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3 



Paris, Wednesday, November 16, 1994 


No. 34,747 



By Michael Richardson 

Inicrmutonal Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — Asian and Pacific lead- 
ers agreed Tuesday to start immedia te 
work on creating the world's largest area 
for free trade and investment, but many 

contentious problems will have to be over- 
come before the ambitious program takes 
effect “no later than the year 2020.” 

While the United States and other 
strong advocates of the liberalization plan 
hailed it as a historic turning point for the 
Asia-Pacific region, Malaysia announced 


Main points of the agreement. Page 4. 


a series of reservations, and China and 
Japan appeared waxy of making new com- 
mitments to reduce tariff and nontariff 
barriers. 

But President Suharto of Indonesia, 
who chaired the meeting in Bogor oflead- 
ers of the 18 members of APEC, the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, 
said that he was “sure” the group could 
speed up its timetable. 

in an eight-page “declaration of com- 
mon resolve,” the leaders said they were 
committed to “complete the achievement 
of our goal of bee and open trade and 
investment” in the Asia-Pacific region no 
later than 2020. 

They agreed that the pace of implemen- 
tation would take into account the differ- 
ing levels of economic development 
among APEC members, with the industri- 
alized economies achieving the target by 
2010 and developing economies by 2020. 

APEC's diverse members include Aus- 
tralia, Brunei, flumiria , Chile, PFrina. 
Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia. 
Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Girin- 
es, the Philippines, Singapore, South Ko- 
rea, Taiwan; Thailand: and the United 
States. ‘ v : " • / 

They account for around half of world 

See APEC, Page 4 


_ J DavkJ Aie' Agnue Fraocr-Prcs* 

Leaders found the Asia- Pacific summit conference tailor-made. From left: Prime Minister Jean Chretien of Canada 
and Presidents Carlos Safinas de Gortari of Mexico, Eduardo Frel RoizTagle of Chile and Jiang Zemin of cwn^ 

Giant Step in March of Capitalism 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Past Sen-ice 

JAKARTA — Call it windy rhetoric, 
call it mere symbolism, but the pledge 
issued Tuesday for free trade in the Asia- 
Pacific region is a historic step io the 
worldwide advance of capitalism. 

To grasp the overarching significance 
of the pledge, which was issued at a 
summit meeting of the 18-nation .Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, it 
is not necessary to understand the eco- 
nomic fine points. The implications for 
increased trade and economic growth. 
Chough potentially huge, depend critical- 
ly tm decisions yet to be taker.. 

What is most important about the 
summit declaration is that it marks a 
milestone in the triumph of free markets 
that began to sweep the world during the 


1980s. Such countries as China and In- 
donesia. which once stood in the fore- 
front of the Third World's Noualigned 
Movement and until recently carried 
much of its anti-capitalist baggage, are 
now committed to taking capitalism to 

.VESTS ANALYSIS 

new heights by dismantling barriers to 
foreign goods and investment. 

Completely free trade is such an ex- 
traordinarily ambitious goal, even 
though the deadline of 2020 seems far 
off. that ii strains credulity — and rea- 
soiu ar-r-j^.u io C;LirUon t-c 

countries involved can muster the politi- 
cal will to come even close to the target. 

But an unmistakable signal was sent 
this week as President Suharto of Indo- 


nesia, who still presides over the Non- 
aligned Movement, staked his prestige as 
summit host on getting his fellow forum 
members to make the” free-trade pledge 
and cajoled reluctant members to join 
the consensus. 

“The fact that President Suharto, the 
leader of one of the world's largest devel- 
oping countries, has taken the initiative 
is a sign of rbe fundamental transforma- 
tions which are taking place in the world 
economy ” Prime Minister Paul Keating 
of Australia said. 

It would be wildly premature, though, 
to expect any immediate economic re- 
sulis Iron, -.itc ’ B .»gor Declaration.” 
named for the city where the leaders met 
in Indonesia's presidential palace. 

The declaration does not legally bind 

See TRADE. Page 4 


Kohl’s Slim Re-election Points Up Coalition Weakness 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Past Service 

BERLIN — Helmut Kohl won formal 
re-election as chancellor by the skin of his 
teeth Tuesday in a parliamentary battle 
that underscored the weakness of Bonn's 
ruling coalition. 

Mr. Kohl clenched his hands over his 
head like a victorious boxer after hearing 
that he had collected 338 votes, only one 
more t ha n the absolute majority needed to 


secure a fourth term. . like walking a tightrope. 

The chancellor’s political handlers in the ^ Kohl's ultimate selection as chan- 
Bundestag, Germany’s lower house, were cgjj^ was not in serious doubt since under 
so uncertain of victory in the secret ballot pariiamentary rules an inability to secure 
that two seriously ill deputies from Mr.. ^ absolute majority within two ballots is 
Kohl’s Christian Democratic Union were followed by a third ballot for which a 


ties to Bonn a day early to be certain of a 
100 percent turnout. 

Despite showing uncharacteristic signs 
of anxiety as the votes were tallied, Mr. 
Kohl quickly regained his equanimity and, 
with studied insouciance, said. “It was the 
result 1 expected, more or less.” 

The opposition leader, Rudolf Scharp- 
ing erf the Social Democrats, however, pre- 
dicted that “making difficult political deci- 
sions with such a narrow majority win be 
like walking a tightrope.” 

Mr. Kohl's ultimate selection as chan- 
cellor was not in serious doubt since under 


roused from their side beds to cast votes. 

Mr. Kohl's center-right alliance with the 
liberal Free Democrats won a narrow ma- 
jority in last month’s federal elections, 
snaring 341 of the Bundestag’s 672 seats. It 
is uncertain who from the coalition broke 
r anks to oppose Mr. Kohl's c an di d a cy 
within the sanctuary of the secret ballot, 
but the dose tally was a reminder that 
every vote ms a controversial issue over the 
next four years could be a potential coali- 
tion-breaker. 

Party whips had ordered coalition depu- 


simple majority would suffice. Neverthe- 
less, failure would have been humiliating 
for Mr. Kohl and further eroded his clout 
in a badly splintered Bundestag. 

In postwar Germany, parliamentary 
votes lor chancellor have often been ex- 
tremely dose. In 1949, for example, Kon- 
rad Adenauer was elected with the bare 
minimum needed for an absolute majority 
but then went on to serve for 14 years. Mr. 
Kohl, who first became chancellor in 1982, 

See KOHL, Page 4 




Clinton to Sign Pact on European Peacekeeping Group 


■ _ Dec. 5 and 6, the Conference on Security 

By Steven and Cooperation would play a larger role 

New l^kVmaaertKe mediating conflicts, protecting embat- 

WASHINGTON— ftwtoi ' tied minorities and providing peacekcep- 

ton will join the leaders of Russ^Gcrma- d conflicts in places like Georgia 

n y.F™«mdBriK^mBad^»tn« ^^“omo-Karab^ officials sad ^ 

tnnnlh trt CIOTI flit ABTCCmCQt aimed ai nfFinalc incict 


month to sign an agreement aixnea at 
transforming the 53-nation Conference on 
Security md Cooperation in EWope into a 
stronger organization specializing m con 
flict resolution and peacekeeping. US. of- 
ficials said Tuesday. .. . 

The administration is pushing, to 

^etSStSSSSgs 

conflicts in Europe and 

republics, like the onern Bosnia, and tak 

mg sane of the burden off the United 

Under the agreement, to be signed in 
Budapest at the organization s summit on 

j Newsstand Prices^ 

! Andorra 9.00 FF Luxembourg 60 L.Fr 

! SSSksLll MOrOCCO . • " ■ ” ■ g 

i Cameroon..! .400 CF A 


CKfrttm administ ration officials insist 
thattbcrplan to upgrade the organization 
will in no way diminish NATO’s tradition- 
al role of providing a security umbrella for 
Western Europe. 

From the adminis tration s view, upgrad- 


ing the organization's role should make it 
easier to someday expand NATO’s mem- 
bership eastward by signaling to former 
Soviet republics, especially powerful Rus- 
sia, that the United States and Western 
Europe plan to include, rather than ex- 
clude, them from future European security 
arrangements. 

in this way, strengthening the Confer- 
ence on Security, in which the United 
States and Russia are the dominant pow- 
ers. is aimed at reassuring President Boris 


Fed Shakes Markets 
With Big Rate Hike 

Threat oflnflationls Cited to Justify 
% -Point Rise, Higher Than Expected 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Responding to tears of 
inflation in financial markets, the Federal 
Reserve Board raised short-term interest 
rates Tuesday by three-quarters of a per- 
centage point and raised its discount rate 
by the same amount for good measure. 

Most economists bad predicted that the 
Federal Open Market Committee would 
move rates up by only half a percentage 
point, but the Fed said it bad acted more 
forcefully because of the persistent 
strength of the U.S. economy and the high 
use of the country’s industrial capacity. Its 
justification was that higher rates were 
“necessary to keep inflation contained, 
and therefore foster sustainable economic 
growth.” 

The federal funds rate, which sets the 
wholesale cost of money for the country's 
banks, went to 5.5 percent from 4.75 per- 
cenL The discount rate, a largely symbolic 
measure of the cost of emergency loans by 
banks from the central bank, moved up to 

4.75 percent. 

But there was no hint as to whether this 
rate increase, the sixth this year, was the 
last of the current series, leading Wall 
Street analysts to suspect that the central 
bank might move again late in December 
or early in 1995 if the higher rates had still 
not started to check the rate of economic 
growth. 

The Fed's long-awaited decision Tues- 
day spurred major money center banks to 
raise their prime rates to 8.50 percent from 

7.75 percent. Much will push up credit 
card charges and the cost of business and 
auto loans. 

Wall Street reacted erratically. The Dow 
Jones industrial average finished down 
3.37 points at 3,826.36, erasing a more 
than 20-point gain accomplished immedi- 
ately after the Fed’s move. Stocks initially 
followed Treasury bond prices higher, but 
then fell back on sentiment that fixed- 
income securities would draw funds away 
from equities. 


The lure of higher rates also strength- 
ened the dollar by more than a pfennig 
against the Deutsche mark and by nearly a 
half a yen. (Page 16) 

The yield on the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond finished Tuesday at 8.04 
percent, down from 8.07 percent Monday, 
narrowing the spread between the two- 
year Treasury note and the long bond to 
less than 1 percentage point for the first 
time since December 1990. The yield on 
the two-year note finished at 7.08 percent. 

If this finally proves that long-term dol- 
lar investors may be growing more com- 


m Down 

m 337 

3626.36 

The Dollar 

New vortc, 

DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


0 . 1&6 


Tuas. dote 
1.5558 


previous ctase 
1.5446 
1.5665 
88.30 
5.3095 


fortable with their returns as well as with 
the Fed's aggressive policies, foreign mon- 
ey could flow back into New York. lifting 
the dollar, rallying bond prices and keep- 
ing a lid on long-term rates. 

Evidence that economic growth contin- 
ued to exceed the central bank’s goal of an 
annual 2.5 percent came with the latest 
government statistics Tuesday. Higher re- 
tail sales in October showed continued 
growth in consumer spending, especially 
on expensive items like cars, whose pur- 
chase can be influenced by interest rates. 

Factories also were operating at hieh 
levels of capacity, another traditional indi- 
cator of future inflation. That indicator, 
however, is increasingly questioned by 
union leaders and some corporate econo- 
mists because American companies are 
able to tap factory capacity worldwide. 

The Wall Street gurus who guide the 

See FED, Page 4 


Relaxed U.S. Policy Gives 
Weapon- Sellers a Break 




Mn-hoo) Urban/ Rtulcr* 

Helmut Kohl being sworn in Tuesday for a new term as chancellor of Germany. 


N. Yeltsin and Russian nationalists that 
the new security arrangements planned for 
Europe are not anti- Russian. 

At a news conference Tuesday in Jakar- 
ta, Mr. Clinton explained his decision to 
support strengthening the Conference on 
Security and Cooperation, saying, “What 1 
have sought to do is to create a stronger 
Europe that was more independent but 
also more closely allied with us, and one 

See CSCE, Page 4 


By Ralph Vartabedian 
and John M. Broder 

Los Angela Time Service 

WASHINGTON — In a victory for the 
U.S. defense industry, the Clinton admin- 
istration is preparing to adopt policy 
guidelines that for the first time would 
factor the health of U.S. weapons makers 
and the shape of the domestic economy 
into decisions on whether to approve for- 
eign arms sales. 

Arms sales abroad require government 
approval, and historically those decisions 
have been judged by whether the sales 
enhance U.S. security, regional stability 
and international cooperation. But the 
new guidelines would require the govern- 
ment to consider also whether a deal helps 
support U.S. defense contractors and 
maintains high-paying American jobs. 

As U.S. military spending continues its 
downward spiral, the Pentagon is unable 
to fully support its once massive industrial 
complex, and exports are being counted on 
for a quarter of American contractors* fu- 
ture revalue. Over the next two years, for 
example, about half of American jet fight- 
er production will be exported. 

A draft Oder is awaiting President Bill 
Clinton’s signature, pending White House 
and cabinet-level decisions on several un- 
resolved issues, including whether to ap- 
prove a financing mechanism that would 
provide as much as $1 billion for the indus- 
try to promote foreign weapons sales. 

The Clinton cabinet must also decide 
whether the new pohcy-would include lan- 
guage that advocates restraint in arms 
trading on certain types dt weapons and to 
which nations the restraints would apply, a 
White House official said. 

Some experts are troubled by the new 
policy, saying that making economics part 
of the arms sales equation wiQ not only 
encourage additional U.S. exports but 
make it difficult for U.S. officials to ask 
other nations to restrain their own arms 
trading. 

“This will be very lucrative for us,” said 
Kenneth Watman, a senior researcher at 
the RAND Carp- “By this policy, the U.S. 


Russia’s Burial Games: Headstones and Dirt Are Extra 


By Michael Specter 

New York Tima Service 

MOSCOW —The Russian way of death 
would make anyone want to live forever. 

Burials, once one of the many subsidies 
doled out by the worker's state, have be- 
come so costly and so 


Cameroon CFA J FF fcw people can contemplate finding quiet 

fSSr 1 ' ■ YooS sSSaSS" ■■*?*- plotsofland or buying headstones. 

Gabc^'l’.’.-WO CFA' Senegal The amplest municipal burial in Mos- 

Greece 300 Dr. Spain. -^»PTA5 ^ without a headstone, 

Italy the average monthly industrial 

jSSSl"^ ■ “ C JD ua£ 8.50 DU* SSigc in Russia. In many ^provincial citie 

Lebanon "JlVlJSS 130 U.S. Mil. (Bur.) SUP tb C costs are even higher because the Mos- 


cow city government subsidizes Ritual, the 
main public burial company. 

Flowers for a municipal service cost an 
extra $25, and many Russians believe pro- 
foundly that funerals without flowers are 
an insall to the soul. 

“This has become a nightmare for many 
pensioners,” said Leonid Sidov, a sociolo- 
gist at the Russian Center for Public Opin- 
ion Studies. “But in many ways the prob- 
lem is a mirror of life in Russia today. The 
young accept the changes. They are flexi- 
ble. Bui for the old people, many of whom 
served in World War II, to have no dignity 
in death, to have no hope of a headstone, 
to know that you will fie so far from 


Moscow that your family will have trouble 
visiting the grave — it’s all too painfuL" 
Cremations have increased steadily in 
the past three years, largely because the 
costs are only half those of a burial, despite 
the Russian Orthodox Church's call for all 
faithful to be buried in the ground. 

But the competition for burial space has 
become so intense that even the church has 
granted believers grudging permission for 
cremation if no alternative is available. 

“These days, if you get out of the 
moigue and into the ground, you are 
lucky,” said Vladimir Panin, chairman of 
Kristin, one of the many private funeral 
companies that have sprung up. “But to be 


buried in Moscow is practically impossi- 
ble. You have to be in the mafia or a major 
politician for that” 

Even Ritual, the munidpaJ company, 
offers special services with “American 
hearses” and “European embalming tech- 
niques” for the wealthy. The prices start at 
$1,500 — tombstone not included — and 
can run to many times thaL 
But for most people, the best they can 
hope for is that their survivors have 
enough money to bribe the undertakers, 
grave diggers and cemetery operators nec- 
essary lobe buried only 50 or 60 kilome- 

See BURY, Page 7 


will also give a green light to other weap- 
ons sellers in the world.” 

But Joel Johnson, vice president for in- 
ternational affairs at the Aerospace Indus- 
tries Association, a Washington trade 
group, defended the legitimacy of large 
U.S. arms exports. They have helped pro- 
mote international stability in such areas 
as the Mideast, he said, and have cush- 
ioned the blow of declining defense spend- 
ing on American companies. 

“Nine years out of 10 we are the mer- 
chants of death and then the next year we 
are the arsenal of democracy,” Mr. John- 
son said. “I would feel more guilty selling 
sugar-coated breakfast cereal to kids than 
selling weapons to democratic nations.” 

The proposed guidelines follow a 
lengthy review of the issue that began in 
September. The policy, known as a presi- 
dential decision directive, has been de- 
layed, but a White House official said 
Monday, “Hopefully, it will be soon.” 

The prospective policy would make ex- 
plicit what has been an increasing trend of 
American officials — everybody from am- 
bassadors to the president — promoting 
arms sales from the Middle East to Asia. 

Although many experts predicted that 
aims sales would decline after the Cold 
War, U.S. sales have gone up sharply, 
because the world is less stable and Rus- 
sian sales have dropped. 


Kiosk 

Militant’s Grave 
Sacked in Israel 

N ESHER, Israel (AF) —The grave 
of Izzcdine Qassam, role model for 
Muslim militant gunmen fighting Is- 
rael, was found desecrated Tuesday, 
and Jewish extremists claimed respon- 
sibility. 

The police said the headstone of the 
grave was smashed and black graffiti 
on the cemetery walls read: “Death to 
the Arabs and followers of Lzzedine al 
Qassam." Mr. Qassam is buried is a 
Muslim cemetery in the town of 
Nesherjust outside the northern port 
dty of Haifa. 

The police in Haifa they had no 
suspects. But Israeli journalists said 
they had received a message in which 
the outlawed Jewish extremist group 
Kach took responsibility. 

Oanaral Haws 

Germany's refugee flood ebbs as Bonn 
slams the door. Page 6. 


Book Review 1 

Crossword 

Weaker 


Page 12. 
Page 23. 
Page 24. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 







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Page 2 


** 


Fatal Gaza Car Bombing Leaves Both Sides Guessing 


By Barton Gellman 

Washington Post Sentix 

JERUSALEM — Hani 
Abed, a sometime professor 
and local leader of the radical 
Islamic Jihad, left his classroom 
in Khan Yunis in the Gaza 
Strip on Nov. 2 and approached 
his usual car at the usual time 
and place. 

Moments later, a life lived in 
violence ended so. A powerful 
explosion tore apart the 35- 
year-old Palestinian, probably 
as he turned his key in the igni- 
tion. Encouraged by broad 
hints from Prime Minister Yitz- 
hak Rabin, nearly everyone 
here who expressed a view sup- 
posed that the long arm of Is- 
raeli security had struck. 

If so, it struck for the first 
time in territories that had been 
handed over to Palestinian self- 
rule. The echoes of the car 
bomb are still resounding here, 
as Israelis and Palestinians try 
to puzzle out the significance of 
the act. 

Why Islamic Jihad, when an- 
other fundamentalist group — 
the Islami c Resistance Move- 
ment, Hamas — claimed re- 
sponsibility for the suicide at- 
tack in Tel Aviv in October? 
Why autonomous Gaza, when 
the occupied West Bank holds 
as many or more of the toughest 
enemies of Israel? Why a weap- 
on of stealth, when Israel has 
struck so openly and often at 
those it considers its foes? 

And did the bomb, as ru- 
mored, augur the start of a wid- 
er assassination campaign? 

As both sides waited for the 
next move, a young disciple of 
Mr. Abed’s made his own reply 
Friday afternoon. Hisham Is- 
mael Hamad, 21, wrapped ex- 
plosives around his chest and 
bicycled into a knot of Israeli 
soldiers, killing three of than 
and himself when he detonated 
the charge. 

“There is no peace with the 
sons of monkeys and pigs, the 
enemies of peace, and no peace 
with Zionists who killed proph- 
ets,” Mr. Hamad wrote in a 
final letter to family and 
friends. “We the sons of Islam 
must move to stop this cancer- 
ous disease called Israel be- 
cause its destruction is a Koran- 
ic imperative.” 

If Israel was behind Mr. 
Abed’s death, it was not quite 
so transparent about its rea- 
sons. Officially, the government 
did not confirm or deny in- 
volvement. But there were clues 
from Mr. Rabin and his aides. 

“With one hand we are shak- 



WORLD BRIEFS 

# 

U.S.-Norlh Korea Pact Annoys Russia 

MOSCOW (Combined Dispatches) — Russia said Tuesday 
that it was unhappy about a nuclear treaty between the 
States and North Korea because the deal infringed upon Mo* 
cow’s commercial interests with its former Communist, ally. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman, Ongon Ka rasm, said Ru^ 
had been counting on helping North Korea build a power station 
based on light-water nuclear reactors, which under the treaty are 
now to be supplied by the United States and Japan. 

In North Korea, meanwhile, Pyongyang said thelatesi rouudof 
t»nr< with U.S. delegates on dismantling its nuclear program had 
been “productive and beneficial.” The talks., which started Moq. 


extracting 
nuclear weapons. 


make 
(Reuters, AP) 




Sna NadEflmd/AtCDCC France. Preaje 

Schoolgirls marching in a parade at a Gaza City stadium on the sixth anniversary celebration of the Palestinians* declaration of independence. 


ing the hand of peace with the 
Hashemite Kingdom of Jor- 
dan,” Mr. Rabin said in a pub- 
lic appearance on the day Mr. 
Abed died, “and with the other 
hand we are pulling the trigger 
in order to harm the murderers 
of Hezbollah and the terrorists 
of Hamas and the Islamic Ji- 
had.” 

In the next day’s newspapers, 
and all that week, Israeli securi- 
ty officials disclosed details 
about Mr. Abed that read like a 
rationale for killing him. Not 
only had Mr. Abed been re- 
sponsible for the deaths of Is- 
raeli soldiers, the anonymous 
officials said, but as he died he 
was also plotting a new car 
bomb attack himself. His agent, 
one newspaper reported, had 
already stolen the vehicle that 
Mr. Abed planned to use. 

Tellingly, according to Israeli 
journalists, the military censor 
warned them against fiat state- 
ments that the government was 
behind the booby-trapping of 
Mr. Abed’s car. Instead, the 


censor told them, they could 
write that Palestinians alleged 
as much. 

That fig leaf of deniability, 
according to senior members of 
Israel’s political establishment 
could be read as a kind of com- 
pliment to Yasser Arafat the 
man in charge of the limited 
self-rule areas of Gaza and Jeri- 
cho. 

“If we did it” an official said, 
“Arafat should be flattered Is- 
rael is respecting his boundaries 
and his authority. Israel is treat- 
ing Gaza like a European coun- 
try” 

Peculiar perhaps to an out- 
sider's ear, that assertion holds 
a certain logic here. In the occu- 
pied territories, or Israel itself, 
another well-connected Israeli 
explained, “we are the sover- 
eign. We have to follow the rule 
law. If someone kills some- 


one else, we have to investigate 
who did it” 

Not so abroad. 

After the Palestinian Black 
September group lolled U Is- 
raeli athletes at the 1972 Olym- 
pic Games in Munich, mad 
made wbat the authors Dan Ra- 
viv and Yossi Me l man called “a 
oold, calculated decision to kill 
those who had killed.” 

In Rome, Paris and Beirut 
the next year, the Mossad and 
the army sent hit teams to track 
and execute the Palestinians 
who had planned the Munich 
attack. 

Everyone who mattered — 
the Israeli public and Palestin- 
ian leadership, among others — 
assumed, as they were intended 
to, that Israel was behind the 
spate of killings. But Israel 
sought to avoid direct acknowl- 
edgment to avoid undue embar- 


rassment to the host govern- 
ments. 

Die details became public 
nonetheless when Israeli agents 
blundered in Norway, mistak- 
ing a waiter for a terrorist and 

trilling him. 

In 1988, another Israeli team 
killed Mr. Arafat’s top deputy. 
Khalil Wazir, also known as 
Abu Jihad, at his home outride 
Tunis. 

There are, however, impor- 
tant differences between the 
European operations of the 
1970s and 1980s and the car 
bombing in Gaza two weeks 
ago. 

Although irritated at the 
time, the French and Italian 
governments were not threat- 
ened fundamentally by Israel's 
covert strikes. Mr. Arafat’s, ac- 
cording to many observers here, 
is. 


The killing of Mr. Abed led 
directly to the worst humilia- 
tion of Mr. Arafat’s short ten- 
ure in the self-rule territories. 
When he showed up for Mr. 
Abed’s funeral in Gaza City, an 
angry crowd drove him away, 
knocking the trademark check- 
ered scan from his bead. They 
called him a collaborator and 
traitor. 

Some commentators here say 
they believe that Mr. Rabin, as 
a keen student of power poli- 
tics, intended the assassination, 
in part, as a warning to Mr. 
Arafat to crack down on the 
radicals — or Israel would. 

Others, however, saw it more 
simply: that Mr. Rabin sought 
a revenge attack after the Tel 
Aviv bomb, but may not have 
been able to find the well-con- 
cealed cells of the Hamas mili- 
taiy wing in the Occupied West 
Bank. 


Leader Admits Austria’s Holocaust Guilt 


just 


ask fee butler.. 


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Win i trvut it ..yibi.g ytm tr«ir it It it. 


s-i-n-g-a-p-o-r-e 


By Clyde Haberman 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — President 
Thomas Klestil of Austria, go- 
ing where none of his predeces- 
sors had ever been, went before 
the Israeli Parliament on Tues- 
day to say that his country had 
often failed to face its past and 


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that it produced “many of the 
worst henchmen in the Nazi 
dictatorship.” 

Mr. Klestil's remarks fell 
short of an explicit Austrian 
apology for the Nazi Holocaust, 
which Israelis had been told to 
expect. But he told the lawmak- 
ers, “I bow my head with deep 
respect and profound emotion 
in front of the victims.” 

“No word of apology can 
ever expunge the agony of the 
Holocaust,' 7 he said. 

His visit was the first by an 
Austrian head of state, made 
more poignant for Israelis by 
the fact that his immediate pre- 
decessor was Kurt Waldheim, 
the former United Nations sec- 
reUury-generaL who had hidden 
details of his service in Hitler’s 
army daring World War IL 

During the Waldheim presi- 
dency, from 1986 to 1 992. Israel 
refused in protest to send an 
ambassador to Vienna, filling 
the post only after Mr. Klestil 
took office in June 1992. In an 
indirect reference to that icy pe- 
riod, Foreign Minister Shnnon 
Peres said in Parliament that 
now “most of Austria — still 


not all of it — is prepared to to 
accept their part in the historic 
responsibility for the Nazi 
crimes. 

“The former generation 
bears the guDt,” Mr. Feres said. 
“The current generation bears 
the responsibility.” 

On this visit, Mr. Klestil visit- 
ed the Yad Vashem Holocaust 
memorial and went out of his 
way to make gestures to his Is- 
raeli hosts. Unlike many recent 
foreign leaders, be made no 
journey to Orient House, the 
Palestinian political center in 
East Jerusalem, which is under 
attack from Israelis. 

In his speech at a lightly at- 
tended session of Parliament, 
he made no direct reference to 
Mr. Waldheim. But he said that 
too often his country bad cast 
itself not as a partner of Nazi 
Germany but as a victim itself 
because it was annexed by the 
Germans in 1938. 

“No people should be 
blamed with collective guilt,” 
Mr. Klestil said, speaking in 
English, “and no one knows 
that better than the Jewish peo- 
ple, who have suffered more 


than any other from such 
sweeping allegations. Neverthe- 
less, there remains a burden- 
some legacy arising out of our 
history that Austrians have to 
acknowledge. 

“Today, the Austrians recog- 
nize that acknowledgment of 
the full truth was long over- 
due,” he said “We know full 
weO that all too often we have 
wily spoken of Austria as the 
first state to have lost its free- 
dom and independence to Na- 
tional Socialism and far too sel- 
dom of the fact that many of the 
worst henchmen in the Nazi 
dictatorship were Austrians.” 

Unlike Germany. Austria has 
never offered reparations for 
the tens of thousands of its peo- 
ple who were among the 6 mil- 
lion Jews killed by the Nazis. 
Mr. Peres raised the issue of 
payments. Mr. Klestil, making 
no commitment, said the matter 
would be studied. 

“For far too long we have not 
done enough, and perhaps not 
always the right thing, to allevi- 
ate the plight of the survivors of 
the Jewish tragedy and the vic- 
tims’ descendants,” he said 


Rabin Assails Arafat’s Security Effort 

GUSH KATIF, Gaza Strip (AP) — Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin accused Yasser Arafat on Tuesday of not doing enough to 
prevent attacks on Israelis and warned that the Israd-PLO peace 
accord ctmld collapse as a result. 

During a tour of army posts guarding Jewish settlements in the 
PLOruled Gaza Strip, Mr. Rabin said 35 Israelis bad been killed 
Ibis year in three suicide attacks by Islamic mi litants. He said that 
while there was “no certain method to hermetically prevent 
terrorism,” Israeli expected “a more serious effort than we have 
until now by the Palestinian authority.? 

Mr. Arafat countered in an interview that “violence has two 
sides” and noted that the latest suicide attack, which lolled three 
Israeli soldiers, was in response to the car-bombing death of a 
leader of the Islami c Jihad movement that was widely Mamed on 
Israel. 

Prince Andrew Visiting Argentina 

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) — Prince Andrew of Britain & 
rived Tuesday in Argentina for a four-day visit billed.as amqor 
gesture of reconciliation between the two nations that went to war 
over the Falkland Islands in 1982. 

President Carlos Saul Menem said the visit by the prince, a 
Falkl ands War veteran, would have been “unthinkable a while 
ago” and stressed that Argentina would press its continuing claim 
to the Atlantic islands through peaceful means. 

Earthquake in Philippines Kills 60 

CALAPAN, Philippines (Reuters) — An earthquake and tidal 
waves ravaged the central Philippines island of Mindoro on 
Tuesday, lading more than 60 people, rescuers said. 

More than 130 were injured when the quake struck at about 3 
A.NL, triggering panic, cutting off power and water supplies and 
splitting open the base of a mountain in the tourist resort of 
Puerto Gaiera. Many of the dead woe' children who drowned 
when their homes were hit by waves up to 15 meters (48 feet) high 
The quake measured 7 on the Richter scale, according to govern- 
ment seismologists. 

Russia Squeezes Ukraine on Treaty 

MOSCOW (AFP) — Russia has stopped fuel deliveries to 
Ukraine’s nuclear plants and will resume them only when Ukraine 
ratifies the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, President Leonid 
Kuchma of Ukraine said Tuesday. 

Mr. Kuchma, quoted by the Russian news agency Interfax, said 
Russia had told the Ukrainian state committee on nuclear energy 
of its move. Rusaa had been delivering fuel to the Ukrainian 
nuclear plants since Ukraine began transferring its nuclear war- 
heads to Russia in accordance with a treaty signed by Russia, 
Ukraine and the United States in Jamm y. 

Ukrainian legislators are to debate Kiev’s ratification of the 
treaty as a nonnuclear power Wednesday, just ahead of a visit to 
Washington by Mr. Kuchina next week. Russia, the United Star 
and other Western nations have repeatedly pressed Kiev to rati 
the treaty. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Paris to Open Orly to EU on Jan. 2 

PARIS (Bloomberg) — France's transport minister said Tues- 
day that France would allow European Union airlines to begin 
using Orly Airport outride Paris beginning Jan. 2. 

The official Bernard Bosson, said he was still trying to reroute 
air traffic into Orly and Paris’s main international airport. Charles 
de GauQe, and that be could not respond to demands by airlines 
seeking landing rights before the arrangements were in place. 

Lufthansa German Airlines, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and 
Lauda Air in Austria are all seeking rights to fly to Orly as soon as 
possible. In April the European Commissi cm ruled that France 
bad to open access to Orly by Oct 28. But Mr. Bosson maintained 
in late October that he could not grant further access until he had. 
sorted out traffic between that airport, south of Paris, and Charles 
de Gaulle, northeast of tire capital 
Air traffic controllers in Athens have called four-hour work 
stoppages on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, threatening long 
delays in local and international flights. The controllers are 
seeking higher wages and pensions and the replacement of the 
airport's radar system, which they say is out of date. (AP) 
Cathay Pacific Airways introduced dual-lan g ua g e audio — Eng- 
lish and Chinese — for Chinese- language movies. (AFP) 

Thirteen more people have (Bed! of cholera in Albania, bringing 
the death toll to 30 since the outbreak began in September, health 
officials said. (Reuters! 

The Dubai airline Emirates says it will begin nonstop service 
between Dubai and Ho Chi Minh City in June. (Reuters) 


Without U.S . , NATO to Maintain Bosnia Sanctions 


Ctxnpikd tv Our Staff From Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — NATO for- 
mally agreed Tuesday to con- 
tinue an arms embargo on Bos- 
nian Muslims without full U.S. 


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participation and emphasized 
the need for alliance solidarity, 
tested by Washington’s break 
with its European partners. 

NATO’s ambassadors ap- 
proved an assessment from the 
or ganiza tion’s militar y commit- 
tee that problems caused by the 
abrupt U.S. move were “unlike- 
ly to degrade the overall mili- 
tary effectiveness of the opera- 
tion.” 

President Bill Clinton's deci- 
sion noL to implement the em- 
bargo against the Muslims, 
made under strong pressure 
from Congress, has dismayed 
the European allies concerned 


about its wider political conse- 
quences. 

NATO's secretary-general, 
Willy Claes, who is to fly to 
Washington on Wednesday for 
talks on the issue, has also re- 
ceived assurances from Mr. 
Clinton that U.S. commanders 
in NATO operations would 
continue to put NATO first 

But NATO sources said a 
U.S. decision not to share intel- 
ligence continued to irk several 
European nations, particularly 
those with UN peacekeeping 
troops in the area. 

In Bosnia- Herzegovina on 
Tuesday, fighting raged for a 


>lateau near the Cro- 
atian border, and shells fired by 
Bosnian Serbs rained down on 
another government-held city 
declared by the United Nations 
to be a “safe area.” 

In Sarajevo, snipers fired on 
a streetcar, prompting suspen- 
sion of sendee. The police kept 
all cars, except bullet-proof ve- 
hicles, off the notorious “Sniper 
Aliev.” 

Shelling and shooting 
gripped the Bihac pocket of 
northwest Bosnia. Fierce fight- 
ing between Bosnian Serbs and 
government forces was reported 
Tuesday around the Grabez 


plateau, strategic high ground 
northeast of Bihac. 

Lieutenant Colonel Tim 
Spicer, a UN spokesman, said 
fighting was not spilling off the 
plateau into government-held 
territory that has been declared 
a safe area. 

Bosnian radio, referring to 
“the fiercest offensive so far” 
against the Bihac pocket by 
‘joint forces of Bosnian and 
Croat Serbs,” said several civil- 
ians had been killed. 

The radio said said that two 
civilians were killed and three 
wounded in the Serb attack. 

(Reuter^ AP) 


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Page 3 



THE AMERICAS/ 


Senate Is No House: A Republican Style Primer 


By Adam Qymer 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — When they were 
in opposition. Senate and House Repub- 
licans sounded pretty much alil«» in their 
complaints. When they won the nrid- 
teniL ejections last week, they sang in 
jubilation from the same page, promis- 
ing a d iminis hed federal government. 

1 But now .that they .taste power, their 
message is mixed. 

From cooperation with President Bill 
Cfinton to now hard to whack at wel- 
fare,' there are at least two distinct Re- 
publican positions. Bnt the key to un- 
derstanding them, and how they will 
affect the work of the 104th Congress, is 
not to wave ideological litmus papa at 
them. It fe instead to ask which end of 
the Capitol they come from. 

House Republicans have a big, specif- 
ic agenda: on tax cuts, on a constitution- 
al amendment to require a balanced 
budget, - on term limi ts, and on such 
internal questions as allowing more 
votes on amendments and cutting staff. 
Representative Newt Gingrich of Geor- 
gia, the probable' speaker of the House, 
and Dick Armey of Texas, its likely 
majority leader, add new items every 
Jay. 

' ■ But Senate Republicans are more cau- 
tious. “On the Senate side, the agenda's 



M to-be controlled by a consensus, 
leadership working with committee 
airmen,” said Bob Dole of Kansas, 
theprobable majority leader. 

The differences are far less ideological 
than environmental, because the Senate 
is a place that promotes accommoda- 
tion, and the House has been one that 
kills it. Even Senator Phil Gramm of 

NEWS ANALYSIS "" 

Texas, personally at least as conserva- 
tive as any leader in the House, goes out 
of his way to list fights he will not be 
piriring: on assault weapons, a national 
consumption tax, family leave, even im- 
migration. 

Senator Christopher J. Dodd, the 
Democrat of Connecticut who is run- 
ning for minority leader, crystallized the 
differences when he said there were 
three kinds of Republicans: House Re- 
publicans, Senate Republicans, and 
“Senate Republicans who served recent- 
ly in the House." These last Republi- 
cans, be said, were “sort of like junkyard 
does, because you go over to pet them 
ana they growl.” 

After a while, he added, they come to 
see that the Senate is not like the House, 
and that the two parties must work to- 
gether if anything is to get done. 


Or, as Richard F. Fenno. a professor 
at the University of Rochester, put il: 
“Every member of the Senate has an 
atomic bomb and can blow up the place. 
Thai leads to accommodation.” 

The atomic bomb he referred to is the 
ability of a small minority, even a single 
senator, to tie the place up for days or 
weeks with procedural devices. Even the 
60 votes required to halt a filibuster are 
not enough just before a recess, because 
the rules still allow unlimited amend- 
ments to legislation. 

Some part of the differences derives 
from two special sets of circumstances. 
Senators Dole, Gramm and Arlen Spec- 
ter of Pennsylvania are all thinking of 
running for president in 1996. Most of 
the rest probably have some later date in 
mind. A presidential campaign requires 
careful navigation: close to the right 
h ank during the primaries, closer to 
midstream in the general election. Pre- 
paring for such a race instills caution. 

Still, this circumstance could have 
been found, to one degree or another, in 
the Democratic majorities of each cham- 
ber in recent years. 

But something else is new: the fact of 
Republicans in power in the House after 
40 years in the minority. 

Ross K. Baker, a professor at Rutgers 
University, compared the Republicans 


to “people who have been released from 
extended incarceration, coming out in 
the light and squinting, and feeling a 
sort of sense of vengeance toward their 
jailers.” 

The Republicans promise to be nicer 
to House Democrats than the Demo- 
crats were when allowing the minority 
only a tiny share of staff and few oppor- 
tunities to offer amendments. 

Mr. Armey was nearly eloquent Mon- 
day when he proclaimed “Armey’s Axi- 
om,” which holds: "You cannot get 
ahead while you are getting even. It's a 
waste of time. It’s a waste of other peo- 
ple’s resources. It’s not an honorable 
thing to do." 

Still, Democrats are spoiling for a 
slight, and Mr. Gingrich's snippy letter 
to their defeated speaker. Thomas S. 
Foley of Washington, about not de- 
stroying documents was the first they 
felt. 

No mailer how much revenge is tak- 
en, the new majority in the House is sure 
to be legislatively energetic. After years 
in political wilderness, if not prison, it 
has ideas it wants to try. 

And it has a singular sort of congres- 
sional leader in Mr. Gingrich, who went 
out and campaigned and organized and 
planned strategy for the party, so that 
the majority he leads owes him its pow- 
er. 


Away From Politics 


• The tropica] storm designated Gordon dumped up to 8.5 
inches of rain on South Florida after lashing the Caribbean. In 
Haiti, the death toll from the storm rose to at least 350, 
according to reports of fatalities from flooding. A pregnant 
woman in Florida was killed in a three-car collision at a traffic 
light broken by the winds. The storm moved into the Gulf of 
Mexico, where its winds were expected to slow. 

• Tall people have a better dunce of surviving a heart attack 
than short people, researchers said at an American Heart 
Association conference in Dallas. Duke University scientists 
said they did not know exactly why height would influence 
heart attack survivability, but a cardiologist, Christopher 
Granger, said tall people may have arteries that are larger in 
diameter, allowing blood to flow more easily through them. 

• As American youths get fatter, their cholesterol levels are 
rising ominously, threatening a surge of heart disease when 
they reach adulthood, research suggests. Dr. Hugh D. Allen of 
Columbus Children’s Hospital in Ohio said: “There are 80 
minion children in the United States today, and 30 million of 
them win die of heart disease. It’s not a small problem.” 

• O.J. Simpson’s defense suffered a setback when the judge in 
his murder trial ruled that he would not throw out evidence 
seized ironj Mr. Simpson’s Bronco. Mr. Simpson’s attorneys 
contended that the evidence could have been contaminated 
when a worker allegedly went through the vehicle, which was 
seized after the slayings of Mr. Simpson's former wife, Nicole 
Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald L. Goldman. 

• Patches of ice shrouded in foe caused a 65-car pfleup on 
*;? Interstate 25 on the north side of Denver, killin g one person 

and injuring 36 others. A police spokesman said: “Someone 
must have lost it initially, rm sure the fog was a factor.” 

AP. Reuters 



FLORIDA TRIAL — John Craraitie, 17. watching jury selection in his trial for the 
murder of a British tourist at a rest stop last year near Monticello, Florida. On 
Tuesday, the rictus's girlfriend, wounded in the attack by four youths, recounted how 
gunmen had knocked on the window and opened fire when they tried to drive away. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


A Victor, Finally, in Maryland 

HYATTSVILLE. Maryland — Parris 
Glendening. a Democrat, won the race for 
Maryland governor on Tuesday by a mere 
5.405 votes after all but the overseas ballots 
were counted. 

In a state where Democrats outnumber 
Republicans by 2 to 1. Mr. Glendening had 
proclaimed victory the day after the election, 
when he led by 6.187 votes. 

Ellen Sauerbrey would not concede in her 
bid to become Maryland’s first woman gov- 
ernor and its first Republican governor since 
Spiro Agnew was elected in 1966. 

Absentee ballots from Marylanders who 
were overseas have until Friday to arrive at 
boards of elections. Gene Raynor, head of 
the state election board, said Tuesday that he 
did not expect there to be more than 500. 

The final, unofficial tally gave Mr. Glen- 
dening 706.531 votes to 701.126 for Ms. 
Sauerbrey 

In Connecticut. Representative Sam Gej- 
denson apparently won a four-vote victory in 
the 2d Congressional District, the secretary 
of state's office announced Tuesday in certi- 
fying the results of a recount. 

The seven-term congressman had 79,160 
votes to Republican Edward W. Munster's 
79,156 votes in results certified by Connecti- 
cut's secretary of state. The first count after 
last week's election had Mr. Gcjdenson up by 
two votes. 

Mr. Munster has promised to appeal — 
either through the courts or in the Republi- 
can-controlled Congress that takes over in 
early January. 

Secretary of State Pauline Kezcr declined 
to declare a winner. “I'm choosing my words 
carefully because it's a hot legal battle and I 
don't want to get in the middle of it." she 
said. 

Meanwhile. Senator Dianne Feinstcin's 
lead grew in her California race for re-elec- 
tion, but her Republican challenger. Michael 
Huffington, refused to concede. With more 
than 667,000 absentee ballots remaining to be 
processed. Mrs. Feinslein had 3,637.972 
votes to Mr. Huffington's 3,510,652 — a lead 
of 127,320 votes. Mr. Huffington said he 
expected “a miracle." 

Also still hanging are the governor’s race in 
Alaska, and House contests in California. 
New York and Oregon. (AP) 

Presidential Hopefuls line Up 

WASHINGTON — Senator Arlen Specter 
launched a possible presidential candidacy 
with a sharp blast at the “far-right fringe" 
and a call to moderates to help him take the 
Republican Party in a new direction. 

Less than a week after the party’s biggest 
victory in four decades, Mr. Specter, Repub- 
lican of Pennsylvania, warned that the party 
faced a potentially disastrous defeat in 1996 
unless the far-right forces symbolized by Pat- 
rick J. Buchanan and Pat Robertson arc 
defeated. 

Mr. Specter, 62, also said the party must 


jettison its platform plank opposing abortion 
and truly become the "big tent that Lee 
Atwater, a former party chairman, envi- 

sioned. . . 

Mr. Specter said he did not oppose the roie 
of most religious conservatives within tne 
party, but he attacked the "zealotry of tne 
far-right 5-percent fringe" and said they do 
not stand for ‘religious.’ “Christian or *Ju- 
deo-Oiristian' values when they advocate in- 
tolerance and reject brotherhood and insist 
on either ruling or ruining." ( wr) 


Simon Won’t Seek Re-election 

WASHINGTON — Senator Paul Simon, 
the senior elected Democrat in Illinois and 
the leading vote-getter, has announced that 
he will not seek a third term in 1996. casting a 
shadow over the party's hopes of winning 
back control of the Senate in two years. 

Coming less than a week after the Demo- 
crats lost nine seats and relinquished Senate 
control to the Republicans, the announce- 
ment by Mr. Simon. 65. was a further setback 
to the party because he won handily when he 
last ran and was considered one of the party's 
best prospects for re-election. ( (VP) 


Any Frequent- Flyer Bonus? 

JAKARTA — Mr. Clinton s Asian trade 
mission involves 20.500 miles of travel, but he 
will give new meaning to the term "jet-setter" 
if he keeps his engagements for December. 

That schedule, administration officials say, 
calls for Mr. Clinton to fly to California on 
Dec. 3 for a Democratic Party fundraiser, 
back to Washington on Dec. 4 for a ceremo- 
nial event and on to Hungary that night. 

Mr. Clinton plans attend a Budapest sum- 
mit meeting of the Conference on Security 
and Cooperation in Europe on Dec. 5 and 
return to Washington in time for a Christmas 
party that night. 

Tuesday and Wednesday. Dec. 6 and 7. are 
supposed to be normal work days for the 
president, but his planning schedule calls for 
him to leave Washington again Dec. 8 to 
attend a Dec. 9-1 1 summit meeting of West- 
ern Hemisphere leaders in Miami. A presi- 
dential visit to Haiti is scheduled for Dec. 12. 

Mr. Clinton criticized George Bush in the 
1992 presidential campaign for having spent 
too much time traveling abroad, but he will 
eclipse Mr. Bush's record of six foreign trips 
in one year — the most ever by a U.S. leader 
— if he goes to Hungary and Haiti next 
month. The separate trips would give him a 
total of seven. ( Reuters) 


Quote-Unquote 

Representative Newt Gingrich. Republi- 
can of Georgia, speaker-presumptive of the 
House, saying he was aware of how often new 
members of Congress arrive in Washington 
calling for change and then let it slide: "This 
is a city which is like a sponge. It absorbs 
waves of change, and it slows them down, 
and it softens them, and then one morning 
they ccasc to exist." (NYT) 





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we’ll compare your situation with ones we’ve 
faced before to give you the direct benefit 
of real-world experience. And, we can help 
you at any stage: from initial consulting to 
implementation. 

So if you’re looking for an experienced 
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contact your local IBM representative. 


INTERNET: «A Guide to Open Client/Server* is available via 
1 J E-Mail- cUentsen.'er@vnei.ibm.com 

2) http:/ hpime-europe.ibm.comJelient^server 

3) ftp:/ Iftp.europe.ibm.comJclientMrverldoes 


B 9 



I 


T 







\ 




Page4 


INTERNATIONAL WF.BAT.D TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


Clinton Confronts Suharto Over East Timor 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dt^aieha 

JAKARTA — President Bill Clinton publicly 
pressed Indonesia on Tuesday to ease its grip on East 
Timor, injecting a contentious note into a trade-relat- 
ed visit and tails he will hold with his host. President 
Suharto. 

At a wide-ranging news conference that followed an 
agreement at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation 
summit meeting Mr. Clinton also said the election 
upheaval in the United States last week would not 
cause him to shift his focus from domestic to foreign 
policy. _ „ 

Mr. Clinton’s comments on East Timor came as a 
group of 29 students from the former Portuguese 
colony embarrassed the Indonesian government dur- 
ing the summit meeting with a sit-in at the U.S. 
Embassy in Jakarta. 

Asked if he believed Indonesian troops should with- 
draw and allow East Timor self-rule, Mr. Clinton 
reaffirmed Washington’s position that “the people of 
East Timor should have more say over their own local 
affairs." 

“I have already spoken with President Suharto 
about this in the past in our personal meetings, and it 
will come up again in our discussion tomorrow," he 
said. 


Mr. Clinton’s summit-meeting trip to Indonesia will 
become an official visit on Wednesday, complete with 
military pomp, ceremonial events and talks with Mr. 
Suharto, a former army genera] sworn in last year for a 
sixth five-year term. 

The students involved in the embassy sit-in want 
Indonesia to free a jailed East Timor resistance leader, 
Xanana GusmSo, a demand that it has rejected. Indo- 
nesia invaded Hast Timor, 2,000 kilometers (1,200 
miles) from Jakarta, in 1975 and annexed it in 1976. 

The U.S. secretary of state, Warren M. Christopher, 
was to meet with members of the National Commis- 
sion on Human Rights on Wednesday, a watchdog 
body set up last year by the Indonesian government, 
American officials said. 

Mr. Suharto, in a rare encounter with the interna- 
tional press, ducked a question about the annexed 


The 29 students who occupied the embassy said that 


FED: 

Interest Rates Up 

CotfUtaeA from Page 1 


they wanted asylum in Portugal. They also said they 
still wanted to meet Mr. Clinton. 

Activists said they were increasingly concerned 
about the fate of the 29 and several-dozen other 
Timorese, including about 35 detained on their way to 
the embassy protest. 

In Dili, the provincial capital of East Timor, the 
police said 16 people were in detention after anti- 
government demonstrations. 

Witnesses said about 100 people rallied on the 
campus of East Timor University, c hant i ng slogans 
that criticized Indonesia and implored other countries 
to support their pro-independence c a u se. 

On the US. political front, Mr. Cfintoo, the first 
Democrat to occupy the White House in a dozen years, 
said he had no intention of withdrawing from the 


bond market had called far 
strong action by the Fed to stay 
ahead in the fight against infla- 
tion. John Lipsky, chief econo- 
mist at Salomon Brothers Inc., 
told an audience of foreign 
bankers that “the Fed has to 
provide a message that it has re- 
evaluated its view of February 
that the economy would be 
slowing down and step up the 
scope and pace of tightening.” 


fw| 


When the Fed began raising 
tes on Feb. 4. its aoals indud- 


tionai pr ess, niprtfpri a question about me annexed saiu ne naa no miamuu « uiuu uk. 

enclave on Tuesday, but held out the prospect of talks domestic field and concentrate instead on intemation- 


on the issue. 

“To answer that question, later there will be a longer 
time allotted, in the framework of a conference to be 
held by Indonesia,” Mr. Suharto replied. 

Indonesia" officials said they knew of no planned 
conference on East Timor, and the official translation 
of Mr. Suharto’s remarks made no reference to a 
conference. 


al issues, where his power is greater. 

“I expect that the lion’s share of my work will 
continue to be at home,” he said. 

Still, Mr. Clinton announced that he would soon 
make another foreign trip, to Budapest for a summit 
meeting of the 53-nation Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe. (Raam .AFP, 


APEC: Liberalisation Plan Is Hailed as Turning Point Highlights of APEC Agreement 


Continued from Page 1 


production and 45 percent of Kba^ization in general 


ers and being involved in trade market in the world” to Ameri- 


can and other exports. 

He said that even after the 
multilateral trade liberalization 
deal that was signed earlier this 


Main points of the agreement by leaders of the 18- 
member Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum: 


global trade. Although they agreed to the He said that even after the 

In an obvious message to Eu- declaration, China and a num- multilateral trade hberalizauon 
»hp a PFf*' if»arirr<; uiH ber of other East Asian mem- deal that was signed earlier this 
tto ih*w«r“ou^y r^osed bers of APEC with relatively 

to building an inwtrd-loolSg high levels of protection are of the Graeral Agr^ent on 
trading bloc. clearly wary of being forced Tariffs and Trade, tariffs on 

Instead, they said their ac- “to an early round of region- American automobiles m Ma- 
rions would bd“a powerful im- wide tariff cuts that could cause 
petus for further cberabzation 


at the multilateral level to 
which we remain fully commit- 
ted.” 

Prime Minister Paul Keating 
of Australia said that at current 


to political consequences arising between 30 percent and 60 per- 
il. From large-scale restructuring 06111 compared with the U.S. 
and job losses. tanff cm autos of 2.5 percent. 


• Achieve free and open trade and investment in the 
Asia-Pacific region by 2020, with industrialized econo- 
mies reaching the goal by 2010 . 

• Strengthen the open, multilateral trading system 

• Intensify development cooperation In the Asia-Pacific 
region. 

• Carry out commitments under the Uruguay Round of 
the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 
fully and without delay. 


rates on Feb. 4, its goals includ- 
ed throttling short-term con- 
sumer borrowing with higher 
bap fc and credit card rates and 
encouraging long-term invest- 
ment with lower band rates. But 
bond traders and investors had 
borrowed heavily — much 
more heavily than Fed officials 
realized — as a way to bet on 
continued declines in rates and 
consequent increases in bond 
prices, especially in Europe. 

The turn in policy, therefore, 
hit the bond market when it was 
overextended, and traders had 
to cash in billions in bonds to 
meet margin calls, which drove 
bond prices down further and 


long-term interest rates up. It 
was the exact opposite of the 


was the exact opposite of the 
what the Fed had intended. 

