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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



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Paris, Wednesday, October 12, 1994 


No. 34,717 


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Russia Vows to Prop Plunging Ruble 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

Yew York Tinea Service 

MOSCOW — With its credibility and 
its hopes for economic stability increas- 
ingly on the line, the Russian govern- 


ment said Tuesday night that it° would 
in to bolster the value of its plunging 


step 

currency. 

After watching passively as the ruble’s 
monthlong decline turned into a near 


rout Tuesday — the currency lost more 
me-fifth 


than one- fifth of its value — die govern- 
ment reasserted its determinating to 
keep inflation under control and prom- 
ised to try to calm the financial markets. 

The dive in the ruble was largely the 
result of currency speculators selling 
waves of rabies rather than any funda- 
mental change in Russia’s underlying 
economic condition. 


But it came amid questions about the 
govemxneni's ability to continue a tricky 
economic balancing act: between reduc- 
ing inflation and government spending 
by reining in subsidies to ailing factories, 
mines and farms, and avoiding wide- 
spread unemployment and potential po- 
litical and social unrest that such cuts 
could bring. 

The plunge in the ruble increases the 
threat of inflation, primarily by making 
imported goods more expensive. Infla- 
tion had fallen to less than S percent a 
month over the summer, but has since 
risen to around 8 percent a month. 

In its announcement Tuesday night, 
the government said it intends to pass a 
budget for 199S that wQl be anti-infla- 
tionary. 


The rise in inflation was the initial 
impetus for currency dealers to sell ru- 
bles and buy dollars. But the ruble's 
sharp decline over the past few days has 
had more to do with me central hank's 
decision not to sell its reserves of dollars 
to buy rubles and prop up the Russian 
currency’s value. Seeing that the central 
bank would not act, speculators sold 
rubles Tuesday and bought dollars with 
abandon, knowing there was almost 
nothing to check the ruble's decline. 

In an attempt to end the ruble’s 


plunge, the government said the central 
bank would begi 


begin buying rubles more 
lv. It also said it 


actively on Wednesday, 
would increase short-term interest rates, 
to 170 percent from 130 percent, to make 


See RUBLE, Page 6 



■pa 

DoDasMTibie 


U.S, Wants Weapons Ban 
For Zone in Southern Iraq 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

TmemaUanai Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Sensing an Iraqi 
retreat, the United States argued Tuesday 
for a demilitarized zone inside southern 
Iraq to prevent Baghdad from threatening 


Pentagon at approaching 80,000 — had 
withdrawn by early Tuesday. 


In addition, the news agency Reuters 
said one of its reporters had seen large 


numbers of lop-grade Iraqi armor moving 


its neighbors and p inning down U.S. 
’ /, inaefu 


troops in a costly, indefinite deployment. 

American officials, meantime, escalated 
their threats against the government of 
President Saddam Hussein, repeating pub- 
licly that the United States was consider- 
ing a preemptive strike to destroy or dam- 
age Iraq's military force near its border 
with Kuwait. 

Baghdad said Monday that it was pull- 
ing back its troops near Kuwait At mid- 
day Tuesday — dusk in Iraq — the chair- 
man of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
General John M. Shalikashvili, said the 
latest U.S. intelligence showed that Iraqi 


troops were breaking camp but had not yet 
from XuwaiL 


turned north, away 
“I am not at all prepared to say yet that 
the crisis is over in any way,” the general 
said aL a briefing. The American buildup 
will continue; be added. 


Iraqi officials had insisted in Baghdad, 
ewYc' 


New York and Washington that their de- 
ployment near Kuwait had ended and that 
nearly all those forces — estimated by the 


northward Tuesday. While some 
tanks were moving southward, Reuters 
said, the majority were headed away from 
the Kuwaiti border. 

President Bill Clinton, on a trip to Mich- 
igan, said that he was “hopeful” that Iraqi 
troops were withdrawing but that it was 
too soon to reach a final conclusion. 

An Iraqi official said Russian and Chi- 
nese military attach 6s had been escorted to 
the southern city of Basra to confirm the 
withdrawal The Russian president, Boris 
N. Yeltsin, sent a diplomatic team to Iraq 
and Kuwait 

General Shalikashvili said that 19,000 
U.S. troops were in the Gulf, that 44,500 
more were on their way and that 156,000 
others wear on alert. He said 12 U.S. war- 
ships and five allied warships were in the 
region and that 21 others were on the way. 
In addition, he said, 200 U.S. warplanes 
and 52 allied warplanes were in the Gulf, 
467 more were being deployed and 196 
others were on alert 

In a further sign of U.S. pressure, the 
chief U.S. delegate at the Umted Nations, 


Madeleine K. Albright said that Mr. Sad- 
dam had “absolutely” killed any possibili- 
ty that the United Nations would e-ise 
sanctions on Iraq while he remained in 
power. “The sanctions resolutions are 
based on verifying credibility,” she said, 
“and when somebody lies, it is very hard to 
make that point ” 

The removal of sanctions, and UN ap- 
proval to sell oil, has been Iraq's most 
critical diplomatic goal since the end of the 

n,.7f Wo. 1 


Gulf War. Nizar Hamdoon, Iraq’s delegate 
it lr 


at the UN, said Tuesday thailraq would 
continue to “fight diplomatically" to show 
that the Iraqis were starving because of the 
sanctions. 


From all appearances, U.S. policymak- 
ers have decided * 


! that the crisis provides an 
opportunity to tighten the economic and 
military noose around the Iraqi regime in 
the hope of achieving a long-held U.S. 
goal the overthrow of Mr. Saddam. 

The U.S. diplomatic effort to create a 
new demilitarized zone was to be pursued 
later Tuesday at a meeting of the five 
permanent members of the UN Security 
Council in New York. 

tissuestobe 
: caution- 


“It’s obviously one of the big issi 
discussed," a U.S. aide said, while i 

See IRAQ, Page 7 


Officials Hedge on First- Strike Option 


Akuinkr A-ndanicfKnlMVTlK AukuioJ Prc» 

infftw a Moscow street Tuesday as the^ Russian currency lost more than a fifth of its value. 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — If Iraqi forces seemed on the 
point of attacking Kuwait, would the Unit- 
ed States launch a preemptive military 
strike? Could an attack on Iraq convince 
Saddam Hu&sein of the weakness of his 
position and deter war? 

Washington has been deliberately am- 
biguous about this possibility, publicly 
leaving the impression that the United 
States considers it an option. 

Realistically, however, the idea is a non- 
starter for the Clinton administration, ac- 
cording to U.S. and European officials. 
Although they declined to say anything 
that might inhibit U.S. action, they made 
dear Tuesday their belief that U.S. rein- 
forcements could defend Kuwait at this 
juncture without firing the first shoL ' 

“I’ve heard it discussed.” a Pentagon 


source said, “but I think this administra- 
tion's instincts drive it the other way. to- 
ward a more cautious treatment of any 
crisis." 

While easy enough militarily, a preemp- 
tive strike could expose the United States 
to accusations of starting a war unneces- 
sarily. 

Even such an unpopular regime as 
Baghdad’s might manage to exploit a U.S. 
initiative to weaken international support 
for United Nations sanctions on Iraq. 

“It might actually play into Saddam's 
hands.” a French official said, “because it 


rary respite unless U.S. troops were willing 
to cross the border and seize Iraqi territo- 
ry- 

Israel has created such a security zone 


along its northern border, using surrogate 

se. But 



by 

mg on sanctions.” 

-• By striking first. *fcr Clinton administra- 
tion could hope to minimize American 
casualties. But it would only offer tempo- 


forces of anti-Palestinian Lebanese, 
Washington has shown no inclination to 
create a similar area in Iraq by, for exam- 
ple, arming Iraqi opposition forces to op- 
erate from (he zone in an effort to topple 
the regime. 

A U.S. preemptive strike would almost 
certainly be limited to bombing raids on 
Iraqi military installations, probably head- 
quarters in southern Iraq, to disrupt any 
offensive. 

Alternatively, the United Stales could 
use Stealth aircraft or missiles to destroy 
command bunkers in Baghdad, communi- 


See STRIKE, Page 6 


Wall Street Bolts Higher on Good Corporate Earnings 


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. By.Lawreace Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW .YORK — After a month in the 
doldrums,- the stock market turned up 
sharply Tuesday on good news from the 
real woridof business. 

Good earnings reports and forecasts 
from companies that make products rang- 
ing from soap to microchips helped push 
the Dow Jones industrial average up 55-51 
points, its single biggest jump since Sept 
15. The average finished at 3,876.83. 

The gain in the overall market came 
from big-name companies that have reor- 


ganized their operations to profit from the 
economic upswing. 

• Procter & Gamble stock reached a 
record high after the consumer-products 
company said it expected to record record 
sales and earnings for its first quarter. 

• Chrysler Corp. shares gained after the 
company said higher sales and lower cus- 
tomer rebates contributed to a 54 percent 
rise in third-quarter profit. 

• PepsiCo said its third-quarter earn- 
ings rose 18 percent on strong overseas 
sales. The gam was higher than analysts 
expected, and the company's stock rose. 

Since these companies are multination- 



als, their earnings were helped by an eco- 
nomic recovery in Europe that has been 
stronger than economists expected. 


The general economic and financial out- 
look also cleared the way. Worries about 
higher interest rates, which had driven the 
market down in recent weeks, receded U.S. 
employment figures released Last Friday 
indicated that wage inflation was under 
control. 

This is expected to be confirmed on the 
price side by what are expected to be 
modest wholesale and retail inflation fig- 
ures due out Thursday and Friday. 

Receding inflation fears helped the 
bond market, which in turn helped stocks. 
Long-term Treasury bond yields, which 
See MARKET, Page 12 


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ll.sti' 


Kiosk 


Israel Suspends 
Talks With PLO 


JERUSALEM (Reuters) — Israel 
smpended peace talks with the Pales- 
tine -Liberation Organization in Cairo 

of an 


CEL, 


Israeli soldier by the Islamic mOitant 
1 st 


group Hamas, Israeli radio said. 

The radio said the head of the Israe- 
li .delegation, Major General Danny 
Rothschild, had been recalled to Israel 
forconsultations. 

Earlier, Prime Minister Yi tzhak Ra- 
bin ordered that . the autonomous 
Gaza Strip be sealed off until further 
notice. He said the PLO chairman, 
Yasser Arafat, bore responsibility for 
the fete of the soldier. Nachshon 
Waxsman, 20. 


Book Review 

Crossword 


. Page 7. 
Page 21. 


Nobel Panelist Objects to Prize for Arafat 

PLO Chairman Would Share ike Peace Award With Rabin 


By John Darn ton 

Hew York Times Service 

LONDON — The Nobd committee has 
decided to award the Peace Prize this year 
to Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel 
and the PLO chairman, Yasser Arafat, but 
the decision has stirred dissent, with one 
committee member threatening to resign. 

The report of the decision first appeared 
in the Norwegian daily newspaper Aften- 
posten on Tuesday and was later con- 
firmed by people familiar with the normal- 
ly secretive deliberations of the five- 
member committee. 

The sources said that the committee had 
decided early on to recognize the peace 
accord between Israel and the Palestine 
Liberation Organization, which was 
reached in September 1993. The only ques- 
tion was who should receive the prize. 

The committee debated the issue for two 


months, since one committee member, 


Kaare Kristiansen, a longtime supporter of 

i Mr. Arafat, 


Israel objected strenuously to 
regarding him as someone who had es- 
poused terrorism. 

The committee considered giving the 
prize, worth 5950,000. to Foreign Minister 
Simon Peres of Israel and a PLO subordi- 
nate of Mr. Arafat’s or, at another point, to 
“technicians’’ who had negotiated the out- 
line of the agreement during secret talks in 
Norway. 

But last Friday, the committee reverted 
to its original position and decided to give 
it to the two leaders who signed the agree- 
ment and shook hands in the White House 


Rose Garden on Sept. 13, 1993. 
m declare 


Mr. Kristiansen declared that he would 
it the committee in protest shortly after 
ie award was announced Friday in Oslo, 
according to Aftenposten. 


qrn 

the 


Reached by telephone at home, Mr. 
Kristiansen refused to comment on the 
report, saying that to do so would be 
violating the Nobd committee statutes, 
which rail for complete secrecy on the 
selection of candidates and the awarding 
of the prize. 

Journalists and others in Oslo said Tues- 
day that the committee might well hold 
another meeting before Friday to re-exam- 
ine its decision. 

The accord between Israel and the PLO 
reversed four decades of hostility in the 
Middle East 

The agreement called for Palestinian 
self-rule to begin in the Gaza Strip and the 
West Bank city of Jericho as an interim 
measure before a settlement within five 
years on the status of the territories cap- 


See NOBEL, Page 2 


in 


For Germany’s Bomb Hunters , World War U Lives On 


}). bn"- ' 

•• - 

'Hunt r-*' ~ 

yr 


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1 


; By Rick. Atkinson 

Washington Post Service 

BERLIN — Peter Harvey, a cheerful 
maff looking for trouble, was explaining 
the odds of folding it 
*Tf 100,000 bombs were dropped on 
Beriin.toward the end of the war. at least 
IQ percent didn’t go off," he said. "So 
wtfre tailring about 10,000 unexploded 
bombsburied in the city. Only 2,000 have 


been found since 1945; statistically speak- 
ing, there could be 8,000 bombs still here." 
Mr. Harvey’s ruminations were inter- 


rupted J>y an abnyt^shout from his work 





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crew. Trouble had been found. Stowing 
their metal detectors, the workers gingerly 
dug beneath the grassy surface of Berlin's 
vast central park, tin; Tjergarten. When the 
hole was a meter deep, the rusty snout of 
an 80mm Soviet mortar round protruded 
through the dirt 

Die shell probably a dud from the last 
desperate battle around the Reichstag in 
May 1945, was gingerly hoisted from the 
hole and laid aside for later retrieval by the 
police bomb squad. 

Although it was not one of the thou- 
sands of-unexploded munitions dropped a 
half-century ago from Allied airplanes — 
Kke the 225-Jologram (500-poun<p U.S. 
bomb that killed 3 workmen and irqured 
17 other Berliners last month— the mortar 


shell was a reminder that Germany some- 
times seems to be one big powder keg. 

No one knows with certainly how much 
World War II ordnance remains buried in 
Germany. 

One official with the city’s Munitions 
Disposal Service estimates that in Berlin 
alone than are still 15,000 explosive de- 
vices, including artillery and mortar shells, 
hand grenades and 3,000 bombs, Others 
say the number could be much higher. 

While time and corrosion defuse some 
munitions, others become more unstable. 

Almost daily, something explosive is 
found somewhere in Germany. In late Au- 
gust, police cordoned off several blocks in 
the ancient city of Trier after an unexplod- 
ed bomb was found sear the cathedral In 
Kleve, near the Dutch border, the town 
center was evacuated Sept. 17 after work- 
men discovered a British bomb with add 
leaking from its detonator. And 10,000 


residents were herded from the port city of 


n tne por 

WHhelmshaven on Sept. 21 after a 450- 
kilogram bomb was unearthed at a con- 
struction site. 

On the former border between the two 
German ys, search teams use tractors to 
look for several thousand land mines still 
unaccounted for out of the 1.3 million 
sown by tire Communist regime. 

But it is the big bombs hidden under big 
cities that excite the most concern. 


There has been a renewed sense of ur- 
gency since Sept. IS, when construction 
workers unwittingly bored into the detona- 
tor of a bomb buried beneath a site on 
Petenkofer Street in eastern Berlin. "The 
biggest explosion since the war,” as one 
newspaper put it, demolished parked cars 
and an apartment building, wounded 20 


See BOMBS, Page 6 



^siSiv 

Gtottes Schneider/ Agcncc FnwTnuc 

Jijrg Haider, whose party woo 22.6 percent of the vote on Sunday. 


Austria’s Man in a Hurry 

Rightist Hopes to Get Top Job by -96 


By Alan Friedman 

Intanatumri Herald Tribune 


VIENNA — The leader of Austria’s 
extreme right Freedom Party, which on 
Sunday won a stunning 22.6 percent of 
the national vote, predicted Tuesday 
that he could be chancellor within “a 
year or two.” 


The far-right leader, JOrg Haider, a 
rid he expected 


millionaire populist, said 
Chancellor Franz Vranitzky’s govern- 
ing coalition would collapse within one 
to two years under the weight of what 
he termed its “bankrupt policies," pav- 
ing the way for him to lead a new 
government. 

Mr. Haider also said in an interview 
that he expected a pan of the conserva- 
tive Austrian People's Party to break 
away from the governing coalition and 


vote with his party on several issues, 
forcing new general elections in less 
than two years. Even if this does not 
happen, Mr. Haider said: “I am sure 
that I will be the chancellor by 1998." 

In any event, Mr. Haider, 44, said his 
party would use its newfound power to 
put pressure on the Vranitzky govern- 
ment to renegotiate some of the terms 
of Austria's imminent member shi p in 


the European Union. He rejected criti 
cism of his p * 


party from Jaqucs San ter, 
— -an Commission presi- 
! should tiy to meet me 


the next European Commission presi- 
dent, saying “be she “ * 


before slating on the basis of hearsay 
what he thinks." 


Mr. Haider’s fervent anti-foreigner 
rhetoric and his ability to play upon the 
public's fears over unemployment have 

See AUSTRIA, Page 6 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


Kohl’s Fate Hinges on How Well Tiny Party Performs 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Craig R. Whitney 

Afar York Times Service 

BERLIN — For ihe 60 million Ger- 
mans eligible to vote Sunday in the 
national election, the issues boil down 
simply to this: Do they want four more 
years of the same under the 12-year- 
old coalition government of Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl, the front-runner, or 
has the tune come for a change? 

With less than a week to go. public 
opinion polls are not much help in 
predicting the answer. 

If it depended only on Mr. Kohl and 
his Christian Democratic alliance, the 
polls agree, he would defeat the Social 
Democrats and their candidate, Ru- 
dolf Scharping, and leave them in op- 
position for another four years. 

“We have good prospects, but the 
election isn't over yet," Mr. Kohl 
warns his supporters, flying by govern- 
ment helicopter to rally after rally — 
II of them last week alone. “We 
haven't got a vote to lose ox to give 
away." 

The two latest polls, taken for the 


weeklies Die Zeit and Der Spiegel in 
the last week of September and the 
first week of October, predict that the 
Christian Democrats will win 42 per- 
cent of the vote, down from 43.8 per- 
cent in 1990 and well short of the 50 
percent they would need to govern 
alone. 


If that turns out to be right, Mr. 
Kohl’s fate could depend on how his 
junior coalition partner. Foreign Min- 
ister Klaus Kinkel’s tiny Free Demo- 
cratic Party, does. 

So far this year, it has not done well 
at all in votes for five state elections 
and the European Parliament, falling 
short of the 5 percent needed to win 
seats in each one. 


Only one poll, a few weeks ago, 
forecast that the Free Democrats 
would not make it into the notional 
Parliament. If they do not, however, 
the only way for the Christian Demo- 
crats to hold on to power might be to 
join forces with the Social Democratic 
opposition in a grand coalition like the 
one from 1966 to 1969. 


That one paved the way for Willy 
Brandt to become the first postwar 
Social Democratic chancellor, and 
those who know Mr. Kohl say he 
would rather resign than accept the 
humiliation of a new grand coalition. 

If Mr. Scharping wins enough votes, 
he could conceivably form a coalition 
with the Greens, the environmentalist 
party, and send the Christian Demo- 
crats into opposition. 

Mr. Kohl and his current coalition 
partner say that none of this will bap- 
pen. 

“Well get way over 5 percent in the 
national election, don’t worry." Mr. 
Kinkel said at a campaign appearance’ 
in Berlin on Saturday. But privately he 
and his advisers can give only one 
reason why they think so: because the 
Free Democrats always made it into 
Parliament in the pasL 

But that was in West Germany, 
when the country was still divided and 
the party was clearly identified with a 
cautious foreign policy of nonconfron- 
tation with the Communist countries 
to help the Germans who lived there. 


Many people on both sides of the Iron 
Curtain believed that this policy and 
its best-known exponent. Mr. Kinkel's 
predecessor, Hans-Dietrich Genscher. 
helped bring about the peaceful col- 
lapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. 

Mr. Genscher resigned two years 
ago, after leading the Free Democrats 
to 1 ljjercent of the vote in 1990. This 
year, the two latest public opinion 
polls predict, they may get 5 or 6 
percent. 

“I voted for them four years ago." 
said Volker Ebigt, 23, a student at the 
Free University in Berlin who came to 
bear Mr. Kinkel plead for support 
among the shoppers in Wittenberg 
Square, “but 1 wouldn’t do it again." 

Mr. Ebigt lives in DOsseidorf and 
has already filled out his absentee bal- 
lot, he said, for the Christian Demo- 
crats. "The Free Democrats made it 
impossible for Germany to make a 
contribution to the war in the Gulf in 
1991.” he said. 

Mr. Kinkel later went to East Berlin 
for a queslion-and-answer session at- 
tended by about 200 voters at the Frie- 


drich List school in Pankow. home to 
the first East German Communist gov- 
ernments after World War II, 


Berlusconi Accedes to 'Blind Trust’ 




With some passion, he assured his 
listeners in the eastern part of the 
country, where unemployment is 13.S 
percent, that he understood why many 
of them were so disappointed and re- 
sentful at the way reunification had 
destroyed the Communist economy 
that they might vote for the former 
Communists, the Party of Democratic 
Socialism. But he promised to keep 
wotting to make things better by help- 
ing local businesses if the government 
was re-elected. 


ROME (Combined Dispatches) — Prime - Minister Silvio Ber- 
lusconi pledged Tuesday to bow to plans for a “blind trust to 
administer his business affairs, as he signaled his intent to bridge 
widening rifts in his government coalition- . 

Mr. Berlusconi, who owns the Fininvest business empire, said 
he would accept proposals by three government advisers aimed at 
staving off politically damaging conflicts of interest between his 
public duties and business concerns. . 

“Although the plan is very harsh in relation to legislation 
existing in other countries, I think modifying it would not be 
opportune,” the prime minister said. “It will be up to the sovereign 
Parliament to decide” the proposals’ fate. (AFP) 




I Iraq 


L f **** 


“If you vote for them,’ Mr. Schaip- 
ing said at rallies in East Germany, 
referring to the forma Communists, 
“you’re voting against a change in gov- 
ernment. If you cast a protest vote out 
of frustration, you’ll just end up with 
four more years of frustration.” 

The extreme-right Republicans, in 
disarray after a series of state election 
disasters in recent months, are not ex- 
pected to get into Parliament this year. 


Serb Chief 
In Bosnia 
Threatens 
To Evict UN 








Right Wing Assails Major at Meeting 

BOURNEMOUTH, England (Reuters) — Bitter divisions 
within Britain’s governing Conservative Party burst into th eopen 
on Tuesday with a fierce onslaught by right-wingers on Prime 
Minister John Major’s policy toward Europe. 

Nor man Lamont, dismissed as chancellor of the Exchequer in 
May 1993, stunned the first day of the Conservatives' annual 
conference by saying Britain was losing the fight against closer 
integration and might one day have to pull out of the European 
Union. Mr. Lamont's attack capped a fraught day for Major 
whose party, in power since 1979, is stuck more than 20 points 
behind the Labor party in opinion polls. M 

The four-day gathering began under a cloud of allegations or 
inflnca ooy edmim leveled against Margaret Thatcher s son, 
Mark, in connection with a huge arms deal his mother «roed with 

Saudi Arabia when she was prime minister in the mids 1980s. Lady 

Thatcher, upset by the controversy, looked pale and drawn when 
she took her place on the podium to muted applause - from 
delegates who once cheered her every word. 


4. -it ha£ 




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Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — Bosnian Serbs threat- 
ened to evict UN troops from 
their territory Tuesday in an 
escalation of their psychologi- 
cal war with the United Na- 
tions. 

The Bosnian Serbian leader. 


Radovan Karadzic, made the 
threat to the Belgrade daily 
Borba after a chill in relations 
with the United Nations since a 
NATO air strike, a Muslim at- 
tack that left 20 Serbs dead and 
the imposition of a Yugoslav 
militar y embargo. 

The move would cripple UN 
aid and peacekeeping opera- 
tions in support of Muslim 
communities surrounded in the 
70 percent of Bosnian territory 
under Serbian military control. 

Mr. Karadzic, under interna- 
tional pressure as a result of the 
Serbs’ rejection of a Big Power 
peace plan, accused the United 
Nations and its peacekeeping 
force in Bosnia of a pro-Muslim 
bias. 

“We are nearer to a decision 
to demand that the United Na- 
tions Protection Force leave our 
country,” he told Borba. 

“We are now even firmer in 
our conviction that Unprofor 
must leave,” he said. “It has 
protected the Muslims from to- 
tal defeat Our highest forums 
will soon hold a session at 
which the final decision will be 
taken on an eventual withdraw- 
al” 

The Bosnian Serbian threat 
could turn the current turmoil 
in UN aid activities into a ca- 
tastrophe with winter closing in 
on besieged Muslim communi- 
ties by halting all road convoys. 

It would provoke a confron- 
tation with the United Nations 
over the enforcement of the 
peacekeepers' mandate to pro- 
tect Muslim safe havens. 



Kim Jong II Misses Dedication Event 

SEOUL (AFP) — North Korea's president-designate, Kim 
Jong n, missed a much-heralded ceremony on Tuesday, leaving 
analysts to wonder whether he would appear at ceremonies this 
weekend to marie 100 days since the death of his father, Kim It 
Sung. 

Mr. Kim, who has not been seen in public for 83 days, and 
Defense Minister O fin U, were absent from the list of those who 
a ttended the ceremony for the inauguration of the tomb of 
Tangun, Korea’s legendary founding father. 

“It is something unexpected that Kim Jong II missed the event,” 
an official at the Unification Ministry here said. The official 
added that the completion of the tomb had been a pet project of 
the late president- 


Rnhcn Polla/Rancn 


ALL FALL DOWN — Public housing towers in a suburb near Lyon 
crashing down Tuesday alter being dynamited. The apartment build- 


ings in VenissieuK, which were called “Les Minguettes” and construct- 
ed in file '60s, had become a symbol for French suburban deterioration. 


Exiled Bangladeshi Sets French Visit 

PARIS (Reuters) — Organizers of Taslima Nasrin’s canceled 
visit to France said Tuesday that they were malting new plans for 
the exiled Bangladeshi writer to come to Paris for a weeklong stay 
around Nov. 23. 

They said Dr. Nasrin would request to stay about a week, and 
they were waiting for the French authorities to say how long she 
would be allowed to stay before establishing her schedule. Last 
week, she dropped plans to visit after the government limited her 
stay to 24 hours for security reasons. After an outcry. Foreign 


jailljKIIgll 

ujv lull I S Heje* 


Minister Alain Jupp6 retreated and said she would be welcome. 

Dr. Nasrin has been condemned to death by Muslim funda- 
mentalists in her country for criticizing Islam and for suggesting 
that the Koran would benefit from rewriting. ; 


A Game Tool Wins 3 Economists a Nobel 


Compiled by Our Surf From Dispatches these games, players have to 


STOCKHOLM — Three think ahead — devise a strategy 
economists who played a major based on expected counter- 

■ - j i - -i i r « n i c 


“The Nash equilibrium has widely accepted in economic 
become a standard tool in al- analysis and is even used when 


Skinheads Attack 
German Woman 


part in developing the study of moves,” the Royal Swedish 
games like chess or poker into a Academy of Sciences said in a 


most all areas of economic the- financial markets are seeking to 
oiy in order to improve our un- determine how a central bank 


vital tool for economic analysis, statement. “Such strategic in- 
were awarded the 1994 Nobel teraction also characterizes 


demanding of complex will behave. 

strategic interaction,” the acad- “Nash equilibrium has be- 


emy said. come a standard tool in almost 

The academy lauded Mr. all areas of economic theory.” 


Economics Prize on Tuesday, many economic situations, and 


come a standard tool in almost 


The three, who will share the S am « has J h . c . reforc 

$930,000 prize, were John C. proved to be very useful ineco- 

. * . . nnmi/* onohrcic 


Harsanyi both for showing how the academy said. 


H'^-'VfVVW tfVUAi v». _ 1 ■_ w 

Harsanyi, a retired professor nomjc anatyS 15 - 

from the University of Calif or- The researchers focused on a 


games of incomplete in forma- The economics prize is the 


tion can be analyzed and for second of six Nobel prizes to be 
“significant contributions to awarded this week for out- 


nia at Berkeley; John F. Nash, a formula in which players in 
mathematician at Princeton games — or executives in com- 


the foundations of welfare eco- standing achievements in medi- 


cine, economics, physics, chem- 


U Diversity, and Reinbard Sel- panies — received information 
ten of the University of Bonn, about each other’s positions to 


Mr. Selten, who co-authored istry, literature and peace. Two 
a book with Mr. Harsanyi on Americans won the medicine 


They refined the foundation * orm strateg* 65 - 
of game theory — discovered 50 It was borrowed in part from 


equilibrium selection in games, prize on Monday. 


was the first to refine the Nash The economist Oskar Mor- 


years ago — to be able to make the biological concept of natu- 
p redictions by devising stratc- ral selection. Their research has 


equilibrium concept and apply genstern and the mathemati- 
it to analyses of competition cian John von N eumann first 


gies based on unknown factors, been used in everything from 
Their work used strategies the study of environment to 


with only a few sellers, the adapted game theory for eco- 


UN sources said Mr. Karad- 
zic could be restrained from a 
total ban on the UN protection 
force by the need for UN hdp 
to feed his own civilians. 


applied in such games as chess an ^lysis of foreign trade and 
and poker to make predictions information, the statement said, 
about interactions in a variety Mr. Nash was singled out for 
of economic areas. what has become known as the 

“Everyone knows that in “Nash equilibrium.” 


academy said 

The Swedish academy, which 


nomics in 1939. The academy 
said Mr. Nash, Mr. Selten and 


has awarded the prizes since Mr. Harsanyi added invaluable 
1969, said the theory of equillb- refinements so that game theory 


rium analysis — the theory that could be applied to almo st any 
enables people to make skilled strategic decision, 
predictions — had become (AP, Reuters ) 


Compiled by Our Staff Frmrt Dispatches 

POTSDAM, Germany — A 
German woman was badly in- 
jured when she was thrown 
from a streetcar by skinheads 
after she had tried to stop them 
from robbing an elderly wom- 
an. the police said Tuesday. 

The injured woman, 34. had 
gone to the aid of an elderly 
woman whom three skinheads 
were attempting to rob. As she 
helped the old woman stand up 
to leave, the skinheads threw 
her from the streetcar. She was 
hospitalized with hip injuries 
after striking a pillar. 

A black African man was 
also attacked by skinheads on 
Monday, the police said, re- 
porting the latest acts of ex- 
tremist violence in East Ger- 
man cities. In Berlin, two 
skinheads were arrested for mo- 
lesting Tamil flower vendors 
and making the Hitler salute. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strike to Shut2 More Greek Sites 


ATHENS (AP) — A strike by Culture Ministry employees that 
has closed the Acropolis and its museum for a week will spread on 
Thursday to two more popular archaeological tourist sites. Cape 
Sounion and the palace of Knossos on Crete, a labor official said 
Tuesday. 

The ministry’s 6,000 employees are seeking higher pay and the 
establishment of a “self-help fund” that would come out of a 20 
percent increase in ticket prices. The strike will be indefinite and 
will spread throughout the country unless the demands are met. 
the official said. 

Cathay Pacific Airways, Qantas Airways and Thai Airways 
International announced Tuesday that they would match cuts m 
fust-class and business-class fares by Singapore Airlines to desti- 
nations from Singapore. Singapore Airlines said last week that it 


was cutting its first-class fares by 10 percent to 15 percent, alon 
with its SnkAir subsidiary. Business-class fares would be cut by 1 5 
percent to 20 percent Hie new rates take effect Sunday. (AFP) 


SAS will restore flints to Zagreb, Croatia, flying weekly from 
Cop enhagen , on Saturdays as of Nov. 5, the airline said Tuesday. 
It plans to use MD-087s seating 100 passengers, (Bloomberg) 
Malawi reported an outbreak of Mbonic plague Tuesday, fol- 
lowing outbreaks in Mozambique and Zimbabwe last week. (AFP) 


NOBEL: Arafat to Share Prize? 


Meanwhile, UN officials said 
that Serbs had expelled the last 
21 Muslims from a Bosnian vil- 
lage east of Sarajevo, continu- 
ing a program of “ethnic cleans- 
ing.” 

The Muslims from the village 
of Borati, near the town of Ro- 
aatica, were forced out of their 
homes at short notice on Mon- 
day evening, bused 60 kilome- 
ters (40 miles) to Sarajevo and 
ordered to cross the “Bridge of 
Brotherhood and Unity” into 
the Bosnian government sector 
of the city. (Reuters, AP) 


Continued from Page I 

tured by Israel during the 1967 
war. 


black majority in South Africa. 


But there had been specula- 
tion that the prize might also be 


The sweep of the accord was awarded to a political rival of 
highlighted by the ceremony Mr. Rabin’s, Foreign Minister 
that accompanied its signing. Shimon Peres, who was a main 


U.K. Offers Landing Slots 
In 2d Rank to Americans 


Pact Will Give Narita a 2d Runway 


Millions around the world architect of the agreement 


watched on television as Mr. 


Another Swedish newspaper. 


AraStt and Mr Bnbin shook =Sd 

^ the weekend that the prize 
of President Bill Clinton. ~..m k» aa* 


ui rroiucai olu y union. could be shared by Mr. Arafat 
Hat event so dommated the ^ Rabin, Mr. Petes and an- 

other PLO representative. 


had predicted that the Nobel 
committee would pay homage 111 * 
to it, in much the same way as it 
awarded a shared prize to Nel- ter «« 
son Mandela and Frederik W. shared 


In 1978, President Anwar Sa- 
dat of Egypt and Prime Minis- 
ter Menachem Begin of Israel 
shared the Nobel Peace Prize 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 


de Klerk the year before inrec- their signing of the Camp 
ognition of the peaceful trans- Uayid peace accords between 


fer of political power to the th«r two countries. 


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Bloomberg Business News 

BOURNEMOUTH, Eng- 
land — Transport Secretary 
Brian Mawhinney said Tues- 
day he had offered to open 
British regional airports to 
American carriers on trans- 
Atlantic flights. 

Mr. Mawhinney’s offer, 
which was detailed in a letter 
to Frederico Pena, the U.S. 
transportation secretary, was 
intended as an opening bid in 
negotiations with Washington 
over a new bilateral air treaty. 

But because the proposal 
excludes Heathrow and 
Gatwick, the two London air- 
ports that are the most prized 
destinations for airlines in the 

United States, it is likely to 
produce a lukewarm response 
from Washington. 

American Airlines said it 


was not impressed with the 
offer. 


“We don’t think it's that big 
a deal,” said lizann Peppard, 


a spokesman for American 
Airlines in London. “Basically 


Airlines in London. “Basically 
we are still looking for greater 
access to Heathrow and be- 
yond.” 

But officials of AMR Corp., 
American Air’s corporate par- 
ent, said the airline might be 
interested in opening service 
between Birmingham and 
Chicago and between Man- 
chester and Miami. 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — In a step to- 
ward improving access to Ja- 
pan by arr, the government an- 
nounced a compromise 
agreement Tuesday that could 
lead to a major expansion of 
capacity at Tokyo’s over- 
crowded Narita airport. 


The deal is a taming point 
in the bloody conflict with lo- 
cal residents who have op- 
posed the airport since it was 
announced — without their 
consultation — in 1966 and 
opened in 1978. 

By admitting past mistakes, 
and withdrawing its bid to ex- 
propriate land, the govern- 
ment persuaded local oppo- 
nents to agree to drop their 
unified fight against expan- 
sion of the airport 

“It’s a memorable day that 
signals the end of the state of 
enmity between the govern- 


Negotiations on a new air 
treaty between the two coun- 
tries broke down in January 
after U.S. transport officials 
walked out of the talks, main - 
taining that the British were 
not willing to make serious of- 
fers. 


moit and the local people,” 
said Hiromichi Ishige of the 
opposition Atsuta faction. 
“This is a virtual end to the 
Narita dispute.” 

The basic agreement Tues- 
day calls for the completion of 
a second, parallel runway at 
Narita in exchange for sus- 
pending plans to complete a 
third runway needed to cope 
with strong cross-winds. Ac- 
quisition of land and con- 
struction, however, will only 
proceed with the consent of 
neighbors, who so far have ad- 
amantly refused to surrender 
their land. 

The ti min g, therefore, re- 
mains uncertain. In practice, 
however, the second runway 
could be completed in less 
than two years. 

Its completion is certain to 
lead to a major expansion of 
flights to and from Tokyo by 
Japanese and foreign carriers. 


Narita, the world’s fifth- busi- 
est passenger airport and top 
international cargo facility in 
1992, has been unable to ac- 
commodate requests for in- 
creased service. 


The problem has particu- 
lar irked foreign carriers. ! 
most of which are far more 
competitive than their Japa- 
nese rivals, whose costs have 
risen with the yen. Airlines ■ 
from 42 countries are waiting ! 
for permission to fly to Japan. - 

“This is the best news Wve 
had since Narita opened,” 
said Warwick Blacker, chair- 1 
man of the Board of Airline ' 
Representatives in Japan. - 

The agreement was her- 
alded as a victoiy for social ' 
justice in Japan. The govern- ! 
meat had been criticized for - 
announcing plans to build the ! 
airport east of Tokyo without 
consulting local re si dents.- ■ 


ay 111 




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EVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


Page 3 


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'THE AMERICAS / K 

Clinton’s Foreign Policy Harvest U.S. Troops 

Haiti and Iraq Efforts Provide Political Fruit In Palace, 

t By Ruth Marcus Mr. Clinton’s aim. said a senior official, was to Aiiroitl n ft 

cutxi r-TvS? 8 "’" PoSt Smia use the speech to show that “we make commit- l\Vf til llliflj 

WAM11NGTON — After enduring months of meats, we stand by these commitments, and it ” 

accusation of an indecisive and ineffective for- brings us results. 1 ’ A . • _• J 

leigo policy, the White House moved quickly to The White House was determined to reap the 


Mr. Clinton’s aim, said a senior official, was to 
use the speech to show that “we make commit- 


WASHINGTON — After enduring months of meats, we stand by these commitments, and .it 
accusation of an indecisive and ineffective for- brings us results.” 


leign policy, the White House moved quickly to 
capitalize on a good day in the foreign policy 
’arena. 


The White House was determined to reap the 
political capital without being ragged with doing 
so. The stem word went out to senior staff 


_ President Bill Clinton seized on the resign a- Monday mo rning ? No one was to discuss the 
don of lieutenant General Raoul C£dras in political implications of the administration's ac- 

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Haiti and the administration's continued hard u vines in the Gulf 
'hue on Iraq as the occasion for an Oval Office “I want you to v 
address Monday, the ultimate presidential fo- House would talk a 
-rum. It was the third time in three weeks Lhat Mr. a senior official. 

Clinton has spoken to the nation from the Ova] Said another, “T 
-Office. ... Outside observe 

•- ■ Although the administration said the crisis Some; particularly 
“ with Iraq remained far from resolved, officials the events would g 
j boasted of their quick and forceful response to public fears about 
“ the buildup of troops on the Kuwaiti border. It leadership. But Ren 
vwas evidence, they said, of an administration' if any, benefit to ti 
„ that would not repeat the mistakes of the past bv “Each time he de 
'-allowing Iraqi aggression to proceed unchecked, he is a president w 
- At the same time, officials were eager to trum- strengthens his ban 
-pet the events in Haiti as the fruit of a firm and cratic pollster. Gee 
. focused U.S. effort to pave the way for the return time he’s up for re 
'"of President Jean- Bertrand Aristide. The resig- very comfortable tl 
..nation of General C&Lras, a senior official said. But Republicans 
was “a major step forward" in the restoration of tive. A Republican 
democracy. fm*ien oolicrv nrnF 


tivities in the Gulf and Haiti. 

“I want you to write that no one at the White 
House would talk about the politics of this," said 
a senior official. 

Said another, “I’ll leave that to the pundits." 

Outside observers differed on that score. 
Some, particularly Democrats, said the}' thought 
the events would go a long way toward allaying 


“Each time he demonstrates to Americans that 
he is a president who will stand his ground, he 
strengthens his hand as president,’’ said a Demo- 
cratic pollster, Geoff Garin. “Politically, by the 
time he’s up for re-election, people have to feel 
very comfortable that he fits that job." 

But Republicans had a far less rosy perspec- 


was a major step rorwara m the restoration of tive. A Republican pollster, Ed Goeas, said the 
damocracy. . foreign policy problems distracted Mr. Clinton 

ror wane House officials, ltwas a fax more at a time when he should be campaigning more 
p le asant alternative than the image one year aggressively for Democratic candidates. 


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- UPDATE 


earlier of the grim-faced president discussing the 
'^deaths of -U.S. soldiers in Somalia, or — as 
"recently. as last month — threatening to take the 
«. politically unpopular step of invading Haiti. 

The latest developments offered Mr. Clinton 
the chance to be presidential — serious and 
[ resolute as he announced the largest deployment 
. of force of his administration — without ddiver- 
' rag unwelcome or difficult news. 

- In his address, the president wrapped in the 
recent visits of President Boris N. Yeltsin of 
"Russia and President Nelson Mandela of South 
Africa, saying, “We are making progress in 
building a world of greater security, peace and 
democracy.” 


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“It just delays him being able to fight back," 
Mr. Goeas said. 

Richard Haass, a National Security Council 
staff member in the Bush administration who is 
now at the Carnegie Endowment for Internation- 
al Peace, said it was premature to predict any 
longer-term impact. 

“It’s too soon for it to have any decisive or 
lasting effect," said Mr. Haass, “in part because 
Haiti hasn’t played out, in part because of the 
memories of Somalia, Bosnia and the general 
perception of the president as someone uncom- 
fortable with thing s military, and also because I 
think he's yet to demonstrate that he can manage 
the use of force effectively throughout a crisis." 


Campaign TV Ads Turn Raw 

Surly Voters Reject ‘Sojtand Fwszy Stuff of ^92 Races 


By Howard Kurt? 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — During the 1992 New 
Hampshire primary. Bill Clinton made a tele- 
vision advertisement with a man unable to 
pay for heart surgery for his ailing 2-year-old 
son. 

“There’s something wrong." Mr. Clinton 
said, “with a government that can’t open its 
heart to help a father care for a young child 
whose heart is already broken." 

