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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


** 


Paris, Monday, October 10, 1994 


No. 34,? 15 




* . .■ K 



Cnuiafn Fermi /The Amsaied Plcsfc 


Coionri Bob Smalser of die UJ5. Army, commander of Camp Doha in Kuwait, answering journalists'' questions Sunday. 

Extreme Right Surges in Austria Vote 


By Alan Friedman 

fniemaaomd Herald Tribune 

SALZBURG — Austria experienced a 
, political earthquake Sunday as voters gave 
v Jorg Haider’s extreme right Freedom Party 

a record 22.6 percent of the national vote 
* and the country's two governing coalition 
parties suffered their worst electoral set- 
back since World War IL 
Although the so-called grand coalition 
of Social Democrats and the conservative 
People’s Party will keep their majority in 
Parliament, the results dealt a humiliating 
personal defeat to Chancellor Franz Vran- 
itzky. 


Mr. Vranitzky’s Social Democrats won 
just 35.2 percent, a drop of 7.6 percentage 
points since the last election, in 1 990. With 
nearly complete returns, the People's Party 
dropped 4.4 points, to 27.7 percent. 

The results, which also saw progress by 
the Green Party and the centrist Liberal 
Forum, are a breakthrough for the populist 
Mr. Haider, who has wooed disenchanted 
voters with harsh anti-foreigner rhetoric 
and fervent opposition to Austria's joining 
the European union. 

The ambitious and telegenic Mr. Haider 
said Sunday night he was “speechless" at 


the size of his vote count, 6 percentage 
points higher than in 1990. 

“I would like to be chancellor by 1998," 
he said on television after the polls closed. 

While on paper Mr. Haider and the 
People's Party now control a total of 94 
seals jointly,’ enough to form a rightist 
governing coalition, this is considered 
highly unlikely. Instead, the People's Party 
indicated that it would remain loyal to the 
present governing coalition, and Mr. 
Haider announced plans to become oppo- 

See VOTE, Page 2 


CIA Paid Japan’s Long-Riding Party 


iVw- York Times Serrkr 

The following article is based on report- 
ing by Tint Weiner, Stephen Engelberg 
and James Siemgold ana h«s written by 
Mr. Weiner : 

WASHINGTON — In a major covert 
operation of the Cold War, the’ Central 
Intelligence Agency spent millions of 
i dollars to support the conservative party 
1 that dominated Japan’s politics for a 
generation. 

The CIA gave money to the Liberal 
Democratic Party and its members in the 
1950s and the 1960s to gather intelli- 
gence on Japan, make the country a 


bulwark against communism and under- 
mine the Japanese left, retired intelli- 
gence officials and former diplomats 
said. 

Since then, the CIA has dropped its 
covert financial aid and has focused in- 
stead on gathering inside information on 
Japan's party politics and positions in 
trade and treaty talks, retired intelli- 
gence officers said. 

The Liberal Democrats’ 38 years of 
one-party governance ended last year 
when they fell from power after a series 
of corruption cases, many involving se- 
cret cash contributions. Still the largest 


party in Japan's Parliament, they formed 
an awkward coalition in June with their 
old Cold War enemies, the Socialists — 
the party that the CIA's aid had aimed in 
part to undermine. 

Though the CIA's financial role in 
Japanese politics has long been suspect- 
ed by historians and journalists, the Lib- 
eral Democrats have always denied it 
existed, and the breadth and depth of the 
support has never been detailed publicly. 

The CIA did not respond to an inqui- 
ry. In Tokyo, Katsuya Muraguchi. direc- 

See JAPAN, Page 4 


Body of a Sect Leader Is Said to Be Found 


By AJan Cowell 

New York Tuna Service 

CHE1RY. Switzerland — The mystery 
surrounding the macabre deaths of 48 cull 
members in Switzerland deepened Sunday 
with a report that a presumed leader of the 
Solar Tradition, for whom a murder war- 
rant had been issued, had been identified 
among the dead. , , 

But there was still no clue to the where- 
abouts of Luc Jouret, the 46-year-old Bel- 
«ian founder or the sect, who is also want- 
ed on murder charges. It has not been 
established whether he was also among 
those who perished in the deathly scenario 
that was apparently coordinated with five 
more deaths on property owned by the cult 
leaders in Canada. 


Swiss television reported Sunday that 
several family members had identified the 
body of Joseph di Mambro, a 70-year-old 
French-Canaidian reputed to be the finan- 
cial mas termind of the cult, and that of his 
wife, Jocelyn, among 25 badly burned bod- 
ies recovered from three incinerated cha- 
lets aL the Alpine ski hamlet of Granges- 
sur-Salvan, 160 kilometers (100 miles) 
from Chriry. 

When the police issued international 
warrants for the arrest of Mr. di Mam bo 
and Dr. Jouret on Friday, it was assumed 
that they were thought to be on the run 
after orchestrating the mass deaths. On 
Saturday, Swiss investigators said publicly 
for the first time that thor initial suspicion 
of a mass suicide among cult members had 


rep! 
:of t! 


some 05 the dead had been murdered. 

If Mr. di Mambro was among the dead, 
however, the question of Dr. Jouret’s 
whereabouts becomes all the more impor- 
tant in dete rmini ng bow the deaths oc- 
curred. Both men were seen near the sites 
of the Swiss blazes hours before they broke 
out, Swiss investigators say. 

Investigators declined to confirm the 
Swiss television report, saying that rela- 
tives had identified only Mr. di Mambro's 
personal effects found' in the embers at 
Granges-sur-Salvan. But his name figured 
in a further, baffling twisL 
Compounding the puzzles confronting 

See CULT, Page 4 


Kiosk 


Arab Assailants 
Injure 11 Israelis 

JERUSALEM (AF) — Arab 
men ran down a cafe-lined sidewalk m 
Central Jerusalem late Sunday, shoot- 
ing and throwing hand gffjwtekAf 
least II Israelis were wounded, Israel 

^The £oti«iid two Arabs apparj 
entl y involved in the attack were “fled 
£ Israeli border police. Army radio 
saidh was not clear how nmyABto 
had taken part in the attacked that a 
third man could still be at large. 


Book Review 


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Marathon in the Medoc: 
Defer the Gratification 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pan Seme e 

PAUILLAC, France — Napoleon 
may have believed that the performance 
of soldiers depends on then stomachs, 
but Andrt Cazes likes to think that the 
prowess of athletes is determined by 
their palates. 

A jovial man who proudly bears the 
title of grand master in the Comman- 
derie du Bontemps de Mfedoc « de 
Graves, Mr. Cazes and a group of physi- 
cian friends derided a decade ago that 
one way to lift people’s spirits before the 
harvest would be to hold a marathon in 
which runners would traverse the 42- 
kilometer (26-mile) course through some 
of Lhe world’s most hallowed vineyards. 

It was virtually unthinkable that the 
runners should lope along on empty 
stomachs. And where food is served in 
France, wine is sure to follow. 

Along with a pasta feast and “refresh- 
ment stops” that featured oysters and 
other regional delicacies. Mr. Cazes pre- 
vailed upon 60 wine chateaus along the 


course to open their doors and ofrer 
tastings of their wines. 

“Sport and wine in the Medoc is like 
love and marriage in life.” Mr. Cazes 
said. “It can go from zero to infinity; we 
wanted this to be the infinite experience 
for all of us.” 

What started as a gourmet jaunt for 
several dozen oeno-sportifs, or athletic 
wine buffs, has blossomed within 10 
'years into one of the French wine coun- 
try’s most exotic extravaganzas, luring 
participants from all over the world — 
many in elaborate costumes — who are 
looking for something more than the 
thrill of breaking through "the wall” at 
the 30-kilometer mark. 

On a cool, cloudy fall morning, more 
than 5,000 marathoners aged from 20 to 
70 set off from this town on the Gironde 
River in search of Mr. Cazes's “infinite 
experience.” Winners in each age group 
were to receive their weight in bottles of 
the finest Bordeaux. 

Led by Jean Guyon. owner or Chateau 

See RUN, Page 4 


U.S. Forces May Not Wait 

F or Iraq to Invade Ku wai t 


Saddam’s Aim: 
Gain Leverage 
On Sanctions 


By Caryle Murphy 

Washington Peat Service 

JERUSALEM — In creating his latest 
confrontation with the United States, 
President Saddam Hussein of Iraq appears 
to have calculated that Washington has 
neither the ability nor the will to mobilize 
the huge military force it once did agains t 
him and that he can emerge from the crisis 
with bargaining leverage to ease United 
Nations sanctions against his country. 

Iraqi and American analysis offering 
this assessment say that by pointedly de- 
ploying troops on Iraq's border with Ku- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

wait, Mr. Saddam has achieved his aim of 
putting Iraq back on the international 
agenda after months of being ignored and 
that he does not need to invade the emirate 
again. 

Mr. Saddam and his associates believe 
that if they create an escalation of tensions, 
the United States and its allies will not able 
to mobilize as they did in the Gulf War of 
1991, an exiled Iraqi active in the opposi- 
tion said. 

They also believe, he added, that “it is 
not necessary to strike Kuwait” but that by 
creating a threat at the border, they will be 
taking the initiative. Mr. Saddam “will 
watch now to see what is the reaction of the 
United States and its allies," he said. 

The Iraqi troops' mere presence so close 
to the border poses a threat that President 
Bill Ginton will have to deal with. At the 
very least, it forces Washington into an 
unanticipated militaiy buildup. “Its ex- 
pensive to America, and it distracts Clin- 
ton," a U.S. analyst said. 

However, some exiled Iraqis who main- 
tain clandestine contacts with critics of 
Mr. Saddam in. Baghdad . say the Iraqi 
leader is so desperate with the economic 
tailspin into which his country has fallen 
that he appears ready to risk the conse- 
quences of an attack on Kuwait if the 
United Stales does not respond with nego- 
tiations. 

“This lime he is very serious,” said Buha 
Shabeeb, an Iraqi who says he has been 
briefed by informants from Baghdad. 
“He’s rushing forces from all over Iraq to 
the Basra theater.” 

Mr. Saddam's closest advisers, drawn 
mainly from his Tikriti clan, “are counting 
80 percent that Ginton will blink and 
come to the negotiating table.” he said. 

But “if this fails, they can attack Kuwait 
and kiD as many Americans as possible,” 
he said, adding: “They missed their chance 


IRAQ! FORCES 


within 20 km of Kuwaiti border 
60,000 - 70,000 troops 
700 tanks 

900 personnel carriers 


\ Caspian — ( 

Sea i 



ALLIED FORCES 


2.000 U.S. troops in the GuH 

18.000 Kuwaiti troops 
44 tanks 

USS Leyte Gulf cruiser carrying 
122 cruise missiles 
USS Hewitt destroyer carrying 
73 cruise missiles 

USS Tripoli amphibious assault group 
48 U.S. F-15 fighters in the Gulf and Turkey 
6 British Tornado fighters 
9 French Mirage 2000 fighters 


Souroas. AF. Jane s Fightmg Ships 


hit 


last time. There was no confrontation on 
the ground." 

Although Mr. Saddam may have gained 
the impression that a U.S. president who 
withdrew his military forces from hostile 
fire in Somalia and gave easy terms of 
departure to Haitian dictators may seek a 
negotiated settlement with the Iraqi leader, 
this is a major miscalculation, the U.S. 
analyst said. 

As he goes into midterm elections, “it’s 
going to be impossible for Clinton to ap- 
pear soft on Saddam,” the analyst said. 

Indeed, most observers agree that Mr. 
Saddam's latest provocation stems mainly 
from desperation with Iraq's increasingly 
dire economic situation caused by four 
years of United Nations trade sanctions. 

They say the new crisis is an attempt by 
Mr. Saddam to distract his people from 
their deteriorating conditions by appealing 
to their nationalist pride. 

“Saddam is quite desperate.” said an 
Iraqi opposition figure reached by phone 
in Kurdistan, in northern Iraq. “In Bagh- 
dad iisdf food prices have skyrocketed, 
and people are in a great slate of anxiety." 

Mr. Saddam may be hoping that a re- 
newed sense of conflict and danger will 

See GULF, Page 4 


UN Aide Calls 

Troop Mo ves a 
‘Hostile’ Act 

By Ann Devroy 

ir<uAiii£{iiii i’rtl Srrvfir 

WASHINGTON — Increasing its pres- 
sure on President Saddam Hussein, the 
Clinton administration said Sunday that 
the massing of 70.000 Iraqi troops at the 
border with Kuwait was a “hostile” act 
that could be met with U.S. military action 
even if those troops did not invade. 

The wanting came from the chief U.S. 
representative at the United Nations, Ma- 
deleine K. Albright, who described the 
movement of four armored Iraqi divisions 
to within 15 kilometers (Q miles) of the 
Kuwaiti border as “disrupting the stability 
in the region.” 

“We consider this hostile,” she said. 

Speaking on CNN after leaving a White 
House session on Iraq. Mrs. Albright said 
an invasion of Kuwait would be an “obvi- 
ous” reason for a U.S. military response. 
But she added that the United' States was 
now discussing internally and with its al- 
lies "under what circumstances the region- 
al instability” caused by the troop move- 
ments, even those within Iraq’s own 
borders, “becomes intolerable” to other 
states in the Gulf region. 

That was a central discussion at the 
White House on Sunday, officials said, 
when most of Mr. Clinton's senior foreign 
policy and national security aides met on 
and off for most of the day- Officials said 
Mr. Clinton will meet again with his top 
aides Monday morning to assess the situa- 
tion in Iraq and determine whether to issue 
a firm warning. 

Defense Secretary William J. Perry also 
suggpted Sunday ihat the United Suites 
and its allies would not allow themselves to 
be (Ripped in a long stalemate. 

The White House discussions came as 
the Pentagon sent new airpower to the 
Gulf and 18.000 Marines were put on alert 
at Camp Pendleton, California. Those 
moves are part of the U.S. military niuscle- 
flexing aimed at heading off a feared inva- 
sion and persuading Mr. Saddam to pull 
back from the border. 

Mr. Perry pointedly ticked off the ele- 
ments of what he called “a formidable 
military force" in place or en rouie to 
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait and other points 
in the Gulf. 

Besides the Camp Pendleton Marines, 

4.000 members of an army mechanized 
division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, and 

2.000 Marines aboard amphibious-assault 
ships already in the northern Gulf have 
been pul on alen. About 300 Marines have 
left there already to prepare Patriot missile 

See FORCE, Page 4 



Mann Rnnn'Agcn.'c France -Pity 

Worshipers in a Port-au-Prince church Sunday. Haiti’s priest-president, Jean-Baptist e Aristide, is to return Saturday 

Cedras to Go Monday, Haitian Army Says 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupac/ta 

PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti — Lieuten- 
ant General Raoul Cedras will step down 
Monday as Haiti’s military leader, trans- 
ferring power to the army's No. 2 com- 
mander, the Haitian Army said Sunday. 

Major General Jean-Claude Duperval 
will replace Genera! Cedras under a plan 
approved Saturday in Washington by Hai- 
tian officers and rq>resentatives of the 
exiled president, the Reverend Jean-Ber- 
trand Aristide, an army spokesman said. 

He said Brigadier General Phillipe 
Biamby, the army chief of staff and a 
leader of the 1991 coup, had also resigned. 

U. S. officials here and in Washington, 
however, said Sunday that they were un- 
able to say exactly when the military lead- 
ers would step down, only that it would 


precede Father Aristide’s return next Sat- 
urday. 

Leon E Panetta. the White House chief 
of staff, said on an NBC News program 
that he could not confirm that General 
Cfcdras would resign Monday, "hut, clear- 
ly, we have this mission on track right 
now” 

"It is a stable situation,” he added 
“There’s calm that's been restored to the 
country. President Aristide is prepared to 
return. We have the Parliament in place. I 
think in a matter of days we will see 
democracy restored to Haiti, and that was 
the fundamental goal of the president's 
policy.” 

A Clinton administration official, 
speaking Sunday on condition of anonym- 
ity. did not deny reports of the resignation 


Monday, but said, "Nothing is clear until 
he does iL” 

Under a deal brokered by Jimmy Carter, 
the former U.S. president, averting an in- 
vasion, the two generals have to leave pow- 
er by Saturday. The third leader of the 
September 1991 coup, Lieutenant Colonel 
Michel Francois, fled to the Dominican 
Republic on Tuesday. 

Haitian sources said the agreement on 
the resignation was worked out Saturday 
by General C&lras’s representatives in 
Washington. 

Defense Secretary William J. Perry stud 
that he and General John M. Shalikashvili, 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, met 
with General Cidras on Saturday at Port- 
au-Prince airport. 

“We discussed the actions he could take. 
See HAITI, Page 4 





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Page 2 


ESTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


Q&A- U.S. and Russian Differences on European Stability 


U.S. and Russian views on Europe- 
an stability will be debated during a 
six-week session of the Conference on 
Security and Cooperation in Europe 
that starts Monday in Budapest and 
culminates in a summit meeting in 
December. The U.S. representative, 
Sam Brown, talked to the IHTs 
Joseph Fitchett about how the Confer- 
ence's agenda is viewed in Washing- 
ton. 


Q. Your name was a household 
word in the 1960s when you were an 
anti- Vietnam war activist attacking 
the U.S. government. How does it 
Cedi to be an official? 

A. Actually, this is my second tour. 
In the Carter ad minis tration. I ran 
the Peace Corps. My concern has 
always been to make government 
more responsive, more humane, with 
a foreign policy that reflects the es- 
sential decency of the American peo- 
ple. The Clinton administration is 
clearly engaged constructively in this 
sense, starting with trade and eco- 


nomic engagement In Europe, our 
policy certainly includes an effort to 
tackle the fundamental issues creat- 
ed, really, by the collapse of the Sovi- 
et Union. Dealing with the compet- 
ing demands of national sovereignty 
in new democracies and the demands 
of minorities, even separatist groups, 
is a constant tension. It adds up to 
asking how you integrate Russia into 
Europe in an affirmative way. That's 
the political question that this body, 
the CSCE, is all about right new. 


not going to have. It doesn't have the 
strength of NATO’s unanimity. But 
TO isn't 


NATO isn't equipped to handle 
»e do. Todi 


Q. Is Moscow lavishing attention 
on the CSCE because it wants an 
alternative to NATO in draping Eu- 
ropean security? 

A. The CSCE is the natural multi- 
lateral forum, as the trans-Atlantic 
institution where Russia has an equal 
voice, for work on these questions. 
This is not war and peace in the 
traditional sense, but instability 
around Russia's borders. It's very 
different from what NATO does. 
The CSCE doesn't have guns and is 


some things we do. Today we spent 
hours talking about how to do elec- 
tion-monitoring in Tajikistan. The 
CSCE and NATO are simply not in 
competition. . . . 

Q. Will the CSCE give a seal of 
approval to Russian peacekeeping 
operations in the newly independent 
republics? 

A Clearly, Russian troops are go- 
ing to be indispensable in peacekeep- 
ing on their periphery, but it's prefer- 
able for them to be part of larger 
international forces and, in any case, 
they should obey strict rigid stan- 
dards. The CSCE is demanding com- 
pliance with higher standards than 
the United Nations. That means that 
any peacekeeping unit must be legiti- 
mately invited into a conflict by the 
parties involved. It must be linked to 
an ongoing political process aimed at 

a solution, not an imposed settle- 
ment It must have a limited dura- 
tion. It must be fully transparent in 


the sense that outside monitors can 
see dearly all the way through the 
peacekeepers’ organization, see what 
they’re doing at every level in the 
community. The United States feels 
strongly about the need for tight 
st 


Q. What if the Russians say CSCE 
standards are too tough? 

A The other forum is the United 
Nations. 

Q. The CSCE claims to have 
helped defuse problems such as help- 


ing get the Russian Army out of the 
■ allaying fears 


Baltic states, mainly by ; 
about the Russian minorities there. 
But can the CSCE ever become more 
than just a talking shop? 

A This is where these problems are 
raised first — and some would say 
debated the longest. It’s the strength 
of the CSCE when we can produce 
consensus. We've bad some strong 
missions that have made a real differ- 
ence — little publicized internation- 
ally — in shaping peaceful outcomes 


in the places you’ve mentioned and 
some others, including Moldava, 
where the situation otherwise might 
have deteriorated dangerously. It’s a 
learning process for everybody: how 
to find enough independence so peo- 
ple can express their cultural identity 
and at the same time hold the state 
together. Sometimes it’s a matter of 
confidence budding, preventing ru- 
mors from taking control — a little 
like the best programs in some trou- 
bled Western cities. When Yugosla- 
via broke up, the CSCE was only one 
of the many institutions that failed to 
solve it. But now missions sent by the 
CSCE to trouble spots have made a 
difference, including in places threat- 
ened by the spillover from the fight- 
ing in Bosnia. Right now, the CSCE 
has the lead in what is perhaps the 
most complex negotiation of ad on 
Russia’s periphery, involving Nagor- 
no-Karabakh. Russia is deeply in- 
volved in the mediation, as is the 
United States. ... What happens will 
be important for what happens in 
other places. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Major Viewed as Easing on Sinn Fein 

BELFAST (Reuters) — Foreign Minister Dick Spring of Ire- 
land said Sunday that Britain might soon decide fx> talk to the 
Irish Republican Army’s political wing, Sinn Fan. 

Mr. Spring said Prime Minister John M$jor v who'has wams\- 
ly resisted talks with Sinn Fein, would have more^room to 
maneuver once the annual conference of his —■-■■*** 


tive Party, to be held this week, was out erf ■ 

The Irish government has already accepted Sitatranbaafauo 
mainstream politics following the cease-fire ;_thai^the IRA, an- 
nounced Aug, 31. But Britain continues to demand concrete 
assurance of the permanence of the cease-fire; '£■ 


Aid Planes Resume 


Sarajevo Deliveries 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — The United Nations 
resumed its airlift into Sarajevo 
on Sunday, as aid officials 
struggled to replenish food 
stocks in the Bosnian capital 
before the Balkan winter sets in. 

Stocks had dropped perilous- 
ly low after Bosnian Serbs ef- 
fectively closed the airport on 
Sept 22 by threatening to shoot 
down any planes uying to land. 
A total of 19 UN aid flights and 
two Red Cross planes landed 
Sunday. 

Aid flights resumed briefly 
Friday, only to be called off 
after both Bosnian government 
troops and rival Serbs fired on 
planes at the airport. 

Hie resumption of the airlift 
comes at a time of soured rela- 
tions between the UN Protec- 
tion Force and the Bosnian gov- 
ernment , and of increased 
bloodshed in and around the 
capital. 

Bosnian Serbian forces on 
Saturday hit civilians in Saraje- 
vo with machine-gun fire, ktil- 


bian violation of an Aug. 14 
agreement to stop sniping in 
and around the city as a “fla- 
grant and deliberate attack on 
civilians.” 

The 12-minute fusillade on 
three streetcars and pedestrians 
on Saturday followed warnings 
by the Serbs of reprisals for the 
tailing Thursday of 16 Serbian 
soldiers and four female medics 
in a government attack on a 
Bosnian Serb army post that 
appeared to violate the UN de- 
militarized zone. 

Witnesses saw some victims 
hit several times on the exposed 
boulevard known as “Sniper 
Alley.” Doctors said six of the 
wounded, including boys aged 
14 and 16, were badly wounded. 

(Reuters, AP) 


ing one and wounding 1 1 . 


UN special envoy. Yasu- 
shi Akashi, denounced the Ser- 


Tnrkfi Kill 2 Leftist Suspects 

The Associated Press 

ISTANBUL — The police 
killed two suspected members 
of the underground group Rev- 
olutionary Left when an over- 
night raid on an Istanbul apart- 
ment ended in a shoot-out, the 
Anatolian News Agency said 
Sunday. 



Italy 'Blind Trust’ Idea Dr^Scorii 

TURIN (AP) — Prime Minister Silvio Berlu^!m|s^ahi politi- 
cal ally but frequent critic, Umberto Bossi.:Seo®» Suhdatfat a 
proposal to separate the media magnate 

insisting that it would create a blind trust 3 tiW«;just ant tie 
blind.” . ' . . 

Mr. Bossi, leader of the Northern League* q&kfged a quick 
vote in Parliament on a cost-cutting national butigetto fiefpsettie 
foreign finanrJnl marke ts and bolster the h^: 5fhe proposed 
budget, which calls for trimming pension andw^C||^benfi§ts, has 
touched off a strong protest from unions, general 

strike for Friday. - ^ 

Meanwhile, a report issued Saturday by aspecwl pandapoom- 
mended that political figures place any business interest with 
independent trustees, but ruled out a coinplete break. Mr. Berlus- 
coni is locked in conflict with anti-corruption prosecutors looking 
into possible ownership fraud at a pay-television channel partly 
owned by bis Fininvest company. . . "f - 



•5% 


Turkish Troops Bum lthrd Villages 

TUNCELL Turkey (Reuters) •— Security forces have burned 


down 17 more villages in eastern Turkey as they push through 

xk offea 


tensive against Kurdish 


mountain terrain in their three- week 
guerrillas, villagers said on Sunday. 

U.S.-madc Sikorksy and Super Cobra helicopters flew over 
Tunccti town all morning, ferrymg in troops and launching rocket 
attacks against rebel positions ft the- northwest They reported 
killing 11 guerrillas. 

At least 200 families fled to the. town of Hozat, in Tunccli 
Province, after they were driven from their homes on Saturday by 
security forces. The Interior Ministry says Kurdistan Workers 
Party guerrillas are mounting a propaganda campaign over, the 
burning of villages to discredit the armed forces. 







Crew Alive After Crash in Sumatra 


JAKARTA (Reuters) — Two pilots and two technicians aboard 
a biplane that crash-landed on an Indonesian island while trying 
to retrace the first England to Australia flight in 1919 have been 
found alive, an official said Sunday. 

A local rescue was on its way to the south Sumatran 
capital, Lampupg, near where the plane came down, a Jakarta 
airport official said. The plane, the “Shell Spirit of Brooklands 
Yimy is an exact replica of the twin-engined Vickers Vimby 
bomber biplane that made the original flight. 

The pilots are Peter McMillan, 35, an American, and Lang 
Kidby, 47, an Australian, but the identity of the other two persons 
in the aircraft was not immediately known. The plane came down 
on a beach in Sumatra with engine trouble after taking off from 
Singapore with six more stops left on its 1 8.000-kilometer ( 1 1 .250- 
mile) flight 


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UN armored vehicle standing guard near a streetcar that was hit by gunfire in Sarajevo’s “Sniper's ADey.” WllC S I t© Jr UJlffiOFl JdBCK6u 





BREITLING 


1884 



,4s n 

CHRONOMAT 


At a dm? when instruments unerringly cope with Mach 1 flight data, 
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Election Gambit in Germany 


Former Communists Put Hopes on Writer, 81 


VOTE: 

Rightists Gain 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Times Sermv 

BERLIN — When a voter 
asked Stefan Heym recently to 
describe his political program, 
the candidate for Parliament 
looked a bit surprised and final- 


si nee 1990, when they renamed 
themselves the Party" of Demo- 
cratic Socialism. If they are to 


solidify their position in nation- 
>li ‘ 


al politics, ’ they must win 
enough votes to take seats in 
Parliament. 


ly replied, “I have goals, but I 
diet 


left them at home.’ 

Asked which committee be 
would like to join if he is elected 
on Oct 16, Mr. Heym an- 
swered, “I don’t even know 
what committees they have.” 

Mr. Heym may have lost a 
few votes by such replies, but he 
feels little need to explain him- 
self. He is a candidate of the 
former Co mmunis t Party, and 
he knows that most voters will 
support or oppose him on that 
basis alone. 

The election is the biggest 
test for the former Communists 


A party qualifies for seats by 
winning 5 percent of the vole 
nationally, a goal the former 
Communists probably will not 
reach because they have almost 
no support in western states. 
But there is a second way: a 
party that wins three head-to- 
head races enters Parliament 
automatically. 

In two Berlin districts, for- 
mer Communists seem to have 
strong chances. The party’s 
most popular figure, Gregor 
Gy si, is a favorite in Ms district, 
and Christa Luft, a former East 
German minister of economics. 


Skinhead Gang Beats and Robs 
Commuters on a Berlin Train 


The Associated Press 

BERLIN — A group of 
about 20 rightist skinheads 
rampaged on a Berlin commut- 
er train, robbing and beating 
passengers, including a man 
from Mozambique, the police 
said Sunday. 

The skinheads beat seven 
people and stole leather jackets 


and jewelry from them. The 37- 
year-old Mozambican suffered 
slight injuries in the beating, the 
xmee said. 


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The rightists also tried to 
push a man off the train, but a 
female passenger intervened 
and the skinheads gave up. The 
police arrested three other skin- 
heads for damaging another 
train. 


In central Magdeburg late 
Saturday, five skinheads, shout- 
ing “foreigners out," attacked 
four asylum-seekers and 
wounded one of them with a 
broken beer bottle. The skin- 
heads fled before the arrival of 
police. 

German ultrarightists have 
tailed at least 16 foreigners 
since German reunification in 
1990. 


also appears to be running 
ahead of her opponents. 

Party strategists say they 
have outside chances to win 
their crucial third seat in Pots- 
dam, Rostock or Schwerin. But 
all agree that their best hope is 
in Berlin with Mr. Heym. As a 
result. Mr. Heyra's race is per- 
haps the most’ closely watched 
parliamentary campaign in 
Germany. The outcome could 
help shape German politics for 
the next four years and beyond. 

When Germany was reuni- 
fied four years ago, most ana- 
lysts expected the former Com- 
munists to fade quickly. But 
they have grown to surprising 
strength, winning more than 20 
percent of the vote in several 
eastern elections. 

Supporters of the party are a 
combination of longtime Com- 
munists and others who are dis- 
satisfied with some aspects of 
reunification. Organizers assert 
that the party’s roots in the East 
make it the only party truly 
qualified to speak for the con- 
cerns of East Germans. 

In some ways, Mr. Heym is 
an ideal candidate for a party 
seeking to portray itself as free 
of the old Communist taint In 
East Germany he carved out a 
niche as a writer who, although 
far from a dissident, was not 
satisfied with the system. None- 
theless, the government granted 
him freedom to travel and other 
privileges. 

If he is elected to Parliament 
Mr. Heym, 81, would probably 
be its oldest member. That 
would give Mm the right to de- 
liver the opening speech of the 
four-year session, a prospect 
that horrifies many established 
Bonn politicians. 

Mr. Heym’s race is compli- 
cated by the fact that Ms main 
opponent Wolfgang TMerse, is 
one of the most respected politi- 
cians from East Germany. 


Continued from Page I 
sition leader in Parliament. The 
election was a particular defeat 
for Mr. Vranitzky because he 
ran a campaign based more on 
his personal leadership than on 
any specific policy issues. In the 
last poll published before the 
election, Mr. Vranitzky’s party 
was projected to lose no more 
than 3 to 4 percentage points; 
instead, he lost twice as much 
ground. 

In Salzburg, Klaus MOndle, 
an executive director of Aus- 
tria's central bank and a mem- 
ber of the People's Party, tried 
to play down the results by 
terming them “unpleasant, but 
not a catastrophe.” 

He acknowledged in an inter- 
view that “this is the expression 
of malcontent and unease with 
the performance of our govern- 
ment” 

“We shall have to do better,” 
he added. 

With 42 seats in the 183- 
member Parliament, a net gain 
of 9, Mr. Haider’s party is likely 
to become a force to be reck- 
oned with. The Social Demo- 
crats won only 66 seats, a loss of 
14. The People’s Party lost 8 
seats and now has 52. 

The Greens, breaking the 5 
percent barrier for the first time 
to win 7 percent, or 13 seats, are 
expected to become a more 
prominent force. The Liberals, 
a recently formed centrist polit- 
ical grouping led by Heidi 
Schmidt, got 5.7 percent of the 
vote in their first general elec- 
tion, winning 10 seats. 


LIMA (AP) — The Human Rights Commission of the Organi- 
zation of American States has declared that Susana Higuchi 
should be allowed to run for president of Peru against her 
estranged husband. President Alberto Fujimori, a newspaper 
reported. 

The commission maintained that the government should allow 
Miss Higuchi to appeal a law that bans the president's immediate 
family members from seeking national office. La Republics re- 
ported. Congress passed the “Susana Law” in July. 


-a! 


Rightist Parties Gain in Belgian Vote 


fc*'s R.uo it T <m|b i 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Extreme-right parties made strong 
gains in local elections in Belgium on Sunday, with the anti- 
immigrant Flemish Bloc nearly doubling its seats in Antwerp. 

The bloc now has 18 seats in Antwerp, an increase of 8 . making 
it the dominant party on the 55-seat city council. Political analysts 
said, however, that other parties would probably form a coalition 
in opposition to the extreme-right movement Results were still 
trickling in, but analysts said the general trend was a swing to the 
right and losses in Socialist ranks. 


« -a* 

. -M 

1 -.15 
- - !* 
.'-A 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


‘n. I. 

■■ b 

r- 


N 


Holiday Boom on Channel Predicted 


LONDON (AFP) — More than 3 million Britons, a record 
number, will cross the F.nglish Channel during the Christmas 
season to shop in French ports, maritime companies said in 
estimates published Sunday. 

Cross-Channel ticket reservations have increased about 15 
percent over last year, wMch was also a record year. 

Stena SeaHnk estimates that 1.5 million Britons will cross the 


■ 

U 


i 

'-tfe 


C hann el on their ferries to France during this period. Company 
officials at Stena Sealink worry that last month’s sinking of the 
feny Estonia in which more than 900 people died, combined with 
the planned public opening of the Channel Tunnel in November, 
will lower maritime reservations. 




WufiFrs, la* 


A new British airline, British Mediterranean Airways, will start a 
daily nonstop service between London’s Heathrow airport and 
Beirut on Oct. 28. 

Denver win inaugurate a fight rail system Monday that will wind 
along a 53-mile ( 8 . 5- kilometer) route from downtown to nearby 
residential neighborhoods. Passengers will pay 50 cents or SI, 
depending on the time of day. (NYT) 


■Tvra 

P-4 

M 


For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 

every Saturday 
in the IHT 


Hiis Week’s Holidays 

BanteM and government offices will be closed or services 
rfa.iM rn th» countnes and their dependencies this 

and religious holidays: 


‘n 

•* 6 

-1 

kj 


curtailed in the foil, 
week because of nati 


Canad8 ’ ^ Ja P an ' Pcnj - Sooth Africa. 


TUESDAY: Canada. 

_WH)NESDAY: B aha m a s. Brazil, Chile, Cosia Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador. 
Ecpiaional Gnmea, Guatemala, Honduras. Mexico. Puerto Rico, Spain, Uruguay. 


tji 


THURSDAY: Burundi, Hong Kong, Macao. 

FRIDAY: Zaire. 

SATURDAY: Burkina Faso. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan. Reuters. 


-■<1 

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* POLITICAL NOTES * 



tost i Robert. rAjcnce Fom heu 

President CHnton cfiscussing the situation in Iraq mtb 
Ms national security adviser, Anthony Lake, who with ' 
Secretary of State Christopher has been tinder fire. 


Christopher Remains in Clinton Umbo 

WASHINGTON — At the beginning of the Haiti occupa- 
tion three weeks ago. while on a trip to Chicago. President 
Bill Clinton put in a quick morale-boosting phone call to 
Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher. He told him to 
pay no attention to reports that the White House had lost 
confidence in him and that his day’s were numbered. 

The days for such awkward reassurances were supposed to 
have been over for Mr. Christopher. Summer was to have 
been a time of redemption, when be would take charge of a 
floundering foreign policy to show’ Mr. Clinton that he could 
handle loomingchallenges in Bosnia, North Korea and Haiti. 

Instead, Mr. Christopher and, to a lesser extent, the na- 
tional security adviser. W. Anthony Lake, remain at the 
center of concerns over Mr. Clinton’s low popular standing 
in foreign policy. Even as White House officials cautiously 
declare the Haitian occupation a success-in-the-making. Mr. 
Christopher's role as foreign policy shepherd remains in 
doubt. 

Mr. Clinton is publicly committed to his national security 
team. But he is also sticking; to a summertime pledge to 
reassess the roles of Mr. Christopher. Mr. Lake and others 
before the new year begins. 

“I do not believe the president has addressed the issue/’ 
said a senior official who has discussed their roles with Mr. 
Clinton in recent weeks. “I believe he may do so, but has not 
now. He remains an agnostic on it, unwilling to think about it 
until he has to think about it. Nothing has changed, and 
certainly it is a strong possibility nothing will.’’ . ( l VP) 

Mayor’s Race a Tough Call for Hie Post 

WASHINGTON — With the election for mayor a month 
away. The Washington Post is faced with three choices, all 
unpleasant. One alternative would be for the paper, whose 
endorsement has often been the deriding factor in local 
political contests, to endorse former Mayor Marion S. Bany 
Jr., who handily won the Democratic primary' test month. 
But The Post reviled Mr. Barry in its endorsement of one of 
his opponents in the primary and again in an editorial three 
days after the vote. 

A second alternative would be to endorse Mr. Barry's next 
opponent, Carol Schwartz. But she is a while Republican in a 
city where two-thirds of the population is black and where 
only 8 percent of the registered voters are Republicans. Such 
an endorsement would be seen by many blacks as the height 
of arrogance. 

The third possibility would be to endorse no one or 
someone with no chance of winning, like a write-in or fringe- 
party candidate. But in journalism circles such a step would 
be viewed as irresponsible. If The Post cannot deride, the 
thinking goes, how are voters to make a choice? 

“If I were they, I'd be feeling very much boxed in,” said 
Reese Cleghom. dean of journalism at University of Mary- 
land. “This is a terribly difficult thing for The Post.” iNYT) 


For Virginia Voters, Issues Finish Second 

WASHINGTON — Ask Virginia voters what they want 
from their next senator,- and most say: Vote to ban assault 
weapons. Support voluntary prayer in public schools. Op- 
pose military intervention in Haiti. Back term limits for 
Congress. 

Of course, none of the three U.5. Senate candidates are 
promising to do everything the people want. But even if any 
of the candidates were embracing the public's agenda, a new 
Post survey suggests, the voters might be the last to know*. 

The survey found that the overwhelming majority of likely 
voters in next month’s election do not know where the Senate 
candidates stand on many of rhe major issues in the campaign 

— including topics that Virginians say matter the most to 
them, such as violent crime, education and the economy. 

What is more, most voters do not even know whether the 
candidate they support agrees with them on the issues. The 
results clearly suggest that the character of the men running 

— in a race where both major-party candidates are dogged by 
controversy — will be the deriding factor. 

Against that backdrop, the Senate race enters its final 
month in a statistical dead heat, with the Republican nomi- 
nee, Oliver L. North, the choice of 42 percent ot the likely 
voters interviewed and the incumbent Democrat. Charles S. 
Robb, supported by 41 percent. .An independent, J. Marshall 
Coleman, is favored by 9 percent of those interviewed, while 
8 percent remain undecided. ( WPi 

Ouote/UnQUOte 


Sena tor Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming, the deputy Repub- 
lican leader, complaining of attacks on what he cilkd his 
party's “principled opposition ’: “The president and some in 
themedia have tried to characterize my party as a bunch of 
f -i nAAlK' standing in the mouth of a musty cave with 



greatest 
in our daily lives. 


the 
role 
{NYT} 


The 103d Congress: Two Years of Divisive Bitterness 


By Adam CTymer 

Nn York Times Sarm 
WASHINGTON —The 10M Con- 
gress quit for the elections over the 
weekend, leaving behind a bitterly dis- 
puted record of legislation passed, de- 
feated and put off. 

As it dosed its books, the Senate 
Overcame the 28lh Republican filibus- 
ter in two years and voted to protect 
millions of acres of California desert. 
Some senators who bad already re- 
turned to their slates to campaign had 
to fly back to the capital to vote. 

That frantic footnote sent President 
Bill Clinton the first significant envi- 
ronmental bill of this Congress. Mr. 
Clinton and congressional Democrats 
looked back over 21 months that be- 
gan with high hopes that a new presi- 
dent and more than 100 new members 
could solve dozens of problems they 


said had been ignored in 12 Republi- 
can years. But they were dogged by 
defeats on health care, campaign fi- 
nance and frustrating delays on many 
issues. 

They argued, however, that accom- 
plishments in trade, education, crime 
and deficit reduction had earned a 
place in history. 


in listing accomplishments, Repub- 
licans agreed with Democrats only on 
trade — an issue both sides managed 
to leave unfinished until Congress re- 
turns after the elections to vote on the 
global trade agreement The vote last 
year on the North American Free 
Trade Agreement was indeed one of 
only a handful of truly partisan law- 
making efforts, repeatedly praised by 
Republican leaders like Senator Bob 
Dole of Kansas, tbp minority leader, 
and Representative: Newt Gingrich of 


Georgia, the minority whip, as the 
kind of Democratic leadership they 
wanted to see more of. 

Democrats were also keenly aware 
of the session's failures. Senator 
George J. Mitchell of Maine, the de- 
parting majority leader, told the Sen- 
ate of his unhappiness with the failure 
of health care and campaign spending 
legislation. 

“The disappointments of recent 
months are real.” be said, but “we 
made a significant difference in the 
economic direction for the better — 
more jobs, lower inflation, declining 
deficits — than the country has seen 
for a dozen years." 

"Fast start, slow finish, too much 
rancor.” was how Representative Pat 
Williams, a Montana Democrat who 
managed one of the many health insur- 
ance bills, described this Congress. 


Where Democrats claimed the S30 
billion crime bill this summer os an 
accomplishment, providing more 
money for police, prisons and crime 
prevention. Republicans scoffed, call- 
ing it too soft. Mr. Dole said the legis- 
lation was filled with pork-barrel pro- 
jects. calling it “big pig.” 

The deficit issue remains perhaps 
the sharpest division of all. Fourteen 
months after it passed without a single 
Republican vote, Democrats say it Has 
spurred economic growth and' confi- 
dence; Republicans continue to blast 
it as no more than a tax increase. 

Generally, Republicans saw con- 
gressional success only where the 
Democrats saw failure. 

On that issue and many others, the 
Republicans were remarkably unified, 
while the Democrats, with solid-look- 
ing majorities, were really too shaky to 


let them push mere than one measure 
at a time. 

Thai made the variety of bills passed 
in 1993 a legislative tour de force. But 
it also made 1994, with its yearlong 
focus on health care, seem even more a 
failure, with attention significantly di- 
verted from that defeat and others 
only by passage of the crime bill. 

There was no doubt that this Con- 
gress disappointed voters. 

In January 1993. a New York Ti- 
mes/CBS News Poll showed that most 
Americans expected the government 
io work better now that one party 
controlled the While House and Con- 
gress and about half believed that 
more than 100 new members would 
help Congress improve. By last month, 
only 19 percent said Congress had ac- 
complished more than it does in a 
typical two-year period. 


U.S. Presses Aristide on Cabinet 

President Is Urged to Choose a Moderate Prime Minister 


By Daniel Williams 

I Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States is pressing Haiti’s 
exiled president, the Reverend 
Jean- Bertrand Aristide, to 
choose a prime minister who is 
friendly to the country's well- 
off esta blishm ent when he re- 
turns to power under U. S. mili- 
tary protection. 

The U.S. goal is to ensure 
that Father Aristide does not 
ignite class warfare by reverting 
to the radical, populist style 
that made him the favorite of 
Haiti’s poor. 

Washington wants to mini- 
mize the risk of violence, espe- 
cially while American troops 
are in Haiti with some responsi- 
bility for keeping the peace. In 
addition, the United States be- 
lieves the new government win 
need business support. 

The candidate mentioned 
most frequently by UJS. offi- 


cials is Robert MalvaJ, a 
wealthy businessman and for- 
mer prime minister. He fell out 
with Father Aristide early this 
year over the latter’s opposition 
to broadening the cabinet to 
include more moderate political 
rivals. But the State /Depart- 
ment is reluctant to campaign 
openly for anyone. 

“We would like to, see him 
choose someone with broad po- 
litical appeal” said the depart- 
ment spokesman, Michael 
McCurrv. “Not a conservative, 
but someone who wjp be seen 
by the elites as a ppson inter- 
ested in getting tninjgs to run 
smoothly and not settle old 
scores.” I 

The search for a middle-of- 
the-road leader is an bid feature 
of American interventions 
abroad. It was accomplished 
successfully in post-Worid War 
II Italy, unsuccessfully in Viet- 
nam, and over the years in sev- 


eral Latin American countries, 
with mixed results. 

Father Aristide’s advisers are 
wary, fearing the Haitian leader 
will in effect be neutralized by a 
prime minister beholden to 
Washington and to Aristide op- 
ponents in Haiti. “The real is- 
sue is informed by the U.S. de- 
termination that Aristide will 
be straiijacketed when he goes 
back to Haiti.” said Burton 
Wides, an American adviser to 
the Haitian leader. 

Aides to Father Aristide are 
keeping his choice of prime 
minister secret, although it 
would appear that Mr. MalvaJ 
is not in the running. Father 
Aristide’s public relations team 
sent out an “update” last week 
that noted Mr. Malval had re- 
signed. It said the post would be 
filled “at the appropriate mo- 
ment,” that is, not until Father 
Aristide was back in Haiti. 


South Korea Makes It Harder 
To Get an Accord With North 


By T. R. Reid 

Washington Post Service 

SEOUL — With, another 
tense round of lLS--North Ko- 
rean negotiations under way in 
Geneva on Pyongyang’s nude- 
ar program, some Western ex- 
perts say South Korea is trying 
to anger and alarm the North, 
and thus make it harder for 
Washington and Pyongyang to 
reach an agreement. 

“The hard-liners in the South 
Korean government do not 
want a deal between the U.S. 
and the North,” said Stephen 
W. Linton of Columbia Univer- 
sity, one of the top UJS. schol- 
ars in Korean affairs. “Unfor- 
tunately, that group seems to be 
in control, and they are trying 
to block anything substantial 
happening in Geneva." 

For woks now, South Kore- 
an officials have criticized the 
U.S. approach to the Geneva 
talks. But the suggestion that 
Seoul is working to sabotage the 
U.S. position adds a new di- 
mension to this dispute between 
allies. 

The evidence includes South 
Korea’s crackdown on any of 
its citizens who tried to go to the 
funeral of North Korea's self- 
styled “Great Leader," Kim D 
Sung, or even mourn his death. 

“The hard-liners have derid- 
ed that their best bet now is to 
poison the atmosphere and 
make it impossible for the U.S. 
to get any agreement out of the 
North in Geneva," said Mr. 
Linton, wbo grew up in South 
Korea and has visited the North 
several times. 

The deeper problem, scholars 
and diplomats say, is the chang- 


foredgn minister, Han Sung Joo, 
made a hurried trip to Washing- 
ton to tell Secretary of State 
Warren M- Christopher person- 
ally how frightened Seoul was 
by the thought of a UB.-Nonh 
Korea agreement. 

On Friday, in an interview 
with The New York Times, 
President Kim Young Sam wor- 
ried aloud that the United 
States might “settle with a half- 
baked compromise.” 

Observers point to a dear 
hardening of South Korea’s 
stance in recent weeks, even as 
North Korea appeared to be 
moving toward some sort of 
agreement with the West on its 
nuclear program. 

“Early this su m mer, there 
were encouraging signs of bet- 
ter relations, between North 
and South and between North 
Korea and the rest of the 
world,” Mr. Linton said. “But 
South Korea stomped on the 
brake. Did that have an impact 
on Geneva? You bet it did.” 

South Korea’s deputy prime 
minister, Lee Hong Koo, a Yale 
graduate whose official portfo- 
lio includes planning for reuni- 
fication, agrees that Seoul’s pol- 
icy stance has hardened, and 
that this has cooled efforts to- 
ward resolution of the nuclear 
question. 

The South's tougher stance 
toward the North “was not use- 
ful,” Mr. Lee said, “but it was 
necessary” 

It was necessary, he ex- 
plained, in the context of South 
Korean domestic politics. A 
conciliatory stance toward the 
North, such as the Clinton ad- 
ministration has been urging, 
“would create great political fe- 


program, Agence France- Pr esse 
reported from Geneva. A U.S. 
spokesman said the talks would 
continue Monday. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


The Santa Fe Furniture Fantasy 

The Santa Fe style — that rough-hewn, 
faintly tinted, gently dilapidated look that has 
become a Sl.S billion furniture market — is 
based on fantasy rather than fact, according 
to Keith Bakker, a furniture conservator 
trained at the Smithsonian Institution in 
Washington. The Santa Fe look is a product 
of the New Mexico sun and an aesthetic 
misunderstanding by tenderfoot, romantic 
Easterners. 

Mr. Bakker examined rare samples of early 
Santa Fe furniture. His findings indicate that 
the genuine article, by the people who lived in 
New Mexico from the 1600s to the turn of this 
century, was neither scrubbed nor primitive. 

Instead, Mr. Bakker says, the bare wood 
tables, chairs and chests were originally paint- 
ed in bright colors, like the Greek statuary 
that faded to white marble over the centuries. 

Mr. Bakker's theory is that around the turn 
of the century. New Mexicans began to get 
goods by mail order, including new furniture 
from the East Coast. So they put their old 
furniture on the front porch, or in the barn, or 
sometimes left it out in the open. The strong 
sun quickly bleached the paint away, leaving 
faint smudges of blue or red on bare wood. 
Naive Anglos bought the battered relics, var- 
nished them and placed them with pride in 
their living rooms. A trend was bom. 

About People 

Former President Gerald R. Ford got a 
college athlete's ultimate honor on Saturday. 
His alma mater, the University of Michigan, 
retired his number, 48. Mr. Ford and his wife. 


Betty, rode into (he university’s vast football 
stadium at halftime during Michigan’s annual 
showdown against archrival Michigan State, 
which Michigan won. 40 to 20. "May I say 
bow proud 1 am,” Mr. Ford told the crowd of 
more than 100.000. Mr. Ford earned three 
varsity letters during 1932-34 and was the 
Wolverines* most valuable player his senior 
year as starting center. 

Short Takes 

A 67-foot (20-meter) concrete statue of 
Sam Houston, the first president of the Re- 
public of Texas, will be inaugurated Oct. 22 in 
Huntsville, which is best known as the site of 
the most active execution chamber in the 
United States. Houston lived in Huntsville tus 
last years and died in 1863. The sculpture is 
described os the tallest free-standing figure of 
an American historical figure. As The New 
York Times notes, this rules out Mount Rush- 
more, which is not free-standing, and the 
Statue of Liberty, which is mythic, not his- 
torical. 

Victoria Ingram and Randal) Curlee of Mis- 
sion Viejo, California, plan to marxv this week 
and honeymoon in the hospital, where a doc- 
tor will transplant one of Miss Ingram's kid- 
neys into Mr. Curlee on Wednesday. Mr. 
Curlee, 46, who knew he needed a transplant, 
had taken Miss Ingram, 45. to see his doctor 
so she would understand how his diabetes 
would affect their future. The doctor warned 
that only 4,000 kidneys become available 
each year for the 36,000 people awaiting a 
transplant. Mr. Curlee's relatives weren't 
compatible as donors. Miss Ingram urged 
that she be tested. It turned out that, in a 
mfllion-to-one coincidence, their immune sys- 
tems were identical. “It was like winning the 
lottery,” Mr. Curlee said. "I fed gifted," Miss 
Ingram said. “It’s something I can give him 
that we'll both enjoy " 

International Herald Tribune. 


h -’ft-- 




n 


i* .. 






la r.*«a.vJ 





, -Cy.-Sr-* 









ing diplomatic chemistiy on Lhe ver ^ ^vision in the South,” 
Korean Peninsula. It is harder ^ 


these days for the United States 
and South Korea to agree or 
trust each other when zt comes 
to dealing with Pyongyang. 

“We can no longer say that 
South Korea's interests, which 
are North-South matters, coin- 
cide with the rest of the world's 
interest in blocking nuclear de- 
velopment" in North Korea, 
said Gtinter Unterbeck, a for- 
mer East German diplomat and 
student of North Korea. “The 
danger is that South Korea's 
actions will make it impossible 


South Korean offi cials deny 
that they are trying to under- 
mine the U.S. negotiators. 
American officials have said 
they intend to cooperate closely 
with South Korea on Korean 
policy. 

But officials at the U-S. Em- 
basty here, normally ready and 
w illing to talk with reporters, 
now decline to discuss the Ge- 
neva talks. 

■ Geneva Talks Go On 
Top U-S- and North Korean 

than 


to get agreement on the nuclear negotiators held more 
- ■■ three hours of “serious ana 


issue. 

South Korea is plainly un- 
comfortable about some devel- 
opments. Last month, Seoul’s 


businesslike” talks Saturday on 
easing the crisis over Pyong- 
yang’s suspected nuclear aims 



Away From Politics 

• The SuDreme Court will decide wheth- 
er states may prowdekwer 


merits to new residents. A 

court had ruled that such 
violate the constitutional 


peals 


as immigration has surged, Hispanic 
birth rates have outpaced those of other 
groups and non-Hispanic whiles and 
middle-class blacks move to the suburbs. 
• Seeking to bolster their argument that 


^??5LmtetovSdepS newly poUWofFicere may have mishandled or 

nghtof -eoniA of the ability to planted evidence in the 0.1. Simpson 

murder case, Mr. Simpson’s attorneys 


S&'^d'other necesdu®. murder ^ 

ODiain such ™ rfTOmi h^r«; have asked four aciccuvco 

.triHSSt 22 SLS 5 


_____ have asked four detectives tosupplyhair 

that of blacks in Uw Angrfes. 

tbemurdcr scene- Sour^ ^ 


case said the request infuriated the offi- 
cers. 