If bond prices stabilize near 
the levels set Tuesday, this spi- 
ral may at last be unwinding — 
the fruit of the central bank’s 
determination to continue rais- 
ing short-term rates in an effort 
to slow the U.S. economy. 



j>SSS5 htJt! 


j*r\ 


mmM oA 


MBwTMtefRwen 


Dissenters on the rate increase protesting the Fed*s action 
outside the board’s headquarters Tuesday in Washington. 


President Bill Clinton hailed 
the accord as “especially good 


rates of growth APEC members news for the United States and 
will include seven of the world’s our workers" because under the 


of global trade. 

A study commissioned re- 
cently by the Australian gov- 
ernment found that if free trade 


emmrat found that tiftee trade !? at h the fh Unitcd 

was applied by all APEC coun- States ft« most 

triesln 2Q10, it would generate open markets on Earth.” 


additional economic activity “By opening other markets,’ 

.L_ •o/ff l_! Ilf _ _ a >«\ a J al _ 4 p flnrl rnr 


worth more than $365 billion a he said, “our products and ser- 
year with the benefits widely vices become more competitive. 


distributed throughout the re- And more sales abroad create 
gion. more high-wage jobs at home.” 

The liberalization measures RefWrW to Janan. China 


The liberalization measures Referring to Japan. China 
agreed by the APEC leadens ^ other East Asian members 


were “basically win-win ar- of Ap EC ^ accounted for 
rangements," Mr. Keating said. ncar i y ^ D f America’s $1 16 bil- 


“And that is why I think the lion global trade deficit in 1993. 
sveloping countries are bring- Mr. Clinton said that “what we 


developing countries are bring- Mr. Clinton said that “what we 
ing their tariffs down unflater- are doing in this agreement is 


ally, removing nontariff barn- opening the fastest-growing 


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In entering his reservations, 
Prime Minis ter Mahathir bin 


• Expand and accelerate trade and investment pro- 
grams. 


most powerful economies by agreement individual APEC 
2020 and account for 57 percent nations “will have to tear down 


trade barriers to reap trade 
benefits.” 


M ohamad of Malaysia said that 
his country was worried it 
would not be in a position to 
compete with the big economies 
in APEC 

“We will make our best ef- 
fort,” he said. “We’ll try, but if 
by the year 2020 we find our- 
selves unable to compete, I 
don’t think anyone should force 
us to open up our country to an 
invasion by powerful compa- 
nies from the developed coun- 
tries.” 

President Jiang Zemin said 
that China endorsed regional 
trade and investment liberaliza- 
tion as a long-term objective. 

The group stopped short of 
making any commitment to 
start a region-wide round of ne- 
gotiated cuts in protection. 

Mr. Clinton made it dear 
that he had high expectations of 
Japan, which takes over as 
chairman of APEC from Indo- 
nesia for the next year and will 
be host to the next ministerial 
and leaders’ meetings in Osaka 
in the fall of 1995. 

“We’D meet again next year 
in Osaka,” he said. “Mean- 
while, we'll develop a detailed 
action agenda, a blueprint, for 
achieving our goal of free and 
fair trade, which I hope and 
believe will be approved when 
we meet in Osaka.” 

Prime Minister Tomiichi 
Moray ama of Japan said that as 
chairman of APEC Japan 
would “take a positive ap- 
proach in the creation of an 
action agenda.” 


The Bogor Declaration 

Summary of the Declara- 
tion of Common Resolve: 

• APEC will promote eco- 
nomic cooperation on the 
basis of “equal partner- 
ship, shared responsibility, 
mutual respect, common 
Interest and common ben- 
efit” 


• APEC leaders undertake 
to carry out the Uruguay 
Round commitments “fully 
and without delay” and 
urge others to do the same. 
APEC will also “acceler- 
ate’’ commitments under 
the Uruguay Round and 
“refrain from using mea- 
sures which would have 
the effect of Increasing lev- 
els of protection.” 

• APEC leaders urged all 
non-APEC members of the 
Work! Trade Organization 
(WTO) “to work together 
with APEC economies to- 
ward further multilateral 
trade liberalization.” 

• APEC leaders “agreed to 
adopt the long-term goal of 
free and open trade and in- 
vestments in the Asia-Pa- 
cific.” The goal will be pur- 
sued “promptly by further 
reducing barriers to trade 
and investment and by pro- 
moting the tree flow of 
goods, services and capi- 
tal” in a manner consistent 
with GATT. 

• Industrialized economies 


will achieve the goal of 
“free and open trade and 
investments no later than 
the year 2010 and develop- 
ing economies no later 
than the year 2020/’ 

• APEC will give “particu- 
lar attention” to Its trade 
“with non-APEC develop- 
ing countries to ensure that 
they will also benefit trade 
and investment liberaliza- 
tion in conformity with 
GATT /WTO provisions.” 

• APEC economies will 
promote flows of goods, 
services and capital “by 
eliminating administrative 
and other impediments to 
trade and investment” 

• To "intensity develop- 
ment cooperation" and re- 
duce "economic dispari- 
ties/’ the APEC leaders 
agreed to develop human 
and natural resources in 
the Asia-Pacific. This coop- 
eration will cover human 
resources, science and 
technology, promotion of 
small and medium-size en- 
terprises and infrastructure 
and environmental issues. 

• The APEC leaders 
agreed that "APEC econo- 
mies that are ready to initi- 
ate and implement a coop- 
erative arrangement may 
proceed to do so while 
those not yet ready to par- 
ticipate may join at a later 
date ” 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


KOHL: Chancellor Wins Re-election in Narrow Vote 


ingly accepted by the Christian 
Democrats. German law now 
defines nationality by blood- 


Continued from Page I Coalition leaders unveiled ingly accepted by the Christian 

is on track to break Mr. Ade- ** legislative pl» tof D^ocrats. German law now 
nauer’s postwar record for Ion- «■? f °Sf defines nu»ab& by blood- 

opvitv iff IQQ6 curing three weeks of private hnes, not place of birth. 

S i talks after the elections. Unsur- 

OmoaUy sworn into omce given the coalition’s Bnt the proposal immediate- 

reveral hours after the vote, shaky hold on power, the 49- ly drew opposition fire because 
Kohl summarized hss gpalsfor pgg e program spelled out few of its strict conditions. For ex- 
what he has said will be his final unexpected initiatives in a doc- ample, at least one parent of a 
term as Germany's leader. ument described by the Frank- child applying for citizenship 
“I want to complete the ma- furter ADgemeine as a “con- must have been born in Germs- 


But the proposal immediate- 
ly drew opposition fire because 


term as Germany’s leader. 

“I want to complete the ma- 


terial and spiritual unity of Ger- glomeration of fainthearted- ny and both parents must have 


many, a unity that is not a sim- ness." 


lived here 


for at least 10 
! child’s birth. 


pie annexation of East Beyond a call for political years prior to the child's birth. 
Germany but the creation of and economic renewal, and the The child could hold a form of 
something new, in the best usual vows to be toogh on crime dual citizenship, a demand of 
sense of the word," he said. “I and drugs, the platform rndud- Germany’s large Turkish corn- 
want to keep the German train ed an agreement to allow third- munity, until age 18, when full 
on the trade to Europe so that generation children of foreign- German citizenship would be 
no one in the future can derail ers living in Germany to obtain forthcoming but only jf other 
the locomotive and return to citizenship, an issue pushed by nationality claims were ra- 
the old nationalist thinking." the Free Democrats and grudg- nounced. 


someth! 
sense of 
want to 
on the i 


the old nationalist thinking/ 


Contained from Page I 

that at least created the possi- 
bility that there would not be 
another dividing line in Europe, 
it just moved a few hundred 
miles east.” 

As an example of how a pow- 
erful Conference on Security 
and Cooperation could come in 
handy, American officials 
pointed to a possible conflict 
someday between Hungary and 
Romania over the large Hun- 
garian minority in Romania. A 
strengthened organization 


TRADE; Bogor Meeting Marks a Giant Step in Advance of Capitalism, 


could mediate the dispute, pro- 
vide advice on how to protect 
minorities, send monitors to 
make sure the two sides respect 
a cease-fire and provide peace- 
keepers to enforce a cease-fire. 

It would be better to use the 
Conference on Security rather 
than the United Nations to 
handle such a conflict, Ameri- 
can officials say, because the 
conference has more expertise 
and involvement in the region 
and because it has more flexi- 
bility than the UN since it has 
one-thud as many members. 

Increasing the importance of 
the Conference on Security is 
part of two-track approach to 


American officials say that 
eariy next year NATO will tell 
these countries about the 


“how” of joining NATO: how 
modi it will cost them and how 
they will integrate their military 
structure into NATO's struc- 
ture. 

“NATO expansion, when it 
comes, will be to extend stabil- 
ity into Central Europe, which 
has often been a seedbed of 
wars.” a senior administration 
official said. “We can not have 
new Bosnias and Nargono-Ka- 
rabakhs. They’re too great a 
risk to destabilizing Europe.” 

According to administration 
officials, increasing the impor- 
tance of the conference is de- 
signed not only to reassure Rus- 
sia, but also to check its 
ambitions by having a Europe- 
an-based security organization 
that includes Russia looking 
over Moscow’s shoulder. 


Continued from Page 1 


ahead, forum members are al- 


the countries. It does not define ready starting to jockey for ad- 
what free trade means, leaving vantage in nervous anticipation 


open such contentious ques- of next year’s su mmi t meeting 
turns as what constitutes a le- in O s aka , where the Japanese 


gi timate government regulation government is expected to pro- 
and what constitutes a trade duce a more detailed blueprint 


professor at Australian Nation- 
al University. “Who will wake 
up on Wednesday and be sure 
that anything has changed? 

“I expect, nevertheless, that 
when we look back not from 


w Uf KjujjuAUtai 1 1 , revamp security arrangements 

in Europe. On the other track, 
ence of Third World leaders — the United States is working 


prominent among them Egypt’s 
Nasser, India's Nehru, Yugo- 
slavia’s Tito and Ghana's Nkru- 
mah — that pul the Nonaligned 
Movement on the world map. 


with NATO members to ex- 
plain to Eastern European 
countries what they will need to 
do to someday join NATO. 


barrier. Its deadlines of 20 10 for for carrying out the Bogor vi- 
the richer countries and 2020 sion. 


Wednesday morning but from Theirs was (he rhetoric of eco- 
some years hence, the events in nomic confrontation with the 


for the poorer countries are The Japanese themselves. 


hardly imminent enough to along with the South Koreans 
pose a serious problem for pdi- and Taiwanese, have quietly 


Bogor will have helped to lift industrialized powers, the buzz- 
the Asia Pacific community to words being “anti-imperialism” 


details now in power, who are suggested that the plan’s 
anxious to protect favorite in- “scope" must be limited, ac- 


new heights of achievement’' 
Mr. Garnaut said. 

For an eerie historical con- 


“ scope” must be limited, ac- trast, consider the events of 
cording to Western government nearly 40 years ago in the Indo- 


d us tries. cording to Western government nearly 40 yearn ago in the Indo- 

Tbese weaknesses were un- officials, an indirect way of say- nesi&n city of Bandung, about 
derscored when Mr. Suharto ing they are desperate to ex- two hours’ drive from Bogor. 
answered a reporter’s fanciful elude sensitive agricultural Sukarno, the fiery Indonesian 
question about how the world products like rice from new nationalist who preceded Mr. 
would look in 2020 as a result of threats of import penetration. Suharto as president, was host 
the Bogor Declaration. The 


and “anti-colonialism.” 

“Their idea, especially in the 
’70s," said a diplomat at the 
Bogor meeting, “was that the 
West should pay up for exploit- 


U.S. Panel Urges Same Rules 
For Big and Small Airplanes 


ing the poor, so let’s have debt 
reOcf, let’s be against multina- 


Suharto as president, was host 


president mumbled something whether forum members should 
about how there “should be an be allowed to keep protecting 


Problems loom, too, over of a highly publicized confer- 


refief, let’s be against multina- 
tional corporations, let’s pro- 
tect our industries. Well, like 
Marxism, this has all been 
found rather wanting.” 


improvement,” then joked that 
he hoped the reporter would 
live that long. 

In a sign of the difficulties 


(jfustries from international Extradition Near lor Nice’s Ex-Mayor 

competition, like Indonesia’s 

program to develop a co mm it- Tfcr Axtodaied prat Este after France and interpe 

er plane. MONTEVIDEO — Jacques requested his detention. 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The National Transportation Safety 
Board recommended on Tuesday that the strict rules govern- 
ing major airlines be extended to smaller commuter carriers, 
whose safety record has caused concern in recent years. 

John Lauber, a board member, said he believed that the 
need for separate regulations for large and smaller airlines 
had been outgrown. 

The recommendations, after a nine-month investigation of 
commuter airline safety, go to the Federal Aviation A dmin i s- 
tration for action. 


to develop a commut- 


ORLY- LONDON 

from FF. 790 RT* 

4 flights daily 
1st flight from Orly 7: 15 am 


Nonetheless, economists and Mfcdecin, the former mayor of 
officials maintained that the fo- Nice, who is accused of taking 


nun leaders had set their poll- $725,000 in bribes and embez- 
des clearly in the direction of zling city funds during his 25 


freer trade and had given their years in office; will be extradit- 
subordinates strong marching ed to France within two days, 


orders to draw up an effective an Interpol official said Tues- 


Scheduled Airline 
See your Travel Agent 
or call (Paris): 44 56 1808 

*plus tax 


scheme of implementation. 
“For people who judge his to- 


day. 

Mr. Mgdecin, 66, fled to Uru- 


ry by the grander standards of guay in 1990 to escape the cor- 
congressioual landslides, there nmtion charges. He was arrest- 
will be disappointment,” said ea II months ago in the 


months ago in the 


Ross Garnaut, an economics Atlantic resort of Punts del 


Este after France and Interpol 
requested his detention. 

Uruguay’s Supreme Court 
ruled list month that Mr. Me- 
decin be extradited. 

’Tomorrow three police offi- 
cers and a doctor will arrive 
from France to take Medecin 
back,” said Uruguay’s Interpol 
chief, Ricardo Bernal. 

Mr. M6decin has asserted 
that he is the target of a political 
witchhunt by the Socialists for 
defeats he inflicted upon them 
while mayor. 


and often operating under the colors of those carriers — have 
proliferated in recent years. Several crashes, including those 
in Hibbing, Minnesota and Columbus, Ohio, and most re- 
cently in northern Indiana, have focused attention on that 
segment of the industry. 

Current rules impose tougher standards on planes with 3 1 
seats or more. The safety board recommended extending 
those roles to planes with 20 seats or more, and those of 10 to 
19 seats “wherever possible” This would put nearly all 
scheduled airline flights under the same strict rules, while 
leaving the less severe standards in effect for air taxis and 
other unscheduled small planes. 

The changes would also tighten safety inspections of air- 
craft and reduce the number of hours pilots can fly. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


Pcge 5 


Jlle 6 New 5 Aristide Finds Little Success Selling Reconciliation to the Masses 


Washington Pox followers accord the reconciliation message. But a 

PORT-AU-PRINCF Halt; .u , number of Haitians have predicted restlessness soon 

' he. returned to newer month since unless the Haitian poor, denied the satisfaction of 

- military* PresidentJean J* 1 ® US ‘ “P heaval and revenge, begin to see swift improve- 

formed WSStiraJ^Sf d *** menl ' m ^«r daily lives. 

. instead of ^olution 1 ^^ Aristide’s spokesman.said 

• the^K 2 ? 5 ? m P roniisc and recondSatiS 
Axi f lde ^as sought to please his 
wfch hS? avoid repeating tEconfrontation 

SlSf S Md c elite thtftei to 

his overthrow in September 1991. But the shift has 
jhsa^uued many among the masses, whodS 

■ jr R-saa- a 

Sm ite Sr® ** ** 

reconciliation when so many 
people dial?” asked Andre Dugue, 59 a mm 

SESSrStf 0 ?®!? t** 1 of oi&StNSSS 

dliapon, ox but first you’ve got to have justice 
StSS’t^r J ' SbnpSOD iS mjBil “ United 

Moh a A^^ e t S <P cra0I,ai remained 

mgn depute the lukewarm reception many of his 


the president is aware many of his followers have 
trouble swallowing the call for reconciliation. ‘‘Even 
with all the love they have for the president, the 
people suffered so much during the last three years 
that he cannot heal that wound," he said. 

A U.S.-led aid program has promised to pump 
5550 million into Haiti over the next year, making 
the hemisphere’s poorest country its largest develop- 
ment project Aid bureaucrats carrying sheafs of 
numbers from around the world have filled betel 
lobbies. But so far, little of their effort has found its 
way to the shantytowns or rural huts where Haiti's 
poor struggle to survive. 

“When the helicopter put Aristide down in Port- 
au-Prince, people said the Messiah had arrived." 
explained Hubert de Ronceray. a conservative anti- 
Anstide politician who beads a party called the 
National Development Mobilization. “Well, now 
that he’s here, he has to produce some miracles.” 


Father Aristide’s repeated calls for reconciliation 
have been matched by his choice of a businessman 
as prime minister and appointment of former minis- 
ters who cooperated with the military, including 
Defense Minister Wilton L’Herisson, to his new 
government. These choices flew in the face of his 
political philosophy — he has compared himself to 
the 18th-century French revolutionary Robespierre 
— and of his political movement, named Laval as 
after Haiti's flash floods that sweep away all in their 
paths. 

But the most immediate concern among Aristide 
followers centers on the security forces, which were 
used by the military government to impose a brutal 
repression across the country. An estimated 3.000 
Haitians were killed during the three years of mili- 
tary rule. 

The U.S. military has for the time being supplant- 
ed Haitian policemen and soldiers. But under a 
stopgap Justice Department program, a new corps 
of Haitian policemen — including former soldiers — 
is being dispatched around the country in distinctive 
blue-and- white uniforms to patrol under interna- 
tional monitors after one week of retraining. These 
police have been assigned to provide security pend- 


ing creation of a new police force, separate from the 
army, that has been programmed for next year at the 
earliest. 

Despite Father Aristide's repeated appeals for 
cooperation with the “new" police, many Haitians 
have expressed dismay at seeing the return of their 
former oppressors under the new *»uise. “We can’t 
reconcile with this army.” said Gisfene Georges. 49. 
a mother of six children in Cap Haitien. “Maybe 
another one. O.K., but not this one.” 

A half-dozen retrained policemen reporting for 
duty on Sunday in Gonaives, a regional capital 
about 50 miles north of here, were met by a crowd of 
young men who declared that the police could patrol 
the region only as a “test” to see whether they had 
indeed reformed. 

“That one over there,” Pierre-Louis Audonel said 
as he pointed to a returning policeman with aviator 
sunglasses, “he handed out 200 blows with a club. 
How are you supposed to reconcile with him?” 

Although Father Aristide also has spoken, of jus- 
tice, he has avoided defining what he means. But to 
most Haitians justice means clear retribution 
against the many human rights violators among 
Haitian soldiers, policemen and government thugs. 


There is precedent for this expectation. The rail of 
the Duvalier dictatorship in 1986 set off a round of 
s umm ary justice. And in an incident that helped 
establish his reputation as a radical. Father Ansi ide 
made an impassioned speech just before his over- 
throw in which he seemed to endorse necklacing 
such people— killing them by putting a burning tire 

around their necks. r 

This time, however, there has been no move From 
the president to proceed with punishment. Many 
observers have predicted he will settle for a Un- 
inspired Truth Commission along lines followed in 
El Salvador, substantially less clear-cut than the 
retribution described by Haitians in the street. 

Nowhere has Father Aristide’s new caution been 
more visible — or more openly contested — than in 
Cap Haitien, which with 250.000 inhabitants is Hai- 
ti's second citv. 

When he visited Wednesday, he drew boos from 
an otherwise adulatory Cap Haitien crowd by em- 
bracing Archbishop Francois Gail lot. a prelate re- 
sented for f ailin g to condemn military repression. 
Similarly, the president inspired only hesitation 
when he asked his followers if they would cooperate 
with 50 newly retrained police in Cap Haitien. 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 

How a Make a Sore Bet 
Tom Into a Sore Loser 

When New York City went 
into the bo okmaking business 
in 1971, its officials envisioned 
that their monopoly franchise 
would ultimately yield annual 
profits of 5200 million. Today, 
The New York Times reports. 
Offtrack Betting Corp. is los- 
ing money. 

Over the last two years, 
OTB has become “the only 
bookie operation in the world 


to lose money,” as Mayor Ru- 
dolph W. Giuliani frequently 
points out The operating defi- 
cit totaled $5.3 million for the 
fiscal year that ended in June. 

Last week, as part of an ef- 
fort to revive the agency, the 
mayor appointed a new presi- 
dent AUie Sherman, a Time 
Warner executive and former 
New York Giants football 
coach. City officials say they 
will consider selling OTB to a 
private company after the new 
management team restores 
profitability. 

Like racetracks and other 
off-track betting corporations. 
OTB has been losing custom- 
ers to casinos and state lotter- 
ies. But it has its own long- 
standing problems: 
unappealing betting parlors, 


antiquated technology, politi- 
cal patronage, inept managers 
and inefficient workers. 

The fundamental problem, 
according to both OTB’s crit- 
ics and its defenders, is that 
racetracks and OTB have sep- 
arate managements that inev- 
itably work against each other 
for fans and income. En- 
trenched political bureaucrat- 
ic and labor interests oppose 
bringing them together. 

Short Takes 

The 15 seconds of shaky, 
grainy film showing the shoot- 
ing of President John F. Ken- 
nedy 31 years ago this month 
is one of 25 films added to the 
national film registry at the 
Library of Congress this week. 


The footage, taken by Dr. 
Abraham Zapruder, “is' prob- 
ably the most famous amateur 
film of all time,” said David 
Francis, chief of the library’s 
motion picture division. The 
original Zapruder film was 
sold to Life magazine for 
5150,000 shortly after Kenne- 
dy's assassination. In 1975, 
Time Inc. sold the film back to 
the Zapruder family for 51; 
the family has retained owner- 
ship. 

Ralph Laron's high-priced 
clothes have been “ingenious- 
ly marketed through images 
from a made-up world of 
physically flawless, polo-play- 
ing WASPS” (or while Anglo- 
Saxon Protestants). William 
F. Powers writes in The Wash- 


ington Post. Mr. Lauren is “so 
skilled at this game that huge 
numbers of mall-moles actual- 
ly bought into the idea that if 
they laid down 5200 for a 
sweater they would be spiri- 
tually transformed into landed 
gentry.” 

Two men who broke out of 
the county jail in Benton, Ar- 
kansas, have reason to cry 
over spilled milk. They stole a 
milk truck but failed to secure 
the rear doors, letting cartons 
of milk tumble out. “After 
they got hold of the milk truck 
we were just minutes behind 
them and following the trail of 
milk canons that they were 
leaving,” Saline County Sher- 
iff Judy Pridgen said. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Some Cubans at Guantanamo May Get Into U.S. 


For a 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON •— Facing intense 
pressure from Cuban- American groups, 
the Clinton administration is leaning 
toward granting entry .to Cuban families 
being held at the Guantfinamo Bay Na- 
val Station on the ground that holding 
children there month after month is in- 
humane. •• 

A UJS. official said the move would 
probably be announced before Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton meets with Latin 
American leaders in Miami in early De- 
cember to reduce the chances of demon- 
strations by Cuban-Americans that 
could embarrass the administration. 

There are from 2,700 to 3,000 Cuban 
children tinder the age of 27 at-GuantA- 


namo Bay, and with their parents they 
account for about a third of the 23,390 
Cubans being detained there, adminis- 
tration officials estimated. 

Permitting them to come to the Unit- 
ed States would be a policy reversal for 
the administration, which asserted re- 
peatedly that the thousands of Cuban 
boat people transferred to Guantinamo 
Bay in August would be held there in- 
definitely and would never be allowed 
direct entiy into the United States. 

Explaining the move, an official said: 
“Ihere are definite humanitarian con- 
cerns here. There are questions of 
s chooling and health for these children. 
Hie camps are rudimentary, and life is 
pretty rough.” 

At die same time, according to one 
official, the administration fears that 


allowing in f amili es could draw Cubans 
to American shores, encouraging them 
to think that the door is a g ain open. 

Another concern, however, is that the 
Cuban government might be angered by 
such a decision because the administra- 
tion stated in an agreement signed on 
Sept. 9 that “migrants arrested at sea 
attempting to enter the United States 
wfl] not be permitted to enter the United 
States.” 

Several officials said they doubted 
that President Fidel Castro would be- 
come so upset by such a move that he 
would encourage a new flow of refugees, 
a situation that would vex the United 
States at a time when Mr. Castro is eager 
for Washington to end the trade embar- 
go it imposed three decades ago. 

Leaders of Cuban-American groups 


said Monday that the administration 
recognized that if it did not admit a large 
number of the GuantAnamo detainees 
soon, Cuban-Americans could stage 
demonstrations when the leaders of all 
the countries in the hemisphere, except 
Cuba, meet in Miami from Dec. 9 
through 11. 

Administration officials acknowl- 
edged that if the president was going to 
have any chance of winnin g Florida in 
the 1996 presidential elections, he would 
need strong backing from Cuban-Amer- 
icans. 

Seeking to discourage any new exodus 
of Cubans, several officials stressed Lhat 
even if those families were granted entry 
on compassionate grounds, others at 
Guantanamo should not get up their 
hopes about being admitted. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


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The . liMXia'cd Press 

DUBLIN — Prime Minister Albert Reynolds pleaded for 
the life of his government Tuesday, saying a vote of no- 
confidence would hurt a historic chance to pursue peace in 
Northern Ireland. 

The Parliament agreed to put off the vote until Wednesday. 

In a speech to the legislature, Mr. Reynolds said the 
governing coalition should not be allowed to founder after 
winning a truce from the Irish Republican Army on Sept. 1, 

“It will be a great pity if a government that' is achieving 
rapid economic progress, that has achieved the biggest break- 
through in Northern Ireland in over 25 years, and that has a 
tine legislative program, should be placed in jeopardy over 
misunderstandings" surrounding a single judicial appoint- 
ment.” Mr. Reynolds said. 

The prime minister's appointment of a conservative judge 
to the high court angered* his coalition partners in the Labor 
Party, who walked out of a cabinet meeting Friday. That 
move led an opposition party to propose the no-coafidence 
vote. 

The coalition was split over the appointment of Attorney 
General Harry whelehan as president of the high court. Mr. 
Whelehan was criticized for not extraditing a priest charged 
with sexually abusing a child. 

For seven months. Mr. Whelehan 's office took no action on 
the request from Northern Ireland for the Reverend Brendan 
Smyth, accused of molesting children for more than 20 years. 
Mr Smyth returned voluntarily to Northern Ireland last year, 
v here he was con vie led and is serving a four-y ear sentence. 


£3 Adnsns 2» Visii Briiain 

The Sinn Fein president, Gerry Adams, will visit Britain on 
Thursday for the first time since the government lifted an 
order banning him because his party supports the IRA, The 
Associated Press reported from Belfast. 


In Germany, Refugee Flood Ebbs as Bonn Slams Door 


Washington Past Service 

BERLIN — For the Zejwullahus, a young 
family of ethnic Albanian refugees, the land of 
milk and honey so far measures only 6 by 3.5 
meters. It contains four cots and a crib, a table 
and chairs, a few second-hand toys and a bat- 
tered television set. A dim corridor leads to 
communal toilets and showers. 

Modest as their quarters are in the German 
Red Cross refugee home on Berliner Street, the 
Zejwullahus — Fedil, 27; his pregnant wife, 
Selvete, 23; and their two toddlers, Valmir and 
Valmire — consider themselves immensely 
lucky. They are among a dwindling number of 
political asylum-seekers who manage to get into 
Germany and remain long enough to have their 
plea for sanctuary considered. 

“All we want is to stay here," said Mr. Zejwul- 
lahus. who contends Serb persecution first cost 
him his job as a train engineer and then drove 
him from his homeland, the Kosovo region of 
Serbia. “We want to stay here as Germans." 


Not likely. 

Following a radical overhaul of the German 
asylum law that took effect in July 1993, the 
□umber of asylum applications has plummeted 
from an average of nearly 37.000 a month to 
about 10,000 now. Of the 300.000 applicants 
judged so far this year by federal officials, barely 
7 percent have been granted sanctuary — and 
even more out of reach to most foreigners is 
German citizenship. 

Germany still gets almost half of all asylum- 
seekers in Europe, “by far the highest load of any 
European country," said Judith Kumin, head of 
the United Nations High Commissioner for Ref- 
ugees’ office in Bonn. Yet the number has sub- 
sided so dramatically that what had beat the 
nation’s most explosive political issue two years 


ago was hardly mentioned in the election cam- 
paign this fall 

The drop in asylum applications reflects no 
decline in migratory pressures; the socioeconom- 
ic fault line between rich, stable northwestern 
Europe and the poor, turbulent lands to the 
south and east remains as stark as ever. Rather, 
that divide has become tougher to cross success- 
fully, or at least legally, as Western Europe locks 
down its borders and builds legal obstacles to 
either keep refugees oul or deport them more 
easily if they slip in. 

Two provisions of the new German law are 
particularly effective in thwarting would-be asy- 
lum-seekers. One holds that any refugee arriving 
overland in Germany via a “safe third country” 
— a democracy where human rights are observed 
— is ineligible for asylum. All nine of Germany’s 
contiguous nei gh bors have been declared safe 
thir d countries by Bonn, providing Germany 
with a kind of terrestrial moat 

The other key provision involves assessing 
whether the home country of a refugee is a place 
where political persecution by the state is evi- 
dent Critics contend Bonn's list of persecuting 
nations is too narrow and excludes countries 
such as Somalia or Liberia where, in effect there 
is no state. 

Ger many also has cracked down on airlines 
that bring in aliens without proper passports or 
visas. Only about 1 percent of asylum-seekers 
now come by air, and to prevent them from 
taking refuge in the legal system they are shuttled 
into special transit areas considered outside Ger- 
man territory. 

The government also has beefed up border 
patrols while si gning treaties with Poland and the 
Czech Republic to make it more difficult for 


asylum-seekers. A refugee family that previously 
might have collected more than $1,000 in cash 
each month now typically gets $52 per adult and 
a basket of groceries or other in-kind assistance. 

The crackdown means that the lot of the 
refugee is now more uncertain tium ever. Deci- 
sions often are made so peremptorily that critics 
such as Martin Reiner of Amnesty Internation- 
al’s Berlin office question whether those who are 
truly persecuted at home can effectively plead 
their case. 

The safe-third-country provision has resulted 
in sharp increases in amn esia and mendacity: 
Asylum-seekers often contend that they were 
spirited into Germany by smugglers and are 
uncertain of the route taken. Unless authorities 


can prove that an alien entered Saxony from 
ithv 


southwest Poland, for example, deponing the 
suspect to Poland is difficult 


Refugees who appear likely to lose their asy- 
lum requests — deport 


refugees to use those countries a$ staging areas. 

id 2 “ 


And Bonn sharply curbed welfare payments to 


leportations since 1990 have 
climbed' more than sixfold, to 36,000 last year— 
often just melt into the inner cities, adding to a 
growing number of illegal immigrants. 

Those who play by the rules often find them- 
selves fighting a protracted legal battle with 
authorities from the moment they set foot in 
Germany. The Zejwullahu family, for example, 
arrived 13 months ago with two suitcases and the 
clothes they were wearing, after traveling by bus 
to the Czech Republic and crossing into Germa- 
ny on foot Despite arriving via a safe third 
country, they have managed to stave off deporta- 
tion because a sympathetic Berlin judge has 
prevented the government from acting until the 
family’s claim of “ethnic persecution” is 
reviewed. 

Most experts believe that illegal immigration 
has climbed substantially in the past 17 months, 
although as the UN official observed. “The one 


thing none of us can measure is whether thesa®^* 
number of people are entering Germany as be- 
fore, but rather than applying for asylum are 
instead staying illegally. * 

The Interior Ministry has estimated ; that 
14,000 migrants enter the country illegally each 
month, but such figures are little more 
guesses. Crossing illegally has had tragic come- 
. quences. with at least a dozen drownings report- 
ed this year in the Neisse River, which separates 
Pdand and Germany. Hunger strikes and riots 
by those awaiting deportation have become 
commonplace. 

Even some of the new law’s, sharpest critics 
concede that Germany needed to do something 
to stem the migrant tide. After receiving fewer 
than 20,000 asylum applications in 19S3, the' ' 
country was swamped with 438,000 a decade 
later. Rightist extremists fueled the perception 
among voters that economic refugees were ex- 
ploiting a liberal German guarantee of political 
refuge, which had been adopted partly as atone- 
ment for Nazi excesses. 


Although Chancellor Helmut Kohl has assert- 
“Genm 


ed that “Germany is not an immigration coun- 
try,” the nation remains one of the most ethnical- 
ly diverse states in Europe. 

■ Statistics released in Bonn this month show 
that Germany has 6.9 million foreigners, who 
make up 8.5 percent of the population, compared 


with less than 3 percent in Western Europe as a 

y of 1960. 


whole and 1.2 percent in the Germany 
In the turbulent five years since the disintegra- 
tion of fiie Iron Curtain, Germany has attracted 
far more than its proportionate share of refu- 
gees; an appeal that has continued despite the 
new asylum law. Two-thirds of all refugees flee- 
ing to Western Europe from forma- Yugoslav:) 
republics have ended up in German y. . 

— RICK ATKINSON 


The A340 has brought Delhi closer to Washington D.C. 


Leader of German Jews Calls 


The A34Q is the longest range aircraft in civil aviation history. It can fly a full complement of passengers, in true wide-body 
route network for the world’s airlines. For example, the A340 can easily fly non-stop all the way from Frankfurt to Santiago, New 


comfort, for over 16 hours non-stop. This opens up a whole new 
York to Cape Town or Delhi to Washington D.C. 


For EU to Tame Far Right 


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AIRBUS INDUSTRIE 

TAKING THE WORLD VIEW 




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Return 


BONN — Ignatz Bubis, lead- 
er of Germany's small Jewish 
community, appealed Tuesday 
for common laws against rac- 
ism and anti-Semitism in the 
European Union to stifle the 
growth of extreme-rightist par- 
ties. 


Speaking to a congress in 
Bonn on discrimination against 
foreigners in Europe, Mr. Bubis 
pleaded for the Union not to 
fool itself into thinking that 
rightist extremism was confined 
to Germany but to tackle far- 


right trends in the member 
countries. 

“We are seeing a trend to the 
far right in the whole of Eu- 
rope," said Mr. Bubis, head of 
Germany's Central Council of 
Jews. 

“From other countries, Ger- 
many is seen as the stronghold 
of right-wing extremism," he 
said. 

“That has a lot to do with 
history, is an emotional re- 
sponse and is understandable. 
But they forget that not one far- 
right group is represented in 
Parliament in Germany.” 


Italian Unions Call 
For General Strike 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dupmches 

ROME — Italy’s three main 
unions called Tuesday for a 
general strike against Prime 
Minister Silvio Berlusconi after 
he refused to back down on 
pension cuts in the new budget 
and called a vote of confidence 
instead. 

The unions called for an 
eight-hour strike that would 
probably be held on Dec. 2. 

Mr. Berlusconi, battling a 
wave of public and political op- 
position to his tough 1995 bud- 
get bill, called the confidence 
vole, the second this week, to 
force through the pension mea- 
sures. 

The Northern League. Mr. 
Berlusconi's biggest and most 
troublesome coalition partner, 
had sought to water down 
changes that would raise the re- 
tirement age and reduce entitle- 
ments of Italians who take early 
retirement. 

The League’s deputies in Par- 
liament reluctantly agreed to 
back the government, ensuring 
Mr. Berlusconi’s survival. 

Opposition politicians, who 
filibustered for seven hours 
Monday, pledged to use the 
same tactics on pensions to 
slow the budget's passage 
through Parliament. 

“This is a declaration of 
war,” said Fabio Musi of the 


opposition Democratic Party of 
the Left, the former Commu- 
nists. “We accept it." 

The new confidence vote will 
take place in the Ch amb er of 
Deputies on Wednesday. 

The confidence vote was 
called after the center-right 
government, f action ahzed by 
policy differences among coali- 
tion partners, failed to convince 
the federalist Northern League 
to drop amendments to soften 
the blow of the pension 
changes. 

The league, which ensures the 
government's 51 -seal majority 
in the chamber, said it would 
back Mr. Berlusconi in the vote. 
He would have to resign if he 
lost. 

But the party signaled a po- 
tentially bloody battle once the 
budget reaches the Senate, 
where the coalition lacks an 
outright majority. 

The League’s amendments 
will fall if the confidence vote is 
passed, but a League deputy, 
El isabetta Casteliazzi, said they 
would be resubmitted in the 
Senate. 

Mr. Berlusconi, elected in 
March on pledges to rein in 
Italy’s runaway deficits, has 
staked his credibility with waiy 
financial markets on getting the 
budget through Parliament un- 
scathed by the end of the year. 


Follows a Waste Trail 


Reuter* 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Commission has thrown 
away millions of dollars from 
the European Union's budget 
through a combination of poor 
management, lack of verifica- 
tion and contradictory actions, 
according to the Union’s spend- 
ing watchdog. 

‘The assessment and moni- 
toring of measures are often in- 
sufficient. and various irregu- 
larities affected the reliability of 
the accounts so that it is not 
possible to trace back with pre- 
cision every operation," the 
Court of Auditors said in its 
report on the Union's 1993 
budget. 

The report, which was to be 
formally presented to the Euro- 
pean Parliament in Strasbourg, 
highlighted a number of cases 
where vast amounts of money 
had been paid out incorrectly or 
not reclaimed, or whose intend- 
ed effects had been directly ne- 
gated by other spending. 

The auditors noted that. wine 
production in the Union had 
risen by one-fifth since 1989 de- 
spite EU spending totaling 1.2 
billion European currency units 
l$1.5 billion) to lake surplus 
vineyards out of production. 

It also noted that the effects 
of payments to persuade pro- 


ducers of both milk and wine to 
reduce output were frequently 
offset by other EU incentives to 
increase production. 

In addition, the report high- 
lighted discrepancies in EU 
spending to create jobs, saying: 
“Certain cases of job creation 
mentioned in the progress re- 
ports were more forecasts titan 
reality and cases of job losses or 
even bankruptcies were found." 

“Moreover, aid was granted 
to finance the training of some 
workers who. at the moment of 
their recruitment, were neither 
unemployed nor threatened, by 
unemployment nor affected by 
the restructuring of a firm,” the 
auditors added. 

In the milk sector, the report 
said the European Commission' 
had broken its own rules in sev- 
eral cases. In one, the “the 
Community had wrongly taken 
into account certain agricultur- 
al subsidies which were repaid 
one year later without interest 
for late payment amounting to 
an estimated 19 million Ecus." , 

The auditors said that it cfftea 
took two years for EU structur- 
al funds to reach their finaidesr' 
ti nation, during which; time 
some of the money sat in ac - 
counts run by mtennedianss 
who sometimes used theHtier* 
est earned for other purposes-. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


Page 7 


1 


on Mainland 


Sew York Tim** ** I V st 8 ovcra *neru and the Na- Taiwan radio later said that 
RPtnKir ** tionaHsi forces who fled 45 troops on the island were con- 

Jj — Taiwan ex- years ago to Taiwan, where they ducting a military exercise 
pressed deep regret” Tuesday haye transformed the island of when the incident occurred, 
thftt its troops fired at least a raillion people into a major The radio said the troops direct- 

economic power based increas- ed their practice fire toward the 
ingly on democratic 


dozen artffiery shells into a vil- 
lage .on the southern coast of 
mainland China, wounding 
four people, two of them seri- 
ously. 

•. A Chinese spokesman in 
Bering called the episode “a 
videos incident that sabotaged 
the peaceful atmosphere across 
. the Taiwan Strait” 

Taiwan, which initially de* 
nied the shelling to U.S. offi- 
dais in Washington on Monday 
night scrambled on Tuesday to 

issue a statement of regret and a 
promise to compensate die in- 
jured. 

TTie incident Monday under- 
scored the tensions that exist 
across the Taiwan Strait be- 
tween the mainland Commu- 


on democratic gover- 
nance. 

A statement issued Tuesday 
by Taiwan’s Defense Ministry 
failed to fully explain how the 
incident occurred, or who gave 
the order to fire round after 
round of artillery shells across 
the narrow band of water sepa- 
rating Xiaojlnmen Island, also 
known as Quemoy, from the 
m ai nl and’s Fujian Province. 

“According to our judg- 
ment,” the statement said, the 
shelling “could have been 
caused by unexploded powder 
falling to the ground, causing 
this unfortunate incident. We 
express deep regret over this 
mistaken incident, which had 
no inimical intern.” 


Alleging Spying, Khmer Rouge 
Admits Kitting 3 Westerners 


The Associated Press 

PHNOM PENH — The 
Khmer Rouge guerrilla group 
confirmed Tuesday that it had 
executed three western hos- 
tages last month and accused 
them of being foreign spies. 

The three men — David Wil- 
son of Australia, Mark Slater of 
Britain and Jean-Michel Bra- 
quet of France — were killed by 
the Khmer Rouge in the south- 
western province of Kampot. 
Their corpses were found in a 
grave with their hands tied. 
They had been held by the guer- 
rillas after being captured in a 
Khmer Rouge attack on a train 
that they were traveling on in 
July. 

Contradicting an earlier 
statement that claimed the kill- 


ings were not carried out by the 
guerrilla group, a Khmer Rouge 
radio broadcast said the three 
were executed because “they 
acted as spies to continue Viet- 
namese aggressive war.” 

The Vietnamese war was a 
reference to the conflict be- 
tween the Khmer Rouge and 
other guerrilla groups against 
the Vietnam-backed govern- 
ment, which ended in 1992 with 
a peace agreement. The Khmer 
Rouge subsequently withdrew 
from the peace process and con- 
tinued to fight, claiming Viet- 
nam still was deeply involved in 
Cambodia. 

The radio broadcast stated 
that “those who conduct activi- 
ties of aggression against Cam- 
bodia” must be “punished as 
criminals of war.” 


BURY: Headstones and Dirt Extra 


Costumed frora Page 1 
ters (30 or 40 miles) from Mos- 
cow, where there is still space in 
several cemeteries. 

People encountered recently 
at Mitingskaya Cemetery, 
about 30 kilometers from the 
center erf Moscow, were eager to 
'express their bitterness at a sys- 
tem that demands bribes and 
dispenses humiliation at a time 
they fed very vulneraWeu 

“I don’t know how they can 
live with, themselves/' said 
Lyudmila Povdovka, 56,recall- 
ing the bribes she had to pay to 
buiy her father last year. I had 


Ex-Bnsoa Leader Fined 
Far Zhirinovsky Insult 

Agence France-Presse 

MOSCOW — Former Prime 
Minister Yegor T. Gaidar was 
fined I millio n rubles ($325) by 
a municipal court for calling the 
far-right leader Vladimir V. 
Zhirinovsky a fascist, Interfax 
reported Tuesday. 

The judge, confirming an ear- 
lier ruling by a lower court, said 
that Mr. Gaidar had insulted 
Mr. Zhirinovsky when he called 
him “the. most popular fascist in 
Russia” in an article published 
in Izvfcstia on May 17. 


OffreacylorTarkish Cyprus 

Agence France-Presse 

ANKARA — Northern Cy- 
prus plans to issue its own cur- 
rency, the Turkish-Cypriot 
leader Rauf Denktasb said. He 
told the daily Cumhuriyet that 
the breakaway “Turkish Re- 
public erf Northern Cyprus, 
which marked its 12th anniver- 
sary Tuesday, would have its 
own currency along with the 
Turkish lira. 


to give vodka to a grave digger. 
I had to pay the morgue extra to 
make sure everything went all 
right. And of course I couldn't 
afford a headstone.” 

The funeral director, Vladi- 
mir Smirnov, acknowledged 
that a normal burial service in- 
cluded putting a rough wooden 
coffin into the ground. But it 
does not include covering that 
boffin with dirt. That costs ex- 

tTcL 

Perhaps not surprisingly, the 
only happy people in the ceme- 
tery were the grave diggers. 

"If people want to pay me 
something, I am certainly not 
going to refuse,” said Roman 
Vtkhayal, 23, a grave digger at 
Mitingskaya, the cemetery clos- 
est to Moscow that is still not 
full “If people want to do it 
themselves, of course they have 
that right” 

Mr. Vikhayal said he made 
an excellent living, though he 
declined to cite specifics. 

It is not only Ihe free market 
that has maHft people like him 
so successful and his clients so 
angry. The laws of supply and 
demand are also cm Ms side. 

More than 150,000 people 
died in Moscow in the first naif 
of 1994, 12 percent above the 
corresponding period in 1993. 
At least 400 people need to be 
buried every day in the capital, 
and as the director of Ritual, 
Anatoli Pokhorov, pointed out, 
“If we take a day off, we have 
800 to bury the next day.” 

Russians traditionally make 
the journey to a funeral in a bus, 
usually supplied by the funeral 
parlor, which doubles as hearse 
and conveyance for mourners. 
Once, Ritual put only one cof- 
fin on each bus. But in Moscow, 
Ritual only has three, or four 
working buses, and now it loads 
as many as three coffins on 
each, with mourners sharing 
their grief with people they have 
never meL 


Got an Urge for Chicken? 
WheninEurope, Careful 

Reuters 

*•“ the Bjro P ean Consumn5 

1TO0 -«**»■ samples earned out on its 
MMS all European Union 
behalf mNorvray,^w ^ almost one quarter 

** 3 out * 10 
food poisoning resulting in 


33E5a=soaiH 

e cta&en ' JL ** Denmark was not far 
M 3SS' turns of samples and campy- 

lobacier in m - r salmonella scare in 1988, was 

Sweden were the fimddn- 


the 


Qgu 

other direction, over the Tai- 
wan Strait, whose airspace is 
used by commercial air traffic. 

The anti-aircraft shells were 
supposed to explode in midair 
but failed to do so and crashed 
onto the mainland, the state- 
ment said. 

No details were given on 
whether the rounds carried 
high-explosive charges or were 
dummy rounds. Officials in the 
mainland coastal dty of Xia- 
men declined to describe the 
incident in any greater detail 
than that carried m a brief dis- 
patch by the official Xinhua 
press agency. 

In Beijing the Taiwan Af- 
fairs office of the State Council 
expressed “grave concern" over 
the “evil act” of firing shells 
into the village of Tatou. in the 
suburbs of Xiamen. Beijing de- 
manded that Taiwan investi- 
gate the incident and provide a 
satisfactory explanation of how 
it occurred. 

Jinmen Island and the near- 
by Xiaqjinmen, just 2 kilome- 
ters off the coast of mainland 
China, are heavily aimed bases 



Angolan Factions Take 
Key Step Toward Peace 


Mjnnrl Ceneu ' 'Vpcner Vrcncr-Praw 

VIGIL — Chang Jin-shon, a great-grandson of Cbiang Kai-shek, at a Beijing hospital, 
where doctors saw “no hope” for his fattier, Winston Chang, who suffered a severe stroke. 


manned by thousands of Tai- 
wan forces since the Nationalist 
retreat led by Chiang Kai-shek 
from Mao Zedong's Commu- 
nist army in 1949. 

Taiwan remains serious 
about defending itself against 
any Communist attack. Its De- 
fense Ministry last week pro- 
posed a record budget for 
weapons spending. 

■ Reaction on Taiwan 

Analysts in Taiwan were sur- 


prised at the strength of China's 
condemnation. Reuters report- 
ed. 

“This shows that hostilities 
remain very deep and cannot be 
eased in the near term,” said 
Chi Mao-chi. a professor at Na- 
tional Central University. “The 
most wonying factor is that in 
the future such an accident 
could develop into conflict 

But an official at the Main- 
land Affairs Council, which for- 


mulates Taiwan's China policy, 
played down the likely effect of 
the bombardment. 

“This is an isolated incident 
and it will not affect relations 
across the straits.” said the 
council’s director of informa- 
tion, William Li. 

The last serious bombard- 
ment of China by Taiwan was 
during a cross-strait battle in 
1958. There have been no re- 
ports of exchanges of fire since 
the 1970s. 


The Associated Press 

LUSAKA, Zambia — Ango- 
la's warring factions signed a 
truce Tuesday intended to al- 
low their leaders to formally 
end a 19-year civil war this 
weekend. 

The truce cleared the way for 
further negotiations on final de- 
tails of a peace accord in the 
war-ravaged southern African 
nation. 

While it is a major step to- 
ward halting one of Africa’s 
longest civil wars, the truce rep- 
resents only part of the formal 
peace plan. Throughout the 
war, which began on the eve of 
independence from Portugal in 
1975, peace overtures and trea- 
ties have repeatedly failed to 
stop the fighting. 

Under the plan, signed by 
senior government military of- 
ficers and leaders of UNITA, 
the National Union for the To- 
tal Independence or Angola, 
fighting is to halt Wednesday at 
8P.M. The truce would remain 
in effect until a formal cease- 
fire. called for in the peace ac- 
cord scheduled to be signed 
Sunday, takes effect at mid- 
night Nov. 22. 

“From tomorrow at 8 P.M., 
there should be no more hostil- 
ities in Angolan territory,” said 
Alioune Blondin Beye, the 
United Nations special repre- 
sentative to Angola, who medi- 


ated a year of peace talks in 

Lusaka. _ . . . 

President Jose Eduardo dos 
Santos and the UNITA leader. 
Jonas Savimbi, had been sched- 
uled to sign the peace pact 
Tuesday, but continued fight- 
ing that included a string of 
government victories caused 
the rebels to demand a delay. 

In effect, the truce signed 
Tuesday was a government con- 
cession to the rebels to ensure 
that Mr. Savimbi would sign the 
peace pact on Sunday. 

A government offer to halt 
fighting had brought UNITA 
officials to Lusaka on Monday. 
Both sides agreed to postpone 
the formal signing of the peace 
pact from Tuesday until Sun- 
day while Lheir military delega- 
tions worked out an immediate 
truce and other final details. 

President Nelson Mandela of 
South Africa said on Tuesday 
that Mr. dos Santos bad told 
him the government was ready 
to stop its aLiacks. 

“I am confident that the 
peace treaty will be signed on 
Sunday,” Mr. Mandela said af- 
ter returning from Lusaka. 

Mr. Mandela met in Lusaka 
with President Robert Mugabe 
of Zimbabwe, Meles Zenawi of 
Ethiopia and Salim Ahm ed Sa- 
lim, secretary-general of the Or- 
ganization of African Unity, to 
discuss the peace prospects. 


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INTERNATIONAL 



(Eributte 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


OPINION 


itcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



SrUninc 


PdBI.LNHMl VVITH THE SEW YORK TlMWi AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Fair Trade With China 


— s 


China desperately wants to qualify as a 
founding member of the World Trade 
Organization. President Bill Clinton ob- 
stinately stands in the way — which is 
exactly where he belongs. 

The" WTO, according to the trade ac- 
cord signed by more than 100 countries in 
April, wiU be created early next year to 
oversee international trade. Membership 
would solidify China’s emerging presence 
in international markets and guarantee 
that countries would not discriminate 
a g ainst its exports. America agrees that 
China, which is among the world’s 10 
largest exporters, belongs in the World 
Trade Organization. But the Clinton ad- 
ministration rightly masts that it agree to 
adopt the same rules of fair trade that 
apply to other large countries in the WTO. 

China brazenly pirates about SI billion 
worth of intellectual property each year. 
Music recordings, pharmaceuticals, films 
and books are copied and sold without 
compensation to Foreign manufacturers 
holding patents, copyrights and trade- 
marks that other WTO members honor. 
The Chinese also block imports with layers 
of testing and licensing procedures that 
serve only protectionist purposes. And 
China has dallied in making its rules clear 
and subsidies transparent to outside ex- 
amination — a key to determining wheth- 
er it lives up to its trade obligations. 

China balks at adopting fair trade 
rules, demanding exemptions that apply 
to s mall, developing countries. But China’s 
iresence is huge in international markets, 
.f it wins immediate WTO membership, 
it will have little incentive to change so 
that it plays by the same rules as its major 
trading partners. Mr. Clinton under- 


stands that the time to knock down Chi- 
na's protectionist policies is now, as the 
price of its membership. 

China threatened to scuttle a proposal 
at this week’s Asia-Pacific Economic Co- 
operation summit to create a free trade 
zone, perhaps as a way to bargain for 
early admission. That tactic does not 
seem to have worked. To gain admission 
to the WTO, China should adopt fair trade 


principles. Those include treating foreign 
sthesa 


firms the same as Chinese firms and giving 
imports a fair shot in domestic markets. 
The Chinese government must codify its 
import and investment rules and pm its 
accounts in order so that foreign govern- 
ments can monitor whether China is un- 
fairly subsidizing exports or expropriating 
profits from foreign investors. The WTO 
need not insist that China conform imme- 
diately. But phasing in fair trade rules 
should be completed in a few years. 

Chi na has moved in recent years to 
lower its tariff and nontariff trade barri- 
ers. It has even moved toward a convert- 
ible currency — which ensures foreigners 
tha t they can convert future profits to 
dollars without government interference. 
Yet reforms are incomplete and some- 
times proceeding slowly. 

The Europeans have suggested a sensi- 
ble compromise by which China would be 
accorded the status of a founding member, 
with its privileges suspended until it nego- 
tiates terms of entry. Mr. Clinton could 
embrace such a compromise, as long as he 
does not waver from demanding that Chi- 
na be held accountable, within a few years, 
for violations of the rules governing its 
major trade partners. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Focusing on the Alliance 


It is the sort of thing that concentrates 
the mind. America's clumsy semi-with- 
drawal from the Bosnian arms embargo 
has alarmed many Europeans, whose reac- 
tion has angered Americans. But this latest 
row over Bosnia does not point to the end 
of the alliance, as some excited people say. 
It has come, by good chance, just when the 
European half of the alliance is trying to 
work out bow it can do a more efficient 
defense job. If the quarrel make both 
sides think more clearly about their mili- 
tary future, it will do NATO good. 

