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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 






PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Paris, Monday, November 21, 1994 


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French Political Winds 
Cool Franc’s Prospects 

ElectionTurbulence Makes Currency 
Potentially Vulnerable , Experts Say 


By Alan Friedman 

. International Herald Tribune 

PAR IS — As France heads into an in- 
creasingly bitter and divisive presidential 
campaign, economists say the French 
franc is most likely to be a prime victim of 
the turbulence. 

Uncertainty about the outcome of next 
spring's election, as well as a series of 
political corruption scandals that have 
.weakened the standing of Prime Minister 
Edouard Ballad ur, has cooled investor sen- 
timent and left the franc more potentially 
vulnerable than at any lime since it was at 
the center of the European currency crisis 
in mid- 1993. 

In 1993, France clung to high interest 
rates in order to defend its strong-franc 
policy amid deep recession, even as the 
crisis blew apart the European exchange 
rate mec hanism. 

As a result of current election fears, 
analysts say big investors have become 


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increasingly cautious, and some have been 
ptdfijztg out of .French . assets in recent 

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beenthema- 

jor factor in weakeningthe French franc 
since fbe summer, and politics wiR contin- 
ue to dominate sentiment on the franc 
until the election is out the way," said 
Avinash Persaud, head of. cuarency re- 
search for J. P. Morgan in London. On 
Monday, the U.S. investment bank will 
issue a special report by Mr. Persaud that 
warns of the franc's potential weakness. 

While senior French officials like Jean- 
Claude Trichet, governor of the Bank of 
France, insist that the franc re m a in s sta- 
ble, several economists said the cloudy 
political outlook had created a “ride pre- 
mium” for the franc 

The French currency — which fluctu- 
ates in a narrow band against the Deutsche 
mar k — has weakened to a low of nearly 
3.44 francs to the mark in recent days, 
from about 3.40 francs in June. This is 
significant because the franc-mark level 
counts more than any other relationship 


looked at by the market and investors in 
French assets. 

The franc has performed much better 
against the dollar because of the persistent 
wea kn ess of the U.S. currency in recent 
months. The dollar has fallen from about 
5.70 francs in June to around 5.30 francs at 
present, and it is expected to trade in a 
range of between 5.00 and 5.50 in coming 
months. 

“Up to the election you can't rule out 
further franc weakness,” said Jean-Fran- 
fois Merrier, an economist at Salomon 
Brothers in London. “The election looks 
quite uncertain. It is a fairly close call.” 

What is especially frustrating for de- 
fenders of the franc in Paris is the fact that 
except for its fiscal deficit and high unem- 
ployment rate, most of France's economic 
fundamentals now look better than they 
have for years. 

The view of many in the financial mar- 
kets is that these otherwise promising sig- 
nals — including low inflation, unexpect- 
edly robust economic growth and an 
improving trade surplus — will only have a 
positive impact on the franc after a new 
president is chosen. 

Although it will probably strengthen af- 
ter the elections, between now and next 
spring the franc couJd be susceptible to 
volatility as a result of such factors as 
these: 

• A series of contradictory remarks 
about monetary policy by Jacques Chirac, 
the mayor of Paris, who is the first de- 
clared candidate in the race to succeed 
President Francois Mitterrand. 

• A siring of political corruption scan- 
dals that have already forced three minis - 
ters to leave the government and that have 
ta rnishe d Mr. BaOadur’s reputation and 
reduced his chances of beating Mr. Chirac 
for the presidential nomination. 

• A sense that the newly independent 
Bank erf France, defender of the national 
currency, has yet to establish its credibility 
in a decisive way. 

• Cancan that not enough has been 
done to tackle the serious structural prob- 
lems causing France's high public-sector 
budget deficit, and that the ] 99 4 target has 
been met largely thanks to beuer-than- 
cxpected growth, winch produced higher- 
thanranticipatedtax revenues. 

• Worries about France's stubbornly 
high 12.7 percent unemployment rate, and 
itsimpheafions for future efforts to rein in 


Last week, Mr. Chirac tried to soften the 
impact of his call for a new referendum on 
a single European currency and his state- 
ment that battling unemployment was as 
important as monetary stability. Those re- 
marks had dented the franc’s standing 
against the Deutsche mark. 

In his latest comments, Mr. Chirac said 
monetary stability remained among his 
top priorities, bat his clarification was not 
taken as seriously by international observ- 
ers as it was by domestic officials. 

Edmond Alphandfery, France’s econo- 
my minister, tried to put a brave face on 
Nfr. Chirac’s flip-flop, saying in an inter- 
view that “While it is not my job to inter- 

See FRANCE, Page 11 



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Jacqucfanc Aml'The AuociORd Pto> 

Danish UN soMiers in Sarajevo scanning a hilltop Sunday after UN troops stationed in Bosnia were put on red alert. 

Democracy Breaks Out in Southern Africa 


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By Bill Keller 

New York runes Seme e 

LUSAKA, Zambia — As a meeting of 
southern African leaders was winding 
down last month. Frederick Chiluba, the 
elfin forma union leader who is now the 
president of Zambia, lapsed into a pensive 
monologue. 

Maybe Africa was not really cut out for 
Western-style democracy, he told his fel- 
low heads of state with a sigh. How could a 
president get anything done with oppo- 
nents constantly carping at him? Maybe 
the one-party state was the way to go, after 
alL 

“To run our countries effectively, we 
have to be securely in control," he said, 
according to another participant in the 


meeting. Soon, leaders from South Africa 
and Zimbabwe, Botswana and Mozam- 
bique were all embroiled in this philosoph- 
ical debate. 

Not long ago, it would have been hard to 
find a quorum of African leaders who 
could argue from experience about the 
frustrations of democracy. 

But while much of the continent lan- 
guishes under warlords, despots or martial 
rule, southern Africa is coalescing into a 
region of peace and political pluralism, 
sometimes crudely honored but remark- 
able by African standards. 

Already this year three erf the 10 coun- 
tries that make up the bottom third of 
Africa — South Africa, Mozambique and 
Malawi — have settled domestic conflicts 


through negotiation and elections and 
joined the club erf novice democracies. 

On Saturday, leaders from across the 
southern part of the continent converged 
on this placid capital hoping to induct 
their newest recruit — Angola, a country 
that has spent most of the last 33 years at 
war. 

Eduardo dos Santos, the Angolan presi- 
dent arrived Saturday for the scheduled 
signing Sunday of a treaty promising a 
cease-are and a share of power for the 
Unita rebel movement 

But UN officials said Saturday night 
that the rebel leader, Jonas Savimbi, had 
refused to come for fear of his personal 

See AFRICA, Page 4 


No. 34,751 

NATO Strikes 
Authorized in 
Croatian Area 
Until Friday 

Security Council Acts 
After Zagreb Agrees to 
Missions Agqinst Serbs 

By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — NATO military com- 
manders said Sunday that they had full 
authority from both the Ltaited Nations 
and alliance headquarters in Brussels to 
launch air strikes against an air base in 
Serbian-held territory in Croatia, but only 
until Friday. 

NATO ambassadors endorsed a Securi- 
ty Counti] decision late Saturday to autho- 
rize strikes against targets in Croatia that 
the Serbs used to launch two air raids 
against the Muslim enclave of Bihac in 
northwestern Bosnia. 

The Croatian government gave the 
United Nations a free hand ova airspace 
in the area for one week from 8 PM. local 
time Friday, a NATO military officer said. 

“We can take the fight into Croatia if we 
have to until 8 PM next Friday, and after 
that everything is subject to negotiation,” 
the officer said. 

The United Nations has declared the 
area around Bihac a “protected zone,” but 
Serbian jets from Udbina airport in Serbi- 
an-bdd Croatia dropped napalm on Bihac 
last Friday and bombed and strafed the 
town of Cazin, about 15 kilometers (10 
miles) north of Bihac, on Saturday without 
any NATO response. (Page 2.) 

One reason why NATO did not immedi- 
ately respond, according to officers, was 
that the UN forces on the ground in Bihac 
are HI equipped to call in air strikes or to 
defend themselves against retaliation. 

The main UN presence in the area is a 
battalion of about 1,000 lightly armed sol- 
diers from Bangladesh. Only a quarter of 
them are said to have rifles, and they have 
beat prevented from receiving supplies by 
a Serbian blockade. 

Rebel M uslim troops opposed to the 
Muslim-led Bosnian government in Sara- 
jevo are also involved in the fighting. 

Colonel J. C. Lemieux, a Canadian off i- 
cer with the UN forces, said, according to 
Reuters Sunday, that the Serbian attacks 
on Bihac and Cazin were intolerable. "I 
have personally and urgently appealed to 
my superiors to do their utmost to stop 
these outrageous violations of internation- 
al law,” he said. 

Last year, the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization agreed to back up the UN 
forces in Bosnia with air strikes and air 
support if they requested it, but the alli- 
ance has no authority from the United 
Nations to act on its own. Until Saturday, 
NATO pilots trying to protect the zone 
around Bihac could not fly in Croatian 
airspace or launch strikes against the air- 
port in Udbina. 

On Saturday, the Security Council au- 
thorized retaliation, and the NATO am- 
bassadors in Brussels agreed that Admiral 
Leighton Smith, the NATO commander in 
Naples, could launch bombing missions in 
Serbian-held Croatia if UN civilian and 
See NATO, Page 4 


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Helms Attack on Clinton Called ‘Reckless 9 



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By Paul F. Horvitz 

Internationa/ fftraSI Tribune 

WASHINGTON — A debate over Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton's credentials to head the 
nation's mili tary turned raw on Sunday 
with the White House branding as “reck- 
less” a leading Republican senator’s criti- 
cism of the president’s abilities. 

The senator, Jesse Helms of North Car- 
olina, one of the White House's most per- 
sistent critics, ignited the controversy in a 
interview televised Saturday, saying Mr. 
Clin ton was not up to the job of command- 
ing the UJS. mili tary and that some officers 
felt tiie same way. 


Responding Sunday, Leon E. Panetta, 
the White House chief erf staff, called the 
comments “certainly reckless.” 

“They send terrible signals abroad to 
both our enemies and our allies about our 
ability to come together on foreign affairs 
issues,” he said. “And they send a terrible 
signal to the troops, most of whom are 
loyal to this president” 

Mr. Helms’s opinion resonated widely 
because he will become chairman of the 
Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 
January. 

General John M. Shalikashvili, chair- 
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, tele- 


Svm Nadairand/Agencc Frans*- PttMe 

Family and friends at the funeral on Sunday of Gil Dadon, an Israeli Ann; officer wbo was killed in the Gaza Strip. 

Peace Depends on Aid, Palestinians Warn 

■' about 200 on Friday, officials turned their month, Mr. Shaath said it had to end what 


Judge’s Vanity , Not O, J,, 
Becomes Talk of the Trial 




phoned reporters ova the weekend to re- 
but any suggestion that the nation's 
military leaders have a low opinion of Mr. 
Clinton or that they are not completely 
loyal to him. 

In a televised interview on Sunday, a 
leading Senate Democrat, Christopher J. 
Dodd of Connecticut, said Senator 
Helms’s remarks “undermine the presi- 
dent” and come dose to “aiding and abet- 
ting insubordination.” 

But some leading Republicans, includ- 
ing the party’s Senate leader, Bob Dole of 

See HELMS, Page 4 


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■' about 200 on Friday, officials turned their month, Mr. Shaath said it had to end what 

By Qyde Habennan attention to what many here regard as a he called a “siege of starvation” andspeed 

Sc* York Tima Sernct ^asic ca^ of unrest: imbedded poverty up its pledged payments to the self-rule 

GAZA CITY — In an urgent plea for ^ the hopes raised when Yasser government, 

economic help, the FMtman self-rute Antoft Palestinian Authority came into Two days after tbe ^worst violet imnce 
anuprmnmt Sunday on Israel to lift u_:_„ h fl ]f a year ago. self-rule began — with Mr. Arafat s police 

of starvation” of the Gaza Strip pdeaiman officials warned that force stunning and enraging Palestinians 

Md wit Bank, and told foreign countries cM ^ chaos and that by repeatedly opening fire on street pro- 

S it w^Tow or never” to carry out East peace talks cm^coltanse testos ~ Gaza was relatively qmet on 

their unfulfilled pledges of aid- unless money started pouring m fast Thai Sunday. At a news confereora, Mr . Shaath 

mar uniumu p diwrders that ^ ^ echoed by United Nations repre- asserted confidently that “peace, security 

v,?. 1 ? noS ^ntativ^ld fwdgn diplomats, who <fc- and tranquility had been instored to evoy 

killed at least 13 Gazans missed as a failure the effort thus far by so- Palestinian m the Ga 2 a Strip. 

called donor countries. But Gaza was far from normal Tensions 

“It is now or never ” Nabil Shaath, a key remained high, as dKWnby burning tires 

said of countries that on tbe roads and shuttered shop windows. 
iiSlSS ^tihless than $200 mil- And even though militant Islamic groups 


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which cut the number of Mahmoud Zahar, a leader of the main 
wt£k f SrS^forM«tiiiiaiis by two- Islamic organization, Hamas, warned that 
Xbdsafus^ series of terrorist attacks last See GAZA* Page 4 


yil iliU JUdUJ ouu AUUUWMI Mxvy nuiuvnih 

And even though militant Islamic groups 
and Mr. Arafat’s authority held negotia- 
tions to turn a temporary truce into a more 
lasting agreement, the menace of renewed 
battles hovered above them. 

Mahmoud Zahar, a leader of the main 


By Joel Achenbach 

Washington Pan Service 

LOS ANGELES — Lance A. Ito, 
prankster, a funny guy as judges go, is in 
a dour and snippety mood. He’s having a 
bad day in a horrible week. He looks 
glum. He’s not joking as he usually does. 
He's not himself. 

He’s not the Lance Ito who as a young 
lawyer had a license plate that said 
“7BOZOS” in honor of the California 
Supreme Court He’s not the Lance Ito 
who once infested a colleague’s office 
with pigeons. He's not the Lance Ito who 
has a Doberman named Gillis, as in 
Dobie GiUis. What he is on this particu- 
lar afternoon in November is the Lance 
Ito who blundered, who opened his 
mouth at the wrong time and managed to 
gel almost everyone angry at him. And 
he's the Lance Ito whose wife, a high- 
ranking Los Angeles police officer, is 
about to be dragged into the maw of the 
O.J. Simpson trial. 

There is a faint crackling in the court- 
room. It comes from the direction of 
Marcia Clark, the prosecutor. She is fid- 


dling with something, maybe a candy 
wrapper. A couple erf opposing attorneys 
start squabbling over something, talking 
at the same time as the court stenogra- 
pher struggles to get it all down. Judge 
Ito suddenly declares, in a humorless, 
schoo l nm imi s h tone, “One counsel gets 
to address the court, preferably the one 
that’s not eating.” 

He looks at Ms. Clark. She freezes. 
Then she looks at her co-counsel in con- 
sternation. She wasn’t eating anything. 
The moment passes. Court resumes. But 
the man up there on the bench this day is 
definitely not Lance Ito. 

Officially, of course, it is O. J. Simi>- 
son who is on trial, and the charge is 
murdering Nicole Brown Simpson and 
Ronald L. Goldman. But last week, that 
was just a legal technicality. Judge Ito 
was all anyone was talking about. The 
charge was arrogance, vanity, foolish- 
ness. 

Normally judges are reserved, and 
Judge Ito was considered low-key until 
the Simpson case. But he has surprised 

See HO, Page 4 


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Dooglai CbmUa/Tbe Wading wn Put 

Cab Calloway dies at 86. Page 4. 

IRA Admits It Killed 

Ulster Postal Worker 

DUBLIN (AFP) — The Irish Re- 
publican Army admitted responsibil- 
ity for the fatal shooting of a postal 
worker in Northern Ir eland on Nov. 
11. It blamed the killing, a violation of 
the 10- week cease-fire that threatened 
to undermine the peace process, on a 
“problem” in the c hain of command. 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


! UN on Alert as Tensions Rise in Bosnia 


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By John Pomfret 

Washington Past Serrict 

ZAGREB, Croatia — The 
UN operation placed its 43,000 
soldiers on red alert and NATO 
warplanes stood by on aircraft 
carriers and airfields Sunday as 
UN and NATO officials con- 
sidered l aunching air strikes 
against rebel Serbs. 

But the officials emphasized 
that the increasingly explosive 
situation in the Balkans and the 
weakness of the lightly armed 
UN force was limiting their op- 
tions. 

Air strikes could trigger a 
wider war in the Balkans by 
prompting a Serbian attack on 
Croatia after almost two years 
here of uneasy peace. 

But doing nothing would fur- 
ther erode the already meager 
authority possessed by the UN 
missi on here, and it could invite 
retribution from Bosnian Mus- 
lim fighters and riviHans fed up 
with 31 months of international 
inac tion and apparent indiffer- 
ence to their plight. 

Once again in the Balkans, 
the United Nations appears to 
have no way out. 


"We’ve reviewed the options 
and all of them are bad," said a 
UN official after meetings Sun- 
day to discuss a plan of action. 

The discussions followed the 
second consecutive day that 
Serbian fighter jets had 
launched bombing raids on the 
Muslim enclave of Bihac in 
northwestern Bosnia. 

Sarajevo radio reported that 
an 1 1-year-old boy died of in ju- 
ries after one of the two Serbian 
Oreo jet fighters crashed into 
an apartment block filled with 
refugees. Three unexploded 
bombs also were discovered 
near the area, including one 
bomb hanging off a balcony in 
an apartment block. 

Saturday’s Serbian strike oc- 
curred as the UN Security 
Council authorized NATO to 
attack Serbian targets in Cro- 
atia, including the Udbina air- 
field where the Serbian aircraft 
are based. 

It marked the first time that 
the Security CooncS had sanc- 
tioned air strikes on Serbian 
forces or installations inside 
Croatian territory, a move 
backed by the Croatian govern- 


ment Previous resolutions have 
all concerned Bosnia. 

Meanwhile, Bosnian Serbian 
forces around Bihac kept up 
their offensive from the east 
and the Bo snian government 
claimed Serbian tanks had ad- 
vanced to the edge of the UN- 
designated "safe area.” 

In addition, rebel Muslims 
loyal to a renegade Bosnian 
businessman continued to bat- 
tle government troops loyal to 
the mostly Muslim army in the 
north of the enclave. Croatian 
Serbs were providing fire and 
logistical support to the rebel 
Muslim troops and some of 
their fighters had crossed the 
border to join the fray. 

By authorizing the use of air 
power against Croatian Serbian 
targets, the Security Council 
could be leading the Balkans 
toward a wider war, some UN 
officials fear. 

For more than two years 
now, Croatian forces and the 
Serbian rebels who occupy 27 
percent of the country have 
faced off uneasily following a 
war in 1991 over Croatia's se- 


U.S. Denies European Claims 
Ii Is Aiding Bosnian Muslims 


Washington Past Service 

ZAGREB, Croatia — Recent 
reports in Europe that the Unit- 
ed States is covertly aiding the 
Bo snian Muslims are strongly 
denied by American officials 
and appear to be inaccurate in 
many details. 

The frequency of these sto- 
ries, based on claims by uniden- 
tified European officials and 
United Nations officers, in- 
creased last week after the Clin- 
ton adminis tration derided to 

S tarring a regional aims 
against Bosnia's Mus- 
ovemmenL 

Foreign Minister Alain 
Juppfc of France, miffed at the 
U.S. move, entered the fray 
Wednesday, urging “the Anglo- 
Saxon press to investigate the 
supply of arms to Bosnia.” 

The U.S. Defense Depart- 
ment and the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency have denied the 
reports. 

In interviews, a senior Ameri- 
can military official, UN offi- 
cers and Western diplomats dis- 


puted the specific c laims made 
in these stories. 

A senior West European dip- 
lomat accused the French of 
using the subject as a way to 
punish the United States for 
breaking ranks with Britain and 
France, which oppose any 
moves to exempt Bosnia's Mus- 
lims from the arms embargo im- 
posed by the Security Council 
m 1991 on Yugoslavia and its 
former republics. 

In European newspapers, de- 
tails of possible Ui>. military 
involvement are scant, but three 
main claims are repeated: 

• That U.S. military officers 
agreed to share sensitive satel- 
lite information with the pre- 
dominantly Muslim Bosnian 
Army during a “secret” meeting 
in the central Bosnian town of 
Gomji Vakuf and that General 
Charles Boyd of the U.S. Air 
Force, a deputy commander of 
U.S. forces in Europe, who al- 
legedly was chairman at the 
meeting, would be leading CIA 
teams on covert operations. 



BREITLING 


1884 



mnim 


AEROSPACE 

Altitude, speed and time are still shown in modem cockpits by means of a 
potato or need le - pre ci se ly because this sort of indicator sweeping over 
a circular gauge is what a pilot sees best particularly when he also has to 
keep track at connttew other ' p i ec e s of Information. 

Bui readouts can for instance provide times to 7100th of a second 

and alphanumerical data along with simplifying the setting of 
programable functions. 

These display principles contribute to the Aerospace's design excellence 
which, in turn, explains Its selection as the personal instrument of many of 
the Murid's finest aerobatics teams. 


BREITLING SA 
P.O. Box 1132 

SWITZERLAND - 2540 CRENCHEN 


TeU 41 65 / 51 11 31 
Fax.: 41 65 / 53 10 09 


INSTRUMENTS FOR PROFESSIONALS 


• That U.S. military advisers 
are working to finish an airfield 
between the central Bosnian 
towns of Visoko and Kakanj, 
which, depending on the ac- 
count, is already being used or 
will be used to ferry in weapons 
in violation of the international 
arms embargo on Bosnia. 

• That a team of U.S. officers 
led by General John Galvin, re- 
tired, mil arrive in Sarajevo 
“shortly" to train senior staff in 
a joint Muslim-Croatian army. 

According to a senior U.S. 
nnlitaiy official, die meeting in 
Gomji Vakuf took place Sept 4 
and was led not by General 
Boyd but by Richard Hol- 
brooke. the assistant secretary 
of state for European affairs. 

Mr. Holbrooke was in Bosnia 
on a publicly announced fact- 
finding mission to determine 
what needed to be done to bol- 
ster the Croatian-Muslim feder- 
ation, which was brokered by 
the U.S. government in March. 

General Boyd was at the 
meeting almost incidentally, the 
senior U.S. military official 
said; the air force general is an 
acquaintance of Mr. Hol- 
brooke’s and derided to make 
use of the trip to see Bosnia. 

The meeting in Gomji Vakuf 
was also attended by the British 
co mman der of UN trOOpS in 
the region — and if such a deal 
was being worked out, a UN 
general would hardly have been 
mvited. The U.S. military offi- 
cer said that no discussions 
were held on the supply of satel- 
lite information and that no 
plans were hatched under 
which CIA agents would lead 
covert operations. 

The military official also de- 
nied reports that U.S. opera- 
tives had helped build an air- 
field near Visoko. 

Finally, reports originated by 
officials in the Croatian De- 
fense Ministry, that IS U.S. of- 
ficers led by General Galvin 
would soon arrive in Sarajevo 
to train officers of the Muslim- 
Croatian federation, also ap- 
pear wrong. No such team is 
planned, the U.S. officer said. 

JOHN POMFRET 


cession Hiram Yugoslavia. The 
two sides recently concluded an 
agreement to restart limited 
economic ties for the first time 
since 1991. But following the 
Serbian air strikes, the Croatian 
Serbian Parliament rriected the 
deaL. 

By attacking Udbina airfield, 
near Croatia’s border with Bos- 
nia, NATO could prompt a Ser- 
bian assault on Croatia, fol- 
lowed by a counterattack; by 
Croatia — and Bosnia’s war 
would have overflowed its bor- 
ders. 

Milan Martic, president of 
the Croatian Serbs’ self-styled 
Republic of Srpska Krajina, 
threatened as much rax Satur- 
day. 

NATO, officials said they 
shared UN anxiety that a strike 
against Udbina could have a 
domino effect and widen the 
war. 

“One of the real problems for 
Croatia is what will the Krajina 
Serbs do if there’s an attack on 
their territory, given that 
they've had a cease-fire for a 
while now,” a NATO officer 
said. “It could get really ugly.” 



Qkg Popor/RcMoi 


A class of drildren 


to read Arabic at a refugee camp boosing 500 Muslims near Zenica, Bosnia. 


In Iran, a Crisis of Confidence 

Economic Malaise Sets Off Student Protests 


New York Tima Service 

TEHRAN — Iranian dem- 
onstrators took timeout from 
a week of state-sponsored 
anti-American rallies recently 
to redirect their anger against 
the hlamifi government and 
economic policies that have 
created a crisis of inflation. 

During a demonstration 
this month commemorating 
the takeover of the UJ5. Em- 
bassy dining the Iran hostage 
crisis in 1979, nearly 500 stu- 
dents called for the execution 
of “capitalists” and de- 
nounced lawmakers for fa- 
voring wealthy merchants 
over low-income groups. 

“Free market economic 
policies must be corrected,” 
the protesters chanted. “The 
system must help the poor.” 

The protest, the second in 
two weeks at Tehran Univer- 
sity, was only the latest exam- 
ple of unrest signaling a crisis 
of confidence m the govern- 
ment 

In October, 800 students 
marched to protest legislation 
that would have required 
them to pay if they faded a 
course, although there is no 
tuition at the university. After _. 
the protest, Parliament de- 
feated the bin. 

Senior government offi- 
cials promised to continue a 
previously announced crack- 
down on speculators and 
profiteers hoarding large 
amounts of food after the 
government imposed price 


controls. But the economy 
has sent few encouraging 
signs. 

Industrial growth stands at 
I percent this year and buy- 
ing power has been under- 
mined by uncontrolled infla- 
tion that has sent some food 
prices up by as much as 4,000 
percent since March. 

“If structural changes are 
not made, social and econom- 
ic opposition can turn into 
political opposition,” said 
Phang T7. Pahla van. a political 
scientist in Tehran. “On the 
one hand, the state is reluc- 
tant to bring about change 
because they fear that public 

o^^^without^iange, they 
face a serious challenge. The 
official thinking is that if they 
put the crisis behind them, 
they will survive.” 

The crackdown an profi- 
teers, planned after a series of 
urban riots in 1992, was inter- 
preted by political scientists 
and economists in Iran as a 
short-term remedy, neglect- 
ing the more fundamental is- 
sues: curbing government 
control of the economy and 
fostering competition. 

With prices on some basic 
foods firing 100 to 4,000 per- 
cent since March, the govern- 
ment issued a list of regulated’ 
prices. In October, it threat- 
ened violators with financial 
penalties and flogging. 


Then the police, judicial 
authorities and civilian- 
clothed Bossy, veterans of the 
Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s, 
raided dozens of supermar- 
kets and warehouses in a na- 
tionwide campaign. The raids 
yielded thousands of tons of 
hidden food supplies that 
merchants were accused of 
hoarding after the system of 
price controls took effect, the 
Kcyhan newspaper reported. 

President Hashemi Raf- 
sanjani announced this 
month that the crackdown 
against profiteers was part of 
an effort to turn the open 
market intn an “ Islamic mar- 
ket" where profit would have 
to be fair. 

Analysts attribute the vola- 
tility of Iran’s economic tran- 
sition to a lack of long-term 
planning , the emergence of 
monopolies and oligopolies 
that prevent market forces 
from working properly. 

“We have a hodgepodge 
economy,” said Kamal A th- 
an, an economist and re- 
searcher at the state-run Ur- 
ban Planning Center. 
“Wealthy bazaar business- 
men and special interest 
groups have formed monopo- 
lies engaging in foreign trade 
and buying state-owned in- 
dustries. Ibis has prevented 
real privatization and the 
emergence of entrepreneurs, 
impending recovery, especial- 
ly in the industrial sector.” 


Muslims Urged to Target Clinton 


RaOm 

TEHRAN — A leading Iranian hard-liner. 
Ah Akbar Mohtashami, in an interview pub- 
lished Sunday, called cm Muslims to avenge 
the trilling of more than a dozen Gazans by 
targeting President Bill Clinton and Israeli 
leaders. 

“Definitely the revenge should target the 
real terrorists: criminal Amoicans and the 
Zionists who have bases in the heart of Tel 
Aviv and other places,” he told the Jahan 
Eslam newspaper. 

He said that Mr. Clinton, Prime Minister 


Yitzhak Rabin of Israel and Yitzhak Shamir, 
a former Israeli prime minister, “are directly 
behind this crime which was only carried out 
by Arafat." 

He was referring to Yasser Arafat, the 
leader of the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. “Naturally, Arafat and his clique come 
next in line to be punished,” he added. 

Mr. Mohtashami has been an the sidelines 
of Iranian politics for the past two years 
following the defeat of his radical faction in 
elections. 


WORLD BRIEFS , 

Ireland’s Probable New Leader Vow 
To Give Priority to the Peace Process 

LONDON (Rentes) — Bertie Ahem, who is expected to 
become Ireland’s new prime minister, pledged Sunday to get the 
Northern Ireland peace process bade cm track after a traumatic 
political week in the republic. 

Mr. Ahem, 43, who was elected unopposed on Saturday as 
leader of Fiartna Fail, Irdantfs largest political party, said in a 
television interview: “Peace on the island, saving lives is more 
important than any other political objective.” 

He now faces delicate badtroom negotiations with the Labo r 
Party, Hanna Fail’s coalition partners who brought down Prime , 
Minis ter Albert Reynolds over his handling of an extradition case. 

Mr. Ahem, who currently is finance minis ter and is the youn- 
gest leader in his party’s 70-year history, said: “Whatever we do, 
we must try to end the political instability, build on the peace 
process and try and get mat bade on the rafls quickly.” . 


7 Share First U.K. Lottery Jackpot 

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s first lottery attracted nearly 25 
million people, the organizers said Sunday, and the £5.9 
million jackpot will be shared among seven winning tickets. 

The company that runs the lottery, Camdot Group PLC, 
that bettors spent around £49 million on tickets. 
The odds of correctly guessing the six winning numbers from 
3 to 49 were nearly 14 milli on to 1. Proceeds from the lottery 
will support the arts, sports and charities. 


Near The Champs EutS£es, 

A Real Taste Of Pams 

Paris Tradition Special s* 
Hotel Royal Monceau " V 

Smgk RooouIT165Q per night -Doable Room: FF 1950 per nigh* 
37. avenue Hodar- 75008 Pwa - Fiance 
TeL 03) 145 61 06 98 /fix (33) 142 9* 89 » 

. Hotel Vernet 

Single Room: IF 1400 per night - Doable {foam: FF 1550 per n%ht 
25. roc Vernet- 75008 Pin*- France 
TeL (33 1 44 31 08 70 03) I 44 31 85 69 

* 


Groupe Royal Monceau 

“Luxury with the French Touch" - . . 

•A pfifcah tc e»cey week-end und March 31 w. I“>95 and diHy in December 1994. 


13 Killed in Pakistani Port 
As Rival Factions Do Battle 


Agence Frmce-Prate 
KARACHI, Pakistan — The 
death toll in two days of unrest 
has risen to 13 in this southern 
Pakistan port city, local hospi- 


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tals said Sunday, as clashes con- 
tinued between two rival fac- 
tious of the ethnic Muha/ir 
Qaumi Movement. 

The worst fighting was re- 
ported in the industrial areas of 
Korangi, where witnesses re- 
ported running gun battles be- This Week’s Holidays 
tween the factions. ... J 


UN Nuclear Experts Go to Pyongyang ' 

VIENNA (AFP) — Technical experts from the International 
Atomic Energy Agency headed to North Korea on Sunday to 1 . 
discuss with officials there the “freezing” of five graphite nuclear . 
plants, said Hans-Friedrich Meyer, an agency spokesman. 

The agency has been ordered by the UN Security Council to „ 
monitor later this month the freezing of five graphite midear, 
plants in accordance with an agreement signed by Pyongyang and 
Washington in Geneva last month. 

In the agreement, Washington promised to replace the graphite 
plants, which are capable ofprodudng weapons-grade plutonium, 
with light-water reactors, financed by the United States, Japan 
and South Korea. 

Opposition Leads in Italy Exit Polls 

ROME (Reuters) — Parties opposed to Prime Minister Silvio • _ 
Berlusconi's coalition looked set to emerge as leaders in the first 
round of voting for mayors in five of seven large towns involved in .. - 
local Italian elections on Sunday, an exit poll showed. 

More than 2.6 million Italians were eligible to vote in mayoral „ 
elections in 242 municipalities. The seven most-watched races, . 
which were the subject of an initial exit poll, were in Brescia, . 
Massa Carrara, Pisa, Brindisi, Pescara, Scmdrio and Treviso. 

The most significant successes for the opposition were in 
Brescia, where Mino Martinazzali, a former Christian Democrat, .. 
led Industry Minister Vito Gnutti of the Northern by 9 ■ 

percentage points and in Massa Carrara where the center-left, 
candidate led by 22 points. 

For the Record 

The ferry replaci n g the Estonia, winch sank in September with 
the loss of 900 lives, was being repaired Sunday after crashing into •• 
a pier at Tallinn, Estonia, as it was leaving for Stockholm. The 
■ Balticum was not badly damaged. (Reuters) ■*, 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Greek air traffic controllers began a series of four-hour work 
stoppages on Sunday, forcing airport officials to reschedule doz- 
ens of domestic and international flights. The controllers want 
higher salaries and pensions and the replacement of an outmoded 
radar system at Athens’s airport tower. (Reuters) 


The army, which has been 
deployed in southern Sind 
Province since June 1992, was 
patrolling the Korangi area, 
which is heavily populated. 

More than 20 people have 
been treated for gunshot 
wounds over the past two days, 
hospital sources said. 


Banking and government offices will be dosed or services 
curtailed in the following countries and their dependencies this 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

TUESDAY: Lebanon- 
WEDNESDAY: Japan. 

THURSDAY: Puerto Rico, Uni led States. 

FRIDAY: Bosnia- Herzegovina. 

SATURDAY: Mongolia. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 



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^Koton’s Advisers Pin Hopes on Republican Radicalism 


By.Ann Devroy 

* • Washington Past Service 

/WASHINGTON — President BiD 
uuticjt has returned to Washington 
from tas Ashm trip with the broad 
oottmes-of a-strategy to resurrect his 
presidency, that is based in part on 
hopes that the Republicans look so 
raHcal they spare America away and 
in part on moving himself back u 


the political ' 
The move 
stream, his ai 
new effort- to 


into 
iter. 

the political main- 
say, will focus on a 
middle-class taxes 
t u spending in his 1996 

Widget, a Tefqrm agenda” that en- 
compasses welfare and camp aig n fi- 
nance and, perhaps, a broad 
to die nation, that some of his propos- 
als wore misguided. 

As Mr. dinton relaxed in Hawaii 
last week, senior aides engaged in what 
ode called “doqr-to-door, wall-to- 
wafl” debates over what the president 
should do. 


Interviews with several found little 
disagreement that Mr. Clinton’s hope 
for political survival lies in what one 
outside Democratic adviser called “re- 
capturing the center in a decisive, firm 
and solid manner that reins tills the 
nation's belief in him and his presiden- 
cy.” 

But even as aides were debating how 
to achieve what would amount to a 
major image makeover, Mr. Clinton 
himself was illustrating how tricky and 
perilous even small elements of that 
effort will be. Asked about a constitu- 
tional amendment on school prayer 
being proposed by the Republicans, 
Mr. Clinton answered by emphasizing 
his belief in voluntary school prayer 
and his openness to the idea of amend- 
ing the Bill of Rights. 

Representatives of the old Demo- 
cratic coalition reacted in what White 
House aides said was a flood of angry 
and alarmed phone rails and letters. 

The White House quickly walked 


Mr. Clinton awav from a prayer freedom from Democratic congressio- bm pjee as new Republican leaders 

l..> iiT-v . i i ■ ...kA unMui w. n:« , . , . r .■ 


amendment, but the effort illustrated 
the difficulty of trying not to displease 
Democratic activists while reaching to 
voters in the center. 

Senior administration officials said 
that the budget was being revamped to 
meet the reality of a Republican Con- 
gress and an electoral repudiation. The 
advisers are amenable to a middle- 
class tax eul of up to $50 billion, addi- 
tional spending cuts, and welfare and 
modest health-care reform proposals. 

White House officials acknowledge 
that their fiscal proposals are likely to 
be shredded by the Republicans and 
that their budget is likely to end up as 
more of a political outline of where the 
president stands than an actual guide 
to budget reality. 

Officials are 'beginning the process 
of assembling a further package of 
spending cuts, facing one of the few 
diver linings that the clouds of the 
election brought the White House: 


nal chairmen who resisted Mr. Clin- 
ton's efforts to trim and reorder do- 
mestic spending his first two years in 
office. 

The Republican governor of Cali- 
fornia, Pete Wilson, a former congress- 
man who watched Mr. Clinton's de- 
cline in his state, said Mr. Clinton’s 
“real problem” was that “he has to do 
things that will develop a different 
attitude on the part of the American 
people” toward him. Mr. Wilson add- 
ed that Mr. Clinton has “a better 
chance to do that with a new Republi- 
can Congress than he had with tne old 
one. 

The president’s fundamental prob- 
lem, Mr. Wilson said, is that “people 
do not trust him” because he came to 
Washington as a new kind of fiscally 
careful Democrat adverse to big new 
programs and strayed, or was pulled, 
from that posture. 

Aides have reacted not with dismay 


unleashed a string of conservative pro- 
nouncements from which they hope 
the country will recoil. 

“People are going to look at this 
parade of school prayer and anti-abor- 
tion stuff and one investigation after 
another and say. That’s not what we 
bought into,* ” said a Clinton aide. 

Concentrating on social issues rath- 
er than reducing the size of govern- 
ment and “cleaning up the mess in 
Washington,” said another Clinton 
aide, could be to Republicans what 
gays in the military and the large 
health-care proposal was to Mr. Clin- 
ton — intrusions on the main voter 
agenda that lose the centrist indepen- 
dent voters. 

“I know they would love to believe 
that,” Mr. Wilson said of the Clinton 
aides, “but if they really do, they are 
going to be in a minority for a long, 
long time.” 


* POLITICAL NOTES* 


School Prayer Issue: 
'Conservatives 

Is Gingrich Moving Too Fast? 



By Catherine S. Manegold 

New York Tima Ser vic e 

WASHINGTON — The 
speed with which Newt Ging- 
rich moved to put school prayer 
at the top ofhis political agenda 
has both astounded the conser- 
vative groups traditionally al- 
lied with that cause and left 
some of them worrying that he 
is moving too far, too fast 

While generally pleased at 
the revival of a cause that 
seemed moribund, many of the 
leading conservative groups in- 
volved with the issue are con- 
cerned that in supporting a con- 
stitutional amendment that 
would fundamentally change 
the Bill of Rights, Mr. Gingrich 
may be courting the same sort 
of political setback that Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton incurred when 
he pushed early in his adminis- 
tration to overturn the ban on 
homosexuals in the military. 

And they worry that even if 
successful, a school prayer ef- 
fort could hand libera] groups 
anjtasy target they could use to 
undermine support on other is- 
sues. 

T want to make it perfectly 
clear that this is not oar top 
priority,” said Ralph Reed - Jr., 
president of the ; ChristiM. Co- 
alition, a idgh-tedi -grass-roots 
giant of fund-raising and issue- 
promoting that has 1.5 milli on 
members in 1,200 chapters and 
a $20 millio n annual budget 

T, for one, don’t think' well 
turn the country around by hav- 
ing public acts of piety. Our 
priorities are tax relief and wel- 
fare reform.” 

But other religious leaders, 
like D. James Kennedy, head of 
a radio and television ministry 
that readies 2^00 towns and 
cities, support Mr. Gingrich for 
ta ckling the issue now, and bo- 1 
lieve a return of prayer to 
schools would help hit a gener- 
al moral decline. 

“Every society that has ever 
existed nas been based on some 
religious vision," said Mr. Ken- 
nedy. “There has been no di- 
vine, no absolute moral stan- 
dard in the schools since the 
removal of the Ten Command- 
ments.” 

Most leading voices in the 
religious right have been uni- 


fied on the subject for years, but 
as one court case after another 
has underscored the difficulty 
of altering the constitution, 
they have become resigned to 
letting the matter lie dormant. 

Mr. Gingrich’s proposal — 
and Mr. Clinton’s comment, 
later played down by the White 
House, that Mr. Clinton could 
be open to an amendment on 
prayer — has revived the issue. 
But it has also highlighted some 
of its complexities. 

Beverly LaHaye, president 
and founder of Concerned 
Women for America, a group 
that generally favors the agenda 
of religious conservatives, side- 
stems the issue. 

Ms. LaHaye said she was 
startled hut week when her ra- 
dio program drew a flood of 
calls reflecting widely divergent 
views on the issue. 

T had my eyes opened,” she 
said. T got every kind of opin- 
ion you could. Some people 
said, ‘If s OJC with me as long 
as it’s. *My Lord, Jesus.’ which 
we know is not going to go 
through.*” 

■ Amendment Is Doubtful 

Senators from both parties 
voiced doubt on Sunday that a ■ 
constitutional amendment al- 
lowing 'school prayer could 
pass, and indicated they would 
prefer to steer away from such 
issues. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. 

T don’t think we ought to get 
bogged down” on such divisive 
matters, said Senator Bob Dole, 
Republican of Kansas, in a 
broadcast interview. “If we’re 



•< -.i-v v **v »**. \ 

ScO|Hdl/llani 

Haitian clrildrefl saluting President Aristide as they marched during an Army Day celebration at the presidential palace. 

Aristide Quits Priesthood , Citing Church 


Reuten can and the head of stale of the 

PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti Republic of Haiti." Mr. Aris- 
— President Jean-Bertrand tide wrote to Haiti’-s senior bish- 
Aristide, in the letter in which op in his resignation letter. “1 
he resigned from the priest- have decided, excellence, to 
hood, told church leaders he agree to your request” 
was quitting because he was n 

asked to leave by members of *?**?•” 111 

the church hierarchy. although his rcs.gnaoon be- 

“You have asked me to leave came public only last week and 

the priesthood” for the sake of 

harmonious relations between =d by the Vaucae. 

“the head of state of the Vati- The content of the unusually 


formal correspondence sup- 
ports reports by Aristide allies 
that he resigned only because of 
pressure from the Holy See and 
its representatives in Haiti. Vat- 
ican sources had denied that 
pressure played any part in Mr.. 
Aristide’s decision. 

Mr. Aristide and the Vatican 
have regularly clashed since be 
rose to prominence in the mid- 
1980s with passionate sermons 
espousing leftist liberation the- 


ology. The trouble increased 
when he was overwhelmingly 
elected president of Haiti in 
December 1990. 

The Vatican subsequently 
became the only state to recog- 
nize the military regime that 
toppled him from office in Sep- 
tember 1991. Unlike most other 
countries, it has not commented 
on Mr. Aristide’s return to pow- 
er last month. 


Pole Is Still Holding Out on Trade Treaty 

WASHINGTON — Senator Bob Dole said Sunday that 
he was still fighting for the White House to commit itself to a 
cut in the capital gains tax rate in return for his support of a 
global tariff-reduction treaty. 

The Kansas senator, who is the Republican leader in the 
Senate, met on Saturday with Treasury Secretary Lloyd 
Bentsen, the chief U.S. trade representative. Mickey Kantor, 
and the White House chief of staff, Leon E. Panetta, to 
negotiate terms for the senator's support. 

Mr. Dole's vote is considered pivotal as President Bill 
Clinton presses for congressional ratification of the 123- 
nation trade treaty negotiated under the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade. 

The senator wants companion legislation to make certain 
that the United States can quickly pull out of a new trade 
regulation body, the World Trade Organization, if it issues 
what he called “arbitrary, capricious, adverse decisions.” 

On Sunday. Mr. Dole characterized the GATT treaty as “a 
22,000-page document that nobody has read.” But he added: 
"If we can fix it. then I’ll vote for it." I Paul F. Horviiz. IHTI 

Wilson Urges a National Curb on Illegals 

WASHINGTON — Governor Pete Wilson of California 
has proposed that Congress adopt a Federal version of his 
state's controversial Proposition 187. which would deny all 
benefits except emergency medical care to illegal immigrants. 

In an address to the conservative Heritage Foundation, 
Mr. Wilson, a Republican, said the new Congress should 
either fully reimburse states for the cost of education and 
medical services to illegal immigrants or seek to end the 
requirements that they provide such services at all. 

“I don’t think it is proper for federal or state taxpayers to 
pay the costs of those services,” Mr. Wilson said. “So my 
preference is to end the services.” 

Mr. Wilson also sharply denounced the Mexican govern- 
ment's criticism of Proposition 187. (LATi 

Gore In ’60s: Army Is a ‘Fascist Regime* 

NEW YORK — Vice President AI Gore, as a Harvard 
student writing home to his father, once cited the U.S. Army 
as an example of “fascist, totalitarian regimes.” He now 
dismisses that notion as “a college kid's silly language.” 

The previously unpublished letters were detailed in the 
Nov. 28 edition of The New Yorker magazine, which ob- 
tained them from Mr. Gore’s parents. After writing the 
letters, in the late 1960s, Mr. Gore served in the military, an 
experience he now says “allowed me to shed that nonsense" 
about the army. 

The magazine noted that Cambridge, Massachusetts, was 
a hotbed of political revolt at the time, and that Mr. Gore 
later enlisted in the army and served in Vietnam. ( AP) 

Re-Recount Requested In Connecticut 

HARTFORD, Connecticut — Both candidates in the 
closest congressional race in the nation have asked the 
Connecticut Supreme Court for another recount. 

A recount completed T uesday found Representative Sam- 
uel Gejdenson. a seven-term congressman from eastern Con- 
necticut. ahead of his Republican challenger, Edward W. 
Munster, by four votes out of 1 86,000 cast. Only one congres- 
sional contest this century has been closer. 

Mr. Munster is seeking enough discrepancies to overturn 
the election, while Mr. Gejdenson. who is seeking another 
recount only in one town where ihe first recount gave him 13 
fewer votes, appears to be trying to increase his margin of 
victory. 