• The veteran television anchorman Rob- 
ert MacNril will announce this week thai 
he p lans to retire from “The MacN<aL' 
Lehrer NewsHour” next year, pnbfic- 
television sources said, pie native Cana- 
dian, who will turn 65 in January 1996, 
and his co-anchor. Jim Lehrer. will cele- 
brate their 20th year together In 1995. 

(LAT. WP. NYT) 


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Page4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 




Israel Vows 
Retaliation 
K Attacked 
By Scuds 





Kuwaitis Never Regained Faith in Nation 


Kjrfcn Sahih/Agcmx France- Pro-c 

Iraqi ‘“volunteers” demonstrating Sunday in Baghdad with photos of Saddam Hussein. 


Thousands ‘Volunteer’ in Iraq 

4 Saddam Commandos’ Book Anti- Sanctions Campaign 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BAGHDAD — Iraqi officials said Sunday 
that thousands of volunteers were rushing to join 
“Saddam commando'’ units, vowing to fight to 
the death if the United Nations refuses to ease 
sanctions against Iraq. 

About 4,000 of them gathered in a stadium in 
Baghdad. Still wearing civilian clothes, they 
shouted slogans in praise of President Saddam 
Hussein ana his demand that UN sanctions be 
eased. 

A woman named Salima Abbas said she want- 
ed to avenge her sons, who she said were killed 
when U.S. planes bombed Baghdad during the 
1991 Gulf War. 

Officials said recruiting centers were open 
throughout the country and that volunteers were 
reporting in the thousands for a force to be called 
“Saddam commandos.” There was no indication 
when they would be trained or armed. 


driver said. “It would never be like when Bush 
attacked us.” 

Residents complained of the hardship brought 
on by the sanctions. 

"If we cannot eat, we will starve," a street- 
sweeper said. “Better to fight and die in action 
like brave men than die of hunger like cowards.” 

The newspaper Qadissiya said in an editorial: 
“We have made the decision to confront the 
unjust embargo with all determination and cour- 


age. We. totally reject the starving of Iraqis in 
such a vicious and barbaric manner.” 


Meanwhile, armed UN observers stepped up 
patrols Sunday on the Iraq-Kuwait border. The 
observers monitored several hundred unarmed 
people who have erected tents on the Iraqi side of 
the frontier, apparently to bold an anti-Kuwaiti 
rally. 

Sheikh Zufairi, founder of a rights group in 
Iraq, said the camp was a "peaceful protest 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JERUSALEM — Foreign 
Minister Shimon Peres of Israel 
said Sunday that Iraq apparent- 
ly no longer had the capability 
to launch missiles at Israel, but 
he added that any Scuds fired in 
surprise would draw "an un- 
precedented” counterattack. 

Iraq fired Scud missiles at 
Israel while the U.S.-led alli- 
ance expelled the Iraqi Army 
from Kuwait in the 1991 Gulf 
War. Israel under U.S. pressure 
not to take action that could 
anger Arab allies in the coali- 
tion, did not hit back. 

“If be tries again to fire 
Scuds, which according to all 
signs he no longer has, then I 
thmk he will invite ou himself 
an unprecedented attack,” Mr. 
Peres was reported as saying in 
Paris by Israel Radio. 

In its morning newscasts at 
the start of the workweek in 
Israel, the radio highlighted 
comments by unidentified Is- 
raeli defense sources that ten- 
sions along Lhe Iraq-Kuwait 
border did not pose any danger 
to the Jewish state. 

Dan Shomron, who com- 
manded Israel’s Army during 
the Gulf war, said the Iraqi 
leader is unpredictable and 
could still try to attack Israel 
using aircraft and missiles. 

But Israel, now accepted by 
much of the Arab world and 
negotiating peace with the Pal- 
estinians, would no longer be 
constrained by concerns of 
breaking up an Arab coalition 
against President Saddam H os- 
sein, he said. 

“The man remains the same 


By Chris Hedges 

Sew Fork Tima Service 

KUWAIT CITY — With its gleaming 
high-rises, lavish shopping malls and 
well-groomed highways, Kuwait looks as 
if it has lifted itself out of the destruction 
and morass of war. But the glitter and 
affluence mask a country that has lost 
faith in itself, lives in fear of a resurgent 
Iraq and sees a future darkened by forces 
beyond its controL 

“There is a scramble to get another 
passport, to teach children other lan- 
guages besides Arabic and to keep our 
money outside the country,” said a lead- 
ing businessman, who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity. 

“There is a feeling that if Iraq to the 
north does not get us. the fundamental- 
ists. backed by a growing movement in 
Saudi Arabia, will.” 

Three and a half years after the Gulf 
War, the sense of insecurity was palpable 
on a recent visit to the country. It has 
driven many Kuwaitis into the aims of 
Islamic fundamentalists, who preach 
that the country has been punished for 
its moral laxity and loss of faith. 

It has also fueled a sense of hopeless- 
ness among other young Kuwaitis, who 
see no future in ihdr country, look to the 
West and revel in American popular cul- 
ture and habits. 

“The wax acted hke a volcano,” said 
Haya Mughni, a sociologist “It spread 
out and exaggerated extremes that al- 
ready existed within the society before 
occupation. 

UN sanctions against Iraq, still in 
place, have done little to change Bagh- 
dad's behavior. 

And senior Iraqi officials warned the 


United Nations last week that they 
would ‘'retaliate” if the Security Council, 
as expected, decides on Monday to 
maintain economic sanctions. Their 
meaning was unclear. 

"There has been no change in the Iraqi 
stance toward Kuwait since the war,” 
said Abbas Habib Mounar Mussein, 
chairman of the Kuwaiti Parliament’s 
Defense and Interior Committee. “As 
long as Saddam Hussein is in power we 
are concerned.” 


allowed political parties, to form, have 
sputtered out. . • 

Die most powerful political figure is 
Prime Minister Sheikh Saadal Abdullah 

as SaUm as Sabah, who is also the crown 

prince. The prime minister can only be 
appointed or removed by the einir, 
gfrriirh Jabex al Ahmad as Sabah.. 

“As long as the al Sabah family is able 
to handle the public finances," said Mu- 
barak Adwani, a political analyst, “it will 
keep tremendous power within its 
hands.” 

The frustration with the $lpw pace of 
reform has seen many Kuwaitis, and 
especially those under 21, who make up 
60 percent of the population, give up on 
the political system . 

An increasing number embrace Islam- 
ic f undamentalists, who hsvt| the largest 
single bloc in Parliament. Mosques that 
were empty before the war are now over- 
flowing during Friday prayers, and the 
movement has contacts with other mili- 
tant groups in the region. 

“The fundamentalists promise their 
followers that they arc pah of a move- 
ment that is destined by history to suc- 
ceed," Mr. Mughni said.. 

In contrast, many young Westernized 
Kuwaitis embrace American pop culture 
with gusto. One recent night dozens erf 
young Kuwaitis crammed into a luxury 
penthouse overlooking the coast Rap 
music could be heard blocks away as 
couples danced or threw back shot glass- 


But Iraq is only one of many troubles 
besetting Kuwait. The ruling Sabah faro- 
fly, discredited in the eyes of many Ku- 
waitis when some members fled the in- 
vading Iraqis, promised to liberalize the 
political system and the press. Parlia- 
ment was revived in 1992 elections and 
political reforms were debated, 

“It was the new democratic leadership 
that many hoped would be able to re- 
store Kuwaitis' faith in the government 
and self -confidence,” a Western diplo- 
mat said, “but the r uling family has only 
been stalling for time.” 

Members of Parliament have mounted 


a fierce campaign to prosecute officials, 
many from the ruling family, suspected 
of skimming billions of dollars Cram the 
government or losing it through misman- 
agement 

The press carries reports on official 
corruption and ineffective leadership 
that would be unthinkable in Saudi Ara- 
bia. But power remains in the hands of 
the ruling family, which failed to prepare 
the country's defenses. 

Pa rliam ent’s inquiries into the behav- 
ior of senior officials have so far yielded 
little. And the political reforms, which 
would have given women the vote and 


***- 
- IMSj 



, .... *«* 
i*. ,-**4**®: 


jf tequila, although alcohol is banned. 

“Kuwait is like west Berlin during the. 
Cold War,” shouted a young man. “We 
know at any moment we could be fin- 
ished off, so we drink and party until 
they come to get us.” 


FORCE: U.S. Officials Tell Iraqi Leadership It Risks Devastation in War 


Continued from Page 1 


defense systems being brought into Saudi 
Arabia. 


By midweek, officials said, nearly 200 
U.S. waplanes and support aircraft will be 
in place in Saudi Arabia and Turkey, in- 
cluding F-15 fighters. A- 10 anti-tank 
planes, F-16s equipped with laser-guided 


The Baghdad government has set adeadline of movement which aims to draw world attention to 
Monday for action on the sanctions. This is when the situation of these Kuwaitis dec rived of their 


Rolf Ekeus, the UN official in charge of monitor- 
ing Iran's arsenal under Gulf War cease-fire 


ing Iraq’s arsenal under Gulf War cease-fire 
terms, is due to report back to the Security 
Council. 

Baghdad last week warned of unspecified con- 
sequences if the UN decided to maintain its 
embargo. More than 60,000 Iraqi soldiers are 
now stationed near the border with Kuwait. 

Iraq also threatened to prevent UN arms in- 
spectors from checking on weapons and military 
industries in Iraq. But a UN spokesman said on 
Sunday that the inspectors were working 
normally. 


the situation of these Kuwaitis deprived of their 
nationality and civil rights.” 


Speaking in his Baghdad office, provided by 
the Iraqi authorities. Sheikh Zufairi said: "We 
are civilians. We have no weapons. We chose this 
area to camp in order to attract world attention.” 

Many staleless Arabs left Kuwait during or 
soon after the 1990-91 Gulf crisis. Almost none 
of them has been allowed back. 

The border demilitarized zone, a strip 15 kilo- 
meters (9 miles) wide; remained quiet. 

But a spokesman for the UN Iraq-Kuwait 
Observer Mission said: “The number of armed 
patrols has increased, and we are keeping our 
vigilance.” 

The UN set up the DMZ and deployed the 
mission along it in 1991. Its job is to ensure that 
no unauthorized military personnel enter the 
zone. Iraqi and Kuwaiti police are allowed in. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


life appeared calm in Baghdad on Sunday 
hough residents said many basic food stuffs 


although residents said many basic food stuffs 
were scarce and prices high. There were also long 
lines for gasoline. 

Many people doubted that another war was 
imminent 

"We are no longer afraid of bombs,” a taxi 


unpredictable man, but all the planes, F-16s equipped with laser-guided 
other conditions have bombs and C-130 gunships from Pope Air 
changed, the retired lieutenant Force Base in North Carolina. Nearly 100 
general told Israel Radio. U.S. planes are already in position, offi- 
Palestinian leaders, who cials said, 
backed Baghdad during the a carrier battle group led by the George 
1991 war, were taking a cau- Washington has been sent to the northern 
nous line Sunday and called for Gulf, along with support ships en route 
a peaceful solution. Nabil from the Indian Ocean. Pentagon officials 
Shaath, the official in chaige of said. 1 

international cooperation for Mr. Perry said some analysts had sug- 
the Palestinian self-rule author- gested that Mr. Saddam could believe that 
ity, said the authority was great- the United Stales, already engaged in one 
ly concerned and urged a peace- military operation in Haiti, would be too 
ful settlement. "distracted” to launch another. But that 

Die Iraqi rout in 1991 saw would not be the case, he said. 


general told Israel Radio. 

Palestinian leaders, who 
backed Baghdad during the 
1991 war, were taking a cau- 
tious line Sunday and called for 
a peaceful solution. Nabil 
Shaath, the official in chaige of 
international cooperation for 
the Palestinian self-rule author- 
ity, said the authority was great- 
ly concerned and urged a peace- 
ful settlement. 

The Iraqi rout in 1991 saw 
the expulsion of tens of thou- 
sands of Palestinian workers 
from Kuwait and a cutoff of 
funds to the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization from the oil- 
producing Gulf states. During 
the war, Palestinians in the oc- 
cupied territories, who were pul 
under curfew, cheered as Scud 
missiles hit Israel. 

Jordan, which sympathized 
with Baghdad in the crisis over 


“If the Iraqis enter Kuwait,” he said, 
“they will be soundly defeated.” 

Senior officials said Iraq had massed 
nearly 70,000 troop near its border with 
Kuwait and now has two armored divi- 
rions within an hour of Kuwait. It also has 
its Third Corps and air defenses on full 
alert and has moved offensive military 
equipment into the area. 

Die officials said that Mr. Clinton’s 
stem warnings of Friday and Saturday — 
that Mr. Saddam should not doubt the 
UJS. intention to prevent an invasion — 
have not had an effect on the movement of 
the Iraqi troops to the border. “The situa- 
tion is unchanged,” a senior official said. 

Mr. Clinton, who interrupted a Colum- 
bus Day holiday weekend at Camp David, 
Maryland, to return to the While House 
for military briefings Sunday, avoided fur- 
ther comments on the situation. He met in 
late afternoon with Vice President Al 
Gore; Genera] John Shatikashvili, head of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Mr. Perry; W. 


Anthony Lake, the national security advis- 
er, and others for an update. He was also 
briefed on additional deployments 
planned under what one official called “a 
master plan” approved Friday that leaves 
open a variety of steps. 

A senior official said Mr. Clinton was 

mulling over whether to publicly inrist.that 

Mr. Saddam move his troops away from 
the border, eves though there is no UN[ or 
other requirement limiting movement of 
Iraqi troops within the country. Another 
official said the administration was also 
discussing issuing deadlines for such 
movement. 

Mr. Clinton on Sunday faced the first 
public opposition to his moves against Iraq 
in a harsh denunciation by Ross Perot, the 
billionaire independent who accured him 
of hyping the situation for political gain 
before the midterm congressional elec- 
tions. Mr. Perot derisively referred to the 
president as a “draft-dodger” who could 
not be trusted as commander in chief. 


GULF: Saddam Viewed as Doubting U.S. Will 


Y A HA XT /-.r a n _ _ Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, said 

J Ax All! CIA Spent Millions on the Long-Ruling Party Suada F y j l was °pp° s f d IO 

* C? & J use of force to resolve inter- 

Conthmed from Page 1 describes a secret meeting in a Slates’ maintaining military Arab disputes under any “pre- 


tor of the Liberal Democratic 
Party’s management bureau, 
said he had never heard of any 
payments. 

“This story reveals the inti- 
mate role that Americans at of- 
ficial and private levels played 
in promoting structured cor- 
ruption and one-party conser- 
vative democracy in postwar 
Japan, and that s new,” said 
John Dower, a leading Japan 
scholar at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. “We 
look at the LDP and say it’s 
corrupt and it’s unfortunate to 
have a one-party democracy. 
But we have played a role in 
creating that misshapen struc- 
ture.” 

Bits and pieces of the story 
are revealed in U.S. government 
records slowly being declassi- 
fied. A State Department docu- 
ment in the National Archives 


describes a secret meeting in a 
Tokyo hotel at which Eisaku 
Sato, a former prime minister of 
Japan, sought under-the-table 
contributions from the United 
States for the 1958 parliamenta- 
ry election. 

But the full story was pieced 
together through interviews 
with surviving participants, 
many well past 80 years old, 
and descriptions of still -classi- 
fied State Department docu- 
ments explicitly confirming the 
Kennedy administration’s se- 
cret aid to the Liberal Demo- 
crats in the early 1960s. 

The CIA's help for Japanese 
conservatives remained secret 
in part because it succeeded. 
The Liberal Democrats thwart- 
ed their Socialist opponents, 
maintained their one-party 
rule, forged close ties with 
Washington and fought off 
public opposition to the United 


bases throughout Japan. 

One retired CIA official in- 
volved in the payments said, 
“Thai is the heart of darkness, 
and I'm not comfortable talking 
about it, because it worked” 
Otiters confirmed the coven 
support. 

“we financed them,” said Al- 
fred C. Ulmer Jr., who ran the 
CIA's Far East operations from 
1955 to 1958. “We depended on 
the LDP for information.” He 
said the CIA had used the pay- 
ments both to support the party 
and to recruit informers within 
it from its earliest days. 


text. 

A government spokesman, 
quoted by state news agency 
Petra, said that “the possibili- 
ties of escalation of the situa- 
tion will not be in the interest of 
any Arab” (Reuters, AP. AFP ) 


Continued from Page 1 

take people's minds off what was one erf 
the government’s most dangerous steps in 
recent months: the decision to reduce by 
half some items in the monthly food ra- 
tions given to Iraqis. Bui for these state 
rations, many Iraqis would be forced into 
starvation because food prices are so high. 

At the same time, this latest move is 
risky gambit for Mr. Saddam, because he 
has set in motion an adventure that could 
have unpredictable and uncontrollable do- 
mestic consequences if the confrontation 
becomes long and drawn out or if unfold- 
ing events cause him to look weak before 
his own people. 

Worst-case scenarios involve massive 
defections from the army or popular upris- 


ings. A U.S. analyst said that Mr. Saddam 
must be very worried about disintegration 
of his armed forces and society in general. 

“What can he do to feed these troops?” 
asked an Iraqi in Kurdistan. “Do you 
think they are going to stay massed in the 
desert waiting for an air strike?” 

If his past performance in the 1990-91 
Gulf crisis is a gauge, Mr. Saddam can be 
expected soon to offer a faoe-saving pack- 
age deal to extricate himself, perhaps of- 
fering to trade Iraqi recognition of Ku- 
wait’s borders and sovereignty for an 
easing of the sanctions regime. 

He thinks he can start from a new nego- 
tiating position, said the Iraqi in Kurdi- 
stan, because of the military threat he has 
placed on Kuwait’s borders. 


For 

investment 

infbmnation 


read 

THE MONEY 
REPORT 


every 
Saturday 
in the 
IHT 


HAITI: 

Junta’s End 


Continued from Page 1 
the actions we could take to 


RUN: Bordeaux Marathon a Gourmet Treat , Sort Of CULT: 

Continued from Page 1 couragement and offered sau- lances struggled to reach the Mystery DeeoenS 
Rnrian it* Hv a omnn rtf ik sages, cheese, wine and water, medical tent nlanteri amona rh* * J Mer 


'll . 

’*l.T • 


Continued from Page 1 

Roflan de By, a group of us, 
including experienced mara- 
thon runners, embarked with 


lances struggled to reach the 
medical tent planted among the 


L" 

-i-i, • - 


Wekept in mind Mr. Guy on’s vineyards to evacuate the fallen. 


make that transition more some trepidation about thw nn . 

nAnAdflll W A Mm. Da-.-. Anlrf — f I I r « 


“The principle was certainly peaceful,” Mr. Perry said of the usual hazards. 


acceptable to me,” said U. 
Alexis Johnson, United States 
ambassador to Japan from 1966 
to 1969. "We were financing a 
party on our side.” He said the 


one-day visit 

The status of General Cedras 


"Die trick is to drink nothing 
but water for the first half of the 


advice even as we passed aristo- 
cratic chateaus whose names 
alone stirred the taste buds: 
Gruaud-Larose, L£ovflle-Pcy- 
ferxfe, Pichon-Longueville, 
Grand-Puy-Lacoste. 

At the halfway mark, our ab- 
stemious crew was ready for a 


‘Drink more water, and 


Continued from Pagel 


medic advised. “It helps replen- 
ish the salts and minerals.” in Paris during the weekend in a 

Sure enough, the oyster stand mysterious package addressed 
at the 37-kflometer mark was 10 Interior Minister Charles 
packed with hungry runners ea- Pasqua, the ministry said, with- 
gerly following the doctor’s pre- out giving details, 
scription. We skipped the ax> That was not the only French 
companding glass of white wine connection. Police searching a 
but sucked in the briny area- farmhouse in the commune of 


r — V — - — — — m — r ~ ' UZ9UUA tile WLUt, ± UUU | VdlC li I - , - * * — vu 

payments continued after he This could be seen in the taunts j t ' s Lafite-Rothschild: don’t s T >rt yther com P an iom geny following the doctor’s pre- 


left Japan in 1969 to become a Haitians hurled at his motor- swaflow or vouTl die.” 


Save on Inti Calls 


senior State Department offi- cade Saturday and in the huge 
dal. pro-Aristide demonstration 

The CIA supported the party that surged past military head- 


pro-Aristide demonstration 

that surged past military head- £l'? la8C , f ^-J^en. the 

first temptation loomed at the 


and established relations 'with quarters the day before, 
many promising young men in The U.S. military occupation 
the Japanese government in the has neutralized the army, and 


who had chosen to follow the scription. We 
course on bicycles had staked companyinggl 
out an ideal rest stop near the but sucked in 
Mouton and Lafite estates, the tures with reti 
two properties nurtured over refreshed, just 


the ac- 


>rv, 


The U.S. military occupation lEtom ?®iS“ I V ,sr Roth f hjad 

is neutralized the armv. and banking fortune to achieve 


Anytime • AT&T Network • Worldwide 

Start saving now an international phone calls from any location 
compared to local phone companies, hotel surcharges, or phone card plans. 
The More You Call The More You Save! 

Service representative lines ppm 24 hrs a day! 


1950s and 1960s. Some are to- apparently broken the back of 
day among the elder statesmen the paramilitary network. 


tame into view. Dutifully, we some of (he greatest, most 


tures with relish. Restored and 
refreshed, just as French medi- 
cal wisdom had promised, we 
surged past the last of the great 


of Japanese politics. 


Parishioners at SL Gerard 


The covert aid apparently Roman Catholic church 


U.S. Direct 1-407-253-5454 Ext. 110 

or U5. FAX 1-407-253-6130 


ended in the early 1970s. when cheered when the Reverend Ge- 
growing frictions over trade be- rard Jean-Jusie. an official in 
gan lo strain relations between the Aristide government that 
the United States and Japan, was toppled three years ago, an- 
and the growing wealth of Ja- nounced General Cfidras’s ini- 
pan made the agency question minent departure. 


stuck to water. 

The impressive stone gate- 
way of CMteau Leovflle-Las 
Cases signaled our arrival in 


pensive wines in the world. 
Summoning second wind 


chateaus. Grand- Puy-Ducasse, 
> hi the world. and crossed the finish line back 
g second wind, we at the Pauillac docks. 

She slopes of Cos . After a quick rfieelqip by car- 
the most glamor- diologists and a recuperative 
ranes of Saint-Es- nap, most of the runners were 
i the sun emerged ready for what (he French call 
uds, heat and fa- “a serious meal.” Enormous 
o take their tolL servings of fish, tripe, duck, sal- 


Aubignan, in southern France, 
that had been used by the sect 
in August discovered Saturday 
that it had been boobv-traoned 


” : 4<5 i«f 
1 *- ■.**> 
S 


cheered when the Reverend Ge- Saint-Jufien, whose gravel pla- 

ravrl loon-Ttiefo nn « v i .i . . . 


rard Jean-Juste. an official in tean has imbued the local wines 


the Aristide government that with a reputation for harmoniz- 
was toppled three years ago, an- Ing fragrant grace with power. 


CORPORATE 

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the point of supporting politi- 
cians. 

_ “By that time, they were self- 
financing," a former senior in- 
telligence official said. 


vcoia5 5 Nibbling raisins but steering 
inent departure. dear of the wine, our horde 

“Tomorrow we should hear forged to Chlteau Bey- 
that CMkis has left,” he said- chevelle. The course then 
“But don’t dap your hands too wound through manicured 

i,.k 71 m. L, -.ill — v i. ■ , i i ■ 


to explode on the same night as 
the fires at the farmhouse in this 


the fires at the farmhouse in this 
village, 80 kilometers north of 


ous of the wines of Saint-Es- 
tfcphe. But as the sun emerged 
from the clouds, heat and fa- 
tigue began to take their tolL 


AftCT a qmck checkup by car- Geneva, and in Gianges-sur- 
aiologists and a recuperative Saivan. . 


As the investigation pro- 
gresses, there is incr easing spec- 
ulation that the motive for the 


much. There is still much work vineyards bulging with grapes 
to do.” (AP, Reuters, AFP) as field workers shouted en- 


iw r- r savmgs or nsh, tripe, duck, sal- crime could be financiaL The 

naVif 011 en * e ™y? the wooded ad, cheese and fruit tarts were Canadian and Swiss police have 

among thc famished confirmed that they areSquir- 
resembled participants, and glasses of M6- ing into reported monev Laim- 
a battlefield. Physicians were docs finest were raised time dering, with the well-heeled cult 
draining dnp bags mto the arms and again to toast Mr Guvan’s havino K^n r 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1994 


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Taiwan Enclave in Hong Kong Is Doomed 


By Kevin Minphy 

InifmaHeaai Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG —With hun- 
dreds of Nationalist Chinese 
flags flying. Mandarin in the air 
and construction machines 
pounding away in the distance, 
the ramshackle fishing village 
of Rennie’s Mill could be al- 
most anywhere in Taiwan. 

But this redoubt, the last stop 
for Kuommtang soldiers and 
their families stranded after los- 
ing the war to the Communists 
in 1 949, thrives instead in Hong 
Kong — for a few more months 
anyway. 

Monday will be the last time 
Taiwan’s National Day, or 
“Double Tenth,” is celebrated 
in this pro-Taipei stronghold on 
a secluded cove now only mm . 
utes by ferry or minibus away 
from central Hong Kong. 


After years of trying to move 
about 6,000 villagers from their 
44-year-old squatters' camp, 

the Hong Kong government is 
close to dearing the land for a 
huge new public housing com- 
plex. 

The colonial administration 
will also be ridding itself of a 
ticklish political problem that 
has flared anew in the prepara- 
tions for Hoog Kong’s return to 
China in 1997. 

“The Co mmunis ts won't al- 
low a place like this to exist 
when tney take over,*' said a 
man who declined to give his 
name, echoing a widely hdd 
suspicion among older resi- 
dents of the warren-like settle- 
ment. “It all has to be settled by 
1997“ 

The Hong Kong government 
has always had a careful tine to 


BOOKS 


ALL’S FAIR: Love, War 
and Running for President 

By Mary Matalm and James 
Carnlle with Peter Knobler. 478 
pages. $24. Random House / 
Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by 
Robert Sherrill 

A CLEVER title. After aU, 
you couldn’t have a more 
exciting come-on than love and 
war. But as one who believes 
products should be accurate in 
their list of ingredients, I feel 
obliged to point out that this 
book’s love affair was displayed 
mostly in phone calls of the 
most up impassioned sort. And 
while the presidential campaign 
of 1992 could certainly be 
called a political war, the ac- 
count of it here is anecdotal in a 
rather frothy fashion. It*s fun, 
but it amounts to little more 
than the kind of barrel -of-becr 
bull session that front-line vet- 
erans of any war are likely to 
have when, they get together. 

Admittedly, the bull session 
takes on some luster because 
the veterans held the rank of 
generals: James CarviHe, who 
was Bill Gmton’s campaign 
manager, and Mary Matahn, 
deputy manner of George 
Bush’s campaign. 

Of the two, Carvillc is the 
more interesting, perhaps be- 
cause the man from CarviUe, 
Louisiana (general store and 
post office), is so different from 
the man from Hope, Arkansas. 
While Clinton is concerned 
about hairdo and image; Car- 
wile (mostly bald) makes little 
effort to hide his rough edges. 
Except that he lacks bigotry, he 
seems a throwback to Dude’s 
mare colorful political past. 
CarviHe and Matalm were al- 


began. But they coded it for i 
duration. Consequently, the ch- 
cM-addicted press never tired 
of portraying them as Romeo 
and JufieL The publishers of 
this book continue to exploit 
that angle, but Matalm, to her 
credit, says that by the end of 
the campaign she was “plenty 
damn sick” of it 
“All's Fair” will have its wid- 
est appeal among political junk- 
ies who keep hoping for blood 
and who enjoy even the minuti- 
ae of partisan attacks and coun- 
terattacks, of propaganda dads 
and psychological one-upman- 
ship. Matalm is obviously tal- 
ented at all of the above, but too 
mnch of her stuff comes across 
as 1 
one" 


-■ ■ VI UM JM*I I W VII I U? iamwv 

s “cheap, wiriny political rhet- 
ric” (Carvflkrs description) 


emanating from “a sort of Miss 
Know-It-AB” (her own). 

Carvillc and MataJin are 
alike in some respects. Cam- 
paigns make them vicious. For 
these two, political campaigns 
are extraordinarily emotional. 
A lot of these pages are wet. 
CarviQe, dearly a world-class 
weeper, wept often. 

. When thing s are going just 
right, says CarviBe, the result 
can be an ego trip thai is “very 
sexual. It’s very gratifying, it’s 
very intense^ It builds up to a 
climax, if you will. And once 
you get that feeling, there’s 
nothing that can match it** 

How does the winning cam- 
paign manag er profit? Well, 
aside from the $15,000 to 
$20,000 a lecture Carville can 
now demand, plus a kin g ’s ran- 
som in consulting fees, plus his 
share of the nearly Si million he 
aztd Matalin reportedly re- 
ceived for putting their names 
cat this bode, he has some good 
memories. 

The best goes back to the 
time when Hillary was not very 
popular with the public. Car- 
viDe’s crew had just received the 
result of a dial group — that is, 
a group of people watching a 
video with their bands on a dial; 
they turn the dial up if they see 
or hear something they like, 
down if they don’t. When Hilla- 
ry appeared on the screen, Car- 
ville recalls, “the dials just 
plunged. AH of them. I mean 
they dropped into a trench. 
Clinton looked at the chasm 
tine and said, *You know, they 
just don’t like her hair.’ 

“This was a man who desper- 
ately loved his wife. He could 
not deal with the fact that, at 
the tune, Hillary was unpopu- 
lar. Couldn’t deal with it? He 
couldn’t see it! If someone 
asked me one moment to re- 
member from the campaign, it 
would have been They don’t 
like her hair.’ ” 

Clinton’s blind loyalty and 
affection supplies the note of 
softness that this tale of unre- 
lenting combativeness needs for 
relief. It’s the kind of softness 
the absence of which in the Car- 
vflJc-Matalm affair makes one 
uneasy. Not until the last line in 
the book do we finally get the 
feeling this affair may be real. 
Opening the door of Matalin’s 
apartment, Carville calls out: 
“Honey, Tm home.” 

Honey? After nearly 500 
pages, it s about time. 

Robert Sherrill, the author of 
** Gothic Politics in the Deep 
South,” wrote this for the Los 
Angeles Times. 


WHAT THEY’RE READING 


• Walter Seipp, chairman of 
the supervisory board of Com- 
merzbank AG, is reading the 
~ Pariser TagebOcher” (The Par- 
is Diaries) of Ernst Jtinger. 

“I think Mr. Jtingar is the 
outstanding German author of 
the last 50 years.” 

(Brandon Mitchener, IHT) 



BRIDGE 


. By Alan Tiuscott 

A MONG the American con- 
testants in the World 
Bridge Federation Champion- 
ships in Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, were Michael Becker 
of Tenafly, New Jersey, and 
Ron Rubin of North Miami 
Beach, long one of the country’s 
best partnerehips. On the dia- 
gramed deal, from the Spingold 
Knockout Teams in San Diego, 
California, they defended a 
contract of five clubs. 

Hie three-diamond opening 
bid by Rubin as West was a 
transfer bid, showing hearts, 
which accounts for East’s re- 
sponse of four hearts. North- 
South then backed into five 
dubs, which would have suc- 
ceeded easily against a routine 
lead of the jack or ten of hearts. 

But Rubin led the heart king, 
which had a double effect. It 
allowed bhn to retain the lead, 
and it caused South to t hink 
that the beat ace was on his lef l 
W hen Rubin then shifted to a 
low spade. South naturally 
played low from dummy and 
lost two spade tricks for down 
one. 

In the replay. West’s lead 
a gaintt the same contract was 


equally inspired: he chose the 
spade three. South again played 
low from dummy, but when the 
East won with the queen, be 
returned a spade instead of 
cashing the heart ace. West now 
believed that South held the 
heart ace, so after taking the 
spade ace, he shifted to a dia- 
mond at the third trick, a poor 
decision, and the contract suc- 
ceeded. The Rubin team gained 
five imps. 

NORTH 

*K52 

<?3 

0 AQ 107 2 

* A96-I 

WEST (D) EAST 
♦ A83 AQ10964 

OKJ 10 9762 PA854 
065 

*J *72 

SOUTH 

* J7 

PQ 

1 K J 9 4 

* K Q 10 8 5 3 

Neither side was vulnerable. The 


bidding'- 
West North 

East 

South 

3 0 Pass 

4<? 

Pass 

Pass Obi. 

Pass 

5 A 

Pass Pass 

Pass 


West ted the heart king. 



toe between mainland China 
and its Taiwanese rivals. 

Taiwan retains a significant 
but increasingly lower-profile 
presence in Hong Kong that ex- 
tends far beyond Rennie’s Mill. 

Burgeoning Taiwanese-Chi- 
nese trade and investment still 
largely flow through Hong 
Kong; the two enemies have yet 
to open direct economic or 
transport links. 

But as a new dispute between 
China and Hong Kong over the 
Double Tenth celebration dem- 
onstrates, that relationship can 
squeeze those caught between 
the two political rivals. 

China has blocked the Hong 
Kong government’s effort to re- 
negotiate air service agreements 
governing commercial traffic 
between the colony and Tai- 
wan. It also intervened in nego- 
tiations between securities au- 
thorities from both jurisdictions 
in June over an agreement that 
would allow Taiwanese inves- 
tors into Hong Kong's financial 
futures market. 

More recently, China has 
criticized a Hong Kong govern- 
ment decision to allow a pro- 
Taiwan group to hire a public 
hall for a National Day celebra- 
tion, charging that the move en- 
dorses a “two Chinas" policy, 
which Beijing bitterly opposes. 

Despite strong diplomatic 
protests by Beijing, Hong Kong 
argues that stopping the cele- 
bration on political grounds 


would breach current anti-dis- 
crimination laws. 

The new tensions have 
heightened concerns about the 
future among some of the Ren- 
nie's MSI residents and Tai- 
wanese and Hong Kong gov- 
ernment officials alike, who 
wonder if China intends to 
change its stance on Taiwan’s 
role in Hong Kong. 

“Some of the villagers are 
scared that if we don’t settle 
with the Hong Kong govern- 
ment on compensation for the 
move, it wffl be left to the gov- 
ernment after 1997 and they 
will get nothing at all,” said 
James Wong, secretary of the 
Rennie's Mill Action Commit- 
tee. 

In preparation for 1997, Tai- 
wan has closed the newspaper it 
controls, the Hong Kong 
Times, mured its propaganda 
machine and moved to put all 
its semiofficial representative 
offices in Hong Kong under the 
control of the Mainland Affairs 
Council instead of its Foreign 
Ministry. 

Susie Chiang, who heads Tai- 
wan's information office in 
Hong Kong, which recently 
changed its name from the pro- 
vocative Free China Review to 
the Kwang Hwa Cultural and 
Information Center, said. “Chi- 
na has made it quite clear: We 
can stay, but they want us Lo 
keep a low profile’.”' 


An Anti-Deng Heresy Gets Wide Play 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

.VfK York Times Service 

BEIJING — The Communist Party 
theology here these days is that the eco- 
nomic reforms begun by Deng Xiaoping 
should prepare China for the next hun- 
dred years and that any Chinese leader 
who tries to reverse them will be over- 
thrown. 

But a new and ominous portrait of Mr. 
Deng’s economic program has begun io 
appear, suggesting that latent political 
opposition to the 90-year-old paramount 
leader is beginning to emerge. 

A book that was circulated during the 
summer suggested that Mi. Deng had led 
the country into a “trap” of rapid eco- 
nomic growth, where socialist values 
were eroding and the control systems 
that used to keep peasants productively 
engaged on the land were being de- 
stroyed. 

That heretical challenge to partypoli- 
cy appeared in “Looking at ’China 
through a Third Eye." While the book’s 
authorship is mysterious, its publication 
suggests cracks in the ideological confor- 
mity strictly enforced by Mr. Deng and 
his chosen heirs duringthe last five years. 

The book said that China’s $00 million 
peasants “are like a living volcano, which 
could erupt at any time,” and it suggest- 
ed that Mr. Deng’s economic policies 
have neglected to provide any substitute 
social controls to prevent mass migration 
to the cities by peasants who might “stir 
up trouble.” 

The debate over the merits of estab- 


lishing a “socialist market economy” was 
won by Mr. Deng’s reformers. But Com- 
munist conservatives, repulsed by cor- 
ruption, what they call money worship 
and the movement toward individual- 
ism, find fault with Mr. Deng's China. 

That faction, sometimes called Maoist 
or leftist, remains a potent force within 
the Chinese leadership and is expected to 
figure prominently in the power struggle 
that follows Mr. Deng’s death. 

The "Third Eye” book, now banned 
because of its “negativism," captured the 
attention of China’s intellectuals during 
the summer. The publishing house in 
Shanxi Province identified the author as 
a “world-famous German sinologist” 
whose name is transliterated from the 
Mandarin as Luo Yi Ninggeer, 

German academics are at a loss, how- 
ever, to recognize such a colleague. 

Sensing conspiracy, many Chinese 
have looked in the direction of the best- 
known writer with similar views, a politi- 
cal essayist named He Xin, 45. Mr. He is 
an erstwhile adviser to Prime Minister Li 
Peng and a defender of the military 
crackdown on the Tiananmen Square 
democracy movement in 1989. 

In an interview, Mr. He conceded that 
he was familiar with the book and that it 
mirrored many of his ideas. Some Chi- 
nese have noted that he has seemed inca- 
pable of explicitly denying authorship. 
The closest he came in 90 minutes of 
conversation was, “The book has noth- 
ing to do with myself.” 

The nature of Mr. He’s assault is indi- 


rect, though. While heaping praise on 
Mr. Deng. Mr. He nonetheless made the 
case that a new disaster is building. 

Mao's disastrous economic policies of 
ibe Great Leap Forward resulted in star- 
vation for 100 million Chinese peasants, 
20 million to 30 million of whom died 
from 1959 to 1961. But Mr. He credited 
Mao for preventing “a famine of such 
great scale” from causing “a great distur- 
bance” in modern China's history. 

The Deng reforms, he said, freed tens 
of millions of peasants from the agricul- 
tural communes of the Mao era. and 
these peasants established the household 
and township-level industries that ignit- 
ed China's economic boom. Once they 
were freed, however, Mr. He observed, 
the ability of the state to control their 
movement started to break down. 

■ Rumors Depress Bourses 

In an unusual report, the offici.il Chi- 
na Daily referred Sunday to rumors 
about the health of the country's top 
leaders, saving these haJ depressed the 
country’s two stock markets, .\gcnce 
France- Presse reported from Beijing. 

The report was the first time ih:>: j 
Chinese newspaper had referred to the 
rumors over the health of senior officials 
that have been circulating in the Shang- 
hai and Shenzhen stock exchange.-, caus- 
ing both bourses to drop. Rumors about 
the health of Mr. Deng have been circu- 
lating for two weeks, On Friday, a rumor 
started about the death of the consen .i- 
tive economist Chen Yun. S9. 


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Page 6 




Soufcaa: 1994 Simmons Proprietary Study 6/30/94 ABC, . 



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When people get serious about business, 

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* Forbes circulation climbs to a record high of 779,125. 

Success isn't something you will into existence. It takes drive. 
Vision. And of course, the right tools. Which is why today's top 
business executives spend more time reading Forbes than any 
other business magazine. A well-known fact reconfirmed by a 
recent independent study. After all, Forbes provides its readers 
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the business world. Information they can act on. Throughout their 
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Forbes 

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T> 

m 


Page 8 


MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 



OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


Published With Tbe New York Tinm* nm) Thr Washington [\bl 


No Trade War for Now 


What is most important about tbe re- 
cent trade agreement between the United 
States and Japan is not what happened 
but what didn't. The United States and 
Japan decided not to start a big trade 
war. They decided to leave key issues 
open for future negotiations. 

There woe some important concessions 
from Japan that win open the country to 
more American products in areas such as 
telecommunications, glass, medical equip- 
ment and insurance. The Clinton adminis- 
tration will fairly count these as victories. 
But battles over the sector that accounts 
for two-thirds of Japan's trade surplus 
with America — in autos and auto parts 
— were left to be fought over another 
day. which is good news for Japan. 

The agreement does not provide for 
explicit numerical goals to measure greater 
Japanese openness to American products, 
a victory that Japan won some time ago. 
But the administration will crow about 
language railing for “a significant increase 
in access and sales” for American goods. 

Some who sought a hard American line 
against Japan mil say that the Clinton 
administration blinked. But the adminis- 
tration has its eye on some large issues, 
both economic and political- The central 
economic fact is that the United States 
has an interest in the economic recovery 
now under way in Europe and wants an 
economic recovery in Japan. A trade war 
would unsettle or reverse a movement 
toward growth that will benefit Ameri- 
can exporters and American workers. 
The a dminis tration also cared about the 
financial and currency markets and knew 


that a trade war would unsettle them, too. 

In addition, Japanese politics is in a 
state of great turmoil. The Japanese gov- 
ernment is moving on an economic pro* 
gram that ought to increase consumer 
demand, which is good for the United 
States. It is not clear that an American 
ul tima tum on trade now would push Jap* 
anese politics further along these lines; it 


might well have the opposite effect. 
The 


; Liberal Democrats who dominate 
the governing coalition seemed willing to 
make some concessions to prove to Japa- 
nese voters that they were tbe party best 
able to deal with America. The adminis- 
tration decided, reasonably, to pocket the 
concessions and not push the government 
to the wall. The Japanese, in turn, will 
have to live up to their pledges of change 
or face a serious American reaction. 

Tbe politics of trade issues between the 
United States and Japan is becoming 
more complicated by the day, which is on 
balance good news. Tbe recovery of the 
American auto industry’s share of the 
domestic market is moderating pressures 
to use a big stick against the Japanese. 
The high value of the Japanese yen 
amounts to a modest tariff wall, although 
it has made less difference in the trade 
balance between the United States and 
Japan than many expected. 

At this point, the specific issues in- 
volved in such agreements may matter 
less than the larger economic policies 
pursued by trading partners. In backing 
away from a trade war now, the adminis- 
tration suggested that it understands this. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Invest in South Africa 


Nelson Mandela has been in the Unit- 
ed States dramming up interest in the 
economic prospects of South Africa. If 
the personal courage, vision, wisdom and 
grace of a national leader were the only 
criteria, then his country would be over- 
flowing with growth, investment and 
trade. Similarly, if a nation could reap 
development as a reward for past travail 
and bard passage, then South Africa's 
future would also be ensured. But of 
course few investors will make their deci- 
sions just on the basis of the appeal of 
one leader. Nor just on tbe basis of a 
country’s political virtue. In its last phase 
of liberation it was uphill going for South 
Africa, and in the new phase of catch-up 
modernization it is uphill going, too. 

The “pervasive poverty” of most South 
Africans that President Mandela out- 
lined in his moving address to Congress 
on Thursday constitutes the prime na- 
tional agenda. Bui South Afnca is not 
without substantial resources to tackle it 
— and not just natural resources. It is a 
potentially rich country with, already, a 
modern economy that previously worked 
well for a minority of its people, that 
expansion compelled to bring in many 
blacks and that provides a foundation on 
which tbe whole country can grow now. 

There was a time when people won- 
dered whether a one-man-one-vote gov- 
ernment could provide economic leader- 


ship^ as committed to growth as to 


stribution. Within the president's na- 
tionalist African National Congress were 
and are a well-placed left favoring a dis- 
credited Marxism and a hungry trade 
union movement that had honed its 
strength on the liberation struggle. 

Just in the few months since he became 
his country’s first democratically elected 
president, however, Mr. Mandela has 
moved toward a free market policy that 
would cut spending, taxes, debt and 
bloat. He has dealt with organized la- 
bor’s strikes in a way that has cost him 
politically, since the unions are his al- 
lies, but has won him the essential re- 
spect and cooperation of the interna- 
tional banks. From workers he pleads 
for patience, and from the mostly white 
employer corps and from foreign inves- 
tors for empowerment of capital- and 
experience-short blacks. 

President Mandela can call on a 
unique source of foreign investment: the 
companies which know South Africa, 
pulled out during the struggle against 
apartheid and are there to be lured back 
now. The loans which Western govern- 
ments control are starting to flow to 
South Africa. The private sector has its 
place, too. All Americans share a power- 
ful interest in helping make multiracial 
democracy in South Africa work. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


America’s Way With Sex 


“The real purpose behind the current 
sex survey proposal," Senator Jesse 
Helms thundered in 1991. “is not to stop 
the spread of AIDS, but to compile sup- 
posedly scientific facts to support the 
left-wing liberal argument that homosex- 
uality is normal, just another lifestyle.” 
Ducking the storm, the Senate promptly 
blocked federal financing for the first 
major study of American sexual behavior 
since the Kinsey research of 1948 and 
1953- Fortunately, several private foun- 


dations ponied up the money. The result, 
700-t 


published last week, is a 700-page tome 
entitled “The Social Organization of Sex- 
uality,” and a surprising finding. 

Sexually speaking, America is a na- 
tion of squares. 

The study, by a team of researchers 
based at the University of Chicago, is 
invaluable on two counts. 

Prevention of sexually transmitted 
diseases and unwanted pregnancies de- 
pends on knowing enough about peo- 
ple’s sexual attitudes and behavior to 
issue the appropriate warnings and ad- 
vice. That is precisely the kind of infor- 
mation that “Social Organization.” 
which is based on surveys of 3,432 men 
and women aged 18 to 59, provides. 

The policies that may emerge from it, 
especially those involving AIDS educa- 
tion and prevention, may incur consid- 
erable debate. But there can be no de- 
bate about the study’s other attraction. 
There is no better way to measure one’s 
own sex life than to compare it with the 


well-documented (as opposed to bar- 
ker-room i 


room boasts and loc 
dotes) sex lives of others. 


anec- 


Americans who believe that only they 
are living in the slow lane, for instance, 
can take comfort in the fact that fidelity 
is flourishing. The great majority of mar- 
ried men and women say they are faithful 
to their spouses; furthermore, they are 
more sexually active than their single 
counterparts. And although the range in 
the number of lifetime sexual partners 
varied enormously (1,016 being the top 
figure), the median number for men was 
six, and for women two. 

As surprising as Americans’ sexual 
conservatism is the fact that only 2.8 
percent of the men and 1.4 percent of 
the women identified themselves as ho- 
mosexual or bisexual, although more (9 
and 5 percent respectively) reported 
having had at least one homosexual ex- 
perience since puberty. 

More than a third of the younger wom- 
en queried said that peer pressure had 
made them have sex for the first time. 
That has important implications for the 
prevention of teenage pregnancy. 

Mr. Helms's condemnation — and 
warped description — of this study was 
part and parcel of the stifling political 
climate that prevailed during the first 10 
years of the AIDS epidemic. But the 
senator, and other conservatives who 
fear that America is sliding ever more 
precipitously into licentiousness, can 
take comfort from the fact that the study 
showed something quite different. 

Americans can also be grateful to the 
foundations which stepped forward and 
did what the federal government should 
have been doing all along. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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lip:; 


Spheres of Influence for Americans and Russians? 


W ASHINGTON — With American 
troops in Haiti and Russian troops 
engaged in at least three neighboring civil 
wars, the “sphere of influence” question is 
upon us. During the recent U.Sl-Russian 
summit meeting, the question came up 
again and again. Does the United States 
hive one? Should Russia be allowed one? 

For American liberalism, spheres of 
influence — areas of domination conced- 
ed to a “Great Power” — have long been 
anathema. Since Woodrow Wilson's 
presidency, they have been identified 
with aQ the amoral Old World geopoliti- 
cal stratagems that led to the catastro- 
phe that was World War I. 

When Fr anklin Roosevelt returned 
from tbe Yalta talks in 1945, he declared 
that the agreements he. Stalin and Chur- 
chill had signed “ought to spell the end of 
the system of unilateral action, the exclu- 
sive alliances, the spheres of influence, 
the balances of power, and all the other 
expedients that have been tried for centu- 
ries — and have always failed.” 

The United Nations was supposed to 
substitute for these failed devices. But 
the Cold War intervened, the United 
Nations atrophied, and for almost 50 
years the world was divided most rigidly 
into American and Soviet camps. Now 
that the Cold War is over, the desire to be 
done with any hint of that is palpable. 

Last month, the U.S. ambassador to 
the United Nations, Madeleine Albright, 


Bv Charles Krauthammer 


told a Moscow audience: “Let us all 
work for the day when we will see a 
Europe fully liberated From spheres of 
influence and artificial division.” 

Hie fact is, however, that after decades 
of exertion and sacrifice, the United 
States has acquired several spheres of 
influence that 'it ought not be eager to 
give up. Western Europe, a core of the 
Middle East comprising Egypt. Israel 
and the Gulf states, and much of the 
Pacific Rim fall into the American 
sphere. Most obviously, the United 
States has claimed and maintain^ for 
almost two centuries a sphere of influ- 
ence in the Western Hemisphere. It could 
hardly be expressed more concretely 
than by the occupation of Haiti. 

Given the liberal tradition, however, 
the administration is at great pains to 
deny the obvious. Washington recognizes 
no sphere of influence. Secretary of State 
Warren Christopher claims. President 
Bill Clinton points to Security Council 
Resolution 940 and a paper coalition of 
28 countries as proof that the Haiti inter- 
vention is a UN police action, not an old- 
style assertion of the U.S. sphere. 

But of course it is. The whole justifi- 
cation of the Haiti operation is that this 
is trouble “in our backyard.” What does 
“our backyard” mean, if not “our 


sphere of influence”? The odd part of 
this policy is that while straining rhetor- 
ically and diplomatically to deny the 
legitimacy of a U.S. sphere of influence, 
the administration has gone some way 
toward granting one to Russia. 

When the Soviet Union imploded, 
Russia was shorn of 300 years" worth of 
conquests. It is now trying to reassert its 
influence over some of its lost territories. 


influence over some 

President Boris Ydtsin explicitly told 
the United Nations that Russia’s ties with 
former Soviet republics are “closer than 
traditional neighborhood relations: rath- 
er, this is a blood relationship.” Bloody, 
too. Russian troops are engaged in dial 
wars in Tajikistan, Georgia and Moldova. 
Russia would now Kke to insert itself into 
Nagorno-Karabakh, over which Armenia 
and Azerbaijan are fighting. 

Russia is quite prepared to “peace- 
keep” — the post-Cold War word for 
“intervene" — unilaterally, but it would 
prefer international recognition of its do- 
minion. And it has been receiving fairly * 
sympathetic noises from the United 
States. Last winter in Moscow, Mr. Clin- 
ton acknowledged that Russia would be 
involved — mmiarOy — with its neigh- 
bors ust like the United States has been 
involved in the last several years in Pana- 
ma and Grenada near our area.” 

He reinforced the parallel last week. 
“The United States does not object to 
Russia taking an active role in the resolu- 


tion of the problem in N agomo- Kara- 
bakh," lie said. The problem, he added, >5 
only “how that could be made more tike 
Haiti." The Clinton policy Seems to be: 
You can have your sphere, jusi make sure 
it has the UN fig leaf we have in Haiti. 

W hat’ s wrong with that? Isn't a Great 
Power tike Russia going to have a sphere 
of influence anyway? Perhaps But the 
crucial question remains: How extensive 
and how o ppressive will that sphere be? 

To his credit, Mr. Clinton has worked 
hard, and with considerable success, to 
exdude the three Baltic states from Rus- 


sia’s reach. But he scans rather pliant 

Soviet 


concerning the rest of the former _ - — 
Union, a huge swathe of territory stretch- - 
ing from Kishinev to K a zak hstan . 

True, America will not go to war oyer 
these territories. But it should be putting 
down markers as to what it will not 
tolerate. Mr. Clinton should make clear 
that overstepping these boundaries (in 
Ukraine, for example) would prove cost- 
ly to Russia, putting at risk many of the 
things it covets from the Unite d Sta tes: 
good r elations, trade and investment, 
mem bershi p in the international clubs. 

America's concern should be less the 
procedure of Russian expansion than its 
extent and intent. The important issue is 
how mudi control of the former Soviet 
Union it is bait on seizing, not how many 
UN fig leaves it can collect along the way. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 





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But Then Comes the Hard Part: Establishing Civil Society in Haiti 




N EW YORK — Developments 
in Haiti have the mesmerizing 
quality of a glass about to fall off a 
table. You can see the trouble 
coming but you can’t bring your- 
self to make the necessary move. 

Despite that ominous state — 
and Lieutenant General Henry 
Hugh Shelton's insistence that 
U.S. forces under his command 
“are not rent-a-cqps” — Ameri- 
can troops are being drawn into 
policing the country. 1 

The invasion was thoroughly 
planned, U.S. military officials 
maintain, but they are clearly at a 
loss about how to maintain civil 
order. All this was to be foreseen. 

If the Haitian military had re- 
sisted the landings, they would 
have been quickly defeated. But 
then the problems of running the 
country would have been greater. 
What did Washington expect to 
do after declaring victory? 

It is hard to understand why 
former President Jimmy Carter, 
after negotiating the deal to avert 
a combat invasion, felt that he 
had to go so far in praising and 
honoring General Raoul Cedras. 


By Flora Lewis 


the Haitian dictator. But that was 
certainly preferable to a fight 
that would have cost lives and 
left far more onerous political 
consequences for the United 
States at home, in the Western 
Hemisphere and in the world. If 
some rhetorical extravagance was 


theprice, it was well worth it. 
That 


does not change the fact 
that the United States went in to 
oust the regime and try to provide 
some order in a bitter, terrified 
country whose citizens were 
throwing themselves into the sea 
in an attempt to escape to the 
United States. The idea that the 
Haitian police would be able and 
willing to oust General Cedras 
and maintain order was never go- 
ing to work, whether or not Mr. 
Carter achieved his agreement. 

