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At' 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 




1 gWlB 33 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Monday, November 14, 1994 


Asia S ummit 
Clouded by 
Tensions on 
East Timor 

Riots Erupt in Province, 
And Protesters Occupy 
U.S. Embassy in Jakarta 

By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — Rioting erupted in Indo- 
nesian-occupied East Timor, and Timor- 
\ >e protesters occupying a section of the 
U.S. Embassy grounds here were refusing 
to leave Sunday only hours before Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton arrived for an Asia-Pacif- 
ic summit meeting. 

The incidents ensured that human rights 
would remain on the agenda over the neat 
few days despite the U.S. administration’s 
hopes of focusing on market-opening mea- 
sures in the region to create more jobs for 
Americans. 

The riots in the capital of East Timor, 
Dili, and the invasion of the embassy 
grounds in Jakarta by a group of about 30 
Timorese students reflect continuing ten- 
sions over the status of the former Portu- 
guese colony invaded by Indonesia in 1975 
and annexed the following year. 

The takeover of East Timor by Indone- 
sia has not been recognized by the United 
Nations or the United States. 

Analysts said that the embassy occupa- 
tion, which began Saturday, and the unrest 
in Dili that Oared on Sunday were intend- 
ed by Timorese opposed to Indonesian 
control to attract international attention as 
leaders from the United States and 17 
other members of APEC, the Asia-Pacific 
Economic Cooperation forum, gathered in 
Indonesia for an informal summit meeting 
Tuesday in the city of Bogor. 

Indonesian and American officials 
sought to play down the trouble. 

Major t awtan Simh nlnn, the Indone- 
sian mili tary spokesman in East Timor, 

■ tid that protesters rampaged through Dili 
on Sunday, smashing shops, burning cars 
and throwing rocks at the police. But he 
added that the disturbances had died down 
by micklay. 

Previous unaiitlidfizcfl' protests in DiJ* 
often have been harshly - -tressed. Maj' „ 
Simbolon indicated that on 
security forces had kept a low 
said no arrests had been made or shots 

fired. But he warned that if there was any 
further action, troublemakers would be 

arrested. . , , . ... 

Major Simbolon said that he dip not 
know what had triggered the unrest, but 
residents said several hundred demonstra- 
tors had taken to the streets to mark the 



. . tot Yiamiiui predictions that membership would under- 

East Timorese demonstrators who occupied the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta ta kin g a rest from their protests Sunday after storming the compound y . ^ t | ie country’s stringent environmen- 

tal and social welfare laws. 

mw rT 1 1 m 1 Tfc 4* TT O O A united front of most of Sweden’s busi- 

China Lags on World Trade Reform, U.S. Says 

' — ' nit» one that Swnlni the Union to 


No. 34,745 

Swedes Head 
For EU After 
‘Yes’ Vote in 
Referendum 

Historic Independence 
As Neutral Is Altered ; 
Norway Could Follow 

By Fred Barbash 

Washington Past Sen ice 

STOCKHOLM — Swedish voters de- 
cided Sunday to join the European Union 
after a soul-searching debate that focused 
on the nation’s historic independence from 
the rest of Europe. 

With virtually all districts counted. 52.2 
percent of ballots cast favored member- 
ship; 46.9 percent were opposed, and .9 
percent were blank. 

For Sweden, and for Europe, it was a 
landm ark day. Sweden has always gone its 
own way, proudly and often alone, remain- 
ing officially neutral throughout World 
War 11 and the Cold War and declining for 
three decades to affiliate with the Europe- 
an Community or its successor, the Euro- 
pean Union. 

That tradition was the strong^ argu- 
ment made against joining the “single mar- 
ket,” according to polls, along with dire 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JAKARTA — The U.S. trade represen- 
tative, Mickey Kamor, said Sunday that he 
doubted that a deal could be struck in lime 
to allow China to join the World Trade 
Organization by the Jan. 1 target date. 

The United States says C hina must do 
more to bring its economy into line with 
other major trading nations to qualify as a 
founding member of the World Trade Or- 
ganization. which succeeds the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

Speaking after a meeting with Foreign 


Trade Minister Wn Yi of China. Mr. Kan- 
tor said that although it was still possible 
for China to make the Jan. 1 deadline, he 
was “not persuaded* that “we can finish 
our negotiations by the end of the year.” 

Still, he added, “We will make every 
effort” to do so. 

To that end, he said American and Chi- 
nese officials would meet in Geneva early 
next month to pursue a deal. 

“The pace of progress depends on Chi- 
na," Mr. Kantor said. “They know exactly 
what is necessary.” 


Mrs. Wu countered by warning against 
making the negotiations a “one-way 
street^ 

She added: “We think we have have 
arrived at the time to resolve the accession. 
But whether we can do it or not isn’t only 
up to us.” 

The U.S. trade official said the majority 
of the 20-nation working committee on 
WTO membership “supports the U.S. po- 
sition China’ s offer at tfiispointls not 
adequate.” 

Washington wants a range of commit- 


ments from China to reform its currency 
and market laws in line with the free-trade 
princip les that underpin GATT. 

rhin» maintains that it is a developing 
country and that allowances for this 
should be made. But Washington counters 
that the Chinese economy and growth rate 
are so large that Bering can no longer 
make that argument. 

Mr. Kantor is in Indonesia for meetings 
of the 18-member Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation forum. President Bill Clinton 

See GATT, Page 6 


tal and social welfare laws. 

A united front of most of Sweden's busi- 
ness and political establishment was as- 
sembled to overcome the diverse coalition 
of opponents. The argument of the “yes” 
ride was that Sweden needed the Union to 
bolster its exports, improve its lagging in- 
ternational credit and strengthen its trou- 
bled economy. Join up or get left out, was 
the slogan. With the Cold War over, neu- 
trality was no longer so relevant, they said. 

For Europe, its “single market*’ will now 
stretch for the first time from the Greek 
isles and the Mediterranean nations of the 
south to the Arctic regions of the north; 
from Ireland and Britain in the West to the 
Baltic Sea in the East Sweden, though just 
emerging from recession, will bring signifi- 


‘Come to Us’ on Foreign Policy 9 Dole Warns Clinton SIS 


aid that no arrests had been made or snots ~ pa u i p Horvitz 

£d. But he warned that if there was ar* SLSi. 

urther action, troublemakers would be l ,„ PUTXirTnw . . 

crested. WASHINGTON — -suing a blunt 

Major Simbolon said that he did not warning on the conduct of American for- 

know what had triggered the unrest, but eign policy. Senator Bob Dole .^d Sunday 

residents said severalhtmdred demonstra- that the White House would ha^ ^ bow 

tors had taken to the streets to mark the to the views of the new Repubhcm^^. 

Svtxsrav of the killing of scores of Ti- iw in Congress as it pursues its 

morese by Indonesian soldiers during a abroad. 

demonstration three years ago. Mr. Dole specifically cited VS. policy u 

Others were protesting the falling of a Hait L Bosnia, Korea and on world trad) 
Timorese man fey an Indonesian, appar- . ^ he signaled that Republican 

entlv in a trade dispute on Saturday, they .^uid n ot permit President Bill Clinton ti 


January, when control of the legislative 
branch shifts to Republicans. 

“They’re going to have to come to us,” 
the Kansas senator said in a broadcast 

A large c onse rv ati ve rock glands in CEn- 
tan’s foreign poficy path. Page 3. 


enily in a trade dispute on Saturday, incy 

Protesters said that they planned to bury 
the man at Dili’s Santa Cruz cemetery on 
Monday after a procession that would pass 
bv the office or the EastTimor governor. A 
similar funeral procession to the cemetery 
three vears ago led to the killings that 
tiimishcd Indonesia’s human rights image. 

The U.S. secretary of state, Warren M. 
Christopher, said that Washington under- 
stood itic concern of the Timorese students 

See TIMOR, Page 6 


Kiosk 

Algeria Hijackers 
Give Up in Spain 

themselves up, an airport spokesman 
ta&lt to fly to the Spanish island of 

i 

\ ' w '°' ^ 

■fflfttghs.s 

\ 

\ finoks Pas«? 


Mr. Dole specifically cited U.S. policy u interview. “We’re willing to cooperate, but 
Haiti, Bosnia, Korea and on world trade not on their terms.” 
issues as he sipped j that Regubli^ns w, Dole is the Republican leader in the 
would not permit President Bill CLnton to and will be majority leader in that 

set his own agenda in foreign affair* '>fter elections last week that swept 


Republicans to majorities of both houses 
of Congress. 

The cautionary note by Mr. Dole came 
just as Mr. din ton, in Jakarta for an 
economic summit meeting, was idling 
concerned Asian leaders that UJS. foreign 
policy would not change in the election’s 
aftermath. (Page 6.) 

In warning the White House that Re- 
publicans would vigorously assert their 
views, Mr. Dole specifically aligned him- 
self with similar remarks on domestic poli- 
cy made recently by Representative Newt 
Gingrich of Georgia, the presumptive new 
House speaker. 


In a speech on Friday, Mr. Gingrich said 
he was “very willing to cooperate” with the 
Clinton administration but declared: “I 
8m not prepared to compromise” on Re- 
publican goals. 

Mr. Dole’s remarks suggested that Re- 
publican assertiveness in foreign policy 
could hinder any new White House strate- 
gy to shift the Democratic president's at- 
tention away from legislative matters and 
toward the foreign stage, where he can 
presumably act more freely. 

“I think the president should know now 

See POLICY, Page 4 



A Hell for Bosnia Refugees, 
Made by One of Their Own 


AG 

the Australian Grand Prix on 


ffcwfcs 

Bridge 

Cross*wd 

Weather 


Basic Logi&Mich^ffc . n \ 

Bv Suzanne Muchnic do da Vwri, sold aK«A Fr i rilZ UOWi 


By Roger Cohen 

Hew York Tbta Soviet . 

CETINGRAD, Croatia — Where 
60,000 chickens once ducked and fed, 
thousands of Bosnia's ragged dispossessed 
now mingle in the mud, lugging containers 
of water and bundles of soiled clothing 
through a landscape awash with sewage 
and misery. 

They are Bosnian Muslims, these chil- 
dren playing amid stinking piles of gar- 
bage. these women crouched in huge chick- 
en coops stirring soup overmakcslmt fires, 
these mm chopping firewood in the gloom, 
yet the distinction between their lot and 
that of annuals is not easy to discern. 

Of all the horrors of the 31-month-old 
Bosnian war, the Batsoga refugee camp in 
an enormous converted chicken farm is 
one of the strangest and most sinister. In 
the midst of Europe, it suggests the depri- 
vation of Africa. 

And in its origins, it conveys the degree 
of madness now attained by the war. Fra: 
the 17,000 Muslims inhab i ting this shad- 
owy farm have fled the Mudm-led army 
of the Bosnian government. 

Whether they did so out of rational fear, 
or because they were obliged to do so by 
the rebel Muslim leader th*y support, is a 


Question overshadowed by the squalor of 
their pfighc. 

Tor me, this is the shame of Europe,” 
said WycBffe Songwa, a United Nations 
High Commissioner for Refugees official 
from Kenya who is striving to conjure 
some level of order from the morass. “If I 
was back in Africa, I would understand, 
because the poverty is such that these situ- 
ations arise. But in the middle of Europe 
this is unacceptable." 

In each of 24 fetid sheds where chickens 
were once fattened, about 750 refugees 
now live. By the shifting light of candlesor 
small stoves, some play cards, some stir 
caldrons of cabbage, some lie slumped on 
mattresses provided by the United Na- 
tions. 


names scream and children play while 
aid men stare vacantly out across a shad- 

tSSSSSS "" that “ ****** 

The camp began to take shape three 
months ago, when the V Corps orS 
Bosnian Army, based in Bihac in north! 
western Bosnia, overran the renegade 

forces of Fikret Abdic. a Muslim busSeSl 
man and politician opposed to Presided 

See BOSNIA, Page 6 


Lot Angeles Timet 

LOS ANGELES — Biil Gates, per- 
hra the richest man in the United Slates 
ar<j formerly known to the museum 
world as a champion ci digitized images 
*nd something oT a threat *hc integrity 
4 original works of art. i; row cast as the 
rmencan savior of a rare. 72-cane docu- 
‘oent, laboriously whiter, and illustrated 
u an artist’s banc. 

Mr. Gates, the chairman of Microsoft 

I £p. ; ti ie computer software &iant| ^ 

identified as the aaonvawus buver 


lucrtiiicu as me anonymous buyer 
m n il.ustraled manuscript bv Leon a r- 


$30.8 mxffion. Word record 

Mr. Gates’s purduk ’ 
scientific manuscript by\fe y of th 
naissance master has ereakt; fl „ 
for the computer industry £ 
ait experts said. Averal 

“It’s his first major puitt* ** 
kind," said a Microsoft spok*. 
Mich Matthews. 

Mr. Gates, 39, listed this yi 
Forbes magazine as the riches: 
can, with assets of S92 b illion, corf* 
be reached for comment, but Ms. B 
thews said Saturday that Mr. G 


worldwide tour of “ 

Leonardo’s vast - \ 

known as the Hanune^SSSf 
at Christie’s NewVnX Ca * ex ’ was 
behalf ^ bouse on 


Leonardo’s Manuscript 


B hedge against potential 
lcurred by Mr. Ham- 
stie’s had estimated the 
tardo at more than S10 
purchased it in 1980 at 
in for the then-record 
ifflion. 


\ 


Coxp, anTfe 

^agement in ^£[ Slt * look ™ r 

Ifle cons *gned the vata- 

Y ^ ent 10 action u, estabSa 


ngcnccr later & 
er was Mr. .G^ 


LOSedriiat the new own- 
, whose compuiersoft- 


-V ’ ^«°se computer-soft- 
ware empire b based in the Seattle 
suburb of Redmosd. 

At the UCL\/Hammcr Museum, the 


^ - “ ->P-ous 

makes perfect sense t£^ , ^ d } 1 
lo&c to a sdeniific whiz bein a intSU? 1 ^ 
m a scientific manuscrioL” 8 Ulterested 
He also praised Mr 

it0 “ t 

hope so. 181(1 i would 

A museum trustee, pis d 

SeecSSS,^^ ^ 


the needs of the poorer member countries. 

Arid the expansion is just beginning. 
. Norway will hold a referendum on Nov. 2£> 
on EU membership. While prfis there have 
been tilting toward “no,” analysts say they 
believe the outcome here could change 
sentiment there as well as in Finland, 
where, despite a favorable referendum 
vote last month, the Parliament has been 
holding off formal ratification. The newly 
independent nations of Eastern Europe are 
next in fine. 

The “no” advocates — farmers, environ- 
mentalists, leftists and others — contend- 
ed that the European Union was a hydra- 
headed bureaucratic mbnst&r that would 
swallow up Sweden and its 9 million peo- 
ple, undermining everything they stand 
fort neutrality, open government, social 
welfare and purity of air, water and life in 

See VOTE, Page 5 






VS& 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRTOUNE> MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 



Irish Leader Sees WORLD BRIEFS 

Threat tn TR A Paqpp 2 More Bomb Blasts Rock Baghdad 

X1UIAU- IU AAliT J. CatC BAGHDAD (Reuters) - One person was uBd and thr*>- 

students were wounded in Baghdad when two bombs exploded^ “ 

Coalition Breakup at Issue SSSJECftML 


M*umihci Sambocctti/Tbc Auocnicd Ptcsa 

STICKING THEIR NOSES IN — Demonstrators wearing Pinocchio mayks to show Adr opinion of Silvio Ber- 
lusconTs budget during rallies in Rome that drew a million people. The budget faces a parliamentary test Monday. 


Feuds Leave French Right in Disarray 


By James F. Clarity 

New York Tunes Service 

DUBLIN — Prime Minister 
Albert Reynolds said Sunday 
that the breakup of his coalition 
government, threatened by the 
Labor Party, would impede ef- 
forts toward peace in Northern 
Ireland. 

The threat remained intact 
Sunday night after a meeting of 
the Labor Party legislators, 
with a decision delayed until 
Mr. Reynolds answers ques- 
tions on the dispute mi Tuesday 
in Parliament. 

After the Labor Party meet- 


ing, Labor officials and those of 
other parties, as well as inde- 


Reiam 

PARIS — The resignation of a third 
scandal-tainted cabinet minister and fierce 
political feuding have plunged the French 
light into deep disarray, conservative po- 
litical leaders acknowledge. 

The bitter rivalry between the GauJlist 
presidential rivals, Jacques Chirac, the 
mayor of Paris, and Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur “could end up suicidal" 
for the right, said Philippe Scguin, presi- 
dent of the National Assembly and a 
GauliisL 

“If we continue down the path that we 
have taken, we will end up finished," Mr. 
S6guin said on French television. He pre- 
dicted that the squabbling would pave the 
way for a victory by the likely Socialist 
candidate, Jacques Delors, in the April- 
May elections. 

_ Mr. Delors, now the European Commis- 
sion president, surged into the lead in the 
latest opinion survey published on Friday, ' 
although he has yet to declare his candida- 
cy. 

Just a few months ago, the left was in 
shambles, and victory appeared all but 
certain for the right, which look control of 


government from the Socialists in 1993 
and had seemed to be consolidating its 
power base. 

Mr. Bahadur's center-right government 
has been hit by widening corruption scan- 
dals that have now claimed three cabinet 
members. 

Cooperation Minis ter Michel Roussin 
stepped down on Saturday over allegations 
of illicit political funding. He became the 
third member of the cabinet to resign un- 
der a cloud since July. G&rard Longuet 
quit as industry minister last month and 
Communications Minister Alain Carignon 
resigned in July. 

To maximize its chances in the contest 
to succeed President Francois Mitterrand, 
whose second seven-year term ends in 
May, conservatives had been lobbying for 
months for a single candidate from the 
right Instead, it appears there will be a 
plethora of challengers from the governing 
coalition. 

In addition to Mr. Chirac and Mr. Baha- 
dur from the Gauhist Rally for the Repub- 
lic. both former president VaI6iy Giscard 
d’Estaing and a parliamentary leader, 
Charles MiDoru from the junior coalition 


party, the Union for French Democracy, 
and Jean-Marie Le Pen from the far-right 
National Front are expected to run. 

Tension peaked Saturday when Mr. 
C h irac, twice before a losing presidential 
candidate, announced to a special RPR 
convention that he was stepping down as 
party chief to devote hims elf full-time to 

campai gning . 

The meeting culminated in a vote of 
confidence in Mr. Chirac, which his sup- 
porters boasted was tantamount to an en- 
dorsement of his candidacy. 

Mr. Chirac was unapologetic in his ad- 
dress to cheering supporters, emphasizing 
divisions rather than seeking to smoothe 
them over. Though he did not mention Mr. 
Balladur by name, he contrasted “real 
friends like you and those courtesans who 
are swayed by opinion polls.” 

He dismissed “those who are popular 
today but will be swept away like dry 
leaves tomorrow.” 

Mr. Balladur, wbo has not formally de- 
clared his candidacy yet, leads Mr. Chirac 
in the polls. He stayed away from the 
meeting, as did numerous cabinet minis- 
ters and deputies who support him or sim- 
ply wished to remain uncommitted. 


other parties, as well as inde- 
pendent analysts, said that a 
collapse of the government 
seemed likely and that party of- 
ficials had begun preparations 
for a general election. 

Mr. Reynolds, who has 
spearheaded the effort to bring 
the Irish Republican Army to 
the negotiating table, appealed 
to the Labor Party leader, Dick 
Spring, not to puQ out of the 
coalition. Hie action could ei- 
ther precipitate a national elec- 
tion before Christmas or the 
time-c onsumin g formation of a 
new coalition gove rnmen t pos- 
sibly excluding Mr. Reynolds 
and his party, Fianna F ail. 

Northern Ireland peace is not 
the issue dividing the two par- 
ties, whose 99 combined seats 
control the 166-member Parlia- 
ment. Mr. Reynolds and Mr. 
Spring generally agree on how 
to advance the peace initiative. 

Labor party members threat- 
ened to leave the government 
on Friday after Mr. Reynolds 
promoted his attorney general 
to the second-highest judicial 
post in the country. 


The appointment ignored 
Labor's complaints that the of- 
ficial, Harry Whdchan, had de- 
layed for seven months re- 
sponding to a request for 
extradition to Northern Ireland 
of a Roman Catholic priest ac- 
cused of child molestation. The 
priest eventually surrendered, 
was convicted and is now serv- 
ing a four-year term in a North- 
ern prison. 

Labor members had de- 
manded that Mr. Wb el eh an 
personally account for his ac- 
tion in the case, which pro- 
voked widespread media cover- 
age in this predominantly 
Roman Catholic country. They 
consider Mr. Whelehan's pro- 
motion to president of the High 
Court, a position where he is 
immune from questioning, to 
be an arrogant political stroke 
by Mr. Reynolds. 

On Sunday morning, after 
telephoning Mr. Spring, who is 
deputy prime minister and for- 
eign minister. Mr. Reynolds 
said, “At this crucial stage of 
the peace process, it is my per- 
sonal conviction that the inter- 
ests of the nation are best 
served by the government con- 
tinuing in office.” 

On Sunday night, Mr. Spring 
said Mr. Reynolds must “re- 
dress the breakdown of trust in 
the partnership” when he 
speaks cm Tuesday. 

Labor members of the two- 
year-old coalition said as they 
entered their meeting that the 
collapse of the two-year-old 
government seemed inevitable, 
but was not certain. 

“There is the most serious of 
doubts about the continuance 
of this government,’' Health 
Minister Brendan Howiin said. 


students were wounded m Baghdad when two bombs exploded S * 
Iraqi capital, the official Iraqi press agency, IN A, reported. 

The person who dial was believed to have been cairyine 
bomb when it exploded on a main street Saturday. The studen.t 
were wounded m a bomb attack on a Baghdad schooL 

The authorities have reported four such blasts in the capital i n 
l«s than a month. No group has taken responabflityfor 
aturnks, although Iraq has suggested that Israeli agents w 1^ 
could be responsible. irai1 

Chissano Leads in Mozambique Vote 

MAPUTO, Mozambique (Reuters) — With nearly three-cna, 
tore of the votes counted Sunday in Mozambique’s first presHten' 
tial and general elections. President Joaquim Chissano held a " 
comfortable lrad over his nearest rival, Afonso Dhiakama, the ~ 
former Reoamo rebel chief. v *** , 

Mr. Chissano, whose Frelimo party has ruled Mozambique 
smcc independence from Portugal, in 1975, held 55.5 percent S ; 
votes m the presidential race compared to Mr. Dhlakama’s ?! ' 
percent, out of just over 68 percent of votes counted, J - 

In balloting for the 250-seat Parliament, Frelimo held 46 s 
percrat and Renamo 36.6 percent. National Electoral CbmmiL ' 
sion figures showed. . 


Pakistan Troops dash With Militants 

PRQHAWad m ,\ i . 


P^HAWAR, Pakistan (Reuters) — At least II people were 
kmed Sunday as rebellious Islamic militants fought Pakistani 
troops in a remote northwestern region, officials anddoctore said. ' 

The rebels, calling for Islamic law to be imposed in their - 
sennautonomous tribal region, fired rockets and mortar shells at 
tbeparamiktary Frontier Corps troops trying to dislodge them- 

nesses Mid?* ** * hC B ^ aur A ^ eac y bordering A fghanis t an , wit- ■ 

. Six militants and three paramilitary troops were killed in battled 
m the Nawagai pass southwest of Khar, official sources said. Two 
avflians were killed m Khar itself. . . 


Amnesty International Faults Kenya 

«T?P MOPS visit to 


— rxcsmeni L/amei arap Mors visit to 1 
L °S, d0 “ ri ,lll L Week ^ ** ^ med * a report that accuses Keuy^ ; 
authorities of permitting the systematic harassment of their noS ! 
cal ODDonents. a finish a 


— , — ojoreuiduu Harassment oi tneir nolii - . 

cal opponents, a British newspaper said. ^ . 

The Sunday Td^aph said the report by Amnesty Internation- i 

Sh news paper< condemned in particular ■ 

the trial of four leading dissidents. ■ < 

AiSf P ramin «* opponents of Mr. MoTs- Kenya : 
Afncan National Union party, face charges of attempted robbdry ' 

a s H aon north ^Nairobi last November ■' 
If convicted, they will receive ma n d atory death sentence? “The ‘ 

defen ^ a ? ts appears to be part of apattem of i 
harassment of human rights activists, opposition figures and ■ 
journalists,” Amnesty said. 


m ask the butter... 


^ A Look at the Record of Troubled USAir 


Beijing Convicts a Leading Reporter 

BF.TJTNfi nsTYHA a t 1 ■ , - ■ . - 


Wktrt i truer ii snjthimg j„« mMm / i; /, 


S-l» W-C • A • P - O « R • E 


By Douglas Frantz 
and Ralph Blumenthal 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — As USAir 


the pilots made a chilling di* After the SeptemberoSh, ]im 

covery - then- DC-9, carrying federal officials and USA^S K T d? £ 

62 passengers from Washington ecutives rushed to defend the plovees tofed 

to Boston, might not have safety of the airiine. The Feder- SSSfSnf 

oaough fuel to reach its destina- >1 lAnation Administration^ ffijg SSSlfiJ 

Radioing for an em«gency i^t& U&\ir orecutivesdraSS 

Mjasasss 

thejet had engine trouble. to draw negative conclusions oSivfX S 
Only after it had landed and about safety. They strongly de- i&Air vioia iM 
the ground crew had discovered nied that financial troubtelS 

the ,fu«I stoutti*-* . . 

tam acknowledge that there was “When it comes to safety, we to a dented and " cracked ^ 
no engine problem. Behind are wdl within the mean range, flap 8 

schedule in Washington, work- and better than some," Seth E Concerned hv the rwiotte 
cts had neglected to refudand Schofield, USAir's chairman criEUS oSdab 
the pilots had not checked and chief aecutive, said in an USAir «^tive^dSmS 
gauges before takeoff. interview. ‘The reality is that if proving safetTand^S^ 

The error and Bttenmtcd con- I thought the airiine was unsafe Aug. 29. SSough USAir 2 nd 
^mmt from federal authon- I would pound every plane.” aviftion agenc^ de^ 

, 0f SCveral S3 !S a • reasmpS Portrait scribed tfae^rion as deadly, 
and training lapses uncovered of Lhe nation s sixth-largest and others said the airlin'O*! been 

? aN rTJ A ® rkr ^ eS T XaiI1 ? a ' b ? SUSl emer 8 es from Pat on notice tr strengthen 

tton of USAtr .undertaken after thousands of pages of federal uainine and sa^- 
a USAir Boeing 737 crashed records and court files covering 
near Pittsburgh on Sept 8. kfll- the last five years that were ex 

ing 132 people. amined by The Tunes. 

The crash, the worst aviation The Flight 565 fuel scare, for Timisp- canon Safety B^rd. 
disaster in the United Stales example, was not an isolated the federal agency 

since 1987, was the fifth for incident. Records show nine in- ^ investigates accidents, said 
USAir since 1989, the worst re- stances in which USAir planes t»-re might be a connection be- 

left without enough fuel since ■* ecn three of the five USAir 
the airline eliminated two pre- crashes, 
flight refueling checks * ^From the issues of pilot 
mouths ago. The cutback “ training and cockpit discipline, 
made to save time, despK”°“7 yon could potentially have a f 
ceras expressed by the eaeral connection between three I 

Aviation Admin infra. ^ there,” said Mr. Burnett, 

In addition, in» / 1CWS lawyer in Arkansas, 
safety experts There is no irondad measure I 

of court He of ^ ^ AvittST^ 

obtained thrj*? ^heFreedom pens caution that fatal a«n 
of Inf orrnr'®^ denB 080 distort an airline’s re- 

^^because there are so few of 



US$16,000,000 



“v uau uim m MLVC LUC 

company money by allowing a 
plane to fly even though a man- 
datory warning system was in- 


operative. In another case, 
USAir violated U.S. regulations 
by permitting a plane to fly for 

r | -y n H 

to a dented and cracked wine 
flap. 

Concerned by the Charlotte 
crash, U.S. officials met with 
USAir executives to discuss im- 
proving safety and training 
Aug. 29. Although USAir 2 nd 
aviation agency official de- 
scribed the session as nendly, 
others said the airiin' -fla >l been 
put on notice tr strengthen 
training and sa^- 

Jim Burn** 1 ’ w ho served 
nearly a d*’^ 6 25 a monber 
and nHai T’ ia n °f the National 
Transir [aI i on ^ty Board, 
the ir^pdent federal agency 
lju, investigates accidents, said 
,i-re might be a connection be- 


USS 138.000 paid out at each 
craw. USS 16 Million won so 
far In the world-famous Abu 
Dhabi Duty Free raffle. Each 
ticket priced at US$133. Just 
1.200 tickets entered in each 
draw. Approximately 6 draws 
every month. Available 
exclusively to passengers 
travelling or transiting through 


Abu Dhabi Airport. Notification 
immediately by phone and by 
mail. Money paid in cash, by 
banker's cheque or directly 
into the winner's bank account. 
USS1 6.000.000 hard cash. 
The easy way. 


rcupic s miermeaiaie Court has tned a gnf^ and succeeded, ao. 
co J3§ !n 8 to family members and rights groups said." ' ' 

Tte journalist, Gao Yu, 50, a reporter known for her incisive 
analyses of China s economic reforms and internal political stran- 
gles, was convicted in the last week and sentenced m secret tom 
years m prison, family members said over the weekend. 

Miss Gao has been m jail since Ocl 2, 1 993. She was seized davs 

before she was to depart for an academic year at Columbia 
University m New York. After her arrest, Miss Gao was accused 

2 to P®*"* the borders," a 

charge that is believed to be related to articles on politics and 
eponoimcs she wrote for the Mirror Monthly magazine in Hong 


The first Israeli 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


.vor um»n 4 * « 


sum P m & UiepSSwrts of the4S sighlscera. SSl 

Ttis Week’s Holidays 

week because of national and religious holidays* 

MONDAY: Jordan. 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 
For Work, Life and Academic Experience 
Tfra^ComwverrfHomeS&icf/ 

(310) 471-0306 EXT. 23 
Fax: (310* 471-6456 
Fat or send detailed resume for 


Pacific Western University 

600 N. Sepulveda BfwL. Dept 23 
Los Angeles, CA 90049 


TUESDAY: Brazil, Ivory Coast 
WEDNESDAY: Germany. 

THURSDAY: Bunn*, Sli Lanka. Zaire. 

FRIDAY ; Haiti, Latvia, Morocco. 

SATURDAY: Belize, Monaco, Oman, Puerto Rico. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. • 


lawyer in Arkansas. 
There is no irond 



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^is five fa6I accidents since 
jr5 are notdonnected, failures 
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nd -tint OTtinns I 


There is no ironclad measure 
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perts caution that fatal acci 
dents can distort an airline’s re- 
<wd because there are so few of 
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In a letter to The Times on 
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“SCSn" U ° wr ^- lao* *na i^idbS«5 

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InClinton’s Foreign Policy Path , a Conservative Rock 


ByJohnM. Goshko . 

; - aflid Daniel Wininmc 

V : . ' WteioigWB Paw SerWcr 

WASHINGTON - With Ro>ubIi- 
c^taki^ control of Congress, Presi- 
Bifl CKntott will find his entire 
fordgn poU<yc<Kifrqnted by one of the 
Democrats’ worst .nightmares: the 
harsh' Scrutiny .and frequent outright 
opposition 'erf Jesse Helms, the North 
Carolina. Republican who is the dean 

of S«iate conservatives and will be the 

newebairman of the Foreign Relations 
Committee.. 

.puling, a brief news 'conference in 
Raleigh, -North Carolina, last week, 
Mr, Helms reeled off a list of griev- 
ances, J ‘- 

■ ^.started ter asserting that Demo- 
crane control had made the Foreign 
Relatk^ Committee “moribund inks 

oversight responsibilities,” thereby al- 
lowing“State Dqjamnent bureaucrats 
too often to fail to carry out thw 
duties as required by law.” 

• w ® re . a ? 50n S the issues that he 

said thc committee would review un- 
dethisJeadership: 

• 'The so-called foreign aid pro- 
gram -ihatj" he said, “has -spent an 
estimated S2 trillion of the American 
taxpayers’ money, much of it going 
<|p?n foreign rat holes, to countries 


that 
ed Nations, 


concepts of freedom." 
• Ev 


pose us in the Unit- 
many which rqect 


will be no vindictiveness, no getting 
even," he said. “We owe it to the 
American people to function as an 
efficient committee whose guiding 


valuation of why the Foreign whuuiugc wuusc guiuiag 

Jctwo, which Mr. Hehiis regards as a principle must unfailingly be. What is 
eUll5ts ’ “should oper- the best interest of the United States 
and the American people?” 

Foreign Relations has lost much of 
the luster that in the postwar period 
made it the Senate's most prestigious 


ate under different personnel rules 
from all other of our government's 
civilian personnel” 

• Re-evaluation of U.S. relations 
with “that longtime nemesis of nril- 
«ons of Americans, the United Na- 
tions, winch costs the American tax- 
payers billions of dollars.” 

• The Middle East peace process. 

The peace process has enjoyed 

broad bipartisan support, but Mr. 
Helms singled out die current empha- 
sis on achieving peace between Israel 
and Syria. 

“Syria doesn't want peace with Isra- 
el,” ne said. "What Syria wants is the 
Golan Heights; plus, of course, access 
to the American taxpayers’ money." 

“Congress needs to get off the 
dime,” he said, “and demand a reas- 
sessment of the entire Middle East 
peace process so that we can know, in 
advance, what our commitments are 
likely to be.” 

But he took to the high road at the 
close of his recitation. 

“As long as I am chairman, there 


f As long as I am 
chairman, there will be 
no vindictiveness, no 
getting even. 9 

committee. But its powers, which in- 
clude authorizing the money for for- 
eign aid and the conduct of U.S. activi- 
ties abroad, holding hearings, 
approving presidential nominations 
for senior diplomatic posts and pass- 
ing on treaties with other governments, 
still give the committee the potential to 
be a significant player. 

No one recognizes that better than 
Mr. Helms, who bas spent two decades 
waging s killf ul parliamentary guerrilla 
warfare against what be perceived as 
the tendency of successive presidents 


to be too soft on combating commu- 
nism, too wiling to surrender Ameri- 
can sovereignty to vaguely defined 
multilateralism and too complacent 
about squandering U.S. tax dollars on 
dubious foreign ventures. 

As one American official half-jok- 
ingly said, Mr. Helms has been “thor- 
oughly bipartisan" in that respect. 
Even Presidents Ronald Reagan and 
Bush, two fellow Republicans whose 
administrations were not noted for 
their liberal bent, found their policies 
under constant attack by Mr. Helms. 

Through scrutiny alone, the admin- 
istration will certainly be treated dif- 
ferently from when committee hear- 
ings were run by the outgoing 
Democratic chairman, Senator Clai- 
borne Pell of Rhode Island. 

“The free ride is over," said Michael 
Mandelbaum, an analyst at the Johns 
Hopkins University School of Ad- 
vanced International Studies. “They 
will have to articulate foreign policy 
better," 

In addition to the conciliatory com- 
ments last week, Mr. Helms also sent 
Secretary of State Warren M. Christo- 
pher a letter assuring him of “my in- 
tent to work with you in a spirit of 
mutual friendship and cooperation." 

And Mr. Helms went out of his way 


to deny “media reports that the presi- 
dent’s nominees will be at the mercy of 
a new Senate chairman who purport- 
edly has made a career of delaying 
and/or obstructing large numbers of 
presidential nominations under the 
purview of the State Department." 

Administration officials seized on 
the conciliatory part of Mr. Helms's 
message to argue that working with 
him will not necessarily be as difficult 
as some people assume. 

“There were no surprises in the 
agenda he outlined in RaJeigh,” a se- 
nior State Department official said. 
“These always have been his issues, 
and he’s always been very up-front in 
telling us where he stands on them." 

Some people familiar with the for- 
eign-policy process are less optimistic 
about the chances for such under- 
standing. 

The administration, they say, is un- 
likely to gel very far with Mr. Helms 
on such issues as U.S. involvement in 
Haiti, greater U.S. financial aid to 
Russia or, as one source put it, “any- 
thing that smacks Of multilate ralism, 
whether it's the UN and its peace- 
keeping operations, contributions to 
the World Bank or U.S. adherence to 
GATT," the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. 



Joe Mahoae\/The Auocuicd Pnu 


NEW ON THE BUS — Coronado High School students were not paying much 
attention to a hamburger ad on their has, bat it was the first of its kind in the nation. 
The Colorado Springs school district also sells advertising space in its schools. 


AMERICAN 


Re making HitMnvira Into Elope 

The movie mogulSam GoWwyn once said: ' 
“Studios shouldn’t remake hit pictures; they 
should take flops and make than better " 

The Goldwyn wisdom has seldom been 
practiced. Instead, notes Bob Thomas of The 
Associated Press, it's all too often the other 
way around: Yesterday's hits are remade into 
today's flops. 

“Love Affair” was a' bit in 1939, less so 
when redone in 1957 as “An Affair to Re- 
member.” The 1994 version with Warren 
Beatty and Annette Bening has dropped like a 
stone at the box office. 

