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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 




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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Wednesday, May 25, 1994 







Russia Agrees to Join 
NATO 'Partnership’ 


No. 34.597 


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By William Drozdiak 
and John F. Harris 

Washington Pott Serriu- 

■ BRUSSELS — Russia’s defense minister, 
; rsvei s. Grachev, declared Tuesday that his 
counter would join NATO’s Partnership for 
• Peace but emphasized that the terms of Russia’s 
; participation still needed to be clarified. 

^Resolving some of the recent ambiguity 
abCBftJRussja’s relations with the Atlantic alti- 
ane^GCTfiral Grachev said after meeting with 
NATO defense ministers that Russia would 
definitely join the military cooperation pro- 
gram that is designed to create a new security 
system for Europe with the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization as its foundation. 

“Bens Yeltsin, our president, h.-w instructed 
me to make it clear that Russia wffl join the 
Partnership foe Peace program,- General Gra- 
chev said. But he noted that “these framework 
agreements do not fully set forth the principles 
and the forms of the cooperation." 

The defense minister said that Russia would 


was not opposed to joining NATO in peace- 
keeping missions. Later, he told reporters that 
Russia would only resort to nuclear weapons 
when faced with aggression from another nu- 
clear power or one in coalition with an enemy. 

Senior U.S. officials described the meeting as 
“friendly and nonconfrontational.” They said 
there was none of the bombast or rhetoric that 
had been feared before General Grachev's ar- 
rival at the headquarters of an alliance created 
45 years ago to contain Russian expansionism. 

But U.S. officials sounded a note of caution, 
saying they wanted to hear (he specifics of the 
general’s proposal Wednesday. 

Other allied defense ministers emphasized 


the need to show patience and understanding 
for Russia’s plight beca 


like to sign a paraDd document that spelled out 
of Russia’s collaboration and the 


the nature __ 

defense of its vital interests. He saiiTfae would 
provide details Wednesday after meeting a gain 
with Defense Secretary William J. Perry of the 
United States and other NATO ministers. 

General Gradhev said that after the two doc- 
uments were completed, be or Foreign Minister 
Andrei V. Kozyrev would be prepared to visit 
NATO headquarters “to sign the two docu- 
ments, (hat is, the doctrine of Partnership for 
Peace and our document on the collaboration 
of Russia.” 

_ But NATO’s deputy secretary-general, Ser- 
gio B alanrino , said after a meeting of the alli- 
ance’s defense ministers earlier Tuesday that 
there could be no question of drawing up a 
formal separate agreement for the Russians. 

During his 90-minute session. General Gra- 
chev spent most of his time elaborating on 
Russia's new military doctrine. He said Russia 


mse of the importance of 

making it part of a new European security 
system 

“Russia and NATO need a solid partner- 
ship “ said Germany’s defense minister. Volker 
RQne. -Russia must be treated and be per- 
ceived to be treated as a great power.” 

For months, the Russians have sent confused 
signals about their intentions of cooperating 
with NATO. After indicating early on that 
Moscow would join the Partnership. Mr. Yelt- 
sn appeared to bow to demands from the 
military hierarchy that NATO must recognize 
Russia s rote as a major power in the European 
theater by granting it special status. 

Western defense officials have tried to reas- 
sure the Russians that they wDl be accorded all 
of the importance warranted by their country 
and its special place in Europe. But by insisting 
that aU partners must play by the same rules, 
they are trying to relieve fears among East 
Europeans that they will again fall under Rus- 
sian military do mina tion 

After expressing some dismay for what they 
perceived as second-class status, 18 states from 
Eastern Europe and parts of the former Soviet 
Union have now signed 'up. 



.thddt-’RcuKT' 

STRATEGIC RETREAT — Ad aimed Southern Yemeni fleeing Ataq, which has 
fallen to North Yemeni fortes. A missile killed 12 in San’a, the capital. Page 2. 


U.S . and Japan End 
Impasse on Trade 
With a Redefinition 


Of Market Access 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

Intemcuonal Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The United Slates and 
Japan displayed newfound harmony on trade 
Tuesday, resuming talk* on trimming Japan’s 
trade surplus after a breakthrough agreement 
on how to measure access to Japanese markets. 

Officials of the two nations ended five days 
of intensive, high-level trade discussions by 


revealin^a new understanding on the way mar- 


ket conditions in Japan will be assessed. It 
appeared that a compromise was reached large- 
ly because Washington seemed to soften its 
demand for “objective criteria” in measuring 
progress. 

The issue bad been the subject of broad 
disagreement for months between the economic 
superpowers. leaving an impression of a grow- 
ing diploma tic lift as Japan changed govern- 
ments. as well as uncertainty in currency mar- 
kets that had helped lo weaken the dollar. 

According to one American analyst the out- 
come closely resembled the existing U.S.-Japa- 
nese agreement on access lo Tokyo’s semicon- 
ductor market. Under that accord, reached 
during the administration of President George 
Bush, a numerical goal — but not a requirement 
— was set for improved market access. 

This analyst, Gary C. Hufbauer of the Insti- 
tute for International Economics in Washing- 
ton, said it appeared the two sides had agreed to 


Some Japanese viewed the resumption of the 
framework talks as an acknowledgment that 
bilateral relations transcended trade mailers. 
Steven Broil of the International Herald Tri- 
bune reported from Tokyo. 

“The agreement shows that the Clinton ad- 
ministration has become more aware of the 
deficiencies of its aggressive unilateralism.” 
said Kernchi I to. president of the Japan Forum 
on International Relations. “Mickey K. an tor's 
approach failed to comprehend die broader 
political and security aspects of the Japan-U.S. 
relationship” 

The Japanese media stressed that Washing- 
ton might only be shifting strategies and noted 
that the framework talks remained fixed on the 
goal of increasing sales of American goods and 
services in Japan. 

President K& Clinton made a congratulatory 
telephone call to Prime Minister Tsulomu Hata 
after the agreement, and Mr. Kamor an- 
nounced that staff-level discussions had re- 
sumed Tuesday on the so-called framework 
trade negotiations, which had broken off in 
February. 


Those talks are aimed at drafting language to 
Tu 


keep a range of statistics on Japanese markets, 
ana if 


U.S. 



eijing’s Trade Status 


■ By Daniel Williams ■. 

. . . . Wash in g t o n Ptat Scdce 
WASHINGTON —Secrctaryof State War- 


by Mr. Clinton, who called at the time for 
“overall, significant progress” in these areas. 


ren 


ton that China Ims^M^dted Trifli tTO fennan 
rights comfiticms that the Clinton administra- 
tion said were mandatory tf Qrma were to 
retain its trading privileges with the-United 
States. 

That determination sets the stage for Mr. 
Clinton to impose lesser sanctions against Chi- 
na for human rights abuses 

Mr. Christopher also advised (he president 
that Qi bia had opt shown improvement in 
sane erf the five other categories set a year ago 


• Botin a meeting Monday morning with Mr. 
Omtpn and other foreign policy advisers, in- 
duffing W. Anthony Lake,ttie national security 
adviser, Mr- Christopher suggested that China’s 
human rights failures could be addressed with 
measures short of revolting China’s most-fa- 
vored-nation status, which allows Chinese im- 
ports the same tariff treatment as goods from 
most other countries with which the United 
States trades. 


Specifically, Mr. Christopher proposed that 
sanctions be placed on imports of goods pro- 


duced by the Chinese Army, administration 
officials raid. 

Such: targeted sanctions probably would sat- 
isfy many congressional proponents of Chinese 
human rights. Over the weekend, Mr. Christo- 
pher took political soundings from 16 members 
of Congress on their reactions to various ways 
of pressuring China on human rights. 

Last May, Mr. Clinton warned China that its 
trade status would not be renewed without 
progress in human rights, but in recent weeks 
he mid Ins aides have appeared eager to find an 
alternative to so dramatic a step as crippling 
China’s growing trade with the United Stales. 

China exports nearly $30 billion a year to the 


United States, which in mm sells China about 
$9 billion. 

Mr. Christopher’s presentation appears de- 
signed to break the link between trade status 
and human rights that has hung over Chinese- 
American relations for five vears. 


Influential voices in the business community 
and Congress have warned of major losses to 
the U.S. economy if trade was disrupted. 

On Monday. Agriculture Secretary Mike 
Espy warned that American, fanners would lose 
business if the trade status was revoked. 

The effect of Mr. Christopher’s presentation 


See CHINA, Page 5 


then to discuss whether market access had 
in fact been improved. 

The U.S. trade representative. Mickey Kan- 
tor. provided one example of how the new 
understanding might work: One “quantitative” 
measure of U.S. access to the automobile mar- 
ket might be the number of dealers in Japan 
offering American-made cars. 

While insisting that U.S. goals in the talks 
bad been fully met, Mr. Kamor cited an aspect 
of the agreement that no doubt cheered the 
Japanese. He said that no angle criterion in 
measuring market access would determine suc- 
cess or failure. 

But he also said that no existing U&.laws 
that could ultimately result in trade sanctions 
bad bees undei mined. 

“Rhetorically, the United Stales has backed 
off considerably,” Mr. Hufbauer said. But he 
also said that the Japanese economy and its 
powerful domestic cartels “will never be the 
same” now that American trade “searchlights” 
will be continuously scanning for barriers to 
free trade 

“This is the death knell for the Japanese 
economy as we knew it," he said. He added, 
however, that the process of truly opening mar- 
kets in Japan would take a decade. 


accompany the understanding Tuesday that 
will set criteria for judging improvements in 
market access in such industries as automo- 
biles, auto parts, telecommunications, medical 
equipment and insurance. 

Mr. Kan tor also said Washington was dis- 
cusring with Tokyo ways to extend these frame- 
work talks to indude financial services, glass 
products and intellectual property. These sec- 
tors are major trade priorities for the White 
House. 

Foreign Minister Kqji Kakizawa said in To- 
kyo that he had told Mr. Kan tor on Tuesday 
that there were many issues still to be resolved, 
but he said the remaining discussions “will not 
be like the Rocky Mountains but like Beverly 
Hills.” 

He said talks were being scheduled in at least 
three areas: government procurement, insur- 
ance and auto parts. 

Mr. Kan tor said Washington had never de- 
manded numerical quotas as a way of measur- 
ing progress in reducing Japan's $60 billion 
annual trade surplus with the United States. 
Tokyo had repeatedly characterized Washing- 
ton’s position as amounting to “managed 
trade” in relying on quotas for market access. 

Mr. Kamor said both sides had agreed that 
the purpose of each agreement in the frame- 
work talks was “to achieve concrete and sub- 
stantial results in the market, increased access 
and sales, not merely to change regulations or 
procedures." 


Chinese Army Gets Down to Business 


By Patrick R Tyler 

1 Hen York Times Strife 

BEIJING — Ever since the People’s Libera- 
tion Army went into business more than a 
decade ago, Weston intelligence agencies have 
been concerned that profits from its hog? com- 
mercial enterprises would go toward the pur- 
chase of tanks, fmssites and fighter aircraft. 

But over the last two years, the agencies have 
come to a new condurioo: China's military 
enterprises - are pyramiding their successes, 
plowing -profits into new and bigger commer- 


cial enterprises, hotels, truck and shipping com- 
panies — even discos. 

- As a result of this new analysis, assumptions 
about die pace of China’s military moderniza- 
tion, its ambitions as a regional military power 
and the true size of its overall military spending 
are being scaled back, several 'Western analysts 
say. 

White this assessment may provide a measure 
of comfort to neighbors who fear China's grow- 
ing military power, its military goals may not be 
totally nonthreatening, especially when it 


comes to disputed areas in the South China Sea. 
where several of other Asian governments are 
vying for od exploration rights. 

The new analysis is significant in assessing 
China's overall military strength. Western ana- 
lysts say, because profits from the ventures are 
either bring invested in new commercial activi- 
ty or are being spent on the welfare of the 
military units that control businesses that 
sprang up in the era of economic reforms after 


See ARMY, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Mecca Stampede 
Kills 250 at Hajj 


Up lo 250 worshipers were trampled 
deatn during the annual pilgrimage 
Mecca, Saudi authorities said. (Page 2) 


B omb ers Sentenced 


Four TTHfri who took ^arf ifl (be February 


1993 bombing of the worid Trade Center 
inNew Ybrk were each sentenced Tuesday 
to.240 years in prison. 


Stags/EntortainiiMnt 


Hie Ojpfira Bastae’s new _ 

*Tosca” finally opened, 10 
schedule. . **8** 


of 


BockReview 

Crossword 



The North Korea Puzzle 


Wicked or Just Wily on Nuclear Effort? 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

WahnrguM Post Service 

WASHINGTON — North Korea is gov- 
erned by international lawbreakers bent on 
completing a nuclear arsenal to terrorize their 
neighbors. Or, North Korea’s leaders are mere- 
ly wily negotiators, trying to trade away a sham 
unclear effort in exchange for rich economic 
and political benefits. 

Which is the real North Korea? 

U5. and allied officials would Eke .to know. 
Just when North Korea’s true intentions serin 
about to emerge, the country takes another 
bold action subject to conflicting interpreta- 
tions. 

Look, for exampk, at the confusion sown by 
North Korea’s derision last week to begin with- 
drawing phuomran-laden fuel rods Rom a nu- 
clear reactor at its Yongbyon complex, without 
sufficient inspections by the United Nations 
n rtrW watchdog, the International Atomic 
Energy Agency. 


Defense Secretary William J. Perry aod other 
UJS. officials had warned that such a step 
would not be tolerated. It would amount to a 
repudiation of North Korean pledges to ensure 
the continuity of agency safeguards against 
secret nuclear weapons work. 

Administration officials threatened to seek 
punitive economic sanctions if North Korea 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


crossed this Hue. They reasoned that, without 
inspection. North Korea could reprocess the 
reactor’s estimated 8,000 spent fuel rods to 
produce enough phitomum for four or five 
nuclea r bombs. Moreover, if the rods were not 
handled carefully. North Korea could ruin any 
chance for the agency to measure their radioac- 
tivity to calculate how m»ch rep rocessing was 
conducted previously for nuclear weapons. 

The atomic agency s director, Hans Blix. who 


See KOREA, Page 5 



«rl BmSmv'ne AtfAMKd Pte» 


PARLIAMENT OPENS IN CAPE TOWN — Nelson Mandela and las daughter 
Zinzani on the steps of the Partianient bmkfing before the South African president 
pledged fiscal disdpUne Tuesday in overcoming die legacy of apartheid. Page 5. 


Stateless State: 


A New Specter 
Stalking Africa 


Aspiring Talent Agents Fight to Get In at the Bottom 


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By Monique P. Yazigi 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Dressed in a $2,000 Giorgio Armani suit, 
wearing* $5,000 Rotex, sporting a handmade Hue pin-stripe 
Shirt with French cuffs hdd dosed by 18-karat-gold initialed 
caff links, Glam A. GuHno pushes a mail wagon down thn 
corridor of the WlHunn Morris Agency, throwing envelopes 
into cubbyholes. - 

Not too tong ago, Mr. Gulino, 30, pulled down a six-digit 
salary as an associate at the prestigious New York law firm of 
LeBoeuf, Lamb, Great & MacRae: He now earns $300 a week, 

“My Meads just don’t get it," Mr. Gulino says. "They think 
Fmcrazy.’ 1 > 

■ Many others dearly do not. Mr. Gulino and 12 others were 


out of a Arid of more than 500 applicants seeking to 
job in the mail room of the William Morris Agency, 
where 25 percent of the New York office's current agents were 
Wined. Not to mention generations of moguls in the enienam- 
menl industry, from Banv Diller in 1961 to Michael Chit7 in 
1969. 

Ip fact, Mr. Ovitz’s name is evoked almost os a mantra by the 
polished college graduates and tony offspring of Hollywood 
hard-charging, quick-wilh-a-handshake typo who 


their way through the agency's midiown offices, picking 
of advice, s'" 


up crumbs of advice, straining to overhear high-powered 
oonwa rations and reacting every memo, fax, piece of mail they 
can get their hands on. 

Once thought of as a pen c*f rough-around-the-edge* Brook- 


lyn teenagers who would do anything — ethical or not — to 
become a talent agent, the mail room now attracts lawyers and 
MBAs. And there is a formal, structured training program with 
seminars, luncheons, manuals and grammar tests, a change 
that reflects the new button-down image of the profession as a 
whole. 

Bul, of course, they still get down and dirty. 

"They must know how to sell.'’ said Pat Galloway, the firm’s 
director of human resources. “And they have to learn how to 
make thrir clients fee! like they are the most important person 
in the world.” 

The trade itself cannot be taught in a seminar, being smoke 
and mirrors, three-card monte and the ability to recognize 


See MAIL ROOM, Page 3 


By John Darnton 

New York Tima Service 

KINSHASA, Zaire — After four years of 
political turmoil, government authority here is 
simply dissolving away, leaving the cities and 
the countryside to pillaging soldiers and roam- 
ing ga n g s of thags and bandits. 

Zaire is coming to represent a new specter in 
Africa — the stateless country. 

Where once there was the “big-man rule” of 
President Mobutu Sese Seko, there is now what 
some Zairians are calling “no- man rule.” 

Marshal Mobutu is still nominally in charge, 
but he is rarely seen or felt. Meanwhile, the 
rapacious central authority that he personified 
for nearly three decades has so disintegrated 
that vast stretches of the interior are without 
any government and the congested capital is 
laigriy lawless. 

The same phenomenon has been seen in’ 
Somalia, where the “technicals” — carloads of 
gun-toting youths —are now back in the streets 
of Mogadishu. It can also be seen in parts of 
West Africa, where fighting in Liberia and 
Sierra Leone has given way in places to more or 
less permanent anarchy. And Rwanda, one of 
Zaire's eastern neighbors, is slipping deeper 
into a chaotic civil war. 

But Zaire could turn into “Somalia and Libe-] 
ria rolled into one,” a U.S. State Department 
memorandum warned last year. 

Zaire’s 40 million people have seen their 
living standards drop every year for more than 
a decide. The economy is in a shambles, with! 
external debt at more than S10 billion. Prices' 
rise a hundredfold a year. There is virtually no 
investment. 

The infrastructure is crumbling. About 85 
percent of the 85,000 miles of roads that existed 
at independence in i960 have reverted to bush. 
Shaba Province, die mineral-rich area to the 

south that was the scene of turmoil in the 1960s; 
and of two invasions by Katangan rebels in 
1977 and 1978, has declared its autonomy. 
Many regard that as the first step toward seces- 
sion. 

largdy abandone^Tso^y afl acctsnm the epi- 
demic is soaring. ' 

In March, the international relief organiza- 
tion Doctors Without Borders undertook a sur- 
vey of children up to 5 years rid in Kinshasa. It 

found that one out of every 10 was malnour- 
ished and one out of 40 was starving. 

It is difficult to find any services that the 
government delivers. Schools and health dimes 
are dosing. The sweltering streets of Kinshasa, 
with potholes the size of bomb craters, are 
crammed with pedestrians. There are no buses 


See Zaire, }*age 5 


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** 


ENTERNATTONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 



Stampede Israel Rejects PLO Move to Impose OwnLaws world BRIEF S 

Kills 250 

At Mecca 


Inadequate Effort 
To Control Crowd 


The Associated Pros 

MECCA — As many as 250 
Muslim worshipers were trampled 
to death when crowds surged to- 
ward a sacred cavern to symboli- 
cally throw stones at the devil as 
part of the annual pilgrimage to 
Mecca. Saudi security officials said 
Tuesday. 

The inunplings Monday came 
despite Saudi attempts to increase 
crowd control in the area from 
Mecca to Mina, about 5 kilometers 
away, where a stampede in i WO 
killed 1.400 people. 

The pilgrims were crushed in 
narrow pedestrian paths leading to- 
ward the Mina cavern, security 
sources said, speaking on condition 
or anonymity. Ambulances could 
not reach the scene quickly, con- 
tributing to the high toll. 

A Health Ministry official said 
in Jidda that the crush was caused 
by worshipers vying to get close to 
three stone pillars in the cavern. 

During the ritual, the pilgrims 
imitate the Prophet Mohammed, 
who was said to have thrown rocks 
at the pillars to symbolize stoning 
the devil. 

“A wave of people, predomi- 
nantly Asian, wanted to rush to the 
edge of the cavern because they 
think it's most sacred to actually hit 
the pillars with the pebbles." said 
Abbas Hamza Abbas L, deputy di- 
rector of the Health Ministry. 

“Most of them do not believe in 
a symbolic throw" he said. 

Muslims are expected to make a 
pilgrimage, or hajj. to Islam's holi- 
est shrine, Mecca, at least once in 
thdr lives. Saudi authorities say a 
record 2.5 million people congre- 
gated this year. 

Fervent Muslims believe that if 
they die in Mecca they are guaran- 
teed a path to heaven and will be 
the first to rise from the dead on the 
day of resurrection. 

Before Monday's deaths. Saudi 
officials had said the pilgrimage 
season was trouble-free despite 
tension with the Iranian contingent 
of about 60.000 pilgrims. 

In 1987,402 pilgrims, mostly Ira- 
nians, died in clashes with the po- 
lice as they tried to march on Mec- 
ca's Grand Mosque, toward which 
the world’s estimated 1 billion 
Muslims turn during prayers. 

The hajj rituals peaked Friday, 
the most sacred day of the Islamic 
calendar, when hundreds of thou- 
sands of pilgrims, all wearing white 
robes, prayed in unison atop 
Mount Arafat outside Mecca. 

Although some pilgrims left after 
that ritual, many stayed on for such 
other events as stoning the devil. 

In 1990, 1,426 people died in a 
stampede inside a pedestrian tun- 
nel that leads from Mecca to Mina. 
The stampede was touched off by 
the fall of several people from an 
overhead bridge. 

Saudi authorities have since 
spent millions of dollars on tun- 
nels. overhead passes and roads. 


Benjamin C Bradlee 
On Dublin News Board 

The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — Benjamin C. Brad- 
lee. retired executive editor of The 
Washington Post, has been named 
to the board of Independent News- 
papers PLC in Dublin, run by the 
Irish entrepreneur Tony O’Reilly. 

Mr. O'Reilly also is chairman of 
HJ. Heinz Co. 


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Bacterial Outbreak Has Britons Worried 


Reuters 

LONDON — British health officials on 
Tuesday sought to calm fears over an out- 
break of a severe bacterial infection that has 
been blamed for at least six deaths. 

A minister told Parliament that a duster of 
cases of the tissue-destroying infection 
around Gloucester in western England was 
only the second ever recorded and was being 
investigated by health authorities. 

“J am advised that, except for Gloucester, 
the pattern and number of these cases is not 
out of line with what would normally be 
expected,” said Tom Sackville. junior health 
minister. 

“But 1 give an assurance to do everything 
possible to find the source of these infections 
and make sure there are not further mo- 
dems," he said. 

A sixth person died in London on Thurs- 
day from the infection, which is known as 
necrotizing fasciitis. Other cases have been 
reported in Stirling. Scotland, in the North- 


ern English dry of Bolton, and in the south- 
ern English counties of Surrey and Hertford- 
shire. 

Normally between two and 10 people die 
in any given year from necrotising fasciitis. 
The infection involves a form of the strepto- 
coccus bacterium, a usually harmless organ- 
ism that lives in the throats of about 10 
percent of the population. 

Health authorities in Gloucestershire, 
where the first six cases were reported, said 
550 cases of severe streptococcal illness usu- 
ally occurred in England and Wales each 
year. 

Members of Parliament from Gloucester 
said there was real concern and anxiety in the 
area about the outbreak. 

“The fact there is a duster of these cases u 
extremely rare and it is being investigated 
urgently by the public health authority," Mr. 
Sackville said. 

Health Ministry officials said doctors 
across the country had been asked to report 
immediately any new cases. 


Doctors have said the bacteria only rarely 
gets into the bloodstream. Some of the pa- 
tients had recently undergone surgery, and 
others could have had weakened immune 
systems. 

The first signs of the infection are red- 
dened. inflamed skin with possible blistering 
The patient can become feverish, with severe 
pain, vomiting and diarrhea. 

In later stages it becomes necrotising fas- 
ciitis, in which the bacterium seats itself in 
the fat tissue under the skin and reacts with it, 
causing the fat to liquefy, said Sally Pearson, 
director of public health in Gloucestershire. 

“That then means the skin tissue dies 
above it," she said. “The only treatment is 
surgical removal" 

Some victims had surgery to remove infect- 
ed tissue and one had a limb amputated. 

Mr. Sackville said: “It appears that when 
this infection reaches the state of necrotising 
fasciitis, the only answer is surgery. We wifi 
make sure these cases, if they continue to 
appear, are treated with all dispatch.** 


Scud Missile Kills at Least 13 in Yemen Capital 


Reuters 

SAN* A, Yemen — At least 13 people were 
killed and nearly 100 wounded when a missile 
flattened houses In San’a, the second such at- 
tack on the Yemeni capital in three weeks of 
rivfi war, officials said Tuesday. 

Three families were unaccounted for 12 
hours after the strike on Monday evening, res- 
cuers said. A security' source said that the 
search was still going on for bodies buried in 
the rubble. 

San'a television quoted an official source as 


saying 13 people were killed and 100 wounded. 
The security source said 120 people were killed 
or wounded but did not give a breakdown. 

"This is the work of traitor Ah' Salem, the 
dog." said Mahmoud Hanunad. a resident of Ai 
Qar area, referring to the leader of Southern 
Yemen, Ali Salem BakL “It’s inhuman." 

War broke out May 4 when President Ali 
Abdullah Saleh launched a military campaign 
to crush southern rivals led by Mr. Baidh after 
almost a year of disputes about the balance of 


Kohl Calls Rivals 'Dishonest 9 for Criticizing Vote 


Compiled M- Our Staff From Dispatches 

BERLIN — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl called Germany's opposition 
Social Democrats poor losers on 
Tuesday and said that criticism of 
the presidential election won by his 
candidate was hypocritical and dis- 
j honest. 

I The chancellor assailed the op- 
I position one day after Roman Her- 
I zog, of the Christian Democratic 
( Union and president of Germany's 
1 highest court was elected to the 
ceremonial post of president Mon- 
day by a special assembly, defeat- 
ing Johannes Rau of the Social 
Democratic Party by 696 votes to 
605. 

The result was a boost for Mr. 
Kohl, who is in a close battle for re- 
election in a national vote Oct, 16. 

Rudolf Scharping, leader of the 
Social Democratic Partv. later 


questioned the vote’s legitimacy 
and accused the Free Democratic 
Party of backing Mr. Herzog only 
to assure their re-election with Mr. 
KohL 

He also urged voters to protest 
the election by backing the Social 
Democratic Party in the European 
Parliament election on June 12. 

“They have shown themselves 
once again to be poor losers.” Mr. 
Kohl told journalists after a strate- 
gy meeting with bis Christian Dem- 
ocratic Union. 

Mr. Scharping's vague hints that 
Germany should switch from ac 
electoral college to a popular vote 
to select its presidents were nothing 
less than hypocrisy. Mr. Kohl said 


“Whoever argues like this must 
do it honestly and say he wants to 
change the system," Mr. Kohl said. 
“I find it dishonest to cry to bad- 
mouth an institution in the anger of 
the moment just to make oneself 
popular.” 

At a separate news conference 
on Tuesday. Mr. Scharping cast 
doubt over the legitimacy or an 
electoral college mostly filled with 
sitting legislators who ignored 
opinion polls that he said had 
shown that Mr. Rau had far wider 
popular support than Mr. Herzog. 

“The voters' will was ignored on 
May 23,” Mr. Scharping said 

Mr. Kohl said the postwar Ger- 
man Constitution deliberately cre- 


ated an electoral college to select 
presidents so Bonn would uot re- 
peat the mistakes of the Weimar 
Republic, when President Paul von 
Hindenbuig named Hitler as chan- 
cellor in 1933. 

The European Parliament elec- 
tion should be a “fourth round of 
young” to reflect popular opinion 
in protest against the three presi- 
dential rounds, which were dosed 
to all but the 1,324 members of the 
special electoral college, Mr. 
Scharping added. 

But Mr. Scharping stopped short 
of calling for a constitutional 
amendment, saying it was a com- 
plex issue. (Reuters, AP) 


German Soldiers linked to Racial Slurs 


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The Assrinaifd Press 
_ BONN — Seven German sol- 
diers in the showcase honor guard 
that welcomes foreign leaders are 
suspected of shouting anti-Semitic 
slogans on a public bus and beating 
up a passenger, officials said Tues- 
day. 

According to the Defense Minis- 
try. the Bonn prosecutor's office is 
investigating a witness's allegation 
that seven drunken metnbera of the 
1 .000-member battalion, dressed in 


civilian clothes, rampaged through 
a bus in nearby Siegburg last 
Thursday yelling “Jews go tome!" 
and "Foreigners go home!" 

The witness claims the soldiers 
aiso beat up a German passenger, 
the Defense Ministry said. 

The soldiers contend they got 
into a fight with German youths 

who would not lei them hare a seat 
but they deny shouting radical- 
right slogans, the mhasLry said. 

Along with fines or jail 'sentences 


they would face if found guilty, the 
seven could also be expelled from 
the army. 

The soldiers belong to a battal- 
ion that is called to the chancellor's 
office to stand ramrod straight, 
dressed in jackboots, white gloves, 
green berets and grey uniforms, as 
foreign leaders arrive 

The honor guard troops do not 
receive special combat training. 
Thdr function is almost completely 
ceremonial. 


Senior officers with Yitzhak Rabin on Tuesday as he visited the Gaza branch of the mOitaiy-nin Cnfl Administration, near the Erez 
checkpoint From left Major General Danny Rothchild, coordinator for the occupied territories; Lieutenant General E3nd Bar ak, ar my 
chief of staff: Mr. Rabin; Brigadier General Do? Gazit, Oil Administration chief in the Gaza Strip. The officer at right is tmidentined. 


power following the union of North and South 
Yemen in May 1990. 

Mr. Baid declared the south had seceded on 
Saturday as northern troops tried to encircle his 
stronghold of Aden. 

Mr. Baid, who was later named president of 
the breakaway state, said Monday night his 
troops were regrouping to push back the north- 
ern forces. 

Since fighting broke out. more than 20 Scud 
missiles have been fired against northern tar- 
gets. 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Putt Strict 

JERUSALEM — Israel sealed 
off the West Bank town of- Jericho 
on Tuesday to give Palestinian po- 
lice more time to organize them- 
selves after two armed Jewish set- 
tlers were detained by mistake and 
thdr weapons temporarily confis- 
cated. 

Meanwhile, tiie PLO chairman, 
Yasser Arafat, published a notice 
in Arabic newspapers- here dedar- 
ing that in the Gaza-Jericho areas, 
he had reinstated all laws in effect 
prior to the 1967 Middle East war. 
His move appeared to be as at- 
tempt to force cancellation of Isra- 
el regime of military, ordera. 

Israel said the legal announce- 
ment was a violation of the Gaza- 
Jericbo peace accord. 

The closure of Jericho, for a day, 
was another sign oF the uncertainty 
and confusion surrounding the de- 
ployment of 3,244 . Palestinian 
fighters from Egypt, Iraq, Sudan 
and Jordan as police in the newly 
autonomous zones of the Gaza 
Strip and Jericha 

The new police, most of whom 
do jmx speak English or Hebrew, 
have had difficulty communicating 
at tense moments of confrontation 
with Israelis who dp not speak Ara- 
bic, and there has. been confusion 
over terms of the agreement under 
whicb they are operating. 

In a visit to the Gaza Strip on 
Tuesday, Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin of Israel expressed sympa- 
thy for the early start-up problems, 
saying most of the pobce had not 
been m the West Bank or Gaza for 
27 years and needed more time to 
become familiar with the area. 

Israel and the Palestinian police 
have been at odds over the right erf 
Jewish settlers to cany weapons in 
the Jericho self-rule zone. The set- 
tiers and the army assert that set- 
tlers fall undo: Israel's jurisdiction 
and may continue to carry guns. 

But the Palestinian police have 
repeatedly insisted that the settlers 
doi cany guns when moving about 
the Jericho self-rule zone. 

Palestinians are not permitted to 
carry weapons in the rest of the 
West Rank, still under Israeli mili- 
tary occupation, or in IsraeL except 
in special cases of cooperation with 
the Israeli security service. 

In the latest Jencbo indden U two 
Jewish settlers from the nearby set- 
tlement of Na’ama were in a mon- 
ey-changer’s shop in Jericho when 
they were approached by a Pales- 
tinian policeman. 

One of the settlers, Yaix Yosef, 
said the policeman cocked Ins rifle 
when the two refused to hand over 
their sideanns, so they acceded. 
The two were taken into custody 
and later released. They were per- 
mitted to recover their weapons at 
a Israeli- Pakstmian security office. 

The Palestinian police com- 
mander said latex the incident was 
a misnndg m (nnd?ng The army an- 
nounced that the town was being 
sealed off for 24 hours to g jrve the 
Palestinians time to explain die 
rules to the rank-and-file. 


Trial Set 
For Italy’s 
Ex-Leaders 


Reuters 

MILAN — Two former Italian 
prime ministers, several former 
government ministers and the 
Northern League leader Umberto 
Bossi are to stand trial on charges 
of breaking the law on political . 
party fin a n cing, judktal sources 
said Tuesday. 

The former Socialist Prime Min- 
ister Beutno Craxi, the former 
Chixtian Democratic Prime Minis- 
ter Arnaldo Foriam, and Mr. Bossi 
are among 31 people sent to trial by 
a Milan magistrate on charges ris- 
ing out of the so-called Enimont 
affair, the sources said. 

Mr. BossTs Northern League en- 
tered government for the first time 
earlier this month as p art of Silvio 
Berlusconi's Freedom Alliance. 

Mr. Boss, who frequently at- 
tacked Italy's corruption-tainted 
political old guard, was put on a list 
of suspects in December over a 
$125,000 payment his parry re- 
ceived from the Ferruzri group. 

The Enimont affair is the largest 
strand of Italy’s corruption scan- 
dal, involving a failed joint venture 
between Fenuzzi and the state en- 
ergy company ENL with about 150 
baton lire ($94 million) in bribes 
believed to have been paid. 

The trial is scheduled to start oo 
July 5, with a former Christian 
Democratic budget minister, Paolo 
Chino Pomicmo, and a former for- 
eign minister, Gianni Do Mkfcelis 
also charged. 


Bosuian Leader Peace Plan* 

DemandxnfiQarification From V&- 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Hdzegovma S J£T plan *** 

Tuesday that his country was seriously and 49 

would back the plan., , . his rearm f tm a 

President Alfa close to 

pflprffTTiHw to Mecca, said he did not believe Bosnia s war 

ffi^Ttiwoghhe predicted some type of provid- 

The president's comments, wink annv, which 

ed an insight into the machinations of bis govomn^anuarm.' ^ 

havcstr^cdbadcfnjm mar. dans; SomMoU’s 

Bill Clinton tBSWi 

sending up to 25,000 American gjrouixL troops -to Bosnia JjTg 

we have seen, what those add 1 up to: nothing. 

NATO Affirms Bosnia Commitment 

— The North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies 




BRUSSELS (AP) — The North Atlantic Treaty .Ojgn^tion affies 
said Tuesday that there would be no unilateral withdrawal 01 tnar 
peacekeeping troops from, the Conner Yugoslavia. • . 

Rcctmtbr, officials in France and Britain — which supply the route* 
the 20,000 UN troops in the region — have sug^sled they jnay n*oce 
their. forces if Bosnian peace udks remain fruitless. France, a NA 
member but not- a part of its inOitary command structure, -dm nor. 
hart in the meeting. .- ■ , 

In a statement, NATO defense: ministers said: “We confirmed our 
a riflrrcpr’re * - to'e^p iipiig affiance' support fori United Nations operations 
. and the ongroig peace process.— NATO's deputy secretary- - 
Sergio Balanzino,' said ■ the affies. remained -determined to help *es a 
negotiated solution to fhoBomiah war oh the basis of a new peace plan 
drafted jomtly by the United States, Russia and the European Union. 

U.S. Intercepts aHaili-Botind Ship 

JACMEL, Haiti (AP) ^-The Uniied S tales intercepted aPanamaman- 

a . ■_ • . m : <r ti - oft/*- 3 rarea 



The frigate 'USS Antrim fired warning shots, and U-S. Ctiast Guard 
officers boarded the cargo vessel Leonese da Tuesday morning. On 
Saturday, a Bahamian-registered cargo ship loaded with contraband ou 
slipped into Haiti, defying an intema tonal embargo and ignoring a U.&. 
warship's warning shots. • . . _ , „ 

Ten international .warships, .eight of. them American, . are posted off 
Haiti to enforce the embargo. Coast Guard cotters and patrol boats are 
also deployed there, mainly to intercept Haitian “boat people." 

UN Plays DowttRwandan SheUing 

NAIROBI (AP) — Mortar fire fdl around the eerier of Rwanda's 
capital Tuesday and near the Defeose Ministry where a jspecial envoy 
from the United Nations was meetingwith government Qffidals. 

UN officials played down the intenruttent mortar and smaD-anns fire 



negotiate' the enc «... 

estimated-in the hundreds of thousands. - • 

Thousands of people took advantage of the lull Tuesday to flee south ; 
from Kigali, fearful that the rebel advance would resume soon and that ; 
the insurgents mig ht be vindictive in victory, a UN spokesman^ Abdul . 
Kabuu'sauL" - - ’ \ : ; . ’ - t • ’ 


KIEV (Reuters) — President LxpnMM.Kravchnkc^.Ukimne accused 
Boris N: Yeltsin on Tuesday of fomenting tension in Kiev's dispute with 
Crimea, saying that the Russian preadent had issued baseless warnings 
and violated diplomatic practice. 

Mr. Kravchndc made the allegation as the Ukrainian and Russian 
prune minister met for a second day in Moscow to discuss, the crisis over 
. Crimea, a Ukrainian i 

. to loosen its ties .with Kiev and move closer to Russia. - 
. “A p resident can issue warnings roly to ltis own government bodies « 
and ^muristera and not to the president of other countries," Mr. Kravchuk ] 
told a gathrongof warveterans. “This is at variance with accepted norms, i 
undemocratic arid: to no one’s benefit” Wh3e he did not refer to Mr. 1 
Ydtrin by name, Mr. Kravchuk was clearly alluding to comments made - 
last week by the Russian leader on Commonweal til cf Independent States . 
televiaro. Mr. ‘ 
dispute. 


\ I 


A. Jr 


1 - 


Yeltsin warned Mr. Kravchuk not to use force in the 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Madrid b Hit by Transport Strikes 

MADRID (AP) — Madrid residents braced Tuesday for more than 
two weeks of bus, subway and rail strikes that threatened to snarl traffic 
in the already congested Spanish capitaL- 
Intcrcity bus dnvers staged their second full-day walkout Tuesday," 
while sulway and city bus workers planned the first of two 48-hour 1 


n Wednesday, employees of the state railroad conroany, RENFE, 
were to bold the first of seven nationwide rush-hour stokes would' 
culminate in a full-day walkout on June 10. The strike would also affect ■ 
commuter lines running into .Madrid. ’ _ 


; 1 


shut the anpoftJ5pt two days, officials said • , . . (Reuters); i 

Th» hm bniKf now rhoinc in MnlnMaa rtj. j ■ 


The two largest movie chains in Manhattan — Cmcplex Odcon and 
res-Loews, have raised ticket prices at many of their theaters 

LiUf- fwwn tT CA '' 


Sony Theatres-^ 

to S3 for adults, from S7.50. 


(NYT) 


2 Jets Nearly Collide Over Pacific 

The Assoaated Press' 

TOKYO — Two jumbo jets came within seconds erf a collision 
over the Pacific Ocean after an air traffic controller's mistake 
Japanese aviation officials said Tuesday. 

_A collision was averted when Northwest FEght 6 from Tokyo to 
gucago took evasive action to avoid Cathay Pacific Airways Flight 
SSUrimLcS-Angeles to Hong Kong on Sunday, the officials said. 

Officials stud a Tokyo air traffic controller’s mistake put the two 
Spe tatod in roposhe directions, on the same course 
and altitude. The Northwest Boeing 747 was carrying 266 people. 
whQe the Cathay Pacific Boeing 74T was carrying 389? ^ 

In Hone Kong, however, a Cathay Pacific spok esman denied that 
thetwo planes had come dose to each other off northern Japan. He 
said automatic wammg systems worked in both aircraft wbenthev 
were 65 kilometera (40 miles) apart The Cathay Pacific pWk 
syaem instructed the pilot to ascend, the Northww system £Sjj 
palot to descend, aod both pflots bbcyed, he added. 7 ° 


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THEAMERICAS/ 


Page 5 jj 


Health Bill Altered to Silence Negative Ads 


IS 

:eds 


By Michael Wdsskopf 
WASHINGTON ^\VhM ^Z w , 

° g TT ***** !° V0,c 00 heai ” « 5StaS 

mooOvHany and Louise will be on vacation^ 

of America, which has 


POLITICAL NOTES 


sh weased t he c haracters Ham- and Louise ,n provocative 


Committee. The deal is more significant for demonstrating 
the power of television advertising to reach from the living 
room to congressional committee rooms. 

The 510 million ad campaign, featuring a middle-aged 
couple who raise questions about Mr. Clinton's health-care 
plan, has been widely credited with undermining public 
confidence in his proposal. 

Consummating the accord in a May IS Setter to Mr. 
Rosienkowski, the president of the association. Willis F. 
Gradison, pledged that while legislation was under consider- 
ation by the panel, the 250-member association would not 


The most important is how extensively insurers would 
have to abide by the policy of “community rating." in which 
members of the same community are charged about the same 
premiums for coverage. Now the industry is accused of 
imposing exorbitant rates for the sick, elderly and people 
who work in hazardous settings. 


New Clinton Pitch on Health 


tdevaion advertisements cnSprS'E 
b^th^rep^lcaee, reached agreement with the committee 
om1 ”" pie ° [r ■ hcj,r, " r "“ ra fm 

s *f IK^a^ds, a liiile designed for 

advantage, ll allowed the chairman. Dan “The chairman has said from the beginning that the ads 
° r { Uinois ' 10 nail down the votes create negative vibes and make the decisions of members 
where the insurance industry is tougher," said a Rosienkowski aide. "The absence of those 
ilf insurance association to snuff out ads and the public pressure from them improves the 
11 ‘£ ns,ders most threatening. meat for dosing the deal with monbers.” 

BU !i?? r L 0lher ® on S es ®««l committees havejurisdietion T “ • - J -«* 

over hg^fh care legislation, and the association is free to 


pubUcly advertise against certain provisions it opposes. 

the begi 


renvtron- 


advertise if and when a bill gets out of thc^ arri M«ms 


In exchange, Mr. Rosienkowski agreed to modify certain 
approved in March by the Ways and Means 
subcommittee 


The subcommittee bill required that insurers adopt com- 
munity rating for companies of 1.000 or fewer workers, 
representing 60 percent of employees nationwide. Mr. Ros- 
lenkowski agreed to limit the requirement for community 
rating to companies of 100 or fewer workers. Only 40 percent 
of employees work for companies of such size. ’ 

The chairman also would permt i insurers for six months to 
refuse coverage to people with illnesses who had been 
previously uninsured. The subcommittee bill called for an 
end to the practice once a new law became effective. 

"It's a back room deal that doesn't have any visible 
benefits for the people who are uninsured or inadequately 
insured," said Cathy Hurwit, a lobbyist for Citizen Action. 



Away 


From Politics 


• Domestic violence in military 
fannies has increased steadily 
since the late 1980s, according to 
Pentagon figures. The number of 
confirmed spouse abuse cases 
climbed to 18.1 per 1,000 spouses 
last year, from 12 cases per 1 .000 
in 1988. Substantiated cases of 
child abuse inenssed slightly in 
that period, to 6.6 cases per 1.000 
children, from 6 per 1,000. 


• The Medal of Honor, the high- 
est US. award for military valor, 
was presented by President Bill 
Clinton to the widows of two 
U S. soldiers who died trying to 
rescue a fellow commando in a 
Somalia donnish in October. 


• A nan was IdBed, a 5-year-old 
boy was critically wounded and 
three other men were wounded 
in a restaurant robbery that 
turned into a six-hour hostage 
ordeal in Indianapolis. There 
was no gunfire after the initial 
fusillade, and the gunmen re- 
leased their hostages a few at a 
time before surrendering. 


• A case of alleged racial dis- 
criamnatian by Dalny’s rhain of 
Z000 restaurants was settled 
when Denny’s agreed with the 
UJL Justice Department to pay 
$45 million in damages to hun- 
dreds of alleged victims in Mary- 
land and California. It was be- 
lieved to be the largest settlement 
ever in a public accommodation 
case. 


ItaJ Bcmoa/TbcAaocaicd Pros 


■jfUMFlfrG FOR. JOY — Cody Shifts, 3, and his frog, which 
iron fhe annual Cabreras County frog jumping contest in 
Cafifonria, with three hops totaling 19 feet, one-half inch. 


• Two beBbops, a blade and a 
Hispanic, were reassigned by a 
Boston hotel last week so they 
would not be called upon to 
serve the visiting prime minister 
of India, P.V. Narasiraha Rao. A 
spokesman for Mr. Rao denied... 
that, he had asked to be served by 
whales only. The bold manager 
made a public apology for the 
incident. 

NYT, WP, AP 


Cigarette Makers 
Face a State Lawsuit 
Over Medical Costs 


By Michael Janofsky 

New York Time* Service 

WASHINGTON — Mississippi 
has become the first state to de- 
mand that cigarette makers bear 
the health care costs of smoking. 

The state has filed a lawsuit 
against the tobacco industry, seek- 
ing reimbursement for the cost of 
medical programs, including Med- 
icaid, that support victims of smok- 
ing-related illnesses. 

“This lawsuit is premised on a 
simple notion: You caused the 
health crisis; you pay for it," said 
Mike Moore, the Mississippi attor- 
ney general. 

“The free ride is over. It’s lime 
these billionaire tobacco compa- 
nies start paying what they right- 
fully owe to Mississippi taxpay- 
ers.” he said. “It’s lime they quit 
hooking our young people on nico- 
tine delivered through the dirty 
needle of cigarettes and other to- 
bacco products” 

The suit, filed Monday, names as 
defendants 13 tobacco companies, 
as well as wholesaler, unde associ- 
ations and industry public relations 
consultants. 

it follows four class-action law- 
suits against the tobacco industry 
in recent months and mounting 
anti-smoking pressure in Congress, 
where a House subcommittee is 
studying the possibility of regulat- 
ing tobacco products as drugs. 

But the Mississippi suit is unusu- 
al as the first initiated by a govern- 
ment on behalf of taxpayers to hold 


likely to watch the Mississippi suit 
closely. 

Richard A Daynard. a law pro- 
fessor and chairman of the Tobac- 
co Products Liability Project at 
Northeastern University in Boston 
called the Mississippi suit “a go- 
ahead sign to attorneys general in 
other suites.” 

Steven C. Parrish, vice president 
and chief counsel for Philip Monis. 
the largest American cigarette com- 
pany. said that a state would have 
the same burden of proof as any 
other plaintiff suing a tobacco 
company, and that could prove dif- 
ficult for the state. 

Through years of litigation. the 
tobacco industry has never paid 
anything in a judgment or settle- 
ment, chiefly because companies 
have always been able to show that 
smoking is a matter of choice. Also, 
no jury has ever concluded that 
illnesses are directly caused by 
smoking. 

With the industry under such 
wide assault for so many issues, the 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. is be- 
ginning a national advertising cam- 
paign to dispute government 
claims that second-hand smoke is a 
health hazard. 

The company ran full-page ad- 
vertisements in several newspapers, 
including The New York Times 
and The Wall Street Journal. It 
argued that second-hand smoke is 
too diluted to contribute to any 
illness. 

Mississippi is asking that the de- 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton 
plans to go to Capitol Hill this week to pitch 
health care reform to Democratic lawmakers, the 
White House said Tuesday. 

Mr. Clinton will meet Wednesday evening with 
Democratic leaders to “keep everybody focused 
on the end game" before the Memorial Day recess 
at the end of the month, said the White' House 
press secretary. Dee Dee Myers. 

The president wants "to talk about health care 
as members prepare to eo home,” she said. 1 AP> 


becoming the chief vamp of the 1992 campaign, 
she had to leave her S!7.500-a-ycar state job'— 
obtained, she contends, with Mr. Clinton's help — 
and abandon Arkansas with little hope of return- 
ing. She said she w ould like 10 get her singing and 
business career back on track 'but that she can't 
do that without first getting “vindication" from 
the "gold-digging, lying. SOB” image she said the 
Clinton campaign had created for her. 1 W "Pi 


Rosienkowski Balks at Prison 


Gennifer Wants You to Listen In 


NEW YORK. — Today h‘m Gennifer's turn. 

To cash in. To set the record straight. To settle 
old scores. You be the judge. She wants you to. 

Just when you thought ii was safe to return 10 
the health care debate. Gennifer Flowers, the for- 
mer lounge singer and self-proclaimed Bill Clinton 
paramour is trying to get buck to center stage with 
the release of an hour of taped phone conversa- 
tions with the then -governor of Arkansas. 

At a news conference, she announced that for 
SI9.95 you can have your own iwo-cassoue pack- 
age. commentary by Ms. Rowers, and a 70-page 
transcript that she says will prove to a discerning 
listener her contention that she had a 12-year 
affair with Mr. Clinton. 

"I have lied for this man and helped him cover 
up and cover up." she said in an interview. "His 
truth could have set us all free. This is his fault. 1 
told the truth and I act blasted.” 


A White House spokesman said: "These tapes 
ere shown to be selectively edited in 1992. We're 


not going to comment on recycled trash." 

But Ms. Flowers insisted that she had only 
taken out some names to protect certain individ- 
uals. She wanted the conversations made public, 
she said, so people could hear all the “darlinV* 
and "bye. babes" and decide for themselves 
whether the two had really been an item, or — as 
Mr. Clinton has said — just casual acquaintances. 

"Decide whether you're listening to a man who 
is outraged because he's a victim of outrageous 
lies, ora slick manipulator doing his best to circle 
the wagons and keep his defenses in line." Ms. 
Flowers suggests during an interlude between tw'o 
of the conversations included on her tape. 

The reason she's doing il she said, is that since 


WASHINGTON — Lawyers for Representa- 
tive Dan Rosienkowski. Democrat of Illinois, and 
federal prosecutors have continued to negotiate 
bui have been unable to reach an plea bargain that 

would forestall a long and acrimonious court 
battle, sources familiar with the negotiations said. 

Federal prosecutors have outlined a broad con- 
spiracy to defraud the government case against 
Mr. Rosienkowski to the Justice Department, in- 
cluding charges that he paid employees for work 
not done ana that he misused official accounts for 
leased cars, office supplies and office space. He has 
publicly denied all the charges. 

Although progress was made toward an agree- 
ment on a plea, lawyers for the House Ways' and 
Means Committee chairman and these working 
with U.S. Attorney Eric Holder still had consider- 
able differences, sources said. 

Prosecutors are pushing for a felony plea and 
some jail time, sources said. Mr. Rosienkowsld's 
counsel has indicated there might be room for 
compromise, but remains firm That Mr. Rosten- 
kowski should not be imprisoned. 

“I don't know how he thinks you can get a 
felony conviction and no jail." said a federal 
source, referring to the lawmaker. , HP} 


new- bouses and*' 
> 30 percent of all 
he next five years . g 

Is constituted iheL 
the ANCs plan 
iter life for all." 
in both fields say 
10 meet the tar- 
L at present lacks; ? 
f- funding mecha-i' 
200.000 housing r 5 
the land redistri- 1 
ill be slowed by a 
‘that ail current 

-be compensated, 

' id make specifiesh 

to provide frte t 1 
''I needy childrennd 
-id to pregnant £s 

* education up to'idi 
..u dents. le i 


. ra 

W( 


>gli 


Quote/Unquote 


The secretary of housing and urban develop- 
ment Henry G. Cisneros, speaking at an invest- 
ment conference in New York, saying that he had 
once been introduced as Henry Cisnerosis. which 
he did not consider as bad as being introduced as 
Mayor Sclerosis when he was mayor of San Anto- 
nio. and adding that his favorite came after an 
appearance on C-SPAN when a woman who had 
seen the broadcast asked for him by telephone at 
his office; "1 really can't pronounce’ his name, but 
it is something like CheeseN'achos.” t IVPl 


ess State I 

eer 

y and his print- ital 
_ money. On the « li 
We’ have no- 
ioney. We can't V 3 
' he can't over- HS 
1 If. I 

ago. the presi- wa: 

■ called ■'The i uri 

“ The Messiah.” • O 
M- His image T 0 
Tice — a leop- ’lay 
” an elaborate a 
cane — were ,e 1 
*■ UTTency. in the ac ^ 
" ver the desk of l0( 
rat. e yt 

“ fading, some- 
. television no 
montage that 
* lown from the W J , 
' *dl 

- -rising are the ,rniJ 
1 newspapers, 
h names like 
and The Bea- 

’ egularly and, 

- a buy them, 

‘ t lengths of 

s. where they 


3 Sentenced in N. Y. Bombing 

Judge Orders 240 -Year Terms in Trade Center Attack 


tobacco companies directly ac- fendants be required to reimburse 
countable for the health corise^the stale Tor money paid out for 
quences of their products. The pro- smoking-related illnesses like lung 


vious suits were filed by individuals 
or groups. 

With medical costs soaring 
across the country, other stales are 


cancer, emphysema, heart disease 
through insurance claims. Medic- 
aid and medical assistance pro- 
grams for the elderly and indigen L 


Compiled br Our Staff From Dupaicha 

NEW YORK — Three Muslim 
fundamentalists convicted in the 
terrorist bombing of the World 
Trade Center in New York were 
each sentenced Tuesday to 240 
years in prison. The judge called 
one a coward for planting a bomb 
“to kill innocents.” 

Hie three, Mohammed A. Sala- 
meh, 26, Nidal A. Ayyad, 26. and 
Mahmud Abohalima, 34, were sen- 
tenced after they were given the 
chance to address the cowl They 
spoke in Arabic, which was trans- 
lated into English. A fourth defen- 
dant, Mohammed Ahmad Ajaj, 28, 
was awaiting sentencing. 

Judge Kevin Duffy of U.S. Dis- 


In New World Order, East- West Love Is by Mail Order 


on 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Past Seme* 

WASHINGTON was a gray day in 
Red Square when Chris Iblenfdd dropped 
to one knee , and proposed to a Russian 
woman he had met four days cariier. 

'At the cobbled foot of Sl BasiTs onion 
spires outside the Kremlin, Anastasia Fe- 
dorchoukova smiled sweetly down at the 
divorced computer technician from Virgin- 
ia. She said “yes.” 

They, .married six months lata 1 , 
March- 25 at a courthouse near Wi 

ton. Now. amid coos and coddles in a 
apartment with a large stereo, the young 
couple is living a fantasy that started with a 
magazine advertisement - 7 - their own Rus- 
sum-American dream. 

. The ihlenfdds! nmoa is a. product of the 
growing worldwide mail-coder bridal ba- 
zaar that has sprouted smce Soviet Com- 
munism died. With Soviet emigration bar- 
riers- daman tied, about 3£>0 Russian 
women entered the United States last year 
as fiancees of American men. In 1988, only 
$ wonKaj' came from the Soviet Union to 
many Americans. 


The Ihlenfdds 1 marriage was the first 
arranged through Beret and Natasha Spi- 
vadc, an Amencan-Riissian couple from 
Betbesda, Maryland. The Spivacks are 
cashing in on the lucrative business of 
showering America with brides from Rus- 
sia. 

Last July, the Spivacks started a business 
called Encounters International to intro- 
duce American men to Russian women. 
More than 50 Washington area men have 
come to the Spivacks’ office and grazed 


to $4,000 to search for romance 5,000 miles 
away. 

In interviews, American men and Rus- 
sian women involved m the program struck 
remarkably compatible themes. The men 
said they were sick of career-obsessed 
American women running to the subway in 
business suits and tennis shoes. The wom- 
en said American men were more likely 
than Russian men to treat them as equal 
partners. 

T was tired of American women,” said 
Mr. Ihlenfdd, 24, sitting on his living room 


through photo albums and videotapes of Mr.^™aa.^, siiunganiiMuymgroom 
n™™ couch, stroking his 22-year-old wife s long, 

blond hair. “All they cared about was their 


about 300 Russian womec. 

Two couples have married; six are en- 
gaged, and others are busily faxing letters 
and pictures back and forth, sifting for true 
and everlasting love. About every two 
weeks now, another Washington area man 
travels to Moscow and becomes engaged. 


work-' 

Jeff Nester, 36, a Treasury Department 
accountant, became engaged this month to 
17-year-old Lena Blinkova of Moscow. He 
picked ho- picture out of an Encounters 
International photo book in January, ex- 


That heavy traffic to Russia is a new changed 50 faxed letters with her during 


wrinkle in Washington's dating scene, 
where the 

the imhalanas between eligible women and 
men in the nation’s capital. Still, the Spi- 
vacks’ pialft clients are shelling out $3,000 


the next three months, then Hew to Russia 


and popped the question. 
Mr. Nestei 


fester had been writing to four or 
five other potential brides, just in case, and 
be was prepared to meet them if Miss 
Blinkova did not work out. But he liked her 


when she met him at the airport, and he 
soon foigol about the others during a week 
of sightseeing and courting. 

“It’s not like there’s a difference in ap- 
pearance," Mr. Nester said. “You can find 
nice-looking ones here and nice-looking 
ones over there. But there's a difference in 
the values ” 

According to an Encounters Interna- 
tional flier, Russian women are “much less 
materialistic” than American women, as 
well as “more willing to follow their hus- 
band’s lead” and “more appreciative of 
men.” 

They also have “old-fashioned tradition- 
al family values that are getting harder to 
find” in America, the flier says. 

On top of thaL the brochure says, the 
“dating scene in Russia is almost nonexis- 
tent, and a woman over 22 is considered 
past her prime. 

"Wars and alcoholism have taken their 
toQ on eligible Russian men and created a 
large number of single women. Many beau- 
tiful Russian women dream of having an 
American husband." 

There are lough requirements for those 


women, who must pass entrance interviews 
with the Spivacks’ staff member in Mos- 
cow. Women are accepted only if the inter- 
viewer deems them reasonably slender and 
attractive, if they are between 17 and about 
55 years old, have one or no children and 
speak some English. 

The women also musL persuade the Spi- 
vacks’ screener that they are not simply 
looking Tor passage to the United States. 
Natasha Spivack said that 600 to 800 wom- 
en had applied to the service, but that only 
300 had met the qualifications. 

Men using the service range in age from 
22 to 71. but they are mostly in their 40s, 
and many are divorced. There are no spe- 
cific eligibility qualifications. 