And apparently Washington 
had no plans, despite being well- 
informal about the habitual de- 


spicable behavior of the police and 
their non-uniformed “attaches.” 


and about the hatred and thirst for 
vengeance they had provoked. 


So far, the relative restraint of 
the public has been the second 
major accomplishment of Mr. 
Carter's negotiations. This should 
not be underrated, hut it also can- 
not be counted upon indefinitely 
— especially if the police and 
attaches continue to wreak havoc. 

Belatedly, U.S. officials have 
begun to understand that Ameri- 
can soldiers cannot just stand 
aside and watch the violence, if tbe 
Haitian people are not to come to 
consider the troops they welcomed 
as liberators to be mere conspira- 
tors of the detested power. 

Americans finally took after 
the attaches' headquarters, seized 
a few arms — there was time to 
hide many — and rounded up 
about a 30 of the thugs. They were 
taken 'to a “detention center” at 
U.S. military headquarters. Now 
what will be done with them? 

This is the start of a police role 
and it will surely get much bigger. 

When deposed President Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide returns next 
Saturday or shortly thereafter, he 


will still need to rely on 
rich does 


on a struc- 
tured force, which does not exist 
outside the U.S. troops. 

The problem of the power vac- 
uum was one of the arguments 
which General Cfidras used to 
persuade Mr. Carter to let him 
delay stepping down. If he left 
Haiti immediately, civil war would 


break out the next day, General 
r. Carter 


was 


Cedras claimed. Mr. 
right to take it seriously. 

But the time is not being used 
well enough now to give the public 
much confidence in its future safe- 
ty. There is still no clarity about 
who will be covered in the amnesty 
demanded by General C6dras and 
what is to be done about the crimi- 
nals who are not covered- “The 
police are melting away,” one 
newsman reported, but that is no 
assurance that they won’t retrieve 
their concealed weapons and reap- 
pear at the first chance. 

The U.S. policy of going into 
Haiti massively, booting out Gen- 
eral Cedras, plunking down Jean- 
Bertrand Anstide and then pull- 
ing out never made sense. 

Mr. Carter saved the Clinton 


administration from an early, 
messy rebuke for its self-decep- 
tive policy of escalating bluffs un- 
til undesired action was unavoid- 
able. But, as Mr. Carter knows, he 
cannot save Washington from the 
illusion that it does not have to 
chew what it bites off. 

It is not clear whether Bill Clin- 
ton and Iris advisers know that by 
now, and don’t want to admit it to 
the country before the November 
elections, or whether they are still 
fooling themselves as well as tbe 
American public. The longer they 

put off acknowledging the need 

to disarm the Haitian thugs — 
and take charge of keeping order 
until new Haitian police can be 
created — the more costly and 
embarrassing it will be. 

And then there will be the task 
of helping launch structures to ^ 
restart the Haitian economy. w 

Long before talk of invading 
Haiti first began, it was clear that 
these would be the consequences. 
The glass has fallen off the table 
while we watched. Now there is a 
big cleanup job. 

© Flora Lewis. 


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THE TRIB 


And Bolstering Cambodia’s Young State Against the Khmer Rouge 


W ASHINGTON —The Unit- 
ed States has crossed a for- 
eign policy Rubicon in Indo- 
china. The Clinton administra- 
tion has quietly agreed to a 
Cambodian request for defense 
assistance and sent about 45 mili- 
tary advisers. It is hard to imagine 
an initiative that raises more 
specters. Is America about to be- 
come embroiled in a new Indo- 
china conflict? 

A few years ago, Phnom Penh 
was a ghost town. The killing 
fields had claimed nearly a quar- 
ter of the country's population. 
Many Cambodians felt that they 


By Marvin Ou 


had been cursed by the gods and 
abandoned by the world. 

Today the capital city is alive 
with activity. Shops are" stocked, 
children are in school, restaurants 
and food stalls are busy, foreign 
businessmen are exploring invest- 
ment opportunities, and traffic 
jams are becoming a problem. 
There are few signs of the classic 
development pathologies — lim- 
ousines pushing bicycles to the 
side of the road, beggars, filth, 
large, walled mans ions adjacent 
to shantytowns, and environmen- 


Amnesty Only for Those 
Who Admit the Crimes 


By Aryeh Neier 


N EW YORK — Haitians 
considering how to apply 
legislation for an amnesty 
should look lo South Africa. 

The temporary constitution 
under which Nelson Mandela 
was elected requires an amnes- 
ty. In drafting an amnesty bill 
the minister of justice, Dull ah 
Omar, drew on the experiences 
of countries that have made the 
transition from dictatorship to 
democracy. 

Under Mr. Omar’s bill a 
Truth and Reconciliation Com- 
mission would investigate gross 
violations of human rights 
committed from March 1, 1960, 
to Dec. 6, 1993, and identify 
perpetrators and victims. A full 
report would be published. 
Recommendations would be 
made to the president for pay- 
ment of reparations to victims. 

The legislation draws on the 
experience of Argentina, Chile 
and El Salvador. But it goes 
further. Amnesty would not be 
granted across the board. Po- 
lice officers and others who 
committed such crimes as the 
torture or assassination of anti- 
apartheid activists would be 
able to obtain amnesty only by 
fully disclosing the crimes. 

Most of the torturers and 
murderers will be spared trial 
and imprisonment for their 
crimes, but only by acknowledg- 
ing individual responsibility. 
There is a practical reason for 


would emulate Colonel Michel 
Francois and flee Haiti in the 
time it took to establish a truth 
commission and a committee 
on amnesty. Yet by putting on 
record detailed information on 
their criminality, a commission 
could help to prevent them 
from trying to return and over- 
throw a fragile democracy. 

Even if amnesty is granted 
only on an individual basis to 
those who acknowledge their 
crimes, it is possible that very 
few of those responsible will be 
tried for the politically motivat- 
ed violence that has caused so 
much suffering. 

But if trials are held, it is 
crucial that they 


crucial that they respect princi- 
ples of due process. The state of 
Haiti’s judiciary makes this dif- 


's judiciary makes 
ficulL Most likely, internation- 
al assistance will be needed, 
and it should be provided. The 
conduct of trials will have a 
profound influence on the pos- 
sibility of establishing the rule 
of law in a country where it has 
never taken root 

The South African approach 
does not answer all objections to 
amnesties. One is that the state's 
refusal to punish crimes invites 
private vengeance. 

Yet it seems possible that this 
very real danger will be mitigat- 
ed if those who have suffered 


such an approach. By covering 
of the Haitian 


up all the crimes 
military, police and "attaches,” 
a blanket amnesty would make 
it hard to weed out those who 
should be barred from serving in 
any reconstituted force. 

No doubt many with the 
most blood on their hands 


i tenant General Raoul Ce- 
dras and company come to un- 
derstand that their persecutors 
must own up individually before 
getting away scot-free. 


The writer is president of the 
Open Society Institute, which fi- 
nances transitions to democracy. 
He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


tal abuses. Much of the same, on 
a reduced scale, can be said of the 
major provincial towns. 

All this is unfolding against the 
backdrop of a political transfor- 
mation: successful national elec- 
tions, conducted by the United 
Nations, and the establishment of 
a coalition government presided 
over by an ultimate survivor and 
national symbol King Norodom 
Sihanouk. The Parliament has 
emerged as an arena for remark- 
ably open debates. Tbe press is 
passably free. An active Cambo- 
dian human rights organization 
nips at the government’s heels. 

Yet a great many Cambodians 
are fearfuL Serious human rights 
abuses by some provincial au- 
thorities go unpunished and un- 
checked. A- recent coup attempt 
highlights the fragility of the new 
political order. 

Four months ago, a Khmer 
Rouge force expelled a disorga- 
nized Cambodian army from the 
provincial town of Pailin. After 
this, a final attempt to reach a 
political settlement between the 
new government and tbe Khmer 
Rouge collapsed. Parliament put 
its seal on the outcome by voting 
to outlaw the Khmer Rouge. 

This is good news. A debilitat- 
ing illusion that the Khmer Rouge 
can somehow be accommodated 
in a political settlement has long 
hampered prospects for a resolu- 
tion of the Cambodia problem. 

The same small coterie of se- 
cretive fanatics who created the 
killing fields of Cambodia still 


lead the Khmer Rouge. The men 
and the agenda remain the same: 
to achieve total power and liqui- 
date everything and everyone in 
Cambodia that might resist the 
communication of the country. 
The government now seems to 
understand that there can be only 
one solution with two variants: 
elimination of the Khmer Rouge 
through military defeat or by 
gradual marginalization. 

Cambodia’s leaders also realize 
that a thorough overhaul of the 
Cambodian army is a precondi- 
tion for any satisfactory outcome. 
The army has been described as 
the worst in the world. Second 
Prime Minister Hun Sen calls it 
“an embarrassment” About one- 
third of its nominal 140,000 
troops are “ghost soldiers.” 
Nearly 70 percent of its actual 
force consists of officers, 2.000 
of whom are generals. 

Hun Sen and the first pr imp: 
m i nis ter, Prince Norodom Ran- 
ariddh, agree that the army must 
be substantially downsized (to 
perhaps 60,000), the percentage 
of officers drastically reduced 
and the training and education of 
officer corps and rank and file 
given the highest priority’. 

Bui any move to rapidly demo- 


bilize would cast large numbers 
of young men with few employ- 
able skills into a civilian economy 
that has no place for them. The 
inevitable result would be bandit- 
ry and insecurity, if not a military 
coup. And any hope to improve 
training and education of existing 
personnel founders on the dearth 
of teachers and trainers. 

Enter the United States. Prince 
■Ranariddh and Hun Sen, sup- 
ported by King Sihanouk, want 
America to “adopt” three or four 
Cambodian army battalions and 
train and equip them for con- 
struction work. Then, with U.S. 
economic assistance, these units 
could be demobilized and used 
for road building and other civil- 
ian projects. 

Washington is providing mili- 
tary construction advisers, grad- 
ers and bulldozers, and demining 
specialists. It is an important 
start but just a start 

Why should the United States 
return to tbe scene of a disastrous 
and divisive intervention? 

Unlike South Vietnam, Cam- 
bodia has a government selected 
through free elections and recog- 
nized by the international commu- 
nity. The world has a substantial 
stake in the outcome in Cambodia 
because the UN effort there, at a 
cost of more than $2 billion, re- 
mains its most successfuL 

Cambodia’s current leaders 
generally acknowledge the prob- 
lems that their government faces 
and the weakness it exhibits — 
and show credible indications 
that they are prepared to adopt 
necessary remedies. 

Most important, the Khmer 
Rouge are not giants. They are 
generally confined to a .region 
near the Thai border. A lack of 


broad popular support undercuts 
their ambition to launch a war of 
attrition. The organization sur- 
vives because it is disciplined, 
controls a nearly inaccessible base 
area, receives cross-border assis- 
tance from dements of the Thai 
army and is opposed by the inept 
Royal Cambodian Armed Forces. 

America should not be the only 
country willing to assist the Cam- 
bodian govemmenL What is re- 
quired is a multilateral defense- 
assistance program, orchestrated 
and led by Washington, to pro- 
vide training, materiel and non- 
lethal equipment, plus ammuni- 
tion and, eventually, small arms. 

Toward that end, the State De- 
partment has started discussions 
with other interested countries, 
notably Australia, France and In- 
donesia. Under no conditions 
should foreign combat troops be 
introduced, nor should Vietnam- 
ese assistance be sought. 

A basic lesson of history is that 
successful strategists anticipate the 
consequences of intended actions 
and plan for them — answering 
the “Then what?” question. For 
Cambodia, the U.S.-UN strategy 
that produced the F&ris accords 
and national elections was incom- 
plete. Hard realities and follow-on 
plans were submerged in the eu- 
phoria of a successful vote. But the 
election was only the begi nning 

Cambodia has reached a culmi- 
nating point that requires a new 
strategy so that what has been 
gained is not lost The “then” is 
now and the “what” is clear. 


iVAPldli.- 


A 










5*. 


- ***< 


* *-<■ 


The writer, who specializes in 
Asian security issues at the Na- 
tional War College in Washing- 
ton, contributed this comment to 
the Los Angeles Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Russia and China 


PARIS — Russia will allow the 
present war between Japan and 
China to be fought to an end — 
that is to say, until China is com- 
pelled to ask for peace —so long 
as the stability of the Chinese 
dynasty is not disturbed either 
by Japan or by internal revolu- 
tion. The maintenance of the 
Empire as it now exists will 
however, be absolutely insisted 
upon by Russia, for otherwise 
she believes her own Siberian 
frontiers would be imperilled. 


against enormous competition, 
one can safely say that their su- 
premacy remains intact. And 
there is nobody to beat a French 
builder in the design of an “auto- 
mobile de luxe." 


s. 






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1944: Lethal Streetcars 


1919: Auto Salon Opens 

PARIS — The opening of the 
Fifteenth Automobile Salon, the 
first real industrial Peace mani- 
festation seen in Paris since the 
war, marks the return of French 
industry to its normal activity 
and progress. Although French 
constructors have to fight 


ON A GERMAN HILLSIDE 
OVERLOOKING AACHEN — 
[From our New York edition:! 
American engineers flung two 
“secret weapons” — they call 
them V-13’s — into the German 
lines at the outskirts of Aachen 
today [Oct. 9], and judging from 
the gunfire they scared out of (he 
Gomans, they were at least a mor- 
al success. The V-i3’ s were street- 
cars loaded with 38-mm shells and 
dynamite, which were abandoned 
by the enemy in the pillboxes of 
Aachen State Forest The Ger- 
mans apparently had decided that 
not even the mechanic Ameri- 
can Army could -use a streetcar. 


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International Herald Tribune, Monday, October 10, 1994 


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Page 9 


CAPITAL MARKETS 


Investors’ Waiting Game 
Is Getting Into Full Swing 


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market drew only 



Hons; economic reports last 
week signaled no slack in the 
momentum of growth. 

The Fed might be holding 
back awaiting the results of the 


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German election and hoping to get more bang out of its next move. 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s conservative coalition is expected to win 
re-election. Confirmation should see a rush back into Deutsche 
mark bonds, analysts predict, as yield differentials ova: DM debt in 
most European bond markets have narrowed appreciably in the 
run-up to the election. A simultaneous rise in UJ5. interest rates 
could help stabilize the dollar against a resurgent DM. 

A loss by the German conservatives would shock both the bond 
and currency markets and a coincident rise in U.S. rates could be 
the catalyst to pull worried European investors back into the dollar. 

The Fed normally is a passive observer of the exchange rate. The 
board’s daily concern is that the market remain orderly. The value 
of the dollar is the responsibility of politicians. But the Fed now has 
a vested interest in a strong dollar as the currency’s weak perfor- 
mance this year has undermined the board’s Lightening of monetary 
policy. A low value of the dollar has fueled exports, which keeps 
industry working at levels that the Fed is trying to slow. 

Analysts at J. P. Morgan in New York predict that the U.S. rate 
increase will be followed by a rise of 1 percentage point in Australia 
and possibly a quarter-point rise in Canada. 

Investors, meanwhile, show only modest interest in new issues 
coming to market The World Bank’s 2 billion DM of global bonds 
last week were a difficult sale, bankers reported. Priced to yield IS 
baas points over German government paper, the five-year bonds 
ended the week well bid at a spread of 14 basis points over the 
benchmark. Bankers said a quarter of the issue had been placed in 
Asia, with Japan alone accounting for about half of that demand. 

This week. Statkraft a Norwegian-owned power company, is 
expected to make its debut in the international market with a five- 
year issue of 300 million DM (S 1 94.7 milli on) expected to be priced 
at 35 baas points over German government levels. 

In the dollar sector, underwriters reported solid demand for the 

See BONDS, Page 11 




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THE TRIB INDEX 


World Index 

International Herald Tribune — 

World Stock Index, composed 122 

of 280 Internationally investable 121 

stocks from 25 countries, 


....... ng 

compiled by Bloomberg ns 
Business News. 117 

II© 

115 

Week ending October 7, 114 
daily dosings. ”3 


daily dosings. ”2 ‘ . 

Jan. 1992 = 100. 112 f " m t " w ' T F 


138 

137 

136 

13S 

134 

133 

132 

131 

130 

129 

128 


AshffKWc RESTS! 


123 

122 

121 

120 

119 

118 

117 

116 

115 


Europe 



127 ■v/.-v — 

126 *- 




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104 

103 

102 

101 

100 

99 

98 

97 

96 


North America | 


Latin America 


147 



146 

145 - • • 
144 -j.„- 
143 - 


142 




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F F M 

T W T 

F 

Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 

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diango 

Eiwrgy 

112.93 11258 

-0.04 

Capital Goods 

11220114.79 

-1.65 

Utilities 

12450 129.03 

-3.51 

Raw Materials 

131.04 134.00 

-221 

Finance 

11320 11429 

-025 

Consumer Goods 10128 10227 

-026 

Services 116.97 119.84 

-JL39 

Miscellaneous 

1215013329 

-932 



Jim MWr mu US. aottar VWUOS ex HOtw bk lutyii, now im, urasni 
Amotirn. Australia. Austria, Bafgftun, Brazil, Canada, Chrta, Danmark, 
Finland, France Gmmany, Hong Kong, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New 
Zeeland, Norway, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Ve nezue l a . Fix 
Tokyo. Now Yak and London, ttm todax is composed <X (he SO top iaauoa m toons 
ot mwftef oaptafizattJn, otfwiiwsa ffw wn top stocks w tracked. 


The Dollar 
Poised at 
Crossroad 


By CarlGewinz 

huenuomtol Herald Tribune 

P ARIS. Activity is likely to slow to a crawl on the 
international capital market as investors sit on the sidelines 
waiting — first for confirmation that the U.S. Federal 
Reserve Board will increase rates, and then for the outcome 
of the federal election in Germany next Sunday. 

If the Fed, dosed for a national holiday Monday, does not act 
Tuesday, that the betting is that it will not move until the following 
week. Given the extent to which an increase been in 

the bond and currency markets. 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — An eerie calm has 
settled on the foreign exchange 
market and analysts cannot 
agree whether it portends the 
beginning of the dollar's long 
awaited revival or the start of a 
nasty storm driving it to new 
lows. 

All agree that the outcome 
could be shaped by this coming 
weekend’s federal election in 
Germany, with the Deutsche 
mark weakening — and the dol- 
lar rising — substantially if 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl and 
his conservative allies fail to 
win re-election. 

Jim O'Nall, London-based 
analyst at Swiss Bank Corp., 
said that if Mr. Kohi wins, "the 
dollar will fall below 1.50 DM 
within two weeks.” 

But John Reynolds, of 
NatWest Securities in London, 
believes the dollar is clearly 
headed higher in any event. A 
Kohl victory might slow the 
dollar’s advance but would not 
prevent it, he said 

Last week, the dollar was 
nearly static, stuck in the mid- 
dle of its recent trading range 
it the both the mark and 
It finished the week at 


Is Europe Too Tuned In to U.S.? 

Obsession With American Rates Appears Misplaced 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Once again the pre- 
sumed linkag e between the direction of 
U.S. interest rates and the the health of 
the fledgling European recovery domi- 
nated market sentiment. 

This time, it was fear of a possible rise 
in American short-term rates based on 
expectations of a huge jump in Friday's 
figures for American jobs. In the end, 
with new jobs well below private fore- 
casts, European markets firmed 

Economists, however, wonder if the 
markets’ concerns are not misplaced. 
They increasingly express doubt that Eu- 
rope is as much a hostage to American 
interest rates as the markets seem to 
believe. 

“I cannot really see why the markets 
get so upset every time short-term inter- 
est rales in America go up,” said Nigel 
Gault, chief European economist at 
DRI/ McGraw-Hill in London. 

At the short end economists stress 
that interest rates in Europe are set by 


the Bundesbank, not by the Federal Re- 
serve Board. In addition, they insist that 
there is overwhelming evidence to sug- 
gest that the German central bank con- 
tinues to be largely unmoved by events 
on the far side of the Atlantic. 

“The Bundesbank will go its own 
way," says Ulrich Beckmann, senior 
economist at Deutsche Bank in Frank- 
furt. 

Having said that, most forecasters ad- 
vise that they can see little reason for the 
Bundesbank to begin tightening mone- 
taiy policy soon. They point 10 predicted 
declines in German inflation well into 
next year and even to Germany’s trou- 
blesome measure of money supply. M-3. 
which at last seems headed back into the 
Bundesbank's target range. 

Where U.S. interest rates do exert a 
direct and nearly instantaneous impact 
on Europe is via the price of long-term 
money. In general, interest rates in Eu- 
rope nave raced upward in tandem with 
those in America for much of the year. 

"Economic conditions in Europe do 


not justify interest rates at current lev- 
els," said Jeremy Hawkins, chief eco- 
nomic advisor at 'the Bank of America in 
London. 

Where opinions diverge a bit is over 
the impact of those made-in-America 
bond yields on the future course of Eu- 
rope’s’ recovery. Theoretically, the im- 
pact should be greatest in countries like 
Germany, where fully SO percent of cred- 
its are 'long-term. Yields on 10-year 
bonds have soared from 5.5 percent at 
the beginning of Lhe year to 7.6 percent. 

Nonetheless. Richard Reid, chief 
economist for UBS in Frankfurt, fore- 
cast a steady acceleration of German 
economic growth, from 2.6 percent this 
year to 3.2 percent next year. 

In Europe, where the strength of the 
recovery has surprised most forecasters 
this year, economists argue that high 
long-term interest rates imported from 
America will simply limit the scope for 
future surprises on the up side. 

“These interest rate rises do make me 


See FEAR, Page U 


Tensions 
In Gulf 
Unsettle 
Oil Trade 


Kuieait Prepares 
Emergency Plan 


Greenspan Warns Banks on Lending 


By Saul Hansell 

New York Times Service 


13470 DM and 100.605 yen. 

To some observers, the only 
element holding the dollar from 
rising was absence of the Feder- 
al Reserve Board action con- 
firming the market’s assump- 
tion that short-term interest 


See DOLLAR, Page 11 


NEW YORK — With banks 
suddenly flush with extra capi- 
tal, federal regulators are warn- 
ing that the days of easy money 
and risky loans may be return- 
ing, just a few short years after 
excessive real estate lending 
brought the banking system to 
its knees. 

The Federal Reserve Board 


chairman, Alan Greenspan, 
gave a stem lecture on prudent 
lending Saturday to members of 
the American Bankers Associa- 
tion, gathered for their annual 
convention in New York. 

“Competition among banks 
and their nonbank counterparts 
has never been greater.” Mr. 
Greenspan said. "We have been 
seeing for some months now 
that the result of that competi- 
tion in the form of easing of the 


for 


Brussels Notebook 


More Power to Delors 9 s Successor ? 


Jacques San ter, the Luxembourg prime 
minister who was widely dismissed as a light- 
weight when nominated in July to head the 
European Commission, is suddenly being en- 
couraged to take on unprecedented powers 
when he succeeds Jacques Delors in January. 

The urgings come from officials seeking to 
influence the reorganization of the European 
Union executive agency, which will grow 
from 17 commissioners to 21 if Austria, Fin- 
land, Sweden and Norway join the EU club. 

To make room, some French officials have 
suggested breaking up foreign affairs geo- 
graphically, with commissioners for Eastern 
Europe, the Mediterranean, Asia, and indus- 
trialized partners like the United States and 
Japan. Linder this scenario, Mr. Santer would 
have overall responsibility to ensure consis- 
tency in foreign policy. 

Many officials in Brussels dismiss the idea 
as unworkable, noting the fierce turf battles 
over the past two years when foreign affairs 
was split between Sir Leon Brittan on trade 
and Hans van den Broek on political matters. 
They regard the plan as a bid to win a key 
trade post for Yves-Thibault de Stiguy, the 
European affairs adviser to Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur of France. 

Other new positions rumored include a 
commissioner to prepare reforms of EU insti- 
tutions ahead of the 1996 Union conference. 
Some Brussels insiders say the post is a natu- 
ral for Edith Cresson, the former prime minis- 
ter and second French nominee. 


of outcry as the 20 billion-franc subsidy for 
Air France, which was challenged by seven 
European airlines last week. 

That is because some of Bull’s chief com- 
petitors are also shareholders and suppliers, 
including International Business Machines 
Corp. and NEC Corp. 

IBM has used its link to pul its PowerPC 
chips into Bull machines. At the same lime 
Big Blue, itself struggling to restore profit- 
ability, took advantage of a previous Bull 
recapitalization last December 10 reduce its 
stake to 2.1 percent from 5.6 percent. 

A spokesman said the company has taken 
no position on the French government’s latest 
bailout plan and hasn't derided yet whether 
to chip in money of its own to maintain its 
stake. But, he added, “We’re pleased with our 
current relationship with Bull." 


EU Finance Officials Can't Crow 


EU Seen Approving Bull Bailout 

The European Commission is expected to 
approve an 1 1 billion-franc (S2.1 billion) state 


bailout for the struggling Group Bull, but the 
likely to spark the same kind 


European Union finance ministers want to 
crow about their determination to cut budget 
deficits, but their legal experts have imposed a 
gag rule. 

The ministers are expected to approve com- 
mission recommendations 10 10 member 
states for cutting budget deficits when they 
meet in Luxembourg on Monday. It is the 
first time the ministers will listen to such a 
critique as part of new roles designed to lead 
to a single currency by the end of the decade. 

Finance Minister Theo Waigel of Germany 
promised last month to publish the recom- 
mendations as a sign of deficit-cutting seri- 
ousness, only to have EU legal experts point 
out that the Maastricht treaty requires they be 
kept confidential 


injection is not 


Tom Buerkle 


price and nonprice terms 
credit for business loans." 

He said it was an "open ques- 
tion” whether current stan- 
dards were adequate. "There 
are enough questions to be 
raised about industry loan prac- 
tices to give a central banker 
and supervisor pause." he said. 

The currency comptroller. 
Eugene A. Ludwig, echoed Mr. 
Greenspan's concern in his 
speech to the convention. “We 
found signs that some banks 
have eased their underwriting 
standards over the last sever J 
quarters.’’ 

In a tone measured to warn 
bankers without raising alarm, 
Mr. Ludwig called the situation 
“a yellow caution light signal- 
ing all of us to remain alert to 
avoid a repeat of mistakes made 
in lhe recent past. 

The banking industry tradi- 
tionally oscillates between peri- 
ods of lax lending standards 
and periods of contraction as 
many of the earlier loans turn 
bad. 

Many bankers and industry 
experts have been warning in 
recent months that the sloppy 
lending practices of the past are 
being revived faster than ex- 
pected. In particular, bankers 
have worried that key condi- 
tions, like how much collateral 


is required of business borrow- 
ers, have been relaxed loo far. 

Mr. Greenspan, in fact, al- 
luded to “anecdotal evidence 
that credit standards have 
weakened," but he noted that 
“these banker anecdotes, of 
course, are always referring to 
the competitor down the 
street." 

Mr. Greenspan also strongly 
criticized the way that banks 
were setting interest rates on 
business loans. 

“The highest-quaiity borrow- 
ers are being charged loan rates 
that are higher than actual loss 
experience indicates." he said. 
“Meanwhile, the riskiest bor- 
rowers are not bring charged 
sufficiently high rates to cover 
their significantly higher risk of 
default." 

Mr. Greenspan described 
dire results if bunks did not 
start taking risk into account in 
loan pricing. For example, he 
said, their competitors will steal 
the banks' highest-quaiity cus- 
tomers, leaving them with only 
the riskiest loans. 

Mr. Greenspan called for 
banks to take groups of loans 
they have made and to sell them 
to investors as securities, much 
as they do now Tor home mort- 
gages.' 


Compiled by Our Stjfl From Dispatches 

DUBAI, United .Arab Emir- 
ates — Oil traders said Sunday 
that the Iraqi military buildup 
along the Kuwait border was 
unlikely to disrupt world oil 
markets, but that an upheaval 
could not be ruled out because 
the market sees President Sad- 
dam Hussein as unpredictable. 

Kuwait said it had prepared 
an emergency plan to protect its 
oil installations and maintain 
crude production in the event of 
an Iraqi attack. 

Oil Minister Abd al Muhsin 
al Mudij said the plan was “pre- 
cautionary” and should not be 
seen as a reason for “excitement 
and fianic,” according to the 
Kuwaiti press agency. KUNA. 

Iraq said it had no plans to 
invade Kuwait. A Kuwait Pe- 
troleum Corp. executive said oil 
sales were proceeding normally. 

On Friday, oil prices surged 
in London but closed slightly 
lower. In the United States, 
crude for November delivery 
closed 4 cents lower at SIS. 21 
on the New York Mercantile 
Exchange. 

When Iraq invaded Kuwait 
in August 1990. crude prices 
climbed above $40 a barrel. 
Iraqi troops set fire to most of 
Kuwait's 700 oil wells in Febru- 
ary 1991 as they fled in defeat. 
Kuwait has since capped and 
repaired the wells and is pro- 
ducing close to its OPEC quota 
of 2 million barrels a day. 

While a new takeover of Ku- 
wait by Iraq could deprive the 
market of those 2 million bar- 


rels per day, experts believe 


jrices would not soar because 


Euro Disney Attendance Said to Dive 


Agencr Fniihv-Presse 

PARIS — Attendance at the Euro Disney theme park for the 
financial year totaled 8.2 million people. 160,000 people less than 
the previous year, the economic weekly L'Expansion reported on 
Sunday. 

The magazine said that park visitors spent an average of 51 
francs ($9.70) on food and beverages and 48 francs on other items, 
such as toys, in the year that ended in September. Euro Disney 
had counted on visitors spending 53 francs in each sector. 

L’Expansion said attendance in the first half of the financial 
year, from October 1993 to March 1994. was 21 percent lower 
than the same period last year. Euro Disney will publish its annual 
report next month. 


pm 

Saudi Arabia and other region- 
al producers could boost '‘pro- 
duction. 

Traders said prices would be 
bolstered over the long term 
since Mr. Saddam's defiance of 
UN resolutions would be likely 
to delay the day when Iraq 
would be allowed to export oil 
again. 

At the same lime, they agreed 
that prices were hostage to the 
possibility that the Iraqi leader 
might resort to force. 

"Nobody can predict what 
will happen," a Saudi- based oil 
source said. 

A Western oil executive, dis- 
counted the threat of war and 
called Mr. Saddam’s moves “a 
big roar from a desperate cor- 
ner." 

On Sunday in Singapore, oil 
traders said they believed oil 
prices would rise by about 20 
cents a barrel on Monday be- 
cause events over the weekend 
heightened fears of a conflict. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP) 




I S> -4 


FIRST HALF RESULTS 


O Inlemabooul HaraW Trfcune 


i’R? 


CURRENCY RATES 


HIGHER EARNINGS 


Cron Ratos 






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no w York and Zurich, fixings In other centers; Toronto 


Active in some forty countries, 
Lafarge Coppee is one of the world's 
foremost producers of building ma- 
terial. Wc hold leading positions in 


each of its core businesses; cement. 


gno debar; -; Units of HDD; N.O.: not owner,- NJt-; not 


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concrete and aggregates, gypsum, 
and specialty products- 
With its products and its expertise 
developped around the world, Lafarge 
Coppee helps to improve the qualify 
of life by enhancing comfort, safety 
and esthetic appeal. 


Net income attributable to Lafarge Coppee 
rose by 50% and earnings per share gained 
20% in the first half of 1994, reflecting an 
increase in business. The period also saw 
further strengthening of the Group's bal- 
ance sheet. 


SUSTAINED EXPANSION 


L 


Foiwird Rates 


Currency 
Canadian dollar 


taday ttdov ftdov 
1JMM U4W 1J4W 
99.73 99X7 99.1S 




uni 13903 13904 
LSJS4 13140 13N* 

UW3 M7S7 

5aunm; 'NGtkm* i Amsterdam!; udoamaenk 

{MHanl; Ayenee Frtnat Pres* (PorfsJ; Bonk ot Tokro (Tokyo!. Revol Bonk of Cooodo 
[Toronto); tMF tSOOJ, Other data from Beaters andAP. 


LAFARGE 

COPPEE 


Capital spending increased by 22%, illus- 
trating the Group's international develop- 
ment and the reinforcement of its product 
lines. 


WORLD LEADER IN BUILDING MATERIALS 



THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
AND THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation. 
Self-winding chronometer 

in 18 U gold. 

Swiss made since 1848. 



o 

pMEGA 

The sign of excellence 











Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. OCTOBER 10. 1994 


WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


Provided by CS First Boston 
umited, London, Tel: (071) 
518 40 25. Prices may vary 
fccording to market conditions 
and other factors, Oct 7. 

Dollar Straights 


taw 


Con Mot Price YU Trw 


Governments/ 

Supranationals 


MO Jul 7Vl 

AdbJun 4% 
A WO Apr 7H 
AMO tor 7% 
ASA Mar 6% 
Albert Peg Mg* 8% 
Atari Pro Nov 7H 
Alberto Pr Does 
UxrtePrHil 
AsdevbkMor 6% 
AjflnooPqb «k 
Austria F are 7% 
Austria Feb 7b 
Austria Jgn t 
Austria Jan 8% 
Austria Jen BV* 
Austria Mv 7% 
Austria Mar 8* 
BriaUnnAci- Bto 
BelpiumFfb 8 

Betaken Jun 5b 

BetgtumJui 9b 
BetehlflOul 7 
BriOTim Nov 5b 
BeWumOet m 
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Cnl Europe Jun4 
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Cr Fonetor FOT9H 
Den Marie Aim 4% 
Den Mark Feb 4% 
Dot Mark Feb Sto 
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Amoco Con 56P7M 02 
Amoco Cn Mar f 3 * 16 
At IT Apr 6b 97 
AILTAOT Sb 98 
AllTFrt 5b 99 
AI&T Cm Junta M 
Board Fm Jut 516 98 
Bast Pin Auo 7 99 

Best Fin Apt 3 01 

Bari Fin See I M 
Bat COP AW 6 98 

Bat Cob Nov m 03 
BaverAsAm an. « 
BtdSttlTcJun 5b 91 
BeftstliTcSeP 6b M 
BmwUsMar 6b 04 
Boats Pic Jon 9 97 

BPAmerMOT 18 96 
BPAmerMar 9b 99 
BpcnFlnAnr 8b «8 
BrGasIM Jut ta 03 
Br Gas ltd Mar ta 97 
Br Gas Inf Sep 8b 99 
Bt Fin Bv Alia Bto 99 
BtFtaSv NOY 9b 98 
Bt Fin By 590 7b M 
CabMWDec 6ft 03 
Cheung Fin Seo5b 98 
OilwDNav 6b 03 
China Rep Feta Oft 04 

okauEaub ta as 

Owbu Elec Jcti 9 97 
Chubu E Mar 7 M 
CnubuElcc5ei>av> 90 
CMfSQkuEIF 7 97 

Chueoku EIM H 96 
OwgakuEIN Bb M 
CibaCorpDec Aft 97 
OtnComMcx 5b 00 
a ha Corn Od 5b 98 
QOHAmaHN 7b 96 
Dotal Noe May M 96 
DaftnNacOa 8 98 

DctmlerApr n 99 
Dan/KrOTJm WVi 96 
Dupont El Aor 8 02 

□uaent El Jun Bb 90 
Dupont El Jun 7b 99 
ElacCeNz Jul 9b 96 
Electro Jot 7 98 

EMAauftMor 7b 97 
EliLilly Jul 5b 98 
Emerson 7b 7b 90 
EnergieBeJui 5b oo 
Ericsson Od 7b M 
EsttparMar 6b 04 
Euroflrm Mta (b 01 
ExxanCMav 4ft 9 a 
E xxon Ctxi MarAft 03 
ExxonCaoOda 98 
Exxon Cap Sep Aft 81 

Foe Nov 4b 03 

Ford Ep Oct 6b 97 

Ford MCr Jun Ab 97 
Ford Mat Auu 9b DO 
Ford Motor J uny+k 97 
Farits Fin Nov 7b 9A 
Frd Mir Cc FeOAft H 
GeccAug 6b 97 
GcccAug fib 08 
GeceFOD 616 96 
GeccFeb 6 98 

GeocFeb A 04 
GecCJun 4b 96 
GcccJim 6ft 97 
GeecMar ** 96 
GeccMar 8b 98 
GeccMar 6b 99 
GeccMar 5b 99 
GeecSep 4V. 96 
GeccSap 5 98 

Gccc Drop Apr 5ft 98 
GrccDrOTNOvM 96 
GeccTrA Jun 6b 97 
GeneccanOdi 8b 99 
GMAC 616 98 

GMACJiri 9 M 
GMAC Oct 716 97 
Grand Inv Jun 7 99 

HJ Heinz Oct 7b 96 
KedatMar Bb 97 
Hand Fin Dec A 98 
HI toad Cr Dec 7ft 96 
Hitachi Cr Jut 7b 97 
Hitachi Cr Jul 5b 98 
HkecpwrSea 9b M 
HoectatAuo 6 00 

Hakurtk El NovBb 96 
Honda Mtr Feb 9b 97 
ibmJapanDtcta 97 
Intelsat Aug 7b 02 
lutetsolJan 6b 00 
intatsatMar 6b 84 
investrAO jot tb *9 
J ill Co Jul 6b 03 
Kansal EleM 10 96 
Karaol EieSenfb 96 
KodakAar 7b 97 
Korea E let Dec fb 03 


97b 

95b 

107b 

97ft 

94ft 

mm 




Spd 

Cpn Mat bn rid Tny 


HI AT FaB 

Nt AT Jul 

Ml IT Jul 


Ml AT Nov 




TepcoAug 
Tosco Aug 
Tapes Jo! 


Vattenfall Jun 6 
VbtvoQrpSep 7* 
VwimtAug 3 


94 

9Bi 

7.9S 

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88H 

834 

+42 

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4X2 

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M+k 

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466 

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488 

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7.17 

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7X9 

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E- 

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+37 




Erl 




+17 



7X2 

+15 


77ft 

7X4 

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7X5 

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IM 

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Km 

+44 


.. r y 

742 

462 


jft 

7X3 

404 


i*. 

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96 

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7X6 


98 

98b 

795 

+57 

97 

101 

7JS 

+43 

94 

10Q 

7.12 

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98 

B9H 

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99 

12X00 

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94 

102H 

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98 

103V* 

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99 

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*7 

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749 

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98 

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94 

84% 

7.18 

+27 

97 

99b 

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98 

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752 

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731 

+44 

97 

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+27 

96 

raw 

6.42 

+5 

97 

95V* 

732 

+24 

96 

96H 

453 

+33 

96 

TOlto 

691 

+32 

90 

103b 

7X3 

+38 

00 

105b 

7X6 

+28 

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0.13 

4S 

98 

93X90 

7X1 

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7X8 

+59 

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96+6 

833 

+78 

01 

73V6 

827 

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822 

486 

99 

95b 

8X1 

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90 

71% 

7X7 

421 

96 

101X00 

730 

+78 


Dollar Zeros 


Issuer 

Mat Price YM Tray 





FT 3 7. ■ 

on 

£ZH 

844 +72 

[I'l i | J 1 mJL'IjJB 




00 

61% 

814 +38 

Ami inti usd 

97 

7314 

11X4 +460 

Austria Jul 

« 

«5% 

5X3 +3 

BP Got Bv Jun 

« 

95% 

6.15 +44 


21 

10X20 

8X7 +30 

CcceMay 

»5 

96% 


Cm May 

01 

60b 

7X9 +9 


02 

E 

824 +33 


07 

35 

872 +38 

CecetPl 

09 

29b 

8X4 +37 

rzjaj-i 

95 

98 

583 +52 


96 

91X99 

7.16 +81 


97 

B4H 

7X5 +71 


90 

77X69 

8.W +85 

pi .'f 'ft'l- 1 

99 

71b 

517 463 


01 

59 Ik 



87 

55b 

845 +56 

F* ri:ri2 r l 

03 

49% 

571 +72 

Db Rn Nv Jan 

W 

263b 


DM Mark Aug 

98 

Tib 

725 -19 

Exxon Cot Nov 

0* 

40* 

826 +8 

FnmaMfn 

99 

67% 

7X8 +25 

FstFeaFeh 

05 

416. 

590 +71 

Greece Mar 

95 

97H 

6X1 +46 


Issuer 


_ Spd 

mot Price Yld Trsv 


GMCCCJUl 

% 

89% 

571 

Got miik Aua 

H 

44% 

Ul 

G«i Mills Aug 

13 

15% 

M 

ladbJOT 

96 

STO 

6X3 

lOdbDK 

96 

86X50 

7.15 

lodbJun 

98 

76b 

74? 

loot) Jun 

at 

60b 

7.90 

ladbDee 

02 


517 

loan jot 

03 

50% 

523 

ladbDac 

a 

J9H 

8X3 

ladbDee 

86 

36% 

866 

laflbtPj Dec 
IbrdOrf 

08 

02 

X 

53 

586 

525 

l sec Mar 

97 

B 

851 

Italy Mot 

99 

77 Vi 

8X4 

Maru Cara Jul 

95 

Mb 

6.98 

Merck & C0 Aug 

77 

82% 

699 

Middletown Jul 

10 

305 

742 

New Emxn Fen 

99 

68% 

9.16 

Pru Realty Jgn 

99 

72% 

7X8 

Sato Nov 

94 

99W 

463 

SBC Cayman Nov 

97 

80% 

7.17 

Sera O/S Jul 

ra 

75% 

7X9 

Sims Jun 

01 

59% 

8X2 

VicPuMSu 

if 

dii 

7X4 

WMtinn FlnMav 

M 

98 

no. 


Hoatkig Rato Notes 


Cri. 

Price Chi. 


Ecus 


Bca D I Rom Act 97 
Belgium Aw oo 

Bet Blum May w 
Bk Grocer Apr 77 
Blta Aug 96 
C A g Jen 75 
CcceFebOA 
Cr Fonder Apr 96 
CritaltaJul97 
Sb Feb 02 
ElbAuoDl 
■tan Trn Jin Jun 97 
isvebner Nov 95 
Italy Oct 05 
Lavoroo/sAprSO 
Public Pwr Sen 97 
SHMhalpePcrp 


99% 

0X2 

99 

02 

99% 

519 

•8% 

142 

99% 

OXS 

99% 

LZ1 

«% 

615 

99% 

8JJ3 

90% 

544 

95% 

616 

97b 

614 

99% 

544 

99 

1X8 

95% 

OM 

99% 

632 

98% 

6*7 

fib 

592 


U.S. Dollars 


Altaev Tsv Mar 99 
Abe Mar H Mar 94 
Abdni5tAar83 
AbdilStSepOZ 
Atn Amro Apr 05 
Aba Amro Aug 02 
Abn Amro RejullB 

Advance Bk Jot 99 

Alb Pern Peru 
A® PIC NOV 49 
Alb PIC Jut 49 
Alaska Hie Jul 01 
AHusFlnJunOO 
Amu Bk Feb 04 
Aitz Bka Gp AW 00 
Anz Bkg Gp Dec 99 
Am Bkfl GP Od 92 
Am Bkg Gp oa rt 
AnzBko Git Feb 96 
AnzBkaGpMar95 
Arab Skits Jixi 00 
Asflnag Jul 97 
AshttoDoSspOO 

Aslk<ger Jal 00 

Austria Jot 03 

Austria Oct IB 

Austria Aug 97 
AuxHCffOctKZ 
AuxllCtf FatiOG 
AuxllCHSepC 
Boon art Sep 97 
Boob a/I nov 94 

Banco NazAirg 97 

BOTcatnmltl Jul 00 

Banssfa Is Mar 94 

Barclay Old Nov 49 
Barclay Sl Jut 49 

Barclay <2 Feb 49 

Barings Bv Jan 81 
Borinas Bv Mar 01 

Bolt Sa Mar 96 

Bayer Land Aug 85 
Bayer Loid May 03 

Bayer vere Aug 05 

Bayer Verr Jan 03 
Bayer Vere Aug 02 
Bbf (Brat) JOT JOT 98 
BV Inti Jun 01 

BOt mtt Anr99 
Be Nan Ldn Dec 96 
Be NOT Ldn Feb 99 

Be Nan Ldn Dec 98 

Bca Dl Rom Jot 01 

Bca Ol Ram Dec 99 

Bca Dl Rom Aug *7 

Bca Dl Ram Jut 97 
Bd Junta 
Ben Nap Hk SaoOl 
Bca not in Aug 97 
BcocomBol Jun 95 
Beta Tro Oct 94 
Betakim Jcn9S 
Betotam Dec99 
Belgium Od 94 
Bergen Bk Aug 97 
Bergen Bk Aug 49 
Bfce AugT7 


99b 

99 

90 

92 
87b 
93’A 

109ft 

99ft 

91 
B3b 
82 
99ft 
98ft 
9Sb 

100 

100 

99b 

01ft 

mi 

99ft 

99ft 

99b 

97ft 

97 
ezta 
9Zft 
96ft 
97b 
91ft 
92b 

100 
99ft 
99b 
97ft 
99ft 
«$b 
84ft 
S3ft 
95b 
99ft 

98 
84U 
87 
86 
9114 

93 
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77ft 

98ft 

99b 

90ft 

99ft 

95ft 

99ft 

99b 

100 

98ft 

88ft 

99ft 

99ft 

99ft 

99b 

9914 

99ft 

99ft 

74ft 

100ft 


ILOfl 

OS6 

1A4 

1.15 

183 

8*4 

033 
036 
083 
142 

184 
023 
035 
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0X9 
047 
843 
148 

0.19 

003 

0.00 

0.12 

085 

0*4 

091 

094 

1.17 

1JX9 

124 

LQ5 

817 

082 

052 

Oi8 

025 

123 

128 

128 

058 

049 
150 
IJi 
129 

1 JO 
122 
0.97 

25422 

IL4? 

050 
043 
043 
041 
089 
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006 
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164 

034 

851 

320 

041 

002 

059 
049 
267 
001 


issuer 5 Mar 


Btif Ffn BvMcr99 
BtawbrttAueO] 
BlkiJben5n00 „ 
Bilbao Irirlo Aug 01 
Bk CM no Oct 97 
Bk OH no May 77 
BkCnmaJutta 
Bk Greece Dec 96 
Bk Greece Morn 

Bk Greece Mar *9 

Bk Grata Dec 98 
Bk Greece Dec 96 
Bk I retard 5a? 49 
Bk Ireland Dec 49 

Bk Metaaur Oct 97 

8k Mcritri Jul 98 

Bk NOVO 5C AUO 49 

Bk Seal Nov 47 
BkSeenenavPcrs 
BJXsmmunl Oct 01 
Brail Aug 99 
BAI IHk) NBV03 
■Bnl (HklOdM 
BMPebOS 
Bra>OdD2 
BttP JUl 97 
BlU>5fp49 
Bee Carp Jim U 
B« Loro Mar 99 

BoaCwpMarVS 

Sot Hide NOV 77 
Be Paribas Nov DS 
Ba Paribas Sep 49 
Brit Col urn Peb 03 

Broadway Od 99 

BtnvcSePK 

BtnrCAPrOS 
caOOn ta rto Mar 99 
cadSek See 02 
Cnrtpto FeDta 

Corlpto Apt 97 

Cairtsol JUI99 
Cass Veron Ftfi 99 
Cha Jul 49 
CbaFeb49 
Cba Jul 99 
Oxi Fed 99 
CM Jut 98 
CcdMorW 

cdAugW 

Cd Marik 

Cd Morin __ 

Cd Hot Hk Sea 03 
CeameJuntS 
cm Feb 03 
Chase Man Scam 
ChemcoraApra 
Cheuns Pin Jan 01 

□Una Tst Aorta 

Christ OgQd 97 

cnrtsi Og Sepoi 
Christ Do Nov 49 
□be Aug 4» 
abcJuf49 
Otic Redeems Aw a 
ailery Na See 05 
atlcry No Jan 05 
Cltlcry Na Auoin 
ComeencSapoz 
Cam it Fin Nov DS 
CamrzbnkScoaz 
Camztika/SNavDS 
Coirat* a/S Aug AS 
Cranibk o/S Nov 98 
Cam Bk Aug 98 
CrDuNoidOct97 
Cr noila Aug 00 
Crltatla Jun 97 
Cr Local Apr OS 
Cr Local Feb ID 
Cr Local Aua 02 
CrLvonn Sen OS 
CrLvannMar03 
Cr Lyomi Aug 77 
Cr Lyons JtxiTS 
Cr Lvom Jul 00 
CrLyano Dec 99 
CrLvennJul98 
Cr Lvurm Mar 96 
Cr Natl Oct 03 
Cr Natl Feb 97 
Crrtt Local D*C 97 
Cmt [IHk Jun 03 
CradtopOsMarV9 
Credit Loc Dec 02 
CreaHanxI Aug 05 
Crtdl thank Apr 03 
Credooo/sStpTI 
Crtgan Fin Mav 01 
CstbBv Mar 49 
CdbBv219ep99 
CsSjBv2J5e*>77 
Csfh BvAugCT 
CxtbBvMayDJ 
Csft Grp Od Q5 
CdbCroMt Feb 03 
CsfblncMorM 
CstbincFeb04 
□ Italia Fed 00 
Daewoo Aua 95 
Db Fin Nv Oct 03 
Den DanskeNav49 
Den Danske Fr Jun 00 
DenDamkeTrJunOO 

Den Hankc Ne Aug 49 

DcnNarskeOlNev47 
Dendanxige Fr Jot 00 
DkbJpmSeaOO 
Donatuse58S Feb 03 
Dres Fln5eP02 
Dresdbk Ag Aug 05 
Dresdtik Ag Mar 0+ 
Dresdbk AgAprU 
Ebrd Od 02 
Edl Jun 94 
EdcFeem 
Eat Nov 07 


W4 

09ft 

97b 

78ft 

100ft 

99ft 

HM 

98ft 

99ft 

99 
98ft 
99ft 
98ft 
81ft 
99ft 
96ft 
77ft 

82ft 

94 ft 
98ft 
99ft 
87b 
tab 
fib 
flft 
100ft 
81 

92 
99ft 
100ft 
99ft 
85 
81 

92ft 

96b 

92ft 

87b 

99ft 

95 
100ft 
99ft 
994k 
99ft 
99ft 
99V8 
99ft 
99ft 
97ft 

99ft 

07ft 

98 
*w» 
89b 

100 
92ft 
90% 
90ft 
97ft 
100ft 
97b 

96 
75ft 
78 
87U 
84 
87ft 
70ft 
flft 
73ft 
92ft 

93 
85ft 
85b 
97ft 
100b 
79ft 
99ft 
97ft 
B7ft 
71 
73b 
B2b 
90b 
9Hft 
100 
77ft 
99ft 
188 
99ft 
B4ft 
97b 
100ft 

taft 

99 
92ft 
89ft 
89ft 

100 

89 

77b 

93 

M 

90b 

93ft 

84ft 

92V< 

74ft 

94ft 

100b 

99ft 

92ft 

03b 

HIIW 

100b 

75 

75ft 

96b 

97 
99b 
93 
85ft 
92ft 
B9ft 
91 
95 

91 Vi 

92 


Crl. 

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0. 17 
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1.12 
028 

044 
041 

045 
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124 

033 
121 
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026 
045 
124 
144 
129 
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OJB 

144 
120 
099 
127 
020 
141 
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025 
019 

032 
1.71 
147 
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069 
1.11 
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OB7 

028 

019 
024 
027 

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OB9 

006 

on 

002 

012 

140 

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143 

CJW 

009 

120 

127 

mo 

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054 

OAI 

105 

123 

121 

008 

127 

1.12 

1.12 

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OH 

127 

123 

003 

023 

034 

058 

020 
150 

1.13 
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2.13 

123 
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124 
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033 

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1.09 

152 

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1.92 
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125 

1X4 

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1X8 

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060 

019 

070 
1X0 
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186 

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129 

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EdfFebff 

ERbeneaMorH 

Coal Thai Mar 95 

Elb Jon 03 
EibOetos 
EksaerHlnAagO 
EkSDortfln Sen 02 
Elders Res Dtc 96 
Eue Coal Dec Dl 
Euroftmo JonCD_ 
Extm Korea Sw 97 
Exterior NovSl 
F.eJtOdM „ 
FerrovteMov97 
PbiCicAuaBl 
FkiClcSCPfB 
Flh CIC MOV 96 
Fin Exp Aua 97 
Fin Retd Aua 95 
FI non Clc Mav *7 
Finland May 99 
Fort mCr Aua « 

Full lot Fin S otM 
GeccFeb 03 
GeccJonn 
Gccc Dec 02 
GJJ [LSI Febta 
GJJ.IUP) Sea 97 
GtruOrAgDecIO 
GgWmonLpNOvOS 

Gatdrnon LpOcIQS 

GaUman LpAuuW 
GotflmonLPMOvBS 

GotanupiLP Fcb98 

Gbtobonken Sea 01 

Greet Lakes Dec n 

GuangdOTSlVUvn 

HaHtax Bs.5en99 
Rttaba JonD3 
HUl Samuel Jul 16 
Hid Samvel 
HJliSamuel Feb« 
HlsaanoAmcrOdH 
HokurtkuSepOD 
HSbCI Dec 49 
HsOClAug49 
Hsbc»Jul47 

aassr* 

inraPera 
l bra Marta 
IMP Nan Nov 85 
IMP Mass Sec M 
ItapTurtnJiPOa 
lbs> Turin Fchta 
1 bum Jul 03 
Ibsen Jut 01 
Uni Bank May 99 
I ml Bank Decta 
iml Bank Jun ta 
linl Bank Sap 97 
ln«OTOBNav94 
Indonesia Feb 01 
liMtouez Oct 05 
Indosud Nov 97 
Indasuez Aua 77 

| rg Mar 03 
ipg BkOdBS 
ISU Ltd Decta 

IstCrOtl Dec 77 

Isvebner Mar 96 

isveimer Jul 95 

Isvetmar Aorta 
| jvttmer Feb 95 

Isveimer Nov 94 

Italy Jul 97 
IMv Junta _ 
rtaiv Usd JulT9 
IHIntBk Jun 96 
Joti Inc Apt 05 

Jem Inc Nov 02 

Jpm Inc Aug 02 

KopMOYft 
Kb Iflma April 
Kdo Aprff 
KdbJulf7 
Klein Ben Jun 49 
Korn muntav Juf 98 
KH) 31/5 May H 

KMlS/Mavta 
Kao 21- May 96 
X0P29/Mavta 
Koa Juf 97 
KdpSM> 43 
K-cm Ml Febta 
Korea Exch Mar 97 
Land Hess SOPH 

LawoBk Septa 

UsRbeMdDecOS 

Lh R/MlnW Marta 

Lkb Fata 03 
LkbOctOl 
Lkb Aug 02 
Lkb Fin NvNavta 
Lloyds sl Jun 49 
Lloyds &2 Nov 47 
Uavdss3Aua4V 

MatatgovOdOS 

Malaysia Apr 15 
Malaysia Dec 09 
MetvlncMaytD 
Mgn GrenMI Perp 
Nddl FinlMarfl 

Mkflandsl JOT49 
Midland s3 Sep 49 
Midland S3Dec49 
MltsubtsN Bk SOP 08 
MllsufShk motM 
Mitsui AslJd 77 

MorgGroJanT? 