And in California, after a drawn-out count of absentee 
ballots. Senator Dianne Fcinslein. a Democrat, claimed vic- 
tory over Representative Michael HufTingion. / ATT. AP> 

Q uote/ Unquote 

Bob Slagle, chairman of the Texas Democratic Party, after 
a meeting of state Democratic leaders on how to "rebuild 
following the party's electoral defeat earlier this month: 
"There was a discussion that the message needed to be a lot 
more clear and lot more focused and ii needed to be focused 
on fewer issues." ( A P I 


bring up some measures 
we can pass.” ■ 

While most Republicans, in- 
cluding Mr. Dole, support the 
principle, many say the new 
majority party must first con- 
centrate on economic matters. 

Senator Orrin Hatch, a con- 
servative Republican from 
Utah, said that it was more im- 
portant to pass a constitutional 
amendment on a balanced bud- 
get 

“On school prayer ” he said, 
“I really don’t believe the votes 
are there for a vocal prayer 
amendment” 


Away From Politics 


. • Plans to buBd the largest taydroetectric power project m 
i North America have been abandoned by 8 ov f™" 

' meat The controversial $10 

datrw and dikes in northern Quebec had been billed as thjkey 
to Quebec’s economic salvation, through 
electric power for sale across North * 

many asthe basis of its viability as an independent state. 

mflesftom Pittsburgh, killing all 1 32 people aboard _ 

• Immigration to New York City is qp 30 
1980s andriiows remarkable diversity, with Dominicans, 
Chinese and Russians the largest groups. 


the etfniea! trial, of the 
Planned Parenthood clinics say 


WP. AP, NYT 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Beware of Betting the Tame’ Deer 

With the advent of hunting season, wildlife 
specialists urge caution when approaching 
any wild animal, even a harmless-looking 
deer. One national study shows that deer 
cause more fatalities than bees, fire ants, even 
rattlesnakes, according to Steve Hall of the 
Texas wild game department. 

“I suspect those figures include car wrecks 
caused tty collisions with deer.” Mr. Hall said. 
“But they include people getting gored, too.” 

Several years ago, a Caldwell, Texas, man 
picking up metal cans on the roadside was 
killed by a whitetail buck. Neighbors said the 
deer bad become almost a local pet but 
suddenly turned aggressive when the man 
rattled the cans. He suffered more than 70 
puncture wounds. 

Mr. Hall said: “When a deer loses that 
natural fear of humans, you’ve got potential 
problems.” 

A veteran big-game hunter, Cy Angelloz of 
Ingram, Texas, says, “If you bottle-feed an 
animal, it loses all fear of humans, but the 
pure instincts are still there. It’s a ticking time 
bomb.” 

He says an aggressive buck attacks by bor- 
ing in low, driving forward and lifting upward 
with its head, shoulders and antlers. If the 
victim is knocked off balance, the buck gives 
no quarter with its antlers and its razor-sharp 
hooves. 

“The animal is either docile and passive," 
be said, “or it’s trying to lull you. There’s not 
much in the middle." 


Short Takes 

‘They tan np oe every local newscast in the 
country,” The New Y ork Times says, “report- 
ers speaking live at the faraway scene of a 
natural disaster, a plane crash, a big c riminal 
case. They lode and sound exactly like the 
reporters from the local station, even to the 
point of finishing their reports with the famil- 
iar sign-off. ‘Back to you in the studio.’ ” In 
fact, it’s back to as many as 140 studios, 
which share the cost of the single reporter on 
the scene. The local station gets the appear- 
ance of having its own reporter covering the 
event, at a fraction of the cost. This is generic 
television, operated by network affiliates. Not 
everyone plays the game. A CBS spokesman 
said his network insists that its generic reports 
dose with “For CBS News, this is Bob Smith. 
Now back to you in the studio.” 

Burglars who broke into an elementary 
school in Indianapolis passed up computer 
~ jmem and went straight for me cash — a 
iglass well filled with 80,000 pennies, or 
worth, weighing 450 pounds (200 kilo- 
grams) that pupils had spent months collect- 
ing to help pay for library books, extra com- 
puters and an artist-in-residence program. 
Fortunately, around 200,000 pennies had 
been picked up by a bank earlier this month. 

In Bader, Pennsylvania, Michael Ricksgers 
was convicted of murder in the fatal shooting 
of his wife, despite his claim that the disorder 
called sleep apnea, in which breathing is in- 
terrupted and behavior can become erratic, 
caused him to fire away as be slept. Mr. 
Ricksgers, 37, a welder, said the fatal shot 
awoke him, and be found himself holding the 
357-caliber magnum pistol that his wife kept 
under her pillow. 

Inlemafianai Herald Tribune. 


A Cult Leader Ordered Murder 
Of Quebec Baby as Antichrist 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tima Service 

TORONTO — A three- 
manth-old boy was stabbed to 
death in a Quebec village be- 
cause he was considered the 
Antichrist in the rituals of a cult 
linked to the murder-suicide of 
53 people in Switzerland and 
Quebec last month, the Quebec 
provincial police say. 

The police reconstructed the 
bizarre developments in a 
burned-out chalet in the ski re- 
sort village of Morin Heights, 
north of Montreal, where five 
people were found dead early 
last month. The incident was 
followed a few days later by the 
fiery deaths of 48 cult members 
in two Swiss villages. 

All the victims had some as- 
sociation with the Order of the 
Solar Temple. 

The cult’s two leaders, Luc 
Jouret, 46, a Belgian-born phy- 
sician, and Joseph di Mambro, 
70, a French Canadian who 
lived in Switzerland and Que- 
bec and who controlled the fi- 
nances, died in Switzerland. 

The Quebec police said an 
earlier investigation into the So- 
lar Order probably prevented 
more deaths. In March 1993, 


the sect was being investigated 
in connection with possession 
of illegal weapons mid a sus- 
pected role in threats to kill the 
province’s public security min- 
ister, Claude Ryan. 

That same month, the police, 
raided the crypt of the order in 
St. Sauyeur, a village next door 
to Morin Heights, in a search 
for weapons. 

Constable Michel Brunet 
said a mass suicide was bring 
planned at that time. 

The most surprising revela- 
tions related to the killing of the 
baity, who the police said was 
killed along with his parents by 
Joel Egger and Dominique Be- 
la ton. Swiss followers of Mr. di 
Mambro. The police said the 
killers had been acting on the 
orders of Mr. di Mambro, an 
authoritarian figure in the culL 
The baby’s parents, Antonio 


Dutoit and Nicky Robinson 
Dutoit, did odd jobs for Mr. di 
Mambro. Mrs. Dutoit had been 
the babysitter for Mr. di Mam- 
bro’s daughter Emmanuelle. 

According to the police re- 
construction, Mr. di Mambro, 
who usually decided when 
women in the cull had babies 
and what names would be se- 
lected. was outraged when Mrs. 
Dutoit had a baby July 5 and 
named the boy Christopher 
Emman uel. 

Mr. Brunet said the police 
learned from interviews with 
some of the sect’s former mem- 
bers that Mr. di Mambro re- 
garded the baby as the Anti- 
christ because the came 
matched that of his daughter 
and because he had not been 
consulted, and then ordered 
two of his followers to Quebec 
to kill the entire family. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


Cab Calloway Dies, 
Flamboyant Figure 
Of the Big Band Era 


By John S. Wilson 

New York Tuna Service 

Cab Calloway, 86, the flam- 
boyant bandleader who strut- 
ted and. scat-sang his way to 
fame as the “Hi-de-ho Man” of 
jazz, died Friday in a nursing 
home in Hosckessin, Delaware. 
He lived in Greenburgh, New 
York. 

He had suffered a stroke in 
June, said his wife, Nuffie. 

Mr. Calloway, who gave up 
law school and spumed an offer 
to play basketball with the Har- 
lem Globetrotters for his music, 
led one of the most successful 
bands in die Big Band era. 

The trademark Calloway im- 
age, combining an almost cat- 
lie grace with a singing style 
that could be slyly insinuating 
one moment and' wildly exuber- 
ant the next, came into full 
bloom on a nig ht in 1931 when 
he was leading his band in a 
radio broadcast from the Cot- 
ton Club in Harlem. 

He had recently written 
“Minnie the Moocher,” a new 
radio theme song for his band. 
It combined a melody that was 
close to the band’s previous 
theme, “St. James Infirmary.” 
As he started to sing, Mr. 
Calloway suddenly realized 
that be could not remember the 
lyrics. 

“I couldn’t leave a blank 
there as I might have done if we 
weren’t on the air," he wrote in 
his autobiography, “Of Minni e 
the Moocher and Me.” “I had 
to HU the space, so I started to 
scat-sing the first thing that 
came into my mind.” 

What he scatted was: “Hi-de- 
hi-de-hi-de-ho. Ho-de-bo-de- 
bo-de-hee. Oodlee-odlye-od- 
lyee-oodl ee-d oo. ” 

“The crowd went crazy,” 
Calloway recalled. “I asked the 
band to follow me. 1 sang ‘Ho- 
de- hi -de-hi -de-do.' And the 
band responded. I sang, ‘Dwaa- 
de-dwaa de-dwaa-de doo.' I 
asked the audience to join in. 
They hollered back and nearly 
brought the roof down.” 

His record of “Minnie the 
Moodier” issued in 1931, be- 
came his first big hit and gave 
his band an immediate identity. 
In 1980, he introduced the song 
to a new generation in the film 
"The Blues Brothers.” 

Cabell Calloway was born on 
Dec. 25, 1907, in Rochester, 
New York. His father was a 
lawyer, his mother a teacher. 
The family soon moved to Bal- 
timore, where he was reared. 
His sister, Blanche, got him his 


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first show-business job singing 
in “Plantation Days,” a touring 
show in which she was singing 

When the tour ended in Chi- 
cago, Mr. Calloway kept a 
promise made to his sister that 
he would alter law schooL He 
was also playing basketball well 
enough to get an offer from the 
Globetrotters, and was moon- 
lighting as a singer at the Sunset 
Cafe, where Louis Armstrong 
was playing in Carroll Dicker- 
son's orchestra. 

Mr. Calloway and Mr. Arm- 
strong became friendly during 
the six months they were to- 
gether at the club. Mr. Arm- 
strong was already scat-singing, 
and he planted the seeds for Mr. 
Calloway’s later success. 

As Cab Calloway and His 
Orchestra, his band replaced 
Duke Ellington's orchestra in 
1930 at the Cotton Club, broad- 
casting from there almost night- 
ly. The band continued to play 
and record until 1948 .when, as 
the Big Band era faded, he 
played with small er groups. 

Among the songs he made 
famous were “Jim, Jam, Jump," 
“Are You All Reel?” “The Jum- 
pin’ Jive,” “Boog It” and 
“Peck-a Doodle Doo.” A lexi- 
cographer as well as a compos- 
er, Mr. Calloway compiled the 
“Hipster’s Dictionary.” 

Beginning in 1952, he loured 
the world playing Sportin' Life 
in “Porgy and Bess,* a role that 
the composer George Gershwin 
had modeled on his performing 
style in 1935. In 1967, he was in 
an all-blade version of “Hello, 
Dolly!” with Pearl Bailey. 

Erwin N. Griswold, 90, 
Former Solicitor General 

BOSTON (APJ — Erwin N. 
Griswold, 90, who was solicitor 
general in the Johnson and Nix- 
on a dminis trations and whose 
more than 100 cases before the 
Supreme Court included the 
Pentagon Papers arguments, 
died Saturday. 

His legal career spanned 65 
years, more than half on the 
faculty of Harvard Law School. 
He was dean there for 21 years 
before joining the Johnson ad- 
ministration in 1967 as solidtor 
general, the government’s top- 
ranking courtroom lawyer. He 
argued more cases, 127. before 
the nation's highest court than 
any other living attorney. 

In 1971, he argued on behalf 
of the Nixon a dminis tration in 
attempting to halt publication 
of die so-called Pentagon Pa- 
pers, which chronicled the U.S. 
involvement in the Vietnam 
War. Mr. Griswold, a liberal 
Republican, argued unsuccess- 
fully that publishing the federal 
documents would "have the ef- 
fect of causing immediate and 
irreparable harm to the security 
of the United States.” 

Patrick Dean, 85, Britain’s 
representative at the United 
Nations from 1960 to 1964 and 
ambassador to the United 
States from 1965 to 1969, died 
Nov. 5 in Kingston, Surrey. 



AFRICA: Democracy Breaks Out 

continent more famous Rr 
Continued trom rage i slaughter and starvation, this 
safety. The treaty was to be has become an advertise- 
signed instead by less senior of- for hope? 

Edals, indicating that even tf One reason is the demise of 

the rivals stop fighting, they we ^ soviet Union and subse- 

a long way from trusting eaai retreat of the snpeipow- 

era, who for many years Ji- 
be calmed, a nwnce d their proxies in a battle 
in 100 million f or strategic influence and ideo- 


other. 

If A 
region 


-ola can be ca lme d, a 
more than 100 million 


ICglUU m 11W1V ~ , 1U1 uaiMVMw 

people will be at peace for the jogjcal high ground. 

first time since the liberation Another is the domino effect 

uprisings of the 1960s. 0 f change in South Africa, the 


Soldiers detaining suspects Sunday in a Rio de Janeiro 


Military Sweeps Into Rio’s Drug Slums 


The Associated Press 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Hundreds of 
sailors moved into a Rio shantytown on 
Sunday, jo ining the army in a campaign 
aimed at the 1,800 drug lords who reign 
over the city’s hillsides. 

More than 600 members of the Brazil- 
ian Navy stepped up operations early 
Sunday near Rio’s international airport 
at the Dende shim, believed to hold the 
largest stockpile of drug lords' weapons. 

The huge militaiy operation, which 
includes the federal police, tanks, jeeps, 
helicopters and 2,000 soldiers, has occu- 
pied seven shantytowns, several of which 
border fashionable residential districts. 

In the first sign of resistance, ah army 
recruit was grazed by a bullet Saturday. 


James Brooke of The New York Times 
reported earlier from Rio de Janeiro: 

The deployment is the greatest show 
of army force here since the Brazilian 
militar y relinquished power to civilians 
in 1985. On Saturday. 50 people were 
detfiinftfl in the shantytowns, most of 
them because they lacked legal docu- 
ments or woe suspected of drug pur - 
rhay»y or trafficking, the authorities said. 

Criminal sweeps in the shantytowns 
normally are handled by the state mili- 
tary police, who answer only to state 

S eniors and are widely feared by resi- 
ts for their tactics of extortion, in- 
timidation and violence. 

Twenty years ago, the army also was 
deeply feared because it repressed urban 


guerrilla movements with torture and 
assassinations. Although such memories 
have faded for many people, the civilian 
leadership’s decision to call out army 
troops underscores an impression that 
drug trafficking in Brazil is spiraling out 
of control- 

President Itamar Franco announced 
three weeks ago that the army would 
intervene, as an increase in crime threat- 
ened the image of the country’s tradi- 
tional tourist capital 

The deployment also has coincided 
with a visit by Defense Secretary William 
J. Perry of the United States, who de- 
scribed international drug enforcement 
as a top priority. 


uprisings of die 1960s. 

Every country but one, the 
tiny mo narchy of Swaziland, 
has passed through multiparty 
elections and all, with varying 
degrees of indulgence, tolerate a 
political opposition. 

The style and oratory have 
changed, too. Not long ago m 
southern Africa, the role model 
was the guerrilla freedom fight- 
ers, the battle cry was black 
Tiariruiaiism infused with an 
anti-capitalist economic popu- 
lism, and the symbol of political 
dissent was the raised fist, often 

clutching an AK-47 assault ri- 
fle. 

Now the role model is Nelson 
Mandela, the freedom fighter 
mellowed into a conciliator. 
The battle cry is growth and 

investment. 

The hip acronym is GNU — 
for government of national uni- 
ty, the power-sharing arrange- 
ment embraced most famously 
in South Africa, but also used in 
Zimb abwe and contemplated in 
Angola and Mozambique. 

Whether peace and democra- 
cy will take firm hold in south- 
ern Africa is a question the Af- 
rican presidents debate among 
themselves, as Mr. Ghpnba's re- 
marks last month indicated. 

Sometimes the new African 
democrats seem less like a re- 
gional bloc than a 12-step sup- 
port group — reformed war- 
riors who help one another 
resist the temptation to return 
to old, violent habits. 

How did it happen that, on a 


ITO: Judge Becomes the Dominant Personality in Trial HELMS: Reservations on Clinton 


In this Tuesday’s 

( 7FV 



Continued from Page 1 

people. As the case has pro- 
gressed, he has become the 
dominant personality. He has 
hurled thunderbolts at the 
press. He has used letters from 
the general public as props. He 
has been dramatic, engaging 
and unpredictable. 

Then came the interview. To 
the surprise of everyone observ- 
ing the case, Judge Ilo appeared 
two Sundays ago on the Los 
Angeles station KCBSTs pro- 
gram “Face to Face with Tritia 
Toyota.” Taped in October, 
even as Judge lto was railing 
from the beach about the irre- 
sponsible media, the interview 
contained no bombshell pro- 
nouncements and indeed 
showed Judge lto to be a reflec- 
tive, sincere, witty person. The 
problem is that judges just 
don’t do this sort of tiring. 

Overnight, Judge lto became 
Lance, the local Asian Ameri- 
can boy who made good, son of 
Japanese parents who were 
forced into an internment camp 
in Wyoming during World War 

n. 

The television station hyped 
the interviews with constant 
promos. Prospective jurors saw 
them and told Judge lto so in 
court 

Reporters were scornful. 
Judge lto had berated them for 
weeks for sensationalizing the 
case, and suddenly he was on 
televirion himself saying things 


like, “I have newfound empathy 
for people like Cher ana Ma- 
donna who have to put up with 
this every day.” 

In the interviews, he tried to 
play down his star status. 

“I take solace in the fact that 
nobody remembers who the 
judge was in the Lindbergh 
case, nobody remembers who 
the judge was in the William 
Kennedy Smith case, nobody 
remembers who the judge was 
in the Mike Tyson case, nobody 
remembers who the judge was 
in the Charles Keating case, no- 
body remember s the judges, so 
this will all pass.” 

Those judges also did not 
grant interviews to a television 
station during the trial and talk 
about their childhoods. Not 
even the judge in the Charles 
Keating case: Lance lto. 

Legal observers were ap- 


“It’s a disgraceful perfor- 
mance,” said Barry Tarlow, a 
Los Angeles defense attorney. 
“It calls into question whether 
he has lost his sense of judg- 
ment and appropriateness." 

He added, “It's dear to me 
that he has been seduced by the 
siren song of publicity." 

Peter Arcadia, a law profes- 
sor at the University of Califor- 
nia at Los Angeles, said: “His 
giving this interview only con- 
tributes to the circus-like atmo- 
sphere.” 

On Monday, the lto angle 


will become even more compli- 
cated when his wife, Captain 
Margaret York of the Los An- 
geles police department, ap- 
pears before another judge in a 
Simpson-related hearing. Mr. 
Simpson’s lawyers want to 
know what Captain York’s role 
might have been in an internal 
investigation in 1985 of Detec- 
tive Mark Fuhrman, who said 
he found a bloody glove at Mr. 
Simpson's estate after the mur- 
dera. Mr. Simpson’s lawyers 
might want Captain York to 
testify at Mr. Simpson’s trial — 
a perplexing scenario given that 
her husband is the judges 

Robot L. Shapiro, attorney 
for Mr. Simpson, says he does 
not want to embarrass Judge 
lto. But when asked if be might 
seek to have him removed from 
(he case, Mr. Shapiro did not 
rule out the possibility. 

Mr. Simpson, meanwhile, has 
become the forgotten man of 
the triaL He is a piece of furni- 
ture, over there on the left, at 
the end of the table near the 
bailiff. His attorneys do not let 
him talk. He smiles sometimes. 
He laughs sometimes. He closes 
his eyes and rubs his face 
mournfully. He is a profession- 
al murder defendant. 

Judge lto has top billing for 
the moment One friend says he 
is for now the most famous 
graduate of Lhe University of 
California at Berkeley Law 
SchooL 


Cautioned from Page 1 

Kansas, declined to criticize 
Mr. Helms on Sunday, offered 
only qualified support for the 
president and laid out what 
they see as the Democratic pres- 
ident's foreign policy flaws. 
Senator Dole said he had had 
reservations about Mr. Clinton 
early on but that he had “done a 
little better” recently in leading 
the military. 

“I think he's up to the job, 
but rd prefer somebody else in 
1996 ” Mr. Dole said. 

Mr. Panetta termed Mr. 
H elms 's view “pretty narrow” 
and said the senator did not 
support trade agreements nor 
the Middle East peace process 
and favored apartheid in South 
Africa and some military dicta- 
torships overseas. 

Under the constitution, the 
president is commander in chief 
of all the armed forces. In his 
two years in office, Mr. Clinton 
has ordered a missile strike on 
Baghdad, sent troops to Kuwait 
and into Haiti, and pulled 
troops out of Somalia after ca- 
sualties were sustained. 

Mr. Helms has long been a 
severe critic of the president 
and vehemently opposes the 
U.S. intervention in Haiti. 

He was asked in the CNN 
interview whether be believed 
Mr. Clinton had demonstrated 


an ability to command the 
armed forces. 

“No I do not,” he responded. 
“And neither do the people in 
the armed forces.” 

Mr. Helms cited letters he 
had received from military men, 
including generals. 

General ShalikashviK, a Clin- 
ton appointee, responded in a 
prepared statement, saying that 
the president “has and will con- 
tinue to have the full support 
and loyalty of the Joint Chiefs.” 

In televised interviews Sun- 
day, Republican leaders were 
hardly supportive of Mr. Clin- 
ton. 

Representative Bill Archer of 
Texas, incoming chairman of 
the House Ways and Means 
Committee, was asked if Mr. 
Clinton was up to the job of 
commander in chief. His re- 
sponse: “Certainly there are 
problems for a person of the 
background of BiB Clinton.” 

Senator Orrin G. Hatch, Re- 
publican of Utah, asked the 
same question, declared that 
the White House had been “na- 
ive” in its dealings with North 
Korea and had “bought off” 
Haiti’s militaiy leaders to leave 
power. 

He said Mr. Clinton had 
been “doing better” lately, but 
added that he was “very 
alarmed and concerned” by 
White House policies abroad. 


richest and most developed 
country in the region. 

To defend its flanks against 
black insurgency, the apartheid 
regime in South Africa toon- 
sored wars is ndghboring Rho- 
desia (sow Zimbabwe), Angola, 
Smith-West Africa (now Na- 
mibia) and Mozambique. 

With the election in April of 
a coalition government led by 
Mr. Mandela, South Africa has 
been transformed into an alter- 
native model of bow to deal 
with enemies. 

The change has given new fife 
to the main regional political 
forum, which was originally 
formed to combat white racists 
in South Africa and still goes by 
the militaristic name of the 
Front Use States. 

With South Africa now a 
member, that organizatkm has 
begun to synchronize its dji£> 

S as a force for regional 
ty in ways unthinkable 
before. 

When Lesotho’s fledgling de- 
mocracy was overthrown by the 
military last August, South Af- 
rica, Zimbabwe and Botswana 
brought pressure, including a 
threat to send troops, until the 
legal government was restored. 

When the leader of the Mo- 
zambican rebels announced a 
boycott during the country’s 
first elections last month, the 
Front Line States summoned 
him to Harare, Zimbabwe fora 
stem warning. 

Front Line representatives 
have met twice here this week to 
orchestrate diplomatic pressure 
for peace in Angola, (tying to 
halt a government militaiy of- 
fensive, and trying to persuade 
Mr. Savimbi that it was safe to 


; was safe to 


emerge from hiding. 

Once the Angolan treaty is 
signed, it is widely expected 
rhat troops from the region will 
join the 7,000-member peace- 
keeping force to be deployed in 
Angola under the auspices of 
the United Nations, including 
for the first time noncombal 
troops from Mr. Mandela's 
South Africa. 

African officials and forjjgn 
diplomats point to a numb&rf 
dangers that could stifle tlx 
promise of the region. 

Aldo Ajello, the UN diplo- 
mat who nursed the peace In 
Mozambique, said the main 
question is whether African 
states will be able to avoid the 
temptation to crush their oppo- 
nents, driving them back to 
war. 

“What is esoteric for Africa is 
the concept of the opposition as 
a permanent component of the 
political dialectic,” Mr. AjcDo 
said. “In local culture, once the 
chief is selected, he is the 
bloody chief.” 

As a result, he and other 
Western diplomats have be- 
come strong promoters of in- 
cluding the opposition in some 
executive role, as South Africa 
has done. 

But many Africans resent 
this advice as another example 
of Western pate rnalism, noting 
that few Western politicians 
share power with the opposition 
in their own countries. 


Icons 


w v omen who 
set the pace. 


International 

Classified 

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Monday 

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Tuesday 

Education Directory 
Wednesday 

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Thursday 

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Arts and Antiques 


NATO: Croatia Strikes Authorized 



Continued from Page 1 

military officials in Bosnia re- 
quested them. 

How to respond to attacks on 
the UN protected areas around 
Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital, 
and other enclaves in Bihac and 
Srebrenica has been a conten- 
tious issue for the alliance. 

Britain and France, which to- 
gether provide nearly 10,000 
troops to the UN peacekeeping 
force in Bosnia, have consis- 
tently pushed for restraint by 
NATO for fear of provoking 
retaliation against the peace- 
keepers, while the Clinton ad- 
ministration has argued for a 
credible threat of strong action 
to deter aggression. 

More than a week ago, the 
Clinton administration bowed 
to pressure from Congress and 
ordered U.S. Navy ships under 
NATO command in the Adriat- 
ic to do nothing to enforce the 
UN-ordered blockade of arms 


shipments to the Bosnian gov- 
ernment. 

The alliance, whose senior 
military commander is an 
American general in Brussels, 
decided last week to keep on 
enforcing it even without U.S. 
cooperation. American ships 
did not pull out of the blockade 
but are under orders not to pass 
on to the allies information 
about arms shipments to the 
Bosnians. 

With the alliance divided and 
still unable to halt the war, 
some senior American political 
leaders say NATO has failed to 
show that it has a useful role 
after the Cold War. 

French, German and British 
politicians have also become in- 
creasingly interested in 
strengthening the European 
Union's ability to pursue mili- 
tary strategies of its own choos- 
ing, even when the United 
States disagrees. 


GAZA: A Plea for Economic Help 

Gmtmued froa Page I Israel, Mr. Arafat’s negotial 


“this is the beginning of the end 
for Arafat.” Hamas's armed 
wing threatened “bitter re- 
venge” for what it called a mas- 
sacre on Friday, while in turn 
Mr. Arafat's El Fatah faction 
said it was poised to strike 
against what it described as a 
foreign-orcbes (rated conspira- 
cy ag ain st Palestinian self-rule. 

For the first time since the 
disorders, Mr. Arafat ventured 
just beyond the gates of his 
Mediterranean beachfront 
headquarters for a brief appear- 
ance to wave at 150 cheering 
Fatah supporters and to appeal 
for unity against unnamed 
forces that have “orders from 
outside to harm the Palestinian 
dream.” 

But he has made no concilia- 
tory speech to Palestinians in 
general, many of whom contin- 
ued to denounce him as a trai- 
tor for letting his police officers 
fire on fellow Pales tinians 


Israel Mr. Arafat’s negotiat- 
ing partner and the occupying 
force throughout Gaza until 

last May, also kept a low pro- 
file. Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rubin, in New York City of 
S unday, urged his cabinet micr 
isters to say tittle and “leave it 
to the Palestinians to deal with 
their internal matters.” Speak- 
ing out in support of Mr. Arafat 
at this point, the Israelis rea- 
soned, would only persuade 
many Gazans that lie is collabo- 
rating with them, as Hamas 
charges. 

Israelis were nervous, howev- 
er, especially troops guarding 
the isolated Netzarim settle- 
ment, near Gaza City, where a 
soldier was shot and killed from 
a passing car on Saturday night. 
He was the fourth Israeli to die 
in the last nine days at an out- 
post that a majority of Mr. Ra- 
bin’s cabinet says should not 
even be there. 


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Page 5 


Journalist Ban Stirs 
fears for East Timor 

Rights Groups See Repression 
Djakarta Faults Reporters 


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By Philip Shenon 

J New York Thna Service 

DENPASAR, Indonesia — 
‘ - As the police struggled to re- 
store order in East Timor after 

- the largest anti-government 
‘ - demonstrations in years, the ln- 
" donesian government said it 

would temporarily bar foreign 
■" reporters from visiting the dis- 

- puted province. 

The move: alarmed hmnan- 
rights groups, which have 
'* warned of a new, violent crack- 
down on dissidents in East Ti- 
; - mor, a former Portuguese colo- 
■“ ny that was invaded by 
Indonesia in 1975 and later an- 
” nested. 

Order was restored Saturday 

■ * in Dili, the East Timor capital, 
•*’ after a week of demonstrations 
v that embarrassed the Indone- 
’ -sian government as it played 

host to a meeting of Asia-Pacif- 

* >c leaders, including President 
*' ‘Bill Clinton, who raised the is- 
;>dhie of human-rights abuses in 
' cast Timor in a meeting with 
- 1 President Suharto. 

On Friday, hundreds of anti- 
~ government protesters took to 

- the streets in Dili in a noisy 
" demonstration that turned vio- 

* lent when the protesters en- 
’• countered a small group of 
\ stone-tb rowing government 

- supporters, most of them Indo- 
* 1 nesjans from other parts of the 
; country who had settled in East 

Timor: At least two people were 
reported seriously wounded. 

A government official said 
■ the move to ban foreign jour- 
nalists, announced Saturday, 
■was motivated by a concern 
- ' that some of the reporters now 
‘ - in East Timor were inciting the 
' demonstrators. 

‘The journalists are acting in 
an unjoumalistic way,” said the 
■“ official. 

He cited the case of a Japa- 
‘ nese television reporter who has 
; been accused by the Indonesian 

■ police of giving an anti-govern- 
ment banner to East Timorese 

■* students and urging them to un- 


furl it for the cameras. The re- 
porter has denied the accusa- 
tion. 

A spokeswoman for Amnesty 
International, EstrelUta Jones, 
said by telephone from Wash- 
ington that the move to bar for- 
eign reporters “is certainly most 
ominous.” 

I 2 Leave U.S. Embass y 

Two East Timorese protest- 
ers left the U.S. Embassy on 
Sunday, leaving 27 colleagues 
to continue their eight-day-old 
demonstration demanding LhaL 
Indonesia release a jailed rebel 
leader, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Jakarta. 

One of the two had suffered a 
neck injury when the protesters 
scaled a fence to enter the em- 
bassy grounds on Nov. 12, said 
Domingos Sannento, a spokes- 
man for the group. The other 
was accompanying him to seek 
treatment, he added. 



Angola Peace Shaky 
As Treaty Is Signed 
Without 2 Leaders 


Upsli Aairoguv Acmx France- Prenc 

Some of the East Timorese occupying part of the U.S. Embassy grounds in Jakarta reading about die violence in Dili. 


The Associated Press 

LUSAKA, Zambia — Ango- 
la's government and rebels 
signed a peace treaty on Sun- 
day, but their leaders did not 
sign, heightening fears that the 
agreement would dol end 19 
years of civil war. 

The UNITA rebel leader. Jo- 
nas Savimbi, did not attend, his 
aides said, because government 
attacks made it impossible for 
him to leave his bush camp in 
Angola. 

President Jos6 Eduardo dos 
Santos was at the ceremony in 
Lusaka. But, rather than put his 
signature alongside that of a 
UNITA deputy, he designated 
Foreign Minister Venancio de 
Moura to represent the govern- 
ment 

The head of a rebel delega- 
tion, who goes by the nom de 
guerre of General Eugenio 
Manuvakola, represented UN- 
ITA, the National Union for 
the Total Independence of An- 
gola. 


In Nepal Vote: Advantage 9 Communists 


By John Ward Anderson 

Washington Post Service 

NEW DELHI — Fed up with corrup- 
tion, bickering politicians and their im- 
age as a stepchild of India, droves of 
citizens in the four-year-old democracy 
of Nepal have deserted the ruling party 
and voted for a Co mmunis t government. 

As counting continued Sunday in the 
second nationwide parliamentary elec- 
tions since democracy was restored to 
the tiny Himalayan kingdom in 1990, it 
became clear that the ruling Nepali Con- 
gress Party had lost its majority to a 
surprisingly strong showing by the Com- 
munist Party of Nepal United Marxist- 
Leninist, known as the UML. 

With all but 10 races decided in the 
205-member parliament, it was apparent 
that no party would win the 103 seats 
necessary to rule, and that a coalition 
government would have to be formed. 
Intense negotiations and lobbying were 


under way in the capital, Katmandu, 
with the Communists trying to lure dissi- 
dents away from the faction-ridden Con- 
gress Party to form what would appar- 
ently be the world's first Communist 
monarchy. 

Although the UML promised land re- 
form and other communist-style initia- 
tives during the election, the party is not 
hard-line co mmunis t and is often com- 
pared with Europe's social democratic 
parties. UML leaders campaigned vigor- 
ously over the years for an end to Nepal’s 
absolute monarchy and a return to mul- 
tiparty democracy. 

“They're very moderate, very sensible 
and almost indistinguishable from the 
Nepali Congress," said Leo Rose, former 
professor of political science aL the Uni- 
versity of California and an expert in 
South Asian politics. 

A Western diplomat in Katmandu 
said: “We don’t think we’re looking at a 


radical change here. This is not a Stalin- 
ist, revolutionary party ” 

Nepal was ruled by a hereditary mon- 
archy from 1960 until 1990, when a pop- 
ular uprising forced King Birendra to 
give up many of his powers and permit- 
elected governments. 

Despite its ranking as one of the world 
most backward nations — annual per 
capita income is about 5180 and literacy 
is about 25 percent — the campaign 
turned on relations with India, pleas for 
stability and personality clashes. 

Political analysts said that although 
there was an abundance of Communist 
sloganeering during the campaign, the 
election was less a vote for communism 
than a backlash against the Congress 
Party and its Prime Minister, Girija Pra- 
sad Koirala, whose three-year adminis- 
tration was plagued with charges of cor- 
ruption and subservience to India. 


Ghissano Wins With 53% 
Of the Vote in Mozambique 


Reuters 

MAPUTO, Mozambique — 
President Joaquim Chissano of 
Mozambique and his governing 
Frelimo party have won the 
country's first multiparty elec- 
tions with 53.3 percent of the 
presidential vote and 129 of the 
250 parliamentary seats. 

“The winner of the elections 
was the Mozambican people.” 
Mr. Chissano said in a national 
radio and television broadcast 
from his Frelimo party bead- 
quarters where he watched the 
announcement of the results 
Saturday on television. 

Former rebel leader Afonso 
Dhlakama, whose party took 
112 parliamentary seats, con- 
ceded defeat in the final tally 
from the OcL 27-29 polls, but 


said he still believed ibe elec- 
tions had been rife with irregu- 
larities. 

“We accept the election re- 
sults, but they were not fair,” he 
said at a news conference at his 
Maputo residence. 

The president of the National 
Electoral Commission, Brazao 
Mazula, said Mr. Dhlakama 
had come in second with 33.7 
percent of votes for president. 

Mr. Chissano appealed in his 
address for a final end to the 
civil war that raged for 16 years 
from independence until the 
signing of a peace accord with 
Mozambican National Resis- 
tance Movement in October 
1992. He said Mr. Dhlakama 
should be treated with “digni- 
ty.” 


A permanf 
to take effect in two days. A 
truce was to have preceded the 
si gnin g as a demonstration of 
good faith, but fighting contin- 
ued up to Saturday. 

The new treaty calls for UN- 
ITA fighters to gather at assem- 
bly points, turn in weapons and 
cither be sent home or report 
for tr ainin g in the existing 
army. It sets up a joint commis- 
sion, with the United States, 
Russia and Portugal as observ- 
ers, to oversee proper imple- 
mentation, and turns over secu- 
rity to a 7,000-member United 
Nations force to be deployed in 
upcoming months. 

“All Angolans should forget 
the suffering of the Angolan 
conflict and face the future with 
solidarity and trust,” General 
Manuvakola said after signing 
the treaty, stressing he was act- 
ing on behalf of Mr. Savimbi. 

But Angolans were subdued 
and skeptical. 

“Only with the signatures of 
President Jos6 Eduardo dos 
Santos and the leader of the 
rebels, Jonas Savimbi, will the 
cease-fire be respected," the 
Jomal de Angola said in a 
front-page article in Luanda, 
the Angolan capital. 

Hopes that one of Africa’s 
longest and crudest wars, with 
more than 500,000 dead and a 
potentially prosperous nation 
in tatters, were blunted by re- 
newed fighting and the unpre- 
dictable political climate. 

Mr. Savimbi ’s absence Sun- 
day increased speculation that 
he had been wounded or even 
killed in a recent government 
offensive, something UNITA 
officials and foreign diplomats 
have denied. 

A truce was called Wednes- 
day, but UNITA said govern- 
ment troops broke it within 
hours. On Friday, they said all 
airports in rebel-controlled ar- 
eas were under bombardment, 
preventing Mr. Savimbi from 
leaving for Lusaka. Fighting 
continued Saturday, 


BOOKS 


Mandela Terms U.S. Aid Plan 6 Peanuts 9 


■ $ 


•_9PHE VILLAGERS. 
’• Changed Values, Altered 
lives: The Closing of die 

- Urban-Rural Gap 

By Richard CnlchfiehL ‘ 497 
. • pages. $27.50. Anchor. . 

Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 

D ICHARD Critchfidd is by 
- XV his own account neither a 

• historian nor an anthropologist 

• but “a reporter who writes 
-.. about villages, a nonintdlectual 
. - writing essentially for nonintel- 
lectuals, certainly for non- 

-- academics.” This means that his 
books, of which “The Villagers” 
is the ninth, are informal in 
_ ■■ tone, as much descriptive as in- 
• terpretive, and closely attuned 
to the ne w sw o rthy events of our 
time. His abiding prcoccupa- 
. tion is with villages around the 

- world, tbeir economies, culture 
and mores; in this bode, his 

-. particular concern is with the 
fate of villages in a world of 
massive and near-instanta- 
neous change. 

In oil his books, he writes, his 
“hope is to leave a record, as set 
down by a witness, to show in- 
terested readers what life was 
like for a few ordinary villagers 
r in our tumultuous tim es.” That 

task now has acquired a specaal 

urgency because the traditional 
•• village is rapidly vanishing, the 
victim of five broad influences 
that are this book's principal 
concerns: “traditional village 
society adapting to an exchange 
economy and commercial tele- 
virion culture, the religious fun- 
damentalism it can provoke, 
challenges to inherited patterns 
of authority, cross-cultural mi- 
gration ana rapid agricultural 
change.” 

Critchfidd’s method is to go 
to a village and settle in for 
weeks or months. He is ^jour- 
nalist of the old-fashioned 
school who believes that his 


For 

investment 

information 

■ Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 




subject is more important than 
himself, with the happy conse- 
quence that he permits his vil- 
lagers to speak and act as them- 
selves; their lives may be 
filtered through the screen that 
he provides, but for the most 
part he manages to keep it al- 
most entirely invisible. 

This time he visits villages in 
Poland, Egypt, Indonesia, 
South Korea, Mexico, Califor- 
nia, Kenya, the Sahel, Ghana 
and India. His intent is to see 
bow much of the old culture has 
survived into the late 20th cen- 
tury, and how much has been 
washed -away or trauma tically 
altered by lbe dosing of the gap 
between city and country. 

Although Critchfidd is a par- 
tisan of village life who feels 
that one of the great problems 
of contemporary urban society 
is its alienation from its village 
roots, he readily acknowledges 
the benign effects of what must 
be called Westernization. Chief 
among these are the agricultural 
miracles that have been worked 
by the Green Revolution. Thus 
he welcomes the remarkable in- 
crease in agricultural productiv- 
ity that has been brought about 
in the Punjab of India, even as 
he laments the cost that has 
been exacted in dying old tradi- 
tions. 

In some ways his most opti- 
mistic chapter involves Popow- 
lany, a farming village in Po- 
land that is slowly being 
brought into the 20th century as 
a consequence of freedoms re- 
sulting nom the breakup of the 
Soviet empire. He finds there 
“Europe’s last authentic peas- 
antry, but also a village strug- 
gling to raise its economic pros- 
pects through various up-to- 
date endeavors. What most 
impresses him is the resilience 
with which the village holds on 
to its heritage. 

But to suggest that Cntcb- 
fidd is optimistic about the fu- 
ture of villages would be a thor- 
ough misreading of this and his 
other books. He laments not 
merely the decline of the vil- 
lages but the concomitant de- 
cline, in the larger society, of 
traditional sources of individ- 
ual and communal strength: the 

family, the farm, religion. 

He writes: “The questions 
really facing us, in America and 
all over the world are: Can we 
invent a substitute for the 
shrinking rural base of our in- 
creasingly urban sprawl? Can 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• William Gaddis, whose 
novel “A Frolic of His Own." 
won the 1994 National Book 
Award for fiction, is reading 
“ Erewhon " by Samuel Butler. 

“It’s such a terrific picture of 
the Republican ‘Contract with 
America.’ It’s shows a sodety in 
which illness is a crime, and 
that sort of thing.” 

(Lawrence Malkin, IHT) 



urban living on a long-term ba- 
sis s tabilize for human beings? 
Can village-like groups be 
found withrn dty living that can 
give our lives the meaning and 
cultural guidance that rural life 
provides? Can dues be made 
humanly and intellectually ac- 
ceptable to all their inhabit- 
ants? 1 ” 

Though Critchfidd may deny 
and/or misunderstand the gen- 


uine virtues of cities and their 
own culture; be is right to la- 
ment the passing of a simpler 
worid in which human bemgs 
were on more intimate terms 
with nature and each other. As 
a chronicler of villages, Richard 
Critchfield is, however reluc- 
tantly, an obituarist. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of The Washington Post 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Pres- 
ident Nelson Mandela has criti- 
cized the United States' three- 
year, $600 million aid program 
to his newly democratic country 
as “peanuts,” causing confu- 
sion among American offidals 
who say they are South Africa’s 
most generous bilateral donor. 

South Africa has received 
“very limited support indeed” 
from the United States, Mr. 
Mandela said at a press confer- 
ence last week. “It is peanuts — 
600 million rand over three 
years.” 

In his remark, Mr. Mandela 
confused the dollar with the 
rand, leading some diplomats 
to wonder initially if he was 
simply misinformed about the 
size of the package. The pro- 
gram actually amounts to 2.1 
billion rand over three years. 


But Mr. Mandela's spokes- 
man, Parks Mankahlama, said 
that the mix-up was just a slip 
of the tongue and that the sub- 
stance of his remark stood. 

‘The president expects more 
from the United States,” Mr. 
Mankahlama said. “He feds 
that, relative to the size of the 
U. S. economy, the aid program 
here is small.” 

The spokesman added that 
Mr. Mandela had raised the 
matter with President Bill Clin- 
ton in Washington last month, 
but that Mr. Clinton “appar- 
ently wasn't convinced." 

In May, immediately after 
the election that brought Mr. 
Mandela to power, Mr. Clinton 
announced a $600 million 
trade, investment and devdop- 
ment package for the country. 
It was a doubling of the previ- 
ous U. S. assistance level here 


and represents the largest 
Agency for International De- 
vdopment program in sub-Sa- 
haran Africa. 

For the first time, the bulk of 
the money is going into govern- 
ment programs. Under white- 
minority rule, all U.S. assis- 
tance here was channeled to 
anti-apartheid nongovernmen- 
tal institutions. 

According to South African 
offidals, foreign donors have 


|ed a total of about $3 bil- 
lion in assistance over the next 
three years to help the new de- 
mocracy get on its feet. 

The Japanese have made the 
biggest pledge, offering $1 J bil- 
lion over two years. But the vast 
majority of that money is in the 
form of concessional loans and 
trade and commercial credits. 

A U. S. Embassy spokesman 
said that no country would pro- 
vide more than the United 
States in direct grants. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

A bid that inexperienced 
players neglect in response 
to a takeout double is the pre- 
emptive jump short of game. 
Michael Lawrence used it as 
East on the diagramed deal, and 



exported 
fit, and was willing to pay a 
small penalty for the chance of 
pushing the opposition to a pre- 
carious height. 

Five hearts doubled would 
have failed by just one trick, 
and North, naturally, tried five 
ides. Now the obvious lead 
a top heart would have al- 
lowed South to succeed, but 
Kan tar made the thoughtful 
lead of his singleton dub. He 
foresaw the possibility of scor- 
ing a club ruff if he kept a line 
of communication open in the 
heart suit 

The dub lead was won in the 
dummy, and the spade queen 
was led. West held up his ace 
for one round, eager to see a 
discard from his partner. On 
the next round, East threw the 
diamond three, and West drew 
the right inference by asking 
himself why East had not 
thrown a heart. 


If East had held the ace or 
king of hearts, he would have 
played a high heart. If East had 
held very weak hearts, he would 
have played his lowest heart So 
the diamond discard indicated 
that he did not know which 
heart signal to give. 

Kan tar correctly placed his 
partner with the heart queen, 
underled his honors, and beat 
the contract when Lawrence 
won and returned a club for the 
crucial ruff. 

NORTH 
*Q JB4 
09 

9 A 10 9 8 4 
*Q J4 


WEST 

♦ A 92 

O A K 4 2 
6 K J 75 2 

♦ 6 


EAST 

• 6 

9 Q 10 8 7 6 5 
9 6 3 
*10985 
SOUTH (D) 

*K 107 5 3 
? J3 

oQ 

* A K 7 3 2 


Neither side was vulnerable. The 
bidding; 

South West North East 

1* DM, RedbL 

3* 50 5* Pass 


West led the dub six. 