Few politicians would air such an ad in the 
meaner, grittier, anti-government climate sur- 
rounding this year’s elections. Armed with 
pqIling reslM^ta■ shqwthg that Americans are 
disgusted with the political system, candi- 
dates are marketing themselves not as com- 
passionate reformers but as tough-minded 
outsiders 

“All that soft and fuzzy stuff doesn’t mat- 
ter,” said a Republican consultant, Don Sip- 
ple. “Voters are immune to video cliches. 
They want the meat." 

The meat, in 1994 terms, is rather raw: in 
favor of the death penalty, longer prison 
terms and cutting off welfare benefits; against 
taxes, immigration and congressional perqui- 
sites. In 30-second television or radio spots, 
strategists say, specific issues are far less im- 
portant than tapping into the electorate’s sur- 
ly mood. 

“Ninety-four is about who can get further 
outside the system,” said a Republican poll- 
ster, Frank Luntz. “To me, the best candidate 
of all would he an astronaut. He can say, ‘I 
was floating in outer space the whole time.' " 

The result is what political professionals 
describe as the most bitterly negative cam- 
paign in modem history. 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Democrat of 
Massachusetts, is running attack ads for the 
first time in his 32-year career, using laid-off 
workers to criticize the business practices of 
his Republican opponent, Mitt Romney. 
Governor Fete Wilson of California is criti- 
cizing the Democratic candidate, Kathleen 


Away From Politics 

• Colorado’s anti-gay rights measure has been 
: ruled unconstitutional. The state Supreme 

Court ruled, 6 to 1, that the measure bars 
homosexuals from “having an effective voice 
in government affairs" and denies them equal 
protection under the U.S. Constitution. Stale 
officials vowed to appeal 
•The space shuttle Endeavour landed in the 
Grffomia desert after heavy cloud cover in 
Florida foiled plans to end the shuttle's 1 1- 
day Earth-mapping mission at its home base. 

• The judge in the O J. Simpsoa trial has 
threatened to throw out many pieces of evi- 
dence in the murder case, including tests on a 
bloody glove, saying they may nave been 
submitted too late to a laboratory for testing. 
Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito said the 


Brown, as soft on rapists and child molesters. 

Senator Jim Sasser, Democrat of Tennes- 
see, has even depicted Dr. William Frist as a 
cat hater. A radio ad describing Dr. Frist's 
medical experiments on cats asks: “Why did 
he do it? Dr. Frist said, ‘I wasn't going to let a 
few sentiments about furry little creatures 
stand in the way of my career.' Millionaire 
doctor Bill Frist: The only thing he puts first 
is himself.” 

Strikingly absent from most campaign ads 
are the issues that loomed so prominently in 
recent years: abortion rights, federal budget 
deficits, the environment. Health care is bare- 
ly a blip on the screen, . 

"■ Mr. : Sippfe, the consultant, calls these 
“therapy” issues — sol wag problems through 
an activist government — and says they have 
been superseded by sharper-edged “disci- 
pline" issues. 

“The most powerful issue is disciplining 
Congress," he said, “punishing people wbc've 
bounced checks and traveled extravagantly." 

When Senator John H. Chafee, Republican 
of Rhode Island, was up for re-election in 
1988, Mr. Sipple said, “We did a ton of 
environmental spots on the Sierra Cub and 
Narragansett Bay." He added, “I haven’t 
done any of that this year." 

Signs of the new tunes are everywhere. In 
1992, President George Bush ran ads touting 
his plan for “a choice of quality schools," “job 
training” and “health care for alL" This year, 
his sons, Jeb and George running for 
governor in Florida and Texas, are airing 
stark ads about dangerous criminals bong 
turned loose and the need for more capital 
p unishm ent. 

As the air wars intensify in the campaign's 
final weeks, the decibel level may leave the 
electorate with a splitting headache. 

“Here you have voters fed up with the 
partisan bickering and negativity, and what 
they’re getting is a bigger dose of partisan 
bickering and negativity," said Mr. Luntz. the 
pollster. “It’s a vicious circle.” 


defense made a strong case that it was unfair- 
ly burdened by the delay. He said he would 
nile Friday. 

• The Supreme Court has named a Florida 
lawyer to help referee a dispute between New 
York and New Jersey over which state gets to 
claim Ellis Island, once the nation's major 
immigration gateway. 

• A gunman wounded eight people in a New 
York dance dub after someone stepped on his 
toes and a shoving match ensued, police said. 
The police were searching for the gunman. 

• An American Airlines jet from New York 
Mew several tires upon landing in Toronto, 
causing a small fire and forcing the 157 peo- 
ple on board to disembark by sliding down 
emergency escape chutes. A few minor inju- 
ries were reported. Fire fighters quickly extin- 
guished the flames. 

AP. AFP. VYT 


By William Booth 

Washington Pott Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
— U.S. troops on Tuesday oc- 
cupied Haiti’s ultimate portal 
to power, the National Palace, 
in preparation for the return 
from cole of the elected presi- 
dent, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

Hundreds of soldiers milled 
about on the expansive lawns of 
the gleaming white building, 
their Hum vees and armored ve- 
hicles blocking entrances, as the 
de facto president, Emile Jonas- 
saint, remained camped at his 
hillside borne. 

U.S. officials predicted that 
Mr. Jonassaint would resign by 
Wednesday, the same day that 
the former military command- 
ers. Lieutenant General Raoul 
C&lras and his deputy. Briga- 
dier General Philippe Biamby, 
are expected to fly into exile. 
The generals resigned Monday 
and are most likely to go to 
Panama. 

U.S. troops also occupied the 
offices of the de facto govern- 
ment's ministers. Mr. Jonas- 
saint' s entire cabinet is also ex- 
pected to resign. 

Father Aristide's acting 
prime minister, Robert Malval, 
issued a communique Tuesday 
stating that he would return to 
his duties — at least temporar- 
ily — in anticipation of Father 
Aristide’s return Saturday. Mr. 
Malval, the moderate choice of 
some in the Clinton administra- 
tion, has repeatedly stressed he 
does not want to remain as 
prime minister, and in the past, 
he has clashed with Father Aris- 
tide. 

While former President Jim- 
my Carter, who brokered the 
last-minute deal with Mr. Jon- 
assaint that led to the arrival of 
U.S» troops and the ouster of 
the military regime, has insisted 
that the 81-year-old de facto 
president is no mere puppet, to 
most Haitians he is a cruel joke. 
Mr. Jonassaint has done little, if 
anything, tobenefii his country, 
and is bat known for his ram- 
bling addresses on Haitian na- 
tional television at 2 A.M_ the 
only time. UJ>. Embassy staff 
members joked, that he dare 
face his countrymen. 

At the National Palace on 
Tuesday, the while mansion 
was surrounded by gawking 
Hal tians, who saw another sym- 
bol of their country occupied by 
Americans. 

“I just came by to see another 
of our national institutes taken 
over by the Americans," said a 
wealthy Haitian. “I'm ashamed. 
We’re like children. We need 
someone else to come in and 
settle our affairs. 

■ Aristide's Finns Awaited 

Tim Weiner of The New York 
Times reported earlier from 
Washington: 

With his return to Haiti 



w Ur m 


•>* H: * 


>, V . : 


_ rim Pn\fcmg 4p.ifcr FrjiHr- ftrue 

Residents of Cite Soldi, a Port-au-Prince slum, cleaning up with equipment provided by the United States. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Gore Says Worth Alda Iraq 

WASHINGTON —The White House 
said Tuesday that Oliver L North, the 
former national security aide who is run- 
ning for the Senate from Virginia, was 
“giving aid and comfort" to Saddam 
Hussein by suggesting UJS. forces could 
not stop an Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. 

“It is despicable, it is unpatriotic and 
as is often the case with statements from 
Oliver North, it is also patently untrue," 
Vice President Al Gore said in attacking 
the former Reagan administration aide. 

“He has put the rankest form of parti- 
sanship ahead of the national interest in 
a manner which is insulting to our armed 
forces, to our flag, to the soldiers who are 
prepared to go into battle if necessary," 
Mr. Gore added. 

Mr. North, a Republican, is in a light 
race with Senator Charles S. Robb, a 
Democrat, and both President Bill Clin- 
ton and Mr. Gore have campaigned on 
Mr. Robb's behalf. 

On Monday, Mr. North backed off 
from his assertion that the Clinton ad- 
ministration had so weakened the U.S. 
military that it could not slop 3n Iraqi 
invasion of Kuwait. But he continued-lo 
hammer the president, dismissing him as 
“not my commander in chief." (AP. WP) 

Clinton Bating Falls lit P oH 

WASHINGTON — President Clin- 
ton's approval rating has dropped to 42 
percent and his disapproval rating in- 
creased slightly to 52 percent since the 
latest crisis started in the Gulf, according 
to a poll published Tuesday. 

In the CNN/ USA Today/Gallup poll. 


taken Friday through Sunday, 6 percent 
of the 1,013 respondents had no opinion 
on the president. A Sept. 23-25 poll by 
the same group gave Mr. Clinton a 44 
percent job-approval rating, against a 51 
percent disapproval mark. The new sur- 
vey had a margin of sampling error of 
plus or minus three percentage points. 

The group also reported that Congress 
received its highesL disapproval rate in 
the survey in 20 years of polling by 
Gallup, with 73 percent disapproving 
and 21 percent approving, while 6 per- 
cent had no opinion. ( Reuters) 


Wife Stirs Up Senate Race 

LOS ANGELES — Those who have 
known Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffing- 
ton would not be surprised at the latest 
tempest she has stirred up. After all, 
when she was 23, her first book took a 
slap at feminism that drew an interna- 
tional audience of admirers and foes. 

Now, as her husband, Michael Huff- 
ington, campaigns for the U.S. Senate in 
California, the woman who has often 
sought the center of attention has found 
herself there again. 

This time Mrs. Huffinglon, 44. is the 
target of accusations that her husband’s 
candidacy is more a product of her ideas 
and quest for power than his. And, if so. 
her critics say, they are judicious about 
her role in a religious group in which she 
once served as a minister. 

Mrs. Huffinglon said she was 
“shocked” to be the target of such accu- 
sations, which she said were vastly over- 
blown by a liberal conspiracy aimed at 
discrediting her husband. 


She played down her role in the cam- 
paign, saying she served as a surrogate 
speaker like many political spouses, but 
was not a major decision-maker. 

She also described her role in John- 
Roger’s Church of the Movement of 
Spiritual Inner Awareness, known by its 
acronym MSIA, as a casual one, involv- 
ing seminars about practical life ques- 
tions rather than religious dogma. She 
said the organization was not a cult. 

Five former staff members of the 
Huffington campaign said the candi- 
date’s wife was so active that she was 
essentially acting as the campaign man- 
ager. They said eight staff members quit 
because of disagreements with her. 

Former ministers said that Mrs. Huff- 
ington had been a devoted John-Roger 
follower Tor many years. A new book by 
Peter McWilliams, a former church 
member who is now critical of the group, 
described her as an active organizer who 
sought new recruits. 

Mrs. Huffinglon. a prominent social- 
ite and author before she met her hus- 
band, said she had not taken part in the 
church since 1987, when she became a 
born-again Christian. (LIT) 

Quote f Unquote 

Albert M. (Bo) Calloway, a council- 
man in Trenton, New Jersey, on why he 
is endorsing a Republican. Garabcd 
(Chuck) Haytaian, for U.S. senator: “ 1 
don’t care if I'm a Democrat. I’m 72 
years old, and I can do any blankety- 
blank thing I want, and I'm endorsing 
him.” fNYTi 


Mexican Police 
Arrest Suspect 
In Assassination 

The Associated Press 

MEXICO CITY — The po- 
lice on Tuesday arrested one of 
two fugitives sought on charges 


Mock Slave Auction Sets Off Scuffle 


scheduled for Saturday. Father 0 f masterminding the assassina- 
Ansttde has netthw chosen a ^ of ^Sniing party's 
cabinet nor revealed his unmew officii, lo^al 

diate plans upon reB^rning tde vision Reported. 

power, worrying some White J T1 , .■■ - 

House officials who want assur- 

ances of stability. lez * “ 10 “ n ' 

The White House has been 51x55111811 Muflta Ro- 

prodding Father Aristide to 
pick a prime minister with mod- 
erate politics, roots among the 


cha, was arrested in the central ^ d* Colonial WUliams- 
dty of Zacatecas, a television bui £ Foundation^ which oper- 


Ccmpiledbv Our Staff From Dispatches uay our j n 21 minutes 

WILLIAMSBURG, Virginia and make it some sideshow." 

Demonstrators shouted. At that point, two protesters 
scuffled briefly with the actors sat down on the steps and chal- 
and conducted a sit-in on the lenged officials to call the po- 
stage. But the re-enactment of a lice. They did not, and the show 
slave auction at the historic vil- we nt on around them. 

lage of Colonial Williamsburg 

caused at least one of the pro- ^ 
testers to change his mind. 

The re-enactment, which 

generated complaints after it \ 

was announced last week, was 
staged for the first time Mon- 


Later, Mr. Gravely said that 
the performance had changed 
his mind. “I would be lying if I 
said I didn’t come out with a 
different view ” he said. 

(AP. NYT. WP) 


NKflU.r-SUR-SBN6 


station reported, quoting 


HUdndZZd.uS^r 3™*“® “ * e attorney generaTs 
working with U.S. Embassy of- 


finals. But Father Aristide is 
keeping his intentions to him- 
self. 

On Monday, as the military 
rulers in Haiti stepped down. 
Father Aristide's only political 
act was to sign a decree express- 
ing his agreement with the law 
on amnesty passed Friday by 
the Haitian Parliament The 
law fell short of the general am- 
nesty sought by Genera] C£- 


office. 

Mr. Rodriguez GonzAlez and 
Mr. Munoz Rocha, both of the 
governing Institutional Revolu- 


ates the restored village that 
depicts daily life in the Ameri- 
can colonies before indepen- 
dence. 

Organizers said the mock 
auction dramatized the honors 
of slavery. Protesters com- 


JARRASSE 


LTCAIUER 
DC PARK 


nini lhat cheapened histo- 
u, c fi pff 311(1 deal1 with an episode too 

painful to handle in a theater- 


a rising star in the ruling party. 
Mr. Rodriguez Massieu, of 
Guerrero state, was to be the 
next house majority leader. 

Both men fled after the Sept. 
27 murder outside a hotel in 


dras, leaving the leaders of the central Mexico City. Mr. Mu- 


1991 coup that toppled Father ?6z Rocha remains at large. He Overcome." 
Aristide potentially vulnerable is being sought in Mexico as Costumed 


like production. 

Just before the auctioneer 
mounted the stage, the steps of 
a restored tavern, six demon- 
strators pushed through the 
mostly white audience of 2,000 
and began singing, “We Shall 


Aristide poten tiall y vulnerable is being sought in Mexico as 
to charges of corruption and well as in the United States, 
murder. Ten suspects have been ar- 

The failure to win a complete rested in the case, including 
amnesty was a factor in the gen- other high-ranking party m ent- 
eral's decision to leave Haiti, bers. Daniel Aguilar Trevino, a 
U.S. officials said. farmhand who was arrested at 

The resistance to Father the scene, reportedly told the 
Aristide among the Haitian mil- police he was paid $15,000 to 
ilaiy and police re mains strong, kill Mr. Rodriguez Massieu. 


Costumed employees of Co- 
lonial Williamsburg, some us- 
ing canes and umbrellas, tried 
to push the demonstrators 
back. Jack Gravely, political di- 
rector 'of the Vi rgini a branch of 
the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored 
People, who organized the pro- 
test, shouted, “You cannot por- 


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 

OP I N I O N 


Page 4 




Tt 

IT 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Pulilixhrd With Thf \rw Ynfk Tinin ^nrl Th^ ttmhinglnn Vo-I 


A Reckless Iraqi Ploy 


;A Decisive Clinton 

i Five days of Iraqi deployments and 
•U.S. counterdeployments around Ku- 
. wail's northern border have left Bill Clin- 
ton looking like a born-again military 
-strategist and Saddam Hussein like a 
dangerous and clumsy bully. Iraq's an- 
nouncement on Monday that it was with- 
drawing troops from the border region 
vindicates Mr. Clinton's strategy of quick 
and massive military deterrence of any 
Iraqi plans for renewed aggression. 

The Iraqi leader’s motives and inten- 
tions are known only to him. But if he 
thought he could force a resolution of 
the diplomatic stalemate over oil sanc- 
tions by stirring up a new military crisis 
over Kuwait, he was badly mistaken. By 
foolishly conducting threatening mili- 
tary maneuvers near the Kuwaiti bor- 
der, Baghdad has set back its cause 
among friend and foe alike. 

Iraq's cooperation with United Na- 
tions arms inspectors entitles it to seek 
limited relief from international sanc- 
tions — permission to again export oil 
and amass petrodollars. But the Security 
Council cannot and must not ease sanc- 
tions under duress from military threats. 
If Iraq is really withdrawing and. is now 
prepared to accept Kuwait’s sovereignty 
and borders, it can again begin trying to 
persuade Security Council members that 
lifting oil sanctions sometime next year 
would be in the b<st interests of all con- 
cerned. But its actions in the past few 
days have set back its chances of success. 

Before Baghdad precipitated the larest 
crisis by moving at least two elite divi- 
sions southward toward the Kuwaiti bor- 
der. it was making diplomatic gains . UN 
inspectors reported that Iraq's nuclear, 
biological and chemical weapons compo- 
nents and Ionger-range missiles had been 
fully located and destroyed. A thorough 
system for long-term monitoring is ready 
to go into operation in the coming weeks 
— if Iraq continues its recent pattern of 
cooperation with the United Nations. 

Such destruction and monitoring of 
prohibited weapons are the only formal 
UN requirements for lifting oil sanctions 
under the Gulf War cease-fire resolution, 
which was largely drafted by the United 
States. China. France and Russia have 
indicated that they might soon be ready 


Sanctions Should Stay 

Saddam Hussein evidently looked hard 
during the weekend at the prompt and 
forceful American response to his provoc- 
ative movement of troops up to the Ku- 
wait border. On Monday he announced 
that he was backing off. Ass uming that 
there are no surprises — and the extra 
buildup steps that President Bill Clinton 
announced Monday night are meant to 
ensure that there are none — the crisis will 
have provided a good demonstration of 
the value of sending clear signals to a 
potential aggressor. The Bush administra- 
tion wobbled in 1990 to ill effect. The 
Clinton team avoided ambiguity. It seems 
there will be no repeat conflict now. 

What Saddam Hussein apparently has 
most on his mind is to end the severe 
economic sanctions that the United Na- 
tions imposed four years ago for his swal- 
lowing of Kuwait. He had sought to ac- 
complish this result on the cheap by 
meeting UN standards for policing Iraq’s 
capacity to make especially dangerous 
weapons. But it had become apparent at 
the United Nations that he would have to 
do more — at the least, recognize Ku- 
wait’s sovereignty and borders. This 
touches a prime nationalist issue on 
which he has consistently refused to 


to vote to lift oil sanctions. But even these 
countries rightly demand that Iraq first 
firmly and explicitly recognize Kuwait’s 
sovereignty and borders. That condition 
has now become even more important 

The other two permanent members of 
the Security Council, the United States 
and Britain, oppose any relief at this 
time, or perhaps at any time while Sad- 
dam remains in power. They argue that 
he cannot be trusted to continue his 
cooperation on arms once sanctions 
have been eased. That objection now 
carries added weight. 

Iraqi diplomats suggest that Baghdad’s 
menacing military moves were meant to 
cut through this Security Council dead- 
lock. The idea was to set up a deal where 
guarantees for Kuwait could be traded 
for a definite promise that sanctions 
would be lifted. If that was the plan, it 
has blown up in Iraq's face. Rather than 
having to explain to impatient allies why 
it was rewriting the rules on oil sanctions. 
Washington can now point to Iraq's con- 
tinued dangerous unpredictability. 

Mr. Clinton shows that he has learned 
the lesson of George Bush's equivocal ear- 
ly response to Iraq’s 1990 threats against 
Kuwait By quickly moving tens of thou- 
sands of troops, along with combat air- 
craft and ships, toward Kuwait the ad- 
ministration may be able to claim credit 
for avoiding a possible invasion and war. 

This emergency but precautionary de- 
ployment of U.S. troops falls within the 
president’s constitutional powers as com- 
mander in chief. Unlike the recent situa- 
tion in Haiti, threats to Kuwait clearly 
affect U.S. national interests, and the 
president’s moves have elicited broad 
public and congressional support. Still, 
Mr. Clinton should resist any temptation 
to strike preemptively at Iraq, and if the 
military confrontation persists he should 
seek explicit congressional endorsement 

For Saddam, this crisis demonstrates 
again that however well he understands 
Iraqi politics, he badly misreads the out- 
side world. For Mr. Clinton, provided the 
crisis is now defused with no Americans 
trilled, the episode could turn out to be a 
pre-election gift The president has reas- 
sured a nervous public that when it is 
clearly and urgently needed, he can pro- 
ject force decisively and effectively. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


bend. Instead be launched a rash and 
counterproductive attempt to intimidate 
Kuwait and its supporters. Now the at- 
tempt has failed, rendering even more 
unlikely any early sanctions relief. 

His failure at intimidation may induce 
him to experiment with withholding his 
promised cooperation on arms monitoring 
until sanctions are lifted. The United Na- 
tions would have to reject that new linkage 
and respond with whatever intrusive and 
punitive military means were found neces- 
sary to prevent illegal rearming. 

The whole episode has revived debate 
on whether to move beyond enforcement 
of specific UN resolutions on weapons, 
Kuwait and so forth in order to deal with 
the Iraqi threat permanently by bringing 
about the ouster of Saddam Hussein. The 
weekend nonwar freshened the already 
compelling case that while Saddam Hus- 
sein rules, there can be no abiding stabil- 
ity in his region. Military operations to 
remove him seem beyond the Gulf War 
coalition’s political reach. But continued 
sanctions, to limit his military option and 
embolden would-be coup makers, still 
make sense. The existing loophole for 
humanitarian aid should remai n open, 
notwithstanding Saddam's refusal so far 
to use iL And the sanctions should stay. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Iraq, Clinton and U.S. Polities 

Whatever its outcome, the new show- 
down with Saddam Hussein seems bound 
to work to the advantage of President BUI 
Clinton, casting his foreign policy in a 
more resolute light and perhaps bolster- 
ing his and his party’s popularity before 
next month's mid-term elections. 

Unlike Haiti, Somalia and Bosnia, Iraq 
is an issue on which American politicians 
are virtually united. Thus far, even usually 
unrelenting critics of the President's inde- 
cisive style such as the Senate Republican 
leader Bob Dole have thrown their weight 
behind the White House. The lone dissent- 
ing voice has been that of Ross Perot. 

As’ George Bush knows better than 
anyone, popularity boosts from besting 
Saddam Hussein can be shortlived — but 
a president so often accused of waver- 
ing has acted without hesitation. If the 
clrrnbdown is genuine, he will be given 
much of the credit. 

— Rupert Cornwell, writing 
in The Independent ( London j. 


Seeing President BUI Clinton’s rapid de- 
ployment of 36,000 soldiers in the Gulf 
region in response to a possibly exaggerat- 
ed Iraqi threat, one cannot help but regret 
that the United States failed to show the 
same determination sooner in Haiti. 

Is it because Saddam Hussein is a much 
more fearsome adversary than General 
Raoul C&dras or than a S omalian warlord 
that the American president took the risk 
erf exposing GIs' lives to danger in the 
Gulf? There, Bill Clinton didn’t hesitate 
for a moment to use all available means. 
He gave the impression that he was leap- 
ing at the opportunity offered by the 
Baghdad dictator. It is true that some of 
America’s allies were ready to vote for an 
easing of the oil embargo imposed on Iraq, 
a step firmly opposed by Washington. It is 
also undeniable that in the Gulf, the stakes 
were far more important. 

Did his waning popularity, and predic- 
tions of the Democrats’ rout in the legis- 
lative elections next month, not, in this 
case, dictate his actions as president? 

— Le Monde (Paris). 



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S i li t JuV lj 


No Lifeline for Saddam as He Drowns in Unsold Oil 


N EW YORK — The heart of the 
matter is not what Saddam Hussein 
will do or can do to harass his enemies in 
the West and Mideast. It is what they can 
do and will do to destroy him at last. 

Will they allow him one more victory' 
so he can return again to threaten the 
Mideast and the United States next year? 
Or will they push him finally into the 
grave he has been digging for himself, his 
regime and his nation? 

Basically that has been the question 
ever since George Bush made one of the 
more unusual decisions in history. He 
allowed an enemy smashed swiftly on the 
battlefield to remain in power indefinite- 
ly, his dictatorship intact and his army 
strong enough to cany on unceasing war- 
fare against millions of his countrymen. 

But by his latest adventure — sending 
troops to the Kuwaiti border — Saddam 
Hussein has shown the West his own 
desperation and its opportunity. Sooner 
or later many dictators do that 
Baghdad's announcement of the with- 
drawal of the troops changes neither Sad- 
dam's desperation nor the West's choice. 
It accentuates them. 


By A. M. Rosenthal 

Until now Saddam used his time since 
his resurrection by Mr. Bush extremely 
well He has rebuilt a substantial part of 
his army to terrorize his country, kill 
Kurdish and Shiite rebels and remind the 
Muslim world that he is still a power. 

But one thing prevented him from re- 
building his country as a major economic 
power, which is the essential step toward 
again becoming a major military power: 
the United Nations embargo. It blocked 
him from selling the oil that had been his 
indispensable fountain of revenue. 

Then, just as the United Nations was 
about to consider if and when to lift the 
embargo, Saddam tried to put on heavy 
pressure — massing troops against Ku- 
wait and tying their removal to the em- 
bargo. This forced the Clinton adminis- 
tration to move tens of thousands of 
troops in preparation for the war that 
another Iraqi invasion would bring. 

Why did Saddam take this dangerous 
ibfe? He has made dreadful mistakes 
fore but not quite this obvious. This 


time he had notice that if it came to war. 
Bill Clinton was not likely to allow him to 
remain in power. That of course meant 
that he would not remain alive. 

Saddam also knew that France, Tur- 
key and Russia were working to lift the 
embargo so that they could again do oil 
business with Iraq. 

Madeleine Albright, the U.S. represen- 
tative to the United Nations, deserves 
national bouquets for fighting against 
ending the embargo. But Saddam also 
knew that ever since the end of the Gulf 
War European industrialists had been 
meeting with Iraqi officials to rebuild the 
reconstruction and arms network that 
empowered him before the war. They were 
using their influence to lift the embargo 
that kept them from the Iraqi treasury. 

Saddam was being told by his European 
friends to lie low and maybe the United 
States would go along in six months or so. 
But he could not afford just to wait. The 
oil embargo was not merely crippling the 
country but inciting rebellion among civil- 
ian Iraqis and the armed forces. Laurie 
Mylroie has reported (IHT Opinion. Oct. 
4) that in both the civilian population and 


the military, Saddam has ordered amputa^r. 
tion of ears, feet and arms as punishment 
for rebellion or desertion. ]*. 

The issue now is not what to do about. 
Iraq if it does invade Kuwait but wbai to 
doff it does not. The answer is to tighten, 
the embargo, not loosen it, by insisting- 
that before it can be lifted the Iraqi 
regime has to end rule , by terror against 
all Iraqis and foreign targets. 

Saddam Hussein would of course ntrt 
agree Without terrorism be could rule far 
a month perhaps, not much longer. But 
when the Iraqi army and civilians under- 
stand that the embargo will not be lifted 
with S»dd»m in power they might take 
their own lives, and his, into their hands. 

The West could destroy Saddam by 
war. But by his own desperation and 
stupidity or both, he has shown that he is 
drowning in bis own unsold oiL 
Clintonian policy has been exactly 
right — send in troops in case Saddam is 
not only desperate but insane, and try to 
prevent either France, Russia or the 
death lobby from throwing the man. a 
li feline as he sinks and rinks and sinks. 

The New York Tones. r 






For an Economic Union Linking Russia and Its Western Neighbors 


M OSCOW — A principal fea- 
ture of Russian politics is 
President Boris Yeltsin’s ambigu- 
ous attitude toward integration 
with the former republics of the 
Soviet Union. Big unanswered 
questions hover in the air. 

With which members of the 
Commonwealth of Independent 
States, if any, should Russia inte- 
grate? How? On what basis? With 
what goals? And with what conse- 
quences for Russia, those repub- 
lics and the rest of the world? 

America and others might well 
conclude that a neo-imperialist 
Russia, catering to an outdated 
notion of its vital interests, is try- 
ing to re-create the defunct Soviet 
empire through military, political 
and economic integration. 

For this conclusion, blame 
Russia's chaotic foreign policy 
and vague priorities, as well as the 
influence of both Vla dimir V. 
Zhirinovsky, the hard-line na- 
tionalist, and the Co mmunis ts in 
the country's populist leadership. 

When Americans raise objec- 
tions, Moscow retorts that the 
United States really does not 
want today's situation in Russia 
and the entire post-Soviet region 
to improve; that it has an interest 
in doing everything possible to 
preserve instability. 

To prevent confusion about its 
intentions. Russia must base its 
policies toward its so-called near 
abroad on explicitly formulated. 


By Grigori A. Yavlinsky 

The writer, an economist, leads the Yabbko bloc, a democratic opposition 
party with members in the lower house of the Russian Federal Assembly. 


intelligible principles that reflect 
moral absolutes. 

If Russia truly wants to contin- 
ue being democratic, these should 
be the principles: the states that 
appeared after the collapse of the 

Russia should base 
policies toward its so- 
called near abroad on 
dear principles that 
reflect moral absolutes. 


Soviet Union must remain politi- 
cally independent; integration 
should be voluntary, without any 
pressure from Russia; economic 
union should be the basic form of 
integration — and in Ukraine, Be- 
larus and Moldova the only form. 

Why would this approach be 
practical? First, because neither 
Russia nor any other post-Soviet 
country can hope lo join the Eu- 
ropean Community, much less 
NATO, in the near future. Russia 
and its neighbors need their own 
markets, which would provide the 
sole basis for economic growth in 
the next five to 10 years. 


Second, because economic in- 
tegration would result in greater 
social stability throughout the 
post-Soviet region. 

An economic union would need 
three main features. First, a cus- 
toms union. This would guarantee 
flee trade and neutralize mono- 
polies in these countries. 

Then a payments union. This 
would promote convertibility of 
the currencies and, with help 
from the central banks, establish 
and support exchange rates. Of 
course, this assumes coordination 
of fiscal and budgetary policies. . 

A payments union would lead 
to greater stability of the currency 
systems and thus to growth of 
trade, while significantly dimin- 
ishing the risk of loss through 
wildly fluctuating exchange rates. 

Finally, harmonized economic 
legislation. This would facilitate a 
single set of rules and simplify the 
movement of capital among the 
several countries. 

If an economic union is formed, 
Russia's economic gains; while 
not guaranteed, would signifi- 
cantly slow the decline in produc- 
tion and the growth of unemploy- 
ment An increase in sales in 
Commonwealth of Independent 
States markets would enable Rus- 


sian enterprises to pay for their 
own restructuring, enabling them 
to enter world markets eventually 
with competitive products. 

Russia could temporarily pro- 
vide gas and oil at a discount to 
such countries as Ukraine and 
Belarus. It would cost $2 billion 
to $3 billion a year — a relatively 
small price to pay for a significant 
expansion of markets for Russia’ s 
industry and agriculture. 

What most worries the demo- 
cratic opposition in Russia is the 
absence of a clear stand among 
the country’s leaders against mili- 
tary and political integration with 
Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova — 
the only approach that can truly 
improve the political situation in 
the Commonwealth of Indepea- 
dent States and make talk of neo- 
imperialism unfounded. It would 
also prevent the danger of politi- 
cal schism between the western 
and eastern parts of Ukraine. 

Besides, a clearly expressed de- 
sire to avoid political and military 
union with the western countries 
of the former Soviet Union would 
weaken the pressure from East 
European countries for immedi- 
ate integration with NATO. 

Russia has no need for a mili- 
tary union with Ukraine, Belarus 
or Moldova. No one is threaten- 
ing it from the wesL What it 
needs first and foremost is coop- 
eration with Ukraine on reducing 
nuclear arms. 


The economic scenario I pro- 
pose might well persuade the 
United States to reduce its fraan- • 
dal aid to Russia, including aid* 
through international financial 
institutions, and to increase aid 
to other former 


tet countries. 

In particular, money could go 
to Ukraine or Belarus — on con- 
dition of faster market reforms 

— to support their balance of 
trade with Russia! 

Any support that opened mar- • 
kets for Russia is more beneficial . 
than direct aid. It would stimu- 
late production in Russia. This 
would let the Russians work in- 
stead of receiving handouts. And \ 
it would support 25 million Rus- ■ 
sians living in the near abroad. - 

Is economic integration with- ! 
out political integration possible? ■ 
Yes. But Russia has to under- ; 
stand that it must refrain from 
any political union with Ukraine, 
Belarus and Moldova whatsoever . 

— even if these states invite it — 
because there would be only two j 
possible outcomes: failure or neo- . 
impe rialism 

In view of the discomforting 
neo-imperialist dunking that is 
arising in Russia, formation or un 
economic bloc is the only reason- 
able compromise. 

This comment was translated 
from the Russian by Antonina If' 
Bouts for The New York Times. 


A Humiliating Smithsonian Retreat From the Facts of Hiroshima 


W ASHINGTON — It was a 
humiliating spectacle, 
scholars being forced to recant 
the truth. Curators at the Smith- 
sonian’s Air and Space Museum 
in Washington have been com- 
pelled by veterans’ groups to re- 
write the text for an exhibit on the 
bombing of Hiroshima. 

The show, which will feature 
the forward fuselage of the Enola 
Gay, the plane that dropped the 
bomb, is set to open next year for 
the 50th anniversary of the event. 

All summer, the museum’s cu- 
rators faced mounting pressure 
from the American Legion, the 
Air Force Association and dozens 
of politicians. A hostile press por- 
trayed the curators as anti-Amer- 
ican, leftist and motivated by 
their anti-Vietnam War genera- 
tional instincts rather than schol- 
arship and archival evidence. So 
late last month the curators 
bowed to political reality. 


By Kai Bird 


In two closed-door sessions with 
representatives of the American 
Legion, they agreed to censor their 
own historical knowledge. Worse, 
Smithsonian officials agreed to in- 
troduce new language in the text 
that most historians win regard as 
flat-out falsehoods. 

This is not to defend every- 
thing in the original Smithsonian 
text It was hardly judicious to 
describe the Pacific war as a “war 
of vengeance” for most Ameri- 
cans. But such criticisms are mi- 
nor compared with what has been 
done to promote pure myth. 

At the heart of the dispute is 
the inaccurate but understand- 
able belief of the veterans that the 
atomic bomb saved their lives 
from being sacrificed in an inva- 
sion of Japan. At the insistence of 
veterans’ groups, the text win 
now state that 1 945 casualty esti- 


mates ranged to “conceivably as 
many as one million." and that 
“to try to save as many American 
lives as possible. Truman chose to 
use the atomic bomb." 

Many scholars — including 
Barton J. Bernstein, Martin J. 
Sherwin. Robert Messer. James 
Hershberg, Gar Alperovitz, Mel- 
vyn P. Leffler and Stanley Gold- 
bag — have noted that there is 
compelling evidence that diplo- 
matic overtures, coupled with as- 
surances on the postwar status of 
the emperor ana the impending 
entry of the Soviet Union into the 
war, probably would have led the 
Japanese to surrender long before 
an American invasion could be 
mounted. Unfortunately, all this 
evidence dribbled out long after 
orthodoxy had taken root 

The million-casualty figure was 
first used by Secretary of War 


A New Test for U.S.-Japanese Trade 


W ASHINGTON — In 
past. U.S. 


the 

past, U.S. and Japanese 
negotiators would spend 
months hammering out trade 
agreements, then years arguing 
over whether they had been 
lived up to. That pattern has 
apparently been broken with 
the trade agreement signed on 
Oct. 1 in Washington. 

Japan promised to lower reg- 
ulatory barriers protecting its 
medical, insurance and telecom- 
munications industries, giving 
foreign producers a crack at 
those markets. The agreement 
seeks a “significant’’ rise in sales 
of competitive foreign products 
and services in these key sectors 
over the next four years. 

Disparaging Japanese editori- 
al writers labeled the agreement 
a tamamushi-iro , after a beetle 
that appears to change color de- 
pending on the angle from which 
you see il Such criticism misses a 
couple of central points. 

If the deal had not been a 
tamamushi-iro, there ''couldn't 
have been an agreement,” said 
Minoru Murofushi, president of 
the giant trading company Ito- 
chu Corporation. On the “re- 
sults" issue, the two rides were 
dug in too deeply to retreat. 

And if Ocl 1 had ended with- 
out an agreement, the Clinton 
administration would have im- 
mediately imposed sanctions on 
Japanese medical and telecom- 
munications firms. 

The agreement calls for “pro- 
gress” in opening designated 
markets, and stipulates bench- 


By Peter Behr 

marks that will be used to assess 
that progress, such as how cur- 
rent sales and market share fig- 
ures compare to recent trends. 

Said a Japanese Foreign Min- 
istry official: “Our interpreta- 
tion is, if the U.S. products are 
really competitive in the world 
market, then their value and 
share in the Japanese market 
will certainly increase.” 

The test of this agreement’s 
effectiveness wiD be pretty sim- 
ple. A year from now, cull up 
Medtronic IntL, in Minneapolis, 
a billion -dollar manufacturer of 
pacemakers and other high-tech 
medical devices, and ask how 
their sales to Japan are going. 

Ask, in particular, about the 
Medtronic PCD. It is an “im- 
plantable defibrilator” that can 
be placed within a patient who 
has suffered “sudden cardiac 
death syndrome,” a near-fatal 
heart attack. If a new attack oc- 
curs, it sends out sharp electrical 
impulses to control the heart- 
beat Medtronic calls it a rescue 
squad in the patient’s chest 

The device has been cleared 
on safety grounds in Japan (as it 
has been in America and Eu- 
rope), but Japanese medical 
cost regulators have not yet in- 
cluded it on medical insurance 
reimbursement schedules, Med- 
tronic says. Without reimburse- 
ment, few patients can afford 
the $20, 000-plus device. 

When U.S. medical industry 


officials see such delays, they 
suspect Japan of holding for- 
eign products back until it can 
dose its gap with the United 
States in medical technology. 

Japanese offidals deny such 
intent, saying that their caution 
in funding expensive new medi- 
cal technologies is bora in part 
by what has happened to health 
care costs in the United States. 

In the past, the two countries' 
negotiators have chased each 
other round and round the table 
arguing about the meaning of 
such delays. As long as the ques- 
tion turned on the actions and 
motives of Japan’s regulators, 
resolution was often out of reach. 

Now the calculation will be 
more direct Japan’s negotiators 
agreed to a new approach for 
evaluating bids on medical con- 
tracts that will help U.S. manu- 
facturers whose advanced de- 
vices cost more than rival 
Japanese products but also de- 
liver added value. Japanese gov- 
ernment ministries will formally 
urge government hospitals and 
medical institutions to consider 
purchasing foreign products — 
a signal that carries real weight 

It follows that sales should 
indeed increase significantly 
for “world class” companies 
like Medtronic. "We’ll get to- 
gether a year from now, to see 
if _ the sales have increased.” 
said a U.S. official. And if they 
haven’t, "we'll be upset.” 

The writer covers international 
trade for The Washington Post. 


Hairy Stimson in a 1946 Harper's 
article, but without any supporting 
evidence. According to the histori- 
an James Hershberg, the figure 
“instantly became the orthodox 
defense for bombing Hiroshima 
and Nagasaki." No scholar of the 
war has ever found archival evi- 
dence to substantiate claims that 
Harry Truman expected anything 
dose to a million casualties. 

Mr. Bernstein, a Stanford his- 
torian who has pored over declas- 
sified military planning docu- 
ments, could not find a worst- 
case estimate of higher than 
46.000 deaths. 

J. Samuel Walker, the chief his- 
torian for the U.S. Regulatory 
Commission, has written that 
“the consensus is that the bomb 
was not needed to avoid an inva- 
sion of Japan.” He said; "It is 
clear that alternatives to the 
bomb existed and that Truman 
and his advisers knew it.” 

Mr. Truman's diaiy, released in 
1979, shows that he knew from 
decoded Japanese cables that the 
enemy was about to surrender. 

In the diary, Mr. Truman re- 
ferred to this intercepted intelli- 
gence as the cable from the “Jap 
Emperor asking for peace.” He 
wrote on July 17, 1945, that he 
believed Stalin would “be in the 
Jap war by August 15. Fini Japs 
when that comes about.” 

It would seem then that Mr. 
Truman realized that the war 
would end long before the United 
States could mount an invasion of 
the Japanese home islands, the 
first phase of which was not 
scheduled until Nov. 1. 

Similarly, General Dwight Ei- 


senhower, Assistant Secretary of 
War John J. McCIoy and many! 
other top advisers to the presi- 
dent all believed that even with-! 
out the bomb the war would end- 
without an invasion. ’ 

According to Stephen E. Am- 
brose, author of a much lauded 
Eisenhower biography, the Allied* 
commander told Mr.' Stimson of 
his “belief that Japan was already 
defeated and that dropping the 
bomb was completely unneces- 
sary.” (This quote was removed 
from the Smithsonian text at the 
behest of the veterans’ groups.) 

Historians continue to proffer 
a wide range of suggestions about 
why President Truman neverthe- 
less approved the atomic bomb- 0 
ing: the Manhattan Project's bu- ' 
reaucratic momentum; a fear of 
domestic political consequences 
if the war ended with anything 
less than a bang; the assumption 
that, as Secretary of State James 
F. Byrnes told the physicist Leo 
Szilard, “rattling the bomb might 
make Russia more manageable.” 

None of this disparages the pa- 
triotism of World War n veter- 
ans. But neither should one ques- 
tion the patriotism of scholars 
who labor in the archives at the 
difficult task of peeling away lay- 
ers of historical truth. 

The Smithsonian should . dis- 
play history with all its uncom- 
fortable complications arid not 
feel-good national myths. 

The writer, author of' 4, The 
Chairman: John J. McCIoy and 
the Making of the American Es- 
tablishment, ” contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Tunes. 



:<:ii 






■4’i 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Die Czar’s Rlness 

PARIS - — (The Herald says in an 
editorial;] The illness of the Em- 
peror Alexander III is one of the 
most important questions in Eu- 
ropean politics. A belief in the 
extreme gravity of the situation 
continues to be rife in political 
headquarters. For whoever 
knows the whole of the Claris 
family life it is cruelty to discuss, 
as all the papers in the world are 
doing, the chances which remain 
for this husband and father. 

