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INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


c 


** 


Paris, Friday, October 7, 1994 


No. 34,71 3 


c 


Swiss Officials Debate 


‘Execution’ Theory in 
Sect Members’ Deaths 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tima Service 

GRANGES-SUR-SALVAN. Switzer- 
land — Swiss investigators raised doubts 
Thursday whether the 48 members of an 
esoteric sect who were found dead in two 
Swiss villages Wednesday had taken part 
m a collective suicide, noting that some 
of them had been administered a power- 
ful drug before they died. 

Andre Piller. a magistrate investigat- 
ing the deaths of 23 sect members at a 
farmhouse in the village of Cheiry, said 
that some evidence still supported the 
idea of a collective suicide but that other 
evidence "makes us think of an execu- 
tion." He added: "We cannot exclude 
one or the other.” 

He said it was possible that some sect 
members had chosen to die by taking “a 
powerful violent substance," but he re- 
called that 20 of the 23 bodies had bullet 
wounds, that 10 had sealed plastic bags 
over their heads and that several had 
been found with their hands tied behind 
their backs. 

Bernard Geiger, the police chief of the 
region that includes Gran ges-s ur-Sal van, 
a mountain hamlet where 25 of the bod- 
ies were found Wednesday, also ques- 
tioned whether all 48 members of the 
Solar Tradition had chosen to die, partic- 
ularly since at least five children were 
among the dead. 

"You can't expect children to want to 
kill themselves,” he said at a news con- 


ference. “For me, it is not suicide if death 
is ordered or applied by the leader of the 
group. So I cannot exclude the possibili- 
ty that a good number of them were 
murdered." 

Mr. Geiger said 15 of the victims in 
Granges had been found lying on beds or 
in rows on the floor and had not strug- 
gled for their lives. "They obviously ab- 
sorbed drugs of some kind,” he went on. 
"The question is whether this toxic sub- 
stance was applied voluntarily or invol- 
untarily.” 

The Swiss police, meanwhile, began 
looking for Luc Jouret, the 46-year-old. 
Belgian-born homeopathic physician 
who founded the sea in the 1980. They 
said he was not among the 23 victims at 
Cheiry or among the 15 bodies so far 


identified here in Granges. But they con- 

bodit 


ceded that his could be among 10 bodies 
taken from a fire- ravaged chalet here 
that were burned beyond recognition. 
He was reportedly seen here a few hours 
before the tragedy. 

Both here and at Cheiiy, 160 kilome- 
ters (100 miles) to the north, the intent 
was apparently for all the bodies to be 
destroyed by fire. But the fire at Cheiiy 
did not reach the area where the 23 sect 
members were found, while it only de- 
stroyed two of three chalets at Granges 
where fires were set 
Fire fighters, who found 25 bodies in 
two chalets here Wednesday, searched 

See SECT, Page 6 



Peace Moves 



Killing of 20 

Bosnian Serbs 


4 Sarajevo a Tinderbox,’ 
Government Troops 
Blamed for Massacre 


Chli* Hdgrcn/Reufcn 

A man who was released in a major prisoner-of-war exchange greeting his brothers at dawn on Thursday in Sarajevo. 


Is Kohl Sinkable? Maybe , but for Now He’s on a Steady Course 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Pan Service 

i. WITTENBERGE, Germany — When 


'Helmut Kohl blows into yet another cam- 
paign rally these days, he doesn't so much 
stroll as sail. Homely blue raincoat flap- 
ping about him. a fair wind at his back, the 
German chancellor tacks through the fes- 
tive crowd before berthing himself at the 
podium to deliver another vote-for-me 
■Stem-winder on peace and prosperity. 

’ Germans have seen and heard it all a 
thousand times in Mr. Kohl's long political 
career. Yet they still listen attentively. For 


Germany must soon decide whether it has 
had enough of Helmut Kohl, whether after 
12 years of his leadership the country can 
imagine itself without him. 

If Mr. Kohl wins a fourth term on OcL 
16 — and the odds look a bit baler than 
even — he mil eclipse Konrad Adenauer 
as the longest-serving German chancellor 
since World War II. Once President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand leaves office next spring. 
Mr. Kohl will be the only remaining Cold 
War leader still in power, having long 
outlasted Ronald Reagan and Margaret 
Thatcher. 


At 64, Mr. Kohl has tried with consider- 
able success to make this election a refer- 
endum on his place in history as the chan- 
cellor who reunified Germany, showed the 
Russians the door and cemented the coun- 
try's role as an equal partner in trans- 
Atlantic and pan-European alliances, in- 
dividual issues have been subordinated to 
a larger question: Mr. Kohl, yes or no? 
His campaign is a shameless cull of 


campaign poster contains no text, just a 
color photograph of Mr. Kohl surrounded 


personality. The $26 million advertising 
budget of his “ 


; Christian Democratic Union 
stresses one theme — Mr. Kohl — to the 
virtual exclusion of all others. A recent 


by adoring supporters. 

That a portly, hopelessly unlelegenic 
politician from a bygone era remains hot 
enough to carry his party to power again is 
a testament both to Mr. Kohl's political 
prowess and his complicated relationship 
with Germany. 

The chancellor has fashioned a career 
out of being underestimated.- Early in this 
campaign, he was pronounced dead once 
again by pundits: The newsmagazine Der 
Spiegel ran a cover story last December on 


“The End of the Kohl Era,” and the news- 
paper Die Zeit announced, "We are watch- 
ing the beginning of the end.” 


Yet once again, Mr. Kohl has stormed 
back. His popularity jumped from as much 
as 15 percentage points behind his Social 
Democratic challenger. Rudolf Scharping, 
earlier this year to 1 1 points ahead in some 
polls. His re-election is by no means a sure 
thing; volatile variables .such as the 
strength of the reformed Communists and 
the weakness of Mr. Kohl's Free Democrat 


See KOHL, Page 6 


Immigrant Boom Prompts 
Israel to Reconsider a Law 


X 


By Clyde Haberman 

<V« York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — In the knitted yar- 
mulke and prayer shawl that he brought 
from his home in India. Haokhothang 
Lunkhei says that all he wants is to live 
as a Jew in Israel. 

‘i wish to pray here in the Holy 
Land." said Mr. Lunkhel who arrived 
this summer from Manipur state on In- 
dia’s border with Burma and went al- 
^ most immediately to a trailer in the West 
\ Bank settlement of Kiryat Arba. "We 
can't do all the commandments in Mani- 
pur. Here, we can.’’ 

He is doing no more than chasing the 
Zionist dream, be says. 

For many Israelis, though, his dream 
is their nightmare. 

The problem for Mr. Lunkhel, and for 
56 other Indians from the northeastern 
states of Manipur and Mizoram who 
turned up in August, is that virtually no 
one in Israel recognizes them as Jewish 
— certainly not the government and not 
rabbinical leaders. 

They were brought by an Orthodox 
rabbi who traces supposed remnants of 
the 10 lost tribes of Israel, exiled by the 
Assyrians 2,700 years ago. Their ostensi- 
ble connection to Judaism lies in asser- 
tions that they are descendants of the 
tribe of Manasseh. 

Israelis are skeptical to put it mildly. 
Nonetheless, the Indians were allowed 
in, and now they live in Kiryat Arba and 


Jerusalem, studying Hebrew and reli- 
gious customs that are unknown to them 
so that they can convert formally to 
Judaism in a manna acceptable to the 
chief rabbinate. 

But their arrival touched off Israeli 
alarms about whether the gates had been 
opened to potentially millions of foreign- 
ers with similar assertions of being chil- 
dren of lost tribes. Fears were stoked by 
scare headlines about how 300 million 
such migrants were poised to surge in 
from the Third World. 

And though the news articles were 
dismissed by critics as not only wildly 
exaggerated but perhaps also racist, they 
set off a continuing public debate on 
what for Israelis is an existential ques- 
tion: Has the time come to amend or 
even repeal the Law of Return, which 
gives all Jews, with few exceptions, and 
specified non-Jews an automatic right to 
relocate here? 

The law was enacted in 1950, two 
years after Israel came into being, and is 
a bedrock of modem Zionism. But some 
leading figures in the Zionist establish- 
ment warn that if they do not close what 
they call legal loopholes, Israel may be 
swamped by immigrants with dubious 
ties to Judaism, and find its Jewish char- 
acter in peril. 

Supposed members of lost tribes, 
while attention-grabbing, are the least of 


See JEWS, Page 7 


Rivals 5 Parting Shot at Clinton’s Agenda 


By Helen Dewar 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Senate Republi- 
cans blocked legislation on Thursday to 
tighten controls on lobbyists in angry 
Democrats denounced as an effort to keep 
Congress from cleaning its own house so 
the Republicans can inherit the wreckage. 

Efforts were under way late Thursday to 
find a way out of the impasse. But the bill's 
sponsors said there was only the slimmest 
chance of reviving this iast remnant of 
President Bill Clinton's reform agenda as 
Congress prepares to adjourn for the Nov. 
8 elections. 


“It seems a Republican-led filibusta 
has killed the toughest lobbying and gift 
ban law that Congress has been able to 
consider in decades," said Senator Carl 
Levin, Democrat of Michigan, a sponsor 
of; the bill to lighten registration rules for 
lobbyists and ban them from giving free 
meals and other gifts to lawmakers. 

The action on Thursday was taken less 
than a day after Republican representa- 
tives effectively forced the House to post- 
pone a vote on ratifying the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. Al- 
though leaders from both parties agreed 
Wednesday night that the trade pact 


would ultimately be approved, there was 
little doubt that Republicans wanted to 
delay the vote until after the elections to 
deny Mr. Clinton what has become his top 
remaining legislative priority this year. 
(Page II) 


Republicans, apparently anxious to 
avoid looking as though they wanted to 
continue the free meals, trips and charity 
golf weekends that have drawn the ire of 
many constituents, circulated a proposal 
to impose the gift ban by changing Senate 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Timet Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herzegovina — 
Troops of the Muslim-dominated Bosnian 
Army killed and mutilated 20 Bosnian 
Serbs military people just outside the de- 
militarized zone near Sarajevo on Thurs- 
day, raising tensions in the Bosnian capital 
and prompting a stiff protest from United 
Nations officials. 

Yasushi Akashi, the senior United Na- 
tion official in the forma Yugoslavia, said 
the incident took place early Wednesday 
morning on Mount Igman, southwest of 
the capital and involved the killing of 16 
men, all soldiers, and 4 women, 'pie wom- 
en were apparently military nurses. 

"In all probability. Bosnian government 
forces may be implicated," Mr. Akashi 
said, noting that Bosnian soldiers have 
been seen moving in large numbers 
through the demilitarized zone in recent 
days. 

[Bosnian Sabs said Thursday that the 
killing could ignite the Sarajevo area, Reu- 
ters reported from Pale, Bosnia. 

[The Bosnian Serbs’ Romania Corps, 
which surrounds the UN-protected capi- 
tal said in a statement: “Tins criminal act 
by the Muslim side has made Sarajevo a 
Underbox that can ignite the whole area."] 

The demilitarized zone on Mount Ig- 
man, a highly strategic area overlooking 
. the Sarajevo airport, was established in 
August 1993 after Bosnian Serb forces 
captured the area and were then forced to 
move by a NATO ultimatum. 

The brutal killing on Thursday under- 
scored the fact that massacres have been 
committed by all rides in the Bosnian war 
and that, even as it expressesjts outrage at 
the Bosnian Sab .encirclement of Sarajevo 
the Bosnian government is apparently pre- 
pared to engage in attacks of provocation: 

The killing of the Sobs came at a highly 
embarrassing moment, for Mr. Akashj. He 
had just spent several hours Wednesday in 
in Pale, the self-styled capital of the Bosni- 
an Serbs, conducting difficult negotiations 
that succeeded in securing an opening of 
the Sarajevo airport. 

The airport was dosed for two weeks by 
Bosnian Sab threats to incoming aircraft. 
The threats were combined with a demand 
from the Serbs that their ownership of the 
airfield be established. Mr. Akashi rejected 
this demand. 

On Thursday, a single aircraft arrived at 
the airfield to take Mr. Akashi to Zagreb. 
Further flights are planned for Friday, but 
it was unclear how the killing of the Bosni- 
an Sab soldiers might affect these plans. 

Intense movement of Bosnian govern- 
ment forces in the area south of the capital 
had been noted by UN military observers 
ova the past week. Some believe that ah 
offensive on the Trnovo area, aimed even- 
tually at linking Sarajevo with the eastern 
enclave of Gorazde, may be imminent 

The Mount Igman area is particularly 


See CONGRESS, Page 6 


See SERBS, Page 6 


Kiosk 


Ferry Co-Owner 
To Quit Business 


STOCKHOLM (Reuters) — The 
Swedish co-owner of the ferry Esto- 
nia, which sank with the loss of 910 
lives last week, said Thursday it would 
quit the passenger ferry business. 

A statement from the Nordstrom & 
Thulin AB shipping company quoted 
the managing director. Ronald Bag- 
man, as saying: “We have concluded 
that we cannot carry on conducting 
passenger ferry operations to Esto- 
nia.” 


Books 

Bridge 


Page 5. 
PageS. 


Suspicions of CIA Tie to Haiti Militia Chief 


By John Kifner 

New York Tima Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — The sud- 
den transformation of the leada of Haiti's 
paramilitary gunmen into a U.S.-spon- 
sored spokesman for democracy has 
stunned many Haitians and stirred specu- 
lation in the diplomatic community about 
American intelligence ties to the forces 
that ousted the country’s elected president, 
the Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

"Are the American Embassy and 
FRAPH strolling hand-in-hand?" asked a 


front-page headline Wednesday morning 
in Le Nouvelliste. the country’s most inde- 


pendent newspaper, using the acronym of 
yforc 


the paramilitary force the military set up to 
support its rule. FRAPH stands for Front 
for the Advancement and Progress of Hai- 
ti. 

U.S. soldiers this week raided the 
group's offices in Port-au-Prince, rounding 
up the gunmen who bad broken up pro- 
democracy marches with gunfire and beat- 
ings. The American commander. Lieuten- 
ant General Hugh Shelton, pledged 


Monday to "take down” the shadowy atta- 
ch 6s, as the civilian gunmen are called, 
saying bluntly, “We call them thugs.” 

By Tuesday afternoon, U.S. soldiers 
held down a barbed wire security perime- 
ter as Emmanuel (To to) Constant, the 
leada of the Front, spoke at a news con- 
ference arranged by the U.S. Embassy, 
calling on Haitians to "pul down their 
tires, their stones, their guns." 

Members of Father Aristide’s staff said 


See HAITI, Page 6 


Sex in America: Not So Wild and Crazy 


By Tamar Lewin 

New York Turns Service 

NEW YORK — While the common 
image of sex in America is one of extra- 
marital affairs, casual sex and rampant 
experimentation, a sweeping new study of 
American sexual practices — widely de- 
scribed as the most accurate ever — paints 
a much more subdued picture of marital 
id less exotic sexual 


fidelity, few partners ant 
ipatfices. , 

** We have had the myth that everybody 


laying 

lands,” said John H. Gagnon, an author of 
the study and a sociology professor at the 
State University of New York at Stony 
Brook. “That's had two consequences. It 
has enraged the conservatives. And it has 
created great anxiety and unhappiness 
among those who weren't having it, who 
thought, ‘If I'm not gening any. 1 must be a 
defective person.* ** 

In the new study, based on surveys of 
3.432 men and women aged 18 to 59. 85 


Newsstand Prices 


Andorra 9.00 FF 

Antilles 11.20 FF 

-Cameroon . .1 ,400 CFA 

Egypt E.P.500Q 

France 9.00 FF 

Gabon 960 CFA 

Greece 300 Dr. 

Italy .2,600 Lire 

Ivory Coasr .1.120 CFA 

Jordan 1 JD 

Lebanon ...US$1.50 


Luxembourg 60 L Fr 

Morocco 12 Dh 

Qatar 8.00 Rials 

Reunion ....11 .20 FF 
Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Senegal 960 CFA 

Spain JOO PT AS 

Tunisia ....1.000 Din 
Turkey ..T.L. 35,000 

U.A.E 8 JO Dirh 

U.S. Mil. (Eur.) 51.10 


r 


Dow Jones 


Trtb Index 


Down 

11.78 

3775.56 


Down 

0 . 22 % 

112.85 


Now York 

Thun ctosa 

□reviews dew 

DM 

1.544 

1.5445 

Pound 

15908 

1 5855 

Yen 

99.835 

99605 

FF 

5278 

5.275 


percent of married women and more than 
75 percent of married men said they had 
beat faithful to their spouses. And married 
people, on average, nave more sex than 
their single counterparts: 41 percent of all 
married couples have sex twice a week or 
more, compared with 23 percent of the 
singles. 

But those who are cohabiting have the 
most sex of all, with 56 percent reporting 
that they had sex twice a week or more. 

For on American man. the median num- 
ber of sexual partners ova a lifetime is six; 
for a woman, the median is two. 

Among the other findings: 

• More than half the men said they 
thought about sex every day, or several 
times a day. compared with only 19 per- 
cent of the women. 

• More than four in five Americans had 
only one sexual partner, or no partna, in 
the last year. Generally, blacks reported 
the most sexual partners, Asians the few- 


See SURVEY, Page 6 



DEMOCRACY IN TAIWAN — Opposition lawmakers storming the 
proposed measure. Angry lawmakers covered the mouth of Deputy 


-Reno* 

on Thursday to protest a 
fang Chin-ping, third from right. 




I. 


ft 


7 










sul 


T t 


Page 2 


** 



Vilnius Picnic Spot Yields One of KGB’s Dirtiest Secrets world briefs 


By Stephen Kinzer 

/Wffw York Tuna Service 

VILNIUS, Lithuania — A pleasant 
park on the outskirts of Vilnius, until 
recently a popular spot for picnics, is 
yielding one of the KGB’s most grue- 
some secrets. 

Investigators have found the re- 
mains of more than 500 people in the 
sandy brown soil of Tuskulenai Park, 
and they are uncovering more each 
day. They work behind a discreet 
fence, while children play teams on the 
other side. 

This park, was a secret execution and 
burial ground in the crushing of one of 
the Cold War's hotter campaigns, the 
Lithuanian partisan rebellion of the 
late 1940s. The victims were shot after 
being found guilty by summary tribu- 
nals of joining or supporting partisan 
groups. 

One recent afternoon. Algimantas 
Remeilris, a security officer who is su- 


pervising the exhumation, watched as 
an archaeologist gently lifted a skull 
out of the earth. A small hole showed 
where the executioner's bullet had en- 
tered. 

Many older residents of Vilnius 
knew that the KGB had maintained a 
private graveyard somewhere in town, 
but memories had faded during de- 
cades of Soviet rule. After Lithuania 
won its independence in 1990, the 
KGB agents here departed hastily. 
They left behind a trove of files, and 
Tuskulenai Park was identified from 
them. 

The excavation has not been widely 
publicized here, and some of the his- 
torical memories it awakens are likely 
to be awkward. They may remind 
Lithuanians that heroism can be am- 
biguous, and that glory and shame 
sometimes mingle uncomfortably. 

Files list 780 people reportedly bur- 
ied in the park. Among the bodies 


already exhumed is thought to be that 
of Vladimiras Gulevicius, a Roman 
Catholic bishop who disappeared after 
being arrested by the KGB. 

“We know of other clandestine cem- 
eteries, but none on this scale," Mr. 
Remeilris said. “This is a real unveiling 
of history. It shows some things that 
are slipping from our memory." 

Lithuania was annexed by the Sovi- 
et Union in 1940 and occupied by 
German troops during World War II. 
It was reclaimed by Moscow after the 
war. 

In the following years, thousands of 
Lithuanians fought a doomed war of 
resistance against their new Soviet rul- 
ers. Some Western countries, including 
the United States, did not recognize 
the annexation, and the partisans’ 
struggle was supported by Western in- 
telligence agencies. But it had little 
chance of success and was finally 
crushed in the early 1950s. 


Stalin’s counterinsurgency troops 
tracked the partisan rebels with brutal 
effectiveness. They pulled thousands 
of civilians from their homes and took 
them to killing grounds like Tusku- 
lenai Park. 

They displayed the bodies of dead 
partisans at village squares, then ar- 
rested passers-by who betrayed emo- 
tion or sympathy. And in an effort to 
rob the movement of its base, they sent 
several hundred thousand Lithua ni a ns 
to Siberia and other distant points. 

Partisans who fought against this 
oppression are now widely viewed as 
heroes, and when the digging is fin- 
ished at Tuskulenai Park, a memorial 
will be erected to the memory of those 
found there. 


Union led them to fight alongside the 
Nazis. . , . . 

Efforts to deal with this ambiguity 
have already hurt Lithuania's image in 
the world. In 1991 and 1992, the newly 
independent state issued thousands of 
official pardons to partisans who were 
convicted by Soviet tribunals, only to 
be embarrassed by revelations that 
some of them had been members of 
Nazi death squads assigned to kill 

Jews. . r . 

Based on information from the 
KGB files, Lithuanian prosecutors are 
searching for several citizens of the 
former Soviet Union who may have 
been executioners at Tuskulenai Park. 
But they are not counting on success. 

“We’re going to ask," said one offi- 
ciaL “But if we start finding people in 


But officials are already worrying 
what the monument should say. be- 
cause there were some among the par- 
tisans whose opposition to the Soviet 



Jacqueline (iodany/Reuicn 

SIGNING UP — Jorg Haider, leader of Austria's far-right Freedom Party, autographing a supporter’s sweatshirt at 
Iris final rally in Vienna before die general election Sunday. A poll showed Iris party getting 22 percent of the vote, up 
from 16.6 percent in 1990, and Chancellor Franz Vranhzky's Social Democrats 39 percent, down from 42J8 percent 


Why Does U.S. Take 
Milosevic’s Word? 


No Proof of Blockade Leaks 


Left Wing Rebukes U.K Labor’s Leader 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispatches 


BLACKPOOL, England — 
Left-wing members of the op- 
position Labor Party inflicted 
an embarrassing defeat on the 
Labor leader, Tony Blair, on 
Thursday when the annual par- 
ty conference backed the prin- 
ciple of widespread nationaliza- 
tion. 


A resolution, carried by 50.9 
percent to 49.1 percent, ex- 
pressed concern that Mr. Blair's 


strategy placed little emphasis 
on achieving the objectives of 
Clause Four of the party consti- 
tution, which deals with state 
ownership of private industry. 
The Mandst-style clause has 
been in Labor's constitution 
since 1918. Up to now, it has 
been routinely endorsed as a 
cherished tenet of the left, al- 
though Labor has not advocat- 
ed widespread nationalization 
since the early 1980s. 

The vote came two days after 


Mr. Blair pledged to overhaul 
the party principles and sig- 
naled that he would drop its 
traditional Socialist principles. 
In a speech to the conference on 
Tuesday, he promised to draw 
up a modem statement of aims 
to replace Clause Four. 

Worried that the motion 
could give the governing Con- 
servatives ammunition to at- 
tack Labor, Mr. Blair tried 
speedily to limit the damage. 

In a BBC radio interview, he 


said that the outcome of the 
vote “was surprising only in 
that it was so close." 


Quake Leveled Military Sites in Kurils 


Compiled hy Our Staff From Dispatches 

MOSCOW — Dozens of 
Russian military sites in the 
Kuril Islands were destroyed by 
the earthquake that hit the re- 
gion this week, officials said 
Thursday, as a high-level team 
was sent to assess the damage. 

Thirty-four complexes hous- 
ing Russian border guards, 
their families and weapons 
stocks were leveled in the quake 
on Tuesday along with about 
150 related structures, includ- 


ing a fuel storage depot, said 
Mikhail Borikov, a spokesman 
for the guards. He said the dam- 
age to border guards installa- 
tions was estimated at $34 mil- 
lion. 

Other reports say a military 
hospital was also destroyed. 

A government commission 
was to leave for the Kurils on 
Thursday. 

There were conflicting re- 
ports about the casualty toll 
from the huge undersea earth- 


pa ask the buder... 


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THE OLDEST COCKTAIL BAR IN EU ROTE t* 
Just tell the taxi driver. "Sank too doc noo ” sm 
PARIS: 5, rue Dounou 
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MS EUROPA . At Sea MONTKEUX: Montreux Palace 



quake, which registered 8.2 on 
the Richter scale. The quake 
was centered about 160 kilome- 
ters (100 miles) off the northern 
Japanese island of Hokkaido, 
□ear the Kurils. 

President Boris N. Yeltsin, in 
a statement expressing condo- 
lences to the victims' families, 
said at least 10 people had dial. 
But disaster officials said 
Thursday that only four deaths 
were now confirmed. No deaths 
were reported in Japan al- 
though more than 220 people 
suffered injuries, most from 
broken glass or falling objects. 

Dozens of strong aftershocks 
Thursday rattled the sparsely 
populated Kurils, where rescue 
teams began setting up tent vil- 
lages for some of those whose 
homes had been destroyed. 

Heavy rains and strong wind 
hampered relief operations, but 
a rescue plane was able to drop 
warm clothing and food sup- 
plies to people who had fled to 
the hills in fear of tidal waves 
caused by aftershocks. 

The quake unleashed waves 
up lo 3 meters (10 feet) high 
that swamped coastal areas of 
the Kurils and hurled boats 
onto land. (AFP. AP) 


“To have a 50-50 vote now 
indicates how far the party has 
traveled” be said adding that 
he was confident of pushing 
through Ms proposals. 

Peter Hain, a leading left- 
winger. said the motion would 
probably have been carried by a 
10-to-l margin if the vote had 
been held Before Mr. Blair's 
speech. 

Nevertheless, it was the first 
substantial setback for Mr. 
Blair since he won the leader- 
ship in July. 

Labor's national executive 
had pleaded with Tim Meams, 
who called for the motion, not 
to press for a vote. They said the 
party was already committed to 
a debate on its constitution af- 
ter Mr. Blair's speech. 

Party officials portrayed the 
debate as the start of a wide- 
ranging internal consultation 
before a text is put to next 
year’s conference. 

Mr. Meams refused to with- 
draw the motion, telling the 
conference: “Clause Four did 
not stop us winning elections in 
the past, and it will not stop us 
winning elections in the fu- 
ture." 

Adapting a slogan about 
crime associated with Mr. Blair, 
he added: “Lei us be tough on 
capitalism and tough on the 
causes of capitalism.” 

The ballot was swung by 
bosses of several big labor 
unions casting block votes 
counted in tens of thousands in 
favor of the clause. Delegates 
from organized labor — which 
finances the party — arrive at 
the annual gatherings with in- 
structions from their unions on 
how to vote. (Reuters, AP) 


By Elaine Sciolino 

Ne*. York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In De- 
cember 1992, the United States 
branded President Slobodan 
Milosevic of Serbia, among oth- 
ers, as a possible war criminal 
who should be tried for crimes 

against h umani ty - 

Since then, the man who in- 
flamed Serbian nationalism and 
allowed paramilitary forces to 
conduct an ethnic cleansing 
campaign in his name has sur- 
vived, even thrived. 

Now the United Nations has 
rewarded him for good behav- 
ior by lifting some of the sanc- 
tions it imposed 28 months ago, 
m aintaining that he has halted 
the passage of war materiel to 
the Bosnian Serbs. 

The State Dqxmment insists 
that Mr. Milosevic has not sud- 
denly gone from being the bad 
guy to the good guy in Bosnia. 

The United States still has its 
doubts that the Serbs are living 
up to their pledge to stop arm- 
ing the Bosnian Sobs. The 
State Department spokesman, 
Mike McCurry, acknowledged 
Wednesday that “there have 
been reports that there are some 
goods — other than humanitar- 
ian goods — that might be com- 
ing over the border.” 

So why, for the moment at 
least, is the United States will- 
ing to treat Mr. Milosevic as an 
authoritative head of state 
whose word can be trusted? 

The first reason, administra- 
tion officials say, is that Ameri- 
can intelligence reports on the 
transfer of war supplies from 
Serbia to the Bosnian Serbs are 
not dramatic enough for the 
United States to pick a fight it 
might not win in the Security 
Council. 

Moreover, they add, they 
lack crystal-clear proof that Mr. 
Milosevic himself is allowing 
war materiel to flow to the Bos- 
nian Serbs. 

“Are thugs worse than Milo- 
sevic doing stuff behind his 
back?” a senior Stale Depart- 
ment official asked. “Or is he 
faking it? Those are the tricky 


s 


German Official 
Opposes a Rapid 
NATO Expansion 


Legionnaires ’ Disease Surge 
Traced to Liner’s Hot Tubs 


The Associated Press 

ORLANDO, Florida — An outbreak of Legionnaires’ 
disease on a cruise ship last spring and summer has been 
traced to hot tubs on the ship. Health officials say lounging in 
the steamy water, or merely walking by the tubs, was enough 
to catch the illness. 

At least 50 people are thought to have been infected on the 
ship Horizon during nine trips between Bermuda and New 
York City between April and July. 

Doctors from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, who investigated the outbreak, said Wednesday 
they had tracked it to one contaminated filter that recirculat- 
ed water for the ships' three spas. 

Dr. Jo Hofmann, one of the investigators, said several other 
outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease have been linked to hot 
tubs, but this is the first on a cruise ship. “We have to do 
something about controlling the way whirlpools are main- 


tained on ships,” she said. 


To track down the source, investigators questioned 3,322 
passengers who had sailed on the ship. Eventually, they found 
50 people who had gotten pneumonia on nine sailings. All had 
been in or near the ship’s hot tubs. The researchers calculated 
that sitting in the tubs increased passengers’ risk of getting 
Legionnaires’ 17 times, and walking past the tubs increased 
the risk 13 times. 


Azerbaijan Parliament Backs 
Dismissal of Prime Minister 



BAKU. Azerbaijan (Reuters) — A special session of Azeibax-i 
ian’s inner Parliament voted Thursday to confirm the dismissal of 
Prime Minister Surat Huseynov, accused of taking part ur an 

armed rebellion. ' , „ .. . , . , ‘ 

President Heydar A. Aliyev had carter dismissed Mr. Hu- 
seynov during a top-level meeting at which participants sffl'd'the 

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Huseynov flatly denied Mr. Aliyev’ 
tried to mount a coup. “I demand air tune to inform the — 
lion about these events,” Mr. Huseynov told the inner Parliament 
before the vote. “1 refuse to answer any .questions,! remain primp 

minister.” 


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the Russian Federation, the govern- 
ments there will probably drag out the 
extradition process until the last one is 
dead." 


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only serious rival, jus relations wim mepresiaeni nave ucicy- 
ed sharply since be helped Mr. Aliyev take power last year. 

Mexico to Widen Assassination Probe 


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MEXICO CITY (AP) — A congressman and a former federal 
official accused of arran g in g the assassination of a senior party 
aide may have been us c^ by higher-ranking off ici al s, the prosecu- 
tor in the case said Thursday, - 

Deputy Attorney General Mario Ruiz Massieu told the Radio 
Red network that neither the lawmaker nor the official “have the 
resources or the intelligence’’ to carry out the murder of his 
brother, Josfc Francisco Ruiz Massieu, the No. 2 man in tht 
governing Institutional Revolutionary Party. jft 


.vW 


uestions, and we don't know 
e answers to them.” 

A third reason is that there is 
disagreement within the admin- 
istration over whether to share 
the intelligence reports that the 
United States does have with 
the Security Council. 

“The sources and methods 
are such that some people in the 
intelligence community want to 
withhold what we have.’’ a se- 
nior administration official 
said. “The intelligence just isn't 
significant enough to justify 
any kind of big battle.” 


Insulted 9 Nasrin Cancels Paris Visit 

PARIS (AFP) — Taslima Nasrin, the Bangladeshi writer 
who is under a death threat from Muslim fundamentalists, 
has canceled a trip to France because authorities offered her 
only a 24-how visa, it was announced here Thursday. 

The journalists’ association Reporters Without Borders — - 
which, along with her French publisher, invited Dr. Nasrin to 
France — said the writer had canceled the trip because she 
took the daylong visa “as an insult” Dr. Nasrin, 32, sentenced 
to death by Islamic fundamentalists in Bangladesh, lives in 
exile in Sweden. .... 

Foreign Minister Alain Juppt of France said the Interior 
Minis try had told his ministry that Dr. Nasrin’s security could 
be assured only for 24 hours. 


Italian Cabinet Accuses Prosecutor 



km 


Reuters 

BONN — Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkel cautioned Thurs- 
day against any quick expan- 
sion of the North Atlantic Trea- 
ty Organization into Eastern 
Europe. 

His remarks, in a speech pre- 
pared for delivety to German 
soldiers, contradicted the posi- 
tion taken last week by his cabi- 
net colleague. Defense Minister 
Volker Ruhe, at a NATO meet- 
ing in Seville, Spain. 

Mr. Kinkel said the NATO 
defense ministers had been 
right when they declined in Se- 
ville to set an early deadline for 
deciding what former Soviet 
bloc states could join the alli- 
ance soon. The meeting ended 
with a number of members, 
headed by the United States, 
rejecting Mr. RQhe's call for a 
decision soon to adjnit Poland, 
Hungary, the Czech Republic 
and Slovakia. 

“To those who are pushing 
and demanding a rapid NATO 
expansion,” Mr. Kinkel said, “I 
say that it cannot be in the in- 
terests of Central and Eastern 
European states if the price for 
joining the alliance would be 
the return of confrontation and 
blocs in Europe.” 


ROME (Reuters) — Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's govern- 
ment said Thursday tha t it would file an official complaint against 
the chief prosecutor of Milan as it pursued its attack on Italy’s 
anti-graft magistrates. 

A cabinet spokesman, Giuliano Ferrara, said a report on the 
prosecutor, Francesco Saverio Borrelli, would be sent to President 
Oscar Luigi Scalfaro, the nominal head of Italy s self-governing 
magis trates’ council. Mr. Ferrara said submission of the com- 
plaint, which raised the threat of disciplinary action against Mr. 
Borrelli, had been unanim ously approved by the cabinet. 

llie decision followed a storm unleashed Wednesday, when Mr. 
Borrelli said investigations into Telepiu, a pay TV channel partiv 
owned by Mr. Berlusconi's Fininvest empire, risked reaching 
“high levels” in politics and finance. Mr. Borrelli said Thursday 
that he did not intend to resign. “Fm not going to leave the 
magistrature unless I'm expelled,” he said The government report 
on Mr. Borrelli accuses him of trying to prevent the government 
from carrying out its functions. The offense is a crime under 
Italy's penal code and can cany a jail sentence of 10 years or more 
on conviction. 


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7,000 Found in Rwanda Mass Graves 


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KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — Two more mass graves containing 
more than 7,000 bodies have been discovered in western Rwanda, 
UN peacekeepers and the government said Thursday. 

The graves, side by side at Mabanza, about 100 kilometers (60 
miles) west of the capital, Kigali, were believed to contain massa- 
cre victims killed several mouths ago, said a UN military spokes- 
man. Captain Stephane Grenier. 

The Tutsi-instaBcd government and UN peacekeepers based in 
nearby Kibuyc, on the shores of Lake Kivu, were informed of the 
graves by local officials traveling in the area in recent days. Some 
officials believe the Mabanza graves could contain as many as 
10,000 bodies, said Tom Ndahiro, of the government information 
organization Orinfor. At least 500,000 Rwandans, mostly of the 
Tutsi ethnic minority, have died in ethnic bloodshed triggered by 
the April 6 death of President Juvgnal Habyarimana. a Hutu. 


■■ 

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TRAVEL UPDATE 


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Germany to Study TEco- Jumbo Jet’ ' '^ela to ( 


BONN (AP) — The German government decided Thursday ]&■ 
fund research for an “eco-jumbo jet” that would seat between 60 v 
and 800 people, use 25 percent less fuel and cause less damage to 
the environment than prevailing jumbo jets. 

The project was approved as part of a 600 million mark ($350 
million) civil aviation research program lasting through 1 998. Die 
research and technology minister, Paul KrQger. said the program ’ 
called for an equal financial contribution from private sector -- 
participants. 

A 24-hour strike on London’s Underground rail system started 
Thursday night with the rail workers' RMT union predicting total '■ 
support. It was not clear how services would be affected, because 
about 60 percent of drivers belong to a rival union, Aslef, which ■ ’ 
accepted a 2.5 percent raise rejected by the RMT. 

European railroad companies want to introduce duty-free sboff- . 
ping on international lines to be able to compete with air and sea 
earners on equal terms, the head of the European Union of 
Railways, Etienne Schouppe, told an international congress. 
Thursday in Berlin. (AP) 

The Italian air controllers’ radon canceled a strike on Thursday ■ * 
that they had called for Friday from 7 A.M. to midnight, the -/ 
Autonomous Company for Ground Assistance announced in 
Rome. (AFP) ' 

Winter made its debut in Austria on Thursday with the closure 
until spring of the Soelk mountain pass connecting the F.nns and 
the Mur valleys in Styria. state. It was the first pass of the season tb'N^. 
be closed. Around 15 centimeters (10 inches) of snow fell over the ‘ 
Austria Alps during the night. f Reuter# 

Swissair will resume flights to Belgrade on Oct. 17. (AFX) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. OCTOBER 7. 1QQA 


Page 3 



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THEAMERICAS/ 


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\ Does Money Talk? A Big - Spending tf < Outsider 5 Draws Even in Senate Race 


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By Dan Balz 

' : i?, WaA&jyAwi ^an Serna 

■* LOSANOELES — “Let me just say one thing," 
* Senator Dianne Feinstein said after a rousing speech 

; ■ *: to her supporters at a recent Beverly Hills fund- 
■■■:*. “If 1 were naming against any other Republi- 

-Pan, I d cream ’em ” 

• Her words carried a tone both of scorn and 
.. bravado, for with Ettle more than a month before 
-■A Hcction Day, Ms. Feinstein knows her opponent, 
• . .Michael Hiufington, a freshman U.S. represen ta- 

*ive, is anything but just another Republican. 

‘ . ■„ HufFmgton is' running one of the most ex- 

?: traordinary campaigns in the history of American 
.politics, powered by millions of dollars of his own 
partial fonune. He has used it to reassemble the 
: .successful campaign image-makers who directed the 
campaigns of Ronald Reagan and George Bush and 
i has saturated the airwaves with a series of negative, 
I anti-government ads that have turned Ms. Feinstein 
from one of California’s most popular politicians 
.into just another endangered Democrat. 

Mr. Huffington, meanwhile, has presented him- 
self as the classic outsider who is not responsible for 
what has gone before and whose vision is of a 
.government that does practically nothing and a 
; .society in which charity and volunteerism nourish. 
The most recent public polls showed Ms. Fein- 
.sitein and Mr. Buffington in a dead heat. 

i 





to have somebody in government, why not a ci- 
pher?* ” 

Mr. Huffington's prodigious spending has not 
appeared to hurt him with voters. His advisers say 
the only people offended by the amount of money he 
has spent on the campaign would not vote for him 
anyway. Others, they claim, like the idea that he isn’t 
dependent on special-interest money. 

Ms. Feinstein’s campaign advisers estimate that 
Mr. Huffington, with a personal fonune estimated 
at S70 million, already has spent S12 million for 
television ads and say he has reserved time on 
California stations between now and election day 
worth about $6.5 million more. They also estimate 
th3t Mr. Huffington will spend about S3 million on 
radio advertising, more man SI million for prim 
advertising and perhaps 52 million for direct mail, contrast in philosophies, 

Lany McCarthy, Mr. Huffington s media consul- She runs on her record and her accomplishments, 
tant, would not confirm the estimates. "I'll let Fein- After barely two years in the Senate she has much to 
stein *s media buyers estimate our spending," he said . talk about — the ban on assault weapons, which she 

Mr. McCarthy said, however, that he would he nusheri rdemle.«lv on a skeptical Congress, and a 
surprised if 103d Congress adjourns, presumably by the end of tins week, aijfomia Desert Protection Act, 
tween S4 mi Since he withdrew his name from consideration for a by a conference committee 

now and ele vacancy on the Supreme Court this spring, most of ^ e ?ngression,il vote. 

Huffington in the final month of their fierce cam- "If you look at public service as something that 
paign. Mr. McCarthy is one of the high-priced should only last a short time. I guess 1 do become an 


Reagan’s 1984 campaign and whose career was on 


the skids just a year ago after he boasted falsely of 
suppressing the black vote in the New Jersey guber- 
natorial campaign; Richard Wirthlin, a "Reagan 
pollster; the Reagan speechwriter Ken KJiachigian: 
and a Reagan and Bush adman, Sig Rogich. who was 
recently brought in to produce a spot about Mr. 
Huffington and his family. 

In addition to all this high-priced help. Mr. Huff- 
ington'S wife, Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffington. is 
seen as the candidate's most powerful political ad- 
viser. But she has also become a controversial figure, 
under fire from critics for past ties to a religious 
organization called the Movement of Spiritual Inner 
Awareness. 

Ms. Feinstein and Mr. Huffington offer a striking 


insider," Ms. Feinstein told supporters at her recent 
fund-raiser, “because 1 have been a county supervi- 
sor For nine years and a mayor for nine years- And 
let me tell you, what that has done is teach' me how to 
craft legislation that is able to pass a legislative 
body. Because government is not just rhetoric." 

Mr, Huffington has taken an anti-government 
position. One of his earliest ads used William Ben- 
nett’s “The Book of Virtues" to make the point that 
the answer to most problems lies not in government 
but in individual responsibility. His welfare-reform 
plan stressed volunteerism. 

Mr. Huffington is almost totally a creature of the 
airwaves and his political personaveers from that of 
the soft and tender father and husband to slashing 
critic of government and his opponent. His positive 
ads are meant to flesh out a person who remains 
largely unknown to most Californians. His more 
numerous negative ads are designed to bring Ms. 
Feinstein down. 

His campaign gained traction last spring when he 
bombarded the airwaves with an ad attacking Ms. 
Feinstein for voting in favor of Mr. Clinton’s deficit- 
reduction package, which he described as the biggest 
tax increase in history. 

Ms. Feinstein claims that of 13 million taxpayers 
in the state, only 163.000 saw their taxes increase 
from that bill, with 2 million low-income workers 


in 


receiving a tax break and the rest seeing no change ii 
their taxes, “it bun me the way they' presented it. 
she said. 

Ms. Feinstein’s attacks increasingly focus on Mr. 
Huffington as an untrusted outsider. 

"Do you trust somebody who walks into this 
state, buys s House scat, isn't satisfied with it, 
unperforms for his district, buys a Senate seat?” she 
asked. “Or do you trust somebody who’s lived here, 
who’s put their divot back, performed for her city 
and now is performing for the nation?" 

Mr. Huffington’s money comes from a Texas oil 
business started by his father. His own business 
talents have been questioned during the campaign, 
and The Wall Street Journal reported that the family 
company was fined 5250,000 in the mid-1980s for 
shipping shock batons and other equipment to Indo- 
nesia. 

Mr. Huffington bought a house in California in 
1988 but did not declare his residency there until 
1991. shortly before running for a House seat Crit- 
ics say it was to avoid paying California state income 
taxes. 

Mr. Huffington declined a request to be inter- 
viewed, maintaining a posture ot keeping his dis- 
tance from the media and relying almost soley on his 
television commercials to tell California's tuhed-oul 
electorate who he is and what he stands for. 





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ye POLITICAL NOTES* 


Criticism of Wlnoritlei Stirs Illinois Furor 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Illinois — The president of the 
Illinois Senate has touched off an outcry by criticizing state 
workers who are members of ethnic minorities, saying that 
some have a lesser work ethic than whites and cover up for 
other minorities. 

“It's probably a terrible thing to say, but I'll say it; Some of 
them do not have the work ethics that we have," James Philip, 
who is white, told the editorial hoard of the Daily Herald m 
Arlington Heights on Wednesday. 

Mr. Philip, a Republican running for re-election in his 
heavily Republican suburban district, mentioned the cose of 
19 children who wore living in a roach-infested Chicago 
apartment despite two visits By a caseworker. 

“Of course, she was a minority,” he said of the caseworker. 
“Her boss was a minority. They don't tend to squeal cm their 
fellow minorities." 

Governor Jim Edgar, a fellow Republican also running for 
re-election, moved to distance himself from Mr. Philip’s 
remarks as Democrats heaped criticism on the senator. “I con 
tell you that the governor strongly disagrees with Senator 
Philip’s comments," said Mr. Edgar's spokesman. 

Dawn Clark Netsch, Mr. Edgar's Democratic challenger, 
called Mr. Philip's comment ‘'outrageous," adding; “It is 
racist, it is deplorable, it is not accurate, it is very offensive, it 
is extremely offensive." (AP) 


U.S, Yjgidg a Point on Ex-Ho»tage*» Suit 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. government has decided that 
it does not need to protect the privacy of the Middle Eastern 
terrorists who held the journalist Terry Anderson hostage for 
nearly seven years. 

But it may still withhold some of the government files 
requested by Mr. Anderson on the ground, that they contain 
national security secrets; 

Citing the Freedom of Information Act, Mr. Anderson, 
who was an Associated Press reporter when he was kidnapped 
in Beirut, asked more than a dozen federal agencies to release 
records about his captivity so he could write a book about liis 
experience. 

The Drug Enforcement Administration, the FBI and the 
CIA all tola him that because of various privacy protections 
in federal law, he would have to get notarized permission from 
his former captors to release any files that mention them. 

On Wednesday, U JS. Attorney Eric Holder, whose office is 
defending the government against a civil lawsuit filed by Mr. 
Anderson to obtain the documents, wrote the former hos- 
tage’s lawyer that “the government will not assert exemptions 
to protect the privacy interests of any terrorist abductors" 
who are mentioned in documents in the case. (AP) 


Senator Mitchell Contemplates Nibbles 

WASHINGTON — The retiring Senate majority leader, 
George J. Mitchell, Democrat or Maine, will be considering 
overtures from law firms, colleges, corporations and national 
associations — as well as baseball team owners — after the 
103d Congress adjourns, presumably by the end of ihis week. 

Since he withdrew his name from consideration for a 
vacancy on the Supreme Court this spring, most of the 



Mji.it Nijdi •JKjfr'TV *»>».. n, \l h.». 

Senator George Mitchell, leaving Congress after 14 
years, at his retirement dinner with President Clinton. 

speculation about his future has centered on whether he will 
be offered ihe job of commissioner of major league baseball. 

Bui there are other nibbles as well. Mr. Mitchell told 
reporters this week, and he will consider them all over the next 
few weeks. He emphasized that he had not ruled out another 
job in "public service," but he did not elaborate on what it 
might be. ( WP) 


Quota /Unquote 

Emperor Hirohito to Barbara Bush during a 1982 lunch at 
the Imperial Palace in Japan, after Mrs. Bush, desperate for 
conversation, inquired if the previous palace had to be vacat- 
ed because it was in poor repair; "No, I’m afraid that you 
bombed it.” (WP) 




A Conviction 
In Killings at 
Abortion Site 


The Associated Press 

PENSACOLA. Florida — A 
former minister who shot and 
killed a doctor and his escort 
has been convicted of violating 
a new federal law guaranteeing 
access to abortion clinics. 

A federal jury deliberated 
just over two hours Wednesday 
efore finding Paul J. Hifl 
guilty of three counts of violat- 
ing the lew, which prohibits 
anyone from injuring or other- 
wise interfering with people en- 
tering abortion clinics. He was 
also found guilty of a federal 
firearm charge. 

Mr. Hill snowed no emotion 
during the reading of the ver- 
dict, but after the jury left the 
courtroom, he smiled broadly 
and shook hands with his two 
standby attorneys. He could be 
sentenced to life in prison. 

Mr. Hill has said that murder 
is justifiable if it stops abor- 
tions. But he was prohibited 
from presenting that defense 
during the three-day trial. 