Some marriages between American men 
and Russian women make sense, according 
10 Harley Balzer, director of the Russian 
Area Studies Program at Georgetown Uni- 
versity. 

“You've got this funny situation where 
the American man is looking for an unli- 
berated woman, and the Russian woman is 
looking for a slightly more liberated man.” 
he said. 


trict Court sentenced the men after 
hearing a statement by the husband 
of a pregnant clerical worker who 
was killed in the explosion. 

“HI never get a chance to see him 
grow up," Ed Smith said of the boy 
his wife, Monica, was carrying. 
“We lost all this because of ' four 
men who wanted to blow up land- 
marks in New York." 

The February 1993 explosion, 
which ripped through the garage 
level of the huge office building at 
.lunchtime, killed six people, 
wounded more than 1,000 people 
and caused hundreds of milli ons of 
dollars in damage. 

A federal jury convicted the four 
defendants on March 4 of partici- 
pating in a conspiracy resulting in 
death and destruction. 

Mr. SaJameh proclaimed his in- 
nocence in a half-hour statement to 
the court. 

“I wonder how long I will remain 
in prison until the government re- 
veals I was innocent?” said Mr. 
Salameh. “Two years? Seven? Ten? 
Twenty? God only knows." 

Under federal law. Judge Duffy 


could have sentenced the defend, 
dams to prison for any length of . 
time. 

The judge said the 240-year sen->„ 
fences were calculated according to » 
the life expectancy of the six people.' 
killed by the bomb — 180 years — j 
and adding 30 years each on two;* 
further counts. 

“It is the mark of a sneak and a' J 
coward to plant the bomb to kill ■» 
innocents and to steal away,”; 
Judge Duffy said, “and that’s what . , 
you are — a coward.” 

The judge also fined the defen- 
dants £250,000 each and told them'., 
that any money generated by story. - 
rights or book deals would go to the 
victims’ survivors. ./ 

Mr. Salameh was accused of - 
helping pay for and assemble the 7 
bomb and of renting the van that .1 
carried iL 

Mr. Ayyad ordered chemicals for 
(he bomb. 

Mr. Abohalima was often seen in* " 
the apartment where the bomb was., 
built, while Mr. Ajaj provided 
bomb-making expertise. 

(AP, Reuters)^ 


A Special U.S. Memorial Day in Europe 


International Herald Tnbttne 
Among the mass of events 
\ maridng the 50th amuvasmy of 
! tpe D-Day landings, the annual 
\ Menywial Day conunemoratKffl 
*> Its, mflitary cemeteries in Eg- 
' rape takes on a special sagnifi- 
T canoe this year. 

The American Battle Mann- 


jtuju.y IBM* W 11 I 

^Enrobeaii office at Garto jtear 
"'fejis-^fetjed a score of .official 
events. These are in addition to 

' the . main " commemoration in 
Nor mandy on June 6 and smaller 
commemorations organized by 
1 specific tmlitaiy units.. 

* The main events in or near Par- 
is on May 29 will be at the Amen- 
can cemetery at Mont Valenffl, 

. Sortsnes; the Lafayette Squad- 
ron monum ent- ManteS-wAJ' 
quetiej.the Arc de Tricanph*i die 

■ American Church and the Ameri- 
can Legion Mausoleum, Nemlly- 
.Aff-Sdner : - r 

1 Commemorations fartlx^ from 

Paris' will be held at the Rhone, 
Aisne-Mame, Lorraine, -EPJ 1 ®* 
Meuse-Argonne, Somme, Saint 
Mihiel, Oise-Aiine and BnUany 
U5L military cemeteries. AB-are 
on May 29* with the exception of 
Brittany, where the ceremony 
May 30 will be followed by a 
display of parachute jumping at 
Saint~James ' 

. hr England, ceremonies wiu oe 


at Brookwopd on May 29 and 
Cambridge bn June 4. 

The m*m ceremonies in Bel- 
gium will be at the Ardennes U.S. 

miliiaiy ccmetemra May 28, and 
ai the Flanders Field and Henri- 
ChapcHc cemeteries on May 29. 

Ceremonies also will be held at 
thelLS. cemeteriesm the 
Netherlands and Luxembourg. _ 

' Memorial events in Italy will 
be held ax the Florence military 
cemetery cm May 30 and a t the 


May 30 i 

Sp-fly -Rome Mifitaiy Cemetery 
at Nett 


.^ettuno on June 3. This wiQ be 
followed by a “feast, of friend- 
ship" at the Borghese Villa in 
Anno, hosted by the dries of 
Neituno and Anzio, for veterans 
of all' nationalities. - 
Then veterans of the Italian. 


June 4 to commemoralethe 50th 
anniversary of the liberation of 
the Italian capital, with the tot- 
tiapatkm of rreadent BUI Clin- 
ton. . 

Tbe- president then travels to . 
France to take part mthecerenHH 
nies at Pointc du Hoc, Utah 
gw* and Omaha .Beach. The 
ceremonies are available to veter- 
ans with special badges bat 
dosed to virtually everyone else. 
Veterans who have not yet ob- 
tained their badgps can get help 
from the U^. Embassy m Paris, 
a*> QA 12 02. extension 2690. 



Mania Oiw/Tlw Awuunl ft<— 

A isamny paratrooper banging from the church in Sainte- 
Mfere-Egfise, Normandy, to commemorate the paratrooper; 
who were trapped during the battle for the town on D-Day. 
T be ate wfl be the scene of a major ceremony on June 6. 


M AIL ROOM: Agents’ Nursery 


Continued from Page 1 


talenL But in mingling with the real 
agents and navigating the city’s 
night life after work, the baby mo- 
guls can absorb certain lessons in 
the craft, including making connec- 
tions, feigning importance (never 
place a call your secretary can 
place) and mastering the art of be- 
coming someone’s best friend. 


the W illiam Morris mail room in 
New York in 1964. 

It is show-business legend that 
after applying to the mail room. 
Geffen in'. ercep ted a letter from the 
University of California at Los An- 
geles stating that he did not gradu- 
ate from college so the people who 
hired him would not see it 



As if acknowledging the nature 
of their profession, agents young 
and old implore one another, 
“Don't agent me.” as in “Don't 
hype it" 

Ms. Galloway says she tries to 
teacb her trainees "honesty, morals 
and ethics, like her mother taught 
her.” But even she concedes she 
couldn't make h as an agent be- 
cause she was “too straightfor- 
ward," 


"It's absolutely Lrue," Mr. Gef- 
fen confirmed. 


Norman Brokaw, chairman and 
chief executive of William Morris, 
said: “A good agent is someone 
who gets sparked when they see 
new young talent" 

But first “you must be prepared 


mentally to push that mail cart" 
util 


"If someone has to get pumped 
up evay time to act like an agent" 
said Kim Croninger, who runs the 
program with Ms. Galloway, 
“they’re not going to be able to 
sustain the energy and they eventu- 
ally bum out" 

Agents-in-training lead frenetic 
lives that include chauffeuring real 
agents around town, house sitting 
and running errands. 

in the mail room, patience plays 
a heavy role. Impatience helps, too. 

“You must seize every opportu- 
nity that comes your way." said 
David Geffen, the record and en-, 
ienainmeni mogul, who started in 


said Mr. Gulino. “I went to law- 
school to become a lawyer, and 
now I'm at William Morris to be- 
come an agent-” 

And. he said, “when I graduate, 
the sky’s the limiL” 

Let’s check back in five years. 


DEATH NOTICE 


EDMOND KONYN 


died Thursday, May 19 . 
Funeral .service lakes plait »»n 
Friday, May 27 . at Noire Dame 
tie llimliigne. at 10:30 a.tn. 

Ili.\ d.m>*liier. NaJeue. would 
like («■ welcome all his friends 
& family. 


The Kowloon Hotel's 



in-room Telecentres 


let you get three times 



as much work done. 


THE KOWLOON HOTEL 


It O N 1; K O N 1! 


SHAHt THf EuriRtlKCe 


Miijj.-nlv-r^T Rwtrjiam ken kv 


The Peninsula. Hone Kong • Manila * New Vort • Beverly Hills 
The Palace Hotel Belling • Ttw kowIqog Hotel Hong Kon« 


iqja. recently 
epicting the 
xxv Zairian. 
a cause for 
>ack. 


tedli 

rea 

ttevi 

'To 

froi 
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pwiecretaris 
emporonr and 



OTTBnr 


vwnipii u fton 

or Mnd 

sJuatfKM: 


H.OcnB 
Suite I27D 


Swte 1_ . 
OOfl USA 
3-223-936? 