On Monday the Western European 
Onion, which links NATO and the Euro- 
pean Onion, gave its general approval lo a 
plan that would lei the WEU do some 
military operations on its own, with no 
Americans taking part. Note how modest 
the Europeans' ambitions turn out to be. 
These operations would be small — escort- 
ing food and medicine into some future 
war zone, providing peacekeepers once the 
combatants agree to peace, maybe (al- 
though this could prove too much) rescu- 
ing people from a disintegrating Algeria. 
Any such operation would need the con- 
sent of every WEU member, so there 
would not be many of them. And if the 
Europeans had to borrow transport air- 
craft or other equipment from NATO, this 
wouid need American blessing. 


being asked to do with fewer U.S. troops 
may sometimes have to take military ac- 
tion on its own. Fine, Americans should 
say. They need a more self-confident Eu- 
rope, for such a Europe will be a steadier 
partner in a dangerous 21st century. 

But Europe has to realize the limits of its 
new self-confidence. Even for a fairly 
small WEU operation, it may have to turn 
to the Americans for arms and aircraft and 
communications equipment. That shows 
how far Europe is from having even the 
rudiments of serious world power. 

Because most of its soldiers are in-and- 
out-again conscripts, it cannot swiftly as- 
semble an army to fight anything like the 
equivalent of another Gulf War. It does 
not have the airlif t to fly an expeditionary 
force to even a small distant battle. Its 
navies now reach barely beyond the pe- 
riphery of Europe itself. Above aO, it does 
not have the hugely expensive array of 
satellites and command-and-contiol elec- 
tronics that the Americans possess. To 
acquire these things might need a doubling 
of Europe’s present defense budgets. Since 
higher public spending would probably 
mean even more unemployment, that is 


most unlikely to happen. Europe is no- 
in defense. 


Modest though it is. die project is some- 
should support. It 


thing that America 
wants to cut its military presence in Eu- 
rope to maybe 100.000 men. So it will not 
wish to join in every minor military expe- 
dition that sets out from Europe! More 
important, this change in numbers re- 
quires a change of attitude. A Europe 


where near self-sufficiency ii 

The Bosnian squabble could have been 
avoided if Europe had been bolder and 
America less fuzzy about the disaster in 
ex- Yugoslavia. But il is not the first time 
the two sides of the Atlantic have dis- 
agreed, nor the last. This is not the end of 
their alliance. It may indeed have helped 
them to understand how much, in a hugely 
changed world, they still need each other. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Queuing to Join Europe 


Europe is engaged in the reorganization 
and expansion of its most important insti- 
tution, the European Union. Having be- 
gun as an economic community, its politi- 
cal status has risen over the decades with 
Europe’s prosperity. On Sunday, Sweden, 
in a referendum, voted to join it, as Fin- 
land did last month and Austria did in 
June. Norway will vote in two weeks. With 
that, the 12 members will increase next 
year to 15 and, depending on Norway’s 
decision, perhaps 16. There are already 
signals of anxiety from the Mediterranean 
members that the Union’s center of bal- 
ance is shifting northward. That also 
means a shift toward countries with a 
strong interest in Eastern Europe — possi- 
bly, they fear, at the expense of southern 
countries closer to the Arab world. 

The Swedish referendum was sharply 
fought, and the issues would strike an 
American as similar to those that have 
emerged in the debate over the trade bill 
that would lake the United States into (be 
new World Trade Organization. Some 
Swedes charged that membership in the 
European Union would diminish their 
sovereignty. Some argued that it would 
undercut Sweden's environmental and 
health laws. But in the end most voters 
seem to have derided that those claims 
were exaggerated. The most compelling 


argument in favor of joining was that the 
already dominates the 


European Union 
economic world in which Swedes live, and 
the only real choice was whether, by join- 
ing, to get a voice in setting its policy. 

The next stage of expansion is going to 
be much more difficult. The countries of 
the former Soviet empire want to come in, 
beginning with Poland, Hungary, the 
Czech Republic and Slovakia. Here the 
Union’s motives go weD beyond com- 
merce. The strategy is to use membership 
to lock Eastern Europe into democratic 
government — but that will not make the 
economic disparities any easier to handle. 

One of Bill Clinton's reasons for going 
to Indonesia and the Asia-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum is that APEC is 
a potential counterweight in international 
trade politics to the well-organized and 
increasingly powerful European Union. 
Ideally, all trade agreements ought to be 
worldwide. In fact, progress sometimes 
comes through trade blocs, and three big 
ones are now visible. The European Union 
is the most highly developed, but the 
North American free trade area is a reality, 
and APEC seems to be taking shape on the 
horizon. It is not surprising that the small- 
er trading nations are scrambling to gain 
access to one or another of them. 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

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Prevent a Return to All- Out War in Ex- Yugoslavia j 


By Adam Roberts, John Chip man, Philip H. Gordon, Mats Berdal 


L ONDON — Battlefield advances by 
d Bosnian government forces in the 
former Yugoslavia and shifts in U.S. pol- 
icy on the arms embargo remind us that 
wars may appear static but are not In 
this new environment, the international 
community needs to rethink its policies. 

Too much passivity (patience m letting 
the parties fight or come to terms by 
themselves) or too much activity (impa- 
tience in seeking to force changes it cannot 
control) could lead to renewed all-out war. 

There are three sets of developments 
on which the international community 
has to make the right decisions if the 
conflict and the prospects for peace are 
not to take a dramatic turn for the worse, 
back to the honors of 1991-1992. 

The least talked about set of develop- 
ments, but perhaps the most potentially 
explosive, is those in Croatia. The con- 
flict between the government of Croatia 
and the three Serb-held areas within Cro- 
atia remains serious. 

Since the arrival of a United Nations 
Protection Force in the spring of 1992, 
these three regions (comprising the so- 
called Serb Republic of Krajina) have 
been relatively quiet, and the world's at- 
tention has focused on the savagery of 
Bosnia. But the Croatian conflict has only 
been frozen, not resolved, and the chang- 
ing balance ctf power in the region could 
lead to attempts to settle it by force. 

The government of Croatia is increas- 
ingly fed up with the role it perceives the 
UN force to be playing on its territory. 
As many Croats see it, the force is not 
f ulfilling its manda te to demilitarize the 
three Serb-held UN Protected Areas, 
control borders and permit the return of 
displaced Croats to their homes, but is 
rather protecting the Serbs who drove 
those persons from their homes and de- 
priving Croatia of its vital communica- 
tion links in the east and the south. 

The Croats do not want the creation of 
a state within a state, and are impatient 
with the UN force's lack of progres s . - 
The Krajina Serbs who fear for their 
safety in a Croatian state give no hint 
that they would accept any autonomy 
plan that did not leave them virtually in 
charge of their regions. They point to 
provocative symbols like the new Crea- 
tion currency, the kuna, which was previ- 
ously used by the fascist Croatian state 
during World War 11. 

The Zagreb government's line is that it 
will not cede an inch of territory, while 
the Krajina Serbs assert that they would 
rather die heroically than accept Cro- 
atian rule. Negotiations about Lhe future 
of these areas proceed under various aus- 
pices, but they do not look promising. 

During the last two years the Croatian 
government has equipped and trained its 
armed forces. It now possesses a more 
professional military capability that it 


may soon be tempted to use. In January 
Pants 


apj^rovz 


the Croatian Parliament will vote on an 
extension of Lhe UN force’s mandate; 
■ral is far from assured. 

Krajina Serbs feel that time is 
working a gains t them as the Croats build 
up their forces, as their own fuel short- 
ages become acute and as Serbia dis- 
tances itself from the Serbs outside. But 
they are in no mood for compromise 
despite their situation. 

The status quo is thus shaky, and if the 


UN force has to pull out, or even if it 
stays, the next step could be war. 

The second set of developments where 
change needs to be managed concerns 
Bosnia. After two and a half years of 
mflitaxy success, the Bosnian Serbs re- 
cently suffered their first major tactical 
reverse. Faced with sanctions imposed 
last August by their supposed brethren in 
Serbia, they are militarily overextended 
and face a Bosnian government army 
that is better organized, collaborates with 
Bosnian Croat forces, has internal lines 
of communication and has developed a 
strategy for using the comparative ad- 
vantage that its greater infantry provides. 

While the Bosnian Serbs are now find- 
ing it difficult to find the fuel they need 
to move around their tanks and artillery 
pieces, the Bosnian government forces 
are receiving arms through a leaky em- 
bargo and nave begun to capture weap- 
ons from the Bosnian Serb forces. 

In theory, the pressure on the Bosnian 
Serb forces should assist efforts at a Bos- 
nian settlement After afl, the policy of 
the Contact Group (United States, Rus- 
sia, Britain, France and Germany) is to 
pressure the Bosnian Serb leadership in to 
accepting a proposed partition of Bosnia- 
Herzegovina, which includes some territo- 
rial concessions by the Serbs. However, 
increased pressure on the Bosnian Serbs 
could lead to a wider disaster. 

With their backs against the wall, and 
sensing that time is on the side of their 
enemies, the Bosnian Serbs might con- 
clude that their best bet is to force the 
departure of the UN force and “execute” 
some or ah of their metaphorical hos- 
tages — Bihac, Sarajevo and the three 
eastern enclaves of Gorazde, Zepa and 
Srebrenica — thus freeing up the artillery 
and troops needed to besiege them and 
using these resources elsewhere. 

Even if the Bosnian Serbs were just to 
retreat, if they could not reverse their 
losses, Slobodan Milosevic and others in 
Serbia might not be able to stand by and 
watch fellow Serbs suffer. The Yugoslav 
army, perhaps acting on its own, might 
fed pressure to intervene. The Croatian 
Serbs have already done so. 

In any case, the new military dyna- 
mism is putting internal pressure on the 
contact group, with some members con- 
donning the Bosnian government ac- 
tions and others cheering its successes. 

The third way in which the current 
Yugoslav conflict might escalate derives 
not from the inside but from actions 
currently being considered outside. 

Last Friday the U.S. government an- 
nounced that it would no longer take part 
in the military enforcement of the embar- 
go so far as Bosnia is concerned. America 
may attempt to go further and supply 
arms on a unilateral basis, or try to get 
the Security Council to lift the embargo. 
The policy announced last Friday is 
straining the coherence of the contact 
group and the unity of NATO. Going 
further would pose even more acute 
problems, including in Bosnia itself. 

The Bosnian government, of course, is 
already getting new aims (the Croats let 
“grey market" arms get through), and the 
heavier weapons that could come in were 
the embargo lifted would only make a 
military difference over time. 

Lifting the formal arms embargo 


would have three immediate practical 
effects, all undesirable. First, it would 
announce to all concerned that the Unit- 
ed Nations is no longer impartial but a 
party to the confiicL 

Second, the UN force would almost 


alia imm e dia tely, not only ending the 
relief program but also destroying the 
e p-tting foundation of a future force (en- 
visaged as being under a NATO label) to 
implement a settlement 

Third, lifting the embargo would rein- 
force the sense of the Bosnian Serbs that 
time is against *1*™ and that they should 
take extreme measures now. 

American proponents of lifting the 
emb argo and critics of UN “appease- 
ment” that they are doing the mor- 
al thing by allowing victims to defend 
themselves. But set against the reality of 
aims gyY ting into Bosnia anyway, their 
proposal is more theoretical than practi- 
cal. They need to reflect on the conse- 
quences of their proposal, not only for 
allied uni ty but also ror the hundreds of 
thousands of inha bitants of Sarajevo and 
the archives who would be at risk of being 
lolled, starved or captured by a cornered 
Bosnian Serb army and le ad er sh ip. 


Third, in framing a political solution 
for Bosnia, the contact group needs 
openly to confr ont the viability of a slate 
that was prematurely bom. Bosniau goy. 
eminent forces ha ve ach ieved important 
military successes recently, but no one 
should doubt the military and political 
impossibility of putting the whole of Bo*. 
nia-Herzegovina back together again. 

Because of the disputes within Serb- 
dam, the solution that the Bosnian Sots 
previously called far (attachment to Ser- 
bia) may no longer be their first choice. 
Yet leaving space for a possible confedera- 
tion between Bosnian Serbs and Serbia 
' be the best available avenue to peace. 


any case, it is a fiction to prflend that 
ia-Hc 


in 


T HE NEW dynamism of the situation 
in former Yugoslavia, and the shifts 
U.S. policy, have created a set of 
ilocus that need to be handled care- 
_ . The contact group and the UN 
Protection Force must take certain steps, 
and avoid taking others, in an effort to 
prevent a further humanitarian disaster 
possibly even worse than that of the 
earlier phase of the conflict. 

First, the temptation to lift the arms 
embargo must be resisted in the Security 
CounciL The British and French should 
not hide behind a probable Russian veto 
and should make dear (hear principled 
opposition to any such resolution. Forc- 
ing the Russians to play “bad cop” at the 
United Nations would wrongly portray 
the arms embargo debate as an East- 
West issue and would unnecessarily ex- 
acerbate Russian resentment of the West. 

Were the U.S. government to allow its 
own dtizens unilaterally to supply arms 
to die Bosnian government, it would risk 
the absurdity of a direct clash with a 
NATO still committed to enforcing the 
arms embargo a gains t all traders. 

Second, the international community 
needs urgently to concentrate on the situ- 
ation in Croatia. Members of the contact 
group, particularly Bonn and Washing- 
ton, should impress on Zagreb that any 
early attempt to regain by force the three 
Serb-held UN Protected Areas in Croatia 
would lead to international isolation. 

It could also lead to a new Serbian- 
Croatian war if the Yugoslav army were 
militarily to support the Krajina Serbs. 
To avert any such such outcome, the UN 
force should intensify its efforts to deliv- 
er on its mandate in the UNPAs. 

Although demilitarization is impossi- 
ble in the absence of consent, the United 
Nations could still engage in more vigor- 
ous poticing of the UNPA borders and 
redouble its efforts for the return of dis- 
placed people. If the UN force is obliged 
to leave Croatia, which prorides its head- 
quarters, its continuance in Bosnia be- 
comes virtually impossible. 


B osnia -Hcrzegovina can •furictirai-'as. a 
state in its formal but uncontraiUed bor- 
ders. The international community can do 
many firing s in ethnic conflict mana g e 
meat, but it cannot force people to make 

an oath of fealty to a state that is . seea as 

artificial by so many of its inhabitants. 
To try to do so is to invert the principle 

of self-determination. Without a political 

promise from its inhabitants, always ab- 
sent in Bosnia, structural arrangements 
for the continuation of this -state wifi be 
without foundation. 

The borders of Bosnia will eventually 
be redrawn. Doing so by stealth rather 
than through open negotiation, is untikdy 
to advance the cause of peace or the h 
of more humane interaction among 


people of former Yugoslavia. 

Finally, in working an the challenges 
ahead, the contact group and other medi- 
ators need to develop more contact with 
the UN force. As the four of us saw on 
our recent visit, things look different on 
the ground than they do from foreign 
capitals. International plans that are not 
coordinated with those fulfilling the in- 
ternational community’s complex man- 
date only invite the parties to tbe conflict 
to again play tbe United Nations off 
against national capitals, and national 
capitals against each other. 

The UN Protection Force is unfortu- 
nately named. It is not a protection force: 

It can offer very little protection, and it 
cannot use or condone force that de- 
prives it of the consent it needs to operate 

the humanitarian dement of its mission 
Its presence is not an unmixed good. Jt 
has helped to create a stalemate in Cro- 
atia, and may have contributed to pro- 
longing the war in Bosnia. 

Yet it has fed hundreds of thousands 
of people, and more than attenuated the 
horrors of siege warfare. 

If it is able to stay, and if diplomats 
work energetically on the parties, a Yu- 
goslav settlement is perhaps possible. But 
if it is chased or pulled out, the warm the 
Yugoslav area could return to the ex- 
tremes of 1991-1992, and it will end only 
if tbe combatants exhaust themselves. The 
parties have a proven stamina for fighting, 
and the international community should j 
not, through too much passivity or misdi- "s 
reeled hyperactivity, invite than to con- 
template a return to all-out war. 


Mr. Roberts is Montague Burton profes- 
sor of international relations at Balliol Col- 
lege, Oxford. Mr. Oapman is Director of 
the International Institute for Strategic 
Studies, London. Mr. Gordon is d senior 
fellow at the institute; and Mr. : Berdal a 
research fellow. They contributed this com- 
ment to the International Herald Tribune. 


In China, Reasons to Expect a Fairly Smooth Post-Deng Transition 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts 
— Many observers believe 
that history is about to repeat itself 
• UK ailing 


By Yasbeng Huang 


in China. They say 


health of Deng Xiaoping, 90, is 
jiruggles bet 


brewing power struggles between 
reformers and conservatives, just 
as conflict between the radical 
Gang of Four and tbe moderates 
escalated in Mao’s waning days. 
Mr. Deng's death, this theory 
goes, could lead to a period of 
instability reminiscent of the pal- 
ace coup in 1976 that resulted in 
the arrest and imprisonment of 
the Gang of Four. 

Such a comparison is tempting 
but flawed. Mr. Deng is not 
Chairman Mao. He shares power 


with a handful of octogenarians 
— some in robust health — and 
he often needs to compromise on 
key policy and personnel issues. 

And for all Mr. Deng’s might, 
his departure wifi not leave a pow- 
er vacuum nearly as gaping as tbe 
one Mao’s death created in 1976. 

Mao’s demise started intense 
jockeying for power because 
there was no strong successor in 
line. Hua Guo/eng was anointed 
successor only five months be- 
fore tbe chairman’s death. He 
did not have time to consolidate 
his power base, and soon found 
himself sandwiched between the 


radicals led by Mao's wife. Jiang 
Qing, and the moderate faction 
led by Marshal Ye Jianying. 

Tbe current succession ar- 
rangement, however, was put in 
place five years ago. when hang 
Zemin assumed party leadership. 
(He became president in 1993.) 

Mr. Jiang has had time to build 
up his political support. Knowing 


that the army holds the key to his 
tne 


survival in the post-Deng era, be 
has been lavishing money on the 
military and promoting his allies 
in its senior ranks. 

At the Central Committee con- 
ference in September, Mr. hang 


promoted two allies to key posi- 
tions, and its final communique 
strongly bore his imprint Mr. 
Jiang has attained a greater stat- 
ure than Mr. Hua ever could. 

In 1976, the leadership was bit- 
terly divided. The Gang of Four 
and the moderate leaders repre- 
sented two irreconcilable visions 
about bow China should be gov- 
erned. The radicals wanted to 
continue the Cultural Revolution, 
which ran from 1966 to 1976, 
when Mao died. The moderates 
wanted to restore the bureaucrat- 
ic normality of the 1950s. 

By contrast, the leaders of all 
factions now share a commitment 


crigpl 


to economic reforms and political 
; there a 


In India, the Plague Scare Was Overdone 


N EW YORK — The plague 
outbreak that struck India 
this year caused more panic than 
was warranted. The sudden ap- 
pearance of this ancient scourge 
sent hundreds of thousands of 
residents fleeing from the indus- 
trial city of Surat, igniting fears 
that they would spread the conta- 
gion to the jam-packed slums of 
India's major cities. Apprehen- 
sive nations cut off air travel and 
trade with India; tourists and 
conference groups canceled trips. 

When a World Health Organi- 
zation team completed a 10-day 
inspection recently, the picture 
seemed far less frightening. The 
plague was limited to two out- 
breaks in areas far from the usual 
tourist haunts and business ven- 
ues. Not a single case of transmis- 
sion was confirmed elsewhere. 

Tbe epidemic burned out os 
fast as it began. If the plague 
scare was not exactly a false 
alarm, it surely seemed to have 
been an excessive alarm. 

The epidemic started with little 
notice in August in the Beed dis- 
trict of Maharashtra, where vil- 
lagers developed the swollen 
lymph nodes erf bubonic plague. 
One theory holds that a devastat- 
ing earthquake brought infected 
rats into closer contact with hu- 
mans, allowing fleas to spread the 
disease from animals to man. 

Panic did not set in until Sep- 
tember, when pneumonic plague 
— a more dangerous form that can 
be spread by coughing — popped 
up in Surat, some 380 kilometers 
(240 miles) away. The new epi- 
demic struck with devastating 


By Philip M. Boffey 


swiftness, killing many victims in 
lays. Citij 


just a few days. Citizens fled, some 
private doctors fled, and the 
plague seemed poised to spread. 

With the Indian health system 
on high alert and doctors 
throughout the country reporting 
every fever that might conceiv- 
ably be plague, the toll of suspect- 
ed cases quickly mounted. By the 
end of October, tbe nationwide 
count topped 7,000. 

When one of the nation’s top 
laboratories reported erroneously 
that it had confirmed the first 
cases in New Delhi, far from Su- 
rat. everyone’s worst nightmare 
seemed to be unfolding. 

But very few of the suspected 
cases were really plague. Doctors, 
as instructed, were reporting ev- 
erything that might be plague. 

But problems arose. The Indi- 
an health system lacked the lab- 
oratory and epidemiological ca- 
pabilities to quickly distinguish 
real cases of plague from a host 
of other diseases. Worse, in a fit 
of false pride, India refused at 
first to ask for outside help or 
even accept it when offered. 
Nobody knows how many cases 


bubonic plague in Beed and fewer 
than 100 cases of pneumonic 
plague in Surat. Tbe number of 
deaths was officially put at 54, 
but Russian experts on the WHO 
team suspect that many of these 
were not plague. Comparable 
plague epidemics occurred with 
less notice in Peru, Vietnam and 
Zaire in recent years. 

Not a single case of plague 
transmission was confirmed in 
Bombay, the metropolis closest to 
those fleeing Sural, or in Calcut- 
ta, Madras or New Delhi 

Tbe Indians deserve credit for 
a vigorous response that helped 


stability. To be sure, mere are 
serious disagreements over the 
pace and specifics of reform, but 
they do not come close to the 
kinds of ideological divisions that 
engulfed China in 1976. 

Political life during the Cultur- 
al Revolution fit Hobbes's de- 
scription of an anarchical state: 
nasty, brutish and short. Political 
opponents were purged as trai- 
tors, and often their family mem- 
bers were not spared punishment 

Defeats were life-and-death af- 
fairs. For example, Liu Shaoqi, the 
former president, died in prison. 
No-hokls-baired power struggles 
made politics cruel and unstable. 

Today, power rivalry portends 
no such frightening prospects. 


The writer, a visiting scholar at 
Harvard’s Center for International 
Affairs and assistant professor of 
political science at the University °J 
Michigan, contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


stop tbe plague in its tracks. After 
slui 


of plague occurred. Indian health 
authorities 


ities claim that more than 
800 were confirmed by blood tests, 
but the test they mostly used is not 
considered definitive. 

When the WHO team tracked 
down a subsample of cases, only 
one was deemed plague. The best 
guess of outside experts is that 
there were fewer than 100 cases of 


a sluggish start, they poured anti- 
biotics into Surat, isolated and 
treated those who were sick, and 
(raced and treated their contacts. 
Thousands of health and sanita- 
tion workers were mobilized. 

But the authorities failed utter- 
ly to measure and explain the 
limited dimensions of the health 
threat On a recent visit to India, 
this Western journalist was re- 
peatedly told that sensational 
press treatment in India and 
abroad, had grotesquely exagger- 
ated tbe danger. But Lhe deeper 
fault is India's, for failing io 
maintain adequate monitoring 
and laboratory systems. 

India did all the righL things to 
contain the plague out little to 
contain the fearful overrcaction 
to it That is proving a costly 
mistake in a country that seeks to 
become a magnet for foreign in- 
vestment and a welcome partici- 
pant in global trade. 

The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: No Help for China 


PARIS — fThe Herald says in an 


IS — [The 
editorial:] China must now under- 
stand that she has little chance of 
interesting the great Powers in her 
fate. Her request for intervention 
has met everywhere with refusals. 
She will therefore be obliged to 
treat directly with Japan. 


hold the United States aloof fro., 
foreign controversies. 


1944: What Ails Hitler? 


1919: TVeaty Is Rejected 


NEW YORK — [From our New 
York edition:] By the adoption of 
ten drastic reservations the Senate 
today [Nov. 15] paved the way for 
the complete rejection of the treaty 
or peace. A dominant majority, 
supported at one time by no less 
than thirteen Democratic votes, 
rode rough shod over the adminis- 
tration forces and put through the 
entire programme framed by the 
Committee on Foreign Relations 
to safeguard American institutions 
under the League of Nations and 


LONDON — [From our New 
York edition:] Competent Bciti& 
sources believe that Adolf Hitler 
has a blood clot on- tbe. brain 
There seems to be no doobt.lh*t 
Heinrich Himml er is the acting 
leader of Germany. Hitler suf- 
fered a cerebral thrombosis, « is 
believed, partly as a result of. die 
assassination attempt on July 20 
and partly from bigb blood pres - 
sure, which was aggravated 
great Allied smash through 
this summer. The only wayofar* « 
resting this condition 
complete rest, winch wodd; *®’ 
count for the fact that theOecOjtf® 
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The punishment of the Gang of 
Four for perpetuating large-wale 
persecutions was far milder than 
dm fate of liu Shaoqi — or, for 
that matter, Deng Xiaoping, who 
was sent to the countrykde to do 
hard labor and whose son was 
>led by the Red Guards, 
the three fallen leaders in 
the reform era, Mr. Hua and Hu 
Yaobang were removed from 
their positions gradually and 
were allowed to keep most of the 
trappings of power. In 1989, 
Zhao Ziyang came dose to a total 
defeat, but in the end, he was 
granted considerable freedom 
and his family’s economic inter- 
est remained largely intact. 

Ending the vicious cycle of re- 
venge and instituting more civil 
rules of the political game are 
among tbe great — and underrat- 
ed — achievements of Mr. Deng, 

Today, the leaders are no long- - 
er political enemies at each oth- 
er's throats but are rivals who 
negotiate and compromise. This 
is the essence of normal and 
peaceful politics, and it augurs 
well for a smooth transition of 
power when Mr. Deng exits. 


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?An Arrogant Man of Vision, 
For Better and lor Worse 


By David S. Broder 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 

OPINION ~ 

Something Terrible in Siberia 

J UNEAU. Alaska — In Alaska, By 'Walter J. Hickel ies; Lhis will be devasiaiii 

an oil spill like the one that _ , .. , neonle who deoend on fish 


Page 9 


TT7ASHINGTON —Newt Ging- 

tjc ST the °= xt weaker of the 
of presents Lives, is 
one of the most vexing politicians I 

S^«Sk CT ^ P figUTe out - His 
strengths — intellectual and politi- 
cal — are so large and his weak- 
nesses so glaring that they are diffi- 
cuU to reconcile. The good 
Gmgnch is a man possessed by 
arxestmg, powerful ideas; the bad 
Gingnch, a man possessed by de- 
mons he seemingly cannot control. 

Last week, as the Republicans cel- 
ebrated their takeover of the House 
for the first time in 40 years, both 
sides of the Gingrich personality 
were on view. On the eve of the 
votin g, he made the grotesque sug- 
gestion that the drowning of two 
South Carolina children by their 
mother was the symptom of a failure 
in soda] policy that could be laid at 
the door of the Democrats. The day 
after the election, he babbled about 
Bill and Hillary Clinton being 
“counterculture McGovem-niks.” 
He also declined to interrupt a talk- 
show interview to accept a phone 
,}«H from the president of the United 
States and delayed an hour and a 

half in retu rning the call. 

Judging from the phone calls I 
got the next day, that show of juve- 
nile arrogance appalled many of his 
fellow Republicans. 

Yet on Friday, Mr. Gingrich 
came back to Washington from his 
Georgia district and gave a policy 
speech that was confident, coherent 
and in every way impressive. The 
words were strong, the thoughts 
clear and no one who heard him was 
in any doubt that the House Repub- 
licans he leads will attempt to en- 
act the conservative governing agen- 
da he described. 

Mr. Gingrich has been like that for 
all the 20 years I have known him. At 
one moment, be can dazzle you with 
the mmbleness of his mind. I remem- 
ber an extended metaphor, devel- 
oped with seeming spontaneity at one 
breakfast, in which he remarked that 
Ronald Reagan had played football 
in college and George Bush, baseball. 
The differing nature of the two games 
helped you understand their ap- 
proaches to the presidency, he said. 
The exposition lasted about five min- 
utes and it was so smart that you just 
stopped eating and tistened. 

On the other hand, I also remem- 
ber him, highly agitated, at a Bush 
campaign event in Ms district, right 
after the 1992 Republican convert- 
•Tion. Mr. Gingrich had locked onto 
the idea that some obscureprovision 
in the Democratic platform was “the 
Woody Allen plank*” Lei; a tacit ap- 


proval of a middle-aged father hav- 
ing an affair with his adopted 
daughter. Mr. Gingrich was ob- 
sessed with the notion, haranguing 
reporters before the rally. No one 
could disabuse him of the conviction 
— and several Bush aides tried — 
that this was a dynamite issue. 

However flawed his tactics may 
be at times, Mr. Gingrich has a rare 
grasp of long-term strategy. He un- 
derstands the power of ideas, the 
techniques of mass communication 
and political mobilization and — 
rarest of all — the need for strong 
political parties in government. 

His strategic vision has never wa- 
vered. During his first term in Con- 
gress, 16 years ago, I interviewed 
Mr. Gingrich for a book on the new 
generation of emerging political 
leaders. After noting that it had tak- 
en Mr. Gingrich three tries to win 
a House seat, 1 wrote: 

“He had no more than arrived 
when he began talking up bis next 
crazy scheme — to achieve the ma- 
jority that Republicans had not won 
m the House since 1952 ... Ging- 
rich's effort in his first congressional 
term was centered on building a 
cohesive Republican challenge to 
the ruling Democrats on the basic 
question of the size and shape of 
die government budget. 

“T am a Republican,’ Gingrich 
said, ‘but 1 think the greatest failure 
of the past 20 years has been the 
Republican Party. The Democratic 
Party has attempted to do what the 
governing party should do — gov- 
ern. But it faded. And when it faded, 
there was nobody there to take up 
the burden. And I think that in or- 
der for this civilization to survive, at 
least as a free society, we've got to 
have a more rigorous and cohesive 
sense of an alternative party.’ 

“That view was so unusual in a 
politician of Gingrich's age that the 
fr eshman legislator drew much more 
than his share of attention. He said 
that he knew that the conventional 
wisdom was that he should look af- 
ter his constituents’ needs and Ms 
own re-election and let someone else 
save the free society — at least until 
he had a couple or three terms under 
his belt. But Gingrich said that ‘the 
dearth of strategic vision in this par- 
ty is so enormous that it’s the old 
story: a one-eyed man, even if he's 
nearsighted, has huge advantages.’ ” 

By sticking to that vision. Newt 
Gingrich, for all his faults, has gained 
a major role in the leadership of the 
United States. It remains to be seen 
whether Ms lapses of judgment wQl 
undercut the authority he has won 
The Washington Post. 


J an oil spill like the one that 
happened in the Russian Arctic 
this summer and fall would be 
called an unmitigated disaster, un- 
leashing a national media frenzy. 
In Russia, the reaction could 
hardly have been more different. 

It wasn't a sudden spilL An old 
pipeline operated by the state oil 

MEANWHHJE 

company apparently wore out, de- 
veloping leaks along its 30-mile 
(50-kilometer) length. 

Estimates of the magnitude vary 
wildly, from 4 million gallons ( 17 
million liters) to 80 million gallons. 
(The Exxon Valdez spill, off the 
Alaskan coast, was 1 1 million gal- 
lons.) But whatever the cause and 
the Size, an immediate, full-scale 
response is imperative. 

This month, a team of Alaskan 
experts and 1 flew west in a small 
jet, across 12 time zones and most 
of Russia, to the site of the spill — 
near the town of Usinsk, 1,000 
miles northeast of Moscow. 

1 led the mission as secretary- 
general of the Northern Forum, an 
organization of 24 regions in the 
circumpolar north. 

Touring by helicopter about 
250 feet (75 meters) above the 
scrub spruce, meandering streams, 
tributaries and great rivers, we 


By Walter J. Hickel 

77ie writer is governor of Alaska. 

could see that something terrible 
had happened. 

Oil was caked on stream banks. 
Despite a recent snowfall, we 
could see ofl bubbling out of leaks 
in the pipeline, unattended and 
ignored. Crude containment dikes 
had been breached by heavy rains. 
A videotape made before tbe 
snowfall showed oil lying on the 


This spill has catastrophic 
potential. The battle to 


rivers must be icon now. 


tundra in black pools the size 
of football fields. 

We landed. We walked in the 
muck. We took samples. 

Though we had been told a 
cleanup was under way, we saw 
no evidence of it. 

Make no mistake, this spill has 
catastrophic potential. Unless a 
huge cleanup effort is begun soon, 
the oil will ruin fresh water sup- 
plies. It will destroy wildlife and 
contaminate salmon spawning 
grounds and downstream fisher- 


ies; Lhis will be devastating to 
people who depend on fish and 
game for survival. 

It will threaten migratory birds, 
from temperate climates, which 
spend their summers in the Arctic 
tundra. And if not contained now, 
the oil from Usinsk will flow into 
the Pechora River system, and on 
to the Barents Sea. From there 
it will be taken by the currents 
— west, toward Norway, or east, 
toward Alaska. 

What is to be done? Our experts 
recommend four steps. 

First, there must be a full and 
accurate assessment of the scope of 
the spill. President Boris Yeltsin 
should let the world in to see the 
environmental legacy of the Soviet 
era. Then he can champion a clean- 
up effort that will enlist worldwide 
support and create jobs for tens of 
thousands of Russians. 

Second, the corroded pipeline, 
all of it, must be replaced — a 
project that the president of the 
Komi Republic, Yuri Spiridonov, 
said would begin immediately. 

And Western companies devel- 
oping Russian oil need to share the 
responsibility. We were told that 
many of the leaks appeared shortly 
after the pipeline was “pressured 
up” to take oil from new wells 
recently put into production. 

At least six Western companies 
are expected to begin producing oil 



in this region soon. Isn’t it time 
they adopted the same standards in 
Russia that we require in Alaska? 

Third, the cleanup effort will 
have to begin in the next 30 days if 
it is to take advantage of tbe win- 
ter construction season. In the 
Arctic, cold is your friend. The 
best time to retrieve oil is when 
it is congealed on frozen tundra. 
The battle to keep Lhe oil out of 


By EWK. CkV Syafcvc 

the rivers must be won now. 

Finally, the bigger issue must be 
addressed. The energy production 
system built in the Russian Arctic 
during the Soviet era is a world 
catastrophe waiting to happen. If 
Russian leaders are willing, the 
world community will help them in 
the monumental task of cleaning 
up and modernizing that system. 

The New York Tones. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Election Afterthoughts 

Regarding Everything Changes, 
Excitement Ahead"' (Opinion, Nov. 
II) by William Safire: 

The United States abounds with 
talent. It is such a pity that so little 
of it is available for public service. 
But the entrance fee is too high for 
most people. William Safire is abso- 
lutely right when be says that the 
television set has hijacked democra- 
cy. You could redress both griev- 
ances by making it unla wful for can- 
didates to appear on television. Put 
the people back in politics and tal- 
ent back in government. 

NORMAN SANDERS. 

Drammen. Norway. 

The “me generation’’ of the 1980s 
has remfiltrated society, like a can- 
cer. Instead of the American people 
mming away egocentric congress- 
men who can see only as far as their 
autobiographies, these politicians 
have finally won. History will not 
now remember Ml Clinton for his 
view of the future, because Ameri- 
cans have just tossed away their fu- 


ture. America! Where has your 
courage gene? 

JOEL SAVITZ. 

Ley sin. Switzerland. 

To understand the degradation of 
the democratic process over tbe past 
200 years, one only has to reread the 
speeches of Madison, Jefferson, Lin- 
coln and Franklin Roosevelt and 
compare than to the monosyllabic 
high-school locker room jargon of 
our present officials. Democracy 
does not guarantee good leadership, 
but tbe fault does not lie with the 
politicians. The people do get the 
political leaders they deserve; it just 
doesn't say much about the people. 

ELWOOD L RICKLESS. 

London. 

While generally welcoming the re- 
sults of the election in the States, may 
I offer the following, perhaps Cassan- 
dra-ish, comments. 

1. As a New York Stale resident, I 
am more entitled than most to cele- 
brate the vision of the end of Gover- 
nor Mario Cuomo. I greatly fear, 
however, that unless the current nine 


justices take very good care of then- 
health, we may end up having this 
Socialist Hamlet inflicted upon us 
from the Supreme Court, from where 
he wifl be free to plague the lives of 
all Americans. 

2. Olivier North got ambushed by 
his own “party.” Ollie, never mind. 
Next time, go for it all; president 
You'll win. 

3. Finally, we get the sad news that 
the greatest president the United 

■ Stales ever had, Ronald Reagan, has 
got Alzheimer’s disease. Well, hang 
in there. Rock. 

And Newt do your thing 

JACKJOUS. 

Brasschaat Belgium. 

All fundamentalists who worship 
the God of the Old Testament be 
they Jewish, Christian or Islamic, 
share traits of zealotry which make 
life unpleasant or even dangerous for 
those of reason or moderation. After 
the recent U.S. elections one may 
assume that tbe Christian right will 
have greatly increased influence; we 
look forward to our impending re- 
turn home with little enthusiasm. 


... Oh well, at least Ollie North 
struck out. 

JAMES KINGSLAND. 

Gourd on. France. 

As a Democrat, 1 view the recent 
U.S. election results with mixed feel- 
ings: optimism in that the failing 
party has been purged and can now, 
perhaps, go forth with renewed vi- 
tality to reinvent itself; pessimism 
that the polled public had doubted, 
before the election, the quality of the 
world awaiting its children, yet has 
delivered the Congress to the same 
band of hucksiers-of-the-free-hinch 
who just a few years ago mortgaged 
our children's financial, social and 
environmental future, 

HERMAN ARCHER. 

Cairo. 

As an American expatriate (one 
whose sympathies traditionally are 
with the Democrats), the recent 
election resnlts have left me ponder- 
ing where my country is beaded, A 
few of my thoughts: 

1. Republicans and middle-class 
whites of other persuasions cannot 


barricade themselves off from the 
demographic and economic changes 
in America. Unless they can come 
up with solutions to the country’s 
social problems that guarantee 
equal treatment and opportunity to 
minorities and poor people, their 
age nda is doomed to fail. 

2. Nonvoters on the left who did 
not vote because they felt disenfran- 
chised shot themselves in the foot 

3. Liberals must face the fact that 
they took a wrong turn by aban- 
doning the concept of personal re- 
sponsibility and censoring the very 
freedoms of thought and speech 
that had allowed them to prosper. 

GREGORY J. SCHMIDT. 

Frankfurt 


Letters intended for publication 
should he addressed “ Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer's si- 
gnature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 




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ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES 

19 PeH Rood. Oougtes. 

Isle of Man. D41 4.S 
Tel: 0624 626591 
Fax. 0624 625126 
or London Tel: (7 1)222 8866 
Fax pi) 233 1519 


J 


FOR A WORLD-WIDE RftTENT: 

Distributors needed to hotels, 
airlines, cosmetics and advertising. 

Contact I.P.T. Ud. 

Tel: 972-4-668816 
Fax: 972-4-677674 


OFFSHORE BANKS 

• M wd w nt f giuH Bdal brak 

■ Accept deposits 

• Closic Afioance 

■ No y ntfa fan aq u a— n h 
- No Iomb or msoiie* 

•Tdelonayiiiily 

■ Becvsr shares OX. 

• Nominee dnmWonO.K. 

• bnmedkua daft ra y 

• US$15,000 or $25,000 wflh a 

trust company 

Caff or fox for fra e details! 
Ron Jensen 

London TeL 71 3S4 5157 Fes 71 231 9928 
Canada Tel. 904 M2 MM Fn M2 3179 


U.S. CORPORATIONS 

fer as C ri A plus 
little as state lees 


• 5 minutes over the phone 

• Serving business since 1899 

• Free name reservation 

302-998~0598 

CORPORATE AGENTS, INC. 
FAX (302) 998-7078 
CompuServe: CO IRC 
Internet: 

trrm/fwwwxorporatsxom 


OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 

It Y LAWYERS 

IMMIGRATION 

& TRUST EXPERTS 


OFFSHORE TRUSTS. COMPANIES, 
BANK INTRODUCTIONS. NOMINEES 
& ADMINISTRATION 8Y UK LAWYERS 
raw no. tummtaam 


■ mSH<nBE5j £1BSM 

■ ISLE OF HAN £1SSJB 
m DDMUEut £435. » 

■ JERSEY OS5JO 

u B.V.L/PRNAHA E2SSJ8 


SCF 

^n-NCin COMPANY rODMATlONTi 

LONDON OFFICE 

SCORPIO HOUSE. 102 SMIIJET STREET 
CHELSEA. L0:;0(Jt; S'.'Ji fc!U 
■s -5--71 352 '2274 
«-718TT'J5S5 


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 


Major Corporation Orders Sale of Prime U.S. Property 


Real Estate AUCTION 


193,000 SF Multi-Use Facility 
SOMERSET, NEW JERSEY, USA 

Between New York City & Philadelphia 

Convenient to Major Highways, Ports of Entry and International Airports 

{2} connected buildings on 27* acres • Fonmerty used for executive offices and manufacture of 
Integrated Computer Chips • 30,000 SF of deanrooms, Classes 10 & 1000 Suitable for R&O, 
bio technical, biological, food, laser optical, and mecticai device manufacturers • Excellent nearby 
technical labor pool • 3 excellent houses and 15* acre tract {possBjie development parcel) al zoned 
M-1 Industriai/Oommerdal 

Sale on Premises: Wed., Dec. 7, 1:30 PM 

Preview: Wed., Nov. 30, 10-4 PM • Or by appointment 


Deposit 10% of which 5250,000 by 
Certified or Bank Treasurer's Check 



Foumdtd 1924 


World Headquarters • 1519 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 
24 (215) 545-4500 - FAX (215) 545-2462 


'Atwmamt 


Douglas CXemena • Auctioneer • NJ Real Estate Broker 

Brochure Request Line, 24 Hrs4 (215) 526-0800 


AMERICA'S FOllliMOST REAL ESTATE Ai CTIO.X ORGAXIZA T/OX 


TURIN (ITALY) 

Hie most prestigious position in the most important commercial sheet 
Palace of historical and artistic importance 

'ii it 



3.0UO Hj.jdoQ three Hours. ftfrnueK wrQ mtorail-divisililr in 3 part* «f l.OOU -q.vd. 
Mrh, 35 HinJom. well floor on three ftrrrt*. all ronfurt- and pm air parkin;. 
Nrjotiatiiip with printr pnstn or Estate aanrifs. 

For all informations please contari: Studio Fontana. Hw Rosi Foniana Via Dunati 3 
10121 TOUNOirrAUT) -TEL00103^>- 11-543.769 - FA\ 001039 - 1 1 - 543.923 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls! 


Save over 50% on phone 
calls compared to local 
phone companies. 
Call for rates - 
Lines open 24 hoars. 
Tel 1-206-284-8600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 



■: I V Sen nt A » * W • Scanlc. * A 98 1 1 1 -US A 


“B iulding Materials” 

Are you looking for Building Materials & 
other Consumers Goods from Korea? 

Please Contact: Mr. Frank Yuu 
SMS ^Association Co., Ltd. Seoul, Korea 

Tel: 82-2-546-8251 
Fax: 82-2-5448254 


! BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 1 


Seeking —L-THIE MP W W1BB MW— IH— (|) 

with cflstributlon network, 
to distribute on an exclusive basis, our patented ~ 

ENVIRONMENT and FUEL SAVER 

Savings belween 18% and 30%. 
on fuel and exhaust gases.on cas, trucks and bqalv ’ 
Yovrrtfacflcns (Company pmfUa) Idncry exported byr j 

DAK£X GflOUP B.V. Bkxdc 265, 301 1 GB Rotterdam, The fMTwdonb 

Fax: +31 10433 1428 


SCULPTURE WORLD™ 

Discover A Gold Mine In 
New Acryfic Sculpture Art 
Ybu Transform 
Posters into Art 
That Sefls from 
$100-82,000+ 

Great Profits 
Return Potential 
No Direct Safes 



AM Equipment/ Fug Control 

Investment Sl&-$25,000iroi 

716-691-1750 

FAX: 716-691-1766 


9 


PERFECT CLOTHING 

TIC CRAZEST DEALW THE WOfiU). 
TODAY, F YOU HAVE $1,200,000. 
FOR 17 FULL 40FT C0NTMCRS OF 
PERFECT CL0THNG REMS. TOTAL 
QUANTITY WCLUOeS AT LEAST OfC 
4GFT CONTAINS OF TOP QUALITY 
SffiEPSWN COATS, OVER 1^00 GENTS 
SlinS, PLUS 16 OTTER C0NTAFERS. 
CAN YOU BELEVE COST PER ITEM. 
$236 Kim TPS TRUE- STOCK CAN BE 
VENED TODAY. EVEHYTWG PERFECT. 
ALSO WOlfiES DRESSES, BLOUSES, 
SUTTS, SUPERB WfTVfEAR; IN FACT 
EVERYMVGMAGTIABLE FOR LADES 
Al® GENTS aOTHWG. 

US $Z36PBtfIEM_ ALSO 


SPOT TRADING IN STOCK 
LOTS AVAILABLE NOW 




IW wto ■ wrw 

■ OS. Attorneys! ■ 


tKOOHOitae Herat wr jpcri*r- take k 
ill 50 S40 Gtarmre of cooptaf Untfatf. 
We ofa US. Mkhess wifi pbooe & fajcnio, 
office Jdrtco. US. bank noun. US. dfaa 
n wre is dkccun. comtae kgtf wrier* t 
assiauice. including OTC inrixi uuf ft 
taaipBiotL Pta* re*w oar tee baxtac. 
itMitfeBEMGahftGeaai. 

Dr. Jar- Wlttbuo A. Wright 
Attoroeyatliw . 

UJL Corp° a rioo Sendees, Inc 
343&BabnMSt Drive, Suita »10, 
Sscnntamo. Cififoava 95827 

m Fax (USA) 916/783-3005 


International 
Herald Tribaar 
ads wort 


£25 each, ip to 60,000 avafeUe in 
smal or targe tote 

• MRED CONTATERS OF PERFECT 
BRANDED HARDWARE. TOYS. FANCY 
GOODS SOLD AT USS30.000 FOR 
US$150,000 RETAL VALUE 

- TOPUK BRANDED PERFECT 
FOOTWEAR. 80* DISCOUNT FROM 
RETAL EXAMEE US$300,000 
COSTS US$60,000. 

• DESIGfER CL0THNG. DESIGNER 
LABELS. FOR EXPORT OUT OF EEC. 
EXAMPLE USS 100.000 VIU. COST 

usszzooo. 

• DALYBANKRUPICYAWUOUmTlON 
aOSE OUT DISPOSALS. 

STOCK PLC 
7H; +44 fOI 21 552 5522 
FAX: +44 ft 2T 5440444 
IHOfc 333333 
JUNC 2, MS MOTORWAY 
BRMNGHAM.UK 


CLEARANCE OF 
LASER TONER 
CARTRIDGES 


SPECIAL BULK PURCHASE of 

genuine Apple laser toner (Pvt 

NO.M202BGM) 
fortheAppfc 
LaserWito 
Select 300 & 

310 printers 
Also fits 
the STAR 
LS5 ’ 
series 

and . . 

CLEARANCE SALE OF APPLE 
PERIPHERALS AND PRINTER 
CONSUMABLES... 

d. Sheet A Envelope Feeders 
■.Colour Printer Paper 
■ Transparency FHm 
. ■.Ethernet Cables 
■ Monitors 


call +44 (0)1623 782233 

or Fax +4<i (0)1628 781S55 
PST iTradmgi ltd * Priors Way 
Maidenhead - Serhs SL6 2HP • UK 



COMMERCIAL 
REAL ESTATE 


FOR SALE 

Southern California 

Prfrne LA county, 68 unll home tract 
$2-7 rrtSon. Buyers wifi experi e n c e In 
Inveslmenl potential, possible Joint 
venhre or other prelects to consider. 
Fax for Info: (818) 222-7904 USA 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


READERS AK ADVISED 

that thm tatmraattonal 


MkfreaaaM»Arl»<r 
damag u i nammd at an- 
wall of fnnsoc Mom wtam- 


■*»r 

bill wfewwcwwnirf . 
ad tbjt t aadwn mat* op- 


w wn dhg my menwy or an- 
tariag Mo any Mi dhj 


IMPORT/ EXPORT 


OtSCOVB THE SOISCB Deal cWy 
wtfh manufaduar. 3 n a pack, pia- 
mofeanal bays & Jrh soda. Pantyhose 
& toMs. exfuclng terfured & desgner 
Kyles. Newl WHe toe - hah, scarfs, 
leg women, eta fto f e a waafa at ex- 
port for 9* pat decade. Guaranteed 
law prices S Irerdy refabie savxa. 
Mafeaan Hauay Teh 718-785-1 300 
fan- 718-789-6x20 USA 


THB ULTIMATE SOURCE I 
Manufaduren of mens & bays eMehc 
lodes. Aihiefcc & casual fcorwecx 
(shoes] lor men, lad«s ft cKkken. Our 
pre to onol ft dee fc at e d sfcff offer 
you punctual semes a> sasisfactsry 

WarWvnde Impart/ bcporl Tel: 
51499 Fax: 71 58S2-6OT L6A 


pnaes. v> 
718-783-1 


SOI LEVI JEANS 
•’UWattVAHLE RATCS"* 
FAST OBIVBPr 

CAU/FAX (310) 271-0714 USA 


MAJOR OOARET1B, mode « US\ 
has then 180 days and less fan 90 
days freshness. Defverv 2 weeks erfter 
a wfirm ufm L/C Pertonnonce Band, 
against delwy. foe 343 - 


G04ER1C CIGARETTES. American 
Wend tobacco. k)*«t prices, crvs*» 
labeSnq oral aUe. FAX JSA: 1 (305) 


kxxBnq a 

47«a& 


USB) LEVI MI’S. Ouoity pen 
Acts from the USA. ReibbJe ! 


fae 5Q3/i2M7<9 USA. 


' ****** 


BEAOTBUL C05METK UNE for mier- 
notional sdes. Send for catckxi and 
pro fa. FAX USA: 1 P0S47- 


DOMNCAN QGARS, HAND MADE, 

finest tobaccos, low prices vohmn 
stfes orfy. FAX USA: ? 005) 474-3BM 


VTTAMMS, FDA/USA. tow fwk 
■ '.FAX USA.- 1 (3 


«atome safes ariy. 
474-3866. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPAMES 

• READY MADE Cffv FUU. AOMIN 

• TRADE DOCUM£M5 AND UC 
m BAIWJG & ACCOUNIWG 

» Q9NA BUSNESS SBMtB 

Contact Stela Ho for imnedase 
services ft conpamr tood«re 
MACS LTD, Room 906. Alban Plena. 
2-4 GranvSe Road. Tan Sha Tsui, 
Kawioan, Hang Korn 
Tel 852-7741223 Fas 852-! 


HXSIUST MTHE5T PAD- Tax-free 
paymenti to cSerts an 
once ' 

5350 


Mi to ctents an yearfy detnsO 
1981 Chefara Fiduoones Ud, 

frnersor\ Ixfej, Tens 75309 

Allik i. Kdkai TeL 214/954*02 

Fc* 2147352-1965 USA 


■ h iMiaguBiai to Top EC Country » 
MMOMTE EC Gtonsfo ft taMl 
docw*rtI owigUelhru purrtese of a 
bearfii 150 sqjtL up to 330 sqjn. 
hn^y Wto ^artmenL Red Estate 

lm *£?*** i ? ? “P to 
$895,000 mdudes 100% lead 
Gorennnent NnflxaEznlicn. 

Fdl PMedton Of Y«r fends 
Money to Escrow. A ntozrchip « 
far He. Go wit h pro fc a to nuU you 
con trust. Gradve an inubi. 
fouNL 

American PoeSc Ireanmce N.V. 


^DBAWAKWCisUCs 

Oed drect wdh Detoware 


money an U5A coROaey 

UC. S350 USD. Fast. 


Detoware toe or 

idtoUe. coaxfeta semen in ti US 
stofes. Free mfa Cd or fax: 


10SU S??2toSfS4, Dept H 
Oav», K 19901 
Tefc 302-734-5510 
Hbc 302^36-5620 


SALB AGENTS WANTS 

For 61N Worldwide Cmd which 
„ h» 50X dscou# to 9 J00 

Hal3sn75 cowenes. Hoh prdu. rnrv 
mum >Mstaere SlO^XXTFor 500 cards 
todarftog Phone Cato facEfe. 

“°sssSss&tssssr 


Tel: 


1 Fax 6382271 


FOR SA LE 

Oflilvr tax exempt finance cotapaay. 
Ml ireniries to- C J. Comes, Touche 
Rce» Cak ftxt «4at®TJ534 UJL 
PumxA Orfy 


COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPERTIES 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


Exceptio nal RE NTAL OFFS! 

GENEVA AIRPORT . FRENCH 5DE 
1.000 sqj& clMsbie modem offices 
IrBernaftond. Busnes* Center 
F8ffCr-V0ttAflE - FRANCE 
Amud Ser4 FF 4S0 per sflm. 