Likewise^ “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstei n .” 
James Whale's 1931 version created asmall 
mdustrycf imitators. Kenneth Branagh’s new 
attempt features Robert DeNiro in the Bons 
Karloff role. Reviews have been mixed, at 
best. - . * 

Perhaps the most successful of r em a k e s is 
the 1989 “Batman,” originally a serial in 
1943,_then * 1966 movie. But history is replete 
with failed remakes. Among them: 

“Withering Heights”: The 1939 classic 
with, Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon is 
frequently revived. The 1970 redo with Timo- 
. thy Dalton and Anna Calder-Marshall went 
nowhere. . _ 

. “ King Kong": Who could forget Fay 
Wray? The 1976 version had Jessica Lange, 
with stronger sexual. overtones but fewer tick- 
ets sold ... , . _ _ _. 

- “Stagecoach": The 1939 original with John 
■Wayne became' a classic* but the 1966 redo 
with Ann-Margret and Bing Crosby was hor- 
rendous. ' :• • . • 


Short Takes 

If someone flashes a badge ami identifies 
-himself as a law enforcement officer, take 
your time. A police spokesman told The New 
York Times that you should ask to examine 
the badge, then ask to see a police identifica- 
tion card. The card number and badge num- 
ber should match and the picture on the card 
should look tike the officer concerned. If you 
are at borne and are unsatisfied with the 
badge and picture identification, dial 9 1 1 , the 
emergency number. Policemen rarely travel 
alone in cars when they are working. If a lone 
man with a badge beckons you to his car, 
request the presence of another officer, in 
uniform. 

This Sporting Life: Emi Kijek, 79. who 
fired his first ever hole-in-one at Rehoboth, 
Massachusetts, dropped dead at the next tee. 
After shooting his ace; Mr. Kijek “was kind of 
happy, but he wasn’t jumping with joy,” said 
Ms playing partner. Moms Dumont He ap- 
is tee-shot at the next hole, rolled 
i eyes, said “Oh, no,” and collapsed. He had 
been suffering from high blood pressure. 

A proposed city onfinance in Woodcfiff 
Lake, New Jersey, would prohibit unsports- 
manlike conduct at public sports events — by 
players and spectators alike. This would in- 
clude fighting, verbally abusing or threaten- 
ing anyone dse at the game. Most of the 5,300 
residents say they favor the proposal. But the 
state’s American Civil Liberties Union chap- 
ter said it would place an unconstitutional 
restraint on free speech. And one resident, 
Timmy Frasa, 21, said, “You mean I couldn't 
say 'Kill the ump!’ or anything else? What am 
I supposed to say if the ump makes a really 
bad call — 'Excuse me sir, but 1 dare say that 
last pitch was a strike, not a ball?’ Come on." 

International Herald Tribune. 


They Ve Rarely Had It So Bad 

Outlook Is Grim as Democrats Ponder *96 


By David S. Broder 

Wasftzngtatt Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
Democratic Party faces a tough 
two-year comeback effort, with 
a weakened president, a resur- 
gent opposition and the ever- 
present danger of a civil war 
within the party. 

The situation confronting 
President Bill Clinton and his 
party has ominous historical 
antecedents. After less-devas- 
tating midterm losses than their 
party suffered last Tuesday, the 
last two Democrats in the Oval 
Office, Lyndon B. Johnson and 
Jimmy Carta, tried to readjust 
their policies but failed to re- 
gain political equilibrium. 

The 1978 Democratic losses 
were relatively modest: 3 seats 
in the Senate and IS in the 
House. In 1966, Democrats lost 
4 Senate seats and 47 House 
seats. In both cases, they kept 
control of Congress. 

White House aides dismissed 
the notion that in 1996 Mr. 
Clinton may follow Mr. John- 
son, who retired rather than 
seek re-eicction in 1968, or Mr. 
Carter, ’who beat back a chal- 
lenge "by Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy for nomination but 
lost the 1980 election to Ronald 
Reagan. 

The applicable precedent, the 
presidential aides said, is Harry 
S. Truman, who saw Republi- 
cans capture Congress in 1946 
and turned the tables on them 
by winning the 1948 election 
and restoring Democratic con- 
trol of Congress. 

Tony Coelho, a former 
House member and one of the 
president’s political advisers, 
said: “There is no need to pan- 
ic. On the breadbasket issues, 
like reducing the deficit, in- 


creasing jobs and keeping the 
economy moving, the president 
is very credible. What he needs 
to do is stay focused in those 
areas where he's credible, and 
let the Republicans deal with 
reform of Congress and trying 
to implement that 'contract' 
they signed with the American 
people." 

Still no one around the presi- 
dent disputes that Mr. Clinton 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

faces a steeper climb to victory 
in 1 996 than any of them antici- 
pated before Tuesday's land- 
slide produced Republican ma- 
jorities in both houses of 
Congress and in the nation’s 
governorships. 

An NBC News-Wall Street 
Journal Poll taken immediately 
after the voting showed Mr. 
Clinton losing to the new Sen- 
ate majority leader. Bob Dole. 
Republican of Kansas, by 45 
percent to 39 percent. 

Analysis of Tuesday’s returns 
demonstrates even more clearly 
how the electoral odds have 
tipped against Mr. Clinton, es- 
pecially if the 1996 election 
turns out to be a two-way race, 
uncomplicated by Ross Perot or 
some other significant indepen- 
dent candidate. 

In 1992, Mr. Clinton won a 
plurality victory, gaining 43 
percent of the popular vote, to 
George Bush’s 38 percent and 
Mr. Perot's 19 percent. In elec- 
toral college votes, Mr. Clinton 
prevailed over Mr. Bosh, 370 to 
168, with no stale going to Mr. 
Perot 

For both parties, the main 
political game for the last two 
years has been wooing Perot 


supporters. Tuesday’s exit polls 
showed that the Republican 
Party came out on top by a 
lopsided margin. Fully 65 per- 
cent of those who said they had 
backed Mr. Perot in 1992 voted 
for Republican congressional 
randiriates this year. 

But there is worse news for 
the president from the 1994 
election. Last time. Mr. Clinton 
carried 32 states and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. If you add up 
the 1994 votes for governor, 
senator and representatives in 
each of those 32 states, you find 
that 13 of Mr. Clinton’s states 
would be in the Republican col- 
umn and eight others too close 
to call. That yields an electoral 
vote count of Mr. Clinton, 81; 
undecided, 141, and Republi- 
can, 316. 

This is obviously a theoreti- 
cal exercise. White House offi- 
cials point out that Mr. Clin- 
ton’s approval rating in 
California and New York, the 
two largest states that this sta- 
tistical model rates as toss-ups, 
is significantly higher-than that 
of “the Democratic gubernato- 
rial candidates who lost lasl 
Tuesday. But some larger truths 
about the electoral map can 
hardly be disputed: 

In 1992, Mr. Clinton carried 
five Southern and border states 
with 47 electoral votes. At this 
point, only his home state of 
Arkansas can be counted clear- 
ly on his side. 

In the key Clinton states of 
the Midwest — including Illi- 
nois, Iowa, Michigan. Minneso- 
ta, Ohio and Wisconsin — Re- 
publicans won all but one of the 
10 gubernatorial and senatorial 
contests, and in every state but 
Minnesota won the majority of 
the House vote as well 


Away From Politics 


• Atmospheric monitors peered down on 
Earth from the space shuttle Atlantis on Sun- 
day for a final round of experiments before 
the shuttle’s scheduled landing. Atlantis is set 
to return to Florida on Monday morning after 
1 1 days of scientific experiments focused on 
the shrinking ozone layer and how i t is affect- 
ed by the sun. 

• Walgreen Cd. is recaffing thousands of cans 
of its store-brand Ant and Roach Killer be- 
cause they can explode. A worker in a Wal- 
green store in Chicago needed stitches on the 
forehead when the top of the aerosol can blew 
off, a company spokesman said. Too much 


moisture in the cans may cause corrosion, 
which could cause the cans to burst 

• Picket tines cone down after a tentative 
agreement was reached for striking workers of 
San Francisco’s two daily newspapers, the 
Examiner and the Chronicle. The proposal 
could end a strike that began Nov. 1, when 
2.600 reporters, printers and delivery drivers 
walked off the job after more than a year of 
negotiations ova salaries and other issues. 

• A man walking between the care of a subway 

in upper Manhattan fell onto the tracks and 
was lolled when he was run ova by the train, 
the police said. The man was identified as 
Wilson Nunez, 25, of the Bronx. ap 


In this Tuesday’s 



gribunc 


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England 0800 413000 - Switzerland ! 5 5 ~’3o4 
Italy 1678 ”4483 - Austria 0660 6789 
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Norway 800 11633 - Spain 900 973333 
Netherland 06022 20 iO 


u! 




Information: schedules, reservations, Frequent Traveler Bonus System. 



the route to serenity 


ip POLITICAL AOTES * 


A Hew Look in State legislatures. Too 

HOUSTON — Mirroring the party's huge gains in con- 
gressional and gubernatorial elections on Tuesday. Republi- 
cans made striking advances in state legislatures, taking 
control of at least 15 chambers that had been in Democratic 
hands. 

Republicans also picked up enough seats to cause an even 
split between the two parties in three other chambers, accord- 
ing to figures compiled by the National Conference of State 
Legislatures, a nonpartisan group based in Denver. In none 
of the SO states did Democrats take control of a legislative 
house from Republicans. They achieved a net gain only in a 
handful of Northeastern states and Hawaii. 

Analysts are already debating whether the election was a 
long-term national shift, or whether a volatile electorate 
could just as easily lurch back to the Democrats two years 
hence. 

In the North Carolina House of Representatives, a 78-to- 
42 Democratic edge was transformed into a 67-to-53 Repub- 
lican margin. The Illinois House, where Democrats had a 67- 
to-51 majority, is now 64 Republicans and 54 Democrats. 

Before the election, the Democrats held 64 chambers, the 
Republicans 31, and 3 were tied. Nebraska’s unicameral 
legislature is officially nonpartisan. 

The Democrats will control 49 chambers and the Republi- 
cans 46: 3 appear tied. One of those, the California Assembly, 
could slip into Republican hands after a recount of one close 
race. Republican control would oust the Democrat who has 
been Assembly speaker for 14 years. Willie Brown, one of the 
nation's best-known and most powerful state legislators. 

For the first time since Reconstruction, the total number of 
Republican state legislators (3.391) is now' approaching the 
total of Democratic counterparts (3.847). ( NYT ) 

Gingrich Dismisses a ‘Nonsense Issue* 

WASHINGTON — Representative Newt Gingrich dis- 
missed as “a nonsense issue” questions the House ethics 
committee has asked him about the role GOPAC, the politi- 
cal organization he heads, played in developing a college 
course he taught last year. 

In a television interview, the Georgia Republican — ex- 
pected to be elected speaker of the House aficr the Republi- 
can gains in Tuesday's election — said GOPAC “provided 
some initial ideas on who might be interested in helping 
finance the course and how we might go abour that.” 

'That's all they did." he said. 

Documents about the course cited by The Washington 
Post last year and again Saturday show that GOPAC officials 
also helped develop the course and market it to Republican 
groups. The Post reported Saturday that the ethics panel told 
Mr. Gingrich in an Oct. 31 letter that the documents filed 
with a complaint by Ben Jones, the Democrat he defeated 
Tuesday, raised questions about whether the course at Ken- 
nesaw State College was exclusively educational, as Mr. 
Gingrich had said. 

Mr. Gingrich, a fonner college history' professor, taught 
the course, called Renewing American Civilization, on Satur- 
day mornings without pay. The course was expensive to 
develop and'disiribute — about S 300,000 — because it was 
offered on videotape and by satellite. Mr. Gingrich said. 
Corporate and individual donors, some of whom also have 
contributed to GOPAC and Mr. Gingrich’s campaigns, got 
tax deductions because they sent checks to the college’s 
foundation. 

Mr. Gingrich acknowledged that the ethics committee was 
reviewing Mr. Jones's complaint. “Every lawyer we’ve talked 
to says it is a nonsense issue,” he said. "And you know, ever 
since I filed charges against Jim Wright, who had to resign as 
speaker, there's been. I think, a sincere desire to make sure 
that I’m investigated as thoroughly as possible." U P. 


Quote/ U nquote 


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Representative Barney Frank. Democrat of Massachu- 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


Corruption Threatens to Spill Russia’s Economic Brew 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — Corruption 
has become so pervasive and 
deep-rooted here that it is jeop- 
ardizing the development of a 
free-market economy and sour- 
ing many Russians on the idea 
of democracy, . according to 
government officials, police in- 
vestigators and opinion polls. 

Tax inspectors, factory man- 
agers, police officers, soldiers 
and politicians at all levels, and 
in an regions of Russia, have 
been implicated in recent cor- 
ruption scandals. But investiga- 
tors and business officials $ay 
the public revelations are just 
the tip of the iceberg. 

Russia's peculiar post-Com- 
munist brew of easy money, in- 
stability, outdated laws and 


long-suppressed detire to live 
well has bred a brazen get-rich- 
at-any-cost ideology. . 

At the same time, the old 
state bureaucracy set up by the 
Communists, having feudal off 
all efforts to reduce its numbers 
and powers dramatically, bla- 
tantly uses a vast array" of li- 
censes, approvals and manda- 
tory signatures to enrich itself, 
businessmen and officials said. 

The result is widespread cyn- 
icism toward those in power, 
including President Boris N. 
Yeltsin, and growing anger at a 
new system that seems to re- 
ward most those who defy the 
law. 

The optimism and hope that 
greeted the 1991 collapse of 
communism and the embrace of 
the West have mostly faded, re- 


placed by a feeling that only 
suckers play by the rules. 

Ella Pamphilova, a pro-re- 
form member of Parliament 
and anti-corruption crusader, 
said: “People have lost all Lbeir 
faith. They don’t believe in any- 
one. But a society without 
ideals, without morality, dies.” 

Yuri Shchekochikhin, an in- 
vestigative journalist, said: “In 
the past there were rules to the 
game, good or bad or whatever. 
And there was fear. Now there 
are no rules, and there is no 
fear.” 

A presidential report on 
mime and corruption deter- 
mined this year that one-third 
of all retail trade earnings went 
for “corrupt purposes.” Rus- 
sian consumers, in other words, 


for bribery and extortion, 
my R 


routinely pay a 33 percent “tax” for dollars, lucrative timber ruption by taking on Russian 

rights given out far Volvos, partners, who handle all con- 
mmm ftl investigations halted tacts with local authorities, 
for payoffs, federal government Others amply make the local 
funds deposited m certain government a legitimate part- 
banks for bribes, new state ner of any business deaL 


Many Russians also come 
into more direct contact with 
corruption. Nearly half of those 
responding to a recent poll said 
they or a relative had been 
forced to pay a bribe to a gov- 
ernment official at some point 
in the last three years. 

Russians have become adept 
at the art of figuring out when 
someone expects money under 
the table. When a bureaucrat or 
traffic policeman throws up a 
barrier, it often means they are 
waiting for the citizen to sug- 
it the issue be settled 
stweea us.” After that, the 
bargaining on a price begins. 

No area of the economy or 
ion is immune. 

breaks have been sold 


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for cash. 

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said. 

“Top-level government min- 
isters are much less corrupt 
than you believe,” he added, 
but the middle-level officials 


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than simple bribery these days. 

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tories, which in many cases 
have hot paid their workers in 
months, have siphoned off 
company funds to buy Volvos, 
lose vacation villas in the Ba- 
hamas and fund businesses 



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“are very corrupt, very much owned by relatives and friends. 
v - n — *” Some managers, after beg- 

ging for new government cred- 
its to pay workers’ salaries, have 
parked the money in bank ac- 
counts in order to pocket the 
monthly interest. 


bribed. 

Organized-crime groups are 
the most pervasive bnbepayers, 
with prosecutors, policemen 
and government officials on 
their payroll, according to cor- 
ruption investigators and news 


According to First Deputy 

P rime Mmis ter Anatoli Tt Clhu- 

Moscow, two top prosecu- kajs, who oversees the privati- 
ton were recently revealed to of Russia’s factones, “at 
have ties with organized crime. 


reports. 
In Me 


And an official of a KGB suc- 
cessor agency, the Federal 
Counterintelligence Service, 
was recently arrested for selling 
his services to crime groups. 

“Everywhere, these gangs 
have informers in the militia, 
the traffic po lice and banks,” 
said Pyotr Filippov, author of a 
presidential report on crime 
and corruption presented to 
Mr. Yeltsin last wmter. 

Bribery has become so much 
the norm that the daily Komso- 
molskaya Pravda was able to 
compDe a price list of Moscow 
bribes last yean 

To register a foreign joint 
venture swiftly, and without 
weeks or months of rad tape: up 
to $2,000. To get the docu- 


leasr” 50 percent of the coun- 
try's crippling: nonpayment oa- 
sis — in which most factories 
are on the brink of bankruptcy 
because they do not get paid 
what they are owed ana do not 
have the money to pay their 
debts — is the result of embez- 
zlement and financial mantp n- 

lations by managers. 

“As long as 100 to 200 gener- 
al directors who have embez- 
zled tens of millions of rubles 
from the state are not in prison, 
no macroeconomic concepts 
wUlhdp us,” Mr. Chubais said. 

Corruption has even overrun 
the nrilitazy. Mr. Filippov said 
one-third of the military's re- 
sources ware “being stolen.” 

Perhaps the roost egregious 



OfaNtanf;, 

A young Moscow resident taking to the streets with her 
accordion on a rainy day to pick np some extra change j§ 
hard times endure for most people in the Rnssrah capital. 


POLICY: A Warning From Dole 


merits, stamps and si g n a t u r es examples of mflitaiy corruption 

r*nni'rpd tn nnra ^ h atllf * - j •_ n 


open 

But to open a bank and 
y register it as a mere 
business, to skirt hanVfng regu- 
lations: $300,000. 

For a non-Muscovite to ob- 
tain a Moscow residency permit 
— a Soviet-era req uirem ent still 
in effect — and the right to 
purchase a three-room apart- 
ment here: as much as $35,000. 
That amount does not include 
the cost of the apartment. 

Sl Petersburg is no better, 
according to a former dty offi- 
cial. D ismisse d from his job, he 
recently told Pravda that 70 
percent of the officials working 
in the mayor's office were on 
the take. Last week, a local 
prosecutor in Sl Petersburg 
was convicted of taking a 
525,000 bribe. 

Foreign companies are not 
immune, although many insu- 
late themselves from the 


tly occurred in Russia’s 
estern Forces Group, winch 
until its return to Russia this 
summer was based in Eastern 
Germany. 

Arnxnt given to Mr. Yeltsin 
more than a year ago about cor- 
ruption in tne Western Forces 
Group found that several top 

generals hfld made mfllirmg of 

dollars by buying food, ciga- 
rettes and liquor at cheap on- 
base pikes and then transport- 
ing the goods as military 
supplies to Pd and and Russia, 
where they were sold for much 
higher, froc-markct prices. 

The generals were also re- 
portedly selling oil products 
and electronics from the army’s 
stocks on the German black 
markcL The money from these 
transactions was deposited in 
bank accounts in Finland, Swit- 
zerland and the United States. 


ContiMied tram Page 1 
that the Republicans who con- 
trol the Congress may have a 
much different view on areas 
like Haiti and Bosnia and 
North Korea,” Mr. Dole said 
Sunday as he urged the White 
House to “be prepared” for 
questions from new Republican 
committee chairmen. 

In particular, Mr. Dole said 
all UJS. troops should be with- - 
drawn from Haiti by Nov. 24, 
Thanksgiving Day; - that the 
arms embargo on Bosnia 
should be lifted entirety, and 
that the recent agreement on 
North Komi’s nuclear program 
should be scrutinized. 

In addition, Mr. Dole said he 
hoped to discuss with Mr. Clin- 
ton's chief trade adviser, Mick- 
ey Kantor, possible clarifying 
' * * ’ U that Republicans are 
that would have to be 
if Congress is to ratify 
die world tariff-reduction ac- 
cord under GATT, 

That new lan guage, in sepa- 
rate legislation, would presum- 
ably enunciate Ui>. sovereignty 


in the face of any adverse trade 


World TradcOrganization. 

Mr. Dote has long supported 
a unilateral lifting of the United 
Nations aims embargo an Bos- 
nia and believes the - B osnian 
government has a right to de- 
fend itself under the United 
Nations. Charter. Although the 
administration last week acced- 
ed to congressional demands 
and halted U.S. enforcement of 
the embargo, some : senators 
want the United States to go a 
step further and supply Muslim 
forces with arms. 

The United Nations, Mr. 
Dole said, is “trying to dictate 
policy in Bosnia instead of 
NATO dictating policy.” 

On North Korea’s nuclear 
program, Mr. Dole suggested 
that Congress “investigate 
whether we got a good deaf" 
when the Clinton administra- 
tion negotiated a freeze of 
Pyongyang’s nndear program 
in return for furnishing No^ja 
Korea with advanced reactois 
not capable of producing large 
amounts of weapons fuel 



Majesty and 
power are 
displayed by the 
elephants of 
Okavango, In 
contras! to the 
elegance of the 
strikingly 
marked 
gemsbok. seen 
to Botswana's 
Gemsbok 
National Park. 


Tourism: A Rich Resource to Develop 

Tourism could become domestic product after scenically 

mining, according to 


the biggest contributor 
to Botswana’s gross 



Noni Lephole, Director 
of Tourism. She says 


t 


tourism presently 
accounts for only 2.5 
percent of the gross 
domestic product a fig- 
ure far lower than the 
international average. 

Botswana's main 
tourist attraction is the 
Okavango Delta - an 
area of 16,000 square 
kilometers of marsh, 
river, open grasslands 
and riverine forests of 
fms - that Is home to 
pride of Africa’s wild 
game. Other tourist 
attractions include the 


stunning 
Makgadikgadi Pan ana 
the Chobe National 
Park. 

in many places 
great herds of large 
wildlife - such as ele- 
phant. lion, giraffe, 
zebra, buffalo and 


range of tours and safa- 
ris is available to cater 
to most interests, such 
as bird -watching. 

fishing and photogra - 
phy. • . 

As a first step in 
expanding the tourism 
industry, the govern- 


gemsbok-can be seen ment has designated a 
in their natural habitat n um ber of conservatio* 


The national parte 
have a variety of envi- 
ronments, Including 
Kalahari sands, la- 
goons, forests, scrub 
and salt pans. This 
allows for a diversity of 
animal, bird, insect and 


areas in the Otevanoj 
Delta, it will grant lonj 
term leases for tl 
management of th< 
areas to private oper 
tors who submit plar 
embodying the bei 
combination of conser 


plant life that is rarely vatlon and commercial' 
found elsewhere. A exploitation. 


For More Information: 


Director of Tourism, Department of Tourism, Private Bag 0047. Gaborone, 
Botswana Tel: (207) 353024 - Fax: (267) 308675. . 

Information may also be obtained from Botswana dipfon&tic 
missions and honorary consuls abroad. 























iKdi LM tJ&fO 


Page 5 


". By Raymond Bo oner 

■ Yorik Times Service 

‘‘.'-KIGAIJ, Rwanda — The 
-deadB of Rwanda’s president in 

in ' ' 


wanda’s Disaster: A Plot by Extremist Hutu? 


has emerged • — much of it from 
a Belgian investigation — to 
support the theory that extrem- 
ist Hutu carried out the attack. 


anecrasn last April touched and that foreigners were dv% 
Jraudredtiiousajid people, most whom the foreigners 




of tbemTutsi, were slaughtered, 
mostly fcy Hutu soldiers and 
Muilitia, in a matter of weeks. 

. It was widely assumed, but 
never conclusively established, 
that the plane carrying Presi- 
dent Juvenal Habyaziinana was 
i shot- dtown. In any event, those 
.■responsible have never been 
^identified. 

■* : ■ •But now some hard evidence 


„ were 

wen-long for remains a mystery. 

Any inquiry inevitably con- 
fronts several theories for the 
plane crash. 

. One widely held view is that 
it was the work of the Rwandan 
Patriotic Front, the Tutsi-led 
rebel army that has sinra de- 
feated and replaced the Hutu- 
ledgovenuoent. 

The other assumption is that 


extremist Hutu killed the presi- 
dent, himself a Hutu, because 
he was about to bring the Patri- 
otic Front into the government, 
as required by a peace plan. 
There have also been allega- 
tions of Belgian or French com- 
plicity. 

All the theories are based on 
circ umstan tial evidence and po- 
litical intrigue. 

Those who believe the Hutu 
were responsible, for example, 
base their case generally on the 
fact that immediately after the 
plane crash, the army put up 
barricades around the capital 
and the killing began. 


a Others counter that such a 
link is irrelevant, that the barri- 
cades went up quickly because 
the array was in the middle of a 
civil war, the capital was tense 
and when the president was 
killed the army simply reacted. 

Like many such assassina- 
tions, the case will probably 
never be resolved to eveiyone’s 
satisfaction. 

The plane carrying the 
Rwandan president crashed on 
the evening of April 6. That 
morning, Paul Henri cm, a Bel- 
gian national who has lived 
most of his 60- some years in 
Rwanda, was in a car on the 




■ V; 


'IS- 


[J Js 


% 






J-ijo 5ili j/Tbc Auf-cuMd Pm> 


Angolan children, playing in a puddle, being watched by a boy who lost a leg to a land mine in the country's civil war. 


Angola Offers a Cease-Fire as Pact Signing Nears 


-j 


Reuters 

LUANDA. Angola — The Angolan 
government said. Sunday that it was 
ready to declare an Immediate truce in 
the nearly two-decade-long war with 
UNITA rebels, the state radio reported. 

‘The Angolan government declares 
solemnly its readiness for the immediate 
establishment of a truce across the whole 
country,” die radio said, quoting a gov- 
ernment statement The statement said a 
planned meeting of government and re- 
bel leaders could discuss the timing of a 
cease-fire. • . 


A military delegation from UNITA, 
the National Union for the Total Inde- 
pendence of Angola, was due in Lusaka 
as the statement was issued. 

The rebel movement has repeatedly 
said a government assault on its central 
highlands bastion of Huambo, which is 
now in government hands, had cast 
doubt on the peace process and the for- 
mal sig nin g of the accords. 

On Saturday, the government denied 
reports it had agreed to halt fighting with 
UNITA ahead of a formal cease-fire ac- 
cord involving both sides. 


The two rides initialed a peace agree- 
ment in Lusaka on Oct. 31 after 11 
months of talks, calling for a formal 
signing Tuesday to be followed by a 
cease-fire Thursday. 

State radio said earlier that Angolan 
troops captured the northern town of 
Mbanaa Congo from UNITA in the lat- 
est heavy fighting. 

African diplomats said Sunday they 
expected President Jose Eduardo dos 
Santos and the UNITA leader, Jonas 
Savimbi. to meet Tuesday to sign the 
accords. 


outskirts of Kigali. As he drove 
past the village of Masaka. he 
noticed a military vehicle with a 
piece of artillery behind il 

In an interview here, Mr. 
Henrion said the sighting of the 
artillery piece surprised him be- 
cause under a peace agreement 
then in effect, heavy weapons 
were to be kept in compounds. 
So he ordered his driver to slow 
down. 

He then noticed that among 
the dozen soldiers standing 
there, two were wearing Rwan- 
dan Army uniforms that were 
newer than the uniforms of the 
other soldiers. 

Each had a weapon slung 
over his shoulder. These weap- 
ons were about 4-feet long and 
covered, Mr. Henrion said. But 
what stood out most, be said, 
was the manner in which they 
wore their berets. Rwandan sol- 
diers wear their berets cocked 
over the right eye. These two 
soldiers, he said, were wearing 
theirs over the left. 

Later that evening, he said, 
he drove past the same spot and 
the military post was still there. 

Forty-five minutes later. Mr. 
Habyarim ana’s plane, which 
was also carrying Burundi's 
president, Cyprien Ntaryamira, 
crashed. 

The missiles believed to have 
brought it down were fired from 
a shallow valley a few hundred 
yards from where Mr. Henrion 
had seen the soldiers, according 
to villagers in Masaka, who in 
interviews said they had seen 
flashes of missiles being fired 
and the plane go down. 

Belgian authorities, who have 
undertaken the most thorough 
investigation of the crash, have 
also determined that the mis- 
siles were fired from Masaka. 

Based on the evidence they 
have gathered so far, the Bel- 
gians are convinced that ex- 
tremist Hutu were responsible. 
According to Belgian military 
experts, the plane was hit by 
two surface-to-air missiles, 
probably Soviet-made SAM-7s. 

In the view of former a 
Rwandan defense minister, 
James Gasan a, the presence of 
such weapons would support 
the theory that foreigners were 
involved because the Rwandan 
government had never pur- 
chased surface-to-air missiles 
and Rwandan soldiers did not 
have training in their use. 

Hie Bel gians believe that the 
two soldiers Mr. Hemion saw 
were French, possibly from 
Martinique or Guadeloupe. 
French soldiers wear their be- 
rets cocked over their left eye. 
When on training missions in a 
foreign country, they wear uni- 
forms of the host country. 


in- 


If French soldiers were 
volved, they could have been 
acting as mercenaries, not un- 
der orders of French officials. 

The Belgian investigators 
also have a two-page, hand- 
written letter dated May 29 in 
which the writer says that two 
French soldiers were involved 
in the plot to kill the president 

The writer said the French- 
men were working with the Co- 
alition for the Defense of the 
Republic, a radical Hutu party. 
He said the president was killed 
“to spark off the carnage.” 

He said that he was a senior 
militia commander and that his 
right arm had been torn off. 
“No doubt I am going to die 
soon for lack of treatment” he 
wrote, signing only his first 
name. 

The letter was first delivered 
to a Belgian journalist Colette 
Braeckman, who gave it to the 
Belgian investigators. It said 
that very few people were aware 
of the plot other than four 
members of the Coalition, in- 
cluding himself, and the two 
Frenchmen. 

T will not give the names of 
the Rwandans, but one of the 
Frenchmen is called Etienne, I 
t hink, ” he wrote. 

In interviews here, three Eu- 
ropeans living in Kigali said 
they had known a French sol- 
dier named “Etienne.” They 
said he had been stationed in 
Burundi, where he was involved 
in training the presidential 
guard. 


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Page 6 


IKTER1NATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


Sarajevo Hotel Hit 
By Shelling as War 
Rages Across Bosnia 


CaapHed bf Oir Staff From Dispatches 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herze- 
govina — Government troops 
battled Bosnian Serbs on three 
fronts^ Sunday, and five projec- 
tiles hit the Sarajevo hotel hous- 
ing most foreigners, setting part 
of it ablaze. 

Local police said five tank 
rounds from Grbavica, a sub- 
urb held by Serbs, hit the Holi- 
day Inn, where most foreign re- 
porters and other visitors to the 
Bosnian capital stay. But a 
United Nations peacekeeper 
from France said the building 
was apparently targeted by 
rocket-propelled grenades, 
which cany a lesser punch. 

UN and local fire fighters 
were battling a second-floor 
blaze at the hotel, and one UN 
fire fighter was stightfy wound- 
ed by shrapneL There was no 
word on other casualties. 

Meanwhile, the Muslim-led 
government in Sarajevo hailed 
die U.S. decision to stop block- 
ing Bosnia-bound arms ship- 
ments in the Adriatic Sea. 

But officials in Washington 
and Europe appeared to agree 
that the policy change, effective 
Sunday night, was unlikely to 
provide any boost to Bosnia's 
army, which has received most 
of its arms imports by air. Out 
of 42,000 vessels challenged in 
the Adriatic by NATO 


ff 


over the past two years, only 
three were found to be ferrying 
arms to Bosnia, according to 
the Pentagon. 

“We don’t see massive 
amounts of arms coming in as a 
result," Ejup Ganic, the Bosni- 
an vice president, said of the 
U.S. move. 

Congress voted last summer 
to stop funding U.S. enforce- 
ment of the arms ban if Bosnian 
Serbs by this month had not 
signed a peace settlement bro- 
kered by the United States, 
Russia and three West Europe- 
an countries. But senior U.S. 
diplomats also portrayed last 
week's action as reflecting 
Washington’s frustration over 
ineffective allied air strikes and 
Europe's failure to take stron- 
ger measures that would com- 
pel Bosnian Serbs to accept the 
peace agreement 

The proposed agreement 
would split Bosnia's territory 
roughly equally between Serbi- 
an nationalists on one side and 


the Muslims and their Croatian 
allies on the other. 

Even though the ban on 
sending arms to the area has 
been increasingly flouted, the 
two-year-old air and naval pa- 
trols in the Adriatic by the 
United States and several Euro- 
states were considered a 
y important symbol of 
their will to work together in 
containing Europe's bloodiest 
conflict since World War II. 

Under the new policy, U.S. 
ships will be able to chafleoge 
foreign cargo vessels and send 
inspection teams aboard. Bui if 
arms bound for the Bosnian 
overament are discovered, 
JS. sailors can no longer divert 
the vessel or report the finding 
through North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization channds. 

Congress also has required 
President Bill Clinton to submit 
a plan for training Bosnian 
forces outside Bosnia. 

UjS. officials said American 
forces would remain engaged in 
a range of other NATO actions 
related to the war, including en- 
forcement of the remaining em- 
bargo against Serbia and the 
“no-fiy” zone over Bosnia. 

Battles were being fought in 
Bosnia’s northeast, extreme 
northwest and the southwest, 
where government troops are 
trying to push Serbian fences 
farther back from the major 
highway linking the Adriatic 
coast with Sarajevo, and farther 
north to the government strong- 
hold of Tuzla. Bosnian radio 
reported gains by government 
troops east of Mostar and south 
of Konjic, saying more than 100 
Serbian troops were killed. 

The Serbs also seemed to be 
in trouble in northeast Bosnia, 
near Bijdjina. A reliable source, 
who asked not to be named, 
said the Muslim-led 
meat army had encii 
an Serbs on Mount Majevica 
and a television relay tower 
about 10 kilometers (6 miles) 
east of Tuzla that the Serbs 
were protecting. The source, 
speaking after visiting the re- 
gion, said Serbian volunteers 18 
years old and over from region- 
al towns had gone to try to 
break the Bosnian Army's ring 
around the tower, an important 
part of the Serbian communica- 
tion network. 

(AP, WP) 



lay Dime/ Roan 


President Clinton taking up the saxophone for a hmchtime gig at the presidential palace in Manila, en route to Jakarta. 


Q&A: Free Trade Push at the Summit 


What President BiU Clinton and other 
leaders of the 18 members of APEC, the 
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation fo- 
rum, hold their second informal summit 
meeting on Tuesday in Bogor, Indonesia, 
they will have before them a blueprint for 
reform recommended by a group of senior 
business executives from the region. Les 
McCraw, chief executive of America’s Flu- 
or Corn, who was a co-chairman of the 
group lcnown as the Pacific Business Fo- 
rum, discussed the major issues in Jakarta 
on Sunday with Michael Richardson of the 
International Herald Tribune. 

Q. What do you hope will come out of 
the Bogor summit? 

A. We recommended that no later 
than this year, the APEC leaders should 
adopt the goal of achieving free trade 
ano investment liberalization by the year 
2002 for the developed members of the 
com, and no later than 2010 for all 
APEfc economies. I think business over- 
all is looking! or free trade to be defined 
as zero tariffs over time. 

We felt the program should be aggres- 
sive because this is the way business 
lie think. Usually, if you set a high 
, you can make much more progress 
i if you set a softer goal Fixing a firm 
date would send a signal to those who 
have to develop policy that the sooner it 
can be done the better. 

We also call for an immediate stand- 
still to the introduction of new trade and 
investment barriers. If the APEC leaden 
respond positively to that, it would pro- 
vide a strong start to the whole liberaliza- 
tion process. 


Q. Are you concerned at reports of 
some resistance to setting a firm date for 
freeing up trade and investment, even if 
it is pushed back to 2020? 

A If APEC is to succeed and become 
more than Just another international talk 
forum, tire leaders in Bogor must strong- 
ly embrace a move toward free trade and 
investment liberalization. They must 
also undertake practical efforts to facili- 
tate the conduct of business in the re- 
gion. 

There is no time for delay. The private 
sector is already moving in this direction 
and governments must essentially catch 
up with their business mnimiimfiM 

Q. APEC ministers on Saturday 
adopted an investment code for the re- 
gion, but it was not binding. Is that real 
progress? 

A. We see this as a first step — a floor, 
not a ceiling. It can be improved and 
strengthened each year. 

AH APEC economies are competing 


instead of going into business expansion 
and job creation. 

There should be transparency in ad- 
ministrative systems, rules and regula- 
tions. Entry procedures for goods, ser- 
vices and professional personnel should 
be girwpKR-ri product standards harmo- 
nized and intellectual property protec- 
tion improved. 

There should also be mechanisms for 
settling commercial disputes between 
its and businesses in the Asia r 


with countries outride the region for in- 
vestment dollars. At the of the day, 
these dollars will flow to where barriers 
and red-tape are minimal, and where 
every investor operates under the same 
set of rules. 

Q. You said that governments must 
intensify practical efforts to encourage 
business enterprise in Aria and the Pacif- 
ic. What do you mean? 

A There are a lot of initiatives that 
could be undertaken. Many regulatory 
and administr ative systems unnecessari- 
ly drive up the cost of doing business. As 
a result, business resources are diverted 
to Healing with systemic inefficiencies 


: region. At present, we waste a lot 
of time and money taking commercial 
disputes outride the region. 

