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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


¥ * 


London, Thursday, May 26, 1994 



No. 34, <98 


A Tear for Rwandans, 
And a Helpless Shrug 

Europeans Deplore the Slaughter 
But Are Umvilling to Risk Troops 


By Stephen Kinzer 

'■ffc York Time-. S.-xtuc 

In a recem. debate in the British Parlia- 
men L an opposition member asked Foreign 
Secretary Douglas Hurd whv Britain was not 
sending peacekeeping troop; to Rwanda as it 
had to Bosnia-Herzegovina. 

“Is there one law far Europeans and an- 
other for black Africans?" the member, Kim 
Howells, inquired. 

His question reflected Europe's rising hor- 
ror over the killings, which are said to have 
taken uncounted thousands of lives in Rwan- 
da m the last seven weeks. 

Mr. Hurd’s reply, lamenting that there was 
no clear mission for British troops in Rwan- 
da, exemplified the fear of European govern- 
ments that active involvement there could 
lead them into a bloody quagmire. 

In this conflict between humanitarian im- 
pulses and cold calculation of national inter- 
est, realpolitik is winning. European govern- 
ments deplore the slaughter in Rwanda but 
are not willing to take the risks inherent in 
trying to stop it. 

Governments fear repeating the debacle of 
Somalia, where a UN force took publicized 
casualties and was ultimately forced to with- 
draw from the country without having paci- 
fied it, 

With former colonial powers in Europe no 
longer- willing to intervene quickly in Af rican 
countries, the United Nations is the onlv 
agency available to do so. but not yet the 
capacity for rapid reaction. 

After weeks of delay, the United Nations 
voted last week to send 5,500 peacekeepers to 
Rwanda. Three African countries — Ghana. 
Ethiopia and Senegal — said Tuesday that 
they would send troops, but it was unclear 
who would provide their military equipment 
and underwrite other costs. Several Europe- 
an countries have declined informal UN re- 
quests to join. 


“Denmark already contributes United Na- 
tions soldiers 10 many oilier places .” Foreign 
Minister Niels Helveg Petersen said last 
week. “The basis for the Rwandan mission is 
somewhat uncertain. The question is whether 
the UN soldiers will have a reasonable 
chance to fulfill their mission.” Italy is the 
only European country to express willingness 
even to consider joining die UN force in 
Rwanda. 

“What is happening in Rwanda is infinite- 
ly sad." the Italian defense minister. Cesare 
Previli. said m Brussels on Monday. “The 
tragedy is taking place before our eyes, and 
we would be fully prepared to take part in an 
international initiative, even bv sending 
forces." 


Among countries that have turned down 
UN requests for help in Rwanda are both of 
its former colonial masters. Germany and 
Belgium. Germany ruled Rwanda from 1899 
to 1916, after which Belgium took over under 
a League of Nations mandate until indepen- 
dence in 1962. 

“We were asked to provide a 100-man 
medical team like the one we sent to Cambo- 
dia. but we are awaiting a decision from the 
Constitutional Court about what our forces 
can legally do abroad and we don’t want to 
introduce any irritation into that process, so 
we have declined,” said Alois Bach, a spokes- 
man for the German Defense Ministry. 
“They also asked for armored Iran sport vehi- 
cles, and we have told them that we don't 
have what they need. 

“As for the final request, for a plane to 
help with airlifts between Rwanda and Tan- 
zania. we are willing to send one as soon as 
conditions are safe enough.” 

Airports in Rwanda would have to be 
under UN control and all parties to the 
conflict would have to agree to allow the 

See RWANDA, Page 5 



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Butros Ghali: T Failed. It Is a Scandal' 





The Associated Press 


UNITED NATIONS, New York— Secre- 
tary-Genera/ Butros Butros Ghali called it a 
“scandal”' Wednesday that countries have 


The Security Council Iasi week authorized 
the sending of 5.500 soldiers to Rwanda, but 
the UN leader said he had commiimenls for 
only 2,200. 




not moved more ^mckly to offer troops and 


equipment for a 
Rwanda. 


peacekeeping force in 


'Unfortunateljfjet us say with great hu- 


Mr. Butros Ghali said he had spoken to the 
heads of state of several countries in recent 
weeks, but only three nations — Ghana. 
Ethiopia and Senega! — have made firm 
offers of troops. 


utility, I failed,” Mr. Butros Ghali said. “It is 
a scandal 1 am the first one to say it, and 1 
am ready to repeal it.” 

The United Nations estimates that 200,000 
people have been killed in Rwanda in a 
month of ethnic slaughter. 

“All of us are responsible for this failure," 
he said. 


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Tidsi fixtures from seven weeks of fighting budding against the cold and damp in a refugee camp at Kabgafi, in southern Rwanda. 


Russia Seeks 
Much Wider 
Relationship 

With NATO 


But Defense Chiefs Plea ' 
Gets Cautious Response : 
From Alliance Ministers 


Asian Leaders Fear a Backlash From ‘America Bashing 9 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herat! Tribune 

KUALA LUMPUR — As Asian criticism of U.S. trade 
and human rights policies rises, a growing number of busi- 
ness and political leaders in the region are warning of the 
danger of “America bashing.” 

Although many of them share concerns about Washing- 
urn’s approach to the region, they fear that strident postur- 
ing will strengthen American isolationism. 

Such a development would make it difficult for the 
Clinton administration to continue its program of opening 


up e<y i ripmie* and furthering military links in the Asia- 
Pacific area. 


The United Slates is the largest market for exports from 
East Asia, especially manufactured goods, and American 
military forces in the Western Pacific, many based in Japan 
and South Korea, play a key role in mai n tai n i n g a balance of 
power in a potentially volatile part of the world. 

Asian businessmen and analysts say that keeping this 
balance is essential for preserving the peace that has allowed 
East Asia to concentrate on economic growth and raodem- 


At a meeting of the Pacific Basin Economic Council that 
ended Wednesday in Kuala Lumpur. Jaime Zobel de Ayala, 
chairman and president of Ayala Corp., one of Philippines' 
largest companies, said that the United States was the only 
country that could maintain the peace and stability “indis- 
pensable to successful enterprise and thriving commerce.” 

The meeting was aitentied by 800 business executives 
from 17 Asia-Pacific economies. 


nation. 


Mr. Zobel said “the trend towards Ameriea-bushing” in 
Asia should be discouraged. “A U.S. which ceases to believe 
in free trade and international order — and pul iis new 


conviction into practice by going protectionist and isolation- 
ist — would throw this region into a tailspin." 

He said that the size and wealth of the United Stales “pose 
a constant temptation for the country to withdraw into 
herself and leave the rest of the world to its own devices.” 

Lee Kuan Yew. Singapore's senior minister, warned in 
Australia recently against “a U.S.-bashing crusade.” 

And in a speech last week in Singapore to an international 
conference otganized by the Asia Society of New York, he 
said that the United States was a “key player” in the 


By William Drozdiak 
and John F. Harris 

Washington Pint Senve 

BRUSSELS — Defense Minister Pavel S.*, 
Grachev of Russia called Wednesday for the-- 
creation of a “full-blooded strategic relation-' 
ship” between his country and the Western^:*? 
military alliance that was formed to contain its * 
territorial ambitions. 

During a meeting with his counterparts from 
the 16 North Atlantic Treaty Organization na- 9m 
lions and former Soviet-bloc allies in Eastern nR 
Europe, General Grachev reiterated Moscow's 
readiness to join, without conditions, the Pan- p^, 
nership for Peace. NATO's program to enhance 
military cooperation with former enemies in the 
defunct Warsaw Pact. • — 

But General Grachev emphasized that the 
Partnership was “not a complete answer, but 
only a first step” toward dealing with the post- } 
Cold War security environment in Europe. 

He said that Russia's status as Europe's bigj 1 
gest nuclear power required a broader “consul- 1 
tative mechanism” with NATO that would en- 
compass disarmament, conversion of military 
industries and global threats such as terrorism: 
nuclear proliferation and environmental pollu? , 
lion. 

NATO ministers, while expressing some caur 
lion about Russia’s ambitions to create a spe- 
cial relationship with the alliance, warmly weT 
corned Moscow's willingness to join the 
Partnership program after months of ambiva- 
lent and contradictory statements. 

Defense Secretary ’ William J. Perry of the 
United Slates praised the “historic nature” of 
the meeting with his Russian counterpart and 
said “we are very pleased that be announced the 
unconditional derision for joining Partnership 
for Peace." 

But Mr. Perry seemed less enthusiastic about 
General Grachev’s proposal to expand the rela- 
tionship into areas not covered under the terms 
of the military partnership. He said issues such 
as nuclear proliferation “have been handled fox 
a number of years on a bilateral basis” between — 
Moscow and Washington, suggesting it may 
not be appropriate to extend the dialogue to a 
broader basis involving aB NATO members. 

Before the session, senior NATO officials 
said they reared that General Grachev would 
make unacceptable political demands that 
would scuttle hopes for a Russian role in the 
Partnership. But they said he gave everyone “a 
pleasant surprise” by producing a document 
that included a long list of projects, including 
joint efforts at peacekeeping, technical training, 
military field exercises and strategic planning. 

“It’s looking very good,” said Defense Minis- 
ter Malcolm Rifkind of Britain. “Russia clearly 
wants to play a constructive role working with 
NATO on matters of common interest. But 
there will be no right for Russia to take pan in 
NATO’s decision-making.” 

Mr. Rifkind’s German counterpan. Volker 
Ruhe, said: “We are definitely on the right 
track. Partnership for Peace is a common posi- 
tion for everybody buL beyond that there is 
scope for a partnership between Russia and 
NATO. But it still needs to be worked out." 

General Grachev gave no indication when 
his country would join the program, which was 
formally begun bv NATO leaders in January as 


See BASH, Page 5 


See RUSSIA, Page 5 


Kiosk 


Clinton to Renew 

China’s Status 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Presi- 
dent BiH Clinton is expected 10 announce 
Thursday the renewal of China s most- 
favored-nation status, adnnmslrauon and 
congressional sources said Wednesday. 
High-level discussions were continuing. 

The trade designation lets nations ship 
goods to the United Stales at the lowest 
tariff levels. Mr. Clinton has larked con- 
tinuing the benefits to improved huirum 

strings tied to the renewal. Congressional 
aides said they expected a curtadmg of 
Beijing's exports of assault weapon^ to 
appease human rights acuvists. 


Book Review 
Bridge. 


Page 7, 
Page 7. 


Iraq Used Toxic Arms in War, Report Says 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — There is strong evidence 
that Iraq attacked US. troops with chemical 
weapons during the Gulf War, spreading con- 
taminants that have sickened thousands of 
Americans, according to a congressional report. 

Exposure to chemical and possibly biological 
agents during the war was widespread Senator 
Donald W. Riegle Jr, a Michigan Democrat, 
said Wednesday in releasing the report 

Mr. Riegle. in hearings of the Banking Com- 
mittee he chairs, demanded that the Pentagon 


make public all information on chemical expo- 
sures and do more to help sick veterans. 

“I’ve seen our government lie to us before in 
other war situations,” he said in a room filled 
by veterans, some crippled by illness. “This is 
not going to be on issue that gets swept under 
the rug." 

But Edwin Dorn, undersecretary of defense 
for personnel and readiness, said the Pentagon 
had concluded that Iraq did not use chemical or 
biological weapons during the war and that 
there were no conclusive reports of troops hav- 


ing symptoms caused by exposure to chemical 
or biological warfare agents. 

“There were no confirmed detections of any 
chemical or biological agents at any time during 
the entire conflict-" he said. 

The 160-page report lists more than a dozen 
incidents where American troops appear to 
have been exposed to chemical agents, mainly 
from rocket attacks. 

It also says that contrary 10 Pentagon claims 

See GAS. Page 5 


France ? s f Intellos 9 Strike a Malraux Pose 



By Alan Riding 

New York Times Sermr 

PARIS — Whether it was Emile Zola de- 
nouncing (be French Anny in the Dreyfus Af- 
fair or Andii Malraux supporting the Republi- 
cans in the Spanish Qvii War or Jean-Paui 
Sartre campaigning against the Vietnam War, 
French intellectuals have a long history of 
swaying French public opinion. 

All die stranger, then, that they should have 
been so ritem of fate. But the problem is that 
students, their natural audience, now worry 
more about finding well-paid jobs than about 
changing Fiance. And, with the end of the Cold 
War, the traditional debate between left and 
right has also evaporated. 

So are les inieilos, as they are known here 
with a peculiarly French mixture of admiration 
and derision, threatened with extinction? 

This month, to the considerable surprise of 
French politicians, they showed they still carry 
clout. Led by the philosopher Beraard-Henri 
L6vy. a group of intellectuals have adopted the 
caus e of Bosnia’s Muslims and overnight they 
have lifted Bosnia to the top of the political 
agenda here. 

Indeed, judging by reactions, it is apparent 
that France's politicians, press and pubuc still 
attribute to intellectuals a moral authority that 
gives special weight to their opinions. Even 
those who disagree with them shy from chal- 
lenging their privileged right to be heard. 



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To make sine they are noticed. 35 of ihe 
intellectuals have decided to run on a pro- 
Bosiuu ticket in next momh's elections for the 
European Parliament. Specifically, they are de- 
manding a lifting of the international arm* 
embargo on Bosnia’s Muslims and the preser- 
vation of Bosnia as a multiethnic suite in ,im 
final peace agreement. 


But the main purpose of the ticket, which 
calls itself “Europe Begin.' in Sarajevo.” is to 
stir debate in France about tbe plight of Bos- 
nia's Muslims. And in this, it can already claim 
success. The prev» has given the initiative blan- 
ket coverage, while both government and oppo- 
sition have felt obliged io respond publicly to 
the group’s demands. 

True to tradition, of enurse. the intellos are 
not acting in unison. The philosopher Andre 
Glucksmann. the writer' Marck Halter. Pascal 
Bruckner and Juan Goyti-olo. and Lite actress 
Marina Vlady are among those running in the 
June 12 elections. But nun> prominent names 
are not on the list. 

Part of the problem i' Mr Levy, whose 
publicity-seeking antics have alienated many of 
his colleagues. A handsome tousle-haired 45- 
year-old who has taken to wearing a khaki T- 
shirt, he launched his movement after promot- 
ing his war documentary "Bosna!" at the 
Cannes Film Festival this month, ^vnounded 
as ever by a bevy of admirers. 

Last week, the satirical newspaper Le L a nurd 
Enchalnc. which refer* !>■ Mr. Levy simply by 
his initials of BHL puked fun at him. renaming 
his election ticket j' "Sarajcvote for Me and 
carrying a cartoon of .1 Bvromi-lookmc Mr. 
Levy holding an automatic rifle und saying, 
“■o Rimbaud". Rnnih. 

Bui there are at.-*- intellectuals who have 

See FRANCE. Page 5 


Pact Without Harmony 
Just Resets Trade Clock 


U.S. and Japan Take Contrary Views 


By Clay Chandler 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S. and Japanese 
officials are offering starkly different inter- 
pretations of their agreement ending a three- 
momh stalemate in trade negotiations, even 
a$ both sides hailed it as a major break- 
through. 

The accord announced Tuesday, and the 
divergence of views over it. cast doubt on 
President Bill Clinton's pledge to transform 
the nature of the U.S. effort to open the 
Japanese market. Indeed, the negotiations 
appear to have returned to the point at 
which they started nearly a year ago. 

While U.S. officials said they had won 
Japan’s commitment to use “objective exile- 


two largest economies for much of the past 
decade. 

Indeed, the agreement seems to do little 
more than return the two countries to the 

point at which their trade negotiations start- 
ed in Tokyo in July, when Mr. Gimon 
pressed Japan's then-prime minister, Kjichi 
Miyazawa, into signing a “framework agree- 
ment" to begin a market-opening effort that 
Clinton administration officials said would 
mark the beginning of a new era in Japanese 
relations. 

But those talks bogged down almost as 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


na" to measure progress in opening specific 
.—including 


sectors of the Japanese market ' 
automobiles, auto pans, communications 
and medical equipment — Japanese officials 
emphasized that progress in those areas was 
not a primary goal. 

Similarly. Japanese officials challenged 
the U.S. assertion that Ihe two sides had 
agreed to a “results-oriented” approach — 
one that emphasizes sales of foreign prod- 
ucts in Japan — to resolving their trade 
differences. 

The Japanese officials said the most sig- 
nificant pan or the accord was an explicit 
assurance that the United Slates would not 
rely solely on numerical targets to measure 
Japanese progress. 

U.S. negotiators minimized that provi- 
sion, saying it was something they had never 
sought 

The divergent visions of the accord, 
worked out in five days of feverish negotia- 
tions and numerous phone calls between 
senior officials in Washington and Tokyo, 
typified the sort of ambiguity and confusion 
that ha> clouded relations between world's 


soon as they began, as it became clear that 
both sides had come away from the Tokyo 
meeting with starkly divergent visions of 
just what had been agreed to. 

Hie agreement rat Tuesday clears the way 
for those talks to resume soon, although (he 
time and place of the next session has yet to 
be detennmed. There is no deadline for 
concluding the talks and no sanction for 
failing to do sa although both sides will 
have to make a public account of their 
progress at the Group of Seven summit 
meeting in Naples in July. 

US. officials said that negotiators had 
clarified several of the key flaws of the 
language of the July agreement But the 
statements or officials on both sides left 
considerable room for skepticism about that 
claim. 

Nevertheless, a Japanese Foreign Minis- 
try spokesman in Washington seemed to 
suggest that the greatest achievement was 
less a clarification of these points than an 
agreement to get the two countries back to 
the bargaining table. 

“The important thing is 10 get past this 
metaphysical debate — what is what and 

See TRADE, Page 5 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 





By \ oussef M. Ibrahim 

A'w Yivk Ttnja Senne 

GAZA cm — Perhaps the 
roost dramatic measure of the Pal- 
estinians’ first week of self-rule in 
Gaza has been the sudden normal- 
ity in people's lives; barbecuing at 
Jhe beach, leaving home without 
i-D. cards, chatting in coffee shops 
long past the former curfew and 
Strolling by police stations without 
throwing a stone. 

The 900.000 Palestinians packed 
into this day strip of Mediterra- 
nean coast, once described by a 

Gaze psychiatrist. Dr. lyad Elsaruj. 
as “tribal, conservative, rigid, con- 
frontational. prone to violence and 
wildly moody." have, in fact, be- 
haved in the most remarkably affa- 
ble way. Since May 18. when the 
Israeli Army began to withdraw, 
the Palestinians here have im- 
mersed themselves in joyful cele- 
bration. 

Calves and sheep have been 
slaughtered to feed the 5.000 or so 
Palestinian policemen who 
streamed into Gaza over the last 10 
days to replace the Israeli police. 
Mounds of food and sweets make 
their way daily from each neigh- 
borhood to the police camps. 

On the whole. Gazans and for- 
eign visitors alike say. these first 
few days of autonomy for the four 
cities, eight refugee camps and sev- 
en villages that make up the Gaza 
Strip, widely viewed as a lawless 
urban jungle, have gone rather well. 

If anything. Gazans are demon- 
strating a kind of political maturity 
that many analysts did not antici- 
pate. Many, in fact, predicted fac- 
tional fighting would break out 
among those who support and 
those who oppose the peace accord 
between the Palestine Liberation 
Organization and Israel immedi- 
ately after the Israeli soldiers 
pulled back . 

It could still happen. But fewer 
people arc willing to believe it now. 
having seen the wav Gazans *reet- 



A f France Frvue 

HAMBURG — President-elect 
Roman Herzog is calling for a 
“head-on fighr by the authorities 
against the extreme right in Germ j-' 
ny. 

“It is above all a question of the 

E olice and legal authorities.'' Mr. 
lerzog. who was chosen Monday 
as the next head of state, told Die 
Woche in an interview to be pub- 
lished Thursday. 

Asked whether he believed ev 


to Beach Isa Celebration of Normality 


... 

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WM 







Add Hnu/Tbc Allocated Pras 

Palestinian women on a Gaza beach tins week following the return of setf-rtde for the area. Under Israefi rule, the beach was off-limits. 


ed autonomy. And Palestinian fac- 
tions. including the most radical 
Islamist opponents of the peace 
treaty, say they do not want inter- 
necine fighting. 

Maybe. Dr. Elsaraj says, it is the 
intoxication of newly found free- 
doms. Over three day's of talking to 
scores or Gazans, it is impossible to 
overestimate the effect lhaL an end 
to 27 years of Israeli occupation 
and decades of foreign rule by 
Egyptian. British, and Ottoman ad- 
ministrations is having on people 
here. Nor is it possible for outsiders 
to appreciate the significance that 
Palestinians, for the first time in 


anyone's memory, are free to rule 
themselves. 

“Do you know that I haven't 
been able to come to this beach, to 
sit like that, grill this meat, as we 
are doing, for 27 years," Yasir Ah- 
mad Malar, a merchant, said idle 
Monday night as he placed skewers 
of meat over a glowing charcoal fire 
at Gaza Port beach. 

Under Israeli occupation this 
beach alternated between a no- 
man's- land and a heavily restricted 
area reserved to fishermen with 
permits. The Israeli military comp 
was on the beach and two weeks 
ago anyone found on the quarter- 


mile- wide stretch of while sand 
near midnight risked arrest or seri- 
ous injury. 

But “Gaza by night'' is taking on 
a whole new look nowadays. 

Long after sunset, hundreds of 
people flock to the long-forbidden 
seashore, clustering around bon- 
fires in the fresh Mediterranean 
evening breeze. On Monday night 
they stretched as far as the eye 
could see: men. women, children, 
all clapping their hands to Arab 
music blaring from tape players as 
the smell of grilled meat wafted 
aver the shore. 


Vendors of ice cream and cold 
drinks hawked every spot of the 
seaside comiche. On the dirt road 
fr amin g the beach, cars snaked in a 
slow procession, headlights shining 
into the dark horizon. 

During the day, the whole town 
is a vast traffic jam. Children line 
up at a horse ride in the reopened 
park of the Unknown Soldier mon- 
ument Graffiti artists, once shot 
on sight by Israeli soldiers, now 
have time to paint their slogans in 
multicolored Arab calligraphic 
styles. 

Another popular attraction is the 


EL' Provides a Forum 
For its Gvpsv Groups 

For the first time. ieaden* of 
Gypsy groups from across West- 
ern’ Europe have met under the 
aegis of the European Union. 

The meeting, in Seville, Spain, 
which included observers from 
the former Yugoslavia and Ro- 
mania. was “a form of official 
recognition of this transnational 
minority” of several millions dis- 


persed across the Continent ac- 
cording to the French daily Liber- 
ation. 

A series of conferences dealt I 
with serious , closely fell issues: 
racism and intolerance, the prob- 
lem of schooling, the status of 
Gypsy women. The deaths of 
thousands of Gypsies at the i 
hands of "ethnic cleansers" in for- 
mer Yugoslavia were discussed at 
length, and a minute of silence 
was observed for the estimated 
400.000 Gypsies who were victims ! 
of the Holocaust ' 

In the end. the 250 delegates — 
including even Irish “travelers.” a 
white-skinned wandering people 
who are not true Gypsies — left 
Seville with a feeling of ebul- 


lience. “For all the Gypsies of 
Europe,” said a Spanish delegate. 
Juan de Dios Ramirez Heredia, 
the only Gypsy member of the 
European Parliament "there will 
be a before Seville and an after 
Seville.” 


Around Europe 

PoGsb war veterans seeking to 
join D-Day commemorations in 
Normandy will have to pay and 
organize their own way there, the 
Warsaw veterans' association 
said. Zygmunl Korwin-Soko- 
lowski. chairman of the organiza- 
tion, said the Polish veterans, who 
foughL alongside the Allies in the 
June 6. 1944. landings, had not 


been officially invited by France. 

He said veterans were angered 

by what they saw as the failure by 
Polish authorities to secure places 
for some of their comrades in the 
j official Polish delegation, to be 
i led by President Lech Walesa. 

| Finns are far more inclined to 
1 violence than any other national- 
j ity in Western Europe, recent re- 
search shows. In 1992, the lasL 
year for which figures are avail- 
I able. 3.1 Finns per 1.000 suffered 
; personal attacks, according to 
Jussi Pajuoja, a criminologisL 
Thai compared with rates of 22 
in Italy and 1.6 in Portugal the 
next most violent countries, and 
, of 0.7 in Britain and 0.6 in Ire- 


land, the least violent. About 80 
percent of the Finnish attacks 
were alcohol-related. 

“Anyone who eats m front of 
tile television,'' the German nutri- 
tional psychologist Joachim 
WesthSfer says, "pays too little 
attention to what be is eating. He 
eats uncon trolledly, eats too 
much, and eats unhealthily.” This 
is not surprising, notes the Ger- 
man weekly Die ZeiL But try this 
weighty statistic on for size: Since 
the invention of the TV remote 
control, the average weight of the 
adult population in the West has 
risen by 653 grams ( I J pounds). 

Brian Knowlton 





New German President Urges 


treme- right parties and groups 
should be outlawed. Mr. Herzog, 
who is currently chief judge of the 
constitutional court, replied. "Ye*, 
when the facts are such that one- 
can be sure of upholding the case in 
the courts." 

The president-elect told the 
weekly newspaper he could not 
imagine neo-Nazi theories flourish- 
ing in Germany. “What worries me 
much more is that the crypto-Na- 
zis. the old incomgjbles. should 


find an appeal and imitators 
among the younger generation." 

Mr. Heraog. who takes office 
July 1, has been criticized Tor not 
having dealt with the problem of 
rightist violence in Germany in his 
acceptance speech Monday! 

In interview, he called for deter- 
mined resistance against any move- 
ment similar to that in Italy to 
bring neo-fascist ponies into gov- 
ernment. 

He saw no immediate danger of 


this, but said “the highest vigi- 
lance” was demanded. 

Mr. Herzog spoke out against 
the revival of German nationalist 
ideas, which he believed could “no 
longer be a driving force for our 
people.” 

He also dismissed the idea that 
the reunited Germany need no 
longer fell concerned about its 
Nazi past. 

Emphasis should not primarily 


be laid upon past responsibility, be 
said, “but on that which we can 
learn fix the future.” He said that 
meant “a particular need to devel- 
op barriers against totalitarian- 
ism." 

“We must be ready in the future 
to draw conclusions from the atroc- 
ities of the extermination of the 
Jews and other minorities," be said. 
“I can for that reason absolutely 
not adopt this notion that the post- 
war period has ended" 


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fer 


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ml » m ! 


Van Cleef & Arpels PARIS 22. Place Vsndome, Tel : 42 0 • 5S 5$ - GENEVE 31. Rue du Rhone. Tel : 3 n 60 70 “boutique 




Central Gaza Prison, now open to' 
the public, where many Palestin- 
ians d digit in revisiting the cells 
they once occupied. 

Gaza is not yet . free of Israeli 
soldiers. But those still here are 
limited to guarding access to the 
narrow strip of land and protecting 
Jewish settlements. 

Day after day, more Gazans 
seem to come to the realization that 
they are f reef rom the sight of Israe- 
li Army patrols on the streets, the 
“midnight visit'' by Shin Bet, the 
Israeli secret police, and the daily 
exchange of stones for bullets with 
Israeli soldiers. 

The change has beat electrifying, 
producing universal delight and a 
dear lessening Of tension, whatever 
a person’s political view. 

“I am what you might call a 
hard-liner," said Kansan Abu 
Khalil who had the Muslim funda- 
mentalist bearded look and long 
white shin. "But I have to admit 
that I broke down in team when I 
saw them leave.” 

Ahmad Abueid, 25. a Palestinian 
from Egypt who mans a guard post 
at the Palestinian police command 
residence, looked at a dozen people 
chatting with other guards. 

"People come to say hello all the 
time," be said. "People i don't 
know at all.” 

Testifying to the much publi- 
cized lack of money that has de- 
layed full deployment of the Pales- 
tinian police force here, Mr. 
Abneid stood guard behind a 
stretch of old telephone wire that 
serves as a symbolic fence framing 
the police command post 

Except for jeeps donated by the 
United States and a few foam mat- 
tresses given by Gazans, the police 
officers seem to have no equipment 
other than their personal pistols 
and machine guns. 

The policemen cannot stroll 
around without being surrounded 
by Palestinian youths and men ask- 
ing questions, engaging in conver- 
sation and offering coffee, tea or a 
meal. 

Gaza Return 
Is Possible, 
Israeli Says 

Compiled by Our Staff From Ditpatehes 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli 
Army has contingency plans to re- 
enter the Gaza Strip if the first 
phase of the peace process fails, 
according to reports here Wednes- 
day. 

“ft is clear that if it won't work in 
the coining weeks and months.” 
Major Genera] Matan Vilnai told 
Israel television, “we win no doubt 
draw our conclusions." 

In remarks reported in Israeli 
newspapers on Wednesday, Gener- 
al Vlhiax, the southern commander, 
said. “In the extreme sense, that 
means returning to Gaza. The army 
is a body that creates plans of all 
sorts, and today we do have contin- 
gency plans for returning to Gaza.” 

Israel handed Gaza ami the West 
Bank town of Jericho over to Pales- 
tinian self-rule last week as pan of 
the Israel -Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization agreement. 

The Palestinians have said that 
the transfer has not been as smooth 
as expected, and it will take time 
for the police to assume total con- 
trol 

Israelis have also said recent 
statements by the PLO leader. 
Yasser Arafat, violated the agree- 
ment. The latest involves Mr. Ara- 
fat's unilateral decision to return to 
the pre-occupation legal system. 

Yoel Singer, the Israeli Foreign 
Ministry's legal adviser, said the 
unilateral move was a violation of 
the pact signed in Cairo on May 4. 
He said only the Palestinian Au- 
thority has legislative powers, and 
not Mr. ArafaL 

There were these related devel- 
opments Wednesday: 

• Israel freed two West Bank 
Palestinians jailed for nearly the 
entire 27 years of Israeli occupa- 
tion, Palestinians said. Hundreds 
of Palestinians turned out in the 
city of Nablus to welcome Taj 
Deen Hussdnl 55, and Issa QaiaL 
68. Both had been serving life sen- 
tences. . 

• Palestinians, asserting civil au- 
thority in the self-rule area of Gaza, 
reinstated 47 tax officials who re- 
signed from the Israeli-run civil ad- 
ministration more than six years 
ago. 

. • Palestinian security forces in 
the Gaza Strip have for the first 
time disarmed members of El Fa- 
tah. an official of the organization 
said. "Security men heard gun 
shots in Gaza, and found two Fa- 
tah activists with guns, so they took 
than away," said the official Abd- 
el Saiam Abu Askar, f AP. Reuters) 


WORLD brief s___ 

Chinese Nuclear Test Expected Soon 

BEUING (NYT) - China is going forward with Wesw r J 

hydrogen bomb at its underground test range at lot p^ denI Bill 
dipkaSate say, and the test could come “ the 

CUotoo's decision to renew China's favorable trade acn** 
market. -.plosion to 1 

Communist Party leaders appear 50 JPjSKhLfeie it cou ld come 
poUtkal, 001 technical reasons. Western -saded ■*’ 

at any font The military purpose for this wst » - g rJC K 

threatening by Western governments, who see it as a pre 
of China’s relatively small strategic nuclear eaf iv :h»> 

• Preparations for the tmdergfound test were juigc> 

month by Japanese officials. They haw new proceeded to - al s j,e 
and instrumentation to monitor the blast is believed to ^ P 
test site in Xinjiang Province. .. 

Russia Warns of Ukraine Gvil War 

MOSCOW (AP)-An armed conflict in Crimea ^^fpavd S. 
war engulfing the rest of Ukraine, Defense Minister . - n 

Grachev of Russia told the Interfax news agency on , h , 

Brussels. He also accused Ukraine of saber rattling in its dispute vm 
separatist Parliament on the Crimean Peninsula. twider.t 

Major General Volodymyr Pwenko, military adviser to 
Leonid M. Kravchuk of Ukraine, criticized General Grache\ s rem j 
"T his is the policy of Russia: To start, to organize, to promote anu 
finance confucts in other states," General Petenko said- . 

The virtual declaration of independence by pro-Russian legislators i , 
Crimea on Friday triggered fears in the Ukrainian capital. Kiev. t. * 
do mino effect in other regions seek ing closer ties with Moscow. 

Mussolini Backer Gels House Post 

ROME (Reuters) — A neofascist who fought for Benito Mussolini was 
elected chairman of Parliament's foreign affairs commission on « ounesr 
day in a move opponents said would add to foreign concern about t 
qcw Italy ... 

MirkoTremagtia, a member' of the neofiucist Italian Social Movement 
since 1946, won a ballot of commission members by 24 to 23 vote*. * ne 
foreign affairs post is one of tbe'most prestigious in the Chamber o- 
Deputies. Mr. Tremaglia fought from 1943 to 1945 for ihe Republic of 
Rain, the last-ditch puppet state that Mussolini set up in German- 
occupied northern Italy after he was deposed from power in Rome. 

Mr. T remag lia 67, was the Erst prominent old guard member of the 
I talian Social Movement to. gain. a. significant position since PfipT 1 " 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi's conservative Freedom Alliance took, office 
two woks ago. In a sign of radical political change in Italy, the 
chair manshi p of all 13 lower bouse .commissions went to members of ihe 
Freedom Alliance. 

Aden Holds Out Against Northerners 

AL A NAD FRONT. Yemen (Reuters) — Northern Yemeni forces 
were advancing on Wednesday toward Aden from the north but had been 
firmly repelled in the west and unable to break through in the east to 
complete a siege of the southern stronghold 

A correspondent visiting all three fronts saw northern shells slamming 
closer to the city than on previous days but life in Aden retained its 
outward calm and normality. 

Southern aircraft, which have largely dominated the sides since the civil 
war started on May 4, were seen taking off from. Aden airport in repeated 
sorties against northerners. San’ a-based President All Abdullah Saleh has 
vowed to capture Aden and overthrow its rukrs^ who declared a separate 
republic last Saturday. - - • 

Sharp Drop in South Africa Violence 

JOHANNESBURG (Renters) — Politkal violence in South Africa fell 
last week to its. lowest level in more than two years, a monitoring group 
reported Wednesday. 

"The national death toQ of 14 is the lowest recorded by the Human 
Rights Committee in a seven-day period since December 1991" a 
statement said. The committee, a private group, said it was “encouraged 
that this is the sixth successive week of defining violence throughout the 
country.** 

According to committee figures, political lriTKng s during the year 
through March never dropped below 25Q a month and sometimes were 
more than 500. . 

2 Held in Slaying of Tourist in^ U.S. 

MURRIETA, California (AP) — Two men were booked Wednesday 
for investigation of munkr, attempted murder and robbery in connection 
with an attack earlier this month that left a German tourist dead and her 
husband seriously wounded. 

The two men. You Yang and Kham Ktsouvannasane. both 19, were 
among five that were detained Tuesday after searches m Banning, about 
85 miles (135 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles. It was unclear 
whether the other three men were still being questioned in the case. 

Gisela Pfteger. 64. of Emmerich, Germany, was shot and killed May 16 
near Banning in the San Jacinto Mountains. Her husband. Klaus. 62, was 
wounded in the shooting and is in fair condition in a local hospital The 
police said robbery appeared to be the motive. 

For the Record 

The United Nations secretary-general Butros Butros Ghah said 
Wednesday he would seek a second five-year term if his health was up to 
it Mr. Butros Ghali, 71, who took office in January 1992, had said shortly 
after his election that be was a one-term secreuiy -general ( Reuters ) 

Correction 

An article Tuesday gave the incorrect date of an agreement between the 
Prophet Mohammed and the Knraish tribe. The correct dale is 628 A.D. 

TRAVEL UPDATE 

Pollution Prompts Athens Car Ban 

ATHENS (AP) — The government announced a ban on cars from 
central Athens on Thursday as soaring air poBution and high tempera- 
tures sent hundreds ofpeopk to the hospital on Wednesday. 

The Environment Ministry also said that it was considering a series of 
measures fo ewmbat air pollution this summer. They include a perm ane nt 
ban on cars in the heart of the city and staggered hours for civil servants. 

The ministry said it would ban all cars on Thursday from a 13- square- 
kilometer (S-square-nule) area around central Athens and all care with 
IkwKe plates ending in even numbers from a zone twice that size. The ban 
will be in effect from 7 A.M. until 8 PiM. The measures came after air 
pollution levels soared past clanger levels on Wednesday and tempera- 
tures hit 38 degrees Centigrade (100 degrees Fahrenheit). 

Raaroad wotkera across Spain walked off the job during rush hour 
Wainesday morning in wbat was expected to be a two-week series of 
strike throughout the public transport system. The workers provided 
bare-bones service in commuter and long-distance lines. The workers are 
protesting what they say are plans by RENTE, the national rail company 
to subdivide and cut 14,500 jobs. . . (4Pi 

Almost ljilHiBg| 0 r US. airSnes are offering flights of up to 750 miles and 
back for S99 this weekend anywhere they fly within the United States 
e ? ccpl Aka*®- For destinations more than 750 miles awav' 

JJ25 1 ^ flights have to be taken between noori 

Saturday and nndmght Sunday, and tickets must be bought within ™4 
hours of making a reservation. ^ fWT? 

Taman fiftad a ban on package toms to China on Wednesday tL 






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THE AMERICAS/ 


APOLITICAL NOTES A 


AWarning to Nuclear Weapons Workers 

j s ^ Ifv,r GTO\ — The Department c>J Enerev is warning hun- 
JRd fcrmcr ™ R«k‘. Flai- nuciiMr- 

*?. V 01 ” 5 **! that i lie-, ucrc exposed to higher 
had banS r, ' ,n rjdu!l,,n rrc ‘ m ‘ y - - 7 10 l»" ih^n they previous!* 

J*5“! examination* arc being offered to the worker*, and 
. * Pe ® un - 10 J^cnniR*: accurate levels of exposure for 
"> ers who were either improperly monitored or not monitored at 

Erchmina^finding, ahead* have shown that neutron-sensitive 

n\ u«o in the employees' radiation-monitoring badges had been 

reau incorrectly, resulting in underestimation* ofexptvsure. officials 


Sanctions Steer Haiti Into Lively Trade in Contraband 


Department of Energy official* *aid they u ere notifying about 140 
current Rocky Rais employees jnJ soon mil beein 'contacting 
several hundred former employee-. rail of a> many as3.00U workers 

exposal to notation from 1^55. when xhe plain became operational, 
until 1967. when monitoring procedures were tightened f K Pi 


Takin g a P age From Singapore’s B ook 

SACRAMENTO. California — A hiii requiring juvenile graffiti 
vandals to he punished with as mjny a* 10 whacks of a wooden 
paddle has been introduced hy a California stale legislator. who 
declared that the public 1 - “sick and tired" of the way such offender* 
are “coddled" by the criminal justice system. 

“It is hard tr* take pride in your neighborhood when everything 
you see is covered with graffiti.” said Assemblyman Mickey Conroy. 
3 *V\?. *f an f rorn Grange Count*. near Los Angeles. “That is why 
paddling is so important. 

“If we can stop these punks w|hi ha*e no respect for other people, 
we can give the neighbii'rhood* back to the law-abiding citizen* of 
this state.*' he said. 


Capitol H ill Newspaper Gets a Competitor 


NEW YORK — a company that publishes community newspa- 
pers in the New York area said it would begin a Capitol Hill 
newspaper war by starting a weekly to compete with Roll Call, the 
twice-weekly publication that bills itself as the hometown paper for 
Congress and Congress- watchers. 

The new paper, tentatively called The Hill, is to he published by 
News Communications Inc., a New York City company with more 
than 2fl community newspapers in the city and its suburbs. The 
company’s chairman and biggest shareholder is Jerry Fmkelsiein. 78. 
a politically influential publisher whose son. Andrew J. Stein, was a 
Democratic officeholder in New- York City for years. 

The newspaper's publisher and editor is to be Martin Tolchin. 65. 
a veteran correspondent in the Washington bureau of The New York 
Times, who said Tuesday that he was leaving The Times. Mr. Tolchin 
said that the first edition of The Hill would appear in September and 
that the paper would begin with a frec-distribution circulation of 
more than 20,000. “We think we'll be more substantive, wittier and 
more stylish" than Roll Call, he said. (NYT) 


Quote/ Unquote 


Connie Brock, writer of a profile in The New Yorker magazine on 
Hillary Rodham Clinton: “In the end. that sureness about her own 
judgment — at its extreme, a sense that she alone is wise — is 
probably Hillary’s cardinal trait." f W P) 


By Douglas Farah 

HuiAini.'frin Pun Srrrh e 

J ACM EL, Haiti — ■ Despite a 
newly reinforced United Nation- 
embargo. a flotilla of ships has 
sailed into this port city carrying 
contraband including gasoline, 
cars and color television sets. 

Local residents said at least nine 
ships have docked since the 
strengthened embargo started on 
Sunday, in theory barring every- 
thing except approved shipments 
of food, medicine and propane gas. 

Army officers were directing 
trucks onto the docks to unload the 
merchandise. 

[Speaking lo reporters at the. 

Haitian border with the Dominican 
Republic, the U.S. ambassador to 
Haiti. William Swing, said the em- 
bargo had been violated repeated- 
ly. Reuters reported from Mal- 
passe.l 

The embargo was imposed in 
October and reinforced by the UN 
Security Council in an effort to 
force the military to allow the re- 
turn or the president, the Reverend 
Jean-Ben rand Aristide. 

He was overthrown in a military 
coup in September 1941, six 
months after becoming Haiti’s first 
democratically elected leader. 

The ships in port here, which 
flew British. Jamaican, Colombian. 
Dominican, Bahamian and Haitian 
flags, demonstrated how difficult it 
could he to enforce the measure, 
especially since the ships largely 
ply only the waters between Haiti 
and the Dominican Republic. 

“So far, the ships have been tri- 
ple-parked out there." said one res- 
ident, watching as ships waited to 
he unloaded. 

“It has been years since the port 
was that busy." 

With sanctions so far having no 
effect on the military s hold on 
power, the U.S. House of Rcpre- 


lopt< 

Tuesday urging President Bill Clin- 
ton to avoid using military force in 
Haiti. 

Diplomats involved in monitor- 
ing the embargo said it could take 
weeks to figure out how to plug its 
leaks, and admitted that the offi- 
cer.* who control the contraband 
could build up substantial stock- 
piles in the meantime. 

This means the measure would 
not really begin to have an impact 
on the rich and on the officer corps 
for .several weeks, they said. 

But it is j question wbeLhcr the 
wealthy or the officer corps will 
.suffer.’ While reporters watched, 
uniformed army officers super- 
vised the unloading of a truckload 
of color televisions and other elec- 
tronic goods. 

At the port entrance, a small 
market has sprung up. and resi- 
dents said there had been an influx 
of prostitute* to keep pace with the 
growing number of ships. 

Residents said that at time* over 
the weekend there were nine tanker 
trucks on the dock gelling fuel 
from tanks on visiting ship.*. Other 
ships unloaded vehicles and luxury 
goods. 

The Bahamian-flagged Sea 
Search, a seagoing tug that on Sat- 
urday was engaged by a U.S. ship 
enforcing the embargo, was docked 
in Jacmcl on Monday, it* barrel* of 
fuel being unloaded under the su- 
pervision of military officer*. 

Witnesses said another ship, the 
Oakleigh, fly mg the Union Jaik 
and registered in Aberdeen. Scot- 
land. made several trips a week 
over the Iasi several months to (he 
Dominican Republic, bringing 
back about 15.000 gallons of fuel at 
a lime. 

Residents of Jacmcl and knowl- 
edgeable sources in Port-au-Prince, 
the capital, said much of the Jacmcl 
fuel flow is controlled hv a fuel 


•J*. .w* 

.?,i § 

"W 





TV A-wkumJ hr** 


Dockworkers in Port-Au-Prince unloading rice. Food is considered humanitarian aid and is not covered under the UN embargo. 


wholesaler named Gerald Caroli. Dominican vessel sat about a mile 
Knowledgeable sources said Mr. from the dock, abandoned because 
Caroli was a major fuel supplier of its captain, known only as “Dirty 
the U.S. Embassy and other diplo- Harry." fled for his life when the 
malic missions. buyers of his fuel found some of it 

While ships were unloaded, a was full of sludge and unusable. 


A Clinton Warm-Up for D-Day Mission 


Away From Politics 


• A campus muraf honoring Makoln X was painted over on orders 



signs. 


Corrigan ordered theobliteration of the mural after theanisi refused 
to alter it. 