MlgBkDenJunlB 

MutrfMgSeplI 

Muirfletd a Jm 10 
Nab Oct 49 
Nab Jut 7 Jut 77 


Cri. 

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axo 

123 

0X1 

055 

1X3 

029 

l.W 


0X9 

0X5 

0.15 

020 

116 

0.12 

022 

020 

0.12 

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020 


101 
70ft 
99ft 
72ft 
« 

91ft 
92b 
« 
tab 
92ft 
99ft 

nn 

92 
99ft 
99b 

too 
100 
97b 
79ft 

97b 

99ft 0X8 
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77b 
71b 
91ft 
71b 
97b 
99 
88ft 
85b 
B6ft 
90ft 
90ft 
99ft 
lOSft 
97ft 
99ft 
99ft 
92 
8Bb 
74 

99 
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97ft 
78 
78 
76ft 
in 

1W 
71ft 
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85ft 
89ft 
97ft 
10016 
91ft 

S8S 

100 
in 
100ft 
97b 


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140 
147 

040 

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0X3 
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171 
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1X9 
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129 

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139 
059 
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047 
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027 
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053 
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016 
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152 
092 

028 

on 

045 
013 
157 
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04ft 

99ft 


0914 


NO 

97ft 

78b 

87 

fib 

83ft 

weft 

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TO OUR READERS 
IN BIRUN 

You can now receive 
the IHT hand delivered 
to your home or office 
every morning on the day 
of publication. 

Just call us toll free at ■ 

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Soles 

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23ft 19ft 21ft —ft 
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AnrvesIF _. 1453 10 

Amvlln 2057 8ft 

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AnalvTc 44 IX 600 15ft 

Analysts 52 3X 724 18ft 

Artcnoel l.DOe 6X 428 15ft 

Aiwtm _ 23 2b 

AnchBcp — 6484 16ft 

AncSWii JO 1.7 1049 30ft 
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AndvBc jsa 2J 2507 IH» 
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Andros .. M2 16b 

Anergen - 312 3b 

Anosta _ 1146 8ft 

Antec -21123 25ft 

APOrius .. 12429 B'Vu 

Aphton ._ 2585 8ft 

ABOOEn 40 IX 668 tab 

Apogee 568 18ft 

AppleC AB 14169026 38V. 

Aphous X2 .1 4321 IBb 


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3874 21ft 
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-.70972 46 ft 

_ 839 4b 

-. 635 Aft 

._ 85 b 

... 1996 5 

- 1053 5ft 

- 1188 1b 

-. 323 2ft 

_ 260 17ft 

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21 21ft— 1 

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10 10ft —b 
28b 30 Vi -ft 
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32 33 —ft 

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1.08DX4 61534ft 

XO 17 217 30 
. - 2999 25ft 

BgndBM. X6a 6X 84 15b 
Banda lX2e 7.7 18 M 

BkSOum X3 2.911420 18ft 


BkGrans 
BnkNH ao 

BanfcAil 35 

Brtcutpt 
BkUtFpf 
BonkrsS XO 
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Bkrittl XO 

Banta J2 

BanyM3 
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BovRldtM 
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Bod Bath 
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IX x9227ft 
IX 152 27 
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_ 23 9b 

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2.5 469017ft 
2X 163 20ft 
2X 885 Mft 
1XX1420 33V* 

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_ 372 lb 

9X 319 4b 
_ 9451 17ft 
J 957 16 
_ 456 7 

_ 1836 11ft 

- 1096 19b 

- 279 3*1. 
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3X 141826ft 
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— 

_ 362614ft 
2X*1505 25b 
3J 7554 56 

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2X 17714b 

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_ 13 4ft 

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. _ 3257 14b 

taeiX 369 19b 
JO 1J 2927 25ft 

- 544626 

- 380016 
-11769 23b 

- 218 Sft 


BeJFuse 
BMdBIk 
Belize 
Ball Bess 
BeUCcW 
BeUMic 
Beusw 

BEtwers _ 

BenJETry _ 90814b 

BFrankft - 305 4b 

Benhan - 109 4b 

BenscnF _ 973 12ft 

BentOG _ 4664 7ft 

Berkley X4 1J 467336 

BericGS 1.10 73 92216ft 

Bertud _ 673 lift 

BeitPwr _ 2743 14b 

BmtPd _ 13166 7to 

BestOP - 366 9b 

Betas - 411 4 

BlgB .16 IX 28511b 
Btgonr - 284 tab 

DbRcV. - 328 14ft 

Blndty X8 X 1068 14ft 

Biol .oak _ 217 3ft 

BJoPlex _ 130116ft 

BJoDent - 1026 4b 

M2S - 4136 2ft 

BJaSpedf _ 237 9b 

BjoSurt _ 5000 3b 

BtaPhar _ 71610ft 

Btodr - 363 I 

Blocrvst „ 479 5b 

Bbgen -116234 55 

8k»ea - 1035 4 

BJornog _ 878 lft 

Btomatr _ 2309 5b 

Btomet -2132513b 

BorrUro - 679 5ft 

BioSaftty _ 772 3b 

Bjosesrs - 0026 3ft 

BotpU _ 276 7ft 

=*3® 

BioTeG - 11778 2ft 

BlndCP JO 2.3 413 9 

BlrdMff 368 4ft 

Birtchr _ 1545 lb. 

BIckBxs - 6053 12ft 

HkHwkG - BM lib 

BlkHGwlA - 82 'Vu 

BlkHGwtB - 122 lb 

Blimptes X2I J 301 8 

BliSLOU _ 13 Sft 

BtOCOv „ 4499 lift 

BlckO IJMD3X 347 31b 

Bwtti _ na s>* 

BoetSnc IJ6 4X 16097 31b 
BobEvn 33 IX 678420ft 


— Vk 


♦ ft 


— to 

♦ ft 

• ft 

-b 


BocoRs 

BonTan 
BookMs 
BaaieB 
Baoinlwn 
Bard U9e6X 

Borind 


BasfTe 

aoxEn a 

BOkBlB 

BoydBros 

BrodPhm 

BrdPwtA 

BrdFwffi 

BrdPvwO 

BradvW 


BmfdSw 

Brauns 

Brkwto 

Branaa 

vfflrondl 

Brents s 

BrdaF 

BriteV 

BriMUo 

Braarft 

BrdbdTe 

Bocstm 

BrdPort 

153?" 

BrockCS 

BradSf 

BklynBC 

Braakstn 

Brirtras 

Brown 


1254 6 
182 13 
413511b 
194213ft 
94 30ft 
359516ft 
.. 13219b 
-2339813ft 
_ 209 6b 
12 339 18 
24 imasut, 
-25461 21 
-11261 14 
- 2212 

- 8771 9 
_ 433 11ft 
„ 3987 4*i. 

- 698 3ft 
_ 374 lb, 
_ 1438 1'Vu 

ij X 143 48 to 

21 220 13b 

_ 15T ft 

- 123 Sft 

- 7084 ft, 
20 98212b 

.56 lto 
100 20 
94310b 
_ _ 1757 13ft 

390 2.6 701 17 
ta 1.1 *39 8b 
-19469 23 
_ 523 Jft 

- 1097 13ft 
_ 342215b 
X 2920 
_ 1579 9b 
-3S7KS Sab 
_ 1107 34b 

- 36316 

- 838 a 
_ 1714 10b 


u 

2.1 


47 

13 

U 

3ft 

l^k 

to 


Sato 

Slacks Div Ykt 100s MOT 

Low 

Che Choc 

BroGour 2444 13 

1IH 

IJ 


BrTom _. 2098 13b 

1 JH 

tab 


Brunos JA 2.721905 10b 

BUY,, 



BrynMw X0 1.9 21 32W 

11 V. 

17 

—I* 

BuckArii .. 77 9 

81, 



Buckle 634 13b 

tab 

tab — 1 

Buffets - 25739 ISb 

14'.* 

J"to— I'b 

BuoCrek _. 502 tato 



-'* 

BudtfT „. 1077 12b 




SuBRun „ 1933 1' 'u 

BurrBr 3737 10V. 

I # .ii 

Ib 

10'-. 

i b 

BusinObf .. 444* 79". 

77 b 

79 

i to 

BusnRc 9*35 

.14 

34b 

, v. 

Butter . 421 5b 

BultrAAl .10+ J 2338 J7b 

Sb 

JO 

»bZ3b 

Butrcv .. 719 8b 

7"'„ 

8b 

> ■* 

1 _c 



13 


.16 


Wto 19ft 
23 23ft —ft 
32ft 32ft —ft 
2ft 2ft +V H 
1ft lft 
4'A 4ft _ 
16ft 17 —ft 
15b 15ft —ft 
6b 6ft -to 
11 11 —ft 

18ft 18ft — b 
2to 2b —ft 
I 8ft —to 
lib lib — to 
10b lib _ 
26 26b -ft 

OTAi 2ft — 4ft 
12ft 14b *to| 

S 34+6 —ft 
56 *1 

3b 4 + b 

tab 14ft -Vi 

3b 3b —ft 
6b 7 -ft 
13ft 13ft —to 
lift 19b -ft 
Mft 25ft -ft 
tab tato^Jft 
13ft 14b —to 
20to 33ft -lft 
SYi 5ft -to 
13 13V, —V* 

4 4 — Via 

4b 4b — b 
11b lift — b 
7 7b -'ft 
35 35 Vk —V* 

15b IS’A —ft 
10 10b —ft 

13b Mb -b 
69* TA - 
9 *b - 
3ft 3ft —ft 
ii iib — b 
15ft tab -b 
13b 14 
13M 13ft 
2b 3 
IS'A 16 
3b Sft 
I'ft 2 
89* 89* 

Sft Sft 
10b 10b 
ft l 
5 5ft —to 
48 54b -to 

3b 3b — ft 
lb lb —to 
4ft 5ft —to 
lib lift —to 
5b Sft -ft 
7ft 2ft —to 
29k 3b -ft 
Sft 6ft -ft 
3ft 3b — b 

A A ^ 

8b Bft -Vi 
3ft 4 — Vk 

lto lVk -V* 
12ft 12ft -ft 
10b 10ft -Vg 
01 'to. * Vg 
Vk lft -ft 
7 7b —ft 
5ft Sft -ft 
lb lft -ft 
30b 31 — to 

Jft 4b — b 
29 30b 

30b 70«k —ft 
5 5Vg — ASt 
12b 13 -ft 
10b lift -to 
12b 13 -ft 
29ft tab — b 
TSV, 16 —ft 
19b tab —ft 
lOft 13b -Sift 
5b 5b —to 
15 18 -3to 

32 321k —3ft 

19 20 —1 

12ft 13ft _ 
9to lib -lb 
Bb 8ft -to 
lift ltto —ft 
4 4Vu — Vg 
3b Tb, — V„ 
lVu lVu — Vli 
lb lft 

47b -b 
13Vk —ft 

i v 5 "ft 

b -Vb 

ww -ft 

b —to 
ifft toft — b 
9 Vi 9ft —ft 
12ft 13V* _ 

15 15 —3 

7b TV, —to 
17b 22b -4ft 
3ft 3b _ 
Mft 13 -Vg 
tab 15 

19ft Mft - 

lto 8b -ft. 
48ft 57b +4 
31ft 31ft— 2ft 
15b ISft —ft 
7to 7 to —to . 
9to 9to -ft I 



. iis 

44 

CFWCm 33 1 3 

as Ten 

cSflGim = 

CNB X8 2-6 

CNB FNY 1.16 2J 

CNS 

CP AC J6 IX 
CPB X8 3X 

CRAetd 

CRH .77 e 2X 
CSBFr^ JO 2.1 

CTEC I 

CTLCr 

S Bnc 

□sgn _ 

CGbimox _ 

CabotM 1X1 1 25 J 
Cache 
CACI 
COdbvS 
Cadeln 

Cadr 

COdmus XO 
Caere 
Cairn 
CakienE 
CalAmp 
CaiBnc J6 
CoiMCui 
CalFnd X4b 2X 
CeJMD 

CaUWUc 


OalSEk 
Cotton P 

Cataway 

Calunwt 

CamNtB 

Cambex 

CambNE 

CanbSnd 

CamhTch 

CammAsn 

CamoaS 

CWlneB 

CWraeA 

Ctradala 


_ 65*11 « I0W —to 

. 3696 71’/. 20 »•*— 

.. 1191 12 10 10 -2 

3.7 165 34ft ta’i Mft — •« 

1.9 *131 46 44 45 1 * • to 

.. 2314 4b Jft Jft — 1 to 
33 703 43to 47'1 42b -I 

3993 43V. 39 to 42 V* '3 
.. 2056 9 0 8'* - to 

1323 28 26 ?7ft —to 

_ 164 2W* 2b 7’"i, "ft 

_ 1583 13to lift l?ft • I'. 
03 *108 25 Mb 75 -to 
_ 31 4ft 3b 3ft 

_ 651 15b 14V. 14ft _ 
2.4 311 l*b 18b IBb— I 

13 751 23ft 21 21 ft— 2ft 

_ 1645 2-ft 2to 2b —'to 
_ 330 3ft 2ft 2ft —ft 

- 1329 13b II Mft lift 
26 133 34 W 33b 34 — b 

ZX 1 40ft 40ft 40ft . to 

n "9 ft Ab i K tJ! 

2$!^ ?b »-;* 
7Z7i.i IPr* 77V* —ft 
*315 15 14 14 —1 

955 26 25to TS'tt — b 

8 3 9 8ft 8ft 
127 23 M+k— 2 

102 lift 10ft 11 —ft 

BUS 7b 7 7b -Vi. 

301 14ft 13ft 13ft— 1 

778 8 7 7to —ft 

B48 6'A 5b 6 _ 

_ 826 6b 6to 6b - ft 

_ 2259 10b 9W 9% —‘.'3 
1.170 6.1 19575 Mft 28 2Bto — 4k 
_ 144 IVu ft »b, 

- 1650 5 1 /* 4ft 4b —b 
1.1 1183 18ft IB 18 —to 
-1036110b 9'/. 10'.. -ft 
._ 781 7V* 6ft 6 V. — b 

_ 6639 *b Bft Bb — b 
_ 333 5 4'.4 5 - 

21018b 18 18 —V* 

429 AVt Sft 64* - V* 

28616 15V4 15b _ 

- 20464 13to 10b 11b— lto 
_ 4356 26 24 ft 25ft -ft 

3X XI54 11 to 10b 11 — i to 

_ 10712ft 12 12b —ft 

_ 13Q Ift lto 
- 804 37b 35 

_ 2057 5b 4ft 

- 468 Jb 4to 

_ 337 5 4to 

_ 437 Bft 7b 

- 744 15V. T4 
_ 10121 S' Vp 14ft 15ft -Vi. 

- 567013 lift 121Vu -lft 

_ 22 34to 33ft 34b -1 

_ 5706 34'/* 32ft 34V* -ft 

_ 93 3 2ft 2ft —'A 

S» Ift lft l'Vu —<h> 

♦!« 


3.1 


xa 


ift —ft 
35ft— 2b 
4b — b 
4b -to 
4to —to 
7ft —ft 
14 


CannExp _ 

CoreiExB 

Coran I XI e J 
Canon* - 

Constar JO 
Canlab _ 

cartel _ 

Conltorv 
CanyRs 
Cm* wt 

CCBT .159 X 

rnp«y _ 

CapBne 48 2X 
CapBn pf 1.95 9J 
CapSw X8e 3 

CooSw XOa IX 

OOTH8C JO 3J 
CapTms taa IX 
Caraustr X6 " 

CardBnc XO 

eva 

CtnGp 
CraeerHz 
COTeerSif 
Corel Ine 

Cronwfc — wu, «n iu ***ii - u*. 

Carton .91 B 3-5 1122 26b 26ft 2Aft —ft 

CamoaBc - 91 13 lift 13 -to 

CtmBwt - 51 1V» b 1 — '/< 

CoraFlt JOblJ X282 15ft 15 15 -ft 


117 13ft 12 12ft 
111 11 11 —ft 

465 89 to 866. 89b - lb 
418 5b 5b 5ft -b 
7ai2ftllftl2 -to 
_ 181 6b 3b 6b -ft 

_ 128 6b 6 6ft -ft 

_ 732 2ft 7ft 2Wi* —to 

_ 7783 2*1, 2b 7V|, —to 

679 V* Wo V, 

81 27b 26ft 27 V* —to 
371 *ii ft Wu -V M 
424b tab Mb -1 
1221b 2flto 21b -b 
11014b 14 14 —ft 

64 39b 38ft Mft — b 

36 9ft Bb 8W — W 

« 17ft 17+* 17ft —ft 

IX 4172 20ft ,vy, i»b— 1*„ 

2X 1530 28b 29 —1 

_ 2370 9"/„ 9to 9b -ft 
-1766321V,, 2ft 2ft —to. 
_ 3252 17 16 16 —to 

— 43014 13b le -ft 

-12523 6to 5b 6b +b 
-34850 Mb 23 Mv„-13Vi 


CarsPlr 
Carver 
Ca s c C cm 
Cased* xo 
Gnent ta 
CasnOd 
CasAm s 
COJiHODS 
COTMOOiC 
CasRawt 
CasnRsc 
CasriEs 
CatatSem 
caitsvt 
OdhBcp 
CothStr 

CotoCo .16 

CCdraGp 

CetSd 

COSCWT 

Cdadan 

Ceteblnc 

Cetes«al 

Coins 

CetOOT* 

CedGens 

CattPra 

C««r 

Cri War 

CHCmA 

CrilldttS 

Cri Cm PR 

CriirTcs 

Cettrx 

Cerrted JO 
CenBBcp Ji 
CetdlBc ' _ 
CenlCel 
arem, .16 
Centrbtc 
Cctrigrm 
Centacar 
Centcrvri 


l V Jt 


2940 21 19ft 19b— 1b 

- 91 3b 3 3 — b 

- 9207 47'/. 43 46b —ft 

2J 260 Mb 23b M —ft 

X 6088 124k Mb 12b 

_ 9tn 8ft 7ft Bb 

5D2B lift 10b II —to 

- 2099 23b 20 'A 20ft— 2ft 
-.14531 7ft 6b 6'V U -A', 

V„ ft 

lft lft -Vu 

IS I5to —ft 

2 2<« —to 

3b 4b 
13b 14 +b 

Bft Bft —l'A 

flV, 

7 


Bb — 2Vi 
7ft —to 
Wb 

*». *v» 


CFTdWf 1.12 
OenGardn 
QrtINBc XI 
CJerec 
CJerFns 
OWOM 
CRiLle 
Crfipm 
CtrfTroc 

CHSau 
CrtvBc 

QTYjO 

ceohin 
Centyn 
Certwo 
cemer 
Centtsc 
Cervecier 


8B2 Vu 
_ 910 lb 

_ 3513 16 

- 756 2to 

- 1068 4to 

XO 4J *1214 

- 1754 10 
1X2597211 

- 5443 8 

- 9462 »Vb 

- 959 Vr. . ... 

- 1348 18 to 16ft 17b— 1 

_ 173 Sft 5 5 

_ 1519 19W 17 18b —to 

_ 3581 21ft 30 20 — l'«, 

- 1502 7ft 6Vi 7Vk -V* 

- 329S 9ft Bb 8ft —lb 

- 1654 20b 19V. 20b -ft 

- 716 4 3b J'Yi, -Vu 

_ 4W8 15V* 1S1V M isto —to 

3605 54 52ft J4 -I 

- 2184 39b 3* 38to— I 

- 4403 35V* 34V* 34to -ft 

_ 3090 12b 11 12V* - 1 

- 686 7ft 6+1 Oft —ft 

IX H71fft 19b lfto-1 

U 676 26ft 25b 26b -1 

1X71157 13911 10 IQ —ft 

_ 4496 17b 1«V) 16ft _ to 
U ta2M3to 12 12 -lb 

- raw i3b i7v* law _b 

- 384816'.', IS ISft —ft 
-33145 18b tab 17 —1b 

- SS'.SS ,<H * 11»— 3b 

- 393817b 14ft lift .lft 

37 5031 31 » 30 -1 

if* 5ft -ft 

329 28b 77V. 27% — V* 
341 32 31b 31ft -to 

.86 21b 19b 19b— 2 
866 30ft 19 19ft— 1 

137 Bb 8 8 —ft 

fijito io nv* 

-17307 16ft 16 tab 

- 10 ift Aft 4ft 

S 'd Si% 1% zs 

- 135 3ft 3b 3to -ft 

- 12206 42ft 38b 39 -lft 

- 92 13 lift lift— lift. 
X3E 17 4790 26 23to 25V* .ft 



Sales 

Dtv Yld 1005 Hum Low Ou 0*9 


.. 267 3' i 3ft 
_ 141 6b 6ft ... 

a 108 24b tab 74b 
... Ill Jft 4ft Aft 
. 99 6b 5ft 6 

.. 43 5ft 4'i Sft 

.09 1 3 70450 Bft 7ft ri'u 
X0O7.6 330 31b 31 31 

_ 174 12ft lift lift 


1.9 
75 2X 
400 2.1 
48 2X 
■44 SX 


3ft — *v« 
A*/* 

• V. 
-b 
-ft 
'ft 
-•ft 

—to 

_ .... —ft 

3 0 2864 20ft 19<» 20+ft — v« 
_ (XI 7 Aft 7 ' v, 

- 447 5'Vu 5ft tb • V. 

*. 10708 4ft Jft 4b 
. 9A5 8 7ft TV. —ft 

... 7514 18ft 16ft 18 to i I 

:• ,7 S A'* mi i^u 

47 4 On. ta»> 404* i to 
7 4b 35. 37. -to 
1482 17V. l5‘/f 16 —I 
929 17ft 16 tab _ 
2324 21’-* Mft 30b -ft 
21 20", Mft 20b -ft 
4 405 10 b 9b 9b — I 

.. MIS BV. 7ft 8ft 
.. 9*8 3ft 2V. 7 to,. — Vu 

.. 647 141. 13b 14V* > ft 

.. 282 1ft lft, IH ■ ft 

_ 19024 S3b 4Bto SI ft— 2b 
. 2806 SH 4ft 5ft ■ V. 
..70498 6*b 57b 60 — 6W 
2X 408 31V, 20", 20b —ft 

_ 140 21 20 to 20 to , to 


to — to 


J4 


37 
X4 33 


2JI 


ZO 


CIMALb 

CnnFin 1X8 
OnAAic 
Cnergl 

Crntai 
Gprtco 
DrcFn 
Grelnc 
Grcan 
CrcSy 
□mil 
Gsrn 5 
atFnd 
CUatnCpt 
CitatiDn 
Olffinc 
Grtcastr 
OzBcp 1436 
OzBach 
OiteBkO 
GlrHns 

OvHJd X4 
avicSc 
CltiyEng 
OemiH 

GerCdg 
OevfRt 
aitDr 
OfDrpt 
dinlcom 
atfiKH 
amtrlals 
Oath 
OuOCar 
CoOoBk 33 
OUBncp 33 
CsJBnpf 2JS 
CstHIhl 
Coooncs J2 
COTroEl 
Cobra 

CocaBti Ita 
Cocensvs 
CodnEn 

CbdeAl _ 

Caflexip JlelX 
Ownes.: _ 

Cognasg _ 

ConerCm _ 

Cotiemt 

CahoEn _ 

Ccshu 34 

CTaytar .70 
Colaben 
COlaBCP 

iS e 

CotnGo 40 1.9 
OdBnk 
CoFst 

Comalr 3t 

Comra, 

Camats J39 
CmcsPS 09 
CmcsrUK 
Co i coo 

CmdiHff s 
Comdial 
CametStt 



. . Ih dt 

Sto 33b 14to —to 

149 4H Jft 4to —'A 
17 176Z7H 26 tab— 1 
13 155 11 10ft 10ft _ 

_. 491 12 11b 11b — to 

320 5b 5b 5b —to 
_ 52047 28to 26 »Jk — H 
-265417 27ft 2Jb 27*k +to 
X 375 33b 30W 30b— 2 
_ 19S 7 6b 7 — 

- 1692 12 lib lift ♦'* 

_ 1516b 16 16 *46 

663 22ft 21 21 ft —to 

740 30b 28W 29to— 1 
3 33to 33b 33b - 

98 26b tab tab *-1 
2044 5Vt* 5VS. 5ft —to 
84 M 32 32ft— 2 V* 

463 5V„ Sto SU -Vu 
101 Q'A 8b 9’A +b 

- 391 7 A 6b 

_ 2791 2to IH lft —Yu 
.16 5J «S7 3ft 3 3 —ft 

- 256 lib 10b 11'* — b 

9.1 150 26ft 25b 25ft —to 

- 77703 IB 14 17b 

- 120 4 3ft 4 +to 
_ 348 8H 7ft 79k —to 
_. 2930 4ft Jft Jft —to 
_ 7910 16to ISto 76 —to 

7.9 457 17to 15+4 16b —to 
17 “ ” 

»J 


Stocks 


Sales 

Div Yld lOOsHMt Law Che Chge 


1J 


72 24ft 23ft Mb 

- 74037 32+* ta'A 29 —OH 

IX 31 29 27H 29 el 

_ 810 2b 2b 2b —to 
_ 20696 55* 48 n'/*— 3ft 

3X 5W 29 to 27b 28 —to 
_ 356 5V» 4b Jto —ft 
_ 6530 6ft 6to 6ft +ft 
22511b 10ft lift —ft 
370 22 b 31b 22ft— 1 
5fi7?18b tab IBM, +V» 
305713ft Mft 13to -ft 
1708 9>/. 7b Sto *Vfn 
612 Mft 13to 14'A -to 
893 5<A Jft S —Y H 
... 207 20b IBb 19 —I'A 

.. 1.1 110018 I PA 171k —ft 
•too X 2338 22ft 21 to 22 —to 
40 13x2933 19ft 18ft 15ft— lto 
108 2to Sft 2'A +V* 

25623ft 23to 23to —ft 
216 2Hi 20b Zlb — b 
629 31 to 28ft 30b +lb 
212 II 10W 10ft -to 

- 201 40 37 38 —lto 

1.1 6004 22ft 21 21ft— lto 

- 288 5to 5V* 5¥u —Yu 

X 23974 15b Mb 15 — V. 
X35D70 16V* 15 15V* —Hu 

-3)572 19ft 17ft 18ft— 1 
_ 262 14V* 13ft 14 _ 

- 6250 9+e Bto 9ft -1ft 
_ 1085 JV U lft 2ft — 

_ 959 5ft 5b Sft —to 
_ 6325 2ttk 22 24b, -lft 

OimdSc _ 836 3to 3Vk 3to —ft 

CmcBNJ X5 11 159821ft 70 21ft -to 
QncBMO 48 13 1344 30 29 

CmcSVA X0b IX 771 37b 36 
78 4.1 
70 4.7 
30 17 

S b IX 
X3 


Cm Or 

cmars 

CmceGo 

CmcSOR 

CmcBNY 

Cm OOOT 

Onet=ttt 

CwttSav 


39b —to 
tab +to 
17 —Ift 
17ft— lto 
taft —to 


16018ft 17 
60218ft 17 
711 16+6 16 

41 tab 15ft tab - 

45 9ft 9 9 - 

- 33714ft 13ft 13ft —to 
_ 2679 25 23to 2*ft — V* 

Jfle 17 X343 15b 14+fc 15b _ 

CmCWNC .931 62 39615 14to IS +ft 
ComErtf _ 2444 »b, b, ft +V* 

ComEnA - 47 'Yu to ■*» — Vu 

CWnOrl 8561 ta 14'4 15 -b 

CamSyi 3a 2J 120810b 9ft 10b -to 

OmtyBS 170 34 10B31H 31 31 H -to 

ClifcPa XO 2X 37 33b 31 31 —lto 

QrttvBn xb 3.1 14 16<A 15ft 15ft —to 

CrniyFBFU.IOt 9X MUft JOft lift +V* 
ComFTBX X4 2X 115215ft IS 15ft _ 
43 64 28b 27ft 27ft— 1 

_ 68 2 IT# 2 —to 

_ 3fl9926*u 25b 26 

- 41 10ft ID 10b -ft 

19 1939 23ft 23b 23b —to 
_ 3501 9'A 8ft 9ft —ft 

- 597 3to 3ft Jft 

- 80 7V* 6to AW,, — ft, 
.10 S 259 12ft lift lift —ft 

- 1611 12 1 ** 11 M Mb .'A 

- 2ta lft lft lft -Vu 

40 4X 390 9 

-15600 7b 

- 1904 Sb 

- 3714 3H 


ComFBef 175 
GorrtHBh 
QjmHGsY 
Comnet 
CompBnC .92 
CmprsL 
Cmpcm 
Computlo 
CmpData 
CmptH* 
CmpKtn 
CmpLR 
CDtNwk 
CWOdfS 
CmoPr 
CempwtNr 
Comshr 
Cmstfts 

Con it cli 
Comvers 
DM Cam 
CncEF5i5 
CancHWi 
conotwr 
ConcHld 
ConcOn 
Condor 
Conduetu 
Conettga 
CBntTc 
Canmed 
Cannwi 
Cbnseo 

ConSm* 
ConwPd 
ConsGph 
Con Pd 
CanStain 
ComFn 
CrrsFn p* 
ConWat 

centra 

OtCCOra 

atwuo 


12 1.0 


X3r 7.9 

05 IX 
X5 NL6 
1.18 72 


Bft Bft —ft 
5ft Ato— 1*U 
Ab 5b ->A 
... _ ^ 3ft 3ft -Vu 
__ 28745 49ft 44ta 47ft -V u 
_ 3Mllto!l lift +ft 

- 1825 3ft 3 3Vu -Yp 

- 843 4b Jft 4to —to 

_ 59a lift 10ft MU -ft 
_ 3004 3b 3 3 —to 

_ 1427 19ft IflblBWu— Vu 

- 1718 Ab Sto 5V, —to 
ib ift _ 

7b Sft 
l n"u — v u 
2ft 2ft —ft 
_ .4 Jft -ft 

_ 2201 13V* lift 12b -ft 
1476 4ft 4 Jft +ft 
360622 18 20b +1+6 

66M+6 23b 23Vi— lft 
417 3H 3ft 3ft —ft 
931 12b lift 13h —'A 
1251 Sto «b Sft. +>Yu 
11414ft 14 14 +ft 

434 21ft Mft 19V* — 2'* 
383 II 10ft 10ft - 
BP 7 Ato 4H —to 
18 2ft 2 Sft + ft 
ta 8 7b 8 + * 

_ 19817b 16 16b— T 

_ 2095 239* 23ft tab —to 

- -*** * Sfe +b 


- 1998 lft 

- 268 Ift 

-27619 lft 
_ 48 3ft 

- 311 4b 


CttSavpf 

CtrlDt 

Cm/Sat 

Canwsig 

CoaarO 

CooorL 

Ojooe+s 

Coon B 

Cooaii 

Copley Ph 

Capytel 

Cor Thor 

CreGabF 

Corcam 

Cordis 

CaretCpS 

CmrFn 

Corkrum 

CorpEM* 

CorclCP 

CorCp wt 

Cortecn 

Carvas 

Carvel 

CmOr A 

CtnClrB 

Coil CD 

CtnSLfln 

Courer 

Cvrttry s 

Crtuflrl 

CrfTmde 

CravCm 

CrfboMol 

CrTctIL t. 

CredSvs 

CrdAcpk 

OeeRsh 

CrasAir 

CresArwt 

Critter e 

CrrmG 

CropGpf 

CropGrw 

CTasCam 

Oossman 

CrumAn 

CWmBfc 

CrwnRs 

O-yenco 

CrvatUo 

Owned 

CUUnFr 

Cufps 

CupNBk 

CurTOT 

CustCh 

CytxOpt 

CVtjeronlc 

CvgnoD 

Cygmis 

Cyrix CP 

Cyrit 

Cytet 

CytRdun 

Cytocre 

Cvtoon 

Cytottir 

CytRx 


443 187 IV. IH IH —b 

_. 3683 AH Ab Aft -YU 
ISO 1‘Vu lift, lto IV M 
10 I8'A18IV H I8 IV M — iv« 
... 67 3V> 3ft 3ft 

... 100 10 9ft 10 — v h 

- IDA 19H 18ft 18ft— I'A 

2.7 7778 '9 IBb tab — Vk 
1161 1SH I5to IS'A — V* 

_ 4274 20 taft Mft —ft 

- SOS6 5!. 4ft 5H I +6 

_ 2293 1SW Mb lift _ 
... 5993 Mb 18 18b. — 'Vu 

29 3 ^Vu 3 
-30737 55+6 51b 55b OH 
-1127521". 19+4 71 H ift 

- 83 6H Sft Aft i to 

- IWJII1 IBb 19ft— IH 

-1169721ft 19+6 20H - 

- 491017ft 16b 17ft - 
.. 330I0H 9H 10b tft 
-30018 3ft 2b. 3H ilVu 

- 135 2H 2b 2b 

... 654 23b 21V, 21b— lft 

786 19 17b 17ft —to 

... 14819 IT 17b —ft 

..66086 13b tab MVu— IVu 

1.8 642 9ft 9V* 9to —to 

1 3 40 tab 16 taft —ft 

- 19196 2Sft 23 24V* ■ lft 

.131067 23 20 2IH— I'A 

4 237 taft 10b TOto — V„ 
_ 6715 lto 1V H IVu I ft 

- ioi7 3v* 3b Jb 'to 

_. 12954 18 17 I/Yu— 'Vu 

.. 51652* tab 54ft— lb 

- 1363 33 30ft 33 —ft 

79 9ft 7ft 9 lft 
_ 2005 lft W U*B — V» 
_ 746 ft ft to — b. 
_ 383 2ft 2to ITA 

1 lVu 'Vu 
... 3b 3b —to 

_ 2200 15V. 14'A M+k— IVu 
-17530 9ft 7>Vu 7Vfc— 1+4 
_ 74 7 6b 6b —ft 

- 328 7ft 7ft 7b* '■Vu 

- Ml 14H 16ft taft _ 
_ 1079 5ft 5+k 5% +V» 

- 394 5 3Vk 5 + 1+S 

- HIM lb I —to 
_ 3715 4’A 3+k 4b 

1 3 1196 38b 36ft 36ft— lto 
.1 622 9 8b 8ft + ft 
ffl 9to 9 9to ... 
698 37k 2b 2ft —to 

- 41Q5 19ft 17ft 18ft + to 

_ 331 6b Sft 6 — b 

- 75 4 4 4 +V4 

_ 3145 22W 20 TOb— 2 
„ 890 Tto AMu 7 —ft 

.. £2343 46V* 36 36 —9ft 

- 2078 30+4 27b 29ft— bk. 
_ 2258 4b 3ft 3ft —Aft 

- 1451 5ft 4'A 5Vu +to, 

_ 1448 Sft 5 5 —ft 

-13260 4 3 3ttft +'A* 

- 1344 67V 54* 6b, —Hi, 
-17167 2b. 2Vk 2b +V» 


Stocta 

Donegal 

Danhenv 

even Hu 

DorsevTr 

Daskdri 

Doskd 

Dolmix 

□uetree 

DalsLom 

Dovatm 

Draxag 

DrecoE 

DresB 

Dmrin 

□rex It 

OrovgrG 

Drone 

Dryvera 

OuaDrl 

DwaPti 

Our com 

Durfcn 

Our ranee 

OrairOTi 

DwvaGn 

OvnRih 

DvtdlC 


SdK 

Dtv Yld MOlHtOT 

JA 2X 158 Mft 
_l*777 7IH 
X8 SX 54413b 
_ 472 talk 

- 1829 Vk 

- 351 9 

- 71 lft 

_ 2206 19b 

.40 2J 1475 18 

- 4085 tab 
.100 - 1458 IH 

- 121 Wft 

- 2829 10ft 
t - 1B2 9 

- 594 ift 
3a X- 1909 25ft 

_ 1002 4to 

- rm »• 

- 9776 13to 

- 106511b 

- 5258 36ft 

- 345 taft 

- 41*4 taft 
42 17 3065 Mft 

_ 3471 Jft 
X0I12X 487 3ft 

- 8299 27ft 


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12 12to — 
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Mto Mlk 
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9ft Mft 
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25'/* 25>Vu ' • Yu 
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17b 1146 1 

lib 13ft IT', 
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33b 34ft < ’ 
17b 17b 
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tab ISft 
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2ft 3Vu lb* 
21b 27 i Jft 




EtarM 


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D&N Fn _ 720 9H Bto Bto —ft 

OlYHme _ J0510 9ft io +b 

DBA _ 128 474 3*. 3ft 

DGP A - 149 3b 3b 3ft +ft 

OePEJ - 167 4 3'A 3ft +b 

DFiR - 3378 28ft 27ft 2Hto —ft 

DHTCh - 224 23ft 22 22+6 —ft 

DM Mot „ 47 9 Bft 8ft —ft 

DNAPI _ 8047 4ft 39k 4ft — Vn 

DNAp! 2X5 10J X24S 23 21ft 22 —I 

DNXCp _ 57 41k 4to Jft —ft 

DRHort J4t 5.9 1436 72b 72ft 12b — b 

DSBnc _ 2015 26ft 24ft 26b _ 

DSC* ~ 51 546 29ft 27ft 29 +b 

DSGIrt 350 IX 45026+6 Mft 26<A — b 

DSP GO _ 2878 22ft 20b 20b— Hb. 

DSP _ 123 4 3M 3ft +ft 

DTinds X4e J 2520 15Vk Mft Mb — b 

□USA _ 495 3ft 3Vu 3* Vi* +b, 

DreoCps - 398 15b 14ft ISto +ft 

DtarvB _ 335 3b 2to 2Yk — b 

DrtryA _ 92 3 Jft 2Y. —ft 

Date _ 1083 15ft 75 15ft +ft 

Dakotah „ 491 Jft 4to «ft +ft 

Dttfrwi _ 55 7ft 4ft Aft - 

Demark _ 2953 7 2ft taft lift ~^>A 

Draitca i -24091 IBb 77ft 17ft —ft 

Donjkfri - 1129 4b 3b 3ft +b 

Dorttng - 94 13V* 12to tab + ft 

DratGP .13 3 10 M 79 83 *4 

DtBdcst - 2576 5 Aft Jft —to 

DtalO - 860 3b. 3 3b. —to 

raaMec _ 325 Aft 6 Aft + lto 

□taRsh _ 358 9ft lb Sft —to 

DtSvvh Jl. - W3 2ft 2ft 2b -ft 

Drttfivst _ 4804 B 5ft 7ft +lto 

D»Tm _ 26715b 14b 14b — ft 

DtTrNw ._ 4 03 taft 17ft IBb —to 

Ortflx - 789 8 H 7ft Bto + ft 

Datfcey _ 243 3ft 7H 3H *-to 

Oatmar _ 177 70ft 9'A lOto +ft 

DalSCP 129416 14b 15b _ 

Dtasttl - 31D Sb 4to Aft - 

Dalavrrae - 2413 Mft 12 12b —ft 

Dtawtdi - 205 1b. lto IVU '■Vu 

Dtawtewt - ass <Y„ H «u — Vu 

PotoRM - 1432 i 5ft 5ft -VU 

Drtron - 247io 9'A in — to 

8 6b 7to "to 

□auphn S3 33 1729 25b Mft 25 _ 

Davcp - 14£S 16ft 14b 15to— 1 

Davd _ 7071b 10ft lib — +4 

OavdsnA - 1033 20b 19V6 2dto +ft 

Davax - 192 4V* » 4 —ft 

Daw Ten - 1227 Sft Aft sb — b 

Daw»n _ 1J1S 13b 13 73 —ft 

DayRun - 879 27 19ft Mto - 

- 1W827 25ft 36b -ft 

RfiKS? - v* ^ 6,4 3* +** 

CMbShP JO 4X 384 6 5 5 —1 

EjKKOut - 1377 I Aft ISto 15ft — to 

DaorTaot - saaiflto 9ft ton +to 


DMrbcnk X0o 1 J «S 37 34b 34b — 3 

= BSE SB a -35 

■M lS 29b 2^4 28ft —to 
.10b .9 67 10ft ID'* 10ft _ 

M 12 274 21 tab lfft 


Drill Inc 1 

OettcShd 

DeMb€ 

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DriOOfi 

Detcm 

DeOCPtr 

DctoEln 

Drfplnt 

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DriiPine 

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■15 .9 1246 18 17 1 * l7to —to 

t.W 6J 8718 16ft 16ft —ft 

Dentapty X8e 2 2501 34ft taft 33b to 

ptwGTV 1.12 ax 108732 to 31b 31 K ^5fc 
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XO 4.1 314 Mb 14 


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Designs 

DetSy* 

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DeVBui 

Devon 

DWPga 

Dldoglc 

Dtametrc 

Ohnon 

OioUttr 

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WOMiC 

DtaPrci 

DSgtSd 

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- 5404 Ifk 1ft lft ft 

- 9MM'A 23b M —ft 

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_ 2211 20b 18ft 20'* - 

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- #>nU» 12+k tab-db 

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_ 10199 ZWu 2Yu 2W. -ft 

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296 9to 8b 8b —ft 

2323b 22ft 23 Jft 

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a00 4X 55 Sto -4b 5 +ft 

- J0D4X 24 4ft Jft Jft - 

EglM l S3 ax *111 25b 23b 34b —ft 

BogffnOff - 540 14 13 tab — b 

EjoolFnct 36 3X 1633 21 20b 21 — b 

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joIHrd _ 750312 10ft 11 eb 

EarttiT _ <73 10b 9% tab *Vu 

Etnrf . - 1932 3ft Sft 3b —b 

EsjnBc .16 X 1348 22b 20b 3Jb— lft 

EsfnC n 4. 163 lto IVi« IVu - 

jo?t«y _ 302 2ft 3ft 2ft —Vk 

Effterie _ 763 4b 4 4b - 

grtnVOT X4 2.1 Ml 31W 29b 29+k — Y« 

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Ecogen -14803 4b Jto 4b _ 

EdfaCtr - 23 4ft 4ft 4ft Yb 

gcAlt _ 781721ft 18ft 20to +ft 

EOTOv _ 00110b 9ft 9V* +b 

Ed ucim. _ 202 7b Bto AVt —ft 

Edmeflc - AM 3 3to Tfu —to 

Edusrtt _ .12110b «4 rob +to 

jtfWBt , - 1028 f fiYu Aft eft 

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_ 1QS7 2V. 2b 2b —ft 
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gc*nfi _ 401 Mb Mto 15ft +H 

gcSd „ 3647 1 5b M Mft —ft 

BtSetl .10 IS 15 3b 3b 3b —'A 

grfrds 6190 49b 42ft 44 —Sft 

guxAB XlelJ 13948b 44ft 48b +lft 
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gcAj?, -90222 22 tab 27ft *3>A 

BjKErtj _ 5S Bft 8b Bb —ft 

gCRefl ~ 93 7b fift Aft 

a^Tri .12 2*4 18 5 3ft 5 '■Yu 

gll. -10137 27b 24ft 26 —to 

B«*T«k „ _ 104 10 9 9b „ 

Blattflr X8a X 43016 15 15ft +ft 

- 13010b 9b 9ft — b 

- 1489 Mb 13b Mto +1b 
_ 4483 7ft 3ft 7ft '■lto 

- 7136 lft ft Ift +ft 

- 220 7to fift 7 — ft, 

- » 3ft +TS 

- S5M Mto Mto— 2 

- 1927 9b, Bb 9 'ft 

- 6082 17ft 14+k Mb— 1ft 
-40177 SVu 4+k 4b - 

- 1471 79to tab 19V4 - 

- 5020 9b 7U Bb Alb 
84 tb 7b 7ft —ft 
4017b 77 17ft — H 

212 lib 10 taft —to 
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Coadmed od Page 13 


























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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


Page 11 


New International Bond Issues 


^ Compiled by Paul Horen 

?;' i— — Amount Coup, 

y (mBOofts) % 


Prteo 
Fries and 
weak 


^ Floating Rate Mu 

Discover Card Master 
?.: Trust 94/3 

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\ . Philippine National 
■>:,' Bank 

s -- — — 

jit FtodjoupoM 

5; Crfecfit Local de 
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f | firmish Export Credit 
¥ : 

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jj! Trust 

{■: Sweden 

$• 

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J*' Counci! of Europe 

n ■ 

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Overseas Finance 


2004 0.35 100 — 


2004 0,85 100 — 


1977 1 M 99.60 — 


Over 1 -month Ubor. Mctamum coupon 14% Average Etc 7 
years. Feat nor <&do*od (Doai Witter.] 

Over 6-monrii Libor. Callable at par in 1996. Fee* not 
rfisdosed. (Paribas Capitol Markets.} 

Over 3-month Libor. Noneodabie. fees natdsdased Dtnow- 
natiom $10,1)00. (Solomon Brothers WLJ 


1997 T/t 101.063 99 J5 Nooenfabk. feet 1%% [Bear Stearns Wl) 


1996 zero 87.74 — 


2004 m 
1999 Th 


100.925 99a 
101-055 994)0 


1996 7 100.9? 99.85 


1996 m 100.906 Wjs 


DM2,000 

£100 


1999 7V* 

1996 m 


99 A 32 99 JO 
100-95 — 


FF 2,000 1999 m 101-355 — 


feoffor ed at 87.23. Yield &5HJ. Nonaiabte. Feu not star. 
dcoed. ptawa Europe.) 

Scattered Ol WV6. NoneotoUe. Feu 2%. (CS First Boston.) 

Ktoffomd at 99x3. NoncaSoble. Fbos 15%. (fiJ IntlJ 


Beofhrod at 99.99. Noncofefah. Feu 1H% (JJ>. Morgan 
Securities.] 

Reoffered a 99.906. Noncafcdtte. Feu 15% (Morgan Starfey 
MU 

NoncnPablo: Fees 0-25% [Deutsche Bonfcj 

Reoffend ol 99.95. NoneaHabla. Feu 15% [S.G. Waiburg 
Securifesj 

Fteoffered cd 9978. Ngncofabte. Feu 15% (Credit Commer- 
cial de France.] 


Hong FF 1,000 2004 8‘4 9&56 — Noncofcbte. Fees ret ifodotod. (Socrttt Generate.) 

Banque Nationde de m. 150,000 1996 115* 1015* 99.95 Noncaflobie. Fee* ivt% [Crcdiio Mbno.) 

Peris 


Deutsche Bank m 200,000 1996 11 . 101475 99.95 Nonealabto. Fees 15% [Deu&chB Bank.) 

finance 

Johnson and Johnson m. 200,000 1998 UK 101.175 9975 Reoffered or 99775. Nonorfbbit. Feu IH% (1MI Lmcam. 

bourg.) 


OQn now rece'uj 
^ hand deliver 
if home or o| 
K)rning on hi 

F publication. 

all us toll free d 

130 84 8585 


Eurofima 

Commerzbank 
Overseas finance 

Bank Austria 
Finnish Export Credit 

Swedish National 
Housing Finance 
Corp. 


Df 250 2004 7% 101-20 99m Reoffered Ot 9 9-65. Noncalable. Feu l ML (ABN-AMRO 

tor*4 

DF250 1999 7# 101-56 100.10 Reaffared at 99.96. Nonccdobla. Fees 1JSV (IMG Bc«t) 

AU$100 2004 10% 107,58 100 JO Norrcofcble. Fus 2V*% (Bgrdoyi de Zoete Wedd.) 

Y 20,000 1997 3 Vt 99 .99 — NoncoflobJc- Fees 075%. [Yomaidv Inti) 

Y 22,000 1997 3X0 99 j>9 — MoncaBaWe. Fe*. (L30%. (Nomura Wlj 


DOLLAR: Eerie Calm Settles on Currency Markets 


-* rtm •>- v 


■ iiTT" 


Contmued fromPage 9 

rates will be increased another 
half percent^e point to 53 
percent from 4.75 percent 
“The dollar is out of the 
woods,” said Mr. Reynolds. 
“It’s been forming a base since 
its summer lows against the 
Deutsche mark and file yen.” 

He sees last week’s partial 
U.S.-Japanese trade accord as 
^establishing “a cap” on the yen 
'and expects continuing -UJ5. 
rate increases carrying over- 
night money to 6 percent to give 
the dollar the interest-rate ad- 
vantage it needs to move up 
against the mark. 

Paul Chertkow, of Union 
Bank of Switzerland, sees the 
dollar at'L65>DM within three 


that could possibly take it up to 
the mid 1 .60s against the mark 
and up. to 103 yen, but its long- 
term downtrend remains m 
place." 

John Taylor, of FX Concepts 
Inc. in New York, concurs that 
the “the dollar is currently in a 
weak uptrend,” but he adds 
“that should end by next 
month, if not sooner.” He pre- 
dicted the dollar would fall to 
the low 1.40s against the mark 
and retest the record kiw of IJ9 
DM. 

Ronald Leveo, of J. P. Mor- 
gan in New York, sees the dol- 
lar “below 1 JO DM and around 
93 yen” before the end of the 
year. “It’s premature to look for 
the dollar bottoming,” he said. 


months on the assumption that “If s preparing to go lower. 

Mr. Kohl wins and that Ger- Leven assexts that Euro- 

man interest rates decline a fur- pean institutional investors are 
ther quarter point by early win-' 5 ^ 3 ] heavily invested in dollars 
ter. that were purchased at around 

Neil MacKinnon, of Qti- 1.62-1.65 DM. 
bank in London, agrees that the “Given we’re we’ve been, 
percep tion of an imminent Fed they’d love nothing better” than 
rate hike will help boost the to be able to close the positions, 
dollar. he said. “Above 1.60 DM.’ 


amount” of dollar selling in Eu- 
rope. 

At the same time, Morgan 
predicts that balance-of-pay- 
ments trends will keep the yen 
under upward pressure. To 
change the dollars negative dy- 
namics, Mr. Leven said, “We 
need to see dear evidence that 
the Japanese current-account 
surplus is declining.” Morgan 
does not expect a sustained de- 
cline to occur before mid- 1995. 

“We also need to see U.S. 
short-term rates some 13 per- 
centage points higher than they 
are and investors have to fed 
that the Fed has done enough to 
contain inflation and is finished 
tightening," Mr. Leven said. 

Morgan analysts, who have 
been consistently ahead of the 
consensus on U.S. growth and 
inflation prospects now warn 
that a pickup in wage inflation 
“appears imminent” and pre- 
dict that the Fed will raise rates 
by one percentage point before 
the end of the year. 

In their weekly Global Data 
Watch, Morgan analysts cau- 
tion that “a different cloud may 


a, - '•«. -n. 1 

. r. tfVt. 1 a 

•• - 

•S 


■ A-r- ■“ 

llV 1 . 
r«. *- KVi 

(it i*i 

Wk Ufc* 


ly bullish,” he added. “The dol- 
lar is in a technical correction 


to be able to dose the positions, non mat a ainerent cioua may 
he said. “Above 1.60 DM," he soon drift into view” to upset 
added, “regardless of what hap- markets: “the growing possibil- 


pens in the German election, 
there will be a tremendous 


ity of a recession within 18 
months or so.” 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


rvi*-’ . 

J 4 * 

ff.ffcVf > 

•BKr- - 

•MR -• 

*■**.-.: I * 
HU**' - • * 

WPS/ ! 

c 

■ITT' 

BSST/ *: 


VnAgamFranM-Pnow 

?j.; Amsterdam Hong Kong 

■ The exchange ended the week Stock prices fell in volatile 

^ V stronger after sluggish p erf or- trading due to lingering con- 
^ temances earlier in the session on asms about further U.S. mter- 
N>i "the back of a drop in the Ger- est rate increases, 
i- V' man bond market, which brief- The blue chip Bang Seng In- 
N ly dragged the EOE index dex shed 236 J6 points to dose 
' ,r \ down. *8 wcek at a *«-««** low of 

cl'. In buoyant trading Friday, 9^84^8. 

\ the index put on 2.09 points to Bndceis said tradmg would 
readi 302.87 points, dealers at remain volatile with strong sell- 
V ABN Amro bank said, as some mg pressure unless there was 
>■? 1 1 biUion guilders worth of confinnaucm of a further U.S. 