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Page 6 


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 

OPINION 


lieralb 



Eribunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Helms’s Reckless Words 


Hutu Prepare a Bloody Return 


Senator Jesse Helms, chair apparent of 
the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee, is an ideologue distrustful of in- 
ternational trade agreements, arms con- 
trol treaties, foreign aid, the United 
Nations and multilateral cooperation in 
g en eral He is also a skilled attention- 
getter and tactician who knows how to 
raise the profile of an important commit- 
tee that has drifted close to irrelevance 
under its current Democratic chairman, 
Claiborne Pell. 

Will Mr. Helms be a constructive or a 
destructive force? The first signs are not 
encouraging. On Tuesday, Mr. Helms 
tried to bully President Ball Clinton into 
delaying a vote on the Uruguay Round 
world trade agreement Mr. Clinton's de- 
cision on this matter, Mr. Helms suggest- 
ed, would affect his own willingness to 
give full and fair consideration to the 
president's entire foreign policy agenda 
m the next session. 

Friday he went beyond rudeness to 
recklessness by challenging Mr. Clinton’s 
fitness to serve as commander in chief 
and alle ging that many officers agreed 
with his view. The voters and the U.S. 
Constitution have made Mr. Clinton 
commander in chief whether Mr. Helms 
likes it or not 

In his years as a foreign policy gadfly to 
the Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton ad- 
ministrations, Mr. H elms has sometimes 
been a positive influence. He has. for ex- 
ample, consistently made an issue of hu- 
man rights violations and offenses against 
democracy in China and Mexico. But he 
has also held meritorious ambassadorial 
nominations hostage for petty and even 
vindictive reasons. For example, he 
blocked confirmation of Robert Pastor as 


ambassador to Panama because of Mr. 
Pastor's work in the Carter administration 
in support of the Panama Canal treaties. 

Mr. Helms has taken a shortsighted 
view of American security by opposing 
arms control agreements and aid topost- 
Communist Russia. His hostility to inter- 
national peacekeeping and cooperative se- 
curity could complicate America's efforts 
to take part in the new security arrange- 
ments emerging in Europe and Aria. 

The senator’s power to obstruct and 
delay, already formidable as ranking mi- 
nority member, will now be greatly en- 
hanced at a time when a new strategic 
arms agreement and an important chemi- 
cal weapons convention will be coming 
up for Senate approval. 

On the trade agreement. Senator Bob 
Dole, not Mr. Helms, is likely to be the 
key Republican player. Meanwhile, more 
moderate Republicans on the new For- 
eign Relations Committee, like James 
Jeffords, Nancy Kassebaum, Richard 
Lugar and Frank Murkowski are unlikely 
to lend themselves to across-the-board 
obstructionism. 

A strong congressional voice is abso- 
lutely necessary to assure adequate public 
debate and democratic decision-making. 
But because of the way the constitution 
divides foreign polity responsibilities, co- 
operation between the president and the 
Senate, especially Mr. Helms's committee, 
is a practical necessity for main taining a 
coherent foreign policy. 

Seniority and a sweeping Republican 
victory have given Jesse H elms his com- 
mittee chair. Americans can only hope he 
will use his position more responsibly 
than his recent words suggest 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Clear the Air With Russia 


The Russian city of Sverdlovsk suffered 
an anthrax epidemic in 1979 that Soviet- 
era officials attributed to contaminated 
meat Now there is proof of what Wash- 
ington long suspected: that the outbreak 
was caused by airborne anthrax released 
from a military microbiology facility. 

The report, published by a team of 
U.S. and Russian scientists in the current 
Science magazine, traces many of the 
victims to an area south of the plant. The 
obvious surmise is that the installation 
was manufacturing germ-warfare agents, 
a violation of the 1972 treaty banning 
biological weapons. 

The findings should accelerate U.S. 
efforts to strengthen the 1972 ban, 
which was signed without verification 
procedures. True, s mall quantities of 
germ warfare agents can easily be con- 
cealed, making the ban difficult to veri- 


fy, but larger amounts in weapon form 
are harder to hide. 

The main impediment to germ warfare 
remains what it was when the ban was 
signed — doubt that germs can be pre- 
cisely targeted in a militarily useful way. 

Russia now apparently shares that 
judgment Some Russians cooperated in 
the inquiry, and President Boris Yeltsin 
has spoken with unusual candor “The 
KGB admitted that our military develop- 
ments were the cause.” 

Mary Russian scientists who worked cm 
germ warfare are now eager to do some- 
thing else, like develop pharmaceuticals 
and monitor health threats. The institutes 
that employ these scientists seek money 
for mflitary-to-dviHan conversion. Such 
collaboration is a smart way to get Russia 
out of germ warfare for good. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Guatemalan Will 


Behind the personal drama of an 
American woman’s search for her miss- 
ing guerrilla husband in Guatemala lies 
a political drama that has unfortunately 
been obscured. Not that they are unre- 
lated. Jennifer Harbuiys so far unavail- 
ing quest for Efraim Bamaca Velasquez 
illustrates for an international public a 
lack of official accountability all too 
familiar to the families of the large num- 
bers of Guatemalans killed or “disap- 
peared” at official hands. But the larger 
event of Guatemala's incipient effort to 
put aside its violent past also is pan 
of the picture. 

The armed forces are corrupt and 
make the old El Salvador’s armed forces 
— the killers of the Jesuits — look well- 
behaved. Importuned by Ms. Harbuxy, a 
lawyer from Washington, the army has 
dodged and lied and failed to provide 
verifiable facts about the missing man. 
Some parts of the human rights commu- 
nity in Guatemala have supported Ms. 
Harbuiys campaign, which entailed a 
monthlong hunger strike outside the Na- 
tional Palace. Others have noted that Mr. 
Bamaca is not a typically innocent Gua- 
temalan civilian victim of army terrorism 
but a member of an organization itself 
identified with violence. 

No matter. It is worth it to have the 
military on the defensive at this moment 
when a UN-sponsored renewal of Guate- 


mala is taking fragile root The govern- 
ment of Ramiro de Le6n Carpio, a for- 
mer human rights ombudsman, has been 
negotiating with the guerrillas on human 
rights, the role of the armed forces, the 
place of the majority indigenous peoples, 
refugees and a Salvador-like “truth com- 
mission”; other issues are to come. It is 
tough going: Mr. de Leon Carpio is a 
minority president, and the armed forces, 
unlike El Salvadors, are not vulnerable 
to American pressure, having been cut off 
years ago. But it is going. 

The Cold War began, in the Western 
Hemisphere, in Guatemala in 1 954, when 
the United States helped topple an elect- 
ed leftist government that was beginning 
to take up the very questions returning to 
the national agenda only now. Except 
this time the United States is supporting, 
not subverting, the Guatemalan popular 
will as a formal “friend” of the talks, 
welcomed by both sides. 

The renewal process is about ending 
the war that caught up Mr. Bamaca and 
many others. But his single case does not 
lend itself to being made a test of U.S.- 
Guatemaian relations. A fair result is 
likelier if the nrilitaiy can make the neces- 
sary concessions not to the United States, 
in which event nationalistic hackles rise, 
but to United Nations h uman rights 
monitors, an option now opening. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Not Just Jakarta’s Business 

Three years after the Dili massacre, re- 
newed disturbances in the East Timorese 
capital have shown again the hollowness 
of [Indonesia's] claims to authority in the 
former Portuguese territory. Nineteen, 
years after the Indonesian invasion, there 
is no peace in East Timor. Fortunately, 
these latest disturbances have been met 
with comparative restraint by the Indone- 
sian authorities. No doubt that is because 


they occurred when the eyes of much of 
the world were on Indonesia, as host of the 
Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation sum- 
mit. The latest disturbances in Dili are by 
no means just another internal Indonesian 
affair. They were accompanied by demon- 
strations protesting the Indonesian pres- 
ence in East Timor. The issue cannot be 
resolved without a change in Indonesia’s 
fundamental policies toward legitimate 
East Timorese aspirations. 

— The Sydney Morning Herald. 



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TT7ASHINGTON — Rwanda is about By Kathi Austin 

▼ ▼ to plunge bade into yet another 
human disaster. The Hutu leaders of the . . 

defeated Rwanda military are preparing poolside, at the exclusive Riviera Hotel in 

to invade their country retake power the Zairian city of Bukavu, orchestrating 
— all the while claiming refugee status their campaign for a return to war. 
under the mantle erf theUni ted Nations. The tragedy is that another round of 

The Hutu officers were ousted by Tutsi bloodshed in Rwanda is being made pos- 

rebels last spring after perpetrating one sible partly by the huge h umanitarian 
of the world's most organized gwincidal relief program launched last spring, 
campaigns, which kill*** nearly half a Nearly S1J> billion from the interna tion- 
mlllion people in a few weeks. al community has gone to support a huge 

The haunting images of this summer . 

are already out of dale. The sight of the . 1 <■»! jl j* 

hundreds of thousands erf desperate Anew round ofolooctsneam 

SS.ab’SM.eTfS' Rwanda is being made possib 

partfybythehuge,^ 

^fought. But during a recent 10- week inlentumed relief program. 

tnp to Central Africa, I also saw a differ- _ _ 1 j r 

ent kind of refugee crossing the border — France has OtSO played a role. 

one the worldwide televirion audience 

rarely saw: former Hutu military and 


ftapa-s "J" 


Kwanaa wav ure v - _i_i~ kill nearly a uau uiwkkl 

MOOMpS peopletuas emboldened them to continue 
ity Tutsis forcedmore ttan 2(»,000peo- pwpwu® and terror. 

pie into exile. The new Rwanda So^em thar ^ ^ ^emational Com- 
ment, dominated Ity Tutsis, accuses the On n^i Cross threw up her 

& tfSSEsid from ofl>« 

French have provided nrilitaiy andfman- ^mps, s°we arebejjS ^ NGOs 

d* ta* Hunted 


partly by the huge, weBr 
intentioned relief program. 


militiamen, plucked from the nightmare 
in Rwanda by French military forces, 
protected by Zairian security forces in- 
side military camps, fed and supplied 
by the United Nations. 

Now they are smiling, well-fed and 
well-rested. They wear freshly laundered 
uniforms, H»nr*» to blaring radios and 
lounge with their f amili es. At the military 
camps in Zaire, there is no cholera epi- 
demic or sign of human suffering. 

These refugees are open about their 
plans to launch a renewed offensive 
against the Tutsi-led government in their 
homeland. For example, Eliezer Niyite- 
geka, who was minister of information in 
the former Hutu government, now living 
in Zaire, says: “Yes, we have our big 
weapons, we even have our helicopters. 
We win use them. And when we get 
enough munitions, we wffl go bade there 
to Rwanda.” Jean Kambanda, a former 
prime minis ter also living in Zaire, says 
much the same thing They are si tting 


refugee relief operation. Though well- 
intentioned, that money is now helping 
the defeated Hutu army regroup. 

Mea n while, not a dime of foreign aid 
has been provided to the new Rwanda 
government, either for reconstruction or 
to protect this newly recognized United 
Nations member state. 

The result has been an escalation of 
violence inside the refugee camps near 
the towns erf Goma and Bukavu. Interna- 
tional relief organizations have now lost 
control of these camps to the extremist 
Hutus. These extremist elements have 
threatened relief workers and begun to 
launch s kirmish es on the Zaire-Rwanda 
border. War is in the wind. 

One cannot understand the current 
situation in Rwanda without looking at 
the role that the French government has 
played. Since decolonization in the 
1960s, the French have cultivated allies 
in Central Africa. These ties, both eco- 
nomic and personal, have main tam ed 


wai _ - 1 (VVI 

Rwandan nrilitaiy regime since_ is«u. 
Even the genocide of the Tutsi minority 
did not dhstner the French-Hutu alliance. 

The French did tittle for the refugees 
seeking to escape the Hum reign of texxor 
last April and May. But they did provide 
effective cover and transportation for the 
escape of many former extremist leaders, 
the army, the gendarmes and themmua- 
TTvn who had participated in the slaugh- 
ter. They retreated to neighboring Zaire. 

Zaire is a country without an effective 
go vernment. Marshal Mobutu Sese Seko 
established a kleptocracy in which a small 
ruling clique ennehed itself while the rest 
of the country steadily slipped into anar- 
chy. France and the UN rehabilitated die 
Mobutu regime ostensibly to assist with 
the humanitarian crisis. Zairi a n f orcesa rc 
now training the Hutu soldiers, according 
to Tadcle Slasrie, the United Nations mili- 
laxy qwwTMtwfer in the region. Rwandan 
militants are using whatever they were 
able to steal before fleeing the country to 
pay the Tanians for assistance in prepar- 
ing a renewal of war in Rwanda. 

In the camps in Zaire, former officials 
implicated in the genocide now have un- 
challenged power over hundreds of thou- 
sands of refugees. The remnants of the 
defeated Hutu regime view the camps as a 
power base from which to pressure the 
new government in Kigali a little more 
than 160 kilometers (100 miles) away. The 
politicians use the camps as their podiums, 
controlling the fate of hundreds of thou- 


tnrm. vyc iccu uisju- ~ 

[nongovernmental organizations] wflL It 15 

atifcto save. We can’t be the arbiters. 
Anyway, they would just raid the^ camps. 
So we go on taking care erf them.” 

The Fundamental issue for civilian ref- 
ugees and local Rwandan population is 
security. If you ask people what they 
want most, what is most needed to re- 
build their lives, they do not say plastic 
sheeting or food. They want protection, 
they want the establishment of law and 
order, and they want a tribunal or mech- 
anism for justice so that the guilty and 
innocent can be separated arid there can 
be punishment. Only then can one speak 
of normalization of ufe or society. Mean- 
while, the Western community is trying 
to impose Western models of dealing 
with genocide like basing a war crimes 
commission at the Hague far away from 
the real life of the Rwandans. 

The new Rwanda government needs 
the civilian refugees to come home, to 
help rebuild the country and prevent de- 
stabilization and fomenting of war. The 
former Rwandan extremist leaders, mili- 
tiamen and army elements, secure in 
United Nations camps, are preventing 
thrni The longer they succeed, the more 
likely that terror mil return to Rwanda. 

The writer, a research fellow at the Insti- 
tute for Policy Studies, is a consultant to 
the World Bank and other international 
organizations. She contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post 


NAFTA: Clinton Should Help Open Its Doors to the Hemisphere 


W ASHINGTON — When 34 
democracies convene in Mi- 
ami next month for the S ummi t 
of the Americas, one question wfll 
stand out in the minds of the 
Latin American and Caribbean 
heads of state. How widely and 
how quickly will the door to the 
North American Free Trade 
Agreement be opened and the 
hemisphere’s remaining democ- 
racies be invited to join? 

President Bill Clinton will face 
enormous pressures to temporize 
and go slowly. As grounds for 
caution, some will argue that a 
new trade initiative could jeopar- 
dize congressional ratification of 
the GATT agreement Others will 
cite Congress’s recent failure to 
reauthorize presidential fast- 
track authority to negotiate free- 
trade agreements. 

Instead of yielding to similar 
pressures to abandon NAFTA 
early in his presidency, Mr. Qin- 


By Bernard Aronson 




ton and Vice President Al Gore 
took their case to the public, join- 
ing Minority Whip Newt Gingrich 
to mobilize a bipartisan majority 
to ratify the treaty. Rather titan go 
slowly at the summit, the president 
and his fellow heads of state 
should declare their intention to 
unite, by 2001, all the hemisphere’s 
democracies (Including, by 
Cuba) into a Western Hemisphere 
Free Trade Agreement. 

They should establish an 
Americas Commission, modeled 
after the European Co mmissi on, 
to coordinate and accelerate pro- 
gress toward that goal And they 
should declare the Summit of the 
Americas an annual event,- in a 
rotating capital, to ensure that 
their commitments are followed 
al the highest political leveL 

Immediately upon such an an- 
nouncement, nations and regional 


WE IPOK 

to WORKING wm 
THE NBN MAJORITY- 


would compete to jem NAFTA 
and reap the reward erf increased 
foreign investment To gain admit- 
tance, they would have to guaran- 
tee democracy, open their econo- 
mies fully to investment, goods 
and services from fellow NAFTA 
members, protect intellectual 
property and show respect for la- 
bor rights and the en v ir onm en t 
The Qmton administration could 
not design an aid program that 
would advance U.S. interests and 
ideals across the Americas more 
quickly, or more directly strength- 
en the domestic economy. 

Already, the United States sells 
as much to Brazil as it does to 
China, more to Mexico than to 
Germany and France combined, 
and more to Venezuela than to 
Russia. By the year 2010, U.S. 
exports to Latin America will ex- 




SPEAKfcR 

WRSELF. 


ceed exports to the European 
Union by $100 billion annually, 
according to the U.S. special 
trade representative. 

Bat the benefits erf enlarging 
NAFTA gp further. Throughout 
the hemisphere, economic inte- 
gration is eroding old border ri- 
valries and fostermgpcac^ul po- 
litical cooperation. That political 
progress in turn greatly eases the 
foreign policy burdens of the 
United States in areas such as 
nuclear nonproliferation and 
bees US. resources for crises 
such as Iraq and North Korea. 

In the last century, for example, 
Brazil and Argentina built their 
railroads with different track 
gauges to prevent an enemy inva- 
sion by rafl. Today, the two former 
military rivals — whose two-way 
trade Has tripled since 1990 — are 
drawing up plans for a 2,400 kilo- 
meter (1,500-mile) highway to 
speed products between Sao Paulo 
mid Buenos Aires. The two na- 
tions — once considered likely 
new members of the nuclear weap- 
ons club — recently negotiated an 
agreement to guarantee peaceful 
nuclear energy development under 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency safeguards. 

Accdcrating economic reform 
by expanding NAFTA will also 
strengthen democracy. That is be- 
cause the dd, dosed system of 
statist economic controls through- 
out Latin America was the bed- 
rock of power erf the elite that 
financed and supported authori- 
tarian role. This elite profited, in 
turn, from economic privileges be- 
stowed, often through corruption, 
by the government. Dismantling 
that structure has liberated not 
only market forces in the economy 
but also the forces of democratiza- 
tion in civil society. 


As a result, popular pressures 
in Mexico this year led to the 
fairest presidential election in his- 
tory. And in Brazil two years ago, 
public outrage forced impeach- 
ment of the president for corrup- 
tion. Throughout the hemisphere, 
economic liberalization is em- 
powering a new class of entrepre- 
neurs, far more attuned to the 
demands of international mar- 
kets than the old economic elite 
and far less inclined to risk eco- 
nomic isolation by supporting a 
military coup d’6taL - 

Expanding economic refonnC 
essential, also, to improve the lives 
of the hemisphere's 180 minio n 
citizens who subsist in abject pov- 
erty. In Chile, the Latin nation 
that has.gone the farthest in liber- 
alizing its eco n omy and diversify- 
ing its exports, unemployment is 
4.9 percent, the proportion of 
Chileans with low-paid, unstable 
work has steadily declined, and 
more than 600,000 citizens have 
been lifted from poverty. 

With the recent election of 
committed reformers as president 
in both Brazil and Mexico, with 
democracy being re-established 
in Haiti, and with renewed 
growth and access to capita) mar- 
kets, Latin America and the Ca- 
ribbean are poised as never be- 
fore for a new, more hopeful era. 
With trade flowing freely across 
its borders, the Western Hemi- 
sphere can emerge in the 2 1st cen- 
tury as a zone of democracy and 
peace where rising prosperity is 
widely shared — a model for the 
rest of the world. 

The writer was assistant secre- 
tary of state for inter-American af- 
fairs from June 1989 to Jufy 1993. 
He contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post 


Culture War: Potshots Often Ricochet 


N EW YORK — Of all the 
comebacks of Election '94, 
surely the strangest is the coun- 
terculture. Declared dead in the 
1970s and finally laid to perma- 
nent rest at Woodstock II last 
summer, the counterculture was 
long ago annexed by a corpo- 
rate culture that employs the 
Beatles’ “Revolution” to hawk 
Nike r unning shoes. 

But now Newt Gingrich, echo- 
ing other Republican moralists 
like William Barnett and Dan 
Quayie, has brought the counter- 
culture back — not for a reunion 
concert, alas, but as a scapegoat 
with flowers in its hair. 

Not only is the countercul- 
ture being held responsible for 
the excesses of Bill Clinton — a 
non-inhaling Fleetwood Mac 
fan, of all unlikely hippies — 
but for everything unmoral, vio- 
lent and sexually explicit in 
American culture today. 

The prospect of turning bock 
the cultural dock is scaring some 
in the arts and show business, 
who smell a whiff of McCarthy- 
ism in any cultural blame ganta. 

The Los Augdes Times won- 
ders if a new Republican era of 
movie censorship is at hand. The 
Washington Post reports that the 
networks, already terrified by a 
V-chip that might regulate vio- 
lence in TV sets, now anticipate 
an S-drip regulating sex. 

And every liberal watchdog 
worries about the future of the 
National Endowment for the 


By Frank Rich 

Arts and the Public Broadcast- 
ing System, long branded by tire 
Gmgrich gang as countercultur- 


orpe and lost in *92, the embold- 
ened Republicans of ’94 now 
apparently fed they can run 
against the Stones — Rolling, 
Oliver, Sharon, whatever — 
with impunity in '96. Demo- 
crats can only hope they try. 

Republicans who rail a gains t 
the counterculture at this late 
date are far more out of touch 
with the public than they think, 
Sonny Bono’s efforts to bring 
them op to speed notwithstand- 
ing. If a party championing 
smaller government now uses a 
big-government stick to beat up 
on culture, it may end up maim- 
ing its own partisans. 

Culture — high and low, 
good and bad, moral and sleazy 
— does not divide along party 
lines. Few would doubt that TV 
shows like “Melrose Place” and 
“Studs” epitomize what Mr. 
Gingrich vilifies in American 
culture, but who is responsible 
for than? Not the countercul- 
ture, but Fox, the network 
owned by Rupert Murdoch, 
publisher of TTae New York 
Post, one of the mast conserva- 
tive papers in the United States. 

Who is the most successful 


purveyor of violent entertain- 
ment on the big screen? Arnold 
Schwarzenegger, another Re- 
publican. Who is the most vocal 
fan of Mick Jagger and Bruce 
Springsteen to emerge from the 
elections? New York’s gover- 
nor-elect, George PatakL 

By contrast, it was Attorney 
General Janet Reno who tried 
to jawbone Hollywood to re- 
duce film violence and Tipper 
Gore, the vice president’s wife, 
who led a battle against dirty 
rode lyrics. 

The audience that consumes 
culture, whether at chamber mu- 
sk concerts or multiplexes, also 
defies political stereotyping. 

Much of the more conserva- 
tive American crowd is joining 
its liberal neighbors in wat chin g 
“Roseanne," “Interview With 
the Vampire” and other hit en- 
tertainments that parade single 
moms, homosexuals, mindless 
violence and other scourges of 
the Gingrich world view. 

Instead of initiating a new 
round erf culture wars, Republi- 
cans and Democrats alike might 
benefit by actually stopping to 
wade into the culture of 1994 
and listen to what it is saying. 

A few hours spent contem- 
plating the Intensely moral out- 
laws of “Pulp Fiction” might 
even help them understand 
why 63 percent of the country 
rejected both parties by elect- 
ing not to vote. 

The New York Tunes. 


GATT: Stop the Games and Approve It 

F REE TRADE is one of the oldest ideas in the books, bnl now its 
time finally may have come. 

Last year President Bill Clinton lobbied for congressional passage of 
the hrstonc North American Free Trade Agreement CongrETvdiich 
never should have been so difficult on an issue so dearly in the national 
interest, grudgingly came through. Now Congress bodes to be difficult 
agam on another free-trade issue — the vitally important General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. That passage is in some doubt is a 
oommentary on how partisan and ridiculous Washington has become. 

^orically has been a signal champion of free 
V™!*? rctre ? t fron ? 11131 TOhtable economic philosophy now would be 
soldy for p3iihm puiposes; “ 

n r rATT* ey»3 raude aspect of GATT is unblemished. But the totality 

^ of talks, is extraordinary. It 

pkn ? ul }S e r l ** bleak WOlf W of dosed-door trading 
blocs and economically inefficient commerce. 

SSS agram “ t and ■** "»*** “s * "* 

— Los Angeles Times. 

m OUH PAGES: 100, 75 AM) 50 YEARS Acn 


1894s life After Death 

NEW YORK — Can life be re- 
called? is the all-absorbing topic 
al present in New York State, an<t 
a very interesting experiment is 
about to be tried — no less than 
an attempt to revivify a man after 
having paid the last penalty of the 
law in the electric chair. Dr. PJ. 
Gibbons says he can and is about 
to experiment on the body of a 
murderer, Charles H. Wilson, 
who is soon to undergo electrocu- 
tion for his crimes. Governor 
Flowers has given permission for 
the experiment and promises, if 
revived, the man will not again be 
submitted to the death penalty. 

1919; England in Dismay 

LONDON — [From our New 
York edition:] The news that the 
United States Senate has laid 
aside the treaty of peace with 
Germany caused undisguised dis- 


may here. Simultaneously big 
pewspapa headlines express what 
is manifestly England’s greatest 
fear: .namely, that Amenca has 
definitely shelved the treaty, just 
as Mr. Lodge and his supporters 
predicted she would and intends 
to “get out from under.” 

1944: A Flag in Metz 

METZ — - [From our New York 
edition. Collie Small writes:] Gor- 
man resistance in Metz collapsed 
today [Nov. 20]. Western Eu- 
rope s strongest fortress, last con- 
quered by direct assault 1,500 
years ago by Attila the Hun, is^ 
now almost in complete control 
of Lieutenant General George S. 
Patton’s 3d Army , Tanks and in- 
fantry are moving into the heart 
of tire city. During a two-hour 
ennse around the city in a Jeep I 
saw only one flag — an American 
flag that must have been hidden 
away for the last four years. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


PINION 


Page 7 


r ONDON^ — Last wfeek the 
/Azerbmam fifrfian an rat- 
ified^what Western cal i en and 
-officials in BaW&re ca ing the 
“contract of tbdeentuit!" 

Leading a//cons*rtinm, 
Amoco, BntisfcffPetrouuin and 
Peroizofl have peached £n agree- 

■ meat with . the; Azerbaijan gov- 

. ezzmknt that project total in- 
vestment of $8 bxUbn in the 
; formerly Soviet-ontrolied 
Baku, oil fields. - I. fulfilled, 
Azerbaijan could jreome the 
Kliwait of the Caspian Sea. 

Senior U.S. offuials predict 
’ that the contract rill generate 
economic praspetiy in an un- 


Axerbagan ’sprofits ■. 
from a hugeWestem oil 
dealmustnftbeusedto 
fuel the figliing against 
ethnic Antonians. 


stable region** ere the vital in- 
terests of Rissia, Turkey and 


;e Beneath die Caspian 


By Caroline Ctfc in favor of the Armenians of 

v i r . L _ Karabakh. Against all odds, the 

and John Eibnr smaU but J££ lincd Kara . 

bakhi defense force, with maie- 
i- rial and limited personnel sup- 

jan’s oppressed Lezgia Kurd- port from Armenia, recovered 
ish and Talysh imncties — most of the enclave in 1993. 
have been press-gared and In the past 12 months, the 
dispatched to their caths on Karabakhi Armenians trans- 
the Karabakhi front. f erred the main theater of war to 

Zt is this war foWagomo Azerbaijan proper. They re-es- 
that has tnsformed tablished security in the enclave 
the potentially josperous by creating a buffer zone to stop 
country into one ofie greatest fhe sheffing of Karabakh’s dvil- 
catastrophe zones a the Euro- ^ centers. Hundreds of thou- 
Asian land mass. With more sands of Azerbaijani civilians 
than 40,000 dea* and more have been forced to flee their 
than 1 mihion bmeless, this homes in the buffer zone. 



Families in Crisis? IPs Relative 


Bv CHAFMTTC In U Tnbnoc (k Gcatrc CAW Sr nrtinir 


war has producedeath and de- 
struction comparJle in scale to 

that in B osnia 


The costly failure of Azerbai- 
jan’s war efforts has forced 
President Heydar Aliyev to sign 


Azerbaijan trk the lead in ^d honor a succession of 
introducing vicnce into what cease-fire agreements over the 
had been a lately peaceful po- P 351 four months. His strategy 
Utica] strugglf by the Arme- appears to be to buy time for 
nians of Karatkh to free them- the resumption of (he war tin- 
selves frca repressive der more favorable conditions. 


Utica] st niggi< by the Arme- appears to be to buy time for 
nians of Karatkh to free them- the resumption of (he war tin- 
selves frco repressive der more favorable conditions. 
Azerbaijani tile. Azerbaijan He has declared repeatedly 
later «sral«M the conflict into that his top priorities are to re- 
full-scale w«- build his humiliated army and 

In Febnry 1988, an orga- t0 defend the territorial wtegri- 
nized mass-Te of Armenians in ty of the new Azerbaijani state. 


■ Jran collide. 
# They vie* 


■ They viev it as. a winning 
stroke in tb “Great Game” be- 
tween Rusra and the West, fol- 
lowing thexrflapse of the Soviet 
Union, fo control of the rich 
resources^ the Caspian Sea. 

But a.*ast influx of capital 
could bister dictatorship in 
Azerbaian and fuel a new 
round c the war over the the 
tiny, lagdy Armenian enclave 
of Nag<mo-Karabakh. 

The West should beware. 
Azezbqan is no young democ- 
racy. Is political elite is animat- 
ed by-he fingering spirit of com- 
munixn and the revived spirit of 
extnmst nati onalism Genuine- 


the town < Sumgait was Azer- Turkish m ilitary officers and 
baijan’s rponse to the Kara- mujahidin mercenaries from 


bakhi Aitrarians* first public If 23 ? and Pakistan are now as- 
eatpressic of the wish for free- asting him in this. 
rinm Pooms followed, raising 33 President Aliyev is to re- 
tbe spoer of another Arme- establish control over Nagomo- 

■ * If arokolrh lia nrtfl paK /1 


nian geJClde. 

Afte Azerbaijani special 


Karabakh, he will require solid 
foreign backing. Mr. Aliyev has 


troopso.1991 deported entire turned to his old comrades in 
Karachi Armenian villages, Kremlin. 


fan and its ally Turkey It is in Russia's interest to 
' Nagorno-Karabakh establish a barrier in Azerbaijan 
a, keeping humani- against the spread of Lranian- 
m! from the tlnitftH backed Muslim fundamental- 


and nnenia, keqring humani- agamst the spread of lraman- 
tarir workers fromrne United backed Muslim fundamental- 
Napns and otha 1 organizatiotis j 8 ® and pan-Tuikac national- 


aw/ from the suffering in the I* 11 - Russia also has an interest 


w?zone. Aid deliveries to vio- 
tiis of the 1988 Armenian 
ethquake were also obstructed 


fining control of the Cas- 
oil fields. The Russians 
demanded the stationing 


the Azerbaijani Anny of border guards in Azerbaijan 


ly dmocratic forces remain on Jgan ferocious assaults on the an d a l arge share erf its oil re- 
tire oargms of public fife. jpital of Karabakh, Stepana- P nce 1 J ms too 

Kunan nrfits abuses have -cit, and other ethnic A rmenian high. Mr. Aliyev could not ac- 

a b^dwt Qvil . liberties exist -owns and villages, using weap- : 

onf on paper. Rqpeated waves ons of mass destruction indud- 
ofurests have taken a heavy toD ing multiple missile launchers 
or Azerbaijan's political opposi- hnd duster bombs, 
tvn. Both the Azerbaijani goy The high tide of Azerbaqani 
i»nrrvmt and private miHiiy aegressjon came in the spring of 
WM fljhwif: Ar menians hostag 1992, when its army overran 40 
Riding wppmn and rhildT r. percent of the N agomo-Kara- 
ideased hostages show vigm T bakh enclave before being 
having been tortured. stopped 11 kOometers (7 miles) 

Tens, of thousands of par from Stepanakert Since then, 
youth — r many from Azcrli- the mxfitary balance has shifted 

£he Azerbdjan Question 

H AVING IN EFFEcfoc- ed Abnlfaz Hab^preadenL A 
aipied the neighborii in- dose afiy at Turitey, he was 
dependent itpuWic.af Gegik, . 

tbe^rasiansmenaweDdrvor- Habey.attemp^d to ti 18 . ... 

ing to expandtbffi mfhiSeto mtowidtta from Mmcow, 

SnlH^lOTner Soviet rflony . and sought to conqilete a deal 
-Az«lS!^ ' witii Weston oil companies. 

MoaJs goals in Aibai- Jnslas the pnaadenl was get- 
jan < indlude reintroicing ting dose to nntiding Ae oil 
hoods, re-establishing ; inlli-' agreranent m London, he was 

taryoase, controtogmtil re- : ^ 

sSvcTSd manning fffron- , edty was financed and support- 
tiers. Thus, the tin ton cd by Moscow. A pow^strug- 
administration mustlecide ft ensu^.dumig whidi a 
what to do about the eSovict former KGB general and Com- 
nmublk — whether toow to ®^ xust boss ’ 

Nfoscow’s wishes or htf Azct, Ahyej^ged as pi^t 
bah an remain indepetent It to Se^te^, Mr. Mgv ^ 
is. savs Jack Marescahe for- off to visit the Umted States. 

neeoftor for On the day a (fanner was being 
SfiJSKwt ffuS- hosted to idebrate tire tigning 
flie region, a t«t casc*r u-a. ^ the oil agreement, Mr. Aliyev 

Rl AWhiS K SffCTsrom the received news that two hi^i- 
♦ in two level officials in Ins government 

f** m had been assasanated in Baku. 

Those who see a Russian 


cept Russia’s conditions and 
hope to survive in Azerbaijan's 
staunchly Turkic-oriented po- 
litical culture. 

Mr. Aliyev is now gambling 
that an oil-addicted West will 
provide the material resources 
and political support he needs 
to reverse his country’s defeat 
in Nagorno-Karabakh. The re- 
sources are on their way. Mil- 
lions of dollars of oil money, 
including a $300 million bonus 
for the government, are to start 
pouring into Azerbaijan's emp- 
ty coffers by year's end. 

President Aliyev has also ex- 
ploited America's lingering, 
and not entirely unfounded. 
Cold War fears about Russian 
expansionism to gain political 
backing beyond the narrow 
bounds of oU interests. 

The oil deal can contribute to 
the peaceful development of 
Transcaucasia. But the Untied 
States and its allies must not 
encourage plans for another 
Azerbaijani offensive. 

The west needs to couple the 
oil agreement with two condi- 
tions for the improvement of 
relations with Azerbaijan: visi- 
ble progress in the establish- 
ment of democratic govern- 
ment. and an end to Turkey’s 


and Azerbaijan’s economically 
crippling blockades of Armenia 
and Nagorno-Karabakh. 

President Bill Clinton should 
also appoint a special envoy 
with political weight to do two 
things: assist negotiators from 
Russia and the Conference for 
.Security and Cooperation in 
Europe to establish a credible 
peacekeeping force in the war 
zone; ana promote respect for 
the basic human rights of all the 
citizens of Azerbaijan and Na- 
gorno-Karabakh. Once these 
conditions are met, the interna- 
tional community will be right 
to expect the Karabakhi leader- 
ship to honor its pledge to with- 
draw its forces from the buffer 
zone in Azerbaijan proper, with 
the exception of its vital life- 
line corridor to Armenia. 

The Baroness Cox is a mem- 
ber of the British House of Lords. 
Mr. Eibner is assistant to . the 
president of Christian Solidarity 
International, a human rights 
group. They have traveled to Na- 
gorno-Karabakh many times and 
are the authors of “ Ethnic 
Cleansing in Progress: War in 
Nagorno-Karabakh . " 77ier con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune 


B OSTON — I am up to my 
elbows in Thanksgiving 
preparations when the phone 
rings. There are macadamia nuts 
to the right of me, pecans to the 
left. Flour and eggs are wrestling 
in ray mixing bowl 
I reach for the phone, cra- 

S it between my ear and my 
der and hear the voice of a 
television producer. She wants 
to know whether I might be 
available to comment on the 
decline and fall of tire American 
family. A stoiy for the season. 

As I stand there, covered in 
batter, she rattles off tire horrif- 
ic list of stories that make her 
case. The South Carolina moth- 
er who drowned her children. 
The 19 toddlers found in a 
squalid Chicago apartment 
without food or dotires. The 
Pittsburgh couple who took off 
for two weeks without warning, 
abandoning three kids to teen- 
age babysitters. 

I listen to this familiar litany 
with an equally f amiliar sense 
of gloom, and then I decline. 
Pm sorry, but this afternoon, I 
promised to visit my mother. 
Tomorrow, the cousins are 
coming from California. The 
next day is our wedding anni- 
versary. Tuesday, the young 
adults we call “the kids” are 
arriving. And there is a crisis in 
the care of an aged aunL 
I hang up the phone, wiping 
pastry dough from my hair and 
savoring the irony that flavored 
this exchange. The irony of be- 
ing too busy with family to 
comment cm its breakdown. 

Folding in tire last ingredi- 
ents erf my too-elaborate recipe, 

I wonder how many of us live 
with this duality, we are con- 
vinced that the great amor- 
phous, generic American family 
is falling apart. At the same 
time we are occupied with fam- 
ily maintenance. 

I hear a steady drumbeat of 


By Ellen Goodman 


despair about “family values.” 
The overwhdnung majority of 
Americans agree — 98 percent 
in one poll — that other people 
are not living up to their com- 
mitments. Yet in the same poll 
only 18 percent believe they are 
irresponsible themselves. 

Everywhere I go, when peo- 

MEANWHBUE 


pie talk about what they value, 
the topic is their family. The 
coin of the conversational ex- 
change between friends and 
even strangers is tire state of 
their parents, their children, 
their spouses. 

In our daily lives, we work at 
and for family. At four o’clock 
in tire morning, when we worry, 
it is about our family. 

Today, we have higher de- 
mands on ourselves as the par- 
ents of growing children and 
Irmgftr demands as the children 
of aging parents. But eveiy 
morsd of evidence of success — 
8 erf 10 high school juniors and 
seniors list their parents as the 
people they trust — comes lost 
m a survey of f amil y woes. 

What do we make of this du- 
ality? I wish the producer had 
asked me that. Some of it comes 
perversely from tire very strug- 
gle to do a good job. The harder 
most of ns try, the angrier we 
are at those who don't and at 
tire price society pays. 

But we are also reding from 
something alcm to negative ad- 
vertising about the American 
family. The horror stories that 
make the front page, because 
they are so extraordinary, have 
gradually begun to be accepted 
as ordiniuy. 

The radio talk shows provide 
an endless stream of anti-gov- 


ernment messages. But the Jen- 
ny Joneses and Mon tel Wil- 
liamses, the Sally Jessy 
Raphaels and Geraldo Riveras 
present an unbroken stream 
of pathological families. 

On any day, Americans can 
channel surf across an electron- 
ic byway of talk shows, from 
murderous mothers to hus- 
band-stealing sisters to proud 
mothers of teenager strippers. If 
Norman Rockwell's Thanksgiv- 
ing family were on the air, 
grandpa would be a child mo- 
lester, grandma an addict and 
the kids would bear sexually 
transmitted diseases. The ab- 
normal is the norm. 

I’m hardly a PoUyanna about 
family life. I know about the 
stress of the sandwich genera- 
tion, trying to be all things to all 
bosses, parents, children, 
spouses. I know that every fam- 
ily has troubles. At some time 
or other, in some light or other, 
we all lode dysfunctional. But 
the fact is that most of us are 
functioning. And loving. 

Somewhere along the way we 
Americans have lost a sense of 
proportion. We have come to 
believe that I’m O.K., but 
you’re not, and that thing called 
the American Family is most 
certainly not. 

This Thanksgiving Day has 
always been been more about 
f amily than food. It is the time 
when Americans travel through 
airports, highways, ZIP codes, in 
order to squeeze around the fam- 
ily table and discover how many 
adults can sit on a piano bench. 

Standing in my kitchen, cov- 
ered in homebaked proof of my 
holiday excess, I wonder if 
those of us who are connected 
by bonds of DNA, marriage, 
affection and above all else, 
commitment, can forget for a 
while that we’re supposed to 
befalling apart. 

6 Boston Globe Newspaper Co. 


f 

- i 

li 




- - r/ ’" there. Second, whi Moscow 

- can argue that in ®igia 3,1(3 

— - — _ other republics the: is no one 

_ - -'J dtotooooaductpeaceepingop- 

- - orations, in Azerban the bass 

for an mtemationiP eac ® <:ee P - 
• ' ing fence exists. 

It was created iresponse to 
tire continuing si® with Ar- 
o' menia. Two y«»raf>, ****“**£ 

V national “Minsk roup <rf the 

'si . Conference on S^nty and Co 

~ ' conation in Enr® reached an 

; a agreement to 
' v the area. TTiis jr, the CSCE 
' V , expanded this ^wment to m- 

* "J. dude an mter t * ona l P eace “ 

\ keeping forcefti^ region. 

Since the CStf effort got im- 

derway,tbeRflamb^«Hi- 

sistentiy attend *° ‘5 s 

... - ' T v inmlementatk)J tn P at ^ y 

feringti septtfRuss 311 or CIS 
. ‘^eacdceepimfaw-.. Under- 

tukrarhanams are 


fenng a separt 


adamantly op®®®* 

In June 19: an election was 

held and the*fbaijaius elect- 


ed Abulfaz Elribey president. A 
dose ally of -Turkey, he was 
distrusted by the Russians. Mr. 
Hdbey. attempted to assert his 
independence from Moscow, 
and sought to complete a . deal 
with Western oil companies. 

Just as the president was get- 
ting dose to initialing tire ofl 
agreement in London, be was 
overthrown. The coup report- 
edly was financed and support- 
ed by Moscow. A power strug- 
gle ensued . during which a 
former KGB general and Com- 
munist Party boss, Gaidar 
Aliyev, emerged as president. 

In S^tember, Mr. AKyev set 
off to visit the United Stales. 
On tire day a dinner was being 
hosted to celebrate the signing 
of the oil agreement, Mr. Aliyev 
received news that two high- 
level officials in his government 
bad been assassinated in Baku. 

Those who see a Russian 
hand in these slayings daim 
they were meant as a wanting 
both to the Azeri parliamentari- 
ans and to President Aliyev. 
' When Mr. Aliyev returned to 
Baku, he discovered a coup in 
the rnaking in one of Azerbai- 
jan’s largest dries. Game. There 
was also trouble in Baku. 

There was no smoking gun, 
to be sure, but Moscow's com- 
plicity is impossible to doubt 

Russia is also trying to amend 

the ceding cm tanks, armored 
personnel camera and short- 
range artillery that it agreed to 
when it signed the Conventional 
Forces Agreement. These 
change s would enable M oscow 
to deploy forces along Azerbai- 
jan's northern frontier. 

It is tiwre to put a stop to 
Russian expansionism. The 
Qjjiion adminis tration ca nnot 
ignore the Caucasus and turn 
its bade on Azerbaijan. 

— Lady Weymouth, comment- 
ing lit The Washington PosL 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HKHAT.n TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


CAPITAL MARKETS ON MONDAY 


Most Active International Bands 


The 250 most actively traded intemetkjnal bonds 
traded through the Euroctear system tor the week 
ending Nov. 18. Prices supplied by Teh hum. 


