkok most days ihig 
week 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Baku 

C*kv 


Jaruwknn 

Lin 

Rtynti 


Today 
High Low 
CIF OF 
20/88 
3J/M 17432 
3Z.*B9 IS«I 
two iew 

41/108 22iTI 
4 i/ioe 24 /re 


TO 

High Low W 
OF CIF 
29/84 21/70 S 
34 /so so me • 
33/91 17*2 i 
2M2 17AB ■ 
43/10021/70 a 
42/107 24/75 s 


Today 

Heh Low W HJjyi Low W 
C/F CIF CIF OF 

Buenos A/res 23/73 1407 j 21/70 fl/<B ah 

Caracas 31/86 2 S /77 pc 3 i,tB 26/79 pc 

Lhno 21/70 17/82 ■ 21/70 17 /e 2 pc 

MedooCay 35/77 12/53 pc 28/79 13>53 ■ 

RJodwtenfro 24/75 19 «B pc Xm 20 /M pc 

SaiMavi 13/55 e .43 in IB /&4 aog pc 


Legend: aeumy. pc-pa/Ov dandy, c-dOudy, sn-enowora, Mnundarstorms. r-rah, af-snwr nirrles. 
ar-snow, Hce, W-Weather. All mope, forec ae ta and data provided by Aecu-Weettnw, Inc. 6 1 W 4 


Asia 


T<vi*y 


TamonnW 


High 

Low 

W 

High 

Low W 


OF 

Of 


OF 

OF 

Banqfcok 

34 73 

23 TJ 

t 

J3-51 

3577 X. 


X1.-37 

18-64 

a 

32-89 

10-81 pc 

non/lhcng 

3'/88 

34-75 


3158 

34/75 3C 

V-ui/j 

34 

23Ti 

p: 

3391 

34.75 pc 

r/*» mm 

42-107 

' :t *9 

J 

43-109 27.00 s 

Spool 

287? 

is.-: 1 

=c 

36.79 

16-8 1 PC 

Shorqhai 

24-75 

2371 

1 

26/79 

T9*6 pc 


32 89 

347: 

oh 

J3-J1 

2475 PC 

Tnaxi 

29 -8a 

tj'”i 

1 

29 84 

3271 ih 

Tc4vq 

23 -S 

12 TO 

* 

2373 

13 55 5= 

Africa 

Akpen 

35-83 

19.66 

PC 

37-80 

19.™ pc 

Cjjjc Tonn 

lh'01 

9-40 


18-84 

9.49 pc 


3371 

1763 

DC 

2475 

17/83 PC 


2373 

9 IB 

f \ 

25.77 

I1.-S2 PC 


3'.' 86 

?L . . 

•x 

JI58 

2577 1 


J1/ , 0 

::oa 

X 31.70 

13 55 X 

Tot- 

3S'53 

13.56 

N 

32.89 

20.-60 1 

North America 

VOwjjn 

13.55 

4.59 

an 

12-13 

3-37 pc 

AllwHr 

31 -m 

mx4 

1 

•V -80 

1B.t4 pc 

3yam 

337J 

11.53 

" 

2170 

12-53 tx 


28/87 

15-59 

1 

39.77 

11/52 ! 

Domra* 

27<80 

11 <2 


3577 

io-*D rc 

Dnrw 

■t-.-bo 

13 « 

DC 

2271 

H -57 vi 


29-84 

3271 


2S-A4 

2T~I pc 

ricufto-i 

JO 56 

199=0 

5 

33/63 

1-1-06 pc 

L do tngrtoo 

3ST7 

14'57 pc 

3371 

15-39 pc 

Ham 

39/04 

31-70 

3 

33 09 

2271 pc 


x/v 

14 <57 

1 

2373 

12 *3 pc 

Monn-al 

20.59 

0-46 

pc 

17/63 

f/43 pc 

Notvru 

29.84 

2271 


2JiS* 

2271 pc 

NmrVo** 

2B/S2 

14.57 


2373 

13<55 pc 

Phoanb 

30.100 33.73 

5 

39/97 

2271 » 

S*r Fro" 

21. -TO 

11/53 


21.70 

11.52 pc 

Swmio 

2271 

10/30 


33.71 

11/52 pc 

To^mo 

33/73 

B/40 


10 54 

6-4J ih 

WssNnglcn 

39 84 

17.62 

a 

27/80 

14/57 pc 


ACROSS 


1*.. more than 
one wav to skin 


s Supply a parly 
10 Beasi of burden 
is Rads 

is Speak publicly 
iBCaiiech nval 
17 Cereal 'iruii" 

19* — of These 
days. Alice. " 

20 Outdoor 

21 Sp/rtlual 
punishment 


23 Meadow 

24 Jockey Ccrdero 

25 Civil War flasn 
point 

32 Nom de crook 

33 Upset 

24 Small dog. for 
short 
37 Spin 

sa Grew ashen 

40 Coffee, 
irriormelly 

41 Hai-room future 

42 Salon offering 


Srjlulion to Puzzle of Mav 20 


| A M 
A 
L 
E 
S 


0 . n/ioiy tn 

O: □□□0100 
an naoiDBoa 
HQUQ Q 000 Q 

no :* 0 Giaan aazna 
0 sa Sanaa □□□ 
□oaa □□□□□□□£ 
□nHraaHuao 
QQQQSPQ □□□□□ 

qb Qaaaa aaaaa 
Has aaaaa aaoa 
aaaa □□□□□ uua 
□□□□□□ □□□aoaa 
□□□□□a laoaaaua 
□asiria aaaQua 


43 More Damful 
44 U.S. 

commodore rn 
Japan. 1853-54 
47 Letter-shaped 
metal bar 
so Seiior Gusvaro 
51 Lovebirds' 
destination, 
maybe 
54 Paul of 
‘Casablanca* 

» Altos. Calil. 