1919: Too Near to Beer? 

NEW YORK — Combining 
business with pleasure unalloyed, 
six Columbia University students 
have started a twelve-day drink- 
ing test of two and three-fourths 
per cent, near beer. This test is 
being made on behalf of the brew- 
ers, who claim that two and three- 
fourths per cent, beer is non-in- 


toxicating, despite the fact that the 
courts have ruled otherwise. 
Should this test prove conclusive, 
it will give the nation’s tiiirst a 
substitute during the dry years : 

stretching ahead. The House of 
Representatives to-day fOctl 11] 
passed the Prohibition Conference 
report, making national prohitn* - 
tion effective on January 1. 

1944: Palestine WarmngwT 

LONDON — {From our New 
Yor k edition:] General Sir Bo\ 
na ™ C. Paget, Allied .Command-* ! 
cr in chief in the Middle East, antf 
J. V. W. Shaw, British officer ad 3 
ministering the Palestine govern-; 
rant, charged in a communique 
that Jewish terrorists are aidinrf 
the enemy by committing crimes. . * 
of violence in the Holv Land, r 
the situation is not immedSattS 
remedied, the coriummique^saitK , 
it will “bring-shame and diShonOf; 
on the Jewish people as a whole. - 






BSTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 

OPINION 


Page 5 



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W ASHINGTON — So far 
as I can see. Lord Acton's 
■dictum — “Power tends to cor- 
rupt and absolute power cor- 
'rupts absolutely” — stands in- 
tact more than a century after 
be stated it in bis correspon- 
dence with Bishop Creighton. 
yic sometimes forget that he 
added, to reinforce the point: 
“All great men arc bad men.” 

. Yon could hardly disprove 
that notion, from the pages of 
.'‘The Private Life of Chairman 
Mao,” a new book, about the 
Chinese revolutionary written 
by the physician who" attended 
bun in the last 20 years of his 
Jife. U.S. News & World Report 
has a long, riveting excerpt in its 
OctlOissuet 

Here we find all sorts of 
choice clinical details about the 
bid tyrant’s private medical life. 
■Like most south Chinese peas- 
ants, writes Dr. Li Zhi-sui, for 
Instance; Mao never brushed 
bis teeth, with the result that the 
few he retained were green and 
bis. gums so infected that they 
fexuded pus to the touch. 

. -It was Mao’s pleasure to swim 
for hoars in polluted rivers, amid 
the raw. sewage and dangerous 
parasites. The old lecher, while 
preaching the puritanical life of 
revcAnthmaiy self-denial to the 
millions, kept a harem of. lus- 
cious young women for group 
sex. must he died of Lear Geh- 
rig’s disease, they pickled him in 
formaldehyde ana made a wax 
effigy. The grieving admirers 
who viewed the remains couldn’t 
tefl whkh was which. Et cetera. 

My first reaction was this: If 
we needed a last nail for the 
coffin of the 20 th century colos- 
si’ of totalitarianism, deadlier 
even than those -already ham- 
mered into the coffins of Lenin. 
Stalin and Hitler, this is it. The 
fat, degenerate old peasant 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 

probably caused more human 
misery than even that diabolical 
trio, though at this level of mis- 
chief comparisons seem idle. 
This doctor’s memoir shows 
that Mao’s corrupt and self-in- 
dulgent private life was a mirror 
of the cruelty that marked his 
public policies. 

My somewhat more compli- 
cated second thought — not 
that it cancels the first — is this: 
Here we have another example 
of the recent tendency to ex- 
plain the lives of all “great 
men” in pathological terms. Di- 
gestive tracts and glands be- 
come the sovereign determi- 
nants of character and history, 
turning the reticence of Victori- 
an biography on its head. 

“Pathography,” someone has 
cleverly called the form: skewed 
biographical writing that re- 
duces good and evil to bodily or 
psychic warps. It is cousin to 
the “psychobiography” th3t 
was the rage for a while, when 
everything could be “ex- 
plained” by a psychic complex. 

But how mach does patho- 
graphy really explain?. A quar- 
ter century ago, Sir Winston 
Churchill's personal physician. 
Lord Moran, published' a very 
long book about that great 
man’s medical history — his 
“black dog” depressions that 
required steady pill-popping, 
his strokes and heart attacks. 

By Lord Moran’s account, 
you could easily suppose that 
this great spirit who held civili- 
zation together in 1940 was a 
leaky bag of chronic ailments. 
But if character has meaning, to 
overwhelm it with clinical med- 
ical detail is to miss its essence. 

Churchill’s bodily life was a 
part of him, no doubt as bodily 


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



China Can Peed More 

- Regarding “ Question for 
2030: Who Win Be Able to Feed 
China ?* . and “ When China’s 
Scarcities Become the World’s 


.-Mr.: J$rown makes the impor- 
tant jKnnt that China’s food 
prodqdjon has physical limits. 
China js already intensively us- 
ing its limited soil and water, its 
level of fertilizer consumption 
per. hectare is three times the 
U.S- leveL 

But while it is true dial future 
population and income growth 
wfll lead to an expansion of set- 
tlements, infrastructure and in- 
dustrial areas, die impact on ag- 
ricuitural capacity might be less 
d ramati c than Mr. Brown be- 
lieves. Since .1973, China has lost 
4 percent of Its arable land, but it 
has expanded its permanent pas- 
tures by -30 percent; and land 
under-irrigation by. 10 percent. 

Population and industrial 
growth reduce water availability 
for. agriculture. However, the 
waterlogging and salinity prob- 
lems mentioned by Mr. Brown 
indicate less than optimal, water 
use -in ir rigation. Water-Saving 
manag ement and technology 
could help avoid environmental 
****". iV*' degradation, irrigate more land 
...i ^ ^.i®: - with available water and reclaim 
•“* some di^raded landi 

Mr. Brown sees China’s rice 


. , ■ ? ’■ ■' yields "stagnating at about 4 

gJUktl' >’ LontAwa Anwdrntr In 


waif* 


torts per het^are. According to 
UNFood 


and A©aculture Or- 

", ; ganiTaiwn -data, China’s rice 
a \-:i rt. ;■ yidds are dose to 6 tons per 

wba-D^ 11 - hectare and have risen since 

i ttrsfr-ftW + f . • 1980 at about 3 percent a year. 

^°«1» K - orea * incidentally, 

t c ; V r ; ' * adneves.an average rice yield of 

f«wvt 8-tons per hectare. 

‘ a-* China’s long-term foodsew- 

r^dlK' ¥ rity'.'will, because of the see of 
]U}; I ^ 1 - its “population, depend on how 

* . .. •' ‘.x - l closely demand and domestic 

JJlNl"’ . < ; ' l .' production trends can be 

: ” v> matched. On the demand side; 

1 it^appears that per-capita rice 

«r ‘ • : «®suimtion is leveling off and 

/ V ^ ■ •* — : w|ih increasing affluence 



W — . ,k • . v. — production — ■ 

per-^|nta food production has 

■■■ •••'■. ■■■ 


shown uninterrupted improve- 
ment of 40 percent since 1980. 
Despite population growth, 
daily calorie supplies increased 
from 1,660 in the eariy 1960s to 
2,640 in the early 1990s. 

While there is, of course, no 
guarantee that this trend Mil 
continue, it does show the re- 
markable strength and momen- 
tum of China's agriculture. 

• Lester Brown and the World- 
watch Institute have been criti- 
cized for having cried.wolf too 
often, but it should be acknowl- 
edged that many of the warn- 
ings — for example, on the fuel- 
wood crisis — triggered 
remedial action that probably 
prevented some of the admon- 
ished consequences. 

HEINRICH von LOESCH. 
Consultative Group oh 

International Agricultural 
Research. Washington. ’ 

Russian Economics 

Regarding "Back Russian Re- 
form and Its Sensible Advocates, 
Not a Weak Yeltsin"’ (Opinion, 
Sept. 27) by Jonathan Steele: 

Mr. Steele shows about as 
much understanding of eco- 
nomics as those in Russia .he 
advocates supporting^ Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin 
is a classic example of a Soviet- 
era industrial bureaucrat learn- 
ing economics on the job- His 
“caution” regarding reform is 
not a product of wisdom and 
learning but of uncertainty at 
what he is doing. The “com- 
mon-sense , moderation” to 
which Mr. Stede refers is a con- 
sequence. of Mr. Chernomyr- 
din’s juxtaposition .between 
sensible economic . advisers, 
who. recommend austerity and 
anti-inflationary measures, and 
big industrial bosses lobbying 
the govemmentTor a handout. 

Mr. Steele’ s “socially orient- 
ed” market economy means, 
simply, greater public spending 
But since the money has to come 
from somewhere, this means ei- 
ther increased central bank cred- 
its to clapped-out enterprises, 
which would result in higher in- 
flation and consumer price 
hikes, or higher taxes on the 
Russian public;. . 

C A. NAGLE JR. 

London. 


life is for all of us. But it was far 
from all. It is a great human fact 
that people react differently to 
infirmity — some well, some 
not so well. Churchill’s peat 
partner in the salvation of free- 
dom, Franklin Roosevelt, was 
for a lime misleadingly depict- 
ed as the addled victim of his 
failing cardiovascular system in 
the last stages of World War IL 

Parhograpby, fascinating as 
are the aches and pains and car- 
nal quirks of the great and pow- 
erful explains little, either about 
great vice (Mao) or great virtue 
(Churchill and Roosevelt). 

Historically, the roots of Mao 
and Maoism are to be sought not 
in the old man’s digestion or his 
sex life but in his historical illu- 
sions. He pursued a Chinese ver- 
sion of revolutionary rational- 
ism, the great 20 th century 
heresy, the special conceit of 
those who think human beings 
are made to be molded to a for- 
mula of their own invention, and 
who believe themselves appoint- 
ed by God or destiny to wreak 
their designs on history. 

Pathography may capture a 
minor part of the story, but it 
cannot account for Mao’s im- 
pact on China and the world in 
our time. We forget that at our 
peril, for we have not see the 
last of political messiahs. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Music to Their Fans’ Ears: ‘We Will Never Strike 9 


K AMAKURA, Japan — The long 
baseball season is finally at an 
end. On Oct. 22, the two league cham- 
pions will face each other in the first 
game of the annual best-of-seven fall 
classic to determine the professional 
baseball championship. 

Unfortunately for Americans, I am 
talking about Japan — a nation where 
such things as player strikes happily do 
not occur and citizens look askance at 
countries where they do. 

“We really can't understand how 
you could let'sucb a thing happen,” the 

MEANWHILE 

novelist and baseball fan Masayuki 
Tamaki said of the collapse of the 1994 
season in the United States. “Don’t the 
players in your country ever think they 
are paid too much?” 

As an American living in Japan — 
and one who has followed U.S. major 
league baseball with some disgust 
through numerous walkouts and lock- 
outs — 1 have come to appreciate the 
Japanese alternative, even though the 
level of play may be a notch below that 
of the United States. Despite talk of a 
new individualism among younger 
Japanese, it is still a country where 
soda] responsibilities generally come 
before individual rights. 

The baseball players' union over 
the years has steadfastly declined 


By Robert Whiting 

to exercise its strongest weapon. 

“We will never strike.” a former 
player representative declared. “It 
wouldn't be fair to the fans or the 
owners.” And there are also, incredibly 
enough, baseball free agents who re- 
fuse to leave their teams. 

Free agency came about last year, 
and only because owners thought’they 
needed to change the dynamics of the 
leagues to compete for fan support 
with the popular new professional soc- 
cer league, which has a free-agent pro- 
vision. Players are not eligible until 
they serve 10 full seasons. 

Instead of the exodus of players seen 
in the United States, only four of 59 
eligible players signed with new teams. 
The response of Manabu Kjta- 



obligaiion i 
pan can not simply adopt the business 
ways of the Americans.” 

Former U.S. major leaguers who 
play in Japan invariably argue that 
Japanese players are letting themselves 
be used by management And in 
Americans terms, perhaps they are. 

Despite the widespread popularity 
of the game — annual attendance of 20 
million, nightly nationwide telecasts 
with high ratings — the average play- 


er' s salary is only one-third that of the 
U.S. baseball major leagues. 

Moreover. Japanese players have to 
work a lot harder for their paychecks. 
They practice on travel days and off 
days. There is a month-long post-sea- 
son autumn camp and compulsory 
“voluntary training” in January. 

They most also subject themselves 
to the paternalistic rule of the front 
office, which frowns on player agents 
and multi-year contracts and controls 
all player endorsements. The 20-year- 
old Tokyo Giants' star Hideki Matsui 
even needed permission to begin driv- 
ing his car to and from the stadium. 

Yet few Japanese players are pro- 
testing. Although their union has ex- 
pressed a desire for higher pay and 
better pension benefits, and has shown 
support for the striking U.S. players, it 
is clear that money is not the only 
important thing to them. 

Many players are driven by a need 
to belong. “Baseball is a world of 
duty and humanity,” said Hiromichi 
Isbige, captain or the Seibu Lions. 
“To evaluate oneself just by money 
and sell oneself at the highest price, 
that’s business.” 

With the possibility of the strike in 
the United States extending into next 
season, there is talk of big-name Amer- 
ican free agents looking to Japan. Paul 
O’Neill, a New York Yankee, has al- 
ready expressed his interest. Other 


players are sure to follow. 

Fading American big leaguers have 
long been a fixture here in Japan; there 
is a limit of three per team, in general, 
they are better reimbursed than their 
Japanese teammates and a source of 
resentment if the performance does 
not match the income. 

The former Detroit Tiger Rob Deer 
signed a record $2.7 million contract 
this year, only to find himself unable 
to hit Japanese pitching. He was re- 
leased with a batting average of .151. 

Now, with many cash-rich Japanese 
owners ready to splurge on American 
talent, the gap between American and 
Japanese salaries will grow. 

The logical question for Americans 
is, will that be enough to finally spur 
the union to action? Will Japanese free 
agents take the unprecedented step of 
trying their hand in the United States? 
Most Japanese think not. 

“I can’t think of anything that will 
make them do that.*’ said Kozo Abe. 
the sports editor of the dailv Yukan 
Fuji. “They might not tike the situa- 
tion, but it’s just not the Japanese way 
to make waves.” 

If only American players thought 
that way too, from time to lime. 

The writer is author of “ You Gotta 
Have Wa, ” about Japanese baseball He 
contributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 




Pistol Was Carried Between Sect Killings 


By Alan Riding 

Netv York Times Service 

GENEVA — Swiss police concluded 
Tuesday that one or more people partici- 
pated in the deaths of 23 members of a 
religious sect in one Swiss village last week 
ana then drove 150 kilometers through the 
night to another village, where soon after- 
ward 25 more sect members lost their lives. 

The police also confirmed the death of a 
second leader of the so-called Order of the 
Solar Temple, but investigators conceded 
they were still no closer to understanding 
what happened in the farming village of 
Cheiry and the mountain hamlet of Gran- 
ges-sur-Salvan last week 

There is evidence of murder, not least in 
the bullet wounds in 20 of the 23 bodies 
found at Cheiry. And there are indications 


that some victims committed suicide, not 
only in a letter in which one victim said she 
had come to Switzerland to die, but also in 
the sect's doomsday teachings. 

On Tuesday, the police said a .22-caliber 
pistol with a silencer found at Granges- 
sur-Salvan was one of the weapons used at 
Cheiry, thus confirming that one or more 
people left Cheiry after the first deaths. 
But did he or they go to Granges-sur-Sal- 
van to die or to oversee the next stage of 
the drama? 

Without knowing whether he is alive. 
Swiss police are hunting the sect's spiritual 
leader, Luc Jouret, 46, a Belgian physician 
last seen in Granges-snr-Salvan on Oct. 4. 
If his body is among several badly burned 
victims still to be identified, the case will 
become even more baffling. 


"Until all the bodies have been identi- 
fied, his arrest warrant still stands.” a po- 
lice spokesman said. “He is definitely still 
being sought." Police in France, Marti- 
nique. Canada and Australia, where Mr. 
Jouret frequently traveled and still may 
have followers, have also been alerted. 

On Tuesday, the police said Camille 
Pilet, a former executive of the Piaget 
watch company, was among the dead at 
Cheiry. Mr. Pilet. who lived in Monaco, 
financed many of the sect's operations and 
paid for a dinner attended by a dozen sect 
leaders 10 days ago. 

On Monday, police said they had identi- 
fied the body of Joseph di Mambro. a 
French-Canadian who joined forces with 
Mr. Jouret in 1984 to form what was then 
known as Solar Tradition. 


RUBLE; Russian Currency Plunges in Selling Frenzy STRIKE; 


Continued from Page I 


borrowing rubles for specula- 
tion more expensive. 

In official trading on the 
Moscow Interbank Currency 
Exchange, the ruble fell to 3.926 
to the dollar from 3,081 at the 
close on Monday, a decline of 
21.5 percent. Later in the day. 
traders said dollars were selling 
for more than 4,000 rubles, and 
at a few currency exchanges on 
the street for 5.000 rubles. 

“It may have started as some- 
thing else, but at this point the 
market is driven simply by ex- 
cessively speculative forces and 
the way they see the actions of 
the authorities." said Maarten 
Prank, the managing director in 
Moscow for ING Bank of the 
Netherlands. 


Martin Andersson, the presi- 
dent of Brunswick, a Moscow- 
based, Swedish-owned broker- 
age firm, said the central bank 
would have to act forcefully to 
brake the ruble's decline over 
the next few days if it is to 


retain any credibility in the 
market. 

"If they take some decisive 
actions, that will be a very good 
sign,” Mr. Andersson said. “If 
they passively watch the market 
destroy the value of the ruble, it 
will be a bad sign that will lead 
to higher inflation.'' 

In Moscow, hard currency 
stores that accept rubles at the 
market rate closed down during 
the day. unwilling to accept the 
currency while it was falling 
several percent an hour. 

“I wouldn't call it a panic, 
but just a very cruel reality," 
said Alexei A Obozintsev. the 
head of hard currency opera- 
tions at Tokobank, one of Rus- 
sia's largest financial institu- 
tions. “It's an extraordinary 
change in the market situation 
that will have an effect on every 
Russian citizen." 

Analysts said that it was dif- 
ficult to explain the central 
bank's lack of aggressive re- 
sponse so far. They said that the 
government had been under 


pressure from large exporters to 
devalue the currency in order to 
make their goods less expensive 
on world markets, or at least to 
make the current level of ex- 
ports more profitable. 

A cheaper ruble also would 
mean Lhat new loans to industry 
and to cover the budget deficit 
would be worth less in dollar 
terms, making them less worri- 
some to such Western institu- 
tions as the International Mon- 
etary Fund. 

While some economists said 
the ruble had become some- 
what overvalued this year, they 
said such a sharp fall created an 
impression of economic insta- 
bility just as Russia seemed to 
be getting its economic bear- 
ings. 

"If their objective was to 
make a quick and painful deval- 
uation to a level defined by ex- 
port requirements, they’ve done 
a good job," Mr. Andersson 
said. “If their objective was to 
stabilize inflation, they certain- 
ly have not.” 


Option for U.S.? 


BOMBS; For Wary Searchers, World War U Lives On 


Continued from Page 1 


people and showered a wide 
area with glass and masonry. 

About 160 tons of World 
War II debris was pulled from 
Berlin soil last year, ranging 
from soldiers’ helmets to bombs 
buried up to six meters below 
the surface. The city's war-sal- 
vage budget this year is $8.4 
million, sufficient only to 
scratch the surface of one of 
history’s most relentlessly 
bombed cities. 


Mr. Harvey and his crew, for 
example, have been methodi- 
cally combing the Tiergarten 


for four years, but they have 
hardly made a dent in its 385 
hectares (960 acres). Currently, 
they are focused on the park's 
east end, about 300 meters from 
the Brandenburg Gate, because 
many new government facilities 
in Berlin will be built near 
there. 

The 18-member team stakes 
out lanes and then glides back 
and forth with a metal detector, 
supposedly capable of detecting 
a bottle cap nearly six meters 
down. The men typically cover 
nearly 835 square meters 0,000 
square yards) a day, at a cost to 
the city of roughly $6,500. 


Ironically, the combat planes 
that visited such devastation 
have also provided critical help 
in rooting out unexploded 
bombs. During the war, recon- 
naissance pilots took countless 
rolls of aerial photographs to 
assess the bombing damage. 

City authorities today have 
about 6,000 black-and-white 
photos from American and 
British archives. Analysis study 
them to determine where 
bombs either exploded — pro- 
ducing sizable craters — or did 
not — thus leaving only small 
boles punched in the ground or 
building. 


Continued from Page 1 
cations facilities or intelligence 
directorates to shake the re- 
gime’s leaders. 

That lactic, used last year in 
retaliation for an Iraqi plot to 
kill President George Bush, 
might be revived in a prolonged 
stand-off. 

“People might have to think 
again if Saddam starts playing a 
'cat -and- mouse game, with- 
drawing his forces and then 
bringing them forward again a 
few weeks later," said Andrew 
Duncan, a retired colonel, who 
is now at the International In- 
stitute of Strategic Studies in 
London. 

Mr. Saddam may have start- 
ed a waiting game, hoping that 
by causing U.S. military costs 
to mount. Washington will 
make a deal on sanctions. 

Faced with a war of psycho- 
logical and economic attrition, 
the United States could seek to 
impose an exclusion zone in 
southern Iraq similar to the UN 
ban on heavy weapons around 
Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. 

Offi rials said that before 
U.S. forces start knocking out 
Baghdad's equipment in south- 
ern Iraq, the Clinton adminis- 
tration would want backing 
from UN Security Council res- 
olutions. 

Right now, Mr. Duncan and 
most officials said, Kuwait can 
be defended with U.S. air pow- 
er. U.S. ground forces arriving 
in Kuwait can use the crisis to 
check their prepositioned heavy 
equipment and help train Ku- 
waiti forces. 


See our 

International Recruitment 

every Thursday 



r.rtg, Bcv Reutm 


James Reiman, of Glasgow. 


Booker Prize 
Is Awarded 
To Scotsman 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 


LONDON — The Scottish 
writer James Kelman won Brit- 
ain's most prized literoiy honor 
on Tuesday night for “How 
Late It Was, How Late,” a 
black comedy about a blind 
drunk that is peppered with ex- 
pletives. 

Accepting the £20,000 
($32,000) Booker Prizes Mr. 
Kelman, a self-educated Scot 
who once worked as a bus con- 
ductor and building laborer, 
launched into an impassioned 
plea for Scots not to be cultural- 
ly drowned by the English. 


At a dinner attended by Lon- 
don literati at the Guildhall, 
Mi. Kelman said: “My culture 
and my language have "the right 
to exist and no one has the au- 
thority to dismiss that” 


He added: “One of the re- 
maining freedoms we have as 
writers is the blank page. No- 
body can prescribe how we 
should fill it whether by good or 
bad intention." 

The Booker Prize, estab- 
lished in 1968, is awarded each 
year for the best novel written 
in English and published for the 
first time in Britain by a British 
publisher. Mr. Kelman's book 
beat out works by five other 
nominees. (Reuters, AP) 


AUSTRIA: Far-Right Leader Predicts Rise to Power 


Continued from Page 1 


made him a rising star on the 
Austrian political scene. 

He called Tuesday for a ban 
on all immigration except for 
political refugees from the for- 
mer Yugoslavia, saying “we 
should give no permission for 
people to come in until the level 
on unemployment here is re- 
duced.” 

But Mr. Haider said he was 
willing to disassociate himself 
from such extreme right parties 
as the neo-Fascists in Italy, the 
Republicans in Germany and 
the National Front in France. 
He said he was grateful, howev- 
er, for the congratulations of- 
fered this week by Jean -Marie 
Le Pen, the French far-right 
politician. 

He contended that his natu- 
ral allies in Europe included the 
Christian Democrats led by 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl in 
Germany, whom he said he had 
met. 

He also denied that be was 
either a racist or a neo-Nazi, but 
he repealed earlier praise for 
the employment policies intro- 
duced in the 1930s by Hitler. 

As far as Hitler-era employ- 
ment policies are concerned. 


Mr. Haider said he had already 
suffered the consequences of 
praising the Nazi leader. 

"I was misunderstood,” he 
said. “What I said was that be- 
tween 1933 and 1936 Hitler had 
a successful policy on unem- 
ployment. I didn’t mean to sup- 
port Nazism." 

On Tuesday, he claimed the 
real level of unemployment in 
Austria was 5.8 percent, rather 
than the officially stated levd of 
4.4 percent. Citing housing 
shortages in Vienna and a 
threat to jobs, he said “we have 
to stop immigration until un- 
employment is reduced to un- 
der 5 percent." 

Although insisting that in 
some sections of Vienna “these 
foreigners are my friends,” he 
also said that foreigners should 
not be allowed to account for 
more than 30 percent of classes 
in schools. He also aipicd that 
“the real problem is people 
from Turkey, India and worth 
Africa who are involved in 
drugs and crime." 

In response to Mr. Haider, an 
aide to Mr. Vranitzky said 
Tuesday night: “Mr. Haider’s 
accusations are completely un- 
founded when it comes to the 


figure he gives on unemploy*' 
menu and we will fight his poli- 
cies on immigration and on the 
European Union.” 

Mr. Haider said he was un- 
happy with the terms negotiat- 
ed for Austria’s forthcoming 
membership in the European 
Union, especially on issues con- 
cerning agriculture and the en- 
vironment. 

Seeking to portray himself as 
a moderate ‘‘liberal conserva- 
tive” in favor, of privatization, 
health care aqd social security 
reforms,^ and a free market 
economy, Mr. Haider accused 
Mr. Vmnitzky of failing to gov- 
ern in recent years. “He has 
governed by nondedsoo,” he 
said. 

Mr. Haider made clear that 
he would remain in oppoaiton 
as long as the Austrian People's 
Party is led by Vice Chancellor ' 
Erhard Bustle, But Alois Mock, 
a fellow member of -the Austri- 
an People's Party and Austria's . 
foreign minister, said' in ah in- 
terview Tuesday that while he 


expected his party to form a 
new coalition with Mr. Vran- 


itzky’s Social Democrats, he 
would not rule out a future alli- 
ance with Mr. Haider. 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Florida Poll Defeats 


'Cultural Superiority’ 


Three Christian Coalition- 
backed school board candi- 
dates who favored teaching 
students that American cul- 
ture is superior to all others 
were soundly defeated in the 
Republican primary election 
in Lake County, Florida. 

Their moderate Republi- 
can opponents, as well as the 
Democrats vying for three 
open seats on the five-mem- 
ber panel in November, all 
have pledged to overturn the 
so-called America-first poli- 
cy, which was adopted by the 
Lake County School Board in 
May but never went into ef- 
fect. 

“The people turned out the 
extremists," said Keith Mul- 
lins. co-chairman of People 
for Mainstream Values — 
formed expressly for the Sept. 
8 primary and the runoff of 
last week. Lake County in 
central Florida has farms, cit- 
rus groves, mobile homes and 
about 150,000 people, many 
of them retirees. 


John Dowless, state fiekl 
director for the Christian Co- 
alition, complained, “Now, 
the America-first policy w£Q 
be reversed, and they’ll prob- 
ably want more explicit sex 
instruction.” 


The conservative majority 
also rolled back property tax- 
es, cut school financing, de- 
layed construction of new 
schools and froze teachers’ 
salaries. 


The teachers’ union, the 
Lake County Education As- 
sociation, bad sued to throw 
out the cultural superiority 
policy, contending it violates 
a state law requiring the 
teaching of respect and ap- 
preciation for other cultures. 


Short Takes 


A New York policewoman 
trying to Mend in at a bar 
bought a beer, which quali- 
fied her for a drawing for a 
$14,000 Plymouth Neon 
automobile. She won. “There 
are people within the depart- 
ment wno take a conservative 
view that she shouldn't keep 
the car," Deputy Commis- 
sioner Walter Mack said. 
“I'm hoping the Board of 
Ethics determines she can 
keep it.” Until there's a rul- 


ing, the bright red car will sit 
on a dealership lot. The offi- 
cer was not identified. 


Why are babies especially 
lovable when they're asleep? 
Aside from the fact that 
they're less troublesome that 
way, Robert Wright a geneti- 
cist and author of “The Mor- 
al Animal, " told The Wash- 
ington Post, it may be all in 
the genes — that parents, are 
programmed to keep a dose 
eye on sleeping babies since 
they are especially vulnerable 
then, unable to cry and crawl 
away at the approach of dan- 
ger. Mr. Wright said, “The 
sensation of *Oh, they’re so 
cute' would be your genes 
saying you should be espe- 
cially vigilant now, you 
should not stray far.” 


For yean, she has loved 
parties. For weeks, she has 
been Truly Boring. It hap- 
pened when Truly Gold mar- 
ried Cary S. Boring last 
month and took his name! 
Tn really not boring,” said 
Mrs. Boring, 24. “I can be the 
life of any party.” But, rite 
says, “People are already 
coming tip with names for 
children we could have." The 
most frequent suggestions: 
Really, Very and Totally. 

International Herald Tribune. 



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Gamble by a Desperate Saddam \ JoumalisU 

Sanctions Vi iewed as Forcing Dramatic Action Are Beaten 

' Sa ’ olino After retail prices soared last “He was miming out of time Mg>nr TtflVm 

Nov York Times Service year, Mr. Saddam decided to nnri natieiuv hart (n dn ■* "l*v/vl 


Iraqi Acts Shed Doubt on liftin g Ban 


By Elaine Sciolino 

Nov York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Saddam Hussein's latest 
confrontation with the United 
States illustrates both the suc- 
cess and the failure of Washing- 
ton's handling of the Iraqi lead- 
er. . 


After retail prices soared last “He was running out of time 
year, Mr. Saddam decided to and patience and had to do 
accept Security Council Reso- something to convince his peo- 
iuiion 715, which set up the pie he was in charge and taking 
weapons- inspection system; as action to get the sanctions lift- 


States illustrates both the sue- a result of his compliance, he ed. Sooner or later something 
cess and the failure of Washing- promised his people, sanctions like this was going to happen." 
ton s han d lin g of the Iraqi lead- would dissipate.” Mr, Saddam was apparently 

^ Instead, the sanctions re- convinced that even if he com- 

The success is that two mained in place, and prices plied with the UN resolutions, 
successive administrations have soared again. Even Mr. Sad- the United States would not al- 
managed to maintain crippling. Yarn’s son Uday used his news- low the Security Council to ease 
sanctions on Iraq that have ere- paper, Babil, to criticize offi- sanctions. He ignored repeated 


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% NEWS ANALYSIS 

, ifc, aled an economic crisis so des- 
perate that Mr. Saddam felt 
i V Mr ^E‘ cornered. But instead of recog- 
. '* t' w . nizing the sovereignty and the 
, Hui uij borders of Kuwait, a condition 
B '4 W so. by the United Nations for 
^ easing the sanctions, he moved 

er U'j a - 70,000 troops toward the coun- 
J ' If Ui ^ that his troops invaded in 
1990. 

JijfT That troop mobilization 
bighh'ghts the policy faflure: 
‘*i a W Three years after the end of the 

v Qulf War, Mr. Saddam remains 
\ J finhly entrenched in power. 

The result is that even if Iraq 
is pulling its troops .away from 
, i ,a r«i!i Kuwait, Mr. Saddam will have 
; ll J fjjjr proved once again that he can 
” force the United States to send 
bi n ^ tens of thousands of troops to 
confront him; if he is not ie- 
ht f 3 r*l moved .from power, he will 

uNev 1 prove he is a political survivor 

“ r ‘ , f“Tbry In his 15 years as president, 
told tvj Mr. Saddam has ruled by ruth- 
lessly suppressing all opposi- 
,, Pca : non. But his government does 
not rule by terror alone. It has 
^ survived because it has always 
ij! , p ^ been supple enough to respond 
_ to Ihe basic physical needs of 
■v ^iidcfei the 'people. The philosophy of 
r j ^ governing is best expressed in 
J two Arabic words: tarhib (ter- 

1 ror) and targhib (enticement). 


cials who promoted compliance advice from France, Turkey 
with the UN demands, al- and Russia chat they would 
though he never attacked his support the lifting of some 
father by name. sanctions if he would fulfill Se- 

After the Iraqi dinar lost half curity Council resolutions and 
its value in May, Uday Hussein recognize Kuwait and its bor- 
critidzed Iraq’s prime minister ders. 

and finance minister for their Instead, he has always said 
inability to control inflation. that Iraq's isolation from the 
So Mr. Saddam added the sea was a cruel accident of colo- 
portfolio of prime minister to nial history, 
his responsibilities as president. So it is not surprising that he 
commander-in-chief and head found it particularly galling af- 
of the Arab Ba’aih Socialist ter the Gulf War when the 
Pany. He also turned the ruling United Nations formally re- 
Revolutionary Command drew the Kuwaiti border to give 
Council into an economic body P 3 ^ of Iraq’s only port, at 
that made decisions on such is- Umm Qasr, to Kuwait 
sues as how much sugar should “Had Saddam come up with 
cost. a satisfactory statement on Ku- 

The economic crisis wors- wait, the coalition would have 
ened last month, when the Se- sofwned further and compelled 
curity Council again decided 1116 United States to confront 
not to lift the sanctions. On sanctions issue," said Ms. 
ScpL 25, Mr. Saddam halved Marr. “But he didn’t, and my 
monthly food rations, and food interpretation is that he wasn’t 
prices doubled in one day. close to it yeL" 

The economic pressure coin- 
cided with mounting political -m- «-w-« 

pressure. In September of last I /\wi I g*w\ 

year, there were reports that a I f ill 1 1^1 

bomb had exploded in front of ™ 

Mr. Saddam’s motorcade in « w~ v » j 

Baghdad; last May, a car bomb Michael R. Gordon 
exploded at a place where his * Vw y ’ ar * Tunes Service 
motorcade was expected to WASHINGTON — Even if 
pass. Iraq pulls its forces back from 

Purges and executions fol- the Kunmt border, as its ^plo- 
lowed each incident, and during ™tsfflidithaddoneonTues- 
necent months, Mr. Saddam has «*V. Baghdad s troop move- 


Comptkdby Our Staff Frvm Dispatches 

BASRA, Iraq — Jour- 
nalists heading to the Ku- 
wait border on a trip orga- 
nized by the Iraqi 
government were am- 
bushed, robbed and threat- 
ened with death by gunmen 
in southern Iraq. 

The journalists were 
traveling by bus to report 
on the tensions at the bor- 
der when five gunmen 
stopped their bus on the 
highway. They robbed the 
passengers, including jour- 
nalists from Reuters, CNN 
and Agence France-Presse, 
of television cameras, 
watches, jewelry and at 
least $4,500 in cash. 

One gunman then forced 
everyone off the bus and 
ordered the Iraqi men to 
strip off their clothes. 

The journalists said the 
gunmen initially said they 
would put all the passen- 
gers back on the bus and 
blow it up. Instead, they 
shot out the tires and fled. 
The driver then changed 
the tires and proceeded to 
the city of Basra. 

(AP, Reuters) 


By Julia Preston 

Washington Past Service 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — Iraq's military maneu- 
vers near Kuwait have soured 
its chances for a sympathetic 
hearing anytime soon on lifting 
the oil embargo, diplomats said 
Tuesday. But the United Na- 
tions Security Council remains 
divided over whether to ease the 
sanctions at a later date. 

One of Saddam Hussein's ap- 
parent purposes in moving 
troops toward Kuwait was to 
show frustration with the sanc- 
tions and gjive an idea of what 
Iraq was capable of doing if the 
oil embargo was not eased. 

The 15 Security Council 
members rejected Iraq's clumsy 
attempt to intimidate them. But 
they differed over how lasting 
the damage would be to Iraq’s 
effort to get relief from the 
trade embargo that has devas- 
tated its economy. 

Ironically, Iraq’s troop move- 
ments wrecked its prospects for 
reaping immediate gains from 
the one area in which it has 
shown good will: the destruc- 
tion of its most lethal weapons. 

One catalyst to the current 
crisis was a six-month report 
issued Tuesday by the UN com- 
mission overseeing the disman- 
tling of weapons. The chai rman 
of the commission, Rolf Ekeus, 
reported that a system for long- 
term monitoring of Iraq's weap- 
ons industry was “provisionally 
operational.” 

The report, which Mr. Ekeus 


called “fundamentally posi- 
tive," concluded that there was 
“cause for optimism" if Iraq 
continued with “the same level 
of cooperation" that it had giv- 
en so far. The panel said it had 
accounted for all of Iraq's Scud 
missiles, destroyed its chemical 
weapons and largely crippled 
its biological capabilities. 

“My honest assessment is we 
had an excellent chance to get 
lifting or easing, say', in a six- 
months’ time' period.” Mr. 
Ekeus said. “Now the trust in 
Iraq may be undermined by the 
steps they took." 

Russia and France, two of 
the five permanent Security 
Council members, had been 
prepared to give Iraq a public 
pat on the back for its weapons 
progress as the first diplomatic 
step toward easing sanctions. 
But neither country was ready 
to say any kind word about 
Baghdad this week. 

The United States jumped on 
the chance to reinforce its argu- 
ment that Iraq should gel "no 
break from the sanctions until it 
bad established a clear record 
of compliance with the full 
range of UN resolutions. 

Washington's view is that be- 
fore the oil embargo can be re- 
considered, Baghdad must stop 
its attacks on Kurdish and Shi- 
ite minorities; recognize the 
UN-drawn borders and the sov- 
ereignly of Kuwait; return Ku- 
waiti prisoners and property, 
and improve its human rights 
record. 






Long-Term, How to Keep Iraq at Bay? 



But in the past year, that deli- even purged officials from the 


cate structure has crumbled. 

“There was only terrorizing," 
said Amaoria ftaram, chairman 


of the Department of Middle command. 


Dun clan, a center of his sup- 
port, and the clan of Izzat Ibra- 
him, officially his second in 


East History at Haifa Universi- 
w hi v; ! 1 - ty- "There was no longer entice- 

i*i- 2 ; i . Ii b menL" 

! * !u .i V'i!V Mr. Saddam was forced by 

>in rss-it- , n ^ * the sanctions to allow the Unit- 

. - j J, r 11 ed Nations to scrap his weap- 

H j." _ 'Vi p . , t ’ n! £ £ j| ons of mass destruction, set up 

!: ’ * 4 i * an elaborate and hu miliating 

fr - ■ • V ,r: ' k- . monitoring system of his arms 

1 ‘ ,v ‘ ’ ■•'•'I 1 *" are il*e industry, and take mcreasinpTv 


,v • r ■ Pi- .tic i.*e 
«. unit :up_v- 
• *': ■'**«:. >*. s-uichi'i': 
' ’'■■V.icm SU iic-v 

' v:\ ar.J Ti-ij;. 


industry, and take increasingly 
tough economic measures. That 
hurt the Iraqi people, fueled 
discontent and brought him to 
what some Iraqi scholars say 
was an inevitable decision to 
take dramatic action. 


He has answered each set- 
back with more stringent proc- 
lamations: He has imposed 
strict Islamic punishments of 
amputations of a hand or a foot 
for thievery and has announced 
that deserters from the armed 
forces risk losing one or both 
ears. A repeat deserter may 
have an “X" branded on his 
forehead. 

“Iraq has been a sleeper," 
said Pbebe Marr. a senior fel- 
low at the National Defense 
University and a historian who 
has written extensively- on Iraq. 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Even if 
Iraq pulls its forces back from 
the Kuwait border, as its diplo- 
mats said it had done on Tues- 
day, Baghdad’s troop move- 
ments have created a new 
problem for the Pentagon: how 
to ensure that Iraqi troops not 
only withdraw from the border 
but also keep a respectful dis- 
tance. 

An Iraqi withdrawal, which 
U.S. intelligence has not yet 
confirmed, may help ease the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

immediate sense of crisis, but it 
could create a longer-term 
problem. 

The question for the Penta- 


fending Kuwait but was also administration official said, is 
preparing to put pressure on the to ensure that “Iraqi troops are 
Iraqis to move their troops well rolled back to nonthreatening 
away from the Kuwait border, positions." Once this crisis 
With its forces sketched thin, passes, the Pentagon wants 
the Pentagon is reluctant to sta- some breathing room. 


Lion thousands of U.S. troops in One plan being developed is 
the harsh Kuwaiti desert indefi- to establish a deculi tarized zone 
nitely as a precaution against a in southern Iraq that would be 
new threat from the north, as it off-limits to Iraqi forces. That 
does with its 37,000-member would, in effect, replicate on the 
force in South Korea. ground the no-flight zones the 

“I have no desire to keep a United States established in 
large military force there for a southern and northern Iraq af- 
long time," Defense Secretary ter the Gulf War. 

W illiam J. Perry said on U.S. Such a zone, which would be 
television, adding: “So, no, we established by the United Na- 
do not plan to keep them there, tions and enforced by the Unh- 
We want to resolve this crisis." ed States and its allies, would 
Nor does the Pentagon want give the Pentagon some protec- 


gon officials said Washington 
would proceed with the deploy- 
ment until it was clear that Iniq 
had indeed removed its threat. 

Nor is 36,000 the upper limit. 
If Iraq continues to menace Ku- 
wait with its Republican Guard 
divisions, the U.S. deployment 
could double to about 70,000 or 
so, Pentagon officials said. 

Complementing its deploy- 
ment of ground troops, the Pen- 
tagon on Monday sent more 
warplanes, including 66 F-I6 
fighter jets and 42 A- 10s. which 



established by the United Na- are equipped with Gatling guns 
tions and enforced by the Unit- m1 V armor-piercing shells and 
ed States and its allies, would an H- tank missiles. The Penta- 


IRAQ: U.S. Wants Exclusion Zone 


Continued from Page 1 

ing that American officials were 
eager to hear other ideas from 
the Security Council members. 

“We are looking at ways to 
kind of move them back and 
make sure that they stay behind 
a certain area so that we are not 
faced with this kind of thing 
again," a senior U.S. official 
said. 

Defense Secretary William J. 
Perry called a weapons exclu- 
sion zone “a viable option” and 
raid it could be patrolled from 
the air “for some number of 
years, depending on the situa- 
tion.” 


southern Iraq resulted from “Our policy is clear.” he said. 
Washington’s urgent desire to “We will not allow Iraq to 
avoid situations in which Mr. threaten its neighbor or to in- 
Saddam could repeatedly pro- timidaie the United Nations." 
voke an expensive and risky Bui the broad deployment of 
U.S. deployment to the Gulf. 356 warplanes that he an- 
Mr. Clinton declared in a brief nounced su gg ested that the ad- 
televised speech Monday night ■ ministration was not merely de- 
that Mr. Saddam could not be 
trusted and that “actions, not 

words" would guide U.S. ded- RITCT <5 

sion malting. PLJ k £3. 