Rok None 

CPS 

Mata-fly 

Pita 

YMCI 

Austrian SctiHBng 

186 Austria 

TV* 

10/18/04 

992000 

76000 

225 Austria T-WIta 

zero 

05/02/95 

976755 

52100 

Bstgisn Rraic 

145 Belgium 

7 

04/29/99 

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7.15M 

160 Belgium 

716 

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CmmmRmi Dodwr 

210 Canada 

616 

02/01/98 

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66500 


Danish Krone 


6 Denmark 

7 

12/15/04 

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7.9200 

7 Denmark 

9 

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101.9500 

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16 Denmark 

8 

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95^4000 

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9 

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101.7000 

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26 Denmark 

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zero 

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zero 

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1 Trauhand 

7Wt 

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38 Germany 

8ft 

07/21/97 

103X480 

7X400 

39 Germany 

8 

03/20/97 

103.1700 

77500 

40 Germany 

6ft 

05/20/99 

96X140 

6X500 

4T Germany 

8 

07/22/02 

102^900 

7X100 

42 Germany 

8ft 

08/20/01 

106X875 

8X200 

44 Treuhand 

6ft 

06/11/03 

957600 

7.1800 

45 Germany 

7ft 

10/20/97 

101X600 

7.1500 

47 Germany 

8ft 

04/22/96 

103X400 

8X300 

48 Treuhand 

5ft 

04/29/99 

95.1700 

6X400 

49 Germany 

7ft 

10/20/97 

102X200 

7X500 

50 Germany 

Bft 

01/22/96 

103X575 

85900 

51 Treuhand 

6ft 

07/09/03 

94X300 

7X500 

S3 Germany 

Bft 

12/20/M 

107.1800 

8X800 

53 Germany 

6ft 

05/20/98 

98X525 

6X800 

55 Germany 

Bft 

01/22/96 

1025400 

7X200 

56 Treuhand 

7ft 

10/01/02 

101X500 

7X700 

57 Germany 

9 

10/20/95 

1029700 

87400 

58 Treuhand 

5ft 

09/24/98 

95X750 

5X8M 

59 Germany 

6ft 

04/22/03 

95.1300 

7.1000 

61 Treuhand 

6ft 

04/23/03 

935600 

6.9SOO 

62 Germany 

7 

12/22/97 

100X200 

6.9600 

63 Treuhand 

5 

01/14/99 

93.1214 

5X700 

64 Germany 

5ft 

08/20/98 

96.1300 

5X800 

65 Germany 

8ft 

01/20/97 

103X333 

8X700 

66 Germany 

5ft 

02/22/99 

94.1600 

57100 

68 Germany 

516 

10/20 /VS 

94X183 

55700 

69 Germany 

7ft 

12/20/02 

975700 

7X000 


72 Germany FRN 

77 Germany 

78 Germany 

79 Germany 
IT Germany 

84 Treuhand 

85 Treuhand 
87 Germany 
94 Germany 

100 Germany 


nxu 

8% 

«ft 

« 

8ft 

m 

6ft 

m 

7ft 

8 


09/30/04 91L87D0 
05/22/95 107.5800 
08/21/00 705X050 
02/20/98 97X000 
02/20/01 105X133 
01/29/03 974120 
03/28/98 978000 
05/22/95 1014500 
10/21/02 984557 
05/02/02 1014700 


84900 

8X600 

6.1400 

BJB00 

7.3100 

6X600 

84100 

74600 

74800 


Ml 

Nans 

Can 

Maturity 

Price 

ncM 

104 Germany 

m 

07/20/95 

102.1800 

8X900 

107 

Germany 

6ft 

05/02/03 

93X775 

7.1800 

109 

Germany 

6 

86/20/16 

80X000 

7X700 

113 

Germany 

6ft 

08/14/98 

90X133 

65000 

114 

Germany 

8ft 

07/20/00 

1065267 

8X100 

119 

Germany 

8ft 

08/20/96 

103.7200 

8X000 

130 

Germany 

Bft 

05/22/00 

1065900 

8X100 

143 

IMI Bk FRN 

5M, 

11/1 0/97 

99X000 

5X200 

144 

Trauhand 

5 

12/17/98 

93X525 

5X600 

162 

Treuhand 

7ft 

12/02/02 

98X000 

7X500 

173 

Britain 

7ft 

10/28/77 

101X000 

7X500 

176 

Germany 

7ft 

02/21/00 

1025200 

75600 

178 

Germany 

7ft 

11/21/96 

101X700 

7X100 

196 

Germany 

5ft 

08/20/77 

98X000 

5X700 

197 

Germany 

7ft 

01/20/00 

100X500 

7X000 

211 

Germany 

zero 

08/11/75 

955363 

6X700 

212 

world Bank 

7ft 

10/13/99 

1005400 

7X100 

218 

Germany 

6ft 

02/20/97 

100.1300 

6X900 

220 

Germany 

Bft 

07/20/95 

102.1100 

85700 

230 

Bundesbk Uq. 

zero 

03/15/95 

98X034 

4.9700 

Z31 

Austria 

6ft 

01/10/24 

82X000 

7.9300 

236 

World Bank 

5ft 

11/10/03 

885000 

6X400 


Dutch Guilder 


Netherlands 

7ft 

10/01/04 

97X000 

7X300 

Netherlands 

5ft 

01/15/04 

88X500 

65200 

Netherlands 

6ft 

07/15/98 

97X000 

6X200 

Netherlands 

7ft 

01/15/23 

945000 

7.9400 

Netherlands 

8ft 

09/15/07 

103X000 

7X600 

Netherlands 

7ft 

06/15/99 

101X000 

7X300 

Netherlands 

Bft 

06/01/06 

105X000 

8X300 

Netherlands 

6ft 

04/15/03 

935500 

6.9500 

Netherlands 

8ft 

02/15/07 

1035500 

7X700 

Netherlands 

7 

(0/15/03 

96X800 

7X400 

Netherlands 

Bft 

02/15/02 

104X500 

7X300 

Netherlands 

8ft 

06/15/02 

104X500 

7.9300 

Nether lands 

6ft 

02/15/99 

98X500 

6X600 

Netherlands 

8 ft 

09/15/01 

106X000 

8X000 

Netherlands 

7 

05/15/99 

99.1000 

7X600 

Netherlands 

Oft 

01/15/07 

107X500 

8.1500 

Nether kinds 

6ft 

04/15/96 

100X300 

6X500 

Netherlands 

7ft 

11/15/99 

101X000 

7X300 

Netherlands 

zero 

06/30/95 

96X950 

65800 

Netherlands 

6ft 

01/15/79 

97X500 

6X600 

Netherlands 

9 

05/15/00 

107X000 

8X000 


ECU 

31 

UK T-nate 

5ft 

01/21/97 

95X750 

55000 

46 

UKT-note 

8 

01/23/96 

101.1250 

7X100 

60 

EIB 

10 

01/24/01 

1065000 

9X900 

75 

France OAT 

9ft 

04/25/00 

104X500 

9X500 

95 

UK T-bills 

zero 

12/15/94 

995862 

5X600 

99 

France OAT 

8ft 

04/25/22 

92X000 

8X800 

105 

France BTAN 

7ft 

03/16/78 

97X200 

7X000 

ill 

France OAT 

6 

M/25/04 

83X000 

7.1500 

116 

Italy 

6ft 

02/21/99 

icmfmn 

7X900 

124 

France OAT 

6ft 

04/asm 

90X500 

7X600 

137 

UK T-tollli 

zero 

02/16/95 

985722 

5X100 

138 

Britain 

9ft 

02/21/01 

1Q2J500 

8X800 

147 

France OAT 

8ft 

03/15/02 

99X900 

85600 

154 

France BTAN 

5 

03/16/99 

88X200 

5X300 

167 

France OAT 

8ft 

05/12/97 

101X000 

8X000 

182 

Italy 

7 

11/29/98 

95X000 

7X700 

195 

UK T-bllis 

zero 

01/12/75 

99X837 

55700 

234 

Italy 

9ft 

03/07/11 

96X750 

9X000 

244 

Calsse Fse Dev. 

5ft 

02/09/01 

811250 

t Attn 

Plimlsh Markka 

142 Finland 

11 

01/15/99 

105X099 10X600 

166 

Finland 

9ft 

03/15/04 

97.1330 

9X800 


French Franc 


127 FranaeOAT 
132 France OAT 
146 France OAT 
158 France OAT 


174 France BTAN 
187 France BTAN 

192 France BTAN 

193 France OAT SP 
205 Gold Sachs Put 

221 Gold Sadis Call 

222 France OAT 

223 France OAT 
242 France OAT Sf 
250 France OAT 


634 

5ft 

6ft 

9Vj 

10 

6ft 

7 

441 

zero 

IUL 

nxi. 

8V: 

6 

zero 

Bft 


10/25/04 
04/25/04 
10/25/03 
01/25/01 
05/27/00 
10/12/96 
11/1 2/99 
04/12/99 
04/25/23 
11/12/96 
11/12/96 
11/25/02 
10/25/25 
04/25/01 
04/25/23 


904000 

824200 

91.3000 

1074000 

T09JS00 

99.2400 

974700 

894300 

89300 

1080000 

954500 

1024000 

714000 

6OL9OO0 

984000 


74500 

64400 

74900 


9.1400 

64500 

7.7100 

54100 

88600 


83000 

83600 

84000 

84300 


ItaHen Lira 


183 EIB 


1815 07/06/98 974250 104000 


j Mt Nam 

cm 

monmr 

Rita 

YMd 

JapvitM Yan 

11 World Bank 

no. 

12/20/04 

99X750 


. 92 World Bank 

4ft 

03/20/03 

98.1250 

45900 

98 Exlm Bk Japan 

4ft 

10/01/03 

96X250 

45300 

108 Italy 

3ft 

06/20/01 

91.7500 

3X100 

120 Credit Fonder 

4ft 

08/09/02 

98X750 

4X000 

122 Roche Fin-1 

1 

05/15/02 

745000 

1X400 

125 World Bank 

4ft 

12/22/97 

1(0X000 

4X100 

139 World Bank 

4ft 

06/20/00 

100X500 

4X900 

1 151 World Bank 

5ft 

03/20/02 

103X000 

5.1000 

159 Sumitomo Rlty 

4X0 

06/24/97 

100X500 

4.1900 

175 Roche FlnlMst 

IUL 

06/15/98 3500X400 

— 

199 Sweden 

zero 

09/20 m 

83X687 

3X900 

207 Senlnoc FRN 

2X25 

12/31/99 

100X000 

2X200 

208 Merrill Lynch 

2X0 

11/16/98 

loaxooo 

2X000 

209 IFC 

zero 

11/15/79 

79X953 

45900 

217 World Bank 

6 

10/18/76 

104X500 

5X300 

224 Japan Dev. Bk 

5 

10/01/99 

102X500 

4X700 

226 IBM InH Fin 

S 

03/10/78 

85XMG 

5X800 

232 Solntab FRN 

3ft 

12/31/99 

100X000 

3X300 

246 Mitsubishi Fin 

4ft 

08/27/97 

105X679 

4X700 

248 FullfeU 

3X5 

07/23/97 

99X898 

35800 

249 Austria 

S 

01/22/01 

101X290 

4.9200 

Spanish Pasata 

115 Spain 

8X0 

12/15/98 

91X500 

9.1000 

191 Spain 

10ft 

11/30/78 

97X700 

105300 

200 Spain 

11X5 

08/30/98 

101XS00 

11X100 

204 Spain 

9 

02/28/97 

97X000 

9X800 

229 Spain 

10X0 

08/30/03 

98.0400 11.1200 

238 Spain 

8 

05/30/04 

815000 

9X200 

Swash Krona 

228 Sweden 

11 

01/21/79 

102X000 10X400 

235 Sweden 

10ft 

05/05/03 

97X600 10X800 

U.S. DoPar 


13 R. Fleming call 
15 Argenttna FRN 
20 Brazil FLIRBL 
30 Argent in a par L 
36 Venezuela FRN 
43 Brazil 9804 FRN 


rua. 

6ft 

4 

4 Vi 
5ft 
6H> 


54 Brazil El LFRN 6 54. 


74 Mexico par B 
80 Brazil L FRN 
82 Mexico D FRN 
86 OKB 

88 Brazil par VL3 
91 Venezuela par A 

96 Mexico par a 

97 Toyota Fin 

102 Argentina FRN 

103 Yokohama 
106 Brazil ZL FRN 
112 Venezuela FRN 
118 Venezuela par B 

128 BNG 

129 Poland 
131 LKBFRN 

133 Brazil par YL4 
135 Mexico B FRN 


4 Vi 
6ft 
S«ft 
7ft 

4 

6ft 

6ft 

m 

541. 

m 

6 ft. 
ruL 
6ft 

7 

3ft 

59h 

4 

6766 


140 Italy FRN nja. 

141 Sweden zero 

149 Scrroa Fin FRN 6tt 

152 Finland 

153 Korea Dev. 8k 

156 Philippines B 

157 Nigeria mam 
161 Finland FRN 
166 EIB 

169 Finland 

170 Smith Kline 
17) Argentina 
172 Argentina 
177 Mexico C FRN 

179 Bulgaria A FRN 

180 Sweden 

181 Hemlsph FRN 

184 Bulgaria FRN 

185 Britain FRN 

188 Tokyo 

189 Mexico A FRN 

190 Sweden 
194 Sweden 

202 EdF 

203 Thai OH FRN 
206 Natwest FRN 

213 BcoCom Ext. 

214 Ontario 

215 Brazil LFRN 
219 Japan Dev. Bk 
233 Venezuela A 
237 BcoCam Ext. 

240 Italy 
245 Canada 
247 Sweden FRN 


6ft 

809 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

m 

79k 
74k 
84k 
1895 
6 4k 
6H. 
64k 
rui. 
U 

5 

79k 

6 4k 


zero 


6775 

6.10 

zero 

79k 

646 

m 

7 

716 

6 

6ft 

54W 


10/31/95 

03/29/05 

04/15/14 

03/31/23 

12/18/07 

oi /20/m 

04/15/06 

12/31/19 

04/15/12 

12/28/19 

11/15/99 

04/15/24 

03/31/20 

12/31/19 

10/24/97 

03/31/23 

09/22/04 

04/15/24 

03/31/07 

03/31/20 

08/23/99 

10/27/14 

11/04/98 

04/15/24 

12/31/19 

07/26/99 

04/03/95 

11/15/04 

11/24/97 

10/06/04 

12/01/17 

11/15/20 

07/17/97 

06/30/99 

07/28/04 

11/10/97 

12/20/03 

11/01/99 

12/31/19 

07/28/24 

11/07/96 

11/16/01 

07/28/11 

09/24/96 

10/13/M 

12/31/19 

02/10/95 

01/17/95 

02/07/97 

11/16/01 

12/31/99 

05/15/95 

06/22/04 

04/15/09 

10/25/99 

03/31/07 

02/02/04 

09/27/03 

07/07/97 

02/08/01 


1180000 
723500 
524314 
485382 
453874 
8241745 
694590 
63.9840 
633755 
86 M. 
974250 
41.7407 
45X695 
643082 
983000 
683948 

94.1250 
653356 
474221 
46X563 
963000 
453313 
994400 
413752 
853095 
994600 
97.1595 
1080000 
973500 
980000 
623611 
393500 
99.9300 
943000 
957500 
983750 
78X750 
986290 
854525 
488660 
99.1922 
1081167 
434288 
997800 
957500 
863744 
988977 
984763 
943000 

1080000 

993000 

973060 

943500 

653420 

973000 

46.9174 

817750 

843000 

97.1250 
984800 


89800 

74300 

9.1300 

124100 

73900 

94300 

97700 

186700 

67000 

74800 

93B00 

147500 

97300 

73300 

85100 

81000 

103000 


144600 

73700 

7.1400 

89100 

93900 

73800 


73000 

63700 

63400 

83600 

9,1900 

143100 

53800 

73100 

83200 

73000 

104900 

11.1000 

81200 

124100 

6.9300 


119000 

53100 

83200 

77000 

43200 

9.1500 

45200 

67800 

6.1300 

54900 

80900 

183800 

74900 

14.9200 

85100 

7.1400 

64900 

17600 




ki 

IWOKID MhkI 





International Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development 

US$200 million 
August 1994 



Kingdom of Sweden 

Yen 100 billion 
August 1994 


Republic of Italy 

Yen 175 billion 
July 1994 



Expertise in Sovereign 
and Supranational 
Financing 



European 
Investment Bank 

USS500 million 
November 1993 


Kingdom of Sweden 

US$300 million 
July 1994 




International Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development 

USS1.25 billion 
September 199? 


Ji 


The Export-Import 
Bank of Japan 

Yen 105 billion 
September 1993/May 1994 


Japan Highway 
Public Corporation 

US$500 million 
August 1994 


ONO/XUJRA 


K N O W M O W 


Nomura International pic. Nomura House. 1 St. Martin's-Ie-Grand, London ECl A 4NP, United Kingdom. 

Nomura iniernauonel. memtm o! Bib 5FA and the London Stock Exchange. 


Hope for Bonds Risesas 

A ftVR-lar W 


tens 


By Carl Gewirtz 

[niemabonol Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Analysts have said it before 
but now they’re saying it again: Bond markets are headed lor 

from the sudden nattenmg of 

current and projected yield curves in the major 

The normal slope of the yield curve is upward from tower rates 
on short-term securities to higher rates on long-^mi ones 

But last week, when the U.S. Federal Ram* 
cost of overnight money by three-quarters of a 
or 75 basis points, to 5V4 percent, the impact alemg^the manrnry 
span was very unequal Rates on two-year mones r«e jo baas 
points, at 10 years the increase was only three basis points, and a 
30 years rates actually dropped two basis points. 

With short-term rates rising faster than long-ienn ones, tfcit 
meant the yield curve had flattened. Last week, the spread 
between the cost of two-year and 30-year money was around a 
two-year low of 90 basis points — down from 129 basis points a 

m ^The^Stemng of the yield curve is a sign of confidence that the 
Fed is doing what needs to be done to keep inflation tamed, saia 
Andres Drobny at CS First Boston in London- 

“The credibility of the Fed influences the slope of the curve, he 
said. “The actual level of rates is determined by the pace ot 
economic activity.” , , . . 

Meanwhile, the spread between two-year and 10-year bonds in 
Germany, at 130 basis points, is down from its peak of just over 
140 basis points, and the rates quoted in the forward market snow 
that the spread is expected to narrow a further 45 basis pom ism 
six months and by 80 basis points in 12 months. Given that short- 
term rates are expected to increase over that time span, the 
narrowing means the burden of the increase will be felt only on 
short-term rates. 

“The steepening of the DM yield curve has ended," says 
Christopher Potts at Banque Indosuez. “The trend now is a 
gradual corrective flatt ening . It tells us that European recovery 
has now been fully priced into rates. The convalescence period for 
European bonds has begun," he declares, adding that “recovery 
can only be a tedious affair." 

The combination of higher short-term interest rates and in- 
creased confidence in the Fed also stabilized the dollar on the 
foreign exchange market. The absence of any upward pressure on 
the Deutsche mark, is expected to fan interest in the high-yielding 
European bond markets — in particular Britain, Denmark, Spain 
and Italy, where rates are expected to fall closer to German levels 
over the next few months as higher demand for their bonds means 
they don’t have to offer such hi gh rates to attract investors. 

But the immediate beneficiary of the renewed calm in the 
currency market was the dollar sector, where there was a a burst of 
activity last week. 

The most successful of the new issues was the S200 million of 


notes 

,S.go 

mini! 

from the 


were 
three yi 
The 
mem 
milli on 


edly 
reserves 
Greece 
at 198 basil 
high-yield 
the issue 
North 


bv Unilever at a spreal o£ 1 S basis points 
Lt rates. Underwriters said the issue sold om 
Lnd the spread nanwedib 1 1 basis points, 
xrorn uic -itrfe-A raring of the^bomVer, the renewed 
iwith the currency and the relanvdi^o^t ^zeam^tort 
lured by fee 8 percent coupqr J— the highest seen m 
at this maturity for such a hici-qualky borrower, 

ianese government- guaran teed Efectric i"'— >- 

te its debut in the market wi\ 
vc-year notes priced to yield 23 1 
levels. A substantial amount of 
European central banks, whicl 
in government or government- 1 
1 the five-year sector with a g 
its over the benchmark. The : 
is rather -limited, and an 
sold there, with the rest 
and Asia. 


w 




an offering of $i__ 
s paints more than 
j paper was report: 
a vest their currency 
~ inteed paper. 

I offering priced 
-Jcet in Europe for 
ated 40 percent of 
divided between 




Bond 
For Pi 


•ket Pre] 
of Note Auctions 


NEW YORK 
two-year notes 
Tuesday, but tr 
which are likely - 
Yields rose last 


The Treasury will be selling 
iday and SI 1.0 billion in 
are not looking forward 
Id even more volatility to p 
after the Federal Reserve 


725 


billion in 
-year notes 
ie auctions, 


I surprised 


CRE3)1T MARKETS 


many on Tuesday wi 
The benchmark 3C 
on Friday, compared 
“There’s always na 
Dan Seto, economist at 
the market’s deteriorate 
intense than usual” 

But the message 
Federal Reserve’s next 
the last until late J am 
suggest that the market is 
raise interest rates again 
The Fed’s next pohey- 
makers will meet again for 


75 -basis-point increase in 
Treasury bond closed at 
8.04 percent on Tuesday. 
i associated with the au 

in New York. 

the nervousness will be a 


i rates, 
percent 


littl 


'said 

hit given 
it more 


w from the bond market 
increase is that Tuesday’s 
Forward rates and other 
, that the Federal Reserve! 
the end of the year, 
ig meeting is Dec. 20. The 
Ly session Jan. 31 and 
(Knighi-Ridder, 


— — 1 \ 




| 


_fl 

m : 



New Inti 

smal 

llOB 

feCH 

nona issues \ 

V 

Compiled by Laurence Desvilettes 

Coup. 

% 

Price 

Price 

end 

week 

Term* ^ 

1 

\ 

I 

Floating Rata Notes \ 

Ambroveneto Infl 
Bank 

$150 

2004 

% 

100 

— 

Interest will be ft over 3-month Libor until 1999, wheriknit 
aver. Reoffered at 99X7. Fees 1X3%. (Morgan Stoniest* 

is callable ot par, thereafter It 
.) 

Bank of Sautti 
Australia 

$300 

1999 

0X5 

99xu 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. Callable at par In 1996. Fees OX0( Denominations S10X00. Increawn 
from S25D million. (J.P. Morgan Securities.) \ 

SMM 

$169 

1996 

Vo 

100 

— 

Over 3-month Ubor. Noncallable. Fees not disclosed. Dt 
Securities.) \ 

ruinations $100X00. (J.P. Morgan 

SMM 

Dm 485 

1996 

0.15 

100 

— 

Over 3-manth Libor. Noncallable. Fees not dlsdosed. (J 

Morgan Securities.) 

IMI Bank Infl 

£100 

1999 

Vb 

99575 

— 

Over 3-month Ubor. Noncallable. Fees 0.15%. Denomim 

m tl 00X00. (HSBC Markets.) 

FUad-Coupons \ 

Baden 

Wuerttemberg L- 
Flnance 

$400 

1999 

8 

101.1« 

99xo 

Reoffered at 9957. Noncallable. Fees 1ft%. (J.P. Morgn 


Banco do Brasil 

$100 

1997 

10U 

99.773 

— 

Semiannually. Noncallable. Fees 0X75%. (Chemical invi 

client Bank.) 

Banco Nacional 

$100 

1998 

10 Va 

97X61 

— 

Semiannually. Noncallable. Fees not disclosed. Denomli 

^ns *10X00. (Citibank Infl.) 

Electric Power 
Development Co. 

$300 

1999 

BVa 

101567 

99.74 

Reoffered at 99.944. Noncallable. Fees lft%. (1 BJ.) 


| Euro Credit Cards 

$350 

1999 

7% 

101 XW 

— 

Reoffered at 99X92. Noncallable. Fees lft%. (Cttlbank Infl 




Investment Bank 


$200 1998 TV* TOlxs 99 jb Reoffered at 9955. Noncallable. Fees ltb«. (ABN -AMRO bSu 


Greece 


$500 1999 9% 99.91 lOO.oo Semiannually. Nancallable. Fees 030%. (CS First Boston.) 


KFWInfl Finance 


$500 2004 fPA 98.904 98.68 Nancallable. Fees 0325%. (Goldman Sadis lnt*l.) 


Landwlrtschaft 
Rentenbank 


$250 7997 7% 10)43? 99 JO ReoHered at 99M5. Nancallable. Fees 7%%. (Nomura infl.) 


Ontario Hydro 


$350 1997 7% 100.942 99xs Reoffered at 99755. Noncallable. Fees 1%%. (CS First I 






Unilever 


$200 1999 8 101315 99.iq Reoffered at 9939. Noncallable. Fees 1ft%. (Union Bank of Shetland.) 


Asflnao 


DM200 1999 7Vfe 101497 — Reoffered at 99497. Noncallable. Fees 2%. (Morgan Stanley.)! 


Merrill Lynch 


ffIXXM 1999 


Societe Genera le itl 15(1000 1996 
Acceptance 


8Vo 101434 — Reoffered at 99361. Noncallable. Fees 030% . (Merrill Lynch.)! 

lOO.oo Noncallable. Fees lft%. (Credits I fa liana.) 


Asfirtag 


BNG 


PF300 2002 7% 101% 99xo Reoffered at 99.925. Noncallable. Fees 2%. (ABN-AMRO Bank.! 


of 350 2000 TVi 101.13 9936 Reoffered at 9933. Noncallable. Fees 198%. (ING Bank.) 


European 
Investment Bank 


SpI&QOO 1998 10.98 IOTA 


99.92 Noncallable. Fungible with outstanding issue, raising total ar 
13*%. ( Banco Santander de Negation) 


V to 35 billion yen. Fees 


Euroflmo 


European 

Community 


ecu 170 7 999 816 707x85 99.35 Reoffered at 99385. NonooUaMe. Fees 736%. (Barclays de Zoefel 


ecu 95 2001 8% 101343 99.is Reoffered at 99488. Noncallable Fees (Barclays de Zoete 


Rabobank 

Nederland 


csl25 2000 9 101383 99.75 Rea Kered at 99783, Noncallable. Fees 1%%. (Wood Gundy.) 


New South Wales 
Treasury Carp. 


AualOO 1997 416 87x23 — Semiannually. Nancallable. Fees 1%%. Denominations AusSK 


Mom ura Infl.) 


Queensland 
Treasury Corp. 


AW* 100 1997 4 Vi 87J33 


~ ^nnually. Noncallable private Placement. Fees 1%%. Oeni^on^^aoaa (No- 


£3 


Daiwa Int'l 
Finance Cayman 


v 10,000 2005 * 100 — Nonoallable. Fees not disclosed. Denominations 100 million yen. IML^aTrjn.) 


Daiwa Infl 
Finance Cayman 


y 10,000 2005 5 100 


Oalwa Infl 
Finance Cayman 


y 13.500 2005 5 100 


— Semiannual Interest will be 5% until 2000, when Issue Is callable 
Fees not disclosed. Denominations 100 million yen. (Salomon Br 


INI Finance 


— Interest wljl be 5% until 2008 when issue Is col table at oar, 

vendue 2005 and paying 5% until 2008 thereaft^S^FfeStdl^g 


r. thereafter 5.15%. 

<lnt'l.) 


Italy 


Y3QJ0C 1999 4te 99.95 — Noncallable. Fees 035%. (Merrill Lynch Infl.) 


t.A Iso 23 billion 

■ (Nomura InfL) 


Italy 


y 125,000 1997 3.W 99.99 — Nonoalloble. Fees 0.30%. (Daiwa Europe.) 


Italy 


y 200,000 2004 5 99 -w 9935 Noncallable. Fees 8325%. (Daiwa Europe.) 


Landwlrtschaft 
Rentenbank 

Nomura Bank 
Int’l 


Y 125,000 2014 5Vfr 100 — Noncallable. Fees 0.50%. (Daiwa Europe.) 


Y 10,000 1998 zero 85% — 


Yield 3.99%. Noncallable private placement. Fees not disclosed. (Norite,, inn.) 


y 3,000 1997 3.«s 700 — 


Nomura Bank 
infl 


y 3,000 1999 4 


100 — 


raTn?l.)° b,e prhnrte P'°«ment. Fees not disclosed. Denominations 100 1 


i yen. (Nomu- 




Nomura Bank 
int'l 


Y5J00 2000 4 


700 


Rabobank 

Nederland 


yIO. 000 1998 zero 85.«s — 


Interest will be 4% until 1997, when Issue is callable at oar 


V Iso 5.1 billion 
ninations 




Yield 4Jll%. Noncallable. Fees not disclosed. (Norlnchukln Inn.) 


Swedish Export 
Credit 


y 15,000 1997 3% 99.W — 


Noncallable private placement. Fees 830%. (Nomura Int'l.) 


Equtty 4 Med 


Technology 

Resources 

Industries 


$175 2004 2% 100 


ft 


Rlso Kagaku 


yl04H» 2002 1% 100 






fy 


' 1 % 


Last Week’s Markets 


Euromarts 


AttOaum ore as olcloae of means Friday 

Stock Indexes Money Ratos 


Eurobond Yields Weekly Sah^ 

Hov. iinov. ii YrUgtiYr im Wman>Merfcet 


Nw. 17 


United States N». 18 Nov. 11 
341526 3301X7 


DJ Indus. 
DJUtIL 
DJ Trans. 
S&P100 
S & P 500 
SAP lnd 
NYSE Cp 
Britain 


17447 17671 
146854 147226 
43074 43047 

46147 4623S 
55122 55031 
Mil XIX 


Ctfge 
+836% 
— 127% 
-025% 
+ 807% 
—819% 
+ 817% 
-038% 


United States 
Discount rate 
Prime rate 
Federal funds rate 
Japan 



FTSE100 
FT 30 

Japan 


IT3U0 3075.90 
240730 236420 


+ 179% 
+ 131 % 


Nikkei 225 
Germany 
DAX 

Hang Kong 

Hong Seng 

world 

MSCIP 


193054 1938434 +809% 

2,10023 207835 +UB% 


Discount 
Coll money 
3-monfti Interbank 
Germany 
Lombard 
Calf money 
3-month interbank 
Britain 


Pu 

23/16 

75/l(i 


1* 

222 


too 

iOO 

520 


600 

485 

520 


UJL 8 long term 
U.S.S,axten ferm 
US. S, short term 
Poo ads sterling 
Fmch francs 
Italian lire 
Donish krona 
5wh8sIi krona 
ECU, taag fern 
ECU, RHtm term 
Con. J 
Aas. t 
N7.J 
Yea 


846 845 
801 7.M 

7 39 7M 
92b 925 
&15 818 
1101 1109 
841 853 
1069 1894 
867 87B 

833 860 
907 90S 
1840 1026 
M2 9JJ7 
460 460 


848 621 
801 565 
7-38 408 
961 529 
824 507 
1120 7.91 
874 620 
1123 704 
884 818 
850 501 
964 628 
1040 629 
961 5.99 
404 287 


Cede I 

* Mo«s 
6250 B0420 


Nans 

30845D 


Straights 
Convert. 

FWJs 8550 - 1JI 3120 

EW 190170 7059.10 &28OO0 

Total 4051 JO 866340 1 1,96(12,19770 

Secondery Market 


962764 906705 +864% 
62520 625JO —006% 


Bank base rate 
Call money 
3-month interbank 
Gold 


London 
pjm. flxo 


Nov. 18 
38400 


51i 

5 1 .* 

m 

NOV. 11 
38520 


5^4 

Pa 

61/16 

cine 

-834% 


Source: Unembeuiv Slock Exchange. 


Cedel 

M “ lS \ NonS 
«™gMs 977100 15.961S02762MI277JO 
»»»*■ 32290 46800 4 

™ S.9J iM U5M0276SMS«I 

Total 2870360 38929501 

Source: Eurodcor. CedsL 


Ubor Rates 


world man From Moraonsianiev CooUM infl 


l-OHMA UnoBtt OHDwnn 

UA* 5% 5 15/16 616 

Dentate matt 5 53/16 55/16 

Pound staling 5ft 5 11/16 6ft 


1 -month 

FnwetUraoe 5ft 


ECU 

Yen 


V 18 

J-roonttj pmnti 
511/16 
5ft 
2ft 

Sources; Uonts Bank i^r* 


5ft 

25/16 


*16 

(16 

V* 

















I 


% •. 


V 






, ?"• -V 

. , * ^S). 

• - . ’w 

L -V 

:rv V 

••• * :r U-’ 

... s ; 

-J ■ 

■-•I ; 7 - _ -r., 

r ^ --T* 

■ -• . 'i;\ 

... r O^ : 


: S;p 




Lie 4 


/ 


-v 

•r-SS'VrK#.*?.. 




...V- 


,■4 i 


Tv^VC 




.; } j£ 



International Herald Tribune, Monday, November 21, 1994 


<v .*v? 


V.-.'Sxl 


A&wj 


'■to: 






Page 9 


LEIPZIG NOTEBOOK 


As Construction Booms, 

Its History Still Looms 

By Brandon Mitchener 

Intemattomi Herald Tribute 

* up^Bd coming 

around the worldly “ d m P Mt advertisements 

ho™ »*• il ^ fastest- 

SSsSon. mSd,“nf b S? 1 i?^ b<Bid ' :s aiac - is commereiaJ 
pJOTstraclion, much of winch, m turn, is focused on ihe city's 

of mS\^l C l W !.nn EaStem Gemtany-s highest conception 
01 prewar buildmgs and restitution claims, a mix that makes 

SSTe^r'SIS 1 ® dty ’ s residential propenies 

JatSfiff ***- tc Sp f d about 18 billion Deutsche marks (S12 
u "^tectural heritage up to Western German 
Sfef ger Tschen ^ “* dty offidal “ rhmge of 

Ti of ,. tlie dty,s buildings were built before World War 

of ah construction and renovation applications are 
sugect to a time^onsunnng study of ownership claims. 

a number of city policies intended to speed residential 
■^nsrironon, n wU be another 10 years before all the claims are 
fwfi! -LT' Tsc bense said. “I don’t want to predict how many of 
these buddings will still be standing in 10 years.” 

/tbout 25,000 of the city’s 255,000 apartments are already consid- 
ered uninhabitable and stand empty 
So much retail and office space will come on the local real estate 
market m the coming years that many locals fear the current boom 
wih be followed by a big bust. Many also worry they will soon cease 
to be locals as apartment rents soar. 

While an influx of more than 80 banks over the past four years 
has made Leipzig Germany’s second biggest financial center, Mi- 
chael Sc n i man ski, director of the city’s economic development 
office, is desperately searching for smokestacks. 

Once a hub of heavy industry, Leipzig has seen the number of 
city manufacturing j obs shrink to fewer than 1 5,000 from 1 00,000 in 
1989 The dty’s eventual goal is 50.000 manufacturing jobs, the 
m i n i m u m represented in similar West German service-oriented 
cities such as Frankfurt. 

The city is resting its hopes on light, modem industries such as 
printing, telec omm uni c ations and medical and environmental tech- 
nology. 

But with manufacturing employment stOl falling, “it’ll be a iftwg 
time before we get self-sustaining growth,” Mr. Sehtmnncki said. 

Going for Broke? 

Peter Kaminski, Leipzig’s treasurer, is distracted by another 
small problem involving the dty’s bonds. 

The problem isn’t the 10-year, 6.25 percent bonds issued in 1993, 
but the dty’s 21-year, 7 percent Sinking Fund Gold Bond External 

See NOTEBOOK, Page 11 


Angst in the Upper Ranks 

Job Insecurity Takes a Mounting Toll 





THE TUB INDEX 


International Hersdrf Tribune 
World Stock Index, composed 
of 280 infematfonalfy Investabte 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 
Business News. 

Weekending November 18, 
daily closings. 
Jan. 1992 » 100. 


World Index 


131 
130 
129 
128 
127 
126 
125 -7 
124 


Asia/Padflc 


F M T W T F 

North Amerlcal 






By Louis UchiteUe 

Mew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When Karl Marx de- 
scribed an increasingly miserable and exploit- 
ed working class, he never imagined that his 
oppressed workers might someday include 
Ivy League graduates being tossed out of 
$200,000-a-year jobs in business. 

But a changing economy is gradually link- 
ing highly educated managers and technicians 
with assembly-line workers and office clerks. 

The link is Lheir common place in an in- 
creasingly competitive economy that no long- 
er values workers as much as it once did. 
What they share, public opinion polls show, 
are feelings of uncertainty, insecurity and 
anxiety about lheir jobs and their incomes. 

A class consciousness may be emerging 
from this shared anxiety — an awareness 
among millions of Americans that they occu- 
py the same unsteady boat, even if they are 
doing well in high-paying jobs. 

Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, giving the 
phenomenon a name, describes “the anxious 
class" as “consisting of millions of Americans 
who no longer can count on having their jobs 
next year, or next month, and whose wages 
have stagnated or lost ground to inflation." 

But the growing sense that people of differ- 
ent levels of wealth, education and skill may 
be victims of the same economic forces lacks 
two crucial elements of class consciousness as 
the term has historically been used: a class 
vocabulary and a class enemy. 

The traditional adversaries — big business, 
owners of capital, managers — are no longer 
viewed that way. 

Instead, business is seen as also a victim, 
caught in a global comped tiou that forces 
cost-cutting and layoffs. That sort of thinking 
showed up in focus group sessions and fol- 
low-up interviews with 2,400 workers of all 
income levels for a soon-to-be released study 
directed by Richard Freeman, a Harvard la- 
bor economist, and Joel Rogers, a professor 
of law and sociology at the University of 
Wisconsin. 

“They tefl us, ‘My boss is trying hard, but 
there is nothing he can do, either,”’ Mr. 
Rogers said. “That does not mean they don't 
see their employer as often unfair and cruel 
But then they say he does not have the ability 
to protect them, which is much different than 
saying, ‘He could protect me if he wanted to 
but he chooses not to.’ " 

It is this forgiving attitude toward manage- 
ment that distinguishes today’s unhappy 


workers from their forebears. If the boss were 
the target, it would be easier to know what to 
do: People might take action in groups. 

But public opinion polls show that while 
Americans are increasingly angry about their 
economic insecurity, neither business nor the 
forces that make companies so hard on work- 
ers are the targets of this anger. It is directed 
instead at government, immigrants and the 
poor, among others. 

The 1994 electoral uprising suggested that 
if there is a class enemy it is an ill-defined 
political class, a combination of government 
and media that are seen as imposing their 
social and cultural views on an alienated 
populace. 

But this modem populism, unlike the 19th- 
century movement that provided the name, 
sidesteps the main source of discontent: the 
economic changes that define America’s new 
anxious class. 

“You would think that in a free enterprise 
system, there would be more criticism of its 
warts,” said Florence Skelly, vice chairman of 
DYG Inc., a polling company founded by 
Daniel Yankelovich. “Instead, we say that 
government should be run more like a busi- 
ness. And we deal with the boss by ousting the 
congressman." 

The anxiety, uncertainty and insecurity 
that characterize the new class consciousness 
show up in different ways in public opinion 
polls. Although the economy is growing 
briskly and unemployment is down, only 31 
percent of those surveyed this month by Lou- 
is Harris & Associates see this improvement. 

“Over and over, people tell us they are 
concerned about their jobs, that they don’t 
feel secure, that the economy is doing badly,” 
Humphrey Taylor, Harris’s chairman, said. 
“For most people, if the economy is not 
synonymous with jobs, it is at least highly 
coordinated with jobs.” 

Mr. Reich, who has argued that education 
and training provide the best job security, 
contends that most members of the anxious 
class have only high school educations. But 
he, too, now acknowledges that education is 
less and less of a buffer against tbejoblessness 

A variety of new statistics shows that the 
incomes of college-educated people have been 
failing; in recent years to keep pace with 
inflation. Men In their early 50s with four 
years of college, for example, have been stuck 
for 10 years at the same income, adjusted for 
inflation, according to the finding s of Frank 
Levy, a labor economist at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 



To Keep Oil Output Frozen 


135 "AVi 

134 

133 * 

131 F M T W T 


Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 


11/1M« 11/1 U« 
dow dm 


11/1 MM 11/1 MM 


Energy 112.98 11 B.87 -4.95 
UtHMes 12858 12887 -1.B7 
Finance 11253 116.13 -3-10 
Services 116.04 110.42 -2*3 


Cap ital Goods 114*2 118.79 -3*4 

Ram Materials 131.71 13897 -522 

Consumer Goods 105.DB 105.43 -0.33 

Miscellaneous 121.85125.48 -2.89 


ttfmartel caprtalbatian, otherwise the ten lop stocks are tracked. 


Reuters 

DENPASAR, Indonesia — 
Cash-strapped OPEC produc- 
ers, who are meeting here Mon- 
day, appeared ready on Sunday 
to freeze oil production for up 
to one year to try to push up 
sagging world oil prices. 

Oil Minister Gholamreza 
Aqazadeb of Iran said he would 
accept any solution tiiat would 
support world oil prices, which 
he said were too low. 

The price for the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries’ basket of crudes av- 
eraged S16.97 a barrel in the 
week ended Nov. 11, compared 
with its target of $21. In infla- 
tion-adjusted terms, the price 
was not much higher than it was 
before the 1973 Arab oil embar- 
go. 

Saudi Arabia, the world’s 
biggest oil producer, also set the 
tone for Mem day’s opening ses- 


sion by calling on the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries to freeze oil output 
through all of next year. 

OPEC has kept its output 
ceiling at 2452 million barrels a 
day since September 1993. 

Analysts had been expecting 
OPEC to bold the ceiling there 
for a further six months because 
the 12-member group is bank- 
ing on rising world demand to 
lift oil prices. 

World oil demand is forecast 
to grow at a strong pace, fueled 
mainly by booming economies 
in Asia. Demand wifi surge 1.3 
million barrels per day in 1995, 
to 69.4 million barrels, accord- 
ing to analysts at KJeinwort 
Benson. 

But rising production from 
non-OPEC countries will grab a 
large share of the new demand, 
leaving OPEC with little room 
to increase sales, they said. 


An OPEC production freeze 
should leave world markets 
broadly in balance next year, 
analysts said. 

But other factors might pre- 
vent prices from moving higher, 
they said. 

OPECs first hurdle will be 
the northern winter. Normal or 
severe cold could drain the 
world’s stockpiles and prevent a 
big price slump in spring, when 
demand is low. Mild weather 
could leave markets glutted, 
leaving prices weak for at least 
the first half of the year. 

OPEC would also have to 
curb quota cheating, which has 
undermined many of its past 
production deals. 

Another wild card is Iraq, 
which has been barred from ex- 
porting ofl since it invaded Ku- 
wait in mid- 1990. 


SHORT COYER 


CURRENCY RATES 


,ir 


Nov. 15 

Cross Rates m. or if- ^ ° p “ rtl 

* 1 ^ _ MS* UB3S was* l BS U«* 

Amsterdam lOTJ 2785 U* ***2 ua DJH2 4M WO* 

Brea* jura slv ** Sn uhi* vm i «*• us* tot 

London (o) Utf W* J** iom IU9* MU" «* — 

Madrid wn «« JgJ M ipvk i un iwa ttM 

MBm UR* W* “MO Jj- J1* UJK n» 1JOT B* 

Now York Oil — !»• & l gg. UW u« MW* 3*» 

Bans uas 8JH MW — “ “2 tnc 7SJ5 M IN® 

»U1 ** . *£ ™ ^ S 4- MR- — us* 

w wjU 2 g £!• 52 iS* — ** 

w Utn tw IX* Ui mM urn vu 

™ ,£ S !£ £» ” ™ “ * J “ 

I SDR 1405 9JO cmtierx 

“ssrrsKts; ’ “■ ■ 

available. 

Other Dollar Valuos 

- p-r S cumtKT 

tSSia. io*s nS 

SIS 011 ™ - *2/9 uSxrvpUb 1W5UB 

qiIiibm ftm ao* AA 4 B 5 

S 5 B 5 S mw isSh’SL o 5 » 

ES 5 SSS ST- — 


Tokyo 

Taranto 

Zorich 
1 ECU 
ISDN 


Kemper and Conseco Call Off Talks 

CHICAGO (AP) — Kemper Corp- and Conseco Inc. an- 
nounced Sunday they had called off their proposed merger, less 
than three weeks after Conseco lowered its original $3.25 billion 
bid by $290 million. 

Conseco, an insurer based in Carmel, Indiana, in June offered 
$67 a share for Kemper, of Long Grove, Illinois, which has 
interests in insurance and financial services. 

Kemper accepted the offer. But on Nov. 1, Conseco, saying 

rising interest rates were malting financing more expensive, cut its 

e Nitonrioftai H«Bid Titsuno offer to $2.96 billion, or $60 a share. 

Reliance Shifts to Rockwell Offer 

SEAL BEACH, California — Shareholders of Reliance Electric 
Co., in a move that could signal the end of the company's merger 
agreement with General Signal Corp., tendered almost two-thirds 
of Reliance’s stock to a rival suitor, Rockwell International Corp., 
Rockwell said Sunday. 

Rockwell International made a $13 billion cash offer last 
month for the Cleveland-based electrical equipment maker, top- 
ping General Si gnal ’s $134 billion stock-swap agreement 

Last week, the three companies signed an agreement that gave 
Reliance until noon- Monday to decide if it would combine with 
Rockwell. If the agreement is reached but Rockwell does not buy 
the Reliance shares by April 1, General Signal and Reliance will 
resume their merger talks. 


Comae* 
MKKM 
M. Zealand * 


PtriLKto 
POlllli**** 
ParL escudo 
goes- raft* 
Saudi rival 
Shn.> 


pars 

mw 

14038 
IB 115 
2422 


1563 # 

3147.00 

17515 

14713 


CWTtocy 
5.Afr.rand 
5-Kw.woa 
5wed.mao 
Taiwan! 
TftalMM 
TurKtab Bra 
DAE Arinin 
Venn. both. 


ml 


Pars 

15378 

74640 

71311 

3620 

VLS9 

363*9. 

3472 

1W.57 


w»rd Rates 


'afriv 3 2*5 *55 l I3w 

Sa s as is sss- - - “ 

Sir I-* 744 ,JW - '■ ^ ,-n^^TConunerclale itoliono 

*• INC Bank Tokyo (Totml; toy* Bank of Carat* 


U.K. Rail Plan in Works, Paper Sap 

LONDON (AFP) — Long-awaited plans for a multibillion- 
pound privatization of Rail track, the body which runs Britain's 
rail system, are due to be unveiled this week, according to The 
Tunes newspaper. 

Transport Secretary Brian Mawhinney will announce the selloff 
in Parliament, the pqxr said. 

The move, which could be worth as much as £6.5 billion ($10 
billion), would allow. Prune Minister John Major to face down 
criticism from Tory right-wingers that the government’s new 
legislative program lacked a radical cutting edge. A Department 
of Transport spokesman described the newspaper report as specu- 
lation but conceded that privatization of Rail track was a priority 
for the government. 


Commodities 
Keep Hurd 
Ubrld Afloat 

Reuters 

LONDON — Many Third 
World countries are riding high 
on the back of soaring com- 
modity prices, and economists 
see no reason for this to change 
even th oug h major industrial- 
ized nations are squeezing cred- 
it hues. 

“I would expect the benefits 
of higher commodity prices to 
more than offset the damaging 
effects of higher interest rates, 
said Peter West, an economic 
adviser at West Merchant Bank. 

Commodity prices have 
soared in 1994, responding to an 
expanding global economy and 
providing desperately needed 
foreign exchange earnings for 
many developing countries. 

But Western central banks 
have moved to cool overheating 
economies by raising interest 
rates, a move that could threat- 
en Thin] World earnings 

The coffee price has quadru- 
pled, aluminum prices have 
surged 90 percent, copper has 
jumped 77 percent, and nickel 
has gained 95 percent. 

Economists said the biggest 
beneficiaries are in Latin Amer- 
ica — economies once almost 
crippled by a debt crisis but 
now on a more stable footing. 

The surge in commodity 
earnings will hdp to narrow 
sharply Latin America's trade 
deficits, analysts said. 


EU, Talking Softly, Gains 
Little in Tokyo Talks 


By Steven Bmll 

Imatmtiarml Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Japan politely rebuffed Europe’s 
major trade demands over the weekend but of- 
fered a series of smaller concessions that Eu- 
rope’s trade representative said had vindicated 
the European Union’s nonconfrontational ap- 
proach to the world’s second biggest economy. 