• Sexual harassment complaints against employers resulted in com- 
pensation of $25.2. million to American workers last year, twice as 
much as in 1992. according to a study by the Center for Women in 
Government. It stud 1.546 workers gained compensation in 1993. 
including back pay, damages, promotions and reinstatements. The 
year before, 1,340 people received $12.7 million.. 

• Ireland’s consul-general in San Francisco was sentenced to three 
years probation and fined $1 .200 Tuesday after pleading no contest 


to a charge of drunk driving causing injury, a prosecutor said. 
~ * * *■ fie was involved in a traffic 


Declan Kelly, 43, was charged after 
accident in San Francisco on May 5. 

• A couple and the preacher who encouraged them to choose prayer 
over medical ireatmeni Tor their diabetic daughter have pleaded 
guilty in the girl's 1991 death. David Davis. 45. his wife. Ann. 38. and 
the Reverend Richard Vaden. 48. all of Aberdcsn, Mississippi, will 
likely be placed on probation, authorities said. 

AP. A "YT Reuters 


The Arnmutetl Press 

ANNAPOLIS. Maryland — 
President Bill Clinton challenged a 
new generation of American mili- 
tary leaders on Wednesday to "ex- 
pand the reach of democracy and 
economic progress.” much as 
World War II veterans helped 
bring the world decades of peace 
and prosperity. 

"The challenge of your genera- 
tion is to remember the deeds of 
those who served before you and 
now to build on their work in a new 
and very different world," Mr. 
Clinton told graduates of the LI.S. 
Naval Academy. 

The commencement speech was 
a forerunner to an eight-day trip to 
Europe by Mr. Clinton to mark the 
50th anniversary of the June 6. 
1944, Normandy invasion. 


It is a politically delicate mission 
Clinton, wl 


for Mr. Clinton, who avoided mili- 
laiy service during the Vietnam 
War and helped organize demon- 
strations in Europe against U.S. 
involvement in that war. 


"It took years after D-Day to not 
only end the war but to build a 
lasting peace," he said. “It took 
decades of patience and strength 
and resolve to prevail in the Cold 
War. And, as with generations go- 


ing before, we must often he willing 
to pay the price of time — some- 
times the most painful price of all.” 

The president defended his Bos- 
nia policy against congressional 
critics who want the United States 
to lift the arms embargo on Bosni- 
an Muslims without support from 
other countries. He supports lifting 
the ban. but not unilaterally. 

“Our administration will not 
walk away from this Bosnian con- 
flict, but we will not do what is 
wrong," he said. 

Citing the sacrifices of World 
War II veterans. Mr. Clinton said: 

“Thai war marked the turning 
point of our century, when we 
joined with our allies to stem a dark 
tide of dictatorship, aggression and 
terror, and 10 start a flow of democ- 
racy and freedom that continues to 
sweep the world, down to the pre- 
sent day.” 

The D-Day anniversary is 10 be 
the subject of Mr. Clinton's weekly 
radio address Saturday. He also 
will speak of it in an address at 
Arlington National Cemetery in 
Virginia on Monday, the Memorial 
Day holiday. 

Mr. Clinton is scheduled 10 leave 
Washington on June 1. stopping 
first in Rome 10 meet with Pope 


John Paul 11 and Italian political 
leaders on June 2 and to pay honor 
to the Allied campaign to liberate 
Italy. On June 3. he will visit the 
American cemetery' at Nenuno 
Beach and meet wiili U.S. veterans. 

On June 4. he will meet with 
Prime Minister John Major in Lon- 
don and then fly to Portsmouth for 
dinner with Queen Elizabeth II and 
leaders of other allied countries. 

On June 5. he will join the lead- 
ers in commemorating the sailing 
of thousands of ships across the 
English Channel to begin the Nor- 


mandy assault. He will spend that 
night on the U.S. aircraft carrier 
George Washington and begin the 
D-Day anniversary with a sunrise 
ceremony on die ship. 

From the carrier. Mr. CTinton 
will go to La Pointe du Hoc. a stony 
cliff where American forces suf- 
fered heavy casualties under Ger- 
man machine-gun fire. 


His major speeches on D-Day 


will be at La Pointe du Hoc and at 
the American cemetery at Collc- 
ville-sur-Mer. whete 9JS6 Ameri- 
cans are buried. 


wmiMPs 


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Another Political Red Flag for President 

Republican’s Victory Shows Democrats’ Weakness in South 


By Thomas B. Ed sail 

Washington PM Semre 

WASHINGTON — Ron Lewis 
broke a 129-year Democratic hold 
central Kentucky congressio- 


on a 


_ ngressi 

nal district, revealing for the sec- 
ond time in three weeks the dangers 
facing Democrats running in con- 
servative Southern and border 
states ami the liabilities of Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton in these elector- 
ates. 

With 


100 percent of the vote 
counted, Mr. Lewis, a Republican 
who is a fundamentalist Christian 
minis ter and bookstore owner, had 
55 percent against 45 percent for 
the Democrat, Joe Prather. 


Democrat, Joe 
Until Mr. Lewis, whose cam- 
paign was aided by 5200,000 from 
national Republican committees, 
began his assault on Mr. Prather 
andMr. Clinton, the Democrat had 
been the strong favorite to win the 
seal that had been held for 4 1 years 
by Representative William H. 
Natcber, who died March 29. Dem- 
ocrats now bold a 256-u>I78 ad- 
vantage over the Republicans in 


the Home. There is one indepen- 
dent 

“Everywhere I went through the 
district there were people upset," 
Mr. Lewis said. “They actually 
were mad," he added. “They felt 
like they needed to do something 
and say something that would 
change Eves.” 

Bill Paxon, a New York repre- 
sentative and chairman of the Na- 
tional Republican Congressional 
Committee, declared that the re- 
sults were “a big defeat for the 
president and ibe Democrats in 
Congress, and a warning message 
10 Democrats that 1994 is going to 
be a Republican year." 

A mobilization effort by the 
Christian right also helped Mr. 
Lewis, and its success augurs badly 
for Democrats. Twenty-one Demo- 
crats retired this year, and 11 of 
them represent Southern or border 
state districts where the Christian 
right is strong. 

Representative Vic Fazio, Dem- 
ocrat of California and chairman of 
the Democratic Congressional 
Campaign Committee, sought to 


play down the significance of the 
Lewis victory. 

“The outcome was not about 
message; it was about tactics." Mr. 
Fazio said, referring to Mr. 
Prather's decision to run a low-key 
campaign and to the low turnout in 
which strong Christian mobiliza- 
tion and the intense Republican 
media effort paid off. 

In his commercials, Mr. -Lewis 
charged that Mr. Prather was cut 
from the same mold as Mr. Clin- 
ton. His TV commercials staled: 
“Kentucky doesn't need Joe 
Prather. Send a message to Bill 
Clinton. Send Ron Lewis to Con- 
gress. Ron Lewis, he’s one of us.’ 


The victory by Lewis follows the 
victory by Frank F 


Lucas, a Republi- 
can, in a once rock-solid Demo- 
cratic district in Oklahoma. Mr. 
Lucas succeeds Representative 
Glenn English, a Democrat, who 
resigned. 

While Jhe 2d Congressional Dis- 
trict in Kentucky has been repre- 
sented by Democrats for more than 
a centuiy. it dearly has moved to- 
ward the Republican Party in its 


presidential voting. In I9*»2. Presi- 
dent George Bush outpolled Mr. 
Clinton there by 45 percent 10 41 
percent, and in 1988. Mr. Bush 
crushed the Democratic presiden- 
tial nominee Michael S. Dukakis. 

■ Arkansas Governor Wins 

In Arkansas. Governor Jim Guy 
Tucker, who took over when Mr. 
Clinton was elected president was 
the first Democrat in a slate guber- 
natorial race to not have to face a 
primary opponent in 80 years. The 
Associated Press reported. 

On the Republican side, the mil- 
lionaire lawyer Sheffield Nelson 
defeated state Senator Steve Luelf. 
Mr. Nelson, a leading critic of Mr. 
Clinton, has fed tips about 
Whitewater 10 the press. 

In Arkansas' 4th District. James 
McDougal whose real estate in- 
vestment with the Clintons and 
failed savings and loan are the fo- 
cus of the Whitewater investiga- 
tion, came in last in a three-way 
race for the Democratic nomina- 
tion for Congress. Slate Senator 
Jay Bradford won the race. 


16 Hijacking Attempts 
Reported in China City 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Airport po- 
lice in the southern Chinese city of 
Shenzhen have foiled 16 apparent 
far this vear. 


aoenzticn nave 

hijacking attempts so far ta* 

the Beijing-con trolled Hong Kong 

China News Agency said Wednes- 
day. 


a, rhe most recent case con«nicd 
a woman arrested !"f* ' 


a woman arresieu « - — 

board a plane with 10 bullet s and a 
gun hidden in her carry-on lugg- 
Die agency said. It gave no details. 
Eleven Chinese aircraft ^ 
hijacked to Taiwan since April last 
y ea r by 15 hijackers. 


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Page 7 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 


Ihe North Korean Crab Card 

Catch at Heart of Lucrative Trade With Japan 



IIP ■ 

:* ft 4, 


By David E. Sanger 

Sctv York Times Service 

SAKAIMINATO. Japan - 
Nonh Korea may have no power- 
’ll friends left — not the Chinese, 
who are tired of protecting an em- 
barrassing old relative, and certain- 
ly not the Russians who realized 
years ago that their fiscal and tech- 
nological future lav on the other 
side of the Demilitarized Zone. 

So when the North Korean* arc 
looking Tor a warm welcome, 
mixed, of cCiur.se. with some hard 
currency, they head for this busy 
fishing port on the Sea of Japan, 
where North Korea’s fleet is always 
eagerly awaited. 

That is. the crab fleet, a rusting, 
leaking collection of hulks that 
struggle into the harbor here twice 
a month, more if the catch is good 
and the political weather allows. 

They come to this somewhat 
ramshackle town to sell snow crabs 
for abouL S5 cents a pound. It is a 


< RUSSIA 
Vladivostok J 


yf^ 

/ NORTH ■ 

Pyongy ang^7“K0fl£A 


..JAPAN— a. I 


I _■* a,Wonun 

i yy ‘ E 

: s ■Seoul S 

I SOUTH -r- f 
| KOREA / 


■Seaof Japan * 


. ! Tokyo* 




tough way to prop up a Communist not be on impediment to creating 
government that is having trouble warm exchanges between our peo- 


govemment that is having trouble 
feeding its people and is believed to 
be building nuclear weapons at the 
some time. 


em 

China Stef 


mins to 3nd their counterparts in 
Wonsan, Sakaiminato’ s sister city. 

“1 confess it’s an unusual situa- 
tion. 1 ’ Mr. Kuromi said in his of- 
fice. which is decorated with North 
Korean dolls and other mementos 
of his goodwill tours to the Hermit 
Kingdom *‘lt’s true that Japan has 
no diplomatic relations with North 
Korea. But we thought that should 
not be an impediment to creating 


It should also not be an impedi- 
ment to profits, many Japanese 


But lust year Sakaiminato sav. and that explains a lot about 
bought S12 million in crabs and Japan’s hesitancy to talk publicly 


other seafood from North Korea. 

The boats slipping into Sakai- 
minato Harbor are reminders that 
while North Korea is usually de- 
scribed as isolated, it is hardly cut 
off. Though Japanese officials are 
loath to publicize it. there was 
slightly under a half-billion dollars 


about joining in economic sanc- 
tions to force North Korea to back- 
down on its nuclear program. Fish- 
ing concerns in Sakaiminato pay 10 
times less fora North Korean catch 
than they do for its Japanese equiv- 
alent. 

In private. Japanese officials 


in recorded trade last year across have come to argue that such com- 
the Sea of Japan — with North mercial connections also expose 


Korea racking up something that 
has long eluded Washington, a 
modest trade surplus. 

(The trade number- exclude the 
$600 million to SI. 5 billion in cash 
that ethnic Koreans living in Japan 
are believed to funnel to the North 
each vear. ostensibly to help tens of 


North Koreans to the wonders of a 
cash economy. 

Certainly that is what Hiroaki 
Ohmori. the president of Daishin 
Marine Products, says he has been 
trying to do for more than a de- 
cade. Mr. Ohmori runs a seafood 
processing center in Sakaiminato. 


thousands of relatives who were an ^ ^ or ' > ,ears has been nur- 

lured to Kira II Sung’s “Paradise on ““ 

Earth" in the 1960s and have never 

been able to return. In reality, ]%T V 

much ofthemonev is believed to be / W 

diverted by the governments X “ M'OI'C'CA'f JLB 
Last summer the North Korean 

military test-fired its newest missile _ .... n- -.i— 

just off the coast of Sakaiminato- f , ^ 

a reminder that Osaka is in easy , VIENNA - Experts from the 
firing range — but that does not International Atomic Energy- 
stop anvone front describing the Agency have been allowed to com- 
Norih in fairtv glowina terms. Pj elc ‘^ eir inspection of a North 
~ T . Korean nuclear reprocessing plan; 
So while bureaucrats m Tokyo ^ takin2 ^pfes. agency offi- 
s,t in endless meetings reviewing k ^ 
what Prime Minister Tsuiomu 

Hata called “emergency prepara- The samples should allow the 
lions” in case of a confrontation agency to determine whether pluio- 
with North Korea, Sakamiinaio's nium could have been manufac- 
mayor, Tetsuo Kuromi. is making fured or diverted, possibly for use 
preparations of a different sort. ' n making nuclear bombs. 

He is working out the final de- Earlier Wednesday. Hans-Frie- 
lails for an exchange of drawings drich Meyer, a spokesman for the 
between schoolchildren in Sakai- Vienna-based agency, said that 


luring the North Korean crab in- 
dustry. He now buys S2 million to 
S3 million in crabs "every year. 

“My philosophy is that North 
Korea is a eood neighbor." he said. 
“So 1 don T t think about political 
and military mailers." 

But thev have a way of intruding. 
Business is way down, more than 
50 percent From two years ago. be- 
cause North Korea's fishermen are 
running out of gas. When North 
Korean boats finally arrive in Sa- 
kaiminato. the Japanese authorities 
refuse to allow the crews to leave 
their ships; North Korea has never 
complained, perhaps because de- 
fections are a growing problem. 

In turn. Mr. Ohmon and scores 
of Japanese businessmen have 
trudged across North Korea’s 
crumbling infrastructure in recent 
years, examining ports that have 
not been improved since Japan’s 
colonial government in Korea built 
them more than 50 years ago. 

So far. most projects have come 
to naught, and the Korean- Japa- 
nese who owns a dozen or so ven- 
tures in the North complained pub- 
licly recently that virtually all of 
them lose money. Nonetheless. Mr. 
Ohmori talks of building a food 
processing center in North Korea, 
much like one be operates in Vladi- 
vostok, “if the situation improves.” 

Such dreams are the only bright 
news North Korea can clutch at 
these days, so it is wooing investors 
even as it snarls at their govern- 
ments. Though it had been lost in 
the dispute over the nuclear pro- 
ject. North Korea in the last few 
months has issued laws creating 
free-trade zones, some even allow- 
ing business executives to come 
and go without visas. 

Not surprisingly, the zones have 
been carefully placed in remote ar- 
eas to assure that few ordinary 
North Koreans come in contact 
with foreigners — or their ideas. 


Hint s at Mexico Plot 


•~r •••• -Byffa. oaten -••• 

. : ‘ - TIJUANA, Mateo. -.Hinting , in a series of vague and 

• s ’ •• y that the presidential candidate of times contradictory accounts 

7 •; / ’. Mexico’s governing ’.party was porters, Ruben 

■■ : VltSSi P aSa^ thathwsM retired 


'W&SBSr. 


.JjpfcV 


■ against Mr. Aburto. and that H * ^ 
hfwtao (fid not want »*«»■"•■ 




UO1-0SA.UIUJ "MV ™ I TL1II, LUCU UM*‘ ' V, ' ' .Vi ,,- 

at ihe scene. Mayoral and Tranquil^ 0 Sw* 

A lawyer Tor’ the family said Venegas. ■ retired [Tijuana ■ 

Wednesday that Rubio Aburto, guard who is jaihid on the . 
the father erf Mario Aborto Marti- charge. 

nez, had not spoken up before Adconfint , to Mr. Schey. Mr. 
about his son’s parted m« tog that Mario had wM 

with the agent berause he feared meeting a man named Sal- 

for the hva.of relatives in Tijuana. Tomassini sever- 


Those relatives, including Mario 


nuwiuuifi w . — - - . j 

Aburto said that Mono had i eta 
him of meeting a man named w 

vador Hemindez. Toraassim sever- 
al weeks’ before Mr. Colosio s 


inedpuJ ' 















A U1AIW HI WKAJ . . .1 

Aburto’s mother, crossed into the death: Mr. Hernandez was initially 
United States illegally on Sunday* . jmplicaied in the shooting but was 

seeling political asylum.. On cleared by investigators after men' 
Wednesday, however, their lawyer tify inp hims elf as a member of a aU- 
said tbey'ihay not seek asylum after : man {qj^ that backed up Mr. Co- 
all because they hope to return to idsio’s team of half a dozen 
Mexico within perhaps three to.ax penoaal bodyguards, 
months. . . . . . 

55“^ ais-saRSbiss!* 

W*n Aburto had told him about it ™ Amoni o Sanchez Or- 
scxrnafrer Mr. Schey began to r T ^.ffSSuS. He 

resent the family, about sx wews S^d oneTtbS^rried a 

. •. • , 38 -oaliberrevolvCT: tte same kind 

Mr. Aburto has mamtamed hts ^ ■ thstt : Mar i 0 Aburto has ad- 
son's innocence despite Mano b j^Mr. Colosio. 

Aburto s repeated confessions that 

he shot the candidate, Lois Don- . Mir.. S&ncbea Ortega has been a 
aldoColosio, as be left a campaign focus <rf suspicion about ttw go - 
rally here on Marti 23. • . emmenfs case almost since he was 

Rubfe -Aborto has dedined to £2** *V 1 °SL^!!f tt ? r 5 J w 
testify to federal prosecutors ^be- ^ Mr C<> 

cause they refuse toin««t his condi- where Mr. Co- 

don of immunity from charges that foaowas^shoL 


WiB Borfc. v Unjwra 

A NEW BEIJING —A worker on Wednesday demolishing a small dwelling not far from a palace 
that lies within the Forbidden City. Many houses are being torn down to make way for W^Hises. 


he shot his brother and another 
man in Mexico some. 25 years ago. . 
But a spokesman. for the special 
prosecutor investigating the: case 


said no such charges were pending how he left H. 


The agent,. who had blood spat- 
tered on the sleeve of his jacket, 
gave contradictory accounts of 
what be did during the rally and 


Nuclear Inspectors Complete Work at Korean Plant John Wain, Novelist 

Compiled S imr Staff From Dispatches talks were under way with the The spent fuel rod*, could hold NATO defense ministers heard a rods that might have been diverted And Poet, Is Dead at 69 


Compiled S iter Staff From Dispatches talks were under way with the 

VIENNA Experts from the North Koreans on a separate issue 

International Atomic Energy — the monitoring of fuel rods at a 
Agency have been allowed to coni- nuclear reactor, 
plete their inspection of a North The agency originally demanded 
Korean nuclear reprocessing plan; to be present and to conduct tests 
■after takine samples, agency offi- when North Korea began the 
cials said Wednesdav. scheduled removal of spent fuel 

_ . .. rods from its five-megawatt reactor 

The samples should allow the a( Yongbyon, the country's only- 
agency to determine whether pluto- n(JC , ear 5 p^ r piam . 

mum could have been manufac- B ul a\hree-man inspection team 
lured or diverted, possibly for use al Yongbyon last week to 


The spent fuel rods could hold NATO defense ministers heard a nods that might have been diverted 
vital evidence — independent or briefing on the situation by De- for fuel — or from the original fuel 
the samples from the reprocessing fense Secretary William J. Perry of load in 1986 when the reactor was 
plant — as to whether North Korea the United States. Mr. Perry said first started. 


The Associated Pros 


in making nuclear bombs. 


find that refueling had already be- 


Earlier Wednesday. Hans-Frie- gun and some of the 8,000 uranium 
drich Merer, a spokesman for the rods had been removed, contrary to 
Vienna-based agency, said that the UN agency's requests. 


has developed a nuclear bomb, as last week that the United Nations 
suspected by some Western gov- was confident no fuel had been 
emments and intelligence agencies, diverted from the reactor. 

, The Ihuttd States previous!, al- 

UN inspectors arrived. North Ko- l ed , h Nonh Korea shut down 

« ™ “ ™ h lau ™ ? theYnngbyon plant in 1989 to di- 

safeguards agreements, the atotmv vm fu * ^b-mOJog, and 

TbS on Tuesday, the about to do so again. 

North Atlantic Treaty Organ iza- Careful sampling of the age of 

lion said the crisis over North Ko- the fuel rods would determine 
uiclear program presented a whether they dated from the 1989 
i risk" to peace and stability, shutdown — and thus replaced 


rea’s nuclear program presenter a 
“grave risk" to peace and stability. 


first started. 

North Korea told the agency 
Saturday that it was willing to hold 
negotiations on the monitoring of 
remeling. 

In its statement on the Korean 
nuclear issue Tuesday, NATO said 
the North's attitude “and its histo- 
ry of exporting ballistic missiles 
and weapons technology to regions 
of instability pose a grave risk to 
peace and stability in the Far East 
and globally.” ‘ (AFP, Reuters) 


at Oxford Unrvcrsty itx 1973. a 


LONDON — John Wain, 69, the post be held for five years. 


novelist, poet, and author of an ' -His fiction includes. "Strike the 
award-winning biography of Sam- Father Dead," "Young Shoulders” 
lid Johnson, dred of a brain hemor- in 1982. which won the Wtu thread 
rhage Tuesday in an Oxford bospi- prize, and “Where the Rivers 
lal, a friend said. Meet." 

Mr Wain’s fim novel "Hurry ; Volumes of poetiy include, “A 
on Down, published in 1953, Word Carved on a SilT'and “Ooen 


Mr Warns first novel "Humr . Vohimes of poetiy include, "A 
on Down, published in 1953, Word Carved on a SiU.'"aDd “Open 
made his reputation. His widely Country" He also did much work 

IQ7<1 huwnmhu “Cnmii. . ... . 


acclaimed I974bk^raphy, "Samu- . 
el Johnson," brought him both the 
James Tail Black Memorial Prize 
and the Hdnemann Award. 

He was made professor of poetry - 


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educated, inQneQu] dad 

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as a critic, editor and axubologisL 

Sar Levitan, 79, Economist 
Was Social Policy Analyst 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — Sar 
A. Levitan, 79, an economist wide- 
ly known for his analysis of social 
policy and influence on govern- 
ment programs ranging from em- 
ployment training to rural develop-- 
mem, died of cancer here Tuesday. 

After teaching briefly at the 
Plaitsburg campus of the Stole 
University of New York, Mr. Levi- 
tan moved to Washington and was 
an aide on the Wage Stabilization 
Board during the Korean War. He 
then became a researcher for the 
Legislative Reference Service of the 
Library of Congress. 

Working with Senator Paul 
Douglas of Illinois, a liberal Demo- 
crat who served in the Senate from 
1 949 to 1966, Mr. Levitanhelped to 
formulate the Area Redevelopment 
Act, one of the federal govern- 
ment’s initial efforts to break the 
cycle of poverty in rural communi- 
ties. 


DEATH NOTICE 

BRENER Stephen W. 

the beloved husband of Ann 
Brener, loving father of Angela 
Brener, grandfather of Simba- 
Brener, died peacefully Wed- 
nesday, May 18, 1094. ot natural 
causes, while in Chaumont-sur- 
Tharonne, France. 

Stephen Brener was born on 
April 20, 1926, in New York 
.City, son of the late Marguerite 
Lazaurus and Samuel Brener 
He attended Horace Mann 
School, Riverdale. anil Georgia 
School of Technology, in Atlan- 
ta. He served during World War 
B with the 309th Infantry Batta- 
lion of the 78th Division was 
wjunded during the Battle of 
the Bulge and received a Purple 
Heart. f 

At his death he was President of 
InterBank Brener Brokerage 
Services, Inc.. 630 Fifth Avenue 
New York specializing in ar-‘ 

S nation disposition services i"o 
e hospitality industry. Pre- 
viously he had been, far ten 
Years, president of SWBA. Ste- 
phen W. Brener Associates S 
Brener was responsible far the 

te? staasj^"- 

In addition he was founder and 
chairperson of N.Y.LVjs Infers 
tional Hospitality Indui^fal 
vestment donference. whith is 
considered the most successF.d 
in the industry. He nlavcTl’ 
fgY* roje in teaching wuti „ 
the industry at N.Y.Li/s 
of ConrinuLng Education rJi 
.E tote Institutl, ComeU°u n K 2 
sty's School of Hotel Ad 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 36, 1994 


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Blockade Pushes 
Macedonia to Limit 

Nationalist Explosion Feared 
ds Economic Tendon Grows 


Bacterial Infection Still Rare , Health Officials Say u^Assisf 1 


By Steve Vogel 

Wpshinstun P..*i Srmrr 

\a^S P3 ^ MiiCedo »ia - To heir 
Macedonians on the streets here 
talk, the only ones suffering from 
ihc blockade that Athens has 
placed on this landlocked former 
Yugoslav republic are \he Greek 
themselves. 

“The Greeks are so dumb." said 
“? ra ? Bajram. a taxi driver. 
They ve lost all their Macedonian 
tourists to Turkey." 

He gestured to a near-emptv gas 
station. “Look: There's no line We 
always have gas. When I need it, l 
just fill up,” he said. 

"We can still get what we need 
from Turkey." said Irena Dim], 
tneva. a travel agent. “The only 
problem is that everybody would 
love to go to Greece for holiday." 

Downtown shops are filled with 
everything from imported cutlerv 
to basketball shoes, and Macedo- 
nian women in the blest l i.iH.in 
fashions still crowd Skopje's late- 
night discos. 

But beneath the bravado and 
flashy goods, Macedonia stands to 
lose far more than holidays on the 
Aegean. The trade blockade that 
Greece imposed Feb. 16 to add 
economic pressure to a campaign 
to force Macedonia to change its 
name, flag and constitution has left 
the Skopje government struggling 
to prop up an increasingly weak 
economy, and hoping it can con- 
tain nationalist sentiments that 
could tear the country apart 

Greece has claimed that the 
name Macedonia and other sym- 
bols adopted by the new country in 
1991 are historically Greek, and 
that their use reflects Skopje's de- 
signs on Greece's northern prov- 
ince. also called Macedonia. 

“If this embargo is prolonged, 
and if the economic difficulties and 
tensions are increased, there is no 
guarantee that there won’t be an 
explosion here,” President Kiro 
Gligorov said. 

Factories unable to obtain raw 
materials have shut and many 
planned enterprises aborted, exac- 
erbating unemployment 

Mr. Gligorov's moderate but 
fragile coalition, facing elections in 
November, may fall apart under 
nationalistic pressures, observers 
say. Fuel and other prices are bang 
kept artificially low by a govern- 
ment that is mortgaging its future 
to shield its people temporarily 
from the embargo’s effects. 

Macedonia’s population of 2 
million includes substantial Alba- 
nian and Bulgarian minorities, and 
the region's conflicting territorial 
claims nave touched off two Balkan 
wars in this century. 


"If this place comes apart, wc 
have senous problems, because I 
can’t imagine it happening without 
seeing all the neighbors involved,” 
said Victor Comras. the U.S. gov- 
ernment liaison to Skopje and the 
likely ambassador if and when 
Washington accords full diplomat- 
ic relations. “There have been mo 
many Balkan wars fought over 

Macedonia." 

Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
d raj li of Greece has ignored pleas 
from the 1 1 other members of tbe 
European Union to drop the em- 
bargo. Mr. Gligprovsays that Mac- 
edonia is willing to make compro- 
mises but that Greece keeps 
creating new demands. 

President Bill Clinton has ap- 
pointed a special envoy, Matthew 
Nimetz, to mediate the dispute, 
thus far without break through. 
And the EU has said it wiQ take 
Greece to the European Court of 
Justice. 

But some officials in Skopje fear 
a settlement of the problem will 
come too late. “We are very dose to 
the edge." said Dimitar Belcev, the 
Foreign Ministry's undersecretary 
for economic affairs. 

Ironically, government officials 
here say the sanctions imposed by 
the UN Security Council in 1992 
against Serb-dominated Yugosla- 
via over its support for Serbian 
forces in Bosnia are a bigger prob- 
lem for Macedonia than the Greek 
blockade. 

The UN sanctions have largely 
cut Macedonia off from its tradi- 
tionally largest trading partner and 
have cut its land and river links to 
Western Europe and the former So- 
viet Union. 

There are widespread violations 
of the sanctions via Macedonia, 
U.S. and UN officials say. But all 
acknowledge that no country, aside 
from Serbia, has suffered more 
from the sanctions, and that very 
little of the promised economic 
compensation has been delivered 
to Skopje. 

The sanctions made Macedo- 
nia's outlet via the Greek port of 
Salonika all the more important. 

Oil and other goods are now be- 
ing trucked through Bulgaria or Al- 
bania. but transportation costs 
have risen 30 percent to 100 per- 
cent, according to the government 
Many raw materials no longer 
can be imported. Of grave concern 
to the government, for example, is 
the loss of coke and phosphates 
needed for zinc smelting. 

And because it is impossible to 
export products such as steel plates 

and copper in bulk, foreign income 
is dwindling and newly developed 
markets arebdnglost 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tnhanr 

Reports or a flesh-eating bacterial infec- 
tion described as “galloping gangrene'' 
cropped up around the world Wednesday, 
feeding fears in Britain of a major out- 
break of (he quickly fatal disease. 

But the World Health Organization in 
Geneva said die disease, a mutation of a 
common streptococcal infection that nor- 
mally causes no more than a sore throat or 
a mild fever, had existed for several years 
and remained uncommon. 

A spokesman described it as an "un- 
common but devastating disease" that is 
often fatal. He said the health organiza- 
tion had counted about 166 reports of the 
infecu'on in the past five years, some of 
them involving more than one case. 


A cluster of seven cases in the countv of 
Gloucestershire in western England in' the 
past three months touched off lurid re- 
ports in the British press of on invasion by 
mutant bugs. Tabloid newspapers ran 
headlines like “Killer Bug Ate My Face.” 

The British reports said up to 12 people 
had been killed recently by the disease, 
known to medical science us necrotizing 
fasciitis. This was in addition to other 
cases in which patients had to undergo 
surgery to prevent the infection spreading 
through tissue at the rate of at least one 
inch an hour. 

British health authorities warned 
against panic. “At the moment we’ve got 

no evidence that this particular disease, or 
indeed other infections due to streptococ- 


cus, is increasing in the country at the 
moment," said Norman Begg of the Public 
Health Laboratory Service. 


But experts were baffled by the out- 
break in Gloucestershire because patients 
were found to have different strains of 
streptococcal infection, and there were no 
obvious links among them. 

Doctors said people commonly carry 
the streptococcus virus, which has' always 
been known to be capable of violent muta- 
tion. causing diseases such as childbed 
fever, rheumatic fever and scarlet fever. A 
strep infection killed Jim Henson, creator 
oT the Muppeis, in the United States in 
1990. One theory is that the streptococcus 
undergoes mutation because or viral at- 
tack, but the latest scare also fits in with 


reports of new disease strains resistant to 
antibiotics. 

Experts said, however, that the flesh- 
dcstroying bacteria can be stopped by 
antibiotics, accompanied by surgical re- 
moval of infected tissue. 

In Berlin, a spokesman for the German 
health agency said about 40 cases of the 
disease are reported every year, and about 
half the patients die. 

The Dutch National Health and Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency said 21 peo- 
ple have died of streptococcal infection in 
the past 18 months. But a spokesman said: 
“The number of cases is very low and 
spread around the country. This is not an 
epidemic situation." 

Other reports of the disease came Trom 
as far afield as Iceland and New Zealand. 








J* RUSSIA: Broader Ties to NATO 

Continued from Page 1 the Commonwealth of Indepen- 
lllr a way to satisfy demands from East 1 ***? * oosc confederation 

■ European countries for a closer se- of former &>vnet republics. He said 
■T curily relationship with the West, * uss,a *«*«■* presence in some 
PS without fully incorporating them f “™ er SoV} ^ ^“ics known as 


wiinoui fully incorporating 
into the allian ce. 


the “near abroad” should be seen 


Eighteen countries from Eastern “ “ft °f “peacekeeping objec- 
Europe and the former Soviet uves dial in no way pose a security 
Union have now signed up. thre3L 

General Grachev insisted that In response. Mr. Perry said any 
Russia was not seeking “a warmer regional peacekeeping role should 

nlami in ih. ««- VI « TV\'- l -J _ ° . _ • r ■ > 


4 : i ‘ i\ * 1, 


place in the sun” than NATO's 
other partners in the East, but 


be carried out through a United 
Nations mandate and that “Rus- 


merely a relationship “adequate to sia’s role should be kept compati- 



tts weight” as a nuclear superpower ble" with goals approved by the 

^;rji“£ S ? l!, 5E!? fromEu ' UN Security Council. 

■ ■ a Sorae Peptics in Washington see 

fnnSf^ 3 ^ 311 l ? tere ?l m wl 4 eT Russia's peacekeeping activities as 
fon.oraMperauoo than en^ evidence that thTS^nsionist ten- 
aged in this program, be said, denries that reigned during the 
“What suggest is not to imm the CoW War are bang reawaSned. 
sphere of partnership, but to enrich East European countries Tear that 

U b T WeCT1 ^ Rush’s dEmSd for special recog- 

and NATO not only in military njtiod by NATO may trepan ofai 
are* but on other important is- mempt t0 creale Yalta" 

sues ' that would make them again be- 

General Grachev noted that come satellites within Moscow’s se- 
many Russians still feared that curity orbit. 

NATO was a honile military alii- General Grachcv Mid such 

R jf « 85 M . Me - doubts were unfair. “We reject as 
my. He said that such bloc-onem- groundless some claims that Russia 


iun ft.wi'Rcwrf. ed percept ions” must be 
HEADING HOME — The writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn leaving his bouse in Cavendish, Vermont, surmounted by enhanced coopera- 
for the last time on Wethiesday. The Nobel laureate is returning to Russia after 20 years in the West bon or else they would eventually 


is trying to realize imperial goals,” 
he said. 


BASH: Asian Leaders Fear Backlash in Assailing U.S. 


trigger a new arms race in Europe. Earlier, General Grachev met 
In spelling out Russia’s new mili- sepamdy with Mr. Pmy to dis- 
tary doctriSe. the general made cuss a range of bikteral issues bo- 


Coniinofd from Page 1 


administration recognized that the 
“diversity of APEC requires con- 


^ “diversity of APEC requires con- 

transationtoapost-Cold War order sensus and a common comfort lev- 


in the Asia-Pacific region. 

“The smaller countries of East 


Asian countries “need to under- 


Asia, including Korea, want a U.S. stand our style in these matters, 
which will participate in and bene- and bring their own ideas to the 
fit from the rapid economic table, rather than allege we are de* 
growth” in the area, Mr. Lee said, mantling or dominating,” he said. 
“This will make the U.S. more able “We genuinely want consultation 
and more willing to provide the and consideration of ideas. We do 
stabilizing anchor force around not want confrontation." 


which the smaller countries can 
duster.” 


Mr. Gardner said the Clinton 
administration was “committed to 


FRANCE: InteUos for Bosnia 


Continued from Page 1 

more substantive differences with 
him. Guy Sorman, a conservative 
writer, said be considered it “im- 
moral and unethical" to encourage 
“more war^ by calling for an end to 
the aims embargo on Bosnia. “As 
for a multicultural Bosnia," he 
went on, “it won’t work because 
people no longer want it” 

lie further questioned the paral- 
lel Mr. Uvy has drawn between the 
Bosnian conflict and the Spanish 
Civil War. “People in Bosnia want 
peace, but L6vy wants to turn every 
Bosnian into a hero,” Mr. Sor man 
said. “Of course, what L4vy is real- 
ly saying is, “This is the Spanish 
Civil War and I am Andrfc Mal- 
ranx.’” 

Mr. Livy, who was one of the 
“new philosophers'' who broke 
with Marxism in the early 1980s, 
still considers himself a leftist. But 
Regis Debray, another leftist intel- 
lectual, also has doubts about the 
ticket, saying be would have greater 
respect for the intellectuals if they 
went to fight in Bosma-Herzegovi- 
ua “for a just cause." 

Yet, for aH the sniping at Mr. 
Levy’s penchant for self-promo- 


tion, as far back as 1992 he look the 
lead in France in befriending Bos- 
nia’s Muslims and denouncing 
their “betrayal” by the West. This 
weekend, Bosnia's president, Alija 
Izetbegovic, visited Paris as his 
guest and applauded the “Europe 
Begins in Sarajevo” ticket. 

By presenting the Bosnian war as 
a moral rather than political issue, 
Mr. Lfcvy and his group have also 
disconcerted French politicians. 
Criticized for supporting the parti- 
tion of Bosnia, President Francois 
Mitterrand dismissed the intellec- 
tuals as “sincere voices at times 
misled by passion.” Foreign Minis- 
ter Alain Juppt was even more 
scathing, referring to them as “war- 
rior intellectuals.” 

Mr. Livy has nonetheless made 
one important convert. After be 
announced that the intellectuals 
would not run in the elections if all 
dm traditional political parties 
adopted their position on Bosnia, 
the Socialist opposition leader, Mi- 
chd Rocard, for the first lime came 
out in favor of lifting the arms 
embargo. But if he hoped the intd- 
los would back bis ticket, he has so 
far been disappointed. 


In recent months, the Clinton ^ 

administration has been involved r j?^ 1013 10 ach«ve our 

in rancorous disputes with China ^ objective^ a timvtng re- 
over human rights and trade, with B^al economy. 

Japan over trade, with Indonesia T°‘ e i" a 

and Malaysia over labor standards, ^ eec ® J? conn™ on Tuesday, 
and with Singapore over the caning h .^P U S V 

of an Amer^eenaga. R™ ra,DJ ? er ' ^ 111 

5 . Asia must be prepared to temper 

A number of East Asian coun- our economic self-confidence with 
tries have also accused the United the humility to undertake further 
States of seeking to achieve a domi- reforms, including to strengthen 
nant position in the Asia-Pacific our institutions of civil society.'' 
Economic Cooperation forum as a He said that although Asia re- 
means of putting more pressure on jected the condescending attitude 
its members to open up their mar- of some Western critics, “we can- 
kets to American goods and ser- not remain unmoved by the real 
vices. blights and shortcomings of our 

In an apparent effort to reduce societies, including abject poverty, 
friction. Booth Gardner, the depu- corruption and moral decay." 
ty U.S. trade representative, said Reflecting a reluctance among 
Wednesday at the council meeting key East Asian nations and busi- 
in Kuala Lumpur that the Clinton nessmen to take action that might 


be interpreted as exclusionary by 
the United States, Japan and sever- 
al other countries in the region are 
wary of joining a Malaysian-spon- 
sored East Asian Economic Cau- 
cus. although Malaysian officials 
say it would promote free and open 
trade. 

Pacific nations Should “refrain 
from fomiing a hostile regional 
bloc,” said S.R. Cho. chairman of 
South Korea's Hyosung manufac- 
turing group. 

However, Richard Woolcott, a 
former Australian foreign minister, 
said in an interview that the Clin- 
ton administration should halt its 
“inconsistent, confused and heavy- 
handed economic and social poli- 
ties" toward Asia. He said there 
was a risk that East Asian countries 
would form their own economic 
group from which America might 
be excluded. 

“There are already some sugges- 
tions that Indonesia. Malaysia. 
China, Japan, Thailand and Singa- 
pore are being pushed closer to- 
gether as a result of U.S. politics," 
he said. 

“Australia and New Zealand, 
too." he said, “could find them- 
selves reluctantly obliged to look 
closely at East Asian associations 
rather than wider Asia-Pacific link- 
ages." 


dear to the Western ministers that 
Moscow stffl envisioned the Part- 
nership chiefly as a stepping stone 
to a new “collective security system 


tween Russia and the United States- 
that included nuclear proliferation. 
North Korea and Bosnia. 

Mr. Perry announced that Rus- 


jn Europe." Russia, he said, still s ’ a the United States would 
regarded the 32-naiion Conference conduct their first joint exercises 
on Security and Cooperation in Eu- this July in Russia. Russian leaders 
rope as the basis for this system, in had earlier indicated the exercises 
which NATO would play a subor- might be canceled because of grow- 
dinate role. mg dismay that Russia was not 

General Grachev acknowledged bang accorded proper respect in its 
that Russia wanted to strengthen relations with Washington. 

TRADE: Pact Without Harmony 


Continued from Page 1 

what is not what — and get the 
working groups back together,” he 
said. 

Many analysis agreed that was 
the real significance of the accord. 

The negotiators “simply wanted 
to start up the framework talks 
again and they needed some ratio- 
nale." said Alan Tondson, research 
director at the Economic Strategy 
Institute, a Washington research 
organization that has advocated 
taking a firm stand with Japan on 
trade issues. 

“They are not agreeing to the 
kind of provisions that would give 
this agreement meaning," be said. 

U.S. trade negotiators sought to 
portray the accord as an important 
victory, saying the Japanese bad 
agreed to a solution that foDowed 


GAS: Senate Report Says Iraq Used Chemical Agents Against U.S. Troops 


almost precisely a proposal the 
U.S. trade representative, Mickey 
Kan tor, made last month to then- 
Fortign Minister Tsulomu Hala at 
a meeting in Morocco. Mr. Hata 
now is prune minister. 

One negotiator boasted (hat the 
United States had broken the dead- 
lode without giving in on “any U.S. 
negotiating position." 

But that claim underscores the 
point that the United Slates has 
spent almost a year wrangling with 
Japan over the wording of its bar- 
gaining arrangements even as Ja- 
pan's trade surplus with the United 
States remains enormous. 

The real issue appears to be one 
of trust As Mr. Hata told Mr. Kaz>- 
tor in a late-night meeting in Wash- 
ington in February, just before 
talks broke down: “The trouble is 
we can't trust you with numbers 
and you can't mist us without 
them." 


Amerasians 
In Vietnam 


By Jim Mann 

Lax Angela Tuna Scrcicc 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton 
administration has concluded an 
agreement with the government of 
Vie tnam that will open the way for 
U.S. diplomats to represent and 
protect Vietnamese- Americans on 
Vietnamese soil, according to U.S, 

officials. 

Under the agreement, any Viet- 
namese- Americans who are arrest- 
ed or imprisoned in Vietnam will 
be entitled to have American diplo- 
mats visit them and try to ensure 
that they are treated humanely and 
fairly. In addition, U.S. diplomats 
in Vietnam can try to locate Viet- 
namese- Americans who are miss- 
ing. can help Vietnamese- Ameri- 
cans replace lost U.S. passports, 
and can try to arrange money 
transfers for Vietnamese- Ameri- 
cans who are robbed. 

The understanding is one pan of 
a broader accord in which Vietnam 
and the United States agreed to 
open up liaison offices in each oth- 
er’s capital cities. These offices, to 
be staffed by at least 10 diplomats 
each, will cany out some oT the 
functions of embassies until diplo- 
matic relations are established be- 
tween the two governments. 

The move to set up liaison offices 
is one of several recent indications 
that the Clinton administration is 
taking steps to upgrade U.S. rela- 
tions with Vietnam. Last week. 
Deputy Prime Minister Tran Due 
Luong of Vietnam visited Wash- 
ington Tor talks with Secretary of 
State Warren M. Christopher. 

“The point is dial we have taken 
another step forward." a senior ad- 
ministration official said Tuesday. 

President Bill Clinton proposed 
the creation of liaison offices when 
be lifted the trade embargo against 
Vie tnam in February. But the final 
arrangements were not worked out 
until last Friday, after Mr. Luong's 
visit, when the assistant secretary 
of state for East Asian and Pacific 
affairs, Winston Lord, signed the 
documents spelling out the details. 

A senior administration official 
said that there was now agreement 
on consular protection for Viet- 
namese- Americans, “and we can 
begin to look for property and open 
up the offices.” 

In the past, Vietnam took the 
position that Vietnamese- Ameri- 
cans were not entitled to the pro- 
tection of U.S. diplomats, because 
they were Vietnamese nationals. 
But the Clinton administration 
stuck to the traditional U.S. view, 
that such people are U.S citizens 
and are entitled to the same consul- 
ar protection as other Americans. 