“We wOl not allow Iraq to The New itbo 

threaten its neighbors or to in- tn* ^ ** basal 011 iron more Uua 

IMtall Naibni" 1000 bwksKnts throogboin ihe Uni led Suies. 
turn date the United Nations, Weets M list air nen necessarily couecucivc. 

Mr. Clinton said. 


a longer-term to be hostage to President Sad- 
dam Hussein's whims and rush 
n for the Penta- forces to the area every time the 
gon is how to prevent Iraq from Iraqi leader moves a couple of 
renewing its threat to Kuwait divisions. Creating a credible 
yet again and forcing Washing- force in Kuwait is a costly, 
ton to respond by sending thou- time-consuming and logistical- 
sands of troops to the distant !y demanding enterprise. 
GuITat each new provocation. The Pentagon’s problem re- 
President Bill Clinton allud- calls the months before the 
ed to the problem in his address 1991 Gulf War, when one of the 
on Monday, without saying Bush administration's greatest 
how it should be resolved. concerns was that the Iraqis 
is clear." he said, would withdraw from Kuwait 
allow Iraq to before the allies began the war, 
ighbor or to in- continue to menace the Middle 
oiled Nations.” East and dare Washington to 
d deployment of try to establish a large military 


lion against future Iraqi threats. 

To keep the pressure on Iraq 
to withdraw its troops, mean- 
while, the Pentagon has contin- 
ued its military deployment. 

Senior Pentagon 'officials 
said the administration was 
sending 36,000 troops. Penta- 


gon is also sending 36 F-15E 
and 18 F-1I1F jets. Those 
planes are equipped with laser- 
guided bombs, and were used 
against Iraqi tanks and other 
targets in the Gulf War. 

The Pentagon also ordered n 
B-52 bombers to Diego Garcia, 
an island in the Indian Ocean- 


PainA Hu Afc«,r Truki- Pn-** 

Kuwaiti officials visiting the French frigate Georges Ley- 
gues after it arrived Tuesday in Kuwait City's port. 


Real Estate 
Marketplace 

Every Friday 
Contact Fred Ronan 
Tel.: (33 1)46 37 93 91 
Fax:(331)46 37 93 70 

or your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


“Our policy is clear.” he said, would withdraw from Kuwait 
“We will not allow Iraq to before the allies began the war, 
threaten its neighbor or to in- continue to menace the Middle 
timidaie the United Nations." East and dare Washington to 
But the broad deployment of try to establish a large military 
356 warplanes that" he an- presence in the conservative 
nounced suggested that the ad- states of the Gulf, 
ministration was not merely de- The long-term solution, one 


Weeks on list are not necessarily consecutive. 
FICTION 


BEST SELLERS 

kTlmo 3 BASEBALL, by Geoffrey C. 

mu from more than Ward and Ken Burns 


years, depending on the situa- According to U.S. cabinet of- 
tion.” fidals, the exclusion zone could 

Mr. Perry said late Monday b 2 rt ?5 ks ' other 

that the United States could not anDOrcd weapons, 
accept and would not accept the since the end of the Gulf 


Lm Weeks 
Wk M Li* 


accept and would not accept the since the end of the Gulf 
possibility of bang “pinned War, an exclusion zone has ex- 
down" in the Gulf. isted prohibiting Iraqi aircraft 

After Mr. Clinton's older 

Monday night sending B-52 ^ ^ A 

bombers, F-U7 Stealth fighters SSw?' “ 
and scores of other rmbtaiy air- normem iraq. 
craft to the Gulf, American of- Aircraft from the Gulf War 
fiedak appeared on television coalition, primarily from the 
Tuesday to reiterate thai the United States, Britain and 
Pentagon and White House France; have been patrolling 
were considering a military those exclusion zones for years 
strike. - and could be given orders to 

“Definitely, we are talking destr °y “7 heavy wound 
about a preemptive strike “ weapons m A ezone, U.S. offi- 
Mrs, Albright said. She said the aals indicated Tuesday. 

United States, under existing Genera] Shalikashvili said 
UN resolutions, had the au- that a heavy-weapons exclusion 
thority to act alone but could zone in the Iraqi desert would 


Aircraft from the Gulf War 
coalition, primarily from the 
United States, Britain and 
France; have been patrolling 
those exclusion zones for years 
and could be given orders to 
destroy any heavy ground 
weapons in the zone, U.S. offi- 
cials indicated Tuesday. 

General Shalikashvili said 
that a heavy-weapons exclusion 
zone in the Iraqi desert would 


1 DEBT OF HONOR, by Tom 

Clancy I 

2 TALTOS. by Anne Rice 

3 NOTHING LASTS FOREV. 

ER. bv Sdary SbeJdon 2 

A THE BODY FARM, by Patri- 
cia Conwefl 3 

5 THE CELESTTNE PROPHE- 
CY. by James Rcdfieid 4 

6 POLITICALLY CORRECT 

BEDTIME STORIES, by 
James Finn Gamer 5 

7 THE GIFT, by Danielle Steel 6 

8 THE BRIDGES OF MADJ- 

SON COUNTY, by Robert 
James Waller 7 

9 THE CHAMBER, by John 

Grisham — 9 

10 HOLLYWOOD RIDS, by 

Jadde Coffins M 

11 A SON OF THE CIRCUS, by 


John Irving . 

12 WILD HORSES, by Dick 

Francis - I 

13 BROTHERS AND SISTERS. 

bv Bebe Moore Campbell . — 12 3 

14 DISNEY'S THE LION 

KING. mJapied by Don Fer- 
guson 10 10 

15 ONE TRUE THING, by 

AnnaQuimficn . IS Z 

NONFICTION 

1 BARBARA BUSH: A Mem- 
oir, bv Barbara Bush i * 

2 COUFLEHOOD. by Paul 

Reiser - 2 S 


turn to the Security Council for be easier to police than a similar 


“additional support." 

Pressure for the creation of a 
broader exclusion zone in 


FACTORIES OF DEATH; 
Japanese Biological War- 
fare 1932-45 and the 
American Cover-Up 

By Sheldon Harris. 297 pages. 
£25. Roiitledge. 

Reviewed by George Hicks 

I N 1981, the American news- 
paperman John Powell 
opened the eyes of the English 
reading world with a series of 
v articles on Japan’s biological 
warfare experiments and at- 
tempts by the United States to 


UN exclusion zone around the 
mountainous Bosnian capital, 
Sarajevo. 


BOOKS 


has not been wasted. Barring ously unrecorded. However, the 
the unlikely discovery of major book lacks photographs, which 


new primary sources, his will is a pity, 
surely be the classic work for Nonetheless, Harris shows 
many years to come. convincingly that although 

The story he tells is basically many thousands died in the 


similar to that of Williams and Japanese vivivsection and germ 
Wallace. Japanese biological test experiments, the scientific 


and chemical warfare stations 
in Manchuria and China used 
human beings as guinea pigs. 
Many thousands, mainly Chi- 
nese, died dreadful deaths. 

In return for information on 
the Japanese research, U. S. au- 
thorities secretly granted immu- 
nity from prosecution to the 


conceal all knowledge of iL Japanese organizers of the pro- 
Eight years later, the British gram. No one was prosecuted 
journalists Peter Williams and for these crimes in the Tokyo 


achievements were minimal. 
Starting a decade or so after 
Japan and without the benefit 
of human guinea pigs, Ameri- 
can scientists rapidly caught up 
and surpassed the Japanese ef- 
fort. Huge sums were spent by 
Japan on bacteriological war- 
fare projects. Thousands of 
highly qualified experts were in- 
volved. But nothing was pro- 
duced that proved lo be a valu- 
able weapon of war. 

The United States quite un- 
necessarily gave immunity to 
Shiro Ishii, the evil genius who 
mastermined the program, and 


journalists Peter Williams and for these crimes in the Tokyo duced that proved lo be a valu- 
David Wallace published what war trials. able weapon of war. 

appeared at the time to be a The years Harris spent in ar- The United States quite un- 
deunkivie work: “Unit 731: Ja- chives around the world has necessarily gave immunity to 
pan's Secret Biological Warfare paid off in a wealth of new Shiro Ishii, the evil genius who 
mWoHdWar II. • detail both on the cover-up and mastermined the program, and 

G^ifepe be anything new to the death factories. The exten- his colleagues. They cunningly 
say?7&K? decade that Professor sive field work he did in China took full advantage of ihe Cold 
Sht&tHiims. a U- S. histori- led to the discovery of Japanese War, playing on American fears 
an ha^dtfvoted to the subject research center that wax prcvi- that if immunity was not grant- 




4 JAMES HERRIOTS CAT 
STORIES, bv Janies Hcrrioi 9 

5 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 

DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL, 
by John Berendt 5 

6 Toe book of virtues. 

by Wilburn J. Beoaeu 4 

7 ALL’S FAIR, by M«iy Mala- 

Im and James CarviDewiib Pe- 
ter Knobler 8 

8 EMBRACED BY THE 

LIGHT, by Betiy J. Eadic with 
Curds Tavtor 3 

9 MOTHERLESS DAUGH- 
TERS. by Hope Eddman 7 

10 THE KENNEDY WOMEN, 

by Laurence Learner 10 

11 DON'T STAND TOO 

CLOSE TO A NAKED 
MAN. by Tim Allen 

12 BETTER THAN SEX. by 

Hunter S. Thompson (3 

13 THE LAST BUS TO ALBU- 
QUERQUE by Lewis Griz- 

isuti 14 

W TRUE NORTH, by JDI Ker 

Conway II 

IS BRANDO; Songs My Mother 
Taught Me, by Marlon Brando 
with Robert Lindsey... 12 

ADVICE HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 MEN ARE FROM MARS. 

WOMEN ARE FROM VE- 
NUS. by John Gray l 

2 IN THE KITCHEN WITH 

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3 MAGIC EYE II. N E Tiling 

Enterprises 4 

4 MAGIC EYE III. N E Thing 

Enterprises 3 


ed the information would fall 
into Soviet hands. 

Racism may also have been a 
factor in the US derision not to 
prosecute people who were 
clearly war criminals. The vic- 
tims of the Japanese experi- 
ments were almost all Chinese. 
In the atmosphere that pre- 
vailed at the time, what Asians 
did to other Asians was of no 
concern to Americans or Euro- 
peans. 

Harris is horrified that “no 
one in 1948 was prepared to 
raise the issue of ethics, or mo- 
rality, or Judeo-Christian hu- 
man values." He noted that in 
all the documentation that has 
survived “no one individual is 
chronicled as having said bacte- 
riological warfare human ex- 
periments were an abomina- 
tion. and that their perpetrators 
should be prosecuted.” 

George Hicks is an economist 
and author of several books on 
Asia l 


Lust, greed, envy, hate, 
love, joy- 

everything in life is there. 

And that’s 
just Charlie Brown. 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 



China Sends 3 Dissidents to Labor Camps Travel Irldustry Snubs Appeal by India I Qt 

Compiled ty Our stiff From Dispatches lice thai gave no reasons for the at about the same time and rela- nrn-demncraov aoitarion in the 1 I H l * 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispatches 

SHANGHAI — Three dissi- 
dents have been sentenced to 
three-year terms of “re-educa- 
tion through labor," their rela- 
tives said Tuesday. 

Families of Yang Zhou and 
Bao Ge were told by the au- 
thorities on Tuesday that the 
two men. leading human-rights 
campaigners, had been given 
three-year sentences. 

Public Security Bureau 
agents earlier told the family of 
another activist, Yang Qinheng, 
that he, too, had been sentenced 
to three years, dissident sources 
said Tuesday. 

In all three cases, relatives 
were handed a terse written no- 


tice that gave no reasons for the 

p unishmen ts 

“Re-education through la- 
bor” is a form of administrative 
detention. Three years is the 
maximum penalty, although in 
practice this can be extended on 
a year-by-year basis. 

Western human-rights orga- 
nizations said China was in- 
creasingly using the punish- 
ment as a way to silence its 
dissidents without attracting 
the attention of a formal trial. 
Re-education was formerly 
used against minor c riminals . 

Yang Zhou was arrested May 
12 by the police, who dragged 
him from his home. Mr. Bao 
and Yang Qinheng disappeared 


at about the same time and rela- 
tives have not been allowed to 
see them since. 

Their sentences are calculat- 
ed from the time they were de- 
tained. 

Yang Zhou is a founder 
member of the Shanghai-based 
Association for Human Rights. 
Mr. Bao has angered authorities 
with his persistent demands for 


pro-democracv agitation in the 
late 1970s. 


Li Guopin, the wife of Yang 
Zhou, said the police talked to 
her for more than three hours, 
but dodged her questions and 
would not gjve a clear explana- 
tion of why Mr. Yang had been 
sentenced. 

Li Guopin said her husband's 
actions had been completely le- 
gal, and that she was at a loss as 
to the reason for the punish- 
ment She said he was weak and 
in poor health. 

Virtually every member of 
Shanghai’s small dissident com- 
munity is under administrative 
detention. (Reuters, AP ) 


compensation from Japan for 
Chinese victims of Japanese 
wartime atrocities. Yang Qin- 
heng is a businessman. 


All three have had long spells 
fail for their roles in the 1989 


in jail for their roles in the 1989 
Tiananmen Square demonstra- 
tions and an earlier round of 


Compiled In Oxr Safi From Dupatika 

NEW DELHI — Foreign airlines and 
hotel operators have rejected an Indian 
government appeal to slash fares and 
rates in a bid to lure back tourists scared 
away by an outbreak of plague, industry 
sources" said Tuesday. 

Except for Air- India and Air France, 
which offered free travel to journalists 
and tour operators, other airlines flying 
to India have rejected the tourism de- 
partment's call issued at the height of the 
epidemic. 

Airline executives, hoteliers and tour 
operators met with Indian officials over 
the weekend to try to devise a strategy to 
restore the country’s image as a vacation 


spot, but said they would not slash rates. 

“The consensus was that discounting 
may not be the right answer now,” said 
Gann Shankar Dhar, India's deputy 
tourism chief. He described the meeting 
as inconclusive. 

October is the start of the peak cool- 
weather travel season in India, which 
runs through March. 

The plague outbreak has cast a shad- 
ow over the government’s plans to host 
the world's largest cancer conference 
here, beginning Oct 27, industry sources 
said. 

Some 7,000 experts were expected to 
attend the conference but organizers say 
cancellations of up to 20 percent were 


expected now because of the plague scare 
and the lack of assurances that the dis- 
ease had been eradicated. 

Fifty-six people have died « pneu- 
monic plague since the first case of mis. 
disease was diagnosed in the western aty 
of Surat more ihan three weeks ago. . 

The Worid Health Organization sad 
Tuesday that the outbreak in Sura; wa^, 
rapidly coming to an end and that thette 
was no sign of any new -eruption of tbcj 

disease. , . j* 

“WHO’s advice to travelers « un- 
changed," according to a statement by. 
the organization. “There is no restnetiop. 
for travelers visiting India.” 

(AFP. Reutctil 


ffl! 


*' ' . r* 


A* 
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1 . .m.- 


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BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 


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International Herald Tribune 
Wednesday ; October 12, 1994 
Page 9 


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Tomorrow the World: The Rise of the Almeida Playhouse 


By Matt Wolf 


L ONDON — Inside a small north 
London theater off a street where 
drinks jostle for space with yup- 
pies, some amazing careers are 
taking shape. The playhouse is the 303- seat 
Almeida, aonetime music halj whose mod- 
est auditorium has become a talkin g point 
of the British — and increasingly, the in- 
ternational — theater. 

_ That its rise comes at a time of contrac- 
tion for the arts in England, where theaters 
up and down the country are cutting cor- 
ners and playing safe, honors the co-artis- 
tic directors, Ian MacDiarmid, 50, and 
Jonathan Kent, 45. The men, who became 
friends more than 20 years ago when they 
first worked together at Glasgow’s Citi- 
zens* Theatre, inherited a playhouse devot- 
ed mostly to booking productions from 
abroad. Since they took over late in 1989, 
the MacDiamxid-Kent team has turned the 


Almeida imo a self-generating enterprise 
that now regularly sends plays to the West 
End and beyond. 

Next year, the theater launches its most 
ambitious project yet; an international 
tour of “Hamlet,” directed by Kent and 
Starring Ralph Fiennes in his first stage 
role since the films “Schindler’s List" and 
Robert Redford’s current “Quiz Show” 
made him a Hollywood star. 

This will be the first Almeida staging to 
open away from its Islington base — at the 
1,000-seat Hackney Empire in working- 
class East London — opening Feb. 28. 
From London, “Hamlet” embarks on a 
short European tour before traveling to 
Broadway where it is expected to open in 
time for the Tony Award nominations — 
and, presumably, to scoop quite a few 
itself. 

_ And lest the venture seem cynically mo- 
tivated — a case of let’s-grab-a-film-star- 
whfle-he’s-hot — MacDiarmid and Kent 


emphasize that their “Hamlet” furthers the 
spirit of adventure on which their regime 
was founded. 

“This can be a great forum for revivify- 
ing a career, or giving it that extra launch/’ 
MacDiarmid, a quiet-spoken Scot. said. 
He was joined for an interview by Kent 
and the Almeida’s general manager. Jona- 
than Reekie, 30. 

“The genesis of it wasn’t, ‘Blimey, Ralph 
has just done a movie, let’s bag him,’ ” said 
Kent. Instead, be said, Fiennes ap- 
proached him two years ago about return- 
ing to Shakespeare in a fresh context from 
the Royal Shakespeare Company, where 
he got his start. 

“It may sound arrogant.” said Kent, 
“but the only policy we have is to do the 
plays we like and admire and to work with 
the people we admire. Ralph’s astonishing 
rise has obviously given the production 
more latitude." 

While larger subsidized companies like 


the Royal National Theatre and the RSC 
seem wary of tackling too broad a Europe- 
an repertoire, many of the Almeida’s great- 
est successes have been in lesser-known 
plays by Luigi Pirandello (“The Rules of 
the Game”), Jean Anouilh (“The Rehears- 
al" which transferred to the West End) 
and Henrik Ibsen (“When W e Dead 
Awaken”). 

N EW plays are important, too. 
The Almeida is where Harold 
Pinter decided in September 
1993 to open his newest play, 
“Moonlight,” a mournful oblique piece 
about an irascible dying father. The Amer- 
ican dramatists Han Ong and Phyllis Nagy 
have both premiered work at the theater, 
and Kent has a long-standing interest in 

two other, older American writers — 
Thomas Babe (“Taken in Marriage”) and 
Lanford Wilson (“The Fifth of July”). 

In November, the Almeida hosts the 
British premiere of Brian Frid’s new play 


“Molly Sweeney,” a chamber piece for 
three actors, well-suited to the in tima te 
venue; Friel makes his directing debut 
with the play, a co-production with Dub- 
lin’s Gate Theatre. The play wifi complete 
an Irish autumn begun in September with 
an acclaimed revival of J. M, Synge’s clas- 
sic “The Playboy of the Western World,” 

Said Kent: “We’ve been spoiled by 
working in this glorious space lor plays; 
Our success has largely to do with the 
space.” And with a formidable array of 
actors, from Glenda Jackson and Claire 
Bloom early on to Alan Baxes and Ian 
Holm more recently. The theater’s “Me- 
dea" in June won Diana Rigg the Tony for 
best actress in New York, completing an 
upward spiral begun in September 1992 at 
the Almeida for derisory — by Broadway 
standards — across-the-board wages of 
£190 (S300) a week. (The hope is that Rigg 
will sign on to play Gertrude to Fiennes’s 
Hamlet.) 

Not every play succeeds. Howard Bark- 


er’s "A Hard Heart" and the Ben Travers 
farce “The Bed Before Yesterday" closed 
early because of poor attendance. And 
since rite theater budgets for 77 percent 
attendance, every flop means, Reekie said, 
that “we have to sal out four shows in 
order to recoup.” 

Indeed. MacDiarmid emphasizes that 
greater public and industry recognition 
doesn't necessarily mean an end to finan- 
cial worry, especially since the .Almeida 
carries a deficit of £50,000. Five years ago, 
he said, the theater wouldn’t have done 
“Hamlet," “because we’d be panicking 
about being able to afford the produc- 
tion.” 

“That panic hasn’t disappeared," Mae- 
Diarmid continued. “One of the disadvan- 
tages of being internationally known is 
that people assume you're rich.” 


Matt Wolf is an American theater critic 
and journalist based in London. 









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From Hollywood Back to Bombay 


By Alexandra Viets 


OMBAY — Soom Taraporevala, 
best known as the screenwriter of 
the critically acclaimed “Salaam 
' Bombay” and “Mississippi Ma- 
iives in an apartment along the 


ty fines, where the steady hum of 
trains from 


sala, 

raflwa. ^ 

t Bombay’s Grant Road station 
can be heard outside her window. 

Bom and raised a Para, Taraporevala 
has returned home to Bombay, after 
nearly 20 years abroad^ The Paras, also 
.known as Zoroastrians, who originally 
came from Persia, are a tiny and rapidly 
declin ing community of 125.000. the vast 
majority of whom are concentrated in 
Bombay. Taraporevala lives on a Parsi 
street and in a Parsi building that is only 
minutes from where she grew up. Sur- 
rounded by photographs of her family, 
Taraporevala writes her screenplays in a 
small neat room that once belonged to 
her granduncle, a man who was a great 
source of inspiration to her as child. Tm 
home,” she says with a smile. “It’s like a 
dream come true.” 

Taraporevala’s most recent script is an 
adaptation of a novel by the Parsi author 
Rohm ton MIstry, “Such a Long Jour- 
ney.” Mistr/s novel which was short- 
listed for the Booker Prize in 1991, 
chronicles the life of Gustad Noble, an 
honest bank clerk, and his family, who 
live in the midst of a crowded Parsi 
colony in Bombay. Noble, whose jour- 
ney is mixed with humor and sadness, 
struggles to come to terms with a series 
of seeming betrayals that have deeply 
offended his sense of loyalty and honor. 
Extremely, visual the novel is rich wifh- 


description of the daily ri tuals of Parsi 
life and full of Dickensian characters 
Taraporevala say remind her of home. 

Currently in ^reproduction, “Such a 
Long Journey” vwB be released as aCana- 
dian-British co-production and is sched- 
uled to begin shooting in December. 

Taraporevala’s own journey began as 
an only child in a typical Parsi home with 
a large family not unlike the Nobles. 
Despite being an only child, Taraporevala 
was always surrounded by relatives and 
family friends, living in a tightly knit 
community, which she credits for her suc- 
cess. She recalls storytelling uncles, doting 
grandparents and re gular vacations with 
20 or more. “A whole horde. . . . I loved 
it, I loved growing up that way.” 

This is not the first time that Tarapore- 
vala has taken on a project concerning the 
Parsi community. A photographer of 
some repute who has had her work exhib- 
ited internationally, she has gradually col- 
lected a portfolio of photographs on the 
Parsis, which she plans to publish. The 
project began as an attempt to capture the 
life of a community in rapid decline. 

“Every time I came home,” she said, 
“there were less of ns. ... My own 
family has been cut in half in just one 
generation.” In both black and white and 
odor, many of her images seem to be 
portraits of the very old and the very 
young: a boy being initiated into the 
priesthood, an old man with his back to 
the camera as he prays to the sea on “Ava 
Rqj,” a day on the Parsi calendar devot- 
ed to the spirit of water. 

Like Noble’s son who leaves home in 
“Such a Long Journey” determined to 
pursue a career in art, Taraporevala left 


India for the fust time on a scholarship to 
study literature at Harvard in 1975. It was 
there that she met another Indian woman, 
Mira Nair, who became a friend, collabo- 
rator and the future director of “S alaam 
Bombay” and “Mississippi Masala.” 

After Harvard, both women moved to 
New York, Taraporevala to get a mas- 
ter’s degree in cinema studies from the 
New York University film school and 
Nair to begin work on her documenta- 
ries. It wasn't until 1986, 11 years after 
they first met, when both women were in 
India watching a screening of Nair’s doc- 
umentaries, that Taraporevala and Nair 
decided to work together on “Salaam 
Bombay,” their first feature film. 

Launched by the success of “Salaam 
Bombay,” Taraporevala went onto Los 
Angeles, making a firing writing scripts 
for HBO cable and a variety of produc- 
tion companies. During the period in 
Los Angeles most of the scripts she 
worked on were never made into films. 
She recalls that a script on Vietnam war 
stories was considered “too ambitious" 
and a script on homeless children “too 
depressing.” 

When Taraporevala left Hollywood to 
return to Bombay, she says, she realized 
she had already spent half her fife abroad 
and it was time to come home. To her 
surprise, 10 days after she arrived she got 
a call from her agent with a new project. 
Since then, the work hasn't stopped. 

“But even if it hadn’t worked out it 
was not a sacrifice to come back. Bom- 
bay was always home.” 


Alexandra Viets is a writer based in 
India. 


From Chloe, All Sugar and Lace 


zi 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — After a few 
uncertain seasons, Karl 
Lagerfeld got into his 
stride at Chkte. But it 
was more of a dainty little step. 
The collection was sugar sweet, 
with no fabric stiff er than the 
consistency of whipped cream. 
It was very finely crafted. But 

PARK FASHION 

the show lacked the urgency, 
the modernity, the cut and 
thrust of forward fashion that 
are Lagerfeld’s signature. 

“Very refined and sophisti- 
cated — nothing casual about 
it,” said Lagerfeld, to explain 
the spun-sugar fabrics and lacy 
knits. Galltfs turn-of- the-cen tu- 
glass was the inspiration for 
i translucent colors, which in- 
cluded watery green, amber and 
h sflvery-mauve. 

Hie show started with sinu- 
ous lacy knits with midcalf 
hemlines decorated with deli- 
cate silver bugs as jeweby. The 
caily tailoring was in the softest 
crepe with ripples of satin skirt 
underneath. Otherwise it was 
afi frills and lace and hats in 
butterfly-wing gauze. 

Chlofc is primarily an evening 
wear collection, and as an exer- 
cise in style it was romantic, 
with ombrb-colored chiffons, 
flower-patterned tunics and 
lace dance dresses. Yet even 
when embroidered jackets went 
with flared pants or dresses 
over underpants, the 
> seemed dedicated to deco- 
rative women of a different era. 

. How to put the feminine back 
into fashion without looking ret- 
rograde? In her powerful 
Comme des .Gargoos show. Rei 
Kawakubo nude womanly dir 
cites of raffles-and-Mls seem 
modem. First apron-skirts sub- 
tly feminized pantsuits. Then 
fnlled muons were tied back-to- 
front, giving ruffles to the back 
of ajackeLMakeup was pretty, 
with ruby lips and pin-curled 
hair. As the show advanced, so 
did the wave of frills: at jacket 
hem, as the tulle underskirt of a 
simple dress, m layers like piped 
oeam -on a satin skirt under a 
strict tailcoat 

In its dairy freshness of milk 
white surd buttereream cotton, 
withits focus on rippling ruffles 
breaking out of sleek tailoring, 
the show_aicceeded in present- 
ingprettmess in a forceful way. 
Ithpugh some of the taDor- 


The further Yohji Yamamoto 
(figs back to his Japanese roots, 
the more dazzling his collections 
become. The show he sent out 
Tuesday was an ode to the kimo- 
no and to the dress. The show 
ended with an ovation as two 
kimono robes in fiery red and 
gilt were followed by 18 black 
dresses, all different, but cut to 
take their shapes, ltimonofike, 
from the body. Other dresses 
were given touches of color and 
decoration: batik patterns, or 
the fabric dyed in patches and 
then twisted into shapes like pa- 
per flowers. 

There was not a single pant- 
suit. The only vestige of sports- 
wear were play suits with 
shorts, and they came under the 
floating kimono robes that were 
the central subject of a femi- 
nine, romantic, modem and im- 
pressive show. 

When a slender tomato-red 
dress walked down the runway 
at Mario Ghanet — and then 
transformed itself by untying 
strings into an ankle-length 
bias-cut slip, it seemed symbol- 
ic of a show where nothing was 
quite what it seemed. By wrap- 
ping and tying asymmetric 
skirts, by stitching deep-pile 
fabrics into taut jacket shapes 
or by giving wide-legged pant- 
suit a glazed surface, the design 
duo gave resonance to simple 
clothes that looked to the future 
rather than the past. 

T Nina Ricci, design- 
er Myriam Schaefer 
took a bow — knotted 
, at the tail of a curving 
jacket, jutting in a soft satin 
from the hips of a sleek black 
coat or thrusting in chiffon 
through the lsced-up backbone 
of firm tailoring. Schaefer, sev- 
en years with Jcan-Paul Gaul- 
tier, revealed her origins with 


LONDON THEATER 


Ruffled lace dance dress for Chloe by Lagerfeld. 


A: 


pinstriped suiting and corset- 
lacing at the spine. But sire gave 
a fresh young face to tailoring 
cut on the curve: 

How nice it would be to see 
Martin Margiela’s clothes in the 
light of day; to taste the cock- 
tails of fabric and texture; to 
absorb the cut and detaiL But 
when all wise Parisians were 
dining, fashion pros were 
slumped in a bijou theater 
watching film footage of the 
September event when the Bel- 
gian designer unveiled his line 
simultaneously in boutiques 
from London to Tokyo. That 
was followed by a 60-second 
glimpse, from the rear, of mod- 
els in boiled wool jackets over 
satin skirts and viscose pants. 
What with staff dressed in sur- 


ing yas weird, it could also pro- 
duce perfect inodeni classics — ff cal white coats, the ahow^ 
like the crisp naval jackets salt- seemed like scenes from fash- 
ed with g3t buttons. i 00 ’ 5 madhouse. 


PARIS 


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‘Twins’ Is No Favor to Goldoni 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Michael Bogdanov’s 
rare revival of Goldoni’s “The Ve- 
netian Twins ” at the Barbican, is 
an exercise in noisy desperation. 
By all accounts it was a riot on the small 
Swan stage at Stratford last year, but in 
opening it up for the main London stage the 
director has resorted to a National Youth 
Theatre party night, with usually reliable 
RSC players frantically camping and mug- 
ging their way through an increasingly des- 
perate attempt to cover up what they dearly 
see as the shortcomings of the play- 

True, this does owe rather too much to 
Shakespeare and Plautus, who both did it 
belter. Twin brothers (both played by Da- 
vid Troughion) turn up in Verona on the 
same day having been out of touch for 
many years. One is a tongue-tied country 
bumpkin, the other a dty sophisticate, but 
they are soon taken for each other in a 
confused plot featuring missing jewels, 
confused lovers and long-lost sisters. 

It has taken the RSC all of 30 years to 
get around to Goldoni, and the company 
has done him less than justice. An interval- 
playing band, actors wandering in from 
other productions in the building, a faked 
ambulance-dash for a member of the audi- 
ence, other spectators invited to sit on the 
stage as at an open-air Italian restaurant, 
all are indications of Bogdanov's lack of 
apparent interest in the play. 

In which case, why bother to do it at all? 


The world repertoire surely contains 
enough plays that do not need such dis- 
guises to make them work, and there are 
surely directors around with enough re- 
spect for Goldoni to stage “The Venetian 
Twins” as something other than a trick 
circus. 

Tim Firth’s “Neville’s Island” (Apollo) 
concerns a quartet of middle-aged, middle- 
management executives who have been 
sent to bond in a course in the Lake Dis- 
trict, in the currently fashionable belief 
that this will make them better at dealing 
with crises back in the office; though as 
their business concerns bottling spring wa- 


True. this play owes 
much to Shakespeare and 
Plautus , who both did 
it better. 

ter it is hard to fathom precisely what these 
lakeside adventures could teach them, ex- 
cept perhaps where to find more water. 

Disaster strikes early: Their boat runs 
aground, they are marooned on an island 
which may contain wild beasts, and though 
this is still England — so we are not about to 
get the Derwent Water version or “Deliver- 
ance” — there’s just enough menace in the 
air to keep an otherwise rather lame sitcom 
moving along predictable tracks. 

The Neville of the title is the team leader 
(Jonathan Coy), a hopelessly inept captain. 


His crew consists of a neurotic (Paul Raf- 
field), a born-again Christian in nervous 
breakdown (Michael Sibeny) and Gordon 
(Tony Slattery), the only really well-written 
role of the four. Jeremy Sams, the director, 
does his best to keep the isle full of noues, 
but it is like watching “The Tempest" per- 
formed by mice. 

At the Barbican Pit, a classical rediscov- 
ery of considerable, cool fascination: Euri- 
pides’s “Ion" is the darkly comic tale of the 
foundling son of Apollo and a mother w ho. 
unaware that he is also hers, alternately 
plots to have him killed or make him her 
lover. A fable about love and power and 
above all paternity, it is held together by- 
Jude Law. an actor only 21 who has in the 
last year given breathtaking performances 
in two other hothouse, incestuous dramas 
(“Les Parents Terribles" and “Fastest Cock 
in the Universe”). Nicholas Wright directs 
David Lan’s agile translation. 

There’s an extraordinary kind of moder- 
nity here, a questioning of the rights of 
parents and children, gods and men. And 
(unlike "The Venetian Twins") this is a 
model example of a director, translator 
and cast taking a relatively unknown text, 
remaining utterly faithfui to its original 
intentions, and yet giving it a 20th-century 
spin that ensures that Ion never seems 
remote or irrelevant to our debates about 
timeless issues of passion and control. 

“Ion” is about a god who lies and a man 
who discovers his true parentage in the 
nick of time. But in its universality and its 
political subtlety, it is just about the most 
contemporary show around. 



























































































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THE TRIB INDEX: 115.2691 

ss&rasa 

by Btoomberg Business News. Jan. 1,1992 = ioo 
-120 — 


Trm 




r.- .. 



».-.•••. • «fS. Wvv i ' v* "*Tv ' .;.h;:.tku-. 

» M a . f -L 41 * ■ at: >■ XL .-■■ 'i' 1 '.- ' iaa ■• **» • *> r ! , VY 1 y 

M j j « c 


IBM 

| asta/PacHic 


Europe 


Approx weighting: 32% 

Qos« 127.83 Pm- 125.B8 
>0 

EH 

Approx, werghfing: 37% 

Close: 115.67 Prev_- 114.49 



?»•*■&> y.un.ry 

MJJASO MJJAS 
1994 


North America 


Approx weighting: 26% 
Close: 96.90 Prev^ 94-67 


Latin America 


Approx, weighting: 5% 
Close: 142L36 Prevj 14a 17 





im 1994 

H World Index 

to**? U.S. OoSar nbM of stocks kc Tokyo, Nw York, London, and 
ArgonMn ^ Auotr rto. Aiutria, Mgtum. Brad. Cvuda, Chto. Danmark. Finland, 
Fnrna, Qaranny, Hons Kong. Italy. Mttckw, NMtiailanda, Nw 2Mand. Norway, 
annporw, Spain, Swwian, SaMeariand and Vanazuoia. For Tokyo. Now Yak and 
London, tho ndox Is eompoaad of fte SO top kuiMK in torma of maikot capHahation, 
othervrisotho tan lop stocks uvtmckad. 


Industrial Sectors 


hn % 
dost changs 


BWfly 11426 11133 +0.82 CkpM 6 ood« 11538 fllBI + 1 J 1 

mates 127.77 126.74 ^CLBI R-fMateriah 13191 13322 dL52 

Rnanca 115.02 ft4.lB d).73 OonaumarGooda iQ4ie 103.08 * 1.73 

Sawcas 118J0 11S37 -»2J7 teceflanaoos 122^5 121.87 dl.72 

For more information about tho Index, a booklet Is svaBabb hoe of charge. 

Write to Trib Index. 1B1 Avenue Charies da GaukB, 92521 NeuNyCedex. France. 

C International Homld Trtxra 





International Herald Tribune, Wednesday, October 12, 1994 




Page 11 


Court Ban 
Is Sought 
By Intel 

Injunction k Goal 
In the AMD Case 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SAN JOSE California — In- 
tel Corp. said Tuesday it would 
seek as injunction against rival 
Advanced Micro Devices Inc. 
to stop the chip-maker from 
shipping clones of Intel's 486 
microprocessor. 

Intel Corp. said Tuesday it 
had won a federal court victory 
against AMD for using part of 
Intel's microcode known as ICE 
microcode, but AMD said the 
ruling would not prevent that 
company from shipping Am486 
computer chips. 

ICE or in-circuit emulation, 
is a code used by designers cre- 
ating chips. 

AMD said it had already be- 
gun production of microproces- 
sors without Intel's microcode, 
and that the ruling won't dis- 
rupt distribution of 486 chips. 

Intel's move to seek an in- 
junction follows U.S. District 
Court Judge Patricia Trum- 
bull’s ruling Friday that AMD, 
the fifth-largest maker of com- 
puter chips, had violated copy- 
right laws by using a portion of 
proprietary Intel code in the 
chips, which are used in person- 
al computers. 

The r uling was handed down 
Friday but was under seal until 
after midnight Monday, an 
AMD spokesman, John Green- 
agcl, said. 

The r ulin g, which resolves a 
lawsuit filed four years ago, in- 
volves a license clause that also 
applies to the older 386 chip. 
Litigation over the 386 chip 
continues. Intel will seek an un- 
specified amount in compensa- 
tory damages for the milli ons of 
486 chips already sold by 
AMD, said Jim Jarrell, an Intel 
spokesman. 

Analysts said the request for 
injunction was unlikely to have 
an adverse affect on AMD. . 

(Knight-Ridder. 1 
Bloomberg, Reuters) 1 


Investors Rethink Russia 

Ruble Rout Puts New Cast on Market 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The record fall of the ruble 
Tuesday sent shock waves among Western 
financial analysts who only recently had be- 
gun to turn bullish on investing in Russia. 

Now some were wondering if admittedly 
risky bets on Russian assets had not become 
foolhardy and if a return to hyperinflation 
was not threatening. Even before it pl umm y, 
ed Tuesday, the ruble had lost a third of its 
value in a month. 

“The free-fall collapse of the ruble indi- 
cates an almost complete lack of confidence 
in the ability of the current government to 
come up with an effective anti-inflation poli- 
cy," said James Lister-Cheese, an analyst with 
Independent Strategy, a London-based in- 
vestment research firm. 

In the last few months, since Russia com- 
pleted its first round of privatizations, money 
has been pouring into the country from for- 
eign companies and investment funds that 
had previously been nervous about Russia’s 
political and economic transition. The Minis- 
try of Privatization recently estimated that 
foreign investment had quadrupled since the 
beginning of the year, to $600 million a 
month. 

Many Western observers said that the ru- 
ble’s rout not only reflected the danger that 
the government was losing control of the 
economy but was also adding to the econo- 
my's problems. The pace of Russian inflation, 
which has become more moderate through 
the course of the year, faces tremendous up- 
ward pressure as a result of the soaring cost of 
imports. 

Only last week Russia had reached a long- 
awaited agreement with foreign banks to re- 


schedule $26 billion of commercial debts. At 
the time, that confidence-boosting agreement 
was widely hailed as paving the way for a 
flood of new investment into the counfrv. But 
many analysts said on Tuesday that Western 
investors were at best likely to hold off any 
moves until the ruble can be stabilized and 
the damage to the economy asscssed, 

“Russian assets were cheap before today, 
and now they are even cheaper," said Jona- 
than Hoffman, an economist with CS First 
Boston in London. The problem is that they 
also suddenly look far riskier. 

Although the ruble's plunge makes ruble 
assets cheaper in dollar terms, it is worrisome 
to foreign investors who eventually may want 
to translate ruble profits into dollars or other 
currencies. 

“The supposed achievements of the current 
Russian government at reform have been too 
good to be true,” said Peter Young, a director 
of the Adam Smith Institute, a British free- 
market think tank. “The plight of the ruble 
just proves that you can only fool some of the 
people some of the time." 

Other analysts disagreed. They traced the 
ruble’s fall simply to a shift in the policy of 
the centra] bank. AfLer watching the ruble rise 
steadily all year, they pointed out, the Rus- 
sian central bank announced two months ago 
its intention to seek a devaluation in the 
currency. The purpose was to aid Russia’s 


Chrysler Net 
Jumps 54 % on 
Higher Sales 


By all accounts, that policy of an orderly 
devaluation has now run off the rails. Many 
analysis, though, insist that the reformers in 
Moscow are blameless. 

Instead they fault currency speculators, 

See RUSSIAN, Page 12 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Hie European Com- 
mission will tell Groupe Bull on 
Wednesday to sell its Nipson, Telesincro 
and Compuprint units in exchange for 
approval by the commission of 11.1 bil- 
lion French francs (S2 billion) in stale 
aid, a draft of the decision said. 

The draft decision also called for the 
restructuring of Bull’s open systems and 
software business. 

It said further that a "significant 
amount" of Bull's shares had to be sold 
to an industrial partner when the com- 
pany was privatized. 


If that did not happen, all the com- 
puter firm's open systems and micro- 
computer business should be sold off 
within a period that would guarantee the 
company’s viability in the Tong term. 

The draft decision, which was expect- 
ed to he approved at the commission’s 
weekly meeting on Wednesday, also 
urged the French government to'refrain 
from investing more in Bull unless it 
complied with EU rules. 

The commission opened an investiga- 
tion in October 1993 into the payment 
of 2.5 billion French francs to the com- 
puter firm. In January, it extended the 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatha 

HIGHLAND PARK, Michi- 
gan — Chrysler Corp. said 
Tuesday its third-quarter profit 
surged 54 percent, as the No. 3 
American automaker benefited 
from higher sales and lower re- 
bates to customers. 

Chrysler’s net income rose to 
5651 million, or 51.76 a share, 
from $423 million, or $1.13 a 
share, in the year-earlier period, 
before a $109 million gmn from 
the sale of its Mitsubishi Mo- 
tors stock and a favorable in- 
come tax adjustment. 

Revenue rose 21 percent, to 
51 1.7 billion. 

The 1994 period was the 
automaker's best third quarter 
ever and seventh straight quar- 
ter of record earnings. 

Chrysler shares gained 62J5 
cents, to $46.50, on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Normally, the third quarter is 
the weakest for U.S. automak- 
ers because of plant shutdowns 
for vacations and model 
changes. 

General Motors Corp. and 
Ford Motor Co. are expected to 
announce their earnings soon. 

“We’re very encouraged by 
the high degree of acceptability 
our products are enjoying in the 


Exchangi 


marketplace," said Robert Ea- 
ton. Chrysler chairman. 

