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Reralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Monday, November 28, 1994 



No. 34.757 


Pentagon Holds No Hope 
Of Reversing Serb Gains 


n3u Agnwc Francc-Picoe 

A Bosnian government soldier in Sarajevo sprinting to escape Serbian sniper fire, while in Bthac the Serbs dosed in. 

Europe’s Menacing New Divisions 


UN Turns Down 
Last-Ditch Strike 

By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 

ZAGREB, Croatia — The UN Protec- 
tion Force in the former Yugoslavia has 
rejected a NATO request to destroy Serbi- 
an anti-aircraft missile sites around the 
besieged Bihac “safe area" in what one 
military official desorbed Sunday as “the 
last NATO bid for an air strike in B ihac 
and possibly in Bosnia as well.” 

Western military officials said the Unit- 
ed Nations mission in Zagreb bad rebuffed 
the NATO request Saturday to hit approx- 
imately six surface-to-air missile sites in 
both northwestern Bosnia and Serbian- 
held territory in neighboring Croatia. 

“We won't be able to do anything to 
protect the people in Bihac unless we re- 
move that problem,” a Western official 
said: “But we can’t get approval.” 

The air strike would have been the most 
militarily significant NATO action in Bos- 
nia’s war and come at a time erf growing 
differences between NATO members, spe- 
cifically the United States on one side and 
Britain and France on the other, about 
what to do in Bosnia. (Page 6) 

UN sources said it was rejected because 
of fears that the Bosnian and Croatian 
Serbs, who have launched a concerted and 
coordinated assault on the Bihac enclave, 
would respond by killing peacekeepers. 
Serbian forces in eastern Bosnia detained 
150 more UN soldiers Sunday, mostly 
British and Dutch troops, to bring their 
hostage total to about 400. UN officials 
said 

Sources added that UN officials also 
turned down the request because erf negoti- 
ations about a cease-fire around the Bihac 
“safe area.” 

Late Sunday, the Bosnian government 
accepted the deal, which would force Mus- 
lim troops to abandon the area for other, 
more dangerous parts of the Bihac pocket 
in exchange for a commitment by UN 
forces to protect the area and the 70.000 
mostly Muslim civilians trapped inside. 

For their part, the Serbs, who had npt 
yet responded to the plan, would be forced 
to withdraw from the safe zone, although 
they currently hold one-third of it. 



Under the cease-fire deal, the Bosnian 
Serbs would effectively obtain what their 
Ieader, Radovan Karadzic, has said he 
wants: the neutralization of the Bosnian 
Army's 5th Cmps as a fighting force. How- 
ever, the Serbs would not gain control of a 
rail link that runs through Bihac town and 
that could connect the Serbian-held city of 
Banja Luka in Bosnia with Knin, the bead- 
quarters of the Croatian Serbs. 

UN officials have said one reason why 
the Serbs have pressed their offensive into 
the safe area is to grab the railroad, which 
See BIHAC Page 6 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Tones Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
Five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, 
Checkpoint Charlie has moved 600 miles 
southeast to a bridge over the Miljacka 
River in Sarajevo, where coils of barbed 
wire and occasional tearful family re- 
unions testify to the new divisions of Eu- 
rope. 

Here at the bridge,. Benjamin Hanrido- 
vic, a Bosnian Muslim, stands guard. He 
ga ze* out, past the wire and the French 
UN soldiers in their blue helmets, to the 
far side, held and guarded by Bosnian 


Serbs. It is very dose, the other bank, but 
eerily distant — another land in a severed 
city. 

.The division at this bridge is new but no 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

less treacherous than the old one between 
Cold War ideologies. 

Mr. Hamidovic is one of the myriad 
people who have already fallen victim to 
the ethnic and religious conflicts that 
lurked beneath the damp of communism 
and have since erupted, revealing the fra- 
gility of the societies and borders once 
behind the Iron Curtain. 


As yet, the West has found no coherent 
response to these conflicts: indeed, the 
United States and Western Europe have 
been divided by them. Their failure to 
work together to end the Bosnian war 
suggests that the security of Europe, now 
lacking effective guarantees, will be uncer- 
tain for many years. 

Economic progress and political open- 
ing were supposed to follow communism 
in Eastern Europe. They were the logical 
consequence of what the West saw as its 
victory over totalitarianism. 

Instead, the Caucasus has erupted, and 

See DIVISIONS, Page 6 


A Cultural Revolution: Sex Talk in China 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Times Service 

BEUING — A sexual revolution of 
sorts is under way in China, not because 
the world’s largest population has just dis- 
covered sex but because it is discovering 
how to talk about it 
In newspaper columns, on radio talk 
shows and over dinner, the Chinese are 
^ discussing sex, how to enjoy it and how to 
vdeal with its consequences more than at 
any time in this century. _ 

And what they are discovering is that 
even though millions of Chinese have al- 
ready thrown off the sexual constraints of 


the orthodox Communist era, China is still 
struggling against huge pockets of igno- 
rance as it tnes to normalize the rale of sex 
in society. 

Some Chinese “are still very shy about 
sex,” said Wen Jingfang, the proprietor of 
Beijing’s only shop for sexual aids, called 
the Adam and Eve Health Care Center. 

“With so much shyness, scientific 
knowledge about sex cannot spread wide- 
ly,” he added. 

The Chinese couple that everyone seems 
to be talking about this fall may be most 
famous not for what they did but for what 
they failed to do during more than a year 


of marriage: have sex. Their story has been 
publicized on the front pages of official 
newspapers and has been tittered about on 
late-night radio shows. 

The official Legal Daily, which reported 
their amorous ineptitude this year, spared 
them the mortification of public identifica- 
tion. But their loss of face occurred when 
the newspaper reported that after months 
of tiying to conceive a child, the couple 
sought the advice of a doctor, who discov- 
ered that the wife had remained a virgin. 

Both highly educated university lectur- 
See CHINA, Page 6 


Gaza Police and Militants 
Maintain a Fragile Peace 


By Barton Gellman 

Washington Post Service 

GAZA — Ten days after what Gazans 
are calling Bloody Friday, when Pales- 
tinian police turned their guns on Islamic 
militants, Yasser Arafat's self-rule au- 
thority and its religious foes are strug- 
gling to pull back from the brink of open 
war. 

A brittle accord averted a reprise at a 
large Islamic rally on Saturday of the 
Nov. 18 bloodshed, in which at least 12 
died and more than 100 were wounded. 
This time, the police steered clear as a 
crowd of more than 10,000 demonstra- 
tors burned an Israeli flag and pledged to 
wage a holy war against Israel. 

Bui the effort by the militants to turn 
their fight with Mr. Arafat, chairman of 
the Palestine Liberation Organization, 
toward Israel bears the seeds of renewed 
fighting among Palestinians as welL 

Emad Faluji, a leader of the Islamic 
Resistance Movement, or Hamas, said' 
that his organization would no longer 
refrain from attacking Israeli soldiers 
and settlers in the Gaza Strip. 


That threat, which resulted in a series 
of small strikes last week, undercuts a 
central basis for detente with Mr. Ara- 
fat’s self-rule authority. The PLO chair- 
man is required by his peace agreement 
with Israel to stop such attacks in his 
jurisdiction, and Prime Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin intends to hold him to his word. 

“Any act against settlers is a wrong 
act, for the simple reason that there is a 
peace agreement, which we have to re- 
spect,” the Palestinian police chief, 
Ghazi Jabali, said on Saturday. 

“The country is open for them to do 
whatever they want" he added, referring 
to the militants. “Why do they insist on 
doing it here? The heroic acts are not 
here, they are somewhere else, and they 
know that" 

Although the self-rule authority and 
the I slami c fimriamentaliR t-g have issued 
ritual calls for unity, their mutual con- 
tempt is manifest 

Mr. Faluji and other Hamas leaders 
now openly call Mr. Arafat a stooge of 
Israel, a provocation they used to leave 

See GAZA, Page 6 


A Laborious Florida Flighl 
(And a Boy Named Dulles) 


By Stephen C. Fehr 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — When he grows up. 
Matthew Dulles de Bara will regale his 
friends with the story of why his middle 
name is the same as an airport in Virginia 
and why his birth certificate says *n 
flight” for the place of his birth. 

Here’s what he will teU them: 

Matthew’s parents and 3-yearK)ld sister 
boarded TWA Flight 26.5mNewYo r km 
Wednesday, bound for Orlando, Florida, 
on an L-iOl I packed with 213 passengers. 

Theresa de Bara, nearly sewn months 
pregnant, had woken that morning with 
painthat she first thought was indigestion. 
She had called her doctor as a precaution, 
and he had assured her that the pam was 


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probably false labor and that it was all 
right to make the trip. 

But as the plane climbed to its cruising 
altitude of 30,000 feet, the pain increased 
Seated next to Theresa toward the rear of 
the plane was her husband, Santiago. 

“The pain just got worse,” Mr. de Bara 
said over the weekend at the Virginia hos- 
pital where Matthew was in .critical but 
stable condition. “She was holding onto 
my hand and sticking her nails into me.” 

About a half-hour into the flight, the de 
Baras told a flight attendant they needed 
help. Mrs. de Bara was bent over in pais, 
ana contractions had started. 

Steven M. Rjachlin was sitting with his 
family when a flight attendant got on the 
public-address system and asked for a doc- 
tor. Dr. Rachlin, a Long Island internist, 
once delivered a baby — 13 years ago. 

“Here I was on a vacation to relax,” he 
said, “and then I was on an airplane being 
asked to deliver a baby. I was in an altered 
slate.” 

Dr. Rachlin examined Mrs. de Bara, 
now stretched out across five seats. He, 
too, thought that her pains were false la- 
bor. But the contractions grew more fre- 

See A BOY!, Page 6 


Kiosk 


Norway Voting 
On Joining EU 

OSLO (Reuters ) — Norwegians be- 
gan voting an Sunday on whether their 
country should join the European Union 
in a two-day referendum that has turned 
into a cliffhan ger. 

Pollsters agreed that the outcome was 
an open question because the pro-EU 
lobby had rallied in the last week, under- 
mining the comfortable lead held for 
months by the anti-EU camp. 

Voting was taking place Sunday in 220 
of the country’s 435 communities. It will 
spread to all communities on Monday, 
and the result mil be known late Mon- 
day or, if the race is very dose, early 
Tuesday. The referendum is nonbinding, 
but the Labor Party government has said 
it will accept the outcome even if it is 
“no.” The anti-EU opposition, however, 
has threatened to block ratification of a 
narrow ‘’yes” vote in Parliament 


Books 

Bridge 

CrussMwd 

Weather 


Page 7. 
Page 7. 
Page 19. 
Page 20. 



Rcvwn 


A pony in Oslo firmly In the “yes” camp on Sunday as Norwegians began 
voting in a two-day referendum on whether to join die European Union. 


Diplomacy Fails , 
Perry Concedes 

By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The United States 
on Sunday offered its most pessimistic 
assessment to date of the conflict in Bos- 
nia, with Defense Secretary William J. Per- 
ry declaring that diplomacy had failed, 
that Muslim forces cannot recapture lost 
territory and that NATO air strikes will 
not influence the battle for the UN -desig- 
nated safe area of Bihac. 

The secretary offered no new options for 
ending the fighting in Bosnia and said that 
a force of 2,000 U.S. Marines ordered to 
stand by on three ships off the coast of 
Bosnia had been dispatched strictly for 
rescue operations. 

U.S. policy, Mr. Perry said in a broad- 
cast interview, would focus on preventing 
any spread of the conflict beyond the bor- 
ders of Bonsia-Herzegovina, though he de- 
clined to say where any “line in the sand" 
might be drawn. 

He conceded that diplomacy by the five- 
nation “contact group" composed of the 
United States, Russia, Germany, France 
and Britain “has not succeeded in stopping 
the war.” 

Assessing the ground combat in and 
around the Muslim enclave of Bihac, Mr. 
Perry noted that the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization would only order fighter- 
bombers to attack if requested by the Unit- 
ed Nations. Without UN orders, he said. 
NATO is “powerless” to influence events. 

“Even if they were to ask for air strikes.” 
he stressed, “the air strikes cannot deter- 
mine the outcome of the ground combat. 
They can punish the Serbs, but they cannot 
determine the outcome of the ground com- 
baL” 

It seems, he added, that the Serbs "have 
demonstrated military superiority on the 
ground.” 

Mr. Perry said there was no plan to send 
more U.S. ground forces to the region, 
because it would take hundreds of thou- 
sands of troops, accompanied fc> he.sv : 
weapons, to affect the outcome :f th'.- 
fighting in Bosnia. Ami he concluded ihc; 
there was “no prospect” of Muslim forces 
winning back any of the roughly 70 per- 
cent of Bosnian temiorv controlled by 
Serbian fighters. 

The Pentagon announced on Friday that 
2,000 Marines would be stationed off the 
Bonian coast “to support UN, NATO and 
U.S. military personnel in rhe area.” Mr. 
Perry suggested on Sunday that a primary' 
role for the Marines would be to rescue any 
pilots whose aircraft are shot down. 

Meanwhile, Senator Bob Dole signaled 
Sunday that Republicans may step up 
their pressure on the administration of 
President Bill Clinton when Congress 
changes in January from Democratic to 
Republican control. 

Mr. Dole, leader of the Republicans in 

See WAR, Page 6 


Third Reich 
Deserters Want 
Names Geared 

By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Past Service 

BERLIN — More than a half-century 
ago. Seaman Ludwig Baumann tried to run 
from the war he had grown to detest. He 
has been running ever since. 

Arrested in civilian clothes on June 3, 
1942, when he tried to slip out of occupied 
France, the German sailor was court-mar- 
tialed for desertion and condemned to exe- 
cution by firing squad. Mr. Baumann's, 
death sentence was eventually commuted 
to a long prison term, and he spent the rest 
of World War II in a German penal camp 
before being liberated by Soviet troops. 

Although Mr. Baumann survived Nan 
justice, the war pursues him to this day: in 
the anonymous letters accusing him of 
cowardice; in the German legal system, 
which still considers him a convicted felon; 
in the recurrent nightmares of being led in 
shackles by his executioners. 

Now 72 and living in Bremen, Mr. Bau- 
mann has devoted the final years of his life 
to battling what he — and a growing num- 
ber of Gorman historians and politicians 
— see as the unfair stigma attached to 
those who rqected Hitler’s war by fleeing. 

Of some 22,500 German soldiers sen- 
tenced to death for desertion, approxi- 
mately 15,000 were shot or guillotined. 
More than 5,000 others were condemned 
for “defeatism” or “subversion of national 
defense,” offenses that included denounc- 
ing Hitler or criticizing the war. Of those 
who escaped execution, all but a few hun- 
dred died in prison or in the five decades 
since the war ended. 

In an emotional debate that is pan of a 
broader anguish over why so few Germans 
resisted Hitler's Third Reich, the Bonn 
Parliament failed to find common ground 
this fall in re-evaluating the legal status of 
deserters. Mr. Baumann and his support- 
ers want a general annulment of sentences 
by Nazi nmitaiy courts. They also want 
formal government recognition that such 
punishments were unjust because they 

See DESERTERS, Page 2 


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INTEHNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUTE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994. 


**. 



Q&A: A Man of Both Sides on Germany’s Internal Frictions 


H inrich Lehmann-Grube, a former 
deputy mayor in Hannover, moved to 
Leipzig right after the fail of the Berlin 
Wall and was elected mayor of the 
East German city in 1990. He spoke 
about his political experiences, the 
pace of reunification and friction be- 
tween Eastern and Western Germany 
in an interview in Leipzig with Bran- 
don Mitchener of the International 
Herald Tribune. 


we mobilized all the nation's re- 
sources. Now we have the duty to 
mobilize our national resources for a 
peaceful purpose, not for a stupid 
war, and Bonn has been acting as if 
this were a minor oil crisis. 

The political class in Western Ger- 
many completely missed the dimen- 
sion. Some have only begun to see it, 


MONDAY Q&A 


ates, are beginning to establish them- 
selves. 

Tm optimistic there will be a rea- 
sonable balance in another 10 to IS 
years. It may be that we are so inte- 
grated into the world economy by 
then that we fall prey to international 
economic cycles, but I don't expect 
the current boom to fail. I expect 
industrial production to kick in and 
keep it going. 


just unified, we were one. It wasn't 


until the following years that people 

.Fortv- 


Q. Leipzig is the fastest-growing 
town in Eastern Germany. There are 
construction cranes everywhere. But 
the initial flood of contracts is al- 
ready beginning to dry up. Could the 
boom go bust? 


A. I’m not an economist, but I’ve 
learned to mistrust forecasts. Every- 
thing the learned economists said m 
1 990 was rubbish. I always said unifi- 
cation would take a long time and be 
immensely difficult — a national 
challenge that is only comparable 
with the wars we fought here. Then, 


and many still don’t see it for what it 
is. But some have begun to under- 
stand. It took Chancellor Kohl two 
or three years to catch on. But I don’t 
think you can compare this boom 
with a normal economic cycle. It's 
something completely different 
I don't deny we still have big prob- 
lems, but I'm happy for every con- 
struction site. We can try to restore 
equilibrium by establishing the pre- 
requisites for industrial production. 
Things are beginning to move. Here 
and there, small and medium-sized 
companies, sometimes spin-offs 
from the big, old state conglomer- 


Q. A Dresden court recently sen- 
tenced a West German to pay a fine 
for calling an East German a "stupid 
Ossi,” effectively declaring the sec- 
ond word, which everyone uses, a 
four-letter word. Are East Gomans 
fed up at being patronized by “Wes- 
as”? 

A. I use both words with abandon 
and don't think it's worth making a 
big deal out of. There are raw nerves 
and tension, but I remind people 
constantly that Prussia and Bavaria 
also experienced years of tension. 
When Germany unified there was a 
lot of euphoria. We said we're not 


realized how different we are. Forty- 
five years of the German Democratic 
Republic left a mark. But the Ossis 
wanted unification, which I always 
emphasize. Now they are always 
adapting, and that makes them tired. 
If you have a brother who always acts 
superior, you get tension in even the 
best families. 

Q. Nevertheless, there is a certain 
bitterness in the air. Many East Ger- 
mans complain that unification has 
been a one-way street. What aspects 
of the East German experience 
would you like to see transplanted in 
the West? 

A. It is very difficult to transfer 
experiences, but the people in East- 
ern Germany have had to adapt 
quickly. People knew things couldn’t 
remain the same and are extremely 
w illing to change. Fd like to recom- 
mend that to the West 


Q. Many Ossis reseat the fact that 
Wessis like yourself control so many 


offices in the region. When will Ossis 
be ready to assume responsibility? 

A. In unification — which was 
really an annexation — the people of 
the German Democratic Republic 
threw all their institutions an the 
rubbish heap of history. Few realized 
what they were doing. We’re now 
experiencing the natural, unavoid- 
able consequences. A lot of Wessis 
were tactless in the beginning. That's 
regrettable. 

But when everything here began to 
follow a different drumbeat, a lot of 
Ossis couldn't march in step. For 
many offices, the only qualified can- 
didates came from the West- I tried 
to fill every office I could with local 
people — the head of my personnel 
department is a mathematician, one 
of my deputies is a physicist. But the 
head of my economics office is a 
Wessi because he had to do things no 
Ossi knew how to do. I see myself as 
someone who was needed as an am- 
bassador to the West to sow under- 
standing for what’s happening here. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Saddam Takes Over Iraq Diplomacy : : 

BAGHDAD (Reuters) — President Sadda m Hussein has taken 
personal charge of Iraq’s foreign policy, accosting to a newspaper 
article signed by the president’s oldest son and published on 

Sl rS 3 artide said that "the leader is now assuming in a direct 



M oy Mi. J — — — J. « . , , . j- 

The paper did not say when the Iraqi president nan started-, 
directiimfweign policy. But it attributed “changes at the UN.- 
Security Council” on bow to deal with sanctions on Iraq to his. 
diplomatic efforts. 


30 New Cardinals Invested by Pope 


VATICAN CITY (Reuters) — Pope John Paul II invested 30 ' 
new including the Roman Catholic leader of Bosnia, on: 

Sunday and told them that they should be ready to die for the' 
church and their people. 

The Pope completed two days of investiture ceremonies for the ; 
new prelates, some of whom will be entrusted with electing his " 
successor after he dies, with a Mass in SL Peter’s Basilica during 
which he gave them the ring of office; 

In his sermon, the Pope, 74, said that a cardinal's red garb was- 
intentionally the color of blood to remind them of the early church; 
martyrs. "In receiving the cardinal’s dress, each of you hears the- 
cal! to be ready to shed blood if Christ asks for it," he said. 


Berlusconi to Try to Placate Coalition: 


Major Plays on Unpopidarity 
In Crucial Parliamentary Vote 


By Fred Barbasb 

Washington Post Service 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
John Major and his Conserva- 
tive government confront on 
Monday night a make-or-break 
parliamentary vole that is cer- 
tain, whichever way it turns out, 
to inflict a serious wound on an 
already badly scarred ruling 
party. 

The gambit leading to Mon- 
day’s showdown is one of the 
strangest in recent British poli- 
tics. Actually, it is among the 
strangest in politics anywhere, 
for it revolves around a political 
leader attempting to use his 
own unpopularity for leverage. 

If Mr. Major stumbles, his 
government will collapse. If he 
brings it off, which is likely, he 
will prove, at best, that nothing 
succeeds like failure. 

The issue confronting Parlia- 
ment is approval of the coun- 
try’s regular financial contribu- 
tion to the European Union, 
not, on its face, a sexy matter. 
Within the Conservative Party, 
however, Mr. Major is bedev- 
iled by a contingent variously 
known as the “Euroskeptics,” 
the “Eurorebels" or, at the ex- 


treme, the “Europhobes,” for 
whom any measure involving 
European integration is 
grounds for a brand. 

Some time ago, they made it 
known that they would fight the 
bill With the Conservatives 
bolding a slim majority of 14 in 
the 651-member House of 
Commons, the defections could 
sink it. 


Having won a divisive inter- 
nal battle in 1993 over another 


matter of European integration 
— the Maastricht treaty — only 


after a humiliating internal bat- 
tle, Mr. Major determined that 
he had to make a show of force. 


He announced that he and 
his cabinet would treat the vote 
on the contribution as a “vote 
of confidence.” If it went down, 
he said, he would call for a 
dissolution of Parliament and 
new elections. To show that he 
was not bluffing, his entire cab- 
inet agreed to what is being 
called a “suicide pact,” stating 
that they would all resign if the 
vote on Monday was “no.” 

The maneuver was wickedly 
perverse. If Mr. Major and his 
Conservative Party were popu- 


lar in Britain, his enemies with- 
in the party would have liked 
no thin g better than to see a new 
election and a new prime minis- 
ter. In fact, they are extraordi- 
narily unpopular, according to 
all polls for the past two yean, 
commanding at best 25 percent 
electoral support Conserva- 
tives consider themselves fortu- 
nate that no election is required 
until 1997. 

Massive disfavor in the coun- 
try at large was thus the linch- 
pin of Mr. Major’s threat. That, 
coupled with some bludgeoning 
by party whips, appears to have 
badly eroded the numbers of 
deputies willing to oppose the 
Eu contribution. Vote counters 
on both sides now predict be 
will win. 


Reports Sunday morning, 
however, suggested that his vic- 
tory will not bolster his position 
in the party. Indeed, Conserva- 
tives angered by the tactic Mr. 
Major chose are reportedly now 
preparing to challenge his lead- 
ership of the party. 


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While their chances of suc- 
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has delighted the new Labor 
Party leader, Tony Blair, who 
declared in the House of Com- 
mons last week that the govern- 
ment had only proven itself “an 
ill-disciplined rabble incapable 
of governing this country.” 


DEATH NOTICE 


Henry Herman Haijes D 

died * Grrcnhcac, Cafifania, on Oantxr M, 
W»4 at age 8! f* remains artved by Air 
France In Paris on November 22, for 
imwrancw B the Hatjcs Mawdcum, Cimdeur 
do Gonads. VtosSks. Dean E. Hunt rf die 
American Cadxdrai effldned. 

Mr Hairs' grandfather, jehn H Haifes. (funded 
th: hank firm of Dread & Hajw In 1BGS 
which became Moron & Haxfcs In later juaa 
The hank remained Moqpn & Ha)cs undl the 
death of son H. Hetman Harjes St. tn NZ7 
Bom a ftto accJdcra In DeauvUc. H. Hamm 
Hatjes 11 was w> young to cany on th: ram?, 
so the hank beam* Mrajpn & Oc and tea; 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company whac it SHI 
is in npcodon at 14 Ffaor Vtndran* 

Kb {yaxfcther John K. Harks founded and 
funded ihc American Hospital, the Amertan 
Cathedral b Pails, fpw the statue ot Mamin 
Frankfin a the Trocadcro as wfl as many 
tther outer contrihutinm by the Hajo family 
to ibe C*y of Fartv 


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ROME (Reuters) — Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, battling, 
to hold on to power despite a corruption inquiry, will seek to make 
crucial deals with coalition partners and trade unions in the nexf; 
few days. 

The bOEonaire businessman won some breathing space over the" 



A new date has not been set, but newspapers said Mr. Berlusconi 
could meet the magistrates as early as Monday. " 

The prime minister must now win the backing of coalition 
partners at a cabinet session on Tuesday and then seek a compro- 
mise with unions on Wednesday to avert an eight-hour general 
strike planned for Friday. 


Chechen Rebels Concede Weakness 


TOLSTOY- YURT, Russia (Reuters) — Moscow-backed rebeh 
fighters in the breakaway region of Chechnya conceded Sunday 
that they needed more hdp after the failure of their military 
attempt to depose the Chechen leader Dzhokar Dudayev. 

The rebels attacked the capital, Grozny, with tanks late Friday 
but were pushed back by forces loyal to General Dudayev. 

A senior rebel official, Gersolt Ehnurzayev, said the defeat 
stemmed from a “lack of professionalism among our militaiy' 
leaders.” 


Polisario Deputy Wants New War 


ALGIERS (AP) — The No. 2 leader of the Polisario Front said* 
Sunday that he wanted the United Nations to withdraw its 
mission from the disputed Weston Sahara so his guerrilla organi-1 
zation could resume combat. 

The remarks cast a shadow over UN efforts to organize a' 
referendum to determine the future of the territory, claimed by 
Morocco since 1975. They were made at a news conference in ; 
Tindouf, in southwestern Algeria, as the UN secretary-general^. 
Burros Bucros-GhaK, visited refugee districts there and met with 
Polisario leaders. 

Bachir Mustapha-Saycd said that S&hrawi “hope that Butros- 
Ghali rrill make good on his threat to withdraw the United . 
Nations from the Western Sahara so the armed struggle can be. 


resumed.” He was quoted by the official Algerian APS news 

of im. 


agency. It was not dear whether he reflected the views 
Polisario leader, Mohammed Abdelaziz, who called for direct 
negotiations with Morocco to resolve differences in an interview , 
published Sunday in El Moudjahid, the Algerian pro-government, 
newspaper. 


For the Record 


UfiMu\:Hctkki Sajii.nsaa' Reuters 


MEMORIAL AT SEA — A wreath being thrown into the Baltic during a service for 
the more than 900 people who died there when the ferry Estonia sank in September. 


Suspected neo-Nazis desecrated a Jewish cemetery in Busen- ' 
berg, in western Germany, d amagin g 50 to 60 graves and scrawl-', 
mg swastikas and anti-Jewtsh slogans, local policemen said Sun- 
day. (A EPl 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


DESERTERS: Germans Want Their Names Cleared Egypt’s 'Aida 9 Staging: No High Note _ 

prices, poor advertising and 


Continued from Page 1 

were meted out by a corrupt, 
illicit judicial system. 

The German Defense Minis- 
try — and, thus far, a parlia- 
mentary majority — oppose 
any blanket amnesty. Pardons 
should be granted only after the 
review of individual cases, op- 
ponents contend, because many 
a deserter left his comrades in 
the lurch just to save his own 
skin. Moreover, exonerating 
those who fled suggests that 
“every soldier who bad the 
courage to stick with it” made 
an illegitimate choice on behalf 
of Hitler’s regime, as the con- 
servative politician Norbert 
Geis put it 

“It’s a two-edged sword,” 


In its immediate impact legal 
rehabilitation would have little 
effect other than to compensate 
some surviving deserters for 
time they spent in Nazi prisons. 
But like so many questions of 
20th-century German history, 
the issue has a transcendent 
power, beset with conflicting 


claims of justice and injustice. 

right 


said Michael Wolffsohn, a po~ 
Mu- 


Htical science professor in 
nich. “If you have a general 
amnesty for deserters, you im- 
ply that those who did not de- 
sert were active collaborators, 
which is wrong. And because 
this is a symbolic issue, it’s a 
signal to the present rather than 
the past and might be seen as 
encouraging desertion today.” 


innocence and guilt, righteous- 
ness and iniquity. 

Why, for example, should 
World War II deserters still be 
considered pariahs, while East 
German Army deserters were 
welcomed with open arms by 
West Germany before the Ber- 
lin Wall fell in 1989? 

Why should an amnesty be 
extended to those who collabo- 
rated with the East German 
Stasi secret police — a proposal 
now gaining momentum — 
while those convicted of sub- 
verting the Third Reich remain 
tainted with felony convictions? 
Why should the army officers 
who tried to assassinate Hitler 
with a bomb on July 20, 1944, 
now be lionized as heroes, while 
soldiers who refused to fight are 
considered shirkers? 


w ask die butter... 




_ ~J/oueu 

Vhrrt iirpm n «i>rir*{ jvm >n/ it r* it. 


S • I ■ N -G • A- P-0- R • E 


iVi. P.lilval, I 


There are no clear answers to 
these questions in Germany to- 
day, only opinions and more 
questions. 

“A simple soldier was not in 
a position to plant a bomb 
against Hitler.” said Norbert 
Haase, a military historian and 
author of “German Deserters.” 
“Besides, deserters are not mo- 
tivated by a desire to overthrow 
a regime. But desertion is a 
form of resistance for the sim- 
ple soldier.” 

Those seeking a blanket par- 
don contend that reviewing 
cases individually is impractical 
because many records were de- 
stroyed as the war drew to a 
close, either by the Allied 
bombing of army archives in 
Potsdam or by German military 
judges anxious to thwart war 
crimes investigators. 

Furthermore, those who were 
executed rarely have a strong 
advocate trying to clear their 
names today, while deserters 
still living tend to be old. feeble 
or disinclined to exhume the 
past. 

Parliament long ago annulled 
sentences passed on civilian de- 
fendants by the infamous Nazi 
People’s Court. But the endur- 
ing stature of court-martial 
convictions reflects both the 
continued influence of militaiy 
judges, some of whom served in 
Germany’s postwar judiciary, 
and the lingering myth that the 
army was apolitical during the 
Third Reich. 


Egyptian government’s at- 
a $3.5 million production of 


LUXOR, Egypt (Reuters) — 
security concerns nave set back ti 
tempt to draw in foreign tourists with a 
Verdi’s opera “Alda,” travel agents said. 

About 75 percent of the seats were filled for the opening night 
at the pharaonic temple of Queen Hatshepsut near the southern 
town of Luxor on Saturday, many of them with Cairo-based 
guests of the government The Cairo Opera House, organizer of 
the event is conjunction with the Ministry of Culture, has can- 
celed the last three of six performances originally planned because 
it could not fill seats at up to $350 each. 

The government’s guests also dominated the $150-a-head gala 
buffet at the luxurious Winter Palace Hotel. The government had 
hoped the opera would show that all was well in southern Egypt 
where Muslim militants have killed seven tourists in a two-year 
campaign to embarrass the government 
Thoms returned to Strasbourg for the first time in more than 30 
years over the weekend. Five years after deciding to revive the 
system, authorities in the home of the European Parliament 
inaugurated the new 10 kilometers i 6 miles) of track with 1 8 steps 
that run throughout the city. (AFP) 

The new Zhuh a i airport in southern China’s booming Guang- 
dong Province is expected to be working by February, the Xinhua 
news agency reported Sunday. The airport reportedly will be able 
to handle more than 12 million passengers ana about 400,000 tons 
of cargo annually. (AFP) 

Opposition parties have called a general strike in Bombay on 
Monday to protest police action that resulted in the deaths of 1 30 
demonstrators in a stampede last week. The strike is expected to 
halt public transportation in the city, and the domestic carrier 
Indian Airlines said some flights may be canceled. (Reuters) 

TUs Week's Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
curtailed m the following countries and their dependencies this 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Albania. Chad. Israel. Mauritania. Panama, 

TUESDAY: Albania. Liberia, Serbia. 

WEDNESDAY: Barbados, Philippines. Yemen. Serbia. 


THURSDAY: Central African Republic, Chad. Macao. Mexico. Portugal 
Romania 


FRIDAY: United Amb Emirates. ' Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters, 


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I 




ton Delves Into Past Defeats in Search of Lessons About Latest Setback 




; e ^ 


By David. Maraniss 

WasNngMn Pan Serna 

■ WASHINGTON — There stood 
JBfil Clinton, suddenly rendered ir- 
rilevant, watching in bewilderment 
as the college boys in the election- 
night crowd chanted the miwk of his 
opponent, hoisted the fellow onto 
their shoulders and carried him 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

around the room in triumph. It was 
March 10, 1967, on the Georgetown 
lioivenaiy campus, and' Mr. din- 
urn, at the. dawn of his electoral 
career, was experiencing an early 
bitter taste of political rejection. 

-In his first two years at George- 
town, Mr. Clinton was twice elected 
to lead his class. But by the spring of 
bis junior year, when he sought the 
presidency of the student council, 
his peers had grown tired of him. 
Now they were discarding him for 
Terry. Modglin, a self-described 
square, who had nonetheless effec- 
tively characterized Mr. Clinton as a 
defender of the status quo while po- 
sitioning himself as a populist agent 
of reform and change ■ — an early 


version, perhaps, of the putative 
speaker of the House, Newt Ging- 
rich. b 

It is a considerable distance from 
that college election in the ’60s to the 
national political stage of 1994, 
where the long-ago loser now sits in 
the White House. But one path to 
understanding President Qin ton’s 
precarious situation today starts 
with his earlier moments of defeat 

The telling irony of Mr. Clinton’s 
career is that for someone who was 
elected governor five times and who 
reached his long-sought goal of the 
presidency at a relatively early age, 
the style and substance of his politi- 
cal persona have been shaped more 
by rebuke than acclaim. Repudia- 
tion is a recurrent theme in his rise to 
power, as much a factor as persis- 
tence. 

Tbe essential question now is 
whether any of the lessons he 
learned from earlier rejections can 
hdp him recover or, alternatively, 
whether the cumulative effect of his 
previous responses has led him final- 
ly to a predicament from which there 
is no way out. 

In the days since the Nov. S elec- 


tion, as Mr. Gingrich, Republican of 
Georgia, and the new Congress have 
dominated the news, Mr. Clinton 
and his advisers have struggled to 
draw the right lessons from the past,’ 
while realizing that his situation is 
different from any he has faced be- 
fore. The last time the nation's atten- 
tion was drawn away from him so 
obviously, making him seem pass6,' 
was in May and June 1992, when 
Ross Perot’s presidential fever was 
at its highest. 

“But where we can see the paral- 
lel, there are no parallel solutions.’’ 
acknowledged Paul Begala, one of 
Mr. Clinton’s political consultants. 

Mr. Clinton regained his stature 
that s umm er with dramatic acts of 
symbolism: playing the saxophone 
on a late-night talk show; walking 
on the streets of New York to make 
an early appearance at the Demo- 
cratic National Convention; launch- 
ing the bus rides through America. 
There is a realization in the Clinton 
camp, Mr. Begala said, that such 
dramatics would be of little use now. 

In searching for parallels from 
Mr. Clin tern’s Arkansas experience, 
some of his friends have said the 


president has mentioned a possible 
comparison with the early 1980s. 
The state legislature, while he was 
out of office, passed a creationism 
bill, signed into law by his successor, 
that was to the right of thepublic 
' mainstream. It gave Mr. Clinton, 
while making his comeback, more 
room to position himself as a moder- 
ate. 

If the Republicans in Congress 
push their conservative soda! agen- 

The president’s 
political persona has 
been shaped more by 
rebuke than acclaim. 

da too hard, Mr. Clinton could again 
benefit. 

In a rare spurt of op timism, one 
Clinton adviser predicted that the 
Republicans would move too far to 
the right. The opportunity for Mr. 
Clinton to regain his footing as a 
moderate, this adviser said, “borders 
on the miraculous." Wishful think- 
ing, another aide said, is part of the 


strategic planning in the White 
House this month. 

The Georgetown vote came near 
the stan of a string of defeats for Mr. 
Clinton and Democrats for whom he 
worked: Judge Frank 'Holt for gov- 
ernor of Arkansas in 1966; Joseph 
Duffey for senator from Connecti- 
cut in 1970; George S. McGovern 
for president in J972 and Mr. Clin- 
ton himself for the House in 1974. 
His era of repudiation dragged on 
for a decade until he was elected 
attorney general of Arkansas in 1976 
and governor two years later. 

During that decade, Mr. Clinton 
saw defeat from every angle. Judge 
Holt, much like Mr. Clinton at 
Georgetown, was rejected after be- 
ing characterized by his opponents, 
not entirely accurately, as the sym- 
bol of machine politics and the sta- 
tus quo. Mr. Clinton revered the 
judge and told friends that he was 
especially impressed by his refusal to 
respond to negative attacks, saying, 
“He wants to win on his own merits 
or not at all " 

In the Duffey and McGovern 
campaigns, both fueled by opposi- 


tion to the Vie tnam War, Mr. Clin- 
ton encountered a centra] dilemm a 
of the modem Democratic Party: 
bow to promote a progressive agen- 
da without turning off the white 
middle class. For much of the next 
_two decades, he pursued answers to 
that question, constantly reshaping 
his rhetoric for the middle class. 

The pivotal repudiation of Mr. 
Clinton’s career came in 1980, after 
he had served as governor of Arkan- 
sas for only two years and was un- 
ceremoniously dumped by the voters 
in favor of Frank White, a jovial 
unprepossessing savings and loan 
executive. 

The conventional wisdom about 
that loss is that Mr. Clinton was too 
bold, experimental and supercilious 
in his first term and that after he was 
slapped down, he returned two years 
later transformed into a consensus- 
seeker who tried to be all things to al] 
people. 

That analysis misses several other 
key lessons that Mr. Clinton carried 
with him through his later terms as 
governor and into the White House. 

The first was a conclusion by Mr. 
Clinton and his inner circle that vot- 


ers were not aware of his achieve- 
ments during his first term because 
he had relied on the traditional me* 
dia to get the word oul From then 
on, he used paid media to promote 
his legislative agenda and shunned 
the traditional press. 

Although this strategy worked to 
a large degree in Arkansas, Richard 
Morris, a Clinton political consul- 
tant, said he later came to believe 
that it did not serve Mr. Clinton's 
best interests when be moved into 
the realm of the presidential cam- 
paign and the White House, where 
the national press corps was a more 
considerable obstacle to try to get 
around. 

A second response Mr. Clinton 
made to his 1 980 repudiation as gov- 
ernor was to rely far more heavily on 
non-election-year polls to shape his 
governing rhetoric. It was a strategy 
in which Mr. Clinton took great 
pleasure, and it provided him with 
scone short-term victories. But over 
the years, it also led to unease among 
many voters over whether he main- 
tained a set of core convictions that 
were not susceptible to survey re- 
search. 


voted 
1 raar- 
e time 
lid not 
a Re- 
t that 
irit by 
lomon 

■e was 
party 

k that 
1 have 
il had 
roved. 
ed,.he 
little 
old be 
f con- 








U.S. Rejects Call 
On Disarming Haiti 

Task is Too Great, Perry Says 


i By Daniel Williams 

Washington Past Service 

. WASHINGTON — Defense 
Secretary William J. Perry on 
Sunday aQ but rejected a call by 
Haiti’s president, Jean -Ber- 
trand Aristide, for American 
troops to disarm opponents of 


deal was cut with the then mili- 
tary leaders, paved the way for 
the restoration of Mr. Aristide 
as president on OcL IS. 

In the interview Friday, Mr. 
Aristide said the United 'States 
had “to continue disarming the 
terrorists, those who are killing 


his newly reinstalled govern- P**? 1 ' “ d have weapons. 
menL waiting for the moment to come 

Mr. Perry compared the “I “Jf 
problems of taking weapons Mr. Amhde,m thefirstpub- 
Lm HeMea iuCZr he note of discord between his 


from Haitian thugs and army 
units of questionable loyalty to 
the difficulties that would be 


task that is being requested.” he 
said. 

Mr. Aristide made his call 
publicly last week in an inter- 


govemment and Washington 
since his return, said: “It is not 
enough to just disarm some of 
them. We should be moving 
fast. This is the cry of the Hai- 
tian peopIe. lt is the will of the 
Haitian people, and I welcome 
this cry and I share it.” 

American officials, who har- 


view with The Washington memories of the messy ef- 


Even before his return to 
r in September, Mr. Aris- 


fort to disarm militias in Soma- 
lia daring a tumultuous 


£e and bis supporters had 


pressed the Clinton administra- 
tion for a pledge to cany out an 
aggressive disarmament cam- 


1992 and 1993. are reluctant to 
get involved in a gun hunt that 
might mean casualties. Mr. Per- 


ry pjaced the burden on the 
paign. They fear that remnants, vjg****^ 
ofthe nuutary regime and its suture pahs* Torce, 

supporters will try to recover. 

Dower when theUnited Nations JSj-fS-SiJSRS 
peacekeeping force, which. will ^ be towned m 

replace the U.S. troops, leaves 
.gebountiy. probably in early 

The U.S. troops, who went 

ioto Haiti in September after a “5 

spot check of cars on the road 

had produced only one weapon, 
he concluded that “it's not clear 
that there are- a lot of loose 
AWay weapons around there.” 

■ The dispatch of troops to 

FrOHl PolitiCS Haiti in September went 

— - — — - " . 77" against public and congressio- 

Tbe Federal Aviation Ad- nal opinion. Republicans in 

! ministration has ordered a particular appear ready lo 
review of the rudder con- pounce on any misstep, and vi- 
’ trol systems on all Boeing olence and casualties could sink. 
737s after two fatal crashes tths entire occupation, 
involving 737s, one near : Th e administration is likely 
Pittsburgh m September - jq ^ more wary of deeper 
and the other m Colorado involvement in Haiti when the 
Springs in 1991. In both ac- Republicans take control of the 
'Cidents, investigators have Home and Senate in January. 

1 suspected rudder malfuno Qu Sunday, in a broadcast in- 

tions. terview, the future Senate ma- 

A 2-year-old mil lost in jority leader, Bob Dole of Kan- 
the mountains of northern sas, repeated his demand for an 
'Georgia was found alive imm ediate withdrawal of U.S. 
but. in critical condition troops. 


Away . 

From Politics 

The Federal Aviation Ad- 
) m ini stration has ordered a 
review of the rudder con- 
*irol systems on all Boeing 
' 737s after two fatal crashes 
'involving 737s, one near 
Pittsburgh in September 
and the other in Colorado 

* Springs in 1991. In both ac- 
cidents, investigators have 
‘suspected rudder malfunc- 
tions. 

A 2-year-old mil lost in 
the mountains of northern 
t Georgia was found alive 
but. in critical condition 
‘nearly 24 hours after she 
disappeared from a family 
‘outing. Naomi Leigh 
^Whidden was in shock and 
suffering from hypother- 
mia. 

Two Continental Airlines 
737s dipped wings as they 
taxied past each other at 
Houston Intercontinental 
Airport. The wing of one 
jet, which was not carrying 
passengers, was damaged. 

* No one was injured: 

Police officers firing at a 
man who they believed was 
drawing a gun accid en ta ll y 
shot and killed a bystander 
in Crown Heights, in the 
I Brooklyn borough of New 
' York. The man whom the 
-.officers were firing at was 
also critically wounded. 

-fa one of the -strictest 
» punishments ever levied 
! against a scientist) federal 

■ investigators have found 
1 Thereza Iraanishj-Kan, a 

former researcher ; at the 

* Massachusetts Institute of 
I Technology, >aty of 19 
. counts of faking data and 
'falsifying evidence in a 

1 1 986 paper on immunology 

■ and have recommended 

; that she be barred from 
i taking part in any federauy 
| financed research for 10 
I years.. 

’ Hours after, a state tow 


r parently expired, Ur. Jac* 

‘ Kevorkian helped an riling 

• 72-year-old woman from 
’ Royal Oak, Michigan, die 
I at her home of carbon mon- 

• oxide poisoning. 

Reuters. AP. HVT 





Dimd SupJT' Reuter- 

URUGUAY VOTE — Tabare Vazquez, leader of the Progressive Encounter Party, signing a flag after voting 
Sunday in Montevideo. Turnout was brisk as Uruguayans voted on a replacement for President Luis Alberto LacaOe 
and to fOl seats in Parliament and other state posts. Sir. Vazquez has an outside chance of winning the presidency. 


AMERICAN 
TOPICS I 

New York’s Park Avenue 
Strives to Retain Exclusivity 

Up and-down the midtown stretch of 
Park Avenue; probably Manhattan's 
most elegant thoroughfare, with Fifth 
Avenue long since having caved in to 
fast-food eateries and cut-rate camera 

baz^brandnsand airline offices used*to 
be. These offices are unlikely to return. 

Many have grown well-known enough 
so that they no longer need the high- 
priced billboard of a Park Avenue 
branch. And technologies like computer- 
ized reservation services and automatic 
teller, machines mean that airlines and 
banks do not need myriad branch of- 
fices. 

In contrast, many fast-growing retail 
food and clothing chains would love to 
breach Park Avenue. So would many 
other ventures, from cosmetics stores to 
delicatessens. 

But owners of Park Avenue real estate 
are not interested, The New York Times 
reports. They are holding out for banks 


and financial-services companies, the | Macy’s said it sat tfus one out because 
only kinds of tenants they feel fit in with the- original film was “a one-of-a-kind ' 
the avenue’s exclusivity^ . classic.” Another possibility. The New . 

So far, : from 42d to 55th Street, it’s an York Times suggests, is that a subplot 
impasse. And the empty spaces gape, about the store's financial problems was 

too close to reality. “Now." The Times 
m .m , observes, "Macy’s loses both ways: the 

Snort takes film will inevitably remind audiences of 

For those who have poor credit ratings, Macy’s woes, but Macy's doesn't get all 
so-called credit repair clinics run late- that publicity." 
right television advertisements offering 
to dean up consumers’ credit reports or ii . 
even proride new credit histories. Forget ADOm reopie 
it, advises Janet D. Steiger, chairwoman Robot Strauss, former chairman of 
of the Federal Trade Commission. These the Democratic Party and former ambas- 
clinics “prey on consumers who are des- sador to Russia, always returns tele- 
perate to improve their credit histories,” phone calls. Rather than undermine Mr. 
lightening their already light wallets even Strauss's status as one of Washington’s 
further, she told The Washington Post, powers that be, this has probably helped 
Typically, these outfits offer to wipe it.: “Ask 10 people in the Washington 
clean the consumer’s slate of bad debts, press corps why the press has always 
bankruptcy and the like. But if the con- been so rice to me,” he observed, “and 
sumer's problems are real, there is no they’ll say he always returns phone 
way the clinics can legally do these calls.” 
things. AD they can do is challenge inac- 
curate information — which the consum- The actor Burt Reynolds, appearing on 
ers can readily do for themselves. a San Francisco television talk show to 
, promote his book, “My Life,” was asked 

“Miracle on 34th Street*” the 1947 by a telephone caller whether his toupee 
f3m classic, opens with -‘the -Macy's de- was alive or dead. Mr. Reynolds told the 
partment store's annual Thanksgiving host, “You’re supposed to protect me 
parade of riant animal balloons. Lo the from calls like that,” and stalked off in a 
1994 remake, Macy’s bowed out, so the huff. 

store has a fictitious name, C. F. Cole. International Herald Tribune. 


APOLITICAL /VOTES A 


Helms Will Get Chairmanship, Pole Says 

WASHINGTON — Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, the 
Republican leader of the Senate, said Sunday that Senator 
Jesse Helms of North Carolina would become chairman of 
the Foreign Relations Committee and that he expected the 
outspoken Mr. Heims to "perform very responsibly.” 

“Senator Helms will be the chairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee.” Mr. Dole, who will become majority 
leader in the Senate, said in a broadcast interview. “We have 
a seniority system. I think it works." Mr. Helms is the 
ranking Republican on the panel. 

Some Democratic legislators had called for Mr. Helms to 
be denied the committee chairmanship after his recent com- 
ments that President Bill Clinton was unfit to be commander 
in chief of the military. Mr. Helms was also quoted last week 
as saying that Mr. CTinton was so unpopular in North 
Carolina that "he better have a bodyguard" if he visits the 
state. Mr. Helms said later that the comment was a “mis- 
take.” 

Alluding to the controversy caused by Mr. Helms, Mr. 
Dole said Sunday, “I think you're going to see Jesse perform 
very responsibly." (IHTf 


Treasury Chief Predicts Victory on GATT 

WASHINGTON — Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentscn 
predicted Sunday that Congress would approve the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade this week, but acknowl- 
edged that the Clinton administration was still working to 
secure lawmakers' support for the pact. 

"I think we’re going to win it,” Mr. Bcntsen said in a 
broadcast interview. He acknowledged that a number of 
senators had not yet committed themselves to voic for ratifi- 
cation of the GATT agreement, but attributed their hesita- 
tion to procedural issues. 

Senator Dole also predicted that the accord would be 
approved. He said that support would be "fairly wide- 
spread." . AFP: 


Governors Become Hole Models for Big ht 

WASHINGTON — They may not be household names 
inside the Beltway, but Republican governors are the new 
role models for congressional Republicans coming to power 
in Washington. 

From New Hampshire to California — and particularly 
across the industrial belt in the Midwest — Republican 
governors who have been leaders on issues ranging from 
welfare reform and education to cutting taxes and govern- 
ment won overwhelming victories in elections this month. 

Many of their policy innovations are in the experimental 
stage. Nonetheless, Republican governors have brought lo 
their work models for activist conservatism that are in sharp 
contrast to the virtual benign neglect of domestic issues that 
former President George Bush displayed during his one-term 
presidency, and it is that framework that so many conserva- 
tive Republicans in Congress find attractive. ( I VP) 


Quote/Unquote 

Representative Jose E. Serrano, Democrat of New York, 
on the feeling that House Republicans are so conservative 
that all the Democrats have to do is lie back and wait for the 
new Republican majority to overreach and undermine public 
support; "The feeling is we don't have to do much. You guys 
wanted it? Then govern." ( H ’P) 


■fill!!' 





T O I. 1. F R E E N U M B E R : 

France 0591 6000 - Germany 0130 6333 
E n 'Oanci OSuO 413000 - Switzerland 155 7344 

i - * 

Italy I 74488 - Austria 0660 6789 
Denmark 8(H) 1 555^ - Sweden 020 / 97000 
Norway 800 i 1 633 - Spain 900 973533 
Ncthcrland 06022 2010 

Information, s-iihcduioi, rwerva turns. Fmjuem Traveler Rorniv SyMero. 


KOREAN AIK 

rHE ROUTE TO SERENITY 








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INTERNATIONAL 



PVBI.IHHK1) WJTII THE Nl-W IOHK TJMKS AMI THR WASHINCJTUN POST 


H umiliat ion in Bosnia 


Snbutie Bosnia Fiasco: Western Hypocrisy and Failure of Will 

. ««■• ■■ hi! l ^ **■ i . ■%. T 1 ITO Vrt/- f A flic# 


NATO’s patty-cake air strikes in re- 
sponse to the latest Serbian aggression 
around Bihac, a United Nations-declared 
“safe area,'* seem to have encouraged the 
Serbs to redouble their attack- The Mus- 
lim-led Bosnian government is faced with 
the loss of another important enclave 
and, further, with defeat of the military 
uni t whose briefly successful offensive 
last month was converted by the Serbs 
into the pretext for their current assault. 
In its distress, the Bosnian government is 
falling under heightened pressure to con- 
sider a nationwide cease-fire that would 
leave the Serbs in militarily un contested 
control of their territorial conquests. 

Could NATO h3ve avoided this utter 
humiliation? It is easy enough for Ameri- 
cans, who have no peacekeeping troops 
exposed on the ground, to answer with a 
“yes.” But NATO’s European troop pro- 
viders could not have failed to be con- 
cerned — although they never needed to 
be paralyzed — by threats of Serbian 
retaliation in the event of alliance attacks 
on Serbian positions. 

If America was not going to stiffen 
NATO by providing U.S. peacekeepers, 
then the best alternative probably was to 
remove the peacekeepers altogether. That 
would have permitted freer use of NATO 
air power. It would have meant a wider 
war and more civilian casualties, but also 
a chance for UN-NATO forces to take a 


clear shot at the Bosnian Serbs, the prin- 
cipal aggressors. Yet the reality is that 
there never was the political taste for that 
option, and there plainly isn’t now. 

The United Nations now strives to 
mediate the battle. Good luck. The Serbs, 
pressing their advantage, want a perma- 
nent end to hostilities. The Bosnian gov- 
ernment, hoping to recoup, seeks a three- 
month cease-fire. Perhaps a formula can 
be found. If so, there are some other 
cards the allies can still play to interest 
the Serbs in the interna dona] peace plan, 
which requires substantial Serbian with- 
drawals. The Serbs face indefinite eco- 
nomic and political isolation as long as 
they defy the international terms — the 
same kind of isolation that led Serbia 
proper belatedly to try to bring the Bosni- 
an Serbs around. The Serbs’ conduct in 
the Bihac area, where casualties are 
mounting among the 175,000 mostly 
Muslim civilians, will tell whether they 
care one iota for international favor. 