We also see a role for APEC in encour- 
aging good business athirs and efficien- 
cies m government procurement prac- 
tices. 

- Q. How else can APEC hdp the pri- 
vate sector? 

A. APEC can solidify the economic 
and political security business needs to 
' and flourish. It can also encourage 
it of stable market econo- 
mies. 

This was made quite dear in a recent 
stuefy in which political and economic 
security was ranked as the highest con- 
cern by S3 percent of the American 
CEOs surveyed. 

; APEC provides an opportunity to 
construct fair and transparent trade and 
investment rules which business needs to 
function most efficiently — everyone 
playing the same game by the same rules. 
APEC also provides a forum in which 
members such as the U.S., Japan and 
China as wefl as less powerful economies 
can engage with each other in construc- 
tive discussions, not destructive confron- 
tations. 


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WC2E9JH T«± (44 71) 836 4802 Roc (44 71) 836 0717 __ 

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Continued froa Page 1 

Alija Izetbegovic and more in- 
terested in commerce than war. 

Whether Mr. Abdic, who was 
convicted of baud by the Yugo- 
slav authorities in the 1980s, is a 
tyrant bent only on his own 
enrichment or a benevolent ad- 
vocate of business and trade as 
a path to peace remains a bitter 
point of contention. 

What seems dear, however, is 
that Mr. Abdic commands 
fierce loyalty from his many fol- 
lowers, who call him “Babo,” or 
“Grandpa,” and fled with him 
out of the Bihac pocket into this 
bleak area of Croatia under the 
control of Serbs. 

UN officials estimate that 
30,000 Muslims took flight 
from the Bosnian government 
army, with the largest concen- 
tration of them now housed in 
the chicken farm owned by Mr. 
Abdic’s Agrokomerc food 
group. 

Mr. Abdic lives in nearby 
Vcnnic, where he has started a 
radio station supported by 
Serbs who see him as a useful 
ally against Bosnia’s Muslim 
president. 

“We want peace, just peace 
— we do not want to make 
war ” said Hajrudin Hodzic. a 
schoolteacher who fled with his 
wife, Suada, and their 3-month- 
old son, Alan, when the Bosni- 
an Army took Mr. Abdic’s 
stronghold of Velika fdadusa. 

“At first we believed Izetbe- 
govic when be said he wanted a 
better life for us,” be said. “But 
then we saw be wanted an Is- 
lamic state for Muslims alone, 
and that is not the life we want 


Clinton Campaigns 
To Reassure Asians 

HeSeesNo Change inPoIiey 


By Thomas Lippman 

Washington Pan Service 

JAKARTA — Campaigning 
to reassure Asian leaders that 
Ids international agenda will 
survive last week’s election, 
President Bill Clinton asserted 
Sunday that he did not expect 
the Republican takeover of 
Congress to have “any impact 
on our foreign policy.” 

The United States does not 
have a parliamentary system, in 
which a change of party control 
in the legislature forces a 
change in government, Mr. 
C&nton said at a joint press 
conference in Manila with Pres- 
ident Fidel V. Ramos. The pow- 
er of the president to represent 
the United States in foreign af- 
fairs, he said, “is quite dear.” 

Seeking to calm Asian lead- 
ers about U. S. policy has be- 
come a major item on what was 
already an ambitious agenda 
for Mr. Clinton’s Asia trip. 
While he expected to leave be- 
hind the domestic political re- 
buff he suffered in last week’s 
voting, to concentrate on for- 
eign policy, he is finding that he 
cannot escape it entirely be- 
cause Asian ftffigalt and jour- 
nalists want to talk about it 

Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher, also touring the 
region, nas been pep p ered with 
questions from every foreign 
minis ter he has met about 
whether Mr. Clinton can cany 
through an such initiatives as 
the nuclear agreement with 
North Korea, said Michael 
McCurry, die State Depart- 
ment spokesman. 

They want “reassurance” be- 
fore their bosses — including 
the leaders erf China, South Ko- 
rea, Japan and Indonesia — 
meet separately with Mr. Clin- 


ton here this week, Mr. 
McCurry said. „ 

“They want to know, he 
said, “that we intend to remain 
engaged in the area, and they 
were interested in the points of 
commonality cm foreign pokey 
between us and the Rep uWl ' 
cans.” 

This “commonality,” such as 
a commitment to expanding 
free trade and U. S. exports, has 
quickly become a standard 

theme to aigue that much of the 
adminis tration's foreign policy 
agenda is acceptable to the 
newly assertive Republican* 

*Tm convinced mat what Tm 
d«ng is in the interest of all the 
American people without re- 
gard to party and is supported 
by leaden of both parties,” Mr. 
Clinton said. 

Mr. Clinton flew here Satur- 
day night to be gin the business 
part of his Asian program after 
a mostly ceremonial and sol- 
emn day in Manila that fea- 
tured visits to World War IT 
battle sites and tributes to sol- 
diers who feD in that conflict.’. 

White Mr. Clinton was sol- 
emn as he visited the U. S. mili- 
tary cemetery in Manila, the 
largest outside the United 
States, and emotional as he re- 
counted seeing the grave of a 
soldier from Arkansas, his 
home state, he was also relaxed 
enough to entertain his hosts 
with his skills on the saxo- 
phone. 

At a “state luncheon” with 
Mr. Ramos, attended by Cora- 
zon C Aquino, the former pres- 
ident, Mr. Clinton sat in for a 
few numbers with a jazz band 
called The Executives, directed 
by a former foreign minister, 
Raul Manglapas. The selec- 
tions: “Sweet Georgia Brown,” 
“Take the A Train” and “Sum- 
mertime.” 


TIMOR: Pre- Summit Protests 


BOSNIA! Strange, Sinister Horror 


We support Abdic because he 
wants to open things up.” 

Mr. Hodzic ana his family 
share a small teat with Sabira 
Beganovic, another Muslim ref- 
ugee who has a 2-month-old 
son. Her husband, captured by 
the V Corps last August, has 
never seen the boy. 

“With Izetbegovic,” she said, 
“we can never return home.” 

The Bosnian authorities, who 
have invited all the refugees to 
return home and offered all 
men a six-month reprieve from 
military duty, say most of these 
Abdic supporters have been 
brainwashed or forced into obe- 
dience. Their argument is partly 
supported by UN officials. 

“We fed there is a lot of pres- 
sure and propaganda from Ab- 
dic that effectively compels 
these people to stay in the 
chicken farm,” said Mzeke Bos, 
a UN High Commissioner for 
Refugees official who over see s 
this area. “Without a pass 
signed by Abdic, they cannot 
return.” 

But she added that soldiers 
from the V Corps, commanded 
by Atif Dudakovic. had been 
acting in a way that made re- 
turn unattractive, moving into 
vacated apartments and steal- 
ing furniture. 

Mr. Songwa estimated that 
75 percent of people at the 
chicken farm would leave and 
return home if Mr. Abdic al- 
lowed them to. 

Sead Kajtazovic, Mr. Abdic's 
chief representative at the Bat- 
noga camp, challenged Mr. 
Songwa to find a angle Muslim 
refugee who would return to 
Bosnia in the current circum- 
stances. 


Continued from Page 1 

occupying the embassy com- 
pound. 

They were making a number 
of demands, including U.S. in- 
tervention to secure tfie release 
of the Timorese resistance lead- 
er Xanana Gusndo, who is 
serving a 20-year prison term 
for actions against the state of 
Indonesia and illegal possession 
of firearms. 

Mr. Christopher said that the 
United States would, as in the 
past, be “raising questions” 
about East Timor in bilateral 
meetings with Indonesian offi- 
cials during a state visit Mr. 
Clinton will make on Wednes- 
day after the APEC meeting. 

But the secretary emphasized 
that America had much in com- 
mon with Indonesia, including 
important trade, security and 
economic interests. 

“So we will raise the ques- 
tions as we have in the past, at 
about the same level of intensi- 
ty as we have in the past,” Mr. 
Christopher said. 

Thc US. Embassy said Sun- 
day that despite assurances to 
the demonstrators from several 
senior Indonesian officials that 
there would be no arrests or 
retaliation as a result of their 
action, the group was still refus- 
ing to leave the compound. 
.Foreign Minister Ali Alatas 


said that the Timorese in the 
embassy were “simply trying to 
embarrass” Indonesia. 

Mr. Clinton and other senior 
administration officials have 
made it dear in recent days that 
the United States wants to con- 
centrate on expanding its eco- 
nomic and commercial ties with 
Indonesia and other APEC, 
members to take advantage te" 
the rapid economic growth in 
the Asia-Pacific region. 

Washington hopes the Bogor 
summit -meeting wifl produce 
agreement on working toward 
free and open trade and invest- 
ment in the region by 2020. 

In a speech Thursday setting 
the tone for his visit to Asia. 
Mr. Clinton asserted that UJS. 
economic engagement would 
help improve human rights. 

“I don’t think we nave to 
choose between increasing 
trade and fostering human 
rights and open societies.” he 
said. “Experience shows us over 
and over again that commerce 
can promote cooperation, that 
mare prosperity helps to open 
societies to the world.** 

But a new report on human 
rights in the APEC region by 
Human Rights Watch/ Asia, the 
New York-based advocacy 
group, says that commercial di- 
plomacy in the Asia-Pacific re- 
gion is pushing human rights 
concerns to the ridelines. 


GATT: Doubt on China Timetable 


CODEX: Downloading Leonardo 


Coetiased from Page 1 
welcomed the news. “It’s a good 
thing," he said. “I’m delighted 
that the manuscript win stay in 
the United States, and that it 
will not go to Seoul or even to 
Italy, or get hidden away in a 
vault in Switzerland.” 

Before the sale, Christie’s had 
taken the manuscript on tour to 
Milan, Zurich. Seoul and To- 
kyo, leading to speculation that 
the buyer would be from a for- 
eign country. The competing 
bidder at the auction was Mi- 
lan’s Cariplo Foundation, 
backed by one of Italy's largest 
banks. 

The news created something 
of a sensation in Mr. Gates’s 
hometown, 

•This bodes well for Seattle," 
said Mary Gardner NeflL direc- 
tor of the Seattle Art Museum. 
“I haven’t talked to BUI Gates, 
but we hope that the manu- 


script will go on public view. I 
TOD do everything J can to see 
that it is displayed at our muse- 
um at the earliest possible 
date.” 

■ Computer Art Displays 

In June, Mr. Gates told the 
annual conference of the Asso- 
ciation of Art Museum Direc- 
tors, meeting in Seattle, about 
his vision of sending artistic im- 
ages and literature into homes 
and schools through computer. 
The Associated Press reported 

Mr. Gates’s privately held 
firm. Continuum Productions 
Corp-» licenses and buys sets of 
images from collections around 
the world. The compan/s mul- 
timedia archive includes images 
from ait, history, technology, 
architecture and travel. 

The images are paired with 
text to make reference-oriented 
software. 


Continued from Page 1 
and other APEC l eaders will 
hold a summit meeting on 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Clinton said that he 
hoped the leaders would “em- 
brace a common direction, set- 
a goal for free and open 
among all our econo- 
mies.” 

On a related issue, Mr. Clin- 
ton urged Democrats and Re- 
publicans to cooperate on ap- 
proving the new world trade 
pact A session of the current 
Congress is to convene later this 
month to vote on legislation 
carrying out the GATT accord. 

But the incoming majority 
leader in the Senate, Bob Dole 
of Kansas, said that be was “not 
quite ready” to work with Mr. 
Clinton to see that GATT is 
approved before the year of the 
year. 

In a broadcast interview on 
Sunday, Mr. Dole said it ap- 
peared to “a lot of American 
people” that “we’re sort of be- 
ing sold down the river” with 
GATT. 

He added that “we ought to 
try to resolve the questions that 
a lot' of real hard-working 
Americans have, including 
mau£, many people in agricul- 
ture. 

But he did bold out the possi- 
bility that he would be “very 
supportive" if language can be 
worked out that would address 
his and many other Republi- 
cans’ concerns about how the 
treaty could undermine U.S. 
sovereignty in trade disputes. 

Mr. Dole is now working 
with Mr. Kan tor on language 
that would deal with this issue 
and be separate from the 
GATT accord. Yet even with a 
Republican majority in the Sen- 
ate, approval for such a docu- 
ment remains uncertain. 

Mr. Clinton’s trip to partici- 
pate in the APEC forum follows 


a stunning political setback last 
Tuesday that saw Republicans 
control of both bouses of 


congressional vote on 
the GATT will be the defining 
decision for America as we 
head, into the next century,” ^ 
Mr. Clinton said in his weekly , * i 
radio address. “And I believe 
the members of both parties 
will put aside par tisanship to do 
what’s right for our country and 
our future,” 

He said the accord would 
help create hundreds of thou- 
sands of high-paying U.S. jobs. 

(AP, Reuters) 


VOTE: 

Swedes Say Yes 

Coutbned from Page 1 
general. Their votes came most 
heavily from rural areas in 
northern and central Sweden. 

The “yes” proponents coun- 
tered that it was simply loo late 
in the day for such contentions. 
Sweden was already immersed 
in the global m ar k et. The coun- 
try should participate in the de- 
cision making, they said, or i IK 
decisions would be made f orit. 
pfes” voters were concenua* 0 * 
tn the more urban rrf^ 0DS » 
around Stockholm and yah* 30 * 
When Sweden’s Paifiri 06111 
ratifies the vote, the eoonlry 

wiU become the 1 4th of 

the Union, with flenriany, 
France, Britain, ipfr- Spam, 
the Netherlands, {?«<*■ 
mum, Portugal Denmark, Ire- 
land, Luxemboiu* rcccnI_ 

Austria. 

Swedes opou»°£ member- 
ship prediciedjbai decisions af- 
fecting evensw s lives would 
now be madSBressds, where 
Sweden vatE* have only 4 votes 
out of abbot 90. 




: — 



13^ 


LP 









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_- 5 * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVE MBER 14, 1994 



Page 7 


Carmen McRae, 74, 
Jazz Stylist, Is Dead 


BOOKS 


BRIDGE 


The Associated Pres, 

■BTOLY hills, Califor- 
Carmen McRae, 74, the 
vetwaii jazz stylist hailed for 
net innovative scat singing and 
2J£ U0US phrasing, died llurs- 

^ bedridden since 
s«uenn& respiratory failure 

SassSsitK 

She never performed 

hi December, the National 

forihe Arts named 
tier one of its masters of jazz, 
hailing her “instinctive feeling 
Tot rhythm, her skillful vocal 
technique, her innovative scat 
smgmg, as well as her relaxed 
manner of presentation,” 

A pianist as well as a singer 
sac was one of jazz’s best- 
taown women performers. Her 
repertoire included “God Bless 
the Quid.” a song closely asso- 
ciated with her biggest influ- 
ence, Billie Holiday; Cole Por- 

You Under My 
Skm ; Billy Joel’s “New York 
State of Mind," and Dave Bru- 
beck’s ‘Take Five.” 

iota Volpe, an Ex-Governor 
■Of Massachusetts and Envoy 
BOSTON (Reuters) — John 
Volpe, 85, a former Massachu- 
setts governor who was also 
Secretary of Transportation 
and ambassador to Italy under 
President Richard Nixon, died 
on Friday, police said Saturday. 

Lous Nizer, Trial Lawyer 
For Many Celebrity Clients 
NEW YORK (NYT) — Lou- 
is Nizer, 92, the shrewd and 
voluble trial lawyer who made a 
career of representing famous 
people in famous cases and 
whose autobiography, “My life 
in Court,” was a best-seller, 
died here Thursday. 


His roster of celebrity clients 
included Johnny Carson. Char- 
ue Chaplin, Salvador Dali, Ed- 
Rsher, Alan Jay Lemer. 
Mae West, the basketball star 
Juuus Erving and Spyros 

r^ r , os ^ once board chairman 
oF -Oth Century Fox films. 

Dr. James Winston Watts, 
Brain Lobotomy Pioneer 

WASHINGTON (AP) — 
Dr. Janies Winston Watts. 90. a 
neurosurgeon who helped de- 
velop tiie frontal lobotomy of 
the brain to relieve severe p ain 
and mental disorder, died of 
cancer here Nov. 7. 

With a colleague. Dr. Walter 
Freeman, Dr. Walts performed 
the first lobotomy — in which 

the frontal lobes of the brain are 
removed — in the United States 
in 1936. By 1950, they had per- 
formed the procedure more 
than 1,000 times. 

Up to 50.000 lobotomies 
were performed in the United 
States until 1960, when the de- 
velopment of tranquilizers and 
anti-depressants made the sur- 
gery unnecessary, and it was 
phased out of practice. 

Chief S. O. Adebo, 80, a pio- 
neer of the Nigerian civil ser- 
vice, former United Nations en- 
voy and university president, 
died of a stroke Sept. 30 in 
Abeokuta, Nigeria. 

Paid Frame, 80, who illustrat- 
ed some 200 children's books, 
including the Nancy Drew and 
Hardy Boys adventure series, 
died Tuesday in New York. 

Michael O’Donoghue, 54. 
one of the original writers for 
TV’s “Saturday Night Live.” 
died Tuesday of a massive cere- 
bral hemorrhage, said his wife, 
Cheryl Hardwick. 


COMPLETE & UTTER 
FAILURE: A Celebration of 
Also-rans, Runners-up, Nev- 
er- weres And Total Flops 

By Neil Steinberg. 258 pages. 
$17.50. DouNedav. 

Reviewed by 
Jonathan YardJey 

/~V RIGINAL ideas for books. 
\Jas for anything else, are 
rare; good books are rarer still; 
good, original books are so rare 
as to make hen’s teeth seem 
commonplace. So raise a glass 
in celebration of Neil Steinberg, 
who has written in “Complete 
and Utter Failure” a good, orig- 
inal book that is also inordi- 
nately entertaining. 

If _ anyone else previously 
published a reasonably compre- 
hensive book about the causes, 
nature and history of failure, 
word of it has not reached this 
quarter; nominations are invit- 
ed. To be sure. Steinberg men- 
tions in his brief bibliography a 
publication of seven years ago 
called “No Way: The Nature of 
the Impossible.” a collection of 
essays that he calls “a broad 
and intriguing primer for this 
rarely addressed topic." but he 
says that the quality of its arti- 
cles is inconsistent. That, 
though, appears to be it. 

Steinberg has some useful 
and perceptive things to say. 
and even some original ones. 


One, which is not original but 
certainly is true, is that “the 
second-placers and also-rans 
[are] sometimes belter, more in- 
teresting, even more worthy, 
than those whose combination 
of luck, effort and circumstance 
for some reason brought suc- 
cess." Another, which does 
have the whiff of originality and 
is prompted by the long series 
of unsuccessful assaults on 
Mount Everest, is that “pro- 
gressive failure breeds inter- 
est .. . the way more and 
more people play the lottery as 
it rolls over week by week, even 
though their minuscule odds of 
winning are no better.” Yet an- 
other. which Steinberg calls “a 
convenient intellectual tool Tor 
categorizing folly.” is the syn- 
drome that he defines as fol- 
lows: “The belief that because 
something can be done, it will 
or should be done.” 

In examining the rich history 
of corporate failure. Steinberg 
does acknowledge that failure 
can in lime lead to success, citing 
such examples of slow liftoff as 
JeU-O. Kleenex, Pepsi-Cola and 
Kotex. which is why he declines 
to pronounce the last rites for 
laser disks or video telephones. 
By the same token success can 
turn into failure: “The heighten- 
ing of expectation after success 
happens constantly, even though 
failure to match exceptional past 
performance is almost a univer- 
sal.” This helps explain not 
merely such ephemeral phenom- 


ena as Michael Jackson and Ma- 
donna but also the failure of 
many authors to meet the expec- 
tations raised by the most suc- 
cessful of their books; this has 
led not merely to crippling cases 
of writer’s block but also to alco- 
holism, depression and suicide. 

Pause for a moment to con- 
template the National Spelling 
Bee, a publicity campaign for tbe 
Scnpps-Howard newspaper 
chain that passes itself off as a 
contribution to American educa- 
tion. Steinberg — who works as 
a reporter for the Chicago Sun- 
Times — followed the 1993 bee 
from early competitions in Chi- 
cago .to the champio nshi p m 
Washington, where a single win- 
ner was crowned after tbe elimi- 
nation of Q million losers. By the 
end of the experience Steinberg 
had become thoroughly con- 
temptuous not merely of the bee 
itself but of (he mantra routinely 


chanted by its adult managers to 
the effect that every entrant is a 
“winner.” 

Steinberg may be a humorist 
bordering mi a wit, but he is 
also steeped in the great ines- 
capable truth about the human 
condition. As he puts it: 
“Aren’t decay and loss and 
oblivion the way of the world? 
Science tells us that, no matter 
who wins the National Book 
Award, eventually weTl all be 
part of tbe same lukewarm, uni- 
formly distributed soup. The 
fact that Mick Jagger was big, 
and Andy Pratt wasn’t, won’t 
matter a lot then.” Whether it is 
really true that nobody loses all 
the time is for tbe deep thinkers 
to debate, but this is certain: 
We all lose in the end. 


Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of The Washington PosL 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Maria Cristina Hamel, an 
I tali an -Austrian designer living 
in Milan, is reading “Geschich- 
ten vom lieben Gon ” (“Stories of 
God”) by Rainer Maria Rilke. 

“It’s a collection of short sto- 
ries, written as if for children, 
about how God manifests him- 
self. Because the stories are all 
set in Russia it reads almost like 
a travel book.” 

( Brandon Mitchener. JHT) 



By Alan Truscoit 

I N the diagramed deal the ob- 
vious contracts are seven no- 

S and seven clubs, both of 
succeed if the clubs split 
3-2 and fail otherwise. They 
have a 68 percent chance. But 
once you think of seven dia- 
monds, it should be clear that 
this is superior. Since a 13th 
trick can be maneuvered by 
ruffing a heart, the club split is 
not necessary. The contract will 
fail only if the diamonds split 
worse than 6-2, or if there is an 
opening ruff. The contract das 
an 81 percent chance. Note that 
it would be worse without the 
diamond ten, for an opening 
dub lead, from a four-card 
holding or a singleton, would 
complicate matters. 

Those percentages fall sharp- 
ly if opposing bidding suggest 
bad breaks, as it did when the 
deal was played. West’s two- 
diamond cue-bid showed tbe 
major suits. North eventually 
hit on the desirable seven-dia- 
mond contract. This was partly 
because his partner was eventu- 
ally forced into rebidding his 
four-card suit by the cue-bid of 
three hearts. 

Die response of five dia- 
monds to four no-trump 
showed one key card, the club 


ace. Then six hearts in response 
to five no-trump showed two 
key cards on the next level, 
which North could tell were the 
spade king and the diamond 
queen. He therefore took a shot 
at seven diamonds, hitting the 
target. 

After the lead of the heart 
queen, won in dummy. South 
bad no difficulty in maneuver- 
ing a heart ruff and drawing 
trumps to make the grand slsm. 


NORTH 
♦ A Q5 
OAK 
OAK3 
+ K8652 


WEST 

♦ J 10 9 7 4 3 
CQ J 983 
>75 


EAST 

♦ 0 

010 4 4 
49S03 

♦— *JI0974 

SOUTH (D) 

♦ K82 
0785 
C- Q J 10 2 

*AQ3 

Neither side was vulnerable. The 1 
bidding: 


South 
1 O 
Pass 
4 0 
50 
60 
Pass 


West 

2 O 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 


North 

DbL 

3 <7 

4 N.T. 
5N.T. 
7 O 


East 
■2 0 
Pass 
Pass 


Wesi led ihe heart queen.- 


To subscribe in Germany 
just calif toll free, 
0130 8485 85 



Thai 


Request for Business Process 
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As part of our business process reengineering program, Thai 
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Planning. Thai Airways International Public Company Limited, 89 
Vibhavadi Rangsit Road, Bangkok 10900. The deadline for 
submission of the firm proposal will be on or before January 16, 
1995 at 17:00 hoars Bangkok time. 

THAI reserves the right to reject any or all proposals, waive any 
formality or accept such proposals as may be considered 
advantageous. . • 


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P«ge 8 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


PINION 


Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Slop Arming the Aegean 


Sributie I An Opportunity for a Historic International Initiative 


. In reoent years U.S. arms have poured 
into Greece and Turkey, maMng them 
two of the biggest recipients of Ameri- 
ca’s lethal largesse. The United Nations 
arms registry reveals that in 1992 and 
1993 the United States corned over 
1,163 tanks and 23 combat aircraft to 
Greece and 1,509 tanks, 54 fighter 
planes and 28 heavily armed attack heli- 
copters to Turkey. All of these weapons 
were slated for reduction under the 1990 
treaty on conventional forces in Europe. 
Instead of scrapping them, the Pentagon 
is giving them away. 

whax does the United Stales get in 
return? Greece continues to impose an 
economic embargo on Macedonia, threat- 
ening to destabilize the newly indepen- 
dent faivan republic and jeo pardize the 
lives of hundreds of American peace- 
keepers stationed there. The Greek gov- 
ernment has muzzled dissent at home, 
reports Human Rights Watch, rounding 
up its own citizens who dare to speak, out 
agains t its machinations in Macedonia. 

Turkey, meanwhile, still provides bases 
for U.S. aircraft to patrol northern Iraq 
and protect Iraqi Kurds, but it is not 
enforcing the UN embargo on Iraq vigor- 


CHisly. At the same time, Turkey has esca- 
lated its war against its own Kurdish mi- 
nority, turning southeastern Turkey into a 
free-fire zone. Turkey may have used Un- 
made Cobra attack helicopters and F-16 
fighter planes to depilate entire villages 
in an effort to suppress Kurdish separat- 
ists. It is also using smaller but no less 
lethal UJS. arms, not accounted for in the 
UN registry. So far the fighting has 
claimed 13,000 lives, according to Human 
Rights Watch, and forced an equal num- 
ber of Kurds to seek refuge in Iraq. 

The Parliament of Turkish-controlled 
northern Cyprus, with Ankara’s encour- 
agement, has hardwigd its stance on a 
settlement in Cyprus. With no resolution 
in sight there and the ever present risk of a 
wider war in the Balkans, there is a danger 
that Athens and Ankara may come 
to blows, turning U.S. aims an each otter. 

The Pentagon euphemistically : refers to 
the Dow of arms to Greece and Turkey as 
“cascading" — as if it were doing what 
comes nahirally. Yet there is nothing nat- 
ural about arming allies who act increas- 
ingly against U.S. interests. The flow of 
aims to both countries should cease. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Paying lor Illegal Aliens 


The failure of the federal government 
either to control illegal immigration or to 
accept the burden of prqvimng services 
needed by the millions of individuals who 
are in America without documents has 
produced a backlash in the states. Last 
Tuesday, Californians over whelming ly 
approved Proposition 187, a ballot item 
barring illegal aliens from receiving al- 
most aQ publicly funded benefits, includ- 
ing schooling. The initiative will not be 
mforced right away because, as expected, 
it has been challenged in both state and 
federal court. In both forums, judges have 
issued t emp or ar y restraining orders for- 
bidding implementation until the courts 
can sort out the constitutional question of 
whether a state can regulate at all in the 
area of immigration, which is the responsi- 
bility of the federal government 
California and a handful of other 
states do have a genuine problem — and 
a big one — coping with millions of 
undocumented residents who need ser- 
vices. Popular support of Proposition 187 
canno t automatically be attributed to 
racism or xenophobia, as many people 
seem to do; frustration with the federal 


on dubious constitutional ground but ar- 
gue that they are entitled to have their 
concerns taken seriously in Washington. 


Nor is it insidious to distinguish between 
immig rants who have come legally, who 
are a welcome and vital presence in 
American society, and others who have 
come in violation of the law. 

That said, however, the best way to 
address this problem is not with a sweep- 
ing measure that may be unenforceable. 
The better alternative is to force the fed- 
eral government to step up to its respon- 
sibilities and provide help. Hus may have 
been die real unspoken objective of Pro- 
position 187 supporters, some of whom 
have already conceded that they may be 


mg on a 1982 Supreme Court case called 
Plykr v. Doe. There, the court ruled, 5 to 
4, that Texas could not constitutionally 
bar the use of state funds for the educa- 
tion of children not legally admitted to 
the United States. Justice W illiam Bren- 
nan, who wrote for the majority, did 
suggest, however, that the result might 
have been different if Congress had au- 
thorized such a restriction. 

Chief Justice Warren Burger, who 
wrote for the dissenters, pointed out the 
folly of the Texas law as policy. “It is 
senseless for an enlightened society to 
deprive any children — including illegal 
aliens — of an elementary education 
. . . (and] to tolerate creation of a seg- 
ment of society made up of illiterate 
persons, many having a limited or no 
command of our language.” (In fact, the 
children covered by the Texas law who 
were still in the country in 1986 were 
eligible for amnesty and are presumably 
now a permanent, legal part of that 
state’s population.) 

He found no constitutional problem 
with the statute, however, and pointed 
out that the courts are not authorized to 
strike down laws because they do not 
meet some standard of desirable social 
policy. His suggested alternative: “If the 
federal government, property charged 
with departing illegal aliens, fails to do 
so, it should bear the burdens of their 
presence here.” If Californians have 
moved Washington in that direction by 
their vote on Tuesday, they will have 
made great progress notwithstanding the 
fate of Proposition 187. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Yes, Eat Your Spinach 


Ever since POpeye hoisted his first can 
of spinach, American children have 
squirmed under the threat that “You’re 
not going to leave this table until you eat 
those vegetables.” OJC, so maybe there 
was virtue in kale and broccoli But 
wasn’t it possible that telling their proge- 
ny to swallow that stuff was just another 
way for parents to show who was boss? 

Maybe it was, but no matter. The order 
was worth obeying. According to two 
studies in The Journal of the American 
Medical Association, chemicals in green 
and yellow vegetables may protect 
against macular degeneration, the most 
common cause of blindness in the elderly, 
and against heart disease as well. 

The compounds, called carotenoids, 
are what make squash yellow, spinach 


green — and a farmer’s market in fall as 
glorious a sight as a stand of maple trees, 
m one study of 1,899 men with high 
blood cholesterol, heart attacks and 
deaths were 36 percent less common 
among those with high levels of carot- 
enoids in their Mood. Another study 
compared 356 people who bad darctoped 
age-related macular degeneration with 
500 who had not Those who ate the most 

cent ks^Hkefy to have the disorder than 
those who had eaten the least 
Popeye, then, was probably right So 
were generations of cranky parents. But 
did they follow their own advice? In the 
land of the pizza, the pancake and the 
french-fried potato, one doubts it 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 


Litigation lor die Masses 

We tend to regard litigation as the 
panacea that will cure all society's ills — 
quickly, painlessly and cheaply. Litiga- 
tion is not merely our political crutch. It 
is our opiate, drugging our will to resolve 
our own problems, person to person. We 
go to the law these days for such matters 
as a Cracker Jack box that lacked a prize, 
the prom date’s defection, the lost-and- 
found lottery ticket 

A coflcaguc of mine once had to devise 
visitation arrangements for a pet dog, the 
subject of a bitter mtrafamilifli ownership 
contest Another had to decide if a 15- 
year-old defendant should give back the 


13-year-qld plaintiff’s birth-control pills. 

Litigation offers still another anodyne. 
It helps us fritter away our leisure. From 
the media frenzy over the von Billow 
case, we have moved (1 could hardly say 
advanced) to the ultimate in court cover- 
age, start-lo-finish live video dramas star- 
ring real people — sometimes even star- 


ring real stars, like O. J. 
I wonder when iudg 


f wonder when judges, like football 
referees, will begin to be expected to call 
time-outs (the courtroom term is “recess- 
es”) to let the commercials run. 

— From “ In Love With Lawsuits," 
by Massachusetts Superior Court Judge 
Hiller B. Zobd, in the November 1994 
issue of American Heritage, 



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W ASHINGTON — When they meet 
in Indonesia on Tuesday, President 
Bill Clinton and the leaders of the 17 
other members of the Asia Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum haw an oppor- 
tunity to launch one of the boldest inter- 
national economic initiatives in history: 
die achievement over the next 25 years of 
free trade and investment in a region that 
makes op half the world economy and 
more than 40 percent of world trade. 

The first key step was taken at last 
November's initial APEC summit, host- 
ed by President Clinton in Seattle, when 
the group embraced the concept of “a 
community of Asia-Pacific economies” 
and indicated its receptiveness to moving 
toward free trade. 

Thai event was part of the “trade triple 
play of 1993,” one of the administration’s 
oignf ti policy successes to date, which 
began with congressional passage of the 
NAFTA legislation and culminated in 
the successful condusion of the Uruguay 
Round of global negotiations in the Gen- 
eral Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

This week’s APEC summit could mitt- 
ale an even more dramatic triple play 
continuing through congressional pas- 
sage of the GATTpackagp to a commit- 
ment to achieve free trade in the Western 
Hemisphere at the Summit of the Ameri- 
cas to be hosted by die president in 
Miami on Dec. 10. 

The APEC event is potentially the 
most significant of aH The 18 members 
include three of the world’s largest eco- 
nomies: the United States, Japan and 
China. Trade among the members ac- 
counts for two-thirds of their total trade, 
a higher degree of regional interdepen- 
dence than nmfwig (he memb ers of the 
European Union despite modi closer 
physical pro x imi ty and three decades of 
integration efforts in Europe. 

The APEC initiative has jelled at tins 
time because nations on both tides of the 
Pacific have concluded that it will signifi- 
cantly advance their interests. 

On the Asian side, most countries seQ 
one-quarter to one-third of their exports 
to the United States, and rely heavily on 
trade expantion for their economic vitali- 
ty. Virtually all xdy on the United States 
to preserve a security balance in the re- 
gion, providing assurances a gains t future 
uncertainties such as those generated by 
a huge and rapidly growing China. 


By C. Fred Bergsten 

In fact, most of the initiatives for free 
trade in the region have come from 
Asians, not from America. President Stir 


summit, has provided mast of the leader- 
ship in galvanizing the consensus that 
could emerge at the resort city of Bogor. 

For the United States, the deal would 
provide growing and eventually total ac- 
cess to the largest and most dynamic 
economies in the world. It would provide 
an enormous competitive advantage, be- 
cause America has already eliminated 
most of its own bade restrictions while 
barriers remain high in most of Asia — 
ranging from tariffs of 40 to 50 percent in 
Lrioneaa and Thailand to opaque ad- 
ministrate controls in Japan and China. 

At the end of the third ghbal 
conflict of this century 9 the 
Cold War 9 wodd attention has 
tarried to Asia and the Pacific. 

AD these obstacles most, of course, be 
addressed in the liberalization process. 

APEC can be especially helpful in pro- 
moting market opening and deregulation 


twin U.S. goals of reducing Japan’s huge 
trade surplus and etimmatrng its access 
barriers. But those same countries and 
sympathetic Japanese loathe America’s 
tactics of “aggressive unilateralism” 
more than they like its objectives. Hence 
they have opposed U.&. efforts, stiffening 
and justifying the resistance of Japanese 
bureaucrats and poKticians. 

An effective APEC would dramatical- 
ly change the negotiating equation be- 
cause Japan would confront a collective 
and hence mare powerful caD for reform. 
A similar shif t in thft bargaining Mi* 11 ” 1 
would occur in efforts to obtain greater 
openness in trade policies in China. 

Americans must also recall that they 
have fought three wars in Asia in the past 
half century. Any chance that a dividing 
line would be drawn down the middle of 
the Pacific would raise huge risks for the 


United States, as well as for the Asians, 
on both security and economic grounds. 
APEC does not discuss security, but its 
promise of further strengthening the 
Asia-Pacific economy and c r ea t i n g insti- 
tutional linkages carries political impli- 
cations of profound significance. 

A further advantage of the pending 
APEC initiative is that it could prompt 
an early resumption of global trade liber- 
alization in GATT. Europe is now ex- 
tending its trade bloc and could eventual- 
ly encompass as many as 40 countries 
with 800 million, people. It finally accept- 
ed the Uruguay Round last December 
only when the Seattle summit demon- 
strated that the APEC countries could go 
their own way if GATT faltered. 

And since APEC will offer to extend 
its liberalization to nonmember countries 
who are wilKng to reciprocate — an offer 
that wiH be hard to refuse, given the share 
of the world economy that APEC repre- 
sents — barriers are quite Hkdy to fall 
outside as well as inside the region. 

Achieving free trade in such a large 
and diverse region will obviously take 
time and considerable effort. Hence the 
Eminent Persons Group of private indi- 
viduals appointed by APEC govern- 
ments, winch I chair, in response to the 
mandate given us at Seattle to prepare a 
comprehensive blueprint for achieving 
free trade in the region, proposes an 
extended period to work out and imple- 
ment the plan. The most industrialized 
memb er s (such as Japan and the United 
States) would dhmnafe their banders by 
2010, the in terme diate countries (such as 
Korea) by 2015, and the least developed 
(such as Indonesia) by 2020. 

The Pacific Business Forum, which 
comprises two corporate leaders from 
each member economy, urges a still fast- 
er timetable: 2002 far the richer coun- 
tries, 2010 for the poorer. 

Equally important, APEC will under- 
take a series of “trade facilitation” mea- 
sures to develop a habit of cooperation 
among the members that will be needed 
to wore oat and faithfully implement the 
free trade co mmitm ent, mid demonstrate 
to the region’s business communities that 
APEC deserves their full support. 