His brief dosing argument 
was almost identical to his 
opening s [a lenient; “This gov- 
ernment is unjust because it 
does not protect innocent life. 
To the extent wc lake pari in 
this evil, we must answer to 
God. May God help us all ” 
Witnesses testified that Mr. 
Hill ambushed Dr. John B. Brit- 
ton. James H. Barrett and Mr. 
Barrett’s wife, June, with a 12- 
gauge shotgun as the three ar- 
rived July 29 at a Pensacola 
abortion clinic. Mrs. Barrett 
was wounded. 

Mr. Hill is also awaiting trial 
in state court Jan. 30 on murder 
and attempted murder charges; 
if convicted he could be sen- 
tenced to die in the electric 
chair. 


Away From Politics 


• The number of Americans living below the 
poverty line rose to 15.1 percent of the popu- 
lation last year. A Census Bureau report said 
a total of 39.3 million Americans in 1 993 lived 
below the poverty level, which was set at 
$14,763 for a family of four. In 1992 the 
nation’s poverty rate was 14.8 percent 

• The Arctic peregrine falcon, once facing 
extinction because of pesticide exposure, has 
rebounded and will be removed from the U.S. 
government’s endangered-spedcs list next 
month. 

•A U.S. foundation says it wiO give 'up to 
$300,000 a year to reformers with Fresh ideas 
for shaking up the establishment. The Stem 
Family Fund says the awards will go to appli- 
cants with ideas for making society work 
better but without the resources to put thetr 
thinking into practice. The foundation cites 
Ralph Nader, a crusading consumer advocate 
in Washington for nearly 30 years, as an 


example of the type of work it is willing to 
finance. 

• Die Food and Drug Administration has pro- 
posed stronger warning, safer packaging and 
other measures to prevent accidental iron 
poisoning in children. Despite child-resistant 
caps, more than 1 10,000 cases of accidental 
ingestion of iron occurred between 1986 and 
1992, leading to at least 33 deaths, the agency 
said. Pari of the problem has been caused by 
prenatal iron products token by pregnant 
women, it said. 

• Seven states with more than 85 percent of 
the imprisoned aliens in the United States will 
share the first $42.9 million in federal aid to 
pay for them, Attorney General Janet Reno 
announced. California, Texas, Arizona, Flori- 
da and New Jersey have sued the federal 
government for reimbursement for their ex- 
penditures on jailing, educating or providing 
services for illegal aliens. They will receive a 
share of the money, along with Illinois and 

New York, Reuters. AP. UT 


In Hollywood, 

A Sinking Feeling 

The AsswateJ Press 

LOS ANGELES —A federal 
transportation official has halt- 
ed a Los Angeles subway pro- 
ject. citing poor management 
and faulty construction that 
caused Hollywood Boulevard 
and its Walk of Fame to sink by 
nine inches (23 centimeters). 

And the transit administra- 
tor. Gordon J. Linton, suspend- 
ed funding for the $5.5 billion 
line lo link downtown with the 
San Fernando Valley — until 
the transportation authority re- 
sponded with plans to put the 
project in order. 

Tunneling stopped Aug. 18 
after a nine-block stretch of 
Hollywood Boulevard dropped, 
damaging businesses and forc- 
ing evacuations. John For- 
sythe’s star cracked and was re- 
moved along with those of other 
celebrities. 


“Bailer school in Bangkok 
would like to dance Swan Lake 
in Rio.” 


/‘Sounds like a good idea for KLM ? s 
Bridging the World Contest." 




The Reliable Airline KL.IV1 

J’Sy eittrJ 


HA\ I I 

tu Much 

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Mandela to Congress: Aid World’s Poor 


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By Steven Greenhouse 

T York Times Serna . 

\ WASHINGTON — Assum- 
ing the role of tribune for the 
..world’s poor. President Nelson 
Mandela of South Africa told a 
-joint meeting of Congress on 
Thursday that the United 
States and other wealthy na- 
tions must resist the lure of iso- 
[Jationism and dedicate them- 
- selves to improving the lot of all 
+he world's people. 

‘ After spending the last two 
days asking the Clinton adrorn- 
'isiration to help his countiy, 
President Mandela had a 
troadcr message on Thursday, 
saving that as the world s na- 
tions grew closer together, nch 
Hinds needed to do more to aid 
their poor counterparts because 


that would serve the cause of 
democracy and peace world- 
wide. 

In an address filled with po- 
etic passages, Mr. Mandela told 
the lawmakers that if ‘‘the 
world is one stage and the ac- 
tions of its inhabitants part of 
the same drama," then "each 
one of us as nations. Including 
yourselves, should begin to de- 
fine the national interest to in- 
clude the genuine happiness of 
others, however distant in time 
and space their domicile might 

be.” 

Mr. Mandela, who received a 
five-minute standing ovation 
when he entered, used his fo- 
rum to serve not as national 
spokesman but as global states- 
men and visionary. He de- 


scribed a vision in which the 
masses of Africa and elsewhere 
in the Third World would not 
be marginalized, but would be 
central to a cooperative world- 
wide effort to increase prosperi- 
ty and freedom. 

' He said that with the Cold 
War over, il was time to move 
"to the positive.” He urged a 
shift to “the global creation of 
the conditions which will make 
it possible for all peoples to 
enjoy the right to full human 
dignity.” 

Sprinkling passages from 
Langston Hughes, T. S. Eliot 
and Walt Whitman into his re- 
marks, Mr. Mandela saw 21st 
century telecommunications 
creating a problem for fledgling 
democracies like South Africa. 


“The new age will surely de- 
mand that democracy must also 
mean a life of plenty,” he said. 
"As the images of life lived any- 
where on our globe become 
available to all, so will the con- 
trast between the rich and the 
poor.” 

That, he said, will become a 
"force impelling the deprived to 
demand a better life from the 
powers that be." 

Mr. Mandela said great 
countries like the United States 
and institutions such as the 
World Bank and Internationa] 
Monetary Fund and European 
Union had to base (heir policies 
and actions “on the creation of 
a world of democracy, peace 
and prosperi ty." 



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Page 4 


Pi 


TF 

nv 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


* 

. **r 


OPINION 



limits 


INTERNATIONAL 



Srtinnte 


Piihlnhril Will Thr Nrw %irk Timm anil Th* Wynliinjjini IV».r 


Saddam Still Has Far to Go 


The continuing argument over lifting 
the international sanctions on Iraq, ag- 
gressor in the Gulf War, is in a new and 
more difficult phase, thanks in large mea- 
sure to the success of the last phase. The 
United Nations bad insisted that Iraq 
open up to intrusive inspection to ensure 
that it could not retain or acquire region- 
threatening weapons of mass destruction. 
So now, Saddam Hussein has by common 
agreement gone far to meet the United 
Nations' terms and is demanding that 
sanctions be brought to an end 

There is a case against piling on new 
demands, and it is no less weighty for 
being made mostly by those countries and 
economic sectors that look forward to lu- 
crative trade with Baghdad. The case is 
this: If you keep “raising the goalposts” 
and denying rewards for good behavior, 
you weaken an offender’s incentive to 
meet international standards at all. 

Saddam Hussein, however, is not an 
ordinary regional transgressor. He is an 
unregencrate potential repeat offender 
and the leader of a once-and-future 
powerhouse state, who could reasonably 
be expected to make further trouble 
with tne resources he would gain from 
the lifting of sanctions. This is the ratio- 
nale for the American call to take into 
account, in the sanctions debate, “all 
the issues which comprise the true test 
of Iraq’s peaceful intentions." 


Foremost among these is recognition 
of the sovereignty and borders of Kuwait, 
the country that Iraq swallowed in 1990 
and continues to call its “19th province.” 
Not to require Iraq to make a full formal 
disavowal of the central claim that led it 
to war is to invite U to take a second bite. 
Fortunately, the centrality of this issue is 
widely accepted, as is the requirement 
that Iraq account for people and property 
it took away during its invasion. 

Not so well accepted as it ought to be is 
the requirement to use the embargo as a 
lever against Iraqi repression of Smites in 
the South and Kurds in the North. It 
would be insupponably inconsistent to 
allow Saddam Hussein to escape the very 
economic isolation be is imposing, along 
with harsh military measures, on two vul- 
nerable groups of his own citizens. 

Otherwise, Saddam is said to have 
ordered the ears cut off of hundreds of 
accused army deserters and draft evad- 
ers. Such punishment is not what the 
United Nations wrote sanctions to 
counter. But it reminds onlookers of the 
way Saddam Hussein uses power, and it 
unavoidably colors the atmosphere in 
which the issue is weighed. The wise 
course remains to go slow on lifting 
sanctions. Who will have the will, once 
trade resumes, to interrupt it to punish 
further offenses? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Mexico in the Cross-Hairs 


EU: In the Nordic Debate 9 a Clash of Nationalisms 


H ELSINKI —The decision 10 
enlarge the European Union 
to include Austria, Finland, Nor- 
way and Sweden has been taken 
by the governments concerned, 
but will the people follow their 
leaders? The Austrians have al- 
ready said yes, but in the three 
Nordic countries, opinion re- 
mains divided and the outcome 
of referendums to be held in Oc- 
tober and November uncertain. 

More is at stake than the cred- 
ibility of the three governments. 
A rejection of membership by a 
majority of voters in the Nordic 
countries would be a serious 
blow to EU aspirations to repre- 
sent the wave of the future for all 
of Europe. Its democratic legiti- 
macy, already widely questioned 
within the member states, would 
be further weakened. 

The order of voting — Finland 
first on OcL 16, Sweden next on 
Nov. 13, Norway last on Nov. 27 
— was determined on the basis of 
opinion polls indicating that the 
Finns were most likely to vote in 
favor of membership. A yes in 
Finland would then, it was 
hoped, have a domino effect in 
Sweden and Norway. 

The assumption underlining 
this strategy is that geopolitical 
factors are likely to have a greater 
impact in Finland than in the 
other two countries. Simply put, 
Norway has NATO and Sweden 
has Finland, but Finland shares 
an 1,100-kilometer (700-mile) 
border with Russia. And the 


Bv Max Jakobsoo 


Furnish, conditioned by history, 
tend to view Russia** conversion 
to democracy and peaceful be- 
havior with some skepticism. 

From distant vantage points, it 
is argued that the imperialist rhet- 
oric heard from Moscow need 
not be taken seriously. Politicians 
tend to raise tbeir voices when 
arguing a weak case. Russia is 
weak today, and it is a fallacy to 
imagine that Russia could be- 
come strong again by reverting to 
a dosed command economy and 
an aggressive foreign policy — by 
methods that led to the downfall 
of the Soviet Union- For a long 
time to come, Russia will lack the 

strength to play an important role 
in world affairs. 

But. as a regional power, Rus- 
sia retains a massive preponder- 
ance over its European neigh- 
bors, and Russia's weakness in 
the global context has the para- 
doxical effect of intensifying the 
security concerns of the nations 
living along its borders. As a con- 
sequence, many Finns view the 
European Union as a safe haven 
and are likely to vote accordingly. 

But Lhe Russian scene has been 
relatively calm in the post few 
months,' and recent polls indicate 
that support for EU membership 
is flue mating in Finland, while in 
Sweden it is gaining ground. 

Such swings in opinion illus- 
trate the hazards of governing by- 
referendum. Yet there is no 


turning back. Parliaments have 
been partly paralyzed by the is- 
sue of EU membership. 

It is an issue that cuts across 
party lines. In Finland, for ex- 
ample, opponents to member- 
ship include conservative farm- 
ers, former Communists, leftist 
intellectuals, nationalists of the 
far right, militant feminists and 
fundamentalist Protestants 1 , a 
grotesque coalition in parlia- 
mentary terms. And so party 
managers prefer to let the issue 
be decided in a referendum rath- 
er than risk losing control over 
their party organization. 


This abdication of parliamen- 
tary responsibility lias had con- 
sequences that wore hardly con- 
sidered at the time the decision 
to hold referendums was taken. 

One is the populist character 
of the campaign. In a parliamen- 
tary election, the opposition is 
always inhibited by the knowl- 
edge that success wrfl bringwith 
it responsibility. In a referen- 
dum, on the other band, no such 
constraints operate. It is a battle 
between the Establishment and 
the Common People, in which 
victory for the opposition would 
cripple the governments in pow- 
er without replacing them. 

As Jacques Delon has said. 



By IOEP BERTRAMS la Hu VMMi (AoMMrlaail VWflQ ^ymittmUoa 


no one can be expected to love a 
common market, but it seems- ■ 
many people are able to hate it. 
Those who say no to member- 
ship in the Union say it wit hi 
passion, believing they are de-. 
fending the independence and 
traditional way of life of theit 
country. ■ Supporters of rocmr * 
bership on the whole lack; . 
strong emotional commitment. 

But it would be a mistake to . 

Opposition to the Union r 
as an expression of outdated 
tionalism. The relentless adj- 
vance of integration creates j 
tune fears of social insiat 
The European idea is too 
street a pd distant to inspire w 
kind of loyalty and solidarity 
tbatisneccMvy far thecohesfc® 
and orderly functioning of soct- . 
ctles. Only a healthy nwtoa*Kg» : , 
can provide such a focus. 

In the debate in the Nordic 
countries, both sides are in Stfl 
nationalists. The difference be- 
tween them is that supporters of 
EU membership are optimists 
who believe that their country 
can best advance its national in- 
terest by entering the Union, 
while opponents are pessimists 
who’ fear that membership is 
bound to lead to a loss of mdo~ 
pendanoD and national identity. 

The writer is a fanner Finnish 
ambass a dor K> the United Nations. 
He contrUhdedtitts comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 




Jfos6 Francisco Ruiz Massieu, the depu- 
ty leader of Mexico’s governing Institu- 
tional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, was 
assassinated Sept 28 and government in- 
vestigators now think anti-reform factions 
of the party may have been involved. Simi- 
lar allegations surrounded the murder of 
the party’s presidential candidate, Luis 
Donaldo Colosio, in March. 

The United States has a strong interest 
in assuring that surviving reformers, like 
President-elect Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de 
Ledn. do not feel intimidated about press- 
ing for further change and that Mexican 
politics is not drawn further into a cycle of 
violence. But given Mexico's sensitivities 
about U.S. meddling, Washington must 
pursue those goals with extraordinary tact 

Mr. Ruiz Massieu was a strong Ze- 
dillo loyalist but he also had good rela- 
tions with traditionalist FRI power bro- 
kers hostile to reform. Had he not been 
murdered, he might have calmed the 
civil war that has been tearing the gov- 
erning party apart since the late 1980s. 
During the transition period, Mr. Ruiz 
Massieu was working to line up the 
PRI’s majority delegation in Congress 
behind Mr. Zedillo’s reform program. 
After that, he probably would have 
moved on to a key cabinet post. 

Like the still-unresolved murder of Mr. 


Colosio, the shooting of Mr. Ruiz Mas- 
sieu. could conceivably have been linked 
to drug cartels, personal vendettas, PRI 
conspirators or some combination of the 
three. The leading suspects include a PRI 
congressman and a former federal land 
official. Both originally hail from the oil 
state of Tama ulj pas, where drugs, corrup- 
tion and hostility to reform are embed- 
ded in the political culture. According to 
the brother of one suspect, Mr. Ruiz 
Massieu’s name had been on a hit list of 
pro-reform politicians targeted for death. 

Though Mexico has just gone through a 
multi-party election, it remains essentially 
a one-party state. The PRI has monopo- 
lized the presidency since the victorious 
generals of the Mexican Revolution orga- 
nized the party 65 years ago. Mexico's 
sharpest political struggles take place not 
between parlies but within the PRI. 

Mr. Zedillo wiQ be Mexico’s third 
successive president from the PRI's pro- 
reform wing. Party traditionalists fed shut 
out at the top and threatened at the base 
by reforms that undermine the old patron- 
age machines. Mr. Zedillo cannot govern 
against his own parly. His best hope of 
harnessing it lies with men like Mr. Ruiz 
Massieu. If such men become targets. 
Mexico faces a violent and chaotic future 
— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Albania’s Show Trial Looks Like a Perilous Provocation of Athens 


N ORTH GRAFTON, Massachusetts 
— The conviction of five leaders of 
Albania's ethnic Greek community on es- 
pionage charges in a political show trial 
has aggravated tensions between Greece 
and Albania and set in motion repercus- 
sions that could affect the entire Balkans 
and even the United States. 

Observers from half a dozen foreign 
human rights groups have described the 
trial, which ended Sept. 7 with sentences of 
six to eight years in prison, as a gross 
violation of international standards. Alba- 
nian opposition leaders called the trial 
a political maneuver. 

The defendants said they were physical- 
ly and psychologically tortured during de- 
tention, and during the trial they were 
denied the right to question the prosecu- 
tion's witnesses or to present their own. A 
representative of Amnesty International. 
Bjorn Elmquist, declared that the trial was 
“a staged process” that the authorities ma- 
nipulated for propaganda. 

And Minnesota Advocates for Human 
Rights said in a report that “despite broad 
accusations and strong rhetoric, the prose- 
cution did not present direct evidence of the 


By Nicholas Gage 

charge.” The defendants were convicted 
even though there was never proof that they 
were in any position to know government 
secrets, let alone pass them to Greek agents. 

Why did the government try these men? 
They are the most vocal leaders of the civil 
rights organization Omonia (Greek for 
harmony), founded by the Greek minority 
in Albania. (The number of Greeks in 
Albania, most of them in the southern 
region called Northern Epirus, is put at 

400.000 bv Athens. 60.000 by Tirana and 

280.000 by the CIA.) 

These convictions (whose appeal is being 
considered this week) are part of a wave of 
persecution of Albania's Greek minority 
launched by the government of President 
Soli Berisha. Since he came to power in 
1992. he has forced virtually all Greek offi- 
cers out of the armed forces, has drastically 
reduced Greek representation in the police, 
judiciary and public administration, and 
has cut back G reek-language schools. 

All these measures, including the trial, 
are intended to make ethnic Greeks in 


Albania feel that they are powerless, have 
no hope of retaining their ethnic identity 
and must abandon their homes and move 
south to Greece. 

The trial so angered the Greek govern- 
ment that it expelled more than 70,000 
illegal Albanian workers. Critics in Europe 
and the United States called the expulsions 
excessive. But Athens argues that other Eu- 
ropean countries have refused to accept 
Albanian workers, while Greece took in 
400,000, who send home more than S350 
million a year. Why would Mr. Berisha 
provoke Greece and lose a mayor part of 
Albania's vital income? The most credible 
explanation is that the pressure on ethnic 
Greeks to abandon they homeland is the 
first step in his plan to enlarge Albania. 

He hopes to force the Greeks out in 
order to secure the southern Hank. Then he 
can encourage Albanian enclaves in lhe 
former Yugoslavia to revolt and seek 
union with Albania without worrying that 
Greece will take advantage of the unrest to 
occupy Northern Epirus. 

Supporting this scenario is Mr. Berisha's 
call for self-determination for Albanians 
in the Kosovo region of Serbia, and for 


constituent-nation status (which includes 
the right of secession) for the Albanian 
enclave in the western port of the former 
Yugoslav republic of Macedonia. 

This agenda promises to create conflict 
throughout the southern Balkans, eventu- 
ally involving Greece and Albania’s ally 
Turkey. These two heavily armed NATO 
members are regional fo«‘ if they tangle, 
only American forces could separate them. 

As long as the ethnic Greek minority 
survives In Albania it may check Mr. Bert- 
sha’s ambitions, because any rebellions in 
the Albanian enclaves in. the former Yugo- 
slavia would raise the risk that Greek 
forces would cross the border to protect 
fellow Greeks in Northern Epirus.; 

Anger raised by the trial has brought^ 
regional tensions to a boiling point. They *- 
can be reduced by persuading Mr. Berisha 
to stop persecuting the Greats and to be- 
gin improving relations with Athens. The 
first step is to free the Greek prisoners. 

Mr. Gage, who was bom in Greece near ■ 
the Albanian bonier, writes frequently on the . 
Balkans. He contributed this comment to * 
The New York Times. 


IT- 


Helping Zaire to Help Itself Lhe Smoke Over Parts of Asia Obscures Some Profound Concerns 


Zaire is an African crash story, but the 
United States and some of its friends in 
the West are now attempting to rescue 
what is still there to be saved. They art 
offering a bit of political and economic 
support to the new prime minister, Leon 
Kengo Wa Dondo, w his improbable ef- 
fort to undo the havoc wreaked by Presi- 
dent Mobutu Sese Seko. This is how Mr. 
Kengo came to be in Washington this 
week. The Cold War took down with it 
U.S. readiness to make support of the 
corrupt Marshal Mobutu the centerpiece 
of its anti-communism policy in Africa, 
and he has been boycotted for years. 

A former Mobutu protfcgfe turned re- 
former, Mr. Kengo has a technocrat's in- 
sider talents. With no tribal power base of 
his own, he has made himself plausible to 
many though not all the dements in 
Zaire's new and unproven political opposi- 
tion. He operates in the sliver of democrat- 
ic space opened up by Marshal Mobutu 
underpressure from the exemplars of Afri- 
can democracy, especially the new South 


Africa, and from Zaire’s foreign lenders. 
But Mr. Kengo remains painfully behold- 
en to his former paLron. The dictator still 
controls the two key national institutions, 
the army and the central bank. Marshal 
Mobutu is also still using his region's rich 
supply of other crises, such as the war in 
Angola and the massacres in Rwanda, to 
try to freshen the stale myth of his own 
strategic indispensability. 

His trip to renew Zaire's Western con- 
tacts gives Mr. Kengo a badly needed 
political card to play at home. Meanwhile, 
Zaire's population, centrality and re- 
sources compel continuing attention. Even 
in its weakened condition and at heavy 
cost, it has offered refuge to many Rwan- 
dans. The possibility of Zaire’s further 
deterioration into its own ethnic ferment 
also compels concern. Mr. Kengo pleads 
for a chance to show Africa and the West 
what new leadership can do in slowly 
democratizing and reconstructing a wast- 
ed land. His promise is worth encouraging. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Give lhe UN the Power It Needs 

The Somali experience cut deep into 
America's soul, making Congress jib at the 
thought of American money, let alone 
American lives, being expended on causes 
not vital to America. This was the main 
single cause for the unconscionable delay 
in getting help to tortured Rwanda. Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton has now ruled that im- 
planting democracy in Haiti is vital. But 
the projected sequence — an American 
force handing over, after a few months, to 
a UN force led by America — carries 
ample warnings. In Somalia such a hand- 
over opened the way to disaster: The Unit- 
ed Nations was pressured to take over 
before it felt ready; America had not ful- 
filled the conditions that the United Na- 


tions thought it had promised; problems 
of dual control plagued the venture. 

This is so damaging that it has led 
some to argue that superpowers should 
be excluded from peacekeeping. Made- 
leine Albright, America's ambassador to 
the United Nations, argues otherwise: 
The United Nations is so short of money, 
die says (failing to add that this is largely 
America’s fault), that the stop-gap solu- 
tion is for it to empower others to do the 
job — but naturally a job of their own 
choosing. The aim should be for the Unit- 
ed Nations, through the Security Council, 
to decide where a UN-sponsored force 
should be deployed and have the capacity 
to man it, not to subcontract the job to 
individual members. 

— The Economist (London). 


S INGAPORE — There are 
views from East Asia that are 
decidedly different from those of 
Kishore Mahbubani in his com- 
ment, “You May Not Like It, 
Europe, but This Asian Medicine 
Could Help” (Opinion. Oct. J). 

First, his metaphor of a “ring 
of fire” defined by political flash- 
points along Europe's edges is fig- 
urative. Here in Southeast Asia, 
such a description is a literal real- 
ity, revealing much about the 
“Asian model” he supports. 

For the past month, Singapore, 
much of Malaysia and parts of 
Indonesia have been choking un- 
der a thick cloud of smoke from 
Indonesian forest fires raging out 
of control. It is unthinkable that 
such a catastrophe in Europe 
would meet with such resounding 
reticence among government offi- 
cials of the affected countries. 

Despite pollution levels in Sin- 
gapore and Kuala Lumpur that 
often surpass or else hover just 
below the unhealthy level, the 
public is belatedly informed that 
a ministerial meeting to address 
this crisis will not be held until 


By Christopher Lingle 


the end of October. One has to 
wonder what Europeans might 
learn from this Asian remedy. 

Such inaction and refusal to 
comment on the internal affairs 
of neighbors is a defining charac- 
teristic of ASEAN, the Associa- 
tion of South East .Asian Nations. 
These Asian states seem more in- 
terested In allowing fellow gov- 
ernments to save face than in sav- 
ing the lives of their citizens or 
preserving the environment. 

The remark that "more lives are 
lost daily on the periphery of Eu- 
rope than in the entire Asia- Pacific 
region” is remarkably disingenu- 
ous. The assertion is probably not 
true. However, there arc no means 
for independent corroboration for 
what goes on in much of Asia. 
News that flows freely and is dis- 
tributed widely in Europe results 
in active public introspection 
about its consequences. 

In many Asian suues, the media 
are subject to numerous restric- 
tions and forms of censorship, 
some blatant, some subtle. As a 


consequence, Asian citizens can 
receive diluted or filtered informa- 
tion, or remain uninformed except 
for self-serving government an- 
nouncements. This control of in- 
formation allows governments to 
release news on their own terms, 
basking in their own glory while 
concealing their failings. 

In the particular case compar- 
ing the loss of life in Europe's 
conflicts, there is no solid infor- 
matron on bow many Asians lost 
their lives in the political strug- 
gles in such places as East Timor, 
Burma or Tibet. 

The indifference of the regimes 
in this region to such outrages 
and crises strongly supports the 
perception that human life is 
worth tittle in Asia. Such a re- 
sponse must be seen in the con- 
text of governments based upon 
patriarchal, collectivist ideals 
where society is placed above self. 
There is no tradition for promot- 
ing individual liberty or protect- 
ing individual rights. 

Mr. Mahbubani's reference to 


Deep in Nevada, Nuclear Danger Lurks 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED IBS7 

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C AMBRIDGE Massachusetts 
— Nevada officials are mak- 
ing two mistakes. They are not 
worrying enough about radioac- 
tive contamination of subsurface 
water from underground nuclear 
tests. And they needlessly fear the 
prospective Yucca Mountain nu- 
clear-waste repository. 

For 30 years, the United States 
conducted a total of nearly 1,000 
underground tests in southern 
Nevada. First, a bole, often more 
than 1,000 feet (300 meters) deep, 
was drilled and the device low- 
ered into it; then the hole was 
tamped except for cables carrying 
the test results to instruments on 
the surface; then the weapon was 
detonated and its performance or 
effects measured. Each explosion 
carved a cavity up to hundreds of 
feet in diameter at the bottom of 
the hole. The cavities, almost al- 
ways below the water table, soon 
filled with water. Hie debris, ra- 
dioactive for thousands of years, 
remains underground today with- 
out barriers to inhibit its move- 
ment in water. 

The water can flow from the 
cavities at rates ranging from a 
few hundredths of an inch to 150 
feet a day. The bureaus responsi- 
ble for monitoring, based at the 
Los Alamos and Livermore 
weapons laboratories, have been 
seriously underfunded. 

Early in the nuclear era, the 
government sponsored theoreti- 
cal studies on the fate of radioac- 


By Kosta Tsipis 


tivity from underground tests. The 
studies largely concluded that it 
posed no significant risk to the 
environment Since then, only a 
few incomplete measurements of 
radioactivity leaking from two 

small cavities have been made. 

Some confirm the theoretical pre- 
dictions; others show hard-to-ex- 
plain, alarmingly fast migration, 
In short there has been little sys- 
tematic evaluation of the degree of 
aquifer contamination. 

In addition, the ground of the 
overall test zone is dotted with 
radioactive piles of abandoned 
equipment and contaminated soil 
from holes dug too near the cavi- 
ties. All these hot spots leach ra- 
dioactivity into the surface-water 
runoffs and contribute further to 
contamination of the aquifer. 

While tittle attention is paid to 
the big problem, there is unneces- 
sarily vigorous opposition to the 
construction of a carefully engi- 
neered subterranean repository in 
Yucca Mountain, 100 miles (160 
kilometers) northwest of Las Ve- 
gas. The government wants to use 
it to store spent fuel from com- 
mercial nuclear power reactors 
and even plutonium from disas- 
sembled nuclear weapons. In the 
1 980$, a study of the site found it 
safe. Foes of nuclear power 
forced another study, and a deep 
tunnel is now being dug to ex- 


plore the mountain's geology pre- 
paratory to developing an envi- 
ronmental impact statement. 

Designed to erect several barri- 
ers to the migration of radioactiv- 
ity, this essential repository 
would prevent any leakage of ra- 
dioactivity into the aquifer, ex- 
cept in case of an improbable 
major geological upheaval. 

As Tor die underground-test 
zone, in 1993 die Energy Depart- 
ment successfully opposed the re- 
sumption of tests that the Penta- 
gon was demanding. Now it 
should request additional funds 
from Congress to conduct a sys- 
tematic and complete examination 
of the fate of the leftover radioac- 
tivity in the thousand-odd cavities. 

If the migration of radioactive 
isotopes from them proves to be 
slow, fears of serious environmen- 
tal contamination from the nucle- 
ar tests will be assuaged. But if the 
migration appears worrisome, the 
water supply of populated areas 
downstream from the test sites will 
have to be monitored closely. 

Any threat to the public health 
would come from the unoontoined 
radioactive legacy of the nudear 
aims race, not from the proposed 
Yucca Mountain repository. 

77j<? writer directs the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology's 
program in science and technology 
for international security. He con- 
tributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 


the tragic carnage in Europe may 
be corrccL However, he conve- 
niently overlooks the fact that 
considerable numbers of lives are 
ruined in Asia for participating in 
political opposition. 

Intolerant regimes in the region 
reveal considerable ingenuity in 
their methods of suppressing dis- 
senL Some techniques lack finesse: 
crushing unarmed students with 
tanks, or imprisoning dissidents. 
Others are more subtle: relying 
upon a compliant judidaiy to 
bankrupt opposition politicians, 
or buying out enough of the oppo- 
sition to take control “democrati- 
cally.” Trade unionists in Europe 
seldom face such pressures. 

Mr. Mahbubani's claims are 
strongest when he is not compar- 
ing Europe's flawed institution's 
to Asia's allegedly superior ones. 
For example, it is hard to disagree 
with his advice for ending Eu- 
rope’s agricultural subsidies. Al- 
though consistency demands that 
the South Korean and Japanese 
governments muster the political 
witi to face down their farmers on 
this issue, he conspicuously re- 
frains from offering such advice 
to his Asian neighbors. 

One is also heartened by Mr. 
Mahbubani’s encouragement of 
increased global rather than re- 
gional integration. Nonetheless, 
his remarks do not seem to square 
with the initiatives for an ASEAN 
free-trade area or an East Asian 
economic caucus. Certainly it is 
wrong for Turkey to be excluded 
from the European Uaion. Mean- 
while, India is kept at arm's 
length by ASEAN. 

After being called to account for 


regional myopia. Europe is 
blamed for overlooking the three 
big forces on its doorstep: Russia, 
Africa and Islam. Mr. Mahbubani 
deftly side-steps the lack of mutual 
response among Asians to three 
big forces that threaten their sta- 
bility: China, overpopulation and 
a rapidly decaying environment. 

Meanwhile, his articulate deliv- 
ery masks the shrill refrain that is 
increasingly commonplace 
among apologists of authoritar- 
ian regimes in Asia. 

During the Cold War, the 
ASEAN states used the image of a 
Communist menace to great ef- 
fect. They developed a coherent 
front that provided legitimacy to 
their often repressive methods. Ijjp* 
served an end that was applaudar- 
by the West As a reword, devel- 
oped economies provided those 
Asian regimes with national 9WF ■ 
rity guarantees and generally open 
markets while turning a blind eye 
to the boot kept at the throat of 
tbeir political opponents. 

With the disappearance. of 
communism as a realistic threat, 
some Asian regimes deflect inter- 
est from tbeir rigid authoritarian 
control by pointing to the ejaro* 
sive effect on their societies from 
the decadent influences of the. 
West Yet the only certain threat 
associated with the introduction 
of liberal democracy is its weak* 
ening effect upon tfie cboke bold 
of one-party political dominance. 

The writer, senior fellow in J&k 
ropean studies at the National Uni- 
versity of Singapore, contributed 
this personal comment to the Inter- 
national lUrald Tribune. 





m 0UR PAGES; 10 °- 75 and so years Ann 




1894: Moukden Attacked 

SHANGHAI — Telegrams From 
Moukden to-day [Ocl 6] report 
that thousands of Chinese sol- 
diers have been passing through 
the town in wild retreat. The Jap- 
anese army is believed to have 
arrived there now. The Japanese 
are aided by 10,000 armed Cor- 
eans. The Empress Dowager of 
China is now exercising the su- 
preme power in the Empire. 

1919: Uprising Is Foiled 

NEW YORK — A committee 
composed of civilians and military 
authorities investigating the riot- 
ing at Helena, Arkansas, has re- 
ported a widespread plot of ne- 
groes Tor an uprising, arranged to 
take place to-day {Oct. 6J, wherein 
the negroes intended to massacre 
the white planters and take over 
their plantations. The confessions 
of several prisoners agree in de- 


tidls* and consequently the au- 
thorities are redoubling toetr efforts 
to rapture the ringleaders, who in* 
crude whites as well as negroes. 

1944* Dutch Laud Grab? 

LONDON — [From our Now 
York edition;] The Dutch people, 
never annexationists by nature," 
are taking an increasingly realistic 
ytmv of maldng permanent 
nal clams against Germany, EdJ 
N. van KlejTois, Nelhariandsftl 


i,uuu l uuo acres of rim 
farm land, much of it purely “ma- 
liaou$“by fanatical defense eiuri- - 
ncers. The Foreign Minister’s att£ - ' 
tude was that if the influx of sail” V. 
!SJ?j c £f r . to kjghly productive . • 
^bariW and potato fields of 
Holland had a lasting effecl. bis 
government would be entitled to ‘ 
^ for an equally bountiful share ' ;v 

or German territory. : 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7. 1994 

OPINION 


Pago o 


In California’s Elections, 
Victory May Be in Defeat 

By William Satire 

T OS ANGELES — “Cogniuvedis- to children of illegals and turn teact 
sonance” is ih^ jangling in your ers inio government informers, an 



I Uj AiN utLfcb ‘ Cognitive dis- to children of illegals and turn teach* 

i-< sonance" is ih^ jangling in your ers into government informers, and 
it - 611 y° u hold beliefs that for what — to put hard-working im- 
clash with each other. Nowhere does migrants in costly jaiJs? 
that apply more than in the 1994 Libertarian conservatives like me 
election campaign in California. are a small segment of the voting 
1. Women running as candidates public, but we have long memories 
are good, but candidates running as and are put off by this excessive grit- 
women are bad. Both parties need to tin ess. Pro-choice Pete Wilson, ar- 
get more women running for ever- tractive in many ways as a decisive, 
higher positions. When Republicans hold-down-government alternative 
elected Christie Whitman as New to Mr. Clinton, could find that riding 
Jersey governor, they opened the this anti-immigrant tide today could 
possibility of a woman on the 199$ generate a powerful undertow later, 
national ticket. 3. Business executives should 

But the L992 “year of the worn- plunge into politics but a private for- 
an,' 1 when some women candidates tune shouldn’t buy a Senate seal, 
won mainl y on the basis of sex, is Michael Huffington, a one-term rep- 
- - - resentative given no chance at the 

The year of the men? Only 
on the surface, even if men 

candidates in kish-visibiUtr Mr - Wilson’s manager, George Gor- 
r . . - . ^ J ton, says that with likely low turnout 

Lalljorrua defeat their this year, a Democrat needs a four- 


m PtWKLY.IWlSH \ 

HE'D STICK TO . 
HI BUILDIN6TTK&E. F 
m. LITTLE HOUSK- ^ 

m ww® w § 

1 PN4SIH6? 




Snuffing Out the Smokes 
Of the Great and Famous 


B> Charles Paul Freund 






mm 








women opponents . 

having its inevitable backlash. One 
sign of women voters’ political ma- 
turity is that the moment of higb- 
heeled shoo-ins has past. 

In California, the only state with 
two women Democratic senators, 
Kathleen Brown found that a fam- 
ous family name combined with 
womanhood does not a gubernato- 
rial candidacy make. And wbea she 
turned on Senators Barbara Boxer 
and Dianne Fein stein for having 
changed their minds abont capital 
punishment — suggesting that only 
she remained principled in opposi- 
tion — Jerry Brown’s ‘lister turned 
off some women Democrats. 

2. The best candidate has the worst 
issue. Governor Pete Wilson, who 
seemed to have terminal negatives a 
year ago, got up off the floor, roared 
back and now has a commanding 
lead. Mr. Wilson, universally de- 
scribed in the media as a “gritty ex- 
marine," has a lock on law and order, 
another victory in California, the 
largest state, would give the Republi- 
cans a hot prospect to make Bill 
Clinton a one-tram president. (Mr. 
Wilson has said this race would cap 
his career, but most Californians, like 
most New Yorkers, do not worry 
about governors using die state house 
as a stepping-stone.) . 

The dissonance: Mr: Wilson’s anti- 
ill egal -immigrant rhetoric, so helpful 
to fus resuscitation, has led the gritty 
ex-marine to embrace the “Save Our 
State” proposition, ftiis nativist 
abomination would deny education 


point lead in the polls to win. The 
senator, a wealthy woman, is now 
professing to be considering mort- 
gaging her home to raise TV money. 

Democrats, on the defensive for 
Ms. Feinsiein’s lax-increase vote, 
are reduced to complaining about 
Arianna Siassinopoulos Huffing- 
ton’s New Age spirituality. That’s 
almost as low as Ted Kennedy’s 
blast at his opponent’s Mormonisra 
in Massachusetts; Arianna is the 
Republicans’ Shirley MacLaine. 

A carpetbagger charge at Mr. 
Huffington, a Texan, has little reso- 
nance in a stare Oiled with people 
from elsewhere. (“When Robert Ken- 
nedy ran for the Senate in New York, 
he was accused of asking, “Where are 
the Bronx?" Didn't stop him.) 

Plenty of dissonance here. This 
outcome will depend on the emer- 
gence of a “clothespin vote" for Mr. 
Huffington — from people willing 
to tolerate an activist arriviste with 
profound pockets and a right-wing- 
ing inclination to let 'em eat cake — 
in the hope of chang in g the majority 
in the U.S. Senate. 

The year of the men? Only on the 
surface, even if men in high-visibili- 
ty California (and Illinois) defeat 
women opponents. If women lose 
this year, they can blame President 
Albatross; in California as across 
the nation, more and better women 
candidates are in die wings. 

Cognitive dissonance is a bother to 
partisans of individual politicians 
and to true believers in any ideology, 
but serves an ameliorating purpose: 
You lose a little with your winner and 
win a little with your loser. 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Disney's Park That Wasn’t 

Regarding the report “ Disney 
Packs Up Muskets Ai Cm/ War Bat- 
tlefield" (Sept. 30): 

Three cheers for Disney Corp.’s 
sensitive and sensible decision not 
to build a theme park near Civil War 
battlefields in Virginia. Disney 
Corp.’s consideration of the historic 
and environmental concerns of the 
region is to be congratulated. It also 
provides a model of how a large 
corporation can gain the greater 
community’s lasting appreciation 
and respect by thinking beyond the 
immediate "bottom line.’’ ’ 

We take issue, however, with the 
suggestion that a small group of 
landowners was able to prevent the 
project over the hopes of the larger 
community. On the contrary, in 
seeking signatures for a petition 
against the Disney project, our 
group (Save the Battlefield Coali- 
tion) encountered thousands of citi- 
zens of widely differing ethnic and 
economic backgrounds who simply 
did not want the beautiful Virginia 
countryside destroyed by massive 
commercial development. 

MARK BRZEZINSKI. 

CAROLYN BRZEZINSKL 
London. 

Oink, dang, danger 

In “The Clank of Falsity and of 
Marley,” William Safire hints at erro- 
neous plagiarism by David Kendall 
the Clintons’ private attorney, for us- 
ing “clanging ring of falsity” over Mr. 


Safire’s original “clank of falsity.” 
( Language. ~Sept . 26). One could also 
say that the lawyer dropped a danger 
(made a very obvious mistake). 

R. G. HART. 

Vienna. 

Dishonor for Europeans? 

Regarding “Following the Europe- 
ans to Dishonor" (Opinion. Sept. 30): 

William Safire accuses France 
and Britain of dragging the United 
Slates down the road to dishonor by 
arguing for postponement of the 
lifting of the arms embargo in favor 
of Bosnian forces. 

We do not know whether Paris 
and London talked Alija Izeibego- 
vic into asking President Bill Clin- 
ton to postpone a decision approved 
by Congress. Nor can we know’ 
whether it is true that the president 
and his administration were relieved 
not to lake a step, the wisdom of 
which, according to some reliable 
reports, they questioned on two 
counts. One was whether it u'ould 
have helped or hurt the Bosnians; 
the other was the grave risk of a 
severe crisis in the alliance. 

To think that the lifting of the 
embargo would tip the scale to (he 
advantage of the Bosnians is a per- 
fectly legitimate opinion, although 
strongly denied by the highest mili- 
tary authorities, on the spot and 
elsewhere. 

Let us simply say that the policies 
and motives of countries that have 
several thousand of their troops 
there, already at too heavy a cost in 


lives, should at feast be spared the 
insult to their honor «.«f noncommit- 
led bystanders. This is reminiscent 
or the early months of World War 
II, before the fall of France, when 
Nazi propaganda’s favorite theme 
was that England v.ould fight "to 
the last Frenchman.” 

Let us beware of the danger of a 
sentiment settling in across Europe 
that, in the Balkan 1 -, the United 
Slates is ready to fuel the fight to the 
last Bosnian and endanger' the lives 
of United Nations soldiers — hos- 
tages to their commitment to a hu- 
manitarian mission. 

FRANCOIS rie ROSE. 

Former French Ambassador 
to NATO. 

Paris. 

On a Singapore Arrest 

Regarding “Singapore Arrests 
U.S. Executive in Assault Case” 
(Sept. 19) by Philip Shenort: 

The article stated that Robert 
Freehill’s case had alarmed other 
American businessmen in Singapore 
who fear that it is pan of a vendetta 
by the Singapore government 
against the United States. It also 
cites businessmen and diplomats to 
whom the charges appeared to be an 
effort to punish Mr. Freehill for 
the actions of his son. 

Mr. Freehill was charged for as- 
sault and using abusive language. 
The article did not include Mr. Free- 
hill’s actual words: “Why don’t you 
teach this dog s— to park the car?” 
"All you f— mg Singaporean bas- 


W ASI 1 1 N< H ON — I lie image of 
the MucMiirm Robert Johnson 
has been featured on a newly released 
U.S. stamp, with the prominent ciga- 
rette carefully removed. But Mr. 
Johnson's is not the first cigarette to 
be erased from an ‘’official'' linage by 

■Jl lii'jcomfiurd bureaucracy. 

I iga relic-erasure constitutes an 
oild hitie ihapier in the history of 

MKVNWlflLE 

political loialisin, although it is il- 
lnsir.iloe •»! the potential c\pres- 
si\ene>s of smoking. 

Several instances are reproduced 
by the French journalist Alain Jau- 
beri in his I'Wb book called, in Eng- 
lish. “Making People Disappear." 
which is devoted io cases of image 
falsification. None of them conic 


tards are alike.” “F — you. f~ you 
people are always picking on u» 
white men." “F — ing Singaporean 
Chinese Chink, bastard Chinese.” 

Mr. Freehill committed the of- 
fenses on three separate occasions 
between December 1^2 and May 
1994. The complainants lodged sep- 
arate police reports. The ease had 
nothing to do with Mr. Freehill’s 
son or Michael Fay. In court, ad- 
vised by counsel of his choice. Mr. 
Frcehiil pleaded guilty to the 
charges of using abusive language. 
He also admitted to the charges of 
assault, which the court took into 
consideration in sentencing him. 

Mrs. Freehill claimed that she of- 
fered to make a statement in 1992, 
but that a police officer had told her 
it was not necessary. This is untrue. 
Mrs. Freehill has never offered to 
make a statement to the police. She 
has repeatedly refused to cooperate, 
thereby hampering and delaying po- 
lice investigations. 

The article quoted the State De- 
partment as saying that “we expect 
Singaporean authorities to treat 
Freehill fairly and have made that 
view known to the government of 
Singapore.” The Singapore govern- 
ment has received no representa- 
tions from the State Department 
concerning Mr. Freehill. 

All persons charged with breaking 
the law in Singapore receive equal 
and fair treatment irrespective of 
nationality. 

S. R. NATHAN. 

Ambassador of Singapore. 

Washington. 


from political cultures ue admire 

There is the example oi Fnw r 
Hoxha. the SuliniM dictator oi .V 
bania. He once i an a cafe and loK«. 
co >hop, and a photo oi him liur . 
captures him in his rumpled -.m. 
with a bun hanarni: out of hi 
mouth: he is revealed .in 5 v*nn -o. 
Maximum Leader than a hart rev 
barman wiping glasses. The p!:oi 
was later retouched so a* to rc\ 
the uisdiint and inner strength •< 
had alnay* piK-c<«ed. qualities th,-: 
may have been I«b>eurcd by tin* v:e : 
relic, which was ehminareJ. 

M.to smoked, loo. although ihw 
was a time when the Chinese inu.v 
police thought that was an incur: re 
nient fact. A 1 9.17 diot ,«f him u 
Yenan. taken well before he 
sumed power, captures him stand- 
ing casually with a cigarette us lib 
hand. Because, as Mr. Jauher: 
writes, that "did nol a word uirh the 
great man’s dignity the image ihq: 
Taler appeared in C hinese hisjors 
texts omitted the cigarette Mao’s 
offending right arm was m.uk to 
look as if he were holding it behind 
his back, but unfortunately the re- 
touchers overlooked the perfecth 
visible shadow Mao cast: that shad- 
ow continues to smoke. 

Stalin also smoked, and was 
smoking when photographed shak- 
ing hands with the German foreign 
minister. Joachim von Rihbentrop. 
after signing his pact with Hitler. 
Hitler, on the other hand, was an 
aggressive nonsmokcr. When he saw 
the Slaltn-von Rihbentrop photo- 
graph. he was furious: he thought 
the cigarette ruined the solemnity of 
the occasion. Stalin’s smoke was 
erased on Hitler's orders before the 
photo was released to the press. 

Similar questions of image dignity 
have arisen in the West, although 
with revealingiy different results. 
The statue of Winston Churchill 
that stands before the British Em- 
bassy in Washington is a case in 
point. When statue design was an- 
nounced it included a cigar in the 
prime minister's hand; the question 
arose whether this was any way to 
commemorate a great man. The ci- 
gar had become a symbol of his 
doggedness and character. Chur 
chUTs statue is clutching the ciga: 
now, presumably promoting tobac- 
co day and night. 

Churchill’s dogged cigar probably 
wouldn't survive today, and neither 
would FDR’s debonair cigarette b 
its long holder; they would be 
snuffed out in the same memory 
ashtray that now holds Robert 
Johnson’s smoke. 

The Washington Past 


BOOKS 


CHINA WAKES; 

Hie Struggle for ripe Soul 
of a Rising Power 

By Nicholas D. Kristof and 
Sheryl WuDunn. 502 popes, S25. 
Times Books. 

Reviewed by 
Richard H. Solomon 

U NTIL the late 1960s, most 
Americans formed their 
impressions of China primarily 
through the reporting of major 
journalistic personalities. Fig- 
ures like the strongly anti-Com- 
mimist Henry Luce and Joseph 


WHAT THEY BE READING 


• John Merriman, professor 
of history at Yale University, is 
reading “ Seducing the French ” 
by Richard F. Kuisd. 