It makes a difference that in this in- 
stance Bosnian Serbs — familiar viola- 
tors — have been joined by Serbs from 
the neighboring Serb-populated territory 
of Krajina within Croatia. Has it not 
occurred to the Krajina Serbs that they 
are an embattled community with their 
own special requirements for the good- 
will of the West? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Poor Arms Guidelines 


America has a rare chance to use its 
dominant position in the arms market to 
inhibit the international traffic in weap- 
onry. Unfortunately, new guidelines gov- 
erning American arms sales abroad, now 
on President Bill Clinton's desk, would 
toss away that chance. 

With the end of the Cold War. global 
arms sales began to dry up and competi- 
tion intensified to capture what was left 
of the market. The demonstrated prow- 
ess of American arms in the Gulf War 
allowed the United States to dominate 
the market, accounting for well over half 
the world's sales. That would enable 
Washington to take the lead in restrain- 
ing sales, especially to volatile regions 
like the Middle East. 

The defense industry has resisted re- 
straints. With the slowing of Pentagon 
procurement, the industry looked over- 
seas to peddle its wares. Now the Penta- 
gon wants to turn export promotion into 
a strategy for keeping the industry afloat, 
and Mr. Clinton is bong asked to sign on. 

The guidelines are pernicious in several 
ways. To win government approval for an 


arms deal under existing rules, arms mak- 
ers have had to show that the sales would 
promote U.S. security, cooperation with 
a foreign government and regional stabil- 
ity. One unwritten purpose of the sales 
has always bam to help domestic indus- 
tries keep their production lines open. In 
the new guidelines, that purpose is explic- 
itly stated, giving commercial consider- 
ations much higher priority than before. 

The guidelines would aiso provide up 
to SI billion in loan guarantees for arms 
exports, adding to the billions in subsi- 
dies that the defense industry already 
receives to market its wares. That will 
only invite U.S. competitors to sweeten 
their own subsidies. 

As an added inducement to buy Amer- 
ican. U.S. companies sometimes offer to 
co-produce arms abroad, leading to a loss 
of control over military technology. The 
guidelines do little to slow the diffusion 
of American know-how. 

The guidelines would sacrifice long- 
term security for short-term economic ad- 
vantage. Mr. Clinton should reject them. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Stand Up to Helms 


Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina 
is no stranger to outrageous statements. 
But his recent remarks about President 
Bill Clinton have drawn enormous atten- 
tion because he is set to become chairman 
of the Senate Foreign Relations Commit- 
tee. His impending promotion is drawing 
much fire from Democrats, but the peo- 
ple it should bother most are the many 
Republicans who have held firm to their 
party's best traditions on international- 
ism, free trade and human rights. 

Mr. Helms’s recent statements showed 
no undemanding of the status and role of 
the military in a democracy. He said that 
Mr. Clinton was not up to the job of 
commander in chief and that "the people 
in the armed forces” agreed with him. It 
is one thing for right-wing radio talk 
jockeys to speak loosely about Mr. Clin- 
ton’s standing with the military. It is 
another for a prospective Foreign Rela- 
tions chairman to challenge a president’s 
authority as the nation’s top commander. 
The stakes here ought to be well under- 
stood by conservatives, who rightly worry 
about preserving constitutional tradi- 
tions, one being civilian control of the 
military. Mr. Helms then made thin gs 
worse by saying that Mr. Clinton “better 
have a bodyguard” if he visited military 
bases in North Carolina. How can any- 
one, let alone a senator, be so careless and 
irresponsible in his comments after the 
political assassinations the United States 
has experienced these last three decades? 

The dangers of a Helms chairmanship 
go beyond the senator’s loose lips. He is 
out of step with the consensus within his 
own party on issue after issue, including 
his isolationist views on the United Na- 
tions and foreign aid, his protectionist 
views on trade, his stances toward assis- 
tance to Russia and the Middle East, 
and his past sympathy for South Afri- 
ca’s old apartheid regime. 

Democrats have had a grand time con- 
demning Mr. Helms. But we suspect that 
secretly many Democrats would Jove to 
see him get the Foreign Relations job. 
Mr. Helms promises to be a continuing 
embarrassment to his party, and to open 


division after division within Republican 
ranks. It is a measure of their political 
plight that Senator Helms may in fact be 
the best thing the Democrats have going 
for them at the moment 

The issue of who should get a chair- 
manship is an internal party matter, and 
Republicans seem reluctant to break with 
seniority in Mr. Helms’s case. But if duty 
grant him a new role, Senate Republicans 
had better be ready. The incoming major- 
ity leader. Bob Dole, a responsible inter- 
nationalist and other reasonable Repub- 
licans such as Senator Richard Lugar will 
have to spend much time doing damage 
control and making sure that Mr. Helms 
does not impede initiatives that enjoy 
wide support in both parties. 

In the past senators of various political 
stripes have demonstrated a reckless indul- 
gence of Mr. Helms’s outrages, which may 
have grown from their reluctance to mix it 
up with a very tough guy. This indulgence 
hurt American interests again and again 
when Mr. Helms was allowed to hold up 
for months ambassadorial appointments 
that left large, important countries with- 
out American representation. The days 
for indulgence should surely be over. It is 
time for those Democrats as well as those 
Republicans who privately detest much 
of what he has done and is doing to show 
the courage to stand up to him. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

Feeling Sorry lor Arafat 

One cannot but have pity for Yasser 
Arafat these days. Moammar Gadhafi of 
Libya is so dismissive of Mr. Arafat now 
that he refers to him as the Zionists' 
mayor of Gaza. To rub salt in the wound, 
no foreigner may enter a territory under 
the control of the Palestinian authority 
without the permission of Israel. With the 
guns of Palestinians pointed against Mr. 
Arafat, and Israel putting pressure on 
him, to whom is he going to turn now? 
— The Sowettm (Soweto, South Africa). 


International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED IHS7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Cn-Chturnvn 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief Exetuiive 
JOHN VINOCUR. Lin-umc EJimr £ VhxPraideni 
•WALTER WELLS, .Wwj £&,*-• SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNGRR and 
CHARLES MITCHELMORE. De/ia\ EtRh t. • CARL GEWTRTZ, Assnriuir Editor 
•ROBERT J. DONAH UE. Hhtrrif rhr BfainJ F,/^ • JONATHAN GAGE. Buxines* and Fmjnce Ediwr 

• RENE BONDY. fjr]n,n Pnhhdur • JAMES McLEOD. Adivnuing Durar* 

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• IVM, hurni/uiinJ HiviM Jh/wr Ml ad&i nvnvU ISSN: fOW-Jffl.C. 


I ON DON — The eyes-averted tiptoe 
/ through horror that the West calls its 
Bosnia policy is drawing to an end in the 
worst possible way. 

_ That Bosnia's Muslims, the chief vic- 
tims of the war, are pretty clearly being 
left to their fate is bad enough. 

That an internationally recognized 
state is thus being demolished by armed 
force is in one way even worse, for it 
gives future demolishes elsewhere a 
precedent they will relish. 

Worst of all is that, while this happens, 
we of the West say one thing and do 
another, promise action but do not pro- 
vide it, and use transparently false argu- 
ments to excuse our inaction. In short, we 
compound failure with hypocrisy. 

It is hypocritical to say that we should 
not give help to the Muslims because this 
would be “taking sides.” We took rides 
long ago, when we proposed first the 
Vance-Owen peace plan and then the 
current, weaker peace project Both were 
based on the proposition that Bosnia's 
minority of Serbs had abused Bosnia's 
other people and that the abuse should 
be at least partly rectified by a Serbian 
withdrawal from occupied land. 

That was a taking of rides. The ques- 
tion was whether we would do some thing 
to make the Bosnian Serbs withdraw, or 
just hope that words would puff them 
away. The answer is now brutally dear. 

There is growing hypocrisy in the 
claim that, if we will not sake them pull 
back, Serbia’s President Slobodan Milo- 
sevic will save us the trouble by doing the 


By Brian Beedham 


job for us. It is almost four months since 
Mr. Milosevic imposed his “blockade” 
on the Bosnian Serbs. The machinery for 
checking the honesty of that blockade is 
patently frail. This month's assault by the 
Bosnian Serbs on the Bihac “safe area” 
— another phrase to squirm at — shows 
that they still have abundant arms, fuel 
and ammunition. Xt is hi ghly dubious, to 
put it mildly, whether we can leave an 
honest peace to Mr. Milosevic. 

A familiar qn easiness therefore resur- 
faces when it is said — for instance, by 
the British Lieutenant general Sir Michael 
Rose — that after the past month’s bat- 
tles the West's aim should be to return 
Bosnia to its “status quo ” That “status 
quo” is a war which goes cm killing peo- 
ple but for which no even passably just 
outcome now seems in prospect. 

If the West intends to take no further 
serious action, it would be better, as well 
as more honest, to say so now. The victims 
might then accept defeat without further 
struggle. The “status quo” condemns them 
to more bloodshed, without hope. 

Hypocrisy is the ultimate sin in the 
making of foreign policy. A failure of 
calculation can be survived; even defeat 
by superior armed force is endurable. 
Both can become a challenge to do better 
next time. Hypocrisy is an add that eats 
away the ability to do better next time, 
because it destroys other people’s trust in 
those whose deception is duly revealed 


and the self-deceiver's belief in himself* once usually, 

There are vulnerable people m time, too. 

pans of toda/s world who might hope to p1 ; n t of hope in this Sony 

S on die West’s aid if they came under happens, the 

unjustified attack. Imagmewbat these tyWRL ^ hnm!m spirit will pro- 
people think when they see “peace plans SSTTh/necessarv reaction. A sense of 

unsupported by any will to make the d . _ -~ TT ,g rn t may yet over- 

San? Sack; “safe m s” which remain 
open to sniping, bombardment and as- 

sault; above all, a refusal by West Euro- about, the West will have to 

pean governments to do anything more » toOT^ao«jq thought 

became it mightput some o f iheir sol- ■*— 


lieve that they are capable of achieving 
less in the world is in fact the case. 

They still have great economic and 
military power. They could have used it 
to much greater effect in ex- Yugoslavia. 
By behaving as they have behaved, they 
have persuaded themselves otherwise. 

This is why it is already being said 
that NATO will never again venture 
into a peacemaking operation outside 
its own borders. That will probably 
prove to be false. For the world's sake, 
one hopes it is. But the chances of its 
being proved false are certainly dimin- 


ntissed, each successive stage of the war 
grew harder to oqpe with. This was the 
failure of dear thiziking. 

The failure of wiH runs deeper, because 
if the will had been there the thinking 
would have been sharper. To avoid the 
shame now descending upon us, we 
should have had to reject the very 
thought of letting medieval brutality re- 
assert itself so dose to Rome and Vienna. 
We could then have summoned up the 
courage to do what was necessary. By 
fading to do so, we set ourselves on the 
road to hypocrisy and ineffectuality. 

Internationa l Herald Tribune. 


Dangerous Trans-Atlantic Strain, With Real Damage to NATO 


B ONN — The damage that 
has been done to NATO 
since November began is proba- 
bly irreparable. The united 
Stales and Weston Europe have 
broken apart on a crucial issue 
concerning Europe's future poli- 
cy toward the war in Bosnia. 

They have in the last few days 
conducted air operations in com- 
mon over Bosnia and Croatia, 


By William Pfaff 


matters, and my impression was 
that no one there was under 50. 


so long as NATO has functioned. 
However, the United States 


Many in Europe; however, are cannot conduct one policy 
concerned with what goes on in through NATO and the West 


Washington and believe they are 
seeing a destructive rise in isola- 
tionism. There cannot really be a 
revival of 1930s-style isolation- 


Europeans conduct another, so 
if the Europeans want their own 
policy they need the military 
means to cany it oul NATO has 
command, staff, forces and op- 


mon over Bosnia and Croatia, ism; American business and the command, staff, forces and op- 
bui with bitterness expressed on American economy are much too crating systems in place. The 
both sides — by Americans at implicated in the European and WEU has nothing or next to 
what seems Europe’s moral abdi- world economies for that. But nothing. The encounter in recent 
cation in former Yugoslavia, and (Marx notwithstanding) econom- days with a divided NATO has 


what seems Europe's moral abdi- 
cation in former Yugoslavia, and 
by Europeans at what they see as 
America’s irresponsibility and 
even pusillanimity about backing least of the All anti cist kind, 
up talk with men on the ground The United States and the En- 
in the Yugoslav crisis zone. ropean Union can go their sepa- 

The midterm elections had al- rate ways on Yugoslavia without 
ready produced a Congress little bothering the operations of Mi- 
interested in foreign drama, its crosoft or Disney or Ford, or 
priorities being tax cuts, welfare Siemens or BMW. (If they go 


ic involvement does not in itself shaken up people who in the 
dictate political engagement, at past ignored the WEU. 


restriction, the culture wars and 
the presidential election of 1996. 

Few in Washington today 
care much about developments 
in Europe, and those who do 
care are not in Congress. They 
also are not young. In Seplem- 


their separate ways on trade, it 
will be a different matter.) 

What is happening greatly in- 
creases European interest in 
Western Europe’s own long-ne- 
glected security organization, 
the Western European Union. 


ber, in Washington, I spoke to a The WEU has been named the 
group of policy people and aca- mihtaiy arm of the European 
demies concerned with Atlantic Union, but this has meant little 


There not only is disagree- 
ment about ex- Yugoslavia on 
the two sides of the Atlantic, but 
about Iraq as well, and poten- 
tially about other issues in the 
Middle East and in Africa. 

There is also a convergence of 
West European views with those 
of Russia, at least on Yugoslavia 
and Iraq, in opposition to UJS. 
positions. The major West Euro- 
pean powers and Russia all are 
against arming Bosnia. They all 
think that Iraq now has done 
what United Nations resolutions 
demanded of Baghdad, and that 
sanctions should be lifted. 


The German government is 
convinced that the so-called Eur- 
ocorps, composed of French, 
German and Belgian units, now 
is essentia] to Europe's future. 
Officials say it currently is suc- 
cessful beyond what had been 
expected, and will be operational 
in 1995, in need of assignments. 
A second such Eurocorps is ben® 
developed with French, Spanish 
»nd Italian components. 

Even the British government 
non' seems convinced that it has 
a security stake in Europe out- 
side NATO. It takes the Euro- 
corps seriously, which as recent- 
ly as last spring it did noL In 
recent weeks a French-British 
air force equivalent was agreed 
upon, which would initially have 
a British base and a French com- 
mander and would be available 
for rapid-response operations. 

The British now also look like- 
ly to join the European program 
to commission a long-range mili- 
tary transport aircraft from the 
Airbus consortium, for early 
21st century delivery. 

In Germany one is also told 
that the two-speed Europe pro- 
posed by a Christian Democratic 
Party study group in September 


is essential As Europe expands 
from 12 members to 16 and mere 
“structural change” most follow 
or there will be a drift back (as the 
CDU/CSU group put it) toward 
“a loosely knit grouping of states 
restricted to certain economic 
aspects ... no more than a ‘so- ' 
phisticated’ bee trade area inca- 
pable of overcoming other the 
existential internal problems of 
the European societies or the ex- 
ternal challenges they face.” 

In a fundamental sense, this 
estrangement of the Europeans 
from America is inevitable, a re- 
flection of the diverging views 
and preoccupations of people on 
the two rides of the Atlantic now 
that the pressures and fears of 
the Cold War have vanished. 

However, the terms on which 
this estrangement has come, and 
the bitterness that has been ex- 
pressed about how it is happen- 
ing, are not entirely reassuring 
about die future of America’s 
relations with by far the most A : 
powerful group of industrial w 
economies an earth — possess- 
ing a notable record, when up- 
set, for making waves in history. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angda Times Syndicate. 


expands 


The American Liberal Case Against the World Trade Organization 


W ASHINGTON — The 
GATT agreement was con- 
caved by the Reagan administra- 
tion, nurtured by President 
George Bush, and is strongly 
backed by giant corporations that 
are a prime constituency of the 
Republican Party. Yet many Re- 
publicans are threatening to kill it- 
Democrats are also playing 
against type. The trade deal epit- 
omizes a system of ungoverned 
global markets that relentlessly 
undermines institutions of eco- 
nomic management which have 
been the longtime habitat of 
Democrats. 

Since FDR, Democrats have 
successfully used economic inter- 
vention to shelter their constitu- 
ents from the vicissitudes of lais- 
sez-faire The GATT deal accel- 
erates the demise of that eco- 
nomic order, yet it is championed 
by a Democratic president 
On the surface, this deal merely 
reduces barriers to trade, creates 
common rules and replaces the 
old, feeble General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade with a stronger 


By Robert Kuttner 


World Trade Organization able 
to adjudicate disputes and en- 
force decisions. But under the 
guise of merely harmonizing rules 
of trade, the agreement achieves 
three other far-reaching changes. 

First, it is the only internation- 
al agreement that surrenders U.S. 
sovereignty to a global organiza- 
tion based on one nation, one 
vote. In every other nontrivial 
world body that the United States 
has joined, it has insisted on ei- 
ther a veto or weighted voting. 
This describes the United Na- 
tions, NATO, the World Bank, 
the International Monetary Fund 
and GATT itself, where decision 
has been by consensus. 

In the proposed WTO, the 
United States will have the same 
power as El Salvador or Mall In 
effect, it is backing into the sort of 
world government that it would 
never embrace if the derision 
were based on first principles. 

Second, the constitutional 
structure of the proposed WTO 


mocks many of America’s cher- 
ished principles of law. The main 
adjudicatory bodies, dispute-res- 
olution panels, function as judge, 
jury and legislature. There is no 
U.S.-style due process. 

Deliberations are closed to the 
press, with no written transcripts, 
no right of judicial appeal, and no 
prohibitions against conflicts of 
interest. One of the judges (they 
serve part-time) could also be ad- 
vising a multinational corpora- 
tion, even one with a material 
interest in the ruling. 

Third, the whole WTO frame- 
work is biased against a mixed 
economy and in favor of abolish- 
ing domestic standards that tem- 
per the cruelties of pure capital- 
ism. Under the WTO agreement, 
any national regulation or eco- 
nomic intervention that discour- 
ages trade is considered suspect 

It would, be different if the 
WTO were a true world govern- 
ment with a constitutional struc- 
ture and democratically account- 


Black Humor Tells Why the Wall Fell 


B ERLIN — In outworn cli- 
che, Germans are as heavy 
as their national diet bereft of a 
sense of humor. A visitor here 
quickly learns that this is not 
true of Germans in general or 
in particular of Ossis, the for- 
mer citizens of the Communist 
East This was readily apparent 
in Berlin this November, the 
fifth anniversary of the demise 
of the wall that scarred the city. 

The sober German of stereo- 
type was indeed visible in seem- 
ingly endless and earnest televi- 
sion talk shows on “die Wende,” 
shorthand for the great change 
attending unification. But in 
bookstores there was a less for- 
mal observance, marked by the 
dxy, even grim humor at which 
Berliners excel. 

Published in time for holiday 
giving are three fast-moving ti- 
tles that mock the solemnities of 
the Cold War. “DDR-Wilze.” 
or “German Democratic Re- 
public Jokes,” offers a year-by- 
yea r compendium of political 
humor, assembled by Remhard 
Wagner, an Ossi himself. These 
are from the 1970s: 

• Napoleon. Nasser and John 
Kennedy, on meeting in heaven, 
find much to praise about East 
Germany. “If I had had the Peo- 
ple's Army at my disposal, I 
wouldn't have lost the Sinai in 
my war with Israel.” says Nasser. 


By Karl E. Meyer 

“If I had had the Stasi [the East 
German secret police],” adds 
Kennedy, “I wouldn't have been 
assassinated.” “And if only I had 
a newspaper like Neues Deutsch- 
land,” Napoleon imeijecied. 
“they still would not know I lost 
the Battle of Waterloo.” 

• In his cockpit an airline 
pilot is confronted by a hijacker 
with a pistol who says, “We're 
flying not to Moscow but to 
Stockholm.” The pilot shrugs: 
“I’m sorry, sir, but behind you is 
a DDR grandmother with a 
bomb in hear purse, and she 
wants to fly to Majorca.” 

• Question: What is the dif- 
ference between ihe ersatz 
DDR coffee mix and the neu- 
tron bomb? Answer: You can 
protest the neutron bomb. 

Better than any polemic, 
these lines expose the crippling 
infirmities of a system that 
crumbled overnight, to the as- 
tonishment of its leaders as 
well as of the CIA. 

But imagine that the opposite 
had occurred, that a great popu- 
lar uprising in 1989 had united 
Germany under communism. 
Such is the amply illustrated 
documentary fantasy offered by 
Reinhold Andert in “Rote 
Wende,” or “Red Change." 


Five years after the DDR 
conquers West Germany in this 
fantasy, bookstores everywhere 
are piled high with the works of 
party leader Erich Honecker 
(who in fact recently died in 
exile and disgrace). 

Headlines focus on 12,000 
homeless in West Berlin, and 
every television channel offers 
the same mix of sanitized news, 
corny “Everybody sings!” re- 
views and a documentary life of 
party founder Ernst Th ai man n 

That this is not outlandish 
burlesque is borne out by a work 
of unintended satire, “Teurer 
Genosse!” or “Dear Comrade” 
(“dear” as in “costly"), consist- 
ing of often flowery letters lo Mr. 

Honecker from eminent figures 
Hke the Pope, Fidel Castro and 
Saddam Hussein. 

Most astonishing is a note 
from Mr. Honeckefs predeces- 
sor as party chief. Walter UI- 
bricht, who protests in unctuous 
bureaucratise that his name is 
not on the guest list for the cele- 
bration marking the 55th anni- 
versary of “the Great Soviet Oc- 
tober Revolution." The note 
concludes. “I hope you under- 
stand, as a participant in the 
Great Fatherland War, where 
my bean lies.” 

The wall fell because it was 
rotten from the top. 

The New York Times. 


able officials. It would be different 
if the WTO replaced national stan- 
dards with global or regional ones, 
as the European Union has begun 
to do. By contrast the WTO is 
mainly a mandate to dismantle 
national standards. 

The agreement's core principle 
is that any law or regulation that 
affects trade, however indirectly, 
must do so in a way that is the 
least trade restrictive.” Countries 
can violate the WTO rules by pro- 
tecting consumers, workers or the 
environment — but not by abus- 
ing them. The WTO sets up what 
the late Justice Louis Brandeis 
called a “race to the bottom,” in 
which weaker standards under- 
mine stronger ones. 

A variety of U.S. health, safety, 
consumer, environmental and la- 
bor regulations have already been 
challenged by Europe, Japan or 
others as “GATT-illegaL” These 
include fuel efficiency standards, 
food purity laws, pesticide con- 
trols and technology programs. 

But there is a key difference 
between GATT and the proposed 
WTO. If a GATT panel rules 
against the United States, Wash- 
ington is essentially free to ignore 
the ruling and invite the com- 
plaining nation to retaliate. This 
rarely occurs, because of fears of 
further retaliations. Under the 
WTO, however, the United States 
would have to comply with the 
ruling or pay a large fine. 

The proposed WTO also pro- 
hibits “unilateralism,’' which de- 
scribes the modestly successful 
U.S. effort to pry open Japan’s 
closed markets by threatening to 


withhold access to America's for 
more accessible ones. Chief U.S. 
trade negotiator Mickey Kan tor 
alternately takes pride in his suc- 
cesses in getting tough with Japan 
and in lobbying for the WTO — 
which would foreclose virtually 
all of his Japan policy. 

The WTO is being criticized by 
both far-right America-firsters 
and mainstream consumer, labor 
and environmental groups. The 
broad misgivings about the WTO 
cannot be dismissed as the work 
of a political fringe, for it raises 
the most fundamental issues about 
the nature of American govern- 
ment, economy and society. 

Senator Robert Dole and Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton have made a 
deal that provides for a special 
review of U.S. membership m the 
WTO as soon as three WTO rul- 
ing? go against the United States. 
This is a pathetic demand for a 
double standard. 

It would be far better to fix the 
flaws in the WTO before the 
United States joins. II America is 
to be part of an embryonic world 
commercial government, that gov-j 
eminent should be one whose 
principles and processes earn 
America’s wholehearted support 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" ami contain the writer's 
signature, name and full address. 
Letters should be brief and are 
subject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible for the return of unso- 
licited manuscripts. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Inquisitorial Tax 

NEW YORK — The Treasury 
says it cannot enforce the income 
tax unless Congress makes an ap- 
propriation for the purpose. Next 
to the device of custom houses for 
providing officials and red tape, 
the subject of income tax is proba- 
bly .the best scheme for encourag- 
ing bureaucracy and inqmsitoriai 
researches into private affairs. 

1919: Kardlyi’s Fortune 

BUDAPEST — [From our New 
York edition:] One hundred mil- 
lion crowns, contained in twenty- 
one cases buried deep in the cellar 
of Count Michael Karolyi’s pal- 
ace, has been discovered and con- 
fiscated by the Hungarian police. 
The treasure consisted of stocks, 
bonds, silver and gold, represent- 
ing the Former Premier's total for- 
tune. Thorough searches by the 
communists Failed to reveal the 


treasure, although the palace was 
ransacked several times. 

1944: New Opera Season 

NEW YORK — [From our New 
York edition:] A miserable rain 
notwithstanding, 4,000 devotees 
thronged to the Metropolitan Op- 
era House last night [Nov. 271- 
starting its sixtieth season of op- 
era with a performance of Gou- 
nod’s “Faust” They thus heartily 
echoed a choice which in 1883 
first opened the building, mid ac- 
complished one more chapter in a 
tradition which three wars' have 
failed to daunt Lone casualties 
from olden days appeared to bA 
the white ties and once maf? 

culine uniforms de rigueur for 
Metropolitan openings. The men 
among the audience were mfid fo 
black ties and even plain business 
suits. It was the women who 
maintained the splendor associat- 
ed with six decades of openings 


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Tanks Reassure Nervous Rio 






Army Crackdown on Crime Seems to Pay Off 


I 


£ By Jofixi F. Burns 

; Ww Fit Times Service 

, ^KATMANDU, Nepal - 
vgRtoxe th^n a week after elec- 
Produced a divided Parlia- 
^yipa^the two main political 
^TPSr: fhe. vComai musts and 
^ ^c entrist Nepali Congress 
1^. party , ^ are . at an increasmgLy 
ftopasse oyer which wifi 
Ram the new government. 
-Ncuher party has been able 
... tolme np a coalition partner to 
- j. : assure a njigority in the 205-seat 
‘ .Fadiamentr The uncertainty 
/ l .• ^basnreated anew constitutional 
. & King Bixendra, who 

j ; yras fcwced by mass protests 
l mto ceding Ms ruling powers to 
' i ••. Parliament in 1990. 

4; Early in the vote, count, the 
- Communist Party of Nepal, the 
(' main .force in the -splintered 
f c ommuni st movement, built up 

* a strong lead over the Congress 

i. Party, which won power ui 1991 
It in the first election after the 
, i king relinquished .power. Bui a 
m late surge by the Congress Party 
T‘ rianrowed the gap. 

j ^ The. Communist coalition 
i . won 88 seats and.Congress took 
| : 83. An additional 20 seats went 
I to a rightist party with close ties 
j” to - the= long, the . New Demo- 
te crats, with the r emaining 14 
« ' 'seats spread among minor par- 
{ ties and independents. 

» The contest for power has 

j. been sharpened by an election 
I commission tally last week that 
j showed that, .-the Congress Par- 
j ty’s late .surge in returns from 
t ; rand seats had pushed it past 
j . ' the Commnnists in the popnlar 
! vote, 33 percent to 30 percent. 

| [The Communists gained 
support. Sunday from a tiny 
I pro-Indian party, Agence 
! France-Presse reported from 
i Katmandu. 

\ [The pro-Indian Nepali 

( Sadbhavana Parishad Party has 
? Only three seats in P arliame nt 
l not enough to give the Commu- - 
j nists d majority coalition. 

; [Leaders of the Cqmrrmnist 
J party, were meeting late Sunday 
i in preparation for the govern- 
] meat’s expected formation -on. 




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FIND OF ‘HANOI HILTON' — Karen Black holding a brick from Hoa Lo Prison in Hanoi, where her husband spent 
6% years as a prisoner of war. The “Hanoi Hilton" was being demolished Sunday to make way for an office complex. 


‘Hanoi Hannah War Legend Is at Peace 


- . -The Communists, growing, 
impatient, have warned that 
they: will call mass deraonstra- 


;^tidns -if the Congress Party 
i Pfeecks to remain in power. This 
}, has caused widespread anxiety. 


- partictilariy in. 


By Philip Shenon 

Netv York Turns Senicv 

HO CHI MINH CITY — Not many 
calling cards list an alias, but even, in 
Vietnam few people would know this 
slight, elegant 65-year-old woman by her 
real name, Trinh. Thi Ngo. 

The alias — Thu Huong — means Au- 
tumn Fragrance, the name she first used as 
an English-language radio announcer in 
the 1950s because it was easier for her non- 
Vietnamese listeners to pronounce. 

"Fewer syllables,” she said in the clear, 
nearly accentless English that helped her 
become a legend. And even (hat is not the 
name that millions of American veterans 
would recognize.. 

For a generation of American troops at 
war in Indochina, Mrs. Ngo was Hanoi 
Hannah, the silky-voiced announcer on 
North Vietnamese radio, the Voice of Viet- 
nam, who tried to convince American CIs 
that the war was immoral, that they should 
lay down their anus and go home. 

"My work was to make the GIs under- 
stand that it was not right for them to take 
part in this war,” she said. "I talk to them 
about the traditions of the Vietnamese, to 
resist aggression. I want them to know the 
truth about this war and to do a little bit to 
demoralize them so that they will refuse to 
fighL” 

It was the Americans who dubbed her 
Hanoi Hannah, the Vietnam War’s coun- 
terpart to Tokyo Rose. 

, “I only heard the name later.” said Mrs. 


Ngo, whose propaganda broadcasts to 
American troops lasted from 1965 until the 
Americans left in humiliation a decade 
later. “The Americans like nicknames." 

After Saigon was overrun in 1975 and 
renamed Ho Chi Minh City, she moved 
here with her husband. He is a retired 
engineer, while she still works in broad- 
casting, now at Vietnamese television. 

Reared in Hanoi during the French oc- 
cupation, Mrs. Ngo was sent to private 
tutors in the early 1 950s lo study English, a 
language that Hollywood had' made her 
eager to learn. 

"f always preferred American movies to 
French films," she said. "The French 
talked too much. There was more action in 
American movies. I remember ’Gone With 
the Wind' with Clark Gable and Vivien 
Leigh. It was so popular in Hanoi 1 re- 
member we took bread and sausages with 
us to the theater because it was such a long 
film.” 

Mrs. Ngo joined the Voice of Vietnam in 
1955, the year after the Communists under 
Ho Chi Minh ousted the French and took 


power in Hanoi after years in the jungle. 
She was selected as an announcer on the 
radio's new English-language shortwave 
service, which was beamed overseas. 

“I wanted to join the Voice of Vietnam 
because ii was a good opportunity to help 
mv country." she said. “1 was not political. 


my country," she said, “i was not political. 
I was patriotic.” 

Her work did not take an anti- American 
turn until 1965. when the first .American 


ground troops landed in Vietnam and the 
Hanoi government decided to begin spe- 
cial broadcasts to them. Using scripts pre- 
pared by the North Vietnamese Arniy, 
Mrs. Ngo said, she was never tempted to 
alter a word, no matter how strident the 
tone. 

"I agreed with these scripts,” she said. 
"We were trying to make the Americans 
understand that it was not right for them 
to be in Vietnam, that they were an aggres- 
sor. that this was a problem for the Viet- 
namese to sort oul” 

Mrs. Ngo said her goal was always to 
project a soothing, convincing voice. She 
said she never felt aggression toward 
Americans as a people “except during the 
bombing” — the 1972 Christmas bombing 
of Hanoi. 

And if she did once feel anger toward 
the United States, Mrs. Ngo insists that 
she put it behind her years ago. Like many 
northern Vietnamese, she expresses little 
but fascination for the land of her former 
enemy, and she hopes some day to visit 
"New York. Washington, many places.” 

Her enthusiasm for things American 
also extended to music, she said. Toentice 
the American troops to tune in to her 
show, the propaganda was intercut with 
music from records and tapes taken to 
Hanoi by visiting anti-war protesters from 
abroad. 

“We had Bob Dylan. Joan Baez, and I 
always liked Elvis Presley," she said. “He's 
*The King,’ yes?” 


By James Brooke 

Sen York Tunes Servne 

RIO DE JANEIRO — 
Two olive green Panther heli- 
copters droned in wide circles 
. over the vast, human amphi- 
theater of the Nova Brasilia 
shantytown. But in the shad- 
ows of one narrow alley, one 
cocaine trafficker said an 
eventual occupation by Bra- 
zilian Army soldiers gave him 
no fear. 

"The army won’t come in 
to massacre us,” said the traf- 
ficker, a lean young man 
sporting new sneakers. "Our 
guns will be hidden. There 
won’t be any shooting;" 

One week after army tanks 
and armored cars began ram- 
bling out of barracks in Rio 
for a crackdown on crime, the 
army has emerged as a reas- 
suring and nonviolent disci- 
plinarian in a city hungry for 
law and order. 

After dozens of shanty- 
town operations, the casual- 
ties amount lo only two — 
one soldier and one shanty- 
town resident, both apparent- 
ly wounded by accident. 
Most of the roughly 200 peo- 
ple detained have been re- 

No major arms arsenals or 
drugs caches have been 
found. But for a frightened 
city, the television images of 
helicopters and camouflaged 
soldiers at checkpoints have 
had a positive impact: From 
talk radio to beach chatter, 
Rio residents overwhelmingly 
say they feel safer than they 
have in years. 

"There is a less aggressive 
climate in the streets,” said 
Manoel Francisco Brito, ex- 


ecutive editor of Jornal do 
Brasil, an independent news- 
paper here. “People feel safer 
m the streets. It is undeniable 
that Rio is safer.” 

Even the simple announce- 
ment on Oct. 31 that the mili- 
tary would lake control of 
Rio’s police forces apparently 
was enough to cause crime to 
drop in the city, the nation's 
second largest. In the first 
two weeks of November, car 
thefts were down 10 percent, 
bank robberies were halved 
and murders were down 75 
percent from the comparable 
period in October. 

On Friday, in one of the 
largest operations to date, 
about 1,000 soldiers occupied 
a shantytown near the mid- 
dle-class Tijuca neighbor- 
hood. 

With army squads likely to 
set up surprise checkpoints at 
any time or any place, crimi- 
nals seem to be more reluc- 
tant to venture out with guns 
or to drive around the city in 
stolen cars. 

As peace offerings, gangs 
in two neighborhoods aban- 
doned small caches of weap- 
ons accompanied by hand- 
scrawled signs saying they 
were leaving town. 

"Our goal is to reduce 
crime to tolerable levels,” 
Colonel Ivan Cardozo. the 
army’s spokesman, said of the 
military's mission. The inter- 
vention is scheduled to expire 
at the end of December, but 
the governor-elect of Rio de 
Janeiro state, Marcello Alen- 
car, an enthusiastic support- 
er, is committed to extending 
the deployment into next 
year. 


Daily press briefings by an 
army officer dressed in civil- 
ian clothes evoke 1 memories 
of the days two decades ago 
wheh ; Brazil’s arniy. using tor- 
ture and assassination, fought 
to wipe out .urban' guerrilla 
groups.' But in- the decade 



since military rulers left pow- 
er. society's worries have 


er. society s worries have 
shifted from Communists to 
criminals, and the army's tac- 
tics have Shifted from the use 
of force to the show of force. 


a Re- 
t that 

icit by 
■lomon 


re was 
party 


While American and Euro- 
pean tourists may be alarmed 
at the sight of jeep convoys of 
soldiers carrying light auto- 
matic weapons, Brazilians 
seem to like what they see on 
national television. A flood of 
bookings is .filling Rio hotels 
for New Year’s Eve. when a 
fireworks display and a con- 
cert by Rod Stewart are ex- 
pected to draw 3 million peo- 
ple to Copacabana beach. 

"All the hotels will be full 
over New Year's," predicted 
Phillip Canuthers, general 
manager of the Copacabana 
Palace Hotel. "If this army 
exercise works out. 1 think we 
are going to get more Brazil- 
ians for the summer and for 
Carnival.” 


■k that 
i have 
al had 
roved. 
ecLhe 
little 
uld be 
tf con- 


Popular approval for the 
military intervention stretch- 
es to the favetas. the hillside 


es to the favetas, the hillside 
homes of many of the city's 
working poor. 

In a poll of Rio residents 
taken one week before the 
army action, backing for the 
military averaged 85 percent. 
Support was slightly higher 
among less educated and 
more impoverished respon- 
dents. 


Guerrillas Kill 16 Policemen in India 


Reuters 

HYDERABAD, India — 
Maoist guerrillas who have 
vowed to prevent elections in 
the southern state of Andhra 
Pradesh killed 16 policemen 
with a land mine, officials said 
Sunday. 

The "police officers were trav- 
eling in a truck to a remote 
security post in the district of 
Karimnagar, where Prime Min- 
ister P. V. Narasimha Rao ad- 
dressed an election rally on Fri- 
day, when the mine exploded 
under their vehicle on Saturday 
night. 


The officials said there were 
unconfirmed reports that three 
civilians also had been killed in 
the attack, part of a Maoist 
campaign to disrupt elections 
seen as crucial to the future of 
Mr. Rao and his Congress (I) 
Parly. 


Andhra Pradesh is due to 
vote for a new state assembly on 
Dec. 1 and 5, and defeat for the 
Congress (I) Party, which local 
opinion polls say is likely, 
would be a major embarrass- 
ment for Mr. Rao. 


Thousands of paramilitary 


police, many of them from out- 
side the state, have been de- 
ployed to counter attempts by 
the Maoist guerrillas to disrupt 
the elections. 

The 16 policemen who woe 
killed were all from the north- 
ern state of Puqjab. 

On Thursday, guerrillas kid- 
napped the brother of one of 
Mr. Rao's sons-in-law and de- 
manded a 10 million rupee 
(532,000) ransom for him. The 
police said Sunday that the man 
had been freed. They declined 
to comment on whether ransom 
had been paid. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


Israel and Jordan 
Announce the Start 
Of Diplomatic Ties 


< 'imtpiUii hr Our Slu/f t'nm Ihyahtm 

JERUSALliM — Israel an- 
nounced the establishment of 
diplomatic lies Sunday with 
Jordan, a month after signing a 
peace treaty ending a 46-year 
state of war. 

ft made Jordan the second 
Arab country to have such ties 
with the Jewish stale. The other 
is Egypt, which signed a treaty 
with Israel in 1979. 

Israel and Jordan “hereby 
declare as of today to establish 
diplomatic relations at the am- 
bassadorial level." a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, Danny 
Shek, said in a statement. 

He said the new relations aim 
to consolidate and enhance the 
two nations’ peace “to the bene- 
fit of expanding the horizons of 
a just, lasting and comprehen- 
sive peace in the region.” 

The ministry's director-gen- 
eral, Uri Savir. told Israeli radio 
that ambassadors would be ex- 
changed Dec. 10. or within the 
six weeks allotted by the peace 
treaty signed Oct. 26. 

A simultaneous announce- 


ment. broadcast in Amman by 
state-run radio, said that Jor- 
dan's 3 1 -member cabinet had 
approved the lies. 

Israel has not named its am- 
bassador to Amman. The daily 
Yedioth Ahronoth said that the 
outgoing army chief of staff. 
Lieutenant General Ehud Ba- 
rak, had turned down the posL 

In an issue relating to anoth- 
er neighbor, Mr. Savir also said 
that Israel has asked the Euro- 
pean Union to reconsider its 
expected decision to lift an em- 
bargo on arms sales to Syria. 

“There is still a Syrian em- 
bargo on a peace agreement and 
on direct peace negotiations” 
with Israel, he said, calling any 
lifting of the embargo “a diplo- 
matic mistake.” 

An EU official said Friday 
that the eight-year ban would 
be lifted when its ministers met 
a Syrian delegation in Brussels 
on Monday. The ban was im- 
posed after charges that Syria 
was involved in an attempt to 
smuggle explosives onto an Is- 
raeli airliner. (AP. Reuters) 



A Major Crisis Looms at NATO: 
Bosnia Splitting U.S. and Allies 


Pamci ELu’i'^nw-Fram-rrr'V 

An elderly mao praying among the more than 10,000 Palestinians at a Gaza Islamic rally. 


GAZA; Palestinian Police and Islamic Fundamentalists Struggle to Maintain a Fragile Peace 


Continued from Page 1 
to anonymous graffiti artists 
and pamphleteers. 

“Yasser Arafat does not even 
deserve to be a Palestinian.” 
said a rally organizer. “His ac- 
tions show that he has no rela- 
tionship to the Palestinian peo- 
ple.” 

Likewise, Arafat loyalists 
have called Hamas a puppet of 
other countries. 

“I fought the Israelis for 25 


years, and I don’t need some 
bearded guy in Iran to approve 
my nationalist credentials,” 
said Mr. Jabali. 

But neither side wants civil 
war. 

Mr. Arafat regards his fledg- 
ling and limited self-rule au- 
thority as the nucleus of a fu- 
ture Palestinian state, which 
would have the West Bank as its 
heart. Aides said he knew Israel 
would not cede the West Bank 


until he had produced at least 
relative stability in Gaza. 

The Islamic militants, for 
their pan, know they are out- 
numbered and outgunned by 
the PLO security force. They 
also have found a measure of 
security in Mr. Arafat's autono- 
mous zone. Nowhere in the oc- 
cupied West Bank could a Ha- 
mas leader make explicit 
threats to direct its “guns 
against Israel” — as Mr. Faluji 
did in Gaza. 


“We are mainly concerned 
with damaging Israel." he said. 
“Our equation is, the more the 
authority will pressure us, the 
more we will answer back in 
Israel because we consider the 
authority the tool of Israel and 
we will hit against its head.” 

m Settler Killed by Gunmen 
Gunmen believed to be Is- 
lamic militants opened fire Sun- 
day on a car canying Israeli 
settlers near the West Bank 


town of Beit Hagai The Associ- 
ated Press reported. Officials 
said one Israeli was killed and 
another was wounded. 

More than 30 bullets were 
fired in the barrage, according 
to Israeli radio. 

Israeli sources said a car car- 
rying at least two armed men 
overtook the settlers' car and 
then the gunmen opened fire. 
One source said the driver was 
hit by bullets and lost control of 
the car, which then overturned. 


By Craig R. Whitney. .. 

New York Tinxs Scmrc 

BONN — In London, Paris 
and here in Bonn, some officials 
are beginning to fear that 
NATO could be headed toward 
its gravest crisis since 1956. 
when the United States clashed 
with Britain and France over 
their attempt to seize the Suez 
Canal. 

This time, the issue is Bosnia, 
where Europeans and .Ameri- 
cans have been at odds over 
how to react to aggression by- 
Bosnian Serbs against the Mus- 
lim-led Bosnian government. 

Disagreement is becoming 
increasingly- acrimonious, de- 
spite diplomatic attempts to 
patch up the quarrel 

Last’ week, according to 
lomats, the undersecretary of 
state for political affairs, Peter 
Tarnoff, went to Paris to see 
Foreign Minister Alain Juppe. 
His mission was to deny, in per- 
son, recent reports that the 
United Slates bad been secretly- 
arming the Bosnians. 

According to one diplomat. 
Mr. Juppe told Mr. Tarnoff, “I 
take note of your statement” — 
diplomatic language, unusual 
between supposed allies, for “I 
won’t come right out and say it. 
but I don’t believe you.” 

In London, advisers to Prime 
Minister John Major worry that 
the new. Republican-dominat- 
ed Congress could force Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton to a unilateral 
U1SL* decision to violate a Unit- 
ed Nations-imposed. NATO- 
enforced arms embargo against 
the Bosnian government. 

Acting under congressional 
pressure. Mr. Clinton has al- 
ready directed U.S. ships to 
stop” taking active measures to 
enforce the naval blockade in 
the Adriatic to halt ships with 
arms for the Bosnian govern- 


ment, and not to share intelli- 
gence about , them with the al- 
lies. . . 

■ American officials say that 
much depends on whether Sen- 
ator Bob Dole, who is expected 
to become majority leader of 
the new Senate, can be persuad- 
ed to change bis mind about the 
wisdom of Washington's unilat- 
erally violating the .embargo. 
Mr. Dole will be in. London 
next week, and Mr. Major is 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ready to tell him that such a 
move would expose the 1 8,000- 
strong UN protection force in 
Bosnia to disaster. . 

“If the parties restart aJJ-out 
war or the arms embargo breaks 
down,” the UN military- force 
in the Balkans could have “no 
choice but to withdraw,"- the 
prime minister said Thursday. 

NATO has approved contin- 
gency plans for providing air 
support and ground reinforce- 
ments to cover such a with- 
drawal, if it becomes necessary, 
but diplomats in all the major 
capitals say that a humiliating 
retreat forced by unilateral U.S. 
action would put NATO under 
strain for years. 

British and American offi- 
cials hope it will not come to 
that. But on Thursday night, a 
U.S. attempt to persuade the 
NATO allies to gel tough on 
Serbs attacking the northwest- 
ern Bosnian enclave of Bihac 
ran aground in Brussels when 
France objected, saying that en- 
forcing a Uni led Nations “safe 
area” around the town would 
take thousands of additional 
ground troops. 

France, with 6,000 soldiers 
already in the former Yugosla- 
via, could not provide any 
more. And the British, with 


kbout 4,000, said in effect, 
“Don't look at us.” 

So, the French representative 
at the meeting wanted to know, 
where were the soldiers needed 
to make this new American 
plan work going to come from? 

The United States remains 
unwilling to provide any. Mr. 
Clinton concluded after he was 
elected that the American peo- 
ple did not want him to risk 
American lives in the Balkans. 

Instead, he sent Secretary of 
State Warren M. Christopher to 
Europe to try to persuade the 
iHitx; to lift the arms embargo 
for the Muslim-led Bosnians 
and to support them with air 
strikes against the Serbs.' ' 

Mr. Christopher failed, and 
the United States failed again 
on Thursday to get the allies to 
agree to carry- out air strikes 
against the Serbian forces now 
occupying 15 to 20. percent of 
the safe area around Bihac un- 
less they withdrew and allowed 
the Muslim defenders safe pas- 
sage out as welL 
. .NATO and American offi- 
cials have begun openly dispar- 
aging the “double-key” ar-. 
rangemem the alliance mad^t 
with the United Nations when : 
it first stepped into the conflict 
in 1993 in an effort to deter 
more vigorous military action. 
NATO has no combat forces in 
Bosnia and can send in air 
strikes only if civilian and mili- 
tary commanders of the UN 
force approve. - 

“I hope we never see it 
again,” 'the assistant secretary 
of state for European .Affairs. 
Richard C. Holbrooke, said 
Thursday in London. "The dual 
key turns into a dual veto, be- 
cause of the enormous com' 
plexity of two different com- 
mand structures with two 
different missions.’* 


A BOY!; Passengers and Crew Pitch In During the Birth of d Baby Aboard Florida-Bound Jet Serbs Keep Up Attack and Take UN Hostages 


Continued from Page I 

quern, and it appeared that she 
was starting to hemorrhage. 

“The plane has to come 
down,” Dr. Rachlin told the 
crew. Captain Gerald McFerrin 
radioed controllers at the clos- 
est major airfield. Dulles Inter- 
national Airport outside Wash- 
ington. that he was going to 
make an unscheduled landing. 

That was when most passen- 
gers on Flight 265 learned what 
was going on. 


"I want eveiy arm, elbow and 
foot out of the aisle!" ordered 
Connie Duquette, a flight atten- 
dant for 22 years. The crew be- 
gan running linens between 
first class and Mrs. de Bara’s 
airborne bed. 

Suddenly she screamed. 
Holding his wife's legs, Mr. de 
Bara could see black hair as his 
son's head appeared. U I felt 
helpless," he said. "We had 
worked so hard for this baby. I 
didn’t want it to end like this." 


"ft’s here,” the doctor an- 
nounced. The cabin was eerily 
silent. Dr. Rachlin told Theresa 
to take deep breaths and push. 
Out came the baby, the umbili- 
cal cord wrapped around his 
neck. The plane was 90 miles 
( 150 kilometers) from Dulles. 

The child was not breathing. 
A couple several rows away 
rushed over and identified 
themselves as Jim and Jen Mid- 
gely, paramedics from Massa- 
cuseiis. They had delivered 


about a dozen babies, and Jen 
Midgely said her specialty was 
infant respiratory procedure. 

She needed a straw to suction 
fluid from the baby’s lungs, but 
no straws were on board. Then 
a flight attendant remembered 
she had a juice box with a tiny, 
bendable straw. Mrs. Midgelv 
gently pushed it down the in- 
fant's throat while Dr. Rachlin 
administered CPR. The child 
began to breathe on his own. 

Something was needed to tie 


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off the umbilical cord. Miss Du- 
quette looked down and saw a 
pair of dirty sneakers. The 
flight attendant hesitated for a 
moment. “Then I saw a man 
wearing new shoes, and 1 said. 
‘Sir. 1 need your shoelace,' " she 
said. “He whipped that shoe- 
lace off so fast" 

As the plane landed and tax- 
ied down the runway. Miss Du- 
quette got on the public-ad- 
dress system: “It’s a bov." The 
cabin erupted in applause. The 
flight attendants were crying. 
Finally, so was the baby. 

As with all. premature in- 
fants, Matthew's recovery is 
still uncertain, although the’ ear- 
ly prognosis is good. He 
weighed 4 pounds 6 ounces and 
was 17 inches Iona. 

Emergency workers took 
mother and newborn to the hos- 
pital. The de Baras credit the 
hospital staff for their son’s 
middle name. After his doctor, 
and then the nurses, started 
calling him Dulles, the name 
sort of stuck. 

Dr. Rachlin and the others 
went back to their seats, and 30 
minutes later the plane was on 
its way to Florida. Everyone got 
free drinks. The doctor had a 
couple. 


Continued from Page 1 
would put them well on their 
way to uniting Serbian-held 
Bosnia with Serbian-controlled 
Croatia. 

A senior UN official said that 
by accepting the deal, the most- 
ly Muslim government ap- 
peared to be acknowledging 
that it was in "a fatally weak 
position.” 

Indeed. Serbian assaults Sun- 
day on the Bihac pocket contin- 
ued to squeeze the Muslims. 
The UN chief spokesman, Mi- 
chael Williams, said that in- 
stead of blasting the Bihac safe 
area, Croatian Serbian forces 
had taken the initiative and 
hammered the northern town of 
Velika Kiadusa with tank and 


artillery" fire along with a 
ground assault. 

Under the terms of an agree- 
ment made between the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization 
and the UN peacekeeping com- 
mand in October, each side can 
request air strikes in Bosnia bur 
only the UN command in Za- 
greb can approve them, 

That agreement was worked 
out because of NATO concerns 
that the UN mission was ignor- 
ing Serbian violations of two 
weapons exclusion zones, 
around Sarajevo and’Gorazde, 
and UN Security Council reso- 
lutions in the interest of appeasr 
ing die Serbs so that their heavi- 
armed forces would not hurt 
soldiers. 


iy ar 
UN 


In Bihac itself, a UN official 
described the situation as Ex- 
tremely dire.” Speaking by tele- 
phone to reporters from the Bi- 
hac enclave, Ed Joseph, a civil 
affairs officer, said people fell 
that ‘^ust next door is the holo- 
caust, the wolf is at the door.” 
He said Serbian front lines had 
already encroached into the 
built-up parts of Bihac town. 

Few people, however, wan^i 
to leave, he said, because there 
was no place to go. 

“They’d be leaving whatever 
food and shelter they have now 
for some other place that 
doesn’t even have the paper sta- 
tus of a 1 ‘safe area," he said. 
“They re prepared to die.” 


WAR: U.S. Offers Its Gloomiest View Yet on Bosnia 


CHINA: 

Latest Revolution 

Cbntinuwl from Rage I 

ers, they thought that sleeping 
together, literally just sleeping 
together in the same bed. was a 
reproductive act. 

“It’s no joke,” the official 
Guangming Daily said last 
week in retelling the story. 

A 22-year-old female univer- 
sity graduate, who like most of 
her classmates giggled through 
mandatory sex education vid- 
eos as a freshmen and decided 
by her third year that having sex 
with ber boyfriend was O.K., 
said. “Maybe this couple is Lhe 
only one that could make such a 
mistake.” 

Maybe, maybe not, say Chi- 
nese officials who want to rein- 
force sex education programs 
that began in the mid-1980s. 

. The popular Southern Week- 
end newspaper now carries -a 
.regular column on sex, which 
this month posed the question. 
“What do women need from 
sex?" . * 

■ In Mandarin, the answer is a 
“high .tide." ' or orgasm. The 
newspaper said, that women 
reach high tide 40 percent of the 
time and that one-sixth of the 
women surveyed had never ex- 
perienced a high tide. 

** Husbands, should under- 
stand women's needs -about 
sex." the article said. “Sexual 
high tide riot, only benefits 
women's health, but also, bene- 
fits women's spirit ” 

Such openness not only was 
unheard of a decad.e ago but 
also might have been illegal. 

For decades under. Mao* Ze- 
dong. prudery was the ideok 
cal fashion, at least out in ti 
open. But in Deng Xiaoping's 
era of reform, sex — like capi- 
talism — has enjoyed a huge 
resurgence. . 


Continued from Page 1 
the Senate, said In a televised 
interview that NATO had suf- 
fered “a complete breakdown" 
in Bosnia, and he called for the 
removal of all 24.000 UN 
forces, including the UN lead- 
ership there, the special envoy. 
Yasushi Akashi. and Lieuten- 
ant General Michael Rose. 

“Puli ’em out," an angry Mr. 
Dole declared. “They're not do- 
ing their job and 'they’re in 
harm’s way.” 