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21 .46,94 


flU* 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 


ADVPg* l* 

~~~7t 



Joe Pass, 65, Dies, ‘Benchmark’ Guitarist Played With the Greats 


Manu; & F 
in Bn raSv 
cussed Mi » 
nation say 
with fi es ' 
editor ME 
Heralt Bai.- 


Compiled by Our Staff From Qispeucka 

LOS ANGELES —Joe Pass. 65. 
an award-winning jazz guitarist 
who worked with such greats as 
Ella Fitzgerald. Count Basie and 
Duke Ellington- died of liver can- 
cer Monday 

Mr. Pass made a series of albums 
for Pacific Jazz In the 1960s and 
'joined the Pablo label in the 1970s, 
in effect becoming the house ses- 
sion guitarist as well as making a 
steady flow of his own albums. 

While at Pablo he also worked 


with Dizzy Gillespie. Carmen 
McRae, Andre Previn. Zoci Sims. 
Sarah Vaughan, Benny Carter and 
Milt Jackson. 

He shared a 1975 Grammy 
Award, the U.S. music industry's 
chief honor, with Oscar Peterson 
and Niels Pedersen for best jazz 
performance by a group for their 
album "The Trio." 


an unflappable rhythmic pose are 
the hallmarks of a style which has 
made Joe Pass the benchmark play- 
er for mainstream jazz guitar." 


ana derisive about the media in 
which he worked. 


i Reuters . A P) 


Henry Morgan. 79. Satirist 
On Radio and Television 


In the "Penguin Guide to Jazz on 
I.P and ihe critics 


CD, LP and r-»"“"e. w the critics 
Richard Cook and Brian Morton 
wrote that “taste, refinement and 


view: 

Hi'i 

200 l 

SC It Of 
tied ii_ 
work. ~ 
citirio 


TQ QUR READERS IN VEVEY/MON1HEUX.AREA 


Hand-delivery of the IHT 
is now available on day of publication. 
Just call toll-free: 1 55 57 57 


NEW YORK (NYT) — Henry 
Morgan, 79, the scalpd-tongued 
satirist who became the legendary 
bad boy of radio in the 1940> and 
went on to appear on TV panel 
shows, died of lung cancer Thurs- 
day in New Y ork. 

Mr. Morgan earned strong criti- 
cal notices when he used no script 
and a few notes and ad libbed his 
way through his broadcasts. He 
was unpredictable, iconoclastic. 


Jacques Ellul 82, Theologian 
And Critic of Technology 

PARIS (NYT} — Jacques Ellul. 
82, a French Protestant theologian 
whose pessimistic assessment of 
modern technological society 
found a receptive American audi- 
ence in the late 1960s. died Thurs- 
day in Bordeaux France. 

Although 20 of his 4? books have 
been translated into English. Mr. 
Ellul was most widely known in the 
United States for “The Technologi- 
cal Societv.'* written in the 1950s. 


Dutch .Army captain who led the 
Dutch- Paris” underground network 
that rescued hundreds of Jews and 
Allied airmen in Nazi-occupied 
Europe, died of bean failure Satur- 
day. 

The organization Mr. Weidner 
helped form during World War II 
was credited with saving at least 
1.000 people, including 800 Jews 
and more than 100 Allied airmen. 
His exploits were recounted in Her- 
bert Ford's 1966 book “Flee die 
Captor." 

Ghuiam Farid Sabri, Singer 
Of Sufi Devotional Music 


John Herny Weidner, 81, 
Led Underground Network 
LOS ANGELES (AP> — John 
Henrv Weidner. 81. the former 


KARACHI. Pakistan (NYT) — 
Ghuiam Farid Sabri. a noted Paki- 
stani singer of centuries-old devo- 
tional music, called Qawwali. in 
praise of the saints of Sufism, the 


« mystical extension of ls- 
l here April 5. He was in 
his tnid-COs. 

Mr. Sabri and his younger broth- 
er, Maqbool Ahmed Sabri, per- 
formed before many audiences, 
some in Germany and in the Unit- 
ed States, where they were praised 
for the festiveness and soulfuincss 
of their music. 

Giovanni Goria, 51. whose brief 
term at age 44 in 1987-88 distin- 
guished him as Italy's youngest 
prime minis ter, died Saturday at 
his home in northern Italy after 
suffering from a lung tumor. 

Masayoshi Ito, 80, Japan's acting 
prime minister for a month after 
the unexpected death of Masayoshi 
Ohira in 1980. died of pneumonia 
Friday. 

Midori Schwartz, 47, a dancer 


and pioneer in dance video docu- 
mentation, died of AIM on May 
17 in New York. . 

Hanna Gfunwrid, 94, a retired 
group psychotherapist, form di- 
rector of Amnesty International 
and veteran of the anu-Nazi resis- 


anu 

tance in Gtamany and France, dicu 

May 15 in Fairfield, Connecticut. 


May 15 in Fairfield, Connecticut 

Harry WinthropFowter, 73, a re- 
tired president and chairman of R- 
dudary Trust Company Interna- 
tional, a New York investment 
manag ement film, died Thursday 
in New London, Connecticut after 
a long illness. 

Janes Augustine Shannon, 89, a 
medical investigator and educato r 
who was director of the National . 
Institutes of Health. from 1955 to 
1968, died Friday in Baltimore of a 
ruptured aortic aneurysm. 




ftZADStSABEADVtSS) 



that the tntomationrri 
Herald Tribune cannot be 
held responsible for ha or 
damages incurred as are- 
tub of trcna act hns stem- 
ming from advertisements 
whkh appear in ourptpor . 
Hn t h ere fo re rocommand- 
ed that readers make ap- 
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aantSng any money or on- 
taring too any batons 
com mb ma n t s . 


IMPORT/EXPORT 



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vrilh a view *:■ sxoansai 
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SEEKING MULTICULTURAL 
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stating your buying potential, backgroung and references. 

BTV International A/S 

P.O. Box 2227, Jens Juuls Vej 13, DK-8260 Viby J. 


* HOW TO LEGALLY * 
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or at ivpos of business 


Broier s cacidawn jjao raced 


ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES 

i? Peel Road. Douglas. 

Isle of Man. imi jlS 
Tel : OKM 626591 - Fax- 0624 S25JW 
or London ToL- (71) 2228866 
Fax: (71)233 1519 


For city irio-Ttmcr 

Mmiuun M-LFXB. and Du. 


i Tlmk Too For fe a uitfeiu to our 
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Because of the success of ihs ad in 
ihe IHT. we ere ik lancer tak in g 
! iKtem, fa cdtafena. Thank you. 
, Fae 908-144-7770 USA. 



TOUR ADDRESS aavOKUUadai 
fautewH oddraas. fxn/fhnm umber. 



sdascau > 


COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPER! 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


Mi - BD HAUSSMANN 

V*y m kmrJioun 439 sqjn. 
cm be eftvided. 

SHEAC0Nffll(lJ47 30199B 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 


FINANCIAL 




■ i./.Vll -r! 


™DWG tJTT. W1ANC1AL offaa hxx* ta dnra JD- f kjjb. Tafc 

u « JSS. Fox npO 67 72 SI (office hours) or 

Lord or erf (33 93 18 « 4? p] <5 44 4590 


OO Arwrionn Co stftfan m farii hmW 
office Hxm Id diene 40 + sqa Tufc 



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fiemcir- w, 

mfiriiir-h.! 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


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OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 


BY LAWYERS 


IMMIGRATION 


- ; & -TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE THUSTS. COMPANIES. 
BANK (HTROOUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
A ADMINISTRATION BY UK LAWYERS 
tumumcmmmaimrm aa. umKsnma 


a HUSH (MHO) £165.00 
a ISLE OF MAH £ 195.00 
a DELAWAEEut £435.00 
■ 1EBSEY £395.00 

B S.T/.5./PAMAMA £285.00 


1*5? '; LONDON OFFICE 

Is-CG.RRIC’HOUSE, 1C2 SYDJiEY STREET, 

ISrV'ftCNELSEA; LCND0N'SY*3 6NJ..’"- ' 

TT .44-71 352 2274 
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• bnmodfcta defevery 

• US$15,000 or $25/300 with a 
trust company 


Call or fax far free details! 
Ron Jensen 


London T«L 71 3B4 5157 Fax 71 231 9928 
Canada Tot. 604 942 8119 Fax 942 3178 


Nivelles-ltfro (Brussels* Belgium) 


Master License Opportunity 






public auction of Mceptionnai estate of 
■The CHATEAU-GOLF de la TOUSNEUEb 


AlphaGrjphics. 24-vear leader in ihe quick print and 
related services industry is seeking additional Master 
Licensee* io develop our ? 30-store network, currently 
operating in 18 countries. 

Each AiphaGraphics cemer offers offset printing, 
electronic printing, computer-assisted graphic design, 
binding and finishing, and is lied to our worldwide system 
through a digital data network. Consider your future as a 
Master Licensee, developing franchise locations in your 
counfn of interest. 


isms 



US Attorneys! 

toromMJx-frfe Nct*b ocr.»p«B*r. Sovicr m 
lO 50 Sinn Gflarunrc of cnmpkic ULrmyinXv 
Tc offer US. uldrro wiih ptwoe & bx service, 
offirr Mviccs. US. hank Joroums. US darm 
io sore v di reclow, cmnplctc fef»l semcea & 
Jssisunrc. including OTC rairtci eoiry A 
immipniina (Vi-c rnjws <m fret hrodiurr. 
mfliMc in Enyftsh & Gcraun. 

Dr. Jur. William A. WHgfal 
Attorney at Law 
US. CorpmatioD Services. Inc. 
iHJil BaJmoraJ Drive. Suite “10. 
Sxnmentn, CaliforaH 95821 
= Fax (USA) P16/783-J005 = 


CHINA 

Uyon teed io buy Cbioexc rocTEbxndifc 
or hew coodi mida m C3miD you 

eptriftfalkaw fit OUT 5HlIl^lli nffwr 
>z (86) 01)21^-8890 or Mr. YoeinStii 
Frwaciscoxi 415-951-I04&. Fro, 1.000 
T-jhizte Do tho jef-ap of coxnpiclt chip 
f.n Biiiu, our nniips utpcricDcc of tfacr 
f*hi tv gl axinsmal boo, ml ope, 
U'liuuAns, ^ . viU pmUDe tbe best 
priest and retell* far your company. 
AMERICAN PACIFIC CORP. 


OFFSHORE WORLDWIDE 
Ready made companies (shells) 
' * full management 
• address services 
Frrffrafar 


INTERCOMPANY MANAGEMENT 

P.O. Bat 160,9493 Mure, 
vsbj Utaienwm 
Tff# Fau 4I-75-37J 4062 
lLi ante 19 79 


JL'M'.f 


Panama continues to after xs trarBional 
advamagss lor dang busmess rhraugh 
Panamanian e/btnm companies, fiscal 
and corporate laws governing such 
aawtfes remain unchanged. Wrte lor tree 
brochure on the advantages of Panama 
companies, conventem ship reparation 
and company managemem ta 


I M T CORPORATION 

P.O. Box 7392 

Panama 5, Republic ot Panama 
Telephone: (507) 63-6300 
TELEX: 270fl PG 
FAX: (507) 63-6392 

(507) 64-8000 


Loti. 

■The Chateau-Gotf de la Toumette* made of two 18 hole Goff 
Courses 

15 to 6 ree-off) in a splendid envirctwwment nmhCiub-Hwjseina 
historical mansion cxvtt th centuryt plus uottxiiidtngs ana soon fadUdes - 

Provisionally sold at tke prite of 51,000,000 EOF 
Lot 2. 

Ittre: parcel of land - crossing of trie rue de Baudfimont anti 
roe de la Toumette- 

Provisonally sold at the prite of 700,000 BEF 


AiphaGraphics is seeking Master Licensees forAfrica, the 
Caribbean. Central America. Southern Latin America and 
Western Europe. 

For an information packet, please call Bill Edwards at 
1 1602) 293-9200. or fax your request to 1 1.602) 887-2850. 


Ziebart TidyCar is the recognized brand name for a soc- ; 
cessful automotive aftermarket business in 41 countries.- 


Professionally applied and installed products and sSrwces 
for Detailing, Accessories, and Protection areourspedalty. 
We meet the strong consumer demand for cars fiikt W 
better and last longer. . 


alpnagraphics 


Total area For lots 1 4 2 as per onooertv uta iiowa 2ia 56ca 


PliTihlYCpS 1 Zit If'* Fyim* 


37h0 N. Cummcrcc Drive 
Tiwsrai, Arizona 85703 USA 


Extensive initial arid on-going training, marketing; acfc^ 
tising, and technical support is provided V V V 


Lot 3. 

set of Equipements immovable by destination and assigned to 
the maintenance and the running of the Coif (list to be 
obtained at the Notaire’s offices) 

Provisionally sold at tbe prite of 200,000 BEF. 


T JOINT VENTURE SOUGHTJ 


Urtan planning; • aut>-H0use. ouajulBJngs. pent and part of me Coif 
courses Part rone ■ ° woods Forest zone ■ pasture: agriculture zone with 
valabfe landscape - * parcel of land; Agriculture rone. Occupation: inoulnes 
at trie Notawe's offices. 

Bank guaranty of 30.000,000 B& to be produced at the auction. 

For visits: by appolntement only - Service immoblller Notarial - 
32/2/502.63.73 

Public auction: Monday 6th junl 1994 at 5 p.m. 

Motei-sud de Niveiies - cnaussee de Mons. 22 ■ Nh/eiies (Higway 
Brussels-pans - exit Ntvelles-Sud) 

For informotioii. 




U hn Master RsMVJoM Wenfurc Opfioittinay 
h Travel Networt is a leatSng travel agency. 
p3 Develop a chan wdh Irigti esme potential. 

H USflftL 201-5674500 ir Far 201-567-1838 


Inlernatioiiai 
Herald Tribune 
ada work 


Master Franchises are available to qualified individuals » 
companies looking to diversify. For more inf cmnation, please 
contact: 


Ziebart International Corp. 

P.O. Box 1290 • Troy, Ml 48007-1290 USA 

TEL 1-810-588-4100 • FAX: 1-810-588-0718 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


Leading US-based manufacturer ot 
exclusive hi-tech surveillance, night 
optics, airport & government 
security products for over JO years 
seeks IV partner to manufacture: 
distribute abroad. “CCS is one 
of ihe largest & best known 
companies in the last growing 
surveillance & monitoring industries * 
Fortune Magazine. 


CCS-TEL 2I3-597-3W0 
Fox. 2I2-W-1278 USA Attn Mr King 
or TEL 10)71 4050287 
FAX. 10171 629 4538. London 
Attn: Mr. Hart 


Notnhe Jem-Paul fiftlGNON - PboM 32/67/64.84.19 - 
Fox: 32/67/64.81.26 


Hotabe Jules DUPOKT • Phone: 32/2/513.8935 - 
Fax: 32/2/513.97.18 


CITIZENSHIP 


U5 S150JB0 condominium purchase plus 
fee provides immediate dfizerehip m a 
la i Tree, English speah'ne Common- 
wealth cotmtiy (trot Antigua). Printipals 


or their lawyers only, pfeasr cwitert 
Maritime International Ltd. 
F.O. Bo* 1302, 43C Redclifle Street, 
St. John's Antigua, Wes! Indies. 
Far. (809) 462*2718. 


SERVICED OFFICES 


HQ 


Bl SI NESS 
CENTERS 


Over 150 Business Centers Worldwide 


Argentina • Belgium • Brazil • Canada 
Chile • Colombia • France • Germany • Mexico 
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Tel; USA 415-781-7811. ext 32 Brussels: 322-645-1 611 


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Canada's leading and most innovative pizza delivery chain . ; 
is seeking Master Franchisees or Joint Venture Partners to pro- 
vide leadership and a strong personal desire to be the best. 

Successful expansion in Costa Rica has proven the ” - 
Pizza Pizza system. 25 years experience and our ability to 
tailor products and services to local needs give Pizza Pizza 
International franchisees a clear competitive advantage. 

Business Planning • Training • On-site Supervision - 
Quality Assurance • Technology Transfer • Marketing 
Product Development • Business Development 
Central Commissary . 

For more information? 

Call Lorn Austin, President, at 
(4 16) 967-1010 




or write: 

Pizza Pizza International,. 
580 Jarvis Street, Toronto 
M4Y 2H9 Canada 


















































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China Violated Pact 
On Prison Labor, 
Rights Group Says 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25. 1994 


Paf re Sage 7 


® 


By Lena H. Sun 

.W a *"® ,n " P °* r Smicr 

Ch i ne * PO*«icaI 


Firmed as having had direct in- 
voivexncm in U.S. govern men i- 
banned products, according to a 


Pnsoners performed quality con- rcpon by Human Rights Waich/A 


•_j fU^V — tun- 

iroi cnecics on approximately 100- sia. 


Snw-^imlS ”F fical examination 
fi™* 3 ‘ rn P° r 3 ed mto the United 
nJw.te' 1 Illinois-based compa- 
ny. violating an American law har- 
nng pnson-bbor imports, a human 
nghts group said. 

J}* 1* n ™ reported case in 
winch a specific group of Chinese 
political prisoners has been con- 


ARMY: 

Serious Business 


Continued from Page 1 

decades of “starvation” military 
budgets. 

“The answer to whether they are 
plowing back these profits into 
more bombs, rockets, ships, and 
guns is ‘no,’ ” said David Sham- 
baugh. a China scholar at the Uni- 
vera ty of London who has recently 
completed a study of Chinese mili- 
tary spending. 

Even the rapidly declining reve- 
nues from overseas sales of Silk- 
worm anti-ship missiles, F-7 fighter 
jets, and ballistic missiles appear to 
be financing science and technol- 
ogy research academies, not miii- 


Thc information raises questions 
about China’s compliance with one 
of the mandatory conditions for 
renewal of its low tariff privileges 
with the United States. 

Administration officials, under 
pressure to renew Beijing’s most- 
(avored-nation trading status, have 
already said the Chinese have met 
this condition by agreeing in 
March to implement a 1992 accord 
aimed at stopping Chinese prison- 
labor exports to the United States. 

Despite the accord, human rights 
groups and others say, American 
companies are continuing to im- 
port goods produced in the Chinese 
gulag. 

Human Rights Watch/ Asia pub- 
lished its information on the export 
of the rubber gloves last week, but 
did not release details of the U.S. 



Mandela Vows Fiscal Discipline on Needs 


By Paul Taylor 

U'ttshrpm Pou Senue 

CAPE TOWN — President Me!- 
son Mandela of South Africa set 
forth a moderate domestic policy 
agenda Tuesday in his first major 
address to Parliament, pledging to 
address the material wants left by 
apartheid without resorting to defi- 
cit spending or permanent tax in- 
creases. 

In a speech that seemed tailored 
more for boardrooms than town- 
ships. Mr. Mandela lime and again 
returned to the theme of fiscal dis- 
cipline as he outlined his vision for 
a “people-centered society” where 
all South Africans will be free from 
hunger, deprivation, ignorance, 
suppression and fear. 

He proposed reallocating about 
S700 million, or roughly 3 percent, 
of the 1994/93 national budget to 
programs for upgrading bousing, 
electricity, water and sewage sys- 
tems. education and health services 


V» ben the white minority govern- frighten investors and trigger uifh- build a million new houses and*'**' ■ 

matt legalizedall liberation organi- lion — and thereby hobble their redistribute up to 30 percent of all *[ 

ptrons in 1990. most of the black best hope of using an expanding arable land over the next five years, y-v-** l 

£££££ ZMl T7 10 T ,0< TT z if “ d - 

ded to a socialist vision of wide- I always said we were a bloody symbolic heart of the ANCs p an — 
scale wealth redistribution through “ 1 Ef rv!,ll l ve organization the to provide a better hfe for all 
nationalization and other forms of ANC spokesman. Carl Nichaus. However, experts id both fields say it* 

state intervention. qmpped. only partly in jest, as he it will be difficult to meet the tar- ^ nik 

In the give-and-take over the en- waUted ou{ of PaHiameni alter the gets. The country' at present lacks; - b • \ thai 

suing yean, Mr. Medela's African s P** h * Tta real tesL as he and the -jW 

Nauonal Congress won most of the olherh acknowledge, will come nisms to build .00000 housing ruj f nv 1 ol 

constitutional debates about Souih ““ lbc «*«*■ « **** a S*”- Mld ’ j4 w1 

Africa’s new political order, but pn^ard of living of the poor bunon program wl I be slowed by a^ h for 2 

Mr. Keys and the white business hasn t nsen. but the political ton- parallel promise that all current 

establishment made them converts P CT2lun has. can the ANC still landownere must be compensaied J y ^ hed 
to market economics. remain wedded io fiscal discipline? Mandela did make specific sh has >g. 

The ANCs economic ministers Mr. Mandela's first major policy promises Tuesday to provide free! iheyj j 
in the new coalition govenunem. speech held no decisive dues, but it medical care to all needy children nds of * 

such as the former union leader Jay was notable for some of the things under age six and to pregnant « die “VJ 
Naidoo. now say that if they over- it left out It made no mention of mothers, and free education up to'idual- r(5n2w u 
spend on social programs, ii will the ANCs campaign promises to age 16 for needy students. lemio^, 

_____ 3; qS? 

7\ TTJF. xr c . . 


zations in 1990. most of the black best hope of using an expanding 
leaders who came oui of jail or economy to lift the lot of the poor, 
returned from exile were still wed- . 


ded 10 a socialist vision of wide- 
scale wealth redistribution through 
nationalization and other forms of 
stale intervention. 

In the give-and-take over the en- 
suing years, Mr. Mandela’s African 


economy to lift the lot « the poor. 

“I always said we were a bloody 
conservative organization.’’ the 
ANC spokesman. Carl Nichaus. 


mjk > cf Ccnett’ Apms fnafftnif terns, edueauon and health services 
Dinutrius Perrkos, a senior offidal with the UN nuclear agency*, for the country's mostly black 
on his way to board a flight Tuesday from Beijing to Pyongyang. P°o£ 


Mr. Keys and the white business 
establishment made them converts 
to market economics. 

The ANCs economic ministers 


spend on social programs, it will the ANCs campaign promises to age 16 for needy students. Ie into 


company involved until Monday. 
The gmtm said Technical Con 


UN Experts in North Korea 
For Talks on Fuel Rods 


The group said Technical Con- 
sulting Trade Co. lnc„ known as 
TCTC and based in Roscoe, Illi- 
nois, imported five shipments be- 
tween October 1993 and late Feb- 
ruary 1994. 

Human Rights Watch/Asia 
based its information in part on 
U.S. import records and discus- 


Rcuitn 

TOKYO — United Nations nu- 
clear inspectors arrived Tuesday in 
Pyongyang, the North Korean cap- 
ital. for talks with the government 


That figure is to rise steadily un- 
fil it reaches more than S2.8 billion 
-.1 in the fifth year of the new govem- 

1 1 Or Trl JYOrea mcm ' s Reconstruction and Devel- 
opment Program. 

1 1 fj j Mr. Mandela said the money 

1 11P| Knnfi would come from across-the-board 

cuts in other govenunem depart- 
„ . . .... menu. Even with the increased so- 

ergy agency Saturday it was willing ^ sp^ng. he said he expected 
to hold negotiations about a reac- , 0 ^ abte , 0 
tor at Yongbyon where ithas start- mcm ’ s annual deficit spending 


ZAIRE: New Specter Stalks Africa : the Stateless 

Cootmued from Page 1 political game with the opposition. laritv, onlv his armv and his print- iwl 10 

In response to the growing discon- ing press to make money. On the * line. “31, h . 


Cootmued from Page 1 political game with the opposition. 
, In response to the growing discon- 

or other organized transport except tent, he convened a National Con- 


private open-air trucks. 


ference four years ago 10 chart the 


mg press io make money. On the « 
other is the people. We” have no ■ 


Hraz-the 

■emi-ho 


• Pres ^’ n £ wn Zaire's d»ceni country’s future. It soon turned 
into chaos is Marshal Mobuiu. against him and come out with a 


Now 63. he took office in a coup in new constitution and even a new 
1965 With the backing of tbe Cen- nrime minisier FiimneTthiwk^i 


army, we have no money. We can’t L 3 ^. 11 ,_ n j 3 ‘ ,j v 
overthrow him. and he 'can't over- night- h r* 
come us." If. ont 


prime minister, Etienne Tshisekedi. 


tral Intelligence Agency*, which an implacable opponent of Mar- 
feared that instability could lead to shal Mobutu’s. 


communism in the former Belgian Eventually, Marshal Mobutu 


ed replacing spent fuel rods. 


(now running at 6.S percent), and 


Also Tuesday. North Korea crit- to avoid any permanent tax in- 


Co ngO, and he has been Washing- dismissed Mr. Tshisekedi and ap- 
ton s point man in Central Africa pointed a prime minister of his 


LWIUC IM. »« I oat— 10- 

A decade or two ago. the presi- 
dent. sometimes called **The iiwinjS “* or 
Guide" or even •‘TTie Messiah." • Dne 
seemed omnipresent. His image T on * ed 
and his totems of office — a leop- 'l^yed - . f _ 


U iwp- - - « jl : 

aid skin cap and an elaborate ,_ n ^ 


about the refueling of a key nuclear jcized the United Sutes for kibd- creases. 


more or less ever since. 
Washington has made it dear 


reactor, the North’s offidal press ing it a “terrorist state" and said it 


own. Fauslin Birindwa. In March 
1993. Mr. Tshisekedi was qected 


loouvii acaaenues, not mill- sions with thccompany spresdent 
taiy procurement, the analysts say. The last shipment of gloves arrived 
In China 5 booming coastal in Long Beach, California, shortly 


agency, KCNA, said. 

The experts, from the in tern a- 


was itself the main target of U.S. 


In a briefing for reporters. Fi- 
nance Minister Derek Kevs — a 


terrorism. The State Deportment's holdovcr {rom ^ old Nauonal 


that Marshal Mobuiu is cunently from his office by soldiers, and fhe 
in disfavor because he is blocking country ended up with two prime 


rived “according to an agreement" 
between North Korea and the In- 
ternational Atomic Energy Agen- 


cy. news agency said in a dispatch 
monitored in Tokyo. 


personnel carrier. 

At tbe same rime. Western offi- 
cials say, big military businesses 
have also led to corruption, the 


Ministry spokesman said. 


in LJuna s booming coastal in Long Beach California, shortly rived “according to an agreement" terrorist state “is an anachroi 
prownoes, military commercialism after Treasury Secretary Lloyd between North Korea and the In- act based on the U.S. hostile p 
as produced a generation of lop Bemsen visited Beijing and praised temational Atomic Energy Agen- for impairing the image" of b 
QUtcerswno are more likely to have Chinese officials for their “cooper- cy. news agency said in a dispatch Korea “and stifling it as it has 
jxnven a new Mercedes-Benz in the anon” on prison labor exports. monitored in Tokyo. over ‘the nuclear issue,' ” a Fo 

roan a tank or armored The Illinois company, which im- North Korea told the atomic en- Ministry spokesman said, 
personnel earner. pons the gloves for use in AIDS- 

. At the same time. Western offi- related medical cases, had turned __ 

have also led to corruption, the high-quality gloves and decided to KOREA; Wicked or Just Wily? 

“SSS On Friday, 

even as they give wide publicity to The company president. Roger fcars fi** 1 “y of weakness oilictais depicted Lde North l 
an anti-cotruption campaign in the A. Newman, told Ok rights group lovvard Nortl1 Kona «>uld under- “ 1 “^hon as only a tedmicaJv 

civilian sector. that bdbreihe joint vmturewSs ® me lhc agency’s prerogatives ^° n of agency rules and cited 

... » . almi.1^. ..... J. J .L. _ I 1. .11 Pf iTIflfV rwci f ■ t/A V»firtnc mi 


lional Atomic Energy Agency, ar- designation of North Korea as a Panvgov^en t - ackoo^ TbSt tafiStoSSTB? 
nved Bmvdins in an acrpfmeni terrorist state is an anachfonisuc .1 j* . ^ occausc ne nas looteu zmre. 


democratic development And he is ministers, two cabinets, even two 
something of an international pan. constitutions. 


terrorist state is an anaemomsue d gcd ^ lemponpi ^ in . 
act based on the U.S. hostile pobev cr ^ s ^ ^ Bul ^ 

for lmpainng the image of North ^ h shou f d ^ ^ hk lp fioaiJce 


Now, there is an agreement on a 


Korea “and stifling it asi. has done £ cd ™ 

ora* the nuclear issue, a Foreign at!rilio n streamlining of re- 


accumulating. according to testi- pew. single constitution, but tbe 
t ?° n y _*™P_ oumster, opposition is divided between 


about SSbiBion. The United Slates hard-Unere, who want nothing to 
ami W«t European nauons have do with Marshal Mobutu, and 


dundam apartheid bureaucracies 
and spending cuts in certain areas, 
such as defense. 

The siate-of-the-nation address. 


refusal him visas. Still, he survives, moderates, who believe they can 
And as conditions go from bad work with him. And there is a sus- 


to worse, that old refrain that pidon that the president is back in 

helped to preserve Western back- effective control 

ing for him throughout tbe 1970s There is a sense of stalemate to it 


even as they give wide publicity to 
an anti-corruption campaign in the 
civilian sector. 


“From China's standpoint,” a 
Western diplomat here said, “one 
’ of the problems is that the military 
is too busy making money to think 
• about national defense.” 


fully operational, he imported 
“several container loads of exami- 


“severaf container loads of exami- 
nation gloves” from the Chinese 
factory in late 1993. 

He said he did not know of any 


The explosion of growth in Chi- prison-labor involvemenL But, trie 
na’s mili tary industries has also report said, “be was aware that the 


raised tbe profile of its exports to gloves were not being inspected on 
tbe United States, including every- the premises of tbe plant and had. 


- thing from assault rifles to toys to 
' toilet seats. Some members of Con- 
1 gross advocate imposing penalties 
. on China’s military industries to 

- punish Beijing for its record on 
r human rights, an idea that some 

- China specialists call coumerpro- 

*■ itllrtiw Tlii* civnalictc ira» thar 


moreover, heard rumors about a 
possible link to prisons.” 


The Chinese Justice Ministry on 
Tuesday dismissed the Human 
Rights Watch/Asia report as 


toward North Korea could under- 
mine the agency’s prerogatives 
elsewhere, sounded the alarm bell 
Thursday. He sent a telex to North 
Korea and a message to the UN 
secretary- general. Butros Butros 
Ghali. tailing North Korea’s action 
“a serious violation” of the coun- 
try’s inspection accord with the 
agency. 

At the same rime . Mr. Blix made 
it dear that the game was not over, 
given that the fuel withdrawal will 
not be completed for at least seven 
more weeks. 

“It stiD seems passible.” he said, 
“to implement trie required safe- 
guards measures.” He called on 


- c . . . - , , o m "^y ways, represented the cul- 

On Friday, however senior U.S. urination of an ongoing tutorial in 
officials depicted Lhe North Kore- modern economic? that men like 


and 1980s — when all is said and 
done, who else can hold the coun- 


alL Frederic Kibassa Malibu, head 
of the overall opposition coalition 


an action as only a "technical viola- Mr. Kevs have been giving men like 
non of agency rules and cited oih- Mr. Mandela for the past four 


try together*? — is being heard called the Sacred Union, sat in the 


again in some Western capitals. shade of a tree in his backyard and 


JBA AND IB MUM 

THAMt SMNT M* 

AND THE SAQB3 htAEI. 


ductive. The specialists argue that 
the military wul be die key institu- 


the military wul be die key institu- 
tion for stability m China after the 
. death of Deog Xiaoping, the senior 
* leader. Punishing nrifiiaiy .iridos- 


“groundless fabrication,” Agence North Korea to suspend the with- 
France-Presse reported from Ben- drawal of the fuel rods immediately 


France-Prcsse reported from Beij- 
ing. 

A ministry spokesman _con- : 


“tries, they contend,' would be 
fraught with problems of definition 


firmed that Beqiiq 
had a contract wit 


drawal of the fuel rods immediately 
pending an inspection accord, and 
sent senior agency officials to 


No. 2 Prison [Pyongyang for consultations. 


a factory; for Mr. Perry said May 3 that Wash- 


er, more positive actions by lhe years. 

hard-line Communist state as justi- 

fication for a U.S. gift of sorts: a 
staled willingness to begin new 
high-level talks that North Korea 
badly wants. 

U.S. officials say the purpose of 
the talks, which could begin in Ge- PERSONAL S 
neva within a week or so. is to more jba aicwimum 
toward a bargain in which North that* saint jude 
K orea would get a series of politi- and the SA Cgp tCAtr 
cal and economic concessions in SAC8H> * ART 

exchange for allowing all the in- i>o* you. msn 
spections the agency wants. Work- 
ing out the details could take muvinu 

months, but U.S. officials are opti- 
mistic that North Korea might ^ 
quickly accept the fuel rod inspcc- INTERD 
lions on an interim basis. o»*> 

New talks seemed sensible be- foe a free estiwje 
cause all parties want to see the PAPIC m 
issue resolved without bloodshed. rMK) W SfAJU 


Now Marshal Mobutu has era- put it this way: "On the one side, 
barked on a long and complicated there’s Mobutu. He has no popu- 


hand-carved ebony cane — were 16 T 

everywhere, on the" currency, in the a ® ke |* we "rto 

newspaper, framed over the desk of ' tel 

every major bureaucrat. 2 J’ 0 * 1 id 

Now his image is fading some- tlojaj a 

what. The evening television no ^ 9, t1 

longer begins with a montage that "5he 

depicts him floating down from the n. 

clouds. m >\r. 

Perhaps more surprising are the ,nnj l' — %r 
number of opposition newspapers. .. • . 

dozens of them, with names like :cd L !" n ‘ie 

Storm of the Tropics and The Bea- rea r 1 - 

con. They appear irregularly and, :l ^ ver ^e 

since few people can buy them. UJ 151 e^ 

they arc draped over lengths of . Yo F ^ 

string on the roadsides, where they rrx>I *J * s fl 

attract crowds. ■ ' and )Q j 

One such paper. Umqja, recently ie * 80 ICn 
printed a cartoon depicting the . e led 

president strangling a poor Zairian. . »t 

That would have been cause for a 

execution some years back. na 


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CHINA: Stage Is Set for Renewal 


pome structure, and they have 
Deenjomed by a number of other 
Qrinese mffitary leaders. 


China’s 


r top Cainese mffitary leaders. 

■ StiD, it remains to be seen whetb- 


Confinned Iron Page 1 ' In the years following China's 

1989 crackdown on pro-democracy 
was to free Mr. Clinton’s hands demonstrators. Democratic mem- 


ber a new emphasis on training and .. f 
_ readiness will r am pos e sufmnent imnrov _j , 

- discipline so that COTunuiust Party 
Meadm can madntain stability in the 

'ra** 5 - . # , UniiedSU 

* "Tbe cammerdaluaoon of the th e Jacksi 
I'PLA,” Mr. Shambaugh said, “has dating fre* 

•had a very deleterious effect on China h 

• readiness and training.” where, Mr 

But prosperity is well received ^ other 
-among the troops, most erf tbe ana- China has 
’lysts agree. Universal 

t "I have actually overheard an Rights and 
'officer criticizing a superior for be- cal prison] 

..ing too interested in taking money other requi 
'from commercial activity and turn- China h 
^ing it over to the central govern- Imemanor 

-merit," a Western diplomat said. Red Cross 
"He told him he should be more although n 
'concerned about the living stan- China a 
-dards of his comrades." American i 

■ Today, China’s military runs a of the Voice of America. On anotti- 
' pharmaceutical empire with earn- er condition, protecting Tibet’s re- 
*ings<rf Slbillionayear.it produces Egious and cultural bentage, Chip 
- sS&K te tdevisiop dishes and cdlu- has shown no progress, by admims- 


somewhai on noking a final ded- bets of Congress proposed legisla- 
tion. Tire two compulsory condi- tion to place human rights condi- 


tions for extending the trade stains, 

improved emigration policy and ra- 


tions on extensions of China's 
trade status. President George 


spection of prisons suspected of Bush repeatedly vetoed the mea- 
produdng goods for export to tbe sures, and Mr. Clinton sharply ai- 
United States, were required under tacked him during the presidential 


the Jackson-Vanik amendment election cam p ai g n. five judgment of the adequacy of 

dating from the 1970s. Mr. Clinton now seems bent on inspections. “It is unclear why we 

China has a mixed record else- taking tire issue out of tbe realm of should be in any burry to move to 
where, Mr. Christopher said. He donratic politics. To do so requires high-level talks," he said, 
and other officials have said that heavy politicking, exemplified by The Clinton administration. 
China has formally adhered to the Mr. Christopher's weekend round which has preferred the “wily nego- 
Universal Declaration of Homan of phone cans to members of Con- tiator” interpretation of North Ko- 


But the U.S. decision had awk- 
ward consequences, according to a 
former undersecretary of state, Ar- 
nold Kanter, the most senior U.S. 
official to meet with North Korean 
diplomats. “It looks as if Washing- 
ton has a different view of what is 
O.K. than the IAEA,” Mr. Kanter 
said. 

Mr. Kanter said the administra- 
tion would have been wiser to awai i 
the results of new agency consulta- 
tions with North Korea on an in- 
spection arrangement for the fuel 
rod withdrawal and a more defini- 
tive judgment of the adequacy of 
inspections. “It is unclear why we 


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Unrrasal Declaration of Human 


Rights and produced lists of politi- gress. To some extent, the decision 
cal prisoners — two of tire five on what to do is bang framed by 


other requirements. 

China has held talks with the 
International Committee of the 
Red Cross on prison inspections, 
although no visits have been held. 


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of phone calls to members of Con- tiator” interpretation of North Ko- 
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China also has discussed with man rights pressure. One, Repre 
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man rights in China. Korea needs io get something be- toma, austka Tet 713 - 3374 . 

Limited sanctions seem accept- fore it concedes on the inspections. Jl 

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man rights pressme. Oire, Repre- evidence of North Korea’s good £ -Ttm'ZStZ 

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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW VOBK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON PONT 


Ukraine Could Be Trouble 



I Crimea’s Parliament elected by the Ukrai* 
I nian territory's ethnic Russian majority, con- 
tinues to tug at Kiev’s leash. Ukraine has now 
ssem in tanks to signal national resolve. Here 
lurks Europe's most serious security dispute. 
Ukraine, with its heavily Russian east also 
1 looking to Moscow, fears for its sovereign in- 
tegrity. With reason: almost aD Russians think 
of Ukraine, and all the other formerly Soviet 

I territories except the Baltics, as Russia's own. 
Russia is nuclear. So is Ukraine. The gathering 
political tensions between them and the possi- 
ble fragmentation of Ukraine’s nuclear hold- 
ings are the very definition of danger. 

* Last January a rightly alarmed American 
government helped Russia and Ukraine patch 
together a deal committing Ukraine to denu- 
clearize and Russia to respect the wholeness 
of Ukraine. But the Ukrainian leadership con- 
tinues the backward-looking economic policy 
that feeds the real distress inclining Ukraine's 

II million ethnic Russians to look to their 
ancestral homeland. And meanwhile, a Russia 
with its own copious frustrations sinks into a 
nationalistic phase of asserting Russian inter- 
ests across all the once Soviet parts of the new 
Russia’s “near abroad." 

' In the Caucasus and Central Asia, this is of 


Indonesia as 


It is generally reckoned that at least 200.000 
civilians died after Indonesia lawlessly invad- 
ed in 1975 and then annexed the former Por- 
tuguese colony of East Timor. Bui unlike receni 
massacres in Rwanda, it caused no internation- 
al outcry, no calls for military intervention by 
the United Nations. One reason for the differ- 
ent response is Lhal Indonesia is a big and 
powerful Islam ic country, a leader of the non- 
aligned bloc, yet also a lucrative market for 
Europe and the United States. And Jakarta has 
few scruples about using its muscle. 

This has been confirmed afresh by Indone- 
sia's crude pressure on President Fidel Ramos 
of the Philippines to censor a human rights 
conference in Manila scheduled to begin next 
Tuesday, at which eight exiled East Timorese 
activists were invited to speak. When Indone- 
sia's military regime learned of this, it warned 
that unless the conference was canceled, Indo- 
nesia would probably refuse to be host to 
peace talks between the Philippine govern- 
ment and Muslim separatist rebels. 

Initially. Mr. Ramos tried to mollify Indo- 
nesia, sending an envoy to Jakarta and stress- 
ing that Mani la recognized East Timor as part 


of Indonesia, adding that his government was 
powerless to halt a private conference. The 
rumbling only increased in Jakarta, so Mr. 
Ramos on Friday banned non-Filipinos from 
laking part in the conference, saying that therr 
presence would be ''inimical to the national 
interest." Now Jakarta has pulled out of a 
Filipino trade fair, which has been postponed. 
Thus does Indonesia assert iis right to silence 
debate on East Timor anywhere. 

Will Australia be the next target? In years 
pasL Australian journalists have defied trav- 
el restrictions to East Timor. But. like the 
Philippines. Australia meekly refuses to 
challenge Indonesia's illegal grab of this un- 
fortunate former colony. Indeed, in the tra- 
dition of Orwell's Newspeak. Australian dip- 
lomats avoid mentioning the words “East 
Timor” and pointedly talk about "Timor,” 
thus uniting in their vocabulary what Indo- 
nesia has vainly striven to unite with gun and 
bomb. The sound of those dropping knees 
surely has not escaped the Suharto regime, 
and Canberra may soon be pressured to 
cany self-censorship even further. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Back to Reality on the Left 


The British Labor Party carries within it 
both a tradition of social reform that even 
Conservative governments have felt bound to 
ratify and a tendency toward doctrinaire in- 
ternal feuding that could tum even sympa- 
thetic voters away. Over its history. Labor has 
swung back and forth between these two ten- 
dencies, with predictable electoral conse- 
quences. The British electorate is fond of 
Labor as the party that created the country's 
National Health Service and put in place 
protections for the poor and unemployed. It 
turns off to the Labor party whose hard-line 
Marxist wing gave Lhe world the phrase "loo- 
ny left," Ironically, former Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher may have been allowed to 
pursue her bolder conservative experiments 
because of both Labor traditions. The strong 
social safety net that Labor helped build pre- 
vented social upheaval when the country con- 
fronted high rates of unemployment under the 
Conservatives. And the rise of Labor’s left 
wing sent many anti- Thatcher voters toward 
centrist third parties, splitting her opposition. 

John Smith, the Labor leader who died 
suddenly on May 12 at the age of 55, was 
given a good chance of becoming his country's 
next prune minister because he had pushed 
forward the work done by former Labor lead- 
er Neil Kinnock in restoring his party's stand- 
ing as a responsible agent of reform. Even 
more than Mr. Kinnock, Mr. Smith enjoyed a 


reputation for a practical seriousness that 
reassured swing voters who thought 15 years 
in office was enough for the Conservatives but 
who didn’t want to take any big chances. Now 
Labor has to decide how to replace Mr. Smith. 

The two leading contenders for the Labor 
leadership. 43-year-old Gordon Brown and 
41-year-old Tony Blair, promise to continue 
Mr. Smith's tack toward the center. They are 
both, in Labor’s parlance, ‘‘modernizers,” 
meaning that they are more like 1990s .Ameri- 
can Democrats than 1920s Fabian Socialists. 

What is happening in the Labor Party re- 
flects what is happening to socialist and social 
democratic parties ah over Europe. Although 
many of these panics irace their roots to 
Marxism, they usually won power courtesy of 
voters seeking to tame capitalism rather than 
overturn it- The excursions of some of these 
parties to the farther reaches of the left in the 
1970s or 1980s not only marked a break with 
their own practical achievements but also de- 
prived voters — especially those most in need 
of some protection against the vagaries of the 
market — of palatable alternative to conser- 
vatism. Paradoxically, the shift leftward nar- 
rowed rather than expanded voter choice. 
Now the democratic left almost everywhere is 
returning to its reformist tradition, strength- 
ening democracy by offering voters realistic 
alternatives to the status quo. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis 


By now the image is burned into the Amer- 
ican memory: a young woman in widow's 
weeds standing between two small children. 
One of them, a little boy who is not yet 3 
years old, has his hand raised to his forehead 
in salute. He is honoring, of course, his 
father's coffin, which, borne on a caisson 
and followed by a riderless horse, is on its 
way to Arlington National Cemetery. 

There are other photographs, thousands of 
them, and since last week many of them have 
showed up in newspapers and on television. 
They will continue to do so for years. Be- 
cause the young woman in widow’s weeds, 
who became the 64-year- old grandmother 
who died last Thursday, had an extraordi- 
nary bold on the American public. 

Other presidential wives have captured the 
nation's respect; a few have captured its 
love. But Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onas- 
sis did something else as well — she captured 
its imagination. 

Part of her fascination can be attributed to 


the sheer drama of her life. By the age of 31 
she was first lady; by Lhe time she was 34. 
first widow. She raised two children, lost 
three others and married a Greek shipping 
magnate who, after the Golden Boy who was 
her first husband, seemed to her puzzled 
admirers a somewhat improbable Prospero. 

Widowed again after she and Mr. Onassis 
drifted apart, she went to work in hook 
publishing. Not spendthrift with her fame, 
she used it shrewdly in the service of land- 
marks preservation. 

The rest of her mystique, however. musL be 
credited to the intangible — to whatever it is 
that makes certain performers and writers 
and the occasional politician as much ravtb 
as reality. Her looks helped. So did her style 
so did her dignity. Above all. though, what 
makes Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis 
memorable is that in a public sea she steered 
a private course; that in the age of confes- 
sion. she kept her own counsel. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



Internationa! Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED I8S7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cif-Choirmn 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR. Executive Edurr & VtcePnsdoa 
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CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Dejxay Eebuws • CARLGEWIRTZ. Aao.'saw Editor 
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•JUANITA L CASPAR! htbmxiiwial Devekfmen Dinaar • ROBERT FARR& Chaise DiretiPr. Europe 

DinaatrJela PMicatun: RktunlD. Simmons 
Dirraeur Adjoin! tie lu Publiaaim : Katharine P. Dane*- 


International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Otirics-dc-GaulJe.92521 Neiallv-sur-Scine. Frana-. 
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£ / W. fntenttmd Herald Trim. AS rights reserved. ISSN: fQ94-'f)52 



area Isn ’t Hearing the Message 


no great consequence to Western interests. The 
civil conflicts and Islamic furies abounding 
there cry for a steadying hand. NATO and its 
instruments are content to let Moscow* provide 
that hand, if Moscow meets international stan- 
dards of supervised intervention. Russia's ar- 
gument for policing its own backyard —duty, 
stability, refugees — is essentially the case 
Americans make for invading Haiti. 

Ukraine is different. Its location, size and 
nuclear status make its fate central to Eu- 
rope's destiny. Russia makes no direct claim 
for military intervention. But its concern for 
border stability and the welfare of ethnic 
Russians is broad enough, and the conrexi 
uncer tain enough- to raise the question of 
whether its goal is to revive the Soviet empire 
under the Russian flag. 

At the moment, Russia is knocking on NA- 
TO's door, asking for a "special relationship” 
that reflects Russia's importance and goes be- 
yond the Partnership for Peace offered to Cen- 
tral Europeans. Moscow deserves such a link. 
as long as its cruder nationalist currents do noi 
prevail. Ukraine is the key foreign policy ques- 
tion on which Moscow's readiness for a securi- 
ty association with the West is being tested. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


W ashington — on May 3, 
President Bill Clinton public- 
ly offered "a hand of friendship” to 
North Korea if it honored a pledge 
not to develop nuclear weapons. On 
the same day. Defense Secretary 
Bill Perry softened previous rheto- 
ric. offering to cancel lhe U.S.- 
South Korean combined military 
exercise "Team Spirit” if Pyong- 
yang cooperated fully with Lhe In- 
ternational Atomic Energy Agency. 

These words came on the heels of 
earlier statements by Secretary of 
State Warren Christopher and Un- 


By William J. Tavlor Jr. 


Korea out of the diplomatic action. 

My reading from yet another set 
of meetings in mid-April with Kim 
H Sung and senior members of his 
government is that Pyongyang has 
concluded that the United States 
lacks the will and staying power to 
handle a crisis on the Korean Penin- 
sula amid all the other foreign and 
domestic difficulties besetting the 
Clinton administration. 

In fact, the official North Kore- 
an news agency recently referred to 


The decision really is up to them whether to bite the 
hand of friendship and suffer the consequences . 


dersecretary Winston Lord that U5. 
policy toward North Korea was 
basal on “patient diplomacy." 

In early April, in recognition that 
previous policies toward North Ko- 
rea had not been effective in resolv- 
ing the nuclear crisis. Assistant Sec- 
retary of State Robert Gallucci was 
given ambassadorial rank and placed 
in charge of interagency coordina- 
tion of policy toward North Korea. 
His fust steps were to reopen a mid- 
level dialogue in New York and to 
speak publicly or a new "comprehen- 
sive approach” toward the North. 

Also in early ApriL South Korea 
(in close coordination with the 
United States) dropped its insis- 
tence that a North-South exchange 
of high-level envoys must precede a 
third round of UjS.-Nonh Korean 
negotiations in Geneva. 

All these developments were re- 
flective of a significant U.S. policy 
shift in the right direction. That is, 
Washington and its allies in Seoul 
and Tokyo had decided that patient 
diplomacy and dialogue with the 
North had to be attempted in a seri- 
ous way before going to sanctions to 
coerce Pyongyang's compliance with 
its legal obligations under the Nucle- 
ar Nonproliferation Treaty. 

But Pyongyang has disregarded 
or misread Lhe message. Kim II 
Sung and his son. Kim Chong 11. 
continue to resort to brinkmanship, 
thinking that they can wring larger 
and larger concessions from the 
United States while cutting South 


the United States os a “paper ti- 
ger.” and Pyongyang has returned 
to its old rhetoric of referring to 
“United States imperialists and 
South Korean puppets.” language 
that it abandoned in 1992. 

The latest escalation of Lbe nucle- 
ar crisis by North Korea comes with 
the decision to shut down its five- 
megawatt reactor and begin remov- 
ing spent fuel rods from which 
weapons-grade plutonium can be 
extracted. This action has been tak- 
en despite crystal clear warnings in 
the past few weeks from Washing- 
ton, Seoul. Tokyo and Lhe IAEA 
that extraction absolutely could not 
begin without IAEA supervision 


and sampling of the spent fuel rods. 

Pyongyang is badly misreading 
the Clinton administration and the 
American public. 

Any scholar familiar with the his- 
tory of U.S. national security policy 
knows the fundamentals in Ameri- 
can behavior; the primacy of do- 
mestic affairs; the dissociation and 
depredation of power and diploma- 
cy; utopianism, aversion to violence; 
distrust erf large standing military 
forces; and impatience. Americans 
are slow to anger in national security 
affairs, but once pushed too far we 
pursue a cause with a vengeance if 
there is measurable progress toward 
defined objectives. 

Pyongyang is about to pull off a 
very difficult thing to do in Ameri- 
can politics nowadays: forge a bi- 
partisan American consensus. Re- 
cent polls show that Americans are 
wilting to use sanctions against 
North (Corea. And. wonder of won- 
ders, on May 15 the Senate majority 
and minority leaders coalesced on 
television appearances in express- 
ing their support for imposing-eco- 
nomic sanctums on North Korea. 
Support for sanctions dearly is 
growing in Congress. 

Patience with North Korea is also 


Demilitarized Zone and an armed 
platoon showed up at Panmunjom. 
To add to the problem, Pyongyang 
issued a statement that it consid- 
ered the 1953 military armistice 
agreement “a mere scrap of paper.** 
and threatened to annul it. Then 
came the announcement that North 
Korea is removing the fuel rods. 

In tbep$ytdioia 9 i^y«ns(tiwe^ 
vironment of South Korea, the lead- 
ership in Seoul reacted immediately 
with very tough public sta t ements. * 
Concern over North Korea's missile 
capabilities and possible ntidear 
weapons also is running high ht J*; 
pan. Prime Minister Tsutomu Hath 
has made a very tough statement on 
North Korea’s midear program, 
and Ichiro Ozawa, lhe powerful 
leader of the Japan Renewal Party, 
the largest party in Mr. Ham’s mi- - 
nority government, recently urged a 
firm stand against North Korea. 

The new US. initiative in patient 
dnrfomacv has been the rishi course 


Korea is also 


running out rapidly among the US. 
allies in South Korea and Japan. 
Two weeks ago. North Korean 
fighter jets flew too close to the 



of action — right if Americans and 
their allies in South Korea and Ja- 
pan are to be shown that America, 
went the extra m3e with North Ko- 
rea; right if China is to be persuad- 
ed that Washington tried hard to 
foDow its insistence on a diplomatic 
solution before going to the UN 
Security Council for sanctions 
against North Korea; right because 
a decision to impose increasingly 
severe sanctions raises the risk of 
war by accident, miscalculation or 
conscious decision by Pyongyang’s 
historically erratic and unpredict- 
able leadership. The imposition of 
sanctions is not a decision to be 
taken before peaceful diplomatic 
means have been exhausted. 

The next few days or weeks will 
tell Americans and the internation- 
al community which way to go. 
Pyongyang's leaders need to un- 
derstand now that the decision 
really is up to them whether to bile 
the hand of friendship and suffer 
the consequences. 

The writer, senior vice president 
at the Center far Strategic and In- 
ternational Studies, recently re- 
turned from his fourth trip to North 
Korea, where he met again with Kim 
II Sung, Be contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post 


The United States Lacks a Coherent Policy for Asia 


C ANBERRA — There is a lack of 
consistency, cohesion and effec- 
tiveness in U.S. policy toward Asia ai 
the very time when a steady, sensitive 
and coordinated American strategy is 
vitally important 
The Soviet threat, which prompted 
some countries in the region to iden- 
tify closely with the United Slates, 
has ended. Asian nations that once 
nestled under the protective wing of 
the American eagle and, explicitly or 
implicitly, welcomed a U.S. military 
role in the region are now adopting a 
more self-reliant stance. 

The end of many of the Cold War 
tensions in East Asia, the opening of 
China, the dynamic expansion of 
economies and the growing shift of 

f iolitical as well as economic power 
rom the Atlantic to the Western Pa- 
cific are reinforcing this assertiveness. 

Such a fundamental change calls 
for more understanding and more 
sophisticated responses from Wash- 
ington. Instead, tne Asia policy of the 
Clinton administration is character- 
ized by unpredictability, inconsisten- 
cy and heavy-handedness. 

In November, Bill Clinton pro- 
claimed a firet-ever meeting of Asia- 
Pacific leaders in Seattle to be "a 
turning point in US. history" and a 
milestone in closer Lrans- Pacific links. 
Today, only a few months laier. U.S. 
trade and political tensions with Chi- 
na, Japan, Indonesia. Malaysia and 
Singapore — all important partici- 
pants in the Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation forum — are more seri- 
ous than at any time in recent years. 

America needs to remember that 
China, Japan and Indonesia are ma- 
jor powers with a permanent pre- 
sence in East Asia. Their relations 


Bv Richard Woolcott 


with the United States cannot in the 
future be solely on American terras. 
The United States must not try to 
impose its values on strong and dif- 
ferent Asian cultures. 

There is uncertainty in Asia about 
the level and durability of .America’s 
commitment to and military presence 
in the Western Pacific. U.S. trade poli- 
cy has caused similar doubts. Wash- 
ington has tried to promote simulta- 
neously an open multilateral trading 
system through the Uruguay Round 
negotiations, a regional trade group in 
the Americas, and managed bflaieral 
trade deals, notably with Japan. 

Unpredictability and inconsisten- 
cy can lead to illogical and counter- 
productive policy responses. For ex- 
ample, the United States strongly 
supports APEC. At the same time, it 
firmly opposes a Malaysian-spon- 
sored plan for an East Asian Eco- 
nomic Caucus, from which it would 
be excluded. Yet America’s policy of 
linking its trade with the region to 
issues such as human rights and labor 
standards are strengthening support 
in East Asia for Lhe caucus proposal. 

Indonesia is under pressure from 
Washington to improve workers’ 
rights, civil liberties and the situation 
in East Timor. However, Indonesia's 
continuing firm support for APEC is 
essential if it is to remain the preemi- 
nent forum for economic cooperation 
in the Asia- Pacific region that Wash- 
ington wants it to be. Indonesia is to 
host the second APEC leaders’ meet- 
ing in Jakarta in November. 

Australia, an American security 
ally, also suffers from US. inconsis- 
tency. Washington tells Tokyo that 


Japan's annual trade surplus of $60 
billion is unacceptable and threatens 
sanctions because of alleged barriers 
to American imports. Yet lbe United 
States has a yearly trade surplus with 
Australia of 58 billion, which in per 
capita terms is greater than Japan's 
surplus with America. Australia’s 
persistent trade problems with Amer- 
ica continue despite complaints from 
efficient Australian exporters of farm 
products and other goods about pro- 
tectionism in the U.S. market. 

The in consistencies evident in 
American policy toward the Asia-Pa- 
cific region are partly a consequence 
of the end of the Cold War and the 
loss of a clear focus, which the Soviet 
threat provided. There is no longer a 
central issue to which Washington 
can relate all its policies. 

However, the main reason for the 
inconsistencies is the pursuit of con- 
flicting objectives by the Clinton ad- 
ministration. On one side is idealism 
and the long-standing American wish 
to remodel lhe world in its own image 
by promoting U.S. concepts of de- 
mocracy, human rights and a free 
market. On the other side is Ameri- 
ca's pragmatic pursuit of its narrow 
economic self-interest. 

President Clinton has expressed 
both aspects of this policy tension, 
without suggesting bow they might 
be reconciled. Of the former, he has 
said that America's “overriding pur- 
pose must be to expand and strength- 
en the world community of market- 
based democracies.” This is essen- 
tially a crusading position. 

By contrast, his more pragmatic 
preoccupation with the domestic 


Tell Us AU About the Waldheim File 


N EW YORK — In 1948, the 
U.S. representative on the 
United Nations War Crimes Com- 
mission voted to list Kurt Waldheim 
as an “A” suspect, the most serious 
category, for his work in Yugoslavia 
as an Austrian officer during World 
War D. The case vanished. No con- 
nection ever seemed to be made with 
the Waldheim fast rising in the Aus- 
trian Foreign Ministry. 

Over the years. the’U.S. Embassy 
in Vienna then sent confidential re- 
ports on Mr. Waldheim to Wash- 
ington. Some have been obtained 
by Professor Robert Herzsiein or 
the University of South Carolina 
history department. He has nude 
them available to me. with a specif- 
ic purpose in mind. 

September 1961; "Waldheim is 
considered by many sources to be 


ministry and he has proven most 
cooperative and helpful in promot- 
ing U.S. interests 

July 1964; "The Embassy has 
found Dr. Waldheim extremely co- 
operative and friendly and consid- 
ers him to be outstanding among 
Austrian Foreign Service officers 
. . . understanding and receptive to 
American thinking.” 

August 1966; "... a thoughtful, 
dignified individual who has been 
cooperative and helpful in promot- 
ing U.S. interests.” 

August 1968: ** . . . cooperative 
and receptive to U.S. interests.” 

We do remember Kurt Wald- 
heim. don't we? That was the first 
sentence in ibis column on Nov. 
26, 1989. To help Mr. Herzsiein 
achieve his purpose, it is important 
to ask it again. 

Mr. Waldheim, with the help of 


By A. M. Rosenthal 

the United States and other major 
powers, became secretary-general 
of (be United Nations in 19/1. He 
was re-elected four years later. But 
when he tried Tor a third term, the 
United Slates was one of only a few 
countries (hat wanted him. 

Then he became even belter 
known in the world. The details of 
his wartime record, which he had 
expunged from his official biogra- 
phy, became public, including ser- 
vices to the German military au- 
thorities as they deponed Serbs. 
Greek Jews and other prey to their 
deaths. Still, he was elected presi- 
dent of Austria. 

fn 1987 he was put on the U.S. 
watch lisL prohibited entry as a 


paled in "activities amounting to 