+ VAr nsffu 
+ SffVCE&WGB 
(Heannq etoctnofy & water) 

Contact SOW Td (331 50 40 73 82 
Fax: 33 5048 90 73 


SALES 


SOUTHERN ITALY ma CdautrA 
400 ha farm, tpeoatoed m «qeiable 
export dnnsitJe mto rwo unti Com- 
pleie inlrattruciure-migaticfl and 
'■lod rail ImfcL Outstanding develop 
men* {xcveett and financing owi- 
obto Wnt? fer docvmenijfion to Box 
631. I HI rte Cossota 6 20127 M*si. 
UfltV 


TOP CLASS THQROU GWRB stud 
form - gemg corem ■ 500 ocrcs in 
prane horse breeding oreo m South 
Africa. 2 Homesteads, 80 nobles. 3 
s&Aton stables. Ompleto eqmqnwe, 
■mpfemMs. eta 40 top dost paven 
broodmemn tod with toabalfoor- 
20 yearfargi ere ered tor venous soles 
by lop das Amerkm are (now bode 
m fa USA4- Stalon. leaser, eta 
I nw edn te return naa sales m eorfy 
1995. Presem penholders - lap 
homer and leafing breeder prepared 
to stay n it desred. Tap das race- 
horses from fa j rud recertify exported 
to U5A Ctosohitog of syndKaSe. Pnce 
UKC 900.000 InegSwbH Contari: fax 
2716 571 581 T^nrUfa 


PROVBKZ - COTE ITA&flL Far sde 
Enghth boobtae, Wictotohed 25 
years; Umerstiy town eipmfing 
busrwss. FF1.4M + sellers ere*. Ttf 

home Pa 91 75 78 9» 


FILM PRODUCTION - PADS MjOOa 
foadfmode ft ready taw company 
Aha lease tor office S (60 sqm), 
nqupped. furttohed. choraoet. cakn 
Sfalow rent Tel/Far |1) 435739U 


FRANCE. BED A BREAKFAST/ fames 
i/v pleasure. Sumptuously torrmhed, 
6 betboonrs, 5 bdhroam. new SIM. 
Provenc e Fox 133} 422B 8737 borinre. 


MARBB1A/E5TEPONA 

Donwwsn Beadi tosMi Package 
Luxinanly toed 2-bedroom apartments, 
m am fistorwv cental heat to g, marbto 

wool CaD, neawa poo- woo marv 
ooe tn ent, acelera real rcome. Far 


Tet 34 5 2810102 Fax U17788 


USA-TEXAS 161 AOB derdapnM 
land m Sm Audio an 2 motor fax- 
aughfarrs, 2% fan from Sea World. 
F4em new Hyatt d e sh n»on hold. 
Owner must set Nota asjmremon. 
Quoted 57500'aae. EitdTb Proper 
be, Tel 2102714660 Foe 210% 
1951 USA i Braubadt m Brimeb. Td 
03 311 B9 28. fa D3 313 96 H 


EXCSU4T (NYHTM&fT Buy a la « 
amy Brad. Fan oradxkiq tounst 
m*a near beach 55 ton good road 
from Inti aepon. USfir per stun. 750 
nm. lot far US53.00Q £r VS. IHT, 
92321 Nfalr Ctfa France or Fax 
Luoano Cfataarre (53 B5 261 3100 


TOP LEADERS 

RANGE + K Courtises 

TO fVWTlCmUE IN THE MOST 
INNOVATIVE AND EXCITING 
EU80PWN MUITUEVH. VBYTURE 
Fox Mcfa toon ft Records Ice 
Bemad faier, TOP NVEAU 
p52) 36 64 41 (laarabaurgi 


R4TB04AH0NAL BUStC55 HOLES 

needs to jwrhase ouridit fe6o *~ 
ol refineries ccppdty 125,000 
cement [fad *mh Tip ton capadty 
p^L hefeoptorswkh 30/36 acastsami 
« toss cxrcT crft w ith 60 / K) pcbbp- 
gen capacity and lorQV. Hatoanft 
and hvdufd. lyie irexxifaduring 
dart. Write veto fid dends to Bar 
3525, liiT, 63 Lang Wat, London, 
WC2E9JH 


. RBWaWAHVB WANIB) 

For an ettobfifad irtiernatio«>al 
mvestmeat banting foe, bcritsl 
co mm dsnj n . Sotos or finance tatocr— oe 
helpfii Wb bon. No m rifi nenl 
required Bean For response to: 
B0UCM725 or cal 806643*00 USA 


SWISS PRW ATE RANKS 
offers pi d e sce nd terwees to 
confiderihd k we d me rt accaunls. 
Only asset i Ponagewert. No toae, 
no bank debertues. neasa far 
USA 1 -30M5W616 reference Mode. 


AinST/PAJNTH. 30: 

work ready tor worldwide exhi b toons, 
seeb bvestar or Agert on a 
tore! to c uua a udBe ft eesiaae fa 
sale of fa rights to ha works, taut 
tog 6 50 deMaftor vefco grenes, CTX 
ft al arktfic br-oradueni Fax/phore 
MiaEbo Vesta: NY 01 212 987 186 9. 


OSTRICH OWHSHP hhe other red 
neat + hide ft fetAnnf. Lei us 
inboduu you to fa pranaer ogri- 
eweAcni of fa Wi Bnfc ae 
■mured, aid aaiaged an a Texas 

ranch. Frre l ent returns ex pected Cal 

817/5954909 USA (24 hou4 leave 

telephone jid fra puntoery 


CLASS A BANK to ton fire wu wsh 
odreiostiulwe semres and Btab W ie d 
banking and aanftes accounts. US 
S5Q£QQ. (Mnedrft tnaeder. CoS 
Canada (604 942-6169 or Fax B04) 
942-3179 or London 071 394 5157 or 
FAX 071 231 9928. 


YOW PATWWW, broker ft regafe 
otar « i Western ft E mtarn 6 ro pe ft 
R iwe o to rrxu n re ad. ledvkcd L icgd 
makers. Conto ri us for co ncept ft 
prire qucwwn FE5TTNA LENTE A/S. 
to 1 4553926766 or fax +45 
33147404. 


BUSINE5S OPPORTUNITIES M 
MYANMAR (BURMA). Myanmar 
(Burma) is mailing torogn uwesimuil 
and |Oxnl vertsre laamdDbiirer. t you 


are u de xes tad ptotne 
21NZAR LTD, A tempo Na 20, Jak- 
arta 10320. Indaieja. Fax 3904 1 30. 


years 

GOLD MS3M. - Back an fa rata 
" translative SYNCHRO' WASWR.- 
•adia. rtoce# and fats 3 kg to 15 
eons lana a nn) DoamimAtoen : MCA 
138 rue C D cra me F-59199 Hewnes 


TOP OPPORTUNITY ' Food 0 «f Non 
Food. Currency. Sugar. Very cheap 
Fra 41-1 -4928934 Trfil 1-491 M85 


CHMA COMCCTION 
h u oeAtoe Fretory Prices 
From Mctotofa Qano. Al Products 
DoMb foe (JOS) 751-1937 USA 


JOMT VBmjRE/aequiatian/technal- 

oqy trorefar apparAxtoes sought n 

boMnfl G»- -corxfeoon’q ft 

nxTiTwrcxJ refnaerabCTL Fou orion 
Dunrop UK 44 W34 509922 

100% fjXYgia 5UTTMGS. Very 
t^re^JliAefy priced mere ft kxfies 
100% pdytaer suilings suable for 
Aasa/Mmd CaL'fea us m WG Tab 
esa 418-1663 fox: !%5Z 418-2298. 

■BAND - OfFSHOfS COMPATOES 
From USS 300. USA core s fran 5325 
FoxHAVBM +353 1 283 9866 



WE AE MIBBSIH) IN SUFFUB 
pnxfctang breebdf a^s with UED. 
letters (ntorro letorsL FAX mfarmo- 
bon to 215850602 USA. 

BMPS/2 SAIL 

550 rrhxbshed units. 5220 - FOB - 

5X^5 (8535J. TeL + Fat 972-3- 
6850044. 

OFFSHORE COMMNES: JKX. 1/5 
0*ch Street. Douglas. Isle of Mon. 
Tet (06241 629S5foj(06241 629662. 

2nd TRAVB. DOCUHBfTS. Drrring t 
OfCKL GM, 2 PedieotB. Vodiognteni, 
Afans 16671, Gteace. Fox 8962152 

OFFSHORE COMPANIES. Far bee 
brojfare or advice Tefc London 
44 81 741 1224 Fax- 44 81 748 6568 

2nd NATIONALITY/ TRAV& dtw 
mmo. Cenbd ft South Areenax 

90 days. Fox +36-1-131-3767 

THE BRBTON WOODS COMPANY 
The honfesi waking ttapng office m 
America Free 91W4M007 USA. ' 

M1OT4AHOANL CO seeks lay ample 
to hefe wtih Euapasn ft far totem 
toponsnn. UK. (44 426 952103 

FBME 8MFRC OSEDfT INSTRUMENTS ■ 
tnakife. Funds first ■ Oad response 
fa week. 04 fin (33-11 4227 iSB 

DORIC BU5M55 WITH TAIWAN. 
r°f* copy now Taraxan relow 
popes. Teh +7) 1-362 73 82 

TELECOM. 


End of Year 

SPECIAL 

Call USA From... 


Saudi Arabia- 
5oulh Africa-. 

Sngapore 

ftong Kong — 
Chna 


194/ min. 

5.94/mn. 

S54/ITOT. 

to/mw. 


Irtfia- 


.SI JO.' min. 
-5.99/nwt 


SAVE On All 
bfemational Cdbl 

US. Teh 1-4 07-676-9500 
Ext. 116 

US Fax: 1-407-676-4909 

Service RepranWrve Unes 
open 24 hn every day! 

OOOW.TC plans Available 

AGENTS WB.COME 


MEXICAN FOOD 

Anwrioott Cmfant 5 yn expasence m 

rrrouyi MQX2H tOCXL 

Reskuraa JftTt-cp/dmge over 
rood shops 
Cfaring 


ba manqeem a rt 
3 Aitogo'i CareaWm_ 

[4WS172-7W7D 


Cdl Gereoiy 
Fax 


S1727B21 


BANKING 


COLLATERAL AVAILABLE: P8G/SLC. 
rain. S100 Rio., funds fat and coNal- 
ertrf first, Froaf of fundi reqwred. Abo 
rcAproorom 20 It p.w. Fa* +49 + 
I611SBS8 or +49+89907887. 


FUFWNG PROBLEMS ? 

Varture Captd - Equty Lam 
Red Eerie • Busmen 
J Term 

Cofoerd! 


He pyo ronwes to s eeuwfi meing 
fex wife pxofris uiugtd toy: 

Bokot of Asia 

Omndaon earned ady upon Rmctng. 
Broker's Common Assoed. 

Fax (63-21 8TO-92B4 
Teb 163-2) 894-6358 or 810-2570 


104 S. us.1. MeWne. R 32901 


OFF5HORE RNANOAL 
COMPAMB 

A camptote prafessiond and 
ccrrdered service picredcd to 
corporate aid privrtr dents. 

Ow expertise a ro provide a designed 
sdufeon to your offshore re gw remeixs 
not an off fa faff - product. 

toxmrance 


COLLATERAL REQUIRED: PBG/S.C 
fund first aid cofata d lint fto +44 
81 679 627 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


PROJECT HNANONG 
VBITURS CAPITAL 


• USJ 250000 

* NoMcwmura 
1 Term Loam 

• Eqaty Finance 


HUNTS LaROCHE 

THj +44 (0)181 673 9172 
FAX +44 (tnlftl 675 5176 


WzISLZSEii 

ttyworox^jaruiTlme Service* 
BS, 576 5 Are 4 1103 NT NY 10036 
Tefc 212-221-5000, Fac 2132215958 


MTBDUIiaNAL __ 

Agentk/inen. 15* oocrv amwai 
ft m c ei a vBfc Globe Net Tfe 213519 
9700. Fax.- 215-525-8610 USA. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


HUA&t BKOFEAN CONNECTION 
B&gaeNCED BUSINESS ASSISTANCE 
Corea*. Mata Iseath, Negooa w 
Engfcih - Frendi ■ German ■ Russian 
Confidenhaity Guaranteed 
_ REASONA8U FEES. 

EMC Tab (+33) 1-45 56 05 23 

Foau (+33) 1-47 Q5 44 M 


YOUR AGBIT IN HONG KONG: 

'facto, trustworlhv. accepts shat/ 
tong lenn irnuons. fa* 852-5703677 


EWBS STATE BUUDtNG ADORES 
The most cfetataaafied adefinx n USA. 

N-T.C— 99 PAIK AVE MOBS 

Bre your he an ml identity. Mrd 

MtyJ^rgijfane, fre craMfe. Tofc 
212-667-7SO Fro; 212467-7904 USA 
CA S A B LANCAr VIST or BUSINESS 
rtwr new rarrespondex* wil certrefe 
“fo nd more effioert for 
you. Fat p!2) 2 30P63 PaiCLOTT 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


IX/ ltotof Ora Frequent Travefan 
to Otonl/Aistrifa/ Afncor No. ft So 
Aaenca Sore up to 50%. Na cou- 
pons. no neanriidrt. hnne nof Cone fa 
td- 51+341-7227 Fax 51+341-7998. 


CONSULTANTS 


TOUR PROJECT SIUDT - WE GWE n 
(R FINAL TOUCH ■ to mate it «dfe. 
Fax nquBY + 49 30 Bl 14497, 
Germxiy. 


ANGLO AMBBCAN CROUP PIC 

Fax +44 924 201377 


FUNDS AV ARABLE 
AGMNST 

• Letters of Crecfil 

• Bank Obkganorn 

• OBr- Aecetedde Cotaad 

• J by mvate bwestm 

THRU MAX3R WIT BANS 

sS CAPITAL SUPPORT CORP. 

U-S. (714) 757-1070 Fax 757-1270 


“ IMMBXAlEAUranuffiD 

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WIN US $7 nxl/no e. 

f717) 3977490 (Ui FAX) 


EXPMB TO HAITI ft 

a SjUkStSP’ ^ 


GSM. URA. Y9I AND MCD pnnopdi 
fou LOJ to UK 44 pBI 807 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


FINANCING A V ARABLE 

WORLDWIDE 

AUCOMMSfOAL PRO ACTS 

NO FBS 

NATIONAL BU5MBS 
RH>ORIlNC BUREAU 

TeL 212-702-4871 ffa 212467-5127 


BANK PURCHASE ORDERS, CTTi a 
Centfitand SWIFT s avadable. Ccntaa 
by fa* ndr London 71 839 Wi 


WIHNATIONAl FUNDB4G 

0 ft 8 Rated Gompoiy. 

X Yean in Busxiea. 

FINANCING 

• Veuve Cnptid 

• Busmen Lams 

• New Prafea Ftoaxang 

• Commerod Rod Estate 
• No Advance Feei 

GCC FUNDING GROUP 
THj 407-394-3901 
FAX: 407-394-4568 USA 


RHANCIAl GUARANTSS. We 
provide kturance Guaorte et at 
ere* enhancement for xpemdiand 

fS-«l5 Id 4C '- WM222 


FINANCIAL 

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U.S. STO CKS 

FOR NON-U J. BriTTlES ONLY 
We rey ered several Ui pubkdy 
boded c omp aw being offered tf 
tfecounh to fa makel pnce from 251k 
- 40% punuan to BegJabon i ftae 
cd) a fax fa w fai fe too u Geneva/ 
ftolato Co, B4B fata! ta, -HO. 
FISI31 USA. 


Man, I 


THc MS-377-0032 
FAX: 305-377-3351 


PROJECT IWANCE 
VB41URE CAPITAL 
Avofede from 
One mftan US. Dolat fAo 
repayment term Three to Ten yeay. 
Ti tofl. + 597S43453/43M7 
FactofT. + 589S43449 
1ST. MftARTEefl 


OUST PARTNERSHIP 500.000,- USS 

required. Sde, serious, long time 

fnied, oppatinty, supported by 

pubfic auihannei, H fcr e afing y«dd ond 
tax afarxnges, pine answer «nti 
LOI and prod at fundi to Ben 3772. 
lit T, ftmfafmr. 15. D4Q323 Frreik- 
furt»'Man, Germaev 

IW SQLWGH YBD STATE bonds 
ban Finiaid and fa Bdhc comma. 
Ccrtoci b> fax: + 36800011305. 


SERVICED OFFICES 


™ fg f y q* W ecatBiMKaion 

»a Y^ond servica Moderate 


“a (1) <J 37 ig oQ 


Intiant Office in Hong Kong 

•RexMt that ft tong (ernikSang V 
" Kjfo fo tfaed ft egupped wife amt 

“ GxwenmxKly located in fa m«r 
prettfaia dfafaring Peretywe 
Tow. uppo GrXre 

• WdUiuw^i Id AdmraSy subway 
stidon. ton ft bu station 

• Camected by covered wcAways to 
mar office takings, 5-star holeh, 
ywppmg ceiae ft service apatrem 

• Ftft tsncMw nmand support by 
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ovoiafcfe 

AstoPafa Business Cexire 
For (afar dddik 

Man. Mu ft Asoaates Coreufting lid 
Fax: [B52I 530-5937 

T^JtoSJ 5224)19* 

2206 faegrjoe Town 


M FRANCE ft MONTE CARLO your 
ful mutAngud office service- Cornet-. 
W. ha Sdxiz, P.a Box 5184, F83094 
Toulon Cede*, foe 0033 94 62 13 9 
phore 94 62 13 53 


NEW YORK SaVKZD OFHCES 
And 
from _ 

572-8301 


AT7WTKXN EXECUTIVES 

Publish yxwr tahixH 

than a Hurd of a million 
reader, wwtffefa moat 
of wnopi ore in bowmen 
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4637937m befara lOara 
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you back. huUtotm which 
major aortf ard you with 
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and exjmman data, and 

gRys nasfcs 

abo Mxcfude your odtbmea 
andto lop hon m number far 
owrfBre. 


VOICE AW MXMAK M ROOIIM. 

Whrs round fa world) 

0*r 533/ mo. Confidientnfily tuaran- 
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TO* AD0BK rear Owps 


747P4 fax 4256 2835 


lODON WIBUBNCB CB41RE Al 

few operas. Tek UK (441 
71 935 4)48 Fnx <44) 71 935 7919. ~ 


YOUR OHKE M LONDON 70p per 
T f u ’ J!*- ^ tenneti. 
Tet 71 436 0766, fax. 71 580 3729. 

TOUR ORia N LONDON 

Tet 44 71 499 foTft EH? 


International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

■ Monday 

international Conferences and Seminars 

■ Tuesday 
Education Directory 

■ Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

■ Thursday 

International Recruitment 

■ Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Hobdays and Ttavel 

■ Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings m International 
_ Classified Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Pads: 

Tel: (33-1) 463794 74- Fax: (33-1) 46375212; - 



'■'"‘•l' *■« "* »»■ lOklMBMIM W<swn.llbl rerf- 













h t, 

til 

VER 



■■ -»;<«• 
■Zi 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


w 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


Page 11 


ZffiBART TlDYCAR 

International 

Proudly announces the 

GRAND OPENING 

November 18, 1994 

of 




For better looking, longer lasting cars 

1061 Budapest, Jokai Ter 3 
Tel.: 132-4738 and 112-9354 

Products and Services 
|Rust Protection Detailing Automotive Accessories 

GRAND OPENING ACTIVITIES: 

Sweepstakes, Discount Coupons, Live Music 
2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on the 18th 

Individual Franchises still available. 

Call or fax: 201-6377 


4 


OwHYomcoumrua 

Youommwow* 



Fos, efficient itojtta! lechm^Jogy is 
changing thr way businesses mow data 
around me globe To sen ice these changing 
needs 5u Spoil;, wuh’e wars of experi- 
ence. is buihlmg'u global digiial network 
Sir Spew}.- printing, copra* and 
digital semoscwfcrs will be riftirairaSr 
linked With each other wah customeis 
With imenuuwial araie^c business pan- 
tiers All to ensure that Sir Speedy remans 
the world's li/gea Irandnse in us indi&rv 
Share in the vision and the rewards' 
asa master licensee Build a network of 
ccnlers in your iounln- Then teach beyond 
rour borders as pan erf the Sir Speedy global 
digital network Cunemlr. we have over 900 
centers m M ocumrxs ha now The world 
is shrinking 


Alin- ken fou 

23131 Verdugo Dr . Laguna Hills CA «2te3 USA 
[7UI472-013U fa\ (7 1 41 456137 

U 5 SK0.iW minimum an came m fujutcd 


WORLDWIDE 

DEMAND 

Mail Bnxes Ext & the irld - !jrg«r 
franchise neftorii of rein! ceffns 
nflirring 

• Jteutl Postil Mrvhv* 

• Shipping Scnxvs 

• Businun Support Scrvic?* 

• Cnmmuniaiiun Service 

MHF is i he wi.irtdwide leader in i>ur 
indusrn. nirh <*er 2.JV) MBE Centers 
licensed mi -0 count ne? in North 
Xmencj. Fumfw-. .Asia and xusirald toe 
are revkinj: qiuliiriii maser licensees, 
jrca de\ elopers and I ranch lx; owners «■ 
exfarki 'Hir iwermrumat nennotfc. 

Juntw mfynuvin. <-v:u.i 

f.JjTj i,' Shiu ftiii.'jf , £ 

hntniimoiuil Dnt lif mwt 

MAIL BOSS ETC' 

Dept H • MX/1 Cunkffloftr Cl Vfrtt 
San Prego. C\ u21dl • I s\ 
Phone; inlOi nSs-syrd eu W 
Fax: m|*>i hss-J4**.1 

c I IliJ tt .,1 .M. .1 j/rT-.n; "1 Jn .'nm •• rJi 

tjih 'IHf irtttff. .HI m^Tkii.LiiCr ...» nl 

J t.1 > ftfioint /i. (Ik *>i « 


GET A SLICE OF PIZZA INN1 


Master Franchises Available 


$ 



Sebart TWyCaris tenecognized brand name for a sue- 
cessful aufonrotwe sfte™ business in 41 countries. 

Professionally spited and installed products and services 
forDetaiiing, Accessories, and Protection are our specialty. 
We meet tfe strong consumer demand for cars that look 
■better and last longer. 

Extensive initial arid on-going training, marketing, adver- 
tising, and technical support is provided. 

Master Franchises are available to qualified individuals or 
companies looking to diversify. For more information, please 
contact 

Ziebart International Corp. 

P.O. Box 1290 • Troy, Mi 48007-1290 USA 
TEL 1-610-588-4100 • FAX: 1-810-588-0718 


There are 

100 , 000,000 


With 30 years of franchising 
experience, Pizza Inn supports over 
430 restaurants operating in 20 
states and \ 6 countries. 


Exclusive territories available for 
select international markets. 

214-701-9955 

Fax 214-934-2314 

5050 CkJoruoi Drive, Suits 500. DaBeo. IX 75240 



in the World. 

In case you wondered, most of 
them co&ect dust because people 
don’t know wftkh buttons to push. 
With over 70 locations worldwide, tew 
Horizons olters you a prtwo ampler teaming 
renter FRANCHSE. As an ofiepanff. you 

woridownabusaiessfharseascofnpirertrari- 

mg to SeMIUJOfSotbisiness people feanv 
mg to use fteir computes. 

We cm pnwto you DM you dont have to be a 
computer expert to on a New Horizons is&- 
ctaepst be ai entrepreneur V fn do ml 
wart a harness that ■wolves deavtg rags or 
tiffing bugs, call New Horizons. We are (he 
worn leader in the basting business, tut there 
vesta places wStout a New Horans, lipid 
assets teqared: g95flOQ USD (Esfimded). 


MASTER LICENSE 


Go wirh o proven leoder in commercial end residential deontng 
sewtoes. 64 year old USA company now expanding, offers master 
franchise in your mother. Over 600 Durocteon service frondxisesln 
20 countries worldwide. Entrepreneur magazine ronKs m Top 1 %. 
Extensive training programs. Sraff available for immediate devet- 
opemenf. U5& 1 0OK minimum capital required. Gonraa; 

I T. Marshall, Pnrswfcnt I e(e Pj^ n „® : c 7 ^ 45 ' 2000 

4-75Y Duradean Bldg. Fax: 7O8-945-2023 

Deerfield, iL 60015 





Sandwiches & Salads 

9,600 Stores Open in 
17 Countries 
International Expansion 
Available 


Fax Inquiries 203-876-6638 
or write 325 Bic Drive 
Milford, CT 06460 USA 


Master Franchise Opportunity 

AlphaGrcphics. tbe 24-year worldwide leader In the quick prmf 
and related services industry is seeking additional Master 
Franchisees to develop our 33Gstore network. 

AlphcGrophics is seeking Master Franchisees for selected countries 
in Africa. Asa. Europe. Latin America and the Near East. Consider 
your future as a Master Franchisee, developing franchise locations 
in your country of interest. 

AIpnaGraphics centers offer offset printing, electronic printing, 
computer-assisted graphic design, binding and finishing, and die 
tied together Py our worldwide electronic network. 

AlphaGraphics currently operates high technology business 
service centers in Australia. Belgium. Brazil. Canada. China. 
Holland. Honq Kong. Hungary. Japan. Mexico, the Phillipines. 
Russia. Spain .'Sweden. Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United 
Srctes and Venezuela New centers wilt open shortly in Chile. 
Germany. Saudi Arabia -and Thailand. 

Fc: an ir.forrr.crion pocket eg our Warier Franchise opportunity, 
plecse call Bill Edwards at 1 (602) 293-9200 or fax your request to 
1(602)887-2850. 

(if you ere interested in a franchise m on existing AlphaGraphics 
territory, we will be happy to forward you request for mtormohon 
to the appropriate Master Franchisee.) 


3760 N. Commerce Drtve 
Tucson. Arizona 85705 USA 


?m»ops Ot The FuTue 


BUSINESS 

SERVICES 


DELAWARE (USA) 
CORPORATIONS 

OiaHtj ranWentUJ senrice. teBowble 
cost CalVwne for tree kfi. 

Detente Reetetiy Ud. 

PO Bar 484- H Whnlnglpn. 
Delaware l W9 USA 
7H. 302-6S2-6532 - Pax 302-652-S79? 

6QO-3 2 1 -CORP f USA only). 


SERVICED 

OFFICES 


NEW YORK COY 

BagCTfty Appointed Officas 

for the demanesng E»»cuttvo . 
fri the heart ot Manhatton 

Alliance 

■ •■■■Ml f I«nn 


* Equipped OWce* » Suite* 

230 Parte Avenue 
Premier USA adcfcesi 

(21^972-5700 toe (212) 808-3020 


Here’s An Investment With 
Global Growth Potential. 

Futurekids, the world's largest network of computer learning centers for 
children has expanded into more than 30 countries, making us one of the 
hottest international franchise opportunities you'll find. Seeking top mas- 
ter franchiser/operators in the (hited Kingdom, Austro, Finland, Belgium, 
Iceland, tire Netherlands 
and Eastern Europe. 

For more information, call 
Jay GSfogfy m Los Angeles. 


FUTUREKIDS 

COMPUTER LEARNING CENTERS 


(310) 337-7006 ext 210 

FAX (310) 337-9346 


m 


t/ani 






mwt ama* muvnrtu n am* rrrem 


MASTER FRANCHISE 
OPPORTUNITY 

/albimihforarWMBahrte 
nki emmmial denial fiaKchistx 

■ 25 jam of exptritact. 

• Tndoots in DS. nod On-tiU. 

Mon *ot 4fi6Q umt/nmcUtett 
woriMde. 

' SaptrurJhMdastttnbBBgoadstfport 
progr ams OMpmraOtMd m the wdutoy. 

FOR DtPOBMAXION OOHXACT 
MX.CHI>C*GtHONl 
Pkm; (214) 991-0900 F*t (214)991-573 
4950 Kdki Spdap Bod 
a 75248 USA. 


DISCOVER 
HOW you 
CAN PROFIT 
FROM OUR SUCCESS 




Htoavel network 

B 8 I RIlUVELMEKyiMieBS 

H Inti Master Rg«VJoM Venture Opportwfiy ?l 
h Tra^Netvnrk-lead^Gto&Chan H 
!j Now 330+ units in USA S 7 Ccmrires. Jj 

H DSA Id: 201-587-8500 or Fax: 201-567-1838 » 

h m wwMmmmn 

m mini ri 


RADIO SHACK 
INTERNATIONAL 

seeks distributors 
who want to participate 
in an exerting marketing 

opportunity in consumer 
electronics. For more 
information, contact 

Radio Shack International 
New Business Group 
800 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 
Fax 817-390-3805 
Phone 817-390-3475 

Radio /hack 


^Idelawaile (USA~ corporations "* 

SET UP INSTANTLY, 

by phone or FAX. only US$109 to 
US$131 (Ofbbore fee) complete. 


No attorney’s fees required. Locate 
company headquarters in any state 
(or country). To fiod out why 
Delaware is “America’s Corporate 
Address,” phone, FAX or write tor 
FREE Delaware Incorporation 
Handbook (5th Edition) which 
includes Subchapter S and Limited 
Liability Company (LLQ infor- 
mation. Free corporate name 
reservation. On-line into database 
of Delaware Division of Corpora- 
dons. Professional services, since 
1986: Registered Agent, Uniform 
Commercial Code (UCC) Search' 
es. Bank Introductions, Shelf Cor- 
porations, Telephone Answering. 
Delaware Business Identity and 
^Maii Services. 


Offshore independent agents 
wanted to market Delaware 
(USA) incorporation services. 
Annual recurring commissions. 


Delaware Business 
Incorporators, Inc. 

3422 Old Capitol Trail, Dept- IHT 
Wilmington, Delaware 19808. USA 
PHONE: 

302-996-5819 

FAX: 

302-996-5818 

Payment in US. $ only: 

VISA /MC/ AMEX credit cards, 
international money order, bank 
wire transfer, or U-S. bank check. 


International Franchising Information 

If you are interested in obtaining information on U S 
Franchise companies that are expanding internationally. 

Franchise UPDATE has just what you need 
Two special publications that will supply you with both 
detailed information on expanding U.S. franchise systems and 
expert articles on international franchise trends and events. 
To receive uour copies of 

The World Franchise and Business Report 
and 

The Executive’s Guide to Franchise Opportunities 
via Airmail, send a check or money order for 
$25.00 (U.S.) to: 

Franchise UPDATE 

P.O. Box 20547. San lose, CA 95160-8547 USA 

L or order by VISA or MasterCard by faxing your 
order with account number, expiration date and 
approval signature to: 408-997-9377 (USA) 



1 995 

Publication 

D cites 

♦ 

JANUARY 25 

♦ 

APRIL 21 

♦ 

SEPTEMBER 20 

♦ 

NOVEMBER 22 

♦ 

F OR' 

ADVERTISING RATES 
AND DEADLINES 
CONTACT 

in New York: 

JUDITH KING 

Tel.: 

212 - 752-3890 

Toll Free: 


800 - 572-7212 

Fax: 

212 - 755-8785 

Hcral62^H ettbunc 




/Master License OppoBTUNrrvX 
* Computer Related ' 
#1 in the USA 
Fiisl Time Offered 

$IM plus yeariy income potential. 
Exciting products for the entire 
family. Complete set-up and 
training. We manufacture or you 
manufacture. 

Call Now! 

Only I Hcease available per coairtcy 
t TeL: 818/879-7763 

V (USA. West Coast ttmei J 


ENTER THE EXPLODING 
WORLDWIDE CD-ROM 
PUBLISHING MARKET! 

Exclusive software distribution rijyrts 
now available In many mart vis lor 
leading authoring/retrleval system, let II 
year profits ol 550-5100,000 or | 
franchise lee of $10,000 is refunded. 
FAX MidisAetrfBual Corporation 

FAX: 617-630-0230 USA 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


ITC 

(NTERNATIOVAL TELEPHONE COMPANT 

WORLDWIDE CALL BACK 
SYSTEM 

Now offer* Direct Dial lo enywhere 
in the world ai Call Back Prices. 

Fax & Data can also be used with 
riVs Direct Dialer: 


Distributors Ne odc-d 

W o v I d rv i <1 e 
For (Ail! Buck Fall Onrrrs 
.tml JVrpaid (’ailing Cants 
i ts Cf.Titit? ion fiJ ;utd l>o.rm''sfic. 


International Telephone Company 
290 Pratt Street 
Meriden, CT 06450-21 1 8 
im-638-JSfg ctl III ’201-23B-9794 
FaxJ03 -929-4906 



«*» 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


personals 


WW. _ 

W « ur^rety fer TS Bwelmg- 
Onrman 


friendship 


••EECANT BLACK K 
world (rovsfed, 
refined l a m ire quoibw. 
jMKKlllhJrDl baSpeund. Web 

aSSTfll FAX; P12J 


announcements 


YUNNA, AUSTRIA. Teb TT 3-3374. 
Are you sod ot wanvS Loneftr or 

jotatu 

80=8184005 tn tatri wnWence. 
MoMti. M0 ree ■ 1 pm red every 
day &30 pm ■ 10 pro. _ 

f^l INTERDEAN 

BOULOGNE near BOtS 

270 sam. hooE, entirety renortsd, 

7 rearf*o«, 4 bedrtwnL 2 brntioons, 
fittsd 4-rooro benanere, venter greifea 

FOR A HE ESTIMATE CALL 

PARIS n) 39201400 

8RK3NL The ftreet toMiA 
brast selection m Smtierfand ar 

Wor®SG *b TTf* 5f 5f *' 

BtMxtir. 13. Zurich 01-211 29 50. 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

16ft - OORNM OF AVBOJE fOOf 

Ob the 3rd floor of a dos buWng. 

125 SQA: dreris Kwuft 2 betioomt, 
garage + maid’s room. FiOOOAOO: 

asatOOUSLY DHXXMW. 

Tab AIT. (1)45 03 38 8$ 

MOVING 

PARIS & SUBURBS 

HCMESHP. Smal A maderen im«i 
bgnAooe, con worldwide. QJ (^wfo 
SS(flr42 81 18 81 (near Optra). 

Iflft. fftAR fOOi, b«»«fut IBP tya. 

W.0rerl-ti002066 


p automobile MARKET 1 


Attention Yisifors 
from the DS . ! 



going the ATT 
jve), why not 
at home? 


in key U5. dti«. 

jjrraliSienbimr 


MR, o» 

g thowes. 
n gwimsl 
[tore, nA"- 
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rr* 


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fcatojvto 
tax troo - 

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rsss 

AUTO RENTALS 


VVffl®*: FF 515 
SPEOAL OFffll ■ 7 DAYS: F 
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i4wD! 


aGWVtSTOR BASED (N 
MADRID, SPAW. HGHIY 
WietESrtO TO IMPORT 
USED4 Wtffcl DRIVE. 4 YRS. 
OLD MAXIMUM. 

TRj 434-1-345 27 86. 
^FAX: 434-1-3502043.^ 


TRAN5CO BOGAIM 

The brioopl wot 

&part sohs-reg oftona rv 
Sm r g - irauotGe 
&ffopeon, aSot & UA VO. 

Tnaw. 5* Veswd^rete, 

ri 

telex 3UB7 Iron & 


AIK WWDWM 

?.ATK.w1g» 


motorcycles 


1994 HABEY 

802 -<85-3505. 


Ju Oolden i»wet7wiire. 


AUTOMOBIIiS 


YOU 


FANTASTIC SAVMG5 ON 7AX-FSB 
V8IOB 

• WV5 oBsre yw il» gfrantod bed 

• ace oi met) nda of Uimvopem 

and kemra wtidet 

•WVShirsSaflirw«*e 
nmefedwerondafy eriidBam 
mi up he an awry' "tide Meat 
of a crenraaOA vWi 
SAVE MONEY. 

■ WVS haries ew friing trow »p- 

P*B , 

bropumuL 

Onien before dw Is of Jomrey 1995 
for S0% dscourt on jtiqmg 

Cook#** far ear frodwm on hand 

but hdory made wax rtprakxxas 

tndak fee nr tonnes pottage 

WOHOWDE VBflOE SLtfBJB UD 

IB: I44m 255 2655 

FAX. [44) 71 MO 4729 


88)1988 TOMAU TBtAKOfiSA 

EXCffllONAL/ AS NEW 

3J19o" - Th u^xxd. beS offers 
T«l {33-1) 40 M 73 18 


COSTA RICA 


COSTA BCA. « hedww (108 arret) 
property for ade. Pbbfic Ocean wevn 
end privtSe bead) in pnswou, resort 
oarenuily cf Oicpoc, Mcrod Art- 
ona Idea for mo/rexort and vik 
devofopTBer*. Col Mr. Otcprxei m 
Secrie. WA fahone} 2068^6762. or 
M 20S4»4172. 


MONACO 


MONTS CAULO 

CBDSVTMt ABBA - Spaoaus Sam 
apartme nt « parted eonMon 

aagedi 

7/9. Bd dot Motto. MOWw Monaco. 
Td 33-92 165959 Fax 33-93% 1942 


MONTE CABO 

Unique. Dntiyisfced freehold wla lo 
be view on ihe 

hrefaor end polace. 540 sqm king 
space and huge lernm for further 
defois car ta t Mn Bodonon - SM, 

9 eve d'Odmde - MC 9800D Monaco. 
Tel: (33)9216 90 00 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HAMPSHttE Gig fog fra for Qremcs. 
Isnieti thafthed cottage twtArie for 
hofidoy semoa. 4 beds, 2 baGts. 
ncoo/wi ta uk 44 pyi 3S1 1511 


PARIS AREA FtlRNKHED 


Yow Smtio or 
IN Pi 

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International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday. November 16, 1994 
Page 12 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


- 


Moody’s Improvisations onTruth 


LONDON THEATER 


P ARIS — James Moody has been 
known to belt an impromptu bel 
runtn version of Charlie Parker's 
“Hot House” in a crowded hotel 
lobby. He practices singing. 

If Moody doesn’t practice every day 
he gets irritable. Musicians practice, pe- 
riod. No excuses. Although he’ll be 70 
next year, there’s still so much to prac- 
tice. To begin with, he needs to keep in 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


chw pg on three saxophones and a flute. 
Plav all the major and minor scales start- 


Play an the major and minor scales start- 
ing on every note in them. Learn every 
gi-mg you know in all 12 keys. Sit down 
and write your own songs and practice 
them too. He's really just getting the 

hanrflft on all Of it. 

King Pleasure’s recorded version of 
Eddie Jefferson's vocal adaptation of 



that scares them. You know what? There 
is no truth in the world.” 

“None?” 

“You name me one.” 

‘Tm thinking," 

“Well if you have to stop and think 
about it don’t you think we’re in trouble? 
They tell you smoking’s O. K_, it's just a 
habit. But it’s not a habit, it's an addic- 
tion. Like eating’s an addiction. You 
ought to eat to stay alive. Eat to live. But 
people are living to eat.” 

“That’s just gluttony." 

“Sure. Think of the reason for that” 


“People are bored. Having dinner cuts 
the boredom.” 


Moody's alto saxophone improvisation 
on “Tm in the Mood for Love became a 


on *Tm in the Mood for Love became a 
hit Aretha Franklin and Van Morrison 
did it too. Now Moody sings his version 
of their vocal interpretations of his im- 
provisation. “Every musician should 
know how to sing,” he said. “If you can’t 
sing it you can't play it” 

He was irritable tonight Maybe he 
hadn’t practiced today: “Look over 
there. People smoking. Makes me crazy.” 
He couldn't really ask them to stop be- 
cause the upstairs bar of the club La 
Villa had been declared a free-fire zone. 
Downstairs his numerous “no smoking” 
si gns were cowing the crowd of custom- 
ers in the dub. He waved the smoke 
away and said: “People are always im- 
posing Thing s on you.” 

He stopped to hug and kiss a musician 
who had come through the door and to 
give Him a Moody T-shirt and then con- 
tinued: “I’ve said this many times. 
Blessed are those who run around in 
circles for they shall be known as big 
wheels. They run the music business. Big 
wheels run the medical profession. The 
medical profession sucks. When some- 
thing’s wrong with you, the doctors look 
in the bode and it says take some capi- 
corpaloomanine. You say Will this 



“Yeah, but if people had good quality 
food at dinner it would suffice and they 
would not be hungry again before they 
go to bed. They are never satisfied be- 
cause what they are eating isn’t nourish- 


ing them.” 

“What do you eat?" 


Saxophonist James Moody 


help?’ And they say. Well, there might 
be 12,000 side effects.' Big wheels rimik 
they know what people need. The people 
are getting nothing but lies.” 

Shaken by this unexpected explosion, 
I resisted the urge to light up. He was 
looking at me with raised eyebrows and 
an “are you ready for this?” flush. “How 
do yon recognize the truth when you see 
it?” I asked him. 

“Nobody has to tell you that a dog is 
wee-weeing on you when the water is 
tunning down your leg,” he replied 
quickly. “It’s obvious. And you know 
what? When it comes to music, it’s also 
the people’s fault. People really only 
want to hear things that they could do 
too. All that hollering and screaming. 
They say, *Hey! I could do that too. I like 
that.’ Somebody who takes a little effort 
to do things different and tell the truth. 


“Live food — lettuce, apples, oranges, 
brown rice. Meat is dead food Here I ate 
wrong. The French tempted me.” 

“Where are you going next T 

“Mexico Gty, New York for a week, 
L. A., Chicago, a jazz cruise and three 
weeks in Germany. Everything is ‘cool,’ 
as they say.” 

Moody was bom in 1925 in Savannah, 


when he was 16. (His father played trum- 
pet with Tiny Bradshaw.) Drafted, James 
played in an army band Released he 
joined Dizzy Gillespie in 1946 and it has 
been basically cool for him for almost SO 
years. He is happily married to a woman 
he met at the Bahai church. He's been 
nominated for a Grammy, had hits, 
worked continually as a sideman (several 
years in Las Vegas hotel bands), a guest 
star and a leader. But his name is inextri- 
cably linked to Dizzy (who was also a 
Bahai). He was his musical director, side- 
kick and stand-in. Combined as it is with 
an engaging stage presence and an en- 
thusiastic song delivery, his no-nonsense 
upper-echelon improvising makes Him a 
unique performer. On a good night he's 
just about unbeatable. 



Michael Maloney and Sasha Hanau m a scene from "Alice 's Adventures Under Ground ” at the National 


A Funny and Savage ‘True West’ 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — A decade after it was 
first seen over here, Sam She- 
pard’s “True West” comes into 
the Donmar Warehouse from the 
West Yorkshire Playhouse in a truly stun- 
ning new production by Matthew War- 
chus. The story is of two brothers arriving 
at their mother’s Southern California 
home and effectively demolishing it and 
each other, as they fight out a fraternal 
battle that is almost biblical in its Cain and 
Abel intensity. 


Shepard Dissects American Soul 


By Stephen Holden 

New York Tuner Service 


N EW YORK — The 
most colorful charac- 
ter in Sam Shepard’s 
elegiac new play 
“Simpatico” is a former bigwig 
in the California horse-racing 
world who has been forced 
through scandal to relocate and 
start life over under an assumed 
name. The man, once known as 
Simms (James Gammon), now 
calls himself Ames and holds a 
low-echelon job with the Ken- 
tucky Racing Commission. 

A gruff, raspy-voiced throw- 
back to 1940s detective movies, 
he works in a grimy office 
whose most distinguishing fea- 
ture is a leather chair decorated 
with the horns of a steer. Visited 
by Vinnie (Fred Ward), a self- 
styled private eye who helped 
arrange his downfall 15 years 
earlier, Simms seems hardly to 
remember his previous life or 
the man who disgraced him. 

Waxing nostalgic, Simms la- 
ments the disappearance of 
movies like “Double Indemni- 
ty” and “The Maltese Falcon” 
because, he says, they were 


“pictures with a plot you could 
sink your teeth into.” 

“Shnpatico,” which opened 
Monday night at the Joseph 
Papp Public Theater here, is 
Shepard's highly idiosyncratic 
take an the fum-nair genre. Set 
in the world of professional 
horse raring, with a labyrin- 
thine plot involving blackmail, 
false identities and two women 
(one angehc, the other demon- 
id), it has the mood and trap- 
pings of the sort of classic de- 
tective yam that S imms misses 
so keenly. 

But “Simpatioo,” tike She- 
pard’s earlier plays, has much 
loftier aspirations than simply 
paying tribute to a favorite 
genre Like all of his work, it 
has characters who carry a 
heavy symbolic weight That 
symbolism will be familiar to 
Smepard watchers, especially 
those who recall “True West” 
the play to which “Simpatico” 
stands as kind of a long, reflec- 
tive epilogue Here, as before, 
the power struggle between two 
men evokes an American soci- 
ety with a divided soul, one part 
“civilized,” the other primitive 
and intuitive 


ers from complaisant neighbors in the de- 
sert 

Marcia Warren as the brothers’ be- 
mused mother, and David Hairy as a 
gargantuan Hollywood producer, add 
cameos of distinction but this is really a 
two-man play and as Rylance and Ruako 
prowl around each other, giving two of the 
best-contrasted and indeed best perfor- 
mances in town, “True West” seems some- 
how a stronger, funnier and more savage 
play than I recall from its first staging in 
Britain in the early 1980s. 


“Simpatico” may be symbol!- in a shoe bOT, has lost much of One brother a Hollywood 


cally provocative, but it isn't its incendiary potential As. Car- ^writer ™ the ^ thVoffiTa 


especially gripping. 

This play’s two combatants, 
Carter (Ed Harris) and Vinnie, 
are childhood friends who grew 
up in Cucamonga, California. 
Their lives have taken divergent 
paths since they collaborated 1 5 
years earlier on the race-fixing 
scheme that destroyed Simms's 
life. Carter, who now lives in 
Kentucky, has become a power- 
ful businessman with a wife and 
family. Vinnie, who subsists on 
money paid to him by Carter so 
he will keep quiet about the 
past, is a shady lowlife, resent- 
ful of Carter’s affluence. 




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HEALTH/SCIENCE 


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on scientific and physical develop- 
ments in the intriguing worlds of 


I N HIS spare time, he 
picks up women whom he 
impresses by pretending 
to be a detective. Adding 
salt to Vinnie’s wounds is the 
fact that Carter stole his girl- 
friend Rosie (Beverly D’An- 
gelo) and married her. 

As the play opens, Carter is 
visiting Vinnie in Cucamonga, 
in hopes of severing their rela- 
tionship once and for alL He 
offers Vinnie a large cash pay- 
ment in exchange for the nega- 
tives of pornographic pictures 
Vinnie took of Rosie cavorting 
in a motel with Simms. 

But Vinnie has other plans. 
Several of the pictures, he says, 
are in the hands of CecSia 
(Marcia Gay Harden), a wom- 
an he has Just met who be 
claims is suing him for harass- 
ment. When Carter visits Ceci- 
lia, hoping to wheedle the evi- 
dence away from her, he 
discovers that nothing Vinnie 
has said about her is true. 

The plot turns into a wild- 
goose chase in which Carter tries 
to recover the incriminating pic- 
tures, while Vinnie revisits the 
past and discovers that the evi- 
dence, which he carries around 


IA 5 IU* io insuiiesnuc. ro les ^ ^ gg ^ whi]e Wardlus has 

To the extent that “Sixnpati- had the intelligent notion of having his two 
co” portrays a man who sold his leading players take on the two characters 
soul for worldly goods in conflict for alternate nights, 
with an unsocialized, intuitive performance I witnessed had Mark 

adversary who is more m touch Rylance as the nervous writer and Michael 

Ridko as the thuggish dropout, and She- 
“True WesL Once ag ain , the p^’s central joke is, of course, that in a 
down-and-out character California where everyone is self-invented 
schemes to gam the upper hand, anyway, it only takes a couple of conversa- 
and the *dld pioneer spin t shows ti 0 ns from Cam to become AbeL 

There ^ a wondrous, raw energy here 
so-called 0 that makes even much of Mamet look tame 

This fable may have : plenty of by comparison, allied to a brutally funny 
potential for explosive stage realization that the great American fron- 
drama, but the playwright his tier dream of self-improvement and self- 
directed it in surprisingly Ian- sufficiency now adds up to little more than 
guid style. the willingness to steal a few electric toast- 


I T IS tempting to take Nod Coward’s 
“A Song at Twffight” (Greenwich) as 
a closet autobiography: the story is 
of an old, gay author who has man- 
aged to conceal his homosexuality from an 
intolerant world, but only at the cost of 
warping his own talent and cutting off all 
human sensibilities and sympathy. 

This was the last play Coward wrote, 
and in it he made his farewell West End 
appearance in 1966. “Like Dolly,” he 
wrote in his diary after a long exile, “I am 
back where I belong." Yet, as he explained 
to me at the time, the play was in truth not 
so much about Hims elf as about Somerset 

Mau gham 

The issues it raises axe, however, central 
to any understanding of Coward, who de- 
clined to reveal his own homosexuality not 
because he had any problems with it but 
because he thought his by now somewhat 
aged and conservative audiencejust might. 
In its faintly creaky, Edwardian way, “A 


Song at Twilight” is a morality play about 
the importance of being true to yourself 
and never allowing public prurience to 
invade private ethics. The only problem 
with Tom Smith's new production at 
Greenwich is that it is woefully undercast 
in an appalling set, and seems oddly un- 
willing to drive itself forward with any real 
energy. 

As die old author, John Quentin cap- 
tures the clenched agony but none of & 
charisma, while the women in Iris life (roles 
treated by Lilli Palmer and Irene Worth) 
are equally subdued. For all that. “A Song 
at Twilight” predates and foreshadows 
many latterday AIDS plays in its plea for a 
more enlightened world 

On the Cottesloe stage of the National, 
the dramatist Christopher Hampton and 
the choreographer Martha Clarke have 
come together for “Alice's Adventures Un- 


der Ground,” a curiously un dramatic trip 
around Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland, all of 
which takes place in the author’s studio as 
he is attempting to photograph the little, 
girl who is ms current proto-Alice. v 
Carroll’s interests in pioneer Victorian 
photography and (somewhat more uneasi- 
ly) pubescent girls are now well enough 
documented, and neither Hampton nor 
Carte seem to have much to add. 

Thus we get Michael Maloney pottering 
around the stage as a melancholy, 
author, Sasha Hanau as his dangerous 
muse and three other actors briefly bring- 
ing to life such familiar highlights as the 
Mad Hatter tea party. But nowhere is it 
dear what tins is all for. 


The Brilliant Twilight of Carmen McRae 


By Marc Fisher 

Washington Past Service 


W ASHINGTON — Jazz, the critic Whit- 
ney Balliett has written, is a night crea- 
ture. It was only in the twilight of Car- 
men McRae's years that she found the 
freedom to dwell in that darkness. 

McRae, who died Thursday at 74, would have left 
behind a very different legacy had she died 20 years 
ago. For it is only in her last years, only after she 
survived the producers who paired her with 40-piece 
orchestras and the record company executives who 
made her share vinyl space with Sammy Davis Jr. — 
only after nature and half a century of smoking 
turned her voice into a winter blanket of a contralto 
did she become one of the greats. 

In the ’50s, McRae won fame and recognition. She 
won Downbeat polls, she sang with the Count Basie 
band. But she was second-tier, an interesting charac- 
ter who didn't quite rank with Billie Holiday, EUa 
Fitzgerald or Sarah Vaughan. 


And then, as Vaughan's voice transformed from 
silk to velvet, McRae, too, aged in the fascinating 
way of only the best jazz singers. When opera singers 
lose their voices, they become impresarios. When 
rockers age, we find the very idea of their continued 
performance cause for derisive laughter. But in jazz, 
a great singer is two artists: the young Ella's super- 
human range and irrepressible cheer, and decades 
later, matronly Ella, master of timing and wit. 

In her early years, McRae lacked Fitzgerald's 
playful girlishness. Nor was she the bombshell the 
FR types tried to produce in publicity stills of her in 
ermine coats and processed hair. 

Yet even in those early years, McRae found ways 
to work her magic: A startling soprano coda on 
“Summertime” is tucked onto her cameo on a Sam- 
my Davis album. On “Sweet Georgia Brown,” a 
cbch6 others treat as froth, McRae slowed the whole 
number down by half and squeezed the blues out of 
a tune that had become bland enough for football 
halftime music. 

On that song, as on so many others, Carmen 
McRae knew how to find the autumn in a tune. 


She was such a smart singer, no one knew quite 


what to do with her. She ended up playing with 
Benny Carter, the wise professor of the big band 
world. And she drifted awkwardly, like almost ev- 
eryone else in jazz, through the ’60s. trying on Stevie 
Wonder tunes and finding that they did not fit. 

She was not revolutionary, like Betty Carter, or 
European exotic, like Nina Simone. But by the mid- 
1970s, she was on her way back. She cast off the big 
bands, whose bright brass she had never been able to 
compete with. She settled into smaller settings, re- 
cording with the guitarist Joe Pass and the bassist 
Ray Brown, or with the Shirley Horn Trio. 

And McRae mastered the scratches and strains of 
her old woman’s voice, applying her classical train- 
ing and hex strength to express the night. She devel- 
oped the courage to record a cappella solos. She sang 
songs of Blossom Dearie, lyrics of the night's loves 
and romps, its reeling dives, its terror and anguish. 

In the last years, suffering from a series of bron- 
chial ailments. McRae knew she could do less, but 
she knew how to do so much more with it. 


BOOKS 


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TONY CURTIS: 
The Autobiography 


By Tony Curtis and Bony Paris. 
352 pages. £16.99. Heinemann. 


Reviewed by 
Thomas Quinn Curtiss 


In 1943, Curtis left hig h 
school to enlist in the navy and 
spent two years in the Pacific 
submarine service. Back at 
home, he entered New York's 
Dramatic Workshop as a full- 
time student under the GI Bill 
Erwin Piscator, who had been a 


T ONY CURTIS has known 
most of the prominent art- 


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A most of the prominent art- 
ists and bosses of Hollywood, 
and he can recall the moguls 
who once ruled the studios and 
their glamorous occupants. 

Curtis was born Bernard 
Schwartz in the Bronx, the child 
of Hungarian-Jewisfa immi- 
grants who had fled Bela Kun's 
Communist tyranny. In the 
New World the couple con- 
versed in Hungarian; they nev- 
er learned proper English, but 
their son mastered several lan- 
guages. 


E reducer in Germany until Hit- 
x took over, headed the work. 


Ier took over, headed the work- 
shop, and among otter begin- 
ners was Walter Matthau. 