“This is a classic failure in 
which NATO has been tied in 
knots" by the United Nations, 
Mr. Dole said on the eve of a 
European trip that will include 
meetings with 


NATO officials. 


He also said that Congress 
should “take a hard look” at 
U.S. funding for UN opera- 
tions. 

The senator also said that 
Haris Stlajdzic. the Bosnian for- 
eign minister, believed that the 
Serbs may have obtained a new 
air-defense system from Russia. 
Mr. Dole provided no details, 
but be repeated his call for a 
lifting of the UN arms embargo 
in Bosnia. 

Mr. Perry said that any his- 
torical assessment of the Bosni- 
an war would have to conclude 
that UN peacekeepers had suc- 
ceeded in limiting the level of 
violence there and in preventing 
the civil war from spreading to 


neighboring countries. But he 
acknowledged that the West 
had not succeeded in stopping 
the conflict. 

‘To affect the outcome of the 
war, to win the war. so to speak, 
would lake several hundred 
thousand troops with heavy 
weapons, undoubtedly involv- 
ing significant casualties ,” he 
said. . 

“Now, President Clinton has 
decided not to make that com- 
mitment. President Bush before 
him decided not to make that 
commitment, and I have to tell 
you that. I am not prepared to 
recommend the deployment of 
those several hundred thousand 
ground troops.” 


DIVISIONS: New Em’s Dangers Rivaling Cold War’s 


Continued from Page 1 

Yugoslavia has seen an atavistic 
retreat into nationalist futy that 
has cast the shadow of concen- 
tration camps and the Serbian 
slaughter of Bosnia’s Muslims 
across the European Continent. 

Against this madness, grand 
Wilsonian ■ principles like the 
self-determination of peoples 
and grand institutions like the 
United Nations and NATO 
have proved no insurance. . 

All of them will probably 
have to be rethought after the 
death of 250,000 people and the 
displacement of 2 million in a 
Bosnian conflict bom of old 
grievances, economic stagna- 
tion. the cynical leadership of 
communisis-turned-national- 
ists and Western disarray. 

Certainly, the gloom of Bos- 
nia has come not only from the 
fighting. It has also stemmed 
from the way NATO, the Euro- 
pean Union and the United Na- 
tions have been revealed as 
cumbersome and divided be- 
fore the ethnic conflicts of post- 
communist Europe. 

In July. President Bill Clin- 
ton was celebrating cooperation 
between the United States and 
Europe during the Cold War. 

"No wall can forever contain 
the mighty power of freedom," 
he intoned in Berlin, at the site 
of the wall that once divided the 
city. But he did noi mention the 
divided city of Sarajevo, where 
American soldier* have been as 
conspicuously absent as they 
were decisively present in Ber- 
lin, and his words rang hollow 
in a Europe now increasingly 
bereft of American leadership" 

Of course Sarajevo.is not Ber- 
lin. at least not yet: a division of 


the world into hostile blocs does 
not lurk behind the city's barri- 
ers. But it is far from clear that 
Europe's new cleavages, rooted 
in the vagaries of tribal alle- 
giance, are less menacing than 
those of the Cold War. Already, 
the potential of Bosnia's rival 
armies to be proxies for a resur- 
gent Islam arid for pan-Slavic 
sentiment is apparent. 

Already, the three states in 
Eastern Europe without a clear 
ethnic identity — the Soviet 
Union, Yugoslavia and Czecho- 
slovakia — have disintegrated 
since the fall of communism 
five years ago. 

But fertile soil for the Yugo- 
slav disease exists elsewhere in 
Eastern Europe and the Bal- 
kans. Long subservience, to 
alien empires or Communist 
Party rulers, economic back- 
wardness. historical grievances 
and the general absence of dem- 
ocratic tradition, have created 
receptive audiences for militant 
nationalism, which has a facile 
appeal in' that it promises a glo- 
rious future on the basis of a 
supposedly glorious past. 

There are more than 25 mil- 
lion ethnic Russians outside 
Russia, at least 2.3 million eth- 
nic Hungarians outside Hunga- 
ry. at .least 2 J2 million ethnic 
Albanians in Macedonia and 
the Kosovo region of Serbia, a 
vociferous Greek minority in 
Albania and a large Turkish mi- 
nority in Bulgaria. 

If Serbian claims to territory 
could bring an intractable war 
to the Balkans, what of an even- 
tual explosion of Russian na- 
tionalism under Vladimir V. 
Zhirinovsky, or an Albanian 
drive to unite its people in u 


single country or a sudden 
Hungarian itch to recover the 
large swaths of territory lost to 
Romania, Yugoslavia and * 
Czechoslovakia after World ^ 
War I? 

. 'Unease is evident. Ethnic Al- 
banians vow to achieve autono- 
my, or even independent slates, 
in Kosovo and western Mac- 
edonia. Greece has expelled 
more than 50,000 ethnic Alba- 
nians in reprisal for the arrest of 
five ethnic -Greeks in Albania. 
The ethnic Russians in the Bal- 
tic states and the Ukraine are a 
lingering source of tension. 

Romania's Hungarian mi- 
nority is fuming over a recent 
decision by the local authorities 
to remove a bronze statue of a 
15th-century king. Mathias, 
from the Transylvanian .city of 
Cluj because, some Romanians 
say. he symbolizes 500 years of 
Hungarian oppression’ before 
Transylvania became Roma- 
nian after World War I. - 

Averting these dangers is ar- 
duous. The Iron Curtain was all 
of a piece: It could be policed- 
and American troops, among 
others, did so. But the jagged 
fragments of old enmities con- 
stitute a mined and scattered 
terrain. 

“The Yugoslav war has. re- 
vealed! Western institutions as 
bungling, incompetent aad 
powerless,” said Jonathan EyaL 
the director of studies at -the 
Institute of Strategic Studies 
London. “We thought we coulc 
bark and people in the Balkans 
would listen, but they defied.us 
and found us- naked. The mes- 
sage that sends is terrible.- Tlw. 
only question now is. how vio- 
lent the Bosnian war will. he and 
how far will.it spread.” 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


Page 7 


Smokeless Cigarette to Refire Industry? 


BOOKS 


By Philip j. mus 

■ 1 ' York Tima Sentee 

^22KLS33Mtt 

yeartbat produces little smokef^OT^d 

■^ssaar--— 

- tfie. Asmoke cigarette, is gambling that 
aich^aproduct can bring new Hf e w the 

‘ '--T5 ? ne ^ ****** R- J - Reynolds hopes, 
. couM undercut some of the most bask 
arguments made against smoking: that cig- 
arettes are extremely hazardous to smokers 
and that secondhand smoke is irritating 
and harmful to nonsmokers. 

The i argument on secondhand smoke 
has led to smoking bans in 700 cities and 
counhes in the last two years, prohibiting 
smoking in public places as diverse as 
■ airplanes, restaurants and even sports sta- 
i (hums. 

■The new cigarette, called Eclipse, does 
• not burn the tobacco but uses smoldering 
charcoal to extract the flavor, cutting the 
cancer-causing tars of other cigarettes by 



the cigarette because 
. it. does not have the scientific evidence to 
back up the c laim. 

The company introduced a similar non- 
k' burning cigarette, called Premier, in 1988, 
' but it was withdrawn because smokers 
. disliked the. flavor and critics protested 
■» that it was intended to lure new smokers 
. and prevent current ones from quitting. 

Reynolds, thinks it has found a way to 
~ deal with those problems. The objections 


by smokers have been largely overcome by 
making the cigarette smell, taste and look 
more like a regular cigarette. And the com- 
pany plans to market Eclipse in an unusual 
m a nn er in town meetings in which smok- 
ers would be introduced to the cigarette 

R. J. Reynolds is again 
gambling that a new product 
can undercut some basic 
arguments made agains t 
smoking. 

and then, once convinced, would, the com- 
pany hopes, spread the word about it. 

Reynolds says the converts could also be 
the company’s strongest advocates against 
government regulation that could take the 
cirarette off the market. 

Thomas C. Griscom, executive vice 
president of Reynolds, said that the com- 
pany saw Eclipse seizing a small share of 
the market in the beginning — perhaps 1 
percent — but that the share would steadi- 
ly grow as people tried the new cigarette. 
“After that, there is no way of knowing 
how big the market could be, because there 
is no other product like this,” he said. 
“This is where we hope the future of the 
company is.” 

Because the new cigarette delivers as 
much nicotine as regular cigarettes, it is 
just as addictive. Nicotine, although not 
the most harmful component of conven- 
tional cigarettes, nevertheless carries some 
risk of heart disease. The cigarette also 
delivers about as much carbon monoxide, 
which is toxic to the lungs, as regular 
cigarettes. 

James O'Hara, the chief spokesman for 


the Food and Drug Administration, said, 
“We haven't seen this new product yet, but 
the scientific data needs to be looked at. 
and we would be pleased to meet with the 
company” 

For more than a year, Reynolds has 
been conducting consumer tesis in which 
the cigarette has scored very strongly both 
among smokers and their nonsmoking 
spouses and family members. More than 
80 percent of both groups who have been 
part of the testing say they believe the 
cigarette is a breakthrough. 

The Eclipse cigarette looks like a stan- 
dard, while filtered cigarette, and contains 
tobacco and reconstituted tobacco parts as 
conventional cigarettes do. But it does not 
work as a regular cigarette does. 

The crucial difference is at the lighted 
end At that end is a piece of charcoal, 
wrapped in a fiberglass insulator. When 
the charcoal is lit. it burns at about 900 
degrees centigrade, (,1652 degrees Fahren- 
heit} or about the same as the flame on a 
regular cigarette. But it is wrapped in an 
insulator so that it does not start the tobac- 
co on fire. 

Just behind the charcoal are processed 
tobacco parts containing more than 50 
percent glycerine, which vaporizes at tem- 
peratures below those that would bum a 
cigarette. The glycerine thus makes a 
smoke-like medium that can carry the to- 
bacco flavors without burning the tobacco. 

In effect, then, the cigarette works like a 
coffee maker. The hot air passes through 
the glycerine and tobacco, carrying flavor 
and nicotine, just as water passing through 
coffee grounds picks up flavor, and leaves 
the coffee grounds behind in the filter. 

Because the cigarette does not bum. it 
remains the same length after it is smoked 
and the tobacco taste is depleted. 


DICTATORSHIP OF VIR- 
TUE: M ulricol turalism and 
ibe Battle for America's 
Future 

By Richard Bernstein. 367 
pages. $25. Alfred A. Knopf. 

Reviewed by 
Nicholas Lemaun 

I N the prologue where he sets 
out his purpose, which is to 
excoriate the Left (mostly edu- 
cational) for the sins it commits 
in the name of fighting racism 
and sexism, Richard Bernstein 
demonstrates that the phenom- 
enon he deplores is on the rise 
by doing a Nexis search for the 
words “multicultural” and 
“multiculturalism.” There are 
40 appearances in 1981. more 
than 2,000 in 1992: “a 50-fold 
increase in just 1 1 years .” 

Another side of the story can 
be imparted by replicating Bern- 
stein's Nexis exercise using the 
phrases “politically correct” and 
“political correctness,” which 
are used always sarcastically, 
never straightforwardly, by the 
opponents, not the supporters, 
of multiculturalism. The result is 
7 appearances in 1991. and 5.007 


in 1992 — a 700-fold increase 
during the same period. 

Perhaps it doesn't look this 
way to people on campuses, but 
from the outride a pitched battle 
appears to be going on over mul- 
uculturahsm, with both sides 
passionate and well armed. 

To appreciate “Dictatorship 
of Virtue” fully, though, re- 
quires sharing the view of Bern- 
stein, a New York Times re- 
porter, that criticism of political 
correctness “for a few weeks, 
was something of a national 
media event,” whereas multi- 
culturalism Is “a movement 
gathering force,” “extremely 
powerful,” “vast and ever- 
growing,” “the establishment” 
and a “giant force,” providing 
entrfee “to book contracts, to 
prominence in American life” ; 
it “covers the public discussion 
of crucial issues with a layer of 
fear.” 

In short, “the mititicultura- 
lists have won.” 

If this is the case, then the 
horror stories that make up the 
heart of this book merely dra- 
matize a much more general 
campus reign of terror in which 
free thought and speech no 
longer exist, the cause of “diver- 
sity” is used to impose a rigid 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Yannick Noah, captain of 
the French Davis Cup team, is 
reading “ Face a la Deiresse. " by 
Professor Leon Schwartzienbeig. 

“The professor is a friend of 
mine, we were recently in Jericho 
and Jerusalem playing football. I 
was particularly interested in his 
views on the situation of society 
and ethics in France today. His 
explanations are lurid and en- 
lightening." 

(Margaret Kemp , IHT) 



BRIDGE 


Archbishop Rivera of Salvador Dies at 71 


Las Angeles Tima Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Arch- 
bishop Arturo Rivera y Dam as, 
who led El Salvador's besieged 
Roman Catholic Church 
through civil war as its priests 
were assassinated and its pa- 
rishioners persecuted, died Sat- 
urday of a heart attack, his 
. aides said. He was 71 years old. 

Often the lone voice of the 
. nation's conscience. Archbish- 
op Rivera spent much of the 
1980s promoting dialogue be- 
tween leftist guerrillas and the 
U.S. -backed, government 
forces, who fought a war in 
which tens of thousands of peo- 
ple died. His efforts helped 
■ bring about the peace accords 
that ended the conflict in 1992. 

As the peace agreements fal- 
tered is recent months. Arch- 
bishop Rivera spoke out to de- 
mand political reforms, a fair 
system of justice and an end to 
the impunity that has allowed 


some of the war's worst atroc- 
ities to gp unpunished. 

He was appointed by Pope 
John Paul H after the murder m 
1980 of Monsignor Oscar Ar- 
nulfo Romero, a critic of the 
army and the government. 

The new archbishop adopted 
a less confrontational, more 
measured style. He emerged in 
the 1980s as a champion of hu- 
man rights and social justice. 

Michael Somes, 77, Ex-Star 
Of Royal Ballet in London 

LONDON (NYT) — Mi- 
chael Somes, the first male star 
to be trained by the Royal Bal- 
let and Margot Fonteyn’s long- 
time partner, died Nov. 18 in 
London. He was 77 years old. 

The cause was a brain tumor, 
according to the newspaper The 
Guardian. 

Mr. Somes was often called 
the conscience of the Royal Bal- 


let because of his familiarity 
with the company’s develop- 
ment since the 1930s and his 
high standards in teaching and 
staging the troupe's signature 
works in London and abroad. 

As a performer, he made his 

X tation as a danseur noble , 
excelled in the 19th-centu- 
ry classics and in Frederick 
Ashton's ballets. But after he 
succeeded Robert Helpmann as 
Miss Fonteyn’s regular partner 
in 1950, audiences identified 
him largely with one of classical 
ballet’s most notable partner- 
ships. 

His achievement in this re- 
gard was summed up in 1 957 by- 
John Martin, dance critic of 
The New York Times, who not- 
ed Mr. Somes's deliberate “self- 
effacement" with the English 
ballerina but added: “How 
large he looms as an artist in his 
own right Visually handsome 


and noble in carriage and de- 
portment he infuses the succes- 
sion of basically wooden 
princes with humanity and in- 
nate gallan try." 

Willem Jacob Luyten. 95, an 
astronomer whose work ex- 
panded the understanding of 
stellar motion, dying white 
dwarfs and the origin of the 
solar system, died of heart fail- 
ure Nov. 21 in Minneapolis. 

Maynard L. Pennell, 84. a 
former executive of Boeing Co. 
who for 34 years played a lead- 
ing role in the development of 
nearly every type of aircraft the 
company made, died of Parkin- 
son’s disease Tuesday in Seat- 
tle. 

George J. Feldman. 91. a for- 
mer UJS. ambassador to Lux- 
embourg and Malta and a lead- 
ing figure in the U.S. space 
effort died Tuesday io Bryn 
Mawr. Pennsylvania. 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE first National Par Con- 
test was played with 301 
entrants playing is their own 
homes, eyes glued to computer 
screens. 

Consider how to play four 
hearts on the diagramed deal 
after the lead of the diamond 
deuce. When North invites 
game by raising one heart to 
three hearts, limit South thinks 
he has plenty in hand for game. 
He is slightly worried about 
missing a slam, but as it turns 
out even a game is defeated if a 
spade is led. 

This par deal had a simple 
moral: think carefully at the 
first trick, because the second 
trick may be too late. Luckily 
for South, a diamond is led, not 
a spade, and he inspects the 
dummy. He discovers an irritat- 
ing duplication of distribution: 
each of his suit lengths exactly 
matches the dummy's. He is in 
danger of losing two spade 
tricks, a diamond and a club, 
and this will happen if West has 
an opportunity to lead spades 
twice. He has" already missed 
one chance, but will gel two 
more if South casually wins the 
first trick. 

The kev to success is to let 


East win the first trick with the 
diam ond nine. Declarer then 
wins the diamond return, draws 
trumps, cashes the remaining 
high diam ond and plays the ace 
and another club. West wins 
with the king and leads a spade, 
but too late. South plays low 
from dummy, and when East 
wins with die jack he must 
make a losing lead: either a 
spade from the king, or a mi- 
nor-suit card giving a ruff and 
stuff. 

NORTH 
* A Q 9 
9 Q J 7 32 
0 8 5 3 
*Q6 


cation ancTshow trials of politi- 
cal criminals are commonplace. 

Many of Bernstein’s anec- 
dotes will be familiar, at least in 
outline, to readers who keep up 
on the PC issue, because they 
have been written about often 
enough to form a miniature 
canon: the proposal to require 
freshmen at the University of 
Texas to take a course railed 
“Writing About Difference”: 
the persecution of a Penn stu- 
dent who called a group of 
black women “water buffalo”; 
Brookline High School's at- 
tempt to drop a European his- 
tory course; the assigning of 
“Children of the Rainbow Cur- 
riculum” in New York City 
public schools; the firing of a 
tenured professor at the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire over 
flimsy sexual harassment 
charges; the leaflet at Smith 
College that labeled “lookism" 
a form of oppression, and so on. 

Bernstein, whose previous 
books include “From the Cen- 
ter of the Earth" and “Fragile 
Glory,” recapitulates these 
cases with drama and fervor, on 
the basis of his own interviews 
and of printed and taped mate- 
rial given to him by the anli- 
multiculturalists, along with 
more pro forma research about 
the other side's position. 

He presents himself as being a 


believer in multicultural princi- 
ples. But he says he has become 
disillusioned after seeing so 
much bad done in the name of 
good — hence the book’s title. 

Notwithstanding this en- 
dorsement of multiculturalism 
in principle. Bernstein never 
finds a single example of it in 
practice that he approves of. 
Everything multiculturalists 
protest fails to cross his own 
threshold of outrage. Every 
multiculturalist thrust is pre- 
sented as self-evidently absurd. 

To pick a small but represen- 
tative case, only somebody who 
hasn't carefully read the work of 
the leading historians of the 
American West could see, as 
Bernstein apparently does, Fred- 
erick Jackson Turner as some- 
one who is out of fashion only 
because he has been deemed 
“Eurocentric,” and his revision- 
ist, Patricia Nelson Limerick, as 
a heavy, ill- informed ideologue. 

Certainly, Bernstein’s com- 
plaints about people who have 
“an exaggerated sense of aggrie- 
vement” and about an “industry 
of exaggeration” that has creat- 
ed “a misleading impression of 
American life” are strangely 
easy to apply to his own work. 

Nicholas Lemann, a national 
correspondent for The Atlantic, 
wrote this for The New York 
Times. 


WEST 
• 10 8 7 
984 
.0 Q74 2 
*K843 


EAST (D) 

* K J 32 
09 

C J 10 9 

* J 10 0 5 2 
SOUTH 

♦ 6 5 4 

9 A K 10 6 5 
0 AK6 

* A 7 


North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

East South West North 

Pass 1 9 Pass 3 9 

Pass 4 9 Pass Pass 

Pass 

West led the diamond two. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


^PTAI MARKETS ONjWOWPAY 


Most Active International Bonds 


The 250 most active international bonds traded 
through the Euroctear system for the week ending 
Nov. 25. Prices supplied by Tetekurs. 


ft* Name 

Cpn 

Maturity 

Price 

Yield 

Austrian Schilling 

147 Austria 

7% 

10/18/04 

100.0000 

741300 

Belgian Franc 

168 Belgium OLO 

7 

04/29/W 

973650 

7.1700 


7ta 

04/29/04 

97-3800 

74500 

207 Belgium olo 

7% 

10/15/04 

96.7500 

841100 

British Pound 

141 Danmark FRN 

5% 

08/24/98 

993900 

5.9540 

778 Fort Credit 

8% 

11/21/97 

993250 

86400 

244 GECC 

8<m 

11/18/96 

100.7500 

8.1900 

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23S Canada 

7% 

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7 

12/15/04 

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9 

11/15/98 

1024500 

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6 

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103 Treuhond 

105 Germany 

106 Treuhond 
111 Germany 
124 Germany 

128 Germany 

129 Germany 

133 Britain 

134 Treuhond 

135 Germany 

140 BundesbkUo. 
152 Germany 
(63 SAW FRN 
165 Germany 
146 SMM FRN 
169 Sweden 
172 EDC 
177 Germany 
179 Germany 
185 Exim Bk Japan 
188 Germany 
194 Sweden 
202 Germany 
205 Germany 
211 Germany 
215 World Bank 
222 Germany 
225 Bundest* Lio. 
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73600 ! 
7.7300 I 
93200 ; 
6.4600 ; 
55900 j 
7J600 i 
11700 : 
6.9900 ; 
85800 | 

7.9600 
874C0 . 
B.050C 1 
73200 
51900 
33300 , 
95900 
5 8600 1 
7.C5CC 
81800 ‘ 
6.4300 . 
7J80C ( 
53300 : 


Dutch Guilder 

30 


7V, 

10/01/04 

987800 

75300 

31 

Netherlands 

S%4 

01/15/04 

39.4000 

64300 

44 

Netherlands 

6 V. 

07/15/98 

970100 

65900 

89 

Netherlands 

T 

32/15/03 

97.70W 

7.1600 

106 


7*y 

01/15/23 

962000 

7.8000 

109 

Nelherkinds 

a 

09/15/07 

1M.9500 

7.8600 

110 

Netherlands 

7V* 

06/15.99 

101.6500 

74800 

121 

Netherlands 

6VJ 

04/15/96 

100.9000 

6A400 

144 


B'o 

02/15/07 

104.9000 

74600 

ISO 


&J-. 

02.' 15/99 

99.0500 

65100 

160 

Netherlands 

til; 

04. 15/03 

74.4000 

64700 

186 

Nether lands 

t »\ 4 

02/15/97 

99.9000 

64600 

189 Netherlands 

flv. 

04. 15/02 

105.1500 

74500 

191 


? 

10/16.00 

1084500 

84100 

195 

Netherlands 


Pl/15/07 

103.7000 

8.0500 

200 

Netherlands 


09/15/01 

1076000 

B.I300 

241 

Netherlands 

By.- 

06/01/06 

107.1500 

7.9300 

245 

Netherlands 

9 

05/15 00 

108.0000 

84300 

ECU 

34 

UK T-note 

SU 

01/21/97 

95.6250 

5.4*00 

56 

ElB 

10 

01/24/01 

107.2500 

94200 

63 

France BTAN 

7’.j 

03/16/93 

?848W 

74600 

70 

UK T-nale 

S 

01/23/96 

1014500 

7.9<ffl0 

77 

France BTAN 

5 

03 /to/99 

09.4500 

54900 

84 

France Oat 

6^- 

04-25/02 

9IJ000 

74800 

90 

France OAT 

6 

04 .‘25 -'04 

B5.0000 

74600 

92 

Holy 

t*‘A 

02/21-99 

62.0000 

76300 

93 


T: 

01/25 ’00 

105.7000 

&9900 

123 

Britain 

91; 

02/21.1)1 

103473) 

84300 

145 

France OAT 

8»3 

03/75/02 

103.9000 

8X200 . 

155 

France OAT 

S'* 

04/25/22 

94.6000 

8.7200 

167 

Finland 

B’r 

02/13/07 

9AJ750 

&B200 , 

171 

Prance OAT 

10 

02 .'j6/01 

108.1000 

94500 

180 

Italy 

?'< 

03-07/ n 

775000 

9.4900 

190 

Credll Local 

S'.to 

12-29/99 

87.8750 

5.9700 i 

219 

France OAT 

8 

04/25 .'03 

97.9000 

8.1700 

224 

Caisse Fse Dev. 

S' i 

02-09/01 

86.0C0G 

6.4000 1 

247 

FEK 

9' 4 

06-09/9S 

10 1 .2500 

9.1400 

Finnish Markka 

97 

Finland 

9i.- 

03/15-0* 

«?.76B0 

9.7200 ! 

159 

Finland 

6': 

09/15-96 

97.7790 

9.6500 

216 

Finland 

11 

01/15/99 

105. 4400 

10.4300 ] 

French Franc 

69 

France OAT 


13/25-04 

Tt-O/TM 

74300 

153 

France OAT 

P’> 

03 23. M 

:03.7400 

8.1900 

164 

France BTAN 

7' ; 

04 I2 »S 

1006100 

7.4500 

174 

France OAT 


32'2?.-'04 

1025000 

34500 ' 

181 

France DAT 

5-r 

W. 25/04 

&tzm 

64300 ; 

197 

France BTAN 

6 

OS'12.98 

101.9700 

7.8500 

212 

France OAT 

6-’i 

10:25. 03 

918600 

7.2700 

213 

France OAT 

6 

10/25-25 

73.8000 

9.1300 

214 

France Oat sp 

zero 

04.T5/23 

9/zeoo 

94200 

221 

France OAT 

B": 

11/25/02 

103.8000 

8.1900 | 

225 

France OAT 

9 ; s 

01. -25. 01 

108.7000 

8.7400 | 

72B, 

France OAT 

8'-! 

04/25/33 

101.1000 

8.4100 f 

246 

France OAT sp 

zero 

10 an? 

I2A200 

8.7300 1 


Rak Ns.**e 


Cjw hWvrity Price YteW 


Italian Lira 


17$ Italy 
199 Italy 
240 Italy 


8W 

Vn 

avto 


Japanese Ywi 


BO World Bank 
116 Sweden. 

118 MrtsuMshiFtn 
131 World Bank 
136 Italy 
148 World Bank 
172 Exim Bk Japan 
192 World Bank 
208 Sweden 
210 Credit Fonder 
739 Belgium 


446 

Mto 

435 

SV, 

3W 

4Vj 

44k 

AVt 

zero 

41* 


12/20/04 

06/21/99 

11 / 22/00 

03/20/02 

06/20/01 

03/20/03 

>0/01/03 

12/22/97 

09/20/99 

08/09/02 

11/00/04 


1003750 

982500 

995843 

1035750 

925250 

99.1250 

975750 

1025000 

81.7983 

99.7500 

1003750 


Spanish Peseta 

130 

Spain 

7.40 

07/30/99 

87.7500 

84300 

132 Spam 

10% 

11/30/98 

97-5000 103100 

146 

Spain 

1040 

06/15/02 

94J700 

108600 

156 Spain 

840 

12/15/98 

91-5000 

94)700 

157 

Spain 

11.45 

08/30/98 

101.3700 

11J000 

| Swedish Krona 

81 

Sweden 

i 

02/09/05 

70.2700 

88400 

86 

Sweden 

>7 

07/21/99 

107.9000 

10J900 

104 

Sweden 

IOMi 

05/05/03 

96.9700 

108700 

113 

Sweden T-bills 

zero 

05/17/95 

963880 

8-2)00 

Swiss Franc 

231 

SMM FRN 

4.368 

11/22/M 

100JW0 

44)900 

U.S. Dollar 

18 

Brazil FURB L 

4 

04/15/14 

495312 

&4»00 

36 

Brazil 9000 FRN 

6 ’a 

01 m/oi 

7VS79B 

7-6200 

3V 

Argentina FRNr 

W-z 

03/29/05 

70.4285 

92300 

43 

Venezuela FRN 

5% 

12/18/07 

44,1507 

1Z4600 

49 

Argentina par L 

4>A 

03/31/23 

45.1087 

94200 

72 

Brazil L FRN 

6*4 

04/15/ 12 

59.9378 

112600 

75 

Brazil El LFRN 

6 - . 

04/15/06 

67.9389 

98400 

82 

Mc*ico par B 

6'to 

12/31/19 

63.4961 

98*00 

, 85 

Tokyo Bay Hwy 

8% 

11/22/04 

100.6250 

BJ320O 

91 

NTT 

Tito 

11/18/99 

99.0000 

78300 

95 

Brazil par YL3 

4 

04/15/24 

40.6983 

94000 

102 

Toyota Fin 

V» 

10/24/97 

9&5000 

742300 

107 

Mexico pot A 

6>to 

12/31/19 

63.4716 

98500 

114 

Brazil par YL4 

4 

04/15/24 

405124 

98700 

115 

World Bank 

7Vs 

09/27/99 

97J750 

78200 

117 

ElB 

6% 

06/30/99 

94JB750 

6.9800 

11* 

Nigeria main 

SVi 

11/15/20 

384)000 

14.4700 

120 

Argentina FRN 

5 =*. 

03/31/23 

65.9194 

88200 

122 

Yokohama 

7»to 

09/22/04 

95.3750 

7.9900 

125 

FHLB 

67a 

1 i/ia/96 

99,1250 

6.9400 

126 

Andalucia 

8 

01/18/00 

98J750 

88900 

127 

Venezuela par A 

6U 

03/31/20 

450252 

14.9900 

137 

Brazil ZL FRN 

6 

04/15/24 

63.5305 

108300 

138 

Sweden FRN 

5 “* 

02/08/01 

98^200 

5.7600 

139 

Italy FRN 

5’. 

07/26/99 

99.440© 

5.7195 

142 

Bulgaria A frn 

6 > 

07/28/24 

474)901 

128700 

143 

Finland 

(A* 

11/24/97 

97J750 

68300 

149 

Finland 


07/28/04 

96.7500 

8.1400 

154 

Venezuela B 

7 

03/31/07 

465100 

15.0505 

158 

Korea Dev. Bk 

BJ39 

10/06/04 

98J500 

8.1900 

161 

Bk Slh A ust Frn 

645 

11/23/99 

99.7700 

68600 

162 

Mexico D FRN 

5 *» 

12/28/19 

86.6891 

6-7000 

170 

BNG 

7 

08/23/99 

96.7000 

7.2400 

176 

Sweden 

zero 

02/10/95 

98.7284 

5.9400 

>82 

Argentine 

ln.95 

11/01/9? 

98-2500 

11.1500 

183 

Poland 

3<to 

10/27/14 

44J098 

78300 

184 

Natwest FRN 

6.10 

12/31/99 

99^000 

6.1300 

ie7 

OKB 

7'.*: 

11/15/99 

98.000Q 

7.6500 

196 

Britain FRN 

5 

09/24/96 

99.7800 

58100 

1?8 

Brazil L FRN 

6^. 

04/15/09 

615832 

10.9600 

201 

Venezuela A 

7 

03/31 /or 

46.6646 

158000 

203 

Deutsche Bk Fin 

T'-a 

02/23.98 

99.3750 

78500 

204 

Finland FRN 

5»to 

07/17/97 

99.9500 

58800 

209 

Venezuela par s 

6*t 

03/J 1/20 

44-5332 

15.1600 

217 

Sweden FRN 

5 

11/15/96 

99.7800 

57000 

2)8 

Ontario 

T»3 

06/72/04 

95.1Z50 

10200 

220 

Japan Dev. Bk 

7's 

10/25/ 99 

98.0000 

7-6500 

223 

World Bank 

8^ 

10/01/99 

1033500 

8.1900 

227 

Bet) Com Ext. 

7' • 

02/ 02<D4 

B 1.2500 

B.9200 

230 

Holy FRN 

SPz 

06/29/98 

100.1100 

5.4900 

232 

Tokyo 

T* 

10/13/04 

974)000 

8.1200 

233 

Mexico B FRN 

6.766 

12/31/19 

855092 

79100 

234 

SEK 

(Pa 

10/14/97 

97J000 

6.9200 

237 

Ford Crcdl FRN 5425 

11/02/99 

993500 

58500 

238 

Sweden 

zero 

02. 14/95 

98A515 

64XKU 

242 

LKB FRN 

5ito 

11/04/98 

99.4400 

5.9100 

243 

Italy 

6 

09/27/03 

847500 

78800 

750 

EdF 

4 Si 

02/07/97 

94.1250 

4.9100 


Don't miss the upcoming 
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Bond Issues Aim to Please Investors 


08/01/97 985200 9.0900 
04/0 1/99 900000 9-4400 

01/01/99 905400 94000 


4.7323 

3.9400 

4J70Q 

80500 

37800 

45400 

45700 

43900 

43500 

87600 

43600 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — A year-end rally appears to be 
under way in the international capital mar- 
ket. Institutional investors who are not 
keen to show large holdings of cash in the 
year-end reports are in a buying mode, 
while underwriters who are eager to im- 
prove their standing axe only too willing to 
propose attractive terms and conditions to 
prospective issuers. 

Last week’s fall in equity prices, widely 
read as a precursor to slower economic 
growth, gave a big boost to bond prices 
and improved the market’s mood. But 
skepticism abounds about how much fur- 
ther bond prices can advance in the cur- 
rent environment. 


These doubts are shared by investors, 
who showed a dear preference for very 
short-dated fixed-income paper and float- 
ing-rate notes, which provide the greatest 
safety against increases in interest rates. 

The major imponderable is whether the 


signal from the US. equity market is cor- 


rect or whether substantial further lighten- 
ing of interest rates lies ahead. 

The view at Salomon Brothers Inc. and 
J. P. Morgan & Co, the long-standing pes- 
simists about how far U.S. interest rates 
will need to rise, is that last week’s rally 
was nothing more than a brief respite in a 
declining market. 

“The end is not in sight for the current 
tightening phase of U.S. monetary policy,” 
said John Lipsky, Salomon's chief econo- 
mist. 

Ian Loeys at Morgan said last week’s 
rally was fake. “We’re headed for higher 
inflation and rising interest rates,” Mr. 
Loeys said. 

Morgan analysts warn that this week's 
first glimpse of activity in November will 


highlight the pickup in growth that is un- 
derway. On Thursday, the National Asso- 
ciation of Purchasing Management's mdex 
is forecast to hit a new recovery high, and 
on Friday, the U.S. employment data are 
expected'to show a rapid increase in 1 pay- 
rolls and a gradual acceleration in average 
earnings. 

Bat given the current weakness in the 
equity market, these analysis expect the 
Federal Reserve Board will not increase 
rates yffifrn until its Feb. I meeting. The 
Federal Reserve’s policymakers hold one 
more m eeting this year, on Dec. 20. 

European analysts are more sanguine. 
Malcolm Roberts at Union Bank of Swit- 
zerland expects this wedc’s data losnow a 

decline in the workweek and a virtual sta- 
bilization in hourly earnings,” which may 
be sufficient to persuade investors that 
another Fed tightening is not imminent. 

Christopher Potts at Banque Indosuez 
SA said he thought last week’s develop- 
ments were “idling us unambig uously that 
a significant threshold has been crossed m 
the process of monetary' tightening, that 
policy is clearlv restrictive now. While he 
said he agreed that U.S. interest rates were 
likely to rise, he said bond market partici- 
pants were focusing on slower growth and 
tamed inflation as reasons to buy bonds. 

George Magnus at S. G. Warburg 
Group PLC said it was “too early in the 
economic cycle" for money to move into 
bonds. Even if equity prices continued to 
f all and even if this led to a repatriation of 
U.S. investments from emerging stock 
markets, which pushes up the dollar, he 
said he expected the money to stay in cash 
or to be deposited in money-maritel mutu- 
al funds until it was clear that the Fed had 
finished raising rates — a development he 
did not foresee until late next year. 

Investors appeared to share this view. 


showing a clear preference for voy short- 
dated two-year and three-year ftred-rate 
paper and floaters. Analysts sad bond 
inutual funds considered a three-year 
holding as a neutral maiunty. 

Issuers for the most pan were top-rated 
credits and were well received, especially 
the two-year notes from Umqn Bank of 

Netherlands. Toyota Motor Credit Corp. s 
$250 million of three-year paper also was a 
success. 

By contrast, ABB International Finance 
NY’s $200 million issue triggered oom- 
plaints. The payment date is an unusually 
tong seven weeks. Because short-term rates 
are more likely to rise than fall dunng that 
finw L investors have no incentive to com- 
mit to buying this paper. 

But for the issuer, the long payment date 
means a more aggressive swap rate. Bank- 
ers estimate that assurance of ABB’s fixed 
cost of funds is worth about 2^5 basis 
points per week on the cost of its swap into 
a floating-rate liability. The rumor is that it 
will end up paying 22 basis points below 
the interbank rate, whereas under the stan- 
dard one-month payment, its floating-rare 
cost of money would have been 14 basis 
points below the benchmark. 

Rank A merica Corp. ran into resistance 
on its $200 million Issue because of opposi- 
tion from underwriters on the proposed 
fees. The five-year notes were initially 
launched with an underwriting fee of 25 
basis points — a level at this maturity 
normally reserved, for triple-A-rated cred- 
its. Within hours the fee was raised to 275 
basis points — the standard charge for a 
double-A-raled borrower. 

But BankAmerica is rated single- A, and 
banks expected a fee of around 35 basis 
points. 






p 


■4 

N 


I ■- 


Fledgling Bond Rally Fragile in Face of Data 


Conpiltd br Our Staff From Dupatcrxs 

NEW YORK — A batch of data this 
week that is likely to show solid growth in 
the U.S. economy should stem the forward 
momentum in Treasury bond prices that 
started last week. 

Bond prices posted their biggest weekly 
gajn in 17 months last week as investors 
jettisoned their stocks in favor of what 
seemed like a less risky bond market. 

“We think bonds are very cheap," said 
Stephen Ward, chief investment officer at 
the Charles Schwab Family of Funds. 
“Bonds aren't a bad place to be right now." 

The bond-market rally came after a nine- 
month slide that began Feb. 4, when the 
Federal Reserve Board started raising rates 
on overnight bank loans to prevent an accel- 
eration of inflation. Bond vields climbed as 


high as 8.17 percent this month from 6.17 
percent in January as prices plunged 

The yield on the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond fell to 133 percent last week 
from 8.13 percent the previous week. While 
some analysts said the action last week 
meant yields had peaked for the year, others 
warned that government data showing solid 
economic growth could stall the price rally. 

The most significant piece of data this 
week will come Friday, when the Labor 
Department releases employment data for 
November. Economists are’ expecting the 
report to show that 250.000 nonfarm jobs 
were created. 

Other numbers include the first revision 
lo third-quarter gross domestic producL 
due Wednesday, and the November index 
of economic activity from the National 


Association of Purchasing Management, 
due Thursday. 

Bond traders also will be watching for 
indications as to how the holiday shopping 
season started off over the weekend. 

Stephen Slifer, a money market econo- 
mist at Lehman Brothers Ino, said bond 
prices could drop if the data suggest the 
Fed might raise interest rates again at its 
December meeting, instead of waiting un- 
til the end of January or first of February 
as market participants generally expect. 

“It’s clear from their comments that 
they still have a bias toward tightening, 
and I think that if they get a sense that 
fourth-quarter growth is going to be above 
4 percent, they could well pud the trigger," 
he said. (Bloomberg, Knigfa-Ridder) 





1 


■ u 

new inreraanonai Dona issues 

Compiled by Laurence DesvDettes 



| Issuer 

Amount 

(minions) 

Met 

°W- Price 

Price 

end Terms 

week 

Floating Rata Notes 




- — 

Bank of Seoul 

sioa 

2000 

Qjo 

100 

Over 6-month Libor. Redeemable at Par In 1998. Fees not disclosed. Payable In Jan. 
(Standard Chartered Asiaj 

Challenge Bonk 

S2S0 

1997 

Ojs 

9986 

Over 3-month Libor. Noncallable. Fees 0:20%. (CS First Boston.) 

Cofiri inn 

SI 60 

1999 

0-425 

100 

Over 6-month Libor. Noncallable. Fees not disclosed. (IBJ Asia.) 

Eagle Pier Corp. 

S200 

2001 

<5. 

99.73 

Over 6-month Libor. Noncallable. Fees not disclosed. Payable In Jan. (Morgan Stanley 
Int'l.) 

Monte del Paschi di 
Siena 

S200 

1999 

ns 

99.W 

Over 3-month Libor. Nor callable- Fees 0-20%. (Swiss Bank Carp.) 

Urban Mortgage 
Bonk of Sweden 

S200 

1996 

1/16 

998*7 

Over 3-month Libor. Noncallable. Fees not disclosed. Denominations $104)00. (Nomura 
Int'l.) 

Citicorp 

DM250 

1999 

Yt 

99.W 

Over 3-moatti Libor. Noncallable. Fees 0.775%. (Goldman Sachs Int'l.) 

Deutsche 

Ausglelchsbank 

DM600 

2002 

llbor 

100 

interest will be the 3-manth Libor. Noncallable. Fees OJ20%. 

European 

Sovereign 

Investments 

£200 

1999 

0.10 

9985 

Over 3-month Libor. Noncallable. Fees 020%. Denominations HOMO. (CS First Boston.) 

Fixed-Coupons 

ABB Int'l Finance 

5200 

1997 

TVj 

100.V55 

Reoffei «d at 99.98. Noncallable. Fees lft%. Payable in Jan. (ABN-AMRO Bank.) 

BankAmerica 

$200 

1999 

8% 

99J5S 

Noncallable. Fees 0.275%. Denominations $104)00. (Salomon Brothers int'l.) 

Bayerfsche 

Landesbank 

5300 

1997 

7% 

101822 

Reoffered at 99835. Noncallable. Fees T%%. (Lehman Brothers Int'l.) 

BNG 

5200 

1996 

7V5z 

100871 

Noncallable. Fees ivto%. (J.P. Morgan Securities.) 

General Electric 
Capital Corp. 

5200 

1996 

m 

100.94 

Reoffered at 99.96. Noncallable. Fees 1Vk%. (Swiss Bank Corp.) 

SBC Finance 
(Cayman) 

sToo 

2001 

7Va 

10083 

Reoffered at 9953. Noncallable. Fungible with outstanding Issue, raising total amount to 
5350 million. Fees 1W%. 

Tovota Motor 

Credit Corp. 

5250 

1997 

TVa 

10182 

Reoffer ad at 995325. Noncallable. Rees 1W%. (Paribas Capital Markets.) 

Uni banco Leasing 

S150 

1997 

11V% 

99% 

Semiannually. Noncallable. Fees 1%. (CS First Boston.) 

Union Bank of 
Switzerland 

$100 

1996 

7 

10085 

R *JJ f » r 9riat1 Noncahabte. Fungible with oustandlng issue, raising total amount to S2S0 
rniffrarv. Fees 

KFW int'l Finance 

DM 500 

2004 

7% 

10085 

Noncallable. Fungible with outstanding Issue, raising total amount to 15 Nihon marYs. Foes 

2V2 to. |VVeSiV_D.J 

Deutsche Bank 
Finance 

£100 

1996 

8 

101.10 

Real fared at 100.10. Noncallable. Fees lVfe%. (Deutsche Bank,) 

European 
investment Bank 

£100 

1999 

6 

91.947 

,saue ' ra,Slr «’ WO' *» 

National & 

Provincial Building 
Society 

£100 

1997 

8% 

ioi 

Reoffered al 9985. Noncallable. Fees l%%. Denomlnalions 00800. (CS First Boston.) 

Baden 

Wuerttemberg L- 
F1 nance 

DF350 

7999 

7% 

101J9 

Reoffered at 998751 Noncariable. Fees 1%%. (ABN-AMRO Bank.) 

BNG 

DF 500 

2004 

7V* 

101 82S 

Reoffered at 99.975. Noncallable. Fees l%%. (Rabobank.) 

Deutsche 

Ausglelchstxunk 

DF250 

2002 

7% 

100.90 

Reoffered at 99.325. Noncallable. Fees ltofc%. ( Rabobank.) 

Credit Local de 
France 

AusslOO 

1999 

10</» 

101.453 

Noncallable. Fees 1%%. Payable in Jan. (Barclays de Zoete WedtL) 

New South Wales 
(Jersey) 

Aus$200 

2006 

zero 

31.95 

in”SrSsBCWtart«s) ,aM% ' NwicoltoW «- Proceeds AusS63 million. Fees Tfc%. Payable 

Finance 

auss75 

1997 

10Vi 

101-45 

Noncallable. Fees m%. (Deutsche Bank-) 1 "" 

MTBC Finance 

y 2*000 

2005 

5 

100 

Intel bu| will bo 5% until zMKif when issue is coUoblc Cit dot. thwooftor c uwu e___ 
disclosed. Denominations TOO million yen. ( wutsublSil TmSf nnT”” 5 * 40% ‘ F ^ 

Swedish Export 

y 10800 

2004 

— 

100 

Cftapon amount will be linked to the yen performance. Fees not disclosed. Dennminntb^ in 


I H 






Vv. 


Last Week’s Markets 


All Haures are as ofetasu oi traMtg Friday 

Stock Indexes 

United States Nov. 25 Nov. 18 
330827 181826 
17941 17447 

1429.18 146854 
42147 43876 
45229 46147 
53751 55172 

24740 25230 


DJ Indus. 
DJ Util. 
DJ Trans. 
S&P100 
S& P500 
S&PInd 
NYSE CO 
Britain 


Ch’ge 
—230% 
+ 295 % 
-168% 
-116% 
—159% 
-258% 
-136% 


FTSE100 
FT 30 
Japan 
Nikkei Z5 
Germany 


333350 313130 
232348 240730 


—311% 

-347% 


DAX 

Hons Kong 


14466*3 77J0256 — H9% 
2Q5143 210822 —131% 


Hang Sens 
worw 


U58JQ 742744 -415% 


AftSCIP 


60650 «&30 — 199% 


Money Rates 



United States 

Nov. 25 

Nov. IB 

Discount rate 

4% 

Ai 

Prime role 

Vh 

Bit 

Federal funds rate 

600 

5% 

Japan 



Discount 

1% 

1% 

Cat! money 

119 

2 3/16 

3-montn Interbank 

2 5/16 

25/16 

Germany 



Lombard 

m 

600 

Call money 

5.95 

500 

3-month Interbank 

&30 

530 

Britain 



Bank, base rate 

5% 

5% 

Coll money 

Fto 

5V» 

3-monfh interbank 

6Vfc 

600 

Gold Nov. 25 

Nov. 18 

OiY» 

London 38LS 

3WM 

+ 022 % 

PJn. flx 8 




WtorW fade* F/wn Morgan Stonier Capital inn. 


Euromarts 



Eurobond YMkta 


Itev. SNov. 18 Yr hWiYr low 
*47 846 848 821 
833 801 835 545 
745 739 745 438 
9.18 936 941 826 
8.13 815 824 537 
1135 1131 11J0 731 
334 *41 374 620 
1037 M4* TL23 734 
362 367 3B4 4.18 
333 850 557 
9.12 937 944 638 
1034 1040 1043 639 
9.18 *22 941 539 
459 440 4J4 237 
Source; Luxenitourp Stock Excftanoe 


Uifc Ions term 
UJS. Lrxlm term 
U5.fc short term 
Pounds SMTlIeg 
French francs 
Italian Bre 
Danish krona 
Swedish krona 
ECU, lane term 
ECU, nMm term 
Can. 6 
Aus.5 
Hi* 

Yen 


Weakly Salas 

Primary Mattiel 


Nov. 24 


Cede! Evrodear 
S NoaJ i Mont 
Shwarts 10030 47630 134030 99SM 

Convert. 430 — 26 .N 

FENS 55000 - 50230 4280 

ECP 4,73130 3342201139620 9,15450 

T«oi 438650 4318401100150 1021926 

Secondary Market 


Cartel Eerocteor 

_ * Nans J Nans 

ShBWrts 9442* I5JU40287I520 2295550 
Convert. 33120 82550 136920 139950 

RUM* 536520 129150 2248930 5354* , 
HCP 5,14750 13,92550 928330 2034050# 
Total 2030736 37317304055890 SIMM : - 
Source: Eurodeor. Cemi. 


"• 

>v 

k\ 


UborRatas 






Nov. 25 

l-Mprtfi 

l+BBOA 

6«RMft 




*#*» 

WAS 5% 

515/16 

6 5/16 

French tame 

5% 


513/16 

beubdiernarit 5 

53/14 

SVi 

ECU 



61/14 

FomdstnDno 5% 

61/16 

6 9/14 

Yea 

25/16 

2% 

JV* 


Sources: Umm Son*. ReeW* 


V'> 


}_ ■ 

j)i 














■PS 

m 

**i 

• ... ^ 

; -^uaj. 

' “int 

= ?!> 

?. h *? i 

f- . <*#■ 

I-’!*** 




/.:w :'x:r?... 




i gp apt eg ;pr 

! »3 h mmmRl§Sm 

'Sg# tt 1 ^ Mss 

International Herald Tribune, Monday, November 28, 1994 




ise 3 



Page 9 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Hard Times for Stocks Another U ’ S * Mone y Measure Turns Negative 


After a 20- Year Boom? 

By Floyd Norris 

pK I u W — If there is one thing that 1 990s investors 

TV mw> ttaeir lieads. it » chat s&ocfcs are 

I {J® “ loQ g'tenn investmenL Over the long stretch of 
+ S?’, iT 316 10,4 st0cks P™1«* °* averafe return of 

nothing ^ 3 A- P-e 

beKrf ™^ 2 tual J" lld “ dusli y “ evidence of growing 

behef m this. The stock market may have done nothing this year. 

but three of the four best months - 

ever for stock mutual funds -—in c *• . . . 

terms of net cash now from in- Sometimes the short 

veslors — were in 1994 * * i_ 

Investors have put more won- term «™beaTeiy 
qr mto stock funds than they I nna time, 
took out for 48 consecutive ® 
months. To put that into per- “ 

jp^ v e, the indusuys old record was 12 months, a string that 
. the 1987 market collapse. B 

a ^*29^ a bout the relation of academic research to the 
Fust the academics discover something, and are 
ignored by most money managers and the public. Those who 
believe make money. 

Then, as the word spreads, more and more climb on the band- 
wagon, and the trend gets even truer. They drive prices to ridiculous 
heights, then the bandwagon crashes. 

That happened, to cite one example, when the professors found 
that small stocks had a way of doing better than big stocks, year 
after year. Eventually, so many people were throwing money at 
small stocks that prices got out of hand in 1983, and such stocks did 
poorly for the rest of the decade. 

A couple of important stock market anniversaries serve to 
remind us that while stocks may be winners in the long r un the 
short tens can be a very long time indeed. 

It was 40 years ago last week, Nov. 23, 1954, that the Dow Jones 
industrial average first closed above its 1929 peak. Anyone wbo 
bought at that peak had to wait 25 years to break even. 

And next week brings the 20th anniversary of the end of the 
worst post-Depression bear market. On Dec. 6 , 1974, the Dow 
closed at 577.60, a 12-year low. It was down 45 percent in less than 
two years. 

The papers then were not full of talk about how stocks were a 
wonderful long-term investmenL Instead, they discussed how much 
lower the Dow would go — another 10 percent or so was the 
consensus — and how long the recession would last. 

It was over in a few months, but most expected it to last longer. 
Triumphant Democratic politicians — having scored big gains in 
midterm congressional elections — were talking of imposing con- 
trols on prices, wages, executive compensation and profits. 

Today, things could not be more different Over 20 years, stocks 

See STOCKS, Page 10 . 



THE TUB INDEX 

. . „„ World Index 

International Herald Tribune — 

World Stock Index, composed : — 

of 280 internationally investable tie ~ , - 

slocks from 25 countries, 115 — — 

compiled by Bloomberg in • — • 

Business News. 113 . 

112 yWafry. 

Weekending November 25, 
daily closings. 

Jan. 1992* 100. 110 F M T w T '? 


120 -== 

127 

126 

125 "s; 

124 -,'V? 
123 
122 - 
121 
120 


Asfa/PacBfSc 


Europe 


F M T W 

North America | 


102 ==—= 

101 

100 

99 

98 

as --r? 

95 

94 


F M T W 


114 

11 3 


Latin America 


129 ‘r-t 

128 " 

127 

126 Wimk? 

F M T W 


Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 

lUSM 11/IM* % • 


IlfifiM 11/1894 


Energy 11 1.89 116.87 -5JS7 Capital Goods 111.41118.79 -&21 

Utilities 122.43 12&37 =-5-07 Raw Materials 12880 13897 -7.53 

Finance 110.06 116.13 -5-23 Consumer Goods 1Q2J3 105.43 jj? 

Service s 112.75 119.42 -559 Miscellaneous 115.25 125.48 -5.15 

tv. v*., neks U S dollar values of s/oefcs In.' Tokyo, Now Yetk London, and 
Au^Taolflluin, Brazil, Conod*, Chile, Denmark. 

Italy, Mexico, Nethorlemta, Mo* 
Finland, Franco, Brnwy- ^L swcdan, Sfritawtand and Vmwzuoia. For 

S3SS5&s=sa^“ LI 

CkaamatlonBl Mwoid Trfouna 


CURRENCY RATES 


Crews Ratal 

1 E DlM. 
Auuleukm 17* 17» U»* 

Brants 31005 SUO *■ 

FnmWurt IMM ~~L 

LMdM(fl) ISO ** 

MotfrM J3BB5 201*0 HJO 

MBoa UMS M MB W** 

New York lb) lAflo UJ® 

Forts MSB UU u» 

Tokyo M “5 

TorudO US “® 

I ark* • 1J»S 2KB WW 

1 ECU 1 JW * 2 * 

I SDR W 135 

OotiriOS In Arosterdom, London, t 

a: To bur on* pound: b: To bur 
avaBBbttr. 