: 1 ; shares changed hands. rate hike to ease investors’ con- 

The UiL unemployment fig- corns, 
ores far September encouraged j 
the market, but it was still a day MuOtUMfH 
'S- of mixed performances for The exchange again experi- 
. many -large firms. Akzo Nobel a rough ride, jolted by 

che mi cals lost 0.70 guilders to concerns over inflation and a 
* ,T 196.10 and Unilever slipped possible interest-rate increase 
0.70 to 192.90. But Royal ^t£e United States. 

. Dutch/Shdl pushed ahead 230 The Financial Times-Stock 
u '■/ guilders to end at 187.50, and Exchange 100 index of leading 
Philips edged up 0.20 to 52.40. shares ended the week at 

2^98.7 points — the level in 

Fmnlefirrt mid-July — after registering a 

JtramqUM weekly drop of 27.6 points or 

The market was uneasy last 0.9 percent 

wee k ""rid ignainm: in the bond Banks were hit after S.G. 
market and uncertainty about Warburg and Hambros predict- 
the result of the German legisla- ed sharp drops in profit due to 
tivedections on OcL 16, traders turbulence on the financial 
said. markets. 

The DAX index dropped jifilgm 

2.54 percent on the .week to end ■*“****■ * 
at 1,960^9 points, its lowest The exchange lost 6.86 per- 
dose of the year. The indicator cent last week as the conflict 

hadlost more than 4 percent the between the government and 






& ' 3 y 
* ■ - . 


Frankfurt 


1,856-38, representing a loss of 
1.2 percentage points on the 
week. 

Friday’s better- than- expect- 
ed U.S. unemployment figures 
did bring some relief, sparking 
a 0.71 percent rise on the day. 
But the market is currently 
18.16 percent behind its Jan. 1 
level and 21.7 percent behind its 
1994 high. 

Losses on the bond markets 
have been equally strong, with 
drops of 17 percent in eight 
months, pushing 10 -year bonds 
to 8 3 parent from 5.6 percent 
in January, an unprecedented 
scenario in such a short time, 
according to dealers. 

Singapore 

Share prices ended the wed: 
lower on profit-taking and re- 
newed fears of interest rate 
hikes in the United States. 

The key blue-chip indicator, 
the Straits Tunes Industrials in- 
dex, fell 2M points to 2,330.09, 
while the broader-based SES 
All-Singapore index gained 
Z 66 points to 574.74. 


Microsoft 
A nd China 
In 'Battle of 
Strength’ 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China said Sun- 
day it was involved in difficult 
talks with the U.S. computer 
software giant Microsoft Corp. 
on standards for a Chinese ver- 
sion of the popular Windows 
operating system. 

“Although some progress has 
been made, negotiation is rath- 
er tough,” Yang Harming, head 
of the computer department in 
Ministry of Electronics Indus- 
try, told the China Daily Busi- 
ness Weekly. 

“It is a battle of strength,” he 
said. 

Since April, China aod Mi- 
crosoft have had 10 rounds of 
negotiations over a Chinese ver- 
sion of Windows. 

China does not allow the Mi- 
crosoft verson developed in 
Taiwan and Japan to be sold on 
the domestic market because it 
does not meet with China’s 
standards, the newspaper said. 

China ’s objection is believed 
to stem from Microsoft’s deci- 
sion to design the Chinese ver- 
sion of Windows together with 
Taiwan and Japan, but without 
participation from Beijing. This 
resulted in different standards 
for characters and type styles. 

The talks are important be- 
cause of the potentially huge 
size of the Chinese computer 
market. 

Microsoft's chairman. Bill 
Gates, came to Beijing in 
March to lobby for bis compa- 
ny’s system, saying that the 
market, not governments, 
should decide standards. 

■ Key Trade Talks Set 

China on Sunday urged the 
United States to resolve out- 
standing trade disputes amica- 
bly in order to further improve 
relations between the two coun- 
tries, Reuters reported from 
Beijing. 

The China Daily Business 
Weekly, previewing trade talks 
in Beijing this week, quoted a 
Chinese official as saying 
“Sino-U.S. economic relations 
have gained steam recently and 
will see greater gains if the ex- 
isting skirmishes are resolved 
smoothly, based on mutual un- 
derstanding and equality.” 

Deputy U.S. Trade Repre- 
sentative Charlene Barshefsky 
will hold negotiations on a host 
of potentially difficult trade is- 
sues, including intellectual . 
property rights, China's re-en- 
try into the worid trading orga- 
nization GATT and the access 
U.S. companies have into the 
potentially huge Chinese mar- 
ket 

China maintains it is already 
following all the previous agree- 
ments on trade issues it has with 
the United States and that it is 
Washington that is failing to 
meet its own commitments. 

Euromarts 
A* u Glance 

Eurobond Yields 


Weekly Seles 

Primary Martel 



i 

HonS 

5 

Maas 

SMattb 

1050 

599^0 

34780 

133530 

Cnmrtrt 

1M 

130 

40200 

15939 

ran* 

3530 

11810 

<1450 

B340 

ECP 

U4130 

473510 120(150 

7.17570 

Total 

537250 

545350 lX«5t0 

545750 


UPTMCT 

Cedel 

Earpdear 


s 

Maas 

i 

NOBS 


SfralflWi TZ481W 147KM VJMM asiBOtfO 

comn. mx tni n iws warn 

FHIII 1177.20 USA) SM 2 M 0 1 M 114 Q 

ECP isteu U 07 M 0 9,11050 T 4 J 7 &* 

Total 277000 31707 JO 67 . 02&20 453 ) 1 JO 

source: Eurodear. CedeL 

Ubor Rates oa.7 


a profit dne to tOKYO 
the financial » 


fi * :; ; ' previous week. the judiciary deepened, drag- 

- , , . ■„ ite ging the Mibtcl real time index 

: y “ dc S ^t^a^Sd raided 

:‘i: had not. JiiMMpdloauuc^w the headquarters of Prime Min- 

’ . •: I* : *unmatian by the ^ond mar- ^ ficrhiscom’s Frnin- 

•t: tt !“ : : ketijAmb has vest group precipitated a 222 - 

i- i n -1 point drop, leaving the index a 

v’«: »* ? -4 le ®d. The strength of theU^ percent down from its 

recovery year's bi^on May 10 . 

feawofa tightening rfrr^®- ^An^ofsdtoginkeyMib- 
r \! ^7 P<*cy .to ward off infla- ^ issufis heightened doubts 
ton, and those fears have hurt about ^ eacdSage’s ability to 

thcmaricels * _ withstand more conflict invoW- 

<: * . \l > One trader said the Frankfurt jjjg jj,e group. 

fi exdrangcwas,fornow I a“scene t ' 

r ,« t . of. watnmons depression feed- P/tm 
**! i, •4 l 'i mrcm'AjEBOicaii economic in- . 

dicators;” But Commerzbank A downward trend continued 
j : ! ' V ” . said it expected a recovery in last week as thrCAC-40 
; r !. the middle term because of a plunged at one P°*nJto 
“'Vj’.*-- resurgent German economy theywbrfore ia 

*■■■■■. and a rismg trend in company technical rebound took it back 
".‘i-v-S’ earning utitil 1997, up slightly to end the session at 


full 22 J percent down from its 
year's high on May 10. 

A rush of selling in key Mib- 
td issues heightened doubts 
about the exchange’s ability to 
withstand more conflict involv- 
ing the group. 


A downward trend contmued 
last week as the CAC-40 
plunged at one point to its 
worst level of the year before a 
technical rebound took it back 
up slightly to end the session at 


Share prices rebounded, with 
brokers relieved at news that 
Tokyo and Washington nar- 
rower averted a breakdown in 
key trade negotiations. 

The Nikkei Stock Average of 
225 selected issues rose 180.94 

? oints, or 0.9 percent, to 
9,744.75 pants, after falling 
269.86 points the previous 
week. 

After opening at 19,669.03 
points on Monday, the key indi- 
cator remained relatively firm 
in the wake of the news that the 
United States and Tokyo had 
readied a partial accord. 

Zurich 

The Swiss Performance In- 
dex dropped 22.66 points or 13 
percent to end at 1,660,7. 

The downward movement 
was fueled by signs of the U.S. 
economy overheating and fears 
of impending rate rises, along 
with the dollar's continued 
weakness. Rising bond yields 
also played their part in adding 
to the overall gloom. 



lHMOltl 

3 -avoafn 

4 -mann 

IL 1 * 

51/16 

iVi 

5 % 

DcabdKnak 

5 

■S’h 

5 % 

Paaad sterdag 

SVl 

5 15/16 

tens 

nmek erase 

S 7/16 

» 

« 

ECU 

5 * 

at 

4 % 

YS« 

75/16 

7 % 

2 fc 

Sources: Uovtis Bank Reuters. 



Bonds Await September Price Data 


Compiled frr Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The bond market 
heads into a week that will bring two 
major reports on prices in September 
and possible added pressure on the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board to increase interest 
rates again. 

Some traders were less concerned than 
others about the upcoming data — the 

US^ CREDIT MARKETS " 

producer price report and the consumer 
inflation index — because they believe 
the market has already priced in a rate 
increase of 50 basis points. 

The market also wifi be keeping close 
watch on the situation along the Iraq- 
Kuwaii border. Traders said the market 
could easily become focused on this cri- 
sis if it is not quickly resolved. 

The market may get some respite on 


Monday because the Public Securities 
Association, a trade group of securities 
dealers, is recommending that the Trea- 
suiy market dose in observance of the 
Columbus Day holiday. But many deal- 
ers say they will maintain a small staff. 

John Kim, chief investment officer at 
Aetna Life Insurance & Annuity Co.. 
said that caution also will continue to 
dominate the market at least until inves- 
tors become convinced that the Fed has 
finished tightening credit. 

The September producer price index, 
due Thursday, is expected to show a 0.4 
percent rise in the core rate, which ex- 
cludes food and energy costs. Steven 
Nothem, a senior vice president and 
portfolio manager at Massachusetts Fi- 
nancial Services, said such a gain would 
fuel market concerns about inflation. 

The outlook for Friday’s consumer 
price report is more upbeat, with the 


consensus predicting a 03 percent rise 
overall and a 0.3 percent increase in the 
core rate. 

"The pressure just kind of intensifies 
as we get closer to the inflation num- 
bers.” said Robert Schumacher, chief 
fixed-income strategist at Kemper Fi- 
nancial Services. 

Bond prices got a boost Friday by a 
strong unemployment report for Sep- 
tember. leaving the yield on the 30-year 
bond at 7.91 percent and at 6.62 percent 
on the two-year Treasury note. A week 
earlier, the ’30-year bond stood at 7.S1 
percent, and the two-year Treasury note 
at 6.58 percent. 

With September nonfarm payrolls ris- 
ing by 234.000, some analysts pushed 
back the timing of the Fed’s next tighten- 
ing move to its Nov. 15 Federal Open 
Market Committee meeting. 

f Knight -RidJcr, XYT) 


FEAR: European Focus on Rates BONDS: Market Shuts to Crawl 


Continued from Page 9 

very suspicious of optimistic 
forecasts of the pace of growth 
in the second half of next year,” 
said Philippe Brossard. chief 
economist of Credit Lyonnais 
Capital Markets International 
in Paris. 

Economists warn however, 
Lhat if long-term rates remain 
high or rise even further into 
next year as demand for bor- 
rowed funds from corporations 
begins to pick up, the effect on 
the recovery could be more pro- 
nounced. Most think that the 
bond markets rake far too grim 
a view on the risk of future 
inflation even in America, 
where economic growth is 
strongest and spare production 
capacity in shortest supply. 

Mr. Hawkins faults the bond 
markets for a lack of patience. 
He says that instead of waiting 
to see how much steam rising 
interest rates have taken out of 


the recovery, they push rates 
higher at every indication that 
American output continues to 
grow. 

“The market continually 
looks for weaker figures the 
next month when interest rates 
normally take at least a year to 
produce an impact,” he says. 

Curiously, some European 
economists argue lhat at this 
point the best thing that the Fed 
could do is to hike short-term 
interest rates substantially in 
order to convince the markets 
once and for all that it is on top 
of the situation. Convinced that 
the reins were being pulled tight 
at the short end, they argue, 
longer yields could then actual- 
ly ease. 


To subscribe in Germany 


Continued from Page 9 

S200 million issue from Intel- 
sat. Although 10-vear paper is 
not the currently favored matu- 
rity, bankers said the pricing of 
55’ basis points over U.S. gov- 
ernment paper was deemed to 
be generous. The bonds ended 
the week trading at a spread of 
49 basis points. 

Japan Development Bank, 
unable to get approval for a 
three-year issue in Swiss francs, 
increased its planned $300 mil- 
lion issue to $500 million. The 


five-year paper was priced to 
yield 22 basis points over the 
U.S. benchmark. 

In the floating rate sector, 
HIT Finance, a unit of the 
Hutchison group in Hong 
Kong, created a storm with its 
Sl.7 billion of 10 -year notes. 
Critics said the issue was a dis- 
guised syndicated loan with 
the parent company taking 
two- thirds of the issue. But 
lead manager Paribas asserted 
it is an underwritten, listed se- 
curity dearable through Euro- 
clear or Cedel like any normal 
Eurobond. 


just call, toll IrMj 
01308^8585 


U5.5kBWhnB 

Oet-TSoot* 

bos m 

YrMaii rruw 
504 671 

[LS- L iDtim term 

754 

777 

756 

54$ 

U5. 5 sborl term 

7-04 

7JS 

786 

AX 

Paandsucfflnf 

954 

959 

941 

599 

Fmaftna 

UO 

817 

524 

587 

lUtaalM 

IU3 

1177 

1179 

7.91 

Donlsti krton 

U7 

170 

574 

470 

SwaBx& krona 

1973 

1073 

1173 

744 

COL ions Mna 

B8I 

8-74 

504 

4.1* 

ECU, mam Mm 

544 

534 

846 

$81 

Con.1 

9.17 

9.10 

944 

479 

MLI 

Ml 

943 

943 

559 

MiS 

9J9 

977 

941 

559 

Yoo 

444 

442 

444 

24 7 

Source: Luxembourg Stock Exchange. 


Last Week’s Markets 

Ait ftoures are as ot close of trading Frfdav 

Stock Indexes Monoy Rates 

imncd Stales Oct. 7 SepUO Ch-ga UwHod 5 Iota* 

OJ Indus. Stf*7X I 340.19 — U9% Discount I’dia 

DJ Util. 17&42 18145—147% Prime role 

DJ Trans. VU4.7B 1491 39 —3.14% Federal funds rain 

S&P100 <01-54 42117—134% JaMn 

S&P500 455.10 46271 -1.44% 

5 £. P lnd 539.55 54974 -185% 

^ - 1 ** SSSLtWK 

ffffTnta 

FTSE100 Z99&7D 3426J0 —091% 

FT 30 2010.50 205090 —172% Lombard 

japan Call money 

Nikkei 225 1974475 1934381 +092% 3kjw»m Interbank 

Cermany 2£2B* 

DAX 1.96059 281175 —754% Bank base rate 

Haw team Co" 

Hang Seng 978488 952104 —248% 3-montti liwrrbank 

World ®2lS °* 

M5CIP 415.90 42770 —180% London a jn. flxi 39: 

World Index Front Moryar Stantev Capital mn. 


INTERNATIONAL fffk 

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FtiiL»ai» «m< TW ur» numaMm wna* rwr 


OCTOBER 14 

■ - ~ i 

Monte Carlo Business Forum I 
As pm efthewh miflfnaJarul Fair cfMonaccx 
thelunjorCJiamber mmllaborationwtthite 
Scart oi Trade sd Indusc/. Mora&sque 

Banhne Association, the Real Eflateaanm 
the Chartered tarunianis‘ Assoofflcffi and ihe 
BarAaodaUounvues you 10 attend a senes of 
axifBenas on the Monepsque bosmsss 
oppommties ‘Iheennaws Slree 
Stwiii mas jbran toodd etdrod « 

Mmu? Curio cm fv prowled upon n»ud 
Enquiries- 

tEXINECHAMBRE GOONOMIOUE DE MONACO 
BJ>. 13 MC 98001 MONACO CEDEX 
TeL- ( 331 91 W 54 .J 0 - Fak- 031 92 .W- 31 3 ? 

MONACO 


OCTOBER 4, 5 &6 

National Business Aircraft Association 
47th Amina] Meeting & ConyentSon 
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Mahon m the werid. the N&*ACon*ertion!Tfln 5 
neartvcnHhiid mile d indoor ahWi space An 


the r»eaJty "feo Exhibicbes who ffB the mas*ve h^is 
taestliittedlttlhlkn ddbrewenh clairaaJi 
eras the tarmac anhe Salic teptayAirpai 
Gmotl- KAtMeeu Hnfl, NJMA, 
Washington. D.C, USA 
TCL (2021 783-92S2 

Fax: (2021 862-5552 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. U.SA 


FSB. 16-18 

Societies hi Crisis 
and Mental Health 



Ccmlod: Mercure Communteabon 
International. 

TeL: ( 33 - 1 ) 42 99 1 7 70 
Fax. 133-1145 63 25 68 

PARIS 


tVHJWttWWn* so®* n-OiW, tcihnMnn 

ARGENTINA: 

A COMPETITIVE 
MARKETPLACE 

A Conference/Debate 
Organized By Club 
Europe Argentina 
And The International 
Herald Tribune. 

With their vast experience, 

Club Europe Argentina is taking an 
active role to help potential 
European investors establish 
successful businesses in Argentina. 

With the help of a strong 
economy, Aigentina is poised to 
compete with other regions for 
investment and development. This 
conference will explore investment 
possibilities for European business 
• decision-makers interested in 
expanding in Latin America. 

^•Addressing the conference will be: 
Domingo Cavallo, 

Minister of Economy 

• Guido di Telia, 

• " Minister of Foreign Relations 
Enrique Iglesias, 

\-; Y; President, IDB 

. . Conference Date: 
Thursday, November 3, 1994 
Hotel George V 
75008 Paris 
3:00 pm - 6:00 pm 

For additional information, 

' please contact Mr. Thierry Courtaigne 
at Club Europe Argentina 
. ;■*••• 32,. Avenue Pierre ler de Serhie 
: 75784 Paris Cedex 1 6 
Tel: 40 69 44 32 
Fax: 40 70 96 47 5 


LVTEBWATIumU. 


a***' 





* 




Page 12 

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1994 



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TO OUR 
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IN FRANCE 


.,X 4lnW i 
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— 6505411* 38% 39 — 2 T /u un Alik 1 00a 1 9 46 52V* 51% 52", 

i-ffi 3-; ,^38%“, n v -*2 HSmSr _ I6?ia% 31% »% *1 

2.00 2-6 3507 TVi. 74ft 75% — *. MriU . _ 


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- 1414 5Vi 4ft 4ft _ J™™™* 

.. 405 4 ft 4ft 4ft +ft NJMH" 

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_ 45 6% 6ft 6% - HISS, 

_ 266 *V a ft ft — V# NIMerc 

.. 1427 4 3% 3% —ft NtPe™, 


- 3625 7 6 6ft "ft 

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-134230 36ft 53ft 54ft— 1% WSanlr 
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_ 2424 10V* M lOVi —Vi Nuiicw 

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52 2J 6MM 23ftgW-lVu N ISSmbO 

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_. 1672 Bft 7% »«*'„ — »u 
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- 292 24V, 21% 21%— 2% 

_ 319 Sft S 5ft —to 
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J8b5J 33 lift lift lift - 
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_ 974 7ft bto 6ft —to 

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3484 16 13*', 15*. *2% 

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.. 1511% 11% 11% - 

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JO 1J 1081 15V, 13V, 13ft— lft 

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_ 38317 14% 14ft— 2 

- 9244 29% 28% 39ft — Vu 

.16 .9 2070 18ft 17% 18ft 

... 2514 4'% 3". 4 .ft 

- 655 8% 7*1 Bft —ft 

- 2344 2ft 2Vp 2% + 'At 

- 21434 33V, 34 

...12440 1! 10 10%— lft 

- 3358 21% 20 21ft *ft 

-23637 6 4ft 5% *■% 

- 506 3ft 3% 3% 

- 640619ft 18ft 19V] —ft 

- 1870 BW Bto BVit — V U 


It’s never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save 
with our new 
toll free 
service. 
Just Gall us 
today K 
at 05437 437 


•ii** >1 


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t/ A 


1% i% -% 


You will find below a listing of employment offers published in last Thursday's International Herald Tribune 


17% 14% * f/u 
26", 27 ft —4 ft 
16% 17% -1 
75 25ft— lto 

Ito f!s Z% 


POSmOK/LOCATIOM 

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR IN RWANDA 


,8% -C 


PRESIDENT AND CEO SENIOR EXECUTIVE 


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Fax: 44-734-588-938 
• Fax: (503) 721-5840 


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The IHT/Delta Air Lines 
Destinations Competition 


INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 
CONSULTANTS 

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World Leader in Electrical/ 
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Fax: (703) 715-4212 


US REGIONAL MANAGER 


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Here's How to Enter. 


Test your travel knowledge! Each day for 18 
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DIRECTOR REGIONAL IN NEW YORK 


SECRETAIRES ASSISTANTES 


Finders S.A. 
United Nations 
Galderma 


Box 828 1HT Via CassoJo 6 
20122 Milan Italy 

Box D4361HT Paris 
92521 Neuilly Cedex France 

Kienbaum und Partner 
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Fax: (41.21) 312-99-60 
Fax: (212) 963-31-34 


20, Av. Andre Malraux 
92309 Levallois 


Delta Air Lines' Destinations Ma 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


Page 13 


Whistle-Blowing: Risky and Costly 


percent before selling them to individual 
investors, an excessive hidden commission 
that violates guidelines of the National 
Association of Securities Dealers: and that 


meeting on Oct. 20. That was the second 
■ NFVVnRr , time he had met with a manager to reveal 

hoss alleged improprieties. 

await diity draEngs in the office in Octo- Among his allegations: that traders were 

a ■ De ? mber ’ K 11 a the prices of bonds more than five 

Mmadwce of the timing of corporate cut- percent before selling them to individual 
ba«s. Or is it a nifty way to gag a trouble- investors, an excessive hidden cornmu ‘ 
malcer who knows too much about the way that violates guidelines of the Nati 
things work? Association of Securities Dealers: and 

A rormer senior trader on the bond 
trading desk in Merrill Lynch & Co.’s ■ 

Dallas office says he wound up on the 

A former senior trader 

trading room. In the end, he claims, his with Merrill Lynch gays he 

woond upon the street 

“Ea fttod to the trade* I T a S e ?f nt did 


A former senior trader 


l&g# 

8f% 


fts nev& 
tasnecsj 


;; allegations, acted on some of them and laid 
him off as part of an unrelated corporate 
'downsizing. The former employee’s ded- 
' sion to speak publicly about the case be- 
fore appearing at an arbitration proceed- 
ing was inappropriate, said Jim Wiggins, a 
Merrill spokesman. 

_ . ‘‘We’re not going to get involved in a 
point-by-point response to his allegations 
in the press, even though we know that 
there can be a cost to Merrill Lynch in not 
doing so in this post-OJ. Simpson era 
where anindjviduaTs legal and public rela- 
tions strategy are one and the same,” Mr. 
Wiggins said. 

A panel of arbitrators for the National 
Association, of Securities Dealers Inc. will 
decade whether the claims of Raymond C. 
Qumo, now a bond trader at Barre & Co. 
in Dallas, are true. 

Mr. Quinn, who was dismissed on Dec. 
20, gave his boss a Ktany ocf alleged securi- 
ties violations in the Dallas office rim ing a 


not want to hear his tales 
o! malfeasance. 


Merrill had held bonds in its own account 
in order to conceal the fact that an institu- 
tional cheat actually owned the bonds, a 
violation of securities laws. 

Management’s response, according to 
an arbitration complaint filed by Mr. 
Quinn on Aug. 5: The boss said that if Mr. 
Quinn spoke to Merrill’s New York attor- 
neys, he “would never work on the Street 
again.” 

A Merrill spokesman noted that Merrill 
encourages whistle-blowing and that it has 
set up a confidential 800-number for em- 
ployees to call if they spot dishonest busi- 
ness practices. In an interview hst week, 
however, Mr. Quinn said that his managers 
had given him every signal imaginable that 
airing Merrill’s dirty laundry was a mis- 


boods for himself, wishing to see if they 
rose in price so that he could make a profit 
by buying them later at Merrill’s cost. 


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Gouging Aside, Foreigners Favor Seoul 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tunes Service 

SEOUL — Over the past 
year, South Korea has had one 
of the hottest stock markets in a 
hot region, and foreign inves- 
tors have piled in. 

The Korea Composite Stock 


emment planners, and that ex- 
tends to the financial markets. 


The government openly ad- 
mits to intervening in the mar- 
ket to control price movements 
in pursuit of its policy aims. 

Nevertheless, a slow, step-by- 
step liberalization process is un- 
der way. The government an- 


cestors, a form of discrimina- 
tion that irks foreign fund man- 
agers and brokers. 

Because foreigners are bid- 
ding for just 10 percent of the 


shares of any one company, de- snapped up shares of the most 


Price Index has oin 25 percent “1 

. L n _t_j. ^ *2 “ __ nounced last week that the cap 

since April atode, and most an- t w v ZZ 


011 holdings by foreigners, n< 
set at an aggregate )rvd or 


ue. The question is whether for- ^“fT*e 

SSMRWnSL: SS-nrta?uSS« 


i « i»T i-u. ssftarispsss’s 

A of next year. 


the action. 

The . root of the problem is 
that the government limits ac- 
cess to the Seoul Stock Ex- 


The reaction to the news was 


mand far exceeds supply. 

Korean investors, or brokers, 
can snap up shares in popular 
companies, then sell them to 
foreigners at a premium. 

Milton S. Kim, senior man- 
aging director of Sangyong In- 
vestment & Securities Co., said 
the premium is often as much as 


Intern-. -Jl ■ 


CONTACT 


cp to the Seoul Stock Ex- increase hdps foreign investors, 
dwuge. The market was com- ^ big 

fclpletely dpsedto foreign capital inst itutions. Already, more 
junta early 1992, and even then than 200 companies are at the 

t St nct cap8 were placed on the jq penent timi i so the increase “It really is a handicap “ sai< 
•aggregate number of shares for- ^ fi^dy to result in a flurry of Thae S. Khwarg, managing di 
jeagners could buy. buying in popular issues. 

> South Korea has often been On the other hand, such re- 
routed as an example of how the strictions seem out of place for 
(capitalist spirit is transforming an economy as dynamic as 
’East Aria, but the economy is South Korea's. 
itightlYigpilated by central gov- Worse; it means that foreign- 


mixed. On the one hand, the 20 to 30 percent. 

increase hdps foreign investors, Most foreign fund managers 


have bought the shares anyway, 
because of their eagerness to 
gain a toehold. 

“It really is a handicap," said 


buying in popular issues. 

On the other hand, such re- 
strictions seem out of place for 
an economy as dynamic as 
South Korea's. 

Worse; it means that foreign- 


rector of Asset Korea LuL a 
fund management firm. “You 
see a stock you really like and 
maybe you don't mind paying a 
20 percent premium at first, but 
when you’re running a fund 




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energy forum will he addressed by 
Oil Ministers from three of: the wo rid’ s 



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industty executives. For fcrthet details, please 
contact Brenda Erdmann Hag&fcy in 

• • 71) 836 4802 


Fax; (44 71) 836 0717 



CONFERENCE CO-SPONSORS 


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CORPORATE SPONSORS 

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Smith Bamcv Inc.. ABN AMRO Bank N.V. 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Oct. 10-15 


take. From then on, the complaint said, 
“Quinn became a marked man.” 

Although Mr. Quinn’s trading revenues 
in 1992 exceeded those of 1991, Merrill cut 
his bonus for 1992 — as it happens, just 
two months after he first went to manage- 
ment with concerns about excessive mark- 
ups on bonds. 

By April 6, 1993. Mr. Quinn received a 
memo from a Merrill boss telling him that 
he was not a good team player. Mr. Quinn 
says he was the major producer of revenues 
in the municipal bona group in Dallas but 
that claim could not be confirmed because 
Merrill would not comment on the specif- 
ics of the case. 

The complaint says that Mr. Quinn 
spotted other problems last spring and 
summer, which be brought to a boss's 
attention at the ill-fated “never work on 
the Street again” meeting in October. 

According to the complaint, Joseph A 
Moglia, managing director of Merrill’s 
municipal division, “suggested that Quinn 
not pursue the matter any further" when 
Mr. Quinn passed on information about 
possible arm-twisting of Merrill employees 
to make contributions to local politicians. 

Among alleged violations relayed to Mr. 
Moglia were that: 

• a Merrill colleague had bought bonds 
from a retail customer five points below 
the going price on Wall Street, a practice 
known as “picking off* a customer. 

• another colleague was keeping a sepa- 
rate set of books with a Sl Louis brokerage 
firm to hide payments to that firm for 
bringing business to MerrilL 

• a third colleague may have set aside 


A actoduh ot Ms week's economic anO 
nnmdai evens, compeoa tor ffieimema- 
ticnalHenU Tmune by ffoomberg Bust- 
ness News. 


Asia-Pacific 


• Oat. 10 Japan Haafth- spars Day 
holiday. 

Slngapo** Asm Pacific Derivatives Exhi- 
bition. featuring senvurs and exrabtlE by 
rancors, brokerage firm*, banks and ex- 
change* Raises City Convention Canttr. 
Through Oct. 12. 

Tafam National Day houaay. 

• oet.ii Tokyo Economic Planning 
Agancy rewaan machinery orders tor 
August 

•Oct.12 Tokyo Federation of Bank- 
M Association releases banking depos- 
its ana loans at Japan's n coy banks 
durtng September. 

s Oat. 13 Canberra Australian em- 
Dtayment data for September. Forecast: 
Jobless rate to drop from 9-5 percent in 
August. 

Wafitngton New Zealand Treasury to re- 
lease government's budget details tor 


year ended June 30. Forecast. First sur- 
plus in 16 years, over 537 minion 
Singapore Smg^wra Informatics TM. 
an exhibition at information technology 
products ana services from more than 
ISO companies at the world Trade Can- 
tt*. Through Sept. 16 . 

• Oct. 14 ICefboume Natona) Aus- 
tralia Bank to release business confi- 
dence survey. 

Singapore Opening of the Europ&>East 
Asa Economic Summit. Speakers include 
Prime Mimsler Qeh Chek Tong of Singa- 
pore, Prune Mineter Mahathir bm Moha- 
mad ot Malaysia, Proudem Fidel V Ra- 
mos Of the Philippines, and Prince 
Norodom Rananddh. first prune emmster 
ot Cambodia. 

eOet-IB Melbourne Puma Minister 
Paul Keating attends Labor Party stats 
conference. 


year. Output up <L2 percent in month, 
output up 2 a percent in year. 
Lu xem bourg Elf finance rammers meet 
to discuss budget deficits. 



franc caposi injection by th* Franco 0<*' 
emment tor Group* Bull, 
e Oat. 19 Frankfurt Bundesbank 
councd meeting 

e Ostia Amsterdam July-August in- 
dustrial sates. 


Anwricas 


Europe 


a Oct. io London September pro- 
ducer pnee index. Forecast Input up 0.3 
percent m month, input up 4.7 percent m 


• Oct. 11 FranWurt Do Metot union 
announces IMS pay claim for metalwork- 
ers. 

• Oct. 12 Madrid Markets dosed lor 
rational holiday. 

8rusMtt European Commissioners 
mem to deeida whether to anew 11 bBJon 


• Oct. 10 United States Columbus 
Day hotel ay- Soma financial markets are 

flnpori 

e Oct. 11 Washington Commerce 
Secretary Ronald H Brown hosts round-, 
table on U.S.-Patosttman busies* 

• Oct. IS Boston Association lor 
Commercial B«i Ewne twws 
conference. FMMart *94. Speaker* m-- 

i «tw Secretary Robert B. flo£h 
and Governor William waldolMassachii. 
sets Through Od 15. 

• Oct. 1* Washington Federal Re- 
serve reports September industrial pro- 
duction and capacity utilization. 

• Oct. is San Fmodaoe Association, 
of Computing Machinery international 
conference on MuMimadia Through Oct 


Germans Expanding in China 


MAILED FROM AMERICA 


A genre France- Presse 

BELTING — Two German 
industrial giants, Daimler-Benz 
AG and Siemens AG, have out- 
lined plans for major expan- 
sions in China, according to a 
weekend report in the China 
Daily newspaper. 

By the end of the year, AEG 


fices in Guangdong and Liao- 
ning provinces. 

He declined to put a figure on 
the size or the new investment. 
The three AEG joint ventures 
currently in operation involve 
investment of S32.3 million. | 

Meanwhile, Siemens said it [ 
would establish a S7.7 million 


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plans to add seven new joint joint venture in the northwest- 
ventures to the three it already era province of Shaanxi to 


ers still have to pay more for that is valued every week, it’s a 
most shares than domestic in- burden to have the market price 


has in Henan and Guangdong 
provinces, the newspaper 
quoted AEG’s chief Beijing rep- 
resentative, Wilhelm Budcwar, 
as saying. 

Mr. Buckwar said the compa- 
ny would concentrate its invest- 
ment in the aerospace and air- 
port technology sectors, and 
that it would establish more of- 


make components for China’s 
power-transmission network. 

The Chinese partner, 
Shaanxi Baoguang Electronics 
Corp^ will hold 40 percent of 
the investment with the Ger- 
man side responsible for the re- 
maining 60 percent 

The new joint venture is the 
seventh for Siemens in China. 


'.fisoiftniBsIhe 


upcoming 

nwwnuH 


Mailed from America on 

««#y0fraiM 


below what you paid.” 

The market rallied sharply 
this week after the announce- 
ment that the cap would be 
raised. Domestic investors 




Don't miss the upcoming page: 


popular blue chip shares, antici- 
pating that foreigners would 
have no choice but to pay inflat- 
ed prices. 

“If this continues, foreigners 
will be afraid they're being i 
stuffed in at the top of the mar- 1 
ket and they won’t go for it,” 
said Scott Foster, a senior ana- 
lyst in Seoul with Merrill 
Lynch. “They have fallen for 
this ramping of prices before. 
But they’re consenting adults." 

Indeed, analysts say that ulti- 
mately it is a matter of whether 
the market is expected to per- 
form well. Nobody wants to 
miss an elevator on the way up 
and prices here are expected to 
muscle higher from their cur- 
rent record levels for another 
year or more. 


This week’s topics: 

o Our 65th Anniversary Issue Features 
O A Special Report, “Rethinking Work” 

0 Finally, German Industry Is Paring The Fat 
o Murdoch Has The Last Laugh - Again 
o Mexico: Reform Faces Murderous Opposition 


Worldwide 
Luxury 
Real Estate 


A selection of the world's finest 
properties presented in color. 


Now available at your newsstand! 


See the Saturday October 15 
edition of the newspaper. 


BusinessWeek International 
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sj'onsokld skciton 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1994 


TAIWA 


- lBr . ii* * 


S PON SO R KD SKCTlOjs 


vrt 



Economic Success 
Set to Continue 

GDP is expected to grow by 9.7 percent per year. 


The traditional art of calligraphy survives in a Taiwan that has become the world's thirteenth largest trading nation, as is shown inside the busy World Trade Center in Taipei (right). 

New Strategies, New Industries as Taiwan Goes Global 


Fred C.H. Feng . deputy director. International Cooperation Dept., Ministry of Economic Affairs, discusses Taiwan’s development plans and ambitions. 


What are the challenges 
that Taiwan now faces in 
consolidating its successful 
trade position ? 

Our main challenge is that, 
in recent years increased 
prosperity has caused land 
and labor costs to rise great- 
ly. and os a result our com- 
parative advantage in tradi- 
tional labor-intensive manu- 
facturing has begun to de- 
cline. We now have to in- 
crease our productivity and 
upgrade our industries away 
from labor-intensive prod- 
ucts to more high-tech prod- 
ucts with greater value- 
added. 


How is Taiwan ’s industri- 
al base being upgraded? 

We have been making 
great efforts to help our 
companies forge strategic 
alliances with leading multi- 
national companies so that 
we can upgrade our techni- 
cal expertise. We have iden- 
tified strategic growth indus- 
tries and offer assistance and 
tax incentives to foreign 
companies with expertise in 
these fields. 

In addition, we have em- 
barked upon an ambitious 
$300 billion development 
plan to upgrade our infra- 
structure and improve the 


investment climate. 

Will Taiwan join GATT? 

We are holding bilateral 
talks with many GATT 
member countries, and we 
are confident that we can 
meet the criteria for GATT 
entry. The elimination of 
tariff and non-tariff barriers, 
the removal of foreign ex- 
change controls, the rein- 
forcement of intellectual 
property rights and the 
wider opening of our econo- 
my to foreign firms are just 
a few of the many steps we 
have taken. 

What am hi lions do you 
have for Taiwan? 


We would like to play a 
greater role on the world 
stage in keeping with our 
importance as the world's 
thirteenth-lurgest trading en- 
tity. We also wish to join the 
OECD as well as GATT, 
and will continue to lobby 
for a seal in the United Na- 
tions. We would also like to 
develop the ROC ITaiwanJ 
as a regional operations cen- 
ter for businesses seeking to 
lap the Asian market, espe- 
cially mainland China; we 
believe our strategic loca- 
tion. political stability and 
skilled workers make the 
ROC an ideal base. 











*>'t .**• 


Fred CJi. Feng: “We have identified strategic growth industries . r 


UNITING THE WORLD THROUGH TRADE 



In just forty years, Taiwan 
has been transformed from 
an agricultural backwater to 
an economic giant. GNP 
grew at an average rate of 
9.1 percent in the 1960s. 
10.2 percent in the 1970s 
and S.2 percent in the 1 980s. 

Even during the 1993 
global recession, Taiwan's 
growth reached 5.9 percent 
and its GNP stood at $220 
billion, the twentieth highest 
in the world. According to 
Vincent Siew, chairman of 
the Council for Economic 
Planning and Development, 
GDP will continue to grow 
at an average annual rate of 
9.7 percent between 1995 
and 2005 once Taiwan has 
entered GATT. 

This extraordinary pros- 
perity has been built* on the 
strength of Taiwan's export 
performance. Exports con- 
tinue to soar, and Taiwan is 
now the world’s thirteenth 
largest trading nation. In 
1993. total exports amount- 
ed to $84.9 billion while im- 
ports totaled $77 billion. 
Thanks to persistent trade 
surpluses like this. Taiwan 
now holds the world's 
largest foreign-exchange re- 


New industrial structure 
As with the other three of 
Asia’s so-called Four Drag- 
ons. Taiwan's rapid devel- 
opment has come mainly 
from a proliferation of labor- 
intensive industries such as 
textiles and footwear manu- 
facturing. Taiwan's compet- 
itively priced goods have 
made their way into house- 
holds all over the world. 

The prosperity of recent 
years has given rise to a 
greater standard of living for 
most of Taiwan’s popula- 
tion. Per capita GNP is now 
$10,566. the twenty- fifth 
highest in the world. 

1 .and and labor costs have 
soared, however, and pro- 
ductivity has fallen; Taiwan 
has lost some of its compar- 
ative advantage. Entrepre- 
neurs are seeking opportuni- 
ties elsewhere in tnc region 
where land and labor costs 
arc lower. 

Taiwan's government has 
therefore introduced mea- 
sures to upgrade its indus- 
tries and has created incen- 
tives for industiy to invest in 
much-needed high-tech pro- 
duction to establish u new 
comparative advantage. The 
label “Made in Taiwan" is 
no longer synonymous with 
cheap plastic toys, but with 
advanced technology such 
as computers and compo- 
nents. 

Taiwan's aim to focus on 
more high-tech industry re- 
quires substantial domestic 
and inward investment. To 
stimulate a more beneficial 
investment climate, the gov- 
ern me nt embarked on an 
ambitious $300 billion six- 
year national development 
plan in 1991. 

The project is aimed at up- 
grading and modernizing the 
country’s infrastructure. The 
plan was also intended to 
hasten technology transfer 
and the transformation of 
Taiwan into a regional oper- 
ations center. 

The government has creat- 
ed a task force to review 
how best to turn Taiwan into 
a regional center for interna- 
tional corporations. Blue- 


prints are expected to be 
published by the Ministry of. 
Economic Affairs in the next 
few months, i Taiwan's 
strategic position midway- 
between northern and south- 
ern Asia, along with its 
proximity to China, skilled 
workforce and abundant 
capital resources, arc all cit- 
ed as the advantages that 
will help it reach this goal 

Incentives are being of- 
fered to foreign corporations 
that will assist in the devel- 
opment of strategic indus-.. 
tries. Banking and financial 
regulations have undergone 
a thorough liberalization and 
foreign banks can now set 
up branch offices in Taiwan. 
Foreign institutional in-' 
vestors can buy and sell se- 
curities. 

Global perspectives 
Taiwan has applied for ad- 
mission to GATT as “the 
separate customs territory of 
Taiwan, P’enghu, Kinmen 
and Matsu," and. according 
to analysts, should be admit- 
ted within months, at the 
same time as mainland Chi- 
na. 

The Taiwan government . 
plans, in addition, to partici- 
pate in the Asia Pacific E<x> 
nomic Cooperation (APEC) 
and the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and 
Development (OECD). «’ . 

The emergence of world 
trading blocs like the Euro- 
pean Union and NAFTA has 
made clear to Taiwan the ad-, 
vantages of a level playing 
field in world trade, and the 
government has stated a . 
commitment to free trade. 

Goods are now permuted 
to pass freely in and out of 
Taiwan, provided the ship- 
ments do not violate iiHcmn- 
(ioiiai ct *n vent ions nor trade' 
agreements, and do not con- 
cern national defense, public 
safely, culture, health, envi* 
ronmeni. wildlife conserva- 
tion or industrial policy. 

Taiwan and China 
Taiwan and -main land China 
technically remain m a slate 
of war, and relations periodi- 
cally hcconic tense as main- 
land China continues to op- 
pose Taiwan’s policy, of 
pragmatic diplomacy in Hhe 
world community. 

Indirect trading links and 
cultural ties between the two 
countries, however, are 
growing ever stronger. 

The Mainland Affairs »■ 
Council has been set up -to ; . 
review all matters relatingto * 
cross-straits relations, with 
the aim of eventually 
achieving a peaceful, reiiriffi- 
cation of China to die satis- 
faction of both the Tai- 
wanese and mainland Chi- 
nese governments. . £ 

The recent rejection *jf 
Taiwan’s second application 
to join the United Natip^ . 
because of a veto by maijg 
land China came as no siSf 
prise to Taiwan’s leaders^- 
who nonetheless remain 
firm in their resolve to gain 
admittance. 

Taiwan's government in- 
tends to take an active role 
in world affairs and to work, 
with the world community 
to find an equitable way to 
be admitted to the UN. 

“Justice delayed is better 
than justice denied," accord- 
ing to the country's foreign 
affairs ministry. 


TOP TEN EXPORT MARKETS 

by country On bilBons of U.S. dollars) 


Hong Kong 


Germany 
Singapore 
United Kingdom 

The Netherlands 
- Thailand 
Malaysia 
. Canada 


“Taiwan” 

nut pnihu nl hi its entirety fry the Adverts inn Department 
<U Hie Intirnaihuiu! Herald Tribune. 

Writer: •.Pout J, Hicks, who » based in Hi mu Kiwi!. 

Pm hmam hirhxti w: Bill Mcihdrr. ‘ 


















SPONSORED SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


1 f 


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SPONSORED SECTION 


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*One of World’s Key Trading Nations 


CCEsj 


! Balancing foreign trade is now the chief element of Taiwan 's trade policy. 




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:/1ls an export-oriented 
; economy, Taiwan realizes 
I that trade is its lifeblood. 

It is fitting, therefore, that 
i Taiwan should be holding a 

■ Worid Trade Week Oct 1 7- 

• 23 to mark the 1994 Worid 
; Trade Centers Association 
i Silver Jubilee General As- 
; sembly in Taipei 

! The fourth Taipei Intema- 

• donal Fair, a biannual event 
I that promotes the continuing 
; expansion of world trade 
land the strengthening of 
; economic ties among na- 
I tions, will be held during the 
; same period, Oct 18-23, in 
! the Taipei World Trade 
; Center (TWTC). 

These events are being or- 
; ganized by the China Exter- 
nal Trad e Dev elopment 
; Council (CETRA), a two- 
i way trade promotion body 
{funded by the government 

■ and private industrial and 
{ business organizations. CE- 
.TRA’s functions include 
{ gathering trade information, 

• conducting market research, 
j doing market promotion, or- 

■ ganizing exhibitions, arrang- 
; ing product promotions and 


providing business training 
and convention services. 

CETRA, based at the 
TWTC manages die rapidly 
increasing number of inter- 
national trade shows held 
there. The TWTC contains 
99,100-square-meter (1.06 
million square foot) perma- 
nent display of local and in- 
ternational products, with 
1,600 booths displaying lo- 
cal products alone. If visitors 
are int erested in a product, 
CETRA will foward their 
names to the manufacturer 
for a follow-up. 

Taiwan’s trade outlook 
While Taiwan's trade 
prospects continue to be 
rosy, the export of tradition- 
al labor-intensive products 
has shown a considerable 
decline in recent years, re- 
flecting the trend of local la- 
bor-intensive industries to 
relocate overseas. As costs 
continue to rise, Taiwan has 
lost its comparative advan- 
tage in these industries. 

Joseph Lee, vice president 
of Taiwan's Chung-Hua In- 
stitution for Economic Re- 


search, notes that light in- 
dustrial exports as a percent- 
age of total expons have 
fallen considerably. In 1988, 
light industrial manufactur- 
ing accounted for 53.2 per- 
cent of total exports, while 
this year the figure has fallen 
to only 42.4 percent Heavy 
industries now account for 
53-5 percent of expons. By 
1993, electronics, machin- 
ery, and information and 
. communications products 
had replaced textile products 
and footwear as leading ex- 
port categories. 

There has been a shift in 
the balance of Taiwan's ma- 
jor irading partners, too. 
Japan and the United States 
□sed to account for more 
than half of Taiwan's trade 
volume. In 1983, Taiwan 
shipped 55 percent of its ex- 
ports to these two countries, 
and received 50.4 percent of 
its imports from them. In 
1993, while the United 
States and Japan continued 
to provide 51-8 percent of 
Taiwan’s imports, their 
share of exports had de- 
clined to 38.2 percent, just 


over one third. The main 
reason is the surge in exports 
to mainland China. 

The United States remains 
Taiwan’s largest trading 
partner, but dependence on 
the United States as an ex- 
port market has decreased. 
Taiwan continues to accu- 
mulate trade surpluses with 
the United Stares, but these 
are showing a decline, drop- 
ping to S6.7 billion in 1993 
from $16 billion in- 1987. Of 
more concern to Taiwan is 
the continuing trade deficit 
with Japan, which now sup* 
plies over 30 percent of Tai- 
wan’s imports but takes only 
10.6 percent of its exports. 
The trade deficit with Japan 
was $14.2 billion in 1993, 
up 10 percent over 1992, 
and more than twice the 
1 989 deficit of $6.9 billion. 

Balancing foreign trade is 
now the most important 
component of Taiwan's 
trade policy, not only to re- 
duce friction with trading 
partners but also to relieve 
the pressure on monetary 
stability caused by Taiwan's 
excessive foreign reserves. 



: A Leading Source of Investment Capital 

•Approved investments abroad totaled $1.66 billion in 1993; the lion s share of Taiwan ’s overseas investment is in Asia. 

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. ith the world’s laigest 
I foreign-exchange reserves, 
; Taiwan has quickly become 
I one of the principal sources 
; of investment capital in the 
I world. According to the 
; country's Ministry of Eco- 
I nonric Affairs, Taiwan is the 
{world's seventh-largest 

■ overseas investor. 

{ The vast majority of this 
> investment is within Asia, 
^predominantly mainland 
. China. Around $19 billion 
{ has been invested in China 
• by Taiwanese firms, more 
; than 80 percent of it in the 

■ past three years, despite the 
[fact that direct investment 
i from Taiwan to China is for- 
.* bidden by Taiwan’s govern- 


ment. All such investment 
has to go through a third 
country (in practice, this is 
usually Hong Kong). Tai- 
wan is also the largest for- 
eign investor in Vietnam, 
the second-largest foreign 
investor in both Malaysia 
and Indonesia, and the 
fourth-largest in Thailand. 

“Most of Taiwan’s out- 
ward investment is in labor- 
intensive manufacturing 
processes, since escalating 
land and labor costs have 
made it cheaper for our en- 
trepreneurs to manufacture 
overseas,” says Long Shan 
Chen, director of the Indus- 
trial Development and In- 
vestment Center of the Min- 


istry of Economic Affairs. 

This investment has made 
Taiwanese businessmen 
very welcome among their 
Southeast Asian neighbors, 
but the outflow of so much 
capital (approved overseas 
investments in 1993 totaled 
$1.66 billion) deflects funds 
from Taiwan's domestic in- 
dustry. 

Restrictions are not im- 
posed on outward invest- 
ment, although all projects 
require registration with the 
authorities. The government 
has instead taken various 
measures to stimulate do- 
mestic investment. 

“We expect our outward 
investment to continue to in- 


crease in labor-intensive in- 
dustries," says Mr. Chen, 
“but not by as much, since 
more investment will be 
concentrated on upgrading 
our own industries.” 

Business opportunities 
have also helped attract for- 
eign investment into Tai- 
wan. The government has 
identified ten emerging in- 
dustries, and is offering 
many incentives to investors 
in these areas. They are 
telecommunications, infor- 
mation, consumer electron- 
ics, semiconductors, preci- 
sion machinery and automa- 
tion, aerospeace, advanced 
materials, fine chemicals 
and pharmaceuticals, health 


care and pollution control. 

Taiwan offers foreign in- 
vestors administrative assis- 
tance and financial support 
for joint projects in the tar- 
geted sectors. The Industrial 
Development Bureau may 
subsidize up to 50 percent of 
the financial management, 
quality control, production 
management, material man- 
agement, marketing, in-ser- 
vice training and design 
costs of a company that 
meets the sirategic-indusuy 
criteria. These companies 
are also allowed a five-year 
tax holiday and may be ex- 
empt from import tax on 
equipment imported for 
R&D work. 



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WITHOUT A FULL TEAM, 
IT'S UPHILL FOR THE U.N 





fill * ; •; ... J 



1 ': 



Why has the Republic of China on Taiwan, one of the world’s strongest democracies, been banished 
from the world stage? Such exclusion from the U.N. and other world forums is unfortunate and 
detrimental to world affairs. 

All because of rhetoric that ignores reality. 

Communist China says the Republic of China on Taiwan does not exist. But that’s a ploy 
which simply won't work anymore. How is it possible to ignore 21 million people, who make 
up the world’s 20th largest economy, 14th largest trading nation, a blossoming democracy, and a 
colorful culture? 

. Communist China also argues that the U.N. is not big enough for two Chinese seats, even if only 
temporarily, until China’s unification is achieved. But the U.N. was big enough for two Germanys, and 
is still big enough for the two divided parts of Korea. So much for that argument. 

Rhetoric can’t change reality. The Republic of China on Taiwan exists. The international 
community should not be bullied into playing along with any charade to the contrary. It's high 


time the international community says “no” to Peking’s attempts to 
block the Republic of China from assuming its rightful role as a 
responsible, charitable and key member of the U.N. family of 
nations. 

Yes. The 21 million Chinese on Taiwan are ready, willing and able 
to assume a role In the U.N. , to do their share in building a better U.N. 
and more harmonious world. Their continued exclusion is no longer 
justified. Reality and reason, not rhetoric, should make the world go 
round. 

So, isn’t it time for the U.N. to give the Republic of China on Taiwan 
a chance to participate in the most august of world bodies? 

The Republic of China on Taiwan. We’re Ready. 


TODAY’S 

TAIWAN 


REPUBLIC 
OF CHINA 








Page 14 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


EVTERNATTONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 ' 

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I 1273 —33 TxlnsAp 10.81 —36 FFBN J 1036 —09 Moriolncp 952 _ . Incomen 1066 —35 StHnet 536 —33 ' MjEflCn 1661 —37 ! ShTmBdd 9.9? 

r 1431-31 TvirOAp 10.14 —35 FFTijiFunds _ I fW A mer Mutl C: J SKLrwniOjM —34 I |trtTt jg 


. BdirtCA 11 JIB —36 1 GrlhD 1?30 —.40 
CATE A p 737 —061 Glnotx 930—16 
I ~Apl464 —27 - - -- — 


l- Rrst Amer Mutl C: i S&S Lna n KbM — jw strSTt 38 

9.91—31 DtvrGwtnn898 —.12 S&SPMn36J6 — 59 StrWGI 559 — 38 

936 —.OS I Emvlncn n 936 — .13 Tar Ex 11JU — 09, TEBndp 171 —.05; GtoFxA 1137—07 

9.93 . 1 LMTerm n 9.95 J Trusts n 3X58 -50 UWincp 419—10* GvlAl 1159-39 

Mnodlncan952 + 31 GE Funds 15i Funds 1 IntFlA 


1435 —28 * SCOPV4 9J7 
11.67 —37 : Value Eq4 955 


- >. —s— HUncDp 765—07 

AP1135— .04 InvGD 972 
kP 1268—19 NYTXDpx 9.93 


«dln 936 — JM I Eatvlnca n 976 — .13 Tar Ex 1154 —09, TEBndp 171 —.05 ; GAFxA 1157 — 07 ! AAatnenn 1A63 — >04 ' GvScAp 1061—34 1 MHLOv« 951 —38 
” ■” _ 1X59 — 39;SWRWG 1X63—52 GwttlAp 957 —17 STGvtDo 937 _m 


STGvtDp 237 —31 
SmCaoD 1039 —16 


Ad vest Ad 
Govtnp 
Gwttinp 
HYBdp 
Inca no 


MuBdNat 935— 09 
Sod np 2037 —55 KYTF 
Siratlnc 11.97 —88 NrjngfT 
Aetna Advisor: QRTF 

Aetnat 1060 —10 TxFUT 
Bondr 962 —31 Aquinos f 
Grlncam 1106? —.16 Bdtance 
irtHGrt 11.17—16 Eatncn 
TaxFree 9.10 —38 .Fxlncn 


9W =57 Gvllnc 4.85 _ Japan n 2654—66 FPA Funds:, BtChiP px 1A97 — 22 , GE use 

1XW— 10 MedRs 1816 —/II UKn 3X93 —37 Caplt 1953 -.17 Gtablp ,4.16 

1X16=06 NZkmd 1033 —58 Contn 15.11 —35 Newlncx 1023 — 1? Govtp 1060 — J* GjJJivsfc 

937=09 NJopan 775 —To DFARIES1HL13 —34 Pannm 1458 —15 Grolncpx 652 — . 14 1 ^cn 

10.12 —m Omfinal Family: Fixdn 101.17 +37 _Peren 2158 —36 H-ahYdP 4.« —m TFNotfn 

? is =10 ABHGlti 9.A — 16 GlBd 9669—24 Rnnrnn 2451 —63 Income n 356 WA 

^ SaScBd 9.79— .11 Govfn 10055 —.05 Fasdano n 1770 — 30 InvGrdP 955 — 03 rGTGtobab 


GEUSG 1567 —36 SlmGvtp 958 —31' TaxExna 
US EqA 1556—26 TRBdP 937 — J)4 ; Landmark 
(Tlnvsh TR Grp 1132 — 37 Bdonn 


[■Sjllr'' 


. fc. 