Curtis was spotted in “Golden 
Boy," in a Greenwich Village 
revival, by the secretary of tbe 
New York branch of a Holly- 
wood film company, and within 
a week be was offered a ticket for 
Los Angeles, where a seven-year 
contract was waiting for Him. 


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Hollywood in the postwar 
years wanted new blood, fresh 
faces and, if possible, talent. 
Curtis was introduced to Burt 
Lancaster and Y vonne de Carlo, 
who would play tbe leads in 


“Criss Cross," Curtis’s first film 
Romances and Westerns at Uni- 
versal followed and Curtis soon 
had a wide audience in the Unit- 
ed States, Europe and Asia. 

Curtis kept fit with dancing, 
fencing, riding, boxing, swim- 
ming, taking stunts himself and 
daring high- wire numbers in 
“Trapeze.” An elocution coach 
was summoned to remove his 
New York accent, but he re- 
fused the offer, and only later 
improved his delivery. 

Laurence Olivier, when they 
were working together on “Spar- 
tacus,” inquired of Curtis how 
to keep his arms strong. Curtis 
advised push-ups, and the great 
actor repaid him by explaining, 
“Clothes are the thing for acting. 
Dress the part, look at yourself, 
and you are the part.” 

Curtis married the actress Ja- 
net Leigh, and their marriage 
lasted more than 10 years. He 


has been married four limes 
and has six children. 

Marilyn Monroe met Curtis 
when they were nobodies in Hol- 
lywood. Years later, she was the 
cinema's erhne de la ertme, and 


Tbe New York Times 

Thu lift n based cm rcpons from mon dun 
2,000 bookstores throughout the United Slates. 
Weeks on list are not necessarily consecutive. 


6 DOLLY, by Dofly Panon 

7 JAMES tiERRfOTS CAT 


7 JAMES HERRfors CAT 
STORIES, bv James Hcniof 

8 BARBARA BUSH: A Mem- 


L mt Wwfa 
Wk at Us 


air. by Barbara Bush 8 

9 COUPLEHOOD. by Paul 

Reiser 9 10 

10 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES. 

by William J. Bennett 10 47 

11 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL, 

by John Berendi 13 36 

12 ALL'S FAIR, by Mary Mala- 

bo and lames CorviHc with Pe- 
lerKnobler 11 7 

13 NO ORDINARY TIME by 

Doris Keanu Goodwin 12 5 

MALL THE TROUBLE IN - 
THE WORLD, by P. J. 

O'Rourke 14 J 

15 SAVED BY THE LIGHT, by 
Daanion Brinkley with Pan! 

Ferry 22 


Billy Wilder had composed a 
wild farce about Prohibition-era 


136 Chestnut Circle, 
P.O. Box 661 
Lincoln, MA 01773-0661 
USA 

Phone/Fax (617) 259-9435 
CompuServe ID# 70473,1000 


TO OUR READERS IN HOLLAND 

It’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save Just call today 

02503-24024 


Chicago, “Some Like It Hot,” 
for Monroe and Curtis. Monroe 
had become a monster, suffering 
tbe effects of drugs and alcohol, 
and when a reporter asked Cur- 
tis what it was like working with 
Ira - on screen, he replied, “It’s 
like kissing Hitler.” It was one of 
Monroe's last films 
Curtis had more sympathy 
for Orson Welles who bad be- 
come a glutton and had to enter 
a Hollywood restaurant by the 
backdoor to gobble his meals in 
secret His favorite actor, whom 
he considered his second father, 
was Cary GranL 
There is a grim chapter on 
Curtis's slavery to cocaine. 
During his recovery he pursued 
painting, inspired bv Matisse 
and Joseph Cornell. ‘ 

His book is amusing, candid 
and informative. He objects to 
the Method training of actors; 
many do, including the great 
Olivier. Curtis look another 
road and has accomplished 
much, in the movies and in his 
autobiography. 

International Herald Tribune 


1 THE CELESTJNE PROPHE- 
CY. by James Redfidd 

2 INSOMNIA, by Stephen King 


3 T ALTOS, by Anne 1 

4 POLITICALLY C 


4 POLITICALLY CORRECT 
BEDTIME STORIES, by 
lamM Finn Gamer - 

5 DEBT OF HONOR, by Tom 


t LORD OF CHAOS, by Rob- 
ert Jordan — — 4 3 

7 NOTHING LASTS FOREV- 
ER, by Sidney Sheldon 7 8 

8 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by Robert 
James WaBer II 118 

9 MUTANT MESSAGE 
DOWN UNDER, by Mario 


ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 


10 SPENCER VILLE. bv Nelson 

DeMflk 1 

11 THE LOTTERY WINNER. 


1 MEN ARE FROM MARS. 
WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 


by Marv Higgins Clark 

12 THE BODYFARM. by Pa 


THE BODYFARM. by Patri- 
cia Cornwell 


NUS, by John Gray 

tIN THE KITCHEN W 


ROSIE, by Rosie Daley ... — 

3 REAL MOMENTS, by Bar- 
bara De Angetis 

4 MAGIC EYEUL N.EThm*. 


13 THE GIFT, by DanieDe Steel 12 

14 A TANGLED WEB, by Ju- 


14 A TANGLED WEB, bv Ju- 
dith Michael 

15 WILD HORSES, by Dick 

Fronds 


Enterprises 


NONFICTION 

1 CROSSING THE THRESH- 
OLD OF HOPE, by John Paul 

2 WCOLE ~B ROWN“ ' siMpl 


SON, by Faye D. ReBnick with 

Mike walker __ 

3 THE BELLE CURVE 
Richard J. Hcrrastein ™i 


Charles Murray .. 

' THE HOT ZONE, bv Richard 


4 THE HOT ZONE bv Richard 

PnstOfl 1 

5 DON'T STAND TOO 

close to a naked 

MAN. by Tim Allen 


For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY JSEPQRr • 
every Saturday- ■>.; 
in the IHT — - 


i. 1 ; I" 
K&. 




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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 



Astronomical cost 
has kept the future of 
personal communications 

up in the air. 


Weve just 
brought it 
down 
to Earth. 


Today’s market is clamoring for 
truly portable, global personal com- 
munications. But the costs of such a 
system - costs that will ultimately 
come out of the consumer’s pocket - 
have remained dauntingly high. Until 
today. Because today we launch the 
Odyssey™ system, a constellation ot 
medium-earth orbit (MEO) satellites. 
In a world in which most people lack 
access to even basic telephone service, 
this satellite-based mobile communica- 
tion system will provide convenient, 
effective, consistent communications 
to subscribers around the globe. And it 
will do so at a price that compares 
favorably with cellular service. 



MEO virtually eliminates the voice delay of geostationary 
[GEO] satellites and minimizes the shadowing effect of 
buildings and other obstacles that interrupts fow-earth 
orbit [LEO] and cellular systems. 



Directed antenna coverage concentrates service on land 
masses worldwide. Dual- satellite coverage provides even 
greater assurance of reliable communications. 


FROM URBAN CENTERS TO 
THE MOST REMOTE CORNERS 
OF THE GLOBE 

The Odyssey handset, essentially a 
palm-sized earth station, will operate 
in both cellular and satellite modes. 
Where terrestrial service exists, the 
Odyssey system will augment it, regard- 
less of regional or carrier compatibility. 
Where it is absent or interrupted, 
your handset will link you directly 
- and transparently - to an Odyssey 
satellite. 


JOINT VENTURE OF TRW AND TELEGLOBE 

For more than three decades, TRW Inc. has stood at the forefront of space communi- 
cations, enjoying a worldwide reputation built on innovation , reliability and techni- 
cal excellence. Teleglobe Inc., through its subsidiaries, operates one of the world's most 
extensive digital telecommunication networks and is a quickly emerging leader in the 
global mobile arena. 

Together, TRW and Telcglobe create the driving force behind Odyssey. 


and components derived from proven 
TRW technology. Initial start-up costs 
will be 60 percent lower than for the 
two other major systems in a recent 
study.' 5 ' And Odyssey’s constellation 
price will be fixed. Estimating over a 
10-year period, replacement satellites 
for the other systems evaluated will 
give Odyssey an even more dramatic 
cost advantage. Just as importantly, 
subscriber projections indicate that 
Odyssey will offer the best value for 
the end-user. 

Today, TRW and Teleglobe forge 
a new alliance to launch Odyssey. 
For more information, please contact: 

North America & South America 

(New York) Tel.: 212 903 4267 
Europe (London) Tel.: 081 247 0123 
Asia (Hong Kong) Tel.: 852 845 1008 


THE BEST VALUE FOR THE USER 

Simpler technology and faster 
start-up are scheduled to bring Odyssey 
into global service in 1999, before any 
other system. Superior service and 
minimal user cost will attract sub- 
scribers worldwide. 

RELATIVE COST OF SATELLITE SYSTEMS 

rx - 

,i» : - • 

”i " r 

TO- YEAR COST 

Licensing authority for the Odyssey 
system is expected in early 1995. Unlike 
other systems, it will use frequencies 
already allocated for this type of service 


£ iii ■. tin • hi Sh i^i -tii I Moli*- Siu-Hiui Gna'viuvirAljniis 

CIH'J.I u Inilpan .|i«J Olyjtyri ' 199J n»; Mitrv Curpni-ntioii 

IR'.V •n.ilQilYSSiiy it'- !f.iilfin:irks n! IRW hr. T r-k-.-|h-iho |. ir 

In Miv-'l uVri 


the adventure is just beginning 




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International Herald Tribune, Wednesday , November 16, 1994 


Page 15 


1 1 4 . 460 i 

IntemaUonai Herald Tribune Wnrtr! c*~vi . . „ w l*nrai 

280 InternationaBy inveetebte stodLuSS ®’ . com P° sed of 
byHoomberg conned 



rue Index tracks U.S. dotar vs tew of slocks in: Tokyo, Now Yortc, London, and 
Argentina, Auttnrito, Austria, Belgium, Brad, Canada, Chile, Denmark, FtntamJ, 
Prance, Germany, Hong Kong, Holy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zeeland. Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New York and 
London, the index Is composed of dm so top leeuee in mri nf mukto c mMhat bq 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tracked. 


J Industrial Sectors j( 


Tig. Prw. % 

don doM dung* 


Toe. 

CfoM 

PfWt 

daw 

% 

change 

Energy 

113-30 112.92 -tO.34 

CapHGootte 

11532 

115.15 

+0.15 

UHXfeft 

12&63 128.05 40.45 

Raw Materials 

13257 

13247 

+0.08 

Finance 

11352 113-33 +0.17 

Consumer Goods 

104.78 

105.12 

-032 

Sendees 

117.71 117.33 +0.32 

IfisceUaneous 

122.61 

12292 

-425 

dfcr mom information about the Index, a booklet k avaiabtefm of charge. 

Write to Tti) Index, 181 Avenue CheriesdeGauBe, 92521 NeuHyCedex, France. 


European Trade Authority Clipped 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — If the Euro- 
pean Union’s trade partners 
were frustrated by the bloc’s 
convulsions over agriculture 
that nearly derailed world 
trade talks Iasi year, they 
haven't seen anything yet. 

Europe’s ability to con- 
clude trade agreements was 
made more difficult Tuesday 
when the European Court of 
Justice ruled that ibe EU’s ex- 
ecutive body, the European 
Commission, must share au- 
thority over trade in services 
and intellectual property with 
the Union’s member coun- 
tries. 

The ruling was a setback for 
the Brussels- based commis- 
sion, which had sought to ex- 
tend its existing authority 
over merchandise trade to 
growth areas such as financial 
services. It was a victory for 
countries led by France that 
bad tried to clip the commis- 
sion's wings ever since the 
farm-trade dispute. 

A spokesman for France's 
mission in Brussels said the 
government was “satisfied” 
with the r ulin g. 

The decision worried out- 


Clinton Bends on GATT 

International Herald Tribute 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton endorsed Tues- 
day a legislative maneuver suggested by Senator Bob Dole 
that could smooth the way for congressional ratification of 
the new global tariff-reduction accord. 

Mr. CUzrlon, speaking in Jakarta, acknowledged that “pop- 
ulists” in both the Democratic and Republican parties were 
worried that the disp u te- resold ti on process under the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade would undermine U.S. 
sovereignty. 

This is the central issue Mr. Dole, a Republican from 
Kansas who is due to become the Senate majority leader next 
year, has raised, and he has urged talks with the White House 
on clarifying legislation. 

Mr. Clinton for the first time endorsed this approach;, 
saying he believed it was possible for Congress to pass a 
measure outside the GATT agreement “which would make it 
clear that our sovereignty was intact." 

It was not clear exactly what form new legislation would 
take. According to one report, Mr. Dole would back GATT 
ratification only if Mr. Clinton supported a reduction in 
capital gains tax. 


side countries, who are likely 
to face a more fractious nego- 
tiating posture from Europe. 

“It’s a concern because it 
will take longer to negotiate 
bilateral and multilateral 
agreements,” said Bruce Gard- 
ner, the U.S. ambassador to 


the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade in Geneva. 

But in the short term, the 
rating should enhance pros- 
pects for EU countries to ratify 
the Uruguay Round trade 

grtT^Toffiaals sakL Several 


countries have held up ratifica- 
tion pending tbe judgment. 

At a meeting in Geneva on 
Tuesday, officials from Eu- 
rope, the United States, Japan 
and Canada renewed their de- 
termination to ratify the ac- 
cord on time and establish the 
World Trade Organization, 
GATT’s powerful successor, 
Jan. 1. 

Sir Leon Brittan, the EU 
trade commissioner, said the 
court ruling at least provided 
“a dear basis” on which En- 
rage could participate in the 
WTO. He said the Luxem- 
bomg-basd court said there 
was a “duty of cooperation* 1 
between the commission and 
EU countries on trade matters 
where authority is shared. 

But officials at the Council 
of Ministers, which represents 
EU member countries, said 
the ruling had dearly rein- 
forced national powers to set 
EU trade policy and left the 
commission more of an execu- 
tor of that policy. 

“Nothing has changed,” a 
council official said. “The 
commission’s thesis has been 
completely negated by the 
court." 


Vehicle Sales 
Power Volvo to 
Record Profit 


Fed Move Shows Diverging Rate Cycle 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Volvo AB said 
Tuesday that a surge in demand 
for its trucks and cars had 
pushed profit for the first nine 
months of tbe year to a record 
for any publicly traded Swedish 
company. 

In spite of ihai b ullish report, 
however, the company’s shares 
dosed unchanged as investors 
continued to fret over the long- 
term future of the company's 
carmaJring arm. 

Tbe company’s pretax profit 
for the period rose to 12.7 bil- 
lion kronor ($1.76 billion) from 
1.1 billion kronor a year earlier. 

For the first three quarters of 
the year, Volvo said overall 
sales volume rose 30 percent, 
led by a 38 percent surge in 
delivery of its heavy trucks. Car 
sales rose 18 percent 

The company credited the 
success of new and revamped 
models for its ability to gain 
market share in both cars and 
trucks away from its rivals. 

Volvo’s year-old FH series of 
heavy truck has been a runaway 
success. Among its cars, Volvo 
found gains along a wider front 


chiefly crediting rises in the 
sales of the 850 series and larg- 
er-than-expected sales of the 
940. 

Soren GylL Volvo's chief ex- 
ecutive, said the profit was “in- 
deed gratifying" but “not yet 

adequate." Specifically, he ex- 
pressed concern over operating 
margins on the automobile side 
of the business that stood at a 
mere 4 percent in tbe third 
quarter. 

Analysts also found reason 
for concern. 

“If Volvo is making 4 percent 
on cars in a really good year, 
that has to be seen as pretty 
disappointing,” said Philip Av- 
ion, an analyst at Barclays de 
Zoete Wedd in London. 

Disappointing margins on 
car sales underlined what many 
analysts insisted was the major 
question mark that had hung 
over that side of Volvo’s busi- 
ness since February. 

It was then that Volvo plied 
off the planned merger of its car 
group with France's Renault 
SA and abandoned its cross- 
shareholding relationship with 

See VOLVO, Page 17 


OMenwttanal Herald Tribune 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Federal Reserve Board’s 
interest rate increase Tuesday, combined 
with recent remarks by the president of the 
Bundesbank, signals that the business cy- 
cle in the United States re mains far ahead 
of those in continental Europe and Japan 

The Fed move on Tuesday, the sixth 
increase this year, also brought into stark 
relief the fact that interest rates are moving 
higher in the United States while they 
remain largely on hold in Europe and 
Japan. 

The prime reason for these divergent 
trends is that the recovery in continental 
Europe’s most important economies — 
Germany and France — is at a much 
earlier stage than is the case in either the 
United States or Britain. The Japanese 


economy, meanwhile, is experiencing a 
weak recovery at best 
While fears of future inflation being 
stoked by strong U.S. growth lay behind 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

the Fed’s rate rise, Hans Tietmeyer, the 
Bundesbank president explained last 
week that as far as Germany was con- 
cerned, “I don’t see for the time being that 
we are near what the Anglo-Saxons have to 

Looking at prospects for German inter- 
est rates in coming months, Mr. Tietmeyer 
said: “I am not excluding the possibility 
for a small move downwards, nor that it 
will remain the same.” 

The Federal Reserve’s main aim in rais- 
ing short-term interest rates is to avoid a 


spurt in inflation next year by slowing tbe 
pace of U.S. economic expansion from its 
present level of 3 percent to 4 percent to a 
more sustainable level of around 25 per- 
cent. For Alan Greenspan, the chai rman of 
the Federal Reserve Board, and his col- 
leagues, the challenge is to avoid increas- 
ing rates so much that they trigger an 
eventual recession. 

The Fed has been raising rates since 
early February, when it ended five years of 
downward rate moves. In Bri tain which 
also has a buoyant recovery under way, the 
Bank of England switched from a mone- 
tary policy of earing to one of tightening in 
September. 

Alison Cottrell, a London-based analyst 
with Kidder, Peabody & Co., said that 
while Europe and Japan were trailing the 

See RATES, Page 17 


France, Yielding to the EU, 
Will Open Orly on Jan. 2 

Reuters 

PARIS — France, under pressure from its partners in the 
European Union to open access to Orly airport, said Tuesday that 
it would grant landing rights to European airlines on Jan. 2, earlier 
than it previously planned. 

Transport Minister Bernard Bosson said he had decided to 
allow European airlines to fly in and out of Orly to other 
destinations in the European Union at that time. Orly was opened 
to British Airways this summer after the airline threatened to fly 
in without authorization. France originally said other European 
airlines would have to wait until spring. 

Mr. Bosson contended that France had sought to limit the use 
of Orly to prevent excessive disturbance to the local population. 
On this basis, he said, it had drawn up a program of landing rights 
for a “summer schedule” starting March 27. 


MEDIA MARKETS 


This Bud’s Not for DMB&B 


* 


By Stuart Elliott 

Hew York Times Service 

N EW YORK — It is last call for one 
of the longest relationships in ad- 
vertising. Anheuser-Busch Cos. 
has startled Madison Avenue by 
dismissing the Sl Louis office erf D’Arcy 
Marius Benton & Bowles Imx, which has 
served as the sole agency for its flagship 
Budweiser beer brand since 1915. 

Effective in 90 days, creative responsibil- 
ities on the estimated $ 125 million account of 
Budweiser, America's best-selling beer, will 
be consolidated at the Chicago office of DDB 
Needham Worldwide Ino, a unit of Omni- 
com Group Ino, which handles the light, dry 
and ice-brewed versions of the brand. 

Bud Light in particular has had robust 
growth in the last two years, fueled by humor- 
ous commercials from DDB Needham Chica- 
go featuring an inept liar who asserts, i es, l 
am,” when his many outlandish claims are 

^UiSfsunday, when Anheuser-Busch exec- 
utives notified D’Arcy Masms Ben ton « 
Bowles executives of the dismissal, the ties 
between America’s largest 
the world’s largest agencaes had wAs tood^ 1 
manner of challenges — even ProMntion, 
when Anheuser-Busch produced products ra 
lieu of beer such as Bevo, a nonalcoholic 
malt-based beverage, and Carcho, a choco- 
late-flavored soft drink. ^ 

D’Arcy Marius Benton & Bowles began 
working cm Budweiser 32 
heoseSusdi began brewing and distributing 

the brand. It was under DMB&B sstevmd^p 

that Budweiser surpassed Schbtt m the late 


1950s to become the No. 1 beer in the United 
States, a rank it has never relinquished. 

But that relationship could not survive the 
intensely competitive nature of tbe contem- 
porary beer market. 

Budweiser sales have declined because of 
consumers’ weakening brand loyalties, as 
they have increasingly experimented with 
dozens of lighter, tastier, more flavorful 
brews, including several being rushed onto 
shelves by Anheuser-Busch. 

“It’s a big step far Anheuser to sever that 
relations hip," said Emanuel Goldman, an ana- 
lyst with Paine Webber Inc. in San Francisco 
who follows the $50 billion U.S. beer industry. 

“Yet the domestic brewing business is more 
competitive than it has ever been,” he added. 
“That being the case, you really want to bring 
outyour best.” 

Those feelings were reflected in a statement 
by Patrick T. Stokes, president of Anheuser- 
Busch in St Louis. 

“The people at D’Arcy have done a tremen- 
dous job in helping us create memorable 
brand-budding advertising,” he said. “While 
this was not an easy decision, we believe 
Anhe user-Busch is best served at this time by 
combining these major brand assignments 
under one roof.” 

The creative duties on other Anheuser- 
Busch assignments, with bQHngs estimated at 
$50 milli on, will be handled by various agen- 
cies. They indude the Michdob line of high- 
er-priced beers; OTJoul’s. a nonalcoholic 
brew, and a moderation campaign canying 
the theme, “Know when to say when.” 

While the cost-reduction from consolidat- 

See BEER, Page 18 


Japan Posts 
Downturn 
hi Surplus 

With U.S. 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s political- 
ly sensitive trade surplus with 
the UJ3. marked its first month- 
on-month decline since Febru- 
ary an Tuesday, falling 6.8per- 
cent in October to $4.79 billion. 

Japanese officials said the 
figure was due to a surge in 
imports amid the appreciation 
erf tbe yen, which has risen 12 
percent against the dollar so far 
this year. Imports from the U.S. 
jumped 26 percent on the year, 
while exports to the UJS. rose 8 
percent 

Japan’s overall customs- 
cleared trade surplus also fell in 
October, for the third consecu- 
tive month, declining 15 per- 
cent from a year earlier to $9.28 
billion, the Japanese Finance 
Ministry said. 

October marked tbe fourth 
month in which Japan’s imports 
grew faster than its exports, 
jumping 24 percent on the year 
to $2534 buHon, while exports 
rose 10 percent to $34.62 billion. 

But, as Japan’s overall ex- 
ports still significantly exceed 
imports, relatively email gains 
in exports can offset larger per- 
centage growth in imports. 

(Bloomber$, AP, Reuter) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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Key Money Rates 

uaued Slate . 
Ohewalrata 

prune rote 
Federal fond* 
firaonth CDs 
Cwnm. oaper n* dm 
3-HMdtl TTBOlWT'bB 

1- yrar Treasury ten 

2 - year Treasury m>»» 

syew Treasury rate 
7-year Treasury ra* 
lMNar Treamnr rate 

j^rrar Treasury boW 

Merrill Lvrah 3 M 09 ready 


Nov. 15 

Yen ECU 
2 «r2 v. 

ru-m svrsva 

TfchZV* 64Vfa 


away IMuy»Mw 

13*11 U606 UW7 

TJX VIM 7TM 


Dtecwatrafft 
can money 
Mnoatb bderhanfc 
>monlti In t e r b an k 
Month InlartMBk 
itorear flmrmMl bead 
Oewnaa 
Lombard rate 
Cad moan 
XBoatthdartnak 
xnoatti interbank 
donna Mefbrak 

lFraor Bond 


Ctee 

Prev. 

Brttotn 



4% 

too 

— A aw rate 

M 

» 

WafPb 

m 

Coll mam' 

SK 

SVfc 

Vh 

5Vt 

HnaattMHtnak 

» 

5*ft 

SjW 

479 


flb 

4tt 

556 

585 

6-naan MRtKn* 

IK 

Mb 

£37 

526 

IMwOA 

8-57 

143 

4.16 

110 

France 



TIB 

Tin 

tatsmatioererte 

5JJ0 

SUM 

7M 

7A4 

Cofl mosey 

5Vi 

sn 

770 

7jS7 

VmoaMilBtertwnh 

5K. 

5*. 

771 

772 

Unooili Interbank 

SVS 

5Vt 

&04 

£07 

6-monHi Inlarboak 

» 

» 

'oust 449 

447 

IP- year OAT 

. 0.10 

W7 



Sources: Reuters. 

Bloomberg, Merrill 

IV 

1% 

Lynch. Book ot Tokyo. Commerzbank, 

2M 

222 



2V. 

2% 




133 

132 

Gold 



244 

« cm 

144 
a a a 

AAA. 

PM. CbVe 


^ IWI 

Zurich 38630 


+ L40 


6SD 6JB 
LOO 500 
£00 LOO 
£20 £20 
£30 520 

729 744 


London 30645 30670 +140 

New York 38720 3*720 + 240 

US. dodoes per ounce. London ofdckd fix- 
tops: Zurich and New York open in g and d a* 
k» Prices: New Yor* comat tDaeemberj 
Source: Reuters. 


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Depositors' Funds. It's Still 
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T hroughout history, man 
has sought to safeguard 
the things he values. 

It was true in the Middle Ages, 
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Today, however, safety isn’t 
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padlock. In today’s fluid world* 
safety is tied to prudent poli- 
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REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


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Timeless Values. Traditional Strength. 


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I 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


13 

« 


\ 


V 






Page 16 


MARKET DIARY 


Fed’s Rate Increase 
Whipsaws Stocks 


Compiled for Our Stuff From Dupauhe 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
closed Buie changed Tuesday 
after the Federal Reserve 
touched off concern about 
slower economic growth in 
1 995 by raising interest rates for 
a sixth time this year. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed 3.37 points lower 
at 3.826.36, but it rose as high as 


U.S. Stocks 


3,856.31 and fell as low as 
3.807.86 in turbulent trading. 

Advancing stocks outnum- 
bered declining shares slightly 
on the Big Board, where trading 
swelled to 336.34 million shares 
from 260.42 million shares 
Monday. 

Prices initially rose then re- 
versed course after the Fed an- 
nounced its raLe increase of 


three-quarters of a percentage 
point Short 


point Shortly after the increase 
was announced, sell orders 
sliced about 22 points from the 
Dow industrials. 

The chief concern is that 
higher rales mean competition 
for stocks, traders said “Why 
be in the stock market if you 
can lock in nice rates for the 
time being?” asked Richard 


Meyer, bead of institutional eq- 
uity trading at Ladenburg, 
Th ai man n & Co. 

Other investors said the Fed 
had shown it was determined to 
fight inflation and that this 
would ultimately help stocks, in 
pan by boosting bonds and the 
dollar. 

The rate increase will “clear 
the stage for a nice sustainable 
rally in the next few days," 
based on expectations of mod- 
erate economic growth, rising 
corporate profits and the pros- 
pect of a more pro-business 
Congress, not investors’ percep- 
tion of what the Fed is doing, 
said Don Hays, director of in- 
vestment strategy at Wheat 
First Butcher Singer. 

Among the stronger gainers, 
Hewlett-Packard ended % high- 
er at 98% after rising as much as 
2 Vi on expectations for the com- 
pany's fourth-quarter earnings. 

Dayton Hudson fell 3K to 
80% after the retailer said it 
would invest $ 1.3 billion in 1995 
in new stores and remodeling. 

Deli Computer rose 2W to 47 
after it unveiled a new series of 
computers using Intel Corp.'s 
Pentium microprocessor. 
Whirlpool rose 1W to 53 after 
saying it would close two 
plants. ( Bloomberg, AP > 


Via AiMcfatod Rim 


AS 


The Dow 





«■ '.”f _ . . 

AMMT. • • i- • t i •*•••, X .v ..: • * : 




NYSE Most Actives 


Buyers Flock to Dollar 
After U.S. Rate Rise 


Compiled by Our SttffJ Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rallied to a six-week high Tues- 
day against the Deutsche mark 
after die Federal Reserve raised 
U.S. interest rates by three- 
quarters of a percentage point, 
easing traders’ concern about 
inflation. 

“This is what the market 
wanted,” said Earl Johnson. 


Foreign Exchange 


currency advisor at Harris 
Trust & Savings Bank in Chica- 
go. Many traders and analysts 
bad felt that the Fed had raised 
rates too slowly to control the 
inflation that often accompa- 
nies strong economic growth. 

The dollar rose to 1.5558 
Deutsche marks from 1.5446 
DM on Monday, and to 98.75 
yen from 98J0 yen. It rose to 
5.3425 French francs from 
5.3095 and to 1.3101 Swiss 
francs from 1.2972. The pound 
fell to J 1.5720 from $1.5865. 

The rate increase eased con- 
cern among investors that the 
Fed had not raised rates fast 
enough to control inflation. 


Higher rates also help the dollar 
by making U.S. deposits more 
attractive. 

“This was a very good move 
for the Fed,” said Karl H alii an 
of CF-CIC Bank New York. 
“They’ve caught up with infla- 
tion. We’ve seen the lows for the 
dollar this year." 

Amy Smith, an analyst at 
IDEAi a research firm, said the 
dollar was seeing “a good 
bounce." She said the rate rise 
was “a sign that they are taking 
some aggressive action." adding 
that the rate increase “was cer- 
tainly warranted on economic 
grounds." 

But she said the size of the 
move had precluded the possi- 
bility of a second rate increase 
in December. 

Ms. Smith described the rise 
as a “positive showing” by the 
Fed at this time, but added she 
did not think the move would 
be enough to quell concern 
about rising inflation. 

“I don’t think it’s going to 
address the inflation threat" in 
the longer term, she said. 

f Bloomberg, AFX ) 


RJRNcfc 

Qu-yslr 

Kmart 

HmeOea 

TeiMex 

CasaCpn 

FordMl 

GnMotr 

PhilMr 

Campaqs 

GTE 

waiMart 

Merc* 

AT0.T 

SloneC 


Vo <L KB* 
09278 7 
MOW 50V, 
403 « IS*. 

am m v« 

39779 52W 
37801 19W 
35297 277S 
32400 37 Vi 
31171 Oh 
27973 41% 
24113 31*1 
25305 2» 

23624 Wm 
22720 54V* 
22007 UK 


L«w 
6V. 
49* 
14* 
47* 
51 V* 
19* 
28* 
33* 
62* 
40* 
30* 
23'A 
36* 
S3 
IS* 


6 * 

SO 

14Vfa 

47* 

52* 

19* 

28* 

38* 

63* 

40* 

31* 

23* 

36* 

S3 

IS* 


on. 
+ M 
+ 1 


Dow James Averages 


Own Men Low Lost o>«. 


Indus 3832 47 385631 3807 JW 382634 —337 
Trent T485J7 1492X2 1477,15 148437 *1.63 
UNI 17733 1 77.83 175.98 176M — 
Come 127122 1284J4 127059 12763* —0.75 


Standard & Poor's Indexes 


Tronsp. 
UHUflas 
Finance 
SP SOB 
SP >00 


Kfgti Low Close arse 
35053 551 JO 55423 — 1.IS 
354.73 352 J? 154.17 +1JB 
15055 T«67 1*9.44 — 0X0 
4001 4232 4264 —0.11 

44031 46235 46302 —102 
43378 43001 432.® —1 04 


NYSE Indexes 


Htsti LOW Last Cbg. 


Composite 
indusMate 
Trams, 
maty 


255.98 25X49 25432 —032 
32445 320.99 32207 —044 
229.61 22701 22842 -134 
200.43 19835 199.62 —051 
20135 199.94 20039 —0.12 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Low Lust Chg. 


Camomile 

Industrials 

Banks 

to arcne e 

Ftnanoa 

Tronso. 


771.17 767.02 768.19 + 02)5 
700.26 776.77 77834 -135 
71108 700.41 70933 —0.91 
90643 901.04 90531 -139 
BTOSl BSS.48 889.75 —039 
683.16 475.67 67539 —531 


Dow Jo n es Bond Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


U.S./ ATTHEClQSi 


Metals 


P revie w 
BH Ask 


Qnt 

BM Adi 
ALUMINUM (Htah Croce) 

Dollars per name ton 

SOOt 1837X0 UAOO 186030 186930 

J 87630 1 88230 188330 
COPPER CATHODES (HMl Gm>«) 
nuUnn scr nezrlc ten 

5pa» £72X0 £73X0 2781X0 S7B2X0 

Forward 2754X0 27S&X0 2750X0 2752X0 

LEAD 

Dm lar* per metric tan 
Spat 4J2X0 673X0 66630 667JO 

mCKEU 6904X1 (W0 - 5B 684X0 685X0 

Doflars per metric tan 

Soot 7550X0 7560X0 7510X0 7520X0 

Forward 7675X0 7677X0 7635X0 7640X0 

Tl N 

Dalian drt astitctso 

seat ^200X0 6710X0 MUM dum 

Forward 6300X0 6305X0 6325X0 6330X0 


DOnOrS POT fTKITIC rOnM 


Seal 

Forward 


1164X0 1165X0 116630 116730 
1189X0 1190X0 1192X0 119230 


Financial 


— u 
♦ * 
+ 1 


— * 

—44 
— 1 


AMEX Most Actives 


VmcvtI 

VlocB 

XCLLJd 

Cobeffln 

CtwrSftS 

Towndv 

EchoBav 

GaytCn 

Vkjcmrt 

interDla 


veL High Law Last Chg. 
107269 1V U 1*1 1* 


26303 40* 39* 40 

9451 l*t 1 
7797 9* 7* 

5635 11* II 
5460 1*. 1 

5356 11* U* 11* 
4398 9*4 9 9* 

4322 3* t 3* 


8* 

11 * 

1 


—’A 
♦ * 
+ *i 


4033 3Vit 


. 3* 

39ii 3Vu 




-*i 


20 Bonds 

HUtllMci 

10 Industrials 

dose 

7627 

09.15 

99X0 

Ctoe 
— 119 
= & 

AMEX Stock Index 


Higta 

Low Lost 

Chg. 

449X3 

447X0 448.62 

—0.10 

NYSE Kary 





Close 

Prev. 

Advoncad 

1126 

1238 

DecEnad 

1106 

1015 


695 

639 


2927 

2*12 

New Highs 

38 

» 

New Lows 

198 

210 


AMEX Diary 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


Oscos 

Intel 

Sybase s 

SunNUc 

Informix 

Micstts 

TetCmA 

DedCrtr 

BavNtws 

Novell 

Pwnafi 

3Com s 

Oracle i 

MO 

DSC s 


Vot Wgh 
42278 34* 
39261 67* 
39060 47* 
33206 34 
32777 27* 
32766 65* 
29030 23* 
25776 47* 
2S558 24* 
24723 IS* 
34092 71* 
24002 43* 
22603 45Vit 
21350 22* 
20619 331a 


Low Lost 
33 33Vu 
61*1 61*. 
46* 46* 
32* 33* 
23* 26* 

64<A 64*t 
22 * 22 * 
45* 47 

25* 74 

18* 18* 
49* 70* 

41* 42* 

44 44* 

2 i* aiwu 
32* 33* 


t- 1 * 
+ 2 * 
-Vu 
— * 
+ 2 * 
— V» 
i* 
* 1 * 
+ 1* 
- V. 
— Vu 
- 1 * 


Market Salas 


Todnr 

Cfen 

NYSE 33634 

Amo* 31X0 

NaSdOQ 287X7 

m millions. 


317X4 

2251 


Advanced 

262 

271 

Declined 

315 

315 

Unchanged 

243 

221 

Te*of issues 

B20 

807 

New Highs 

11 

16 

New Laws 

37 

36 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undvxtaed 
TWttf issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1647 

1569 

1908 

SIM 

107 

124 


1546 
1663 
1913 
SI 22 
84 
UB 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0X43 

Copoor electrolytic lb 1X9 

Iran FOB. ton 713X0 

Lead, lb 044 

Silver, tray oi 5.215 

Steel l scrap), tan 127X0 

Tin, lb 4.1303 

zmc.lt J CJ796 


Prav. 


213X0 

SL% 

137X0 

4.1092 

038M 


Htoti Low dose Change 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 
CSMUMO-pfSOMMXt 
DCC 9343 93X8 

Mar 92X2 9276 

Jun 92X3 92.17 

S«P 91.79 91.75 

Die 9146 9143 

Mar 91X2 91.19 

inn 91X4 91X2 

Sep 9089 90X5 

Dec 98.73 9070 

Mar 9045 90X9 

Jun 90X7 9055 

SOP 9054 9053 

Est. volume: 4*784. Open Inf.: 497430 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 
tl mflllaa-ptioriMpd 


93X9 +0X1 

9279 +0X4 

9221 +0X5 

9178 +0X4 

9145 +UH 
91X0 +0X3 

91X3 +0JM 
9088 +0X5 

9073 +0X5 

9045 +0X8 

9059 +0X6 

9057 +0X6 


DK 

93X9 

91*5 

93X6 

—0X1 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93X7 

+ 0X1 

Jun 

N.T. 

N.T. 

92X8 

+ 0X2 

Sop 

N.T. 

N.T. 

915* 

+ 0X1 


94X5 +0X1 

9447 +0X2 


94X5 

9196 

93X7 

9030 


niw 
+ 0X4 
+ 003 
+ 0X3 


91X5 +0X5 

9278 + 0X4 


92X4 

9243 


+ 0X2 
+ 0X2 


9233 +0X2 

92X4 +0X3 


Est. volume: 34. Open Int.: 4777. 

3+60 NTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 mllllafl - PtS Of 180 pet 
DK 9485 94X3 

Mar 9448 9444 

Jan 9436 9479 

Sep 9196 9192 

Dec 93X0 93X4 

MCB- 9333 9337 

Jan 93X5 92X8 

Sep 9278 9273 

Dec 92X6 92X1 

Mar 9243 9240 

Jan 9232 9230 

Sep 9274 9271 . 

Est. volume: 93302. Open Int.: 707X05. 
3-MONTH PIBOR (MAT1F) 

FFS million - pts at 188 pet 
Dec 942B 9476 9437 +0X1 

Mar 9346 93X3 93X4 +0X1 

Jail 9347 9344 9347 +0X3 

Sep *116 9112 9116 +0X4 

Dec 92X5 92X1 92X4 + 0X3 

Mar 92X9 91S 92X9 +0X3 

Jan 9235 9133 9235 +OCM 

Sep 92.15 9113 9115 +0X3 

ESI. volume: 23499. Open Ini.: 1B7.5B3. 
LONG GILT (LIFF El 
SUM - Pts A 32nds of IDO pel 
Dec 102-07 101-23 102-01 +0-10 

Mar I01-1T 100-31 101-07 +0-10 

Est. volume: 44441 Ooen int.: 106X21. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND IUFFB) 
DM 250X00 - Ptl Of 100 PC* 

Dec 9073 9037 9045 +037 

Mar 89X1 8946 8976 +040 

Est. volume; 125701 Open bit.: 207.921 
19- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF1 
FF580XOB - pts of 100 pet 


DK 

111x0 

111.16 

HUS 

+ R36 

Mar 

1)0-58 

110X4 

110X6 

+ 0X6 

Jon 

109X6 

109X0 

109 J2 

+ 0X6 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

108XB 

+ax6 


EsI. volume: 139721 Open Int.: 148X65. 


Industrials 


High Low Lost Settle arte 
GASOIL (IPE) 

U3. dollars per metric ton-lots of 100 tons 
Dec 1 5275 150X0 15175 1517S —225 

Jan 15475 152X0 153J5 15375 —2X0 

Feta 15575 154X0 154X0 154X0 —175 

Mar 155X0 153X0 15435 15475 —173 

Apr 153X0 15200 15275 T52H — 175 


Hi?* LOW 


MOT N.T. N.T. 

Jane 152X0 15175 

■lair N.T. N.T. 

Aee N.T. N.T. 

s«p N.T. N.T. 

act N.T. N.T. 

Nov N.T. N.T. 

Elt. volume: 13473. 


Last Settle arte 
N.T. 15235 —ITS 

15175 I SITS —2X0 
N.T. 133X0 — 1.7S 
NT. 15475 -2X0 
N.T. 156X0 —IS.} 
N.T. 158X0 -ISO 
N.T. 16075 —250 

Open int. 94701 


BRENT CRUDE Ol L ( IPE) , . 

US. deBara per barraHats pnXN Barrett 





17X5 

17X6 

+ 0.07 




16.70 

16X9 





16X0 

1M» 




1625 

16X4 

16X3 

+ 0X8 




16X3 






1X26 





UX5 

16.16 

14.13 





1A10 





14.1* 

1624 


+ 0X3 




N.T. 






N.T. 

1619 


No* 

16X5 

16X5 

16X5 

1422 

+ 0X3 

Est. volume: 60331 . 

Open tot. 195X42 


Stock Indexes 



HU 

LOW 

FT5E HO (LIFFE) 
05 par Index POM 


DK 

3158X 

31 UX 

Mar 

3168X 

3138X 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Low Close Chant 


_ N.T. 3T90X +54X 

EsL volume: 20X14. Open InL: 59432 
CAC4Q (MATIF) 

CPMB HBP IlNlPT nfllftt 

Nov 1967X0 1949X0 196200 +14X0 

Dec 1974X0 JftSMBS 1971X0 +14X0 

Jtra 1979X0 1970X0 19B0X0 +14X0 

MOT N.T. N.T. 1998X0 +15X0 

M 1979X0 1979X0 19B1X0 +15X0 

Sep 2006X0 2006X0 2005X0 +14X0 

Est. volume: 19X15. Open Inti 62334. 


Sources: Motif, Associated Press, 
London Inn Financial Futures Exchange. 
Inti Petroleum Exchange: 


Divi d ends 


Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


IRREGULAR 


Cham Bk ocHpfL 
CoUasen Corp 
ProdEqFdA 
Prud EaFdB&C 
Prud GrtJppABC 
Prud MultSecFd 
Prud StrtFdABC 
Patnm AdlUSGvtB 
Putnm mcFdB 
Target PortTr 
Croop oalns dtstrtbutlan. 


.14075 
. X75 
C XS 
c xo 

C 435 
C J25 
C XI 

- X35 

- X3fi 
C 1.190 


12-15 12-31 
12-15 1-10 
11-23 11-29 
11-22 11-29 
11-22 11-29 
11-22 11-29 
11-22 11-39 
11-15 11-25 
11-15 11-25 
11-22 11-29 


FstCommdCP 

Krualntf 

ZemexCorp 


. 5% 
. 10 % 
. 2% 


12-15 i-a 

11-28 12-23 
11-28 12-19 


STOCK SPLIT 


Amcr Sensors Inc2 for 1 spin. 
PeoPieSoft 2 for I split. 


INCREASED 


Arbor Dam 
Bandas Inc 
Conntates Flnl 
FstCommdCP 
Horsco Corp 
Northern Tr Cp 
R pvnoids& Reynolds 
SefasCorp 



REGULAR 


Acordic lnc 
CiMHtYldSecs 
Conseco Inc 
Cumst-wnpht 
FPL Grp Inc 
Green mi Pwr 
LabOne lnc 
Loctif# Corp 
Marsh&Mc Lennon 
McDonald's Cp 
Merchants NY Ben 
Public sve Enter 
Putnm HlYtdAdvB 
Putnm HlYMTrB 
Suncor Inc 
Sundstrmd Carp 
Synavus Find 
Trm Flnl Bcp 
T urner BcastAftB 


.15 11-28 12-12 
X7 11-25 12-5 
.125 12-10 
75 12-1 12-15 
42 11-25 12-15 
X3 12-15 12-30 
.18 11-21 12-2 
31 12-9 +2 

725 1-11 2-15 
A6 II -3D 12-16 
XO 12-14 12-21 
X4 12-7 12-31 
-08 11-15 11-25 
X98 11-15 11-25 
77 12-15 12-23 
30 12-6 12-20 
.1125 12-22 1-3 

.14 12-1 12-15 
XT75 IKK) 12-15 


j; p-p c ya tol e b Canadian funds; m- 
•: MHrttrY; MMitomwl 


TRW Announces Satellite Venture ^ 

n EV ELAND (AP) — Joining an already crowded communi 


i xvry au« iciwws, » j- . __ _ 

percent equity interest in the Odyssey system and seek financing 

fb " 


For the remaining 85 percent. 


Whirlpool to Cut Its Work Force 

DETROIT ( AP) — Whirlpool Corp. said Tuesday it would 
close two plants and cut about 3.200 jobs in North America and 
Europe as part of a restructuring. The moves will result m a S25U 
million charge against fourth-quarter profits. 

Whirlpool said it would cut 2,000 jobs in Europe, pan of a 
reorganization of appliance-making operations it acquired from 

w*i -I- m.rw ■ 9 non 8r. am FilonnArl in PlirnnP 


Philips NV in 1989.“ No plant closings are planned in Europe. 
The world’s leading appliance mak< 


ker will close a plastic-pans 


plant in South Carolina and a clothes -dryer plant in Ontario in 
1995, * * * *~ s ~ 


eliminating about 900 jobs. A further 300 manufacturing 
and management positions will be cut in the South and Midwest. 


Ford Looks at Electric Conversion 


DEARBORN, Michigan (Combined Dispatches) — Ford Mo- 
tor Co. said Tuesday it had joined forces with U.S. Elec tricar lnc. 
to develop guidelines for a program that could lead to the 
authorized conversion of so-called gliders into electric j vehicles. 

Gliders are incomplete cars or trucks that are built without 
engines, transmissions, fuel systems and other selected components 
so that they ca n be more easily and economically modified^ ‘o 
accommodate all-electric drive systems. 

Ted D. Morgan, chief executive of U.S. Electricar. said the Ford 
name on his company’s products would help to sell them to the 
current target market: the fleets of local, state and federal govern- 
ments and big companies. U.S. Electricar does not currently 


market its cars to in< 


mpames. 

naividual 


buyers. 


(Reuters, NYT ') 


Dayton Hudson Profit Jumps 56% 

MINNEAPOLIS (Bloomberg) — Dayton Hudson Corp. an- 
nounced Tuesday a 56 percent rise in third-quarter profit 

Profit at the retailer rose to $67 milli on from $43 million a year 
earlier. Revenue advanced 9 percent to $5.05 billion from $4.63 
billion. 

Thu: company said most of its third-quarter gains had come from 
its Target stores; where revenue increased 15 percent Sales in stores 
open at least one year rose 6 percent Target’s gross margin was 
higher and operating expense lower, the company added. 


Better Sales Help J.C. Penney Net 


Novell Fires Back at Microsoft’s On-Line Plan 


PLANO, Texas (Bloomberg) — J.C. Penney Co. said Tuesday 
its third-quarter earnings rose on the strength of stronger sales 
and a decrease in expenses and its tax rate. 

Net income was $274 million, after profit from operations of 
$221 million a year earlier. After a charge against earnings for the 
early retirement of debt, net income a year ago was $185 million. 
Revenue increased to $5.15 billion from $4.74 billion. 

The retailer said the effective tax rate on its operating income 
fell to 38.7 percent from 40.4 percent 


By Mitchell Martin 

International Herald Tribune 

LAS VEGAS — NoveE lnc. launched a 
response Tuesday to Microsoft Corp.'s 
planned on-line service, announcing a sys- 
tem to link computers via cable television 
lines. 

Speaking at the COMDEX computer 
trade show, Novell's president, Robert J. 
Frankenberg. said Novell and General In- 
strument Corp. would derise a system to 
allow networking for the 30 million VS. 
homes with personal computers. Mr. Fran- 
kenberg said his company’s aim was to 


provide “pervasive computing" — a way 
of linkin g people to such services as bank- 
ing, entertainment and communications. 

AT&T Corp., regional U.S. telephone 
companies and overseas telecommunica- 
tions authorities also are among partners 
working on Novell’s pervasive computing 
system, he said. 

" Novell plans to use the Internet commu- 
nications network as a key element in its 
plan. This differs from the system pro- 
posed Monday by Microsoft, which would 
be a new service that would be easily 
accessible to people who have Windows 


95, the latest version of the company's 
popular operating system for personal 
computers. On-line services allow people 
to communicate, play games, shop and 
invest by computer. 

Mr. Frankenberg drew applause from 
an audience of about 3,000 people by say- 
ing “the best news is that we don't have to 
wait for the year 2005," a reference to the 
presentation on Monday by Bill Gates, the 
Microsoft chairman, who presented his 
view of a world a decade from now in 
which computers and television sets allow 
rapid transmission of data and pictures. 


Home Depot’s Net Profit Up 36% 

ATLANTA (Bloomberg ) — Home Depot lnc. said Tuesday 
that fiscal third-quarter profit soared 36 percent, exceeding Wall 
Street's expectations, as expansion into Canada and the 1^5. 
Midwest fueled a 40 percent increase in sales. 

The largest American home-improvement retailer said net in- 
come rose to $140.8 million, or 31 cents a share, in the quarter 
ended Ocl 30. from $ 103.4 million a year earlier. Revenue rose to 
S3w24 billion from $230 bQlion, boosted by a 9 percent sales 
increase in stores open more than a year and results from 15 newer 
stores. The results came in just above the mean estimate of 30 
cents a share by 23 analysts surveyed by Institutional Brokers 
Estimate System, 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Afltmoo Franca Prmia Nov 15 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Annan 
Ahold 
Akzo Nobel 
AMEV 

Hob-Wsssonen 
C5M 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fakker 
Gist-Brocades 
hbG 
Helneken 
Hooaovera 
Hunter Douotas 
IHCCakmd 
Inter Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
KNFBT 
KPN 
Nedltavd 
OcrGrinten 
Pokhoed 
P HIHsm 
Polvorom 
Roheco 

□lulmiu j. 

Koaamco 
Rallnco 
Reran ID 
Royal Dutch 
5torK 
Unilever 
Van ommeraa 
VNU 

Wofters/K toner 121X0 120X0 


6140 6170 
3640 36X0 

109.10 10740 
51.90 51.10 

201X0 199 

74 74J0 
3340 33 

6840 68X0 
129X0 137 

17X0 17.10 
14X0 15 

44X0 442S 
274X0 273 

247 24670 
SE40 0050 
77X0 7670 
42X0 42X0 
9640 94X0 
79X0 79 

4640 46X0 
51 50X0 
55X0 55X0 

56.10 55 

76X0 76 

46.10 45X0 
54X0 5370 
76X0 7640 

11110 1)2X0 
5070 50.90 
lid 11540 
8240 82X0 

190.10 189X0 
4370 42X0 
198X0 19870 

46X0 46 

180 I7B 


Brussels 


Ahnonil 
Artied 

StF 

bs^t* 

3fp B 

Cocker 11 1 
Cobepa 
ONruvf 
Deihaue 

Electro bel 
Elect raflno 

Forth AG 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaart 

Glavertei 

Immobal 

Krea let trank 

MOSCOW 
Patrol! na 
PDwerfln 
Recttcel 
Rovaie Beige 
Sac Gen Bcnaue 


7750 7750 
5070 N_A. 
2480 2510 
4260 4770 
23600 23625 
12200 12125 
2660 2610 
1990 I960 
194 194 

5430 5500 
720B 7173 
1294 1294 
5570 5590 
2905 2900 
7630 2620 
1268 1268 
3908 3840 
9050 9040 
4180 4200 
2935 2990 
6260 6160 
1370 1362 
9490 9540 
2915 2920 
488 480 

4790 4750 
7630 7520 


Soc Gen Belgique 2200 2195 


Safina 
Sotvav 
Tasscndarla 
Troctvtiel 
UCB 

Union MJnlere 
i uts 


Stock ExcXonge: 
Pravloot : 710X9 


13225 13250 
15000 14925 
9990 10125 
OS» 95 U 
24300 24300 
2660 2665 
6010 6010 
.7208X7 


156.10153X0 
263 265 

2445 2416 
645 650 

750 730 
317X0314X0 
347X034570 
415 410 

465 459 

672 690 

399X0396X0 
789 776 


787XO 771 

NA. NA 
227X0226X0 
762754X0 

433 436 


Frankfurt 

AEG 

Alcatel 5EL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 
Asfco 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bay. Hypo bank 
Bay Verefrabk 
BBC 

BMP Bank 

BMW ... ... 

Commerzbank 328X0 326 

Continental 224.90 222 

Daimler Bene 
Deaima 
Dt Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 

Douglas 

Dresdner Bank 41150409X0 
FeMmuehle 300 306 

F Krupp Hoesch 20180203X0 
Harpener 321 322 

Henkel 599 591 

Hochtief 914 920 

Hoectut 327X0 326 

Hoiwnann 855 861 

Horten 206 206 

IWKA 333 333 

Kail Salz 169169X0 

Karstodi 567 567 

Kaufnot 473 461 

KHD 124.8® 124 

KlMckncrWerfce 136 136 

pnae BOi mo 

Lufthansa 305X0 204 

MAN 416X041050 

Mmneamann 401X0X77X0 
Metollgexll 
MuenchRueck 
Porsche 

RWE 


159X0159X0 
2790 3780 
670 656 
453448X0 
242 240 

465X0461X0 


Close Prev. 