Die Vietnamese government “fi- 
nally came around on this issue;" 
said a State Department offidaL 

In the 1990 census, 615,000 
Americans identified themselves as 
being of Vietnamese descent. 


SERGE GRES 

Ptimfmtjs 1932 - 1940 

PARCOURS POLVNESIEN 

F.xtiibiiict! 

25 MAY TO 3 JUNE 1994 


MAISON DE TAHITI 

23 BD SAINT -GERMAIN 
PARIS V 


Costumed from Page 1 

that nerve-agent levels delected by 
the Czechs and other allies during 
the war were not harmful monitor- 
ing equipment picks up nerve 
agents only when levels are 1,000 
times higher than what is deemed 
to be hazardous. 

Senator Sam Nunn, Democrat of 
Georgia and chairman of the Sen- 
ate Armed Services Committee, 
said Wednesday that while detec- 


tion equipment would have picked 
up only a large-scale chemical at- 
tack, a low- levd chemical attack 
“could have occurred.” 

“I certainly would not dismiss 
it,” he said. 

“There are too many people who 
have served in the Gulf who are 
now experiencing some severe 
problems to dismiss it," he said. “It 
certainly could have happened." 

The report indudes testimony 
from 30 Gulf War veterans who say 


that apparent Iraqi missile attacks 
were followed by the sounding of 
chemical -agent detectors, the air 
filling with fumes and burning sen- 
sations on their skin. 

Almost all are now suffering 
from the debilitating symptoms of 
what has come Lo be known as 
Persian Gulf syndrome. 

“There are multiple witnesses to 
what appear to be best explained as 
chemical or mixed- agent attacks," 
the report said. It said that symp- 


R WANDA: Europe Condemns the Slaughter but Shows Reluctance to Involve Its Troops 


Continued from Page 1 

flights, he said. “Civil wars in Afri- 
ca are very hard to stop,” sard the 
O rman news agency DPA in a 
dispatch from Nairobi published in 
several newspapers last wee*, in- 
terventions in Somalia and Liberia 
hardly brought freedom any closer, 
and in Angola and southern Sudan. 

fighting continues despite count- 
less peace initiatives. Even for a 
country as small and poor as 
Rwanda, there is no quick solu- 
tion.” 


Ten Belgian soldiers and seven 
civilians were killed in Rwanda be- 
fore all Belgians there were evacu- 
ated last month. A government 
spokesman in Brussels, Patrick Re- 
nault, said Tuesday that Belgium 
would not reestablish a presence 
there until the conflict was over. 

“At the moment we have no will- 
ingness to haw contact with the so- 
called government in Kigali, which 
consists of a gang of murderers," be 
said. 

In an earlier era, France might 


have sent troops to Rwanda, where 
French is the most widely spoken 
European language. Bui France is 
no longer eager for such missions, 
and in the case of Rwanda finds 
itself in the position of having 
armed and advised the government 
now being accused of responsibility 
for many massacres. 

Earlier this year, the U.S. group 
Human Rights Watch singled out 
France as the principal non- Afri- 
can supplier of arms lo the Rwan- 
dan gownmeat, and charged that 
the French government had ig- 


nored human rights concerns there. 

Health Minister Philippe 
Douste-Blazy of France recently 
returned from a visit to Rwanda 
and to refugee camps in neighbor- 
ing Tanzania with horrific tales of 
what he called “the worst genocide 
of the late 20th century.” 

Mr. Douste-Blazy reported that 
some marauders offered to kill vic- 
tims with bullets if the victims 

could pay for them, using machetes 

to kill those with no money for 
bullets. 


Paris newspapers have criticized 
the United Nations for noi acting 
sooner, but there have been few 
callsfor direct French intervention. 

“Since the end of the Cold War, 
the world is do longer interested in 
Africa," the newspaper Liberation 

wrote in an editorial. “Its wars do 
not threaten the stability of the rich 
world. And its people are too far 
away, too obscure and too poor to 

convince the ‘great powers’ that 

they are worth spending money 
and shedding blood." 


toms appeared “simultaneously 
with alarms going off" and missile 
attacks. 

Mr. Riegle said his yearlong in- 
vestigation included interviews 
with 600 American soldiers, many 
of whom corroborated reports of 
chemical exposures. 

The report said that in addition 
to direct attacks, there appear to be 
three other primary sources of ex- 
posure: 

• Fallout from coalition bomb- 
ing of Iraqi chemical and biological 
warfare plants. Visual and thermal 
satellite imagery confirms that fall- 
out during the air and ground war 
moved to the southeast, toward 
American forces. 

• The administration of nerve- 
agent vaccines to troops, some 
which act in a mann er similar in the 

actual agenL 

• Continuing contact with Iraqi 
prisoners of war. 

The Pentagon and the Veterans 
Affairs Department have launched 
several programs to register sick 
veterans, study their symptoms and 
search for treatment. But while 
they acknowledge that the illnesses 
are real they say there is no evi- 
dence of a single cause. 


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SEVEN DAYS THAT CHANGED 
THE WORLD. 

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assault and the Alfied advance into 
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To commemorate these dramatic 
days, we will reproduce the seven front 
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of B»rty on the European continent. 

Fifty years taler, you! foflow the 
events day-by-day from the reports of the 
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Page 6 


Human Rights in China 


9^ a s r «peci for human rights — or 
China's lack of it — will affect the lives of 
incalculable numbers of people over Ihe com- 
jnj> decades, China has not only a huge popu- 
lation of its own but great influence on other 
poor countries as it successfully and rapidly 
becomes richer. Thai is why president Bill 
Clinton needs to keep pressing (he Chinese 
government on human rights. And that is why 
he needs a better instrument than the threat to 
lift most-favored-nation trade treatment and 
cut off Chinese exports to the United States. 

It is important not to misunderstand the 
current scale of Chinese abuse of political and 
religious freedom, or to allow the Chinese 
government to argue that Americans are only 
trying to impose their own legal practices on 
another culture. Many of the worst trespasses, 
like the frequent resort to torture by the po- 
lice. are in violation of Chinese law. Large and 
persuasive compilations of these cases have 
been published by such reputable organiza- 
tions as Amnesty International USA. Asia 
Watch and the Puebla Institute. The issue is 
how to bring the government into conformity 
with its own laws and with the principles ac- 
cepted by mosi other countries, rich and poor. 

One danger in lifting most-favored status is 
that it would sharply diminish China's con- 
tacts with America. Ideas follow the trade 
routes, and increased trade means increased 
openness to other changes as well. Lifting 
most-favored status would also impede the 


development of a market economy in China, 
and the emergence of a commercial middle 
class — ■ two forces that are already undercut- 
ting the centralized Communist regime. 

The United States has more effective ways 
to lean cm China. A wanner policy toward 
Taiwan and more public attention to the re- 
pression in Tibet would remind China's rulers 
that there are real penalties attached to viola- 
tion of the world's standards — penalties that 
would not injure the people in China who are 
pushing their country in the direction in 
which most Americans want to see it move. 
Repeatedly calling a government to account 
for its human rights record and engaging it in 
a dialogue, privately and publicly, is a diplo- 
matic tactic that has had significant successes 
in many places over the years. 

There is hardly any exercise in international 
politics more difficult than bringing a rising 
power peacefully into the world system. China 
is a great power, with nuclear weapons and the 
world’s third-largest national economy. But it 
has not yet acknowledged the responsibilities 
that its position carries. Mr. Clinton needs a 
strategy not lo shut China out but lo draw it 
more deeply into the fabric of international 
agreements and organizations that set govern- 
ments’ standards for dealing decently both with 
each other and with their own people. The 
welfare of Asia, and or the United States as a 
Pacific power, will depend on his success. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Arafat’s Identity Crisis 


Most Israelis understand the need for a 
political settlement with the Palestinians, but 
most doubt the trustworthiness of Yasser Ara- 
fat to make and keep an honorable and effec- 
tive peace. Mr. .Arafat has a perverse genius 
for inflaming these doubts. Last week’s con- 
troversy over a recording of his coll for a jihad, 
or Muslim holy war. to liberate Jerusalem had 
barely died down when another explosive ex- 
cerpt’ was released faim the same speech, se- 
cretly taped earlier this month in a Johannes- 
burg mosque. The latest quote cuts directly to 
the issue of mist by suggesting that the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization's peace agree- 
ment with Israel might seen be broken for a 
new round of fighting. Mr. Arafat's attempts to 
reinterpret his bellicose remark* convince no- 
body. Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin under- 
standably challenges him to reaffirm his per- 
sonal commitment to the peace agreement. 

Correctly, the Rabin government perseveres 
in its engagement with Mr. .Arafat, understand- 
ing that there is no realistic alternative. But 
right-wing Israelis have exploited the politico! 
gift handed them by the PLO leader, threaten- 
ing the consensus needed to expand a fragile 
peace. Mr. Arafat's inflammatory rhetoric and 
conspicuous failures to condemn terrorist out- 
rages endanger the peace process to which he 
and Mr. Rabin have linked their Fates. So does 
early evidence of administrative disarray in 
areas newly transferred to Palestinian control. 


Enforce Haiti Sanctions 


Sanctions can work to restore democracy in 
Haiti — if they are strong and if they are 
enforced. New. suffer sanctions went into 
:ffect on Sunday. But as long as contraband 
psoline flows freely across the border with 
Die Dominican Republic, the UN embargo 
against Haiti exists in name only. 

The immediate need is to get tough with the 
Dominican Republic, reminding its govern- 
ment that these sanctions, approved by the 
United Nations, are mandatory and ihji 
those who ignore them will pay dearly for 
defying the international community. UN in- 
vestigators have been looking at violations of 
the embargo on the border. Secretary-General 
Burros Butros Ghali will decide what action to 
lake after reading their confidential report. 

Unfortunately, the Clinton administration 
is already signaling that it is not prepared to 
romplv with the spirit of the embargo. In 
addition to us mandaiory sanctions, the Unit- 
ed Nations has called upon member state to 
freeze assets and revoke visas for supporters 
of Haiti’s illegitimate military rulers. But 
Washington is only doing this selectively, ex- 
empting key supporters of (he junta: the M«v, 
Brandt. Aero, and Madsen families. Also, three 
Haitian senators who played important roles in 
the coup again st President Jean- Bertrand Aris- 
tide reportedly will be dllowcd to keep their 
U.S. visa s. These are precise!* the people who 
need to be nude moM uncomfortable. Their 


privileges should be revoked. Undermining the 
sanctions even as they go into effect is a danger- 
ous policy. It increases the damor for military 
intervention, and the likelihood that Bill Gin- 
ton. under pressure to achieve a foreign policy 
success, will condude lhai an invasion of Haiti 
is not just an option but a necessity. 

Pressure must be applied to the Dominican 
Republic, even though the results of recent 
presidential elections are unclear Joaquin Ba- 
iaguer. r be incumbent president, claims vic- 
tory, but his opponent. Jose Francisco Pena 
Gomez, says many of his followers were de- 
frauded of their votes, and independent ob- 
servers have backed up these claims. 

Mr. Balaguer seems set to hunker down, as 
he did after the last questionable election, in 
1990, and wail for the controversy to die 
down. No doubt he is hoping that the United 
States, in its desire to preserve some sem- 
blance of stability on the island, will not make 
too much noise over election fraud. That 
would be a mistake. While pushing the Do- 
minican government — no matter who is in 
power — to police its border, the United 
States also needs to support those who are 
trying to ensure the fairness of the vote. In the 
Dominican Republic as in Haiti, long-term 
stability will come only one way: through 
democracy. This is not the time for mixed 
messages, on either side of the island. 

— THE .YEW’ YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Drop the MFN Pretense- 

[Withdrawing China’s most-favored-nation 
irading status/ might mean something terrible 
for the geopolitics not just of Asia but of ihe 
whole world: It would risk starting Cold War 
II. Revoking MFN would create j hostile, 
suspicious and aggressive China. 

The Clinton adminisl ration began w real- 
ize (too latei last autumn that the only sensi- 
ble China policy would be to uncouple hu- 
man rights from trade and deal with them as 
another element in the increasingly dense 


Chincse-American relationship. That will be 
the right way to proceed in the future. Hu- 
man rights in China are a legitimate subject 
of American concern, as even the Chinese 
have begun to jdmil by agreeing to argue 
their case with the American and other gov- 
ernments. But there is. and will be. no magic 
way to turn China quickly into a tolerant 
democracy where civni liberties flourish. It 
does nobody, including the scores or hun- 
dreds of thousands who are persecuted in 
China, any good lo pretend otherwise. 

— The Economist tLond'.*/. 


International Herald Tribune 

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THUBSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 


America and China: Lets’ s Scrap the Cold War Relics 


Mr. Arafat has had a hard time selling 
compromise to a Palestinian community that 
both the PLO and more radical Islamic 
groups have encouraged for years to hope for 
much bigger gains. What a contrast today’s 
heckling must seem with the adulatory ap- 
plause he used lo win from sympathetic Third 
World audiences with empty boasts of push- 
ing Israel into the sea. 

But fresh doses of apocalyptic rhetoric will 
do nothing to ease the PLO’s problems. Mr. 
Arafat has rightly concluded that there is 
more gain for Palestinians in un glamorous 
compromise than in empty posturing and un- 
achievable demands. The best answer to his 
radical critics lies in delivering quickly on the 
full promise of autonomy, extending self-rule 
from Gaza and Jericho to the remainder of the 
West Bank. But by his reckless rhetoric. Mr. 
Arafat makes it harder for Mr. Rabin to win 
the necessary support for moving ahead. 

The PLO chairman urgently needs lo re- 
solve his lingering identity crisis and decide 
who he really is. Globe-trotting guerrilla lead- 
er or chief administrator of Palestinian self- 
rule? Revolutionary phrase maker or co-archi- 
tect of a historic compromise with Israel? If he 
cannot decide, he risks torpedoing his most 
imp c*n ant achievement for the Palestinian 
people — negotiated autonomy and an end to 
Israeli military rule. 

— THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON — The mandatory link- 
age between trade privileges and hu- 
man rights is obsolete. President Bill Clinton 
and Congress need to replace this Cold War 
rdic with a new approach that broadly engages 
China on h uman rights while promoting Amer- 
ican strategic and economic interests. 

U.S. -Chinese relations are shackled by the 
linkage , which embodies two aspects of old- 
think that should join the era that spawned 
them cm the dust heap of history. 

First, the yearly “most favored nation” 
requirement — for waivers from high U.S. 
tariffs on imports from Communist countries 
— dales from the bygone era of U.S.-$oviet 

Helping strengthen the rule 
of law i ciU advance human 
rights by reducing arbitrary 
interference tckile improving 
Beijing's ability to govern. 

competition. Under the 1974 Jackson- Vanik 
Amendment China may retain lower tariffs 
only if the president certifies that such bene- 
fits facilitate emigration. China’s current 
trade benefits expire cm July 3 unless Presi- 
dent Clinton announces by June 3 that be 
intends to extend them. 

Second, the new conditions for an exten- 
sion that Mr. Clinton set last year — such as 
adherence to the Universal Declaration of 
Human Rights and protection of Tibet’s cul- 
tural heritage — originated i n congressional 
opposition to George Bush's prctipilous re- 
engagement with Beijing after the Tiananmen 
massacre of 1989. These and (he other de- 
mands are legitimate, but they cannot be 
achieved by the linkage policy. 

Even partial revocation of trade benefits. 


By Bill Bradley 

The writer is a senator from Sew Jersey. 

which the administration is said to be consid- 
ering, would not work. For example, targeting 
goods produced by military-owned factories 
would invite retaliation against U.S. exports 
and antagonize a key actor in China's succes- 
sion struggle without advancing human rights. 
Our task is to foster the emergence of a 
responsible, outward-looking China as a force 
for stability in Asia. We cannot do so if we 
hold the U.S.-Chinese relationship hostage to 
an annual “most favored nation'* review. 

U-S. interests require a multifaceted engage- 
ment with China. With its nuclear arsenal, 
growing mfliiaiy strength, unresolved border 
issues and permanent seat on the UN Security 
Council. China must be reckoned with. Ameri- 
ca's strategic agenda in Asia — such as control- 
ling North Korean nudear proliferation — 

T ies cooperation with China. 

ith a large economy growing by more than 
10 patent a year, China is an engine for global 
growth. U.S exports to China rose by more 
than 18 percent last year and have tripled in the 
last decade. American companies have com- 
mitted billions of dollars in investment. 

Obviously, Americans have a strong inter- 
est in improving the lives of China's J.2 bil- 
lion people. Today’s linkage between trade 


benefits and human rights is simply too nar- . 
row to do the job. To be truly effective, our 
human rights policy must go hand in hand 
with the forces of economic growth that are 
remaking China: information, investment 
and goods, which ore flowing in and out of 
C hina in unprecedented volume. 

Centralized control over the provinces has 
loosened. The rigor of law is slowly replacing 
the whim of the Communist Party in many 
economic sectors. Individuals now have per- 
sonal freedom that while inadequate; is un- 
paralleled in modern Chinese history. 


The first dement of an effective human 
rights policy lies in further increasing Owia's 
exposure to the ouiade world. 

Beijing has agreed to discuss the jamming 
of our radio broadcasts. We must use those 
discussions to insist upon meaningful expan- 
sion of onjammed Voice of America' and. 
Radio Free Asia programs. We should also 
increase the number of educational and cuf-' 
-tnral exchanges that etpose young Chinese to. 
our nratoethmc democracy. 

The second element is an expansion of 
trade, which is the motive for China’s opening 
outward. I support China's membership in 
-the World Trade Organization, which wDl be 
the successor of the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. Membership would re- 
quire adherence to legal standards. For. ex- 
ample, Beijing would have to accept dispute- 
resolution procedures and disclose rules 
governing state enterprises. 

Growth alone will not democratize China. 
But h does create a fluid political and social 
environment and promote the emergence of 
a class of prosperous Chinese — all of which 
fuel democratization and improved human 
rights practices. 

Evidence from South Korea, Taiwan and 
elsewhere shows that prosperity breaks down 
old controls and gmerates demands for im- 
proved political and social conditions. - 

A third feature of a beneficial human rights 
policy is genuine dialogue on human rights. 
AB too often, the uXChinese "dialogue” 
consists of American officials presenting their 
Chinese counterparts with a list of demands. 
China responds that Weston human rights 
standards are not applicable m Asia. The 
result: an empty exchange of monologues. 

The alternative is a genuine exchange of 
views. While we will not agree that human 
rights are relative; we can us ten to the Chi- 
nese with the aim of finding common ground 
on which to build. 

For example, helping tire government 


iim parliamentary delegations to investigate 

to come to the United States for tins purpose 
Once tfae Chinese stop viewing bumM ngjj 

asa weapon deployed against titan- they will 
be willing to have a systematic dialogue. 

‘ Fifth* Chroa’s craving for international lo- 
gnimacy gives us additional leverage, we 
must make it dear that so long as China does 
not uphold basic human rights standards. 
will continue to work to deny China such 
symbols of legitimacy as playing host to tne 


Olympics and international meetings. 

Sixth, we most ask business to help p\ 
supporting voluntary ^hwial investor princi- 
ples as- part of .an, Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation forum investment code. I have 
in mind adherence to such principles as safe 
workin g conditions and -a prohibition against 
the export of goods produced by forced labor. 

To revoke or place conditions on trade 
status would be a historic blunder. Unlike 
1949, when America could ignore Red China, 
in the Aria of 1994 we would isolate ourselves 
from the world’s most dynamic .region. 

The Cold War is over. Let us de-link mosi- 
favored-nation status from human rights and 
begin to realize the full potential of the U.S.- 
Chxnese relationship. - 

The Sew York Tones. 


Great China Is Having Great Problems, and Publicizing Them 


H ONG KONG — China’s Com- 
munist regime has not bothered 
lately to conceal increasingly grave 
problems from outriders. Public can- 
dor is Beijing's attempt to deal with 
multifarious difficulties. Newspapers 
and broadcasts are best way to in- 
struct tens of millions of bureaucrats 
and party officials, collectively known 
as cadres, on the challenges the nation 
faces — and what to do about them. 

Following is a summary of the offi- 
cial catalogue of China’s' woes. 

The economy is overheating, with 
annua? growth around 14 percent and 
inflation as high as 25 percent in 
some urban centers. One third of 
state-owned enterprises are effective- 
ly bankrupt. Such enterprises are still 
tiie backbone of the economy despite 
the expansion of tire private sector. 

The centralized authority of the 
Communist Parly and die government 
is being eroded! Corruption among 


By Robert Elegant 


cadres is widespread Law and order 
are breaking down, as evidenced by a 
wave of crime — open and violent, like 
armed robbery, as well as stealthy and 
complex, like embezzlement. 

Chinese peasants and workers are 
putting up violent resistance to un- 
popular policies, resulting in pitched 
battles in which both civilians and 
police have been killed. Some 200 
million people are either unemployed 
or underemployed. Many “local des- 
pots and warlords” have reappeared, 
similar to the local tyrants who ter- 
rorized Chinese in past centuries. 

Strikes, brigandiy and racial and 
religious tension are serious pro- 
blems, as is organized crime, often 
based on traditional secret societies 
but now led by tool cadres. Drug 
trafficking and addiction are greater 
than ever before. 


Is this really the profile of the next 
superpower, which will posses the 
world's biggest economy? Despite the 
expectations of futurists and entre- 
preneurs, mostly outsiders. China to- 
day hardly looks a sure bet — or even 
a good bet Euphoria is (Mounded 
for a number of reasons. 

Although China may well have the 
world’s largest gross national product 
in a decade or so, the population will 
by then have substantially exceeded 
the 1.2 billion to which Beijing ad- 
mits today. However, what really 
counts is not gross income but per 
capita income, and there will be tens 
of millions more people to feed, 
clothe, shelter and educate. 

Most of the capital entrepreneurial 
and managerial talent that has given 
China the world’s highest growth rate 
comes from abroad. largely from Chi- 


nese settled elsewhere. The domestic 
market and the supply of cheap labor 
may well be inexhaustible; ‘bui no 
economy can keep growing primarily’ 


The Chinese today account for 22 
percent of the world's people hut they 
have access to only 7 potent of the 
world’s arable land, and not neces-. 
sarfly the best A continuing food 
deficit is the least to be expected. 

Growth is concentrated along the 
coasL Uneven growth already evokes 
bitter resentment in the less Favored 
regions. The centrifugal forces thus 
generated could lead to open splits 
between regions and tire de facto 
transfer of power from the' central 
government to provinces de termin ed 
to defend their own interests. . 

Chinese leaders are bewailing tire 
virtual disappearance of all ethical 
standards and any moral consensus. 
The Communists destroyed -the old 


Confuriancode that governed man- 
ners, morals and daily behavior. They 
have been unable to put anything in 
place of those pillars of a stable soci- 
ety. The only value.tgday is money. 

- China’s. foreign trade will amount 
to some S3 biOiori in deficit this year. 
Altbottth foreign exchange reserves 
are sufficient, barely, the S25 bi&ion 
favorable balance of trade with the 
United States is vital. 

- That is why President BUI Clin- 
ton's decision on the 'future of Chi- 
na's roost-favored trade status is so 
important Tet by’ refusing" lo make 

- reasonable human rights concessions, 
the Chinese leadership could throw 
tire trade benefits aside for internal 
political advantage. 

Whatever its immense potential 
and tire sheer mass that makes it a 
force in wodd affairs, China is hardly 
on the highroad to success. : 

International Herald Tribune. 


Illegal Chinese Immig rants Everywhere, and No Letup in Sight 


H ONOLULU — Dramatic eco- 
nomic and social change in Chi- 
na is spurring an annual exodus of 
tens of thousands seeking opportunity 
or political freedom abroad. Chinese 
criminal organizations are facilitating 
much of this illegal emigration, thus 
transforming human smuggling into 
one of the major international security 
concerns of inis decade. 

With annual profits estimated to 
exceed S3.5 billion, Chinese human 
smuggling has replaced drug traffick- 
ing as the enterprise of choice for 
many gangs. Chinese smuggling syn- 
dicates. often working with Russian. 
Middie Eastern or European groups, 
have established a global network in- 
volving more than 30 countries. 

The United Suites has long been 
targeted by these smuggling syndi- 
cates. The arrival last summer of a 
series of smuggling ships carrying 
thousands of Chinese prompted Pre- 


By Paul J. Smith 


sidenl Bill Clinton to declare the 
phenomenon a threat to national se- 
curity, thereby authorizing the Na- 
tional Security Council to direct the 
American response. But evidence in 
the past six months suggests that the 
business of smuggling Chinese immi- 
grants into the United States is con- 
tinuing to prosper. American officials 
concede that criminal smuggling 
gangs have merely changed tactics. 
They now rdy on more circuitous, 
clandestine, multi-country routes. 

In testimony to Congress, CIA Di- 
rector James Woolsey has confirmed 
that some 100.000 Chinese are being 
smuggled into America each year. 
Many are sent first through Belize. 
Guatemala, the Dominican Repub- 
lic, Mexico or other countries in Cen- 
tral America or the Caribbean region. 

Large numbers of Chinese are also 


being smuggled toward Russia and 
Europe. Fears of mass Chinese innm- 
gration into Russia's Far East are 
stalling plans for greater economic 
cooperation along the border. The 
yearly influx of thousands of Chinese 
into the Central Asian republics of 
Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan is exac- 
erbating tensions between those re- 
gions and Beging. Russian and Chi- 
nese gangs are reprated to be re- 
sponsible for the estimated 50.000 
Chinese illegally residing in Moscow. 

In both Western and Eastern Eu- 
rope, officials confront dramatic in- 
creases in crime and other internal 
security threats associated with hu- 
man smuggling from China. A re- 
cent rise in violent crime in the Slo- 
vakian capital of Bratislava, thought 
to be a major smuggling conduit 
from Eastern Europe into Austria, is 


Shape Up and Stay Influential in Asia 


S ANTA MONICA California 
— The United States has major 
problem? in its relations with East 
Aria, notably China and Japan. Yet 
the Carton administration, which 
is having difficulty shaping a coor- 
dinated .Asia policy, may face even 
more intractable problems in deal- 
ing with the region in future. 

Several issues seem likely to chal- 
lenge .American leadership. Tee 
first is the rapid economic growth 
of China and iti restoration of 
strong ties with Russia. 

In the early 1990s. China had an 
anr.ua! per capita income of S54’; 
that was it> percent of the UJS. 
figure. It had a GNP of S603 bil- 
lion, 1 1.6 percent of the US. figure. 
But China’s population is took 
than four times America’s. The 
number, mean that China could 
fairly easily build an economy the 
same size as .America's while still 
having a relatively poor population. 

China has advanced from a lowly 
I7ih place among Russia's trading 
partners a few years ago to second 
place today. Trade between the two 
amounted to 57.7 billion in 1993, 
Because Western economists foisted 
onto the former Soviet Union such 
an inappropriate model of capital- 
ism. there has been an increasingly 
pro- .Asian uend in Russian politics. 
China is well on iu way ic replacing 
Germany as Russia’s most impor- 
tant trading partner. 

A China sri:.*! an economy grow- 
ing at up to 12 percent a year will 
very quickly change the regional 
and global balance of power. A 
China growing at those rates, suspi- 
cious or U.S. intentions and col- 
laborating with a Russia embittered 
toward die West, could constitute a 
major problem for .America. 

Another looming challenge for 
the Clinton administration is Ja- 
pan's need lo replace America as 
the major market for the manufac- 
tured goods of the rest of Asia. The 


By Chalmers Johnson 


role of America as East Asia's pri- 
mary market is coming to an end. 
not necessarily because the United 
States is about to close its doors but 
because the output of Asia has sim- 
ply grown too large. Equally impor- 
tant. the American economy is not 
growing fast enough to play the role 
that it has played in (he pasL 

The United States needs to cor- 
rect its domestic imbalances and 
restore needed savings and invest- 
ment. which involves cutting con- 

The chief policy 
difficulty is a piecemeal, 
short-term approach. 

sumption and reducing its iradc 
deficits. The best way to do this 
would be to impose surcharges on 
Japanese products entering the 
American market The surcharges 
should be placed only on Japanese 
products because it is chiefly Japan 
that needs to open its market. 

The future of Korea is another 
critical issue. The Communist 
North may be on the verge of col- 
lapse, while the South is rate of the 
richest, most productive places on 
earth. Each of the rival regimes has 
rfce capacity to become a nuclear 
power. In case of attack by North 
Korea, the United States is commit- 
ted to defend the South and has 
35,000 troops stationed there. 

Talk of sanctions against the 
North because of its suspected pro- 
gram to develop nudear weapons is 
unrealistic because they would re- 
quire the full support on the ground 
and in the United Nations of Chi- 
na. Japan and South Korea, which 
would be impossible to get. 

The only available strategy is to 


let time pass until the economic situ- 
ation in the North worsens, or until 
Kim U Sung dies and his son Kim 
Jong n proves unable to govern. This 
could happen sooner than expected. 
Disaster will result if preparations 
are not made, above all to help pay 
for unification and avoid the eco- 
nomic policy mistakes that followed 
the collapse erf Ihe Soviet Union. 

Korean unification and the role a 
unified Korea in the East Asia of 
the furore will inevitably affect the 
balance of power in the region. The 
main local players in that balance 
arc Japan and China. 

Hisahiko Okazaki a former am- 
bassador of Japan and one of his 
country’s best strategists, has said 
he does not think that China will 
ever be “truly dose to Japan even in 
the future.” If he is right, there is a 
continuing role for the United 
States in helping to main tain a bal- 
ance of power in Asia. 

Russia and India will be too pre- 
occupied internally to participate. 
So the balance will be among Chi- 
na, Japan and the Association of 
South East Asian Nations, with 
Korea and Vietnam serving as buff- 
ers and America shifting its influ- 
ence to maintain the equilibrium. 

Such a policy mould require U.S. 
recognition of Vietnarn*rcatly en- 
hanced attention to ASEAN and a 
new type of commitment to Korea. 
It would also require a carefully 
sirucrored policy, presidential lead- 
ership and what George Bush called 
“Ihe vision thing.* 1 

Without those, it is folly to ex- 
pect effective new U.S. strategies. 
Tbf chief difficulty with America’s 


largely attributed to the activities of 
the Chinese underground. 

Many experts are convinced that 
Chinese gangs are using Eastern Eu- 
rope as a forward staging base fra 
human smuggling into Western £u- 

T and the United Stales. 

officials say that Chinese smuggling 
syndicates arc responsible for an in- 
crease in gang murders, extortion and 
prostitution. An estimated 50,000 
Chinese have been smuggled into 
Spain. Many are employed in low- 
paying workshops in Madrid. Similar 
trends are being documented in 
Fiance and Germany, where tens of 
thousands of Chinese immigrants re- 
side illegally. . 

In Asa, leaders have voiced con- 
cerns about the security implications 
of a breakdown in dvfi authority in 
China leading to a mass exodus of 
refugees. Hong Kong and Taiwan axe 
receiving tens of thousands of illegal 
Chinese immigrants annually, ■ and 
the numbers are increasing. In Japan, 
despite some of the world’s strictest 
immigration rules, officials estimate 
that the number of tHegal Chinese 
residents could exceed 25,000. 

Illegal Chinese immigration into 
Southeast Aria threatens to unleash 


ethnic Chinese in the region. Roni 
Sikap Sinuraya, Indonesia's immigra- 
tion director, has openly dedared ole- 
gal Chinese immigration to be a threat 
to the country's national sovereignty. 
Officials in Thailand fear that tbeir 
nation is being used as a major region- 
al transit center, as shown by approxi- 
mately I0GJJ00 Chinese hiding out 
(here at any one time. 

The magnitude erf the smuggling 
has led some to suspect drat theChi- 
nese government is either failing to' 
doallit can to stem the emigration or 
is even allowing it as & safety valve 
against overpopulation, unemploy- 
ment and internal migration from Lhe 
countryside to the dues. 


Beijing contends that human 
Smuggling is an international prob-, 
lem. However, evidence of Chinese 
official involvement, particularly at 
local levels and in some military 
units, tends to suggest otherwise. 

Whatever the government's role, 
an array of signs indicate that the 
•trafficking will not end soon. Politi- 
cal instability in the post-Deng era, 
the breakdown of central control and 
rampant corruption in the Commu- 
nist Party are factors that could influ- 
ence future emigration trends. 

Equally disturbing are the implica- 
tions for social stability posed by in- 
crewing numbers of internal migrants. 
China’s floating population, made up 
mainly of unemployed peasants, has 
grown to more than 100 tmOiort and is 
increasing by perhaps 13 million a 
year. If these internal migrants are 
unable to find employment in China’s 
more prosperous regions, they will 
look to emigration as an increasingly 
attractive and viable option. 

Continued Chinese emigration 
- threatens to undermine China's rela- 
tions with neighbors and trading 
partners, lire question is whether 
China has ihe ability and willingness 
to manage (his crisis. 

The : writer is d research associate 
with Pacific Forum CSIS in Hawau. A 
longer article on the implications of 
Chinese emigration wiB appear in a 
forthcoming issue of Survival the jour- 
nal of the International Institute for 
Strategic Studies in London. He con- 
tributed this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

Letters intended for publican,* 
should be addressed '‘Letters to die 
Editor*' and contain the writer's 
signature, name and full address. 
Letters should be brief and ore 
subject to editing We cannot tv 
responsible for the return of unso- 
licited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES: IOO ? 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: A Great Battle 

LONDON — Despatches received 
from Port Said give particulars of a . 
great battle’ having been', fought on 
Lake Nyassa between' British troops 
and the slave-raiding chief Makan- 
jira. Hie chief, at the head of 2,000 
men,- attacked the, B ritish force at 
Fort Maguire. Major C A: Edwards, 
-with 200 troops, including 60 Sikhs, 
engaged the natives, and after a se- 
vere engagement inflicted upon 
item a crushing defeat. When Ma- 
kanjira retired it was found that a 
hundred -and three of his men had 
been left on the. field, among them 
bang many of his sub-chiefs. 


1919 : FBgbtReeord 


The writer is president of the Ja- 
pan Policy Research Institute, 
based m Santa Monica. He contrib- 
uted this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


ever recorded was aaxanpl^ed on - 
Saturday fMay 24J by the French 
aviator, Lieutenant Roget, who, with 
. Captain Orfi as navigator, flew, from; 
Paris to Knitra. near. Rabat. Moroc- 
co, a distance of 1375 miles, in twelve 


*°«« "id Captain 
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fire odock oh Saturday montine. 
Ibar intention bang to land in Mo- 
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TWmMbI at Knitra oh uneven 

1944 : U.S. Patrols Meet 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1991 


OPINION 


'age'5 


Arafat Should Be Held to His Word 


N ^ORK — Israelis, spent de- 

Va«« d ? ? ,Sm,SMn « *« Words nl 

Yasser Arafat as meaningless and 
false. Now thev take thrive word?, more 

W*? lnc PLO chairman docs 
himself And su they should. 

h».ro 3 Ma * llJ ,! pccch 10 a Johannes- 

5S“ 6 ' Mr. Arafat called for a 
Jinad to liberate Jerusalem. He then 

HR- his peace agreement 
Isra . c J *?* °n!> a tactical step 
that could still he reversed. These 
words touched off a pal, Heal firestorm 
in Israel. Officials there sav that \1r. 

pffi?. 1 - 5 *??**"» ituo question the 
Palestine Liberation Organization's 
comm Ilmen I io peace. 

Mr. Ararat’s advisers offer sltpnen 
explanations of what their boss meant 
lo say: He did not intend jihad ashoK 
war, its customary usage. He was call- 




The Boston Hotel Incident: md 


By Jim Hoagland 


Words count enormously in 
this phase of peacemaking ; 
ns ice-breaking turns into 
cooperative risk-taking. 
Arafat needs to learn that 
his words are now being 
taken most seriously. 


peace on the White House lawn and to 
the Israeli public. 

This is a return in form by Mr. Arafat, 
who survived in Arab polities by playing 
off feuding Arab leaders against mte 
another. Bui this time his remarks have 
been gleefully seized upon hy Israel’s 
rightist Likud opposition as a weapon io 
flail Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. 

Mr. Arafat's words wound Mr. Ra- 
bin by undermining Israeli public sup- 
port for Mr. Rabin ‘s peace efforts with 
the Palestinians and Syria. Mr. Rubin 

and Foreign Minister Shimon Peres 
have thus demanded that Mr. Arafat 
recommit himself in writing to peace. 

But -what good is a new pledge from 
Mr. Arafat if he didn't mean ii the first 
time? Why should Israelis begin io be- 
lieve this' man now. after a political 
lifetime of manipulating words as ruth- 
lessly as he manipulated people and 
causes for his own ends? 

Mr. Arafat promised his people war 
against Israel when he could noi deliver 
it. And now he promises Israelis peace 
when his ability and his desire to deliv- 
er it have to be seriously questioned. 

But the Johannesburg mosque up- 
roar should illustrate 'two essential 


the killing of two Israeli soldiers in 
the Gaza Strip. 

WAFA correctly warned that the at- 
tack on the Israeli troops was in fact an 
attack on the Palestinian leadership and 
its efforts to liberate Gaza and (he West 
Bank by peaceful means 

Those words refltxn reality. Mr. Ara- 
fat’s very survival in Jericho is a joint 

Israeli-Palesunian venture. Neither Mr. 
Arafat nor peace will survive the chal- 
lenge of the fundamentalists and other 
Palestinian rebels without acme, com- 
mitted Israeli protection. 

All the blustering and bravado in Jo- 


liations 




Heads Should Surely Roll sift 


Bv Bob Herbert 






Fi , — r : -Tzvjgp 


N EW YORK — It was the kind of 
ugliness sou expected from the 




hannesburg or elsewhere cannot change 

that. The new words of peace Mr. Arafat 


that. The new words of peace Mr. Arafat 
needs to utter are not rally directed at 
Israelis, who are under no obligation to 
believe him. His words must he directed, 
clearly and expressly, to the Palestin- 
ians. They must know and accept the 
commitments to which his words and 
actions bind them. 

The ll'ash/ngnn Past. 


.... ' 


**.«r* v - ?r. 

J* ~ .TO ^ 

Ss#§£*'_ ^ •’ * 


XN ugliness you expected from the 
South in the 1950s. hut it happened last 
week in one of the great hotels of Boston. 

The prime minister of India. P. V. 
Narasimha Rao. and his entourage 
checked into the Four Seasons Hold 
late on the night of May Ip. Thirty -six 
rooms were hooked for Mr. Rao and the 
approximately 50 jides who accompa- 
nied him. There was also a contingent of 


MEAINWHILE 




At. • A,-*. 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


China: Wffl Clinton Yield? 


S oints about the Israeli- Palestinian po- 
tical accord. The first is that Mr. Ra- 
bin and Mr. Peres are not foolish 
enough to depend on the word alone 
of Mr. Arafat. 

They have held back enough cards to 
suspend or abandon the Israeli with- 
drawal from the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip well before Israel's security is 
threatened by the PLO. They will' not 
hesitate to do so. Secondly, and para- 
doxically. words do count and count 
enormously in this phase of Middle 
East peacemaking, as ice-breaking 
turns into cooperative risk-taking. 

Yasser Arafat should learn from his 
Johannesburg speech that words, once 
uttered, no longer belong to their 
speaker. They' take on a weight, and a 
life, of their own. Context will often 
determine their meaning more than the 
speaker's intent. 

That is why Israel needs to bring Mr. 
Arafat back to the language of peace. 
He must recommit his constituency in 
words, and deeds, to cooperative risk- 
taking with the Israeli leadership. 

Far more significant than Mr. Ara- 
fat’s Johannesburg speech was a state- 
ment over the weekend from the PLO 
news agency. WAFA, which condemned 


mg I or a nonviolent campaign of liber- 
ation of Jerusalem. His reference to j 
peace treaty that was abandoned be- 
fore the forces of the Prophet Moham- 
med took Mecca has been distorted bv 
the Israeli media. Mr. Arafat wjs ac- 
tually showing that Muslims keep 
their commitments. 

Pardon my Arabic: Hog wash. 

Mr. Arafat knew how his words 
would be interpreted hy South Afri- 
can Muslims unless he specified alter- 
native. lesser-known meanings. The 
PLO spin-control squad explains that 
words mean what they want them to 
mean after Mr. Arafat has uttered 
them in another context. 

The truth is more prosaic. Mr. Ara- 
fat got caught by an unexpected tape 
recording that found its way to Radio 
Israel. He could not resist telling a 
Muslim audience what it wanted to 
'hear and what in his heart of hearts 


he probably believes. 

To Muslims. Mr. Arafat preaches 
words of struggle, while he talks of 


Our son. then a junior in college, wav 
in Beijing's Tiananmen Square during 
the massacre of students by the Chinese 
government on June 4. 1989. He wit- 
nessed in person what (he rest of the 
world watched on television. 

I vividly rceall my shock and anger 
when President George 1“I am not a 
wimp") Bush wasted no lime in sending 
U.S. officials to Beijing to meet with 
leaders who had ordered the massacre. 
Shortly thereafter, lie renewed China's 
most-favored- n a ii on trade status. 

Bill Clinton talked a good moral game 
concerning China when he was seeking 
election. Now. responding to intense 
lobbying by American business, he is 
pretending that China's human rights 
situation has improved. 

As an American citizen. I am 
ashamed of my counny. 

PATRICIA HAYES. 

Geneva. 


behave in outrageous defiance of the 
UN Covenant that their UN member- 
ship will he canceled, it is ironic to note 
that Rwanda is currently an elected 
member of the Security Council. 

JULES A. HORN. 

Kraaincm. Belgium. 


They May Know Something 


Earlv Retirement 


I am sure many of your readers will 
protest the elimination of Rex Morgan 
M.D. from your comics page. Speaking 
on behalf of a Great Sikni Majority, let 
me congratulate you for getting rid of the 
phony physician once and for ail. 

HARRISON SHERWOOD 
Cambridge. England. 


Please give us hack Rex Morgan, with 
his epic, polyphonic, almost Tolstoyan 
breaaih and depth. Also. I want to know 
how he .saved Chef Tito. 


"America's Kno* • Sowings Are Bark" 
(Opinion. Mtiv 79/ hv Anna Quindlen: 

Ms. Quindlen fails to recognize that all 
school curricula include subjective matter 
taught as though it wen; fact The world is 
shaped by people with opinions. Let Ms. 
Quindlen stop pretending that Floridian 
schoolchildren will be stripped of the 
ability to think critically if they are taught 
that .America is the superior’ culmre.'ln 
the end, someone's opinion will be pre- 
sented as objective truth. Why should not 
the school board and parents, rather than 
the news media, decide which opinions 
are important for their children? 

STEVEN STORTZ. 

Swanhmore. Pennsylvania. 


MICHAEL RAISE. 
Brunswick. Maine. 


E.J. ACHENBACH. 
Essen. Germanv. 


Winning; Was No Surprise 


To die World's Shame 


Nearly 50 years after the establish- 
ment of the United Nations, the geno- 
cide under way in Rwanda should deep- 
ly shame the world community, if we are 
to build a new world order, the UN 
needs to inform those countries that 


Rex Morgan, rest in peace. My col- 
agues and l held a small, but appropri- 


leagues and I held a small, but appropri- 
ately convoluted, memorial service to 
mark ihe passing of the never-ending 
story lines and those bizarre cooking 
lessons from Chef Tito. 


JAY GLYNN. 
London. 


“Like Old Days. Yanks Can Do No 
Wrong." reads a headline on a story 
about the Yankees winning seven in it 
row (Sports. Max Nl. Well, not quite. In 
the old days, nobody would have thought 
that was worth writing a story about — 
just normal Yankee behavior. 

HAL BERGER. 

Paris. 


U.S. Secret Service personnel assigned 

to i he prime minister, who was to speak 
at Harvard the next day. 

Now, in a great hotel like the Four 
Seasons, there is a surge of excitement 
and activity when important guests ar- 
rive. Parking attendants, bellhops, 
clerks, maids, waiters and the like have 
to carry out a variety of tasks. 

Last week at the Four Seasons, any of 
those tasks done for the prime minister 
of India had to be done by white people. 
No African-Americans could cany his 
bags, no Asians could clean his room, no 
Latinos could .serve him his food. At the 
direction of a hotel official, the prime 
minister had to be served by whiles only. 
American or European. 