1152— » 
ricA 1M? — IQ ! 


, 4-. 


g»S ’fcg =:!? 

invTrAp — JJ 

vTrO 


RIES111L13 — 34 Pannm 1458 —15 Grolncpx 652 —14 1 EaSpcn 19.43 —43 Im/Resh 459 —33 Equilyn 1477—51 VAMuTn 10.14 —10 i Inr&ii 

n 101.17 +37 Peren 2158 — 36 HiahYdp 4.94 —.03 1 TFNottn 9.7B — 37 IlnvSerppHd: Irfflnc 931 — 34 , VaAAunlt 10.16 — . TO i StarB 

9669 —24 Fakmtn 2451 —63 Income n 356—32 TxFrVAnl055 — 38 1 CnpGrl r 1131—77 IntiEg 1115 — 34 iMentGtti 1131—36, V 


TRBdP 937 — JM Landmark Femes: : USGavTn 952 — .01 BdlncBp 113H — 06 imBd 968 —M 

TR Grp 1132 — 37, Bctonn 1X43 —31 1 USGvtltn 752 — 31 CafcrB I 14S — 28 LA TF 1037 — 36 

ivResh 459—33 Equity n 1477—31 VAMuTn 10.16 —10 1 IntEaBt 1556 -17 STGv 9.94—01 

ivSerOptM: Inline 931 — 34 ; VaMunl 1 1X16 — 10 ; StarB d 1131—39 1 ValEa 1151 

CapGrfx 1131 —77 IntlEa 1X15—34 
QoaCIk x 1250— 1.82 NYTFnp 1056 



” ISI^ 

~34 AtknSTn 
—05 Asset An 
.e* conytn 

B56 —30 Eqhic n 1XW —14 
Ss — 30 ExPkX«rn44L*9— 16 
Mo&r 9.04 —10 Mwwsin 115? — 2* 
SseadmSi Funds: Ptmcpn ■"« +■"* 

"SSSdrt W-l? 




Amlndn l.W — -- 

“■■.S3! 

—7? 
n 953 —.05 

n 1058 —07 


TaxFree 9.10 —38 Fxlncn 955 —01 CardCa 1X92—33 
Aetna Sated: Arch Funds: COmeaOHTE956— 03 

a2£S7Tml43 -10 b 3™™965— 11 CgtaroRmte _ 

AsxmGrn 935 —35 EmGrifi 1134 —31 p^SlSS" X S ~-5? 

Bondn 9.62—0) GovCorp 9 JO — .05 FemlnCn 954 — .01 . _ . 

Govt 9 46 —51 Gralnc 1238 —32 NC TF n 939 — 34 1 Bdlonn 

Growth loS — 37 HStF 1082— ID CentwjlGp 851 — 13| Inexxne 




VaMunl t 1X16 —10 i StarB p 1331 — 39 ValEq 1153—18 

i 1X21 —36 , volueb 764 —31 VolGr 1430 —29 

II 11.99—31 |NewUSAp 11J7 —33 Parkstnne Inst 
lptX83 — 35 ^ Nichoka Group: Baiancdn 10.29 —16 

n 2166 —52 Nicholn 50.43 —62 Bondn 9.16—03 

Lynch A: Nch II n 2652 —59 EquitV n 1569 —68 

Amen ha 1 9.12 —36 Nichlncii 354 —32 Gvllnc C 937 — mi 

AdiRAp 965 —31,' NchLdn 1759 — 34 HiYEan 1368 —27 




map' 


958 —OH GflncA P 6.00 —06 


i pall 41 — 22-Loun>r 


Ataer Funds Aimstnan 858 — 16 QJBStnt 14510— 265 O 

Gnjwlnr 1930 —38 Arrow Funds *-S t* 

IncGrr 1155 —30 Equity 9 JO —24 OnitoGjIn 15.94 —20 5r 

MidCpGri1154 —17 Fxd/ncm 936 —35 OjuttlTR 1455 —18 Dn 

SrnCOnt 2132 —59 Muni 9J9 —38 aipoern 47.94 —54 A 

ASanSQqe AHcnroGrp1032 —24 CuEnW Funds A 

ACancep 659—15 Altos Fundi CoTTEA 636 — 37 A 

Bataip 1X04 —IS CAJnsA 955 —06 CmiTE 

Bctanot 1193 —14 CaMuniA 1054 —12 


FfiRtn 15.75 —36 FSTlSSp 865 _ First Omaha: FCIncB 1X75 —55 Gold n 630 — .19 iLazard Gmuip:'' 

5mCpValnI139— 44 GnmclSn]D58 — 06 1 Euuitvn 1130-10 InfnjA 1X11—38! Growth no 113 —39 I Equity 1*66 — 30 


nvGdA 1X72 —.05 




IMA I 930 —U < COreGnt* 1265— 50 MIMnC 1062 —06 


936 —38 
650 —32 


A 1X40 —11 I BondFd 9.17—031 Fedlnt 


Upoern 47.94 —54 A Bond nx 1142 — . 
MorUalFunds Aprecno 14.99 — 

ColTEA 636 —37 AssetAH n!2J2 — 


St 1193 —1* 
kp 12J3— 16 


CAJnsA 955 —06 CanTEA 7.05 —09 Batncd 1X42—17 

CaMuniA 1054 —12 FfldSeC 9.98 -.06 Bo£idnrMU62 -36 

GvKecA 961 —38 FLTE A 7.03 —.10 CalTxn 1*38 —18 

GnHncA 1172 —37 FundA 756 —13 Callntn 1256 —09 


GfimoSp 1058 — 06 Fxdlncn 9 J7 —03 I InfraB 1X09 —38 H 1th Sen 3437 —37 IntlEa 1232—30 
—.14 Fiarssp lliy— .03 SIFxInn «56 Intlp 035—13: HlYWnp 663 —36 1 inttSC 10 JO —30 

—19 inflndnst 935 —03 FPDvAS>PXl230 — 17 i IrrtIB 065 —13 1 Indlnainpll^ — .12 SmCap 1538 — J7 

—11 IMT IS 1031—04 FPMuBd pel 166 — .10 > Japan p 266—09 lidGovn 1230—32 SpEa 1439—01 

—17 MidCap 1031 — 38 First Priority: I JcpmiGrS 255 — 39 IhftGrn 16J4 — Jl StroYd 932 —04 


CpITA 1035 —05' IncGrB 1152 —.11 I Eauity 1568 —67 
DevCcpp 1668 — 34 I WWGrB 1431 — 67 Govtlnc 9.27 _ 


InfraB 1X09 —28 HlthScn 3457—57 IntlEa 1252—201 DevCop p 1668 — 54 1 WWGrB 1451 —671 Govtlnc 9.27 

Intlp 1035 —.13 ■ HlYWnp 663 — JGUS I InttSC 10 JO —30 DroaAT 1731 —39 1 WWflr 14.95 — 66 HiEq 1X48—37 

IntIB 1065 —13) Indlrcpnpll33 — .12 SmCap 1558 —57 1 EuroAt 15.15 —24 Nomura n 17.93—19 InIGovt 954 _ 

FedSecA p 9.19 —05 North Am Funds intIDis 1X96—19 


—36 GroIncA 13J2 -37 FundA 756 —13 

=? 5 ts38u.Hr=fi 


__rTxil 1458—18 ModGfn 9.91—37 FxdlncTr __ , _ .. . _ ,, _. 

Callntn 256 —39 AA9dGron 959 -.il LMMGv 966 _ Pacffp I4J5 — 34 SellrKinrv>6.07 — 33 lLe99 Mason 

CTIntn 272—37 Msdlncn 9.89 —34 Firat Union: 1 PodfB 14J0 — 34 ShTrBdu 9J8 — 31 I AmerLd P 953 — 16 

DWhB X30— 36 MaxCap 1158—18 BalTn 1164—15: SlratAp 103* — 55 TxFreenplS.13 —.10 : GPIGOV! p 9.90 — 33 

EdHInd a94 — 30 AAinicap n 1165 — 32 BalCtn 1165 —15 StrarB 1039 — 36 Tecftn 2337 —65 i Gvnndiw 930 — S 

FLIntn 1X91—34 ShrtTerm 1038 — 04 BolBp 1164—15 Tetecom 16.94 —40 TotRtn 1X18—10 HiYldp 1430 — 31 


J 1X71 — in First Priority: I JaponGrBlX55 — 39 InflGrn 16J4 — Jl StroYd 932 —04 FLAAA 968 —12 AstAIIC Ptl 1 1.10 — .13 Ltd Mat 93H 

rn 9.93 —13 EquityTrn(0J2— .11 1 LatAmG 26.01 —38 I Leisure n 2154 — 58 LebenNY 732 —11 1 FaFTA 1197—37 GTGrp 1455 — 39 MI Mu 1041—36 


955—03 LatAmGB25.85 —89 I PacBas n 1652 — 39 LeebPer n 1053 —37 I FdGrAD 953 —11 I GrwtliCpn 14.81 —29 SmCap 2266 

966 Pacffp 1455 — 34 | Sellrtcm np6 37 — 33 lLe99 Masoit GIA1A 1196 —17 | Gr IncC pn!259 — 39 , PamBaln 15.71 

1 PodfB 1430 -34 ShTrBdu 958 -31 I AmerLd D 933 - 




1455 —34 | seilnannp6.07 —33 i Le99 AAason: j G1A2A 1196—17 Gr IncC pnIX59 — 39 PamBal n 15.71—15 

1430 —34 ShTrBdu 958 —31 I AmerLd P 953 —16 GIBdA 9.10 —32 USGvIAp 969 —33 Pama&SUS 3X96 —62 

1059 — 35l TxFreenoi5Li3 —.10 ! GfalGovi p 9.90 — 32 ! GiCvAx 1059—11 NelnvGrn 2468 -51 Pasadena Gran 

1X10 —32 NelnvTrn 9.94 —.08 BalRlnA 20 a —39 

I 1537 —50 Northern Funds GrowthA 1142—52 

IA 9.74—15 Rxlnn 959 — 35 Nifty 50 16.88 —51 

Atx 1X25—36 GrEqn 1X18—24 PaxWarldn1367 — 32 


—59 USGovt np 631 —37 InvGrnp 961 — 38 


—34 UlOn 958 —16 '■ 

—25 V«Eq 1757 —16 1 


15 GDRA 18JJ8 — 57 incEqn 956 — 12 PavsonBI n 1151 — 39 


InvTrCviBt 866 — 59 | Splnvnp 2037 —M 1 HeaHhA X57 — .04 InlTaxEx n».86 — .04 PeochTBd 953 — 31 

31 IstelFd np 1433 — 12 ! TvFrlntp 1*37 —37 i instlnp 953—31 IntlFxInn 9.84 —06 PeachTEq 9.74 — Tg 

>42 JPMlitsSt: , TatRetnp 1354 —38 , hitlEoAl 1155 — JW lntGrEon1067 — 14 Pelican 11.97—20 


: 2067 —46 mrlEq 1937—67 NY TEA 668 —US GwthOp n 1035 — 04 EaPGfi 2837 — 50 AAnBdT n 9.46 —02' Asset no 2X14 — 42 JPM Instil: , TatRetnp 1354 —38 InflEoAI 1155 — JW IntGrEan 1067 —.14 Pelican 

: D 2462 —54 MimlBd 1437—38 OhTE A 6.93 —04 InsAAun np1636 — 31 EaPIncA 16.00 —30 NCMunC I 950 — .10 I ConvScPn1154 — 06 Bondn 936 —04' VafTrno 1X94 —53 NIIMuA 9.43 —.14 InltSelEq nil. 12 —.04 I PenCao A 

If 2066 — 46 SWDurax n4_92 » SrnSIRp 1733—46 In term n 1351—09 GiMResc 1751 — 52 US&vIBp 9.16 —.05 ' Eqlncp 1167 — 37 Oiversild n 9.91 — 10 : Lehman Brothers: MNMuA 10.01—11 SdlEan 9.B6 —53 ' PAMunl P 

Ip 236—04 ShlDurtnv n4.92 . StrttncA 465 — 33 InterEq p 1533 — 30 GavInvAo 8.98 — .05 USGvrCr 9.14 —.05 I GllntCPn 10J6 — 18 EmgAU:E4X34 —31 1 RRtGvA 9.91 *32 LWAmA 11737 —68 SmCuGr n 9 78 — T9 I Pertarmar 


p 236—84 ShlDurtnv n4.92 . StrttncA 455 —35 InterEq P 1533 —30 GavInvAo 8.98 —.05 USGvrCr 9.14 —.05 I GllntCPn 10J6 —.18 EnwMkE42i34 — 31 1 FIRtGvA 9.91 *32 LotAmA 11737 —M ! SmCiX>n 9 78 —.19 Performance FPs: 

1151—14 StuFxIn P 1538 —35 TxExAp 1X74 — .13 InvGNn 1436 —10 GrwOppp2X73 — 56 UlilitvCl 9.10—11, GlConvn 1056 — 38 InttEcty n 10.47 —11 i SetGrSIBllXlS — .12 I MnlRSA 758 —101 TxE-.pl n 9.71 —10 I EaConp 11.16—16 

C 955 —10 ySCFxJn 1451 —37 TxlnsAp 7J6 — 08 MAIntn 1260 —11 HIAAuAp 1158 — ID Vatu^D 1750 -32 GTTel o 10.12-36 ST Band n 9.61 - 02 I ShDutGvA 9.93 AAuaLMA 933 -32 USGovtn 9.76 —02 I Eainsn 11.14—16 

9.18 —15 BFM&iDu n9.«9 .1 USGrA 11.92 —15 AAA Tax n 1550 —.13 [ HiYMApnll.16 — 14 ValueC m 1751 — 31 I Goldn 12.02 = 1 SmgllCP n 10.00 —21 ILnlngtonGrpt I AAuliiTrA 932 -3* I Harwell Fundi: I InFlCn 950—04 

ttpimz ' ‘ ‘ 


11.16—14 ValueC m 1751 —31 I Goldn 1X02 - SmallCP n 10.00 —31 | LexhMton Gra 

1468 —.13 I ValueTn 1750 — 31 1 Growth np2X0? —69 SelEatyn 1033 — 19 CrivSecn 1X81 — 36 


IntlAp 1853 — 32 

MK?¥Fap 55 =32 
MtaTrtfp 950 =01 

S»|p 14! —IS 


me » zfi ?S=^ i^raSSiSz:!! stf? 

T: FundBt 735 —14 NYTEp 1751—17 StraK 

CapAponll61 —13 GBjEqB 1117—37 Peoolndt 1532 — 35 FSeB) 

!S^«=^ l&i 

InvEqAoa n9.73 — .1 1 HYSecBt 662 —35 ST Inc Pn 1*35 —02 IShIG 

RWBfWz* 


l 951 -.01 
WAp 19.64—51 OualGrp 1232 -32 

I n* > «U0 -50 TotRTSV PxX» =08 
n 16.09 —30 Value P\ 1133 -34 


959 _.CB TotRIn 1054—11, 
1362 -30 Janus Fuikt 


3NAAAn 755 —.05 
utohofn 1407 -31 
dfdn 736 —30 
inen 1534 —53 
nffn 1035 -.14 


IShlGv 932 -.02 
UBIn 1051-03 


) 951—13 InvintEq nl33i —30 AAATxBt 756—08 UST lot 1258 — 33 AwTF rrEU.14 —.09 

IP 9.61 —14 InvLGvln 9.70 —31 NatRes8IIXB6 -33 USTLnsll33-.il AAAgrn 1468—10 

:p 951 — 14 InvUtfl nx 939 — 34 NYTxBI 658 — 38 USTShn 1431 — 33 AM8rGrnlX76 — .15 

PX74— 15 PacBasEatoJS — 37 OHTxBt 6.93 -.06 Dreyfus Comstock: AAABrtnnx 10 60-38 

1X05 — IB BabsaaGruWK SmlSflcB 1769 —46 CapValA 11.90 <37 Batonc 1759 —11 

8 'is -is issy^=3s ssafw* 


AATEap 1 
AATECP 1 


1X47 -61 AssalAUn 10.41 -.13 Tax Ex 1001 -A 

9.92 —.14 CTMun 959 -08 TotRIn 1054—11, 

1232 — 32 EqGrth 1367 —30 JanusFund: i umn iuju — la 

C36 -30 EqtVal 1XB6 -.27 Balanced nil. 94 -.09. SIGovtn 9.73-31 

1930 — 08 Eqlnonn 12JB -.13 Errterprn 2254 -34 1 StS.1 465—12 

133 -34 hfiOBd 9.59 _3S FedTxExn6 56 -.07 Slim/ 154- 06 

S intBd 971 -03 Flxlncn 9.no_04! TE Bdn 9.97-08 
—39 WitEatn 1X75—15 Fundn 1B34 -51 , WidEm 1X65 -.13 

038— 10 MAMun 9.25 —.09 Grthlnc 1199 —36 Uhecty Family: 

0.11 -.09 NY Mu n 1037 -.10 IntGvl 4.82 -31 I AmLdr 1487 -35 

9.86 -.10 ST Bdn 9.76—01 Mercury 1X36 -.19 

9.35 -37 SmCoEqnl102-33 Overseas n9.96 _ 10 


CP 8.92 -.14 

li K=: 


SSw BS=:,3 

pi I il 

NtlMuC P p . 56 — ]6 


rp2n lira —35 
in 16.94 +35 

" l^=il 

own 1031 —11 


miiwuc. P »jo — .16 UMBHrtn 
NEurAp 1254 —13 UAABSln 
NEurB n 1238 -.13 UAABWw 


Sin 1533 —.19 

UM8 Ww nio.94 —14 inflStKn 13.10—37 GnrnaBt 13.71 -39 Diverintl M1.9B — 26 DHTEAp 1039 —09 Equity nx 1252 -51 ! iWoTCB 10.95 —11 

Value n 2553 —39 Munln 1157 — 30 MAMunAll31 — 12 DivGthn 1X15 —.18 DHTECO 1039 -39 inlGovrw 936 — .08 NYTEp 1155—11 

BaDanWabl&Kaisat: ReEEan 1166 — .18 MDMunAlll! — .10 EmoGrorl4(W —61 PATEAp 9J8 -.09 Intnx 1X61-33 STSTrafB 8.49—01 

DiversanxllJS —36 sped n 1957 — 5* Ml MimA 14,92 —.14 EmrMkt 193* —37 TnTEAo 10.48 —10 AAunlnt nx 9.83 — .11 SpdEAp 1497 — 50 


ip 9.35 — 37i SmCoEqnll32 — 33 Overseas n9.96 — 10 

fA% w =39 g^«' 4 - 08 war^s 

-p 1660 —19 LoraeCan14 7i —32 Ventrn 5004—62 
&P 1 IV, =.?? §Mn,$ =5°? JopunFdn jfS -i? 

A%1 Sff -:i8 


sBI 7.76 —38 PtSfwOI 9.49 _ CATFn 10.91—12 KYTEApl052 -.il SmonConl763 — 51 

Bt 11.83 -.15 Dreyfus Premier: Canada n 17.18 —36 KSTEa 9.48 -.10 USTreosn9.9? — 03 

/Bt 652 —03 CA AAunA el 239 —14 CapApp 16.76 -54 LATEAp 1017 —09 Utility 9.72 —17 

bia Funds: "'** ^ S, ffl? zfl SSSSEST-W =JS 

s?n n p=8 gs&nfssz--?? 

’15 =31 


» n S£=3 


I n 2535 —59 GnmaA I3J0 —39 
itkn 1X10—37 GnmaBi 1171 -39 


>p 1X76 -54 LATEAp 10 17 -.09 Utllitv 9.72 — .17 JP IGB 395—04 
MnrX97 — 11 LWTEp 10.45 -33 Gtwylnd>PJ16.0l — 14 John Hancock; 

SI rf5031 —159 MITE A p 1131 —.11 Gtwy5lndxn9.76 -30 CATE 1134—11. 

knffijzfl ,85-JSiLiiKSW-lSKb 

yin 1765 —35 NCTEAP 9J8 -38 Ensanp 24J7 -69 IIAcorex 1X37 — 53 

vll n28.14— 39 NMTEP 955 — 39 GinilFd n 1X18 — 53 LTGvAp 8.48 i .01 , 

n 1055 -37 NY TE d 1032 -.10 Gtopmede Fuads: MATE 1130—10 


Tettp 2856 


ptvvsa nxt 1J5 —36 see 
IntlEq n 5.98 —12 Comi 
tntlFI nx 732 —20 Asl 
inird Funds: Agl 


I n 1951 —54 Ml AAunA 14.92 —.14 
■oa Sense: AAN MunAl467 —13 

D2A P1112 —14 AAOAAuB 1 1119 —.10 
u2BnflX09 —14 AAuBdSt 1365—12 
1031 -36 AAuniBdA 1X51 —36 


1X92—18 VATEA p 10 
1633 — 27 I Flex FWI*: 


—.10 AAunlnt nx 9.83 —11 SpdEAp 14.97 —50 
—.09 SmCap nxl4.l6 —59 SpdEBp 1485 —30 
—.10 OtweintA 956 —31 SpOpsA 7.60 —11 


10 OtmeintA 956 —31 SpOpsA 7.60 —11 
GojdenoaKCWU— 15 SpcOpsB 755 —.1 1 
_ Goldman Sachs Fmk SirtocAp 6.91 —33 

.1 ears!? 3 aszs 

. GftJlnc 1368 —03 UtBsBx 7.B8 — 10 
5 Grtnc 1634 — 61 J Hancock Freedm: 


STMtop BJO—O Affilnc 936 -31 Govt 1031 -36 MuniBaA 1X51 —M ErCapApnll31 -37 Bondnp 1936 _ Goldman Sachs Fmty: StrUlc 

STMtot X70 — 33 BlChlpp 1836 — 56 Gralnc 1552 — 32 NCMuA 1253 —15 Europe 19.94 —50 GOtlnen 955 . AsiaGrth 1552 — .16 Strlnc 

Tech P 2856— J2 C«toDevp2X18 — 56 Growth 1430—32 NCMuBt 1X32 — .15 ExchFdrf0X12— 1.13 Growth npl 337 +.01 CaoGr 1551 — 50 TaxE: 

Wldlncp 138 _ Baron Asl n 2261 —61 GrtlAp 1151—17 NYMunAlX68 — 15 FdafFd n 855 — 27 Muirtdpnx556 . Gtoinc 1368 —.03 UtBsB 

WldPrivB 0056 —17 Bartlett Funds: GrtlBp 1168—16 NYAAuBt 1358 — .16 Fifty 037 —32 Fontaine n 1039 —15 Grtnc 1634 — 61 J Horn 

Am50Uill Funds: BoscVln 1454 — 33 MunB 1X05 —38 OHMuA 1X41 —.10 GNMn 032 — 39 Forth Funds: IntlEq 1639 — J3 AvTe* 

Balance 1154 —39 Fixedln 953 —03 GontpaH Capital: OKA/luBt 1X43 — .10 GtoBd 053—04 AstAUp 1X99—31 Muni Inc 1X25— .14 Envrn 

Bona 1050 —.02 ShtTmBdnt.76 —02 Eqtylna) 1X73 — 50 PA AAunA 1559 —15 GtoSaln 1X08 —.13 CopApp 21.95 —52 SeJEq 1X09 —30 GOnB 

Equrty 14J2 — 18 VI Inti 1X33 —.19 Fxdln 9.92 —33 PAAAuBt 1559 — .15 GvtSecn 938 — 35 Capifl p 1753 — 66 5maCap 1936 — 64 GlobA 

FloTxF 9.96 .. BascomBal 12.74 -.13 Growth 1138—13 TXMuA 19.90 -33 GroCo 2733—52 Fiducrp 28.97 -33 GoUrnan Sochs tosh GlohB 

Gvttn 951 — 33 Bay Funds tnslt IntlEq 1X91—16 VAAAuA 1551 — 16 Grolnc 2153 — 39 GlbGrthp 1430 -32 AcSGv 9.76-31 GHnA 

LtdMat 1X10 - ST YleW 953 — 32 IntIR 1036 — 33 VAAAuBt 1X51 — .16 HiYW 1156—11 GcrvTRp 7.77 — M GqvAu »J8 , GJobR 

ReoEq 1655 — 69 Bondn 951 —02 MunSd 10.18—07 Drertus Strategic hisAAwin 1033 — II Grwthn 2631 — 60 ShrtTF 933 — 33 GiTec 

nwwhc 1251 — .14 EouMv 1069 —13 NJMun 1057 —00 Gfer p 3X84 —55 IntBdn 9.92 —32 HiYldp 738 — 34 ST Gov 955 —01 GoidA 

mhosspdorFW: _ BqyFUnds Invest: _ Shrtlnt 10.13 +.01 Growth p 41.12 +57 InterGvtn 936 — 04 TF MN 9.98 — .10 GovSlBnd SB-20 — 32 GoldB 


1168—16 NYAAuBt 1358 —.16 Fifty 1037 —32 Fontaine n 1039 —15 Grtnc 1634 —41 J Hancock Fieedm: 

f — 38 OHMuA 1X41 —.10 GNMn 1032 — 39 Partis Fundfc IntlEq 1639 —33 1 AvTech 9.72—16 

b OHMuBt 1262 — .10 GlaBd 1053 —04 AstAUp 1X99—31 Muni Inc 1335 —.14 , EnvmAn 123 — 1 19 

—30 PA AAunA 1X59 —15 GlaBaln 1238—13 CopApp 21.95 —52 SelEq 1539 —30 GOnBI X74 — .02 


936 —64 GloCA P 1X54 —32 


1M5 —69 


BaincF 953 —30 
Band nx 9.14 —08 
EstCoGrnIS.TO —61 


951 —02 MunBd 10.18 —07 
1M9 — 13 NJAAun 1057 —00 
Invest _ Shrttm 10.13 +.01 


In 953 —32 I SmCapVal 1 
951 —02 Compart* Or 


GllnA 8J5 —.01 
GlabRx 1659 —.12 
GITech 1732 -51 
GoidA* 1453 —43 
GokJBtx 1451 —61 


n T259 — 28 Beac Kin 2855 —11 GwthA p 1263 —.14 DutlPEnR n 9.98 


Income p 1X99 —07 I SnttGdn 1739 —37 I TF Nat 1038— 10 GvtErtvn 2252 —18 PocSos 1X24—55 


btvGSn 698 —04 USGvt 835 —34 Gavefl Funds: 


n 1049—13 BdSlkAp 1155 —.13 I InvBt 1951 —51 I Japan nr 1X82 -.1? Fortress towst 


PocBosB 15.19 -34 


idxStk nx 1130 —35 BSEmgObt 930 _ inFdAo 857 —35 Dupree AAutuab 

infBand nx 934 —34 1 Benchmark Funds: NW5«Apl436 — 17 UtiGavn 96 


Japan nr 1X82 —.19 Fortress InvSfc DvrlpBd 851 +39 RsBKAx 2152 —56 

LatAmr 1433-J5 AdiRtl 969 _ EmBAAk 1733 -58 RgBkBtx 2154 —52 


InfBand roc 954 —M Benchmark Funds; 
Inltstkn 1194—13 Bduneed n9.71 — 15 
EmC0Grnll54 — 54 BandAn 1X69—05 


InFdAn 857 -35 Dupree Mutual: LtdMun 9.19-36 Banar 9.10 -JM GKJvIn BJ9 +31 J Hancock Savenne 

NW 50A p 1456 —17 imGcvn 969 — JU LowPrr 1650 — 34 EqtocFStll.il —.17 IntlEq 1239 —19 AchA 11 62 — 

TxExAp 7.24 —37 KYTF n 7.16—03 Ml TF n 1130—10 OI5I m 864 —02 FfcStfl 9J3 — 23 AchBt 1156 — 


EmC0Grnll54 — 54 BandAn 1X60 —05 USGvAp 9J1 — 36 KYSAAfn XI 5 —.01 MNTFn 1061 — 09 «AunlnctXl030 — 12 

Ambassador lav: OivGrA n lain — Jl Conestoga Funds: EBI Funds: AAaoellan 6X81—1.60 NYAAunit 969—12 

Band nx 9.16—08 EqldxAn 1067 — .17 Equity 1462 —28 Equityp 59.98 —52 AAktlnd nr 3X84 — J4 OHFartp 105H — 11 


1668 —36 BalA px 9.88 —36 

lAAcDonaU: BatBux 9.88 —34 


EstCoGrnl557 — .40 FocGrAn 9.87 —36 Incm 


9J5 —33 I Flexp 5355 — 52 AAA TFn 10.92 —10 UWr 


10^9 —11 EstVOl pn 2153 —55 Bon DA p 1432 —37 
1235 —11 Gavlncp 1115 —06 BondB 1432 —37 


Grwthn 1257 — 38 IntlBdAn 20.10 — 35 LtdAAat 1050 _ Income p 4162 —13 MidCnpn 10JA — 33 44 Wall Eq 539—17 OH TF p 1257 —12 InvApx 14.16—56 

incaBdnx 938 — 08 UrtlGrAn 10.47 —17 Conn Mutual; Mulftlx p 3X88 — 59 AArgeSecnliL30 — 06 Forum Funds: OppVcJo 1738 — 50 invSpx 1X16—53 

InIBand roc 954 —06 ShlDurn 9.99 _ Govt 955 —.04 ESCSlrlnA 966 —35 AAuncoln 7J3 — 39 InvBnd 9.95 —35 GHAANTE 9.60 —37 USGvAp 937 —05 


InftStk n 12.91 —.13 SIBdAn 1931 — 31 Grwttl 1X76 —22 EopJeGrfh 11.13—13 NYHYn 1161—13 ME Bod 1X14—38 GHNaiTE 9M — 515 USGvBT 9^—35 

MlTFBd nx9.02 —.10 SmCalA 11.12—33 Income 954 _ EifinV Classic: NYlnsn 1032—10 TaxSvr 1X12—04 Greenspmo 1430 J4VBd Ilia —33 

SrnCoGrnl352 —54 Uffivikn 1938. - TrtHet 1X89 — 13 Chinan BJV — 17 NewAAkt nll.16 _ Founders Funds: GriffinGrln 10.97 —.17 KSAAun 1135—09 

TFBdroc 931—36 USTidxA n 1X98 — 04 CO Cop Mkt Fds: FLLtdp 958 — 05 NewAAa 1236 —18 Brfnp X69 —13 GuartSon Funds: ” " 


<1- BdlW 9.91—36 US1 laxA n IB.9B —04 CG Cup Mkt FOS: FLLiap 938 —OS NewMfll 1X26— .18 Bd np 869 —13 Guarddn Funds: KSIAAumj 1135 — 35 

TRntBdnt033 — 38 Benham Group: EmoMld n 960 —56 Govtp 9.14—32 OTC 2115—65 BlueChp np6j» — 1 1 Ast Alloc 1035 — 10 Kaufmanp 354 — 36 

AmtxnsadorRet A: AdjGpvn 962 —03 Intffxn 739 — 31 NatlLtdp 961 — 34 Oh TFn 10.91—39 Ducvp 19.10—53 GBGlrrtl 1X19 —19 KMUtor Fdnds A: 

Bona tx 9.16—07 CaTFJn 1X66 —06 IntlEq n 1060 —11 NattAAun p X90 — 08 Ovrsean 2X13 — 64 Fmtrnp 2AJB —62 Bondn 1162 —02 AdiGovA 836 —01 

EsiCoGr 1567 — 60 CoTFWn 958 —ID InnFxn 8.19 _ .04 Edan V Marathon PocBosn 1963 —IB GovSec 839 —03 PurkAv 2765 — 66 BlueChp A 11 J»8 —JO 

Grwth 1257 — 38 CaTRSn 10.04 —33 LgGnvn 962 —18 CALtdt 934—35 Puritan 1534 —.11 Grwthrw 1155 — 22 Stock n 2753 — 69 CaBfTxA 731 — 37 

InlBondX 9.24 — 36 CalTFHn 633 —38 LaVrt n 8.95—13 Chino I 1X81—25 ReclEst n 13.02 —26 Passarln 938—30 Tax Ex 0.17 —J» DivtocaA SJV — JJ2 

InttStk 12.91—13 CnITFLn 1055 —.09 AAnzBkdn 750 — .05 Inalat 1032+36 RetGrn 1X29—18 Snedun 751—11 USGovt 953 —03 FLTxA 933 —07 

SmCoGf 13ia — 34 EqGrun 1136 —22 Muhin 736 —09 FLUdl 9.95 —05 SWTBdn X92 — 01 WUwGrpT758 — 58 HTInsEqp 1263 —.17 GtolncA 8.41 —33 

TFlntBdtxKUO— 38 EurBdn 1851 — 33 SmGrwn 12J4 —J4 MALtdl 9.83 —04 STWldn 938 —02 Fountain square Pdse HTMpR p 936—31 GrtnA 1266 — 37 

Amcor* Vintage: GNMA n 9.97 —37 SmValn XS7 — 33 MILIdl 950 — JM SmrfiCaP 1050 — 24 Balanced 963—17 HtrifnCOlo 9.07 _ HiYieW 7 JO —34 

Equity n 1050 —20 Goldin n 1336 —55 TURton 7.70 — Jl NdlLldt 1030 —05 SE Asia nrlX3* — 14 GavTSec 950 -31 Hanover hiv Fds: toOxJA 735—03 



InFI CD 960 —.04 


inFi I n 9.60 
AACpGrin 962 
STFICun 9.71 


STFI I n 9.71 
Perm Fort Funds: 
PermPln 16.74 —.17 
TBiR n 66.14 i .04 


951 — M 
862 —37 




PhUaFund . 651 

Tsurtti 


conxen ixm 
GroSSf p 20 7 :” -13 

H.v r X90-04 


toll 1757 
MulFlAp 17.07 
AAulFIBp 1205 -37 

P Bwdnk'67 -34 

.... TEBondn 1133 -.06 

nX*4— 37 ErrejAAEqtCJO 
n938— .03 Eauity n 1X26 
CatkApp n 7057 


hr 1064 —10 WVaTxAn954 —06 

GIRsBr 1535 —50 OakHrfln 13.17—33 inllEqn 11.12 
GOjISmBl 933 -.74 Odkmrk 2455 -57 NYTaJRBdfc90 
auiBl* 1232 — 54 Oakmntt 1452 — 53 PflmhnGrp: 

GrlRBt 1738 — 55 Ofterweis n 2066 — 53 ARSIII 677 —37 
HeallhB t 123 —34 OceanTE P 1X18 -.08 ARS IV 457 —08 
IntEaBI 1164 —09 OffilEmAAk n9J» — 03 AUSI-A 669 — 33 
GBHdB 1250 -21 Offilhyn 9.44 -3* AtfiUSIV 6.63 -34 
LatAmB 1755 —68 OWIlift 1039 —07 ARS I 655 —07 
AAAMBt 1007 —.10 OUOomin 1X98—54 ARSI-A 667—00 
AAiAAuBT 9AJ —14 One Group: arsii 650 — 37 

MNAABt 1031—11 Aset All P 938 — 38 AdjUS 666 — 34 
MnlnsBt 767 —10 BfueCEq 1258 — 34 AdiUSII 658 —34 
MnLTdBt 954 — Jl DscVal 1264 —15 AUSIII 658 —04 


HiYMBt 1154 
HYAdvBT 951 



M . t j f A 


: 



TolPlBd 954 -53 
TIFF Inu Fnx 


n953 —05 
9.17 —33 


11.1 

dAvV 17. 


iru 

vssjr^ra 


958 —37 
X79 — 3J 


iSOAQ NATtOf 


.90 -39 
. Pit 10.13-33 
CAInt 957 -35 

SfciS*=3 

Grtnc 29.51 -65 


msan Growt GwWsh a 14.44 —.12 

EqtoA 1737 —23 GrlnBr 2960 — 66 

GwthA 21.74 —27 WIEqA 1138 -32 

totlA 12.73 —.19 NY Tf 10.98 —39 

OpcrA 2858 —.49 STBdP 9.92 

PrcMIA 1173 - 41 TF toon 1153 —10 

TcjyetA 1X93 —50 Vaiumei 1*63 —31 
USGvA X64 —.04 VovogeurFdi: 

nB 1234 —33 Aims 10.16 —11 

rihBt 2135—37 COTF 956 —10 


toeomeflt 764 -37 Calif A 9.70 -.11 
tot® I 1X37— .19 FLinsd 951—12 


SmCpEln P053 —11 

Shawrnul FdS-ThiR I mm i iu/ — -iv l i-l. insa ¥61 — .12 

FxStocn 956 —32 OporB I 2756 —68 GroSikp 1767 —34 

GrEatTr 10.17 — .14 l PrecM*tB1135 — 60 I lATt X91 — 11 


'.72 —05 Eqlndx 1159—18 GNMA x 1258—13 
MNaflBt 957 — 38 GvArmn 951 — 31 WYWpx X94 — 08 LgValYn 1034 — 22 

NJMBt 1055 —.08 GvBdp 9.19—36 MaoCaP 1139—14 SmValYmO-29 —08 

NYMnBt 1036 — 12 incEq 1356 — 24 STMMiix 7.41 > OuanHIative Group: 

NCMBt 953—10 moomeBd 9J1S — 04 ShrrTrpx 633 - Grtnc 1X29—20 

OHMBT 10.09—10 imFXI 957 — 34 PWor Funds: ln«Eq 1X48—30 

ORMimiB 1 933 — .10 IrrtTF 1058—06 BalGrAn 1032 —.11 Numeric 1564 —62 

PacBt 2155 —34 IntlEan 1360 — 33 EaAgAn 1154 — 58 BasNumOI562 — 63 

PA MB! 1068 — 39 LaCoGr 1131—19 EqGrAn 1050 — 35 Quest Far Value: 
PhnxBt 1111 —16 LgCdVrf 1154 —15 EqlnA 1X49 —14 

ST GIB 1 X12-31 UVol 1036 —01 FxdlnA 957 -33 

SpVIBf 1530 — 51 OH Mu 1064 — 37 IntmGvA n 967 — 02 

SrDvSfxlira— 135 ShTmGI n 858 — 33 NJMllAn 10.12 —34 
TedlBt 563—32 SrnCoGr 1654 — 36 STInvAn 9.97 
TX MB ! 1X17—08 TFBd 969 — JM PikrtlntEB 1569 — 55 
UtllnBtx 839 —07 One Group A: PilotlntEAnl554 —55 I NY TE 1065 — 39 



,F- 




SpVIBf 1530 — 51 
SxrfhrSfx 1133— 135 
TecJiBt 563 — 32 


WTdlncBt 859 —33 DscValA 1268 —15 Pioneer Fund: 
Merriman Fds: IncEqA 1355 —34 AmlncaTr p9J6 —34 

AstAIInx 11.13 -30 ,SmCoGrA1651 — 26 Bondn 856 -35 
CopAdo Y 10J6 — 16 lllCorco 956 —04 Eqlncp 1536 —.18 
FlexBdny 9.92 — .12 lllCorNC 9.82 —08 COpGrp 1666 —10 
■ ~ “ Gold 851 —34 


Opport 1X98 —.16 


, OpeenbeJmer Fd: , a-» — 

MetLHe StateSfc. | Asset A p 1263 —.14 Growth n 1X00 —.13 1 Acted 2539—07 


Grin x 1056 —03 


CacApA 957 — Jl 


P 937 —.12 tocornep 93*— 06, Care 


CmApB 939 —32 | ]238 —04 1 Europ ep 1X77 — 38 1 EmGr 3535 —72 


CopApC 963—32 


— — . — ChHYCt 1238 — 04 PionrFdp2X8I — 39, 

EqlncA 1030 — 31 DiSCFdp 3537 -64 PinMBdp 954 —39 ST1F ,™ 

Ealnffl 1X69—22 DiscovB 1 3531 —64 InflCr 2X35—10 Value 2650 —25 

EqlncC 1069—22 - *> ™ ’■ - ■■ “ 


2535 — JS 
1X38 +52 


EqinvSIA 1X26 —21 
EOlnvCp 1X26 —20 
637 —06 


EqlncA p 958 —14 Ptonrllp V .83 —30 Rainbow n 514 — JW 

ncSt 954 —14 PWThree pi? JO —32 ReaGrap 1353—16 

14.96 —35 1 ST Inc X80 —01 RoqH Fund: 

' TaxFroe Pi 1.50 — .11 C&B Balxll 36 —19 


»</ — » , uhboi* p 9 37 — 51 j TaxPrae P115Q — .11 : uto mxi uo — > i» 
500 —04 GloMA p 3599 —JO I WnlhREI 1155 —31 I C&B Eq* 12.94 -19 


F*incD 9.g — 51 tocGron 1X68 —23 Copley n 1961—57 NJLIdl 959 —.05 51k Sen 18J8 — 30 InhEoly 954 —11 BIOiGrl 9.89—19 totlA 1066 —18 

IffldtTFn 932 —56 LTreasn 8.63 — .07 CoreFundS: NYUdt 9.90 —55 ShOpot 1930—52 MtoCap 1034—15 STGvl 956 . MuniA 9.60 — J19 

Amer AAdvont Instt NJTFI n 1062—65 BrfanAn 958 —11 PAUdl 9.95 —.06 Trend n 5533—159 OhlaTF 954 —05 SnKtoGrt 9^ —.11 NYTxA 1X42 — JJ* 

EWonn 12.17—13 NfTFLn 10 94 —11 EaktX 20.96 —53 ALTxFI 967 —11 USBIn 1007—55 QocSBd 934 — SO USGwl 934 —33 OHTFA 934 —09 


Grtncon 1354 — 30 STTreasn 9.70 — JH GIBdA n X90 — 02 AZTxFT 1X00—12 UliStvn 13.50—33 OvxXGr 961 —32 HoThor Funds: Retirel 1057 —11 

InOEqfy n 1256 — 18 995 n 9510 +.07 GrEqAn 958 — 31 ARTXF ! 9.79—12 Value n 4366 —50 Franktoi Group: Bond 1060 —02 Retlre2 1266 —10 

LWTrmn 930 -51 Tm3000 n 6632 -31 IntBdAn 958 —02 CalMunit 930 — 09 Wrldw 1363 —13 AGEFdPXX63 -JJ3 ‘ " " * ” 

AmarCapftak Tra3W)5 n 44.95 -38 InflGrAn 1361 — 16 COTxFf 963 —10 Fidelity Selects: AdUSP 952 -JO 

15-^5 —4 s TartOlO n 3154 —33 VolEqBpn1193— 33 CTTXFt 963 —12 Air r 1119 —39 ARS 930 —61 


Cmsfflp 1569 —26 Tar2015n 2266 —53 
CnBdB P 665 —62 TartWO n 1X96 —32 


CopApp n 1537 -32 Retires 9.96—11 
Growth n 1237 —31 Retire* 859 —09 


Retires bjo — 68 


1X86 —26 Ealnl 10JJ* — 68 AmGakJr2332 — 63 ALTFp 11.12 —.03 1 toHGrn 11.14 —25 1 SIGovA X01 


545 —62 Tar2020 n 14.96 —32 COwenlGrA1053 —.11 I FIoTxFt 1X14 — 13 Aulor 2131—64 AZTFp 10.93—69 

PJ64 — ro I TNpten 9.92 — 0] ) CraMe Huson:_ I GATXFt 969 — -JO 1 Biotech r 2430 —65 BaOm^ 1Z6T —56 ] 


EmGrCpnjl— 69 Utillnopn X96 — IS AHAOP 1X76—16 GpvtOWt 9.13 —63 Broker r 1536 — 67 CAHYfid B 9.49 —69 HaveiFdntl060 — 11 TXTFA 955—09 

|GAP »35 —30 Berger Grows „ „ Eauffyp 513 —37 H1 1 net 598 —64 Chemr 3X27—133 Cdinsp 1157—10 Heartland Fds: ToiReiA 858 —17 

ErnGrBp 2333 —69 100 pn 15.71 -35 OR Mun n 1 X06 —W KYTWt 969—11 Otoipr 2766—89 CA InrermHll —66 USGvtp 8.99 -65 US GavfA X39 -JK 

EntAP 1J.91 —18 101 on 1137 — 31 SoeeiDl n 1356 — 14 LATxFI 9.61—12 ConPTOr 1X98 —27 CaTTFr PX 597 — 67 VatueP 2351 —28 USMSgA 576—64 

125° 3319 “‘22 .SmQiGr ngX« — 05 CrertFimds Trust: MDTxFt 969 —12 CSHour 1655 -60 COTFp 11.12—08 Valuetoca 950 — 67 Kemper Funds a- 

EnJC.B , 115* —.18 Barmtaw Fds: Bondn 936 — 63 MATrFt 956—13 DfAeror 1733—19 CTTFp 1069 —09 wiTxF 950—09 Dx/tocBt 539 — 62 


tGAp SJS -50 Berger Grow „ Eauity o 1513 —37 Hlinei 598 —64 

EmGrBp 2333 -69 100 pn 1531 —25 I ORMunnlX06 —W KYTkFf 969 —11 


I 9.13 —63 Broker 1X26 


ShtOurn .8.77 
value n 1124 — 10 


SmCpEqA 167 —14 
TechA JO-59 —19 


598 —64 Chemr 3X27—133 Ccdlnsp 1157 —10 j Heartland Fds: 


49 —09 I HavenFdntl060 —11 TXTFA 955 —09 


TgiRelA 858 —17 


r 2766 — 89 CAtofermM.il -66 USGvtp X99-6S US GavfA X39 -65 


E/WCD fl54 —18 1 Barnstwn FdE „ Bondn 936 — 63 MAT* Ft 956—13 DfAeror 1733—19 CTTFp 1069 —0? W1T*F 9>I0 

Eqh/lncA PSJ2 — 66 GvSHDunl2J2 — M I 31 Bdn 958—61 MITxFt 956 —.11 I DevCotnrl85S — 30 CvtSeCP 1233 — 15 Heroutos P wkF 


Globl IKS X62 —03 


Eqln«p 531—07 ShtOurn 1239 — ra SoEqn 1X90—30 MNTxFf 967—12 Efecfrr 17.18—32 DNTCp ?32 —13 EuroVln 1X19 — 13 GrthBI 1X61—27 

EaincCn iJl —07 IntDurn 11*5—69 Value n 1X92—13 MSTxFt v.ai — 10 Enerovr 1766 +.12 1 Equityp 564 —II LAmVdnll62 ~J0 GrttlC 1X61—27 

ExchFd 71266 -X35 CnMun 1100 —06 VAMun 950-65 MOTxFf 966—72 _ " ^ -i — -- - 


FdMjjAp 1X01 — 01 DlvMunnlX94 — 05 CuFdAdin 9.9S -.01 N,.._ . ... ... ... 

PMbBd 1X02—01 NYMunn 12.92 —.06 CuFaSTn . 954 — .01 NYTxFf lOJi —13 FknSvcr 4950— 139 FetfntenrfpJ* — 06 WortdBdn 9.16 — JU Shtlnft 7.9B 

GCqAp 157—31 Inti Vain 1639 —23 Cutter T lush NafIMunt 9J3 —.08 Foodr 31 55 — 29 FedTx 1169 —13 HerBone Funds: SmCap Bt 5.65 —.13 

aEqgpn 1136 — 3® Berwvn Fdn IS JO —31 ApvEqn 1X04—15 NCTxFt 966—10 Health r 7335 —.99 FLTFIno 961—17 CapApp P 1X73 —38 TechB 1055 —20 

GIEoCnp 11*4 —20 BerwyhlncrtClS — Jl E qlvlnca n 9.76 — 07 OFOJdt 950—05 HomeF 2555 —90 FLTFp 11.14 —JP Dtvtocpx 957 —08 TotRtfll 858 — .17 

GKSvAP 7.g — 03 BW^udMCG 1052 — 38 GmrtSecn 935 —01 OHTxFt 9.95—12 IreEapr 1935 — 30 GATFp 1133—08 IncGrp 1131—12 TotRtC 858 —17 

DKJvBpn 7.98 — 64 ErthTlore Funds: KG Investor ORTxFf 959—13 IndMatr 2191 —61 GiGvtoCP X07 —61 LM Gov px 9.07 -.03 USMlgBt 57S —04 

GS3vCP 7.93 —03 Balanced 9.97—11 Equity 1X41—11 PATxFt 1060 —101 Insurr 1930 — 51 GiDHIthn 1136 —31 SmCop5plX98 — 31 Kent Funds Instfc 


—17 NAmGrtr.n953 -.19 HIYldBt 759 —04 


—61 NjTXF t 1060—10 Enviror 1057 —19 FIST ARS p931 — 01 PcfBVal n 1:152 —11 IntIB 1055 —18 

—01 NYTxFt 1X32 —.13 FlnSvcr 4950— 139 Fe«ntenrtpJ4 — 06 WortdBdn 9.16 —03 Shtlrtt 7.98 

NafIMunt 933 —.08 Foodr 3155—29 FedTx 1169 —.13 Heritage Funds: SmCaaBt 5.65 —.13 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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WBAStAIIB 14.96 -.18 
WoEqBl 1X29 — J6 
WOGvB 1169 —61 
WqGrB 1662 —50 
WoTotS 1052 — .10 


. 5.98 —64 GtoblB t 3X66—78 Piper Jaffroy: OSJDvx 1062-34 

InltEqAp 1056 — ,14 j GIEmGrpl863 — 42 Bakmcp 1158 — 13 D51LMx 937—17 

IntEqB 1052 —14 GoWp 1X84 — JO EnwGr 1X81-55 FMA SPC 1038 -67 


iroEqCp 1059 —14 1 FHYldA 13J5 —05 Govtn 8J6 —06 JCMSCk 1661 —36 
IntlFxtof X03 —53 I HIYIdBr 1339 — J15 Grtnc 1069 —18 McKlntEqlt62 —30 

*— *— " '■ 1 !PWnx937 — 67 

rotl 530—37 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


Page 15 


SPORTS 



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Portugal Beats 
Lativa, Croatia 
Stops Lithuania 




The Associated Press 

Sy -• Two goals from the striker JoSo Vieira 
:• ^jPinto liftecLPortugal to a 3-1 victory Sun- 
'S? . .'.day over newcomer Latvia, in a qualifying 
■'•match for soccer's 1996 European Cham- 
. £ v .'pionships in Riga, Latvia. 

'■ la Zagreb, Croatia, Croatia took anoih- 
•"erstro toward qpwlifkatkm after goals by 
• • ]$ ' r'-NilKna Jeritan and Ardian Kozniku se- 
‘r; i <*$ired a 2-0 victory over Lith uani a 
, Portugal -dominated offensive action 

nearly an, oatplaying the Latvian side and 
vpressihing keeper Gleg Karavayev with a 
■ - vSr i .steady rain of shois-on-goal 

i, v •’ . - Pinto scored the visitors’ opening goal 


i* ‘ - 


S?; ^wUb a blazing 15-meter left-footed drive 
^ jjpast Karavayev m the 33d minute. In the 


"'yuanr*^ - 


»■ iiir^-a | 

W'WlsVuac, ' ' 




t . ‘ . , r 


%■ *: EUROPEAN SOCCER 

:■ I? 

ivv i^^econd half, Pinto ticked a centered bail 
■’ \£‘ v through Karavayev’s legs and into the net 
*£• r^ffom 16 meters out in the_72d minute 
? s-j Less than a "mm* lain, striker Luis 
•£?:• .’jjFigo made it 3-0, dashing past two defend- 
cts to score from six meters away. 

. i Latvia showed a brief flicker of life late 
*\ in the second half when the striker Igor 
■; *: Stepanovs challenged the Portuguese goal- 

‘ r keeper, Vhor Baia, with a solid kick from 
* :?*. five meters directly in front of the net. 

£■£ <■', ' Baia hobbled the ball, which then drib- 
i £.V tabled past him. As Baia scrambled to reoov- 
,; er, the striker Yevgeni Milevsky booted in 
£V ‘‘ Latvia’s 88tb-mmute face-saver. 

^ -J‘ *V' Portugal has woo both its matches in 
: Vf , *: Grcasp 6, while Latvia has two losses. 

thar first-ever international 

y/ r first half, with their captain, 

Zvonirmr Boban, nazrowiy missing a dear 
jiw . ; chanc e at god in the 40th minute. 