persecution” during World War II. 

The questions that remained are 
emphasized now by the records Mr. 
Herzstdn obtained — and their af- 
fectionate euphemisms about his 
cooperation in promoting the inter- 
ests of the- United States. 

How was the record of Mr. Wald- 
heim's service to the Third Reich 
military machine made to vanish 
from international diplomacy dur- 
ing all his years in the Austrian 
Foreign Ministry? Why did the 
United States tuna out a sanitized 
biography in 1952, devoid of infor- 
mation about his wartime record 
and of that American vote in the 
War Crimes Commissioo in 1948? 

Was the United States simply a 
tittle forgetful when it backed him 
for secretary-general in 1971?. If 
so, why did a 1972 Cl A inquiry 


into his wartime record turn up 
nothing? Just a bungle? 

Or was U.S. support or Mr. 
Waldheim given despite knowledge 
by some American officials of his 
war record? Was it payment for his 
"cooperation” as an Austrian dip- 
lomat and in expectation of favors 
as secretary-general? 

How many other nations knew of 
his past but had similar expecta- 
tions? Is painstaking forgetfulness 
still an American practice with, let's 
say, criminals of the KGB? 

Mr. Herzstdn, author of “Wald- 
heim: The Missing Years.” is work- 
ing on another book about the con- 
cealment of the Waldheim past (He 
also has a new biography out of 
Henry R. Luce.) After years of inves- 
tigation, be says Mr. Waldheim "was 
protected by the US. government. 


that protection and profited from 
the government’s willingness to 
obliterate his wartime service.” 

Now: His purpose in giving me 
the “assessments above, which he 
got from the State Department, is 
to try to focus congressional atten- 
tion on opening the more important 
and still closed Waldheim files of 
the CIA. Mr. Herzsiein and The 
New York Tunes are considering 
legal action to overturn CM refus- 
als. But he thinks it urgent that 
Congress itself pass legislation pre- 
venting government agencies from 
denying information about World 
War JI war crimes. 

Myself. 1 think passing such leg- 
islation would be lire best way. pro- 
ductive and revealing, for members 
of Congress to show that they do 
indeed remember Kurt Waldheim. 

The New York Tunes. 


Tl [STi U iTRTm 


Straff! 



m 





LiS 



1 1 ‘iT vvi u 1 ' 1 ^ ' 'i > ~ l i 

TV : » 1 i i r-si i'll! iT-T i j j . 

— aaSis^ 


friii'ii r fL 'fciri ;*-** g < T 

i iu7 


economy and U.S. self -interest is 
dear in his insistent*: that Asian 
countries purchase more LLS. exports 
so as to create jobs for Americans. 

Both policy strains attract negative 
reactions. Asian countries do not 
necessarily see the United States as 
the political or soda! model they wish 
to emulate. They want to evolve then- 
own balances between economic 
growth and political reform, and be- 
tween the rights of society and the . 
rights of the individual. They resent 
heavy-handed pressure to accept 
American export quotas and are gen- 
erally opposed to managed trade. 

As the sole remaining superpower, 
with a liking for quick fees, the Unit- 
ed States expects to set the interna- 
tional agenda. This leads to testiness 
and impatience with those countries 
that question American motives or 
put forward other agendas. 

UJS. policy form matron is also im- 
peded by widespread ignorance in 
Congress of the transformation un- 
der way in East Asia. This is com- 
pounded by the readiness erf some 
American lawmakers to take up par- 
ticular causes, often unrelated to the 
wider interests erf the United States in 
the Asia-Pacific region. 

The loss of a central focus in 
America's Asia policy has been ex- 
acerbated by a growing need to redi- 
rect resources to major domestic 
problems that Mr. Clinton in his 
election campaign promised to ad- 
dress. With no Soviet threat and an 
array of daunting domestic difficul- 
ties. there is less of a constituency 
now for foreign policy issues. Disen- 
chantment with overseas troubles 
has been deepened by what are 
widely seen in America as U.S. fail- 
ures in Somalia, Bosnia and Haiti. 

In the United States, knowledge of 
Asian countries is often based on 
television coverage of specific inci- 
dents. It also tends to be colored by 
active lobby groups. 

All these trends have come together 
to undercut attempts to build a trans- 
pacific partnership. To dispel the ten- 
sions that currently afflict America’s 
Asia policy. President Clinton must 
take the lead in setting a coherent and 
coordinated foreign policy. 

The writer is a former Australian 
ambassador to the United Nations and 
several Asian countries and former 
head of the Department of Foreign 
Affairs and Trade in Canberra. Be 
contributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


t-i. < IT* iTiTl'o, QC J ,t!J 


servax 
emrag 

total { 

Exj 

wQ] b 
tjnijtn 
these 

the Wodd Bank have 
strict 

rinian 
sound 
exhori 
transf 
eratios 
and n 
one o 
Palest 
crame 
comm 

resources m sn 

the Palestinians to cnaie_tlns^a the 
critical mootiis-tibe^Vi^Virr 
There is no qoestimi 
in Palestinian leadersfijL YasBSrftat 
far may have a spotty ccoojd tjaj^ 
nandal managemeint,;l^lie'c3euly 
will be the key Palestiman fjgnrcin 
the coming mflnth& and atiif^aaibir 
ter of how moneys f or bedgetstlppait 
will be spaiL Palestinians may com- 
plain about his antoerajSntiridb^ict, 
but there is no one dsfc W tie main- 
stream PLO ready to fc*»eed1&i; - 
Wxth a nrimmum of^cQnauhatica; 
Mr. Arafat has appointedlradm.cf 
the self-governing authbntyjip hold 
office pending dectioo&Ttis aieaswi- 
ablc bet that he will maucuva todd r 
elections beyond their achedukd^te 
of Joly. until he is confident that Ms 




;><>.v4n 




ger technocrats may. be aKxessfyW 
didates, but be wQInotwant ifaeplo 
dominate the government. L- *v; 

The voters' eventual dioice^odd 
be between Mr. Arafat's candidates 
and the Islamic militants. Were elec- 
tions to be held today in the Wea 
Bank and Gaza, a victory for tic 
Palestinian Islamic militants would 
be unlikely. But no one can predict 
bow fast the militants’ appeal wifi 
grow if Yasser Arafat and nis loyal- 
ists are unable to provide tangible 
benefits to the voters. Unemploy- 
ment rales are hi g h , and enthnsasn 
for lbe newly arrived Palestinian po- 
lice officos wfl] quickly wane if 
jobs remain scarce. 

Protest votes against the present 
leadership and in favor of the ubB; 
rants cannot be discounted. What 
happened in Algeria three years agp 
should caution those who would bod 
back budget support to apply pres- 
sure to Lhe Palestinians. In Algeria, 
the December 1991 elections swept 
into office an Islamic mfitonr party 
that owed its victory largely to tl» 
protest votes of thousands of Algeri- 
ans, who were weary of the ineffec- 
tive and corrupt governing party. 

U.S- policy should be to do every- 
thing possible and appropriate to 
help create a political and cconorac 
climate to encourage the eventual 
election or Palestinians from the 
mainstream —- and not from Iskunc 
militan t groups like Hamas that foo* 

because they consider Israel’s vert 
existence an abomination. . 

In other words; “walk aroma 
money is needed now for the » 
knowledged Palestinian leadership to 
spend on salaries and job creation.. . 

Some of this assistance may oe j 
squandered or put to pom* use, bot 9 t 
there is a reasonable expectation 
that this money will help strengthen 
the peace process. Abuses are inev- 
itable; to some extent they can w 
tolerated. Palestinian political lead- 
ers face new and risky challenges. 
They need the help of all who sup- 
port the peace process. 

The writer, ; a senior fellow at d# 
Council on Foreign Relations, 
mer U.S. assistant secretary of MW F* 
Near Eastern affairs. Be contributed 
this comment to the Herald . Tribune 


LN OUR PACES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Diploma Mania 

Paris — a 


deal of 


dons, and now it is fdi ate w*J 
continue, even extend, ibe» crediii ® 




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INTERNATIONA L HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDA Y, MAY 23, 1994 

PINION 





Sifting Through the Pasts 
In Search of an Identity 


V<0A,lVt fWNVUACtO WEftR 
tbmHEQDuKr gear . was 
THWTH t R6HT WaftOH. 

'AJPPlDOpJUtCftT IWOHD0J. 
i e^c-iv 


WWX(^,SK.- I 
ir was A Fine, fine, 
BCEua^nxcisioN, , 

ewscwwso 1 


Bv William Pfalf 

P warmV.f ZT ^ Cto:h gP'enwneni vei said very much about. Where should 
adviced ^ «cn as more -when: doss- “Europe" Mop? 

rnunist cntmS^ C r C ? er fonT1CT Coro- Mr. Klaus is saving that the Czechs 
ord^to^khC? ^°Pf. '. n bdong 10 West European civilization 


OTYW tn *; n L. « in wvjvul »v »* wi uwuryviut wnuituiui 

rebrinn« llS 1 ??, Lbe C«ch Republics but that they also possess a special na- 
ambition it ~^ cs i < ? n Europe. Yet this lional destiny. He objects to “a too stm- 
^ present plistic repudiation of nationalism." 
WkiooW 1 S unw, "*rogness to join the The present leaden of Russia insis 



KENiyrr 

NtUfAEAN 
TW ? ^ 


^EMlV.SlK- 
V«S MQSf lPApRE5S>! 
rr'SlNAU.TrtEfWSRS*! 


if r *b 


The Healthist Izationer Will f 1 ^ 
Fail to Impress the Governor v , J U 


Bv James Thurber 


Mr. Thurber, the humorist, died in 

1961. This previously unpublished article. 


vntten in 1956, will appear in a forthcom- 
ing collection, “ People Have More Fun 


on Western tcrml J ‘ 

Monster Yacl a v Klaus said 


ine present leaden or Russia insist 
that Russia is Europe, too. and that if it 
is treated otherwise the consequences 


'o-ntlv rh-.i l-i i- **■ “ utJiwj ramwije me miu^uoiuo 

mipJLr 31 W - , e , government wants could be very bad Tor the democratic 
nni £ w,lh Wcsicni Europe, it does movemeni in'Russia. and quite possibly 

not European union. He said that for Russia’s neighbors. The Clinton ad- 


wu.wat.WEU -Take TUat, 
Mt'fbUvlEKKS VWO ChlL , 
MMOSIME.' HMf£A; 

fa^TS 


yE5.SK... MCW, 
WtfWUUJ SIR 


OUEE1. \ DUNN.0, POUPADOP’OlllS <J=EZ- 
H6fA@JK3£^NWBE.. LM%E FRIES AtSffi. M3. 


»K collection, "People Have More Fun 
Than Anybody: .4 Centennial Celebra- 
tion of Drawings and Writings. ” 


language by izationizing almost every 
noun and adjective ending in but 
I have decided to conserve my strength 
for that triumphant day in the Tunny 
house or the nursing home. 


v shut ei 
r-'» wmk 

lughl lhal 
~J ihe-irtih 
Board ol 
"(give Court 


However, I have enough suength forjl ^arc- 
one crack in conclusion. The public? Clearly 


UK6 P3R LUNCUr "PouBlE Ch€CSE0UR6cK. NO. A BlC? N\AC 


tfSVi iWftwr Chicken 

nva^be.. bk>.. 


N EW YORK — Now a certain Pub- 

tic Health expert has come up with 


figures in America, who are largely re- ^hudicd 

sponsible lor the beating English has 
taken, don’t seem to realize that they,, w--'^ Har- 
are playing verbally into the hands of ^ unione 
the Communists. Nothing reduces Lhe ”,6 P L ’ r ' 1s0rs 
shape, color and vitality of individual- f *o! le nun ^ 
iiy so much as izadonizing people into '^ -'jj™ 
a colorless lump of category. , u’ 

1 have view’d with alarm, ihis many ijr 1 ".* 
a year, the decline of the spoken word. -„r- lhaI 
The trend toward massive meaningless- "£. TV,L ' C 
ness got its greatest boost during the“f;6 
McCarthage period when there seemed "™i h,l f at "' 
to be an unspoken slogan, inridental fp °~ n . tt:L ' 
the attack on everything all along the line. tpl»\yees 

The slogan was Lingua delenda est ^ 

I fell asleep upon this ominous Latin w , 

phrase recently, and dreamed a night- ” ,m ■ 
mare. I may be overexerting myself, bill 
1 am going to tell what it was anyway: ''■■hp 11 ’ * 1lV 
Two men in uniform were measuring 1 1,11 the fH>s- 
me for a uniform just like theirs. One -'rop* or 
man had no mouth and the other one . 

had no ears, and their names. display«l denied 


IN tic Health expert has come up with sponsible for the beating Englisi 
a new classification of me and my age taken, don’t seem to realize that 


not fmlv W *UV uui IVWJ1UJ V.UUIVU UU" 

Counl 0' but also the other ministration agrees, wanting to solve the 
stal » need “to find Russian problem and the East European 
,deol, *y not to lose it problem at the same time. 

*?H ay i. Cn ft** ,£> Europe.” If not only the Czechs but Lithuania, 
should not accept the inis- Belarus and Ukraine are Europe, surely 
tong and false idea that something Russia is Europe. Its literature and mu- 
— ■ - sic are integral to lhe modern European 

p «... . . consdousness. On the other hand, it is 

rrOutictans W the former evident that at some point Europe stops. 


cwucrtK ^ 


aVJUWAKE i 
\bd HfeVir^. 1 

v^STB^xifbus? 


A UWW vmwuiuiuvu VI lllti auu Ul\ d»c UU.cn. UUU l SCCllI IU lOUUA lliai j | r - - — 

group, or. to be precise, those of ui who are playing verbally into lhe hands of jnjt,n l? 


meanwhile 


Politicians in the former 
East bloc do not oU want 
theSr countries to r return 
to Europe . 9 But this poses 
a question: Where exactly 
should — when? does — 
.'Europe 9 stop? 


-called Europe must be great, strong, and Eastern Europe were saying before 
united, prefabricated and controlled 1989. President Havel has consistently 
*wwe in order to compete in spoken as if Ids country were entirely ’a 


and something else has begun. 

It is not perhaps important to say 
where exactly that point is. but ii is 
important for the countries to the west 
of Russia to understand that there is a 
difference between what they are and 
what the Russians are. 

Mr. Klaus is saying that there is also a 
difference between what Czechs are and 
what Western Europe is. Perhaps the 
West Europeans should pay attention. 

No doubt a difference exists, although 
that is not what people in East-Central 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


D-Day Considerations 


More Room in America 


today's international society. 

Mr. Klaus objected in particular to 
the social welfare measures associated 


part of the moral community of Western 
Europe and of the Western democracies. 
It is, of course, passible to be part of 


•with the European Union today, identi- that community and yet not wish to 
lying these as a milder form of the “ag- adopt the same political and economic 

WKtiv* CnmtVirm" r.n» ..V;.L .1 __ 1 _r -i_ - 


Regarding "There Were Germans in 
Normandy and Some Lie There Still ” 
f Opinion , May 18 ) by John C. Ausland: 

How could il “contribute to European 
harmony” if. as Mr. Ausland suggests, 
one or more of the European leaders 
would include the German military ceme- 
tery at La Cam be in his or her Normandy 
itinerary? It is scandalous enough that 
veterans of the U.S. 90th Infantry Divi- 
sion are to hold a memorial service there. 

For at La Cam be are buried veterans 
of the SS Panzer Division “Das Reich” 
— the unit that massacred French civil- 
ians at Oradour-sur-Glane. 


gressive socialism ’ from which the choices as the members of the existing 
Czechs and other Central and East Eu- European Union. That is what Prime 
rqpeans escaped when Soviet commu- Minister Klaus is saying. But one won- 


SHIMON SAMUELS. 

Paris. 


msm collapsed in 1989. 


ders if the implications erf this argument 


His idea of "Europe" thus is not that are fully undostood. 


The writer is director for Europe 
and Latin America of the Simon Wie- 
senthal Center. 


Regarding “U.S. Envoy Rebukes Ger- 
mans and Kohl on Foreigner Issue" {April 
16) by Rick Atkinson: 

1 am quite sure that the Germans have 
many faults and deserve to be criticized. 
But surely a country with twice the pop- 
ulation density ot France and eight 
limes ihat of the United States can de- 
ride for itself whether it wants to be a 
country of immigration. Considering the 
huge number of refugees now- in Germa- 
ny, it is strange to hear criticism from 
the representative of a country whose 
government has forcibly repatriated 
Haitian refugees. 

KLAUS J. MULLER-MOHWALD. 

Geneva. 


against the Vietcong and. more recently, 
against the warlords of Somalia. 

Democratic change in Eastern Europe 
and South Africa proved that successful 
democratization necessarily involves a 
peaceful, internal movement that begins 
at the top of the government hierarchy. 

In this respect, the United Nations 
should consider de-escalation of policy 
in Haiti instead of risky escalation. 
Abandoning the embargo' of Haiti in 
favor erf monetary incentives to the Ce- 
dras regime to guarantee immediate 
elections may be the only hope for 
democracy in Haiti. 

PAUL J. CRYSTAL 
CreteiL France. 


are in our 60s or older. The Public 
Healthist divides us into the institution- 
alized and the noninstitutionaiized. 

As good luck, prayer and a sound diet 
would have iL I belong to the noninsiiiu- 
tionalized. which includes the working, 
the up and about but unemployed, and 
those who are just lying in bed at home. 

When the time comes for me to be 
committed to the funny house or a 
nursing home. 1 will become an ex- 
noninstitutionalized person. If and 
when, upon good behavior, 1 shall be 
released in the custody of mv family, 
my designation will then be that of an 
unex-nooinstiiuiionalized person. 

When I am put back in. after raising 


i tragic by the 


The Bashing Wasn’t F anny 


Think Harder About Haiti 


of the German and French govern- Mr. Klaus and the others who believe 


ments, chiefly responsible for the Maas- as he does see the future of their countries 
triebt treaty’s program for progressive in terms of the past Nationalism, of 


uropean unification. 

Mr. Klaus represents one important 


course, nearly always provides a roman ti- 
dzatian or remvention of history. People 


Mr. Klaus represents one important azaoon or remvention of history. People 
current of thought among the new lead- i*l»* the past they prefer, and usually 
ers who have taken over from the former embellish il The “Greater Serbia" being 


-dissidents and intellectual rebels who created in the former Yugoslavia is an act 
created most ot the post-1989 govern- of imagination, a deadly one 


- meats in cx-C ommums t Europe. 

- As the most prominent figure from 
those romantic postrevolutionary days. 


There always are several posts. The 
st experienced by Central and Easton 
trope in this century is not something 


Czech President Vaclav Havel now says that any sane person would wish to relive, 
that the Czech Republic is no longer But it is much more relevant to Europe's 


"Post-Communist” but a normal de- situation today than Central Europe’s 
- mocra cy. As such, it expe ri ences the real or ima gined medieval history. 


The anniversary of the momentous 
battle triggered by the Allied landings in 
Normandy should be celebrated by all 
veterans, regardless of nationality, li is a 
time for than to remember fallen com- 
rades. friends and adversaries. The occa- 
sion can document our maturity and wis- 
dom. It is not the lime for politicians to 
boost their profiles; that is disrespectful 
of the fallen. Sorting the dead bv nation- 
ality or, as happened with President Ron- 
ald Reagpn’s visit to Bitburg, by military 
unit, is an obscenity. When one considers 
the youth of most soldiers buried in the 
cemeteries of Europe, all were victims. 


-return to power of normal pofitirians. This recent past must be left behind 


Here as elsewhere in the region, nota- and the future understood as an oppor- 
bfy in Hungary and Poland, an increasing tunity for change. Since 1989 the peo- 


Tbey should be respected as such. 

If Chancellor Helmut Kohl is not to 
be invited to the Normandy ceremonies, 
other politicians should turn down their 
invitations, freeing the stage for the vet- 
erans of the fighting, and reluming some 
dignity to a mournful remembrance of 
young lives cut short. 

A. SPANGENBERG. 

Brussels. 


-□umber of these were also functionaries pies of the region have been offered the 
of the fanner Communist governments, possibility of serious change. It is not 


They do sot automatically see the future apparent that ail of them, or possibly 
of their countries as “a retom to Europe;'’ any of them, will take it 


as the former dissidents (fid. 

This poses a problem that no one has 


International Herald Tribune. 
© Lor Angeles Times Syndicate 


Regarding “Haiti: When All Else Has 
Failed, Time to I made" (Opinion, May 
16) by John Kerry: 

Senator John Kerry's call to arms is 
little more than a revival of Cold War 
nation-building strategy. He offers no 
analysis of what action might be best in 
the unique case of Haiti's historical tug- 
of-war between military rule and smoke- 
screen democracy. 

While asserting that a Vietnam-like 
quagmire can be avoided in Haiti, the 
senator would justify intervention there 
by the need to “prove to all renegade 
elements that Americans mean what 
they say." The Vietnam debacle, of 
course, resulted from a battle for Ameri- 
can credibility that continued long after 
the possibility of military success had 
been ruled out. 

Mr. Kerry ignores another lesson 
from Vietnam by dismissing the Haitian 
Army as an “unformidable opponent.” 
Such underestimation of the enemy pro- 
duced lackluster strategic planning 


Regarding “East Asia Will Find Its 
Own Roads to Democracy " (Opinion, 
May 1 7) by Mahathir bin Mohamad: 

When I worked in Washington in the 
1970s, Japanese- bashing was popular. 
Some of my .American colleagues, re- 
senting the increasiogly stiff economic 
competition, joked: “Perhaps the U.S. 
helped rebuild Japan a bit too well. 
We’re the victims of our own success." 
When I studied there in the 1980s, some 


When I am put back in. after raising on badges, were Tweedledumb and n Jl P* 1 ! 
hell on Third Avenue and other subver- Tweedledeaf. When they got me all /on S pwinU 
sh e conduct, my new tag wiU be. as any dressed up in a kind of s traitjacket. 
modern child could tell you. “re-unex- Tweedledeaf said, "It makes you look w c "J 1 
noninstitutionaiized." like everybody dse. Does it make you r.. 01 , 

I do not propose to take it lying down like everybody dse?" 

when I am dragged back to die instiiu- “Yes.” I said. “How am I going to .. 9 tJ| 5?J. , 
tion, and 1 have a plan already worked te ll myself from me?” Tweedledeaf 
out to plague lhe Public Health expert, grinned evilly. "I can’t hear whqt ‘ 

1 will pretend to be a maximum bed-rest you’re saying," he said, “but Tweedle- m * I j ’ 
case until my chart is filled with over- dumb can. if you want any informa- — 
confident descriptions of my various in- tion. ask him.’ & 

abilities. Then one bright day. when the I was about to protest that Tweedle- nt > 
Healthist makes his rounds. I will be dumb couldn’t say anything, but 1 real- . ‘Jr 

hanging from the chandelier in my ized it wouldn’t do any good, whatever niVhe 

just .’waitne 

You re-^nunu- 


of my professors, also jokingly, said the 
same' thing. Now. in the I990£ 1 wonder 


same thing. Now. in the 1990s, I wonder 
whether those remarks were really 
meant to be jokes. The last pan of Prime 
Minister Mahathir's speech rings a bell. 
This time 1 fully share his views. 


ARIZAL EFFENDI. 
Bekasi. Indonesia. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer's sig- 
nature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
editing, We ctmnot be responsible for 
the return of unsoiiched manuscripts. 


noninstitutionaiized.” 

I do not propose to take it lying down 
when ( am dragged back to die institu- 
tion, and 1 have a plan already worked 
out to plague Lhe Public Health expert. 
1 will pretend to be a maximum bed-rest 
case until my chart is filled with over- 
confident descriptions of my various in- 
abilities. Then one bright day. when the 
Healthist makes his rounds. I will be 
hanging from the chandelier in my 
room, not by my neck but by my heels, 
and reciting! without missing a word or 
rhyme, all or “The Prisoner of Chi lion.” 

I like to think that the Healthist will 
have a number of journalists, col- 
leagues and state officials in tow, per- 
haps even the governor. I like to think 
of him being so shattered by the failure 
of his analyses and prognosticationiza- 
lion of my case that he wiU have to be 
completely reclassified himself. 

Oh. I shall be able to handle him. 
have no fear of th3L 

“Come, come, Mr. Turble.” he will 
say. with a firmness showing dear signs 
of crumble, “be a good statistic, now. 
for these gentlemen. And shake hands 
with the governor." 

“If the governor wishes to shake 


I said. “An amusing thought has just 
struck me.” said Tweedledeaf. “You 


hands with me." Til reply, “he will have 
to lie down on his back. I intend to hane 


to lie down on his back. I intend to hang 
here until I have finished ‘Intimations of 
Immortality.’ ” It wiU be a great, if con- 
siderably confused, victory for me. 

I had planned to veer off here into 
one of my attacks on the Izationizers. 
who have deformed and bloated our 


struck me." said Tweedledeaf. "You ^ LiT 
may not be able to tell yourself from *'s 
you, since you look like everybody and , r 
everybody looks like everybody eke. so so ] r r x!r ia : 
1 will put a tail on you." Ve ^ Yjfj 

Ana he put a tail on me. a big chesty 
tail id a dark suit, whose derby kept he ‘ 
going up and down his forehead as he nd -n rr"* 
slowly chewed something. 1 woke up at at- e, TvfJ 1 
that point, yelling, as usual ad roem. 

I have put down this little descrip- es 
tion not so much to amuse or frighten . 
anybody as to have a record of it in case Qe - 
my memory should succumb to the ob- 

lit era ting processes of age. Right now, 

it is all right. • ^ 

Right now my classificationization to al ruff 

chart reads as follows: “Sex. male. Age, led a 
going on 62. Color of moods, grayish 
black. Height, indeterminate because of r 1 a nui- 

d ucking. Occupation, sympathizer with le led to 

kst or unpopular causes. Soda! status ? sled a 

(subject to change without notice), non- l ~ ;re no 

institutionalized." n 'ssruff 

HI see you in the funny bouse. 1 ‘ 

The New York Times. ® for in 


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Bone Fklh 10 AIBcs, Gn Dtuged b P«fl 
Bv\bbV 1» Flee ,\orw ladrrAirBJo** 



JUNE 

5-11 

1944 


jJ£L-. Itoll o^&^axibtiiu !?J!i 
Invasion On, Allies Land in France 
As Plane* and Ships Blast Coerl; 
ftfamgonicry Leads dir Advance 


SEVEN DAYS THAT 
CHANGED THE WORLD 



iotwion Succeeds in Initial Steps; 
Attics Push Inland From Beaches; 
Lowes Small in Channel Crossing 
'55M 



The historic week started with 
the fall of Rome and 
continued with the D-Day 
assault and the Allied 
advance into Normandy. 

To commemorate these 
dramatic days, we will 
reproduce the seven front 
pages from the New York 
Herald Tribune which 
chronicled the first week of 
the rebirth of liberty on the 
European continent 
Rfty years later, you’ll follow 
the events day-by-day from 
the reports of the Herald 
Tribune’s award-winning 
team of war correspondents. 


Hrtalflg^Sltolrilraiir "iS" 
Allies Take Fintl Town in Fruncts 
Cat OirriiMirg Road at Bayeux: 
German Resistance Is Stiffening 


The card 
t hal speaks your 
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6000 Pams Hit Foe French FidArnUrt 






, V . >V : "A 
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Don’t miss the international Herald Tribune’s 
special commemorative series starting Saturday, June 4th. 


v. : 


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V 







International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday, May 25, 1994 
Page 8 


STAGE '/ENTERTAINMENT: 


Easy Riding 
With Italy’s 
Triple Threat 


By Joan Dupont 

Immtajional Herald Tribune 


C ANNES. France — 
Slender, bearded Nanai 
Moretti, ihe director 
who moves with priestly 
elegance and plays water polo with 
a vengeance, has celebrated turning 
40 with a movie that tells all: 'Tm a 
beautiful 40-year-old," be declares 
in "Caro Diario" ( Dear Diary f, for 
which he won the Cannes festival's 
best director prize Monday night. 

- Moretti. who has made seven 
films, is not known in the United 
Stales outside the festival circuit; in 
Europe, particularly in France, the 
country that co-produced his last 
films, be is admired for backing 
young Italian cinema and for stand- 
ing up to Silvio Berlusconi. Italy's 
triple threat writer-actor-director is 
often compared to Woody Allen, 
mostly because people don't know 
how to describe his witty, original 
style. “It’s aQ right with me to be 
compared to Woody Alien because I 
like his movies," he says. "Tm not 
sure 1 resemble him though; some- 
times I don’t even resemble myself." 

The director may be the only 
man in his profession to get high on 
chocolate. Bright bits of tin foil 
float around his suite overlooking 
the sea. In honor of his favorite 
chocolate cake, the movie house he 
owns in Rome’s Trasteveie is called 
the Nuovo Sac her; there he shows 
the kind of dramas be thrives on. 
but doesn't make. This year. Sacher 
presented Abbas Kiarostami's 
“Life Goes On," Derek Jarman's 
“Blue," and Nicholas Ray’s “John- 
ny Guitar." restored by Martin 
Scorsese. 

“Because of the festival, we’re 
playing ‘Caro Diario’ again." be 
said. “It came out in Italy last win- 
ter and did well. Maybe the film 
strikes a note with the Cannes pub- 
lic too because it’s so different from 
the other films here; it’s free. I tried 
to recapture the feeling of irrespon- 
sibility I had when I made my first 
shorts." 

A chronicle of the director’s life 
over the past two years, the film is 


made up of three chapters — “On 
My Vespa," “Islands," and ‘‘Doc- 
tors.” It opens with Moretti on his 
Vespa, traveling through Rome in 
August, moves to the Aeolian Is- 
land s, and ends up with his visits to 
doctors in search of a diagnosis for 
a strange itch he developed. “I shot 
the movie backward." he said. “Af- 
ter my sickness. I wanted to do 
something light in a quiet space, a 
happy space. So I started on the 
Vespa to give the audience time to 
get into this particular kind of 
film." 

The beautiful midldle-aged man 
on the Vespa has been called narcis- 
sistic; in “Caro Diario" he takes 
narcissism for a subject, examining 
the leftists of his generation, thdr 
quirky passions and phobic dislikes, 
and airing his own obsessions. 

He took special care with the mu- 
sic, paying more than be usually 
likes for scores by Keith Jarrett ana 
Khaled. The action is Filmed simply: 
Moretti drives through deserted 
Rome, daydreaming about people 
be would like to meet — Jennifer 
Beals — and critics he would like to 
strangle — particularly the one who 
loved “Henry. Portrait of a Serial 
Killer." He actually spots the actress 
and (racks down the critic, torturing 
him with his own words: “It’s my 
way of making a joke on the critics. 
I'm not for censoring violence in 
films, but if we're having violence. 1 
prefer Jonathan Demme." 

H E goes on a pilgrimage 
to the spot where Pier 
Paolo Pasolini was 
murdered: “Pasolini 
was important for Italy — an inde- 
pendent intellectual — an impor- 
tant figure in our collective memo- 
ry; we’re losing our memory about 
fascism, we’re ignorant of our own 
history." 

The second section. “Islands." is 
a satire on a generation of intellec- 
tuals who wanted to run away from 
it alL The director, too, needed a 
breath of fresh air: “I wanted to 
put all my characters on tire islands 
and leave them there — the intel- 
lectuals shut up in their ideologies, 
the leftists who decry television and 



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\ anni Moretti: 
'Sometimes I 
don't even 
resemble myself 5 


? Tosca’ in the Abstract 


By David Stevens 

Ituemtuiatad Herald Tribune 


expiring on the part of ^ 

,'.u¥wi5inrfl<i . 


P ARIS —The Opera Bastille’s new production 
of Puccinis “Tosca” finally made it before the 
public, 10 days behind schedule and coder a . 
dead of labor-management strife that will 
almost certainly get worse before it gets better. 

Not only were the first three scheduled perfor- 
mances canceled before the fourth became theoef&cto 
premiere Monday, but the project of transmitting live 
Wednesday’s gala (with Plirido Domingo as Cavara- . 
dossi) on a giant screen outride the opera house and tm 
other screens around the country, also wasdropped, to 
the great regret of the owners of caffe surrounding 
Place de la Bastille, among others. 

In dispue is the implementation of a plan social 
intended to put the house in order before the new . 
director-designate, Hugnes Gall, takes over nett year. 
The labor unions approve of a reorganization in princi- 
ple, but not to the pant of agreeing with the loss of 136 
jobs in a total work force of 1,700, full- and part-time. 

As for 'Tcsca," Eteraiists probably will "not be 
entirely happy with this abstract and visionary con- 
ception of wbat is one of tirc most reahstk of operas— 
setin real sitesin the Rome of i 800 and in the midst of 
real events. Werner Scbroeter, the German filmmaker 
and stage director, is much attracted by operatic 
subjects (even in nonoperatic films) and by the power 
of images, and his designer, Alberte Baisacq, is his 
collaborator of kmg standing. 

The church of the first act might have been one of 
Piranesi's imaginary prisons after a bombing, ereept 
for the statue re the virgin at one side and Cavarados- 
sfs relipous painting oo the other. But tire decapitated 
saintly head of the punting is hardly tire Mary Magda- 
lene of the libretto (a SL Catherine, perhaps?), and 
even less one tiialFtauToscaoould be jealous of. ' 
The second act. (be most successful of tire three, 
suggested a jpalace-prison interior, with the Imu of a" 
marble wall ami the dimensio ns of alarge salon indicat- 
ed in blood-red lines. The playing area, winch had only 
Scarpia’s huge table as furniture, was surrounded by 




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get booked." He visits Gerardo, a 
friend who bas made a life study of 
Joyce’s “Ulysses” and who brags 
that he hasn't watched television in 
30 years. But a random glimpse of 
“The Bold and the Beautiful” cm 
TV fascinates him. 

“Italy is a culture of soccer and 
TV," Moretti explained, “and the 
most powerful man in TV and soc- 
cer is Berlusconi — Lhe head of our 
government is also tire bead of an 
empire, the information empire. 
This is seriously wrong: You can't 
run a country the way you ran a 
company — you can’t rale a stale 
with tire profit logic." 

This is the kind of speech he 
never makes in the movie; instead, 
with Gerardo in tow, he travels to 
Panarea, where Antonioni filmed 
“L’Awemura," and Stroraboli, 
which is Rossellini country. Con- 
templating the crater. Gerardo gets 
impatient for his TV fix. 

Up to the last part, “Doctors," 
the filmed diary has been a light- 
hearted experience. Moretti starts 
to itch; he becomes a doctors’ di- 
lemma. He undresses for a series of 


specialists, and lands at “The 
Prince of Dermatologists.” Every 
day, the bottles of medicine and 
prescriptions pile higher, and the 
fiction turns into historical fact. 

At a dime for Chinese medicine, 
he was semto have an X-ray, then a 
CAT scan. Diagnosed, with cancer, 
he is told there was no hope. He 
starts to film his chemotherapy ses- 
sions: “Some people thought it was 
a strange idea to have filmed my 
chemotherapy, but I had oo qualms 
about it at the time; I had no idea 
how Td use it either. Speaking about 
my sickness wasn't Eke reliving it. 
When I make a movie Tm thinking 
about where to put the camera. I 
don't think that there's a right alti- 
tude to sickness; when it’s serious it 
doesn’t matter what your altitude is: 
You can be passive, negative, or 
positive, a fighter. What counts is 
being lucky, getting cured." 

The director has always been an 
activist; an eariy script “MBitanza, 
Militanza" was never produced, but 
in 1976. he managed to finance and 
film “lo Sono un AuiarchkxT (I Am 
Self-Sufficient), shot in Super-8. A 


mitiian t of the counterculture, he 
relishes taking on everything holy: 
He played a free-thinking priest in 
“La Messa b finita" (Tire Mass Has 
Ended, 1986), a disillusioned Com- 
munist who has lost his memory in 
“Palombdla Rossa" (The little Red 


m a style ibaf isn’t realistic; the crisis 
of communism, shown through the 
game of water polo." 

Luckily, it turned out that the 
doctors were wrong about his cancer 
being incurable, ami the director got 
to make a happy ending to his diary. 
“I don't usually keep a diary," he 
said, “though 1 keep notebooks fen: 
work, but J do talk to myself." 

At the end of the film, he talked 
to the camera too, in his husky 
Roman accents, surrounded by an 
elaborate tnisc-en-scdne of pill bot- 
tles. “Now every morning, before 
my cappuccino and roll, 1 drink a 
glass of water." And easy rider 
Moretti got back on his bike, made 
his movie, and went on eating choc- 
olate. 


nnconsumed dnmg- But m gp ^ A dear that 
wounded hands, althffl^SCTp^^ applied- H? 

tire painter's head ws where 

fescue's new production tiwxH»ctana to an ao ^3r7 f ^ J cro tic 

mafly made it before tire . m thaidoes not«?n^K alctwr^®^ 
id schedule and under a, reverie. The corose oT a 
igemem strife that will apd Trecaoiaerves °L. 

»e it gets better. ^jfSnhaHvTrom dbsctly behind the targrt- 


desa improbably from tmecay ^ 

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nated sneer, eyebrows and v® 3 * 1 

Arpris was hr charge cf a thoroo^ily uEomatic musu^ 

oerfonnanca. 


The third act, an abstraa top level of tire Castd 
Sant’Angelc, has not tire statue of Sl Michael that tops, 
it in real life, but an image of a faffing Satan or Lucifer 
to parallel Tosca’s leap into an interior void. 

Schroder's direction of bfc singers, and other scenic 
detafl, was uneven. Here too, Act 2 was the most 
successful, with the Tasca-Scarpia conflict carefully 
worked out and spectacularly culminated, with Scarpia 


,r — “ — 7 . . ► 

: f ■ ^ HEOrdiesnrdfc l^obsawedatr^^ 

.1 - event in its mast, recent concert P r 9f”?J3i 
‘ I ^ ffemringMahkT»s“Das Lied 
. • JL \ in an uadeistated hot movmg 
conducted by Serijyoo Bychkov and with! he meg 
soprano Mariana Lipovsek and the tenor Gary Lakey 
'as the satisfying voca sokwsts. The *** 

dedicated to tire- memory of Ftore Vozlinslw, ih? 
orchestra's general director; who died unexpectedly at 
age 61 after his return .with . tire orchestra from us 
recent U.SL viaL - . . . 

Vozfinsky wa»a rarity, abotn impeesano with a rear 

imsricalbadtground. A premier prix graduate in ptanf 
of tire ParisCOTsecvatoire. he soon turned to manner 

: meat, mnskati filmmaking and record production. AJ 
Radio France in tire WTtjs* he reorganized and raised 
tiie standards of its orches tra s, attracted the likes of 
- Sergiu Gtfbidadre and Lorin Maaaad as permanent 
COndqctora, and thnnghtnp such productive venture? 
as having Isaac Stem ^pend. two months in dose 
coatsict wilhihe Ordrestie National . 

Jfc later came to the Orehestre de Paris, , and -after 

going with Damd Barenboim to be part of his team at 
the Optra Rngtflft; he realized this was til-faied and 
' rfeumed to tire orthestra: > 

. The tributes in the program from leading musical 
personalities have the ring of rare ancerity. One, b* 
PiCTre Boulct, says in part: “If the word ‘prof essionaT 
has a mm mm g in tire vocabulary of French musics 
life, it is in large part thanks to him." ! 




THEATER 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


Boos and Whispers at Cannes L 


Compiled bv Our Stuff Front Dispatches 

C ANNES. France — For the third time in the last 
six years, the Cannes Him Festival awarded its 
Palme d’Or to an American lowlife serenade. Quentin 
Tarantino's showy salute to the cool and the crazy. 
“Pulp Fiction." 

Tarantino’s movie was the most talked about at the 
festival, and the most controversial The announce- 
ment was greeted with some booing and suggestions 
by some French commentators that Clint Eastwood, 
tiie jury president, had favored American movies and 
that the festival was turning its back on a tradition of 
favoring “arty" movies. 

Eastwood brushed aside the suggestions after the 
ceremony, adding that be was bound by festival rules 
not to discuss the prizes: “It was a democratic decision. 
People thought it was origin aL I can't say how 1 voted." 

lire festival director, Gifles Jacob, dismissed the 
controversy, saying the festival had no tradition to stick 
to: “We’ ve always had some jiffies which go for more 
popular films or for more ait films. There’s no law.*' 


“Pulp Hction," a thriller mixing violence and crude 
humor, is seen by some critics as a typical market- 
oriented Hollywood production it odds with such past 
winners as “Farewell My Concubine." The French 
daily Le Quotidien said on Tuesday that the Golden 
Palm had been “stolen" or “skillfully negotiated." 

Tarantino’s victory is reminiscent of the unexpected 
crowning of “sex, lies and videotape" or of “Barton 
Fink." low-budgfe movies by Hollywood outsiders. 
Film buyers stressed that Tarantino was atypical erf 
Hollywood. “Cannes hasn’t turned its back on its 
vocation because Tarantino’s work is a parody of 
America. It's Americana rather than American and 
owes a lot to European directors," said Paul Brett of 
the British Distributors’ Guild, which will have “Pulp 
fiction" among its titles. 

Two films by celebrated directors shared the Grand 
Prix du Jury, Cannes’s runner-up award. They were 
Zhang Yimou’s “Houzhe" (To Uve) from China and 
Nikita Mikhalkov's “Outomlionnye Solntsem" 
(Burned by the Sun) from Russia. (Reuters. LAT) 


Danger! Flintstones Ahead 


L ondon ~ a revival of 
“Perides," the last sat- 
isfactory of all Shake- 
speare's plays and indeed 
the least Shakespearean since there 
b evidence that whole chunks of it 
are the work of otirera. usually 
means one of two things: Stratford 
is feeling girilty about having ig- 
nored it for a decade or two. or 
there is some director out there 
with a reputation to make. 

The current revival b at tbe Na- 
tional's Olivier stage, and its direc- 
tor. Phyilida Llcryd, b already rea- 
sonably established, so we yrili have 
to look elsewhere for a motive. It is, 
l think, that Lloyd wished to see 
how far she could go, in partnership 
with a choreographer and a design- 
er, toward taking our minds off the 
text altogether and simply distract- 
ing us with a selection of divertisse- 
ments, rather as though Peter 
Brook's "Midsummer Night's 
Dream" had been rearranged fay the 
Theatre de Compliatt. 

Thus we get an actress on a pair 
of stilts giving ns a carnival-king 
Antiochus, while the same actress 
(Kathryn Hunter, herself a Com- 


plicdfc veteran) later toms up in a 
breathtaking parody of -Barbara 
Windsor as tire bawd of the broth- 
el. References therefore Tmge from 
the “Cany On” movies to Chinese 
Opera and Japan^e Kabuki, but 
the moat-constant sightis that of a 
director desperately signaling tons 
that tire hasn’t the faintest idea 
what or who tins play might really 
be about, but thalif wellpist stay 
in our seats shell think up some-, 
thing else to divert our attention in 
just a moment. Meanwhile, a huge 
cast is left to flounder around roe 
stage and (be script, grabbing what 
they can from the wreckage. 

This “Perides” is typically long 
on concept, short on actual deliv- 
ery. 

Nkol wnfiamson’s solo “Jack — 
A on die Town With John 
Banymore? (Criterion) tarns out to 
be riot so modi a xugbr as a rather 
faltering evening. The idea was a 
great one: 'WHHamson retaining to 
a London theater where he has 
been much missed these last 15 
years, and in a stage bio&aphy of 
one at the other great "Hamlet" 
heB-raisos of the century. 

The trouble, at least as it ap- 
peared on the first mgb£ was that 
nobody bad bothered to get much 
beyond the; idea. Though LesGe 


By Anthony Ramirez 

AVw* Yr~k Times Senior 

E L SEGUNDO. California — Ahem. Atten- 
tion. please citizens of Britain. Germany. 
France, Australia. Japan and other princi- 
palities: You may want to form a line right 
now. On Fridav. “The Flintstones" is to open in the 
United Slates, it will then cross the oceans this sum- 
mer to a movie theater near you. 

Step right up to Flintstones active wear, sizes 4 to 
18. Thrill to Flintstones video games. Marvel at Flint- 
stones wristwatebes. Read the Flintstones book. Hang 
the Fliaistones. poster. Play FIints:or.es chess. 

IT movie and merchandising power were all that 
mattered, then the winner of tins year's contest for 
summer juggernaut would be Mr. Yabfco-Dabba-Do. 
The people behind last year's prehistoric blockbuster. 
“Jurassic Park" are marketin': and prcxi wring the 
movie, which stars John Goodman and Elizabeth Per- 
kins as Fred and Wilma Flintstone. 

Already, the star-making machinery is in overdrive, 
wiih McDonald's touting itself as “Roc Donald's." and 
Goodman appearing or. “Saturday Night Live" in Bed- 
rock regalia and cm the “Tonight" show bolding a 
TaBdng Fred doll from Martel. 


But before counting the doubloons. Mack DiCumSo. 
a marketing director at Mattel, allows himself a shiver 
of uncertainty. In 1986. a toy line that he helped 
develop. Masters of the Universe, seemed headed for 
similar blockbuster status until the movie it was hitched 
to, starring DoJph Lundgren, bombed. 

DiCamillo’s company is spearbeading an effort to 
ship millions of toys into stores in advance of the movie. 
Just one toy. tiie Talking Fred doll, entails the produc- 
tion of 200.000 Freds, valued at 56 nriition at retail 
“Are we trying to launch a craze? I suppose so," said 
DiCajznBo, whose official title is director of marketing, 
boys' toys. “Unfortunately, there is no exact formula for 
starting a craze. If there were, there would be crazes 
popping up every second." A Mattel spokesman chimed 
in. "And there would be no need for Marie DiCamiQo ." 

Assuming that adults do not overdose on tiie hype 
before they open their wallets, what spoQs can a summer 
movie hit look forward to? Huge box office, certainly, 
but even more money oa top of that from the worldwide 
retail sales of toys, videogames, T-shirts, baseball caps, 
pillowcases, bubble bath. Christmas decorations and 
more. There are 50 movie licensees and nearly 200 
cartoon licensees. All told, about 1,000 Flintstones 
products will flood the market 
The merchandisers' sales goal: SI billion. 


Rock and Buddha in Japan 


By Andrew Pollack 

Htte York Times Service 

N ARA, Japan — Shfaikai Shindoh, the 
head priest at one of Japan’s oldest and 
most famous Buddhist temples, says 
(hat aB he knows about rodc ’n’rol] is 
that it rives him a headache. “Whv do they have to 
wear those strange costumes and have such long 
hair?" said Shindch, whose taste in fashion leans 
toward clerical robes and a shaven head. 

But last weekend, Shindoh found himself the 
host of an unusual rode concert featuring Bob 
Dylan, Jon Boa Javi, Joni Mitchell and' ZNXS 
among other pop notables, as well as Japanese 
rock musicians, the Tokyo New Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. a traditional Japanese orches t ra, taiko 
drummers and a chorus of about 100 chanting 
Buddhist monks. 

The setting was the courtyard of TodaijL a 


temple established in the eighth century, when this 
dty near Kyoto was the capital of Japan. The stage 
was directly in front of the Hall of the Great 
a Buddha, the largest wooden building in the world 
and home of perhaps the largest statue of Buddha 
in the world. The. 49-foot-higb bronze Buddha 
looked down upon the concert, his face visible to 
tiie audience through a window. ■ 

The three concerts here lasi^ weekend, are the fira 
of wbm are expected to be seven annual concerts at 
some of tiie weald’s architectural treasures. Future 
; sites are envisioned to include the Pyramids, the 
Fcatndden Gty m Bering and tiie Tq Mahal, 
tbopgh nope of these rites has been con fir med yet. 

. The concerts, called the Great Music Expert-, 
eace, are sponsored in part by Unesco, which 
hopes t he conce rts, by drawing-upon the appeal of 
rock musicians, will introduce the world’s cultural ■ 
heritage to an audience that would otherwise never 
be readied. - 


i i 

IS i 


; * 


Megabeyis credited as director andj 
(with WSfiamson) co-author, nei-i 
tber man seems To have done a loti 
more than ttawlthrough the half-1 
dozen Barrymore biographies for a 
few of the old Broadway and Hop 
lywood anecdotes. They haven'^ 
even botixred to write an aid to 
the show, so that Williamson! 
abruptly departs on the. line^ 
“That’s all there is," raving us' no 
indication of how; where or wfay[ 
Barrymore died, or whether it 
much matters to him or to us. “ 
But it should. Even a cursory 
glance at Gene Fowler’s “Good 
Night, Sweet Prince," the best i® 
the bios, suggests that Barrymore's) 
is a classic American tragicontedy! 
and one that deserves much better- 
than this. The “Hamlet” of his gen-j 
eration was a . tortured alcoholic, ( 
the .staraest member .of the “royal i 
family of Broadway ” but also a} 
man who could never forget being! 
seduced at 14 by his stepmother, 1 
nor yet the incarceration in a men-| 
tal home of his actor-father, Mau-« 
rice. It is a great story, one neverj 
yet property told onstage or screen-! 
Mcrdy to me it as a half-bufltvehi-i 
de in which WSfiamson can warmj 
over his own old “Hamlet” is aj 
chronic waste of both star and sub -1 
jecu * ; 






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MX.. 


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SO FAR, SO GOOD: 

A Memoir 

By Burgess Meredith. 171 pages. 
j S 2 2.95. Little, Brawn. 
Reviewed by Tom Wiener 

T HIS may be the firs: show-biz 
memoir whose subject plays a 

I supporting role. The first giveaway 
is the chapter titles: “Katharine 
Cornell" "A Marriage, a Musical 
and Maxwell Anderson,” “Kurt 
Weill and Loue Lenya." "Tallulah 
j Again." “Orson Welles,” “John 
Steinbeck,” “Weren't You Married 
to Pauieite Goddard Once?” and so 
on. Definitely a case of pit by asso- 
j elation. 

i Not (hat Burgess Meredith is 
■ overwhelmingly modest. He quotes 
I chapter and verse from New York 
( critics who were awed by his mid- 
j i 9%-j Broadway turns in “Little OT 
| Boy" aid “WiriterseL" In 1958 he 
i directed Zero Mosul as Leopold 
i Bloom m tiie suge production of 
! “Ulysses in Nighttown." and in a 
lengthy aria, reprinted herein. Mos- 
tel cor.cludes that Meredith was 
“one of the best directors I've ever 
worked with." 

Nor is Meredith simply dropping 
i names. Maxwell Anderson wroie 


“Winterset" for him. Ernie Pyle 
personally selected Meredith io 
play him in “The Story of G. I, 
Joe." And Orson Welles thought so 
highly of Meredith that be hired a 
lovely French girl to entice him to 
play Prince Hal in a 1940 Shake- 
speare stage production. 

Bui for all his high-profile asso- 
ciations. Meredith never saw- his 
career kick into high gear. The 1936 
film “Wimetset," his Hollywood 
debut might have launched him on 
a long ran in movies, but he proved 
tough to cast He had neither the 
looks of a Clark Gable nor the 
charisma erf a Spencer Tracy. Mer- 
edith and his second wife. Marga- 
ret Perry, soon discovered that 
“when we had a job, Hollywood 
was pleasant enough; but when we 
were jobless, the town turned tough 
and cracL” So they shuttled be- 
tween the coasts until World War 
1! broke out and their marriage 
broke up. 

During the war Meredith en- 
countered Paulette Goddard, the 
sexually voracious actress whose 
own marriage to Charlie Chaplin 
was nearly played out. She and Pri- 
vate Meredith flirted for several 
years before settling into a stormy 
and brief marriage. 


As s young actor in on appren- 
tice workshop, Meredith was ac- 
cused by the stage diva Eva Le 
Gaflienne of coming on so strong 
he was “spitting in God’s eye.” The 
source (rf this intensity was two- 
fold: a childhood of Dickensian 
dimensions and a mental disorder, 
diagnosed only much later. 

Three marriages bier, he found 
domestic tranquillity with a Balan- 
chine dancer named Kaja Sund- 
stetL She was 18, he was nearly 40; 
she soon became pregnant. After 
two children, be had created the 
loving famil y he’d craved as a child. 

Meredith occasionally refers to 
being in therapy during the 1930s 
and 1940s for his violent mood 
change s. Hi s Qliifes turned out to 
be cyclothymia, “a miW bipolar 
disorder characterized by instabil- 
ity of mood," but be is vague about 
how and when this was discovered 
and, more important, bow it was 
treated. 

Eventually Meredith found a 
niche is Hollywood as a character 
actor, he has worked SK&dfiy for the 
past 30 years, piling up dozens of 
t- mrfifc and twj Oscar nominations, 
for “The Day of the Locust" and 
“Rocky." On TV he played Joseph 


Wekb to Peter Boyle’s Joseph Mc- 
Carthy — an Emmy-winning per- 
fonnance that was also a measure of 
revenge for Meredith, who had been 
blacklisted in the 1950s. 

Meredith is 85 now, Irving in 


Malibu, and admits, “Many of the life like his. Even if he did olav a 
activities I followed, 1 should have supporting role in so much of it ~ 

let go; they often Brought sorrow at — : 

the time. Now, m reflection, tiny Tom Wiener, the ourhor of “ tQ 
make me smile.” They make me Book of Video Lists, ” *vwe ihiflZ 
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Higgins Clark 2 4 

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CY. by lama Raffidd 

3 INCA GOLD, by CGsC 

Custer 5 2 

4 “K" IS FOR KILLER, by Sac 

Grafton — . .3 5 

5 THE DAY AFTER TOMOR- 
ROW. by Aflan Fobom „• 6 5 

• THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 
SON COUNTY, by Robert . 

J ames W ager ... 1_V 4 93 

7 ACCIDENT, by Dandle 

Sled II 14 

S LUCE WATER FOR CHOC- 
OLATE. by Lam Euuivd - 10 38 
9 THE ALIEN 1ST, by Cakfe 

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11 THE FIST OF GOD. by Frcd- 
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12 SLOW WALTZ IN CEDAR 
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ter ] 

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14 XUSCLOSURE. by JwGdwd 

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15 DAYBREAK, by Bdva Plain ■ 

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LIGHT, by Beq-J.Eadtte with 

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by WSKua 1. Bennett ' ' • - 
4 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
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by Joba Bacndt 

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THETRIB INDEX 113 .„„^ 

9ftn£!!!!2?^[ WerakJ Tribune Worid Stock Index ©. composed of 
Inve siable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
Dybtoornberg Business News. Jen. 1 . 1992 = 100. 

120 - 


110 



too 


World Index 

5(24(94 close; 113.05 
Previous: 113.59 



go 


o j F M A M DJFMAM 
1093 1994 1993 1994 


North America 


Latin America 


150 


AppRtt.«^4ng-.2fi% 
Close: 93.B7 Prev.: 9376 


fnx(».«nighbig:5% 
Close: 116.78 Paw.- 11452 


130 


110 

90 


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D 
1993 

Woett Index 


M 


A M 
1994 


O J 
1993 


A M 
1994 


7he index Meta U.S. dollar values tit stacks In Tokyo, New York, London, and 
Argunttna, AustraBa. Austria, Btfghim. Brazil, Canada. Chita, Danmark. FWand, 


Franca, Gannany, Hong Kong, Italy. Hoadeo. Nattariincte, Maw Zaatand, Norway, 
SwHzartmd and Vananioia. for To/tyt3. New York and 


Singapore, Spain, Swadan, ... 

London, the Index is composed of the SO tap Issues in terms of market capkotasdon, 
othembe the len top stocks are imckBd 


1 Industrial Sectors I 


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11553 

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118.44 110JJ5 -0J1 

RawIMorioh 

12751 

12956 

-059 

Ftaooe 

11871 120 03 -1.10 

Consumer Goods 

9751 

98.10 

-050 

Services 

117-34 11758 -020 


128.11 

12959 

-0.91 

For more Information about (he index, b bookisl is avafetfe free oi charge. 

Writa foTrib Index, 181 Avenutt Charles deGarfo. 92521 NeuiBy Codex. Fiance. 


DBM Puts 
Its Eggs 
In One 
Ad Basket 


© International Harakf Tribune 


By Daniel lilies 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

PARIS — International Business 
Machines Corp. said Tuesday that it 
would consolidate most of its global 
advertising at a single agency, 
Ogihry & Matter Worldwide. 

Ogilvy will be responsible start- 
ing June 1 for advertising the IBM 
brand and all of its products and 
services. More than 40 ad agencies 
around the world now handle the 
job, but Ogilvy is not among them. 
Although precise figures are 
hard io come by. tbe value of the 
account is thought to be as much as 
$500 million a year. 

IBM advertising executives 
around the world conducted an in- 
ternal review in recent months on 
the company's strategy. An IBM 
spokeswoman said the results indi- 
cated that a single agency would be 
best positioned to “leverage the tre- 
mendous equity of the IBM brand 
name using a consistent and coordi- 
nated brand message, something 
which was just too di/Ticuii to man- 
age wjihg hs current roster of more 
than 40 ad agencies worldwide." 

She said Ogilvy “offered a num- 
ber of qualities" that made it IBM's 
choice. Among these were previous 
work in the conmuter field, for such 
companies as Compaq Computer 
Corp. and Microsoft Corp„ and its 
demonstrated “brand stewardship." 
Charlotte Beers, the Ogilvy chair- 
man, called this the “shepherding of 
brands through turbulent times." 

Ogilvy & Mather, a unit of WPP 
Group PLC of London, is based in 
New York. Among its clients are 
American Express payment cards, 
Jaguar automobiles and Maxwell 
House coffee. 

Herv£ Brassard, chief executi ve of 
DDB Needham France; said “The 
decision came as a total shock to 
IBM’s current roster of agencies." 
His company won tbe IBM PC busi- 
ness for Europe in October. “1 was 
notified by fax, I haven l even spo- 
ken with anyone yet at IBM." 

The IBM spokeswoman said the 
shift would not affect certain rela- 
tionships, notably in Japan. 


In Fashion Coup , 
Armani Executive 
Joins Calvin Klein 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The dawning of 
the age of America as a global 
fashion force was forecast Tues- 
day by Gabriella Forte — the 
woman who made Giorgio Ar- 
mani a household word. 

In a move that surprised the 
industry and Mr. Armani Mrs. 
Forte will become president of 
Calvin Klein Inc„ the Italian de- 
signer's arch-rival Mrs. Forte. 
45. was vice president of Giorgio 
Arinani SpA until she left his 
Milan headquarters abruptly 
Tuesday after IS years. She will 
take tiD her new Dost on Sept. I. 

“America is just discovering 
a global fashion market — be- 
fore designers only thought 
about America." she said in a 
telephone conversation from 
her Milan home. “It’s the begin- 
ning of a story, and anything in 
its embryo stage is exciting 1 
was ready for a change, to be 
president of a company, to 
spend more time in the United 
Slates and to work with a com- 
pany more mass-oriented." 

Mrs. Forte paid generous 
tribute to Mr. Armani. “Gior- 
gio taught me everything." she 
said, while a more terse commu- 
nique from her former compa- 
ny thanked “Mrs. Forte for 15 
years collaboration" and 
wished her welL 
Whatever spin the principals 
put on the story, it is a coup for 
Calvin Klein in a battle that is 
played out even in Hollywood 
as the designers — both disci- 
ples of modern, minimalist 
clothes — vie to dress the most 
Academy Award winners. 

The departure of Mrs. Forte 
comes at a difficult lime for Mr. 
Armani's business, which 
swung through a heady expan- 
sion in the 1980s but which now 
faces problems in its jeanswear 
division, Armani A/X Ex- 
change. Armani A/X is the U.S. 
division of Simhit SpA, which 
last month reported a loss of 
184 billion lire f$ll6 million) 
for the first 10 months of its 


financial year. Armani holds a 
23 percent interest in Siminu 
which sources in Milan said had 
financial irregularities that were 
not revealed to Mr. Armani be- 
fore he made his investment. 

But Armani remains one of 
the most profitable fashion 
companies in Italy. In 1992. the 
latest full year available, the 
company posted a net profit of 
78 billion lire. 

Calvin Klein is just emerging 
from a difficult period of finan- 
cial restructuring, which in- 
volves selling his lucrative 5150 


Vs the 
beginning of a 
story, and 
anything in its 
embryo stage is 
exciting.’ 

Gabriella Forte- 


million jeans business so that 
the designer can operate on a 
licensing basis. 

Since Mr. Klein and the 
chairman, Barry Schwarz, the 
co-founders of the company, 
wilt remain in charge, the initial 
impact of Mrs. Forte's defec- 
tion from Mr. Armani may be 
mainly psychological. 

She' played down her role in 
developing the Armani business, 
especially through its Emporio 
Arinani boutiques worldwide. 
Thirty-four percent of Armani's 
market share is concentrated in 
the United States, with 28 per- 
cent in Italy and the rest, in other 
European countries and Asia. 

But the fact remains that Cal- 
vin Klein, whose collections 
were once dismissed in Europe 
as Armani clones, is poised to 
take on the global fashion uni- 
verse with one of its most pow- 
erful management figures at his 
side. 


German Money Supply 


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Compiled n Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank announced Tuesday that 