“Kuisel examines the growth 
of anti-Ameri canism in the con- 
text of the Cold War. It's an 
interesting look at the some- 
times tense intersection of two 
cultures and the victorious 
struggle of the French to remain 
French." (Samuel Abt, IHT) 


Their partisan reporting tion dhaos during the late 1960s 



part of Deng Xiaoping’ s "open- 
ing” policies that have pro- 
duced China's dramatic eco- 
nomic takeoff? 

Kristof and his Chinese- 
American wife Sheryl WuDunn 
were Pulitzer Prize-winning 
correspondents in China for 
The New York Times from 
1988 to 1993. Kristof says he 
has little affection for ihe'Mid- 
die Kingdom. His hostility to- 
ward official harassment of for- 
eign journalists and 
suppression of political dissent- 


ers "was sealed" at Tiananmen, 
where he saw pro-democracy 
demonstrators killed. 

WuDunn, a third-generation 
offspring of immigrants from 
South China, has more complex 
views of her ancestors’ home- 
land. Her language skills and ap- 
pearance gave her intimate ac- 
cess to Chinese society, enabling 
her to circumvent the cflicial 
control system designed to iso- 
late foreign reporters from the 
day-to-day lives of (be people. 

Her chapters in “China 


Alsop at one end of the political helped to impart to the Chi- were transformed overnight by 
spectrum, and writers sympa- nese- American relationship the TV coverage of Prime Minister 
toetic to Mao Zedong's revoiu- dramatic swings of mood that Zhou Enlai toasting President 
tion like Theodore white and continue to trouble Washing- Richard Nixon in the Great Hall 


thetic to Mao £eaong s revoiu- aramauc swings or mooa mai 
tion like Theodore white and continue to trouble Washing- 
Edgar Snow at the other end, ton-Eeijing relations. 


nese- American relationship the TV coverage of Prime Minister 
dramatic swings of mood that Zhou Enlai toasting President 


Richard Nixon in the Great Hall 
of the People during his visit to 
Beijing in 1972. China suddenlv 


were passionate interpreters Such polarized alternations in Beijing in 1972. China suddenly 
and promoters of China's 20th- America’s view of China have was a nation of high culture and 
century struggle to overcome bean intensified in the era of sophisticated diplomacy, 
foreign invasion and transform television. The negative images Then the appealing China 
itselfinto a modern nation. of China in its Cultural Revoiu- with, which the United States 

had normalized relations dur- 
ing the 1970s and 1980s was 
, RRIFiri? transformed, again overnight, 

: DIUDItIj into a threatening police 'stale 

" through CNN coverage of the 

ai._ Tmscott mood. South had to lose anoih- violent suppression of peaceful 


By Alan Truscott 

J OE SILVER, as West, 
helped his team with; a bril- 
liant opening lead on the dia- 
gramed deal 1 i 

One would expect North- 
South to bid briskly to four 
hearts and perhaps make over- 
tricks, since West is likely to 
make a helpful lead in a black 
suit. That happened when Sti- 
ver’s teammates were North- 
South, for the opening lead was 
a club. South led his singleton 
diamond at the second trick 

and put up dummy’s kmg when 
West played low. He then led a 
spade and made 12 tricks. 

Against Silver, as shown. 
South fell into an error. 

The two-heart raise by North 
was mildly encouraging in the 
partnership methods but even 
South should simply have 
bid four hearts. His two-spade 
bid was made in the hope of 
reaching a miraculous slam, 
and his subsequent four-club 
bid was mote of the saine. By 
the time he reached four beans. 
Silver as West had been warned 
against a black-sun lead and 
chose the diamond deuce. 

South played the diamond 
jack from dummy on the as- 
sumption that the ace was on | 
hk n°hL East won with the ; 
queen and shifted to a club A | 
finesse of the queen lost to the ■. 
kin*, and a club was returned to | 
5X«. With only one entry to 

Z dummy, So«f * ““"B 
was now doomed. When he 
ZL trumps ending in dummy 

spade ten, ^stpui 
up ihe spade ace and led a dia- 


mood. South had to lose anoth- 


er trick for down one whether protesters at Tiananmen Square 
or not he ruffed. m 1989. 


NORTH 

* 10 9 A 
CKC2 

0 X J 93 

* J 73 

EAST 

• A Q 3 
S J95 

0 Q 10 7 4 

♦ 9 8 2 
SOUTH (D) 

* K J 6 5 

? A Q ttl 7 4 3 
<■ 5 

* A Q 


bidding: 

South • Wesr 

North 

East 

1 c .< 

Pass 

2 ■: 

Pass 

2A 

_ Pass 

3C 

Pass 

4* 

" Pass 

4 -7 

Pass 

Puss 

Pass 




r not he ruffed. m 1989. 

As Nicholas Kristof asserts in 
north “China Wakes,” most joumalis- 

i I??? wridug 011 China, in retro- 

c, x j 9 3 spect, is “an appalling record” of 

♦ j 7 3 misinterpretations and even fati- 

WEST east ure to grasp fundamental reaH- 1 

* 8 7 a ♦ a q 3 ties. He notes that Edgar Snow, j 

■7 8 ^ J 8 5 who wandered through China in ! 

♦ k ioVs s ♦982 1960 official blessing, failed 

SOUTH (D) to see the signs of the country’s 1 

♦ K J 6 5 worst f amin e. We now know I 

A Q 10 7 4 3 that more than 30 million peas- 

♦ A q ants died as a result of Mao’s , 

Great Leap Forward policies 1 
Neither side was vulnerable. The (hat corttmunized the country’s j 
idding: agriculture, 

ouih • Wesi North East Will Americans gain a more j 

♦ Pass 3 h pSs accuratc - balanced undersiand- 

♦ Pass 4 -7 pass ing of China today as the coun- | 

ass Pass try reluctantly admits foreign j 

West led Ihe diamond two. journalists and TV reporters as 


*71* i l IVnvKMTKlIUl.M « a 

iiera ? ©nbun e 

ISU-4-tVU.fV. V. W, r— .—-TV. 

LIVING IN THE U.S.? 
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■ 71 1 V *OHSiwM.» . v 


WSUBOXHTH Bgfen ttM: nnu«*»vv OWKlWW-* »*• 

International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

I Monday 

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Plus over 300 headings in international Classified 
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For further information, contact Philip Oma in Pans: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33- 1) 46 37 52 \2 


Wakes,” which alternate with 
those of her husband, present a 
complex and empathetic inter- 
pretation cf China's rice-roots 
reality. She is revolted by coer- 
cive birth control practices, yet is 
understanding of the need for 
population limitation. But she is 
heartened by the en-.sraence cf a 
generation cf Chinese million- 
aires. bv young entertainers able 
to mock parr.'" rule, by peasants 
willing to_ fight official corrup- 
tion, and by a flowering of cul- 
tural life and communi cations 




beyond official control — the 
buds of a “civil society” in Chi- 
na. 

The Kristof- WuDunn inter- 
pretation of contemporary Chi- 
na gives us the rough and rich 
texture of a peasant empire now 
transforming itself so rapidly 
that early in the 2 Isi century' 
China is likely to be the world’s 
largest aggregate economy. 

Their interweaving chapters 
help the reader knit together the 
polarized images of the “good” 


China and the"“bad” China that 
have made America’s China 
policy’ so difficult to stabilize. 
Their access to the daily lives o: 
ordinary Chinese gives depth 
and complexity to Lbe TV imag- 
ery that now defines the param- 
eters of the U. $. public debate 
about China policy. 

Rickard H. Solomon, presi- 
dent of the United States Insti- 
tute of Peace, wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 


v V*Y^ ■■ : <: 


. “Hiizli school students in Franhfurt 

. • -v , ' •>.£ V- 

o . - would like to help lytpp-c - - 
v : renovate a school in Harare5'h# id 


. ✓ , ; • ’ . -J 

I;- “Sounds like a good idea for KLl^Rh-’ 
Bridging the World Contests* 


(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


I aiTi mr *n» «II*I liui- 


The Reliable Airline ICLiH! 





Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7. 1994 


«* 


U.S. Priority: Cut Casualties 

Haiti Action Illustrates Pentagon Policy Shift 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. intervention in 
Haiti offers a case study of a shift in the Defense 
Department’s concept of military pl annin g to- 
ward the importance of minimizing casualties. 

The military has always sought to hold down 
its losses, but 'it has nonetheless accepted casual- 
ties as the necessary price of its activities. They 
were built into the pl annin g of any operation. ' 

But with the Pentagon fearful of losing public 
support for an unpopular mission, holding down 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

casualties has become not just an integral part of 
military planning but often a criterion for 
success. 

General John M. Shalikashvili, the chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, acknowledged as 
much when he boasted that the U.S. mission in 
Haiti was succeeding in part because the military 
had suffered minimal losses. 

The U.S. forces have been in Haiti for two and 
a half weeks. 

“We have had two Americans hurt,” the gener- 
al said. “No one killed, thank God." 

Even if the United States had invaded Haiti, 
keeping casualties to a minimum would have 
been a political requirement. But the unopposed 
deployment of troops into what is still a volatile 
and potentially explosive situation has made the 
administration and the public that much less 
tolerant of casualties. 

The larger question, however, is whether the 
administration has encouraged unrealistic expec- 
tations about casualties that will tie U.S. hands 
in future conflicts or invite enemies to target 
Ameri cans in the hope that they can set off a 
storm of criticism at home. 

“If you communicate that you are afraid of 
casualties, it is almost a certain way of inviting 
them,** said Eliot Cohen, a professor at John 
Hopkins School of Advanced International 
Studies. “Our opponents will very quickly figure 
out that is our most important vulnerable.” 


Charles Moskos, a military sociologist at 
Northwestern University, said. “Hie implication 
is that we cannot take casualties over a score 
anymore without serious question." 

It was noL always this way. During World 
World II and the Korean War, casualties were 
incidental to the completion of the mission. 

Vietnam changed that. Not only was the mili- 
tary accused of wasting lives in an ill-advised 
war, but it conduded that steady U.S. casualties 
would lead to an erosion of public support. 

Then came the Gulf War, which defied even 
the U.S. mili tary's most optimistic hopes for 
holding down its losses. More than a million men 
squared off in that lopsided conflict, but only 
143 Americans were killed in action. 

The Gulf War produced new public expecta- 
tions that high-technology weapons and a well- 
trained volunteer military would result in low 
casualties in future conflicts and helped divorce 
the public from the reality of war. 

The assumption that losses should be minimal 
has also inhibited the use of military force as an 
instrument of national power. 

In Somalia, General Mohammed Farr ah Ai- 
did sought to drag out the U.S. engagement and 
wait for public opinion to turn against military 
involvement. His strategy worked. After IS 
Americans died in a raid to capture General 
Aidid's aides, the United States pulled out. 

Some current and former Pentagon officials 
say the message is not that the U.S. public will 
not tolerate high casualties but that it will do so 
only when it believes that the fight is important. 

According to a study on public opinion and 
military intervention by the Rand Corp.. a re- 
search organization, when casualties began lo 
mount in Korea and Vietnam, much of the U.S. 
public wanted to increase military involvement 
rather than to quit. 

“When we have conflicts in which the U.S. 
interest is not widely accepted lo be important or 
vital, casualties can push us to become disen- 
gaged,” said Zalmay Khali Izad, a former head of 
the Pentagon’s office of policy planning. 


HAITI: Some Suspect CL4 Links to Chief of Militia 


Continued from Page 1 
they believed Mr. Constant was 
in touch with American intelli- 
gence officials with whom he 
had worked to persuade them 
to intercede on nis behalf. 

A Latin American diplomat 
closely involved in the crisis 
said of Mr. Coasiant: “He was 
burning up the wire to his 
friends in Washington Monday 
night.” 

In the past, the American in- 
telligence community has been 
deeply suspicious of Father 
Aristide and his impoverished 
supporters from the shanty- 
towns and, conversely, has bad 
strong links to the military and 
its establishment supporters. 

Bryan Littell, the CIA’s chief 
analyst for the region, has de- 
scribed Father .Aristide as a 


dangerous, unstable mental 
case and has praised Lieutenant 
General Raoul Cedras, whom 
the U.S. troops are here to force 
out of office, as a particularly 
promising officer. 

The CIA also poured large 
amounts of money into the 
army hierarchy for an anti-nar- 
cotics intelligence program, de- 
spite the fact that high-r anking 
officers went into the drug busi- 
ness themselves or used the pro- 
ceeds to finance torture or build 
villas. 

The Nation magazine, in an 
article to be published this 
week, reports that Mr. Constant 
was urged by the Defense Intel- 
ligence Agency to organize a 
front that could “balance" Fa- 
ther Aristide’s movement and 
do “intelligence” against it. 


The article also reports that 
Mr. Constant taught a course in 
the ill-fated C LA-sponsored 
drug intelligence program on 
“liberation theology ” warning 
against the dangers of the popu- 
list "little church” movement of 
Father Aristide. 

The situation once again 
points to the problems and con- 
tradictions facing U.S troops as 
they attempt to establish stabil- 
ity in a country split between a 
tiny, wealthy elite and a vast, 
exploited majority, a country 
where the only political tradi- 
tion is brute force. 

Haitian crowds on Monday 
cheered ecstatically as the gun- 
men were rounded up and thou- 
sands followed the American 
convoy as they look some 30 
handcuffed prisoners to their 
compound at the airport. 


SERBS: 

i A Tmderbox 9 

Continued from Page 1 

sensitive because the one road 
out of Sarajevo controlled by 
Bosnian government forces 
passes through it. The road has 
been fired on regularly by Serbs 
over the past two months. 

Mr. Akashi’s meeting late 
Wednesday with the Bosnian 
Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic, 
was stormy. The UN official 
said the Serbs had been angered 
by NATO air strikes two weeks 
ago. by reinforced UN sanc- 
tions against them, and by what 
they describe as continuous 
provocations from the Muslim- 
dominated government forces 
in the Sarajevo area and else- 
where. 

Squeezed by Serbian embar- 
go on them, the Bosnian Serbs 
are in a restive mood, deter- 
mined to resist an American- 
backed peace plan, but facing a 
winter that appears certain to 
be one of great hardship. Their 
leader, Mr. Karadzic, has made 
dear that he will not hesitate to 
pass on this hardship to the 
people of Sarajevo. 

■ Muslim Unit Blamed 

Serbian sources said that “a 
large Muslim sabotage unit” 
had attacked the Bosnian Serbi- 
an Army’s Trnovo Battalion 
and committed the killings, 
wire services reported 

The Muslim attack violated 
the demilitarized zone that the 
United Nations imposed 
around Sarajevo when the Serbs 
were forced to move their siege 
guns from around the city in 
February. 

Mr. Akashi refused to say 
whether he had threatened 
NATO air strikes or other re- 
sponses if government troops 
refused to vacate the demilita- 
rized zone, but he said Bosnian 
leaders had promised coopera- 
tion. 

Serbs and Bosnian govern- 
ment forces did make one of 
their largest prisoner swaps of 
the war earlier on Thursday, A 
UN spokeswoman said 295 
prisoners were exchanged Bos- 
nian Serbs released 166 people, 
and the Muslim-led govern- 
ment freed 129. ( Reuters ; AP) 


Gas Kills 10 Korean Miners 

A$enct France- Fressc 

SEOUL — Ten miners died 
when toxic carbonic arid gas 
filled the shaft of a coal mine in 
which they were working in 
South Korea's eastern province 
of Kangwon on Thursday, local 
press reports said. 



Healer Inspired a Doomed Following 


By Barry James 

Inlemiianul Herald Tribune 

For most of the Solar Tra- 
dition victims, the road to a 
fiery death in Switzerland be- 
gan in a hazy New Age sub- 
culture of astrology, macrobi- 
otic food oriental' mysticism 
and spiritualism. 

Luc Jouret. the leadeT of the 
cult members, attracted fol- 
lowers with all the parapher- 
nalia of the Age of Aquarius. 

"He was very gentle and 
sweet,” said a French woman 
in Paris who received homeo- 
pathic treatment from him in 
Belgium and at Annemasse. 
France, just outside Geneva. 
“He seemed to be absolutely 

nonviolent.” 

Dr. Jouret lured many fol- 
lowers through an association 
called Arcadia International, 
which had branches in 
France. Switzerland and Can- 
ada. The association offered 
conferences. lectures and 
roundtables promising to 
teach “applied knowledge.” 

Those who wished to as- 
cend to a higher level of “intu- 
itive knowledge” were invited 
to join the Solar Tradition, a 
secret society whose emblem 
was the initials TS inside two 
sets of Masonic dividers, sur- 
rounded by four crosses. 

Moving to fresh pastures in 
Canada several years ago. Dr. 
Jouret set up another front 



The Jouret cult's symbol 

organization called the Acad- 
emy of Research and Knowl- 
edge of Higher Sciences. He 
published many books on 
subjects ranging" from love to 
nutrition, ran an esoteric mag- 
azine called Excalibur and 
gave inspirational lectures. 

The chosen few — chosen, 
it appears, for their money as 
well as their gullibility — en- 
tered the secretive world of 
the Solar Temple, with its 
pseudo-Masonic rituals and 
its claim to follow in the foot- 
steps of Lhe medieval Knights 
Templar. 

The victims in Switzerland 
were not New Age hippies but 
well-heeled citizens. Among 
the 1 1 Canadians were the 
mayor of. Richelieu, Quebec, 
and his wife, a respected Que- 
bec City journalist and a mid- 
ievel official of the Quebec 
Finance Ministry. 

Cult experts said that set- 


ting up an apparently inno- 
cent front to lure members 
into a secret inner circle is a 
technique often used by sects. 
One such group, they said, is 
the widely spread New Acrop- 
olis. which hides a paramili- 
tary, neo-Nazi core behind a 
legitimate philosophical and 
cultural association. 

Though many saw Luc 
Jouret as a gentle doctor or 
inspired lecturer, few saw his 
dark side. 

A 46-year-old Belgian, bom 
in the Belgian Congo, now' 
Zaire, he trained as a doctor at 
the Free University of Brus- 
sels. Later he traveled to the 
Philippines to learn healing 
methods from tribal .faith- 
healers. He had said in a radio 
interview that he was “seeking 
a synthesis capable of healing 
the whole man.” 

He also dabbled in the oc- 
cult world of the illuminati 
who claimed to be reviving the 
traditions of the Templar 
Knights. The Knights, noted 
for their arcane and possibly 
blasphemous initiation rites, 
were banished in the 14th cen- 
tury, and their Grand Master 
was burned at the stake. 

Dr. Jouret joined a rightist 
sect called the Reformed Or- 
der of the Temple, founded by 
a former Gestapo collabora- 
tor. Julien On gas. At the same 


time lw followed the spiritual 
teaching of Jacques Brew, 
who Winded the Sovereign 
Order of the Solar Temple in 
the 1950s. 

After the death of Origas in 
1981 Dr. Jouret tried to take 
over the Reformed Order, but 
other members opposed him. 

Taking some followers with 
him. he created Solar Tradi- 
tion and several related asso- 
ciations. including Arcadia 
International. Amenta. Aguta 
and the Hermetic Brother- 
hood of the Universal Tem- 

ple * . . 

Moving to Canada in the 
late 1980s, Dr. Jouret again 
took a few followers with him. 

“We had to work 15 hours a 
day. and then pray all night, 
standing up, around a can- 
dle.” said Rose-Marie Klaus, 
who followed her husband to 
Quebec. 

Canadian police built up a 
thick file on the activities of 
the Solar Tradition, which is 
known to be survival ist. apo- 
lyptic and obsessed with guns. 
Former cult members told the 
Le Soldi newspaper of a rigid- 
ly hierarchical organization 
that forced them to hand over 
all their money while Dr. 
Jouret and an associate, Jo- 
ih Di Maiubro. lived in lav- 
style. 


SECT: 

Execution Theory 

Continued from Page I 

the ruins of a third chalet that 
was too dangerous to enter until 
Thursday morning, but they 
discovered no new victims. 

Mr. Piller said that be did not 
know whether Dr. Jouret was 
alive or dead, but he said the 
police were questioning some 
present and former sect mem- 
bers. He said three cars had 
been found that belonged to 
members of the cult who were 
“at the farm and who left a little 
before the drama.” 

Swiss experts in sect activities 
said that Dr. JoureL who is 
known to have built up a small 
following in Canada. France 
and Martinique as well as Swit- 
zerland, seemed obsessed by 
fire. 

One of these experts. Jean- 
Franqois Mayer, who had met 
Dr. Jouret. said he received 
three documents in the mail 
Thursday signed simply “Mr. 
Depart,” which, he said, “con- 
firmed the theory of a horrible 
mass suicide” resulting from 
the sect's intense persecution 
complex. 

He said one of the documents 
read in part: “We are leaving 
this earth to find in all lucidity 
and freedom a new dimension 
of truth and absolution, far 
from the hypocrisies and op- 
pression of this world, in order 
to achieve the seeds of our fu- 
ture generation. We are now 
free of a burden that day by day 
became increasingly intoler- 
able. Know, meanwhile, that we 
will continue to work through 
other means and other times.” 

Certainly, whether all the vic- 
tims committed suicide or ac- 
cepted death voluntarily, the 
deaths were well coordinated. 
On Tuesday, a man and a wom- 
an were found dead in a 
burned-out house in Quebec 
owned by a prominent sect 
member, and the deaths in 
Cheiry and Granges occurred 
only hours later. 

Supporting the notion of a 
collective suicide, 19 of dead at 
Cheiry were lying in a circle 
adjacent to a small chapel with 
their heads pointing outward, 
many of them wearing white, 
red and black ceremonial capes 
that identified their rank in the 
sect and some women dressed 
in long golden gowns. 

■ 2 More Bodies Found 

The police said Thursday 
that they had found at least two 
more bodies in the charred re- 
mains of two homes connected 
with the Solar Tradition, 
Agence France- Presse reported 
from Morin Heights, Ontario. 

Thai brought to at least four 
the number of bodies found 
here and to at least 52 the total 
known death toll in Lhe series of 
four blazes in Canada and in 
Switzerland. 



l-ahtwx tVITrmtf Apim* FrancvPrcwf 

Swiss police .searching die rubble of one of the bumed-out chalets of Solar Tradition. 


KOHL: German Chancellor Holds to a Steady Course 


Coo tin lied from Page I 

coalition partners will make 
this campaign a cliff-hanger to 
the end. But no one these days 
is talking about the end of the 
Kohl era. 

What is Mr. Kohl's secret? 
That question has been asked 
relentlessly on television talk 
shows and in newspaper col- 
umns without anyone profess- 
ing to have completely solved 
the riddle. 

Pan of the answer seems to 
lie in Mr. Kohl's ability lo be 
Mr. Kohl: unpretentious, pre- 
dictable, extraordinarily ordi- 
nary. He has no airs. His speech 
is thick and inelegant, the bur- 
ble of Everyman. 

“He's a throwback, a dino- 
saur, one of the last of the great 
noncommunicators,” Helmut 
Markwort. editor of Focus 
magazine, recently observed. 
“He’s like a lot of "his voters in 
the way he eats and the fact that 
he has gone to the same place 
on holidays for the past 25 
years. He's one of millions, just 
more determined. They don’t 
love him, but they trust him.” 


There’s much more to Mr. 
Kohl's success, of course, than 
being an ordinary guy. Napo- 
leon's observation that luck is 
the attribute most prized in gen- 
erals is no less true for politi- 
cians, and Mr. Kohl is lucky. 

His dwindling popularity in 
the late 1980s was abruptly re- 
suscitated by the fall of the Ber- 
lin Wall and German reunifica- 
tion. This time, as the campaign 
began, he had the good fortune 
to see the German economy re- 
cover from the deepest reces- 
sion since World War II. Mr. 
Kohl has also been fortunate in 
drawing rather ineffectual op- 
ponents. Mr. Scharping often 
comes across as an icy pedant. 
Despite deft efforts to rein in 
his parly’s left wing. Mr. 
Scharping seems to have made 
little leeway in wooing Germa- 
ny’s large center-right voting 
bloc. 

Moreover, the Social Demo- 
crats may have made a strategic 
error earlier this summer when 
they accepted tacit support 
from the Party of Democratic 
Socialism, the reformed Com- 
munists, in forming a state gov- 


ernment coalition in Saxony- 
Anhalt. Mr. Kohl seized the 
chance to portray his oppo- 
nents as a leftist cabal, and Mr. 
Scharping has been on the de- 
fensive ever since. 

The recognition and exploi- 
tation of such opportunities are 
a reminder of Mr. Kohl’s prodi- 
gious political skills. 

He shrewdly maneuvered the 
Russians into agreeing to leave 
German' soil four months earli- 
er than planned, allowing the 
chancellor to preside over their 
departure as the campaign en- 
tered its home stretch. 

Last fall, when the German 
economy was at its nadir, Mr. 
Kohl portrayed himself as ah 
agent of change; now, with the 
economy on the mend, he is the 
personification of stability. 
Whether working the streets or 
an international summit meet- 
ing, he presses the flesh like an 
old-fashioned ward heeler. He 
wields power ruthlessly, re- 
warding friends and punishing 
adversaries. He comes across as 
someone who knows how to be 
in charge. 


SURVEY: Americans Not So Wild and Crazy After All 


Continued {ran Page 1 

esL Only 3 percent of Ameri- 
cans — most of them under age 
30 — reported having five or 
more partners in the last year. 

• Three-quarters of the mar- 
ried women said they usually or 
always had an orgasm during 
sex, compared with 62 percent 
of the single women. Among 
men. 95 percent usually or al- 
ways had an orgasm, married or 
single. 

• Fewer than 8 percent of the 


participants reported having 
sex more than Tour times a 
week. About two-thirds said 
they had sex “a few times a 
month” or less, and about 3 in 
3 0 bad sex a few times a year or 
less. 

• About one man in 4, and 
one woman in 10 masturbates 
at least once a week, and mas- 
turbation is less common 
among those aged 18 to 24 than 
among those aged 24 to 34. 

The study is considered im- 


CONGRESS: Parting Shot at Clinton Political Agenda 


Continued from Page 1 

rules to include it. Bui Mr. Lev- 
in and other Democrats de- 
scribed this as a face-saving, 
half-way step that falls short of 
the bill's goal of closing loop- 
holes in existing law that allows 
thousands of lobbyists to es- 
cape registration and disclosure 
rules. 

In a counterproposal, Mr. 
Levin offered to change the bill 
lo eliminate language that Re- 
publicans said could impede 
grass-roots lobbying activities. 
But Democrats said Republi- 
cans appeared cool to this ap- 
proach. 

The bill was blocked when 
the Senate, reeling under a 
surge of opposition prompted 
by conservative lawmakers, talk 
show hosts and grass-roots lob- 


bying organizations, fell 14 
votes short of the two-thirds 
needed to end Republican de- 
laying tactics and pass the bill. 

Another vole to rescue the 
lobbying bill was scheduled for 
Friday, theoretically the last 
day of the 103d Congress. But it 
was not clear whether a com- 
promise could be reached by 
then. Mr. Levin and Represen- 
tative John Bryant, Democrat 
of Texas, House sponsor of the 
bill expressed skepticism that 
Republicans would let the legis- 
lation pass. 

Republicans are pursuing a 
“scorched earth" strategy to 
persuade people that Congress 
cannot reform itself so they will 
throw out its Democratic ma- 
jority and turn to them, Mr. 
Levin charged. 


Congress has shelved Mr. 
Clinton’s proposal to overhaul 
the health care system, legisla- 
tion to rewrite campaign fi- 
nancing laws and proposals for 
streamlining congressional op- 
erations. The Seriate has still 
not acted on the remaining “re- 
form” bill on its agenda, which 
would require Congress to live 
by the worker protection laws 
that are imposed on others. 


Although the lobbying bill 
previously passed both houses 
by large margins, a House-Sen- 
ate compromise barely got 
through the House last week 
after conservative talk show 
hosts, prompted by the House 
minority whip. Newt Gingrich, 
Republican of Georgia, gener- 
ated thousands of phone calls 
against the measure. 


portant because it is one of t 
first to rely on a randomly : 
lected, nationally represen 
live sample. Most previous s 
studies — from the Kinsey 
ports in the 1940s and the Mi 
ters & Johnson study in i 
1960s, to more recent populi 
ized studies such as the Playb 
report, the Shere Hite repi 
and the Red book report — : 
lied on information from voli 
teers, a method that may se 
ously skew results, becau 
those who are interested in si 
and most sexually active, te. 
to participate. 

The survey has many imp< 
tant policy implications, parti 
ularly in the area of AIDS pi 
vention. Since most peop 
choose their sexual partiu 
from among those who resei 
ble them in race, religion, a 
and education, the authors si 
AIDS is likely to remain high 
concentrated within the grou 
that are currently most affect 
— intravenous drug users aj 
homosexuals — and AIDS pi 
vention work should focus < 
those groups. 

In another finding, lari 
numbers of women said th< 
had been forced by men to v 
something sexually that thi 
did not want to do — almc 
always by someone they kne 
— while very few men report! 
ever forcing a woman, Tbe a 
thors said the findi ngs were *\ 
stark that they ciy out for 
national dialogue.” 





'mi 


Saudi Arabia Forms 
Group to Counteract 
Islamists’ Influence 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


Page 7- 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

Wlpw York Tima Service 

, — In a move to limit 

the influence of militant clerics, 
Kmg Fafad of Saudi Arabia has 
set up a Supreme Council of 
Islamic Affairs directed by 
ranjang family members and 
technocrats. 

The council will act as a sort 
of ombudsman of Isl amic activ- 
«y Iu educational, economic 
and foreign policy matters. 
Cnuce Sultan ibn Abdulaziz, 
defense minister and a brother 
of the king’s, is head of the 
council. 


non, which has been used by 
the ulemas to influence policy, 
a well -placed Saudi said by tele- 
phone. 

Among the royal family 
members named to the council 
yere the powerful interior min- 
ister, Prince Naif ibn Abdula- 
ziz, and the foreign minister, 
another brother of the king’s, 
Prince Saud aJ Faisal. Another 
member is Mohammed Ah Aba 
Khayl, a technocrat who has 
served for three decades as fi- 
nance and economy minister. 


oi me lungs, is head of the In petitions to the king, the 
C0 'S.us militant clerics have denounced 

‘ be king said the goal was to what they describe as the gov- 
deepen Saudi Arabia’s service emment’s deviation from Is- 
of Islam." But knowledgeable lamic values, though (he Saudi 
“ au ® ls said there was little government is widely viewed as 


doubt (hat one purpose was to one of the more rigorous in the 
dilute the authority of the Ule- Muslim world. 


uuuie tne authority of the Ule- Muslim world. 

t/i* wnseiva- Among other changes, the 
“ e group of Muslim theolo- militan ts have demanded an 
, end to dealings with intema- 

J ne . 1 Ulemas Council has con- donal banks that charge inter- 
SSJhSL? 113 ** 5 ?- ltS power “ est and the severing of relations 
se * k ™& to push with Arab governments that are 
educational, social, legal and fighting fundamentalists, in- 



Coup Fears Mount 
In Sierra Leone 

Renegade Troops Hard to Curb 


7 , * f o utuiuiK i uuuaxiiWiuamu, 111“ 

foreign policy m fundamental- eluding close allies like Egypt. 

Last week, the Saudi govern- 



1 


opposed efforts to modernize 
the economy and have support- 
ed radical Islamists in other 
Arab countries. 

Just before the United Na- 
tions population conference in 
Cairo last month, the Ulemas 
Council called the conference 
an insult to Islam and directed 
the Saudi government to boy- 
cott the meeting. 

“What the new council is 
meant to do is to widen the 
government’s authority over 
matters of religious in terpre la- 


ment arrested 1 10 militan ts, in- 
eluding some senior ulemas. 
Opposition groups in London 
say more than 1,000 militan ts 
have been rounded up in the 
past month. 

A London-based Saudi op- 
position group, the Committee 
for the Defense of Legitimate 
Rights, said Wednesday that a 
new wave of arrests was under 
way, with professors of reli- 
gious affairs and militant Is- 


JO HAN NESBURG STRIFE — Riot police arresting a protester who was carrying a gun at a labor protest bv 
security guards Thursday. The police exchanged gunfire with the guards, but no serious injuries were reported. The 
protest, and a separate strike by bus drivers who blockaded the city center with their vehicles, snarled traffic. 

It’s a Fact : i Anastasia 9 Was a Fraud 


By Rebecca J. Fowler discovered in 1991 with samples was eventually admitted to a 

Washington Pan Sauce of their DNA still intacL mental hospital, refusing to re- 

WASHINGTON — In a qua- Last month, the Russian gov- veal her identity to anyone, 
et corner of Upper Bavaria sits eminent reported that after two where the nurses finally chris- 
a tranquil cemetery once dedi- years of study, scientists had tened her Miss Unknown, 
cated to the local nobility, concluded that Anastasia had But in 1921, while she was 


■ , m 


Top Syrian Official Meets 
8 Jewish Leaders in U.S. 


■„ -i . ■ iu mw ivl.«u uxjuiii iv. wuuuuwi rkuiuuiaia udu uul ui i7£i, wuu c Mic was . , • ■ — Is- 
lamic poets among those being There, among the remains, are indeed died in 1918 — her still a patient at the mental hos- to ^ royal family 

naQ * the ashes of a woman laid to bones were among those of the pital, according to staff , she saw who had escaped Russia, visited 

rest adecade ago beneath a sim- royal family identified in 1991. a magazine with the headline , “ Anderson and unmediaie- 

pie gravestone that bears a Rus- For the princes, dukes, writ- “Did Anastasia Survive the y dismissed her assertions. In 
»»• • -m -mm- sian cross and a name in Cyril- ers and historians who had Massacre?” And there was a r f s -P®5 s< L’ v 1158 Anderson 

TiniQl MpAfc lie letters — Anastasia. made Miss Anderson’s claims picture of the princess. A nurse clam “ “e baroness had be- 

llt/lal ITIUUlo After three-quarters of a cen- their most treasured cause, the later recalled Miss Unknown’s ***7. ”>7“ family and did 


bones were among those of the 
royal family identified in 1991. 
For the princes, dukes, writ- 


he letters — Anastasia. 

After three-quarters of a cen- 


made Miss Anderson’s claims 
their most treasured cause, the 


WASHINGTON — Another barrier between Arabs and 
Jews fell when Syria’s foreign minister, Farouk Shara, held his 
first formal meeting with U.S. Jewish leaders, according to 
congressional and Jewish sources. 

“It is the first time a Syrian foreign minister has met 
formally with Jewish groups in this country,” a source with 
the World Jewish Congress said in a telephone interview after 
the meeting on Wednesday. 

Mr. Shara met eight Jewish leaders in Washington for a 45- 
minute session after an initial discussion with six members of 
the House Foreign Affairs Committee. The committee orga- 
nized the meeting at the request of the Syrian Embassy, the 
Jewish sources said. 

Mr. Shara opened the meeting by saying that President 
Hafez Assad of Syria had made a strategic commitment to 
peace with Israel and that there was no time to waste in 
getting a peace agreement signed, said Malcolm Hoenlein, 
executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents of 
Major Jewish Organizations. 

He told the Jewish leaders that Syria would absolutely not 
participate in a high-level conference to be held in Casablan- 
ca, Morocco, on the regional economic development of the 
Middle East, Mr. Hoenlein said. 

“But he said Syria's first priority was to change the region 
from war to peace.” Mr. Hoenlein said, noting that Mr. Shara 
and the Jewish leaders pledged to continue the dialogue. 

"It was a very useful meeting,” Mr. Hoenlein said. "It was 
not confrontational, but it was very intense, very candid." 


tury of speculation, it was only fairy tale is finally over. But her 
Wednesday that the memory of real life, as described this week, 
the Grand Duchess Anastasia, was a story as poignant as “The 
the youngest daughter of Czar Princess and the Pauper.” Not 
Nicholas □ of Russia’s ill-fated only has science shown who she 
royal family, was truly put to was not, for the first time we 
rest. The woman in the Bavar- know who she probably was — 


By Cindy Shiner 

Washington Par Senice 

FREETOWN. Sierra Leone 
— Indiscipline in the military is 
thwarting this West African na- 
tion’s attempts at economic and 
democratic reform and raising 
fears that renegade soldiers will 
overthrow the government. 

The chairman of the Supreme 
Council of State, Captain Val- 
entine Strasser, whose govern- 
ment pledged what it called a 
people's revolution when it 
seized power in April 1992, has 
promised elections and a transi- 
tion to civilian rule by January 
1996. His government has re- 
duced inflation and stabilized 
the exchange rate as part of a 
tough structural adjustment 
program. 

But change has also meant a 
loss of jobs, with a reduction of 
the civil service, and concerns 
about the government's stabil- 
ity have diminished the private- 
sector investment that was to 
provide new employment. 

protester who was carrying a gun at a labor protestin' t h ® ve f ele !i CI ! 3ted 50 

guards, but no serious injuries were reported. The p^e expSg^a bi£ di- 

eted the city center with their vehicles, snarled traffic. £ster." a localjounwhst said. 

Twenty-nine suspected coun- 

lercoup plotters were executed 

* 9 WW7" T eight months after the takeover. 

1 / 1 /VfCP g-m §4 ifjrw-u m The government claims to be 

yVLM/ TV lio ti JL / UfiU fighting a rebel war that spilled 

over from Liberia in March 
... 1991, when the Liberian rebel 

was eventually admitted to a project their longing for a world i ea der Charles Tavtnr ri- 
mental hospital, refusing to re- that had disappSSl.” a Son i 

whereSenS'firS Even in the face of two sen- ESTSMl 

tened her Miss Unknown ous challenges, she stood firm. “} en Pl [f s, ®f nt p ? . ■ 
Bui in 1921. while she was Baroness Bushoeveden^ a lady- * c W«?Airi° 

stillapatien. a. .hernial hos- tKfflLS ASg figS ^iek^rswho 
pital, according to staff, she saw n ? a l““ pea ™ed ^ Ji Tavl iT from —murine 

a mavarine with the headline Mss Anderson and immediate- “ VAl ■ y 0 - , . 

Survive the * dismissed her assertions. In Llbenon ca P llal “ 1990 - 
Massacre^S Xii* wasa response. Miss Anderson But the war in Sierra Leone 
rictueS'thenhiceBA^4 claimcd the baroness had be- has ended, according to diplo- 
SS^jralled SS^nim frayed the royal family and did mats and some government of- 

not wish to be exposed. Then, in Ticials, and the government’s 

SSSto ^oSteSbout l927 ’ a young Berlin woman toughesl ( F aa * is c . fron \ its 

S”AiiMf£nSizS?d “Inn toJd a German newspaper she own unruly troops. Sierra Le- 
ste^fhat I IhS,' recognized Miss .Anderson as one has become much like Ube- 

her fbnner roommate. Fran- ria. where bands of armed 

ISheSSn ustwS*” Schanzkowski. a Polish young men kill for little more [ 

uy Detween us two. fann worker than personal maierial gain. 


ity between us two?' ” 

Within months, Russian ex- 


ian grave, who claimed to be the most likely the daughter of a lies began to stream totheasy- 


surviving heir to the Romanov 
throne until her death in Char- 


poor Polish farming family. Ium to meet the lost Anastasia 
But how could her fantasy and brought their own raemo- 
ve taken root and entranced nes of life in the aristocracy, 
many for so long? “With each group of visitors 

It started in the bloody after- she would glean information on 
ith of the Russian Revolution the world in which Anastasia 
ien the Bolsheviks arrived at lived to impress the next,” Mr. 
atennburg in July 1918 io Remy said. “She was the blank 


lottesville, Virginia, in 1984. has have taken root and entranced 
been finally, unequivocally re- so many for so long? 


vealed as a fraud. 


In a fiercely biller scientific math of the Russian Revolution 
race, two separate research when the Bolsheviks arrived at 


ziska Schanzkowski. a Polish young men kill for little more 
farm worker. than personal material gain. 

Civilians have deserted huge 
Until this week, that was all areas of Sierra Leone's east and 
that was known of the woman southeast because of looting. 


who claimed to be a princess. 

- . l _ . _ r it. n .* - • ■ 


robbery and killings 


It started in the bloody after- 


But the tests of the British team by soldiers and small bands of 
have revealed that there is only rebels. Some diplomats here say 
a l-in-300 chance that Miss An- the lack of government ac- 
derson was not Miss Schanz- countability enables renegade 


teams simultaneously unlocked Ekaterinburg in July 1918 to Remy said. "She was the blank 

the key to her identity using massacre the Russian royal ..screen onto which they could 

DNA tracing. A German team, family. As they faced the seven 

led by Maurice Philip Remy. a Romanovs, the royal physician t 

television producer, used a 43- and three servants, the soldiers 

year-old specimen of the blood were told to aim straight at their 

from the woman, who was hearts. 


kowski, a working-class Polish 
girl with her eye on the main 
chance. 


soldiers to sell their weapons 
easily, return to Freetown and 
obtain new weapons. 


“The government is shy in 
accepting that their soldiers 
may be involved in rebel activi- 
ties," said Mohammed Abuba- 
kar, the Nigerian high commis- 
sioner to Sierra Leone. 

Relief workers estimate that 
about 300 people have been 
killed each month this year and 
that one-quarter of this former 
British colony’s 4.4 million peo- 

S le are displaced. The United 
tales feeds 1.5 million Sierra 
Leonians at a cost of about S18 
million a year. 

It appears as if the govern- 
ment might be inching toward 
dealing with its internal prob- 
lems by prosecuting a few offi- 
cers. “We do believe that some 
renegade soldiers are destroy- 
ing the confidence die nation 
has in our fighting forces by 
engaging in acts of banditry, 
terrorism and even collusion 
with the enemy, and are har- 
bored by some disloyal and dis- 
gruntled civilians who are in 
support of their unworthy 
cause," Captain Strasser said at 
a recent news conference. 

Siena Leone had only a cere- 
monial army of about 1,000 ac- 
tive troops when rebels invaded 
during Major General Mo- 
mofa’s rule. Major General Mo- 
moh asked Nigeria, which has 
sub-Saharan Africa’s largest 
army, for help. A battalion of 
about 800 Nigerian soldiers ar- 
rived to protect strategic areas. 

To boost its force, Siena Le- 
one conscripted unemployed 
young men and increased the 
army to between 8,000 and 
12,000. Poor conditions on the 
war front prompted disgruntled 
junior officers to overthrow 
Major General Motnoh, who 
had used the war as an excuse to 
prolong his rule. 

A senior-ranking officer in 
the putsch. Captain Strasser 
automatically became “the re- 
deemer” and chairman of the 
National Provisional Ruling 
Council government. 


For investment 1 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


known throughout her life as 
Anna Anderson. A British 
team, led by the forensic scien- 


Instead, bullets ricocheted 
across the room, bouncing off 
the crown jewels sewn into the 


list Peter Gill, had a minute clothing of the princesses in 
sample of her intestine that was what a soldier witness later re- 


preserved in paraffin wax. 


called as “a shower of hail.” 


Their results, presented at a The bodies disappeared, and 
press conference in London on the rumors began. 

Wednesday, showed that Miss _ Two years later, in Berlin, po- 
Anderson’s DNA bore no re- licemen saved a young woman 
semblance to that of the czar from a suicide attempt in the 
and czarina, whose bones were freezing waters of a canal She 


Iraq Demands End to Economic Boycott 


BAGHDAD — A meeting of 
Iraqi leaders presided over by 
^ President Saddam Hussein has 
T warned the United Nations Se- 
curity Counril of unspecified 
consequences if it decides to 
maintain its crippling economic 
embargo, Baghdad radio re- 
ported Thursday. The Security 
Council is expected to consider 
the issue on Monday. 

B agh dad broadcast the warn- 
ing shortly after a United Na- 
tions envoy, Rolf Ekeus, left the 
capital after announcing that 
long-awaited tests of a system 
to monitor Iraq’s arms industry 
had begun. 

Iraq’s leadership must ‘ pre- 


pare for the study of a new 
attitude that will lift the Iraqi 
people from their predica- 
ment,” a spokesman for the 
governing Revolutionary Com- 
mand Council said on Baghdad 
radio. 

Mr. Saddam led a joint meet- 
ing of the council and the re- 
gional leadership of his Arab 
Ba’ath Socialist Party to discuss 
the latest visit by Mr. Ekeus, the 
radio reported. 

“Through scrutiny, it ap- 
peared that despite what Iraq 
has honored, the owners of vi- 
cious purpose — among them 
the United States and the chair- 
man of the Special Commission 


— are bent on harming Iraq," 
the spokesman said. 

The Special Commission was 
created by the United Nations 
following the 1991 Gulf War 
and given the mandate of assur- 
ing that Iraq would no longer 
produce weapons of mass de- 
struction. Mr. Ekeus heads the 
commission. 

“We shall wait until the 10th 
of this month and after that 
every party will bear the conse- 
quences of its stand,” the Iraqi 
spokesman said. He did not say 
what measures Baghdad had in 

min d. 

Iraq’s most influential news- 
paper, Babfl. said Saturday that 
the coming two weeks would 


“lead to a decisive stage in the 
course of the military, political 
and economic confrontation 
between Iraq and American im- 
perialism.” 

Mr. Ekeus said he would an- 
nounce the start of provisional 
monitoring in two or three days 
and that hits report to the Secu- 
rity Council on Oct. 10 would 
be’ a step forward for Iraq. 

Mr. Ekeus said he was not 
aware of any attempts by Iraq 
to block the monitoring opera- 
tions. About 50 remote cameras 
set up at Iraq's ballistic missile 
production sites were working 
and work in a data processing 
center in Baghdad was going on 
uninterrupted, he said. 


The 

International Herald Tribune 

Congratulates 


KLM 

on its 

75th Anniversary 


vi. f •• r^*-T 

• •• • '• • •• •• ••* “,•*<»•> r- 

■ w • • . . • 


JEWS: Israel Worries About a Flood of Immigrants Under i Lmv of Return r 




Continued from Page 1 
iheir concerns for now. More 
immediately worrisome, they 
say, are many of the rougUy 
500 000 immigrants from the 
former Soviet Union who have 
poured in since 1989, helping to 
swell Israel’s population to 5.4 
million. _ . , - 

Government officials now 
acknowledge what they used to 
deny in the heady first da^ of 
the Soviet flow: that an c?*™* 1 - 
^ one-third of the immigrants 
are not the least bit Jewish. 

They have been allowed^ 
under a 1970 amendment to the 
gfrf Return, «ten<tog™- 
OTgrauon rights 

i lion to Judam j 
Sa f£s n ^breogeneratioli sian- 

'SaSSSfe 

enough for Israd- 

But times change. 

Israel has become an increas- 


verge of peace agreements with 
its Arab neighbors. Foreigners 
who once would not give the 
country a second glance are 
now looking for ways to resettle 
here. And as their numbers 
grow, the spirit of come-one, 
com e-all no longer reigns su- 
preme. 

“The amendment to the Law 
of Return, which was meant to 
deal with a few exceptional 
cases, turned with time into an 
automatic entry ticket into Isra- 
el for non-Jews in numbers be- 
yond acceptable proportion," 
said Uri Gordon, a senior offi- 
cial at the Jewish Agency, a 
q uasi-govemmen tal body that 
oversees immigration. 

Fearing for “IsraeFs future 
social texture,” Mr. Gordon 
wants the amendment 
scrapped. Other senior officials, 
including Absorption Minister 
Yair Tzaban and Deputy For- 
eign Minister Yossi Beilin, also 
suggest, without getting too 
specific, that changes may be 
needed at some point 
This interest in tightening the 
rules has nothing to do with the 
fad that many potential immi- 
grants are from the Third 
World, officials say, adding 
that the issue ‘is Jewishness, not 
race. 

They point to Israel's enthu- 


siastic welcome of waves of 
Ethiopian Jews in 1984 and 
1991 and its absorption of 
about 25,000 Jews from India, 
mostly in the early years of the 
stale. Those were people whose 
Jewishness was basically not in 
question, a far cry from the case 
of Manasseh's children. 

More dramatically, some Is- 
raelis are ready now to raise the 
drawbridge also cm people who 
are unquestionably Jewish. 