The ElTs trade commissioner, Sir Leon Brit- 
tan, stressed, however, that a final judgment on 
Europe’s “persistent but diplomatic" approach, 
which officials contrasted with the strong-arm 
tactics used by the United Stales, would have to 
await concrete results of increased sales of Euro- 
pean products to Japan. 

“My mood on emerging from these meetings is 
one of satisfaction but not euphoria,” Sir Leon 
said Saturday night after talks with the Japanese 
ministers of foreign affairs, finan ce and trade. 
“We have made good progress in some areas, but 
we still have a long way to go.’’ 

Europe’s primary goal for the ministerial 
meetings, the first since January 1993. was to 
ensure that last month’s framework accord be- 
tween Japan and the United States would not 
discriminate against European companies. 

That accord, which followed 15 months of 
arduous negotiations, aimed to improve foreign 
access to Japan's public markets for medical and 
telecommunications equipment, as well as pri- 
vate-sector markets for insurance and flat glass. 
It also established a bilateral dialogue to allow 
the United States to monitor progress in market 
share for foreign goods. 

Europe, fearing that the Japanese government 
and private corporations would bias their pur- 
chasing decisions in favor of American suppliers, 
sought tojoin the monitoring process. But Tokyo 
agreed only to set up “a system of parallel 
monitoring” whose details have yet to be 
determined. 

“I don't think it’s a disadvantage that it’s done 
separately if we get the same figures and the 
same facts and the same opportunity to talk,” Sir 
Leon said “We will do our own monitoring.” 

“The real test will be in the coming period if 
we see some major purchases of European prod- 
ucts,” he said, mentioning Airbus planes and 
Rolls-Royce jet engines. 

Japan delivered a less indirect “no” to the 
EU’s request that Tokyo agree to cut its current- 
account surplus to 2.0 percent of gross domestic 
product for the year ending in March 1996, 
compared with the current 3.1 percent and To- 
kyo’s forecast of 2.7 percent for next year. 


Sir Leon, stressing that Europe did not advo- 
cate manag ed trade, said the figure was “not a 
c ommi tment or a target but an expectation or an 
analysis of what might come” from policy 
changes and other structural measures. 

Finance Minister Masayoshi Takemura re- 
sponded only that “it was a reasonable expecta- 
tion to move in the direction of that figure.” 

The EU did reach a series of smaller agree- 
ments that should mak e it easier for European 
producers of electronics, food, textiles, medical 
devices and linen to penetrate the Japanese mar- 
ket These included changes in food labeling 
regulations and steps toward eased certification 
requirements. 

But Japan rejected Europe's demand to reduce 
its import duties on European spirits, which are 
nearly four times as hi^h as those for shochu, or 
low-grade Japanese spirits, in violation of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. Japan 
has progressively lowered the differential since 
1989, when it was 1 5.5 times. 

Sir Leon said the small but concrete results 
were typical of what could be achieved with the 
EU’s nonconfrontational approach. “We are 
talking about cracking away, eliminating obsta- 
cle after obstacle, rather than dramatic break- 
throughs,” he said 

A gradualist approach, however, was long ago 
rejected by the United States as too slow given 
Tokyo’s towering trade suipluses. In private, 
some EU officials agree, saying they would pre- 
fer to adopt a harder line. That, however, would 
require cooperation with the United States, 
something that is anathema to European leaders 
whose bid for a common stance toward Jac 
was rebuffed by Washington in the early 19c 

Saturday’s agreements, moreover, are unlikely 
to make a big dent in Japan's surplus with the 
EU, which totaled $18.56 billion in the first 10 
months of 1994. The figure is 19.5 percent less 
than during the same period one year ago, chiefly 
due to a 14.1 percent jump in imports mto Japan 
owing to the strong yen, Japanese figures show. 

For Tokyo’s part. Foreign Minister Yohei 
Kono urged the EU tojoin the consortium that 
will build two light-water nuclear reactors in 
North Korea that do not produce weapons-grade 
plutonium. But Sir Leon was noncommittal 

“I explained that no decision of any kind had 
been made,” he said, “and I took note of their 
request," 

Tom Buerkle 
article. 


in Brussels contributed to this 


Saudis Grant Concession on Debt 
As Russian Official Opens Guli Trip 


Reuters 

RIYADH — Saudi Arabia and Russia on 
Sunday signed agreements on easing Moscow's 
debt burden, improving relations and strength- 
ening trade ties during the first trip to the king- 
dom by a senior Russian official. 

The pacts were signed during a two-day visit to 
Saudi Arabia by Prune Minister Viktor S. Cher- 
nomyrdin, who held talks with King Fahd, Saudi 
officials and businessmen from the world's big- 
gest oil-producing nation. 

Russia’s Interfax news agency reported that 
Saudi Arabia had agreed to reschedule Russia's 
$250 million debt to the kingdom. 

The agency quoted Deputy Prime Minister 
Oleg Davydov as saying in Riyadh that the 
agreement would mean Moscow could defer un- 
til 1996 repayment of the first $100 million. 

Interfax said the debt was part of a $750 
milli on Saudi credit made to the former Soviet 
Union in 1991. 

Saudi Arabia and Russia only established full 
diplomatic relations after the 1990-91 Gulf War. 

: agreement signed Sunday opens the door for 


more specific deals on trade, economics, culture, 
technology and sports, Russian officials said. 

They said they also hoped for closer political 
ties. 

Diplomats in the region said Mr. Chernomyr- 
din was eager to reassure wealthy Gulf Arabs 
suspicious of Moscow's ties with Baghdad that 
Russia would not develop them at the expense of 
relations with the Gulf states. 

Moscow has been leading a campaign in the 
UN Security Council to ease sanctions on Bagh- 
dad, especially since Iraq's recognition of Ku- 
wait this month. 

“We hope this trip wfll open opportunities for 
signing concrete agreements,” a spokesman for 
Mr. Chernomyrdin said. It was the highest-level 
Russian delegation to visit the kingdom. 

Trade between Russia and Saudi Arabia is 
currently only about $30 million a year, mostly 
made up of Russian exports, including timber 
and cars, to Saudi Arabia. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin went on to Kuwait on 
Sunday and will later visit Oman and the United 
Arab Emirates. 



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3ra,'^=5S MJI3 

ioas-fll wgncA 8^-iJ6 

k WiWmw IV Rl I in LyiXJk EMkV— 

V 1451 -.05 AdjRB _ 960 —03 


Advantage: 
d 1819 
fl 22-14 
ri U62 
I 2265 


~ COTNWtpiSTl —37 GrKT 

a Ig-Jl --fi? CpAT 3963— 33 TxEx 
9 DivGrP 963 —04 ufini 


<k SnCopn 2535 —17 Wndsll. .1.662 -60 

—01 S aSSb?"^ 0.(0 —fll V toSS*. 4^ —fll 

069 — .07 AmUMn 966 —.06 Murant 865 —01 


GvttocC 9.W —ill 


1069 —07 AntUMri 966 —06] Murant 865 —01 

6.81—61 AdcPacn ?67 —34 NYVen 1172 —.14 

873 —03 CmStkn 17.92 — Ofl RPFB t 

677 + fll Discov n 18/1 —.08 RPFCv TsS —25 


Murant 865 
NYVen 1172 


SuSfD 1773 —05 LatAmGB2i5T 68 Growth np 5.19 — 03 

Sf J &’k=s MS^n n iijo=fl8 is&Jirs ww,«i=fi t&s 

& '?:ob =fll | CTTEB t 661 —.04 OTS* J2$ -ffi fer ^ -|, HrdMut Li -01 StratAPx ta^V —17 r^rn 1877- 4. 


- mSm? aS_oT EqlnAp 854 —08 %4Shsnp 961 +fl3 MY1MU 9.14 — 06 , RPFRE 1367 — 88 

- 1„-S ~~7n I EuGrAp 1262 —17 man Grow: Incan 967—02 Victory FaiKh: 

5 'ImZ-S Fedlnp 931 - FrontS-A e 1064 . 36 indUlun .969 —05 AoarGr 9^-3* 


— .02 [ Victory FaiKh:_ 


D 1796 =18 NY TE 963 =10 I F«JScBr 962 — flJ NJAAunn 12.01 -fl7 STk Bond 15.97 Fpt Omatira 

o {mb— II aft I n-T^st 8M-.05 NwLdr ^ 'jfiSKS'i'ihJir- 03 U’K * m 

1799— IB 1 CtuApa n 12 03 - 64 1 FundBl 7.99 — A3 NYlTxrw 1061 ~A6 Federated Laefty: Fxdincn .. 

MrtaAD 811 ' IrroAMMnra — 01 CtoEgB 1269 —fla NY Torn 1173 ~W AmLdrA 14.98 — 66 SlFxInn 9.47—01 

MrtnBP 871 ") rS&tAnlfl37 — A 1 SwihBl 1269 -fl? NYTEo 1853—10 CapGrADlO.96 —II FPDvAstp 12.17 —.12 

r n Bit - - ni HYMuBt 973 -A5 Peoolndl 1667 -32 EflWCAp I 30 -JJ8 R=>AAyBdPlU4 -36 


1 1269 — JW NY Tax n 13.73 —69 jmcprA l«.T» — J» I Ml- ) 

I 1369 -a? NYTEo 1663 — ID CapGrADjO.96 — .11 IFPDv. 


■ ■ v k y+F* ... 

i§r ^ =|! 

^aSp 893 — A7 
^Cp 893 —07 

afMBzfl 

ICAB 11.18 — A7 
4JCp 8JI —fl8 


1361— 68 MATxBl 6.91 —AS STIncpn 1167 —A3 InflEaA n 1966 — 13 

9*22 NatPwBtIJJl -64 StllnTD 1273 —05 IWtlncAt 10.45 -66 

964 —fll NYTxBt 663 —05 SpGrp 1568 — 61 LtTrmA BX9.48 —65 

lane OHTxBt 851 — A4 TTWCntm 768 — A4 UdMuriA P9.46 — .05 


p?9| —fll 


Utillnco p 493 —03 PadfP 1410-40 mglnCOnplI66-.ro' strgYd 964 —01 BasVIB I 2258 —26 j LgCoGr 18J7 

VA TFp |U1 — fl4 PocitB 13.95 —A3 totGpvn 1164 — fl3 LebenNY 866 —A3 CalMnBt 1073 — A9 Mgd^ 25.10 

TrstMut 855 —fll ShratAp* 1059 -.17 inBGrn 1677 — 4 LeebPw n 1062 —38 CAlMBt 856 -37] Mod&rf 17JJ 

wsSQmcta; StratBx 10.60—16 Lerturen 2256 -.12 Um Mason: CapFdB I 2831 — 73 , StnCaGr 21.78 

Equity n 11.13 +63 Telecom 1769 —67 MUIAstAH 9.49 — .04 , ArnerLdP 958 —.13 ttHlBI 750 —A3 ' Stcbielnc 1001 -fll 

Fxdincn 963 .. TefeB 1764-68 MulABal 1DAI —36 GttGovtPx975 —.15 ClnvGdB 103« -.02 Narwest Investor. 

SlFxInn 9.47 —fll WldwD 1895 —07 PacBas n 1847 — 62 ' Gvtlndnp 974 — fll : CnITBt 1069—33 AcfiGcvA 961—05 

PDvAstP 12.17 —.12 WldwB 1677 —67 Sellncmnp6JI — A3 . HiYIdnx 1190 —.09 | DvCanBt 16.03 —6* ' COTF A 869—69 

PAAuBd D1U4 -66 Gabett Fundi: ShTrBdp 973 -AT ' InvGrnp 974-61 Dr«Bt 1800 -.12 1 GvtlncA 460—06 

irstFriomy: ABCP 1043 +35 TxFree np 1469 —39 • JIWTF D 1477 —SI ! EuraBI 1437—18 tocumeA 898 —.05 

EquitvTrn 1056—62 Asset np 2374 +JJ Techn 24.94 +66,' PA TFp 1473 —37' FWSecBt 9.06 — 62 TFOtoA 891—13 

FxdlncTr 9.43 —32 CanvSCpnll 52 -J2 TotRtn 1860 -65; Sptovnp 1976 —.19 FundlGrfit9.9S _ Vahtg rA 176 1 —16 
LtdMGv 960—02 Eqinco 1169 —33 USGavtnp 671 _ TxFrlntp 1472 — fl* FdGrCt 9.95 _ Norwed Trust 

imunuxe GllntCPn 1079 +.01 Utiln 966 —.07 TotRetnpl2A8 — .17 FLMBt 891 — A7 A<«BT 962 —04 


iVt 5 Ti HiYdA px 11 75 — 13 FLTXA 4.91 —JM TOTOin 2 
9M I HYAdA PX 963 -.10 GATxA 464 -JM SummitHY 1 
1261 —19 InanApx 664—04 GfalEmrgAlfl? —03 SunAmencal 


l 

Balance 765 —02 
18 DvrsJdSI 1263 — 63 


rn 768 — 34 UdMuriA pV.44 


nIStkB 17.90 +34 USTInt 1260 —.05 MIMuInC 9.84 — A7 
■tins I 459 -34 USTLng 1112 _ MunSecA 1077 -66 




t 1262 -67 USTShn 14 66 -64 
.Jt 774 —65 1 Dreyfus Comstock: 
irBt 11.95 -32 1 CopVatA 1160 —.16 
3vB I 667 —.01 C^ValBnlUl —.15 


I?-! i as 

T5 —10 Va 


5/Bn 8.16 —.09 BoaurdBlehU 
3vC 8.15—10 Diverwnr 
fthA D1162 _ InttEqn . 

rthBpl150 IntIFIn 

rAp 2269 +31 Baird Funds: 


rn 9.98-62 
in 1039 —02 

^nh%=M 


ien5lknl536 - 
■ixedn 1110 —.02 
jovt 8fl4 —32 

" 2860 * j 


ikicdRti 9.74 —37 
1MUI1A116? —38 


a — 37 

=i 

astajlS 


GllntCPn 079 +.01 

rn 1163 —62 GtCorvn 0.43 — A7 

1? 115 =S W H3=S5 

852 —.06 Growth np 2254 +36 
952 —.07 SmCopG 1890 + 62 

53=$ oKUSUr 


-32 TotRtn 1830 — 35- Sptovnp 1976 —.19 

—A3 USGavtnp 871 _ TxFrlntp 1472 —36 , 

* .01 Util n 966 —37 ' TotRet no 1188 —.17' 

-67 VdEa 1769 -.07 i . ValTr np 1902 —.07 ■ 

—.08 WtdCam 1068 _ I Lehman Brothers: i 


Kite =j 
5 c P ’5S=j 


MuAt 10.95 —65 GWResp 1873 —62 ValueBp 1 
aGIh 1515—65 GovtnvA P_B36 +A1 ValueCm] 
MuBt 10.95— 35 Gmappp2i?7 _fl2 Value Trr I 
MunA 1364 — fle HIMuAp 106? — .11 Flog Investor 


jjwrinllH _+J 


iTrGvtBt 871 —62 I FlRtGvA n 966 — A1 
EHFdrto 1187—13 SelGraSt 1071 + 62 
rFun£: ShDurGvA n9.90 - 

i CTKlp 9.16 j LKtttlgOTGr|^ 

!BJ2 “fl? I CM&.n 'fW “fl? 


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t 1274 —11 GvimcTr 8.40 — A6 1 NUtvSB 1756 + 33 NwOpAp25^ +72 LATxA 73? —34 M>dCapAPllB2 +.11 CHMI !4^ — 06 

JC 1375 . IncmStkT 1032 — 05 PtniWortdnll68 +A7 NYTxAp LW — 36 MosTxA 731 —A3 SmOlGrAiy^ +71 SptGrStk 858-10 

II 934 — 38 IncomeTr 897 -65 :PaysonBln 1139 — 13 NYCtoAp 867—05 MDTxA Jiff —65 SmCoGrB 7JG +31 sSvallie 1034 —05 

I 10.61 — 69 1 TFIncT 892— .13 PeodlTBd 933 —.02 OTCEp 1157 +.14 MfTxA 7.71—34 TE InsA p 1130 — .07 SfklltX fM — 31 

1275 —.11 TatRetT 935 — 02 RetJdlTEo 9.90 —A3 OhTxllP 314-36 MlnnTxA 776 —63 TE Itofi 1130 —07 Vcrfue 9.90—34 

t 1518 —71 VotuGrT 1770 — .16 iPeficon 11,90 —39 OvSekp 1304 —66 MOTxA 666 —05 USGvA 806 —JU Vision Funds: ^ „ 

10 1 9j60 —.02 j Nuveen Funds: PenCcoA _ RA TEe 834 —05 NuHTxA &M — 65 USGvB d 807—31 Grlnc 978 — 39 

I 1269 _.1B CAInsRn ?33 — 03 1 Performance Fds TxExAp 7.92 -36 NJTxA 880 — 66 TARGET) • . NYTaxFT 888 — I] 


It 1061 -391 


Groove MnTxllp 807 —85 IncotneD 1373 —.04 GUBolB 

Z1A0 +35 1 N1RSAD 18)0—33 IntiA 1899 —11 HilncAp 


Ttast , Pasadena Groan: NtoTwip 8w 

r 9A2 — 04! BfllRtnA 2130 + 35 NIRsAn 1810 

T 9.99 —.18 ; GrowthA 1560 +32 NJTxA p 806 

Tr 8.40— M 1 mtvSO 1756 + 33 NwOpAp25Jg 

KT 1032 —05 PaxW0rtdnl868 +.07 NYTXAP TW 
‘Tr 8.97 —65 PoysonBln 1139 —13 NYOrAd 807 


tocT 892 — .13 i Peach' 


1373 —04 GtlBolB 668 —33 tnvQIBd 9.05 m 

1899 —11 HilncAp TiS — 33 Ltdln 9.83—02 

1465 —.11 HilncS P 732 —03 OH Muni 9.9B — 37 

739 —34 MidCqpA P13J2 +.11 OH ReaSt 1437 —36 

731 —03 SmCoGrAB’67 +71 SpferSk 858 —10 

767 —65 SmCoGrB 1773 + 71 Sptvalue 1024 — 05 

7.71 -JM TE InsApIlTO —07 Sfklnx 9.98—31 


Ip 11.97—14! 
.p 1872—181 


intent n 1272 -39 totIBp 29A0 
*Xli I LaraeCa nU.92 —XO I ST Govn 9M 


JblnvAnl579 —37 HlYld 
HblnvB t 1530 —36 IncGI 


InAo 9.40 +32 Inn n 1' 
HAP 29^0-39 SI Govt n ' 


inen lsJ3 —6? 


iBt9flo-.|e NutjeenRnxte: ... ' PenCcoA ... 

1269—18 CAInsRn 923 —03 i Perfarrotmce Fds 

t 1761 +.0S 1 CAVIRn 938 —07; EqConp 1131 — 

01 033 +62 FL VtrfR n 931 —34 Eqtosn 1131 — 

It 1174 - 38 WIDVWn 961 — 05 I mfiCn 964 — 


=:S5 BS&'iHlfl! Sb v «25i=S ^ VA-F S^a a p Rl?- 09 JS=g !S n i5^ = 

—30 LatAmB 117.19 -56 MA InsR n 933 -JM klHIn 964—01 UtflAp 878 —10 ORTxA 894 —34 LgCapGr n«L03 + 

—03 MAMBt 9.48 —35 MAVIRn 878 — M MOnGrln 965 . VstaAp 730 —02 PATkA 887 —OS LaCooV 1074 — 

—18 MIMuBt 8ffl — 35 I IMIValRn 9.14— 65 STHCnn 9.63 —02 VOvAp 12.13 +.11 CAHvTxA 801 — 03 Mttfflkdn 967 — 

—07 MNMBt 938 — 69 ( MuntBd 844 —03 STFIJn 963 —02 Putnam Fends B: CAOTxA 884 —04 SmCnpC H54 + 


=xA P 7.92 —66 NJTxA 881* —66 TARGET: . _ 
tlAB 1368 -36 NYTxA 6.87-67 UtterBdn 960—31 

fXA 1X10—09 NCTxA 867 —05 InJBpndn ,?A3 — .13 

JvAp 1811 . Oh'UJTxA 774 —.05 IntlEqn 1174—67 

Ap 878 -10 ORTxA 6.94 —64 L«CapGr nUL03 +31 


NYTaxFr 8® — ' 


pl2A5 —02 

fntlEqri 636 —04 AiOpffl ntJ2.0l — 62 UOGvA p 11.94 —0 LtdTEl 974 —35 QuatGrb 1258 —TO SmOiEfl r»T239 +35 ST Bond n 954 —A3 

IntIFIn 7.92 —34 Govt 938 -02 LtdlncR 1814-62 OvseaP 1165 — .1) Tel IncShp 1266 —07 TE Bond n 964 — 05 SmaUQjn 9|7 — 1] 

Baird Funds: Grolnc 1574 —69 LtdMuApll.lB — 64 STRo 9.45—31 TotRTsypftlO . USTreos n 9.78 —32 SeEflt yn J0.73, — 36 

Art Inc 899—61 Growth 15.05 *.01 MAMimA1079 —64 5IrtJOPAplftJ3— 02 Vali^p l 1.18 — 06 ^LtniitV^ 934 —07 Jackson Nahonnt 

BIChipp 1833 + 32 GrllAp 1139 +61 MD MunA 11 65 —.04 Fidrtoy Instrtufc Ftaedw Grout*, Gatav Funds Trust: Growth 11.15—01 

CanOevP 22.42 — 68 GtIIBp 1165 -61] Ml MunA 1813 —.08 EflPGln 2953 +.11 AATEap «67 —37 AdAIn 1054 —A3 toaxpe 963 

BaronAst n 2330 +61 MunB 12.48 —69 | A6N MunA 1374 —07 EqPII n 1826 — 67 AATCCp 9^—06 EqGron 1465 +63 TaxEx 961 — 66 


l 1352 —03 LtdTERA P974 
> t 1354 —63 LtTBRA p!034 
Ip 11.94 — 33 LtdTEl 974 


MuAp 1869 — M rinSmShMir MA MTn aii =35 - TC Bdn 975-31 Mtor^ai 7^ -W IriM^Hn 975 -34 PyroForlFuri^: Adglrt ' igJU -65 1 « 

YldAltoini -66 EmGthTllrtl -66 A^>Bd n 9JH -64 ’’BSSS 9.14 -62 WMBn 1136 -30 MnlJ^r 978 -61 NJ VdR n 935 -05 P^nPt n 765J -.04 A?TxBI 8. 1 =67 U 

■GtD 14^3 .04 fntlnD 9M .03 1 NYMun 9-dA 07 Ertversifd n 9.96 — _0l Liberty FiUndot MutntB 93S — JOS NYInsRfl9J6 — a» TBiH n tAJ 17 -.04 AsioBf 14. 5 +.Q4 Hi 

TTH2A P974 — M Slfrp 1352 —39] STBdn 970 -61 EtrSvSfiolilS -J4 Gttilnc 1078—11 MNa«3t 970 — .08 NY VIR n 93? V toxin 5559 -64 AABoJBt 835 —01 Sen 

TBRAD1034 MMunin 9.40 — .08 SmallCon 17.56 —.00 lntlEatvnlD.J4 —3/ InsMixn 9.65 —07 NJMBt . 978 — 6? OHyalRn 931 —.02 iPentCGn _ 113# .. AACnB t 8.5—61 Bt 


7.09 —05 SmCmV 1)71—34 EquSvpn 
i p 651 —63 TrtRtBd 963 _ Govtnc 


IA 1894 —62 
ndPH 1801 
1W 931 -61 


Ap 2269 +31 I Baird Funds: I Grolnc 1574 —69 LtOMuApll.lB — 64 

Uap 8.68 —01 Art Inc 899—61 Growth 1565 +.01 | MA MunA 1879 —64 


5T Mlb t 8.68 —62 BIChipp 1483 +62 GrllAp 1159 +61 • MD MunA 11 55 —.04 Fidel 

Tech p 3257 + 169 CopOevP2342 — 68 GtIIBp 1155 -All Ml MunA 14.13 —08 Efll 

Wldlncp 1.98 „ BaronAst n 2330 +61 MunB 12.48 —69 | MN MunA 1X74 — 07 Eq 

WldPrivB M.' ‘ - ‘ 


MMunip 9.40 —68 SmallCon i; 
QuolGr P 1258 — 62 SmCaEflnl 

Ss'^- W se 

Value p_ 11.18 —06 Ut1litV_ ' 


fiaPrivB M54 —14 Harden Fund*: Compass Coptoit: 

iSoath Funds BasCVl n 14.15 —.10 Eqtvtoco 1173 — 11 

a lance 1154 — 03 fixed! n 951 —03 Fxdln 976 _ 

and 1810—61 ShlTmBd n956 — .03 Growth 11.19—12 

iauitv 14.69 —07 VI Inti ^ 11.90—17 toflEfl 1362-6? 

IdTxF 9.70 — 04 Basawnflal «0A3 — .09 ItoffH 1812—65 

ivtln 9.17 —.01 BoyFunds Inslt MunBd 956 —.02 


dlnAplOTS— 62 IShlGv 932 — 61 AZTE Ap 958 — 65, __ _. . . . -..- 

MAuSI 1154 — 65 LI Bin 1825 _ CTTCAp 974 —.05 EdVoln 1X20 +63 JanusFund: LotrtJFn 1862 — ^ 

HdB t 1268 —06 Fwiwly Invest: COTEp 880 —67 FMBdn 962 —61 Balanced ril2.11 +.01 LonplfSC n 1814 —73 

nffidA 1267 — 67 AorTC m 1855 -67 FL TE p 950 -66 IrrtSdn 953 -63 Eitoprn 23.91 — 10 LoombSoyte: 

MuA 1153 -66 AMBrn 1466—03 GATEAp 976 -66 tolJEqn 1873-6? FedTxEx n6.20 —03 Baton 5^2? — JM 

MuB I 1152 — 66 AM5rGrn1X66 — 66 GtoRtjp 1671 —64! NYMunin 966 — 67 Flxlncn ,888 —04 GBjBdn 9.74 - 


n 1251 —65 TotRtn 1056 —66 


n 1844 —MI InsMuni 9.65 —67 NJMBI 978 —J» OHVdlR 

in 954 -63 TF Borto 95S —08 NYMnBt 1814 — 99 PA VIR r 

in 9.97 —.11 US Gov 847 -68 NCMBt 931 — JM VAVrtR 

n 1873 —66 Ulllx 1834 —10 QHM8I 954 — 65 ONE inti 
totatot Lindner Ftinifa DRMuniBt864 — 05 OVB FllMb: M 

11.15—01 Bulwark n 754 +.08 POcB I 21.13—06 Cai»ApoAn?56 —62 
9.43 _ Drvn 2479—11 PA MB I 1812—09 EmGfthA nB73 -67 

951 -661 Fund n 2165—15 PhnxBT 11.90 —08 GoytSecAn8«— TO 

t .810 —61 WVaTxAn891 — M 


MNatfflt 970 —08 NY VIR n 939— g LVBWn 5559 — 64 AABalBt 835 — 61 Sentinel Group: Bond 9.66 —02 GwWshp T4A2 

NJMBI 97B —69 OH VqlR n 971 —02 I Per.lto n 1157 .. AACnB t 815-61 Balanced p til B— 06 EirwMkt 1847 — 30 GrtnBr 2969 

NYMnBt 1814 -69 PA VIR n 962 — .04 1 Phfla Fund . 677 —01 AAGthBf 873-61 Bondp 556 . InHEflly 1826—17 IntttgjA 1158 

NCMBt ?31 — 64 VAVrtR n 964 —65 ; Ph oenix Se ries _ BIGvBt 450 —01 ComSlk p 2855 -33 U5 E«itv 1030 —63 NYTF 1062 

OHMBI 954 -65 ONEintl 1351 -32 Brtrfd ISA? -.01 CATxBI 758 -65 EmGrp 864 +61 Temrieton Gtan STBdo 9.91 

DRA/luniB 1864 — JJ5 OVBFUndv _ CalTxEp 11.92 —.06 ConvBt 1852 —07 GvSecsp 972 - AmerTr r 13/S —03 TF Iron 1871 


963 - Govtnc 1051 

oe Grlnc 2952 —.09 

956 —02 GwWsh p M62 -35 
1067 —30 GrtnBr 2969 —10 
1036 —17 InttEflA 1158 -66 
1030 -63 NYTF 1062 —66 


LongtfPF n 1832—18 
LonplfSC n 14.14 — 73 I 


Gvtln 9.17 —61 

&W 1 2iS=S 

BalncF 9.45 —03 


1863 +.03 DvrEoBI 872—61 Growth p 1679 +.11 CapAcc 1531 —.13 I Votomet 1452 


]t 1812 — .0? ETOgrthAfl8S-67 CvF^er 1770 -.10 I DyrtoBI 1175 -62 PA TFp 1235 —83 DevMktpl450 -.12 VOVUUeur FttE 

! 'L?5 — - 08 GovtSecAna.95 — ig Eqtv^p 7^— flli DtvGB 9^ — 63 TFIncp 1236 — 65 Fgrunp 9.17—69 A2Jns 958 — 66 

It 810—61 WVaTxAn891 — fl? Growth 20.B2 — .10 Eqlnc I H52 _ World p 1268 —10 Gtolbfra 1037 — 66 COTF 139 —08 

t 1457 —.04 OcfcHafl n 1259 —77 «YieW 887 —011 EuGrHI 1257—17 SentrvFd n 14.94 —14 GtobOpP 1337 — 07 Cast A 964 — 67 

It 1159-12 Ortanrk 245? -.15 toGrAp ftll -.02 | FLTxBI 813 -.06 Sequoia n 5730-77 Growth P 1639 — 14 FLInsd 9.19-66 

T 851 +68 Ortonnlt 1467 —.10 InGrSt 9.10—63 GeaBt 1332 — 68 Seven Seas Series: Inam p 8.951—03 GrtStkP 1871—62 

Jt 954 — 08 Ubervreisn21J2 +67 Wl m> 13.05 — IJ gE5b t 11)1-63 EmsMWnll.60— 17 RrEstp IftS =13 lATt 871-69 


6 P 736 — -09 MNInS 973 —08 
P 1430 —.14 Mlrvilnt 10.40 —64 


—66 AMorGrnl35* — 06 GMRbp 1631 — JM ! NYMunin 956 —67 Flxlncn 888 —04 GttlBdn 9.74 - UtllnBt 802 —67 OceanTEp 950 — 67 Mul FfA p 11.79 —06 GtGrBr 9.42 —.08 Grlnann 1061 — 66 SmotCo p 736 —69 MNIns 973—68 

iv i _ —ill AMprtri n 1056 IrdTEp 953 —10 ( ShtTrnn 870—01 Fundn 1935 — 62 Grawtnn 1233 +.03 . WKHn c Bt BJ — 66 OfjjlErriMk ngflJ — —64 GrtnBI 13.15 —IT JMrixn 113? +61 _Wortdp .1430—14 Mlrmlnt 10.40—64 

field T3S — 62 NJMun 1032 — 63 NY MuBt 1254 — 11 Bdrax: 1274 —65 KYTEAp 9.74 — 66 SmCoEflnl270 +65 Grlhlnc 1840 +64 GrSInn 1243 — 14 MeROLyncft IX RfHEX" — -S 'lit — '21 *■?? SAPMMnlB.90 — 02 Tanpteftxi InstR: AAinnTF 11.00—67 

a ,n ^_62 i W3fsw- J . pa i® 1478 =5i ^ffln is^ =s ffigtM =& tS 'wS&s#-* tssf^t^\JHEsL w - esA ^# A *aJ 

dn 941—62 GwthA p 1249 — 65 Ty, MuA 1851—12 CopApp 17.16+67 MOTEAp 951 —05 Gate! Group: Twwn 2332 +.10 


EstCaGr 1665 —05 Efluity n 1834—65 inFdAp 835 — 62 VA MuA 1450 —10 uminoo nr 856 — 67 M1TECP1D45 — JM fcnsa no 21M +JM ventrn 5155-11 . MMW p ' ut — fl' jsgrra/ .I-g — 6* yscyui !S-K «Z-25 - 4H CEHr"** r .“-y. 1 —-“2 Gov/wa yjt / —jjz Tnormurg Fas: USGovYn 942 

Growth 1250 —.08 BeocHHt 29.93 +67 NW 5DAp 14.15 —01 VAAAuBt 1450 — .10 CanorSt 1856.21 +151 NCTEAp 936 — 65 Gtote^n 1X97 —.05 WrWW 2678 —68 LortAbbeft to«E«Dt 1145 — 68 Eqtodx 17-07 —02 X^BandnlOflJ — 67 NWesB 14.01—33 Grolncn 1870 —its Ini Mu 12.21—68 Woddee KReed: 

idxStkn 11.92 —6' BSEmaDbl 859 +.03 TxExAp 656 — 69 Dreyfus Stratewc Contra 3053 +66 NMTEp 871—67 Gtenmede Funds JtxnnFdn 1173—11 AlfHMp ?.W —59 LafArnOrl7J2 —76 GvAntin 9.77 EmaMEqtC.0? —34 NJJxBt 806 — 66 tooomen 950—03 LldTin 1172 —06 TOtRet 1266 —63 

intBona ftl4 — 61 B«»elmffl: Funds: USGvA p —.02 GtGrp 3375—32 QnvSccn 15.93 +66 NYTEp 974 —6? ^ilyn 1231 — 66 JPCapApw 16.14 —.14 BomCtto 0 071—04 ST^lDp 810— 61 GvBclP ,?67 — u: Enudvn 1835 —11 NwOpoB 12532 +71 MATBn n 9.10 — 04 LidCal 1110 —.05 Gnwrth 1574 +31 

InttStk 1113—63 Balmtced 11958 —JM CDnestopa Funds: „ Growth p 39.04 —17 □ertitiyinllU — 63 OHTEA p 1039 — JH ntGovn 939 - JPIGB 872 +61 De«IG«ip>0-37 +.19 MemmmjRte tocEq 1352 —62 CopAPonaMA —33 NYTxBI 7.91—06 TExMedn 974 — 03 LMGvtp 1154—63 LtdTerm 948 — 62 

SmCoGrnll79 — 63 BcndAn 1874 +.03 Equity 1473 —69 Income P 127D —64 Destinyll n2844 —64 DHTECp 1079 — 65 Inf n 1160 —09 J atm Hancock: Eql9?0p 1420 — 6? AstMl nf I1JM — 62 IncomeBd 8.94 —62 [tojEfln 1168 — .08 OTCBt 1145 +.17 Shuwmut Fds-lnvest: LldMunpllB2 — 66 Muni 934 —67 

mbassodorinv: DlvGrAn 10.12 —07 mcmx 9.67 -55 InvA 1937—11 DisEqn 1855 —55 PATCAp 972 -65 Munlnln 979 -68 CATE 1047-69 Fdyrtup 1235 -63 CopApp if 1037 — 01 toJFxl 945 —01 flYTolRBd 875 -67 OyfcSf 1106 — 06 Fxdlnc dx 930 -65 NMIrtf 1124 —07 Global 937 -57 

Bond 964 —61 EqldxA n 1065 — 66 LtdMal x 1817 -66 tovBt 1961—11 DivwlntlnllWJ — .11 TnTEAP 9.93 — 66 StrrCmn 1171 — 13 DiscvBt 9.18+64 GIEqp 127? — 0? HexBd nf 969 — 62 ntTC ~fl^ x „„ ghfpgt 814 —.05 GrEauity p10.5A—is;( Tocquev 1350 —17 WaBSt 7^K +64 


SmCoGr n!3J9 —63 
Ambassador tov: 

EstCoGr 18TO =66 


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1069 _ KueCEq 1166 -09 PtotpnitFds: I 

952 -62 DscVat 1239 —67 Bmdn 9J4 —02 1 


Eqtodx 1267 
GvAntl n 9.77 


1267 —TO TEE 


p 967 —03 
1X62 —02 


in 1052 —.07 NTNesB 14.01 —23 Grolncn 1870 —63 IntMu 112 1 —68 Wadde08Reed: 

=q*flfl« — 34 NJTxBt 866 — 66 tooomen 950—03 LldTin 1172 —06 TOtRet 1266 —63 

1 1S-25 — -ii ^wOpoe 125-22 +71 MATEln n 9.18 —.04 LidCal 1110 —.05 Grovrth 1574 +31 

n ??™ ~S JKXn 8 .* ,7?i ~fl$ TEtoVtedn 974 —03 LMGvtp 1154 —63 LtdTerm 9.48 —62 


rrameB 1x642 —04 Yl.dPln. 9.97 _ FEsafS 30 -.09 NMTFA 971 ... 

I 7J8 —53 1784 Funds: GrwthS IT 79 — 14 MD TF 951 -69 

MATxBt 83? — 55 CTTEIncn943 — 65 TTlIrdAW 1776 + 64 USGv 942 

MumB 1 861 —.05 Gov Med 967 —62 Thornburg Fds: USGavY n 942 

NtRetfl 1401 —33 Grolncn 1030 —its IntMu 1121—68 Woddee RReed: 


qldxA n 1065 — 66 1 UdMaix 1817 -66 InvBt 1961—11 
icGrAn 1803 —07 Conn Mutual: DuHPEnRn9.97 


ntlnllOO— .11 I TnTEAp 9.93—66 


n 1255 —63 UttlAf 


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inflGrAn 1043 —65 Grwth 1479 —JX InIGovn 974 —61 EmrMkt 1854 —.14 FlexFUntS: GotdmcniSachs Fmly: LTGvAp 875 —62 1 TaxFrp 

i htDurn ftgs - income 93S — .01 KYTF n 669 —05 fcgutlnc 3244 —62 Bond np 1934 _i AsxiGrth 1558 +.14 MATE 1050 — 66 TF CT p 

ilBdAn 1950 — 61 TotRet 1367 —03 KYSMIn 5.12—61 EOtln 1861—16 Gtolnon 972 , CtwGr 1436—18 MgTEB 10J4 — AB 

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802 —65 Grtnf 1889 


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IntCJk 1X10 — JU SIBdAn 1950 — 61 TotRet , 1367 —03 KYSMIn 5.12—61 Efflln 1861 

MITFBd 879—03 SmColA 11.05 —09 CG Cap Mkt Fds: EBI Funds: Eqldx 17.12 

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TF Bd 972 —62 USTldxA n1877— 01 IntirFk OX 7.66 —65 Fllap 5X25 —31 Europe 2036 

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SmCoGr 1176 —04 EqGron 11.94 _ SmVaJn 837 —05 Govtp 962 — 61 GvtSecn 9.14 +61 GrwttiAp 2669 +34 ST Gov 9.48 —62 J Hancock Freedm: Lutheran Bra InffcflCp 10.49 —.15 AssetAp 1254 — 64 Pltor Funds: Numeric 15.92 — 08 EmGrA p 1460 

TRntBd 9.73—01 Eu.rlJdn 1079 —17 TtIRtnnx IS -64 NcrtlLidp ft® —03 GroCO 2869 -.10 HiYklA p 763 -64 GovStBnd 19.93 —03 AvTech 9.95 +69 BroHiYd B.72 — 01 InltFxInf 7.98—10 CATE Ap 9.19 —10 BalGrAn 1060 -65 BasNumOI6.il -M mmAp TS 

Amare Vintage GNMA n 965 —01 Copk^n 1979 —08 _NaHMun p 8j3 —67 Grolnc 7151 — 67 TFMNE 9.49 —06 GvfEcrtyn 2149 —.12 EnvmAp 810 - Fund 1733 — 62 MgdAstB 844 —67 OidHYp 1118—04 EqAoAn 11.18—32 Quest For Vatoe: Grtnoftp 1151 

Equity n 1045 —63 Gototnn 1150 — 7* Corefimds: EdjnVMnffin HiYld 1033—09 TFNatE 933 —.06 GarctfFuntfa GtabAo 1361 — JM Incnme 7.96 _ MqdAstA 847 —67 OiHYCI 1118—64 EaGrAn 1075 —10 CATE 951—08 GrmtohApllOS 

Fxlnco. 946 — 61 hCGron 1455 —61 BalanAn ?.» _ CALrdl 9.48—64 tosMunn 1036 —.08 USGvrE 8.60 —63 DvIpBd 833 —06 GtobBt 1378 —65 Alton! 750—64 MgdAslC 847 —08 DtSCFd p 3533 +65 EqlnA 1042 —16 Fund 1119—18 tollGrAo 1037 

IttWITFn 937 — 08 L Treas n 870 +.06 Ealctt 2139 —05 China t 1177 +69 IntBdn^ 9.84 _ 44 Wall Eq 578 —OB EmgAAV 1883 -34 GilnA 883 _ .OppGr j 1037 +.18 TaxExA 738 -.04 DisCOvB 1 3SjJ4 +64 FxdlnA 9/Ti —.02 GlEq 1440—12 NatNtoA p 995 

Amer AAdvunt [nsH: NjWesn 7J0 — 68 GIBdAn 890 —62 tocsal 10.46 _ interGvtn 9.16 — JU Forum Fundi: GIGyto 855 —05 GlinBt 862 +.01 MASfiiitoS: „ .JxE+S 738 — 63 FalncAp 943 —07 lntmGvAn9ja -63 GrlncA 9.93 —67 5TCUA p P 270 

Brtann 12.15 —Iff NITFIn 1066 -65 GrEgAn 958 Rj-ldt 9.40-63 InttGrin 17.13 -69 InvBnd 960 -62 InflEq 1236 —13 GtabRx 1891 +.t» Botana-d nlUO— 61 Midwest: EqtocBt 978 -67 NJMuAn 9.74—10 IrrvQto 954 _ STlkOrAB 275 

Gnnran 136? —.03 NJTFLn 1078 — .OA intMAn 9 JO — .03 MALtdt 949 —.03 InvGBn 890 M MEBnd 9.64—13 PfcStg 9.21—06 GlTeCh 1977 +37 EmerGrnlATJ +34 Adi USGvt 930—03 Gt&p 14.94 — 06 STInvAn 9.96—61 NmTTE 932 — 68 USGovAo 910 

lnnEqtyn1250 -.il STT,rotH n?53 —62 intIGrAn 13JB — .1? MlLfdt 9.17—63 Japan nr 1J52 — 63 TaxSvr 939 — 69 SmCas 1852 +68 GoWA 1339 — 34 E gutty n 2890 —04 Govtp 898 —01 Gtob&iv p 967 — 03 PllailntEB 1550 — o? nytc 9Ja — 07 SkvtneFundl- 

LtdTrrn n 955 -61 Torl9?5n 95.1S — 05 ValEqBpnlX03-J17 NoflLtdt 957 -63 LalAmr 1558 -51 Founders Funds: Grodisoa McDoanfci GoldBI 1X77 -34 Fxdlnll n 10.18 _ totGvp 9.94 —02 GtabalAp37Jl — 12 P3o«ntEAnlt56 -68 1 OppqtI 19J1-J1 r* 


aSStVnv l cn “■ IX 1065 -66 SIGOvt n 969 —07 NY Muni n 9.92 —03 

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SmVotY n80.tfl — .13 Sami Trust: AcQGyA 9.67 62 Weiss Pea Greer 

Owntthrthm from* „ CAinsMA p95I — 63 CapSrp 1140 — 66 1HO=.10 

prjnc 1446 +^ CalMuAp 953 —.06 CATFAp 9.06 — 68 Govt 839 — 62 
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1140 —66 Drvtoc 11.10 —10 

9.06 -m Govt 879 -ro 


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Gnncen 1369 —03 NltFLn 1078—06 IntMAn 9J0—63 MALtdt 949 —.03 to 

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(Continued From Page 12) 


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INTKKNATIONAL iIKKALI) TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


Pa 1 1 


investment Climate Heating Up in Helsinki 

. AAi>iiHA<-fu o. .. 


Auiinru .\Vn* 

—The prospect lhat Fin- 

^hShfL. 11 * ®r uro P ean Union next 
year has helped make the markka one of 
tnestrongcsi currencies in the world in 
1^ and encouraged investors to fkvk 
• stock and bond markets 

v. m ^kka has surged to two- year 
highs agmnsi major currencies, advanc- 
ing 24 percent against the dollar. S per- 
cent against the yen and 9.5 percent 
against the Deutsche mark so far this 
year. 

“large institutional investors in Eu- 
rope are beginning to notice the attrac- 
tion of Finland now that it's wine to he 
part of the EU.” said Juha Korhoncn. 
i !j C * 0f trading and finance at Partita 
Ltd., part of Finnish commercial bank 
uzutas Bank Ltd. 

A strong performance by e\pon-ori- 
entaied industries has also boosted Finn- 
ic stocks. The return on the Helsinki 
Stock Exchange General Index is 50 per- 
cent so far this year. 


Thiii makes it the best performing eq- 
uity index in Europe and among the 
world’s top It) in dollar terms in the year 
to dale. It has provided more than 10 
limes the 3.47 percent return investors 
got on Germany's DaX too Index in the 
period. 

Finnish bunds have also proved good 
invest men is. An index of one-year to 
three-year Finnish government bonds 
has yielded 27.34 percent in dollar terms 
in the year to date after taking both 
interest payments and capital gains into 
account. 

Thai’s the best return of any bond 
market in the world and more than dou- 
ble the 10.96 percent return on the besi 
performing index of German bunds. 

Finnish bonds .<f longer maturities 
also appear in the tup 10 bond index 
performers so far this year. 

Finns voted to join the EU in a refer- 
endum in October, a decision ratified by 
the Finnish Parliament Friday. The 
warm reception investors have given to 


closer Finnish links with ihc EU is a far 
cry from (he skepticism two years ago 
when Finland tried li< peg the markka to 
a basket of EU currencies. 

In September 1992. a speculative at- 
tack forced Finnish authorities to break 
the markka's link with the lieu and float 
the Finnish currency for the first time 
since World War 11. Today, eeniral bank 
intervention is more likely to he aimed at 
slowing the markka's rise against the 
mark than at shoring it up. 

So. what's the difference 7 

“Before, it was a good for Finland to 
be on the fringe of Europe because of the 
competitive gains they won from the 
weak markka." said Richard Neill, se- 
nior investment manager of European 
equities at Johnson Fry European. 