Rheinmetall 
Schorl no 
Siemens 
Thvssen 
Varta 
Veba 
VEW 
Vlag 
Volks 
Walla 


308X0 288 

989 969 

6236ZL50 
290X0 289 

327325X0 
530X0521.10 
373 375 

473X0 468 
459X0 456 

100 ) 1000 


Pnnrtaas : 785X3 


Helsinki 

Axnrr-Yhtvmo 101 100 

Ere*M3utzeff 
Huhtamakl 


K.O.P. 
Kvmmene 
Metro 
Nokia 
Poh tola 
Rmala 
Stockmann 
HEX General .. 
Prevtoa* : 1731 


39X0 .5®X0 
148 147 

6.11 6.10 
130 130 

150 147 

675 685 

70 74 

93X0 93 

250 250 

1 1922X4 


Hong Kong 

BkEast Asia 34.88 33.90 
Cathay Pacific IIJO 10.95 
Cheung Kang 37X0 37 

Chino Light Pwr 38X0 3SJ0 
Dairy Farm Inn 9X5 9.75 
Hong Lung Dev M.10 13X0 
Hang Seng Bank 59.75 5Bx» 
Hetvtorsvi Land 49.90 4840 
HK Air Ens. 31X0 31 JO 
HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Land 

HK Realty Trust 

HSBC Holdings 91X5 89X5 
HK Shang Htts 10.45 10X5 
HK Telecomm 15.90 isxa 
HK Ferry 10JO iojo 

Hutch Whampoa 35J0 34X0 
HvtanDev 20x5 19x0 
Jartune Math. 62X5 62 

Jardlnc Sir Hid 28X0 20X5 
Kowloon Motor 14X0 14X0 
Mandarin Orient NUB *7.70 
Miramar Hotel 17X0 17X0 
Nrw World Dev 2540 24x5 
SHK Props 
sreiux 
Swire Pac A 


14X0 14 

23X0 23X0 
19X5 19X5 
18 T7XS 


58X0 57X5 
3X0 3X0 
57X0 57 


Tpi Cheung Pros exs 9X5 


TVE 
Whorl Hold 
Whaelock Co 
Wing On Co Intt 
Wlnsor Ind. 

RWHS? 


30X0 29.90 
16.40 16.10 
9.70 940 
10X5 10X0 
9565X6 


Johannesburg 

28X0 28X0 


AECI 
Attach 
Anuta Amcr 
Bortews 
BtYvoor 
Buffels 
De Beers 
Diiefonfeln 
Gencor 
GF5A 
Harmony 

HtonveW Steel 
Kloof 

Nedoank Grp 
Randlontaln 
Ruspiaf 

SA Brews 

Sasal 
W e s tern Deep 

S3SSS??S$£S* : 


100 100 
243242X0 
33X5 33 

8X0 9X5 
41 40 

97X5 99 

64 64X5 
15X0 15X5 
120 128 
38X5 38 


34 34 


66 67X5 
38X5 38 

43X3 43X5 
112X0112X5 
99X0 99X5 
35.15 35 

195197X0 


London 


Abbey Natl 
Allied Lyons 


4 ns 


Argyll Group 
Aes Brlf Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BCC Group 
Boats 
Bowatar 
BP 

Bril Airways 
Brli Gas 
Brlf Sleel 
Brli Telecom 
BTR 

Cable wire 
Cadbury Sch 
Carodon 
Coats VI vet lo 
Comm Union 
Courtauhto 
ECC Graub_„ 
Erherprlse Oil 
Eurotunnel 
Flsgns 


4X4 

6.10 

2X5 

2.70 

5X0 

A95 

4X1 

2.16 

6.11 

5J8 

4X6 

1.07 

3X6 

7X1 

5X4 

4X4 

4X8 

3X3 

103 

1X6 

190 

3.10 

X74 

4X7 

2X7 

2JD1 

5X0 


4X1 

5.95 
2X3 
2jA 
5A9 

4.95 
4X3 
116 


3.48 

3X0 

2X3 

1X0 


544 

4X0 

1.08 

3 

7.10 

5.15 

447 

4.19 

3X5 

2.94 

1X9 

3X7 

3X5 

3X5 

4X9 

2X4 

1.97 

5X1 

4X2 

3.48 

3.74 

273 

1X7 


Forte 

GEC 

Genl Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

PUS 

Hanson 

Hlltsdown 

HSBC Hklgs 

■Cl 

Inc h groe 

Kingfisher 

Ladbroka 

Land Sec 

Laparle 

Lasmo 

Legal Gen Gru 
l la yds Bank 
Marks Sp 
MEPC 
Non Power 


Natwest 
NthWsf Water 
Pearson 
P.5 O 
Plikingtan 
PawerGen 
Prvdenllal 
Rank Ore 
Rockllt Col 
Red la no 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
PMC Group 
Ralls Hovce 
Rottttnn (unit) 

Rowii Scot 

Salnsbury 
Scot Newcas 
Scot Pmeer 
Sears 

Severn Trent 
Shell 
Sletae 

Smith Neahew 
Smith Kline 8 
Smith IWH) 

Sun Alliance 
TateSiLvie 
Tesca 
Thom EMi 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Goon 3» 
WeUaome 
Whtioread 
Williams Hdgs 
Wllllt Carroon 
FT M index : MIZM 


Clan Prav. 

2X3 

2X2 

2X9 

282 

5X3 

585 

628 

618 

All 

4X9 

1.91 

1X9 

4X8 

4X6 

5.71 

5X3 

2X3 

2X2 

1J4 

175 

7X0 

7X2 

7.91 

772 

4X0 

423 

479 

470 

1X3 

1X2 

6X4 

420 

7.30 

7.14 

1,47 

1X6 

4X4 

KJ 

5X6 


4X8 

4X2 

4.17 

4)5 

5X2 

495 

528 

522 

SX2 

5X8 

6.15 

417 

4X5 


1X8 

1X6 

5X9 

5X0 

127 

125 

4.15 

409 

5X8 

5X2 

4.71 

4X5 

7X8 

7J1 

4X5 

*74 

10X3 

9.90 

1J9 

1.79 

4X1 

426 

4X7 

446 

8X9 

8X7 

4.16 

409 

5.14 

5.03 

3X8 

3X2 

1.1D 

187 

5X1 

5X2 

7.13 

783 

5X5 

5X9 

1X8 

1X4 

425 

419 

4X8 

451 

JJO 

3X4 

4J0 

428 

2X1 

2X4 

9.9B 

977 

220 

221 

230 

228 

11X4 

1120 

3.17 

3.13 

2X1 

117 

*7.19 

*075 

6J0 

669 

5X1 

5X5 

3X2 

148 

1X6 

1X7 




FT 

Previous : 389SJ0 


Madrid 


BBv 3370 33]o 

Bco Central Hbp. 294S 2960 
Banco Santander 53CB 5200 

905 BB9 

im STBS 
1970 1970 
5990 5820 
161 162 
879 869 

4050 3995 
3660 3590 
1735 1715 


Banesro 

£lf 5A 

prooadas 

Endesa 

Ercros 

Iberdrola 

RcpsoI 

Tabacalera 

Telefonica 




1705 


lira 


Milan 

Alletmu looso 

Assl fella 1 0Q50 

Agtortrcdepflv 1610 
Bca Agrtmturo 2750 
BcaCommnr llal 3555 
Bcu Naz Lavoro 11410 
gca Pop Novara 
Banco dl Rama 
Bca Ambraslcno 
Bca Napotl rtn 

Benetton 

Credlta iiaitana 1663 
Enktiem Aug 
Fgrtln 
Flat soa 
Flnoru Aorolnd 
Finmeccanica 
Fondlaiio soa 
Generali Asslc 
IFIL 

jtotcementl 
nnuljTuuuiiLu 


BCE Mobile Cam 


Cdn Tire A 
Cdnt 



.1 West Ufecn 
Haas Inn Bcp 
Hudson’s Bay Co 
itnascn Ltd 
Investors Grp Inc 
Labott (John) 
LoWawCos 
Mo Ison A 
Notl Bk Canada 
Oahawa A 
Poncdn Petralm 
Power Carp ■ 
Power Fln’l 
Quebecar B 
Rogers Comm B 
Royal Bk Gda 
Sears Canada lnc 
Shell Cda A 
Sautham Inc 
Sleloa A 
Triton Flnl A 




43 * 42 Vt 
111% 11 
23* 23* 
7Vj 7* 
18* Wi 
IB* IBM 
12* 12* 
20* 20* 
13* 13* 
25* 25* 
38* 38* 
Id* 15* 
20* 20 
21 * 20 * 
19* 19* 
FW PM 
IBM IB* 
42* 43 

IB* IB* 
29* 29* 
16* 16* 
19* 19* 
28 28* 
8* S* 
43* 43* 
14* 14* 
8* B* 
3.95 190 
1B57J9 


Paris 


Accor 


629 *15 


Air Ltaulde 740 730 

Bteli 


A total Aisthom 43L50 mass 




Oureeura 
Clments Franc 
Club Med 
Elf-Aaullaine 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Earn 
Havas 
I metal 

LafareeCoopee 413X0413X0 
Legrond 7020 6870 

LvoaEoux 4S6X0 482X0 
Qreal (L‘) 114* 1140 

L.VJVLH. 863 848 

Matra-HadWtta 113X0 HO 
Mlchelln B 71 ABO 216 

Moulinex 111X0112X0 

Paribas 366.10 36(ua 

Pechtoev Inti idsxo 170 
Pernod- Rlcart 317X0 316J38 
Peugeot bzb BZ7 

Plnault Print 9B7 984 

Rodlotedmknia 525 515 

Rh-Pouiene A 137X0 i36xa 


Rati. St. LOutS 
Sonafl 

Saint Gababi 
S.^B. 

Sta Generate 
Suez 


1431 1410 

263257X0 
648 647 

565 561 

607 609 

264X0 262.10 


Ihomson-CSF 154.90 154 


Total 

UJLP. 

Valeo 


■ 334 334JD 
144X0 148X0 

■ 285 290X0 




1720 

4310 

,!'9S 




1*56 

3150 

12S0 


1585 

12300 

37758 

5690 

11150 


12100 

37950 

5670 


19450 


Pirelli sou 
RAS 

Rlnasceme 

Sm Paolo Tarina 9500 
SIP 4290 

SME 3*55 

Sniabpd 1966 

Stcndo 33600 

Stol 4075 

Toro Asslc 23300 
MIB TefetnaWco: 10253 
Previous : 102M 


2325 

18650 


9295 

4390 

3W5 

1935 


Montreal 


A to Lid i 
Bonk Montreal 


14* 14* 
34?b 25 


Market Closed 
The Sao Paulo 
stock market was 
closed Tuesday for a 
holiday. 


Singapore 


Asftl P oc Brew 1440 16XD 
Cgretaos n An urn 

CHvDjveiopmnJ 0js us 
MS' 4 Carriage 1130 13X0 

S||, 10.70 1048 

9|S Land . 4.92 4.98 

FE Lovlngston 7 7X5 

gPf££. n £ v ® IS 50 1480 

Gt EtKtn Ufa 27X0 28 

HongLjong Fin 4X0 4A2 
Ihcncooe cm ju 

.iurongShlgyard 13 13 

Kav Hkm J Cape I |J9 Tg7 
Keppel 13 13 

Nanteei 3 2.97 

NeohmeOrtem 2.17 2,13 
OCBC foreign 15X0 1530 
O' seas Union Bk 7.13 7u 
O'scas Union Ent 93s fxa 
Sembcnwana 11X8 uxo 
Slme Slnoopare 1.13 i.n 
Sing Aerespoca 2X8 2Xa 


Chow Prav. 
Sing Airlines torn 14X0 MXO 


Sing Bus Svc 
Sing Land 
Stag Petim 
Sing Press farn 
Stag SMpbldg 
Sing Telecomm 
Straits Steam 
Straits Trading 
Tot Lee Bank 
UM industrial 
UM OVa Bk torn 1630 16.10 
UM Oaeas Land 2.90 290 


9X0 9.10 
9 895 
2X6 243 
27X0 27 JO 
2X2 2X4 
3.14 3j06 
5X0 5XB 
3X4 3X0 
4X0 4X0 
1X8 1X5 


f^6S&r :UnM 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Aseo af 
A stra AF 
Attas Copco 
Electrolux B 


70 70 
536 536 
280177X0 
9B 77X0 
394 3H 


Ericsson 45. 5 jss 452 

Ewelta-A 95 95 

Handel shank BF 97X0 .99 

Investor BF 188 183 

Nor* Hvd re 24924650 
Ph ar macia AF 121X0122X0 
Sandvlk B 123 122 

SCArA 113 115 

S-E Ban ken AF 48. W 4190 

Skrmdla F t32 132 

Skonska BF 17X50 172 

5KF BF 134 133 

Store AF 440 435 

Trelleboni BF 112 108 

Volvo BF 138 138 

gSEETM 1 ” 1 - 67 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Baral 

Bougainville 
Coles Myer 
Coma ico 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodmwi Field 
1C1 Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nkw Nehnark 
N Broken Hill 


Pac Dunlop 


850 8X0 
173 3X6 

19.10 18X8 
3X8 3XD 
09t aw 
611 6X7 

5.10 £10 
1754 1754 

4X8 4X3 
1.12 1.14 
MB 1X1 
1190 I0JB 
1X5 2.10 
2X4 2X8 
10X6 10X8 
5X4 SJB 
NA NA 
3J5 123 
191 3X9 
120 12a 


Nmndv Poseidon 2XD 224 
QCT Resources 1 J6 1X5 
Santas 182 374 

TNT 2X6 US 

Western Mining 7X5 7 xo 
Weitpoc Banking 422 42J 
waoaslde 4X7 4X9 


itsermar™* 


Tokyo 


395 390 

745 742 

1220 mo 

1410 1400 
1550 1530 
1750 1750 
1250 1340 


Akal Electr 
Asa hi awmtoi 
Asahi Glass 
Bank or Tokyo 
B ri dg es tone 
Canon 
Cosia 

Dot Nippon Print 17W mo 
Datwa House 1CT 1330 
Daiwa Securities 1300 1260 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fuiltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Hondo 
Ito Yokado 
Itochu 

lapan Airlines 
tollma 

Kansal P ower 
Kawasaki Sleet 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec tads 
Matsu Eiecwks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Ml Hub Qwm tool 
MiHubjstu Elec 
MHsublsht Hev 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsui Marine 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulatars 
NlkkD Securities 
Nippon Kagaku 


topon Oil 
Ipaon SM 


4650 4620 

2040 2020 

2250 2240 

1050 HDD 
974 970 

780 767 

1690 1690 
5290 5270 
742 733 

KS8 716 
875 876 

2370 23S0 
434 423 

1040 1050 
915 916 

734 727 

7310 7250 
1530 1540 
1060 1060 
2190 2178 
556 555 

706 702 

749 740 

1200 1300 
053 055 

746 746 

9S3 955 

1380 1380 
1180 1160 
last 1020 
1030 10M 
947 925 

478 610 


Stool — 

Nippon Yusen 647 645 

NUan 791 788 

K 'i-Sii.ru Sec 1920 18HJ 

NTT 8760a 86400 

Olympus Optical UPO 1060 

Pioneer 2510 2SD0 

Rtoh 928 916 

Sana Elec 569 559 



Close 

Prav. 

Sharp 

1790 

1770 

Shlmazu 

708 

704 

Shlnetou Chem 

1900 

1890 

Sony 

5780 

5750 

Sumitomo Bk 

1760 

1740 

Sumitomo Chem 

580 

56* 

Surni Marine 

853 

845 

Sumitomo Metal 

341 

342 

Taljel Carp 

620 

616 

TakettaOieni 

1190 

1180 

TDK 

4540 

4510 

Tell to 

565 

565 

Tokyo Marine 

1150 

1110 

Tokyo Elec Pw 

7820 

2800 

Toppan Printing 

1430 

1430 

Term Ind. 
Toshiba 

752 

708 

753 

704 

Toyota 

2730 

2110 

Yamakhl Sec 

713 

499 

o.'jr MXt 




U.S. FUTURES 


VjaAuocMtou 


No.. 15 


Toronto 


AUtm Price 17* 
Air Canada 8* 

Alberto Energy 19* 
Alcan Aluminum 34* 
Amor Barrtek 31* 
Avenar 

Bk Nova Scotia 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 
Bombardier B 
BramalBa 
Brascan A 
Cameco 
CIBC 

Cdn Natural Res 
CdnOcdd Pet 
Cdn P . lBc 
Cascades Paper 
Cam Inca 
Consumers Gas 
OafCESCO 
Datnan Ind B 
Du Pant Cda A 
Echo Bar Mines 
Empire Co. A 
Fotonbridge 
Fletcher Chall A 
Franco Nevoda 
Guardian Cap A 
Hernia Gold 
Horsham 
imperial Oil 
taco 

IPL Energy 
Low taw A 
Laldtow B 
LoewenGroup 
London InsurGp 23* 
Macmlll Btaedel 17* 
Magna Intt A 
Maple Leaf FdS 
Moore 


25* 

27* 

45* 

25* 

21* 

2X9 

20 

29* 

31* 

17* 

33* 

20* 

6* 

25* 

17* 

IS* 

11 

17* 

15* 

13* 

22 * 

17* 

82 

8* 

14* 

19* 

47 


17* 

B* 

19* 

34 

31* 

27V. 


25* 

21* 

2X7 

29* 

32 

17* 


27* 

9* 

9* 

35* 


48 

II* 

24* 


Newbridge Netw 46* 


34* 

1®% 

17* 

46* 

T2* 

13* 

11 * 

20* 


Inc 

Noranda Fores! 

N o rcen Energy 
Nthem Telecom 
novo 
O nex 

Palm Canada 
Placer Dome .. . 
Potash Corp So&k 45U 

Proviga 5* 

PWA 0X1 

Quebecor Print 13* 

Renaissance Eny 31* 

Rio Ataorti 24* 

Sooo ro m Co 38* 

StanoConseM 15* 

Talisman Eny 20 

Tafegtobe 10* 

Telus 15* 

Thomson 16* 

TorOomBonk 2D* 

Transaita 14* 

TransCda Pipe 17* 

Utd Damlnton 27* 

Uta wostbume n* 

Wostcoast Eny 23 

Weston 39* 

Xerox Canada B 45* 


6 

18 

15* 

13* 

22 * 

17* 

82* 

8* 

19* 

*£ 

27* 

9* 

47* 

im 

24* 

44* 

24* 

S5 

13* 

2* 

44* 

s* 

0X9 

13* 

31* 

24* 

30* 

15* 


Season Season 
HW Low 


Oom High Low One Ov OcJnt 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOD 3060 bumnimm- dons B*r bumd 
4.18* 1X9 Dec 94 3X0 3X3 3L78 3JBW-0X2W 25.544 

4X6* 1X7 Mar 95 3.97 3.94V, 189* 3X9*-OIH* 29.151 

390* 316* May 95 UBUi 3X3* 3X9* 3X9* 4,590 

343* 111 Julto 338* 341V. 3J7* 338 -0X0* 10.908 

3X5 1X0 5ep95 342* 145* 142* 141 -0X0* 336 

3X5 152 Dec 15 152 3X4 3X2 15JW rD.D0* IS 

154* 3J4*JU|96 3X1 —0X0* 7 

Etf. sales 15X00 Man's, sales 12.179 
Man's open ini 70XM off 611 
WHEAT (KBOT) SXOO bl n-rtmum-aoPn ow DuPart 
4J3 'M 317*DkW l«y 194* 389* 1X453 

4X7V. 325 Mar 95 193 195* 190 190V.— 0X2* 14,913 

403 12l*Mnv95 175* 177* 173* 17J*-XXlta 2X» 

3L6BV. 116* All 95 3X5 147* 143 IQ* -0X1* 4J05 

177 129 Sep 93 145*— 0X2 86 

3X9* 154 Dec 95 153 -0X2 10 

Esr. sales NA. Man's, sales 3,9*9 
Man's open tnl 35X45 alt 517 
CORN (CBOT) 1X00 nuirH i t HMn - Ou ll a r a par buiUal 
X77 113'-. Dec M lift* 2. IB* Z16* 2.16* -0J0V4 98X76 

2X2* 123*Mar*S 24s 129* 2X7* 2X0 —0X0* 75X12 

2J0*Mov9S7J5 234* 2JJ 2X5* 29X10 

2X5* All 95 IXO'.i 2X1* 2X0 2AO*-OXO'A 39,241 





m 



HiHh 

Low Open 

High 

Low 

dose 

O* 

Oo.lnl 


11.18 May 90 1128 

12X1 

1228 

1231 

♦0X1 

33 

12.17 

11 J0 Jul 96 12.15 

1115 

12.15 

1220 

‘ IL05 

192 


Octta 



1213 

+ 005 


Ed. ides 140» Man's, ides 21X65 




Mon's open n* 16&5R4 UP 

2J65 





COCOA 

(NCSE) lOriMlClDnt-tnvkri 






1289 




2X20 


1077 Me 95 1310 

13* 

1310 

ms 

♦29 40,178 


1078 May 95 1337 

1363 

1337 



8X86 


122SJJ95 1340 

1389 

1358 


-25 

3X90 


IBM Sep 95 1385 

MDfi 

1385 


♦ 25 

1X78 


12*0 Dec 95 1422 

1422 

1422 

1438 

♦25 

5X88 


I3S0MCT M |*73 

1473 

1473 

t*« 

♦25 

5,1 » 






-25 

073 


Jul 96 




•25 

II 

Est.safia 12X02 Man's. sows . 22X05 




Mon's ooen 67X5B off 2017 






b 





111X5 

naxa 


— 0J0 

203 



11525 

11X75 

1 1495 

-0.15 15,721 



77840 

II7J5 

110X0 

*0X5 

5X1B 






♦005 

1.709 



12450 

124X0 

124J0 

*0X5 

915 






•0X0 

1.285 


109JDNOV 95 



125XS 

♦ oxa 

1,295 









Marta 



125X5 

*0x0 


Est. sales NA Man's. 0^ 

2XS5 





1 McvTiOpen W 27X52 up 751 






2X5 

2XTO 

170* 

2X3 

2X0* 

2X7 


7.04 

7.05 
7X5* 
7X6* 
6.12 
615 
6J0* 
6.16 
6X0 


iai* uu s,«i 

239 Sep 95 144* 2X6* 2X4* 2X5 -0X0* 1M0 

2J5WD0C95 2X9* 151 2X9 2X9V.-0XI I9,7BJ 

2JO*Mm96 25 a 257* 256 256 -0X0* 7*7 

_ 255* Jul 96 2X4 2X4 2X3* 2X3* M 

Esl.ades 35X00 Man's. uses 28,903 
Mon ’I open int 248,107 up 538 
SOYBEANS (CBOT1 unninMnun-woitaBaM 
757* 5X4* NOV 94 552* 5X3 351* 34016+0X4* 5JSJ 

137^ Jon 95 341 5X3 559 

147% Mar 93 371* 5X0* 5X9 

554 May 95 378* 384* 373 

5X3* Jut 95 3X2* 3.91 
344*Aue«3 5X6* £92 
5X1 Se»9S 388 392* 5X8 

5X0* Nov 95 393 399 5X3 

399* Jan 94 4JO 6JM 

399* Jul 96 MB 420 

Est. sales 45X00 Man’s, sales 37X72 
Man's open in> 136JB9 oh 1462 

50rBEANMEAL (CBOT) now . 

209X0 1 51X0 IXt 94 1 59 JO 141X8 >5190 159X0 

160X0 Jon 95 140X0 16180 140J0 140J0 
164X0 Mar 95 164X0 U7X0 16450 16310 
147.H May 95 1*9X0 171X0 148X0 149X0 
170X0 Jul 95 1700 17350 17140 174.10 
17100 Aua 95 176.10 177X0 175.90 17*50 —0.1 
17130 Sep 95 178X0 179X0 177X0 178X0 -05 
175.600095 179X0 181X0 179X0 100.10 
17650 Dec 93 18100 104X0 182.90 1B3X0 


340 40X3* 54X34 

377* *0X3’* 27,715 

5JWA -0X2* 14504 

5X2 5X9* ♦0.(0* 22X01 

386* 392 *0X3* 1X14 

' 390 -0X0* 60S 

397* tOOl* 0X15 

4X3 4X3* ♦0X0* 117 

MB 318 +0X0* 56 


20750 

20750 

307X0 

20300 

10240 

1B2J0 

181X0 

18320 


Jan 96 

Esi. sales 14X00 Man's, sain 0,789 
Mai's open ini 102.021. off 264 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) MPMtn-doH 


+ftl0 33J08 
♦aio 20X38 
♦ 050 18X20 
♦050 10X24 
-4150 9.99B 
2X01 

— 020 1,74? 

+32# 3J11 
+0J0 2X49 


18430 -0X0 


28X7 


15* 

16* 

20* 

U 

I® 

27> 

n* 

23* 

J9* 

4410 




Zurich 


BBCBrwnBavB 1099 1105 


Oba Gelgy B 
CS Holdlngi B 
EleWrowB 
Fischer 8 

intend tacount B 

JetaieiiB _ 
Landis GvrR 
Moevenplck B 
Nestle R 

Oerllk. Buehiie R 
Pargeso Hid B 
Roche HOg PC 
Satra Republic 
Sandaz B 
setondtor B 
sutzor PC , 
Surveillance B 
SwWBnkCarpB 
5«rtss Retraur R 
Swissair R 

ubsb 

Winterthur B 
Zurich Am B 


753 746 

EM 570 
359 354 

1440 1435 
1920 1O90 
000 80S 

731 730 

420 415 

1195 1193 
135 136 

1465 1480 
5760 5035 
107X0 107 

706 30 5 
7BOO 7450 

B90 aas 

1030 1000 
359 341 

782 ESS 
BM B45 
1206 1205 


1227 12 


Previous ; 


22X0 Doc 94 2750 
2265 Jon 95 2657 
22.91 Mor 93 25X0 
22X5MOY95 2445 
33.lt Jul 95 2430 

22.73 Auo 95 2450 
7275 Sep 95 23X5 
22.750095 23 JO 

22X0 Dec 95 2370 

2375 Jan 96 

ESI. sate 23X00 Mon-s.sdes 1B787 
Man *5 enon Inf 1IFX47 OH 185 


28J0 
so es 
77X5 
2750 
2475 
3455 
74X5 
2413 


27.15 

26.15 
2555 
3673 
2435 
3405 
23.95 
23X0 


27.15 

2617 

25X0 

21X5 

24X5 

2420 

23X5 

2370 

2345 


2678 

27.12 

2610 

2577 

VS 

2423 

23.90 

7377 

2370 

13X0 


♦0X7 35X99 


♦ 0JB [7,711 
♦0X4 14X02 
♦OXS 6767 
♦0X3 I JW 

— 0.05 1X35 
♦0X2 2X00 
♦am 3X14 

♦ OXS 5 


Livestock 


7425 
75.10 
69 JO 
4610 
6755 
6655 


4600 

B0.95 

BOJS 

76« 

7630 

73X5 

71X0 


71X0 

71X0 


CATTLE (CMER) nwetomti 
74J0 S7J0O8C94 70X0 7040 

66X5 Feb 95 4970 *970 

6777 Aar 95 49.95 49.98 

4430 Jun 95 6575 65J0 

4140 AIM 95 4442 4447 

64200095 4SX5 6505 

66 70 Dec 95 44X0 UM 

EsL sales 9,121 Man's, sales 9X14 
Mon's own IM 77X70 ,400 

CATTLE [CMER] JIUXSB 

71 75 Nov W 7457 7457 

71X0 Jan 95 75.10 7570 

7635Mar«S 73X7 7X10 

TO. 10 Aar 95 7775 72JS 

69X0 MOV 95 7170 71.70 

69X0 Ana 95 7140 
69.60 SOP 96 71X0 

Est. scons 437 Man's, sates 643 
Man's oeenlM 1X61 up 97 
HUGS (CMB9 w K 

50 JO EJODecW 3370 33X7 

SDXa 35. 45 Feb 95 3672 36X7 

34. 10 Apr ti 37.40 37.80 

41.57 Junta 47X0 4275 

4140 JUl 95 4270 42.75 

41.15 Aug 95 42X0 4275 

3870 Od 95 39X5 39X5 

39X0 Dec 95 41X0 41X0 

41X0 Feta 94 42X0 42X0 

H im 5X97 Mian's, vacs SXO 

Mien's open k* 37Xffl oft 4N 
PORK BELLI FS (CMER) «uw«n-< 
37X0 Fob 95 41X5 4tJ0 

37X0 04a’ 95 4115 41X5 

J&XSMOV95 42X5 42X5 

39.85 Jul 95 43.10 43.10 

lOTSAuavs 
Est. safes 1,123 Man's sates 1X30 
Man’s ooen ini 10.111 uo 41 


70.17 7077 

*9X0 49X7 

49X0 49X7 

45.41 45X7 

44X5 64.12 

64X8 6695 

6600 6600 


-0X3 77767 
—0X1 261B0 
—0X3 15X42 
— 070 5X17 

’ll? 

-070 7 


.-am Barb. 
74X7 74X0 

7475 7477 

72XS nm 
72.05 72.10 

71X0 71 JO 


— O.BS 1,798 
—0X8 4.311 
—0X7 1,167 
— 077 4*1 
— 0X5 414 


47 JB 
45.00 
41X0 
40X0 
41X0 
42X0 

EsI 


33X0 33X7 

3650 36X7 

37X0 37X7 

43X3 4272 

42X5 4272 

42.15 42X5 

3972 3975 

41X0 41X0 

42X7 42X0 


—0X3 75,1*4 
—070 11,914 

—o n 5X4 

—003 2XB3 
— 0JK 704 

-015 423 

—607 459 

79 


60X5 

ML20 

61.15 

54X0 

4400 


A85 41X77 

41J5 41.95 

42X0 4279 

4175 


—0X5 6.139 
-0-9) 1,240 
-0X5 351 

— OJQ 36* 
— 0X0 17 


Food 


CUFF EEC (NCSE) 37X00 in.- trm pwr to. 
34475 77. 10 Dec 9J 173X0 17600 1*970 

78.90 Mar 95 17075 101X0 17 LOO 

82. 50 MOV 95 ir 

HS-OOJulOi II 
1UX0Scp«5 II 

II JO Dec 95 li __ 

1 90.00 Mar 9* 107X0 117X0 104X0 

ESI. safes 12X41 Men's, safes 9X48 

Mon's O pchM 32.177 ua Til 

SUGAR -WORLD n INCSE) liUMOliv-cem 


244m 

244X0 

24610 

>30X0 

242X0 

203X0 


183.00 179 JO 
18475 18075 
_ 185X0 107X0 

3X0 187X0 11275 


171 75 
17690 
179X0 
18175 
103X0 
18375 
184X0 


—690 6339 
—5 25 14X93 
—4X0 5J08 
— 5X0 1.900 
-SJ0 971 
-60# 825 

—175 133 


1177 

mxuZTn 

13XB 

1172 

13J3 

1100 

-007100X00 

1174 

10J7May95 

lltt 

1170 

IL5B 

11X8 

36107 

13-n 

last juts 

IDS 

U* 

UJ7 

11* 

— OJB ii.sa: 

17.89 

10J?Oa95 

1280 

I2D 

17X0 

1281 

-0X7 I69U 

12 00 

10X8 Mar *6 

■ 7X8 

1100 

1717 

12X8 

■ 0X1 6322 


Season Season 
High Law 


Ooen HMl Law Close Cho OeJnt 


93.180 91 750 Jun 96 91050 92.130 92.070 92X30 — 10133J74 

92X70 91X405OPM 91.950 92X00 91.970 91.930 -M120JD1 

ESI. MK *81X25 Men's, sales 260X67 
Mon's open hit WMI. up 16731 


BRriKHPOUND (CMERJ i bit kum- riwm mi WX001 
1X436 1X500 DOC94 1X050 1X8*4 1^40 ]J46 —120 47X20 


Metals 


HI GRADE COPPBI MCNIX) .BXOOIn-iwnt italb 
120X5 77J3NOVW 130X0 I30JM 13000 

7575 Dec *4 1I7X0 130.10 K7J0 JWM 
76?o Jm 95 1Z7J» 127X0 127X0 12770 
raJMFed9S 1363! 

7X00 Mar 95 125X0 IZT.tO 124.90 1HJS 
9l.10Apr9S _ 122X5 

7685 MOV 95 111X5 1 21X5 121X0 3LX 
10410 Jun 95 1 19-35 

78X0 Jul 915 1 19 JO 170X0 119 JO 110X0 


127 JO 
13650 
125X0 
12650 
12030 
121X0 
117X0 
119X0 
117X0 
II ABB 

11630 
11575 
11170 
11230 
1 09 JO 


♦1X5 1.236 
♦1J5 32.611 
♦1X0 926 

♦ 0J0 

-US r 3,«i 
-XJ0 «0 
-1X5 UTl 
— 0.95 566 
-1X0 3X90 
— IJ5 


JUH 

Sep ?6 

Ed. soles 27.000 Men's, soles 16144 
Man's open W «X67 up 221 
SILVER fWCMXJ SXOOBuvol-amtiBeriravnt 
517X — 

597X 
5765 


11450 

11335 

—200 

—2X5 

159 



Industrials 

110X0 

—JJO 

1.851 




109 JXJ 

-2X5 


77.23 

0 09 Dec 9J 




107X0 

-120 

291 

7615 

62X0 Marta 

75X0 

»4W 

75X0 


—1X0 




7670 

77XS 

7670 

ID/ .00 








10670 

•7X0 


7470 

04X0 Od 95 







72X17 

6625 Dec 95 

7010 

70X5 

70.10 






71.00 

7100 

71.00 


4065 
4100 
403J 
4200 
61 2X 
622X 
5WX 


51 IX New 94 00.9 

JBDXDeC 94 521 J SS4.0 5205 527X 

401XJm95 5100 5100 518X 043 

4145 Mar 95 539X S33X 52*X OOJ 

410XMav95 536X 53SX 5360 S36.J 

420.0 Jul 95 542X 544X 5400 542X 

532J5ap95 5«0 

539XDee?S 557X 5505 S57X 5M.9 

5*70 Jen 96 541* 

5S4XMar9t 549.9 

5aiL5Mav94 577.1 

57 6X Jul 96 580.6 

S«P 9* 592J 

Ed.sofes 29X00 MOWS, soks WU 
Men's onan M 127X54 up 5745 
PLATINUM (NMER) sovavoL-di4nB«rira«oi 
43150 374X0 JOl 95 416X0 41950 41A50 417 40 

419X0 moo Apr 9S 422X0 42150 422X0 42Z.I0 

0)00 41000 Jul 95 42650 

441 ja 422.000095 431X0 431X0 431X0 43140 

439 JO 438X0 Jon 94 434X0 

Esr. sOes 6319 ftAtartsahn 2X0? 

(Men's open M 27,134 oH 10M 
GOLD (N04XI mororox- otflm wwwoi 
307.00 303XDMav94 304.70 

340X0 Dec 94 387 JO 387 JO 30680 387.* 

Jan 95 3B9.1D 

36150 Fab 95 39170 391X0 390 JO 391.10 

344J0APT9S 395X0 39570 394J0 39080 

34170 Jun 95 39670 39970 39870 39BJ0 

3BU0Aue9S 40270 402.90 40170 402 JO 

*1X00(7 95 404X0 

400 JO Doc 95 *7170 411X0 411 JO 411.10 

412J0Feb96 *15X0 

47870 Apr H 41970 

413 DO Jun M 424X0 424X0 42470 424X7 

Aug 9* 420X0 

Est. sales 15X00 Man's, sates 23.7H1 
Mon'S ooen inf 1*L*70 up 5378 


-46 35 

*4J 40.732 
•4J 

• 46 31.** 
-46 6519 
•4* 7X08 
‘4-t, 3.553 
-46 9X50 
■4.4 
-L4 

•4X 3X15 

-4X 

♦40 


>2.9017X73 
■:.«) 7.T77 
•2.90 1.974 
-LW 
•2.90 


42650 


41+50 

419.20 

429X0 

434J0 

mate 

431 JO 


-270 1 

■HO 75X73 
♦110 

-2.10 25X69 
•2.10 10X99 
-110 10790 
-2.10 7.960 
“ 2.10 2.191 
'210 9X86 
•110 
*110 

•110 5X58 
‘2 W 


Financial 


UST.BA.1-S (CMS)) iimawmainoa. 


7145 

71-55 

-025 

158 

9610 

9425 Dec 94 

94X5 

9455 

9448 

94.49 

—005 17X10 

71X0 

71X0 

-0.15 

24 

9SJ5 

93.95 Mar *$ 

94X4 

94X0 

91ta 

9196 

—0X6 10X00 





9410 

93X4 Jun 95 

*3X0 

91X7 

93X0 

93X1 

—0.00 6910 





*137 

91I9Seo9S 




93.16 

—003 77 


Est soles 4X30 (Man's, sales 2705 
Man's open Iff JJ747 up 625 

5 VW- TREASURY (CBOT) UH*ni,n.in*aaiViMM 
104-20100-105 Dec 94101-015 101-13 100-29 101-015 ■ 01 171 J96 
IB3-09 100-00 Mor 95100-7* 100-245100-105)00-145- 015 15.749 

99-1* Jun 95 99-305 ■ 0|S 10 

Esl. sales 50.000 Man -6 sales 43714 
Man's ooen Ini 1B677S up 2276 


ID YR. TREASURY (CBOT) .lOOXMe— pm*, b™** 
11+11 99-02 Dock 99-29 100-20 99-22 100-05 - C 8 
111-07 90-13 Mar 95 99-09 *9-28 99*0 99-11 . m 


27BL398 


97-27 Jun *5 98-10 90-25 96-13 
101-06 97-26 Sep 95 98-07 90-09 98-07 

110-31 97-12 D6C9S 97-25 97-27 97-25 

Est. sates 105,105 Mon's, sains BI.683 
Mm's open Mt 305.29$ ua 3000 
us-ntEASuny bonds icbod u«.hm 

114-00 91-19 Dec 94 97-00 90-04 **-» 

114- 20 *5-13 ftftar 95 96-10 97-15 **-08 

115- 19 94-17 Jun 95 96-01 »fc- 2 * *5-27 

112- 15 94-10 Sep 95 

113- 14 93-27 DOC9S 

ilf-SS S'! 3 «*»*49S-0S 95X5 95X14 
100-20 91-06 Junta 

93-25 93-05 5a>96 

Esl sales 415X00 Man's soles 373.743 
Man's Open im 450X64 UP 3595 


96-75 • 



98-0? • 



97-37 , 

OB 




16 






| ? 


96-0! - 






95-C4 - 



90-23 . 



94-11 - 

18 

1 


S’-* S^t'eS 5-10 S ^ 4 ° a, - J ’ 07-71 . U 77JJI 

■MP M«*SBI-«3 12-00 80-79 81-21 ■ 15 V>}j 


Esl sdos 6500 «torrt. sales 9.117 
Mon’s open ml 31,773 up 2526 
H«pDaLlJ}«(CMra> iirttawetawmpB 

91W0 93900 

ML3* Mar 95 91480 93X00 91320 *1400 
JHJS552? 91 “T® W-9IP 97.9M 
J TJAIO «A50 92.5* 97J50 

J115S U, ' ,S 72JMJ 92.35) 91! 5) 
40750*00^96 97 280 92.7.50 *2.140 92 I X 


96180 

96500 

94J30 

*4J» 

94JH 

90.220 


-70 417X83 
“-70422,91! 
— 40304J14 
—«:43.I04 
-XHM.7S7 
—701*1.765 


1X0* 1X640 Mar 95 1JB56 IJ07O 1J730 1OT0 -110 72} 

1X300 1 J34BJJm95 _ 1X714 -110 17 

Esr. tabs MX70 Man's, sate 12X46 
Man’s open m 4BJ65 off 731 

CANADIAN DOLLAR CCMBt) iwvor- 1 pamr*amaaauooi 
0.7670 0.7038 DOC 04 0735? 07344 07325 07320 -32 34X02 

07405 OJTOSMirVS 07354 07354 0.7326 07330 -31 2J09 

04990 JUT) 95 0.7338 0J33B 07330 17322 

0X965 SOP 95 07315 07335 07324 07215 

ft .’ft') Dec 95 07310 07315 0-7310 07300 

O73l0M<r 9* a728* 


07522 

074a 

074001 

07335 


Est. sate 5744 Man's, sales 1.924 


—30 1X22 
— 79 151 
—20 77 

—27 4 


Man's open M 30X65 Off 514 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) it 


permarte - 1 nak9*<aj<4stt0OOl 
0X731 05590 Doc 9* 06478 0.4493 06428 0X431 —46 87X16 

0X745 OJ010Mar«S 0X488 0X900 0X440 04444 -45 6724 

0X747 0.5980 Jun 95 04464 —45 1J08 

0X740 0^47 Sap 95 0X*5 —45 US 

Ed. SOU 34X14 Mon't- sales 49.729 
Men's caen int 95715 on 4707 

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or have announced similar plans. , e 

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It Is Interested 
In Chiron Stake 


Inflation , iVof Fluctuation 

That’s the New Job for Central Banks 


Earning s 

Double 
At Svenska 


Frankfurt 

DAX ■ 


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ConpUedby Our Suff From Dispatches 

4 ZURICH — Gba-Geigy AG 
said Tuesday it was holding 
talks to buy a stake in Chiron 
Corp., an American biotechnol- 
, ogy company. 

u The announcement con- 

;• hzmed rumors of the talks that 
'had been circulating on Wall 
Street since Friday. 

; Such a porchase could help 

1 Chiron secure its position as a 

biotechnology leader with an 
‘ample source of research money 
; while giving Ciba access to 
", Chiron’s research. Ciba already 
holds 6 percent of Chiron. 

But the Swiss company said 
there could be no assurance 
that a final agreement would be 
.reached. 

Ciba said the talks also in- 
' volved the contribution of its 
.diagnostic business and its in- 
terest in a joint venture with 
^Chiron to develop vaccines. 

*7 Ciba’s diagnostics business 
had sales of $445 million in 
1993. Tt makes equipment that 
' help doctors diagnose diseases. 
Chiron, which is based in 
Emeryville, California, said last 
week it was holding talks about 
selling a substantial minority 
stake to an unnamed buyer. 
Chiron's stock price jumped 20 
percent Friday. The stock rose a 
further 4 percent Monday, but 
" c»3 Tuesday it was off $2.00 at 

- $7225 in late trading. 

On Monday, Ciba-Geigy 

- bearer shares fell 3 percent, to 
‘ 746 Swiss francs ($575). Dealers 

said the negative market reac- 
tion had been linked primarily 
to short-term fears of a dilution 
erf' earnings and ignored the 
longer-term benefits of a strate- 

- gic alliance with Chiron. The 
'shares rose 7 on Tuesday, to 
. 753. 

’ A newspaper report Monday, 
citing unidentified sources, said 
■ Chiron was negotiating to sell a 
49 percent stake to Ciba for 
nearly $2 billion. 

Tuesday’s statement did not 
mention any specific figures, 
and a Ciba spokesman refused 
to provide them. 


Chiron and Ciba each own 
half of two vaccine ventures. 
Biodne Co. in the United State* 


and Biooine SpA in Italy. 

This year Chiron said it was 
interested in reaming up with 
Ciba-Geigy to buy American 
Cyanamid Co.’s $354 roillion-a 
year vaccine business. 

Ciba had 72 billion Swiss 
francs in cash and marketable 
securities at the end of 1993. 
and analysts have said it would 
have no problem financing a 
major acquisition. 

A stake in Chiron would give 
Ciba access to Chiron's re- 
search and development pipe 
line and products including 
drugs, eye products, vaccines 
and medical tests. Chiron 
would get money to continue its 
research. Research costs at 
Chiron consumed $140 milli on 
last year, or 58 percent of its 
revenue. 

Ciba-Giegy, based in Basel, 
Switzerland, is a world leader in 
biological and chemical prod- 
ucts. Its sales amounted to 
$15.3 billion in 1993, including 
nearly $4.5 billion from phar- 
maceutical products. 

Its American division, Ciba- 
Geigy Corp., based in Ardsley, 
New York, is a leading develop- 
er and manufacturer of health 
care and agricultural products 
and specialty chemicals for in- 
dustry. 

Chiron is involved in four 


main businesses — drugs, diag- 
nostics, vaccines and eye prod- 
ucts. This year it introduced Be- 
taseron, the first drag to treat 
paralysis stemming from multi- 
ple sclerosis. 

Analysts said Ciba’s possible 
acquisition of a stake in Chiron 
reflected the Swiss company's 
need to strengthen its position 
in the biotechnology sector. 

Mernrad Gyr, an analyst at 
Credit Suisse, said a strong bio- 
technology sector was “a must” 
for any pharmaceutical compa- 
ny to remain competitive and at 
the forefront of research. 

(AP, AFX Bloomberg) 


By Paul Lewis 

,Vtn- York rmifi Service 

For the world’s central bankers, the stage 
these days may be smaller, but their role has 
become bigger. 

in the 1980* when Paul A. Volcker was 
chairman ot the Federal Reserve Board and 
Karl Ouo Pdhl led the Bundesbank, central 
banker* starred in Lhc drive to curb global 
inflation, sharing top billing with the finance 
officials oi the seven largest industrial coun- 
tries. in moving currency rates up and down to 
cope with trade imbalance*. 

Now, their successors are playing to small- 
er crowds, limited primarily to the domestic 
Scene. They have largely abandoned efforts to 
act hi unison oi lix exchange rates, particular- 
ly after rhe collapM: of the European Mone- 
tary System iwo years ago. 

Within that narrower drama, however, the 
cenual bankers an li - inflation cause — bol- 
stered by the growing power of traders in the 
freely fluct uating capital markets io call the 
tune — • has taken over center stage. 

Indeed, the meeting Tuesday of the Fed’s 
moncuuv policy committee tms produced an 
interest-rate increase motivated as much by 
bond traders demands foi a show of Fed 
resolve to fight inflation as by any strong 
indications that price* are about to rise. 

Central bank* still intervene in currency 
markets occasionally a* the Fed did recently 
when it bought dollar* to stem the currency'’* 
decline against the yen and Deutsche mark. 

But there has been no repeat of the Plaza 
Agreement of 1985, when the United States 
and its major trading partners united to drive 
down the dollar. Nor has there been the kind 
of concerted inieivention that took place two 
years later under the agreement reached at the 
Louvre in Paris to halt the dollar's slide. 

"There has been nothing comparable to the 
Plaza-Louvre agreements — probably be- 
cause governments' hearts aren’t in it any 
more,” Mr. Volcker said. “They are reluctant 
to set exchange-rate targets these days.” 

But in contrast to (heir declining power 
over currency movements, cen ural bankers are 
gaining more authority domestically. 

Politicians, struggling everywhere to curb 
public spending and no longer sure that cheap 
credit creates jobs and popularity, are increas- 
ingly granting their central bankers the stature 
and independence they need to fight inflation. 

A growing number of countries, emulating 
the Ge rman and U.S. models, have given their 
central banks more leeway to set interest rates 
on their own. But even as central bankers are 
eclipsing politicians in setting monetary poli- 
cy, they are findin g their own starring roles 
constricted by legions of private investors in 
the capital markets. 

"Central b anks are becoming more inde- 
pendent because that is the best assurance 


they mil follow a stable nyninf Jaiionan mon- 
etary policy, 5 ' said William J. McDonough, 
president of the Federal Reserve Bank of 
New York. 

Moreover, Mr. McDonough contended, a 
stable domestic policy also should pay divi- 
dends internationally. 

“Low inflation is the best assurance of 
exchange rale stability;” he said. 

Apart from keeping inflation low, central 
bankers acknowledge there i* little they can 
do to impose stability on floating currencies 
This was aptly illustrated at the annual meet- 
ing of the International Monetary Fund and 
the World Bank last month in Madrid. 

Officials there declared that misaligned 
and volatile exchange rates inflicted sigmfi- 


"While their role in setting 
currency values has waned, 
central banks under the 
German and American 
models are getting more 
power to curb prices. 


cant damage on a country’s economy. But 
when C. Fred Bergsten, director of the Insti- 
tute for International Economics in Washing- 
ton, suggested that central banks act to en- 
hance stability by setting official exchange- 
rate "target zones” and intervening to defend 
them, be got little support. 

Hans Tieuneyer, president of the Bundes- 
bank, said the power of global traders to 
move markets "sets limits to formalizing ex- 
change rates.” 

Except for the United States, Germany and 
Switzerland, most countries have long given 
elected officials, rather than the central bank, 
powers to set rates directly. This has tempted 
politicians to manipulate monetary policy. 

"Central banks under the direct control of 
governments seem inevitably to be templed to 
promote easy-credit policies, particularly when 
elections are near,” Mr. McDonough warned. 

Academic research suggest* that indepen- 
dent central banks preside over lower rales of 
inflation. In 1993. Alberto Alesina of Harvard 
University and Lawrence H. Summers, now 
the senior international official at the Treasury 
Department, showed that Germany and Swit- 
zerland, which have the most independent cen- 
tral banks, also have bad the best record on 
inflati on. The United States, the Netherlands, 
Canada and Japan were dose behind. 

A third group of countries — including 
France, Norway, Sweden. Britain, Italy and 
Spain — has more politically subservient cen- 
tral banks and poorer inflation records. 


C emptied by Our Slttff from Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Svenska 
Handel sbanken AB said Tues- 
day that a reduction in its provi- 
sion for loan losses helped its 
operating profit more than dou- 
ble in the first nice months of 
theyear. 

The bank posted an operating 
profit of 3.18 billion Swedish 
kronor ($441 million), up from 
1.29 billion kronor in the first 
nine months of 1993. Earnings 
were helped by a 59 percent re- 
duction in the loan-loss provi- 
sion, to 114 billion kronor. 

Problem loans, which are the 
sum of net bad debts and re- 
duced-rate loans, fell 41 per- 
cent, to 7.36 billion kronor. 

But the bank’s interest in- 
come fdl 14 percent in the peri- 
od, to 6.46 billion kronor. That 
reflects a fall in the amount lent 
by the bank and shrinkin g mar- 
gin* between lending and de- 
posit rates. But this trend 
showed signs of reversing in the 
third quarter, the bank said. 

Keith Brown, an analyst at 
Morgan Stanley & Co. in Lon- 
don, said the results were in line 
with expectations and that most 
analysts had expected the lower 
loan-loss provision. 

The bank's expenses rose 3 
percent in the period, to 4.23 
billion kronor. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 


m 



J JA S O N 
1994 


Exchange 


Amsterdam 


Frankfurt 
Frankfurt 
HatetaM 
London . 
London 

Madrid 

Mian. 


AEX • . ' 

Stock Index 

DAX ' ' 

FAZ 

HEX 

Finendat Times 30 
FTS61Q0 
General Index ™ 
MtBTEL 
CAC40 


Stockholm 

Vienna 

Zurich 

Sources; Reuters, 


Stock index 


Close 

41231; 

7,208.67 
2,110.75 
7B1.13 ' 
1,922.64 
2,407.80 

304.62 

10253 

1,95433 

U921-S7 

419.74 

91WR 


“j'jfl'SON"' 

.1064 

Close 'Change 
4oafla *g6q 
7,183.59 .*035! 

2.089.29 +103 

785.73 *0.69 

1,931.47 -046 

■■■• jjjggtgy. y+Egs 

3.095.30 4=1.30. 

300-2* . >1.26 
,10264 ; -0-11 

. 1,94198 -40-69 
1,91338 +0.44 

419.21 44X13 

917.61 . +0.04 


Inicnuliorul Hcnlil Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Banesto Figure 

Accused of Fraud 


• Boots Co. bought back 96.13 million of its shares, or about 8.2 
percent of the total outstanding, in a move aimed at bolstering 
earnings per share. 

• British Telecommunications PLC said it won a “very large” order 
from Microsoft Corp., to develop a data communications network 
in Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. 

• Zurich prosecutors launched a preliminary inquiry into possible 
insider trading in connection with CS Holding's takeover of Neue 
Aargauer Bank. 

• France said the number of new jobs rose 0.4 percent in the third 
quarter after climbing 0.6 percent in the second. 

• Fiat SpA is negotiating to take control of Sevel Argentina SA, 
Argentina’s largest auto maker, a Sevel official said. 


Agence Fnntee-Presse 

MADRID — Mario Conde, 
the Former president of Banco 
Espanol de Cn&dito SA was 
charged Tuesday with fraudu- 
lent management of the bank, 
judicial sources said. 

The National Audience, 
Spain’s highest prosecuting au- 
thority, filed the charges. 

Nine other members of the 
former Banesto management 
team are bring prosecuted as 
well. Mr. Conde and his former 
colleagues are accused of falsifi- 
cation and embezzlement. 

Banco de Santander SA 
bought Banesto in April as pan 
of a rescue operation. 


• Sedgwick Group PLC. a British insurer, reported a 19 percent 
rise in profit, to £78.1 million ($124 million), and cited an 


rise in profit, to £78.1 million ($124 million), and cited an 
exceptional profit from the sale of units in the third quarter. 


• General Accident PLC of Britain said its pretax profit rose 56 
percent, to £321.6 million, in the first nine months. Analysts had 
forecast profit of between £323 million and £355 million. 

• Daimler-Benz AG’s chairman -elect, Jflrgen Schrempp, predicted 
dramatic improvement in results for the company this year after 
the sharp loss in 1993. “The direction of the group is good,” he 
said. “The turnaround in the results in this year will be clear.” 


• Germany’s Economic* Ministry said it would make slight 
changes in the way it released monthly data to try to avoid leaking 
information to the market*. 

• Egypt mil offer the private sector a role in power generation next 
year. Electricity Minister Maher Abaza said. 

• Royal PTT Nederland NV said it would group its multimedia 
activities in a new company. PTT Multimedia. 

Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters. AP. Kmghl RulJcr 


senior lDena managers 
Cut Their Own Salaries 


Telefonica Says 
9-Month Net Rose 


RATES: Fed Fuels Divergence 


VOLVO: Vehicle Sales Power Firm to Record Profit 


Bloomberg Business News 

MADRID — Ten senior managers at Iberia Air lines 
agreed Tuesday to take a 15 percent salary cut — the same 
sacrifice they are asking of the national airline’s workers to 
save it from bankruptcy. 

A news release signed by Juan Saez, the company’s chair- 
man, and nine other members of its board said the reduction 
was “indispensable for the viability of the company.” 

Iberia’s management has asked unions to accept a 15 
percent pay reduction and 2, 1 20 job cuts. The company had a 
loss of 69 billion pesetas ($543 million) last year. 