Other DoflarValw* 


— js iw, DJ=I BJ. SJ=. Y8I C* Peseta 

iS- — '* ,J »* }ja 2 °‘ 

rS*T 8»5 WW U»1 2U2 X4 S* 

iJi. 0BM2 *Mtr LUM l-» U™* 
S S SUM MO 1W W 

imT- mso usn mjm uim** «« — 

™ uuh iw tm 1 3/6 nm um uui 

ff? J 55 * u£ aw am mb* jjw 4iu* 

«jt «aij SUB ms w* — it 41 

„52 M2* U»» M** Ufll 1jm * 

,-jjj ,,ni asm uw bid ia« wsn 

SS “ » «w «■ «■ «■ ■* 

mr York Toronto and Zurich, fixings h . 

^ZedoUor: •: Unlia of MV not wo tod; HA. not 


set si s-j > »■ 

den vucm yp 

Akoma VJT2 ^ 

Bta&kraM 4-1M ^ 

xm ■ Kmiam»nar ow* 

SS? S; 2505 


C u rrency 
Max. pen 
H.ZMtaMfS 

Morw.knna 

PhK-PCSB 

ponsn Boly 

portescodo 

Una. ruble : 

SoudHrtyol 

SUM.* 


Cwrratcv • rers 

S. Air. rand 1534 
iicor.wEW 7MJB 
Swed. krona 7446 
TOKhobS 3 W 1 

Tbalbaht 25A2 
TakWiRra 36530. 
UAE dirbom 1472 
Vtoetbenv. i«J7 


rdRatM rmrMicv 30-dav 60-day SMuy 

1WW bUtn SS*doltar -1J747 U751 1JB» 

-ass ssss- . - - 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The clock started ticking 
in 1987, when for the first time since 
the early years of this century foreign 
debts owed by Americans began to 
exceed their overseas assets. 

It was only a matter of time until 
the cash flow of dividend and interest 
payments caught up with the balance 
sheet, and that time has arrived. 

With U.S. net international debt 
estimated at S556 billion at tbe end of 
last year, it’s only this year that Amer- 
ica's net investment income turns 
from positive to negative — and the 
United Stales opens a new outlet for 
hemorrhaging dollars to a world al- 
ready awash in them. 

“It’s another drag for the dollar on 
the foreign exchange market," ob- 
serves George Magnus at S. G, War- 
burg in London. 

Nevertheless, the current consensus 
is that the dollar is headed for a bit of 
a bounce. Typically, the approach to 
year-end is positive for the dollar as 
U. S. companies begin repatriating 
profits and dividends on foreign oper- 
ations for their yearly reports. 

And with the dollar still benefiting 
from the larger-than -expected in- 


crease in U. S. interest rates two weeks 
ago, foreign exchange analysts see the 
dollar pushing up to 1.58 Deutsche 
marks in the next few weeks while 
remaining relatively stable against the 
yen. 

The dollar ended last week at 
1.5602 DM and 98.775 yen. The big 
test for the dollar looms between 1.58 
and 1.60 DM. a “formidable resis- 

The 1994 turnaround 
on the nation’s 
investment income 
highlights the dollar’s 
vulnerability. 

Lance area," says Joe Prendergast at 
Paribas Capital Markets in London. 
But not much of a move is expected 
against the yen, as Japanese investors 
snow no inclination yet to resume pur- 
chases of foreign assets. 

Meanwhile, the turnaround on the 
investment-income account highlights 
the vulnerability of the dollar to the 
whims of foreign investors. 

America's neL income on the invest- 


ment account peaked in 1981 at S33 
billion. Last year it amounted to a 
measly $4 billion. 

This year it turns to an outflow 
estimated at $7 billion, and the deficit 
thereafter is forecast to balloon — up 
nearly 60 percent next year and 80 
percent the year after — through the 
end of the century. The interest the 
U. S. government pays on bonds hdd 
by foreign investors accounts for a 
large share of the turnaround. 

In comparison to the merchandise 
trade deficit of more than $1 50 billion, 
an estimated investment income defi- 
cit of $20 billion by 1996 does not 
appear dramatic. 

“But it’s not trivial,'' insists one 
close observer of the statistics. “It be- 
comes a drag quite quickly — another 
source of dollar outflow that needs to 
be financed.’* 

This observer notes that investment 
income is only a relatively small com- 
ponent in measuring the balance of 
international payments and thus can 
be swamped easily by, for example, a 
huge flow of foreign money into U. S. 
stocks and bonds. 

But with portfolio flows this year 
r unning out of rather than into the 
United States, the new deficit on in- 


vestment income “is one more reason 
why the dollar has been under pres- 
sure in the foreign exchange market” 
the close observer adds. 

Although the size of its internation- 
al indebtedness makes it by far the 
world’s largest debtor, the United 
States is not on the lip of a debt crisis, 
as the dollar amount of the debt is 
equal to a mere 8.5 percent of total 
annual output or gross domestic 
product 

But as the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Development 
reported last week in its survey of the 
U.S. economy, tbe shift in financing 
flows and the continuing buildup of 
indebtedness to finance the persistent 
external deficit make the U. S. econo- 
my “increasingly vulnerable to 
changes in market perceptions.” 

The long delay between the 1987 
accounting slide into net debt and this 
year's appearance of an investment 
income deficit is in part explained by 
the high rate of return on decades-old 
U. S. investments abroad compared 
with relatively recent and often un- 
profitable international investments 
in the United States, of which Rocke- 
feller Center and Columbia Pictures 
are but two examples. 


U.S. Shoppers Balk at Prices and Wait for Sales 


By Stephanie Strom 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — U.S. retail- 
ers kicked off their Christmas 
shopping season over the week- 
end, but many shoppers seemed 
to be saying they would wait a 
few weeks before making major 
purchases. 

Even the early arrival this 
year of Hanukkah. which start- 
ed Sunday night seemed to 
bring no added urgency. Most 
shoppers were keeping an eye 
out for bargains and hoping 
that skittish retailers would 
slash prices closer to Christmas. 

Despite abundant promo- 
tions intended to get people to 
shop early, “the notion that the 
day after Thanksgiving is the 
biggest sales day of the year has 
become myth,** said Isaac Lag- 
nado, principal of Tactical Re- 
tail Solutions Ino, a retail con- 
sulting firm. 

Mr. Lagnado said he expected 
Christmas Eve, which falls on a 
Saturday this year, to be the 
most lucrative day for retailers, 
followed by Dec. 23 and Dec. 17. 

To visit stores over the week- 
end was to see consumers proc- 
uring their skills at this game of 
wailing. 

“Fm not so particular about 
what Tm buying, so I always 
shop around until the week be- 
fore Christmas because the 
prices just get better and bet- 
ter," said Susan McKinney, a 
secretary who works in Stam- 
ford, Connecticut 

Most stores have begun of- 
fering discounts on selected 
merchandise, while some, like 


J.C. Penney, Sears and Wal- 
Mart, enticed shoppers with 
specials that began as early as 6 
A.M. on Friday. 

The discounts are likely to 
continue, because many retail- 
ers have slightly heavier inven- 
tories of apparel than they had 
anticipated for this time of year. 

An u nusuall y mil d aut umn has 

inhibited sales of sweaters, 
coats and other cold- weather 
gear, which must be cleared out 
by the end of January. 

The busiest stores were those 
selling items for the home. At 
the W ill j ams - Sonoma store in 
Stamford Town Center, cus- 
tomers laden with goods waited 
in line 10 deep at each cash 
register, and Brookstone, which 
sells everything from basic tools 
and lawn and garden equip- 
ment to fancy gadgets, was full 
of people tnring out leather re- 
diners with built-in massaging 
mechanisms. 

Stores selling apparel were 
much less busy. Clerks behind 
the cosmetics counters at Saks 
Fifth Avenue found few takers 
and in the Limited store, work- 
ers kepi busy folding sweaters 
and straightening displays. 

Stores that sold gift items 
fared better. Banana Republic, 
which does most of its business 
in clothing, lured customers 
with prominent displays of sat- 
in scarves, velvet gloves and 
holiday party wear just inside 
the doorway. 

Victoria’s Secret was clearly 
the store of choice for men 
shopping for their wives. It even 
had two male employees on 


band to answer questions from 
men who might be embarrassed 
about asking a female sales 
clerk about lingerie. 

Retailers said they were not 
anticipating tbe sales bonanzas 
they reaped during the past two 
holiday seasons, when sales 
soared far beyond their expec- 
tations. Last year, holiday sales 
jumped between 7.5 percent 
and 8.9 percent depending cm 
the definition of the season, and 
the increases were even greater 
the year before. 

Some analysts and economists 
measure holiday sales starting at 
the end of November through 
December, while others include 
the entire two months. 

The National Retail Federa- 
tion is predicting a 6 percent 
sales increase this year, and 
most other analysts' estimates 
fall into that ballpark. Tracy 
Mullin, president of the federa- 
tion, said she expected retailers 
to ring up $425 billion in sales 
during the five-week period be- 
fore Christmas, up from about 
$400 billion last year. 

“Although last year was up 
about 7.5 percent over the pre- 
vious year, we’ll be very happy 
with a 6 percent increase,” she 
said. 

Ms. Mullin cited a number of 
macroeconomic indicators that 
portend healthy holiday sales, 
including low unemploymenL, 
fairly stable consumer confi- 
dence and lower consumer debt 

Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported earlier from Houston: 

U.S. retail sales on Friday, 


Riding Asia’s Sports Boom 

Hong Kong Partners Face Major Decisions 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Working from a shared 
office in the bustling Wanchai district Mar- 
lene Lee and Des McGahan sit at the center 
of Asia’s professional sports boom. 

But for the two co-owners of PRISM, a 
email public relations firm specializing in the 
management of sports and entertainment 
events, it’s no time to rest on their laurels. 

With Asian living stan- 
dards and demands for lei- 
sure and entertainment ac- 
tivities growing rapidly in 
step, their game has barely 
begun. 

“No one really conr- 
petes with us right now” 
said Miss Lee, a Canadia n 
who settled hoe after buying a round-the- 
world ticket to all the places she then consid- 
ered living in. “But it looks like others now 
want to come in." 

Since pouring their savings into the start- 
up business five years ago, the PRISM part- 
ners have became Hong Kong's top team of 
its kind since they derided they would rather 
work for themselves than for a previous em- 
ployer. 

PRISM, or Public Relations International 
Services Management is typical of many 
public-relations firms in the services it pro- 
vides to a largely corporate diem base. 

But with early successes in managing such 
events as tbe Hong Kong Sevens, an annual 
rugby tournament of national seven-player 
teams from around the world, and Asian 
stops on the Johnnie Walker Golf Classic, 
PRJSM has built up a lead in a rapidly grow- 
ing regional market niche. 

“They have an impressive combination of 
expertise and energy and sheer get-up- and- 
go,” said David Broadbent, corporate affairs 
head of Hong Kong ft Shanghai Banking 
Carp., long a sponsor of the rugby sevens. 
“They deliver.” 

On a recent weekend four groups of 
PRISM’S staff of 30 woe spread across Asia, 
working in Beijing, Tokyo, Shanghai and Ma- 
nila on one son of event or another, oversee- 
ing the planning, media relations mid logisti- 
cal minutiae that moke or break any event. 

Injured sports stars, typhoons, feuding 
sponsors and bureaucratic red tape are just 
some of the crises that can make this work a 
frazzling endeavor for ihe fainthearted. 


’This business is a lot of deadlines and a lot 
of unknowns,” said Mr. McGahan, who left 
Ms native Northern Ireland because of “the 
troubles" and worked and studied in Austra- 
lia before settling in Hong Kong. “But we 
love the challenge of the big events.” 

Lately though, bigness has become an issue 
as the boom in Asian sports and major events 
threatens to grow more quickly than PRISM 
can match. 

“Events suit the Asian style of doing busi- 
ness," said Miss Lee, who served was presi- 
dent of the Canadian Chamber of Hong 
Kong in 1993. “Clients appreciate the use of 
special events to gain access to the people 
they want to see, whether it's government 
officials or big local businessmen.” 

“And,” said Mr. McGahan, “companies 
are seeing how successful sponsorship can be 
in advertising in a place like China, where 
they love their sport, and other forms of 
advertising are stdl in their early sta g es.” 

Adding to the surge in sports is the endless 
demand for programming created by explo- 
sive growth in Asa’s satellite and cable televi- 
sion industry. 

Industry observers expect many more deals 
such as the $20 million sponsorship of an 
Asia-wide badminton competition backed by 
the sports promoter International Manage- 
ment Group and STAR-TV, owned by Ru- 
pert Murdoch’s News Corp. 

“Broadcasters and entertainment groups 
have finally woken up: Asians like to watch 
Asian sport,” said Mr. McG ahan , who pre- 
dicts an “explosion" of new sporting events 
and competitions across Asia. 

“We will soon see the development of 
Asian sports heroes,” adds Miss Lee. “Once 
that starts the spin-offs will be enormous.” 

But a reluctance to build up fixed costs by 
opening offices elsewhere in the region has 
hurt PRISM when large potential diems con- 
rider hiring them for Asia-wide projects. 

“There is only so far PRISM can go,” said 
Mr. McGahan of a business with a turnover 
of about 25 million Hong Kong dollars ($3 
million) this year. “Either we stay the same 
and miss the boat, or we align with someone." 

Whether to expand or seek a larger partner 
remains to be decided, but PRISM executives 
say they have had plenty of offers. 

(Articles in this series appear every other 
Monday.) 


considered the first day of the 
holiday shopping season, rose 
5.7 percent from a year earlier, 
TeleCheck Services Inc. said. 

The Houston-based check 
acceptance company said that a 
same-store comparison of the 
dollar volume of authorized 
checks written by consumers at 
more than 10,000 locations 
across the United States fell 
within its forecast erf 1 a 5 percent 
to 7 percent increase. 

W illiam Ford, the senior eco- 
nomic adviser at TeleCheck, 
said cooler weather that recent- 
ly moved across much of the 
United States *‘roay have 
helped get shoppers into the 
Christmas spirit” 


■ Letdown in Germany 

Tbe German Federation of 
Retailers said Sunday that sales 
on the first “long Saturday" 
ahead of Chris tmas were disap- 
pointing. Reuters reported 
from Cologne. 

It said retailers surveyed were 
disappointed, but many hoped 
the Christmas season was just 
having a late start. 

German shops usually dose 
at 2 PAL on Saturdays except 
on the first Saturday of the 
month, when they stay open un- 
til 4 P.M. in summer and 6 P.M. 
in winter. On the last few week- 
ends before Christmas, howev- 
er, they stay open until 6 PM. 
every Saturday. 


Volkswagen Is Setting Date 
For Launch of a New Beetle 

Reuters 

BONN — Volkswagen AG said Sunday that it would produce a 
new version of its legendary Beetle car. 

"We have now taken the decision to build the car before die end 
of the decade, although details about where it will be built and so 
on are not yet clear," said Bemd Graf, a spokesman. 

The automaker has indicated that any new Beetle would be 
produced in Mexico and would be aimed at the U.S.. Canadian 
and some South American markets, with production starting in 
1998 or 1999 and prices at around $12,000 to $13,000. 

Tbe car will be based on the new Polo model platform and 
probably have a turbo diesel or electric-diesel hybrid engine system. 
It mil cuffer from its predecessor in having a water-cooled, front- 
mounted engine instead of a rear-mounted, air-cooled engine. It will 
also have such modern safety features as air bags and anti-lock 
brakes. 

The Beetle was designed by Ferdinand Porsche, a German 
engineeer, in 1934. Although production of the car in Europe 
ceased in 1978, the Beetle is still being built in Brazil and Mexico. 
Around 22 milli on have been built making it the most-produced 
car in history. 


China 
Sees More 
Job Loss 
In 1994 


Compiled fy Oar Staff From Dnpaicha 

BEUING — Real personal 
incomes are rising rapidly 
enough to keqp ahead of 20 per- 
cent inflation, but government 
economists said Sunday they 
expected China’s unemploy- 
ment rate to soar this year. 

Economists at the Chinese 
Academy of Social Sciences, a 
government agency, predict 
that urban incomes will rise 7 
percent this year, adjusted for 
inflation, while rural incomes 
will increase by an inflation- 
adjusted 5 percent the official 
China Daily said. 

The economists predicted 
that inflation would remain at 
20 percent for the year — twice 
the official maximum target 
The urban inflation rate in Oc- 
tober hit a peak of 27.7 percent 

Policymakers have been 
struggling to strike a balance 
between inflation and the alter- 
native — massive layoffs that 
could threaten China’s social 
stability. 

But China said it would des- 
ignate 30 percent of its national 
unemployment insurance fund 
for retraining the rapidly ex- 
panding ranks of jobless work- 
ers, according to an official re- 
port An estimated 1.5 milli on 
Chinese will be drawing unem- 
ployment benefits by the end of 
] 994, which is equal to the com- 
bined total of the past seven 
years. 

Separately, the government 
will be tightening controls on 
foreigners finding jobs in Chi- 
na’s booming economy, an offi- 
cial report said. 

The Public Security, Labor 
and Foreign minis tries have is- 
sued a joint circ ular banning 
unauthorized employment of 
foreigners, the report said. 

(AP, AFP ) 

Daimler Planning 
A Vietnam Move 

Mgence Fnmce-Presse 

HANOI — Daimler-Benz 
AG of Germany has applied to 
open a joint venture assembly 
line in Vietnam to build cars 
and small trucks, it was report- 
ed Sunday. 

A Singapore- based company 
subsidiary is seeking to open a 
$70 million project with Saigon 
Motor Co., owned by Ho Chi 
Minh City and the May 1 Auto- 
mobile Plant, the Vietnam In- 
vestment Review said. 

Separately, San Miguel Corp. 
of the Philippines has won 
clearance to produce beer in 
Vietnam, a semiofficial report 
said Saturday. San Miguel will 
own 51 percent of a $24 million 
joint venture, the Vietnam In- 
vestment Review reported. 





THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
AND THE FUTURE 


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rage 10 


INTERNATIONAL HF,RA T.D TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28 , 1994 


The Hard Part of the New Capitalism: Learning Service With a Smile 

M ... , _ > ivr- Polish satirist Jacd 


Los Angela Times Semce 
PRAGUE — It was 7:45 
AM., 15 minutes before open- 
ing, when the Kmart salesclerks 
congregated in the menswear 
department for their daily dose 


of religion, free- market style. 

Two dozen women in Bright 
red smocks gathered around a 
bargain bin of flashy neckties as 
a supervisor preached from the 


store's “Ten Commandments of 
Good Sales.” 

The capitalist lesson for to- 
day: Smile even if you feel 
lousy. Dress up even if you pre- 
fer jeans. Oblige customers 
even if they treat you ruddy. 

“Look in the mirror every 
morning and make sure the im- 
pression you give is a good 
one.” Hana Pekarov a said 


sternly. “You are making mon- 
ey for the whole store." 

Five years of free enterprise 
have stocked East European 
shops with consumer goods as 
never before. But converting 
the souls behind the counter is 
another matter. The notion of 
“customer service*' is so incon- 
gruous the phrase has no lin- 
guistic equivalent in most of 


these countries’ languages. 

“There is no miraculous 
place where you can send em- 
ployees and have them cone 
bade as different people,” said 
Imricb Gombar, director of hu- 
man resources for Kmart in the 
Czech Republic and Slovakia, 
where the company has taken 
over 13 state-owned depart- 
ment stores. 


You wifi find below a listing of employment offers published in Iasi Thursday's International Herald Tribune 


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8058 Zurich Airport - Switzerland 


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER 


International Consultancy Company 


OK Cadres - Ref. JSW25 
ruedesMoulins5i 
2000 Neuchatel 4 - Switzerland 


BUSINESS MANAGER 


V1SKASE 


Ref: HTI - J.P. Joynes - Human Resource Manager 
Viskase Ltd - Salters Lane, Sedgeleld 
Stockton on Tees - Cleveland TS2I 3EA 


CANDIDATE WILL BE WORKING 
IN THE DOCTORATE FOR 
COMPUTERS & COMMUNICATIONS 


OECD 

Human Resource Management Div. (U2) 

2, me Andre-Pascal - 75775 Paris Cedex 16, France 


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1 100 17th Street, NW, Suite 300 Washington, 
DC 20036-4601 USA 


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“Because, under commu- 
nism, everything from toilet pa- 
per to bicycles was in short sup- 
ply, it settled in the psychology 
of people that those behind the 
counter were in a superior posi- 
tion,” said Jaroslava Stastna, a 
sociologist of the Central Euro- 
pean University. 


At the British-owned Hotel 
Bristol in Warsaw, the manage- 
ment interviewed 4,000 people 
before picking 290 as suited for 
the hotel’s doting customer ser- 


vice, and half of those have 
since quit. 

The Bristol requires employ- 
ees to bathe daily, wear deodor- 
ant, refrain from eating garlic 
and spicy foods, keep a tooth- 
brush and toothpaste on band, 
avoid nail-biting, wear only 
ri<»*f najt polish and keep fin- 
gers out of mouths, ears and 
noses. Thor hair must also be 
washed daily and be “re- 
strained” in color and style. 

Above aflL, they are expected 
“to be happy and friendly,” 


Kemper May Sever Units 


Bloomberg Businas Sens 

NEW YORK — Kemper Corp. is considering die piecemeal sale 
of its insurance, mutual fond and brokerage divisions if it does not 
find a buyer lor the entire company by the end of the year. 

“If they can’t get an offer they like, they say they'll break up the 
company,” said Ira Zuckerman, an analyst with SBS Financial 


Group Lie. who spoke with the company last week. 

Kemp er is looking for an offer after Conseco Inc. scuttled its 


$2.96 billion offer for the company Nov. 20. The company's stock 

fell 18 percent last week, dosing Friday at $39,875. 

Brokerage concerns said they had been contacted by Kemper's 
adviser, Goldman, Sachs & Co., about considering new bids for 
the company. A Kemper spokesman declined to comment except 
to point out that Kemper’s chairman had said the company would 
“take all appropriate actions” to raise its stock price. 


said Ingrid Eras, the hotel’s per- 
sonnel and training manager. 

“The discipline we reqmre 
has been the hardest part for 
most people,” she said. It 15 
not easy telling people to com- 
pletely change thear Thinkin g 
and personal habits, that w hat 
they have been doing for the 
past 15 or 20 years is wrong- 

One success is Agnieszka Ja- 
sinska, the sales director, who 
started two years ago as a clerk 
as a bleached blonde with 
bright red nails. Ms. Jasnska 
said her family was shocked 
when she cut her hair, threw out 
the bleach, stripped the nail 
polish, bought pin-striped suits 
and toiled without complaint 12 

hours a day. 

Putting on a happy face has 
been one of the least popular 
and most ridicuted notions of 
customer service in the former 
C ommunis t world, where ser- 
vice with a sneer was long con- 
sidered a badge of honor. 

“Being nice is forced under 
capitalism, just like being rude 
was under socialism,'' said the 


Polish satirist Jacek Fedorowicz 
in a popular radio broadcast 
chromclmg changes in Poland. 
“A human bang does only what 
it pays him to do, and under 
capitalism it pays to be nice and 
smiling.” . , 

Grazyna Lobaszewska, a 
tr ainin g consultant for McDon- 
ald’s restaurants, said East Eu- 
ropeans are perplexed by West- 
ern expectations that negative 
emotions be put aside- 
But McDonald’s has aiso 
mged managers to ddVe mto 
the personal problems of em- 
ployees and juggle work assign- 
ments accordingly. 

“It is not unusual for some- . 
one in the United States who 
has a big problem at home to 
say, ’Fine, thanks,’ when asked 
at work bow he is doing,” she 
said. “Our tradition is different. 
When you have something on 
your heart, you don’t hide it” 
Even the guards at Prague 
Castle, the official residence of 
President Vaclav Havel and a 
popular tourist attraction, are 
working on people skills. 


STOCKS: The End of an Era? 


Russia Reaches Pad 
With Japan on Debt 


CootiiBied from Page 9 
have risen at an average annual 
rate of 15 percent Ana now the 
triumphant Republicans are 
talking of cutting government 
regulation and the capital gflins 
tax. 

Not surprisingly, in 1974 


people weren't that eager to 
own stocks. Households had 12 


own stocks. Households had 12 
percent of their assets in slocks 
and mutual funds, compared 
with 22 percent now. The Stan- 
dard & Poor's 500 was trading 
at seven times earnings and 


yielding 5.4 percent in divi- 
dends. The figures new are 18 
times earnings and 2.9 percent. 

The bet here is that this all 
has a way to go. that Americans 
will have more money in stocks 
than the)’ do now before the 
bottom falls out. The sagging 
stock market early Iasi week re- 
flected unwarranted recession 
fears, which are likely to fade. 

Still, it seems like a sure bet 
that the next 20 years won't be 
as good as the last 20 for the 
stock market 


The AssodoieJ Press 

TOKYO — Japan agreed Sunday to give Russia more time to 
repay trade debts of as much as $280 million and promised to 
strengthen economic relations, the Foreign Ministry said. 

The agreement came in talks between Yohd Kono, Japan’s 
foreign minister, and Oleg Soskovets, the first deputy prime 
minister of Russia. 

Mr. Soskovets, who arrived Sunday for a four-day visit to 
Japan, also agreed to start full-scale negotiations on fishing rights 
in the waters near four Russian-held northers islands also claimed 
bv Japan, said a Finance Ministry official who spoke on condition 
of anonymity. 

Mr. Kono and Mr. Soskovets signed four memorandums, the 
official said. Under them: 

• Japan win allow Russia to reschedule $180 million in debt due 

. . r . . .i - i-L. j mi i ^ 1 1 


by the end of this month. The debt will now be repaid over 13 
years starting in September 1997. The official said Japan would 
1 sign another accord next week to allow Russia to reschedule its 
1 remaining $100 milli on in debt 

ft Japan and Russia will set up a cabinet-level committee to 
’ rij<n»gs ways of promoting economic and trade relations. . 

• Japan will extend assistance such as personnel training for 
; Russia’s shift to a market-oriented economy. 

• Japan will help with Russia’s entry into the General Agree- 
’ meat on Tariffs ami Trade and the World Trade Organization. 


In this Tuesday’s 



From 
Cowboy 
to Couture 


Blue 

jeatiS 


SHORT COYER 

Hungary Presents Privatization Plan ^ 




he history 
of jeans. 


SH 


I BUDAPEST (Reuters) — The government has made decisions 
| on the extent to which it will privatize major state enterprises, the 
J privatization commissioner. Ferenc Bartha, said Sunday. 

While some enterprises would be fully privatized, the govem- 
i ment plans to reduce its holdings in otberenterprises to a minority 
stake. 

The entopmes involved were Magyar ViUamosmuvek Rt, the 
national electrical utility; National Oil A Gas Industry Co.; the 
country’s five rural gas suppliers; Antenna Hungaria Rt, a broad- 
i caster; and Hungarian Telecommunications Co., which is already 
partly private. 

The decision marked a new stage in the privatization strategy 
adopted by the government this month and the privatization bill 
1 submitted to Parliament, the commissioaer said. 


Investors Sue PaineWebber 


L\TEHYtTK>NAi. 


promts «Tni no m kb too* ro no xuuncim i 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Clients have filed soil against 
PaineWebber Group Inc., accusing the brokerage of duping them 
into buying risky limited partnerships. 

The lawsuits, which seek class-action status, follow a disclosure 
that the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating 
PaineWebber as part of a broad review of Wall Street's limited 
partnerships sales. 

The suits, filed last weds in U.S. District Court and in New 
York State Supreme Court, both in Manhattan, seek unspecified 
damages. 


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SHANGHAI (Reuters) • — Bausch & Lamb Inc., a contact-lens 
maker, predicts a 48 percent growth in sales and profit in China 
this year, a company executive said Sunday. 

Stephen Walton- Anderson, managing director of Bausch & 
Lorab China Inc., said sales in 1994 were forecast at 200 million 
yuan (S24 million), up from 235 million last year. China would 
account for 25 percent to 30 percent of company sales in the Asia- 
Pacific region this year, he said. Overall growth in the region is 
estimated at 20 percent this year. 

**We are optimistic we’ll see tile China market grow at around 
30 percent.'’ he said. 

Bausch & Lomb plans to invest $30 million in China in the next 
five years, be said. Part of this would be to expand to a joint ft, 
venture in Beijing, which makes contact lenses and lens solutions. 


DEC 15 (16.-00 to 20401 

HoieTco&iKle pim 6eac6V 

ZfaxnotadedelaFUgc. ffaQSM*sd 0 e. 

US & Foreign Commeidal Service 
IMaselUe DefegatoM? 
corofiafly Invites you to 
THE U-S- /FRANCE TAX AND 
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FEB. 25-28, 1995 


Africa Trade & Investment 
Conference 


To rate ptaa?m Uxeville. Gabon, 
ihis hgh-lwel conference wdl bring wgether 
business and wdus+y teedaslroro tb? wfafc 
a Africa. Asa Europe and the Amencas along 
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lo discuss trade G mvesmau t^pcxUrmties 


in Atnca Key topics indixfe investment dlmae 
sources of finance Afita s stod motets and 
spedTumduanes 


Conliau: Barbara Hayward 

USA Tel.: (202IS62-3955 
USA Fax: 1202) 802-3056 


MARSEILLE 


GABON 


GEC Gets Hong Kong Rail Contract 

HONG KONG (AFP) ■ — GEC Alsthom Transport SA has won 
a contract valued at 470 million Hong Kong dollars ($61 million) 
to install a signaling system for the new Hong Kong airport 
railway system. 

A statement from the Mass Transit Raiway Corp. said Saturday 
that the electrical and mechanical engineering project — the ninth 
of 31 major con tracts connected with the airport raiway — would 
be launched next week. 

The new Chep Lak Kok airport, due for completion in 1997 to 
replace the congested Kai Tak airport, will be connected to the 
rest of Hong Kong by a 34-kilometer (21-mile) express railway. 

Chinese-German Trade Up Sharply 

BEIJING (AFP) — Chinese-German trade volume exceeded 
$7.9 billion in the first nine months of this year, mal^ng fi ei m an y 
China's largest trading partner in the European Union, the China 
Daily said Sunday. 

Volume was up 19.9 percent compared with die same 1993 
period, with Chinese imports of German goods rising 21.4 per- 
cent, to $4.81 billion, and exports rising 17.7 percent, to $3.15 
btilitTO. Trade with Germany now accounts for 37.4 percent of all 
Chinese trade with the EU, the newspaper said. 

The two countries signed billions of dollars worth of contrafe 
during the visit to Beijing last year by Chancellor Helmut Ko&t 
and a visit to Germany by Prime Minis ter Li Peng in July 


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Page 11 



", ByBarry Meier 

" New Yak Times Service 

NEW YORK — Lawyers in- 
volved in lawsuits against 
Chrysler Corp. have circu la t ed 
acorporate document that indi- 
cates that latches on the rear 
door of the company's popular 
nwivans may be less safe those 
of caaqaethors. 

TIms memo's release comes 
amid dozens, of lawsuits as well 


o Questions Safety of Door world stocks in review 


as a year-long investigation by 
die National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration involv- 
ing rear lift-gate latches on 4 
onllion Chrysler minivans pro- 
duced between 1984 and 1994. 

The models include the 
Dodge Caravan, Plymouth 
Voyager and Chrysler Town & 
Country. 

The Associated Press report- 
ed Saturday that accor ding to 
updated federal statistics, 


Chrysler lift gates had opened 
in 5 1 accidents, with 74 passen- 
gers thrown out and 25 killed. 

Rick Deneau, a spokesman 
for Chrysler, defended the safe- 
ty of the company’s minivans, 
which are the most popular ve- 
hicles of their kind. He charged 
that the company memo was 
being circulated to generate 
publicity for lawyers. 

“From our pe rspe c t i ve tins is 
a complete misrepresentation 


of the facts," he said last week. 
“Chrysler minivans are the saf- 
est minivan in the world.” 

The Chrysler memo, which 
was prepared in 1990, suggests 
that the lift-gate latch used by 
the company is not as strong as 
ones found on many compara- 
ble vehicles and does not have a 
secondary me chanis m to pre- 
vent it from opening if it is not 
fully dosed. 


jl— Wwek Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Nov. 28 -Dec. 2 


Vio Agrncc ftonorfiWK 

Amsterdam 

Shares fell last week, with the 
EOE index dropping 3.40 
points, to 406.45, as dealers re- 
acted to the sharp fall in shares 
on the U.S. stock markets. 

Akzo Nobel, the chemicals 
company, dropped 1.80 guil- 
ders, to 195.80 guilders, and 
Royal Dutch/ Shell slipped 2.90 
Iders, to 185.80 guuoers. Un- 
lever, lost 2.30 guilders, to 
193.70 guilders. 


Aecitme* a tote wee** economic and 
Mi^TMbunetvBmone^Bij^ 

Afhi Pac ific 

* f!!! 1 ! 3 * thl *y Balance of pay- 
raerts kw October. ^ 

Ko "0 Ko ** 9T Government to inue Octo- 
ber pfbvMonat merchandise trade Hg- 


- - Australian balance 

payment* tor October. Forecast cteflcrt 
to addon to 1.8 bUflon Australian dollars. 

BuBcHna approwto lor October. Forecast 
drop of about 5 percent. 

October job-to-appOcant raflore- 
leand by Mnta&y of Labor. October un- 
« w< *yn*nt rate retaaead by Manage- 
rosot and Coordination Agency. Japan 
AuttmoMe Manufacturers Association 
ralaaaea October vefdcie exports. Mtnta- 
Wy Of International Trade and Industry 
ra toaaa a large-scale retail sales during 

• #0 SytfcMiy National accounts 
tor Jutf-Septombar quarter, Including 
-grow dofiwsttc product 

Hong Kong JardSne Matheaon Hokl- 
togs. Jartflne Strategic HoMnga. Lai Sun 
Garment (international) and Windsor trv 
dustrial Oorpi to be replaced on the Hang 
Sang tome of top shares by Amoy Proper- 
Hea, Guangdong Investment, Johnson 
Electric Holdings and Oriental Press 
Group. 

Toiqto • Housing starts and construction 
orders tor October raiaased by Construc- 
Iton »«restiy. produoion for Oc- 

tober relaasadby MlnMry of Internationa 

Tracts and Indusby. 

• Dee.t Sydney Foreign debt tor the 

JLdr&apMmtar quarter. 


Tokyo Bank of Japan to announce cor- 
porate service price index for Octocer. 
Bresasto Japen and European Union » 
I»W wortdngjevel talks on whether to 
Bmlt Japanese car expona to Austria and 
three Scandktwtan countries expected to 
Join the EU in January, 

• * Tokyo Research arm of N&- 

hon Ute Insurance to release economic 
outlook tor Bscal 1896. 


Europe 


November coo 
wmer prim index. Forecast up 0.2 per- 
cent in month, up 2Jt percent m year. 
London Partiamani votes on EU flnance 

Ml. 

toarfctd Unions strfte against Iberia air- 
lines to protest management reorganiza- 
tion plans. 

Bores Stock Exchange extends its 
hours until 5-00 P.M. and Inmates the 
trading of futures contracts. 

Expected anytime this week 
Rome November official consumer 
price Index. Forecast: up 0.4 percent In 
month, upS.7 percent inyear. October M2 
money supply, three-month average. 
Forecast up 5.0 percent in year. October 
total bank lerxang. Forecast down 2.7 
percent October houtfy wages. October 
balance ot paym e n ts. 

Zkddk November consumer price in- 
dex. Forecast up as percent In year. 
Frankfurt October Industrial produc- 
tion Forec ast, up 0.5 percanL October 
manufacturing production Forecast up 
05 percent. 

n mile trims November CPI. Forecast 

up 2.8 percent in year. 

Madrid September Industrial produc- 
tion Forecast: up 6.0 percent tn year. 


• Mew. se London Chancellor of trio 
Exchequer Kenneth Cireke presents the 
fiscal 5998 Dodger to Parliament. 

• Men. 30 Paris October unemploy- 
ment rate. Forecast: 12.7 percent. Octo- 
ber Job-seekere. Forecast up 0.1 percent 
TWrtFquarier housing sales. 

•°*c-1 Copenhagen October unaro 
ptoyment rare. Forecast 11.5 percent 

• Dee. 2 buaeett November unem- 
Ptoymen* too. Forecast 14.4 percent. 
Nwsmber news car registrations. 


Son rare Forecast down from 3.45 per- 
cent 

■ Mow. 2S NewVert Tr>e Conterfnce 
Board reteases He Index of consumer 
confide n c e tar NsrMxr. Johnson Red- 
book research service releases its weekly 
survey of same-store sales a department, 
discount and chain stores in the United 



WSW f wflten House debates and voles 
on General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade bU, which would a dvance me Uru- 
guay Round bade accord. 

Oftswe September employment, earn- 
ings and hours report September unem- 
ployment maurance Btadsaes. 
RtodoJanabo The cental bank to otter 
6 millon 35-day central bank bonds, or 
8BCS. Foreca et yield down tram 5.7 per- 
cent 

e New. SO Washington Senate 
scheduled to begin debate on GATT trea- 
ty. Third-quarter corporate profits. Pre- 
bNnary grew domenc product g ro wth 
tar the third quarter. October vnport/ ex- 
port price irtdexas. 

Salt Late Ctty Federal Reserve Chair- 
man Alan Greenspan speaks on risk man- 
agement tools in banking at the Gran 
Institute of Finance. 


Italy Workers hold a general strike tor 
eight hows to prated the government's 


•Muir. 26 ■ »— nfaginn Exsting home 
sales for October. 

Paolo Institute tor Economic Re- 
search, or RP6, to release 30-day infia- 


— . 1 W reMn g tau The Commer ce 
Department reports personal Income and 
xpentfang tor October and releases thhd- 
quarttr balance of payments report on 
merchandise trade. November chain 
store sales. October construcdon spend- 
ing. Senate votes on GATT. 

* D*c. 2 Well in gton November em- 
ployment report. October tattling eco- 
nomic bidieatora. October factory orders. 
Ann Alter, NkNgttt The University of 
Michigan releases its revised conaumw 
se nti m em Index for November. 


girili 

Devi 
193. 

Frankfurt 


The DAX finished 23 per- 
cent lower, al 2,051.62, after it 
was hit by heavy foreign selling 
that foQowed equity losses on 
Wall Street. 

Shares in BASF, the chemi- 
cals company, fell 530 Deut- 
sche marks, to 30730 DM, de- 
spite bullish profits. Hoechsi 
fell 7.00, to 31730 DM, and 
Bayer fell 3.00. to 340.00 DM. 

Hong Kong 

Slock prices plummeted 8 
percent following drops in the 
UJS. market. 

The Hang Seng index, the 
key barometer of Hong Kong’s 
top shares, lost 768.61 points to 
close at 8,658.83. 

Average daily turnover was 
434 billion Hong Kong dollars, 
compared with the previous 
week’s 3.40 billion dollars. 

London 

The F inan cial Tunes-Stock 
Exchange 100-share index fell 
973 points to 3,033.5, a fan of 3 
percent from the previous week, 
as investors abandoned shares 
for bonds. 

A report by the Confedera- 
tion of British Industry, which 
highlighted increased price 


pr essur es, refueled fears of an- 
other rise in British interest 
rates, which pressured stocks. 

SmithKline Beecham, an- 
nouncing sale of its animal 
health interests to Pfizer for 
$1.45 billion, lost 98 pence to 
end at 421. 

Milan 

Political worries affected the 
stock market, forcing the Mib- 
tel Index down 3.73 percent, to 
9,950. 

News that Prime Minister 
Silvio Berlusconi would be in- 
vestigated on charges of paying 
bribes to tax inspectors weighed 
on the market. 

Paris 

Share prices rose slightly, 
pushing the CAC-40 index up 1 
percent, to 1,945.89 points. 

But analysts said the outlook 
for this week was uncertain. 
Since the start of the year, the 
index has lost 14.21 percent. 

Analysts said shares were 
helped by a report indicating 
the market was undervalued by 
with other world 
Lets and did not reflect the 
growth prospects in the French 
economy. 


Tokyo 


Share prices tumbled to a 10- 
roonth low in a holiday-short- 
ened week. 

The market continued to be 
hit by Sony’s decline, following 
huge write-offs at its U.S. film- 
making subsidiary. 

Public pension funds were 
the only active buyers, as the 
Nikkei Stock Average of 225 
issues fell to 18.666.93 points, 
down 33 percent from a week 
earlier. 

The Tokyo Stock Price Index 
of all issues on the first section 
slipped 2.6 percent, to 1,484.02 
points. 

Foreign investors dumped 
their holdings, depressed by 
price setbacks on Wall Street 
and other foreign markets. 


Corporate investors took 
profits, offsetting active buying 
from public funds and invest- 
ment trusts Friday. 


Zurich 


Zurich shares fell in line with 
Wall Street, as the Swiss Perfor- 
mance Index lost 19.07 points 
to dose at 1.696,49, a fall of 1.1 
percent. 

Volume was modest, with the 
market dominated by the fall in 
U.S. shares. The market was 
also weakened by a dispute be- 
tween Union Bank of Switzer- 
land and BK Vision over terms 
of a joint share issue. UBS 
shares fefl 65 Swiss francs, to 
1,135. 

Nestlfc feQ 28, to 1,201, after 
annnnnring 10- month results. 


Singapore 


Share prices fell as the mar- 
ket was hit by sell-offs on Wall 
Street and redemptions from 
mutual funds, a dealer said. 

The blue-chip Straits Times 
Industrials index plunged 
1 16.92 points, or 4.96 percent, 
to 237.75. 

Turnover for the week 
amounted to 590.80 million 
units valued at 1.82 billion Sin- 
gapore dollars. 



This week's topics: 

o Latin Nations Aren’t Waiting for NAFTA 
o The GATT Fight 
o Why Americans Love Trucks 
o Hong Kong: Jimmy Lai’s Media Gamble 
o Drugs From Smog? 

Now available at your newsstand! 


BusinessWeek International 
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The 25 key world markets 
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THE TR1B INDEX 108 86^ 

Httntttonaf Herat* Tribune Wood Stock Index O. composed ol 
280 ntematnnefly rwesuble stocks from 25 countries, campled 
by BtoomMig BinMu News. Jen. 1. 19SS a 100 





lndir*n;xl Sector, 


M >W. % 


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1001 1K4 -U 
110J7 UP W -1J5 
117X3 11X56 -11Z 



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GM* 9205 9257 -DM 


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nmmm » with thk mi** m» twhi m the w/isawcnw post 



THIS ANNOUNCEMENT APPEARS FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY 

REPUBLIC OF PERU 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF 
PRIVATISATION 

The Special Committee for the Promotion of Private Investment in Banco 
Continental S.A., appointed by the Government of Peru, through the 
Commission for the Promotion of Private Investment, COPRI, announces the 
sale of the Peruvian Governments participation in: 



Banco Continental is Peru's third largest commercial bank in terms of assets 
and equity. 

The tender terms for the International Auction Sale may be obtained from 
november 21 through: 

COMITE ESPECIAL DE PROMOCION 
DE LA INVERSION PRIVADA 
Luis Hidalgo Viacava 
President 

Av. Republica de Panamri 3055 
Centro Comercial Continental Of. 20 
Lima 27, PERU 

Telefax: (5114) 419396 / 419424 / 417250 
For further information please contact: 


Credit Commercial de France 
Paris, Francla 
Francois Lagreti 


Socimer International 
Madrid, Espana 
Sak>m6n Benatar 



Tel: (331)4070-7040 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


?1 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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J4 1.1 1414 2t% 20% 21% -totlmcoEn 


_ 1845 J2% 31 


oj 4 24'. 

420 144. 
.- 91414 


- 2495 23 
-. 156 8’ 


20% 22% “1*. ! Imotm 


_ 420 ?% 6% 7 —to UuSki _ 507 

_ 1454 Pi Tht rr. — Vu LnJock - 2222 

_ 47212% lire lire —4* , Lodg&n _ jm 

Loeweno 04 


_ 273427% 26 . 

z M k Sto =5 

= rz 8% :% 

06 _ 3708 24% 25% 25% —to 

_ 190 7<4 7 7 —to 

_ 114 39* 21* 3 *% 

549 7 6to flto — % 

J9e J.9 90 flto ito flto - 


A JOb 40 A5 5 

MB J0b4J 131 44, 

30220% 19% 19%— 1 EautoBra 0*a!.7 »S% S. E'* ' 

157721% I8’-» 184* — 2to ewSrtl .92 40 150 23% 20% 21 -14, 1 Gdk s 

26H 22 20 Mto— 1% CaglFnce - fZSISJj I?'* ■'JS GAB Bra 

154214% 15% Wh. -Vu EogJFnd 04 40 VWMVi 19 19 —1% GBCBC 

796 9 744 I’Vu-Vu EofFtf ~®J2^ 2 2% -Yu GBC Ten 

— - - 8345 9% 8% 9 _ ' GMIS 

275 94* 9% r* -V* I GNI 
_ 1301 3% 2to 3 — V« GPFncJ 

.16 .9 *33318% 17V. 17% — % ! H-i 


156 8’: 7% B _ • lma.CC 
347 2*, 2", !% —to imdne 
; Imucor 

I I imuLog 

; imunon 

| inkjnRu 

404 74Vu 15% lire —re Jtri une, 

4 30% sore 30% _ ! imiPkna 


r -5 

lire *1^ 
Sto -% 

tZ :% 


_ 154 2% ito 1% —re 

JOell.l 117 4V* 4% 4V: - 

36 0 155725% 24% 2Vu , re 

J3f 00 24W 2to 2to Sto “to. 
02 10 19029 78% 29 - 4 

08b XI x2315% 15 15% 

Z. 250 19 17% 10% —to 

172 1'Vu Wu Ito. —L* 

■: fefssfSto-z? % 
• w -i mKK'gzx 

. i - m sre sre sre _ • 

. T17 3to 3 3V, 


I 7V9UJH 9H IU —re j Loewnstn 
_ 2516 Ito 1 u Ito -Vu < UwcD 
_ 333 6 : J s*i Sr. — to I Lomafc 

- 2270 3 ?. 79* - % J Landlnf 


A .80 li 290 27% 20% 20% —7 
» 1J6 40 X154 79Y, 19 W — % 
) 08 1.9 63533V, 30% 31 to— Ito 

_ 200 sre 9% 9% * re 

_. 383 38 34% 34% —IV* 

r J2 1.9 695019 16 14%— 2% 


9 12% 17 12". ♦ % i j rr * JC ^ v 

704 BW 'to 8 —'4 


.16 .9 *333 18V. 17’A 17% —4* ! 

_ 761 1 *Vu 'Vu .to GTS Drt* 

^ ... >. 275 24* 2to 2% _ «-HI 

— 13S3 9 8 8 —4* Eaferie — 229 4% <to 44* * % OZA 

09 0x15090 17to 15% 16 — Ito EatnVon 04 20 J3M29V, 244* »to— 2to Grf«Y 

09 0*36409174* ISto 16 — Ito I EcoScS - Jg9Wu 2% 2V: — V, Gol.vo 


_ <069 20% 18 
_ 378 4to 4 


19 — Ito 55Sf 
4 —re I ! ri r9? J 


„ 4137 5 3% 4’* - 1’* LneSStk 

. 1* 7 7 — 'i LnneStr 

_ 9243 16’> 15% ISto _ Uto 

_ 977 A'. 3% < — % LmtSfk 

_ 1*5 I*. Ito Ito _ LoSiix 

t _ IB9S 15% 12% M —I'--- i LotteryE 
1.14*130 <58 9to 8% Bto — Ito I Lotus ' 


_ 2S46 7% 6** 64i 
_ 7Z3 V» Yc % 


.1 8271146 946 II 

_ 1335 18% 17 17% —to 

_ 44 'Vu % Vi 

„ 783 3 756 29* - 

33a 4J 259 1646 1 546 16 — % 

_ 1138 5V4 5 5 —% 

_ 2349 ll’A 70 101*— Ito 

100a 1.9 7 52 50% 52 

*73 8V. 8 8% —to 

_ 13 J '46, 7 ♦% 

usual Mi 15% i<to 15 —% 
08a xo _ 4444, 44 4446 —% 
08 11 3*0 2246 21to 22 — 1% 

J6 20 1970 15% 14% 14*4 — % 
„ 24 0 746 74* —'A 

_ 1308 18% 1646 17%— Ito 
„ 9691 45% 42% <4'6 —to 
_ 154831V* 29 V* 30% —4* 
_. 1689 4% 346 3to —to 
.. 788 2H 2% Cto —to 

32063 72 124* 114* 114* 

.16 12 ® S 4% 5 

„ 7OJ'0 S’A 3% 

00b XO 21 27% 25% 26% “to 

_ 41110 9% 10 “to 

_ 74 9% 9% 9% —4* 

_ 103 4V, 4 4V» .to 

J6 11 B IZV, 12% 12V, _ 

00 30 11 17to 174* 174* —to 

_ 1714 54* Sto 5% —to 

03e 10 872 3% 2% 3% - 

_ 1669 5 44* 5 _ 

_ 150 36% 3446 36 - V, 

_ 1137 1BV* 174* 17% —4* 

_ 374 164, ISV, 16 — % 

_ 7 079 S'A 4% AV» —>A 

_ 3623 AVk Sto Sto —V* 

JO 10 11S1 M 13% 14 _ 

_ 4452 28V, 76%24>Vu— IV* 


TOto— TV. 
17% -to 


zwt r w-r: 

„ 24739 JOT* 12% JOT* “to 


_ 1178 10 8% 9 —46 
_ 1720 44* 4 4V* “to 


00 3.9 13564 ?1 % 19*4 20*u — to In— nm 

z S s 

Z 'jgft r r =:: 


*»• T?" -"'‘(Lufkin 


iridenHId 02 e .7 


_ 406312 lore lire 
_ 264 1% 1% I’, 

_ in lire ii 1 , 11% 


00 30*1437 16% ISto 1546 —% 
_ 673 79% 17% 78% ♦% 

_ 274 18% 17V4 17% —Vi 


BastTc 

BoxEnA 

SaxEnB 

Baydflros 


Crncses 09 0 x36409174* 754* 76 —14* ECOSO 
CmcstUK _ 7 1435 18 16 IflVu— Ito, Ecosren 

Corricoa „ 7*5 l<% 1346 14% -4* 

Comdaia - 2249 10% 9% 104* *to 

Comdml - 1927 3V» 2% 2Vu — Vu 

ComeTStt > 545 <4* 4 4 — % 

Commnet „ 5799 29% 24% 27 to —Ito EduOv 

CmndSc ~. <11 3% 3% 3to —to Edudn* 


- Ili’/i* ' sw '£? —5 indBkMA .04 e 0 

— MS 4to < 4to — % uytAkMI £0 13 


u? S? zi; GOmbra® ,17e 10 784 71% 10% lire _ 


_ 910 15% 12% lore— 1*4 SEZXSjy 

7 4% <% 4% —** I 


3% 2% T» —to 
34* 2to 2to —6* 


_ 251722 17% IB —Sto 

„ 1499 14% Mto 13% —% 


CmcBMJ 05 3.6 511 1846 17 

CmcBMO 08 23 XB37 30V, 29 


—to Eduneflc 
—ito Edaoft 


4% —1% S2S52J. 