The offense was so blatant and egre- 
gious that the head of the Massachu- 
setts Commission Against Discrimina- 
tion could not at first believe it. The 
initial reaction of the commission 
chairman. Michael Duffy, was that the 
allegation, made by hotel employees, 
was “too outrageous to be true."' He 
ordered an investigation, (t turned out 
that a Four Seasons official, who has 
not been publicly named, had notified 
hotel supervisors in a memorandum 
that non whiles were not to serve 
the prime minister. 

This was confirmed by the hotel's 
general manager, Robin Brown, who 
said. “There was a memo that went out 
to a number of employees saying that 
only certain nationalities should service 
the prime minister's room." Mr. Brown 
has made extensive public apologies on 
behalf of the hotel and has described the 
memo and its aftermath as “very, very 
stupid and unforgivable and painful.'' 

But how could the flap have hap- 
pened? To carry out the directive, some 


nonwhite employees had to he shitted 
from their normal duties. How could 
anyone at the hold have thought that 
was all right? Last week marked the 40th 
anniversary of the Brown v. Board of 
Education ruling by ihe Supreme Court 
that led to the dismantling of legal Mrcre- 
ga non in the United Slates. Clearly 
there are many who remain untouched 
by the spirit of that ruling. 

Two African- American bellhop*. Har- 
rison Lilly and .W Ahad. were among 
those tNd by Four Seasons supervisors 
that they could not assist the prime minis- 
ter or his pony. Mr. Lilly, the night bell- 
man. said he was given paperwork to Jo. 
He was quoted in The Boston Globe as 
saying. “I felt w hen it happened that they 
had traded my eight years of service fair 
one night of revenue." 

Four Seasons officials, while ac- 
knowledging that what happened was 
wrong, contend that hotel employees 
were carrying out a request made by ihe 
prime minister's security people, who 
Teh that Mr. Rao would be safer if only 
white people waited on him. 

The security people, according to ho- 
le! officials, were worried about The pos- 
sibility of an assassination anempt or 
some other terrorist act. 

The Indian government has denied 
that any request was made that per- 
tained to the racial or ethnic background 
of hotel staff members. 

The Four Seasons is doing its best to 
make the controversy disappear. Hotel 
officials have apologized to Mr. Lilly and 
Mr. Abad. and have reimbursed diem a 
total of S179 for lost gratuities. The two 
bellhops, who had filed charges with the 
Commission Against Discrimination, 
have withdrawn their complaint. Mr. 
Brown, the general manager, has said he 
would like the “healing" to begin. 

But hold on. What happened at the 
Four Seasons last week was a moral out- 
rage. Mr. Duffy said Tuesday that the 
commission's investigation was continu- 
ing. And the American government has 
an interest in knowing whether a foreign 
head of state has been rostering racial 
discrimination in the United States. That 
should be thoroughly investigated And 
the hotel, which insists that it will not 
tolerate discrimination, needs to shew 
thal it is serious. There are limes when 
heads should roll and this is one of them. 

The New York Times. 


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BOOKS 


BRIDGE 


LEARNED HAND: 

Hie Man and the Judge 

By Gerald Gunther. Illustrated. 
818 pages. $35. Alfred A. Knopf 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


Reviewed by 
Herbert Mitgang 


I N legal circles and law schools 
aD over the United States in the 


X aD over die United States in the 
first half of the 20th century. 
Learned Hand came to be regarded 
as “the 10th justice” on the Su- 
preme Court. 

In his 52 years on the federal 
bench — beginning in 1909, when 
be was a federal judge for the 
Southern District of New York, 
and then, from 1924 until he retired 
from active service in 195 1, as first 


• Barbara Carson, playwright 
and author, is reading “ The Com- 
mitments” by Roddy Doyle. 

"It’s about a rock group from an 
Irish working-class neighborhood, 
and it’s wonderful. I can write die 
kind of dialogue be writes, but I 
can’t make the book work like he 
can.’’ (Unvrence Malkin. IHT) 



TO OUR READERS 
M GREAT BRITON 


Ifs never been easier 
to subscribe and save. 
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among equals in the 2d U. S. Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals — his opin- 
ions and law-review articles were 
regularly cited as precedent in 
Washington. They still are, but 
Learned Hand himself never made 
it to the Supreme Court. That is 
what makes a book about his life a 
pohtica! mystery as well as essen- 
tial legal history. 

In addition to the landmark rul- 
ings at the heart of Gerald Gun- 
ther’s important biography, 
“Learned Hand: The Man and the 
Judge," ihere’s a good deal of inti- 
mate personal background in this 
work. 


A well-documented book of such 
length inevitably includes diver- 
sions and longueurs; neither the 
subject nor the author ever seems 
to forget the pull of Harvard, its 
professors and its snobbish clubs. 
At times, this critic wished the sub- 
title could be reversed so that the 
emphasis would be more on the 
judge’s trials than his travails. For 
Hand (1872-1961) will be remem- 
bered for his contributions to legal 
philosophy, not for the book’s run- 
ning theme about the uncertainties 
and tensions of his long marriage. 

Why didn’t Hand reach the Su- 
preme Court? He was considered to 


be in the class of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes Jr. Louis Brandos and 
Benjamin Cardozo. Asked who 
among his Supreme Court col- 
leagues was the greatest living 
American jurist. Justice Cardozo re- 
plied, “The greatest living American 
jurist isn’t on the Supreme Court." 

In 1930 and again in 1942. Hand 
came close. But then as now. poli- 
tics, geography, religion and payoffs 
for past and anticipated favors de- 
termined presidential appointments. 
In those years, blacks and women 
were not considered essential candi- 
dates for the highest court. 

Hand had once run for the New 
York Court of Appeals to strength- 
en Theodore Roosevelt’s Bull 
Moose ticket: that, plus political 
considerations, raised doubts 
about him with some Republicans, 
including President Herbert Hoo- 
ver. And despite the urging of As- 
sociate Justice Felix Frankfurter. 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt 
declined to name the 70-year-old 
Hand to fill a vacancy in 1942. 

The assumed reason was his age. 
But the real reason, the author 
writes, was that Roosevelt Tesemed 
Frankfurter’s pressure tactics and 
also thought the independent-mind- 
ed Hand might become a dissenter. 


Hand's legacy lies in his writings 
and in the 4,000 opinions he com- 
posed while on the bench. These 
showed the implacability of his legal 
convictions and his immovable re- 
spect for the Constitution. He was 
also active off the bench, becoming 


one of the original spirits behind the 
founding of The New Republic and 
writing essays for the magazine in its 
formative years. "The Spirit of Lib- 
erty." a collection of his extrajudi- 
cial paper, and addresses, edited by 
Irving Dilliard in 1952, reached it 
wide and influential readeiship. 

When an acquaintance asked 
Hand to join liberals at a dinner in 
the early 1920s. he answered: “It is 
kind of you to think of me as a 
liberal, f sometimes am afraid that 
l am not a very - good one. that l am 
a conservative among liberals and a 
liberal among conservatives." 

The author adds: “Hand was 
clearly a partisan of liberal values 
in his defenses of free speech and 
toleration. But unlike many of his 
fellow liberals, his devotion to the 
cause never deteriorated into self- 
righteous. uncritical allegiance." 

When Senator Joseph R. McCar- 
thy’s wild accusation* of disloyalty 
against government officials and 
private citizens grew more virulent 


in the early ’50s. Hand publicly 
denounced McCanhyism. 

The author notes that in a letter, 
“Hand emphasized that he had in 
mind not only Senator McCarthy 
but Richard Nixon — who had 
recently become the Republicans' 
vice-presidential nominee — as 
well." In several Cold War cases 
that came before him on appeal he 
reversed convictions lhal violated 
the Fourth Amendment guarantee 
against unwarranted search and 
seizure and for other constitutional 
reasons. 

In “Learned Hand." author and 
subject are ideally matched. Gun- 
ther was a law clerk for Hand and 
later for Chief Jusiice Earl Warren 
in the '50s; since 1962. he has been 
a professor of constitutional law at 
Stanford University Law School. 

Hand’s landmark opinions es- 
tablished key principles of antitrust 
law. labor law and many other as- 
pects of American jurisprudence. 
In the most valuable chapters of his 
biography. Gunther has found last- 
ing gold in Hand's writings, and he 
has mined them with great knowl- 
edge and enthusiasm. 


By Alan Truscott 


N EW YORK CITY has never 
won the Grand National 


Herbert Mn gang is on ihe staff of 
The New York Times. 


won the Grand National 
Team title since tbat event was in- 
stituted more than two decades 
ago. Thai may be remedied in July, 
for the metropolitan area will be 
represented in national playoffs in 
San Diego. California, by a world- 
class foursome: Jim Cayne, Alan 
Son lag. Larry Cohen and David 
Berkowitz. 

The Cayne team won the area 
final, played at Honors Club, by 19 
imps. The losers were Jim Samp- 
son. Simon Erlich. Glenn Miigrim. 
Ken Jacobs. Gene Prosniiz and Bill 
Rosenbaum. 

On the diagramed deal the two- 
diamond opening by Cohen was a 
Precision System action, showing 
shortage in diamonds. South even- 
tually landed in four hearts, and 
West cashed two spade winners 
and shifted to a club. Since West 
had passed originally and was 
known to have all the spade hon- 
ors. it was dear to Berkowitz as 
South that East held all the missing 
high-card strength. 

As it happens he would have 
succeeded easily by playing low 
from dummy, but he had to worry 
about a singleton club in the West 


NORTH 

* 9843 
T K 7 fi 2 
0 A 

♦ A 9 8 2 
WEST ID) 

• AKQJ6 ♦ 


? 954 
* 10 7 6 A 3 


D) EAST 

3 ♦ 10 7 

?Q954 
v Q J 8 6 4 
*K J 
SOUTH 

♦ 52 

T A J 10 8 3 
K 7 3 2 

* Q 5 


North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 


West 

North 

East 

South 

Pass 

2 <■ 

Pass 

2 N.T. 

34 

Pass 

Pass 

4<r 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led the spade king. 


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hand. To avert a hypothetical rulT 
he put up the club ace and led u 
heart to the jack. 

The bad tramp split was a nui- 
sance. but not fatal. South led to 
the diamond ace and conceded a 
club trick to East. There were no 
more losers, for he could crossraff 
to score ihe remaining tricks. 

This was a gain of 1 1 imps, for in 
the replay Cayne as West opened 
two spades, a weak two-bid. and 
was allowed to play in that contract 
for down one. 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MAY 26, 1994 


t lEe Pagt Pa *‘ 
iCi-A 1 — 


HEALTH/ SCIENCE 




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To the Brain’s 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

Atcw Yuris Tirtur. StTnic 


E\V YORK— In 1848. 
Phineas P. Gage, a 25 - 
year-old foreman for a 
New England railroad, 
mei with a horrible accident. In 
laying track across Vermont’s 
rough terrain. Mr. Gage routinely 
drilled holes in large rocks, poured 
in hiasling powder, laid fuses and 
covered the explosives with sand. 
After tamping these miniature 
bombs with a long metal rod. he 
would light the fuses and run for 
cover from the explosions and shat- 
tering rocks. 

But one September day. Mr. 
Gage was momentarily distracted 
and began tamping (he blasting 
powder before his assistant had 
added sand. There was a powerful 
explosion. The lamping rod. mea- 
suring three and a half feet long 
and an inch and a quarter in diame- 
ter. flew like a rocket into his face, 
just under his left cheek. It shot up 
behind his left eye. destroying it 
and exiled the top of his skull. The 
rod landed many yards away. 

Momentarily stunned. Mr. Gage 
stood up. began talking normally, 
and was able to walk away with the 
help of his men. He was taken to a 
tavern, where he was given a room. 
He recovered within a couple of 
months, but as a different man: he 
could no longer make ethical deci- 
sions. 

The story of Phineas Gage has 
fascinated brain researchers, said 
Dr. Antonio Damasio. a neurolo- 
gist at the University ol Iowa Hos- 
pitals and Clinics. It remained a 
mystery that has been widely 
taught to neurology students under 
the rubric of freak stones. 

But now. Dr. Damasio and Dr. 
Hanna Damasio. who is a leading 
expen in advanced brain-imaging 
techniques and Dr. Damasic’s wife, 
have revisited the case of Phineas 
Gage and placed it in a new light. 


ATHER than being 
merely a curiosity. Dr. 
Antonio Damasio said. 

Of am the case offers compel- 
ling evidence that the human brain 
has a specialized region for making 
personal and social decisions and 
that this region, located in the fron- 
tal lobes at the top of the brain. is 
connected tu deeper brain regions 
that store emotional memories. 


When this higher brain region is 
damaged in a certain way by stroke 
or injury, he said, a person under- 
goes a personality change and can 
no longer make moral decisions. 

The finding "is tremendously 
important.” said Dr. Patricia 
Churchiand. a philosopher and 
cognitive scientist at the University 
of California at Sun Diego. "As we 
begin to understand the brain cir- 
cuits that underlie decision making 
and planning, we will need to re- 
examine our notions about moral 
character, empathy and the deter- 
minants in choosing right over 
wrong, foolish over sensible.” 

The new research on Phineas 
Gage, published in the journal Sci- 
ence. is pari of an effort to explore 
and map the frontal lobes, arguably 
the least understood part of the 
human brain. Situated behind the 
forehead and eyes, the frontal lobes 
seem to help people weigh the con- 
sequences of future actions and to 
plan accordingly. 

The Damasios are trying to de- 
termine whether the frontal lobes 
have separate functional areas. 

T HEIR study of Mr. Gage 
suggests there are two. 
One. in the underbelly of 
the frontal lobes and run- 
ning along a midline between the 
two brain hemispheres, seems spe- 
cialized for nuking social decisions 
in an emotional context. .A second, 
more to the sides of the forehead, 
seems to specialize in abstract calcu- 
lations and other kinds of decision 
making that call less upon emotions. 

The evidence for this hypothesis 
stems from a tour de force of brain 
imaging carried out by Dr. Hanna 
Damasio. Using detailed photo- 
graphs of Mr. Gage's skull, she was 
able to reconstruct on a computer 
his three-dimensional brain and the 
focal point of his injuries. 

Before the accident. Mr. Gage 
had been an intelligent, socially re- 
sponsible. hard-working fellow 
who was well-liked by all who knew 
him. Dr. Antonio Damasio said. 
Bui in the weeks after the tamping 
rod pierced his brain, he began us- 
ing profane language, lied to his 
friends and could not be trusted to 
honor his commitments. 





!»■ jmJ PjikU' hr Jink 


Computer images of Phineas P. Gage's skull reconstruct 
likely trajectory of the rod that pierced his brain. 


Physically, he was unchanged 
except that he had lost his eye. His 
memory and high intelligence were 
intact. But Mr. Gage had lost all 


respect for social conventions. His 
physician. Dr. John Harlow, noted 
that “the equilibrium or balance, so 
to speak, between his intellectual 
faculty and animal propensities" 
had been destroyed. In the words 
of friends and acquaintances. 
“Gage was no longer Gage." 

Frontal-lobe damage has always 
been art enigma. Dr. Antonio Da- 
masio said. 

"Why do these people behave so 
poorly in the social world, when in 
fact they are smart?" he said adding 
that Mr. Gage epitomized this. “Ev- 
eryone could tell he was still smart, 
but he behaved like an idiot." 

The Damasios concluded that 


the frontal lobes contain separate 
but interconnected circuits for de- 
cision making. One operates in the 
social domain, with rich input from 
emotion and its underlying neural 
machinery. Another operates in 
other domains involving extraper- 
sonal space, objects, language and 
arithmetic. 

Thus. Phineas Gages modem 
counterparts perform well on intel- 
ligence tests, speak normally, moke 
new memories and associations, 
and use logic impeccably. “But 
when it comes to being rational in 
their personal and social behavior." 
Dr. Antonio Damasio said, “they 
just fall apart." 


Lymphomas: Rising, but Why 1 


By Lawrence K. Allman 

No* Yi'fk Time'. VVni.r 


EW YORK — Non- 
Hodgkin’s lymphoma, 
the cancer of the im- 
M \Qj mune system that caused 
Jacqueline Kennedy Qnassis’s 
death, is one of the fastest rising 
cancers in the United States, and 
no one knows precisely why. 

Three factors can explain pan of 
the overall rise. One is HIV. the 
virus that causes AIDS, which 
somehow increases the risk of lym- 
phoma. A second is the growing 
number of people with transplant- 
ed organs, who are at increased risk 
for developing lymphoma because 
of the immunosuppressant drugs 
used to prevent rejection of donat- 
ed organs. A third is improved di- 
agnostic techniques. 

Yet even in combination, the 
three can account at most for one- 
third of the rise in non- Hodgkin's 
lymphoma, experts say. The rise 

has been greatest among people 60 
and older, a group least affected by 
AIDS and less likely tu undergo 
oigan transplant surgery. 

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma ap- 
pears in many types, and the prog- 
nosis varies tremendously accord- 
ing to the type. Many people live 
for decades, hardly bothered by 
their lymphoma. Some may not 
need treatment for long periods. 
Yet many others die swiftly, even 
afler responding to early therapy; 
despite aggressive therapy. Mrs. 
Onassis died at age 64 five months 
after the first signs of her malignan- 
cy appeared. 

Doctor 1 ; know little about why 
lymphoma lakes a more aggressive 
form in some people than in others, 
beyond the fact that sometimes it 
tends to become resistant to drugs. 

Mrs. Onassis's lymphoma Tilted 
the pathological description known 
as anaplastic, meaning the cancer 
cells looked primitive under the mi- 
croscope. an indication that the 
cancer was highly malignant. In its 
most severe form, the cancerous 
lymph cells divide rapidly in a geo- 
metric progression, doubling every 
few days to produce orange-size 


A Cancer’s Rise 

Doctors divide lymphomas, or tumors of 

the lymph system, shown at right, into ^ 

two types: Hodgkin's disease and a jKj&cKj s 

dozen other forms grouped as non- \ : t V-vS 

Hodgkin’s lymphomas, the cancer /&■ 

from which Jacqueline Kennedy Jj'y 

Onassis died. While the incidence Zj.-: ; 

of Hodgkin's disease has been & 

stable, that of non-Hodgkin's Wijfr# 

lymphomas has risen sharply. m 

In addition, while the death rate for 

Hodgkin’s disease has improved, the 

death rate for Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 

has not. 


Hiil 


WM 

vk ':•* 


ii m 


INCIDENCE Cases per 1 00.000 population 
15 


0 73 T4 75 76 77 7B 79 80 81 ’82 83 '84 85 86 '87 88 89 90 


MORTALITY RATE Deaths per 100.000 population 


H6dgkjh;s disease 


73 74 75 '76 77 7B 79 '80 '81 ’82 '83 84 "85 86 '87 '88 '09 '90 


Source: American Cancer Society . “The Human Body.' Arch Cape Press 


Thr'sci. Y'»l Tirfcrv 


tumors, as it did in Mrs. Onassis’s 
liver. Bui no one knows what 
makes one cancer anaplastic and 
another not. 

Doctors have long arbitrarily di- 
vided lymphomas into two types: 
Hodgkin's disease and a dozen oth- 
er forms grouped as non-Hodgkin's 
lymphomas. Hodgkin's disease is 
named for Thomas Hodgkin, a 
19th century physician in London 


who distinguished the cancer from 
tuberculosis. 


Infectious agents have long been 
suspected to cause lymphomas. 
Speculation that lymphomas are a 
viral disease has been fueled by the 
identification of clustered cases of 
Hodgkin's disease that seemed to 
defy statistical chance. Yet exten- 
sive investigations have failed to 
turn up a cause for the clusters. 


A Link Between Smoking 

And Fatal Breast Cancer 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Women who smoke 
face an increased risk of dying of breast cancer, 
according to a recently published study. 

The finding, which does not necessarily mean 
that smoking causes breast cancer, is nonetheless 
the first to link cigarette smoking to the second 
most common cancer killer of American women. 
TTie leading killer, lung cancer, is widely recog- 
nized as being due almost entirely to smoking. 

The breast cancer study, conducted among 
more than 600.000 women who were initially 
cancer-free and who were followed for six 


years, found that smokers were 25 percent more 
likely than nonsmokers and former smokers to 


likely than nonsmokers and former smokers to 
die or breast cancer. In the study, out of 3 19.000 
women who never smoked, there were 46S 
deaths, but among 120,000 current smoken. 
there were 187 deaths. The ratios were then 
adjusted to take account of the known risk 
factors for breast cancer, like Tamils history. 


Television as a Depressant? 
Study Finds a Connection 

PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) — A Penn State 
University researcher says there has been a 


"dramatically high" connection between the 
rise of television and a rise in depression among 
American young people since World War II. 

In his study. Dr. Paul Kettl. associate profes- 
sor of psychiatry at Penn State's Milton Her- 
shey Center, compared the incidence of depres- 
sion among 24-year-olds from 1954 to |Q £4 
with the presence of television among the popu- 
lation. He found that as the presence of televi- 
sion grew, so did depression. 


But he said other factors contributing to 
depression could include a rise in two-workin^- 
parent families and divorce rates and increasing 
drug and alcohol use among the young. 


Key Hormone in Mother’s 


- -/ ;r . 

-■s* m 

■ r z.4 


A? 


By Rick Weiss 

Hcisflingfi-H Prut Service 


W ashington — Breast milk 

has long been appreciated for 
the nourishment it provides and 
Tor its rich supply of antibodies 
that help newborns fight infections. Now 
research suggests that breasts also produce 
large quantities of a hormone that may aid 
the development of a newborn's brain and 
sexual organs, and may also affect the health 
of the mother's breast itself. 

Scientists said the findings, which were 
made in experiments on rats but appear to be 
true for humans as well, strengthen the argu- 
ment for breast feeding and may lead to new 
strategies for fighting breasi cancer. 

Researchers have known for years that the 
hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone 
(GnRHl, is'made in the hypothalamus of the 
brain in adults, where it influences sex-organ 


growth, the reproductive cvcle and sexual 
behavior ill rats and people. Pregnant women 
also make the hormone in the placenta, where 
il is passed to the embryo and has a major 
influence on fetal brain development. 

Researchers at lbe Weizmann Institute of 
Science in Rehovot, Israel, have found that in 
lactatiog rats large amounts of GnRH are 
made in breast tissues. The hormone is prob- 
ably also made in human breast tissues, they 
said, since human breast milk has been found 
to be loaded with the hormone. 

The researchers, led by Yitzhak Koch, a 
neuroendocrinologisL propose that the GnRH 
in breast milk may help complete certain as- 
pects of brain or sex-organ development left 
unfinished during the fetus's stay in the uterus. 

Breast-milk GnRH may be especially im- 
portant to a newborn rat, since rat brains are 
still largely undeveloped even after birth. 


hn»a«i milk remains uncertain. But even 

breast tniiA m the lintr-v 


WUS dianee substantially in the fine m 
man brains iMiMasSIs 


vara of ttfe andmay benefit from 
years in , .ug-j swL 


yearn others said « 

-I, could be innwruj' Jj* fflSfiKS Sfe 
iSiSST* AefdIerU»v«iiy.te M[ 

SyotLBui he stressed tiat tunho;a-..| g||. 
SSmET are needed to see whether gg, 

E?£ — ve in to It 
siirHlnft newborn or is deactivated 

Serao R. Ojeda, head of nenrosaenffi f® ; 

the Oregon Regional Primate Cbm* . m 
vert orv said Searchers discovered : .-a -te; 

yearsago that breast nu»«>nt™ _b$g| ^ 


Human brains are more fully developed at 
birth, so the importance of GnRH in human 


Mds. Much are critical for growth, .and gjg 
rine. which aids in the absorption 8g>: 

S. and that baby formula wmpniija^ gg 
subsequently added those ingredient s t ot Ba f,..-; gp; 
products. Ffc predicted ibat §g£ 

would bring other hormonal benefits 
breast milk to UgbL 

— 


In Britain, the 'Earliest European 






By John Noble Wtlford 

Vor TtvA Tinm Senior 


EW YORK — British scientists, dig- 
ging among ancient stone tools and 
animal bones in a West Sussex gravel 
pit, have uncovered the shinbone of a 
strapping six-foot (1.8-meter) man who lived 
half a million yeais ago. They are calling their 
discovery the earliest European. 

Known as the Boxgrove Man. from the name 
of the quarry site, he lived at a time when 
Britain was a peninsula of Europe and populat- 
ed with many now-extinct species of elephants, 
deer, bears, rhinoceroses, voles and other ani- 
mals. From the stone-cutting tools and flint 
chips found in the pit in recent years, the 
presence there of early human ancestors of an 
uncertain antiquity was apparent buL until 
now. unsupported by fossil remains. 

Dr. Geoffrey Wainwright. chief archaeolo- 
gist of English Heritage, the government 
group that financed the excavations, said, “h 
establishes the antiquity of humanity in this 
country at 500.000 years and is our earliest 
European." 

Other archaeologists and paleontologists 
were somewhat more cautious in their com- 
ments because the arrival of early human ances- 
tors in Western Europe is a matter of much 
dispute and little firm evidence. 

Writing in The Times of London. Dr. Nor- 
man Hammond, a Boston University archaeol- 
ogist. said the discovery has stirred internation- 
al interest among scientists "who have long 
suspected that the first European man predated 
previous finds." 

But Dr. Hammond and other scientists noted 
that a jawbone found in 1907 at Mauer. near 
Heidelberg. Germany, may be as old os the 
Boxgrove Man. or even older. 

Indeed, the Boxgrove discoverers have tenta- 
tively identified their man as a member of the 
species Homo heideibergensis. a designation 


first applied to the Mauer specimen because its 
place in the human family tree — whether a late 
Homo erectus or early Homo sapiens or some- 
thing else — was not clear. 

In a report in the journal Nature, the discov- 
ery team led by Dr. Mark B. Roberts, an ar- 
chaeologist at University College. London, said 
the large tibia, or shinbone, of the left leg is the 


had cut up carcasses with stone tools he 
himself from flints taken from a .nearby 
diff. which once faced the coast a gtd^iffefe 
what is today the English Channel j 

known if these human ancestors were 
or mainly scavengers. 

Archaeologists plan to resume excavaiionfu^.X :. 1 

next year to see whether they ca? fmdm«0 ; a 
pieces of the Boxgrove Man or his rdab^fej ; 
nortv'i.toriv a skull that might provide a 


oldest fragment o[ an early human ancestor to , skl 5f that might provide a hw&if V 

be found in the British Isles and provides the identification of the speriefc^S^liT 

— — Dr. Fred H. Smith, a palconlolo^sr't*^ 

# Northern Illinois University in DeKalk^a&g^ 


Scientists have uncovered 
the shinbone of a six-foot 
man who lived half a 
million year? ago. 


Northern Illinois University m 
spedahzes in early human studies, quesUcmd^: 
whether a single tibia fragment was suffidenLccgi 
evidence on which to base an identificatiqa.^j^, 


evidence on wiuui ~ 

the species. But such discoveries, be said, comtt: 
be critical to understanding the early history.^'^ 


first information about the early stone tool- 
makers of Europe. 

No human fossils had previously been direct- 
ly associated with the early tool making, or 
Ac heul ear industries, of Britain and Europe. 

Judging by the extremely large tibia. Dr. 
Roberts and his colleagues — Dr. Simon Par- 
fitL another archaeologist at University College 
and Dr. Christopher B. Stringer, a paleontolo- 
gist at the Natural History' Museum in London 
— concluded that the individual had been a 
man. and a large one at thaL more than six feet 
tall and 180 pounds (about 80 kilos). 

The time of his existence was established 
most persuasively, the scientists said, by the 
presence of surrounding skeletons of a vole 
with a type of molar that disappeared about 
500.000 years ago. 

"He was a robust male, a man as we would 
recognize as man today." Dr. Wainwright said. 

The human bone was round beside the site or 
an ancient stream in an area once used for 
butchery. Scattered animal bones showed he 


humans in Europe. • +:?$£- 

"We just don’t have very much fossil «$£,*'<• 
deuce on eariv humans in Europe” Dr. 
said. “It's not altogether clear who these peopfcrTT. 
were.” * 

From fossils uncovered on other continems^v.? 
scientists think Homo erectus, the immediate 
predecessor of Homo sapiens, migrated bqBfovf 
Africa into the Middle East and then across 
Asia more than one million, perhaps even twp ^ y • 
million years ago. 

Although a jawbone indicates a possible 4” | 1 
Homo erecuis presence in Georgia about . 
million years ago, there is no evidence of air* ' 
entry into Europe for almost a million years. .TV" ! 


Who the earliest Europeans were. Dr. SantAi*-’-- 
said, is “a point of some contention." Sonae -’- 


scientists doubt that Homo erectus ever " ;}+ 
reached Europe and that the Heidelberg Mari T - 
was descended from a separate branch . 

African origins that evolved into N eanderthalsX>v 
and then became extinct - 

Others suggest that the Heidelberg Man. 
perhaps the Boxgrove Man, too, was a transt^'v';. 
tional figure, either a late Homo erectus or aii : : 
early archaic Homo sapiens. : *y£.v 


Nevertheless, "the evidence sug- 
gesting that lymphomas are due to 
viruses is as strong as there is for 
any cancer." Dr. Harmon Eyre, an 
official of the American Cancer So- ' 
ciety in Atlanta, said in an inter- 1 
view. 

Id recent years. HTL V- 1. a mem- 
ber of the family of retroviruses 
that includes HIV. has been linked 
in Japan to one rare form of lym- 
phoma. But even the discovery of 
viruses as causes of lymphoma may 
not explain how they are transmit- 
ted and why they have increased in 
number. 

The possibly infectious nature of 
lymphomas is reflected in their 
symptoms, including fever, fatigue 
and weight loss, which can mimic 
those produced by many infec- 
tions. But most lymphomas are 
symplomiess in tbeir early stages. 
Usually, it is a painless swollen 
lymph node that leads a person to 
seek medical attention for a lym- 
phoma. which is what happened 
with Mrs. Onassis. 

Lymphomas (the "oma" stands 
for tumor) afreet the lymph system, 
which is a series of beady nodes 
spread throughout the body. The 
nodes are connected by tiny tubes 
much like veins in the separate cir- 
culatory system. 

Lymphomas can occur an% where 
in the body, often invading the 
spleen, liver and bone marrow. By 
damaging such organs, which pro- 
duce the red cells that carry oxygen 
in the blood, lymphomas often' pro- 
duce anemia. 

One puzzle is why at least 33 
percent of AIDS patients develop 
lymphomas, often aggressive non- 
Hodgkin's tumors. Dr. Robert Yar- 
choan of the National Cancer Insti- 
tute said that researchers there 
estimated that at least 3.1)00 L .f the 
non -Hodgkins lymphomas each 
year were associated with AIDS. 

The number is likely to increase 
as newer therapies extend the lives 
of AIDS patients. For unknown 
reasons, many HlV-a SS ociated 
AIDS cases tend to first develop in 
the intestines, spleen and brain 
rather than the lymph nodes. Tests 
showed that Mrs. Onassis wax not 
HJV-infectcd, a health worker fa- 
miliar with her case said. 


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LATIN AMERICA 


NYSE 


Wednesday's dosing 

Tables inctude Ihe nationwide prices up to 
llie dosing on WaJi Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


A New Investment Partner, 


UMontn 

High Low Stock 


Div Yld PE IBfc Mofl LowLctrsI CfToe 


12 Month Sfc 


How Io Reap the Dividends of the Region’s Economic Revival 
LONDON • JUNE 9-10 • 1994 


June 9 


June 10 


CONSOLIDATING AND SPREADING THE BENEFITS OF 

ECONOMIC CHANGE IN THE REGION 

Enrique V Iglesias. President, inter- American Development Bank 

FUELLING FUTURE ECONOMIC GROWTH 
Eduardo AninaL Finance Minister. Chile 
Fernando Cossio. Minister of Finance. Bolivia 
| ulio Sosa. Finance Minisier. Venezuela 

TURNING THE NEW INVESTMENT ENTHUSIASM INTO 
LONG-TERM CAPITAL FLOWS 

David C Mulford, Chairman. CS First Boston Limited. London 
Onno van den Broek. General Manager. INC Bank International 

SOCIO-ECONOMIC REFORM IN LATIN AMERICA: 

TOWARDS A NEW SOCIAL AGENDA _ . 

Carlos Rojas. President. Solidarity Fund, Mexico 
Gert Rosenthal, Executive Secretary. ECLAC. Santiago 

Guest Luncheon Speaker: Domhi«o Cavallo. Minister of 
Economic Affairs. Argentina 

INNOVATING TO PROMOTE NEW FORMS OF 
SUSTAINABLE GROWTH 

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMERCIAL FUNDING 

Sir Michael PaMiser. Vice Chairman. Samuel Montagu. London 
CHANNELLING PRIVATE SAVINGS INTO FINANCING SOCIAL 

IdtoeLfemiente. Superintendent. Pension Fund Administrators Chile 

UNKING SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY 

Hugo Vatsky. Executive Director. Bolivar-Enlace Programme 

LATIN AMERICAN INVESTMENT - FUTURE PROSPECTS 
Joaquin AvSta. Member of the Board. Managing Director. Santander 

Investment , 0 , n j, 

Peter West. Director. West Merchant Bank 

r * ^Z— r Director. Equities. Ktemwit Benson. London 

Conference Location 


REGIONAL AND SUB-REGIONAL INTEGRATION: 

AN ENGINE FOR GROWTH 
NAFTA 

Hermlnlo Blanco Mendoza. Under Secretary of International 
Commercial Negotiations. Mexico 
CENTRAL AMERICA 

Ana Ordonez de Molina, Finance Minister. Cuaremald 
THE ANDEAN REGION 

Enrlqae Garcia, President. Andean Development Ccrp< >rdi ion 
MERCOSUR 

Jorge Herrera Vegas, Under Secretary. Economic Integration. 
Argentina 

SOUTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AREA 

Rubens Antonio Barbosa, Ambassador. Brazilian Embassy. London 
THE UNK WITH EUROPE 

Juan Prat, Director-General for North-South Relations. European 
Commission, Brussels 


ROUNDTABLE: INVESTING IN MAIOR NEW 
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS 

Dong Ebdon, Director of Operations. Global Gas. British Gas l . .iul.,.n 
Inakl Santtllana, Chief Executive. Telefonica imemacional Madrid 


CONSOLIDATING THE CAINS: OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
FUTURE INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT 
COSTA RICA 

lo»& Rossi. Minister of Foreign Commerce 

PERU 

Jorge Carnet Minister of Economy 

URUGUAY 

Ignacio de Posadas, Minister of Economy 


Registration Form 


riu. Reseat Hotel. 222 Marylebone Road, Londoa 
Th £SJ7»»l 8000 Fax: 144 711 631 8080 


.. i_ l _ i j a , rhp Recent Hgul, where a limited number 
The CPntoer , delegate at a preferential rate. To reserve 
of rooms *' ! f *f*„ conia a Ihe hold, notifying the tMervalions 
accommodation pus connection wiih the 1H7 conference 


T To register for the conleience. please complete the lorm below 
| and send it to 

Fiona Cowan, International Herald Tribune, b3 Long Acre, 
London WC2E 9JH Tel: (44 71) S3d 4802 Fax: (44 71 1 83b 0717 

The conference fee is £650.00 + vat at 1 7 5’j, 

□ Pfotsr Invoke. 


26-5-94 


Prrn.STRATIQN INFORMATION 


! Title iBiwMnUMs/Uabi -Hisl name_ 


u , fo rrtnre is £650 plus VAT at 17.3“-,. This Indudes both 
Tfie lee for the an d all droimentation. Fees are payable 

lunches, the cockta'in^P*^ ^ a ^ oo cancellation charge for any 
in advance and will x rere ^ ^ b^oie |une I . after which time we 
cancellation received in Subsll i ,)[*** may be madeat any time The 
regret there ran » w ™ u ' lhc right w amend the program if necessary 
conference sponsors rese 

^ Saotondrr InvestaxtU 

Luncheon hosted by 


; Lautname_ 


Position— 

Cumpany- 


| Address. 


I City. 


-Country. 



nine 


i Telephunc. 


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CoBtinaed on Page 10 


-a 





















































































































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International Herald Tribune, Thursday, May 26, 1994 



THE TRIB INDEX: 112 

International Herald Tribune Worid Stock Index ©, composed of 
280 internationally inve stable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1992 - 100. 


120 








iiu k 





... M . 

■w 

World Index 


v \ . A 

rt'x 

5/25/94 elese: 112.92 
Previous: 113.05 


; % »V-Hr< ' ' 

s 



D J 

1993 

F 

MAM 

1994 

| Asitt/Pacilic 


Cut 

'OFOV* 1 


Appnj*. woghtnj 3Z% 
Cfcse: 131.72 Ptbv: 131 12 


150 


Appro weighting: 37% 
Close: 112.48 Pro.: 113JJ8 


130 


«rA.. 


Mi 




, V- ‘ . ■%->'« 

. />. ■ 

: ■■■■■ -s-." 

; '■ *\ 

s 

U. 

•"> 

o 

A M 

D J F M 

A M 

1SS3 

1994 

1993 

1994 

• Nortlt'America 


Latin America . 


Arjor. weignting: 26% 

Close: 9359 Piev^ 33.97 

n 

Approx, we^ptlng: 5% 
Ctee. 118 BPyr.: 11679 

■ 



o 

1933 

World kxta 

The index tracks U S. doBar vahres of stocks m: Tokyo, New Tori*, London, and 
Argentina. Australia. Austria, Belgium. 8m*, Canada, CtiBa. Den merit, Finland, 
Franca, Germany. Hong Kong. Italy, Mexico, Nethedands. New Zealand, Norway. 
Singapore. Spain, Sweden, Sarttcariand and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 
tendon, me nrdex s composed of me 30 top Issues m terms or market capuaAsanon. 
offKnmst! me ten top smcks ere tracked. 


I (nduatriat Sectors: ? \ 

■ 



mus 


WmL Prcv. % 

close doM riangc 


WML 

don 

Prey- 

don 

% 

Energy 

111.23 111.07 -0.S7 

CapHel Goods 

114.87 

115.14 

-0J23 

Utilities 

118.10 118.44 -029 

Raw Materials 

127.38 

I27J9T 

-0.41 

Finance 

118.51 118.71 -0.17 

Consumer Goods 

97.81 

8781 

Unch. 

Services 

117.26 117.34 -0.07 

lisceUaneotB 

T26.8C 

128.11 

-1.02 

For more hdotmahon about the Index, a booklet is avatetie tree ol charge. 

Write to Trib Index. iBl Avenue Claries de GauDe. 92521 Neui8y Cedes. France. 


Morgan Taking Reluctant Steps Into Modern Times 


By Jacques Neher 

Iniemmonal Herald Tnhrne 

MALVERN LINK, England — With its foot plant- 
ed firmly on the brake, Morgan Motor Co, one of the 
Iasi remaining British-owned carmakers, is lurching 
into modem rimes. 

Three years ago. Morgan installed its first data- 
processing system — actually just a personal computer 
to keep track of accounts. And to slim down the order 
book, under which customers currently wait more 
than five years for delivery of their classic-styled 
sports cars. Morgan is tinkering with the layout of its 
factory . built in 1909. These innovations, to be speed- 
ed into place by the end of the century, will increase 
production by one car a day. 

Under the bonnet, a bit of technology is being 
introduced, ever so slowly. Last year, power brakes 
were offered as standard equipment, and the company 
now b trying to figure out how to modify the models, 


one of which was designed in 1936, to accommodate 
air bags, in particular to meet U.S. regulations. 

It's even toying with the idea of expanding its 
product range beyond its three-model lineup — the 
Four Four, the Plus Four and the Plus Eight — with a 
new pricey sports car utilizing a mixture of carbon 
fiber and its basic chassis building material, ash wood. 

Not that the company’s chairman. Peter Morgan, 
and bis son. Charles, have any intention of inviting in 
robots or instituting quality circles and automated 
jusl-in-Ume inventory control —concepts adopted by 
the world's auto industry as it has pushed to cut costs 
and boost productivity. 

Indeed, 84 years after Henry Frederick Stanley 
Morgan began turning out the nine-horsepower three- 
w heeled “Runabout,” Morgan’s red-brick factory on a 
hillsi de in this residential community near Worcester 
still turns out cars built the old-fashioned way — by 
hand. 

“Sure, we could change our methods to up the 


production, but then we would be assembling cars 
rather than. manufacturing them." -said Peter Morgan, 
74, who- has ran the company since his father's death 
in 1959. . 

Dealers ay that Morgan's cachet would be de- 
stroyed if modern production methods, not to. men- 
tion power tools, woe brought to iheshop floorwhere 
130 metatbeoders and woodwork a-s toil pretty much 
as they did nearly a century ago. 

The fact that Morgans are hand-built is vital.” said 
David Harrison, sales director for FJJ. Do u gl as , a 
London Morgan dealer since 1929. “People nke to 
think there was someone with a hammer, and chisel 
making their car. rather than a robot." 

Auto industry specialists attribute Morgan's surviv- 
al to the enduring demand for its relatively affordable 
cars, crude vehicles offering a hard and fast ride that 
entice buyers seeking die thrill of motoring through 
yesteryear. The cats are priced between £16,000 and 
X2WXJ0 {$24,000 


and $39,000), and there are more - 


than 30,000 Morgans of various vintages on the to» 

^sticking io three replica mo 

gan has avoided the heavy capital m 

tiooal automakers face for retooling aa P fuiancc 

professor at Cardiff Badness -School. 



e (mematWaf Herald Tribune 


Greenspan 
Unfazed by 
Derivatives 

The Ass Oct Bled Press 

WASHINGTON — Alan 
Greenspan, the chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, said 
Wednesday that new laws were not 
needed to regulate the booming de- 
rivatives market because banks, 
brokers and regulators were mak- 
ing progress in controlling risks. 

Mr. Greenspan, in testimony be- 
fore a House subcommittee on tele- 
communications and finance, dis- 
puted key findings in a report last 
week by the General Accounting 
Office, the investigative arm of 
Congress, about derivatives. It said 
derivatives could undermine U.S. 
financial markets. 

Other leading regulators ex- 
pressed general agreement with 
Mr. Greenspan. 

Derivatives are complex finan- 
cial contracts that limit risks or 
losses from fluctuations in securi- 
ties prices or interest or currency 
exchange rates. They are based on 
— or “derived” from — stocks, 
bonds or other assets. 

Today, the value of all derivative 
contracts totals $12 trillion — more 
than twice the U.S. national debt 

The GAO report said the col- 
lapse of a major dealer in deriva- 
tives could snowball, forcing an- 
other large government bailout 


British Are Ready to Bet 

Camelot Group Wins Lottery Contract 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — British bettors have gotten off to a 
bad start with the new national lottery. 

On Wednesday, their odds-on favorite among 
the eight bidden to win the lucrative contract to 
run the lottery, according to odds tabulated by the 
belting company Ladbrokc PLC. lost out. 

The British government chose Camelot Gamp 
PLC, the group that brought the most experience 
and, crucially, the smallest proposed operating 
costs to the task, over the consortium led by 
Richard Branson, chairman of Virgin Holdings 
LtiL, which had pledged to turn over all its profit io 
charity. 

A Camelot spokesman, David Riga, predicted 
the lottery would quickly win a cherished place in 
the “national fabric” and soon be in the some 
august company as the Grand National (steeple 
chasing), the Derby fborse racing) and the Cup 
finals (soccer). “Only the lottery will be weekly, 
not once a year.” he said. 

Camelot officials said they expected the lottery's 
sales to reach £4 billion (S6 billion) a year within 
two years, and to peak at £6 billion by 2001 when 
their contract e x p i re s . Roughly half those sums 
will be paid out in prizes, and 30 percent wfll go to 
various arts and sports groups. 

Citizens plunking down £1 for their lottery tick- 
ets will have a l-in-14- million shot of becoming a 
millionaire, and lottery officials said they expect 
the weekly jackpots, which will begin in Novem- 
ber. to total at least £3 million each. 

Camelot officials also pledged Wednesday to 
have hundreds of thousands of winners each week, 
bringing the odds of winning something, at least. 


down to a more appealing 1 -in-52. Ultimately the 
group plans to blanket the nation with 35,000 
computer terminals. It also plans to introduce new 
“instant winner” games by next spring. 

But the biggest and roost consistent winner will 
be Her Majesty’s government. Jt will levy a 12 
percent lax on all lottery sales. 

In choosing Camelot, the government chose the 
consortium many experts had long viewed as the 
favorite. The group’s five- shareholders include 
America’s Giech Holdings. Coup., which already 
services three-quarters of the world’s lotteries in- 
cluding those of Switzerland, Ireland and 26 ILS. 
states, as well as Britain's De La Rue PLC the 
world’s -largest printer of bank notes, which has 
also been printing lottery forms for two decades. 