This part of the strategy includes an 
APEC Investment Code, the first compre- 
hensive international understanding of its 
type, and agreements on industrial stan- 


dards and mutual recognition of each oth- 
ers’ testing and verification procedures, a 
valuable lubricant for business. 

A third dement is an APEC dispute 


settlement mechanism, to bdp mediate 
the tendentious bilateral con fl icts that 

have dotted the region in recent years. Yet 

another is a common effort an antitrust 
and competition policies, to help Icvd the 
playing field throughout the region. 

Just as these facilitatio n measures will 
pave the way for subsequent liberaliza- 
tion, a political commitment at the sum- 
mit to achieve free trade in the region will 

infuse the entire process with political 
momentum and promote the success of 
the initial steps. 

The economic and security stakes 
alone dearly justify the APEC initiative. 
But it has far broader implications. 
APEC includes countries with per capita 
incomes ranging from more than 530,000 
in Japan to 81,000 or less in China and 
Indonesia. Successful implementation of 
its free trade commitment would deci- 
sively bridge the “North-South gap.” 

APEC members aQ embrace market- 
oriented policies, but they pursue very 
different brands of capitalism. A success- 
ful APEC would subdue that potential 
source of international tensioix. APEC 
tvmtains at least five distinctly different 
cultures; its success would obviate any 
ride of a “dash of civilizations.” 

At the end of World War II, the worid 
focus was on Europe and the Atlantia 
The leaders of the day built a series of 
institutional arrangements, in both the 
economic and security spheres, to avoid 
repeating the disasters of the previous 
half century. As we look back at their 
handiwork 50 years later, they succeeded 
beyond their wildest dreams. 

At the end of the thud global conflict 
of this century, the Cold War, world 
attention has turned to Asia and the 
Pacific. But there have been no broad- 
based institutional linkages to bind the 
two rims of the area together, and to 
protect against future conflict. APEC of- 
ten the potential to provide the econom- 
ic dimension of that architecture. The 
leaders at Bogor can take a historic step 
to launch the process. 

The writer is director of the Institute for 
International Economics. He contributed 
this comment to The Washington Post 


America Strikes a Body Blow to die Trans- Atlantic Security Alliance 


B russels — The blow 

strode by the U.S. Congress 
will not help the oppressed. In- 
stead it will further weaken the 
foundation of the international 
house that was intended to bring 
some measure of stability in the 
post-Cold War world. It has se- 
verely damaged the trans-Atlan- 
tic bond, that is the. basis of the 
North Atlantic Affianced 
The order from the president to 
U.S. faeces under NATO com- 
mand to cease to enforce the arms 
embargo on shipments to the Bos- 
nian government, and to cease to 
pass intelligence concerning such 
shipments to the other allies, cuts 
dimply across allied command 


By Frederick Bonnart 


ation of the allied integrated mili- 
tary structure. 

The order also shows complete 
disregard for the aims and con- 
straints of friends and allies, as 
wdl as for those of Russia. 

The impression of a U.S. Con- 
gress, determined to bulldoze its 
decision through regardless of 
America’s allies was reinforced 
by the waythe information 
reached NATO. A leaked news- 
paper story arrived before any 
official notification. 


It seemed to strike Brussels 
like a bolt from the blue — and 
yet the Nunn-MItchefl amend- 
ment to the defense authoriza- 
tion bill had been wdl publi- 
cized. Congress voted to cut off 
frmdsTor enforcing the weapons 
ban as of Nov. 15 if the Serbs did r 
not -agree to a peace accord. " 

An immediate damage- limita- 
tion exercise had little effect U.S. 
Ambassador Robert Hunter ad- 
dressed an explanatory letter to 
the NATO secretary-general, cop- 
ied to his colleagues. Administra- 
tion officials painted out the limit- 
ed nature of the breach. It applied 
only to certain weapons. Air-to- 
air, air-to-ground, anti-aircraft, 
anti-ship guns and missiles, as wdl 
as weapons of mass destruction, 
would continue to be banned. 

UJS. forces would monitor the 
shipments to ensure correct desti- 
nation, and mixed shipments 
would be diverted. Also, aQ UJS. 
personnel at NATO headquarters, 
mdnding those supporting the 
Adriatic operation, would contm- 
oe to cany out tbeir duties. Final- 
ly, it was pointed out that, as most 
of the illegally imported weapons 
reached the Bosnian farces by air 


or land, toe small quantities of 
lighter weapons now able to enter 
by sea would be intigmficanL 

The damage is great, however. 
In practice, the order means that 
an dement in a military organi- 
zation — US. ships under NATO 
? command- -in -Operation Sharp- 
Guard enforcing a blockadc on 
former Yugoslavia —will unilat- 
erally disobey part of its orders. 
Instructions for the operation 
had been, given by toe North At- 
lantic Council, an winch America 
tits with its 15 allies, to its ntifi- 
taiy command chain. 

Moreover, the decision under- 
cuts a NATO engagement to car- 
ry out a Security Council resohir 
tion which was also voted by the 
United States. 

Heavy weapons such as ar- 
mored vehicles and artillery are 
not under the continued ban and 
can be transported by sea in 
greater quantities than by other 
means. The reinforcement to Bos- 
nian government faxes could 
therefore be considerable. 

If so, the present war win ex- 

l>odies will be tom to pieces, in- 
cluding those of helpless civilians. 


As the UN Protection Force 
win be exposed to unacceptable 
casualties, contributing countries 
will withdraw their troops. Warn- 
ings to this effect have already 
been made by senior officials of 
Britain, France and Spain, the 
countries which provide most of 
them. This will impose further' 
intense hardship on populations 
- which now rdjr largely on those 
forces for the provision of baric 
means of survival and the mainte- 
nance of a measure of security in 
some safe areas. 

Nor is it likdy that the Bosnian 
forces will achieve a rapid victory. 
Mare probably, other parties — 
Croatia, then Serbia — will be- 
came involved, with unforesee- 
able consequences as potential 
external badeers wade in. 

The full damage to the web of 
international relations has yet to 
become dear. As far as NATO is 
concerned, it is very serious. By 
this action, toe U.S. administra- 
tion has confirmed the accusa- 
tions of dominance of the alliance 
voiced frequently by some Euro- 
pean critics. Britain will at last 
recognize the reality of toe demise 
of the special rdatimuhip. France 
wfll ralJfy the others toward creat- 
ing an independent European de- 


fense organization. Germany will 
turn another ratchet toward the 
federal integration of Europe. 

This Monday’s meeting of for- 
eign and defense ministers of toe 
Western European Union 49 
Nooidwijk, Netherlands, is likely 
to make a start in that direction. 

The impression is growing that 
a power-drunk Congress, in con- 
trol of a weak presidency, is de- 

tenmned to enforce American de- 
cisions on the world, regardless of 
the interests and feelings of 
friends and allies. The result will 
be a loss of power and influence 
by toe United States, which win 
damage not only itsdf. 

The present reaction by Ameri- 
ca’s allies should give the more 
influential members of Congress 
cause for reflection that, only su- 
perpower though America may be 
at present, other world power cen- 
ters are growing in strength. Only 
by a common nannonious effort 
with them can the United States 
maintain the impetus for creating 
a stable, more peaceful world. 

The writer is editor of NATO’s 
Sixteen Nations, an independent 
military journal piddished in Brus- 
sels. He contributed tins comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


It’s Less a Republican Breakthrough Than a Society- Wide Stalemate 


W ASHINGTON — The elec- 
tion results are likely to 
usher in an era of political turbu- 
lence in America characterized by 
empty sloganeering, mean-spirit- 
ed campaigning and the growth 
of local and national third parties 
— an era in which neither Demo- 
crats nor Republicans can count 
on stable majorities. 

What the 1994 election most 
dearly signaled was the last gasp 
of the Democratic majority that 
has prevailed since 1932. That 
majority, which controlled Con- 
gress and the statehouses even 
when it ceded the presidency, was 
based on a coalition among urban 
ethnic machines, minorities, la- 
bor unions and the white South 
and Southwest. 

In 1948, Strom Thurmond and 
the Dudeoats temporarily bolt- 
ed. In 1968, the Democrats suf- 
fered a more {permanent reverse, 
as George Wallace led many 
Southern whites and some work- 
ing-class Northerners out of the 
party to protest Democratic sup- 
port for racial desegregation. 

Tn the ]nte *70$, as mtianarirmal 
competition forced down real 
wages and efimuated budget sur- 
pluses, the Democrats suffered 
another wave of defections by 
voters angered by higher taxes, 
which they believed were bring 
squandered on new social pro- 
grams. They became the so-called 
Reagan Democrats. 

These last two splits were fun- 
damental. They removed toe basis 
for a liberal populist alliance be- 
tween the saddle and lower classes 
and opened the way for a conser- 
vative populism directed against 
i mm ig ra nts, welfare cheaters and 
toe urban undbdass. 

Democrats made their share of 
foreign policy mistakes, but what 
undermined the party was the 
voters’ perception that it had 
made irrevocable choices — on 
spending, taxes, crime, education 
— between its white middle-class 


By John 

supported and its low-income 
black and Hispanic constituents. 

With this dark cloud han g in g 
over them, Democrats lost five of 
six presidential elections from 
1968 to 1988. Except for a six- 
year hiatus in the Senate, the par- 
ty maintained .power in Congress 
and the majority of statehouses. 

In the South, Democrats con- 
tinued to win by staying suffi- 
ciently to the right of the nation- 
al party to preserve a share of the 
older Democratic vote, while 
gaining the new minority vote 
against even more conservative 
Republican opponents. 

m House ana stale legislative 
races. Democrats were aided by 
the Republicans* weak local orga- 
nizations. And they gained the al- 
legiance of well-to-do young vot- 
ers drawn by the enviro nmental 
and social movements of toe ’60s. 

After the 1992 election, the 
Democrats had a fleeting oppor- 
tunity to revive the party by unit- 
ing old Democratic constituen- 
cies with the voters who flocked 
to Ross Perot, wooed by his eco- 
nomic nationalian, fiscal conser- 
vatism and cffiix for political re- 
form in Washington. 

But the Clinton arimiwt g yration 
quickly alienated Mr. Perot and 
Reagan Democrats by supporting 
homosexuals in the miKtaiy, ap- 
pointing lobbyists and Wall 
Street heavies to high positions, 
abandoning the middUndass tax 
cut and dhaippdosaing a stimulus 
package directed at cities. 

Of course, no other Democrat 
could have done much better. 
While Mr. Clinton nude obvious 
tactical errors, be had to address 
the needs of cities and suburbs, 
poor and middle class, under the 
straitened rircumstahees of a com- 
petitive international economy. It 
is the dilemma that has plagued 
Democrats since 1968. 

. Mr. Qmton’s victory m 1992, 


B. Judis 

like Jimmy Carter’s in 1976, was a 
product of unique circumstances 
— in this case, a powerful third- 
party challenge and a tone-deaf 
Republican incumbent. Tuesday’s 
elections were the culmination of 
the process that began with Mr. 
Wallace’s defection in 1968 but 
was interrupted by Watergate and 
George Bush’s ineptitude. 

Republicans have finally estab- 
lished a solid congressionm beach- 
head in toe South. North Caroli- 
na’s dele g a tion , which had eight 
Democrats and four Republicans, 
now has ri ght Rqiubucans and 
four Democrats. Georgia, which 
had seven Democrats and four Re- 
publicans, now has seven Republi- 
cans and four Democrats. 

The Democrats increasingly re- 
semble a rump version of the old 
New Deal ana Great Society co- 
alition, supplemented by some 
upper-middte-ciass suburbanites 
emended by Republican ties to 
the religious right. 

Democrats can win elections 
against oddball candidates like 
Oliver North and Michael Huff- 
ington, but in economically dev- 
astated California they could not 
defeat an unpopular Republican 
governor running on a platform 
of bashing immigrants. 

Does this mean that a Republi- 
can realignment has occurred? 
Not necessarily. Although united 
against Mr. CUn ton, the Republi- 
cans are deeply divided among 
themselves. To some extent, the 
national. Republican Party is toe 
fractious Virginia branch writ 
large. And these in tonal differ- 
ences wiQ grow as the party is 
forced to govern rather than 
merely oppose. 

Some Republican mayors and 
governors have proved effective 
leaders, hit toe national party 
lacks toe constructive leadership 
that would allow it to create na- 
tional prosperity without exacting 


the kind of sacrifices it condemns 
toe (Hinton administration for. 

Newt Gingrich’s “Contract 
With America” was largely a 
throwback to the campaign plat- 
form of 1978, which also prom- 
ised tax cuts and a balanced bud- 
get but led to huge deficits and 
financial scandals. 

Republicans have nothing 
more to offer Perot voters than 
the Clinton administration did. 
The party leadership is thorough- 
ly committed to free trade and 
has blocked every effort at lobby- 
ing and campaign reform. Now 
that Republicans have won back 
the House, they will probably 
back away from their commit- 
ment to term lhmls. Their conser- 
vative populism is thematic rath- 
er than substantial 

In all likelihood, this election 


does not augur a new Republican 
realignment, but rather more in- 
stability. Both parties are likely to 
remain in the minority while 
more and more Americans cast 
about among thud parties or 
abandon politics altogether. 

Congress will become more 
contentious, as it was in the late 
19th century, and the results will 
be much die same: the near im- 
possibility of adopting major so- 
cial legislation or undertaking 
comprehensive political re fo rm 
It’s a situation that cries for 
change but makes change itself 
impossible. 

The writer is author, most re- 
cently, of u Grand Illusion : Critics 
and Champions of the American 
Century. "He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


BV OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


beer, but, deeming the beer too 
valuable to be used for this pur- 
pose, they decided to toss him . 
mto toe Trafalgar square foun- , 
tains. Mr. Johnson had intended 
to lecture on “The How and Why 
of American Prohibition." ' 

1944c Is Hiller Dead? 

LONDON — [From our New 
York edition:] German Prop*- 
ganda Minister Paul Joseph 
G°a>bel$ swung into a csropdSti 
to persuade toe worid tbstaJoff, 
stranded Adolf Hitler is in “excel' 
lait, vigorous health"' anti not a 
ghost upon whose prestige Hdn- 
nch Himmler is trading as the 
real master of Gcinany. Ger- 
man news agencies declared that 
the fact that HiaBBler, and not 
Hitler, broadcast toe proclama- 
tion issued yesterday in Hitter's 
Mme “ was way proof” of 
widespread reports that Hitler 
was incanaMikted or dead. 


PARIS — [The Herald says in an 
editorial:] France is going to 
send fifteen thousand men to 
Madagascar: this will cost her 
sixty-five millions, but will give 
her a protectorate over, that u to 
say practical, if not legal, posses- 
sion of one of toe most fertile 
islands in the worid. 

1919: Wet Prohfbitlomgt 

LONDON — [From our New 
York edition :rrhe second public 
appearance ofW. E. Johnson, who 
is called in England “Pussyfoot 
Johnson,” in America’s prohibi- 
tion invasion provoked turbulent 
scenes. Mr. Johnson was dragged 
off toe platform from which he 
tried to speak and carried through 


crowd of frenzied coQegutns. The 
students intended to publicly 
duck Mr. Johnson into a barrel of 


IK*” 


i So 











































































■V 


Pa 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


British Bonds Give a Royal Performance Rate Rise Seems 

V r .i «t«c fiM- th 



Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — British government 
bonds have provided investors with the 
best return among bonds of major in- 
dustrial nations in the past three months 
because of the country's low inflation 
rate and tough monetary policy. 

Gilts, according to an index of seven- 
to 10-year bonds, gained 13 percent in 
the thir d quarter, taking interest pay- 
ments and capital gains into account. 
That is the best return of any major 
government bond, including those of the 
United States and Germany. 

German bunds, for example, posted a 
return of just 0.7 percent in the quarter, 
while U.S. Treasuries lost 0.8 percent. 

Gilts’ performance is expected to con- 
tinue, according to a recent survey of 33 
banks. Gilts are likely to be the most 
profitable major European bond market 
in local currency terms in the fourth 
quarter. 

“Our forecast is broadly positive for 
bonds over the next three months.” said 
Terence Prideaux, director of Kemper 
Investment Management, the London- 
based fund management subsidiary of 
Kemper Corp, “We think bonds in gen- 
eral are cheap, and gilts are likely to be 


amongst the better performers over the 
next three months.” 

So far in the fourth quarter, gilts have 
the best returns of any bond market of 
the Group of Seven industrial nations. 
The total return on seven- to 10-year 
bonds is 2.09 percent in local currency 


Gilts are likely to be the 
most profitable major 
European bond market 
in local currency terms in 
the fourth quarter. 

terms, against a 1.46 percent return for 
German bunds and negative 1.33 per- 
cent for Treasuries. 

“There is a good chance now that gilts 
can perform well, even in isolation from 
other bond markets,” said Bill Clarke, 
associate director of bond investment at 
Legal & General Investment Manage- 
ment 

The reason for investor enthusiasm is 
Britain’s benign inflation, which is at a 
27-year low of 2 percent as measured by 


the retail price index. Inflation is the 
enemy of bond investors because it 
erodes the return on such investments as 
bonds that pay a fixed-rate of return. 

British monetary authorities appear 
bent on keeping it that way. Last month, 
they raised interest rates a half-point to 
5.75 percent as a preemptive move 
against inflation. 

If the Bank of England and the Trea- 
sury are to be believed, inflation is likely 
to remain low for some time. The bank 
now expects underlying in fl ation, which 
excludes mortgage payments, to gradu- 
ally rise toward 25 percent over the next 
two years having origin ally forecast in- 
flation to rise to just below 4 percent 

The market appears to agree that the 
British authorities, at least in the short 
term, may have called inflation nearly 
right The yield of the index -linked 2 
percent 1996 gilt, whose return is irnkari 
to inflation, now stands at 3 percent. 

“This bond redeems in September 
1996, when its value will be determined 
by the retail price index eight months 
earlier,” said Kevin Adams, British bond 
strategist at Barclays de Zoete Wedd Se- 
curities. “In other words, the market ex- 
pects inflation to average 3 percent over 


the period 
1996." 


September 1994 to January 


Also helping gjlts is that the supply of 
British bonds is not being bloated by 
heavy government borrowing. The pub- 
lic-sector borrowing requirement is fore- 
cast to fall to around £30 billion this 
year from £54 billion last year. 

.. Because of the low inflation, tough 
monetary stance and lower borrowing, 
the benchmark 15-year bond, which 
yields 8.65 percent, can provide an' in- 
vestor with a yield after inflation of 
more than 6 percent That has made gilts 
particularly attractive for income-ori- 
ented investors such as pension funds. 

In a recent Smith New Court/ Gall up 
poll of British institutional investors, the 
balance of fund managers planning to 
increase their gilt holdings singed to 47 
" rcent in October from just 4 percent in 
itember. 

If British inflation’s performance 

really turns out as good as the Bank of 
England is suggesting, then there is 
room to see renewed inflows to gilts 
from overseas, Mr. A dams said. 

So far this year, international inves- 
tors have not been deterred from buying 
gilts. 


Bloomberg Business News 

NEW YORK. — It’s 50 oh 
the 15th. 

The Treasury bond market 
has concluded that this is how- 
many basis points, or hun- 
dredths of a percentage point, 
the Federal Reserve Board will 



US CREDIT MARKETS 

raise the interest rate on over- 
night bank loans when its poli- 
cy-making committee meets on 

Tuesday. , _. 

“The federal funds rate will 
rise,” said Robert Dow, who 
manages fixed-income securi- 
ties at Lord, Abbett & Co. “A 
50 basis point rise in the funds 
rate already is reflected in Trea- 
sury bill rates.” 

The yield on the three-month 
bill was 522 percent Friday, up 
32 basis points in the past month 
even though the Fed has not 
raised rates since Aug. 16. 

The yield on the iwo-year 
note is now 7.01 percent, up 
from 428 percent the day be- 


fore the Fed raised rates for the 
first time this year on Feb. 4. 

“That’s a pretty good barom- 
eter of interest rate pressure,” 
said Joseph Bench, with -New 
Castle Advisors in White 
P lains, New York. 

A drop in U.S. wholesale 
prices in October reported by 
the government last, week 
strengthens the hand of those 
investors who are expecting: 
only a 50 basis point increase. 

The big drop in wholesale 
prices wm “take the edge off 
people looking for .100 basis 
points,” said Terrence Crowe, a 
trader at NGcko Securities Co. 
International. 

Through October, wholesale- 
price inflation was running at a 
12 percent annual rate, com- 
pared with 02 percent for the 
first nine months of 1993 and 
02 percent for all of last year.. 

Inflation measured by the 
consumer price index was run- 
ning at 28 percent for the first 
nine months of the year, com- 
pared with 23 percent during 


the comparable 1993 period and 
2.7 percent for all of last year. 

One signal that people are 
betting that the Fed is more 
likely to raise rates . soon comes 
from the narrowing yield' gap 
between two-year Treasury 
notes and 30-year bonds. ' 

. That gap stood Friday at 112 
basis points, ini from -129 baas 
points a month ago. A narrow- 
mg gap typically reflects in- 
creased investor concern that 
.the Fed will soon raise short- 
term interest rates. 

The Fed has raised overnight 
bank loan rates five times so far 
this year to 4.75 percent from 3 
percent. The Feds objectives to 
stow the economy’s growth to 
around 23 percent, regarded as 
the . annual rate at which the 
economy can grow without ac- 
celerating inflation. 

. If the Fed decides to raise 
rates by more than the expected 
50 .basis pqihts, it will probably 
opt for an increase of "I full 
point, said Simone Broderick, 
an economist at Gtiban&r - 


WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


Provided by CS First Boston 
Limited. London. Tel: (071) 
516 40 25. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. Nov. 11. 


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5b®Dc 8 97 

SbW 10 95 

SecvQd 79k 92 
S® na 93 

sell Apr m. 9* 
SekAua | f| 
5ek na. 99 

sue 0 Can May 11 94 
SneflConOct im 95 
Smut* Apr 9fe 97 
SncfDC «k 99 
SnctSep 44k 97 
SocQKF® 1016 03 
SocoenTsrJul WV4 9S 
San 184fc 06 

saaaAua n* S3 
Suae Jul 9 B2 
St Bk Nsw Sen 74k 01 
Stockholm Jul 1846 94 
Stockholm 00 616 98 
Sudwftf Aua <fe 97 
Svwdtn Mh 94 
SwadanDc 7 « 

Sweden Jut Wk 98 
Sweden May 8 03 

SvNdemtkOc 71k 96 
^Mdmrtk Dc M 99 
TelesctOcf - 

TWAUO 
Tec dc 
T ep Jun 
TMCCAua 
TMCCDc 
TMCCDC 
TMCCDC 
TMCCJul 
TMCCOct 
Tordara MJn 

Toronto Feb 

TorenraJyl 
Toronto May 


Sad 
Yld Trey 


10 » 

94% 

97% 

7081* 

991k 

93% 

1034k 

M34k 

99% 

102 % 

91 

m% 

96 

110 % 

W2Vl 

1054k 

700% 



+61 

Taranto Mr 

b% n 

94V* 

941 

+34 


+67 


HI* 96 

urns 

Ut 

+81 


+50 

Bin..}... JH 

Wfe 96 

194050 

7J8 

+77 

ha 

+62 

Toyota On JwTfe 98 

Wfe 

809 




Toyota May 

» 97 

100ft 

665 




Toyota Can Mr 6ft 98 

94ft 

836 

+X 

9-V 

+88 

UtnAusJ Sep 

fife 97 

Wft 

837 

+15 


+80 

WsavAug 

10ft H 

mm 

813 

+61 


Vopuv 

im 01 

wtoso 

904 

+52 


+66 

Vanuver 

lift 95 

101% 

620 

+59 


Vienna Of Mr 7ft K 

95fe 

Ml 

+37 



VODeMant 

life M 

1834* 

hi 



+24 

VS Mont 

Wfe X 

ion* 

+.52 




W, Inti Jon 

101*95 

1011* 

642 




Westtotat 

IUL 96 

90ft 

7J0 




WtonfpegMay 5W X 

915* 

939 

+73 


+76 

WstftncurSep 

191*97 

WJft 

Prl 

+50 

9 14 

+63 


95V* 


+75 

930 

+55 


fife 96 

98% 

706 

+45 


181% 

& 

16% 

97% 

1814k 


spa 

Con Mat Price YM Trev 


ECU Straights 


Sod 

Cm Mot PnetYUTrer 


Abb Fin May 9 97 

Abbey Tsy Aug 104* 95 
Abbey Tsv Sep 946 96 
Aegon 00 746 9S 

Attop oH o Sep 94k 96 
Alt Ni pair Asr 9 95 

AsBnegO0 104k 93 
ATT Oct B 99 

AiTCorRAog 744 98 
BeMjmMr 94k 96 
Betaken Mr 6% 18 
BellsttiCoFtb 546 99 
Bice Feb 7% 96 
Bice May 9 99 

Bto Lux Alls 9% 95 
BIH Fin Nov 94k 96 
Bk Greece May 1046 98 
Bk HetelnkMr 9 96 

Boot* APT 8% 97 
BnaAug 1% 95 
BPamerMr 8% 99 
Bn lndasuO0 646 98 
Carol, Inc Nov Hi 93 
Cniiplo Oct 7% 95 
CCCP-Feb 5% 01 
Of Fonder Apr9% 95 
Cdt Natl DC 1016 95 
CnaJul 
Cha Jul 
CnaJun 
Cm May 
CncoJun 
Coe Jan 
Coe Jim 
Coe May 
Coe Nov 
Coe Nov 
CombancJim 9% 96 
CombancJun 7% 98 
CombancSep 6V, 99 
CkPWiTHMr 1046 95 
CopenhgnMr 8 97 

Cr Funder Apr 7% 96 
0 - Fonder Ah Wfe 96 
Cr Fonder Dc 9% 99 
Cr Fonder Feb 5% 01 
Cr Fonder Jul I 96 
Cr Fonder Mr Mt 04 
Cr Load Aug 9 95 

Cr Local Dc 
Cr Local Feb 


Mfe 95 
■% 99 
9 00 

7% 95 
94* 95 
9% 95 
9% VS 
6% 04 
9 01 

54* 81 


W1V, 

VSVl 

1024b 

994k 

Wife 

noik 

inoM 

98399 

97% 

Id* 


99% 

10T4k 

ion* 

181% 

M7% 

10146 

1014k 

MO 

98% 

904k 

M0 

HO 

84% 

101 % 

tOVj 

TO% 


Cr Local Jan 
Cr Local Od 
Cr Loan Sea 
CrLyomMay 
Cr Natl Dc 
Natl Jun 


9% 94 
1046 95 
Ife 97 

no. 01 

6 98 

9 96 

19% 94 
CrNotIJun 1% 95 
CredapOtMr 9% *6 
Credit LOC DC 54k 99 
CradKonolDC 1% 94 
QFtdGsyAuo946 « 
CteMav 144 95 
Dotffl Nix Sep 9% 96 
Db Fin Dc W6 95 
DbFtnMr 8% 99 
DmMrkApr 8% 02 
DonMrkJan 6% 96 
DNerskeJun 11% 99 
OknevMr 94k 95 
□KbiJoa 7% 97 
Fin Aug Ml* 95 
4 99 

1% 96 
n 95 
7% 96 
I 97 
1% 95 
6% 9* 
7% 98 
8% 99 
104*01 
W% 95 
746 81 
8% 97 
9% N 
8% 99 
7% 96 
9% 98 
5fe 98 
6 00 
BV, 04 
9% 99 
16 81 
9 02 

71k 00 
8% 99 
M 97 
9% 95 


EbrdMay 
EbrdOct 
Esc Aug 
Ecsc Apr 
E ok Jan 
EacOd 
EdcFeb 
EDI Aug 
EdfAug 
EiffJin 
Etc Aar 
EecAuo 
EecDc 


EecFeb 
Esc Mr 
EecMr 
EkNov 
E sc Nov 
Hb Apr 
ElbDC 
EfeJm 
EfeJul 
ElbMr 
EM NOV 
Elb Feb 
ElbluxApr 


100% 

M1% 

too* 

M1% 
1 6% 
180=% 
869k 
182% 
94 V> 
90% 
100 
100 V, 
99% 

im 

not* 

ssv> 

M2JB1 

95% 

Wife 

«% 

WUk 

MPk 

181% 

Mil* 

W4 

ion* 

wr* 

101% 

] 2L% 

103% 

99% 

99J29 

99b68 

MOV, 

lOlfe 

98% 

102V, 

91% 

10216 

W24* 

MOV, 

woo* 

99% 

98 

700 

99% 

1084*, 

101% 

93% 

Wife 

1833)01 

99% 


91% 

89V* 

97% 

182% 

18646 

Wife 

97% 

1D0JHT 

104% 

101 % 


839 -HI 
654 +2 

7J6 +27 
611 +143 
ISO +59 
634 +58 
641 -3 

BAS +5 
806 -M 
7JD -2 
kjo -m 
7J8 -34 

IM +43 
644 +08 
651 +40 
111 +50 
1JD +7J7, 
7J5 +57 
E3K +24 
661 +206 
888 +53 
9J4 +109 
832 +999 
746 +92 

17, +23 
U9 +19 
,82 +78 
153 +71 

173 +33 

882 +32 
647 +25 
664 +11 
438 -148 
613 -21 

881 +15 
880 +22 
698 +40 
741 +35 
985 486 

18, +44 

149 +34S 
7J2 -4 

7.19 +7 

7.97 +59 

174 +27 
664 +M 
IM +23 
695 +28 


-4 

-90 

-15 

+7 


471 
580 

171 

906 +48 
114 +58 
761 +23 
369 -212 
<07 +1 

131 +72 
651 +4 

MS -57D 
iM <4 
611 -24 

771 +44 
692 +11 

153 +18 

664 +6 

7JS +8 
na 

444 -141 
648 +98 
US -23 
164 +7 

IS +1 

154 

IM -4 
78* +28 
659 +188 
781 +94 
7.11 *112 
164 +23 

172 +14 

611 <4 

644 -12 

881 + 
691 •* 

661 +28 
489 -4 

621 +17 
189 -20 
U1 -21 
183 +16 
869 +22 
163 +10 
671 +M 
639 -9 

673 +27 
789 -3 

615 +1 


Spd 

Issuer Cpn Mat Price YW Trey 


EBimApr 

EBSux Feb 

EibtaxFeb 

Efttaxjqn 

E MUX Jul 

ElbhnJan 

eibhtxJal 

ERrfuxMay 

CtatnxMr 

EMHox May 

ETWaxMay 

EIMouNdv 

Efidux Nov 

EfefaxOd . 

EUaxSea I 


Tfe 96 99% 

f 99 T0LO65 
9kl 95 IMA* 
■ 94 MCA* 

0 96 108% 

7% 97 18% 

It » IM 
84* 91 99% 

7% » U0% 

l» 94 WHk 
9 97 102% 

6fe 98 93% 

7% 95 lOOfe 
8% 97 H*U»1 

1 91 91082 

8% 95 181% 


EtaporDFeto 8% » lOWk 
EkwartfMay Wfe 95 W»k 
QPwrjBl T*fe 95 Wife 
QPwrStP ■% 96 Wife 
EurntamAPr 7% 97 91057 
EurnforaJul 7% 94 fQ 
Eoraflraa Feb 5fe 01 85JR9 
EurnftataJun HA* 95 W2JK7 
ElPdfiraaJna 84* 07 95% 

Euroflrao Ha Tfe 9S TOOfe 
EuroflmaMr 7% 97 97% 

EuraBmO 8% 99 99% 

EutebotMr 8% 97 181% 
EBtebotMor Tfe 98 9$:* 

Extol bk 00 W% 95 W3 
Extol bk 00 9 94 102% 

F.EJCJun 9% 95 181% 

Ferruvte Jan Wfe 9B 184V* 
FWond Feb ' 8% 99 98% 

Fla land Feb B* 07 94% 

Finland Mr 94* 98 1SM97 
Finland Mr 8 98 98% 

Finland O0 1046 95 W2% 

Finland Od 8% 81 99V, 

Forsraarks Feb9% 94 1 02% 

GeccFeb M 97 KXR* 


GeCCScp 


IWFtoMr 


7% 91 
9% 97 
11 95 


97% 

Wife 

111 % 


Ibm InHJaa » 95 100=44. 
IbrdApr B*. 97 lOOfe 


IbnlJrei 
IbrtJ Jun 
IbrdJan 
I bn) May 
ibrdOd 


9V: 95 100+i 

Wfe 95 lEfe 
7% 97 fffe 
6% 01 90% 

fffe 95 Wife 

indBkRn^Kt 9* 95 leSSl 

iisssr ss; 

Ireland ton Mfe 95 WOfe 
Ireland May 7% 96 Wife 


irrtandMr 
(rttandOd 
Hair Apr 
Itofyjn) 
Italy May 
Italy Mr 


99 97fe 
■% 95 Wife 
Wfe 00 WU27 
HA* 97 1041k 

ba 94 89% 

9fe 11 95% 


JasKBtnrJol 9% 9* U24* 
JopHgtlwO0 S3. 98 lOOfe 
J0,J0 194*95 W2fe 

JffiOd 8% 97 lOOfe 
Johnson JMov 9 97 Wife 

Ktw Apr Wfe 95 Wife 
KfwtnHFeb 8V* 97 W1JI71 
Ktw Inti May 9 96 10Z009 

KtwtnUScs Tfe 98 98% 

Kommootov 8fe 97 WO’k 
KomnnmbTV 9% 95 Wl% 
Ko mmu nlnv 9 99 99=k 

LkbAau 9% 96 102% 

LkbJuB 9 95 Wife 

Ltd, Dc 0% 94 TOO 
MJtselAsJOd 1% 95 nofe 
MtgbkDea FebTfe 97 98% 

Mlgbk Den iul 96 Br* 
Muol FlnanOd9% 96 Wife 
NZeotad Jun 10% 97 105% 
NZeoJndOd 71i « W0% 

NacftnMr Wtk 97 182 
ftallnvBkOct 6 98 

Natl Hona Sep 10 96 
Nedgosoc 
Nadgca Jun 
Nib Feb 
Ninon MtrJ 
Norway Jul 
NIT Jun 
OkbAjr 
Ditotov 


Queb Kyt) Jul 9fe 99 lOOfe 698 +5* 

Robot* Jon 9 94 1D001B nZ 7 +35 

RabobkAAay 9% 95 181% 57* -0 

Robot* MflY 7% 94 99% 737 +41 

Sofa Jan 7fe 97 9Sfe 8J0 +« 

SanwoFln AugV 95 Wife 7.D +40 


7J4 424 

657 +31 

588 -7 

7+7 +50 
753 +61 
615 +25 
671 +47 
865 +25 
621 +11 
768 +C 
789 +9 

659 +44 
IM +30 

137 +34 

658 +B 

661 +9 

7SSJ +7 
57* -47 

6X3 +1 

693 +0 
L2S +4* 
101 +65 
*70 +17 
432 

7JM +37 

615 +8 
63* +63 

670 +2B 

601 +29 
6B -HO 
701 +31 
777 +11 
*35 +5 

640 +34 
867 +31 
931 +41 
633 +25 

138 +38 

478 +7 

BJS +24 
732 +22 
637 +37 
779 -24 

234 +45 
647 +1 

644 -C 
614 +3* 
377 -236 
581 -47 
779 +30 
873 +17 
*71 +n 
65k -6* 

668 +204 

641 +79 
no. 

5l41 -47 

na 

8X8 +14 
699 +31 
67* +31 
618 +31 
772 +56 
9 JO +111 
7J9 +9 

671 +0 

646 +1 

622 +24 

616 +34 

608 -6 
7J2 +21 
7.SG +21 
614 -11 

889 +97 
643 +9 

698 +40 
784 +46 
605 -24 

7J7 +200 
135 +167 
654 +82 
7 IS +46 
7.95 +3* 
809 +22 
688 +23 
930 +146 


Pound StorHns 


Issuer 


Spd 

Con Mat .Price YW Trw 


See 

Cpn Mot PriseYWTrer 


31 Inti Aug 7fe 03 
3lPteOd IP* 01 
Abbey StgJaa t«M 
Abbey Stg Mov H 0 * 
Abbey Tsy Apr Wfe 97 
Abbey Tsv Aup 4 99 

Abbey Tsv Apr 8 W 
Abbey Tsv Jon 7fe « 
Adb Apr 11 2! 