Labor Minister Ora Namir 
touched off a political storm the 
other day by suggesting that Is- 
rael could live without many of 
the recent Russian arrivals, who 
often are old or disabled and in 
need of social assistance —peo- 
ple “who have learned to ex- 
ploit what they can from the 
state,” she said. 

The next day many hundreds 
of people called a radio phone- 
in show to say they agreed that 
a more selective immigration 
was needed. 

Critics were outraged, 
though, some calling it an aban- 
donment of Zionist principles. 
Joining the condemnations, 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
gave Mrs. Namir a public wrist- 
slapping. 

But that is unlikely to end 
appeals for a more exclusive 
policy. Some Jews here even ar- 


gue for a flai-out repeal of the 
Law of Return, saving that by 
doing so Israel will have an easi- 
er time deflecting Palestinian 
claims to the same right. 

For them, the so-called lost 
tribes are at best an after- 
thought, albeit an exotic one. 

Mr. Gordon estimates that 40 
million people around the 
world make vague assertions of 
Israelite origins — from Pash- 
tuns on the border of Afghani- 
stan and Pakistan to various 
tribes in Nigeria, Sierra Leone 
and southern Africa. 


jnf&ngtiond 

Recruitment 







You'll find your copy of 
The International Herald Tribune 
aboard KLM flights 
compliments of 


Evay Thursday 
Contact 

Philip Oma 
Tel.: (33 1] 
46 37 93 36 
Fax; (33 I) 
46 37 93 70 
or your nearest 
IHT office 
or representative 








International Herald Tribune 
Friday, October 7. 1994 
Page 8 


A A 7 


S A A A 


Images of Peace in Northern Ireland 


B ELFAST — Six days after the 
IRA declared an unconditional 
cease-fire. I set off to explore 
Northern Ireland. Of course, I 
had images of war in my head. But I also 
knew that this once kingdom of Ulster 
was a beautiful land with an ancient 
history and that it offers images of peace, 
not war, of wide sandy beaches, cliff-lop 
castles, friendly people, lakes, islands, 
strange medieval faces carved in stone. 

I ducked the issue at the outset by- 
heading away from Belfast up north to 
the nine Glens of Antrim that trail down 
to the sea. each one ending in a little 
town or harbor. “Will the cease-fire 
hold?" I had asked the woman who 
handed over my rented car. She was 
categorical: “No. It will never end. L 
think they’re tricking the government." 
She might be right, but with hedges of 
crimson fuschia on one side, and the 
emerald sea merging into the heathery 
mauves of the Scottish coast on the 
other, my images of a battle-scarred 
country were already fa ding . Waterfoot 
was where I went up the mountain to 
watch waterfalls cascading through for- 
ests. Cushendall was where three glens 
meet under a flat-topped mountain and 
where 1 discovered the romantically 
ruined Layde Church. Cushendun was 
where the whole village was architecture 
designed in shades of whitewash and 
slate. There were no signs of war here. 

Eventually. I reached Baiiycastle, 
which lies opposite Ra thlin Island where 
in 1 306 one of En glan d’s greatest Scottish 
opponents. Robert the Bruce, watched 
the spider “try. try again" and decided to 


By Rachel Billington 


, Bushmills-} r- Giant's SCOTLA&tj 

Dunluce-, Causeway 

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see a side section that looks like or 
pipes against the cliff and chimneys wi 
it stands on top. 


At this point myjoumey was all about 
the wondrous violence of nature, not 
man f arrived at the ruins of 16th- 
century Dunluce Castle a few miles west 
of the Causeway in a sort of thunder- 
storm where lightning, thunder and rain 
alternated with a weirdly brilliant light. 
So far I had not seen a soldier and 
encountered only one checkpoint, just 
outside the airport But now I planned 


barbed wire and rough boulders. Yet 
this goes alongside business as usual and 
the Heritage Society is rebuilding the 
great walls to make a walkway for tour- 
ists around the city. If you want to 
understand about die Bogside, that’s 
where you must stand, on the high walls 
with the Protestant cathedral, SL Co- 
lumb’s, behind you and far. far below, 
Bogside. where long rows of small 
houses gathered around their own Cath- 
olic calhedraL During the troubles in the 


to visit Londonderry, as it is on the map. 
Derry to the Catholics. Deny is the 
infamous location where in 1969 British 
paratroopers fired into a crowd of Cath- 
olic protesters and killed 14 men. six of 
them only 17 years old. Here, within the 
ancient stone walls, I found a military 
presence, high lookout posts, armed po- 
lice, city gates blocked by the ugliness of 


late ’60s and "70s, the inhabitants put up 
a sign that still stands today: “You are 


fight one last battle. He won. History is 
all around, but there are signs of modem 


all around, but there are signs of modem 
conflict in this coastal area: the high 
security walls, barbed wire and cameras 
constructed to protect the Royal Ulster 
Constabulary’s buildings from IRA 
bombs. “Will the cease-fire hold?" I 
asked in the busy little town of Bushmills 
and received the’ fervent but hardly confi- 
dent reply. “We must ail pray so." 

Bushmills was a tourist center when 
William Thackeray came in 1842 and it 
still is. offering tours of the Old Bushmills 
Distillery, with free slugs of whisky at the 
end. 

But the main reason visitors come to 
this area is The Giant’s Causeway. Unes- 
co declared it a World Heritage Site, 
although Thackeray, who hated it, called 
it “a remnant of chaos.” Scientists de- 
scribe it as 37.000 black basalt col umns 
thrown up by an explosion 60 milli on 
years ago. But I prefer the popular myth 
that explains that a giant who needed to 
visit his beloved in Scotland laid down an 
elegant pathway of hexagonal paving 
stones across the sea. Either way, you can 
walk on it until the waves become threat- 
ening. and then take the cliff paths and 


BE. IB JBIS 


■ Anne Conrad-Antoville, the 
principal cellist of the Eureka 
(California) Symphony Orchestra, 
has resigned in protest over the 


symphony’s plan to perform 
Prokofiev’s “Peter and the W 


Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf* 
and is asking local music lovers 
to boycott the performance. She 
wrote a local newspaper that 
“Peter” teaches children “to 
applaud a hunter who kills a wolf’ 
and that wolves have survived 
despite “genocidal programs 
being waged against them and 
other predators.” 


a sign that still stands today: “You are 
now entering Free Derry.” 

Peering over the wall, I found myself 
eye to eye with a workman, suspended in 
a cradle over Bogside as he painstaking- 
ly repaired the heavy stones. “Will the 
cease-fire hold?” I asked. “If you be- 
lieve that, you’ll believe anything” was 
his dour response. 

My next destination was Fermanagh, 
the soft green southwestern county that is 
straddled by Lough Eme, with Enniskil- 
len standing at the narrow waist between 
the Lower Lough and the Upper, not far 
from the border. This April the canal that 
joins the River Shannon in the Republic 
of Ireland to Lough Eme. reopened, defi- 
nitely a positive symboL 

The lakes are a paradise for fishermen 
who set out for the day or even the week 
on smart white launches. But I wanted to 
visit the islands and see the Celtic crosses 
and mysterious stone figures left in the 
mins of a monastic life so near the Dark 
Ages as sometimes to feel more pagan 
than Chris tian. At Boa Island I found the 
strange two-faced Janus who gazes wild- 
eyed in the Caldragh graveyard. 

Devenish Island has no stone faces 
but a perfectly smooth 81 -foot tower 
you can climb via four ladders and look 


T B E B 9 \IE 9 f l 9 E 


Ladybird 

Directed by Ken Loach. U. K. 
Maggie (Crissy Rock), 
abused in childhood, has dra- 
ma deep in her makeup and 
has always been drawn to vi- 
olent men. By the tinie she 
meets Jorge (Vladimir Vega), 
the children she had with 
four different men have been 
taken away. Gentle Jorge is 
determined to make a differ- 
ence in her life, to give her 
new children. But the social 
system has Maggie down as 
an unfit mother and her new 
babies are wrested from her. 


Ken Loach has kept to the 
spirit of his first films and 
refined his method. With 
screenwriter Rona Monro, he 
has turned a real story into a 
fiction that unfolds like an- 
tique d ramg : Maggie is a 
doomed heroine. Jorge, the 
hero who wanted to save her. 
is caught up in her tragedy. 
The people surrounding the 
couple are not monsters, but 
a gray chorus of public ser- 
vants. Crissy Rock, in her 
first screen role, won best ac- 
tress in Berlin as Ladybird. 

(Joan Dupont . IHT) 


Petits Arrangements 
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Directed by Pascale Ferran. 
France. 


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On a beach in Brittany, Vin- 
cent (Didier Sandne) is build- 
ing an elaborate castle in the 
sand. Nine-year old Jumbo 
(Guillaume Chairas) prom- 
ises to watch over the castle. 
The child and the man are 
linked by a subterrean drama 
in their lives: Jumbo’s best 
friend has died and Vincent 
lost his sister in childhood. 
After Jumbo’s story is played 
out, the camera moves along 
the beach to Vincent and his 
family: his brother Francis 
(Charles Baling) and sisters 
Zaza (Catherine Ferran) and 
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Piece by piece, the mourning 
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ber is reassembled like a vast 
puzzle. Pascale Ferran has 
made an original and ambi- 
tious first film. Her way of 


directing a superb cast says 
something for the Cassavetes 
influence on French cinema 
— Catherine Ferran as a 
Gena Rowlands character is 
especially fine. But there are 
some heavy-duty metaphors, 
and the narrative has a start- 
stop-and-rewind rhythm that 
makes the story hard to ded- 
pber. (Joan Dupont, IHT) 


The Tropical People 

Directed by Yojiro Takita. 
Japan. 


Japanese abroad seem to be a 
specialty of Takita and the 
writer, Nobuyoshi IsshikL 
They earlier teamed on the 
salary man-in-the-j ungle 
comedy, “We Are AH Alive,” 
and now they have some fun 
rippingoff compatriot tour- 
ists in Thailand. Misa Shimi- 
zu, the harried tour guide, 
mislays her awful group’s 
passports. By the time she 
finds them she’s been fired so 


she decides to sell them on 
the black market. Helping 
her is an odd pair of swin- 
dlers, a half-Japanese bar 
owner and a typical Japanese 
student. Together they sting a 
couple of yakuza and get into 
deep trouble. AD of this 
should be more fun than it is, 
but the pacing is so feeble, 
the gags so slow and the dou- 
ble-takes so prolonged that 
this comedy sinks to the bot- 
tom of the klong. And just 
when it looks as though — in 
compensation as it were — 
the picture might be heading 
for a depiction of healthy 
troflism, everyone decides to 
settle for laughs. However, 
the viewer gets to see again 
the always appealing Misa 
Shimizu. She was also be- 
tween two guys in “Okoge." 
Though these two are straight 
— sort of — she knows bow 
to be likable and understand- 
ing and still have fun. 

(Donald Richie, IHT) 


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down on the remains of two early medi- 
eval monasteries. I was taken to the 
island by a ferryman who was trying to 
decide whether to invest in a bigger 
covered ferry. “Now if the peace holds," 
he told me without me even having to 
ask, “I’ll have more customers than I 
need, but at the moment I’m spending 
half my lime mowing the grass.” 

On the boat ride back to Killadeas on 
Lough Eme, my pick-up companion, an 
Englishman who works on both sides of 
the border gave me the most optimisti- 
cally sensible summary of the situation. 
"The cease-fire will hold for this genera- 
tion. They’ve had enough for now.” 

The next day 1 went into Enniskillen 
and lunched on oysters and Guinness. 
This is another town whose reputation 
has been tarnished by an atrocity, when 
in 1987 the IRA planted a bomb amid a 
crowd gathered to honor the war dead. 
Now there are posters on the lamp posts: 
“Seize the opportunity for peace.” 

It was on the drive back to Belfast 
that I saw my first foot soldier patroL 
There were five of them, guns at the 
ready, moving quickly through the small 
town of Kesh. “No special reason,” 1 
was told and I noted that they wore 
berets not helmets, a change to acknowl- 
edge the cease-fire. 


U NTIL reaching Belfast, I had 
seen very little to remind me 
of England and everything — 
pubs, people and scenery — 
to remind me of the Ireland I know so 
well. But Belfast is different — at least 
the center of it. With its grandiose Vic- 
torian buildings, it is far more like the 
towns of northern England: Manchester 
or Leeds or even Edinburgh or Glasgow 
in Scotland But what I really wanted to 
see was the battleground, the Falls Road 
and the Shankill Road where Catholics 
and Protestants are still divided by a 
metal wall. Will it come down soon? 
Will the shops take down their protec- 
tive boarding? 

I bad wanted to see the famous murals 
and the very first I saw was a gigantic 
image of the Virgin Mary. The next was 
a political message painted since the 
cease-fire on a wall just a few yards from 
the recently bombed Sinn rein head- 
quarters. It was topped with a dove of 
peace and included words like “Truth. 
Dialogue. Unity. Respect.” Around it 
small children played cheerfully. This is 
the hopeful face of the Falls Road. The 
first graffiti I saw in the Protestant 
S hankill Road area suggested in un- 
printable terms what the IRA could do 
with its cease-fire. The second was more 
subtle: “The people of the Shankill ac- 
cept the surrender of the IRA.” Soldiers 
riding in the back of their armored cars 
wear helmets around here. 



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Rachel Billington wrote this for The 
New York Times. 


L yj 






' - • '* . - < V- - ' 





Casino’s Atrium . top right, and gaming rooms. Bottom, slots in the Cafe de Paris. 


Monte Carlo Gambling 
Steps to a New Beat 


By David Spanier 


M ONTE CARLO — After a hundred 
years of reverie, the sleeping prin- 
cess of Monte Carlo is waking up. 
The casino, faded but stQl beautiful 
is tapping its foot to a modern beat 
Saturday nights, the square is filled with a 


polyglot mixture of beau monde and backpack- 
ers. They have come in their thousands to pay 
court to the grande dame of European gambling. 

For after extensive painting and primping and 
refurbishment, the old casino has put on a new 
face. There are now four different casinos in 
Monte Carlo, but they are not finding it too easy 
to make money. 

Gambling turnover, at about 1.02 billion 
francs ($192 million), was 12 percent down on 
the year, according to the latest annual report of 
the SBM. as the elegantly named Soci6t6 des 
Bains de Mer et du CencJe des Elrangers & 
Monaco is known. The main difficulty in a 
climate of recession was the dearth of gamblers 


from Italy, traditionally Monaco’s best market. 

Who cares about the money, anyway? The 
return on gambling is on a par with the principal- 
ity’s sale of postage stamps. The decline in the 
spending on gambling, according to the Mone- 
gasque accounts, reduced the net profit from the 


new clientele. Many of our best players come 
from Russia as weO as France and Italy.” 

After entering the atrium, a marbled hall of 28 
Ionic columns, the gamblers cross the Salle Re- -g 
naissance, decorated in gold and white marble, • 
to reach the Salle Europe, lit by eight monumen- 
tal chandeliers. High murals depicting wistful 
Pre-Raphaelite damsels — summer, winter, 
spring and autumn — span the walls. The croupi- 
ers call this room la cuisine — the kitchen. 

Here, the paradox of Monte Carlo’s casino 
manifests itself most sharply. Amid all the fin de 
sihcle splendor, the gambling lacks any style or 
presence. In the middle of the room stand three 
roulette tables. They make a dim contrast with 
the ornate surroundings. The play is slow, the 
li gh ti n g faint; a table of trente et quarante*. the 
French card game, ambles along in the corner. 
Neither the players nor the croupiers seem wor- 
thy of the selling. ' 

The atmosphere is a little brighter In the suc- 
ceeding salons, open to anyone for 50 francs 
more. Here are blaclg'ack and more roulette 
tables. Only in the so-called super-prrves, where a 
few chosen players gather for chemin de fer, is 
there any sense of drama. 

“Chemmy” is more than anything a game of 
manners because the players, most of whom are 
acquainted as comrades of the green baize, bet 


SBM’s principal activity of gaming and hotels to i- *5L lhc hou f e ‘ Engh&b 

a piffling 32 million francs in 1993-94. against 90 

trillion die previous year. 9° n . b . no wben they hit a “natural" Sor9. 

What matters, so far as tourists in Monte Orientals squ-e-e-e-ze tbe cards Out slowiv. 


million the previous year. 

What matters, so far as tourists in Monte 
Carlo are concerned, is that ihe casino buili by 
the architect Charles Gamier in 1878. in the 


one of the sweetest confections Europe has to 
offer. (The cupolas on the roof are modeled, 
legend has it, after the bosom of a famous courte- 
san of the Belle Epoque.) 


T 


Carlo are concerned, is that the casino Duut by r— u i HE SBM’s other casinos are close. A 
the architect Charles Gamier in 1S78. in the I minute downhill is Loews hord, with its 

ornate style of hisopera house m Pans, remains I Sun Casino. This is a big, bri|htly-lit 

IT fcif lhC t T m 0t 3 fam0US C0U "* *5 Ihou 1 tuss “France a model for toW 
sanof the Belle Epoque.) °f straightforward, in-house gamina se2?m- « 

On one side of the mam square stands the creasingly in international resom 8 ‘ 3 

stately Hfitel de Pans^ ,ts restaurant running The thiid casino, in the suramermonthi 
down a long terrace. The tabte are well patron- Monte Carlo Sporting Club, a five-rainute^ SS 
ized by American ladies who exemplify the nde on the seafront The casino. ? 

D«hes of Windsor's adxicc: “One can never be decoration as an 2£« aumeL S 
too rich or too thin. On the other side, the the audiences from thr rafomm * 

crowded tables of the Caffe de Paris are filled Etches below, and the go-^nightcSb U 

mth young lovers eating .ce cream. Low-level roulette and blackjack is the snS? An i S 

Up the steps to the anno flows a i^bag of occasional chemmy game in one of the suwr" P 
tounsts m j^ns andT-shms-No dress code here, privfes may run on unSlbreakfast. ^ I 

All the gamblers need ls a 50-franc uckei and a Finally, in a bid to entertain the tourists whn * 
passport. A g«ard scans the faces to ensure the throng the sidewalk tables and give 1 SSScS&J 
visitors are over 21. (Many are turned away.) its zest and color, the Cafe de h K - 

The exerted crowds contrast with the sumptu- slots parlor. The ambience is cheap and ch • 

ous setting. Such is their haste to hit the slot the players likewise TH* . u %#- 



too rich or too thin." On the other side, the 
crowded tables of the Caffe de Paris are filled 
with young lovers eating ice cream. 


The excited crowds contrast with the sumptu- 
ous selling. Such is their haste to hit the slot 


machines that they scarcely glance at the tum-of- is run woSdnxaktTa Las Ve 2 MnnSl» l ? e 
the-centurv erlt and s»ranri«ir of the interior U/llh Amkrirmeem, 9S . P^O CSSlOQfll I 


Patricia Wells is the author of The Food 
Lover's Guide to Paris, now in its 
third edition. 


the-century gilt and grandeur of the interior. with embarrassment Bui tffi s the hWfc£ 

“Everyone wants to play at Monte Carlo,” egasque way which, down the years hni nJS 
observes Francis Palmaro, the casino director, in Monte Carlo synonymous with oimKu*!: 

an office musty with dark wood and old photo- SWwWing. ^ 

graphs. “We have a faiLhful core of old players David Sportier is a British r *3 

who never desert us. But now we are attracting a quentfy writes on the gambling scene ** 1 


cl/zSA***-*** 1 xXfi 







International Herald Tribune 
Friday, October 7, 1994 
Page 9 


“b. 





• - M 


■Pi 





Armani’s Via Glamorosa 






nil %/.&? 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


set the pace at so many fashion shows seemed to 
have got to Armani and imposed change, for its 
own sake. 

M ILAN — Giorgio Armani took the Bill Armani threw a splendid post-show party 
Via Glamorosa. He mart* the path » his new Palazzo Orsini — all ceiling frescoes 
from flat shoes to vertiginous heels, and votive candles. Sophia Loren, revealing 
and from plain to pretty seem unstoppable legs in a tailored black Armani 
smooth enough. His diversions into decoration dress, had the last word on Milan’s glamour 
— bows on thejacketand rippling frills on shorts craze - “Glamour?” she said. “I think it’s a magic 
“ w ere a pleasure rather than a penance. But as wor d — you can’t define it.” 

e show ended with its only touch of bright Prada’s show Thursday proved that stylists rule 

colo r, you had to ask whether the fashion journey the fashion world. Salable, wearable individual 
a ®* en necessary. pieces — a sfflcy sweater, a slim jacket, a narrow 

/\rmaw aoes what he does supremely well, belt — were made to seem like a manifesto for 
That means not the little dress- Modem Fashion. Yet who. ex- 
es slung from bra tops. (Heav- ————— cept the front row lineup, could 

v fe *** ® ou 8^ °f But his VPntnre> understand the fashion logic of 

those elsewhere.) Armani’s I f ul nis venture whipping thin belts roundlvety- 

the soft jacket. He intn drgsses Jnnks thing 10 S'* the models middle- 

reshaped it, stroking curved U * LU agetfsprSd? Of enlarging their 

the front or cut- forced 3.S ■ million-doll ar legs with white 

Ung a horizontal line across the , hose? And slicing shorts across 

br ^f r U- SHOWS end the widest part of the thighs un- 

i« T ?L f i®f hj<m T. p t rspecu Y e led da- completely sheer dresses? 

inexorably to the bosom, but as Dresses made out of the nylon of 

a gentle tracing of the female form. The decade- Prada’s signature b ags would be equally baffling 
long journey from the androgynous, oversized to most women. 

jackn to this curving, feminized version is the Yet fashion today is like that. A cult for the 
distulation of Armani’s genius and the reason initiated. Prada has a point of view about mod- 
why he is the top-selling designer for American era allure, with modest on-the-knee hemlines 
stores. and simple, feminine dresses. Magazine editors 

But Armani yearns to break out. Forget the are cheerleaders for the total look, but it has yet 
jackets, the show seemed to say. Look! Dresses! 10 prove it has a life outside the runway and 
They came out in layers of gauzy chiffon, often pboto spreads. 

with shorts underneath, or those same divided Fendi’s show did not set any fashion agenda 
skirts fluttered under long jackets. There were aad — apart from striking swimsuits with cubist 
tunics in pallid organza or lingerie lace, although blocks of bright color — it seemed to offer a few 


more convincing outfits were printed with faint thoughts from designer Kari Lagerfeld, rather 
flowers, like faded wallpaper. than a finished collection. He played a familiar 

Embossed patterns, sheer textures and white* °f using an indeterminate base Kite bicyde 

on-white embroideries were the way Araumi en- shorts “ l ? ckcloth J«*«s « h “ 1 

riched a palette that was drained' of color all at the front or wtth asymmetric handier- 
beige and white, with an occasionally dark my h ™s- One was reduced to a pair ol 

like oily smoke, and the finale of bright chinSse- ? tevcs ’ n “ whal ** Maon world 1ms 


and simple, feminine dresses. Magazine editors 
are cheerleaders for the total look, but it has yet 
to prove it has a life outside the runway and 
pboto spreads. 

Fendi’s show did not set any fashion agenda 
and — apart from striking swimsuits with cubist 
blocks of bright color — it seemed to offer a few 
thoughts from designer Kari Lagerfeld, rather 
than a finished collection. He played a familiar 
game of using an in determinate base like bicycle 
shorts as a backcloth for .jackets that were cut 
away at the front or with asymmetric handker- 


ucigc ana wane, wun an occasionally dark gray » , . , . , . . . . 

like oily smoke, and the finale of bright Chinese- £****> n ° l wha ‘ txteonjsodd has 

rie embroideries. l f eD *«?“« for - But m its dashed-off way, the 

. show had some strong pieces — and swimsuits to 

Armani had to find a way forward after his dive for. 
pantsuits (the skirts have never been up to much) As some of the fashion crowd moves briefly to 

had reached fashion zen. But the dresses, and London, before next week’s Paris showings, the 
especially an injection of bras and lingerie, often consensus is that the MO an shows have put too 
looked forced. Are those whose religion is easy much attention on discomania on the runway 
clothes going to wear spindly sandals, gather up and too little on the quiet luxury that is the 
their hair and paint on Up gloss? The stylists who mainstay of Italian fashion exports. 




i u-i 




N't:,- 


The New Teen Romance 


N 


By Judith Newman 

A’w York Times Service 

EW YORK — Worried that the Me- 
nendez brothers’ trial, violent movies 
and talk-show depravity have numbed 


Richard Goldsmith, a former Disney executive 
whose company, Hollywood Ventures, brought 
Ford and Random House together for the senes. 

The books — by Christina Lowcnstein. who 
writes for young adults under the pen name B. B. 
Calhoun — “are not about the modeling business 


JL ^ the United States ’s sense of moral P« se,” Goldsmith said. ‘They’re about young 
outrage? Worry no more. It’s there. girls out in the working world who are dealing 

If you have any doubts, just walk into a with the problems all giris their age have," he said, 
bookstore and request a book about modeling Each book, he said, has a message. For exam- 
geared toward prepubescem girls. pie, the first, “The New Me" (first printing. 

“You want what?" said a clerk at Books of 50,000), tells girts to “Just Be Yourself.” a lesson 
Wonder, the children’s bookstore in Manhattan, certain to lake them far, but maybe not in the 


geared toward prepubescem girls. 

“You want what?” said a clerk at Books of 


Tm sorry, we wouldn’t cany anything like that, fashion industry, 
thank God.” At Tower Books a 


Moore' TV 

The little dress slung from a bra, Armani's version. 


clerk glared and asked pointed- 

ly: “You want this book for your \ f n n , r ^ r A? a T - 
friend’s kid? Do you like this 0\CT i\dnC\ 

W Mcve over Nancy Drew and DreW - make r0 ° m 
Cherry Ames; make room for fnr Pa i erf* R e*rri 
Paige. Cassandra, Pia, Katerina, 1 ° 7 ' r> ' 

Naira and Kerri. These are the 6 aSSSndra. Pia. 
youthful heroines of a new senes 
of young-adult novels, “Ford Su- 
permodels of the World.” They may not know that takes pi 
how to dig for clues or dress a bound, but they interest of ih 
sure know their way around a can of mousse. wfll probably 
The premise of the series: Thanks to the Ford “*8 a B°ut b 
Models agency — in real life, one of the world’s vt T>' few kid: 
leading agencies — six girls have been brought ballet 11 
together from various points on the gjobe to live And then 
in a Manhattan apartment (scrupulously super- themselves. > 
vised by a “den mother") while trying to make it Spilker walk 
in the glamorous world of modeling. Claude Mon 

Readers of the two books that have been few years, bii 
issued so f3r, at $3.99 each, can follow the 15- “1 ^ ove Eilee 
and 16-year-old models on their rounds as they S 1 " 631 woman 
learn about stylists, photographers and test Do you know 
shoots. They hang out at a coffee bar, have school, come 
a bove-th e-neck romances with age-appropriate Forherpai 
guys and debate the finer points of makeup, hair ding agents, 
and clothing with an intellectual rigor that be- about “Read 
speaks thousands of hours well spent in the every girl in 
company of Ken and Barbie. model,” she s 

Curiously absent from the early modeling expe- ^ancy Drew^ 
riences: drugs, smoking, anxiety about weight. ““ ! “dn 1 1 
bookers who expect large cash bonuses at Christ- In fact, the 
mas and over-the-hill rock stars with scary hair- Ford modelii 
cuts. “Because young girls emulate models, we tently gives tl 
wanted to use the venue of the modeling business finishing schi 
as the basis for a new life-style property," said that profits fi 


Not surprisingly, David EI- 
"" kind, a professor of child stud- 

. ies at Tufts University and the 

“ - author of “The Hurried Child: 

Irf* rnnm Growing Up Too Fast, Too 
T. . Soon" (Addison- Wesley, 19SS t. 
A.P2TL 15665 modeling as too passive a 
r> . profession for 10-year-olds to 

y i 13, aspire to. “1 see this as just an- 

other example of the need for 

adults to market things to kids 
that takes precedence over what's in the best 
interest of the children," he said. "These books 
will probably do no more harm than kids’ read- 
ing about ballerinas, another profession that 
very few kids will actually go into. But at least 
with ballet there’s skills you can master,'* 

And then there are the reactions of models 
themselves. As a teenager in Germany, Angela 
Spilker walked the runways for the' likes of 
Claude Montana. She left the business after a 
few years, but recently returned, in her late 20s. 
“I love Eileen Ford,” she said. “I think she’s a 
great woman. But books like this, they're bull. 
Do you know how many people drop out of high 
school, come to Ford and don't make it?" 

For her part, Eileen Ford, the doyenne of mod- 
eling agents, doesn’t understand what the fuss is 
about. "Reading about models isn't going to make 
every girl in America feel she must become a 
model,” she said. “When I was a kid I read every 
Nancy Drew novel 1 could save up the money for. 
and 1 didn't become a detective, did 1?" 

In fact, the real heroine of these books is the 
Ford modeling agency itself. The series consis- 
tently gives the impression that Ford is a kind of 
finishing school for pretty girls, not a business 
that profits from them. 


/// isis sins 


i*. 




it i mil!! 

Seal 


AUSTRIA 

& Vienna 

Kunstforum der Bank Austria, tel: 
(1) 53124-5486, open daily. To 
Nov. 27: “Herbert Boeckl, 1894- 
1 966." A retrospective of the work of 
' the Austrian artist. The 70 paintings 

* and 60 watercofors and drawings 
3 document his career from Austrian 
. ■ Expressionism as a younger contem- 
I porary of Kokoschka, Gerstl and Ko- 

lig to his abstract work starting in the 
1950s. 

BEUaU— 

3 Bruges 

| Groeningemuseum, tel: (50) 34- 
79-59, open daily. Continuing/To 
Nov. 1 5: "Hans Memling: Five Centu- 
ries of Reality and Fiction." 40 works 
by Memling and 60 paintings, draw- 
ings and sculptures by his contempo- 
raries in Bruges. It also includes peri- 
od objects of the kind Memling 
painted. 

Ghent 

Museum voor Schone Kunsten, tel: 
(9) 222-1703, closed Mondays. To 
Nov. 27: “Meesterwerken van de Go- 
tische Beefdhouwkunst" An over- 
view of the origins and development 
of the Late Gothic style fn sculpture. 
The wood, stone, metal and ivory 
scriptures come from the Benelux 
countries, northern France and Ger- 
many. 

BRITAIN 

London 

Hayward Gallery, tel: (71) 928- 
3144, open daily. To Jan. 8: The 

* Romantic Spirit in German Art 1790- 
" 1990." Explores the romantic tradi- 
tion in German art and its relaftonship 
with Modernism- Includes 300 paint- 
ings. watercofors, prints and sculp- 
tures by Johann Heinrich Fuseli. Ca- 
spar David Friedrich. Emile NoWe. 
Kandinsky, Wee. Beuys 

To complement the exhibition, me 
Goethe institute presente Romantic 
Travellers: Romantic Germany in 
English Eyes c. 1 790-1 860. (Oct 8 
to Nov. 5). , . 

Royal Academy of Arte, ten (71) 

494-5615, open daily. Tc i Dec- JJ- 

-The Glory of Venice-. Art m the 18th 
Century." Includes cityscapes byCa- 
naletto, Guardi and BeUolto ' f 

irasrs {"Lsaa 

SSSSbSfSSXtSSS 

lection of works by Turner. Approxi- 
mately 1 70 works will behung^any 

m chronological order. It is cornpie- 
mented by a presentation of T urneris 
life and times whieh inciu^iettere. 
archive material and his early Selt- 
Portrait." 

CANADA 

ArtGcMHy of Ontario, tel: (416) 

077^)414, dosed Tuesday®. Con- 
rtnufna/To DboSI: "From Cezanne 
lo kffie: &eat French Paintings 
Foundation." ln- 


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British Muwiub 

A 16th-century’ Japanese helmet, in Madrid l detail of “Liegender Afcr” by Herbert Boeckl, in a Vienna show . 


dudes 80 Impressionist. Post-im- 
pressionist and Modernist paintings 
from the coBection of Dr. Albert o. 
Barnes In Philadelphia, includes 
works by Renoir. Matisse, Cezanne, 
Picasso, Manet and Modigliani, 
among others. 

FRANCE ~ 

Lyon 

Musfee des Beaux-Arts, tel: 78-28- 
07-66, dosed Mondays and Tues- 
days. To Dec. 18: "Maurice Denis. 
1870-1943." 200 paintings, draw- 
ings and art objects, ranging from 
small Nabi paintings of the 1890s to 
targe complex figure groups in pale 
colors by the French painter and il- 
lustrator. The exhibition win travel to 
Cologne, Liverpool and Amsterdam. 
Parte 

F1AC- Oct. 8 to 16: The annual con- 
temporary art fair, featuring 1 60 gal- 
leries from around the worm Sngte- 
artrsl shows devoted to Bazaine, 
Arman, Picasso's frescoes and Louis 
Ports, among others. 

Grande Halle de la Viflette, tel: ( 1 ) 

40-03-75-75, open dally. To Jan. 8: 
"On a Retrouve le Tresor du San 
Diego." The San Diego was sunk in 
160) In the China Sea and recently 
efiscovered. Together wtth a presen- 
tation of the recovery, the exhibition 
features Ming porcelain, silverware. 


and miscellaneous objects found in 
the holds of the galleon. 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-171-17. 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Jan. 9: "Gustave Caiiiebone, 1B4&- 
1894.“ A retrospective of 89 paint- 
ings and 28 drawings by the French 
Impressionist painter. Caillebotte or- 
ganized and financed exhibitions ot 
Impressionist paintings and left nis 
own collection to the French state. 
Also, to Jan. 2: "Nicolas Poussin." 
More than 100 paintings and 135 
drawings documenting the 1 7th-cen- 
tury French painter's artistic evolu- 
tion. from his Baroque compositions 
to the mythological paintings and the 
biblical subjects. 

Instttut du Monde Arabe, tel: 40-51- 
38-38, closed Mondays. To Jan. 15: 
"Delacroix au Maroc." Paintings, 
watercofors. drawings and engrav- 
ings created during Delacroix's visit 
to Nortii Africa m 1832. as a member 
ol the entourage of Louis Philippe's 
ambassador to the Sultan of Morocco. 
Mus6e Cam aval et, tel: 42-72-21-1 3, 
dosed Mondays. To Dec. 1 1 : "Les 

Anglais a Paris au XDCe Slecte." Soon 
after their victory at Waterloo, the 
English return to Paris as tourists. 
The exhibition features wstercotors, 
including views of Paris by English 
artists such as Bonington. Boys, Cal- 
low and Holland, as wed as numerous 


Anglophobic caricatures by often 
anonymous French artists. 

MusAe du Louvre, tel: 40-20-50-50. 
closed Tuesdays. To Dec. 19; 
"D'Outre-Manche-. L'Art Britannique 
dans les Collections PubJiques Fran- 
ceses." The evolution ol British art 
from the end of the 16th century to 
1850, through 230 paintings, engrav- 
ings. drawings and sculptures. Fea- 
tures engravings by Hogarth, portr a its 
by Reynolds and Gainsborough, wa- 
ter colors btfBortnglon, landscapes by 
Constable and Turner. 

Musde d’Orsay, tel: 45-49-11-11. 
closed Mondays. To Jan. 8: “Ingres, 
Courbet, Monet, Rodin, Gauguin: Les 
Oubiles du Cafre." 120 paintings, 
sculptures and drawings from the 
Egyptian national collections, includ- 
ing works by Orientalist painters, 
sculptures by Carpeaux and Rodin, 
and Impressionist works. 

GERMANY ~ 

Berlin 

Alias Museum tel: (30) 20-35-55- 

200. closed Mondays. To Jan. 8: “El 
Dorado: Das Gold der Fursten- 
graber." Mainly from the Gold Muse- 
um in Bogota, Pre-Columbian gold 
Items. 

Frankfurt 

Schirn Kunsthalle, tel: (69) 299- 


882-0. dosed Mondays. To Nov. 27: 
"Nicholas de Stael: Retrospective." 
80 oil paintings and numerous works 
on paper, often related to me exhibit- 
ed paintings. The Russian-born 
painter worked in Parts during and 
after World War II and developed an 
abstract style. He committed suicide 
at age 41. 

Leipzig 

Museum der blklenden KOnste, tel: 
(341 ) 31-31-02, closed Mondays, to 
Nov. 5: “Lucas Cranach: Bn Maler- 
Untemehmer aus Fran ken." More 
than 200 items, including 54 works 
by the 16th-century German painter 
and engraver. Features religious 
paintings, portraits and animal stuctes. 

IRELAND 

Dublin 

The Irish Museum of Modem Art, 
tel: (1) 671-8866. dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 1 5: "From Beyond the Pale.” 
A series ot exhibitions and artiste's 
projects exploring the links between 
art si the 1 990s and at the beginning 

of the century. The lira exhibition. 
"Picasso to Koons," Includes works 
by Picasso. Duchamp, Warhol. 
Beuys and Koons. 

ISRAEL 

Art Focus. Oct- 1 to Nov. 10: Israeli 


art ot the last 10 years by 750 artists 
is exhibited in 100 museums, art 
schools, noncommercial galleries 
and artists' studios. It includes paint- 
ings. sculptures, photography and in- 
stallations. 

ITALY 

Florence 

Luigi Pecci Museum ot Modem Art. 
tel: (574 ) 570-620. closed Tues- 
days. To Oct. 30: “Gli Ullimi Sogm di 
Joan Mlno." More than 100 works, 
including paintings, sculptures, 
drawings and etchings created by the 
artist during the last 15 years ol his 
life. 

Ghiesa di S. Stefano degli Agostin- 
iani in Empoli. To Dec. 11: "11 Pon- 
tormo a Empoli. " Features works by 
the 16th-century Italian Mannerist 
painter created during his stay in the 
district of Empoli. It also includes 
paintings by other masters of the ear- 
ly T6th-ceniury, such as Andrea del 
Sarto and Fra' Bartolomeo. 

Venice 

Biblloteca Nazionaie Marciana, teV 
(41 ) 520-8788. closed Sundays. To 
Oct. 31 : "Aido Manuzio and the Ve- 
netian Milieu. 1494-1515." An exhi- 
bition of more than 150 books and 
related manuscripts from the Aldine 
Press, founded by AJdo Manuzio in 
Venice 500 years ago. 

JAPAN 

Tokyo 

Hare Museum of Contemporary 
Art, tel: (3) 3445-0651 . open daily. 
To Nov. 3: “Yasumasa Morimura: 
Rembrandt Room." Morimura uses 
photography to superimpose himself 
into masterworiss ot Eastern and 
Western art. His creations have in- 
cluded him as Manet's “Flute Play- 
er," and as Pre-Raphaeine maidens. 
The exhibition features 26 works 
based on portraits by Rembrandt. 

RUSSIA 

Moscow 

Pushkin State Museum of Fine 
Arts, tel: (95) 203-69-74. To OcL 
16: "Anatoly Zverev, 1931-1986." 
Features 65 gouaches and 1 00 draw- 
ings by the Russian Expressionist 
painter. 

SPAIN 

Madrid 

Fundeddn Juan March, tel: (1) 
435-42-40, open daily. To Jan. 22: 
"Tesoros del Arte Japones: Periodo 
Edo 1615-1868." Documents artistic 
creation during me Edo Period, Fea- 
tures prints and folding screens, uki- 
yo-e drawings, ceramics, lacquer- 
ware, and weapons. All the objects 
are on loan from the Fuji Museum In 
Tokyo. 

SWITZERLAND 

Basel 

Kunstmuseum, tel: (61) 271-0445. 
closed Mondays. To Nov. 27: “Fer- 
nand Leger 191 1-1924: Le Rythme 
de la vie Modeme." Presents the first 
artistic phase of the French artist and 
includes monumental paintings, ab- 


stract paintings, gouache drawings 
as well as still fifes and interiors. 

UNTTEP STATES ~~ 

Kansas City 

Kemper Museum of Contemporary 
Art and Design, tel: (816) 756- 
1803, closed Mondays. To Dec. 4: 
"O'KeeHe's Canyon Suite." The new 
Kemper Museum, designed by Gun- 
nar Birkerls. launches ns temporary 
exhibitions program with 28 water- 
colors and two paintings by Georgia 
O'Keefle. The permanent collection 
includes modern American paintings 
and works on paper . as well as sever- 
al monumental sculptures. 

New York 

Museum of Modem Art, lei: (212) 
708-9400, open To Jan. 10: "Cy 
TwomWy: A Retrospective.'' Twom- 
bly has pursued a form ol painting 
that combines elements of gestural 
abstraction, drawing and writing. The 
exhibition surveys the American art- 
ist's career with rarefy seen works 
drawn from European private collec- 
tions: It includes 45 paintings, 45 
works on paper and a selection of 
sculptures. The exhibition win travel 
to Houston. Los Angeles and Berlin. 
Pierpont Morgan Library, tel: (212) 
685-0008. dosed Mondays. To Nov. 
20: "A Chief of Ideas: Voltaire and the 
Eighteenth Century." An exhibition of 
letters, manuscripts, love letters and 


a small selection ot personal memo- 
rabilia commemorate the 300th anni- 
versary of the birth ol Voltaire. 

Philadelphia 

Museum of Art. tel: (215) 684- 
7860. closed Mondays To Nov. 20 
“Japanese Design A Survey Since 
1950." An overview of Japanese de- 
sign over the last 40 years More than 
200 objects ranging from the Sony 
Walkman, hand-held TVs. lo furniture 
and clothing by designers such as 
Issey Miyake. 

Washington 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (2021 
842-6353. 

To Dec. 31: "Robert Frank. Moving 
Out." A selection of photographs- 
shot by Frank in Switzerland after 
World War It, images ot his travels in 
Europe and the Americas and por- 
traits of his friends and fellow artists. 
The exhibition will travel lo Yokoha- 
ma. Japan, Zurich. Amsterdam. New 
York and Los Angeles. 

Corcoran Gallery of Art. tel: [202) 
638-3211. dosed Tuesdays. To Jan. 
2: "Louise Bourgeois The Locus ol 
Memory: Works 1982-1993." 27 
sculptures and 30 drawings in water- 
color, charcoal, pencil, and oil from 
1 982 to the present tune illustrate the 
themes which have long obsessed 
the American artist: gender, sexuality 
and the rights to freedom and individ- 
uality. 


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7/9. Bd des Matin MC9SC00 Monaco. 

Ttl 33-92 16 hoc 3393 SO 194 


PANAMA 


PAMS 3rd -MARAIS 
STUDIO . A EAL BARGAIN 
TctOmrpidSJBMV. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


AVENUE FOCH 


PAMS I Hi - HOUSE TO RENOVATE 
VIEW ON THE SAGS COBJR 
Tat Omw fl} 4SJJ3M00. 



NKJfoa 70s 4 Roo 

COCOS MVS vcws 


. .mootrs 

Z.Dedroons, 2 mortal, botto 
*Uh taeuzn on high floors. South m*r 
Warar/dryv in apmiu wH . taw 
SBI7 awmon dagn/roSsHf, ttsM. 
Seta, Ml sap Xu lop dos M anin 
SWona with hedrii deb. 60 wd 
JOAN WH.TZ 

snai-nvsnbe 212 - 091^239 


DOUGLAS HUMAN 


<W-Afwj 7Fn CondO &d. 

THE PHRCT PHflHOUSE 

«*• A 1 * 'ep Bow ond 


« v ** n to aueBy al a paint 
Pank nat; H oho jjmm firsdwi, AT 
»"B nwn uadi firteio* mil tad 
Banwy formta dong room, 3 bed- 


SWITZERLAND 


AMBBCAN REAL ESTATE SfMd^d, 
in Paris sues 1980 wil find, fame*, 
duign and renovtfe rtsdenbd/ 
oan m orqdl space for utvtdon or 


.TTTT3 


indvidds at nnutmid Jowl pneu. 
CIA Td (33-!) 42571777 Fax <2571797 



4561 27 S 


I f ° oat -,3 merit Mb end » trata 
emn hr Mortaring 4 to 

Amy todm (21 2) 3250333 

GRS<THAL R5B3MIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


“*T ’ VWTH OPTION TO BUY f*n 
*wt lor retf paid ogoret purdiose 



JboCBKotfmfSBKHKMBA 

CANNES 


PARIS 1ST 

VB'lDCMKONCOflDE AREA 

2 recastai apartrmnn 
h new nigh das 


serijng- 156 SQM 
IMWWUBtESAYB 


fMMOnUEE SATIS 
tab (1) 45.03.7378. 


CARIBBEAN 


FABULOUS WATERFRONT MANSION 

PdacfrSce layout, 1,800 *qjn. 
tang spac, marUe noon/ txJla , 
fcrfcl carathon. S w imm ing pool 
Price: ff2B.flQO.O0O 
UNMUEOPfOKniNtTY 


ST. KITTS, 


Grib Mooku Bareo 93 38 00 46 
or Feet; 93 3913 45 


OET&BOUMJA 

Howes far »le with wonderful vine of 
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ovaiatfe far devdopmert. Hofioric 
Propenies ond Invnhnwr Servicu. 
Tel/Fax: 301-2845060, Tab 307-3254140. 
Wg haw pup ert ta o3 oner Groece- 


EXGEPnONAL 


Blta. PLACE FtANCOtS 1BI 

TOP RCCS. BALCONY 
349 3CJ&, tr ee d a ne, Ficdidow 
maid's studio. TeL (I) 44 71 87 82 



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20 Or 140 acre site w* Uachfrcnt. 
Wortd doss hotel & condos with casino 
Ecense & tax abatwnrt. Atari, Bnadi 


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A mque opportunity ariy 15 mi — 
tram Mae Airport and 5t Pod da 
Venoe- 4 ho. in boensifut countryside 
neighboring Id* CfftWY GvXoau, 
kiedfor lorpe pnvcM estate or knarry 
residential dowtaprert. 3700 iqjn. 


Front Broker commsson guaranteed 
Priced From $22 sSon to 5* mSBarv 


Priced From 522 adkn to S6 
TeL NYC. USA 
(213) 888-7555 

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eoratrudnWiy for up to 15 pmj. 
tmJnes F. VAN NAB.TWJCK 
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FRENCH PROVINCES 


BUY M FRANCE 
WITHOUT COMMISSION I 



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Fred fccerye regutaty. otyour hotM. Htr*' Ndvdoss bAfan. taMs UNESCO 

a selection of led eftfe , ham 2 to 4 rooms. Duett Romiarcr. I 4th floor. 153 stpa. 5 nxxra. 3 baths. 


a selection of red ettcre 
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Fax: [331 67 03 33 39 or write te 

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34030 Atodpoffier odm 01. Frirxa 


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93 15 92 09 


I soex. 5 rooms. 3 belts, 
arm. To! (1) 44 71 87 82 


a WJWWttC04JWHJUCB> 
BARGAINS 5784/mo. Mantenoncel 
Corporatrown cr sublets ak 
Wdow morsel 1 tmdroom /1 both. 


USA GENERAL 


Begem Dortheaan Porh Ave. &57thS*. 
Fvf hotel sconce. Priwre mm 





|icr.l li.i i») J.'iittt 


Wflitel service. PowTe game." 


Asfcng 5229K unWied 
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Two MnJL bm 305-536-8201 US 


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Come Brad* to The GALAXY 

00 Bbd E Guttenberg/lcwrer Mdl 
Terns, kt & Outdoor Pools, dub 



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3 raoraTw Kyn. - P9£QQ reL 
3 rooms, 83 sqjn. - P9^40 not 
3 room* Dupim - F10J00 neL 


5 r> 


m zEMnzEssm 


92 - NHJULY, BD MAALOT, 80 run, 
krm 2 roomu F9J300 induing 
charges. Teh P) 45 20 25B5. 


1-2 & 3 B«6e wi & Penthouses 
ITAIS JI2CO-S40CX! 

“cGITORATERa^ 65 ^ 


HATOTH 


Riverfront 


Auction sale at the Palais de Justice of NANTERRE 
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 at 2pjn. 