Continued strong demand 
for such popular vehicles as the 
Jeep Grand Cherokee allowed 
Chrysler to lower its average 
discounts per vehicle to 5520 m 
the third quarter from 5610 in 
the second quarter and $775 in 
the third quarter of 1993, the 
company said. 

Chrysler also reduced its 
sales to fleets to 10 percent at its 
overall North American sales 
from 15 percent in the second 

r rter and 11 percent in the 
d quarter of 1993. Those 
sales generally are less profit- 
able than retail deliveries. 

Chrysler, which has been by 
far the most profitable of De- 
troit’s three automakers on a 
per-vehicle basis, made an af- 
ter- tax profit of $1 ,000 on each 
car or truck sold in the quarter, 
up from $570 in the year-earlier 
quarter. 

James Donlon, Chryslcr’s 
controller, said the automaker 
planned to build between 
690,000 and 700,000 cars and 
trucks in the fourth quarter, up 
from about 580,000 in the third 
quarter and 650,000 in the 
fourth quarter of 1993. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


inquiry to an investigation of another 
injection totaling 8.6 billion francs by 
the French state and the state-owned 
telecommunications company France 
Telecom. 

Of the total 11.1 billion francs, only 
3.1 billion francs have not been paid yet. 
the paper said. 

Bull narrowed its losses considerably 
in the first half erf 1994 and aims to 
break even in the first half of 1995. 

■ UAP First-Half Profit Fefi 22% 

France's largest insurer, Union des 
Assurances de Paris, or UAP. said Tues- 


day thai its net profit totaled 853 million 
francs in the first half, down 22 percent 
from the same period a year earlier, 
Bloomberg Business News reported 
from Paris. 

The figure, which was at the lower end 
of analysts' expectations, reflected con- 
tinuing losses from banking operations 
that narrowed only marginally to 438 
million francs in the first half from 462 
million in the year-earlier period. 

The company’s main banking unit, 
Banque Worms SA, narrowed its first- 
half loss to 394 million francs from 544 
million. 


Sr* 


K3T 






j '! ; ; 


New (Interfaces on Screen 




if i* 1 ^ •■■■ 


5 * JE 3i 


i • * ^ 


By Mark Potts 

Washington Pest Service 

W ASHINGTON — Big changes 
are coming to the way users inter- 
act with their personal comput- 
ers. The result will be sophisticat- 
ed interfaces that will make computers easier 
to use. 

Both of the major personal computer oper- 
ating systems — Windows and Macintosh — 
will undergo major revisions in the next year 
or so that will significantly change the way 
they appear to the user. 

Just over the horizon are even more 
changes in interface design that could make 
.even the newest Windows and Macintosh 
systems look as antiquated as, well, MS-DOS. 

Future computers may be based on inter- 
faces that represent what they are doing more 
graphically, replacing the. standard arrange- 
ment of folders and files with much richer, 
easier-to-control displays that provide lots of 
information at a glance. 

“The future of the desktop is to be much 
more visual,” said Ben Sbneidcnnan, a spe- 
cialist in interface design who runs the Hu- 
man-Computer Interaction Laboratory at the 
University of Maryland. “We’re stuck in the 
valley of 1984.” 

That was the year Apple Computer In t 
introduced the Macintosh and popularized 
the concept erf graphical interfaces that made 
the computer screen look like a desktop, with 
files, folders and a trash can. ' 

Inspired by work done at Xerox Corp. s 
Palo Alto Research Center a decade before, 
the Macintosh interface, in turn, paved the 
way for Windows, by Microsoft Corp., and 
.. began the death knell for MS-DOS. 


The coming windows 95, or Chicago, due 
out next year, cleans up the familiar Windows 
interface. It adds several sorely needed fea- 
tures, such as flexibility in dragging files from 
one window to another on the screen, and 
eliminates Window^ greatest problem: its 
reliance on MS-DOS to do most of its dirty 
work. 

Apple is worried. The company is feverish- 
ly working on technology to leapfrog Micro- 
soft’s new system. Forget the recently re- 
leased Systran 7 5, which makes mostly 
cosmetic changes in the Macintosh interface 
and operating system. The real change in 
Apple’s famous interface will come when the 
company unleashes System 8, code name 
Copland, in about a year. 

System 8 will be a radical reworking of 
Apple’s interface. According to MacWeek 
magazine, System 8 will make folders easier 
to work with and add computerized “agents” 
to automate routine tasks. It will provide 
more information about individual files and 
let users customize their desktops. 

Windows 95 and System 8 may seem like 
big changes to the rest of us, but Mr. Shnei- 
derman of the University of Maryland is not 
impressed. “You’re wasting Loo much time 
opening and closing and dragging and resiz- 
ing windows,” he said. “To me, the evolution 
is away from the computer and toward a 
user’s tasks.” 

Some of the experiments percolating in Mr. 
Shneiderman’s lab hint at what he is talking 
«abouL 

For instance, Mr. Shneiderman and his 
group of researchers and graduate students 
have come up with a novel way of viewing 

See INTERFACE, Page 13 


Regulators 
Slow Sales 
In Taiwan 


Bloomberg Business Nen-s 

TAIPEI — In an extraordi- 
nary attempt to stem a slump in 
stocks, Taiwan’s Securities and 
Exchange Commission told se- 
curities companies Tuesday to 
buy shares or risk having their 
requests to start new mutual 
funds denied. 

The threat was followed by 
an announcement from the in- 
vestment trust industry group 
that its members would tempo- 
rarily stop selling shares. 

The SEC was spurred into 
action after Taiwan’s main 
stock index fell 14 percent dur- 
ing the last four sessions, fol- 
lowing one of the worst spates 
of unsealed trading the country 
has ever gone through. 

The most unusual of the 
SEC’s moves involved tele- 
phoning securities houses 10 en- 
courage traders and fund man- 
agers to step up purchases after 
stocks tumbled in early trade 
this morning. 

“They called here and talked 
to the boss about this," said 
Kuo Sboo-min, a fund manager 
with National Investment Trust 
Co., one of Taiwan’s largest se- 
curities companies. “We coop- 
erated.” 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


CtomIMw 

I COM.F4F.Ui 
AnaSertam UBS WS « W OH « 

KfiHMh SITU SMS Mil U1S SJE 

Rwkfurt ISO U«l — 52® W 

LMdH (al ISH UHS W 

Madrid HUB att«7 H» VM 8.1 

MBoa UBU5 unss Un«S 39JJ* — 

MnrYWfelb) — UWa tf* 

Porn SM* U7U MW U3 

Trim wuq «M MS* U 

Toronto LOT U« I2M3 SM 

Zuridi 13B 243* MB* 02*38 111 

J ECU 13*13 05 

I SDR Mill HOT 12SN 7JW1 230 

Oestrus m Amsterdam. London, Hew York 
ntnatsom. ^ 

a: To bur one pound; b: To buy one dollar 
available. 

Oth*r Dollar Values 

Corrracy Fcr* CWrriinr 

ArMtm os?W omktrac. 

AHBN4.S US* . HomKow* wa 

AMr.KM. WJ83 Howl forint 

braMTwet 0M l***rm*x 

CMmmvmi 05113 lnda.rw** MMffl 

CawhkHTM 2M4 . Irtriit 043R3 

OattbkroM 4054 

CmtNari UW “J” 

Fin. markka 009 MptoY.rtw, IdOS 


Oct 11 

FJP. urn OR BJF. SJ>. Yen Cl tarta 

(ujm an- — i*«u* uas i»* uses un ■ 

U115 1ID2I* lun — TAJSi UK3 2U1 JUGS* 

UB$ mu* un USB' ua inn* tun uu* 

UIVJ ww urn suae um uuk slot mu 

jmt 8.D8* MBIT iftffl W31 12731** *SM7 

25JJ* *RS8 4UB 122025 Uitf U7U5 11254 

tM LSHJB L7» 1111 1MH HO 134* CB22 

BJJD* lED 01*42 4X137 5X541 * 3J3C 4.0*5* 

1*01 tO J&01 usn 7825 — HA UK 

ISO UKH* 077*5 U8S* UUJ1 14HB2* ISIS' 

02*38 UBt* 074*5 4JBK* 'J*®' 0»7 MUSI* 

tSB US3JH 1M2 3M73! L!W3 12UB IMS* 15*023 

7jwi 2 an.o am sum we wiu un u72u 

Mew York and Zurich, fbtlnas in ether centers: Toronto 
om dollar ; Units of 7»/ U.Q.: m ouoted; ALA.* no I 


f Deposits 




Oct. 11 

D-Mark 

Swiss 

Franc 

Sterling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

rife-5 

3 "V3 'v. 

5*-5Vi 

5 4»St. 

2 l w2 v. 

5 * t5 ’ *. 

5 Hr 5 4k 

4 >V4lk 

5*-Sft 

5 -tr5 * 

2 W2 



4 4—J *. 

6 

5*,r5<»» 

218-2VY 

6 

rtL rv 
SrrilN 

A Wr4 

7fcr7K. 

6Vr& 4. 

2V.-24S 

6»r6 ■V. 


Currency 
Mux. K90 

lazuntondl 
NunakiMU 
PMLptM 
MbhkWy 
Port undo 
Han. mbit : 

Saudi rhnrt 
5km t 


C ur rency Purl 
5 . act. rood ISOS 
5i.Kqr.won 80080 
Swed. krona 7JM5 
Taiwan f 26.19 

Thai baht 2503 

TwftMlIira 342*8. 
UACdtrlMM 5*727 
Vontt.MW. 

1690057 


1 month 5v5«i 48W 


1 nor SVi-flfc 5W5W A Wr4 7 *,7 K. i Vr& »• IPW 
Sources; Reuters Uartb BanK 

Kates tamOmble to ftiftortun* deposits ofst million mkOmum toreautvaientl. 


Key Money Rates 

United Stntm Close 

■HKwmtrote 400 

Prime rate n» 

Padcrnl fonds 

S-tHonth CDs 433 

Comm. pOpct Ml dors 5Z0 

>monttiTru«5ry bill 4J9 

1- yaor Treasury bflt 505 

2- y*or TreoKjry ante 661 

tfior Treasury note 7 JO 

7^r*ar Treasury note 7-32 

19-year Treasury note 705 

JO-renr Treasury bond 706 

Menu Lvncfc JMny Ready auri 4.17 


Forward Bates 

ri.rn.Ti. soriov ator 9»da y Currency May uwr ft-ear 

IflW UXK Owullon *Mor 104M 1J429 10432 

SSE£-. r lE «- *—«■ ,oa " ^ 

Swim franc 1358 10873 VWt 

Seams*- INU Bonk MMertMl; tndosuex Bonk (Bassets); Bona Commendtdo Hattona 
fTbrontet; IMF I5DIO. OOur data from Reuters ondAP. 


DIscMmt rate 
Call money 
l-monrh Intertank 
Smanffi Interbank 
Hwam um rtmnk 
19-year govern men t boon 
Germany 
Lombard rate 
Call Money 
l-mwIH mtarHaaK 
Senaalh Irierbask 
44tMnHi interbank 
19-voar Bund 


146 73. 

2 4. 24k 

2 4. 2 4. 

2 ». TL 

2 *■ 2 4 . 

476 478 

600 600 
405 405 

500 500 

516 511 

505 505 

7J1 7J9 


BrHnbi 

Boik base rate Sta 51* 

Calluoner » 5% 

1 -Month Interbank 5Vi 5 7. 

Senanth biterhank 5*. SH 

6-month to tertwn k 61* 4 V. 

10-ytarCilt 807 668 

Proace 

interveaHoe rate 500 500 

Can money 5 V, 5 y » 

J-moeBi M eil Minfc 5 v. 5 4. 

3-meaiti In te r bank Sr. 5 *■ 

Urmffli Interbank 5 t. S'*. 

IB-vwM-OAT 611 613 

Sources; Reuters. Bloom boro. Merrill 
Lrncti. Bonk of Tokyo, Commerzbank. 
Grcenwett Montagu. Credit Lyonnais. 

Gold 

AM. PM. Chve 
Zurich 39005 38775 -175 

London 38945 38705 — 205 

New York 39200 39020 -32B 

UJL dollars ner ounce. London OiflCFH Hx- 

btgss Zurtcn and New York ooenhts and eka- 
fno prices : New York comex t December.! 
Source: Reuters. ■» 


Our Philosophy of Banking 
Goes Back 4,000 Years. 



I t was the ancient traders 
who first established 
many of today’s hanking 
practices. They accepted 
funds tor safekeeping. 
Bartered goods for services. 
And extended credit. It was 
a business based on trust, 
and a handshake contract 
was binding. 

The world has changed 
immeasurably since then, 
but Republic National Bank 
still holds to the principles 


established nearly four mil- 
lennia ago. 

We believe in the primacy 
of personal relationships, the 
importance of trust and the 
protection of depositors’ 
funds. This emphasis has 
made us one of the world’s 
leading private banks. 

As a subsidiary of Safia 
Republic Holdings S.A. and 
an affiliate of Republic New 
York Corporation, we’re part 
of a global group with more 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEW YORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SATRABANh 

Timeless Values, traditional Strength. 

HMD OFFICE GENEVA i 2 Q4 • Z, PLACE BO WC • TEL (0221 70S SS 55 • FOREX; (0Z2) 706 55 SO AND GENEVA 1201 • 2. RUE DR. ALFRED-VINCENT (COHNFB 
QUAI DU MOHT-BLAMCi BRANCHES: LUGANO 6901 • 1. VIA CANOVA - TEL. 10811 23 89 32 • ZURICH 8039 ■ STOOCERSTRASSE 37 - TEL lOl i 2HH in . 
GUERNSEY • RUE DU PRE ■ ST. PETER PORT ■ TEL. (4811 711 761 APPILMTB REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS: 
GIBRAUAR ■ GUERNSEY • LONDON ■ LUXEMBOURG • MILAN • MONTE CARLO - PARIS ■ BEVERUf HILLS • CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES ■ MEXICO CITvTmuu, . 
MONTREAL • NASSAU - NEW YORK • BUENOS AIRES • CARACAS • MONTEVIDEO ■ PUNTA DEL ESTE ' RIO DE JANEIRO * SANTIAGO * BEIRUT * BEIJING • mr mr . 

JAKARTA > SINGAPORE ■ TAIPEI ■ TOKYO 


than US$5 billion in capital 
and more than US$50 billion 
in assets. These assets con- 
tinue to grow substantially, 
a testament to the group’s 
strong balance sheet, risk- 
averse orientation and 
century-old heritage. 

Though cuneiform tablets 
have given way to modem 
computers, the timeless 
qualities of safety, service and 
personal integrity will always 
be at the heart of our bank. 




- i 


Page 12 

market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


1 Vio Associated Press 


Stocks and Bonds 
Bolster the Dollar 


The Dow 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Own High lm L«m ora. 


Daily dosings Of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 


Metals 


Lost Settle Ch"9* ' 


Indus 3631 75 3SB2XS 1921 37 3E76.B3 - 5551 
Tirana 146? .93 1483.91 146275 1480.41 -17.93 
Util 180317 181.91 179X7 181.37 -155 

Como 137452 1291.0? 127251 1588.90 -1£» 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
finished slightly higher against 
most other major currencies 
Tuesday, profiting mainly from 
the performance of stock and 
bonds, as the market awaited 
more economic data. 

Signs that Iraq's troops were 
moving away from the border 


Foreign Exchange 


with Kuwait had damped the 
dollar’s earlier gains. 

Analysts and traders said de- 
velopments between Iraq and 
the United States had little ef- 
fect on the dollar. 

The dollar typically benefits 
in times of international con- 
flict as investors seek a haven 
for their funds. 

Traders were also reluctant 
to bet too aggressively on the 
dollar's prospects before the re- 
lease of inflation and plant-use 


reports. Those will give them 
fresh insight into whether prices 
in the U.S. are rising enough to 
prompt the Federal Reserve to 
raise rates soon, analysis said. 

The dollar closed at 1.5445 
Deutsche marks, flat from 
Monday, and at 100.20 yen, 
down from 100.38 yen. 

The dollar rose to 5.2850 
French francs from 5.2830 
francs Monday and to 1.2886 
Swiss francs from 1.2829 
francs. The pound was at 
SI. 5795. down from $1 .5853. 

An analyst at MCM Cur- 
rencyWatch, Win Thin, said he 
expected the dollar to stay firm- 
ly bid at current levels through 
the week in anticipation of 
firmer bond prices. 

The possibility that optimism 
about a resolution to the Mid- 
dle East tensions may have 
been overdone helped underpin 



Standard A Poor's Indexes 


Htati Law One Cite 


industrials 
Transn. 
UHilUes 
F tonne* 
SPSffS 

spioa 


553-63 54470 553.44 +8.74 
35U3 35186 358.94 + 105 
152.56 150.14 151.97 4 1.78 
4X24 4X48 0X0 + 032 
46674 45974 465X0 + 676 
43X08 4 25JM 43134 +632 


NYSE Indexes 


Kgh Lpw Last dig. 


CJrtlPMiW 

Industrials 

Transn 

Utility 

Finance 


25635 253.14 25438 -3.24 
323 07 118 36 322.95 -4 59 
320.M 277 JM 230 19 -3.45 
205.53 M7-S5 205X4 -7.48 
204.48 207.81 203.93 - 1 1? 


Close 

BM A3k 
ALUMINUM (Won Crude) 
Dollars per metric tan 
5901 161450 161 7 JO 

Forward 163550 1634X0 

COPPER CATHODES (HI0R 
DeHart per metrte ton _ 
Saal 1485X0 2484.00 

Forward 3485X0 2486X0 

LEAD 

Dollar* per metric ton 
Spot 425X0 62XA0 

Forward 43850 639X0 

NICKEL 

Delian per metric ton __ 
Soot 6475X0 448100 

Forward 6580X0 6590X0 

TIN 

Dollars per metric ten 
Spat 5290XS 5300X0 

Forward 5370.00 5380X0 

ZINC (Spectat huge Ora del 
Donors per metric too 
Spot 1034X0 1037X0 

Forward 100870 1059.00 


Previous 

BM ASX 


T6165D 141750 
1634X0 1635X0 
Grade) 


Mar 141X0 140X0 

AW 15850 15850 

May 15750 15750 

Jam 157X5 1 5 6.2 3 

Jrty 15850 15850 

Alio 14025 14055 

Est. volume :28X54. 


14025 14025 -153 
15150 15850 — 155 
15750 15750 -155 
13650 13650 - 225 
15850 15755 -125 
16(03 159.75 —225 
Open Hit 111453 


349750 247850 
2491X0 2492X0 


■RENT CRUDE OIL (IPS) 

U5. dollars per bam Mot* at 1X95 Barrels 


431X0 63150 
64350 644X0 


6555.00 6560X01 
6660X0 6645X0] 


5310X0 5320X0 
S39SX0 5400X0 


I03«X0 1040X0 
1060X0 1061X0 


ttm 

14X4 

1638 

18X6 

16X4 -070 

OK 

16X6 

16X3 

1648 

14X0 —072 

Jan 

14X9 

1648 

1652 

1654 -0X8 

Fob 

16X8 

1652 

1692 

162 —078 

Mar 

14X6 

1670 

1670 

1650 — 070 

A»r 

1672 

1679 

1672 

1650 —078 

Mar 

N.T, 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1652 —078 

Jim 

16X3 

1680 

14X0 

1452 —0X3 

Jhr 

1690 

1683 

14X4 

1654 —6X0 

AW 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N,T. 

1640 -078 

50P 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1640 — 0JB 

Oct 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16X0 — 078 

Ext vatume: 51X30. 

Open Int. 181X52 


A M J J A 5 
1094 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Financial 

High Law dose OMnvc 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFPEJ 


Stock Indexes 


FTSE lBO(UFFE) 
as per inoex pobrf 
Dfc 3U0A 3038X 3MZA +45A 

Mar 30997 30B4X 3126X +445 

Est. volume: 19X62 Open bit.: 57X84. 

CAC 48 (MATIF) 

FF2BB per Index paint 

Oct 1934X0 1S9&X0 1927X0 + 20X0 

NOV 1922X0 1907X0 1935X0 -S-lttfiO 

Dec 19S2X0 1915X0 1944SS +»70 

Mar 196150 196150 197050 +20X0 

Jen N.T. N.T. iKisi +»X0 

sen 1934X0 T9S4X0 1779X0 +20X0 

Est volume; 30737. Open lnt: 64X04. 


High Lew Close amuse 


tfgh Law Lan dig. 


NYSE Most Actives 


CompcHlre 

Industrial? 

Bonks 

insurance 

Finance 

T nanw. 


76594 76151 76517 - 8.31 
777.78 77376 776.90 - 655 
751.49 74451 7S0A5 -104 
93T79 927X3 924.88 -3.10 
«2.58 4W57 *2\.«B -144 
702.43 494.48 701.76 -S.15 


the dollar earlier, analysts said. 
(AFX, AFP. Bloomberg) 


NMedEnt 

SFPGIdn 

DiaitM 

FordMs 

Motoring 

AAfledH 

PeasiC 

Compaq * 

MJcrTCS 

Cnrvslr 

GnMatr 

Merck 

WalMarr 

EMCs 

AT&T 


VoL 

High 

Low 

3 pm 

Chg. 

71511 

15*. 

IS’* 

15ft 

—Y> 

492B8 

15U 

14ft 

15 

—ft 

47105 29h 

28ft 

29 V, 

+ Ift 

38475 

29 J* 

28ft 

29ft 


34312 

SiVt 

53ft 

54ft 


34766 

2 41* 

23ft 

24ft 

♦ 1ft 

32173 

34to 

33 >l 

34ft 

+ 2 

31600 

36V, 

35ft 

35ft 

-ft 

28392 364y 

35 

35ft 


34832 

47 

44ft 

44ft 

♦ ft 

24402 

44* 

45ft 

44ft 

-!■% 

25532 

36ft 

36 

34ft 


23553 

24ft 

23ft 

23ft 

♦ft 


ZIM 

20 V. 



22W 

53ft 

52ft 

53ft 

♦ft 


AMEX Stock Index 


Kish Law Last Chg. 

457.86 455.48 457 JS -1.77 


Pow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
w umnies 
10 industrials 


Close Cb'se 

96X1 +0X9 

90.93 —003 

1DT.09 + 0X7 


MARKET: Earnings Lift Stocks 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


Cbutinued from Page 1 

had been flirting with levels of 
around S percent, have dropped 
back since last Friday. On 
Tuesday, the yield on the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond fell to 7.86 percent, from 
7.90 percent on Monday. 

There was little sentiment on 
Wall Street that the Tuesday 
rally represented a reversal of 
the market's underlying bearish 
trend. Christine Callies. stock 
strategist for Brown Brothers 


their cash positions. The only 
thing missing was something to 
strike a spark and bring them 
back in." 


U.S- Stocks 


Har riman, said she expected 
the market to pick up through 
the aut umn but did not expect it 
to head much higher in 199S 
because stocks were already 
well priced. Some traders may 
take the opportunity to bail out 
of financial and other over- 
priced stocks, she warned, say- 
ing this was “a traders* rally 
rather than an investors’ rally.” 

"This has been a hard market 
to rationalize, and it has been 
very volatile, but now you have 
a good general performance by 
companies across the board, 
and that brought buyers back in 
a big way ” said Laszlo Biryini, 
whose consulting firm tracks 
large trades. 


The market emerged from 
last week’s “gloom and doom 
that you could cut with a 
knife," according to Hugh 
Johnson of First Albany Securi- 
ties. “People sold and rased 


A report by Motorola late 
Monday did it. The company, 
whose share surged 1% to 54 Vs 
on Tuesday, said its third-quar- 
ter earnings jumped 50 percent 
on a 28 percent increase m sales 
powered by worldwide demand 
for its cellular telephones. 

On Tuesday morning, Chrys- 
ler started the parade by an- 
nouncing its jump in sales and 
profits. 

Chrysler, which rose % to 
46V£, has been the most profit- 
able of the three U.S. automak- 
ers in recent years. When it re- 
ported higher sales volume, 
stock in Ford and General Mo- 
tors rose because those compa- 
nies are also expected to report 
improved sales and profits. 

Just as in the automobile in- 
dustry, Texas Instruments and 
Microsoft stock rose in the wake 
of Motorola’s good news. Apple 
Computer reported higher earn- 
ings on demand for its new note- 
book systems, and its stock con- 
tinued to rise on rumors that it 
was striking a deal with IBM to 
make the companies' computer 
systems compatible. 

Procter & Gamble climbed to 
close at 2Vi to 62%, Pepsico 
surged 2‘A to 34%, and Apple 
rose % to 39%. 

Volume on the Big Board 
surged to 355.53 million shares 
Tuesday from 213.11 million 
shares Monday. 



VoL 

HW 

Low 

Lost 

Chg. 

NoveJ 




16",. 

+ 1ft, 



4lft 

39ft 

39ft 

-ft 

Intel 

5S9S1 


60 ft 

40ft 


Cisco s 

55814 

29V« 

27ft 

28ft 

-ft 








34891 

23ft 

22ft 

23ft 


MiCSflS 


54ft 

55ft 

55- W, 

- lift. 

AaMMatl 





Blown 


Sift 

48 V, 

50 


DSC S 

26176 

31ft 

30ft 

31 ft 

-ft 

Informix 

25952 

27ft 

26ft 

27ft 

♦ft 

Oracles 

25773 


47ft 

44 ft 

-1ft 

Near* i 



5ft 

6ft 

•Wh 

DeilCdfr 

K 1 •■'il 

42ft 

40ft 

42 

+ 2ft 

WsIWtS 

23ft 

23ft 

23ft 

-Vu 


Advanced 
Declined 
linen Biged 
Tara) issues 
Now Highs 
New Law* 


1561 1515 
MS 731 
644 484 
2870 2829 


tsauxK - phot wo pa 

Dec 9X45 9139 9145 +0X3 

Mar 9264 9258 9266 + 0X3 

Jim 92X2 91.92 92X1 +0X4 

5W 9155 91.47 91.54 +QX4 

Dec 9124 41.14 91X2 +0X5 

Mar 9096 90X7 9056 +0X4 

JUB WTO HJ.72 9ftJtl + MS 

Sea ?0 ab m S9 WLas + cum 

Dec 9058 90.55 9061 + 0X3 

Mar 9056 9050 90X0 +0JK 

Jun 9057 9053 9057 +0X2 

s«a Pass mss mss uml 

Est. valumt: 54516. Open LM.: 481.743. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (L1FFE) 

11 million -Pt* of 100 net 
Dec 94X6 94X6 94X7 + 006 

Mar N.T. N.T. 9369 + 0X5 

Jun N.T. N.T. 932? +007 

Sep N.T. N.T. 92.98 + 0X9 

Est. volume: 15. Open lnt.: 4.148. 

3-MONTH EUROMARK5 (L1FFE) 

DM1 fnlHloa - pti of loo act 
Dec 9471 9466 9470 +DX1 

Mar 94X5 94X9 94X4 +002 

Jun 94X0 93X2 93X9 +0X5 

Sea 93X5 9353 9264 + 0X8 

Dec 9133 9122 9133 + 0X9 

Mar 9110 92.98 9110 + 0.10 

Jun 92X6 9175 92X7 +008 

Sep 9265 9268 9267 +0X8 

Dec 9252 9240 9230 +0X9 

Mar 9235 7227 9235 +0X9 

Jan 9224 92.18 9224 +0X9 

Sep 92X7 92X7 9215 +0X9 

Est. volume: 115X21. Open lnt.: 70196a 


Sources: Motif. Associated Press. 
London ton Financial Figures Exchange, 
inti Petroleum exchange. 


DMdmdt 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
IRREGULAR 


CWM Mlg Hold - 76 10-25 IMS 

Eaton VT Tot Ret - .029 10-17 10-31 

Empresa Nadan El b .2753 10-18 
b-oppro x amount per ADR. 


CWM Mlg Hold 
Eaton VT Tol Ret 


STOCK SPLIT 
Micros Systems 2 far 1 spilt. 

INCREASED 


Cummins Engine Q 25 12-1 12-15 

Pennlcfwdt dorp O 21 11-1 11-15 


3-MONTH PIBOR (MATIF) 

FFS million - pts of 1D0 Pd 
Dec 94.11 94X5 94X8 Uncft. 

Mar 9166 9357 9363 + 0X3 

Jun 9326 9115 9324 +0X5 

Sep 92.92 92X3 9289 + 0X2 

Dec 9264 9256 9261 +0X2 . 

Mur 9243 9235 9142 +0X4 

Jan 9221 9114 9221 +0X4 

Sep 92X7 92X0 92X6 + 0X3 

Est. volume: 452m Ooen Inf.: 174X15. 
LONG GILT CLIFFE) 1 

tSQAOO - pts A 32nd5 Of 100 pet , 

Dec 100-30 100-08 100-25 +007 I 

Mar 99-27 99-04 79-28 —M2, 

Esi. volume: 48X40. Open biL: 91245 | 

GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) | 


v a 

REGULAR 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tola! issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


317 275 

289 264 

206 333 

81? 773 

e 13 

2J 24 



VoL 

High 

Low 

Last 

Chg. 

VlOCViT 

35675 

1ft. 

1ft 

1ft 

— Vi, 

VIOCB 

15051 

38ft 

38ft 

38 ft 

+ ft 

cnayS+ts 

6755 

10V* 

9ft 

9ft 

-ft 

EchaBav 

5922 

13ft 

13 

13ft 

—ft 

XCLLM 

4880 

1ft. 

Ift. 

IV* 


SPDR 

4614 

46ft 

46ft, 

46ft 

-t>/ 4 

RoyatOg 

4543 

4ft 

4ft, 

4ft 

— ft 

Aiurl 

3887 

7ft 

6ft 

7ft 

— ft 

wmtra 

3805 

12ft 

12ft 

l?'l 

—ft 

AmdW 

3513 

8ft 

8ft 

Sft 

-ft 


94.11 

9405 

9408 

Unch. 

93X6 

93-57 

92X3 

■HUB 

9374 

9115 

9374 

-+0A5 

92.92 

ma 

9289 

+ 0A2 

92X4 

92 £6 

9261 

+0A2 

92X3 

0275 

9242 

-HUM 

<271 

9214 

9221 

+0A4 

9207 

9200 

9206 

+0A3 


Dale Food 
Colon VM Tot Ret 
Lo-Z-Bov Chair 
Puget Sound PAL 
Sr Homan QltyMun 
US West 


Q .10 11-10 12-15 
M X3 10-10 10-17 
G .17 11-17 12-9 
Q 46 10-24 11-15 
M .0782 10-20 10-26 
Q £35 10-20 11-1 


o-amwal; g-payaUe In CaaacBaa funds: m- 
moalRIy; o+taartertv; s semi on mini 




a*M 

Frov. 


1744 

1X73 

Dedineo 

1413 

1318 

Unchanged 

1937 

2100 


5094 

5091 

NowHigns 

132 

76 

Hew Laws 

61 



DM 25OM0 - pts Ot 100 PCf 
Dec 8958 BU9 8947 +041 

Mar 88X0 8825 8572 +029 

Est. volume: 161971 Open lnt.: 164221. 
ID-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FFSDWOO-Ptsaf 100 pd 


Dec 

111.16 

110X0 

111A4 

+ 0.U 

M or 

I1D70 

109X8 

11078 

+ 076 

Jim 

10976 

10976 

109X2 

+ 076 

Sax 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Uncft. 


Certain offerings of securities, financial 
<cr«ica oc imerats in teal estate published in 
ibis newspaper ate not authorized in certain 
jurisdictions in Much the luonauooal Herald 
Tribune is distributed, including (he United 
Sines of America, and do not cuuniuuc 
ofTcnngi of securities, services or interests la 
these jurisdictions. The fntentaiional Herald 
Tribune n rentes do respoosibiBly whatsoever 
for any advcitise i p nt ts for offoiop of any kin d. 


For the Record 


AMR Corpus American Airlines said it would dose its crew 
bases in Raleigh/ 1 Durham, North Carolina, and Nashville, Ten- 

• m jr t aa? 1 . Pf> _ _ -» . _ . _ i # h« Jk _ "1 _ i J| fl? a 


nessee, by May 1995, affecting a total of 714 pilot and flight 
attendant jobs. (Knight-Bidder) 

ARA Services Inc, known best as a food services provider at 
cafeterias, airports and sports arenas, has changed its name to 
Aramark to reflect its nonfood operations, the company said 
Tuesday in Philadelphia. (AP) 

McCormick & Co. said it would cut 600 jobs, 7 percent of its 
work force, resulting in a pretax charge of up to S66 million. The 
move is a restructuring that includes the sale of the Golden West 
Foods subsidiary in Bedford, Virginia. (Knight-Bidder) 


Est. volume: 196270. Onen Inf.: 152424. 


Spot Commodltfos 


Market Sales 


Today 

□use 

NYSE 35553 

Amax 19J0 

Nasdaq 34349 

In millions. 


Commodity 

Today 

Prev. 

Aluminum, m 

0734 

0734 

Cooper electrolytic. R> 

172 

172 

Iron FOB, ton 

21100 

71100 

Lead, lb 

0.42 

(M2 

Sliver. Iroy az 

149 

4PK 

Steel (scrap), ton 

110.17 

110.17 

Tin, lb 

1X706 

1X546 

Zinc, lb 

ng+tn 

0X24? 


Industrials 


His* Low Lost Seme arpe 
GASOIL (IPE1 

U-S. dollars per metric ton-lots of 100 tons 
Oct 15450 151.75 15100 15275 —325 

Nov 15725 15475 155X0 15550 —275 

Dec 159X0 15675 157 JO 157-50 -275 

Jen 161X0 15875 15950 IS9X0 —225 

Feb 16075 160X0 16050 16050 — ITS 


Every Tuesday 
Contact Fred Ronan 
Tel.: (33 1)46 37 93 91 
Fax: (331)46 37 93 70 

or your nearest HT office 
or representative 


RUSSIAN: Investors From Abroad Are Starting to Rethink Business Strategies as Ruble Keeps Plummeting 


Continued from Page II 

that familiar nemesis of many 
Western governments. “This 
policy shift is very difficult to 
manage for the central bank,” 
explained Susanne Gahier. an 
economist with J. P. Morgan in 
London, referring to the bid to 
devaluate. “It is facing a sub- 
stantial speculative attack on 
the ruble coming from the 
banking sector.” 

The defense of the currency 
has indeed been costly. Viktor 


V. Gerashchenko, the head of 
the Russian central bank, said 
Monday that the bank had 
spent $2 billion in recent weeks 
buying rubles in the effort. On 
Tuesday, he said the sharp fall 
in the value of the ruble 
stemmed from “speculative de- 
mand on the part of individual 
commercial structures.” the 
news agency Itar-Tass reported. 


interest rates. By hiking the cost 
of borrowing, the government 
can send needed signals that it 
is both concerned with and in 
control of Lhe situation. At the 
same time, higher interest rates 
would be seen braking the econ- 
omy and thus lessening the dan- 
ger of inflation rocketing up- 
wards on the back of higher 
import prices. 


agreed with the central bank 
that a cheaper Russian currency 
was necessary. Ms. Gahier cal- 
culated that in the 12 months to 
August, the ruble had risen in 
real terms by 150 percent 
against the dollar. Even after 
the sharp declines of recent 
days, she still put its real gain at 
108 percent from the year-earli- 
er level. 


its largest exporters, analysts 
said, the central bank was try- 
ing to alleviate ooe of the gov- 
ernment's greatest problems, 
the huge level of indebtedness 
in many Russian corporations. 


said. By boosting profits for ex- 
porters, the hope was that some 
of those debts could now be 
paid off without budget-busting 
state intervention. - 


In recent months, the govern- 
ment has been under- intense 
pressure from industrial lobby- 
ists to take over some of those 
bad debts. 


Whatever the cause of the While everyone agreed that 
rout, there is clear unanimity on the speed of the ruble's decline 
the remedy — sharply higher was harmful, many analysts 


“The lower ruble is great for 
exporters," noted Mr. Lister- 
Cheese. By boosting profits for 


“Insofar as exporters have 
been squeezed by the rising ru- 
ble, its fall now helps them,” he 


The problem is whether a de- 
valuation that, many experts 
agree is helpful be confined 
before it becomes a total col- 
lapse. Much, analysts agreed, 
would now depend.on the speed 
and degree of the government's 
response to the crisis. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Scoot Scoot 

High Lon 


Open HSgh Low One Chg On. tint 


Scoot Seowm 
High Low 


Open Htotl Low dose Qm OP.M 


Agencc Franco hone Ocl 11 


Via AhoooM ftesi 

Season Sea-on 


Amsterdam 


abn AmraHId 
ACF Haul ns 
Aegon 
Ahold 
AJaa Nobel 
AMEV 

Bols-Wessanen 
CSM 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fokkcr 
Glsr-Broeades 
HBG 
Hel (token 
Haoaovens 
Hunter Douglas 
IHC Caland 
Inter Mueller 
Inti Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

Nadi lard 
OcaGrlnlon 
Pafc hoed 
PrvlUra 
Polygram 
Rogcra 
Rodamco 
Rotlnca 
Rarenlo 
Roral Dutch 
Stark 
Unilever 

Van Ommeren — — . 

VNU 180 174 

Writers/ Kluwer 124X0 122X0 


Rhein metoll 260 254 

Scherlna 938 8V8 

Siemens 643 627 

Thyssen 272X0 293 

Varto S®5 305 

Vebd 529X0509^9 

VEW 349 3S2 

Vloo 497489.50 

Volkswagen 47145450 

weiia loos 990 

mm™ 

Previous : 76327 


Eurotunnel 

Fi sons 

Forte 

GEC 

GenlAcc 

Glaxo 

Grand AM 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hllbdown 

HSBC Hides 

ICI 


Helsinki 

Amer-Yhtyma T 

Emo-Gutxeir 42. 

Hotitomakl 1 

icap. 

Kymmene 1 

Metro 1 

Nokia S 

Pohlola 66. 

S63S%«m ^ 


101 100 
42X0 4340 
145 144 

10 16 
133 128 

143 146 

553 533 

66J0 66J0 
98.10 97.90 
247 243 




Hong Kong 




Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanll 

Ar tied 

Barca 

BBL 

Befcorrt 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocke rill 

Cabepo 

CMrwvl 

Delholze 

S lech-abel 
lecirofliio 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevaert 
Gloverbel 
immobel 
Kredletbank 
Mos o ne 
Pstroflno 


Recital 

RavaieBelee 

Sac Gen Banaue 

SocGen Bctgloue 

Satina 

Safvuy 

Teesenderb 

Tractebel 

UC8 

Union Mlniere 
wagons Lib 



30.10 
1640 
11 JO 
1020 



Montreal 


A too Ltd I 1314 139b 

Bonk Montreal 24H» 2416 
BCE Mobile Com 389b 3P6 


CrinTIre A !!■* 11 

CdnUtllA 23W 2» 

f iw tnlpe 8 A 

Crown* Inc 17M* 171* 
CT Flnl 5 VC 1716 17% 
Gar Metro 12H 1216 

Gf West Ufeeo 20V. 3SFA , 
Hers Inti Bcp 13^ 13Vk i 
Hudson's Bay Co 27V5 2716 
Imasco Ltd 37 37 V6 

Investors Grp liK 17 16*5 
Labatt { John) 2196 21V. 
umtawCas 2T»6 22IA 

MotoonA 21 21 V6 

Natl Bk Canada ?*fc m 
OshawaA 19V5 19% 


17 16V6 
2196 2194 
2P6 2296 
21 2TV4i 
9H 9V6 
19M 1996 


i. lo 1.14 
Z36 2J4 
14 1370 
925 970 
925 9 

250 247 
26 25.90 
241 254 
126 322 
570 5; 

158 3.40 
4J6 434 
144 1J9 
16 1550 
2X0 273 
Strwltsjn fr ies Urte x: 234523 


Stockholm 


SAImazu 
Shine tsu Qwm 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Own 
5uml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TalseiCorp 
Takeda Chem 
TDK 
Tellhi 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tonpan PrSnllnB 
Torav ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YamaictU Sec 

a:* no. 


723 716 

2080 2080 
6000 5900 
1880 1800 
560 559 

887 88* 

341 343 

642 632 

1220 1210 
4560 4450 
541 546 

1140 1140 
2840 2850 
1430 1440 
768 766 

760 746 

2060 2070 
780 771 


Open High Low Close Ow OpJnt 


12 X0 10X8 Mar 96 If 55 114] 1155 

ll.W II. >8 Mav 9ft 

11X8 11.70 Jul 96 

Est. soles 38,652 Mon's, sales 4J9I 

Mon’s open int 135477 up 459 


-HIS 1431 
-0.15 9 

-0.15 5 


Grains 


Pancdn Petroim 4216 4216 


Power Corp 19V6 1996 
Power Flnl 29 29 

OuebecorB _ 17V, 17% 

Rogers Comm B 1916 19M 
Royal BkCda 2B96 2816 
SearsCanodolitc 896 BV6 
Shell Cda A 4«. 44 

Souttiam Inc 1596 156 
S telco A 8V6 M6 

Triton Flnl A 345 345 


4494 44 

1596 liffli 
8V6 M6 
345 345 




Johannesburg 


Madrid 




Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 

AJlkmi Hold 

Altana 

Asks 

BASF 

Bayer 

Bay. Hypo bank 
Bov Veretnsbk 
BBC 

BHF Bank 
I BMW 

I Commerzbank 

I Continental 
Daimler Bora 
Deginsa 
Dl BabCuCk 
Deutsche Bank 
Douglas 
DfMdner Bank 
FekmtUenie 
FKruaaHacKh 
Home net 



AECI 
AHech 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 

Blyvoor 

BuHelS 

Do, Beers 

Drlelonteln 

Gencor 

GFSA 

Harmony 

H lohve Id Steel 

KRJOl 

Nedbank Grp 
Rondfantem 


5A Brews 
SI Helena 
Sasol 

western Deep 


Kis^ 


2750 2750 
100 TO 
230 233 

3050 3050 
11 11 
NA 56 
99 101 
6X75 6125 
14 MX5 
125 125 

40 4150 

30 30 

m to 

31 31 
5075 5250 

114114.75 
8350 8350 
4750 48. 

3550 35751 
210 223 
5SS572 I 


BBV 3120 3120 

Ben Central Hlsn. 2975 2940 
Banco Santander 4970 4900 


Endesa 

Ercroa 

Iberdrp ftg 

Re osol 

Tabacalera 

Teletonlca 


839 836 

3150 3185 
1075 1800 
5540 5510 
160 167 

BM 012 
3965 3955 
3180 3160 
1710 1705 


Accor 
Air UauHe 
Alcatel Alslhom 
Axa 

Bon col re (del 

BIC 

BNP 

Bouygues 

Danone 

Carrefour 

GCF. 