AJdbJlil UVi 01 
Aide Mr wfe 99 
AHLdCJOn 7% D4 
AS ted Dam Febl8% 99 
Amp Uk Jul 11% m 
Argyll Grp Mr Bfe M 
ASdoGPApr %h 
AsfinoeOd Iff* 01 
AasfrtoJui 9 M 
Austria Mr Wfe 99 
STPIcMr no. W 
BardaysDc WU 97 
BarctavsFeb tfe Of 
Bo r Load Feb 8fe 0 
BOVHVPOC 7 98 

BdVHVPOd 6 ^ 

BcetncJcn 5% « 
Bog bk Apr Tfe 00 
Bra bk Aug 7fe O 
BWDC fife 9V 

Boe Group Feb « w 
BPooierJun 97* 98 
BP Dev Apt 
B ill Gas Mr 
Br0 Gas Mr 
Brn Gas Mr 
Brit Gas Nov 
BlPteFeb 
Bt Pie S«p 
CG Jus 
CabWIr Mr 
Carts Fa, Mr 
Ca»Mr . _ _ 
Oataa EJ Aug 6% 99 
Coe Nov 8% 96 
CansnUnlMr Wfe 02 
Cnmtik DC 7 98 

ComzfakOTSOCfiU 9V 
Cr Fonder Asp 7% 98 
Cr Local DC 7fe 98 
Cr Local Dc I 1 -* 99 
Cr Local Mr na ci 
CrecBtLocJun Bfe 04 
DbFtoDc 711 99 
Db Fin Feb (UL 01 
Den MrX Aug 5% 98 
Den Mr* Jan 71% X 
Decta Fin Nov 7% X 
Dixons Tsv Frb7fe 04 
DresdFtoDc 6 99 

DsJbkAag Tfe 98 
Dslbk Aug 9fe 02 
DsIFlBAtig 8 99 

Eosta 61 Mr Bfe 94 
Eto 8% 98 

Elb Apr U 98 

E kb Aug 6 W 

ElbDC 7 99 

ElbDC 5fe X 

Elb Feb 12 X 
EibJun 8 C3 
EibMr 7 98 

EtoMcy 9 2 

ED Her El* X 
EibNcv 


life 01 

7fe 00 

ita 01 
Bfe 10 
7% 97 
ns. X 
Tfe x 
7% 98 
Wfe C2 
71 k 99 
Wfe 31 


sr.k 

USfe 

103% 

93% 

104.078 

BBU 

91% 

96% 

UJ7fe 

lOPk 

ior* 

ST* 

101% 

1W-* 

94% 

75% 

105% 

»•* 

TOT* 

47JK1 

I03fe 

niw 

95% 

93% 

87-k 

9771 

93% 

Wt 

Mfe 

87% 

lOI'i 

TOTfe 

94% 

TC7DM 

97-* 

Wfe 

suer 

88% 

96% 

IVl 

1C\ 

Wfi't 

91fe 

lOCr 

ior^ 

93% 


953 +69 
9+4 +75 
9JJ 

6E +C 

9.14 +4S 
M7 *54 
653 +39 
927 +46 
930 +« 
915 *5 
965 +3 

932 +5* 
948 +65 
9.41 +46 
9*2 t)30 
9.5 +35 
9.r +33 
693 +29 
9ja +K 
BJB +47 
9.49 

933 +39 
690 +S 

9.15 +44 
9.71 +66 
886 +23 
?»1 +41 
9^5 +52 
959 +n 

693 +37 

946 +64 

t£3 +7 

922 -fl 

925 +r 
625 -U 
92C +45 
9J7 +23 

696 +C 
IS. +61 
9JS4 +2 

926 +45 
9.U +41 
S3 +25 

<>r. +r. 

899 +?» 
715 +43 

SJ3 +r 
63 +” 
939 +36 

923 +£3 
9JB +45 
671 +51 

is: +5 : 

680 tS 
?J9 +35 
951 +43 
1144 +7H 
738 -rZS 
IS *zt 
9 26 +3 

697 +3 
*.C -54 
£56 +B 
63e -34 


Leeds SsocDc 7V* *7 
LtedsBSMov.nk *8 
Lloyds Pic Mr Tfe 04 
Mocs Carp Jun »* X 
MobdCorpJal 9% 99 
MrkSPeDC 7% 98 
NZeatodNov 7% 98 
NO) tnvBkDc tfe 99 
Nation Wld Nave 4k 99 
Natl Grid Mr 7% .98 
NcflHonaAae W O 
NoO Power Mr Wfe 01 
Kaurov BS Ilk w 
Nfitwest Mny in* 01 
Nestle Uk DC 8% 97 
ffibAug 7% 98 
NfTMcv TO* 01 
MbAmCcpi Ilk 03 
Nttunbrfa FebWk 02 
0*33 JtH 94k a 

Ontario Pr Feb life 01 
Ontario PTJto nt 82 
OitarfaPr5eP« X 
Osaka Gas AagSW X 
PrarsnSTOa 9% M 
PcanooStFebBIk D 

PskApr Wfe 81 

PwerGtnMr 8% to 
QaeCHvdApr life B1 
QuebHnfOc 64* 98 
RbsPICfilr C% 04 
ReotodSMNavWfeOl 
Rails Rove Jul IN* 98 
Rorul I ns Mr ffe 03 
RttocOC 74k 98 
SbabAar 7fe M 
SBCCirnFeb A a. 01 
Severn Ttf Jul 111*99 
Severn Tnt Mr ink ff] 
SraifRkCap 7% 98 
Cm Bfe 98 
SHtBFMr »4kX 
SoedwestLOeSfe X 
Sweden DC 71* 97 
5 widen Dc 7 98 

EeedmstkDc 6% 99 
SwedetotkJal 7fe X 


673 +B 
695 +43 
9.76 +90 
9JO +53 
920 +57 
172 +12 
885 +25 
Ml +47 
922 +50 
672 +21 
122* +337 
9J8 +56 
689 +50 
988 +97 
642 +2 

6D +29 
973 +41 
12J1 +m 


Tec Jan 


TesPtoFeb 
ThpicJoo 

SStWM 

Tsy ViC J0 

UrrlirveDc 

Vic Ptol Aug ... . 
'ABt&Cur Jan IV* 33 
Wbdw Ema Dc 1 Ife 01 
Vioc-w Eaui BS7 98 
WvFiDMr 71k 04 

XfflTB Jot 1 % n 


11 

7fe 10 
n x 
1 *% 02 

IK* 81 

B 99 

■% as 
Tfe 98 
ft 


94% 

UT4* 

954* 

95% 

87fe 

86X7 


HSfe 

97% 

W9A 

ton* 

98% 

187% 

79V* 


80258 923 +7 

W7fe 141 +40 
99% M3 +47 
89fe 9J3 +H 
94% 981 +« 
99fe 9X2 +80 
HSfe 964 +72 
MC9k 924 +42 
fffe 929 +56 
Wfe 956 +75 
9Mk 9J9 +70 
Cfe 15* +70 
186873 964 +78 
Wfe 921 +65 
96% KL3* +134 
93% 929 +41 
1500 909 +S7 
57fe 9J1 +51 
W84k 9J0 +53 

mas 943 +42 

864k 924 +50 
96fe 909 +49 
nun 9M +53 
Mfe 939 +01 
96fe 667 +27 
93fe 922 +41 
884* 911 +4* 
92?k 935 +47 
H6BK 927 +45 
*5% 67* +23 
951* *54 +63 
KKlt 958 +42 
1054k TjQ +48 
9M 9J6 -MS 
V5fe 955 465 
964* 641 +9 

1011* 9.17 +49 
Wfe 9M +54 
1X4* 9J5 +189 
93V, 927 +50 
85V, 952 +46 
93* HIS +115 


Yen Straights 


spd 

Issuer Cpn Mot Price YM- Trev 


lodbDc 

41* 

97 

181ft 

198 

-to 

la* Fab 

6ft 

01 

. 1K% 

All 

-58 

las, Feb 

fife 

01 

110ft 

433 

4 

lodbjan 

7 

96 

187ft 

103 

-129 

tadbJun 

4ft 

98 

102ft 

154 

-35 

lad) Jun 

7 

96 

105ft 

3J1 

-4 

ladbJoa 

«% 

98 

100ft 

420 

-7 

tadbOd 

6 

01 

IDLED 

439 

-40 

tadbOd 

4 

81 

Wfe 

401 

-7 

ItedAua 

W 

96 

1851* 

131 

-7B 

IbrdApr 

7ft 

95 

181% 

204 

+32 

ibrdAug 

5ft 

96 

W% 

184 

■0 

Ibn) Dc 

6% 

96 

.180ft 

007 

-234 

ibn) Feb 

flb 

96 

184ft 

Z6T 

-44 

Ibn) Jun 

6ft 

97 

109% 

201 

-71 

IbrdJan 

4% 

01 

114% 

419 

-50 

IbrdJun 

6ft 

97 

107% 

336 

-8 

ibrdJwi 

fife 

« 

Til 

435 

-7 

IbrdMr 

fife 

X 

113ft 

302 

-53 

IbrdMr 

fife 

00 

109% 

409 

-6 

QndOd 

8% 

95 

107% 

825 

-232 

ibrdOd 

7ft 

95 

1011% 

004 

-1*3 

IbrdOd 

< 

M 

Wife 

248 

•44 

ltxdOd 

Ife 

95 

104ft 

239 

•4 

fbrtOd 

7ft 

95 

HMft 

238 

-8 

IbrdOd 

4 

96 

KMft 

347 

-3 

tfe Jun 

+1* 

98 

IXft 

4.18 

-7 

Italy Jul 

M 

X 

102ft 

430 

-4 

Italy Jul 

51* 

03 

ion* 

502 

+7 

Jdb Sep 

4ft 

81 

ia% 

422 

-47 

Jdb Sen 

6ft 

81 

W9% 

438 

-1 


issuer Curt «ia» Price'. Yld Trey 


K OevBkCfcts 99 
Dev Bk 005 - 99 
KTW mu Jun .7 96 

Kfw Inti Jua -7 M 
taw Inti Nov 6 fl. 
ICh* Inti Nov 6 99 

LopdsvIrfcMr 3* 99 
Norway Apr Sfe 95 
Norway Feb 5fe 97 
Norway Feb 5% 97 
NtTSep 5% 96 
NIT50P .5% N 
OfcbNov 4fe 97 
OtcbNav 4fe 97 
Okb Sep 6% 96 
OftbSep tfe 98 
Ontario PrOct tfe 96 
Ontario PrOd efe g* 
PodficGaSep 7 W 
Port Reo Feb- 4fe 98 
Port Rep Feb 4% 98 
SndMr ife bo 
SnctMr tfe M 
Spate Jut 4% 04 
Spate Mr 59* 02 
Snln Mr Sfe <D 
Sweden Feb 4% 98 
5wedenEeb 4% 98 
Ten Dc 6 « 

TxDc 6 -96 


-17 

* 


.18530 677 

W»* 400 

R 15 

: 95% 437 +2* 

® 2*7 +38 
293 -59 

Mk'-IM -■+ 
*41 -72 

IMt 643 -3 

JSJfe 829- -a 
W«k XM 
UOfe IM -29 
1871* 631 -2 

-186% 2J3 -49 

KKfe is 


HO 654-+416 
SJ5 XW -40 
W2fe 414 
lOfe 368 -58 
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International Herald Tribune, Monday , November 14, 1994 


Page 11 


CAPI TAL markets 


Mediaiii-Term Financing 
Gains Investor Preference 

By Cad Gewirtz 

P lftiemtiitmat Herald Tribune 

ARiS — While bonds remain the largest single source of 
“M™*™"! aptofwrtm, the fastest 
£^3f» Se S* ltf v7“ actwlt y W far ibis year running at 

^>rc than double the pace of a year ago — ^ medhm^em 

^ ** 0l ^ anization for 

“™°™ct^p()eration and Development, says new mediuin-lerm 
note Programs m the first nine months totaled $157 4 billion — 

Sa^Mssaaafa^ffisssss; 

™J““^onalbOTd issues. But the factors hiding the “spectacular 
morease in medncm-tenn notes remain in place and 

“undoubtedly will spur” the ^ 

continued expansion of this sec- k * 

tor, the report said. DlOte programs 

^tSEZJSS&SZ provide tremendous 
tailor new issues in tenns of cur- flexibility. 

■550CV, maturity and siz e — — ex- ■' 


Lubbers 
'Available’ 
For Top Job 
At OECD 


„ matching the p.„ T 

<kn“£d of investors. Originally, there was no underwriting in- 
ere^d^nte. mana£ra8 these P ro S rams amply matched borrow- 

Ipcrearipgty, however, note issuance is being underwritten with 
oanics buying the paper from the issuer and then looking to place it 
mth investors. As a result, the study said, the distinction between 
notes and Eurobonds is blurring. The report cites market sources as 
estimating that “around half of new MTN issuance has been made 
in the form of underwritten Eurobonds” using documentation of 
the note program. . 

About94 percent of these notes are issued by borrowers within 
the OECD. So far this year, the largest programs are from borrow- 
ers in Japan, with $22.9 billion, followed by Sweden, with yr> *> 
billion, and Germany, with $1 8.6 bilEon. 

The report suggested that activity In the note market mav 

rwum« (rw riv.OA 'J . J • V _ * - . . J 


Acr -\ . r iwnmuw l/J 

OECD companies as well as for the 25 percent decline in bond 
issuance by OECD governments. 

Overall, the volume of international bonds in the first nivn» 
months is down 13 percent. Within this total, straight bonds are 
down 27 percent, equity-related issues were about unchange d and 
floating rate notes were up 53 percent 
Banks were the largest issuers of bonds, accounting for 30 
percent of this year’s volume. German banks were the largest single 
group, raising $27 hflfion. They were followed by British banks, 
with a volume of $16.7 billion, and Dutch banks, with $10-5 billion. 

Germans were the largest users of the bond market, raising $32.1 
billion in die first nine months. Americans were in second place. 

See BONDS, Page 13 



THE TRIB INDEX 


International Herald Trfoune 119 


World Index 


World Stock Index, composed 118 ■' if-'y # 
of 280 internationally investaWe . 


internationally nwestabte . . *; ■ cr * • - 

stocks from 25 countries, ti7 / ■ '' • — ■■ ■ 

compiled by Bloomberg . , ; ■ ' ; 


Business News, lie 

Weekending November It, 115 
daily closings. 

Jan. 1992 = 100. f 



120 tr .... . . 

119 



F M 


^Industrial Sectors/Weekend close 
nnta* iw« * 


IVtl/M rum 


Bway 113JB 11B.87 -4-67 Capdal Goods 
. UflBfcfl 128.10 128.97 -M7 


115.56 11B.79 -2-72 
13193 138J7 -163 


I CD- tU Ifl WI 

nnT tt -SL 18 Consumer Gcocts 104.80 105.43 -jjO 

Sarvicaa 117-67 119.42~-^<7 Use*-*** V 2 M 1 SSM -H.<B 

Aigntffa*. Australia, »£^ll*h*rl-Kta. »w 

. Rntand, ftnw, Gannamr, • nd Votvwunta. For 

Th d im tH omw . 

-tokfix. Na*t Yotie and (meted 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Amid a stalemate 
over the choice of a new secre- 
tary-general of the Organiza- 
tion for Economic Cooperation 
and Development, member 
governments have begun pon- 
dering a new slate of candidates 
led by Ruud Lubbers, the for- 
mer Dutch prime minister. 

Although he remains an un- 
declared candidate for the job, 
Mr. Lubbers, 55, would be 
“available” to serve as head of 
the Paris-based economic think 
tank, according to Hans v an 
Mierlo, the Dutch foreign min- 
ister. 

Mr. van Mierlo stressed in an 
interview on Sunday that his 
government had not lobbied 
openly for Mr. Lubbers, who 
served as prime minister of the 
Netherlands for 12 years and 
who stood as a candidate earlier 
this year for the presidency of 
the European Commission. He 
said, however, that Mr. Lubbers 
would be “an excellent candi- 
date, who could count on the 
unqualified backing of the 
Netherlands government,” 

Since June, the 25 member 
countries of the OECD have 
been unable to deride between 
the candidacies of Donald John- 
ston. a former Canadian politi- 
cian, and Jean -Claude Paye, the 
French candidate who ended 10 
years in office on Sept 30. 

Last month the United States 
firmly rejected a compromise 
proposal by France and Cana- 
da that would have allowed Mr. 
Paye to stay on for another two 
years, to be succeeded by Mr. 
Johnston. 

An official at the OECD said 
that both Mr. Paye and Mr. 
Johnston were coming to be 
seen by diplomats as “damaged 
goods” and that the only way to 
break the deadlock appeared to 
be to come up with a new list of 
candidates. 

On Sunday Mr. van Mierlo 
said that his government had 
been supporting Mr. Paye, the 
official candidate of the Europe- 
an Union, “m a show of sohdari- 
ty with our European partners.”. 
But he tamed the idea of a deal 
allowing both Mr. Paye and Mr. 
Johnston to serve as “fraught 
with penurious consequences 
for this important organization.” 

A U.S. official confirmed 
that the names of Mr. Lubbers 
and three other new candidates 
had been discussed in Washing- 
ton and other world capitals in 
recent days. 

The other names now circu- 
lating for the OECD job are 
those of Henning Christopher- 
sen, the outgoing EU econom- 
ics commissioner from Den- 
mark, Hisashi Owada, Japan's 
ambassador to the United Na- 
tions and the father of Crown 

See OECD, Page 13 


Bullying Bureaucracy 

Foreigners Help to Open Japan Media 


By Steven Brull 

Intenuukmal Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — When Itochu Corp. paid $500 
million two years ago for a small stake in a 
company do minat ed by Time Warner Inc. 
and the telephone company U S West Inc., 
the investment seemed a smart way to acquire 
software, technology and experience that 
would help the Japanese trading company 
pioneer multimedia in Japan. 

But the foreign partners will be playing 
another, equally important role as the heav- 

Foreign partners will help 
dear the bureaucratic 
obstacles to new business 
ventures. 

ies, the tough guys who apply gaiatsu, or 
foreign pressure, to help dear the bureaucrat- 
ic obstacles to new business ventures. 

“Without Time Warner and U S West, we 
cannot challenge Nippon Telegraph and 
Telephone,” said Ted Matsumoto, Itochu's 
multimedia strategist, referring to the giant 
phone company that dominates Japanese 
telecommunications. “We have no bargaining 
power.” 

Faring a long-term decline in their tradi- 
tional roles as middlemen for Japanese com- 
panies, Itochu, Mitsubishi Corp., Sumitomo 
Corp. and other trading companies have been 
spearheading development of multimedia ser- 
vices in Japan. 

Japan's top companies, each of which has 
annual sales m excess of $100 trillion and which 
rank among the biggest companies in the 
world, have set ambitious plans to supply pro- 
gramming and develop an interactive telecom- 
munications infrastructure that will merge 
voice, data and visual information. 

In the foreseeable future, these new busi- 
nesses will comprise only a small portion of 
their overall operations, which run the gamut 
from textile trading to real estate to natural 
resource development. 

But over the long term, the companies see 
multimedia becoming a major segment of 
their operations, an area that will allow the 


companies to prosper as traditional activities 
die out. 

The realization of their plans, however, will 
hinge to a great extent on deregulating laws 
that have stunted development of multimedia 
in Japan. In particular, they want Nippon 
Telegraph & Telephone Corp., a former gov- 
ernment monopoly that continues to domi- 
nate the market, to open up its network to 
outsiders. 

The companies have thus become key 
agents of deregulation in Japan and natural 
allies of foreign media companies. “Their 
future growth potential is really up to the 
bureaucracy,” said Leon Rapp, an analyst at 
Baring Securities. 

Pioneering a new field such as multimedia 
comes naturally to the companies, but it also 
comes by default. 

Japan’s electronics manufacturers, Matsu- 
shita Electric Industrial Co. and Sony Corp., 
have bought Hollywood studios that will pro- 
vide content for multimedia networks. But 
development of domestic networks per se is 
made difficult by their need to focus re- 



equipment makers NEC Corp. and Fujitsu 
LttL, are consumed by the need to stay compet- 
itive in semiconductors and other cash-devour- 
ing busi n esses. Nor can t hey afford to be seen 
as a competitors to NTT, their biggest custom- 
er. 

NTT, for its part, has no interest in provid- 
ing programming. The government is also 
loathe to give the behemoth free rein in setting 
op multimedia networks. 

Itochu , which had sales of 16.135 trillion 
($165 billion) in the year through March, 
taken the lead in the race to develop 
multimedia markets in Japan. 

Including its 1992 investment for a 5.6 
percent stake in T ime Warner Entertainment, 
the company has plowed nearly $1 billion 
into a broad-based strategy that includes sat- 
ellite television, cable TVj program produc- 
tion and an 18 percent share of the Interna- 
tiona] telephone company. International 
Digital Communications Inc. 

Although it is redundant to invest in cable 
and satellite system delivery systems, analysts 
say Itochu’s strategy makes sense because 
See MEDIA, Page 13 


Japan Says U.S. 
Is Unclear on 
Car Trade Talks 


Campi/al by Our Sta ff From Dispute thy 

JAKARTA — Ryutaro Ha- 
shimoto. the international 
trade and industry minister of 
Japan, charged the United 
States on Sunday with failing to 
coordinate its response to his 
offer to revive stalled auto 
trade talks. 

Mr. Hashimoto said Mickey 
Kantor. the U.S. trade repre- 
sentative, and Ronald H. 
Brown, the commerce secre- 
tary, had responded differently 
to the latest offer during sepa- 
rate talks with the two men at 
the Asia-Pacific Economic Co- 
operation forum. 

“Let me say first of all that I 
had a big fight in a very friendly 
atmosphere,” he told a semi- 
nar, noting that Walter Mon- 
dale, the former vice president 
who is now ambassador to Ja- 
pan, was present at both meet- 
ings. 

Mr. Hashimoto said he made 
the same set of proposals to 
both men in a bid to resume 
negotiations on the auto trade, 
the most difficult area in bilat- 
eral economic talks. 

But he added that while Mr. 
Kantor said the Americans 
“could start talking” on the ba- 
sis of the latest offer during 
talks on Thursday. Mr. Brown 
said in subsequent talks Sunday 
that he "could not” accept the 
Japanese proposal. 

"I believe the /ynerican gov- 
ernment is imposing two differ- 
ent ideas.” Mr. Hashimoto 
said. 

"Who has more power — Am- 
bassador Kantor or Secretary 
Brown?” he asked. 

The United States is seeking 
access to Japanese auto dealer- 
ships for Detroit’s Big Three 


automakers — General Motors 
Corp. Ford Motor Co. and 
Chrysler Corp.— according to 
Mr. Brown. Washington also 
wants Japan's major auto com- 
panies to come up with a volun- 
tary plan to buy U.S. auto 
parts. 

Japanese officials said earlier 
that Mr. Hashimoio and Mr. 
Kantor had agreed Thursday 
to resume talks on opening the 
Japanese market for flat glass 
on Dec. 5 although they failed 
to set a timetable for relaunch- 
ing the auto talks. 

Under the so-called frame- 
work agreement reached be- 
tween leaders of the two coun- 
tries last year, the auto talks are 
being carried out by Mr. Hashi- 
moto's ministry and the com- 
merce departments. 

Japan's $4.5 billion market 
for flat glass, used by the con- 
struction and auto industries, is 
second only to that of the Unit- 
ed Slates, according lo the Of- 
fice of the U.S. Trade Repre- 
sentative. Autos and auto parts 
account for about two-thirds of 
Japan's $60 billion annual 
trade surplus with ihc United 
States. 

An auto deal is seen as key to 
reducing the imbalance and de- 
flating tensions between the 
economic powerhouses. 

The United Stales has long 
accused Japan of playing by its 
own rules when it comes lo 
cars, be it locking foreign rivals. 

For its part, Tokyo concedes 
there are problems in the sector 
but in large part blames the Big 
Three U.S. producers for fail- 
ing lo make cars that suit the 
Japanese way of life. 

(AFP. BltHimhrr " ; 


Federal Express Asia Hub 
Planned for Philippines 


China Details Market Reform 


Agence Fama-Press* 

MANILA — The Philippines 
agreed on Sunday to allow Fed- 
eral Express Corp. to set up an 
Asian hub at the former U.S. 
Naval base at Subic Bay. 

Under its agreement with the 
government. Federal Express 
will begin operations from the 
base in raid- 1995 and will pay 
the Philippines $1.65 milli on 
per year for the next seven years 
to use the site. 

The deal between Federal 
Express and the Philippines 
came less than a month before 
the second anniversary of the 
UJS. pullout from Subic Bay, 
after the Philippine Senate vot- 
ed to terminate Washington’s 
basing rights and end nearly 
100 years of U.S. military pres- 
ence in the country. 

Warren M. Christopher, the 


U.S. secretary of state, who wit- 
nessed the signing of the agree- 
ment, said the deal reinforced 
remarks by President Fidel Ra- 
mos that the country was “bade 
in business at the heart of Asia.” 

Manila is converting the 
sprawling Subic Bay facility, 
which functioned as a repair 
yard and logistics center fra- the 
Japan-based UJS. 7th Fleet, 
into an international free port, 
industrial zone and tourist cen- 
ter. 

Several foreign companies, 
including Enron Energy Corp. 
of the United States, tiave al- 
ready set up operations in Su- 
bic. Enron is building a 105- 
megawatt power plant in 
addition to maintaining a 28- 
megawatt facility the Ameri- 
cans had left 


The Associated Press 

BEUING — China has formulated a plan to 
open its stock markets to foreign investors to 
raise more capital and bring the markets more in 
line with international practices, an official re- 
port said Sunday. 

The state-owned Business Weekly reported that 
the China Securities Regulatory Commission has 
drawn up a three-print plan. The plan would 
allow a greater number of state-owned enterprises 

and H shares, which arc listed cradle HougKong 
stock exchange. The A-share market, which is 
amenity restricted to Chinese investors, would be 
gradually opened to foreigners. 

Foreign securities institutions in China, mean- 
while, would be permitted to handle offshore 
business under the proposed plan. 

Nic Qin g pin g , of the securities commission’s 
overseas market department, said that interna- 
tionalizing C hina’ s fledgling securities markets 
was a long-tom priority. But he did not give a 
time frame for implementation of the reforms. 

The commission is currently experimenting 
with the listing of Chinese enterprises on over- 


seas exchanges, Mr. Nie said. So far, 1 1 compa- 
nies have listed in Hong Kong, issuing 6.3 mil- 
lion H-shares with an initial value of 13.34 
billion Hong Kong dollars (SI. 73 billion). 

China’s two stock markets were established 
four years ago, with the first issue of B shares in 
1991.' By the end of last year. 42 companies had 
issued a total of 3 billion B shares, raising a 
combined $13 billion from the issues. 

■ Chinese Inflation Set to Exceed 20% 
China’s inflation will rise above 20 percent this 
year, the highest level since economic reforms 
were launched 15 years ago, according to an 
official forecast published Sunday in The China 
Daily and reported by news agencies. 

The forecast by the State Information Center 
underscored the failure of a 17-month drive to 
restrain an overheating economy that has aver- 
aged 1 3 percent growth over the past two years. 

The Chinese government pledged in January 
to keep inflation under 10 percent in 1994, com- 
pared with 14.7 percent in 1993. The target was 
raised midyear as authorities launched a cam- 
paign to keep price increases below 15 percent. 

(AFP, Reuters ) 


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Real Sales but Virtual Profit 


SMALL 

BUSINESS 




By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald -Tribune 

BRISTOL, England — What do you call a 
five-year-old company with 70 employees and 
£2.1 milli on ($3 million) in revenue for the 
first half of the year? In the virtual reality 
business, yon call it the entrenched titan of 
the industry. 

“I guess that says this is a pretty small and 
new industry,” conceded Pierre duPont, mar- 
keting director of Division 
Group PLC, the fast- 
growing makes: of hard- 
ware and software for vir- 
tual reality systems. 

Five years ago Division 
consisted of four young 
men, all in their middle 
and late 20s, working out 
of a farmhouse in a town called Chipping 
Sodbury. Three of them had just left the big 
European semiconductor maker INMOS Ltd. 
and the fourth, Charles Grimsdale, had just 
left the British software house Perihelion. 

AH were well qualified as technology wiz- 
ards, but only, one had the slightest acquaint- 
ance with management It was Mr. Grims- 
dale’s experience helping to manage his 
family ’s 450-acre daiiy and cereals farm that 
made him the logical and unanimous choice 
as Division's managing director. 

“We all felt stifled and wanted to do the 
things we wanted to do — things like comput- 
er graphics,” said Phil Atkin, one of the 
original gang of four and now Division's 
director of entertainment projects. Two years 
after its founding, the company had grown to 
18 employees, big enough to move into new 
i cm two floors ofa small braiding in a 
park. Now that base has ex- 
panded to encompass two entire buildings. 

It was an expansion faded in part by the 
company's first share issue, in May, which 
raised £5 million and valued the company at 
£13 million. 

Six months later, Division is valued on 
paper at £44 million and its clients include 
companies ranging from . Glaxo Holdings 
PLC in Britain to Matsushita Electric Indus- 
trial Co. of Japan, and McDonnell Douglas 
Corp. in the United States. “We have exceed- 
ed our expectations,” Mr. Grimsdale said. 


But he said the company's growth has not 
made bis job any easier. Despite Division’s 
success, the company remains deeply im- 
mersed in red ink. While revenue for the first 
half of the year reached a record, so did the 
company’s loss. In the first half of the year. 
Division posted a loss of £945,000, which the 
company blamed on expenses related to its 
huge expansion in staff mid facilities. 

Division's founders remain sanguine. In its 
most significant deal to date, in July the com- 
pany was selected by Hewlett-Packard Co. as 
its virtual reality partner. In addition to col- 
laborating on developing technology. Division 
will sell its own virtual reality systems through 
Hewlett-Packard to be connected to its com- 
puters. The combined hardware and software 
systems will sell from £20,000 to £40,000 each. 

Just last month. Division scored its biggest 
single contract to date, a $2 million order from 
Virtual World Entertainment Inc. of Chicago. 
Undo - that contract. Divirion will supply the 
Chicago-based entertainment company with 
systems to nm its Battle Tech game. 

More specifically, it will provide the tech- 
nological fuel to enable computer game junk- 
ies to go into Virtual World’s game centers, 
don headsets equipped with twin television 
screens and take up their data guns. 

For Division, which had long eschewed 
projects on the entertainment end of the vir- 
tual reality business, it marked a major depar- 
ture. “People see entertainment as a lowering 
of standards,” Mr. Atkin said. So far. Divi- 
sion has designed systems that do everything 
from allowing Gulfs tream Aerospace Inter- 
national Corp. to design the interior of its 
corporate jets to allowing Glaxo to design 
new drugs, molecule by molecule. 

“Frankly, I think part of our problem with 
entertainment was just that we did sot know 
how to do it,” Mr. Atkin said. To overcome 
that problem he spent much of his summer in 
Chicago, perfecting programs to get virtual 
explosions and virtual flames up to a reason- 
able semblance of the real thing. 

In the process, Mr. Atkin rdeamed a lesson 
that has been repeatedly pounded into his head 
in his five years as a corporate executive. “At 
the end of the day the consumer is the only one 
that counts, even if it means losing step and 
pending a lot of time in Chicago, he said. 



THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation, 
k gpld. 

Swiss made since 1848. 



Q 
OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 







\ 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


ary 


THE GERMAN © PFANDBRIEF 




** E 


SOLID VALUE FROM THE GROUND UP 


The last thing many investors want is to get adventurous about current fads and exotic markets. 
If safety, yield, a stable currency and long-term value are your priorities, consider Germany's Pfandbrief 
system. Pfandbriefe in Germany are bonds issued to refinance mortgages or public loans, a time-tested 
idea that dates back more than two centuries. In line with the Mortgage Bank Act of 1900, these bonds - 

JKKk which are secured by mortgages or by 




mff. 


'■}= 




W 


public-sector loans - can only be 
^ issued by specially authorized 
banks which are fully liable for 
A each issue. They must carry 
p backing of separate funds with 
at least matching yields and 


maturities. And all Pfandbrief 


I. 






mjW* 


f 

Sk, 




jim 


m 


issues are monitored by a state- 
appointed trustee. 

The bottom line on safety? No 


investor has ever failed to receive 


100 % repayment on a German Pfandbrief held 


to maturity. The legal framework surrounding Pfandbriefe has an unsurpassed record for endurance, 


offering investors a fixed-interest D-Mark instrument of quality - plus yields generally 


higher than German Treasury bonds (Bunds). Sound reasons why Pfandbriefe, 


at nearly DM 1 trillion at year-end 1993, amounted to 40 % of Germany's entire 


bond market. 


German Pfandbriefe are officially ^ 
quoted on German stock ex- 
changes. Issuers actively maintain 
a well-functioning secondary 
market. 


UNBEATABLE 


GERMANY'S MORTGAGE BANKS 


.5 l/ r 


’ n i s 






DEPFA-BANK, WIESBADEN 
BAYERISCHE VERE1NSBANK AG, MUNCHEN 
HYPO- BANK, MUNCHEN 

DEUTSCHE HYPOTHEKENBANK FRANKFURT AG, FRANKFURT 
RHEINHYP, FRANKFURT 

DEUTSCHE GENOSSENSCHAFTS- HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, HAMBURG 
FRANKFURTER HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, FRANKFURT 
DEUTSCHE CENTRALBODENKREDIT-AG. KOLN 

BAYERISCHE HANDELSBANK AG, MUNCHEN 


r «r-> j"5" 



WESTHYP, DORTMUND 
BERUN HYP, BERLIN 

SUDDEUTSCHE BODENCREDfTBANK AG, MUNCHEN 

MUNCHENER HYPOTHEKENBANK EG, MONCHEN 

HAMBURGHYP, HAMBURG 

W0RTTEMBERGER HYPO, STUTTGART 

NURNBERGHYP, NURNBERG 

HYPOTHEKENBANK IN ESSEN AG, ESSEN 

DEUTSCHE HYPOTHEKENBANK [ACT.- GES.). HANNOVER 


BRAUNSCHWEIG- HANNOVERSCHE 

HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, HANNOVER 
ALLGEMEINE HYPOTHEKEN BANK AG, FRA 
RHEINBODEN HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, 
L0BECKER HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, UJB# 
NORDHYPO BANK, HAMBURG M- 
BFG- HYPOTHEKENBANK AG, FRANlgP^ 
Wl-BANK, MUNSTER 
HYPOTHEKENBANK IN BERUN AcJP^' 


N'i-v- 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 13 


New International Bond Issues 


^Compiled by Laurence Desvitettas 


Amount 

(mDSons) 


Mat 


_ Plica 

C ^ p * Price end 
* week 


Tenns 


gating Rate Notes 


Bonk of South 
Australia 

$250 

1999 

0.35 

99J85 

— 

Over 3-mer*h Ubor. CaBalfe at pw in 1996. Fen 020%. 
DtAoranatiOAi $'0,000 |W. Morgen SecurHinJ 

Sovereign 

Investments 

$250 

1999 

Olio 

99as 

— 

Owr 3-morth Libor. Noncdtoble. Fan 020%, Dengmirte* 0 « 
$10,000, |C5 Fir* Bataev) 

Grypo Industrial 
Durango 1 

$100 

1996 

3» 

100 

— 

Over Amortth Lior. Nonccflable. Fees 1%, £>**»* 

Bank) 

H«tiispherw Fjmding 

$300 

2001 

Oab 

100 

— 

Ovar 3-monh Libor. Crfebl* a per on oaf coupon popnont 
dote. Fan 0.30%. (Coldmen Soda btlj 

Merrill Lynch j 

$100 

2000 

0.20 

100 

— 

Q*r3-marth Ubor. Nonoaflabie. FenAetrfectotad. Dvnomi- 
nahans SlOjOOO. (Mari Lynch WTJ 

Portman Bufldmg 
Society | 

£100 

19 97 

a 

100 

— 

Over 3-morth Libor, hoffartd of 99.85. Caltabie at par in 
1996. Fees 0275%. Denominations £10,000. (Barcfayi de 
ZbetaWeddJ 

Flxed-Coubon* 

Astra Gxnparfa 
Argentina de 
Petroteos ; 

STOO 

1999 

im 

99ft 

— 

Semionmjaly. Nonaddbie. Fees 03275% (Swas Bank Carp) 

Austria j 

4 

$200 

1997 

714 

101 

99.90 

Reoffared at par. Noncotiabie. Fees INK. (Lehman Brothers 
tart) 

Council of Europe 

$150 

1996 

714 

100J72 

99 JO 

Noncaflabie- Fees 1M% (Bodays de ZoeM WeddJ 

Nbrddeutsdw 
Landesbanfc i 

$150 

1996 

7V4 

100J4 

99 JD 

Reaffsmd a> 99.79. NonatedUe. Fees «H L (Partial Capital 
Mcrim&J 

SBC Finance ‘ 

$250 

1996 

m 

100ft 

— 

faoHered at 99% NoncaSafafe. Fees 1M% (5w Bank GorpJ 

Union Bank 
Switzerland 

$150 

1996 

7 

10041 

— 

Reoffend at 99£l. NoneeBaUt. Fees 0.125% (UBS.) 

European Investment 
Bank 

£200 

2000 

m 

100.433 

— 

Reoffared at 98R33. NonooUle. Fees lftX. (HSBC Capital 
Mori— J 

ftfcP Schleswig-Holstein 

E100 

1996 

8 

100712 

— 

Reoffered of 99737. Noncaflabie. Fees 1H* (HSBC CapM 
Markets) 

Deutsche finance 

m 50,000 

1996 

IT 

102 



□mount to 350 bAan Ere. Fus IMfX. peutsdw BanfcJ 

European Investment 
Bank 

m 400,000 

1996 

m 

96.195 

95.20 

NoncaBobfa, Fungible with auHnodeig one, reeling total 
amount ta 900 biCon Ire. Fees 1K% (Banda Nadonale dal 
Lawara.) 

DSL Bezik 

OF 200 

2002 

TA 

100.975 

99.80 

Reoffared at 99.40. Noncaflofata. Fees 1ML (Rabobank Ne- 
derimdj 

Energie Beheer 
Nederland 

DF 250 

1999 

m 

101 ft 

9970 

Reoffared at 99H. Noncaflabie. Few UHL (ABNAMRO 
Bank.) 