While Camelot says its profits will be modest, 
others say that even if margins were as low as 1 
percent — a probable figure, say analysts — Came- 
lot’s shareholders would benefit handsomely, “his 
a small percentage on a very big turnover,” said 
Jonathan Hdliwdl, an analyst who follows De La 
Rue for brokers James Capel- 
in addition to the profits on their Camelot 
stakes, consortium members also stand to gain 
from various contracts they have with die group. 
John Qieetham, a spokesman for consortium 
member ICL PLC the computer concern, noted 
that his firm has the contract to provide and 
service Camdot’s 35,000 terminals and to train 
retailers to use them. 

“Those contracts are likely to be worth in excess 
of £100 million.” he said. 

One of the great mysteries of the lottery, howev- 
er. is where afl that money will come from. 


Markets Plummet 
Across Europe on 
German Rate Fears 


ti d 


p' 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON —Stocks and bonds 
plunged' on European markets 
Wednesday ' amid concern that 
German interest rates had bot- 
tomed out after two years of de- 
clines.. 

Stock averages fell more than 2 
potent in Britain, Italy, France, 
Denmark, Finland and Spain. 
Prices fell more than 1 percent in 
Germany and Belgium.. In Britain, 
the Financial Tunes- Stock Ex- 
change 100 Index of leading shares 
fell 68.40 points, or 2J2 percent, to 
3,020.70, its lowest level since Sep- 
tember. ■. ■■ - • 

The European component of the 
International ' Herald Tribune 
World Stock Index fdl 1.26 per- 
cent, to 1 12.44 .. 

- Government bond - prices fdl 
more than a point in Britain and' 
France as yields soared. In Germa- 
ny. the 10-year bond dropped al- 
most a point aud its yield rose to its 
highest level in almost a year, 
climbing to 6.8 percent from -6.7 
percent. . . 

The yields climbed so high that 
the Bundesbank was forced to can- 
ed an aoctionof government bonds 
for the first time in more than a 


decade, as yidds demanded by bid- 
ders were higher than the central 
bank was prepared to accept- . 

.“The catalyst has been a feeuns 
that German interest rates have 
bottomed for the time bong," said 
Andrew BeU. European equity 
strategist for BZW Global Eco- 
nomics. 

Strategists said the declin es carol 
amid the Bundesbank was 

npflnng the end of its two-year cy- 
cle ■ of interest-rale reductions, 
which could slow or halt rate cut? 
in other European nations. 

The Bundesbank said Wednes- 
day morning that its weekly sccurij 
lies repurchase rate fdl three basis 
points to 5J20 percent. (One per- 
centage-point equals 100 basis 
points.) The decline in the key 
money-market rate follows weekly 
of as much as. 12 basis 
points during the Iasi few months' 

- 'German stocks .and bbnds both 
fdl on the hews, with the DAX 
index of leading German stocks de- 
clining 39.95 points to 2,158.77. ' 

The DAX^xtended its losses to. 
50.44 points in after-boure trading.' 
reacting to comments bya Bundes- 
bank member, Remrot Jochimaeri. 
about the need for caution about 
further German interest rate cuts. ■ 


& 

JR 
llil? 

lister 


its 



INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


Motorola Empowers Peers 


By Frank Swoboda 

Washington Peat Service 

W ASHINGTON — For two years. 
Motorola Inc. has been quietly ex- 
perimenting on the ultimate frontier 
of employee empowerment — peer 
review for pay. 

Work-team members at the company's manu- 
facturing operation in Schaumburg. Illinois, are 
asked to vote on one another’s performance to 
determine pari of the annual pay they receive. 
Eventually the company hopes to have half the 
employees' annual base pay determined by this 
method. 

James D. Burge, a corporate vice president 
closely involved in the experiment. said he could 
not think of any other company that was doing 
what Motorola wes doing in Schaumburg. 

Motorola, one of America's biggest nonunion 
manufacturers, has been a leader for much of the 
past decade in the development of labor-manage- 
ment cooperation, workplace teams and employee 
empowerment. In the past seven years, the compa- 
ny has increased productivity by 126 percent. 

Its success has led other companies io watch 
closely whai Motorola does. 

Motorola's “team-based pay" program is de- 
signed to distinguish the consistently outstanding 
performers from the average and the noi-so-gocul 
performers — and reward the achievers accordingly. 

Executives say the peer review helps eliminate 
some or the subjectivity that often accompanies 
pay decisions in companies that have adopted so- 
called pay-for-performance systems. But they also 
said it was a way to get members of a work team to 
put peer pressure on their fellow workers to per- 
form better. In the Motorola experiment, even the 
best worker can be penalized for being stuck on a 
work team wiih consistently poor performers. 


Under the Motorola system, all factory workers 
reach a maximum base pay after 39 weeks on the 
job. The rest of their pay is based on bow well they 
do. Motorola does not reveal its pay rales, al- 
though executives confirmed that hourly pay at its 
new cellular-telephone manufacturing plant in Li- 
bertyviJle, Illinois, ranged from SIO ioS15 an hour. 

Motorola's goal is to have workers' maximum 
guaranteed base pay equal the middle of the range 
for what the company describes as a “consistently 
good, solid performer.” Below-average performers 
earn less, some possibly as low as the minimum 
pay level for employees with fewer than 13 weeks' 
experience with the company. 

How much money an individual might receive 
under the system is determined on two levels. 

First, team members and supervisors sit down at 
the start of the year and set performance goals for 
the team as a group. These involve numerical goals 
based on quality, costs, production times, percent- 
age of scrap and other performance measures for 
the particular product they produce. 

At the end of the year, team members vote on 
the performance of other members. 

Motorola ihen designates a pool of money for 
merit pay depending on the company’s perfor- 
mance. That pool is allocated to the teams, first on 
the basis of their overall performance. That money 
is then allocated within the teams according to the 
team assessment of each individual* s performance. 

Mr. Burge said there was no corporate mandate 
for spreading the new pay system to all pans of 
Motorola, although he said the entire company- 
embraced the “theme of competitive pay." 

How do the employees like it? Work-team mem- 
bers involved in a recent presentation of the new 
system said they loved it. allhough some said 
privately that some of their fellow workers were 
taking longer to adjust to it than other s. 


Sumitomo 
Plans Cable 
TV Venture 

Tkt Associated Press 

TOKYO — Sumitomo Coip-. a 
major Japanese trading company, 
and Tele-Communications Inc. of 
the United States are planning a 
cable-tefeviaon venture in Japan 
that is expected to sharply increase 
the number of cable subscribers, a 
Sumitomo official said Wednesday. 

It will be Japan's first multiple- 
system operator, in which a single 
table company can operate multi- 
ple channels throughout the coun- 
try, the official said. He added that 
the agreement bad been made pos- 
sible by partial government deregu- 
lation of the industry in December. 

The joint venture puts Tele- 
communications, which is based in 
Denver, “at Asia’s doorstep with a 
strategy of penetrating.” said the 
official who did not give his name. 

Until December, regulations on 
investors in cable television slowed 
growth in the industry in Japan. 

Only 132.000 households in Ja- 
pan currently subscribe to any kind 
of cable television, mostly local! v 
operated channels, the offirial said. 
About 70 percent of U.S. house- 
holds subscribe to cable television. 

Under the agreement. Sumitomo 
and Tele-Communications will 
jointly set up two companies this 
year. One will broadcast programs, 
and the other will supply them, the 
official said. 

The official said spending is esti- 
mated at 52 billion yen (S50Q mil- 
lion) over the next four years. 




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3 r 

a [ gp 


l gpfe 
0m 
Jpss- 




Ess&s; 

tfc* ■*?**:»• 

mm- 

I' 

I WW- 

r* - • ’• 


r 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


urn 

sues 

11*0 


DM. 
I III? 

njs 


its* 

lC*4i 

UBJ? 


ssdi: 

nauc 

ISOMo 

li'» 

i{?4t 
I DM 

rim 


i«eai 

039 

mu 

tun 

3*1*1 

USB 


Con-racy 

Ararat- mu> 
AvURlLI 
Aastr.KMI. 
Brazil GKO- 
a**»TBon 
dadikarana 
Dana* krone 
Egr*. pp«* 
Fin. markka 


i nr i7n iw 
inn a»» ua s 


Prrs 
MIDI 
lJiie 
11 M3 
172*.** 
&6U4 
2W* 
1473 
338? 
MJM 


F.F. LM 
ClBS Ell»» 
tSI« ll»t ■ 

S 3m MESS ■ 
13M9 24KOi 
HCU U»- 

m — ' 
ssz iron? 

— - USB* 

I LSI CLiSs 
&;*sa 4JK0 ■ 
HJ« JMEl * 
ME* I441W 

NO. Ug» 
Mr» York and 


D.FI 


AmUmxmi i£*U 

Browh W 

Frankfurt USH 

London (o> un 

MdOrUI 134*7 

MUM! UH4S 

Now York (bl 

Paris 
Tome 
Toronto 
Zorn* 
l ECU 
1 SDR 

Cfoslrm In Amsterdam. London, 
rates at 3 dm. 

a.- To Dm one pound: O • To buy 
pvaitotfr. 

Other Dollar Values 

Currenc* Per* 
artefcOrac. MOM 
Hong Koag S 7.7744 
Hum. forint 19154 
Indian mee JUS 
Info. rupraO 2ltl52 
Irlsll C 0*78 

ItroOb (Bolt 3JO 
Kuwait! dW 0270 
Malay, rim Idflo 


e.F 

L4>] ' 


iua 

#jbi: 

17TI1 

Jjjn 

suus 

1JMS 

1HE 

544* 

DJ«« 

&74U 


S.F. Yen 
lJia 1441 ■ 
:*» j nxi: 

i iT^i Pin • 
-1!|1 If? *1 
H2H i»«n* 
l.l.’MQ IS-’C 
14141 ic«as 
iX3> SHE* 

T*fi6 ■ 

4*E» U27‘ 

IJitf- 


May 25 
Ct Pmrfa 

US1 lil* 

;*r. ij*i • 

ir, i-iu:* 


ns*?- 
si.i»* 

1*«3 
44*1] 

as* 

'JT. 

Wts 
*lr>8* 

dtio !*-■?*» I>R* ?=24J 
2407 «DW I*f71 U»«* 

Zurich Tews in otner centers: To'cnto 


33S tV4J! 

TLStt 

ll»W I IT* 
IJOt 13SS 
* 3 * 3 : *ia* 
■*£C 

liliT- 

ij:^ ic*:* 
i4i: <l m .~ 

0S12a 1*7 |J* 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 

Donor OMar« Franc 

sterling 

French 

Franc 

Tea 

May 25 

ECU 

1 monrn * >v*'. 

5 '-4 

5 

e r --5 •• 

5 ’^5 

2-2 • . 

■> 

3 months 

5 >S ■- 

S vs V 

5 --S >. 

5Sfc-S%a 

r r-2 ». 

6 -0 , 

6 months tMv. 

5 ,-S -- 

5 *vS 

SV-Sfo 

S V-5 

ZV8-3"* 

S-rh . 

I year SS-S' t 

S’5-5’* 

S -05 s 

5*-«4 

SVa-54, 

sw. 

S'-6 . 


Sources: Reuters. UOrdS Bans. 

Rdec MDhcee/e to htteroatt deoesttsefSI rrutuan minimum toreauhrotenn. 


Key Money Rates 


United States 


Close 


spnr dollar: ■; units of <00 N.C : ne> auOttd: 31 *L. cor 


Currency 

Mcpnii 

N.Zealofid j 
Non*, krone 
PoU. peso 
Poltai eloty 
Port, escudo 
Russ, rub l« 
Saudi rival 
Sins. I 


Per* 

3JO 

1J0IJ 

7.161 

as.74 

22*85 

171.15 

i«W» 

3.75 

1A330 


C ur rency 
S. Afr. rorvd 
5 Kor won 
Swrd- krona 

Taiwan S 
Tael bam 
TurKiSh lira 2327s. 
UAE duTwm U73 
Vcnu. boll*. 140.00 


Per t 
lAiii 
3b>40 
7^41 
77.T1 
3 IS 


Forward Rates 

Currency 3Mny Nhdn tfrfcy Currency 3Ma* tMn tmoy 

PMMtSMrflm 13S5 ia** W03 Canadian aeUar ijbit ij#*; 1.23*0 

pg^Mflemani lASSS 1ASA3 1 aS 6? Japaimeimn Urjs imJS 1MXC 

Swfoc franc mu 1410? Miai 

tfaurm: INO Bank (Amsterdam): tndasuet aonr iSraswrl; Bonea CommefC-ole llononc 
{tuuttm): aaence France Pnsse (Paris/: Bonk at Torn* iTokvai; Domi Bant or Canada 
{Toronto!: IMP tSDRi. Other data tram Reuters card dp 


Diicoonl rat* 

Prime rale 

Federal hind* 

JhihhM) CDs 
Comm, poser iHdays 
3-maott TreWaryNII 
’..year Treasury B0i 

2- veer Treasury oote 
S-year Treasury sole 
T-rear Treasury oate 

W- veer Trenswy note 

30-yatr Treasury bond 
Memll LywtiJMey Ready«*ef 

Jeaan 

Dtscowi rate 
Call money 
l«eutb interbank 
J-rrttnlh Interbank 
k4n -mu interbank 
1 in/ -me Government bond 
gagsw 
Lombard rate 
t:3 ipon ar 
l-monJU Nitcrbaak 

3- nwntb Mertiank 
6 1 mpiillj interbank 
10 -year Buna 


1^ 

2K3 

ly. 

2K 

2 *. 

2Z3 

6.00 

520 

5 JO 
SJO 
5-30 
6.75 


Prev. 

P'S 

T* 

IL 

195 

as 

01 

496 

ff.96 

fcn 

678 

7.16 

1» 

177 

lw* 

tJI 


sv 


SM 

«s 

Sk. 

5 

Sw 

Pk 

Pi 

5h 

(US 

a.17 

5.40 

SM 

5*. 

5*-- 

S**» 

S'- 

Pb 

5-7 

S>n 


TV 

4.91 


2i. 

2»* 

193 

too 

SM 

5J0 

S.1S 

SlOS 

U7 


Sd!22 

Boo k Hasp ra le 
Coll money 
t-anatn iumtoox 

7 w oB it i lamraomr 
6-numWi krterboMr 
1 Mr ear Girt 
fnu 

I nl orvenHa n rate 
CaBdMOey 
t-menm W i ra aak 
T-moMti tamtam 
6 -moan Wertaait 
t Hear OAT 
Sources: Router*. Bloom boro, Merritt 
Lynch. Bonn at Tokyo, Commerzbank. 
CrtenitH Menhspu. Credit Lvconats. 

OoM 

Zancfl 
London 
New York 
US. tkxiars per ounce. London official fl*- 
moi: Zurich amt Neat York aocamoandOos- 
mo ortcasi New York Comer IJunei 
Sourer: Reuter*. 


The key and the gold coin symbolize the combination . 
of stability and sound advice offered by the tey Swiss bank. 


For thousands of years, people have, valued gold for its stability. The first coins, struck in the 7th 
century BC, were gold coins. Since that time people have coveted them not only for their pur- 
chasing power, but also for their aesthetic and historical value. Coin collecting in particular, now a 
choice hobby, has become extremely multifaceted. The Numismatic Group of Swiss Bank Corpo- 
ration is one of the leading authorities inth is field. If you are taking up this fasnnating. hobby for 
the first time, or are an experienced collector in search of rare numismatic items, o\ir specialists 
will gladly advise and assist you in the realization of your goals. The trust that customers place in 
our handling of ail asset-related matters is firmly founded in our many years’ experience and the 
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4969287777, London: 44 7171! 4801, New York: 1 212 5743744, Paris: 33.142965174. Or write the 
word “Numismatics’’ on your business card and send it to: Swiss Bank Corporation. Num;^ 
matics, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland, and we -would be pleased to get in touch with you. 


^ : •• 
f.y 

f ' MW V?:V. 

Jr- .•wiy'W:- 

"Si 

*r. 




AM. 

PM. 

elf's* 


arja 

-W5 

38640 

38730 

—am 

38160 

38680 

-OJO 



Swiss Borik 
Corporation 

The keySwissbank 








” rv 


■*-iwr 












jf'age 12 

1 .'market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 


X 


Treasury Auction 
Cheers Wall Street 


Compiled hi- Our Stuff Fn<m PtynikA/i 
NEW YORK — Strong deman J 
u the Treasury's auction of five- 
war notes cheered Wall Street on 
Wednesday, with stocks rising on 
She back of firm Treasury bond 
prices. 

" The Treasury sold SI I billion of 
kive-vear notes at a vield of n.78 

PU 

b U.S. Stocks 

Saercenu and the auction drew 52.X7 
hn bids for every SI of securities 
Isold. indicoiina much uronger de- 
Cmand than mans analysts had ex- 
pected. 

c The auction results spurred n ral- 
r-y in the bond market. The price of 
She benchmark 30-year Treasury 
tbond rose lb/ 32 point in late trad- 
ang. to 86 28.32. and the yield 
flipped to 7.34 percent from 7J q 
ipercent Tuesday. 

F Slumping commodity prices ids*.* 
benefited bonds. Commodity 
1 prices surged earlier this week, fuel- 
ing sentiment that rising inflation. 
Much would erode the value of 
vfived-incomc securities, was immi- 
cnent. Bui commodities uv.k a 
breather Wednesday, allowing 
t bonds to firm. 

Slocks look their cue from the 
1 bonds, with the Dow Jones indus- 
trial average closing up 10.13 
fu .ints at 3.755.30 and gaining is- 
sues narrowly edging lifting ones 
on the New York Stock Exchange. 


Dollar Slumps on Size 
Of German Rate Cut 


fifoiflifcrg Put Hint AVtit 

NEW YORK - The dollar Tell 
against most other major curren- 
cies Wednesday amid new indica- 
tions that German interest rates 
would remain higher than U.S. 
rates in the weeks ahead. 

The U.S. currency fell to 1.6447 

Foreign Exchange 

Deutsche marks, down a pfennig 
from Tuesday'*. i.r>54? DM. 

Against other leading European 
currencies, the dollar fell to 5.6250 
French francs from 5.&515 and 
dropped to 1.4044 Swiss francs 
from 1.4150. The pound rore to 
S 1.5094 from 51.5060. 

Optimism about progress in 
U2s.-Japane*e trade talks kept the 
dollar from Tailing against the yen 
as far as it did against the Deutsche 
mark, traders said. 

The dollar eased lo 104.45 yen 
from the previous 104.72. 

Guarded optimism abom U.S.- 
Japanese trade kept the dollar f rom 
falling further against the yen. trad- 
ers said. The two countries have 


Via Auxuhxl PlMi 


Da8y closings of the; 

Dow Jw^industrlaf average 


Technolc»g> issues were strong, 
helping the N-asdaq composite in- 
dex to a I.Ub-poitll aain. lalJnt* it lo 
732.53. 

Dell Computer rose l lo 30. still 
benefiting from Tuesday's an- 
nouncement of strong earnings for 
the first quarter. Microsoft rose 14 
lo 50-s in active trading. 

Chiron tumbled 4S to 624 after 
Montgomery Securities lowered 
the biotechnology company to hold 
from buy. 

On the Big Board. Glech Hold- 
ings plunged 12*4 to 22'« after the 
maker of lottery equipment and 
services said earnings could drop 
this year because of declining profit 
margins on equipment sales and 
rising operating costs. The plunge 
came despite news that the compa- 
ny was part of a consortium chosen 
to run Britain's national lottery. 

Hewlett-Packard slipped co 
814 after the computer maker told 
analysts that it ex pec led the rate of 
growth in sales to slow. 

IBM rose 4 lo b3 1 * in active 
trading after it said it would devel- 
op a second-generation 64-mega- 
hyie computer memory chip along 
with Toshiba and Siemens. 

Teledyne rose I 4 ** lo Sit of 
the defense contractor's executives 
bought shares in the company, tak- 
ing advantage or a "window’' when 
insiders could buy stock under Se- 
curities and Exchange Commission 
guidelines. 

f Blimmher-’. AP. knight -RiJtter) 



D ow Jones Averages 

Omhi High Law Uni Qa. . 

mare 3730J» 375JL30 J?;!- 2 ? 3/SiJO - 1113 
Tram 1M673 iflMJJx »5W M 140X41 — A0S 
Ulil 103J3 IBS. II 182 JJ 185.1* *1.91 
Comp IIWJS IMLW 1S9M9 I5MJ0 +iH 

Standard & Poor's Indexes 


Htfi LOW Cteae cn*c 

inaustiiois SfSS 8?-S 5HS + !4l 

Troth 391 JB 387 AS 3HLM — 1JJ9 

U till Mas 15165 151.91 15065 + Xfle 

Finance 4542 *W2 +0.W 

SP500 654 J3 45220 450 2* + 1 .S3 

|p 100 4ZL53 419,43 423J7 + I M 


N 0 J F M A 


\ NYSE Most Actives 


Gi«n 

T«/Ae- 

IBM 

More. 

WnKAorl 

HcwtPx 

Puy'D 

Ci rev. i 

ft bn, ob 

'.VsloEl 

BocOncs 

R JR Nob 

VVM- Ti 

GcnEli 

Chrvslr 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


iacsas 

TrtCmA 

r*>v*u 

DcflCorr 
indigoNV 
MCI s. 
Civics 

Intel i 
USHIh & 

OlKSPi 

Oiwon 
Lex us 
Cmlocnr 

MtiwWrie 

Amgen 


AMEX Most Actives 


N YSE Indexes 

Hhjh Low LM Chg. 

CorruXAilv 753.06 250.18 95106 .HAS 

induslrioB 31IL63 103-27 31083 + 087 

Tramp. 2408* «*■« 24SJ7 —UK 

UtiMv 305.97 204 JM 20S.96 >083 

cronce 315.11 21175 21110 >033 


NASDAQ Indexes 


1 

High 

Lew 

Last 

aw. 

! Campos lie 

73X53 

727 JB 

732 a 

■UJM 

mdustrfols 

74483 

741-20 

7*4-33 

—a 89 

1 Bonks 

720.64 

71680 

72084 

► 181 

j insurance 

BBS 31 

*8682 

00X70 

► 0.71 

Fyiorc® 

92011 

922.77 

926.11 

MLB1 

TransP 

71X25 

70785 

71287 

< 186 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 
Metals 

craa Pmtan 

B v tak W «| 

ALUMINUM njMi GraMI j 

SST” tSBJ» 0n I339JM 1 «l Bg I5S5S 

u£E ftW TOO 

COPPER CATHODES iHWlGraM) 

DoUnra per metric W , „ «o«. 

Spot Tim 3272 jDO awjfl BWfc? 

J^orwora 2279 J)0 228E.S® Wfcffl 7297. Oi \ 

LEAD I 

gr Kr,, w i «i« « K 

ISUfa SOLOO SOUO SRflO SQ5A 

NICKEL 

wuorsperaHWcn. ^ 

Forwu 657W» 65*JM 672000 673008 
TIN I 

sSf r,S<rn »8SlO B 5S5Sin SSSSjOO 3S4S» 
Forwora tSs£ SW40 563SJS 

ZINC (Special HWi CTO*) 
M«p«ca*^jon WJ0 

17700 97800 mSO 99500 

Financial ~ 

High Low CJW Omt 

HWONTH STERLING (LIFFB) 

(SOAWO - pn of 1M net 

Job 9671 9469 9449 Unch. 

s« 9439 94.39 9431 -OftS, 

Dk 9378 93M mao -(LIB 


15200 15050 

mm 


tow 75900 1SK» 

MC 1600 16050 

00 Ml 75 14100 

EM votuma MOOTS. 


Lou Settle erg* 

151 DO 151.80 -OK 
1S275 +*2S 
15435 1S4JB— BuSl 
15700 157JB — &5S 
15909 15900 —835 
MATS 16100 —825 
16700 1*100 +025 

Open w. njm 


VaL 

Vbgh 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

61214 

2* 

22^ 

22 l . 

— 12 1 • 

40747 

6J'.- 

60'. 1 

65'.. 

- "» 

3584J 

6J'V 

63", 

6Jte 

* 

13699 

Jl‘« 

30-* 

30 '.I 

— 1 a 

MltS 

.’J** 

73 

73 


20TOO 

81'. 

73'., 

81V. 

4 

2*417 106>< 

106'. 

106 J , 

—Si 

57912 

24 

II V* 

23ft 


21723 

JO'.- 

79'. 


ft 

2257* 

ll'v 

12 -v 

13' ■ 


19*36 32k* 

31'. 

32'. 

-H 

irwi 

ft'-* 

6 

6's 

• 1 a 

16*45 

77*. 

74*. 

27*. 

*• 

16407 

47 V: 

J6’> 

47 1 -, 


1*113 

49'T 

40 

4*'., 

- Km 


AMEX Stock Index 

Matt Law Leaf Ota. - 
43VJ5 <77.62 439J5 . 0.07 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
io unuim 
10 indusirton 


9431 

9489 

9489 

Unch. 

9439 

9430 

9431 

—■104 

9X98 

9380 

93.B0 

-ais 

9X43 

9X26 

9X25 

— 0.14 

92.94 

9X73 

9X73 

-0.19 

9X47 

9289 

9X29 

— XI* 

9286 

9189 

91.90 

— ai7 

9176 

9180 

9180 

— ais 

91J5 

9L44 

9188 

— 0.17 

9135 

9134 

91.19 

— 0.17 

91.17 

9183 

7180 

-018 

9182 

9083 

9005 

-US 


VM HKjH 

Law 

Las) 

Chg. 

53*48 524* 

50'-* 

52’ • 

*1'7J 

51640 20'* 

» 

70ft 

- -a 

41737 IV* 

IB 1 , 

18 

— « 

40511 30»t 

2 S'v 

30 

— 1 

386)0 20'. 

!*’•• 

20 


33101 74 • , 

74' •, 

24’. 

- '.j 

30043 36 

24’., 

25>. 

• '.'4 

396X7 »l 

60'* 

6)'-* 


2742ft 39 

36'. 

37'. 

— I'fe 

27137 17ft 

16’. 

P-t 

• H 

74237 65 

61'.. 

67 'i^ 

— 

52)70 6V,< 

6?k. 

Uft 

w.^40 

20X97 13ft 

I ?' 1 

13 


194)0 13'. 

12'.* 

Uft 

— S. 

17977 45"! 

44 

«'* 

—1 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced MIS 1243 

Drdmod 1025 908 

unenanged 670 660 

Total issues 2810 381 1 

[Jew Highs 33 44 

New Lows 65 46 


AMEX Diary 


oec 9i.iT 9i jo run —0.1a 

Mar 91jn 9U33 ,_.90M 

ESI. volume; 74 JOT. Open mi.; 500 J77. 
MIONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

II nllllaa - Ms si 160 pc* 

Jan 9525 KM 9533 UIKD. 

Sep 9466 9444 9442 —BUS 

Doc 94U9 94.06 54JO —CUM 

Mar 9325 93J3 1078 —0.10 

Jgn N.T. N.T. 9X49 — 0JJ9 

Sep N.T. N.T. 9327 — DUO 

EsJ. vo hung; 319,Oo*n Int: 10440. 
3-MONTH EURO MARKS (LIFFE) 
omi rnffiton - Ptiof itopci 
Jua 9448 MJD 9487 +0L03 

Sep 94.99 94.90 94.93 + 007 

Dec 9*86 9425 9427 UKfl. 

Mar 9422 9440 9443 — Ml 

Jim 94*7 <CM 9439 Unch. 

Ss p 9426 9414 9417 — 041 

DM 944 r> 93.95 93.95 — 0JJ7 

Mar 93.95 93181 9183 —086 

Am 9178 9343 9144 — BUS 

; Sea 9164 9147 9146 —0.12 

Dm 9150 9342 9341 —0-09 

Mar 9133 9120 91X1 —0,10 

Eat. volume: 196241. Open kiL: 1847269. 

I 3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

FF5 mlHlM ■ R» of 1D0 pd 
JIM 94.43 9430 9442 — 086 

Sep 9455 9439 9450 —0.14 

DM 9443 9428 9440 —0.17 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IFC) ' 

LLS. duten per HrreMeii of i860 barrels 
JM 1646 16.10 1613 1612 —020 

ADO 1631 1603 160* 1627 —615 

Sep 1629 152* 1600 M80 —009 

Ocf . 161B 1698 1589 1529 —610 
Nov 16JB 1527 WOO 1527 -<LJ0 

DCC 14,14 15M .WOO 1527— 9.10 

joe UJM 1528 1S» 1699 — M*, 

Fib 1600 1600 1600 15.90 — 009 

IW 1682 1602 1602 1528 —611 

El*, volume: 31001 . Open M. 131061 


Stock Indexes 

HU Low One cnaoge 

FTSE IN (LIFFE) 

IHf MW point 

S xns 2W&0 29»0 — ■ 7W 

Sep- 31014 30174 30145 —765 

DM ' JB994 30994 MW -10 

e*l volume: 2S3BT. Open IftL: 54m 


213600 -2040 

' 711750 -3150 

srnss -sun 

213400 -3155 

$83 :SS 

int: 11216 

Sources: Mailt. Associated Proas. 
London Ml Financial Futures Exchange, 
inn Petroleum ExchanifS. 





Company Per Am* 

IRREGULAR 

EimbSAAOR X 320 

KongkanoTel x 1471 

Jundt GnwvHi • 37 

Marine Pviml . 4057 

x-oppraxamaantperADR. 

STOCK SPLIT 
Barefoot I nc 2 far I split. 

Energy West 2 for 1 split 

INCREASED 


6-2 67 
6-1 7-18 
6-15 7-1 
5-31 628 


Advanced 250 3W 

Declined 303 2M 

Unchanged 227 226 

Total issoes 780 796 

New h&gns 10 B 

New Lows 13 1? 


9443 

9630 

9482 

— 006 

9A5S 

9489 

9480 

-0.14 

9483 

9428 

94.40 

—017 

94J9 

9X.18 

9420 

— 019 

9489 

94.00 

94JM 

-022 

9X92 

9384 

9387 

—023 

9171 

9X67 

9380 

—021 

9380 

9XS5 

9X57 

-020 


Energy west 
FCB Financial 
Fst United. Bncshrs 
First Virginia Bks 
Home Depot 


6-10 634 

6-30 8-Z 

6-1* 630 

650 7-18 

6 TO 624 


agreed to re-ume formal trade 
talks, which eollap>ed in February. 

With prepress on trade, the Clin- 
ton administration is considered 
less likely to call for a strong yen to 
curb Japan's trade surplus with the 
U.S.. a strategy it pursued Iasi year 
as the dollar fell 20 percent against 
the yen. 

Many traders sold dollars for 
marks after Reimul Jochimsen. a 
member of ihe Bundesbank'* poli- 
cy-making council. said the central 
bank must “move carefully” on fu- 
ture rate cuts to keep Ihe country's 
inflation rate under control. 

“This kind of comment really 
scares dollar buyers." said John 
Nelson, foreign-exchange director 
at Barclays Bank in London. ”lt 
looks like wc might not see lower 
German interest rates for a while." 

German interest rates are as 
much as one percentage point high- 
er than U.S. rates, making mark- 
denominated deposits more attrac- 
tive. The Bundesbank last cut rate* 
on May I!, when it lowered the 
discount raie on loans to German 
banks to 4.5 percent from 5 per- 
cent. 



69258 

Pa 

r 4 

1 J J 

erisco 

1601* 

4 

3’* 

J'l. 


6138 

19 ' 8 






45* > M 

Chaps 

5074 

JL, 

4'.* 

4", 



19** 



NT Tim 

3761 

28'* 

TV. 

TS’i 

MiHRFv n 

3075 

*■'. 


9’. 

PovofQ * 

2*31 



J'x 

EchoBov 

2004 

11' • 




NASDAQ Diary 


Market Sales 



Today 

Prev. 


4:00 

cons 

HfSE 

254.41 

3x0.416 

Am* 

20W 

1L374 

Nasdaa 

240.93 

27986a 


Advanced 1554 1602 

Declined 1525 14*7 

Uncnanped 1455 1930 

Tefal Issues 5034 5029 

NewHigns 63 n 

N4W LOWS 82 103 

Spot CommodiBes 

Commodity Today Pre 

Aluminum, to 0507 OaI 

] Ctrtte*. Brar. » 1 .24 1J 

Cooper electro! vile, lb 147 l.l 

iron FOB, ton 21340 2131 

Lead, lb 034 a. 

Silver, troy Oz 5 63 Si 

Steel (scrap Lion 13753 137. 

TVi, lb 3.7604 1771 

I 2 Inc. lb 04409 Q 461 


Est. volume: 100,786. Open ml.: 219,157. 
LONS SILT (LIFFE) 

(SMM ■ Ptl A SUMS Of MO net 
Jea 104-15 102-30 HD-10 -1-04 

SOP 103-13 102-00 102-07 — 1-OS 

Dec N.T. N.T. 101-07 -1-OS 

Est. volume: 12M12. open tnL: l ISAA. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 2stUMt - on at tot ad 
Jufl 9450 MJ0 9X5! —059 

Sep 9195 9248 934b —059 

Dec 93.10 9110 92.76 -059 

Est. volume: 2M571 Oban Int.: 170512 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONOS (MATIF) 
FFmaas-ptsofiMPd 
Jan J 28.74 120.14 12046 -1.12 

Sep 11940 11528 11952 — 1.T2| 

Dec 11692 11848 11664 —148 

Eli. volume; 227525. Onen int- 141J94. 


Industrials 

Higb Low Lott Settle CVge 
GASOIL (IPE) 

U4. doltars per metric tm>4ots oflOO hxn 
Jim 151 JO 14950 15040 15045 +025 


Barefoot Inc 
x -first cash dividend. 


20lti Century Ind 


REDUCED 

Q 4S 6-1 6-15 
INITIAL 

X JO 6G0 7-15 



6-3 6-23 
6-15 7-1 

6-18 7-1 

6-n 4-22 

544 7-15 

6- 17 7-15 

7- Z2 8-10 

64 642 

6-10 7-1 

6- 15 640 

7- 12 746 
7-23 8-15 
6-3 640 

6-17 7-1 

9-1 WIS 

6- 10 6*30 

6-1 7*T 

5-31 645 

65 7-1 
F6 9-20 
JO 7-1 

7- 15 8-1 


montfay; n ouai tarty; Kenloamai 


1 U.S./AT TH fcj 5 ^ 

Durable Goods Orders Up Sligb^ ^ 

' CHICAGO (Combined CfispalchesJ ~ An* ^ ?^j% u ancsts 
U5. durable goods orders, of lhe u ‘ 

economy is stowmg,"p 0 ffiiWy retieving the -j . 

tighten interest rates again in ibe near fumre.analy the j a | 3 a.** 

automakers faikd to got.dw usual seasonal boost 
spring months, some analysts said. . ! . 4 p ™ij|i«Tn a* *• 

Saks of existiii“ dwdlimgs rose 1^ as buver- 

seasonally a^usted annual rate,.up from 4.07 ,n ® lon JJ/L* ^en hni cr - 
locked in mortgages anrid fears that iflteres* rates wouWr Me ^e . 
the National Association of Realtors said. (Knight’* 1 

Compaq PCs Outrun IBM and Appk 

SANiOSEj'CaHlonik (Reuiersj -Compaq ConnwiJ Com- 
■ took the. giants hwernational Business Machines Corp. and * PP f j rjll 
poter Inc to become the No. I personal compuKroMnpaa. 
quarter, the research group Oataquesi Inc. Mid w ®f[gf>* fiisl qiuir wr 
Appte is involved in a major product transition and IBm s t 4 j 
is traditionally slow. Houswn-tased Con^iaq sazed fust P'^. . e 

124 market share, up from 9.4 percent a year ap Apple smurkei^ n 
. sfannped to 10.4 petceni from 13.5 percent, whUe IBNTs doAnra w 
percent from 10.8 percent, Dataqostsaid. . 

The PC market as a whole showed strong growth b >’ ^ 

shipments by more than 17 percent to 3.94 jnulioo units over t 
quarter of 1993. 

Cable TV Venture Sci for Catalonia 

BARCELONA (Bloomberg) — Time Warner Entertainment amUjS 
West IhteriiatHmal said Wednesday that they had formed a joint \eniu 
with- Spain's Mukijuedia Cable to . bid on cable television license* » 
Catalonia and in other autonomous regions throughout the coun to- 
Tbe joint venture Ts to be called Cable y Television cf Europe S A. 

U5- West and Time Warner wfll shie a 49 percent stake in the 
venture, whOe the remainin g 51 percent win -be nefd-hy Catalonia ac 

lniciaiivav , 

Hewlett-Packard Sbares Fall Sharply 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Hewlett-Padard-Co. shares tumbled 
after the company's chief financi al officer tokl Wall Street analysts ifiur 
.'revenue growth is expected to slow, traders said Wednesday. 

“Our revenue growth is likdy to- decrease somewhat . going forward. 
Robert P. Wajrman told 'a meeting trf securities analysts. Hewlett-Packa ru 
stock was down as^^much as S3J75 to 578^0 in trading bn the New York 
Stock Exchange. - ' . : . r 

Lewis Platt, the chairman of Hewlett-Packard, chided the analysts for 
, their narrow focus on the company after be and senior executives gave a 
generally upbeat three- hour presentation cm the computer maker. 

I For th6 Record 

BnoiSan shares surged 8 percent on the Sfio Paulo bourse as investors 
. continued to buy blue-chip sbares after prices broke through some 
i resistance terriers, brokers said, (Reuters) 

Parker Hannifin Carp.' said it would buy Allas Copco AB's automation 
'-division,' a Swedish maker of air-driven cylinders and valves, Tor an 

iirwtisrjrwri am raint . ( BloumbtTgl 

l Fox Broodcasting, a unit of News Carp* will announce more network 
.affiliation switebes over the next seveial' weeks. Rupert Murdoch, the 
' chairman of News Cbcp_ was quoted as saying in Broadcasting & Cable 
’ magazine's TV Fax. - - .. - ' (Reuters) 

Infeed Steel Industries Inc. said it had formed a 50-50 joint venture 
with AHMSA. Mexico's largest steel company, to provide materials and 
managem ent services to.theJVietican industrial -prpduos. and construc- 
tinn mar kets. ■ (Reuters) 


U.K. Owner Lets Brooks Brothers Go Its Own Lucrative Way 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Inienurtnnal Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — When Marks & 
Spencer took over Brooks Brothers 
six years ago. a miracle of trans- 
Ailintic synergy seemed possible 
under the old Madison Avenue ru- 
bric, “Dress British, think Yid- 
dish." Although Brooks is doing 
nicely, thank you. its innovative 
British parent has had little to do 
with the recovery. 

Christopher Liltmoden. MAS 
director for North America, said 


the successful British and Conti- 
nental mass marketer of clothing 
and food had no Immediate plans 
to import its unique brands or mer- 
chandising methods because they 
are hard to tailor to .American 
tastes and distribution methods. 

“Our priorities are in Europe 
and the Far East," he said, adding 
that M&S had already admitted the 
S750 million it paid the bankrupt 
Allied Stores group for Brooks 
Brothers in 1988 was too much but 


the British company was in for the 
long haul 

In the financial year ending in 
March, Brooks Brothers' gross rev- 
enue increased 23.5 percent to S378 
million, which represents only 
about 4 percent of M&S worldwide 
operations of S9.75 billion. The 
U.S. chain’s profits of J22 minion 
increased by 17 percent as the 
economy recovered, but M&S*s 
biggest profit gain of 43 percent 
was in Asia. Although European 


growth was flat, the company is 
expanding there for the expected 
economic upturn. 

William Roberti, Brooks's 
American president, opened 18 
new stores last year. Brooks now 
has 57 retail stores, some in prime 
malls. 

MAS’S celebrated European util- 
ity clothing simply wiB not ruin the 
United Stales, Mr, Roberti said. 
Not only would it be subject to 
tariffs, but garments would have to 


be reared for more heterogeneous 
American physiques which, for ex- 
ample, demand several different 
sleeve lengths. . . .. . 

M&S has done such_re-cngtneer- 
ing for the surging Asian market 
but appears unwilling to make a 
similar investment for the bigger 
and more competitive U.S. market. 

In retail foods Mr. -Littmoden 
sees HttlefutureforM&Sin Ameri- 
ca even though it has successfully 
challenged even French chains. 


MGSba^ 

Over Oil Deals 

Blvontberg Bmuess News 

FRANKFURT — Metall- 
gesellschaft -. AG shares 
plunged 14 percent Wednes- 
day after the disclosure by the 
meiak and mining conglomer- 
ate of farther provisions 
against possible losses on U.S. 
ofl deals. 

The company -also, said it 
would sell cm its Buderus AG 
aqd Leh Eke ring Montan 
Transport AG subsidiaries. • 


£<§&• 

t-Sgfj*:. 

a-- 


it 





I 


t ; ,«*-l ■*?-. 

'Uj§pSK 

I 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


ftames Ffonw ftmr Mov 23 


Amsterdam 

ABN Am no Hid 61.40 62J 
*CF Molding 45.10 «.i 
Aegon <9 *«.i 

Ahold 47.10 473 

ARM ffahel 203 209 j 

AMEV 74jii 753 

Bois-Wnsonen *0 39.9 
C5A6 65 M.J 

D5M 13040 I27i 

Elsevier 120.20 175t 

Fokker 16.98 16.9 

Gtst-Br»^xte5 99-20 493 

HBG 3I2M 31 

Hemehen 226 2374 

Moogoweni m-so 77.J 

Hunter Douglos 75 1 

IHCCofond 48 48 J 

Inter Mueller S5 I 
inllNoderlond 75 <0 76 1 

Y. LM 51 30 50.1 

KNP BT 4140 49 1 

Heo1K.ro 7640 771 

Cice Grlnien 78 40 1 

Pot hoed SO 60 S— 

Philips 5i »0 

Poivgrorn fX) 77.( 

Rooeco 120 13 1 

Rodamcc 60 30 0O.1 

Rollnco *2140 1314 

Porenio ®7 

Royal Ouich 1»i T) i«; 

5»ory » M2 

Unilever 189 iei 

vanOmmcfCT> S250 ej_ 

|WU 176J0 1T-. 

Wallers. Kiu»er msjo 11/ 
EOE Index; •«« 

PrevMcrs : 4 OSJf 


U.S. FUTURES 

Via AuodMad fteu 


Season Season 
men Low 


Open tfion Low cm . Ov OnJnr 


Season Seman 
Wgh low 


Open MU Um Qase Chg On. int 


Helsinki 


inchcaoe 

Klngllsher 


-.91 S 
5A0 54? 


Brussels 


AO Fin 
Arted 
Barco 
Bel acri 
Coexor r« 
Combs 
D emaize 
Electrabel 
.r.i B 
•OBL 
Uevaeri 
iTredieiSonK 
Pefroflnc 
Powertin 
Naval Beige 


17)5 77-.0 
'JfH> 5050 
J4W 25 H 
2730C T’jT? 
in ms 
S 908 5>J'J 
1360 1)74 
jew 59 -t 

1585 1603 

451s 45» 
9820 99W 
6V» we 
HUGO 11225 
3400 2430 
sen Sew 


Enso-Ouize*! 

4020 

4120 

Hunlomaki 

720 

720 


1230 

1X43 


117 

ne 

Metro 

IBO 

183 

Nokia 

410 

438 

Ponioia 

Bi 

90 


95 

9780 

Slack mann 

245 

240 



Previous ’ 106783 



[ Hong Kong 



30 

3780 

Colhav Pacilic 

11.40 

11 10 

-he’jrn Kong 

30.75 

38J0 


42 JO 4225 

Dairy Farm lnl’1 

n JO 

11 40 




Hang Sena Bank 

56 

So 

Henderson Land 

42 

4! JO 

hk Air Ena. 