£ V The Croatian onslaught paid off in the 
i ''-56th;minate, when Jerkan rammed in a 

- ^pass to put the home ride ahead. 

< ££, ^ On Saturday, Italy gave another lacklus- 
/. ■■ ter performance but escaped with a 2-0 

; 2 victory over heavy underdog Estonia. 

-. Since its loss to Brazil in the World Cup 
7 t '*• final in July, Italy has been held to a 1-1 
. '4 draw by Slovenia and managed only two 
; *• ; ©goals Saturday a gains t a team suffering its 

- v,»m - Hth consecutive international defeat. 

‘ Christian Panucd scored Italy's opener 
■ £ in the 20th minute in Taffiim, and Pier- 

:jl : Luigi f^rirag hi headed in the second goal 
... “ in the 77th minute. 

; ‘t The two other qualifying matches Satur- 
day, France vs. Romania and Armenia vs. 
1- Cyprus, ended in scoreless draws. 



Qira &B.'m/ApeaC( Fn 


Ray Stewart (left), Dave Barr (cento*) and Rick Gibson won for Canada. 


. Team 


The Associated Ftm ,L I hit it dead straight and it Barf had beaten Nick Price 

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — just never drew," Kite said of of Zimbabwe, the PGA and 


Canada took advantage of 
blunders by Tom Kite and Fred 


his 4-iron shot toward the 17ih 

green. 

At the 16th, Stewart was in a 


Couples to upset the defending At the 16th, Stewart was in a 
champion United States on greenside bunker and Couples, 
Sunday and win the DunhiH 2 down, had a 30-fooi putt for 
Cup for the first time. birdie. The Canadian recovered 

Although Curtis Strange shot well for a pax. while Couples 


British Open tiilist, and Germa- 
ny’s two-time Masters titlisi 
Bernhard Langcr to help the 


At ue torn, Stewart was m a Bernhard Langcr to help the 
greenside bunker and Couples, Canadians reach the semifinals. 
2 down, had a 30-fooi putt for Although he then lost to Ernie 
birdie. The Canadian recovered Els, the U.S. Open champion. 


5-under-par 67 to whip Rick missed his birdie putt, then 


Stewart beat David Frost by 
five after shooting 70 and Gib- 


Gibson by seven strokes, the missed again from three feet for son clinched victory for the Ca- 


consisteat Dave Barr downed a bogey. 

Kite by 1 stroke with his 70 and It was a spectacular victory 
Ray Stewart scored 71 for a smr for the Canadians, who had 
glc stroke victory over Couples, never even reached the semifi- 


“This is a just a real fantastic nals be! 
feeling to win something like In th< 
this,” said Barr, the Canadian day, the 
captain, who has played 17 victory 
years on the U.S. Tour. CanadL 

“Canada winning the Dun- ca, 2-1. 

hill Cup is probably good for 

golf," said Stewart, who has 
been on the U.S. Tour for only tut ■■ 
four years. “A lot of countries j 

like Canada will get die per- 
spective that they can go out 
and beat the big teams." 

Kite had a chance to cut into NEV 
Barr’s two-stroke lead at the theNerc 
tough 17th “Road” hole. But event a 
his second shot bounced onto died Si 
the road t hat runs alongside the cancer, 
green and the ball bounced into Lcbo 
the gallery behind the wall 1990. 1 
He had to take a penalty thyroid 
stroke, scored a double bogey 6, six mon 
and Barr won the match despite into rex 
Kite getting a birdie at the last York m 
hole. wishers. 


nals before. 

In the semifinals earlier Sun- 
day, the Americans scored a 3-0 


nadians with another 70 to beat 
Wayne Westner by four. 

Els shot 68 to beat Barr by 
four, but the match already was 
lost. 

In the morning’s other 
matches. Kite downed En- 


victory over England while the gland’s Mark Roe by one stroke 
Canadians downed South Afri- after shooting 69, Couples 
ca, 2-1. romped to a six-stroke victory 


over Howard Clark with 68 and 
Strange took advantage of a fi- 
nal hole bogey by Barry Lane, 
who two-putted from a meter, 
to win by one stroke with his 70. 

England bad made Lhe semi- 
final with a 9-0 record from its 
three group matches. 

Kite was 4 up after birdies at 
the first and third holes and 
Roe’s bogeys at the opening 
two. 

The En glishman rallied with 
birdies at the fifth, seventh and 
12th holes, then tied it with an- 
other at the 14th. But Kite got a 
birdie 3 at the 16th, and Roe 
bogeyed at the 17th. Roe holed 
a long birdie putt at the lSih 
but Kite rolled in a short par 
putt. 


N. Y. City Marathon’s Lebow Dies of Cancer 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Fred Lebow. who founded 
the New York City Marathon and built it into an 
event attracting runners from the world over, 
died Sunday after a second bout with brain 
cancer. He was 62. 

Lebow was first diagnosed with brain cancer in 
1990. The next year be underwent surgery for 
thyroid cancer, and at one point was told he had 
six months to live. But be rallied, the disease went 
into remission, and be completed the 1992 New 
York marathon to the cheers of thousands of well- 
wishers. The cancer recurred early this year. 


“1 think l*m the healthiest cancer patient 
they’ve ever bad,” he once quipped. 

A businessman. Lebow started running to im- 
prove his stamina for tennis. A love of tennis 
gave way to a love of running and he founded the 
New York City Marathon in 1970. The first race, 
a four-loop circuit around Central Park, drew 
127 runners; Lebow was 45th of the 55 finishers. 

Now, the race attracts more than 25,000 run- 
ners, and many thousands more are turned away. 
It is one of the biggest and most popular mara- 
thons on the international circuit. The 25th New 
York City Marathon is to be run Nov. 6. 


Ex-Manager of Rangers Says 

He Mav Coach Japanese Team Russian First in Tour of Lombardy 

•S * Ttalv Vladislav RiiKnlt hprairv* (hr 


Becker Protests Rule Change in Australia 


The Associated Press 

NORFOLK, Virginia — Bobby Valentine, former 
manager of the Texas Rangers, has said he is consider- 
ing a nrillion-dollar contract to manage and operate a 
Japanese baseball team. 

“I very well might do it, but I’m not ready to make it 
official yet,” Valentine told The Virginian-PilOL 
‘There’s a few t’s that haven't been crossed and a few 
i’s that aren’t dotted. I’ve got to figure out if that's the 
bite I want to take out of the apple." 

Valentine, currently manager of the Norfolk Tides, 
said on Thursday that he had been talking with 
management from the Chiba Lone Marines, a peren- 
nial cellar-dweller in the Japanese League. 

Valentine said the contract would be for two years, 
with an option year, and that it would worth more 
than SI million a year, with bonus and other consider- 
ations that could raise it to $2 million. 

Valentine said the job would include overhauling 
the Japanese club’s minor league teams. 


MONZA, Italy (AP) — Vladislav Bobrik became the first 
Russian to win the Tour of Lombardy cycling race Saturday, in a 

three-way finish with Claudio Chiapucci of Italy and Pascal pf Tennis Australia, Groff Pol- 
Richard of Switzerland. ^d, moved Sunday to dehise a 

Bobrik, 23, helped Chiappucci chase Richard and, having dispute sparked by Boris 
caught the Swiss rider 100 meters from the finish, sprinted ahead Becker over the reduction of 
to beat Chiappucci by two seconds and Richard by three. between points at the Aus- 

tralian Open in January. 

Fnr flip RprnrH Becker has threatened to pull 

r or me iiecoru out of the Qpm ^ the cha £ ge 

The NHL and its players union did not meet over the weekend, from 25 seconds to 20 seconds, 
but Bob Good enow, executive director of the union, indicated it introduced last month by the 
wiD present a more far-ranging proposal Monday. (AP) International Tennis Federa- 

Mflinr ieaone base hall's actine commissioner. Bud Selie. and the lion for Grand Slam events, was 


For the Record Be f c r 

out of thi 

The NHL and its players union did not meet over the weekend, from 25 s 
but Bob Good enow, executive director of the union, indicated it introduce 
wiD present a more far-ranging proposal Monday. (AP) Interna ti< 

Major league baseball's acting commissioner. Bud Selig. and the bon tor G 
union head, Donald Fehr. said they expect negotiations to resume enforced. 


late this week, nearly five weeks after talks broke off. 


Bob Boone, a major league catcher for 1 9 years, will succeed the w3s loo much to ask of players 


fired Hal McRae as manager of the Kansas City Royals. (An to be ready to serve again so 
Defemfing champion Italy beat the Netherlands. 3-1. to win the soon in best-of-five-set matches 


men’s World Volleyball Championship in Athens: the United 
States beat Cuba. 3-i, for third place. (AP) 


Tennis Center in the Southern onds 
Hemisphere summer. tion 

Becker said other leading sa * < ^- 
players would also consider 
staying away from the Open H< 


onds but enforced with discre- 
tion and common sense," he 


He said that while the ATP 


He said on Saturday that it 


to be ready to serve again so 


in the intense heat often experi- 
enced at Melbourne’s National 


when they learned of the Tour, which runs the men’s tour 
chang e, a petition against it he- apart from the four Grand 
gan circulating among players Slams, had opted to enforce a 
at the Australian Indoor chain- 25-second rule strictly, the ITF 
pionships on Saturday. had chosen to go with a 20- 

Pollard said Sunday tha. ^-d rule applied uid. discre- 
Tennis Australia, which runs 

the Open, would ensire that ^ it is a sign to the 

world that we are dying to do 
K^av^av^b? som C* h « n 8 t° Speed Up the 

Ete'xsrjA' S 2 SSSSS 

“My understanding is that cning in play. I think we're see- 
the ruling is changing to 20 sec- ing it already.” 


NASDAQ NATIONAL 


C.0 Yld IHKHWl LOW Che Owl 


il Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday. Oct 7. 

(Con filmed) 



• • NTdpd 

.. ' •• „ NwSUWr 

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6* 6ft —ft 
25ft 77Vii _i 4 
3* 6* “ft 
6ft 4* «* 

10ft 10’.— 2 
10>-a ,0ft —ft 

17* 17V% -* 
71% 71% — ft 

10* lift -ft 
&■’. e". —ft 

21* a* ,vj 

17V. 17%4 _ 

?9Vi 30*— 1 
7H 8ft * ft 
74% 7* — %i 
1J1% »* —ft 

2* 2**i. _ 

SO'i 38V. —2 ft 

20 » lift 
131% 14ft - ft 
9ft 9* 

Sft 3ft —ft 
4 4 —ft 

7ft 7% —ft 


Sain 

5*1)0. Ov vm lOOvHrti Low Che Ow 
SwnAI J3 I J 1705 35* D'% 34'. -IV. 
Sfomalr 80/ 8* ■ 8* > 

SonctCto , 1599 i* it* !*„ -ft 

VonlGpl _ 317 81% 8 h. 8* -ft 

SAcVIV _ 552 12* 11* lift -ft 

Sattcnvl _ 23578 15ft 14 16 ift 

SOkxu - 438 10V. V* 10 -'.a 

awK.na _ - Md low 9 10ft , 

SimnFl 0 17 47 78 77* 27ft —ft 
ftmnOut ^ 492 6* . eft 

Simpin * AO 12 3e74 ,3ft 12ft 12* —ft 
SirrennMi 1229 10ft 10% 10'.-. » V» 

StrcnoA „ 1439 51% 4* 4ft 

Sbkon -.,8*6 Sft Sft W* — V, 

a,WeW -OSo J 10313 22ft 21ft 21ft — V. 

Skftoi — 754213 II 17* —ft 

SmtO.1 _ 445 Sft 4ft Sft 

Smtnttd .16 2 A 74 6ft 6* 6* -. 

Vn#»F __ 9990 7b 1 * 7«ft —ft 

Snaepte ...6071713ft lift 12* — * 

SodST - 1463 18ft Ity. 18 -ft 

Lotrecft _ 404 TMi 4ft 7ft ift 

SoJfdesX - 111917 15ft 15*-?% 

Sottkey _ 26929 14ft 14ft 14Va lift 

snoc _ ai vo 9 9ft —ft 

§8S& r,Sift 4 ^ 2 % i 2 

r SIW \ 'k =Z 

Sorrxrton _ 2491 Sft 7ft 7ft —ft 


Drtf WK v%ob Low Ow QlDC j SWJ.6 


r 7^ IS 7ft 7ft 


SOTOCPPl 3J5 4A<2!31 sift soft — ft 
SouAVaBc _ 28411ft 10V. 10ft— 1* 

SoundA _ 224 4%k 6ft 6ft .ft 

SMcnG A0b4J 317 »ft 18ft 19 .ft 

SeslTlir lJ9e5J 083 23% 20% 71 —2% 

SoBk _ 1437 5ft 4ft 4ft —ft 

SltwiEnH _ 459 16* 15ft 16ft .ft 

SoMlnrt J5 4J 992 ,ft * Tft, .*fti 

STt¥>oSv 52 3A 143 irA 14% 14* —ft 

5oJmn7 A8 3A 6334 20 19 If ft —ft 

Eouwd _ 930 2ft 2ft 2% —ft 

SwrlBcp JO 1A 7914* 14 14ft - 
SwSoft 1 JOe 5J 298 S4W 22ft 22ft— 2ft 
Swsmiv ij» 4 0.9 am w% m-if. 
S*rtJSec -M 1.9 VS 7ft 6* 7% *V» 

SwVJatr A0 MA 74 9 8 Ift —ft 

SovBcp .,0b IjD 4540 10 9* 9* —ft 

Soocecb _ 3905 74 239u 23* — % 

SoanAm .10 17 172 4 JP* Sft .V. 
SpcrtVol .059 J ,536 14ft TSl'B 16 
SpecMu _ . 99 5 4ft 4ft -ft 


_ 100821* 19ft 1 9ft — 1* 
_ 363 2* 2ft 2ft —ft 
_ 6061 MU 13 13ft — Vu 
_ 8026 Hft, 1ft 1ft .Vi 
_ 1047 Sft 4ft S — % 
_ 436 4ft 6 6ft * ft 
JO I J 837410 ,4% 16ft— 1* 

_ 4S4 3ft m. 7*ft. — «• 
_ 103 4 3ft 3V. — % 

_ 335 16* 15 1SV4 —ft 
_ 599169% 1594 16ft .ft 
_ 7174 9% 9% — 

- 1719 Ift 1ft Ift .ft 

_ 799 Ift 6 Sft . ft 
_ IS 3 7ft 79% - 

_ 2084 4V% 5* 6* +* 
_ 5535 5* Sft 5ft ♦ A. 
_ 1172 2* Ift 1ft —Vn 
_ 4372 3¥i* Sft 3ft .*B 
_ 6355 10% 9* 9ft —9% 

- 3«1 4ft 4ft 4ft _ 
_ 7888 JO* 18ft ,9ft 

A8 3J 4947 19* 18* 18%— I* 
_ 2100 14% 13% 15% _ 

_ 85 10* 9ft 9ft —ft 

J8 S 304 16*15 15 —1 


S as 

S ptChoH 

SorrmrtA 

Sprtmrt 

Sportsc 

Spor^Tn 


SttmlFm 
9M 

Stoodyn _____ 

5T«te9 1 Z 27813 36ft 31* 34«A * 1ft 

SWrTe _ 879 *V» ft ft — 

5fnbcKs _ 74169 23% 21* 73 — Vu 

SWeflAw _ 2724 8 6, ,7ft .1* 

Slat Tel _ 117513 U* 12ft —ft 

ShBAuT JO 1A 66 14ft 14 14* —ft 

SIB«Bsh A0 U £H IBft 18 18 — A 

SlFncl 44 19 257 15 14ft IS — * 

SMArt _ 654 4ft 5ft 6U —ft 

SlaSrfJcs AO TJ 11248 ft* 35ft ft -ft 
StaJnCas _ 5683 13* lift 131% —ft 

Steel. Vn _ 115 8 7% 8 _ 

S1«!T«3V .08 A 8170 IB* lift 13ft-4ft 

SHWVo _ 26813 17% 12ft .% 

SteirUVUT _ 1700 15% l4Va 14ft — *a 

steria _ 5934Z7* Mft 27ft .ft 

STrtBnc A0 2J 111 18 17* 18 _ 

SlrtFnWA _ 475 13* 12V. 12%— * Oil 
SIrfF pf IJB1 64 330 28% 21* rj% — ft 

stnwsi _ 11 1* 1ft 1ft —* 

STwSJv J8 A 955539 J6)ftiV —1 
SsewEns at JXZJ86 249% 23 23 —1ft 

Skmon _ 719 12* lift lift —ft 

SteiAtv _ 2146 9* 8ft *ft — 

SfOttCmx _ 338 10 9ft 9ft —ft 

SlBlt _ 1750 22 * 20ft 22, 

Sfrotcm _ 31352 41% 349% 41ft +4 

ShtBDiif „ 19417 M, 3 3ft —I 

SlroJCo _ 738 4% 3* 3ft —ft 

StrtCpwt _ 76**u *Vii % **/*• 

Sirwea 1.10 4J 471 23* 73 23 


_ 596 2* 1% 2ft _ I 

_ 27813 36ft 31* 3*% .1* 1 


Struber _ 89 

StrucO _ 11879 5 

Stryfcer JJ7e j 9498 35 

ShirtEn . il> 51 

Siunos - vat v, 

SubMfcr _ 988 4 


_ 0 4ft 4 4ft — 

_ 11879 5 4ft 4ft t ft 
J 9498 35 33* M*— 1* 
. if 5ft 4ft 4%i — ft 
_ 7404 ft) ’fa Vn 
_ 788 6 5* .Sft — Vn 


feJbBncp JO 1.* 128 16% 15% 15* _ 


Sudbury _ 

iuHBne -72 2J 
SUCEN 
SullOnf 

Sumira JO 12 


1516 7% 6* 7ft —ft 
29 27* 76 *6 -1ft 

6063 79. VU 7* 

285 1394 13* 13ft —ft 
21 2S’A2F V„250ft 


SwtWop! 2JO 9.1 14323 22* 22ft — ft 


SurTTTTxiF _ 348916* 13* 16ft .2W 

Surnmoi _ 116 5* 5% 5ft —ft 

Sunxjun _ 629 8* 7% 7ft -Vh 

Surn&WA .14 IJ 10911*10*11* *ft 
Somite Jt 4J 399421 19ft 20ft— *i. 

SumiBTX J6 1A 338 72 21 22 +1 

SorrrfCrc . 3381 » 27% »% —ft. 

SumilTC _ 830415* 32 13% —ft 

SonBncs 1.00 II 5K' 32 32 *ft 

Sunlmi _ 481 26 23ft 24 “ft 

StflMiC _ 64239 29ft 77ft 79* -ft 

SunSd _ 87 5* 5ft 59% —ft 

Sun TV M A 4057 lift 10ft 10% _ 

Sunoett _ 4i 7% 6ft 6* .v. 

SwrvSav _. 373 61. 6ft ft* -% 


SwrvSav 373 61. 6ft ft* — % 

SvUvOI 1J0 9A 159 139. 12* 12* —ft 

****** - *« 4 , 3ft 3ft -ft 

SunSra _ 3067 36% n* 34*— 1* 

Sunplan „ 6752 38% 36ft 37% -ft 

SunBCA .151 7J 22 2% 2 2 — * 

SunScMY - 339720 17* 19 —ft 

Sunuy — 1426 5* 5 5ft » ft 

5utwTc - 1579 2* 2 2 -ft 

SunJUMiiA _ 1297 1«U lftj ,V«J —ft 

Sunstate 4 6* 6ft 6* —ft 


Sundial pi 175 

IrfioRK- 

Suprech 

Supereui 

Suucrtel 

Suprie. 

SuaSocI 

SuraLv 

SurpTc 

SurvTt 

SinaBrc 1.00 

SuTtRjc 

SwtfrT 

SuunpSlO 

5w*bMr 

SyOilTc 

Svbase s 

Svbron 

Svfvon 

SvtvnLm 

Svmn»c 

Symla , 

SymMric 

StmOiXic 
Svnoiov AO 
Svntxo 
Svncor 
Synrcm 

synaK. 

Svnopsyx 

svnnct 

Svnlra 

SvsrSDw .12 

Sysimd 

Svstiimlx 

SystmSW 


114 1 78 78 ?8 

_ 977 13'. 17% 17% 

_ 921 7* S'. 6*. 

453 11* 11 v. ll'i 
_ 539 ,3 12* 12V» 

.. 691 5% 4* Sft 

- <04 7* 2* 2ft 

_ 617 13 1? 17V. 

- 819 3% 3% Jft 

_ 761 4* 4% 4ft 

- 119 8 6* 7U 

M3 510 36', 33V. 23% 

._ 756 32 ft SO* 77% 

_ 4370 43* 42% 429. 
-. 2411 9* 8»* 9ft 
_ 649 J». 3* 2ft 

_ 5775 10* 91. lOVu 
-71517 47 43V..44 

_ 442 25 33% 73V*- 

_ Ml 11* 10* 11V. 

_ '706 17 14* 14* 

_ 18807 15* 14* 15* 
_ 210 10 9* 9V» 

_ 5775 13% II 17% ' 

- 73613 15V. 13*15".% • 

2J 73 19 17V. 18* 

- 134 7ft 2% 2% 

_ 2551 7% 4* 4*5 
_ 1671 Sft 4ft 4* 

_ <925 5"4 4* 5* 

_ 1742 16% 15'.% 16'-. 
-1 1575 46 42 435. - 

- 2644 4V% 3ft 4* 

_ 1180 2ft 2% J* 

IJD 10735 12* 119% 12% 

_ 5498 Ift 7ft Sft ■ 
_ 125 18 I6V% 16% - 

- 5575 19* 16* IK. < 

- 1082 6V. 5ft 5ft • 


I TrianBc 
TriPort 
TnCoBn 
TncoPa 
Tncnm 
Tricord 
Tnonnic 
Triman, 
Tnmbte 
Trailed 
TrnuJc 
Tram 
Triples 
TripOi 
Triteww 
Trnm 
Tnslar 

TrervKJ! 

TruCXCm 
Trust Nj 
T rtIWY i 
TrSIn* i 

Tsena 

TiAmcp 

TuckDt 

TuesM 

Tuta) 

TuSChl 

TvSOn 


_ 2153 3* 
_ 347 % 
_ 3778 10% 
A4 1.9 23Z3 74H 
_ 573 4* 
_ 3838 3V. 
_ 5331 17% 
_ <365(1* 

- 38713 

_ 351 33 I Vn 
_ 181 5* 

S2 IJ 5605 18% 

- 492 4ft 
J7 U ,0049 24 

_ 2065 6* 

- 3879 IS* 

_ 550 Sft 

_ 1216 7ft 

.17 IJ 307 9 
_ 111 31V. 

_ 7484 9ft 
_ 314 14V) 
_ 1171 3* 
_ E7 3ft 
_ 2117 7* 

- 3535 29* 

_ 24 5ft 

_ (019 SV. 

- 3146 I IVh 
_ 897 lift 
_ 4KB 19% 

Si 5.1 Sllft 

- 441 II 

45 8* 

- 168 6* 

- 1040 15 
_ 81 6* 

A0 a 1 J 577 40* 
AOalJ 2584 50 
_ 3687 3ft 

- 541 13 

- 3842 9Vi 
_ 799614-/. 

- 371 V„ 

- 83972 22ft 

_ 76 23 

_ 7681 5* 
_ SS32 6* 
-18854 2* 

- 1470 ft 
-28508 45ft 

__ 82 4ft 

- 12*610 
Jl .1 3984 14% 

- . 378 1 Ift 

-13686 37* 

1.28 2.9 19146ft 

- 1430 19% 

- 1729 9 

JW J7 24918 29ft 
32 23 5513* 

- 1022 13* 

- 4704 18 

- 9W 3* 

- 48 W, 

- 190 

- 797 9V. 
Jl IJ 1 16ft 
38 13 798 17 

- 3157 28ft 
JB IJ 259 24% 

... 92491 38% 

- 2490 The 

- 847725 

- 215 13 

- 469 5* 
_ 272 o,- 
_ W9 7ft 

- <494 16* 

.06 13 50 6% 

- 347 14U 
AOe J 495 S8ft 

_ >1498 8 
-53 p U 724 M 
1300 2.6 239 

J8 6A15S7S Sft 
_ 1300 10 
_ 173 3ft 

_ 3055 8* 
1J7M0.9 30 16% 

J2 3J IBS 9 
_ 317411ft 

- 417 8ft 

- 488 28% 

- 31018 

-. <0313 
_. 15 I* 

_. 569 1'%, 

_ 112813* 
4 3% 

M J <69 IT* 
_ Ml 31* 
_ 307 2tt 
_ 672 11* 
A»1 M3 3 16% 

- 1512 8ft 
_. 470 3ft 

- 74 2* 

.16 1.1 86 15ft 

_ 1447 13* 
iao 73 raisnt 


10- •“ 
23V) —1% 
4% _ 

2ft —ft 
17ft *ft 
IT* “ft 
12% —ft 

h% 

9% — *. 
17ft —ft 
3* — * 
24ft— Ift 
4ft —ft 
mi* — y% 
5% ♦% 

3 8^ ^%“ 
13* —Vi 
3 —ft 
3* “ft 
7ft “ft 
a* -ft 
5ft — 

Sft — % 
10* ♦* 
11% — Vr 

IBVi— 1 
11 

10% »% 
7H —9% 
4ft — V. 
14* —ft 
5* —% 

47% *% 
48 — 1V„ 
2H*. “ft 
121a. —ft 
9% .ft 
M% “1% 

afo—ii* 
22*— 1, ' 
Sft “ft; 
6ft — >6' 
■Va— 1%. 
ft —ft 
MS'* “2ft 
<% — ft 
10 “ft I 
13V. —ft | 
lift *lft, 
35 —2V., 
Mft-lft 
1BH -ft 
5* —ft I 
2Wa*H%| 
(2% —ft 

17% —ft 

17ft “Vn, 

3* * % ! 
5ft -¥«! 
11* _ 
9 ■*% 1 

16ft .1 
155%— 1ft I 

2s* — 1* : 

23ft —ft i 
32 “ft 
3V% -4hi I 
24* *3Vi, ; 
12* — % 
tfv* — Va 

+G 

IS* — * 
51% — V% 
15ft —ft 
57ft -3ft 
7* —ft 
13ft -ft 
39 *3 

6Vi —Vi. 
9ft —ft 
3* “ft 
8* —ft, 
14% 

■ft 

lift —V. 
7ft —ft 
36ft— IN 
17ft “ft 
ISft —ft 
3Vu -~(u 
11% ♦*■. 
15% — % 
1* — * 
13% —ft 
3 1 '. —V. 
12* —* 
20ft — 

2%ia -4/u-> 
11% — * 
16% • % 
8% a % 
3ft « ' % 

2 —ft 

141. ■ V% 

13* - 

271% • * 

27% )% 
2ft — 
M% —ft 
S •* 


(He A 154 11'. 

... 956 13% 

.40 7.6 29 16* 

86 47 

_ 737516'. 
.. 6524 5* 

• 867 4ft 

_ 199 Ift 

- 6843 15% 
... ,338 4 
_ 7944 4* 
-. 304 5% 
.. M2 17ft 
_ 3663 Sft 
_ 1156 6% 
_ 11315% 

60 4 

AS* * 312 12 

_ 2437 10V. 
J» 23 500 15'.% 
1.00b 5J1 47321* 

A0 2.1 348 19ft 

M 3.1 40*0 6ft 
_ 3381 6* 
... 310 6ft 
.. 1057 ift 
_ 91 4ft 

JO U 57517ft 


ltl'-j II — (i VilSpM 
13% 13ft ■ N VoBtb 
15 IS* —ft VoFsl 
42 46 —I VnCi 

15Vi. 15* —ft Wuonscl 
5% 5* ' Vi, VISX 


Sotev 

Dae Yld lttbHigh 
12 7 

16 70 V4 8* 
.10 6 710 17 

171 I*. 


_ VitdlSan .02* J 737 17* 


7ft B i % Vlltek 
14 14* ■ V. V405W 

31) 3ft —ft Vwu* 

4'. 4* —V. Vmork 
Sft SV. -% Motllnt 
lift 17 —ft Volvo 5 
4% 5 -ft Vei 
Sft 6 Wb — 'V e 

14ft 14% ft I 

3* 4 —ft I 

10% 10*— 1% 

10ft ID* —ft WCTCm 
14* 14ft — * WD40 
19V, 70 —1 % WPS BCD 


_ 10017 4 
2<0 S.7 .549 44 
_ 871 15V, 


A0 1.9 236 27* 
AOb 2.5 316 33% 

J0a 3J 1795 6% 
_ 493 S' . 
1J00 17 29 37Vn 

_ 586 T6* 

_ II 4* 
_ 526 3Vi 
I Sft 
_ 38*5 (0 
_ 2447 3* 
_ 33446 IS* 
_ 282 9 

_ 5319 

-. 933 

- 165211ft 
_ 268311 

- MS 7 
_ 1130 7* 
_ 157216V. 
_ 10449361% 

417 1A 111 4* 
.12 14) K770 13 
-. 30oj:>*v 
-12716 5J% 
_ 384 3* 
1A0 4J 407 30* 
7JN 9J 527 73ft 
2M 6J 10)733 
_ 129 17* 

_. 604 1 1 V. 

_ 1091 3* 
14)8 4A 777 74* 
JB 3A 238 26 
1.00 *J 400 IT. 
A0 IJ T 785 35 
.16 1.1 611 14ft 


_ 139 3PA 

16891 Pa 
108b 34) X® 36 
_ 2386 7* 
J4 IB 181 70% 
14)0 4A1356B 25* 
240 8A *41625 
-. 288 4% 

_ 893)1* 
M 1J9I074 4 9 
_ 2238 B 
_ 916234, 
5-00 18 1180 53% 
AO 44) 7063 10* 

_ 45 53 

_ 127220ft 
_ 8944 25% 
_. 160! 19% 
1A0 3A 316148% 

- 1«M6* 
_ 1039 6* 

4)5 J 285 7ft 
™ 170 3ft 

_ 1<9 7 
_ 479 2 
_ M0 3*i 

- 2436 8% 

I A0 3J <34649 
1J0 7J 17 

_ 2319 5*% 

- 2680 28% 
- 1590 3ft 

14B 4J 525 74 V* 
_ 1054 99% 
_ 3893 4H 


VBand 

VLSI 

vse 

VWB 

VocDry - 

vaTeeh 

Vann 

Vo»y59 

VdbCor 

Valmnl 

VatAdCm 

vaiLn 

vavisfl 


Vcn 

vartftos 

Varum 

Varied 3 

v arson 

Vausbn 

VM&k 

VedraTc 

VenoNS 

Vemrllx 

VexCfy 

veraum 

VWilite 

Vertms 

VtFIn 

VTToddy 

Verse 

yesnjr 
VartesC 
verrxPn 
VefO Am 
VetAmso, 


18% 18ft —ft WLRFd J2 IJ <6909 25ft 

6% 6* —ft ftPI Grp - 128 21% 

6 6* • % WPP Go 4Mr IJ 7754 1% 

Sft 6% •* WRTEn _ 2604(1% 

5% 6* 'Vi WRTpl IJ5 9.1 240 75% 

5* SVi —ft WSFS _ 568 3ft 

IS* 17 .* WSMP _ 91 7'i 

23ft lift —ft WTD ... 643 2ft 

WVSFn ,04e J 39I6VJ 

1 XteclcCor - 472 13ft 

I WorfiBk _ ,00 4Vj 

Wotoro A0 2.0 llgn 
25ft— 2 W(*lm ... 7497 7ft 

31* —ft WaUDala _. 9306 35* 

< —ft Won so, _ 42814% 


6 —ft WMJ5DI _ 42814% 

5 “ft WaBhr J4 2J) 15512% 

V —ft WandGtt _ 999 11ft 

lfN— ft, WanaLab - 2948 13 

4* — V% Wamtc — 1671 5*6. 

“S WO"®" - il£ *W 

Sft —ft WFSL Jt MS 7770 70* 
9% —ft WtrA-DC „ 710 5 

3ft “9 m WM5B .72 i7 10458 20ft 

W? - WMSBptCTJB BA 5176% 

Au T?? WMSBP064D 6 S 32393ft 
18% +% WMS8pfE1.90 BA 14123 


31* » — *• | WatdW 
!™ - WatsnPh 


- 30 9% 

_ 4401 25% 
.9 25/7 2S % 


’SS? .•> 1 vvanste s 33 .9 25/7 25% 

fft “ft VftxHPs J« IJ 4162 23* 

,V2_ *,? WBueSv* _ 1544 5* 

I4te WoveTec - 684 <1% 

5? '{J - 2737 13* 

Ate Zte Wovor M 2S 25317* 
IL* -ft WebCOInd _ 214 8 

—9 WbUFn JJ JJ (369 23* 

~J Wadco 1A0I16A 192 to 

3% — % UIB.-UV XMfl civ 


VI Zte WWM* _ 4098 SV. 

Wk. ZkJ Wtefc't _ 3673 » 

WWcomH _ 49312% 

KS TS WettWlM - 3999 23* 

4, *£ Weattti -144085 71’/. 

3 ft waemer .10 A <259425',. 

1.(2 WteBbanc JB 3J 3B<29% 

3 —1 WPQlp V „ _ 257 ft 
fi _i WStOdFL JO 1.7 6 12% 

_)», WMCstOR .16 ?J 1010 9ft 
14 % — * WtfVlor _ 138 23V. 

41 .( WeWOne 32 23 15770 26 

7 — * WAmSc AB 7J 409 33% 

3 J® 2 S 19620ft 

31 ,*., Wflam - 940714% 

13 * 6 — 11 % Wtesterted . 10 e j 733514 
36 *3 WTnBonk AOr 4J IBS 15* 

7ft WHEftel _ _ 1« 7ft 

19% — * WP«PR J0D2A 3 32ft 

75 — * WMIeTc - 519 6ft 

34 _1 WilnObF _. 156717ft 

4ft * ft WxrnPc - 1584 13 

lift —ft WSWOtr - 3843 29ft 

470% “Ift Weson 2131 7% 

7ft “ft WVSvs — 023914* 

32ft— 1% WstpBC - 307 3* 

53 ♦* WStwOn - 7507 11ft 

in* —ft wetSool _ M3 3ft 

J1*_s% wevco JO 2A 190932 

20 —V. Wl*»f JO 1310* 

22ft— 2* WtlrteWwr - 350535% 

(8% —ft WMIVOdS AB 2J 123727 

46ft— 1ft WhIFdS - 4690 ISft 

6V7 “ft WhOKTen _ 945 7ft 

6ft —ft WhofrBv _ 236815 

6*6 —ft W%*Lu _ - 635) 1* 

Sft _ WUvJAl A2 1A 702 44V. 

I ♦% WUtom, .94 M 0203 51\i 

Ik* — ; wmsonv —14294 34 

3ft —ft WilmTr IJfl « M36 26V) 

8 “ft WlndRivr - 975 8 

43 “4 Winstar -16631 8 

16ft —ft WmsFv - 238 8* 

Sft *ft WinstenH jt 8.1 1527 10% 

» “ft WlnttaRv AS J 56 10% 

3 ft —ft WBCCTs - 3670 <3 

aft — ft Wotohn M 1A 839 18* 

9% —ft vvondwro „ 305022 

4ft _ WDOdhtf JJ 7J IIS 15 

; WrfcCoa Si 1.9 73 79ft 

IWK1ACP - 1273 22% 

won Feb .1? IJ 642 10% 

wamos jo 1.9 mu 22 

4ft —ft Wyman _ 2431 6 

101’. — % 

13 —ft | 

10% — 1 5 x 

10% t’A 

3ft —ft X0MA _ 4225 3ft 

11% — % XRib* .16 Jxl9463Sft 

Ift “% XcMNei - 1553 15 

15% _ XMtovaun _ 32 6% 

15ft Xleor 3469 2* 

f *% XiSnx -3)^635 V6. 

31 —1ft Xircom -13971 71% 

SV. “ft Xpetfte _ 133223* 

19*— 2ft Xplor _ 20 1 % 

26 — v, Xyteglc _ 2851 28* 

ift -ft Xypta _ 22438 

22ft “ft 


7 

7V» 8 
IS* 15V?- 
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6 1 ', 7 
I7(i 17ft- 
II II - 
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18'.) 19ft- 
11 n - 
11 ,8 

5ft •% 


3% 6 
42 42% 

14% 14* 
23 24* 

Ift 2* 
3tu Mi, 
(0% lOft 
74% 24% 
3ft 3ft 
41i 7 
2% 2(i 
15* 16% 
13* 13* 
4% 4% 
16% 20'..- 
6ft 7% 
31* 32* 
12% 13'/.- 
11). 1JV. 
lift lift 

12% 12'.-i 

Sft 5>A. 
8ft 8* 

,9% 19% 
4* 4ft 
19ft T9ft. 
25ft a* 
91ft 91 Vi- 
23' '. 33% 
9* 9* 
34* 25* 
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- E 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


0 


O N 


A Y 


SPORTS 


Zhong and Hwang Win Marathons 


The Associated Pros 

HIROSHIMA Japan — China's wom- 
en, having won all the gold medals in the 
swimming pod at the Asian Games, began 
their assault in track and field Sunday with 
Zhong Huandi winning the marathon by 
nearly seven minutes over another Chinese 
runner. 

Hwang Young Jo, the 1992 Olympic 
champion, won the men's marathon by 44 
seconds, but Japan's Toshiyuki Hayata 
prevented the 1-2 sweep expected by South 
Korea. 

Uzbekistan, Mongolia and Indonesia 
won their first golds of the games — Uz- 
bekistan in canoeing, Mongolia in wres- 
tling and Indonesia m badminton. 

With China far ahead in the gold race, 
Hwang helped keep South Korea just 
ahead of Japan in the battle for second. 

The South Koreans picked tip seven 
golds for the day, including two in their 
native fighting sport of taekwondo. They 


also had one each in bowling, badminton, 
archery and wrestling. 

Japan won six — two each in golf and 
synchronized swimming and one each in 
bowling and equestrian j umpiug. 

China boosted its gold total to 73 by 
winning five of the seven canoeing races, 
three of the shooting titles and the fencing, 
table tennis and women’s marathon. 

South Korea had 31 golds, Japan 28. 
Kazakhstan is fourth, with nine. 

Kazakhstan added five golds Sunday 
with two weightlifting titles and victories 
in canoeing, lOO-kflomeiff team time trial 
cycling and shooting. Taiwan won two in 
golf and one in bowling. Iran won three 
wrestling titles and a gold in taekwondo. 
Kuwait also won in taekwondo, and Ma- 
laysia won a bowling gold. 

In total medals, China led with 140 to 
107 for Japan and 81 for South Korea. 
Kazakhstan had 33. 


SCOREBOARD 


Top 25 College Results 


How tte top 25 team in the Auodated 
Pittf allege football poll fared ttrts week: 

1. Florida (Ml boat Louisiana Slate fi-18. 
N ext: vs. No, 9 Auburn, Saturday; 2, Nebraska 
(M)beatOkMMma5fato33-X Next; at No. 19 
Kamos ST. Saturday; X Flsrldo State (4-1) 
lost to No. 13 Miami 34-20, Next: vs. Clemson. 
Saturday; 4 Pea* State (94) did rex Play. 
Next: at No. 7 Michigan Saturday; S. Colora- 
do 154) beat Missouri M-2X Next.- vs. No. M 
Oklahoma Saturday. 

& Artma (4-1) lost to Na 23 Goforodo State 
21-16. Next: al Ha 22 W as h i n g ton State. Satur- 
day; 7. Michigan (4-1) beat Michigan State 40- 
30. Next: vs. Na 4 Penn State. Saturday; 8. 
Notre Dame (4-2) kst to Battaa Ceflege 30-11. 
Next: vx Brigham Yauu. Saturday; 9. ao- 
bara (64) beat Mississippi 5fat*42-lB. Next: at . 
Na 1 Florida Saturday; to Texas ASM (54) 
beat Houston 38-7. Next: vs. Bavtcr, Saturday. 

IT. Alabama (64) beat Southern Mississippi 
144. Next: at Tennessee. Saturday; 11 Wash- 
ington (4.1) bsat San Jose State 34-20. Next: at 
Arizona State. Saturday; 1 3. Miami (4-1) beat 
Na^ Florida Slate 94-20. Next: at West Vlrg In- 
to Saturday. Oct. 22; 14. North Cerodno (4-1) 
beat Georgia Tech 3t-2t. Next: vs. Maryland, 
Saturday; T 5. Texas (4-1) beat No. )6 Oklaho- 
ma 17-10. Next: at RJoe. Sunday. 

toOHaboma 02) lost to No. IS Texas 17-10. 
Next; of Na. 5 Colorado. Satarday; 17. Ohio 
Stale (4-2) lost to Illinois 24-10. Next: atMlchl- 
gan State. Saturday; IB, North Carolina Stale 
(4-1) km to Louisville 35-14. Next: vs. Wake 
Forest, Saturday; 19, Kamos State (44) beat 
Kansas 21-iX Thursday. Next: vx No, 2 Ne- 
braska. Saturday, Oct 15; 20. Virginia Ted 
(5-1 ) beat Temple 41-13. Next: at East Corun- 
na, Saturday. 

21. Syracuse (5-1) beat Pittsburgh 31-7. 
Nam; of Temple, 5oturdoy, Oct 22; 22. Wash- 
ington Stale (4-1) beat Oregon >1-7. Next: vx 
Na.6 Arizona. Saturday; 21 Cofoiudo Slate (6- 
0) beat Na6 Arizona 21-16. Next: vx Texas El- 
Paso, Saturday; 24. Wisconsin (3-2) beat 
Northwestern 46-14. Next: vx Purdue. Satur- 
day^ Utah (54) beat San Dleua State 34-22. 
Next: vx Hawaii. Saturday. 


Offier Major College Scores 


EAST 

Boston U. 45, Rhode (stand 33 
BucfcneU 41. Towson St. 28 
Buffalo 23, Colgate 10 
CotamMa 24, FonSxun 13 
Connecticut 26. VDtanovu W 
Cornell IB. Harvard 13 
Dartmouth 27, Lafayette 15 
Gorman 21. Canlslus 7 
Jamas Madison 3a Dataware 10 
Leftloh 36. Yale 32 
Mar 1st 33, St. Peter's D 
Manmoum, nj. 29, St. Francis. Pa. 7 
New H amp s hire 14, Manachusetts It 
Pace 2Z lana 24 
Penn 59, Holy Crum 8 
Princeton 31. Brawn 10 
RPI 34, Siena 7 
Robert Morris 28. Duaucsne 6 
Rutgers 16. Army 14 
San Dleua 45. Wagner 35 
SOUTH 

Ala-BIrmlneham 34, Wofford 27 
Alcorn si. J8. Texas Southern 21 
Appalachian St. 3a Furman 6 
Delawara SI. 22. Ubertv 17 
E. Kentucky 28. Terwiessee St. 17 
E. Tennessee St 56, Citadel 34 
East Carolina 56, South Carolina 42 
Georgia ea demean 14 


Grambilng St. 24, Mlsx valley SI. 7 
Howard U. 2L Befhuno Cnofcnwxi 19 
Maine 24. Ri ch mond 10 
Marshall 49. VM( 7 
Memphis 11 Tirione 0 
Middle Term. 3a Term-Martin 7 
Murray 5t. 29. Austin Peav 14 
N. Carolina A&T 23. Florida A&M 22 
Newberry 5a Charleston Southern 19 
Parnomt St- 49, W. Kentucky 14 
S. Carolina Si. 49. Morgan St. 7 
SE Missouri 19. Tennessee Tech 14 
SW Louisiana 26. Arkansas St. 0 
Samford 34. Cent. Florida 35 
Tennessee 38. Arkansas 71 
Truv St. 35. Nlchdls St U 
Virginia <2. Wake Fores) 6 
W. Carolina 35. Georgia Soattiem 31 
Washington & Lee 9, Davidson 3 
win lam & Mary 17, Northeastern 12 
MIDWEST 
Ball St. 24. Toledo 24. He 
Bowling Green 32. Ohio u. a 
Cent. Michigan 35. w. Mkntgan 28 
Dayton 42, Wilmington. Ohio 17 
Drake 3). Evansville 2) 

E. Michigan 24 Kent 10 
IMnotS St. 2& SW Missouri St. 14 
Indians 27, Iowa 2B 
Indiana St. 27, S. Illinois 14 
Jackson St. 2L Alabama SL 6 
Miami, Ohio 50. Akron 14 
PL Illinois 48. New Mexico 5t. 27 
N. Iowa It, E. Illinois 7 
Purdue 49, Minnesota 37 
Volparofaa 20, Butter 14 
Vanderbilt 34. ancinnaH 24 
Youngstown st. 17, North Alabama 14 
SOUTHWEST 

Baylor 44, Southern Moth. 10 
North Texas 27. SW Texas St. 14 
Rice 24. Texas Tech 21 
Southern U. 21, Prairie View 7 
Stephen F-Ausrtn 42. Sam Houston St. 6 
Texas- El Paso 24. Tulso 17 
FAR WEST 
Air Force 43. Navy 71 
Arizona SL 36. Stanford 35 
Boise St. 24. Weber SL 17 
Brtgtxim Young 32. Fresno St. 30 
C5 Northridge 40. Sonoma St. 14 
Cal Poly-SLO 35. San Francisco St. 30 
Caiitornta 26. UCLA 7 
Idaho 4a E. Washington 15 
Idaho SL 3A Montana SL 20 
Montana as. N. Arizona 24 
Nevada 3& Pdcfflc 36 
New Mexico 3a Hawaii 21 
Southern Cal 27. Oregon St. 19 
St. Mary's. CaL 34. CSU-CMco T7 
UC Davis 27, Sacramento St. 34 
UNLV 24. Louisiana Tech 20 
Wyoming 2a NE Louisiana 14 


Thai lend l, Malaysia 1 
Oman 1, Nepal 0 

SWIMMING 


Asian Games 


BASEBALL 
South Korea 21. MansaOo 0 
Japan 25. Thailand 2 

BASKETBALL 


Japan 84. South Korea 80 

China B3. Taiwan 59 Men 
South Korea 87, Kaz ak hstan 77 
PMUpInes 87. United Arab Emirates 71 
BOXING 


FCet be rw eigMt: Zafgham Moseel, Paki- 
stan. dot. Zhou Renztd, China, 134; Eric 
Canoy, PhlHppfaicx def. Devarotan Venkata- 
sen. India 1B7; Somludc Kamslns, ThaHamL 
cteLM. Abdullaev. Uzbekistan. 9-3; Nemo Mi- 
chel Bataan, Indonesia deL Kang Song-oh. 
South Korea 114. 

Dgtt WBl h u net iib f . Reynaldo Gatkto Phfl- 
Ipptaexdef. Farkfiod Bafdrev, Uzbekistan, 17- 
4; Po rn rtxil Thangburaa Thailand, stooped 
Khamtay Doomanlvone. Laos. 1:36, 2nd 
round; Usman Ulfah Khan. Pakistan, def. 
Denvnoa EnfaaDian. Mongolia 106; Bator 
Nfagy mb ctav, Ka z a khs tan, defc Fumltaka NP 
tamL Japan, 114. 

UaM Mid dle w eigh t: Pan Feng. China 
stooped Asodoitab J abort Iran, 1:25. 1st 
round; Mnt xmnn od Ghyass Tetfaur, Syria 
stopped Yoon Yone-ctxm. South Korea 0:53, 
2nd round; Sutheap Wdngsuntorn, Thailand. 
deL Byodaatav Bat-Ombfiv Mongolia 10-1; 
Kanofbefc O xi o af nev. K aza k h st a n, stooped 
Ikrom Berdiev. Uzb ek istan. 2:59. 2nd round. 

Srear HtbffsdtM: SHarash Khaa Pakf- 
sttaideLAn Jung-hyun. South Korea. 7-6; M. 
Samadi Katkhoraa Iran. deL Viktor cntaim. 
Kazakhstan. 147. 

GOLF 


Individual Final 
toMO yards. ser 73) 

Huano Yu-chen. Taiwan 71-69-74-77—286 
Kang Soo-yua South Korea 73-76-7S-71— 295 
Sang Choe-eun. South Korea 74-73-74-75—296 
Chang Oita-sha. Taiwan 72-75-76-74—2*7 
Hon H o c- won. South Korea 78-74-74-75—301 


KlmlkoDate. Japan (I l.deL Weng Tzv-ttna 
Taiwan. 4-1, 6-1; Nani Rchcnm Budl BasukL 
Indonesia (3). deL U Fana China 64. 34. 6-2 
TRACK 
MomDIuo 


Huang Llxla China 73-80-75-7S-303 

Oilfca Arlto Japan 76-77-76- 75-304 

Un Shooro. Oitaa 76-77-78-74-305 

Um A0 fan. Mataysta 7540-7S-78— JOS 

Um Slew At, Mafavsta 80-76-79-75—310 

Team Final 

1, Taiwan. 583LZ South Korea, 9BB 3. China. 
608. 4. Japan. 611. 5. Malaysia 61Z 6. Philip- 
pines. 631. 


I. H wmg Young- la South Korea 2 : 1 i :I3; Z 
Tosh I yuki Havuta, Jopaa2:l1 :57;XKlm Joe- 
mono. South Korea. 2:13:11. 


1, Zhong Hurd. China 2:29:32; 2. Zhang 
Urong. China 2:36:27; 3. Noboku Futanara. 
Japan. 2:37:03. 

VOLLEYBALL 


CFL Standings 


Eastern Division 



w 

L 

T 

PF PAPtl 

Winnipeg 

to 

4 

8 

512 4)6 20 

Toronto 

5 

9 

8 

402 486 10 

Ottawa 

4 

9 

0 

372 477 8 

Hamiltan 

3 

10 

8 

308 396 6 

Shreveport 

0 

14 

0 

241 546 0 

Western DhrUtoa 


Calgary 

11 

2 

0 

523 253 22 

Brlt-Catnmbia 

to 

3 

1 

478 339 21 

Edmonton 

9 

4 

0 

374 296 18 

Sacramento 

7 

6 

1 

346 381 15 

Saskaldwwan 

7 

7 

0 

37S 366 14 

Los Vegas 

5 

9 

0 

395 441 10 


ladtvkleal Final 
(Xus yards, par 72) 

Kona me Yofcsa Japan 70-694449—276 
Zhang Ltonwei, China 72-74-7049-285 
Hong Ql fa-yob, Taiwan 74-70-71-71—286 
Aim Jao-hwon. South Korea 72-71-7449—288 
Lai Ylnp-luh. Taiwan 73-73-71-71—288 
Hu Suk-ha South Korea 75-73-72-70—290 
Chang Tse-pang. Tolwon 71-71-77-73-292 
Kim Oiang-mia South Korea 7373-76-71— 293 
Mardan Mcenaf, Sinmmore 72-72-77-73—294 
Jyatt Randhawa India 77-74-73-70—294 
Kiyotofczi Ola Japan 7T-77-73-73— 294 

Team Floal 

l.JdPorv 864. Z Taiwan. 864. X South Korea. 
878.4, IndtoSSL 5, Indonosto 898. A Singapore, 
90a 

SOCCER 


Iran del. Moneofla 15-U 154. 15-7 
Kazakhstan OeL Pakistan. 15-2. 15-U. 16-14 
WEIGHTLIFTING 


Friday's Game 
Baltimore 22. Las Vegas 16 
Saturdays Gmnes 
Winnipeg 38, 9wevapart 22 
Briffifi Cblumbto 2X Saskatchewan 22 
Sacramento 34. Taranto 32 


Taiwan l South Korea 0 


Turkmenistan 2. Bahrain 2 
Saudi Arabia X Hang Kong 1 
United Arab Emirates 2. Qatar 2 
Japan 5, Burma 0 
Iran 4. Yemen 


91-KUogram Fhxd: 1, Andrei Makarov. Ka- 
zakhstan. 1675-197^-3650; Z Anatoli Khra- 
patvt. Kazakhstan. 1650-1973— 342.5; 1 Chun 
Yarn- sung. South Korea 16Z5-2ML0-36ZS. 

fWOlograni Ffaxd: l.Serguel Kopytov. Ka- 
zakhstan. 17732100-3875; Z Choi DOng-kll. 
South Korea 17UF2083—37Z5;Z Dmitri Fro- 
lov. Uzbekistan. 1 6531-2025-3473 
WRESTLING 
Freestyle 

<8 KBoyruna: Gold Modal — Nader Rah- 
matL Iron. def. Tumendemberef Zuunboyoa 
Mongolia; Bronze Medal — Moon M rung- 
soak. South Korea def. Yutafca Saak), Japan 
57 Kilograms; Gold Modal — Tkoronbaatar 
Tsoatbayar, Manuada def. Moksol Bobur- 
benkov. Kazakhstan; Bronze Medal —Ovals 
Ma l kdiL l ran. def. KJmJong-oh, South Korea 
48 Kltograms: Gold M«tol — Ad Akbarae- 
lad. iron. deL Rvusaburo Katsu. Japan; 
Bronze Medal — Hwang Sofaha, South Ko- 
rea det. Kenlebak Omouraltcv, Kyrgyzstan. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


i v 3» 
i 

t 


Wr — 



UWAREWE 7THI5I5A N 
PLAttNfi RWTBAUJ *P0WN IK 
IN THE RAIN.51R? / THE MUD* 
•syj I^-tfiAME, MARGE 


IT'S SIAM, 
SANE, ROCK EM, 
SOCK 'EM! 


FUN!! 

Mil 


GARFIELD 


-0 


(H** 


In swimming, which ended Saturday, 
the Chinese women were J5-for-15, with 
one world record. 