Cents 
Choroeurs 
amenls Franc 
CkrtJMed 
Elf-Aaultalne 
Eura Disney 
Gen. Earn 
Havas 
I metal 

Lataroe Coppce 
Legrand 
Lyon. Eoux 
Oreai (L'l 
L.VJVLH. 
Motra-Hochette 
Michel In B 
Moulinex 
Paribas 
Pectilnev Inti 
Pemod-RIcanJ 
Peugeot 
Plnoull Print 
Rodlotectmkiue 
Rh- Poulenc A 
Rati- St. Louts 
Sonofl 

Saint Gabatn 

S.E.B. 

Sle General* 

Suez 

Thomson-CSF 

Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


AGA 
AseoAF 
Astra AF 
Atlas Copco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
EcHtte-A 
Handetsbank BF 
Investor BF 
Norsk Hydro 
Pharmacia AF 
SondvIkB 
SCA-A 

S-E Banker, AF 

skancBa F 
StoanskaBF 
SKF BF 

storaAF 
Trelleborg BF 
Volvo BF 



: ^9822 

Tontoc index 
Pravlaas : 1571 


Toronto 




Sydney 


Amcor 873 

anz 3X2 

BHP 1952 

Boral 370 

Bougainville 1X5 

Coles Myer 4X2 

Camalco 525 

CRA 1870 

CSR 479 

Fosters Brew 178 

Goodman FMd 127 

ICI Australia n 

Magellan 1X2 

M1M 2X1 

Nat Aust Bank 1IL32 

News Coro 877 

Nine Network 3.99 

N Broken Hill 349 

Poe Dunkw 191 

Pioneer inti 125 

Nmndv Poseidon 248 

OCT Resources L3o 

Santas 405 

TNT 248 

Western Mining 8X8 

WCstpoc Banking 4X1 

wtoodsMe 458 




AUtibi Price 
AirCmodo 
Alberta Eneray 
i Alan Aluminum 
AmerBarrlck 
Avenor 

Bk Nova Scotta 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 

Bombardier B 

Bramatea 

BrascanA 

Camera 

CIBC 

Cdn Natural Res 
CdnOcdd Pet 
Cdn Pacific 
Cosanies Paper 
Comlnco 
Consumers Gees 
rv rfmm 
Donum Ind B 
DuPontCdaA 
Echo Bay Mines 
Empire Co. A 
FaJconbridae 
Fletcher chailA 
Franco Nevodo 

Guardian Can A 
Hernia Gold 
Horsham 
imperial Oil 
Inca 

IPL Energy 
Lac Minerals 

Laid taw A 
Laid law B 
Laewen Group 
London Insur Gp 
M ocmlll Bloed*! 
Magna Inti A 
Maple Leaf Fds 
Moore 

Newbridge Netw 

Nortmda Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Norcen Eneray 
Nthern Telecom 
Nova 
Onex 


WHEAT IGK7T) IdXIDuiTmnifn.aoimM'DvinH 
4.1«'- : 1D» Oec94 4.13'.-, 4.19 i 17^ 4.l6'.i 

*33 127 Mar 9S *31'', 4J5Va 4J0'a 05 

198' t HOijMavVS 3,92’. 1«>6 3.911? 19Tk 

343V. ill Jul9S i5SVi 35B 354k, 3579. 

345 151 'y ScaTS 140 161V, i5fl‘i 34iv« 

375 155 Dec 95 i&9 3.70 3.ft9 iTfl 

151‘j 3M Jul 9ft 14794 

Est. sales 17.000 Man’s, sales 10449 
Man's open int 79.973 oh 297 
WHEAT (KB0T) SJWODvmnrTTurr-aalorsfterBwiWI 
4.19 112'*iDecW 4.11 42«j 4.1 J JJOHi 

422V1 3J5 Mar 9 5 m *3£ 4JW» 4J5’4 

•103 351 MOV 95 1*6 -UM'. X941i 197V. 

IftBU lift': Jill 95 160 342 S 158 VI 341 VI 

177 i» Sep 75 164 

lft9'6 3409, Dec 95 171 u, 

Est. sales HA. Mon's, sales 3.D40 
Man's ooen lm 39707 off 35" 

CORN (CBOTJ SOOOrwmmrTwiv- oofton per ousnw 
277 Z13'lDec94 2.13V. 2.14k, 2.13V, 2.13V, 

2X216 273', Mar 95 22315 U414 223 223V. 

2X5 2J0V.MOV95 131 2J2 2J04V 2Jlls 

2X5 v l 235V. Jul 95 U6'4 137 234 236V. 

270V) 239 Sec » 241 "5 242 241 24IVi 

243 2359, Dec 95 24ft',. 148 246'a 24735 

2 Sft'- 2509, Mar 94 -JJVj iSHf, L52 1 /, 25JS 

262V. 2X5’*.Jul«6 2J9V, 2WV. 2J9G 240+ 

Ed. sales 35X00 Man’s, soles 24.770 

Men's open tfit 739442 up 124 
SOYBEANS fCBOT) Sjeoau nw w iw m-Boiwwiwe 
7JT6 5Jft>.r4av»4 531 533 539V6 S32V. 

7.04 537 l *JOn95 142 5.44 54316 

7X5 i47S.Mar9S 532 533’.*, 530". 5X3 

7.05V, 53* May "5 53916 54|V4 459 541V, 

7X*’-, 543*6 Jul 95 546V, S48W 546 547V, 

6.12 5461, Aug 95 5489, 5.71ii S48'6 5J0VS 

6.15 571 Sep 95 53316 5J4 F.73V6 £74 


>0X3*6 47.125 

> 0X4 21X31 

> 0.03 3.173 

'0X1*6 7,5*3 
>002« 165 

• 0.02 129 

-0X114 6 


1580 

1041 Dec 94 

1362 

1260 

1255 

1259 

1605 

1077 Mar 95 

1316 

1321 

1309 

1311 

1112 

!079Mav«5 

1340 

1345 

1339 

1339 

1600 

1225 Jul 95 

1375 

1313 

1366 

1370 

1560 

1398 Sep 95 

14110 

1400 

Ma 

IJ99 

1633 

1390 Dec 95 

142/ 

1427 

1422 

1425 

1676 

1350 Mar 96 

I4» 

1458 

1453 

1450 

1647 

1725 May 9* 




1491 


Jut 96 

Est. sale* 5J14 Man’s, sates *J2D 

Mon’S ooen lm 74X77 otf 518 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) UXUds-canKeer* 


-2 33424 
_4 20425 
S 7446 
-5 2X51 
-5 1X03 
— 11 £9*0 
—7 3445 
— J 312 
-7 II 


92570 92150 Sea 96 92J00 92380 92X80 923*0 
Est. sales NA. Man's, sales 102730 
Mon's open lnt 2360X01 off 15301 
BRITISH POUND (CMHt) lea-pauna- inmnuaktA 
15990 14500 Dec 9* 13836 13848 13754 13786 
13M0 1460) Mar 95 13780 13786 13730 13768 
131*0 1J3J8 Jun 95 13734 

Est. sales NA Man's, sales A737 
Men's open bit 42387 up 04 • 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER1 ipr^lNHmeu 


.0X3 22250 

r 0X315 12025 
>0X2 1X45 

*0X716 2310 
+ 0X2 72 

► 0X2 5 


134.00 

BUM Nov 94 

92X0 

9175 

91X0 

91X5 

+2A5 

6X37 

13200 

89X0 Jan 95 

96X0 

97X0 

96.10 

9775 

+ 215 

6+771 

12475 

9100 Mar 95 

VVXO 

101 AO 

9120 

10170 

+110 

4X1 

11475 

97.00 MOV 95 10273 

102 X0 

102X0 

10420 

+ 110 

1.761 

119A0 

100X0 Jul 95 




W7 A5 

+210 

625 

114X0 

10775 Sep 95 

109X0 

109X0 

109X0 

11070 

+210 

m 

11160 

109X0 Nov 95 




1 1270 

+2.10 


111A0 

105X0 Jan 96 




11470 

+ 110 



M*r 96 




11570 

♦ 110 



07670 

07038 Dec 94 07438 

07453 

07438 

07440 

+ 12*1.940 

07405 

07020 Mar 95 07444 

07448 

0J43B 

07416 

+ B 



16990 Jun *S 

07430 





17438 

16965 Sep 9S 



17412 

+ 1? 



07040 Dec 95 






ESL late NA Man's.sata 

1754 





Man's open M 44,174 up 138 





GERMAN MARK (CMBU i 





16606 

15590 Dec 94 16470 

0X479 

DX4SA 

0X473 


0XW5 

OJ810MW9S 0X485 

0X4H 

16470 




0X595 

15980 Jun 95 






16525 

16347 Sep 95 






ESI. sam NA Man's, sates 

34,050 






132X34 
+0X0W 49493 
+0X0". 21461 
+0X0*6 24.295 
+ 0X0*4 1X35 
+0X1U 7X65 
+ 0.01*4 113 

•0X1*6 140 


Est. sales NA Man's, sales 1,901 
Van's aoer (nt 20302 alt 461 


Metals 


S.7gv,Nev95 5X4 "j 564V, 5X2 5X4 V. 

£21 5.99*6 Jul 9ft 6X2 6X2 6X7 6X2 

Est. soles 35X00 Man's, sales 2SJ81 
Mur’s nwn Int 149,226 UP 1379 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT1 IM m- aaecrs ear ran 
20730 1S930Ocf 94 160X0 16140 16030 161 JO 

209X0 160 30 Dec 94 16130 161.80 160X0 16140 

30730 16130 Jan 95 16110 16330 167X0 162.90 

207-50 >64 90 Mar 95 16540 16630 TftSXO 16£«0 

207.00 167.60 MOV 95 168.40 148X0 168X0 168X0 

206X0 I70_70Jul 95 171X0 I77.JO 171J0 171.40 

182x0 1 72-00 Auo 95 17100 17150 17230 1713} 

1B2JD 1 7130 Sep 95 175X0 17530 175X0 175X0 

181.00 17S.60OCI95 176J0 177X0 17630 176X0 

18100 17630 Dec 9$ 177X0 179X0 17130 17840 

Est. solas 15X00 IWm’s-sotes 11.913 

Men's ooen lnt 93.194 of* 42B 
SOYBEAN OfL (CBOT1 40.000 Be- oMtos ear loo *k. 
29X4 22.1000 94 2S.05 2A39 24.9ft 25X3 

28X7 72X0 Dec 94 2180 2A07 2177 3X5 

2835 2245 An 95 3J0 2160 2336 2148 

2830 2191 Mar 95 2120 2134 2112 2125 

28X5 22X5 May 95 2105 2115 22.95 73X8 

77X5 2236 Jul 95 22X5 7100 22X0 22X2 

2730 21 73 Aug 95 22X8 2103 22X3 22X5 

24.75 2235 Sep 95 2180 2102 23X0 22X5 

23X0 22.75 OCT 95 22.W) 2105 2230 22.97 

23X5 22X0 Dec 95 2100 2100 22X0 ZL00 

Est.saes 20X00 Man’s. sates 13X64 
Mon’s open rrt 89,757 cfl 283 



CAC-W index : M17JH 
Prevtaas : 189(32 


£ % 
im 2iS 

1500 1500 
1SO0 1 
MOO 1300 




London 


Abbey Ncri 
aiim Lyons 


Arlo Wtoglm 

Argyll Group 


4X8 in 

535 548 

243 2X0 

2X3 243 


I ASS Brit Foods 5X5 5X4 


M3 494 
443 4X5 


Bank Scotland 2X5 1.95 


HochtM 

Hoechst 

Holznionn 


iwka 
K ail Soli 
Karsiadt 
Kouttwl 
KHD 

KktecknerWerke 

Llnce 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mgnnes m ann 

Metaiineseil 

Muencn Rued 

pgrsctw 

Preussao 

PWA 

RWE 


Barclays 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Beets 
Bewoter 
BP 


340 534 
331 535 
430 440 
1X6 1X6 
136 172 
433 490 
5.12 5X2 
4X8 4X4 


Brir Airways 173 166 1 


Brit Gas 
Bril Steel 


Brit Telecom its 3X7. 

BTR 114 113 1 

Coble Wire 417 196 : 


Cadbury Sa 4X M 
Corodon 277 2X0 


Coots Vlvena 2.15 210 
Comm union 5M 537 


Courtoutdt 
ECC Group. 


450 452 

1X9 3X6 


Milan 

AHeonro 
ASSltolki 
Autostrada prlv 
Boa Aori col turn 
Bra Canmtr Hal 
Bca Naz Lavara 
Bca Pop Novara 
Banco di Romo 
Bra AmbraskmD 
BraNapofl rise 
Benetton 
Crsdlto ltd Ikmo 
EnldiemAwB 
Ferfln 
Flat spa 
Flnora Agrolnd 
Finmeccanica 
Fendlarlaspa 
Generali Aisle 
IFIL 

Italcementl 

Itol ros 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 
Olivetti 
Pirelli spa 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

Son POOto Torino 

SIP 

SME 

Snlabod 

Standa 

BM 

ToroAssIc 



Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil 18.70 1975 
a*r»spa 930 ?32 

BrodBBCD 8J0 8X0 

Brahma 26674150 

C«mlg 89X0 87 

Etotrodns 329 33 

isr ^ 

poranopotwno 10.70 1135 
Patrabras 138 U4 

Souza Cruz 730 730 

Tetebros 448b 4675 

Yetesp 430 415X0 

Usiminas 1X0 1X3 

Vole Rio Doce 1M 178 
Vario NA 205 

Bgves p a in dex : dJfl 
Previous : scan 


Tokyo 

AkolEiMtr 

Asotn OwmkMl 
AasM Glass 
Banket Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Casio, MOO 1300 

Dal Nlpoon Print 1878 1S5D 
Dohva ttovse 1390 1390 
Dglwo SecuriHM 1430 1430 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 
ItoYakada 
ItOCIhl 

Japan Airlines 
Kallma 
Kansai Power 
Kawasaki steel 
Kirin Br ewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kyocera 


Placer Dome 

PoiashCorpSask 

Prwlgo 

PWA 

Ouebecor Print 
Renobsance Eny 
Rio Alaom 
Seagram Co 
Stone Consofd 
Talisman Eny 
TcIcbI obe 
Teka 



, 0JBV, 76351 
+0X2*6 27.175 
+ 0.02*6 17,256 
♦ 0X7* 7,956 
+0X2*6 14345 
-0X2 518 

+ 0JE5+ 280 

+ 0X1*4 5374 
16 


-0X0 1011 
♦ OJO 46736 
-0.10 1SL427 
+030 12A66 
7313 
—030 6351 
—030 751 

/070 74 

+0.10 450 

537 


+ 038 7X57 

♦ H7 39.152 
+Q.T2 11,140 
+O.IO 12,687 
+0.13 8.923 
+0.11 63*6 
+ 0.0S 1X35 
*0.07 1X69 

♦ 0X5 339 
+ 0X5 671 


Livestock 


CATTLE 

I CMER) ttMOtn. 




65700094 

66. BO 

£7X0 

66X0 

<7.42 


6770 Dec « 

67X0 

68X0 

*7X0 

68X7 


66X5 Feb 95 

66.90 

67.95 

*6X5 

67X2 

75.10 

67 77 Apr 95 

an 

4870 

6777 

68.17 

6970 

6470 Jun 95 

64 JO 

64X5 

64.75 

44X2 

*110 

63X0 Aug» 


6410 

63X5 

Mffj 

47X5 

4470 DO 95 

6430 

64X5 

64J8 

64X5 


2240 2190 
1170 1080 
1010 990 
864 863 
1760 1770 


TarOam Bank 


TransCda Floe 
Utd Dominion 
utdWesnunw 
West axat Eny 


xorax Canada B 

totes 

r ■ ■itwJX _ SDMI 



Est. sates 2172ft Man's, sales 24,959 

Mon’S open IN 68344 off 525 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) S9XI»(»-aNsp 


9035 10X46 
>1X7 26,777 
♦ l.« 15379 

+0X2 11X19 
+0X0 2,99? 
♦0X3 1.258 
+0X5 160 


S1J5 9500 W 7135 72XS 7135 
88X0 71X0 Nov M 71.90 7125 71 J3 

80.9$ 71 A0 Jon 95 71X0 72X5 7130 

KL2S 7035 Mar 95 7030 71X7 70X0 

74.90 7*920 Apr 9S 70.15 70X5 70.10 

74J0 69X0 May 95 69.98 7030 6930 

73X5 69X0 Auo 95 69.90 7025 O.«0 

69.70 A9.60Sep96 

Est. sales 1-794 Men's, sales 1.914 

Men's open w 9 J13 off 61 

HODS (CMEtU eusBto .- bins d»b 


+ 0-75 2X51 
+ 135 4537 
♦1X2 1327 
» 1X2 515 

•0X3 J77 

+QJ0 262 
+035 39 

1 


M GRADE COPPER (NCMX) »0NI».-caNsawb 
119X0 75J5DecM 11330 115X0 11230 11435 
11130 7630 Jan 95 112X0 112X0 112X0 114X0 

117.60 73. 00 Feb 95 HISS 

117-60 73X0MCT-9S 11110 11330 111X0 111IS 

115X0 76XSAAOV9S 111X0 11160 11130 11235 

iixjo 78.00 ju w riaw liaxo itojo nixs 

11330 79 .10 Sep 95 110X5 11030 110X0 11035 

122.10 7120 Od 95 716X0 116.10 116X0 116X0 

11XX0 77JSNBV95 1*4X5 

11175 08X0 Dec 95 109X0 109X0 10470 10935 

108X0 8830 Jan 96 109.10 

11030 6270 MarM 106.10 

11630 n.l0Air96 112X0 112X0 112X0 11285 
SBfJO 107X0 May 96 10730 

11530 104.10 Jun 96 11230 

Jul 9ft 10400 

112X5 111X0 Aug 96 111X0 

Est.saks 7300 Man’s. sales 5351 
Man’s open int 57.213 off 181 
SILVER (NCMX) SinM»a.-an>i+iTma 
5613 51 13 Oct 94 SOX 

NOV W 5S0X 

5«7X 380XDBCM 5SSX 5AX 549.0 55X0 

576.5 JOIXJan 95 5SLD 553X BIX 5516 

60U) 4163MOT9S 5ft63 5*65 5540 961X 

6043 41 OX May 95 573X 573X 566X 567.9 

6100 47X0 Jul 95 5B1X »1X 5740 574* 

*033 5J23Sep93 5003 581 X 580J 581 X 

628X 529XDK95 SWX 599X S«X 591.0 

*110 5750 Jan 9ft 5942 

6220 5540 Mar 96 60L7 

5870 5070 May 9ft 609.1 

JN 96 617.1 

Est. sates 25X00 Man’s, sates 8X93 
Man’s open IN 124001 up 366 
PLATINUM (IIMER) SllnwaL-aaearspertroyaL 
435X0 36100 Oct 94 410X0 410X0 41&5D 415X0 

43530 37450 Jan 95 4I9JU 42030 41730 419X0 

439X0 390OQ APT 95 424JU 4Z4O0 42130 42 xm 

43500 41930 Jul 95 42BO0 42000 42500 4Z6J0 

43630 42200 OCT 95 42900 42900 42900 429X0 

43930 43930 Jan 96 432X0 

Erf. sales NA. MuYi. sales 2X12 
Man's open lnt 23X13 off 359 
GOLD (NCMX) HOirBvaz^-aaniiraM-ireru. 

417X0 344000a 94 39830 38030 307X0 387X0 

f*>v 94 38670 

42X50 343X0D«cM 39230 39230 38100 39120 

41100 36330 Feb 95 3*520 39500 391 JO 393X0 

417X0 36430 Aar 95 39930 39930 37630 397.10 

42H3D 36130 Am 95 40230 402JO 400.00 400X0 

4M30 3S03SAU09S 406X0 JMXO 404X0 mjS 

m?.5H 401X00095 «3J0 

429X0 40030 Dec 9$ 411X0 4TU0 411X0 412X0 

«4J0 41 230 Feb 96 416J0 

43IUD 41U0APT26 420X0 

43130 413X0 Jun 96 42430 

_ _ „ AUO 96 42170 

Esi. soles sumo Mon’s, sues 16, ni 
Mon'fopenirt 17VJ72 off 1561 


-030 39X38 
—0.40 
— 135 

-035 4.515 
-OJO 1J99 
-020 1X97 
-020 

—1X0 2X74 
-0X0 1,164 
— 020 IJF8 
-020 

-020 217 

-OX 623 
— 020 54 

—028 
— 020 
—OJO 


Mon’s open int bojs up 244 

JAPANESE YEN (CMBO Iwwl Mha >OM4injBmn 

0X1 0490D JW9525DfC 94 0X700220-01 00280X0999C.01 0027 Wifi 

mU056fll U»WM Mn- 950X1007XX1010maEa072iUllqi05 —I 3X09 

amotw —a 5i3 

fjX)i!/?aDKM»Sep 95 0X10X7 —3 U 

aoKMftOLOiouiDecfS 0010375 -4 n 

Est. sate NA. Man's, sales Ilia 

Mon's open int 63X09 up 1235 . 

SWISS FRANC (CMBt) 1 nrrfrtrr t nnlrii «ignUi 10 [HOI 
07905 0-4885 D«C 94 07812 07015 OT7B 0.7775 —51 nan 

07925 07420 Ma* 95 07B35 07835 07788 0J0U Hi 90 

07955 07466 Jun vj 07835 0JB3S 07125 07I3& Zll a 

Sep 95 07866 51 1 

Estsales NA Men’s. sate 9,105 ’ 

Man’s open lnt 36X62 otf 72 


—83 97,126 
-83 4* 

—04 11X16 
—08 4X11 
—9.1 
— 9J 

—94 2X44 


—1.90 235 

—OJO 19X11 
—070 3.112 
—OJO 511 
— 070 
—OJO 


-&18 ,s * 

— 3J0 

-U010U5B 

— 3JD 20,007 
-330 7,194 
-U0 10351 
™SLH 5JB2 
—130 

— 330 7X78 

—130 

—140 1,965 
-ISO 6JS1 
— 330 136 


Rnandral 


441 434 

1140 1130 
905 910 
713 710 

7230 7150 


Zurich 


Mcfsu Elec IryJs 1680 1650 


ElecWks 1060 1060 
Mltsu hShl Bk 2550 2520 
Mitsubishi Kastl N.T. 555 
MHMMstllEkC 728 722 

MftgubMil Mev 785 780 


Singapore 



Asia Poe Brew 
Cerebos 

aty Dgvgtapmnt 
Cvcia& Carriage 


DBS Land 
PC LevInostJOT 
Fraser & Neove 
Gf Eastn Ufa 
Hong Loans Fin 
Indicape 
Jurong Shlpvard 
Koy Htan j CawH 


®3?SSFir 

O^eta union Bk 
OMeas Union EM 
Sembawang 


I Enterprise 011 189 3X0 




16X0 14X0 
730 735 
BJ0 RIO 
13X0 1320 

10x0 iojm 

4X0 4X4 
6.90 6X5 
1730 17.10 
27X0 27 

4X0 4X2 

535 535 
13X0 1370 
152 1X9 
1230 1230 
3X4 124 
221 113 
14X0 1430 
7.10 7 

020 OJO 

11x0 luo 


Mitsubishi. Cera 1230 1240 


Mitsui and Co 
Mitral Marine 

Mitrakwhl 

Mitsumi 

NEC 


839 837 

759 759 
925 932 
1290 1260 
1260 1230 


NGKinrataiars 1030 1020 


Nlkfco Securities 
Nippon Koooku 
Nippon OU 

Nippon Steel 

Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Otympu* Optical 1100 hmo 
P ioneer 
Ricoh 

Sanya Eie« 

Sharp 


1130 1130 
969 957 
S9B 690 
379 379 
635 639 
SIS OU 
SOS) 2800 


2480 2510 
966 965 
581 576 
1830 1820 



4975 33.920a 94 3170 35.10 3435 

J0J0 I? DecW B.T0 34.12 3S35 

5080 36. 90 Feb 95 P30 37X2 3317 

48X0 36X0 Aw « 17 to 37.90 37X5 

4130 42.15 J«H1 95 4100 4125 4ZX2 

45X0 42. 12 Jul 9S 42X2 4110 4282 

0.40 41 JO AUO 95 42X5 423D 82X0 

4030 39X2 Od 95 39X0 39X7 39.12 

41 25 39X0D8C9S 39.90 40. IQ 3TJ0 

Estsales 4387 Man’s. sous t.270 
Man’s open lnt SMJToJt 573 
PORK BELLIES (CMER) 40X001 H.-amhi d. 
flOJH 30X0 Feb 95 *J0 «U0 4020 

6020 SOW Mo- 95 4070 *UO *030 

61.11 J9A2MOV9S 41J0 41.90 4130 

MAO 40X5 Jul 95 42.10 4.45 4210 

44X0 39.00 AUO 95 41.15 4130 41.15 

Esi. alias 1J11 Mon's, soles 1X5* 

Men’s 0PM ifrf 9X48 alt 25 


*0X0 1,954 
+ 013 16X12 
*0X5 6X80 

♦ OAT 2M 

•OJO 1300 
+ 0X8 371 

*002 270 

♦ 003 165 

31 


US T. BILLS (Cmer) ti imasn - m arm m. 

H.10 94J5D4C 94 94X4 94X8 94X4 94X6 +0X3 21X09 

4SXS 9198 Mar 9S 94X2 94X7 9422 9434 +0X3 tjffl 

9424 93X6JU195 93X7 91X7 93X7 91X7 +OQ4 2A93 

Efl-sale* NA Mon's solas 379 
Man's ccgn tar 32.o» elf 240 


SYRTfaEABnrr (CHOTT sl«U»snn-ali8i3M>erill8pct 
104-S I01-X5 Dec 94102-055 102+13 107-05 1Q7-09 + 04 18IAI0 

103-09100-365 MarOaoi-185 101-24 101 -IBS *01-71+ 031 Ull 
Est. soles 30X00 Mon’s.sdes 5X03 
Mon's onen W IB3J91 off 2*7 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) tlOOXDOten-MiSBndErftgBad 
llf-21 loa-M Dec 94 101-09 101-24 101-00 101-17 + 09 271,974 

111-07 99-13 Mar 95100-16 100+31 100-16 100-25 + 10 8X94 

]«-£ JWM »9-3' 10WB 99-31 100-03 + II 1» 

101-06 98-38 Sep 95 99-12 + 11 3 

110-31 98-10 Dec 95 98-27 + 11 

Est sate 75X63 Mon'S.ades 12X26 
Mon copen H 280^75 up 95357 

USTRSASURYBONOS (CBOT) ama-ftlOOjnMMLMrvJ* W1D0»c+l 
l]5-« 91-19 Dec 94 98-14 99-04 98-14 98-25 + IT JM sy ; 

] f-M 96-15 MG’ 95 97-26 98-14 97-25 98-03 + 11 

11S-W JMJ Jun95 97-07 97-ZS 97-07 97-15 • 11 1 1JO 

117-15 96-13 Ssp9S 96-29 + 11 246 

113- 14 95-09 Dec 95 96-13 * II 111 

114- 06 95-17 Mo-96 95-30 + 11 48 

100-20 M-OS Jun 96 95-16 *11 g 

EP. tote 340AM Man's, iota 44X22 

Mon's ooen int 441JS5 


♦0JS 0A55 
*0X1 835 

+0J8 256 

♦ OJO 346 

+020 56 


WlntermurB 

Zurich A39 B 


iK&BS*ar 


1238 122s 

its its 


COFFEE C (NGBB) VXOBta- wn bo+p 
244X5 77. 10 Dee W 1(1X0 18775 180X5 

744.00 71.90 MOT 95 IMJ0 192X5 1B4JD 

244X0 82 JO May 95 191-90 194X0 1*1.90 

245.10 05-00 Jul 95 19195 1*1X0 19195 

TMWi 1UL50S6P9! 194-75 1 9475 19150 

242X0 1IX0D9C95 1«5A0 1*5X0 19190 

Mar 94 

Est. sate 11.5M Mjn'iMte 13.SH 
Mte'sapanlnt 34X0 ! Off 532 
SUGAR-WORLD 1 1 (NCSE1 iiUMte-cmiit 
l?Sl *l7Mar«5 1138 1140 1113 


+4X5 16X39 
•4X5 11X50 
—9X0 4X77 
—9X0 1X93 
—875 803 

-8X0 840 

— 7J0 100 


Industrials 

™£ ro,< 3 INC™> »*00te- ctm VW n. 
77X5 59X0 Dec 94 67X1 63X0 67X8 

78.15 6150Mtr9S 69X0 M 

^ 7070 

Si 

SSS SSSS& — «■'*> 

94a. Mon’s. sales 1979 
Mon’iooenw S2J29 up 257 

nxo 46X0 Nov 94 49X0 50.10 48A0 

621S 43J5Jon95 31.40 51 JO 50X0 

SB.7J 47.95 Fop *5 5100 53X0 51.15 

g-» «A0MW95 51X0 51.95 5095 

SIS 4S05Aor95 51.10 51.10 5070 

5430 47.00 May 95 50X5 38.30 50.10 

53^ 4679 Am 95 50X0 4990 

5430 47ASJU195 50.10 50.10 

M40 CJO/u+O 95 5045 50X5 50L65 

S.10 «X5Sev>« SI JO 51 JO SjS 

D9S 50JWOCTM S13S 5135 BM 

^.srtes NA. Man’s, sales 24,171 
Mon \ oc en rt iffl.117 off ijSi 
USHTSWCHTCRUDe (NMRRJ IxuotM-a 
20X9 14.53 Nov 94 1U0 1IA9 17x1 

3LB0 UJ3D«:M 1L17 1U0 1773 

!o*n l> ' 14 1a - N 

”XO 15X8 Feb 95 18.14 18.17 VX5 

TOM 15>42Mte9S 18.15 18.15 wa 

19X8 1SJ5AST95 111? 1117 1T« 

«« 11.12 1112 17J7 

in* 18.14 i7_Bj 

S ills sas ss us 

'feww i'Sas ikM IS 

*■55 18.19 lKo 

18.84 1B.19Feb96 

>U0 17.15Mcr*4 

20XD njaiSl S 1M7 

18X7 1838 Sap 96 

n ea gl S 

«« 54J0 J4J5 S4JJ 

S6MMWK 

as B3fi? 

SS *» suo 

a» o.iito,« 

o* 5-WD«M 

ffJ ? S4.VQ AUPM 

NA Ma Tt USAs iajm 

Men-sopteW 7MW oHini 


+1A2 27X80 
+-L01 11,915 


+DJ2 6X0 
+0X0 1958 
♦0X1 545 

+075 txn 
+073 1* 


-079 31X05 
—079 16AU 
—074 11X41 
—4X9 4770 
—434: . 
—0X9 6.191 


+011 . 1704 
—OX9 1AM 
—OJN U14 


rite 

—029 nm 

-031 90,136 


-oar . ... 

-026 23,121 
- 02 * 167*1 
—024 0,751 
-annj49 
-071 12747 

070 * 9* 

-019 VLN9 
-Oil 4JU 
-017 AJS0 
—417 10844 
-OU 4741 
-a 14 
-ou ■ 

—014 
— O IS . . 
-013 


OJ4 +049 2X799 
&34 — 403 17744 
*4.59 —024 UMTC 
SM9 -041 SOtS 
5SA4 — 446 UU 
38X4 -0X6 4348 

3734 -OU 2.U7 
M74 —031 823 

3474 -034 1,130 
54X4 -OU 444 
33X9 -014 361 
029 -016 341 

53X9 —016 139 

3044 -021 SOI 



2 U.S. Hospital Chains Combine 

SANTA MONlCA,CaUfOTua 

cal Enterprises Inc. said Tuesday it had agreed to iwqmre ^ 
m Mecucal Holdings Inc. for $2 Wan 
bolstering its rank as the nation s J-SKf assumed 

The planned purchase, which mcludes S13 
debt, comes a week after the horoital gwmt Coliunma/n^L 
SStei agreed to bay Khtmt tatoSMbg; 
disrupting three-way merger talks among +j 

HeSthtnist MidAmerican M^mdusjry '****« L,l(at 




year. National Meoicai ana ""r . — r ; 

combination would reduce costs by 560 million in the first year. 

Union Pacific Tempting Santa Fe 

CHICAGO (Combined Dispatches) — 
said Tuesday it would consider raising its S325bfikon ^dfor 
Santa Fe Paafic Coip. if Santa Fe let the nval railroad look atrts 

books. _ . . j: Canto 


The statement is Union Pacific's latest mm* w I d fy.5““ 
Fe's aneement to merge with jBuriington Northern Int, vamw 
J15 bShon, or $13.33 a share. Union Pacific tost 
total of $3.2 billion for Santa Fe. (Bloomberg, AF) 


IBM Launches Its Warp Program 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. said Tuesday it launched anew version of its 
operating system to compete with the Windows program ot 
Microsoft Corp. „ , . 

IBM said the new Warp system would be installed in aU IBM, 
Toshiba and CompuAdd personal computers and would offer 
easier access to the Internet and mult imedi a applications. 

By offerin g its Warp system now, IBM hopes to steal thunder 
from Microsoft, which has been delayed in bringing out its 
Windows oDeraiine svstem. (AFP. AFX) 


Windows operating system. (AFP. AFX) 

First Union Reports Income Jump 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina (Bloomberg) — First Union 
Corp. said its third-quarter net income rose 24 percent as consum- 
er borrowing rose and interest rates took a smaller bite out of 
income than expected. . 

The ni nth-largest banking company in the United States said 
net income rose to S241.8 million, or $135 a share, after payment 
of preferred dividends, from $1893 million, or $1.12 a share, a 
year earlier. Earning s exceeded expectations of $131 a share, 
based on the mean estimate of 20 analysts surveyed by Zacks 
Investment Research. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 



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Page 13 


EUROPE 


Shying Economic Success 

Germany’s IG Metal! Seeks 6% Wage Rise 


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By Brandon Mitchener 

, Inl emotional Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Feeling 
Jieft out of Germany’s fledgling 
■economic recovery, IG Metall, 
JKe country’s biggest trade 
union, on Tuesday demanded a 
larger share of German indus- 
try’s economic success. 

Klaus ZwickeL the head of 
.the union, rejected a demand 
from the metalworkers employ- 
ers association, Gesamtmetall, 
that it exercise wage restraint 
And postpone its contractual 
jdaim to a 35-hour workweek, 
/starting in October 1995. 

^ Tnctt»a^ [ he said the union not 
only would defend a shorter 
workweek for about 3.2 million 
workers in the automobile, elec- 
tronics and steel industries, but 
L also would press for wage gains 
pf “up to 6 percent” in coming 
pay rounds. 

Mr. Zwickel justified the 
bunion’s pay demand with the 
need to spur domestic demand, 
.jwhich has yet to follow a pickup 
jh German exports. 

I “A worker who has suffered a 
definite loss in real wages in the 
last three years is still putting 
off the purchase of a new refrig- 
erator, car and washing ma- 
■chme,” he said. “If people have 
'money in their pockets, it will 
help strengthen the economy 
-and increase job security.” 
i .Economists said the" union 
•would be lucky to get a 2.5 
.percent to 3.0 percent average 
’increase in wages. But Mr. 
ZwickeTs comments, the first 
salvo in an annual ritual of la- 


bor demands and employer 
counter-demands, are consid- 
ered significant because of the 
union’s high profile. 

For more than a year, the 
union saw thousands of Ger- 
man jobs fall victim to corpo- 
rate cost-cutting. 

Mr. ZwickeTs comments also 
come as the federal government 
is publicly trumpeting the end 
of the recession in an attempt to 
boost the ruling coalition’s 
prospects for re-election in a 
hotly contested federal parlia- 
mentary poll set for Sunday. 

The Economics Ministry, in 
its monthly report for October, 
said Tuesday that the German 
recovery had led to a “dear turn 
for the better” not just in export 

Cockerill Is Faced 
With Output Cuts 

AFP-Exiei News 

BRUSSELS — Cockerill- 
Saxnbre SA, a Belgian steel- 
maker, ought have to find 
55,000 tons in capacity cuts in 
Belgium or Germany to reach 
an accord with the European 
Union on subsidies as part of a 
takeover of EKO Stahl GmbH, 
German officials said Tuesday. 

The officials were speaking 
after Economics Minister Gfin- 
ther Rexrodt of Germany pro- 
vided EU officials with details 
of subsidies provided to EKO. 
The Germans want to keep the 
package as close as possible to 
one approved for another po- 
tential buyer in December. 


orders, but also for the coun- 
try’s labor market. 

But several observers regard- 
ed the tone and tuning of such 
claims with suspicion. 

“We detect more than a little 
bit of wishful thinking ahead of 
the elections,” said Angelika 
H dking, an IG Metall spokes- 
woman. “Profitability in the 
metalworking industries has ris- 
en, as has productivity, but that 
hasn't automatically led to 
more employment,” she said. 

“We don’t consider a recovery 
a recovery if it only benefits the 
companies. We only talk about a 
recovery when they begin creat- 
ing more jobs,” she said. 

West German unemploy- 
ment has begun to flatten after 
months of rising, while East 
German unemployment is be- 
ginning to decline after a sharp 
rise following German unifica- 
tion in 1990. 

“We think the mood is better 
than the reality,” Jens Wiecking, 
an institutional investments ad- 
viser at Merck. Frock & Co. in 
DQssddoif said of the govern- 
ment e c onomic statements. 

Some observers suggested 
that companies were postpon- 
ing announcements of layoffs 
until after the elections. Rolf 
Breuer, a board member at 
Deutsche Bank AG, recently 
said many sectors of the econo- 
my were not yet on a safe track 
and faced continuing demands 
to cut costs. 

“I think it’s possible that 
some are saying it would be 
easier to make a move after OcL 
16 than before then,” he said. 


U.K. Brokers Brace for Cuts 


Bloomberg Business Sews 

LONDON — London’s fi- 
nandal community is bracing 
for what could be its biggest 
cutback in jobs and bonuses 
since the late 1980s, as trad- 
ing profits plunge and bro- 
kerage orders dry up. 

A slump in profits and 
business since the Federal 
Reserve Board raised U. S. 
interest rates in February has 
left many investment compa- 
nies unable to maintain the 
salaries and bonuses paid in 
the investment boom of 1993. 

“The whole industry, both 
institutional and retail, has 
built itself up to a capital lev- 
el in the last two years that 
has been the highest for seven 
or eight years,” said David 
Jones, president of Sbarelink. 
Britain’s biggest discount 
brokerage. 

The Financial Times-Stock 
Exchange 100 Index of lead- 
ing British shares has fallen 
15 percent since peaking at 
3,520.3 on Feb. 1 

To make matters worse, in- 
vestment orders from March 
through September fell 25 


percent from the previous six 
months as fund managers 
and small investors decided 
to sit out the turmoil in global 
markets, Mr. Jones said. 

These concerns were high- 
lighted last week when two 
leading British investment 


Some firms 
already have cut 
out free lunches 
for workers. 


banks said pretax profits fell 
more than 50 percent in the 
first half of the year, citing 
the condition of global mar- 
kets. 

Shares of S. G. Warburg 
Securities lost as much as 14 
percent of their value in one 
day, and shares of Hambros 
PLC fell 13 percent the day 
after, as the two companies 


announced their profits and 
expectations. 

Already several companies 
have begun cutting back on 
employee benefits. Both Mer- 
rill Lynch & Co. and Lehman 
Brothers Inc. have slopped 
providing free lunches for 
their workers in London in 
the last three months. 

Many Wall Street compa- 
nies have already announced 
cutbacks in New- York. To 
date, no U. S. house has said 
its cutbacks affected its Lon- 
don operations, but traders 
say they believe everyone has 
bam affected. 

For London’s securities in- 
dustry, the trading difficulties 
have been exaggerated by the 
pace at which companies' 
costs — mainly salaries — 
have soared in the last two or 
three years. 

Analysts generally agreed 
that year-eDd bonuses were at 
risk, but many analysis said 
they expected" British invest- 
ment houses to try to wait out 
the fourth quarter and hope 
markets turn around before 
deciding to lay people off. 


Barings Bucks Trend as Its Profit Rises 


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SanofiSellrOff 
Helps Finance 
June Purchase 

Bloomberg Business New 

PARIS — Sanofi S A said 
Tuesday it had agreed to 
sell its animal-byproducts 
and food-ingredients busi- 
nesses to Viag AG of Ger- 
many for 4.4 billion French 
francs ($831 million). 

The funds will help San- 
ofi pay for Sterling Win- 
throp Inc.’s prescription- 
drug business, which it 
bought from Eastman Ko- 
dak Co. in June for $1.68 
billion. _ 

Sanofi L ' a subsidiary of 
‘Elf Aqtift&lne£ rijgaated that 
it would sell noocore busi- 
nesses- when it announced 
that purchase. ■ 

It immediately sold Ster- 
ling Winthrop’s medical 
imaging business to Hafs- 
lund Nycomed AS of Nor- 
way for $450 milfion. 

“They’re well on the way 
to making die price of Ster- 
ling after the imaging busi- 
ness,” . Susan Haylock of 
NatWest Markets said. 

She added that the pur- 
chase “could have taken a 
lot longer.” • 

Sanofi shares rose to 
241.20 francs Tuesday 
from 238.10. 


Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — First-half pretax profit at 
Barings PLC surged 54 percent, the company 
announced Tuesday, as the securities firm 
emerged unscathed from this year’s turbu- 
lence is major stock and bond markets. 

By concentrating on emerging equity mar- 
kets such those in India and South Africa, the 
company boosted earnings just as profit was 
dwindling at some of its biggest rivals. 


Profit before tax rose to £54.8 million ($87 
million), from £35.5 million a year earlier. 

“We’re successful because we’re concen- 
trating on areas which are successful: the 
emerging markets,” Andrew Tuckey. the 
company’s deputy chairman said. 

The chairman. Peter Baring, said the results 
were “very satisfactory.” 


South Africa’s Financial Rand at a 12-Month High 


Compiled far Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — The financial rand. South 
Africa’s foreign investment unit, firmed Tuesday to its 
highest level m 12 months amid rumors that it was 
about to be scrapped. 

The financial rand, (he investment currency for 
foreign buyers of shares and government stock and a 
gpod barometer of foreign investor confidence in 
South Africa, strengthened so that a dollar was fetch- 
ing only 4.10 rand, down from 4. 1 6 rand on Friday and 
4.28 a week ago. 