18 —to 
29 —Ito 
35 —1 

74% — ire 


2 2 (* 

6% 7% —4* 


_. 141 646 64* 64* 


GratJDen 

Garnet 

Gcrtners 


RdBkMI 
Indlusr 
IndTMM 

Z 1203 7% ire >v« IlSSi* 

- a® 9 ' 1 * “ft USbSiv 

— ZJ4 2 2 2 — - *i lnAoous 

_ 374 9% 9to 9% _ in3£5fld 

- ujBg* 3% OT* . jndH wtA 

„ 3032 34 33 33 —246 IndStt 

_ 132*184, 17 17% _J* [nfJnOrC 

_ 1455122% 21 21to +Y. mloSott 

05 r J 57 10% 10 10V* >% infoimt 

_ 515 I3H 12% ISV* » to | 

_. 845 646 ito are —to || 

_ 1436 464* 46 % 46to tnform.x 

_ 24512% 11% 11%— Ito Irtrasnc 

_ 2185 2% Ito 2% “to infuTech 
_ 756 3 2*6 2'Vu “Vu IngIMkf 

03 2J 362 21 lore lsv, — 1 to innarm 

_ 677 5 4V* 4% —re inmoc 

08 7% 6% 6% —1% intgrp 
.12e Z9 10 4to 4% <to _ imerdyn 

_ 8883 28% 26% 27% - Ltmkeepr 


„ 1907 9to 8% 9V„ +Vu|JSSS 

_ si 6 11 re 9% 10 —ire | Gdtesooo 


BmfdSvs 

Braun* 

Brenas 

wfBretuJ 


CmreGp JO 10 2455 i6% 15'A —4* \ vBEJPosE _ <WS I 'Vu b-u — Vu gwflra 

CmCBOK JOb 1.9 18 ISto 149*15% — % I EWI J7elJ *7119 l»to 18 — 1%. gegtwa 


5 8SS 


120 are 8% 84* —to Qco 
76124* 12 12V* _ ElcGo* 

1946 IBto 19 — to ElcFUel 


*2 17% 17% 17% +1 


BrireV 

BrttBra 

BmodN 

BrdboTc 

Bdcstln 

BrdPwr 

BdwvSev 

BTDOlCS 

BrodSI* 

BklynBc 

Brookstn 

Brtclree 

Bmktrt 

BroGour 

BrTom 

Brcnos 

BrvnMw 


CmcFtU _ 10401946 18% 19 —to ElcFuel 

CwlrSov JBe 20 66313V* 12% 12% — % EJcRnti 

CmCbtflC .93! ai 106 13% 11% 11%— IV, ElcSa 

Cum Er. „ 983 to 'A 4* _ ElcSen 


- 314 2% l'Yu I'Vu — Vu D nCrHt t 
_ 880 7 5% 5*. — I Gencor 

_ 2399 17 16% 169. “ V* SeWLT t. 
_ 10579 1946 1 7to 18V6— 1% GerwMed 
.10 20 9 3to 3to 34* — V* GnBnd 


:: @5 « a “Ma SS ffuda ^ 

L0 575 12V, Uto 1146 — % EJctrnu 86911% 11V* 11% — % GaMoi 


Comiys 04 2.0 57S12V, Uto 1146 —% Eicfmp 

Cmty&S 1J0 4LI 78 30% 2»to 29to —to gcArl 

CBhPaS 07 2.9 8323% 23 23% *% 

OnfyBn 02 19 410 13% 13Va 13% — % gcHetl 

CmTvFBFU.lMiao 411 lore u r% Bee Tel 


CmryFBFU.lDtiQJt 6 11 lore 11 “% BeeTel 

ComRB* 04 X2 x!22 14 73 1346 —to EFU 

ComFBnl US 60 25 26% 2666 26% —to EleKTefc 

ComHIth _ 249 14* Ito Ito —to EWW1&; 

CtxrimSv _ 1584 73 17% 1746—7 Bhvrj El 

Cornnel _ 1511 10 ID —1 EtronE rl 

COmpBnC .92 43 231322 21 22 “to 

CmprsL _ 8722 8% flto 8 

Cmpcm _ 482 3% 3% 3% — % 




ElronEI 
EtronE rt • 
to Enron 
_ Embrex 
re emco 


Com putt". _ 70 4% 5% 5to — *V« ElrtsTch 

CrnpOato .10 1.0 412 10% 9% 946 _ EmttvKBd 


_ 224 9 B’A 0% —to 

JO 10 61316% 15to ISto — % 

_ )97 9% 8% Sto —to 

_. 929 44* 5% 5% —to 
_ 600 20 18% 19% — % 

J4 10 24315% I486 15% -to 
02 2.7 15919% 18% 19 — % 


BueCrefc 

BuHdT 

BullRun 

BurTBr 

BurtnOW 

BusnRc 

Butler 


399)7 9to 1(7%, — ’W. 
836114* 11 Uto “V* 

siautoi ito 1% —in, 

957 14to )3to 13to —to 
3855 31% 27% 30 —to 
(Ok* 3OT6 34to “1 
1335 6*6 A 6 —to 


.109 J 709 35% 33% 33to— IV* 


_ 272 8% 7% 7V, —% 


Ananoel 10Oe 63 246 ISto 15 


5 246 2% 2% — % 
<101 14 73% 13% - % 


AncBWte 00 1.1 1621 28% 36% 27% —to 


AndvBc 00 

AndvToo 

Andrew 6 

Andros 

Andvna 

Anoraen 

A nosfo 

Amec 

Apertua 

Ashton 

APQoEn 02 

Apooee 

ApmcC 08 

Apisous .07 

Antebee * .0* 

APiRecy 

ApOExtr 

ABkKCl 

ApICartin 

APdDOll 

April mu 

APdinav* 

APklMaH 

APdMIcr 

AOdSd 

APIdSO 

Aouarax 

Aagnx wi 

AraOSh 

Arakto 

Arumed 


00 13 123015V, 13% Mto —to 


_ 37 2% 2% 2V* - 

_ 8239 51'A 46to 48 —2% 
_ 1*28 16% 1446 15% —Ito 
_ 3036 7% 6V. 7V„ _ 

_ 393 3 . 2% 3 “% 

_ J07 4to 6% flto -V* 

_. 7867 26 22V, 24% — 1% 

_ 14207 9% 746 9% — % 
.. 57211 9V* 10% “to 

10 981 IB 17V* 17% “ % 
_ 379 1 5 14 1446 —V6 


C-CUBE 
CAI Wrt> 

CBBnc 100 40 
CBTCps 04 X0 
CCA 

CCBFn 106 30 
CCOR 


_. 572 U 9% 10% “to 

02 10 SOI IB 17V* 17% “ to 

_ 37915 14 1446 —V6 

08 1074908 40';* 364* 37% —2% 

.07 .113350 1446 13% 7346—3% 

.04 0 9714 17 1* 14% — 1% 

._ <70 7% 6 6V, —I 

._ 1930 10% 10 10% - % 

_ 010 5V* 4% <% - 

_ 7565 »n to, Vu — Vu 

,. 4*05 25to SIto 23 — 1W 
_ 1000 flto S'A 5% —IV* 

_ 378 23% 21 21 —2 to 

_ 53*6* 53V* <746 51 % — % 

- 136 3to 3% 3% — % 

_ 170 7V, 6% 6% — Vu 

_. 525 «% sre 4 —y* 

_ u<8 6to are are — % 

_ 594 3% t‘Vi, 7 - 

_. 43 2 1V6 19* —V u 

_. 5727 4% 346 346 — % 

_ 1*0510 8 9 — % 


CDPTCfl 

gws 

CESoft 

CEM 
CFI Ind 
CR Pro 

CFSB 0< 23 
CFWCm 07 1.1 
CHOW 


ATborDrg JO 10 463 22% 21*/, 21% —4* 


ArborHI _. 118318% 17 lore —Vi 

ArbrNII - 999 Mto 13% 13% —to 

ArefiCm _ 2082 70% I9to 30% * 1 

ArctiPI * . <004 JV* l'Vu 2% - to 

Arctrai .19 10 8390 20% 19V, 19V, — 1 

ArdenPd _ Wl IU 7>A I -to 

Arettmsa _ 3284 10% lOto 10% _ 

ArgemB 00 33 “9S 25to 24to Mto— 7 

ArgoGP 1 16 4.1 7236 28to 77n» 78' 1 


as Ten 

CMC Ind _ 

CMGlnf - 

CNB 00 b 7-6 

CNBFt .580 20 

045 

CP AC .141 ... 

CPS 08 3.7 

CPI Aero 

CSBFn 00 20 

CSFHId _ 

CSP _ 

CTEC 
CTECrt 

CTt-Cr _ 

CUBnC 
CUDscm 
CoblmtK 

Cosjojm 101 r310 


Argnv 

ArgusPh 

AriodP 

Artadwl 

ArlstOI S 
ArkBMl 
Armor 

Amok, v 

AmsPn 

Arou.Fi* 

Anowlnl 

ArroMiTrn 

Amt 
Artis fG 
AmVdv 
Asante 
AscemJC 


5487 14% Mto 12% — % 

773 2 % 2 2 —to 

. 4378 2*., 1’-. 7 — '>. 

... 318 "/» 'u ‘y • '<r 

63 5V« 4 to <to —to 

M 3 9981 It. H% llto — ", 

04 31 *289 21 to 20% 20% 

44 2.3 530 30% '8 1 8 to —IV, 

... 151 6 Vi SVi Sto — V, 

41b 3 4 i7721«Vu 13% 14'/u ■ V H 

12 4,112228 are 77% ■ % 

165 5Vi 4% 4*. _ 

9280 9to 815 9 to 

.Wi 1298 3to 7% 3 

„ ISO are 7 Vi 7 Vi —re 

2377 4% 4to 4% 

.. 13*403019 78 V? 

753 Bto 8 | — % 

. 73151091 9". 9% —% 

.. 5444 3*9, » 30 to -3to 

JO 1 5 90 i<re 12 Mto to 

- 7733 18% 1JV* lato — J 
08 35 154 32% 31% lire —to 

. 171 » 255* »% it 

... 494 ?6to 25V, JSV* -% 

_ 1778 13% 13 I] —to 
-. 7471 j7f, Mto 

.i» 1.1 loon 10% lore • re 

Ole 5 66 2to 7 > 

31 4 3% 3", — % 

13 J2% Jl-i 2 1 to ~% 


Asliwnh 

AiOCITI 

AspenBs Jo 

AspeoTe 

A*dBn« 1 08 

AidCmA 

AufCmB 

Artec 

ArtortflF 

A*,n>M .17 

Artron 01 

Ailrmr 

Artrum 


Cocbe 

CACI 

CodbyS i. 
Codeln 
Cocti 
Codmui 
Caere 
Cairn 
Cmaene 
1 CaiAmo 
, CaiBnc 
1 CbhiCul 
I CotFnd 
I CniMD 
> CalMK 
1 CalSBt 
I Coo Net 
1 CalunP 
J Caloway 
| CtPumel* 
Gnnwt a 
Cambaa 
1 Comer Je 

■ Comb&nd 
i CambTcn 
CommAjh 
CompoEl 
CWtneB 
. CwnoA 
Candeki 
, CoraSoi 


CgnnEofl 

Canomze 

Canant 

Consme 

Cornier 

Canton 


SOD 10 
3485 18% 
2377 9to 
183 31% 
71 22% 
442 4% 
3467 38% 
3403 53% 

26 lore 

1904 33% 
438 2Vu 
411% 
177 4% 
99515% 
380 18% 
127 21 
1 4V„ 
4480 3 
1324 4% 
304 18 
100 31% 
XB7 21 V* 
1045 7% 
22* 14 
68 34% 
547 7 
254 13% 
771 24% 
286 IU 
660 20% 
10335 % 
480 10 
1274 7to 
3374 19 
414 6 
521 5 
686 6 % 
1192 10% 
410 28% 
185 ttp 

6314*7,1 

317 17 
12934 16% 
1048 8% 
7144 7to 
9*8 6% 
187 18 
111 6% 
<J7 13% 
10410 61* 
3554 30% 
524 10% 
2* 5% 
13811% 
304 1% 
S4S21 
3139 3% 
362 4% 
1286 4% 
534 9% 
430 19 
694 16% 
1614 t?to 
233 

171533% 
336 2% 
277 IV, 
26 14 
6 12% 
4598 14 
352 88% 
1197 6% 
53 12V, 
418 flto 
1724 ?v, 
7890 Ito 


pw 10 +v> 

17 17%— 1% 

8% Bto — % 
Mto 31 —I to 
22 22% —46 

346 3% - 

37V, 37% -to 
67 X —3% 
9to 9to —to 
29% Mto— 2% 
2M> »M “to, 


*r»j, “vu 

nre ure _ 

4% 4% —to 

14% lift “i 

18% 1846 —’A 
20 20% +% 


<Vm 4Vu— W y 
2V„ 256 “V„ 
4% 5 — »* 

i«re 17% —v, 

m% 3ire - 
M TOto — 1 to 
44* 4% —H 

13% lire * % 

23V, 23to— I 
4V. 7 

12% 12%— IVu 
23% 23% —to 
BV* 8U — % 
19% 20 —to 
to, Y» — Yp 

86* 9% —re 

flto 7to ♦ V* 
i«to iB -ito 

4% sre _ 

4% 4to 
6 6 — % 
9% lore — % 
2/re 77% —% 
'Vu —to: 
«to <w — % 
)«% 16% —to 
13% 15% —1% 

a are —re 

7% 7% 

5% 5% — % 
14% «» —to 
a re are • re 
13 13 —1 

Sto 6% ■ % 

W 29% * V» 
9% 9% _ 

4P/„ <f/ D — ^*b 

lore 10% — % 
IVu 1V|, — Vu 
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J% 4% • to 

3'.* 3% % 

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17% Mto —to 

15% IS'Vi, — v» 
11% 11% —to 

M S. 

33 JJ% ... 
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17% 17% — % 
12% U« _ 
12 I2to— 1% 
Bare Bare— 79. 
S SH -* 
uv, nre —re 

5to t'-« 

7'* 7% 

ire ire re 


CmptH 6 _ 

Cm pi dn _ 

CrnpLR 00 40 
CpfNwfc 
CptOuts 

CmUPr „ 

Carnpwwr 

Comtrir - 

CmvRs _ 

camvan — 

Comwn _ 

CcdCain _ 

CncEFSi 
GtncHfffi 

ContHwl _ 

ConcHW 

CcricCm _ 

Cinder — 

Conductor ~ 

Cnreatga _ 

CoiHTc _ 

Corimed _ 

CarmWl 108 70 
Cansep — 

ConsSvi .12 1.1 
Gomam _ 

ConsaPd 

ConsGon _ 

Con Pd 03t 7.9 
CanStain _ 

CbnFbrt - 

ConsFn 05 20 
CnsFnol 05 100 


_ 3138 15% 14V* 14% —to ErraXBX s 

_ 1056 if. 1% 1% — % Encnd 

40 91 99, OV, f% _. Encore 

_ 2763 4% 4% 4% —to EncoreW 

_ 222 4Y, 4to 4% —V* EnAnnc 

_ 1309 3% 2’Vu 3 —% EnaBtov 


.. 8*9 IU* lire UV, — % GoMoa 
-.35243 21 19% M “V, GenNutr 

_ 358 7% 7% 7% —% GnPnro 

_ 22 6% 5% 6 V> *'A GemsCP IJ0O3J 

.12 20 229 5% 3*6 5 _ GeneThr 

_ 918625*0 21% 22% — 3% Genet! wt 
_ 594 10 Bto 9V* —to Gcnetlnst 

08a 0 62216 15 15 —V* Gontam 

_ 508 B *% 7V, —% GenJyle 

- IS Ito to re —Ito Genome 

_ 1664 21% 18 Mto— 1 Genoa 

_ 412 flto 6 flto —% Gensla wt 
_ 173 flto 5% 5V. —V* Gentn 

- 739 3 2% 2% - Gent** 

_ 1654 16% Mto lire —to Genus 

_ 642*17% II 11% “% GMWm 
... 4470 18% 15V, 14% —to Genxwt 


_ 754 3 
03 2J 362 21 


02 P .7 <03 3% 3 3 — % 

,0<e 0 1772 5% tf>. 5»A “'■* 

00 30 122 24% 23to 2<% “% 

j< xi absiiv. lore uto “% 

_ 46Sl".'u 1% 1% —»: 

00 A0 <64 15% 1<% IS —% 

04bZ7 1925 » 24 _ 

- 896 17 16 16to _ 

00 X0 10 15% 15% 15% -V* 

_ 213 3% 3% 3*i, “Vu 

_ 88 % % % —re, 

_ 239 18% 16% 17 —IV. 
_ 4894 31% 29% 29% —Ito 
_ 48131% MV, 30% “'.1 

- 101 B 7% 7% —to 

_ 148 13 11% 12% —to 

_. 7334 15V. M 14 —5* 

-48925 29% 25% 25V.— 3%. 
_ 1130 3V» 3% 3% —to 
_ 17? ?% ?'* 2to 

06 60 262 10% » 10% —% 
_ 114 9'A BV, 8% —Ito 

- 712 flto Sto Sto -to 

_ 4 Mto 24 Mto— I 

- 7125 4 Sto 3% —V, 

- 5449 8 7to 7% -J/u 


- 277 15% 

- 8* 3% 
.088 A 1171 30 


- 300 17 to 

05 082827 22 

_ 2018 8% 
_ 1083 7% 
_ 25711% 

- 1361 5% 

- 51 12 39V, 
_ 3084 4% 

03e 20 950 Ito 

_ 4W3 3% 


14M —to 
3to *»* 
18% — ito 
lire ♦'* 
2iv» +re 
sre —re 
are —re 
lire +re 
5% —re 
35 — VA 
6W +1W 

ire —re 


.16 10 183710, 

- 2041 13% 

- 69 5 

.160 40 18 4 

- 98 4% 

_ 1398 5% 
_ 7331 13% 
_ 79021% 

02 20 517 21% 

_ 13312 <to 

_ 2484 are 


J4 140 235 ire W« 1% — 9, IlBncoota JIt 40 731 5% jv* s% — % 


„ 2SS2 4V, 3Vu 3re —to Genzv Wt 
_ 915 15 13% Mto —to GtmzrTr 


_ 1383 7% 5% 4% —IV* Geoavn 
... l5 7% 6% VA * I GMtaon 


35 37 37 37 _ Inodlgwl 

1600 7 Vs 6 6% —to InovGme 

35512% r7% I2to —to trmovex 
1501 *1 'A 38% 39 to— Ito Inal ok 
4*4 2% 2 2'* —to Inphvnet 

350 4 to 3% 3% - JrasFn 

4*6 2to I’Vi, 2to - insllco 
4837 5V. 4% 4% “ % MSHnViS 

2S0 to Vi to _ insilE 
658 V't 4'A 7 “'A Insltfifld 

1802 a 20% 21 % —1 re inrttTc 
2611 4% 5% 6 —V* insAut 

770033’/. 29% 30 — z% intoofwr 
889 14 10V* 11%— 19* InteaOrC 

1108 7% 4 6% — ire IntaDv 

84* 3 2% 2% - JnteMJc 

48 7% 7% 7% “Vu inlSilSv 
93 18% IB 18 


_ 448 'Vu 
- 2024 5V, 
10 <832 14 


4V, 49, —t/ M I 


3to —re 
10 “% 
13'A _ 

4% —V, 


4 , re 

4V* —to 


Z3JW035V, 31 'A 35 — lEngynttl 1.12 fc9 X137 17 16% 16V, - I GaBnd 


- 309 13 Uto Mto —V, EnOvRsli _ 

- 2*40 3% 3 3 —Yd EnaWrtS 08 40 

_ <Ofl 3% 3 31* _ 

- <oai ure 11 nre— 1 

- 3176 Z'/u 2% ire — v u 
_ 139*23'., 21% 23V* »% 

- 6254 5V» 6 - 

- 2215 1% Ito Wu — Vu 

_ 115010% 9to 10 —% 

- 1851 !>V» Ito l'/u —V* 

_ SOS 2'Vu 3% 2V6 —to 

- 170 sre <% s —re 

_ 1955 10V. 9% 10 —re 
_ BSP 4% 4% 49* * Vi 


21010% 9% 9% +4* GeoTk 

16 8% 8% 8% —re Gcawarks 

91 9 8% 9 - GwllMd 


70 5% 5% 5% - InlgWst 

7107 8% 7% 8% _ inlBMul 

939 7% 5% 4 —re imw 

779 2% 2% 3 Vi ♦«„ Intel wl 


„ 1851 I>V« Ito l'/u —Vs 
_ sos 2'Vu ire are —re 
„ 170 sre <% s —re 

_ 1955 10V. 9% 10 —’A 

_ BSP 4% 4to 49* * Vi 

_ 976 24% 21% 23 to —2% _ 

108 70 X4824 22% 24 •% EnwyCP 

„ 743 3% 3 3 —to Eroon 

.12 1.1 8011 10V, 10%— I EpeSJes 

_ 402 6% 6% flto - Eawcrdt 

14 13 13Vt 12% —to Eamnox 

- ISO 18% 17 IB'* —V* EauiMX 

03t 7.9 709 11 9re 10V, —‘A Eauilrc 

- 453 7Yn flto 4% — % EquilyCp 

„ 44215% 15 15 - Eafvlnn 

05 20 4 2 2 2 _ EatyMkt 

05 10-0 64 8% 7% 8% * 1 EaiOfl 


Con Wot 1.18 70 29717to 16V. 14% 
Contia _ J407 Mto 24 -24% 


.14 20 SM 7% SH flto —to GtbPack 

_ 341 4 3% 4 r% GJor&i 

_ 706 UV. ll'A llto —Vu GtwnG 

_ 219 1» 0 1% 1% — ’/n GidLew 
_ 52 1% 1% 1% —to, GkwTr 

_ 3M Bto 8V U B% “% Gnats* 

_ T*0* »/„ 9* US, — J/u GJ1MA 

_ S6 2’Vu 2to 2’Vu “V H 
_ 1421 3% 3% 3to — Vu 

_ 2876 are 7% tv, — to aerfle 

_ 1434 1 9'A 1 Bto 19% “to Gtanayr s 

- 7900 210 2% 2% « GJcfcJInd 

_ 4175 23% 19V, 19%— 4% GfeMMI 

- 439 Mto 29% 29% —Vi, GtMId ufl 

_ 965 7 6 6to —to GbVilOO 

- 1029 2% 2 2to “Vu Gtvarad 

_ 123 «to <re <V, ♦ V* GtMEn 

- 3007 14% 13% Mto — % GaWnOn 

08e A7 3485 IOT* 10 10% — % GIOPOul 

_ 504 4% 4% 4% “Vu GUnSVSl 

- 359 4to 4% 4to “to GSSnBks 


00 10 151561% 59% 61 —% 

_ 2311 13% 12% Mto —to 

510 7to 6% 7to 

_ B2I 11 10% 11 _ 


- 135 1 'Vu ■Vu — Vu 

_ 518 13% 11% 12’rt— l 

_ 27681FV, f 18% 18%— 1'4 
_ 65 26% 26V. 26% —to 

- 362 4 3 % 4 _ 

05 10 161 2% 2% 2% —to 
.14 10 104510% 9% 10 

_. 241212% 10% lOto— 1% 
_ 1169 34to 31 V, 32 — 2’A 

_ 3W 7% 6H 7W _ 
_ 2019 Bto 7% Bto “to 
...3574627% 2* % 261* _ 

_ 1B6 8% Bto 8% —to 

_ 1590 27% 25 % 25 'A— 1 IVu 
„ 795 16% 15% 151* —to 

_ 2101 2% 3to 2% “to 
_ 44610V, 9% 10 
J4 q 0318273 6816 <3% 63% — V k 
-.45209 1 5% 14 14 — % 



_ 987 !■%, 1% Tf*i, + %, 

3.11923713% 12 V, 13%, —'A 


_ 318 13% 
06 73 4321'A 

00 10 26 39V. 

00 _ 8612V, 

_ 346 2 to 

940 ID to 
.12 63 6% 

_ 6109 20 
_. 2590 12% 
108 50 X23533 
„ 1212 2% 
_ 33< 3% 

- 781 Sto 

_ 349437 
J* U 3020V. 

36 4 A 3870 18% 

- 41 Sto 

.15* 1.1 X43 14V* 

_ 828 10% 

- 1510 3>/u 

04 20 756 12'0 


00 X9*693614Vt 12% 13% “to lrtlNtwk 


.12 01302015 14 14% —to Intrcrga 

... 85 6 Sto 6 + 'A Marcel 

_ 1633 14% 13% 13% —% JntetlBk 

00 50 101 M% 13% 14% “1% imridn 

_ 1288 lore 9 9*6 —V, IntarfC 

._ 44 6% 5% 6% “% imfrn 

080 20 27 17V* 16% 17 “% IMerfhn 

- S945 60V. 53% 56 —4 Inlgnh 
f _ 437 2314 23 22 —% Interim 
_ 1136 flto 6 6 — Ya intrleaf 


698 I'A, 7* 
2830 9 7 

5972 3 l'Vu 


*% imerflrn 
— * intaoh 

—to interim 
-Af a intrleaf 


_ 1089 8% 7% 7% — Vu 
00 20 293 13 11% 13 —I 

„ 5782 3t/u 2% 3 V h — *u 
.IB 2J 87 9 B'u B'A — Vu 
_ 308 12% llto llto— 1 
■36 1.9 145 19% 18% 19V. *% 
J4 7J 2293 lire lore 10V H — 

.14 1.8 2521 10 B'A 9 —nre 
_. I<6B t'Vi, I«u 1% ~ 

_ 46 7% 6% 7V, 

_ 3371 BV* 8 8% —to 

_ 235534% 234* 24 — Vu 


~. 700 BV. 

_ 1484231. 
32 30 18811 


to — I Martina 
7% —Ito I infrem 


_ 16 4 Sto SV„ 

00 4J 1B1 14to M 14 


OtSaVPf -77 10X7 <24 «Vu 


_ Eafvtwi " ' - 

_ EatvMfd 
I Emofl 
_ ErkTel 

_ ErraiHm _ ow 12 nre lire — 

Vu Eflcmae 1.46129J 467 S 4V, s * 

._ EiWmo JO U 8917% 17 17 — 1 


0Oe 1.1 30849 Mlto 55% 5416—3% 
- 2394 12 lire 11% —to 


-3% GotfEltf 
—to GoodGv 
*'A GaodmB 
-1 GdyFafll 


CarnWst _ 

Or IDT - 

CnvScd 

ConwrtO 04 _ 

CoaprD 

Caaprt. _ 

CoapBk s _ 

Coots B 00 XI 

Gaport _ 

GamevRi 
COPVM 

Cornier _ 

COrGobF _ 

Cor com _ 

Cordis — 

CteralCp t _ 

CmrPfl _ 


1795 lore 9% 9to —re 
3358 6V. 5% 6 —V* 

6P9 1% l"/(, !»%, - 


771«Kfe 16 ‘ 16% — % Evan* 
9 2% 2% 7% —V* I E' 


Ait 40 3<2 lore 9% 10 —to GarortC 

102 6-3 TO 2<V* 24% M% — Gotfiom 

._ 105 6% 6% flto “to GauklP 

- see 1214 Uto Mto —to GvtTch 

_ 84 3% 2% 2'Vu “to, GOvett 


- 5972 3 l'Vu 2% “to irtmetC 

04 60 118 OTu 6% 6% „ Intlllltr 

2 Ito IV* Ito —to imcabl 
04b 3 38 > 7'4 5% 5% —tVi IntCUe 

_ 427 Ito Ito IV, —to InDiXrA 

00a 10 B 38 38 38 „ InDairB 

_ 299 I2to 1D% lOto— 1% Inti moo 

- 184313% 11% llto *to irtisn 

.13 0 54214 IS 15V* —to IntPlr 

- 183P 9% B'A 8% —% IntlPo 

- «j 5re s sre —re imRsti 

_. 499 3 24* 2‘to, — Vu InlTatn 

00 30 1107 21% 70% 20% — »/„ Intmu 
_ 1845 13'A 70 >3 *3 lidmwIS 


_ 2000 12% 11% 12 EvrarnB 

„ 10917% 15% 15% —TV EygrMed 
00 XI *2229 17 16 16% — % EVorMPI 

_ 332 17% 17 17% —% g'OT’RS 

_ 2501 19% 18 18% —V* Exabyte 

_ 7121 6’A rt, 5‘Vi, “Vu Erax-i 

_ 413413% 1J% 13’A _ E«ratt 


% EvamSh!* — 398 5 4% 5 “to Grades 

I Evrgrrfi 05* A 445 15% 13% 13% — % GraffPay 


l.lfleSJ 142 21% 2iv, 21 v* —to imphse 


EvgrMM _ 19 IB 17*1 17 17% “V* GronBd 

EvorMpI 300 40 41044 44 44 _ GrmeC 

114 6% 6% 6% —to GrryitSt 

- 16845234* 1944 20% —2% GffltGeO 

- 117421% 19% 21% —to GrtlfT pt 

~ 789 7 4% 5% —1% Grptiln 

_ 1263 5% <’»u 5 _ GIARC 


CortmoQ 

CorpExp 

CorctCP 
CorCnwt 
Cartech 
Corvo* 
Cirvei 
CtnClrA 
C05CWO 
Coif Cp 
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! Courw 
I Covetuxti 
I Cvntry s 
I CrturBrl 
Crflmde 
[ CroyOn 
1 CrOtaMol 
CrTchLi 
CredSvv 
Crdflcns 
I CreeRsh 
1 CrasAir 
! CriHcro 
• CrooG 
1 Crt»G tX 

' Crtrsarnan 
CnmAn 
CwnBh 
CrwnPs 
Crvenco 
Crvoflfe 
Crvomed 


_ 8634 14% lAfu 16% “ to EkClTCb _ i.oj m ““u a — 

Z 3M 3% 3% 3V* - ExcTTcd* JSe 50 75 4 5% 6 “to 

_ 845160% 54% 5746— 2to E xacT l 1.2312X8 5041 5% 3% 5% *% 

_ U026 M lire 13% “Vu pscraji _ 2?77 3V, are 3% — v H 

_ 393 64* 6% 6% —to EkWeEl 


- 3356 ISto 134* Mto 


_ (537 16% 15% rare 


_ GIARC 

♦to GHBa 
*% Gary 
-Vu GrfFnd 
♦ to G4LkeAv 


Z S641 31% ISto »v,— 1% I grarArn 


1232)4 M'A IS —4. §*0500* 
298 ?to tto 9% ♦ to !*««*• 
<113 2% 2% 2% —to Erc ony 
717 2to 1% Jto “to Exrarp 


- 751 <% 4% 4% _ 1 G*Lk wt 


_ 348 13% 12% 12% — 1 

_ 120 M Mto 13 —1 

.10 _ 30714 10% 94* 94* —to 

.■6 xo so are e a — % 

.40 13 33 17% 17 17W “to 


_ 395719% 17% 

- 3141 76 34% 24% —I, 

.1 32317 19% 17% 19 — 


8 — tolF&CBfl 
l?to ♦ to FSA4 He 


-3 FCLMBh 
-1 F6M Dis 
—to FM Nat 


808 IQto ?% lOVu — Vu FCB Fn 


5234 I Vi, 1% 14* 
_ 1221 2re 1% 3 


„ FCNB 
to FDP 


Z 13722 13% 12% 12% —to FF to 

<51725% M% 25 —to R=BS. r <0 2. 

^ 45 8% 7% 7% - - 

.1451X1 % % — v B 00 X 

329 2Vm IVu 3*u —to FHP 

“ \m 1 % «Vu -V, FHPplA JlC L 

95133,0 418 jre 21* Sto — '*« FLl~_ 

™ 187 16 IW Ml-W 

_ 3918 10 1 * 94* 9% —to FMSFn 

Z II <8 *to 6% 4'A - FNJBME 


186 7 V. 44* 6% —'A PNBRo 


318 17to 16 
1068 Sto 4Vi 
«0 4to 4 


-1 FPAMed 
—»* FRPPr 

— Vj FSFFIn 


7% 7% FSi mi. 


Z 2931 3% 3 re 3to ' to FTP stt 

.88 X9», 7*5 31 to 78V. Mto— 1% 

.10 1.1 1783 10V1 9% 9% —** FatwiVin 


- 3325 33% 25% »%— < GtLkPf 

-. 91 4to 4 4 _ GISaBCS 

- 366 3% 3'A 3to —V* GrtWan 

.. 2369 12% ll'A 13 Vi “ire GlNYSw 

Green* 

e ■ Granfld 

E I GreenSln 

GnranS wi 

00a XI 30 20 19V, 19to —to GmwAtr 

JOb 20 97 29'A 38% 28% — % GmdSu 

08 XI 23 22V, 31to 23to *1* GmyAd 

121S 3% 34* 3% —to GrtfTctl 

00b 3.8 ISO 16% 15% 15% —to GrMMil 

08 A0 90614 11 12 — 3to Gmsmn 

.140 J 7030 Mto 30 'to CrdRna 

„ 172 4% 4 4% • V. Grdwlr 

■66b 4.5 994 13 13% Mto Gmupl 

.40 2-5 132 15% IS 1 '. IS% '1 OrpTecti 

J< l.B 2M I3to I7to 13'A • re 
_ 3285 17V, 16'.u 17 
JSO X5 3147 20% 19% 19V, -4* 

.. 6725 27% JSto 26 —Ito 
JlC 10x1851 24'.* 25'.i ISto —to 
.. 7B7 12V. 12% 12% t to 

- 1)45 3% 2'Vu JVie “A, 

_ 39 23 22% »■:, —V, 

■72 3J) 18 23V, 23% 23V* —4* 

21S 6% 5% Sto —V* 

_ 333 12V, 1IY, II 1 .* — % 

- Jl 17% 17% 17% _ I 

- B01S 8% 7W Bto —V. * 

- 3771 35% MtoJffV,, >Vi| 

- 22023 28'A 25% 36 -1 RA-LO 
Ole .1 ,441 7% 7% Pu — V, MBOs 
.15 70 MB 6% 64* *% — iy B MCCln 5 


- 184 4 3to OT* —to Infant 

_ 618 lore 9to 9% —V. Inteare 

_ 157 Tto 6% 6% .Vi IntocQx 

JO 10 152*21% 20V* 20 Vi — % IntCpt wt 

JS Z8 12911V* 11 llto _ Intcrrtv 

_ 713 3%. 2% 2V, — Vu (nfrfrxxTS 

_ 16 IT** 12% 12% —to IntvtaB 

.07 3 60010% 9% 9% —to Intvoico 

- 7297 to, Vn ’h) „ Inflitl 

JO X7 234 18% IBto 18% —re Invcare 

_ 446 2% 3V* 2% —>A InvTedi 

08e 0 3670 Mto 14V* Mto “ to invBnk * 
_ J77 <re 4th <to — Vu (rWTTIt 
1.841 70 1045 34% »% Mto —V, lORWau. 

„ - 354 3% 3% 3 % — % kMMNal 

1.001 100 4710 9to U» +% Insra 
00 30 65 iflto 16% 16to —to Iroauol 

■23e 40 148 5% 4% sre —re IrwInPrn 

_ 2214 are 7% a —re ikd 

J4 IJ *34 19% TBto IBto _ ISIS 

.17 0 4218 23to 20 20V. —are Kotyser 

_ 669 5Vi 4% 4% — % ihomax 

_. JO ire It* Ito _ JsrtLd 

_ 7S flto 6 * — % ItnacBc 

.80 20 44130% 2Sto 28".— »'« ItaYOkd 
X2S 2J 12 152 to >46 150 —7 I Iron 


2714 4% 4 4% 

475 S <Vi 4% —to 
1197 Uto II llto— 1 

1394 are 5% 6'/, ♦ to 
42 sre jv* 5 re _ 
22H av* ito ito —to 
453230% 27 27% — 3 
289 17to 16% 17V* “ % 

1 ure 16% lav*— ito 

1488 25V* 23% 23% — 1% 
7510 9 9H —'A 

3419 1% Vfl, UV„ — Vu 

316 ere 8 sre ♦ re 

619 2% 2V* 3'A —re 
sisa OT* 3 3 — Vu 

5754 4% 4 4Vu — V H 
» Ito Jto IV* 

1194 12% 10% 11 —ire 
273 9% 8% BV, _{* 
3127 a 6% 7 re —re 


- 543 10 

- 8433 Sto 

~ 46 8% 

-10349 3fe 

- 12525 Z3 '4 

00 30 9016 

_ 100 12% 
.96 15 1143 27% 
_ 451 10% 


.40 30*9566 »'A 
._ 971 10% 


_ 3<1 9 

120 

_ 10a 5% 

06 20 947 25V, 


J8au xsom, 

- 1200 3% 


_ 145 !W» 5% Sto —re 


ire ire —re 

16% 16% — % 


_ 740 Uto 
_ - 317 TV* 

■04* 0 155 ISV* 


_ 29 2% Jto 2th _ 

- 6802 M 12 13V. —to 

- 5544 68V. 6S7A 66 to— I'A 
J 1699 31% MV, 31’A “V, 

- <66 8% Bto Bto —u 
20 100 21% 20% 21 — % 
M 8 8 7re 7re —% 


- 1687 OVu 3Vu 3Vu “Vo 


04 17 14 23% 23 23 

08 5718tol7*Vul7*Ai— 1'to, 

36 2J 3017% 17 17 - 

-36 IJ 489 27% 26% 26% - 

JOb 13 94 9 8% 8% —% 

_ 631 4'-. 3to 4". “ to 

.. 3S01 20V, 16V, 17'u— 2% 
... 564 16% 15’, 16% — to 

_ 577)0% 9% 9% — flr 


- 184 2to 

_ 280B3OT4 

- 325 VVu 

_ 103 Tto 

_ 173 8% 

- 951816th 

- 842 15 

- 6790 47% 

- 4729 4% 

091 43 85 8 

- 226 10% 

— 40 pM/u 

499 17 

57 Sto 

- 2351 14’A 

- 41313 
08 2J 10240 19V, 

_ 324 7 

04 X7 1156 16% 

— 3400 3Vu 


4% —1 
li'A — ure 
21% —to 
20 Vi —to 
4M, “*re 

3% —to 

13 — % 

20V* —to 
381*— 1 
12 % — % 
1» —to 
9% — % 
Ato — Vu 
18 —1% 
uto —to 
MY, —'A 
2% “V, 

Jto -vu 
Sto “'A 
aantw— <%, 
Mto - 
17% —ire 
5V* ♦ v. 
13V* — % 
IOT* “to 
zto —to 
uto “V* 
17 V. — ' Ito 
5 +1 

7 —w 

27% “to 

io% —% 

9% 

E" 

B% “% 

3% 

22% *'A 
16 —to 
12% *t* 
27V* —'A 
10 —to 
«lto “to 

Tto —re 
7t* -1* 
21% “to 

1 Mi _ire 

9% _w 

10V* — % 

19% _% 

10'/* —to 

8% — v„ 

20 +1% 

SY. “V. 

S8=» 

V^.-Z 

Tt* —to 
IBto —to 
3to *to 
Uto — % 

at* —to 

14% —to 

2to —re 

Hito— ire 

?V* —V* 
7% “to 
8tfc “to 
l4»Vu— Ito. 

1 Jto— IV, 
KJto— Jto 
4'A —'A 
7% — to 
9to — to 


247 5V> Sto Sto “to 
17 ISto 14% 15V* —to 
5043 33% 33 33'/. —to 

135 21to 70% 21 to 
1445 6M. 5% 5“*:— 'to, 
309 av, jto rv. —re 
485 2%, 1'V|, l'Vu — Ya 
180 31% 31 31 —to 


5253 8% 7to 6V. _ 


24% 25‘a— 2V, 
5to 6V, —to 

< ato -to 


- 7488 21 T* 19» rare— IVu 


- 88 4 

X00 170 BOD 15 


3026 av* 4% 4'V|,— IV, , 
88 4 2% 2% —Ito 


88 4 2% 

80015 11 

4019 26% 22 
61613% 13 


- 8949 7% 6% 7V, 


2% —ire 

nre— are 

Mto— at* 
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_ 4093 Mto 12 13 — % 

_ 25 3to are 3% —to 

_ 145 4% 3 V, are —re 

- 1349 6th 5% OT* “to 

- 93 Sto 5V* 5% —to 

00 «J 224 18% 18V. 18% 

_ - 11 H* 7% 8% “1 

SO 50 124 9 Vi 9 9 —to 

.16 10 523 IJ ll’A Uto —to 

._ 3408 6 Vi Sto Sto —re 

„ - 21 lire Iflto IM -to 

02e A 44 5 4% 4V* - 

~ 1211 4V* 3% 4 —% 

_ TT65 It* 'Yu Ito, — V, 

- 13438 Mto 12V, 12<*u— ^u 

„ - 144 9 Bto Bto —to 

JO 2A 72) 8W TV, St* “Vi 

_ 3718 23% 22Vi 23 —to 

04 0 312 7VA flto r.-* -to 

- s<4 ato flto flt* “to 

-94371 18 15to 17% “% 

— '77? nre 11 uv, *% 

^ 20 585 Bto are Bto “to 

.97M10 213 b% e are —re 

-20831 6% $to 6 —re 

2JS 7.0 725 35% 31V, 32 -A 


7.1 31722% 21 


mi 4v* «re are 


. -18129 1 

04 U 6 20 
.40 90 12 6’A 

. - 2763 39V* 

04 1.2 235 58 
00 .9x12552 47 
■Ofle J 7467 19 
- 4820 


29 1 % 1 - 

420 20 20 

12 Ate are are - 
r 43 3vre Sire 35 —tre 

35 58 55 ssre— *„ 

32 47 43% 45% — % 

14719 17% 18% “1 

48 20 18to 1B%— 1 

os m. are 6>tA* — % 

25 13te 13% 13V. —to 


c t M 




- ssiare 12 12 —v* 

JO X9 194 17% 16% 17 —to 

- 105 S'A Jto SV* “V* 

104 XI 4855 34'/. 32W 34 “V* 

X12 60 11 49V* 48to 48to 

- - 2764 ti% rare ure — 1» 
J8 1.7 98 14V, 15% 16'A “A 

- M9 Ato 5V* Sto — % 

_ <35 7t* are 714 “to 

_ - <011 187, 17 17% —% 

.Jo XI 164 17 to 16 16 —ire 

1J6 40 801 30V* rare 28Vi—l% 

- 918 16V, IS 16V. “to 

- as 3 2'A 3 “V* 

2089 are 5% 4 —to 

- 2023 tare 14% mvi— 1% 

- OOimVulO 10% —to 


_ 187 37% 35% 35% — S'-* 

08 0 122410 BV, 10 *% 

- 441 11% 11 11% - 

_ 50S sre 5 5 “to 

-173528 20% 18% 18%—' W* 

- 12557 55 50 jm-2% 

- 2969 16% 14 15% —to 

-. 234 are 4% are —re 

JBe 18131%, 13 ITVjj — "*» 

~ V78 Tto 6to fl'*u —*A6 

- 25 3% 3% 3to — 7*< 

~ 1540 l*a 1 IVu —to 

- 7173 113 113 — I 

~ « 4 3% 4 “jj 

~ 833 23to 21V* 21% — % 

442 tl 9to ID'/, —'A 
, _ ~ 7% 10 f V* 9% T % 

1.70 11.1 *17 15", 15’ A ISV. *»"<• 

«. 213 2% sre 2 re 'to “ 

.16 60 146 2V] 2'U 27u “*• 


95 B'A 7% Tt* —% t (weeks 


_ 1170 9% B 9 —V, 

2131 2% It* 2V* —v. 

1798 6% A *V, —I* 

_ b 34 lav. i3’'» nre —v, 

... 22 10 9 10 1 1 

... ion at* sre are — 1 . 
0d 24 194 are M 2i% — re 


_ laoi 11% *re lore— 1 % jaacgp 


50 13% 13'>, Ure 


_ mu IT** rsre i6v» — ** ipe 


.. 1051 4 Vi 3% are »re jSBFn bo 3 

_ 7653 30% 78', are— 1% Jobs 

— 3014 (6 14 —V, JocVHnrf 
10925 13% 12% Uto “1 JOOO0K 
60 X2 72 28'A 27 27 —1 Jpgbvr 60 4 

-w 1091 J 33 78 v> wre— 3% JocprCm 

Jomesnln JOe 7 

' Z 8 Jasmine 

. .. n J Josans 

vitovjoc 

... il 4% 5% ito -% Jean Phi 

.16 016076 33 % 78% 30%—l% JcffrGp .20 


2<8 13% 11% 11% _ 

. S5I J'u <% <% — Wu 
10 3 <21 41' I 38 Aire lire 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


Page 13 


O N 


A Y 



In College Basketball \ the Mind Games — and Upsets — Have Begun 


By George Vecsey 

. . New York Times Service 

^ R^GFIELD, Massachusetts — 
John Cahpan has a theory, which he tdo- 

graphswtth a wink and a smile, just in case 

you re a httle slow; When you open your 
season against the defending Mtional 
champions, it’s only a big game if But 
let bis players tell you. 

“Wbatdol always say?” Calipari asked 
three of his University of Massachusetts 
players before the game. “It’s only a bie 
game if...”’ ° 

_ UIf we win,” the three recited in unison. 
They' had obviously heard this before. 

They did win, h umiliating Arkansas, 
104- SO, in a gam e that tells us there is hot 
going to be any automatic dynasty busi- 
ness, any runaway stuff, going on during 
the college basketball season this winter. 

However, you know that Nolan Rich- 
ardson always has his own grip on thing* 


Last April, Richardson helped prod his 
Razorbacks into beating Duke for the na- 
tional championship after making the 
starters sit and listen to an hour of a black 
coach’s slow progress through the coach- 
ing ranks in establishment America. Re- 
spect, be told them. Nobody gives Arkan- 
sas respect. It was a masterful per- 
formance, using real emotion, real history . 


“You see there’s respect and love for 
Nolan,” Calipari was saying before Friday 
night's game. “We all posture and say 
things. Believe me, I do." 


himself. “We fly to Memphis. No practice. 
Just shoot around and play Georgetown. 
We could be 0-2 by the end of the week and 
StQI have a very good team.’' 

Come to think of it, John Thompson of 
Georgetown normally plays St. Leo eight 
times in the first month." just so he can 
concentrate on “getting the boogaloo" out 
of his players’ systems, as he once told an 
overly flashy freshman. This season, he's 
picking on somebody his own size. Good 
for him. 


Richardson cannot play the no-respect 
game anymore. To his credit, he did not 
insult our intelligence by trying He knows 
how to be a defending champion. He gave 
his players a nice Httle exercise this year. 
Massachusetts in Springfield on Friday 
night. Georgetown in Memphis on Sunday. 

“We should fire the coach who made the 
schedule,” Richardson rumbled, meaning 


There are two ways to open the college 
season. There’s the St. John's way, which is 
to bring in sparring partners and call it the 
La pc hick Tournament, in misguided hon- 
or of Joe Lapchick. the two-term coach 
whose alert eyes are all over the Basketball 
Hall of Fame up here. 

Then there’s the John Calipari- Nolan 
Richardson way, of staging a demolition 
derby between two of the best teams in the 


country. Obviously, the two coaches do it 
for the money, for the televised lure of 
playing where the Dukes and the North 
Carolines and the Kentucky's all have 
been. 

Make sure, right away, that one very 
good team is not going to go undefeated all 
year. But Calipari, who has been on the 
make for the past six years, took a chance 
on being humbled before the first snowfall. 

In this pan of the world, rugged wooden 
planks cover the marble steps of the court- 
house, to make it easier to shovel, to keep 
people from slipping. Winter comes on 
with a vengeance here. People can use 
diversions. And New England is only be- 
coming used to dreaming of UConn and 
UMass as the college equivalent of the 
Boston Celtics during their glory years. 

It took some courage for Calipari to play 
Arkansas, the first national champion in 
29 years to come back with all five starters. 


Arkansas seemed loose and f amili ar and 
cocky as it came cm the court. 

Corliss Williamson, projected as the 
player of the year, had just shaved his skull 
10 Jordanian shininess. His baggy shorts 
dangled all the way down to the fraternity 
branding-iron welt on his left calf. (Fash- 
ion note: shorts are even longer this year.) 
But all the swagger in the world did not 
help Arkansas once the game began, 

Lou Roe, who has the reputation of a 
college-level intimidator without profes- 
sional-level shooting ability, did every- 
thing but tug Williamson's shorts down to 
his ankles. 

Roe opened the game with an emphatic 
two-handed dunk, and the UMass forward 
made 12 of 20 shots up close and 10 of 1 1 
foul shots for 34 points, and he had 13 
rebounds. 

“We got some fuel on the fire, we put the 
quote on the mirror.” Roe said afterward, 
“when they said their second team was 


better than our first team. That ticked me 
off” 

There were all kinds of spin going 
around, and Richardson had his: a learn- 
ing experience. While his players stumbled 
out of control against Massachusetts, 
Richardson didn't call a timeout, didn't 
rage, didn’t force them to pound the ball 
inside, or run set plays. He let them free- 
lance. He let them be embarrassed. 


“I'm not happy, but I’m glad to see we 
have a lot to take care of,” Richardson 
said, adding , “There are three seasons — 
the preseason, the conference and the 
NCAA.” And he marched his players off, 
toward Memphis, toward Georgetown, to- 
ward John Thompson. 

Oh. and by the way, what had Calipari 
told his players to think in case they had 
lost to Arkansas? “It’s just another game,” 
they would have red ted Mind control Big 
games. The season has begun. 


Barkley Back Against Spurs, 
.Shoots His Suns to Victory 







. The Associated Pros 

It had been a long time since Charles 
Barkley played in a game that counted, 
and it showed But his bade doesn’t 
hurt anymore, and that showed, too. 

In the fourth quarter of the first San 
Antonio-Phoenix game of the season, 
Barkley regained the spin moves, alley- 
cat balance and shooting eye that 
made him an eight-time AH-Star. 

“I was struggling with my shot the 
first half,” he said after scoring 10 of 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


his 23 points in the fourth quarter of a 
111-108 victory Saturday night in 
Phoenix. “I was r ushing things,” Bark- 
ley said “but when h got down to the 
fourth quarter, I really picked it up.” * 
After David Robinson of the Spins 
tied at 99 with two free throws with 
3:27 to play, Barkley went to work cm 
the baseline. In a 1:13 span, he hit an 
17-foot rainbow and a turnaround 
jumper over Sean Elliott, putting the 
Suns ahead 107-102 with 1:22 to play; 

Supercouks 98, Rockets 94: In 
Houston, Gary Payton hit a jumper 
with 1 1.6 seconds left for Seattle, to 
halt a Houston comeback and hand 
the defending NBA champion Rockets 
their third straight loss. 

Sam Perkins and Shawn Kemp each 
*d 22 points for Seattle, while Vernon 
Maxwell led the Rockets with 23. 
Lakers 112, Bidets 96: In Laridover. 


Maryland, Nick Van Exel had 22 
points and 13 assists, and Cedric Ce- 
baDos added 18 points and grabbed 14 
rebounds as the Lakers won their 
fourth straight game. 

Chris Webber had 22 points and 20 
rebounds for the Bullets, who have lost 
five straight games. Washington has 
yet to win in three games since adding 
Webber, last year’s NBA Rookie of the 
Year with Golden State, and his ex- 
Michigan teammate, first-round pick 
Juwan Howard, on Nov. 18. 

; Magic 113, Bucks 105: In Milwau- 
kee, Anfernce Hardaway scored 21 of 
his 35 points in the first half and had his 
first fi^e double of the season to lead 
. Oriando to its seventh straight victory. 

. Cavaliers 101, Warriors 87: In 
Cleveland, Mark Price scored a sea- 
son-high 31 points and made five of 
GeVdand’s team-record 11 3-pointers. 

; Celtics 108, 76ers 99: In Philadel- 
: phia, rookie Eric Montross’ two free 
. throws with 1:53 to play and David 
Wesley’s 3-pointer 21 seconds later 
boosted Boston over Philadelphia. Dee 
Biown scored 22 points, Dino Radja 
hail 9 and ManLross finished with IS 
points. Jeff Malone had 28 points and 
Dana Banos 23 for Philadelphia. 

Mavericks 124, Nuggets 123: In 
Denver, Jim Jackson scored a career- 
high 50 points, including two free 
throws with 0.5 seconds left in over- 
time, as Dallas rallied from a 25-point 
first-half deficit to win. 



Texas Gives No. 2 Tar Heels Scare 


Rj* Stub* kl'inc Rollers 


Alonzo Mourning, left scored 27 points and had 18 re- 
bounds for the Charlotte Hornets, despite Patrick Ewing's 
blocking attempts, in the Hornets' 105-95 defeat of the 
Kmcks, playing in New York. Ewing was held to 22 points. 


Jerry Stackhouse scored a career- 
high 28 points and made several key 
plays down Lhe stretch as No. 2 North 
Carolina escaped with a 96-92 victory 
over Texas in the kind of tension-filled 
game usually seen in March. 

“For the first game of the season it 
was played like an NCAA tournament 
game,” Tom Penders, Texas’s coach, 
said Saturday. “Die effort by both 
teams — kids were flying all over the 
floor and fighting for loose balls and 
diving on both sides — it was great 
basketball” 

The Tar Heels, who won their 66 th 
straight home opener, trailed at half- 
time and through most of the second 
half until Stackhouse rallied his team. 

Texas, with three starters back from 
the team that went 26-8 last season, led 
for the final time at 87-86 with 4:18 
left. Stackhouse, who played the entire 
second half, then bloated a shot and 
got a return feed from fellow sopho- 
more Rasheed Wallace for a dunk that 
gave the Tar Heels the lead for good. 

The Tar Heels, who shot 59 percent 
in the second Half , almost threw the 
ball away twice in die final 4) seconds 
after Texas cut the lead to 92-90. but 
the final pass ended up in the arms of 
Wallace under the basket. He made the 
layup with 32.2 seconds left. 

No. 4 Kentucky 124, Tenoessee- 
Martm 50: In Lexington. Kentucky. 
Jared Plickeit made 10 of 11 shots arid 
scored 21 points while the Wildcats 
scored 64 points off 42 turnovers by 
Tennessee-Martin and had a 40-24 re- 
bounding advantage. Kentucky's big- 


ctnry margin was 77 
of Georgia in 1956. 


was 77 in a 143-60 


victor 

Teat of Georgia 
No. 5 Arizona 73, No. 19 Oklahoma 
State 63: In Anchorage, Alaska, Ray 
Owes, who got 18, and Damon Stouda- 
mire combined for 35 points as Lhe 
Wildcats withstood a second-half 3- 
point barrage by the Cowboys' Randy 
Rutherford. He was 6-for-S from be- 


and an- 


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS 


yond the arc in the final 20 minutes 
and finished with 23 points. 

No. 6 UCLA 83, California State 
Northridge 60: In Los Angeles, George 
Zidek scored 14 points and UCLA took 
control with an early 17-2 run. Charles 
O’Bannon added 13 points and his 
brother, Ed, scored 1 1, au in the first half. 

No. 8 Duke 93, Northeastern 70: In 
Durham, North Carolina, Cherokee 
Parks scored a career-high 27 points, 
and freshman Ricky Price sparked a 
late first-half run. A tap-in by Lonnie 
Harrell forced the final tie at 28 before 
the Blue Devils took charge. Parks 
sank an 18-Footer with 4:36 left to 
break the tie and open an 1 1-2 run that 
gave Duke a 39-30 lead with 2:39 re- 
maining. Parks closed the rally as well 
with another perimeter jumper, and 
finished at 12 -for-I 6 . 

No. 9 Kansas 83, San Diego 65: In 
Lawrence, Kansas, Sean Pearson scored 
16 points to lead five Jayhawks in dou- 
ble figures os Kansas won its 22d con- 
secutive opener at home. Doug Harris 
led San Diego with 21 points. 

No. 12 Cincinnati 108, Austin Peay 
73: In Cincinnati, freshman Danny 


Fortson scored 25 points 
chored a 61 -point first half. 

In games played Friday: 

No. 5 Arizona 107, Alaska Anchor- 
age 88 : In Anchorage, Alaska,, Joseph 
Biair worked inside for 23 points and 
Damon Stoud anrire added 20 from the 
perimeter as Arizona came back from 
its 72-7 0 loss to Minnesota. Die Wild- 
cats led by 12 at the half, then blew the 
game open behind Blair's inside play. 
The lead reached 29 before coach Lute 
CHson emptied his bench. 