Javier Salas, the company's president, said last week that 
unless costs were cut severely, the airline could gobankrapt m 
early 1995. A cost-cutting plan is also necessary for European 
Union approval of a 130 billion-peseta subsidy that Ibena is 
seeking from the Spanish government. 


Bloomberg Busina* Vf»j 

MADRID — Telefonica de 
Espana SA, the national tele- 
phone company, said Tuesday 
its group net profit for the first 
nine months of 1994 rose 17 
percent, to 86.61 billion pesetas 
($682 million). 

Telefonica said its profit on a 
parent-company basis rose 6 
percent, to 67.81 billion pesetas. 
Demand for services rose 13 
percent. 

Telef6nica’s gross revenue to- 
taled 1.03 trillion pesetas, up 
from 934 billion pesetas a year 
earlier. Operating income rose 
to 289 billion pesetas from 278 
billion pesetas. The company’s 
shares rose 20 pesetas to 1.735. 


Cotumoed from Page 15 

U.S. economy’s performance 
on a cyclical baas, there also 


was a “qualitative difference.” 
The U-S. recovery, she said, has 
been led by consumer spending 
productivity gains and invest- 
ment, whereas Europe’s recov- 
ery has been fueled by exports 
and capital investment, with 
consumer demand still weak. 


Many economists say, how- 
ever, that interest-rate trends 
are likely to be more in step 
with one another by the middle 
of next year, as the pace of 
European and Japanese recov- 
eries picks up. 

John Lipsky, chief economist 
at Salomon Brothers Inc. in 
New York, said that in 1995 the 


economic growth rates of the 
United States and Europe may 
be similar, but the United 
States is more likely to be in a 
“decelerating mode” while Eu- 
ropean and Japanese growth 
will still be accelerating. 

The prospect of interest rate 
trends converging again next 
year also means that European 
and Japanese equity markets 
could outperform the American 
market in 1995. David Hale, 
chief economist at Kemper Fi- 
nancial Service* Inc. in Chica- 
go, said that for investors, “the 


key to Europe and Japan 
should be stable interest rates 


should be stable interest rates 
and large corporate profit 
gains, while the U.S. offers ris- 
ing interest rates and decelerat- 
ing profit gains.” 


Continued from Page 15 
Renault that was established in 
1990. 

“Early this year management 
said they could not survive as 
an independent car company," 
said Keith Hayes, an analyst 
with Merrill Lynch. 

“What has now changed,” he 
asked, except that the company 
now “has all sorts of cash?” 

In the first nine months of 
the year, Volvo’s efforts to slim 
down and concentrate on its 
core car and truck businesses 
earned it 4.2 billion kronor 
from sales of holdings in other 
businesses, including property 
and petroleum. Analysts expect 
the disposals to bring in addi- 
tional gains of as mud) as 40 


billion kronor over the next few 
years. 

Faced with the need now io 
develop and produce new car 
models, the question is whether 
the company should press 
ahead on its own or wail until 
— as company officials say they 
are keen to do — it is able to 


nately resulting in overly long 
delivery times.” 


Analysis attributed the de- 
lays to the fact that the compa- 
ny is already running flat out 
and badly needs to reach a deci- 
sion on whether to pour cash 
into boosting capacity*. 


sign up new partners that can 
share the immense development 


share the immense development 
costs with Volvo. 

“Volvo ha* the cash.” said 
Susanne Oliver, an analyst with 
CS First Boston. “The question 
is, can its car operations ever 
produce a return big enough to 
justify the investment?” 

Mr. Gyll added urgency to 
that debate Tuesday by admit- 
ting that “the strong demand 
for cars and trucks is un/ortu- 


In spite of ns strong sales 
figures, many analysts insist 
that Volvo still faces a dim fu- 
ture as an independent carmak- 
er unless it can forge alliances 
to develop new models with 
other manufacturers. 


Mr. Hayes, for instance, de- 
scribes the prospect of shovel- 
ing money from divestitures 
into developing new car model* 
as “frittering away the family 
silver.” 


Tuasday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices ȣto 
the closing on Wall Street and do notrenea 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Pro 


(Continued) 


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Page 18 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


V 


Enron Plans Solar Plant in Nevcula 

$150 Million Says Sun Can Compete With Fossil Fuels 


By Allen R. Myerson 

New York Times Service 

DALLAS — The largest natural-gas 
company in the United States is betting 
$150 million that it can succeed where the 
government has so far failed: producing 
solar power at rates competitive with those 
for energy generated from oil, gas and coal. 

Enron Corp. plans to build a plant in the 
southern Nevada desert that would be the 
largest operation in the United States malt- 
ing electricity from sunlight, producing 
enough for a city of 100,000 people. It is 
expected to begin operating in late 1996. 

Grand promises in the late 1970s about 
the potential of virtually pollution-free re- 
newable energy sources such as solar ener- 
gy have faded into an embarrassed hush. 
But several leading American specialists 
on solar power have said that Enron’s 
optimistic goal is probably reachable. 

The reason is that during the last de- 
cade, the cost of solar power generation 
has declined by two-thirds. Far from de- 
pending on some wondrous breakthrough, 
the specialists said, Enron can offer com- 
mercially competitive solar power by inex- 


10 


m in the Neva- 


employing thousands of i 
da desert. 

Even the most optimistic supporters of 
solar power have doubted that they would 
see commercially competitive production 
until the next century. The Woridwaich 
Institute, an environmental group in 
Washington, said this year that solar-cell 
electricity, which now costs as little as 20 


cents a kilowatt-hour, might fall to 

cents by 2000 and 4 cents by 2020. 

But Enron is pledging to deliver the 
electricity at 5.5 cents* a 'kilowatt-hour in 
about two years. That would beat the aver- 
age rate of 5.8 cents currently paid by the 
iXS. government for the electricity it uses. 
The average retail rate in America is 8 
cents. 

Several legal and political obstacles re- 
main, and for competitive reasons Enron 
will describe its technology only in general 
terms. 

Enron's 100-megawau plant would be 
more than a dozen times the size of any 
other that employs photovoltaic, or solar- 
power, cells. These cells use the sun's energy 
to shake electrons loose from molecules of 
silicon or other substances. Size is the key. 
said Sigurd Wagner, a professor of electrical 
engineering at Princeton University. 

“If a good group of people puts a plant 
of tha t scale in, it will have a real conse- 
quence on costs,” be said. “Jt’s not going to 
go down by just a little bit, but by a factor 
of two." 

As for whether Enron’s goals are realis- 
tic, Mr. Wagner said, “They’re pushing it, 
but they’re not far off.” 

The company already has preliminary 
support from the U.S. Department of En- 
ergy, which tentatively plans to buy En- 
ron's solar power as long as the rate is truly 
competitive with the power from conven- 
tional sources. 

Government officials said Enron’s suc- 


cess would encourage the spread of solar 
power in the United States and abroad. 

“If they can do this, they’re going to 
have lots of business,” said Tony Catalano, 
director of the Energy Department’s pho- 
tovoltaic division. “Inis is going to be very 
competitive in the US. and lots of other 
places in the world." 

Enron has asked the government to buy 
or guarantee a market for its power for 30 
years. It also depends on leasing govern- 
ment land, receiving federal tax benefits 
for renewable energy and financing con- 
struction with tax-free bonds. 

William H. White, deputy secretary of 
energy, has proposed having the depart- 
ment’s Western Area Power Administra- 
tion. whose grid connects Hoover Dam in 
Nevada and other projects with large pub- 
lic power authorities, buy the power gener- 
ated by the solar plant That power would 
be available only during daylight hours, 
but those are hours of high demand, espe- 
cially for air-conditioning. 

Previoos efforts to promote solar power 
as a clean alternative to fossil fuels have 
foundered despite hundreds of millions of 
tax dollars spent on solar research. Solar 
power has b<ren considered relatively ex- 
pensive as fossil-fuel prices have declined. 

U.S. officials, aware that solar-power 
breakthroughs have shone and faded al- 
most as often as the sun, said the Enron 
project could introduce commercially 
competitive technology without expensive 
government aid. 


BEER: DDE Needham Worldwide Grabs Lucrative Budweiser Account 


Continued from Page 15 

mg Budweiser and Bud Light 
was probably a big factor in 
Anheuser-Biikh's decision — 
for instance, there could now be 
more campaigns teaming both 
brands — it helped mightily 


managing director six months 
ago, was equally philosophical 
about the loss. 


have coined famili ar Budweiser signments. There were other creative officer at D’Arcy Ma- 
slogans from “Where's there signs of tension in the last year, sius Benton & Bowles in St. 
life, there’s Bud” and “King of such as Anheuser-Busch’s un- Louis who became the office’s 
beets” to “Best reason in the happiness that a DMB&B me- 
world to drink beer'’ and dia unit. Televest, had agreed to 
“Nothing beats a Bud.” handle some media buying du- 

^ _ Four weeks ago, the agency ties for Miller Brewing Co. But ^ ^ ^ 

that 'sales of Bud 'Light*™ brought out a huge campaign few expected a change of this m ^ past'lO months," hesaic£ 
growing, while Budweiser sales carrying the theme. Its always magnitude. . “gaining more than $170 mfl- 

were slowly declining. Indeed, been true; this Bud s for you. Its a gnat disappointment y 0D - m new billings” from ac- 
Anheuser-Busch said during echoing one of Budweiser’s to us, said Roy Bostock, chief including Blockbuster 

the summer that Bud Light most popular themes, which ran executive at the New York head- Corp., Trans 

would become the top-selling 1979 to 1990. _ _ quartersrf D Arcy Masius Ben- world Airlines Inc. and Ral- 


“ We’ve really been on a roll 


ton & Bowles. 

Budweiser served as a corner- 
stone account for the agency as 
it grew through the decades. 


corp Holdings Inc.'s Chex cere- 
ids. 


Those billings equal or slightly 
exceed the Anheuser-Busch as- 
signments that D’Arcy Masius 
Benton & Bowles will lose to 


U.S. light beer, ove rtakin g its D’Arcy Masius Benton Sc 
longtime rival. Miller Lite. Bowles also created campaigns 
“That’s what’s at the heart of such as the “Bud Bowl," which 
this move,” Mr. Goldman said, used special effects to simulate 

“As they say, nothing succeeds football games between bottles helping it attract other clients, 
like success.” of beer during the last six Super “On the other hand,” Mr. 

“Anheuser wants to give Bawl professional football Bostock added, “in this busi- 
DDB Needham the opporiuni- championship games. Though ness over the last 10 years, the DDB Needham Chicago and the 
ty to work its magic with the derided as corny, it has helped large agencies have all been ot “ er agencies; Blockbuster, for 
Budweiser brand,” he added, build beer sales in midwinter, a subject to some shock of this , example, us probably the office's 
Although Bud Light sales are traditionally slow time of the kind. You have to be realistic biggest account, ahead of An- 
expected to increase by 10.9 year. and understand that.” hetiser-Busch. 

percent this year from 1993. ac- In retrospect, Anheuser- When D’Arcy Masius Ben- Mr. Claggett said be had not 
cording to Mr. Goldman's esti- Busch's decision last month to ton & Bowles completes its had time to determine whether 
mates, Budweiser sales are ex- assign Bud Bowl VII to DDB work on Budweiser, he said, there would be layoffs in St. 
pected to decline 5.1 percent. Needham Chicago rather than “we’il talk to anybody in the Louis, but he added, “with all 
D’Arcy Masius Benton & to D’Arcy Masius Benton & brewing business," including the new business we’ve won, 
Bowles and its predecessors, Bowles foreshadowed the shift Miller. we’ve got a number of open 

dating to D’Arcy Advertising, of all the brand’s creative as- Charlie Claggett, the chief positions," 




Business 
Opportunities 
the UAE 


i n 


Offsets, Privatization and Capital Markets 


Abu Dhabi December 5-6 


The United Arab Emirates is set to experience rapid economic expansion as its economy diversifies 
away from reliance on oil and gas reserves. 

join our prestigious panel of speakers by taking up one of the limited places at this major 
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gain up-to-the-minute information, as well as the opportunity to meet representatives of international 
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MX\FtT/N fV7£\F*/ET-rs\ 


BOOZALLEN & HAMILTON 


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an international law firm 



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¥£) Electronic Systems 


E-SYSTEMS 



WESTLAND 

HELICOPTERS 


Newport News Shipbuilding 

A Tenneco Company 


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International 



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A 


DASSAULT 


The Chase Manhattan Privaii Bank 


MXSEEEEMl 


\ CHASE 


C O NFEREN < f S PO N S O R S 


*71 | w ivTtKwfiimt! erne 

Hcralo s ^fe,(!>nbunc. 


jLilagjl j+IaiJI 


Fur further infurtnaiiiin. or in a-RLster tiir the o. inference. please 
complete the fumi below jmi .send or fax to: 

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WCZE9JH Tefc (44 71) 836 4802 Pax.- (4-* 71 ) 836 0717 
The conference fee is WAOO 

□ Please scad me further infarnuUion. 


□ Please inrotc*. 


rule First n.ime. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


Page 19 


«SIA/PACim 


lviatsushita’s lst-Hall Net 


TOKYO — Matsushita Elec- 
tric Industrial Co. said Tuesday 
that stronger overseas sales and 
cost cats helped its net profit 
rise 49 percent, to 23.8 billion 
yen ($240 million), in the six 
months ended Sept 30. 

The maker of consumer elec- 
tronic-products said sales rose 
4.7 percent to 337 trillion yen, 
and that home-dectronic and 
information and industrial 
equipment had posted the 
strongest gains. 

Overseas demand was dearly 
the driving force in the latest 
period. Overseas sales jumped 8 
percent despite the impact of 

then’s appreciation, to 1.71 

uflhoii yen, or 5 1 percent of the 
total,, while domestic sales 
edged op only 1 percent to 1.66 
trillion yen. 

As a- result oF the improved 
economic conditions, Matsu- 
shita raised its . forecasts for 
both sales and profit for the full 
year, which ends in March 
1995. 

praised its prediction of net 
pnffit 20 percent to 72 billion 
yen. Its previous forecast in 
May, expected sales to be little 
changed for the current year. 


but Matsushita now expects a 
3.9 percent advance, lo 6.88 tril- 
lion yen. 

Sales in Matsushita’s home 
electronics division rose 12 per- 
cent as a revival in consumer 
demand and a summer of re- 
cord high temperatures in Ja- 

Nomura’s Profit 

Takes a Tumble 

Agence Francv-Pmse 

. TOKYO — Nomura Securi- 
ties Co. said Tuesday its pretax 
profit for the sit months ended 
in September fell 84 percent 
from a year earlier. 

The brokerage concern said 
lower trading volume in Japan 
was one reason pretax profit 
dropped to 8.7 billion yen (S89 
million) from 55.5 billion. Net 
profit plunged to 1.6 billion yen 
from 253 billion. 

The company said revenue 
had fallen 14 percent, to 291 
billion yen. Commission in- 
come fell 12 percent, while un- 
derwriting and distribution rev- 
enue rose 39 percent, to 57 
billion yen. 


pan fueled sales of air condi- 
tioners and some other 
appliances. 

A boom in sales of home fac- 
simile machines, portable tele- 
phones and compact disk drives 
for computers, as well as strong 
overseas demand for factory- 
automation equipment, drove 
up sales 1 3 percent in the infor- 
mation and industrial division. 

Video sales slipped 2 percent, 
and overseas demand helped 
lift sales for audio equipment 
by 3 percent. 

Electronic component sales 
advanced 5 percent, as semi- 
conductor demand grew both at 
home and abroad. 

Matsushita makes the Pana- 
sonic, Technics and Quasar 
brands. 

Matsushita’s entertainment 
sales Tell 4 percent, to 258.8 bil- 
lion yen, as the rise of the yen 
reduced the growth of dollar- 
based revenue from its U.S. en- 
tertainment subsidiary, MCA 
Inc. 

Despite uncertainty over the 
ultimate control of MCA. many 
analysts expect the consumer 
electronics business to stay on a 
steady growth path. 

(AP, Reuters ) 


Taiwan Still Wary on Foreign Funds 


Bloomberg Business News 

TAIPEI — Taiwan should restrict stock in- 
vestments by foreigners in high-technology com- 
panies, Liang Kuo-shu, the central bank gover- 
nor, said Tuesday. 

According to a summary of his remarks pro- 
vided by the bank, he said that high-technology 
companies were the driving force in Taiwan's 
economic development and that excessive for- 
eign stock ownership could crowd out local in- 
vestors. This could in turn cause volatility in 
share prices and open the door to hostile take- 
overs, he said. 


“This is an industrial policy problem.” Mr. 
Liang was quoted as saying in the Commercial 
Tunes on Tuesday. 

Rules on foreign stock investment in Taiwan 
are among the most burdensome in Asia, foreign 
securities industry executives say. Authorities 
generally restrict foreign ownership of shares 
acquired at the Taiwan Stock Exchange to a 
maximum of 10 percent of a listed company's 
total. 

Individual foreign institutions are allowed to 
buy no more than 5 percent of a company's 


shares at the exchange. Investment in technol- 
ogy-related companies is currently covered by 
these rules. 

Securities authorities, who favor liberalization 
of rules on foreign stock funds, have tried for 
more than a year to have both ceilings lifted, but 
the cabinet has not yet agreed to any such move. 

The central bank has generally opposed any 
relaxation of rules because of concerns that in- 
creased inflows of foreign funds would tend to 
push up the Taiwan dollar and make Taiwan’s 
exports more expensive. 

Securities authorities recently proposed a pub- 
lic hearing on policies toward foreign stock in- 
vestment, and the central bank supports holding 
a hearing as long as people with varying opinions 
are allowed to speak, a bank spokesman said. 

Taiwan has allowed foreign financial institu- 
tions to directly purchase shares at the Taiwan 
Stock Exchange since 1991. The country bans 
stock purchases by foreign individuals. 

Besides restricting foreign ownership of indi- 
vidual shares, the government has imposed a 
ceiling on direct investment by foreign financial 
institutions, and it requires foreign investors to 
obtain permission before bringing in funds. 


China Family Car 
May Get Mercedes 
Or Porsche Input 


Reuter, 

BEIJING — The luxury 
carmakers Mercedes-Benz 
AG and Porsche AG of Ger- 
many said Tuesday they 
were among 12 global car 
companies dial have entered 
an informal contest for the 
chance to be involved in the 
manufacture of a boxy, 
cheap vehicle destined to be- 
come China's “family car.” 

Both leading German car- 
makers covet die increasing- 
ly voracious market for pri- 
vate cars in China, where 
sales are forecast to soar 
from 350.000 this year lo 3 

million by 2010. 

Getting in now, they said, 
was crucial to taking a share 
of a long-range market de- 
scribed by the official China 
Daily as "about 300 million 
potential car owners." 

Both uQveiled their en- 
tries at news conferences in 
Beijing and were to give de- 
tailed private presentations 
at the Ministry of Machine- 
Building Industry. 

Mercedes-Benz, Porsche 
and other European. U.S 
and Japanese carmakers will 
use the private meetings this 
week to push their visions of 
the perfect car for the Chi- 
nese family. 

The competition was an- 
nounced in May when Beij- 
ing. reversing decades of 
support for public transport, 
decreed that a capital-inten- 
sive family car industry 
would become an economic 
pillar of its emerging “so- 
cialist market economy.” 

The two German compa- 
nies’ entries were similar — 
boxy minicars with ad- 
vanced technology and 
prices low enough for Chi- 
na’s nascent consumer class 
— but their strategies dif- 
fered sharply. 

While Porsche is loathe to 
lend its pedigree name to a 
cheap Chinese-made car. 
Mercedes is wanner to the 
idea, seeing the China mar- 
ket as central to its long- 
term strategy. 


Jiirgen Hubbert. a board 
member, said market reali- 
ties were forcing Mercedes 
lo accept change. 

“Research shows that de- 
mand in developed coun- 
tries will not go much be- 
yond 36 million to 37 million 
cars a year, while in the next 

German luxury 
carmakers see 
growth in Asia. 


20 years ail growth will be in 
China, Southeast Asia and 
similar places,” Mr. Hub- 
bert said. 

“To participate in this 
growth, you have to produce 
cars at a cost level that peo- 
ple here can afford. We have 
to understand that with this 
kind of development, we 
cannot remain only as an 
upper-luxury carmaker.” 

The question is whether 
the Mercedes name and em- 
blem should grace the hood 
of a Chinese-made minicar 
selling for as little as 
$10,000. 

Mercedes has begun mov- 
ing toward a car for the 
masses with its A -class in 
Europe, a design Mr. Hub- 
bert said would be easy to 
adapt Tor China. 

Mercedes has not decided 
exactly how it would pro- 
ceed with the project, now 
being called “Family Car 
China,” if its design is ap- 
proved, he said. 

Porsche is taking another 
approach lhaL it hopes will 
protect the exclusivity of its 
brand name, while enabling 
the company to tap China's 
market potential. 

Noting that Porsche 
makes sports cars and pro- 
vides automotive engineer- 
ing to others, Wendelin Wie- 
deking. the company's 
president, said any cars that 
it might make for China 
would not be called 
Porsches. 


Daewoo 
Warns on 
Labor Costs 

Compiled In- Our Staff From Dupaidia 

SEOUL — The cost of factory 
labor in South Korea now out- 
strips that in Britain, although 
productivity remains relatively 
low, the president of Daewoo 
Electronics Co. said Tuesday. 

Bae Soonhoon said the world 
electronics industry had exces- 
sive production capacity and 
that labor costs in South Korea 
were a potential time bomb that 
could undermine Daewoo's in- 
ternational competitiveness. He 
said the industry faced a period 
of slow growth, making survival 
the bottom line for companies 
like Daewoo. 

Mr. Bae said average wages 
for workers at the Daewoo Elec- 
tronics factory in Kumi. South 
Korea, were SI 300 a month, 
compared with an average of 
$1,200 a month at its factory at 
Antrim in Northern Ireland. 

He said Britain’s per-capita 
gross national product was two 
and a half times that of South 
Korea, yet South Korean labor 
costs were about 5 percent high- 
er than in Britain. 

“How long can we sustain 
these high labor costs? Either 
GNP growth should be faster or 
labor costs go down,” Mr. Bae 
said. 

He said the country should 
aim for double-digit growth in 
the next few years, and he criti- 
cized the government for hold- 
ing growth to single digits be- 
cause of inflation worries. 

If labor costs continue to rise, 
“labor will manage the econo- 
my,” he said. 

As for expanding into North 
Korea now that the government 
has lifted some restrictions on 
trade with Pyongyang, Mr. Bae 
said the North may have an 
emotional attraction for Kore- 
ans but was not attractive in 
business terms. 

He said North Korea’s rela- 
tively small population did not 
make the country as likely a 
target for expansion as China or 
some other Asian countries. 

But he warned that South 
Korean companies should in- 
vest in the North if Seoul want- 
ed to avoid a mass migration of 
North Korean workers to the 
South in case of reunification. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


HOOD 

* , iK 

22000 

■* 

10090 A 

S. I i. 

“M W 

“Vvi 

mSf™ 

m Sr 

20000 

J j A SON 

^'J J A S O N 

19000 J JASON 

1994 

1994 

1994 


Exchange Index 

Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore . Straits Times 
Sydney AM Qrcfiriaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuata Lumpur Composite 
Bangkok SET 

Seoul Composite 

TalpeJ Weighted f 

Manila PSE 

Jakarta Stock Inde: 

New Zealand NZSE-40 

Bombay National hr 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 


SET 

Composite Stock 
Weighted Price 
PSE 

Stock Index 


National Index 


Tuesday Prev % 

Close Close Change 

9.56S.G6 9.378.92 +1.99 

2341.18 2.326.94 +0.61 

1341.40 1,926.50 +0.77 

19,391.68 19,261. 45 + 0.68 

1,069.74 1.04431 +2.44 

1,49635 1.477J84 +1.29 

1,125.80 1,128.57 -0.25 

6381-80 6.393 27 -0.18 

2^27.70 2^909.40 +0.S3 

Closed 513.38 - 

2,042.63 2,054.61 -0.58 

1,832.72 1,925.17 +039 


1,496.85 

1,125.80 

6£81J0' 

~2£27.70 


2£42.63 

1,832.72 


lniL'.-n.iiii>rjl IL-nld Tntam- 


Very briefly; 

• South China Morning Post (Holdings) Ltd. plans to increase (he 
circulation of its newspaper in China to 8.000 daily from 5.000 
and hopes to add a mainland printing facility. 

• National Australia Bank Lid. is expected by banking analysis to 
post full-year earnings of between 1.65 billion dollars and 1.76- 
billion dollars ($1.24 billion to $1.32 billion), which would be the 
highest ever for an Australian listed company. 

• News Corp. debt was upgraded to positive from stable by 
Standard & Poor’s Corp.. which said the media giant should have 
enough funds to pursue its expansion plans. 

• The Japanese Department Store Association said sales at Tokyo 
stores fell 4.5 percent in October from a year earlier, their 32nd 
consecutive monthly drop. 

• Yamaha Corp.’s pretax profit more than doubled, to 6.1 billion 
yen ($62 million), in the first half of the year, helped by brisk sales 
of audio equipment and cost-cutting. 

■ Australia’s drought could wipe as much as one percentage point 
from gross domestic product growth and raise consumer prices, 
government officials and the National Farmer's Federation said. 

• The Karachi Stock Exchange plans to rerise its 100-share price 
index to reflect a threefold increase in market capitalization and 
the listing of 190 companies over the past three years. 

• Japanese prosecutors arrested Kazuhikc Takizawa. a doctor 
from Chiba, on suspicion of having violated securities law when 
he sold shares in Nippon Shop Kaisba Ltd. last year. The arrest was 
the first to result from an investigation of insider trading. 

• Hong Leong Asia, the industrial arm of Hong Leong Corp. of 
Singapore, bought a controlling stake in Henan Xinfei Electric 
Ctx, a leading refrigerator maker in China, for about 300 million 
yuan ($35 million). 

• Vietnamese banks started issuing checkbooks to individuals in 
Hanoi under a pilot program launched by the central bunk. 

Roam. AFP.'aP. Bloomberg. XnighlRulJer 


Liz Claiborne to Suspend 
Business Links With Burma 


New York Tana Sorrier - 

NEW YORK — Uz Clai- 
borne Iikx. one of the largest 
apparel makers in the United 
States, will suspend business 
with Burma in protest over hu- 
man rights abuses under the 
country’s authoritarian regime. 

Jerome A. Chazen, the chair- 
man of Liz Claiborne, said last 
week that the company could 
cot “support the activities’’ of 
Burma’s current govemment- 

The decision may be largely 
symbolic, as Burma provides 
less tha n I percent of the voj- 
ume of goods that Liz Clai- 
borne buys from other coun- 
tries. China, where the 
company does considerably 
more business, has also been a 
subject of human rights com- 
plaints, but Liz Claiborne has 
no plans to re-examine its com- 


mitments there. a spokesman 
said. 

Clothing industry analysts 
said news of Liz Claiborne's de- 
cision could nevertheless de- 
press Burma’s apparel industry. 

Burma, which nas a popula- 
tion of 43 million, is controlled 
by a military junta that seized 
power in 1988. 

In 1992, Levi Strauss & Co. 
suspended business with Burma 
after learning that the militar y 
junta owned an interest in sev- 
eral apparel factories. 

PepsiCo Inc- which has a mi- 
nority interest in a bottling oper- 
ation in Burma, and Unocal 
Corp-, which is planning a $1 
billion offshore pipeline there, 
have received shareholder reso- 
lutions in the last few weeks ask- 
ing them to end their opera tions 
there, company officials said. 


On December 8th. the IHT plans to publish 1 1 
a Sponsored Section on i ; 

European Union: 
Profiting From Partnerships | 

Among the topics to be covered are: ! 

■ How cohesive is the Union? j 

B New members: How many, and when? 

■ Cross-border investment. 

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B Corporate partnerships and joint ventures. 

77ns supplement cwriatfes 
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For further information, please contact BSlMahder 
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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


AMEX 


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Tables include (he nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not re flee 
(late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
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Diif YU PE lflfc HUh Low Latest Of qe 


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73%15%Kirbv _ 29 2626 17ft 

19% 8'. '.Kit Mfs -12 3 11% 

ia 4 KlearVu „ _ 745011 

10% AVsKovEq _ 55 190 Sft 

6 'Vi.LXRBIon _ _ an i 

3% 1 La Berg _ 11 194 1% 

227. 13% Lancer _ 17 I ll 18% 

17 13ft Laminar 1.00 68 Id 19 17 

9% 4%Larizz _ d 8 47+ 

9V, S Laser _ 9 lea 5ft 

7V- T'n LsrTech _ 34 15 3*1, 

9’S 6*iLazKdP _ 19 124 9ft 

52 39 LehAMGNB94 58 _ 3 51 

9ft 3%LBEurwt _ ... 5 4% 

25' s 24 LetvSTeln _ _ 13 24% 

19ft 16% LehAIVU n 180 13 ._ 30 19% 

38 29*'tLeflORCL 2J1 4J „ 23 37 

13 l%LaJY95w» _ 117 l'Vi, 

d'-> 2*11 LeJY9dwl _. _ 275 3 

22VulSY,l_aVem J8 1.7 12 <71 16% 

'.11 fta Lilly un _ _ 3 *0, 

57ft 3'/, LitfldAd 44 117 7% 

14% 9 Lumen _ 13 S3 13% 

15% 6%Lurlo _ 9 56 7% 

32ft 22 LynchC _ 19 10 30% 


_ 40 443 17 

- - 204 3V„ 

>A _ 10 8% 

- - 921 34% 

- ~ 56 3ft 

_ - S27 10 

- - 12 9V, 

8 i» 30 lJ’i? 

- - 4911 159. 

_ _ JO 2*A 

- - 32 2*ft 

IA 0 24 15ft 

... , _ 4033 3Hn 
-164 658 1 Sft 

- - 30 % 

- - 10 2"/is 

- — 80 6 


227 8V4 

35 1ft 


- 21 
JO 2.0 33 

.73 Oh _ 
- 100 


24 415 47V. S> 47'. — 
27 Ift 1ft I'A —ft 


>8 3'% 3% JV„ 

63 2*i. T-n 2V.« 


12 5ft SV, 


3 51 
5 4% 

13 24% 
20 19% 
22 37 
117 l'Vi. 
275 3 

<71 16ft 
3 V'n, 
117 7% 

S3 13% 
56 7*, 

10 30% 


lift 11% —ft 
2'Vi, 3 

8% Bft —ft 
34% 34% — % 

3 2 _ 

9% 9% -ft 
9ft 9ft _ 

■%, -1% 
11% 1IW + % 
ISft 151, -ft 
2 'A 2V. —ft 
2'/a 2+, —Vi, 
15% 151. —ft 
3*'r. 3Vi. — 
14ft 14% _ 

% % -Va 

2'V,, 2'Vi, -ft 
5% 6 

^.i 7% —ft 
ft ft — v. 
4% 4V„ _ 

S% 6ft -ft 
V„ *„ — V» 
a 3% 3*f — % 
6 A 

7% 7% — % 
IV, I'.i —ft 
16ft 16% _ 

18ft IB'-, —ft 
d 7% 7% —ft 
7% BY. _ 
4% 5 
% % _ 
10% 10% _ 
Ift 1% - 

2 2 

44% 46% —V. 
6% 6% _. 
6% 6% - ft 
446 SV* - % 
21ft 22 >ft 
9ft 10 

4 6% —Vi 

14 14 

5 5- 

4% 4ft —ft 
3% 3% _ 

16% 17ft -ft 
lift 11% _ 

10 icr.. - ft 
Bft Bft -% 
- 

1 Vi, 1 ft — Va 
17% 18ft -1% 
16% 16% —ft 
4ft 4ft _ 
5% 5% -ft 
3% 3% — V. 
9ft 9ft - ft 
50% 50% —Vs 
4% 4% _ 

24% 24% -ft 
19% 19% -ft 
36ft 36% - % 
1% 1% -V H 
2% 3 

16ft 16% - 

Via "in — 
6% Aft — 1 ft 
13ft 13ft - 
7V« 7ft -ft 
30 30% ->4 


16% UftNrlhbv % 

J7 

2A 

15 

9 


15% 

15% — % 









7ft SftMumac 








13% E’.MCAPI 

JBQ 8.1 



9ft 


9% 


14ft 9ftNFLPI 

J5 

78 


119 


9ft 

9’. 

-% 

1 S'/D 10 NGAPI 

.74 

78 


167 


i 9ft 

9ft —ft 

14ft 9 NMDP12 

68 

7J 


534 

9ft 

9 

9% 

-V, 

14*6 lOftNMOPt 

.70 

AJ 


20 


lift 

11% 

-ft 

14 9 NNJPO 

.73 

78 


19 

9% 

9 ft 

9% 

- V. 


JO 








13% 9>-,NNYPI 

.74 

S.l 


K. 

9ft 


9ft —ft 


Jt. 

79 




9ft 


ft 

14 ft 9%NVAPI7 

88 

78 


41 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft —ft 

14% 9ft NUVWA 

J8 

7J 


193 

10ft 

10ft 

10% —Vi 


14% 7ftOOUep 


10% SftOSuOunC J8 3.1 13 83 
36 21 OhArt J40 8 20 6 


38ft ZSftOlsten J4 J 22x1572 
3+si"'uOtaen wt _ 

lift 9ftOneLJbt 83c 7.7 11 


17’. 1 lift OneLb pi 180 9J - 13 


3*4 ftOmlteEn 
17ft 7'sChtnwn 


21 'A 1 5V> OnentB % 33 2.0 T 5 

7% 3'iPLCSyS _ _ 763 

3 7 » 2 PLM _ 44 

17% 13'. PMC .94 7.0 15 1M 

16' * l4ftPSBP 180 108 13 11 

62% 46' FcEn ptA 4J6 9.1 _ Z200 

69' iS0ftPc£npfD 4.75 9.1 _ Z200 

103*401 Pt£n tKE 784 9A _ 2500 


22% 16’SPGEptA I JO 88 _ 6 

20ft 15% PGEofB 137 82 - 18 

18ft 14 PGEpeC 125 M _ I 

18%13ftPGEp*D 1JS 3.9 .. 9 

Idft ISViPGEpfE 7J5 9.1 - 4 

lBft 13% PGEpftJ 120 BJ _ 24 

ldft lift PCEpfl 1.09 8.9 _ 1 

27%22ftPGEpfM 1.96 BJ 46 

28 Vi 22*a PGEptO 2.00 0.5 _. 14 

28ft 23'- : PGEpfP 2.05 BJ - 7 

MV. PGEphp 1 Bft 8.9 _ «W 

26ftl9%PGEpfU 1.76 88 - 7 

25% 16% PGEofX 1.7? &9 - 137 

4% 7%PacGole _ _ 15 


18ft 14% PacGIf n -57 » 38-65 


6 2’s PaoeAm 

11% 4 PWHKwt 
t's 2 PWHKpwl 
5ft 3VlPWHK30w1 
Ps IVuPWHK OQpwf 
9ft 9 PWSPMia 
3% 1 ft FWUSJ Wl 
61. 3'sPWDYn wt 
4ft ftPWUSDwt 


_ 23 

.. _. 53 

_. _ 56 

.. 1025 
_ 67 

28 

_ 720 

_ _ 38 

_ - 2S 


14 Vi 10ft PWPI MU- 9C261 

7ft2«V„PnmHld - - 

40 34ftParkNs .92 U 15 
UftUVsPorPtd 180 77 12 

15ftl2 ParPK 1.04 8J 11 


16 14'sParPf3 1.28 SJ II 12 


P. 2*«PavFon 
IV: 'iFeerTu 
24%13":PeflGld 


- 31 40 

- _ 11 
■10e J - 1492 


lift 10% 11 
9 Sft 9 
31 30 30 - 

33 ft 32ft 33 
2% 2% 2% 
10% 10% 10% 
idft 16’., Idft 

Vn '-’n ’ft • 

IS*. 14% 15ft 
15% 15% 15% 
d'A 6 6 

7ft TV. 2ft 
13ft 13ft 13ft 
1SV, 15ft ISft 
48ft 48ft 48ft 
52 52 52 

81 (99ft 81 - 

17ft 16% 17ft 
15V d 15% 15% 
13ft a 13% 13ft ■ 

14 V. 14 14 ' 

13% 13*4 13% 
13% 13% 13% 
12% I2'.i 12ft ■ 
27ft d 22 ft 22% 
23% 23V. 23% 
23% aZ3% 23% 
21ft 201. 21 

20 20 20 
19ft 19 19ft 
3 Vs 3", 3% 

15 14’s 14ft 

3 JVu 3 
Pa Jft 4ft 
2 'A 2’s 2’-. 
3% 3"u 3*. 

l>a 1% 1ft 
9". 9ft 9ft 
1 % 1 % 1 % 
4% 4% 4ft 

I • • ^ 

10% tav, 10% 

6ft 6", 6V, . 
39% 39*. 39% 
IT. 13 13 ■ 

13 12% 12% ■ 

IS 14% IS 


521,39%PenEM 1.10a 28 9 53 


- 44% 34 PermTr 


2S% 10% PenPE 1.88 9.9 fi 62 
7ft 4*sPenOb JO 4 1 14 K 


13% 9’.«PeriniC 


24% 21 PemCPt 2.12 9 j rl 


11 23 ,% d 4*. 4% —ft 

44 la 4 3'-< t ?<v ta — v„ 

._ 20J 3% 2% 2‘V‘u 

... 10 3% .. 

> MS 8'.! Bft av, -ft 

11 3 TV., 3'i-, 3'4„ — 


4ft 1- *Pews 
4>s "/uPTYlxLOS 
AVs 2*, PttxNef 


_ 18 10 

_ - 30 


73 12% 12% 

IS 14% IS 

4ft 4 4 

'I. 'ft 

14*, 13ft 14%. 

42 47*, 42 

CO". 4Q 40 

79 ISft 19 
4'V„ 4ft 4'. 
!G% 10ft 10ft 
23ft 23 23 

2 2 2 


9% 3%SBMlnd _. 42 

42% 34 SJW 2.10 68 10 

4>/ u 1HSOI InO - 19 

13% 4*iSctk5am * -. - 

1% ftSahaGpf 87111 J _ 
■Va ViiSoJnr wt _ _. 

17% 12 Scwni A0 2J 15 
53y, 41 ScAAMGN rtLlB 61 ... 
39'S 23% SalDEC 2J3 7J _. 
17% AMSalHKwTta _ -. 
96 79'ASUMSFT 3.99 4J - 
38% 28% SdORCL 2J0 6J- 

J9%33V.Sc» 3 RIn 107 8J- 

29ft 1 Sft Sc«NPLn2L12 138 _ 
47/i, 3%5oBn«l .. _ 

12% 8ft Sermon 1.00 a 69 9 

14 9%5Daap«B .ID U - 
26ft219>SDgo pAH 182 63 _ 

9% 5% Sandy .16 28 9 

10% 6%SMonBk - 62 

1% ftScandC - - 

11% 7% Sceptre _. 19 

6% 3V,5chen, _ _ 

17%17'ASchult .16 IJ B 
20S 168 SbdCp 180 8 10 

lSftlOYnSNas JJ 61 10 

6% 3 SemPck - 48 

1% "ZaSemPk wt _ _ 

3% lWuSemtch _ IS 

10% SVaServico _. 28 

5% 3% Servo tr _ 10 

9% 3%SnefklMd _ _ 

16% 9 ShttCms 86 J 8 
8% 5%ShwdGp _ 6 

4 Vi 2% She PCO JO 167 _ 
7 3%SBnlTedi - 6 

7% 3%SUvFdsn _ - 

25% 4% Simula - 47 

12*6 3%Stoe«75uP _ 171 

39V4 24ftSmniAOA A4 IJ 10 
40 23%Smi1hAO J2 28 10 
lift SViSmtBln 80 a 68 - 
15% I2*6SmtBrnM 85 P 68 - 
9 5% Sonnet _ _ 

15V, U*65CEdpfC 184 9.1 - 

16% 12 SCEdPfD 188 67 - 

1 7% 13ft 5CEd piH 1.19 9.0 _ 

21%15VsSCEdptG 1A5 9.1 - 

24 20%5CEdptP 184 67 _ 

23%16'ASoUCai .911 61 39 

7%2'VuSwnLiee -- ~ 

191. 9%SwnLfepf IJS 161 - 
6ft 3V,Spar!ch - 7 

rh 3ft SDcCTim -. 

11% V'aSpOClVll _ 

S*i ZVsSulSuP wt _. _. 

r/a 7%Spar1sCn _ _ 

5ft 7% Stage .12 17 _ 
CSViATVeSPOR 1.1 Be 2J 

10ft 6 SarrtH 25 13 13 
35% 24% Stepan 88 2.9 18 

21% 14 Stephen _ 16 

7% dftShTCan J5ellJ - 

13ft 9ftSleriHUn - _ 

71. 5 StvGpA - 45 

5% 4%5torPr J2a 6J 10 
lift I'AStrutner _ - 

17% 0% Style Via - 10 

10% 2V a Sulcus _. -. 

11% SftSumtTx .84 9.9 - 

6% 2%SunOv - 31 

3ft l%Sunalr _. 38 


882 u 14% 9ft 14ft ' 
3 3S+1 35ft 35ft 
536 3</ u 2'V« 3 

71 4% 4% 4% 

BA ft V, % 

216 Va d '7 b Va 
43 16ft 16% 14ft 
1 52 53 52 

57 35V, 34% 35Vs ■ 
5 7 7 7 

72 93% 93 93ft 

24 37ft 36% 37ft 
54 35ft 34% 34ft 
66 15ft 15ft 15% 
75 4% 4Va 4ft 


10 lift lift lift - 

3 11 11 11 .% 

■ 3 22ft 22 22 —ft 

103 6ft 6% Aft -ft 
20 8ft 8% 8% - 

7 lYu IVu 1 Va „ 

3 Sft 8'i Bft —ft 

4 4V, 4V5 4ft —ft 

7 12ft 12ft 12% - 

1 171ft 169*6169**— 1*6 

5 10% 10ft 10ft _ 

53 5'.’. 5% 5". -"A 

2 IVu l*u 1ft. +*u 

55 2% 2ft 2ft -ft 

145 10 9*6 9*. —ft 

10 4% 4ft 4ft -ft 

43B 4% 4 4ft -ft 

23 lift 11V< lift <D, 
42 AW 6 ft AW _ 
51 3*a 3 3 — Vu 

55 3ft 3'Ya 3*Vu —ft 

20 4% ti'/i, 4 1 Vi, - 

1014 25ft 22% 22% —7ft 
9 Sit 5 Sft -ft 

1 25ft 25W 25ft - ft 

647 25 Vj 25 25% -ft 

188 9ft JJft 9ft * V, 

40 I?ftdt3ft 12ft —'4 

2 Aft 6ft 6% + ft 
9 Uftdllft 11% —ft 

2 12% 12% 12% - ft 

1 13ft 13V. 13ft —ft 

3 16 16 16 —ft 

37 21ft 201, 21ft _ 

75 17% 17% 17% -ft 

1462 3ft 2"ft 3W _ 

408 lift d 9ft 109, *% 

168 5W 5% 5% -ft 
33 3% 3% 3% —ft 

B50 Uft % Vu -Vu 

29 2ft 2ft 2ft - Vu 
£4 7% TV, 7V, - 

163 4ft 4W 4ft _ 
3144 47Yr ‘Wft 46% — «» 
28 7 W 7V, 7W -ft 

157 32% 30 ft 30% — 1% 

27 15 14*6 14*6 —ft 

2 6ft 6% 6% —ft 

67 9% 9ft 9% —ft 

40 7 6% 6*6 —ft 

5 P/4 Sft Sft -ft 

145 2 Ift 2 


6 Ift US Ale 
25 9 USA) Of 

9ft 4*sUSIntC 
23 17'rUSFGP 
3ft l'VitUndrFn 
6ft 4%uniMri 
7ft 4ft UniftoY 5 
10 8*4 Ltnimar 

8H 4’i LYwgMW 

12% Bl.LtnCaP 
2% 1V..UFOOOA 
5ft l%UGrdn 
8ft 4%UMabH 
lift SftUSBKKd 
3P1 22ft US Call 
9ft 4ftuniteiv 
2 O’* 15%UN1TIL 
BV. SftUnyPat 
1% -aVTX 
7 5 'a 10ft VanyRs 
12 Bft VK Cal 
14ft 9'iVKMAd? 
14% 9ft VKFLO 
15% lOftVKMAV 
15 9% VKNJV 

15ft 9 VKSelS 
14ft 10V.VKOHV 
B r/oVREF I 
7ft SftVREFII 
1% %VtRsh 
4ft 2*. Versor 
55ft 2IW Vtocsim 
49 '.4 21*6 ViOCB 
B Sftviocmn 
2ft IV'rtViac wt 
3*1, WVtoc Wtc 
5ft 2ftVlocwt£ 
10% AftVlrco 
l*u ftVltrortc 
15 10 VoyAZ 

15ft 10% VavCO 
14ft 9ft VOyFla 
17 13 VOYMN 

IS", 9*lVgyMN2 
IS BftVovMN3 
22*4 19*6 VuKCP 


U-V 

1174 4"*i, c'ft 4»U — ' 
JO )5 - 3 W'k 

. 14 20 6 5% ,| - s — 

I.Wa.M - ^ 17ft 17% 17 


.11 7 0 10 

_ IS 
1.72C1B.1 _ 


6 10 ‘ 8 5% Sft Sft —ft 

IS J 4ft 4ft »•* 

, 7? 9' , 9ft 9ft -ft 

_ 35 5 4'Y,« 5 —ft 

'J 12 108 9W Ti 9", -. 


I 40 J1 2 2 ,2 — ' 

_ 35 30 1'*:, 1% 1',— 

JO 6.7 13 14 7"r 7ft 7*, - 

„ _ 321? BV. 7 ”» 0 

31B8 >102 32"i 31% 31’» — W 

19 59 Aft 6ft 6ft —ft 

J4 7.0 9 I 17ft 17% 1; > — * 

_ 54 6ft 6*, 6-s —ft 

_ .. 220 ft ’;•• 

JD SJ 11 4 12ft 12ft 12% -% 

72a 7.9 _. 47 9'.. 9 9'<s - 

83 8.6 _. SS0 9% 9'i 9% ■ ft 

.730 ?A _ 47 9ft 9'y 9ft -. 


■73a 78 " 47 9ft 9ft 9ft -. 

83a 7.9 _ 82 lOVndlOIl 10ft — "* 

J4o 78 _. 17 9ft 9% 

83 9.0 ... 219 9*. 9ft 9*4 —ft 

,77 a 7J 12 10' . lOVi I0'.i _ 

1.69e36J 19 14 6% 6% 6% —ft 

80 e 9.8 ?9 9 6ft 6'» 6ft —ft 

._ - 44 !'■„ 1 1 — *u 

_ .. 39 3", 3*/i JV, 

... . 3723 41% 41 41ft *V| 

_ ..26303 40V. 39% 40 • V. 

_ _. 4322 T'„ 3ft 3% 

107769 IV, , IV14 Ift _ 

_ _ 2508 T/u 3»u 3". - Va 

„ 829 Sft 5ft 5>A _ 

(Mb 4 9 3 9ft 9ft 9ft —ft 

_. _ 48 IV., I 1 

Jft 5J _ 43 10*. 10ft 10ft —ft 


.75 7.4 _. 29< 10% d 9ft 10ft -fb' 

JJ 7.4 .. 145 10*6 lOV. 10% ” 

,93a 78 _ 70 12% 12% 12ft - ft 

33a 78 ... 398 11 IDWlOft.-ft 

J2 7J — 299 10 ?Vt 10 -V, 

80 48 15 2 20 30 30 — 


21 Vi 15% WRIT .92 

Aft 3%WshSV9* .08 
16ft 12*4 Waive B J6 
2<vu lft.weldtm 
1 ViWendtBr 
i4Ud13%Wesca .98 

9% *V', WstBrC 
ISft 12 W1RET 112 

2ft ft With RO 
18 IVaWllStiTc 
3ft IftWinSfRs 
20% 3ft WirelesT JO 
72 58ft WisP pf JJ0 

Bft 6 W0KHB J8 

32 TOVjWarttw 80 

I'Vu YaXCLLtd 
9% SVitXvlron 


ISft 15% 
1% 1%- 


.8 46 2 

_ 7 13 

9.1 13 128 

- - 309 

- - 29 

13 5 

18 52 132 
7.4 .. 720 

19 10 1 

2.1 II 30 

-. — MSI 

- ., 170 


117*6117% 
7ft 3 
12ft l?ft 


Ift Ift- 
2ft 3% 
18% 19V. 
61 61 - 
7ft 7*'. ■ 
77% 28 
I I 
3ft 3ft ■ 


Saks figures are unofficial. Yearly highs and lows reflect 
the previous 52 weeks Plus me Current week, but not the latest 
trading day. Where a wHI or. stock dividend amounting to 25 - 
percenl or more has been paid, the vearthigtHow range and • 
dividend ore shown lor the new stock only. Unless otherwise . 
noted, rales of dividends are annual disburseme nt s baaed on - 
the latest declaration, 
a— dividend also axfrafs). 
b— annual role of dividend plus stock dividend, 
c— liquidating aMdend 
cW— codled. 
d — new yearly tow. 


e— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months. • 
jl— oh/htend In Canadian funds. auMoct to Uftnon-rosldmco . 

I— dividend declared offer spitf-up or stack dividend. * 

I — dividend paid this vear. omitted, deterred, or no action - 
token at latest dividend meeting. . 

k— dividend declared or paid this vear. an acaimutattve 
Issue with dividends in arrears. ■ 

n — new Issue In the past 52 weeks. Tho high-low rang* bealns - 
with the start of trodina. 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — ortcMandnus ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 month s , plus ° 
stock dividend. . 

s — stock sail (.Dividend begins with date of spilt. , 

sb — sales. , 

t — dividend paid hi stock in preceding 12 months, e st i mated 
cash value on ex -dividend or ex -distribution date. 1 

u — new yearly high. > 

v— trading halted. , 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized un- 
der the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed bv such com- > 
pantos. i 

wd — when distributed. 

wl — when Issued. j 

ww — wtth warrants. / "■ 

x — sx-divfctend or ex-rlghts. r»-' • 

Xdls — ax-dtstrlbutlan. 

xw— wilhaut worranls. 

y— ex-dlvtoend and sides in lull. 

vld— yield. 

I— sales In full. • 


— ’.i 4ft 1 ft Sun Nur 
-ft 13 5 SunshJr 


I* It II dlO'i 10ft — • 


-. 63 53 ft 

.. 7*97 u iv, 

• 27 29 

. V, *, 

6 125 1 


-ft B fl 

-ft 7' : GanvDO Mb S 12 47? Bft 8'., oft —ft 

—ft U'Y 7ftGaJ,a»l IC.4+C .... 5 B ’ft 7ft— ft 

7ft jftGomcB .10 ?J r 10 4", 4", 4W _ 


4ft S'AMCShp 
2' i "„,MlPPr 
IVu WA/ISR 
15*i KKvMlacNSC .44 
"• ‘.ftAAagpwtwi 
29ft 22% MePS 1.84 
li><4 5 MamHrv 
I*, * Man ton 

15% 9%MauHE Jba 
4*. 3ftMatec 
44'',29ftMa«am 


® Ik 7, 3*- it — , 'n 

376 2V„ T-Ju V'l* _. 

215 1ft 1'., 1ft - Vu 

166 lift 11 lift -ft 

IB ft ft ft _ 

8 22ft 22% 22% —ft 

214 10ft 10 10ft _. 

50 1 11 

84 I Oft 10 10 -ft 

6 4% 4+i 4ft *•.« 

71 35% 34*. 35 


J9ft 22ft Pb nxRs JO J 15 543 


I 2V„PlcoPd 


B". 6’sPltWVo J6 88 13 10 
43* 129’; Pittway AO 18 12 6 


39 27":PITwvA JO IJ 13 ij 


25r.l6'..PIvG«n .12 .4 _ 353 


10ft SftPIvRA 
10": 5»i>Pl/RB 


46’.i 29ft Polcrlnd 3.52 5.9 14 258 


7*6 CftPWvDh 
12»., 4’i PortSys 


... 39 B3 
_ rat 


3ft 2'"u 3+s 

37ft 36'.. 35ft- 
2 2'.s 2«. 

T 7 7 

39% 39ft 39% 
30ft 38*4 38*. 

«■-. r.j a 

»■« 11% 

7 oft o’. 

9ft 8-, 9 

42 41% 43 


4"/., 4ft 4'"., - ■ 


16%11ftSuorSrB 

6ft 4Vj SuDrmlnd 
2*. WSusXn wt 
I 'Yu ftSuPinun 
10ft 6 TIE 
6ft J TSF 
23T j lftTSXCps 
11% 7WTobPrd 
1SW12 Tastv 
5W 2ft Team 
ir-. e^.TecOpS 
16 8ftTechtrl s 
12ft 9ftTeicsPw 
T6ft 13 TeklR 
53*i35ftT«Dta 
18 12V,TempGU 
1".% ftTenera 
l*i iftTexSian 


_ 10 

212 

9% 

9% 

9% — % 


289 

2W ta 

TVs, 7>Vii _ 

9.9 _ 

173 

8% 


8+i -to 

- 31 

2 

6% 

6% 

6Vi -ft 

-. 38 

13 

1% 

1% 

1%— Vu 

_ _ 

173 

3 

2ft 

2ft — % 

_ 14 

5 

10% 

10% 10% — % 

3 J 15 

15 

14 

13% 

14 —to 

- B 

S3 

5% 

5% 

FA —ft 

_ — 

15 

IVu 

1 

I — Vu 

— — 

24 

Vu 

d Vu 

Vu— V„ 

_ 13 

19 

AVi 

A 

A —to 

_ 9 

10 

5% 

5*6 

Sft _ 


_ 113 S55u24 22*6 23ft — *4 

JO 2A 14 209 Bft 8 Bft —Vt 
JA 4J 14 38 13 12% 13 * W 

-.48 2 2?. 7% 2% —ft 

80 58 16 31 13ft 13*i 13% * ft 


80 58 16 
J8 28 15 
_ 32 
.10 J 68 
J6 8 59 
48 a 3J _ 


31 IJ’fi 13+i 13% 
9 |4ft |4% 14% 
49 9ft 9ft 9ft 
4 13'/, 13ft I3W 
798 44 ft 45% 46 
1202 13ft 12% 13% J 
90 'Y„ IVu iv M 

2B5 l»ft l»/„ 1ft 


1 



.'a “• «. 