43 JO 

44.25 

h ►. enmo Om 


1&70 

HK Eleclrlc 

2430 

23.TO 

Hf Land 

2250 

IX m 

h if Realiv Trusi 



HSBC Hold 1 nos 

91 

IS 

h« snana nils 

1289 

1X50 

Hy Telecomm 

15.40 

ISJ0 

Hr: Ferry 



Huii-h Whcmoca 

3275 

J2.2S 

H,',3n De-/ 

24.18 

2430 

Jaraine Mo'n 


«3J0 

JOr dine s:r •-ic 

3125 

30 JO 

k owi'Tort Wor 

16J» 


Mandarin Orient 

1 1.40 

11JW 

! Miramar hjici 

2240 

7260 

| New World De* 

2S.70 2580 

[ SHK Proos 

SI 



Klngllsher 5.w 547 

LadbroKe 1.72 1.75 

Land Sec 6.64 660 

Lgoone 743 7 61 

Losmo 150 1_<4 

Legal Gen >o 4J3 436 

LlovdS Btx'L i51 5M 


iSl 560 
Morns Sp 4.03 4.13 

ME PC 457 454 

Man Power 425 4-28 

Nawesl 439 452 

NthWst Water 5.17 S.19 

Ptaroon 6.10 63J 


Accor 723 7J0 

Air Liaulae 797 813 

Alcoiel Aisinom 674 643 

Aj»a 1314 1346 

Bancaire fClei SeO 579 

BiC 1260 1249 


P 60 637 652 

P II king Ion 156 138 

PowerGen 468 431 

Prudealial 5.41 1*5 

Pan* Org 331 406 

Pediand 4.97 538 

Peed mil 342 854 

Rearers 430 4.73 

PMC Group 837 9.0S 

Rolls Rorce 164 133 

Portimn lunll) 3.73 178 

Ra/al Scot 4.10 4 1? 

HTI 8 42 955 

SamsOur, 384 1.97 

Scol rlewcoi 518 ST 1 

Seal Power 1 68 330 

Sears 1.25 127 

Severn Trenl 5.10 519 

Shell 7.13 7JJ 

Sletw 533 SM 

Smith Naohew I.j9 150 

SmiihKIIne B 3.90 4.02 

Smith (WH 1 439 4<6 

Sun Alliance 1J?7 3.13 

Tgle S Lvie 435 432 

T OSCO 215 220 

Trw.i EMI ?me 10.70 

Tgmtlns 2-79 738 

T53 GrouD 7.17 2M 

Unilever 997 IU37 

Uid Biseuns 33? 340 

vodofone Sl2s 532 

.Vor Loan J 43.19 4336 


468 43) 

2.91 195 

331 4.06 

4.97 538 

842 864 

430 4.73 

837 <35 

134 139 


384 197 

518 5 J 1 


I Slelu- 155 3 55 

J Srtiie Pac A 19 59 

7 O' Cheung Are; II a0 15 60. 

WE 328 JJO 

Wharf Hold 21 ;i 50 j 
Wing On Cv ini: 1210 12 10 I 

winsar rnu. :2J0 >7 1 

Hgna Sena Index : 957137 
Previous r 9470.11 


1260 1249 
BNP 25950 76950 

bsn'-gd* »b art 

Currefour 1973 1996 

C.CF. 23230 233 

Cwus 1 1220 11430 

Chargeurt U?1 1432 

Cimems Franc 11590 331 

Ciuh Med 421 10 435 

Eli-Aaulloine 4I6.9D42A50 


Ell-Sanoh 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eau» 
Havas 
imefof 


*24 *53 

7935 2450 
7580 2675 
456 463 

56) 581 


Mmnav Poseidon 2J5 2J7 
OCT Resources 136 1.42 

Samos 190 A02 

TNT ZJB 13* 

WesiernMInlne 8.05 817 
■JVesinoc Banking 432 5 

Wcods.de 436 436 

Tokyo 

Aha) Efcctr 4T7 475 

Asahl Chemical 773 782 

Asahl Glass 1300 1220 
Bonk ol Toevo 16B0 1690 
Br Woes lone 1570 1550 
Canon 1&P0 tJOD 

Casio I27B 1280 . 

Co. Nipaon Print ifl50 1B?0 
Daiwa Home 1500 IMO 
Daiwa Securities 1740 17t» 


Lafarge Cosaee 425 413.40 

L corand 6)50 6650 

Lyon. Eau« 58 a 523 

□real (L'l 1199 1233 

L.VJAH. 875 89* 

fJiatro-Hacheile I2S 117.90 

MIchrllnB 230 23U4 

Mouluie/. 1 38 j0 137.70 

Paribas 4O2.9C4ie^0 

Pechlnev inti 165 164.90 

Pernod- Plconj jae 391 

Peuaeor 83*. Ml 

Primemos (Aul *33 *33 

Padiolechmaue 555 150 

Rh-Poulenc A 143147 10 
RalL SI. Louis 16*8 1725 


Fanvc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fuiitw 
Hitachi 
Hiioch. Cable 
Honda 
I io vakoeo 
IfoCtiu 

Jaoan Airlines 
Kol.ma 
Kansat Power 
Kffivascki Sled 


42X 4HD 
2380 2380 
2150 2 im 

JMI wai 
1(00 101 0 
830 825 

IZ7S 1821: 
5210 53G0 
719 713 

739 713 I 

945 951 1 

2650 7700 I 
-TO 3*9' 


Kirin Brewery 1250 1230 


»«JouieiLOJ 
Sami Gobain 
S.E B. 

Sle Oeneraie 
Suez 


*35 937 

681 6*3 

sj4 ss; 

62C 633 

»760 3C*J0 


Komatsu *82 W0 1 

Itidals 754 900 

Kvoeorg 5470 6420 

/VW45U E«C infls tilC 1750 
Motsu Elec w*s 1 180 nan 
r.'.iisiuisr.i 3* 27*0 T'TO 

•V.'ISUblSR. *.««i 
.'■Siisubisn. Elec 

■MllSUCiShl nev 

Mirsuoish' 2src 
MifoL* end Co 
MifouktShi 

M.lstim. 

NEC 

NDK fnsuic'srs 

Nlkko Securd'es 
NlDoan AsgeJiii 
Mlpacn Oil 
tiiBoan 3'ee< 

NiDcan v«er. 

■V'ssca 
Nomurs Sec 
NTT 

0lvmof.-s Cc'icai 
Pkmeer 
Ricoh 
Son #c E re 
Sharp 
Sh.maru 
Shine rsu C-em 

Sumitomo Bk 
SurT.no/T-oCf cm 
Sum. SVforlne 
Sumiicmo Mefoi 
Tcsci Cora 
Toiina rtatinc 
Tafceda Ceir 
TDK 
Tciiin 

Tor vo Mc-ine 
Two Elec ?* 

Tooodn Pr.rrtlra 
Tore, int 

f osnioo 
cvo'c 

vomaiehi Sec 
c. • (CS 

Nakel 225 : 2*444 
PreyHW* : 2*622 

\mSfM3T 


toii mo 

52" 


.Velicame 
Wh .for rod 


560 5*« 

521 5.4? 


AiillamsHcfos 258 TAB 

■VI 1I1S Corroon 1 rt 1.79 | 

F.T. 30 lode* : 239850 
Previous 1 tamjo 
F.T 5.E. 100 Indr* : 302070 
Previous : 3007.18 


Madrid 


Thomson-*: &F 175 '0 I8&.W 

Tofol 31° ~27X 

UA.P. 153 154 9 1 : 

yaleo tin 1M5 

Sac 49 indei : Joann 1 
Previous 1 3133 J2 


Sao Paulo 

acnco do Brasil 2850 77 ye 


jOcGenBanOuC 6270 ?440 
Sac Gen Brig *uf 2500 2545 
*,Ollno 1 5500 I555C 

jolvcrv l6l 75 '*325 

TroclrtOl 10325 1W25 
LiCE 2*725 25175 

Union Minrere 7710 7720 
Current S foctu ndea : 7838.1 S 
Previous : 7791 Ji 


Johannesburg 


Frankfurt 


A ED 1*4501*460 

Allagni Hold 243* 250* 

A Iona 642647..0 

Ajko *7’ •» 

SA5F 11SJ3 334 

Ba,cr 3 64 JO 373 ^ 

3av. HsD6 Oanl 4?B 429 

3av uerelnsM 44dJ0 455 

BBC rt* 7» 

BHF Bonk 403 4.0 

B MW 887 «l 

CommenDank 35* ‘.1850 

Canllnenfol 276 27* 

Daimler Ben: 434 £54 

Deausui 520 rt 525 

Dl BdVCOC* , 743 , J" 

Deutsche Bank 7*25075610 

Dauahis 581 SM 

DrnHwr Bor* 382 384.^0 

Feion-.uehie W4 

F Kruao HOtSCh 223 73 


A 6 Cl 

77 

n 3 

AJIC'lh 

IP 


Anglo Amer 

775 

— 

Barlows 

37JC- 

— 

Bu.oor 

£ 75 

— 

Bullvli 

46 

— 

D» Beers 

105 

— 

Dnetonleln 

55 JO 

— 

'lencor 

TOM 

— 

GFSA 

IM 

— 

Harmony 

75*0 

— 

Hishveic 5ie»i 

2780 

— 

Klool 

47.75 

— 

Hifdljank Ore 

JI 75 

— 

Panafor.lein 

4280 

— 

Rusolol 

84 75 

— - 

SA Brew?. 

IW 

— - 

51 Helena 

41 

— 

5osoi 

25 

— 

A'rslerii Deeo 

io: 

— 

Compoule index 
Previous : W15JJ 

5*1.49 


London 



BBv 

Ben Cenira: Hist 

Banco Iidnlcnaee 

Bnrwila 

CEPSA 

Drnadas 

Enaesa 

Ercras 

iberarolo 

P»*ol 

TaDacaforo 

Telefonica 


3253 3275 
2*35 2*75 
5*770 Stin 

loeo 1375 
2315 rt50 
2720 2335 
4600 6740 
2:7 ;ij 
**S 1025 
4435 4510 
4220 42:0 
1865 1*15 
; XWJ3 


Banes* w 14 J 

Brodesco 1 

Brcnmo 4l«* 

Paranananems 3 
PeirotrcB 10 

Toieorcs 66.4 

| voie Pis Dace 17 
Vorrg !7 

Bovesno Index ■ 23317 
PrevfoJI ‘ 21777 


14 JO 15-015 
27 2£X 
4l*.*5 4C0 

32 

181 17i 

664-1 «0*0 

in; 15 ' jo 
170 1?I 


Horpener 

H«i»ei 

Hocniiei 

Hoechsl 

HolztTiann 

Horlen 

IWKA 

Kali So li 

Karstadi 

KauRiai 

KHD 


341 JO 34f 
6196)1 JO 
1045 1065 
344 351 30 

975 Fi 

241 24* 

405 414 

153 1S1 

616 635 

520 537 

14120 140 


Kfoecwwrwerlio 153 I6J 

Linde *05 93* 

Lufthansa 1*1 

MAN 4y. 441 

rOannesmann 439 *43 

MetaiiKteii 731 :&o 

■■Jiuencn Rueck 2*95 3W) 


Porsche 

PreusMj 

PWA 

P.WE *5 

Rheinmeiait 

Severing 1 

3EL 

Sierncn-, 

ThrsSen 28 

Varm 

7eM 53 

JEM 

VICO 461 

Volkswagen 

Wetie 

OAX inaex - 315877 


7B3 818 

469469J0 
K9MJ? 
453J04S9JJ 
370 337 

IW2 Itrt 
400 37 

1*8707 JO 
787J07*J ‘0 
330 K9 
530.20 S« 
J8837J3 

462J0 46420 
50351' » 
*65 **5 


Previous ■ 21*8 72 
FAZ index . J24M 
Preyfous 235 1< 


; *boev noI 1 
Allied Lvons 
Ario Wiggins 

Argvfl Grouo 
Ju Bril Furls 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scatlond 
1 Barclays 

BaiV 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 

BOC Grout 
'Baals 
Bonn for 
3P 

Bnt Airwrvs 
Brit Gas 
Bril Steel 

Bril Telecom 
BTR 

Co&f* wire 
Caetsurr 5cn 
Corntion 
Cedis Vivella 
Comm union 
CourlauKJS 
ECC Gr«JC 
Enterprise OH 
Eufalunnei 
F 110ns 
“xrte 
OEC 

ficn'l Acc 

Gia<e 

Grand Met 

ORE 

uuhviess 

GU5 

Hanson 

Hmsoown 

H'iBC HUM'. 

1C1 


Barca Comm 5140 

BaSfoBi ISO 

Brneilon group 27COQ : 
OR 2cB5 

Cred ifol 2265 

Emchcm 3005 

Peril" 2*4# 

Ferlm PIsd 13ij 

Fiat SPA 6680 

Finmeccanica jOSP 

Generali jM00 i 

if 1 2**50 ; 

I'oiccm isiuo 1 

ifofoas sao 

Ifolmabl'lcre 46400 ^ 

wiedtoeanco 15700 I 

fltanieaison 115* 

Olivetti ;?ai 

Plrem 5320 

RAO 29200 : 

Binaseenle 1D790 I 

5a item 4085 

San Pool* Torino 9*50 1 

Sip act 

SME 37K 

Snta 2)*ti 

Sloivfo ’7*00 3 

Siet 5405 

Toro Assi RIJP 2*350 3 

mib index : 1227 
Previous : 121* 


[ Montreal 

1 A|W" filuminuin 31 
! Bank "Agnireal 74' r 
, Bell Canada 4fi 1 i 
; flemlwrdier B 70'. 

C;m»or l* 1 ■ 

1 Cascades 8 s " 

Dominlcn Ie«l A t'- 
i DorioniM A 12' « 

1 MacMillan 0; is - ; 

, ! Han 2 k Canada r g 
1 Powfrr Carp. rG-v 
'Zitroec Vi 77 
Ctueoecor A 1* 

Cmeoecpr B l!'e 

Tett-motir 18L 

j Um. a 6 l * 

I v vieoircr. U' ; 

j Industrials Index - 18*2 1 
I Previous: 1901 J8 


Market Gosed 

The Smgjps.re Mock 
markei was closed 
ednesJj'. for u holi- 
day. 

Stockholm 

40 A 3a 7*0 I 

Cm* sr W0 

ftsrra a im '5a' 

ftlitn CrrSO 430 433! 

Elcclrolcv B JO? 414 1 

Erie*3e*i KO 386 

Esse Re - a i?t 12* 

HanO?ISDOnlicn HE 114 

Investor 8 1*6 201 

Norsk Hvgro ?*6J0 2«* 

PrxoraiaAF 17a :2S 

Sanflvlk B 139 126 

5CA -A I;? 174 

S-E Banker. 52 53 

S Handle F i.’3 13 

Sxanskc 1*1 1*« 

S» F 1«J 144 

Store AT) *ii 

Trelletorg 8= 11* 115 

Vciva 755 768 

AHoersvaerMten . IW1.II 
Previous ■ 194U1 


Toronto 


Sydney 


Anccr 

AtlZ 

BHP 

Bora: 

Bgugcinv ilie 
Cows Mver 
Cotr.ci'.o 
CPA 
CSP 

Fosters Bre* 
■Goodmar c,eie 
1C1 ftvs'rciia 
Mage'igr 
m:m 

Not Au-.i Bam, 
Mews Cora 
Nine NrlA^k 
H Bf*ktr. H.li 
Pat Dt-not 
Pioneer irl 1 


Ahii.bi Price 

17" * 

ir.! 

Agr.ico Eeoie 

'6ft 

16 ft 

AlrCcrtcda 

6ft 

6’0 

Aicerro En*r»* 

ZI-! 

21ft 

A.-n Borne* Res 

33 ft 

Xkft 

BCE 

4*\3 

4*'* 

S* 71 p*o Sana 

» 

27ft 

BCO« 

ISTl 

IS-* 

BC Terecoir 

7?- 

25 ft 

BF Pecirr nos 

Q - W 

N.Cl 

Brcmoieo 

031 

C3tr 

Bruns wsck 

13^4 

13ft 

CAE 

6- 

7 

Ccndev 

5 

5 

CISC 

JS 4 * 

»7 

Canadian osci'.e 


2l’i 

Can Tire A 

•7ft 

!X5n 

Cantor 

21 

rift 

Cara 

L35 

413 

CCl ind B 

9 1 

0 

C.neelev 

Art 

ABC 


975 * J» WLL IRd B 
4.64 li*! C.neolex 
1U8 ii«. C ^irnncs 
26* 2 70 1 Cannes! Exp! 
0S2 fl.EC ( Ceti.sen Witt fl 


4 JO 

4 37 . 

Boieses 



Drier A 

17.9? 

10’C 

Ecne 3a v .'8m« 

Iff? 


Eauiir Silver a 

1 !* 


FCA la!l 

LT° 


e « T.s A 

1! 

1! 18 

Flcieher Chail A 


*.05 




Genlro 



Cull Cd a Pes 

07: 


ne« in:i 



Hemlo ifo M.nes 


35?l 

HCl*irwi wr 



Hary-am 


v ']* I 

Hudian J Sav 


Imosco 3 sn. 

Inco 37Va 

InJerorovoipe Dff'tj 
Jan nock IB 

Label I 21 Vx 

Lob km. Co Z IH 

Mackenzie 9^ 

Magna Inn A 6 2 

Maple Leal 17H 

Maritime 25 

Mark Res &hs 

Mown* 23W 

Noma Ind A S 

Noronaa Int 77 

Narando Forrsl 13ki 

Norcen Energy 14*% 

N Ihern Telecom *2Sh 

Nova Core N.O. 

Osnowa 20 

PapurinA 165 

Placer Dome 31 V; 

Paco Petroleum io 1 . 

PWA Core N.O 

Rorroc* l?“! 

Renaissance 30’.. 

Routes B 20 

ttommans 7* 

Raval Bank Can 28 

Seep! re Res 13*s 

Scan's Hasp 8L. 

Seacnam 40'- 

Scan Can 71. 

Shell Can 43>u 

Sherrin Goraon Ilk* 

5HL Svstemhse TV. 

Sautnam i*ki> 

Spot Aerospace r**x 

Slelca A 8^3 

Talisman Energ 28^ 

Teck B 2Sft 

7TvxnMn Corn. Ml. 

Taronlo Damn 21'.: 

Tarsi or 0 74V. 

Trcnsalla U!H l<ly 

TrensCaa Pfoe 17*8 

Triton FMI A 430 

Trimoc 15'^ 

Trliec a 0 30 

Uniurp Enerov 1 J5 


Zurich 


Adia inti B 26* 

Atusutsse B new 675 
BBC Brum Bom B 7310 
ana Gefov B ms 
C 5 Haiainps 3 601 

Eleklrow B 35J 

Fischer B 1450 

Inierdiscouni 8 7IB0 
Jetmoll 0 B2S 

Landis Gvr R TOO 
Muevenxjtck 3 *70 

Nestle R 1)16 

Oertlk. Buehrle R 141 
Paroesa Hid a 1650 
Roche Hdg PC m*o 
S atra Republic 123 
SanSaz B HA. 

ScWndler B S7C0 

Sulcer PC 944 

SurmR'Ionce B 2150 
Swiss 8nk Corn 0 397 

Swiss Bcinwr R J75 
Swissair P 764 

UB5B 1160 

Winterthur B 700 
2urlcnAsSB 1326 


TO OCX 
READERS 
IN 

GRgg 

bs never 

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to subscribe 
and save. 
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inAlhere. 


Season Season 
Wgn Ubv 


Open Wgh Low Close Ow OB.MI 


Grains 

WHEAT (CHOI) Soon nu nw m imv ouOun ftv bmnrt 
3J4 2*6 XI 94 1MVJ 134 3J6 L30V4 -IL0I Z7J85 

157' . 107 Sep 9* 135 loft'd 132 336 Vi *0.00* BJ04 

155 109 DOC 94 3.46 Vi X37 144V, 347 I8.M4 

157 137 Mar 95 150*7 XS5 250 U1W HUXH* *43 

3-50'% 3l6*>May9S 146 51 

142M 3.11 JW9S 1M1 125 ..322V, 124 rOW 152 


Est. soles 20,000 Turt.st4es 17^93 



Tue saoertmi 48JM) up l 

96 




WHEAT 

(KBOT) S*JQ0bunviifamvrwaQAaftperbktaK4 


3JS 

197 JUI94 132 


129 

131ft 

11357 

UT'i 

lfl2ftSap94 3-34ft 

138ft 

133ft 

135ft 

A63S 

360 

117ft D*C94 142 

346ft 

340ft 

X43Vi .0 0) ft 

A63X 


L2S MarTO 145 


143 

XWft-OJOft 


JJ4 

X21 ft May 95 



139ft— 0.00ft 

17 

133 

JXJftJultS 



3J3ft -080 ft 

17 


750 

5.94V, JulW 

6.9* 

6*8 

670 

675 — 0-20 

05.945 

T15 




667 


1X747 

7JU.-5 

fc'7 

SecW 

673 

6J6ft 

AM 

686 -0.16ft 

0.74J 

7 J7* s 

5JJftNw94 

688ft 

683ft 

639 

643 -ft16 


W* 

613 

Jon«5 

665 

667*4 

644 

6471* -0.16ft 

4802 

. 

*1* 

Mcr 95 668 

672 

650 

653 —0.16 

1.951 

702' . 

621 

Mav 95 

6m, 

651 


1.174 

1 U 

6.24 

Jui« 

665 


653 



650 -r 

SSIftNovTO 

630 

434 

617 

622 ft -TO 07 ft 

1838 


Ed. sales VQJCft Toe's, sales 74J86 

Tue’s coen mi 156J79 up J?6 

SOV8EAMMEAL (CBOT) wiwriwniwni 

230J0 I02CJUI94 ITOJO M8J0 1*220 19170 -170 3M41 

20-00 I8SD0Aua*4 l*7i« 1*7 HD 191 50 192J0 -100 I6J61 

IiaftB 181,10 Sep *4 195-50 I9SJD 19050 191J0 -290 *.723 

70fi® «SjjDt>ct« rgjja i*uo whm kooo -2J0 Aim 

ntac 17BJ3D0C 94 197 90 17280 18800 189 W -200 144*5 

231 JO 1.1 S3 Jon *5 19180 1*280 188-50 18*40 -210 IJSB 

JtQ 50 «1 00 MOV -75 19U0 M4J0 ITOJfl 191 JO -230 1J26 

I970C MUBMavTO 1*250 I Vi jo ITOOO ITOJO —200 MS 

1WL0C IB2JHJu|9i 1*260 17250 189 JO 19030 —I JO 2S1 

Est soles 40000 Tue’s. sales 34847 

Tux’s ownrt 86.771 ofl 2737 

SOYBEAN 0« L fCBOTj «iflco im-<worjow uete. 

7082 31J5 Jul W 2*2S 7*33 I7J5 27.73 — 1.45 4L660 

13 65 21.65 Aug 94 2922 2924 2787 27J1 —IjM 15,773 

J3J4 22 A) Sep M 28.90 MTS 77 JO 27 JS -1J7 HUM 

2*j4 2L ic 0d9i an a 20 2070 34.-3 _ ij* 7^40 

28 87 22 00 Dec 94 27,* 2780 34B8 26J3 -1 J6 21 JB 

28-55 27 65JWS95 77 25 27 AO 2605 2605 —1-25 2J8J4 

7HJ0 JLTBMa-95 77.15 27.1 S 2J95 «.« -1.15 U06 

23JS 7462 May *5 76-45 2645 »90 2190 -100 791 

385 2J84Jul95 2178 —092 I S3 

&d vnet 4SOMO Tike’s, saws 21848 
7m SQPcnm! 106058 pH 2S9S 

Livestock 

CATTLE (CMEOl JOOOOtn -cMsieri, 

7177 63.65 JunT4 6L7J 6415 6241 aj At — I JO 23051 

710 AUSMOFJ 8480 BUT 83J? S. U2 — 1J0 2L9& 

74 10 468200 94 4730 S?J 5 6195 6595 —1 JO 12.9)9 

74JC »». sa Dec 94 46-75 68 96 67.40 42.03 — 130 9065 

7435 69 3Q Feb 75 69.» BUS 6llB 48. W -1J0 5.2*9 

75.1C HMA|»95 71 JO 7130 »J0 49.70 — L5D 2.70B 

71 JC 4BJ5JW195 6BJ0 68J0 M.» 66.90 —1 45 SI 7 

Esr saies ItXTO Tuc’s. sokes 17AM 
Tue'saw nir* 77,178 OH 4 
FEEDER CATTLE ICM C R) S0JM ■> - avP, Mr B. 

8488 7130 MOV 94 7430 7465 7425 705 -135 U80 

3100 7230 Aug 94 72.90 rt30 7160 71 JC -1J0 7.7M 

81.10 77505ep*4 7115 73J2 71.92 n 97 — 1 JO 1.927 

8135 72.7000 94 7L« 7332 72.17 72.17 —130 1.938 

OM 7) 90 NOV 94 7430 7440 2230 7180 -I JO 1,475 

80.95 7405 M>96 7430 7440 71M 7X05 —135 512 

B0JS 7X40 MOT 96 7*85 7AM 7J35 7235 — 1J0 » 

1685 rt50Aor*6 7400 7400 7230 7230 — 1J0 19 

Eoum 7.114 Tue’t solos iCi 

Tuv’SOPMiial 14398 UP 513 
HOGS (CMER) aAHK-amicrB 

56 27 4SJ7JunM 47 M 4030 44J0 4735 — 1.17 *338 

5U> 45 30 Jot 94 4&4T 035 *737 —1.43 9.297 

a 40 *605 Am 94 4730 4735 45.90 4i*s -435 4.746 

4*75 *1 on Oct *4 -DC 4L55 4243 4177 -OW C.7S5 

MSB 4335 Dec M 44.12 J4J0 UJS 4175 -OJC 23*0 

HiQ CHOFfbtS J4J) 4130 4179 ABO -062 AS 

4333 4.90 Apr *5 43.10 AID 4X70 AID -DJI 2B1 

5IM 47 40JW195 47.90 «3S 47*0 4832 -0J8 117 

4895 42 70JUJ9S 47.40 4730 4738 -838 5 

Esl sales 7.945 Tub's sales 6895 
Too’ a ocn irV 30371 OH 2G 

PORK BELLIES l CMER) xuMa-uniMe 

3930 Jul M A00 815 4168 4162 -US L67S 

5* VI JIJSAuflU 4190 42.10 4065 49J0 —135 L025 

4’ is J* lORmM 51.40 51 J5 58*5 5035 —13! 214 

«« 3860 Mar 9J 5030 5030 5X07 SUP —133 25 

51.00 62811 May 95 5X25 —125 30 

SI 50 SI JO Jul 95 SUt ■ 1 

SOift 4975 Aug 95 5J3J 3 

E<J MKK 2,9)6 -rue’s, saws 1S6 
Tjc ioocriHU 83116 up IX* 


-335 

-1J0 7,730 
— 1 JO 1.9? 
— I -SO 1.938 
-IJO J^TS 
—13* 512 

-1J0 » 

-1 JO 19 


— 1.17 *A0B 
—1.0 9.297 
—135 4.746 

-a* vss 

—SX 18<0 
-062 69 

-HUB 2B1 
— 0JS 117 
—868 5 


-US L67S 
-J3S 1025 
-1JB 3U 

—133 25 

—1-75 30 

• I 
3 


COFFEE C 04CSS W3«ifa.- ®nl«Ber W 
14&S0 64.9036*4 12*35 IM WUB 

14138 asos»« w.ie 1795 ma 

1 7775 77.10DBC9X I22M 

134« 71 Jl) «W *5 1J1» n.B }{*« 

111 25. »JuMav*5 18US TT *’ /5 

nccu 45 00 Join 
175-OP »39S«P« . 

Es>.s»*» IL4« 

Mk- rvn.. 

nM WiW* "*« 

9JSCMW 12X1 1725 [700 

I7nr y.l'IIFx’ 9 * ‘I ■' 11 TO 11 ’5 


-SJS 26337 
-S4SIUU 
-430 1X9*2 
-530 5J76 
—870 681 

—LOO 93 
-ACO 34 


-008 47,171 
-0JH 56*18 
—80* Ji.ns 


1135 HLS7MOV95 T1JM H39 1U8 

11X2 HJ7JK9S 1133 1US 1U0 

1130 10J70d95 

UM HJiMa-W 1731 7130 1130 

Est totes 1X173 Tue'SHOu 19341 
Hue’s 00m be 125,552 ofl 460 
COCOA (NCSO XlmwnciBne-ipnrwn ■ 


1464 

m jui 94 

040 

Ml 4 

ass 

1302 

1X85 

lOTOSepM 

13*8 

1*« 

0*5 

an 

1507 

1041 Dec 94 

1423 

14C 


1425 

IM 

1077 Mar 95 

ixve 

isa 

MS3 

1453 

19ID 

107BJi!!oy95 

1415 

1*75 

IMS 

14*5 

ISO 

12HJJ95 




16*17 

UM 

1205 Sop vs 




ISM 

1504 

1»Dfa95 

15» 

1570 

.1505 

ISM 

MW 

1350 Mar 91 



ISM 


Est. sales NA. Tue’s sales 6.172 

T»w;s op en ue 2X361 up 686 

CORN (CBOT) S900M mnuvivm. AAwsMrauuiei 

116’, 241 JW94 267 2T0M 243'i t8*H-ftfl»ftt2<v<rt 

292'. 140‘s Sep 9J 144 266'A 7-5914 161 Vi— 0. 071* 34.962 

273'. 236*1 Dec 94 157V, 7-*0 l i 152*. 1S4X.-0JH 87J71 

23*' 1 148V, Mar *5 XM* 186V, 159ft 18 IV. -004 fJO 

232 153 Mav 95 76>',i 170 2J4'Ci 24SV1— 804*. I4QJ 

ISTi 154 JW*S 270 171V, 145V: 186V. -OJMV, 1780 

7J8’; 2JJ Dec *5 US'S 252 14* 2J0 — OJB'o 2JC6 

E9. SOfoS 70800 Tucs. sakfs 59,995 

Tuesaoeninr 6Z3J9* up 356730 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) uabunmnun-dMnMMM 


EO.sdes 14^53 Tub's, soles 2*350 
Tip's awn lot oxosi ofl cm 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTN> lumen-cxnrsoveu 
mOO 92J5 JU 94 97.10 ML80 95XB «J5 

134.50 *580 Sep *8 10050 10138 9788 (980 

13*80 9635 Nov 94 10135 101.(8 *98* 9*85 

13280 97 JD Jan VS 102J0 10XX5 HI80 W135 

13625 9*35*6 arK 10X25 10680 10135 T8273 

1M3S IDOJOMavM 10*33 

11980 105-00 JM 95 10535 

11130 11LS0Sep9S 10635 


-088 1418 
-OK 1,414 
-OW . 640 
—DM » 


—16 37858 
—1519.774 
—• 7.919 
—14 10376 
—IX 1W9 

— M 1334 
— M 546 
-W *62 
— 14 3 


— 030 1X897 
-030 U93 
— n m i.sin 
-030 1588 

-aw 824 

— 085 24 
—083 ] 
-085 2 


EsL sales 1500 Tip’s sales 1336 

Tub's open W 2X093 oB 121 .. 

Metals 

MCRADEOOFFOt (NCMX) xsAxObu^MiMrXk 
10800 7X80 May 94 10530 10530 MUD HIM -110 18*0 

10730 74.10 JM1 94 MX® -I3S 1JS* 

M735 7430 JM 94 10530 HUS W26* IOU0 -235 3B.I9X 

taw 7490 sap *4 injo hhjo «ji.*9 pom -cm Ktsi 

1SI1S0 15.75 Dec 94 10280 10260 HI.U 10140 —1.10 5388 

*580 76JDJon95 1DIJD — LOT 

9980 7X00 Fob 9S HI 80 -080 71 

107 JO 7X00 Mar 95 10180 10180 10030 HOLM —030 1010 

U0J» 768SMOV 93 10180 I OLIO ! 83.10 10080 — BJB 754 • 

uaoo 7880 Jin *5 ioom ieoM mt wnoo -o.to 683 

moo 7SJ0AM95 - . 10285 —185 

BUB 79. 10 Sep *5 • -t-mm —Mi 

«2Jo 75J0 caw : -:vn;m -a 

9208 7735 Nov 9S - • ■ HUB —L20 

99-90 6a.no Dec 95 •"'9930 -035 637 

92SS aa-50 Jan 9* 9930 —035 

9235 6230 M« 96 9930 -433 

MOO 9I.WAcr96 10080 -460 

ESL50BB 16800 Tub's. sales 1X222 
Tub's open InT «L549 g0 |fll 
SLMER (NCMX) JAN n>n- M Mr kwn 
5828 371 D MOV *4 9638 5638 5600 55U -** 111 

5*00 51 5.5 .fan 94 3408 5108 S408 55X5 '^64 

586J 371 8 Jul 94 3418 5698 5528 S5SJ —48 54.9W 

9MJ 3763 SCP 94 5668 574J 5508 5*07 -68)1.170 

978 3808 Dec 94 5748 SSLS 5848 5*U -A9 17^10 

5*48 40l8jan95 5703 —48-- 

6048 41 83 Marts 5058 5898 5138 - 5768 —68 MS? 

80*3 4188 Mav 95 509.0 5098 SOS *824 -68 2802 

8108 4208 JM 95 Witt 910 9108 S0O4 —68 BIB 

4158 *X0Sep9S 5048 -48 23* 

6200 5398 Dec 95 4088 8000 8068 604.1 -4.9 X0ST 

Jan 94 *073 —68 

6108 5808 Mar M 6143 -68 

Ep- sales 31800 Tag's, sates 43899 
Tip's open W nojx* up 2114 
PLATINUM WMHD ■k wa .«anwl WK . 

437.00 357.00 JM 94 X0780 *0030 4030 40480 -XS0 17316 

ffiJM 3608001294 4HLJ0 411.00 40*. » 406JW — XTO 4,160 

429J0 37480 Jon 95 41180 4T180 41180 4B80 —380 1830 

•nxa? 3KL00AOT9J 4TI80- — 190 U?>. 

Esl sates KA. Tux's. sMes 3877 
Toe's opfainl 73370 oa IO 
GOLD (NCMX) Mtsm-Nteurmn 
39280 370.00 Mar M ” “ 

41730 33981 JM1 94 3*660 300-70 3B&50 
JM9* 

41*80 34 1 JO Aug 94 31080 37180 30B8D 

41780 344800(394 3WJ0 3MJD 392J8 

476-50 308001C94 3(640 39930 39580 

41180 363J0Feb» 40060 .40040 400 x0 

417JB 3*4-50 Aar 95 

42X30 36IJOJMI95 40910 400-50 C0.H 
4IZS0 3HUPAW95 

4ii3o <naj«w9* - • 

42*80 408-50 Dec 95 

4X50 41250 Feb *6 

Est. sales 7*800 Tim's, sales 7S3M 

WMFOBltt 15L400 OS 1548 . 

PinaiKtial 

US T. COLLS (CMBO unae-MXIHU. 

9634 9336 JITOM 9X61 9587 9161 9*85, *0JE 17.150 

9640 94.62 SCC W 9S0S 9113 9S0S 9110 rU2 l&3« 

9610 *435 Dec *4 «*J0 9*85 9657 948X *081 7.541 

9S85 9X10 MV 95 W3S 9X39 9432 9437 -08J XM 

ESI. sates KA Tub's, saes S3H 
TueHaoenM 4B309 off IB1 

SYR.TREASURV (CBOT) uauaxe-mtaMeWM . 
117-05203-075 JUflW IW-JI WS-015 RU-23 VO-CUS OKS 157.20 

110- 1951 02- R Sep94H4-W 104-41 MD-MSTM-W& BIS 3UW 

HUHH Wl-26 DK99 TO- 17V 80S S 

EsT. sates 66.500 Tim's. sMss 5LTO0 

Tub’s open W 1W8 5I op S242 

»m TREASURY tCSOl) s1SBANPnt-e«»6 Jte«*«nCteK» 

115-SI 107-10 JMI9C-HB-03 105-0 104-30 ItS-ffl * 05 TO8.9W 

115-01 UH-1B Sepwneoi 104-M TO-li to*-* 1 04 0X470 

I6WI (00-25 OacM WJ-00 70J-I2 H 2K» «HI, *..W 1,174 

IIIHI7 HOTOS Mur 95102-94 M2-23 W-W 102-41. * 04 55 

105-2* 9M0 Jan *5 . . TO-W + 04 1 

EktKJtev lJ0,ao TbeNLsMct W0329 
Tub's apwiW OT823 "nr 2207 . . . 

U* TREAAMY flOfttS- CTCT) (0pdrot4«8BB-iXsS»MHo( WbcH 
119-W 91-04 JMlW 104-03 104-22 HMm.ll * * 330381 

111- 36 *0-12 S*p94 W3-06 HU-O KB- HI KU-14 + 07 HUM 

US-00 '91-19 CMNUS-M BWB VD-JO IW-B >• S7 3L7gT 

-116-20 99-14 Mor*5Hl-H 1D7-M HU -05 KD-0& - V 2376 

115-19 98-15 junnrai-ao m-w wo-s joi-s » 07 941 

112- 1? *9-00 Sep *5 . 101-04 * 07 w 

113- 14 M-27 Dee 95 _ 100-21 * 07 n 

11446 90-73 *40-96 MO-12 » a 40 

ES.MM3 59080) Turt-*e(09 45X111 

T U4>’5 own H 470,141 Ofl 727 

MUNICIPAL SON0S (M0T1 >romiMw-«s*)MiXIM6pa 
104-07 1744 Jufl 94 91 -1* 91-05 91-00 91-26 * 00 9*491 

95-17 06-11 SCP 98 <0-17 91*11 RHJB 9141 ♦ 08 Ts* 

Ea.sMn 6800 tub's. odes XxR 

Tuo'jepenkM 328*7 up 45 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) UnMawatMlnecl 

Hm 90800 JimM (U40 953* 9X«n 95350- -U30A40O 

95 5TO «U6aO«P9* M *S0 9J600 *4800 94840 -»41 Qjm 


'4MSSS 

-6.9 T7810 

— *J 5863 
-6 9 2802 
—69 no 
—69 234 

-4.9 X0B1 


-XSDW4I6 
— 3-W 4.MB 
-A» 1,030 
-190 18S6 


>480 
-450 52824 
— 0J0 

—080 44816 
-080 5.134 
-080 20806 
-tuo 5M3X 
—djo * 
—080 6,182 
—080 
-080 

—081 4872 
-080 


95.100 90710DKM 94000 94130 9*810 94100 -20*028*1 

955*0 90340 Afar 95 91830 KUDO 9X750 93840 2743*1 

94730 *0710 Junts 93J30 9X5*0 938*0 91M0 207 AS* 

9LS20 91370 Sep » ttm t ZXB 9X250 923» 10X420 

WWO 91.100 Dec 95 9X000 91110 93JB0 *1100 110J17 

94320 *0750*40-96 9X010 9X050 92800 9X040 11X113 

Est sates NA Tue-Ljotes 438301 
Tue’sa mHiii X7DX511.0H 6632 
flmTBHPOOHO (CMER) tKrkMU-lHWmgttnAil 
I -5 276 18*74 Jun 94 1J0S* 1-5130 180X8 L50M k 36 4X4*9 

1-5200 18440WPM 1 -5020 1J100 1*020 hSM 734 L544 

1-5170 irosaOeCM UD7D 1JW0 UD0O 1-5050 <38 . 59 

- 1J17D 18t«Mor»6 1.505* >3* 14 

ESLONn NA. Tbo'&.Kdes 630 
Tim's open m *4300 afl 650 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMEK1 suer®- 1 pom pmWST.owi 
07005 QJ113Jun94 07251* 07251 07217 07222 —30 39,14* 

03740 0700* Sap 94 0J207 OJ3B7 -071*0 0719* -32 X707 

07670 07031 Dec 9* 0J18D 071*5 07171 071)0 -34 1877 

07605 07n20*WW 07165 07165 07755 07147 —34 459 

07522 08990 Jun 95 07122 X7130 07120 07126 —38 106 

•7100 07130 Sac 95 07106 — X0 3 

ER- sates NA. TueH. sates X350 
Tue’sooenW 45.1*4 ofl 10* 

CSIMANMAWL (CMER) S«rnwW- 1 muvmuOB BUDO l 
08132 05407 Jul 94 08040 08004 08033 08072 '3512X087 

08101 ’ 9-5400 SOP 94 08015 0J07B 08035 08066 +X 10310 

08106. 08590 D*c 94 08033 08074 0800 08071 >36 294 

04040 OjnOJunVS 08095 <36 49 

aaiONur* . o8oaz . -xs 622 

ea-sotes NA H»”LlDi*3 3X2II . - 
! TUB’S Opwi nt .13X362 Ofl 394 
JAPANESE YEW (CM BQ -Sut rvwv- 1 pulmemcmaJlMISOi . 
ILOO995COjOOa071Jui94 QJ)09570aOD959l11JHN55HJ)095*4 v« 6X775 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 


Page 15 



-Novelist 
^ Dead at 69 



y IciiJjr- "^.Ejgs 
.*• 'Sfdi Polin As 
- •■ ■ ■• n T7-. '> s"f-y 





ASIA/PACIFIC 


:ely 


China Lniiki 
To Join WTO b 
Jan. 1, U.S. Says 


Agence Frame Peru, 

KUALA LUMPL'R — The 

United State* on WedncsdiH ail 
but niled out the possibility of'Chi- 
najoirung the new World Trade 
Organization at the time of the 
WTO s inception Jan. ] because 
tius would not leave enoueh Lime 
for Beying to fulfill d! Lh^obUea- 
uons of membership. 

“It is tough for anvbodv to do 
the amount of work that his w be 
done in the little time that is left ~ 
the depury US. trade representa- 
tive, W. Booth Gardner, said here. 

China has made it clear that it 
attaches great significance to being 
admitted by the time the World 
Trade Organization supplants the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade at the turn of the year. 

GATT negotiating parties would 
have to reach a substantive proto 
col agreement on China’s re-entrv 
by June to have any hope or induct- 
ing Beijing before the new vear. 


GATT officials say. 

They say doubts remain over the 
trans parenc y of China’s foreign 
trade regime, especially its policie-i 
governing import quotas. licenses 
and standards. 

“We have been clear in laying 
out whai we feel are standards that 
have to be met by China,” Mr. 
Gardner said after speaking at the 


Z”th Pacific Basin Economic Coun- 
cil meeting in Kuala Lumpur. 

He said the standards hod been 
agreed to by major developed na- 
tions. 

The director-general of GATT. 
Peter Sutherland, speaking at a 
separate news conference, said Chi- 
na's re-emiy by Jan. 1 “may be 
possible but is an extremely diffi- 
cult prospect “ 

■ Sovereign!)' issue Argued 

Members of the ILS, Congress 
who say the new GATT agreement 
will violate U.S. sovereignly are 

spreading “absolute nonsense.” 
Mr. Sutherland said Wednesday, 
according to a Reuters report from 
Kuala Lumpur. 

Representative Newt Gingrich. 
Republican of Georgia, has com- 
pared ihe WTO to an “economic 
United Nations" where the United 
States “could be outvoted by Anti- 
gua, by Botswana, by Venezuela." 
National sovereignty itself could be 
threatened, he has said. 

“That argument is absolute non- 
sense." Mr. Sutherland said. 

"If the WTO were to institute 
retaliatory measures against any 
country, it would do so after reach- 
ing consensus and after having es- 
tablished that the country in ques- 
tion has actually violated rules of 
free trade." 


TNT Ltd L Posts 
9-Month Profit 

Compiled by Ow Staff From Diyairha 


SYDNEY — The interna- 
tional transportation concern 
TNT Ltd. announced net prof- 
it Wednesday of 85J million 
Australian dollars (US$62.8 
million) for the nine months 
ended March 31. 


The result reversed a net 
loss of 92 million dollars in the 
corresponding period a year 
earlier. 


d by 

an abnormal gain of 78JS mil- 
lion dollars, mostly from sales 
of subsidiaries. 


In China , Corruption Hits Textiles 

'Overlords’ Are Hoarding, and the Cotton Is Gone 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Tunes iYniiv 

WUHAN. China — The No. 1 Cotton Mill 
is probably the best-run textile factory in 
town, hut its labyrinthine production line i> 
in danger of being shut down. 

The reason, says its manager, is that cor- 
rupt officials are hoarding union supplies 
intended for use in state factories and selling 


the municipal government m this industrial 
city in central China to open it> strategic 
reserves of cotton to keep hi, mill running. 

“Wehave lo beg constantly." he said. “You 
should have seen me just ihi, morning on the 
telephone.” 

The trials of the No. I Cotton Mill are the 
trials of China's state industries, which de- 


them on the open market, pocketing the prtv 
tills with short: 


cceds and leaving stale mills with shortages of 
raw material. 