European Investment 
Bank 

Df 600 

2001 

Th 

101.275 

99m 

Reoffered at 9970. NoncoBofafa. Fees DHL MBNAMRO 
Bank) 

Rabobank Nederland 

DF350 

1999 

716 

101.575 

100 70 

Reoffared 99.95. Noncoftobfe. Foes 1*% (fefaotn* Neder- 

frmdj 

BeH Canada 

a 150 

1999 

9% 

10146 

99.95 

Reoffared at 10CLQ75. Nonateabie. Fees ltKL (Wood 
Gundy) 

BNG j 

a 750 

1996 

8 

101.176 

99.95 

Roaffe/ed ai 100.176. NansdUkL Foes DHL (ScoliaM. 
dead.) 

ABN-AMRO Australia 

AusS 100 

1997 

10ft 

10U1 

99.80 

NonoaBable. Fees 1VHL (ABNAMRO Bank) 

Coca-Cola Amatil 

A«s 75 

1999 

10ft 

101.775 

99.75 

Noncaflabie. Fees 2% (Hambras Bank) 

Cammonwwdth Bank 
of Australia 

AtaSlOO 

1997 

10ft 

101.33 

9970 

Noncalabla. Fees DHL (CormnonwoMi Bonfc of AustrefiaJ 

Gounal of Europe 

AudlOO 

1996 

9ft 

101 .06 

9975 

Nonateable. Foes 1UX. (Baidays de Zoete WeddJ 

Export finance & 
Insurance Corp. 

Audi 00 

2004 

11 

101 S5 

99.83 

Noncaflabie. Fees 2MK. (Hambros Bark] 

KFWInfl finance 

A«S150 

1999 

10ft 

701.78 

99 . 85 

NonaJobkL Fees 2% Peutsdie BaJcJ 

Bedriritie de France 

r 30000 

2001 

4ft 

997 0 

— 

Noncaflabie. Fees QJ0% [Nomura Inti) 

Hanfcyu Department 
Stores 

v 10,000 

1999 

4-55 

10035 


R , » «. „ ^ w 


(Sanwo (nt'L) 

Nomura Europe 
^nance 

y 10,000 

2002 

4.80 

100 

— 

Caflable at per in 2000. Abo 5 biBon yen of notes doe 2005 
and paying 4.90% Fees not dedosed. Denorainatians 100 
mi Ban yen. (Noaera kel] 

Nordic Investment 

Baric 

Y10JXJ0 

2004 

5jo 

100 

— 

Nonccteobta. Redemption at nmhniiy wfl be Enloed to the 
doikr/ym exchange rate. Fees not tfisdosed. Denominators 
100 mflton yen. (Bank of Tokyo Capital Ma^etaJ 

World Bank 

r 200,000 

2004 

4ft 

99a04 

— 

Semiannualy. NoncaldUe. Fcss 0325% (MarriHyneh inT l) _ 

Equity-Linked 







Rabobank Nederland 

$100 

1997 

4 

101.188 


Reoffared m par. Noncaflabie. Each $1 ,000 note with 20 
worronU, exerdscble on June 15, 199S end entetng holders to 
a cash settlement inked to the marfc/dol or enthonge rede, 
fees IteJL (Morgn Stanley IntTJ 


Stocks and Election Don \ Mix 


By James K. Glassman 

Washngtan Pon Smicc 

NEW YORK — One of the 
best ways to lose money is to 
base your investment decisions 
on political events. Enphoric in- 
vestor who jumped into the 
stock market when Ronald 
Reagan won the presidential 
race, for example, lost 10 per- 
cent within a year. 

Still, elections wn chang i* 
economic policy, which in turn 
influences the performance of 
individual businesses, which is 
the basis of stock prices. 

And new tax policies can 
have a direct effect on stocks. A 
change that lets investors keep 
more of their profits, such as 
the reduction in the capital- 
gains rate that Republicans are 
advocating, will almost certain- 
ly lift tbe market 
a But since Tuesday’s election, 
the market has gone down, not 
up. One reason is the mystery of 
timing. Sometimes the market 
takes good economic news into 
account before it happens; oth- 
er times, it stubbornly waits to 
recognize the obvious. 

Right now. Wall Street ap- 
pears warned that the new Con- 
gress might actually widen the 
federal deficit Investors also 
are skeptical that the big world 
trade agreement, tbe General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade, can pass tins year. They 
also are anxious about rising 
interest rates. 

But if you believe that there is 
a decent chance that the con- 
> gressional elections will pro- 
duce an economic and fiscal sea 
change, this could be a good 
time to commit long-term funds 
to the stock market. But be 
Warned that you’ll have to wait 
toyour profits. 

Patient investors who bought 
wi*nMr. Reagan was sworn in 
apd held onto their stocks tri- 
pled their money by the time he 
retired. ^ 

These s tittle doubt that this 
Congress will be friendlier to 
business. 

But the change that could 
have the most impact on the 
stock market u a cut in taxes on 
capital gains — the pro fit you 
make when you sell an asset, 
such as stock, for more iHan you 
bought it. 

Represrauuvt Sa Archer. 
Republican of Texas M d ^ 
new chairman of the Ways and 
Means Committee, wants t0 
change the current law m Uuce 


ways: to tax gains at half tbe 
rate of ordinary income, to in- 
dex gains to inflation, and to 
allow deductions to families 
who sell their homes at a loss. 

His counterpart on the Sen- 
ate side, incoming Finance 
chairman Bob Packwood, Re- 
publican of Oregon, is expected 

wjj^and there are majorities in 
both houses for the measure. 

Currently, capital gains are 
taxed at the rate same as ordi- 


Right now, Wall 
Street appears 
worried that the 
new Congress might 
actually widen the 
federal deficit. 


nary income, such as salaries, 
dividends and interest, or at 28 
percent, whichever is lower. 

Under the Republican plan, 
a family with taxable income of 
838,000 to 592,000 would see its 
capital gains rate fall to 14 per- 
cent from 28 pcrcenLA family 
in the top bracket (5250,000 
and over}, now paying 39.6 per- 
cent on ordinary income ana 28 
percent on capital gains, would 
have its rate on gains cut to 19.8 
percent 

The reason a capital gains cut 
is so important to the stock 
market is that it increases the 
amount of money an investor 
can keep, thus making every 
slock more attractive. 

Consider, for example, a cou- 


Lost Week’s Markets 

M nvurtn are ta <* ciawi of rrotOno Frktar 

Stock IndUMs Money Rates 


Unfled States 

NOV.lt 

NOV. 4 

oree 

Untied States Naw.11 

Now. 4 

DJ Indus. 

3JQ1X7 

180723 

—116% 

Discount rate 

4jo 

480 

dj urn. 

WkJl 

17X14 

— Ml% 

Prime rate 

7*6 

74U 

QJ Tranv 

1AJ23& 

1,477.88 

— 1.71% 

Federal funds rate 

SA 

41 ft 

S8.PWD 

430A7 

42 93a 

+ 028% 

Jttean 



S&P500 
5&P ind 
NYSE Cp 
■rttaki 

4035 

55tUlt 

ravrt 

iMIS 

55145 

25*21 

+ 003% 
—048% 
—038% 

Discount 

Call money 

T-mcnm Interbank 
Germany 

1* 

232 

Z37 

1% 

2.19 

2SH4 

FTSETOJ 

3JJTL90 

3JKJM 

— OX»% 



FT 30 

136430 

vum 

-037% 

Lombard 

600 

6J» 

Jetton 




Call money 

CBS 

495 

Nikkei ZB 

1936136 

t van 

—146% 

3-month interbank 

520 

520 

Oarmany 



Britain 



DAX 

2J03I3S 

105756 

+ 053% 

Bank base rote 

5k* 

Sk* 

Hens Ken 




Call manev 

5V6 

500 

Hons Sena 

M67JS 

vaxuo 

—171% 

3HnonB> Interbank 

6 1/14 

61/16 

world 




flow Now. 11 

NOV. 4 

arae 

MSC1P 

flSDO 

63420 

-134% 

London pun. 8x5 38530 

38X80 +039% 


WrW infer fnmMervui Sta tely Oa MW Ml 



The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Nov. 14-18 


A schedule ot Mr economic vrt 

Ortawtaom&oenipMtorfoUttvtv^ 

tkxttimaki tmumoyBioomtmg^f- 
nans NOWS. 

JUHkPocHIc 

• Ha* 14 .Warta Aata-PadflcEoo- 
ncntic Cooperation leaders dimer at Bu 
Jakarta Convention Cantor. 

Tokyo Yeaushi Mono. Bank of Japan 
flwamor. to apeak at the imperial Hotel. 

■ Bov. 19 Sydney noaer ve Bank of 
Austrafla to release its menMy buttedn for 
November. 

Haas Kong Goremment to bsuo Job- 
Ian data lor the Jufy*Sapnmbar quarter. 
Bogor, IndonaUa APEC economic toad* 
«ra mooting. Hearn of state wfl meat for 
Informal dkacusteons at tho prasHentW 
ratnut outside Jakarta. 

Tokyo Machinery orders in September 
released by Econom i c Plowing Agency. 
Stall produeflon during October released 
by Japan Iran and Steel Federation. Mn- 
lory ol Finance reteeses October trade 
balance llguree. Bank of j—nn to release 
wholesale price index for October. 

Teflpel Central Bank of China. Taiwan's 
CHtai bar*, to report foreign exchange 

ra s tevwa in Septe mb er, 
a Mam. 19 Tokyo Haviaad Industrial 
production numbers for September re- 
leased by Wrtstry of Inte rna tio na l Trade 
and Industry. 

a Nov. 17 Sydney WoatpaoMal- 
boume Institute leading indicator on tho 
Aioteaflen economy tor September. Aus- 
tralian merchandise imports tor October. 
AuatrSfian housing financing report tor 
Septe mb er. Auatratei corporate profits 
lor the Jitfy-Septemtoer quarter. 
UMteigtnn New Zealand employment 
report tar Jtay-September quarter. FOra- 
caafc J obi s ee rate to drop to 8.1 percent 
from BA percent 

■ Horn. 19 Hong Kong Government to 
tssue September ordere-on-hand data tar 
manufacturers. 

Tokyo Bankot Japan to rOtaam October 

miw n smetv 

a Ho*. 19 Tokyo Sr Leon Bitten, 


with lha European Commlealon, » meet 
. farmtafaterial towl trade dtacuateona with 
Japanese ofldats. 


» Now. 14 Umtaa October dhartbo- 
#ra trades sunny tram pit Confederation 
Of Brttteh kxtuctry. Octobor producer 
prim Index. Forecast Input op 03 per- 
cent In month, up 1J0 percent ta year. 
Output up 02 percent ta month, up Z$ 
percent In year. 

Part* P tato mantan' de b ate an nodal 
eoourfty. 


FtankMt European Banking Congress, 
spate-ra inciuda Mm Tietmeyir, presi- 
dent of ** Bundesbank, 

London TW id-quarter revtaedgfoaado- 
mestfo product Forecast up OB percent 
In month, up 3.7 poroent In yea. October 
M4. Forecast upa4 percant ta month, up 
42perosnt ta year. kM tondtag EU bWKm 
in month. 


Amor te— 



■ Haw. is Amsterdam September 
and thtnf-quartar li wustr lta output. 
London Official opening of Partament 
tar 1899. Queen's annual speech. Octo- 
ber rente prtca Index. Forecas t, up 02 
percent In month, up 2.8 percent In year. 
BtchKflng mortgage pa ymen t s —>33 par- 
cant in year. October unemptaymm. 
Forec ast: down 25.000 Jobs. September 
average earnings. Forecast: 3.n percent 
ta year. S eptember unit wages on a three- 
month average. Forecast down OA per- 
cant In year. 

a team. 17 Amsterdam September 
unemployment, measured over a three- 
month period. Forecast 72 percent 
Pate October Industrial investment sur- 
wy. 

• New. IB Cupeittegmi S ep temb er 
trade balance. Third-quarter currant ac- 
count. 


e KWh 14 Otam Mrtenai housing 
OuMOk. 

Btade Jan e i ro The central bank to offer 
42 mflBon 35-day central bank bonds, or 
BBC*. Outlook: YMda rise born 623 per- 
cent 

W aal i higte n The U.& Agriculture De- 
partment re tereoa Its weakly report on 
piottingprograBBfurB 0 vancreps.Feder- 
al Home Loon Bank arwouncea suctions, 
a Nov. 15 Weshln gtoa October ratal 
sales. October Industrial production and 
capacity u BbaU on. Federal Open Martel 
Committee meeting. The Insdtute for Inju- 
ry Reduction ralaasas Be annual toy safety 
report, which wa apotfigM 25 dangerous 
toys. 

Afiaeta The Atlsnte Federal Reserve re- 
leases bs Index for October. 

New York Johnson Redbook research 
servtoe retoases Ha weekly survey of 
same-store sales at more dwi 2 D depart- 
ment. dtocowt wnd chain a ares in the 
United 

• Mb*. 1W 
sumer price index. The Labor Dte»nment 
reports October real earnings. The Com- 
merce Department reports September 
buskneas Inventories. Department of En- 
ergy issues Its weekly report on U2- pe- 
troleum stocks, production, imports and 
refinery utUtoatton. The Labor Department 
reports initial weekly ante unemptoymem 
compensation Insurance Glafma- 

• Haw. 18 Ww rtfing to u The Com- 
merce department reports Septe m ber 
meichandtee trade. 

Hasten CHy Finance Ministry an- 
nounoss Me xi co's Saptambar trade bal- 
ance results. 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


MEDIA: Foreigners Hay Role in Japan’s Multimedia 


pic makin g 570,000 a year. The 
couple buys 510,000 worth of 
General Motors Crap, stock to- 
day and sells it in five years for 
515,000. Under the current law, 
the federal tax on that capital 
gain would be $1,400, leaving a 
net profit of 53,600. But if the 
rate on capital y'nx is cut in 
half, the tax would be 5700 and 
the profit $4,300-an increase of 
19 percent. 

Let’s say (hat inflation over 
this period is 3 percent annual- 
ly, or a total of 15 percent For 
calculating profits, the couple 
would raise its “basis” — the 
original cost of its stock — to 
reflect inflation. The basis 
would rise to 511,500. so profits 
for tax purposes would be 
53*500. The tax would total 
5490, so the coirole could pock- 
et $4,5 lO-thafs 25 percent more 
than under the current law. 

But what about the deficit? A 
capital gains cut itself would 
not have much effect- In fact, 
over the next few years, it would 
increase the flow of 
to the Treasury by en- 
couraging more Americans to 
cash in gains they have locked 
away. Tax receipts from capital 
gains jumped from 58 billion in 
1977 to 550 billion in 1986 as 
rates were steadily lowered. 

What seemed to bother Wall 
Street last week were comments 
Mr. Archer made about other 
tax cuts, which might widen the 
deficit, in areas such as oil drill- 
ing. Social Security, estate tax- 
es, the so-called marriage penal- 
ty. and a “family-based cut 
such as a 5500 tax credit for 
each child. 


CootiHoed bum Page II 

cable has an extremely low pen- 
etration rate in Japan, so cable 
and satellite will have roles in 
play in Japan well into the next 
century. 

In contrast, among Itochu’s 
primary multimedia competi- 
tors, Sumitomo Corp. has fo- 
cused more on cable television, 
while Mitsubishi Corp. has 
concentrated on satellites. 

“Itochu has created a very 
diversified and coherent strate- 
gy in multimedia,” Mr. Rapp 
said. “It puts them in a very 
strong position.” 

Itochu plans to nearly double 
its investment in multimedia 
through the end of the decade, 
with most of the money going 
to cable television in Japan. , 

The company, however, ex- 
pects its multimedia business to 
continue making losses 
through the end of the decade. 

By the aid of the year, Ito- 
chu is planning to invest an 


OECD: 

New Name Arises 

Cmtnned from Page tl 

Princess Masako, and Carlos 
Solchaga, a former finance 
minister from Spain. 

Mr. Lubbers, who is in tbe 
United States on a private visit, 
could not be reached for com- 
ment Sunday. On paper, tbe 
strong-willed Mr. Lubbers, a 
popular Christian Democrat 
with a talent for compromise, 
appears to be the kind of “po- 
litical heavyweight” that the 
United States, Britain and oth- 
er member governments say 
they want in order to bring new 
leadership to the OECD. 

The oiganization is accused 
by its critics of languishing in 
bureaucracy and failing to pro- 
vide timely economic analysis 
to Western policymakers. 

The last Dutch official to oc- 
cupy the OECD post was Emile 
van Lennep, who was secre- 
tary-general until 1984. 

Diplomats warned, however, 
that despite the fact that fresh 
names are now circulating, the 
selection process was likely to 
take several more weeks. The 
choice is linked in part to the 
politics of deciding on a head of 
the World Trade Organization, 
the successor to the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade. 

Robert Kroon contributed to this 
story 


Euromarls 
At a Glance 


Eurobond Yields 



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to 




initial 10 billion yen in a project 
that will create a dozen interac- 
tive cable TV operations that 
reach 2 nullion households and 
pass 10 percent of Japanese 
homes by the year 2000. But 
Itochu will be providing only 
one-q uarter of the initial invest- 
ment, with equal amounts com- 
ing from Tune Warner, U S 
West and Toshiba Corp. 

The foreign partners will 
play key roles in providing 
technology and programming. 
But, according to Mr. Maisu- 
moto, these mil be insufficient 
to guarantee the venture's prof- 
itability. Simple cable TV ser- 
vices will never return enough 
income to pay back the huge 
costs of laying cables in high- 
cost Japan. 

Tbe venture can only be via- 
ble if Itochu can use the net- 
work to provide telephone, 
data and other interactive ser- 
vices which, he estimates, will 
provide about 30 percent of 


revenues. But these services will 
be of only limited value unless 
they can be hooked up for a 
reasonable price to NTT's net- 
work, giving nationwide reach. 

“The goal of the interactive 
network is the local telephone 
business,” Mr. Matsumoto 
said. “We know that tbe mo- 
nopolists in the telephone busi- 
ness have a lot of juice, and we 
want to suck some of it out” 
~-The Ministry of Posts and 
Telecommu nica tions is in favor 
of forcing NTT to open its net- 
work to upstart carriers. Last 
February, in a move to spur 
competition, it raised the ratio 
of foreign investment allowed 
in domestic cable TV business- 
es to 30 percent from 20 per- 
cent. And last week, implicit 
pressure from the ministry 
Forced NTT to move toward 
easing access for corporate data 
communications for Japan's 
three domestic long-distance 
telephone carriers. 


^wp Fnmrr-Prm* 

Amsterdam 

Concern that the U.S. Feder- 
al Reserve Board will raise in- 
terest rates pushed st locks low- 
er, with the key EOE index 
finishing at 407.69 points on 
Friday, down from 410.76 
points the previous week. 

The concern about U.S. 
monetary policy outweighed a 
string of strong corporate re- 
sults. 

Frmd^urt 

The DAX 30-share index fin- 
ished the week at 2,078.35, up 
0.52 percent for the week, with 
the tone set by the bond mar- 
ket. 

Some support also came 
from the Republican victory in 
U.S. midterm congressional 
elections. A firmer dollar and a 
stronger German bond market 
also underpinned stocks. 

Hong Kong 

Stocks here slipped last week 
in cautious trading, with. the 
market plagued by fears of U.S. 
and local interest rate increases. 

The Hang Seng index, the 
key barometer of top shares, 
lost 162.55 points to dose Fri- 
day at a two-week low of 
9,367.85. down 1.71 percent on 
the week. 

Average daily turnover 
trimmed down to 2.520 billion 
Hong Kong dollars from tbe 
previous week's 3.516 billion 
dollars. 

Investors were reluctant to 
take large positions before 
Tuesday, when the Federal Re- 
serve's policy-setting commit- 
tee meets. 

London 

Shares slipped last week after 
the market came under pres- 
sure from fears ofa rise in inter- 
est rates in Britain and the 
United States. Support from 
the Republican victory in U.S. 
midterm elections had only a 
temporary effect. 

The main market indicator, 
the Financial Times-Stock Ex- 
change index of 100 leading 
shares, dosed at 3,075.90 on 
Friday, registering a weekly 
loss of 21.7 points, or 0.7 per- 
cent 

Shares were lifted on 
Wednesday by the UJS. swing 
to the right but fell back, domi- 
nated by fears of a rise in U.S. 
interest rates after the Federal 
Reserve’s policy-making Open 


Market Cdmmittee meeting on 
Tuesday. 

Milan 

Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni's rollercoaster P 0 ] 1 }}, 
fortunes pushed the Milan 
Stock Exchange lower early last 
week, but the Mibtei index 
dosed Friday 1.4 percent high- 
er than the wed; before at 
10,201 points. . _ 

Prices fell Monday and 1 ues- 
day as the market was dominat- 
ed by concerns over the for- 
tunes of the rightwing coalition 
government 

Paris 

Shares rose in a holiday- 
shortened week, helped by a 
firm U.S. dollar. The CAC-40 
index finished the week up 0.9 
percent The market was closed 
Friday for Armistice Day. 

Convinced that short-term 
European rates will not fall in 
the near future, dealers are an- 
ticipating a reduction in long- 
term rates. 

Singapore 

Trading was slow last week 
on fears that a possible rise in 
U.S. interest rates Tuesday 
would push up local rates. 

The key Straits Times index 
lost 29.91 points for the week to 
end at 2^22.59 points. The 
broader-based SES All-Singa- 
pore index slipped 1 1.95 points 
to 563.63 points. 


Tokyo 


Prices tumbled last week af- 
ter the Republican victory in 
U.S. elections raised worries 
about a further rise in the yen 
against the dollar. 

Business corporations and 
foreign investors sold heavily 
and the key market gauge fell 
2.7 percent to its lowest level in 
months. 

The Nikkei Stock Average of 
225 selected issues in the TSE’s 
first section shed 527.20 points 
to end the week at 19,284.36. 
The broader Tokyo Stock Price 
Index of all issues on the major 
section dropped 52.13 points to 
close at 1,517.67. 

Zurich 

Shares rose last week, con- 
tinuing the rally started in late 
October and the the Swiss Per- 
formance Index gained 26.42 
points to 1,708,60 for a gain of 
1.5 points. 


BOND S ZMedium- Term Notes Lead Financing Growth 


GnfinoedfromPagell 

with $31 billion, up 66 Decent 
from a year ago and broadly 
based, involving banks, finan- 
cial institutions and private cor- 

porations. 

Borrowers from Japan, who 
in recent years have accounted 
for more than half of total new 
issuance, are in third place with 
a volume so far of $30.6 billion. 

Reflecting substantial reduc- 
tions in government deficits, 
Norway reduced its interna- 
tional bond borrowing by 85 
percent and Denmark cut its 
recourse to the bond market by 
82 percent 

Including all forms of inter- 
national borrowing — bonds, 
notes, bank loans and sales cf 
equity, Americans have raised 
$88.5 trillion, making them the 
largest borrowers. The Japanese 
are in second place, raising 
$56.3 billion, arid the British 
follow with $553 billion. Total 


inteniafionar borrowing rose 
5.6 percent to $644.1 bflfion- 

Sales of equities, boosted by 
some $12 billion worth of priva- 
tization issues, totaled $353 bil- 
lion and are on track to top the 
record $40.7 billion of stock 
sold in all of last year. Ibis is a 
“remarkable” performance, the 
stndy said in fight of the poor 
performance cf most equity, 
markets this year. 

Americans were the largest 
issuers of equity, raising $3.6 
billion, followed by Denmark, 
France and Germany, which 
each raised just undo- $3 bfl- 
fion. 

Looking ahead, the study 
sees borrowers in Asia and Lat- 
in America playing an increas- 
ingly important role. 
^Large-scale privatization 
ns under way both in 
countries and in devel- 
oping countries are bound to 
continue bang an i mp o r t an t 
factor promoting international 


~ offerings' tif securities,” the re- 
port said. 

“With the present favorable 
growth prospects for the world 
economy, it is also likely that 
corporate borrowing on inter- 
national markets will intensi- 
ty,” it said. 

The report said it was an 
open question whether govern- 
ments would return as large- 
scale borrowers on the interna- 
tional market. 


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EMTERNAIIONAL HERAJLD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 14 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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_ 480 8 7ft 8 ‘X 

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2J5 11.1 13322 20V, 20ft— 1’A i RficiBcp 

- 225 5 4ft 4X RlBenA 

JAt 6J0 1229 ly/; 12ft 12ft— lft i FndlWS 

- 1323 25ft 33 23X— IV, I RndSec 

—60788 32ft 29ft 32 - SX : RnTrsI v 

3 114226ft 25% 26ft tX 
_ 373024ft 23 23ft —X 
_ 222 4 3ft 3 Vi _ 

J46 J 60313ft 12ft 1JX -ft 
_ 1643 5ft, 4X CX, -V U 

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117 17 17 —1ft 

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- 163 3ft 3X 3ft -X 
_ 3449 16X 15ft 18 Vi -ft 

- 133 4 3ft 3ft -X 

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_ 8560 22ft SOX 71 Yu **ii 1 FatCStl - 

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_ 32 12U 17>A I2'<i I Ffpwl 

_ 487 5 4*6 444 — Vu . FCtiBA 

- 2150 5 6'i 4ft -ft FslCTlF 


41 Oft 6ft Aft —VS FCojBn 


681 OX 9ft 10 ft -1". I FColB wt 1.75 5.8 
_ 2M 2ft 2ft 2 "ht -V„ iFCoMGD 

- 1272 7 6'i 6>Vu — X, ■ FCrnnC 

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~ UA 18ft 17ft IBft _ • FCrrriBcp ... 

- 548 9 Bft 8X —ft 1 FOncCos J2 3 A 

_ 444 4 3ft 3>V M ->V, 


__ ... 164 16ft 15 15 

.12 1.1 AT 12 l‘i ll’.i 

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_ 562 28’.* IB 28' o 

_ 18111 9 ft 10'-« — 1 

1356 2J 2440 51ft Sift 51", -”■« 
_ 1482 5 4'/. 4V, — X 

_ 4819 B Tft 7ft — U 
_ 213 8", 6ft Aft— 1 ; ! 

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„ 2915 tV, 7 7ft 
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223 32'V 3Pi 3P. ~2 
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_ 191 2 1 , 3 8 

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Me®tOB. 
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MBfiSCrS _ _ 8411 IV- 

MadcwtC _ 113 !k 

MeOCUB J6e A 1013 r 
lYedBens _ 82292 

Medrod „ 8251 

Mdtfcttf _ 2923 11 

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„ 922 10ft 10 10ft 

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„ 326 A’i S’. 5X —X i KcnkakB 
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_ 1285 12ft 12ft 12ft KWXOI 
_ ISE3 73X 17'/. I7X — U ; Kenttth p4 
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_ 034 13=. 12 12ft _ KntefcyH 
_ HU Hi Aft 6»t — l.'KertEnt 
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_ 2C9S 2": IX lft —ft ' Kealet 
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_ 2209 B", a’i 8". ; KevPrd 

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_ 1474 34=* 22ft 34 -IXl KeyTm 
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_ 443 6V, 5ft 6 

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- 2402 59. SV., 5X 

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_ 3345 17ft 15ft If* 

_ 1234 301V. 39V, 3DU 

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99 4ft 4ft AH 

298316ft 14ft 14ft 
3336 IOV: 9ft 1QW 

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625 7X Tft 7ft - U 

190 9Vu Bft 9'4 -ft 

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198 30", 29". 29X —'» 

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- 197 30 IBft IBS* —ft . _» 

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382 16V, 16’V 16X —ft ' FtOfllc s 
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633432 30"/. 32 -T. FsiPclin 

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_ 163 4V. JX 4W * ’*.■«' FreBkNJ 

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_ 227 9 8ft 8*4 — ■ ■ FSecCo 

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_ 1776 19 17ft IBft —ft ■ FtSICOi 

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_ 307 371. 37 3TX - ' . • FstrckBc 

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30’ 



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3.7 747 15*. 15 IS — 

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IJ 119 29 27>"h27"'w— *u 
■ 14 115327 1 . 3Mi lift : 
3J 2513’* i3", 13X 
.. 14 254 15ft 15 If! 

JSbZl 54 42", 41 41 .—2ft 

32 23 6213ft 12=, 13 —ft 

-. 979 12 1 * ll'-i IPS — 

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48 U 31 77 26*. IS". — ’ . 

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_ 5596 6'; 5-'/ 5-. —ft 

_ 1574 16", 15 'S — V- 

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639 16V, 15X 15ft 
1350 9X Bft 9ft _ 
1961 7ft 4ft AV, — X 
£1 18 17*.. 17X ‘ X 

47 15ft 15 l»« ‘ft 

384 20 18ft IBft— lft 
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47 3V: 2 2ft -ft 
4323 14X 14 14 — Vu 

144 37ft 26 V, 27 —ft 
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jrMEXIGO CITY — Terry 
Noras of . the United States has 
of his World Box- 

•tipi after fouling Luis Santana 
'pL.mc_Doinimcan Republic in 
contest that was as 
much theater as it was boxing. 
■; _/Ehe fight, and its sudden end 
2‘ monies and 2 seconds into 
3ae fifth round Saturday night. 

staked both a high and a Tow 
■ppint in a marathon string of 
live world title fights put on by 
-tfce flam boyant promoter Don 

'Fina 


^ f Norris lost his title on a dis- 
qualification after allegedly 
rabbit punching Santan a as the 
iSalknger was trapped against 
die ropes. 

y ’Santana slumped to the can- 
vas, where he lay on his hae-k for 
abont five minutes before being 
taken out of the ring on a 
stretcher. 

■ - But as Santana lay with his 
eyes open in the ring, the ring 
doctor, Horatio Ramirez, could 
be heard telling hun: “Come 
on, don’t act, get up.” 

- Referee Mitch HalDem of the 


anza 

had the bout even after four 
rounds. 

“I saw him lying there and I 
knew my tide was gone,” Norris 
said. 

In an action-packed night be- 
fore a crowd of about 10,000 at 
the Plaza Mexico, the capital’s 
famous bull ring, Hum ben o 
Gonzifcz of Mexico overcame a 
strong challenge from Michael 
Carbajal of the United States 
and retained his WBC and TBF 
light flyweight title on a split 
decision. 

Mexico’s Ricardo Lbpez held 
onto his WBC straw-weight ti- 
tle, easily disposing of compa- 
triot J a viera Vargas for the lat- 
est in a string of 38 unbroken 
victories. The fight was stopped 
when Vargas started to stagger 
m the eighth round. 

In one of two World Boxing 
Assoaation title fights, Genaro 
Hernandez of the United 
States, nursing an injured right 
hand, retained his junior light- 
weight title with a unanimous 
decision against challenger Jim- 
my Garcia of Colombia. 

Orlin Norris floored fellow 
AiwnMn »imes Heath with 2 
seconds gone in the 
d to keep his crui- 



Webber Appears Close 
To Playing for Bullets 


Hie Associated Pres* 


inc Attocurca m 

Terry Norris, right, and the punch that cost him his WBC superwelterweight title. 


By Leonard Shapiro 
and Richard Justice 

Washington Past Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Chris 
Webber, the No. 1 pick in the 
1993 National Basketball Asso- 
ciation draft and last year's 
rookie of the year, has said he 
wants to play for the Washing- 
ton Bullets this season if his 
contract problems with the 
Golden State Warriors canno t 
be resolved. 

“A lot of teams have made 
inquiries about roe,” Webber 
said Saturday in a telephone 
interview from his home here in 
the East Bay. “But the Bullets 
are the only one I'm interested 
in. The only one." 

Sources f amiliar with the dis- 
cussions said Webber and the 
Bullets have reached “an under- 
standing” on a contract that 
would be acceptable to both 
sides, and that the next move is 
up to Golden State. 

The Warriors must detide if 
they’re going to continue to try 
to make a deal that would make 
Webber happy. That seems in- 
creasingly unlikely because, ac- 
cording to sources, Webber met 
with the team’s new manage- 
ment last Sunday and told them 


he wouldn’t play for the team as 
long as Don Nelson was still the 
coach. 

Now the Warriors must de- 
cide if they’re going to trade the 
player they once planned to 
build their franchise around. 

It appears the Bullets are 
willing to part with Tom Gug- 
Hotta and a first-round draft 
choice. The Warriors want 
Gugliotta, but it’s unclear 
whether they want Juwan How- 
ard, the Bullets’ first-round 
pick, or a future draft choice as 
the second pan of the deal. 

Webber also said Saturday he 
was “very excited” about the 
prospect of playing with How- 
ard, his former teammate at the 
University of Michigan. 

“I’d love to play with Juwan 
again,” Webber said, “That 
would make going to Washing- 
ton even better." 

Howard, the fifth pick in last 
Jane’s draft, still is unsigned. 
But Webber's personal advisor, 
Fallasha Erwin of Detroit, said 
that “if there would be a trade, 
the basis of it has to be that 
Juwan has to be there in Wash- 
ington. The trade would not in- 
clude Juwan Howard. 

Webber, 21, invoked an es- 


cape eljmsa this summer to void 
the final 14 years of his $74.4 
million contract with the War- 
riors. He is now a restricted free 
a gen t, meaning that any other 
NBA team can offer him a con- 
tract, with the Warriors having 
the right to match it and retain 
his services. 

Webber said Saturday that 
“this is not about money. 1 just 
need to enjoy basketball again.” 

Webber had problems last 
year with Nelson. Nelson, also 
the Warriors’ general manager,, 
has offered to give up coaching 
if it meant Webber would re- 
sign with Golden State. 

Although Webber declined 
to talk about that Saturday, he 
said Nelson “knows I never 
wanted him to be fired. I’ve 
never said it was a situation 
where it's him or me. 1 just want 
to talk to him, just me and him, 
but I haven’t felt like that’s go- 
ing to happen.” 

At the same time, Webber 
also said, “My first love is still 
Golden State. Before any of 
these inquiries about me, I real- 
ly thought I’d be here for a long 
time. It’s not like I called Wash- 
ington myself. I’m not the one 
who’s in the driver’s seat here." 


Baseball Owners Preparing 
New Proposal for Players 

Washington Pat Service 

RYE BROOK, New York — As major league 
baseball's labor negotiations recessed with a 
glimmer of hope, management sources said tpam 
owners had begun working out the details of a 
taxation system that win be the foundation of a 
new proposal to be made to the union when t«nr« 
are resumed Thursday in Washington. 

Representatives of the owners and players 
spent only about IS minutes together behind 
closed doors Saturday, the third consecutive day 
of meetings under the direction of special media- 
tor W J. Usery. But the principals departed ex- 
pressing renewed hope that a settlement to end 
the three-month-old strike is at least possible. 

“This has been going on for a long tune,” 
Usery said. 

He said “I’ve done my almost to encourage the 
owners to take the players’ concerns into consid- 
eration" when formulating the new proposaL 


SIPEUNES 

Pakistan to Host *97 Muslim Games 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (APi — Pakistan said Saturday it will 
host Olympio-style games for Muslim women in 1997’ in the 
eastern Punjab capital of Lahore. 

The first Muslim women -only games were held in Tehran in 
1993. Fazeh Hasten, the daughter of Iran's President Hashemi 
Rafsanjani, said in Islam abad that “Islam approves of women 
taking part in physical exercise ... healthy women produce 
healthy children.” 

For the Record 

Croatia Zagreb has been banned from European soccer for a 
season and its coach, Miroslav Blaze vie. for 18 months for 
unsportsmanlike conduct at the Cup Winners' Cup match at 
Auxerre on Sept 29. {Reuters) 


Mavericks Mashbum and Jackson Rope Bulls 


two stages outside Italy, the 236-Kiloraeter 
Senales to Lenzerheide in Switzerland and th 
stage from Mondovi to Brian^on in France. 


{Reuters) 


The Associated Press 

With Jamal Masbburn and Jim 
Jackson playing at a gallop, the rest 
of the Dallas Mavericks hung on for 
a joy ride. 

Mashbum set a team record with 
SO points and Jackson added a ca- 
reer-high 38 as the Mavericks beat 
the Bulk I24-120,in overtime Satur- 
day night in Chicago, snapping a 12- 
game losing streak against the Bulls. 

“Usually r ve had two good scor- 
ers on teams that I coached, but not 
that took on the scoring load like 
these guys did tonight.” said Dal- 
las's coach, Dick Motta. “I guess we 
kind of went with them. Sometimes 
you've just got to ride those horses.” 

Jackson sparked Dallas with sev- 
en points in OT, and he had 16 in 


the fourth quarter. Mashbum had 
17 in the first quarter. 

Mashbum ’s previous National 
Basketball Association high was 37 

NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

points, which he scored twice last 
season when he was a rookie. 

The DaDas team record of 49 was 
set by Mark Aguirre against Phila- 
delphia on Jan. 28, 1985. 

Magic 116, 76ers 103: Shaquille 
O’Neal had 28 points. 12 rebounds 
and a season-high six assists and 
Orlando dominated the boards in 
Philadelphia. 

O’Neal punctuated his night with 
eight fourth-quarter points, all on 
slam dunks, as the Magic pulled 


away with a 15-6 spurt for a 109-91 
lead with 4:13 left in the game. 

Philadelphia’s Jeff Malone lol all 
scorers with 30 points, while the 
76ers got another good game from 
Shawn Bradley, who had 12 points 
and nine rebounds. 