“The financial rand is being driven mainly on specu- 
lation of its imminent scrapping, but people have also 
turned bullish on currencies,” a trader said. “I expect 
the market to remain rumor-driven for the next while.” 


Speculation of the financial rand's immin ent demise 
was heightened by recent talks between the governor 
of the Reserve Bank. Chris Stals, and the International 
Monetary Fund in Madrid. In addition. South Africa 
received an “investment grade” credit rating from 
Moody’s Investors' Service. 

Both developments might result in access to cheaper 
foreign credit for South Africa. 

Meanwhile, South Africa's commercial rand, which 
is used for most trade- related and noncapital transac- 
tions, remained almost unchanged at 3.5685 rand to a 
dollar. The commercial rand has been relatively un- 
changed over the past month, with the Reserve Bank 
continually lending support 3gainsi any downward 
movement 


EU to Monitor Orly Flights 

AFP- Eft d News 

BRUSSELS — The European Commission said Tuesday 
that it would review a French plan to limit landing slots at 
Orly airport in Paris to ensure it did not discriminate against 
foreign carriers. 

The French Transport Ministry decreed Monday a limit of 
200,000 commercial flights a year in and out of Orly, a move 
aimed at reducing noise pollution. 

The commission will monitor how French authorities allo- 
cate the available slots, a spokeswoman for the transport 
commissioner, Marcefino Oreja, said. 

“The EU regulation says that member states can and must 
have a number of defined slots that it distributes, and that 
when one becomes free it goes into a common pool and is 
distributed to a new entrant,” she said. 

Tie commission also expects to receive by November new 
rules from the French authorities on flight allocations among 
Paris’s airports, the spokeswoman said. 


Virgin Takes a Step Into Gila Territory 


Compiled by Our Sufff From Dapatcho 

LONDON — Virgin Group PLC said 
Tuesday it had formed a joint venture with 
the cola maker Con Corp. of Canada to 
challenge the dominance of the worldwide 
soft-drink market by U.S.-owned market 
leaders Coca-Cola and Pepsi. 

The London-based venture. Virgin Cola 
Co., is to make and distribute lower-priced 
beverages that play on the Virgin name. 

“Many consumers around the world have 
been paying high prices for nationally brand- 
ed colas such as Coke and Pepsi," said Rich- 
ard Branson, the head of Virgin. 

CotL which produces private-label colas 
for retailers, will produce the new Virgin cola 
at its factory in London. 

Shares of Cadbury Schweppes PLC, which 
bottles Coke in Britain, fell 1 to 445 pence 


($7) in London trading. Cadbury’, a confec- 
tionery and soft-drink maker, owns a 51 per- 
cent slake in the Coke bottler Coca-Cola A 
Schweppes Ltd. 

The agreement with Virgin is Coil's second 
British venture this year. In April, the compa- 
ny began making private-label cola for the 
retailing giant J. Sainsburv PLC. 

Colt and Virgin will own equal shares in 
the venture, although Cott will be in charge of 
product development, manufacturing and 
distribution, Cott said. Virgin will handle 
marketing and promotion. 

The British cola market is estimated at 
more than $1 billion annually. Coke, a prod- 
uct of Atlanta-based Coca-Cola Co., controls 
about 30 percent of the market, and PepsiCo 
Inc. of Purchase, New York, bolds about 18 
percent {Bloomberg, Reuters) 




intfustnals 



Vodafone and SBC Invest in France 

■ , Bloomberg Business News 

LONDON — Vodafone Group PLC said Tuesday that it and 
SBC Communications, formerly Southwestern Beil Corp. were 
qa ch taking. a stake of 10 percent in a French mobile phone 
pperator. . ^ 

* Vodafone will pay 880 million French francs ($166 million) for 
the stake in Soci6t6 Franqaise de Radiotd£pbone SA, with an 
option to double the stake within two years. 

The French company, which is controlled by Compagnie G&n- 
6rale des Eaux, is one of two mobile phone operators in France. 

. Vodafone will also relinquish its 4 percent stake in Cofira, the 
holding company of the French mobile phone operator. 

; SBC said it would invest $626 million for the stake. In ex- 
change. Gfenirale des Eaux agreed to invest $247 million for a 10 
percent stake in Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems’ cellular 
operations. SBC will also acquired lOpercent of certain French 
cable television properties owned by Generate des Eaux. 

Vodafone, one of four British mobile phone operators, will have 
two directors on the French company’s board, while SBCs role on 
the board was not imm e diately known. ( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


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INTERFACE: Changing Screens 

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Continued from Page 11 


m****' 1 '. 

*«■*>' £V 



tiles on a computer. Forget 
folders and files; their system 
[turns variables such as fife size 
into a graphic representation, a 
collection of rectangles on the 
screen that looks like a Mondri- 
an painting. 

This '‘tree map” concept, as 
Mr. Shnriderman has dubbed 
it, takes a little getting used to. 
But a quick glance at uie size of 
-j the rectangles and their colors 
■\ pan provide all sorts of informa- 
tion about the relative size and 
:■ age of the files, or even where 
there are duplicate files. Click- 
*..* ing on a rectangle provides 

* < more information or opens the 
.file. 

‘ Another experiment in the 
Human-Computer Interaction 

* Lab offers a compelling look at 
‘ what might be the home-search 

. service of the future. Using slide 
controls that allow users to 
; quickly set such variables as 
price, location and features of a 
desired home, the program pro- 
vides immediate feedback in 
the form of Jots on a map rep- 
resenting available homes. 


Clidting on a dot brings up its 
real-estate listing. 

This sort of visualization of 
complex information, Mr. 
Shnexderman stud, is a key to 
tiie future of interface design. It 
is not that far away. The univer- 
sity already is selling Macintosh 
and Windows copies of the 
“tree map” file-visualization 
software, cutely named Win- 
Surfer, for $25 a copy. In the 
meantime, it is looking for a 
co mm ercial partner for the 
technology. 

“The future is not goggles 
and gloves, it's not agents, it’s 
not voice recognition,” Mr. 
Shnetdennan said. He added 
that anthropomorphic, adap- 
tive interfaces are not what us- 
ers want: “The designers love it, 
but the users reject it.” 

Is Mr. Shneiderman's lab the 
Palo Alto Research Center of 
the 1990s? That remains to be 
seen. But when Windows 95 
and Macintosh System 8 show 
up on computers next year and 
seem like the Next Big Thing, 
remember There’s a lot still to 
come in computer interface de- 
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London 

FTSE100 



JTA $ 0 

1W4 


, ® , M J T A S O 


Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday 

Close 

Prev. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

404.11 

398.88 

+1.31 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,059.71 

7,007.21 

*0.75 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,071-06 

2.024 79 

+2.29 

Frankfurt 

FA2 • 

772.92 

763U37 

+1.25 

Helsinki 

HEX . 

1,883,72 

1,839.06 

+1.34 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2457.50 

2,335.60 

+0.94 

London 

FTSE 100 

3,073.00 

3,032.30 

+T 34 

Madrid ■ 

General Index 

293.27 

294.40 

-0.38 

MHan 

M1BTEL 

10193 

10294 

-0.S8 

Paris 

CAC40 

1,919.02 

1,898.32 

+1.09 

Stockholm 

Aftaersvaerkten 

1,809.62 

1,758.84 

+2.89 

Vienna 

Slock Index 

43050 

430.36 

+0.03 

Zurich 

SBS 

915.10 

810.76 

+Q.59 

Sources: Reuters, AFP 


lub'maiiinu! McijIJ li.Kirv. 

Very briefly; 


The firming of the financial rand has narrowed its 
gap with the commercial rand to just 1 3.7 percent from 
more than 20 percent a month ago. 

South Africa operates a dual exchange rate system. 
It introduced the financial rand to protect the value of 
the commercial rand from sharp fluctuations during 
the years or political and economic instability under 
the old apartheid regime. 

Mr. Stals repeated assertions that one condition 
necessary for the scrapping of the financial rand would 
be a gap of 10 percent or less with the commercial 
rand. 

Traders believed that a gap of 10 percent would 
result in a merger of the units at a level between 3.90 
and 4.00 rand to the dollar. ( Knight -RiJder. Reuters) 


• British Midland Airways Holdings Ltd. said passenger traffic in 
the third quarter rose 15.5 percent, reflecting a 27 percent rise in 
its intra-European traffic. Separately, British Airways PLC said its 
Gub Europe class bookings were running more than 10 percent 
above last year’s levels. 

• Anheuser-Busch Cos. said it indefinitely postponed talks to buy 
a minority stake the in Czech brewery Budweiser/Budrar and 
would try to settle its decades-long trademark dispute separately . 

• Poland’s economy will grow 4.5 percent this year and 5 percent 
in 1995, Vereins- & Westbank AG forecast. 

• Pecbiney SA is aiming to cut its debt sharply from the current 
level of around 20 billion francs ($4 billion). Chairman Jean- 
Pi erre Rodier told French daily La Tribune Desfosses. 

• Virgin Group PLC chairman Richard Branson announced the 
launch within a few weeks of the company's own cola brand. 

• Italian industrial sales were 6.4 percent higher in July than a year 
earlier; industrial orders were 15.7 percent higher. 

• Telegraph PLC of Britain said Hollinger Inc. of Canada had 
bought 1.4 billion Telegraph shares at 330 pence ($5213) each. 
Hollinger now has a 57.96 percent stake in Telegraph. Conrad M . 
Black is the chairman of both companies. 

• Superfos AS said it acquired Chematex, a Swedish chcmicals- 

trading company from Elof Hansen AB. The companies did not 
disclose the Sale price. a FX. Blmmlvri kruj,ht-RiJJi t 

Channel Tunnel Has Safely Approval 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispahhn 

PARIS — Bernard Bosson, France’s transport minister, said 
Tuesday that a safety commission from Britain and France had 
given approval for trains to take passengers through the Channel 
tunnel. Full service is expected to begin in mid-November. 

Meanwhile, Eurotunnel SA, the British-French operator of the 
tunnel, said it hoped to cany 22 percent of the freight traffic 
crossing the English Channel by the end of 1995. The company 
said it already had 12 percent of the freight traffic between Dover. 
England, and Calais, France. (AFP, Blawbergi 


EKNATlOiVU, 



,.;.A V Y()R K TIM KS AND Ml I ! WASH IV ; I < IN !‘« . 

X ■ 


242,577* 

gold 

dealers get 
more out 
of iht. 

As regular readers of this newspaper, you 
tell us that you spend a substantial 30 minutes 
L ; with it, that you read it thoroughly and above 
F all enjoy doing so.T 

Pf; You also tell us that over 240,000 of you 
p are holders of gold, platinum or premier credit 
: : and charge cards.* 

• It shows that both you and the financial 
services companies who advertise with us get 
s’ more out of the International Herald Tribune. 

' For summaries of the surveys from which 
p-.. these facts are taken, please call, in Europe, 
Y James McLeod on (33-1) 46 37 93 81 ; in Asia, 
r-. . Andrew Thomas on (65) 223 6478: 

the Americas. Richard Lynch 
^ 752 3890. ' 


Saumc tytVA Surveys '92/ VJ. 
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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Oct 11, 1994 


Quotation fWSrt by fuiAEatrt, and taBHmittrt by MICROPAL PAMS IToLSM 4029 0909). 

Nat HMt value quoUtiona ar* auppHad by the Finds Bated with Uw axcaption of m™ qootw based on Issue pricqs. 

The marginal symbols Mart* frequency of quotation* fupp&ad: (d] • daily; |w) - weekly; (b) ■ hwmmthly; (0 fannighUy (evary two weeks); [rj - regularly; [I] ■ tanc* w»«Wj! (m) ■ »«wuy. 

w ouenr mil Fund N.v_ S IASS 


ME5DNER INTL MCMT SERVICES 
LO Toucne Haw IFSC - Dublin 1 
DSB Thornton Lot Am Sri FO 

fl Conautstadar Fund 1 11 W 

DIIBIN A SWtECA ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Tri ; IMP) *451400 Fax : (80919451488 

0 HighbndW CWtof CW J T227T.*3 

rn Overtook Performance FdJ 307987_ 
n? Pacific RIM Op Fd . ....S 10636E 

EBC FUND MANAGERS (Jersey) LTD 
1-3 Seale 5(. St Weller ; 053*3433) 

EBC TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 

<t Copttal - 1 2*.IK 

rf Income t I5J54 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

d Lons Term . . . S 31J77J 

a Lons Term - DMK — . — DM lUOZiS 

ERMITAOE LUX I353-4071M) , , 

w Ermitooe inter Rote Strat-DM 10.12 

wErmitaooSeL Fw*L_ 5 44.95 

w Erinitoge Asian Hedge Fd -S |8) 

wErmltase Euro Hedge Fd— DM 10x0 

wErmltoge Crosby Asia F«_s wet 

w Ermitooe Ainer Hdg Fd — S 7.91 

iv Ermitooe Emer Mkts Fd— J 17J3 

EUROPA FUNDS LIMITED 
d American Enuity Fund — S 1402 

a American cwlon Fund S 14IA4 

w Aslan Equity Fd ......J IMJ; 

w Eurooean Eaultv Fd * 121.11 

EVEREST CAPITAL (l») 2932280 _ 

m Everett Cartel Inti Ltd — S 1300 


..i Everett Cartel inti i 
FAIRFIELD GREENWICH GROUP 
m Advanced Strategies LM— * )«36 

w FalrtieKl inn Ltd s H4JC 

w Folrtteia Sentry Ltd S 34125 

IV Fcirfletd strategies Ltd — i t*M 

m Sentrv Select Ltd s 511.74 

FIDELITY I NTLINV. SERVICES (Lex) 

d Discovery Fund * 20J8 

d For East Fund 5 03.4 

a FitLAmer. Assets s m*& 

d FkLAmer. Values iv S 11057X00 

d Frontier Fund J 3722 

d GleMI Ind Fund * I8J9 

d Global Sewdton Fund s T2T> 

d New Europe Fund s i4.oi 

d Orient Fund s i3Ho 

d special Growth Fund S 42.14 

d World C"~< « llaJfl 

FINMANAGEMENT SA- LOTOBO H 1 .91 /2J?3 12) 
w Delta Premium Corn, . S 121220 

FOKUS BANK A -5- *72 421 535 
w ScanfarKfa Inll Growth Fd-S 0.94 

FOREIGN B COLONIAL EMERG MKTS LTD 
Tri : London on 420 1234 
d Argentinian Invest Co SiCavS 57 JS 

d Brazilian Invest Co Slatv s 4137 

iv Cotomblon Invest Co Slcav-S 1530 

d Glbl Em Mkts Inv Ca SIcevA 11JH 

d Indian invest Co Slcov s 1286 

d Latin Amer Extra Yield Fd S 98*90 

d Latm Amanca Income Co_s 7J1 

d Latin American Invest Co_s 12X9 

d Mexican Invest Co Stosv S 45 W 

iv Peruvian Invest Co Sleav S 14.10 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

PD. Bax 2001. Hamilton. Bermuda 

mFMG Global (31 Aug) S 114? 

mFMG n. Amer. 131 Aua) — * lax? 

m FMG Europe 131 Augi. _J 10J3 

mFMG EMGMKTI31 AuB)_ * 124* 

"I FMG G 131 Aup> S 982 

mFMG Fixed (31 Aua) S 1084 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 
w Concents Fore* Fgncl~._ . % 908 

GAIA CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Goto Hedge II S 13047 

w Gala Hedge III S 1554 

C GAIA Fx I 12X01 

mGalo Guaranteed Cl. I S 84 jn 

mGak) Ouoranleed Cl. u S 8387 



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GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 

OFFSHORE FUNDS 

It Athol 5t,Dougkn.l at Man 44474424037 

wGAMerlco S *43.77 

w GAM Arbitrage 5 41145 

iv GAM ASEAN A 45X21 

tv GAM Australia 5 21788 

iv GAM Boston S 307.1 1 

iv GAM Combined DM 12X11 

w GAM Cross-Market S 11287 

iv GAM EuroMOT S WP 

w GAM France FF 144357 

wGAM Front vol SF 246A5 

WGAMGAMCO 5 21180 

■r GAM High Yield 5 15197 

iv GAM East Asia S 7a0.« 

iv GAM Janan S 88187 

w GAM Money MklsUSS S 101 JM 

d Do Sterltoo C 10125 

d Do Swiss Franc sf 101.00 

d Do DeufSChmrark DM 10JJN 

d Do Yen y I0044.M 

w G AM Allocated MU FFd 5 14X11 

iv GAM Emero MKts Mlh-Fd Jl 18453 

wGAMMiti-Euroee uss s 13451 

wGAMMM-Eurone DM DM 125.75 

w GAM MlU-Global USS S 17422 

w GAM MttRTS J 

nr GAM Trading DM DM 

tv GAM Tradhtg USS s 

w GAM Overseas S 

WGAM Podftc J 

iv GAM Relative Value 

HT GAM Selection 5 

iv GAM Slnoaporc/Malayim -1 

w Gam sf special Bond SF 

iv gam Tyche s 


iv GAM U5__ 

w GAMut Investments S 901.18 

w GAM Value 5 12529 

»r GAM Whitethorn 5 

w GAM Worldwide _S 

Hr GAM Bond USS Or d s 

nr GAM Bond USS Special —8 

IV GAM Bond 5F - -I F 

iv GAM Band Yen Y 

w GAM Bond DM DM 

iv GAM Bond C C 

iv GAM i Special Bond „J 

iv gam universal uss s 

wGS AM Composite S 

■V Global strategic A S 

iv Global Strategic 3 s 

nr European Strategic A 5 

w European Strategic 8 5 

nr Trading Strategic A 5 

nr Trading strategic b s 

iv EmergMfcts Strategic A_J 
jr Emero MX Is Strategic B — S 
SWISS REGISTER ED JUND54M>422 

»g H1, 7 a HL« 

d GAM CH( MBrJln i S F 15898 

d GAM {CHj Podflc SF 284.92 

B C REGISTERED FUNDS 

East 57th SmSMiy 10022212888-4200 

nr GAM Euraee J 8957 

w GAM Global. S 13X43 

Hr GAM International S 194.14 

IV GAM North America S 91j05 

nr GAM Pad He Basin, J 19159 

IRISH REGISTERED UCIT5 

6546 Lower Mount StAuUbl 2J53-V474060 

w GAM Asia UK Y 100.00 

nr GAM EUTOPO ACC DM 727.13 

nr GAM Orient Acc _DM 15792 

nr GAM Tokyo ACC DM 17424 

w GAM Total Bond DM ACC—DM 10423 

nr Gam UntvVSoTDM ACC — DM 17483 


d GAM CH| Mondial, 
rf GAM {CHi Podflc- 


w GAM Total Bond DM ACC—DM 
nr Gam untversoTDM Acc — DM 




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GT MANAGEMENT PLC (4471 71145 67) _ 
d G.T. BtotKh/HcaW) Fund— S 2082 

a 6.T. Deutschland Fund s 1X44 

d GT. Europe Fund S 4883 

ivH.T Global Small Co Fa i 29.94 

d fl.T. Invealmenl Fund ■■ S 24.77 

w g.t. Korea Fund s e Jl 

ivG.T. Newly indCauntr Fd-S 4101 

»GT. US Small Companies— 5 24.11 

GUERNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
/ GCM GMWt 5#L Ea S W M 

t GCMusssoeaai s 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MNGRS (Gneyl LM 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 
0 fttetosed Currency— — * 3983 

a Global b«u( e 2X41 

d Global High income Bond_S 20.90 

d Gilt &( Bone C 1084 

d Euro High inc. Bona t 1984 

d Wow Eouity - — J 9iM 

d American Blue Orta 5 2784 

d Japan and pociiic— s 131.12 

d UK — L 2583 

d European 1 11795 

GUINNESS FLIGHT INTL ACCUM FD 
a Deuncfremart Money— DM ** 

d US Dollar Money 

d US Donor Hlgn Yd Bond 5 2488 

a Inn Balanced Grth 34.15 

HASENBICHLER ASSET MANOT GesmOH. 
w Hosentfehler Com AG * 677980 

>v Hasenblchier Com Inc 5 12148 

w HasenWchler Dhr — .-.--S 1 Jt2* 

*vAFFi S 751080 

HDF FINANCE.TeH33-lMS76fiCM.Faji *076x455 
wMondinvBt Europe— — FF 1247.9* 

w Momflmresl Crafesonce FF 1342.1* 

w Mondln vest Ooo Intles FF 121x30 

nr Monainvest Emwg Growth.FF 1J44J* 

wMonalnvest Futures FF 1207.91 

HEPTAGON FUNDNV 15V9M15555} 

f Heologon QLB Fund 5 88.99 

mHenlooon CMO Fund s na 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: (809)295 ooa Lux: (352MI4 64 61 
Estimated Prices 
Hermes Euraoeon Fund -—Ecu 
171 Hermes North American Rtt 
m H e rmes Asian tun - * 

m Hermes Emeni Mfcls Furw-S 
m Hermes Stwoglw F U rd — 5 

m Hermes Neutral Fund 5 

m Hermes GkttxH Fund 
m Hermes Band Funa. 
m Hermes Sterling Fd 
m Hermes Gold Fu 


| LnDdPPifax 144-711 * 35 9172 

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MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 

m The Corjair Funa Ltd -J “JO 

mTheDaunnessFeLW s 11170 

MEESPIERSON . 

Rekln 5a. ID 1 2kk. Amsterdam 20-52111881 . 
m Asta Poe. Grcwin Fa n.v -S 40.1(1 

w Asian Capital Holdings— s 

w Asian selection Fd n.v pi 

w DP Amer. Growth Fd N.V— 3 

tv EMS Offshore Fd N.V .fi 

n Eurooe Growth Funa N.V. -FI 
1* Jetton Diversified Fund 
w Leveraged Can Hold 
MERRILL LYNCH 
d Dollar Assets PcrttoUo 
d Prime Role Porttalto— _ _ 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT TERM 
PLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 
0»A 


DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 


BOND PORTFOLIO (USS) 


fmjRRENCY BOND PTFL 


T-rr.-irn prrrJ Ti 


C/o Bane at Bermuda. Tel : 809 29s 4000 
in Hedge Hog & Conser ve Fd -S 

TIONAL ASSETS FUND 
Bd Ravel. L-7449 Luxembourg 

Europe SuO E Ecu 

INVESCO INTL LTD, POB Z71. Jeney 
Tel: 44 5M 73114 

a Maximum Income Fund C 0.9300 1 

d Starling Mngd Pill l 28740 

d Pioneer Markets 1 4JW0 

a Global Band 3 

d Okasan Global Strategy 
d Asia Super Growth 
d Nippon Warrant Fund S 


a Gld N.W. 1994 
d Global Let 
PREMIERS 
d American'- - 
a American Enterprise 
d Asta Tiger Growth 

d Dollar Reserve 

a European Growth. 

d European Enterprise 




d Global Grawlti 

d Nippon 
a Nippon 
d UKG 

d Sterling Reserve 

a Norm Ameiiasi Warrant 5 

d Greater China Oops .. . . S 78600 

IRISH LIFE INTL L1CL (fax) 3SS-V704 1921 

d Inlemallonal Cautious S (L99 b 

d international Balanced 
d internallanol Growth 
ITALFORTUNE INTL FUNDS 
iv Class A (Aggr. Growth llaUS 
w Doss B ( Global Equity) 

■vOassC (Global Bond) 

iv Doss □ (Ecu Band) Ecu 

JARDI HE FLEMING , GPO Box 114*8 HO K« 

d JF ASEAN Trust S 59.13 

d JF For East Wrnl Tr 5 20JJ7 

d JF Global Conv. Tr 6 13J7 

d JF Hang Kang Trust S 17.19 

d JF Japan SftLCoTr Y 4880080 

d JFJopan Trust 
d J F Malaysia Trust 
d JF Pacific Inc Tr. 
d JF Thailand Trust 
JOHN GOVETT MANT (IjOJHJ LTD 
Tel: 44824 -62 W 20 
w Gaveft Mom. Futures 
ivGovrit Man. Put USS 
tv Gflvcfl S Gear. Curr, . 
w Govett S Glbl Bal. Hdyv 
JULIUS BAER GROUP 
d BaertMod 

d Con oar 

d Eauibacr America— 5 
d Egulbaer Europe 
d SFR-BAER 

d 5 lock bar 

d Swbstxr 
d Uouibcer. 

Europe Bond Fund 
Dollar Band Fund 
Austro Band Fund 
Swiss Bond Fund 
d DM Bona 
d Convert Band Fund 
d Global Band 
Euro Stack Fund 

US Stock Fu 

a Pacific Slock Fund 
Swiss Slock Fund 
Special Swiss Slock 

Japan Slock Fund 

d German Stack Fund DM 

d Korean Slock Fund 
d Swiss Franc Cash 
d DM Cash Fund 
ECU Cash Fund 

Cosn Fund 
a Dollar Cash F 

d French Frtvic Cash FF 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
mKev Asia Holdings 
m Key Global Hedge 

mKev Hedge Fund Inc * 15181 

Kl PACIFIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

mKI Asia Pacific Fd Ud i 1X03 

KIDDER, PEABODY 

b Chesapeake Fund Ltd 1 

a III Fund Ltd 
b Inn Guaranteed Fund 

O Stonehenge LM 

LEHMAN BROTHERS N/18/W 
d Akkra Dragon Part NV A —8 

d Asian Dragon Pan NVB I 

d Global Advisors 1 1 KVA — s 
d Global Advisors II NV B__5 
d Global Advtaon Port NVAJ 
d Global Advisors Port NV BJI 
d Lehman Cur Adv. A/0 
d Natural Resources NV a 
rf Nahral Resources NV B 
rf Premier Futures Adv a/B-S 
LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
74/F Uppo Tower Centre, 09 OueenswayiHK 
Tel (852) 847 6888 Fax (852) 596 0388 

w Java Fund S 9JO 

w Asean Fixed Inc Fd s 883 

iv IDR Money Market Fd S 119) 

w USD Money Market Fd S I 

tv Indonesian Growth Fd 
iv Aslan Growth Fund 
i* Aslan Warrant Fund 
LLOYD GEORGE MNGMT (152) 811 4433 

iv Antenna Fund-, — S 18*5 

w LG Aslan SmcJ 
iv LG mesa Fund Ltd 
w LG Jam Fd 
wLG Korea Fd 

LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS) Ltd 
» Portfolio's 

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d Muitlcurrencv 
rf Dollar MttSum Term 
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Emerging Mkts Hldos s 

EurSfflr (Ecu) LM E 

FX. Financials 6 Futures _J 
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m MAP 
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MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
ir Mart) me Giw Beta Serfa-S W 


» MgrlilmeGtai Delta Series * fn. 
MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MOT 
E MERG I NG ASLAN STRATEG IES FUND 


ra Class A j 

rf Class B — S 

PACIFIC CONV STRATEGIES FD L' 
mtjtoA l 


w auasorjmi Fund n.v - j |M8S 

w Quota Fund N.V. ■■ ■— S 1B.I3 

REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 

w New Koren Grawlti Fd. S lxn 

w No«o Lot Pacfflc inv Co — S SJW 

w Pacific Artltroge Co — f J^S 

m R.L. Country wrnl Ffl_—5 JH79 

ff PegeniGibl AmGrtaPd— 5 
rf Regent GIN Euro GnhFd_S 39802 

d Regmt Gml Mil Grta W — S 2Jgl 

rf Reoritt GW J» Grib Fd — S J|M6 

d Regen i Glbl Podf Basin — J 

rf Regent GW Reserve J T-Wi* 

a Regent gw Resources s 

rf Rroent Glbl Tiger— s 1MM 

o Regent Glbl UK GrihFfl—J 1-H14 

w Regent Moghul Fd Ltd — } 

m Regent Poci lie Hdgj Fd 1 i».74g 

» Regent Sri Lanka Fd-__1 

rf Undervtf A»T«iwonSer3S 

w unoervaturt Assets Ser f— | 1188 

a White Tiger Inv Co Ltd S 

REPUBLIC FUNDS _ — 

w Republic GAM. . S '3J-22 

w Reautme GAM America— _5 115.15 

w Reo Gam Em Mkts Global >5 5 ” 

w Rep GAM Em Mkts LOI Am* 12856 

wReoubUcGAMEuroDe CHFSF 
w Republic GAM Europe ussj 9&m 

iv Republic GAM GrwtflCHF-SF 1M.16 

IV Republic GAM Growth t — £ 9I.«2 

w ReouHlc GAM Growth U5S5 M787 

W Republic GAM Oopgrtimttv S 

iv Republic GAM Podflc S ,I47» 

w Rea Glob Corrency — — * 

w Rep Ctab Fixed ine * )0»JJ 

iv Republic Grew Dal Inc — S IU4 

w Republic Gmev Eur Inc — DM 10.0) 

ivRePirtlUcLatAmAiioe J waj 

w Republic Lot Am Argcni — J 
w Republic Lot Am Brazil — S 11084 

w Republic Lot Am Mexico*-* 9980 

w Republic un Am yenex. — } 
iv Rep Sriomon Strategics — s 8884 

ROBEC0 GROUP 

POB 9738008 AZ RolterdamJIlllO 2241224 

d RG America Fund R 13|10 

d RG Europe Fund*. p 

rf RG PdCi lie Fttad FI 14190 

d RG Smw'pi« 1 FFL_^FI 1Y4.11 

ROTTISoSnLD^SoUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOU5E FUNDS „ 
iv Aslan Capljal HoUings Fd -5 ,6244 

w Ddwa LCF Rothschild Bd_l I SSI "2 

w Dciwa LCF Rothscn Eo__t 
■v Force Cash Tradlllon CHF-SF ’SSSS 
f. | f U-g wi j 249386 

w Leveraged Can Holdings —} „M8? 

w OW FVatar SF 94686 

w Pri Challenae Swiss Fd SF [04T5S 

ast 

2 ^Wf^^ztIcu II 

b Pri band Fund USD ■ ■■ S 10989B 

b PrlbondFdHY Emer Mkts J IJ8JC 

w Selective WWStSA S 

b Source--..- 1 ’£2flJS 

w US Bond Plus I) 9204™ 

MT ynrHwilii* . Fm 1042.99 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
OTHER FUNDS _ 


b Integral Futures J 92X21 

rf Podflc Nles Fund « 9.12 

f Selection Horizon FF 

D VICHHre Ariqne 5 509789 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CJ> LTD 

m Nemrod Leveraoeo Hid — S M 15671 

SAFDIE GROU P/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
m Kev Dlversiflrt Inc Fd Lld-S 1 171192 
SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

m Commander Fund. 1 ]S§55 

/» Explorer Fund ■ ■ 5 . _ 112338 

SC FUNDAMENTAL VALUE BVI LTD 

Tei 599 9 322000 Fax 399 9 322031 

m NAV . * 3 132951 

5KANDINAVI5KA ENSKILDA BAHKEN 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

d Europe Inc ■ — S 0.98 

rf FiarranOstem Inc S 1-01 

d Global inc — i 

rf Lokamedel Inc 5 0.93 

rt UnrtrHu, Ifu- S 184 

rf Japan Inc Y 9J1] 

d Mlllo inc * 0.94 

rf Sverig e Inc ■ Jlek 979 

d Nardamerlko inc S 094 

d SwIoXm inc Ijek 10*4 

SKANDIFONDS 

d Equity inn Ate 5 78J 

O Eaultv Inn inc I 1X4* 

d Equity Global S 1-S3 

d Equity Nat. Resources— -.8 1-42 

rf Equity Japan Y 10084 

rf Emriiy Nordic S !■« 

rf Eaultv U K x 1-50 

d Equity Continental Europe-5 184 

0 Equity Mediterranean— J 0.94 

0 Equity North America J 2-02 

rf Eaultv Far East 5 5.18 

a Inti Emerging MarketS__I 18 

rf Band Infl ACC S 12^1 

d Bond Inn inc 5 7J8 

rf Band Europe Acc 5 1*3 

rf Bond Eurooe Inc — | 181 

rf Sand Sweden Acc — Se fc J6J0 

rf Bond Sweden inc. Sek 1023 

rf Band DEM ACC DM 174 

fl Bond DEM Inc DM 0-93 

fl Band Dollar US Acc 5 »J8 

d Bond Dollar US inc 5 184 

d Cure. US Doiiar S 188 

rf Curr. Swedish Kronor Sek 17*7 

d Sweden Flexible Bd Acc Sek 

rf Sweden Flexible Bd Inc — Sefc 
SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP 

rf Asia Fund Y 5564*80 

rf BTW Cat A 5 1447 

dBTWCalB S 42*7 

w SGFAM Stmt Fd Dlv FF 411.91 

IV SGFAM Sirat Fd Fin S 101.43 

SOGELUX FUND (SF) 

wSF Bonds A U.SJI * li« 

wSF Bonds B Germany DM 31.19 

wSF Bonds C France FF 1MA3 

w SF Bonos E G.B t 11-57 

wSF BoiWsF Japan Y 2341 

w SF Bonds G Europe — Ecu 17.22 

wSF Bon^H world Wide — s w 

wSF Bonds I Italy Lll 29591.00 

wSF Bonds J Belgium BF 80180 

wSF Eq.K North America S 17-51 

iv SF Ea. LW.Euraoe Ecu list 

wSF Eo.M Pacific Basin Y 1541 

w SF Ea. P Growth Countries^ |«A0 

WSF Eq.Q Gold Mines S 31® 

wSF Eq-R Worid wide S 1559 

wSF Short Terms France — FF 1743163 

w SF Shari Term T Eur._ Ecu 1482 

SODITIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

w SAM Brazil S 2*134 

» SAM Diversified S 13282 

wSAM/McGarrHcdoe S 11*87 

■vSAM Orwartunltv J 13084 

w SAM Oracle 1 11409 

w SAM Strategy 3 11493 

m Alpha SAM S 12384 

wCSAM Composite S 38L2I 

SR GLOBAL BOND ACCUMULATOR INC. 

ra Class A j Toaoo 

mCtasxB S WOOO 

SR GLOBAL BOND FUND INC 

m Ckm A Distributor S 10080 

mCknsA Accumulator S 10080 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD .... 

DtSR European J 101® 

m SR Aslan S »Q6S7 

mSR Inlcrnallonol . - J 10689 

SVENSKA HANDELS BANKEN SJL 
14* Bd Oe la Petrusae. L-2330 Luxembouro 

h SUB Bond Fund S 5484 

wSvensko Set. Fd Amer Sb — S 1532 

wSvenska SeLFd Germany — J 10.14 

w Svgnska SeL Fd Inn Bd Sh J 1272 

w Svenska Sri. Fd mil 5b_ — J 5BJ2 

iv Svenska Sri. Fd Jopan Y 3M 

w Svenska SeL Fd MJtt-Mkt _S*k 11137 
w Svenska Set Fd Nordic- — SEK «684 

w Svenska SeL Fd PoritSb — s B32 

IT Svenska Sel.FdSwqdBds_Sric 140034 











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Every Friday 


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Tel.: (33 1) 
46 3793 91 
Fax: (331) 
46 37 93 70 
or your neared 


or representative 




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2dayspridrio 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21-33 


ema 
ysis 















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


Page 15 






ASIA/PACIFIC 


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Reliance Net Rises 
As Demand in India 
Gathers Strength 


MingPao Chief Targeted 


SSSTJlv ' ■ ■ v*** Another broker said any 

BOMBAY — India’s largest sharp rise would depend on 

¥ nvate- sector company said how the company's global de- 
oesday that a recovery in the positaiy shares performed in 
chem ical industry and in- European trading. The shares 
creased productivity had con- were unchanged in London 
, tnbuted to a spectacular surge trading Tuesday at $28 JO 
in fust-half net profit. _ * ' 

Reliance Industries Ltd. said -J?, 1 ? 2 ’ RehaDce was . the 
_ its first-half net profit more “ ISI “ 1 “ ian company to issue 
• than doubled, to 5.1 billion ru- stock 10 forei gn investors by 
! pees ($163 million). means of global depositary 

The textiles and petrochemi- shares, or securities denominat- 
• cals giant said revenue for the ®“ m f ore3 gn currencies that are 
: period rose 36 percent, to 3420 and traded overseas. 

•hOfion rupees from 25-17bfl- Reliance has said it would 
■ * year earlier. Oper- sped si billion a year for the 

• 744^t»Sion rup ees? percent ' 10 06x1 four 3 ,ears 00 

Anil Ambani the company's Dhirubhai Ambani started 
- managing director and the son the company 25 years ago with 
; of its founder, said he expected his savings from a job at a gaso- 
- a “good financial performance” line station in Aden. Now, it is 
! for the full year, as demand among the world's top produc- 
• continued to grow in the Indian ers of polyester. 

■ CC ^°Bombay, Rdiance stock company also is building 

•rose 10 rupees to 415. Onelndi- “ jefinenr developing 
ian stock £2yst said that al- and fieltk wA Enron 
•though the results were better S? * Gas Ca of lbe Umted 

ing. He said investors were ___ 

: keeping money aside for pend- TT C Snvo 111 
■Mg privatizations and initial fJeOe UdYo " il I 
; public offerings of other Indian J 

.companies. 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — The 
chairman of the Ming Pao 
publishing group faced disci- 
plinary action by the local 
stock exchange Tuesday after 
it was disclosed that he had 
been jailed for fraud in Cana- 
da 15 years ago. 

In a statement, the stock 
exchange said its listing com- 
mittee had endorsed a recom- 
mendation to begin disciplin- 
ary proceedings against Yu 
Pim-hoi, 35, chairman and 
controlling shareholder of 
Ming Pao Enterprise Corp., 
over what it said was Mr. 
Yu's “failure to disclose to 
the exchange that he had 
been convicted in Canada of 
certain criminal offenses.” 

Trading in shares of Ming 
Pao and South Sea Develop- 
ment Co., of which Mr. Yu 
also is chairman, are to resume 
Wednesday after a two-day 
suspension. Shares of Ming 
Pao last traded at 5.50 Hong 
Kong dollars (71 U.S. cents), 
and those of South Sea at 55 
Hong Kang cents. 

The exchange warned 
shareholders and investors to 
“exercise caution when trad- 
ing in the securities of Ming 


Pao and South Sea.” But Si- 
mon Yeung, an analyst at 
Standard Chartered Securi- 
ties in Hong Kong, said, “1 
don't see any reason for the 
scandal to affect the funda- 
mentals of both companies.” 

The exchange’s listings di- 
rector, Herbert Hui, said Mr. 
Yu could be reprimanded or 

The chairman 
could be asked to 
resign for not 
disclosing a 
conviction 15 
years ago in 
Canada. 

asked to resign his positions, 
depending on the outcome of 
the proceedings. 

But Ming Pao Enterprise 
and South Sea said Mr. Yu 
would continue for now to 
hold the positions of chair- 
man and executive director 
“in the interests of the two 
companies.” 

Mr. Yu acknowledged 
Monday that he had been 


convicted of credit-card and 
check fraud amounting to 
4,600 Canadian dollars 
(53,567). as well as illegal pos- 
session of a pistol when he 
was a 20-year-old student. 

Mr. Yu said he had spent 
four months in prison because 
of those convictions, which 
caroe to light in a report in a 
rival Gnnese-language news- 
paper Monday. “I detply re- 
gret my behavior in my 
youth,” he said. *T have al- 


1 earned my lesson from this.” 

Stock exchange regulations 
call for executives of listed 
companies to declare any 
criminal record. 

Ming Pao Enterprise is 
publisher of Ming Pao Daily 
News, regarded as one of 
Hong Kong's most influential 
and independent newspapers, 
with a circulation of 160,000 
aimed at the territory’s edu- 
cated middle classes. 

Last year one oE its report- 
ers, Xi Yang, was jailed in 
Beijing for 12 years on charges 
of betraying state economic 
secrets after a report in Ming 
Pao Daily News on interest 
rates and gold sales in China. 

( AFP, Bloomberg) 


U.S. Says China Still Isn’t Ready to Join GATT 


News Corp. 
Amends 
New Issue 


Compiled M 1 Our Staff Fran Dapaidta 

SYDNEY — News Corp. 
bowed Tuesday to the demands 
of shareholders and revised 
terms of a bonus issue of prefer- 
ence shares aimed at building 
up the global media company. 

The company, controlled by 
Rupert Murdoch, said it would 
guarantee that holders of the 
new shares received a dividend 
at least 20 percent higher than 
the payout on ordinary shares. 

But it said the 20 percent 
guarantee would come into ef- 
fect only when the annual divi- 
dend on ordinary stock reached 
6.25 Australian cents a share. 
That dividend now is 3 cents, 
and News Corp. said it had no 
immediate plans to raise it. 

News Corp. plans to issue 
one share of preference stock 
for every two common shares 
outstanding as of Nov. 11. The 
new’ shares are to offer a divi- 
dend of 7.5 cents. 

The bonus issue is expected 
to raise as much as S.4 billion 
Australian dollars (54 billion) 
to finance expansion plans. 

“The new shares wul now be 
fully valued in line with the or- 
dinary shares. They now have a 
premium, and they’ll be pro- 
tected in the event of a takeover 
offer,” said Lachlan Drum- 


Investor’s Asia 


Hoag Kong 

Hang Seng 

HOOD 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 




M J J A S O 


m M J J A S O 


M J J A S O 


1904 

1994 


1994 


Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday 

Prsv. 

% 



Close 

Close 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9,362.32 

9,248.40 

+1.23 

Singapore 

Slrahs Times 

2,345-23 

2,302.28 

~+187 

Sydney 

All Ordinaries 

2,003.60 

1,986.00 

+0.78 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

19,821.46 

19.744.75 

+0.39 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,128.29 

1,110.12 

+1.64 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,444.26 

1,428.12 

+1.13 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

1,078.66 

1,066.66 

+0.93 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,124.71 

6.214.48 

•1.44 

Manila 

PSE 

2,946.95 

~2.972.fi 

-0.85 

Jakarta 

Stock index 

512.38 

511.86 

+0.10 

New Zealand 

M2SE-40 

~2,02£L75^ 

~t^2 93 " 

+T.65 

Bombay 

Sources Reuters. , 

National Index 

AFP 

2,080.37 

2,081.75 

liri.-in.iip mil 1 L 

-0.07 

i jH 1 nhjrk- 


Very briefly: 


Korean Stocks 
Hit a Record 

Bloomberg Business News 

SEOUL — Stock prices 
rose to a record Tuesday as 
investors continued to buy 
financial companies ana 
other relatively inexpensive 


the market, traders said. 

The Composite Stock 
Price Index rose 9.98 
points, or 0.9 percent, to 
1,078.66. 