Zhang Baoxin. 58, the director of this state- 
owned factory, recently said he was frustrat- 
ed and fed up with the corruption threatening 
his plant and its 9,000 workers and retired 
employees on pensions. 

“The corruption is caused by the two-lier 
pricing system," he said. “There are .so many 
loopholes.” 

China has largely decontrolled cotton 
prices but maintains a subsidized quota sys- 
tem. in part to protect die huge state textile 
industry. But such pricing encourages state 
cotton barons, most of them Communist Par- 
ty bureaucrats, to underreport the lonnngc of 
cotton purchased from farmers, creating an 
off-the-books surplus that eon he sold at 
much higher prices. 

The price difference is substantial. A met- 
ric ton of cotton — about i 200 pounds — at 
the state’s fixed price recently cost $920. 
while the market price was nearly double 
that, a little more than $1,800. 

“This is the problem that you have in the 
transition from a planned to a market econo- 
my." Mr. Zhang said. 

Mr. Zhang's factory, which uses 25 tons of 
raw cotton a day, was down to an eight-day 
supply recently because of the diversion. Last 
August, a supply shortage caused a two- week 
shutdown. This time, he said, he petitioned 


The system encourages 
bureaucrats to 
underreport the cotton 
they buy from farmers, 
creating an off-the- 
books surplus that can be 
sold at higher prices. 


spite being the large*! drain on the national 
budget account for less than half ihe coun- 
try's economic output. 

State factories, on the cusp between a 
Marxist command economy and a market 
economy where most of the rules have yet to 
be written, arc seeing their raw -material sup- 
ply lines undermined and their machinery 
and finished goods .sold out the hack door. 

China has been in the midst of a campaign 


publicly pressing his charges of official cor- 
ruption. 

"Everybody knows — even the mayor 
knows," he said. "These people are so power- 
ful now that we have so beg them constantly 
for cotton. We give them free gifts of cotton 
cloth, cigarettes, liquor: we even write checks 
to them.” 

A request for comment from the mayor of 
Wuhan. Zhao Bacgiang. was not answered. 

Mr. Zhang said his factory should be allot- 
ted 500 tons of subsidized state cotton a year, 
about one-third of the total tonnage the plant 
processes. But the cotton officials, he said, 
have arbitrarily slashed his quota. 

The diversion of this subsidized supply has 
left him scrambling for raw cotton on the 
open market. He now ho* to send buyers to 
Zhejiang province, several hundred miles 
east, where he is developing hi* own cotton 
connections. 

China adopted a law last year making it a 
crime to misreport national production data, 
but Mr. Zhang says there ha, been no en- 
forcement. Of the cotton borons, he said: 
"These people are so powerful they don't 
have to listen to anyone, no: even the munici- 
pal leaders. Ever, if someone gives false and 
misleading figures, who is somg to punish 
them?’' 


against corruption since September, but Mr. 
Zha 


Zhang said it had failed to reach the party 
officials who control major commodities ,uch 
as cotton and gram. He called ihe "over- 
lords” of China', cotton bureaucracy, those 
who control regional distribution of state 
cotton supplies, “completely corrupt." 

The factory manager seemed fearless in 


■ China Adopts .New Price Controls 

Chinese officials announced price controls 
on 34 staple commodities after widespread 
complaints from residents over illegal price 
increases, Agence F ranee- Presse reported 
from Beijing. 

Prices of 10 staple goods, including salt, 
coal, petrol and housing rents, will be set by 
the state, and a system has been set up to 
monitor price fluctuations in 24 others, in- 
cluding rice, edible oil. sugar and pork. 


Investor’s Asia 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 



Wr u A r ri 

1993 1894 


»*!>■ j'F'tf A M 
1993 1994 


1983 


1994 


Exchange 

index 

Wednesday Prev. 
Chase Close 

% 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9,521.37 

9490.11 

+0.33 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

Cfoaad 

2.302.86 

- ’ 

Sydney 

AS Ordmanas 

2,105^0 

2,132.40 

*1,24 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

20J583.60 

20.S22.10 

+OJ20 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

dosed 

987^6 

- 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,348.80 

1.33a 59 

+0.76 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

943-92 

945.69 

•031 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

5,775.18 

5,789.12 

-034 

Manila 

PSE 

2.B7&21 

2.901.S8 

-0.78 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

Closed 

502.00 

- 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,155.18 

2.15622 

-0.05 

Bombay 

National index 

Closed 

1300.04 

- 

Sources Rentiers, AFP 


lnimunoiul HrraldTnhanC 

Very briefly: 


• Sri Lanka's Tamil separatist rebels have opened a commercial hank in 
their northern Jaffna stronghold as a first step toward creating their own 
economy there, Tamil sources in Colombo said. 


Chief Quits as Kanebo Shows Loss MORGAN: Lurching Forward 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Kazulomo Lsbizawa 
resigned Wednesday as chairman 
of Kanebo Ltd., a textile, cosmetics 
and pharmaceutical company 
based in Osaka. 

Simultaneously, the company 
said its toss widened in its latest 
year, announced suspension of its 
annual dividend and said it 
planned to cut 2.000 of its 21,000 
workers over the next two years. 
But it declined to confirm that it 
would suspend year-end bonuses 
for employees. 

Kanebo said it had a pretax loss 
of 6.7 billion yen ($642 million) for 
the year aided March 31 after a 
profit of 4.5 billion yen a year earli- 


er. it forecast a still wider loss for 
tbe current year of 9.8 billion yen. 

“We mil stake everything on 
promoting the restructuring of the 
company's businesses and make ef- 
forts toward an early resumption of 
dividends," Kanebo, Japan's sec- 
ond-largest cosmetics manufactur- 
er, said. 

President Masao Nagaia. who is 
to succeed Mr. Ishizawa as chair- 
man, said at a news conference in 
Osaka that Kanebo would cut back 
on borrowing. 

He also indicated plans to “reor- 
ganize" the unprofitable synthetic 
fiber and fashion merchandise 
businesses. 

Mr. Nagata is to be replaced as 


president by Soichi fshihara. a se- 
nior managing director who has 
been negotiating the restructuring 
of Kanebo with various banks in- 
cluding its chief shareholder. Sa- 
lt ura Bank Ltd., company officials 
said. 


Continued Irom Page II 


Company officials refused to 
confirm a report that the company 
planned to suspend year-end bo- 
nuses, which usually amount to 
several months' salary. 


The daily newspaper Yomiuri 
Shimbun said the employees' union 
had agreed to the suspension of 
bonuses in exchange for a pledge 
on job security. 

(AFP, AFX i 


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LOW COST FLIGHTS 

SCHBRJIB dafy Dgto. Is. bums. 

ccanony a baesi lates. dbo D-day 
soeoat TeilFf ft*e HI 475513)1 


company to double production, im- 
prove efficiency and raise prices. 

Bui Mr. Morgan suli dismi-.sCN 
much of Sir John’s advice, calling 
him “a bit of a windbag." He says 
that raising prices would have 
caused “real trouble" when Lhe re- 
cession arrived and demand fell. 

Dealers say that significantly cut- 
ting delivery times would lower the 
car’s resale value. With the new 
product in such high demand rela- 
tive to supply, the price of a used 
Morgan is maintained near the new- 
car price. 

Peter Morgan says his central 
concern is to avoid making the 
company vulnerable to down- 
swings in the markeL He notes that 
Morgan, throughout its history, 
never had to lay off any workers — 
possibly the only automaker in the 
world that can make such a claim. 

Nevertheless, he agrees with the 
need to reduce the delay between 
the time the customer puis down 
£250 for a “place in line" in Mor- 
gan's order book and the time the 
car is delivered. A wait of one or 


two years, he said, would be more 
reasonable. 

He has assigned his 42-y ear-old 
son the task of streamlining pro- 
duction in order to lift output from 
ihe current 4S0 cars a year to 750 
within five years. 

Abandoning a professional ca- 
reer as a television camer aman 10 
years ago, Charles Morgan is in line 
io take over the company. With a 
business degree earned over the 
past three years, he talks of remov- 
ing production “bottlenecks,'' set- 
ting up “measured flow lines." sur- 
veying the satisfaction levels of 
owners and identifying habitual 
laggards among his 400 suppliers. 

Though he uses a personal com- 
puter to maintain customer ac- 
counts and slock, he still relies 
largely on a visual inventory sys- 
tem. Pointing to a suck of’ body 
panels against a wall, he says he 
knows it is lime to re-order when 
the stack has almost disappeared 

Meanwhile, Morgan is squirrel- 
ing away iu modest profit in a 
rainy-day fund Last year, it had a 
pretax profit of around £1 million 
on sales of £ 8.2 million. 


Taiwan Approves Liang 
As Central Bank Nominee 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

TAIPEI — Taiwan's governing 
Nationalist Party gave its approval 
Wednesday to a state banker. Kuo- 
shu Liang, as the country's next 
central bank chief. 

Analysts said the move made it 
all but certain that Mr. Liang, cur- 
rently chairman of the slate-run 
Chiao Tung Bank, would be for- 


be reformed but under the proper 
conditions." 


mally named by tbe government to 


the po&i in the next few days. 

“He’s a conservative reformer," 
said Daniel Chen, chief economist 
of Chinatrust Commercial Bank. 
“He says financial markets should 


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applK* 1 1r. Berlir 
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: mvisi- issi_ne 351 

to keep .-e as it 
houtits 


• Indonesia's stale oil company Penamina plans to >hed 1 1.U0O jobs, over 
the next five years to boost efficiency, the Amara news agency said. 

• Boeing Co. and three iapanesi; aerospace companies — Mitsubishi 
Heavy Industries Lt«L Kawasaki Heavy Industries LnL and Fuji Heavy 
Industries Ltd. — have started a study on developing a new jet carrying SO 
to 100 passengers, a Kawasaki spokesman said. 

• South Korea's largest conglomerate. Samsung Co. said it planned lo go 
ahead with a joint venture to produce automobiles with Japan's Nissan 
Motor Co^ despite remarks by Trade Minister Kim Chul Su Tuesday 
indicating that the government would not approve lhe project. 

• Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. and Thai partners signed an agreement 
to bunch Thailand's fourth EngJish-languagc daily newspaper, Bangkok- 
based Business Day, to be launched in January, will focus on financial 
news in Southeast Asia. 

• China's economic growth will drop from 13 percent in 1993 to 11.5 

percent this year, economists from the Chinese Academy of Social 
Sciences Said. Reuters. AFX. ap 


mass at 
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Mr. Liang, a confidant of Tai- 
wan President Lee Teng-hui, would 
succeed Samuel Shi eh. 74, who will 
step down at the end of this month 
after completing a five-year term. 

As central bank governor. Mr. 
Liang would be responsible for the 
country’s monetary and foreign ex- 
change policies when the govern- 
ment is trying to torn Taipei intoa 
regional business and financial 
center. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters} 


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10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26. 1994 







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Manager Joe Torre could lell hi> 
Sl Louis Cardinals were stranding 
a lot of runners just h> the con .tarn 
clack in the dugout. 

“You see ihose gu>> ai the end of 
the inning, they’re throwing their 
helmets in. you count the helmet.. 
That’s a lot of people." Torre -uid 

NL ROUND t"P 

after a frustrating 4 -n |r.w Tuesday 
night to the Philadelphia Phillies in 
St. Louis. 

The Cardinals set a major league 
record hv leaving Jt> runners “on 
base without scoring. The previous 
mark for left on base in a shutout 
loss was 15. most recent I \ hv Kan- 
sas City against Detroit in 1975. 

The Cardinals loaded the has* 
in the fourth inning, nut pitcher 
Vicente Palacios Hie-i out. Then in 
the fifth. Bernard Gilkey grounded 
into an inning-ending double pijv 
with the bases loaded. In the sr.th. 
Su Louis again loaded the bases, 
but Ray Lankford struck out and 
Ozzie Smith grounded out. 

The game was scoreless into the 
ninth. Jim Eisenrcich opened with 
his third hit of the game and scored 
on Ricky Jordan’s double off Mike 
Perez. Pete Incaviglia hit a ihree-run 
homer later in the inning. 



Home Run 


The Associated Fress 

Cal Ripken has other milestones 
besides The Streak — like his 300th 
career homer. 

“I’ve tried to put it out of my 
mind, but I’ve been well aware that 
I’ve been close to 300." Ripken said 
after driving in si* runs Tuesday 
night and leading the Baltimore 
Orioles past the Brewers, 13-5. in 
Milwaukee. 

Ripken, also pursuing Lou Geh- 
rig’s record of 2,130 consecutive 

1 ^ ^ i 

AL ROUNDUP 

games the has played in 1 .939). got 
No. 300. a three- run homer in the 
third inning off Ted Higuera. and a 
three-run doable in the fourth off 
rdievej»Jeff Bronfcey. 

“Maybe I was thinking about the 
home run too much and trying to 
get it out of the way." Ripken said. 

Milwaukee lost its 13ih consecu- 
tive game, a club record. 

“I’ve had my experience in frus- 
trations — Q-and-21 will give you 
some perspective.” said Ripken, re- 
calling Baltimore’s record losing 
streak to start the I9-S8 season. “So 
1 can relate. 1 can relate to a lot of 
people's losing streaks.” 

“lr this isn’t rock bottom. 1 don’t 
want to see it." Milwaukee manag- 
er Phil Gamer said. “This loss was 
no different than any other. 
They're all hurting. Any loss is bad. 
but when you get them all bunched 
on top of each other like right now. 
it gets very, very bad." 

Higuera blew a 5-0 second-in- 
ning lead, surrendering home runs 
to Ripken and Jack Voigt in the 
zhird and lo Chris Hoilcs in the 



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After taking out the Atlanta Braves’ Dave Justice, we Houston Astros’ Craig Biggio failed to throw in time to make die double-play. 






fourth. Leo Gomez later hit j pair 
of solo homers. 

Mark Eichhorn four hit;, in -!■ » 
shutouL innings, and Alan Mills 
pitched three innings for hi> fir-i 
save. 

Rangers 2. Roy aLsO: Kenny Rog- 
ers. despite hurling himsdi in a 
hotel mishap, pitched a MX-hilier 
for his firsi career shutout a> Texas 
stopped a Tour-game losing streak. 

Regers to«>k five stitchr- in hi? 
left knee when he Wiprcii .-.n an 
escalator at the V\ eslia C r. v. n Cen- 
ter in Kansas C:t; -‘n M*--nc.i; 
night. Originally scrr.iehcil from 
the lineup, he changed his minJ a; 
the last minuic jnd J^ankeu ;h- 




?.oyal.> a/ir ni- j.vm had giver up 
a ciub-rerorJ -1 ■ rt:n * the three pre- 
vious ■iane*-. 

Mark Gubicr- allowed both run-, 
and si", hits ir, •• innings. 

-iLiieitf'- Jv. itj&rimTs 3: Brent 
Ga'.cv went J-'or-S and u?J a warn 
rceo r d with eight -ttraich: hiL-. and 
Mike B.-rdick doubled twice and 
tripled. 

Greg Hirrari allowed a club- 
re. re" : : •-.ii’- and seven canted 
nn ■ « : r - v. » • : t i r, g S.m i ■. 'e. 

an o. ria.* •’.»_•> 3: 'err 
- 1 .^ -W .1 ’i\--h:Ue: 
r . •: .nipGieg::”!-. this »c.i- 

v.>r. and w ad. H., .gg.v and Jim 
j.e'.ru. - .*ii si V.mle.- Suui- 


Pi ; ! =0 


Astro*. S. Brave* ft; D.-ci Drabe': 
out pitched Ton Ola vine jnd near- 
ly outliit Aiianta at! by hint -elf a- 
Houston w..n ,-n the r.'ad. Drabefc 
pitched a ihrce-hu-cr and v.-. n ho 
seventh strtiight dwi—.o. 

Drabek. who b^-jR ihe gam-; 
batting .U83 hau three hits, includ- 
ing a two-nm Mngk. .lame- M*»i- 
ton had four hits and Sett .Servai-. 
hit a three-run homer a* the -.v»r*v. 
won for the fifth time- in - t\ games. 

Meanwhile. Br.c.o' pitcher John 
Smoltz was suspended for eight 
games by the league for thr* v. mg .n 
John Cangelo'i of the New \oi\. 
Met*, and provoking a brawl. Can- 
gelosi was impended for four 
£ame-'. f< *r charging «!i mound after 
be «a> hit h\ SmolL:. B* -i!'. pl.:ycr> 
were fined. 

Cubs 2. Dodders 0: Willie Bank, 
pitched a n ur-hi'.'.'-T for his lir-t 
shutout in the mai.-r.. a . G'hicauo 
won at Dodger Stadium for tl- 

eighth straight ?ar’-> 

stnsc:-: out sever.. v.aff..-i (•*.. .me 
•jtd not ali* -w a runi.'.rpa'i -ec • 

Orel HersnLser gave up both runs 
in the fourth inning on ar. KB! 
grounder by Derrick May and a 
double by Sammy S- --a. 

Padres 6 . Giants 3: Joe;. Htimil- 
ton won in bis major league debut 
as San Diego *n*. vi-iting .San 
Francisco l< • its slvih .-traizhi loss. 


Hamilton, •he Pavf.-’ ’-•* I Pick ;n 
the June l u;, i dr. a’:. g. ,- e up tnre; 
run. and five ni.- in :•. innings. 

Son Gi.-g. • I io- v ■.lire,* *n a r..w 
.'intc end mg - :/a.t:-r;v.-ri 13- 
gar.ve lo-ir.g .trc..k. 

ii\p.-A ii. Miiriinv i: Darrin 
Fletcher drov : :n ‘"••c run* ar.d Wil 
C'vrder • I*.’.: .'. tw -rcr. liomer as 
Mont real - «n at Plon-J.i. Fletcher 
h_*d far* of i he !\hri:n four sacri- 
fice flies, tying an NL record. All 
four run— coring l l y bal 1 .. c.iine in 
the first three inning- otf Charlie 
Hough. 

Butch Henry gave up two nib in 


6 -.- Tsvrdr^ inning'. '■ 

7e:rl Everett 

homerad off reliever M 

el Rojas f*'r 

ihe Marlin/ ■■ther hit. 


’.ifdrie ■ ' :. a It'S 7: 

vVuli \Yei?s 

n.:d four -r 7:-lor.-.^ •’> 

i" hits and 

ihe Ri-ckic. beat - isi: 

r.ti C:nc:n- 

r»a:i. A-^dre- Geu-.r'je.: 

Svl Charlie 

V •• V,.' "hr — * /»■ . 

■Mch e.; -he 

?.-H.kie% *.■ .jled ! .■ i< -, r 

■‘■.v .'Com j 

Mraish- -Is . Tp; 

.- ;--t their 

i-'unli in . r. ... 


Erie Y-.. gi: h :r-.r.-: 

. • f iln;; « 

do. 3 , 1 “ • L-r.-::.: j:v*j 

-IliCl J J du- 


hen*ce b ih connected tor Cincin- 
nati. 

Nk-Ls -3. PHates 2: Ryji* Thomp- 
son hit j *i • hi; me: with one out in 
the ninih tic it. and Jose Viz- 
caino and j-'-e Orsuial. nuJ RBI 
ringle* Inter in the inning as New 
York rallied a t Pitl-hurzh. 


um. MulholJund struck out five and 
walked one. leading the Yankees to 
their 1 3th victory in 16 games. 

Dave SiewurL failed to reach the 
sixth inning for the fourth straight 
time, allowing six runs and six hits 
in five innings with six strikeouts 
and four walks. 

Angels 8 , Tigers 5: Chuck Finley 
won hts fourth straight start, and 
Bo Jackson. Tim Salmon and Rex 
Hudler homered for visiting Cali- 
fornia. Finley allowed five runs — 
three earned — and seven hits in six 
inning... struck out five and walked 
four. Joe Ora he pitched the ninth 
for a 1 ? ;.* _ :hAi\e. 


White Sox 5, Twins 3: Joey Cora 
hit a go-ahead, two-run triple with 
two outs in the seventh inning at 
Conii&key Park. 

Warren Ncwson's First home run 
of the year led off the seventh and 
tied iHe score 3-3. Larry Casian 
relieved Pat Mahomes. Lance 
Johnson singled. Mike LuV’aliiere 
sacrificed and Tun Raines walked 
with two outs. Cora followed with 
his drive into the right-field corner. 

Indians 5, Red Sox 3: Jack Mor- 
ris allowed two unearned runs in 
seven innings lo get his first road 
win for Cleveland, and Albert BelJe 
had a two-run single. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The New York 
Knicks and the Indiana Pacers 
were supposed to be teams with 
similar styles, and that certainly 
proved true in the opener of the 
NBA’s Eastern Conference finals. 

Both centers, Patrick Ewing and 
Rik Smits. had big performances. 


dUU LUC 3UUUUU& B***" 1 " — '■'CO* 

Miller and John Starks had subpar 
offensive games. 

What separated the two teams in 
the Knicks’ 100-89 victory Tuesday 
night was the support Ewing re- 
ceived inside from Charles Oakley 
and outside from Hubert Davis 
and Greg Anthony. 

“I thought that Oakley was the 

difference," said the Pacers’ coach, 

NBA PLAYOFFS 

Larry Brown. “When you get down 
to late in the game, you can’t give 
up those offensive rebounds. We 
had a chance when we were down 
just 85-83. but Oakley made some 
great plays." 

Ewing finished with 28 points, 1 1 
rebounds and 6 blocks, but that 
was offset by Smils’s 27 points and 
10 rebounds in just 27 minutes. 

“I felt good out there, but we 
didn’t win and that’s the bottom 
line," Smits said. “Ewing is going 
to get bis points. We have to con- 
centrate on slowing down the other 
guys, like Oakley.” 

No one else on the Pacers had 
more than 14 points, while Oakley 
had 20 points and 13 rebounds in 
support of Ewing. In addition. An- 
thony scored 16 points with three 
3-pointers and Davis had 12 points 
with two fourth-quarter 3-pointers. 

Miller's 14 points were 8 under 
his playoff average, and he got off 
just ll'shois. 

“We know that he is capable, 
more than capable," the Knicks* 
coach. Pat Riley, said of Miller. 
“He burned us for 31 points a game 


r anucks Advance to Finals 


The .-huxiateJ Press 

VANCOUVER. British Columbia — The 1982 
Stun ley Cup Finals were hardly memorable for the 
Vancouver Canucks. Now they have a chance to 
make up for lost time. 

The Canucks are in the National Hockey 
League’s championship series for only the second 
time ever. They goi there with a 4-3 double-over- 

3TANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

time victory over Toronto that eliminated the Ma- 
ple Leafs in fite games. 

“There’s always that hope that someday you’d 
get the opportunity and it’s hard to believelhai it’s 
here." Greg Acams said Tuesday night after scor- 
ing the game-winning goal, his second of the night. 
14~ second- into the second overtime. 

Vancouver's only previous appearance in the 
Stanley Cup Final was 12 years ago. when the 
Canucks were swept in four games by the New 
York Islanders. The oniy Vancouver team to win 
the Stanley Cup waj ihe Nlillionaires in 1915 under 
the manager-coach. Frank Patrick, two years be- 
fore ihe NHL was formed. 

"I'm so tired jnd kind of numb.” Adams said. "1 
don't feel anything. What a great feeling, we're 
halfway there" and we're making a run font.” 

i he Canucks, who won the Western Conference 
finals four games to one. wil] face the winner of the 
Eastern Conference finals between the New York 
Rangers and New Jersey Devils. The Devils lead 
that series. 3-1 with Game 6 on Wednesday night 
at the Meadowiands. 

The Canucks had beaten Calgaiy and Dallas in 


earlier series. They trailed Calgary three games to 
one before winning the last three in overtime, 
including a double-overtime thriller in Game 7. 

Tuesday night was a familiar refrain, as the 
Canucks spotted the Maple Leafs a 3-0 lead in the 
first period, then came back with four goals. 

“This is unbelievable, this is what you work for. 
this is what you dream about," said ihe Canucks 
coach and general manager, Pat Quinn, a former 
Toronto player. 

Adams scored the game-winner on a rebound of 
a shot by Dave Babych from the left point. The 
Toronto goal tender. Felix Pondn. gloved the initial 
shot, then dropped it in from, where Adams back- 
handed it into the net 

Potvin, who made 43 saves, just sat in the crease 
after the goaL seemingly stunned by the defeat. 

Toronto took its lead in the first period on goals 
by Mike Eastwood at 7:54, Doug Gilmour at 1 1 :37 
c-n the power play and Wendd Gark at 12: 19. The 
Canucks tied it with three goals in the second: by 
Murray Craven at 1:34, Nathan Lafayette at 9:37 
and Adams at l":5‘ on the power play. 

Toronto's early lead spoiled a shutout string of 
ihe Vancouver goal render Kirk McLean, who 
made 3 1 saves. McLean had gone more than seven 
periods without allowing a goal after the Canucks 
won Games 3 and 4 by shutouts. 

“We came out and threw everything at ihem in 
the first period." said the Maple 'Leafs' coach. Pat 
Bums. “They came back and threw everything 
they had at us in the second. Then it came down to 
one sfaoL one bounce, and that was it. It was a 
pretty good season." 


last year in the playoffs. I thought 
he played very unselfishly; He 
wasn’t Dying to force the issue. 
They’ll try to make some adjust- 
ments and free him up a little 

In their first game since dethron- 
ing the Chicago Bulls, ibe Knicks 
held Indiana to six points in the 

IV. _ *lu» D>Xrt*rC 


dosed to 85-83. Davis’s second 3- 
pointer of the quarter and a lip-rn 
by Oakley put the Knicks back in 

control. _ 

New York was coming on an 87- 
77 decision in tbe seventh game of 
the conference semifinals against 

the Bulls, its most significant vic- 
tory since winning the NBA title in 
1973. 

The Pacers, who took a 7-2 play- 
off record into the opener, won 
Game 1 of their previous two series 
against Orlando and Atlanta cm the 
road. 

“It was very important that we 
won the first game," Anthony said. 
“They fought back lo win Game I 
in both series. We were very leery 
of that.” 

Starks, who averaged 19 points 
in the regular season, scored just 
three on I -for- 7 shooting for the 
Knicks. who play host to Game 2 of 
the besl-ol-7 series Thursday night. 
The third and fourth games at Indi- 


anapolis are Saturday afld ifas-j 
day. . -: - ? - 

The Facets WWateteffcsf 
1 :22 of the game as both Ewfog ancC 
Oakley 1 were called, for technical 
fouls, but . the Riikks caught upj 
quickly as Indiana missed. H of its 
next 15 shots and scored, ju$Vi2' 
points the rest of the qmuto. Ap<; 


••iff ft in 


3:03 of the period, - befpmg; Ncw^; 
York open a .K-2fl edge. , .; Y" : ;7'^: 

Sam^MUcfel] scored . tfw ii& , 

Indianaagain gOt'off tqaTaitata^^^ 
Rul Ewing scored- the first .four;’--; 
points and the last eight of aT^tri 
nm that lifted New York 
28 lead, . '• « V > 

The Knicks went' art to Iead : 2Ji- 

37 at halftime. Smibarid Dale Qa- " 
vis combined for Y-lbr^ sfi^ot^g 
in the first half, for Indian^ bnt ; 
their teammates missed- 1 ^ 22 :• 

attempts’. V 

The Pacers then started the ffoff 
quarter with a 7-0 y 

within nine points, before 
by Oakley, John Starks and foying- 
boflt the margin u^5944. But' the- 
Knicks missed 1 5 of 20 shots mite .» 
period, and they took just a.TOjflL'-V; 
advantage into thefirM quarter af- ?' 
ter Anthony Mason’s dome with 23 
seconds left in the third. V : NN_\-V 



ii 

* J ‘. 
' 

. • \T*A V 


Rjt Smhbkf^c/Rurtca 

Knicks’ center Patrick Ewing put a giant block on the Indiana 
Pacers’ Haywoode Workman in the fourth quarter in Mew York. 

Save the Timberwolyes? 

Compiled fry Our Staff From Dispatches 

MINNEAPOLIS — Public officials in Minnesota are scrambling to 
concoct strategies to derail a move by the Timber-wolves to New Orleans. 

“We haven’t come up with a little poison pill that will kill this and make 
them lake the local deal" said Bill Lester, executive director of the 
Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission. The Timbenvolves’ owners 
have agreed to sell the team to a New Orleans group for 5 J 52 J milbon. 

After talking lo David Stem, the NBA commissioner, Governor Arne 
Carlson of Minnesota had hope — albeit faint — that the Timbenvolves 
aren’t on their wav to New Orleans. Stem has offered Minnesota officials 
the chance to meet with the NBA's relocation committee within the next 
three weeks to make a presentation. Carlson said. 

Paul Hicks, a Minnesota stale legislative administrator, said: “I can’t 
believe they left. They ranked ninth in attendance this year. That's better- 
Lfaan half of the teams in the playoffs." 

The Timberwolves became the second pro franchise to depart in 13 
months: the North Stars hockey team went to Dallas last vear. (AP. R Pi 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 


SPORTS 




Pa«e IT 


Page '5 


mnd 


Graf, Sampras and Muster Struggle Ahead 


radiations, 
sd, being 
lie’s gravi- 


The AaacuUt'J Prrsi 

PARIS — Top seeds Siefn Graf and Peic 
Sampras straggled and won in (he second 
round of the French Open on Wednesday. 

Andre Agassi played some of his best 
tennis and lost. 

Agassi, playing against power-hitting 
Thomas Muster, rallied repeatedly, includ- 
ing a comeback from 1-5 in the final set, 
before the 1 1 th-sceded Austrian survived, 6- 
3. 6-7 15-7K 7-5. 2-6. 7-5. 

Twice a losing finalist at the French. 
Agassi missed out on a seeding by dropping 

to 19ih in the rankings while battling wrist 
trouble. 

Graf, who is pursuing her fifth consecu- 
tive Grand Slam title, was broken early m 


each set by 67ih-ranlced Stephanie Rower 
Nelhc 


herlands. but came back to win. 


VWfahK ■J’wr ;v!iJ 

i.'. 

-r. 


of the 
7-5. 6-3. 

Sampras had his hands full with Marcelo 
Rios, the youngest, lowest-ranked player in 
the field. ' An 1 8-year-old Chilean ranked 


283d, Rios forced Sampras into two closely 
beta 


fought tiebreakers before the top-ranked 
player prevailed. 7-6 <7-5|. 7-6 (7-1). 6-4. 


Schoolchildren packed into Center Court 
cheered boisterously for the long-haired 
Rios, who played the biggest match of his life 
wearing a white baseball cap turned back- 
wards and a gold earring. 

“You have to give him a lot of credit,” 
Sampras said. "He didn't let the situation 
make him nervous or intimidated. He came 
out swinging away, nothing to lose. That’s 
(he way n would be.” 

Defending champion Sergi Bruguens, the 
No. 6 seed, also advanced, 6-2. 6-2, 7-6 (7-3). 
over 1 3 5 ih- ranked Christian Ruud- 

No. 7 seed Jim Courier, the 199 i and 1S92 
champion, labored to a 7-5, 6-0. 6-7 (9-7), 6-4 
victory over Stefono Pescosolido of IuK. 

Other seeds reaching the third round were 
Na 4 seed .Andrei Medvedev of Ukraine 
who beat Nidklas Kulti of Sweden. 6-1. 7-6 
(7-4). 4-6. 7-5. and No. 12 seed Richard Kra- 
jicek. who stopped Thierry Champion of 
France. 6-3, 6-3. 4-6. 6-2. 

But 1 3 ih- seeded Magnus Gusufsson be- 
came the latest upset victim, falling to Daniel 
Vacek of the Czech Republic. 0-6. 6-4. 7-6 1 " 7 - 
4 U 6-4. 


1992 that 
oward the Page 


Graf, despite her straight-set victory, was 
bluntly sdf-criticaL 

“I played badly,” she said. “Even during 

the warmups, 1 was thinking already 1 wasn't 
playing wdL” 

The victories by Graf, Sampras and other 
seeds reversed a tread of first-round upsets. 
Three of the 16 seeded men and six of the 
women — including four of the top eight — 
lost their opening matches. 

The disarray in the women's ranks has. 

boosted the chances of such lower seeds os 
No. 9 Lindsay Davenport, No. 10 Maiy Joe 
Fernandez, No. 12 Mary Pierce and No. 15 
Helena Sukova, all second-round winners 
Wednesday. 

Davenport. 17. overcame fellow American 
Chanda Rubin in the completion of a sus- 
pended match, 6-7 (7-2), 6-4. 6-2. Fernandez 
routed Angelica Galvadoo of Mexico, 6-0, 6- 
1. 

Pierce, raised in Florida but phying for 
France, crushed 1 7-year-old Maria^ France- 
sca Bentivoglio of Italy. 64). 6-1. She is the 
only seed left in her quarter of the draw and 
could make the semifinals — probably 


against Graf — without faring a h i!, 
ranked player en route. 

”1 tty not to think about it and just -i- 
cen irate on my game.” Pierce said. “I hot- . 1 
can get as for as the semifinals so I can r v 
against Steffi. That would definitely i .i 
very exciting match." 

Sukova, a Czech, overtook Gare \\\*» v 
Britain, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2. 

Rios, winner of only SI 7.4a) in a brief i r. i 
career, had squeaked into his first Gran! 
Slam by wimung three qualifying malei c. 
He defeated another little- known qualifier. 
Joshua Eagle of Australia, on Monday, cant- 
ing the right to a second-round match with 
Sampras. 

He described himself as an Agassi fan. and 
said he fell no fear on Center Court. 

“When 1 stoned playing. I tried to concen- 
trate on my game." he said, “I didn't in 
think that I was playing with Sampras. 1 v. j* 
playing good, with a lot of confidence.' 

Sampras, who had seven aces to Rjn%'» ; 
four, said he was content to "grind it out" 
from the bosdine. 


tg circum- 
lack hote. 
it absolute 
itheHub- 


ible to get 
-light and 
■cr to the 
would be 
that their t 
be mea-' 
accelerate 
light as 'it 
it is filled 
k hole, he 


P 




IbUht kmjnk .Aprau- Ffjikr J’n-u. 

Steffi Graf’s forehand easily overwhelmed Stephanie Rentier of the Netherlands, 7-5, 6-3. 


A Series of Cracks, Really ? 

An American Biker’s Other Uphill Climb 


By Samuel Abt 

huernatuau/ Herald Tribune 

HIGH POINT. North Carolina — Waiting in 
the morning son for the airport shuttle that would 
start him home to California from the Tour Du- 
Pont. Bobby Julich was relaxed. 

There was nothing to worry about, he knew. 
What the organizers of the DuPonr had not taken 
care of, his Chevrolet/LA. Sheriff team had. His 


bicycle was bundled into its traveling bag. bis 

idle Greens- 


tagga&e was at the curb, the shuttle to i 

boro Airport ran dependably every half hour, his 
plane ticket was confirmed. 

People had seen to things. Lifeis easy for Julich. 
22, in his comeback from a year as an independent 
professional, a solitary rider in a team sport Last 
year, Julich had nobody but himself to see to 
things. 

“I would go to the races, get thereon my own. be 
really tired when I was starting a race because of all 
the logistical stuff — calling the organizer, making 
the plane reservation, making the car reservation," 
be recalled in an interview during the 12-day 
DuPonL “But that was the easy part 

“The hard part was getting on the plane, paying 
for yonr bike, once you get to your destination, gel 
your bike, get your stuff, rent a car. By this time it's 
probably 9, 10 o’clock at night Then you try to 
find something to eat drive around when you have 
no idea where you are, look for some buffet thing, 
all you can eat. some low-priced thing, try to get a 
decent meal and stay away from the food poison- 
ing that sometimes goes hand in hand with those 
all-you-can-eat places and then after that uy to get 
close to the race site and find a hold. 

“And by that time it’s usually 12 or 1 o'clock in 
the morning and you have to get up and drive an 
bow to a race and it starts at 9 o’clock. You’re up 
at 5 trying to eat. It was just a couple of hours’ 
sleep a night. 

“So it was difficult before I even started a race. 
And then, getting into the race, 1 had to cover every 
breakaway. If there was a Cooes, a Saturn, an LA. 
Sheriff and a Subaru, I had to be on it, no matter 
who it was, when it was, because that’s the combi- 
nation that’s going to go up the road. 

“And if it wouldn’t work, I had to come back 
and another would go and I had to go aga i n . I had 
to go with every smgle breakaway that looked 
dangerous to me, just to make the money to keep 
going.” 

At last he said frankly, he cracked. 

“It was a series of cracks, really," be explained. 
“More of a three strikes son of thing. 

“The first major crack came when I was unable 
to do the DuPont” in 1993, be said, after he learned 
that his sponsor had withdrawn too late in the 
« re»snn for him to join another team. The DuPont 
was dosed to him because major multiday races do 
not admit independent riders. 

“That was when I realized I’m m big trouble, he 

said. “I always had a positive attitude and figured a 
Ti»fim would' pick me up by DuPont time. And 
when I was-atting on ray couch in California and 
watching the prologue on TV, I really had a Jude 
-problem there. I was depressed beyond all belief. I 
was pretty much ready to bag it nght there. My 
girlfriend, Angela, hdped get me through- 

Then be was recruited by a Portuguese team 
that, although it failed to pay hnn, gave tommtiy 
to such major races as the CoreStates U.S. Cham- 
pionship in Philaddphia. . 

By the CoreStates, Julich continued, I started 
to come on, I started to fed rtrong. I was rathe 
final breakaway. After 155 miles. witb5niOTeto 
m we got caught. That was the second blow TTrere 
fwas m a semi-up breakaway and fjra if I got 
seventh, it was going to be about S5.000, which 
would have done amazing things for my financial 

’TbSS FEdtad dul: «a, ovarii 

some team wotdd have picked me up. After that I 


got depressed again for a couple or weeks and 
a g ain my girlfriend pulled me oul" 

Several weeks later, at two races in California, he 
took the third strike. 

“I went toa race in San Rafael and it was so hoi, 
about 1 10 degrees honestly. I started the race with 
what I thought were two water bottles, but I guess 
when I turned my bike upside down to get it in the 
car, one erf my bottles fully drained out ” With no 
support staff, Julich had nobody to pass ton more 
water. 

“I got dehydrated, cramped up, wound up mak- 
ing no money. The third strike was that I had never 
missed a race in my life, but the next day I missed 
the race in San Jose because I thought it was at 4 
and it really was a: 2:30. 

“And that was a sign right there. I had never 
missed a race, I had never made that mistake. And 
that was it for me, 

“I just went into major depression from there 
which taught me a lot about myself. 1 never 
thought Faf all into major depression. You hear a 
lot about it happening to people hut I never 
thought it would happen to me.” 

How bad was his depression? 

“I didn’t want to do anything. I didn't want to 


leave the house, all 1 did was sit there. The only 


time I went out was to get food. All I did was watd 
TV. I was a total slug. 

“I spent so much of my time watching TV and 
drinking, ‘When am I going to pull out of this?* And 


that day-wasnT coming. That signal never came. 
I felt 


“I feat as if I hadn’t raced in years. I’d read about 
the guys racing or watch them on TV and think. 
“Gosh, I used to do that.’ My girlfriend tried to pull 
me out ofil but 1 think I was pushing her away. All 
I wanted was to be left alone. 

“Finally ...” A tortured pause. “I remember 


sitting there and I felt so fat and I'm usually pretty 

riiTor and 1 


was 


skinny and I looked at myself in a minor am 
so embarrassed.” 

From a weight of 160 pounds (72 kilograms) on 
his 6-foot frame, he had ballooned. "I had been a 
successful athlete and in a month, a month and a 
half, my whole life had gone to poL I fell like a 
total failure for the first tune in ray Hfe.” 

Writing off 1993, Julich decided to uy one more 
: to find a team for the next season. 


time i 


“I think many people could have bowed out and 

id. That’s h/ but I’ve always had a competitive 
instinct and I couldn't say it," he said. “I felt like I've 
never been a matter. If I’d given up. I would have 
teamed that mien things get hard, just give up." 

Julich resumed training in California and began 
phoning and faxing teams to ask about a job for 
1994. In November, the Chevrolet/ LA. Sheriff 
team made an offer. 

“I said Til take it.' There was no counteroffer by 
me, no bargaining.” 

Dave Lettieri, the e&recieur sporrif for the team, 
is pleased with his new rider. 4 He’s a young guy. 
very talented,” he said during the DuPonL “He fits 


in wdl and we're very haj>p^ with him.’ 


Up to the DuPonL Julich bad recorded seven 
victories this season. “Once 1 found a team, ! 
. to fed like an athlete again," he said, 
fabcii refuses to describe 1993 as a wasted year. 
“In retrospect, last year was the best thing that 


could ever happen to me as a person and an 
athlete,” he said. “I matured ligbt-j 


-years. I know 
now when things go bad it's just for a brief time. 
You have to trim off the peaks and fill in the 
valleys because Ofe and sports are an everlasting 
roller coaster. 

“The lesson I teamed last year was an overdue 
lesson. 1 always had it handy for me. I may have 
deserved a lot of things I received but I wasn't 
appreciative and now I’ve seen the other side of the 
fence, I know what it’s hke, bow hud it is, and I 
don’t believe anyone can become successful with- 
out ill the help you geL” 

(This is the second of two articles.) 


French Open 
Resuhsfor 
2d Round 


he mvisi’ 


: to keep , e 
ithoutits 


MEN'S SINGLES 

P«to torn pros |1), uj. art. Marcelo nws. 
Chita. 7-4. (7/Si. 7-4 . (7/4). 04 
Fabrics San loro, France. Ort. Jonathon Stork. 
UA. 62. 6-5. 6-7 

Or so Rusedski. Canada, art. Alexandre Vol- 
ta*. Russia. 7-5. 6-3. 3-6. 6-3 
Andrei Medevedev 1 41. Ukraine, Ort. Nietos 
Krttl, Sweden. 6-4, 7* (7/4). 66. 7-5 
Mikael Til iv room. Sweden, art, Andrei Ol- 
hovsklv. Russia. 6-1 7-6. (7/3). 6-4 
Richard Krallcrfc lit). NMitortanas. art. 
Tnierrv Champion. France, Mu.44.e-: 
OorH el Vacek. Czech, del. Moon us Gusiaisson 
((31. Sweden. 06. 6-*, 7-4. (Irni. 6* 

Paul Hoarhuisb Netherlands, art. Lars ions 
son. Sweden, 6-1 2-6, 1-6. 7-1 6-3 
rnamas Muster (ID. Austria, del. Anare 
Aaassl. U1 6-1 6-7. (S/71, 7-1 7-6, 7 5 


: mass at 
it to that 
3 billion, 
de could 
henome- 
ed, only 


further 
ag to get 
er to see 
eswouM 
iew mea- 
. “would 


WOMEN'S SiNOLES 

stem Graf IIJ, German/. drt. Stephanie nat- 
tier. Netherlands. 7-s. 6-3 
MOry Pierce (12). France. art. Marta France- 
sco Bmllvoalta. Italy. 6-0. 6-1 
Ludmila RidiMnwa Czech, drt. Yaml Whli- 
ikW, US. 6-4. 6-3 

Ines Garrncholegut. Argentina, del. Naofto 

Sawamatsu. Japan, 7-1 64 

Mary -Joe Fernander (lot. US_det. Anocllto 

GavoMon. Mexico. 6 - 0 , 6-7 

Miriam Oremans. Netherlands. art. Saotne 

Apprtmans. Belgium, 6-3. 1-6, 6-4 

Joanetla Kruger. South Africa, del. Rod to 

Zbrubakova Slovakia 4-4, 7-x 6-3 

Karin Kschwcndt. Germany, drt. Mm&erlv 

Pa. US, M 61, 7-S 

Lor! McNeil, US. drt. Kristie Boovert. Neth- 
erlands. 4-6. 6-1. 62 

ttmMaloll,CnMlla < drt. Silvia Farina ltalv.6- 
U1 

Rimandra Draganir, Romania drt. Sandra 
CecchlnL Italy. 6-2. 61 6-» 

Marfcem ICochta. Germany, art . Katarina mo- 
laevo. Bulgaria O*. 4-1 6-7 

MEN'S DOUBLES 
First Round 

Lon Bale, South Alrica/Brett Steven, N Zea- 
land. drt. Brer Garnett, ussrj. Middleton. 
U.S. 7-4. 47/21. 63 

Elites Ferreira South Africa/ Mark kml US. 
del Brian Mocpmc/Bry an Shelton. U-S.S-7. 6 
4. 64 

Pablo Aibana, Arg/Roger Smim, Bah. art. 
Shelby Cannon, UJL/David Mocphersoa Aus- 
tralia 7-6, (7/51. 64 

GfWHConnrtLCaiada/Potrck Galbraith ill. 
US~ drt. Stefan Kruaer/MaraH Ondraska 
South Africa 63. 62 

Martin Dcmm/Koret Navacek (M). Czech. 
deLOanaW Johnson/ Kent Kbmeor. Ui.7-6. 
(7/4). 63 

Yevgeny Kafelnikov. Runta/Dovia rim tn,. 
nech.de! Tomas Cartwirtf.Saain/LI&ar pi- 
mrtt. BetMum. 62, 62 
Marc Gooiiner, Germany /Jos tar Soncnei 
(10). Spain, drt. John-Laffnle De jagoer'Kc 
vtn UH/elt. S Africa 7-t. (7/3), 63 
Watty Mow. Ausrolia/David Pare, US. del. 
Crist lan Brandl/Freaerico Mordegan. Holy, 
7/6. (7/11. 7-6. (7/3). 