“But they've had a hell of a lol of 
restructuring, and it would now.be nega- 
tive if they weren't in the EU. since the 
market doesn't want wild swings in the 
cycle.” Neill said. 


U.S. Regulators Look at Curbs on Derivatives 


By Keith Brad.sher 

Nrv York Fours XVrrnr 

WASHINGTON — Three 
federal agencies have decided to 
prepare rules tarring hank*, 
from selling certain govern- 
ment-guaranteed securities that 
take the form of derivatives to 
customers who cannot afford 
the risks involved, according to 
federal regulators. 

If approved, the regulations 
would be the first action taken 
by U.S. agencies to require cer- 
tain sellers of derivatives to de- 
termine whether these poten- 
tially volatile financial 
securities are suitable for their 
customers. 

The regulators’ plans, howev- 
er, are limited in scope and pri- 
marily intended to affect sales 
of one popular type of deriva- 
tive issued by government- 
sponsored agencies like the fed- 
eral National Mortgage 


Association. They arc known as 
structured notes. 

The new rules would also ap- 
ply only to sales of these gov- 
ernment-hacked securities by 
banks, not to sales by the sepa- 
rate brokerage subsidiaries that 
some of America’s biggest com- 
mercial hanks have set up. 

Bank regulators have devel- 
oped a special interest in struc- 
tured notes because they warn 
to avoid any situation that 
threatens the health of financial 
institutions backed by govern- 
ment deposit insurance. Many 
small savings institutions and 
community banks bought them 
heavily and now face huge 
losses because of the sharp rise 
in interest rales this year. 

The comptroller’s office re- 
cently found that at least 100 


small banks in five Southwest- 
ern states had invested signifi- 
cant portions of their capital in 
structured notes and faced po- 
tential losses. 

Derivatives arc potentially 
volatile financial securities or 
contracts based on assets like 
Treasury bonds, foreign curren- 
cies or stock indexes. Struc- 
tured notes pay interest that 
fluctuates based on indexes of 
interest rates, options or con- 
tracts that lode in future inter- 
est rates. 

Regulators from the Federal 
Reserve, the Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corp. and the Office 
of the Comptroller of the Cur- 
rency met for the first time this 
month to begin drafting the 
new rules, Douglas E. Harris, a 
senior deputy comptroller of 


the currency, said Friday. The 
agencies hope to issue the new 
rules for public comment with- 
in a few months, he said. 

A 1992 law required federal 
regulators to review whether 
suitability rules were needed for 
government securities. Most de- 
rivatives are contracts between 
banks, businesses and other pri- 
vate parties and would not be 
covered by the rules now being 
devdoped. 

Technically, Mr. Harris said, 
the new rules would require 
banks to assess the suitability of 
any government security for a 
customer’s investment needs — 
even a savings bond. But the 
new rules an most likely to af- 
fect bank sales of the structured 
note derivatives because of the 
risk assodated with them. 


For the Fed, Inflation Battle Isn’t Over 


FRANCE; Currency Will Remain Vulnerable in Midst of Divisive Political Campaign 


Co ntin ued from Page 1 
pret Mr. Chirac. I am happy 
that he has eliminated any am- 
biguity.” 

Mr. Alphandfery. contending 
that all candidates in the presi- 
dential election are equally 
committed to fighting inflation 
and tackling the fiscal deficit, 
said he was sure that those who 
“wish to have the slightest 
chance of being elected will 
have to be responsible." 

Yet concern was evident 
when Jean Boissonnat, a mem- 
ber of the policy-making mone- 
tary council at the Bank of 
France;' last week called on all 
candidates to be careful not to 
damage the franc’s s tanding. 

Economists, meanwhile, 
warn that markets will become 
more unsettled as Mr. Chirac 
and Mr. Bahadur compete for 
the presidential nomination on 
the right, especially as this 
could help Jacques Delors, the 
outgoing European Commis- 
sion president who lodes likely 
to be the Socialist candidate. 
Mr. Delors, who has yet to de- 
clare, could also benefit from 
corruption scandals that have 
plagued Mr. Ball ad Ur’s govern- 
ment 

Another factor contributing 
to the uncertain political out- 
look is the prospect that Presi- 
dent Mitterrand’s well-publi- 
cized could lead to 

elections being moved up 
should he resign this winter. 

In Europewide terms, domes- 
tic politics could also cast a 
shadow over France’s presiden- 
cy of the European Union, 
which starts in January. Some 
German officials are con- 
cerned, Tor example, that politi- 
cal upheaval at home could : 
slow France’s commitment- to 
monetary onion and other 
forms of European integration, 
just as preparations go forward 
for the ElFs inter-gpvemmen- 
tal conference in 1996. 

Franc watchers also note that 
the Bank of France’s indepen- 
dence, less than a year in place, 
has yet to be tested. 

Mr. Trichet said Friday that 


r happens.” the inde- 
pendence of the French central 
bank had been assured b> both 
constitutional amendment and 
legislation. 

But market analysis say that 
although the central bank may 
be independent of the govern- 
ment, the goal of maintaining a 
strong franc means that French 
monetary policy remains close- 
ly pegged to that of the Bundes- 
bank. 

The franc-fort . or strong- 
franc, policy is an unquestioned 
doctrine among most senior 
French officials, and French in- 
terest rates are thus still higher 
than those in Germany. Yet in 
practical terms political jitters 
have outweighea the rate differ- 
ential, and higher rates have not 
been enough to lure many in- 


vestors to switch from German 
into French assets. 

“The Banquc de France has 
not really had io come up with 
any policy whatsoever.” said 
Alison Cottrell, an economist at 
Kidder Peabody &. Co. in Lon- 
don. “They just move with the 
Bundesbank. So the markets 
have not really tested the franc 
much. But if German rates start 
to rise next year, the Banque de 
France would follow. And if 
this were during the French 
election campaign it might be 
problematic” 

In a recent conversation with 
senior French officials, Hans 
Tietmeyer, the Bundesbank 
president, joked that to really 
establish its independence, the 
Bank of France would need to 
have a quarrel with the govern- 


What the Economists Say 

PARIS — Here is a sampling of what economists at four 
leading Rnanrial institutions have to say about the franc. 

• Brendan Brown, chief economist at Mitsubishi Finance 
in London: 

“I think the franc could have a difficult period. The short- 
term concern is that the franc and Deutsche mark have held 
together very well this year, but it could be a humpty-dumpty 
situation. Any political shock or slowing of economic growth 
or a budget surprise could knock tbe franc down." 

• Jean-Fran^ois Merrier, senior French economist at Salo- 
mon Brothers in London: 

“I would distinguish between two things — the short-term 
volatility the franc may experience before the election, where 
tbe outcome is not clear, and the medium and long-term 
outlook beyond the election, which is quite favorable.” 

• Alison Cottrell, economist at Kidder, Peabody & Co. in 
London: 

“French fundamentals are good, but the risk will be greater 
an the franc titan the Deutsche mark, because the credibility 
of the Bundesbank will always be greater than the Bank of 
France’s- The independence erf the Bank of France is not very 
old and has never been tested. I would buy the currency and 
bonds in February and March 1995 as markets get nervous, 
because the most worrying time will probably be at the 
beginning of war.” 

• Avinash Persaud. head of currency research at J-P- Mor- 
gan in London: 

“If it weren’t for political uncertainty, X redeem the franc 
would now be 3.40 a gains t the Deutsche mark. I think the risk 
premium will not be sustained after the election, because the 
economic outlook is fundamentally good. 

• ALAN FRIEDMAN 


menl. and it would have to win. 

But the strong-franc policy, 
and consequent high interest 
tales during the 1992-1994 re- 
cession, is still seen by many 
investors and analysis as having 
been wrong-headed because it 
prolonged recession, contribut- 
ed to unemployment, caused in- 
dustrial output to be lost and 
weakened investment. On tbe 
positive side of tbe ledger, the 
policy kept inflation low and 
encouraged companies to be- 
come more competitive by cut- 
ting bank borrowing and* staff 
numbers' 

In theory, now that the econ- 
omy is recovering, there is less 
reason for financial markets to 
doubt France’s commitment to 
a strong franc. Economic 
growth in 1994 is likely to be 2.2 
percent, and the government is 
forecasting a growth rale of 3.1 
percent next year. Inflation re- 
mains negligible at 1.7 percent, 
and is not expected to increase 
much in 1995. The key M3 
money supply measure is likely 
to show almost no growth for 
1994. 

But investors are still worried 
about the high level of both the 
fiscal deficit and unemploy- 
ment in France. This year the 
deficit will be about 300 billion 
francs ($56 billion), dose to the 
government’s target because 
growth was better than expect- 
ed Next year, the government 
is shooting for 275 billion 
francs, or 4.6 percent of gross 
domestic product. 

Economists are concerned, 
however, that the structural as- 
pects of the deficit, such as gen- 
erous social security, health 
care and pension spending, 
have yet to be tackled Mr. Tii- 
chet said he had “encouraged 
the government to pursue ac- 
tion with determination,” but 
he acknowledged that tbe defi- 
cit “is the only dement of our 
fundamentals which has yet to 
be improved.” 

Public spending in France 
represents about 55 3 percent, 
the highest levd of any Group 
of Seven industrial bad country 


NOTEBOOK: Leipzig Doesn’t Let Its History Interfere With Progress 


Continued from Page 9 
Loan of 1926, of which a nomi- 
nal $3,061,500 — before inter- 
est — is still outstanding. 

Five years after the fall of the 
WaB, Germany still has to de- 
cide whether to make good on 
foreign-currency bonds Issued 
by Leipzig and other German 
rides that fell into Soviet occu- 
pation after World War II. 

Creditors are starting to calL “If 


we have to pay this back with 
interest, we d be broke,” Mr. 
Kaminski said 

Luckily for Leipzig, tbe fed- 
eral government will probably 
be forced U) service the bonds if 
enough people demand to be 
paid Most of the bonds are 
thought to be on deposit with 
foreign banks. 

“I think people wiH eventual- 
ly get their money,” said Ingo 


Korsch, a Frankfurt banker 
who has written a book on so- 
called Hope Bonds. The catch, 
he said, was that only people 


who owned the bonds in 1945 
would be eligible to cash in. 
Collectors who bought them 
later are out of luck. 


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except for Italy. Investors con- 
sidering franc investments are 
likely to assume that the gov- 
ernment will not lake any polit- 
ically unpopular fiscal austerity 
measures until after the elec- 
tion. 

The unemployment level, 
meanwhile, could decline by 1 
or 2 percent as economic recov- 
ery picks up, but French offi- 
cials admit in private that tbe 
bedrock structural level is 
about 8.5 percent. Private-sec- 
tor economists such as Mr. 
Merrier of Salomon Brothers 
say the structural level is even 
higher, at about 11 percent. 
Once ag ain, few observers ex- 
pect much government action 
to reform unemployment bene- 
fits or king down employer 
contributions until after the 
presidential election. 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Federal 
Reserve Board policymakers, 
who raised short-term interest 
rates Tuesday for the sixth time 
since February, are likely to 
keep raising rates until econom- 
ic growth slows enough to re- 
move the danger of worsening 
inflation. 

That is tbe message from the 
minutes, released Friday, of the 
centra] bank policymakers’ pre- 
vious meeting on Sept. 27, when 
the group chose to wait for 
more information on the econo- 
my before changing rates. 

A major reason a majority of 
Federal Reserve policymakers 
decided against raising interest 
rates at the September meeting 
was uncertainty about tbe ef- 
fects of the previous rate in- 
creases. “It was extremely diffi- 
cult to evaluate whether the 
earlier ti ghtening moves were 
exerting a lesser effect than usu- 
al or it simply was more de- 


layed, or whether the members 
might have misjudged the un- 
derlying strength of the expan- 
sion,” according to the minutes. 

But they concluded that be- 
cause of that strong growth, 
“the risks of some rise in infla- 
tion rates probably had in- 
creased,” the minutes said. 
“How large this rise might be, 
or when it might be reversed 
was very difficult to predict at 
this print” 

Economic growth this year 
has been running just above 3.5 
percent Fed policymakers have 


stressed that growth must come 
down to around a 2.5 percent 
rate to keep inflation from get- 
ting worse. 

The Federal Open Market 
Committee also gave Alan 
Greenspan, the chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, author- 
ity to raise rates by as much as a 
half point if he saw the need 
between SepL 27 meeting and 
the panel’s meeting Tuesday. 

Some analysts suggested that 
Mr. Greenspan did not use that 
authority because of congres- 
sional elections. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


Blue-Sky Investing Pays , for Some 

Several Small High-Tech Arrivals Take Off in U.K. 


Bloomberg Businas Non 

LONDON — Leading British shares 
have been going sideways. The excep- 
tions are recent stock market arrivals 
with no dividends, no earnings and an 
appealing technology. 

In those cases, they are surging. 

Investors call this the blue-sky effect. 
Instead of peril, all that eager investors 
see when they consider the prospects of 
freshly scrubbed companies are a blue, 
sunny sky. 

Shares of computer companies such as 
Calluna PLC, Magnum Power PLC, 
Tadpole Technology PLC and Division 
Group PLC are thriving. 

Magnum Power, a chip maker, climbed 
77 percent in the latest eight trading 
days. The shares have soared 266 percent 
since their debut at 35 pence (54 cents) 
on Aug. 4. 

The appeal of these small companies 
derives partly from investors who are 
weary of buying solid, upper-crust Brit- 
ish companies such as Hanson PLC, 
even though they offer reasonable value. 

Adventurous investors want a piece of 
a brave new world whose gadgets include 
credit-card sized disk drives for comput- 
ers, handheld computers, virtual reality 
graphics for large work stations ana 
chips that prevent computers from 
crashing. 

“People are realizing that the second 
half of the decade will look much like the 
’70s, where you get a true integration of 
computing and communication."* said 
James Warhurst of Manchester’s Albert 
E Sharp brokerage. 

Mr. Warhurst, a computer engineer 
who now promotes slocks for a living. 


helped to bring Calluna, Tadpole and 
Division Group to the British market. 

The promise of glitzy technologies and 
potent profits, even if they are years 
away, allows such companies to com- 
mand market values usually reserved for 
companies with several years of profits. 

For investors, a stake in these compa- 
nies offers a chance, albeit risky, to hit 
the jackpot. 

The market value of Magnum Power, 
developer of the BI-UPS integrated cir- 
cuit whose acronym stands for Built-In 
Uninterruptible Power, has climbed to 
SB 1.46 million from $22.4 million since 
the shares were sold in August. 

In the case of Magnum Power, the lure 
is an application-specific chip that might 
stop personal computers from crashing 
even if the electricity fails. Its supporters 
believe that one day many of the world’s 
PCs could contain a Magnum chip. 

A major attraction at Division Group, 
a virtual reality graphics developer, is a 
pact with America’s Hewlett-Packard 
Co. The two are developing three-dimen- 
sional graphics that will bring the screens 
of computer work stations to life for 
architects and engineers. 

Division Group shares, sold first for 
40 pence in June 1993, now sell for 100 
pence. 

Rapidly rising shares carry the bag- 
gage of fancy multiples that have to be 
delivered. 

Shares of Tadpole, a maker of a note- 
book-size personal computer and porta- 
ble computer work stations, sell for 77 
times the analysts' best guess of next 
year's profits. Shares of the Scottish disk 
drive maker Calluna sell for 100 times 


the rosiest forecast for next year's sales. 

“Of course, one still must get a real 
outcome,” said Mr. Warhurst His ex- 
pectations call for a doubling of Division 
Group's sales each year through 1999. 

Mr. Warhurst said investors would re- 
ceive positive news Wednesday about 
the potential revenue to follow Division 
Group’s pact with Hewlett-Packard, 
which sold $2S billion in computer 
equipment and services this year. 

“The key for Division is providing 
graphic accelerator cards for the next 
generation of pixel,” he said. Pixels are 
the picture elements on a screen. 

If Mag num Power’s computer chip 
makes its way to eager manufacturers 
next year, the brightest of forecasts call 
for pretax profit of $45.5 million by 
1997. On that scale, the company's 41.85 
million shares, last at 124 pence, are 
selling at only twice estimated profits. 

Yet companies residing in Cambridge, 
Bristol and Glenrothes in Scotland, their 
yearly revenue as small as $470,000 and 
their profit ledgers empty, also have per- 
suaded investors to buy new shares and 
to keep on buying. 

That contrasts with the dismal perfor- 
mance of many new issues this year. 
Many investors are jaded in the wake of 
profit setbacks for scores of recent stock 
market arrivals in London. 

Still, there are problems with sinking 
money into relatively unknown and un- 
tested high-technology ventures. Some 
have had dismal performances. 

“You would be crazy to think you can 
pick out the best one in the blue sky,” 
said John Ho ulihan, a researcher with 
Hoare Govett - 


Surging Industry Leaves Modem Pioneer in a Bind 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Tones Service 

ATLANTA — When Dennis C. 
Hayes, (he man whose name was long 
synonymous with computer modems, 
sought Chapter 11 bankruptcy protec- 
tion for his company last week, be ex- 
posed not only the deep problems of 
Hayes Microcomputer Products Inc. but 
also the extraordinary pressures that af- 
flict the industiy itself. 

The bankruptcy filing comes at a time 
of fierce competition in the industry. 
Prices on modems are plummeting even 
as demand for the devices is stronger 


than ever, thanks to growing interest by 
computer users in on-line services, the 
Internet and telecommuting. 

Hayes was a pioneer in modems — (he 
devices that allow computers to talk to 
one another over telephone lines — and 
dominated the market for much of the 
1980s. But Hayes was slow to respond to 
competition from low-cost producers that 
rapidly carved out hefty market shares. 

“There are too many companies and 
too much commodity product out 
there.” said Todd A. Dagres, a vice presi- 
dent of research at the Atlanta invest- 
ment bank Robinson-Humphrey Co. 


Two or three companies make the money 
and the rest fight over the scraps.” 

Hayes, when its sales are included with 
its subsidiary. Practical Peripherals, re- 
mains the market leader in modems, 
though its share has slipped in recent 
years to about 20 percent. 

The other market leaders — Motorola 
Inc., U.S. Robotics Inc. and Zoom Tele- 
phonies Inc. — are publicly held compa- 
nies whose profitability is a matter of 
public record. But because it has re- 
mained privately held, Hayes's financial 
data have always been closely guarded. 


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Via Agent* Fro nee^rrae 

Amsterdam 

Amsterdam shares rose last 
week amid strong third-quarter 
company results but slipped 
Friday on a fall in the bond 
market and on Wall Street- 
The EOE index rose 2.16 
points to 409.85 points. 

The chemical company Akzo 
Nobel Fell 2.60 guilders to 
197.60. Royal Dutch/ Shell rose 
0.70 to 188.70. 

Frankfurt 

Shares scored a moderate 
rise, supported by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl’s narrow re-elec- 
tion and by the firmer dollar, 
but it was still dominated by the 
bond market, traders said. 

The DAX index finished the 
week on Friday just above the 


2,100-point level at 2,100.23, up 
l!05 percent, compared the pre- 
vious Fridays close. 

Volkswagen was up 830 DM 

at 460 . 80 . 

Hong Kong 

Stock prices rose 0.64 per- 
cent, with the key Hang Seng 
Index gaining 59.59 points to 
dose at 9,427.44 on Friday. 

Property firm Cheung Kong 
gained 10 cents, to 36.80 dol- 
lars, while Hongkong Land fell 
20 cents, to 19.50. 

London 

Shares rose after the govern- 
ment released economic data 
suggesting that inflation was set 
to remain low, dampening fears 
of higher interest rates. 

The Financial Times-Stodc 


Exchange index of 100 shares 
ended tie week at 3.131 points 
after a rise 1.3 percent. 

Milan 

St ocks rose despite political 
uncertainties hitting buan^s 

confidence in Italy. The Mibtel 
index closed Friday at 10,336 
points, up 135 points from the 
week before. 


Paris 

The CAC-40 fell 0.26 percent 
to close at 1,926.50 points. . 

Renault shares started trad- Zurich 
ing and rose to 181 francs from 
the issue price of 165. 


index added 32.08 points, to 
reach 2,354.67, while the broad- 
er-based SES All-Singapore in- 
dex gained &04 points, to finish 
at 571.67 points. 


Tokyo 

The Nikkei Stock Average of 
225 selected issues edged up 
18.20, to 19,302.56 points. 

Sony dropped 270 yen, to 
5,480. Other electronics makers 
ended mixed. 


Singapore 

The Straits Times Industrials 


Stocks rose in unsteady trad- 
ing that saw the Swiss Perfor- 
mance Index end Friday at 
1,71536, up 6.96 points, or 0.4 
percent. 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Nov. 21 - 25 


A schedule of this week's economic end 
financial events, compdea lor the Interne- 
fiona Hereto Tribune by&oomOorg Busi- 
ness News. 

AmIm-PmOHc 

a kov. 21 MeBwunw Pnma SAmstar 
Paul Keating and Treasurer Ralph Wilks 
to adtkess Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development confer- 
ence on Australia's place tn the interna- 
tional economy. 

Hong Kong Government to Issue con- 
sumer price Index for October. 

Jakarta Oothea retailer Karwen in dono - 
sia to sell 20 mSion shares, priced tenta- 
tively at 2,900 rupiah apiece. 

Tokyo September household spending 
survey released by the Economic Plan- 
ning Agency. 

Kuala Lumpur First day of two-day Ma- 
laysian Summit on trade and investment 
opportunities in Malaysia. 

Weftington Retail sales for month of 
September and July-September quarter. 
Singapore Singapore-based Investment 
firm China Capital Pte to ftnatae joim- 
venture agreements with a state delega- 
tion trom Changchun Province, China. 

» mow. 2 2 Hriboume Former U.S. 
President George Bush to address Citi- 
bank conference on opportunities and 
challenges laang Asa-PadBc region. 
Denpasar, BaB, Indonesia Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries to 
meet. 

Tokyo Economic Planning Agency re- 
leases September diffusion mdex. 
Eanrdngs expecte d : Cl anon, Hokkaido 
Electric, Kansai Electric. Kyushu Electric. 
Nippon Light Metal. Osaka Gas. 



■ Now. 23 Sydney Meteorologist Ste- 
phen Letlyet and Paul Brennan a re- 
searcher at the Farmers' Federation to 
address seminar on Australia's drought 
sponsored by Austrafan Bust ness Econo- 
mists. 


Jakvta Clothes retaita Karwefl Lndone- 
sia to close itt Imti8i otiertng ol 20 motion 
glares tor a Jakarta listing. 

Taipei Tanvan's cabinet to report Octo- 
ber unemployment datSL 
■ Rw.2( HongKong Government to 
Issue September retao sates figures. 
Tafed Grass national product for the 
thed quarter. 

Earnings expected: Asahi Bank. Bank of 
Tokyo. Dai-lchi Kangyo Bank, Daiwa 
Bank, Descent®. Fuji Bank, Kdhin Bedric 
Railway. Mitsubishi Bank. Sakura Bank. 
Sanwa Bank, Sumitomo Bank. 

• Nov. 25 C an bet ia Australian insti- 
tute d international Affairs begins two- 
day conference on Indonesian oevdop- 
mem and its impficabcm for AustraBa 
HongKong Government to issue tWrd- 
quarter economic report for 1994 and the 
Bnai update of the gross domestic prod- 
uct and pnee loiecasts tor the pertod. 
Taipei Central bank to report money 
supply m October 

Eantings eu t p e tte O . Hankyu, Industrial 
Bank of Japan, Japan Systems, K etsm 
Railway. Long-Term credit Bank ot Ja- 
pan. Mitsubishi Trust 

• Nov. 20 Tokyo President Juan Car- 
los Wesmosy of Paraguay to begin to- 
day visit to Japan. 


Europe 

• Nov. 20 Italy Local elections. 
Expected any tine this week 
Frankfurt October M-3. October private 
credit September trade balance and cur- 
rent account. November cost ot living tor 
Baden-WOrttemberg. Noflh-RMne-Wosi- 
phatia. Hesse and Bavaria October Ito 
business efimate. September capital ac- 
counts. NovanOer preliminary cast ot liv- 
ing. October Import pnees. 

Reme September producer price index. 
September wholesale price index. Oc- 
tober M-2 money supply. October total 
bank lending. October hourty wages Oc- 
tober balance ol payments October offr- 
ciai reserves. 

Madrid Third-quarter unemployment 
rate. 

Zurich November consumer prices 

• Nov. 21 A msterdam September re- 
tail sales. 

Bonn Forum on Germany after the elec- 
tion. Speakers induce Economics Mons- 
ter Gunter Rexrodt and the president ol 
the Bundesbank. Karts Tietmeyv 
Copenhagen October consumer price 
index. 


Frankfurt October produoer price index. 
London October trade balance, exclud- 
ing the Eli. 

room Bank o I Italy emptoyeas strike 
against the budgeL November oties con- 
sumer price index. 

Earning* expected: Thom EMI, Voda- 
fone Group. 

• Nov. 22 Bonn Hans Tietmeyer. the 
president of the Bundesbank, speaks to 
Foreign F»ress Association. 

Parts Senate begins examination of the 
1995 budget October final consumer 
price mdex. 

Stockholm September industrial pro- 
dUctton. 

Madrid Commu ni c a tions Minatry opens 
bids for Spain's cellular phone license, 
e Nov. 23 Amsterdam Third-quarter 
grass domestic product Third-quarter 
consumer spending. 

London Parliament debates economic 
policy in the Queen 's speech. 

Parts September industrial production. 
September manufacturing production. 
Prefamnary third-quarter grow domestic 
product. October housing starts. 
Frankfurt Metangesetischaft AG press 
conference on luB-year earnings. Bank- 
ing consortium tor sale of first tranche of 
Deutsche Telekom shares to be an- 
nounced. 

Ea mtngs e xp ecte d: Commerzbank AG. 
e Nov. 24 Amstardm January-Au- 
gust trade surpka and October Industrial 
orders position. 

Frankfurt Bundesbank meeting, 
tala Third-quarter preliminary gross 
domestic product. October household 
consumption. 

Rone Government talks to unions 
about the budget and pension retorms. 
e Rev. 29 Copenhagen October 
wholesale price index. 

London November Confederation of 
British Industry monthly industrial trends 
survey. 


Ameri cas 

e Rev. 21 Wa s hington The U.S. Agri- 
culture Department releases its weekly 
report on planting p rog i e ss for seven 
oops. 

Ottawa Wholesale trade report lor Sep- 
tember. 

Sao Ptedo institute for Economic Fte- 
s eacl i releases 30-day inflation rate. 
Detroit Toyota Motor Sales U.SA. un- 
veils its redesigned Lores LS 400 sedan. 


The Treasury 
Department reports October budget 
Near York Johnson Bsdbook research 
service ml tie sen its weekly survey of 

same-store sates at more than 20 depart- 
ment discount and chain stores. 
Washington American Petroleum Insti- 
tute Issues Its weekly report on U.S. petro- 
leum stocks, production. Imports and re- 
finery utilization. Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin of Israel meets with Defense Secre- 
tary WUatn J. Parry at toe Pentagon. 
Ottawa Consumer price indew report tor 
October. Mexico's Prostoent-siect Er- 
nesto ZedtBo visits Canada to meet with 
FYtme MiUster Jean Chretien, 
e Rev. 23 Washington Durable 
goods orders tor October. LL8. Depart- 
ment of Energy Issues Hs weekly report on 
US. petroleum stocks, production, im- 
ports and refinery use. The Mortgage 
Bankers A sso c ia tion of America releases 
Its weekly report on mortgage epptice-' 
tidns. The Labor Department reporta Ini- 
tial weekly stale unemployment compen- 
sation insurance claims, president EM 
Clinton and PraNdent-eleet Er n es to Ze- 
dHo of Mexico will meet at the White 
House. 

Atflagtoo, Vfayfnta. The American Gas 
Association releases Its weekly U.S. nstu- 
ral gas Inventory report. 

SanBago Central bank reteeses trade 
figures tor October and monthly mdfcator 
of economic activity, for September. 

Masdco Oty September wholesale and 
ratafl figures lor Mewoo'e three largest 
cities. 

Caracas Central bank to hoM weekly 
auction of zero-coupon bonds. Weekly 
rfihmnt m ea ting . 

Ottawa Prime Mmsler Yitzhak Rabin of 
Israel wfli meet with Prime Minister Jeen 
Chretien. 

e Roe. 24 US. Thanksgiving Day 
holiday. Afl U.S. financial markets and 
government offices are dosed. 

Ottawa International transactions In se- 
curities report tar September. 

Toronto Retalllnduary firm Kubas Con- 
sultants wfll retaesa its major marks) retail 
report. 

Santiago Second ofgovemmenre twice 
weekly debt auctions worth S33 mStion. 
Earnings expected: Toronto Dominion 
Bank 

• Roe. 20 Washington Existing home 
sales for October. The Federal Reserve 
reports October bank credit Tha Federal wi 
Reserve rate roes Hs weekly report ot as- 
sets and HabiMes ot U.S. commercial 
banks. 


f* 




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INTKUVVriOMl. 

-S&ij 

run.rspm r. :iu ?j.» \j.i» •hks t*'h% .-i*\ n- 


(tribune 




BE: 



Well connected 
business people 
get more out 
of iht. 


As regular readers you tell us that not only do you spend 30 enjoyable minutes 
with your paper, but also you don't miss a page.t 

As international travellers you tell us that 57% of you have telephone 
calling cards and that on your last business trip abroad, collectively you used 
them to make an astonishing 1 .500,000 calls.* 

All this convinces us that both you and the telecommunication companies 
that advertise with us get more out of the International Herald Tribune. 

For summaries of the surveys from which these facts are taken, please call, 
in Europe James McLeod on (33-1) 46 37 93 81: in Asia, Andrew Thomas on 
(65) 223 6478: in the Americas. Richard Lynch on (212) 752 3890. 

Stiunv: "> VIVA Surreys V2 / v.f. * ReuJcr Surrey ,<J 4. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 








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REPUBLIC OF LATVIA 


f/l BALT/C SEA 


S T O N I A 


#Staice)e 


✓ > 

International Tender for the sale of x/ 

INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES 

by the Latvian Privatization Agency 


rVentspHs 


Cesn0 


#Smatene 0 ' 

Ahiksna 


Kuldga# TUkumus^ 


•Saidus 


>^RIGA LATVIA 

° teW# \°%*raukte Rawknel 

•jetgeva #Jflfc*pte 


d 


Enterprise number, name, location (in brackets: type of business [capacity p. a. if available], 
[turnover in 1993 in LVL (Latvian Lats if availablej/number of employees mid 1994) 


Krau " e Razehne# ft \ 

ftJekabpfis I itra 

ftu*mtf 


LITHUANIA 


.Daugavpils 

Krastava , 


le 



PAPER AND PRINTING 


(UM6) V/U .Riga Cardboard Factory* 
Riga. IV 1004 


V/U .Stafcetes Paper Factory* (teased out) 
Umbazu.LV 4043 

(Glue paper [150.000 dm), stationer/ 
[600.000 cbm], kraRpapB'P,5 mffl. sqm], 
[29.000 UOJ/42) 


TEXTILE INDUSTRY 


(U/-56) V/U .Krastava Rax Processing Factofy" 
Krastava, U/ 5601 

(Flax tibets p. 100 ft long Bar ffierc [400 ft 
[12.000 Li/iyiO) 


(IV-57) V/U Jjjdza Rax Processing Factory 
LiEdza, IV 5701 

(Long and short flax tibers,Bnen p.100 1 Rax tiber). 

130.000 my64) 


(IV-04JA/S .STRAUME’ 
Riga, IV 1004 


grinders [500.000 pcs], kh 

[73.000 pcs) electrical to 
p.0iM Uty&V 
(iv-Z4)wu jjto&r 

Vaimtea, IV 4200 


[4. 100 unitsl. IP, 8 irtit. WJ/377) 
(IV-87J VAJ .Wgas Ptestika" 

«0a «-Vl045 _ 


Lvum 


(IV-92) VAJ .Progress* 
Rfga.LV J006 
fCfracnssoies: /fww/aan 


(LV-61 1 V/TJ .Prefl Rax Processing Factory* 
Preffl.U/5318 

(Flax fibers p^OOO, long naxfButs [500 0./7) 




CV-9n)VAl jaoas FBcs" 
ffiga.LV 1009 

(Fait hats, [protection stopped to 19931710) 


TRANSPORTATION 


(IV-31JV/U .Vftnte] 
Ventspas, IV 3602 


forwarding, warehousing, [2,5 mx. m.yi2T) 


(LY-32JVAJ .RBzeknes Transporta Apvtenfca* • ' 

ffezeto.LV 4600 ' 

(Rond transport p7miB. Don], [0,15 /nflt Dti.yi90) 


(iV-52) A/S ,&rtslaTraneportalJon“ 


(1V-106) V/U .Riga RsMng Port" 

Fbga.LV 1020 

(Bartxmr services, dl separation [8 specialised 


WOOD AND WOOD PROCESSING 


(LV-06) V/U JDaugavpBs Furniture Plant* 
Daugavpils, IV 5400 

(Bedroom farnitm sets pi. 700 pcs), wardrobes 
ft 3. TOO pcs], beds (7.400 pcs], armchairs 
p. 680 pcs). ttivan beds [840 pcs], totting chairs 
[220.000 pcs], [0,5 mm LVLJ/359) 


J1V-Q8) V/U JLatgale Furniture Plant* 

Riga. IV 1019 

(Upholstered furniture [ 1,0 mfiL 130)7200) 


(IV- 50) VAJ .Kurzemes Priede Forestry* 
Liepaja, LV 3401 

(Sawn (under (200.000 cbm], EuropaBets 
p.000 cbm], 769) 


(IV-62) VAJ .AMttne Forestry 
AJuksne, IV 4300 

(Sawn timber p.400 cbm], wooden crates 
[2500 cbm], paper wood [ 2000 cbm], wooden 
Chips [450 Q. [092 mULLVUTi 12) 


(LV-63) V/U .Cesu Forestry* 

Cesjs,iV 4 ioo 

(Round timber export [50.000 cbm], sawn limber 
[12000 cbm], wooden daps [10.000 cbm). 

transport service, [0,3 miB. U7Q795) 


(137-64) A/S .Daugavpils Forestry 
Daugavpils, IV 5400 

(Timber logging [70.000 cbm], sawn timber 
[2000 cbm], [0.6 mil UIL]7207) 


(LV-65) VAJ .Guftene Forestry* 
GtAeitt,lV4400 

(Umber togging [50.000 cbm], sawn timber 
[3.500 cbm} [025 mm. 1207158) 


(1V-66J V/U Jncutelns Forestry* 

Riga regtqn, IV 2141 

(found timber [3&000 dm], sawn timber 
[7.000 cbm) wooden chips [20.000 cbm], fkewood 
[20.000 cbm], [1, 1 mii. U8J/Z72) 


(LV-67) Assets of 

v/u ■Jaunjdgava Forestry (leased out) 

AHuaiktere^cin.LVSW 

[Wood processing [24000 cbm), [0,42 mtt. U/Q7114) 


(LV-BS) Assets of 

V/U .Jekabpite Forestry (leased out) 
JekabptfS, LV 5205 

(Timber togging [208.000 cbm], sawn timber 
[8.000 cbm], [0.4 mill. U/l]792) 


(IV-69) A/S JCotaiesa Forestry 
Aizkraulde region, IV 5113 
(Timber logging [60.000 cbm], sawn timber 
[3.000 cbm], [0,8 mill. 121)7293) 


(IV- 73) VAJ JUazsalaca Forestry 

Vairmera region, IV 421 5 

(Mp-wood [8.500 cbm}, sawn timber p. 000 cbm], 
firewood [15.000 cbm], plywood togs p.400 cbm [ 
[0,34 mti. U/LJ7167) 




(LV-21)VAJ .Otaine Chemical-Pharmaceutical 
Plant* 

(Name, (V 2114 

(Mecddnes ( 1.500 mid. tablets], raw materials 
tor medicines [700 f], byproducts [BOO g. 

[4,3 mid. Li/LJ/969) 


ilv-60) V/U „SekJas WLcIesaJe 1 
Je/gava. IV3008 

(Vegetables and dower seeds wholesale 
[0£ mdl. LVLj/52) 


(LV-89) V/U .Riga Travel and Excursion Office - 
Riga. LV 1050 

(Travel agency. [20.000 LVLpV) 


(LV-49) V/U ,Livani Biochemical Plant* 
Uvarti,lV5316 

(Concentrated to rage lysin 1 3.000 1], [production 
Stopped in 1992)764) 


p-101) V/U „Bahn Road Construction* 

Bata, LV 4500 

(Road construction, asphalt [ 70.000 1], tiding 
material [200 mid. cbm), [0, 1 mid. LVLj/54) 


p-74) A/S .Ogre Forestry 

Ogre, LV 5000 

(Sawn timber [2600 cbm], paper wood 
[8.500 cbm], firewood [23000 cbm], 
[0.6 mti. U7LJP91) 


(1V-76) V/U .Saldus Forestry* 

Satdus.LV 3801 

(Timber logging (46.000 cbm], sawn timber, 
[0,5 mS. LVL}/14Gj 


(LV-77) A/S .Strencu Forestry 
Vaita region. IV 4730 

(Paper pulp [20.000 cbm), bates p 1.000 cbm), 
plywood togs [3500 cbm], techn. wood-pulp 
p 5.000 cbm), sawn timber [3.000 cbm], tiremod 
[20.000 cbm], [0.8 mill. IMJ/204) 


(LV-78)V/U.Tatsl Forestry* 

TalSl, IV 3257 

(Paper wood [5.200 cbm], sawn timber 
[7.300 cbm], rwnd togs [3.000 cbm], 
(0,4 mIB. UIL]I235I 


(LV-79) VAJ .Tukums Forestry 
TuJam.LV 3100 

(Round togs p 5.000 cbm], firewood [13.000 cbm}, 
sawn timber[1500 cbm). [0,5 mEL U/LJ7150 ) 


(tV-60) VAJ .Zguri Forestry" 

Balvi region, IV 4534 

(Timber togging [25.000 cbm J, sawn timber 
]2500dm], match togs p 200 cbm), 

[0,7 mBL IRJ/209) 

(IV-105) V/U ^tondaga Forestry 
TafeL.LV 3270 

(Timber togging [10.000 cbm], sawn timber 
[1.500 cbm), 798) 


Tender Conditions 

1. In accordance with ns legal mandate the Latvian 
Privatization Agency LPA intends to sefl the afore- 
mentioned enterprises by means of an interna- 
tional tender in the following manner: 

a) bids lor a state owned joint stock company 
(organized as A/S under Latvian law) must be 
for the majority of the shares of the company. 
LPA may reserve a mmonty of the shares of the 
company for future pubfic offering of shares; 

M bids to a state owned enterprise (organized as 
VAJ under Latvian law) must be for its total 
operations; 

c) bids for a plant or leased out enterprise must be 
for Hs total assets (e. g. buildings, leasehold. 
aqupmonl and inventory) wbh Inventory finally 
to be valued as ol the time of acquisition; 

d) Mte for assets or parts ot an enterprise must be 

tor a separable unit of a A/S. VAJ or plant, wi*h 
inventory finally to be valued as of Ihe tone of 
aquation, 

2 . The tender is public and anyone may bid 

3. In deciding among the bids. LPA will take into 
consideration, among other things, the bid price, 
promises to maintain or create jobs, pledges to 
Invest, and the business pton submitted, each of 
which win be considered part of the bid. Upon 
signing a contract, the successful bidder wifi be 
required to posts bond to guarantee these pledges. 

4. Interested parties can obtain enterprise and plant 

profiles without charge from LPA. LPA is not re- 
sponsUe tor the accuracy and completeness of 
this information. Prospective bidders wfll receive 
written authorization from LPA to visit the enter- 
prises or plants on the basis ot which Information 
wi II be provided by the e hteiprise or manage- 

ment. 


5. Bids must be m writing and should be subrratled in a 
seated envelope marked only with the name ot ihe 
enterprise or plant tor which the bid ts submitted. 


6. Bids must be received at LPA. 31. K. VakJemara 
Street, Riga Latvia -IBB 7. no laier than 2.00 p m. 
(local time), on Dec. 22, 1994 (the “dosing date"). 
Bids will thereafter bo opened immediately. Bids 
must be denominated in Latvian Lais (LVL). and 
shall remain vald tor one hundred and twenty (120) 
days after the closing date 


7. Bids must be accompanied by a bond ot five (5) 
percent of the bid value in the form of an irrevocable 
bank guaranlee vafid (or one hundred and twenty 
(J20) days after ihe ckteing date. The bid bond must 
be payable on first demand and will be tortefted if the 
bidder either tads to hold its bid open tor the required 
period or refuses to sign a contract to accordance 
with Its bid. 


& LPA win decide on the bids within one hundred and 
twenty (120) days after the closing date. Bidders 
maypresemiheirbd within a period set by LPA LPA 
to entitled to accept a bid other than that with the 
highest purchase price or may reject any ol the bids 
ai anytime. 


9. Theprivatteationotthe tendered enterprises win be 
canted out accordng to applicable Latvian law. 


LPA (Latvian Privatization Agency) 


Druvis Skutte Jams Nagls 

State Minister tor Privatization GenerakJirektor 


Office hours ol LPA are Monday through Friday 
from 9am. until 4p.m. (Joes) time). 


For further information (enterprise profile, data on Latvia, visit authorization) please contact: 


44 


Privatizaci jas agenlura 

(Latvian Privatization Agency) 

K. Valdemora «ela 31, Riga, LV-1887^Latvija 


+ 371 - 2-332082 

+ 371 - 2-328069 

+ 358 - 49-106103 

+ 358 - 49-106104 


+ 371-8830363 

+ 358 - 49-106100 

+ 358 - 49-106101 

+ 358 - 49-106102 


This project is funded by the 
German Ministry of Finance 
and EU-PHARE 





































Ut 


Page 14 

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, Nov. 18. 
(Continued) 


Sate 

Div YU 1 Oh High Low Ose One 


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Hltaim 

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10 25 25 25 - 

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J8 2.1 1041 14 13V. i|y, 

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_ 221713V, 12 U% 

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HOfMIe 35 SI 5311 18". 17% 17% 

HeriToFd J8 1.7 DC', 71 73 - 

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HmgF L> OS 3J 18538 law »W lov, - 

HmPrl J0 a 4.7 <J74 13' , 12'.. 12V, _ 

HrneSlaf ... 276 MW IJW I4W 1 

HmeTbea _ 3 5030 5'V,. tv, 4 4v„_| 

H mccrp _ 16012% 11 II W - 

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HmowG .20 310 1545 IW % m. - 

Hmh»Bc .. 41 IP/, ||% m* 

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-. 222 18% T7W 17% — % 

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_ 332 3 2% —*1. 

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_ 1317 5 4»* 4'., — % 

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_ 1172 10% 8W 9% -1 

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- 860 7% 6% 6% -*i 

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.. 148416 15 15% 

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8517% 1SW 16V* -IW 

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712 1% 1% 1% — W 

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1.14 1 12J 123510 9 9% — % 

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_ 5643 2"W 2'/* 2% 

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_ 3500 M IP* IP.,— l»-j 

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J4 2J 783 11 10% 10% — W 

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_ 538 3W 3 3% 

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25213'/. 121* 1J'*4 **» 
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_ 1726 5fa 5 5% _% 

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Jit 5.9 795 5% 5Vu 5W — % 

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J2 IJ 10944 I5W 13", 14 -w- 

_ 265 1 ’* % —’in 

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_ 2382 20% 19% 17% —V. 

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_ 401 5 3% 4 — l’O 

.05 1.7 730 2% 2V. 2% - ■* 

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.. 1001 34W 33V 34W -1% 

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_. 2534 9% 8 8 — 

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.. 21 4'i 4W 4% - 

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J6 1.9 357 TOW 18% IBVt — P* 
24 11 136511% 11 I1W 

.16 I J 7225 VW 7 9%„ 

- 911 |». J% n, 

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-. 3424 8% 8W 8' t — ** 

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- 5409 4% 4V, 4% — W 
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178 5% 
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...1041817% 
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- 9314 70 
JH J 7670 31% 

_ 6073 9 
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J8 1.0 50 7% 

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AS SlOP*: 

J6 3J3 517 

JA IJ 150 27% 
20b 13 122 «'* 
... 1309 4’,-. 
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— 114 11V, 

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JO 4.0 1BI 13 


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JocoEJec 

Joeb&n j* a.u 101 13 
jacarC «rt - 36 6% 

Jacorcm „ - M2 MW 

Jamevnln JOe 6J 773 8 
Joirnme 
Jasons 

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JefBsn 
JeftSwa 

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JoiFrm 1 
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JWA 

JofmsmA - 2467 19% 

Jon leal 
Janet A 
JonesM 
Jos Bank 
Jastyn 

JunaLi 

JUSlFFeet _ 4329 34 

JusJTovs 

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K-fOf 
KBKCap 
KLA 
KLLM 
KTron 
KaMer 

KaJsRsc _ 

Konon A3 A 4 37*210 
Korean at i25 7J 112843% 
KmfcakE) _ 366 16 

KelyWI - 6592 6 

KelvOlpf HO 107 248 26’/. 

KeUySA .73 2J 349529% 
Kernel ■"« *' 

Kenan .... 

KencteOi - 254813% 

Kertfenpf 1J7 10.1 35216% 

KdrWifa - 457 IW 

Krvacva „ 706 id 

KentEnf JSe J 88 24V. 
KvAAea _. 166 6W 

Kevlin - 192 2V, 

KrwnSc so 7% 

Key Prd _ 3223 5% 

KevTech - 359 6% 

KevTm _ 2353 11’.* 

KeyPn iju <U 1790 30 
KevsHrs M 13 2718 Vl 

Kimbol BA J J 476 24% 
KndrUwt — 434 6% 

- 5561 13W 
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JO .6 X3Q7 34 v« 

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_ 437934 

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12% 13% -% 
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30"* 30% — 1 
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10 10 *V, 


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26% 77 -VS 
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30% 33 W t2W 
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KndrLr 
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Kirmord 
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KultKe 
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LATSPt 

La inrs 

LCMnldf I 

LCS 

LDD3S 

L_DI Co 

LF&BCD 

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LXE 

LaJrfflPti 

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La s t m Tc 

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- 1496 M-T. 