growth in Germany's broad money 
supply had accelerated in April 
confounding economists’ expecta- 
tions for slower monetary growth 
and chilling stock and bond mar- 
kets across 'Europe. 

The markets feared that a rise in 




culatcd 6 J percent above its level 
in the final quarter of 199.1 
The money supply was boosted 
by high consumer borrowing that 


was spurred by changes in the tax 
‘ “ late last year and bv the urans- 


the money supply might lead the 
ink to hold off on cuts in 


Bundesbank 
its leading interest rates until mon- 
ey growth declined substantially. 

The news led to a 2 percent drop 
on the Frankfurt stoat exchange 
and sizable declines on ihe Lon- 
don. Paris. Amsterdam and Zurich 
markets. 

"German money supply domi- 
nated Europe today and started a 
sell-off in the bond market." said 
Smart Thomson, an economist at 
Nikko Europe. 

According to a preliminary' cal- 
culation , the M-3 measure of mon- 
ey supply grew at rate of 15.8 per- 
cent in the year ended in April, up 
from 15.4 percent in March, the 
centra) bank said. 

The Bundesbank also said that 
the money supply measure was cal- 


eode 1 _ 

fer of profit from the Bundesbank 
to the federal government. 

The rate of expansion exceeded 
the target range set by the Bundes- 
bank for expansion in 1994 of 4 
percent to 6 percenL 

The annualized figure is calculat- 
ed using statistics from just five 
days of each month. The Bundes- 
bank said that the pace of money- 
supply growth had actually slowed 
for the month of April as a whole. 

Tbe latest M-3 increase exceeded 
many economists' expectations, al- 
though a German newspaper, ril- 
ing unnamed Bundesbank sources, 
reported last week that money ex- 
pansion in April had probably ex- 
ceeded that in March. 

“This data will encourage the 
market to take a pessimistic view 
about the course or short- term in- 
terest rates." said Schweizerische 
Bankgesellschaft (Deutschland) 
AG in a note to investors. 

The Bundesbank trimmed its 


main interest rates, the discour® ^ Har 
and Lombard rates, on May 1 J bo ■™ W R 
half a point. It was the third redu&’ crv iS< ? r 
lion this year in the discount nnc5* n JJJ5 
which represents the cheapest forr2v*| , 
of bank borrowing in Germany, c ‘I* 011 
Bundesbank President Hans Tlet-A , 
meyer said on Monday that tbeGei* nj tn r ^ 
man central bank was not planning 1 ** 1,1 
more rate cuts “for the tune being, g- . 

Tbe Bundesbank said in a wnt—' f ^ 
ten statement that the expansion o^fr * 
money supply in April had beeoT ^ I? 
boosted by transfer of the centrar- - .* 
bank's profit to the federal govern— if ^ 
mem. Last month the Bundesbank. * 
transferred 18.26 billion Deutsche . , h . 
marks ($11.04 billion) of its 1993- 
net profit of 18.8 billion DM to thtl_, .. 
government. f 

Analysts said they doubled ^denied 
Bundesbank would revise its target ,, 
for money-supply growth when iL-yound 
reviews the target in July, if only on 
grounds of credibility. ’ -‘ r bciit to 

"To move the target to improve c 
the chances of hitting it means you |j van j 
are only really moving the goal- tem j 
posts." said Richard Reid, chief gfW two 
economist at Union Bank of Swit-«- ( h me 
zerland in Frankfurt. ation. 

I Bloomberg Reuters) _ Mr. 
- - ^teiid he 


CEOs Draft Hi-Tech Advice to EU 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — European leaders must follow a 
liberal blueprint to build an information superhigh- 
way. relying on rapid deregulation of telecommunica-' 
lions, private finance and market-proven standards 
rather than protectionism or massive public projects, a 
group of industry leaders is preparing to recommend. 

The recommendations are included in a draft of a 
report that win be a centerpiece of the summit meeting 
of European Union leaders on June 24 and 25 in 
Corfu, Greece. The group of business chiefs includes 
the heads of 19 major European companies, among 
them Carlo De Benedetti of Olivetti SpA and Etienne 
Davignon of Scathe GeueraJe de Belgique; 

The executives also win urge European Union lead- 
ers to endorse nine pilot projects to give the public and 
industrial sectors tangible evidence of die benefits of 
merging telecommunications, computing and enter- 
tainment technologies. These projects include estab- 
lishing so-called suburban teleworking centers to en- 
able 10 million white-coil ax employees to leave their 
‘ i offices and work closer to borne by the year 2000. 
Tbe leaders commissioned tbe report in tbe hope 
that it would help Europe catch up with U.S. efforts to 
build an information highway for services ranging 




from interactive video to teleconferencing, while cre- 
ating millions of new jobs and boosting Europe’s 
competitiveness in the process. 

“An information society is a means to achieve so 
many of the Union's objectives." the draft says. “We 
have to get it right, and get it right now 

That urgency was echoed in Bonn on Tuesday as the 
government appointed a task force of political and 
business leaders to find ways to nuke Germany com- 
petitive in telecommunications and multimedia, and 
said it would make the issue a priority when it takes 
ova the presidency of the European Union in July. 

“Around half of future economic growth will come 
from this area,*' said Paul Krueger, the telecommuni- 
cations minister. 

“Our report urges the European Union to put its 
faith in market mechanisms as the motive power to 
cany us into the information age," the draft says. 

The draff cites Europe’s telephone monopolies, with 
their resulting high costs, as the biggest single obstacle 
to information networks. It ufges government leaders to 
effectively free telephone companies to operate as pri- 
vate co m panies and to establish a single European 
regulatory framework, but does not demand, privatiza- 
t»OT outright or caB fer an acceleration of Europe’s 1998 
timetable for full competition in telephone services. 


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MEDIA MARKETS 


Fox Deal Shocks Big Three 


Complied by Our Stiff From Dupatdus 

N EW YORK — Fox Broadcasting Co.’s 
announcement that it had lured 12 
television stations away from the Big 
Three U.S, networks set up a scramble 
for new relationships between networks and affili- 
ates, suddenly making precarious the partnerships 
that date to tbe beginning of the television era. 

The broadcast television division of News Coip. 
said Monday it cm a $500 million deal with New 
i Work! Communications Group Inc. that would 
L give Fox 12 new affiliates — eight of which are- 
now wffniafttt with CBS, three that carry ABC 
prog ramming and one from NBC. 

The move represents a sweeping realignment of 
the American television industry and seal shares of 
Rupert Murdoch’s nreffia conglomerate soaring 
more than 3 percent on tbe Australian Stock Ex- 
change. News Corp. ended tratfing Tuesday at 929 
Australian dollars ($6.80). a 29-osal gain on tbe day. 

Media analysts said the deal has immediate 
implications for advertising revenue at the upstart 
Fox and many said they planned lo add between 3 
percent and 4 percent to their 1994-95 eammgs 
projections for News Corp- 
Tbe deal clearly took the three big^tUB. 
television networks by surprise. CBS, which had 
already seen Fox steal away the rights to broadcast 
National Football League games that it had held 
for four decades, now faces the further humblmg 
exercise of having to seek new — and probably 
weaker — affiliates in many of the biggest aties m 
the country, including Dallas, Detroit, Cleveland 
and Atlanta. 


Anthony G Malara, president of CBS’ affiliate 
relations division, said he was stunned when he 
received the news in a phone call Monday morning 
firom William C. Bevins, chief executive of New 


World. Mr. Malara said he asked Mr. Bevins in 
disbelief, “What are you doing?” 

Shares of CBS fdl to S270.00 Tuesday, a loss of 
518.00, after sliding 515.50, to 5288, on Monday. 

Mr. Malara spent much of Monday calling sta- 
tions in cities affected by the change “It’s a big 
Now,” be acknowledged. “But it’s not Armaged- 
don.” He promised that CBS would have new affili- 
ates in each city, though he said that many might 
tune to be weaker UHF — ititra-high-freqiKncy — 
stations, which are those with channel positions 
above 13ou the dial 

Fox already has affiliates in all 12 cities involved 
in the New World deal, but tbe Fox stations in 
many of those markets are less desirable with 
weaker signals. By luring older, stronger stations 
onto its roster in those markets. Fox is, in effect, 
trading up. 

Tlx: Fox network had its beginnings only in 1986; 
it ladies the distingoisbed news operations and rich 
entertainment history of CBS, NBC and ABC But 
the jfiambeyant Mr. Murdoch has been moving the 
network toward equal status with those competitors, 
and Monday’s move was his boldest yet 

“We are getting closer to parity,” Mr. Murdoch 
said “We are about three-quarters of the way there.’’ 

Contracts between a network and its affiliates 
are short-term, usually a year or two, and can be 
broken by either party upon expiration. Because of 
that. Fox executives said Monday that they 
thought they could have all 12 new affiliates in 
place w ithin 18 months — some of them by au- 
tumn. 

The switch is likely to translate into improved 
ratings for Fox, while CBS, depending on which 
stations it is able to secure in the affected dries, 
could sustain serious damage u> its programs 
across tbe board. 

across uk dwkl Reuters, AP) 


Speculation 
Fuels Rise in 
Coffee Prices 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dufsndm 

LONDON — Coffee and cocoa 
prices soared Tuesday to their 
highest levels since the late 1980s as 
speculators continued to ihrow 
money into commodity markers. 

The huge movers are the specu- 
lators and the funds," one analyst 
said. Coffee for July delivery’ 
peaked in early London trading ai 
$2,480 a ion, the highest for seven- 
and-a-half years and SI 84 above 
the previous dose. The price drift- 
ed off in the afternoon but still 
ended S54 higher, at $2,350. 

Some producers warned, howev- 
er, (hat the recent rise in coffee 
prices — touched off a few- weeks 
ago by concern that there might be 
a crop shortage this year because of 
bad weather — has been loo sud- 
den to be sustainable. 


“We have to be careful; we are 
looking for remunerative prices for 
growers, but it is not in our interest 
to have a runaway market," said 
Rubens Barbosa, Brazil's ambassa- 
dor to Britain who is also president 
of tbe 29-member Association of 
Coffee Producing Countries. 

The jump in coffee prices spilled 
oyer into the cocoa market, which 
hit its highest level in more than six 
years. In London on Tuesday, co- 
coa for July delivery jumped more 
than £80 ($121). to £1,085 a ton, 
before ending the day at £1.062. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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MMrdLvMhJMar Ready atMt X27 


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3V» 
7V, 
4 *V 
X9S 
*JS 
421 
4 M 
SJH 

m 

6M 

7.14 

7JP 


Prev. 

Wr 

714 

4h 

091 

<15 

iff 

5ft 

634 

UO 

7.18 

7/0 

133 


BriMn 

Bata Me rah 
Can meow 
i-aieate taterteMk 


4 -b*oo» Itaertwtac 
Ittaear cat 
Prance 


5'4 

s 

sw 

S4* 


iM 

Site 

5V» 

P* 


B.l 7 tun 


Werveaiten rata 
Con money 
Imenl* Mn-baek 
T^woattaertwta 

WmrOfcT 


iM 5.40 
5'. 


5v- 

5h 

Svt 

W1 


5 

5>. 

Sr. 

IUJ. 


?°* 1 **^ — even 7**rt Cormof aray imr 

tSj MB 33 1JBS8 CaBadtandpHar. , ijltt 10983 U8I7 

1551 U&U. us* ' JtawatMKear ■ lwun mil HUB 
1^075 UP* xjaa 


Dtscoatartae 

CaUmanmr 

VmenlblHtarbaita 

Sraratahtatartaak 

4-moaHi biterbonk 

r»war Oaveraraait bead 


W 

un 

1 

214 

2h 

3J3 


114 

2 

2* 
2ta 
3 ta 

FUL 


Source s: Reuters, atoomber*. Merrill 
Lynch, Book of Tokyo. Commereeo n*. 
GraenweU Montosru. Crtdtr Lvonnah. 


ftaenduerflav _ __ 

^ UP*' '-P • 


LomBord note 


I^bmHi leterbaak 
S^tbbthrtMta 
tramlbbdcrtMi* 
IBvear Bead 


4 M U» 
3.40 U0 


1* 5V4 

5.15 S.1) 


5X5 5X6 

642 5X6 


OoM 

AM PJA. Chtee 

Xurldl 3SU5 3®4S - U0 

tendon 398.10 M3) - IJ5 

New rer* naro wx —zoo 

US. Honan per ounce. London otnaoi «■- 

kVU Zurich am Hew York opening oM etas. 
to prices; Hew York Cemex tJunel 
Source: Reuters 


Banks 

De 

Ou 


Were Established to Protect 
positors' Funds. It's Still 
r Most Important Mission. 



T h nu ait liirtory, m.in 

lv»' Nniii>hr n> safeguard 
i he tiling*, he values 
It w.t' true in the Middle Aee.s, 
when h.inLmu )n»tiiutions 
cmcrccJ t" "liclrer rhe wealth 
created hv .m espundinj* marker 
ect'liumy. It'- finally true nuu. 

T*»da\, ht.wcwr, vitety isn't 
a nutter .»! h.ivin^ the 
strunuh-'X er rhe heaviest 
padlock. In rodav’., fluid world, 
safety t- tied to prudent poli- 
cies. a <rr»uvj K-il.tnce sheet and 


a conservative banking 
philosophy. 

Those are rhe very qualities 
thne have made Republic 
National Bank one of the safest 
institutions in the world. Our 
•asset quality and capital ratios 
nrc among rhe strongest in rhe 
industry. And our dedication to 
protecting depositors’ funds is 
unmatched anywhere. 

A» a subsidiary of Safra 
Republic Holdings S.A. and an 
affiliate of Republic New York 


Corporation, we’re part of a 
global group with more than 
US$5 billion in capital and 
more than US$50 billion in 
assets. These assets continue to 
grow substantially, a testament 
to the groups risk-averse orien- 
tation and century-old heritage. 

So, while much has changed 
since the Middle Ages, safety 
is still a depositor's most 
important concern. And it's 
still our most important 
mission. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK ( SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 


timeless Values, traditional Strength, 


MEAD OFFICE; Ofc M V* l.O- 1 - PL»CE DU l*C * TEL. i02:> 70S 55 55- FOREX. iOCZi 705 55 50 AND GENEVA 1201 "Z. RUE DR. AIFRED-VINCENT (CORNER 
QUA/ DU MONI-ctAN-.- BRANCHES: lUoARO eSOl * V ".»» EANttiA * TEV. >09l> 23 B5 32 * ZURICH 8039 • STOCKER 5TRASSE 37 • T£U. (Oil 288 is 18 ■ 
6UF»M'SE» • fc:». F 1 " p PE ■ SI ft i BR PORT ■ TEL .401.711 761 AWLIATt REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS; 

i>'3RlLl4p I,.li r-v.l i ■ lOMDOM ' ...... — ■■ 

MOM Pi*:. • N*vS a <• mEvi iOPk ■ 

JAKARTA - SINGAPORE ' TAIPEI • TOKYO 


. ... - ■ ----- - — — in nen lunn umtK LOLUnDNS; 

h - LUXEMBOURG • • MONI6 CARLO • PARIS' BEVERLY HILLS - CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES ■ MEXICO CITY - MIAMI - 

• BUENOS AIRES • CARACAS ■ MONTEVIDEO ■ PUNTA DEL E&TE 1 RIO DE JANEIRO ■ SANTIAGO ■ BEIRUT • BEIJING • HONG KONG - 


j nui- 
ed to 
ded a 
te no 
ssruff 


for in 
iened 
. and 
nraci 


able. 


wth 

n.t. 






IS* 


Hire 16 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 


Vh MXKBtnlPrAU 


May 24 


S3 

•s 

in Bn 

& 


J. 

cussed 

Mi, 



nation 

say 

41 : 

V 

with £ 

es 



editor 

ME 

ij 

n> 

1. 

Heraii 

Bail 

IL 

la 

h 

are ey 

fin* 

1 


view: 

life 


■J 

Hm 

sue 

n 


200 i 

E 

?c 


schot 

ent 


‘Compiled by Our Staff Frm Dupaichc 

NEW YORK — A rally on the 
>nd market and a resilient dollar 
ted share prices on the Big Board 
irly on Tuesday, but the rebound 


The dollar had been boosted on 
Tuesday after the announcement of 
a breakthrough in the deadlocked 
trade framework negotiations be- 
tween Japan and the United States-. 

Although the Big Board's rise 
was lukewarm, the Nasdaq Com- 


__ The Dow Jones industrial aver- posite Index postal a relative]} 
je. which had risen as much as strong gain of 6.52. to 731.4f. 
3.63 jTOints in early trading, lost Shares of computer software. drug, 
jat gain and fell at one point feii electrical equipment, computer r.s- 

- tern and semiconductor makers led 

the advance. 


U-S. Stocks 


Health care stocks were also fa- 



Dell Computer led the Nasdaq 
actives, rising 2". to IS'* after rc- 


ioints for the day. 

Four stocks rose for ever.' three 

hat feU on Je New York Stock ^ ,. ron , in ;p in 

ach^gt where tradtng vtrfume ^ - 

vds 279.87 milhon shares on Tues- H 

lay. up from 249.40 million on ibm rose i J . :o 6?'-i amid gro-v- 
vlonday. i n g optimum atv'-Jt a >erie> of olli- 

The benchmark 30-year Trea- races" IBM has mad-: or L- planning 
uiy bond closed at 86 12. 32. up with comparje. involved in interne-. 
3/32. ll rose as high as Sb 29/32 in live entcnuiriuv.-nt. 
he course of Tuesday trading and ... 

lad closed at 85 31/32 on Mondav. Several trader- -aic ti.ev were 
„ waichtr .2 shares >:•! Philip Moms 

The yield was quoted at ^3° oer- Co i , 0 ; - d metU< Wetin;*- 

.-ent as trading ended on luesdav. • (-?!!?■• vd d decision m 

down from 7.43 percent Monday- separate die company * food and 


Deify closings of fh© 

Dow Jones Industrial average 
4000 



m N D -J F M A M 


1993 


1994 


IHT 

KYSE KSost Actives 


VaL 

High 

Low 

LOS) 

Off. 

.YcrCK 

770» 

32'.. 

1 

3) 


PhifAi • 

57472 

55'- 


54 


Gi-rbPrd 

4778* 

SI 

50 

51 

- ll 

ToIMt. 


*r- 

*1 

6l« 

» W, 



27 >- 

?7!* 

77 V. 

-4 



1081. 



— ’^i 


7^010 


72 hr 

77** 

—1*6 



*l+a 

M'. 

65' * 

-r-i 

s-aus.jn 


Tl** 


23^ 

* ** 

Cnr.-sir 

TW* 0 


tii'r. 


—* 



48Vj 

*7* 

47' i 

- 

Hm^-Pes 

30MI 

J6i 

AS** 

4Wi 

- 1 

ili.Tii:. 


15' - 





19B8J 

55'. 


£4*. 

— 1 * 

.‘■tfiinlijl 

1*82* 

47 





HASBAQ Most Actives 


“The bond market is rallying." tobacco busir. *•■£*■ would drive the 
probably because investors feci re- stock sharply higher. •« bile «!hcr.* 


»nt commodity price increases warned the stock c*:uld faiT ;h;trpl> 
■‘aren’t going to stick." said Burry if no action was taken. The compa- 


Berman. head trader at Robert W 
Baird & Co. in Milwaukee. 


ny’s share fell ■ ue-Jay by l : i to 
5 3 -i». f Moot r berg. .-1 1. V. F cuter: I 




VOL 

High 

Low 

Last 

CII3- 

T-MCniA 


JMi 

19' . 


- 1 *-i 

Dcfl'-ch- 

f.+*94 

79^ 

28V 


- 3 

..v:;. 1 ; i 

53150 

SI •* 

SO’. 



f;. /A'lrl.j 

JWS 

12’. 

II'.. 

12’. 


.11 

43*10 

18'. 

17'. 




47355 

75 1 

7JV 


- \m 

=wcS^. 


W's 

riv 



in/cl S 

71735 

>l"> 

39V 


- 

Or art-- ; 

J101J 

34 

37', 


- 1 v- 

Cnrw: :o! 

1*907 

|7 * 

15', 

17V. 

* u. 




**'■, 



TPi En 

mis 

8* 0 

7*. a 

7** 


AjT 

1774* 

r? 

1SV 

1*’. 

- l‘a 

r/i It ir 

1890* 

24>« 

271, 


- 'n 

Come?,! 

17450 

1 T Va 

15V, 

1?'^ 



Afi USX Most Actives 


Bloomberg Business Xms 


Now that trade talks arc under 


NEW YORK — The dollar rose way. “i here’s Jess risk that the dol- 
against the ven and other major iar will go lower." said Chris W id- 


currencies Tuesday after the Unit- 
ed Slates and Japan agreed to re- 
sume formal trade negotiations. 
The dollar closed in New York at 


ness, international economist at 
Chemical Bank. “We’re very close 
to a bottom.” 

Finn stock and bond markets 


104.72 yen. up from 104.39 Mon- aj w underpinned the dollar. 

tey and ail.6545 DtuKhs rnrki. „ d d ^ 

“P from 1.6436. The U.S. cuntncy sajd , hev „,' rajilled CJUlioui on J lht 


L Foreign Exchange 


trade front and warned that the 
dollar was still vulnerable to a slide. 

“I don’t think the dollar is out of 
the woods vet," said Hunt Tavlor. 



ISoL 

High 

LOW 

Las 

Off. 

ESKCC* 

19598 

4 s 

]'. 


v 1 ■ 

EchoBa, 

6AJ? 

1 1 

11 


.1*- 

s 


20’t 

18’^ 

IV4 


U j AlC 

37*7 


1’. 



JPDP 

54 Ic 452', = 


J5h.w 


InrrnYjn 

425* 

5S", 

23'.. 

24 


IvC .Co 

3302 

19', 

I8>. 



E‘P'_A 

1346 


IV.; 



Jia-zB 

28+2 

:s’4 

78'. 


+ *ee 

SmOTIO 

2707 

6’- 


5 

- V., 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prrv. 


C p.m. 

cons. 

NYSE 

759.18 

704.193 

A me. 

13® 

14.779 

Nasdaq 

72601 

7304.16 


in millions. 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High LOW Last OW. 


Indus 

Tram 

Old 

Comp 


vna 37*6 35 1.T7.H 3745 17 -L76 
i«jo.» 8 t£i5.’: is"«J3 I6M.M -9.27 
ikt: ibj. 74 ifl“ -w iaj jO -o.t3 

ij+joj rsjsJi IJM.*7 * 3.tJ 


Standard A Poor’s indexes 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Prevton 
Bid Ask 


Industrials 

Tramp. 

Uiiiitles 

r-inonce 

59500 

SPIP) 

High 
533.lt 
577.99 
153 *J 
43® 
456.77 
42J18 

Low Close Ch'rje 
528.98 UO .78 +1J0 
386.90 390J7 -4JB 
15177 152.7. — 0J4 
45® *5® +0® 
453.70 45JJ1 + 141 
470.72 421."1 + 1-21 

MYSE Indexes 


Hiqh 

Low Lest 

Chg. 

Comproiio 

industrials 

TransD. 

Ulil.iv 

Fin-;ncc 

25131 

311.01 

247.7* 

203.04 

2i£j7 

750.78 551.40 
309.1* 709.76 
;*sJ7 34637 
205.(7 205.15 
213.57 214 77 

‘0.62 

tO.60 

-2.W 

-007 

-1® 

NASDAQ Indexes 


High 

LOW Last 

Qig. 

Composite 

Indusirials 

tanks 

In wj ranee 

Finance 

Transp. 

771.88 

7*4.33 

71637 

891.71 

975.79 

71127 

727 73 730 94 
7+1.02 7*5.07 
■'u® 'ia a? 
ar.io 887.93 
971 05 925 39 
708.22 70622 

-599 
• 1W 

- 3*3 
-3.»5 

- 3-84 

-a® 

AMEX Stock Index 


High 

Law Lost 

dig. 


439. X) 

477.6* *39.18 

-IJ* 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 

20 Bands 

10 uitiiiies 

lOindusIrmls 


Close 

77. 75 

94 as 

706** 

arte 

+ 004 
— 0X9 
+ ai7 

NYSE Diary 



Oni Prev. 

Advanced 
Dedincd 
Uncnanged 
Trmt issues 
New Higns 

New Laws 


1245 918 

915 1238 

*50 *65 

7S10 2831 

44 31 

4* SO 

AMEX Diary 



dose 

Prev. 

Advanced 

305 

27* 

DecJirv?.J 



UncjujnBca 

22* 

76b 

Tof« issues 

na 

an 




New Lows 

12 

15 


Close 
Bid Ask 
ALUMINUM (High Cnrtfe) 

Dollars per metric ton _ „ 

s«: lurtfo 1342.00 13*50 WJJ 

ForwonJ 1372.00 tanwo }37tM 137*30 

COPPER CATHODES (Htah Grade! 

Pollan pct metric ton . „ „ _ ___ 

Swot 22MJJD SI-00 227MQ «W 

Forward Z296.0O 7297.00 227*00 277U0 

LEAD 

Boltars per metric i«i 

Soot 48*50 *87.50 ffl4J0 48SJ0 

Forward 304.00 5K.tn 50200 5W4» 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric loo , 

final Mdd.Od 4*40.00 *470-00 M7SOO 

Forward *770.00 67MJ0 675L0Q 6760.00 

TIN 

Dollars per metric tan 
Saol JSSSJM 5545.00 559000 5600X8 

Forward 5*30J» 5635JO 5665.00 567100 

ZINC (Special Migti Grade) 

Dollars per mclrtcjon 

Spal MBJ0 Y&9.50 V74J0 97150 

Forward WS0 "95.00 "WJJO HOOjOO 


Financial 


High Low Close Change 

3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
ffiMMXHl - ptS Dl IM PCf 
Jon 
&p 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jon 
Sen 
DM 
Mar 


94.70 

04*9 

94X" 

— 0X2 

9+40 

94® 

WJ7 

— OJB 

*4 03 

93.93 

9X95 

— 0X4 

97_n 

"3® 

9J4I 

— 0® 

93X1 

92.91 

9X92 

— 609 

92® 

7X44 

92*6 

— 6D7 

92.12 

"105 

92X7 

-606 

91.79 

91 JS 

91 J5 

— 0X7 

91® 

"1X2 

91® 

niv: 

91J° 

91® 

71® 

— 0X5 

41X2 

91.17 

91.10 

— OX* 

91® 

91X4 

91® 

— 0X5 


Est. volume: 51.910. Open tnt.: *99 JU. 
iMONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

SI million - pis o! !M act 
Jim "12 W35 «L23 

Sro 74 j13 «4A2 WAS 

Dt*C "490 "4JJ8 94.11 

Mai- 1JS4 "184 "IBS 

Jon N.T. M.T. 9MB 

Sea N.T. N.T. 9105 

EsL volume: 257 Gotn ml: 10258. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

□Ml million - PH a! 100 Pet 


_ oJB 

— cun 

— CL01 

— niff 

— 0JH 

— tun 



hw 

LOW 

Lost 

settle Ch've 

Nav 

159® 

159-25 

ISMS 

—IS 

Dec 

Ml® 

161® 

161® 

hi® —ns 

Jaa 

161® 

I61J5 

161® 

161® —2-25 

Feb 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

160X0 —2® 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1562S -225 

Apr 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

157® —2® 

MOT 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

155J3 —225 

E». vaftime: 16870. 

Open Inf. 09270 


BRENT CRUDE OIL ftPEl . „ 

u JL Uottero pot RarroHots o* 14M 

Jill 16J0 1648 165 1633 — M» 

A no 16J6 U.16 1643 

Sep 16 lZ 16JI9 1AW 

Oct I6J2 16JB 16.11 

Nov 16.10 16JM 164)7 

SS 16J0 1A0I l^K 

Job 16.18 1*412 WJ» 

FOB 14.15 1AU 16B 

MOT M.19 <602 MJW 

Csf. volume: 3B9QS . Ope" kit. 134074 


1*22 —04)9 
164)9 —Rif 
16419 — 0-10 
16417 — 0-11 
164)7 — 04)9 
1640 —CL® 
16 Bl —007 

164)9 —MS 


Stock Indexes 

CMe OKUT09 


LOW 


HM 

FTSE 1 SO (LIFFE) 

as per mkp poW 

Jaa 31 OU 307641 XU7 -0 — TM 

it inn 3Q7? JS 30900 —125 

S 31120 31194) 

Esf. volume: 12460. Open Inf.: 5493 4. 

CAC 40 IM ATIF) , 

fts 2149 A0 22154X1 + 494)0 
Sm 215M8 2134X0 2W9^' IM*. 

Jat 21465D 214650 21*450 Unch. 

iS. 216MB 215000 ££= +MS 

Dec N.T. N-T. 22^2 

Mar 22254)0 221500 2221410 

Est. volume: UU71. Open lot.: 81<43S. 

Sources: Motif, Associated Pres*. 


Undi 

UlKtL 


London inn manefol Fidvrss Exchange. 
Inn PHrotemt Erehansm. 


Dividends 


per Amt Pay Roc 
IRREGULAR 


Jon 

Sep 

Dec 

Mcr 

Jim 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

Jvn 

Dec 

Mar 


i \C35 
9493 
9450 
94^9 
9« 4J 
B4T4 
V4.C6 
93.41 
93.TJ 
93jx2 
9350 
«352 


9454 

"457 

>454 

9452 

94.12 

"3.44 

4350 

"3 43 


Est. volume: 2 1 6554 


"350 
■ Open 


?4M 

9451 

94.77 

"454 

9459 

44.17 

94412 

934)9 

93.72 

9X5H 

9350 

9350 


earn 
+ 04)7 
+ 04)7 
+ 0.10 
+ 04)7 
+ 04)7 
+ 007 
+ 0417 
+ 0417 
+ 0413 
+ 007 
+ 04H 


ml.: 14139.165. 


NASDAQ Diary 


□oh Prev. 


Advanced 

O-cHned 

Unchanged 
Tefal iiiuci 
New Higns 
flew Lowi 


1602 
1«T» 
I ®30 
5079 
77 
102 


1471 

1670 

1931 

son 


49 


09 


Spot Commodities 


Jun 
Sea 
Dec 
Mor 
Jaa 

Dec 
Mar 

Est. volume: 13*503. Oaen Ini.: 21752". 
LONG OILT ILIPPEI 

cstum ■ on a 32rds once pet 

Jun 105-14 10410 10+14 —14)1 

Sep 10+11 1C1-10 103-12 -1-02 

esl. volume: S44W. Open ‘nl.: 11&JU3. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 250000 - pts of IDO Pd 
Ju«l 1iS3 "L24 9454 — 0.44 

Sep »454 9355 917i — 0.4* 

Dec «170 KUO 9145 —055 

Esi. volume: ai+77. Open InL: 174.976. 
ID-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF1 
FFSOOlOH - pH ol 100 PCS 
Jim 12258 12)52 12)58 -054 

Sm 12158 120^6 120*4 —0*2 

Dec 12044 1195a 119.72 —05* 

Esl volume: 3*555*. Open Ini.: 132.9*1. 


Am InsurMlplnv 6* 
Am InsurMffllnv B8 
Crass Tbnoer Roy 

Fronkln PrtneMal 

Nil Income Rltv 
Perm km Basin Rov 


_ JK 
M 


551 

_ SGI 

_ 4)98 5-51 *-14 

_ .1535 5-31 — 

. .17 6-1 

- JJ1B3 SGI 


S-31 6-15 

a 


Cato Cp 
Conn Enarav 
Fs> Bncnrp OH 
Frontier Insur 
New England Etoe 
Old Republic Inil 
Ouixote Cam 


INCREASED 

a 

i 

Q 
O 

S 


JM tr* 

525 6-10 


575 6-10 
.12 
.11 


6-10 +20 

6-1 7.1 


-ptsaflMxt 


— 611 | 



9**8 



9+64 



44® 

94-57 



94.46 

9*47 




9+28 



94.07 

94.10 

-022 


73_aa 

93X9 

-0.19 1 

93® 

9367 

9377 

— 0.11 ' 


CORRECTION 


Anthony Ind 

jt-e ef r e t- Ted record data. 


.11 +1 7-1 


EXTRA 

Am InsirMfglnv 86. 


REDUCED 
) M 


4)5 S-31 6-17 


- JO HI 
. 40 HI 


Commodity 
Aluminum, lo 
Cot tee. Bros. 10 
Cooper electrolytic. ID 
Iran FOB. Ian 
Lead, lb 
Silver, trav oz 
Steel 'scrap). Ian 
Tin. lb 
Zinc, lb 


Today 

0*09 

1J4 

1JB7 

21100 

054 

SM 

13753 

17797 

0.4*09 


Prev. 

0J.I1 

154 

I4F 

2IX0O 

054 

5.70 

143.00 

356*7 

05*16 


Industrials 


High Low Last Settle CDge 
GASOIL (IPE) 

05. donors per melric wn-tote ol IDO tons 


Jun 

Jut 

Auo 

S«p 

Oct 


i REGULAR 

1 Am Fst PrenFd 2 
Am insurMIglnvBS 
Am Studios 
Balrnco Cora 
Blount Inc A 
BhMul Inc B 
Brenca Inc 
Bulls, Bear Gfelncn 
Carousior Ind 
Circle Find 
ailcorp adlpl 2 
Citicorp odl pt3 
: Colonial lnterm 
i Colonial Mun 
I Rmstedlnc 
Fit Boston Inca 
i Fst Boston Straf 
First FindCp 
1 Fsi Hawaiian 
! Fort Deerbom 
i Franfclki MulH 
Franklin Unlv 
Gatnsco Inc 
I Goman Co 
I Gendls Inc Ap 
i Jadyn Inc 
Kielnwrt Bern Aus m 


+38 

... U 

6-15 4-Si 


M .1277 HI 
M .12 H) 

Q J02 
O JB 
a .125 6-15 
a .1125 6-15 
Q 4)5 6-17 
K\ JM 5-24 
Q .09 *-22 
O .12 6-10 
_ 150 . 

. 175 8-15 W! 
HI 
5-31 


7J 

7-1 

m 

. 6-3B 
BIS Hi 


15175 150 00 150.00 1504)0 —34X1 

152-50 1 5175 15tJ» 15149 —250 . 

153.75 15250 15250 15250 -175 ' Drain NtlCvSec 

155.75 15*50 15450 15475 — 225 Dncaln Ntl Inca 

15BJ30 1574E5 15775 15775 —225 1 Marine MM adlPiA 


M 
M 4)465 
Q .10 
M 4M 
M 4)675 
5 77 

Q 795 
M 4)675 
M 
M 
Q 4TI 
o jy 
.135 6-17 
Q 

■Q 74 

* £ 


6-3 6-13 

6-1 6-15 


6-1 

HI 

6-1 

6-1 


JJ49 5-31 
4)67 


6-15 

6-15 

6-15 


6-15 6-30 
6-10 7-1 


7-1 


6-ID 
7-4 

.12$ 7-15 B-15 
6-3 6-15 
6-1 
6-1 
6-3 


6-10 

•a 



,S./ATTHr 

GTE Plans Extensive Video^^p^l: 

mYING.T^(BIoo^-GTE&JP^gre^^' 


SOM »* «■* Tuesday « pb«N 




Su tab ft , 

The network would be capable of delivering l 

interactive Revision programming. 

^50 million by the end <rf M W WUa 

video netwotk in Thousand CahJorma. 

ter, Florida; Hooohilu, Hawan; and northern Vtrgtma. .<^»| _ ^ 

then be added, 

GTE sad it would weak with esdsting oiiertaimMnt .m 

deliver television programming during the , . 

company plans to develop and : 

SSkSvc programming, starting in northern 

Deere Posts Record Profit rad 

MOLINE, filinois — Deere A Co. on Tuesday opened 





and revalue foritsseccmd quaner, citing soaring.^ 

J189J miffion in IketoKmg 
compared with $21 mfflion a year eariier. Results for 
rrfleca^d a one-time cbaige of $80 mflh<m for a *** 
company’s European operations. • 

Health O Meter to Buy Mr. 

BRJDGEVIEW, Illinois (Bkxnnbera) — Health O Meter 
said Tuesday it had agreed to acquire all the common 
Inc. for $15.50 a share, or $135 million. . 

TTie transaction, subject to amrovai by Mr.. Coffee 
other conditions, is expected to be completed by earty : 

Coffee’s board has approved the transaction, am! die-) 
shareholders, Worth Crap, and Worms * Ox, wbidr 
percent of its stock, have agreed to vote their share* m 
Health O Meter makes scales and equipment, for 

and office uses. Mr. Coffee makes anton^tic drip o _ 

filters, accessories and other kitchen appliances, , 

Germany and U.S. Sign 

BONN fKnight-Ridder) — Germany and die Viated-|iS&S^^ 

the Atlantic. : . ; 

Officials from the United States and Germany said. u flte £ to^i|fe:-.;"j 
would promote fair competition between thewmtries.' fetf^ ^^^ ^-- ; 
years of the so-trailed open-skies agreement, Aegewill bcafieeze^( ^£^ ^ 



-VVfl u wv^mwwvu ywsyi.yvu ■ HI ni A • 

that is due to bqjn next Wednesday^.:,.- 

Boeing Sees $980 Billioh 

PARIS (AFP) —The world market for new airliaers ^B ^e worfit^f ■ - 
billion in the next 20 years, an executive of Boring Co. stud .Tnted^^^- 
The vice president for marketing of the Boeing c^tnroer ckTM r ptew' , '■ • ' 
group, Richard L. James, prelected that carriers would make 
of purchases Lo replace ensimg airliners and would invea'^Gthpoahi ' 


additional planes to cope with an increase in traffic-Boe^.-ttewpiU'Ji 
r« ai “ 


largest manufacturer of airliners, dawns about 60 percent-pf Ihessaiket; - , 

For the Record 


rose to 5.6615 French francs from 

5.6263 and to 1.4140 Swiss francs __ 

from 1.4048. The pound slipped to tnanaains director at Reyn wood 
SI-5060 from 51-5070. Trading Corp.. a Shon Hills. New 

U.S. Trade Representative Jersey-based currency-trading 
Mickey Kan tor said negotiators company. "Erery day l Hear some- 
were beginning talks under guide- one sav the dollar is going higher 
lines aimed increasing Japanese and ^ far it hasn’t."" 
imports of American products and 


American Stores Co. said first-quarter earnings rose 16perceiUas£os- 
reductions more than offset a i 3 percent decline msaks. (Sternberg) 
Merck & Co. announced that Martin Wygod, its wefe chairimn atwt 
chairman of its Medco Ccmiamment Services Inc.' unit had retigued to 
“pursue other interests." ( \ : .-UPX) ' 


Strong Sales Lift Dell Profit , But Derivatives Bite 


services. The breakthrough came 
after five days of meetings in 
Washington. 

With process on trade, the U.S. 
government is considered less like- 


ly to call for a strong yen to curb 
Japan’s trade surplus with the 


Traders said they did not expect 
the dollar to make any big gains 
againsi the yen unlil Japan’s trade 
surplus with the United Stales ac- 
tually starts to shrink. 

“This is a good firsi step." said 
Peter Gloyne. manager of institu- 


United States, a strategy it seemed tional foreign-exchange trading at 
to pursue Iasi year as the dollar First National Sank of Chicago, 
plunged against the yen. “They still have a lot of work to do. 


Bloomberg Business .V> wi 

AUSTIN. Texas — Dell Computer Coip. 
said Tuesday its first-quarter earnings surged 
more than 86 percent aided by strong sales of 
Pentium-based personal computer systems, but 
profit would have been higher if not for losses 
on financial derivatives. 

Net income for the computer company in the 
quaner ended May I rose to S19 million from 
510.2 million in the comparable year-earlier peri- 
od, while sales rose 14 percent to $166.6 million. 

Pentium sy stem sales, which are based on Intel 
Corp.’s top-of-Lhe-line rrncroprocessors. contrib- 


uted about 10 percent of worldwide revenue — a 
1 15 percent jump from the previous quaner. 
Demand for die systems was particularly strong 
in the United States, the company said. 

But Dell said its first-quarter results were 
dented by a S15.6 million charge related to losses 
in trading of imeresL-raie derivatives. The com- 
pany also took a 5 10.7 million charge for declines 
in the market value of certain investments be- 
cause of interest-rate movements. 

The company said it had derided to reduce 
its level of exposure in the derivatives market 
and not invest m such instruments in the future. 


Dell has dosed more than half of its investment 
derivative portfolio, has taken steps to limit 
further exposure, the company said. 

Dell joins a growing list of companies whose 
bottom lines were eaten into by derivatives 
losses. That list includes Procter# Gamble Co M 
Gibson Greetings Inc., Mead Coip. rad Air 
Products & Chemicals Inc. 

“We deeply regret that our strong operating 
improvements have not been fully realized in net 
income because of charges related to interest- 
rale derivatives and investments.” said Michael 
S. Dell, the chairman of the company said. 


BASF to Cut Personnel 


V . *\ T . 


nancia! officer, sa& BASF ' ] 
LUDWIGSHAFEN, Ger- would abolish wag^ prenriums 
many — BASF AG, the Ger- for long service anfciso^aap: - 
man chemicals company, an- fully paid holidays 
nounced Tuesday job cuts and a are about to retire. He a£^s®v 
sharp reduction in special bene - ' that wage scales would l 

fits to company workers. ed to performance. • .1^; 

The company said that staff Mr. Kley said BASF hadi 
levds at the headquarters in spent nearly 1,1. bjllion Peut^ 
Ludwigshafen would be re- - sche marics ($665.‘ni3Bon) 
duced to 42,000 early next year, fecial benefits to staff in 1993;' 
from 45J500 at the end of 1993. u said these costs had to bt 5 
Max Dietrich KJey, chief fi- reduced. . - r - : 


Mi? r 

Prof 


’nr--' 
•r 


PLC. 

Ml- f Li ' 

prfCfni 

ar,d o*-« r 
Milk* 
wr; 

d,iihu¥ *■ 
anjnoB’ 
ed Si.u-> : 
mitt ,y : 
lT! 2 }’• f 
afcch V r 
fOOii oSC *■ 

The 

fcwr-er ‘ 

2131: 3flC ’■ 

IhthiBi 
pas.*i'- 1 
nh'tr thr 
said ii r ;j: 
a&wo'f' 
espar.*t.'"- 


0E( 


VIE'-Va 
C ooperj:- : 

gJK.tU.-w-. 

said ii 
iwiir: -r. 
"laiiii" 

rcces5H>- 7 . 
te-iSE ' 


w@^y 


Ayence trance Prvuc Mo;. I* 
Go«fPra». 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 

6i30 

*180 

Amer-Vhiyma 

138 

139 

ACF Holding 

45.10 


Enso-Gutlrll 


*1» 


9*.10 


Huhlamaki 

220 

224 


47X0 


K.0P. 

12At 

1:® 


209® 21270 


U0 

1H 

AMEV 

75® 

7490 


IX! 

IW 

Bofe-ttfettanen 

39.90 

40.10 

Ncfcla 

jju 

4J7 

CSM 

6620 

*7® 


w 

H* 

DSM 

132® IM® 

Repola 

97® 

V9.® 

Elsevier 

175X0 



240 

242 

Fafcker 

16J0 

16® 



Gist-Brocades 


315 

Preview : 1879.49 



Helneken 

227® 229.40 





Hooaovens 
Hunter Dallas 
IHC Colond 
Inter Mueller 
Inn Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 
Nedllovd 
Oce Grinlen 
PuMwed 
PMIlBS 
Polygram 

Bahaaa 

nUULLD 

Rjodamco 
Rollnco 
Rorenta 
Ravel Duidi 
Shirk 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 


7240 73J0 

76 77 JO 
40 JO 41 JO 

B5 fl-LM 
7410 7490 

50.90 KZJ0 
49.10 «J0 
77 JO 71L6Q 

77 79 JO 
5250 53J0 
32.70 53JO 
77*0 7BJ0 

12040 120.90 
«LW) MJA 
121 jW 121.R) 
°2J0 92J0 
19970 201 

*150 4850 

191.90 193.78 
54 JO 54.90 

177.43 17? 


WOlters/Kluiner 117^0 1I6J0 


Brussels 


AC Rn 
A rood 
Bar co 

Bekaert 

CockerlH 
Cadepa 
Delholrc 
E led rebel 
CIB 
CBL 
Gevaeri 
Kredletbonk 
Pelrailna 

Powertln 
Roval Beige 
Soc Gen Banaue 


7790 7190 
5050 SIX 
7510 2515 
77525 28000 
195 1?7 

5940 5960 
1374 1I7S 
5970 6(W) 
1*00 1535 

4S30 4535 
99*0 99*0 
7000 n»0 
11225 11)75 
3430 3480 
5690 5700 
84*0 8-MO 


Soc Gen Belalaue 2545 2CT 
Soflna 15550 ISfiCO 

Sohav 1*325 i*4Da 

Trodrtel 10425 1D475 

UCB 25175 25300 

Union Mlnlere 272D 2730 
Currant Stock Index : 7907 JS 


LIN icm JIULA nwc 

previous i 7V2X53 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alltaru Hold 
Allana 
Aska 
BASF 

Borer 

Bov. Hypo bank 
Bov VerelrtsUc 
BBC 

SHF Bank 
BMW 

Commerebanh 

Continental 

Daimler Beru 

Deuussc 

Dt Babcock 

Deutsche Bank 

Douglas 

Drwaner Bon* 

FefdmueMe 

F Krupp naescti 

H eraener 

Henkel 

Hocnnef 

HoatdKl 

Hoiemonn 

Horten 

IWK A 

Kail SaU 

Karstaat 

Kauffief 

KHD 

Khieckncr Werke 
Undo 
Lullhama 
MAN 

Mannesmonn 
Metpllgeseil 
Muencti Ruecfc 
Poridw 
Preussoc 
PWa 
RWE 

Rheinmeio'l 
Scheiina 
SEL 

Siemens 
Tiwssen 
Varta 
Veba 
VEW 
vias 

Voikswooen 
WHia 


194 50 195 J0 
2509 25*5 
*47 JO *48 
950 7B0 

324 32" 

373.70384^0 
428 441 

45547250 
730 ns 
410 412 

901 919 

35&50342JO 
279282J0 
854 B77 

524 530 

244 2S8J0 
75D.ID7*3J0 
590 5*2 

38450 408 

348 348 

228 235 

3453515D 
*3150 *39 

10*5 1098 
35150 J57 

875 870 

249 257 

414419J0 
151 151 

(056*650 
532 545 
UD 147 
1*3 I** 

929 9* 

19719950 
4414SL20 
44a 4*3 

260764.80 
SM 3)10 
BIB 840 

4*95049250 

24)50 243 
45950 473 

377 348 

1092 1125 
387 400 
7075072230 
TW.50 303 
339 343 

54054*56 
38750 190 


4*420 
511 JO 
973 


47ft 

S27 

975 




FAZ index : as.ii 

Prwloui ! ur ‘ 


Helsinki 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia J7J50 3750 
Camay PocHIc 11.10 11.40 
■Cheung Kong 3850 3950 
China Llghl pwt *225 -mo 
Dbirv Farm Inl'l 11.40 |)J0 
Hons Lung Dev ll"0 119C 
Hong Seng Bank 5* $7 

Henderson Lana 4150 4150 
HK Air Eng. *4.25 4S 
hk China Cos 1*J0 14J& 
HK EleOrlc 2J.°0 3450 
HK Land 23.1 a 2350 

HK Realiv Trust 21.70 2270 
HSBC Holdings 90 91 JO 
HKShangHtlj 1250 1253 
HK Telecomm 1550 1550 
Hr. Ferry 13 17.70 

Hutch Whampoa 32J5 3250 
Hv^anDev 24 JO 24*0 

Jordlne Math. 6050 *1 

J Or dine Sir Hid 3050 11 

Kowloon Motor 1L2» 15.9J 
Mandarin Or ler.l 11 JO 11.M 
Miramar Holel 2250 ZL’O 
New World Dev 25S-1 :* 

SHK Prcws 52 1250 

Shtlujc 355 3.60 

Swire Pac A 59 53 

Tal Chewm Pros 11*0 1150 
TVE 3J0 :.S) 

Wharf Hold 3150 31.75 
VTIng On Co tnll 12.1C 12Jt 
Wlnsorlnd. '2 12.10 


Hang Sena Index : 9490.1 1 
Previous : 9589 JB 


To Our Readers 

Johannesburg slock 
prices were not avail- 
able for this edition 
because of technical 
problems. 


London 


Abbey Nan 

4® 

410 




Ar|a Wlggire 


2X1 

Argvll Grain 


ISO 

Ass Brtt Foods 


5XS 

3AA 


9.62 


425 

47S 


1X1 

1X4 


5.40 

5 47 


5.18 

5® 


4X4 

43* 

SET 

IJ1 

1® 

Slue Circle 

3.05 

304 

SDC Group 


7X5 


S2B 

S.« 

Sowoter 

4® 

4X5 

3P 

4X1 

3.96 


3X8 

ISO 

3rll Gas 

2X5 

2X5 

SrltSleei 



Srll Telecom 

3X5 

386 

3TR 

691 

195 

liable Wire 

4® 

1.70 

-Od burs - Sot 

4.90 

4.93 

la rotten 

128 

130 

loots Vivrllo 

229 

229 

:6mm Union 

5® 

1*3 

lOUrtnulds 

526 

SJ0 

ECC Group 


448 


4.17 

422 


16* 

2/4) 

-Isons 

1.40 

137 


225 

2.3(1 

SEC 

1.M 

121 

3«11 ACC 

S-5* 

sx» 


5® 

545 


4J1 

453 

;re 

1X5 

1® 

atllnneu 

487 

+88 

3US 

614 

6.12 

-lansofi 

661 

7.64 

-Hllscirtni 

1® 

1J1 

95BC HWtfS 

7.72 

770 

ICl 

820 

619 



Clos# Prov. 


5 

5.22 

Klnollsher 

5X7 

iJi 


1.75 

ua 


6.60 

4.7(1 


7X1 



1X4 



436 


L'rfsvds 9on> 

5® 

1.** 

Mor Its So 

4.13 

425 

ME PC 

- -5+ 


Nan Pow^r 

4.20 

■Ml 


ts 

■J'l 

NtnWsI Water 

5.19 


Pearson 

*J5 

6® 

P 60 

6X2 


Pllklnglon 

7X8 


=owertSen 

481 

4X6 


295 

69< 


4.06 

417 


5.03 

5.10 

Reed Inil 

1+4 

67* 

Reuters 

473 



9 0S 



ixe 

1.90 

Rofhmn lunill 

3.78 

EJ 

ROYdl Scot 

411 

■un 

RT2 

6X5 

6*6 


3.97 

J.Vi 

Scot Newcas 

5® 

5.40 


3X0 

3*8 


127 


Severn Trenl 

Sl» 

5JJY 


7 32 

7X5 


5.48 

5X3 

Smith Neahew 

1® 

1x2 

Smith Kline B 

4.02 

4X4 

Smith tWH) 

4.9* 

5.04 

Sun Alliance 

113 

BUI 


4X2 

Efq 


220 

tl 

Thorn EMI 

10.70 

10.9: 

Tomkins 

2X8 


T5B Group 

120 

221 

Unilever 

1607 


U'd Biscuits 

3X0 

7X6 


5.32 

5J6 

Wor Loan 3'^ 


*4X8 

Wellcome 

5*1 


whllBreod 

5X2 

5® 

Williams HOPS 

3*8 

121 

Willis CtWTOOn 

1.79 


F.T. 36 Hides : 

W4J20 




F.TX.E. 100 index : 3087.1(1 

Previous : 3108*0 



Madrid 


BBV.' 

7275 

■U00 

BcdCenlroi Hlso 



Bonca Sen lander 

*110 

*150 

Banes' a 



CEPjA 



Drag ados 



Enaeja 


o77D 

Ercras 



laerara'a 



P6B50J 



TaCdtslcro 



telelcnico 

7*1' 

■=30 


52E. General Indu : 33556 
Previous : 338J4 


I Milan 


Banco Comm 

5550 

5490 

B as fog: 

184 

1&J 



CIP 

27£S 

E3 

Creo iiai 

2545 

fcL.-J 

Eniehem 

3138 

»to 

Ferlin 

2125 

2115 

rerflti SI5R 

I3TV 

1340 

Flat SPA 

*875 

5700 

Finmeccanica 

2075 

2138 

Generali 

46*00 46100 

IFI 

2**S0 


llaiccm 


iiatgcc 


EikJ- 

1 lot mobi Hare 

II, . T ' 1 

Mediobanca 

I: -XT.-ll 

Mlris loo Ison 

■ nil 

■^\IEi 

Olivetti 



Pirelli 

B.* l-M 


RAS 



ir^Trii 



42DQ 

San Paolo Torino 10490 10*50 

SIP 

4J70 

mo 

5ME 

3850 

38*5 

5nl0 

2495 

2*90 

Slanda 

.in:. 11 

5 tel 

'1 

Eli® 

Toro Alii RImj 


MIB Index : 1119 
Previous : 1234 



Montreal 


Alcan Aluminum 

3D+ 

31'- 

Bank Montreal 

25*5 

26 

Bell Canada 

43'.'. 

48', 

Bombardier S 

ro»» 

70': 

Cam b lor 

19'A 

19", 

Cascades 

8=C 


Dominion Tot A 

6 A? 

0*. 

DanotvjeA 

17^ 

12V: 

MacMillan 81 

181T 

IF* 

Natl Bk Canada 

•lx 



70V* 

21". 

Quebec Tei 

23*n 

23*. 


19'.1i 

19‘i 

Duebecor B 



Teleglobe 

1BH. 

109% 

Unlvn 

6^ 

6 

Vldeotran 

14’4 

14V- 

Indosiriais index 
Prertous ; 1911X4 

1901® j 


Paris 


Accor 

750 

759 

Air Ltaulde 

813 

822 

Alcatel Alsihgm 

*43 

6*2 

A.«e 

134* 

1385 


579 

5W9 

QIC 

1249 

1260 

BNP 

26»x0 

2t» 


66D 

66* 

ESN-GD 

073 

IW 

Carre four 

1°96 

2010 

C-CF. 

233 

Zil 

Cerus 

114X0 11470 

Char gears 

1*32 

M80 

Clmen la Franc 

331 

XW 

Clito Med 

*35 433.10 

E If- Aquitaine 

426X0 427® 

Ell- 3a nail 

953 

"*8 

Euro Disney 

34® 

33.711 


2*75 


Havas 

4*2 

4*5 

!me:al 

58) 

i«6 

Lafarge Coppee 

*3140 

439 

Lcgrand 

6650 

6J80 

Lvon. Eaux 

588 

V»l 

Oreal IL - ) 

1233 

1241 

UVXAH 

89* 

IN8 

Mntra-Hactrette 


Michel In B 


Moulinex 

137 JO 

NA 

PnrlMre 

*1680 

424 

Pechlney inil 

164® 

IU 

Pernod-Ricnrd 

J91 

3VD 

Peogea* 

848 

855 


938 

934 

Rad fate chnlaue 

550 

572 

Rh-Poulenc A 

147.10 1*8.50 


1726 

1727 


937 

938 

Salnl Gobain 

693 

695 

5.E^. 

550 

576 

Ste Genercle 

633 

641 

Sue* 

30"® 317® 

Thom ran- CSF 

18690 

181 

Total 

327® J25.70 

UjA.P. 

154.90 155X0 

valeo 

13*5 

1389 


Previous : 21SS.43 


Sao Paulo 


Bo-ic* ea Brasil 

Bcn-saa 

Brsdesco 

Brahma 

Parana aa nemo 

Pelrobros 

Teiebras 

.'ala Rio Dace 

vcrlo 


27. » 27.10 
7555 1451 
25J0 3 

400 410 

7950 295D 
171 172 

«L« 5755 
15150 1*4 


171 170 


Singapore 


Cerebos 

B® 

670 

Cit/ Dev. 

780 

7® 

DBS 

11® 

11® 

Fraser Neave 

18X0 

1670 

Gent Ing 

18.10 

IB 

Goufen Hone PI 

2X0 

2X* 

Haw Par 

354 

354 

Hume industries 

5X0 

5.60 

Inch cape 

5X0 

5.9S 

Kecael 

10® 

10® 

KLKnang 

un 

3.10 

Lum Chang 

1® 

1® 

Malayan Bankg 

6® 

0.90 

OCBC 

11® 

n® 

OUB 

7® 

7® 

OUE 

6® 

675 

Semtenwna 

13 

13® 

Shargrlta 

5X5 

US 

SI me Parti/ 

3® 

1® 

51 A 

7® 

7® 

Sfaere Land 

7® 

7® 

S'aare Press 

15 

14® 

5 Inc Sioamshlp 

4® 

4JB 

S'pore Telecomm 

3® 

15* 

5 Trails Trading 

a® 

U0 

UOB 

10x0 

10-40 

UOL 

119 

2X0 

straits Times lad. 

: 2302X6 

PmlOus : 2339® 




Stockholm 

AGA 
AMO A 
Astro A 
Allas Copco 
E lecl r Blur B 
Ericsson 
Esseitt-A 
Handel wanted 
Investor B 
Norsk Hydro 
Procoroia af 
S cmdvlk B 
SCA-A 
S-E Banken 
SkandlaF 
Si cans a 
5KF 
Slorn 

Trefieborg BF 
Volvo 


24924950 
12S 126 
124 12* 
124 123 
S3 5350 
1» 131 


AhtoersvacrJden : 194121 
ProvHias ; 1933.99 


| Close Prav. | 

Sydney 



9X6 

9X5 

ANZ 

+Jt6 

JJ2 


I6e* 

13J6 


670 

1*7 

Bougainville 

0® 

0® 

Cotes Mver 

4X8 

444 

Camafca 

i*5 

5.49 

CRA 

16111 

10.1* 

C5R 

5X9 

5.12 

Fosters Brew 

1.1* 

1.16 

Goodman Field 

1.40 


ICl Australia 

11.10 

10.94 


UB 



L33 

3X7 

Not Aust Bank 

IA|B( 

12X2 





4.V0 

4X2 

N Broken HIM 

J-52 

3-53 


4.M 

4AB 


L0* 

3.05 

Nmndv Poseidon 

2X7 

2X7 


1X2 



A02 

-L07 

TNT 

2X6 

2X9 

Western Mining 

617 

8 


5 

5 

woods kte 

4® 

4 39 

All ardhrarkslndex ; 2132® 
Previous : 2121® 

| Tokyo 


Akal Electr 

475 

470 

Asahl Cham leal 

782 

771 


1220 


Bonk of Tokyo 

1690 


Bridges lone 

1550 



1700 


Casto 

1280 


Dal Nippon Print 

■1*1 


Dalwo House 

Eli'] 



1701 

KFH1 

Fanuc 

4250 

4270 

Full Bank 

2380 

2400 

Full Photo 

2180 

2230 


1048 

1040 

Hitachi 

1018 

111 

Hitachi Cable 

825 

es 

Hot aa 

1870 

1780 

Ito Y ok ado 

5300 

5400 

Hochu 

713 

70S 

Japan Airlines 

713 

710 

Kallmo 

951 

952 

Kansal Power 


7630 

Kawasaki Steel 

3?9 

401 

t.lriri Brewery 

1230 

1240 

Komoisij 

980 

967 

Kubola 

700 

6® 

Kyocera 

*430 

r-|) 

Aiatsu Elec inds 

1750 

lirjl 

Matsu Elec mj 


lihll 

MllsuMshl Bk 

2790 


Mitsubishi Kasol 



Mitsubishi Elec 

639 

636 

Mitsubishi Hbv 

715 

714 

Mitsubishi Cora 

1200 

1180 

Mitsui and Co 

797 

7B7 

fAtlMlKOStll 

Mirsumt 

l#ft 

1^ 

NEC 

1180 


NCK Insukdors 

I12D 

HID 

Nivko Securlilcs 

1290 

1290 

Nippon ktoooku 

1000 

995 


756 

748 

Nippon Sled 

368 

3ft" 

Nippon Yusen 



Nissan 



Nomura Sec 

2-1*9 

2340 

NTT 


Olympus Optical 

1090 


Pioneer 

2910 


Ricoh 

913 

"04 

Sanyo Elec 

533 


Snare 

1*00 

1490 

Shlmazu 

-Di 


Shlnetsu Qiem 



Sony 

tkrl 


Sumllomo Bk 



Sumltoma Chem 

503 


5uml Marine 

V« 

m 

Sumitomo Metal 

29ft 

299 

label Cora 

697 

700 

Talsho Marine 

8*0 

863 

TakedaOtem 

1250 


TDK 

4*30 

4400 

Tellln 


SI* 

I ok vo Marine 

1340 

1340 

Tokyo Elec Pm 

J2W 

i "all 

Toapan Printing 

1410 

bull 

Tor ay ind. 

697 

495 

Toshiba 

79ft 

SCO 

Toyota 

2090 

2030 

vamalcni Sec 
a: k IM 

Nikkei 22S 1 20422 

096 

BS9 

Preykws: 285*9 
Topbttodw : 1*54 



Prey ic as : 165* 



Toronto 


Abttlbt Price 

17VS 

17 


14W. 


Air Canada 

6» 

*=» 

Alberta Energy 

71% 

31 'A 

Am BdiTtCk R*s 

3336 

3*>g 

BCE 

av* 

O’A 

Bk Nova Scotia 

27Vj 

2TA 

BC Cos 

IS' A 

15«. 


2SV> 

TS'Y 

BF Realty Hds 

N.U. 

ora 


0® 

0x1 


TQV% 

»H 

CAE 

7 

7v» 


5 

5V» 

CffiC 

3054 


Canadian Pocttlc 

2i*s 

22 


Con Tire A 
Cantor 
Cara 

CCLIndB 
Clneole* 

Com Inca 

Conww! E»ol 
Denison Min B 
Dofasce 
Drier A 
Echo Bar Mines 
Equity Sliver A 
FCA Inn 
Fed Ind A 
Fletcher Chall a 
FPI 
Genira 
GulfCda Res 
Hees Inti 
Hwnlo GPi Mines I2>e 12V. 
Hoi linger 15V: 15V: 

Horsham 

Hudson's boy 
I masco 
Inca 

Inlerwov pine 
Jannodc 


Close Prev. 

12--D 12W 
:)<•.’ 2i l l 
4.10 4.15 
9 9'« 

450 430 
TP* 23'i 
22 22'S 
OH'. 0.04 
70': 20 

aw aw 

IPi 15** 
055 055 
355 155 
*AS *’+ 
IB’S 19 
*'i *vt 
QM 0.47 
4^ 4i» 

UV» 15 


Laban 
LoWaw Co 
Mackenzie 
Maana Inil A 
Maple Leal 
Marl time 
Mark Rea 
Mo Ison A 
Noma ind A 
Noranda Inc 
Noranda Fores) 
Norcen Energy 
Nihem Telecam 
Nova Carp 
Oshawa 
Posurin A 
Placer Dome 
Poco Petroleum 
PWA Cora 
Rov rock 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 

lommoio 
Roval Bank Can 
Sceoire Res 
Scott's Haso 
Seagram 
Sears Con 
Shell Can 
Snerrlll Gordon 
SHL 5vstemhse 
5ouifMm 
Soar Aeresooce 
Slnlca a 
T alisman Energ 
Teck B 

Thomson Carp. 
Toronto Damn 
Torstar B 
TransOlla Uf II 
T raraCda Pipe 
Triton Finl a 
T rlmac 
Trt7PC A 
Unicorn Energv 


l«*4 J9»» 
31V: 314? 

36 L. 3&VB 

r 3 *t* 

30V: 30Vz 
lftv> IB'l 
21 21 1* 
237s 23 s * 
9^9 919 

*2 59 U. 
12Ve 12'T 
24* 241s 

23W. 23 

9* 5i» 

77'* 2iT* 
13'lc 13 

144*. 15 

4T)S *3'^ 
N.O. 11 '.4 
20H> 20 

3A5 LoO 
31*S 32Vs 
10'A HP** 
N.C. 052 
195+ 16 

SO 1 *. 3016 
19"; 19*m 
79 DO 
271m 77^i 
121S NJ3. 
ftl^ 8*9 
41 N.Q. 
7Hj 7W 
44 

11V> Ills 

T-b 9>m 

19*3 19 

16** 16*« 
B’rs B's 
271* 39 

TPA 0S“» 
16** 1*»» 
21Vs 21 S. 
74‘/z 241. 
M'S IS 
17>^ 17*1 
i. *0 4J5 
15V, IP* 
OJ7 PJ3 
I5S NjQ. 


V*a Ansdm! ’’rest 


May 24 


Season Season 
High Lew 


Open rt-an Law Close Cho OpJnt 


Grains 


1 0**1 9.995 
33+',— OM'i 7B9 
14* -0.0S 
320 -0.07 


297 Jul >4 

1X1 

3X5!y 

3JI 

131 Vr — 0.04'i 

13,108 

lOJv-.SeD^ 

3 IS 

139'i 

US 

JJTi-flJIt 

4JB 

112 Vi DK *4 

H2”i 

3J6': 

14V * 


443* 

3X5 Mares 345 

3^9' « 

345 

345 — tLOTS 

509 

3JV.yMav95 




340 — aosvj 

17 

122': All 95 




134 -001 

12 


evious : 429BJ8 


Zurich 


Adla Inti B 241 251 

Alusuteso a new 470 *82 

SAC Brwn Bov B 130* 12*9 

“ aas 900 


Clba Gelgv b 
C 5 Holdings B 
Eieklrow B 
Fischer 8 
Interdlseeunl B 
Jelmall B 
LancfliGvr n 
Maevenolek b 
N estle R 
Oerllk-BuetirleR 
Porgesa Hid B 
Roche Hdg PC 
Sa»ro Reouutlc 
Sandoc B 
5chlndler B 
Sutler PC 
Surveillance B 
Swiss Bn* Coro B 
Swiss Relnstir P 
SwtealrR 
UBS B 
Winierthur B 
Zurich Ass 0 


SBS.nde^^e 


*0* *20 

36) 3*0 

1475 1480 
21S0 2150 
8*5 845 

m 914 
420 420 

Ilia 1137 
147 149 

1650 1*95 
6570 *655 
132 NA 
NA 741 
0700 8*00 
933 947 

2120 2120 

398 408 

578 588 

764 765 

M60 1174 
700 710 
1340 13*5 


Previous : 


H's easy to subscribe 


jarfcai tofl-free: 
0 800 1 7538 


WHEAT (CBOT) Li^eii Ptrr-am 

3J4 L»* Jul 94 J* US 129 3J9^_iC7 TJ1 

If, 3.1); 5«P*4 3J4 't 140-1 )3l! 3J5*i— r,SS>* IASS 

La5 109 C« 14 148 TS1'. 144 - : 14." 

357 127 Mar 95 150 : 155 3Ju r 

US Ui'^Mav »5 XSQ’T UD'- 14o 

1X2'* 311 Jul‘5 in 1Z US 
Esl sales ha IAm's Mies 1BJ9I 
.Man's cnen in 47.114 vs 30*7 
WHEAT (KBOT) 

355 - - 

355' 

1*0 
353 
3J4 

3J3 , 

Est solas NA Man's, soles LOT 
Mian's open ufl ZL*TS ho 76~ 

CORN (CBOT] JJMDuimnVnum- OBiinn o»r PWibI 
3.1*15 2.41 Jul 91 256 170 146 1 ., 257'«— 008 129,34* 

252' 2.«WSeP«4 255 257^ 2.83'n 2.*4"j-0Jirw 3*530 

2J»WDeC94 25T1 16:"i TSTa 258 V,— 0JIH 87541 

2A6V,Mor9f L*3>': 169 2.43V- US'*— AM 1XU2 

153 MOV "4 UOH 2.73 v* 2595: 259Vj_007W UK2 

254 Ju< 95 170 174 2JB 171 —QETit 1*55 

. . 2 jO Dee 6 5 250 75* 250 252 'S — H01 V< 2551 

Esl. SUES NA MorTs-saes 89JW 
Lion's open In 2*7 M b uo &7M 
SOYBEANS I CBOT) S5nbu+«inwm-aii6artiwriugKl 

~ 6.95 — 0J7V* 68503 

6J1*A— 0J7 15.1*9 

a73'4-OJ6’4 8580 
*59 — 0J4V& 5142* 
6M’>- 0.H’i 4400 
*49 -033'<. I.94S 
6.70 — 0J2VS IJ23 
*70 V,— OJTUi 974 
«J0 -0.14 1525 


2JTV, 

2.79W 

UC 

283’,. 

258’v 




7.10 

7.13 

6.93 

?X5 

6X8 

Aug W 

4.98 

7X9 

490 Vi 


4.17 

Seo 94 

*J0 

*X9 

473 

7.57 'Y 

iiSViNDV W 

673 

676 

6X7 


All 

Jm»5 

649 

6® 

4M 



Mor 95 t IB 

*84“: 

649 



May "5 *.01 

645 

470 



JU95 


647 



54) V. Ntn. «5 

*X5 

6JT 

4» 

Est. safes NA Man. safes 

848*7 



32339 

210AO 

3OA00 
209 310 
30150 
30350 
19350 
190JDQ 


Man's open i/s 156.253 ua 8*92 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CSOT) 100 wre- dbuors tmr a, 
ygIM 18130 Jut 94 199 JO mao 19*50 I97.*0 -9.90 35,975 

lB5.00Ain94 (99 JO mao 19550 NiW —10.10 16^81 

IBUDSenf* WOO 200 00 194JW 19450 —9.70 9A73 

IBOJDOaM l*?00 17AM I977D 193-20 -940 6-Z39 

178J0Dec94 I9SOO 197 JIO 19150 191.9] -9 A0 18,144 

i7180A»<95 1 75 AO 19740 19150 19150 —1040 I.S29 

141.00 Ma- 95 I9LOO 19100 19350 19350 —KUO IJU 

IB1XOMav95 19740 197.00 17250 I92J) -9J0 301 

_ 18240 Jul 95 19440 19840 191.00 19150 -8-70 254 

Ed. safes NA Mon's. s«*es 39457 
Mon'S open int 89.5 08 un *921 
SOYBEAN Oft. (CBOT) UMUh-Menm Idb 
3082 21 J5JUI 94 29 55 2947 29.10 29JQ 

- - - „ M 7940 W j7 

2955 2875 28.90 

2875 2i00 28.02 

28.15 2745 3749 

27.70 27 JO 27 J3 

7740 2705 17.10 

I7.X3 2AM *L«a 

2-JO 2*70 26.70 


2155 Alia 94 39 *1 
2Z.«5ep9J 29 55 
22.100794 2U0 
7200 Dec 94 an 
2Z*SJnii95 27.65 
2470 Mor 95 7740 
3452 Mov 75 27.IS 

26*5 Jul 95 3695 

SsL safes NA Men's, safes 20.171 
Mv'scHKViinl 1085*4 up *74 


3055 
4U4 
2954 
28.87 
3855 
2fl JO 
TatE 
3755 


—Ml 48.575 
—1.17 15579 
-1J2 1043* 
-141 74IB 
-1 JO 21592 
-IJ1 3438 
—1.15 1439 
—1.15 711 

—1.15 IM 


Livestock 


2187 


>630 

7625 

75.10 

7150 


*SJC 

*630 

W.4S 

7045 

71.42 

*852 


*952 

7140 

*635 


CATTLE (CMEHI «400 Bis- rants bw«> 
7127 *167 Jun 94 *545 *557 *355 

*625 Aug 94 4570 

SABJOrt 94 <610 
*7*0090"* *9J5 
*9 JO Fen 95 *945 

7040 Apr 95 71 Al 

*845 Jun 95 i860 

Esl safes 18458 Mbi'lmIm 22.98* 
Man's open i* 77.184 w> 7020 
rtEOER CATTLE [CMERI lUMbs-m* 
8440 7130 MOV 94 7<J5 7446 ?-LM 

BIB 72J0*ua«4 74M 7622 7340 

81 JO 7250 5ep "4 J385 7645 7J4S 

*1 JS 72J0OO94 74.75 >475 73.15 

1840 7190 Nov 94 7552 7S52 700 

U.95 7115 Jan 94 75*0 75*0 74J0 

*0 J5 7J40 MOT 94 7650 7*55 74 05 

7*85 7150 Apr 9* 

Ed. sum 3418 MOJTS. safes 4.206 
Mon's ope" jrt 14 J85 » 98 
HOGS 

56JT 4527 Jun W »J7 

*U0Jul94 50 DO 
4AJ5 AU0 9* *630 
HflOOef "4 4*45 
410! Dec 94 4510 
JIIOF+O W 4S4H 
40,70 Apr 95 43J0 
4740 Jun 95 «40 

4740 Jul "5 


*197 

*4S7 

*740 

*690 

*940 

71.J0 

«8J5 


—045 34J34 
-050 2247* 
— 0J2 12440 
— 1117 9.14* 
5.197 
-OSS 248* 
— 0.12 505 


7470 

7110 

7342 

7357 

TAX 

74J0 

7445 

7601 


>OJ* 14V 
*BJ8 7.271 
<047 1458 
-647 1453 
-111 1481 
+0J0 521 

•0J0 45 

19 


1 Season Season 





■■ 

High 

Low Open 


Law 

Owe 

Qig 

Op Jrt 

II® 

10® Mar 9* 



1163 

—tun 

39 

Est. safes 367*5 Mai's, safes 11,255 




Mari 13DCT1 hit 124017 up 

31*2 





1 COCOA (NGSE9 *0 







un 



1430 

1020SepW 1477 

1485 

1375 

14B 

-10 19X35 

1419 

■041 Dec 94 1507 

1507 

1422 

1434 

k15 

I . ■ 

14S2 

1877 Mar "5 I5« 

1540 

1455 

MS7 

■SltlL’U 

1470 

1078 May 95 1570 

1570 

1550 

1497 

415 

4.926 

1420 

1225JWI9S 1993 

1573 

1550 

1ST 

+15 

2XTD 

1250 




1532 

♦ 15 

546 

1480 

129BOec9S 1505 


ISM 

1574 

+ U 

9*2 

14C8 

13SO Mar «6 



1*02 

>15 

3 

Ea.stuei 25X40 Mon'S, safes 74973 




I open Inf 07.404 up 2W7 





ORANGE JIRCE (NCTNJ i5JW»a.-«m>wrB. 



73S® 

92JSJUM 93® 

97® 

93® 

9*85 

*2X5 13,9*4 

13450 

95®Scp94 95® 

99J5 

95X0 

99® 

**105 

1453 

13400 

9425 Nov 94 97® 

lea® 

9ft® 

100X5 

DM 

■F.a 

122® 

97® Ain 95 9325 

101® 

98® 


B'.J 

KAZl 

134X5 

njsmrts 99® 

102® 

99® 

102® 

+2X5 

79* 

11425 

100® MOV 95 



104® 

>2X5 


119® 

105.® Jul 95 



IDS® 

♦ 2X5 


111® 

111® Sep 95 



106® 

+2X5 


Est safes 2XW Man's, sotes ijm 





| Men's open inf 22X14 up 







Metals 




HI GRADE COFFER (NCM» 1U00 




iar® 

7360 May V4 10480 

raft® 

IQS® 

106® 

-Q50 

1X9 

106® 

74 « Jun 94 107® 

107® 

105.90 

I05XS 

—<185 

L> 1 

10490 

7420 Jul 94 106® 

107X5 

104® 


diWlI 

10545 

7 490 Sec Vd US® 

105® 

10140 

104X0 

EU 

I' ll 

iauo 

75®OecM 10.10 

103® 

102® 

102® 

—005 

5JD9 

K® 

7490 Jan 95 



102® 










107® 

73®Mdr«5 101® 

101® 

101® 

101® 

+ 0X5 

1084 

100® 






9470 

78® Jul »S 100® 

100® 

100® 

100® 

+0LAS 

635 

105® 

7SJDAUS95 



10490 

-0® 


98® 

79.10 Sep 95 



100® 

+ 0X5 


92X0 

75X0 Od 95 



103® 

—0X5 


92® 

77® Nav 95 



103® 

-0.15 


99® 

88®Dec9S 99® 

99® 

99® 

99® 


592 

9LBS 

88® Jon 9* 



99® 



92X5 

*2® Mar« 



99® 



94® 

91.10 Apr 96 



701® 



Ed. fete, 14®0 Men's, sffes 12X23 




Man's open tot 62X45 oft 230 





SR.VE3 




582.0 

37IXMnv« S53JJ 

50M 

562-5 

559X 

—1*4 

129 

5&aa 

51 45 Jun 9i 



557.9 

—1*5 








590-5 

1745 Sea 94 571.0 

5805 

XIX 

5*76 


577.0 

MHO Dec 04 5040 



S7U 


5*40 

40L8JO19S 



S77X 



*040 

4l65Mar9S 5935 

5915 

577 J) 

5817 

—1*5 

1*51 

*045 

4180 May 95 55-5 0 

402jD 

5940 

509X 

—l*i 


*100 

42011 Jul 95 590.0 

SSOJ 

WJJ 

S95X 



4150 

4710 Sep 95 



*0IJ 




539 A Dec 75 620.0 







Joi» 



*141 



*180 

5800 Mar 9* 



*J1X 

— I7J 






I Mai’s open M 128.135 up 7987 





1 PLATINUM ItMBU Sllrnv 




437® 

357® Jul 94 412® 

41100 

40*60 

«7® 

-180 17J72 

435® 

360® 04 94 415® 

415® 

407® 


-3® 

4.187 1 


374.80 Jen 95 415® 

415® 

414® 

Er^B 



43B.0Q 

390® Am 95 <17® 

417® 

41*00 

414® 


I'll 

Est. safes NA. ftftan’s. safes 






MarTs ojusi tot 21672 up 1380 





GOLD 

NCMX) tm me, ox.- mumper 





39260 

378® May W 



387.10 

-2® 


417® 

337® JUH 94 38870 

309.10 

385® 

387® 



Jto« 



388® 

—2® 


415® 

341® Aug 94 391® 

391.00 

301® 

390® 




395® 


FT7T7B 



42*® 

343® Dec 94 398® 

397® 

■IrV'l 



411® 

3(3® Feb 95 401® 

401® 






3*4® Apr 95 







XI® Jun 95 489® 

407® 

409® 

607® 




3BL50 Aug9S 













429® 

400® Dec *5 430® 







412® Feb 7* 



*7\M 



Efe. safes HUN Men's, sain 64900 




1 Mon's open Lrt 155.V5J up 3A64 






S5J7 

n« 

47 JS 
5050 
5040 
4880 

nja 

4695 


ilJM 
*7 DO 
59 JO 
*1.74 
M.WJ 
51 JO 
50.10 


4240 MOV 94 . 

39J0 JUlM *35 


39. 10 PH) « »37 

3840 Mar 94 SI JO 

jiaw 1 ”. 

S.Mks J ' 91 ° 

Atei'sopenW up SB 


4947 

4B.I5 

4123 

-X® 10X83 



<L80 

— 1.11 


48X5 

47.12 

47® 

—1.12 

4X72 

44® 


-CL57 

-4L80 

2X42 

4510 

44® 

1457 

-11*5 

IM 



4442 

-0X3 

*11 

43® 

fill 

<3X2 

-0.48 

286 

48® 

48® 

«® 

-0X3 




<7.90 

—0® 

S 

*520 





mm.- 


Kh. 





54® 

-0® 

29 

4540 

4140 

41® 

-2® 

5®i 

4Mjn 

cm 

4205 


1,950 





257 

si.n 

SI® 



24 



54® 


1 



S2XS 


3 


Financial 

US T. DLLS (CMBR) SitnOlan - bhm iflOnd. 


9*7* 

7*2* Jun 94 

91*1 

9ftM 

91*1 

91*3 

7*48 

9462 Sen 94 

9105 

9111 

9S4B 

9108 

9*10 

9425 Dec 94 

94*0 

74*5 

9440 

94*1 

954)5 

9190 Mcr 95 

943* 

94 42 

9436 

94® 

Esl. sates 

NA Man's, udes 

>0.755 



Man's opened 41,920 

Off 197 




«D41 18.398 
-042 15475 
-041 7425 
*042 322 


Food 


rrr r rr c INOL) t ia in - c+h wi o 

«Sj3S 14440 14150 17640 133.10 -595 26027 

” SSS)9< 111 JO 141 M 1»00 13695 -SJO IL219 
TTlAteoM 137 J5 IF. 75 1CL22 12743 —380 10437 

nMMdli 13600 13600 12240 12SJS -33S SJH 

S™Sav9S1JU5 13125 U600 17440 -IM — 

ggjJfoS 13100 13100 13000 17340 —174 

■oinifeDlS 11240 — 3.00 

^^9JSJ|l*4 11-15 'HS 11 

- — 11® 

17.00 
11.95 


13*40 

13125 

>2040 

17725 

12340 

12540 


17® 

I7J9 

1241 

11.94 

US? 

11 ® 


9J20C1 «* 1LM 
9.I7MW« •>•** 
1DJ7MOV 95 11.94 

>0J7X*n ,, m 

UL5/OCI95 >1-70 


1700 

I1J9 

1141 


ll.il) 11.70 


11.93 
12.12 
11® 
IIJ7 
11.75 
1 1.1* 


—074 49J33 

-020 49439 

—015 71454 
—012 3400 
-4)43 MI5 
-443 Ml 


SYH.TOe*MIY tenon nnmnw-wsaMiMiaH 

Am 9*104-305 105-0* 104-Z75 lDS-SO- 035 1*0478 
5«) 94 704-0/ 104-11 104-07 IO4-0S* 035 nm 
102-01 101-26 Dec94 103-17 , 04 

Est. sates NA Man's, sales 5443a 9 

Mm's open tnt IS341* off 4432 
HYR. TREASURY (CBOT) mw H ta. l >,*Mil W)pa 
115-21 102-10 JIP194 104-39 105-12 104-25 105-03 - 09 21SJI7B 

MS-01 101- IB SeoM 103-28 104-10 1 ID-23 iSTS * - 

114-21 100-25 Doc 94 1(0-00 103-12 182-X 1(0-07 * 

111-07 100-05 Mar 95 102-17 - 

IK-22 99-20 JunTS 1040 * 

Esi. soles NA Man’s, safes 93,188 
Men’s gocn W 744J55 an 1442] 

US TREASURY BONDS 


52482 

1.119 

55 

1 




Season Season 

H*m Low 


Open Mah low Close Os OpW 


Mon's open M 2JTS.143 afl 1177* 

BRITISH POUND ICMER) l>*rcounp- IkjwwmABJOJ) 
ism 14*74 Jun 94 l®m 1J088 1JD4 I3J48 — M+CK8 


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34 AM 
1375 
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112- 15 99® Sep "5 00-2? r 

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264® 237.1 5 Dec 9* 25X88 2SUfi 20® *jj® 

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* * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 



Page 1 


Pa«e “ 


EUROPI 


Music Soothes 
Disappoinment 
In Thom Profit 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatch™ 

LONDON — Thorn EMI PLC 
reported on Tuesday »caker-ihan- 


expected profit for its latest frnan- 
r. but it said its music busi- 


cial year 

ness was performing uelL 

The music and electrical- equip- 
■meni giant reported pretax profit 
of £326 5 million ($493 million) for 
the year ended March 31. a rise of 
19 percent from the previous year. 

Analysts had forecast higher pre- 
tax profit of £339 million to £360 
million. Sales were down 4 percent, 
to £4.29 billion. 

Chairman Sir Colin Southgate 
■said the results “revealed strong per- 
formances from the music, rental 


Marks & Spencer 

Profit at Record 


Compiled by Our Staff From JDupadia 

LONDON — Marks & Spencer 
■PLC, the largest retailer in Britain, 
-said Tuesday profit rose nearly 16 
percent last year as cost-cutting 
and overseas expansion payed off. 

Maries & Spencer, whose opera- 
tions indude the chain of food and 
clothing department stores in Brii- 
ain and Brooks Brothers in the Unit- 