Rockets 100, Nets 84: Hakeem 
Olajuwon had 31 points, 10 re- 
bounds and five bloats as unbeaten 
Houston defeated the Nets in East 
Rutherford, New Jersey. 

The Rockets, who opened last 
season with 15 straight victories, 
haven’t lost a game in November 
since Nov. 28. 1992. when they 
dropped a 108-99 decision to the 
Utah Jazz. 

Bullets 109, Heat 99: Rex Chap- 
man scored 30 points and set a team 
record with eight 3-pointers as 


Washington ruined Miami's home 
opener. 

Chapman made 8 of 14 from 3- 
point range to break the old mark of 
six set by Michael A dams against 
San Antonio on Dec. 18, 1991. 

Spurs 101, Knicks 82: David 
Robinson scored 35 points and 
grabbed 13 rebounds in San Anto- 
nio as die Spurs banded New York 
its first loss of the season. 

J. R. Reid had 15 points. Elliott 
added 14 and Willie Anderson 
chipped in with 13 for San Antonio, 
which announced before the gam e 
that forward Dennis Rodman was 
taking a paid leave of absence. 

Sims 108, Clippers 101: Dan Ma- 
jerle scored 1 3 of his 33 points in the 
third quarter, leading Phoenix past 
the winless Clippers in Los Angeles. 




Solps 

Div Yut ion Koti Lon* ase Owe • Mocks 


tots 

Y.a IX* Kan Law Ose Owe fcacts 


I3CSH.BR Law CIS*- Cwu 










































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


O N D A Y 


SPORTS 


Crash With Hill Hands Schumacher Title 


i 


The Associated Press 

ADELAIDE, Australia — Michael 
Schumacher became the first German to 
win the Formula One world drivers’ 
championship on Sunday, when a colli- 
sion with his rival, Damon Hill of Brit- 
ain, knocked both out of the season- 
ending Australian Grand Prix. 

Nigel Mansell won the race in a Wil- 
liams-RenauIt, as his team took the con- 
structors’ championship for the third 
straight year. 

Schumacher, 25, .went out of the race 
while leading on lap 36. Hill had clipped 
the side of Schumacher's Benetion-Ford 
while trying to overtake it on the inside 
at turn six on the Adelaide street circuit. 

Hill's Williams-Renault suffered 
structural damag e in the accident and he 
pulled into the pits at the end of the lap. 
He retired when his pit crew was unable 
to repair a bent suspension arm. Hill 
had needed to finish in front of Schu- 
macher to overtake him for the title. 

Schumacher won the drivers' champi- 
onship with 92 points, while Hill finished 
with 91 and Barger was third with 41. 

Schumacher became the youngest 
world champion since Emerson Fitti- 
paldi in 1972. 

“It’s a dream,” he said. “I can’t really 
bring out my emotions, can’t express 
them. I was under a lot of pressure and 1 


just tried to take everything as it came.” 

“It took a while for me to believe I’d 
won,” he added, “but then I got back to 
the pits and everyone was crying." 

Mansell took the lead on lap 64 when 
the Ferrari driver Gerhard Berger made 
an error and be was able to swoop past. 
The 41-year-old veteran from Britain 
clocked one hour, 47 minutes, 51.480 
seconds for the 81 laps of the 3.78- 
kilometer (2348-mile) track, a total of 
J06.018 kilometers. 

He averaged 170.323 kilometers per 
hour. Mansell punched the air with de- 
light after his victory and threw his driv- 
ing gloves into the crowd. 

Berger, a two-time winner of the race, 
was second, 2.511 seconds behind, with 
Martin Brundle of Britain third in a 
McLaren Peugeot Rubens Barichello of 
Brazil was fourth in a Jordan-Hart. Only 
four drivers were on the same lap as 
Mansell at the end. 

Schumacher won eight races this sea- 
son and had two second-place finishes, 
while Hill recorded six victories, five 
second places and one sixth. 

The new champion bad been critical 
of Hill's skills during the season, but 
said he regretted being so outspoken. 

“I underestimated him,” Schumacher 
said. M He’s done exceptionally well in the 
last two races and 1 apologize to him ” 


Mansell, a former Formula One and 
IndyCar Series champion, scored the 
3 1st victory of his Formula One career 
after gaming his 32d pole start. 

He had twice before started from the 
front of the grid in Adelaide, but had 
never won the race. It was only his 
fourth start of the season in a Grand 
Prix after spending most of 1994 racing 
IndyCars for the Newmao-Haas team. 

“I had a very difficult year in America 
and this is a very emotional win for me,” 
he said. “It had been the sort of year 
where I asked myself a lot of questions, 
so the emotion of being on the podium 
was fantastic.” 

The dramatic denouement to the driv- 
ers' championship happened after Schu- 
macher bad led from the start, holding 
off several charges from Hill. 

The German ran wide to the right with 
apparent steering problems at turn five 
but scrambled back onto the circuit. HiTI 
then tried to move through on the inside 
at turn six. flipping Schumacher's car into 
the air and into a wall on the left. 

“Tbe steering didn't react at all,” 
Schumacher later said. 

The German jumped out of his car 
looking dejected, but was dancing de- 
lightedly with his pit crew only minutes 
later — after it was confirmed that Hill 


was out of both the race and the world 
championship picture. 

Hill had been bidding to emulate his 
father, Graham, who won the world 
drivers' championship in 1962 and 196S 
but died in an aircraft crash in 1975. 

“I gave him a good run for his money 
— he was feeling the pressure," said a 
disappointed HiiL “I saw the opening, 
thought Tve got to go here,' but it didn’t 
happen. That's motor racing. I have a 
really empty feeling.” 

Hill look over as No. 1 driver for the 
Williams-Renault team after the three- 
time world champion Ayrton Senna was 
killed in a crash ai the San Marino 
Grand Prix in May. 

He paid tribute to his back-up crew. 

“I want to say that everyone in the 
Rothmans Williams-Renault team de- 
serves a medal this year,” he said. “They 
have been through a heck of a tough 
time and here at tbe last race we were 


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The exit of both Schuznachei 


The exit of both Schumacher and his 
teammate Johnny Herbert from tbe race 
left Williams-Renault assured of the 
constructors' championship for the third 
straight year — and Mansell's victory 
increased the margin to 15 points. 

Williams-Renault finished with 118 
points, Benetton-Ford had 103 and Fer- 
rari was third at 71. 


Michael Schumacher, above 
left, die new Formula One 
world champion, was all 
smiles Sunday with Nigel 
Mansell after Mansell's 
Australian Grand Prix vic- 
tory in Adelaide. But Da- 
mon HUL right, was deject- 
ed following the crash that 
forced him and Schumacher 
out of the race, allowing die 
German to capture the 
world tide by (me point 



SrcttollmdrTbc AuksmoJ Press 




IARD 


CFL Playoffs 


DIVISION SEMIFINALS 
Eastern Division 
Baltimore M. Toronto IS 

western D hr Mon 

British Columbia 24. Edmonton 23 


Top 25 College Results 


Mow the lee 25 teams In the Associated 
Press* collate football P0H fared (Ms week: I. 
Nebraska (11-01 beat Iowa State 2B-12. Next: 
al Oklahoma, Nov. 25; Z Pena State (HI) beat 
Illinois 3S-31- Next: vs. No r thwestern. Satur- 
day; X Auburn (94-1) tied Georgia 23-21 
Next: at No. 6 Alabama. Saturday; 4. Florida 
(5-1 ) beat South Carolina 4X17 Next: or Van- 
derbilt. Saturday; X Miami (B-l) beat Pitts- 
burgh 17-12. Next: at Temple. Saturday. 

X Alabama (10-0) boat No. 20 Mfsshslaal 
State 29-25. Next: vs. Na.3Au burn, Saturday; 7, 
Colorado (9-1) beat Kasas 51-21 Next; vs. 
Iowa State. Saturday: 1 Florida State (8-11 
beat Notre Dame 23-16. Next: at North Caroli- 
na Slate, Saturday; y, Texas AAM 19-0-1 ) boat 
Louisville 26-11 Next : vs. Texas Christian. Sat- 
urday; ML Colorado State (9-1) beat Arkansas 
State *8-1 Next: at Fresno State. Saturday. 

!L Kansas State (7-2) beat Missouri 21-14. 
Next: vs. Oklahoma Slate. Saturday; 12. Utah 
(8-2) lost to Air Fora 40-31 Next: vs. No. 23 
Brigham young. Saturday; IX Arizona (7-3) 
lost to No. 17 Southern Col 45-28. Nexl: vs. 
Arizona Slate. Nov. 25; M, Syracuse (4-3> lost 
to No. 23 Boston CoHese 31 -a Next: vs. Mary- 
land, Saturday; 15. Oregon (8-3) beat SI an ford 
35-21. Next: at Oregon State, Saturday. 

IX Virginia Tech (S-2) beat Rutgers 41-34. 
Next: vs. No. 21 Virginia. Saturday; 17. South- 
ern Cal (7-2) beat No. 13 Arizona 45-28. Next: 
at UCLA, Saturday; 18. Duke (8-21 lost to 
North Carolina Slate 24-23. Next: vs. North 
Carolina Saturday; 19. Michigan 17-3) beat 
Minnesota 38-22. Next: at Ohio State. Satur- 
day; 20, Mississippi Slate 17-3) lost to No. » 
Alabama 29-25. Next: at Mississippi, Nov. 21 

21 vi rotate (7-2) beat Maryland 40-21. Next: 
al Nol 16 Virginia Tech. Saturday; 22, Wash- 
ington (7-3) beat California 31-19. Next; at No. 
24 Washington State, Saturday; 23. Brigham 
Young (9-2) beat San Diego Slate 35-28. Thurs- 
day. Next: at No. 12 Utah. Saturday, Nov. te; 
24, Washington State (Ml lost to Oregon Stole 
21 -X Next: vs. No. 22 Washington. Saturday; 
23. Boston Col lege (5-2-1) beat No. 14 Syracuse 
H4L Next: at West Virginia Saturday. 

Other Major College Scores 


Monmouth. NJ. M, Cent. Connecticut St. 13 
New Hampshire 21. Vlllonavo it 
Northeastern 22. Maine )e 
Penn 33. Harvard 0 
Prlncelon 19, Yale 6 
Robert Morris 37, Mercvhurs) 27 
St. John's. NY 21. Iona 7 
Towson SI. 48. S. Connecticut 0 
Wegner 35. SL Fronds. Pa 13 
Wed Virginia 55, Temple 17 
Youngstown SL 28. Massachusetts 9 
SOUTH 

Alabama Sf. 33. Miss. Vaster 51. U 
Alcorn SI. 47. Tray St. 44 
Appalachian St. 12. W. Carolina 7 
Citadel 54. VMI 14 
Clem son 20. Georgia Tech ID 
Davidson 37. BrkaBewater.Va 0 
E. Tennessee SL 30, T re-Ch a ttanooga 13 
East Carolina 23. Cent. Florida 20 
Florida A&M 13. Gramblina SI. 0 
Georgia Southern to, denvllle St. 13 
Illinois St. 27. Middle Term. Z7 
Jackson St. 52. Prairie View 7 
James Madison 48. Connecticut 20 
Liberty 40, New Haven 22 
Marshall 35, Furman 14 
McNeese SI. 28, NW Louisiana 7 
Mississippi 38. Tufane D 
Morgan St. 17. Howard U. 14 
NE Louisiana 21, Kentucky 14 
North Carolina 50. Wake Forest 0 
North Texas 31. Nlcholls St. 17 
Samtard 43, Austin Peay 3# 

San Jose Si. 27, Louisiana Tech A 
Southern Miss. 20. LSU 17 
Tcnre-Monin 21, Moreneod St. 7 
Tennessee 24, Memphis 13 
Tennessee SI. 24. Murray St. 21 
Valparaiso 30. Ky. Wesleyan 23 
Wofford 54, Charleston Southern 33 
MIDWEST 
Ball St. 38. Akron 28 
Cent Michigan 36. Bowling Green 33 
Drake 19. st. Ambrose 0 
E. Illinois 28. w.. Kentucky 20 
E. Michigan 24. Ohio U. 13 
Evansville 42. Aurora 21 
Iowa 49, Northwestern 13 
Miami. Ohio 24. Kent 14 
Michigan St. 42, Purdue 30 
N. Iowa 39, 5. Illinois 7 
Ohio St. 32, Indiana 17 
Toledo 37, w. Michigan 34 
W. Illinois 49, Buffalo 7 
Wisconsin 38. Cincinnati 7 


Nevada 56. Utah St. 28 
Pod tic 21, New Mexico 5t. 14 
Portland St. 48. S. Utah 16 
UCLA 59, Arizona SI. 23 
Wyoming 3 & New Mexico 28 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


EAST 

Boston U. 21, Army 12 
Brawn 27, Dartmouth 14 
Colgate 31. Buckneii 7 
Columbia 38, Cornell 33 
Delaware St. 28, Rhode Island 26 
Duaueenc VC GoMshis 0 
Georgetown. DC. 41. St. Peter's 7 
Hotstra 41, Dela war e 41 
Lafayette 34. F u rtf wm 6 
Lehigh 29. Holy Crass 13 
Mortal 45. Siena 19 


SOUTHWEST 
Arkansas 30b N. Illinois 27 
Baylor 19. Rice M 
Fresno SI. 30. Texas- El Faso 30 
Oklahoma 33b Oklahoma SI. 14 
Southern U. 21, Texas Southern 10 
Stephen F Austin 74, SW Texas St. 19 
Texas 48. Houston 13 
Texas Christian 35, Southern Metre 14 
Texas Tech 39, SW Louisiana 7 
Tuba & SW Missouri St. 28 
FAR WEST 

Boise SI. 1C E. Washington 13 
Cal Polv-5LO 27. Sacramento St. 23 
Dayton 42, San Diego 24 
Hawaii 34. SE Missouri 0 
Idaho 79. Weber St. 30 
Idaho St. 28, Montana 23 
N. Arizona 4a C5 Nartftrkfge 7 


EUROPEAN COMMUNITY 
CHAMPIONSHIPS 
In Antwerp. Belgium 
Singfex quarterfinals 

Olivier Defaltre. France, dot. Janas Blork- 
man, Sweden, 6-3. AO; Magnus Larsson (7), 
Swederedef. Sebastian Lareau, Canada. 7-6 17- 
31, 6-7 (5-7). 7-4 17-51; Pete Sampras ULUS, 
del. Bvron Block. Zimbabwe, Al, 6-3; Jared 
Palmer, UJL def. Patrick Rafter (A). Austra- 
lia. 6-4, 6-4 

Semifinals 

Larson def. Delollre. 6-4. 6-3; Sampras def. 
Palmer, 7-S. Al 

Final 

Sampras def. Lorssore 7-6 (7-5) 6-4 
KREMLIN CUP 

In Moscow 
Singles, quarterfinals 

Marc R asset 16). Switzerland, def. Yevgeny 
Kafelnikov (31. Russia, A7 ri2-i41, A4, A3; 
Chuck Adams. United Slates, def. Cnrl-Uwr 
Sleeb. Germany, 3-6, 7-5. A3; Jacco Eilingh. 
Netherlands, def. Petr Korda (7). Czech Ra 
nubile. 7-0 19-7). A4: Alexandre Volkov. Rus- 
sia. def. Daniel Vacck. Czech Republic. re- 
tired III. 

Semifinals 

Alexander Volkov. Russia, del. Jacco El- 
llngh, Netherlands. A7 (6-8). 7-6 (8-6). A3; 
Chuck Adams. Pacific Palisades. CollL def. 
Marc R asset (61. Switzerland. 4-6. 4-3. 4-4 
Pinal 

Volkov def. Adams. A2 A4 

VIRGINIA SLIMS OF PHILADELPHIA 
Singles, quarterfinals 

Natalia Zvereva (S), Belarus, def. Brenda 
Schultz. Netherlands. Al, 7-6 (7-4); Ankc 
Huber (6). Germany, def. Kimberly Ra.U-5.fr 
X A2; Mary Pierce (2), France, def. Meilen 
Tg, Ui. 6-XA4 ; Gabrielo Sabatlnl (4), Argen- 
tina del. Chanda Rubin. U.S. fri ao. 

Semifinals 

Mary Pierce (2). France.def. Natalia Zver- 
eva (5). Belarus, e-X A3; Anke Huber (61. 
Germanv.def.GabrletaSabatlnl (4), Argenti- 
na. A7 (11-131, Al, o-4. 

TOPPER OPEN 
la Buenos Aires 
singles, q u arter fi nals 

Fnmdsco Clavel (B), Spain, def. Alberta 
Berasategul (II.5paln.A7 (7-5). Al. A2; Alex 
Carretia (3), Spain, def. Lulz Matter. BraztLA 
I. A3; Karel Novatek 15), Czech Republic. del. 
Slava Dasedel (4). Czech Republic, a). o-J: 
Javier Fra no, Argentine. def. Juan Vltoca, 
Spain, A4 A4 

Singles. Semifinals 

Frana del. Navocek. 7-5L A2; Carr el la del. 
Clavef. 7-6 (73), 1-6. 63. 



W L 

Pd 

GB 

Wcnhlngton 

4 1 

jun 

— 

New York 

3 1 

.750 

W 

Ortondo 

3 2 

4N 

1 

Boston 

1 3 

250 

2«! 

New Jersey 

1 5 

.167 

3v* 

Philadelphia 

1 5 

.167 

3Vj 

Miami 

0 4 

Central Division 

jno 

3Vt 

Detroll 

3 2 

600 

— 

Indiana 

3 2 

600 

— 

CMcago 

3 3 

-500 

V- 

Cleveland 

2 2 

J00 

’3 

Milwaukee 

2 2 

500 

W 

Charlotte 

2 3 

AOO 

1 

Atlanta 

1 5 

.167 

2Vj 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

Pd 

GB 

Houston 

6 a 

WOO 

— 

Denver 

« i 

BOD 

1'*j 

Dallas 

3 1 

.750 

2 

Son Antonio 

3 1 

.750 

; 

Utah 

2 4 

J33 

4 

Minnesota 

8 6 

Pacific Division 

B00 

6 

Golden State 

5 0 

uno 

— 

Portland 

3 a 

USX) 

1 

Sacramento 

3 1 

.750 

v~. 

Seattle 

2 1 

467 

2 

Phoenl* 

3 7 

600 

2 

L-A. Lakers 

2 4 

J33 

3'z 

LA. Clippers 

0 4 

.000 

4't 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 


Houston 

33 » 

26 

23—103 


Minnesota 44 (Laetfner 9). Assists— Chicago 
21. (Pipped. Kufcocil. Minnesota 37 (Elsley 7). 
Golden State 30 31 31 30—112 

Utah 21 29 26 28—104 

G : Sprewen 10-20 7-9 30, Hordawov 10-15 4-4 
30, Pierce 4-6 IT-1221; U: Med ore 9-21 7-9 2S. 
Stockton 5-12 2-4 12. Rebounds— Golden Stele 
45 (SeikaW 9). Utah 53 (Malone n J. Assists— 
Golden State 22 (JmnJrm 6), Utah 29 (Stock- 
ion 10). 

Phoenix 34 33 30 26-123 

Seattle 29 37 37 26—129 

P: Manning 1 1-20 3-4 Z7.Malerie 7-19 6-8 23; 
S: Kemp 7-13 12-12 26. Schrempf A15 W0 72. 
Perkins 6-8 7-8 22, Payton 9-22 0-4 23. Re- 
bounds— Phoenix 45 (Manning 10). Seattle 57 
(E-Johnson 9). Assists— Pneenlx 21 (Malerie 
41. Seattle 29 (Pavtore McMHJcn 6). 

Denver 25 34 31 is 19—124 

l_A_ Lakers 19 28 25 33 12—117 

D: Pack 5-14 10-12 22; StHh A15 11-12 23; 
L_A_: Jones 9-24 1-2 20. Van Exel 8-15 2-4 21. 
Rebounds Denver is (MutgmBQ 26). Las An- 
getesSO I Jones 9). Assists— Denver 25 (Peek 
12). Los Angeles 30 (Van Exellll.O; RovolA 
11 5-5 IS. 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
orfanda 29 35 30 22—116 

PtdlodelBMa 24 36 2S 18—103 


ic-i: fi.-— 5 -.-— s' ■■■» 


RUGBY UNION INTERNATIONAL 
Engkmd 54. Romania 3 


Boston 18 21 18 25— 82 

H: Olaluwon 9-19 A92A Max woOAl? 0321; 
B: Radio 15-31 1-2 31; McDaniel S-B 0-0 10. 
Rebounds- Houston 66 (Otaiuwcn 14). Boston 
48 (Radio II), Assists— Houston 22 (Harry 6), 
Boston 26 (Fax 6). 

Dafias 27 28 23 31—107 

Philadelphia 20 27 22 31—100 

D: Mnshiwm 7-te 8-10 22. Jackson 7-18 7-8 22; 
P: weaiherspaon 11-23 7-8 29. Bradley B-14 Vi 
17. Rebaands— Dal las 53 (Jones IS). Phllntel- 
pbla 47, (Brad lev 12). Assists— Dal las 26 (Kidd. 
Moshbum 5). PhUodelonio 14 (Barms 8). 
New Jersey HltH 20— 91 

Washington 32 27 19 26—104 

NJ.: Coteman 4-13 5-61 4, Beniamin 7-13 1-2 IS: 
W: Cheaner 10-14 0-0 » MacLean 5-12 8-9 18. 
Rebounds— New Jersey 58 (Beniamin 13), 
Wa sh ington 6a (GvgUofto 13). Assists— New 
Jersey 14 (Anderson5l Wa sh ington TOlSklies 7). 
Charlotte 30 31 33 29-123 

MRwmitae 71 72 » 22—115 

C: Mourning 9-17 A7 24, Curry 10-16 5-5 30; 
M: Day 7-14 aw 21, Con Ion All 7-8 20. Re- 
bounds— Char lolle 54 (Johnson 161. Mltaw- 
kee 52 (Baker 13). Assists— Charlotte 28 ( Bo- 
guos ll)AAilwauke« 24 (Baker 8). 

CNCogo M 29 27 30-112 

Minnesota 26 17 34 33-N8 

C: Plopen 7-10 7-10 Z1 Perdue A10 a 9 U 
Armstrong 6-9 1-2 1* Kukoc All 44 14; M: 
King A7 A8 17, RWer A12 7-7 15. Rebounds— 
Chtcogo 56 (Kryslkowtak. Pippen, Perdue 81, 


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Telephone.: ++69 - 29 81 0 
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O: O'Neal HHT HI 28. Anderson HOW 21; 
P: Wright 8-13X4 19, Malone 12-21 5-6 30. Ra 
bound*— Or:onda57 (O’Neal 12). PWtadeteWa 
S IW right. Bradley 91. Assists— Orlando 25 
(O'Neal 6). Phi loeeiDhta 31 1 Barra*, Tyler 10) . 
Detroit 33 23 19 28—100 

Ctmriotte 31 22 26 3S-113 

D-. Mills 6-138-9 21 .Hill 7-16 11-12 25. Dumors 
7-15 A5 23; C: Mourning 11-ISM 28. Bogues A 
17 A4 22. Rebaands— DetroH 44 LMlUs. NUller. 
Dawkins 6). Otar la tie 46 (Mourning BL As- 
ststs— Detroit 15 (Hunter 4), Charlotte 33 IBo- 
sues 13). 

iDOane 30 D 22 iB-n 

Cteveland 16 23 SI 26-81 

1 : Me Key 4-8 46 11 Smlts All W IX MJiier 7- 
147-723; C: Price A15 AO IX Brandon A14 46 
IX Rebatnid*— <n«ana 47 (D. Davis 81, Clev a 
tana S3 (Hilt 16<. Assists— Indiana 30 1 Jackson 
13). Cleveland 17 (“randan 5). 

Houston 32 22 25 21— MO 

New Jersey 24 24 14 32— 84 

H: Claluwan 1 4-23 3-3 31. Maxwell 8-120-1 19; 
NJ.: Aaeerson 9-19 6-8 26, EOwards All 0-0 14. 
Rebounds— Houston 50 ITharae 13), New Jer- 
sey 52 iCciemcre 14). Assists — Houston 24 
iHzrrv £). new Jersey 17 (Anderson 8). 
Washington 31 28 28 30—109 

Mfarsi 29 23 19 28— 99 

W: GucKrttc 7-16 AS 20 Chapman M-22M 
33: M: Rice 7-17 3-3 21. Eackles A9 4-4 2X 
Rebounds— wcsfllngton57 (MacLean 121.M1- 
emi 53 (wura 12). Assists—' Washington 18 
(Stales 8). Mtem) M (Cates 7). 

Boston 29 26 30 29—114 

Minnesota HUH 29—101 

B: Edwards 7-144-4 18. McDaniel 7-1633 3i; 
M: MarsnoK 3-14 1-Z IB. Rooks 7-9 66 20. Re- 
boonds— Bestcn SC (Strong 111. VJ.onesotc 47 
(Lceftner 9). Assists — Bcston 25 (Brawn 8), 
Minnesota 2i (Smith 7). 

Donas 3) 21 31 26 15-124 

Chicago 34 20 27 28 11—120 

O : CAashbunt 19-31 0-I35C. Jackson 14-26 IA 
HStL'C: Pippen 1A192-72S- PertueA139-14», 
Kukoc7-Ie «-8)9. Redounds— Dallas 57 (Jones 
121. Chicago 55 (Perdue 12). Assists— Dallas . 
25 (Kidd 91. Chicago 20 (Pfapen SI. 

New Tart 31 23 21 18- 82 

Son Antonie 27 30 IB 26—181 

N.Y.: Ewing 1A21 3-1 22; Storks A17 3-2 16; 5: 
Reid A9 5-8 15. Robinson 13-21 <M2 35. Ra 
bounds — New York 54 lOaklev 101. San AntorJo 
53 ( Robinson 131. Assists— New Ywk2l (Antho- 
ny Si, Sen Amen® 19 tJoimscn. Anderson 6). 
Utah 30 27 28 25-110 

Denver 31 28 19 41—119 

u: Mclcne r-14 ;~5 17. Homocek 12-16 11-12 
25; D : Pack 9-15 10-11 24, Atdul-Raut 9-171-1 
te. Rebounds — Utah 40 (Saecner 10). Denver 
51 (Levingsion IK. Assists— L'tah 24 isiock- 
lon 10). Denver 25 (Pack !3). 

Phoenix 20 23 37 23— 1M 

LA. Clippers 13 28 29 31—181 

P: Msnntng AtJ 5-8 15 Malerie 10-189-1033. 
Puffin Ai01>s IS: LA.: Richardson r-u'.-3t6. 
Dehere o-l” 3-7 19. Rebounds— Phcen* 64 
(Green 13). Los Angeles 54 (Vavgni 81. As- 
sists— Phoenix 17 (Perry 6). Los Angeles 22 
(Pichcrdson 91. 

LA. Lakers 22 25 21 31— 99 

Golden Slate 32 32 26 31-131 

LA.: cebaHosAI54-4 2C,5mitnAi7i-4i8.- 
G: Sore well 9-18 A7 24. Pierce 3-16 AS 23. 
Rebounds— Las Angeles 67 (Divot TO) . Golden 
Stele 64 (Selkalv, Galling 131. Assists— Los 


Angelas 25 (Van Exel (01, Golden Slate 32 
IJennlngs 13). 

Atlanta 34 22 16 25— 91 

Sacramento SS 29 33 28— let 

A: Slav lock 8-17 341 20. Norman 9-16 1-2 21; 
S : Richmond 1 Ate 9-9 32. M. Smith AM 26 IE 
R ebo u nds A tl anta 48 (Long 9), Sa cram ento 
51 (Foivnlca 91. Assists— Atlanta m (Lang 41. 
Sac ram ento 25 (Webb 11). 


Australian Grand Prix 


Top Hnlsheni Sunday on tbe 2JNAmBe Ade- 
laide street dree it with rasidem type of car, 
race time, taps completed and wtancrii aver- 
age (Peed In mgb; 1, Nigel MaaseU. England. 
Will lems-Rvnaul I, one hour 47 mlnutere 51 480 
seconds. 82, 10SB36 mnh; X Gwtmrd Berger, 
Austria Ferrari, 83; X Martin Brundle, Eng- 
land. McLaren- Peugeot, 82; V Rubens Barri- 
CheSO, Brazil. Jardon-Hart 80; X Otivler 
Pools. France. Ugler- Renault. 6D; X Jean 
AJesL Prance, Ferrari, 80L 

7, Heinz -MoraW Frentzen, Germany. 
Sauber-Mercedes, 80; X Christian FHtiPakB. 
Brazil. Fo ot w or k-Ford. 80; 9. Pferiotei MarIK 
dL l loir. Mtoanfl-Ford. 79; XL jj. Lehttv Fin- 
land. Sauber-Mercedes, 79; 11, Fraadc La- 
gorce. France; Lteter-RenauH. 79; IX Mika 
Hakktaen, Finland. McLaren-Peugeot 76. 

Final Driver Standings: 1, MlctxwJ Schu- 
macher. Germany. 92; X Oaman HiH, Britaire 
91 ; X Gertiard Beraer. Austria 41 ; A Mika Hak- 
klnen, Fltaona 21; £ Jem AlesL France, 24. 

& Rubens Borrichella Brazil 19; 7, Marlin 
Brundle, Britain, 16; 5. David Caurthard, Brlf- 
d re 14: 9. Nigel Monsell. Britaire 12; 14. Jos 
Verstappen Netherlands. M. 

Phial Team Standings: 1, Williams- Re- 
nault. 118; X Benetton-Ford. 103; X Ferrari, 
71; 4. McLaren- Peugeot, 42; 5. Jordan-Hurt, 
28; X Ltaler-Renault. 13; ftie) Tyrrell: Y a 
mono, 13; X Sauber-Mercedes, 12; ,9, Faof- 
vrarfe-Ford, 9; HJ, Mlharifi-Poni' 5; 117' Lari 1 ' 
rousse-Fard, Z 


Kirs (45th. awn goal?. Timenan Guseinov 
PWll 

Romania X StevgUa 1 
Scorers: Romania — Ghaorghc Pope so/ 
(7th). GheargM Hast (46tiil, Daniel Pradan 
<40th); Stovafcto - Peter Dufiavskv (56ffl). 
Mlrastov awDa (78tti1. 

AFRICAN NATIONS CUP QUALIFIER 
Zimbabwe X Zaire l 

BUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Utrecht 0, Twente Enschede 4 
Sparta Rotter dam Z NEC Nllmegen 0 
Dordrecht V0 1. Heerenvcen 1 
Steadings: Alax Amsterdam 19 potatx 
Rada JC Korturadt 19. Feyenoent Rofierttam 
17, Twente Enschede 16, PSV Eindhoven 16, 
MW Moastrldd IX VHesso Arnhem 1 1. 5oar- 
ta Rutter dam n. nac Breda IX utreent to, 
Willem II Tilburg 10, l l eerenvee n U, Voten- 
dom 9. NEC Nllmegen X Groningen X Go 
Ahead Eagles Deventer 7. Dordrecht *90 6. 
RKC WoaJwilk s. 


F 5 l' ■ 4 7; “ ; ’> . 

^ rr .-Jn r.\* ' -i- 1 • 




GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Hamburger SV X I860 Munich 0 
Dynamo Dresden I, Bayer uerdtagen 2 
Bayern Munich Z Schaike 0 
MSV Duisburg 1. FC Cologne 3 
SC Freiburg Z Elntracht Frankfurt 0 
werder Bremen 4 VIB Stuttgart 0 
Saver Leverkusen o. Karlsruher SC X tie 
Borussia Moenchen. 4. FC Kaiserslautern 0 
VtL Bochum X Borussia Dortmund 3 
Standings: Borussia Dortmund 22 paints, 
Werder Bremen l9,Mcenctwngladbach 1 X SC 
Freiburg 16. Hamburger SV IX FC Kolserv 
lautani lx Barer Leverkusen IX Bovem Mu- 
nich 16. VIB Stetigort IS. Karlsruher SC IX 
Elntracht Frankfurt IX Scnalke 11. FC Co- 
logne IX Bayer Ucntingen IX Dynamo Dres- 
den X 1B«0 Munich X VIL Bochum 5, MSV 
Duisburg 1 

EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP 
QUALIFIERS 
Portugal i, Austria 8 
Scorer: Luis Figa (37th mlnule). 

Ukraine & Estonia 8 
Scorers: Sergei Konovalov (30th). Urmai 


BASEBALL 
N oti onal League 

COLORADO— Promoled Paul Egins. assis 
font director at plover deveknmient. to assts 
tanf director at ptayar personneL 
BASKETBALL 

Nalfaaai Basketball Association 

MINNESOTA— Put MICheal WHItofltS. 
guard, on Mured list. Signed Winston Gar- 
lon& puard 

PHILADELPHIA— waived LHYd Daniels, 
guard. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Leasee - 

N.Y.GI ANTS— Waived Jetf Mills. Imeboct# 
or. Stoned Darren Reese, Board, from prac- 
tice squad. 

HOCKEY 

Nationa l Hacker Leagao 
- ANAHEIM— Assigned Maxim Bets, left 

tMaa. to Worcester. AHL 

BUFFALO — Named Douglas Moss presi- 
dent and cMei executive officer. 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Assigned soolt Scis- 
sors. center, to Minnesota, I HL 

COLLEGE 

BIG E IGHT— Suspended Jim watden, town 
State toatbaB coach, tor one gome tar criticis- 
ing officials after a loss n Kansas Stale tasi 
Saturday. 

NCAA— Announced that Bryanl Notree, 
board, is eligible to plcry basketball tar Illinois 
Nils season. 

CAL POLY-POMONA— Brian Wlesner men's 
ana womens soccer coach, reshmed effective at 
the end of ids contract In mid-December. 

DARTMOUTH— Named Mark Uvoc trainer. 

E. ILLINOIS— Named Steve Ballard worn- 
en*5 soccw coach. 

MARYLAND — Signed Gary Wtiboms. 
men’s basketball coach, to 7-year contr a ct 
extension. 

MINNESOTA— Extendee contract of Mc- 
Kinley Boston, men's athletic director, 
through June 1999. 

M ICHIG AN ST.— F Ired George Perles, teat- 
ball coach, effective al end at season. 

NOTRE DAME— Announced Michael 
Miller, wkte receiver, has left school. 

PRINCETON— Homed Sean McDermott • 
assistant baseball coach. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


Page 17 


DAY 


Bledsoe and Patriots Charge Back 
To Stun the Vikings in OT, 26-20 


Frank Pdich/The AMOcwled Pnat 

Pena State's FVeddte Scott raringaway £nom Scott Trarner of ntiuois to score in tbe first half hi Champaign, Illinois. 


The Associated Press 

It was an p rearing finish to a 
stunning comeback perfor- 
mance by Drew Bledsoe against 
one of the National Football 
League’s best teams. 

The New England quarter- 
back’s 14-yard overtime pass to 
Kevin Turner gave the Patriots 
a 26-20 victory on Sunday over 
the Minnesota Vikings, who 
had seemed headed for a run- 
away win after the first half in 
Foxboro. Massachusetts. Bled- 
soe set NFL records of 45 com- 
pletions and 70 attempts. He 
threw for 426 yards and three 
touchdowns as the Patriots 
overcame deficits of 20-0 late in 
the first half and 20-10 with less 
than three minutes left in the 
fourth quarter. 

Tbe old records were 68 
passes by Houston’s George 
Blanda on Nov. 1, 1964, and 42 
completions by the New York 
Jets’ Richard Todd on SepL 21. 
1980. 

New England (4-6) broke a 
four-game losing streak. Min- 
nesota (7-3) had its four- game 
winning streak snapped after 
outgaining the Patriots 286 
yards to 89 in the Erst half and 
opening a 20-0 lead. 

Trading 20-10. Bledsoe threw 
a 5-yard touchdown pass to Le- 
roy Thompson with 2:21 left in 
tbe fourth quarter. The Vikings 
couldn't get a first down on 
their next series, and Bledsoe 
led the Patriots from their 39- 


yard line to Matt Bahr*s tying 
23-yard field goal with 14 sec- 
onds remaining. 

New En gland got the over- 
time kickoff and began at its 33. 
The Patriots scored just 4: 1 0 lat- 
er on Bledsoe’s sixth completion 
in six OT attempts. It came one 

NFL ROUNDUP 

play after be sneaked 2 yards for 
a first down wi third down. 

Turner got behind lineback- 
er Carlos Je nkins in the left 
corner of the end zone for the 
winning catch. 

Bengali 34, OBers 31: limp- 
ing severely on a bruised ankle 
that required X-rays in the 
fourth quarter, Jeff Blake threw 
four touchdowns passes and a 
50-yard completion before Doug 
Pelfrey hit a 40-yard field goal as 
time ran to stop Houston in Cza- 
rinnati It was Cwcinnatfs sec- 
mid straight victory. 

The victory added to tbe al- 
ready immens e legend of Blake 
— a 166th draft pick in 1992 
who won AFC offensive player 
of the week honors last week by 
throwing for 387 yards in only 
his second NFL start. His en- 
core was simply fairytale as he 
bounced off the X-ray table to 
lead two late drives on his 
bruised left ankle. 