No. 8 Duke 80, Brown 38: In Dur- 
ham, North Carolina, freshmen Ricky 
Price, Steve Wqjciechowski and Trajan 
Langdon helped ignite a 17-0 second- 
half run. Wqjtiechowski’s aDey-oop to 
Price, who dunked the ball one-hand- 
ed, brought a standing ovation. Sec- 
onds later, Wqjciechowski wrestled a 
loose ball from a Brown player and fed 
Kenny Blakeney for an open layup. 
Langdon's 3-pom ter at the 10-minute 
mark put Duke ahead 61-28. 

No. 10 Florida 73, Stetson 64: In 
Gainesville, Florida, Dan Cross scored 
27 points and helped Florida come 
back from an 1 1 -point first-half defi- 
cit Much of Stetson’s early success 
came from the shooting of guard Kerry 
Blackshear, who scored 16 first-half 
points on a variety of jumpers, spin- 
ning inside layups and 3-pointers. 

No. 16 Connecticut 110, Lafayette 
48: In Hartford, Ray Allen scored 23 
points and Brian Fair had 21 as Con- 
necticut cruised to victory. Point 
guard Kevin Ollie finished with 14 
points and Donny Marshall had 13. 


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SupTech 

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39 27ft 

- 255 6ft 

_ 83313ft 

JO 3J 28723% 
LB3 »J 14Q22W 
_ 4019 23ft 
3 Sft 

• - 1593 Bft 

J4B4J 198819% 
J6 U 434 22 

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_ 4935ft 

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J 3099 8ft 

- 37 5ft 

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- 2124 38* 
_ 757240% 

- 753 IT* 

- 631 5 

- 1459 2ft 

- 2442 ft 
62 6* 


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6 % 6 % — W 

11 11 —lft 

B'A Bft— 1% 
16* 16ft — ft 
28 31% .W 

16 16ft— lft 

10V, lQft *M 
24* 25ft - % 
3DW 30ft— =H 
23 W 74 —ft 
10* lftft-1 
8ft Bft — V. 
9* 9* — ft 
19* I9'A— lft, 
52 5JV U — «*, 
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4* 4ft ♦* 
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3* 3* -'A 
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5* 5ft —ft 
33* 35 — 1% 
4ft 4* _ 

S& 5& — 'Vii 
15 IS* — W 
6% 6% —ft 
27% 27%— 1 
6 6 —ft 

13% 12% —ft 
33ft 23 —1% 
21ft 21ft —ft 
21ft Kft -ft 
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7ft 8% -ft 
18ft 19% — % 
21 21 

16'A 16ft —ft 
29% 3Dft 4 ft 
33ft 33ft _ 
XV, 35ft —ft 
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- 4628 10% 9ft 10% ■ V. 

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_. 1137 6ft 5* 5* —ft 


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05e A 25511". II II —ft 

1564 lift ID IO* — * 

71713 12% 12* —ft 

472 20V. 19 19 —1 

>13 2-4 *834 17 16 16% —ft 

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1774 4W 4% 4W - ft 
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4903 14V, 17V. 14 — 

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182720% 19 V. 19* — * 
1906 8' i 7% 7* — % 


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- 6411 
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- 731 3% 

- 97 4 

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1.00 4.9 359 23ft 

- 464 20 W 

- 3732 22 

- 7B Bft 

- 220 ft 

„ 99 4% 

~ 409816% 

-5561845% 

- 780 18* 

- 1513 11% 


5% ... _. 

5* 5* — 1 ft 
12% 17% _% 
2 % 2 % •% 
37% 37% — * 
38ft 40V,— 7% 
16ft 16ft -% 
4% 4% —ft 
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29ft 3tft *1% 
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5% 6% . Vu 
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17* 18 — 3V, 
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17% 17ft _* 
10ft 10* -lft 


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_ 383 4ft 4 4 

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... 292 11* II V. 11% — W I UCcrBk 
_ 17711 10W 10% — % | UCUGs 

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13 753 44 42V. 43* — * 

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- 1911 10 9ft 9* —ft 

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_ 212 Vn Va V» 

-67796 24* 21* 22ft — 1* 

8925* 22* 22*— 3 
_ 1564 9% Bft BW — Wl. 

- 3721 5ft 4* 4 1 Vi# — ft. 

_ 535 5* 5* 5* ‘ft 

-114614 30ft 28 ft 29% - 

... 2641 * V., 1%. ‘ft 

-1689246* 42 45* ♦ W 

„ 654 1'Vi, 1* |% — * 

_. 1396 10ft Bft gft —IV* 

.1 3421 12ft 10ft 11* — * 

- 21210ft 9* 9* —ft 
„ 147/4 44 ft 38* 47*— 1* 

J8 3JJ 1145 43 43 —lft 

- 1143 19ft 17 18 —ft 

_. 1020 9% 8* 9 i * 

.740 1.1 14251 25 V. 74ft 74*— 1* 

J2 2-4 387 12ft II* 12ft .1 

_ 607 12 11 11% —ft 

_ 4169 21ft 1B*71 Vi, ♦ lift, 

.. 1817 2* 2V: 2* ‘ft 
_. 120 5* 5* _ 

.. 120 12* 11* 12% -ft 

1594 Wu 6ft 7 — * 

IJ 14 IS* lift 15* +1 
1.9 1215 14ft 15 —1* 

- 2694 12 11 11 —ft 

_ 218 29ft 28ft 29% — % 

IJ *900 29ft 27% 78 — * 

- 74023 46 41V. 44ft‘ IVu 

- 1019 34m 3"i* 3* • '.'u 
3669 14ft 12% 13% — l'A 

_. 117611 10 10% —ft 

316 5Vu 5 5 — ft. 

385 '■/„ UV 

68611% 9ft ID%— 1 
3925 17ft 16 16ft — * 

9 6% Sft 6% t* 1 VBond 


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UHroK s 

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Ultrastep 
UrvlcoA 
Unitrce 
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UnBnk pi 2.09 9J 
UnBkCc J4 2J 
unonBsh 1 J 0 rxi 
UPUtIsHE 2J» 7.1 
UnSwjcti 
Uniphase 
UnrytTc 
Unitedi 
UBWV 1J08 
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JI 


J3e J 


IJ 


1.771 IM 
.16 1.9 


Tennant 
TelrtiTcs 
TL.ro 
Tava 
T»,«etf 
TTirTOi 
TheraTx 
Uugen 

ThorOun 

1 In luaOv 
ThomasG 
ThamMB J8 
ThamMA J8 
ThmPee 
Thmin 
ThmAV J8 
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TKIeWSt 
TideMric 
Tig era 
TlmbSl 
TodavM 

ToddAO .06 ... 

Totteuntr ... 120 16. 15 15 — * 

TokloF 40e J 120 58ft SSft 55ft— 2ft 

TokasMd - 4779 6ft 6ft 6* -ft 

Tmk plC J7e 4.1 87 14* 13* 13* _. 

I -Mb 9.9 x21 34 33 34 —1 

J8 49 2729 5ft 5ft 5* < ft 

- 581 7ft 6ft 7 — * 

74 3V, 3* 3ft .ft 

87 9* 9ft 9V, — % 

1516ft 15ft 15%— lft 

208 8* 8% 8% —ft 

819 10ft 9* 9* — 1% 

... 1924 14ft 13% 13% — % 

- 8499 12% 11 11 -ft 

- 1842 24% 23% 23ft —ft 

- 14417V, 15* 16% — % 

SS 4J Xll! 14% 14 14 — % 

_ 94 3ft 3* 3* * ft 

„ 46511ft lift »ft -ft 

- II 1% l'A 1% 

_ 837 1* 1»» lft, 

- 4R13% 12* 12ft -ft 

_ 80 4ft 4ft 4ft l * 

J4 A 234810ft 9* | Dft, —ft; 

.. 2287 20% 19* 20V? — 'A 

~ 137 2ft. 2 TVu _ 

- 199611* 11 lift — % 

- 35317 11*111%,— Vu 

Traffic J9t 4-5 «]5* IS* 15* —ft 

TwiciHH * anaiift io* 11* ♦* 

723 6* 5ft 6* v* 

254 Vu 2% 2ft - 

3215% 15% 15% -ft 

_ 28813* 12ft Hft -ft 

1.00 2.7 28237% 36* 37 +'A 

_ 1362 25* 24ft 24* —ft 

_ 500 3* 1 tv. 2 

- 59613% 11* 11% — V, 

1797 5ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

2912 , 11 11 _% 

263 12* 11* lift —ft 

70 ISft 15* 15ft —ft 

- JSSJ? 83 83* * * 

“ 5? l 7 * >7% 17ft _ 

_ 4649 6ft Sft & -ft 

_ 4887 fl* 7ft Bft i * 

- 311 « 7 7ft t% 

- 13ft ISft -ft 

- 2490 4* 3ft avu , 

~ 3883 Sft 4ft 5% 

- 529 5* 5* 5* —ft 

- 397 10% 10 10 -ft 


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J0bZ6 576 31 'A 30ft 00* —ft 
.200 3J 7177 6* 6 6ft — ft, 
I JO 2.9 2 34V. 34ft 34ft —ft 

2151 18 17 18 - I 

- 1384 13", 13ft 12ft —ft 

- 655 9W 9 * —ft 

- 67916 MW 15* —ft 
_ 123® 2* 2ft Tft — ft. 

- 275510 9ft 10 _ 

_ 13* 12'A 13 

_ 666 6* 6% 6% —ft 

- 451 6ft 6ft 6ft _ 

_ 468322 18* 19ft— 2 

_ 1412 39 31* 36ft— 2* 

J7 1.7 368 4ft 4 4*,4 — Vu 

.12 IJ 474 II* 11'/. 11% -ft 
.. 6480 3*. 2% 2ft -W B 

- 5591 4* 4* 4W • ft 

rw 3% 3 3% 

388 29ft 28ft 2B* — ft 
117 =3 22ft 22* * ft 
226% 26% 26% 4% 
44 7W 7* 7W _ 

276 »ft 77ft 28ft —’A 

.- 5015>Vi, 15% 15* — * 

_ 1727 16 14ft 14ft— lft 

- 1484 3% 3ft S’A _ 

_ 1694 8% 8 8Vu ‘Vu 

*J 474 JAW 23 21 — * 
... 3.7 45525% 23ft 24 —ft 
1J2 6J XT 20 14 15% J5W —ft 

■40b 1J3 7042 33% 39% 31 —2V, 

JO IJ 1345 15ft 12% 13 —7% 
1 JB 2S 4343 40% 43 ‘1 

_ 110* 6ft 5ft 5W —ft 
13 3 2% 3 

Utdlns . 149 31 30% 31 +% 

UtcDnlS - 161315% 14% 14% — W 

ULetsrwr _ low lft 1 1 —ft 

UNBNJ IJ80 3J 25 33* 32* 32* —ft 
UUNW5P J6e5J 1216ft 16* 16* — * 
UlReroB _ 167 7 tft 6% 

USvflk .76 4J 93 16ft 15% 16 - 

USBcOR 1J0 4J 15412 23ft 22% 23ft •» % 
US Bn pf 2.03 89 12823* 22* 22% _ 

US Enr _ 472 4* 4% 4* —ft 

Ut. Foci _ 7888 10V: »ft 9% —ft 

US HHtl 5 M U 27060 47 43% 45%— lft 

USHmcr _ 331 2ft 2 2* _ 

USLJma _ 19 5* 5V, 5W +ft 

-15425 12% 10* 11* — V» 
_ 147 7% 6* 7 — ft 

_ 1031541 37% 38ft— 1% 

3J 4001 64% 62% 63ft— 1 

- 345 2% 2% 3ft —ft 

«J 09310ft 9% 10 _ 

- . 51 53 51ft 52 —ft 

- 187121% 19* 21* *lft 
_ 3194 20ft 18ft 20* ‘ ft 
.9 *36618% 17* 18% .ft 

MO 3J 126864% 43ft 44* —ft 

- 185 6 5% 5* —W 

_ 1913 6 5* 5Tu ♦%. 

J *338 6* 6ft 6% — Vu 
_ 1519 2ft 2Vu 2Vy — H/ u 
_ 558 6ft 6 6ft +ft 

_ an 2* 2* 2* — w 

_ 224 3ft 2% 3 —* 

135 6* 5% 6ft —ft 

37 44% 43 43 — % 

22 16* 15% 16 —ft 

1702 5% 5ft 5% **« 
_ 237 30% 39% 29% — % 

- 793 S 4% 4* —ft 

4.7 x311 22ft =1 21ft— 1‘* 

- 1089 8* 7* 7* — * 

- 883 3* 3% 3* tft 


WCTCm 
WD 40 
WFSBcp 
WLRFtl 
WPIGrp 
WPP Go 
WRTEn 
WRTpt 
WSFS 
WS MP 
WTD 
WVSRl 
wocKCor 
WainBk 
Wabro M 


2J5 8.9 


.. 886 Sft 5% 5% —ft 

Z40 SJ 363 42JJ. 41V, 41%— 1% 
.lOo J 899 14* 13ft 13ft— 1ft 
33 IJ 1396 76 24W MW— I 

_ 775 2* 2% 2* _ 

J4e I J 3022 3"*i» 39i, 3%. — % 
2880 10% 9% lO’.i . * 
190 25* 24% 25* ♦% 

212 Ki 3% 3* 

7TJ 7 6% 7 

1708 2% 3 2 

49 14 Vi 13% 13W — * 

_ 140415V* 13% 14 — * 

37 4* 4ft 416 —ft 
14 1009 17% 16% 17 — * 

Walk Ira _ 484 7 6% 6* * % 

WaMTata _ 5337 36* 32 % 35ft _ 

WdlSDl _ 267 12 10ft 11% — % 

Wbtshr -26b 2.6 >19610* 10 ID 


■24 IJ 


WandGfi 


2 JO 


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USRfibt 
US Tret 
US wire 
UStatn 
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hUMVUeo 
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UnKcss 
Unitrin 
Uni*Bx 
UnvEK 

UnlvFor 
UfttfHM 
UnvHsp 
Unvtnl _ 

UnvSds _ 

UnvSldM _ 

UnvB&T MO 3J 
UPenEn MO 7J 
uranRes _ 

UrtmOut _ 


J5 


USBPa MO 

UtohMad 

Utllx 


Tampkn 

T0PPS 

ToosApI 

TorRoy 

TolCont 

ToHTd 

Tow Air 

TxvrAuto 

TowerS 

Tracor 

TrocSup 

TrakAu 

TmsHn 

TmLEO 

TmWEnt 

Tr«Hn 

Tmswa 

TmNtw 

Tmsmt 

Trnmeds 

TrnReCp 

TmSrtt 

TmapAm 

TronstxGs 


TwkHwt 

TrovPn 

Treadco 

TrencflJn 

Tmwck 

TriPotyla 

Tri«e* 

TriodGtv 

TriodSv 

TfionBc 

Trffted 

TrlCoBn 

TritnPd 

Triconx 

Triafirtt 

TrldMic 

Trimark 

Trimble 

Trimeb 

Trifi7< 

Trign 

Triples 


.16 IjO 


040 A 


M 2.5 


VLSI 
VWR 
VacUry 

vorreeti 

V alien 

VoiySv 

VdfiCor 

Vetmnt 

VoMdCm 

V08J1 

VofViC A 

VOluJet 

Varda s 

Vans 

VoriflM 

Vwitm 

Vartan 

VorSprt 

Vaughn 

VectBk 

VedroTc 

VenseW 

VErtritx 

VenCiv 

Ventura 

Veritee 

Varans 

VtPxi 

VTTeddv 

Versa 

Vector 

VertorC 

VertxPn 

VetQAm 

VSaoone 

Vicbt 

Vicer 

Vlcorp 

Vkffin 

VldPini 

VidDSP 

VMeaL 

ViedcPr 

Viewtt 

VUOnas 

V8SpM 

VaBch 

VaPM 

vtroGo . 

VisfanSd 

V15X 

VMSan 


33 73 
30 M 


JO 2J 


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- 202 Aft 4 4* — * 

-37426 12* II 11tVg_nfa 

A0 5.0 230 9% 7% 8 — 1% 

-15e M 17 10 9ft 9ft 

_ 5714 3% 2* 7% — % 
_ 51 12ft lift 12 v* 

189 I* 1 % 1 * "ft 
46515ft 13% 14 —1 
104 17 15* 16ft 

203 1% 1* Wu +%, 
930 30 30 - 

_ 2384 4* 4% 4* —ft 

- 1377 23% 21% 23 —ft 

- 2472 28% 26% 26*— 1% 

- 1055 6 % 5% 6 Vi» + Vu 

- 171022ft 30* 21* — H 

- 900 9% Bft 9% —ft 

IJ 1407 23* 20 21%— 1 

_ 71 16ft 16 16 — * 

- 1329 7 % 6 * 6 * -% 

- 23011 9% 9*— 1% 

- 807 3% 2% 3ft ♦% 

-S0298 2* l»ft SVh +* 

- 1873728% 26 36*— 1% 
-. 1016 3% 2Vu 2V„ -Vu 

J 8 40 72 7 6 % 7 .ft 

- 648922% 20% 30ft — % 

- 149115ft 14% 15 ♦* 

J 8 W 43838* 20 20 —ft 

_ 355 Tft 6% 6* ■»* 

J 6 a U 9V 14% 12* IS* . ft 

_ 1236 5 4ft 4% — W n 

_ 1007 14ft 13% 13% — * 

- 402 14% 13% 13* —ft 

- 1335 8 * B* BV, —ft 
_ 932 3% 3% 3 % * * 

- 718 Bft 7* Bft —ft 
_ 2351 25% 23% 34 —lft 

- 7197 18% 16% 17% .% 
J2 2J 477 24% 23ft 23ft -ft 

- 961 TVs SV. 6 % —ft 

- 100 2 Vi 2 ft 7ft 

- 2975 9* 8 * 9% — % 

- MS 3ft 3% 3% — * 

- 5328 22 20% 21ft -* 

- 2912 31 29ft 29V,— lft 

47 B 7 7—1 

481 7% 6 * 6 * —lft 
68 13* 13* 13ft —ft 
82 1 % 1 * 1 % t% 

- 509 7% 6 * 7 

_ 150017ft 10 * 11 * —ft 
JHe .4x2207 10% 10 % 10 * -% 


.16 2J 
.10 J 


- 367 15ft 16'A 14% — * 

. . _ 2Q511W 10ft 10W — * 

WanoLwi — 420 4 * 4Vu 4ft — * 
Womlc 1609 5% 9* 5*%, —Va 

Warren _ 188 7 ft 6ft 6* — * 

WF5L At 4.9 7222 17* 16% 17 — Vu 

WshFDC _ 712 4% 4% 4'%i — 9* 

WMSB Jt 4J 15134 16* 15* 16 — * 

WMSBpfCZJB 9J 85 24* 34% 24% — * 

— - - - 9883% 79 79 —4% 

115 21 20% 21 _ 

25 9* 9* 9* * % 

50 2% lft lift • Vu 
_ 3667 26ft 22 94%— 1* 

l.l 4414 21* 18% 19ft — 7 
IJ 834 24* 24 24% —ft 

- 527 5 4* 4* — * 

2 6ft 6ft Aft — % 

_ 1209 10* 8% 9% — * 

- B3612W V.% 12* *ft 
2J *19620% 20% 20% —ft 
_ 455 9ft Bft 8* —ft 
19 1060 19 17ft 18 —ft 


WMSpfD&OO 7 6 
WMSB ptCl.90 9J 
waridW _ 

Woirm J4e 2.1 
WarsnPh 
Wattsln s 3a 
WausPt J4 


Wave5ys 
Wove Tec 


WvePttre 
Wovehrt 
Wdver .44 
Waboolnd 
WbSlFn S3 


M0IT6J 


JO IJ 
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Woden 
Wnttek 
wetmt 
wetoomH 
wwuuot 
Womer 
WMbanc 
Wteoost 
WsrCstCA 
WilCMFL 
WsICdOR 
WstMor 
WestOne 

WAmBc 

westerns jo 2.9 
wsscars 

WOttorled 33 1.9 
Win Bank .40b 3.1 
WstSeef 

WFdPR JOe 2J 
WMICTC 
WstnOhP .I3e 
WUnPb 
WstWotr 
Weston 
WstptStv 
WstpBc 

wstwon 

WefSeal 

wevco jo 

WJiort JO 
WWteRvr 
WhBHJds 
WWFds 

wnoiCaa 
whomtv 
vnckLu 
WByJAs 
wmtxre 

WmSons 

WBmTr 
WlndRhn- 
Winster 
WinslFu 
wlnstonH J4 
WmlhpRs J8 
WiscCTs 


1910* 9% 9* —ft 
27S4 3* 3% 3ft —ft 
_ 1849 24ft 23% 24ft 4* 
_ 558 7* 5% A* — * 

_ 1429 25 23ft 34 *'A 

.10 J 3520 23ft 21ft 21*— lft 
JB 18 194 25 23ft 23ft— 2ft 
_ 57311V. 10% 10% _ 

19 ft, ft. ft, _ 
86 M* 11 II — M 
358 9 Bft B'A —ft 
141 21* 19* 19ft— 1* 
JB 3J 4523 27 25* 26ft, — ft, 

48 2J3 325 30% 29ft 29ft —ft 

33 IT* 17ft 17* — * 
915212* 11% 12% — % 

28412% lift 1IW — % 
164 13ft 12 12* — % 

34 7% 7 7 _ 

2732% 32 33 —2 

_. 1164 8* 8ft Bft 
J 123016 14* 15* — Vu 

_ 1891 13% 10ft 10%— lVu 
_ 865 33% 29ft 30 —3 

_ 395 6 5ft 5% — % 
_ 1374 14% 13* 13%— Wu 
102 3ft 3 3ft “ft 
M 8 * — * 
Mi 4% “ft 
34 36 “3 

8Ui Sft — % 


42 


woodhd JI 

wrkCans 33 
WlaAcp 
WortHs 


Wyman 


_ 1871 9* 

_ 1074 4* 

72 X125 36 

299 8* _ 

135 32ft 31 31 — 1% 

48 11 361 23ft 22ft 22ft —ft 

9920 16% 14ft lWu —V* 
„ 9967 14% 10* 12%— lft 

- 3895 17* 10* 11* — % 
.. 1070 15* 12% 13ft— 2ft 

._ IA mtS 43ft 43* —ft 
SS 2JX107B1 43ft 39V u 41 'A —1ft 
_ 150?* 30* 27 28 —2 

44 3588 24% 23* 23% — 1 
_ 1339 9ft 7% 9% “% 

-16582 91%, 8Wu 9Vu ♦%, 

_ 99 7* 6* 7 4'A 

9.1 625 9ft 9ft 9ft — % 

J 71411% TO* 11 
_ 142647 41ft 42*— 3% 
IJ X319 16ft 15% 15V. — Vu 

- 563428 25 26* —ft 

24 6315 14% 14% _ 

24 410 14 13 13 —1 

_ 491521 19* 20 — % 

.17 IJ 346 9 Bft Sft — Vu 

AO 2J 455821* 19ft 19ft— l'A 

- 905 Sft Sft Sft “ft 


1 J 8 


XOMA 

x Rite 

Xoettet 

Xenavaun 

Xlcor 

3Glinx 

Xircom 

XMtfft 

Xplor 

Xvtosric 


_ 86M 3* 
A 1196 39ft 
_ 92516* 

4 5% 
_ 4577 Wj, 
-13874 61 

- 958218* 

- 178519% 

1 lft 
~ 4389 36ft 


7* 3ft 
37ft 37% — 1 
13% 14ft— 2 
5% 5% _ 

3ft 2* +V» 
56 58%— lft 

16% lBVu t-Vu 
T6% 17% -1% 
lft lft 
31 34% —ft 


YeflowCP J4 5.1 6294 19ft 18% 18% —ft 

YesCtth _ 37 1ft 1* lft ♦% 

YcrkFn 40b 3.9 4616% 15% 15% _ 

YnrtcRS _ 667 Aft 4* 4ft “ft 

YounoBd _ 5318 19 17* 17W-1* 

Yownker _ 1345 18* 16ft 16ft-l% 

YoutnSv - 482 Aft 5% 6 _ 


ZSevn 

ZeteCp 

Zarbip 

Zebra 

ZertLabs 

2 !dOS 

2300 

zino 

ZanBcp MO 

znel 

Zoaued 

MtHk 

ZoamTl 

Zycod 

Zyoa 

Zvsioste 

Zylec 


67 W-. 
3488 13 
427 6* 
1884 39* 
634624% 
3692 6% 
4244 27t/« 
26 3* 

- 76137 

- 125** 

- 7758 16 

- *5 12* 

_ 6965 8% 

- 6IS4 l*Vi, 

- 204 7* 

- 404 1* 

- 176 9V. 


15 


16% 16% _ 
12% 12* _ 
5* 6* — % 
35* 37' U — 7 
22 * 23ft „% 
6 6 % + ft 

26 26% —ft 

3% 3% •* 
34 34ft— 2 

7% 8 —ft 
11 % 14 - 1 * 
lift 12 L 

7% Tft “l 
& W» -Vu 
m Tft .% 
l'A i*u 
Sft Bft _ % 


ise 3 


voted 
1 mar- 
e time 
lid not 
a Re- 
t that 
rii by 
lornou 


e was 
party 


k that 
l have 
il bad 
roved. 
etL.he 

little 
jld be 
f con- 


year, 
.if the 
Id get 
his 


very 
“not 
talso, 
i our 
slides 
tigion 


■leed, 
Lsiian 
gani- 
ange- 
e na- 
:toral 

Oil 
I d try 
it the 
anse- 
post- 
;bool 
i. “I 
es of 
were 
eople 
d fc 


or 


irgue 
Vista 
that 
reli- 
run- 
12 ef- 


Lhe 
ula- 
i by 
'iga- 

sinp 


em- 

ling 

mia 


gon 

tool 

lent 

C5«- 

■uld 

Dis- 

lda- 

the 

tha 

?ne 


aw- 

ays 

her 

the 

tha 


her 

lice 

tx:k 

be- 

:UCt 




Urey SwlUedand 




a* ++ I Ur I 2>?S &g-3-C?Si , s.0Sg g-5 s-rs a’^c^ES « IS 




Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


wm» GfpNOOw 


«Mr 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Cm Name WHY 

Fa Nome LgsiOigc 


opium ftktr CfpNnnt WWy gtonph* Wtty GroName wfcfr-SwHjww ■ ... S£ i n g ua 

FflNome LotfChgel Fd Nome Lad Owl Fa Nome Left Chw FdNtme Lap Ot»i Po None Los! Cbge . RJN^w UnJOwe ftjftone Los 


mtY cm Nome lo« «*"* 

S& W lp*E& Ch9e . F 


} 


Puritan la.97 —51 ; AGEFdp 161 _ 02 I Hanover I by Fds: 


RcoJErfn 12J0 -09 

— 35i 


R&tor n 1708 -35 l AR5 Ml - 01 , 
ShtTBdn B46 + 01 I ALTFo io« . 7U I 


_..- _ MOTrfr 9,09 + 09 

i"i • i r . »i_ ]e I Fd Nome Lost Qgv W Nome Lost Qw I TAATjrF I 9i5 * .06 

Clcie ot trading Fnday. NOv. .?5 ( ! mitxFi 9.h *.id 

I (Wj? IHS --S w&\ H? ,£?2 - jt ! Sg| h® 

GcpNome J BttSfigS ■*: WfcR 15 :£i M5 r lfe-iR| £*£■,« :»■ a, 

P&.'IS-Si SSIKV « MS" p-« SWAB :£, OB,* prS. KS* 

11.96 * •DS'lStlSISSJi? faJmftr. 921 -04 OKT#FI M» -08 ufijffvn 1X69 -03 1 CTJFp ,.95 .. 1 ShTOurn ,8.78 + 02. NYT^ 

®SI W=i» Jg»L fflra! Ufidl!HS 3 Kn.W^ ^ 


AALMutUOfc 
Bond D 9 34 -J 
CdGr p HAS — . 


*® ' 



Ijd * 0? '■ CoHTicA 

9J6 —40 DWteCDA 

,JB &££ 
? — jS : iPiew 

lTSl —.48 > InCapA 


_. 978 — __ 

Ufilp 933 -.13 
AARPlmrah 
BolfABn 1633 —.07 

CBtJGrn JOB? — .TO - 

GmieMn 1440 -47 1 GlMdoB 
Grwinc n 3778 —A3 I GUMadC 
HQ Bdn [49[ -,|| 

TxFBan 16JM -.15 

Emergp 13.(3 —J9[ GvW' 

FL HI 943 - OS GvtrA 

FLTF 10. 10 -48 I CvTIB. 

Sim5cp B 1081 -.17 1 DfinAo 

AFL^®n947-34! 

S*Sf' 

AdiSfp -i MunSBP 

Cwtp -77 I R^MBP iLjO - 

-• 7EHiVBpinJS - 



9.58 — 38 ' .IJa. ' WrtdTrfi b14 

nwBiW'PSsai 

SffiJSft-ai mi l:S! SS« n .S=2 


—.191 AornTTn 949 *09 
-Q*. AdmLTn 9.17 -*jb 


WeinQB 1 
AMF Funds;. 

ImMmi 8JB -.02 j inuFdP 13^ — 
ShUSGn IQAO -07! infBOD 1343 - 
USS^WUn 10.19 -.07 . IiwuiAP 1J.M — 


' 1 inwCoA p 18.72 — 

i LicrmBa pklm - 

CcPGrn 971—14' NwEconp M4? — 
Grind n 9.86—481 NcwPer p 15.70 — 
income 936-48 1 SmciWoZ!77 — . 
AZM Fd n 9.34-74 Tajlt-tpi p IMS - .. 
A VESTA; T<f 


Del Gro Inslt 
;q e 1708 —.66' Oecl 1 

Incox 1549 -.10 Dehwl 

MBCAI 968 -41 Dice I 

mi Mint* O kJ - IT? Dlrnl 


_ , LTGn 10J35 *.21 I CorpQual P7152 — 07 I AAkta»n 1374 — J9 

-JM NUmCAn 9.78 -JO 1 MD Mum 8.83 -.06 j HjvGrode P876 - JJ3 > Region r»20O7 —io 

714 -T Munfcn 9.97 -.01 Munlnr «.l? - M iRnDiy o 1408 — J2 Rewvpnx 9.90 -JO 

'<j4— 'Si - MuruNOln 9.18 - .ia 1 NJHVr 1073 - ,09 FronkSa Tempt I Value n 10.16—43 

All -M I ReJiron 1071— .13; MYHYm 9.29 - .05 ! GermGvtplin -j09 H>EX Group: I 

*■ NY intern 19S -M GtobCurnUjxi -.07 laex 17M —47 I 

PAHYm 9_55 - J06 : HCrdCurollAS -04 1 5SShAD isJ? —JA 1 


*t*nSTo .VA -ig 


Uinrx 


9 « ToSStir i£.3i —31! NYTn^rn 


KPMT 7193—132 ValEan 1071- 

-4,! JSfe UL:jtiV%ar , 8?. 


... „ ^ ..... ._ , ... 

a -j»; R 2^n9 JS -.i9 ^£pi^=5: llil ! 5U ^Pi?f r;^' 

9.96 -3(> iffitnSn 9.87 -.05; ftYDTEp 415 -.03 OOP6f I6J6 — 78 MenSGttl 1ZB5 — 43 ' BdlncBp II.C1 -J33 HJOBt 7J3 — .'7? 

9.65 — .40 StkAoSn 9JJ _.17 I lrrstTEo *.97 -.06- Gv® rx 9.15 * .02 MertSlrji H77 —75 , OvQrBt 1*42 — ^0 IrtvGB: 972 -.10 

115^ -JJ 




943—2' BOonAP 1141 . 

9.76— .17.' BdlncA 1}J01 *J 


n 1*29 -.12 CA TF A p 6.77 
1347 —30 : CopGtAp1*55 —49 

...te . GtobGApJQJP -772 

r* 1365 —2 ; GfOpAp 1240 —23 

f 9.97 -.13! GvScAP 1CLS2 -JJS 

_ “ GwtflAp 942 —19 

a rtlrjcAp 9M —06 
-JJ7 imEoAP 1575 —36 
—78 UdlrmAWAC - SB 
—28 ■ McssT Apl*67 -.12 
11? —38 
-JJ1 


IrtAp lilOT -j!5 

1060 —40 

18.93 —42 

HitiA p 770 —X& _ . 

InvGAp 972 -JSt A3. 
•*nAP 9J7 -.06 
P 10.43 -.10 
p 9JS -.12 
: AP 16.E3 —73 . 

'AP 27b 
jjA 97o —.IS 
AP aJ54 -75 

B 83S -7C 

1 laif — 

i 13AT —34 
r e.s - JJ9 
CCPASt *172 — 45 
■ — T-— 878 —is ■ 

;9.25 —30 

1£2 -7? 

ia*i —4* 

GIEnSf 1744 —34 


stgSp ;ni-ri 5^" .'S n *49=^9] {fS’^S 

wT 


Morgan n 1130 — i 
PrmCBn 2801 ... 

—ja 


n 936 
n 1037 tjSn 

n l%:% * 


MergerFdptOAO —51, imEaf?!* itS — Jfi MHlnBt 9J7 - 

“ “ in 2*26 —71' SttarB o 079—38 NT ax 61 ’.30 -.1C 

yneb A: ■ VfflueB 748 -.16 NYmSt 935 -.1? 



38 

:*[ S 5 ^n n :fi 

n 932 - jjb 
038 -79 

) .U^w&an 


UxToln 1130 — 34 
in 10.15—31 


872 —.04 NewUSAp 1182 —43 

944 -.10 fBdxjiaS Group: 

.1 11J4 — >9 • Nicnoln 4977— 1JQ9 

.VIA 27-52 — 35 ' Ncnun KAO —37 
MAt 863 -J37 Nttlincn 127 
,MnA ' ' 


'““i .gig '31 y^ i Bt r Q5 - 03 GWAA^ I3A8 3? 1 O^SiSn iS —.13 j WxFMicI rtn 

-M ~ 2 ~ rhSSt A06-S GWIrt 21^ -41 7Xt<nfto«F<iK M@rn ]l. 

sassr^dlj ffl X|l M d n n }2| 

(rT^wTrJfis— ll29| JnfMunn 1^ -Ss! MuLongn ® -.fl 


f.Mjnf/Ai 1160 - .06 
1042 -.06 


.94—31 
,13 -34 


, EmGrfn ll.m—J? 

.rownit 19.77—47' CKwCorp 948 

IncGrr 146 -41 ; GrcHnc 1164 - 

r/WCpGr(1772 — 44 (dnEq 9.93 

SmCtjpl J1 .47 —.97'. MoTF 10J4 

AIBonceCop. i US Gov ID 09 

AOonce P 661 —.16 . Ariel App np2H62 



FedSecA 9.12 -06 


A 1174 —.43 __ 

S 7147— .47 G--C 

__ ln5M39 —45 NT 

894 -33 inrfSrA 13X1 —34 G-t 


AVjPcI 


lnttBdn 
LotAmrr 

LldTrmTH , 

A5AL1TF nil s> -31 l 




11.74 *.U' win 1Q-QT —32 I MulrOgn HJtt *.13 
22.96 —491 LrdANnn 4S+3T MunSntn 1835 , 


CAfnsir n 

SinsLTn»J9 *.12 
FLinsn 947 -.13 
Njinsn 1030 -.14 
NYlnsn 941 -.13 
OH ins n «L18 -.1* 



Ertvlnco'nx9 61 — .70 ; GTGtebot 
tdTef-m n>9.s) — .01 1 


. BSA 

GCVIA .. 

GovIBp 738 -76 
•^oV»C p 73o - 07 


GfqincA 1330 —42 ; Ef-JTE A *65 


-.a cdlrn n 127? -.02 Govsan 9.J4 *.i«: 

-.10 CTinln 12.17 -J)» GrcnvIhTr #03? — J9 

-.07 CoreVlns nZiM —33 H'HM «5fl— gl 

7 31 — 09 ' CcreVlnv P26 66— S inccTrSn 9.ra -.06 



_..j|p 
GOVt p 1014 -.10 
Grofnco 6.40 —.(2 
HiOhYdp *86 -.04' 
Income p 3.87 —02 
InvGftJp *29 -JJ8 



_ to 10.18—^6 GTbEaA 
nIGvtp 9.55 - 


, _ — .01 i Amerp 1943—48: SnlGvtp 9.55 -J01 GCFvB 11.91 *.0S lnsilnp 

MngdlncoiM6 — XO- AmerB 1933 —.47 TR Bap 9.13 -.10 GfcFxA 1151 -35 , imlEqA _ — _ . .. 

9.07 -.0? ■ EmVAlcT 17-77 —.57 TRGf p 112^ —Zi . GvlAl 1349 -.11 LrfAmA J879 — 33 NrtwGrn 2439 — S3 

.TFoglnT 1241 —42 ExnMKtB 17.65 —36 ' InvResh 447 —.11 ' IrdFlA llS -.08 NUAtoiAt 892 -.04 Netn^Trtw 93C — 36 

■SFd£ 1038 —.19 Europe p 1031 -36 IlMterOptM; KPE1 2131—35 MNMuA 940 -S3 

.. stFdTot 9J3 -M Eut3} IC.H —35 CopCn IDJ9 —.17 MuniBdA »ft)6 -JD NlnlnsA 732 -£7 ■ 

‘FtHWMU GvIncA 

First Investors: GvIncB 

1IC7BPP 1431 —.32. GrtncA 
6 00 —14 GrincB 
HllnCri 
HDCrB 


■ USAJlP 11.76—35 IntrcB 

MATFp 10.76 -.06 irdlp 


mgrtfipnlljl — J6 EAvityn 1*20—31 
nergy n 9.W —36 IWI* « 893 - XS 

1171 —37 


Ml TF O 11.17 -J» InflB 


NJTFo 11.79 -3B Jopano 1107 — 3? 


17.25—11 

11.95— JB' ,.^ __ 

11.92 — 39. Envimn 637 —.11 
1034 —35 ; Europe n 1236 —35 
1074 -.28 FinSwcn 1*58 —.10 


1048 —.73 NYTxFrplXW -05 JcconGrB 11.96 —38 1 Grmvtti no 306 —.13 

llOS— 7B; PATFp 1138 * M . LCflAmG 2506 — 42 HtthScn 3405—39 

n 1299 -07 S-iGtr/l n 10 19 - 07 SoecfW 11 06 -.08 LatAmGBlAB? — .62 HiYIdrw 630—05 

3 (116- 74 S-lGCvS P 10. >9 -02 1 5P5-fp 17J» -37 ' NolResA 11.64 — 39 IndlncoOP)] 03 - IB 

ip 1*65 -4* Shllncln 3.57 - 01 Tai.E»Plp932 * 06 NaResB 1161—39, JrdGpv n 1190 - .06 

n 1430 -JT ShltncSP 157 -.01 1 ToiRetp 1137-14, Pacrtp 13.42 -.68 IntlGrn 1639-48 


*98 —35 


inllA p •.aw — « SMDurat rw.90 
inrtS 17.47 —48 ShiDurmv n4.90 -.01 
M.TQAP 8.17 -J36 SlaFxInp 1544 — .06 
f/.rRB P ?- 13 -.07 USCFxtn »432 -.10 


iStl p (7 73 — - Interm n 17.^9 


smsn , _ _ 

SdrircA is ? —.01 miemp 

T»E« 



PAf.SA 1Q.16 -JU SgEsn vil — 35 3=nir. 9.77 - J2 ■ CcAT 2? 4S — 5 

PlvtkA 1133-32 SmCPGrn 9.0 -3| Eq-.-.nrn 155'. -bO SvCfB, 9^-13 

spVIA 1536—33 TnExcrn »33 Gvf— C -36 Dyr^cAp £_g -30 

arOvA t 1145— .15 USOOvtn HryE=- '.356—35 Omnas ’.jj ... 


TxEx 
Ultra 

5 »' 1 — .19 


■ TechA 
TX VIA 
WkflricA 
McrriBLyi 
AdiRB 




r® 2 = 

iSlo —J2 ?3 —39 i«S' ?T35 —C Parttsmne lnv A: 

13.99-18 AZ.MB1 931-10 IrrtJ.I *5^-39 ESA Is.iT - U 

934 _ B3«I 1141—15 lnti_ _ — 4? cerdFi 5 35 - 03 


n 

Grpvdtin 11X9 — 4i 
MYIMb 9.17 *jn 
(neon 933 +.06 
InsMun 9X1 +.17 
fntin 1X64 — 35 
Invsin 1799—06 
- a 895 *32 
n2829 -36 
n 937 *X1 

n 931 — XJ 

Total n 23X5 —.78 

SunvnitHY 9J6 —JO 


891 -06 
inn 

1876 —37 
( 13.90—33 
13J7 — ilD 

COTDBd 
Equity 

BOB ^ 

* 9J7 _ 

^-iF 12.06 - J06 
l^ntGvinn 931 -dr 



UEurSrt 1134—28 Bond 5 n 9.47 -m 

iff?. i^? n l^ri§ 

%r n \ik-% 

isssir."4|Tfl 


ci ! , ’hJ. 'u 

sfsssac.WTfi- 

riretia 1220 -.10 CTMuAMO.W -.CM ucvlnvA p 6.94 -.ffi 


=525. IJjjrJl! S®tfS8- 

MunA 1151 -30 . H.YldA pp 


1074 -ja 

FLMunA 1341 -.10, HTidAPnMXJ -.ffl 

«ssnffi=fi 


GKjInvB 
inmoA 13*1 -JJ9 


¥7f 


|$Mrt 10.» -'S j _xi I 

am^3SSv- i'Sh - ™; BlChipp 1826 —37) 

KSS&rifi:' USSSSSSS r 

lOCoGr ig-g 


„. LtraRA p WJ9 -.05 

S ,p i^ :S! 'p s -^ 



, —.17 



25? =5 

IAp 1138 —31 
JBp 1134 — JJ 
mB 1233. - X5 
pcssCopitak 
arylnca 11X7 —36 
xdin 9X5-09 
1089 _J0 
1345 - 


rnl333 —36 

TPW 937 - 

Ambassador Uiv; 
EWancfl 931 - 

Bond 932 -.08 
EsiCoGr 1536 -« 
Grwttl 1235 —43 

IncSS ?!?3 - .08 

1148 

iniBtmdn 92B -M 
In tiSIV. 12.78 -32 
MITFRa 865 -.06 
iCoGr 1030 —36 
= BO 9.57 - 05 
NntBd 9.77 -04 
‘ r Ret A: 

732 -08 
EstCoGr 1535 —46 
GrttKO 9.81 
Grwtti 1235 —.43 
idxStk 1138 
lidBand 930+06 


BascVln 1 

I Fixed I n 937 - 06 I Grmvtti 

I SMTmBdn7.6B - 02 MIEo 

| V] Inn 1106 -34, lntlFI 1819 -07 

i BascomBal K-35 —08 MutrBd 971 -05 

NJ Mon 1038 -.06 
Yield 935 _ snrtim mod -07 

Band n _945 + 04 SnvCtjpVal 10.74 —36 



123.8 —.32 


MITFBd 8.66 _ 

SmCoGr 1330 —34 
TFlfBBd 9.77 -04 
AmcoreW 


^mcore Vintage: 
Eraflivn 1031 -34 
Fxlnco 9.48 - 02 
. IntdtTF n« 9.28 -.01 
Amec AAdvant ban 
Bdann 17.02 —08 
Grlnpon 1334 _JS 
Intlgatv n 1237 —33 
LldTrtnn 937 -.02 
Amer Capital 
CmstAP 1535 —38 
CmstBp 7534 — M 
CPBdB P 641 -06 
CorpBdA p64l * 06 

EmGrB P 22.H3 —.74 
EnUB 1134—35 
EntBp 11.71 —.35 


Enffi 

EniC. ...„ 

EdfylncA p532 ... 

EaincBa 5.71 -06 


,h *3B 


EdlncCp 531 —.06 
ExcflFd I r (.89—733 


a 

1042 —32 | 

Is Invest: 

In 935 
ndn 9.45 -04 


Equity. n 1042 —32 NWHlivp 11B8 —37 
BecCHffl 29J7 — 56 TxExAC 6.91 +05 
BSEmgOW J34. — 05 j lISGvA p 906 +.09 

‘ ' ' c f3?” F !B? = - J , 

man . 9.75 +08 


D c n U HTlOrfc Funds: 
Bokmced nSL53 —.16 
BorHSA nx 1835 -01 
DivGrAn 908—34 
EqkJxAfKlOJ7— 3B 
FocGrA n 9.75 —38 
irrtlBdArw 19.99 —31 
InHGrAn 10.17 —.26 
StllOur It 9.98 
SIBdA m 1909 —01 
SmaHA 10.75 -JO 
USGvA nx 19.12 —02 
USTIdxA rM35 -08 
Benttam Group: 
AdiGovn 9J2 -03 
CaTFIn 10 JO +03 
CaTFjnn B.9S -09 
CaTFSn 9.91 
CafTFHn *39-05 
GotTFL n IQjlS - .08 
- n 1132 —33 
n UL46 -07 
.n 9.93 +08 

linn 1002—38 

incGran 1*38 —37 
LTreasn 804 -.14 
NatResn 903 —.17 
NTTFln 1*08 -07 
NFTFUn 1047 -.09 
STTrepsn 9.6S +02 
Tor 1995 n 9507 - .17 
TarMQOn 6609 -35 
TqrtOOSn 4500 +1.12 
7ar2D)0n32.0h -1 .09 
Tcr20l5n 2335 -.99 
TarTOJOn 1501 -02 
TTMoten 904 -04 
UWlncon 8.97 -.16 

*?8Sn I5L 


1*58 —03 


loi pn ia?7 _ 
SmCoGr no235 —.10 



LtdMat 1*2? -04 

CtanMutual; _ 

Covtx 938 - 03 
Grwllt r 1446 —03 
Income 933 —02 
TctRet 1339 —08 
CG Cop Mitt Fits: 

“ lnS.71 -40 
xn 7.71 - 05 

„ - , 904 — 3l 

LflVal n B.7S -08 
AiUgBkdn 747 - 08 
Murffn 7J3 -08 
SmGrwn 1198 —00 
SmVal n 8.16 —.11 
TtIRtnn 706 - 09 

Sre^uSds: — 

BcUanAn 907 —.11 
Eqldx 2007 -40 
GIBdA n 9.00 +.10 
GrEaAn 9J8 —JO 
InlBdAn 903 - 03 
IntlGrAn 1100 —42 

_ M 

M 


V«E<fipnl24?— . 
Co*»enlGfA ML57 — ... 
Ca*enOPAK35 —01 
CniUwHuxaa: 
ASIAUp 1209 




So^ocln 1162 —09 
OestFunds Trust: 
Band n 930 ♦ .06 
SlBdn 902 +03 
SpEq nx 1048 —30 
value ISX 10-66 —.16 
l/AMon 9,11 -.04 
CuFdAdin 904 -.01 
CuFdSTti 948 -.01 
Older Trust: 


"W :S' 

1*23 -32 
1303 -.12 


nnAp]Q36 -.01 


H09 -07 
JZ97 -.10 


SWSf ® 
RttSIlk :s 

NYMUBM193 +.12 

8». iiji :* 

PAMUflA 1488 —07 

a 


PA MUBf 1*87 +.13 
TXflAUA 1*96 +.19 
7AMUA 14.72 +. 
VfiMuBI 1431 


ill 


P 3205 —00 
Growth p 3906 *02 
income p 1709 + 09 
InvA 1802 —45 
InvBI 1806 —45 
OvttPFnR n 9.97 
Diqiree Mutuot 
intGavn 9.45 +.11 
KYTFn 4.94 +05 
KYSMfn 5.13 -01 


EBJ Funds: 

Equity a 59.78—139 
Flex p 5205 -.40 


Income DX45J6 +31 
38.17 — 46 


Multtlx p 

ESCStrinA 904+0 4 
EwteGrth 1006 —.17 
Etdon V Oossic 
Oiinap 8.(5 —09 
FLLttfp 9.09 +03 
Go vtp 905 + 03 


JdP 9.13 *.(M 
_Nat1MlPl O *41 -08 
Eaton V Mvathon: 
CALIdt 902 -.04 
China I 11.90 —07 
India r 1DJ8 —.08 
FU-Tdl 943 +03 
AAALldt 9.52 - .03 
MILtdl 930 * 03 
Marti, td I 9.70 +03 
N0_1dl 907 -.0? 
NYLtol 90* +.04 
FALtdt 945 -04 
ALTxFI 9J1 +.10 
AZT*F) 9J9 +09 
ARTxFI 9.1B -.09 
_ ’ 41 *69 +.07 

... I 907 + 09 
.'vF I *99 +07 

'S3 :S 

GAT xF t *89-00 

ssm’vsfTfi 

Hilltcl 6.06 —.05 
KYTxFt *92 +09 
LATxF f 9M -.07 


.jin 28.60 — .g 
EqPtln 15.94— J2 
IShlGv 935 -03 
Lt Bi n 1039 + Ot 


Fidelity Invest: 
AgrTFrn 1009 +3 
AMsr n 14J7 — J 


AMgrGr 01346 — .. 
AMprian 1007 +.01 
Balanc 1204 
BiueOi 25.71 ^84 
CA Iran 9.02 +07 
CATFn 10J2 -07 
Canada n 1590 —32 
COOAPP 16.92 —34 
Caplnco nr B01 —.05 
CnngrStnlH44 — 307 
Contra 29.76—107 
CnvSecn 1508 — J5 
Deslinvln 17.40 —33 
Oestmy«n2*l2— J7 
OisEan 1831 —34 
Diverlntl n 1 109 — J1 
DivGthn 1235 -40 


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ESCORTS A GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 


ORCHIDS 


LONDON PARIS GENEVA ZURICH 
Escort Agency CrodU Card* VMcana 


UK 07! 589 5237 


fMONATIONAl ESCORTS 

Swwkb ■ MtrtAwdr 
M 2/2-765-7*96 Nnr York. USA 
Motor Ciedl Cards Atxvptcd 


GOCVA - ZURICH 


ALLIANCE 

Csaar Service A Travel. 

Did Genera 022 / 311 07 24 


MAD/SOUS 

LONDON PARE Escort Agency 

UK 071 266 0586 


NATASHA MANN 

10M30N E5CO&T SERVICE 
071 352 1013 


LONDON BRAZILIAN Exort 

Semce 071 724 5597,91 - aedt a»«h 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 10) 


CHBSEA ESCORT SRYKX. 

51 BeaudwnpPfaee, (andan SW3 
Tel. 071-584 6613 


ZURICH •* VK3I0 •• 
Escort Service. Credn auds aeeefted. 
T* 077 7 63 83 32. 


■•'CHICAGO * NEW YORK*** 
O3SM0P0UTAN E5C08T S8MCE 
Ovcdop T* 3127S7-1110 
Newfert Tet 1)27533939 


STOCKHOLM 
'SBMCT 
TEL 08 157821 


TOKYO “• ESCORT SERVICE 
Moor eredu conk ocwrtedl 
Trt OT 34364SW. 


'PARIS 1 LONDON * 
•ELEGANCE' 

Escort Serwce ladan [71) 394 5145 


AMSTBIDAM BUTTERFLY Escort 




Crede Cards: 


ORfStTAL BOORT SERVKZ 

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Tel: 0222/676 96 63 


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TOKYO ESCORT SBtVKE 
Tel 3798 -aSD. 

39*4 - 9611 


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Tel: +31 B2M« 02111764 02 666 


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HIGH SOQETf MemDhpnd Escort 
Cafl Vino + 43-1 S35 41 04. 


• GENEVA * ZURICH* 

■•••GLAMOUR**** 

BASa beat agency 02213*6 00 89 


PAFxInn 942 +.16 GrwthT 25.91 -43 
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MuALAp 9^9 +.02 


KIM6BLY ESCORT SBVKX, 
6rua*h ■ Europe. 

TeF 7T0 4B 76 GSM 075-279814. 


*** PRESTIGE OF FRANCT * 

nOr®ON-5 BCORT AGENCY * ' I ISS^n 9 63 -13 I ^ “ V* 'S i -■ ii 1 - 59 [ Euro "ri “ 'Lw -fl i SpaV iT - ?? -■« 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


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SUON^ORl.D >1 (1 in\ 


Global Sourcing? 

The term may be unfamiliar, but the strategy is not . 


/I^he liberalization of inter- 
national trade, deregulation 
in the. financial services in- 
. dustry and the emergence of 
pew free- market economies 
in Eastern Europe and other 
. regions have brought the 
purchasing offices of the 
wood's businesses one step 
closer to the “global village” 
of Marshall McLuhan. To- 
day, with the help of modem 
technology, foreign-lan- 
guage skills and a heaping 
dose of managerial ability, it 
isVpossible to systematically 
comb the world’s markets 
for the best and least expen- 
sive products, components 
arid raw materials. 

“Global sourcing,” the 
term applied to this new dis- 
cipline, is only one of sever- 
al trends that have made pur- 
chasing the centerpiece of 
the profit -oriented strategies 
of many of the world’s lead- 
ing .businesses. 

Beating the competition 
Along with quality-based 
"supplier partnerships” and 
“strategic management of 
the supply chain,” global 
sourcing is helping compa- 
nies around the world use 
the purchasing function to 
gain a competitive margin 
and better respond to client 
needs. Businesses that have 
introduced global sourcing 
include British Airways. 
Ford Motor Company, Mc- 
Cormick & Co., ICL Chemi- 
cals, Swissair, National 
- Westminster Bank, General 
Electric and SmithKline 
Beech am. 