ed States, posted a record pretax 
proGt of £851.5 million (SI billion) 
on a 10 percent increase in sales, 
which woe £654 billion- Sales of 
food and clothing led the g?mg- 

The earnings were bdd back, 
however, by total of £275 billion in 
one-time charges for a pension pro- 
gram and the rale of satellite stores. 
The charges look investors by sur- 
prise, and the company’s shares fell 
more than 2 percent The company 
said it planned to spend about £1 
billion over the next three years on 
expansion. 

( Bloomberg. Reuters) 


and music-retailing businesses and 
good progress in Lht divestment of 
nonstraiegic businesses.” 

Sir Colin said operating profit 
iose 22 percent, to £382.4 million, 
for the principal businesses, and 
that carrungs- per-share rose to 47.7 
pence From 4? pence. 

Thom's shares closed Tuesday at 
1.096 pence on the London Slock 
Exchange, down If pence. 

Thom EMI's music business, 
which includes ihe Capital, Virgin 
and New York record labels, in- 
creased its earnings by 25 percent, to 
£246. 1 million. Those earnings, ana- 
lysts said, highlighted the company's 
growing strength in an industry that 
is increasingly focused on sophisti- 
cated electronic systems. 

“The opportunities are huge, be- 
cause as all of these new mnliums 
come oul they will provide Thom 
EMI with new ways to make mon- 
ey,” said Nigel Reed, an analyst at 
Paribas Capital Markets. 

“Also, the son of people who will 
be able to afford these new techno- 
logical toys will be of the age to 
know most of the groups in EMI's 
back-catalog.” Mr. Reed added 
Among oilier stars. Thom EMI's 
back catalog includes recordings by 
The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. 

Thom has been selling its elec- 
tronics and lighting businesses to 
concentrate on recorded music and 
music retailing. The company's 
chain of record stores. HMV, in- 
creased its operating profit to £6.) 
million, helped by on increase in 
sales of 25 percenlio £403.9 million. 

Thom EMI said the overall re- 
sults reflected strong demand for 
records by Frank Sinatra, the Roll- 
ing Stones, Janet Jackson, Diana 
Ross, Kate Bush. Paul McCartney 
and The Beatles. The company has 
upcoming releases expected from 
Pink Floyd. The Rolling Stones. 
Paula Abdoul and Garth Brooks. 

(AFP, Bloomberg) 


Sandoz Stock Penalized 

Analysts Fear Overpayment for Gerber 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dnpauhn 

ZURICH — Registered shares in Sandoz AG. 
fell 3.3 percent on Tuesday as investors registered 
disapproval of the Swiss pharmaceuticals compa- 
ny’s planned takeover of Gerber Products Co. 

The S3.7 billion bid for Gerber, which was 
launched on Monday after Swiss markets were 
closed, left some industry analysts scratching their 
heads, although others said the planned purchase 
of the baby-food company was positive. 

“I just hope Sandoz can sec more in this deal 
than I can," said Pieter McDougall of Barclays de 
Zone Wedd. 

Some analysts questioned why Sandoz wanted to 
buy Gerber at afl in view of the impression thui the 
U5. baby-food market has low growth potential. 

Kevin Shea, on analyst with Standard & Poor’s 
Corp„ said the price offered by Sandoz. which was 


nearly 30 times the company's earnings, was much 
nd he had expected. 


mem with Gerber for a decade as a way of boosting 
its nutrition activities. 

“There were no actual negotiations but Gerber 
was a dream candidate," be said. 

The acquisition will double the sales of Sandoz’s 
nutrition division from 1.72 billion francs in 1993, 
still substantially below the 7J5 billion in sales 
that was achieved by the pharmaceuticals division. 

Sandoz has long been convinced that nutrition 
will gain in importance and the addition of Gerber 
will give it access to the market for baby food. 

where it has had only marginal involvement to 
date. 

“With Gerber, the chain is be ginning even earli- 
er,'' said Alexandre Jetzer. executive responsible 
for international coordination. 

A number of analysis also saw opportunities for 
synergy. 

“For Gerber, access to Sandoz' distribution svs- 


higher than any bid 

Other analysts said Sandoz was paying u high, 
but not unreasonable price for Gerber, which has 
more than 70 percent of the U.S. baby-food mar- 
ket. Gerber's stock price surged 46 percent, to 
$5050, after Sandoz said Monday it had agreed 
with Gerber to acquire all its shares fur S53 each. 

“For a wdl-cstablishcd name and a high market 
share, you have to pay goodwill,'* said Birgit Kuhl- 
hoff, an analyst at Union Bank of Switzerland. 

Sandoz executives sought to calm nervousness 
about the financial impact of such an acquisition, 
the deal would not dent this year's profits. 
Ft don’t expect that a profit dilution will take 
" Raymond Brcu, chief financial officer of 
idoz, told Reuters. “Rather we expect the oppo- 
site, that in bier years there will be a profit pick-up 

Sandoz is looking to boost the sales of its other 
nutritional products in (he United States through 
Gerber’s vast sales and distribution network. The 
Swiss company is also expected to benefit from 
access through Gerber to the fast-growing Mexi- 
can and Central American markets. 

Gerber, on the other hand, hopes to take advan- 
tage of Sandoz’s worldwide presence and penetrate 
the European and Asian markets, regions where 
Gerber has had little exposure. 

“There will be sufficient synergies already in the 
first year for no profit dilution,” Mr. Breu said. 

Mr. Breu said that Sandoz would mainly finance 
the acquisition from its pile of cash and market- 
able securities of 6.2 bmion Swiss francs ($4.4 
btQion), but it was too early to give specific details. 

“At the moment a large pan will be financed 
from liquid funds,” Mr. Breu said. 

He noted that Sandoz had looked at an align- 


f I just hope Sandoz can see 
more in this deal than I can/ 


Peter McDougaJl, analyst with 
Bardavs de Zoete Wedd. 


lem outside of North America is very attractive — 
some 86 percent of Sandoz’s nutrition division 
sales arc non-North American.'' said Les Pugh, an 
analyst at Salomon Brothers. 

He added that the potential for international 
jarred baby food sales was enormous. 

James Lee, an analyst with Moody's Investors 
Service Inc., said the business and financial 
strengths and “the potential strategic benefits of 
the merged company will be substantial, especially 
the use of Sandoz' s stronger marketing and distri- 
bution in international markets to extend the reach 
of Gerber brands overseas.” 

Following the acquisition announcement, a 
number of analysts downgraded their ratings on 
Gerber's stock, saying the company's existing fun- 
damentals were weaker than the sector average and 
that the offer from Sandoz represented the best 
likely value that shareholders would receive. 

Some skeptics said that the purchase price ap- 
peared to be extremely high for a company that 
appeared to have deteriorating fundamentals, at 
least in the short term. 

(Reuters. AFX, Bloomberg ) 


Bonn Finds 
Illegality 
At Telekom 


Reuters 

BONN — The German govern- 
ment on Tuesday accused its own 
telecommunications monopoly of 
impeding fair competition by ille- 
gally subsidizing its data- transfer 
services. 

An investigation ordered by the 
economics and postal ministries 
concluded that Deutsche Telekom 
set prices Tor its X_25 da la- transfer 
services below cost, an economics 
ministry spokesman said. 

The resulting losses were com- 
pensated for by subsidies paid from 
Telekom's lucrative basic tele- 
phone services. 

Private competitors have com- 
plained that the subsidies meant 
they were unable to compete with 
Telekom in services like on-line in- 
formation and tele-banking. 

"The government has accepted 
that competition was hindered by 
Telekom's indirect subsidies for its 
Da lex- P services.” the economics 
ministry said. 

Competitors said the govern- 
ment’s position on the matter could 
be the first step in creating a truly 
open market if i t took steps to guar- 
antee free and open access for pri- 
vate operators. 

Because Telekom still has a mo- 
nopoly on telephone netw orks, pri- 
vate operators must lease lutes 
from it to offer telecommunica- 
tions services. 

The data networks are one or the 
few telecommunications services 
already open for competition. The 
government plans to privatize Tele- 
kom in lime for the planned com- 
mencement of free competition in 
all European Union telecommuni- 
cations markets by 1998. 

A Postal Ministry spokesman 
said talks with the Economics Min- 
istry mid Telekom would begin 
soon to determine what measures 
might be taken against Telekom. 

Officials said Telekom would 
probably be forced to raise charges 
for its dai a- transfer services and be 
given around six months to make 
them profitable. 


Investor's Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 
FTS6 100 Index 
3509- 



ent: 

oU 


»o7F 

1883 

MA'M ^'DJFMAM 
1884 1883 1884 

** W *'D' J : F MA'M 
' 1883 ' 1BB4 

Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday 

Close 

•PttW. 

CkaJw 

% 

Chang 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

403.29 

412.77 

-1.09 

Snissata 

Static Index 

7SVM 

7,92353 

• -0^0 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,198.72 


-2.26 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

835.1$ 

850.® 

-1.82 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1JK7JQ3 

1,87^.46 

-0.66 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2A4R20 

2.459.60. 

-0.46 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,089.10 

3,10840 

-0.62 

Madrid 

General Index 

335.36 

33854 • 

-1.06 

MX an 

MIB 

1,219.00 

1^24^0 

-0.41 

Ports 

CAC40 

2,133-32 

2,155.43 

-1.03 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaeriden 

1,943421 

1,955.99 

-0.65 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

455.15 

45805 

•0.63 

Zurich 

SBS 

9554)8 

967.15 

*1.25 

Sources - Reuters. AFP 


ImcraatuivU Herald Trihoi 

Very briefly: 


he shitte 
How coul 
“'light th: 
edihe4ut 
. Board t 
■emir C'oui 
legal \cgrc 
Cliurl 
tintouchci 


lhop\ Hor- 
ere among 

.supervisors 

nmcminis- 

mghi hcll- 
vork to do. 
t Globe as 
d that they 
service for 


while ae- 
wned was 
employees 
ade by the 
oplc. ’who 
fer if only 


ing to ho- 
lt the pos- 
i tempi or 


• Empress National de EJectriddad SA raid it had increased its currer denied 
share offering to 8.70 percent of its capital from 8.26 percent because c l "Jl per- 
high retail demand within Spain. 


ckaround 


■ Moulinex SA, the French household appliance maker, announced ai 
estimated loss for the year ended in March c>f 550 million francs (S9 
million), most of it from nonrecurring items including a charge of I5i 
million francs for a restructuring. 


• Austria will press ahead with its privatization program after tilt 
successful placement recently of stakes in two big state companie 
including VA Technologic ACL whose shares will be luted on the Vienn; 
stock exchange starting Wednesday. 

• Renault SA's chairman, Louis Schweitzer, will be appointed to a nev 
three-year term as head of the automaker soon, probably at a cabine 
meeting set for June 1. industry sources said. 


■ Sweden said it had set a maximum price of 140 kronor ($18) a share or 
the Pharmacia AB shares it will offer to the public, a discount of 1C 
kronor from the price for institutional investors. The government plans tc 
sell most of its stake in Pharmacia in June. 


b Germany's trade balance for March showed a surplus of 7.4 billion 
Deutsche marks ($4 billion), up 2$ percent from February's figure, 
according to provisional data. 

Reuters. Bktomberg. AFX, AFP 


Is best to 
sir. Hotel 
Lilly and 
aJ them a 
. The two 
» with the 
nitration, 
tint. Mr. 
is raid he 
in. 

xi at tlie 
toralout- 
that (he 
con tin u- 
ment has 
a Foreign 
□g racial 
tes. That 
led. And 
will not 
to show 
res when 
of them. 


OECD Tells Austrian State Sector It Should Spend Less 


Reuters 

■ VIENNA — The Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development on Tuesday 


said it would have to do more to bring stale 
spending and price increases under control. 

* In its annual report, the Paris-based group 
Said Austria had withstood the international 
recession well and was poised to return to a 
long-term growth trend in 1995. 


The OECD said Austria's gross domestic 
product fell 0.5 percent last year after rising 1 .6 
percent in 1992, helped by strong consumer 
demand despite fallin g investment and trade. 

But the group criticized Austria's large state- 
owned sector for raising prices and said con- 
sumers were not seeing the cheaper imports 
that should result from the rise in value of the 
Austrian currency, the schilling. 

In addition, unemployment, although low by 


international standards at 4.2 percent, is on a 
stubborn uptrend, the OECD said. 

Finance Minister Ferdinand Lacina told re- 
porters that developments since the OECD, 
report was drafted indicated Austria's economy 
would grow more strongly in 1994 than the 
OECD projected. 

“We had stagnation last year," he said. “That 
was a setback, but it was much less d renounced 
than in other countries.’’ 


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INFORMATION 


FROM INTERNATIONAL INVESTOR XXX 

HcralbS£®ribunf 


FiwisnB Mini the inn times aw tfe >uhi«:ii«i war 


The latest information from the companies listed in this section is available 
to you at no charge. Simply circle the appropriate number on the coupon 
(at the bottom of the page) and return it to us before June 25. The report(s) 
will be mailed to you by the companies involved. 


JB'B 


BAER HOLDING LTD. 


The services of the Jufius Baer Group encompass asset management 
and investment counselling as well as securities and foreign exchange 
trading. The Group's clients are private and institutional investors from 
around the world. Assets under management increased by one third to 

t more than US$30 billon In 1993. 

111 The Group's flagship is Bank 



nt 

.no- 


Julius Baer, founded in 1890 
and headquartered In Zurich. 
There are Bank offices and 
other Baer companies located 
in numerous financial centers 
including Geneva. Frankfurt, 
London, New York and Hong 
Kong. 

Baer Holding Ltd., Zurich, is toe 
holding company of the 
worldwide operating Julius 
Baer Group. Its shares are 
listed on the Swiss stock 
exchanges as well as in 
Frankfurt 1 


Schindler 1993 

Every day. 500 million people worldwide use 
Schindler installations. Schindler, one of the world's 
leading elevator and escalator manufacturers, offers 
its products and services in more than 100 countries 
around the world. In 1993, the Group had the best 
results in its history and achieved the leading posi- 
tion worldwide 



in escalators 
with a market 
share of over 
20%. Group 

key figures in 
fiscal 1993 
were: orders 
received SFr. 
4413 million, 
operating inco- 
me SFr. 4498 
million, net 
profit SFr. 

168.6 million, 
cash flow SFr, 

328.6 million, 
personnel 
31,969. 

(Exchange 
rate USS -SFr. 
1.471 


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nd led a . 


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ll led to 
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Electrowatt 


Eleclrowatt Ltd is a Swiss holding company of a group of international 
companies active in six fields of activity: electric utilities, electric power 
operations - engineering and contracting - security systems, buildings 
control, electronics. These companies have established significant or 
leading positions in their markets in Europe. North America and the Far 
East. 

Consolidated sales have increased by 3°b to Sfr. 4.7 billion in the 1992/93 


financial year. Cash flow grew tyy 24^ io Sfr. 701 million and consolidated 


nel income has risen by ZB^s io Sfr. 212 million. Return on equity amounts to 
10.8% 62% of sales are generated outside Switzerland, pnmanly in the EU. 2 


South 
2 N.T. 
t 9 


Mall this coupon or &end telex ho: 

Ann DoyJe/Inlwnational Investor XXX 
International Herald Tribune, 181, Avenue Cbarles-de-Gaulle 
92521 NeuiliyCecJex, France. Fax: 46 37 52 12 
Please send me toe reports from toe 
companies circled at no cost or obligation. 


INTERNUICMl 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 


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Jap; 


Vehicle Makers 
amines Gear 


Caviled ty Our Staff Frm Dupatcha 

T? K ^° “ Suzuki Motor Co 
on Tuesday reported a large drop 
in profit m its latest financial year 
and it predicted even weaker re- 
sults IGT the current year. 

Some analysts said the' maker of 
small care and motorcycles was be- 
ing too cautious, and its stock rose 
after the results wore announced. 

Separately, Hino Motors Co. 
the truck-making affiliate of 
Toyota Motor Corp. v said its net 
income fell 22 percent, to 2.63 bil- 
lion yen (S25 million) in the year 
that ended March 31. from 3.73 
billion yen a year earlier. 

5S2S? topped 15 percent, 
to 535.49 billion yen, while its cur- 
rent profit was down 33 percent, to 
4.01 billion yen. But Hino predict- 
ed results would improve this year 
and that its current profit, a broad 
pretax income measure favored by 
Japanese companies that includes 
nonoperating and portfolio results, 
would recover to 4.5 billion yen. 


At Suzuki, net income fell 12 
percent last year, to 7.04 billion yen 
from 8.03 billion in the previous 
year. Sales fell 4 percent, to 1.01 
trillion yen, while current profit 
dropped lOperccnt, u> 18.38 billion 
yen. Suzuki predicted its current 
profit this year would be just 18.00 
billion yen. 

In common with many Japanese 
companies reporting earnings in re- 
cent weeks, the vehicle makers were 
hit by the strong yen and weakness 
in export markets, particularly Eu- 
rope. 

But analysis said Suzuki had 
brighter prospects than its forecast 
indicated. They said investors 
viewed the company as the domi- 
nant maker of compact cars and 
likely to benefit from two of the 
world’s largest potential markets: 
China and India. 

“It's the small-car ma k e r for the 
rest of the world,” said Peter 
Boardman, an analyst at UBS Ltd. 

Suzuki, which has cross share- 


holdings with Genera! Motors 
Corp.. already has joint-venture 
plants in China, Indonesia, India 
and Pakistan. Despite China’s huge 
population, there are only 8 million 
motorcycles on Chinese roads, ac- 
cording to government statistics. 

Nonyuld Matsushima, a senior 
analyst at Nilcko Research Center, 
predicted SuzukTs current profit 

was likely to be 20 bOlian yen this 

year, on sales of 1.05 irilhon yen. 
The company predicted sales would 
slip to 1.00 trillion yen. “The 
1994/95 profit is based on persis- 
tently strong demand for Wagon R, 


a 660cc minivan-type utility car, and 
higher exports or motorcycle com- 
ponents,” Mr. Matsushima said. 

The Wagon R. launched in Sep- 
tember. was a bright spot for Su- 
zuki Its sales were above company 
estimates, and they helped push 
domestic revenue up by almost 1 
percent last year. Exports, howev- 
er. fell 22 p er c en t 

(AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


JVC to Shift Production Overseas 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispaidm 
TOKYO — Victor Co. of Japan said Tuesday it 
would turn to new products and increased overseas 
output to try to reverse a loss in its latest financial year 
JVC said it had a nelloss or 19.60 billion yen (SI 88 
million ) for the year ended March 31. which was an 
improvement from the 43.07 billion yen deficit a year 
earlier. Its sales fell 6 percent, to 726.55 billion yen. 

Current loss, a pretax measure that includes nonoper- 
ating and portfolio results, was 26.81 billion yen, slight- 
ly worse than the 25.47 billion yen a year earlier. 

JVC hopes to overcome its losses, which reflect 
weak domestic sales and exports ravaged by the strong 
yen, and it predicted it would post a current profit of 
1.4 billion yen this year on sales of 750 billion yen. 

The company plans to reduce employment by 900, to 
14,000, by the end of this financial year, and it will raise 
overseas parts procurement to 30 percent from the 
current 10 percent to cut costs. It wiu also increase the 
ratio of products hs makes overseas to 30 percent from 
15 percent for products sold in Japan and to 50 percent 


from 44 percent for products sold overseas, according to 
Nobukazu Kaneko, JVC's managing director. 

“Their plans look like they are having an effect,” 
said Hitoshi Kuriyama, an analyst at CS First Boston 
Japan Ltd. He added that since video recorders have 
been on the market in Japan for about 10 years now, 
many users will be looking to replace old models with 
newer ones, especially if the economy picks up. 

Yet current plans are likely to be augmented bv 
changes that analysis said would come from Matsu- 
shita Electric Industrial Co., which owns 52.4 percent 
of JVC Last week, the company said that Takeo 
Shuzui, a Matsushita director, would replace Takuro 
Bqjo as JVC's president in June. 

“JVC and Matsushita have different cultures — 
JVC emphasizes technology and development, while 
Matsushita focuses on marketing,” said Takeshi Nar- 
usc, an industry analyst at Darwa Institute of Re- 
search. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFX, AFP) 


NEC and Rivals 
Are Banking On 
ABCs of LCDs 


Reuters 

1ZUM1, Japan — In a factoiy 
nestled among the green hills of 
Kyushu Island in southern Ja- 
pan, NEC Corp. is quietly turn- 
ing out what it hopes will be a 

big money-maker by the late 
1990s — liquid crystal displays, 
or LCDs. 

LCDs are digital screens used 
increasingly in personal comput- 
ers to replace bulky cathode-ray 
tubes. Thin-film-transistor 
LCDs, offer vivid color images 
on a screen only a few inches 
thick. 

Barely audible over the hum 
of air conditioners, robots on 
the production lines at affiliat- 
ed NEC Kagoshima Ltd. are 
turning out the thin-film LCDs 
at a rate of 80,000 per month. 
Production in the whole NEC 
group is forecast to reach 
150,000 in October, when the 
Kyushu plant shifts into higher 
gear and a new line opens in the 
Akita prefecture in die northern 
pan oi Honshu island. 

The goal of NEC. now tied 
for second in thin-film LCD 
production with Toshiba Corp.. 
u to narrow the overwhelming 
lead enjoyed by the industry 
pacesetter. Sharp Corp. 

“NEC aim s to have a top 
share in the TFT- LCD busi- 
ness, which is a key component 
of our multimedia strategy, 1 ' 
Tadahiro Sekimoto, the NEC 
president, said recently. 

Mr. Sekimoto said NEC aims 
to expand its thin-film-transistor 
market share to 30 percent next 
year from a current 18 percent 
— a big challenge considering 
that Sharp boasts a market share 
of over 40 percent and is con- 
tinuing to invest aggressively. 

Mr. Sekimoto predicted that 
NEC’s LCD sales would double. 


to 100 billion yen ($958 million), 
in the year that began April 1. 

NEC's associate senior vice 
president, Hajime Sasaki.said 
that companies were boosting 
their investment in thin-film- 

transistor production because 
demand was certain to exceed 
supply by the late 1990s. Annu- 
al output is unlikely to exceed 
10 million until 1997, even if the 
companies build new produc- 
tion lines as p lann ed. 

But industry figures show 
that global production of porta- 
ble personal computers, the big- 
gest application for the thin- 
film LCDs, already totaled 7 
million units in 1993. Demand, 
moreover, is expected to rise by 
30 percent per year. At that 
rate, annual output of portable 
personal computers would be 
about 20 million in 1997. 

Due to ibis strong demand, 
industry analysis say there is 
unlikely to be a sharp decline in 
the price of thin-film LCD pan- 
els. NEC now sells 10.4-inch 
ands — the screen's diagonal 
igth — for around 130.000 
yen ($1,245 1 . 

“At one time, makers set a 
goal of cutting the price of pan- 
els to 50,000 yen by 1995, but 
harsh price competition won't 
start until after 1997," said Yo- 
shimasaTaknshina, an analyst at 
Daiwa Institute of Research Ltd. 

While some analysis expect 
Sharp to continue its domi- 
nance of the market, many oth- 
er companies — such as Mitsu- 
bishi Electric Corp., Sanyo 
Electric Co. and Hosiden Corp. 
— also are investing in LCDs. 

Toshiba makes thin-film 
panels in a joint venture with 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp., and supplies most 
of its products to IBM. 


£ 


In China, 
New Game 
Is Price 

Gouging 

Compiled bi Our Stuff Frum Da&aichn 

BEIJING — Prices in China are 
being pushed up far beyond real 
market values, creating 'a bubble 
economy that could burst with di- 
sastrous results, according to Chi- 
nese newspaper reports published 
Tuesday. 

Reports in the official People's 
Daily. The China Business Times 
and the English-language C hina 
Daily cited many instances of price 
gouging throughout the country, 
including a bar in southern China's 
Shenzhen city that charged 11.000 
yuan (S 1.273) for a cup of coffee 
and Tour glasses of wine; a store in 
central China's Hangzhou city that 
charged 98.000 yuan for a "mink 
coat that was worth 50.000 yuan; 
and a Shanghai shop that charged 
300 yuan for a 15-yuan tie. 

The China Business Times said 
that government price inspectors 
who visited 19 provinces between 
mid-March and mid-April found 
nearly 61,400 cases of illegal price- 
setting, meaning that prices either 
exceeded explicit limits or were far 
higher than could be justified on a 
cost basis. 

Inflation, which has been creep- 
ing upward in C hina over the past 
two years, burst into doublenligits 
in 1993, with prices in December 
up 20 percent, compared with the 
previous December. In rides, the 
jump averaged 24 percent. 

As a result, the Chinese govern- 
ment has reinstated price controls 
that it lifted in the late 1980s and 
has deployed thousands of price 
inspectors to enforce Lhcm. 

Part of the problem is that nation- 
wide markets do not yet exist, allow- 
ing local producers and vendors to 
dictate prices without fear of com- 
pethion! 

(AP. Bloomberg / 


U.S. Companies in China Resist Role of Policeman on Rights 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — As the White 
House approaches a June 3 dead- 
line for renewing China's favored 
trade status, American companies 
with operations in China are bring 
asked by human-rights campaign- 
ers to embrace a code of conduct 
that many of them do not like. 

A prominent rights group, Ho- 
man Rights Watch, is raging the 
conq>amestoagreeiioitousei»od- 
ucts made by prison labor, to dis- 
courage political indoctrination in 
the workplace and to encourage 


their executives to discuss rights 
abuses with Chinese offiriak 
The proposal, a form of which 
has also circulated as proposed leg- 
islation in Congress for several 
years, has drawn a swift and nega- 
tive reaction from lag American 
companies. 

Many of these companies — 
which include Motorola Inc., Gen- 
eral Electric Co.. International 
Business- Machines Coqx and Xe- 
rox Corp. — have significant in- 
vestments in China or regard China 
as a major market 
They have lobbied strenuously in’ 


Congress and at the White House, 
to preserve China's trade benefits' 
as a way of retaining and expand- 
ing American com panies ’ share of 
expanding Chinese markets. 

“The impetus of laying on the 
American business community a 
corporate code of conduct simply 
gives credence to the idea that busi- 
ness is morally responsible for the 
human rights situation in China,” 
said Robot A. Kapp, president of 
the U.S.-China Business Council, a 
group that promotes commercial 
links between the two countries. 

While there is some sentiment in 


Congress for a voluntary code, the 
strongest critics of China, such as 
Representative Nancy Pelosi, 
Democrat of California, say con- 
gressional efforts should focus on 
whether to revoke China's most- 
favored-nation trading status and 
on other potential sanctions. 

Ms. Pelosi said she supported a 
voluntary code of conduct but did 
not see that as a substitute for can- 
celing China's trade privileges. She 
said she found corporate opposi- 
tion to voluntary standards of con- 
duct difficult to understand. 

“The business community resist- 


ed this in the past, as now" Ms. 
Pelosi said. “I think it’s ironic that 
the business community opposes a 
voluntary code of conduct. How do 
you oppose something that’s volun- 
tary?" 

The question of voluntary codes 
for American business abroad was 
first raised in 1977 by the Reverend 
Leon H. Sullivan of Philadelphia, 
who suggested ways for companies 
to operate under apartheid in 
South Africa that were sensitive to 
black aspirations. 

The measures proposed by Hu- 
man Rights Watch would prohibit 


the use of prison products by 
American companies, discourage 
compulsory political indoctrina- 
tion in the workplace, embrace 
nondiscriminatory employment 
practices — which means not firing 
people for their political beliefs — 
allow workers to discuss work-re- 
lated issues freely and have Ameri- 
can executives discuss human- 
rights issues in their localities with 
Chinese officials. 

Timothy Kdlogg, director of 
corporate communications for Mo- 
torola. said the company felt com- 
fortable with its' roles. 


India to Start 
A Broader 
Stock Index 

Reuters 

BOMBAY — The stock ex- 
chana here this week is to launch a 
200-share index that marks its first 
step toward index-based futures 
trading to replace the burned car- 
ry-forward system, officials said. 

The new index, to be introduced 
Friday, is expected eventually to 

replace the 30-share BSE index that 
critics charge is unfairly weighted 
in favor of a few blue-chip issues. 

Aat Mehta, head of Nucleus Fi- 


services, ww J 
ed the system, said index-based fu- 

tures trading would solve the 
bourses* problems of illiquidity, in- 
adequate hedging opportunities 
and their cumbersome settlement 
mechanism. 

India’s 22 bootses have searched 
for a successor to badta, orcany- 

forwaid trading, since it tanned 

six months ago on gKwnJs t hat n 
caused excessive speculabt^ and 
index-based futures, though not the 
ideal sohnron, were the oily viable 
alternative, analysts said- 

JL_J I 



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COMPANY IV. V. 
Amsterdam, May 20, 1994 


On June 24th, the IHT will publish an 
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It’s never been easier to subscribe 
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Jusl coll us. today at 05 - 437-437 


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PRIME TIME ESCORT SKVTCTS 
In Manhattan 

UV. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

13GGD 

12300- 
1:900' 

IMS) ft 

900Q- 

®*0 J F M A M 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 22$ 



1983 


1994 


J A*:.:- 5 ® 36 Q* J r F.' M X d : . 
mi t994 : 1993' 1904- 


Exchange 

Hong Kong 

Index 

Hang Song 

Ttiasday-"' F*rtv. -v.' 

Close ...Ctoso".--' Cftange 

$430.11 a58aJB':v'*i*W 

Singapore 

Straits times 

.2402.35. 

Sydney 

AJf Ordinaries 

2,13240 -.2,121.00 ”,40-54 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

21522.10 SQfi 8K7j.:-.4flJW-; 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

967 J6 . ',999,10 ; 

Bangkok 

•SET 

dosed . 1«33&50 : : - 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

94&89 • 94SJSb; ;.;;.^0.04 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

.5,789.12 , 5,817168; ;t»:43; 

Manila 

PSE 

' 2^0138 ' 2^922.17 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

502.00 . 49030. 

New Zealand 

NZSE-4G . 

2,15022 ' •2,138.24'-..' . 

Bombay 

National Index 

i^ooio* i^zijjo 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

lmcnurml HenldTnhonc 

Very briefly: 


• Tokio Marine & Fire Insurance Co_ Yasoda Fire & Marine Insurance 
Co, Mitsu Fire & Marine Insurance Co, Stsmtomo Marine &Fire 
Insurance C6n and Nippon Fire & Marine Insurance Co. — the leading 
Japanese nonfife insurance companies — reported higher net premium 
income for the year ended March 31. with an average increase of 5.6 
percent over the previous year. 

• Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. said it was interested in buying 
back its former headquarters in Shan ghai . The domed building was s e n ted 
by Mao Zedong's communists in 1949 and now serves as Shanghai's city 
hall and communist party headquarters. 

• Li Ka-shing,, chairman of Chetmg Kong (Holdings) l^ has invested 4 
billion yuan (S462 million) this year in energy, communications and 
bousing projects in the southern Chinese city of Shantou. 

■ China Steel CorpM a state-run Taiwan company, and MEMC Electronic 
Materials Inc. of the United States si^ed a joint-venture agreement to 
make silicon wafers in Taipei, economic officials in Taiwan said. 

■ Fujitsu General Lid. plans to triple its ratio of overseas-sourced 

components and materials, to 30 percent from 10 percent of total 
purchases by 1997. AFP. Bloomberg 


Hanoi Motorbike Prices Jump 

Dream Two made by Honda Mo- 
tor Co. had gone up from S2JOO 
early this month to £,800 now, the 
report said. Dealers confirmed the 
prices, and some quoted even high- 
er figures. 

Supplies of motorbikes have 
tightened since the government 
banned imports of seoond-hand 
bikes April 1. 

Nearly 23 rmlhan motorcycles 
were roistered in Vietnam in late 
1993. They are rapidly replacing 
the traditional bicycle, especially in 
Hanoi and Ho Chi MTnh City, as 
incomes grow. 


Reuters 

HANOI — “Motorcycle fever” 
has driven up prices of the import- 
ed Japanese motorcycles coveted 
by young Vietnamese by as mud) 
as 12 percent in recent weeks, the 
state-owned radio broadcasting 
company said Tuesday. 

“There has been motorcycle fe- 
ver in Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh Chy 
and some other cities for about one 
month already, and it has pushed 
motorbikes prices to a sudden in- 
crease” the radio said. 

The favorite model, the 99cc 


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This offer exp**s August 31, 1 994, end h avaSobk to ne* sofeicribere only, i 

Hcralb^^Sribunc 


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he shilled 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. MAY 25, 1994 


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tonnel 


.. __ i.’-i: ji 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


' , i 
•; ■:*'*•* . 

• •. . **. v*-.. 






••• 


v '■• .' > • * j ■'V' v. • 

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Gateway to the Holy Lands 





~To crown this hope of peace based on new democratic 
possibilities in the Arab world, f as a Muslim r a 
Hashemite, and an Arab, and as a person who seeks to 
satisfy my conscience, have called for talks to achieve an 
accord on the holy places in Jerusalem which removes cdt 
sovereign claims except for those of Almighty Cod. ” 

A1 Hussein bin Taial, King of the Hashemite Kingdom 
ofJottfcra. 


IlfjlJ ii; 


In April. with due pomp and circumstance, the Dome of 
the Root in Jerusalem was officially reopened following 
the completion of an $8 million restoration project paid far 
privately by King Hussein of Jordan. 

The Dome, with its massive gold-covered cupola, is one 
of the holiest Islamic shrines. The eight-sided mosque was 
built in 69} AD. on the site of Solomon's temple and 
marks the snor from which marry Muslims believe thar the 


Prophet Mohammed ascended into heaven. 

The irony of the dedication ceremony was that it was 
performed by King Hussein in front of a cardboard model 
in Amman. He cannot yisii the Dome because Israel is still 
at war with Jordan. 

King Hussein is adamant that Arab sovereignty over the 
Holy City must be instated “This, the return of Arab 
soverdgfttypver the Arabtiiy of Jerusalem, is foecaraer- 

cinnft fhr a met' shr? 1 tswsfrn or tv»nr** it* 


stone for. a Just shdtasting peace m theMidcBe Easfef^be 
has saiti; “Only Ihns ean.lesusatem become foe city of 
^^^^a^^bO-WOfS^Bp Uie'Ctee God*- Mtisife' 

The restoration of the Dome was carried out by Mivan 


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[a! 1 : k--. " ■■ - ?.o' '^^^■^WWiiwP^an V - I j ... . i 


Pivotal Rolf, in Middle East Politics 


here is an air of cautious op- 
timism and hope in Amman 
as the Palestinians begin lo 
take control of parts of the 
West Bank and the Gaza strip. Most of 
the Middle East is entering a new era of 
peace as negotiations between Jordan, 
Israel, Lebanon and Syria are said to be 
drawing toward a conclusive settle- 
ment 

King Hussein, who wisely distanced 
himself from the Palestine Liberation 
Organization in 1988, telling Chairman 
Yasser Arafat to “make his own peace 
with Israel,” is now said to be almost 
ready to end hostilities with Israel. 
“We are very near the end of the 
track,” says a highly placed govern- 
ment official in Amman. 

Jordan has, and will probably always 
have, a pivotal role in Middle East pol- 
itics. King Hussein has become a mas- 
ter at both personal survival and politi- 
cal longevity in a region where bullets 
are more common than the now in- 
creasing use of the ballot box. During 
the last five years in particular, the king 
has been easing his country toward 
democracy and pluralist government. 
The right of the Jordanian voters to de- 
termine their future has become recog- 
nized in what is still a society donunat- 


need democracy and liberty of the indi- 
vidual and respect for human rights, 
and our people must participate in the 
decision-making progress of this coun- 
try,” comments the official. 

In the 1988 elections, only 49 per- 
cent of the electorate voted Last No- 
vember, the figure went up to 68 per- 
cent, and 22 parties put up candidates 
who were able to campaign freely for 
the first time. While a multiparty sys- 
tem is in operation with a progovem- 
ment majority, individuals, rather than 
parties, still tend to dominate the scene. 

A new press law has spawned 17 po- 
litical-party publications and created a 
new environment for newspapers. Al- 
though there are still some constraints, 
they can now write openly about any 
developments or subjects without fear 
of sudden and unexplained closure or 
imprisonment. “For the first time we 
are free” comments Nabil EJ-Sharif. 
editor in chief of Ad Dustour, one of 


Jordan’s most respected newspapers. 
Jordan now has the most liberal press 


ed by family ties. 

' It is unfair to judge the progress of 


Jordan now has the most liberal press 
in the Middle East, with Egypt the only 
rival. Greater freedom of the press and 
the opening of more doors to what is 
still a fragile democracy are significant 
steps for the region as a whole. A de- 
mocratic Jordan is seen as fundamental 
to peace in the Middle East. Jordan's 
democratic strategy has won the sup- 


democracy in Jordan and similar coun- 
tries against American or European 


port, not always publicly voiced, of the 
United States and Europe in spite of the 
differences over Jordan's statements at 
the time of Desert Storm. 


norms Jordan is moving forward at a 


much faster pace than before. “We 


The easing of the stop-and-search 
policy for ships coming to Aqaba is a 
sure sign that Jordan has been brought 
in from the cold caused by its relations 
with Iraq, once its biggest trading part- 
ner. The Gulf War probably cost Jor- 
dan more than $7 billion in lost trade 
with Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. 

Now the economy is stabilizing, al- 
though there remains a $2 billion trade 
deficit. The West Bank development 
will have a major impact on the econo- 
my as Amman becomes the gateway 
for tourism to the Holy Lands and for 
new business and investment. 

Last year, more than 765,000 tourists 
visited Jordan, and this is expected to 
rise by at least 25 percent this year. 
Earnings from tourism were estimated 
at $60 million in 1983. equivalent to 1 1 
percent of gross domestic product. Ac- 
cording to the minister of planning. 
Ziad Fans, tourism, services and man- 
ufacturing are to become priority sec- 
tors for development under the current 
plan. He would like to see greater liber- 
alization for investment 

“We have the skills and the brain- 
power to rebuild our economy." says a 
leading banker. “Look what Jordanians 
had done in the Middle East prior to the 
invasion of Kuwait, after which 
350,000 Jordanians were expelled 
from the Gulf. It is we who have built 
Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the other oil 
rich states. It is our intellect and experi- 
ence which has gone into those coun- 
tries.” MT. 



King Hussein’s Long Search for Peace 


0 s a peacemaker. 
King Hussein 
bin Taial of the 
Hashemite King- 
: “dom of Jordan has walked* 
. . narrow tightrope of dipio- 
; macy during the 40 years of 
,. his monarchy J From nme 
time, as in 1?91 Amg ** 
- -Kuwait crisis, he lost hts 

• an eventual P^ ce ith j n 
reel appear to be 

reach following the setrie 

irient between the Pj^ne 
.. Liberation Or??™ 28 *! 0 ? 

. Israel. -We i 

/ until our Palesuntan bra^ 
trade their move, said wng 
Hussein earlier this 5 «fM" 
■ Washington It 

the mot- cause of the igg 

'SSsJSBfgf 

•rect in de”cendent of the 


Prophet Mohammed, be- 
longs to one of the noblest 
and most-respected families 
in the Islamic world. The 
King is the third member of 
the Hashemite family to be- 
come monarch of Jordan 
and one of the longest sur- 


64 YEARS 


Commitment by 
Sy ria to peace 
process 


viving rulers in the world. 

Since the Six-Day War of 
1967, Jordan has been com- 
mitted to finding a peaceful 
solution to the Palestinian 
problem and has supported 
United Nations Resolutions 
242 and 338, which called 
for full Israeli .withdrawal 
and self-determination for 
the Palestinians.. In 1988, 
King Hussein- cut his ties 
with the PLO, saying that 


the PLO should negotiate on 
its own account for a settle- 
ment with Israel. “Only the 
Palestinians can speak for 
themselves,” said King Hus- 
sein. 

In 1991 at the Madrid con- 
ference, which was in dan- 
ger of foundering, Jordan 
suggested a joint representa- 
tion formula to the PLO, en- 
abling the organization to 
overcome seemingly in- 
tractable procedural difficul- 
ties. Jordan's efforts un- 
doubtedly helped the 1993 
Declaration of Principles 
that culminated in the sign- 
ing of an agreement by the 
PLO Chairman Yasser 
Arafat and the Israeli Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin. 

Now Jordan is working to- 
ward a comprehensive peace 
for the region in conjunction 
with Syria, Lebanon and 
Egypt. Most of the details of 
boundary definitions be- 
tween Jordan and Israel have 
been resolved, and details 


about water resources, an 
important factor in any 
peace settlement, are said to 
be in the final stages of ne- 
gotiations. 

In answer to a question in 
Washington early this year. 
King Hussein said of the 
Syrian peace moves; “I am 
in constant touch with them 
... and they have done far 
more than has ever been the 
case in the past in terms of 
clarity and in terms of real 
determination.” King Hus- 
sein said he was confident 
that following the meeting 
between President Bill Clin- 
ton of the United States and 
President Hafez Assad of 
Syria, there was a total com- 
mitment to a comprehensive 
peace. 

He added: “We are mov- 
ing on our own to deal with 
all the problems that ... lead 
to the ratification of a peace 
treaty as a crowning 
achievement.” 

M.F. 


With 64 years of growth, 

we are among the largest international financial institutions in the world. 
With branches and affiliated offices all over the world, 
we have created a complete range of services. 

Our presence spans five continents. 

A look ai our figures shows 1061 million U.S. dollars in Equity, 
over 1 3 billion U.S. dollars in Deposits, 

14.4 billion U.S. dollars in Assets and over 18 billion 
U.S. dollars for the Total Balance SheeL 


Call us at any of our following major centres: 

Amman |6| 638 16 |. Bahrain J973I 212 255, Frankfort {69} 242 590. London {711 315 8500, 
New Y«rk 1212} 715 9700, Paris (01 } 43 59 34 34, Singapore {65 } 533 0055, 

•Sydney 102} 2324133. Vienna {01} 5 134240, Zurich {01} 265 7111, 


UearK 

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ere among 

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vork U> do. 
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a ADVPg e a ° _ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, MAY 25. 1994 




ADVERTISm£^pFT6lW 


Tr ; advertising section 


l! Banks Prepare for 



here is a buzz of 
activity in many 
of Amman's 
banks as they 
1 ^'— gear up for what may be the 
life-saving bonanza of new 
es ^}' West Bank opportunities. 
m 3‘ Unlike the dominant Arab 
g^< Bank, many banks have 
pjji been having a tough time re- 
cently. But the scene is 
changing rapidly, and some 
banks are reporting aslon- 


it£ 

Sill?! 




ishing results. "We look 
over 4 million Jordanian di- 


nars [about ’$6 million] in 
deposits in just over a 
week." reports one bunker. 

Others are adopting u 
more cautious attitude. "At 
the moment, ue would pre- 
fer to wail and see what is 
going to happen." comments 
Hanl A. Al-Qudi. senior 
deputy general manager of 
Arab Jordan Investment 
Bank. "The priori h in the 
West Bank is for banks that 
had branches there prior to 
1967. We were only formed 


15 years ago. Naturally, we 
would like to have a pres- 
ence there." 

Jordan National Bank, 
which had three branches in 
the West Bank (as well as 4U 
branches in Jordan, four in 
Lebanon, and an offshore 
banking unit in Cyprus) has 
been one or the first off the 
mark in getting hack into 
business. "We have already 
received agreement from the 
Central Banks of Israel and 
Jordan to reopen." says Hunt 



The Queen Alia Fund helps women to help thewseh es. 


on Women 


Princess Basma Bint Tula), the only 
sister nf King Hussein and chairman or :he 
Queen Alia Fund for Social Development, 
is one of the leading proponents of 
women's rights in the Middle East. She 
believes that dicre are no real banners or 
limitations to the role of women in .Iordan. 
"But 1 think there is a need for greater 
participation of women from the top to the 
bottom in our society." she says. 

The Queen Alia Fund, now in new 
headquarters in West Amman, has played 
a key rote in helping women to help 
themselves, especially m rural com- 
munities. where it has established 40 
development centers. Its object; \ e i> io 
train women to improve their quality of 
life through better health, nutrition, 
education and vocational training. 


"I think our work here in Jordan has 
become a role model for other countries in 
the .surrounding areas to follow." says the 
princess, who was last year appointed 
Honorary Human Development 
Ambassador by the United Nations 
Development Program. 

As head of the Jordan National 
Committee for Women, she has just 
Lumpleted a two-year report on a National 
Strategy and Plan of Action for Women, 
which 'is to be published in June. She is 
proud of the way researchers identified the 
grass-roots needs of women throughout 
the kingdom. 

"1 think the report realty reflects the 
needs of the women of this country says 
ihe princess. 

M.F. 


Idris, marketing and product 
development manager. "The 
Nablus branch will be the 
first to start up. There are 
opportunities for a lot or in- 
vestment in the West Bank." 

The Arab Bank, by far the 
largest in Jordan, has kepi its 
West Bunk staff on the pay- 
roll lor the last 25 years, and 
will be reopening its seven 
existing branches, plus a 
new one in Jericho, in the 
near future. "We have found 
that the Israelis have been 
more amenable to our de- 
mands than v.e had ex peel- 
ed says u senior executive 
of the hank in Amman. 

The Israelis have been try- 
ing to impose restrictions on 
some Jordanian banks that 
wish to restart or open new 
branches in the West Bank 
or Gaza. All foreign-ex- 
change dealings, for exam- 
ple. must be carried out via 
the Central Bank of Israel: 
another rule states that let- 
ters of credit and guarantees 
must go through the Israeli 
banking system. 

The Cairo- Amman Bank 
is the only Jordanian bank to 
have had active branches in 
some of the previously occu- 
pied territories. Hani Ha- 
iawani Tamimi. director of 
marketing and investment 
services, says the bank plans 
to increase the West Bank 
branches from eight to 12 
and plans a new branch in 
Gaza. He is cautious about 
the future of the West Bank: 
"There are still many its and 
buts." he says. ‘The changes 
hav e been traumatic." 

Mohumed Ali Ibrahim, as- 
sistant general manager of 
the Bank of Jordan, opened 
a branch on the West Bank 
that has proved to be ex- 
tremely successful. "We 
plan to have eight branches 
in nil.” says MrTlbrahim. 

The bank is looking to 
merge u ith the Bank of Jor- 
dan and Kuwait. Negotia- 
tions have stalled because of 
staffing issues, but the deal 
is almost certain to go ahead. 
With a staff of about 1.500 
and a network of nearly 100 
branches, the new bank will 
become the second most 
powerful in Jordan, after the 
Arab Bank. 

M.F. 



The AJIB. like other Jordanian banks, is trying to decide how best to proceed to have a presence in the .’v’* J-j : 

Press Freedom: Important New Asset 





new era of press 
freedom has be- 
gun in Jordan 
following the in- 
troduction jus; over a year 
ago of a new press law. "AVe 
no longer hav e to look over 
our shoulders in fear." com- 
ments Nahil El-Sharif, edi- 
tor in chief of the influential 
daily new *.puper Ad Dus- 
tour. which has a circulation 
of 100.000. 

This was one of the three 
daily papers, plus the Eng- 
lish-Ianauace Jordan Times. 


Special judge 
for press 
law cases 


in existence before the new 
press law. Today, there are 
six Arabic daily newspapers, 
seven weeklies and at least 
17 political-party periodicals 
ranging from the extreme 
right to the extreme left. 

The government has more 
than a 50 percent share in 
some papers but is supposed 
to reduce this in time to a 
maximum of 50 percent. 


he. 


er is given by the MOL 
says. 

Under the new law, news- 
papers cannot insult the roy- 








Before the new law, the 
government had the power 
To ban a newspaper immedi- 
ately and imprison an editor 
or journalist 
without explana- 
tion. 

Nayef K. Mula. 
secretary general 
of the Ministry 
of Information 
and a former se- 
nior diplomat, 
says that the 
press is now 
changing (not al- 
ways for the bet- 
ter “as we have 
something of a 
tabloid mentality 
in some cases”) 
as part of the 
overall democra- 
tization procress. 

He feels that 
some of the 
more recent 
newspapers and 
weeklies need to 
become more The main page of the influential daily Ad 
p ro fe s s i o n a I . Dustour. 
more accurate 



to court.. ___ 4 = . 

but it has not dwaysriyi^ifex, 
case. TTiefc is ioV . ^ ~ ^ 
judge appointed tb 



forward, “For the . 

we asr jounialists -f^ js^er^ 
and we Jmow foat^are^ndL^. > J 
going trr be pe nalized "with- 'if j j 


and more responsible. ‘To 
help the press, the prime 
minister now gives two 
weekly briefings and unofo- 


al family, publish military 
details or anything that may 
be deemed contrary to the 
national interest. Several 


for our viewstpjl . . 

besays.-: • 

‘The govenin^itt^ I- ; 1 

and did - dos$ dpwh news- 
papers, ar re st edit 6r& < _ 
columnists aiwi : 'repttdters F;' 
without question up To - 
1992. r -! - ? V 

Mr. Nabil cites. the Occa- 
sion in 1989 whbgh the gov- 
ernment of Zeid A1 Rafai 
closed all tbe newspapers' on 
the pretext of an “economic. . 
emergency*’ because it did 
not want any opposition 
voiced to its policies.' 1 ’ • 

Mr. Nabil believes that to- 
day ’s ;freer press is one of 
Jordan's greatest assets and 
an important step' forward 
on the road to increased 
democracy. 

M.F. 


Phosphate 
r 




Arab Potaslh 
Company 


Millions of years have endowed Jordan with the raw ma- 
terial necessary for high -r quality fertilizers. 

By mining rock phosphate, extracting po- 
tassium chloride ahd producing fertiliz- 
ers, the/- fertilizer.', industry of Jordan 
endeavors to. utilize these natural re- 
sources and provide its customers* 
with products to meet their needs 

We in Jordan work tirelessly to de- 
liver the desired products to support our 
worldwide customers. Rigorous analysis 
throughout mini ^extraction and production, 
coupled with expedient delivery, have resulted in dependa- 
bility, quality products and high customer satisfaction. 

A TRADITION OF QUALITY 
EMBRACING STATE - OF 
THE ART TECHNOLOGIES 

Muriate of Potash 
Phosphate Rock | 

Diammonium Phos- 1 

phate; 

Phosphoric Acid; 
Aluminium Flour ide. 






GREATER AMMAN 
MUNICIPALITY 

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

It is a great pleasure tor me uo invite you to 

pay a visit ro Greater Amman. 

Amman, the capital ot Jordan, has grown 
steadily during the pasr 40 years. Lentil the 
1950's the population stood at around 
100,000 persons but an influx of forced 
migrants has led to a surge in population 
growth, and Greater Amman now has more 
than one million inhabitants. 

The municipality had limited financial 
resources to cope with rhe rapid increase of 
population and expansion of the city. 
Nevertheless, in spite of the strains and 
stresses caused by the rise in population 
and lack of adequate economic support, 
the municipality has managed to provide 
sufficient infrastructure and services to 
meet demands: particular attention has been 
paid to the local environment, and Amman 
has distinguished itself among the world's 
capitals by becoming one ol the cleanest 
cities. 

Amman has been transformed into a 
thoroughly modern dry with a wide range 
of daily services and facilities, both new and 
traditional, to meet rhe needs of its citizens. 

It provides all kinds of social amenities - 
public libraries, children's clubs and gardens 
- which can be found throughout the city. 
The municipality has also helped foster a 
variety of cultural and artistic activities to 
help improve the quality of life. 

Wishing you a pleasant stay in Amman, 
please accept my wholehearted invitation. 

Dr. Mamdouh Abbadi, 

The Lord Mtiwr of Qrcater Amman 


Aqaba Welcomes 
End of Delays 


T 


he ending of 
the United Na- 
tions naval 
blockade on 
trade with Iraq is the best 
news that the Jordan port of 
Aqaba has had in over three 
years. 

“We want this thorn out of 
our side,” says an official of 
the Jordanian Foreign Min- 
istry. “It is now only a mat- 
ter of putting things into 
practice, and we have agreed 
to onshore inspections by 
Lloyd’s Register. The whole 
matter has questioned our 
confidence and integrity.” 
He estimated that the siege 
of Aqaba Port had cost Jor- 
dan S 1 .3 million in lost busi- 
ness. 

Times have certainly been 
hard for the port. The Gulf 
War and its aftereffects, par- 
ticularly the United Nations 
embargo and the strict su- 
pervision of goods coming 
into Aqaba, have cut valu- 
able transit traffic to Iraq, 
pushed up shipping costs 
and hence raw material and 
retail costs within Jordan, 
and discouraged internation- 
al shipping. 

Total tonnage through the 
port declined from 13.3 mil- 
lion tons in 1992 to 1 1.6 mil- 
lion in 1993, while re-ex- 
ports to Iraq went from 2.09 
million tons in 1992 to 1.27 
million tons. 

Industry observers were 
beginning to worry that traf- 
fic diverted to ports such as 
Beirut and Lalakia would 
never return. 

Jordanians have always 
believed that the blockade 
on Aqaba was a form of po- 
litical pressure on Jordan. In 
three years of operation. 
1.700 ships were closely in- 
spected and some 8.500 
hoarded. No cargo was 
found that contravened the 
sanctions on Iraq. 

The slowdown in traffic 
has discouraged new devel- 
opments within the port. The 
port's corporation director. 


General Dureid Mahasaneh, 
says activity has been main- 
ly restricted to updating ex- 
isting equipment and carry- 
ing out feasibility studies on 
new projects that will only 
be viable when the port is 
folly back to normal. 

Even with the easing of 
the embargo procedures, the 
best medium-term prospects 
for the port lie in the expan- 
sion of industrial activity 
within Jordan and in the de- 
velopment of the commer- 

Steady expansion of 
free-zone 
facilities planned 


dal and industrial free zones 
in Aqaba, rather than the 
Iraqi transit traffic. 

Minerals make up half of 
the total tonnage of exports, 
and major expansions under 
way by both the phosphate 
and potash companies 
should add significantly to 
totals within foe next three 
years. A tender for a project 
to upgrade the phosphate 
berth has been issued, and 
plans to remove foe berth to 
foe southern end of foe port 
are also under consideration. 

The Free Zones Corpora- 
tion is continuing a steady 
expansion of its Aqaba facil- 
ities. 

It already operates three 
commercial free zones in foe 
Aqaba region, and foe site of 
foe new Japanese-Jordanian • 
fertilizer venture on the 
Aqaba coast has been de- 
clared a private free zone. 
Plans are also under way for 
a 6.5 million square meter 
industrial zone on the south- 
ern coast. Once this and foe 
new minerals ventures are 
working, foe port authorities 
should be able to dust off 
their feasibility studies and . 
get back to wider develop- 
ment work. 

Pamela Dougherty 


This advertising section was produced m its entirely 
by tlie supplements division of foe International Her- 
ald Tribune’s advertising department * It was wriB^i - 
by Pamela Dougherty, a writer based tn Amruah who ' 
is Jordan correspondent for the Middle East Economic; 1 
Digest, and by Michael Frenchman, a free-tence .J 
writer based in the United Kingdom who often writes vf 1 
about the Middle East 













Iff 


u 




. »J ((;: 1 1 1 >-:■#:¥*- » ' |Ki» I J > J * L* 


a -ll* lit 1 f-s>; ill r iTa I uTi rrii fTTIyr? 


in l952, is one of the longest rel^^ nKjnarchs in tfie world and is a d/rect ttescenctert 
ofthe prophet Moftamn waThe king was bom bn November 14, 1935 and was educated at 




two brothers, Crown Prince Hassan end Prince Mohammad , and a sister, Princess Basma. 




^wnan, capital of Jordan, home to more than 1 milBon people. 


the ktng)4md« lower house {80 efecfe^membeis). Free elections ewe Hist held in 198& In 
•thelastefect^^ 



His Majesty King Hussein bin Talal, ruler of Jordan since 1952. 


AVIATION 



77ie Queen AKa International 
airport Amman, offers 
complete engine overhaul 
facilities. 


After long deliberations, the government has decided to 
write off the $48 million debt incurred by its national airline, 
Royal Jordanian, prior to possible privatization. 

RJ, which began in 1963 with a single DC-7 and two 
Handley Page Heralds obtained from the Royal Jordanian 
Air Force, now has a fleet of five Lockheed Tristars, six 

Airbuses, two Boeing 727s 
and three Boeing freighters. 

“We are now planning to 
upgrade our Tristars to 
Airbus Industrie A-340S for 
some of our long-range 
routes,” says Akel Biltaji, 
executive vice president for 
marketing and services. 
RJ's plans include direct 
flights from Amman to New 
York, and it Is looking 
closely at the Latin 
American market (Argen- 
tina, Brazil and Chile), 
where there are at least 20 
million Arabs. RJ is also 
examining alliances with 
other regional Middle East 
airlines. 

RJ has a key role to play 
in boosting the tourist 
industiy (ft already offers a 
free stopover in Amman or 
Petra). “We are examining all our products and services as 
well as consolidating some of our routes,” says Mr. Biltaji. 
With the new peace accord between Palestine and Israel 
and the possibility of a much wider peace in the near future, 
he would like to see RJ becoming the “airline of the holy 
lands.” 

"Whether you want to visit Jerusalem or Makfcah, whether 
you are Christian or Muslim, RJ can fly you to the different 
holy shrines," says Mr. Biltaji. 

RJ offers complete engine overhaul facilities at its 
maintenance center for Boeing 727s. 707s, Lockheed 
TriStars and Airbuses, and it services a number of foreign 
airlines. It provides training services for cabin crews and has 
one of the only fuR-sized fuselage simulators in the region. 


'TRANSPORTATION 


An extensive privatization program has been carried out in 
cooperation with the Public Transport Corp., which was 
estab lished in 1975 to cover the Greater Amman area. The 
PTC has a fleet of 240 buses and 50 minibuses. Under the 
government’s policy of greater private involvement, 13 new 
transportation companies operating routes under the 
supervision of the PTC have been established. The private 
bus fleets total about 450 vehicles and contribute about 250 
mIHion dinars to the PTC’s total annual revenue. About 
350,000 persons use buses daily, of which about 250,000 
use the private buses. 


WATER 


About 90 percent of the country receives an average of 
less than 200 millimeters of rainfall a year, of which only 
some 5 percent remains as surface water, the rest 
recharging the groundwater reservoirs. There is concern 
over the future of water resources following an increase in 