35^ 


m 








Worm 


■r. ’ • - 




about - it sir. I’ll def those 


ues and 



■-There are no easy-names for the kinds pf seryicp^we'.ve given- our 


I K 

i JS!> 

• i4: : - 


Cardmembers ol/er the years. Because every d8^,%vefywhere aroiind : ." 


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the world, so many of our Service Repre&entaiives have gone beyoncf the caff- 


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SPORTS 




Owners to Alter 
Salary Cap Plan 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Major 
League Baseball owners will 
drop their demand for a salary 
cap in their new collective bar- 
gaming proposal, and instead 
wOl ask players to agree to a 
payroll and revenue “tax" that 
would help small -market dubs. 

The shift, revealed Monday 
by the owners’ chief negotiator, 
John Harrington, will be the 
focus of management’s first 
new collective bargaining pro- 
posal since June 14. 

The proposal will be given to 
the union Thursday when talks 
to settle the 96-day-old strike 
resume in Washington. 

“It’s not a salary cap in the 
strictest terms," said Harring- 
ton, the Boston Red Sox chief 
executive. “A tax concept can 
look like a salary cap, and any 
tax plan is meant to put some 
controls on labor costs.” 

“All payrolls would be taxed 
at a low per ce ntage ” he added 
“All duoswould be affected 
above a certain level" 

The significance of the new 
plan will depend on the level of 
the tax. A high percentage pre- 
sumably would be rejected by 
the union. A lower number 
could lead to new negotiations. 

A shift from a salary cap had 
been expected since three days 
of talks between players and 
owners ended Saturday. 

"I wouldn’t get overly opti- 
mistic about movement off the 
cap because there are tax pro- 
grams that are worse than a 
salary cap and tax programs 
that are better," said a union 
lawyer, Gene Orza. “It doesn't 
make me more pessimistic or 
optimistic. I just want to see it.” 

Tax concepts were discussed 
informally in early September by 


Harrington, Jerry McMonis, the 
Colorado Rockies chairman, 
and union officials. Players pro- 
posed that the 16 top revenue- 
producing dubs pay 1.6 percent 
of their income into a fund to be 
distributed to small-market 
dubs with lower revenues. 

A similar tax On the top 16 
payrolls also would be redis- 
tributed. 

The acting commissioner. 
Bud Selig, rejected the plan, 
saying the tax rate would be 
insignificant. 

“The players said the top 16 
teams by revenue and payroll 
should be taxed,” Harrington 
said. “We fed there should be 
some other rationale for at what 
level payrolls should be taxed. 
These are some of the variations 
we are discussing.” 


“We’re going to try to marry 
Tie iu 


the best parts of the luxury tax 
with a general payroll tax,” he 
added. “The players under- 


stand our main theme is to pro- 
>1 on 


vide some collective contra 
labor costs.” 

When owners proposed a sal- 
ary cap — a ceiling on a team's 
total payroll — players said 
they would never accept one. 

The owners haven’t budged 
since, and that fundamental 
disagreement was what led to 
the Aug. 12 strike, which caused 
the World Series to be canceled 
for the first time since 1904. 

If a new collective bargaining 
agreement is not reached by 
mid-December, the owners may 
choose to impose their terms on 


the players, which is their right 
ler federal labor law. 


under 

If they choose to do so, as 



Steelers’ Defense Outscores 
The Bills as Offenses Stumble 


By Timothy W. Smith 

New York Times Service 

PITTSBURGH — After 
watching both the Bills’ and 
Steelers' offenses stumble 
around the field at Three Rivers 
Stadium, one thing is dear. 
Pittsburgh’s defense is certainly 
fun to watch. 

The Steelers used a battering 
drfftnse that harried the Bills’ 
quarterback, Jim KeDy, jarred 
the ball loose from receivers, 
and rendered Buffalo’s offense 
completely ineffective. 

Then, that same defense be- 
came a spectacular scaring ma- 
chine with two great individual 
plays by comerback Rod 
Woodson that resulted in two 
Steder touchdowns. It even 
e« me up with a blocked field 
goal when defensive end Brent- 
son Bruckner deflected a 32- 
yard attempt by Bills kicker 
Steve Christie with 13 minutes 


fense could come back on the 
field.' Midway through the 
fourth quarter, the Stcders of- 
fense had converted just l of 11 
third-down attempts. . 

In the first half, the Mis cer- 
tainly didn’t play like the team 
that bad dominated the AFC 
landscape the last four seasons. 
Sometimes they resembled that 
team when they switched out of 


the two-back set they have de- 
ist fei 


54 seconds to play. 

. Monday night was 


The result ! 
a 23-10 National Football 
League victory for Pittsburgh 
(7-3), which remains a game be- 
hind Cleveland (8-2) in the 
Americas Football Confer- 
ence’s Central Division. The 
loss dropped the Bills to 5-5 and 


,dly finished with 22 com- 
pletions in 43 attempts for 212 
yards. He threw one touchdown 
pass, but was intercepted twice. 

Woodson scored on a 37- 
yard interception return for a 
touchdown in the second quar- 


Harringibn pointed out Mon- 
day, the implemented system 




ter. Is the third quarter, he 
; from Kelly 




could include their original pro- 
posal containing a salary cap. 


. . v . - • 1 * ! 7, -,.v .ar 

V~ -- 1 . -xr vr. 1 .-. „ iiU: •• ' 

Sieve (irntWRaiurv 

Pressured by the Steelers’ Rod Woodson, Buffalo's Russell Copeland (85) watched the 
ball sfip away. Two big defensive plays by Woodson resulted in Pittsburgh touchdowns. 


jarred the ball loose 
on a sack for an eight-yard loss. 
The ball bounced around in the 
end zone and defensive end 
Gerald Williams fell on it for a 
touchdown that made it 23-10. 

For its part, the Steelers’ of- 
fense served as nothing more 
than a distraction until the de- 


Dexter Manley , 
Ex-NFLStar, 
Held for Drugs 


The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — Dexter 
Manley, the former Na- 
tional Football League star 
who was banned from the 
league for violating its drug 
policy, has been charged 
with felony possession of 
crack cocaine. ... . 

The police said Manley, 
36, was arrested Sunday 
night and was released 
Monday after posting 
55,000 bail. 

In 1981, Manley, a de- 
fensive end, was drafted by 
the Washington. Redskins 
out of Oklahoma State and 
went on to play in three 
Super Bowls. 

He had 97 sacks in his 
NFL career, which ranks 
fourth in league history. He 
was perhaps the most dom- 
inant defender in the NFL 
during the mid-1980s, help- 
ing the Redskins win two 
Super Bonds. 

The NFL banned him for 
life in December 1991 after 
he failed a fourth drug test. 


ployed in the last few 
into their no-huddle attack wdih 
three, wide receivers — a' staple 
die last four years.- 

It didn’t help. Kclly was ha- 
rassed for much of thefir&haft 
by the Steelers front seven: 
There was no escapd ijy th e 
two-minute warning, Kelly bad 
been sacked four times and the 
Steelers bad moved past- Dallas 
as the leagne leader :ih Jsicks 
with 33. Buffalo managed just 
80 yards of total offense on 3i 
plays in the first- half and run- 
ning bade Thurman Thomas 
- was held to just 16 yards on six 

carries. 

It was the defense that pro- 
vided the first-half spark for 
Pittsburgh. The defenseprbvid- 
ed the Steelers with the first TD 
of. the game when Woodson 
baited Kelly on a sideline throw 
to receiver Bill Brooks. '1 

With two rec ei v er s s plit right, 
Woodson laid off Brooks, ff* 
outside receiver, by 10 yard* 
Tuning Kdl/s pass, Woddsod 
raced in front of Brooks, inter- 
cepted the pass and went un* 
touched down the sideline 37 
yards for the score.' 

The Steders tiuflt their lea*) 
to 13-0 on Gary Anderson's sets 
and field goal, a 39-yarder. His 
first, midway through the first 
quarter, was also 39 yards. ' 

The Bills got on the board 
with a : 52-yard field: goal by 
Steve Christie with 1 :G7 togoifi 
the half. But tbe.Steders coun- 
tered with a 30-yard field goal 
by Anderson with 6 seconds to 
go to take a 16-3 halftime lead. 

The Bills offense snapped oat 
of its doldrums at the start of 
the second half. Buffalo went 74 
yards in seven plays and 3:04 “ 
and scored on a 19-yard pass 
from Kelly to receiver Andie 
Reed that made thescore 16-10, 


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Owner of NHL Kings 
Charged With Fraud 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LOS ANGELES — Bruce McNall, president and 
owner of the National Hockey League's Los Angeles R 
has been indicted on federal charges of bank fraud and 
conspiracy over loans he obtained from financial institutions. 

Assistant U.S. Attorney Richard Drooyan said McNall had 
been charged Monday with en g a ging in a wide-ranging 
scheme to defraud banks of more than 5236 million in loan 
proceeds over a 10-year period from 1984 to 1994. 

The indictment alleges that McNall. 44, once considered one 
of the most successful sports franchise owners in the United 
States, obtained loans from at least six banks by falsely inflat- 


ing his personal worth and setting up sham companies. 
McNall, who was charged with or 


inspL 

two counts of bank fraud and one count of wire fraud, faces 


one count of conspiracy, 


45 years in prison and a fine of up to $1.75 million. 
He is 


scheduled for arraignment Nov. 28 before a U.S. 
magistrate. His lawyer said that McNall, whose 1 988 trade for 
~ L L * *■ ~ ■ interest in Southern Cali- 



alleged to have embarked on his muItimilUon-dollar 
fraud scheme in September 1984, when be borrowed $35 
million from European American Bank and Credit Lyonnais 
Bank Nederland for one of his film production companies. 

McNall is alleged to have obtained a further loan of $14 
‘million from Credit Lyonnais Bank Nederland by creating a 
“sham” company called U.S. Coin Enterprises. (Reuters, A?) 


‘Big Dog’ in Shoes of a Savior: NBA Rookie Feels the Pressure 


By Jennifer Frey 

New York Times Service 


MILWAUKEE — They are Boy 
Scout troop leaders and advisers ana 
they have come from all over the state 
of Wisconsin to discuss the future of 
their organization. 

For the moment, though, there are 
more pressing things taking place on 
the gym floor one story below. Faces 
pressed against the glass, eyes strain- 
ing downward, they arc watching a 
tall, lanky young man challenge a play- 
er more than 10 years his senior to a 
simple game of H-O-R-S-E. 

Legs crossed, back to the net, one 
hand on his neck, the ball in his right 
hand, the young man easily makes the 
basket from just inside the 3-point line. 
The spectators grin. 

His name is Glenn Robinson, but 
when word of his presence spreads 
through the Archbishop Cousins Cen- 
ter, it is his nickname that they use. 

“It’s the Big Dog,” they whisper. 
“He’s practicing in the gym.” 

Wisconsin natives have waited, both 
anxiously and patiently, for the arrival 
of Robinson, a gifted player who in 


June was taken first in the National 
Basketball Association draft by the 
Milwaukee Bucks. 

Hailed as the future savior of a fran- 
chise on the decline, Robinson held out 
for a contract of epic proportions — at 
one point, his agent reportedly request- 
ed what would have been the fust $100 
million deal in pro sports and he 
eventually signed a multiyear deal for 
$68.1 million just moments before the 
tipoff on the Bucks’ opening night. 

His arrival in Milwaukee, then, has 
caused nothing short of a sensation. 
The locals hope he will return the 
Bucks to the prominence they held 
when another former first-round pick, 
Kareem Abdul- Jabbar (1969), led the 
team. And the league is so eager to see 
Robinson become one of the standout 
players it needs in the post-Magic- 
Bird-Jordan era that Commissioner 
David Stern nudged both sides when 
contract negotiations were stalled. 

The pressure on Robinson, then, is 
nothing short of tremendous. 

“I think it’s a combination of every- 
thing," Robinson said, when asked 
what has been the most difficult ad- 


justment. “The media is a little bit 
more pushy. The fans are a little bit 
more pushy because they want you to 
get out there and win. The players in 
the league — everybody's very good, 
very strong. You Just have to know 


how to deal with all of it” 

“People say there’s pressure on me 
here," be added, “but I’ve been facing 
pressure my whole life.” 


Robinson grew up in Gary, Indiana, 
with his mother, Christine Bridgeman, 
who gave birth to her only son when she 
was a teenager. His father, Glenn Rob- 
inson Sr„ also lives in Gary; Glenn Jr. 
does not like to talk about his father, 
and is guarded when asked about his 
childhood friends and family members. 

He is not hesitant, though, to defend 
Gary, a city with high rates in both 
crime and unemployment. The citizens 
of Gary see Robinson as a point of 


pride and a great hope, much the same 
Milwaukee natives believe he will 


nickname — as well as a major en- 
dorsement deal pending with Nike — 
that accompany the typical NBA su- 
perstar, but it remains to be seen how 
he will fare both on and off the court. 

Set back by his absence from train- 
ing camp, he already is playing catch- 
up to fellow rookies Grant Hill of 
Detroit and Jason Kidd of Dallas,, who 
have started their seasons strongly. 

And, off the court, his reaction to 
the news media and the public spot- 
light is more along the lines of a Pat- 
rick Ewing — - who limits the media’s 
access to him and is extremely guarded 
about his personal life — than the 
league's reigning personalities, Charles 
Baridey and Shaquille O’Neal. 

“I dunk it’s better to be here,” said 
Robinson, who is wary of what he has 
called “crazy stories" in the news me- 
dia and prefers small -market Milwau- 
kee for that reason, among others. 


seconds 


out of the little- 


way 

resuscitate the ailing Bucks. 

League observers don’t quite know 
what to make of Robinson this early in 
his pro career. Certainly, he has the 
talent potential, the contract and the 


For the most part, Robinson just 
‘ 'i his 


wants to be with his new teammatp, 
who call him “rook" and make him 
pick up the balls after practice like any 
other rookie. Outside of Robinson, the 
Bucks are a low-key bunch : Vin Baker, 
the team's best player last season, is a 


■year pro 
known North Atlantic Conference^ 
Marty Canton, the hero of late, was an 
on drafted journeyman who will mike 
less than $175,000 this year. , 

Robinson’s recent game of “H-0-R> 
S-E” was played against . assistant 
coach Butch Outer. It came at the ^ pd 
of a voluntary Bucks practice that was 
scheduled, more otfess^ sotharRoW 
son would have some teammate& to 
help him run through stiB nn famii i a r 
Bucks' plays. 

On the court the previous night 
against Charlotte, Robinson scored 10 
points on 50 percent shooting in the 
first half, but was shaky in the second. 
It didn’t matter, though, to the fan* 
who consistently cheered his presence 
on the floor. 

“I think they're all just happy to see 
me here playing," Robinson said 
“That’s all that matters to them." 

And that’s all that matters to the 
Boy Scout leaders, who watch Robin- 
son line up for another shot Top of the 
key, knees bent, one hand behind his 
back, glass required 

The ball batiks off the backboard, as 
demanded. The rest is all neL 


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Page 23 


5?> 

is?! 

a Pun° ei, V 
ihi > ', 


Vows of the Land 



a 

we 


' '■ *ii L> V take it fer granted. 3 

^ mbaac right has beea taken away from Brace Grobbelaar 

taWoid noapap^JS 


V Snead elsewhere, has not been 

prt^oi in England for 30 years. If 

Grobbelaar fid indeed do so, he 
would go to prison and when he 
caste .out certainly be excommu- 
nicated sine die from sports. 

If, on the other hand, his lawye 

Sun, he.wffl take the editors to the cleaners. He will make a great 
deal cf mone y and possibly inflict on his accusers the ruin they 
wish on him. ... 3 

It is an invidious choice. Frankly, I hope members of my own 
profesaon are shown to be at fault rather than have a goalkeeper 
whose flamboyance and fame reaches out to adults and to chil- 




,,ri . 

4i- 


Rob Jf • 
Hughes 

win a libel suit against The 


- ‘■t.. 



Kill* ft 


n Trcatr 


:i Jan. 


r i(0 


be prevented from ever playing ^ 

He is free to play in the goal for Southampton against Arsenal 
on Saturday, free to perform unless a crime is proven. 

- Perhaps The Son forgot this principle. It seems to have set a 
trap for Grobbelaar, who was secretly filmed, and hung him 
metaphorically from the nearest goal frame. The paper’s source, 
Gtris Vincent, a Zimbabwean like Grobbelaar, will have many 
questions to answer should fie case come to coart 
Vincent was a captain, Grobbelaar a private, in fie Rhodesian 
Army that 20 years ago fought terrorists. More recently, fie pair 
became business partners in a failed safari-park lodg* venture, 
and, according to accounts emerging from Harare and elsewhere, 
Vincent has a stream of debts and broken deals behind him 
Grobbelaar and his lawyers insist fiat, come fie judgment day, 
they will turn the tables against Vincent, The Sun and others who 
preatmed Grobbelaar guuty by fie printed word. 

Thar first step must be to answer the FA on two charges: 
“conduct which is improper or which is liable to bring the game 
into disrepute,” and “acceptance of consideration with a view to 
influencing the result of a match.” 

The police* and no doubt tax officials, are also investi gating . 
Meanwhile, Grobbelaar, dubbed the down prince of soccer be- 
cause of his eccentric habits, plays on for Southampton. The club 
— ■ that “fie circus will come to town” but has faith in 



As Tennis Season Ends, 
Spain Is Riding High 


Frink KletfrMi'Ajenct Framr-Pm* 

Sergei Bruguera slamming a return to Michael Chang en route to his victory on Tuesday. 


By Christopher Qarey 

Special la the Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Hie year 
of Spain in broad terms was 
1992, wifi fie Olympics in Bar- 
celona, fie World Exposition in 
Seville and enough cultural fall- 
out to fill a socialite's calendar 
for a lifetime. 

But fie year of Spain in ten- 
uis is now. Of fie eight Grand 
Slam singles titles, Spanish 
women and men won four in 
1994. That’s fie sort of excel- 
lence historically reserved for 
nations like fie United States, 
Australia and, in more recent 
years, Germany. 

As fie denouement of fie 
season plays out in New York 
and Frankfurt, Spain has the 
world’s second- and third- 
ranked women in Arantxa S&n- 
chez Vicario and Conchita 
Martinez. It also has two men in 
fie year-end top 10 for the first 
time since fie ATP started com- 
puter rankings in 1973. 

Although neither No. 3 Sergi 
Bruguera nor No. 7 Alberto 
Berasategui is expected to head 
back to Barcelona wifi fie 
$1,315 milli on winner’s check 
after this week's eight-man 
ATP Tour World Champion- 
ship, their presence here is an 
exclamation point on a season 
without precedent. 

“For a small country, a small 
country fiat plays most of its 
tennis on day courts, having 
two players in this tournament 
is pretty amazing," said Bra- 


Halard Stuns Sanchez Vicario in Slii 


to hold hims elf together, body and spirit 

He probably wQL For Grobbelaar, bom in South Africa but a 
Zimbabwean by upbringing and choice, performed in fie media 
circus when Zimbabwe beat Zaire, 2-1, cm Sunday in a soJd-out 
African Nations* Cup contest 

His supporters included Zimbabwe’s president, Robert Mu- 
gabe. They included his wife, Debbie, and his two young daugh- 
ters, a show of family unity in fie face of further tabloid accusa- 
tions — from The Sun’s sister paper, The News of fie World, fiat 
Grobbelaar had availed himself of groupies. 

.“That second alleged scandal tested fie relationship of Bruce 
ai& Debbie more than anything else,” said a lawyer accompany- 
ing Grobbelaar to Harare. “But they will not be diverted, they are 
determined to continue together to establish his innocence.” 

The gravest allegation against Grobbelaar is that he received 
£40.000 ($64,000) from a Far East betting syndicate to lose a 
match 3-0 while he was keeping goal for Liverpool at Newcastle 
last November. ■■ . . . 

Liverpool lost by that score. Grobbdaar was beaten three times 
by Andy Cole, the most predatory of English strikers, each time 
from six paces or less. Earn time, inept defenders bad allowed the 
Newcastle forward into positions from which he could hardly miss. 

* No goalkeeper I have ever seen, not even the almost incompara- 
bly agile Grobbelaar, could have prevented those shots. They 
came in the first half hour, after which Grobbelaar would have 
had to be a wizard to insure that Newcastle did not increase the 
score or to influence his own forwards, who missed easy chances 
at the other end. 

Since there is no accusation that anyone acted m common wifi 
Grobbelaar, it seems, to put it mildly, a far-fetched scenario. 

The Sun story was given unfortunate credence by Peter Vdap- 
pan, a FIFA administrator who is general secretary of the Asian 
soccer confederation. He confirmed that soccer was in moral 
decline in lss part of fie worid and suggested that die Grobbelaar 
case “may be only fie tip of the iceberg.” 

But the case is unproven. Why, it might then be asked, did 
fly boast to Vincent, at fie meetings fiat were 

fiat he threw matches and would throw them 

___i? What about fie charge that he accepted £2,000 from 
fincent as an alleged down-payment for a future bribe? 

Who knows? It could be that Grobbelaar, who lives lus life as 
well as his game on fie high wire, boasted fie way men brag about 
fish they never caught or women they never conquraed. Or, as 
Grobbelaar used to boast, about wfld snakes they had hypnotized. 

Or perhaps, haring shared a busi n ess disaster with Vincent, he 
took his former pal for a fool who could easily be parted from his 

m WMc we wait, Grobbelaar intends to face the bedlam and fie 
action without a mask fi tied by a surges to protect Jus brakes: nose. 

“I won’t wear it,” said Grobbelaar. n don’t want to hide behmd 
a nurek- If they want to see me, Fm right hoe. 

I lob these# efVieTmm- 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The best year of 
Arantxa S&nchez Vicario' s career came to 
an abrupt end when she was ambushed in 
the first round of the Virginia S lim* Cham- 
pionships by Julie Halard of France. 

The often inconsistent Halard, ranked 
22d in fie worid. played fie match of her 
life Monday nighi to stun Sanchez Vicario 
is a thud-set tie-breaker, 6-2, ] -6, 7-6 < 7-2). 

The upset created a golden opportunity 
for Martina Navratilova, who was to play 
GabrieJa Sabatini on Tuesday night and 
was seeded to face fie No. 2-ranked San- 
chez Vicario in fie second round. 

£□ fie evening's first match. Kimiko 
Date of Japan, a newcomer to the Champi- 
onships, feQ behind 3-2, then embarked on 
a 10-game rampage to oust 19th-ranked 
Sabine Hack, 6-3, 6-0. 

For Halard, fie pivotal point in fie 
tiebreaker came at 2-2 with her serving. A 
backhand approach by Halard was called 
long by the linesman, but fie umpire over- 
ruled the call and ordered fie point re- 


played. Halard then served an ace for 3-2. 

Thai was followed by one of the finest 
points of fie match. Halard charged in to 
scoop up a drop shot wifi a backhand, 
Sanchez Vicario drilled a forehand cross- 
court, and Halard lunged for a forehand 
volley winner. 

An error by Sanchez Vicario on the next 
point made it 5-2. and Halard served out 
fie match wifi fie help of two more weak 
shots by Sanchez Vicario. the last a fore- 
hand return dumped into fie net 

Said Halard: "it’s fie best match I ever 
did: l did everything I can. I had a great 
beginning, and in fie second set 1 couldn't 
breathe, I couldn't go anymore, but in fie 
third I started again to do everything.” 

Sanchez Vicario not only came into this 
event with a WTA Tour-leading eight titles 
for 1994, but she also had a four-tourna- 
ment winning streak and was undefeated 
in her last 21 matches. 

Since losing fie 1 993 final to Steffi Graf, 
fie world No. 1. SAnchez Vicario became 
fie only player this year to claim two 


Grand Slam titles, wifi victories at fie 
French and U.S. Opens. 

The 22-year-old Spaniard would have 
become fie first women’s player to earn 
more than $3 mini on in a single year by 
reaching the final on Sunday. She would 
not have passed Steffi Graf in fie rankings 
even bad she performed up to predictions 
and captured this year-ending event But 
she said she never considered herself im- 
mune to defeat. 

Tm not a machine,” she said. “Fm a 
human being. You can never win every- 
thing. I was not negative at all; she played 
better than I did. She took more risks, and 
if you don’t go for it in these circum- 
stances. you can lose the match.” 

In fie doubles, the retirement-bound 
Navratilova safely opened her last stand at 
Madison Square Garden alongside her 
partner, Manon BoIIegraf, wifi a 6-2, 6-3 
victory against fie unseeded duo of Jill 
Hefierington and Shaun Stafford. 

f Reuters, AP, NY7) 


■guera, a 7-6 (7-1), 7-5 winner 
over Michael Chang of fie 
United States in his opening 
round-robin match on Tuesday. 

Berasategui, however, was 
crashed by Andre Agassi of the 
United States on Tuesday. 6-2, 

6- 0. Boris Becker of Germany 
overcame 26 aces by Goran 
Ivanisevic of Croatia, 6^3, 3-6. 

7- 6 (7-5). 

Spanish men have experi- 
enced their share of success in 
the past wifi Manuel Santana in 
fie 1960s, Manuel Orantes and 
Andris Gimeno in fie 1970s, 
and, to a lesser degree, Jose Hi- 
gueras in the 1980s. But there 
has never been a wave of talent 
like this. Spain not only has Bru- 
guera, fie two- time-defending 
French Open champion who has 
expanded his range to faster sur- 
faces this year. It not only has 
Berasategui, a surprise finalist at 
fie French in June wifi his un- 
orthodox bolt of a forehand. It 
also has nine other players in the 
men’s top 90. 

Even if Brugu era’s success is 
lately a product of his relation- 
ship with his father/coach. 
Luis, it is Spain’s remarkable 
depth that quickly stifles all talk 
of coincidence. 

“If you ask me whether we 
will win four of eight Grand 
Slams every year, I will have to 
say very nicely no,” said Juan 
Margets, president of fie Royal 
Spanish Tennis Federation's 
professional committee. “But 
on fie other hand, what is a 
dream for me, especially for fie 
men, is that in fie last six or 
seven years we have had consis- 
tency by getting large numbers 
of players in fie top 100. There 
is no secret fiat it is partly relat- 
ed to money.” 

Much of that money became 
available in the years leading up 
to fie Barcelona Olympics. It 
came from fie regional and na- 
tional governments and from 
private-sector sponsors, such as 
the Spanish company Bimbo, 
which sponsored a group of five 
promising young players and 
their coaches, including 
Orantes and Javier Duarte, be- 
ginning in fie late 1980s. 

Two of fie five players in- 
volved were Alex Corretja, now 
ranked 22d, and Berasategui, 
who won seven tournaments on 
day this year but dearly has 
progress to make indoors judg- 
ing from his loss to Agassi. 

Pre-Olympic fever alone can- 
not explain the Spanish surge. 
As in much of Europe, tennis in 
Spain was a sport for fie afflu- 
ent until the 1960s, and it was 
uot until fie death of fie dicta- 


tor Francisco Franco in 3975 
fiat Spanish tennis began to 
adopt a more professional ap- 
proach. Two coaches, the Co- 
lumbian Willie (Pato) Alvarez, 
who would work wifi fie SAn- 
chez brothers (Emilio and Ja- 
vier), and Luis Bruguera, came 
to exemplify fiat new approach. 

Bruguera cites three reasons 
for Spanish success: the federa- 
tion has developed a sizeable 
circuit of events and challengers 
in Spain, allowing players to get 
experience and computer 
points at home; where fie fed- 
eration once hindered private 
academies and coaches, it has 
begun to support players work- 
ing outside its system, often fi- 
nancially, and fie emergence of 
a few top players, like Emilio 
SAnchez and Bruguera, created 
a snowball effect. 

“People have started to think 
they can do it in Spain, but if 
there is no trailblazer, they can- 
not think like this,” Luis Bru- 
guera said. “I think Bjorn Borg 
helped Mats Wilander and Ste- 
fan Edberg a lot in Sweden. I 
think Boris Becker has done fie 
same for German tennis. We 
needed references in Spain 
again.” 

There were essentially no ref- 
erences for fie women, unless 
you count Liii Alvarez, who was 
a runner-up at Wimbledon for 
three consecutive years from 
1926 to 192$. 

“To tell you fie truth, I really 
can’t explain how Arantxa and 
I happened to come along at fie 
same time,” said Martinez, who 
was bom four months after 
SAnchez Vicario, in April 1972. 

“Coincidence” might indeed 
be an appropriate term in this 
case, but there are some trends 
that bear underlining. Sports 
under Franco were a male af- 
fair, and in this Roman Catho- 
lic and deeply conservative 
country, women have only re- 
cently begun to break out of 
traditional roles. 

“What happened in fie Unit- 
ed States 30 years ago with sex- 
ual roles did not happen until 
much later in Spain,” Mar gets 
said. “In fie late *70s and early 
’80s, women tennis players 
didn’t come near having a pro- 
fessional attitude.” 

But unlike men’s tennis, 
women’s tennis is desperately 
lacking in depth. After Sanchez 
Vicario. who won fie French 
and UJS. Opens this year, and 
Martinez, who stunned grass- 
court aficionados by winning 
Wimbledon, fie next highest 
ranked Spanish woman is An- 
geles Montolio at No. 107. 


SCOREBOARD 


SIDELINES 


NFL Standings 


Grobbelaar allegedly 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
EOS* 

W L T 

Miami 7 3 0 

Buffalo 5 5 0 

N.Y.Jeta S 5 D 

IndtanopoDB • 4 0 

NwEngiand 4 6 0 

Control 
W L T 
Ctovokm 8 2 0 

PHttwrgh 7 3 0 

Cincinnati 2 ■ 0 

Houston t 9 8 

west 

w v T 
SanDfcso 8 2 0 

Kansas City * 4 o 

LA Raiders 5 5 0 


pa. pf pa 

JW 239187 
JOO 205 176 
SX 173184 
400 716 233 
JOO 210 339 

Pa. PP PA 
ABO 219118 
•TOO 176 154 
•2M 175 251 
.100 147 218 

Pet PPPA 
JOO 2*3 164 
JOO 195197 
JOO 203 227 


N.Y. Giants 

3 

7 

0 

J00 171230 


Central Division 



11. Kansas 

27-8 

9S8 

T3 

Washington 

3 

B 

D 

200 220 279 

DOtroll 

3 2 

JOO 

— 

12. Syracuse 

23-7 

951 

15 


Central 



Indiana 

3 2 

JOO 

— 

U andmotl 

22-10 

082 

2S 


W 

L 

T 

Pa. pf pa 

Chicago 

3 3 

-500 

w 

K Virginia 

18-13 

854 

— 

MUonosota 

7 

3 

0 

J«Q 224 144 

Cleveland 

2 7 

JOO 

w 

15. Georgetown 

19-12 

420 

— 1 

Chicago 

6 

4 

0 

jAOO 172 182 

Mllwoufcee 

2 2 

J00 

v» 

14. MIcNUOT 

2+8 

613 

11 

Green Boy 

6 

4 

a 

■400 205 143 

Charlotte 

2 3 

JOO 

1 

17. Wisconsin 

18-11 

599 

— ■ 

Detroll 

S 

S 

0 

JOO 197 217 

Atlanta 

1 5 

.187 

2Vj 

11 Alabama 

20-10 

403 

— ■ 

Tampa Boy 

2 

B 

0 

JOO 124 229 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


19. Gomwctlcul 

2W 

351 

4 


west 




Midwest Division 


20. Michigan St. 

20-12 

345 



w 

L 

T 

P«. PF PA 


W L 

PCI 

Qft 

21. Oklahoma St. 

24-10 

329 

19 

San Francisco 

8 

2 

0 

JOO 295 184 

Houston 

a 0 

UNO 


22. VIltaMva 

20-12 

382 


Atlanta 

5 

5 

0 

M 200 224 

Denver 

4 ] 

JOO 

1VS 

23. Georgia Tech 

14-13 

239 

— 

LA Rams 

4 

6 

0 

JOO 179197 

Dallas 

3 1 

J50 

2 

24. wake Forest 

21-12 

231 

— 

Mew Orleans 

4 

4 

a 

JOO 209 241 

Sen Antonio 

3 1 

750 

2 

25. Illinois 

T7-11 

a- lanttll 

178 

In ICS P 

win 


Mondays came 
Pittsburgh ZL Buffalo 10 

. : : -.T .•* 35 r.» 2 fid 

NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Dtvtston 


Utah 

Minnesota 

Golden State 

Portland 

Sacramento 

Seattle 

Phoenix 

LA. Lakers 

LA. Clippers 


3 4 A 29 

0 4 JOOO 

Pacific DWtslaa 

5 0 1JB00 

3 0 1-000 

3 1 750 

3 t -750 

3 2 JOO 

2 4 J33 

0 5 JOO 


3W 

4 


1 

lW 

m 

2 

3V> 

5 



4 

6 

0 

JOO 220 243 


W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

MONDAY’S GAME 

seam* 

3 

7 

0 

JOO 195194 

WashteBtan 

4 

i 

-BOO 



New York if 91 81 D— 97 

NATIONAL. CONFERENCE 

I 

i 

3 

2 

-400 

1 

Utah 29 24 34 3I-41B 



East 



Ortonda 

3 

2 

JOO 

1 

NY : Storks 12-30 44 35. Ewtna 5.14 8-18 18; 


W 

L 

T 

Pet. PF PA 


1 

3 

250 

21ft 

U: Malone 9-W 11-16 29, Stockton 5-10 9-1270. 


B 

2 

0 

JOO 242 141 

New Jersey 

1 

5 

.147 

3V, 

Rataeamts— New York 38 (Ewtna 7), Utah 54 

Philadelphia 

7 

3 

0 

JOO 216174 

PhlkXteUStla 

1 

5 

.147 

3Vi 

(Makme 13). Assists — now York 22 (Starks 8). 

Arizona 

4 

6 

0 

J0D 124198 

Miami 

0 

4 

JSD 

3W 

Utah 22 (Stockton 14). 


_ 

Ml 





— 

_ 

—9. 

The AP Preseason Top 25 


ill. Memphis 94. LoutauWe 84. Mtsstsstool 
State 73. Tulone 7* Purdue 44, Tew» Tech 53, 
TemMe 45. Texas W. NUimeaataM. California 
29, Brigham YounsTA St. 4ohirt2A Oklahoma 
22. Ftor Ida Stale 19, Arlnna State 77, Ohio U. 
17, St. Louis 17, Western Kentucky 13, L5U 14, 
Monmeffe 11. North Carolina Charlotte 
New Mexico St T& Utah A SI. JoaenhH 
Southern Cal 5, CoppM State < Colleae 
Charleston 3, Missouri 3. OkJ Dominion 1 Tlrt- 
so 3. Boston College 2. 


CROSSWORD 


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94 Move to foreign 
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38 Pester 
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QUALIFYING 

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10. Florida 


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CHICAGO— Waived Kevin Rankin. center. 
CHA RLOTTE— Put AMetioeJ Adorns, suont 
an tolured imt Activated Joe Courtney, tor- 
ward. from bHured Itat. 

PHILADELPHIA Mowed Jarett Jackson, 
guard, to a Hear contract 
SAN ANTONIO— Slatted Corev Crowder, 
guard. 


” USC Coach Quits After Car Crash 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — George Raveling, Southern Cal’s 
basketball coach for eight seasons, has ended his 22-year coaching 
career, retiring because of injuries suffered in a car crash. 

“I do not believe that remaining on as bead basketball coach, 
while not fulfilling my professional responsibilities, would be fair 
to fie university, fie student body, my coaching staff and fie 
players,” Raveling said in a statement Monday. Raveling did not 
attend the news conference at which it was announced fiat the 
assistant coach Charlie Parker would be interim coach this season. 

Raveling, 57, was released from fie hospital Nov. S. He sus- 
tained broken ribs, a fractured pelvis and clavicle, and a collapsed 
lung in a crash near fie USC campus on Sept 25. 

4 TV Executive Picked to Buy Pirates 

PITTSBURGH (AP) — A cable television executive and his 
family have won the city’s approval to buy fie Pittsburgh Pirates 
major league baseball team, the city said Tuesday. 

John Rigas and five members of his family are forming a new 
entity to buy fie Pirates. Rigas is chairman, president and chief 
executive officer of Adelphia Communications Ccrrp. Talks wifi 
another potential buyer, fie former Baltimore Orioles president 
Larry Lucchino, were suspended so he could concentrate on 
trying to buy the San Diego Padres. 

For die Record 

Gerry Frauds, 42, was named as the new manager of English 
Premier League soccer dub Tottenham Hotspur on Tuesday, 
replacing Ossie Ardiles, who was fired on Oct. 31. (Reuters) 
Two new teams wiB join Japan’s professional soccer league next 
year, bringing fie total number of J- League clubs to 24, league 
officials said Tuesday. (Reuters) 

Jacques Fouroux’s Rngjby League venture in France will start in 
July wifi only eight teams, not fie 16 he had initially planned, 
Fooroux told the Midi Olympique newspaper on Tuesday. (AFP) 


Piano by court DowNno 

© New York Thna/EcUud hr Shorts. 


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Solution to Puzzle of Nov, 15 


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Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1994 


OBSERVER 


Bring on the Feathers 

By Russell Baker 


W ASHINGTON — Recent 
lunatic attacks on the 
White House had the presi- 
dent's Secret Service guards in 
an unusually keen state of alert. 
The public knew it, so hesitated 
to tar and feather the president 
an H fide him out of me White 
House on a rail. 

Still, it was a close thing. 
Americans bad never been so 
angry, at least in the past five 
years, which was as far back as 
anyone could remember. 

Scientifically sampled Ameri- 
cans said things like, “I am so 
mad I could spit, and would if 
the country hadn't been sold the 
elitist idea that spitting is even 
lower-class than smoking” 
President Clinton, ever eager 
to please, tried to reorganize his 
staff after Speaker Newt Ging- 
rich denounced the White 
House as a group of “left-wing 
elitists." To gratify the speak- 
er's apparent preference for 
right-wing slobs, the president 
said he would replace Leon Pa- 
nel La, his chief of staff, with 
Beavis and Bull-Head. 

This led to the infamous "un- 
real people" affair after a re- 
porter asked George Stephano- 
poulos how the White House 
could be run "by two people 
who aren't real” 

For years thereafter Stephan- 
opoulos always denied that he 
had replied, "If a whole Con- 
gress can be run by unreal peo- 
ple, the White House should be 
a cinch." 

Naturally such congressional 
leaders as Speaker Gingrich and 
Strom Thurmond. Alfonse D'A- 
mato and Jesse Helms were not 
amused by hearing their reality 
questioned. Instead of calling 
news conferences to deny that 
they were unreal they used their 
power to demonstrate their exis- 
tence, if not their reality. 

Gingrich immediately passed 
a law abolishing several cabinet 
agencies to get government off 
the people's back, while Senator 
H elms of the Foreign Relations 


Committee forced the State De- 
partment to declare North Car- 
olina eligible for foreign aid. 

Senator D’Amato broadened 
his famous Whitewater investi- 
gation to search the Clinton and 
Rodham family trees back 
through five generations with 
full disclosure of all financial 
transactions of the 1,936 Qin- 
ton-Rodham forebears. Though 
most were deceased, D’ Amato 
said be sought to detect, expose 
a financial-finagling gene poten- 
tially ruinous to the Republic. 


moved Stephanopouios fra 
the White House and put him j 


Trying as usual to please ev- 
erybody. President Clinton re- 
from 
,in 

charge of the National Endow- 
ments for the Arts and the Hu- 
manities, which were merged 
and given a single mission. 

This, said the president, 
would be to revive and spread 
the practice of the ancient 
American art of tarring, feath- 
ering and riding on a rail. 

The Endowments' job: to 
make adequate supplies of feath- 
ers readily accessible without 
frustrating delay to all Ameri- 
cans in high dudgeon. Also: to 
make tar supplies easily avail- 
able as well as tar-heating 
equipment for liquefying it and 
fence rails suitable for riding. 

Gingrich’s response was to 
order the White House blown 
up during a presidential ab- 
sence. Its destruction, he ex- 
plained, was an essential part of 
the process of minimalizing 
government, which had become 
the problem at the root of the 
nation's difficulties. 

It was purely out of humani- 
tarian impulse, he said, that the 
building was destroyed while the 
president was away, and not, as 
cynics speculated, because Re- 
publicans feared what might 
happen if they did not have Can- 
ton to run against another day. 

New York Times Service 


Mahfouz Caught in Middle of Egypt’s Strife 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Tima Service 

C AIRO — Naguib Mahfouz, a No- 
bel Prize- winning author, has 
been dragged from his hospital bed 
into a debate about religion, freedom 
of expression and the interpretation of 
a novel he wrote that was banned in 
Egypt for 35 years. 

The ailing 82-year-old author, a 
critic of the government of President 
Hosni Mubarak as well as of the Is- 
lamic movement vying for power in 
Egypt, was stabbed in the neck by an 
Is lami c militant outside his home on 
Oct. 14. 

His health re mains precarious, and 
his wife and two daughters have pro- 
hibited interviews and asked friends 
to limit their visits. 

"The attack has been horrible for 
him, psychologically and physically," 
said Tawfik Saleh, a friend. “He is 
very bad, like a flower starting to 
wither. Every day finds him weaker." 

Shortly after the attack. Minister of 
Information Safwat Sherif appeared 
at Mahfouz’s bed in the intensive care 
unit. The minister, with state-run tele- 
vision in tow, declared the author the 
conscience of the Arab world. 

Sherif said that the government did 
not support a ban on any of his works, 
thus abruptly ending the prohibition 
on “The Children of Gebelawi.” Offi- 
cials at A1 Azhar University, Egypt's 
highest religious authority, had de- 
nounced the work, written in 1959, as 
heretical. The novel appeared in in- 
stallments in A1 Ahram, the govern- 
ment daily in 1959, but was never 

E ublished or sold again in Egypt until 
ist week. 

Mahfouz always accepted the ban 
with equanimity, saying that although 
his critics had misinterpreted the 
book, Egypt had “more important 
thing s facing its society" than whether 
“Children of Gebelawi” should be 
sold. 

After the announcement by the 
minister, and a rush by newspapers to 
serialize the work, he asked that publi- 
cation "come at a later time." 

“this issue is diverting attention 
from a (rime against my life to wheth- 
er this novel is, or is not, against reli- 
gion,” Mahfouz said. "If someone has 
a preconception that I have written a 
book against religion, this preconcep- 



AgctKX France- 

The Nobel Prize- winning author Naguib Mahfouz before he was hospitalized in a stabbing attack. 


tion will influence how they interpret 
the book.” 

But his request was ignored. And 
Mahfouz bas found himself an unwit- 
ting ally in the latest government cam- 
paign against the Islamic militants. 

The novel describes the complex 
relationship that a group of Cairo 
slum dwellers have with God. It is 
filled with allegorical characters who 
resemble figures from the Bible and 
the Koran. 

Religious authorities said it con- 
tained a representation of the prophet 
Mohammed as a fallible man who had 
simple ideas and was a philanderer. 
Mahfouz was also widely criticized by 
Islamic militan ts when be supported 
the 1979 peace accord that President 
Anwar Sadat signed with Israel. 

Many of his works were banned for 
several years in other Arab countries. 

He again ran afoul of the militants 
when he criticized the death warrant 
issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Kho- 
meini of Iran against the British au- 
thor Salman Rushdie, although Mah- 
fouz said he had not read the Rushdie 
novel that provoked the threat, “The 
Satanic Verses ” 

The reissue of Mahfouz's book is 
expected to deepen his problems with 
the militants. And Mohammed 
Salmawi, a dose friend of the author. 


said he considered the publication "a 
second assassination attempt.” 

Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman the 
blind cleric currently in prison in the 
United States, accused of involvement 
in a plot to blow up several buildings 
in New York and assassinate political 
leaders, issued a religious edict in 1 989 
that called Mahfouz and Rushdie her- 
etics. Militan ts said at the time that 
they would kill Mahfouz on the anni- 
versary of his receiving the Nobel 
Prize, which, like tbe recent attack, 
took place in October. 

"Islamic law calls on these people to 
repent,' 1 Sheikh Abdel Rahman said, 
"and if they do not, they will be killed. 
If this sentence had been passed on 
Naguib Mahfouz when he wrote ‘Chil- 
dren of Gebelawi’ Salman Rushdie 
would have realized that he bad to 
stay wi thin certain bounds.” 

Underground cassette tapes distrib- 
uted by other radical clerics, and easi- 
ly available in Cairo, also attack Mah- 
fouz, and other Egyptian writers and ' 
poets, as proponents of a foreign ide- 
ology that seeks to destroy Islam. 

Mahfouz's half-century of work, 
rich in detail, usually portrays life in 
the teeming working-class neighbor- 
hoods in Cairo. His picture of the city 
has been compared to Dickens’s Lon- 
don or Zola’s Paris. 


His masterpiece, “Tbe Cairo Tril- 
ogy," follows the fortunes of the Abd- 
el Gawad family over 27 years and 
both world wars. The work was writ- 
ten between 1945 and 1957. 

The author has published nearly 40 
novels and a dozen collections of sto- 
ries. 

A diabetic who suffers from failing 
eyesight and poor hearing, he seldom 
leaves Cairo and lives in a modest 
apartment with bis wife and two 
daughters. He has repeatedly refusal 
offers of police protection, despite the 
death threats. 

The government has been running 
numerous movies and programs based 
on his novels and snort stories on 
television, as well as old interviews 
and documentaries about his life and 
work. His condition is reported in the 
daily news bulletins. 

"Naguib and his book are being 
used in the government’s battle 
against Islamic militants,” Saleh said. 
“Government ministers have walked 
into the intensive care unit, and his 
hospital room, with cameras and 
lights to film themselves with him. 
One day they delayed his meal for an 
hour because someone from Egyptian 
television had arrived to take some 
more pictures. He was furious.” 


people 

Leonardo Manuscript 

To Spend a Year in tody 

Italy lost out in the bidding, 
but Italians will still get to ad- 
mire a Leonardo da Vind manu- 
script bought at auction for a 
record S30.8 million. Cariplo, 
the Milan-based bank that was 
outbid by BiB Gates in the auc- 
tion at Christie’s in New York, 
said Tuesday that Gates will 
loan the manuscript to the bank 
for a full year. 'Hie 72-page 
manuscript, compiled between 
1508 and 1510, has been out of 
Italy for centuries. 

□ 

Charles McGrath, deputy 
editor of The New Yorker, will 
succeed Rebecca Pepper 
Snider as editor of The New 
York Times Book Review. He 
takes over in March. 

□ 

Kidd Lake, host of the syndi- 
cated “Ricki Lake Show,” spent 
the night in jail after she and 15 
other anti-fur protesters 
stormed the New York offices, 
of Karl Lagerfeld. The members 
of People for the Ethical Treat- 
ment of Animals put anti-fnf 
stickers on the walls, clothing 
and handbags, the police said. 
Lake and several others hand- 
cuffed themseives together and 
refused to leave. The protest 
were charged with third-degree 
burglary and second-degree 
criminal mischief. 

□ 

Retired General Colin L 
Powell, 57. will be given two 
honors next month in Jamaica: 
the government’s Order of Ja- 
maica, its equivalent of knight- 
hood. and an honorary doctor- 
ate degree in law from the 
University of the West Indies. 

□ 

Princess Diana, stepping up 
her charity work after a year of 
self-imposed semi-retirement, 
visited a hospital for Scotland's 
most violent mental patients in 
Strathclyde on Tuesday. She 
met some of the patients during 
a private visit, a spokesman for 
the State Hospital said. 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 



Htfi 

Low 

W 

Klflfl 

LOW 

W 


Of 

at 


OP 

C/c 


Aigaiva 

23/73 

13/55 

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22.71 

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11.62 

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10.50 

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13/55 

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2170 

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15/58 

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14/57 

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9.46 

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8/46 

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12/53 

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27180 

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Uaand 

18/64 

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307 

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Vienna 

7*44 

439 

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Warsaw 

6/43 

3/37 

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5«1 

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Auddand 

20/68 

12/53 a 

20*8 

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Sveney 

25/77 

18*4 PC 

29/64 

17/82 a 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



North America Europe Asia 

Moisture horn Tropical Storm Spain and Portugal wll have Showers will travel across 
Gordon will mch northward dry. pleasant weather talar central and eastern China 
along the East Coast, posw- this week. Rain wH develop Thursday, reaching Japan by 
Ny reaching Virginia by Frf- over south central Europe Friday. Hong Kong and 
day. New York will be dty Thursday and continue Fit- Bangkok will have dry 
and mild Thursday and Fd- day. The AJpa will have a weather Thursday, then 
day. with a how era possible freeh blanket of enow Thurs- maybe a few showers Friday 
Saturday. Showers wik occur day. London. Paris and and Saturday. In Mania, the 

in Chicago Thursday, and In Frankfurt will have dry. mHd weather will be dry for the 

Toronto Friday. weeUier late Oils week. most part, but a passing 

shower la poasMe. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


today To 

Mgh Law W High Law W 
OF OF OF OF 

Berm 1906 16*1 on 22 m 17* sti 

Cairo 21/TO 13*5 C 22/71 14*7 sti 

Damascus 1-WE7 BM8 c 16161 9 <46 Mi 

Jsnaatom 15/50 12*3 c 17162 12/53 Mi 

Luux 22/71 7/44 pc 21/70 BMS Mi 

R/jraon 3166 22/71 I 26/82 17/82 Ml 


Today 

Ht#i Low W High Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

BumaAkw 26/82 14/57 a 24/75 13<5S pc 

Caracas 28, TM 20*8 pc 26/62 21/70 pc 

Lima 20/68 17*2 a 21/70 17«2 pc 

Mexico C0y 23/73 10/50 pc 23/73 0/48 pc 

ROttJamao 2B/7B 21/70 pc 27/80 21/70 Mi 

Bamboo 26/79 BMS S 94/75 1152 pc 


Logond: s-njrmy. pc-panly dourly, c-doudy. Mvshowgrs, HtttMideretorma. r-raln. tf-snow ft/msa. 
sn-snow, mx. w-Waatiw. M maps, foracaats and data provided by Accu-Weather, lno.e IBM 


Asia 


Today 

Tomorrow 


Mgh 

LOW W 

Hgh 

LOW W 


C/F 

OF 

C/F 

C/F 

Bangkok 

31.68 

23(73 pc 

29*4 

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Hong Kong 

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27/80 

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Mania 

32*8 

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32/89 

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29*4 

13/55 6 

28*4 

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Tokyo 

14-57 

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22/71 

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Casananca 

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i 


The Body Outline, a Profitable Symbol for the Nineties 


By John Marchese 

New York Tima Service 

When Michael Carr felt compelled sev- 
eral years ago to produce art that would 
commemorate the escalating number of 
violent deaths in Washington, one image 
haunted him. So he went into an alley near 
his home in that city’s northwest quadrant 
and began painting outlines of bodies in 
the style he had seen at tbe scenes of 
homicides in movies and on television. 

By the end of 1992, he had painted 452 
body outlines in acrylic bouse painL get- 
ting the attention of media and neighbors. 

“It is a powerful subconscious image,” 
Carr said. 

So powerful that when Steve Lopez, a 
columnist at The Philadelphia Inquirer, 
was writing a novel "Third and Indiana,” 
in 1993 (recently published by Viking), he 
had a main character paint similar images 
on a stretch of Broad Street. 

A body outline dominates a huge banner 
on the dome of the Liberty Science Center 
in Jersey City, in full view of thousands of 
commuters using the Holland Tunnel. The 


banner is for an exhibition on forensic 
science, “Whodunit" 

Every now and then a symbol makes its 
mark: the peace sign, for instance, or the 
ubiquitous nose and eyes of Kilroy during 
and after World War H. The odd thing 
about the body outline, though, is that it is 
used by artists and novelists, gag writers 
and orga n izers — but not the police. 

Lieutenant Donald Stephenson, com- 
manding officer of the New York Police 
Department’s crime scene unit, said the 
police abandoned its use after many de- 
fense lawyers contended the chalk outline 
tainted evidence from a crime scene. 

But, he conceded, "It's graphic and it 
has something that captures the Imagina- 
tion of the viewing public. It sticks in 
people's minds.” 

"Techniques of Crime Scene Investiga- 
tion,” a book by Barry Fisher, director of 
the Los Angeles County sheriff’s crime lab. 
has the image on its cover. 

“I wish I could take credit for the cov- 


er,” Fisher said. "But it was some graphic 
artist’s notion of what a crime scene looks 
like. It's a figment of the media's imagina- 
tion, more a caricature than reality.” v 

But the selling power of tbe body outline 
has made the Los Angeles County coro- 
ner’s office probably the only one’ in the 
country with a marketing coordinator. She 
is Marilyn Lewis, who helped start a prod- 
uct line" featuring body outlines in 1993. 
Products include watches, coffee mugs, 
beach towels, T-shirts and boxer shorts, 
and are sold through a catalogue and in a 
gift shop at the coroner's office. So far, 
they have raised $300,000, she said, with 
proceeds used to run an education pro- 
gram for first-time drunken drivers. 

At the Liberty Science Center, Elizabeth 
Graham, a spokeswoman, said that a line 
of black T-shirts for the “Whodunit" exhi- 
bition, featuring a white body nu llin g are 
difficult to keep in stock. 

And so, the chalk body outline will 
probably remain ubiquitous, even though 
its original use is obsolete. 



With AT&T USADirect® and 
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