TOWN HOUSE 

3 floors, situated in 
BOULOGNE - BILLAN COURT (92) 

5, rue Gambetta 

STARTING PRICE: 7,150.000 FF 
Contact : Maitre Bepit DESCLOZEAUX, 
lawyer in the Hauts-de-Sefne 
58, boulevard du Couch ant, 92000 NANTERRE. 
Tel.: (1) 47 24 16 58 from 8-10 o.m. 



201-861-6777 

OPEN 7 DAYS FAX 201-8614)677 


Real Estate Agents 

Ui Company rxjpnln .1 Incrrtnc Tnws 
for Inveswrs in Artnma: 

New Homes in Golf A Tennis 

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set up fnr Rcnctfr nr Great Toner 
Hntm-s in Plurcnb-5cm-dik-. 

3 hours from Grand Canyon! 
Anuring Inw Prims hy hinrvMJiiilanta 
TniirSnrfct* • F«: (41>^WMJ.VI7 
9^VJ K Rjoti nr, 'inns. .Vuttsdak'. 
AriymstHjtin 1 15 a. 


COLD STORAGEX 
FACILITIES N 

In the Southern U.S. A. 


FOR SALE 


FOREIGN COMPANY OWNED 

Contact: 

Fox: +41-81-695-244 



fifth Avenue 13 Boom bd 

5000 SQ. FF. 

—AND 2 dootag torroc m New YorVi 
mad gtamourow views from one of 
New Toths finest od drei MS. Trx desais, 
please contact: 

Amy fcsd-or 012 3260333 
Bnan 1 Manning; (2T2J 3260310) 

GRMHAL RESIDENTIAL 



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WASHMGTON, D.C Georgetown’s 
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European Wy, marble, dx mkta s- 
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agents. 202-33MS95+* 7064135636 


Tel: |1) 47.20.30.05 


8RMI BRITAIN 



BANC ASSETS LIQUIDATION 


SALE: 60 ACRES al the HOUSTON INTERCONTINBfTAL AIRPORT 
(2, 613,600 square feel) -Only Si 30 per sq. fl! (Or Best Offer Appraised al 
$2.00 per sq. ft.1) 24.282 Hectare (242B20 square meters) 

19% Agsots* Commission 

Tot Delated Information - Can or Far TeL: (713) 780-1797 Fax: (713) 780-4405 



CENTRAL LONDON 
INVESTMENT 

Next to Buckingham Palace, hi very 



pretty private square, (fistnguished 
5 bedroomed Georgian house. 


5 bedroomed Georgian house, 
including se8 -contained flat 
In need of redecoration; 
interesting history. Private sale. 

$2 mghon/£l -25 mifton. 
TeL UK (44) 71 828 0796. 


Every Friday 
Contact Fred Reran 
Tel.: (331)46 37 93 91 
Foe (33 1)46 37 93 70 
or your nearesMHT office 
or representative 


Max Ivrrrnt. IfL I-ax: t.V> «M *)*» 1-1 tM 
*>r tlx- Inic-niiiliittKil JIcriU Trilmnc in Paris: 
Tel: ( i ) -if. .57 ‘>.i Hi - l*.tx: 1 1 ) -in 37 93 7» 


Ilcralb^Keribune 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


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Fact!] 45 37 93 70. 
G8MANY, AU5T1M5CB4ntAt. 
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BBSUM A attBMOMk tarndh. 
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foe 3464353. 

GBSCE3 CYRUS: Atam. 


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svmsBUMfcMr. 

TdL: (0211728 30 21 
foe KOI) 728 3091. 
1MHDKMGD0M:fondan. 
W.WII 836 4002 
Fa* 1071] 2402254 
Uk 262009 


U.: (30)15535246. 
For 554 5513 


FNMkHU 
W:358MrW7412 
Foe 6121112 


UMIED STATES 


15k. FHJX FAME gi > **U *fo*o. 
Uly cqsmpecL induing phone. «6or 
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tMlY:M3ono, 

W: 58315738. 

Fok 58320938. 
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Far 5737627 
NORWAY* swam 

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NEWYORX: 

Tel: [2121 752-3890 

bem* 

Tk427l^ 


Asu/PAonc 

HONGKONG; 

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Ik: 5IP0H1HK 
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Td- 326) 02 10 
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[fgl l(£i[zJ filial RJrgjRlrElreJfH l i 2 lRJraifgj|^i£j[ 2 Jrc!iffJ| 5 i 0 [HJrdi[ 2 lfHJfgrfaIfaii fol| 


the? middle EAST 

CJ EASTERN 
MEDITERRANEAN 


The Most Lp-to-Date Reference 
for American Business Terms 


[P ^faJraifgJiaJ!aJfalfalfHiRirgjiEJralfaJfairaraJfaJ;£j[EJtaJfaJ.~EJfaJ[aJrcJ?E]?iIi fQl 


Economics, Business and Politics 

ASTIR PALACE HOTEL. VOULIAGMENI, NEAR ATHENS. 10-11 OCTOBER. 1994 


■ ' 


T his exceptionally timely conference will highlight the enormous potential for 
business and investment unleashed by the Middle East peace process. The 
focus of discussion will be on business, investment and infrastructure 
opportunities in Jordan, Israel. Lebanon, Egypt, Gaza and the West Bank. 
The impressive group of speakers addressing this major forum includes: 

Abu Ala’a, Minuter o f Economy, Palestine National Authority and Managing Director, PECDAR 
Yossi Beilin, Deputy Minuter of Foreign Affairs, Israel 

David R Bock, Managing Director, Lehman Brothers International (Europe), London 
Roger Edde, Chairman. Lebanese National Congress (LNC) and Chairman, HOK Intercontinental 
HE Dr Ziad Fariz, Advisor to HRM Crown Pruice o f Jordan 
Dr Jacob Frenkel, Governor, Bank of Israel, Jerusalem 
Rahim K 09 , C bairman, Ko$ Holdings AS. Istanbul 
Manuel Marin, Vice President, European Commission, Brussels 

HE, Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Chairman, Centre far Global Energy StiSiee, London 


■ 

RaP v: X' : - 

Private 


- ntCs ^ 

AMERICAN 

BUSINESS 

TERMS 

Dictionary 


sasafi 






Conference Location 


ASTIR PALACE HOTEL. VOULIAGMENI. NEAR ATHENS 
TEL» (30 I) 896021 1/31 1 FAX: (30 1) 8962682 


Situated on the coast and surrounded fay 80 acres of private land, 
the Astir Palace Hotel at Vguliagmeni is just 50 minutes bv taxi 
from central Athens and 10 minutes from the airport. The calm, 
relaxing atmosphere ol the hotel creates the ideal climate for 
focusing on the key issues under discussion. 


Cosponsored try 

iicnilo^^^enbunc 



AMERICAN HELLENIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 


Corporate Sponsors 
COMMERCIAL BANK OF GREECE, 
HKI.I.MLTII. OBATA & KASSABAUM (HOK), INC. 
JOAN NO l & PARASKEVAHYES (HELLAS) S.A. 


For funher information, or to register for the conference, 
please complete the form bdow and send or fax to: 
Fiona Cowan, International Herald Tribune, 

63 Long Acre. London WC2E9JH 
Tel: (+1 71 ) 836 4802 Fax: (44 71) 856 0717 
The conference fee is £650.004- 18% FPA 


ED Pleatt send me farther uifvmuition. D Plrtue tmmec. 

TliU (MWMRMHsoirw) First name 

lamt name - : 


Position _ 
Company . 
Ailclms _ 


City 

Tdephone 


.Country . 
. I" as - 


The American Business Terms Dictionary includes 
over 4,000 terms from commerce, banking, investment 
and finance — defined clearly and concisely. This refer- 
1 ence book is edited especially for people living and 
\ working in an international environment. 

\ The clear and logical organization . as well as 
\ careful attention to parts of speech, grammatical 
‘ \ number, and idiomatic usage, make this volume 
£ \ the ideal choice for business professionals, stu- 
|k\ dents or anyone who needs knowledge of the 
basic terminology of business and commerce. 
H The Dictionary incorporates many useful 
features: 

■ Each entry has at least one example or 
explanation in addition to a clear and con- 
cise definition. 

■ Current slang and colloquial words and 
^K||||h phrases are included, as well as buzz 
words and jargon. 

® Abundant cross-referencing connects 
synonymous terms and concepts. • 

■ N umerous abbreviations and acro- 
nyms are defined and explained, 
along with common Latin terms and 
expressions. 

The American Business Terms Dictionary is pub- 
lished by National Textbook Company (Chicago) and 
the International Herald Tribune. Hardcover, 330 
pages. Fax or mail the order coupon today. 


— — -Hfralb^^Sribunc- 


FAX ORDER TO: (4481) 9448243 


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»"■ P* 

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Approx. we^ftJng: 32% 

Close: 12729 Piev.: 128.05 

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Close: 1 1227 Prov.: 11128 



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Approx, wagteng: 5% 
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!»?. World index 

T7w index tracks U S. datar wafiias of soda to Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Auatraila, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chita, Denmark. Finland, 
Franca, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Natharian da . Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vanazualn. For Tokyo, Now York and 
London, trio Max b composed of the 20 top issues In tarns of market capkaBzathn. 
otherwise the ten top stocks an tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


Goto^r Homing Into Hong Kong 

| . An Indonesian Lesson From First Pacific 

By Kevin Murphy ptoyces and $1.5 million, served as the o 

International Herald Tribune investment aim of the Salim famil y of I 

Frvmt'h Wfvrhtm HONG KONG — Without a long colonial * a and some of its associates. But it i 

J. I c/IL't rvt/l im>I 5 history behind it. First Pacific Co. pa-s dwelt a m assed a broad collection of holdings. 

Fiaht Frirmfivi-ntr in the shadow of Hong Kong’s biggest hongs. First Pacific has recently winnow 

± <g« u> X f ivuiiMUl-g' or trading houses, during its comparatively portfolio into four main lines of bit 

„ , r _. . short struggle for consistent profits and re- banking; real estate development and 

compiled by our staff From Drspatdtes cpw waKiii iy. agemeot; consumer marketing and dil 

PARIS — Hundreds of n, e reviane the benchmark tio , n; ■“» increasingly, telecommunica 

French workers invaded the Hane Sm«^o<± indexrSntl v Jmbbed the Investors clearly understood when 
Pans Bourse on Thursday, halt- “■*?*£* ^troUed bYtodaoeSn Pacific ^ught “ t0 ** DatA ™ ketil 

mg tractag m financial futures it h^SSly distribution group Hagemeyer NV. I 

and opiums. to protest the par- faSrf newlhttaTiS^m&vSS.^ progeny and consumer-produ 

Hal sale erf the carmaker Re- mbution m Hong Kong, Thailand, Au< 

nault and other privatizations. jt . , Indonesia and the Philippines were als 

The workers, from the Gen- “} e index that First Pacific was not invited as logical, 

era] Labor Confederation, or tojom after five Jardine Mammon companies But analysts said an overactive cor 

CGT, the trade union that orga- d«aded to be delisted has fallen 22 percent development unit made a spate of oil 

nized the demonstration, said j ? ear 35 the Hon 8 Kong ““J*® 1 has foun- quisitions that stretched First Pacific’s 

they were protesting not only dered on nervousness about China’s econo- and mystified potential investors, 

the sale by the government of m Y’ uiterest rates and local property “I don’t make any apologies for our 

its 49 percent stake in Renault pnees. sition phase in the 1980s,” said Mam 

but all privatization in France. First Padfic has bad a better time of it. With Pangjlman. who has been First Pacific's 

“Renault is just the first step. strong, diversified earnings growth and a rap- aging director since its start. “Without 

They will be privatizing the rail- idly expanding telecommunications business, could never have achieved our curren 

ways next,” one protester said. Phcdfic stock has risen 27 percent since but we are actively trying to reduce the 

Trading at the MATTF, the die begi nnin g of the year. The stock dosed plexity of the group.” 

French international futures Thursday at 5.35 Hong Kong dollars (70 U.S. In the past two years. First Padfi 

and options exchange, was cents), down 15 Hong Kong cents. ceased making acquisitions at the ho 

brought to a standstill after the The company recently reported that its company level. It has been selling off nc 

protesters entered the ex- first-half net profit rose 81 percent, to $64.4 assets to bolster existing businesses si 

rhangrt million on $1.64 billion in revenue. Berli Jucker Co„ a consumer-goods con 

“The stock exchange is a „ “T^ is an 8 to 9 dollar stock,” Kirk that is listed in Bangkok, and Metro Pat 

highly symbolic olace where Sweeny of Lehman Brothers said. He added Philippine conglomerate, 

thousandsof Jobs have been de- 0181 Pacific’s stock price made it “the The company plans to sell an 80 pi 

cheapest tdecommunications company in stake in UmWsivings Bank of Califw 

offioial of ^‘SSpany, started in 1981 with five em- See PACIFIC, Page 17 

The federation said it L- — — — 

planned further protests this 

month, including a demonstra- 11 HI 1 fTl • • Tfc 

scandal Snakes Taipei Bom 

work force walked out in a pro- m. 

Japanese-owned Sharp 5 photi> IlWeStOTS Bail Otlt After BroketS Coil’t Cover Checks 
copier factory at Soultz in east- J 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Without a long colonial 
history behind it. First Pacific Co. has dwelt 
in the shadow of Hong Kong’s biggest hongs, 
or trading houses, during its comparatively 
short struggle for consistent profits and re- 
spectability. 

The committee revising the benchmark 
Hang Seng stock index recently snubbed the 
company, which is controlled by Indonesian 
interests. But it has gradually been trans- 
formed nevertheless into an investors' dar- 
ling. 

The index that First Pacific was not invited 
to join after five Jardine Matheson companies 
decided to be delisted has fallen 22 percent 
this year as the Hong Kong market has foun- 
dered on nervousness about C hinn 's econo- 
my, U.S. interest rates and local property 
prices. 

Fust Pacific has bad a better time of it With 
strong, diversified earnings growth and a rap- 
idly expanding telecommunications business. 
First Pacific stock has risen 27 percent since 
the beginning of the year. The stock closed 
Thursday at 5.35 Hong Kong dollars (70 U.S. 
cents), down 15 Hong Kong cents. 

The company recently reported that its 
first-half net profit rose 81 percent, to $64.4 
mfilion on $1.64 billion in revenue. 

“This is an 8 to 9 dollar stock,” Kirk 
Sweeny of I^hman Brothers said. He added 
that First Pacific’s stock price made it “the 
cheapest telecommunications company in 
Asia today.” 

The company, started in 1981 with five em- 


ployees and $1,5 million, served as the overseas 
investment arm of the Salim famil y of Indone- 
sia and some of its associates. But it quickly 
amassed a broad collection of holdings. 

First Pacific has recently winnowed its 
portfolio into four main lines of business: 
banking; real estate development and man- 
agement; consumer marketing and distribu- 
tion; and, increasingly, telecommunications. 

Investors clearly understood when First 
Pacific bought into the Dutch marketing and 
distribution group Hagemeyer NV. Invest- 
ments in property and consumer-product dis- 
tribution in Hong Kong, Th ailan d, Australia, 
Indonesia and the Philippines were afcn seen 
as logical. 

But analysts said an overactive corporate 
development unit made a spate of other ac- 
quisitions that stretched First Pacific's assets 
and mystified potential investors. 

“I don’t make any apologies for our acqui- 
sition phase in the 1980s,” said Manuel V. 
Pangilman. who has been Hrst Pacific’s man- 
aging director since its start. “Without it we 
could never have achieved our current size, 
but we are actively trying to reduce the com- 
plexity of the group.” 

In the past two years. First Pacific has 
ceased making acquisitions at the holding- 
company level. It has been selling off noncore 
assets to bolster existing businesses such as 
Berli Jucker Co., a consumer-goods company 
that is listed in Bangkok, and Metro Pacific, a 
Philippine conglomerate. 

The company plans to sell an 80 percent 
stake in United Savings Bank of California to 

See PACIFIC; Page 17 


Kidder to Cut 
Staff by 10% as 
Losses Mount 


Bloomberg Business Nn-s 

NEW YORK — Kidder, 
Peabody Group Inc. said 


bond market rally. Salomon 
Inc. said Thursday that it would 
report a loss of $100 million for 


Thursday it would slash its staff the third quarter. 


Merrill Lj-nch & Co.. Smith 
Barney Inc. and CS First Bos- 

SSSutagkEsef r fT” 8 *1°?'; r b , iS 

6 luma. firms that have cut back staff. 

The unit of General Electric _ ,. , , , , 

Co. unit now has about 5,000 Regarding the ^and scandal, 
employees worldwide. It is suf- Kidder took a $210 million 
feruig from losses of more than charge against earnings in the 
S300 million this year and a first quarter after it accused us 
bond trading scandal that led to former chief U.S. government 
the departures of top officials. £° n . d lr ® de L' Jo i sc P h ■* elt ’ of V*“ 
Kidder plans to trim its bal- I? 1 ® s E r 5' ^ P ro [ lls 

ance sheet assets to as liule as $350 milhon. Mr. Jett has 
$50 billion by the end of the denied the allegauons. 
year from about $80 billion Separately, a New York state 
now. The firm had $106 billion judge rejected a request by Mr. 
of assets in March. j ell i Q force arbitrators to hold 

Kidder also will transfer its ^ expedited hearing on his re- 
$6.7 billion portfolio of collat- q u «* that Kidder pay his legal 
eralized mortgage obligations fees. The judge also threw out 
to GFs financial unit, GE Cap- Kidder’s attempt to dismiss all 
iia1_ Rising interest rates this of Mr. Jett’S claims. 


Scandal Shakes Taipei Bourse 


Energy 110.63 If 0.63 Until. 

Wrote 124.97 126.32 -1.07 

Finance 1H72 11199 -024 

Services H6.71 117274 -0.48 


Cqttal Goods 
Raw Materials 
Consumer Goode 
ISscdlaneow 


11254 11264 -0.09 
131.62 131.89 -020 
101.73 101.75 -0.02 
12122 121.77 -MJ.12 


For more information about ttm Index, B toooAfef is ovaSable free of charge. 

Write to Trfo Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe. 92521 Nei&ly Cedex. France. 

6 International Herald Tribune 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


era France, trade union offi- 
cials said. 

In addition, unions repre- 
senting workers at Perrier SA, 
the French mineral water com- 
pany bought by Nestte SA in 
1992, asked the European 
Court on Thursday to reverse 
the European Commission's 
approval of the acquisition. 

The protest was organized by 
the CGT, which said 1,000 
workers participated. 

(Rearers, Bloomberg) 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Even by 


menis of up to 6.6 billion Tai- 
wan dollars ($252 million). 
And, moving quickly at the 


Taiwan's legislature, has been a 


of assets in March. 

Kidder also will transfer its 
$6.7 billion portfolio of collat- 
eralized mortgage obligations 
to GFs financial unit, GE Cap- 
ital. Rising interest rates this 
year caused values of Kidder's 
holdings of those securities, 
which was as large as $15.8 bil- 
lion in March, to tumble. Wall 
Street creates collateralized 
mortgage obligations by bun- 
dling home mortgages and cut- 
ting the bundles into bonds tai- 
lored to investor preferences. 

The 129-year-old securities 
firm said it planned to reduce 
costs by remaining in lower 
Manhattan and extending its 
leases for 15 years. Kidder said 
last year it would relocate to the 
GE Building in Rockefeller 
Center in mid town Manhattan. 


the wild and woolly standard of fiirport just after dawn, authori- 
gamesmanship on the Taipei ties detained four executives 


familiar figure in previous decision ^ boos[ lhe 
squabbles that have rocked the finrfs cash flow by aboui S100 


stock market, Thursday was a 
bit much. 


linked to the company before 
they boarded an early morning 


Taiwan market. He has some- 
times been questioned by secu- 
rities officials. 


Ii^ferencf 

ns Terms 


Class War Must Not Spoil Trade Debate 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — A nasty 
whiff of class warfare is con- 
taminating the current 
American debate on trade. It 
has been introduce! by opponents of the 
Uruguay Round world trade pact, who 
seek to brand the agreement as a conspir- 
acy by the political and business estab- 
lishment against regular working people. 


Prince WBliam County thought the deci- 
sion on Disney should have been theirs 
alone, so the more isolationist Uruguay 
Round opponents believe that America 
should assert its “rights" regardless of 
the rest of the world. The level of debate 
has sunk pretty low. 

Supporters of the pact who appear on 
television call-in shows are immediately 
bombarded with insulting telephone 
calls on the air and deluged with hate 


Officials suspended the oper- to Hong Kong, 
ations of two brokerages linked Investors acied quicklv, too. 
to one of Taiwan’s largest con- F° r a second day in a row, they 
glomerates. the Hualon Corp^ dumped shares on Taipei's 
after a check-boundng scandal stock market, where the weight- 
bounced out of control and four ed-pnee index recently hit a 
brokerages defaulted on pay- four-year high. 

It was the deepest sell-off in 
nine months. The weighted 
price index fell 4.19 percent 
Thursday and has lost 7.47 per- 

cent in the past two days. 

“The arrest of Hualon offi- 

fl \ "E - dais was another serious blow 

R I fPDilfP to the market after it suffered 

^ the unexpected setback yester- 

day,” Huang Yuan-Ii, with Na- 
il Geneva last December. The tional Securities, told Reuters, 

lave been taken show wide- “The market has lost all ratio- 

irance of the subject. nalitynow." 

nance is dangerous, because The head of Hualon, James 
srs believe it is easy to turn Oung Ta-ming, one of the most 

opponents of the pact by adventurous investors on Tai- 

lem with very little informa- wan’s exchange and member of 


million. 

Kidder did not say where it 
would cut jobs. The company 

...in 


The Taipei market, one of the ^jj foojs on “select industries 
n'“ l . a _2i ve volatile m Asia. wtere lhe flrm has provm lead . 


had been roaring ahead on an- 
tidpation that the ruling Na- 


ership strengths in terms of in- 
dustry knowledge, research 


tionalist Party, facing difficult abilities, product structures and 
December elections, would en- distribution and trading 
courage a sustained rally. strengths," said Dennis Dam- 
But now, the big individual merman, chairman and chief 
investors that have poured so executive, and Denis Nayden. 
much money into the market president and chief operating 
are short of cash, Ben Chen, officer, 
who heads the Taiwan opera- Employees said Monday that 
lions of Barclays de Zoete ,he firm was expected co drop 
Wedd, told Bloomberg Busi- businesses that have not been 


ness news in Taipei. 


profitable or been central to its 


Now that approval of the pact has mail afterwards, 
been delayed in both bouses of Congress Some of this is the coordinated work 
for nearly two months, these acrimoni- of right-wing groups that may support 
ous accusations are likely to get even 
more shrilL * 

In the populist version, the heroes of n . , . 

the battle are average Americans Strug- r opular COUCCTO flLDOUt 

gling to make ends meet and protect trade could rise as the 

their jobs iD a rapidly c hangin g world. 

The villains are foreigners out to under- world economy becomes 

S ?£* increasingly global. 

that di sdains the needs and rights of the — 

general population. 

The same kind of rhetoric was heard former presidential candidates Ross 
last month on a smaller scale after local Perot or Pat Buchanan. But it is difficult 
supporters of a new Disney theme park to gauge their real strength, 
in Vir ginia 's horse country blamed “fat Not all the pact’s opponents are wag- 
cats” and outsiders for the project’s de- ing class warfare. Many have genuine, if 
fgat and the consequent loss of jobs, exaggerated, fears that freer trade would 

^3£»wss: SSBJSSSSS 

iy hdd ug the g act Jn th ? Sgate. sic 


former presidential candidates Ross 
Perot or Pat Buchanan. But it is difficult 
to gauge their real strength. 

Not all the pact’s opponents are wag- 
ing class warfare. Many have genuine, if 
exaggerated, fears that freer trade would 
dimmish U.S. sovereignty and threaten 
the environment. Some, like Senator Er- 
nest F. H offings, who has single-handed- 
ly held up the pact in the Senate, are 
unabashed, old-fashioned protectionists. 

Astonishingly, there have been virtual- 
ly no nationwide opinion polls on the 
Uruguay Round agreement since it was 


concluded in Geneva last December. The 
polls that have been taken show wide- 
spread ignorance of the subject 

That ignorance is dangerous, because 
some pollsters believe it is easy to turn 
people into opponents of the pact by 
providing them with very liule informa- 
tion — or in many cases misinformation. 

Conscious of these cross-currents, pol- 
iticians have become increasingly ner- 
vous. One reason for this week's decision 
to delay a vote in the House of Represen- 
tatives was the reluctance of many mem- 
bers to commit themselves to the pact so 
soon before Lhe midterm elections. 

But it is likely that popular concern 
about freer trade will nse as the world 
economy becomes increasingly global, 
further fostering class antagonism. 

In the industrial countries, those most 
likely to benefit from the changes shak- 
ing the world economy, particularly the 
introduction of new technologies, will be 
the most highly educated The losers will 
be the less skilled workers. 

The salary gap between Americans 
with and without college educations, 
which had been dosing up to 1979, sud- 
denly turned around and widened rapid- 
ly in the 1980s. 

So far, however, Lhe Clinton adminis- 
tration has done a rotten job of calming 
these divisive anxieties — and of explain- 
ing the trade pact's vital importance. If 
the White House had played its political 
cards more skillfully, the pact would al- 
ready 1,6 ratified. Now it’s even more 
important to disarm the wagers of dass 
warfare before they do worse damage. 


The latest storm arose Tues- operations, such as foreign ex- 
day, when Hung Fu Securities change, slock options opera- 
defaulted on as much as 200 tions and some futures busi- 
miilion dollars of checks. On nesses. 

Thursday. Hung Fu and Riches Culs of , 0 are ^ 

Securities reportedly defaulted biggest reduction this year at a 
on more, along with Feng Shan finn on WaII Slreeu 

~ TArour n where earnings have slumped 

See TAIPEI, Page 16 with Lhe end of a three-year 


Salomon 
Sees Loss 
In Quarter 

Comptledby Our Staff From Papatdtes 

NEW YORK — Salo- 
mon Inc. said Thursday it 
expected to report an after- 
tax loss for the third quar- 
ter of about $100 million, 
mainly because of losses in 
trading for its own account. 

Salomon said it s client- 
driven businesses also 
would post a loss, although 
results improved from the 
second quarter, after being 
affected by weakness in un- 
derwriting volume and cus- 
tomer trading activity. 

In addition, the compa- 
ny's commodities trading 
business, the Phibro Divi- 
sion, will post a pretax loss 
for the quarter. 

The company said it 
would release its earnings 
around Oct. 20. 

Salomon joins British se- 
curities houses Hambros 
PLC and S.G. Warburg 
and Dresdner Bank AG of 
Germany, which this week 
warned shareholders of 
poor earnings, mostly relat- 
ed to own-account trading. 
(Knight- Bidder, Bloomberg) 


Camdessus Will Stick to His Guns on Aid 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Four days after the 
Group of Seven industrialized 
countries firmly rejected his 


resented a remarkably defiant would be inflauonaiy. He coo- World Bank. It also overshad- 
stance for a man who was casti- tended that “nobody believes owed discussion of the encour- 
gated by officials of the United thai 36 billion SDRs would in arine outlook for world eco- 


proposal te«2 biiuoo of now n 

financial aid for developn^ imSonll bureaucit 

Mr. Camdessus said there 
™ “aiH a feeling of coopera- 
tary Fund said Thiiniday he to tha , wm help fimlizeVso- 
wonld press for ns approval. i„tion that is actable to alL" 

“1 have no reason to change But he added that no IMF 
the proposal on the table,” said member was “in a position to 
Michel Camdessus, speaking in totally imoose its views" con- 


f ated by officials of the United that 36 billion SDRs would in 
tales and other G-7 countries any way be an inflationary fac- 
tor having taken a partisan po- tor.” 

sition on the aid package even On Sunday, a dispute erupt- 


aging outlook for world eco- 
nomic recovery. 


Michel Camdessus, speaking in 
Madrid at the end erf one of the 
most contentious IMF/World 
Bank annual meetings in recent 
years. He added that he was 
confident a compromise would 
be reached “in the coming 
weeks.” 

Mr. Camdessus’ remarks repo- 


sition on the aid package even On Sunday, a dispute erupt- r A1 ti'° u S h Treasury Secretary 
though he is nominally only an ed at the Madrid meeting when Bentsen of the United 

International bureaucrat. Mr. Camdessus sided with itates a P° mt °* adopting 

Mr. Camdessus said there Third World countries who 2 conalLato rv tone as part of a 
was “still a reeling of coopera- eventually blocked a compro- dan ) as 5' c ? n T L ^! campaign this 
tion that will help Finalize a so- mise offer from the Group of w ,^ . I*™} 311 d European 

Iution that is acceptable to all” Seven that would have been officials of G-7 countnes have 
But he added that no IMF worth $23.4 billion. The poor been privately fun ous with Mr. 
member was “in a position to countries, emboldened by Mr. *-' a,n dessus. 
totally impose its views" con- Camdessus’ support, also killed The IMF chief himself, who 
ceming the proposal. a separate financial assistance conceded only that he was 

Mr. Camdessus also took a program intended mainly for “possibly too immodest," made 
swipe at the position held by former Soviet-bloc states. repeated references during the 
Germany, which has opposed The feud between G-7 coun- Madrid meetings to “my agen- 


furious with Mr. 


The IMF chief himself, who 


his aid proposal on the grounds dies on the one hand and Mr. 
that creating 36 billion Special Camdessus and poorer nations 
Drawing Rights ^$53 billion), on the other marred the 50th 
the IMF’s artificial currency, anniversary of the IMF and vant. 


a separate financial assistance conceded only that he was 
program intended mainly for “possibly loo immodest," made 
former Soviet-bloc states. repeated references during the 
The feud between G-7 coun- Madrid meetings to “my agen- 
cies on the one hand and Mr. da” and behaved as ihougE he 
Camdessus and poorer nations had political power despite his 
on the other marred the 50th role as an international civil ser- 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


DreteS OfiL 6 

Cr °" , , DJi. FJ. Uni DJI fcF. Si=. YU Cf Paata 

* iucj 11117 uz» MW* MAS* UR 17 * * UW U 50 S- 

nss ua wiush — «ms u\v na sobs* 

■rutMii _ uw uoi* a*n use* un \sm m us insn 

FrwUurt « ZZ UW VUM 1HJ fl» WO UUt 2U» 

M0-r “ ,2£55 lwlb mxr — »» mo ms uhm-mm ua 

Mian u** ,*« sm u*» uw xn m w» ran mu 

Mw York (M — - n tan. usai uto «s» sau m wia ten? 

Pori* *2! M MS W W M 1,1 ™ *» M»1 

I** 0 !!£ urn US* MM* W U® 1 w MW* 

nw» “2 us aits uw* umi u« uw 

Xurte> ' uw uir um« w *• w ■■ w mm 

11CU “J S an ob ms 

,so * ^ Amsterdam London. New York end Zurich, ftxlnsrs In other eenfees; Toronto 

rotas of 3 tun- ... 70 nuvone donor: Untls of W: HA: not auohd: itA: not 

o; To 0«V ana pound* u- 
available. 

Other Dollar Val cumnc* Per* Conoocv Pori 


Minf' 






Eurocurrency Deposits 


1 month A K. 4 MW StfeSVi 2 *,a 

3 months SW**! SVa-SW. 4VWWi 5-»wSte HW* 

6 months WV» 9A-&* 4li.fi* MWfc S5W W2\ 

1 year 6tW6W 5>V5«w 44M4& TVi-7 3 * & WVj VrirV 

Sources: Acutes Uoyds Bonk. 

Boles aaoHcable to Interbank deposits otSI mlitba minimum (or equlvoient). 


Kay Honey Rotas 


UnWd Stoles 
Dbawntrata 

Prime rate 


Close Prev. 
4JOO AM 


«**•** 


a: TO huv ana “■ - VmonthCOi 4J1 

available. Comm. paKrue dan 1145 

„ 3-moaUi TieuMH i MU 4.V4 

-n- * a 

iss,. s t-r ss srsszs a 

MOroLS VP* nanttewia 4J31 Swad-krana JJ7W io-vearTmmnrnata 7.77 

MUr.scMI. i«dmi rupee 31S3 PWLoeta KS2 tawmi 26.18 SMcarTnanrf tmti 13t> 

Brazil real 4“ n^Trrmirai 2T74m P tWilW *»«. ThalQaM 2&N merrOi Lynch IMayRaodrmMi «4 

Chtorttywm 0*30 Fonacudo 157S6 TWkUhnm 3C34 

CxKflkenma 27Jta nm Russ, ruble 3B0UD UABcBitwai ism , l3b 

Dcwtthtawj itoSSlIdliwr 02975 S« J" 1 ” 1 ^ Venez.be! hr. ltfj7 caUmoiwy 116 

Revet- WW - ^ juain.rM- i5A05 Slw-I Vmoofti imertioW 3 v. 

pubinaran 9^oaath Interbank 2V» 

hmttHiMvMl 2% 

ForwnrdBa^ ^ CBrmcY ^ ^ ^ JM^Oonramentban- 448 

CBrrtmcv ^SHI *!S ammttan **lor 14*67 U*6B 1MJ3 „ 

xretM dbem mx 4 Jaaa , i jw imwniii iRtarom* 5iM 

IwHsMoc . iiim J.. moosuez Bonk (Brvaaet&l Banco ConvnertMe /KKtaja Mmrth intertort 516 

jfcwrtw; ING Bans tpartr Bank of TekYO tTekro): Royal Bank at Canada t-month Morbonk 5JS 


Currency * 

ereck Woe. 

Mono Komr* JJ™ 
NimalorM MJ4J 
liufloa rupee 313J 
lede-rwun 2T7cm 
W»t W* 

IvatH***- JXSt 
KmMlII dtaor DJW5 
jMdcnr.rtaa. 25*® 


Currency Per* 
Mex. peso uro 
N.ZMfmdS 14515 
Morw. krone 4731 
PWLneu 2552 
POUAztOtv 33214. 
PortOSCMta 15746 
Rm.ro Me 280840 
SnuflrfyoT US 
sms 14115 


S.Atr.nnt 15655 
LXgr.MM 79940 
SWi A. krone 73799 
TOwmf 26.18 

ThMQaM 2540 

TorkUMIni 34224. 
UAEMrhaa 14727 
Venei. boJhf. |*9J7 


lore they do worse damage. I rj T _ 

- — 1 U.S. House 

Delays Vote 

Oct. 6 On Trade 

P ranch 

Sterling Franc Yen ECU Hew York Tunes Service 

stesv. 2 *,a*. wb-sv. WASHINGTON — Stymied 

SMe&A mi* by clcction-year politics, lead- 

SS ^ r - b» tab p arti? L“ h S! 

House of Rqjresentatives have 
tttomHmum toremuMen,,. derided to postpone until after 

the November elections a vote 
on legislation to allow the Unit- 
ed States to participate in a new 
» » worldwide trade agreement. 

con mo — v si* sn The Senate decided last week 

/£ It to hold a session after the 
MHan initrimak 6 V 2 m Thanksgiving holiday in late 

fEE 001 182 ** November to vote on the mea- 

imerwnttoo rote 540 540 5UTe. 

/! si , House Speaker Thomas S. 
imonMi jntartwk 51* 5 Foley, Democrat of W ashing- 

£%££?*** S la ton, said Wednesday night that 

sources: Reuters. Bloomberg. Merrill the delay did not mean the mea- 
as^safij^sasr*’* would not ultimately be 

enacted. 

Odd Mr. Foley and the other 

mx Democratic leaders decided to 

SSi postpone the final vote because 

New York 3*00 395.10 -no almost all Republicans planned 

US. donors per ounce. London official tlx- j— agains t a resolution that 

have aDowed the vote 

Source: /teuton. UGS Week. 


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Page 12 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Stocks Move Lower 
On Rate Pessimism 


viataMoMAm 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


tt».V £ : 

Oew Jorfes lmk»WaJ average 


Indus 3788.48 379107 37M.1t 3775*6—11.70 
Trans 144025 1446X1 I4MJ6 1438*0 —5.13 
UHI 17122 178.35 1 77*6 177X1 — 0.13 
Comp 13M.lt 138123 1254X5 1355X4 —3.48 


Metals 


HIM LOW LBSf Stmt OfWt 





Bloomberg Busmens Nc*s 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
fell for a fourth day on Thurs- 
wiy amid concern that a report 
on employment due Friday 
would show that the economy 


U.S. Stocks 


was growing too fast, raising the 
specter of rising inflation and 


higher interest rates. 
The Dow Jones ini 


The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage fell 11.78 to 3,775.56. its 
lowest close since 3,75122 on 
Aug. 22. The benchmark aver- 
age has fallen 67.63 points, or 
1.8 percent, so far this week. 

Dediners led advancers 1 1 to 
9 while volume totaled 265.09 
million shares, down considera- 
bly from 359.60 million shares 
on Wednesday. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond fell 1 /32 
to 94 28/32, while its yield re- 
mained steady at 7.95 percent 

For a second day, the decline 
was led by so-called cyclical is- 
sues, stocks that are sensitive to 
swings in the economy. General 
Motors slid I^b to 44, Interna- 
tional Paper tripped 1 ft to 76% 
and J.P. Morgan & Co. fell 1 to 
59ft. 

The Standard & Poor's 500 
Index slipped 1.16 to 452.36. its 


lowest reading since July. 
Shares of automakers, retailers 
and computer software compa- 
nies suffered the sharpest falls. 

If the report on September 
employment shows that the 
economy added more than the 
254,000 jobs analysts generally 
expected, die Fed could move 
to rein in economic growth by 
raising rates a sixth time this 
year, analysts said. 

Shares of Apple fell 1ft to 
36ft after rallying 4ft, or 12 
percent, on Wednesday amid 
speculation the company might 
be the subject of a takeover or 
major investment by Motorola. 
Both companies declined to 
comment. 

Dynatech rallied 3ft to 25 as 
the intermediate-term rating for 
the electronics company was 
raised Thursday to “above aver- 
age" from “■neutral’* by Merrill 
Lynch. 

Shares of retailers declined 
after companies reported slug- 
gish September same-store 
sales. 

The S&P index of general 
merchandise retailers fell 0.81 
to 45.11, led by Wal-Mart, 
which slumped ft’ to 22ft. The 
apparel retailers' index fell 4.40 
to 259.45, led by TJX*s drop of 
2 ft to 17%. 




.A: H 4 J A S 

.798*'.; V::.:. ■ 


l 

i 

• Indexes 

High La 
Industrial* 539*0 536. 

Trotwa. 3S2SQ 348. 

Utilities l49J5 M&i 

. Finance 42.17 41, 

SF5D0 454X9 452. 

5P 100 421*8 61BJ 

w Clast Chta* 

1 536*9 — 1*9 

G —204 

M 148*1 UncB. 

H 42*5 +DJM 

3 453*6—1.16 

14 418*4 — 1*4 

NYSE Indexes 


Nigtl LOW 

Composite 250X2 149.71 

industrials 375.15 313.73 

Tronsa. 726.69 224*3 

U«tV 801.16 206*5 

Finance 281.54 206.73 

Lost Old. 

'249.93 -0X3 
31X89 —0X9 
234*6 —lift 
200.71 -0*2 
208.93 —0.26 

NASDAQ Indexes 

s 


CUM 

Bid Ask 
ALUMINUM (MMl Graft) 
Delian mt metric ton 

5« 143&50 1539X9 

Forward 1647.00 14*800 

COPPER CATHODES (HIM 
Dollars oer metric To* 

Soot 25*000 25*1X0 

Forward 2537X0 


Previous 

DM Ask 


|625S0 1626X0 
I64SX0 1646X0 
Graft) 


161,35 16075 161X5 161X5 +1X5 

159X0 159X0 IS9J0 1J9J5 +1X5 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 15825 +1XS 

157X5 157X0 15775 157.75 + 1J» 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 159X5 +1X0 


EH. volume: 116*7. OMnUit. 111.1*0 


Soot 25*0X0 25*1X0 

Forward 2537X0 fW 

LEAD 

Priori per metric ton 

627X0 628X0 

n!ckS “* “ 

poH«* pot metric ton 
Spot 600X0 6590X0 

Forward 6600X0 6690X0 

Dollars per metric ton 
Sort 5380JX) 5385X0 

Forward 5460X0 5465X0 

ZINC (Special him Graft) 
Delian «er metric ton 

Sp« 1Q»* 1 053X0 

Forward 1074X0 1B75O0 


2 S 2 L 0 O J g W fl fl 
2S3X0 200X0 


SRENT CRUDE OIL (IPE) 

US. Milan per ParreWot, a* 1X09 barrels 


628X0 629X0 
64JH 6*4X0 


6*55X0 6465X0 
6560X0 4565X0 


5380X0 5390X0 
5465X0 5470X0 


Nay 

16.98 

16*8 

16*6 

16.97 

4-0*0 

Dec 

1TJB6 

16X9 

17X5 

17A5 

+0.18 

Jon 

17.12 

16.98 

17X4 

17X8 

+ 0.14 

Feb 

17.10 

17X1 

17X4 

17X4 

+aio 

Mor 

17*5 

17X0 

17X3 

17X3 

+ai4 

Apr 

17*5 

17X0 

17X0 

16.98 

+ 0X4 

May 

17X5 

16.99 

17X0 

16*8 

+ 0X4 

Jon 

17.05 

17X0 

17X0 

17X0 

+ 0X6 

Jiy 

17X5 

16.98 

16.98 

16*8 

+ 0X2 

Aug 

17*5 

17X0 

17X0 

16*8 

+ 0X2 

Sep 

17X5 

17X0 

17X5 

16*9 

+ 0X3 

0« 

17X5 

17X0 

17X0 

17X5 

+ 0X7 


Claims for State Jobless Benefits Rise 

WASHINGTON (AF) —The number 
state unemployment benefits for the first 
marking the first increase in five weeks, the Labor Department 

tSS rose by . seasonally adjusted 4 

reversing a drop of 1 1,000 in the wwk ended ^24. But to 
Labor Department said its four-week moving average of initial 
claims fell to the lowest level in more than five 

Economists consider the four-week aijxage a more rd^We 
gauge of hiring trends than the volatile weekly num wx The 
Department is set to report employment data for September on 
Friday. 


# _ . 


,1.1-M b : 




.-.V 


E*t. volume: 3WOO. Open Ini, 166X44 


1840X0 1041X0 
1063X0 1064X0 


Financial 


HIM Low Lost dig. 


NYSE Most Actives 


, Composite 
! Industrials 
I Bonks 

insurance 

Finance 

Transp. 


747.72 7*3X9 743.0* — 2J9 
759.55 757X3 75773 —1.04 
750X2 748.0* 7*9.04 -1X9 

931.16 927X3 927.53 -0X3 
917.68 915-23 916.62 -135 

697.16 *91.09 *92.64 — 1*8 


5F«PCs 

GnMprr 

Matortas 

Urfevs 

UnPoC 

HuanP n 

MicrTcs 

Hlltttrust 

WOTMart 

Tel Max 

SFPGidn 

Aflcrck 

More* 
Compaqs 
K mart 


VoL 

High 

LOW 

Last 

Ota. 

102226 

15 

I3U 

I3ft 

-ft 

37374 

45 <0 

43 1* 

43ta 

—1ft 

31581 

50V* 

49V* 

49*.* 

— 5* 

28899 12V, 

IV* 

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28492 

SOW 

48 Vk 

50 

—1ft 

25744 

» 

» 

20 


25190 33'.+ 

32 V* 

321* 

— ' ft 

24991 

34W 

33 '4 

33'* 

— ft 

24357 

23+ 

22 V, 

22>/i 

— ft 

MOT7 

60 V. 

595. 

59ft 

— ft 

22140 

16 V. 

15V* 

16 

-ft 

22090 

25W 

24ta 

25ft 

-ft 

2IOI7 

35Vi 

35ft 

—'A 

20*382 

32 V. 

371. 

31 ft 

—ft 

18245 

17 Vi 

16ft 

16>» 

—ft 


AMEX Stock Index 


LOW Lost <310. 


453X0 *61.08 *53X0 -Z49 i 


HIM Low Case Chcnoe 
3^40 NTH STERLING CLIFF El 
■SOSXOO - pta OMN pet 

Dae 93X3 9114 93J0 +0.12 

Mar 92*5 9227 92*0 +0,15 

Jim 71J9 91X2 91J4 +0.15 

Sep 91X1 91.18 91X8 +0.14 

Dec 91X0 90X4 90X6 +0.13 , 

MOT 90J6 90*5 WA +Q.12 

JWI 90*5 90X3 90*0 +0.10 

Sep 4040 90.47 7254 +0.18 

Dec 90S 90*5 90*8 +0X4 

Mar 9054 90*3 90.45 * 0X4 

Jim 9054 90*3 90*5 + 0.06 

See 90X1 90.47 9®** +0M 

EH. volume: 90,172. Open Int.; *98X57. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

11 mllUoR • pa of 180 pet 


FTSE W0 (LIFFE) 

<25 per index point 

Dec 3007.0 2980X 29960 + 22X 

Mar NT. N.T. 30200 +22X 

EH. volume: 13X06. Open mt.: 56X66. 


Stock Indexes 

HIM Low 0088 CftOrtft 


CAC48 CMATIF) 

FF3M per Index potat 

OC 1162X0 1852.00 185200 +11X0 

NOV 1863X0 1859X0 1860X0 +11X0 


Dec 1576X0 1849X0 1B49JO +11X0 

MOT 189*50 1894X0 1895X0 +11X0 

Jin N.T. N.T. 1B81J0 + 1 1X0 

Ext. volume: 8*00. Open Int: 64*13. 

Sources; Motif, Associated Press, 
Leaden Inn Financial Futuna Exchange. 
Inti Petroleum E x chana e. 


Sin wish Sales Dog U.S. Cham Stores 

NEWYORK (Bloomberg) — U.S. chain store on Thursday, 
reported lackluster sales for September as a wave of 
discouraged shoppers from stocking up on winter clothing ana 
back-to-school items. ... _ . 

September sales generally have a big unpact on third-quarter 
^rnmps because they are retailers’ main opportunity to sell ran 
goods before markdowns that usually sweep the industry m 
October. . , 

The September results offered further evidence that the eco- 
nomic recovery is an unusual one, featuring finicky consumers 
who ma y be buying lots of automobiles but are reluctant to spend 
for clothing and other basic items, retail analysts said. 


Dow Jones Bond Average# 


Dec 

93*7 

93,91 

9193 

Mar 

9154 

93*4 

93*4 

Jua 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93.11 

Scp 

9279 

92*9 

9279 


Dividends 


28 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


I NYSE Diary 


Dollar Holds Steady 
Before Jobs Report 


Gsca* 

AflPteC 

Woven 

Intel 

OtnnSti 

USXorss 

HdtOA 

MicsftS 

I nf ormix 

Wellftls 

IntevR&c 

So ouae 

3Com s 

Biooen 

AcacSm 


Web 

Law 

Last 

Cha. 

27ft 

36ft 

27Vu 

+ '** 

3 m. 

36 

36ft 

— lft 

IS 

l-»4 

14 ft 


»ft 

S8ft 

S8>Vu 

♦ ft. 

7ft 

7V* 

7 1 ,. 

—ft 

lS’/j 

14ft 

15ft 


15ft 

13% 

13V« 

— I'Vu 

55ft 

54 'A 

54ft 

—1 

27V. 