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_ 9778 'ft 
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Lunar 

Lundinr 
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MIG Prod 
MAF Bcp 
AAARC 
MB LA 
MCI 
MDL info 
MDTCd 
AAFBCp 
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mips cm 

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AAHAAeyer 
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MR I Mat 
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MS Carr 
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MTCEI 
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.. 3324 23". 2SW 73W -- 
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J4 A4 303 8W 7 2. — , 

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- 5617 39'.., 37", 38% - IV. 

_ 207D A S’., 5W _ 

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Continued oa Page 15 




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Graf Faces 


N D A Y 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


Page 15 


Back Injury 

The Associated Pros 
FRANKFURT — Steffi 
Graf, the top- ranged woman 
tennis player, may need surgery 
..to repair her back injury and 

could miss the Australian Open 
in January, hex doctor said. 

Graf was beaten by Mary 
Pierce on Thursday in the Vir- 
ginia. SHms Championships in 
New York, in what was only her 
second match since the U.S. 
Open in September. 

Her doctor, Helmut Krahl, 
who is also the doctor at the 
ATP Tour World Champion- 
ship, said in a statement that 
the injury would prevent Graf 
from playing or training for an 
unspecified time 

A “stress reaction” in the 
Iowa: back was causing the 
^pain, Krahl said. “AH possibili- 
™ ties of therapy are being consid- 
ered, including surgical steps.” 

• Goran Ivanisevic became 
the first player to be suspended 
from the ATP Tour, receiving a 
two-month ban Saturday be- 
cause of accumulated fines for 
code of conduct violations. 

The ban, which begins Mon- 
day, expires the day before the 
start in late Januaiy of die Aus- 
tralian Open, the first Grand 
Slam event of the year. 

Ivanisevic, No. 4 in the 
world, was banned for accumu- 
lating $10,000 or more in fines 
in 1994, the second straight year 
he has exceeded the $10,000 
limit. In such cases, ATP rules 
call for a $10,000 fine and a 
two-month ban. 

This year, Ivanisevic was 
fined at the Paris Open in Octo- 
ber and fined again Friday for 
swearing at a lineswoman dur- 
ing a loss to Pete Sampras. 

The ATP does not ann ounce 
the amount of its fines. 

Ivanisevic can play next 



In ATP, 'Great’ End for Sampras 


s assasiBB 





Boris Becker was feeling tapped out after his 30 aces were trumped by Pete Sampras. 


By Christopher Clarey 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT— Ibis time, 
there was no depriving Pete 
Sampras of his exclamation 
point. 

A year ago in the final of the 
ATP Tour World Champion- 
ship, he was overpowered by 
Germany’s second-favorite ten- 
nis player, Michael Sticb, who 
slammed 27 aces in from of his 
fellow citizens to keep Sampras 
from finishing off in style his 
first year as No. I. 

This year, Sampras had to 
deal with Germany’s favorite 
athlete, Boris Becker, who 
slammed 30 aces of his own to 
the delight of the 9,000 thor- 
oughly subjective fans in the 
Festhalle. 

But on this occasion, aces 
and an adoring public would 
not be enough. This time, the 
young, gifted and injury-prone 
American who finished the sea- 
son No. 1 in the rankings also 
finished No. 1 in Frankfurt, 
shrugging off Becker’s fast start 
to win, 4-6, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. 

“After this week, anybody 
who says Pete doesn’t have 
heart is barking up the wrong 
tree,” said Sampras’s coach Tim 
Gullikson. 


“This really ends my year on a 
great, great note," Sampras said. 

The victory was Sampras’s 
10th of die season and his sec- 
ond in this year-end event fea- 
turing the world’s top eight 
players. He also won it in 1991. 

This year, the victory was 
worth $1,225 million. But much 
more important to the Califor- 
nian turned Floridian was the 
psychological boost it repre- 
sented after a summer and fall 
fraught with frustration. Al- 
though he bad established his 
preeminence in Lhe first six 
months of 1994, winning the 
Australian Open and Wimble- 
don, be later missed nearly 
three months of action with as- 
sorted leg injuries. 

Even when he managed to 
play — at the U.S. Open and in 
the Davis Cup semifinals 
against Sweden — his fitness 
failed. But in Antwerp, where 
he won last week, and in Frank- 
furt he returned to lop form. 

In the semifinals on Satur- 
day, he played one of the finest 
matches of his young career to 
beat Andre Agassi in three of- 
ten- breath taking sets 4-6. 7-6 
(7-5), 6-3. On Sunday, he pre- 
vailed against Becker, who had 
beaten him twice indoors in 


straight sets in the past month, 
most recently on Wednesday in 
round-robin play. 

“It was probably too much to 
ask to beat the No. 1 player 
twice in the same week," said 
Becker, who ended the year at 
No. 3, behind Sampras and 
Agassi. 

The irony was that Becker 
only had to deal with Sampras 
in the final because be rallied to 
beat Stefan Ed berg in his final 
preliminary-round match Fri- 
day. Thanks to the vagaries of 
the round-robin system, Sam- 
pras would have been eliminat- 
ed from semifinal contention if 
Edberg had won in three sets. 

“I finally got a break," said 
Sampras. “If Boris doesn’t win, 
I am on my way home, and that 
was the break I needed because 
I haven't got so many over the 
summer. I guess 1 was due." 

Sampras also gave Becker his 
due, turning toward him with 
microphone in hand during the 
awards ceremony, and saying, 
“I plan on buying you an apart- 
ment or a dinner or anything 
you want." 

Becker apparently prefers 
option one. 

"I told Pete *We have 9,000 
witnesses to your offer to buy 
me an apartment,' ” he said. 


Drought Over as Sabatini Tops Davenport for Slims Title 


month at the Grand Sam Cup in 
Munich, a $6 mfifion event that 
is not covered by the ATP Tour. 

Since the ban coincides with 
the ATP off-season, Ivanisevic 
agreed not to play the Hopman 
%Cup and a Sydney tournament, 
two exhibition events that he 
could have played since the ban 
only applies to official emits. 


Conqrikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Gabriela Sabatini, 
who had not won a tournament since 
May 1992, won the Vi rginia S lims 
Cham pio nshi ps here Sunday, beating 
Lindsay Davenport, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. 

It was Sababni’s second title here. 
She also won the emit in 198S. 

It was her 44th tournament since her 
last victory, in the 1992 Italian Open, 
and her ei gh th appearance in a final 
since that triumph. 

The Argentine, 24, overwhelmed her 
American opponent, 18, in the first 
two sets, bin fell behind 2-0 in the 
third. When her control appeared to 
wane, she responded with two straight 
breaks, the second at love, to go ahead 
4-2. 

Davenport broke back to even the 
set but Sabatini responded with a 
break and held serve for the tide, win- 
ning the final point with a backhand at 
the net 


Sabatini had eliminated Martin a 
Navratilova in the first round, ending 
the 38-year-old veteran's legendary 
singles career and launching her own 
quest to regain the top spot. 

On Saturday, Sabatini overcame 
herself as well as Kimiko Date of Ja- 
pan for a 4-6. 6-0, 6-3 victory in the 
semifinals. 

Sabatini was firing first serves in the 
90-mph (145-kph) range. She double 
faulted 10 times, however — twice in 
the sixth game of the final set to help 
enable Date to break and get back on 
serve. 

But the Argentine broke right back 
at love to finally snatch control of the 1 
hour, 44 minute match. Sabatini had 
been up a break at 4-2 in the first set 
when she began piling up the unforced 
errors. Date seized the opportunity to 
roar back and win the last four games 
to take the set 

But Sabatini broke at 15 in game 


(me of the second set, on her third 
attempt in third game, and at love in 
game five, as she blanked Date, 6-0, to 
even the match. 

Before the first game of the final set, 
Date requested the trainer, who treat- 
ed her for a strained quadricep that she 
had suffered in a three-set Friday night 
marathon with Conchita Martinez. 

Date played on gamely. Facing a 
break point at 2-2, she combined with 
Sabatini on the point of the match — 
maybe die tournament — as each ran 
the other back and forth across the 
baseline before Date hit an unforced 
backhand out. 

But neither player could bold serve. 
Date broke right back on her third try 
the next game with a beautiful cross- 
court forehand to pass Sabatini at the 
net to even it at 3-3. 

Only momentarily, however. Sabati- 
ni earned the decisive break with a 
forehand winner and then broke again 


in the final game, this time at 15 on her 
first match point with a blistering 
backhand winner into the open coutl 
Davenport had defeated Mary 
Pierce to reach the finaL Davenport 
broke her in the third game of the first 
set and in games three and five of the 
second. And Pierce never had a break 
point opportunity. 

Afterward, Pierce said she had 
learned a lot during the year. In partic- 
ular, she said, she had learned “to not 
take things too seriously, to enjoy my- 
self on the court and also off.” 

Off the court, perhaps, but on it 
Pierce was not having much fun Satur- 
day. After gunning a backhand long 
on match point. Pierce nailed the ball 
deep into the crowd on a line and then 
stormed off in disgust 
After her commanding performance 
Saturday in a match that took just 59 
minutes, Davenport already seemed 
satisfied with her showing here. 


“There really isn’t anything to lose," 
Davenport said about playing in the 
SHms. “We have seven weeks until the 
next tournament I might as well finish 
on a good note.” 

On Friday, Date fought off five 
match points to eliminate Conchita 
Martinez, the Wimbledon champion, 
2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-1). 

In the first quarterfinal Davenport 
bad ousted No. 4 Jana Novotna. 6-2, 
6-1 

Davenport combined powerful 
groundstrokes with Novotna’s bundle 
of errors. Whenever Novotna broke 
Davenport's serve, she immediately 
gave back the advantage, accompanied 
by a large serving of mistakes. 

Novotna had two aces, half as many 
as Davenport, but committed nine 
double faults, two on game points in 
the second set Davenport on the oth- 
er hand, had only one double fault 
(AFP, NYT, AP) 


Becker, who won the ATP 
title in 1992. did not help his 
own in the final by double 

faulting 12 tim es. Astonishing- 
ly, five of those donble faults 
came in the sixth game of the 
second set Less astonishing 
was the fact that Sampras broke 
Becker in that game and pro- 
ceeded to even the match at one 
set apiece. 

To be fair, Becker had taken 
big risks all week on his second 
serve, which he hits as hard as 
players like Edberg and Agassi 
hit their Fust serves. His real 
problem against Sampras was 
inconsistent returning and un- 
spectacular volleying: the same 
problems that caused him trou- 
ble in his surprisingly taxing, 
three-set semifinal victory over 
Spain's Sergi Bruguera. 

Perhaps Becker should have 
realized it wasn't his day when 
at deuce in the 1 1th game of the 
third set, he made one of his 
trademark dives at the net and 
ended up not only missing the 
backhand volley but getting 
tangled up with the net. 

On the next point, Sampras 
broke Becker to take a 6-5 lead 
and then served out the set, 
winning it at 40-30 when a 
Becker passing shot that landed 
near the line was called out. 

Although the crowd did its 
best in the fourth, stomping 
their feel and chanting “Boris, 
Boris" at the slightest pretext, 
Sampras already had taken his 
attacking game to a higher level 

“Pete was flying for the last 20 
minutes of the match," Becker 
said. “But all in afl, he is not a 
level better anymore than me or 
than two or three other players." 

The situation certainly has 
changed since Wimbledon, 
when Sampras swept through 
the field and set tennis pundits 
to talking about Laver-like 
domination. Since then, famil- 
iar talents like Agassi and 
Becker have reasserted them- 
selves and new ones like the 
Russian Yevgeni Kafelnikov 
have emerged. 

But Sampras is still the first 
player sauce Ivan Lendl in 1987 
to stay No. 1 for an entire year, 
and when the Australian Open 
begins in January, he will still 
be the man to beat 


it 

: 3 




Consolidated trading 
ended Friday, Nov. 18. 
(Continued) 





























































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


MONDAY 

SPORTS 

Grobbelaar: First Test Passed 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

SOUTHAMPTON, England — At 
last. Bruce Grobbelaar admitted to hif 
worry. 

“He said, ‘If you thought his debut 
with Liverpool was hard, that wasn't a 
patch on this one today,* " said Lawrie 
McMenemy, the director of Grobbe- 
laar’s club, while celebrating Southamp- 
ton's 1-0 beating of Arsenal on Satur- 
day. "He said he thought he was undei 
more pressure as a footballer than any 
footballer be can remember in his ca- 
reer. He said anyone thinking anywhere 
that he wasn't giving 100 percent must 
be barmy." 

Charged by the English Football As- 
sociation with fixing league matches — 
the result of a hidden-camera sting ar- 
ranged by a former business partner and 
the tabloid newspaper The Sun — Grob- 
belaar had demanded to play because tc 
do otherwise might imply his guilt. He 
looks forward to presenting his side foi 
all to hear, be said, but that will only 
require him to sit in a chair and tell what 
he knows. This match, his first in Eng- 
land since the story broke, was a LriaJ 
before those he is accused of betraying. 

Whether those in the Southampton 
gallery thought he was guilty or not, they 
all cheered for Grobbelaar in this old, 
condemned stadium, as cozy as a blan- 
ket across 15,201 shoulders. He under- 
stood he could earn their mass faith only 
by sending them home happy. That is 
the professional's justice, and no one felt 
sony for him. 

They were singing to him. For He’s a 
Jolly Good Fellow. The key phrase be- 
ing. “The Sun is full of (. . 

Read a Union Jack banner, which 


could be seen through the netting of his 
goal: “Bruce is Innocent! The Sun Ain’t 
Gonna Shine Anymore." 

He has never sought sympathy. At 37 
he is balding with the black droopy 
moustache oT a silent-movie villain. Ar- 
senal waited just 12 minutes before 
crossing in to striker Paul Dickov, trying 
to replace the injured lan Wright. 
Dickov volleyed horizontally, point 
blank. Grobbelaar, mimicking, took it in 
the chest He froze, shocked, then 
crawled on his elbows to cover. 

“With all the hype and everything 
around the game, it was meant io be that 
way," the Arsenal manager. George 
Graham, said later. “] think Bruce must 
have written the script-” 

The game was in allegory to the scan- 
dal. All of the evidence promised a cer- 
tain Arsenal victory, but Grobbelaar 
made save after save. There are many 
reasons to doubt the charges — and that 
is the least of it. The amazing result has 
been Grobbelaar’s refusal to give in to 
the weight of the first English match- 
fixing scandal in 30 years. He returned 
Thursday on a 20-hour flight from his 
native Zimbabwe, trained with his team- 
mates for 2 Vi hours, was interrogated by 
police, and trained again Friday. His 
manager, Alan Ball, could see nothing 
wrong with him. The description of a 
goalkeeper’s job is to convert defeaL into 
victory. Grobbelaar has been doing his 
job. 

On Saturday be came out of the box, 
dribbling, sidestepping a Dickov tackle 
when he should nave kicked into the 
stands. What might have happened 
then: Dickov wins the ball, passing for 
an empty-net goal; Grobbelaar is booed, 
the public turns against him. But it 


didn't happen that way. Instead, the 
public feu in love with him all over 
again, for this week at least. 

In the 69th minute, Dickov was taking 
a penalty to equalize Jim Magilton's 
goal seven minutes earlier. The pressure 
should have been Grobbelaar’s, but 
such pressure reflects off of him like a 
bright smile. Dickov missed the penalty, 
and in injury time, teammate Stefan 
Schwarz missed an equalizing break- 
away. 

The 1,500 Arsenal fans held out fake 
money, specially minted for the day. 
Each bill depicted Grobbelaar and read 
“I promise to let in one goal in return for 
Fifty pounds. For the Governors of the 
Bank of Grobbland Bruce Grobbelaar, 
Chief match fixer." 

He laugbed and gave them the 
thumbs-up. They applauded in re- 
sponse. 

“Bruce thought it was fairy-tale day, 
with thing s happening to him that 
haven’t happened before." McMenemy 
said. “He said he didn't think there was 
any animosity toward him from any- 
where. He said be thought it was a good 
shout when the Arsenal supporters were 
saying, ‘Brucie, Brucie, give me a goal.’ 
One wallet was thrown out at him. He 
said he picked it up, but it was empty, so 
he threw it back.” 

At the end of the day he was hugged 
by his teammates as well as the opposing 
goalkeeper, David Seaman. The crowd 
stood around him, applauding, and he 
kissed the crest on his jersey. Still, the 
FA investigation might not be decided 
for another month. He made it through 
this day, but next Saturday at Crystal 
Palace brings another one. 


Hope Emerges 
In Labor Talks 

Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

BOSTON — Hope has replaced 
seven weeks of acrimony as negotia- 
tors in the National Hockey League's 
labor dispute scheduled another meet- 
ing Monday after wrapping up what 
Commissioner Gary Bettman called 
“a constructive day and a half of 
meetings." 

The sides met for seven hours 
Thursday and about three hours Fri- 
day. They were the first back to back 
meetings held since Oct 4-5. 

With time running out to save the 
season, both sides showed a new spirit 
of cooperation but were cautious 
about predicting a speedy end to the 
owners’ lockout. 

• Major league baseball’s negotia- 
tions were recessed amicably Satur- 
day, with Players Association officials 
still studying the taxation plan pre- 
sented by the team owners and trying 
to decide whether it leaves room for a 
counterproposal. 

The talks are scheduled to resume 
on Nov. 28, by which point the two 
sides will be running desperately short 
of time in which to reach a settlement 
before the owners plan to declare an 
impasse in negotiations and unilater- 
ally impose a cap on players’ salaries. 

“Hopefully well be able to make 
some derisions and come to a conclu- 
sion at the next meeting," the special 
mediator, William J. Usery, said fol- 
lowing Saturday’s two-hour session at 
a Dimes Airport hotel outride Wash- 
ington. 


Golf: Tide of Battle Turns 


Compiled by Oar Staff Fnxn Despatches PGA TOUT tOumaBOCT^ 

THOUSAND OAKS, Cali- exodus of ^ 
forma — Emissaries from the forex a change in that pocy 
opposing rides in professional "The orfamzerste re « 
golfslooming battle have met, pressed their 
bur, roodi like the conflict in flexible in thecr to 

the Balkans, it does not appear cfaem said.. ^Y« 
likely that there will be any win- have additional conversations, 
w He said a task force wouM 

“I can only hope, if we reach meet Tuesday wtih ori __ 


X uiuy uwus, Ji —J . f _ rnm- 

no common ground, Greg and organizers m search of * 
his organizers will look at what promise, althougb^aoco 
is good for the of golf," modaticm will be extremely an 


is good for the game of golf, 
PGA Tour C ommis sioner Tim 
Finch cm said after meeting 


plus events in Japan, Spain, 
Scotland and Canada. 


said finding room without con- ed the PGA Tour, which keeps 
flirts in 1996 would be diffi cult, us employed." 

He has said PGA Tour play- Norman said that he had “no 
ers would not be released for intention of locking horns with 
World Tour events that conflict the PGA. We are not trying to 
with PGA Tour and European undermine any other tour." 


ficult." j . _ 

One solution could be shov- 


with Greg Norman and other jng the World Tour events into 
organizers of the proposed November and December, 
World Golf Tour. when the PGA Tour season has 

“There’s room to do more aided, at least for 1995. ^ ^ 

talking," Norman said. “We “There is room for talking, 
had a good, communication Norman said in a U.S. televi- 
withFinchem last night so only si on interview. "We had good 
time will te£L” communication with Tim Fin- 

Fmchem met with 20 PGA dwm- Only time will teU, We re 
players late Friday here at the looking at everything. Anything 
Shark Shootout invitational is possible.” 
event then met with organizers Arnold Palmer, as well as 

of the World Tour. Fmchem, implored the top play- 

. The Tour’s proposed right- ers to stay with the PGA Tour, 
event schedule would have the told them to protect what 
world’s lop 30 players compel- they know," Palmer said. “I 
ing in four U.S. tournaments, think we wfll have a world tour, 
plus events in Japan, Spain, the first thing is to protect 
Scotland and Canada. what they have had for so many 

Finch em said it was unlikely years. I have been in meetings 
they could be fitted around like that four times in my ca- 
PGA tournaments in 1995, and reer. Each time, players protect- 


The reaction from US. play- 
os showed that to be the stick- v 
ing point . 

“I would love to playagmast ■/. 
Nick Price and, Ian WoosnamV. 
and Nick Faldo and-Sfare 
lesteros eveiy week,, bra 
not do it unless the PGAToucis 
involved and m a k e s it OJCJt?.! 
said Fred Couples, at presen&r; 
the top-ranked American; gOBecT/ . 

Couples said the 'concept ^, 
the woito Tour is “a good V 
thing. I just don’t quite scehow . ’ . 
it’s going to work J think Greg, . 
may have rushed into it, but Pin 
not going to say it's a bad idea." : . 

Brad Faxon, Couples's part- 
ner in the S3iaik Shootout and a 
member of the PGA Tour poli- 
cy board, said Norman imgh; 
have miscalculated the commit- 
ment of U.S. players to the 
World Tour when they held a • • 
meeting Wednesday afternoon. 

“Greg thought fee ‘had the 
support of all the players,” 
Faxon said. “He has the sup- u 
port of the players if he does it - 
by the rules of the PGA Tour." 

Faxon said he wasn’t sure 
Norman heard the part that be- ; . 
gan withif. . 

“I think he wanted the press - 
conference to look like this was 
coming oft,*' said Faxon, who: . 
praised Palmer’s commento (hat . 1 _ 
the PGA Tour had to be in- 
volved in the new tour. 

“When Arnold" Palhtor 
talked, people listened," Faxon 
said. “I don’t know if Greg real- 
ty did.” (AFP.AP.LAT) 


SCOREBOARD 


Top 25 College Results 

Km roe lop as foams fa The Associated 
Press' college football poll Hared Mils week: 

I, Nebraska (114) did not play, next: at Ohio* 
homo. Friday: X Penn Slate (104) beat North- 
western 45-17. Next: vs. MtcfJoan Stole. Satur- 
day ; % Florida 19-1) beat Vanderbilt 24-7. Nan : 
ct Hu. a Florida Slate. Saturday; 4. Alabama 
0 14) beet Na 6 Auburn 21-1 4 Nad: wFtorido 
at Anemia. Dec. 3; & Miami (9-1) beat Temple 
38-M. Next; vs. No. 17 Boston College. Saturday. 

& Auburn (9-1-11 lost to No. 4 Alabama 21 -14. 
Next: season complete: 7. Gafarada (KM; 
beat l awe Stale 41-20. Next: TBD: & Florida 
State 1 9-1) beat No. 25 North Carol tan State 34- 
1 Next: vs. No. 3 Florida. Saturday; 9. Texas 
A AM U 0-0-11 beat Texas Christian 34-T7. 
Next: season complete.; 10. Colorado State 
( 10-1) beat Fresno State 44-42. Next; vs. No. IS 
Michigan In the Halida v Bawl. Friday. Dec. 3D. 

II. Kansas Slate (0-2) beat Oklahoma State 
234, Next; vs. UNLV, Saturday; IX Oregon l* 
3) beat Oregon State 17-13. Next; vs. Perm 
State hi the Bose Bowl, Jon 2; 13. Soribern Cat 
(7-3) tost to UCLA 31-lf, Next: vs. Notre 
Dome; Saturday; 14. Virginia Tea (0-3) last 
to No. 16 Vlretoki 42-23. Next : TBD; lLMTchf- 
gon <7-4) last to onto State 2W. Next: vs. Na. 10 
Colorado State. In Holiday Bawl an Dec 30. 

16. Virginia ift-2) beat Na.14 Virginia tech 
42-23. Next: vs. No. 25 North Carolina State. 
Saturday; 17, Boston College (60-11 tost to 
west Virginia *1-20. Next: at No. 5 Miami, 
Saturday; 10, Washington 17-4) tost to Wash- 
ington Stole 23-d. Next: season complete: 19. 
Arizona f 7-3) did not play. Next: vs. Arizona 
State. Friday; 20. Brigham Young (M) lost to 
No. 21 Utah 34-31. Next; TBD. 

ZT.trtoh (9-2) bear Na.20 Brigham Young 34- 
31. Next; TBD; 22. Ohio State (M) beat Nn.15 
Michigan 22-6. Next: vs. TBD In the Citrus 
BowL Jan. 2; 23. Mbsisslnpl State (7-3) did not 
ptav. Next : at Mississippi, Saturday ; 24, Duke 
(Ml tost to North Carolina 4M0i Next: TBD; 
25 North Carolina Slate (7-3) tost to No. B 
Florida State 34-3. Next; at No. Id Virginia. 

Other Major College Scores 

EAST 

Brown 59. Columbia 27 
Buckneii 29. Ftxdhc n i 26 
Connecticut 21, Massachusetts 13 
Delaware 26. Rhode Island 7 
Holy Cross 27, Colgate 6 
Lafayette 54. Lehigh M 
Navy 29, Rice 17 


New Hamnshiix 52. Boston U. 51. OT 
Penn 1ft. Cornell u 
Pittsburgh 35, Rutgers 21 
Princeton 20, Dartmouth 13 
51. John's. NY 34. Wagner 14 
Syracuse 21, Maryland 16 
Towsan St. 42. (Morgan St. 7 
Yato 32. Harvard 13 

SOUTH 

Alcorn St 52. Jackson st. 34 
Cent. Florida 48. Buffalo 0 
Citadel 17, Georgia Southern 15 
Davtfeon 28. Scwcnee 14 
Delaware Sf. 3S Howard U. 24 
£. Kentucky 54. Manehead Si. 7 
E. Tennessee st 34. w. CaraHna 31 
East Carolina 30. Memphis 6 
LSU 49. Tut one 25 
Liberty 57. Charleston Southern 27 
McNeese SL 41. Nicnolls St. 24 
Middle Term 31, Tennessee Tech 3 
NE Louisiana 38. Norm Texas 20 
Northeastern 9, James Madison 6. OT 
5. Carolina St. 46. N. Carolina ALT 24 
SE Missouri 17, Tennessee Sf. 12 
SW Louisiana 17, W. Michigan 14 
SW Missouri SL 19, Jacksonville St. IS 
South Carolina 31 Cltmsan 7 
TentirMariln 27. Austin Peoy 21 
Tennessee 52, Kentucky 0 
Tik-Chattanoapa 34. Furman 20 
VMJ 26, Appalachian SI. 2X OT 
woke Forest 2a Georgia Tech 13 
William & Mart 21, Richmond 20 
MIDWEST 
Akron 24 Ohio U. TO 
Ball St. 34, Kent 0 
Cincinnati 2a Tulsa 13 
E. Ill loots 24, S. Illinois 3 
E. Michigan 4a Toledo 37 
Indiana 33. Purdue 29 
lawn 49. Minne so ta 42 
Kansas 3L Missouri 14 
N. Iowa 27, E- Washington 17 
Notre Dame 42. Air Force 30 
W. Illinois 73, Murray SL J7 
Wisconsin 19, Illinois 13 
Youngstown St. 14. Indiana St. 3 
SOUTHWEST 

Aia-Blr mlnynwi i 4a Prairie View A 
Louisiana Tech 2a Arkansas St. 14 
Sam Houston St. 34. SW Toxas SL 10 
Stephen F Austin 34, NW Louisiana 13 
Texas Southern 45. Lone 42 
Texas Tech 34, Houston 0 
FAR WEST 
Boise St. 27, Idaho 24 
Cat Pafy-SLO 35. S. Utah 21 
CaWomta 24, Stanford 23 
Idaho St. 29. Mlnn.-Ouluth 24 
(Montana 55, Momma st. 20 


New Mexico 25, Texas- El Peso 21 
Sacramento St. 23, C5 Noritridge 22 
San Jose SL 2& Pacific IS 
UNLV 32. Nevada 27 
Utah St. 47. New Mexico Si. 20 
Wyoming U Hawaii io 


NBA Standings 

eastern conference 
A lton lie Dhrtston 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Oriando 

5 2 

.714 

— 

New York 

S 3 

425 

V* 

Boston 

4 4 

500 

ns 

Washington 

4 4 

500 

Hz 

New Jersey 

3 6 

J33 

3 

Philadelphia 

3 6 

.333 

3 

Miami 

1 6 

Central DMMoa 

.143 

4 

Detroit 

5 3 

425 

— 

Indiana 

S 3 

425 

_ 

Cleveland 

4 3 

571 

to 

Milwaukee 

4 3 

571 

Vs 

Chicago 

5 4 

556 

VS 

Charlotte 

3 5 

575 

2 

Atlanta 

2 7 

522 

3Vi 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Houston 

9 Q 

LOW 

-— 

Denver 

5 3 

525 

3*s 

Dallas 

4 3 

571 

4 

San Antonia 

4 3 

571 

4 

Utah 

4 5 

544 

5 

Minnesota 

1 8 

Pacific Division 

.lit 


Golden State 

7 1 

575 

— 

Phoenix 

6 2 

.750 

1 

Seattle 

4 4 

500 

3 

Portland 

3 3 

500 

3 

Sacramento 

3 3 

5W 

3 

CA. Lakers 

4 S 

M4 

3V, 

LA Clippers 

0 8 

JMO 

7 

FRIDAY'S GAMES 


i-A. dippers 

12 23 26 

29-83 

Philadelphia 

34 19 12 

D— 77 


P : Weatnerspoon 8-173-5 19, Bradley 12-3) 441 
28; LA: Vaught 7-15 M 14, Detiere 3-7 5-7 IX 
RcBoands— Los Angeles 58 (VOugfif Mi, Phlta- 
detptiia61 (BrixSey 22). Assists— Los Angeles 
20 ( Richardson A). Philadelphia 16 (Bamis91. 
Mew jersey 25 27 30 If— 103 

Oriando 28 29 M 38—112 

NJ; Coleman 8-22 S4 22, KAnderson 6-12 1-1 
15; O: OWeal 9-154-4 32. N Anderson 8-18 7-9 21 
R e b ou nd s Ne w Jersey 50 / coierocn id), Or- 


Imdo 47 (N Anderson 12). Assists— New Jersey 
19 [KAnderson 7), Orlando 32 (Kirdanav 10). 
Boston 32 36 28 27—115 

Miami 38 27 29 25-111 

B: Radio 10-14 2-2 22. WUkVns 11-21 M 24. 
Brawn 8-15 4-4 22. M: Rice 8-14 14-15 3A Willis 
9-15 1-2 19. Rebounds— Boston 46 (Strang 12), 
Mlom(40 (Salley 7). Assttto-Bastan 24 (Wes- 
ley 10). Miami 28 (Catos 9). 

MftwaMee 22 72 2t If 4-9 7 

Atlanta 34 19 22 If 2-93 

M: Robinson 11-222-4 26, Day 7-106-821; A: 
Augmon 10-20 3-7 23. Lang 10-14 6-4 27. Re- 
bounds— Milwaukee 55 1 Baker 15), Atlanto 54 
(Lang, Blaylock ID). Assists — Milwaukee 14 
(Mavberrv ID). Atlanta 24 (Blaylock 12). 
Seattle *1 19 27 20-87 

Indiana 21 24 24 25—94 

S: Payton 1008 l-t 21,Schremef 4-125-7 18; 
l: Miller 7-16 4-4 22. tMcKev 5ft 1-2 11 Re- 
bounds— Seattle 54 (Schrvnwf It). Indiana 51 
(D.Dovis 9). Assists— Seattle 17 (Payton 4), 
Indiana 22 I Workman 5). 

Detroit 26 21 26 23— M 

Utah 32 31 35 23-121 

D: Hill Ml 4-4 16, Du mars M 3-5 13; U: 
Hamacek 9-11 2-2 2). Chambers 7-11 2-5 16. 
Rebounds— Detroit 51 (Miller, Leckner, Cur- 
lev 5), urm 56 ( Spencor 9 ). AssWs-Oetroill 7 
(Dawkins 5). Utah 30 (Slacklan 9). 

Portland 21 24 29 27—111 

Phoenix 35 B 36 3T—TM 

PO: C Robinson 10- 15 4-5 24. Williams 10-135- 
525; PH; Ma|erto7-13fr-ll 24, Aftamlng 10-176- 
7 26, Johnson 7*11 6-9 2D. Rebounds— Portland 
S3 (Williams IZJ. Phoenix 39 ( Klofhe. Schayes 
5). Assists— Portland 26 1 J.RoWnson 8), Phoe- 
nix 30 IKJohiuon 9). 

Cleveland 1* 12 2« 25— « 

UL Lakers 25 U 26 15—12 

C: Mitts 6-14 1-2 1A Wiliams M* 4ft 16; LA: 
Von Exei 9-16 0-3 22. Dhroc MB 0-2 16. He- 
baands — Cfovriand 42 fPfTff 121. Us Angeies 
50 (Ceballas 9). Asststs-Clevelimd 21 (Price 

8) , Las Angeles 25 (Von Exei 10). 

SATURDAY'S GAMES 
Boston 31 27 28 25-181 

Washington 28 21 29 24— 1D2‘ 

B: Radio 7-15 7-7 21, WWrins 8-22 5-7 21, Brown 
8-134-522: W: Duckworth 8-162-2 iBLChapman 7- 
17 2-3 19. Rebound s Eas ton 58 (Wilkins TU. 
Washington 64 (Howanl 1 1 ). Assists— Boston 20 
(Brawn S). Washington 17 (5Wtos 4). 
intflena 25 29 u 22-102 

Charlotte 38 21 14 25— B» 

I; McKay 7-9 4-5 19, Smlts M3 4-4 16; C: 
Johnson M9 1-2 17, Mourning 8-14 3-4 19. Re- 
tmmds-imSana 58 ( A.Dovls 14), Chcrtelte S3 
(Johnson 12). Assists— Indiana 26 (Jackson 

9) , Charlotte 25 (Bagues 12). 


San Antonia 

MiBHSSUto 


35 23 3) 18-189 
T9 28 26 36—181 


S: Robinson MO Ml 20, Person 9-14 W 23; 
M: Laettner 8-14 69 22. Marshall 5-19 5ft 17. 
Rebounds— San Antatrio 42 CRobfanon 10). 
Minnesota 52 (LaaNnw, Marshall 8). As- 
sists— San An tank) 301 Johraon 151, Minnesota 
26 (Elstoy, Jones 4). 

Seattle 32 30 27 33-728 

Milwaukee 26 23 27 28- 96 

S: Payton 8-15 9-112SL Perkins 7-104518; M: 
Robinson MS 2ft 17. Mayberry 7-15 4ft 22. 
Rebounds— Seattle 5D (Kempll).AAUwaukoe 


Arabella 

Grand Hotel 

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Speciality restaurants: 
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^ Fax: ++69 -29 81 810 J 


49 (Day m Asststo-Seattle 32 (Payton 71. 
Milwaukee u (Day, Mayberry 5). 

Atlanta 18 21 29 11—79 

New York 35 25 16 16—92 

A: SSmlth F125721, AugnxxiB-ZI 4ft 20; NY: 
CSmrtfr 7-a IB-10 SAHWBkxns 7-D 3-2 JA Re- 
bounds — AHartta 61 (Lmg OL New York St 
(Oakley 15). nntih Altana 17 (Aukhod 6), 
New York 25 (Ocfctoy, Smith. Starks 5). 
CMcogo X H » 19-ni 

DaDas 31 17 15 23— 85 

C: Pigpen 13-29 7ft 36, KukncAft 1-2 12; D: 
Jadam 7-11 4ft 18. Mashbum 5-15 5-9 14 l Rc- 
basads — Chicoga 59 (Pippen 14). Dados 50 
(Taratoy IO). AssWo-Oilcago 28 (Kukoc 5). 
DaDas 21 I Kidd 5). 

Houston 28 32 S 24—189 

Denver 26 30 26 19—1*1 

H: Olaluwan 11-24 4-5 to. CasseU 7-137-7 22; 
D: R-WIIItams 16-15 5ft 26. SlUh 9-17 6-7 35. 
AbdcrF Rauf 9-15 J-1 2L Rebounds— Houston 50 
(Otaiuwon 13). Denver 43 (R.Wimams91-As- 
sisfs— Houston 19 (Cassrii 9), Denver 22 (Abd- 
ul-Roal 5). 

Utah 21 B 36 33—115 

Goiden State 38 29 21 32-119 

U : Malone I2-23MI 32, Hornacek 9-145624 
Stockton 10-172-223; G: Hardaway M9 8ft 26, 
Sprewell 9-19 17-18 39. Pierce 5-M1 10-10 21. 
Rebounds— Utah 56 (Malone IDLGotaen State 
53 CSefkahr 13). Aaus— Utah 30 (Stockton 
157. Gotden State 31 iHanianor 8). 

Major College Scores 

Utah St. 97. Simon Fraser 67 
PRESEASON NIT 

Qaarterfloats 

Wash in gton 6Z Canisfua 57 
New Mexico 5L 86. Atobamo 69 
OMo U. 94 Virginia 83 
Atomphls 94 San Francisco 82 

-1'.'^ 

INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLY 
Trinidad and Tobago I, U-S- 0 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Monaco R Cannes 0 
Montpellier 0. Nice 0 
Mcrtipuex 1. Rennes D 
Salnt-Ettenne 1. ParivSG 3 
Bordeaux 1, Lille 0 
Le Havre 1, Caen 1 
Lera L Auxerre 1 
Sachoux 4 Metz 2 
Nantes R Bastto 0 
Strasbourg 1, Lyon 0 
Standings: Nantes 38 paints. PartySG 34 
CBnnes31, Lyon 30. Strasbourg 30- Bordeaux 


24 Lens 28. Auxerre 27, AAarttoues 27, Sh 
Etienne 23, Rtiwes 23, Monaco 22, Bastto 20. 
MetzJDi Le Havre 19, Lille l9,Sochoux 1 8. Caen 
17. Nice 15. Manlpdller 14 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
VOitodaQd 1. Barcelona 3 
Oviedo 2. Departtvo de La Corona 0 
Valencia L Real Madrid 2 
Compostela a Athletic de Bilbao 1 
Real Sadcdatf 2. Cdta 3 
Real Zaragoza L Atooceta 8 
Espanoi 1. Snorting Gilan 1 
Sevilla 1. Raring Santander 3 
Tenerife 1. Brils 4 
Atlrikco de Madrid X Logranes 0 
Standings: Zaragoza 17. Real Mack Id 14 
Barcelona 14 Deporftvo La Coruna 14 Brits )4 
Athletic de BDboo 14 Espanoi IX Celto IX 
Sevilla 1 x Valencia 1 X CBmpasteia 11, Tenerife 
1SL Sporting de GUan 14 Oviedo », Racing de 
Smdander 4 Afietico de MatrU 7. Real Sode- 
dad 7, Atoacete 7. VWtattofid 7, Logranes 4 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Coventry L Norwich 0 
Ipswich L Blackburn 3 
Manchester United X Crystal Pataca 0 
Natti iuj t Ku u Forest X Chelsea 1 
Queens Fork Rangers X Leeds 3 
Sheffield Wednesday t, west Haro 0 
Southampton 1, Arsenal 0 
Tottenham X Aston villa 4 
" Wim b ledon X Newcastle 2 
Leicester 0. Manchester City 1 
Standings: M a K h e s ter united 34 Btadd w n 
3X Newcastle 3X Liverpool 29. Natttngtxnn For- 
est 24 Leeds 36 Qietsea 2X Mandiester City 2X 
N o rw lch 21.5oulh un i i4 o n aB. Arsenal 19, Crystal 
Pataca 19, Coventry 19. Wimbledon 14 Totten- 
htsn 17, ShefMd wodnesdov 17. West Ham 17, 
Queens Paris Rangers 14 Aston VI Ha IX Ipswtdi 
TO. Leicester 9. Everion X 

GERMAN BUNDESLIGA 
FC Cologne 1, Hamburg SV 1 
Schalka 4 Dynamo Dresden 0 
FC Kaiserslmrfem 1, MSV Duisburg 0 
I860 Munich 1, Bayer Leverkusen 1 
Karlsruhe SC % Bayern Munich 2 
Bayer uerdlngen 1. Warder Bremen 3 
VtB Stuttgart 2. V!L Bochum 2 
Barvssia Dortmund t. SC Frribarg l 
Etotradit Frankfurt 1 Moenchengtodbach 1 
Stamflags: Borussia Dortmund 23. Warder 
Bremen 21, Moenchengtodbach IX FC Kai- 
sentaulern IX Hamburg SV 17, Bayer Lever- 
kusen 17, SC Freiburg 17, Bayern Munich 17, 
VfB Stuttgart 14 Karlsruhe SC 14 EtotrncW 
Franktwi 14 Schatkc IX FCCotogne 11, Bay- 
er Uerdlngen IX Dynamo Dresden X I860 Mu- 
nich 7, VfL Bochum 4 MSV Duisburg X 
DUTCH FIRST DIVI5IQN 
Willem It Ttlbunr 7, Dordreriif TO 0 


l le eranveen L Sparta Rotterdam 0 
vbhndam X PSV Eindhoven 0 
MW MaatrkM X Vitesse Arnhem 3 
Niimoeen X GA Eagles Deventer l 
FC Utrecht X Ajax Amsterdam 0 
FC Groningen X Redo JC Krrkrode 2 

Ttandlerr RodoJCKeriaade21,Aiax2XFC 
Twente Erachode M. Feyenoora 17. PSV E)nd- 
haven T7, Vitesse Arnhem IX Maastricht ix 
WfOsm It THbuni n Heenenvsen ?x FC Utrecht 
U.Spirta Rotterdam 11, Breda la NllmegenlX . 
FC Vatendom m FC Groningen X GA Etstes 
Deventer 7. Dordrecht 4 rkC WoaN«ilk 4 
ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Bart X C r e m ohese ft 
Brescia X AS Rama 0 
Gogflorl 1, Genoa 8 
Juvantus X Reggtana 1 
Lazio at Rome 5, Padova 1 
Nanotl X RorenMna 5 
AC Forma i Foggto ft 
Sompdarta 1, Torino 1 

Stawfiegs: Parma 23. Lazio 2L Floreiilliiu l/ 
21, Juvantus 20. Roma 17. Foggio 14 Bari uf/i 
Coo Hart 15. Sampdorla IX Internazianale IX 
AC Milan IX Torino 11. Genoa 11. Napod IX 
Cremonesef, Padova X Brescia X ReoalanaX 

i.' jaac- 

DUNLOP PHOENIX TOURNAMENT 

Final I aacBeg scores Sondby of the rain- 
i b teto n e d SU million Dentop Phoenix Golf 
Tourn am ent on the 4593-yard, par-72 Phoenix 
Country am coarse to MtytunU, Japan: 


Jumbo OzakL Japan 
Tom Watson, as. 

Scott HoCtV UJ5. 

Nobua Sertzawa. Japan 
Barry Lane. Britain 
Larry Mize. UJ5. 
Noomlchl OzakL Japan 
Isao Aak L Japan 
David Ithll, UA. 

Tam Lehmcn, UJL 


67- 69-65— 2B1 
66 ft8ft8— 202 
71-69-64 — 2W 

1 69-6469— 3M 

64-69-69— 2W 

68- 71-66— 2DS 
646469-205 
rtft74«-2W 
71 -6570-286 
68-71-68— 2B7 

- ••• 


INTERNATIONAL TESTS 
Dfahy Untan 
South Africa 34 Scotland 10 
Roeby League 
Australia 23. Great Britain * 
Australia wins series 2-1. 


Mia w west Indies. 3d Day 
Sunday, la Bombay 
West Indies 1st Innings: 243 (all out) 
India 2nd tanlnm: 287-8 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 






















U'-%-" V J|~~~ -*7 


lers Overcome Dolphins, 16-13, on Kick by Anderson in Overtime 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


Page 17 


y-r?Z 


- : -AvJ-T. 




Mike CfoB/lleaKn 

After a reception, Green Bay’s Robert Brooks was stopped by Mickey Washington of the BiHs on Sunday in Buffalo. 


The Associated Proa 

Gary Anderson’s 39-yard 
field goal with 4:41 left in over- 
time clinched the victory, after 
Mike Tomczak had awakened 
the Steelcrs’ slumping offense 
with 343 passing yards in his 
first start in 27 games as the 
Steelcrs beat Miami, 16-13, on 
Sunday in Pittsburgh. 

The overtime was the Sutl- 
ers’ third in four games. The 
Steelcrs (8-3) have won six of 
their last seven, two in OT. 

Barry Foster ended Pitts- 
burgh's streak of 13 consecutive 
quarters without an offensive 
touchdown with a go-ahead 10- 
yard run midway through the 
fourth quarter following Tome- 
zak’s 40-yard completion to Er- 
nie Mills. Tomczak was 26-for- 
42 for 343 yards and wasn’t 
intercepted. 

But the Suxleis’ 13-10 lead 
didn’t hold up. Dan Marino, a 
master of the late-game come- 
back. did it again by driving the 
Dolphins (7-4) from their 3 to 
Pete Stoyanovich’s game-tying 
48-yard field goal on the final 
play of regulation. 

Pittsburgh won the toss in 
overtime, but Foster, who had 
88 yards cm 31 carries playing 
full-time for the first time in six 
weeks, was stopped on fourth- 
and-1 at the Dolphins’ 39. 

Marino, who was 31-for-45 
for 312 yards, couldn’t turn the 
potentially pivotal play into 
any points, and Miami punted. 

Tomczak. replacing the in- 


jured Neil O’Donnell in his first 
start since an aborted one-half 
outing in the Steelers’ season- 
opening loss to San Francisco, 
then hit Foster for 27 yards and 
fullback John L. Williams for 
23. That setup the ninth game- 
winner of Anderson’s career. 

Chiefs 20, Browns 13: The 
undermanned Chiefs tightened 
two AFC races with their vic- 

NFL ROUNDUP 

tory over Cleveland in Kansas 
City, Missouri. 