Harding Wants Money , 
Fan Club Will Disband 


Zhong, marathon silver medalist in last 
year's world championships, began pulling 
away in the second half of Sunday’s race 
and finished in 2 hours, 29 minutes, 32 
seconds. Her teammate Zhang Liroog, 
third in the 1993 World Cup, passed Ja- 
pan’s Noboku Fujimura in the last kilome- 
ter and finished second in 2:36:27. Fuji- 
mura, thud in 2:37:03, collapsed after the 
finish and was taken by ambulance to a 
hospital, but appeared later at a news con- 
ference. 


In the men’s race, Hwang took the lead 
from Hayata with about eight kilometers 
(5 miles) left and finished in 2:11:13. 
Hayata was timed in 2:1 1:57, while South 
Korea's Kim Jae Ryong. silver medalist in 
last year's Boston Marathon, was third in 
2:13:12. 


The Associated Press 

PORTLAND, Oregon — The Tonya 
Harding Fan Club is being disbanded, and 
not on the best of terms with the figure 
skater its members so staunchly supported. 

“It’s not the happy ending I wanted or 
expected," said Elaine Stamm, president 
and founder of the dub. 

It was a dispute over money that led to a 
final f alling out Harding, Stamm «*td . 
wanted the dub’s bank account cleaned 
out and the money turned over to her and a 
corporation she was forming, Tonya's 
Golden Blades. That corporation will sup- 
port young skaters, market skating instruc- 
tion videos and serve as a new fan dub, 

Stamm said. 

“She wanted the money and I couldn't 
do that,” Stamm said. “We hadn’t paid off 


all our bills yet Tonya didn’t seem to 
understand that we stw had bills to pay.” 


Reuters 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — Princess 
Haya, the 20-year-old daughter of Jor- 
dan's King Hussein, was thrown from 
her horse Sunday at the Asian Games 
and spent two hours in a hospital, bur 
suffered only a headache and bruises. 

She was competing in the final round 
of the individual j u m p in g event when 
her horse misjudged the water jump, 
causing her to lose control and fail 

“She’s gang to be ail right.” said her 
coach, Alexander Wdckner. “She was 
just in shock.” 

The princess was the first of the 12 
competitors to go in the final round, 
riding Sparky I, a horse that also threw 
her last week during practice. ; 

Sparky 1 cleared the fast four jumps, 
but appeared to lose his rhythm as he 
came up to the 1.5-meter barrier before 
the water jump. He failed to dear the 
jump and threw his rider. The princess 
was carried from the course on a stretch- 


er, surrounded by worried Jordanian 
and Games officials as security guards 
tried to keep away the hordes of photogr 
raphezs who had rushed to the spoL 

Princess Haya, who was Jordan's flag 
bearer in the opening ceremony, is the 
latest in a list of royalty to compete in 
international sporting events. 

King Constantine of Greece won an 
Olympic gold medal in yachting and 
Britain's Princess Aonc is a former 
three-day event equestrian champion 
and rode in the 1976 Olympics, while 
Prince Albert of Monaco has bwa a 


if nf 


on 


fills S' 1 - 


ranee sviDcrc vt - 

member of the principality s boosted 
re am in three Winter Olympic Games. ^ 
Prince Felipe, heir to the Spanish 
throne, was a crewman in thrt£HQW(t 
Srfm9 p-Ibss yachting at the 1992 Ban»r 
i hie foikpr Kins Juan 


1714 4V1UUH47 vnjiupiM, "u*™ — — , — _ 

er. Queen Sofia, was on Spain’s y achtin g 
team at the I960 Games m Rome. 




200 Mater B u tter Ite: 1, Uu Urato Oifao. 
2:06J7; z Hong Stain, cnina 2:11125; 3, moqj 
K oruna Jeaaa. 2:1038. 

50-Meter FreeUrte: L Lu Bhv CMna 2568; 
ZNooko imatoJapaa2629; X5umDcaMlao- 
nwtg. Japan. 26J9. 

W-Moter B uLkit i o ko : 1. Ho Clhona China 
2.TJ9.46; Z Uu Biettua China 2:U46; 3. Mlkl 
Nakaa Japan. 2:1402. 


B KBagraras: Gold Medal — Amir Rezo 
JChodera. Iron. ttef. Elmctfl Jabroltov. Ka- 
zakhstan; Branzo Medcd — Htaekazu Yo- 
kohama Jopat det Yang Kyun-ma. South 


108 Kilograms: GokIMedal— KbnToe-woa 
South Korea dot Avub Bool Nassrot. Iran; 
Bronze Modal— Bat-EfdeneBcttogtafc Mon- 
golia. def. Tashtvukl Asonuma Japan. 


Medals Table 


AUSTRALIAN INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS 
to Srstoar 
ScoUftoala 

Boris Becker 12), Germanv, deL Mark 
Woodtordc . AastreDa 74 (7-4). 6-1: Rtchord 
Krai took (7), Notherttxxtodof. Patrick Raftor 
(5). Australia 6-L 74 (7-3L 


2 8 8 Mot or ImSvtooaS Modlor: 1. Xtong 
Goamtno. Otilna 2:0X291 Z Ratapong Urban- 
ont. Thailand, 2:804; X TaKaMra Fuilmota 
Japan. 2:05J7. 

088-McterMedtev Retem 1. Japan (Ed I Ko- 
mino. Akira HavashL Holbne Itoi. TuMhiro 
Matsushita). 3:41 Jd; Z China ( Lin LoIHu. 
Wang Ytwa Jiang owngll. Qto Jlemtoo), 
3:4528; X Kazakhstan (Sergo! OucWca tor, Al- 
exander SavttskL Andrei Gavrilov, Seruuoi 
Bortssenko), 3:4735. 

158 8 M o tor Frorstyte; 1, HJsharo Masrt, 
Syria 15:2928; Z Masoto Hlrana Japan, 
15:3131; l Fu Too, CMna 15:3446, 
TAEKWONDO 

LtoMwctobt: Gold Medal — Faribrgz M 
kart, Iran, doL HkuvukJ Yamashita Japan; 
Bronze Medals — Ralendran Raloa Malay- 
sia and Yousef MJC Abu Zaid. Jordon. 

WoKoraetoW: Gold Medal — Jung Kwang- 
choe. South Korea def. Ebrtfdm Soadatt, 
Iran; Bronze Medals— MltouMgo Arlto. Jo- 
pot. and Jeetonder Kumar Rat, Mataysta. 

MMdtowetoM: Gold Medal — Harmed Ho- 
son, Kuyvalt, def. Am mar Foiled SbaRil, Jor- 
dan; Bronze Medals — Malta Amin ToraM. 
Iran, end Hotim Andrl. Indone si a 

l l i w y do W: Gold Medal — Kim Jo- 
gyouna South Korea def . Farzhod Zorakhsh, 
iron; Bronze Medals — Wu Poo-yl, Tainan, 
and Tawfta R.T. Nnatser. Jordan. 

TENNIS 


China 

Gold 

73 

Silver 

49 

Bronze 

18 

Total 

140 

South Korea 

31 

Z) 

30 

81 

Jaoan 

28 

30 

49 

107 

Kazakhstan 

9 

12 

12 

33 

Iran 

5 

7 

4 

16 

Taiwan 

5 

6 

11 

22 

Syria 

3 

3 

0 

5 

Mataysta 

2 

t 

11 

M 

Kuwait 

2 

1 

4 

7 

Indonesia 

1 

10 

4 

15 

Uzbekistan 

1 

4 

9 

14 

Mongolia 

1 

2 

1 

4 

Vietnam 

1 

2 

0 

3 

India 

1 

1 

3 

5 

Scudl AroOfa 

1 

1 

3 

5 

TrkmnHtan 

1 

0 

0 

1 

Thailand 

0 

5 

4 

9 

Jordan 

0 

2 

2 

4 

Philippines 

0 

2 

2 

4 

Kyrgyzstan 

0 

1 

3 

4 

UAL 

0 

1 

3 

4 

Hoag Kang 

0 

1 

1 

? 

Braoel 

0 

0 

2 

2 

Nepal 

0 

0 

2 

2 

Singapore 

0 

0 

2 

2 

Burma 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Macao 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Talikbnn 

0 

0 

1 

1 


Krallcek def. Seeker, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (9-7), 24. 
63. 

EUROPEAN INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS 
' la Zorich 
Sesi Wools 

Natalie Zvereva (3), Betaruxdet. Miriam 
OremoRS. Netherlands. 60. 62; Mogdaieno 
Maleeva (5). Bulgaria, def. Helotm Sokova 
Czech Republic. 6Z 7-S. 

Final 

Maleeva def. Zvereva 7-5. 34. 6-4. 

TOULOUSE OPEN 
tonll H i Bli 

Jared Palmer, U. s. def. Bcrnd Karbocher 
(5). Germany. 6-4, 61; Magnus Larson (6), 
Sweden. deL Andref Oiesnokov (7). Russia 6 
i, H. 61. 

Final 

Loresan def. Palmer. 61, 61 


Yeehtoaci MtzuroakL Japan, 64. deL PhWp 
wattaa Ireland, 70; Paul McGtolev. Irotato 
70 l def. Taroohlra Moravnma Japan. 72; Dar- 
ren Oorts. Ireland. A del Nobuo Sertzawa 
Japarv 76. 

Ore op TW» 

F ran ce X Spate 1 

Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spato 7X deL Jeon 
Louie Guepy. France, 77; Joan Van derVeMx 
Frunoe.47. deL Jae Rtaera SaatoTD; Michel 
Bctancenev, Franca. 69, del Miguel Anaat 
Martin, Spain. 7X 
Segtoad X A uif ro Cu » 

Barry Lana En qta tote.deL Robert Allen- 
by. AustraOa 71; Howard Clark, Engtoad. to 

deL Stave BktegteteAaafraOteeto Mark Raa. 
E w rt a n d.69.deL Greg Nar n » oi xAustrfdlg.7a. 

On«e Three 
T ol u on x P w u e uu i 1 
Rail Fretev Paraguay, 72, ttef. Chen Txa 
ChunfeTahMOh74: Yoh Ghana Tlng,Ta»won, 
75. def. Angel Franca, Paraguay. 74; Chen 7*1 
Mtao. Tataran. 72. deL Cartas Franca. Pan- 
ouov. 73. 

Soata Africa X Sc et tond 1 
Andrew Coftart Scotland. 70. dot Wayne 
Westner, south Africa 72; Ernie Elx South 
Africa, todef. Gordon Brand Jr. S cotland 7B; 
David PraaL South Africa 7bdeL Colin Mont- 
gomerie. Scotland, 7A 


W 

L 

T 

Pet 

w 

75 

52 

2 

589 

a 

69 

68 

1 

S35 

7 

48 

5* 

3 

535 

7 

as 

59 

3 

JOB 

7 

55 

72 

2 

.434 

SB 

46 

79 

5 

jn 

31 


DaM 9, Selbu 4 


Lotto 4, Seibu I 
Orix 7. Kintetsu 2 


SOCCER 




Tour of Lombardy 


Arabella 

Grand Hotel 

l 'n-v.T.-n mr .mi M-w 


The 

Grand Hotel 
of our Time 


Results Saturday ie the 88th KBMoo of the 
Tear al Lo m b n nty cycling rare: 

1. Vladislav Bobrik, Russia 244 kilometers 
(1512 relies} In six hours, 3 minutes. 21 sec- 
onds or 40291 knh.; X Claudio ChkanxiccL 
Italy. 2 seconds behind: 3. Pascal Richard. 
Swttzer lon d.3 seconds behind; 4. Dhnlirl Kon- 
vstiov. Russia. 25 seconds behind ; 5, MOartHo 
FarxZrlesL llolv. some time: 6. Dovlde Cas- 
sonL Italy, s.1.; 7, Blame Rlix De nm a rk . 30 
eeconds behind; 8. Udo Bolls. Germany, xt.; 9. 
Maura GianettL Switzerland. sJ.; IQ.Maarten 
Den Bafcker. Nether lantte. 36 seconds behind. 

Final World Cup Standings: I, G ton toco 
Bartoto ntL i tofr. Lompre, I IS points: Z Johan 
Minceuw. Belgium. GB-MG, 125; X Andrei 
Tctimfl. Ukraine. Lotto. 115; 4, Claudio Chlap- 
pwed. Italy. Carrera. 89; 5. Giorgio Furton, 
Italy. Gewfsx 87; x Lance Armstrong, united 
States. Motorola 80; 7. Fobto Butaafa. Itofv. 
GB-MG, 67: 8. Gianni Bueno. Italy. Poltl.63: 9, 
Mario ClooillnL Italy. Mercalonl uno. 55; ia 
(lie) Eugeni Berzin. Russia. Gewiss. SO: Ar- 
mand De Las Cuevas. France. Caslorama. 50; 
Erik ZabeL Germany, Telekom. 50; Franco 
BaltertnL Italy. SO 


Canto X O z rman y 1 
Sven Sfrwor. Germany, 7Z deL Ror Stew- 
art. Canada 7Z at 2nd extra hale; Rtefc Gte- 
soaCanoda 69, drt. Alexander CefkaGereno- 
nv. 73: Davta Barr, Canada, to deL Bernhard 
Longer, Germany, TIL 
Zi m babwe X S w eden 1 
Tomr Johnstone, Zhrtoabwe, 71 deL Gabriel 
Hoiijtodt.Saiettin.ZI; Nk* Price. Zimbabwe, 
TftdeL Anders Forsbrond. Swo< ten .73; Jean e r 
Pornavlk. S wodaiv 67. def. Mortc Mctiulty. 
Z im babwe . 70. 

SEMIFINALS 
fftngifii X Saute Africa 1 
Ray Stewart. Canada, 70. del. DavU Prato 
South Afrtca,7S: Rick Gibsen. Canada TILdet 
Wayne Westner, South Africa. 74; Ernie Elx 
South Africa to def. Dave Barr, Canada. 7Z 
United Slates X England • 

Tom Kite. U. S.48.daf.Mork Pox Engkrnu 
70; Fred Comdex U. S. todef. Howard Oar k. 
England. 74; Curtis Strange. U. S. 70. def. 
Barry Lane, England. 71. 

FINAL 

Canada X United States 1 
Dave Barr, Conoda.70.defL Tom Kite. United 
Slates. 71;, Cnrtlx Strange. United State* 67, 
deL Rick 'Glbsox Canada 74; Ray Stewart, 
Conoda,71.def.FreaCouPtaxUoHcdStatax7Z 


ORRMAN BUNDSSLIOA 
Boressta Dortmant % Borer LevbrfctiMn 9 
ElMtacM Frankfurt L Kartoratar SC 0 ■ 
M$V Dobbarg L Fretearv 2 
vw Stuttgart 3. Bayer ihr te wii i 
Barueski Dortmaad 3L Schafka 2 
FC Cotoune L Dynamo Dresden 2 
MW Munich Z Wenter Bremen 2 
Hamburg SV X VtL Bochum t 
Ste w dlag a; Barunia Oortmund H p e k« x 
Mterder Bremen a. Hamburg sv O. Bayern 
Munich It, FC Ibrtsarslawnrn 11, KartMliMfr 
SC to SC FreRwrp to Bayer Levertonoa K 
VfBStuttgortT.BonmlaMotnehkScfwikar, 
Ehdra U rt Frankfurt 7, Dynamo Dresden 1 
Boyer Uordtaaon 5. FC Cologne S VtL 8^- 


chum 4L MSV Dutsburg X 1860 MurAh Z 
SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Root Sodedoda SovfHa 0 
Ovtodo 1. TaMTito 2 . 

VoitodofW Z vutencia 0 
Deporllvo do to Coruna X Zoraaazu 3 
Cotta LOunpartata 2- 




INTERNATIONAL TEST 
South Africa 4Z Argenttno 22 


Downtown location, 
complete health dub 
with indoor pool. 


Speciality restaurants 
lapanese & Chinese cuisine. 
Sushi-bar. 

Bar with live music. 

13 banquet & meeting rooms 


SECOND TEST 

Foktstao ex Australia, Final Day 
5uoday, In Rawa lpin di 
Pakistan 2nd Innlnss: 537-9 (all owl) 
Australia 2nd Innings: 14-1 
Result: Match drawn. 


- -4 VT-, ^ 


Japanese Leagues 


Dtmhlll Cup 


FINAL STANDINGS 
Caatrei L eag ue 


Real Ntodrid X Ractos da Santander 1 
Laaranu 1. Sporflag ttr GOan 3 '* 

Ateaceto L Ateteftc de BWwa 2 M 

Barcetom 4. AttedCQ da Madrid 3 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Owtoao 4, Leicaster 0 
Llwraaoi Z Aston VMa 1 -.' . 

Manchester City X Notltoahom Forest 3 
Norwich Z Leeds 1 

Sheffleid Wodnesday L M unch as ter Uaftedt 
Southampton X Evartoe 0 
Toftenham L Q u ee iu PwZ R on g e ra 1 
West Han J. Crystal PotaoeE - ■ ■ 

Wimbledon 1, Armool 3 
NUwOMfte (. Btackbum I 
Smarms: Newaoteto 23 pobdx Notting- 
ham Forest 21. Btockbaca to Uicrrad 17. 
Manchester united 14. Qwfseo 15. ao u m omp - 
tun 15. Norwich to Leeds H ToHanhom IX 
Manchester Cllv 1Z Arsenal II, Wtost Ham 11. 
Aston viltalL Wimbledon 9. SheffteW Wednes- 
day 9. Quee ns Park Rangers 7, Ipswich 7, 
Crystal Palace 7. Leicester 4. Coventry 4. 
Everfon X 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
GA Eaalcs Deventer 1. MW Maastricht 1 
Sparta Rotterdam Z FC V utentfum 0 
FC Utrecht X NA C Breda Z tw 
S ta ndi n et : FCTwentc 11 potato FCUtrec&t 
iaAJax9.MW9.PSV8, Rada JCXFavonoor^ 
7,w|ttafn 1 1 7. NEC4. NACA VltesM 6Hoanm- 
veen x FC votendom X GA Eogtes X FC 
Gruntaom A Sfxrta 4, RKC A Donfrecitreo 


^ ft 


Konrad-Adenaaer-StT. 7 
D-60313 Frankfurt 
| Telephone.: ++69 - 29 81 0 
^ Fax: +-*49-29 81 810 _ 


QUARTERFINALS 
Group One 

Uuitad States X New Zeotoad ■ 

Tom Kite. U. S„ 69, def. Grant Woitx New' 
ZaotatxL 71; Curtis Strange, U. S_ 69, deL 
Frank NobJia New Zealand. 70; Fred Couples, 
a S- 7Z def. Greg Turner. New Zealand, 74. 
Ireland X Japan 1 



W 

L 

T 

Pet. 

GB 

x-Youdurt 

79 

60 

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4* 

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533 

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Hiroshima 

46 

64 

0 

J8S 

4 

Hanshln 

62 

68 

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jm 

8 

Yakutt 

62 

68 

0 

J07 

1 

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61 

69 

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s: i s : ni 


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x-wan league title 


Yamfurl 6. Chunkhl 3 
Yakut! 4. Hiroshima 3 


Yakutt Z Yekohama 1 


CHICAGO— Sent Blaise llstey. pitcher, out- 
right to Iowa. aa_ , 

FLORIDA— Named Larry RalhscMld 
pitcMns coach. 

HOUSTON— Renamed the Osceola Astros, 
Florida State League to f8e KbsimmM Cp- 

bra*. 


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CALVIN AND HOBBES 


BESIDES WHY ARE LdE 
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C(JM 11 i IM RAIN, 

J CHARLIE BROWN? . 


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ESTTERNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 



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Hurricanes Stop 

No. 3 Semhwles 

By Malcolm Moran 

tfew Tont Tima Service 

MIAMI — When Miami and 
Florida Slate collide, the emo- 
tional pain lingers long after the 
physical damage is healed. But 
such is the way of the rivalry 
with the highest of slakes. 

' After 12 months of suffering 
and suspicion that its era had 

COLLEGE FOOTBA1L 


‘ycome to an end, Miami gained 
redemption Saturday night 
when the Florida State quarter- 
back Danny Kanell, his team 
forced to rely on the pass be- 
cause of an unproductive rush- 
ing game, threw three intercep- 
tions that led to Miami 
touchdowns. The third, on a 16- 
yard scoring return by comer- 
back Carlas Jones, secured a 
34-20 victory before 77,010 in 
the Orange BowL 

Just two weeks after Miami’s 
record 58-game home winning 
streak was ended, the No. 13 
Hurricanes beat the No. 3 Sem- 
inoles for the eighth time in the 
last 10 games and the fifth 
straight time here. And, for the 
ninth time in 18 seasons, they 
handed Florida State its first 
loss of the season. 

The Seminoles committed 
five turnovers. KaneO, who fin- 
ished 13 of 28 for 153 yards 
passing, was replaced by Jon 
Stark m the final mwuttn of the 
third quarter. 

But Kanell was operating an 
offense that produced just 47 
rushing yards. Miami gained 185 
yards on 45. rushes, led by the 
fullback James Stewart, who 
scored two touchdowns and 
jkgained 95 yards on 16 carries. 

~ Stewart led a Miami offense 
that scored on its final two pos- 
sessions of the first half to stabi- 
lize an emotional, mistake- 
filled game. Stewart’s 5-yard 
touchdown run, his second 
score of the game, tied the score 
at 14-aO with 7 minutes. 28 sec- 
onds logo in the half following 
Kan ell’s second interception. 

Miami then went ahead to 
stay will/ a convincing 89-yard 
drive (hat produced a 21-14 lead. 

The Hurricanes held the bah 
for all but 14 seconds of die last 
4:07 in the second quarter. After 
driving to the 1, Miami replaced 
quarterback Frank Costa with 
Ryan Collins, a more mobile 
backup. Collins sprinted to his 
right, forced Seminole defensive 
backs Clifton Abraham and De- 
vin Bush to step (inward, and 
threw a soft, 1-yard touchdown 
pass to tight end Derrick Harris. 

Both teams made penalties, 
poor decisions and uncharacter- 
istic blunders in a series that has 
produced four national champi- 
ons in the past 11 seasons. 

Miami had won the last 39 
games in which it had gained at 
(ost 150 rushing yards. The 

T unicanes had 96 by halftime, 
factor that allowed them to 
settle down a game that could 
have gone out of control. 

Stewart, a punishing 245- 
pound (110-kilogram) junior, 
carried the ball oa the last three 
plays of Miami ’s first 
drive, including the 2-yard 
on a pitchout to the left. 



Walsh Leads 2d-Half Comeback 
As Bears Overcome Saints, 17-7 


Tanncn Maarv'Thc AwxiMd Pic 

Oemsoo defenders dragged down Georgia’s Jeff Thomas after he caught a pass from 
quarterback Brian Daukms. The Bulldog? crashed Qemsoa, 40-14, in Athens, Georgia. 

BC Dashes Irish Hopes, Again 


The Associated Pros 

Playing his third straight 
game for the injured Erik Kra- 
mer, Steve Walsh directed two 
long second-half scoring drives 
ana the Beans took advantage of 
the torn-up turf at Chicago’s Sol- 
dier Field on Sunday for a 17-7 
National Football League vic- 
tory over the New Orleans 
Saints. 

Lems Tillman rushed for 100 
yards and a touchdown for Chi- 
cago (4-2), which goes into its 
bye week with a half-game lead 
over Minnesota in the NFC 
Central, The Vikings play the 
Giants on Monday night in East 
Rutherford, New Jersey. 

Soldier Field, ripped up by 
football games and rod: con- 
certs early last month, had been 
resodded and was in good shape 
until a college game played in a 
steady rain Saturday evening. 

That game left the middle of 
the field looking like a barren 
wasteland — more sandy than 
muddy — and New Orleans (2- 
4) obviously was affected. 

The Saints led only 7-0 early 
in the third quarter despite con- 
trolling play. Morten Andersen, 
one of the best kickers in NFL 
history, struggled with his foot- 
ing and had two field goals 
blocked. The Saints also were 
slipping on offense and sliding 
on defense as the Bears scored 
the final 17 points of (he game. 

Jerry Fontenot’s block of An- 
dersen’s 37-yard attempt and 
Mark Carrier’s subsequent 54- 
yard return set up a 46-yard Ke- 
vin Butler Geld goal 3:21 into the 
second half. 

Because of Andersen's prob- 
lems, Saints’ coach Jim Mora 
decided on the next possession 
logo for a first down on fourth- 
and-4 from Chicago's 30. Jeremy 


Lincoln broke up Jim Everett’s 
pass to Michael Haynes. 

Walsh then completed four 
passes for 55 yards on a 70-yard 
drive, capped by his 21 -yard 
touchdown pass to Jeff Gra- 
ham, to make it 10-7 with 2:24 
left in the third period. 

After a pass by New Orleans 
punter Tommy Bamhardt fell 
incomplete with 8:24 to play, 
Chicago went 63 yards for TD1- 

NIL ROUNDUP 

man’s clinching 25-yard touch- 
down run. Walsh was 4-of-4, 
including three passes good for 
first downs, on the drive. 

Walsh finished 16-of~26 for 
174 yards. 

The Saints scored on Ever- 
ett's 1 8- yard pass to Quinn Ear- 
ly midway through the second 
quarter but otherwise could not 
overcome the slippery field. 

49ers 27, Lions 21: Rookie 
William Floyd scored his first 
two NFL TDs, caught several 
passes and provided Steve 
Young with enough protection 
to guide San Francisco over the 
Lions in Pontiac, Michigan. 

Young, who was sacked IS 
times in the first five games, was 
sacked just twice by Detroit (2- 
4), which lost its third straight 
game. The 49ers (4-2), rebound- 
ing from last week's 40-8 loss to 
Philadelphia, won their fifth in 
a row against the Lions, includ- 
ing a 55-17 drubbing last year. 

Floyd, starting at fullback 
ahead of Marc Logan, carried 
eight times for 35 yards, includ- 
ing two 1-yard scores. He also 
caught five passes for 43 yards. 

Floyd also helped out as a 
blocking back as Young, in- 
stead of trying to throw down- 
field, worked on quick, short 


passes that didn’t require as 
much time to set up. As a result, 
he completed 19-of-25 for 152 
yards, including a 5-yard touch- 
down toss to Nate Singleton. 

Bids 21, Dolphins 11: Thur- 
man Thomas broke free from 
Bryan Cox’s grasp for a 26-yard 
touchdown hue in the third 
quarter for his second touch- 
down as the Bills beat Miami in 
Orchard Park, New York. 

The victory moved Buffalo 
(4-2) into a first-place lie with 
the Dolphins (4-2) in the AFC 
East. It was the first triumph for 
a home team in the last seven 
meetings between the teams. 

After four consecutive weeks 
of getting flagged for 15-yard 
penalties, Cox kept it to an off- 
sides against Buffalo. 

Thomas, who sat out last week 
with a sprained knee so he would 
be ready for the Dolphins, ran 
32 times for 129 yards — his 
fourth straight game with more 
than 100 rushing yards. 

Packers 24, Rams 17: The 
Packers' defense, led by Reggie 
White, hdd Jerome Bettis to 65 
yards rushing on 22 carries and 
provided great field position for 
the offense in a coroeTrom-be- 
hind victory over Los Angeles 
in Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

Bettis entered the game as the 
NFL’s second-leading rusher af- 
ter four straight 100-yard games. 

Robert Brooks returned a 
punt 85 yards for a touchdown, 
and the Packers (3-3) scored 21 
straight points in the second 
half to overcome a 17-3 hair- 
time deficit. 

White, the all-time NFL 
leader with 142 sacks in 143 
career games, had two sacks. 

Falcons 34, Buccaneers 13: 
In Atlanta, Ironhead Heyward 


scored two touchdowns is his 
first stan of the season and Vin- 
nie Clark returned intercep- 
tions 74 and 21 yards, leading 
the Falcons past Tampa Bay. 

The Falcons (4-2) won their 
third straight game. Tampa Bay 
(2-4) failed again to win two in a 
row for the first time since the 
first two games of the *91 season. 

Jeff George threw two touch- 
downs passes to offset two in- . 
inceptions and a lost fumble. 
Heyward rushed for 87 yards 
and a pair of short touchdowns 
as Atlanta took a 24-0 lead late 
in the first half. 

Clark set up a touchdown 
and a field goal with his inter- 
ceptions. 

Jets 16, Colts 6: The Jets 
snapped a five-year home los- 
ing streak aga in st Indianapolis. 
Until a late TD, both teams fell 
victim to their ineptimde on of- 
fense, rarely even managing a 
first down until New York’s 
winning drive, Fumbles, penal- 
ties and in rercep dons bogged 
down both sides. 

Nick Lowery made three 
field goals, moving into second 
place on the NFL career list 
with 336, and backup runner 
Adrian Murrell provided a 
boost for New York in the 
fourth period. 

The score was tied 6-6 at half- 
time and stayed that way as the 
Colts’ usually reliable Dean 
Biasucci missed a 35-yard field 
goal in the third quarter. 

Murrell then sparked the deri- 
sive march, rushing for IS yards 
and turning a short pass into a 
12-yard gain on third down de- 

S ite having little blocking oa 
e play. Lowery’s 37-yard kick 
came with 6:23 to go and left 
him behind only Jan Stenerud 
(373) on the field goal list 


The Associated press 

It was the same old story for 
Notre Dame against Boston 
College. 

By picking up where they left 
.off last season, the Boston Col- 
lege Eagles probably ended 
Irish hopes for the national ti- 
tle. 

Last season, it was David 
Gordon’s 41-yard field goal 00 
the final play that edged the 
Irish, 41-39, and dropped them 
from the No. 1 ranking. This 
tune, it wasn't even close, a 30- 
1 1 victory that was decided in 
the third quarter in Boston. 

“We’re very, very, veiy, very, 
very disappointed,” said Lou 
Holtz, Notre Dame’s coach, who 
has lost two games before No- 
vember for the first time since 
1 986, his first year at the schooL 
■ All the Eagles needed to beat 
Notre Dame again was their al- 
most-impen etrablc defense, a 
flea-fficker, a fake field goal and 
another mediocre outing by the 
Irish quarterback, Ron Powius. 

Powhis was sacked four times 
for 39 yards and hit only five 
passes for 50 yards. He threw 21 
times and was intercepted twice. 

No. 1 Florida 42, LSU 18: In 
Gainesville, Florida, Terry 
Dean threw his 18th touchdown 
pass of the season and Anthone 
Lott scored on an 88-yard inter- 
ception return. 

No. 2 Nebraska 32, Oklaho- 
ma State 3: In Lincoln, Nebras- 
ka, Lawrence Phillips ran for a 


career-high 221 yards and three 
touchdowns on 33 carries. 

The third-string quarterback 
Matt Turman drove Nebraska 
to two touchdowns in its first 
three second-half possessions. 

No. 5 Colorado 38, Missouri 
23: KordeH Stewart passed for 
228 yards and Rashaan Salaam 
ran for 166 as the visiting Buffa- 
loes won their ninth straight 

Stewart hit his first seven 
passes and went !6-for-21 with 
two TDs. Salaam, the nation’s 
leading rusher, had 28 carries 
and scored two touchdowns. 

No. 23 Colorado State 21, 
No. 6 Arizona 16: Anthoney 
Hill completed two touchdown 
passes to tight end Jason Shull 
and threw for 251 yards for the 
Rams in Tucson, Arizona. 

No. 7 Michigan 40, Michigan 
State 20: The Wolverines 
scored on seven straight posses- 
sions against the Spartans in 
Ann Aibor. Michigan. 

Tyrone Wheatley ran for 153 
yards and two touchdowns and 
caught a 5-yard scoring pass 
from Todd Collins. 

No. 9 Auburn 42, Mississippi 
State 18: In Starksville, Missis- 
sippi, Patrick Nix threw for 31 1 
yards and three TDs as Auburn 
tied a school record and extend- 
ed Division I-A’s longest win- 
ning streak to 17 games. 

No. 12 Washhffitoa 34, San 
Jose State 20: In Seattle, Napo- 
leon Kaufman improved on his 


career-high 227-yard game last 
week against UCLA, rushing 
for 254 yards and three touch- 
downs. Kaufman scored on a 
91-yard run on the first offen 
sive play by the Huskies. 

No. 15 Texas 17, No. 16 
Oklahoma I(h In Dallas, Texas 
overcame a 7-0 halftime deficit 
as the reds hi rt freshman James 
Brown, starting for injured 
Shea Morenz. ran for a touch- 
down and passed for another. 

In the final minute, nose 
guard Stonie Clark made 
fourth-down tackle near the 
goal line; stopping James Allen 
and ending a desperation drive 
for the Sooners. 

Illinois 24, No. 17 Ohio State 
10: Illinois won for the fourth 
straight time in Columbus, 
Ohio. Jasper Strong’s 49-yard 
TD catch put the mini ahead 
for good on the last play of the 
third quarter. 

LouisviHe 35. No. 18 North 
Carolina State 14: Linebacker 
Alan Campos set up a touch- 
down with his first fumble re- 
covery in the fourth quarter, 
then ran 20 yards with his sec- 
ond to give Louisville the upset 
of the visiting Wolf Pack. 

No. 24 Wisconsin 46, North- 
western 14: Terrell Fletcher 
scored three TDs and ran for 
186 yards 10 help bring the Bad- 
gers back from a 14-10 halftime 
deficit in Evanston, Illinois. 
Wisconsin scored 16 points in 
55 seconds of the final quarter. 


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31 Writer Murdoch 

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34 Blacktop 
basketball 
contest 

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39" Am — 
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43 Everything 
being taken into 
account 

46 DCGUI doubled 

47 60 secs. 

49 Hebrew dry 

measure 
so Conceive 

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politically Abbr 

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54 Bryce ---- 

National Park 

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Fates 

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or peace 

58 Move about 
as How a 

pendulum 

swings 

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name 

ca Bathroom 
hanger 

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to Bambi e g 
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island 


DOWN 

1 1s down with 

z N.Y.C summer 
hrs 

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performance 

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a Lyric poem 

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is Rube 
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PubM by Waymt Robort WUtlama 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1994 


LANGUAGE 


Amid the Huffing and Puffing 


Naomi Campbell: Life 


By William Safire 


W ASHINGTON — Before President Clinton 
put military muscle behind his neeotiniioas 


jj put military muscle behind his negotiations 
in Haiti, his attempted intimidations, exhorta- 
tions, and dire warnings aimed at the local junta 
were summed up as huffing and puffing, 
“Heralded by the huffing and puffing of a spin 
doctorate gone wild” were the words of one hawk- 
ish polemicist in The New York Tunes, while The 
Washington Post headline over a Mary McGrory 
column was “Huffing and Puffing Over Haiti” 
Puff is the older word, from Old English pyffan, 
of imitative origin, meaning ”to blow in short 
gusts" or, metaphorically, “to inflate; make proud 
or conceited." Richard Brinsley Sheridan, in a 
1779 piay, wrote of “a practitioner in panegyric, 
or, to speak more plainly, a professor of the art of 
puffing.” From die powder puff, a soft and fluffy 
pad for dispensing talc and other cosmetics, came 
the puff piece, or “adoring article." 

Huff — “to bluster, to emit puffs of breath in 
anger” — gained a meaning in 1599 of “a short 
spell of anger." as in “to leave in a huff." In this 
century, it was automicized as “a six-cylindered 
Huff." The two verbs were combined in the 
nursery tale of “The Three Little Pigs,” as the 
wolf warned, “I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I'll blow 
your house in.” (Other versions use “blow your 
house down.” but the 1933 Disney movie version 
helped immortalize “blow your house in" as a 
rhyme for each pig’s refusal to give entry: “Not 
by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin!”) Thus the 
combination of huff and puff came to mean 
“bombastic threats" to be derided. 


that “the time has long passed for negotiations" 
but added: “If die dictators were willing to leave, 
we'd be willing to discuss die specific modalities 
of their departure.” 

Myers is not the son to dip naturally into 
diplolingo; that word, a favorite of the Kissinger 
era, was drilled into her by a foreign-policy 
wonk. Modalities means “means,” as opposed to 
ends; structure, not substance; the trappings 
rather than the essence. It is often a sneer word, 
akin to “technical details," unless you are in 
charge of the communications or security of a 
negotiation. 

□ 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — How cheap to suggest that supennodel 
Naomi Campbell needed a 250-word summary 
of the novel that bears her name. Why. “Swan” 
would require at least two folios to convey its com- 
plex tale of five models, their nomadic fashion Life 
and the murder mystery through which the novel 
plods, in contrast to its heroine’s signature swan-like 
glide. 

The reason why anyone would read the book is 
set out on its second page, where Swan takes to the 
Paris runway and turns into that icon of allure, 
glamour ana stardom that is a current fashion 
phenomenon. 

“1 hooked my thumbs into the pockets of my 
tight silk pants and began to saunter down the 
runway, one foot in front of the other, hips wig- 
gling subtly,” it reads. “ A supermodel can make 
anything look sexy, and they say I’m the sexiest of 
them all.” 

Campbell giggles when asked if that is her speak- 
ing on the tapes that she recorded to create the bones 
of the book, published in London by Heine m a nn . 

“Well, I hardly look in the mirror,” she claims. 
“What I wanted people to know was how ungl amor- 
ous it all really is. And 1 was thinking of ‘mirror, 
minor on the wail’ — you know, Snow White." 

Campbell is not the fairest of them all. She is 
black. The first and only supennodel to break 
through the invisible racial barrier and make it to the 
cover of Vogue. 

Although she might be perceived as a role model 
by aspiring black kids, Ine fan mail she receives 
expresses rather the dreams of any teenager hoping 
to be spotted for stardom, as Campbell was at age 
14, while “hanging out" after school in London's 
Covent Garden. 

“Sometimes I’m on a set and realize that I am the 
only black model there,” she says. “It just makes me 
more determined — it's more of a challenge. But I'm 
not black American, I’m black English and racism 
exists a lot more in America. In New York, it is more 
in your face.” 

Campbell now lives in New York, leading a life 
she can still hardly believe when she recalls her 
childhood in a poor suburb of London, when she 
would gyrate to the Jackson Five and never imag- 
ined that she would one day meet Michael Jackson 
and other teenage icons. 

The tabloid chronicle of her tempestuous relation- 
ships with Mike Tyson. Robert De Niro and her on- 
off engagement to Adam Gayton of the pop group 
U2 seem far more riveting than the tame exploits of 
her fictional models. As sbe says of her heroine: 
“No one is as nice as Swan." 

Stories of Naomi being “difficult” were splashed 
in the press when her long-tenn New York agency 


“Clinton, Advisers Consider ‘Endgame' Plans 
on Haiti,” read a Washington Post headline, 
based on an unattributed quote from an official 
slicing about “endgame p lannin g." End game 
began more than a century ago as a chess term. 
Hire the older gambit (“opening gambit" is redun- 
dant, as is “final endgame"). By 1964, the novel- 
ist Vladimir Nabokov was using it as a single 
word: “We’ll simply take the endgame position 

. .1 . • . • . r i 1 .m T 


at the point it was interrupted today," In diplo- 
lineo, endgame is usually foDowed by exit strate- 


lingo, endgame is usually foDowed by exit strate- 
gy, first used in business in the late 1970s. 

Foreign-policy crises can often produce new 
diplolingo. Just as the Cuban missile crisis in 1962 
produced hawks and doves, an early American 


metaphor recoined by the columnists Charles 
Bartlett and Stewart Alsop. and eyeball to eyeball, 
a popularization of an army phrase by Secretary of 
State Dean Rusk, the Haitian occupation pro- 
duced the noun de factos, used repeatedly by 
Secretary of State Warren Christopher. In a White 
House briefing on Sept. 18. he referred to “factors 
that conjoined to convince the de factos that the 
time had come for them definitely to go" and “it 
became apparent to the die factos that they were 
going to be taken out in other ways." 

This was taken from the Latin words for “in 
fact,” often contrasted to de jure, “in law." The 
two Latin phrases became familiar to most Ameri- 
cans in the '60s to describe forms of segregation in 
education, when de jure segregation was struck 
down while de facto segregation was still tolerated, 
not deliberate^ caused by public policy. De jure 
can be used pqorativdy, to mean “m name only”: 
A slashing vitaperator in Washington often tided 
Janet Reno “attorney general de jure, ” suggesting 
that her then-deputy. Friend of Bill Webster Hub- 
bell, was attorney general de facto. 

In the Haitian case, Christopher, after a thou- 
sand mentions of the Raoul Cfcdrasjunta as “the 
de facto government,” began shorthanding his 
reference by calling the generals “the de factos .” 


Another old word leaped into vogue during 
the buff-puff period: “The American military 
will make quick work of Haiti’s ragtag army," 
Jim Hoagland wrote in The Washington Post. 
The Economist agreed: "America’s 20,000 
troops . . . can make short work of the r aggie - 
toggle Haitian forces on shore.” 

The expression began as tag and rag in the 16th 
century; the rags conjured an image of motley, a 
woolen fabric of mixed colors worn by jesters; 
hence, ragtag became “a motley, or variegated, 
crowd of misfits." By the 1820s, it evolved in the 
world of politics as rapag and bobtail, an aristo- 
crat's contemptuous term for “rabble.” As a 
rhyming modifier, ragtag is being used outside of 
Haiti discussions. Asked on “60 Minutes" last 
month about his inner-city childhood, Kweisi 
Mfume, the Maryland representative who is 
chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, 
said: “I was a ragtag kid in the streets ” 

A snippet of bureaucratese also made its way 
to the forefront. Asked whether high-level emis- 
saries were on their way to the junta. Dee Dee 
Myers, the White House press secretary, noted 


Net* York Times Service 



models at all times: What to drafter pinway star- 
dom? In the 1950 s, a model had to catch her man. In 

the 1960’s, models marched to a feminist beat and 
began to make careers of their own. 

Today's so-called supermoctetsare a new breed, 
“Everyone is individual and hasher own persona," 
says Campbell “No one tries to emulate the other. 
We are all different.” > -i V-.-. » 

Although some of personalities in Swan are as 
thinly veiled as Campbdl in a see-through dress, 
fellow models have not seen tbeivRei as a roman a 
clef. ' ■ ■■■ _ 


Jacket photo for CampbelPs novel “Swan/ 


“It's a fantasy about someone getting killed^ says 
Campbell although (he real denouement is about 
who will be the race to inherit from Swan a big 
money contract with a beauty house. 

That route off the podium is the lucrative cosmet- 
ic contracts that have gone to her fellow model and 
close friend Christy Turlington. A black face is not 
one to launch a thousand lipsticks. 

“Swan" flickers to Ufe with the camaderict that 
exists between models. “In the real world* we work 
really hard — we are not partying aB the time." 
Campbell claims. "For the shows, we are na the road 
for a month. For Kate [Moss], Christy and T it 
becomes a maternal type of riling. We make a 
family.” 

A more perceptive novel has yet to be written 
about supennodel stardom. About looking into a 
mirror at a face which has appeared .on more“ maga- 
zine covers than Princess Diana — and spotting the 
first hairline cracks in tire facade. About the Sunset 
Boulevard despair at 30 as a change of image and 
hair color cannot stop a model slipping inexorably 
over the hifi. 


claimed it had fired her because she had gotten too 
big for her thigh-high boots. She insisted that it was 
ajflted agent’s pique because she had quit, and now 
says that she finds it “undignified" to discuss the 
episode. She calls her London agent “Mom.” Her 
pretematurally youthful mother, Valerie, whose in- 
put in Campbell's childhood was limi ted to sending 
her to stage school, has now followed in her famous 
daughter’s high-heeled footsteps and taken to mod- 
eling herself. 


Although Campdl will be stalking a few of the 
Paris runways as the shows open Monday (“all Karl 
Lagerfeld’s shows”), her priority now is to go back to 
the theater and performing arts training. She has just 
released her first album, launched last month with a 
European capital-dty-a-day publicity tour. She de- 
scribes “Love and Tears” (which has yet to make the 
charts) as an attempt to express in lyrics the pain 
and pleasure, the mistakes and the roller-coaster 
emotions of her life. Campbell is 24. 


Designers claim to want to show mature women 
oat the runway, from Lauren Hutton at. Calvin. 
Klein to Isabella Rossellini camping it up ou the 
runways last week in Milan. The silence of the 
camera shutters when the golden oldies are sent out 
is testimony to the truth that fashion's image is of 
youth. 

On the runway, Campbell is a mesmerizing pres- 
ence, her panther-like walk and voluptuous- bps a 
symbol of animal sexual power. When she travels, 
she says, her teddy goes with her in her bags, along 
with scented candles and things to make hotel rooms 
home away from home. 

In New York, sbe fantasizes about Engla n d, espe- 
cially its comforting nursery foods. She recites a 
litany of British products she carries across the 
Atlantic to give reflow Brits a nostalgic Sunday 
lunch: “Pork sausages, steak and kidney pie, mint 


jelly, spotted dick pudding, custard.” 

fa front of her. Lunch lies untouched, except for a 
few sips of ginger beer. It takes discipline, dnve and 
more street-smart savvy than you might think for a 
swan to stay in the swim. And courage lb try to 
stretch the wings. 


And that is the point For at an age Mien most 
women are in full flower, a model perceives herself 
as a fa ding bloom. Campbell's dile mma is that of all 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Alpne 

AmuB'dam 

Arkan 

Aflwro 


Budacan 

Coconftagen 

Cotta Det Sol 

Dublin 

MnOurgn 

RonmCD 

FranVfurt 

Gone*] 

Heeo* 

lainaii 
Ln Palmas 
Ltefcan 
LorAor 
Madrid 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
22Vi 1752 
77/62 9/48 

28 IK >3/55 
25/77 19*6 
21/70 16*4 
10/BI 5«t 

12*53 4 m 

1854 9/40 

1253 4/39 
11/52 6*43 

22/71 10/tK 
I8«4 0<4Q 

16*1 9/48 

23/73 10.90 
16*SJ S/41 

17*62 9/4fl 

1050 6«3 

22/71 16*01 
26/79 20/BB 
20*60 16*1 
1M« 11*52 
tame 12/93 
22*71 10/60 
15/58 7.44 

I8/&1 409 

23*73 14/97 
11/52 1/34 

2008 19-66 
20/68 12 53 
11/52 409 



Today 
Mgh Yjc*. 
OF OF 


In U.S. Operating Rooms, It’s Scalpel! Sutures! Music! 


Banglic* 

Hong Kong 
Man*a 
New Dei fi 
Seem 

Shanghai 

Tj*o, 

T<*vo 


VITS 25/77 
1956 12.53 
x>m 24/79 
32-09 23-73 
36/97 1854 
24/76 14 57 
22/71 10.54 
31*88 21/70 
27/80 21/70 
24/75 1//W 


I llnsoasaraMy 
Com 


North America 

Setilecf. dry nealhdr will 
reach tram the Great Lakes 
in the USA and Canada to 
the Northeastern slates. 
Stormy weather may hit 
Atlantic Canada. Downpours 
will soak Florida and the 
nearby Southeast CaUomla 
wil be dry: Seattle and Van- 
couver nil have some ran. 


St Pot*fS&*g 

StaAhdm 

Strasbourg 

Tallinn 

Voneo 

Vienna 

Wotkm 

Zwcn 


6-51 2/35 

25/77 9/48 


Europe 

Lmle or no rain and ample 
sunshine is in store tor the 
heart ol Europe reaching 
Irom Britain and nonhem 
France to Italy. Austria and 
western Germany Tuesday 
will be rainy in Catalonia. 
Spain. A storm with wind and 
rain will sweep over the 
Scandinavia peninsula 
beaming midweek 


Asia 

Typhcon Seth wil shape the 
weather Irom east China to 
southwestern Japan and 
southern Korea Winds will 
weaken, but heavy /an may 
be widespread along Seth's 
path. Showers will dampen 
Taiwan; Tokyo will have 
some ram. A downpour may 
wet Hong Kong. Singapore 
and Jakarta. 


«9«n 
Cjpr Town 


23/73 20*88 1 23*73 1 9. 58 I 

1651 7144 * 12*53 7/44 t, 


CjtsJbbna 23.73 15*59 pc 24/76 17.12 PC 


2058 0/48 pc 22.71 0*48 pr 

31/88 23/71 pc 29-54 2475 I 
28/82 12/53 pe 28*82 12*53 PC 
2750 16*1 c 27*80 17*62 » 


North America 


1253 7*44 

1050 5/41 


Middle East 


Latin America 


1956 7/44 

11*52 8*43 


21/70 11*52 
10/50 3/37 

o/40 2.3S 

16151 7*44 


Oceania 


HtB» Low W High Low W 

C/F C/F OP OF 

2&/H2 23/73 PC 29/84 22/71 » 

20*82 21*70 tfi 30*86 1950 i 

26/79 17*82 pc 30/86 1752 l 

26/79 20.58 pc 2054 1956 t 

32/89 23/73 pc 38/100 1054 1 
3301 19/66 9 30/37 1752 5 


1651 9*48 oh 10 64 9<48 pc 

27/BO 13*95 ■ Cl/70 10/50 pc 


legend: a-ourmy. pc-po/By cloudy. c-doudy, I 
an-snow. Mco. W-Waather. AS maps, forecasts 


Today Tomorrow 

Hlqli Low W High Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

Buenos Alios 1958 1651 1 21/70 12/53 pc 

Caracas 31-88 26/79 * 3259 26/79 pc 

Una 21/70 1651 pc 21.70 1851 pc 

MoocoCKy 10/64 9/48 S n 2058 9!*e pc 

FtodeJangko 3258 1956 s 2954 27/70 pc 

96T8S90 21170 9«e C 1054 7.'*4 t 

wwem, Kh 4 da Mum a . r-mm. at-anow fcrrles- 
•rid doto provided by Accu-Weather. he *U 1984 


Andtorage 

Aaanta 

Boston 

Chcago 

Omw 

DettcU 

Honotuki 

Houston 

Los Angeles 


By Carol Lawson 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — “Heartbreak Hotel" is 
on the radio, and Dr. Roy M. Schoen 
is ready to perform a hysterectomy. 

Schoen, a Manhattan gynecologist and 
an attending physician at Lenox Hill Hos- 
pital here, firmly believes that hummable 
tunes are as essential as sutures in the 
operating room. “Music is relaxing.” says 
the doctor, a self-described “older guy” 
who likes to listen to the rock ’n’ roll of his 
youth when he operates. “It relieves a lot 
of pressures and makes things seem easier. 
Sometimes I hum along." 

Many other surgeons, while claiming to 
refrain from humming, agree that music is 


These surgeons' faith in music was bol- 
stered recently by the results of a study 
published in The Journal of the American 
Medical Association. The study concluded 
that surgeons were likely to do a better job 
when working to the accompaniment of 
music they liked. The 50 doctors tested had 
lower blood pressure and pulse rates and 
performed better on nonsurgical mental 
exercises while listening to their favorite 
musical selections. 


“I totally agree with the study," said Dr. 
Frank P. Cammisa Jr„ an attending spinal 
suigeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery 
in Manhattan. “I play music all the time. It 
relaxes me. I do very delicate work, and I 
concentrate better when I'm relaxed." 


to operate to Mozart or jazz, estimates that 
about half of his colleagues play music 
during surgery. . 

Some surgeons say that opinions for and 
against music in the operating room reflect 
a generation gap in their profession. Dr. 
Howard L. Beaton, the chief of surgery at 
New York Downtown Hospital in Man- 
hattan, said that for a long time-his previ- 
ous hospital had a no-music policy. “The 
chief of surgery felt music was distract- 
ing," Beaton said. “That was an older way 
of thinking. The policy gradually changed 
as more young surgeons came along and 
wanted music." 


n * Hi 


Street 


an occupational asset. In operating rooms 
across tne United States, surgeons are let- 


Wnwwtl 

Mertrem 


across the United States, surgeons are let- 
ting loose with varying musical tastes. 


They are replacing the mechanical beep- 
beep-beep, long the standard sound of 
surgery, with Elvis Presley, Mozart, the 
Beatles. Beethoven, jazz, country-western 
and even heavy metal. 


Toronto 

Wasninfron 


But for many other surgeons, arguments 
for the virtues of music fall on deaf ears. 
“Some surgeons would die if they had one 
distracting noise in the operating room” 
said Dr. Ronald C. MerreU, a general and 
endocrine suigeon and chairman of the 
department of surgery at the Yale Univer- 
sity School of Medicine. MerreU, who likes 


Wisoff considers music to be soothing; 
for patients as they are being put under 
anesthesia, so he asks for special requests 
as they are wheeled into the operating 


> \ - \ 


room. But Schoen sees no point in inquir- 
ing about the musical preferences of his. 


patients moments before they go under the 
knife. “Most of them come into die onerat- 


knife. “Most of them come into the operat- 
ing room so nervous that they are not even 
aware there is music," he said. 



, .... .TF, . . , 



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Your flight's boarding. 


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NORWAY 800-100-11 

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ROMANIA .01-800-4285 

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SWITZERLAND* . . 155-00-11 


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MIDDLE EAST 

BAHRAIN 000401 

CYPRUS* ..-.0M-90010 

EGYPT* (CAIRO) 1 .510-0280 

ISRAEL 177-100-2727 

KUWAIT 000-288 

LEBANON (BBRUT) 1 .- 428-801 

SAUDI ARABIA. 1400-10 

TURKEY* ffl-800-12277 

U. ARAB EMMIES*. 800-121 


AMERICAS 

ARGBUINA*. .. . .001-800-200-1111 

BOLIVIA*- 0-800-1112 

BRAZIL 808-8010 

CANADA I-800-575-Z222 

CHILE. 005-0312 

COLOMBIA 980-11-0010 

a SALVADOR*.. .180 

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KENYA* oaa-io 

LIBERIA 797-797 

SOUTH AFRICA ... 0-800-90-0123 


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