Luke Jensen/ Murphy Jensen 1131. drt. 
Gin Ozrtde. Latvia /Lars Wdhlgrea Sweden, 
61 7-4, (7/5) 

Jean- PhUtope Fiewrtan/Stentiane suntan. 
Franco.deL Jhm Grabb/Jared Poimor. UJ. 6 

1. 63 

Todd VWrtfcridge/Morh Waadforde Ml. Aus. 
tralladrt Ate* OUr len/OavId Wilt, UA. 62 62 
Henrik Hodn/AndersJarryd (7), Sweden, drt. 
Mike Bauer . U .1/Byron Talbot, S Africa. 3-4. 
61 64 

WOMEN'S DOUBLES 
FfcSI Round 

Nicole Pravls. Austrolta/ Elena Relnacti. 
south Africa drt. Sabine Hack, German r- 
/ Caroline Schne id er. Germany. 60. 62 
Mala Mwric. Yugosiavta/Betav Naaeisen, 
UJL. drt. Alexandra IHista, France/Moga6 
Mna Miw. Poland. 62, 6-4 
Dailrtle Jones. AmtroHa/Yone Kamto. Jo- 
paadrt. AMkaKlIbnuta/Naoka Klltmuta. jo 
pan. 7-1 63 

Kristine RocUortt Auslralla'Jullr RJcnard- 
son. New 2ealOMLdoL Mtcndlo Joggoro-Lal. 
Austral lO/Martanne WerdeL u 3. 61 7-s 
Olga Luglna Ukralne/Elena Wagner. Grr- 
monv, drt. IGHcnrfsJ/V I ckta Poynter. Ui-6 

2. 7-6, (7/4) 

Laura Golano, Italy/ Mercedes Pa 1141. Ar- 
oemlnou art. Tracey Morton. auutdIio/ko- 
farlika Teoaarawlcz, Poland, 61. 63 
Wlrtrud Pratea/Cfirlsllna Singer. Germany, 
drt. ConcMta Monfnez , spatn/JudUn win- 
ner. Austria. 61 61 

Pam Sh river. U J^EIIzabeltiSmvIta (51. Aus- 
tralia. drt. Elena Brloukhovers. Uknnne/E 
tana Markova, Russia 6-4. 66. EM 
Sandy Collins. U^/ Mo Moon De SMorai. 
South Africa drt. Karina Hobsudovo/Radha 
Zrvbokova Slovakia 7-1 63 
Kvrtoslava HrdUckava/Evo Mrtlctwrava 
Czech, drt. Catalina Crtsteo, Romania/ Sie- 
Ptanie Reece. U1 7a <7/11. 6-3 
WOMEN'S SINGLES 
Rrst Round 

Mrtke Babel, Germany, drt. Pattv Pendlrt. 
UJS.6164 

Lindsay Pov e nport 191, ui drt. Chanda Ru- 
bin, US, 67. (2/7). 61 63 
Katar in a Nowak, Palana drt. Lea GhlrardL 
Francs. 61 62 



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Andre Agassi of the United States strangled long and hard but fell to Thomas Muster of Austria, 6-3, 6-7 (5-7), 7-5, 24, 7-5. 


*Ov»' _ 

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Luiiem Irtmi TV- Ay,«jjio! hai . 


Agassi Rises to Occasion, Then Falls 


opantes 

partial- 
a have 
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inCon- 
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Nations 
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By Ian Thomsen 

I nier national Herald Tribune 
PARIS — The bottom line is 
that .Andre Agu>si is our. but the 
way he went out of the French 
Open was son of like the way Ame- 
lia Earhan retired from flying. 

The umpire took away a point 
from him early in the fifth set «if hi.-, 
second-round match against IHh- 
seeded Thnma> Mumcl and in that 
nrument of Gcprroikm :hc element-, 
of millionaire imm> s»ei upon 
Agassi. He let three crucial games 
escape him. three precious gallons 
of gasoline. 

He was down by 5-1 in the final 
set when be held serve as if trying to 
lose it. He was. throwing tantrums 
at (he ball, and the bail was landing 
in. The French crowd, which loves 
its artists, was beseeching him, and 
their song was like the inspirational 
music or a movie: the more life he 
showed, the louder the music, until 
Muster could hardly hear his own 
breath going short. 

“1 never seem to surprise myself 
when i come to the Orand Slam 
tournaments." Agassi said morose- 
ly after his t>- J. 6-7 (7-5l. 7 *5. 2-6. ?- 
5* loss. “In another sense. I think 
when somebody pushes me m j 
tease environment like that I rise n» 
the occasion." 

He hasn’t been to a Grand Slam 
final since winning his first major 
Ulle at Wimbledon two years ago. 
There have been injuries and wrist 
surgery. Last summer at Wimble- 
don. he almost repealed hi% tri- 
umph without hariih training at 
all. This year he had a new touch, a 
new level’ of physical fit no-, and vet 
few of the raiahtv result, lie was 
expecting on clay/ 

And he almost seems lu prefer a 
that way. to have some part of hi> 
game in disarms. He wj» given 
littie hope in the second round 
Wednesday againsi Muster 
"1 think going nut there. I’ve had 


a rough clay court season and to 
play a day court guy like Muster 
wasn’t easy for me." Agassi said. 

He was broken at the beginning 
of each of the first two sets, and as 
Muster began trying to serve out 
the second set for a 2-0 lead there 
was little reason to imagine what 
followed. 

In that 10th game, in the 69th 
minute. Agassi created his first 
break points, forcing a tiebreaker 
— and in that tiebreaker Muster 
could have earned two set points. 
But he double-faulted instead, his 
second serve hooking clear He 
looked up and saw the (lags in the 
new Court A pulled taut in the 
same direction. Agassi won the 
next four points to equalize the 
match. 

‘‘Actually. I let him do iu” Mus- 
ter said. “I gave him the second set 
which he lost already, almosL" 

Muster has recovered from his 
own miseries. He was hit by a 
drunk driver in J 9S9 hours aJter 
defeating Yannick Noah to reach 
the final of the Upton Internation- 
al in Key Biscayne: and this month 
there ivere back problems, but he 
had recovered from every thin g to 
chase down most of what Agassi 
was throwing at him. In the fourth 
set Agassi was heard cursing — not 
for the first time in the match — 
and received a wanting from the 
chair umpire. Bruno Rebeuh of 
France. 

In the third game of the fifth set. 
Agassi was deducted a point and 
told that he would be thrown out 
for one more violation. It was hard 
to tell what he had said exactly. 

"In the fifth set I wouldn’t say 
anything that would give me u 
warning, and I certainly didn't 
think what I had said was deserving 
of a warning or a one-point penal- 
ty.” Agassi said. ”1 was very much 
under the impression it was O.K. 
It's just sad that the guy in the chair 


could just do thaL 1 didn't think 1 
was deserving of iL and had I 
known I certainly wouldn’t have 
said it.” 

Later he approached the chair 
and asked for the umpire's name. 
Apparently Agassi had trouble un- 
demanding him. “I may forget 
your name, but I won't forget your 
face," Agassi told Rebeuh. 

Muster said: “In the fifth I start- 
ed playing very well. Then he just 
released the tension by not ranking, 
but by bitting the balls ail over the 
place. He started putting me under 
the pressure, and the crowd came 
on his side, and I had to play 
against everybody." 

Agassi broke Muster twice to 
pull even at 5-5. and for each the 


environment was nothing like the 
gentlemanly sport to which they 
are accustomed. The people were 
seesawing emotion ally with 
and he appeared exhausted: while 1 
Muster simply looked angry, and it ' 
says more about him that he was 
able to break down Agassi over the • 
course of four break point'-, and 
(hen cash in his first /natch p. int in : 
the achy 222d minute : 

“I just told him congratuia u..«. ..- 
and that he deserved u> win ti.L’ . 1 . - 

the end, the way he played.” sud 
Agassi who, 30 minutes after the 
match, looked like he might cry. 
“He- said yeah, it was a battle like 
always, and I said yeah, like al- 
ways." 

No. not like a I wavs. Not at all. • 


sd that 
exports 
« year 
tiles Jo 
id have 
l term 
.es. But 
at the 
ar sold 
China, 
in (hp 


SIDELINES 


secre- 
sd, for 
of the 
r U.S. 
jspace 
t VS. 
imisly 

status 

million 

ircrafl 


Valderrama to Host 1997 Ryder Cup 


VIRGINIA WATER, England (AP) — Valdenama. a course on 
Spain's Costa del Sol, was selected Wednesday as the site of 1992 Ryder 
Cup matches, ending one of the bitterest disputes in the history of the 
international golf series. 


Valderrama, called the “Augusta of Europe," had been the expected 
choice by the Ryder Cup committee. It was picked over six other Spanish 
courses, including Novo Sancti Petri, designed by Seve Ballesteros. 


his to 

■Deuce 
ogress 
ted to 
tstrio- 
a was 
if ife 
which 
:Cbi: 


Ballesteros lobbied hard for Novo Sancti Petri and resigned from the 
committee because or the perceived conflict of interest. Ballesteros said 
Valderrama lacked infrastructure, was too exclusive and too weli-mam- 
cured, suiting the playing style of the Americans over the Europeans. 


For the Record 


l been 
xJe ef 
doing 
would 
xiucts 
potiti- 

WCTK- 


A French football manager who admitted injecting vulium into an 
opposing team’s water bottles at halftime of a February IW3 match 
between regional teams in central France was given a six-month suspend- 
ed sentence and a 5,000-franc (S900) fine. ' f -I t'Pi 


Two tries by Tony Underwood and 16 points from the tuvu l«i flyiiali 
Stuan Barnes was enough to give England a slim 26-24 \icton f»cr 
Western Transvaal in South Africa on Wedncsdav. tRiwni 


SCOREBOARD 


Mater League Standings 


LosAiioetes 
Son Francisco 
Colorado 
San Otago 


WertOi rtjtoe 



S 21 

M 

rt- 

21 24 

JS7 

3» 

19 24 

M2 

4ta 

13 K 

3» 

nb 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

B4Hf Division 
, W L 


Tuesday's Line Scores 


now York 

Barton 

BaWmoCo 

Tomto 

Detroit 


» 13 
27 1* 
35 17 

21 72 
19 22 


Central DtviSon 


CMesM 
Ctevrtand 
NUnmstaiO 
Kansas arv 
MlhmuWe 


CatKornto 

Texas 

Seattle 

Oakland 


25 17 

23 2D 
22 21 
21 21 
17 » 
WHt Division 
21 25 

19 23 
19 2S 
. a 32 


EdrtDtvtfOd 

W L 

Aflassn. . 27 

Ntantroo. 25 % 

Ftarfcta * S 

PftiKtartFWO “ w 

NewYert 

• - cesfrgi DfvHtan 


□netanatl 

naqnm 

SL Louts 

Plltaburrti 

Chlcaso 


M t* 
M- 2D 
23 M 
19 23 
19 » 


pet 

GB 

M 

— 

MS 

2 ta 

SK 

4 

M 

9 

463 

Vh 

S* 

— 

s a 

3 

J 12 

3 Hi 

J00 

4 

J 06 

9 

AST 

- 

AS2 

— 

433 

1 

JW 

TYi 

IE 

Ptf. 

GB 

643 

— 

J 68 

3 

Jll 

SV 4 

AW 

tn 

AU 

tn 

sn 

- 

-MS 

2 

J* 

lift 

A& 

6 

.442 

6 » 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Taranto w m W-i s 1 

NewYWtC 12B 301 7 I 

StoNort. Ttmtln W.Codnrrt (71, Brow (■) 
art Bontarg; MuthoHane end Lovm. 
W-MufiwttaffL H. L— Sttwcrrl, 3-4 
HRs-TofWtta Alomar (3). New York. Bom 
U), Lovrm (•). 

rimlane #» Ut 996-5 a 2 

P -^~. 1 M Me tftl -3 • s 

Morris,Mc5D (U,5taMvm end Aunwr; 
tala Howard u). Rdtrol r ta 17) and Volte. 
Berry Mil (9), W-Morrta, 64 U-Sele, 62. 

jj). HR-CIewtond, Sen-ento Hi. 
Cofitarata m m «!-l 21 1 

Ortrrtf 10 * M 3 MB— 5 » 6 

Flntay, Bowser (7). Patlenan (7), Gnjhe 
(9) and Rtturegai; Guincuoa SJSenrts 16), 
Be-vtr m ml Flaherty. Kroutar 17). 
W-FWW.*» L-Guilidtton,W.HRs-C«t- 
tomki. Hudter MMSdmon OIL BJodcsan (51. 
u| yMnl ft 009 910 2rt— 3 11 2 

nipy 200 Me 3W-5 I t 

Mamows. Cnrtan (75. Wlffl* (7) and wtaK 
Mk; mcOosmIi, DeLeon rn. Coot (7). 
ft^Cashid (B).Heraaadn (9) and LaVaUtara, 
w 2 - 0 . j.— Cmtaa 1 j, svHtorafliidtt 

(<>. MRs—Cltkwfc'ritattwtUJ.Mewon (1). 
▼■kos 109 91* 6 1 

Uonsos Otv «* rn 606-9 6 o' 

pggtnaM Rodriguez; G uOhu a Ptehardo 


( 2 ), Mngnonw |J),M«ilwwv ( 9 ) end Mac- 
torttata. W — Rosen, 5 - 3 . L-GuWaa K 
HR— Texas, Canseco ( 50 ). 

Texas IN >ll 0 M — 2 6 1 

I pini i ii COy 009 000 009-0 i • 

Raaorsend Rodrtguau Gubkza. Pichardo 
(111 Maenanto (B), Montgomery ( 9 ) ona Map- 
tartana W fl oat rs. 5 - 3 . L— Gutacu. 2 - 4 . 
H 56 — Texas, Canseco ( 10 ). 

BoUfnwra 999 Ml 120 — U U • 

MBwaoket W oaa 000—5 11 2 

SJ^ernandet, ElcMiorn ( 2 ). Mills ( 7 ) ana 
Hones: Htouera, BronKev < 41 . oraaea ( 5 ). 
Henry ( 6 ). Scanlon [B>, Navarro ( 9 ) ona nih- 
ssa w-mcMianv M. L-Htowra 1-4 
5 v— MUIt 1 1 ). HR*— Bottlmore, CRIpkcn < 31 . 
Gomia 2 M), HoUn ( 7 ), Vblgt ( 3 ). Milwaukee. 
G.vaurtm ( 7 ), Mtaske ( 3 ). 

sedftM em in tie - 1 5 1 

Oakland 160 013 OB* — TO 10 9 

HBtaara. Gownoo ( 71 - PlUanberg ( 9 ) and 
Hatotmanr JhAertObOnttvarMlB) and Shrin- 
bacit Holland (M. W— Jimenez, 5 - 2 . L-+ 4 to- 

bona. Ml 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montreal 132 ON B 3-11 M ■ 

Florida ON ON 019-1 3 1 

Henry. Roles (21 ana Fletaw, Sortir 191 ; 
HouatL Aaulno (», Mulls ( 7 ), Lewis ( 9 ) and 
Ttnetav, Ortoltoran t?>. W-Henrv, M. 
■L— Hough, 60 . HRs— Montreal, Cordero ( 21 . 
Florida Everett ( 2 ). 

Houston Ml m 2 BS — 0 U 1 

Atlanta ON ON 190—0 3 0 

oraUkortSorvtrt;<ltavtne,BadrDslon(n. 
Stanhn ( 8 ). Hill W o«t L«<B- W-OreWcM. 
l— G iavine. 64 HR— Houston. Servo la ( 3 ). 
PM— IN ON 004-4 9 0 

M. uais ■* 888 N 0 -e 9 t 


WosLMwuz ( 51 , Sioomt) f 7 ). Jones ( 9 ) and 
(Mutton; Fakstios, Arom 17 ). Pera W- 
Ewnperd 191 and PnrozzJ. W-Sloaimt). 60 . 
L— Perez, 1 - 1 . HR— PtiUadMnhta IncavtaJio ■ Tl. 
New York on ion ora — a ii o 

PmuargO IN no) 006—3 s s 

Bjones, Franca 19 ) and sitanrth Z 4 miih 
Hone ( 7 ), White ( 9 ), Brtlard 19 ) and staugdi. 
w-BJorns, 64 L-wmie. !-7 Sv-Franco 
191 , HRs— N.Y. Bonilla 17 ). Ry.ThamPMn ( 91 . 
OnctanatJ N 1 no Hi— 7 13 0 

Cdtoraao 149 NO 22 x— II 17 7 

Hanson, Sctnurek ( 61 . j.RutHn ( 6 i, McEF 
ray ( 7 J. Spradlin IB) and Toufaensec; N«d,. 
Bonetrfirtd ( 51 , S. Reed ( 7 ), Moore IB). B.Rul- 
fln (91 and Glrardl. w— Bsttonttaid. :- 0 . 
<— Hanson. 3 - 4 . HRs— Cineiivtan. Larkin ( 4 ). 

TauDonsoe ( 1 ). Colorado. E,Youno ( 4 ). 

Sob Franctsra era M 0 009-3 6 l 

tee Dtaeo 490 BN Oto -6 10 0 

HkSnnon, Burba ( 7 ), Frey (Bl ona Manwar- 
too; Hamilton, EIHott 171 , Noll man ! 9 I ana Aus* 

■ma. W — H o nd Hotv m l— H icvrrsoa 7-4 

Sw -4 tol l m an ( 61 . HR— Son Diego, PXkrt ill. 
CltiCMM M 2 M 009-2 9 1 

UKAOMee ON 000 109-0 4 0 

Uanla and Wilkins; Hemlurr. TO.Worreii 
<91 and Plana, w— Banks. 64 L— Heremser. 
M. 


Mies in lSatlernPl-. Deiensiari*. Jordon iw> 
60 du touts, one assisi ond t.ve errors 


Japanese Leagues 


Central Leaour 



w 

L 

T 

P/l 

GB 

Yotniuri 

23 

IS 

3 

60S 

- 

Chunlcni 

21 

16 

0 

St S 

V: 

Yakult 

1 ? 

» 

0 

487 

4’-. 

vohonoma 

IB 

1* 

0 

486 

4>.' 

Homnin 

17 

21 

b 

J47 

6 

tilrosnima 

14 

21 

0 

400 

’■ a 


WfldnesBCiy-s Results 
Yoaiiwn 8. HansTiin 5. U mnmgs 
Cliunlclii 7. Hiroshima S 
7 okanama io, vakun 3 


Selbu 

PoCihc Lroour 
W L T 

24 14 0 

pci 

»32 

GB 

Dfliei 

2? 

16 

b 


) : 

0n« 

18 

l« 

0 

at 


Lone 

17 


e 

iV- 

6*-. 

Monon Horn 

(7 

22 

1 

A3o 

7’ i 

Kintetjv 

14 

M 

1 


6 


Indloiw: ODavis 4 - 7 66 U.McKev 67 3 - 13 . 
Smlts 10-17 7 -8 37 . Fleming 3 - 65 - 5 1 1 Miller 611 
14 14 . ADmi Is 2 - 4 65 S. Workman D-BMO. ScoH 
:-3 3 - 37 , k. williams 1-2 CM) 3 , VJIchell 3-5 M 6 
Totoa 30-72 26 3 S 09 . 

New Yore: Ochler 61544 20 . 5 mitn 34 ^ 2 B. 
E wing 1 1-24 66 TB. Hamer 64636 Storks 1 - 7 1 - 
7 i h Wiliams 0-1 OO (L £ntnany 611 64 16 
Mason 2 - 26 ^iq.HBa«rs 6 WM 1 L Totals to- 
rt n-a too. 

3 -Pitini goals— Indiana 1 -5 (Miller 1 - 2 DU 0 - 
wISOl.McKevOl.MJIcnrtlO-ll.New Yon 6-16 
i An many 3 - 7 , KOavIs 2 -t Homer t -1 storks 6 
U. Farted out-MCKey. Rebounds— Indiana 
rt (DJJcyis. SmUs 101 , New York 48 (Oakley 
13 ). Assists— (nd lane 36 [Workman 71 . now 
iort 28 (Siarks 6 ). Total tool*— Indiana S. 
New York 23 Teefirtcrti— Ewing. Oakiev. 
Ftaoram foul— Oakley. 


allies— Mandenn lie. Tor (rteowlng), 13 : 09 ; 
Borsdhevsky, Tor I roughing), 17 : 01 . 

TOW period— None. Penalties— Elieti. Tor 
fcrass<n*ci(Jng).4:4J: Lrtebvre. Tor leross- 
cneckinal. 6:24: Lumme. van (stashing), 
0:24; Diduck. Van (reuehlng), 7:43.- Mironov, 
Tor inotalnpi. 0:44 

Pirst overtime— None. Penotties-None. 


Second overtime— 7, Vancouver. Adams 5 
(Linden. Badych). :14 Penalties— Nurn 


Shots on goal—' Toronto >669-741—34 Van- 
couver 11-1614-7-1—46: RONer-utay apfiortun- 
Itta*— ' Toronto 1 o(?; Vancouver » ol 4: 300- 
Urs — Tor on id. Potvln. *-9 id shois-47 saves) 
Vancouver. McLean 12-5 13 + 31 ) 


Weenrsdavs Results 
Dotal 4 Seltiu 2 
Nlonon Ham 4 Lorn . 1 7 
Orix 7 . Kinietsu 3 


Tuesday's NHL Playoff 


The Michael Jordan Watch 


TUESDAY'S GAME: Jordan mini I-Ior-4 
wtth a rtngta. had a stolon nose and nod inrec 
putouts bn a 10-j loss » NaNoHlle. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan H dotting sn 
UMw-lSH with 11 runs, seven Doubles. 21 
RB,S - 12 mill's. 4* striheouis ona 13 stolen 


Tuesday’s NBA Playoff 


Indiana 30 17 2* 26— s? 

New von 71 71 it 70—100 

New Yon leoos seriHS 1-0 


Taraoio 3 0 0 0 9-4 

Vancouver 1 3 0 0 1—4 

Vancouver wins series 4>l 

First neriMS— 1. Toronto Eastwood 3 

iGannen 7:54. z Toronto. Gilmour 6 iBors 
cne»sfcv . £ ilenj, II : 37 idpi. 3. Toronu.CtarV 9 
1 Eastwood 1. 12.19. Penalty— Brawn, vein 
inaiainai. 11:77. 

Second period— 4. Vancouver, Craven 4 
iCourinall. Glynn 1. 1:34. 5 Vancouver. LO- 
iQ.rlir ? 1 Craven. Court nail). Y;33. 0 . Varvctw 
>er. Adnms4iur>aen. Bum. 17 Pinoi Pen- 


wre to 4 L INTWmTSINAI. M # f 

iicral 0 vl&<!>nbunc — i 

IS4kW CU lb V. W4 r— wJ 16 Pm 

LIVING IN THE U.S.? 

Now printed in 
Newark 
For Same Day 
Delivery in Key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE. CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-7523890) 


10 creai 
th broa 
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ring the 
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Page 18 

ART BUCHWALD 

Bill and Hill in the Polls 


W ASHINGTON — The worst 

tiling for President Clinton 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1994 


- 



thing Tor President Clinton 
right now is to wake up every 
morning and have Hillary read him 
tire overnight popularity polls. As 
he is tying his running shoes she 
says, “You’ve dropped six points in 
the Little Rock YWCA poll since 
Wednesday. Fifty-three percent 
say that you 
messed around 
too much with 
Paula Jones, but 
that you didn't 
mess' around 
enough with 
Haiti” 

“What does 
the YWCA in m a 
L ittle Rock 
know about D ■. .. 

Haiti?" Buchwakl 

“Eighty percent of oJJ the call-in 
talk shows question either your 
health plan or what you eat in a 
fast-food restaurant. Forty percent 
believe that you fixed the Universi- 
ty of Arkansas basketball game and 
12 percent think that you kept the 
favorite horse Holy Bull from win- 
ning the Kentucky Derby. Four 
percent say that you have some- 
thing going with Barbra Streisand." 

“Hillary, you don’t believe that 
stuff, do you?" 

"Political opinion polls never 
lie." 

□ 

“What else do they say?" 

“You’re still very popular with 


A Festival for Those- 
Who Love to Love Luo 

V 

The .4 vi',i < ued Pros 
JAMESTOWN. New York — 
People around these pans still love 
Lucy — and Tacky and Ethel and 
Fred. too. 

The hometown of Lucille Ball is 
sta g in g the fourth annual LucyFesl 
a memorial to the flaky redhead 
who defined TV situation comedy 

in the 1950s. The exploits of Lucy 
and Ricky Ricardo and Fred and 
Ethel Mertz live on in endless re- 
runs of the 1951-57 ”1 Love Lucy, 
and organizers of the LucyFesl — 
its formal name is the Lucille Ball 
Festival of New Comedy — try to 
further keep Ball's spirit alive by 
showcasing fresh talent. 


Rhodes Scholars in the northeast- 
ern part of the country, but you've 
gone way down with World Cup 
soccer fans who feel that you blew 
your chance to make North Korea 
a law-abiding nation." 

“Hillary. T have to go. People 
who see me running early in the 
morning like me very much." 

“Liberal Hollywood thinks that 
you're doing a good job, but 67 
percent of all Jewish voters believe 
that you should wear jockey shorts 
instead of boxers before making a 
deal in the Middle East” 

“Hillary, i'm getting sick and 
tired of this. All the polls do is 
bring bad news. You and I know 
that I'm doing a good job. why 
doesn't the public know it as wdlT' 

“Bill, don’t get discouraged. To- 
day's negatives could be tomor- 
row’s affirmatives. You’ve gone up 
two points with the Sioux Indians 
and the eighth grade class at Amer- 
ican Friends believes that you 
pulled our chestnuts out of the fire 
m Sarajevo." 

□ 

M I don’t expect to be loved by all 
the American people, but I 
wouldn’t mind being more popular 
with the boomer population of Chi- 
natown." 

“Bill, it’s not just your problem. 1 
find slippage For myself with the 
Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution. Fifty-six percent of their 
membership call me a smarty 
pants, and 44 percent think that'! 
should stay home and help Chelsea 
with her homework." 

‘if it weren’t for the polls. Hilla- 
ry, we could enjoy being the first 
couple of the country. At this point 
in any administration the president 
can expect to be bashed by an un- 
grateful electorate." 

“It doesn't matter what they 
think. Bill.” 

D 

“What do he think, Hillary?" 

"About what?" 

“About anything." 

“I don't know what we think . 

Bill." 

“Neither do I.” 

“Should we pul ourselves io the 
‘Don't Know' column?" 

“It's better to be there than to be 
known as a president basher. What 
are you going to do today, Hilla- 
ry?’ 

“Play the commodities market 
With these polls on your populari- 
ty, we could make a bundle." 


George Gruntz: To Be Funky and Swiss 


By Mike Zwerin 

fnrerrtu/irmaJ Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Funky means earthy, a sort 
of healthy dirt.lt comes out of .African 
American argot. “You sure are a funky 
drummer.” can be considered a compli- 
ment. It may also mean just-plain dirty, as 
in “my tailor is funky." But even then, a 
certain amount of esteem is involved. Like, 
it lakes talent to be ifuii dirty. You might 
call it a social statement Funky is the 
antithesis of bourgeois. 

There are few less funky people on earth 
than the Swiss. The Swiss pianist arrang- 
er, composer and bandleader George 
Gruntz adorns to having “the most un- 
funky youih you can imagine. 1 grew up in 
Basel playing Swiss pop tunes with a Boy 
Scout band. When 1 was 14, 1 heard jazz 
Tor the first time and after that there wav, 
never any doubt about what I wanted to 
do with my life. My experience is very 
different from a black American, no deny- 
ing that, but I think i can play as dirty as 
anyone." 

That may sound a bit defensive, but the 
fact remains that the George Gruntz Con- 
cert Jazz Band, a formidable big band 
staffed by some of the best and best- 
known (mostly American) players since it 
was founded in 1972, is grotesquely under- 
rated. It has never been a full-time occupa- 
tion for am body, which is one secret of its 
musical success (familiarity breeds the 
same old licks). Even year the hand goes 
out for short, prestigious, subsidized tours 
and records an album or two. 

The three-week Swiss and German tour 
I made with the band in 1978 combined 
the best of both worlds. Hotels, travel 
arrangements, sound and tight engineering 
and the salaries were Swiss level. The mu- 
sic was flat-out American. The band was 
integrated and included European musi- 
cians nurtured by Americans. The impres- 
sive selection of section-men-cum-impro- 
visers included Elvin Jones. John Scofield. 
Pa He Mikkelborg, Howard Johnson. 
Woody Shaw. Jimmy Knepper and Fran- 
co Aznbrosetti. Gruntz's friend Ambro- 
setti is a world-class trumpeter and an 
industrialist in the Ticino in his spare time. 
The two of them teamed- up look like a 
Swissair ad for service to Lhe Land of 
Oobla-Dee. Gruntz is a great costing di- 
rector. He hired the young Scofield before 
Miles Davis “discovered" him. It was the 
only band I ever played with in which 
there was absolutely nobody 1 wanted to 
avoid on the bus. 

The GGCJB is now earning the recogni- 
tion it has long deserved but been denied, 
at least in pan, because its leader is white 
and Swiss. In the late 1980s. the GGCJB 
began to place in the critics polls of such 
magazines as Down Beal and the Japanese 







s-mm 


After a most tmfimky youth, Gruntz says, “I can play as dirty as anyone.* 


Swing Journal, in 1988, Gruntz received 
the best performance award from the Jap- 
anese Music and Audio Critics Associa- 
tion (the Rolling Stones placed second). In 
1991 the band was hired by the Monireux 
Jazz Festival to accompany Miles Davis 
performing 1950s Gil Evans arrangements 
conducted by Quincy Jones. 

Gruntz has subsidized his band by nu- 
merous more “serious" musical activities. 
For many years he was director of the 
Berlin Jazz Festival, which, under his 
reign, became one of the most adventurous 
of them all. He writes film music “Step- 
pen wolf" for one. For 16 years, he was 
chief musical director of the 'Zurich Schau- 
spielhaus. one of ihe best German-lan- 
guage theaters performing an internation- 
al repertoire. His oratorio “The Holy Grail 
of Jazz and Joy" was performed as part of 
the Styrian Autumn Festival in Graz. Aus- 
tria — he also wrote the libretto, based on 
a work bv Alfred Lord Tennvson. When 


Rolf Ueberman was administrator of the 
Paris Op£ra he commissioned Gruntz to 
write an opera, and “Cosmopolitan Greet- 
ings." directed by Robert Wilson with a 
libretto by Allen Ginsberg, was performed 
in Hamburg in 1988. 

His current band will play jazz festivals 
in New York City, Saratoga, New York, 
and elsewhere this summer. Along with 
recognition has come more free- market 
viability but most of the financing still 
comes from bustling grants and subsidies, 
a category in which Gruntz merits an Os- 
car. He describes the business of jazz with 
some bitterness: “A Swiss banker 1 know 
was already experienced in jazz sponsor- 
ing. All of a sudden his bank was criticized 
by jazz-iaction B for giving money to jazz- 
faction A. It was just stupid jealousy, but 
the media picked it up. I couldn’t blame 
that banker for changing his bank's policy 
and beginning to sponsor other contempo- 
rary arts where, he said, ‘They all love us 


good things-' 

“Except for a yoy small almost masoeh- 
istic minority of tree lovers, jazz is in tile 
hands of a mediocre group of impresarios 
and promotes who are unable to sift the 
chaff from the wheat. Because it fe ‘safer,’ 
promoters push poor talent while the teal 
thing goes undiscovered. The granting of 
money is decided upon mostly by inept 
committees often made up of profession- 
als who are losers, otherwise, they wouldn’t 
him the time to sit through all those 

anitessnwetiiigs.AndroihcjazzljuaBeffi 

is 10 ' a large extent monkey business.” 

The $m000 budget for th^GGCJB’s 
1992 tour of China was paid by Gruntz's 
management company Euromusic.- lhe 
Chinese and Swiss governments and 36 
private sponsors. During 1 be band's first 
concert, in Beijing, blues harpist BQly 
Branch quoted a phrase from the French ' 
children’s song “Frisre Jacques." The audi- 
ence cheered, and audiences continued to 
- cheer every time he played it It scans that 
students on Tianan men Square set politi- 
cally oriented texts to ine melody of 
"Frtre Jacques." Gruntz says no govern- 
ment official made any attempt to stop 
Branch’s quotations. 

In fact, Gruntz is hard-pressed to cook 
up with anything negative to say about the 


Chinese people or their government, al- 
though be admits that after only three, 
weeks in the country he is no expert. Of 
course he may have been brainwashed, or 
bribed by Chinese subsidies, but I hope we 
have established by now that to be funky 
and Swiss adds up to something hipper 

Than tha t 

"China Blues," a- German television 
documentary, will be broadcast this year. 
The track “Farewell to. China," on which' 
the saxophone section accompanies Larry 
Schneider’s solo on Chinese flute, con- 
cludes the GGCJB’s soon-to-be-released 
CD "Beyond Another WalT (TCB Re- 
cords). “The band sounded sooooo good,” 
Gruntz says. "It jast got better and better. 

It became a love tour in all respects." He - 
calls the GGCJB a "lover machine." Re- 
member. however, .this is. someone who 
knows how to put Jus. best foot forward, 
although they are both very good feet 
indeed. His musicians often work for less 
than their normal fees. 

Flashback. 1978. Seven A. M one crisp 
autumn morning in BaseL The sleepy 
*iove machine" is having asubdued break- 
fast in the functional dimng room of a tidy 
Swiss hold before boarding- tbe bus. The 
British saxophonist Alan Skidmore walks, 
np- to the larger-than-life Cdlrane alum- 
mis Elvin Jones, leans over the table and, 
with in-your-face eye-contact, breaks the 
siteoce: “Elvin, it sure is a pleasure to . 
wake up in the morning and see yduT 


pE OgljL— 

fighting and Feuduig: 

Butttduocoat^^^^ 

her one-onw Tova- Iu . 

- 

threatening, York. 

S*Hnd ihWKacd tm : 
family. Amy Fidter, J - < o sla . 

. fuoco’swife, Mary Jo. w 

vio Pte was awarded FranMsniy 
est civilian honor, the Grand Crt&J 
nT th^Leuion of Honor, on 

Wednesday bjJ p *® deat 5d"pS 
• Mitterrand The 80 -year-oid Paz 
Won -the Nobel Prize in Literature 
in 1990 and France s Pnx Tocque- 
vide in 1989. 

’ □ 

An unauthorized biography of 
former Prime Mimsterfidwarf 
Heath has wot the NCR Book 
Award for nonfiction. John Camp- 
bell, who has previously written 
books about tire British politicians 
Lloyd George, **, •*?*“ 

Nye Bewa,. received tbe £25,000 
. (S37j500).prize for "Edward Heap 
— A Biogngihy.’' Fust awarded m 
1988, Britain’s only prize for p?°J 
fiction was founded by the Bnush 
computer manufacturer NCR. 

Barbra Streisand canceled .a con- 
cert in Anaheim, California, be- 
cause of what . a spokesman said 
. was 'laryngitis. The show, the first 
of six .in California, might be re- 
scheduled! the spokesman said. But 
it wasn't immediately dear whether 
the others- would be canceled as 
- wedl 

The film director Ofiver Stone 
has-been authorized to film scenes 
of his new movie, "Evita." in Ar- 
gentina’s presidential office btriid- 
.mg in. Buenos Aires. Stone had 
lunch with President Curios Saul 
Menem and afterward loured the 

' - mansion.' - • • — . - 


IIYTERIVATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 4 & IS 




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CROSSWORD 


Europe 


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Oceania 


Forecast for Friday ihrough Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 



Bang'd* 

B 

to* Kong 

Mjnla 
1*u/ (Mil 

Slwr»?Ji 

Savanna 

T«*H 

Tokyo 


Todur 

Kigti Low W 
Clf Clf 
34/93 24.75 pc 
23/73 11.52 a 
26*2 24.75 rfi 
32*9 25.77 pc 
44.1 1 1 27/60 1 
27.W0 11-52 * 
25-77 17.62 4 
3)66 22.71 pc 
»-»4 23/73 I 
24.75 19»& 7»» 


mSrss: w 

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34*3 25.77 I 
25*2 17*2 1 
X.'X’ 24.75 pc 
3351 34.75 Fc 
44 Ml 26-10 t 
2271 11/52 p- 
23 T’ I7.B2 pc 
J2.W 37.73 pc 

29*4 21 Cn pc 
2175 16(51 PC 


‘S’ati ^ K^Lhwooso 

Joi^npam fcvd 6 *** 

North America 

Ptiiiadel^ue to BoQion will 
have windy, chilly weather 
Friday. Memorial Day week- 
end wK be dry and gmduaty 
warmer. Warm, dry wealher 
will prevail across the Mid- 
west Ihroughoul ihe week- 
end Tbo Wi/ihem weihes ot 
Canada to Date?. Torts, win 
have hou mamiy dry wemh- 


Europe 

London and Fart* will have 
dry. plcaaanl weather Fnday 
Wo the weekend A soakmg 
rain aril chill the area Irom 
Moscow io Kiev this week- 
end Signify cooler weal her 
will shift mio sou'heasiem 
Europe as The core ol ihe hm 
wcamor migraws toward 1!» 
western MerLlorranear. Sea 


n Heavy Heavy 

Jjtoi C^j Snow 

Asia 

Tokyo wiH be partly sonny 
and worm Friday mio lhe 
weekend. Cooler weather 
will overspread Korea and 
northeastern China Gening 
will be sonny and warm, 
while ihe Yangtze Va’le/ 
Sums hoi Heavy rains will 
siunoaio pars o-‘ soumwes- 
ern China an! oorhaps 
nonhem Vietnam 




WA 

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North America 


ACROSS 

1 Use a letter 
opener 

s Dadaist poet 
Tristan 

io Bus. bigwigs 
14 Bear ol “very 
little brain" 
is Grant portrayer 
16 Emerald City 
princess 
it Cogwheel 
comparison'? 

20 Skewers 

21 Nuke 


22 Tool for 
Bo-Peep 

23 Focuses 

23 Emmy wmner 

Arthur 

26 Totaled car, 
perhaps? 

33 Made a 
touchdown 

34 Got ruined in 
the wash 

35 Manche capital 
30 Sci-fi regulars 
37 Quieted with 

Quaalude 
40 ‘Do say 1 " 


Middle East 


«ah Low W High Loo W 

Cff OF Clf Clf 

2S/M 20*31 5 MW 2170 s 

36/97 »*S » Jim 21/70-1 

32/09 1742 1 35/95 10/64 s 

20/02 I8«4 • 29«4 19.66 * 

44/11 1 27/BO 3 46/115 22/71 1 
4?.‘ 107 25.77 pe 42/107 25/77 1 


Latin America 

Today Tomwnwi 

High Lon W High Lon W 
Of OF Clf C/r 

Bumroftm 21/70 BUG do 18/64 7.44 pc 

Crncw 31/66 25/77 eg 3209 25-77 pc 

Una 2170 1?«2 o 22/71 17.62 ce 

MansoCW 26.77 1355 24 75 12 53 pc 

R»dfU«nn.' 2700 X -«6 K79 1»W PC 

SouigF 14/57 5/41 di 17.-S2 4S PC 


U1.64 11152 pc 17-62 10-50 M 
20.W 12.53 pc 31/70 13/55 8 


Logcnd: 9-Svmy. pc panly cloudy, c-ctoudy. sh-showers. I Bunoerswnis. r-rato. 5i-sncM Denies, 
sn-snow, Mcc. W-Weaner. All maps, forecasts and dam pmvMM by Accu-Weathar. Inc. .• J894 


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Solution to Puzzle of May 25 


cinnH naaa aaan 
□qqh E3Qana 0000 
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41 Brews 

43 Palm (off) 

44 Financial 
success 

4« Inflamed toe 
cause? 

4e Big Ben? 
se Mayberry boy 
$1 Math discovery 
34 Nameless one 
sa Nolan Ryan was 
one 

ca Mega- 
marathon? 
ea Arabic name 
starter 

84 Christmas Eve 
flier 

es Eye at the 
beach 
ss Botch 
«7 Into pieces 
ea Source of 
abundance 


1 Spring spots 

2 Dropped, 
maybe 

3 Isle near Mull 
a Bob Dylan 

back-up group 

6 Make lace 
e Famed cop 

stepper 

7 Anatomical loop 


a Glean 

• Dadaist painter . 
Hans 

10 Aiken and Hflton 

11 Basso Pinza 

12 Typee" sequel 
ia Dropped, maybe 
ta Stage remarks 
ie Bakery worker 
M Words before 

“TV" or “each 
other" . 
sa Crams 

2 * Hat-tipping 
cartoonist . 

27 Start 

2S Curmudgeons 
2 * EBot's "Jenny- 
anydots." e.g. 
so Author Caivino 
21 TbeFoJger 
Lady, Mrs. 

32 Jet, at Orly? 

32 Levi's mother - 
as Bashes 
39 Defense 

mechanism 
42 Swimming 
classes? 

45 Hides 
47 Dermis the 
Menace's dog 


48 Word with baby 
orschuss. 

81 Surrey carriage 

82 "Mike and lka‘ 
creator Goldberg 

sarieavytOBd 


54 ft's most usrfui 
. when it's ; • • 

cracked - . 
ssPrefixre 
" honeycombs 
87 Buster Brawn's 
bufldbg - . 


88 Kaiser, e.g. 

n Like Nash's 
lama . 

« Public works 
biits. 

iuS. A L accrual 



PuawbyCMiiy 


-® New York Times Edited by WUl Short:, 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


CoBlHgCimt 


83.b' 


[S asiJCurff 


^jaa caRns oo* j Imagine a world where you can call country to country a> easily as you cun from h«:»me. And 

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•1 P'KM .'Jil-T 


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Howto cal! around the world 

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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNim" ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Australia 

China, PBCm 

Guam 

BongKoog 

India* 

Indonesia* 

.13 pan* 

Korea 

KoreaAA 

Malaysia* 

Nen-Zeab/id 

PhDippinea* 
Saipan* 

Singapore 

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Taiwan* 

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ASIA Italy* 172-1011 Brazil - 

1-800-881-011 Ucchiensiefai- 155-00-11 CbOe 

10811 U rt m anla* 84.196 Gotnmbia~~ 

018-872 Luxembouiy 0800-0111 Costai Rftw~ 

800-1111 Macedoni a , F.YJL of 99-800-4288 Ecuador* 


000-117 Malta* 

001-801-10 Monaco- 
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Poland-*" 

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(XKI-bll Romania 

105-11 Rnsabr-QMQBgow) 

235-2872 SlovaMa 

«KLOlll-llI Spain* 

■ijtMSn Sweden* 
0080-102880 Swtoedand- 


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ArebHa"- 02S-903F011 Bahrain 800-001 Cayman 1 

BefeSmn' 0800-100-10 Cyprefl* 080-90010' Grenada* 

tiulpanj oo-iaoo-ooio Israel 177- 1 00-2 , 727 Haiti* 

Croatia** ~ 99-300011 Kuwait 800 -288 jam^“ 

Czech Rep 0042000101 Ichanon (Bdg«) 420801 i«cdi.An 

Denmark* 8001-0010 Qatar . v 080 0011^77 a^KiovN 

Finland* 9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 1-800-10 

France 19 a-OQ 11 Tarkey* , 00-80012 277 E©/prfC^oT 

Germany OZgOgWg UAE.* ■ . ' - 800-121 Gabon" 

Greece* 00800-1311 AMERICAS Gambia 

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