“With purchased material 
typically the largest caregory 
of cost in many products, it's 
impossible to gain and sus- 
tain competitive advantage 
without a vigorous sourcing 
program,” says Malcolm 


Hillyard of A.T. Kearney, an 
international consulting 
company known for expen 
retooling of corporate func- 
tions and strategies. Accord- 
ing to Mr. Hillyard, the com- 
panies most interested in 
global sourcing are those 
whose manufacturing 
processes rely heavily on 
simple pans: “deeper value- 
chain products, which are 
nearer to raw materials.” 

Automotive and aerospace 
companies have thus been 
prime movers in the field, al- 
though the products now be- 
ing sourced globally run the 
gamut from mechanical 
parts to champagne, spices 
and textiles. 

The world gets smaller 
DuPont used global sourc- 
ing in the production of the 
Porsche Carrera’s glass-like, 
state-of-the-art bumpers: the 
polymers were purchased in 
Luxembourg, compounded 
in Belgium, tested in De- 
troit, Delaware and Japan 
and finally produced in cus- 
tom shops in Germany. “The 
world is shrinking year by 
year in terms of where 
things can be made and how 
they can be transported,” 
says Michael Hamilton of 
London-based CBI Partner- 
ship Sourcing, an organiza- 
tion that shows companies 
how to profit from better re- 
lations with suppliers. 

The term “global” tells 
only pan of the story: it is 
not always cheaper to buy 
from emerging economies. 
When transportation and 
communications expenses 
are taken into account, the 
most cost-effective solution 
is often in the company's 
ownbackyarxL 

“Global sourcing means 
you look outside your na- 







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tional market, but it doesn't 
mean you have to buy one 
component from London 
and one from India.” Mr. 
Hillyard says. “It’s not sav- 
ing you should disregard all 
the advantages of nearness.” 

As often as noL the imple- 
mentation of a global sourc- 
ing program leads compa- 
nies io view established rela- 
tions with local suppliers in 
a new, more positive light. 
The research into new mar- 
kets and the esmbiishmeni of 
contacts with potential sup- 
pliers abroad can also give 
companies leverage in quali- 
ty and price negotiations on 
the domestic front. It invari- 
ably leads to rationalization 


of the purchasing process as 
a whole, with a focus on ef- 
ficiency and profitability. 

How to source globally 
What does it take to set up a 
global sourcing operation? 
The costs are difficult to 
forecast, but they usually in- 
clude travel, telecommuni- 
cations and shipping, as well 
as hiring new employees 
with the necessary language 
skills. As interest in global 
sourcing grows, public and 
private institutions are creat- 
ing data bases to help com- 
panies in iheir search for the 
best products at the lowest 
cost. A.T. Kearney has de- 
veloped its own global 


sourcing data base of more 
than 20.000 supplier loca- 
tions in 62 nations. A propri- 
etary data base is therefore 
not a must for the neophyte 
global sourcer. but eventual- 
ly the company must install 
an Electronic Data Inter- 
change system to transmit 
key product and price data to 
suppliers and sustain the 
linkages created. 

“It takes six months to set 
up a global sourcing opera- 
tion in the fullest sense, and 
one and a half years to get it 
running up to speed.” Mr. 
Hillyard observes. 

What advice would the 
experts give a business inter- 
ested in launching its own 


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global sourcing program? 
“It’s vitally important to de- 
cide how the company 
wants to be situated global- 
ly.” says Professor Richard 
Lamming, a fellow of the 
Chartered Institute of Pur- 
chasing & Supply and hold- 
er of the chair of purchasing 
at the University of Bath 
School of Management. 
"It’s one thing to go into a 
region such as Eastern Eu- 
rope to achieve short-term 
savings on products or com- 
ponents. It's another thing 
entirely to commit to global 
purchasing - one is an op- 
portunistic decision; the oth- 
er is a strategy." 

Lisa Rosenthal 


A Concept Whose 
Time Has Come 

Trade blocs are facilitating the outsourcing process. 


T he trend toward global 
purchasing makes too much 
sense not to have happened 
sooner or later. Still, it 
would not have developed 
as quickly or as fully - or 
with such promise for 
greater growth - without the 
rise of big regional trading 
blocs and the global move- 
ment toward free trade. 

Richard Pinkerton, on au- 
thority on global purchasing 
at California State Universi- 
ty at Fresno, says regional 
trade blocs such as the Euro- 
pean Union and NAFTA 
have had both a direct and 
an indirect effect on global 
purchasing. 

The ripple effect 
Companies within a trade 
bloc reap the direct benefits 
of reduced tariffs, less red 
tape and the lowering of oth- 
er barriers to the movement 
of products, services and 
capital among member 
countries. Consequently, 
lower prices within the trade 
bloc are often passed on to 
“outside” companies seek- 
ing materials and compo- 
nents. 

“If you want to get into a 
trade region such as the EU, 
if you're going to start 
sourcing there you might as 
well start manufacturing 
there.” Mr. Pinkerton says. 
“If you manufacture there, 
you want to sell your prod- 
ucts there." 

Mr. Pinkerton, a Cal Stale 
marketing professor who 
also serves as a consultant to 
private industry, says global 
sourcing is one of the rea- 
sons behind the growing in- 
fluence of the unofficial 
Asian trade bloc he charac- 
terizes as the “China com- 
munity.” including Hong 
Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, 


Taiwan. Vietnam and South 
Korea. 

“That's why companies 
like PepsiCo are building 
plants in China, not jusi pur- 
chasing there.” he says. 
“Why do you think Apple 
has a big plant in Singa- 
pore?” 

The GATT factor 
Besides regional trade blocs, 
the move toward freer global 
trade - spurred by the Gen- 
eral Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade - is cited as a key 
contributing factor to world- 
wide outsourcing by experts 
such as Bill Bales, a former 
purchasing manager for 
Union Pacific and Quaker 
Oats who is now president- 
elect of the Amsterdam- 
based International Federa- 
tion of Purchasing and Ma- 
terials Management. "Cut- 
ting tariffs increases trade.” 
he says. “People know what 
things cost.” 

A^World Bank study pre- 
dicts that the new GATT 
agreement, providing tariff 
reductions of up to 50 per- 
cent on tens of thousands of 
products traded among more 
than 100 countries, will 
boost world trade by up to 
S272 billion a year within a 
decade. 

“You can develop a whole 
new set of customers when 
you lower these artificial 
barriers to trade.” says Mr. 
Bales, who works at the 
Center for Advanced Pur- 
chasing Studies at Arizona 
State University in Tempe. 

Benefits for neophytes 

When big companies begin 
looking anywhere and 
everywhere for their materi- 
als, he says, the effects are 


voted 
1 mar- 
e time 
lid not 
a Re- 
t that 
cit by 
lomon 


k that 
i have 
d had 
roved. 
sd,>he 
little 
jld be 
f con- 


Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Continued on next page 


When an airline has a young fle< 


Si 


experienced pilots, attentive cabin ere 
and the pickiest ground technic 
in the world, it’s free to concent 
what’s really important: 


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<*1 sffg s-g'&od'g-OSS a.sg.g-KS-g.rfSg? I.SS 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


SPONSORED M.C 1 ION 




British Airways 


Not Only Flying But Buying Globally 

BA s pooling of purchasing resources with other airlines has created efficiencies and economies of scale. 


X he airline industry, the 
world's international busi- 
ness par excellence, would 
appear to be a natural can- 
didate tor global sourcing. 
Although. Tike other major 
airlines" it has traditionally 
been an international buy- 
er. British Airways began 
systematic cross-border 
sourcing in the run-up to its 
privatization in J9S7. Now 
the company employs ISO 
purchasing professionals at 
its headquarters outside 
London's Heathrow Air- 
port. and runs three pur- 
chasing offices abroad in 
Hong Kong. Sydney and 
New" York. Much of its in- 
ternational buying is con- 
ducted under the aegis of a 
purchasing alliance with 
international partners Qan- 
tas Airways. US Air. TAT 
European Airlines in 
France and Deutsche BA in 
Germany. 

Gareth Kirkwood, gener- 
al manager for global pur- 
chasing at British Airways, 
describes the operation as 
“a loose alliance of airlines 
combining their purchasing 
resources to create efficien- 
cies and economics of scale 
for themselves and their 



suppliers.” His job is to en- 
sure dose contact between 
professional purchasers at 
the five airlines and over- 
see the efficiency of the 
buying network, formed in 
early 1993. 

The worldwide econom- 
ic downturn has meant few 
airlines hate bought air- 
craft lately, but other big- 
ticket items, including in- 
flight equipment and infor- 
mation technology, are cur- 
rently sourced globally by 
BA and its alliance part- 
ners. 

Of the company's mas- 
sive procurement budget, 
equal to approximately £2 


billion ($3.12 billion) per 
year in externa! operating 
expenses, about half is di- 
rected outside Britain: 48 
percent of purchasing takes 
place within the country, 
1 5 percent in the United 
States and 37 percent in the 
rest of the world. Among 
the products sourced: lob- 
ster from Canada, prawns 
from Thailand, salmon 
from Scotland and cutlery 
from the Far East 
Although he believes 
quality, cost and efficiency 
benefits have accrued to 
BA from the international- 
ization of its purchasing 
business, Mr. Kirkwood is 


reluctant to assess the gains 
in monetary terms. “Even 
though bottom-line savings 
are important,” he says, 
“you can't overlook the 
benefits in terms of contin- 
uous improvement in prod- 
uct quality and competitive 
advantage. International 
sourcing is an important 
tool, but it's only one of a 
series of tools that the pro- 
fessional buyer can bring to 
bear.” Equally importanL 
in his opinion, are areas 
like building relationships 
with suppliers, economic 
analysis and professional 
research. 

L.R. 


A Concept Whose Time Has Come 


Continued fn»n first page 

often good for developing 
nations - particularly for in- 
experienced world traders 
who in the past were prone 
to overprotect with the kind 
of high tariffs being knocked 
down bv GATT. 


Mr. Bales calls counter- 
trade. under which regional 
trading blocs require foreign 
companies and countries lo 
do a certain percentage or 
total amount of local sourc- 
ing. a “more subtle form of 
protectionism" that will 
probably be restricted or 


outlawed as the world 
moves increasingly toward 
global free trade in the 21st 
century. 

That will happen. Mr. 
Bales predicts, because of 
the chicXen-or-egg scenario 
developing today: deregula- 
tion and liberalization of 



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What It Means for the Bottom Line 


The prafil-and-loss sheet is one of several areas in which global sourt big t tin imj 


trade have led to more glob- 
al purchasing: in turn" the 
success of global purchasing 
will lead lo greater demand 
for wider free trade. 

“Freer trade." he says, 
“ends up helping every- 
body.” 

Timothy Harper 


JLs global sourcing just the 
latest business fad, a 1990s 
version of qualify circles and 
one-minute management, or 
does it have (he potential to 
bring about lasting improve- 
ments in a company’s bot- 
tom line? Although many 
global sourcing programs 
are too young to be evaluat- 
ed with a rigorous cost-ben- 
efit analysis, companies that 
have made comprehensive 
improvements in their pro- 
curement systems - in some 
cases adding an international 
component to their supplier 
base - seem convinced that 
advantages are already ac- 
cruing in areas like quality, 
customer satisfaction, effi- 
ciency and savings on pur- 
chasing costs. 

“Global sourcing yields 
higher returns than other 
strategies for overhauling 
purchasing operations.” says 
Malcolm HillyarcL a princi- 
pal at A.T. Keumey. an in- 
ternational consulting com- 
pany. “Savings of between 5 
percent and 15 percent on 
total purchasing costs are 
common in the first six to IS 
months.*’ Mr. HiHyard notes 
(hat global sourcing strate- 
gies lurget what is typically 
the largest component of 
corporate spending: “If you 
attack purchased materials 
costs, which usually account 
for at least 50 percent of 
overall spending, you get 
tremendous benefits.” he 
says. 

High qualify for less cost 
In his experience, compa- 
nies that combine global 
sourcing and purchasing of- 
fice improvements in a sys- 
tematic program are often 
able to guarantee themselves 
a steady flow of high-quality 
parts at a fixed future price - 
with savings of !U percent to 
25 percent. One client, an 


automobile manufacturer, 
searched the w orld for the 
best supplier? in an attempt 
to cut material costs by 12 
percent to 24 percent. Since 
introducing global sourcing 
in 1990. the" company esti- 
mates that its savings total 
over SI billion on purchas- 
ing in Europe. S36 million in 
North America and SI 00 
million in South America, 
where 61 percent of pans- 
dollar volume is now global- 
ly sourced 

’ Still, money is only part of 
the story. Says Professor 
Richard Lamming, a fellow 
of the Chartered Institute of 
Purchasing & Supply and 
holder of the chair of pur- 
chasing at the University of 
Bath School of Manage- 
ment: “Global sourcing is a 
very recent phenomenon: re- 
gions like tiie Pacific Rim. 
China. India and Eastern Eu- 
rope were not open '[to 
Western business procure- 
ment] 10 or 15 years ago.” 
To generalize about the boi- 
lonvline impact “would be 
very woolly.” he says. 
“You'd have ’to ask compa- 
nies individually to weigh 
the savings against the rime 
and money spent on activi- 
ties such as translating docu- 
ments. understanding the 
laws of the foreign market, 
dealing with middlemen - 
how would vou calculate 
it?” 

Gains in the marketplace 
Professor Lamming argues 
that one important benefit of 
global sourcing is the im- 
proved ability u> sell one's 
produci in the new markets 
that have been tapped for 
procurement, thanks to what 
he terms goodw ill gains. “In 
some cases, it may be more 
appropriate to talk about x- 
percent increase in local 
sales rather than \ -percent 


drop in purchasing costs, 
he says. . . 

Indeed, money - although 
an important consideration - 
is just one of the reasons 
companies decide to source 
globally. McCormick & Co. 

redesigned its spice purchas- 
ing process primarily to in- 
crease customer satisfaction. 
It now sources in China. In- 
dia. Spain. Morocco. 
Turkey. Egypt- Israel. Pak- 
istan, Indonesia and Mexico, 
its procurement budget has 
grown by SI million, but the 
company reports the im- 
provements in quality have 
made it all worthwhile. 

Improved service to clients 
The benefits of global sourc- 
ing and efficient procure- 
ment practices must be con- 
sidered in a wide perspec- 
tive. agrees David Mannion. 
supplier development man- 
ager of ICL Pic. the giant 
British systems integration 
company’ with headquarters 
in London. “We go around 
the world seeking innova- 
tions. and if we decide to 
source some systems on the 
West Coast of the U.S.. it's 
because we see this as an 
opportunity to give our 
clients better service.’ - ICL. 
with annual sales of S4 bil- 
lion. wields a procurement 
budget of S2 billion. Slightly 
under half is spent in Eu- 
rope. about $500 million 
goes to purchasing in the 
United States and the bal- 
ance - about $600 million 
is directed lo the Far East. 

The company has been 
doing global sourcing far 
over 10 years, but the prod- 
ucts purchased have 
changed as its own produc- 
ts e capacities have evolved. 
Eight years ago, ICL began 
sourcing high -qualify. low- 
cost personal computers 
from Taiwan, but in 1990 


•e results. 

management realized (hat a 
better alternative could be : 
found much closer to home. 
-We realized that wfe had 
improved our own opera- 
tions and lowered our .costs . 
to a point where we could / 
produce the same prddtict - 
in-house at a competitive 
price.” Mr. Mannion -i>ays.' 
“There's, no sense sourcing 
from a remote part of the 
world if the total landed 
costs are superior to ; what - 
vou could get here in the 
U.K” 

Creating global products 
As competition heats up ; in 
the automotive industry, the 
world's car makers are look- 
ing increasingly to global 
sourcing and other purchas- 
ing innovations to boost effi- 
ciency and reduce costs. . 
Ford began global sourcing - 
in ! 989’ as part of its. first 
“world car program,“'the Jh 
CDVV-27, which encom- 
passes the Ford Mondeo in 
Europe and the Ford Con- 
tour and the Mercury Mys- 
tique in the United States. 
The company's procure- 
ment budget for production 
materials alone - excluding 
parts, accessories andma- 
ehinery costs - totals $12 
billion in Europe and anoth- 
er $40 billion in the United 
States. - 

Eckhard Jokisch. vice 
president of supply at Fend 
of Europe, says the compa- 
ny has achieved substantial 
savings through global 
sourcing and “a philosophy 
of single sourcing whenever 
possible.” At the Ford Facto- 
ry’ in Genk. Belgium, 90 per- 
cent of purchasing for the 
Mondeo is single-sourced. 
According to Mr. Jokisch, 
benefits include improved . 
quality, cost savings and in- 
creased efficiency. 

L.R. 


Global Sourcing 94: The Event 

‘ It > not only a business tool: it's now c ho the subject of a brand-new British trade fair. 


't ‘ 


J. o assist companies in- 
terested in making new in- 
ternational contacts and 
implementing or expand- 
ing a global sourcing strat- 
egy. the world's first exhi- 
bition and conference on 
this topic is being held in 
London from Nov. 2S to 
Dec. 2. Harrington Kil- 
bride International Exhibi- 
tions. organizers of Global 
Sourcing 94. fkiie billed it 
as “a tremendous introduc- 
tion to the marketplace" 
for the 6.500 purchasers 
and 200-some exhibitors 
slated to attend. The venue 
is the spacious, well- 


equipped National Hall at 
Oly mpia in West London. 

A range of exhibitors 
The conference and exhibit 
will bring together key- 
buyers from international 
companies and leading 
suppliers from 31 coun- 
tries. including many of 
the emerging economies of 
Eastern" Europe. Latin 
America arid the Com- 
monwealth of independent 
States. To help purchasers 
source effectively, talks 
and seminars will be held 
by speakers with extensive 
practical experience in the 


challenging and rewarding 
business of trading in new 
markets. 

Seventy different indus- 
trial sectors are to be repre- 
sented at the exhibition, 
with most space occupied 
by producers of textiles, 
chemicals, metals, machin- 
ery. food processing and 
electrical goods. 

Of the 160 CIS and East 
European participants, 
around 1 10 come from the 
independent states of 
Russia, Belarus. Kaza- 
khstan. Uzbekistan. 
Ukraine, Lithuania and 
Tatarstan. 






A truly global forum 
The event will also count 
the participation of over 30 
national and regional gov- 
ernment trade Institutions 
from countries including 
Brazil. China. Vietnam. 
Italy. Mexico and Ghana. 

Lufthansa, which is sup- 
porting the event and is ;*•' 
promoting global sourcing '• 
to the 20.000 members of ft 
its frequent: flier program, -j 
is offering a prize drawing ft 
for visitors for two free 9 
business-class tickets to J: 
any destination in the air- 
line's global flight net- f 
work. L.R. J 


Southeast Asia: One Key to Prosperity 

In many cases. Southeast Asian countries have virtually built their economies on this phenomenon. 

A 


sia's fust-growing 
economies offer aiT enticing 
combination of cheap labor, 
design and production flexi- 
bility, and often geographi- 
cal advantages that make the 
difference between a compa- 
ny’s profit and loss. 

Despite surging inflation 
in many Southeast Asian 
economies, labor costs are 
still nowhere near those of 
developed countries. On av- 
erage, a factory worker in 
Europe or North America 
costs about $20 an hour in 
wages and benefits. The 
equivalent in most Asian na- 
tions is about S 1 .65 an hour. 

The economic equation 
The wage discrepancy is 
wide enough to counterbal- 
ance most of the advantages 
offered by Western produc- 
tion - higher productivity, 
market proximity and more 
advanced technical skills. 
Rapid technology transfer 
and the absence of much of 
the crippling regulation that 
hobbles developed countries 
moke Asia even more attrac- 
tive. 

"Several big American 
companies - including Mat- 
tel. Rcchnk. Nike and Levi 
Strauss - Un their sourcing 
here." says Jim Castle, man- 
aging director of Business 
Advisory Indonesia and first 
vice president of the Ameri- 
can Chamber of Commerce 
in Indonesia. "The primary 
reason i.x (hat wages here are 
very competitive!" Mr. Cas- 
tle also points out that In- 
donesia has I he infni.sirue- 


ture necessary to move these 
products and enough politi- 
cally stability to ensure that 
business runs smoothly for 
many years to come - ad- 
vantages that many develop- 
ing nations cannot offer. 

Cornerstone of growth 
Western companies' sourc- 
ing Finished products and 
components from Asia is 
certainly not a new phenom- 
enon. After all. the founda- 
tions of the modem Japanese 
and Taiwanese economies 
were providing low-cost 
products to- the West. 

Three decades ago. that 
trade was based heavily on 
cheap plastic and transistor- 
ized products. Nowadays, 
the examples are almost too 
numerous to mention: aulo 
and aircraft parts, medical 
equipment, chemical com- 
pounds. yarn and fabric, 
wood and leather products, 
and perhaps the biggest cate- 
gory of all - computer parts 
and peripherals. 

Nearly every major Amer- 
ican computer company 
draws a significant amount 
of its - components front 
Asia. A typical personal 
computer .sold in the United 
Slates could have a monitor 
manufactured in South Ko- 
rea. a hard disk made in 
Japan, a sound card from 
Singapore and a memory 
chip from Malaysia. 

A foot in (lie door 
There is little doubt that la- 
bor costs arc the majur rea- 
son so many Eurwjiean and 


North American companies 
have turned to Asia for 
sourcing. Many companies 
are also interested in gaining 
a foothold in the rapidly 
growing Asian consumer 
market. For instance. Procter 
& Gamble is about to signif- 
icantly expand its manufac- 
turing operations in South- 
east Asia - not for export to 
Western markets, but for 
sale? in the region. Initial 
plans include a $70 million 
cleaning product pram in the 
Philippines: $30 million 
beauty care and disposable 
paper produci plants in Thai- 
land: a $20 million Indone- 
sian cough drop and decon- 
gestant plant in Indonesia: a 
personal cleansing product 
plant in Malaysia: and a 
chemical plant in Singapore. 

It is not just the big multi- 
nationals that are taking ad- 
vantage of Asian sourcing. 
Small and medium-sized 
companies are also jumping 
on the handwagon. "A lot of 
small Ll.S. entrepreneurs and 
companies are sourcing in 
Indonesia.” says Mr. Castle. 
This “low end" business 
tends to concentrate on fin- 
ished garments, handicrafts 
and customized furniture. 

The funding incentive 
Meanwhile, many small and 
medium-si zed companies 
are establishing u business 
foulhold in Southeast Asia 
by lapping into a $6 million 
fund established hy the 
Asian Development Bank. 

The United States is a ma- 
jor shareholder in die ADEL 


and more than 75 percent of 
American applicants have 
been successful so far. 

Asian companies are also 
becoming more aggressive 
in seeking out Western com- 
panies that can use their 
parts and components. Cre- 
ative Technology - a small 
Singapore company that 
specializes in computer 
sound boards that allow PCs 
fq talk, play music and pro- 
vide special effects for 
games - was launched 12 
years ago with just $6,000 in 
capital. 

After years of being 
shunned by the world's 
computer giants, one of the 
company's founders decided 
to move to San Francisco in 
order to market its Sound 
Blaster boards to Silicon 
Valley firms. The move paid 
off. Today. Creative Tech- 
nology is a worth about 
$250 million. 

Taking it on the road 

Not many small Asian- 
companies have the re.-., 
sources or the marketing ex- ' 
pertise to present themselves ] 
in the world arena as u 
source for goods and scr- r 
vices. As a result, many gov- 
ernments in the region have . 
embarked on annual road 
shows. For instance, top-*, 
ranking officials from both } 
Malaysia und Indonesia! 
have taken lo thy road over ' 
the past year to present their 
country’s respective advan- 
tages to European and' 
American ci unpanies. 

Julia Clerk 









Jv* jjj (_J, 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, 



28, 1994 


Page 17 



S PONSO RED S ECHOS 


use 3 



"The Baltics: New Suppliers to Western Europe 

Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania are proving attractive to European companies as sources of low-cost labor and high-quality manufacturing. 



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VJince the breakup of the 
Soviet Union, many West- 
ern companies have been re- 
alizing the potential of the 
region as a source of cheap 
raw materials, services and 
labor. 

The seat belts for every 
Lada automobile ever pro- 
duced by the Soviet Union, 
for example, were manufac- 
tured in Estonia by Norma. 
Today, the Tallinn-based 
factory is supplying seat 
belts for Saab, the Scandina- 
vian car and airplane engine 
manufacturer. 

The Baltic states of Esto- 
nia, Latvia and Lithuania are 
among the most active of the 
former Soviet Union re- 
publics looking for Western 
contacts. 

The last states to be an- 


~ Ferrostaal 
Customers Become Partners 

The global sourcing vector can sometimes turn into a profitable loop. 


JL>y selling advanced facilities to compa- 
nies located in rapidly developing coun- 
tries. Europe’s capital goods producers 
have created an “ever-greater source of 
competition and of cooperation partners,” 
in the words of Klaus von Menges, chair- 
man of Ferro staal AG, based in Essen, 
Germany. One example shows bow this 
complex mix of struggle and symbiosis 
can work. 

It sounds straightforward enough: an in- 
ternational consortium builds a major new 
production facility to serve the needs of a 
rapidly developing economy. Last Febru- 
ary, Perwaja Steel Sendirian Berhad issued 
a “provisional acceptance certificate” to 
the direct iron-ore reduction facility built 
by a consortium in Perwaja, Malaysia. The 
consortium was made up of the HYL (Ho- 
jalata y L&mina) Group SA., a Mexico- 
based manufacturer of sheet metal and 
rolled steel; Ferrostaal AG, die trading arm 
of Munich’s MAN Group; and MAN 


GiitehoffhungshDtte, MAN’S industrial- 
engineering arm. 

The heart of the facility is the HYL-EC 
technology, which manufactures sponge 
iron from lump pellets of ore. and which 
has been incorporated into plants built in 
Indonesia and Mexico by the same consor- 
tium. This successful partnership between 
an established German capital-goods pro- 
ducer and an aspiring corporate star in a 
rapidly developing country is. in fact, not 
quite so simple - much of the equipment 
HYL used to develop its products and 
technologies originally came from the 
MAN Group. 

For Europe's hard-pressed steel-makers, 
such companies as HYL — and now Per- 
waja - are a price-cutting source of com- 
petition. For traders such as Ferrostaal, 
steel from Mexico, Brazil, China and now 
Malaysia and Indonesia has become an 
Important commodity for their internation- 
al transactions. Terry Swartzberg 


nexed by Moscow and 
among the first to reclaim 
their independence, they 
were perhaps less affected 
by Soviet labor practices 
than other regions. Their ge- 
ographical position is also 
attractive for companies in- 
terested in doing business 
with Russia, either as a base 
of operations or as a trans- 
shipment point. 

The pries is right 
Chain stores such as C&A 
and Next send fabric to Es- 
tonia and Latvia to be made 
up by the work forces there, 
then reimport the finished 
garments to be sold in stores 
all over Europe. “Western 
companies like our equip- 
ment and quality, but the 
main reason for coming to 
us is price,” says Ginta 
Ozolina. production director 
at Latvija, one of Latvia's 
largest textile companies. 
The average monthly wage 
for the company’s 2300 em- 
ployees is 70 lats ($123), 
meaning that labor is rela- 
tively cheap. Before inde- 
pendence, 80 percent of 
Latvija’ s production was 
seat to the Soviet Union: to- 
day 85 percent of its output 
is sent westward - to Ger- 
many, Sweden and Britain. 

“We also have the advan- 
tage of being not too far 
away, so our products are all 
exported by road, making 
transport costs cheaper,” 
says Ms. Ozolina. 

Matches for South Africa 
Paper and wood products 
have long been important in 
the Baltic region. About 40 
percent of Latvia’s surface 
area is covered with forest. 
Sawn logs and pallet wood 


for crates are sent mainly to 
Britain, while a Latvian 
safety-match factory expats 
to Britain, South Africa and 
Saudi Arabia via a British- 
based company that pro- 
vides the artwork for the 
matchboxes and distributes 
the finished product. 
Lameko, a Latvian trading 
company in wood products, 
acts as tie mediator between 
East and West, benefiting 
from Latvia's natural re- 
sources and relatively low 
transportation costs. 

“Our timber is very hard 
and good for the building in- 
dustry,” says Dace Liduma, 
export manager at Lameko. 

Notebooks for Scandinavia 
In Estonia, Kohila Paper 
Mill is assembling exercise 
books for Scandinavian 
companies, which supply 
them with paper rolls and 
cover designs. With the av- 
erage monthly wage at the 
paper mill at 2,050 kroons 
($155) it is cheaper to send 
paper to Estonia to be cut, 
assembled and packaged 
and then re-exported as ex- 
ercise books than to produce 
the books within Scandi- 
navia. 

While labor remains 
cheap in the region, manu- 
facturers are optimistic 
about future prospects. 
“Business is increasing daily 
- we have good opportuni- 
ties in furniture ana textiles, 
while the flat income-tax 
rate of 26 percent and zero 
export tariffs make it easy 
for foreign companies,” says 
Peeter Puskai, development 
manager of ETK. an umbrel- 
la group of Estonian corpo- 
rations. 

Samantha Knights 




“Global Sourcing” 

wai produced in us entirety bx the Advertising Department of the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 

1 WRITERS Timothy Harper is a wrker, lawyer and international trade 
consultant based in Ridgewood. New Jersey. • Samantha Knights is a 
business and economics writer who covers Baltic affairs. ■ Lisa Rosenthal 
is a London-based writer specializing in finance. • Tern Swartzberg is a 
Munich-based business writer. - Julia Clerk is a free-lance writer who 
splits her time between the United States ami Southeast Asia 

Program director: Bill Mahder. \ 


P roton 

World Hunt for Auto Paris 

Sourcing of car parts is now becoming a two-way street in Asia. 

IVXalaysian car manu- 
facturers have been given 
due warning by Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mo- 
hamad that their days of 
state sponsorship are num- 
bered. At the opening of a 
new assembly plant near 
Kuala Lumpur, Mr. Ma- 
hathir said: “Auto indus- 
tries of other countries 
don’t depend on govern- 
ment protection forever. 

Yet they can produce 
cheap and quality cars. 

Cheap sourcing of compo- 
nents, improved efficiency 
and cost control are among 
ways to reduce cost and in- 
crease profit.” 

Mr. Mahathir was one of 
the driving forces behind 
the development of Proton 
- Malaysia's first national 
car project - and he views however, including trans- tent to let Japan continue 
auto production as one of mission systems, are still as the sole supplier of 
the cornerstones of his am- imported from Japan. The these “proprietary” pans, 
bitious Vision 2020 indus- government finds this par- Proton recently announced 
trialization program. ticularly irksome, especial- that it had started buying 

Mitsubishi jumped at the ly as Proton has to bear the car parts outside Japan be- 
chance of manufacturing brent of the effects of a ris- cause its traditional Japan- 
vehicles and components ingyen. ese suppliers were “no 

in a low-cost labor market While the government longer competitive.” Ne- 
in Southeast Asia. While would like to see as many gotiations for parts supply 
the joint-venture relation- components as possible are under way with Daun- 
ship has generally been made in Malaysia, com- ler-Benz in Germany as 
smooth, the prime minister mercial realities may pre- well as General Motors 
recently let it be known dude this. Mr. Kisai - who and Ford in the United 
that he is not pleased with describes car production as Stares, 
the rate of technology “a global business" - says Perodua, a second 
transfer between Proton that Proton has set an 80 Malaysian national car 
and Mitsubishi, as well as percent local content tar- project involving Japan’s 
other Japanese suppliers, get, with the remaining Daihatsu, will begin mass 
According to Kisai B. components sourced over- production of the new 
Rahmat, Proton’s deputy seas. He says it makes eco- Kancil compact next year, 
managing director. Pro- nomic sense for certain By the middle of 1995, the 
ton's share of local com- proprietary components to first units of a third project 
ponent parts increased to be produced in one loca- are scheduled to role off 
over 60 percent by the tion for all manufacturers, the assembly line - a joint 
middle of 1994, when the “and in turn we sell them venture between Proton, 
company began mass-pro- some components we Diversified Resources 
during engine blocks and make.” Berhad of Malaysia and 

bearing caps in Malaysia. Still, it seems clear that Peugeot Citroen of France. 
Some high-value items, Malaysia will not be con- J-C 



tent to let Japan continue 
as the sole supplier of 
these “proprietary” parts. 
Proton recently announced 
that it had started buying 
car parts outside Japan be- 
cause its traditional Japan- 
ese suppliers were “no 
longer competitive.” Ne- 
gotiations for parts supply 
are under way with Daim- 
ler-Benz in Germany as 
well as General Motors 
and Ford in the United 
Stales. 

Perodua, a second 
Malaysian national car 
project involving Japan’s 
Daihatsu, will begin mass 
production of the new 
Kancil compact next year. 
By the middle of 1995, the 
first units of a third project 
are scheduled to role off 
the assembly line - a joint 
venture between Proton, 
Diversified Resources 
Berhad of Malaysia and 
Peugeot Citroen of France. 

J.C 


A cure 
for jet lag 


Sourcing Q4 

One world. One source 

Ofympia 28 November# December. 


Gulp! 


Here’s refreshing news if you are looking to find compare competitive suppliers and buy at competitive 
components, products and services from all rates - 

over the world. f* " j In a single day you can SOUfCe neW 

Global Sourcing ‘94 is an exciting new \ • -l I products and services, attend the seminars 

exhibition that brings together a staggering l 5 " programme and discover more useful 

number of quality international suppliers all 1 I information from the many government 

under one roof at Olympia. \£lBbai bodies offering advice and guidance. 

Over 400 companies from over 50 \ SOURCING^ | So **7 atch ^ 10 Rome or 

countries worldwide, including the Far East, 1 I shuttle to Slovakia? 

the CIS, Eastern Europe and Latin America ^ With the whole world of trade and 

will be exhi biting- The sheer volume of commerce on your doorstep, 

exhibitiors representing m a n ufa cturing, transport and Global Sourcing ‘94 offers the ideal tonic for tired 

freight, finance, textiles, agriculture, retail, construction purchasing managers. 

Harrington Exhibitions Ltd, Ashbum House, 201-203 City Road, London EC1 1JN. TeL: (44 171) 490 36 33 


■ ■ V '• ! • 

• 'a *♦ . 

•iKS* 9 

GlIbBA! 

^OURCIN G94 


and the service sectors gives you an ideal opportunity to 
compare competitive suppliers and buy at competitive 
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T — « .T -trrK>+* 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


MONDAY 

SPORTS 


At 30 , Schneider Wins 52 d World Cup Prize 


The Associated Press 

PARK CITY, Utah — Vreni 
Schneider, the roaster of the second* 
run comeback, rallied to earn her 5 2d 
World Cup victory by winning the 
women's slalom Sunday, 

Schneider was fifth after the first 
run, but bad the fastest second run of 
4827 seconds, to finish with an overall 
time oF 1 :39.95. 

Martina Accola of Switzerland was 
second at 1:40.58, and Kristina An- 
dersson of Sweden was third at 
1:40.67. Femilla Wiberg of Sweden, 
who led after the first tun, slipped near 
the bottom of the second run and fin- 
ished fourth at 1 :40.70. 

Schneider, last year's overall World 
Cup champion and a five-time Olym- 


pic medalist, celebrated her 3Gth birth- 
day Saturday by placing third in the 
pant slalom. 

Earlier in the competition, Heidi 
Zeller- Bahler of Switzerland finally 
won a race — her first victory after 
nine seasons as a World Cup skier. 

She sped down a giant slalom course 
with the best second-run time Satur- 
day, barely maintaining her balance 
near the top and bottom, to win this 
season's first race. 

Her two-run lime of 2 minutes, 
22.03 seconds was four-tenths of a sec- 
ond faster than Sabina Panzanini of 
Italy. 

Zeller-BShler skidded and nearly 


crashed on a steep portion near the top 
of the course, and then barely avoiding 


falling backward as she crossed the 
finish line. Once she saw her time, she 
triumphantly twirled her ski pole in 
the air with her right arm. 

ZeUer-BShler, 27, whose best previ- 
ous results were seconds hx a 19S9 
downhill and a 1993 giant slalom, was 
tied for second after the first run. She 
had a second-run time of 1:07.46. 

When asked why it took her so long 
to win a race, she replied: “If I knew 
what the reason was. I would have won 
long before this.” 

Panzanini bad the best first-run 
time, 1 ; 1433. She also was seeking her 
first World Cup victory. Panzanini, 
who was no better than 17th in any 
race last year, matched her best career 
finish, second in a giant slalom at 


Steamboat Springs, Colorado, in 1992. 

“America obviously brings me good 
luck,” she said. 

Schneider had debated before this 
year whether to continue her glorious 
career. 



SIDELINES 


“To win becomes more difficult ev- 
ery year. I’m getting old,” said 
Schneider, who closed a news confer- 
ence by blowing out the candies on a 
birthday cake. “After this race of to- 
day, I know my decision [not to retire] 
was right.” 

Pemilla Wiberg of Sweden, the 1 992 
Olympic giant slalom champion, fell 
on the fust run and another pre-race 
favorite, Anita Wachter of Austria, 
failed to qualify for the second run. 



Ok«I»C P-xae/A? 

Heidi Zefler-BSMen First victory. 


SCOREBOARD 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AtkmnclMristoa 

W L Pet 

Orlando 9 2 JIB 

OB 

New York 

6 4 

M 

Tfs 

Barton 

4 6 

SCO 

3K> 

New Jersey 

6 7 

M2 

4 

Washington 

4 6 

ADO 

4W 

Philadelphia 

4 B 

333 

SV5 

Miami 

3 7 

J00 

SW 

Indiana 

Central Division 
7 3 

J00 

__ 

Cleveland 

7 5 

583 

1 

Detroit 

6 5 

MS 

7*9 

Chicago 

6 6 

5D0 

2 

Oku tutte 

5 6 

355 

2 ta 

Milwaukee 

5 6 

.455 

Vh 

Atlanta 

4 8 

333 

4 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMwest DNbloa 

V* L Pa 

Houston 9 3 .750 

GB 

Dallas 

6 4 

MO 

2 

Utah 

7 $ 

583 

2 

Denver 

6 S 

545 

Tfi 

Sat Antonio 

5 6 

.455 

JVi 

Minnesota 

1 11 

.083 

8 

Phoenix 

Pactllc Division 
8 3 

727 


GoWen Stale 

7 4 

A34 

1 

LA Lakers 

7 5 

583 

IW 

Seattle 

7 5 

583 

ivy 

Sacramento 

5 4 

556 

2 

Port tana 

5 S 

500 

2W 

LA Clippers 

0 12 

JX» 

va 


FRIDAY'S GAMES 

NWJmcr 33 27 25 23-107 

LA. Olivers U n 21 33—102 

N: Anderson 8-11 3-321 Coleman M 6-9 16: 
L: Ellis M0 6-9 H. Vaught 0-11 J-4 21. Re- 
bounds— New Jersey 45 (Beniamin VI. Los 
Anodes 45 (Massenburg 71. Assists— New 
Jersey 25 (Andersen Ml. Los Angeles 24 
(Richardson in. 

Orlando 25 30 43 27—134 

Boston 30 31 25 33—111 

O: O'Neal 14-20 8-M 34 Hordawov 13-25 v-15 
35. Anderson M4 0-0 21; B: Fox 7-10 5-7 20. 
Redid 15-27 0-1 3Q, D -Brawn 11-1V B~0 24. Re- 
MOMU— Cdondo 63 (Grant U). Boston 46 
(Radio 111. Assists— Orlando 2S (Show 9). 
Beaton 32 (Fax «>. 

Cleveland 23 17 33 23— N 

Washington 21 24 1? 23— W 

C: Hill 11*17 3-4 25. Ptlllls M7 3-4 IV; W: 

MOCLKOI MJ 34 21. Chapman 7-17 4-5 17. 
R« bo gr i d s Cleveland 60 (Hill 161. Washing- 
ton 42 (WOoer 61. Assists— Cleveland 18 
(Price 7). Washington 20 (Stales Vi. 

LA. Lakers 25 II 23 26—92 

Atlanta 27 17 26 15—47 

L: Dlvoe 6-13 3-3 15. Harvey 6-12 1-3 13; A: 
S .Smith 5-M 4-5 16, Blaylock 7-21 3-3 U. Re- 
(w a nds— LA. Lakers 57 (CNvac 16>. Atlanta 53 
(Lana 12). Assists— LA. Lakers 23 (Olvoe 61. 
Atlanta 23 < Blaylock 6). 

Milwaukee 3« 27 31 26-1*6 

Indiana 30 24 27 30—111 

M: Day 12-29 5* 31, Baker 6-10 5-7 17; ): 
Me Key V-15 1-220, Smlts 11-15 6-13 30. Miller *- 
152-422. Rebounds — Milwaukee 33 (Cordon 71, 
Indiana 42 (D-Davfo 10). Assists— Milwaukee 
24 (Murdock 71. Indiana 33 (Jackson VI. 
Miami 27 32 2* 36-111 

Detroit 24 a 22 23- 77 

M: Willis 12-16 64 30. Rice B-M 5-S 23; D: 
Mills M3 6-7 21. Dumara 7-17 2-3 16. Re- 
baands— Miami 50 I will is 121. Detroit 40 
(Mills, west 101. Assists— Miami 31 (Salley 51. 
Detroit 25 (Hunter. Dumara 51. 

PUIodeMita ana 26-109 

Minnesota IV U 15 21— 71 

P: Weolhersooon V-15 0-0 IV. Brodley 8-9 3-3 
IV; M: Laettner V-12 4-4 22. Rooks 4-7 6-6 14. 
R ebo u nds P hUodetaWo 55 (weatherapaon 
6), Minnesota a (Rooks 11). Assists-Phllo- 
detPhla a (Barra *1. Minnesota 16 ( Rider 4). 
Portland l< if a 21— vi 

Dallas 22 a 31 18 — loi 

P: CRablnsan 6-20 3-4 19, DrvxJcr 5-177-9 JV; 


D; Mashknim 10-07-14 27. Jackson 10-24 10-13 
31. ReOoands— Portland 64 (Dudley !V>. Dal- 
las 63 (Jones 161- Assists— Portland 93 I J.Ro- 
btnson 71, Dallas 20 (Kidd 10). 

Seattle # JS J1 32-114 

Son Antonia 14 27 3 23- 74 

5 : Payton 6-17 5-6 21. Sctiremot 7-12 6-9 20; 
SA: Elthjtl 6-14 (4-t6 27. Robinson 7-17 6-V 30. 
Rebounds— Seattle a ( Kemp 101. San Antonio 
S3 < Robinson ll».Ass{sts-Sea»le24 1 Parian 
71. San Antonio 12 (Ajohnson 51. 

Cftlcoeo WWW 26— 74 

Utah 20 M 29 31—134 

C: PI men 7-16 0-0 IS, Foster 6-9 l-1 13; (/: 
Malone 9-20 6-10 27, Suenaer 6-n 7-V iv. Re- 
tKwods— Oifcano 40 (Simokins 7|. uuh 46 
(Scencer 111. Assists— Chiccga 25 (Ptaaen. 
Armstrong 41. Utah 33 (Stockton III. 
Denver zr 27 23 IV 7—105 

Sacramento 73 20 27 33 16-K8 

D: Pock 6-12 64 24, stlth 7-11 9-10 23; S: 
Richmond 14-2346 33, Brawn 7-rt) l-Z (8. Re- 
bounds— Oenver 57 (MutomtM 16?, Sacra- 
mento 46 (Polvnice 131 Assists— Denver 21 
(Pock >1. Sacramento 33 (Hurlev 7). 

SATURDAY'S GAMES 
Charlotte 17 a 34 26-105 

new Yora a » a 16— ts 

C: Johnson M84-72X Mourning 9-22 9-1227; 
N: Ewing 6-16 6-9 7Z Horner 4-11 56 iv. Re* 
ttot mdi aurtalte 58 (Mourning 13). New 
York 49 (Ewing, Oakley 14}. Assistv-Oicr- 
totle 16 (Hawkins -41. New York IV IStarKs 7). 

Boston a a a 33-ia 

PMiodeftdlhl 2» 22 24 24- 77 

B: Brown 6-1 1 10-11 22. Radio 5-167-11 IV; P: 
Berras wv 3-3 23. Malone 13-21 M a Re- 
bounds— Boston S3 (Montniss 12). Ptulodel- 
phla44 (weameranoon 121. Assisss— Boston 27 
(Wesley 7 1. Philadelphia 21 (Barras 7). 

LA Lakers 28 V 34 23—112 

Washington 21 26 25 24— 7* 

L: Van Exet 8-18 2-3 22, Ceoallas 8-12 2-4 18: 
W: Mac Lean 9-14 5-6 7X Webber v-te 4-8 22. 
Rebounds — la Lakers 63 (Cebnltos 14). 
Washington 58 (Webber 20). Assists — LALok- 
ers2i (VanE«ell3),Washtnaionl7iSkiies7|. 
Golden Slate a 17 a 2Z— 87 

Cleveland 2S 27 26 23-1 Cl 

G: Gatling 5-7 54 IX Hardaway 5-ie GO 11. 
Price 13-16M31. Perrv 6-120416. Re boun ds - 
Golden State S3 iGusitolto 8). Cleveland 48 
(Hill V). Assists— Golden Stole a iHoroowov 
9), Clevetor.0 30 ■ Price ;o> 

Ortonoo 33 2V 29 22-113 

Mltemukce 25 M a 27—185 

O; Hordowov 15-232-4 35. O'Neal 7-167-1 1 21; 
M; Robinson PE 6-6 ZS, Oar 10-20 2-3 &. Re- 
bounds— Orlando SB lO'Neai 12). Milwaukee 
4V (Baker 15). Aunts— Orlando 32 
(Hardbwor 121. Mliweukee 25 (Murdock 10). 
Seattle « 25 27 22-78 

Houston 25 I? 27 23—94 

S: Kemn V-1T 4-5 73- Perkins 7-14 4-4 22; H: 
Olaluwen 7-17 M 22, Mavwelt 5-70 4-5 23. Re- 
bound*— Seattle 5i i Kemp 12i. Houston 52 
(Thorpe Otaluwon 13). Assists— Seattle 17 
(Pavtan 51. Houston 72 (Smith 7). 

Doties 24 TV 46 27 M— 124 

Denver 29 38 22 22 13-123 

DA; Jackson 17 28 16-1750. Washburn 12 a 
10-1235; DE: Drills 11-1904*4. Rogers 10-22 
4-4 25. Pack 8-13 4-4 21. soft 8-9 MI 23 Re- 
booods— Dallas 41 (L.wniiems ill. Denver 48 
(Pack 701. Assists — Dallas i 0 (KM it. Den- 
ver 24 (Pack 17). 

San Antonia 25 26 34 23—168 

Phoenix 27 29 21 34—111 

S: Robinson 10-23 54 25. Del Negro 8-12 2-2 
21; P: Manning 14-zi 3*3 32. Barkley 8-19 7-1 1 
21 Rebounds— Son Antonio 51 (RekfV). Phoe- 
nix 51 (Green V). Assists— Son Antonio 32 
(AJotmson 12). Phoenix 35 (Perrv 161. 


Termessee-Mortln 12440- Next : vs. No. a Ohio 
University, Wednesday; S. Arizona (2-1) beat 
Aiasko-Antfnroge 107-86 Friday; beat No. IV 
Oklahoma St. 73-C3 Saturday. Next: vs. Nat 13 
Michigan at Auburn HHts. Mfcft. Wednesday. 

6. UCLA 04) boat Cal State NarthrJdge 83- 
60. Next: w Kentucky at Anaheim, Calif. 
Saturday; 7, Mo r ytao d £2-1) did not May. 
Next : vs. Loyola mcL Tuesday; 8. Duke (24) 
beat Brawn 8048 Friday; beol Northeast e rn 
93-70 Saturday. Next : vs. No. 16 Conooct tart at 
Auburn Htlij. MJch. Tuesday; V. Kansas (14) 
beat San Dieao 83-65. Next: vs. No. 3 Massa- 
dMdts at AnaheMb Calif. Saturday,- ML 
Florida (V4) beat Stetson 73-64. Next: vi Bos- 
ton College at Auburn Hi IK. Mldu Tuesday. 

11. Indiana ( 1-2) did not May. Next : at Noire 
Dame, Tuesday.* 12, dadnaaf) (14) boat Aus- 
tin Peay 106-73. Next; at Rutger& Monday; IX 
AUcofgaa (Mi aM not day. Next: vs. No. S 
Arizona at Auburn Hills. Mich. Wednesday; 

14, Georgetown (Mi did n at ntov. Next: vs. 
No. l Arkansas at M em o Ms . Term. Sunday; 

15. wtscomta 041 deaf wrtont State 8661 
Next: vs. Wisconsin-Green Boy, Wednesday. 

16. Connecticut (141 beat Lafdrette 1T0-48. 
Next: vs. Na B Duke at Auburn Hilts. Mich. 
Tuesday; U.Mchigon Stale «M» did not May. 
Next: at lUlnob-Chlcoea. Wednesday, Nov. 
30; 18. Syracuse (0-1) did not play. Next: vv. 
Colgate. Tuesday. Nav.29; lV.Oktohomo State 
(1-2) beat Jackson State 75-57 Friday; Iasi to 
tax 5 Arizona 7363 Saturday. Next*, vs. South- 
ern Methodist, Wednesday; 20. Virginia (1-1) 
dM not May. Next: vs North CoraHno AJ.T, 
Wednesday, Nov. 30. 

71. vutamyg (Ml lost to Minnesota 8564 
Friday; beat Louisville 62-11 Saturday. Next: 
vs. Morisl, Wednesday; 22, Georgia TMh 1 1-0) 
beat F lor Mo ABM 112-56. Next: vs. Coastal 
Caroline, Monday; ZL Ohio Uotversltr (44) 
beat New Mexico State 844a OT. Next: at 
Kentucky. Wednesday; 24, Woke Forest (14) 
beat N.C-Greensboro 75-55. Next: at David- 
son. Tuesday 2a Alabama (M) did not ploy. 
Next: at Virginia Commonwealth, Saturday. 
Dec. 1 


Other Major College Scores 


Top 25 College Results 


How the tan a teams to The Associated 
Press: men** college basketball noil fared this 


1. Arkansas (0-1 ) last to No. 3 Massachusetts 
1044a Next: ws. No. 14 Georgelown al Mem- 
phis, Terwu Sunday; 2. Horth Carolina (14) 
boa Texas 9642. Next: vs. Pittsburgh. Tues- 
day; X Moss oc Ji weW s (14) beat Na 1 Arkon- 
sas 1044a Next: vs. No.? Kamos at Anaheim. 
CallL Saturday, Dec 3; 4 Kentucky 04) beat 


EAST 

Friday's Games 

Boston College 97. Cal Poly-SLO 60 
Boston U. 9a Rider 76 
New Homo shire 80. Hoiv Crass 73 
Penn 5). 90, Mount St. Mary's. AML 60 
West Virginia 103. Robert Moms 62 
Saturday's Games 
Army 92. Hobart a 
Buffalo 71. Rutgers 68 
F anthem 75. Adetphl 60 
Harvard 78. Babsan 56 
i ana 99. Cenl. MKiitocn vs 
La Salic SB Princeton 49 
Lehigh 105. Cornell 8V 
Providence 72. Rider 5V 
Stone 61. Wagner 73 

SOUTH 

Friday's Games 

Florida SL 68. Fla. Internation a l 41 
LSU 1C6. 3E Louisiana 80 
Miami 66. ME Illinois 48 
South Carolina 66. N.C.- Asheville 66 
Saturday's Games 
Auburn 7B Lynn 70 
Delaware 82, Delaware St. 80. OT 
Georgia 94 W. Carolina 67 
Liberty 72. Mantreaf-Andersan 66 
N. Carolina SL 104 Prairie View 56 
Old Dominion 93. Towsen St. 75 
Vdnderhllt 75, Sam ford 57 
MIDWEST 
Friday's Games 
low) 12& Morgan SI. 77 
Miami. Ohio 73. Heidelberg 69 
Saturday's Games 
Dayton 91, Howard U. 82 
DePoul 96. E. Illinois 73 
Detrail 77, Wayne, Mich. 62 
Missouri 106. Chicago SI. 72 
Northwestern 77, Alcorn St- 66 
Wichita St. 7a Southern Me ft. 67 
SOUTHWEST 
Fridays Games 
Bavtor 91. NW Louisiana 61 
Houston 74 James Madison 74 


Sat u rd a y's Game* 

Arkansas St. 7a San Franctoca St. 63 
Oklahoma as. Caaain Si. 74 
Texas-Ei Paso va Beftaven 67 
FAS WEST 
Fridays Games 
Idaho 69, MMitaaa Tech 61 
Montano 8a Simon Fraser is 
a Utah 04 Humbotol Sl 60 
Woshinoton 64 E. WasWngfon * 
Saturday's Games 
Air Fores as. New 76 
Codtomta 82, Texas Southern 69 
Loyola Morrmount 9Z Col SL -Hayward SI 
Nevada 7L Rice 60 
Oregon 94 W tat-Grrwn Say 71 
Pcaaerdtae 72, C5 Dominguez Hills 66 
TOURNAMENTS 
BfO ISLAND INVITATIONAL 
SemMaats 
Purdue 04 New Orleans 71 
tows St. 64 Va Commonwealth 97 
Cfttmjnfhm BroEftef 
Illinois SL Sa Hanoi f-Htto 71 
14 lawa 75, Niagara 72 

FRT5 INVITATIONAL 
atamplonstdp 
Shxitard 79, SL Peters 71 
TWrd Piece 
Butler 84 Colgate 74 

GREAT ALASKA SHOOTOUT 

Brigham Young 75, Louisville 60 
Mi n n es ota 85. Vlltanava 64 

CbaamionSthP 

Minnesota 7*, Brigham Young 74 
Third Place 

VUtanavo 82. Louisville 81 

Consotottao Bracket 
Arizona 107. Akako- Anchorage 88 
OkiatxMW St. 7& Jackson 57. 57 
Arizona 71 Oklahoma SL 63 
ATsoko-A n chorove 94 Jackson 51. 74 
LAPCHICK MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT 
aumptocstop 

St. John's 77. Bowling Green 64 
Third Place 
Portland SO. DarTmoulh 58 

PePSt-MARlST CLASSIC 

OMBiMoasWp 
Marts! 81. Vermont 68 

Third Plea 

Columbia 63. Buckncll 58 

PRESEASON NIT 
CbamPtoasiilD 

Ohio U. 84 New Mexico SI. 89. OT 
Third Place 

George Wa shi ng ton 69, Memphis 60 
SAN JUAN SHOOTOUT 
StnKMs 

Illinois 65. ColL at Charleston 57 
Vtrplnta Tech 87. Nebraska 81 
Coatototfan Bracket 

American U^P.R.9S.AkL-BlrminaHatn 90 . 07 
Montana St. 84 NE Louisiana 68 
SHOOTOUT SPOKANE 
Cbanzplonsbto 
Ganzaga 64 Maine 57 

TWrd Place 
Georgia SI. 77. Yale 72 

UNITED AIRLINES TIPOFF 
Fin* Ream! 