demand after the 1991 influx of refugees from Kuwait Water 
sources are limited, with Jordanians having only about 180 
cubic meters of water a year, one of the lowest supplies in 
the world. (The international standard for sound social and 
economic development is 1,000 cubic meters per capita.) 

Water is a major political issue in the region, the subject of 
bilateral talks and a factor in the genera) peace talks in the 
region. With the help of a number of international donors, the 
government has been giving priority to conserving and 
expanding water resources, which are essential for social 
and economic development. About 97 percent of the 
population has access to potable water, and 60 percent of all 
households are connected to public sewage systems. 

The gap between supply and demand amounts to more 
than 237 million cubic meters. Last year, total consumption 
rose to 984 mfifoacubfc meters, of which about 75 percent 
was used for irrigation, 22 percent for domestic use and the 
remainder for industry. 

The national water balance for the year showed that 610 
million cubic meters were available from surface water 
resources: 401 million cubic meters were consumed, and 
the remainder was unused runoff. Renewable groundwater 
resources amounted to about 276 million cubic meters, but 
almost 465 million cubic meters were extracted, the safe 
yield being thus overpumped by 189 million cubic meters. 
Treated wastewater amounting to 50 million cubic meters 
was almost ail used for irrigation. 

Limited resources have led to rationing in the hot summer 
months. The greater Amman area, where 45 percent of the 
population of the country lives, suffers from severe 
shortages. Farmers, Including those in the natural 
"greenhouse” of the Jordan Valley, are unable to maximize 
crop potential because of limited water supplies. Industries 
are also hard hit 

The water-supply situation is becoming more critical as the 
population grows at an average rate of 3.6 percent per year, 
ft is estimated that the total resources available by the year 
2010 will be just overt billion cubic meters, a shortfall of 660 
million cidxc meters from the demands of a population that is 
predicted to have risen to 7.3 million. - 

The government, in conjunction with the Ministry of Water 
and Irrigation, the Jordan Valley Authority and the Water 


. the Land: Jordan shares 

borders with Syria to tf»n<xn 

lraqto theeast,Palestir»^ 
the West Bank to the west ajxj 
Saudi Arabia to the east and 
south. Total area Is 57,304 
square miles. Jordan has an 
outlet to.the Bad Sjea in* * 

southwest through toe 

Aqaba. The Dead Sea on to 
central western border » 
kswest point on earth - « 
metere below sea level. 


• The People: The population 
(1992) Is about 35 milEon The 
birth rate is 5J> percent, and 
the death rate, which is faffing, 
is 3.4 percent Approximately 
64 percent ofthe people five in 
urban areas. Amman has a 
population of Just oyer 1. 
million. Zarqa, population 
420.000. is the second-largest 
dty. 


• The Climate; The capital, 
Amman, has cloudless sunny 
days from May to early 
November, with average 
temperatures well over 25 
degrees centigrade, but 
evenings can be chiBy. Winters 
can be cold and wet, but it Is 
much sunnier and drier In toe 
Red Sea resort of Aqaba and 
in the Jordan Valley. 


Authority of Jordan, is defining a strategic water policy with 
toe assistance of a number of bilateral and internal donor 
and technical aid programs. The main aims are to: 

• Improve the institutional and administrative organizations 
in the water sector. 

- Design and implement a medium- and long-term water 
policy, updating the 1978 National Water Master Plan. 

• Introduce new irrigation techniques to help sustain 
agricultural production levels in the Jordan Valley. 

" Repair and modernize the Greater Amman domestic 
water distribution system to reduce wastage. 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


A new telecommunications law is to be introduced soon to 
allow greater participation by the private sector. At present 
private involvement is limited to the supply of some 
equipment. According to the minister of post and 
communications, Tareq Suheimat, the government will use 
existing bylaws to pave the way for privatization by putting 
parastatal communications entities on a profit-making basts. 
The new strategy is to make the Telecomunications 
Corporation (TCC), established in 1971. the service 
provider, while the Ministry of Posts and Communications 
becomes responsible for policy and supervision. 

The government has decided to go ahead with a mobile 
GSM communications system to be granted through a 
special license to a local company in conjunction with a 
foreign supplier later this year. Tenders from eight 
companies are currently being evaluated for an initial 
15,000-channel system. Motorola, according to local 
sources, is toe top runner, but its assembly plant in Israel 
has caused discussions on its boycott status. 

Once tenders have been accepted, toe new GSM system 
will be available in the Greater Amman area within one year. 
It will be extended over the next three years to cover 95 
percent of the population. Demand for telephone lines has 
risen from 60,500 in 1980 to 308,000 at the end of 1993. 
Between now and 1998, TCC plans to install another 
266,000 lines plus 200 more automatic digital exchanges, 
bringing the total to 838. 


HEALTH 


Earlier this month, King Hussein laid the foundations for a 
$75-mi!lion, 643-bed hospital at the Jordan University of 
Science and Technology in Irbid. King Hussein said that the 
new King Abdullah Hospital will "provide excellent 
opportunities for future doctors to attain the highest 
academic qualifications." The hospital, financed by the Arab 
Fund for Economic Development and the Islamic 
Development Bank, will have a staff of 3,000. Construction, 
being carried out by a Spanish company, will be completed 
by late 1997. When finished, the hospital will bring the ratio 
of hospital beds to population down from 12 per 10,000 to 9 
per 10,000. It will be able to handle 1 ,000 outpatients a day. 

Jordan is highly respected for toe quality and excellence of 
its health services, led by the Royal Medical Services.The 
RMS covers about one-third of the population and operates 
1 1 hospitals (four in toe capital area) with a total of 1 ,662 
beds. In 1992 the RMS treated 1.4 million outpatients and 
carried out nearly 30,000 operations, of which 1 ,000 
involved heart surgery. 


AGRICULTURE AND IRRIGATION 


With toe help of international organizations and aid funds, 
a number of major agriculture and irrigation projects are 
under way. The basic objective is to increase irrigation, 
conserve the soil and improve crop yields and efficiency, 
thus helping to create a better socio-economic environment 
in rural areas. Some of the main projects are the Zarqa river 
basin, the Hamad basin and a project to assist farming in 
high lands. 


FREE ZONES 


There are several free zones in Jordan, including Aqaba, 
which was established in 1973. This is an extensive project, 
with warehousing, storage yards, cold storage and manufac- 
turing facilities. There are plans to convert the whole of Aqa- 
ba into a single free zone. The other main free zone is at Zar- 
ka, just northeast of Amman, with a total area of 5.5 million 
square meters. The zone contains more than $200 million 
worth of commercial and industrial investment 


INVESTMENT 


The government plans to liberalize existing legislation so 
as to encourage foreign investment, joint ventures and the 
transfer of technology. 

Jordan has an advantage in that it can offer one of the 
highest skill bases in the Middle East and a flexible work 
force. Under the 1988 Encouragement of Investment Law, 
toe following incentives apply: 

• No customs duties on fixed assets and spare parts. 

• Income and real-estate tax holidays of five to 15 years. 

• Deductible accumulated toss allowances. 

• Building and land tax exemption for five to seven years 
from approval of project 

• Land leasing at concessionary rates outside Amman. 

• Repatriation of capital in three equal installments. 

• Tax-free interest and dividends. 

• Annual repatriation of cfividends. 

• Protection against some manufactured imports. 


AMMAN FINANCIAL MARKET 


In 1993, the Amman stock exchange boomed as new 
issues flooded the market The total new money invested in 
the issues was about $340 million, indicating toe size of the 


* Language: Arabic is the 
official language, but English is 
spoken widely and French to a 
lesser extent. Jordan has one 
of the highest literacy rates 
(about 85 percent) In toe Arab 
world. 


• Office Hours: Government 
offices are open from 8 A.M. 
until 2 P.M. Private-sector 
offices are often open in the 
late afternoons for between 
two and four hours. Friday is a 
holiday, and most offices close 
after lunchtime on Thursdays. 


untapped liquidity in toe commercial banking system. There 
has since been some slackening off, but new issues for the 
first quarter of this year totaled approximately $120 million. 
Altogether, more than 80 shares are listed on the exchange, 
which is one of toe best regulated in toe Middle East The 
average daily trading volume is between S3 million and $5 
million. “There has been a slight decline in activity compared 
to last year,” comments Jalil F. Tarif , senior deputy general 
manager of Amman Financial Market “At present following 
toe Israei-Palestine accord, there is a wait-and-see attitude." 

The government is trying to encourage more new 
investment in private companies. Foreigners can purchase 
shares through a listed broker (there are 28 brokerage 
houses in Amman) after receiving approval from the Prime 
Ministry. They can also invest in development and corporate 
bonds. 


TOURISM 


Mohammad A. Adwan, minister of tourism and antiquities, 
described in toe following interview toe government’s hopes 
and plans for tourism. 

What are the main strategic points for the development of 
tourism, one of Jordan's principal natural resources? 

We are confident that toe future for tourism is promising 
and bright, especially foliowring toe Israeli-PaJestinian accord 
and the hope of a lasting peace in the region. The 
government plans to privatize toe tourist sector as much as 
possible and to pull out of direct investment 

During the past six months, we have been reviewing toe 
tourist sector, to which we attach great importance because 
of its potential to enhance mutual understanding between 
nations away from the whims of political events. The 
government is playing an active role in coordinating a more 
integrated policy. We hope to ensure that by creating more 
income and jobs, there will be more balanced socio- 
economic development throughout the regions of Jordan. 

At the same time, it is important that we safeguard our 
environment and heritage. We have more than 100,000 
archaeological sites, in addition to such well-known places 
as Petra and Jerash. We are taking steps for greater 
coordination between the public and private sectors as well 
as between non-profit-making organizations, such as the 
Petra Trust, and various 


international archaeological 
institutions and donor 
agencies. The Jordan 
Tourist Board is being 
reactivated as an umbrella 
organization to pool 
marketing and pro-motion 
resources. We should also 
like to revive domestic 
tourism, in which we believe 
the private sector has an 
important rote to play. 

How are you going to 
encourage more private 
investment? 

We hope to improve 
existing legislation and 
create a better investment 
climate through greater 
incentives and proper 
coordination. At present; 
these are available through 
the Investment Encourage- 
ment Law, which is being 
reviewed. 

How are you going to 
improve the tourist infra- 
structure? 

In order to encourage 
more private-sector in- 
volvement. the government 
plans to provide the basic 
infrastructure (water, power, 
roads, sewage treatment 
and telecommunications). 

We are revising our master 
plans for toe development of 
toe major tourist areas - Petra, toe Dead Sea and Aqaba. 
Petra is a priority, and plans for toe Dead Sea are under 
review. We are trying to encourage the private sector to 
invest in services needed by tourists. 

How many hotels and beds are there at present? How 
many new hotels are under construction? 

We have 7.000 classified hotel rooms (13,000 beds). By 
the end of next year, we expect to add another 1 ,400 rooms 
(2,800 beds). About 1 ,000 of these wifi be in seven new 
hotels (all four-star or five-star) being built in toe Petra area. 
However, we are postponing any further new hotel licenses 
in Petra and toe Dead Sea until the regional master plans 
have been completed. The private sector is eager to invest, 
and I already have several proposals for throe two areas. 

How many tourists visited Jordan last year, and how many 
are expected this year? 

The total last year was 765,000, and we expect an 
increase of around 25 percent by the end of 1994. 

How mud) foreign exchange is earned from tourism, and 
what does it contribute to the GDP? 

Provisional figures for 1993 show that receipts from 
tourism amounted to 390 million dinars ($560 million). This 
represents 11 percent of GDP and makes it the thircHargest 
foreign-exchange earner. 

We believe Jordan will be a natural focal point for those 
planning a visit to Jordan in addition to other destinations in 
the region. 

Discussions are under way for a joint promotion with 
Palestine. Syria and Lebanon. However, our thrust will be on 
promoting Jordan as a destination in rts own right. 





Mohammad A. Adwan, min- 
isbr of tourism and antiqui- 
ties; drove, a bujkting In an- 
cient Petra, Jordan's most 
popular tourist attraction. 


• Visas: All travelers require 
visas, available from Jordanian 
consulates at a cost of 
approximately $49.50. Most 
foreigners can obtain visas on 
arrival at Queen Alia 
International Airport in Amman. 


• Time: Seven hours ahead of • Currency: The Jordanian 
U.S. Eastern Standard Time dinar is divided into 1.000 fils, 
and two hours ahead of One dinar is approximately 
Greenwich Mean Time. equivalent to $1 .50. 


Ministry of fnfon**a!ip^FaBo*1$4S, 


•' Tet^woeiait 467 or 628801. ; .* *: 


mt: 

oil 


he shined 
Him could 
>»ughi rhaf 
tfd iheJOlh 
. Board of 
'cine t'lUin 
legal scgn-- 

:s. Otaris 

untouched 


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supervisors 
rime minis- 
nighi hell- 
vcrk u> Jo. 
i Glohc as 
d that rhey 
service for 


while ac- 
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employes 
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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TKISUNfc, V£,DN'£a?DA*, MAI 2o, 199-1 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


advertising section 


; ££ 


{trading foreign 
<jf' t investment to 

!§' Jordan's industri- 

W<ajw til sector has nev- 
er been easy, but both its 
major minerals producers 
now have large-scale joini 
ventures with* - foreign part- 
ners. The Jordan Phosphate 
Mines Company (JP.MO 
and the Arab Potash Compa- 
ny ( APC > are well advanced 
on programs to expand and 
diversify their production 
with the aim of broadening 
Jordan's industrial hast and 
securing long-term markets 
for its'major natural re- 
soua*e. 

JPMC E pushing to com- 
plete phase one of (he 
ShiJiych mine development 
program, which will bring 
production to 5.5 million 
metric tons by 1995. and is 
going ahead with feasibility 
studies for stage two. which 
will bring another 5.5 mil- 
lion tons annually. 

The JPMC managing di- 
rector. Samel) Mudnni. says 
his goal is to see production 


major projects, including 
joint ventures in Turkey and 
Thailand to produce phos- 
phoric acid. 

APC is also involved in 


equipment. They have had 
some success with the estab- 
lishment of at least one spe- 
cialist engineering company 
at the Suhab Industrial Es- 


pi eking up. li jumped Irorrt 
$250 mi Hioti in 1992 to 








i .vitm-. 


£ - v . r 
?•"> , ' .C\a 


XvG.'" “LfF ■V^vr?'! 'L*.sA 




i ■■ ■ 
iv C ' ■/ 




Central plara in the Amiium Industrial O -tuples. where 250 
i‘i wipunies have established Jach >ries. 


M ore manufactured 
goods are 
being exported 


of 10 million tons annually, 
with 30 percent to 40 per- 
cent of it converted locally 
into intermediate products 
and fertilizers. 

The first of the diversifi- 
cation projects is with a 
Japanese consortium, the 
Nippon Jordan Chemical 
Company, which will pro- 
duce fertilizers in Aqaba. 
The $80- mi Hi on company 
v.a> formed in 1992 as the 
Nippon Jordan Fertilizer Co. 
and plans to produce up to 
300.(>00 tons a year of com- 
pound fertilizers, which will 
be exported to Japan. 

The second is the Indo- 
Jordan Chemicals Compa- 
ny. which is to be located 
close to the mine in 
Shidiy eh. The company, 
which* was formed just over 
a year ago. will produce 
224.<iOO tons of phosphoric 
acid a year, all of which w ill 
be exported to India. The 
$15b-miUion project will 
use about 750.000 ions of 
phosphate ruck a year. 

JPMC expects to lake a 
minoriiy share in a project 
for di ammonium phosphate 
production in Pakistan. It is 
•lcjoiiuiinn several other 


major new ventures. A re- 
cently completed expansion 
at its Dead Sea works has 
boosted capacity u> | .4 mil- 
lion metric tons in 1 994. and 
it .should rise to l.o million 
tons in 1995. Studies have 
already been completed for 
a new phase of expansion 
that should bring production 
to 2.2 million ions. 

APC has four diversifica- 
tion schemes on its books. A 
long-talked-of S 140-million 
project to produce bromine 
and bromine derivatives in a 
venture with the Ethyl Corp. 
of the United States is final- 
ly moving forward. Other 
projects include production 


late near Amman that is 
manufacturing equipment 
for the mining, petrochemi- 
cal and cement sectors. 

The Sahab estate itself is 
one of several industrial ar- 
eas in .Amman now bursting 
with new ventures as many 
small and medium-sized in- 
dustrial companies are set 


Samih Darwuzeh. head of 
the Jordan Trade Associa- 
tion and managing director 
of one of Jordan's crop of 
successful pharmaceutical 
manufacturing and export- 
ing companies, admits dial 
Jordanians have traditionally 
been more interested in trad- 



.0^ ■* 

'Ssi w jfcs 


•■jY ,wS y l r «. 


ARAB POTASH COMPANY 


l|P| 

sr*&y 




SSgg; 


* . w.\ .. %/» V>t« .« V. vw . »"»•* ** « .Wk," «<•» >■■# . ■ v«»4W' a Wf« *\ck! ?<»* 

Mineral production with foreign part tiers is helping in 
bn ’tidal J< >rdun '.v industrial ha w. 


of industrial salt. potassium 
sulfate and dicalcium phos- 
phate. A pilot plant for mag- 
nesium oxide production N 

already operating. 

The two companies are 
hoping that their expanded 
activity will stimulate local 
industry to cater more to its 
need for spare parts and 


ing w irh other countries' 
goods than manufacturing 
their own. Now. he says, the 
membership of the Jordan 
Travle Association ha> 
grown from around 20 com- 
panies in 198$ k> 80 today, 
all of them w illi a serious in- 


terest in exporting. 
Industrial investment is 


around $3d0 million in 
1995. Khaiuoun Abu Has- 
san. chairman of the Cham- 
ber of Industry. Iwlicves that 
Jordan's industrial secior is 
increasingly versatile but 
still far from fulfilling its po- 
tential. “1 still believe there 
is a great need lor industrial 
expansion." he says. “The 
number of companies regis- 
tered and die Jet cl of imesi- 
ment an? well below our am- 
bitions." 

The lex el of financing 
available within the country 
for investment is underused, 
and most observers believe 
it will take a combination of 
a thorough overhaul of laws 
regulating the economy, 
something the Ministry of 
Finance has promised for 
1994, ^d genuine peace fur 
the sector to fulfil its poten- 
tial. 

There is some concern 
that many new industrial 
ventures Jo little more than 
copy the success of others. 
The mushrooming of phar- 
maceutical companies is 
common iy cited - Jordan 
will soon have 15 manufac- 
turers. Critics do not alway s 
admit that this growth in 
numbers is in itself an ini.eri~ 
tive for greater development 
within the industry, with 
companies moving into raw 
materials production and 
more sophisticated laborato- 
ry and packaging activity. 

Jordan's industrial sector 
is still in its infancy, bui it i> 
the sector that offers the best 
prospects for substantial job 
creation and a long-ierm im- 
provement in the trade bal- 
ance. Companies nre enjoy- 
ing great success in tupping 
nomraditional markets. The 
sudden cutoff of the Iraqi 
and Gulf markets at the time 
of the Gulf War has gone a 
long way to curing local ex- 
porters of their tendency to 
rely on easy regional sales. 

At present, the trade gap 
remains worrying)) niTie. 
with imports in 1 995 at 2.2 
billion Jordanian dinars 
($5.5 billion) and exports 
only 04 1 million dinars. 

The nows is not all bud. 
however. The share of man- 
ufactured goods in expons is 
rising, and new markets arc 
coming on line, while the 
imports total in l u A? includ- 
ed a substantial share of rju 
materials and equipment, 
good signs that industry L 
beginning to forge a new 
role. P.D. 


„ f 


i 

3 



I IgrapeS 



.. . -L • 'A.. G " \ }d \ ; V>; 

•. . : . .v, .. • ; ••• ■ 

;-*v. - 1?.' - •’ ■ ■ ■ . 


With ;.rrne::tn.\ ru >re than .'J *.*/ 1 Luc- <rs a thiv at Petra, the most p> -pulnr historic site in Jordan, then' is sen- ms concern 
jhrut wfceojrdi’pj the em ir. mount. Although some newfualities mid hotels have been buiit nearly to cope with the 
inji-tr oi :.tiri:.s v, a halt hi further development has been called pending a review of a master plan for Petra. "We have to 
Keep iht. sue t feiin and safe . " vtm Safinm Kk Tell, director g niernt of the Antiquities D<i{xalmenl. Another problem 
fa.-iny n\ i'f, emmen; tv trial af « he nrg.ini zed theft of tretisures and nnifaclK fmm the fOO.OfXi listeil sites. Mr. Te.U Says. 
:;:n: t Anr. Vi,*, -rv "ore conducting ptnuranged work on befudf of commercial centers both inside and outside of the 


.o.Vi.vr. 


•wi -+•* rw*'^A' v..«i«nr** 




e&gsi 





wmmhs 

MM 


Lifting of Blockade Helps Economy 


7T low l\ but sureb. . 


L:f "» j.o Ji.-rJanN n«er- 
: Pur-Jcned econc- 




I 




Ww 





mm 



--mm. - ■ » ^ 


nty is creeping 
back to normality. The 
peace process will undoubt- 
edly ease the overall situa- 
tion. and the recent lifting of 
the blockade of Aqaba, 
which is estimated to nave 
cost the country some SM.3 
billion in lost business, 
could not have come at a 
better time. 

The Gulf War cost Jordan 
about another billion in 
lost trade with Iraq. Kuwait 
and Saudi Arabia. Compar- 
ing this vwih the estimated 
national debt of about 57 bil- 
lion shows the enormous 
impact of the difficulties 
Jordan experienced because 
of the war over Kuwait. 

Signs i >1 a recovery in- 
clude: 

• Inflation has been held at 


around 4 percent for the past 
two years and is likely to re- 
main ai that figure during 

* Total gross domestic 
product in (995. according 
to Ministry' of Finance fig- 
ures. was 3.59 billion Jor- 
danian dinars ($5.4 billion), 
and erowth is forecast at 5.5 


percent. 

• Imports were 2.23 bil- 
lion dinars and exports 641 
million dinars, for a trade 
gap of 1.59 billion dinars. 
Exports are expected to in- 
crease by 10 percent. 

“We face a big challenge 
to achieve the momentum 
and growth anticipated in 
the 1993-1997 Plan, while at 
the same lime we have to 
deaf with die constraints im- 
posed on our economy, 
namely to balance the debi." 
says ZiaJ Fariz. the minister 
uf planning. “There is a need 


for continuous and deter- 
mined efforts.” 

Unlike previous plans, 
which hud been purely in- 
vest mem-oriented, the pre- 
sent one aims to free the 
markei economy, create an 
investment environment and 
give a greater role to the pri- 
vate sector. “We need to cre- 
ate an e.xpori-led growth 
based on both manufactur- 
ing and services.” says the 
minister. “Wc have a chal- 
lenge to develop the services 
sector, which occupies 70 
percent of our gross domes- 
tic product, and to make it 
more market-oriented." 

The minister hopes that 
tourism, which accounts for 
10 percent of foreign-ex- 
change earnings, can be fur- 
ther developed. and much is 
expected of other services in 
the computer and consultan- 
cy fields. “Wc have the right 


environment here in Jordan. 
We have the .stability and we 
have the brain power." adds 
the minister. 

He believes that the dy- 
namics for economic suc- 
cess are in place. One indi- 
cation of change was last 
year's mini -boom on the 
stock market as some $340 
million worth of new issues 
were offered. 'There was a 
boom not only in the sec- 
ondary market but also in 
the primary market, which 
has been really significant 
for us." comments Jalil 
F.Turif. deputy' director gen- 
eral of the Amman Financial 
Markei. “As we ny to imple- 
ment the IMF guidelines, the 
overall performance of the 
economy during the past 
three years has been good. 
And also the peace pn>eess 
is having a beneficial effect 
on the market." M.F. 


mm 

Wm 




mm 

mm 






Palestinians: The Ties That Bind 




Petra. One of the most breathtaking places you'll ever see. An entire city, cjrved 
•'insight out of the rose-red rock and dating back over two thousand years. Yet it is 
only one of the jewels in Jordan's crown, jewels which make a stopover in Jordan 
an unforgettable experience. 

To those who like to make the most of their trip. Royal Jordanian offers the sce- 
nic route. Because even a short slay in Jordan slays with you forever. 



ITFS35J1 cspilc the sluw pace of the 
E ”\ '« peace process. Jordan's 
»-'■ .v J business executives are 
jjt ua.'iing no time in finding 
their way iu the Wcm Bank and Gu/a. 
“Jordanians and Palestinians are natur- 
al and historical partners." says Pales- 
tinian businessman Maher Masri. 

The economic and political condi- 
tions in which the Jordanians will be 
working are still far from settled, but 
they stun w ith j number of advantages. 
Jordanian bank-, arc already reopening 
the branches they were forced to close 
in 1967. and the Jordanian dinar will be 
one of the currencies of the self-rule ar- 


ment and Development Co., is regis- 
tered in Liberia but has strong Jordan- 
ian connections. Its founding members, 
who include some of Jordan’s most 
prominent Palestinian and Jordanian 
business names, arc placing their prior- 
ity on housing and hotel projects and 
on small and medium-sized industries. 
But they hope also to provide services, 
managerial expertise and strategic ad- 
vice toother new investors. 

In the immediate aftermath of the 
September I9 l »5 agreement between 




Dynamics of success 



RDYALJORDANIAN 


rtSIails 

Fur.^ f^.an ° r 

P ° y , 3 r U> as*" 15 


The tics between the two populations 
are close. Many Jordanian companies 
started life on tiie West Bank. anJ oth- 
ers have maintained activities there 
throughout the past 27 years. New in- 
vestors can often call on family mem- 
bers residing in the Occupied Territo- 
ries to help <ci up offices. 

The Israel i government has begun 
granting residence permits in Palestini- 
ans living outside the Occupied Terri- 
tories who gui.raiisce investments of at 
least MIKU**' m new projects, an otfer 
Jordan-based Palestinians are taking 


arc in place 


The most 'ubsUiMial new privulc- 
N-ecior venture announced lor the West 
Bank and Gaza, the Palestine Invcst- 


ihe Israeli government and the PLO. 
there were some fears that Jordan was 
being left out of the agreement and 
would lose economic benefits. But 
prominent members of the business 
community, such ax Paleslinian-horn 
Nidu! Sukhliun. who has extenM'c in- 
terests on both sides nl the river, be- 
lieve tiiat development on the “Acs l 
Bank "will also give Jordan a great 
push, economically, technologically 
and in terms of human rc.s<»un. es." 

Like most businessmen. Mr. Sukhi- 
ian is hoping for a balanced economic 


agreement between Israel and the 
Palcsiiniatis. with encouragement on 
the Jordanian side, to ensure the 
healthy development or (he Palestinian 
economy. Israel Js now cutting utilities 
costs and vusivmis tariffs in an effort to 

attract the business that will follow u 

peace treaty, he says, and Jordan 
should make .sure that it is not left be- 
hind in terms ol reguhifions or pracrical 
matters such as improv ed road connec- 
tions. The PLu-isracli agreement of 
.April 2 ,J . 1994 allows for the import of 
a number ol strategic commodities, in- 
cluding oil. ccmenT ;uid f'hosphates. ei- 
ther from or v ia Jordan. 

Khnidoun Abu Huvain. chairman of 
the Jordan Chamber of Indusirv . is 
hoping that the two sides will cooper- 
ate in prevent die duplication of eco- 
nomic efforts. The chamber is planning 
a conference for Palestinian and Jo£ 
dunian private -sector organization!, in 
Amman in June in the hope that activi- 
ties can be coordinated. 

If the Palestinians get the Irce-market 


economy they arc hoping lor. this may 
be dill null io manage. After 27 vears 


of what one observer wa!K ”j process 
ol Uc-dcvcIopmcni." ificre tilav be a 
scramble for tnvc.simetu rather Than an 
orderly progression. However t! comes. 
Jt«rdan‘.s business community w ill be 
heavily involved. 

P.D. 


L -■* ' ' — 


a 





























































































































Page 20 




1 2-1 
o as 


J 7< 


t 97 

J 1C 




LEGEND OF TINTAGEL 


■U3' [43.5 m| Ocean passage moling lu<u- 
i\ motoryochi. Bull* Italy. !■*& Lfeyds Oass 
Accam for l 2 in i suites pj'.ri crew . bumrtuous 

inferior foesl no equip. Except ‘Inorw 

record 'lotib. Med For sole realishc price 


YACHTING PARTNERS INTERNATIONAL UK. T<bI [44) 0573 571723 • fax. [44) 0373 571720 


Frame TeL. [33] 93 34 01 00 Fax. (33| 93 34 20 40 



PHILANDERER 131.24' (40.00m), 

1992 FOR SALE AND CHARTER 


■ A superb hiijfi performance Wiling jochl 
cr/ai table m the MedilerTOtean 4m summer 
£>teflesit ncomtnodtnvyt far 8 it 10 guests 


MGEL EUSGESS Monaco. TeL (33) 93 50 22 04 - Fox. (33) 93 25 15 3* 
London, lot [44] 071 339 4366 - Fax. [44) 071 639 4329 




NATALINAB- for sail 




■ 5uperb 52 5 m PicducKi builf yachf in 
excellent ;?ndihcr.. Eicec'wnd fi.OOG mile 
range o! 12 f IrK Accommodation io the 
highest stand; - * jar iJwife 3 sdccns V<j;| 
dej> area me 1 * •: n Jy remorlobfe yacht 


CAMPS A NICHOLSONS FRANCE. TeL (33| 93 43 16 7j Fox. (33) 93 34 13 48 


BiS 


MOORINGS Luxury Class 


■ ■ f -rjra is wjHd's TCV iectiTjl sa! yachts All (hot 

.• zr-i'i -t;h ttt isfen: ru.M rietto r;« “ Vmsveia aH 

•i 'h cr-ry ccryr. -s fee z*p -jyc crcimfcn jhmc* r y 

: ssms.-ec r. 3 7 r . » itjj-.-e .if: :« 


r r ft|t 
m3 


MOOWNGS International France; TeL (33) 1 42 61 66 77 • 
Fax. (33) 1 42 97 43 58 

UK: TeL |44| 843 22 71 40 - Fax. [44} 843 22 87 84 


J-CLASS VELSHEDA 

Seriously for sale 


■ 1 2873° m Unique chance to buy one the 
world's 3 existing KJass [ 1 W2| under recons- 
truction Interior may be moiiW. All designs 
and bids from vancvs shipyards cvulile 
For further information, contact owner's office in France. Francine BrocnnL 

Fax. (33) 1 47 40 07 77 ■ Tef. (33) 1 47 40 00 40 


RENT A PRIVATE YACHT 


■ Cruise the Med oi quiet pace, throw die 
mast magic hidewoys on (ward one of our 
luxury privately owned motoryachts Highly 
quaiihaj staff wl help you to taybr your cnff- 
sing prcprwnme and wfl med aB your require- 
menfs ccrtcrJ our office in Mondelieu .France. 
MNT A YACHT, TeL |33| 93 49 74 04 - Fax. 133) 92 97 64 47 


JONGERT 20DS 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 


?.'X- '-•£ ■ EresistUs spacksis yacht coupled widi fajr 

. :rt _- l«s wadvrori' Most complete ritrurrerWwn 
ond equipml ever io be built into o tongen 

[ ' |11 ^ T 0 ®* 'Gnderdla ol Homble' is quite simply 

« -. !!] jirs t aT?gCnaym ! Kl i winfn 7? 3'/ 22. SClm. 6 berth m 3 cabins. 

dahffl International . Germcsry; Phone (49) 211/3555103 - Fax (49| 21 i/364030 




M.Y MIDSUMMER 


■ 40m morciryochl berthed in the South of 
Fiance lor sale and charter in the Med 1994 
season Comfortably accent 1 2 in 2 grand 
master stale rooms and 4 guest ocfans ensmle 
bathrooms Unique sundeck undurteied. luge 
Surfcjhmg area Top speed over 20 knots. 

Wormceion or brochure, contort TeL (44) 071 480 5516. Fax. (44) 071 480 5830 




BLUE ATTRACTION 


|>W 


■ 1 10' (33m|. Amds 1^83 Enensive rehr m 
|W 1. mduding new uphobfcry, carpets, gene 
rotors. pouBwtrli. etc. 2 * 435 hP '—AT. 1 ] Lr. 
3 000 miles rcmgo Accommodate 10 guess 
n 5 hmmn double cabins 7 crew Far char 
to m ihc Caribecn and Mediterranean. 
LUISSEN YACHTS Spam. TeL [34] 71 700443 - Fax. [34J 71 700351 


JONGERT 2100S 

FOR SALE AND AVA1ABIE FOR CHARIER 


■ Ihis modern slocp combines comfort aid 
speed with maximum safay at sea 'Sen era" 
is m eicrilenl condition and will male you 
feel completely at home. 69' 5721.1 Dm. 8 
(10) berths in 4 cabins 
data! international. Germany. T*L (49) 21 1/3355103 ■ Fax (49) 21 1/364030 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 





■w 


- M ■ V' I 

■wK*iL v . 


N 


| 

i 

MOORINGS 


Preferred Yachting Holidays 


B Widest [feet of uewed Yodit Oiartef 50 to 
llW customised. Crwse far fafflif)'. faends v 
carp and inceni trtrref. Carfcbean Bchamai. 
Pofyneao. Brochure, infa. res. pleare contocr 

MOORINGS WensMiand Fnwe TeL (33) 1 42 61 66 77 - Fox. (33) 1 42 97 43 58 

UK: Tel. (44) 843 22 71 40 - Fox. |44) 843 22 87 84 


131' MOTOR YACHT 

For sale by Tender 


3 launched Tior.soceon range, 
■lomfcnil# aic-vsnad^icr. tor !•! guesr. 
ord 3 ertn rcr ■ncj. d?;i!s ple*e canton 
cur cfics 



MOONEN 72 


FOR SALE 

■ This luxurious motoryadit has been desi- 
gngd (or wcfittafe entsmg with a hgh W 
cF comfort. 72'7 , /22.l8m 1 2 *Ve!*o 
Pwto/2 r 216 kW (2 » 292hpJ. Mariimm 
Speed 1 1 At, 8 berms in £ cobra. 


OS MARITIME LTD. UK - TeL [44) (0| 703 456 905 - fax. [44] (0) 703 <54 031 


A** inferaefiaaal Germany. TeL [49) 21 1 3555103 - Fax (49) 211 364030 


C0L0MBAI0 SUN 


/' f'A: , B llo’ (36— ml i«l Du^i world tniismc 

nxr soler baiatrd c ».ile '.rob b«j erf 
r '’jttaH&SfiJ '■ => ‘‘- citrr icl tenet sab *efl d fc-jres ciluxun. 

' •***/& '■'sdam '•;•} Up ro 

A .dour. efc^r^K:. sit.. circcre pne 


YAOfflNG PAKIHaS tKTrRNAJTONAi. 1*. Id [44j 0Z73 571722 - Fox. (44) 0273 571 720 
or France TeL (33) 93 34 01 00 Fox. 133) 93 34 50 40 



SEA CREST 

36m 140 


■ The ebssic aademcr.'s yacht. Sea.Cred is 
For sde end aho avaibbfe far charter. For 
fjjl informancn please cuntad our office in 
Ar.fibes France: Peter Insull's Yacht 
Marketing 


PETER 1N5UU'S TACHT MARKETING TeL [33) 93 34 44 55 - Fa*. (33) 93 34 92 74 


— • v ■ . 

r- " 

« .»•<•' • . . . ■ . 

EL BRAVO 208^4* {63.50m|, 1991 

FOR SALE AND SELECT CHARTER 

D Possibly the most e< citing m.ytorri large 
yade to become orotlable in tecenl times- 1 1 
double cabins. 3 ban. 2 aton:. swimming 
poof, helicopter drd etc 

MGEL BURGESS Monaco. TeL |33] 
London. Tel (44) 071 839 4 

93 50 22 64 • Fax. (33) 93 25 15 89 

366 - Fax. (44) 071 839 4329 



LADY SUFFOLK II 






141.08' [43.0OM], 1992 
FOR SALE AND CHARTER 

□ Tc/;r ;« C L scde mtena. spacious 
dori cw«: -zri .;r- iimcrtjde ai'j^nmoda- 
nvn tar up t IT cue;:: 


NSGtl BUHGESS Monaco. TeL (23) 9} 50 17 64 • Fax. [33] 93 25 15 89 
London. Td [«) 07] 839 4366 - Fax. (44| 071 839 4329 



AZIMUT 86' FLORIDA 


E3 lo :C n biili b. AJ'.VjT l«o Fit-iglttt 

, * ’* .'.V- 

■mm. :c;r^ - cesi'ner: ;ond AEiOoss FvD 


<Jw m: 1 'zfr.~. C-:; Eles \<n 50 tt ccr.-. 


mfc Hl l-IiZrs -2?.'. 21 '-r. .:nir)e speed 


ro : : £ i:i-le coc.r,s »&. orv bjtft 

Ti'T ■-T"- • v-^' 


CONTACT: UM ITT SPA Tel. (39) 1 1 9367271 - Fax. 139)11 936 7270- Mre a NLA TO 



XASTtRIA- FOR SAIL 

3 i ;,; C> f'umi built o e»:epti:ra t’jnird; Ktij ASrr. oJi: 
r.r, onl. i-nn hr pn-tfe -.-vs cr.rmcu-, »' vn at ")2?m 
’ ;i rem-jloble c-i-crra-:f -.Td?' :;•! :( speeds up 
I; Irch Fu.Tuihed ta’ ; zt ~. i j LC'C? arecs 


CAMPER t NICHOLSONS LONDON. TeL [44| 71 491 
2950 Fax. (44) 71 629 2068 


_ - ' 

. , .'.V-i.f , .. . 

PRINCESS TANYA 

Luxury charter b the Med and Cor2» 

■ (5? aOm) km metoryaebt reiy high 

spec 1961 Austin and fickengl tid Extern 
refuted refer* l?92. 2e840tfp Suber deal 
»rg Gtais speed 12 bnoh. 5upetb wood panri- 

Contort your Charter Broker for 

uB infwmatian cmd colour hrathura. 


V. ■ .- -• 

.V- ( . . ’:■ 

AZIMUT 90’ AK0MFA 

■ 27.43m fiaembss boat built Italy A2MUT 

IT \?r. AESOis Fufiefeorona. 2x1525 
rro Mill cruisirg ss«d 23 lou* Accom fcr 8 
in l do-jfcfe abra with pnvde baffi. sep crew 
quenser fcr t in 3 cabins 6 rrorAs wrtfAy 
cveo* Or. show m Hrto Korg. 

| CONTACT: AZIMUT SPA TeL (39) 1 1 93< 

k7271 fax. (39)11 936 7270i Mr* ONATO ' 



JAMAICA BAY -FOR CHARTS. 

■ A mcrwgfibred omcngsi charter yaclds. 
Ctas-’c hnes and tamttana! cngTsb mobago- 
ny jsteior far B guests in 4 rnfwtv Spooous 
ieexs wisile hr entertinng and rriaxing. 
K.gWy eipe.-i»r-red professional crew ensure 

CAMPER S NtCHOUONS LONDON. TeL 

(44) 71 491 2950 Fox. (44) 71 629 2068 


Lv,;> r. 





XHXE 


AIRCRAFT • HOUSES 


1 THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE 


>, CARS, YACHTS, CRUISING, AIRCRAFT, 


1 t “ ARTS,ANDUNIQUE PEOPLE. 



LUCKY DREAM, for sale. 

Also nvailoble for charter. 


FOR SALE GUY C0UACH 


■ For charter. UiS 30. 1 M per *es- far ,c 
to eight gueif. ir. taur JcuWe pn.jte state- 
rooms For sale ailing USS I 5 .V. For full 
tnioanaKan pleas; far Neil Ch?^rn 


BJORKLUFA) . OESTON A RUSE SJUU. TeL |33J 93 34 92 45 • Fax. (33) 93 34 84 25 


■ 'v? 1 * Valve diese! engines 2x306 o. 
•."HF Laron C. aL-tomatrc pilot. 760 000 FF 
HI rjr fjl! informahon. please contact 
dinner, cur office in Mandeheu 8 is tfie lea- 
ding soecialisf of motoryochts in 
.v^Jrtecanear. tea 
FRANCE. TeL [33] 93 49 74 04 • Fax. (33) 92 97 64 47 



JONGERT 22D 

FOR SALE 


■ 'For Two' ccmfcrtable. ;aie. beautiful, 
mduring Y/orlnadup af higfiai q«iey bol 
by one c? the wedd't most tenoned raids, 
hsdi made fcr ewr\ t/pj a! 'vealher and sea 
75723 20m 6 1 1 1 1 be.-ta; in J .aabrm 
Germany; TeL |49) 21 1/3555103 - Fax [49) 21 1/364030 



A & R LUXURY FAST OPEN 
POWERBOAT 


■ I2C lowpnAle up to 50 kn motoyahl buld 
in AL or FSP. Tvto cKesd one turbine wuteqeJ. 
Great f.mbaal from an experienced shipyard 


ABBUNG 8 RASMUSSEN. TeL (49) 421 733 532 - Fax. (49) 421 7 331 15 
US office in Ft Lauderdale. TeL (I) 3Q5 522 4007 -Fax. [1)305 522 116) 


itfgP^ 


PRINCESS ESRA 

Available for charter 


■ See d dose qoanen amken treasures, dal- 
phre iwimrsrig. myht oqup -rtf. urderwahy 
halting sysl h your esmfen .tab -j r Jtxua. 
wtth fish (ol t yaw bait, cnldren so>ba diimg. 
Inend taking a iwdnighi ip I n c -^1^ bay 
KARAD08Z YACHTING & TOURISM WC Td. 90 212 220 6965 - Fax. 90 212 32083 &3 





BENTLEY TURBO COUPE 

by the Royd Coochbuilders Hooper 
& ce. London 


B A handcrafted one oB motor car m the true 
pursue of excellence - for the *ery few who 
seek only the toy beJ' 


l enquiries to Germany. TeL (49) 6403 71791 



THE BEST OF THE BEST, 


■ 19.S9 Bolls ftoyce Silver Cloud I H I 
Mdliner Convertible. 100 point car. contour, 
winner, restored by omsehfc. 0*? cf crir si, 
manufoaured £145.000 


The dieisea Wortutap NeO Gwynn House. Oraycoft Avenue. Otebea SW3 3AU. 
United Kingdom. TeL (44) 0 71 584 8363 / 64 - Fax. (441 0 71 581 3011 



PULL1CIN0 CLASSICS 


B If you ore thinlnng of buying or idling a 
left or right hand drive Ferrari or 
lamtarghini. plane contact PuAdns Oass<a 
fcr hiaxSy advice 


PUUJCMO QA5SKS. UK. TeL (44) 81 877 0157 • Fax. (44) 81 874 7733 


ALMAVIVA 


ROSENKAVAUER 


B 1 43' (<3m| jlumintum IA*1 built m 
Holland. Peter fiaeldsr.,,^ de-.<cr. F'ome-a 
woieijers. 2 ■ 2 100 hp v,fu. 20 In 
litwnous accommijdcn.an for 10 guesc in 5 
dfuble ctimss 8 ere* Plenty of enleriam- 
ment space For sic ar.d charter 
LUR5SEN YACHTS 5pain. Tel (34J 71 700445 Fax. [34) 71 70055 1 




■ Superb 21? dassic mdbryadu fcr dwier.ln 
hese heckc doys of in tviig. there are a lew 
hsfewoy; where one con frdy rda» ond reJum 
to he qutop pace of life by bygone era Travd 
boi m hme to ihe glonwa doys of he 19X' s 
eqxnence lie dnaH R0S94A V AUSi 
Contort your Charter Broker far hill i u far m aaan and caiour brodiure. 


AMBRE MARINE 

To moke your dreams came true 



LOUIStAHHA- TORCHARIBL^; 

B The iFun» yodiFto chnrtw.-focuzzit^r 
noble feared dots, Juj dir ^bofean.-woler ' 
toys ond hAspler 4dc Mojor raftfjhb yrar‘1 
to include new swimowig p idfo m / beodi- 
area and new nn deck. Very ejuto^o ensure _ 
total privacy. Accomm od otion for tff fii " 
superb Meroom. • ’ : • i .. ‘ - 

CAMPBt « NOKX50NS LONDON. T«L (44) 71 491 2950 Tm. 639 


FIFE 105 


B 32 x S^O x 4^0ra, but 1920 by Wiliam' 
fife A Unique Kim*, obce owned by Wai'. . 
Rainier of Monaco: 350 SqMW, 2 x. Rofc; : 
Raya 185 bp, 12 knots, geaatfdn; Atortl:. 
Radar. GPS. Autapfel, 5SB ; Acatoiiibdutipo . . 
for 10 pea + oew. - j. 

FOR SALE A CHARTSL SEAHORSE Greece. TeL [30) 1 8952 212 - Fax. (30) I S958317 


FEADSHIP 116 


■ van lent Hafaod 1973, ousfentcnnd, 35i30 
x 6S2 « 2,16m. ded, rium Juperthitt. 2 x Gd 

6%. 1 200 hours. !2f|4 in, large 3200taiik 
2 x goi/90KW, 3 5Uerooms, drtng > man 
sdoon, study, pewder room, coplain + crew 
quarters, 2 * goaty. 5 4,4001X10. 

SEAHORSE Gramo. Tel (30) 1 8952 212 - Fox. pO] 1 8938 317 


A & R CRUISING KETCH 


■1 1 8' semi custom fail afuminimn world 
cruiser louncJiiog sept 94. Design Ron . 
Holland Fully dative soil bnndjing. Three 
generators. VaricAile pitch prop; Al diesel 
MTUMwcedes. 

A8EKMG A RA58W59L TeL (49] 421 733 532 -Fax. [49)421733115 ‘ 

U5 office in Ft laudteiUte TeL (1) 305 522 4007 • Fax. (1) 80S 522 1161 





PORSCHE 959 

RA1LYE PAMS -DtAKAR 


■ Factory team car, 1985 R. Metge / b; 
lemoyne. Out of o tod of six 959 Rdye atrs 
(hit is only one prirately wmed 


HjEVWPMtTS AG, Box 94, 8046 Zurich. TeL 41 1 372 17 85 ■ Fax. 41 1 371 53S8-- 





MERCEDES 300 SL ROADSTER 


■ Finished in rvury wife red hide, a contpre-'.. 
hensivQ restoration was carried out in arouat - 
>988. an eveeiert , example af this 50’s dns- 
W.C90.000 . . .' 

TAYLOR ft CRAWLEY. 19 Graven? 
TeL (44) O 71 823 2599 

r Cresranl Mews. London, 5W1X 7EX. 

•Fox. (44) 071 233 7716 



AST0N MARTIN DBS 




B Convertible, finished in Godwood green, 
with the otigrid fawn hide irterior, Ms car is 
m excelfeni canftion with o com prehensi v e 
history, etc. £62,000 


TAYIOS ft CSAWirr. 19 Gresvenor Cre stent Mewl, London, 5W1X TEX. TeL [4fl0 71. 
823 2599 - Fox. (44) 0 71 235 7716 


D.S. MARITIME 

Yachting symficatioa 


^ _ r ^, J c ~^ B Management. Tomorrow*! way of yacht 

— owneishp The logic of sharing the use ond 

asst of a new or second-hand yacht between a - 
smol number of Bpdy co-ovmors. supported 
by profesaanci managements, ij inascapahfc 

DA MABITWE FRANCE TnL (33) 93 65 63 56 ■ fax. (33) 93 65 07 78 


B Ambre Marine offers you gll induioe enjr 
sing programmes in Medneraiecm on board 
4i« lr«i sohrg >adih All your yachts ore pr- 
-tSefy o-rv;d ond Wy crew^j cc umijtJ? br 
barebo^dnriefs contact 

AMBU MARINE. TeL (33| 94 38 80 27 Fox. |33| 94 38 BO 38 


TO ADVERTISE IN UNIQUE PLEASE CONTACT 


Alexandra Guillard or Veronique Manios 
on Tel. (33) 1 42 30 81 00 or Fax. (33) 1 42 24 00 72 










































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PARIS 

■ Sypeb oppcnmert, WW, bwed m Q 

■ Stn-Crnfuiy Binfetng with character Very 
r,, a entrance ha'.L Sumptuous reception- 
'Mir, eherming drawing-roam. and 3 

bedwmj P^m bcAtei. 

1£5 BB1B KMEUKE5 M FRANCE 132. aid Hoouram 75008 tank ■ Franca. 

Tel (33) 1 4Q 08 10 38 - 40 08 10 00. Fax. (33) I *2 94 90 65 


PARIS 



■ 253 n srigmd apartment and 200 m 
terror m a I93C tarn to«e 


HMW GABON. 18 roe de (‘imranii* 7S007 torn- Frau*. 
TeL (33) 1 42 61 73 38 • fex (33) 1 4261 75 48 


LAKE GENEVA 

■ Magnhced ISfatentufy Fn mdwtyte pro- 
perty oretbotong Id* Genera w4i vnjaik 
Wandedul 3m hqh «jkngs 3/4 bedrooms. 
3/4 bcfaocmi 3 ulore wA 2 fabulous open 
frepbce. Price an oppfiaaon 

CKAJMt MARKETING GROUP - Swtu mat EKtM. 26, chenw do vtAn, 1030 
■“•OTTwH^warne, SvriurfaML TeL (41) 21 701 50 35 - Fax. (41| 21 701 39 67 




LAKE GENEVA 

■ Buk in 1804 #h wonderful denture is a fa- 
ted properly todfy renovated end redecatated 
to highert standards is stated in a park a! 
100,000 nr’. Four ouibuftbigs: caretaker's 
fa«, 5fflolfam,supaij restored arangenc. 
OOMNt MARKHMG GROUP - Swiss rad Estate 26, them do radon, 1030 
imjbnrptMawaMta. Sratreriaad. TeL (4t) 21 701 50 35 - fax. [41} 21 701 2967 



GREECE 

■TradBond s*fe house on Kao aland. 

Ful service estate agency providing advice, 
mamaohding lawyers and liming bouses to 
gn mfo n fo n . In lhe case of hotels possile to 
bid staff and provide maiding hri&ia- 
HELUENIC PROPERTIES & INVESTMENT SERVICES lid Salomon 18, 
Lylwniis, U1 13 Mai, Oimm. TeL 8 Fax. (30} 01 - 2845060 - 



LONDON 

On Rwhstevcfim of lha Crown Estate 

■ Hie gadvdc via, Regent's pcefc 99 year 
Crown use tor sdoJunl sale agents' Knight 
Franck & Brrtlay. Tef. (44) 71 62981 7] 
1ASSMANS 35-37 Darin* Street Mayhm- Uodoa WIT 1IN • TiL (44) 499 3434 • 
Fax. (44)71 491 8171 



CAP D'ANTIBES 

■ Superb property, hight qudily eo w trudion. 
living surface 290nr, 2 spaconA recaption 
mom, 5 beoknoms, ontavs octm., lunr 
fliBr drawing mm wer the sea, garden of 
1 fiOCW and swimming pool jaaazi- Ref 476. 
JOHN TAYLOtt - Jacques Chaiaigme'. 55, la Craaelta 06400 6 hn - From. 

TeL (33) 93 38 00 66 - Fox. (33) 93 39 13 65. 



ANTIBES “ For jaosoned rcnftds. 

■ locatad just behind the dwrmmg ancont 
town of Antibes wd to famous port, »dW dy 
and museum te trodSonal prrwncd horn 
prondts 4 modem herkara cud bdircom, 
modem Wwi, dU^iIul gmden and swim- 
IHPig pool, ; . * 

141 hd Kmmedy - 06600 0*» ifWibas - Fmnce.'ftL P3) W 6? 99 00 ■ te. (33) 93 67 60 92 


MEGEVE- FRENCH ALPS 

■ Recently built 470 m-' chalet. Facing 
the Mont Blanc, spacious living-rooms, 
5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, game-room, 
maid's studio, sauna. Exceptional fea- 
tures. 


OUi IN PARIS, Frame- Tel s |SS] 1 40 72 69 15 




PARIS NEUIUY 

■ 175 m : flat, s&ntad fa a 500 m garden, 
spatkxA famg-nwm. «W far trtertomng. 
2 ipedous wiles, maid's stadto, poddng fad- 
b»B5 br 2 txn lovely deemKion. 


CALL M PAHS, fn».W : TO I 40 72 69 IS 


FRANCE 

■ )#KM*jry krtfod bmbawe a«x 

bdtfngs oi 5 bo of wodad gwunA wit a 
a«) tit! gains. Vny Wtdidy rcdorad w^i 
d origind moteridk equpped «di 
. BBdemdedrini*tttay«^^ , ^V^^ 

) i fM 2212 er 895 6733 -Fwt 895 #317 


SatSHOREBEAlKWS- Or**** T* 4 - 



FRANCE Sotdfa Brteny 

■ &twly restored 35® iq-fi mdster's haute 

f 3 bothtnon B . s M siB-raoip wdi o 

fireplace, imng-roan, fi^r fated fatdien, 
erd storowwi. 70,000 jq-fl endoied 


Tel P3} 38 95 76,» : l 331 “ W “ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 1994 


Page 21 


SELECTED IN UNIQUE 


■ ft* Sjyj yf\tst town bouse loaned m a 
proa*, peaceful and very readenhal iwei of 
Nr.-'Iv. dters o combination of charm and 
W* A c>ge reception roam opens onto an 
enabled garden with soyihtm exposure. 
Sar age ara Tctf i room 

FNAU FSUBIY -Ffam. 1 * 1 . | 33 ) 1 47 43 22 6 tt - Fax. ( 33 ) 1 46 41 02 07 



PARIS 

■ Onihe'^wmpdeMan E»V 19lh«nM> 
oshfar own house The view of the hfe Tc*cr 

and a dirtcl accni to dv park make this to^n 

house an ocephani resetence 4 storeys on 

905m . phis a garden 

F£AU HVE CAUCW 83, Aveeue da la Baurdeanab 75007 Paris • Fraoct 
let (33) 1 47 05 50 36 - Fax : (33) 1 4] 55 58 21. 



PARIS 

■ Town house m leydennd neighbourhood cl 
Nemly. with ««w an in Seme 5 storey, c( 
approx -WOffi onSClOm grounds Senator, 
swimming-pool. gym. Japanese garden and 
parling faolites tor 3 cars 
EUBQFE PBOHOTION MMOBHSR 88, me de Pravenn * 75009 Paris - France. 

TeL (33) 1 44 91 95 13 - Fax. (33) 1 49 93 02 62 



■ feepnoncJ t»m hou-^ d rwlored to 
the original design. View of the Bon de 
Boulogne end EM Tower 625 m on 5 storeys 
and one underground. 6 bedrooms, terraces 
garden, courtyard cfevoKr. paring 
GUROK PROMOTION WMQMUEK B8, roe de PitneBas - 7S009 Fans - France. 

TeL (33) 1 44 9! 95 15 - Fox. (33) 1 49 93 02 62 



PARIS 

■ Superb apanmeni 2eQm- located in a 
IStfa-cenlury building with character. Very 
nice entrance hall. Sumptuous reaphon roam, 
charming drawing room, and 3 bedrooms 
Parking fac#h« 

L£S BEUE5 DBHUBES DC FBANCi 132, Bid Hauunma 73008 Para - France. 

TeL (33) 1 40 08 10 38 • 40 08 ID 00. Fax. (33) I 42 94 98 65 



CANNES 

■ Superb perthsuse in beautifj, modem resi- 
dence on the hfl west of Gmnes Ouiel. wr- 
i curded in greenery, swimnng pod. Top Boor 
l64nr fivmg surface. pn»a* dewtor. 2 lovely 
reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, mods room, 
poAirg fodfa tnJcdla Ref 29} 

JOtft TAYIOC - Jacques Ovstaignicr. 55, to Croaette - 06400 - Cannes - France. 

' TeL (33) 93 38 00 66 -Fax. (33) 93 39 13 65. 



GREECE 

■ Fully redound windrml in the Cydodm 
Hotels, hobby hams, offices, land br dtMbpncni. aAmds. 
town houses, industrial buAhngs Cooperation passible with 
other agents 

IB1BK PROKITI15 6 fftEMEHr SEKVtCES LID Room 
417, Vaakoures&M 3, 105 64 Athens, Greece. 

Td. (30) 1 -3254140- Fax. 130) 1 -3254120 



M 0 UGINS 

■ Prawned Ojb property «di view of t» sea 
and vfcge. living surface 450 m' on grounds 
of 4200 nr . Drtwing-roofn, living room, dining 
room, master bedroom. 1 baboons. 4 bair 
roaro, swxrxning-pooJ, pod fnae. Pef. J95 
OAUM MUUH 24. la Craircile - 06400 Cannes - Frame. 

1* 133) 93 99 *2 00 ■ Tax. (33) 93 39 53 30 



CAP D'ANTIBES 

■A unique beouSUly renovated him-ofrhe- 
century hone for sole Beauiiful gardens, 
swimming-pool, small private beach, 6 
bedrooms and bathrooms, vast reception 
room and independent summer veranda. 

6B4 flABWantW is bd Aliert V- OAAOO Aelbs -FeL (33) 93 3« as 76 - ho. (33) 93 34 14 23 
141 bd Kennedy- 06600 Ctyd'AiAes- France. TiL [33] 93 67 99 00 -Fax. {33)93 67 60 92 



VILLEFRANCHE 

■ Between Nice and Monaco Swnjtaus pro- 
perty overlooking the Bales des Anges 
luxurious features. BOm reception roam, terra- 
ce, feted kitchen, 4 bedrooms. 2 mdep. guest 
skiebex, autocier's Bo. 3500m' landscaped 
garden, swimming pool, feted pool house. 
FIANCE PROMOTION 3, Avenue Gustave V 06000 Mce • Fume. 

TeL (33) 93 87 46 00 - Fax. (33) 93 16 19 29 



NiaOUEST 

■ TOOnr Bal on Bib Boor (3/4 room) in a 
Napoleon HI residential buMng of high stan- 
ding. Has 25nr terrace with enchanting view 
ol the Bow des Anges. Extelenl coffhfon 
Indudes kitchen, garage, swimming-pool cud 
tennis court. (Vice 1,900,000 FF 
iVO6M0Kce- France. 


T«L (33) 93 87 46 DO ■ Fax. (33) 93 16 19 29 



RIVIERA 

■ Waterfront property, between Canties ond 
and St Tropes Mauresque ardiitedure. prod 
gious historic house in 5800 nr knamwksrtd- 
SCCfSed port Mater's house Swimnng pools, 
gufafs house, caretaker's home, bool's garage. 


CAHNET RAVEYBE Rcfidtace Mkamor 93A00 Put Frejui • France 
TeL (33) 94 53 35 37 Fax. (33) 94 52 IQ 95 



FRANCE Chateau de la Loire 

nriored coHtfa 25 (X) nr intsnor set in 
30 ho of pofa luntriausly deamed with per- 
f. Tennis court, 3 - 
1 ' acquiring an oddr 



FOR FUtlHER WFOIMATON, axrtoct owner's office hi France, francme Brocord 

TeL ( 33 ) 1 47 40 00 40 - Fax. | 33 | 1 47 40 07 77 



AIXEN PROVENCE 

■Set to ?0or25 haul land ndudng lOfucf 
aJfirobfe W A Fgly restaed lnu£ XV ns- 
denoe mauMcp a reoepiion room *4i (irepla- 
^ o period vaied mom, 8 bedrooms Cfte- 
k»w s ooccmxLlien, garage, jwnmmg pool 


FOR SAU BT OWmTeL (33) 1 47 66 92 00 (office) * 1 45 20 15 93 (home) - 
fax. (33|1 47 66 11 34 



PARIS 

■ Eiji.i«to erif ' ?r-:e“..*y lawn nsuw 

Totally ms.'-uorri c-i 'enadeSed Su^ss 

dtt.t ITcO r>- sr i faere with 5 230 m ca*n 
yard 0"d TO .•'Oergras.-r: parking erros 
SuCiJe tor 0 pmee lean c* an edxtsy 

ETUDE SUFFIBEN. Tranjadiant fcnmnWianu de Fresig* 61 bit Are** dc Sufim 

75007 Fans - France. TeL (33) T 45 67 BS 88 Fax. (33) 1 45 67 16 08 



RIVIERA SartAntaimShidfara 

■ MogmficenJ nver-frent estate set in / ned 
of fenced grounds converted la stables 
lasted mlcnd from Pice. 30 min, by ftr to 

Monte Carlo and to rhe secJxard. recently 
bub mam vrEa 340 m’. refined decorrrcn 

Ooaxnentaee end hradi w e an reqaesfc MtfiHOWHSOTTA «ia Bcufcym» 5 his ove- 
nue Princeue AEce MC 98000 Moaoco TeL (33) 93 25 50 25 - Fox. (33) 93 50 95 81 


nUDE SUFREN. Tn 



PARIS 

■ bq-juiw ecrly }9Bv®*sy town rmr Tstt..y renuaturd 

=n= re-iodeilrd Surtax. cicuJ i zr. - tsi mi - ; 24? 
t. raun rzri end 1C -j^derjund rc.-i.rg tss. c - ~sle ry n 
3i<ci rr.>deTi s cn erioss, 


tos hnm ab Jw re i de Pmnge 61 
faia Avenue de SeHren 7 SOOT Ft m - France. TM. 103) 1 

45 67 85 88 Fox. (33) 1 45 67 16 08 


p »=■- z. ji. ; ■ -s, 

~ ■ E«duii«e cfhces. 3fl0 sqm Downtown, 

JE Iff, TT _• jr^V . racing rhe Cosirj. finest quality fittings. 

*j*’ . harkings Recent «Eelle Epoque» style bull 

»•* •' dmg 

MSIM3ND4S01TA *Us fcuGngrinip 5 b*» avenue Princase tfee MC WOOD Monaco 
TeL (33) 93 23 50 25 Fax. (33) 93 50 95 81 




' M 0 NTE"CARL 0 rent the best 


PARIS Tnangle d'Or 

■ Ho-jssATtn pr’iju tewr. rsjse cm i5K 
m-. »rth i *,3CfS *zj‘d Tiait piesticous 
head ctirce far 3 ernes', rsssiihry far 
ardi'-e*. c-i 2 levels *0 s^ 

parking hx -r s far 2 can i~ the s-j-ryars 
ETUDE 5UFTREN, Tramoaiom bmiobi&tiu de Pmtige 61 bis Avenue de Saflfm 
75007 Paris - France. TeL (33) 1 45 67 88 88 - Fax. 1331 1 45 67 16 08 



CORSICA 

■At the entrance of far Gulf of Fort? Veecfu 
Bmlton 3 levels 5 independent suites mdude 5 
bedrooms with private terraces, ond - 
bathrooms Mooing far pleasure boats cf all 
tannege Cor acker's onnei 
ETUDE SUFTREN, Transactions tmnribSera de Prestige 61 bis Avenue de Soflrtn 
75007 Paris- France. TeL |33) 1 45 67 88 88 Fax. (33) 1 45 67 16 08 



AVIGNON 

■ Drecare-uye praverca: ca-.-^rs hc.i£. 5 
«m to the ceroe d tv.vcr, end SOC* m fra-n 
the nearest nuage. Hr.se 450 m plus adjoi- 
ning farm 2CG m Set o 5 £ ha cf graur.ds 
«njh hurvktd-yec-old neei fief 2157 
EMRi GABON, 8. Boulevard Mrabeaa, 13210 St Reaiy de Provence - France. 

TeL [33] 90 92 0! 58 - Fax. (33j 90 92 39 57 


CANNES 

■ 15 mrh (ram Cannes HTstyi: 2T acre estate 
suitable far prVutjrs estate. ho!e}, l reMn or deve- 
lopment. 0 additional huifamgs remodelled 
into lu ramus opadments Hecrted swimming 
pool and tennis <»urt Ref. v/v lfiol 
PRB11GE UMKMHJEfl. «Le> Jcrdiru (Su Mufubao 9 In Crcrioit* DA400 Cam - 
France. TeL (33) 93 39 73 73 - Fax. (33) 93 39 13 89 




RIVIERA PARC DE BEAUVAUON 

■ Ureque setting, bordering the Beouwlon golf 
aaxse . overioofaig the sea. tennis axxts. beach 
ond cnvrfe pontoon, exduwe villas, large 
Ung room [41 nr), covered tenaoe, potto, bt- 
chen reserve, spoaous garage 
1£5 PARCS DE BEAUVAUON - BeauvaBon-Grinmd - 83120 Saime Mredme - France. 
TeL [33| M 56 48 48 - Fax. (33) 94 56 48 82 


RIVIERA PARC DE BEAUVAUON 

■ (Fotfcwmg hr doo* aJl 3. 3 or 4 bedrooms, 
individual swimming pools, plus 0 shore in die 
golf course The estate maintenance team 
takes core of cdf day-to-day aspects of main- 
tanng your property 

LES PARCS DE BEAUVAUON - Beauvalaa-Grinmd - 83120 Sainie Maxnne - France. 
TeL (33) 94 56 48 48 - Fax. (33) 94 56 48 82 




r-f -1 GREECE 

■ 7 bedroom-house 600 «fn in Athens 
Full service estate agency providing advice 

recommending lawyers ard mvtrg houses to 
speahcsAon In fa case of hotels possible to 
hndstol aid provide modeling hcrUies 

HELLENIC PROPERTIES & INVESTMENT SERVICES LTD Sotomou m, 

Lykavrissi, 141 23 Athens, Greece. T«L A Fax. (30101 -28A5060- 




CANNES 

■ Overlooking the bay ol Cannes ond the 
Esleref. property m a J700 m landscaped 
wooded porl Vast receptions rooms. 0 
bedroom} ond bafaocm* Coretaker's todytip. 
swiimrung pool with overflew system Rel 177 
CLAUDE MUUE8 24, la Creantte - 06400 Cannes - France. 

Td. (33) 93 99 42 DO - Fax, |33) 93 39 53 30 


RIVIERA 

■ Watedront property, bteween Comes ond 
and Si Tnopez. Moureque crehitedure. presfr 
got* histone house in 5800 m : lunriort hnd 
scoped park. (Master's bouse Summing pools, 
guest’s house, aretoker’s house, bool's garage 
CABMET RAVEVRE Rerideace Miramar 93600 Part Frefus - France 
TeL 133)94 53 35 37 Fax. 1331 94 52 10 95 


CANNES 

■ located in Iw adm cf a private resdmSal 
estate, beautiful new via of high stondmg on 
grounds of 2500 m ; , drawing room, dining 
room. 4 beckaom. 4 brthroonu, guest flat, 
cyme-roam, mod's quarter* Uonrious fectures. 
AGFNCE LATOUR. 20 rue Latatr Maubawg 06400 Canoes France 
Tcl(33) 93 94 40 5L Fax. [33) 94 43 51 95 



ET ~ — — 


ar Ts 

isnfd 



■ 

r a #i 35 




CAP D'ANTIBES 

For seasonal rentals 

■ Superb modem home decorated n a hrgh 
standard, farary hnishirgs prondvia breothta- 
kwg sea news, overflow swimmmg pool. 4 bed- 
rooms 4 batorooms. private rocky beach frari 
Can N1ERNATKMAL 15 bd AJberr I' 06600 Anbbes-U. (33) 93 34 05 76- Fax. (33|93 34 1423 
141 bd Kmnerty - 06600 Cep d'Antabw ■ Franta. TeL (33) 93 67 99 00 - Fax. (33] 93 67 60 92 



CANNES 

■ A most riegat 650 m : 2-level residence 12 
mmn rooms: 3 reception roans, a beckooms. 6 
bathrooms. oufaJcSngs. Guest house, caeta- 
Ict's house, gomeioan jifuaBed to 7000 nr of 
grounds facing fa bey of Carnes. Ref. OR/218. 


OUVIER PE ROS - 94, la Craiseite - 06400 CANNES. 
TeL (33) 93 94 08 88 ■ Fax. |03J 93 94 00 97 



6 ISSUES/ 1 YEAR 

- FF 150 
• £ 18 

• DM60 

• SF46 

• BF 1150 

• Lit 50 000 

• Pta 4000 

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i Page 22 


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SPORTS 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 35, 1994 




Rockets’ Guards 



uwon 



By Anthony Cotton 

Washington Post Service 

HOUSTON — The Utah Jazz 
entered Game I or their National 
Basketball Association Western 
Conference finals series against ihe 
Houston Rockets determined not 
to lei Hakeem Olajuwon beat them. 
At every opportunity — as in 
whenever he touched the ball — 
they double- and triple-teamed the 
All-Star center. 

Olajuwon 
Wins NBA 
MVP Award 

The AwciaieJ Pros 

HOUSTON — Hakeem 
Olajuwon. who led the Houston 
Rockets to the Midwest Division 
title, won the National Basketball 
Association's Most Valuable Play- 
er award on Tuesday. 

The center, who finished second 
to Phoenix’s Charles Barkley in last 
year's MVP voting, beat out David 
Robinson of San Antonio and 
Scotiie Pippen of Chicago this year. 
A Nigerian. Olajuwon is the first 
foreign player to win the award. 

He received 889 points, includ- 
ing 66 first-place votes, from a pan- 
el of sportswriters and broadcast- 
ers. who each voted for five 
candidates with points awarded on 
a 10-7-5-3-1 basis. 

Robinson received 730 points 
and 24 first-place voles, while Pip- 
pen had 390 points and seven first- 
place votes. 

During the regular season. 
Olajuwon ranked third in the 
league in scoring, fourth in re- 
bounding and second in blocks. He 
was the only player to rank among 
the top five" in all three categories. 

Earlier this month. Olajuwon 
was named the NBA's defensive 
player of the year. He joins Michael 
Jordan as the only players to win 
the MVP and defensive awards in 
the same season. 


But the strategy, while sound 
theoretically, left something to be 
desired. As in the wide-open shots 
given to Kenny Smith. And Sam 
Cassell. And Vernon Maxwell and 
Mario Elie, too. Led by Smith, who 
scored 27 points, including a teara- 
record-tying six. three-point field 
goals, the Rockets took a 1Q0-S8 
decision at the Summit on Mon- 
day. 

“It seemed like they were leaving 
me open." Smith said. “I was getting 
some good looks at the basket." 

Game 2 of the besi-of-7 series is 
set for Wednesday in Houston. 

The Rockets’ back court domi- 
nated to the point that Olajuwon 
actually became a secondary con- 
cern. that, of course, led to no 
good for Utah, and Olajuwon fin- 
ished with 31 points. 

On defense. Robert Horn man- 
aged to shut down Karl Malone, 
holding him to four points in the 
first half before Malone scored a 
bunch late to finish with 20. Ma- 
lone also had 16 rebounds. 

There was a time — perhaps as 
recently as the sum of this season 
— when Utah's strategy was em- 
ployed throughout the NBA. Even 
if Olajuwon passed the basketball, 
the thinking went, the rest of the 
Rockets were too selfish to move it 
around to find the open man. 

But that hasn't been the case in 
the playoffs, and especially Mon- 
day night. The Rockets hit 10 
three-pointers and led by as many 
as 17 points in the second half. 

Utah’s big push came at the start 
of the second half. Guard Jeff Hor- 
nacek hit a free throw and three 
baskets in the first three minutes of 
the third quarter: overall. Utah 
outscored the Rockets 1 1-2 in that 
span to draw within 56-45. 

The Rockets took a timeout at 
that point, but Malone scored off 
the break, bringing the Jazz to 
within 56-47. Utah came within 
nine twice more in the period but 
Houston kept responding. 

Smith hit three of his three-point 
field goals and Maxwell added an- 



Grandly, 

.The. Associated Pros 

LuisLbpezhitagrnnd dam in the 