36ft 

37 

—V, 

20 Vi 

19V u 

20 

+.V„ 

Wn 

1'V S 

1ft 

-Vfl 

23ft 

21ft 

21ft 

—ft 

38 

37 

37V* 

*ft 

52W 

49ft 

49ft 

—2ft 

17 V. 

15ft 

I60ft 



Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
ToitS issue? 
New HIM? 
New Lows 


990 543 

lira 1741 

713 54* 

7831 2B4 a 

18 9 

137 ?«3 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
| Declined 
Unehcnaed 
I Total issues 
i New Kioto 
New Lows 


78* 172 

254 AM 

723 228 

745 SO* 

• 3 

29 44 


Compiled by Cher Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
finished mixed against other 
major currencies Thursday as 
investors marked time before 
Friday, when the government 


Foreign Exchange 


will release employment data 
for September. 

Most dealers said they ex- 
pected the jobs report to set the 
tone for U.S. stock and bond 
markets for the rest of the 
month, possibly sending clear 
clues on when the Federal Re- 
serve Board will raise interest 
rates. That in turn will chart the 
course for the dollar, which 
weakens if foreign investors 
shun U.S. assets. 

“The bond market has been 
driving the dollar.” said David 
Solin, an analyst with Foreign 
Exchange Analytics. 

The dollar dosed here at 
13440 Deutsche marks, down 
from 1.5445 DM Wednesday, 
at 5.2780 French francs, up 
from 5.2750, and at 1.2800 
Swiss francs, up from 1.2795. 


The dollar edged up to 99.835 
yen from 99.610, while the 
pound rose to $1 3908 from 
$13855. 

The government’s employ- 
ment report is considered to be 
one of tiie most reliable gauges 
of economic strength. 

Many analysts said the Fed 
could be prompted to raise in- 
terest rates if (he data show 
more than 250,000 new jobs 
created in September. 

“Everything is riding on the 
employment report,” said Amy 
Smith, a market strategist at 
IDEA, a consulting firm. “Peo- 
ple are concerned that the num- 
ber will be strong, suggesting 
there’s a risk of inflation." 

While higher U3. interest 
rates are generally positive for 
the dollar, increasing the rate of 
return on dollar-denominated 
assets, that has not proven to be 
the case recently. 

Instead, currency traders 
have focused on the trade rift 
between the United States and 

Ja P“ (Reuurs. 

Knigkt-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


Viocvrt 

VocB 

Echo Bov 

Vlocom 

XCLLld 

Meteors 

Gitcaoo 

SPUR 

viocjnrl 

FAusPr 


VoL HWi Urn Lost 
3SS74 IV. 1V„ iv u 


18819 38H 38 

5777 1315 131* 


NASDAQ Diary 


4505 40'+ 39V, 39ft 

*160 l’ft 1 1V„ 


3240 457V* 45>V« 

7940 3*1. 3ft 3i>4. 
2565 9H 9Vi» 9Vi 


Advtnced 
DecSned 
Unc fto nged 
Total issue* 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1571 1I9» 

1557 7041 

1941 1871 

5034 5081 

51 3o 

85 140 


Spot Commodttles 


Est. volume: 65. Open InL: *X99. 

3-MONTH EUROMARK5 (LIFFE) 

DMi manwi - an or ioo pa 
Dee 9**6 94*2 94*3 + 0X2 

Mar 9*-Z7 9+71 9*24 + 004 

Jun 93X4 9178 93X1 +0X5 

Sea 93*4 91*0 9X43 + 0X5 

Dee 9113 9100 9X11 +0X5 

Mar 9290 *2X6 9288 + 0X* 

Jun 9277 92*9 *2*9 + 0X2 

Sep 9256 92X1 9252 + 0X3 

Dec 9239 9XJ4 92X5 Until. 

Me 922S 92X5 92X3 + 0X1 

Jan 9214 9211 9211 +0X2 

Sen 9201 9201 92X2 +0X2 

Est. volume: 86081. Clean tat: 7B4X80. 
3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

FF3 million - pts of 100 pa 
Dec 94X2 9X96 9159 +0X2 

Mar 7X52 93*5 93*9 + 0X2 

Jun 9X11 9X05 93X9 +0X2 

SOP 9280 9273 9278 +0X3 

Dec 72*0 92*4 9250 +0X3 

MW 92X0 9223 9229 + 0X3 

JlHl 9209 920* 9210 + 0X3 

Sea 91X6 91.91 91.97 +003 

Est. volume: 3H8ZL Oocn Irtt: 171X32 
LONG GILT (LIFFB1 
BUM • Pts A 32nds Of 100 pcf 
Dec 9930 99-06 99-20 + 0-19 

Mar 99-02 98-25 99-00 + 0-19 

EiL volume: 60X61. Open Int.: 98J63. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 258AM ■ Pts aM00 pet 
Dec 8133 87X0 8830 +0X0 

Mar 87X9 87X4 87*7 +025 

Est. volume: 122X77. Open Inf.: 159242 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS tMATIF) 
FF38UM - pts Of 100 PO 
Dec 109.92 109X8 109X4 +0X8 

Mar 109X6 108X4 109X0 +0X8 

Jua 1012* 1082* 10X2* +0X4 

Sep N.T. N.T. N.T. Uneh. 

Est. volume; 124*24. Open ini.: 1*8X91. 


Company Per Amt Pay Rcc 

IRREGULAR 

Redstone Res o 22 11-1 11-15 

United Newspaper a X044 10-20 13-12 
d-apoTM amount per ADR. 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 


Gabel I Eaultv l-lOtti ot o than of Gabdl 
Global Multimedia to reach share held. 


STOCK SPLIT 
Numerix Cora 5 tar 2 epltl. 

INCREASED 

Energy Norm Q *8 12 -1 12-15 

MertJrants Bancore Q .10 lH* 10-31 

PNC Bank Q X5 10-17 10-24 

INITIAL 

Weeks Cara - .15 10-17 10-28 

REGULAR 


Burlington Resources Ea rn ings Drop 

HOUSTON (Bloomberg) — Burlington Resources Inc. said 
Thursday that lower natural gas prices cut its third-quarter 
earnings by 16 percent. ... 

Net i ncom e declined to $20.7 million, despite an increase in 
revenue to $314 million from $309.5 million. Lower gas prices 
offset higher production and sales volume, the company said. 

Natural gas prices were depressed by lower demand because oF 
a cool summer, the restoration of service at some nuclear plants 
and increased imports from Canada, the company said. 


United Paramount Sets Launch Date 


Market Sales 


Today 

dose 

NYSE 26027 

Aim 10.12 

Nastfoq 247X1 

In millions. 


Commodity Today 

Aluminum, lb 0239 

Cooper electrolytic, lb 1X2 

iron FOB, ton 21200 

Lead. lb 0*2 

Silver, troy oz 5*05 

Sleet (scrap). Ian 110.17 

Tin. lb N* 

Zinc, to 0X208 


Industrials 


HWi Low Lost Settle arve 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UX. dollars oar metric ton-tots of IDO taas 
Oct 155X0 153X0 154X0 154X0 + 123 

Nov 157.25 154X0 157X0 157X0 +2X0 

Dee 159.25 154X0 159X0 159X0 +1.75 , 

Jan 14075 15925 I6OJ0 140XD + 150 I 

Feb 16150 160X0 141X5 16125 +1X5 


Beckman Instrum 
Blrfc Ins Muni 2008 
Burlington Res 
Can Uflls B 
Find instil Gra 
Pss United Cp MO 
GenJPub Ufts 
Groce (WR) 8 
Greenwich St Mun 
Hlth&Ret Prom 
HerltoaeuSGv 
J8.L Soec Sit 
Mnod HI IneoPt 
Mnod Mun Port 
Mn«d Mun Ptll 
MerconllteStrs 
Muni HI Int 
Morphy Oil 
Ntl Wstmln CaoSec 
OPPtnhelmr MullGv 
onpenhehnr MultSc 
OronpeA R ocklond 
pf income Fd 
pi incoMnamnl 
PflncDOpport 
Southern Ntl 
Sun Inc 

Tempi In Gib Util 
Tower Air Inc 
Upper Peninsula 
2*ntx Income Fd 


Q .10 11-11 12-1 
M X737 10-14 10-31 
Q .1375 12-9 1-3 

o X4 11-10 12-1 
e X45 10-27 11-25 I 
Q .12 10-21 11-1 

O AS 10-28 11-30 
a 35 11-3 12-10 
M 06 10-2* 10-31 
Q JS 10-25 11-30 
M X97 10-14 10-20 
O X9 10-17 10-27 
M X93 10-24 10-31 
M 3)41 10-24 10X1 
M XA1 10-24 10-31 
O XS5 11-30 12-15 
M X54 10-3* 10-31 
0 X2S 11-15 12-1 


NEW YORK (A P) — The launch of the television series “Star 
Trek: Voyager” and its Mother Ship, the United Paramount 
network, are set for Jan. 16, the network has announced. 

The new network will initially broadcast five series during four 
hours of prime time each week. The schedule includes two 
situation comedies and two dramas, along with the network’s 
centerpiece, the latest “Star Trek” offspring, said Lucie SaJhany, 
president of United Paramount. 

United Paramount claims 75 affiliates covering 65 percent of 
the United States. United Paramount network is operated by the 
Paramount Television Group and BHC Communications, Inc., a 
subsidiary of Chris-Craft Industries Inc. 


J)li t ro'oft 


Q *921 1(H4 10-17 
M X52 10-14 10-28 
M JJ7B 10-14 10-28 
Q *4 10-17 11-1 
M .1025 10-24 10-31 

mi m io-2* w-zi 

M X785 10-24 10-31 
Q 20 10-14 11.1 
Q *5 11-10 12X 
M X* 10-17 10-31 
_ .04 10-5 10-17 

O JO 10-14 11-1 


Borden Bid Needs Wider Approval 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Bloomberg) — Holders of two-thirds of 


Borden Inc. stock must approve the pending $2 billion takeover 
bid by Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts & Co. for the transaction to go 
through, according to the filing with the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. 

Previous reports based on statements from the two sides said 
that KKR needed just 41 percent approval for the takeover, 
because it could exercise an option for more Borden, treasury stock, 
that would give it 51 percent control. 

The new filing is likely to cheer shareholders who object to 
KKR's bid. KKR's offer, which will go to shareholders soon, 
would exchange $14.25 of stock in RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp. 
for each Borden share. 


NYSE 


M .069 10-24 10-31 


o-anopol; p noyabta la Capodkm foods; m- 
raonthly; q-o uort Tly; s-semkaaaoal 


Drop in Debt Boosts Schneider Net BSkyB Considers Public Sale 


Bloomberg Business Mens 

PARIS — The electrical engineering company Schneider 
SA said Thursday net profit rose 58 percent, to ’345 million 
French francs ($65 million), in the first half of 1994. after it 
was able to reduce the financing costs of its debt bv 30 
percent. 

The company said that profit for the full year was likely to 
show even more marked improvement. 

Operating profit in the first half rose 10.4 percent, to 1.5 
million francs, while sales, not including divestitures and 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatcher 


TSiriiJ®? * 


minion francs, wnne sales, not including divestitui 
acquisitions, rose 3.6 percent, to 27.69 billion francs. 

Profit had risen 33 percent in 1993 after operating profit 
from industrial activities held up better than expected in a 
lukewarm economy. 


LONDON — British Sky Broadcasting, a satellite broadcaster, 
said Thursday it was working on a share flotation, a move (hat 
brokers expect would raise up to £1 billion ($ 1.6 billion) and value 
it at up to £5 billion. 

BSkyB said it was considering a public offer of the shares and 
listings on the London and New York exchanges. 

The deal could be completed by the end of this year. Richard 
Brooke, chief financial officer said. 


Thermo Bids lor Puritan-Bennett 


The company, which is 50 percent owned by News Corp.. 17.5 
percent by Chargeurs SA or France. 17.5 percent by Pearson PLC 
and I3J percent by Granada Group PLC. appointed Goldman 
Sachs and Lazard Brothers as adviser and co-sponsor for the sale. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


OVERLAND PARK, Kansas (Bloomberg) — Puritan-Bennett 
Corp. said Thursday it had received an unsolicited offer from 
Thermo Electron Corp. to buy the company for $21 a share, or 
about $263 million. 

In a letter, Thermo Electron said it was interested only if 
approved by the Puritan-Bennett board, a maker of medical 
products for the treatment of respiratory diseases and oxygen 
systems for aircraft. - 

Burton Dole, chairman and president of Puritan-Bennett. said 
the board recently decided that it would not want to sell the 
company at this time, but added that the “board of directors of 
Puritan-Bennett will, in due course, review the letter.** 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Scow Season 

K«h LOW 


Open Wgti Low Close Chg Do to) 


Season Season 
Hah Lao 


Open Kan Low Oase CJs Oo.wt 


Agance Franco Prone Os). 6 


Yio Auooatod Ptcm 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
a ho la 
Akza NoDci 
AMEV 

Bots-Wesunen 

SIS 

Eliovler 

Fokker 

Gbt-Brocodea 

HBG 

Hemeken 

Hootovtto 

Hunter Douekn 

ihC Coiona 

mier Mueller 

inn Ncaeriana 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

Neditavd 

Ooe Grlnten 

Porhood 

Philips 

Polygram 

Rogeco 

Rodumco 

Roimco 

Rorenla 

Royal Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
Von Qmmeren 
VNU 

Wolfers.'KIuwer 
EOE Index : >90 XI 
Previous : 390.13 


30530050 iGffll ACC 
*9349050 Glaxo 
341 340 Grand Me* 

*72 *70 ORE 

43*477X0 Guinness 
97650 980 GUS 


faz index : 2*3x3 


Rhein meiall 265 775 Eurotunnel 

Scherlno 912 928 Flsqns 

Siemens 619X0 41 BXO Forte 

Thvssen 276X0275X0 GEC 

Varta 305300X0 ,Gem Ace 

Veba 493498X0 Glaxo 

VEW Ml 340 Grand Met 

Vlao *72 470 ORE 

Volkswagen *3*427X0 Guinness 

W«la 97650 980 GUS 

DAX Index : 1941X3 

Previous : 742*4 ICI 

Inchcope 

— - — — — Kingfisher 

Helsinki 

Amer-Yhtyma ioa KB Lanorte 

Enso-Gutzell 44.90 45*0 Lasmo 

Huhtamokl 147 1*6 Legal Sen Gra 

KJO.P. 1020 10.10 UOVtb Bank 

Kymmene in 134 MorXsSo 

Metro 1*0 1*1 mepc 

Nokia 5*1 555 Mori Power 

Pohlow 70 68 NatWest 

Reoaia 101 103 NlftWst Water 

Stockmann 247 247 Pearson 

HEX.GmraiiMlex : 1870X4 


Close prav. 
255 
1X9 
2X4 
2*7 
5*2 
5X4 

IS 

4*9 


Montreal 


At CO LM I 13*S 13Vt 

Bank Montreal 23^1 23% 
BCE Maeile Com 38H 38V, 


can Tire A 
CdnUttl A 
Coscodes 
Crwnx Inc 
CTFbnSvc 


Goz Metro 

Gl West Llfeeo 20V. 20W 
Hees mn Ben 13+ 13V. 
Hudson-5 Bov Co 2746 273*. 
ImaSCOLM 37V* 37 

Investors Grp lac 14V* 1* 

Labott (John) 2116 21V, 
Lofctaw Cos 21^ 211k 
Mol son A 21 20V* 

Natl bx Canada 9+ 9V* 

Oshawa a 19% 19 


103* ntb 
23*6 23V* 
8VI BW 
171* 17 

1786 17VS 
J2J* 12V6 
20V. 20Vfc 
13V. 


Helsinki 


Enso-Gutzeil 

Huhtamaki 

ICC.P. 

Kymmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohlolo 

Renata 

Stockmann 



J*1 243 Shimazu 

J5 Shlnetiu Chem 
?-35 9X0 Sony 
9-M 9X5 Sumitomo Bk 
2X0 2X3 Sumitomo Oram 
26 25L70 Suml Marine 
261 2X6 Sumitomo Metal 
3X2 232 Talsei Corp 
5-10 T! ak * aa Chem 

3X0 246 TDK 
*44 446 Tallin 

,1-SS ,M! Tokyo Marine 
15*0 14.10 Tokyo Elec Pw 


Com Prev. 
720 720 

2060 2040 
5770 5770 
1900 1900 
566 568 

892 8*8 
345 339 

*19 644 

1200 1210 
4350 4290 
.5*9 554 
11*0 1160 
7900 2920 


Seasm Season 
H*n Low 


Open Hon Low Oow 0*9 OoJnt 


I1J* 1 1.70 Jut 96 

Esi. ufts *,957 wed’s, sales 22972 
WrfJOOdlim 136*52 Oft 3612 
COCOA (NCSE) Mmcnkn-iwm 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOT1 SMflSun 


4.13ft 

309 Dec 94 AOe 

4A7ft 

4X4 


J.7T Mi* ta 4.U 




216V, AAav « 190 

191 

387 

163ft 

1.11 JUJ95 156 

3J5‘. 

141ft 


3JT V, Sho W 158 


3*6'4 


3*5 Dec 95 168 


346 

X54ft 

346 Jul «6 




-AOI'* 71.7*1 

-OJC-t 29*6 


1580 

1041 Dec 94 

1276 

1203 

1268 

1274 

1 It 37*18 

1605 

1077 Mo «5 

1329 

1313 

1320 

1323 

• 5 20X69 

1612 

1078 Mo* 95 

139 

1363 

13VJ 

1152 


6X63 

1600 

1225 Jul 95 

1390 

1390 

13*3 

1383 


2*30 

1560 

!«6S«>95 




1413 


1.290 

1633 

1290 Dec 95 

1439 

1439 

1439 

1415 


4.964 

1676 

1350 Mar 96 




1464 


3*65 

1*41 

1225 Mar. 96 




1497 

»? 

312 


1X876 14500 Dec 9* L5844 1*911 1X816 1X884 1 36 

1X850 1.4640 Mar 95 1X83* 1X900 1X810 1X86* IQ 

1X900 1X348 Jun 9J 1X622 <48 

Est. soles na Wed’s, sales 1081 

Wed’5 open int 3&*Z7 UP 4447 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CM£R) iHrO-lNWMMttM 


267 -0*1 
24*9,-052 


Jut 96 

Est. soles 9*32 wars, soles 23*88 
Wed’S open inr 77*10 up 36* 
ORANGE AJ ICE (NCTN) >5400 ea- co 


2X6 2X4 Toppon PrtntlrtO U50 1450 


^ | ss3^f?agsr JK « u, JSK* 

Toyota 


Loolow Cos 215V 214* ~ 

Molson A 21 20V* SI 

Natl Bk Canada 916 9V* 

O OmoA , 19*6 19 

Poncdn Petrohn *JVS 42V: ?*{” 't 

Power Corp 19Vs 19W 


Stockholm 


YomaldilSec 

a: x Ida 


769 776 

735 732 

2050 2070 
756 764 




Hong Kong 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanll 

Arbed 

Barco 

BBL 

Bekaerf 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocxerili 

cotxaa 

ColrUVt 

Delltalie 

Etoctrabel 

Elect raiina 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevaert 

GUmorael 

immonei 

Kredtalbank 

Mosone 

Petroflno 

Power! In 

Rectlcel 


2388 
7500 
*910 
2400 
4015 
21950 
11975 
2320 
1920 
195 
5260 
7070 
1202 
5300 
2S80 
1300 
3930 
8940 

2860 wtieetack co T6JS 

6000 wins On Co Inti 11x0 

1406 winsarlna hub 

SIS Hcwt s«w hkta ; 9276X5 


Pllklnoton 
PowerGen 
Prudential 
Rork Ora 
Reckltt Col 
Redkind 
Reed Inti 
Pewters 
RMC Group 
Rolls Rovce 
Rotamn (unit) 
Rovol Scot 

RTZ 

Solnsbury 
Scot Newcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

5tiell 

SJetw 

Smith Neohew 
SmifhKIineB 
Smith (WH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tote 6 Lyle 


PowerCora 19V* 191+ 

Power Rnl 2ff+ 2716 pHS,9* >c0 Q 
I Quetwoor B 1716 17V* |[?£™L UX 0 
Roaers Comma tyv. m* Ertason 

Royal Bk Cdo ajs, 28 

SeonCanodolnc 7% 79* fiq ncelsfc onken 
SheJICdaA 44V* 44V* 

Soirtfwmrnc 16 16 g®™”'?* 1 "- 

s teico a as* as* 

Triton Flnl A 3X5 360 0 

I od a+tria Is Indn : I929J9 .= 


Shell Cdo A 
Southam Inc 
S telco A 
Triton Flnl A 


*X9 1 Previous : 


Air Llautft 
Alcatel Atsthom 

Bonaire (Cle) 
SS bn"p 


SCA-A 

S-E Ban ken AF 
SkondloF 
Skoroka BF 
SKF BF 
Stan* AF 
Treliebora BF 
Volvo BF 



1225: 19655 
*as : 19752 . 
WBU57I 
MIS : 1582 


Toronto 


Ahlttbl Price 
Air Canada 
Alberta Encrov 
AJaan Aluminum 
Amer Borrkk 
Avenor 

Sk Nova Scotia 
BCE 


&i.«fts WJXO Wed’s, saws BUFJ 

Wrtf, open tod 78X44 aH 2*9 

WHEAT (KBOI) UttkiiMwnue.aDinpebinw 

3.12kiDeC«i AID 1 *, 4.121, 4081. 4.m._o.0O'A 2L5*8 

Agl* 123 MW 95 4.14 A16 AI2V* 4.16 -aOOVj 11,936 

4X3 3X IV, May 95 141V; 19JV, 190“; 191V,_O03 1,289 

IM’* 116V* All 95 3X8W 3X9 3X6 V, 1X8 -0JJ3V, 2X74 

3 77 LT9 Sep 95 XtO ItO 3X9 V, 3X0 -4MB 69 

3*H>*jDec«S 3« 3X5 3X5 3X5 -0X3 3 

Est. soles 5X44 Wed’s, sales 7.725 
Wed* open int 40.569 oft 479 
CDRN (CBOT) LCOQBuiT**ir*jn>-4aeeneabv>nM 
J2, 114 Dec 94 2.IJ 116 114W 2.15*+— 0X73 134J33 

382V* 223V. Mar 95 1241. 225\. 124V. 2X5 -0JBV> 49,744 

2X5, 2XU*Mcy95 2J3 2JD4* 13 IV, 2J2'/.-<L03W 20287 

220V* 2X9 Seo9S 2X2’.* 2X3 2X3 2X2'A— 0JB'~ IX®. 

ZC 2JSVfOec*S 2X8W i48’v 2X7 2XB'A-C0lV* fi.150 

2-S*;- 2J0'1Mar94 2X3 ■+ 2X*v, 2X3 V, ^mv,_oj)H* 55 

162V* 25P* Jul 9ft 2X0 261 2x0 2x1 —001'* 94 

&.s*fts 45X00 Wed's, sale 3QXJ15 


13400 85 00 Nov 94 91X0 92X0 90.25 91.10 -0X5 9.296 

ULOO OT. Da 3m 95 9490 95X0 9175 94X0 -OJO 6X52 

12425 9300 Mcv 95 98X0 «U0 97.10 97 JO -OJO 4X69 

114X5 97 00MOV95 101X0 1 02.10 10IJ0 101X0 —0X5 1.148 

119.00 10QXOA4 75 10X40 10SX0 10455 10480 -0X5 618 

I14J0 107J05W9S 108X0 108X0 108X0 107.60 -8X5 206 

11360 109.00 Nov 95 11195 *150 431 

11180 105X0 Jan 9t 112X0 tgjs 

Mar 96 113X0 *0X5 

E9.scfts NA. Wed’s. sales 1373 
wetrsopenin 21970 o» 530 


-2 76X02 
• — 3 3.930 
-I 593 
-1 11 


Metals 


MGRADEGOfFSt (NCMX) 2X000 ka- com, pare. 

119X0 75L75D8CM 1I6J5 117X0 11605 11635 *0X5 39X59 
11690 76X0 Jon 95 11610 11625 M5X5 115X5 *0X5 631 


7X00 Mor 9S 1MJ0 11525 114X0 11475 *0X5 


BC Telecomm 
BotnbardlerB 


4X1 480 BlC 

33* 3i6 BNP 

1J1 IJ2 Bouypues 

5-?7 5.t f Danone 


9SIS7IS8S# 


CISC 

Cdn Natural Res 


CdnOcdd Pet 


Cdn Pacific 

Cascades Paper 

U Comlnco 

J Consumers Gas 

BX6 8X0 Ooteco 

3X4 3X5 Daman IndB 

19.04 19X6 DuPont Cda A 

127 328 Echo Bov Mines 

1j 07 IDS E mpire Os . A 

3.95 394 Fotaonortope 

490 485 FletaJwr Chall A 

18X4 18X4 FronttNevoda 

438 435 Guardian Cap A 

1.18 US HemloGald 


Royolo Belee 
SocGen Bonaue 
Soe Gen Beta taue 
Safina 
Solvov 
Tessenderto 
Tract ePel 
UCB 

union Miniere 
wooons Lift 


KM ssras. :n7i * 

4JB 

4365 

715T) ■ ■ ■ ■ 

Johannesburg 

23100 ,,22* 

2665 


Thom EMI 

Tomkins 

TSB Group 

Unilever 

Uid Biscuits 

Vodafone 

War Loan 3W 

Wellcome 

WWtoread 

wiiitamsHdas 

Willis Cartoon 

BBmi 

HI BVttIUl ! 2754 


****9 Madrid 

BBV 3,00 
’“’I’ BCD Central HbA 2900 
Banco Santander 47B5 




Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 

Allianz Hold 

Altqno 

AskO 

BA3P 

Bayer 

Bav. hvpo bank 


De Beers 
.7003X4 Drlefonteln 

• Gencnr 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Hlstmki Steel 
Urt Kiooi 

,js 5; 

smSSES 

J9«L»»5J0 “SL- 

332X0337.40 ~es!ern Deep 


236216X0 
30 30X0 
1TJ5 11 
55 56 

im ioi 
65X0 67 


Bones to 
CEPSA 
Drosados 
I Endesa 
Ercras 


'*-*'** Iftrt^la 

41 a *'*’»! 

ii TabocBlero 

_ 30 31 TftUfcwilptai 


KS9JSS?M 

115 115 


fi! Donene 

Carrefour 
5.08 5X6 CCF. 

V2t ijg crus 

Choraeura 

« 4^ Clments Franc 

3X9 dub Med 

t-H 5-S EM-Aauttalne 
2X2 2^ Euro Disney 

J-JJ 9J7 Gen. Eoux 

2.14 11B Hcsto3 

2.16 2.1; Si 

t^taroe Ceopee 
Leo rand 

J-JS Lvan-Eoux 

4638 *0.19 Oreo I (L ) 

6^5 Lg L.VJVLH. 

5-22 S3 Matro-Hocherte 
431 UP MJCtWdlnB 

1X7 1X3 Moulinex 

0638 Paribas 

je" Peaitaev inti 

t: 2984X0 Pemod-RIcorfl 

» Peugeot 

Pinoult Print 
Rcxflotechnlque 
Rn-Poutenc A 

rW 

3100 3090 Saint Gobain 
i. 2900 2865 S.E.B. 
r 4735 4705 Ste General* 

807 804 Sum 

3170 3070 Thomsan-CSF 
1455 1900 Total 
5260 5200 UAP. 

162 153 Valeo 

3100 3135 

1685 1490 

index: mxo ^ Pau , Q 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 1 

Boca I ; 

BooocInvIUe 
Coles Mver 
Cofnata) 

CRA I 

C5H 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 1 

Magellan 
MIM 

1 

Nine Network 
N Broken HIM 
Poe Dunlop 
Pioneer Inn : 


127 328 
1X7 IDS 
3.95 3X4 


124 126 Horsham 
ia90 1076 imperial Oil 


1 x 2 1 x 2 ineo,. 

2X6 2X8 IPL Energy 


1020 1018 Loc Minerals 
8X3 8.1Q LOWtaw A 

3.96 4 Laldtaw B 

3X4 363 LoewenOroup 
3X6 4X1 London insurGa 

3.19 132 MacmJII Bleed*! 


Wed’s open Irtf 23L097 up 220 

SOYBEANS (CBan S4nhimwvr.MinmbM« 

7X7V, SJ3 Now« U0»5 5314. 329 S3 1 -0X3V* 75302 

Z-SJ H 4 Am 9J I 5X1 h 5X2W SXO'i 3Xn>-0JDV. 24X92 

S3* M<y 95 S51+. 5X2 5X0'^. 551S-0O* 1SXJ3I 

5-** 5i09i-amvi 7X87 

7.0691 SX9's Jut 95 SXA 5X9 166 5X7 1 .S-0X49. 13291 

6 2 Sp'+Aug « s.n'' 1 SJ 1'h s ^’*» SX9>6-J3[15 397 

fTi Sep 95 5.73 574V, 573 5749,-004'.', Z39 

f5»9*Bw9S 5X5 5X5 542V. 5KP*-owVs 50*7 

6-91 6.0? A* 96 598 V>— 0X4 V] 18 

soles 38*00 weirs, sates 79X3? 0 

VWsoaenrt 141X87 ua 2048 
SOYDCANMEAL (CBOT) ItorTC-cWKniwnin 
21-2 160X0 Oct 94 16050 16050 15950 16010 -090 4 367 

3W3XJ 16150 Dec 94 16150 1*1.90 16130 161.10 —1X0 45650 

M IJllOJcnH lftS.00 143X0 162X0 16270 -170 1 4575 

S-2 JMJDMorM 164X0 16630 16560 16590 -I JO 12362 

S-S “’5 m ?y 9 5 IK- 00 ' w -*> ,68J0 '4040 -130 7*09 

206X0 172J0 Jul 95 17250 IT270 171.90 I72XO — IJO 5364 

1E60 17150 Aub« 17450 ttOO 17148 irstA UD 

!rS ? s SS5SS IIS - 00 ue ~ na 17100 ,71 '° — 'xo 69* 

Ifi-ffi '74,70 OO « J77J0 17770 I77P0 177X0 -2X0 89 

1KL X 17ft-HIDecyS 17950 17950 IWXB 179X0 -1X0 341 

Est-.ypto L»o Wed’s. s«es 13,151 
Wafsooemw 90.935 up 79. 

SOTBEANOIL (CBOT) ' 40400 1»- damn p» 100 ft. 

7459 *0.11 «X95 

MX7 22X0Dec94 2142 ZLtfi 711? .0 04 38.95* 

23X0 23.16 2338 -014 70.193 

S , Si tef S 2^° 23*5 2.9ft 23.19 — 0.19 10,991 

2-”Mov?S a.12 23.12 72M 2306 -0.14 8*66 

23X8 2108 2276 22.94 -a 16 5733 

Sts OX* 23.05 7273 2271 -055 1X41 


11580 76X5May9S 113X5 

11470 7BJ0JUI 95 113.15 

11130 79.tosec95 11275 

13.10 75200093 118X0 118x5 118X0 114X0 

11*70 77JSNCW9S 11730 1V73D 1T7.W 11655 

11575 88*0 Dec 95 110.90 11170 11070 110X5 

108*0 8850 Jan <6 17055 

11030 fflTOMa-96 109 35 

11650 91-lOAprM 11455 

10950 107*0 May #6 10150 10850 10858 10855 

11570 1W. 10 Jun *6 11355 

Jut *6 108*5 

112X3 111X0 Airo 96 11270 

Est.scfts 9X00 Wed’S, sdas 9737 
Wed ’s open M 55X75 UP 798 


71L75 * 0X5 5,995 

HIM -0X5 1575 
11115 1 0X5 1361 

11275 ,0X5 952 

H4X0 *050 2.259 
11675 *0X5 1*34 

110X5 + 0X3 904 

11035 *0X5 59 

10935 -045 212 

11435 -045 595 

10BJ5 -0X5 St 

1 1355 -0X5 284 


07670 03038 Pec 64 07438 07432 0 7407 07421 -8 4L2J4 

07605 D7020Mar« 87410 07425 07409 07417 —II 173? 

S32 °- 7 *° W410 “is* w 

07438 06965 Sep 95 07393 ■ —10 391 

07*0 07MOC*c9S 07377 -8 » 

EB. sefts HLA Wed’s, softs 5*050 
Wedsopenlnt <5X41 oft 769 
JJSJAAANMARK fCMER) t nr nuarft- 1 raMMUft ftOtal 
0X606 05590 Dec 94 06483 06494 0X478 0X483 —2 7A5BJ 

0*488 0X505 OXft QXOT3 -J Vm 

0X595 0JW0Am95 0X506 — ) 593 

OXDS 0X347 Sep 9S 0X516 -1 11 

Est. sates NA- W«rt Mte, 32J79 
wnriapenlra 81*26 up 2337 

,■**** (CMER) ftmwn-iMUteauaiBikJMMi 

aj Q560n *09 68QMor 95 0X101730X101840*101 580*101 58 —35 296} 
0*10257 —36 44 9 

0*1 077 50*1 020aS*D 95 0010352 —37 15 

0*1 06600*10441 Doc 95 0010446 -38 “ 

Est. sates NA. W«fs.sote* 14523 
Weds open Inr 52.994 up 658 

, [CMBQ spwinn:>ia«MMuft<aaan 

a7MZ (L7KD « OTTO —10 25*4 
22SS 07862 07877 07858 07863 -to M7 

07930 07466JU19J 07896 —to 43 

Ettjaiei na. Wed's, rales 21x2s 

WH'SOPCCM 35.964 up 1694 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 {NCTN ) SQXOOaK'CMSDn’te. 


108*5 *0X5 
11170 -OXS 


SILVER 



561* 

57 U Oct 94 5585 

5605 

Sffl* 


No. 94 



597X 

3300 Dec 94 562* 

568* 

5610 

57«l5 

401 X Jot 95 



6040 

41 6* Mar 95 SH* 

576* 

5700 

606* 

4180 May 95 



610.0 

4300 Jut 95 5850 

5850 

5810 


SSL53BP95 



6280 

5390 Dec 9S 6040 

6040 


6(20 

5750 Jan 96 




5540 Mot 96 



587* 

5870 May 96 




tl* 1 
*U 

+ 1.3 96X42 
HJ 44 

♦ tX 10,974 

♦ IX 4XM 

♦ IX 3751 
*VA 2*» 

♦ IX 2,634 

♦ IX 1 
♦IX 1*37 
MX 14 

*1X I *04 


5x0 WXJOctM 67*0 67X0 67*0 <7*8 *0X3 220 

77*5 59 Dec 94 57*0 67X4 67.18 67*8 *0*0 27^37 

» w S' 38 66 - 55 «X5 *0J2 11J9 

6 ?™^ J|95 7D - 9S 71 7OJ0 71.10 +022 3.963 

5HS 8873 6975 6873 61.93 ♦0*0 53a 

68Ja “-*8 M- 10 +0*5 17B9 

6488 6BJBMCT-96 4880 +0*5 10 

& soles NA. Wed ’ a soles 8.152 D 

Wedsapenlnt 51,045 up 435 

HWnMGOlL (NMERJ OAOM-tmww 
g*J 4iMNwW 30*5 5060 4970 50*4 -0*9 36.924 

1,10 51 - 50 ®-’J 51*5 ♦028 41734 

££ 3100 i2 - M f-M 52.15 +0*8 31X63 

^-” Fet> 9S 527D 52.90 52X5 5270 +0JB 16.155 

S-f 0 S2M BJS aj ° 5ii0 +07B 12771 

S’* 5££ pf7S fTD 52JS 51 JO 51*5 +023 4X43 

nui 2'?S'lf oy .? 5130 51 ■* 5178 51*0 +0*3 4*» 

*5 51*0 51*0 51*0 51*0 +0*3 6,138 

|| p S3 S3 :a fi 

M HH “ “ “ S3 :83 13 

5J 54X0 ,0*3 7(3 


+0*9 36.926 
♦0*8 42*34 
+ 0*8 31X43 
♦0JB 16.155 
♦0*8 12771 




Nmndy Poseidon 2X5 2X6 Moono Inti A 

QCT Resources 1*6 1x0 Manta Leaf Fds 

Santos 3*a 190 Moore 

TNT 2X3 2X2 Newtyldpe Netw 

western Mining 7.92 7*2 Noratdo Inc 

Westooc Banking 4j» <jr? Nonmda Forest 


2-’? Mov ” S' 3 23-12 52X8 23*4 -0.16 

2i-£ S-”jm95 23X8 2108 2276 22.W -016 

2-95 Aug « a*4 23.05 7273 2271 -076 

24.75 22.90 3ep 95 23*J 23*5 2275 22X7 —037 

3X0 22. 93 DO 95 r77 2X 4 2177 29X4 -073 

Z1S5 22X0 Dec 95 23*0 Z30G 92M 22X9 —0*1 

EF. sates 24*00 WiWH aSB 
Wed taoenint 86,734 up 17*7 


Woodside 4X8 4X7 Norcen Energy 

AHOrtta^W«:«7MO T «teconi 


Livestock 


Tokyo 

Akal Electr 
AsoW ChenUcol 
Asahl Gktjj 
Bank of Tokyo 
Brtdoesonf 
Crascn 
Casio 

Dal Nlepwi Prim 
DalwaHouft 
Daiwa SeamiiM 


Onex 

Petra Canada 
Placer Dome 


Potash Corpses* 52W 


B3j50 SXSD 
47 NTL 
35X0 35*0 


Bay Verelnsbk 39A50404JD 


BeC 692 4» 

BHF Bank 378 . 374 

BMW 741 U) Si ! 

Cormnenftank 3D15030U0 

continental 22922870 

Daintier Benz 730 733 

Dftussa 4J8454J0 

DT BaDcock 21921830 


363 ™ ComocntK® toft* 1 5408*7 

L50404JD Prevloam : S61U7 


London 


730 733 ADbev Natl 
45845430 Allied Lyons 
21921838 Arlo Wlftlns 


Dtutsctm Bank 66830667^43 lArovll Grouo 


491 406 Ass Brit Foods 


Dresdner Bank 37630 380 BAA 


300 300 BAe 


F Krupp Heesch 104 1»2 I Bank Scat land 


Haraefier 

Henkel 

Hochtief 

Hoechst 

Holwnorn 

Horten 

iwka 

KoilSob 

Korstadt 

Kaufliei 

KHD 


mb 310 Bar days 
56830 566 boss 
921 930 0AT 

31031630 BET 
865 8C Blue Circle 
21180 211 BQCGnws 

3383033030 Boots 
136 136 Bawdier 
596 595 BP 
494 491 Brit Airwovs 

illDBJo Blit Gas 


Autostrada priv 
Bco Agrlcaltura 

Bco Com me r ital 

Bco Nat Lavora 
„ Sea Pop Novara 
184 Banco dJ Romo 
539 Bco Ambrostow 
2X2 Bco Napoli rtsp 
2X8 Benetton 
SJD2 Creel to I to llano 
4X5 Enk»«mAii9 
4J8 Peril n 
1.97 Flat 3PO 

F taanaAora lnd 
5.13 Finmecatnieo 
4.17 F gridlorta 3P0 
I Generali A»<C 
2X2 IFIL 
678 I tm cement! 

5J32 I to kxts 

*S Mediobanca 



406 4X2 Montedison 


Klocckncr Werfce ISO 12730 BrK Steel 


Undo 

LvrfttisnsB 

MAN 

Mannesmonn 

Meloltecfttl 

Muencn Rueck 

Porscne 

Preussm 

pwa 

RWE 


5S Bill Telecom 
J5 'g BTR 
8J9.MK23C cable Wire. 

K5KHS £°?5iP' Scn 

12830)3430 ci radon . 


2760 2770 Coats Vlwllo 
641 630 Comm union 

*3442150 Courtaultw 
23050 225 ECC Croup_ 
4}7 414 EntaromeOit 


162 334 OI tveftl 

2.91 2X9 Pirelli sao 

1X4 1X4 RAS 

372 3X3 Rlnoscente 

107 3*1 San Poota Torino 

3X3 3X3 SIP 

4X7 4X0 5ME 

2X4 2X1 Snlobod 

2X6 2X3 Sranda 

5.13 <99 Stat 

4*8 *JJ ToraAssie 

“ a S!*lsrSK :, "‘ 



Bonce da Brasil 18*2 10X9 Fgwjc^^ 

Byieopo 9*0 931 Fuji Bar* 

® ys KiPhSta 

Brotana 258 262 Fullhw 

PuTtmt uj .e Hitachi 

^ Hitachi Cable 

ISnSf*^ 

& 

S, w j* Kcnsal Fewer 
ihS2«w Kamssokl Steel 

\s s isigr^ 

Vorta 175 17S Kubota 

Boraspa Index : 47773 Kyocera 

Pra*iowTiM68 Matsu Elec lads 

MfltauElesWks 

— — MttsuWshlBk 

Singapore flgSBgiE* 

16X0 MltaSShlH^ 

5-12 5-2 whybwii core 

4S M tsu and Co 
]3J0 13X0 Mitsui Mortar 

'22 ,11 

434 Mitsumi 
635 .7 NEC 

l?-?? 18 NGK Iruutetars 


Proviso 

PWA 

Quebecer Print 
RenoissoBce Eny 
Rio AJoom 
SeotamnCo 
Stone Consold 
Talisman Eny 
Teles lobe 
Tetai 
ttoohot 
T orOarnBank 
T ronsotta 
TraraCdaPlpe 
L/td Dominion 
UMWaibURH 

westcocit Eny 


CAT? 1 ^ I CMS) 4unaim.-(erRBer>, 

74-1° fX5 67X7 67*5 67X0 -fl.10 

74*0 67*0Dec44 68X5 68X7 *1 6472 *0*0 

76* 67JDF00 95 67X0 0X0 3*7 ft7.72 t£3S 

J8*5A»95 68.1J 68*0 ft?X7 68.17 HUH 

69*0 64.95 Ju] 95 6500 65*0 &L67 64X7 —0 15 

68.10 «X7Aub« 5 64X0 SS 6417 £x =0^0 

. *5*503 95 «« 65*5 6<7S 64.90 _*.1J 

Est. 5*3 IS.IOT \Wft UftS 17.234 
Wed's ope n in) 67339 off 118 
FOT3S? CATTLE (CMEWI SftxWft.- wnteoerb 


-0.10 15*40 

♦ 0*0 21*91 

• 0*0 14X59 
HUH 10*59 


-013 2341 
-0X0 1,184 


S-52S!?. 71*5 Tlxo 71.95 -0.17 2396 

72ft Nov W 72X0 72X0 71.® 72X0 — QJO 4.268 

nM 71 — 0.18 1*51 

71^Mor« 71*2 71*7 70X8 7190 —0*2 488 UST. BILLS (CMER) HmMoo-iXj^lMpct. 

JS-S S-*S 70x0 70*0 —0*2 360 96.10 94*5 Dec 9« 9452 9433 9451 9433 21X72 

S'?, W 33 ta3J -CXC 338 95X5 9M6«w95 94.10 94.U 94X9 94.10 9XJ1 

S-fL W-B -145 26 *4*4 9168 Jun 95 9170 9X71 9170 «170 +0X1 2,253 

-li 3 ** !!!**■ "£. ,lWl Est. HW NA wed’s. td« 4X15 

*JL UB 120 Wed’i Optniut 33*56 ua 40 

^ *V*L TREASURY (CBOT) ti 00X00 ortr>- p4» ftJ»nd.o» 199 po 

Jf® 3475 31« 1432 -0*7 3XU 104-20181-185 Dec 94101-711 101-245 101-20 101-2S- 005 108,160 

$2gc« 3SJ7 3190 35.10 3SX2 -0X7 15X25 W3-0WW-0U Mor 9801 -0M »01-b45 101-02 101XB- 085 2X17 

£■?? ^-12 37-® 6st«M* Ojas Wfffisso 57*15 

«12 5- 70 J7J0 37 J5 +0X0 XZO? wetfsopenw 190,977 off 111 

«■« 42*0 OSB -5*7 1301 18YR.TREKMRY tCSOTl »m*fi«rtn-Bi»&SnihtflBDBa 

Ifinif ’L 5-H 42*0 43X2 -0*0 2M 114-21 100-12 Dec «4 100-19 100-25 108-17 1D0-10 — 01 278X28 

S’2 -0*5 24D 111-07 99+21 95 99-28 W-30 99-25 90-25 - 81 7,9* 

S’SSS.?, 39J0 WJS *’ 0S » >• 152 1 05-2 79-02 Junt5 99-06 97-04 99-U2 99-02 — m iq5 

T 8*7 29 101-06 98-3J Seo95 98- M - ID 2 

6jn W-'B Dec 75 97+26 — ID 

nrt 30,7Y«w> 518 EsLscfts 55.000 Wed's, sates X7W 

ftatoia-wnterarte. Wed’sopenW 286X71 up 7775 

4U0 3835 «38 +2X8 1X14 US TREASURY BONOS (CBOT) M«i-slMXA0te»»jMiariMpai 


JU96 63X0 +1X 1*04 

Est. sates 1X800 wed’s, sales 20.2S1 
Wed's OPflnlrt I2SX28 UP 113 
PLATWUM INMER) emc-awiwmB 
435X0 360000096 dOJO 422*0 420X0 419X0 -260 430 

43SSO 374X0 Jot 95 436X10 43X50 434*0 424X0 —2X0 19*35 

4J9JO 390XBAW9S 4303D 43030 C7J0 428X0 —1*0 2*97 

435.00 479*0 Jut 95 43190 — 1J0 512 

436X0 42X0003 95 436X0 436J0 *36-50 494X0 —1*0 338 

J(n 96 439X0 47L50 439.50 <37X0 
Est. sues NA Wad's ufts X«6T 
Wed's oo»n Inf 23X09 up 986 
GOLD fNCMX) Ifttmros-ftftrsDerYuvftz. 

417X0 344X000 94 391*0 391X0 39050 

Nov 94 

42L5D 34X00 Dec 94 394*0 395*0 3*3X0 

<11-00 363iBFeb9S 37XftJ 391X0 397 JO 
417*0 36450 Apr 95 68200 43200 ffllXO 
428X0 361*0 JUT 95 404*0 403X0 404*0 
414-50 38050 Aiei 95 408X0 608.90 408X0 
41**0 ft! -00 Oct 95 

<7?X» 400JODac9S 4)7X0 417X0 4)7X0 
424-50 41150 Fed 96 

430*0 411*0 Am 96 

431*0 *1100 Jun 7ft 

AuftN 

Est. sates 18X00 Wad's, sates 33*31 
Wed’s open W 187,927 off 127 


500500 95 
55.90 NOV 95 
53X0 Dec 95 
50*0 Jon 96 
59*0 Feb *4 
54.70 Mir 96 
4600 Apr 96 


gp ?»te» NA- .Wed*vsote» 23X14 


S’® *53 4 ^ SB 

51X0 ♦0*3 4,138 

51*0 +0*3 6*w 

51*0 ♦0*3 1*55 

52X0 +0*3 1*41 

53J0 -0*3 1*11 

51ft +0*3 713 

KJO - 0 ^ 3,763 

55.90 +0*2 466 

55*0 +023 611 

55X5 + 0*3 320 

54-50 + 8*3 70 


uSK&iSES M ? 1 


'X»lw.-aof«rs«w^ 5K 

SS B 

2S-S If 4 ? 'L22 18X2 +0.18 siiM 


15*9 Fed 73 18*8 1146 18*7 18X3 

rsxaMoros jm* {gs 


- 0.10 

-0.10114X44 
-WO 19.999 
-0.16 7.173 
-aid 70X38 
—am sx7i 
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94*28 «J50 ,’At« 92458 

91180 92*28 Junta 92338 

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BRITISH POUND (CMER) inr 



480.259 
399.549 
902*75 
234,954 
-TO 175X25 
— 10150XW 
— 10121 J30 
-18111X57 


Moody’s 
Reuters 
D_f. Futures 
Com. Research 


Commodity Indexes 

.Close 


Previous 

1*56*0 

£086.90 

J53J7 

229*6 


'1 


SI 






** 



Page 13 

EUROPE 


Fine on Tetra Pak 
Upheld by EU Court 


***»!: I 


/^’nv 


\ 


? - * «irru 




The Associated Press 

LUXEMBOURG —The Eu- 
ropean Union's high court 
Thursday upheld the biggest fine 
urfhcied on a company bv the 
Elrs executive agency, roectmE 
an appeal by the Swedish-Swiss 
packaging ©ant Tetra Pale. 