•0 County of 
Northern 
Ireland 

82 Had a little 
lamb? 

83 First name In 
cosmetics 

84 Novelist 
Frangoise 

es Roll ol bids 

86 Looks (to be) 

87 Unattached 


DOWN 


1 With the bow. In 
music 

2 Bellyache 

3 Malarial 
symptom 

4Part of T.V.A.: 
Abbr. 


5 Hooded snakes 
8 Exist 

7 Diamond cover 
b To be. to Satie 

s the Fox* 

(classic fable] 
loin the midst of 

11 From the time of 

12 Girder material 

14 of justice 

18 Yesterday: Fr. 

22 * luck?* 

29 David's 

Instrument 
28 Downwind, 
nautically 

27 Wedding sma 
qua non 

28 Add 10. 
unnecessarily 

29 Smut 

30 Prior to. In 
poems 

21 Crimson 
34 Henry VIH's Vlth 
38 'Reply 

completed.* to 
a ham operator 

36 Queen of Scots 
38 Word before 
bull or stop 

38 Grasshopper's 
rebuker 
40 Baseballs 
DiMaggio 


42 Mexican 
snacks 

43 isn't miserly 

44 Cosmo, e.g. 

45 Reverberations 
40 At what time? 


88 Kind of e&flte 
■6 Therefore v'-- 


47 Wedding 
acquisition 

48 Flora and tauna » Major rug/ 

48 Let up - exporter 

52 Type of wine . *»Unfto#forcjfy‘ 

53 Kitty starter 81 Rep. to* 


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JEP.'JS \ L= • 
itui Vy ii- 
Liberaii:-, 
writing k- 
saner !w?s ; : j. 
Paki'Jl'iT. :. • 
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frrie Mira-t- 
Wedfirn-A^': 


Tiwd in a world without holders, time zones 

or 


AIKT Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1. Using the chan below, find the country you are calling from. 

2. Dial the corresponding XTET Access Number. 

3 An AQTT £nglbJ>-spcaJdng Operator or voice prompt u ill ask for the phone number you u-ish u« cull or connect you to a 
customer service representative. 

Toreadve ytxirfree walks card of AB3A; Access Numbers, just dial theacce* number of 
the country you’re in and ask for Customer Service 


i/aar 


B3b 1#$. 

.iAynry:. 



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convenient Access Numbers on your right 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172*1011 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

Liechtenstein" 

155-00*11 

China, PRC*** 

10811 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

iKsro-oin 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.Y.R. of 99-800-4288 

India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

oeowo-no 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19**0022 

Japan* 

0039-1 1 1 

IS'exberlands" 

06-022-9111 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800*190*11 

Knrpa, , 

11* 

Poland**** 

0*0104800111 

Malaysia" 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

New Zeabnd 

0004H 

Romania 

01-8004288 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Rus9la**CMoscow) 

155*5042 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

00420470101 

Slniwpore 

atCMlMMU 

Spain* 

900-09-00-11 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

020-795*611 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288*0 

Switzerland* 

155-OO-n 

Thai Lind* 

0019-Wl-Un 

u.k. 

0500-89-0011 


EUROPE 


Ukraine* 


Armenia** 


8*14111 


MIDDLE EAST 


Austria- 


022-903-011 Bahrain 


Belgium' 


0800-100-10 Cyprus* 


Bulgaria 


OO-iatXVOOlO brad 


Croatia'* 


99680011 Ktnv.ui 


Czech Hep 


00-420-00101 Lebanon (Beirut) 


Denmark* 


8001-0010 Qatar 


Finland* 


9800-100-10 Sciudi Arabia 


France 


19*-00M Turkey* 


Germany 


0130-0010 U.A.E.* 


Greece- 


OO-8O0-13U 


AMERICAS 



AT&T 


Hungar y * 


00* -80001111 Argentina* 


Iceland* 


999491 BeUre* 


Ireland 


1-800-550-000 Bolivia* 


: i*Mh mr 


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inl,<Uih-tT 

W«"**C«miBCr-[i»iii-io»iM<i/4Uil USATHirCf nrc- i i*u«Jii ^u-aanrul. I'-iruv 
tiwili4i ItKuMnH) muJirojOInji 

■W USaWivo* miw h nwLil'4.- (hm uD ilu- 1 nuiniUi> liwJ 

xuT Irfncingc boc* >cr v VK-- 4fcriTiCTihc-pli'ifii- inn.Trrml»-i m ■ -cr ,4 <iLji<- 

pupo 

Tuhl* i4ci4niRfiKn'mJlnt Uallniv 

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In rfw » ft jrsMt 


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00-800-12277 


H! 10-121 


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"U’lliyT .alDiViiph 

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♦♦♦ *.ii TriAi^«;ir.\ii d3 jrrj» 

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** In tp [nM*; Hkiv- , .»r ^ r^»n -iw n.-j haion. *>j* k» Jul to* md ibouHL 

*l*XK a i/ili.‘KI'i/>i^ihl> < n«<ic4L»ti(ii ‘ 

■ Ij< Uit WoridCoiuiMl-si'nii rlPTTnt-JWK.-jU.onl?. . 

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