The Oilers (1-9) were on the 
verge of breaking their losing 
streak — now at six games — 
when Billy Joe Tolliver threw a 


5-yard touchdown pass to Web- 
ster Slaughter for a 31-24 lead 
with 5:51 left Blake was carted 
to the locker room for X-rays 
on his ankle during Houston's 
go-ahead drive. 

He returned to a standing 
ovation, bounded off the cart 
and led the Bengals to a tri- 
umph that erased their tag as 
the NFL’s worst team — the 
Oilers now bear that title. 

Saints 33, Falcons 32: Rookie 
Mario Bates kick-started the 
New Orleans Saints running at- 
tack, then Morten Andersen 
kicked them to victory against 
visiting Atlanta. 

Andersen’s 39-yard field goal 
with eight seconds left gave the 
Saints the victory and over- 
shadowed six field goals by At- 
lanta’s Norm Johnson. 

But the victory was fueled by 
Bates, who ran for 141 yards 
and two touchdowns in his first 
NFL start. He had three 
receptions for 28 yards. 

Chargers 14, Chiefs 13: After 
Joe Montana threw an intercep- 
tion deep in Chiefs territory m 
the fourth quarter, Stan 
Humphries hit a wide-open 
Duane Young with a short TD 
pass to lift visiting San Diego 
(8-2) to the victory and a two- 
game lead over Kansas City (6- 
4) in the AFC West 

The Chargers had been kill- 
ing themselves all day and had 
snapped the ball in Kansas City 
territory only once when Dar- 


Wilma Rudolph Dies, 
1 960 Olympics Star 

By Frank Litsky 

New York Times Service 

Wilma Rudolph, who grew from a sickly child unable to 
walk into a statuesque athlete of 20 who won three gold 
medals as a sprinter at the 1960 Olympics in Rome, died 
Saturday at her home in Brentwood, Tennessee, near Nash- 
ville. She was 54. 

Her sister, Charlene Rudolph, said Rudolph had learned in 
3uiy that she had a malignan t brain tumor. 

Rudolph was a handsome, regal woman, 6 feet (1.82 meters) 
tall, c harming , graceful and gracious. She was the first woman 
to win three gold medals-in- trade and field m one Olympics. 

Sie also became Americas greatest woman sports hero since 
Babe Didriksoa Zafcariai a generation earlier. 

Wilma Glodean Rudolph was born on Jane 23, 1940, in 
Garksvflle, Tennessee, 45 miles (70 kilometers) north of 
Nashville, and grew up in darksvflle. She was the 20th of 22 
children of Ed Rudolph, a railroad porter, from two mar- 
riages. Her mother, Blanche, was a domestic. 

jtK: 1 — : - , - J e — Aa 

grams) « uum. * »» ■*©— *♦ — — - — 

and scarlet lever simultaneously and almost died. 


child weighed four and a half pounds (about 2 kilo- 
, at birth. At age 4, she contracted double pneumonia 
_ ^ariet fever simultaneously and almost died. The Alness- 
es left her left leg paralyzed. 

At 6, she started to bop on one leg. At 8, she started towalk 

with a leg brace. Later, an orthopedic shoe replaced the brace. 
One day. when the child was 1 1, her mother found her playing 

basketball in bare feet. , 

At 13, she joined the high school basketball team aiul twice 
made the all-state team. She would somfitun^^^schooi to 


run on a track across me strew, rva uwui 
the renowned coat* at Tennessee State Umvemty m Nashville, 
and at his invitation she attended his summer trade camps. 

After she graduated from high school, 
athletic scholarship at Tennessee State. She made the 1960 
Olympic t eam, for which Temple was the women s coach. 

Tbeday before tbe 100 meters in the Rome Olympics, she 
stepped m a bote in the infield of the Practice tr^k ^dtw^ 
anankle. The next day, tbe ankte hdd 
semifinal in 1 1-3 seconds, equaling the w^drwOTd.^wOT 

the final in 1 1. 0 seconds, but the fonOTa^vrod of 6. 15 miles an 

hour precluded recognition as a ^^d recoro. 2 

In the 200 meters, she set an Olympic 
seconds in the heats and won the final m 24.0 seconds. In the 
400-meter relay, with college 

time legs, she helped set a world record of 44.4 secomism a 
heal. Inthe final, after a bad baton pass to her, 3 

two-yard deficit into a three-yard victory in 44.5 second 


Late Rallies Lift Nebraska and Penn State 


The Associated Press 

Victories didn’t come easy 
for No. 1 Nebraska or No. 2 
Penn Slate, but both remained 
undefeated and managed to 
dindbi bowl bids on Saturday. 

Things weren’t easy for No. 3 
Auburn, either, which stayed 
undefeated but not unblem- 
ished. The Tigers played to a 
23-23 tie with Georgia. 

Nebraska used fourth-quar- 
ter touchdowns by Damon Ben- 
ntng and Lawrence Phillips to 
nail down a 28-12 victory over 
Iowa State, earning a trip to the 
Orange BowL 

Penn State spotted minds 
three first-quarter touchdowns 
and still recovered for a 35-31 
victory that clinched the Big 
Ten title and a Rose Bowl trip. 

Nebraska led just 14-12 in 
the fourth quarter before pull- 
ing away. Phillips finished with 
183 yards on 36 carries after 
being held to 30 yards on 15 
first-half carries. 

The victory clinched a tie for 
the Kg Eight championship for 
the Comhuskers. who hold the 
tiebreaker edge over Colorado. 
That assures Nebraska erf the 
automatic bid to the Orange 
Bowl, where it has lost five 
straight times and has seen sev- 
eral previous national champi- 
onship opportunities evaporate. 

Penn State was in major trou- 
ble, surrendering 21 early 
points to host Illinois and still 
trailing 31-21 in the fourth 
quarter. But the Nittany Lions 
staged their biggest comeback 
since Joe Paterao became coach 
in 1966 to preserve their shot at 
the national championship. 

Brian Milne climaxed the 
c om eback on a 2-yard touch- 
down with 57 seconds to play as 
the Nittany Lions clinched their 


first Rose Bowl appearance 
since 1923 and extended their 
winning streak to 14 games. 

No. 3 Auburn 23, Georgia 23: 
Auburn had a chance to beat 
visiting Georgia in the final sec- 
onds, but a 44-yard field goal 
attempt by Matt Hawkins was 
wide to the right. 

The Tigers, on probation and 
ineligible for a bowl game, had 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 

the nation’s longest winning 
streak ended at 20 games. 

Eric Zeier threw two touch- 
down passes to help Georgia 
overcome a 14-point deficit in 
the second half. The Tigers got 
the ball back at the Georgia 38 
wiih 1:21 remaining and got to 
the 27 before Patrick Nix threw 
two straight incompletions and 
Stephen Davis was stopped for 
no gain. Georgia then called its 
final two timeouts trying to rat- 
tle the junior kicker, and Haw- 
kins then came on and missed. 

No. 4 Florida 48, S- Carolina 
17: Danny Wuerffel threw for 
357 yards and four TDs in 
Gainesville, Florida, as Florida 
dinched its third straight trip to 
the Southeastern Conference 
championship game. The Ga- 
tors pulled away in the second 
quarter when Wuerffel threw 
two TDs to Jack Jackson, who 
became the school’s career TD 
reception leader with 26. 

No. 5 Miami 17, Pi tefei ggh 
12: Tbe Hurricanes, who were 
favored by 33 points, overcame 
four turnovers in the rain and 
escaped with a narrow victory 
in Miami. Billy West, the Big 
East rushing leader, ran for 160 
yards for the Panthers, who 
scored the first TD against Mi- 
ami's defense in 18 quarters. 


No. 6 Alabama 29, No. 20 
Mississippi SL 25: Jay Barker 
threw for 325 yards and three 
touchdowns and Dennis Riddle 
scored on a 1-yard run with 51 
seconds left as visiting Alabama 
clinched its third straight SEC 
Western Division title. 

No. 7 Colorado 51, Kansas 
26: Rashaan Salaam broke 
three school records as Colora- 
do pounded tbe Jay hawks in 
Lawrence, Kansas. Salaam 
rushed for 232 yards and three 
TDs, setting season records for 
rushing (1,796 yards) and 
touchdowns (22) and breaking 
the record for most points in a 
season. 122, set in 1937 by the 
retired Supreme Court Justice 
Byron White. Salaam’s three 
TDs gave him 132 points. 

No. 8 Florida State 23, Notre 
Dame 16: Rock Preston ran for 
165 yards and Warrick Dunn 
for 163 as Florida State came 
from behind to win at home. 
Dunn scored the winning TD 
on a 5-yard run with 2:53 to 
play. The loss was the third in 
tour games for Notre Dame. 

No. 9 Texas A&M 26, Loub- 
viBe lfh In Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, Corey Puflig threw a 25- 
yard touchdown pass to Chris 
Sanders and Ledand McElroy 
ran 8 yards for a score as the 
jes held off Louisville, 
to. 10 Colorado St 48, Ar- 
St 3: Antboney Hdl 
threw three TD passes for Colo- 
rado State, the western Athlet- 
ic Conference co-leader, in Fort 
Collins. Colorado. 

No. 11 Kansas St 21, Mis- 
souri 18: Chad May threw two 
touchdown passes and visiting 
Kansas Stale stopped Missouri 
on a fourtb-and-goal from the 3 
with 39 seconds to go. 

Air Force 40, No. 12 Utah 33: 


Beau Morgan, making his first 
start, threw two touchdown 
passes to Jake Campbell, and 
Morgan and Campbell each ran 
for another score as Air Force 
handed visiting Utah its second 
straight loss. 

No. 17USC45.No. 13 Arizo- 
na 28: Rob Johnson threw for 
390 yards and three touch- 
downs and ran for another 
score and Southern Cal’s de^ 
fense came up with two big 
goal-line stands in Los Angeles. 
The Trojans stayed in the Rose 
Bowl race and almost certainly 
knocked Arizona out of it. 

No. 25 Boston College 31, 
No. 14 Syracuse 0: In Boston, 
Mark Hartsell threw three 
touchdown passes and Boston 
College ran its unbeaten streak 
to seven games. Tbe Eagles had 
six sacks as Syracuse failed to 
score a touchdown for the sec- 
ond straight game. 

No. 15 Oregon 55, Stanford 
21: Danny O’Neil threw a 
school-record six touchdown 
passes, three to Cristin McLe- 
more, as visiting Oregon closed 
in on its first Rose Bowl berth 
in 37 years. The Dudes and 
Southern CaJ are tied for the 
conference lead, but Oregon 
holds the tiebreaker edge. The 
defeat ensured a second straight 
losing season for Stanford un- 
der Coach Bill Walsh. 

No. 16 Virginia Tech 41, 
Rutgers 34: In Blacksburg, Vir- 
ginia, Maurice DeShazo threw 
two touchdown passes and 
Dwayne Thomas rushed for 172 
yards. Tech led 41-13 in the 
fourth quarter before Rutgers 
rallied behind quarterback Ray 
Lucas, who passed for a career- 
high 374 yards and four TDs. 

N. Carofira St 24, No. 18 
Dtdse 23: North Carolina State 


raided at home in the second 
half on a pair of touchdown 
passes by Teny Harvey to dump 
Duke, which had advan- 

tage of turnovers by Harvey to 
build a 20-7 halftime lead. 

No. 19 Michigan 38, Minne- 
sota 22: In Ann Arbor, Michi- 
gan, Todd Collins passed for a 
school-record 352 yards and 
two touchdowns as Michigan 
overcame a terrible first half to 
beat Minnesota for the eighth 
straight year. 

No. 21 Virginia 46, Mary tend 
21: Linebacker James Fanior 
intercepted a pass by the Mary- 
land quarterback Scon Milano- 
vkb and then blocked one of his 
punts in Charlottesville, Virgin- 
ia. MOanovich threw three in- 
terceptions, was sacked five 
tunes and lost a fumble. 

No. 22 Washington 31, CaB- 
f onna 19: Reggie Reser ran 
back an interception 79 yards 
and Lamar Lyons returned a 
fumble 38 yards for first-quar- 
ter touchdowns as Washington 
handed tbe visiting Bears their 
fifth straight loss. 

Oregon St. 21, No. 24 Wash- 
ington St 3: J- J. Young rushed 
for 100 yards and a TD and 
Oregon State’s defense smoth- 
ered Washington State in the 
second half in Corvallis, Oregon. 


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Prairie View Loses a Record 45th Straight 


The Associated Press 

JACKSON, Mississippi — It was 17-7 at 
halftime, but Prairie View was blown out, 52- 
7, by Jackson State on Saturday night and lost 
a Division I-AA-record 45th straight game. 

The Panthers (0-10, 0-7 Southwestern Ath- 
letic Conference) haven't won since Oct 28, 
1989. Columbia had lost 44 straight between 


1983 and 1988; ironically, on the day its 
record was broken, Columbia beat Cornell. 
38-33, to ensure its first winning season since 
1973. 

The NCAA aft-divisions record of 50 con- 
secutive losses was set between 1974 and 1979 
by Division III member Macalester College 
of SL Paul, Minnesota. 


ren Carrington intercepted a 
ball that glanced off Lake Daw- 
son’s hands and returned it to 
the 8. 

On thnd-and-goal from the 
5, Humphries tossed the game- 
winner to Young, standing 
alone in the corner of the end 
zone. 

Montana was working with- 
out his best running back, 
blocker and pass-catcher, but 
the Chargers committed four 
turnovers in the first half as the 
Chiefs seized a 13-0 lead. 

Neither Marcus Allen nor 
tackle John Alt suited op for the 
Chiefs, limiting Montana's op- 
tions in the passing game. Early 
in the second quarter, Willie 
Davis, the Chiefs’ leading re- 
ceiver, left with a sprained knee. 

Browns 26, Eagles 7: In Phil- 
adelphia, Cleveland limited the 
Eagles to 288 yards and a 
touchdown while Matt Stover 
kicked four field goals. 

Mark Rypien, 12-of-30 for 
158 yards, threw a 3-yard 
touchdown pass to Mark Carri- 
er and Ernest Byner scored on 
4-yard run to give Cleveland (8- 
2) its seventh victory in its last 
eight games. 

In losing for the first time in 
their last seven home games, the 
Eagles (7-3) got their only score 
on a 15-yard Vaughn Hebron 
touchdown run in the second 
quarter. 

Randall C unningham, whose 
streak of winning starts at Vet- 
erans Stadium was stopped at 
20, was 22-of-38 for 195 yards 
and threw his ninth intercep- 
tion of the season. He was also 
sacked twice. 

C unningham also fumbled 
late in the third quarter after 
the Eagles, trailing by 12, bad 
driven to the Cleveland 13. Don 
Griffin recovered for the 
Browns, who used the turnover 
to drive for Byner" s touchdown 
early in the fourth quarter. 

Canfinals 10, Giants 9: In 
East Rutherford, New Jersey. 
Sieve Beueriein overcame an in- 
consistent performance thanks 
to Bryan Reeves’s superb 9- 
yaxd catch at the back of the 
end zone with 1:39 to play, as 
Arizona extended New York’s 
longest losing streak since 1980 
to seven games. 

Tbe slide is the longest of 
Dan Reeves’s 14-year coaching 
career and it came in a game in 
which the Giants (3-7) squan- 
dered a 9-0 halftime lead and 
saw the Cardinals (4-6) rally to 
win for the first time at Giants 
Stadium since 1983. 

The Cardinals, who limited 
New York to 56 second-half 
yards, drove 54 yards in eight 
plays following a punt Beuer- 
lein was 4-for-7 for 53 yards, 
connecting with Randal Hill for 
25 and 11 yards and Gary Clark 
for 8 to give Arizona a first 
down at the New York 9. 

He misfired on first and sec- 
ond down and, after taking the 
Cardinals’ final timeout, scram- 
bled to his right and lofted a 
pass to Reeves, who leaped high 
to catdt the ball. 

Bears 17, Dolphins 14: Chica- 
go scored its first touchdown on 
a bizarre fake field goal, and 
Kevin Butler won a last-minute 
kicking duel against Pete 
Stoyancwich to win in Miami. 

Butler hit a 40-yard field goal 
with 59 seconds left. Miami’s 
Dan Marino, working without 
any timeouts, completed two 
passes for 38 yards to give 
Stoyanovich a chance to force 
an overtime, but his low 45- 
yard attempt was tipped by 
Chicago’s James Williams with 
two seconds left. 

Miami, the AFC East leader, 
fell to 7-3. Chicago improved to 
6-4, and starting quarterback 
Steve Walsh remained unbeat- 
en at 5-0. 

Bears receiver Chris Conway 
threw the game's most memora- 
ble pass, a deflected toss to 
Keith Jennings for a 23-yard 
score on a fake field goal in the 
first period. 


Pun*b»SWr*yl-Ro«*» 

Oj'few York Times/ Edited by Wdl Shorts. 


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ears 

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a Special Report on 

Telecommunications 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Phone company privatization around the 
world. 

■ The global mobile phone standard. 

■ Overcrowding on the information 
superhighway. 

■ The competition to wire up the fast- 
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For further i nfor m at i on , please contact BWMahder in Paris 

at (33-1) 46 37 93 78, fax: (33-1) 46 37 50 44. 


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Page 18 


INTERISATIONAI. HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1994 


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LANGUAGE 

A Crisis Builds in the Greenroom 


* 

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By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — As language mavens 
gathered at the New York Public Library 
recently to hear a panel discuss “Words in the 
Next Millennium,” a crisis was building in the 
greenroom. 

The greenroom is the anteroom offstage where 
performers or lecturers fret, practice their lines, 
or just horse around until the audience starts 
stamping its feeL (The “attiring room” was noted 
in Shakespeare's day. and may have been first 
called green at the Drury Lane Theatre in Lon- 
don. Some say set designers moved small trees 
and shrubbery into this room, causing it to be 
called the greens roam; others hold that it is 
rooted in outdoor performances being held on a 
greensward, all is speculation, but it is unlikely 
that it was so called because the room was 
painted that color, or was named after a produc- 
er named Green.) 

Where was I? The linguistic crisis. Two world 
class lexicographers were present: Fred Mish, of 
Memam- Webster, the corporate descendant of 
Noah WebsteT and unabashed bastion of de- 
scription of the language as it is, and Anne 
Soukhanov, whose hand guided American Heri- 
tage down more prescriptive lines. 

My plan bad been to select words and phrases 
from' that morning’s New York Times for etymo- 
logical discussion. 1 had the newspaper spread out 
on the table in the greenroom; a chapter of Pope 
John Paul ir s new book, "Crossing the Threshold 
of Hope,” was the centerpiece of the Op-Ed page. 
Circled in red was a word from the following 
passage: . . making use or these very semina 

Verbi, that constitute a kind of common soterio- 
logical root present in all religions.” 

Soterio/ogicaJ ? Mish and Soukhanov looked at 
each other blankly. My New York Times col- 
league. Jeffrey McQuain, who was moderating 
the panel, offered. "It's the adjectival form of 
soteriohgy. ” which was a big help. After some 
fast tbumbwork in their respective tomes, both 
lexies came up with the answer: "theology deal- 
ing with salvation" was the Merriam-Webster 
definition, "especially as effected by Jesus 
Christ." That's a word the bishop of Rome would 
surely be familiar with. But your ordinary news- 
paper reader, even dictionary writers? Hardly. 

The Greek etymon was soteria , "deliverance,” 
from sozein, “to save,” growing out of sos, "safe, 
sound.” The Oxford English Dictionary has the 
earliest use recorded in Webster’s 1S47 dictionary, 
with a meaning of "a discourse on health,” but the 
theological meaning took over ageneration later. 

A question of style arises. The pope, whose 
publishers have more than a million copies of his 
book in print in the United States alone, obvi- 
ously wants to reach a large audience with his 


book. In the same way. The New York Times 
likes its readers to comprehend the prose it 
presents. Why, then, use a word that so clearly 
stumps the experts? 

It raises the level of discourse. The reader is 
required to stretch his vocabulary to grasp the 
writer's point. This goes against the grain of most 
current writing theory, which puts the burden of 
communication on the writer to make his mean- 
ing plain to a large audience. That’s why a 
Newsweek review, troubled by the book’s “lofty 
tone,” cautions, “Willing readers may find re- 
newed wonder in ‘Crossing the Threshold of 
Hope,’ but theyTl have to do more than their 
share of the work." 

What’s wrong with requiring a reader to work? 
There is a trade-off, however the working reader 
has to know that the author is the authentic 
writer of the prose. 

That’s what held me throughout the book. 


which I bought after the panel broke up and the 
edified audience left. This is not a work drafted 
by a dutiful ghost and edited and approved by 
the world figure; nor is it a draft from dictation 
or notes jotted down by a famous person that has 
been smoothed and revamped by editors to ren- 
der it more understandable by the intended read- 
ership. Though it uses the device of answering 
questions submitted by the journalist Vittorio 
Messori, and though it has been translated from 
Polish to I talian to En glish, nothing about this 
style comes across “as told to.” Instead, in a 
throwback to Winston Churchill, it is the work 
product of the mind of the famous person work- 
ing alone. The reader is willing to work because 
the author was willing to work. 


Back to my own line of work: the Latin phrase 
semina Verbi, used by the pope before he let us 
have it with soteriological, means “seeds of the 
Word.” The capitalization of Verbi, “the Word.” 
signifies that word means the Word of God; 
semina means “seeds.” 

The phrase is based on the New Testament 
parable of the sower, says Jan ZiolkowskL, Har- 
vard professor of medieval Latin. In the parable, 
which is told in three Gospels, a sower spreads 
some seed on rocks and thorns, and the seed 
fails; only the seed that falls on good ground 
flourishes. That parable in the Gospel of Luke 
uses the expression “The seed is the word of 
God" 

According to Ziolkowski: “In all the interpre- 
tations, the sower is a person who spreads the 
Word — understood sometimes as just Christ 
himself, other times as others who preach the 
Word” 

New York Tunes Service 


History on Your Wrists 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — The young man in 
the spiffy bow tie peering at the 
marble fireplace is not just admiring 
the architecture of a historic house. Nor 
even wing it up as a sale item for 


Tastemakers 


An occasional series 

about people for whom 

style is u way of life | 1 • _■ i 

Sotheby’s, where he works. Mish Twor- 
kowski is thinking about bow the carv- 
ing might look dangling from your ear. 

“I keep looking at wainscoting or 
molding and thinking, ‘Wouldn’t that 
look wonderful wrapped round a neck 
or a wrist?’ ” he says. 

The 33-year-old jeweler, known 
universally as Mish (dropping his Pol- 
ish family name), has carved out a 
most unlikely comer. He has turned 
his fascination with the architecture of 
the past into an inspiration for jewel- 
ry. And in return, the American cul- 
tural landmarks that he visits sell a 
slice of themselves in their gift shops. 

So there at Old Westbury Gardens, 
a Long Island country estate, visitors 
are offered a charm bracelet hung 
with miniature watering can, garden- 
ing tools, sunflowers and seed pack- 
ets, designed by the green-thumbed 
Mish, who is a keen gardener at his 
Bridgehampton house. 

The commission of which he is prou- 
dest is the chance to ferret in George 
Washington’s home at Mount Vernon, 
Vir ginia. The redoubtable and discern- 
ing Ladies' Association asked him to 
create jewels that speak of the “univer- 
sal dements” erf Washington’s world. 

So Mish did not reproduce Martha 
Washington’s delicate 18th-century 
jeweliy. Instead he took a bookplate 
with the family coat of arms and the 
crest on the silverware and created 
bold pins. The concept of the heritage 
souvenir is thus raised to a new taste 
level, where the past is used to create 
not a replica, but an object worthy of 
the original setting. 

Why should Mount Vernon, the 
Preservation Foundation of Palm 
Beach (winch got gilded monkeys and 
palm leaves) and the Metropolitan Op- 
era House (diva jewded collars) all 


have chosen Mish, a specialist in corns 
at Sotheby’s New York, who five years 
ago was making jewelry just for friends 
and selling it from ins desk drawer? 

"Because I had a real sensibility to 
what made a historical home or gar- 
den important — ■ I could relate to the 
soul of the place,” he says. *‘I don’t go 
in to reproduce the thing. I pick the 
most symbolic element. And I make 
thing s that are not only beautifuL but 
wearable." 

The sk?n is in raking a motif like 
Washington's griffin and blowing it up 
to a different scale, but appreciating 
that it “has integrity and tradition." 

“My mission," he says, “is to bring 
a little bit of George into everybody’s 
life." 

A chirpy cheerfulness combined 
with a genuine aesthetic sensibility 
doubtless endears Mish to the crusty 
custodians of historic houses, as it 
does to the coHeciois whom he mas- 
sages in his role as assistant vice presi- 
dent in the client advisory department 
of the auction house. 

Mish admits that he would find it 
difficult to create Statue of Liberty 
sou venirs - 1 o- a -price, because they sat- 
isfy the hunger of a mass public “like 
fast food.” There is a tinge of regret as 
be talks of the “push” for special exhi- 
bitions that forced museums that were 
once elitist to lure a wider public than 
the “upper-middle-class family.” 

Fashion stores throughout the world, 
inducting Barneys and Bergdorf Good- 
man in New York and Harvey Nichols 
in London, buy from the five Mish 
jewelry tines. Royalties are paid on 
heritage pieces — even if customers do 
not realize that eardms are based on a 
rooster motif in a ceiling cornice in the 
Federal-style Homewood House in 
Baltimore, or the key to the Paris Bas- 
tille presented to George Washington. 

And that really is the point. The 
designs work in their own right and 
only Mish may know where he took 
the idea of the tiny antique frames, set 
with crystal, that form a charm brace- 
let, or fee antique hitching post for a 
design that may be taken up for the 
National Horse Show. 

The origins might be elitist, but the 
prices of the architectural-inroired 
jewels are democratic: from $30 to 
$500. More expensive lines are also 



WEATHER 


Christopher Moor 

Mish Tworkowski, and, right, the 
pin inspired by the griffin motif on 
George Washington’s silverware. 

produced in Stirling silver or vermeil 
(up to $1,000) ana gold (to $5,000). 

So many new projects with historic 
homes are in the pipeline that commis- 
sions are already scheduled into 1997, 
when Mish will stiU be wdl under 4). 

He believes that by changing the 
scale of the original inspirations, he 
translates it into the 20th century and 
can make it look modem. But doesn’t 
he ever have the urge to create some- 
thing that has no reference to the past? 

“Is anything really original — all 
our ideas come from something,” he 
says. “Frank Lloyd Wright studied 
parallel lines of prairies and geometric 
formation of rocks. Do I ever want to 
do something modem? I have a lot of 
modem ideas, but life isn’t letting me 
do than.” 


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■suntai 
uo Paiaui 
LkOon 
London 
Maarv) 

Man 

Moscow 

Minen 

mm 

OtO 

Paima 

Pan* 

Prague 

R*y*i|av». 

Horn* 

Si Peferaourg 

ST'jcvholm 

SmuoouTi 

TePnr 

vurao* 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zimch 

Oceania 


Today 
High LOW 
CJF OF 
asm 13.55 
12*3 9*40 

11/52 7/44 

i6«i lo.-ao 
22m 12/53 
9-40 -1 .31 
1“ 6'*3 
13/55 3 *48 

7/44 2 35 

7X4 7/44 

23m tj*55 
13/53 5'«* 

IC*0 744 
18*61 0'4fl 

12 53 7 44 

14/57 7.M 

4/39 2.35 

13*55 

37.WJ 17/02 
10*6 12.53 
12/53 a.*e 
22/71 5/43 

14.57 7/44 

Cl 32 -SAM 
11/52 4.39 

2170 10/50 
4.-39 235 

20*0 13 55 
17-62 eri« 
9/46 5.41 

3/37 0O2 

20/58 S/45 

205 -2.39 
4/39 4.09 

1203 7.44 

5/41 307 

15 39 8 4fl 

7/44 4.03 

9/48 2,05 

9*40 6-43 


Tomorrow 
W High LOW W 

OF CIF 

* 23.73 IS 59 9 

sh 1132 7 44 eh 

Bi 1132 104 Mi 

c 14, sr 1050 sti 
s 21/70 13.35 s 
X »2-53 4-41 e 
c B. 16 2-35 i 

Sh 11/52 5 41 ill 

8,46 4.39 DC 

• f '46 337 i 

s 24.-5 1«/61 t 

X 11*52 4/M sti 
pc 9,48 6.43 Ml 

DC 14,57 9.48 K 

r 8'4f. 337 t 
C 1253 0/43 sh 

pc 5 41 1/34 I 

>h 13*5 8*48 Ml 

» 27*80 21*70 l 
S 13/66 14*57 s 
Ml 11/52 4/38 an 

1 20*68 8/48 s 

pc 1355 6*43 sh 
» 235 2' 29 9 

c 8 '46 439 i 
PC 19*89 9 48 C 

r 4/39 0*32 r 

S 20.-68 14-57 S 
» 12*3 6.43 -ill 


ac 17/62 8'46 pc 
pc 235 0/32 m 

t 0/43 2/35 ill 

C 11*52 337 r 

DC 0/43 235 f 

DC 14*57 0/40 Sh 

c 8*40 4/39 on 

» 8-48 4/39 r 

C 9-48 430 Ml 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Aocu-Weather. 


M ■ 

h 


Jetstream 


I Unwuonably 
CoH 


i UmoamnaUy - 

Hoi 


North America 

Showers will shift from itw 
eastern Great Lakes 10 the 
heart ol the Atlantic 
Seaboard Tuesday. In their 
wake It will turn colder; 
showers will return to the 
Great Lakes region by 
Thursday. Florida will be 
rainy Tuesday. PacKc coast 
ernes wM be cnMy wtth some 
rain. 


Europe 

Western Europe will have 
more than Its shorn of rein 
and strong wind. One bcutof 
rakra wll soak much ol Ger- 
many, France and Switzer- 
land Tuesday; northern Italy 
should be spared. Winds 
and reins are likely WeAies- 
day and Thursday from the 
northern Alps to Britain and 
southern Scandinavia. 


Asia 

Northern and middle China 
will be cold and gray with 
some rain; also snow and 
sleet tn the north. A chB wB 
linger from Korea lo the 
heart of Japan; some rain 
wfll fall In Bw south. Snow 
will tall at Sapporo. Hong 
Kong, Manila and Bangkok 
wO have warn sun and tttle 
ndn. 


Middle East 


Tod*y Tomorrow 

High Lew W M 01 Lew W 

OF W OF OF 

22/71 18*1 c 21/70 17*2 l 

24/75 14/57 po 21/70 14*7 Sh 

20 *8 9 MS pc 17*2 10*0 Ml 

19*8 12*3 pc 17*2 13*6 Sh 

30.80 PMS f 28/79 12*3 s 

29/79 10*4 pc »«0 10/01 • 


Latfn America 

TorSry Tomorrow 

Hfch Lew W Htgli Low W 
OF OT CIF OF 

Buenos Aliet 29*4 19*6 « 28/84 18*4 c 

Caracas 31*8 25/77 m 31*8 20/77 pc 

UnS 23/73 17*2 pc 23/73 17*2 pc 

Masco Gty 23/73 10/50 pc 22 m 9/48 po 

RtodelaiNtro 33*1 21/70 PC 32*8 21/70 pc 

Saittgo 28/79 11/52 a 28/70 9MB pc 


Asia 


Today 





N W 

Ixm 

W 

HWh 

Lorn 

W 


OF 

OF 


C/F 

OF 


Ban(^co>i 

31**80 

2271 


31*8 

2373 

Bfl 

BnffD 

3/37 

0.-32 

on 

7/44 

2/36 


Hang Kona 

2475 

19/66 

PC 

2475 

19*6 

Sri 

mstot 

X*B5 

247b 

PC 

31 *6 

25/77 


Nam Dan 

& *Z 

16*1 


28*02 

12*3 

B 

Saam 

12*3 

zm pc 

14/57 

4/33 pc 

STranghM 

18/Bi 

14/57 

I 

17*2 

13*5 

r 

Skiguara 

31*8 

2271 


38*0 

2373 

Hfl 

Talp* 

2577 

18/64 


2475 

10*84 

sh 

TcMyo 

18 «4 

r/n 

PC 

20*0 

0 *46 S 

Africa 

Agism 

19.66 

14/57 

pc 21/70 

16*1 

a 

Cape Toon 

17*2 

6/48 


2170 

12*53 

a 

CffffiHffna 

2373 

13/56 


24/75 

10*1 


Harm 

16*4 

6/43 

pc 2271 

7/44 

s 

UUQ'iii 

30*6 

2373 

pc 

31*8 

2577 sh 

Nmho 

19*6 

12*53 


227! 

13/55 

t 

Tins 

2170 

11*2 

s 

18*4 

13*6 

sh 

North America 

Anawragn 

-3*7 

■ana 

in 

-3*7 

•11/13 


/Uttntl 

23/73 

12/53 

a 

10*6 

7/44 

Ml 

9aa»» 

1«*1 

9/40 


17/82 

6/43 th 

CMcago 

13/55 

3/37 


U *40 

1*34 


Ooramr 

6/43 

-6/22 

■ 

14*7 

■3*Z7 

s 

Dams 

18*1 

8*46 

r 

11/52 

2*5 

sn 


V9/BG 12. *53 pc 20*8 12/83 po 
29/77 15 58 * 28*78 »*• DC 


Legend: s-sumy, pc-pa/By doudy, ockMdy. ah-s n o wra . MnurxWn omii , r-rsln. st-onow Mines, 
sn-ano*. --tee. W-Wbather. AS rape, foraoaate end data prov i ded by Aoou-Weather. hie. e 1994 


HwokAi 

HouMon 

LosAngatof 

Mem 

Mnwapau 

Mowed 


San Fran. 
Wash 
Temc 
WUMngWn 


27*0 22/71 pc 28*2 22/71 pc 
27*0 14 *67 pc 20*8 9 (48 pc 

23/73 7/44 s 23/73 9*48 pc 
28/79 2*/75 Ml 2S«B 22/71 pc 


2MB 23/73 I 29*4 
19*6 12/53 pc 18*4 
22<71 B«6 s 28/79 


18*1 9/48 pc 14*7 

9/48 4*9 r 9/48 

18*1 2(35 Mi 10*0 

21**70 11/52 ■ 19*8 


29*4 2373 t 
18 *4 8/48 Mi 

2079 11/32 I 


‘Crop Artist 9 Finds Growing Com in Manhattan Isn’t Easy 


By N. R. Kleinfield 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK. — In Kansas, where Stan 
Herd is known for making art by plant- 
ing arrangements of crops and flowers, pret- 
ty much all he needs is a tractor. Trying to 
replicate the process in Manhattan, he 
found he needed Donald Trump and two 
homeless people as well as the tractor. 

“I have to say I was overwhelmed by the 
whole task,” Herd said, patrolling the land- 
scape image of trees and clouds that he 


River between 68ih and 70th streets. “I put 
nmre hours into this than any of the others 1 
did. 1 like it, but some of the plants didn't 
grow as well as I would have preferred." 

This represents Herd's ninth example of 
"crop art,” which uses soil as canvas and 
plants as paint. To mark the essential com- 
pletion of a work that was started in late 
April, Herd, 44, on Wednesday ushered 
benefactors and friends of the work on 
helicopter flights over the landscape that 
he calls “Countryside." 


Herd’s previous works have usually cov- 
ered between 20 and 160 acres (8 to about 
65 hectares), in places like Kansas or 
Australia. Finding even an acre of decent 
farm land in mid town Manhattan can be a 
test Since the chosen plot was part of the 
old New York Central raflyards, now 
owned by Trump, the ground was rampant 
with nibble inhospitable to growing com 
and watermelons. 

Nevertheless, one thmg New York is not 
short of is people willing to try anything. 
Herd received yeoman service, for example, 
from two homeless men who dwell in aban- 
doned railyard tunnels next to the site. One 
who said he was 43 calls hims elf Lone Wolf. 

The other is Ryan Turner, who is 28 and 
lives a couple of tunnels down from Lone 
Wolf. He is hoping to develop into a writer 
and has plans for a book about the motiva- 
tion behind prayer. 

As it evolved, the $95,000 work of an 
became a handy supermarket for the needy. 
The homeless workers picked and ate the 
vegetables in the landscape, as did other 
homeless people occupying the tunnels. “I 


ate, like, 15 cucumbers until I couldn’t eat 
anymore.” Turner said. "But they. were 
mighty good.” * ‘ * 

It has been right years since Herd first 
conceived of the project. He was happy 
with his other crop an. but the only people 
who saw it were those in window seais in 
airplanes. “1 had always envisioned put- 
ting my work in front of a lot of people,” 
he explained. "I wanted to put one next to 
a high-rise.” 

Trump agreed to lease him the property 
free until the end of November. 

In all, 200 tons of topsoil were put down, 
plus 20 tons of rode; 5,000 plants like 
squash, watermelon, cucumbers, canta- 
loupes, tomatoes, and pumpkins; 2000 
flowering plants like impatiens and mums, 
as well as crops of rye grass, corn, soy- 
beans, and wheat. 

While crop art is never truly done. Herd 
feels that it is complete- for the winter. He 
said the Trump people were optimistic that 
he could keqp the landscape in place 
through next spring. If so, he will return 
then to replenish it 


a 


ra 



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i-.ti Qll.nl,. ■!> jiljMe :*• T* I .*■ Mil. TV lurid Cmuinr |nr»Oa«t»l iMIUrrrt* . 
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