Kimble Anders’s 1-yard 
plunge capped a 69-yard 
fourth-quarter drive and lifted 
Kansas City past Cleveland and 
within a game of first place in 
the AFC West The Browns (8- 
3) plunged into a tie with Pitts- 
burgh in the AFC Central. 

The B towns were driving zs 
the final minute when Derrick 
Thomas sacked Mark R- 
and stripped the balL 
was recovered by Pellom 
McDanidsoo the Chiefs* 48 and 
Kansas Gty ran out the dock 

The Chief s (7-4) were misting 
seven starters, including their 
best running back (Marcus Al- 
len), offensive lineman (John 
Alt), wide receiver (Willie Da- 
vis) defensive lineman (Ned 
Smith) and defensive back 
(Mark Collins). 

The Browns scored their first 
touchdown in Arrowhead Sta- 
dium in four games and took a 
13-10 lead late in the third peri- 


ew 


Alabama Stays Perfect, Ending Auburn Streak 



'-'•z 


to Pvmg 




N V, - ,’ =■ 
; : -.r 


The Assoaatcd Press 
Jay Barker looks down the 
road and realizes it could be a 
straight run to his dream. 

Alabama, getting two long 
touchdown passes from Barker, 
won a battle of imbeatens and 
kept alive its hopes for a nation- 
al title with &21-14 victory Sat- 
urday over Auburn in Bmnmg- 
ham, Alabama. 

*T feel like we’ve -got a 
chance,” said Barker, now 34-1- 
1 as a starter. “We’ve just got to 
k«ep winning games. We’ve 
been talking about it ever since 
September. Thaf s our goal.” 

Sherman Williams ran for 
164 yards and; a score; and 
No. 4 Alabama withstood a fu- 
rious rally by sixthrianied An- 
bom in a battle 'of /rivals. 


National Collegiate Athletic 
Association probation. 

Meanwhile, No. 12 Oregon 
earned its first trip to the Rose 
Bowl in 37 years. The Pao-10 
champion Ducks will play 
' No. 2 Penn State, the Big Ten 
champ, on New Year’s Day. 

The Ducks were one of sever- 
al teams that won bowl -game 
baths after play Saturday. Oth- 
ers were Kansas State in the 
Aloha Bowl, Oklahoma in the 
Copper, Wisconsin in the Hall 
of Fame, Illinois and East Car- 
olina in the liberty, Colorado 

^nu£GEmmmT 

State and Michigan in the Holi- 
day, Ohio State in the Gbus 
and UNLV in the Las Vegas, 
.... where as the Big, West c hamp i- 
With twomorcvictonesv Ate-*.: oait will face the MAC champi- 
bama could win the nat ional on. Central Michigan. 


came a slow start and ripped 
Temple in Philadelphia. The 
victory clinched the Big East 
Conference title for the Hurri- 
canes. 

No. 7 Colorado 41, Iowa 
State 20: Coach Bill McCartney 
wnnmwwwi his resignation after 
the Buffaloes beat the visiting 
Cyclones. 

Rashaan ran for 2S9 

yards and two touchdowns. 


the nation’s leading 


iv Exitfe 


V- <! 


titles. 

Alabama plays No. 3 Florida 
in the Southeastern Conference 
championship game Dec. 3, 
with the winner gang to the 
Sugar Bowl and the loser to the 
Citrus. . 

“We’re going to have to for- 
get about Auburn,” said Wil- 
liams, who had a 13-yard fim- 
quarter TD run among his 27 
carries. “We’re going to have to 
prepare for Florida just a little 
hazder than we prepared for 
Auburn.” 

The loss ended Auburn’s 21- 
game unbeaten streak and was 

the first for Terry Bowden is his 

two seasons as coach. 

Auburn, which trailed 21-0 at 
halftime, got back in the game 
on a pair of 1-yard sneaks by 
quarterback Patrick Nix. But a 
final drive ended when. Frank 
Sanders was stopped inches 
short on a fourth-down recep- 
tion with 31 seconds left. 

It was- the last game of the 
season for Auburn, which can 
not go to a bowl because of 



No, 2 Fen State 45, North- 
western 17: In State College, 
Penn State con- 
four turnovers into 28 
and got three touch- 
bom Ki-Jana Carter, 
who rushed for 107 yards. Safe- 
ty Kim Herring returned a fum- 
ble 80 yards fin a touchdown 
and intercepted a pass on 
Northwestern's first two pos- 
sessions. 

By halftime, Penn State led 
38-3, even though Northwest- 
ern outgamed the Nittany li- 
ons by 65 yards mid controlled 
the ball for all but 5*4 minutes. 


rusher and scorer, became the 
fourth player in NCAA. Divi- 
sion I-A history to run for 2,000 
yards in a season. 

McCartney, who produced a 
national champ ioosnip in 1990, 
plans to make whatever bowl 
Colorado visits his final game. 
The winnmgest coach in Colo- 
rado history with a 92-55-5 re- 
cord, he guided the Buffaloes to 
a 10-1 record this season, with a 
lone loss to No. 1 Nebraska. 

No. 8 Florida State 34, No. 25 

N. Candma State 3: In Raleigh, 
North Carolina, Florida State 
used two touchdowns by Rode 
Preston to better its fifetnne At- 
lantic Coast Conference made 
to 244). 

- Danny Kanell threw two 
touchdown passes for the Senn- 
noles. Injuries took a heavy toll, 
however, with at least nine 
Florida State players forced out 
of the game — including two 
with tom knee ligaments and 
another with a broken leg. Four 
are out for the rest erf the 


No. 3 Florida 24, Vanderbilt 
7: Freshman Fred Taylor 
rushed for 140 yards and two soil 

^ “ Na 9 Texas A&M 34, Texas 


TDs in Florida’s victory m 
NashviDe, Tennessee. Danny 
Wuerffd was sacked four times 
and the Gators bad their lowest 
point production this season. 

No. 5 Miami 38, Temple 14: 
James Stewart, Alfred Shipman 
ynrt Larry Jones combined for 
234 rushing yards and four 
touchdowns as Miami over- 


Qnistian 17: In College Sta- 
tion, Texas, Leeland McEkoy 
scored two TDs and Texas 
A&M beat Texas Christian for 
the 22d straight time. A fumble 
recovery by Michael Hendricks 


bation and ineligible for post- 
season play. 

No. 10 Colorado State 44, 
Fresno State 42: In Fresno, 
California, E. J. Watson ran for 
three touchdowns as Colorado 
State, down by 21 points early, 
clinched the Western Athletic 
Conference title and a Holiday 
Bond berth. 

Watson, questionable for the 
game because of a sprained an- 
kle, ran 2, 24 and 22 yards for 
touchdowns for the Rams, who 
won their first title since joining 
tfaeWACm 1968. 

No. 11 Kansas State 23, 
Oklahoma State <fc In a driving 
rain in Manhattan, Kansas, 
Leon Edwards scored two 
touchdowns for Kansas State, 
which finished at 8-2 for its best 
Big Fight record in 24 years. 
The Cowboys failed to win in 
tiie conference for the second 
straight year. 

No, 12 Oregon 17, Oregon 
State 13: In Corvallis, Oregon, 
Danny O’Neil threw his second 
touchdown pass to Dmo Fhi- 
lyaw on a screen {day with 3:43 
to play, sending Oregon to the 
Rose Bowl for the first time 
since the 1957 season. 

With its sixth straight vic- 
tory, Oregon won the confer- 
ence title outright for the first 
time. The Ducks .won nine 
games in a season for the first 
time since 1948. 

UCLA 31, No. 13 Southern 
Cal 19: In Pasadena, California, 
Wayne Cook ran for one touch- 
down and threw for two in the 
second half as the Brains rallied 
to beat the Trojans for the 
fourth straight time. The Bruins 
bad not previously won four in 
a row in the 64-game series. 

Rob Johnson, who complet- 
ed his last 15 passes for USC 
against Arizona on Nov. 12, hit 




Bri gham Young’s Steve Young 
and Iowa’s Grade Long. 

No. 16 Virginia 42, No. 14 
Virginia Tech 23: Virginia’s Ra- 
fael Garda set a school record 
with five field goals. The Cava- 
liers had five interceptions and 
recovered three of four fumbles 
by Tech. Garda hit from 28, 43, 
37, 50 and 22 yards as Virginia 
snapped the Hokies’ 21-game 
home winning streak. 

Wa sh ing to n Stale 23, No. 18 
Washington 6: In Pullman, 
Washington, Derek Sparks 
scored two touchdowns, and 
Kevin Hicks ran for one as 
Washington State won at icy 
Mar tin Stadium. 

Washington State finished 
fourth in the conference and 
waited to hear if it would be 
invited by the bowl coalition to 
either the Freedom or Alamo 
BowL Washington is on proba- 
tion and ineligible for postsea- 
son play. 

No. 22 Ohio State 22, No. 15 
Michigan 6: Ohio State scored 
10 fourth-quarter points in Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. Marion Keener 
blocked a field goal and Luke 
Fickefl tipped and then inter- 
cepted a pass to set uqp the rally 
as the Buckeyes beat Michi g a n 
for the first time since 1987. 

West Virginia 21, No. 17 Bos- 
ton College 2th West Virginia 
sacked Boston College's Mark 
HartseD six tunes and edged the 
visiting Eagles. Matt Taffoni’s 
tackle on fourth-and-1 halted a 
final BC drive at the West Vir- 
ginia 35 as the Mountaineers 
won for the fifth time in six 
games. 

No. 21 Utah 34, No. 20 BYU 
31: In Salt Lake Gty, Mike Mc- 
Coy threw for four touchdowns, 
including a 20-yarder to Charlie 
Brown with 5o seconds left. 

Utah lost a shot at the Holi- 
day Bowl when Colorado State 
won. The loss by BYU ruined a 


lifting Alcorn, 
McNair Goes 
Out With Flair 

The Associated Press 

JACKSON, Mississippi 
— Steve McNair, playing 
in his final regular-season 
college game, passed for 
533 yards and five touch- 
downs Saturday as Alcorn 
State beat Jackson State, 
52-34, and may have 
wrapped up a Division I- 
AA playoff berth. 

McNair, the NCAA all- 
divisions career leader in 
total offense, had 564 total 
yards. It was the fifth game 
this season in which he had 
more than 500 yards, a Di- 
vision I-AA record. 

McNair, who completed 
29 of 54 passes, threw for 
three touchdowns and 
Cherone Harness ran for 
two in the first half as Al- 
corn built a 35-28 lead. 

McNair, who has 16,823 
career total yards, ended the 
regular season 303-of-524 



TDs and 17 
dons. He also had 936 1 
rushing and trin e TDs. 


by the quarterback 
John Walsh, who was 29-of-46 
for 324 yards and four touch- 
downs. 

North Carolina 41, No. 24 
Drike 40: Mike Thomas com- 
bined with Octavus Barnes on a 
71-yard scoring play with 2:01 
left as North CaroKna stunned 
Duke in D urham, North Caro- 
lina. The loss was devastating 
for the Blue Devils, who seemed 
to have the game won after 
Spence J’isdier — 33 of 57 for 
395 yards — hit Carey Thomas 
with two scoring passes in a 4%- 
ndnnte span late in the fourth 
quarter. 


od on Rypien’s 15-yard pass to 
Michael Jackson. 

Lin Elliott's 28-yard field 
goal tied it at 13 just 53 seconds 
into the fourth period. Then, 
with rookie running backs Don- 
nell Bennett and Greg HOI sup- 
plying most of the muscle on a 
rainy day when quarterbacks 
had trouble gripping the ball, 
the Chiefs swept 69 yards in 
nine plays. 

Patriots 23, Chargers 17: 
Marion Butts trampled his for- 
ma San Diego teammates in his 
best game of a disappointing 
season as New England upset its 
second straight division leader. 

Butts, the second leading 
rusher in Chargers history, ran 
for a season-high 88 yards and 
one touchdown on 28 carries 
against the NFL’s third-best 
run defease Foxboro, Massa- 
chuessetts. Butts was obtained 
in a draft-day trade to add 
er and consistency to the 
England attack. 

The Chargors cut the lead to 

23- 17 with 55 seconds left on 
Stan Humphries’s 2-yard pass 
to Tony Martin, ending a 92- 
yard drive. But New England’s 
Kevin Turner fell on John Car- 
ney’s onside kick. 

The Patriots (5-6) won their 
second straight game in a four- 
game stretch against divirion 
leaders. They beat Minnesota 
last Sunday. 

The Chargers (8-3) are 2-3 
since opening with six victories. 
They still lead the AFC West 

Cowboys 31, Redskins 7: 
Quarterback Troy Aikman, 
playing with a sore passing 
thumb and a broken nose, went 
down with a sprained knee in 
the victory over Washington in 
Irving, Texas. His questionable 
status puts a severe strain on a 
team trying to win a record 
third consecutive Soper BowL 

If Aikman’ s injury wasn’t 
bad enough, backup Rodney 
Peete sprained the thumb on his 
passing hand and was replaced 
by third-stringer Jason Garrett 

Peete responded with a 
touchdown pass and Emmitt 
Smith ran for a two TDs as 
Dallas (9-2), smarting from a 
21-14 loss to San Francisco last 
week, notched its 13th consecu- 
tive NFC East victory. Smith 
rushed for 85 yards and went 
over 1,000 for the fourth con- 
secutive season. He has 1,074. 

Aikman was hurt in the sec- 
ond quarter when he was tack- 
led around the knees by line- 
backer Ken Harvey. 

After the injury, Peete threw 
a 15-yard touchdown pass to 
Alvin Harper to give Dallas a 

24- 7 halftime lead. Kevin Wil- 
liams then dashed 83 yards on a 
punt return for a TD as Wash- 
ington’s record dipped to 2-9. 

Peete jammed his thumb in 
the third period when hit by 
defensive end Dexter Nottage- 
Peete could barely giro the ball 
after the injury, but X-rays of 
the thumb were negative. 

Bears 20, Lions 10: The Bears 
took control of the clock and 
wouldn’t let it go, holding more 
than a 28-minute advantage in 
time of possession to beat Barry 
Sanders and Detroit in Chicago 
for their thud straight victory. 

The Bears, using foot passes 
and tire running of Lewis Till- 
man, ran twice as many plays — 
76-36 — and had tbs ball for 44 
minutes and 12 seconds to 
15:48 for foe Uons. 

Sanders, coming off a career- 
best, 237-yard effort against 
Tampa Bay last week, was held 


to 42 yards on just 11 carries, 
his second-lowest output of the 
season. The Vikings had limited 
him to 16 yards on 12 carries in 
foe second week of foe season. 

Steve Walsh, now 6-0 as a 
starter, led three time-consum- 
ing scoring drives and threw a 
30-yard TD pass to Jeff Graham 
with 12:50 left as the Bears (7-4) 
matched tbdr victory total of 
last season. Detroit fell to 5-6. 

With foe game tied at 10 at 
foe half, the Bears used 1 1 :54 of 
the third quarter on a 20-play, 
71-yard drive that stalled at the 
Lions 6. Kevin Butler then 
kicked a 23-yard field goal fora 
13-10 lead. 

Chicago used some trickery 
the second straight game as 
John Mangum fell on Chris Gar- 
dodo’s onside kick at the Chica- 
go 42. Six plays later, Walsh hit 
Graham behind foe secondary 
to put the Bears up 20-10. 

BiBs 29, Packers 20: In Or- 
chard Park, New York, Jim Kel- 
ly and Andre Reed connected 
for two touchdowns and 191 
yards to beat Green Bay and 
revive the Bills’ playoff hopes. 

Buffalo (6-5) snapped a two- 
game losing streak and sent foe 
Packers (6-5) to their first loss in 
four games. 

Reed had a team record 15 
catches and a career best in yard- 
age. Kelly’s total of 365 yards 
was his best in 2 Yt years and the 
foarth-best of his career. 

Kdly hit Reed for 15- and 10- 
yard touchdowns in the first half 
as foe Bills moved out to a 24-0 
lead. Brett Favre and Sterling 
Sharpe connected for two touch- 
downs and Edgar Bennett 
caught another as Green Bay 
made it 27-20, bat the Packers 
failed in three attempts to dose 
the gap further. 

Cobs 17, Bengals 13: Don 
Majkowski, playing with a tom 
ligament in the thumb of his 
pausing hand, threw an 8-yard 
TD pass to Sean Dawkins with 
1 :54 left to give Indianapolis the 
victory in GncinnaiL 

The Colts (5-6) took away Jeff 
Blake’s deep passing and Ray 
Buchanan intercepted him in the 
end zone with 45 seoonds left to 
seal their fifth victory at River- 
front in six years. 

Blake, playing on a bruised 
left ankle, was 21-of-37 for 207 
yards, by far bis least-productive 
game in four starts for foe Ben- 
gals (2-9). But it had appeared he 
would keep their momentum 
rolling when he led them on a 
nearly nine-minute drive in the 
third quarter that culminated 
with a 15-yard touchdown pass 
to Damay Scott and a 13-7 lead. 

Dean Biasucd kicked a 35- 
yard field goal with 6:3 1 left, and 
the Colts sacked Blake and 
forced a punt. Majkowski, who 
injured the thamn two weeks 
ago, came back on and threw his 


He completed three straight, 
including a 24-yard er to Daw- 
kins, to get into scoring range, 
then read the Bengals’ coverage 
correctly for the winning play. 
Dawkins ran a (pride slant in 
front of Mike Bum, slid to his 
left knee as he caught Majkows- 
kfs ti ght spiral, then got up and 
stepped into the end zone. 

The B eng als had one mom 
clumcc behind Hake, who hit 
passes of 19 and 13 yards to lead 
them from their 31 to the Colts’ 
37. He then went to the pass that 
has made his reputation — the 
long lob to Scott. But it was 
underthrown and Buchanan 
jumped in front of Scott for his 
third interception. 


CROSSWORD 


..nr* 


ACROSS 

1 Hatreras. 

N.C. 

5 Clearheaded 


to Egyptian 
cobras 
i« Mimics 
IS Video arcade 
name 


-4 


TWA 

TheraoricmnfortablewaytoDy. 1 




TTE A GUEST FOR FREE! 
LL TWA FOR DETAILS 


16 Turn ofjftquefy 

17 SCRAM 

19 Antitoxins 

20 Football's 

Bowl 

21 Safety org. 

22 Current, as 
accounts 

24 Russian 
grassland 
as Black Sea 

resort 

*a Actors Silver 
and Howard 
go Illegal trader 
$3 Words 

preceding war 
or God 

as Young 'uns - 

38 Half of MCII 

39 SPLIT 

43 Indiana Jones's 
quest 

44 Franchise 

45 Vertical 

46 Made tea 
4» Crimson and 

carmine 
si Adulates 
53 standards ol 
perfection 
57 Plant pests 

a* Italian wine 

district 
«i Hawaiian 
garland 
82 Cut in a skirt 
«3 BEAT IT 
aa The Mikado's 
Lord High 
Execution**' 
er Papal vestment 
ea One of the 
Bront&s 

as Suffix with road 
or hip 

70 Opera voice 
ti MissTruehoan 
ol »t» miwc* 


DOWN 

1 Summer 
getaways 

2 “You'll always 

be of me" 

3 Tea type 

4 Language 
ending 

s Yankee pitcher 
. Don 

OGreat Salt Lake 
stare 

7 Chocolate bean 
a Get on one's 
nerves 
g Allocate 
10 SL Francis's 
home 

11 VAMOOSE 
» Llama land . - 
is Barter 
isFInish. 
aaDofr 
25 Egg on 
27 Mental - 
confusion 
2 a Took deliberate 
steps 

31 Grammy- 
winning 
Fitzgerald 

32 Peril 

3 s Discoverers' 
cries 

34 "Dead ’ 

(Dick Francis 
novBl) 

asSKJDDOO 

37 HaB-of-Famer 

Mel 

40 Went too far 

41 firman-— 
(fish dish) 

42 dixit 

47 Film cutter 
4 t Pea holder 
so One ol two 

52 Guy with a tail 
34 -Home * 



Debut ol New Bullets 
Spoiled by Celts’ Brown 


The Associated Press 

The Washington Bullets 
didn’t win their first game with 
Chris Webber andJuwan How- 

tbe National BastostbaB Associ- 
ation a bmt of thing s to come. 

Dee Brown crashed Webber’s 
coming-out party with the Bul- 
lets, scoring 22 points and foe 
gam e- winning free throws with 

NBAHH^BUGETTS 


igiv 

102 ’ 


Puzzta by MermanS. 


55 Shows partiality 
■8 Allies (with) 

57 Proposes 
88 Scheme 
■a Normandy 
invasion town, 
1944 

•< Dander 
SsTefl (on) 


York Times/ Edited by Will ShtxXz. 


Sola Don to Pride of Nov. 18 

mm 


HOBO S0CJ03 
OB0B BBC3G10 naan 
□BBBQEimsiiEaiBaaa 
□□saa osa annaa 
0BS CJ0B 
Haanaamaaaiaaaa 
man 0QCJSBO aaaa 
D 0 QHQ □□□ aaaaa 
□oaa Banana ana 

BOB BatDBBBn oasis 

aaa aaa 
dqdqd bob ataman 
□aaBBnaaaBciaBBa 
□□□□ QQEBB Gf 
□BOB □□□-!□ at 


ton Celtics a 103-102 victory on 
Saturday in Landover, Mary- 
land. 

Webber, obtained Thursday 
in a trade with Golden State, 
had nine pants and mire re- 
bounds in his Bullets’ debut. 
Howard, malting his NBA de- 
but, chipped in with 10 points 
and a team-high 1 1 rebounds in 

22 trmnitwt 

Webber had four blocked 
foots, bat missed 9 of 13 shots, 
including a tip-in that would 
have riven Washington a 3- 
point lead with 20 seconds left 

Dock Strong made a layup 
to put Boston op by a point, 
and Calbert Cbcancy’s jumper 
gave Washington the leadwifo 
three seconds to go. Rex 
man then fooled Brown, 
made foe free throws. 


Webber catered to a standing 
ovation with 2:30 to go in the 
first period. He got his fust re- 
bound a minute later, and his 
initial basket on a reverse layup 
with 9:41 remaining in the hair. 

The NBA rookie of the year 
last season, he played 23 min- 
utes despite never having prac- 
ticed with Ms new teammates. 

“3 think it worked pretty 
wdV* be said- s just going to 
take a few days to get it down.” 

Howard, who ended his hold- 
out hours before foe Webber 
trade, entered with 4:21 left in 
the first quarter. His first shot 
was blocked by Dino Radja. 

“Tliat let me know what level 
I was at,” Howard said. 

Howard missed his first five 
shots before seating on a hook 
in the lane in the opening min- 
ute of the second quarter. 

Radja and WHlrrm each bad 

21 points for foe Celtics, who 
have won three straight and four 
erf five after opening the season 
with three straight losses. 

Warriors 119, Jazz 11% La- 
trefl Sprewell scored a season- 
high 39 pants, making 17 of 18 
free throws, as Golden State 
beat visiting Utah for its sev- 
enth victory in right games. 

Tom Gugliotta, acquired 
from Washington along with 
three first-round {ricks in ex- 



Gctis Ncwtmdtartm 

Chris Webber failed to Eft tbe BidJets in his first game. 


change for Webber, was greeted 
by a standing ovation and 
“Welcome Tom” signs. He got 
into foul trouble early and had 
just 3 pants and five rebounds 
in 21 minutes. 

Rockets 189, Nuggets 101: In 
Denver, Hakeem Olajuwon 
scored 26 pants and Sam Cas- 
sell canoe off the bench for a 
season- high 22 as Houston re- 
mained unbeaten. 

It was the sixth straight road 
victory and nin th overall for the 
Midwest Division leaders and 
defending NBA champions. 


Royal Ascot, 
The Derby 

and other major race meetings. 
Enjoy the day in (be comfort 
of a private box overlooking 
the course and win rung post. 

For farther druSs <w 

Charterhouse Mercantile 
Leisure 

TcL: UK (44) 628 669900 
Fax: UK (44) 628 663309 


e 5 


- i 



j 




Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1994 


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Justice Scalia v. Merriam- Webster 


By William Satire 

W ASHINGTON —In a 1924 dissent, Justice 
Louis D. Brandeis wrote: “Modification 
implies growth. It is the life <rf the law.* 1 The law 
got pretty lively recently on the meaning of the 
word modify. 

Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's 
conservative dynamo and frequent dissenter, 
found hims elf writing the majority's decision in 
the case of MCI v. AT&T. This case hinged on 
the reach of die Federal Communications Com- 
mission's power to “modify any requirement** in 
a section of the law. MCI argued that this meant 
the FCC could make basic changes in that sec- 
tion, which it had made over AT&T's objections. 

“We disagree,” Scalia wrote for the court. 
“The word ‘modify’ — like a number of other 
Fn giish words employing the root ‘mod-’ (deriv- 
ing from the Latin word for 'measure'), such as 
‘moderate,’ ‘modulate,’ ’modest,’ and ‘modicum’ 
— has a connotation of increment or limitation.” 

Having plunged into the language dodge (I 
would have used the past participle, derived, 
rather than the present participle, deriving, in his 
parenthetical etymology). Scalia cited several 
dictionaries in support of bis definition, includ- 
ing the 1 976 edition of Merriam- Webster’s Third 
New International Dictionary, the Unabridged: 
“to make minor changes in the form or structure 
of: alter without transforming.” 

But the petitioning MCI had found one sense 
for modify among the seven variations in mean- 
ing listed in Webster's Third Unabridged (simi- 
larly set forth in its current abridgment, Mer- 
ri am- Webster’s 10th Collegiate): “to make a 
basic or important change in.” Quite a stretch of 
meaning, but in a previous court case involving 
railroads in which the verb required was seen to 
have “alternative dictionary definitions.” the 
court had allowed the broader interpretation; on 
that analogy of a loose required, MCI argued for 
the stretched sense or modify. 

a 

Scalia wasn’t having any of thaL He refused to 
accept an ambiguity created by a single dictio- 
nary “which not only supplements the meaning 
contained in all other dictionaries, but contra- 
dicts one of the meanings contained in virtually 
all other dictionaries.” (1 think he means merely 
rather than only. ) “When the word ‘modify’ has 
come to mean both ‘to change in some respects’ 
and ‘to change fundamentally,' ” he thunders, “it 
will in fact mean neither of those things. It will 
simply mean ‘to change,’ and some adverb will 
have to be called into service to indicate the great 
or small degree of the change.” 

Having delivered himself of the opinion that 
modify “connotes moderate change ” the jurist 


went on to opine acidly that “it might be unsur- 
prising to discover a 1972 White House press 
release saying that ‘the administration is modify- 
ing its position with regard to prosecution of the 
war in Vietnam’ — but only because press agents 
tend to impart what is nowadays tailed ‘spin.* 
Such intentional distortions, or simply careless 
or ignorant misuse, must have formed the basis 
for the usage that Webster’s Third, and Web- 
ster’s Third alone, reported.” 

Accordingly, I contacted Merriam- Webster’s 
editor in chief, Frederick C. Mish. 

“I regret having to say that Judge Scalia is in 
error on this matter,” responded the lexicogra- 
pher, on whom the judicial assault has not had a 
dulling effect, “but at least he has the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that his error is not reversible by 
a higher court." 

The problem is that sense 4b of the Third 
Unabridged — “to make a basic or important 
change in: alter” — seems to contradict 4a, which 
is “to make minor changes in the form or structure 
of.” Come on, Fred — bow can it mean both? 

“In lexicography, as in biological taxonomy." 
explains Mish, “there are splitters and there are 
lumpers. The editor who worked on modify for 
the Third was evidently a splitter, who came 
upon the work of an earlier lumper and thought 
it would be useful if we acknowledged explicitly 
that when one speaks of modifying something, 
the changes involved are not always minor. Most 
often they are, of course, as is recognized in sense 
4a, but sometimes not” 


Were the users of the contradictory sense cited 
by the dictionary a bunch of kooks and language 
slobs? “One of the authors quoted is T.S. Eliot, a 
Nobel laureate in literature,” notes Mish. “An- 
other is Edward Sapir, a distinguished and influ- 
ential scholar in linguistics.” “If Justice Scalia 
wants to call tins ‘careless or ignorant misuse,' ” 
ripostes Mish, “well, it’s a free country ” 

So who’s right? 

I think the dictionary’s splitter went a hair too 
far. In the citation of Edward Sapir, the linguist’s 
use of profoundly to modify modify indicates his 
understanding of the meaning of that verb to be 
“change,” neither major nor minor. That is nei- 
ther the historical nor the common meaning; in 
fact, the fuzziness of that usage created the need 
for an adverb — profoundly — just as Scalia 
predicted would happen if the meaning got mud- 
dled. A dictionary is duty-bound to report what’s 
out there, but need not report every misuse as a 
possible sense. Modify means “minor change,” as 
in “ modified limited hangout," a Watergate 
phrase that got no credit for its correctness. 

New York Times Service 


Some Tender Thoughts From David Mamet 


By Bruce Weber 

New York Times Service 

L OWER CABOT, Vermont — You may not 
think of David Mamet, the prolific author of 
angrified and angrifying plays and films, as an 
insecure fellow. But there was a day not so long ago. 
he says, that in an agonizing fit of self-doubt, he 
sought out his wife, Rebecca Pidgeon, an actress and 
singer, and in a sort of desperate way, proclaimed his 
consuming love for her. What, he asked, could have 
persuaded her to marry hin^ save him from himself, 
miserable wretch that he obviously was? 

“She looked at me,” Mamet says, shifting his 
mimicry from his own earnest pleading to his wife's 
deadpan. “And she said, ‘Weu, I don’t know, you 
seemed like a nice guy.' ” 

It’s a funny story for Mamet to tell on himself, a 
twihldy-eyed acknowledgment of his reputation as 
difficult, thorny and impatient. But then, you might 
not think of Mamet, a native Chicagoan, as a home- 
body either, or as a lover of quietude, isolation and 
coziness. 

And that’s what comes across here. The center of 
his universe is a lonely hilltop farmhouse that he 
shares with Pidgeon, n is wife of three years, and 
their tiny daughter, Clara, who was bom on Sept. 29. 

TTie house, his home for the past 15 years, is in a 
rugged part of the state known as the Northeast 
Kingdom, with woods and steeply rolling fields out 
back and a graveyard next door. Behind the bouse 
and then behind the cabin Mamet writes in, it seems 
like wilderness. 

“A lot of people have come to visit over the years.” 
he says. “And I’ve always thought that anybody who 
didn’t love the place had to rethink things-” 

The disparity between the tumult in his work and 
the serenity in his backyard is remarkable, fn his 
plays, notably “American Buffalo,” “Speed the 
Plow” and the Pulitzer Prize-winning “Glengarry 
Glen Ross,” he has made art out of bruising obloquy 
and the viciousness of male-on-male competition. 

More recently, in “Oleanna," his celebrated and 
much debated two-character drama about a power 
struggle between a male college professor and his 
female student, Mamet has solidified his image as a 
man who writes out of a particularly chauvinistic 
brand of male rage. His own screen adaptation of 
the inflammatory .play has just been released. 
(Though faithful to the stage work, its flame, at least 
from the standpoint of most reviewers, has cooled.) 

Bearded, square-jawed and built like a chopping 
block, he sports close-cropped hair that looks as if he 
could slice you up with it. He isn't a belligerent man. 
however. He's rather solicitous, in fact, though he 
does have a mischievous, contrarian streak. In con- 
versation with a reporter, he’s not averse to using the 
kind of language that will stir up the same kind of 
tempest his abrasive writing often does. 

“Every time you direct something, you have to 
direct what you're given,” he says of his work on the 



David Mamet in his cabin, where he writes with a m a nu a l typewriter. 


Paul 0. Boisvert Tor The Nr» York Tin*, 


“Oleanna” film. “The most important thing is to 
make it work according to the quiddities of the 
mf-dbim I had this play, and I wanted to rape it into 
a movie.” 

His work has been labeled misogynistic. In 
“Oleanna,” he has been accused of loading the deck 
against Carol, the student, making her overly objec- 
tionable, even villainous when she concocts a rape 
charge against the professor. Mamet politely sug- 
gests that people have a right to their opinions. But 
he defends the battle of the sexes in his play as a fair 
fight. 

“The fact that the fellow was a professor is not 
proof against him becoming a brute,” he says. “The 
fact that this other person is a woman is not proof 
against her making a false accusation. The play is 
not a candy gram. It’s not a melodrama which awa- 
kens feelings of pity for the person with whom we 
identify, and fear of the person with whom we don't. 
It’s tragedy.” 

Mamet, who will be 47 at the end of the month, 
has taught acting at the Yale Drama School New 
York University and elsewhere, and he still regularly 
lectures to classes at the Atlantic Theater Co. in New 
York, a company he founded, with William H. Macy 
and Gregory Mosher, in the mid- 1 980s as a summer 
workshop in Vermont for his NYU students. 

And though be says his experience as a student at 
the mercy of incompetent and in timi dating peda- 
gogues informs “Oleanna” more than his experience 


as a teacher, his own style in the classroom is known 
to be astringent and demanding. ■ • • .'7 
“As Aristotle told us as to tragedy," he says r “at 
the climax of the play the hero is going to undergo a 
reversal of situation. So that when hehits herat the 
end of the play, everything she's been salting about - 
him becomes true. And he's transformed in his own 9 
eyes, and the eyes of the world, from someone who J * 
had power, who had prestige, who bad a great 
opinion of himself, into a person whose Ere is 
ruined, who has no power, no prestige and has a 
dreadful opinion of himself. And it's his own fault,” ' 
Even in the face of an exegesis so inteflectuaBy - 
exact, it's hard to resist a Philistine question. Are we 
supposed to like these people? Do you like than? 

“You know, my rabbi said something very inter- ■ • 
esting to me,” Mamet says. “When I returned : to. 
Judaism, he said to me. ‘You know, it’s rabbinical ■ 
wisdom there’s nobody in the Torah you’d want 
your children to be like.' ” 

Mamet has written in essays about his childhood 
in Chicago, and spoken about it in the past, describ- 
ing a household in which, particularly after his 
parents divorced and his mother remarried, perpetu- 
al tension often exploded into rage. 

“I may be making this up.” he says now. begin- 
ning a serious point and then deflecting it “But I 
think most writers tend to write about their youth. 

Or as they say in ‘My Cousin Vinny,’ their ‘yute.’ 1 
think that’s the best movie ever made, don’t you?" 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 


High 

Low 

W 

High 

Low 

W 


OF 

OF 


C/F 

CJF 


Algarve 

25/71 

13/65 

a 

22,71 

14 67 


Amsterdam 

14 *7 

6-43 

pc 

1365 

B/46 


Arhara 

10-50 

6/43 

r 

10. -50 

5.54 


Alftons 

16-61 

10.50 

pc 

1661 

U/52 

• 

Barcriona 

21/70 

17/53 

9 

21/70 

13/55 


Briyado 

15753 

409 

c 

11/52 

4/39 


Bcrtn 

7/44 

1/34 


10/50 

3/37 


Bnosefc. 

16/61 

7/44 

» 

14/57 

8/48 



9/46 

3/37 

C 

9/48 

4.39 



7/44 

3/37 

9 

9/41* 

6/43 


Crate CM Sol 

23/73 

13/55 

9 

22/71 

14/57 


Dublin 

13/55 

8/46 

98 

13/55 

8/46 


EtMwgh 

10.-50 

8/48 

c 

11/52 

8/46 


Florence 

16/61 

9/48 

9 

15(59 

9/48 

a 

FranMyrt 

14/57 

2/35 


1365 

4<39 


Oravn 

14/57 

6/43 


13/55 

7/44 


H** 

3/37 

am 

sb 

4/39 

205 


Utettixd 

14(57 

9/48 

eh 

12,53 

6/43 

» 

Los FUmxi 

28/B2 

10«4 


28/82 

21/70 


Inbcn 

19166 

1263 


19/66 

13/55 


London 

14/57 

7/44 

pc 

1467 

8/46 DC 

Mjrfnd 

21-70 

9/48 


20 /W 

9«e 


tQan 

14(57 

7/44 


1365 

B/46 


Mttcovf 

1.-34 

-2 <29 


002 

-3/27 


Minch 

12/53 

3G7 


13Z5E 

4/39 


Mca 

21/79 

10(50 


19/66 

1263 


Oslo 

3/37 

1/34 

sb 

6/43 

3/37 


Palma 

20/68 

1467 


19.66 

14/57 


Parts 

18/64 

7/44 


19/66 

B/46 


Piagun 

8/46 

205 


9/48 

4/39 


5/41 

2/35 


3/37 

002 


Rome 

23/73 

9/48 


22/71 



51 Pnonbuig 

1/34 

-1/31 


3/37 

-1/31 


Stnr*ti<*n 

4/39 

1/34 


7/44 

307 


Strasbourg 

15/59 

4739 

pc 

13/55 

7/44 


TalSm 

3/37 

104 

oh 

4/33 

3/37 

cn 

Vena* 

16*61 

8/« 


1569 

9/4B 


Vmni 

S/48 

3/37 

PC 

9/40 

4/39 


Wm» 

7/44 

1/34 


7/44 

307 


Zwdi 

11/52 

4/39 

pc 

12/53 

6/43 

3 

Oceania 

Auckland 

20/68 

1263 

ah 

1864 

12/53 

oh 

Sydnay 

23/73 

1661 

PC 

24/75 

1081 

s 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



stream 

North America 

Cold weather wil settle over 
the eastern U.S.A. and 
Canada Tuesday. The 
seaboard win be wndy with 
a shower Midweek will be 
dry. Flurries will dust the 
Great Lake region; also 
snow m Hie snowbelts. Dry 
weather will predommale in 
the southern U S.A. to Cali- 
fornia 


Europe 

South of [he North and Baftic 
seas most of Europe will 
have unusually seilled 
weather kilo midweek. Thick 
fog wfl shroud some rfsricts 
such as northern Italy and 
eastern France. Sun will 
wanm western Mediter- 
ranean shores. Northern 
Europe wiH turn windy with 
showers by early Thursday. 


Asia 

Cool, mostly rain-tree weath- 
er wW hold in southwestern 
Japan. Korea and much of 
China. Locally, thick log wilt 
shroud the mornings. Some 
ram wtl wel Tokyo; snow wfl 
whiten Japan's far north. 
South China wil have warm 
sun; thunderstorms will 
douse Malaysia and Singa- 
pore. 


Asia 


Today 




High 

Low 

W 

Mgh 

Lore W 


C/F 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Bangtail. 

31/88 

23/73 

3h 

30/86 

23.73 sh 


B/46 

6/43 

rii 

9/48 

3137 sh 

Hong Kong 

23/73 

19/ea 

c 

23/73 

19/68 ah 

Mnria 

xm 

23/73 


31 m 

23/73 pe 

Mm OH 

27/80 

1365 


28/82 

10.50 s 

Seoul 

9/48 

-irai 


10/50 

2/35 9 

Shanchar 

14/57 

10/50 

c 

1467 

8/48 sh 

Singapore 

30.BB 

72/71 

sh 

29 /W 

23/73 I 

Tot* 

23/73 

17*2 

9h 

23/73 

17*2 sh 

Tokyo 

14/57 

7/44 

c 

13*5 

6/43 ah 

Africa 

Algan 

21/70 

1S«1 


21/70 

18*1 3 

Cape Town 

186 4 

11*2 


19*8 

15*9 • 

Casablanca 

24/75 

12*3 

s 

23/73 

13 /55 s 

Harare 

1661 

10*0 

1 

20*8 

7/44 sh 

Lagoa 

31/88 

24/75 

PC 

31*6 

25/77 sh 

Naacbi 

21/70 

1162 

PC 22/71 

13/55 1 

Tuns 

2060 

12*3 

pc 

21/TO 

13*5 S 

North America 

Anchorage 

-9/18 

.17/2 

an 

■11/13 

■17/2 pc 

Mania 

19/66 

B/48 

ah 

14/57 

0132 a 


At Salvation Army, Few Takers for QE2’s Tawdry Castoffs 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Bmkm 

Chicago 

Denver 

Dcwrt 

Honolulu 


Today 

High Low W Mgh Law W 

OF C/F OF OF 

21.70 1 6/BI pc 21/70 15158 sfl 

21/70 11(52 pc 19/66 14*7 ah 

1B/64 7/44 pc IBS* 6/48 pc 

17*2 10S0 pc 17*2 12*3 pc 

26/79 6/41 a S3' 73 SMS a 

29/W IB AW pc 3046 17*2 8 


BMU 

Cairo 

Damascus 


Riyadh 


Today 

High Low 
OF OF 
BuenoxMras 2 B/B 2 TB *1 9 
Caracas 28/B2 21/70 pc 
Una 22/71 17/62 pc 

MrtcoUy IW/7B 7/44 pc 
RoAnJamto 24/75 19*6 c 
Santiago 23/M 1305 s 


W High 


Low W 

OF OF 
27/80 16/61 3 
28/84 20ZBB pc 
23/73 17*2 pc 
23/73 6/46 pc 

26/7B 1906 pc 
27/80 1306 a 


Los Angrira 
Man 


9M6 jh 12/SI -1/31 pc 

-7/50 c 4/» -5/54 pc 

-9/16 pc 7/44 -6/16 8 

002 «h 3/37 -40 pc 

22/71 pc 29/84 32/71 pc 

6/43 s 1609 3/37 pc 

6M3 9 24/75 0/46 pc 

10/64 *h 29/84 22/71 pc 

■14/7 at 104 -6/18 8 

-1/31 ah a/43 -3/27 c 


1102 
8/48 
2/35 
1305 
78/85 
24/75 
2008 
29/84 
■1/31 

9/48 

27/BO 23/73 sti 79/84 23/73 pc 
1407 1203 ah 1407 1/34 pc 


Legend: s-su/my. pc-panv etouJy. c-doufy. sh-showos. Mfutferaunni, r-raln. st-snow Huntes. 
sn-wmw. Wco. w-WaaDxr AI map*. ftorec ws M md data provided by Acco-WcMher, Inc. <3 1994 


5mFm 

SaSlIfl 

Tcrarto 


21770 

1305 

6/43 

1203 

1601 


7/44 ■ ssn\ 8/48 a 

SM3 pc 1601 7/44 pc 

1/34 PC 0M6 307 ah 

3/37 sh 7M4 -2/29 

1102 » 1305 -1/31 pc 


By Mitchell Owens 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — When more than 1J00 
pieces of furniture that once graced 
the Queen Elizabeth 2 luxury liner docked 
at local Salvation Army thrift stores last 
week, the waiting crowds got a royal disap- 
pointment. 

“To be honest, I was expecting a lot 
better than what I see,” said Kevin Madi- 
son, a Salvation Army district supervisor. 
He was filling in for the absent manager of 
Store No. 5. at 268 West 96th Sl “The 
phone’s been ringing off the hook,” added 
Madison, somewhat incredulously. “I 
mean, nothing’s wrong with the stuff, but I 
do wonder wnat all the fuss is about.” 

What’s happening is that Canard Lines 
is redecorating the QE2. its 963-foot (295- 
meter) flagship. After carrying hundreds 
of thousands of passengers over 27 years, 
the ship needs a facelift The $45 million 
renovation got under way this weekend in 
Hamburg. 

“We needed to make a dean sweep,” 
said Michael Smith, the business group 


manager for the QE2. “Individual rooms 
had been redone over the years, but there 
was no coherent design anymore. The re- 
design will make it flow in one piece.” 

At the Salvation Army warehouse at 536 
West 46th Sl, 60 or so shoppers had 
trooped in one morning last week to see 
the ship’s offerings. 

“Boy. were they let down,” said a Salva- 
tion Army salesman. The QE2’s castoffs 
bravely sported bright yellow and red “Su- 
per Value” tags, but by closing time, the 
salesman said, only four cocoa-brown leath- 
er armchairs had been sold. Each cost $55. 

Though the furnishings’ arrival set off a 
minor frenzy among nostalgia buffs, the 
actual goods were far from ideal. Except 
for some weighty reproductions of Mies 
van der Rohe’s iconic Brno chair of 1929, 
few of the myriad decommissioned chairs 
and tables lived up to the hype. 

The colors ranged from gaudy to gro-, 
tesque, the styles from Late Disco to Early 
Trader Vic’s. Removed from seven heavily 
used public rooms, some of the furniture 


dates from the ship’s first year in service, 
some from as late as 1987. 

There were chairs in grape-colorrf 
leatherette. Chairs with lime-green tweea 
Painted wicker chairs upholstered in stiff 
cotton printed with impressionistic daubi 
of teal, rose and purple. Plywood-lopped 
rattan caf6 tables equipped with holes /or 
umbrellas (not included). Prices range 
from $49.99 for a single chair to $299.99 
for a round wicker table with four chairs. 

Marion Muldoon, who had sailed on 
the ship in 1968, said she thought she 
would go “for old times’ sake.” The sight 
of a row of battered and stained mauve 
velour-and-chrome armchairs that looked 
like rejects from a regional convention 
hall, however, made her wince. “There’s 
not a thing here that would remind me of 
the ship,” Muldoon said. 

Actually, there wouldn’t be. Muldoon’s 
ship was the first Queen Eliza beth, which 
was retired in October 1968, after 30 years 
of active duty (it was destroyed by arson in 
1972). The QE2, its successor, was built in 
1967 and made its maiden voyage in 1969. 



ASIA /PACIFIC 

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CHINA, PRC*** . 

. . . 10811 

HUSSIATf MOSCOW] . . 1 56-6342 

BULGARIA. 

...00-1600-0010 

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.1-009-500-000 

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CYPRUS' 

. .060-90010 

BOLIVIA' ... 

.. 0-800-1112 

VENEZUELA*.. .. 

.. . .30-011-120 

none KONG 

809-1111 

SAIPAN 1 

235-2372 

CROATIA?* 

.. .8*39-0011 

nsur* 

172-M1 1 

ROMANIA ... . 

. . 01-800-4208 

EGYPT' (CAIRO)' 

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