Setan Hall 69. S. Illinois 56 
Hawaii 82. Si. Bonaventare 72 


eteto; 9. Auburn (9-1-1) did not play; season 
esmptotg; la Cotorode State (in) tBd net 
Way. Next: vs. N& 20 Mhftlgan. Holiday BawL 
Friday, Dec 34 

IL Kansas State (9-2) beat U NLV424 Next: 
vs.TBUA)ofao BOWL Dec 25; IX Oregon (W> 
did net play. Next: vc No. 2 Penn Stale. Rose 
Bond. Jan. 2.- U Vbvtoto (Ml lest to North 
Carolina State 30-27, Friday. Next: TBD; U. 
oUo Slate 19-3 7 did not may. Next: vs. TBD. 
Citrus BawL Jen.?; 15, Utah (9-2) dkt not play. 
Next: vs. TBD; Freedom Bawl Dec. 27. 

14 Arizona (8-3) beat Artzona state 28-27. 
Nad-. TBD; 17, Soetbera Cal (7G-1? HedNofre 
Dome 17-17. Next: TBD; mV 8E B8TKM8 
37 dM not ofay. Next: TBD; 19. MJksistoPl 
5 tale (6-3) beat M ts s h nlp w 2i-i7.N*xt: tbd; 
zaAUcMgoa (7-4)<fWnafptoy. Next: vs. No. 10 
Colorado State, Holiday BawL Dec 34 

21. Nbrn Cbraltaa (ftdj tftf net play. Next: 
TBD; 22. Syracuse (7-4) Iasi ta West Virginia 
134. Thursday. Next: TBD; 24 Brigham 
Yoaog (9J) dM not ptav. Next: vs. Oklahoma, 
Copper BawL Oec29: 24 wbsotogtaa state (7^ 
4) d)d not Ptav. Next: TBD.-25. Boston CoBege 
(64-1) tost ta Nc 5 Miami 23-7. Next: TBD. 




FtHSTTSSTS 

New Ztataid n. Soon Abies. 3d Oar 
Sender, to Joha nn e sbur g 
New Zealand 1st timings; 4TI (all oat) 
South Africa 1st Innings: 779 (on oat) 
New Zealand 2d innings: 8V5 


Australia 1st Innings: 426 (ot) eat} 
England IS Innings-. 167 (on oat) 
Australia V timi n gs: 7967 


Japanese Horse Wins Tokyo Race 

SSS? f^T^ ^in^apa, Cup. tha grid's riches, 

SSas ^ KassSSS 

worth SL74 mfllionfrom a pane ot ^OSmillioo, 
raised MarSous Crown’s career eanungs to 54.16 miUfon. 

Chinese Women Sweep lifting Golds 

ISTANBUL (AP) —The Wodd WdghOifting Championships 
ended Sunday with the Chinese women having won all 18 gold 

medals in the six weight categories in which they w«teentered. 

They also now hold 27 of the 28 world records, having set U at 
the championships. The latest mark fell Saturday when L> Dan 
hoistedl07.5 kilos (237 pounds) in the 8J-kilo ckssfor the sna u± 
event She broke the mait of China’s U Yajuan by 2 kilos en route 
to winning three gold medals for her team. 

More Drag Tests Reportedly Fafled 

TOKYO (AP) — Chinese athletes other than swimmer Yanh 
Aihua have tested positive for using banned substances at .last 
month’s Asian Games, Kyodo News Service reported Sunday. 

*Jt said games officials did not name the athletes or identify their 
sports, or even give the number who tested positive The offices of 
the games’ organizing committee, the Japan Olympic Committee, 
the Japanese swimming federation and the testing laboratory were 
dosed and officials could not be reached for comment. 


For the Record 


INTERNATIONAL TEST 
South Airies 20, Wotos 12 




Other Major College Scores 


EAST 

Apoalocblan St. 17. New H o npaki 10 
SOUTH 

Bettumt-Cobkmon 27. Ftartoa A&M 74 
E. Kentucky 34 Boston U. 23 
James Motfison 45. Trey St. 26 
Louisville 34 Tulsa 27 
Moratnl) 49. Middle Term. 14 
McNcese SL 38. Idaho 21 
Southern U. 34 Grambilng SI. 7 
Tennessee 64 Vanderbn! 8 
SOUTHWEST 
LSU 34 Arkansas 12 
Rice 31. Houston 13 

FAR WEST 
Boise Sl. 24 north Texas 2D 
Fresno 5f. ev, San Diego SL <3 
Montana 23. N. lavra 70 
Missouri 32, HonaU 32 


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Top 25 College Results 


with indoor pool. 


Haw (be tag 25 toaras in The Associated 
Press: college taotbafl pell teed tab week: 

1. Nebraska (12-01 Deaf Okfahoma TJ-J Fri- 
day. Next: vs. TBD. Orange Bowl, Jon. 1; 2, 
Pm State (11-0) beat Michigan State 5931. 
Next: vs. No. 12 Oragixi. Rase Bowl, Jaa 2:1 
Alabama 01-0) did not May. Next: vs. No. 4 
Florida. SEC Championship game, at Alta nto, 
Dec 3; 4 Florida (9-Vl) Ned No. 7 Florido 
State, 31-31. Next: vs. Alabama SEC Champh 
anshto game, Dec 3; 5, Miami (10-1) beat No. 
25 Boston College 23-7. Next; TBD. 

4 Cotoradc (W-i) did not play. Next: vs. 
TBD, Fiesta BawL Jon.2; 7. Florida state (9-1- 
1) fled Na 4 Florida 31-31. Next: TBD; 4 
Texas ABM (104-1) did not play; season com- 


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ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Brescto I. Bari 2 
Florenttno 2. Sampdoria 2 
Foaota L MopoU 1 
Genoa 4 Cremonese l 
Lazio 4 AS Roaxi 3 
Padova 1. Javentas 2 
Reggteta 4 Castor! 0 

SttedUm: P m m u 23 petada Joventus 23. 
FtarentiooZL Unto 21. Rama 24 Bari T9,Fog- 
9k> T7. Cag&ari 1L Sanetexta 14 Inter IX 
Milan 11 Cremonee 12. Torino 11, Genoa n. 
Naootl 11. Padova 8. Brescia X Reggloao X 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aston VMo L SteffieK Wednesday 1 
Arsenal 4 Manchester united 0 
Btadcbwra 4 Oueens Parte Raagera 0 
Oteliea 4 Everton 1 
Crystal P uiua 4 Sooftampton 0 
Leeds L N o t ti iighcm Forest 0 
Liverpool 1. Tottenham 1 
Manchester Cty Z Wimbledon o 
Newcastle 1, rpswfcb 1 
Norwich X Leicester 1 
West Horn 4 Coventry 1 

Steadings; Blackburn 36 points. Moacftes- 
ter UgfMZL Newcastle 34 Uverpao: 34 Not- 
tingham Forest 28. Lpeds27. Manchester City 
3. Chelsea 24 Norwich 24 Coventry 21 South- 
ampton 7L Arsenal 24 Crystal Palace 20. Tot- 
tenham 19. Sheffield Wednesday 18L Wimble- 
don 18. West Ham 17. Queen* Park Rangers 
14 Aston VHIa 14 Everton 14 Le'cester 12. 

lentiti 11. 

GERMAN BUMDE5UGA 
VfL Bochum Z Beyer uetfnpen 1 
Werder Bremen X Semite I 
Dynamo Dresden I. Kansmher SC 1 
Bovem Munich Z Beyer Leverkusen 1 
Hamourg SV 4 FC Nalsarslcatem 0 
Borassta Moeacbeng X Borusslo Dortmund 3 
5C FrsOxm Z VfB Stuttgart 0 
FC Cologne Z WO Munich 1 
Duisburg I, EMraOit Frankfurt 0 

Standtogs: Borusslo Dortmund 2< points. 
We rd er Bremen 23. Borussta Moenchcag T9. 
Fretaurg 19. Bayern Mon teh 19, Kaberakxt- 
tern 19. ItenburgSV 18, Bayer Leverkusen 17. 
Karisnmer SC 17.V1B Stuttgart 1L Ehdroetit 
Frankfurt 14 Srtmtke IX Cologne IX Bayer 
Uenflnaen 14 Dynteno Dresden 9. Bortuim 4 
18« Munich 7. Duisburg S 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Parts- St. Germain 4 Bordeaux 0 
Lyon X Mortigiras 0 
Metz X Strasbourg 7 
Caen 4 Lens D 
Auxerre 4 Sochaux 0 
Nice X Sl Eflenne 0 
Rennes Z Montpellier 2 
Basfta Z Monaco 2 
Lille l. Le Havre 1 
Canoes 4 Nantes 1 

Standings: Nantes 41 points. Ports-St. Ger- 
moftt 3i Lyon 31 Cannes 31. Auxerre 34 Stras- 
bourg 34 Bordeaux 34 Lens 29. Marttgues 27, 
Rennes 24 ST. Ettenne 2X Monaco 2X Mete 2X 
Bastla 21. Le Havre 24 Ulle20. Coen 14 Nice 
14 Sochaux 14 Montpellier 15. 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Seorta Ro tterdam 0 WBlem li Tilburg 2 
Rod a JC Kerkrode 1. FC Utrecht 0 


Gabri el Batistuta, the Argentine striker, scored for the 1 1th 
consecutive game in Fiorentina’s 2-2 draw with visiting Samp- 
doria, breaking the Italian first division record set by Bologna’s 
Ezio Pascatti in the 1962-63 season. (AP) 

Jan ApeS and Jonas Bjorfcman of Sweden fought off match 
points in the fourth and fifth sets to beat Australians Todd 
Woodbridge and Marie Woodforde, 6-4, 4-6, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (8- 
6), for the ATP Tour World Doubles title in Jakarta. (AP) 
barmy Harris, the US. hurdler who was banned after testing 
positive for cocaine in February 1992, was reinstated by thelAAF 
in the first use of its “exceptional circumstances” rule. (AP) 
Rugby union was officially accepted back into the Olympic 
movement at in a ceremony before the Wales-South Africa test 
match in Cardiff, but the sport isn’t expected to become a part of 
the Games until 2004 at the earliest. (AP) 

Spain irifi host the men’s 1997 European Championship in 
basketball and France the 1999 tournament, FI BA said. Earlier, it 
created an additional qualifying tournament for the 1995 tourna- 
ment in Greece to allow for Yugoslavia's return to international 
competition following the partial lifting of U.N. sanctions. (AP) 


Ajax Amsterdam X Maastricht 1 
Vitesse Arnhem 4 FC Votondam 0 
RKC Wootoilk 1. FC TwenTe Enschede 0 
PSV Eindhoven 4 Fpy enoont R o tterda m 1 
GA Eagles Deventer 4 H e cren veon 4 
Dordreaa -90 Z Gmntagen > 

MAC Breda 4 NEC Wlmegen 0 
Standbm.* Rada JC Kent rode 23 potato. 
Ala* A mste rdam 22. Tweate Enschede 24 
PSV Eindhoven 19. Feyenoonf Rotterdam 17, 
Willem II Tilburg 14 Vitasse Arnhem 14 
Hwen v c en 14 MAC Breda 12. MW Maas- 
iricm to. Utrecht 11. 5 oarta Rotterdam 11. 
Votondam 11. NEC Nllmegen TC. Groningen 
14 RKC Waalwiik 7. GA Eagles Deventer 7. 

Dordrecht W 6 . 

SPANISH FIR5T DIVISION 
Real Bells 4 Real Sodedad 0 
Borc e tano 4 SevUla I 
Depart! vo Coruna 4 Real valtadoUd a 
Cetta 4 Real Oviedo 0 
Real Madrid 4 Tenerife 2 
Lngrtaes X Votendo 2 
Albocrte Z AttoHeo Madrid 2 
Snorting (Ulan ). Compostela 1 
Rodnn Sa nta nder 4 Espanol 0 
Affdeffc Bilbao L Reel Zaragoza 0 
Standtogs: Real Madrid 18 potato. Denar- 


thra LO Coruna 14 Zaragoza 17, Barcelona 14 
Athletic de Bilbao 14 Beds 14 Espanol 14 
Sevilla IX Celta IX Valencia 12. Co mp oste l a 
lXSporiine de Gltan ) 7, Tenerife 10, Oviedo X), 
Racing de Santander 9, AHettaede Madrid 4 
teal Sodedad 4 Alfcaceta& ValladclU 7,lo- 
erenes 4 


r?*s 

World Cup Skfing ^ 


Resdto of tae Women 1 * Worfd Con Gtant 
sialwa held Satardav tareogh 46 gate* on 
CB-toReata PartCRv Uteftyrnii oaroe, coun- 
try and tow-rev time: 

1. Heidi Zritor-Baehtar. Swlberiand,2 min- 
utas.SJBaeannds; X Sabina P unz ted ni . Italy. » 
2:2244; X Vreni Schneider, Swltzertand. 
2AJn ; 4 Birgit HeetaUedilensiem. 2:2X17; 
4 Marianne Kloeratad, Norway. 2:2X20; 6. 
Martina Em, Germany, 23331; 7,Gra Kvin- 
k» Norway, 2:2338; 4 Korin Rotrn Switzer- 
land. 2:2X30; 9, Alexandra Molssnllzer, Aus- 
tria 2:2335; 14 Urska HravaL Slovenia. 
2:2339. 


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DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1994 


Page 19 


® N D A Y 



On 28-Point Last Period, 
Slate Ties Florida, 31-31 


The /isjocUatd Prea 

Bobby Bowden is one of the biggest 
gambles in college football, but he 
played rt safe after Florida State staged 
one of the greatest comebacks in NCAA 
history. 

The seventh-ranked Seminoles scored 
28 straight points in the fourth quarter 
Saturday to tie No. 4 Florida, 31-31, in 
Tallahassee. Florida Stale might have 
wop bad Bowden gone for the two-point 
conversion following Rock Preston's 
four-yard touchdown run with 1:45 left, 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 

but he sent in Dan Mowrey for the extra 
point that tied the score. 

. was just too good a comeback to 
risk losing , ” said Bowden, known for his 
willingness to take risks with trick plays 
and other unorthodox moves. 

Bowden said he thought Florida State 
had enough tune to get the ball back and 
t drive for the winning score. The Semi- 
noles did regain possession with 22 sec- 
onds remaining at their 29-yard line, but 
the clock ran out when quarterback 
Danny Kanell couldn’t get out of 
bounds after an eight-yard scramble to 
the Florida 43. 

Kanell led the Florida State come- 
back, throwing for 232 yards in the 
fourth quarter and completing 16 of his 
last 17 passes. It was the kind of perfor- 
mance the Seminoles got last year from 
Charlie Ward, the Heisman Trophy win- 
ner. 

If Florida State had made a two-point 
conversion and won, it would have been 
the greatest fourth-quarter comeback 
victory in Division I-A history. Wash- 
ington State overcame a 21-point deficit' 
in the final period to beat Stanford 49- 
42 in 1984. 

The biggest deficits overcome in a 
game were 31 points by Ohio State 
against Minnesota in 1989 and Maryland 
against Miami in 1984. Both teams trailed 
31-0 before rallying to win. 

Although the tie ended slim national 
title hopes for Florida State and Florida, 
it won’t have a big impact on their bowl 
situations. 

As the Atlantic Coast Conference 
champion, Florida Stale (9-1-1) is guar- 
anteed a berth in one erf the major bowl 
coalition game* — the Sugar, Fiesta, 
Cotton or Orange. 

Florida (9-1-1) will go to the Sugar 
v^towl if it beats No. 3 Alabama in next 
Week's Southeastern Conference title 
mine. The loser will play in the Citrus 
Bowl - 


No. 2 Penn St, 59, Michigan St- 31: At 
Stale College, Pennsylvania, Ki-Jana 
Carter made a final push for the Heis- 
man Trophy with five touchdowns and 
Penn State (11-0) overcame another 
poor defensive performance en route to 
the Rose Bowl to face Oregon. 

The loss was the last game for Michi- 
gan State’s coach. George Perles, who 
was forced to resign after 12 seasons 
with the Spartans. 

Carter gained 227 yards on 27 carries. 
It was his ninth 10(£-yard game of the 
season, breaking a Perm State record 
held by Lydell Mitchell, John Cappel- 


letti and 


■ Thomas. 






% 


a 


No. 5 Miami 23, No. 25 Boston Col- 
iege 7; At Miami, the Hurricanes forced 
four second- half turnovers and aif but 
clinched a berth in the Orange Bowl on 
Jan. 1 against, top-ranked Nebraska. 

The Hurricanes (10-1, 7-0) struggled 
offensively against the No. 25 Eagles 
and trailed 7-3 at halftime. Second-half 
turnovers led to both touchdowns by 
Miami, which ranks first nationally in 
total defease and scoring defense. 

Boston College’s Mark Hartsell threw 
three interceptions in the second half 
and lost a fumble that Corwin F rands 
recovered at Miami's 33. 

No. 11 Kansas St 42, UNLV 3: At Las 
Vegas, JJ. Smith rushed for 227 yards 
and two touchdowns and quarterback 
Chad May ran for two scores. May was 
8-of-13 for 126 yards and a touchdown 
despite winds gusting to 40 mph (65 

Kansas State (9-2) is heading to the 
Aloha Bowl, while UNLV (6-5) will play 
Central Michiga n in the Las Vegas 
BowL 

No. 17 Southern Cal 17, Notre Dame 
17: At Los Angeles, Southern Cal scored 
a late touchdown after blocking a field 
goal to salvage the tie. 

Both the Trojans (7-3-1) and the Irish 
(6-4-1) are probably bowl-bound, but 
None Dame fell one victory shon of 
guaranteeing itself a spot in a coalition 

Midway through the final quarter. Is- 
rael Ifeanyi blocked a 37-yard field goal 
Notre Dame’s Stefan Schnrffner, and 



Miami Bombs Jets, 28-24 
To Widen AFC East Lead 


A Ion Bynls I he AuAiurd Frew 

Coach Steve Spurrier, watching the Gators’ four-touchdown lead v anis h 


& 


SC’s Sammy Knight picked up the ball 
and returned it 56 yards to the Notre 
Dame 16. Four plays later. Shawn Wal- 
ters scored on a one-yard run. 

No. 19 Mississippi St. 21, Mississippi 
17: At Oxford, Mississippi. Kevin Borne 
and Michael Davis each ran for over 1 30 


yards as the Bulldogs beat the Rebels for 
the second straight year. 

Mississippi State’ (8-3, 5-3 SEC) is 
probably headed for the Peach or Gator 
bowls. Ole Miss (4-7. 2-6), placed on 
NCAA probation a week ago. lost six of 
its last eight games. 

• Elsewhere. Rice beat Houston. 31- 
13, to gain a five-way share of the South- 
western Conference’ championship. 

■ In a Friday night game: 

No. 1 Nebraska 13. Oklahoma 3: 
Brook Beninger scored the game's only 


touchdown an a quarterback sneak and 
Nebraska's defense made it stand up as 
the Cornhuskers ( 1 2-0) had trouble with 
Oklahoma's defense, managing only 302 
yards. 

Bui the Sooners (6-5) got only 47 
yards in the second half and didn’t get a 
first down in the fourth quarter. 

Nebraska’s fourth straight Big Eight 
title earned it another trip to the Orange 
Bowl, where Nebraska was beaten by 
Florida State last year in a national-title 
showdown. 


The Associated Press 

Just when the New York Jets 
had first place within their 
grasp, Dan Marino and Mark 
Ingram snatched it away in 
spectacular fashion. 

The Miami Dolphins solidi- 
fied their hold on the top spot in 
the American Football Confer- 
ence East on Sunday as Marino 
hit Ingram for four touch- 
downs, the winning one with 22 
seconds to go. Marrno complet- 
ed 24 of 30 passes in the second 
half, fueling a splendid come- 
back for a 28-24 victory in East 
Rutherford, New Jersey. 

The Dolphins (8-4) hold a 
two-game lead in the division 
thanks to their offensive heroics 
after they fell behind, 17-0 and 
24-6. 

New York (6-6) has not been 
in first place this late in the 
season since 1 986. The only Na- 
tional Football League team 
without a division title since the 
merger, the Jets appeared ready 
to make the move as they domi- 
nated the first 40 minutes. 
Boomer Esiason found Johnny 
Mitchell for two TDs, while 
Rob Moore and Art Monk both 
had more than 100 receiving 
yards. 

But even with the Jets in con- 
trol, Marino showed who’s 
boss. He hit 5 of 6 passes on a 
67-yard drive, connecting with 
Ingram for a 17-yard TD over 
rookie Aaron Glenn. 

Troy Vincent’s interception 
at the Miami 37 gave Marino 
another chance early in the 
fourth quarter. He needed only 
five plays — all completions — 
to go 63 yards, with Ingram 
taking a 28-yard pass for the 
score. Suddenly, it was 24-21. 

Marino, who enjoyed perfect 
protection all day, got the ball 
again with 2:34 remaining. He 
completed 7 of 8 in taking the 
Dolphins 84 yards, vic timising 
coraerbacks Glenn and James 
Hasty on ne. . ly every play. 

Ingram's tour touchdowns 
tied a team record as Miami 
snapped a two-game slide. 

Esiason had a hot hand early, 
but the Jets got only Nick 
Lowery’s 24-yard field goal on 
two long drives. Esiason hit 6 of 
8 passes, including three long 


third-down conversions in a 15- 
play march. 

Browns 34, Oilers 10: Playing 
his first full game in six weeks, 
Vinny Testa verde committed 
two turnovers deep in Houston 
territory but also threw two 
touchdown passes as the 

NFL ROUNDUP 

Browns overcame the still-reel- 
ing Oilers in Geveland. 

Leroy Hoard ran for 103 
yards surd two touchdowns for 
Cleveland (9-3), which handed 
the Oilers (1-11) their eighth 
straight loss. 

Testaverde, whose playing 
time had been limited since he 
sustained concussions in con- 
secutive games against Cincin- 
nati and Denver last month, 
was alternately awful and bril- 
liant 

But he was on target when he 
had to be, throwing a one-yard 
touchdown pass to Frank Hart- 
ley, the first of Hartley’s career, 
early in the second quarter, and 
an 1 1-yarder to Brian Kinchen 
later in the period. The Browns' 
defense, which has given up the 
fewest points in the NFL, took 
it from there, blanking the Oil- 
ers over the last two quarters as 
intermittent rain grew steadier 
and heavier. 

Ftdcoas 28, Eagles 21: In At- 
lanta, Jeff George threw for 364 
yards and combined with Ter- 
ence Mathis on two touchdown 
passes to lift Atlanta over Phila- 
delphia despite a 91-yard 
touchdown run by Herschel 
Walker. 

Walker's run, the longest 
from scrimmage in the NFL 
since Bo Jackson went 92 yards 
for the Raiders five years ago, 
gave the Eagles a 14-13 lead 
2:45 into the second half. 

But neither three intercep- 
tions nor the run seemed to 
bother George, who promptly 
marched the Falcons 67 yards 
in six plays, capping it with a 7- 
yard TD pass to Mathis, who 
finished the day with 124 yards 
on 10 catches. 

The next time Atlanta got the 
ball, George, who was 26 of 46, 
took the Falcons 87 yards in 12 


plays capped by Craig Hey- 
ward's 5-yard TD run. Three 
completions on the drive were 
to Mathis, who has 90 for the 
season for 1,073 yards. 

Philadelphia got one score 
back with 4:22 lot on Walker’s 
2-yard run, set up by Eric Al- 
len's inLerceptiou, the third 
thrown by George. 

But rookie Anthony Phillips 
intercepted Randall Cunning- 
ham on the first play after Phil- 
adelphia got the ball back with 
2:25 left on their own 43. And 
the Eagles couldn't get a play 
off after C unningham complet- 
ed a 61 -yard pass to Victor Bai- 
ley at the Atlanta 19 with 11 
seconds left and no timeouts. 

Buccaneers 20, Vikings 17: In 
Minneapolis, Michael Husted 
kicked a 22-yard field goal after 
a fumbled punt early in over- 
time, giving Tampa Bay the vic- 
tory over the VBrings. It was 
Minnesota’s third straight loss 
and it's worst performance of 
the year. 

Minnesota (7-5), which need- 
ed a 40-yard touchdown catch 
by Qadry Ismail and a 2-point 
conversion just to force over- 
time, entered the game in a 
first-place tie with Chicago in 
the NFC Central 

Husied’s winning kick at 
12:52 of overtime snapped a 
six-game losing streak for Tam- 
pa (3-9) and prevented the Bucs 
from losing 10 or more games in 
their 12tb straight season. 

The Vikings were playing 
their third overtime game in six 
weeks. 

More than 16.000 fans stayed 
home rather than risk driving in 
Minnesota’s first snowstorm of 
the season, and many more had 
left after Hustetfs 22-yard field 
goal gave the Bucs a 17-9 lead 
with 5:24 to play. 

But the sparse crowd that re- 
mained roared for the first time 
all day as the Vikings forced 
Tampa to punt, giving Warren 
Moon one last chance from 
midfield with 26 seconds left 
But Moon threw three straight 
incompletions. 

Tampa led 14-9 at halftime 
and controlled the ball most of 
the second half. 



air 


Goes Down Firing Away 


Compiled by Qw Staff From Dupadia 

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio — 
Steve McNair has demonstrat- 
ed before a national U.S. televi- 
sion audience and in a playoff 
game that, despite injury, he is 
indeed a formidable football 
player. The Youngstown State 
team, however, proved infinite- 
ly mightier. 

The final score was Youngs- 
town Slate 63, Alcorn State — 
one is tempted to simply write 
McNair —20, in Friday’s first- 
round game of the Division I- 
AA playoffs. 

The Heisman Trophy con- 
tender, who had pulled a ham- 
string in the previous week's 
game, had not practiced with 
fas i«im all week. He was un- 
able to run, a major part of his 
arsenal, or to throw with accus- 
tomed velocity. . 

Despite this, he threw a Divi- 
sion 1-AA playoff record 52 
completions in 82 passes, and 
his 514 yards gained in passing 


were three yards short of anoth- 
er maA. All three of Alcona’s 
touchdowns came on McNair's 
passes. 

But he also was intercepted 
three times by - top-ranked 
Youngstown State. And with 
his mobility limited, he was an 
easy target for a defense that 
sacked mm six times and forced 
seven turnovers. 

“When we saw that he couldn’t 
scramble,” said Youngstown’s 
coach, Jim Tressd, "we came at 
him from all sides.” 

“In bis four wars as a start- 
ing quarterback,” said Carded 
Jones, the Alcorn coach, “Steve 
saw more people rushing at him 
today than he ever did before.” 

McNair broke the previous I- 
AA playoff passing mark of 78 
by Rhode Island’s Tom Ehr- 
hardt against Furman in 1985. 
His completions eclipsed the 44 
of Mississippi Valley State's 
Willie Totten against Louisiana 
Tech in 1984. fNYT. AP) 



Autissier Leads BOC Fleet Toward Sydney 


Guy TUfin/Agenee Franw Pnaa« 

Isabelle Autissier leaving Cape Town with a five-day lead. 


By Barbara Lloyd 

New York Tima Service 

When Isabelle Autissier returned home 
to France last month after her astonishing 
victoiy in the first stage of the BOC 
’round-the-world race, she was recognized 
on trains, planes and automobiles. 

But nowhere was her identity more hon- 
estly revealed than on the taxi ride back to 
Cape Town’s port, where BOC sailors were 
preparing for the next stage of the race. 

“Oh, you’re the lady that won that race,” 
the driver said to Autissier. “You know, 
the men here are not pleased at all that you 
won. Sorry about that,” 

In recounting the story in a telephone 
interview from Cape Town. Autissier was 
amused. “He was telling me that in a gentle 
voice,” she said. “It was a joke, but I think 
it was true in a way.” 

“I am really sorry,” she told him, “but I 
would like to do it again.” 

Autissier’s 35-day record from Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, to Cape Town put her 
five days ahead of the next 17 BOC com- 
petitors, all men. Steve Petlengill of the 
United States came in second, and Chris- 
tophe Auguin of France, the 1990-91 BOC 
defending champion, was third. 

The 27,000-mfle (43,500-kflometer) com- 


petition resumed Saturday from Cape Town. 
And, like many of the other lone dappers, 
Autissier was itching to get going. A fleet of 
J3 boats set out for Sydney, Australia, the 
second leg of the four-stage BOC Challenge. 

David Scully, who had rejuvenated the 
late Mike Plant's boat. Coyote, was at the 
start line but then headed back to shore, 
apparently with a mainsail problem. Four 
other boats, having arrived late in Cape 
Town, were to depart later. 

The 6,700-mile passage to Sydney is apt 
to be harrowing, given the icebergs and 
storm systems that strew their route 
through the southern part of the Indian 
Ocean. Rather than a tactical match in 
relatively calm water, as was the first leg, 
the second phase of their voyage is apt to 
be a drag race through rough seas. 

Although Autissier so far has sailed a 
smarter race than the others, her overall 
approach is likely to sustain her in the next 
stage, too. *Tm known as the giri that beat 
the men,” said the 38-year-old Autissier. 
“That’s the way people see me. But I think 
they also realize that I did that because I went 
the right way with the weather, and because I 
was prepared. 1 made a lot of effort for thaL” 

Her 60-foot sailboat, Ecureuil Poitou- 
Charentes 2, was well stocked for leaving 


on Saturday, her pantry including gifts 
such as dried ostrich meat, and dried toma- 
toes and bread from local residents. “It’s 
very nice when you are on board to have 
these things,” said Autissier. 

Pettcngill was raring to go as well The 
43-year-old sailor was so focused that 
within an hour of arriving in Cape Town 
last month, he was seen rummaging 
around his boat's work shed in search of 
extra parts for going to sea again. 

As with Autissier, Petlengill listened to 
his own advice in the first leg, and did well 
by it. By going west when others stayed 
east, he gained a speed advantage at the 
end that allowed him to bypass several 
other contenders. Petlengill is sailing 
Hunter’s Child, a 60-fooi sloop. 

In the race to Sydney, PettengjH said, be 
believes there’s less chance erf going astray. 
But as for catching up to Autissier, he can 
only hope. “It’s doable,” he said “But 1 
doubt 1 can do it in the next leg alone. TO be 
driving my boat faster, and m be hoping that 
my boat is faster downwind than Isabelle's.” 

Alan Nebauer, the Australian skipper 
who rescued a fellow competitor. Josh Hall, 
from a sinking boat in Leg I, began the race 
to Sydney with a time credit erf 5.5 hours. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Boats like 
Noah's 

s Dove, far one 
io Swiss mountain 


13 -Star Wars' 
princess 

14 Terre . (nd. 

is Bread with 
seeds 


16 Huey Long 
roman a clef 

19 Judith Krantz 
novel 

20 It's frozen in 
Frankfurt 

21 ’For 


QUALITY THAT LASTS 



CARAN-JACHE 


a Jolly 


22 Secretary, e.g. 
Abbr. 

23 Canyon effect 
25 Shoe bottom 
29 Made as good 

as new 
37 Marry 


Eugene O'Neill 
work 
42 Dye container 
«3 Most 

foul mouthed 
44 Q-tip. e.g 


Bulletin board 
sucker 
50 ’Syncratoc" prefix 


54 Mauna 

57 Letter before 
sigma 

58 Streisand film. • 
after The" 

si Tale of a 
Piggy’s pWflht 

63 Lumberjack’s 

tool 

64 Loved ones 

68 'Is sol* 1 rebuttal 

66 The Affair 

67 Gardner and 
others 

68 Perches 

DOWN 

1 Visigoth leader 

2 Hot dog topper 

3 Potter's oven 

4 Paige, informally 
S 1988 Tim Rice 

musical 


6 Squirrels' 
hangouts 

7 Single- named 
novelist 

a Lab burners 
9 Kathie Lee's 
co-host 
loHost 

11 Soap ingredient 

12 Stylus 

i7 With 39-Down, 
a comb all 
variety show 
ia Speedy jets 
19 Prominent part 
of “Peter Piper 
picked a 
peck 

24 Refinery 
shipment 

26 Possess 

27 'Malcolm X* 
director 

28 Magazine 
chiefs, for Short 

30 River to the 
NrrthSea 
ai Health club 

32 Aviv 

33 Scrap of food 

34 Louis XIV, e.g. 

35 Prior, to Prior 
38 LP spinners 

38 Boob tubes 

39 See 17-Down 

40 It's two after 
epsilon 

41 Giant giant 
45 Basketball's 

Larry 

4? Passionate 

48 Pieces of 
bedroom 
furniture 

49 Feats of Clay: 
Abbr. 

si Radio part 


r- 

2 

T“j 

H 

■ 

n 

e 

7 

r~ 

r - 

| 

w 

ii 

li 

I 13 





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1 

TS - 



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17 






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1 



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21 






1 




Players Throw NHL Negotiations Into Confusion 


30 131 m 1 33 IM 


137 


m 


51 (52 


67 


TssTse 


w 


w 


ice 


*8 1*9 


Puzzla by Jonittan 

© JV«r Yah. Tunes/ Edited by Will Shorn. 


52 Use logic 

53 In base 8 

54 Loamy soil 

55 incorrect 

56 Brother of 
Prometheus 

sa Clinton, 
slangily 

59 Honor: Ger. 

GO Four on a 
sundial 

61 Loose 

62 Petroleum 
company, 
informally 


Solution to Fade of Nov. 25 


By Len Hochberg 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Negoti- 
ations aimed at ending the 57- 
day-old National Hockey 
League lockout have taken a 
curious turn, with the players 
ending the latest collective bar- 
gaining session with manage- 
ment after a half-hour, saying 
they needed more lime. 

It was not clear if the NHL 
Players' Association needed 
more time to review a proposal 
or to present toe. Phone mes- 
sages left for Bob Goodenow, 
the union’s executive director, 
and Kelly Miller, an NHLPA 
vice president, were not re- 
turnee. 

But Steve McAllister, the 
union’s head of communica- 
tionSjquoted Goodenow as say- 
ing, “These are very significant 
issues people are trying to deal 


after taking two days off for 
Thanksgiving. They met from 4 
to 7:30 P.M^ then broke until 
Saturday morning. But after a 
half-hour, they were done. 

Management was prepared 
to spend the weekend negotiat- 
ing. But the response of Com- 
missioner Gary Betiman and 
his delegation to the union’s re- 
quest to end the meeting after 


39 minutes was more surprise 
than anger. 

“As long as the process is 
ongoing, there is hope.” Bett- 
man said. “If the process breaks 
down, that speaks for itself, but 
the process hasn't broken 
down.” 

The meeting was the sixth in 
10 days, easily the busiest nego- 


tiating stretch since the lockout 
began Oct. 1. 

It was learned that despite 
the recent frequency of meet- 
ings, none of the key issues — a 
rookie salary cap, salary arbi- 
tration, free agency and the all- 
important tax on team payrolls 
— had been agreed to in its 
entirety. The payroll tax had 
not even been discussed. 


isebaU Owners likely to Impose 'Cap 9 



with.” McAllister said that 
upon leaving the joint meeting 
Saturday, Goodenow and his 
fellow NHLPA negotiators im- 
mediately caucused. 

A rookie salary cap has been 
agreed to in principle, McAllis- 
ter said, adding that Goodenow 
was working on the “parame- 
ters” of the issue — U l, dollars. 
He said the league will be doing 
likewise before the next session. 
No new talks are scheduled. 

Management and the union 
reconvened Friday in Boston 


By Murray Chass 

New York Timet Service 

NEW YORK — Major- 
league baseball club owners are 
prepared to take one of three 
steps when they meet in Chica- 
go on Dec. 5, the players have 
been told in a memo they re- 
ceived from the union, but 
management’s most likely ac- 
tion mil be a vote on implemen- 
tation of a salary cap. 

In the memo dated Nov. 22 
— a copy of which was ob- 
tained by The New York limes 
— Donald Fehr, the head of the 
union, told the players that 
John Harrington, the owners’ 
labor spokesman, stated the 
dubs’ intentions at the last bar- 
gaining session last Saturday. 

Fehr wrote that Harrington 
“told us that unless there was a 
settlement or a counterproposal 
from the players that the own- 
ers’ committee would recom- 
mend that the owners accept, a 


vote would probably be taken 
at the owners’ meeting on 5 De- 
cember to implement the salary 
cap. 

Given that neither of the first 
two possibilities will become re- 
ality, the owners trill be left 
with the decision to install a 
new economic system. 

To implement the cap unilat- 
erally, the owners would have to 
declare an impasse in negotia- 
tions. They apparently are pre- 
pared to take that step in spite 
of the presence of Bill Usery Jr., 
a mediator asked by the White 
House to work with the two 
sides, and the possibility that 
the union wiQ formulate a coun- 
terproposal at its executive 
board meeting in Atlanta that 
same week. 

Declaring an impasse on the 
eve of receiving a new proposal 
would seem to be a contradic- 
tory act, but a labor lawyer said 
the owners can do whatever 


they want unless their action is 
blocked by a court injunction. 
The union could ask the Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board to 
seek an injunction, but such in- 
junctions are not easily ob- 
tained. 

The two sides are scheduled 
to return to the Washington 
area on Monday, meeting sepa- 
rately with Usery that day, then 
resume negotiations Tuesday. 
The bargaining, however, could 
be brief because the players are 
expected to reject the tax pro- 
posal and the revised salary cap 
proposal that the owners made 
last week, and they will not 
have the counterproposal the 
owners hope to see. 

“It is apparent,” Fehr wrote 
in his memo, “that the revised 
salary cap proposal we received 
is the proposal that we expected 
the owners to make before they 
unilaterally implemented the 
salary cap." 


ee 3 


voted 
i mar- 
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party 

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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1904 


LANGUAGE 


Of Comparisons and Passed Mistakes 


By William Safire 

TYMSHINGTON — To lesi readers and to pull 
▼ Y mail, I occasionally stud my political dia- 
tribes with mistakes in English. These studied 
solecisms not only maltf me seem human, but »>ly> 
provide the basis for the annual review in 
nonpartisan space of the “Uofallpeople" file. 

Et tu, Safire?" writes Klaus Peris of New 
Tone, adding: “Then, English, die!" What 
moved my corrector to this Caesarean mock- 
“ < ?7 or was rhetorical question I posed in 
telling the secretary of state how to deal with 
North Korea: “Which works best, the promise of 
reward or the fear of punishment?" 

Instantiy spotting ihe misuse of the superlative 
m place of the comparative. Peris notes: “I 
thought that in a comparison of two, the word is 
better better” He is correct, of course, though his 
parody of the conclusion to Shakespearean Cae- 
sar's remark to the stabbing Brutus (“Then fall, 
Caesar!”) calls for the parallel “Then die, 
English!” 

When I directed the Keystone Kops investigat- 
ing the death of the White House lawyer Vincent 
Foster to “search for a Foster safety deposit box," 
John Gebhardt of New York gotchaed: “The term 
is safe deposit box. There’s no safety involved; it’s 
just a means of keeping deposits safe.” 

Not afl my “errors" are grammatical. A highly 
paid lecturer once turned down a request for a 
freebie with “I could not love thee. Dear, so 
much/ Loved 1 not honoraria more.” This grasp- 
ing thought comes to mind in reviewing my words: 
“At the Syracuse University commencement exer- 
cises, Robert B. Menschd, of Goldman, Sachs 
accepted his honorary Ph. D.” To which William 
A Moffett, director of the Huntington Library, in 
San Marino, California, responded: “An honorary 
Ph- D.? An honorary doctorate of laws, perhaps. 
Or doctorate in h uman e letters, or some such 
honorific — but Ph. D.s get their degrees, as the 
man says, ‘the old-fashioned way: they earn it!' ” 

In tut-tutting about the passing of “The Year 
of the Woman” in politics, 1 wrote: "One sign of 
women voters’ political maturity is that the mo- 
ment of high-heeled shoo-ins has past.” Most 
readers were so enamored of the play on high- 
heeled shoe and shoo-in (taken from the fixed 
horse race in which the winner has been “shooed 
in” by corrupt jockeys) that they missed the 
“mistake.” 

Not so Norman Lindsey, of Yardley, Pennsyl- 
vania: “Shouldn't past be passed T A writer using 
the pseudonym of Ann/ Ed Mirer of Highland 
Park, New Jersey, composed a poem: 

Once past is passed, only hereafter remains 
Notwithstanding, nonvithsitting. 

The moment is past, or the moment has passed? 
Not to equivocate, but gently elucidate. 


Elucidating this “mistake" requires a lucid ex- 
planation of the homophones past and passed. 
The shorter posr may be a noun (“in the past”), a 
preposition (“drove past the house”) or a modifier 
(“a past Hfe"). When forming a verb, however, you 
need passed, the past participle of pass. The mo- 
ment of high-heeled shoo-ins has passed, and any 
attempt to use “has past" should be passed up. 

Sometimes a seeming error is a fishhook — a 
reaching-out for the accurate rendition of an 
anecdote that the author cannot otherwise find. 
To illustrate how the election of 1994 was not 
directed at all incumbents, I wrote: “On a sum- 
mer's night many decades ago, at the triumphal 
Carnegie Hall debut of . the violin prodigy Yehudi 
Menuhin, the violinist Mischa Elman said to the 

¥ ianist Artur Rubinstein: 'Hot in here, isn’t iiT 
o which Rubinstein replied, TMot for pianists.’ ” 
“Your anecdote is inaccurately populated,” 
writes Erik Tail off, of Washington and Holly- 
wood. “Although Mischa Elman was indeed pre- 
sent that hot summer night, his pianisl-interiocu- 
tor was not Artur Rubinstein, but rather Leopold 
(Papa) Godowsky — a legendary wit, and the hero 
of innumerable muggans* stories — while the 
violinist making his American debut was Jascha 
Heifetz, a virtuoso whose uncanny technique was 
guaranteed to unnerve any fellow-fiddler.” 

Some will say that these “errors” are not little 
devices of pedagogy, but axe actual mistakes in 
English by me, of all people. That’s the son of 
pervasive, corrosive cynicism that President 
Clinton has roundly condemned. 


What Americans caD rubber chicken, the British 
call function fish; both refer to the food required to 
be consumed at large gatherings. The use of the 
noun function to mean “event,” long a Standard 
English sense of the word, has been on the increase 
in the United States. From Bernard E Ritringer, 
of Seattle, a part-time bus driver, we have a 
spotting of a campusasm that is catching on. 

“On assignment recently to the Kappa Kappa 
G amma sorority at the University of Washing- 
ton,” he writes, “I learned a new word.” He was 
waiting in his bus near the sorority house to take 
his passengers to a dance, and saw many of them 
visiting a fraternity house across die street. After 
two bouts, he asked about the delay and was told 
the young people were pre-functioning 
“They were socializing before the dance, or 
function,” be explains. “Eventually 1 took a 
busload of young people to the function. When it 
was over, I returned them to the sorority house. 

“Presumably,” the Lexicographic Irregular 
driving the bus concludes, “those stOl able to 
function then went post-functioning.” 

iVcw York Times Semce 


Getting Under Your Skin, for Beauty’s Sake 


By Alexander Lobrano 

P ARIS — Anne Semonin believes 
that beauty really is skin-deep. 
“My approach is simple. Everyone has 
a different skin type depending on 
their age, health and lifestyle, so l 
customize my products after an initial 
diagnosis, " says this vivacious Pari- 
sian cosmetician, who was a favorite 
of Princess Grace of Monaco for 
many years and who has a growing 
reputation among French, Swiss and, 
recently, American women for her 
beauty treatments and products. 
The extent to which Semonin’s holis- 


Tastemak&rs 


Em 


An occusiorutl series . f 
about people for whom 
style is a way of life 

tic. New Age approach to beauty 
makes sense to a tot of women is re- 
flected by the fact that beyond her own 
shops, her products are carried by bell- 
wether retailers like Barneys Madison 
Avenue in New Yodc and Beverly 
Hills. Barneys Madison Avenue,, ike 
elegant new branch of this trend-set- 
ting New York retailer, chose Anne 
Semonin as the brand for its new top- 
floor beauty spa to open in March 
1995. In Euivpe, Semonin plans to 
open her fourth beauty farm — after 
Paris, Geneva and the French winter 
resort of Meg&ve — in the Italian ski 
station of Courmayeur in March. 

Beyond the beauty-world facade of 
sensual superlatives and impossibly 
feet models, Semonin' s goal has 
to create products that work. 

“So many large manufacturers have 
invoked the old idea of inscrutable sci- 
ence as pr ogre ss that many women no 
longer know what’s actually in the 
products they put on their faces and 
assume that they wouldn’t unde rstand 
any real explanation anyway.” Se- 
monin says. “Women today have been 
led to expect almost instant results 
from a small expensive pot of face 
cream, when in fact a real improvement 
in anyone’s skin occurs gradually from 
a regular r e g im e of gentle denning and 

nfflimhing the sko.” 

Among Parisian women who follow 
this route axe Semonin customers like 
the actress IsabeBe Adjani and the 
designer Paloma Picasso. 


All of Semonin’s growing range of 
products are natural and developed 
from her research in collaboration 
with small French and Swiss laborato- 
ries. Working with alcohol and fra- 
grance-free plant-based products. Se- 
monin prescribes a specific weekly 
regimen corresponding to an individ- 
ual's specific skin problems, adding a 
precise dosage of trace-element min- 
erals and essential oils to several of her 
products. 

“Trace elements exist as tiny mole- 
cules that are easily absorbed by the 
skin and the lymphatic system of the 
face, and they work to feed and regen- 
erate the skin,” Semonin said. 

She says that many of the cosmetic 
treatments used by 'rural women in 
poorer countries are in fact more ef- 
fective than those produced by the 
huge glamour laboratories. 

“The further away from nature you 
move, the less likely it is that you’ll 
find honestly performing products,” 
Semonin says. 

Semonin. 'a doctor’s daughter, ar- 
rived at her approach to beauty care 
by working with a dermatologist in 
her native Besanqon for 10 years and 
then through almost 10 years of expe- 
rience with a private clientele and in 
her beauty farms is Paris, Meg6ve and 
Geneva. 

“When I realized that marketing 
had corrupted the real idea of beauty 
products, I derided that I would cre- 
ate my own.” she says. 

“Many beauty products today work 
only superficially,” die added. “Most 
face creams, for example, don’t, actu- 
ally improve the skin but merely pro- 
vide a temporary comfort. So many 
beauty products are more psychologi- 
cally appealing than they are effec- 
tive.” 

As an example, Semonin says that 
she’s against one of the Holy Grafl 
products of the beauty industry — 
night creams. “You nave to be careful 
with creams," die says. “Over the long 
run. they (ire the skin by interfering 
with its natural add-base cycles. 

Tm alsn agains t special creams for 
the eye areas or the neck. The face must 
be treated as a whole, notin segments.” 

The basic Semooin routine is to 
“wake” the skin every morning with a 
misted spray erf eau vrrante, or ionized 
water, followed by an application of 





Cjlh-nm: i IU< 


Anne Semonin takes a holistic, New Age approach to beauty. 


plant-based lotion, which brings the 
skin into equilibrium. Then a light base 
of plant-based emulsion, made from 
seaweed and sage extract, is applied 
before makeup; for very dry skin, a 
liquid version of this product is avail- 
able. In the evening, makeup is re- 
moved with plant-based lotion; the 
skin is neutralized with a marine lotion, 
made from seawater and trace ele- 
ments, and toned again with plant 
mfllr Finally, instead of a night cream, 
a few drops of phytarosa ofl are 
smoothed onto the skin. 

Phytarosa oil is a product that Se- 
monin is especially enthusiastic about. 
Working with plastic surgeons, re- 
searchers at the University of Concep- 
tion in Chile found in 1980 that musk- 
rose oil was an excellent tissue 
regenerator, fiwiwnin u y$ the ofl as a 
base, to which she adds the essential 
rals of other plants, such as thyme, 

sag p arid ggr anhim 
1 her regular regime, Semonin 
offess a variety of specific treatments at 


her beauty farms, the most popular of 
which is what she calls a “freezing'' or 
a deep chemical exfoliation. This pro- 
cess, which she recommends particular- 
ly to people from 30 to 40, takes 10 
days, the first five of which involve 
twice-daily applications of a solution 
that produces a crust on the skin, 
which is then removed and the new 
cHn underneath intensively treated 
with various plant products and trace- 
dement oils. Semonin says that the 
lasting benefits of this process, beyond 
improved skin tone and texture, are 
that it slows the appearance of wrinkles 
and renews the skin’s capacity to ab- 
sorb moisture. 

Eyeing the future, Semonin doesn't 
see herself as part of the “international 
beauty supermarket,” because in the 
end she believes that “small is beauti- 
ful” 


Alexander Lobrano is a Paris-based 
journalist who writes cm travel and style 
topics. 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


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Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weaiher. Asia 



North America 

Showers wt* dampen south- 
eastern U SA. mostly Flori- 
da. Most of the Eastern 
Seaboard will bo brisk and 
dry. Ontario end the Great 
lakes states wfl be cold with 
only spotty snows. Dry. cold 
weather wfll reach across the 
Plains: some rain will fall 
!rom Portland 10 Vancouver. 


Europe 

Western Europe wfH have 
dry weather. Tuesday wHl 
have a seasonable dull: by 
midweek moderate cold win 
span central Europe wesl 
through Britain and northern 
France. Central tarty trough 
Greece wtl have swi. H may 
become windy. Fog may be 
a problem from northern Italy 
Into Spain. 


Asia 

Clouds will hold sway war 
middle China 10 southwest 
Japan with nun and drizzle 
at times, 0 may rain briefly in 
Beijing and Seoul rain wdl 
reach Tokyo Thursday. 
South China to Taiwan will 
be warm wth a few showers. 
Thundery downpours will 
douse Singapore and 
Malaysia. 


Asia 


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•MS I IT/52 


Sinatra Music Museum? Ho-Ho-Hoboken Holds Its Breath 


By Evelyn Nieves 

Sew York Tariff Semce 

H OBOKEN, New Jersey — It was sup- 
posed to change, but Frank Sinatra is 
still tiiis town’s great unrequited love, the 
one that got away, got famous, came back, 
but won't commit. He doesn't call, he 
doesn’t write. He just hangs there, high- 
cheek-boned and dewy-eyed, an icon on 
the walls of Hoboken's restaurants and 
barber shops. 

More than a year has passed since 
Nancy Sinatra Lambert came to town rais- 
ing hopes that a forever thing between 
Frank Sinatra and Hoboken was possible. 
Squired by the mayor, she toured possible 
sites for a Frank Sinatra music library and 
museum and said prospects looked prom- 
ising 

The Old Trust Co. of New Jersey, a 
three-story building on cobblestoned Hud- 
son Place, already looked like a museum. 
Lambert said she liked the stained-glass 
windows and three fireplaces. And she 
couldn't ask for a better location, across 
from the PATH station. 


A Frank Sinatra museum in Hoboken. 
It seemed only natural, even if Washing- 
ton, and New York, New York, were also 
in the r unning . Hobokenites were already 
popping champagne corks when Sinatra 
said the family would issue its decision in 
three months. That was taken seriously in 
a city that welcomes visitors from (he 
Lincoln Tunnel with a big sign proclaim- 
ing itself the birthplace of baseball (an- 
other heartbreak story) and Frank Sina- 
tra. 

But the Frank Sinatra music library, 
conceived by Sinatra's three children to 
house his collection of music memorabilia, 
is still a maybe. That’s better than a no to 
some people, worse to others. 

“What’s it taking to make a choice?" 
said Rose Aiguenta, standing on Washing- 
ton Street, the main thoroughfare, hands 
indignantly on her hips. “There’s only one 
choice to make.” 

“It is kind of an insult to take so long.” 
said Ida Martinez. 

“It couldn’t be anywhere else,” said Nel- 
son Gigante, Martinez's son. 


“Me and my friends used to joke about 
all the Frank Sinatra songs they’d be play- 
ing in the pizza places,” he said “Now, tho£ 
man’s pretty cooL” 

People can't help wondering if the Sina- 
tras can’t get past Hoboken's past, when it 
was Ho-Ho-Hobokexi. butt of many jokes. 
When Frank Sinatra was born on the west 
side of town 78 years ago (“It’ll be 79 in 
December,” Arguenta remembered), the 
rents were dirt cheap, the people poor 
working stiffs, the streets filled with one 
tavern after another. (Some things haven't 
changed.) He wanted out, and when he left 
he said he wouldn’t come back. The visits 
since have been brief. ‘ 

Mayor Anthony Russo has been court- 
ing the Sinatras gently. A call here, a letter 
there. “I sent Frank a letter when he was at 
the Sands in Atlantic City,” he said. He 
tried not to sound desperate. “I just reiter- 
ated the commitment and the love and the 
loyalty that the people of Hoboken have 
for him,” he said. “And I just reminded 
him that we were still very interested in 
hosting his music museum/’ 



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