Tetra Pak International SA 
had appealed a fine of 75 mil- 
J®* European currency units 
(593 million) that the European 
Commission imposed in 1991 
for abusing its dominant posi- 
UOTm the packaging market. 

The application was dis- 
missed completely," said Mi- 
chael Kenny, spokesman for 
the Eli's Court of First In- 
stance, which hears cases relat- 
ing to breaches of EU competi- 
tion law. 

Tetra Pak. reacted angrily to 
the ruling, saying it was based 
on “a flawed interpretation bv 
the court of the market where 
Tetra Pak is competing and of 
the forces arfectuig this mar- 
ket." 


Christer Hedelin, Tetra Pat's 
general counsel, said the com- 
pany was considering appealing 
the decision to another branch 
of the EU’s high court, the Eu- 
ropean Court of Justice. 

The commission imposed the 
fine on Tetra Pak in July 1991 
after an 8-year investigation 
sparked by a complaint from a 
competitor. Elopak. 

Tetra Pak invented plastic 
and aluminum-laminated car- 
tons for milk and fruit juices. 
With operations in 120 coun- 
tries and 15,000 employees, the 
Swiss-based company bad sales 
of S5.5 billion last year. 

Among other competition 
abuses, the commission charged 
Tetra Pak was forcing dairies 
and others users of its packag- 
ing machines to use only its 
cartons. 

Tetra Pak is owned by Gad 
and Hans Rausing, Swedish 
brothers who moved to Britain 
13 years ago. 










Olivetti Adds Support Centers 
And Microsoft Partnership 

Bloomberg Businas A lews 

LONDON — Olivetti SpA said Thursday it would spend $120 
million over three years to add desktop personal computer sup- 
port centers around the world. The company also agreed to 
provide services to customers of Microsoft Corp. in Europe. 

The support colters will offer various technical services to 
business customers. 

John Rogers of Dalaquest Europe said Olivetti was the largest 
provider of such services, with sales of $811 million last year. 


Matav Dials Into Sophistication 

Hungary’s Telephones Getting a New Ring 


By Henry Copeland 

Special to Ae Herald Tribune 

BUDAPEST — A year ago. Hunga- 
ry's public telephone company. Matav. 
was in the middle of an impoverished 
pack. The company had only 14.5 lines 
for eveiy 100 citizens, a normal ratio for 
its region but one-third the average in 
Western Europe. 

Then in December, Deutsche Telekom 
and Amen tech Corp. paid $875 million 
for a 30 percent stake in Matav. Now, the 
company is starting to pull away from its 
eastern peers. 

(Denver & Ephraia Telephone Co.,' 
Consolidated Telephone Co. and Huntel 
said they had agreed to provide new 
telecommunications services in a rural 
area southeast of Budapest, Reuters re- 
ported Thursday from New York.] 

By buying Matav, the foreign partners 
committed to increasing telephone lines 


by 15.5 percent a year for the next three 
years. Now, Matav forecasts line growth 
at over 20 percent in 1994, with cumula- 
tive growth of 80 percent by the end of 
1997. In contrast, annual growth in tele- 
phone lines across Eastern Europe and 
the former Soviet Union averages just 4.5 
percent annually. 

Malay’s 1993 revenue of SS00 mil Ho n 
was minuscule compared with its foreign 
partners’ combined revenues of $48 bil- 
lion. But the Matav deal was Eastern 
Europe' s largest to date, and “some would 
call it the most important," said Qefl G. 
Harral, director of the telecommunica- 
tions sector at the European Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development. 

“Information flows are fast becoming 
the lifeblood of industrial economies, 
and in this respect the telecommunica- 


tions sector has perhaps the critical role 
to play ” Mr. Harral said. 

Deutsche Telekom and Ameriiech ex- 
ecutive experienced a corporate culture 
shock when they arrived at Matav. 
“Profit orientation is either nonexistent 
or underdeveloped,” Mr. Anderson said. 
Timely financial data were scarce: the 

With Deutsche 
Telekom and 
Ameritech, Matav 
is now starting to 
poll away from its 
Eastern peers. 

company dosed its books once a year 
and reported results up to five months 
later. Matav’s foreign partners are intro- 
ducing monthly profit and loss state- 
ments and new accounting methods. 

Although employee payrolls account 
for only 19 peroent of Matav’s expendi- 
tures, compared with 31 percent at 
Ameritech. Matav was overstaffed by 
international standards. The company 
has just 75 lines per employee, compared 
with 293 lines per employee at Ameritech 
and 250 lines per employee at Deutsche 
Telekom at the end of 1993. Attrition 
among Matav’s 19,100 employees and 
the addition of 1 million new lines will 
push this ratio to 200 to 1 by 1997, Mr. 
Anderson said. 

The foreign partners have revved up 
Matav’s borrowings, pushing them to 45 
percent from 31 percent of equity, and 
capital expenditures jumped 50 percent 


in 1994 to S645 million. In contrast, the 
Czech national telephone company will 
invest only $300 million in 1994; Po- 
land's national telephone company, serv- 
ing a population nearly four times that of 
Hungary or the Czech Republic, will 
spend only S650 million on capital ex- 
penditures this year, the European Bank 
for Reconstruction and Development 
said. 

A survey by the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Development 
found that business executives in the 
former communist bloc ranked poor 
telephones as their biggest domestic im- 
pediment to export. 

In addition to Hungary, only Latvia 
and Estonia have sold stakes in their 
phone companies to strategic investors. 
The Czech Republic will put one quarter 
of its public telephone company out for 
tender next spring. Depending on elec- 
tions, Slovakia may follow suite. Poland 
permits competition for local phone ser- 
vices. but has shown little inclination to 
sell any of its national company, which 
has a monopoly on international and 
long distance services. 

About 23 million people in Central 
and Eastern Europe are waiting for 
phones, according to estimates from the 
International Telecommunication 
Union, based in Geneva. 

But if Hungary is any indication, wait- 
ing lists dramatically understate poten- 
tial demand. “One of our objectives was 
to decrease the waiting list by 100.000 in 
1994,” said John R. Anderson, Ameri- 
tech’s representative on the four-member 
committee that directs Matav’s daily op- 
erations. “Through July we had added 
122,000 lines, but the waiting list had 
only gone down by 5.000.” 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 

2300 


London 

FTSE 100 Index 
3400 


Paris 

CAC40 

2300 




1994 


1994 


1994 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Index 

AEX 

Thursday 

Close 

390.78 

Prev. 

Close 

390.13 

% 

Change 

+0.17 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,003.64 

7,02620 

-0.32 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

1,961.03 

1,968.72 

-0.39 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

743.63 

742.04 

+0.21 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,870,54 

1.889.05 

-0.98 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,308.20 

2^87.80 

+0.89 1 

London 

FTSE 100 

2,984.40 

2.956.30 

+0.95 

Madrid 

General Index 

290.40 

290.78 

■0.13 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

10316 

10272 

+0.43 

Paris 

CAC40 

1^43.38 

1.833 72 

+0.53 ; 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaerkten 

1,742.49 

1,749.17 

-0.38 ! 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

426.95 

427.30 

-0.08 

Zurich 

SBS 

88935 

888.07 

+0 14 1 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


InirnuiiiWi lL’old fiiUi'i 


Very briefly: 


• Porsche AG's chairman said be expected the company to break 
even in the year ending in June 1995 after a net loss of around 150 
million Deutsche marks (597 million) in the previous year. 

• Istituto Mobiliare Itafiano SpA said it expected its 1994 net profit 
to be close to the 512 billion lire ($325 million) posted in 1993. 

• Western German manufacturing orders fell a seasonally adjust- 
ed 2.2 percent in August from July, partly because many compa- 
nies shut down for several weeks. 

• Svenska Celluiosa AB’s Moehilycke unit was cleared by a Dutch 
court of patent infringement charges brought by Procter & Gam- 
ble Co. involving infant and adult diapers. 

• Philips Electronics NY said it planned to sell its industrial 

insurance unit to Nieuw Rotterdam Beheer NV, an insurance 
subsidiary of ABN -AMRO Holding NV. Ka^ht-RidAr. afx 


D~ YV3 yjyj HVrt UwLniesiaVw; 


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Thursday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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Continued on Page 14 


The IHT Desk Diary 
For the time of your life. 





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WILL NICHOLSON in London 
TeL- (44) 71 83648 02 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. OCTOBER 7, 1994 


Page 15 



The conference, 

Europe's leading energy forum, 

will be addressed by oil industry , 
experts from the "orld over. 



OIL 6r MONEY 

London ■ October 11 & 18 

The Oil Daily Group Hcralb^^^Sribunc 


For further information 
on the conference, please contact: 

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Page 16 


BNTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 7, 1994: 




EU Set to Approve 
More Aid for Bull 


Shoot-Out Over Santa Fe jf ;1 " 


space bbanly 


p A B i ® 


- 



Agence Franct-Presse 

BRUSSELS — Karel Van 
Mien, the European competi- 
tion commissioner, gave his 
blessing Thursday to a package 
af state aid valued at ll.l bil- 
lion French francs (S2 billion) 
to the state-controlled compili- 
n' company Groupe Bull a 
source at the European Com- 
mission said. 

The commission, which has 
been studying the group's re- 
structuring plan since it 
! blocked a final tranche of 2.5 
billion francs of aid in January, 
will not make a definitive deci- 
sion until Wednesday. 

But Mr. Van Miert’s support 


makes it highly likely the pack- 
age will be given the green light. 


setting the scene for a new row 

over French subsidies for com- 



ftp, 






pames. 

This week, the British gov- 
ernment, backed by seven Eu- 
ropean airlines, said it would 
take the commission to the Eu- 
ropean Court of Justice to con- 
test the approval of 20 billion 
francs in aid for Air France. 

The French government, 
which announced the restruc- 
turing plan for Bull in October 
1993, has said the cash repre- 
sents a final injection necessary 
to allow the computer group, 
which has had losses of more 


than 20 billion francs over the 
last four years, to be privatized. 

According to the commission 
source, Mr. Van Mien backed 
the capita] injection because he 
was convinced the cost-cutting 
strategy put in place by Jean- 
Marie Descaipen tries, chair- 
man of Bull, was working and 
that the target of breaking even 
in 1995 was attainable. 

Commission approval could 
also clear the way for NEC 
Corp. of Japan, which holds 4.4 
percent of Bull's capital, to sig- 
nificantly increase its holding. 

Mr. Descarpentries, who 
aims to reduce the state's hold- 
ing in the group to below 50 
percent this year, appealed pub- 
licly for industrial partners in 
March when the group an- 
nounced losses of 5 billion 
francs for 1993. 

m Bonn Funds Research 

Germany pledged 600 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (5388 mil- 
lion) to boost research into civil 
air transport technology be- 
tween now and 1998, Bloom- 
berg Business News reported 
from Bonn. 

The funding, which must be 
matched by money from Ger- 
man companies, brings total 
f unding in the program to 1.45 
billion DM. 


Union Pacific Seeks to Scuttle Earlier Bid 




Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

CHICAGO —A takeover battle for Santa 
Fe Pacific Corp. erupted Thursday as Union 
Pacific Corp. followed an unsolicited $3.20 
billion bid with a lawsuit to break up an 
earlier offer from a rival railroad. 

Santa Fe, a diversified company that owns 
the Atchison, Topeka A Santa Fe Railway 
Co„ had been planning to be acquired by 
Burlington Northern Inc. The companies had 
arranged a stock-swap takeover in June that 
valued Santa Fe at about $2.45 billion, based 
on Thursday afternoon's trading prices. 

Late Wednesday, Union Pacific made a 
surprise stock bid for Santa Fe. It followed 
that Thursday with a suit in Delaware chan- 
cery court against Burlington Northern and 
Santa Fe. The suit would force Santa Fe to 
terminate its deal with Burlington Northern 
and negotiate with Union Pacific. 

Either combination would result in the 


largest U.S. railroad in terms of revenue and 
miles of track. 


miles of track. 

Santa Fe's board was meeting to decide a 
response to the bid Thursday. The company's 
shareholders were scheduled to vote next 
month on the Burlington offer. 

In afternoon trading in New York on 
Thursday, Santa Fe was up $2, at $14,625 a 
share; Union Pacific was down $2, at S49.S75 
a share; and Burlington Northern was down 
62L5 cents, at $48.75. 

At Thursday’s prices, the Union Pacific bid 
was worth $17,157 for each of the 186 .52 
million Santa Fe shares, while Burlington’s 
offer was $13.1625. Union Pacific is offering 


0.344 share of its stock, and Burlington is 
bidding 0.27 share of its equity. 

Analysts said the rise in Santa Fe s stock 
signaled a potential higher bid by Burlington. 

“People are thinking there could be a coun- 
teroffer." said James Valentine, an analyst at 
Smith Barney Inc. 

R Edward Flood, an analyst at Robertson, 

Stephens & Co., added: “It's quite promising 
going forward.” He said Santa Fe “probably 
will have to negotiate,” 

Some analysts said Union Pacific's purpose ■ 
may be to force Burlington to increase or rad 
its offer. “This is a hand grenade of a bid,” 
said Scott Flower of Kidder. Peabody & Ca . 

Union Pacific denied that it was trying to 
scuttle the Santa Fe-Burlingttm Northern 
deal. “This is a serious offer,” said Gary 
Schuster, a spokesman for Union Pacific. 

A merger of Union Pacific and Santa Fe 
would create a system with combined sales of 
$7.4 billion, operating income of $1.36 bik 
lion, based on 1993 figures, and 26.371 miles 
(42J500 kilometers) of track. The Burfingion- 
Santa Fe system would have sales of $8 billion 
and 31,000 miles of track. 

Burlington Northern said its proposed 
merger with Santa Fe was better than Union 
Pacific's hostile takeover attempt because its 
offer was “a direct response to the dominant 
position that Union Pacific has in the West.” 

“This is a case of the Union Pacific using its 
market power to become evep more dominant 
at the public's expense,” said Gerald Grin- 
stein, Burlington Northern's chairman. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, NYT) 


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y fi: • vXv.v • • ; • ;.f 

v.V.'Ky.':. ..v - :: 


Mitsubishi Joins in Bid 
For British Coal Unit 


briefly 


Agenee France-Prase 

LONDON — Taylor Woodrow; PLC and Mitsubishi Corp. 
have made a joint bid for the South Wales division of British Cool 
Corp-. the state-owned minin g operation earmarked for privatiza- - 
tion, Taylor Woodrow said Thursday. 

Taylor Woodrow declined to say what price had been offered. • 

The government launched the privatization process April 13. f 
dividing British Coal into five regional lots: Central Norm Eng- 
land, which includes part of Wales; Central South England; 
North East England; Scotland, and South Wales. 

The government said it hoped to finalize the sales before (he * 
end of the year. ■ ' - s ■ ■ 4T 

Britain currently has just 16 deep mines stihoperatmg, employ- -» 
ing 8.000 miners. 

In October 1992. when its program of closing pits wife ah- .... 
nounced, British Coal had 40,000 miners working at 50 pits. When . 
the coal industry was nationalized in 1947. there were 714,000 
employees. ' 


Output Fell 
In Britain 


OECD Raises 
Forecast of 
Growth Rates 


In August 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapaldta 

LONDON — Output from 
Britain's manufacturing indus- 
try fell in August, the Central 
Statistical Office said Thurs- 
day. calming concerns in finan- 
cial markets that strong eco- 
nomic growth would feed 
inflation. 

Manufacturing production, 
which excludes output from ex- 
traction and utility supply indus- 
tries, fell 0J percent from July. 
Most analysts were expecting a 
rise of about 0.4 percent 

Although a 6.8 percent slump 
in coke and oil refining account- 
ed for just over half of the drop, 
there also was a 1.9 percent drop 
in textile production. 

Some analysts said the figures 
showed that the government’s 
interest rate increase in Septem- 
ber may have been unnecessary. 

Financial markets in Britain 
rallied on the news. The yield 
on the benchmark 10-year gilt 
slipped to 8.82 percent from 
8.91 per amt Wednesday. The 
Financial Times- Stock Ex- 
change 100-share index rose 
0.95 percent. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Ratten 

PARIS — The OECD on 
Thursday upgraded its 
forecast for economic 
growth in the developed 
world but urged govern- 
ments to guard against a 
rebirth of inflation and 
high budget deficits. ■ 

Staff an Sohlman, acting 
bead of the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation 
and Development, said the 
organization projected 3 
percent growth in 1995 and 
1996. In its last report, the 
OECD forecast 2.9 percent 
growth for 1995. 

Mr. Sohlman warned 
governments that economic 
expansion would only last 
if inflation were kept under 
control. “The most impor- 
tant message is that OECD 
governments will have to 
take care not to repeat the 
mistakes of the 1980s, when 
economies were allowed to 
overheat,” he said: 

He also said that Germa- 
ny and other European 
countries should focus on 
controlling their budgets. 

For Europe, the OECD 
projected growth of just 
over 2 percent this year and 
3 percent in 1995. 


Sir Mi . tUI 

1 

iil IhhtH't 


■t!’! in 


TAIPEI: Scandal Shakes Stacks 


Cortmned from Page 11 

Securities and Ta Chiang Secu- 
rities. 

The Securities and Exchange 
Commission said that this 
brought the value of trade de- 
faults in two days to about 3 2 
billion dollars, but later press 
reports said the total had grown 
to about 6.6 billion dollars. 

Altogether, ] 5 Taiwan broker- 
ages were involved in payment 
defaults in the past two days, the 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission said Thursday. 

Urging investors not to panic. 
Day limn, the chairman of the 
SEC, announced a 9 billion dol- 
lar settlement fund financed by 


licensed brokers that would tem- 
porarily cover share deliveries. . 

But the instrumental role 
played by illegal banks and’ 
money lenders in Taiwan’s fi- 
nancial markets makes the end 
result of the defaults difficult to 


flFK , , 


ADVEimSEMKft 


GRAND METROPOLITAN p.l.c 

(CDRs) 


Th** nndertignrd announce Unit as 
from 18 October 1994 al kas- Asso- 
ciate N.VL, Spi iiM rant 172. Amster- 


dam. div. rim. nn. 50 of iiir. CDR's 

Grand Metropolitan p.l.c., 

will be payable with Ufl*. 6,^2 prr 
CDR. o-nr. 50 pharos. (re interim 


. ,v P r - * ,u l “ ,,aros - ire interim 

dividend for ||ir period ended 


(iivifirnn lor iiir p 
30.09.1994 of 5,!5p 


Ta\-cjrdit l*sL 0.64 


mt share) 


jp per Klti 

- Dfls. 1,73 


CPR. rrpr. 50 slis. Nnn-n'si«|rnls nf 
the Untied Kingdom ran only claim 
this lax credit when the relevant 
lax l real y meets this facility. 


WiJSH "UU WIW 

y estimated that the defaults 
could total V 1 billion dollars. 

“There was a lot of confusion 
today,” said one Hong Kong- 
based trader monitoring the 
Taipei market. “It appears it’s 
u?* 42®* a few brokers in trou- 
ble. We’re worried it's a more 
pervasive problem.” 

Most analysts said they be- 
heved the fear of a default domi- 
no effect would trigger more 
tosses Friday as margin calls for 
big individual investors widely 
believed to be faring liquidity 
problems force them to cash in 
positions taken in anticipation 
of a politically motivated rally 

ihP 1 5*f f fT, Sai - they •“Pwed 

the default crisis to trigger a 

lasting slump because many 
blue-chip stocks had held then 
value, while relatively smaller 
listings targeted by speculators 
were heavily sold. re 

■^etuaily the falls provided 


AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPAiVY K.V. 
Amsterdam, October 4, 199 k 


Sea our 

* W * ma,ional *«»<niitm«nt 

wy Thursday 








I 


* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


Page 17 


asia/pacific 


i 


Japan Investigates Bidding 

iNine Electronics Companies Are Suspected 


TOKYO — Nine Japanese 
electronics companies, includ- 
ing industry leaders Hitachi 
Ltd. and Toshiba Corp., are un- 
der investigation for possibly 
jigging bids on hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars in public con- 
tracts, Japan’s Fair Trade Com- 
mission said Thursday. 

Kenji Sugiura, a spokesman 
for the commission, said the 
nine companies may have held 
a “draft” similar to those in 
professional sports leagues 
wherein the companies took 
turns selecting public contracts. 

The companies are suspected 
of fixing their bids so that each 
contract would be won by the 
company that had selected it in 
the draft Normally, bidding is 
supposed to be secret to encour- 
age competition among the 
companies for the lowest price. 


r 


. See our 

Education Direct o ry 

every Tuesday 


In addition to Toshiba and 
Hitachi, the companies being 
investigated are Mitsubishi 
Electric Corp„ Fuji Electric 
Co., Meidensha Corp.. 
Yaska wa Electric Corp., Nissin 
Electric Co- Shinto Electric 
Co. and Takaoka Electric Man- 
ufacturing Co. 

The companies and the com- 
mission declined to comment. 

“We cannot do anything that 
might inhibit the investigation," 
said HLromasa Maekawa. anoth- 
er c ommiss ion spokesman. 

The case could turn into the 
latest in a series of scandals 
illustrating the wide extent of 
dango, or bid-rigging, which has 
been rampant in the construc- 
tion industry. 

The United States has asked 
the co mmis sion to crack down 
on bid-rigging because it limi ts 
access by foreign companies to 
Japan’s lucrative government 
procurement market. 

The latest case involves elec- 
tronic equipment for sewage 
systems contracted by the Ja- 
pan Sewage Works Agency, an 
affiliate of the Construction 
Ministry. 


The sewage agency allocated 
46.8 billion yen ($470 million) 
in fiscal 1993 for .electronic 
equipment, such as computers 
and machines to monitor water 
quality. According to local 
news reports, almost all of the 
contracts went to the nine com- 
panies accused of bid-rigging. 

Mr. Sugiura said the investi- 
gation would probably take sev- 
eral more months. If the com- 
mission finds enough evidence, 
it could file a criminal com- 
plaint. 

While bid-rigging and brib- 
ery are said to be the most com- 
mon in the construction indus- 
try, recent investigations have 
revealed widespread collusion 
in other Japanese sectors. 

The Fair Trade Commission 
raided more than 30 companies 
last month on suspicion of rig- 
ging bids to supply equipment 
for Japan’s foreign aid pro- 
gram. Last November, the com- 
mission said it was investigating 
six top electronics companies, 
including Sony Corp. and NEC 
Corp- on suspicion of fixing the 
bidding for giant video screens 
in sports stadiums. (AP, AFX) 


Best Little Offering 
In Australian Market 

Compiled by Our Staff From Duparrha 

MELBOURNE — This city’s most luxurious brothel un- 
veiled plans Thursday to sell sex to investors by floating its 
business on the stock market. 

The Daily Planet plans to raise 4 milli on Australian dollars 
($3 million) from investors for expansion and to list its shares 
on the Australian Stock Exchange, The Age newspaper re- 
ported Thursday. 

“They have con [acted us, and they are going to let us list on 
the new tourism and leisure index,” said a consultant. Andrew 
Harris. 

It would be the first listed brothel in Australia. 

The newspaper said accountants had been brought in to 
value the assets of the luxurious brothel, which employs more 
than 80 sex workers, 14 towel boys and six barmen, and offers 
17 private rooms, some of them with spas. 

The stock exchange said it had not yet received an applica- 
tion for a listing but would not oppose one if requested. 

Prostitution is legal in the state of Victoria, within regis- 
tered brothels and with the planning approval of local govern- 
ment. 

The broLhel, listed in the Melbourne telephone directory as 
a “businessmen's club” and located in a suburb, posts revenue 
of about $6 million a year. 

The brothel, which recently underwent a renovation to 
include Greek columns and marble statues, charges clients a 
room fee. and its workers then levy their own charges. 

Four years ago, a public offering by Mustang Ranch, a 
brothel in Nevada, was approved by the U.S. Securities and 
Exchange Commission, but the offering failed to meet its 
assigned deadline. (Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX) 


Singapore 
Airlines 
Shares Fall 

77* A Beamed Press 

SINGAPORE — Singapore 
Airlines announced fare cuts 
Thursday of 10 percent to 20 
percent on some classes of tick- 
ets, causing its shares to drop 
on the Singapore Stock Ex- 
change. 

Singapore Airlines, which re- 

I iorted a smaller profit for its 
atest year than for the year 
before, said it thought lower 
fares for first-class and busi- 
ness-class seats would help 
stimulate demand. 

But analysts said the fare cuts 
would eat into the earnings of 
the partly government-owned 
carrier, which made 80 1 million 
Singapore dollars ($543 mil- 
lion) in 1993-94, down from 
850.6 million dollars in the pre- 
vious year. 

Separately, in Rangoon, Bur- 
ma, state-owned Myanma Air- 
ways signed a joint-venture 
agreement with Air Mandalay 
Holdings Ltd. of Singapore to 
operate domestic flights in Bur- 
ma and package tours from 
Burma to Thailand. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

ItOOD 


Singapore 

Straits Times 


Tokyo . 

Nikkei 225 



m 


7800 w j :j a so . 2000 m vj j W s b 



1994 
Exchange 


1994 


. Index 


Hong Kong . Hang Seng 


Thursday 
Close • 
9,276.25 


M jj.A SO 
.1994 ... 

Prev. % 

Qose Cftangej 

9,296.36 . -024 


Singapore 

Straits Times 

2^3331 2,380.83 -2.00 

Sydney; 

ABOrcflnarfes/ 

■1,978.30 1,979.80 -0.1B 

Tokyo - ’ 

Nikkei :225 • 

19,655.23 -19,751.55 -0.40 

Kuata Lumpur Composite 

1,143.43 1,133.72 ..+0.86 

Bangkok • 

SET 

. 1,481.50 1,492.80 0.76 

Seoul 

Composite Stock- 

1,06*33 , 1.057.24 . +1.20 

Taipei . 

Weighted Price 

$653.32. ■ 6.94458 -4.19 

Manila 

PSE 

2^77.30 . 2,973.31 +0.15 

Jakarta ' 

Stock Index 

511.46 503.64 • +1.55 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

1,998.16 2,035.01 -1.81 

Bombay. 

National Index ' 

2,374.03 2,063.99 441.49 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 

1 in erica ratal Herald Tnhtov 


TO OUR READERS IN LUXEMBOURG 

It’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free: 

0 800 2703 


Very briefly: 


• India said it would not allow foreign airlines to take more than a 
40 percent stake in its domestic airlines. 

■ China, South Korea and Saudi Arabia are cooperating on an oil 
refinery valued at $15 billion to be established on the north China 
coast. Saudi Arabia was control 4S percent of the operation with 
China holding 40 percent and South Korea 15 percent. 

• People’s Insurance Co. of China, the largest Chinese insurer, 
wants to expand in Asia using Singapore as a launching pad, 
according to the Business limes. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. said that next year it would import and 
market in Japan a new large car, the Avalon, made exclusively at 
its U.S. plant in Georgetown, Kentucky. 

• IBM Japan Ltd. is redeploying 1.000 white-collar workers in 
marketing and other operations in a bid to boost profit. 

• Mitsubishi Materials Corp. said it would build a $240 million 
silicon wafer manufacturing plant in Salem, Oregon, to boost its 
production of semiconductors. 

• Airbus Industrie said it would invest $25 milli on to build a 
tr aining center near Beijing’s airport 

■ Mitsui & Co. and IDB Communications Group Inc. said it won an 
order to build a ground station for satellites in Vietnam. AFX. AP. 

Af. AFP. Kmght-RuUer 


HuanengADR Is Priced 
Below Prospectus ’s Target 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — Huaneng 
Power International Inc. of 
China priced its American de- 
positary receipts at $20 each, a 
spokesman for Lehman Broth- 
ers. global coordinator for the 
isauel said Thursday. 

That price is 27 percent lower 
than the top price of $27.50 
cited in the company's prelimi- 
nary listing prospectus. 

At that price, the issue of 
3 1 25 million ADRs would raise 
aDOuL Sb25 million. 

Huaneng Power owns and 
operates power plants in China 
and is based in Beijing. 

Analysts said Lehman Broth- 
ers had promised Huaneng 
Power a higher price than it 


could deliver in its effort to 
handle the listing on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

“Some investment banks are 
going around offering extreme- 
ly high prices to get business in 
China,” Nick Moakes of S.G. 
Warburg Securities said. 

Slock analysts said the issue 
had been hurt by the poor per- 
formance of Shandong Huan- 
eng Power Development Co., 
which was the first Chinese 
company to have its primary' 
listing in the U.S. market 

Shangdong Huaneng’ s ADR 
dosed at $11,625 Wednesday, 
down from its offering price of 
$14.25 in early August 

(Bloomberg. Reiners) 


slower Plant Planned for Pakistan 

Compdel bv Ow Staff Fhm Dispatches 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — The Hong Kong entrepreneur 
Gordon Wu said Thursday he would finance a $7.5 billion coal- 
fired power plant for Pakistan, the largest single investment in the 
country’s history. 

Consolidated Electrical Power Asia, a division of Mr. Wu's 
Hopewell Holdings Ltd., plans to start building the plant wilhin 
30 days. 

The plant, in the Thar desert in Sind Province, will proride 
5.280 megawatts of power and is expected to employ 5,000 people. 
Much of Pakistan is still without electricity, and even the major 
cities lack adequate power, suffering routing bouts of blackouts. 

(AP. AFX) 


\ 


PACIFIC: Up in a Bear Market 


Continued from Page 11 

the Salim family, a move that 
would largely complete First 
Pacific's consolidation, accord- 
ing to Mr. Pangilinan. 

“There has been a sea change 
in our philosophy," he said. 
“We are now more highly fo- 
cused on organic growth than 
asset trading. We are a fairly 
vaung company; we had to 
learn where we wanted to go." 

First Pacific has ruled out the 
sale of its stake in Hagemeyer, 
but it said it would concentrate 
on expansion in Asia. The com- 
pany said its expertise in tele- 
communications and real es- 
tate, which it developed in 
Hong Kong, would lead the 
way throughout Southeast Asia 
■ and, more gradually, China. 

V From 1990 to 1993 First Pa- 
ific's earnings from Asian op- 
erations grew to 68 percent 
rom 61 percent of total profit 
■ he contribution from telecom- 
■a jiications businesses rose to 
; Can percent from 1.3 percent 
Egv^ the same period. 
Fronda/sts from W.I. Carr Ltd. 
Gabon. ...reacted that by 1996, 

j -'s Asian operations 

j lwv Coii .'u2 ltc , 78 P eI ?? u of 
j Lebanon ...ussaccount for 30 

ar. First Pacific 
■caving permis- 


sion to construct a fixed-line 
telephone service that would 
have begun to compete with 
Hong Kong Telecom and oth- 
ers in 1995. 

Some saw that as another 
slight for a company that stands 
outside Hong Kong's cozy cor- 
porate world of British and Chi- 
nese business circles. 

But in retrospect the compa- 
ny said it was relieved to have 
been able to put its resources 
into markets with greater 
growth potential than fixed-line 
telephones. 

First Pacific already has a 
strong presence in wireless 
phones and portable pagers in 
Hong Kong. 

Smart Communications, 
which is controlled by First Pa- 
cific. has four telecommunica- 
tions licenses in the Philippines. 
The potential for growth there 
is enormous — the country has 
one of Asia’s lowest per-capita 
telephone rales. 

Analysts said they expected 
Smartcom to begin making op- 
erating profit in 1995 as it 
builds a nationwide cellular 
phone business, three local area 
exchanges, an international call 
gateway system and a paging 
service. Technical and financial 
backing will come from a still- 
to-be-named international tele- 
communications company. 


“Descendants or 


m 


continents plan to re-unite for 
St. Patrick’s Day in Cork.” 


A Uii > 


- -.T ■■ 

i 


Sounds like a good idea for KLM’s 
Bridging the World Contest.” 






Page 18 


















\ NASDAQ 

TimnAy’s 4 p.m* 

h This Hat compiled lay the AP, consists of the 1,000 
1 (A 1 most traded securities in terms of dollar value, it is 
updated twice s year. 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


Page 19 


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47 129, 12ft 17ft —ft 
686 >ft 1ft lUft * ft 
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4 ft ft ft 

272 Mft M Mft 9ft 
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91 8 7ft B .ft 

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I 16 16 lb 

218 10% 10ft 10ft 9ft 
2565 9ft W u 9ft .ft, 

4 21ft 21ft 21ft —ft 

3 13% 12% 13% .% 
12 150 150 ISO 

10 15 IS 13 —ft 
149 7ft 7ft 7ft 4ft 

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7 33ftd33H 33ft -ft 
298 489, 43% «ft —ft 
120 >toi ft ft —V* 

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201 2** aft 3ft 
248 Sft Bft Bft 


11 13 
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lift 6 HDwTDk 


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z— soles in lull. 


J 






„Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


SPORTS 



Vf? -Vvit' 


U.S., Scotland Win 
In Dunhill Opener 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

ST. ANDREWS. Scotland — 
rThe American titleholders cd^cd 
: Japan and Scotland got revenge 
"against Paraguay on Thursday 
as a vicious cross wind battered 
Jht golfers on the opening day of 
,the Dunhill Cup. 

Curtis Strange, the winner of 
-successive U.S. Opens in 1988 
-and 1989. was the architect of 
the top-seeded Americans’ 2-1 
■•triumph over Japan, with six 
closing pars, taking him past 
Tomohiro Maruyama to a vic- 
tory by 78 shots to 80 in the 
.decisive match. 

■ The Scottish rookie Andrew 
'Col tart won a nail-biting battle 
.against Raul Fretes on the first 
playoff hole after squandering a 
six-shot lead with seven holes 
•left as Scotland won, 2-1, 
against the Paraguayan trio 
who had stunned the Scots at 
-the same stage last year. 

. Both those victories were 
•achieved late in the day as the 
wind had died down after buf- 
feting the players with gusts of 
more than SO mph (80 kph). 

“It was the toughest wind 1 
-have ever played in," Strange 
‘ said, echoing the views of most 
. players. 

’ One who disagreed was Greg 

* Norman, who made light of the 

■ conditions to lead the Austra- 
' lians past France, 2-1 , by shoot- 
! mg a level-par 72 against Mi- 

• chcl Bcsancency . Norman, back 
‘in action after five weeks of 


to play some shots today that 1 
haven't even practiced in five 
years." 

No one beat the par-72 on the 
6,933-yaid Old Course, though 
two other players, Greg Turner 
of New Zealand and Darren 
Clarke of Ireland, matched it. 

Chen Tze-Cbung of Taiwan 
shot 83 and still defeated 
Wayne Westner of South Africa 
by a stroke, beating the previ- 
ous highest winning score of 81, 
which was tied by two other 
players Thursday. 

One was the U.S. Open cham- 
pion, Ernie Els, who won by two 
shots from Yeh Chang- ting as 
South Africa beat Taiwan, 2-1. 

“I’m embarrassed to win with 
that. I had no idea on the 
greens," Els said. 

David Frost secured the oth- 
er point for South Africa's vic- 
tory, over Chen Tze- ming. 

The world No. 1, Nick Price 
of Zimbabwe, beat Bernhard 
l .anger, 76-78, for his first indi- 
vidual triumph in the competi- 
tion as Zimbabwe won, 2-1, 
over the Germans. 

Price, the British Open and 
U.S. PGA champion, lost all 
three of his matches for Zimba- 
bwe last year, his first in the 
tournament. 

Sweden beat Canada, 2-1. 
Gabriel Hjertstedt defeated 
Dave Barr on the second extra 
hole of their match. 



0=917 ? 


Giants to Retire Taylor’s Number ; i 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jersey —The New York C^wis 
announced that former linebacker Lawrence Taylor, a future’ Hall 
of Famer, will have his jersey number retired at halftime of 
Monday night’s game against the Mi n neso ta Viking* s^C^anls 

Stadium, ** . 

The Giants invited Phil Simms to be honored as well. but the 
former quarterback, citing a scheduling conflict, dec line d, 

Taylor, who wore number 56, is only the eighth player in we 70- 
year history of the Giants to have his jersey retired- The (Sants’ 
president, Wellington Mara, said in a stausnent that thc^tcam 
would retire Simms’s number 1 1 sometime in the future. 


S ><•//«* 

Jo fhe 


I MM 




PGA’s Daly Loses His SpousOTsh^ 

CHICAGO (AP) — John Daly, who withdrew from th^PGA 
Tour last month because of personal problems, has lf $t his 
sponsorship with Wilson Sporting Goods Co. -■> 

The company said it had suspended its contract with Dajjvooc 

< tl/n«iAH rntrl it nmilM rPCLnVM ih< 




. ! -tiW 
. 

- ti fwRF 


:5» i-n 


of golfs most popular players. Wilson said it would resyriw. its 
relationship with n«m under a “restructured agreement^ c&ce the 

company & satisfied Daly has met “specific . behavioral and 
performance objectives," Wilson did elaborate on those require- 
ments. 


Baltimore Added to Whitbread Race 


Ian Waldc/Rcutmi 

Greg Norman teeing off in the first round of the D un hill Cup; Norman and his Australian teammates defeated France. 


NHL Players Reject Proposals and the Insults Fly 


SOUTHAMPTON, England (AP) — Baltimore wfU b£ $ part- 
of -call for the first time in the Whitbread Round the World Race^j 
when the world’s premier long-distance sailing event Is next held, 
starting in September 1997. 

The addition of Baltimore will give the event two stopovers m 
the United States. The other is Fort Lauderdale, Florida; 


i illness, was among a minority of 
'players who had Tun. 


■players who had Tun. 

“I don't think it's the wotsI 
-wind I've played in. I was able 


England beat Spain, which is 
ithout Seve Ballesteros and 


without Seve Ballesteros and 
Jos6 Maria Olaz&baL 3-0, and 
New Zealand defeated Ireland, 
2-1. (Reuters, AFP) 


The Associated P/ess 

NEW YORK — National 
Hockey League players have re- 
jected two new proposals from 
the league, prompting insults 
from one owner and his predic- 
tion that there will be no labor 
agreement by Oct. IS. 

The league and the union 
spent six hours bargaining on a 
day when discourse degenerat- 
ed into vituperation. Gary Bett- 
man, the NHL commissioner, 
was forced to apologize for 
comments by the New Jersey 
Devils' owner, John McMullen. 


“The most important thing in 
the world when you deal with a 
union is to have an intelligent 
union leader,” McMullen said. 
“We did not have one today.” 

Bob Goodenow, head of the 
union, said he would “not low- 
er 1 ' himself to respond, and 
Bettman tried to smooth over 
the dispute. 'T want to go on 
record as saying I do not think 
that is the right thing to say," he 
said. 


man delayed the start of the 
season for at least two weeks. 
After turning down two of- 


fers from the owners, the play- 
ers said they would come back 


“I don’t think we’re going to 
be able to reach an agreement,” 
McMullen said. “It's over." 


For the Record 


It was the second day of con- 
tract negotiations since Bett- 


ers said they would come back 
with a counterproposal “in a 
day or two." 

The season was to have start- 
ed Saturday. Bettman has said 
he hoped to begin the season 
Oct. 15, provided there was suf- 
ficient progress toward a labor 
agreement. 

But none of the owners held 
out hope for a settlement by 
then. 


“The lines are hardening,” 
said Howard Baldwin, owner of 
the Pittsburgh Penguins. “I’m 
very disappointed, very frus- 
trated. I'm not optimistic at 
all." 


Goodenow said the negotia- 
tions were basically stuck on 
one major issue “revenue real- 
location," a system to divide 
income to help the league's 
small-market teams. 


Lee Gamble, 84, a Ondiwall Reds outfielder m the late 1930s, 
died Wednesday after being stricken at his home in Pupxsutaw- 
ney, Pennsylvania. ‘ (AP) 

Organizers of the Atlanta Olympics will be getting at least $20 
million worth of help from the aimed forces to provides security 
during the 1996 Games. (AP) 

Nebraska quarterback Tommie Frazier, once a loading. Contend- 
er for the Hc&sman Trophy, who has been hospitalized with x 
blood clot in his right leg, is almost certain to miss the rest of the 
season. >' (AP) 

Prosecutors In Scottsdale, Arizona, have decided against prose- 
cuting the boxer Michael Carbajal for allegedly fev&g hit a 
bouncer at a bar, saying there was insufficient evidence that he 
had committed a crime, " (AP) 



rnr 


IARI 




m an? 

z- ^:rrL,t::.i 

s to- 




-Japanese Leagues 

* Central League 


— 

■ 

W L 

T 

Pa. 

OB 

'Chunlctri 

6? 60 

0 

635 


•Yomlorl 

69 60 

8 

635 


'Hiroshima 

66 63 

0 

612 

3 

-Hanshln 

62 68 

0 

477 

7Vj 

‘Yokohama 

41 68 

0 

^73 

I 

‘Yakut! 

30 38 

0 

.4® 

8VH 

• Tharsdays Results 

1 Yakult x Yomlurl 2 
'CJiunicni ix Hanshln 2 
- pacific League 


1 

W L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

'x-Selbu 

74 50 

2 

695 

— 

'Kintetsu 

68 58 

2 

639 

7 

•Dotal 

38 59 

1 

635 

7VS 

■Orix 

47 59 

3 

631 

8 

'Latte 

54 72 

1 

9.429 

21 

'Nippon Ham 46 79 
‘x-cl Inched league title 

5 

-373 

28Yj 


Poklttan, stopped J. Al Dossry, Saudi Arabia, 
3:33. 2nd raund; Pumltaka NltomL Japan, 
stappad Onild Rashid, Irarv 2: 2d. 2s) raund; 
Bolal nkaymbatav. Kazakhstani d*f. Horn 
Sung-ilk, South Korea 9-2. 

WOltarwtMlf ; Nariman Ataev, Uzbekistan, 
stopped Md. Detwor Hossala Bangladesh. 
2:30. 1st round; Aria Chavez. Philippine*, 
slopped Profcasn Thapamaaar. Nepal. 1:02, 
3rd round: Arkom Chomriol. Thailand, del. 
Goa Mine. China 12-3; Lee Hoon, South Korea, 
del K ha led AkraC. Svrta, 15-3: Anoushlravon 
Naurlan. Iran, stopped Norlyukl Inwoka Ja- 
pan. 0:53. 2nd raund; Nurgazv An lev, Kvr- 
Ovzstan. stooped Rashid Abdul. Pakistan, 
1:12. 3rd round. 

DIVING 

Women 

3-MeterSprtnabanrd Final: l. Tan Shaping, 
China dosjo, z Fu Mlngxia China M&09. x 
Yukl MatobuctiL Japan. 343.12. 


Hartzofltal Bar: 1. U Jlna China 9612; Z 
Huono Llolna China 9 7JS; X Samel Federt- 
eitenka Kazakhstan. * ATS. 


Men 

Kazakhstan del. Iran. 15-7. 154. 17-15 
Pakistan del. Mongolia 15-4, is- 2, 15-1 
VmOHTLtFTINO 


vaatt: 1. Mo Hullaa China 9.755: Z Ye Un- 
ito. Chino. 9A93; 1 Oksana CtHMovtllna Uz- 
beklsraa 9431. 

Uneven Ban: l.Mo Huiian. China, s.ioo; 2. 
Liu X won, Chine, 9662; XOksanoChusovitina, 
Uzbekistan, * ASS. 

Beam: 1,MaHuJlan,Chlrw,9J75;lQlaoYa 
China 9JS0I X Irina Evdokimova Kazakh- 
stan. 9625, 

Pleer Bnrctsei: i.MoHullan. China 9725; 
Z Ya Unlln.Chlno.9J12; X Irina Evdokimova 
Kakakltston, 9.742. 


1 Thursday** Result 

'Latte X Kintetsu 7 


5- '• 

‘Asian Games 


BASKETBALL 

Men 

China 91 Taiwan M 
Philippines 89. Iran 83 

Woman 

China 8X Thailand « 

BOXING 
First Round 

Featherweight: Zalahatn Mo soot, Paki- 
stan. stooped Bounteulti Phlmphanonh, Laos. 
2:43,1st round; Devonian Venkatesan. India, 
del. Duparbaotar Lhasva Mongolia. 28-11: 
■Erie Conor. Phil IobIum, del. istauke ikehota. 
Japan, 15-7; Samluck Karatne. Thai land, def. 
KvawNUn. Burma 13-0: M. Abdul loev. Uzbek- 
istan, stopped Makkl Zolod Hasson Turkl. 
•Saudi Arabia, l: IX 2nd round; Nemo Michel 
SahorL Indonesia, def.M.5halertou, Iron. 12- 
7; Kano 5uno-oh. South Korea ael. Suresh 
Malta ThakurL Nepal. 16-4. 

Ltaht Welterweight: Usman Ullnh Khaa 


Ptatform Pinal: 1,SunShuwgl,Chlna479.74. 
X XkM Hal liana China 65X41 . X Kelta Kaneta 
Japan, 32528. 

GOLF 

First-Round Leaders 

Women 

Huana Yu-Chea Taiwan, 34-35—71: Ghana 
Chln-sha Taiwan, 3438—72; Kara Soo-yurt, 
South Korea 3736-73; HuotoUxIo. China. 34- 
39—73; Sons Choe-evn. South Korea 3539— 74. 

Men 

Kaname Yokoa Japan. 3337— 70: Bach Mar 
San|a Indonesia. 3334—70; Chana Tse-peno, 
Taiwan, 3736-71; Kiyatako Oto, Japan, 36- 
35-71: Harmeet Kahkm, India 3833—71. 

GYMNASTICS 


SW1MMINO 

Women 

106-Mater Butterfly; 1, Liu Umla China 
5838; X Ou Yun, China 58.70; 1 Jaseclln Yea 
Singapore, 1:01.32. 

156-Meter Breaststroke: 1. Dal Guohong, 
China 1:0967; Z Mooaml Tanaka Japan. 
1:1X94; X HI tori Maehora. Japan, !;11J4. 


580 Me tat Freesty l e: 1, Bara Seuno-hoon, 
South Korea, 3:5472; Z HI sham Masrl Syria 
3:55J4;XMasavukl FullmoM, Japan, 3:55.14. 

380-Meter Breaststroke: i,wengYiwu,CW- 
na2:14S5: X Akira HayashUaoan,2i U9i; x 
Retaoara Sirlsoremt, Thai land, 2:1452. 

585 Me te r Freestyta Retav: l. Japan (Hiro- 
shi PukudaMaklo EndaMasakatsu Usaml, 
YuklWra Matsushita). 1:2330; X China IQul 
j lamina. Jtara CheravL Chen Tleroa Xlono 
Guomlnal. 3:2455; X Kazakhstan (Alexei 
HovtUi. Alexei Egorov. Sergei Ovchkatav. 
Serguel Barlsscnko). 


54-KHoaram Pinal; 1. Lon ShUhana, China 
117J-147J-355JI1 Z Yang Bln, China 117J- 
I4i0— 042J; X Taehiyukl Netaml. Japan. 
10SJFI400— 245X 

30-Kliaaram Final: I. Chun Bvung-kwan, 
South Korea 1356-1500-2950; x Tara Nlng- 
mono. China l»6l *53—29X0 ; L HlrasM Ike- 
ha ta Jaoan. 13X0-157 J— 9873. 

GRICO-ROMAN WRESTLING 
S3 KJtoarami: GoM Medal — Min Kvuna- 
oab, South Korea ael. Khaied Farol. Syria, j- 
l. Bronze M edal — Chamsiddin Khaudaeber- 
dlev. Uzbekistan, dot. Han Yu wot, China 4-1 
(2 Kilograms: o«M Modal— CholSam-sun, 
South Korea del. Ahmetullah Nurov, Kazakh- 
stan 33 l Bronze Medal — Bachodlr Kurbanov. 
Uzbefclstaadof.Shleeki NhhiuuctU. Japan. 3-1. 