Got mntng for his nrsi iD^dr-teague 
homer as the Padres defeated the 
slumping San Franrisoo Giants. 4-0, 
Monday night iri San Diego: 

In 2,248 ai-bats over six-plus 
seasons in the minors, Lopez had 
hit 10 homers, but node with the 
bases loaded. 

Wally Whitehurst pitched 816 
shutout innings as the Padres won 
their second straight after snapping 
a 13-game losing streak on Sunday. 

Bip Roberts led off die SanDk- 
gp first with a single, and Phil nan- 
tier and Derek Bell drew two-out 
walks from Mark Portugal. TJp 
stepped Lopez, making his' 93d 
plate appearance in the majors.' . 

Lopez, starting at shortstop for 
Ricky Gutierrez, hit a change-up 
from" Portugal just over the right- 
field fence. 



Before Lopez’s homer, San Difr 
go batters had' been 0-for-lO- with 
the bases loaded and two out. 

The Giants, shirt out for the first 
time this season, have lost five 

NLRQUNDUP 

straight games -and seven of their 
last eight. " 

Marius 3; Expos 2: Fat Rapp- 
allowed one earned run and Jesus 
Tavarez made a'misnorabte major-., 
league debut for the Marlins 
against Montreal in Miami- 
Tavarez, a 23 -year-old right, 
fielder recalled Sunday from Dou- 
blo-A Portland, threw out arraner 
at the' plate, scored from first on a 
•angle and went 2-for-4 with an 
RBI. Rapp gave up seven hits and 
two walks in 6% innings: - - 

' -pbBBes II, Otfriak 3: hi St- 
Louis, Dhnny Jackson pitched 


s Giants. s 

eight Mop Leony ^ jgj* 

had three stags* 
walks, two stolen bases, three 
scored and an RB1-. ■_* 

r The Wies have won 
thtriTiasTn to pull fcgfc; 

SeadoT the vdleNew- 'iorkM^', 
Rockies 8, Reds 3: In Denver.,, 
Dante Bichette's- AwM ® ■***£» 

hi the first inning help^the^ .a 

ies end a five^wne . 

Cubs 6, Dodgers 3- Dam- 
May’s three-run homer m the a ... 
snapped a tie in L« Aflg« *?- 

Chicago won its seventh straight .. 

- vwih the score at 3-3, May,who* rt 
11th imririg homer Sunday P* 

Cubs over San Franasco, bnedan^j 

1 pitch from Ksym Gwss J*?*#: 
the short fence in ngju and barely j 
made the foul pole. 


a y 


f 


i ji 


Griffey Takes Mantle 
But Mariners Lose 


1 ~ Hand PNUjwTIlt AwWItet P«» 

Hakeem Olajuwon, the Houston center, went to his knees to dribble past Utah’s Felton Spencer. 

Timberwotves to Move 


SCOREBOARD 

r. .T..7- ■ • . T*.; •’’VY'-w 

^ »■ ;• =". A 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 



IN 

L 

Pci. 

New York 

28 

13 

.683 

Boston 

27 

15 

643 

Baltimore 

24 

17 

JB5 

Toronto 

22 

21 

517 

Detroit 

19 

21 

475 


Central Division 


Cnicaoa 

34 

17 

MS 

Minnesota 

22 

20 

534 

Cleveland 

21 

20 

512 

Kansas City 

21 

70 

517 

Milwaukee 

17 

76 

JK 


west Division 


Calltomia 

20 

3S 

.444 

Seattle 

1® 

74 

.647 

Teras 

18 

a 

AN 

Caviand 

13 

32 

.773 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 


East Division 



w 

L 

Pd. 

Atlanta 

37 

14 

A5® 

Montreal 

74 

19 

558 

Florida 

23 

71 

573 


Vrt 

4 

7 

8 ": 


2W 

3 

3 

a 


Philadelphia 

21 73 

.477 

7"i 

now York 

20 32 

.476 

7V» 


Central Division 



Cincinnati 

36 17 

505 

— 

St. Louis 

23 19 

548 

3®! 

Houston 

23 20 

5J5 

3 

Pittsburgh 

19 32 

MS 

6 

Chicago 

II 24 

53® 

V-1 


West Division 



Los Anodes 

35 20 

55ft 

— 

Son Francisco 21 23 

.477 

3^ 

Colorado 

IB 24 

47® 

5* 

San Diego 

12 32 

J73 

12"! 

Monday’s Line Scores 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cleveland 300 1M 100-5 8 0 

Taranto 0 « 128 Ml-« W » 

Clark, prune ffti. Mesa Hi and Alomar , 
SFotilemvre. Castilla in. Hall 1°) and Bor- 
ders. w— Hall. 1 - 1 . Mesa. 3-1 H Rs— Cleveland. 
Boersa f»). Taranto. Carter 1141. 

Bammorr 000 238 800-5 9 1 

Milwaukee 001 000 MO— 3 ® 0 

McDonald. T.Bonon (7). Eicnnom (Si. Poole 
CBI. Mills (81. LeSrnHh 1*1 aid Holies; Bones. 
Henrv IB). Uuvd l») aid NIHson. W-AUcDon- 
otd. 8-2. L — Bones. 3-4. 5 y— L e Smith UBi. 
HRs— Baltimore. Md-emora ID. Voigt il). 


other to give the Rockets a 75-61 
lead with 2:49 to play. That was the 
margin the Rocket* carried into the 
final period, leading 79-64. 

The Rockets entered the game 
insisting they'd learned a number 
of valuable lessons from their semi- 
final win over Phoenix, which went 
to seven games. 

Utah presented many of the 
same problems as the Suns — a 
clever, penetrating point guard in 
Stockton, a braising power forward 
in Malone and a number of sharp- 
shooting perimeter players. 


Seattle 000 tOO 100—5 10 1 

Oakland 122 001 I0*-J 11 I 

Fleming. J.NelSOn 131. T-Davts 1*1. aisto® 
1*1. Plonlenfeerg rfll and D.Wlison; 6.9km. 
Briscoe (2). Edierslev t«! and Slembocn. 

W-B.Wllt.4-t l— Fleming. 5*. Sy—Ecxers lev 
(4). HRs-5eaH ie.Gr iltev Jr. ill 1. Buhner (tOi. 
TJiAarWiHM (61. Oakland. NeeM71.Brw5iv3 141. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Manned 101 000 000—2 B 2 

Florida 000 031 00*— 3 0 2 

Fassero. Heredia 151. Scott lit. Show Ml 
and D.Fietcher: Rapp. Y.Penu in. Non (8l 
and Santiago. W— Raoo. 3-1. L — Fassero. 4-3. 
5v— Nen 121. 

Philadelphia 301 031 Ml— 11 W ® 

SL Loub On 010 000— 3 10 2 

DnJackson, Andersen t®) and Dauilon : Ur- 
ban!. Mabvcn (Si. Everwera r»). Aroctia iBi. 
Murpny (93 and PagnaBl. W— DnJceksca *- 

l.L— Urtxml.l-4.HRs— Phnadeiimlo- Dauilon 

1101. Incavlgiia 16). 

Ctncmnatl 000 MO D1B-3 13 0 

Colorado 301 002 B2x— 0 17 0 

Smltev. Soradlln (At. J.Rutlln 171-Fonuwio 
Ml end Dor sen. Freeman, S. Reed »»). Bialr 
l7|,fl. Ruffin !•/ ana GiranM. W— Freemcn.4- 
1. L— Smilev.4-1 B. Ruffin (31. HRs — Cincin- 
nati. RJanders 16). Colorado. BiefwMe M3I. 


Neither team did much to distin- 
guish itself early on. It wasn’t until 
Cassell entered the game at the 
start of the second quarter, with the 
Rockets leading 20-16. lhaL things 
started happening. 

The rookie opened the period by 
hitting a driving layup, then scored 
on an offensive rebound. At the 
9:45 mark he added a three-point 
plav to give Houston a 27-20 lead, 
then hit another jump shot 32 sec- 
onds later. 

Over the next seven-plus min- 
utes, guards scored nine of the 
Rockets' next 19 points. 


son Froneboo ooo ora ora— • 6 *' 

San Dicaa 400 000 00*— 4 5 0 

Portugal, Gamer 171 and Jo-Reed; wvtute- 
hursl. PAJNortmer (B). Holfmon (Bt and 
BJahreKm W-J WMIeiwnt, 3-5. L— PorfuooL 4- 
4.5v— Hoffman (S).HRs— SanOlWO. LaPM Ol. 
Qilcaaa 020 004 000-6 7 0 

Las Angeles 330 «M 000—3 5 2 

Guzman, Bautista (7). Pie sac IB). Cum f B). 
Mven l«> and Wilkins; Ke.Gross. Wa.ne 17). 
Osuoa (8). McDowell (81 and Plasra W-Gik- 
mon. 2-2. L— Ke.Gross, 3-1 Sv— Mvers HOI. 
H Rs— CMcooa, Mav (41. 5osa (101. Los Ange- 
les, Ke.Gross (I). 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

MONDAY'S GAME ; Jordon did not pKnr in 
Ihe Birmingham Barons' >1 toss 10 Hunts- 
Wile. 

Japanese Leagues 

Central League 


The Minnesota Timberwolyes 
are moving to New Orleans, five 
years after joining the National 
Basketball Association as an ex- 
pansion team. The Associated 
Press reported from Minneapolis. 

Cub owners Harvey Ratner and 
Marv Wotfenson said Monday a 
group led by Top Rank of Louisi- 
ana would pay S 152.5 million for 
the team and move it to New Or- 
leans in time for next season. The 
matter now goes before the NBA’s 
franchise relocation committee. 


TuasdaVs Results 


The Associated Press ' 

One home run gave Ken Griffey 
Jr, a major-league record. Two 
would have given the Seattle Man- 
ners a chance to win the game in 
extra innings. . 

After his 21st homer broke 
Mickey Mantle’s record for homos 

AL ROUNDUP 

in the first two months of a season, 
Griffey was in position to rally the 
Mariners from a two-iun deficit 
with No. 22. But there were two 
outs in the ninth and .Oakland^ ace 
closer, D ennis Eckersley, was on 
the mound. 

Griffey fhed but to end it. forc- 
ing him to settle for erasing Man-, 
tie’s 38-year-old mark in a 7-5 loss 
Monday in O akland, California. 
The solo shot to left-center field off 
Bobby Witt came in the seventh. 

“1 still don’t consider myself a 
home-run hitter," Griffey said: “J 
think about base hits." 

Trailin g SO, Seattle rallied for 
four runs in the fourth off Witt. 
Luis Sqjo and Griffey got back-to- 
back singles before Jay Buhner fait 
his lOthbomer. One out later, Tmo 
Martinez bomered. 

The Mariners had a chance to tie 
it in the sixth, putting a runner on 
third with two outs, but Witt struck 


but Dan Wilson to end the- timing. 

With two outs in. bottom of the 
i nning , Brent Gates reached on -a 
chopper to the mound ahdsobred 
from first when right fielder 
Buhner babbled Gerommo Bet-, 
roa’s single for an error. 

Gates went ~44oM.. with a walk 
and semed three runs. '. 

Hoe Jays 6, tafians 5:- Joe Car- 
ter, the majors’ RBL leader, singled 
home Devon While with two ouls 
in the ninth to lift Toronto over 
visiting Cleveland. ' . 

With one out. White doubled off 
Jose Mesa: After Domingo Gakbb 
struck out and Paul Mohior was 
walked intentionally, Cartels line 
drive to right drove in White with 
the winning run. Carter went 3-for-5 
. with a homer and two KBIs,^ raising 
his major-league-leading total to. S4. 

Orioles 5, Brewers 3: fit MHwau- 
• kee, Baltimore’s Bat McDonald 
won his ogfath game and sent Mil- 
waukee ton dubrrecord-tyifag 12th 
straight lass. - 

' The Orioles’ Rafael Palmeiro 
went 0-for-4 -with a- walk, -halting 
his 24-game hitting streak, the ma- 
jors’ besLthis season. ; : . • ! - •' 

- McDonald scattered eight hits 
over 6% mningy in joining Kan. 
City’s David Code and Bob Tewks- 
bury of Sl Louis as the majors' 
- only eight-game winners. . 


AustratiaRace f- 
To Go on After 
4 Crash Deaths 

. > .' The Associated Press 

-DARWIN, Australia 
The' Cahnonball Run auto 
race will continue, despite the 
deaths of four men Tuesday in. 
the crash of a red Ferrari dnv- 
en, by .a millionaire Jaixinese 
dentist organizers said. 

■ Alrihfm i Kabe^and his co- 
driver, Take^n Okano, died in 
the crash of Kobe's Ferrari F- 

4Q, which aiso killed two Aus- 

trah'an race officials. 

V .Kabe oashed 95 kOometets 
f6(J: miles) south of Alice 
Springs as' the high-speed cars 
were on a run toward Ayers 
Rock. - - - . 

TheCannooball Run, which 
began Sunday, is an qpen-road 
-race 3y800 kilometers across 
the.Naftheni Territory. ‘ 

Organizers, have decided the 
. race will continue on Thurs- 
day, despite' the .crash, and 
warnings from road safety* cx- 
.perts,- -' 

Thfr.'saxrday rape, is being 
- nm in daily stipes, with police 
and'offkral vefoefe idearing; 
the Stuart PBghway in front oi 
.the racers. - ’• l; - - 

v- Kibe’s Ferrari clocked, the 
fastest time in trials at 228 
ldlometeraper hour.. 



• $ i 



' ‘•'S'VipfiV*. 



Honsiiln 3, Yomlurl B 

Hiroshima i Clwnichi 1 
Yokohama 3. Yakut! I 

Pacific League 
W L T 

Pet. 

GB 

Sribu 

24 13 0 

549 

— 

Dalel 

22 16 0 

579 

2*i 

on* 

17 19 0 

jtn 

6W 

Loire 

17 19 0 

jen 

AMi 

Nippon Ham 

Ift 22 1 

421 

8V* 

Kintetsu 

14 21 1 

400 

9 

Tuesday's Results 
Selbu 5, Dole! 4, 11 innings 
Latte 5. Nippon Ham 3 

Orix 9, Kintetsu 5 




Russia, si; 7, Armand Dr Las Cuajqas. 
France, vt.; 8, Ckjudki Chkxppuca. ilohr.sl.; 
9. SWfana DeRo Sanla Italy. Si; Wlwftnlr 
BMIL Italv. Si 

OvoraU stUKNMs: T. Marano Araeifthi. Ito- 
(y.GawHvflollon. 12 hours 47 minutes 11 sec- 
onds; X Buona 7 seconds behind; 1 Eveenv 
Berzin. Russia Gewto-Bolton, J; 4, De kn 

Cuevas. TO ;5. i ndura In. 13; 6. Pran crsco Ccio- 
graMte,itaiy.Mercalenal*; T.AndreaFerrl- 
paia I My. ZG AtaUli, 32; B. ZanlnL 34; ?. 
Pascal RldwnLSwtliertaiid.GB MG, 40; W. 
Marco G lavement, llalY, Miml Oas. 41. 


INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
wales X Estonia 1 . 


EZSniiHi 

Monday’s NBA Playoff 


UMl 

Hi 




w 

L 

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Pet. 

GB 

22 

IS 

0 

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556 

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19 

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PhreWs Tuesday In the mlra sta ge d We 
cyctlna race, from Osimo to Loreto Aprutlno; 
J. Gianni Buona Holy. 1B5 kilometers (114.7 
miles) 4 hours, 25 minutes, 20 seconds or 41.834 
knh (25.937 mpfl); Z Sleftmo ZonlrU, Italv, 2 
seconds behind; 3. David* Rebellln, Italv. 
same lime; 4. Francesca Casogrande.Lt.; % 
Mlauei induraia 5paln,Lt;6.Euaenl Berzin, 


BASEBALL 
America* League 

BALTIMORE— Ad (voted Arthur Rhodes, 
pitcher, tram 1 Wav disabled HsT and optioned 
Mm to Rochester, il: Activated Chris Saba, 
mini baseman, from I54tav disabled list. Op- 
tioned Damon ButanLoutflelder.qnd Rhodes 
la Rochester. 


it h ««- n 
» 'M B 21— -100 

. : . jilo«stoa. leads se/its 1-4 

-Utah; Benoit 4-W 2-2 ItLMakne 9-19 2-3 2a 
Spencer MH l& HornaceR 9-1S M », 3to«*. 
tan M3 1 ; 211. Humphries 2ii V2S. Chambers 
1-3(H)2,Cort»lnMGO6,CrottvG0<W)ft Russell 
WJGOaBtrndMMaHowtedO-IMaTotms 
31-ai w-16 aa 

Houston; Harry 39 0-0 ft, Thame 3-7 0-2 ft. 
Otoluwon 12-20 7-9 31. MaxweB 4-15.04 11. 
SmMh 9-14 342X Cureton 0-00-0 0/E He 49 1-1 
Ml Cassell *6 1-19. Totals 39-80 12-1B 100. 

34>oM Boato-Utah M * BenoHG-i. Homo- 
«k 0-1, Humphries 0-1. Stockton 0-21, Houston 
10-24 (Smnb 6-9, Maxwell 3-9, Elie 1-L Cassell 
D-l, Horry . M). R o b ea n di Utah 53 (Matone 
16). Houston 41 (Horry ill. Asrtsts— Utah 21 
(Stockton 111. Houston 22 (Cassell 7). Total 
toeto—Utah it Houston U-TectMlcnli— Utah 
Illegal detaae. Houston JDegal defense. Utah 
coach Sloan. " 


GE333 

Monday's NHL Playoff -2 

■ \ •• H 

New Jersey 1.0 3>rfi 

RLY. Rmuera 0 0 »^-T 

Mew Jersey leads series M 

First pertotP-1. New Jarsev. Nldhoirs 3 ILe^ 
mteux. 8radeur>.6:49 tsh). Penaftv— AlbeHn. 
nj thlgfi-sttcklnal. 5:06, ' ' 

Second pe ri od None . Penalltos— Tltoj 
kanen. NY tooalle Inter f erence). 8:01; Gve*- 
rtav NJ (skzsNnaL!L5D; Guerin, NJ 
ins). 11:27; Martsau. NY ihoaktoal, M:56k ■ 
Thlrdperiad— 2, New Jersey, Pekao 112: 3f* 
1 Mew Jersey, Nlchalts 4 (MocL«jn,AltwttnT, ) 
M-J7 (up). 4. New Jersey. Chanfce 4 ICarppn-1 
tar. Leraleux), 13^8.5. Nm» York, Tlkkanen * 
(Zobov), 16:33.. Peredltes— Anderson, NY 
(stashlna). 5:13; Noonan, NY irauahtns),, 
0 :32j Kocur, NY ( adspctactilng). 1 1 :13; Ko- J 
cur. NY. (rwahlna). 19:21. I 

Shots on md-New Jersey 1V*G— 25. Naw^ 
York 13-7-ft— Ob pawerwiay wmlt n Uftij 
— New Jersey 1 ol 6; New York D of 3; aoalle*- 
— New Jersey, Brodeur, 8-7 (26 ehots-2S_ 
sawn). New York; Richter, WM (25-21). 






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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 



Pa^e 23 




Can FIFA End TV’s Reign? 




■“4 


M 


7. ,i. N 


as 


l ,, - 

:-P§l 


/« emaiumai Herald Tnhune 

T pN°°N “After almost 40 years of incestuous 
«rt the beast, FIFaW Ho^S 
teJensoa can football take 1 * 

It sountfaa little rich. In less than one month, soccer 
«0 be danmng a global audience of 1.6 billion — a 
quarter of man- 
kind — for the 


1994 World Cup. g ob . jST ‘ • 

The marketing H »9nes 
men will, for once, 








Sepp Blatter. FIFA’s general soonaiv. observes: 
"Television has always been the ideal tool for spread- 
ing tire popularity of our sport. From a commercial 
pomt Of view, this IS surely not detrimental, but with 
more andmore channels televising games nonstop we 
have reached almost saturation point." 

Matte's skill as an administrator has appreciably 
hdped burgeon the triangle oT spom-ielcvinon-adver- 
nsnig. But he now urges soccer to seek a h*i=™~» 


performed together before, and will never likely be 
selected again, he demonstrated the change of this 
television age. 

Milan could scout him in Serbia through TV high- 
lights of his performances for Red Star Belgrade. The 
world knows him now through his definitive goal in 
Europe's prime- time match. And. rich beyond his 
dreams, Savicevic can view a war in his homeland as if 
it were a remote video nasty. 

Yet the game and TV are not necessarily mutual 
benefactors. Germany's league championship was 
changed after a result between Bayern Munich and 
Nuremberg was annulled because television proved a 


Edberg and Sabatini Join the Upset Ranks 

Novotna and Korda Also Lose, 


Bruguera and Courier Gain 

The Asukiaittl Prat 

PARIS — Stefan Edberg 
Gabriela Sabatini joined Ma 


Ba^era goal had not crossed the line. 


between projection on the screen and appeal in the 
stadium. 


; j r &00 "% 1 
: 4 Cr ^ 


Sli 




- rr.iwsk 

:: 


. -*r=aa|- 

r-r-H: 


He warns that the proliferation of television satel- 
lites “undermines the number of spectators at matches 
and jeopardizes gate receipts.'’ He fears “the equally 
penurious risk of turning from an actively enjoyable 
sport to a passively consumed pastime ** 

Tell us about it, Sepp. TV cables are almost as 
common to modem living as the umbilical cord — but 
riot as easily detached. Sports joined with television 
fotj>roTit. 

Theoretically, we are still in control. We each com- 
mand an on-off button. Yet that addictive box now 
dictates the terms and affects the quality or life. 

: The relationship is complex. A week ago, television 
was undoubtedly a friend to soccer, maybe even its 
best friend, enabling fans in 131 countries to view AC 
Milan’s awesome destruction of Barcelona. 

The 4-0 victory in Athens was an Olympian perfor- 
mance. Milan shed its dour cloak, made light of six 
missing major players, and transcended Barcelona in 
every way. 


match replayed in different circumstances 
hdped Bayern to win by a wider margin. Bayern won 
the Bundesliga title, and Nuremberg was relegated. 
The consequences are millions of dollars, the erosion 
of refereeing authority, and, sooner than is good Tor 
the game, instant TV replay win rule the playing Helds. 

Meanwhile, television video is a central witness in a 
trial in England's high court, in which Paul Elliott, a 
defender, is suing Dean Saunders, a forward, for an 
allegedly violent tackle that wrecked Elliott's knee 
ligaments and bis career 20 months ago. 

It is soccer's holocaust: one top professional suing 
another for seven-figure damages, each player accus- 


ing the other of malice, and experts of the sport giving 
opinions oa oath as to the guilt of the protagonists. 


~|~ ^ AWYERS WILL grow fat on the two-week trial. 


A judge most decide the burden of guilt. The 
video of the impact will be scrutinized — and shown 
on TV — over and over again. And a collision in an 


impact sport has become a courtroom drama. 
Already wi 


■5^ 


*jP HERE WAS a plausible excuse for Barcelona. It 


-- 


- *e. 
-TS4 

w- . 




- "b. 




: .aj. 


had come through an emotional final Saturday of 
the Spanish league, capturing the tide from a losing 
situation with three goals in the final 20 minutes. 

; Milan was waiting, plotting, rehearsing for the peak 
in Athens. It had lost Franco Barest. the emperor of 
Italian defenders, but found Paolo Maldini even more 
imperious. 

: ft lost various midfielders, but discovered Marcel 
Desailly, a rock in adversity. Indomitable, physically 
and mentally, Desailly seemed bom for this night. 

1 He was in fact bom in Ghana, adopted by Nantes at 
12 because of his soccer prowess, and a winner in last 
season's Champions’ Cup when Marseille beat Milan. 
Milan bought Arm, and now Milan is a winner. 

’ In attack, Danide Masraro, scored twice, but Dejan 
Savicevic was breathtaking. In an inspired instant. 
Savicevic wrestled off an opponent, looked up, saw 


_ witnesses, including Ken Aston. 78, a re- 
tired schoolmaster who was the refereeing overlord of 
the 1966 World Cup, have born sworn in to give 
subjective weight to an incident (perhaps an accident) 
to which they were not, in terms of seeing things in the 
flesh, witnesses. 

Already the claim for compensation, after intermi- 
nable “negotiations” out of court, is sullying (he game 
beyond its arena. 

Already EUiott is finding himself and his sense of 
fair play under severe cross examination. The defense 
has, reasonably enough, questioned EUiott, the accus- 
er, about Iris own “intimidatory” fouls while perforat- 
ing for Pisa, Celtic and Chelsea. 

Should EUiott lose bis case, the implications could 
rebound oa him. His occupation these days is in 
television — commentating on the moves and motives 
Of players like Dean Saunders. 

Is there anything, anywhere, beyond the television 
range? Well, yes. In Athens late last Wednesday, some 
hundreds of Barcelona supporters were in the old port 
of Piraeus. 

The seafood restaurant was ahve with revelry, with 
the soul erf sport. A handful of Milan fans arrived 
around 2 AM.; the Ca talans bought Champagne and 
shared it with the Milanese. 


goalkeeper Andoni Znbizarreta a yard off his line; and 
i the barfrom an angle 


Together they danced Zorba’s Dance: There, at 2 
n’clock in ti 


v . --c: 


• — i- 


sweetly chipped the ball beneath : 

3) yards out 

; Savicevic could not have been more precise with a 
golfing iron. Playing for a MBan side that had never 


o'clock m the morning, was the joy of soccer. There 
was fraternity between strangers celebrating an excep- 
tional performance. There was no button to turn 
humanity on or off, no screen to synthesize the 
exchange. 

Rtb Mgte ft Of *r aftf 7V Two. 


■, Devils Master Rangers, 4-1 


\t:-»?S3vs&rL?9I0 


playing 
v York 




' SJ - 


y ThrrAssoetaied Press 

NEW YORK — After 
second-best to the New 

\ all season, the New 3ereey 
; have finally reversed that 
It is now the Devils who are 
ahead. They lead their Eastern 


■—VI 

.. yrfc* 


STANLEY CUP ELAYOfTS 


■ t «- 


r.S 

‘.l- :<■ 
. < 


Conference Final 3-2 following 
Monday’s 4-1 victory and can dose 
out the series with a victory in 
Gamed at home on Wednesday. 

A victory wouldput the Devils in 
the S tan ley Cup Finals for the first 
time and send the Rangers home 
for yet another summer — continu- 
ing t heir futile streak from 1940. 


“Well be nexvoos,no question,” 
said the Devi# center Benue Ni- 
dwDs, who scored two goals Mon- 
day. "We accomplished what we 
set out to do and if we can play the 

S we played the last two games, 
hare a great opportunity." 

The Devils, who lost ah six regu- 
lar-season games to the Rangers 
arid finished six pants behind 
them in the overall standings have 
played more competively against 
than in the playoffs. 

While frustrating the Rangers 
with their tight-chraong defense, 
the Devils were creating offensive 
opportunities. Nicholls came back 
from a one-game suspension for a 
premeditated cross-check of Alexei 
Kovalev to score two goals. 


NichoDs made his presence felt 
right away, scoring on a two-on- 
one with Cl a ude Lemeux at 6:49 of 
the first period. 

The Devils held a J-0 lead for 
two periods before breaking open 
the game in the third on goals by 
Mike Pduso, NschoOs and Tom 
Chorske. Prioso jammed the puck 
past Mike Richter at 2:36 off a 
faceoff, NichoDs scored on a two- 
cm-one with John MacLean at 
10:37 and Chorske on a two-on- 
one with Bobby Carpenter at 
13:58. 


Martin Brodeur was 3:27 away 
from his second shutout of the 
playoffs when EsaTtkkanen scored 
on a shot from the blue line. 


The Assniaifd Prat 

and 
anina 

Navratilova as stunned first-round 
upset victims Tuesday in the 
French Open. 

But Sergi Bruguera and Jim Cou- 
rier, finalists last year and winners 
of the past three men's tides, ad- 
vanced in straight sets. So did Mi- 
chael Stich, the No. 2 seed, with a 
6-1, 7-5. 6-4 victory over Renzo 
Furlan of Italy. 

Edberg, seeded third, committed 
18 double faults and fell to Henrik 
Holm, an unheralded fellow Swede 
who hung on to win a seesaw, four- 
hour marathon. 7-5, 7-6 <7-1 U 6-7 
(7-2), 6-7 (10-8), 6-4. 

Holm. 25. has never won a tour- 
nament and lost all three previous 
matches with Edberg. The French 
Open is the only Grand Sam title 
to elude Edberg, who reached the 
finals there in 1989 but lost in the 
first round in 1990. 

“It doesn’t look good now,” said 
Edberg, 28. “I won't get that many 
more dunces.” 

Sabatini, a former U.S. Open 
champion, won the first set against 
!08th-ranked Silvia Farina of Italy, 
then stumbled to a 2-6. 6-2. 6-4 
defeat. Not since the 1985 U.S. 
Open has the Argentine, seeded 
eighth here, lost in the fust round 
of a Grand Slam. 

“It’s very disappointing.'' she 
said after losing on Court I, where 
Edberg and Navratilova's upsets 
also occurred. 

Also upset on that court was the 
women's No. 5 seed. Jana Novotna 
of the Czech Republic, who fell to 
Anna. Smashnova, a 17-year-old 
Soviet immigrant to Israel 6-4. 6-2. 

Novotna’s compatriot Petr 
Korda, the men’s 12th seed and the 
1992 runner-up, was toppled by 
Andrea Gaudenzi of Italy. 6-2, 5-7, 
6-7 (7-4). 6-2. 6-2. 

Ivan Lendl a three-time French 
Open champion who failed to earn 
a seeding this year, lost in the first 
round for the second straight year, 
this time to France's Arnaud 
Boetsch, 6-4. 6-3, 6-4. 

Afterward, Lendl said he was 
withdrawing from Wimbledon be- 
cause of a back problem. 

Courier, the 1991 and 1992 
champion but now only the No. 7 
seed, downed France’s Jean-Ptaj- 
lippe Hetman, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4. 

“I always fed good when I come 
hens,” Courier said. “This time of 
year, this is my borne. I'll play the 
best I can, and hopefully it will lake 
me a long way.” 

Bruguera. a surprise victor over 
Courier in last years final is seed- 
ed only sixth and has been strug- 
gling with shoulder problems. But 
the Spaniard’s muscular baseline 
game looked devastating through 
most of his 6-1, 6-1, 7-6 t7-3) tri- 
umph over the 68th-ranked Martin 
Dainm, a Czech. 

Bruguera let a 5-2 lead in the 
third set slip away before recover- 
ing- 

“I thought the match was over." 
he said. “I realize I stopped moving 
my legs." 

Sabatini, without a tournament 
title in more than two years, lost on 
the same court where she had 


blown a 6*1. 5-1 lead to Mary Joe 
Fernandez in List v car's quarterfi- 
nals. This time, Sabatini had two 
break point* to go up 4-1 in the 
third set but crumbled. 

In another upset, the South Afri- 
can Amanda Coetzer rolled to a 6- 
2. 6-1 victory over No. 6 seed Ki- 
miko Date of Japan. 

Navratilova, the No. 4 seed, lost 
Monday, meaning three of the 
eight top- seeded women failed to 
make the second round. 

The No. 14 seed, Zina Garrison- 
jackson. lost her first-round match 
for the fourth straight time here, 
falling to Silke Frank! of Germany. 

6- 3. 4-6, 6-2. in a match that was 
suspended by darkness Monday. 

The women's No. 2 seed. 
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario. avoided 
the upset epidemic with a 6-4, 6-1 
victory over Argentina's Florenria 
Labor. No. 7 Natalia Zvereva of 
Belarus won 6-0. 6-1 over Romana 
Tedjaku5uma of Indonesia; No. 10 
Fernandez beat Karina Habsudova 
of Slovakia, 64. 3-6, 6-1: No. II 
Anke Huber of Germany beat San- 
drine Tested of France. 7-6 (7-2), 6- 
3; and No. 15 Helena Sukova of the 
Czech Republic beat Laurence 
Courtois or Belgium. 6-3. 7-5. 

Among the men. I3th-seeded 
Magnus Gustafsson of Sweden 
beat Jordi Burillo of Spain. 7-5, 3-6. 

7- 5, 6-2: No. 14 Cedric Pioline of 
France beat Jakob Hlasek of Swit- 
zerland. 6-4. 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. and 
No. 15 Carlos Costa of Spain beat 
Guillaume Raoux of France. 6-1.7- 
6 (7-5). 6-1. 



•v 


Gaby in Defeat: The Attitude’s the Thing 


By Ian Thomsen 

InrcnunoitaJ Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Gabriela Sabatini son of likes — 
likes? — the court where Chris Evert in 1988 
and Martina Navratilova on Monday played 
their final matches in the French Open. On her 
chair, drinking from a large water bottle and 
eating pieces or fruit, with children chanting her 
name like sea gulls — Gha-bee! Gha-bee! — 
she might have been relaxing on a deck, but for 
her shirt drenched with effort. 

“No, no, l like it,” she said. “I feel better on 
that court sometimes. 1 mean, it doesn't —it has 
nothing to do that l lost last year at this time.” 

It was on Court No. I where. 51 weeks ago. 
she was demolishing Mary Joe Fernandez. 6-1, 
5-1. Sabatini lost that match horribly, excruci- 
atingly. and Tuesday she came back to the same 
court and lost again — this time pleasantly — 
which led to expressions of concern from re- 
porters invited to sit around her afterward: Is 
this part or a graver illness? Is her game sick? 

“I guess it is different than the last year.” 
Sabatini said Tuesday after the 2-6. 6-2, 6-4 
loss, her second opening-round defeat in 35 
Grand Slam events. *T don't know if this one 
will hurt me. but in a different way. 1 don't 
think it is going to be as bad.” 

1 1 was the biggest of all days for Silvia Farina. 
22. the 108th-ranked Italian who had won only 
one match in seven Grand Slams, and for her it 
began with the fourth game. The eighth-seeded 
Sabatini was up a break at 3-1. but Farina had 
held serve. She had held serve for the first time 
in three matches against Sabatini — having lost 
previously. 6-0, 6-0; 6-0. 64) — and she could 
build on that. 

“Normally I am in a hurry.'' Farina said. 
“Today 1 wanted to stay more patient.'' 


She is a master of understatement. Farina. 
For the longest time, hardly anyone was paving 
attention to her, even when she was winning the 
second set (another breakthrough); Sabatini 
quickly reacted by breaking ahead in the final 
set There seemed to be classrooms and class- 
rooms of kids sitting in tbe grand stand, and 
they hopped on Gaby as if she were Snoopy. 
Kids don't want close matches. She had a pair 
of break pants in hand to finish off her anony- 
mous opponent and ... and ... sbe let them go. 

“Gha-bee! Gha-bee! Gha-bee!” they called. 

She sal in the chair. She popped food in her 
mouth and chewed voraciously while uncap- 
ping her bottle. It looked like rain. The gulls 
squawked her name all around, as if jealous of 
the snack. After a minute, she got up and 
double-faulted into the net and as sbe leaned 
over her next serve, she was still chewing. One 
break point was fended off, and her next serve 
caught Farina off-balance: The ball was high 
and Farina's backhand was early but the ball 
tripped over the net All square. 

“The most important game was the one that 
went to 3-2. when she could have broken me to 
make it 4-1," Farina said. “Then I realized that 
Sabatini was a little bit afraid.” 

Yet Sabatini was pounding the ball or 
seemed to be. The racket spun hex around like a 
coin on edge. She could not have run any 
further or hit the ball any harder, but the 
double-faults undid her (her first match point 
on Fernandez was lost to a double-fault last 
year) and her eyes were boring in brilliantly but 
with nothing around them. 

The children, f rust rated, whistled at her, 
jeered her. as she returned to her seat now 
trailing, on serve, at 5-4. They were cheering her 


on a minute later — another double fault; 
looking up. she was stiU chewing. 

“Probably my attitude wasn’t that great, but 
I have to give her a lot of credit for the match 
today ” Sabatini said. 

What was that about attitude? 

“1 didn’t put that much fight in those mo- 
ments,” said Sabatini. the 1990 U.S. Open 
champion. “Like, she was very consistent. She ' 
was really trying her hardest. I lost a little bit of . 
my patience. 1 thought” 

So here is the problem. If you are a fan of 
women’s tennis, who are you going to watch for 
the next 1 1 days? Nobody is likely to give No. I 
Steffi Graf a third set. unless No. 2 Arantxa 
S&ncbcz Vicario makes the final. Perhaps 
No. 12 Mary Pierce, with her French roots . . . 
But Navratilova is gone, and Monica Seles isn't 
coming back anytime soon, and look at Sabati- 
ni — 24, and winless since 1992. Two years ago, 
sbe would have been rated tbe next to challenge 
Seles and Graf. 

“WcD. there is nothing right now that I am 
not doing right." she said. “Everything I am 
doing right, and last year I was playing very . 
well at this moment when I played here. Since 
that moment, I didn’t have any good result, J 
didn't beat any player." 

Everyone loves her, the game needs her, she 
could have everything — out maybe that's the 
hardest thing for someone like her to bear. At 
this point, it is doing her no good, begging her 
to live up to everyone else's expectations. She is • 
a rich, young, beautiful woman: A rase has 
been named for her, a doll marketed after her, a 
perfume launched in her name, and the game is 
begging to be rescued by someone who can’t 
beat Silvia Farina. 



--■■'J' 



The (Self) Making of a U.S. Bike Racer 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribute 

HIGH POINT, North Carolina — The 
hotel room must go For S125 or SI50 a night 
and the bicycle leaning a g a in st a wall would 
fetdt 53 , 000 . maybe $4,000. Bobby Julicbwas 
si ting up in bed, watching something on a 
bi color television set, waiting for Ms turn on 
tbe masseur’s table downstairs and eating a 
banma. Good-bye to bard times. That was 

• >; i last year. • . . 

4 JuEch is bright, articulate and glaringly 
--- V ” polite. He is patriotic, in love and devoted to 
his parents. Mainly, _at age 22, be is one of the 
great hopes of American bicycle racing, a tel 
uan rider who climbs strongly, tune tnals 
well and bolds his own in a spiral _ 
Most teams would have been 

have a young rider with fas 
talent unde r contract, people ihoughi But 

they were wrong. Because an opportumy was 

missed, because his luck turned wrong ana 

fcT&nmg weot bad, Jnhch 
riding in the United States as an independent 
professional without a team, a 
support staff. He was alone m ateamspoft 
Food 'and water dunng a «**• 

nobody waiting in the feed zone, 

bets, '*» I just carried everything-jt looked 
a little backpack on. 






* 


"iM 


He enjoyed the DuPont, Jnhch said at the 
end, in High Point, North Carolina, a bleak, 
funntnxe-makmg center where wing chairs 
her outnumber people. He was pleased with 
Ins performance and with that oc his team. He 
enjoyed tbe racing and the attention. 

The attention, ah the attention — press 
conferences, interviews throughout the 12- 
day race, fans asking for autographs, the 
loudspeaker blare of fas name and team at 
the start of each stage. Last year he had been 
anonymous. 

Tliere are so many good riders out there 
and you never hear of them because they’re 
not chi teams.” he said of his year as an 
independent *Td come to the start Hne in a 
race and Fd have on a jersey that was blank 
and they'd say my number out not my name, 
and two or three guys behind me they'd say, 
*011, there’s X with Coots Light or Y with 
Motorola or whatever.’” 

“You couldn’t get on a team because no 
one knew you were in the race,” he added. 

That wasn’t it, of course. That was later. 
There was another reason earlier. 

AS a rider who finished fifth in the DuPont 
in 1991, when be was a 19-year-old member 
of tbe U.S. national amateur team, and then 
10th tbe next year, Julkh received offers to 
join professional teams. In retrospect, tbe 
offer came from the Gahxude team in 
at-the rad of the 1992 DuPonL 


moyattbe rad of the 1992 DuPonL 

onr of water, 5^3 -ft* offer wasthcrebutlwaskmdtrf 

through a feed ^ ^ ^ aptened. “1 was 20 

years dd and a to intimiaated by going all 
toes than noi, thcjf worau a during the way over to Europe and not 


rise date, he noted, was Jan. 26, “when 1 was 
waiting for my first pay check, for the go- 
ahead to have our training camp in Santa 
Rosa. California, the next week. Instead, on 
Jan. 26. I was left high and dry.” 

“I frantically called every team in America 
— Saturn, Coots Ughl Motorola, L. A. Sher- 
iff, IME, everyone, just looking,” be said. “1 
told them 1 understand you guys have made 
your budgets already. Just get me to the races, 
you don’t even have to pay me. 

“Thai wasn’t good enough because, as I 
found out on my own last year, just getting to 
the races is a major, major expense. Even ir 
they didn’t pay me, it was still going to cost 
them between $20,000 and $30,000 in lodg- 
ing. transportation, equipment, ah that sort 
of thing.” No team had that much money left 
in its budget 

He did not call the Gatorade team in Italy. 
“1 figured 1 had my opportunity there and I 
didn't take it and ...” A long pause. 

“I was kind of embarrassed to caQ and say 
‘I wasn't going to go on your team but mv 
contract fell through and can I get back on? I 
had enough sense not even to ask." 

- “So I raced as an independent all year,” 
JuEch continued. “What drove me was to 
convince a team, regardless that it was late in 
tbe season, that Bobby Jnlich was a worth- 
while rider to have on a team. Time and Qnie 
again, when I would get results, I would go 
around to see if anybody was interested. Still 
h was no takers.” 


I talian, not knowing anyone on the team. 
“And I was a little bit scared by the whole 


At last be received an offer to join a Ponu- 
tese t eam for the few weeks that constitute 
heart of the American racing season. 


“tfiS 

a btl lhrow them 


paid 


start to 


lrom J[tie during a 

ttimnj oimu an MimtV WHtCf D01UC O** 1 6 


thtwiroy an on 55 ^ 


race and then you drink: 

«uh£- te coitiniwi m a i 

ckw-bul no agar m qmw a ^ 


Banner « “’•tTj the Tour 

tom ami baa 


R* 


4 




1C3U1 41W ““J — , .Um 

DuPont in'a splendid seventh pace 

the 1!2 riders who safle°- 


fonnerly coach of the 7-Ekven and Spago 
teams, 10 join a new American team funded 
by the Rossin company in Italy. 

“He has a reparation for bringing around 
young riders, for bringing them to success,” 
Jaiich said of Ned. “He offered a team with 
half its races m America, half its races in 
Europe: I thought that would be the best deal 

for me; to get xpy feet wet in my first year as a 
half over in Europe; but if things went 
Fd be aHe to come back to America." 

The sponsQiship for die new team fdl 
through; as it sometimes does m the sport, 
and Jubcfr found himself without an employ- 
er as the 1992 season was opening. The pre- 


. hesaid. 

promised to pay me but they didn't. I 
was supposed to go over and do the Tour of 
Portugal with them and maybe stay in Eu- 
rope merest of the year, but that feU'through. 
The ticket never rarne in the maiL But at least 
I got into races without paying an entry fee." 

“What was a kind of bummer was that l‘m 
from America and Tm very proud of that and 
I had to wear a jersey that said Ponng.il on 
it,” Jidicb recalled. “So everyone thought I 
was from Portugal People would say, 'Gosh, 
you look Eke a guy that was on the U.S. 
national team last year,’ and I’d say, ‘That’s 
me.*" His voice was subdued now. 

“And 1 finally cracked mentally and finan- 
cially,’’ he said. “In early August." 

(This is the first of two anicles.) 


First-Round French Open Results 


MEN'S SINGLES 

Olivier Oeloitre. France, at*. Luu Manor. 
Brazil. 7-6. IB/fr), 7-6. 8/4. re llrefl 
Jared Palmer, 05.0H.Amot Monsdorl. iwa- 
ei. 04. Ofl. 6-2 

Serot Bruguera 14), Socrin. Bet. Marlin Oamm, 
Czech, 6-1. 6-1, 7-6 . I7.-J1 
Jaime Yzoea. Peru. Be*. PoirlcV McEnroe. 
U-S. 6-2. 6-1 6-2 

Lionel Rout. France, oh. Gabriel M-irtuv 
Argentina 74. 6-1. 7-6. 17/31 
Daniel VaeeV. Czech. Bel. Javier Soncnei 
SCO In, 7-4. 17/JJ. 04. 6-Z 64 
Jim Courier |7). U.S. Bet. Jean Philippe 
Fleurian France. 4-!. 64. 64 
Chrlsiton Ruua. Norway. dH. Gilbert 
Schoiler. Ainma «4 ,h t-7 
Mo On us GuSlafcSon (!]]. Sweden, del Jordi 
Burillo. Spain. 7-5. 5-6. 7-S. 6-1 
Bemd Korbocher, German*. del romasCai- 
bonell. Spain. 7-S. 6-2. 3-6, 4-6. 64 
Siefano Pesanolldo. ilolv. del. harden 
Branch. Germany. 4-e. 7-e. 7-s. 6-3 

Brad Gilbert. Ui-art. Cristlano Carom. Ho- 
ly, ►?. tr% 6-3 

Yeuoenv Kotelrritov, Rusclc. del Tbierr, 
Guard I olcr. France, 4-6. 7-5. 64. *4. M 
Patrick Roller, AusyraUa. Bel FroncoC>o,in. 
Araemlna 6-7, (S/7», *4. 2-6. 6-4 7.5 
Ale* O’Brien. US- del. Marc Rassel Se-'itf 
land. 6-1 4-7. <7/31, 4-7 , «rSI. 6-5. fro 
A/noudBaelseft France, del. Iron Lenol US. 
64. 6-3. 64 

Javier Fro no. Araenlino. del Molivoi Wasiv 
I nylon, U.S. 7-S. 4-1. 6-3 
Alberta Bmaoieoul. Sea in. del wavnc Fer- 
reira. S Alrtca. 6-3 rel 
Davkf Rlkl. Crecn. del. Andrei C*ieanof or. 
RutsJa. 6-1 2-1 rel 

Henhk Holm, Sweden, cel. Sietoi Edoen U». 

Sweden. 7-5. 7-e. (7/1 1,0-7. (J/7l. 6-7.8 10 '.64 
Andrea GawSenzUlafv.iM. Peir Koraa H3I. 
Czech. 6-2. 5-7. 4-7 , (4/7|. ele! 

Cedrle Pioline (Ml. France, del. Jakoa mo 
wfc, Swiuerlana 64, 34 . w, t - 3 
Richard FomOero. Ausholio. oer B*ron 
Block. ZJmQttwe, 7-6 , jy/ij. 5-7. 7-6. 7,6 o-l 
Hendrik Dreekmonn. Germany, bat Adrion 
Vamea. Romania 4-1 4-*. 7-5, 44 
Aaron Kricfcilrin. U.S, del. Horatio Dr La 
Pena. Argentina, frx 44. 61 
Carl ere Casio 115). Spain, del. Guillaume 
Raw/. France, frl. 7-6. (7/sj. 6 1 
Korol Kucera. Slovakia, del. Maurice Ruo*i. 
Venezuela 64. 6X 6-1 


WOMEN'S SINGLES 

Amanda Coetzer, S Airica del. Kimlko Dare 
(61. Janan. 6Z 61 

Ine* Gorracnateaul. Araenrlna del. Michelle 

Jaypara-Lol . Avylralta. 61 67 

Silvio Farina. ihdv.dH Gabriela Sabatini (81, 

Argertfl na. 7-6. 62. 64 

Sandro Cecchin), Ifaiv.def Am r Frazier. U.S_ 

14. 61. 7-S 

Morkero Koctim. Germarrv.ael. Tracy AuaHn, 
U.S. 60. 6> 

Loune McNeil. U J. OH. Caroline Vis, Nelftar- 
lontfs. 60. 62 

Arantxa Sanchez |2i. Spoir., del. Florence 

LOOM. Araemlna. 64. 61 

Sii»c Franel. Germany. dH. a no Garrlson- 

JoclMta IM». U.S. 61 44. 62 

Nathalie Touziat. France. dH. Beate Rehv 

•.ladier. Austria 7-S, 62 

Helena Sukova (!5>. Czech, del Laurence 

CourioK betaium. 63. 7-S 

Poona Boar ova Czech, tie f. Roche) McOull- 

lon. Ausrrolla 63. S-7. r-s 

Noetic Van Lorrum, France, del. Linda Per 

rondo. Maly. 62. 6? 

I va Mo loll, Croatia, def. Dommtaue MonamL 
Belgium, 67. 74 

Peiro Rirter. Austria del. Lbo Raymond. 
Ul. J-6. 61 11-6 

Noiaiio Zvereva (7), Belarus, def. Romano 
Tedickusuma inaonesw. 60, 61 
Marianne weraeL U^.dH. PamShriver. U5. 
61 63 

Marine Guenirec. France. Bel. Eva Martln- 
ci>va Czech. 62. 34. 64 
Aie«ia Dechaume-Bailerel. France, dH. 
Emanuelq Zarao. Snirze/lond. 61 61 

Mar V- Joe Fernodez M0). Ui. dH. Karina 

Haosudova Stavokia 64. >6. 61 

Julw Halo rd. France- dH. Patricia Toraoml. 

xigtnMiKL 6l 62 

Leila Meskrii, Georgia del. Carolina Crislea. 
Romania 61 66, fri 

snke Meier. Germany, def. vone Koitiia Jo- 
oon 61. 63 

Jodi Hi Wiesner. Austria del. Petra Kamsrra 
Nertienands. 7-S. 61 

Brenao SchuHz. NH her lands. dH. Paata 
Suare:. araenima. 6l. 61 
Anna Smashnova, Israel, dei Jana Novotna 
l». Czech. 61 63 

Stwum smiiof a U.S- del. Etem Makarova. 
Pussia 61 61 



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Page 20 


Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Mac the Barometer 


By Russell Baker 


YORK — Mac phoned 








lasl weekend with “great 
news." The bank had just cut the 
monthly payments due on his ad- 
justable-rate mortgage. 

This was not great news, of 
course, it was terrible news, but i 
didn’t tell Mac. The truth is: Mac is 
the Federal Reserve Board's chief 
economic barometer, 

I have it straight from Alan 
Greenspan, the Fed's chairman. 
Back when the Fed cut interest rates 
way down 1 asked Alan what had 
got into him and his fellow bankers. 
“Nothing got into us." be said “It's 
the nothing getting into Mac lately 
that told us it was time to cut rates." 

To put it in noneconomisi talk. 
Mao hadn’t bad a job for so long 
that after raiding his savings to pay 
the mortgage he couldn’t afford 
enough groceries to save the Ameri- 
can supermarket industry from 
bankruptcy. In short, when Mac 
doesn't eat the Fed knows it's lime 
to cut interest rates. 


wear weren't enough for him. He 
went ahead and bought the jeans, 
the socks and the shin." 

□ 


□ 


The cut starts the mighty engine 
of capitalism roaring again. Build- 
ers start building again. Grocers 
start seeing the gourmet-food 
counters swept bare'again. 

In Wall Street the bulls and bears 
buy and sell again with joy. At 
sundown they raise glasses to Mac. 
whose dietary deficiency has 
moved the Fed to cry, “Lei happy 
days be here again!" 

Since that great day when the 
Fed slashed the rate so Mac could 
put the grocery business back on its 
feet, the Fed has raised the interest 
rate four times. 

“Why. Alan?" I asked Green- 
span. 

“We ordered the first hike after 
hearing Mac bad bought new un- 
derwear and was talking about 
buying a new pair of shoes." 

If this kept up. Alan explained 
Mac aruld soon be buying new 
jeans. Then it would be new socks. 
Who could say Mac wouldn't go all 
the way and buy a new shin? 

“So we raised the rate a tiny bit. 
Just enough to let Mac know- the 
Fed was watching, so he’d belter 
mind his step. Could you blame usT" 

“Absolutely not. .Alan." I said. 
“The Fed couldn’t let Mac destroy 
the .American economy." 

"Well Mac refused to take the 
hint. Improved diet and new under- 


What choice did the Fed have? It 
plunked him genily with another 
interest-rate hike. And what did 
Mac do? 

Took a pretty good job. He 
hadn’t been able to find one since 
the great leaning-down of the cor- 
porate lean-and-mean era had 
filled the unemployment lists with 
throw-away talent. Now the min- 
ute he saw a good job open up he 
look it. with selfish disregard for 
the health of the economy. 

Suddenly Wall Street's bulls and 
bears haled Mac for no longer be- 
ing unemployed. He was threaten- 
ing the American economy with a 
labor shortage which would inflate 
their money. 

Naturally the Fed had to put Mac 
back into his place at the unemploy- 
ment compensation claims window 
or see the economy collapse and all 
Wall Street burst into tears. 

“We figured a third boost in the 
interest rate would settle Mac's 
hash." Greenspan said. “Or to be 
more precise, would make Mac 
willing to settle for hash." 

But Mac didn't respond. As a 
mere lad. he had been so deeply 
imbued with the American work 
ethic that he refused to quit work- 
ing. even to save his nation's econo- 
my from collapse. 

□ 


When be phoned with his “great 
news" about a reduction in mort- 
gage payments. I immediately 
knew the worst. He was leaving 
Alan and the others at the Fed no 
way oul They would have to deliv- 
er “the big Mac.” as I’ve heard 
Alan call it — an interest rate hike 
that will have him hocking all those 
fancy new clothes if he wants fire- 
wood to get through next winter. 

His mortgage payment of course 
will soon go stratospheric, ending 
his impulses to buy a 1955 Hudson 
and put new tires on it- 

If you’re reading this, Mac. cheer 
up. You tell the Fed what it has to 
do next. Sure it's tough giving up a 
chance to see if you could make the 
old Hudson go. but America's fu- 
ture rests on yours — a bit heavily, 
it's true, but’ life’s never easy for 
heroes. 


<\Vii- York Titties Service 



: X Raps With the Beats 


By Eleanor Randolph 

tt<£rii;.T!>.'t>/] Fi's; iVnm 


EW YORK — Their ponytails gray, their sport coats 


_ wrinkled, the survivors of Ihe Beat Generation re- 
lumed to Greenwich Village last week to throw rhetorical 
word bombs, listen lojazz and. in particular, dispel a tired 
notion left over from the 196ils. Thai is. a Beat is not a 
beatnik. 

The poets Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Gregory Corse. Allen 
Ginsberg and Anne Wald man. along with heirs nf Jack 
Kerouac such as Hunier S, Thompson, appeared as evi- 
dence that the Beat rebellion 50 yean ago wasn't about 
“pads” and bongo drums and free sex and free verse and 
mind-bending drugs and alcohol and thick all-night coffee 
— although that was part of it. of course. As the composer 
David Amrara told otic audience: “No more Dobie GilEs.” 

The Beats were, “ultimately, not alienated but artistic." as 
the 67-year-old Ginsbeig. a bald and bearded professor in a 
suit and lie, described his era. Whs else would anybody 

care. 50 years later? he asked. 

Care they do. as the people running this weeklcmg hap- 
pening at New York University discovered when they 
suddenly found halls being packed and tickets being hoard- 
ed. not by aging hippies and latter-day nostalgia freaks, but 
by young people. Students had discovered that the Beat 
Generation and the X Generation had something in com- 
mon. 

“There's not a lot going on now.” explained Kevin 
Seaman, a 17-year-old from Newton. Pennsylvania, who 
came with a cluster of friends for a poetry reading. “Our 
generation, we’re in a cultural slump." 

Sponsored by the NYU School of Education, the re- 
union began with a 48-hour "Insomnijcathon’’ of poetry 
and music and ended with a marathon reading of Kerou- 
ac V‘On the Road" in Washington Square. In many ways, 
it was like the opening of a living time capsule, as one hip 
generation tried to talk to another. But by today's political 
gauges, the Beats were not sufficiently attuned to the 
rights of women and African Americans, and some of 
them were clearly not into PC pacifism. 

After a panel discussion, in which three white males and 
one white female gave an “overview” of the Beat sensibil- 
ity. a lawyer named Thomas Gayton from San Diego rose 
to chastise the group for not giving enough credit to the 
African American contribution. He introduced Ted Jones, 
a 65-year-old musician and poeL who stood to ask for his 
due in the historical sweep. “Vm the Crispus At tucks or 
the Beat Generation." he said, referring to the runaway 
slave and rabble-rouser who was fc/Ued by British i roops m 
the Boston Massacre of 1770. 

At a standing-room-only poetry reading at New York's 
Town Hall, the emcee. Ed Sanders, a satirist best known 
os the lead singer of the folk-rock group The Fugs, 
introduced a telephone on a stool os the first artist. .After 
Sanders punched a number, a deep, sonorous voice an- 
swered and William Burroughs, author of “Naked 
Lunch." was introduced to the crowd. 

“I thought he was dead." whispered j young woman in 
the audience. “Do you think this is some kind of trick?" 

No trick. Burroughs is living in Lawrence. Kansas. 

Unlike other poets that evening — including Michael 
McClure, who intoned about a life “lying on rite beach 
watching chipMUNKS. chipMUNKs. chipMUNKs” and 
pondering such pressing questions as “can the salmon 
drown?" — Burroughs offered advice that seemed ground- 
ed in harder stuff. Perhaps his bouts with heroin addiction 
and his accidental shooting of his wife. 


“Never get involved in a boy-and-girl fight." said the 
disembodied voice. 

“Beware of whores who say they don't want any money. 
What they mean is that they want more money." 

“If you are doing business with a religious sonuva- 
bitch," he suggested “get it in writing." 

"And. if, after being disposed to someone's presence, 
you feel as if you just lost a quart of blood." he said, 
“avoid that person." 

Feriingheui, a tall, robust-looking seven lysome thing best 
known for his poetry collection “A Coney Island of the 
Mind." read a new poem that called for “just one Tibetan 
Lama, just one Taoist, just one Zen. just one Thomas 
Merton Trappisi" in the Justice Department hierarchy to 
step the storming of the Branch Davidians in Waco. Texas. 

“Then that sick cull and its children might still be 
breathing the free American air of (he First Amendment." 
the poet concluded. 

A women's panel, which tried to make the point that 
there were also women in the Beal revolution, harkened 
back to the real world of the 1 950s with the appearance of 
Carolyn Cassady. the prim and steady widow of Kerouac's 
drag-crazed, wild-man friend Neal" Cassady. 

Cassady. a 71-year-old portrait painter who lives in 
London, noted afterward that she was "really from anoth- 
er planet" as far as the Beats were concerned and that she 
kepi asking young people ai the conference: “What's so 
wonderful about trying to see how fast you can destroy 
yourself?" She was married to Cassady from 1948 until he 
died in Mexico in 1968. presumably of a drug and alcohol 
overdose, a few days before his 43d birthday. 

The author of the" 1990 book “Off the Road: "My Years 
With Cassady. Kerouac and Ginsberg." she recalled a 
crowd of young rowdies who always “modified their 
language because they knew f didn't like ft," 


But even now, there are some raw feelings about her. The 
feminis ts were critical, she said, because me didn’t leaver 
man who was unfai thful to her. And the friends. of Ginsberg 
saw her as an avenging angel who threw Ginsberg out of tar 
house, “even though I felt vety bad about it.” 

Why did she throw him out? 

“1 found him in bed with Neal," she said. “And. I was 
sorry, but I just couldn't take it 1 drove Allen to the airport 
and explained it to him, chat I would have felt the same ..way 
if he had been another woman." 

Jan Kerouac, 42, who met her father only twice before 
he died of overindulgence in 1969 at age 47, told reporters 
in a news conference that she has contested the will that 
has allowed the family of Jack Kerouac’s last wife; Stella 
Sampas. to sell his literary documents and memorabilia. 
Kerouac said the family has been “ransacldngmy father's 
estate, selling everything off piece by piece” to private 
investors rather than to universities so that scholars can 
have access to them. The lawyer for the family has denied, 
the sdl-off and said they are preserving the Kerouac 
literary heritage. 

If squabbles over money and memories have finally 
entered the anti-materiajjslic; all -loving Beat world,, there, 
are also signs not only of aging but of maturing. 

One such moment occurred as Thompson, the grand- 
daddy of appro jour nalism and the model for the mad 
“Duke" of “Doonesbury," was entertaining the crowd _ 
with his instant aphorisms. President Clinton’s three- 
strikes proposal was “a monument to cheap, Lllegitimale 
Arkansas legal thinking," he suggested. And on the prob- 
lems of Generation X: “You are what the beatniks were in 
the 1960s. You're soon going to be Generation Z. You’re 
last year's model." 



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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



Jnwrewi 

North America 
Showers and thunderstorms 
will be sceherpd across the 
East Coasi Thursday, iher- 
Friday and Saturday should 
be dry Toronto will bo main- 
ly dry mio the weekend 
Kansas C/!y and Chicago 
should be dry as well. The 
West Coast will be season- 
able and mostly ram -free 


Europe 

Clouds and a lew showers in 
London Thursday will be 
replaced by sunshine Friday 
and Saturday. Pans will be 
dry Into the weekend wilh 
rising temperatures Much pi 
Eastern Europe can expect 
limes at clouds and sin wdh 
cool temperatures later mis 
week. 


Asia 

Tokyo will be drv Thursday 
through Saturday with above 
normal lemperalures. There 
may be a low showers late 
this week in Seoul Hong 
Kong will be mainly rain-lrce 
and very warm mio the 
weekend Manila is apt to be 
a Heeled by a Iropical system 
Thursday win ward and rain. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Belna 
CflfeD 
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Jeruuhm 


Riyadh 


Today 

High Low W 
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sunny, pe-paffly dwWy. tuSoudy. sh-snowere, hftunderstonra. r*akr, sl-snow Burflas, 

Ice. W-tVealhor. Afl mops, forecasta and data provided by Accu-Woalher, fnc. 6 >994 


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Low 

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ACROSS 


f and 

hounds 

(outdoor gams) 
s Section of the 
brain 

• Palindromic 
name in pop 
music 

ia Midesst carrier 
i« Flower pan 
is Regrets 
IS MANTLE 
is Bars 
90 Kind of oed 


21 Hubbub 

22 Olympus queen 
2 a RUTH 

30 Indian pnneess 
ai Offended 

32 Street sign abbr. 

33 ‘Ars Amatona’ 
author 


34 Manages, as tor 
onesell 


35 Signaled 
W Command to 
Rover 

3T Absorbed by 


Solution to Puzzle of Mav 24 


aa Prefix with 
dollars 

39 AARON 

43 With eyas and 
ears open 

44 Antrpoliutian grp. 

45 SL Francis’s 
home 

48 Confirming 

S3 JACKSON 

ss British P.M. 

Douglas-Home 

56 Jerks' works 

57 Westernmost 
Aleutian 

58 Ritzy 

59 Word repeated 
before *1,2, 3* 

50 Nikita's no 



DOWN 


BCJDHCJSlUaniDIDaESa 

qhocjq hhq aomaa 
□□□am 
□uqq0 sob aaaaa 


1 Fab Four flick 

2 Controversial 
orchard spray 

3 Zany Martha 

• Dignified 

5 Hightailed it 

6 out 

(withdraws) 

7 Cry from 
Scrooge 

• Euclid'S grand 
work 


■ Ark’s terminus 

10 Pal baby on the 
back 

11 One of Alcott's 
little women 

12 Sickly, as a 
complexion 

14* a gun!" 

17 Color anew 

18 Prefix with 
dot la re 

22 hearing 

22 One ola road 
crew 

M Architect 
Jones 

25 Pioneer ofthe 
twist 

28 Reach in total 

97 — ; — couture 

28 Tinker-Chance 
link 

29 Second draft. 
Informally 

30 LB. J. 
son-in-law 

24 Most 
passionate 

as section 

28 Easy catch 

40 Jerk 

41 Greasy-spoon 
Care 


42 Southwestern 
formations 


... yv ■ >*« ’ -cr-v'v 


45 P.D. Q. 

46 One-man band 

47 Courts 


48 Notts, 
buts 

4a Command v> - : 

so — -bay. •' . • -j??p wacftK^- 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ART Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. • ^ 

I. Using the chut below, find the cv*unuy you are calling from. • J ' 

- t>ul the corresponding A1SX Access Number . • . . ' . • '•?( ‘~f. 

.A. An AIM English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask fen - the phone number you wish to call or eOonea you to 
cii*.;rn>ef service representative ; {If f, 

To receive your free waifci card of /aSTs Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 
the country ^xjure in and ask for QtAorrter Service. 




Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since it's translated instantly. Call your clients at 5 am knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AT&L 1 

To use these services, dial the AKT Access Number of the country you're in and you'll get all the 
help you need. Vf ich these Access Numbers and your AIKT Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don t have an ABET Galling Card or you d like more information on AtKT global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 



coinvrRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY. 

ACCESS NUMBSt" 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011 

Brazil 

000 # 0 * 0 .-v 

Australia 

1-800-881-011 

Liechtenstein* 

155-00-11 

Chile 

. . 00*451^* 

China, PRO** 10811 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Columbia 

980-11 -0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

0-800-0111 

Costa Rica*a 


Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia, F.Y.R. of 99-8004288 

Ecuador 


India* 

000-117 

Malta* 

0800-690-110 

EJ Salvador* 

• ••••V.’rtSE;.* 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* 

19*-0013 

Guatemala* 


Jjpan* 

0039-111 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 

Guyana*** 

• - 

Korea 

00^-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 

Honduras^ 


Korean 

u* 

Poland-*” 

0*010-4800111 

Mexico*** 


Malaysia* 

.800-0011 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Nicaragua (Managua) - .. -> 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Romania 

01-800-4288 

Panama* 

•. J. t 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Rnss ia ** (Moscow) 

155-5042 

Peru* 


Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

00-42000101 

Suriname 

ET" 

Singapore 

800-01 11-111 

Spain* 

900-9900-11 

Uruguay 


Sri Lanka 

H 30-430 

Sweden* 

020-795011 

Vcnrjxicti'* 

aOOS-45^/,- 

Taknur 

0080-10288-0 

Swftaeriand* 

15500-11 

r AHTORFAN - cT?i, 

ThaiUnd* 

0O19-99M111 

UJL 

0500-890011 

Bahanwg 

. -r-80t«7afa««^: 


EUROPE 

Ukraine* - 

8*100-11 

Bermuda* 

• - -l-aWEMBEf. 

Armenia*' 

8*14121 

MIDDLE EAST 

British VX 


Austria— 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 

80CM301 

Cayman Islands 

l-80O»73*»»o; 

Belgium* 

0800-100-10 

Oprus* 

090-90010 

Grenada* 

- i-aoo*m»s5. 

Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Israel 

177-100-2727 

Haiti* 

ooL-axrtTz^ss.- 

Croatia** 

99-38-0011 

Kuwait 

600-288 

Jamaica** 


Czech Rep 

00-420-00101 

Lebanon (Beirut) 

426001 

Neth.Act2I 

OOl-AMMRHBW: 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

Qatar 

0800-011-77 

St. Ktas/Nevts 

-i-softg^ygg. 

Finland' 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

1-800-10 

AFRICA - : 

France 

29*~OOI2 

Turkey* 

00-800-12277 

Egypt* (Cairo) 


Germany 

0130-0010 

U-AE.- 

800-121 

Gabon* 

'•'iw#?. 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS 

Gambia* 

• . : -'SSL- 

Hungary* 

oo*-«o(Hmii 

Argentina* 

1M1-80O-2OO-1H1 

Kenya: 

...-.0503; 

Iceland** 


Belize* 

ys> 

Liberia 

. '‘wm- : 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Bolivia' 

0-600-1112 

South Africa 



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Ww« Cot U K^t" prliis,iin»4 1 * XOff ISADKccff Me> plui jn mUU>XU) iluipr 
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feW UntnufK LHW* 5cnrtoci offer mer-thr-phonc Inapicciaan In IfeOUn- 

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“Coded oiling only - "i.'xL't- 

—Public pftonci amiwe balcuW p4rraca tfaourfi trie cafi riuwstoo-"-"-- rr~ 

• Na ivjitiHc imm public phone. “ 

***Xeensara)|ibtftoouSj«» ' ‘-■■■it- 

AftwjtiwMaidJfaimic ~ - ‘ 

44 F™ puMtc |Wnei .vUy, pu«h fa red bung-. wrfardM wng 

trail rubric pbcnei.u«c[iwr , om!rtriJ.iM«arf.. . ‘ i' • . 

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