75 KRaarami; Gold Medal — Han Che*- ha 
South Korea aet. Rouslon Jautnabokov, Ka- 
zakhstan. >x Bronze Medal — TakamMsu Ko- 
lovoma Japan, dot. Ahad JavansalehL Iran. 
3-1. 

98 Kilograms; GoM Medal — ueom jm-hon. 
South Korea del. H cosot Babak, Iran. XL 
Bronze Medal — Yasutosiil Morfyama Japan 
dot. Rosy Rcdleoov, Turkmenlshm. 3-0 
135 KMooram*: Gold Medal— YanOYoura- 
l in. South Korea def. Kefdchl SuzukL Japan. 3- 
X Brant Medal— Hu Riga China, del- Abdal- 
lah Axlzl. iron, 33 


Malaysia 

Brunei 

Philippines 

Burma 

Hong Kang 

Macao 

Nepal 

Slnaopore 

Tallklitan 

UJLE. 


MINNESOTA— Assigned the contract of 
Carl Wliita, pitcher, to Salt Lake. PCL. 

NEW YORK— no ne wed plover develop- 
ment contracts lor 3 years with Columbus. IL; 
Norwich. EL; Greensboro, South Ariantlc 
League; and Oneanta, New Yark-Penn 
Leaaua Named Bill Evars manager ot Colum- 
bus ana Jake abbs manager at Taman. Reas- 
signed Stump Merrill within the organization, 
TORONTO— Rondv St. Claire, anchor, has 
elected free agency alter the chib (ailed to 
restore him to their 48-man rosier, 


GERMAN BUNDESUGA 

KalMrshitvrn 1. Bavam Munich I 
Standings; Warder Bremen 11 Mints. Bor- 
ussta Dortmund 11. Bayern Munich 11, FC 
Kaiserslautern 11. KarlsruneSC IX Hamburg 
SV X Baver Leverkusen X SC Freiburg X 
Schaike 7, Maanctienaiadbaai 7, vib Shid- 
uort 7. Xlerdlnaen X FC Cok»na X Elntrachi 
. F rankfun X Dvnamo Dresden 4 VI L Bochum 
4 M5V Duisburg X 1858 Munich Z 


SECOND TEST 

Australia n. Pakistan, 2nd Day 
Thursday, In Rawalpindi 
Australia 1st innlnos: 521-9 (declared) 
Pakistan 1st t nomas: 36-1 (al ctaset 


Mad a Is Table 


Floor BxardMs: 1. LI XtaaMiuana. China 
9725; X Seraud Pedertchenka Kazakhstan. 
9A00; X ToshUwru Sato. Japan, 9A25. 

Pommel Norse I: (lie), Lae jara-hvuna 
South Korea; Huodono Huana China; Yo- 
thtakl Hataksda Japan, 9J5X 

Rim: l. Fan Honabln, China 9750; 2 (tie), 
U Xiaoshauna China and YooOk-ryui, South 
Korea 9.737. 

Vault: l.Yoo Hora-chuL South Korea, 9643; 
X LI Dashuana. China 9653; 3 (tie), U Xloo- 
shuana China and Lee Joo-hyung, South Ko- 
rea 9649. 

ParaiM Bars: 1. Huang Llplng. Cnina 
9787: X Jura Jbvsoa South Konra.972S.-XU 
Xlaoshuang, China 970X 


SOCCER 
Worn ea 

Japan X Taiwan 0 

TENNIS 

Men's Team Final 
Japan X Indonesia 0 
Memo Endo del. Ro mano, 3-1. go; Noako 
Sawam a t su del. Nani Ranavu Budl 8asukL3- 
1, 64: Nana Mlyagl and Al Suaiyama def. 
Ramona and Natalia Soeidsrw, 4-1 6-1. 
VOLLEYBALL 
Women 

CNna del. Thailand. 15-2. 15-1, 1S-* 

Taiwan def. Mongolia 1WL 15-0. 15-3 
X Korea def. Japaa 13-1X 13-1X 15-X 15-1X15-11 



Gold 

Silver 

Bronze 

Total 

CWna 

43 

23 

7 

76 

Japan 

17 

13 

29 

59 

South Korea 

17 

7 

9 

33 

Kazakhstan 

2 

S 

6 

13 

Taiwan 

1 

4 

6 

11 

Iran 

1 

4 

1 

6 

Syria 

1 

3 

0 

4 

Indonesia 


6 

3 

9 

Thailand 

0 

4 

2 

6 

Vietnam 

8 

2 

0 

2 

India 

8 

1 

3 

4 

Kuwait 

0 

1 

1 

2 

Kvrevzetan 

0 

1 

1 

2 

Soudl Arabia 

a 

1 

1 

2 

Uzbekistan 

a 

2 

4 

6 


BASEBALL 
American uagee 

CALIFORNIA— Waived Harold Reynold x 
second baseman, for uncondlttanol release. 
Activated John Dapsaa Paul Swingle 
md Ken Patttrsaa Pttchers. and Andy Al lan- 
ion. catcher, tram the 15-aav disabled list. 
Designated Swingle tor assignment. Named 
Rick Burleson ttilnt base coach and Bill lo- 
chemann bullpen coach. 

KANSAS CITY— Bob MltaCkl, Oil Cher, has 
elected free agency after ihe dub tailed ta 
restore him ta their 46-man roarer. 

MILWAUKEE — Rick Wrana catcher, has 
elected tree agency otter the chib faired to 
restore him to their 40-man raster. 


National League 

CHICAGO— Reassigned Larry Himes, gen- 
eral manager, to director at Arizona ooere- 
I ions -special assignment scout. Announced 
they are drooping their affiliation with Hun- 
tington, AL. Reached working agreements 
with Orlando. SL and Rockford, ML two sea- 
sons. 

COLORADO— Named Ad Howe batting 
coach and first base coach. 

FLORIDA— Assigned Ihe contracts ot Ma- 
tin Carrillo, aulfleider. and Tim Clark, in- 
llelder. to Edmonton, pcl. Matin Carrillo 
refused n Is assignment and elected ta become 
a tree ooent. 

LOS ANGELES— Designated tor assign- 
moni Jim Gotland Roger McDowell Pitchers, 
and Cory Snyder, outfielder. Bought contracts 
ot Tom Prl nee, caicner, Al Oiuna, pdeher.and 
Jerrv Brooks and Reggie williams, ou I Hew- 
ers. from AibiNueraue, PCL. 

PITTSBURGH— Sont Junior Neboalnhold- 
er, to Buffalo, aa. Reinstated Al Martin, out- 
newer, tram 3<Htav disabled list. 

5T.LOUlS-WliiloSnilfh.Pltcfwr,haselect- 
■d free agency after Ihe club fatied to restore 
him ta their 48-man roster. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Bough! contract ot 
Tom Lamnkln. catcher, from Phoenix. PCL. 
Designated Erik Johnson, inflatoor. for as- 
signment. 


Abdul P«xi guard. Waived Alvin Robertson 
guard. 

OOLOEN STATE— stoned Bab McCann 
and Chris Munk. forwards: Travis Ford and 
Orlando Smart guantsi and Cornel Perkari 
ward-forward, to 1-year contracts. 

HOUSTON— Signed Marta Kilo, guard, to 
multiyear cont r act. 

INDIANA— Stoned Duane Farreft, forward. 

L. A, CLIPPERS— Stoned Bab Mortta. Mo- 
tor, and leotah Mom* and Orlando Veaa, 
guards. 

MINNESOTA— Stoned Dave Jamerson and 
Howard Elitav, guards. Announced that Qton 
Tavlor has stoned a Purchase agreement ta 
buv Ihe team tram Harvwv Rainer and More 
Wo Kenton. 

NEW YORK — Shmod Monty Williams, tor- 
ward, to multiyear contract. 

ORLANDO— Signed Tree Rofflns, cantor 
and assistant coach, and Deed Harnntak. 
cantor, and Keith Tower, center -forward. 

PORTLAND— Stoned Aaron McKta, guard, 
to 4-vear contract, 

SAN ANTONIO SPURS-WOhtod LtoWt 

D SEATTLE— Sl»ie3 Sam CidwtardamiCart ' 
Thomas, guards, and Nate Htogs. forward, 

UTAH— Stoned Jamie Watson and Nkwauet 
Bragg, forwards, and RWianl Mann tax center. 

VANCOUVER— Nonwd Lorry Rltoy direc- 
tor of tcouhna. 


HOCKEY 


ANAHEI M A Se to ped Jab^LHlev, rMn 
wlniitaSan Dtaax inL mraM Hfvtn «t- 
mare, director al hookey neetfflons. to vtae 
pre fl dent el hodw MsrgBOTG- 

boston— A zstoratf 

ooattendir)PhBlPwn»lwi*^rtlO*nttCh*r- 

wakiev.Dirren^tQifef^’^^snwfrwHid*- 


vvatiM.P«rrenStMkjK»taffltemsgg(B.ds- 

(OTsement ora-ieH^^i^a ayt ortMd- 

Pantehto^MBw^a^i^^MsNKMto 

and Sandy Mee wi to M W ffM T Y evligM.v 

AH L, and Kurt Seher. defenseman. h Gw4 
Wtts. BCHL Se nt Daniel LocrrtiL toft wtaxilr 
Prav WenM tor co naittafUng. Rewrra d Jeh 
wens. defepeefiMo, and Tint Ttofkev rad Joe 
rraii wwfvi w rnn!wnw» 

BUFFALO Assigned JflHR fiawe. Viktor 
Goriouk and heart ThonKm.farwanJ4o«tpml- 

»■ - -j — ■ Mnr heelnr AMI 

hp* ■DMcn«r«QMfimniirirPQifyiuMiivff mil. 

FLORIDA— Acaulred Rorart Bvehla and 
MoanusSv en —ntvdelens em ei wt rcfti Ca l gary 
In PNchanra tor a SrGfouod draft cnatM tn 
1195 and future aeraMerattona. 

^^RTP^RD^m^.dgeraOT^^ 

LOS AN OC LEG— Stoned. Jom|tStorrlaoaF 
tenoer, and oselened him taOl^en Sound ana 
Matt Jetweofvrtoto whiwondotolgned Mm to 
Peterborough, bath, at ftw Ontario Hockey 


-J •" ■ 


BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Assectatian 
BOSTON— Named Jan JeieUras director al 
basketball development. 

CLEVELAND— Named Sidney Lowe assis- 
tant coach. Added Greg Dretllng and Mark 
Buford, centers: Gary Collier, Sieve Coulter 
and Mike luzzallna. wants; and Melvin 51- 
mans. Marcus Liberty and Bill Edwards, for- 
wards. ia tralnlra camp raster. 

OENVE R— Signed Data Elds. forward, end 


FOOTBALL 

Nattered Football Leag u e 

CINCINNATI— Suspended Mike Frier, oe- 
tensive mwnan, without pay fbrSweeftx Acti- 
vated Kevin Jefferson, linebacker, from too 
deve l opmental Phwfl.Ytalvod John Johneon, 
Nnebacker, 

DALLAS— Waived Robert Whsen, full back. 

MIAMI— Stoned Cleveland Gary, running 
bock. Stoned Brant Boyar, linebacker, ta ac- 
tive roster. Waived Jesse Salomon lineback- 
er. and Aaron Cravar, running back. I toned 
Dewayna Dotson, linebacker, ta practice 

unmd, 

«LY. G I ANTS-Put Andre Powell. lineback- 
er, an Inlurad reserve. Stoned Jeff Mins, line- 
backer. to active raster. 

N.Y.JETS— Stoned Paul Burke- tight end, ta 
practice sound. Released Terrence Wisdom, 
guard. 

WASHlNGTON-WalvedStwneCDlllns,de- 
femlveena. Re-stoned Cedric Smith, tailback, 


N. Y. 1 3LANDER1— Loaned FnmkPte (ran- 
goto, go at tonder, ta M lnn eeota. IHL. Stoned 
Brett Undrac right wtas, toSnfear contrad. 
. Named Darcy Reator assistant ta T(w general 
manaeer and torec to r ot Mover personnet; 
QerrrHnmontmtstarti tatotaemnii monew- 
er; Burt Marshatr director at scouting; and 
■art tngarfleMasNihpil ladl rector at scout- 
fra, 

M.Y. RANGERS— Assigned Corey HlrecX 
goattonder: Darren Langston, forward; and 
Peter PtoramUw, Martial Non tram. Barry 
Rkhtor. and Michael Stewart rdetensemen, to 
Btrahamtna AHL. 

PITTSBURGH A w toned ten Barrie, cw 
ter, and Chrto Tomer, deferaemaa, ta Cleve- 
land, IHL. Stoned Brian FarrelUaft wing, and 
assigned him to Cleveland, 

VANCOUVER— Agreed to terms with Jeff 
Brawn, defenseman, on multiyear contract. 
Asetoned Jaeeen CutUmara,dafeneaman,and 
Mika Para and Dana Jackson, furwor dv to 
Syracuse, ahu 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


Page 21 



'■4*± , 


5*9.' I 

■k 

4 -*-•«. 
inr i 


* a 


S Big Switch Is On 
In Cycling as Teams 
Redo Their Rosters 


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By Samuel Abt 

p AWT „ Imtnuubml Herald Tribune 

tran ? er s * iS0n “ professional bicycle racing 

inti. has amloiSr?. 380 bUl nearly making a move 

% aIread y' sometimes as long ago as the Tour de 

Ha S “* J»S ^P«s as Luc Leblanc, Jean-Fran^ois Bernard, Andy 
■ Bl ^O- WOfried Ncdisseriaiid^Molidine 

T are moving, .whfle Greg LeMond, Sean Kelly, Marc 

; are citog SS , “^ nd Ptdro Dcl S ado W '«i« d or 

FraSlS 1 S“ ** sponsors but only Novimsil, a 
& 9 “3 v t“ “ »"* * ‘ so far. 

from Spain and Motorola from " 

Uie United States — have re- 
done their rosters in a big way. 

At Banesto, where Miguel In- 
• durain is the jefe, one of his 
lieutenants, Bernard, has 
amoved off, possibly to Italy; 
one, Melchor Mauri, has joined 
ONCE, and another, Delgado, 
has gone to the sidelines in Se- 
govia. Replacing them will 


Callha 

housedeaning, rail 
it a renewal — by 
whatever name. 
Motorola will be 
different. 


-***• 


'4ts 

*4 !•«■- 




WWM*. 

*« '• 


- > 


probably be Thomas Davy — ~ — - 

?? definitely Hampsten from Motorola, 
fie u be a big help for Indnrain in the mountains," said Paul 
f °r 0x5 team, as he discussed 

“y® 1 .“P 7 ® last fw years Andy has been an extremely 
consistent nder m the mountains.” 

Sterwen was giving an overview of next season for his own team, 

which also sought to sign Davy, a Frenchman. Call it a housedean- 
ing, call it a youth movement, give it the proper spin and call it a 
renewal — by vjatever name, Motorola wffl be different. 

Kemodded?^! certainly is,” Lance Armstrong said emphatical- 
™ behold, the team looks almost completely different,” 

i> t ^ ad ^ on to Hampsten, 32, will be such veteran stars as 
Raul Alcala, 30, and Phil Anderson, 36, both retired. Support 
riders leaving the roster are Norm Alvis, 31; Steve Larsen, 24; Kai 
Hundertmarck, 25; Jan Schur, 32, and Brian Smith, 27. 

irs a natural progression," explained Sherwen. “In Phil, Raul 
and Andy, we’ve lost a lot of the elder statesmen, but I thinir we 

ij? S j- ei ^ nuc Ieus of riders whom we can coant on." 

Heading them, of course, is Armstrong. Not far behind him in 
the overall planning is Alvaro Mgia, the 27-year-old Colombian 
who wasa disappointment this year after his splendid fourth place 
in the 1993 Tour de France. 

“We’re going to invest a tremendous amount of tfm<> and effort 
mto bringing Mgia back to a performance position," said Jim 
Ochowicz, the team’s general manager. 

Specifically how? “Communicate with him more. We didn't 



China’s ’Mighty Mom 
Takes 4 Gold Medals 


The Associated Pros 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — The 
teenager her teammates call 
“Mighty Mouse" swept four 
gold medals Thursday as China 
scored a nearly perfect record in 
gymnastics and completed a 1-2 
sweep of all the Asian Games 
diving contests. 

The Chinese women swim- 
mers stayed unbeaten, helping 
their nation pile up IS gold 
medals for the day. 

South Korea's surge contin- 
ued as it swept the day’s five 
gold medals in Greco-koman 
wrestling, won two gymnastics 
golds and added one each in 
swimming, bowling, fencing 


and weightlifting. 

din 


_ , . m _ Kiminuna Mavam/ Rntrf, 

fan Shaping of Qrina going for the gold in the women's three-meter springboard diving. 


■ , . — UIV1U H 6 UlUU I 

give him as much direction as we should have and we can do a 
bette--- 1 - T ’ 


I-. 


. - - i — — — “VIM» uu,u um uui WJ a 

etierjob. In the wmter we stopped communicating with him and 
- wp™ he came to training camp in January, his condition was not 
; what it should have been. 

„ 4ft “In this sport you can't start the season behind and play catch- 
i up. He showed us he stiU has the ability, the talent, but it has to be 
; done on a more consistent basis.” 

In short, Mejia needs motivation. 

Motorola has to make sure he finds it since he’s the only strong 
climber left with Hampsten and Alcala gone. For now at least, 
Armstrong is a classics specialist, which leaves Mg'ia as die team's 
main general clasafi cation hope in the big tours. 

“We’ve got one super climber," said Ochowicz, referring to 
Mejia, |T>ut we want to see what these young guys can do. I 
wouldn’t be surprised to see one or another of our young guys get 
in a big event and show they are climbers." 

The “young guys” include such new recruits as Bobby Julich, 
24, and Kevin Livingstone, 21, from the United States; Max Van 
Heeswijk, 21, from the Netherlands; Gordon Fraser, 25, from 
Canada; Axel Merckx, 22, from Belgium and Fabio Casartelli, 24, 
from Italy. 

Sherwen, a former rider, had high praise especially for Van 
Heeswijk, whom he described as “one of the most promising 
Dutch riders, a member of the Dutch national team for the Iasi 
two years and a very good sprinter." Fraser is also a sprinter and 
dominated amateur racing in France early this season, recording 
more than 20 victories. Casartelli won the road race at the 
Olympic Games in Barcelona in 1992. 

Armstrong was pleased with the signings of Julich and Living 
stone, the current U.S. amateur road race champion, both of wboir 
herode with in his amateur days. “We’re an American team and w* 
should recruit American talent,” he said. “Physically, Julfch’s very 
very talented and he proved to be one of the strongest Americans 
Livingstone’s a good kid and a good bike rider." 

Roughly half the team will be holdovers. “Sean Yates and Steve 
Bauer will be the captains," Sherwen said. “Frankie Andreu is nc 
longer just a developing rider. He's matured. 

“I think George Hincapie wfflhave an even better season next year. 


NBA Acts to Curb Rough Play 

TL* ft — . . 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Look for 
more outride shooting, less ob- 
struction in the backcourt and - 
milder trash-talking in the Na- 
tional Basketball Association 
under new rules approved by 
the league's Board of Gover- 
nors. 

In voting for changes de- 
signed to increase scoring and 
decrease fighting, the NBA 
owners addressed concerns that 
the game was being dominated 
by defense and overly physical 
play. Last season, neither the 
Houston Rockets nor the New 
York Knicks reached 100 
points in the seven-game NBA 
final 

“There's been a slight change 
in the game over the years, and 
the competition committee fell 
strongly it was time to open up 
the game a little bit," Commis- 
sioner David Stern said 
Wednesday. 

The most notable change is 
moving the 3-point line to a 
uniform 22 feet (6.7 meters). 
Currently the arc is 22 feet in 
the corners but extends to 23 
feet, 9 inches beyond the top of 
the key. 


and in the front court as far as 
the foul line. 

“By enforcing the hand- 
checking that will clear up a 
part of the game that had gotten 
out of hand." said Rod Thom, 
the NBA's vice president of op- 
erations. "All players were 


taught in their early stages that 
Uh 


an American, just turned 21 and Andrea, also American, is rmrlrw th* ion* 


defense was done* with vour 
feet." 

Hand-checking, he said, 
“started with us." 

“If you’re used to grabbing 
and bolding people," he said, 
“you’ll have to adjust." 

Other rule changes adopted: 

• When a player has a clear 
path to the basket, a two-shot 
foul will be called if a defender 
grabs him in the backcourt. 

• Players who commit two 
flagrant fouls in a game will be 
ejected. 

• Officials will more strictly 
enforce rules against trash-talk- 
ing and taunting calling a tech- 
nical when a player says some- 
thing that could escalate into a 
fight. 

• Fines for technical fouls 
will increase to $500. from $ 100 
for the first one and $150 for 
the second. 

The second or more of 
when 
can be 


the bench during an altercation. 

Players who do so will receive 
an automatic suspension of at 
least one game and be fined a 
maximum of $20,000. 

“We were appalled by a cou- 
ple of ugly incidents during the 
playoffs," Thom said. “We un- 
derstand that emotions run 
high, but we will not tolerate 
brawls." 


Japan, struggling to bold on 
to second place in the medals 
race, won one each in swim- 
ming tennis, gymnastics and 
bowling 

That left China with a total of 
43 golds, while Japan and South 
Korea each had 17. Kazakhstan 
had two and Taiwan, Iran and 
Syria one each. 

In total medals, C hina led 
with 76 to 59 for Japan and 33 
for the Koreans. 

China’s “Mighty Mouse," 15- 
year-old Mo Hud an, won in the 
vault, uneven bars, beam and 
floor exercises. She also has a 
share in the Chinese women's 
team gold, but missed all-round 
gold Wednesday with a fall 
from the beam. 

The male gymnast Li Xiao- 
shuang became China's second 
triple-gold medalist of the 
Games, after the swimmer 
Xiong Guoming He won in the 
floor exercise, in which he is the 
Olympic champion, and had 
golds earlier from the team and 
all-round competitions. 

The world champion Huang 
Lipingwon on the parallel bars. 
Fang Hongbin on the rings, and 
Li Jing on the horizontal bar. 

Another Chinese gymnast, 
Huang Huadong shared the 
gold on the pommel horse with 
Yoshiaki Hatefceda of Japan 
and Lee Jang Hyung of South 
Korea. 

Yeo Hong Chul of South Ko- 
rea was the only man to com- 
pletely break the Chinese stran- 
glehold. winning the vault 
despite spraining his right ankle 
on the dismount after his sec- 
ond vault. 

Asian or Games records fell 
in all five of the day’s swimming 


races. China’s women winners 
were Liu Limin in the 100-me- 
ter butterfly in 58.38 seconds 
and Dai Guobong in the 100- 
meter breaststroke in one min- 
ute, 9.87 seconds. For China's 
men, Wang Yiwu won the 200- 
meter breaststroke in 2: 14 .56. 

Japan edged the Chinese 
3:23.80 to 3:24.55 in the men's 
400-meter freestyle relay. 

South Korea's Bang Seung 
Hoon won the men’s individual 
400 freestyle in 3:54.72, beating 
Hisham Masri of Syria by 1.14 
seconds. 

In diving, Chinese world 
champion Tan Shu ping and the 
Olympic gold medalist. Sun 
Shuwei, had to fight off chal- 
lenges from their own team- 
mates. 

Tan had to beat another 
world champion. 10-mcter plat- 
form titlist Fu Mingxia, for the 
gold in the women’s 3-meier 
springboard diving. She came 
out ahead 605.82 to 585.09, 
with Japan's Yuki Molobuchi 
third with 543.12. 


On the men’s platform, Sun 
beat teammate Xiao Hailiang 
679.74 to 658.41. Japan’s Keila 
Kaneio took the bronze with 
625.38. 

China already had placed 1-2 
in the women's platform and 
men’s springboard events. 

South Korea's wrestling win- 
ners were Min Kyung Gab. over 
Khaled Faraj of Syria at 52 ki- 
lograms; Choi Sang Sun, over 
Anmetullah Nurov of Kazakh- 
stan at 62 kilograms; Han Giee 
Ho, over Rouslan Joumabekov 
of Kazakhstan at 74 kilograms; 
Ueom Jin Han, over Iran T s Has- 
san Babak at 90 kilograms, and 
Yang Young Jin. over Japan's 
Kenichi Suzuki at 130. 

The Koreans won their fenc- 
ing gold when their men's foil 
team beat China, 9-7, in the 
final. 

South Korea and China split 
the day's men’s weightlifting 
golds. China's Lan Shizhung 
won at 54 kilograms and Cluin 
Byung Kwan of South Korea at 
59. 


Leader of Phony Team 
Arrested in Philippines 


The Associated Press 

MANILA — The police arrested Thursday the leader of 56 
Filipinos who tried to sneak into Japan to find jobs by posing 
as athletes headed for the Asian Games. 

Jerry Velasco appeared before officers of the National 
Bureau of Investigation to explain the incident and was 
immediately arrested on outstanding warrants for a siring of 
fraud cases dating from to 1983. said Antonio Aragon. "the 
assistant bureau director. 

Aragon said new charges were being readied in connection 
with the attempt to send workers illegally to Japan. • 

“1 was just trying to help these people," Velasco said. He 
said most of those who joined the trip had their visa applica- 
tions rejected and were desperate to enter Japan to be with 
relatives who are working there. 

He said he knew the Japanese government had waived visa 
requirements for athletes in the games. 

Nestor Mantaring, a bureau liaison to Interpol, said sum- 
monses had been issued to 1 1 people who joined Velasco in 
Lne inp. 


Vic Endriga, a spokesman for the Philippine Sports Com 
mission, said “poor intelligence-gathering” gave the 


away, they were posing asToileybahpl'ayers^ui thlf PhS 
pines sent no volleyball team. Endriga said sonic of those who 
iso were either too short or too old for 


volleyball. 

When the fake athletes showed up at the airport in Fukuo- 
ka, they wore counterfeit Philippine team uniforms, simulated 
slickers on their baggage and carried forged identification 
cards. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


**. 


4 



JLUAUJJUVUI 5 U 1 V -O' 

an American, just turned 21 and Andreu, also American, is 28. 

Negotiations are continuing to sign Andrea Peron, 23, an 
Italian of great promise who has ridden the last two years for Polti 
in his homeland 

“He’s a strong guy,” Armstrong said “If we get that worked 
oul he’s a guy we’re looking to to step up a little bit, to be one ol 
the leaders on the team.” 


undog the free-lhrow lane. 

Under another rule change, a 
player fouled while taking a 3- 
pomter will get three free 
throws. 

The league also prohibited 
hand-checking in the backcourt 


In response to a spate of 
fights during last year’s play- 
offs, including a brawl between 
the Knicks and the Bulls that 
broke out right in front of 
Stern, the league also stiffened 
penalties for players who leave 


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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1994 


OBSERVER 


My Son the Doctor 


Voltaire Anniversary: Revisiting the Asylum 



PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — When he 
was little mv son used to 


1 N was Utile my son used to 
scoff at me. “Someday.” I used 
to say. "when I am used up and 
decrepit and hovering between 
life and death 2 want to be able 
to call for my son ihe doctor, 
who will then come and save mv 
life.” 

"Hah!** he would scoff. 
“Hah! *My son the doctor.' eh? 
A fat lot of good he’ll do you in 
that future someday of your de- 
crepitude, old-timer-to-be.” 

I mourned his contempt for 
ray dreams. So when one day. 
fully grown, he came home 
from Harvard and said. "You 
may now call me your son the 
doctor" I was ecstatic. 

□ 

“Before you go forth on your 
missions of mercy.” I said, “be 
good enough to give me a free 
diagnosis of these unbearable 
pains right here in the — ” 

He slopped me before my 
shirt was half unbuttoned. Did I 
think he was one of those pill 
prescribes one of those carve 
’em and sew 'em scalpelmeisters. 
one of those Hippocratic leeches 
on the prostrate body of the 
American insurance industry? 

Not he. not my son the doc- 
tor. He was of a higher order, 
the new order prevailing in this 
future medical someday, which 
I had long ago failed to envision 
correctly. 

In short, be was a Doctor of 
Medical Insurance. Years of 


postgraduate education and re- 
search had qualified him to 


search had qualified him to 
treat the most expensive medi- 
cal procedures ever devised. 

□ 


Old-fashioned medical-type 
doctors lived in fear of him, and 
with good reason. When exam- 
ining a medical doctor he could 
instantly detect a tendency to 
put excessive strain on insur- 
ance-company assets. 


It made me proud to think of 
these medical money squander- 


ers on their knees pleading with 
my son the doctor not to cut off 
their access to the premium- 
payer’s hard-earned dollar. 

But wasn’t it humiliating for a 
once-proud profession to dance 
to the tune of commerce? After 
doctors had spent all those years 
fighting to keep government bu- 
reaucracy out of medicine why 
had they surrendered so easily to 
corporate bureaucracy? 

“Doctors aren’t any smarter 
than anybody else," explained 
my son the "insurance doctor. 
“And why,” he continued, “are 
you flopping around on the 
floor like that?’’ 

Sometimes. I explained, the 
pain — right here — became so 
unbearable that I collapsed and 
became unconscious, though 
other times I merely flopped 
uncontrollably on the floor. 

“Can you stop gasping long 
enough to tell me if you have 
medical insurance, and if so, 
with which company?’’ 

□ 

1 confessed to having insur- 
ance. “Disgraceful.” said the 
lad. “With people in your con- 
dition being insured, it’s no 
wonder the insurance industry 
is hard pressed for money to put 
into real-estate speculations. 
What company was foolish 
enough to insure you? 1 ' 

What an insurance doctor! I 
was proud of that boy. believe 
me. Even through the pain and 
flopping around I could see in 
him Lhe virtues that had made 
America Number One. 

“My boy, my boy." I sobbed 
as the light started to fail. “How 
wrong I was all those years ago 
to want you to become a medi- 
cine doctor so you could save me 
when I hovered between life and 
death. The cost of doing so 
might well have forced the insur- 
ance industry to shut you down 
for being cost-inefficient." 

I was gone before the life in- 
surance company could cancel 
my policy. It’s not bad over here. 
Government does the insuring. 


By Barry James 

Iruernaiional Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — On the morning after Lhe 
sinking of the Estonia last week, 
an English bishop told radio listeners 
that such tragedies were pan of God’s 
providence. Without them, he said, 
mankind could have no free will. 

Many believe it so. But what would 
Voltaire have made of i i? In ail proba- 
bility, he would be rushing a longish 
poem or a shortish book into print, 
musing again that theology “is like go- 
ing the rounds of a lunatic asylum.” 

Voltaire’s reaction to a similarly in- 
explicable tragedy inspired his angriest 
and many say his greatest poem. “On 
the Lisbon Disaster.” He wondered 
why a benevolent God would wish the 
destruction by earthquake of one of the 
most Catholic cities in Europe at pre- 


cisely the hour when most people were 
at Mass. Then he wrote “C'andide.” 


Nov York Times Service 


poking ribald fun at the optimistic be- 
lief that all is for the best in the best of 
all possible worlds. 

On the 300th anniversary of his birth 
this year, “people still find Voitaire 
uncomfortable." said Andrew Brown, 
executive director of the Vol taire Foun- 
dation at Oxford University. ‘'There 
are many who find him quite beyond 
the pale^ certainly religiously.'’ 

In Paris, the anniversary is being 
marked by a superb exhibition called 
“Voltaire and Europe" r unnin g to Jan. 
8. It is jointly organized by the Bib- 
liotheque Nationale and the French 
mint in a series of 18lh -century salons 
at the Hotel de la Monnaie. “Voltaire 
and Europe " is a fitting title, because 
he was the most European of the 18lh 
century philosophes in refusing to place 
any barrier to intellectual inquiry or to 
universal values of liberty and justice. 

Francis-Marie Arouei — his real 
name — was born in Paris but spent 
most of his life elsewhere, often on the 
run from outraged authority. Voltaire 
was a court gadfly until he quarreled 
with an insufferable aristocrat and took 
refuge in London. His contacts with the 
English empiricists, and his discovery 
of Shakespeare’s plays and Newton’s 
physics, turned him from poet and 
playwright into the fiery freethinker 
that history remembers. 

Fresh from seemingly interminable 
religious wars and intolerance in 
France. Voltaire was amazed to find 



Voltaire became the equivalent of a modem millionaire. 


that the En glishman was free to go to 
heaven “by the path that pleases him 
besL" He thought a land with one reli- 
gion was certain to be a tyranny. With 
two religions, men will cut each others' 
throats for sure. With 30. they can live 
in harmony, quote? 

Voltaire’s first major contribution to 
the Enli ghtenment was his “Letters 
concerning the English Nation'' in 
1733 and 1744. He began by writing 
four letters on the Quakers who. he 
said, had no church. nc> priests and no 
sacraments yet followed the Christian 


The Paris exhibition is a reminder 
that Voltaire was a competent writer in 
English as well as a superb one in 
French. He wrote both his “Essay upon 
Epick Poetry" and an “Essay upon the 
Civil Wars of France" in his adoptive 
language tc great critical acclaim. Lat- 
er. in collaboration with his intellec- 
tually onliiant mistress, Madame du 
ChatelCi. he persuaded the French to 
accept Newton's law of gravity to ex- 
plain why objects act on one another at 
a distance, rather than Descartes’ the- 
orv of invisible vortices. 


are much more popular in academic 
Circles because they were more subtle 
writers. Voltaire’s great inconvenience 
was saying what he meant and meaning 
what lie said His writing is all loo clear. 
It does not allow the same same room 
for academic hairsplitting as the oth- 
ers." 

The exhibition, of course, pays atten- 
tion to Voltaire's relationship with 
Frederick II, the philosopher-despot of 
Souri, and with Catherine II of 
Russia. Catherine, whom Voltaire 
called the Semiramis of the North, 
bought his library of 7,000 books. The 
diy of St. Petersburg has sent some of 
the books to the exhibition, several of 
them filled with caustic margin notes in 
Voltaire's handwriting. “Will you shut 
up!” he annotated against a Jesuit 
priest's description of demonic posses- 
sion. “Dangerous book!” he scrawled 
across the frontispiece of a volume of 
theology. 

Voltaire became the equivalent of a 
modem millionaire through canny in- 
vestments, and settled in a chateau at 

Feraey, just inside France but close 
enough to Switzerland to hop over the 
border if he needed to escape from the 
Catholic theologians of the Sorbonne. 

But he bad his problems with the 
Geneva Calvinists as wdl They or- 
dered every available copy of his 
“Philosophical Dictionary” to be 
burned, while the bode was put on the 
pyre in France along with a nobleman 
executed for blasphemy. 

After the torture and execution of a 
Protestant shopkeeper — the Cal as af- 
fair — Voltaire stepped in to defend the 
man’s reputation and family, and de- 
clared all-out war on religious supersti- 
tion and intolerance. 

For all his reputation as a fire- 
breathing priest-eater, however, other 
freethinkers doubted the sincerity of 
Voltaire's campaign to “crush the infa- 
my!” He always defended the Jesuits, 
who gave him a rational education. He 
admired the charity work of nuns, built 
a church on his estate and even joined a 
lay association of the Capuchin friars. 
He seemed quite proud of it He ac- 
knowledged that religion was needed to 


Ex-Wife Gives Kennedy 
An Election-Time Break 


more faithfulh than anv other 


precepts more faitt 
Christians he had 


“For many people be is too simple,” 
Brown said. “Rousseau and Diderot 


knowledged that religion was needed to 
curb men's murderous instincts. 

He left the world, at the age of 84, 
with this bon mot. “1 die adoring God, 
loving my friends, not hating my ene- 
mies and detesting superstition.” 


Joan Kennedy has decided to 
postpone reopening her divorce 
i settlement from Senator Ed- 
ward M. Kennedy until after the 
j November election. Monroe 
Inker, her lawyer, declined to 
give a reason for the delay. But 
it may well be a relief to. the 
senator, who has his hands full 
seeking re-election against a 
tough challenge from the Re- 
publican Mitt Romney. Two 
years ago Kennedy was married 
for the second time, to Victoria 
Reggie, a Washington lawyer. 

Tom Oaitcy, former subur- 
ban Maryland car insurance 
salesman turned best-selling 
techno-scribbler, was not hap- 
py with Christopher Buckley's 
review of his latest novel, “Debt 
of Honor" <766 pages), in the 
Oct. 2 issue of The New Yoric 
Times Book Review, and it trig- 
gered a literary feud by fax. 
Buckley’s derisive review began 
with a Mark Twain quip, “Once 
you put it down, you can’t pick 
it up," and went on from there. 
Clancy Fired off a fax to Buck- 
ley, a Washington writer and , 
son of William F. Buckley- Jr. It 
said in part: “You seem to have 
inherited your father's hauteur, 
but, alas, not his talent or no- 
blesse. Revealing a surprise 
ending for a novel is bad form, 
lad." Waspish faxed exchanges 
followed, but when Clancy was 
reached by telephone he told 
The Washington Post the faxes 
were all a joke. “I'm sorry he 
didn’t take it that way. 1 goofed. 
I’m sony." 

□ . 

President Francois Mitter- 
rand's black felt hat raised 
35,000 francs ($6,600). five times 
as much as supermodel Gndy 
Crawford’s skimpy white bikini, 
at a Paris auction of celebrity 
paraphernalia to support the 
fight against AIDS. More than 1 
million francs was raised with 
such items as Magic Johnson's 
jerseys and a tennis ball signed 
by Arthm- Ashe. 


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WEATHER 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


Europe 


Todav 


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23 73 

14 S 7 

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21 .70 

16 61 CT 

Beta race 

12 SJ 

8 4J5 

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337 


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17 62 

6 43 

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9 48 p; 

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Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 

f®.w %**•<$ f 


% 


& ww 


Unseasonably 

C<*1 


Unsea icnaUv 
Hoi 


•••£?•. HC.TVV 
& Swv- 


North America 

The Northeast will hauo o 
mid weekend Showers will 
reach Pittsburgh later Satur- 
day end Ihe New fork City 
tc Boston :ortidor later Sun- 
day Chilly weaihe- will 
plunge southward through 
Minneapolis and Chicago 
Saiuiday night and Sixiday. 
The West will be sunny and 
milder 


Europe 


Sunny, pleasant weather will 
stretch from London through 


stretch from London through 
Paris and Frankfurt this 
weekend Cooler weather 
wdl arrive Monday. Dry and 
mid weather wiD come back 
to Spam and Portugal More 
tranquil weather wik return lo 
Scandinavia this weekend. 
Athens to Bucharest will 
have a soakrtg rain. 


Asia 

Beijing through Seoul will 
have a spell ol dry. pleasant 
weather this weekend into 
Monday. Tokyo and Osala 
will be sunny and «or.l su- 
able as well Typhoon Seth 
will approach the northeast- 
ern Philippines this week- 
end. threatening northeast- 
ern Luzon and Taiwan 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today Tomorrow 

High Lena W Mgh Low W 
OF OF OF Clf 

29 84 2379 PC 31 W 23*73 ! 
29-81 21 73 pc 32 09 19-66 1 
31 Bfl 17*2 ae 33 Si 17.62 s 
28 TC 20 88 pc 31 .‘88 19*6 9 
33 T»1 22.71 I 39*192 17.52 i 
38' 1 002373 • W.-11B24.7S 9 


Today Torn on ow 

High Low W High Low W 

OF OF CIF OF 

BuerosAyW 19/86 12 53 DC 2271 12 53 » 

Caracas 32.-89 25 7? u. 32 *9 26 78 rc 

Lima 20 80 18*1 K 19*56 16 61 c 

Masco Dry 22 >ti n/52 pe 2379 11/93 PC 

HnaeJOnMO 2373 18-54 *n 24 75 18 64 pc 

Sanwgo 2578 H52 pc 26 79 11/53 pc 


Legend: s-awiy. pc-party dwidy c-doudy. sh -showers, nhundawamw. r ■ram. sl-srww Hwros. 
sn-snaw. mm. W-WeaDier Ml maps, torecaeta and data provided by Aceu-Weethar, Inc. ? 1994 


Asia 


Toibr; 


Tomorrow 


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SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 


Al forecasts, and data pkwmm 4t 
by Accu-WaaOwr. tnoc: tufla < 


Europe and Middle East 
Location Weather 


High Low 
Temp. Temp. 
OF OF 


-afar 

Deju-vilie 

ninint 

Ma.aga 

Cagian 

Fare 

P:-aei» 

Carts 

Bnghta-. 

C$lt>nq 

S:fcevar.:.-.«n 

Sye 


r/cuds and sun 
sunny 
ihawers 
jhpjie.-s 
showers 
shower? 
IhunderKC.-ms 
ihunderstcmis 
partly sunny 
3CU2S 3T-C sun 
213-35 and sur 
studs and sur. 

sunry 


Wind 

Speed 

(kph) 

NW 12-22 


Europe and Middle East 
Location Weather High 

Tamp. 
OF 


W 15-30 
SW 15-30 


SE 10-20 
SW 20-35 


W 15-25 
SW 10-20 


S 20-40 
SE 15-25 


NE 12-22 
N6 12-22 


N 12-25 

SE 15-30 


Cannes 

Deauvfle 

Rkrani 

Malaga 

Cagkari 

Faro 

Piraeus 

Corfu 

Bngtxon 

Osteno 

Schevemngen 

Syli 

tanir 

Tel Aviv 


sunny 

ciouds and sun 
clouds and sun 
cloudy 

clouds and sun 

showers 

ran 

snowere 
clouds and sun 
sunny 
sunny 
sunny 

clouds and aun 
sunny 


wmd 

Speed 

(kph) 

N 15-25 


SE 12-25 
SW 12-22 


SW 15-25 
W 15-30 


W 2035 
S 15-30 


SW 15-30 
S 15-25 


SE 12-25 
SE 15-30 


Caribbean and West Atlantic 


Caribbean and West Atlantic 


Baroaoos 
Kingsion 
Si Thomas 
Hamilton 


thunderstorms 29/84 23/73 28/82 

partly sunny 33*91 2373 2M2 

Showflis 32*89 24/75 29/84 

showers 2a*B4 21/70 25/77 


1-2 SE 20-40 

1-2 ESE 20-40 

1-2 SE 25-50 

0-1 SE 12-25 


Barbados showers 30/88 23/73 

Kingston thunderstorms 32/89 23/73 

St. Thomas showers 3Q/B6 23/73 

Hamilton clouds anO sun 30/86 22/71 


29/B4 1-2 SE 25-50 

28/82 2-3 ESE 30-60 

28/82 1-3 NE 30-55 

25/77 0-1 W 15-25 


Asia/Pacific 


Penang 

Phuket 

Bak 

Cebu 

Palm Beach. Aus 
Bay of Islands. NZ 
Srnranama 
Honolulu 


inu'oerstorms 
tnunde-rsterms 
partly sunny 
cartly sunny 
d3jds and sun 

foJfl 

sunny 

douds and sun 


SW 10-20 
SW 15-25 


SW 12-25 
SE 15-25 


W 2040 
NW 25-50 


N 10-20 
ENE 2040 


Penang 

Phuket 

Bali 

Cebu 

Palm Beach. Aua. 
Bay al Islands. NZ 
Shlrahama 
Honolulu 


thunderstorms 
showers 
partly sumy 
clouds and sun 
sunny 
showers 
clouds and sun 
clouds and sun 


SW 12-25 
SW 15-30 
SW 15-JC 
SE 15-25 
NW 12-22 
WNW 30-60 
NE 25-50 
ENE 2035 


Kiosk 


i! ‘- \|>}>rmj*.w 


V 

. 


I- 

- 


stomach's growjing. 


? ■ • *. y/ 

>: '■> . 

Mother Nature s calling. 


* - 1 


wr-W* u»* 

. ar. » t - 


l m ATS? USADirecPmnl 
World Connect * Service, you can make 
multiple calls without redialing 
your card or access number. 


You’re in a hum: So we'll be brief. AT&T I’SADirect and 




i-' ■ 

' 


- 

' ' ' V A 1 




.>• v 


Your flight’s boarding. 


• J* t 

•- 

. % '• 

V U*.-. •• ' AJ 

vl 


TT* * -i 

* * - , * • 


World Connect Service gets you fast, clear connections 


back to the United States or to anv of over 100 other 




countries. Also, an easier way to make multiple calls. 


. • - . \ 

■i - 


« . 

t H. 

» • 


Up to 10 In a raw: Just dial the AT&T Access Number 


Plenty of time to make;,^/ 

i. 

I 

t ' • - - 'V ‘ 

s . • " ten calls. . 

i 


below for the country you're calling from. Your call 


will go through in seconds. Then, instead' of hanging 


up after each call, busy signal or unanswered call. 


oi n-w. 

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simply press the # button. In short, you’ll spend less 


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• •• 


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time dialing. And more time talking. Wait. On second 


thought, isn’t your Right about ready tn take off? 


asia /pacific 


MWiMlWiD ‘JOS-'JH 

PHtUPPUtfS’ 105-11 

RUSSIA "(MOSCOW) 155-5042 

SAIPAN' 235- 2872 

VWP'X HDTOHi ill 
' a>\ LSriiti -ntl"!2C 

TAIWAN- 0080-18288-0 

iHilllMIvl* -ii'lt'MCJI 111) 

EUROPE 

1 8-/14111 


AUSTR1A- ,M 

BELOIUM' 

EuuyfliA 

CDOATIAf* 

CZECH REPUBLIC 

DENMARK' 

FINLAND' 

FRANCE 

GERMANY 

GREECE' 


022-903-011 

0-800-100-10 

uo-Teco-oo-.o 

99-38-0011 

00-420-00101 

8001-0810 

.9800-700-10 

10J-BH1 

0130-0010 

00-000-1311 


HUNGARY' 

ICELAND'. 

IRQJUlD 

ITAIY- 

LIECHTENSTEIN 1 

LITHUANIA* . . 

lUXEMEOURti 

MALTA 

MONACO’. 

NETHERLANDS- 


000-000-01111 
998-001 
1-80 0-558-000 
. . 172-1011 
15S-00-11 
03196 

. 0 0)0-0111 

0800-890-110 
10-1-0011 
DG- 022-01 11 


NORWAY 

P0LAND t,, »... 

PORTUGAL’ 

ROMANIA 

SLOVAK REP. 

SPAM. 

SWEDOT 

SWITZERLAND' 

UKRAINE’ 

IKK. 


.. 800-190-11 
.00010-400-0111 
88017-1-288 
01-800-4280 
00-420-00101 
90049-00-11 
. 020-795-611 

.155-00-11 

85100-11 

osoo-n-oon 


MIDDLE EAST 

BAHRAIN 900 D01 

CYPRUS' 080-00010 

EGYPT' (CAIRO) 1 . . 810-0280 
ISRAEL 177-100-2727 

MlWAJl. BOO -288 

LEBANON (BEIRUT)' 438-001 
SAUDI ARABIA I-6O0-1D 

TURKEY’ .. . 00-000-12277 
U ARAB EMIRATES' . .600-121 


AMERICAS 

ARGENTINA* 001.800-200-11 11 
BOLIVIA'.. . 0-800-1 1 12 

BRAZIL 090-8010 

CANADA 1-800-575-222? 

CHILE. .009-0212 

COLOMBIA BSD -11-0010 

EL SALVADOR’*. 190 

HONDURAS*.. . 123 

MEXICOW 95-600-462-4240 


PANAMA... . . 109 

• . . .131 

VENEZUELA*. .80-011-120 
AFRICA 


Ti'it&oHttCoiiinvfioiis 


GABON- 
GAMBIA' 
IVORY COAST' 

KENYA' 

LIBERIA . 


080-001 

00111 

80-111-11 

oaon-io 

.797-797 



SOUTH AFRICA .0-800-99-0123 


• f\H* il^-ii* tl.tr.: fl. .inw iniiiJiT 


AKT 


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