Meanwhile, stocks in 
Taiwan fefl for the sixth 
day in a row as creditors 
called in loans backed by 
shares that had plunged in 
value, dealers said. The 
Weighted Price index fell 
1.4 percent to 6,12424. The 
index has fallen more than 
14 percent in the past week. 


Bloomberg Business Newt 

BEIJING — The deputy U.S. 
trade representative. Charlene 
Barshefsky, said Tuesday that 
China had made only 'incre- 
mental” progress toward meet- 
ing conditions for entry to 
GATT, the world trade body. 

At a news conference at the 
end of two days of talks with 
officials in Beijing, Ms. Bar- 
shefsky said China was still vio- 
lating bilateral trade agree- 
ments and continuing to block 
U.S. companies from its market 
in the information industry, in- 
surance, financial services and 
other areas. 

The U.S. official said China 
should be commended for steps 
such as cracking down on what 
she called “rampant piracy” of 
intellectual property. But she 
added that much stm had to be 
done before barriers to China's 
entry into the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade 
could be resolved. 

“I would view the progress 
made thus far as incremental 


rather than dramatic, and cer- 
tainly not sufficient with re- 
spect to GATT/WTO accession 
at this point.” The World Trade 
Organization is scheduled to 
succeed GATT on Jan. 1, mean- 
ing that China must join GATT 
by the end of the year to be a 
charter member of the new 
group. 

Senior Chinese leaders have 
said repeatedly in recent 
months that the country had 
made all the concessions it was 
going to make to gain GATT 
entry. 

Turning to specific problems, 
Ms. Barshefsky said piracy of 
compact disks and computer 
software remained “extremely 
serious” despite progress in 
C hina 's enforcement of laws 
protecting these rights. Wash- 
ington wants China to shut 
down 26 factories producing pi- 
rated compact disks, laser disks 
and other such items. But au- 
thorities have acted against 
only about four to six of the 
factories, she said. 


mond, a media analyst at CS 

ght gave an investment-grade rat- First Boston Australia Ltd. 
ion ing Tuesday to China Interna- The company said Sept. 30 
tional Trust & Investment that it would issue 930 million 


U.S. losses from copyright gave an investment-grade rat- 
theft are estimated at 51 billion ing Tuesday to C hina Interna- 
a year, Ms. Barshefsky said. tional Trust & Investment that it would issue 930 million 
She also said China had Corp., or CHIC, and said the preference shares holding limit- 
made only slight progress in outlook for the state-controlled ed voting rights, 
opening up markets to Ameri- investment company was posi- News Corp.'s nri gin.il pro- 
can agricultural products. For live, according to a'Tokyo dis- posal drew strong criticism 
example, all citrus products patch from AFP-Extel News. from investors, who feared the 


from California are banned for 
reasons that are not scientifical- 


itch from AFP-Extel News. from investors, who feared the 

new shares would We little 
The BBB rating for China, value compared with News 


Iy sound, she said. (Bloomberg which applies to $450 million of Corp.’s ordinary stock. 


AP) debt registered with the U.S. 
, D j Securities and Exchange Cora- 

I unit tela Kated mission, is the lowest level con- 

Standard & Poor’s Asia Ltd. sidered to be investment grade. 


debt registered with the U.S. On Tuesday, News Corp. 
Securities and Exchange Com- shares gained to close at 8.27 
mission, is the lowest level con- dollars, compared with 8.10 


ustraiian dollars ($4 billion) • South Korea's Finance Ministry said an advisory committee had 
i finance expansion plans. drafted a bill that would end restrictions on foreign ownership of 
“The new shares will now be listed companies by 1998; currently, foreign investors ore limited 
Ily valued in line with the or- to equity holdings of 10 percent. 

H * Samsung Electronics Co. said sales would rise 40 percent this 
ctedTiheweSbf atSkeS^ 5 fear » to *14 billion, while profit surges fivefold, to $1.1 billion, 
fer," said Lachlan Drum- • Volkswagen AG began production in China of a new model of its 
ond, a media analyst at CS Santana car and will expand output as China's auto industry 
rst Boston Australia Ltd. grows, the Xinhua news agency reported. 

The company said Sept. 30 * Chinn has drawn up a plan to expand exports of electronic 
at it would issue 930 million products and machinery to $150 billion by 2010 from on estimai- 
eference shares holding limit- ed $26 billion in 1994, the China Daily reported. 

i • Japan’s private-sector machinery orders rose 7.1 percent in 

li on 8““.P ro_ August from a year earlier, after a 2.6 percent rise in July, the 

isal drew strong criticism Economic Planning Agency said, indicating its downturn in 
>m investors, who reared lie orders has probably slopped- 

w shares would have little « „ ^ ... , 

lue compared with News • San Jose Mercury News in California has become the first 

irp.’s ordinary stock American newspaper since the Vietnam War to win approval to 

On Tuesday, News Corp. establish a permanent bureau in Hanoi. 

ares gained to close at 8.27 • Malaysia will maintain control over the country's largest naval 

Mars, compared with 8.10 dockyard even if it is privatized, Defense Minister Najib Tun 


Monday. 


ompared w 
{Bloomberg, 


Reuters) Razak said. 


Eurasian Continental Railway Delivers the Goods 


Knigfn -Rubier 

HONG KONG — The first shipment 
of 10 containers carrying cargo from the 
western end of the new Eurasian Conti- 
nental Railway has arrived in the termi- 
nal port of Lianyungang. the Xinhua 
news agency reported Tuesday. 

The containers, loaded with copper 
sheets, will be shipped to South Korea, 


the agency quoted China's International 
Business News as reporting. 

The 10.800-kilometer (6,700-mile) line 
runs from Lianyungang, in Jiangsu Prov- 
ince on the east coast of China, through 
five Chinese provinces and the former 
Soviet Union to the Dutch port of Rot- 
terdam, the western terminal. 

The line, which cuts about 8,000 kilo- 


meters off the sea route, was bunched in 
December 1992. But its growth into a big 
conveyor, of goods was soon derailed by 
technical problems, a lack of experience 
and squabbling. 

A major problem is that China's trains 
run on narrow-gauge rails. Westbound 
trains must stop in Kazakhstan, where 
containers are put on Russian fiat cars. 


4FX. AP. Reurns. N >T. AFP 

Europe* Asia Meeting Set 

Jjjniif Frame Press? 

SINGAPORE — Around 
500 corporate executives and 
government officials will meet 
here this week to debate ways of 
expanding economic links" be- 
tween Asia and Europe. The 
sponsor, the World Economic 
Forum based in Davos, Swit- 
zerland, is also sponsoring a 
meeting in Casablanca late this 
month. 


NYSE 

Tuesday's dosing 

Tables indude the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere, via The Associated Press 

(Continued) 


1] Month 
t-fighLan Stock 


Kv Yld PE 100 k HiQti lowLaleMOfoe 

■Mo *.r - 51Z 


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HlOh Lour stock 


D.V >M PE 10th HWh UtwLnleUCn'gc 

• -■ ’*‘5 

» : -’ffi 4 «2C * 

« 3 r| jk !S 

5 $ '« J ; $ Is ’ ^ 


Dht YM P6 10th men Lo»Lat«stOi'Bfl 


The IHT /Delta Air Lines 
Destinations Competition 


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Here's How to Enter. 

Test your travel knowledge! Each day for IS 
consecutive days, a clue describing a city to which 
Delta Air Lines flies will be published. Using 
Delta's Map, fill in the name of the city correctly 
for at least 12 of the 18 days and qualify to win. 

Once you have at least 12 answers, put 
them in an envelope and send them to us with the 
completed coupon below. 

Winners will be selected from an official 
drawing. The first 10 entries drawn with the 
correct responses will be the winners. 


Win Fabulous Prizes 

First Prize: 

Two round-trip Trans-Atlantic 
First Class tickets. 

Second Prize: 

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Delta Air Lines' Destinations Map 


Stockholm- O Helsinki 

O n. . 


Amsterdam 


Copenhagen <Wrsbu '9 

_ .. O Moscow 


DetroitO 

Cincinnati 

ODallas^ 


°*tew?ori< 


n Berlin OWarsaw 

^affisc^kfurto Prague 

Nlceojfeian °Bucharesl 

UmrMAn _0 ORome ^lolankill 
Barcelona 


Istanbul 


o Atlanta 
oOrfandp 


OTel Aviv 


ooSanJtsn 

0 St Thomas 


RULES AND REGULATIONS 


® Airline tickets are non-transferable and seats subject 
to availability. 

® Travei must be completed by December 31st 1995. 

(i) Entry must be postmarked no later than November 

w 7th, 1994. 

@ Valid only where legal. No purchase necessary. 

® Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, Delta Air Lines, their agents and 
subsidiaries. 

® No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
. postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 

® No cash alternative to prizes. 

® Winners will be drawn on November 15th and 
published thereafter in the newspaper. 

® On all matters, the editor's decision is final. 

® The editor reserves the right in his absolute 
discretion to disqualify any entry, competitor or 
nominee, or to waive any rules in the event of 
circumstances outside our control arising which, in 
his opinion, make it desirable to cancel the 
competition at any stage. 


Delhi 0 

Bombay 

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YOUR RESPONSE: 


o . At the end of 
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\Name of City: 


JOB TTTIE 

COMPANY 

ADDRESS 

POST CODE __ 


COUNTRY. 


Sund coupons w. IHT/ Delta Competition, 
International Herald Tribune, 

1S1 Avenue Chari es-de-Gau lie, 

9252 1 Nett illy Cedex, France. 

T* fL nTcninmrifw . , 

ltcralo s J^enbunc 

AJM3AAIRJJNES 

ton'll Love Thf Vi\ Wl Mi* ... 


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m Page 16 


EVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUIVE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


** *, 


NASDAQ 


... Tuesday's 4 pjm. 

7ns Id compiled by the AP, consists p! the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


liMomti 
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22% 14 Adames 
541 h 10 Adelph h 
37'iJO Adicfiv .14 
37, 19 AdobcS r .SO 
35'/. 20%Adtran 

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31 'A 17 AHCmpS 
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l«% 1 1 V. AJcWa i 
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... 7i 359 31 
... 10 OS IS% 
■ 13c 3 13 381 18 
_ 40) 10 
_ 28 309 33 
_ 30 1454 42". 
_ _ 632 17% 

681 J4 IB Ml 19*4 
... _ 3875 »"■ 
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737 19}'* 
... 3013357 1918 
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.. _ 111 15*8 

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International Herald Tribune 



A Special Report 


Wednesday , October 12 , 1994 

Page / " 


French Technology 




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Too Narrow a Focus? 


SI^v'-'* : ->r'r;'w5b02^E 


'metef* ■where car owners pay to recharge their electric vehicles in La Rochelle, left; a Renault electric car prototype, right. 


In Drive for Electric Cars, France Is a Leader 


; By Thomas Fuller 

; if:?- ARIS — The first time Joseph 

; «'-& \J Cugnot took his car down a curv- 

’ :•■'£} 1 mg Paris street, it went straight 

'J; -A. off the road. 

r-:/-? Mr. Cugnot. a retired engineer from 
ji; i eastern France, was no doubt disappoint- 
>'■£> ed; the accident, however, couldn’t have 
v £* caused much damage , cs his car’s top 
L ;, : r ' speed was three miles per hour. 
l-yi That was 1769. Mr. Cugnot’s three- 
: wheeled steam-powered wagon designed 

to pull artillery pieces was the world’s first 
T~r^ automobile. Mr. Cugnot is credited with 
, 2 ’- the invention and with ushering in a tradi- 
V.\ ' don of French automotive ingenuity. 

“ , =;• Some 225 years later, the country that 
saw the invention of not only the automo- 
- bfle but also the storage battery is due to 
b? ? commercialize relatively cheap electric 
■;?- cars- 

While most carmakers in the United 
i ■ : <•' ' States. Japan and Europe are expernnent- 
^ ing with prototypes, both Renault and 

T-, “PSA Peugeot Citroen SA — France's Big 
j ‘ V Two— will offer dec trie versions of some 
gasoUne^powered cars as early as next 
. March. 

- ‘ The electric models, winch are distin- 

.! ’ i guishable from their internal-combustion 
counterparts only by their lack of tailpipe 
I i and their silent motors, can be plugged in 


and recharged from any household wall 
socket, just like a toaster or coffee ma- 
chine. A maximum char ge of eight hours 
provides just under 100 kilometers (62 
miles) of use, making the car an almost 
exclusively urban type of transport. 

“The vehicles we currently have which 
will soon’ enter production are targeted 
and oriented for the European market," 
said Nod Bureau, vice president for re- 
search at Peugeot Citroen. “They're small 
vehicles with reduced dimensions and re- 
duced range as well. We think that if we 
can slide to a projected range of 80 to 100 
kilometers per day, well be able to satisfy 
perhaps more than 90 percent of urban 
transport needs." 

Many French dties. tired of the fumes 
and noise produced by internal -com bas- 
tion engines, have made agreements with 
Renault or Peugeot to provide the neces- 
sary electric-car infrastructure. 

Kenneth Barber, who beads the U.S. 
Department of Energy’s electric-car divi- 
sion in Washington, attributes France's 
leading role in commercializing electric 
cars to the large price difference between 
its relatively cheap electricity and its ex- 
pensive. highly taxed gasoline as well as 
the centralized structure of the French 
state. 

“In France you have one utility, which 
is dead easy to work with.” Mr! Barber 
said. “So it’s a little different from the 


U.S., where there are separate, individual 
utilities reporting to private or separate 
utility commissions.” 

The United States, where electric cars 
are still in the prototype stages, develop- 
ment has been spurred on by a 1998 
deadline imposed by California and other 
slates for 2 percent of cars offered for sale 
to be free of emissions. General Motors 
Corp. recently created Delco Propulsion 
Systems, a business unit that it expects 
one day to sell electric-car components 
worldwide. 

The United States was once host to a 
large electric car market. In 1912. when 
gasoline-powered technology was in its 
early stages, there were 33,842 electric cars 
in operation — 22 limes the current num- 
ber. 

But today, while GM anticipates. 
France’s Big Two produce. 

Renault's Clio Electrique is scheduled 
to appear in showrooms next July, and 
Peugeot Citroen’s 106 Electrique and AX 
Electrique are to be on the market by 
March or April. Both carmakers see initial 
demand as weak (Peugeot Citroen will 
have production capacity of only 6.000 
electric cars next year) but count’ on im- 
provements in infrastructure in French 
dties and lax rebates and financial incen- 
tives from the government to boost sales. 

The necessary infrastructure includes, 
in large cities, places for electric-car users 


An Entrepreneur’s Search for Capital 


By Richard E. Smith 


— ES UUS. France — Linh T. 

I Nuyen- is probably not the only 

I high-tech, entre p reneur- striking 

Mi' df out on his own in France who 
wonders, sometimes with Tegret and some- 
times with a shudder, how different his 
foray into business might have been in the 
; beguiling bat treacherous U.S. market. 

•; "If I had started in the United States 
t * instead of France,” he said, “the company 
would have already gone public ana our 
sales would be double what they are to- 
day.” V . 

But he also acknowledged that he might 
have followed the fate of many Silicon 
, • Valley start-ups as a flash in the pan on 
;• the over-the-counter market or lost hzs 
\ independence early in a quick buyout. 

,j£ As it is, the 54-year-old 6migr6 from 
7 Vietnam, who spent 15 years as a research 
engineer at Thomson SA, does not have a 
\ lot of complaints. 

“I. like the job I am doing,” he said. “I 
' like developing new products. In a smaller 
\ company, it is easier to do it." 

Picogiga, his company, is now eight 
•' years old. It has 25 employees, sales of 
- over 30 milli on francs ($5.7 million), prof- 
it of about 6 xnMou francs, apleasant site 
-■ near Paris and an idea he feels has an 
outstanding future: the gallium arsenide 
wafer, a minia turized transistor with ap- 
• plicati ons ranging from mobile telephones 
to collision-preventive radar devices for a 
-■ new generation of automobiles. 

‘ What he does not have and what makes 
' him envious of his U.S. counterparts is the 
' kind of plentiful, mobile and sophisticat- 
ed venture capital that provides such fer- 
tile ground for the boisterous U.S. micro- 
electronics industry. 

“We are producing at peak capacity," 

. he said. “We could be doing more." 

He said that when a company in Silicon 
1 Valley or Route 128 near Boston rum into 
a rough, patch, its financiers can tap into a 
rich network of outside consultants, aca- 
; decries, editors and specialized bankers to 
' get a reading on the situation; 

“But in France^ finance people often do 
, not know the market* be said. “They do 
not know who to call m the U.S. Some- 
times they don’t even speak English.” 

As a result; it is the lot of the technical 


,wj - 

ir - ■ 

n 



Unh T. Nuyen 

people in France and Europe in general to 
constantly defend' the performance of a 
high-tech company before skeptical finan- 
ciers. 

Since Mr. Nuyen’s innovation is on the 
cutt in g edge of both microelectronics and 
metallurgy, he has had to do a lot of 
talking. Although be has financing from 
five French venture capital organizations, 
he had serious trouble getting fresh funds 
several years ago to buy equipment he felt 
was vital. 

Nor does he think the situation in Eu- 
rope will improve soon. 

The U.S. market, as he notes, is not only 
large enough to allow many small players 
. to perch on small niches, it has a wide 
range of success stories in spite of a high 
rate of failure. 

“At one point in the past- European 
companies Hke Philips started with the 
ideas of individual people," Mr. Nuyen 
said. “But it has been a long time since 
there have been many great successes. 

“The culture is different in Silicon Val- 
ley,” said Mr. Nuyen, who has been to the 
United States more times than he can 
count. “People say, ‘Why not me?’ There 
have been a lot of successes and this 
makes it easier for others to ask for mon- 
ey. We need more examples of success in 
Europe to excite the market-'' 

At the same time, he said that the break- 
neck pace of the TJ5. market can be in- 
timidating for any beginner, not to speak 
of a foreign one. 

“I am French and Fm here because I 


started working here," he said. “And 1 was 
a researcher, not an entrepreneur. For the 
U.S. market, you have to know about 
marketing there, about law, about the en- 
vironment.” 

Sometimes the slower pace in Europe 
can allow a longer fuse lime for research. 
While three of his venture capital support- 
ers are tied to commercial banks, two are 
state-dominated research funds. “They 
are more patient,” he said. 

Some of that funding originates in pro- 
grams sponsored by the European Union 
and allows small niche companies to bene- 
fit from contact with Europe’s microelec- 
tronics giants. “The arrangement is good 
for us as a small company,” he said. 

“The optimal atuation is to have sever- 
al large companies own a small stake in 
your company so that you can learn from 
all of them but still stay independent." he 
said, highlighting a business pattern that 
is more common in Europe than in the 
United Stales. 

“Jt is sometimes a handicap to be 
owned by a big company, if 1 am bought 
by Motorola, it could mean that 1 could 
not supply others and would lose contact 
with them.” 

In spite of his occasional qualms about 
the raucous and unpredictable U.S. mar- 
ket, his eye is firmly fixed on that market 
for his next big move. 

“In three years, if we continue to grow 
at the rate we are growing, we will open a 
production facility in the United States.” 
he said. 

“In the semiconductor industry, the 
leader in innovation is the United States." 
he said. “The Americans have recovered 
the momentum over the last two or three 
years that they had lost before to the 
Japanese. 

“It is the Americans now who are mov- 
ing most aggressively to apply the newest 
technologies, much as the Japanese had 
been doing before." 

Three years ago Japan accounted for 55 
percent of Mr. Nuyen’s sales and the 
United States for 25 percent. Now Japan 
has slipped to about 25 percent and Amer- • 
ica has surged to 67 percent. France still 
accounts for less than 5 percent. 

RICHARD £. SMITH is on the staff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


BuMer of Nuclear Plants Looks East 



I By Joseph Fftcheit 

P ARIS — When Jean-Claude 
Leny predicts a bright nuclear 
future for Framatonte. he has in 
mind more than the state-con- 
troled manufacturer’s recent sale to Chi- 
na of power-plant parts worth 1.5 billion 
French francs ($282 million). 

His confidence also reflects nuclear en- 
ergy’s unique place in French elite think- 
ing as a crown jewel of national technol- 
ogy. This belief that nuclear energy is a 
state attain helped block a government 
bid this year to privatize Framatome. 
With cash reserves acquired via gov- 


ernment-ordered industrial shifts. Fra- 
malome has outlasted its competitors 
during the bleak years since the Three 
Mile Island incident in the United States 
in 1979, which started an international 
groundswdl of anti-nuclear sentiment. 

Today, Framatome describes itself 
without' fear of contradiction as the 
world’s leading designer, builder and ex- 
porter of civil nuclear reactors. It built 
most of France’s nuclear reactors — 
which supply 75 percent of the nation’s 
electricity. 

Part of what has helped Framatome 
capture its leading role is (he fervent 
commitment of its top talent, including 


Mr. Leny. 63. who has been CEO since 
1985. For nearly 50 years, he has been a 
leading member in France’s fraternity of 
nuclear technocrats. 

Today his faith centers on Asia, partic- 
ularly China, which may follow up the 
recent component sale with a major order 
for the Daya Bay site where Framatome 
has already installed two reactors. 

Asian nations are a promising market, 
Mr. Leny said, because they must have 
nuclear euergy if they are going to meet 
the electricity demand generated by their 
growth boom. 

“They won’t go the ail-nuclear route 

Continued oo Page 18 


to leave their vehicles overnight to be 
recharged. By the end of this year, Paris 
will have 200 such berths. 

La Rochdle, a city on the French Atlan- 
tic coast where Peugeot-Citro&n has leased 
50 prototypes of its AX and 106 models to 
residents and local companies, offers free 
parking for electric cars. The La Rochelle 
experiment is being watched closely by 
those involved in electric-car projects 
around the world because it is the first 
time a city has teamed up with a car 
manufacturer and utility company to pro- 
vide the sperific infrastructure needed for 
electric cars. 

Michel Crepeau, La Rochelle's mayor, 
has long been an environmental activist, 
providing in the 1970s a fleet of free bicy- 
cles for residents to use. Today, along with 
the national utility Electricite de France, 
the city has installed high-wattage re- 
charging stations, providing in 10 minutes 
enough power to drive 20 kilometers. 
Many decLric-car users- however, have 
found the fast-recharging stations unnec- 
essary and prefer to plug in. their cars at 
home. 

Chantal Vetter, a La Rochelle resident 
involved in the project, takes her Peugeot 
106 Electrique to work every day and 
charges it every two nights. One hundred 
kilometers costs her eight francs <5 1 -50) in 

Continued on Page 18 


By Barry James 

P ARIS — The bicentennial of 
France’s two leading establish- 
ments of higher learning this year 
has renewed an old debate about 
the place c*f science and technology in 
education and industry. 

In short, has the pure math and science 
tradition represented by the Ecole Poly- 
technique eclipsed to a disproportionate 
extent the humanist traditions represent- 
ed by the Ecole Norm ale Superieure? 

Polytechnique graduates have dominat- 
ed French industry since World War II. 
They are largely responsible for such ad- 
vances as the high-speed railway system, 
the nationwide teletext network and the 
Ariane satellite launcher. Three of the top 
10 banks, three of the top 10 insurance 
companies and 56 of the top 100 industrial 
companies are headed by former poly- 
technicians. 

"They know everything. Unfortunately 
they do not know anything else.” Marshal 
P&tain was once quoted as saying. 

The Ecole Normale Superieure used to 
be France's intellectual leader, producing 
many of its best-known writers and phi- 
losophers, including Jean-Paul Sartre, 
Claude Levi-Strauss, Michel Foucault, 
Raymond Aron, Jacques Derrida and Mi- 
chel Serres. 

But it has lost ground to the Polyiechni- 
que. and its birthday this month has been 
marked by a certain amount of sniping at 
the rival institution and the tradition it 
typifies. Colette Lewiner, an ENS gradu- 
ate and now a senior official in the nuclear 
reprocessing industry, said that French 
industry is full of scientifically or techno- 
logically brilliant thinkers who are unable 
to work in a team or communicate. 

“More and more.” she said in an inter- 
view with Lc Monde de l'Education. “we 
are looking for multidisciplinary people, 
or people capable of acquiring other disci- 
plines — scientists who do not distrust 
literature” 

Without “great intellectual mobility 
and a strong capability to adapt.” she said, 
technological and scientific knowledge 
risks becoming quickly outdated. 

Although the Polyiechnique tradition 
served France well during its post-war 
reconstruction, it has many negative as- 
pects. Critics say it has created a self- 


replicating caste of remote super-special- 
ists that is ill-adapted to increasing 
European and international cooperation. 
It also symbolizes an obsessive preoccupa- 
tion with diplomas and academic qualifi- 
cations at virtually every level. 

One irony is that while the French put 
the Polytechnique at the pinnacle of learn- 
ing, few foreigners have ever heard of it. 
The Sorbonne. part of the University of 
Paris, is far better known abroad. 

Math occupies a place of honor in 
French business and industry in great part 
because it is seen as a useful means of 
selecting job applicants, being less subjec- 
tive than literature or philosophy. Never- 
theless, the rational French still’ rely to j 
greater extent than any other European 
country on assessment techniques such as 
numerology or graphology that seem to 
come straight from a New Age commune. 

The revolutionary government in 1794 
set up the Polyiechnique to provide the 
young republic with engineers, and the 
Ecole Normale Superieure to provide 
teachers — a role it keeps today. 

The Ecole Normale director, Etienne 
Guyon, said recently that there is a gaping 
need in French education for more inter- 
changes between scientific and literary 
and philosophical disciplines. 

In contrast, however, Mr. Guyon said 
that education is geared entirely io repro- 
ducing elites. Everything is directed to- 
ward an increasingly narrow selection. 

“British education does not function 
like that,” he said, “and it has produced Id 
times as many Nobel Prizes as us. because 
their degrees are more creative." 

Whether industry has accepted a great- 
er need for humanities or gencralisin is 
open to question. “I wish it were true, but 
I have not seen anything to indicate it," 
said Daniel Jouve, a Paris headhunter. 

Mary Boss, of the INSEAD business 
school at Fontainebleau, said that French 
companies lhatjake a European or inter- 
national view are increasingly looking for 
generalists, with training inlanguages and 
the humanities as well as science. 

“If they come here it is because they 
have decided that they need to recruit 
international managers, or French manag- 
ers who have an interest or talent for 
international business.” she said, 

BARRY JAMES is on the staff of the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


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I Page 18 
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IiVTERNATIOiVAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 12, 1994 





French Technology! A Special Report 


Former On-Line leader Now Looks Outdated 



By Richard Covington 

ARJS — As Europe 
braces for ihe invasion 
of American on-line 
services, France’s 
Minitel the Continent’s pre- 
miere on-line sendee, is scram- 
bling to keep its hold on the 
French market and is mount- 
ing a counterattack, adapting 
the system for U.S. consumers. 

CompuServe is already 
available in France, and other 
major on-line services — 
America On-Line, Prodigy, 
and Delphi — are expected to 
arrive by late next year. The 
challenge to France's nine- 
year-old Minitel sysLem is ob- 
vious. Since this spring, Mini- 
tel users have been able to get 
on the Internet, the global in- 
formation and communica- 
tions computer network, by ei- 
ther paying a monthly 
subscription fee or dialing 
3619 USNET and paying 2.19 
francs (41 cents) a minute. Ac- 
cess to a wide range of video- 
text services across Europe 
varies in cost from mo to nine 
francs a minute, according to 
the service. 

But the queslion remains: 
Are users going to go on-line 
through the Mini tel network, 
or will they opt for their com- 
puters to reach on-line services 
such as CompuServe and Prod- 
igy. at half the cost or less? 

“The Minitel has no memo- 
ry, no intelligence, poor com- 
mand control, and it’s slow,” 
complains Joshua Harris, an 
analyst with Jupiter Interactive 
Productions Inc„ an on-line 
service consulting company 
based in New York. “The 
problem is that the French 
now have all these antiquated 
terminals. While this gave 
them a technological lead in 


1985, now the terminals are 
bogging the system down.” 

In the dark ages of 1985 — 
when the word “Internet" sug- 
gested tennis rather than com- 
puter bonding — France Tele- 
com was giving away brown 
plastic breadbox-sized gizmos 
as unlikely replacements for 
bulky paper telephone directo- 
ries and other information ser- 
vices yet to be invented. 

Since then, Minitel use has 
taken off, with practiced users 
consulting the box Tor every- 
thing from updates on weather 
and rail strikes to everything 
they might want to know about 
General Charles de Gaulle — 
on his own Tele tel number. 
3615 Espoir. (Telfctel and Au- 
diotel are the numbered ser- 
vices — the system software; 
the Minitel is the alphanumer- 
ic keyboard and boxed screen 
— the hardware.) 

By the end of 1993, 6.5 mil- 
lion Minitels were in service, 
with another half-million users 
connected through their com- 
puters via modem. The French 
logged 100 million hours graz- 
ing through some 25,000 dif- 
ferent services, forking over 8.7 
billion francs for the privilege. 
But despite the 15.5 percent 
rise in Tdfctel use since 1992 
and a year-to-year profi labili- 
ty, the" system is not expected 
to recoup its 60 billion-franc 
investment until at least 2000, 
according to a report made for 
the telephone company by the 
accounting firm Coopers & 
Lybrand. 

Boosted by the Minitel’s 
success in Europe, France Te- 
lecom has embarked on a pro- 
gram of exporting Minitel 
technology. But results have 
been mixed. After a two-year. 
$80 million joint venture with 
U S West Inc., a Denver-based 
regional phone company, to 


test the Minitel in the Minne- 
apolis-Sl. Paul area. France 
Telecom has given up on im- 
porting the box to the United 
States. 

When Community Link 
Minitel Associates, the intro- 
ductory Minitel project, was 
terminated in June, only 2,000 
households had signed on, a 
miserable response compared 
with the 800,000 households 
the French phone company 
had forecast would be using 
the system by 2002. But it was 
no mystery "why the system 
flopped: It could only reach 
local numbers; the Minitel cost 
SI 2 a month to rent (in France, 
it was initially given away); 
and there was a connection 
charge of 15 cents a minute. 

“Our objective was never to 
seD Minitel terminals,” says 
Luc Guillet, president of Intel- 
matique, France Telecom’s in- 
teractive division. “We are 
now aimin g to develop the on- 
line market and to capture a 
significant share of electronic 
telepayment services.” 

Undaunted by the failure of 
this ini dal venture, France Te- 
lecom is going ahead with an- 
other pilot project, in home 
banking, in partnership with 
U S West and Elec ironic Data 
Systems Inc. According to Mr. 
Guillet, the French phone 
company is involved in further 
discussions, with U S West on 
“broadening our approach” 
from basic videotexl services 
to the full range of multimedia 
services employing voice, com- 
puter-generated still photo- 
graphs and moving video im- 
ages. 

In a separate venture, 
France Telecom signed on this 
spring with AT&T Corp.. Sony 
Corp.. Philips NV, Motorola 
Inc., Apple Computer Inc.. 
Matsushita and other telecom- 


Airbus Seeks Bigger Craft 


By Robert Bailey 


T 


HE creation of Airbus Industrie 
nearly 25 years ago represented a 
recognition that no European civil 
airliner maker could compete with 
U.S. producers on its own. But few people at 
the Lime, on either side of the Atlantic, would 
have predicted how strong a force the consor- 
tium would become. 

Today, France’s interest in airliner design 
and production, alongside that of Germany. 
Britain and Spain, is concentrated in Airbus. 
Aerospatiale, the French state-owned con- 
cern, has a 37.5 percent shareholding, as does 
Deutsche Aerospace. British Aerospace has a 
20 percent share and Spain's Construceiones 
Aeronauticas holds 42 percent 

While the consortium's name is Gallic and 
its headquarters is in Toulouse, .Airbus Indus- 
trie, whose official company language is Eng- 
lish, would be embarrassed to be described as 
a French concern. 

The partners have a dual role as sharehold- 
ers and industrial participants, providing 
work on aircraft in their own factories in 
proportion to their equity stakes. Final as- 
sembly at Toulouse or Hamburg represents 
less than 4 percent of the work that goes into 
each aircraft 

The consortium's main achievement has 
been survival — it became profitable in 1990, 
giving it a firm foundation from which to plan 
for the next century. 

By this summer, "the consortium had deliv- 
ered nearly 1,200 airliners to 112 customers. 
Deliveries included 33 of Airbus’s most ambi- 
tious aircraft development to date: the A-340, 
a four-engine craft with intercontinental 
range and a 260-passenger capacity. The new 
plane filled a final gap in the .Airbus line of 
aircraft in terms of both range and capacity. 

For the future, however, potential develop- 
ment costs and uncertainty of markets are so 
great that even rival manufacturers have been 
exploring avenues of collaboration. 

Thus, the various Airbus partners, along 
. with Bodng Co n are carrying out a joint study 
on a Very Large Commercial Transport con- 


cept. Airbus itself has observer status in the 
project. But there are doubts the program will 
continue once its initial phase is completed 
next summer. 

Boeing, meanwhile, is carrying out its own 
studies of a stretched version of its successful 
747, and Airbus is examining a super jumbo 
option, designated the A3XX. 

To get such an aircraft off the drawing 
board and into the air in the next decade will 
require a firm development decision within 
the next fhree years. 

In the A3XX, Airbus envisages an aircraft 
with two full decks able to carry 530 to 570 
passengers in a three-class layout, or 840 in a 
single-class, all-economy sealing plan, it 
would have a range of" up to 7.400 miles 
1 12,000 kilometers). 

Airbus has also applied its design concepts 
to its own transport requirements. The result, 
the A300-600 Super Transport, had its first 
test flight in September. 

The aircraft is a successor to the bulbous 
U.S.-built Super Guppy airplanes that the 
consortium has used since 1970 to transport 
fuselage sections and wings from sites around 
Europe to final Airbus assembly lines. 

The A300-600 ST is one of the largest 
aircraft ever built, with 50,000 cubic feet 
( 1,400 cubic meters) of main deck cargo space 
and a 56-foot-high { 17-meter) door. Aerospa- 
tiale and Deutsche Aerospace .Airbus, which 
are building the new transport, believe that 
the SI billion development could pay off with 
sales to other operators in the international 
air cargo market. 

With an assertiveness favored by the 
French, .Airbus has succeeded in breaking the 
monopoly of U.S. civil airliner producers. 
This has helped Europe to match the outside 
world in high-technology markets. 

The politics may become more acute if 
European governments decide to go ahead 
with a big new military transport aircraft to 
replace the Lockheed-built C-I30. now in 
general use. 


ROBERT BAILEY is a journalist based in 
London. 



muni cations concerns to bank- 
roll' the development of an 
icon-based, touch-sensitive 
system that is a highly sophisti- 
cated variation of the Minitel's 
Tfetete! and Audiotel services, 
to be produced by General 
Magic Inc. of Mountain View, 
California. 

With Apple France SA. the 
French phone network has de- 
veloped a number of projects 
to bring the MiniteJ to Macin- 
tosh-computer screens and has 
several more in the works, ac- 
cording to Antoine Henry, di- 
rector of business systems for 
Apple France. 

The joint venture that holds 
the most promise is videocon- 
ferencing, an adaptation to 
Apple’s Power Mac AV that 
enables the user to see the per- 
son he or she is calling in a 
window on the computer 
screen and to work simulta- 
neously with that person on 
the same document. 

The videoconferencing pro- 
ject wfll be compatible with the 


:-->4=JC Axub IHT 


worldwide ISDN standard. 
France Telecom, Apple and 
Societe Anonyme de Telfi- 
phonique SA are collaborating 
on the project, due on the mar- 
ket by the end of the year. The 
cost "of the memory card and 
videocamera will run around 
20,000 francs. Mr. Henry says. 

.Also in the works are new 
versions of the Minitel service 
that should go a long way to- 
ward allaying persisted criti- 
cisms of the system's slowness 
and limited flexibility. The 
TVR. or Teletel Vitesse Ra- 
pide, will be eight times as fast 
as the present Minitel system. 

An upgraded Minitel will be 
equipped with encoded memo- 
ry cards to enable the user to 
pay in advance for tickets, 
goods and other services, just 
like phoning in a credit-card 
order. Both the TVR and the 
Minitel with memory card 
should be available in 1995. 

RICHARD conyomy IS a 
freelance writer based in Paris. 


Heavier Payloads 
Higher Paybacks 

I 


T WAS a busy summer 
for Arianespace, the Eu- 
ropean rocket concern 
that projects itself as the 
world’sjirsi commercial *puce 
transport company. 

An Intelsat satellite and two 
British Defense Ministry pay- 
loads were launched June 17 
from the Ariane base at 
Kourou in French Guiana. 
Then came the American Pan- 
amsai-2 and Japan's BS-3N 
satellites on July 9. the Turk- 
sat- IB and Brasilsat B-l on 
Aug. 10, and finally the Soli- 
daridad-2 for Mexico and 
Thailand's Thaicom-2 lust 
week.. 

The Second half of the year 
has been a period of recovery 
for the company. After a suc- 
cessful • run of 26 launches. 
Ariane lost a satellite payload 
in January when the third stage 
of a rocket failed at launch. 

After, five months of investi- 
gation and the rectification of 
problems, Arianespace is back 
on target to achieve 30 
launches from now to 1996. 

With a launch order book of 
about 18 billion francs ($3.4 
billion)! the company believes 
that its European investors are 
getting a good commercial and 
technological payback. The 
largest slice of its equity, 56.65 
percent, is held by French 
companies and banks: the 
largest shareholder is the 
French national space agency 
CNES. . 

Charles Bigot, chief execu- 
tive of Arianespace, notes that 
the new Ariane-5 launcher is to 
come on stream in about 12 
months. The company, he says. 


* * 


1 " * 

IDATE^f* 

L 


+ * 


T ©lecommunications, Data F»roces&itt^'i- .'Media- 
CONFERENCE "The- NOW Frontier 11 , • NOVBtfBER : 1S94 MtttfpeSer.- Frhrice 


HMGBfll 

feOGpm 


4:1Spm 


*00 pm 

MJOwn 


11:19 mi 


fct&pm 


Opening Session: M. Carpcnticr, EC-DG XIII - E. Dovignon, Bangemann Group - G. Th6ry - Representatives from ACE,' 2000 Forum 


Session 1 - New Forums for New Technical 
Standards: W. de Backer. EC-DG XIII ■ 

R. Dorn. Fortin ATM (Alcatel) - P. Kahi. DVB, 
Ministry of Post and TelecommunJcanan. 
Massfel du Blest MOU GSM (SFR). 


Session 2 - Frontiers Collapse, part 1 : A. VaTee. 
Dmsciton G^ntrate des Pastes et Telecom- 
munications (F) - L. Efcnzorti. Telecom Pans - 
P. Kavassaiis. University Pans IX Dauphins - 
M. Trdheux & J.P. Simon. France T6<6com. 


Session 1 - Key Technologies: M. Catinal. EC- 
DG III - J.L Grand-Clement, Pixel InternaMrul - 
P Martnotti. SG5 Thomson -J Stem. Stem 
computing System - T. Zytbertjorg. Franco 
Tdeeom. 


Session 2 - Frontiers Collapse, part 2: 

J A Mannho, AT&T - M. Beknell. Vision Industries 
SA - J. Haine, IONICA • N. Houery, CGRP - R. 
Wwflam, The Cable Television Association. 


Session 3 - The Electronic Market Place and 
International Trade: L Gille, Sirius - 
J.C. Pefissota, Group* Galeries Lafayette - 
M. Tenenbaum. EU/Commerce-Net - 
J. Gurunlian. ONU-CNUCED 


Session 3 - Technologies versus Usages: 

| J.C. Burgehnan. Free University o! Brussels 
N. Arrud & A. Busson, France T£l£com - 
K. Lange, wik - R. Lavoie. Industrie Canada. 


Plenary Session - The Electronic Superhighways Code: R. Petrefla. EC-DG XII - P. Queau. WA - J. de Rosray, Cite des Sciences et de rindustrie - J. Vogt?. IDATE 


Session 1 - The future as seen by the Telcos: 
B. Guton. Groups HEC ■ F. Bavay & 

JJ.M. Longchal, France Tetecom - W.L Franz, 
AirToudh International - B. Timmons, Mercury 
Communications. 


Session 2 - Agenda for Interactive TV, part 1: 
Y. Gasaol, IDATE - R. Baza, BeR Atlantic Video 
Services Inc. - J.P. Coustel. France Tetecom - 
A. Putesochet IDATE • P van Hoogslralen, 
PTT1M5 1.0. 


Session 3 - Asia: Market Dreams, part 1: 

D. Schuster. IUT - H. Lantzke, The World Bank 
M. Nouvion, France Tdteccm ■ D. Pouillcn & 

F. Pujol, IDATE. ; 


Session 1 - (EuraJPrtvuUzation: M. Cove, 
Brunei University - B. Remiche. Belgacom - D. 
Dassi. Telecom Holla - V MuJIlez, J.P. Morgan. 


Session 2 • Agenda for Interactive TV. part 2: 
X . Deut'xhe Telekom - M. Alllone. STREAM - 
S. BocJc. MTA-EMCI - R. Meyers. Viacom 
International Inc. 


Session 1 - Deregulation., and what then? 
C. Game. EC-DG XIII - W H. Melody. CIRCIT ■ 
K. Nakano, fnfoCom Research - J. Artandra, 
[DATE - E. Noam. Columbia Institute lor Tele- 
Information - Y. Poullet. GRID. Facutt&j 
UiwersHalres Notre-Dams de la Pals. 


Session 2 - Can Europe Compete in Video? 

A. Lange. Observatorre suropSsn de raudkwbuet ■ 
R. Stephono, Euronews - B. Miyet, Permanent 
Roprosomauve tor France at the Vienna 
Negotiations - J. Techau. Harvard University 
-V.Cayta.MK 2. 


Session 3 • Asia: Market Praams, part 2: 

0. Schuster. IUT - F. ToDegas, Alcatel China - 
|T. Ho, National University of Singapore - 
F.X. Te3tard-Va(9ant & J.P. Sme Is- Solan es. 
French Embassy. Tokyo -S. Nazzaro. PearsonTV. 


Session 3 - New Frontiers Central and Eastern 
Europe: H.P. Gebhardt. EC-DG Xlil - J. Grenier, 
Eutebal - C. lonescu, Ministry of Communications 
of Rumania - B.P. Lange, European tnsatute for Ihe 
Metfia - S. Phan S J.B. Kempt, EDF 
K. Grewfich, Deutsche Telekom - S. Popwtek. 
Polish Mnistry of Post and Telecommunications 


SrtSpm 


j Keynote Spesker Jacques Altali, ’Skyitnes tor Europe" - Closing Speech; Pekka Taijanne. General Secretory of mj. j 




9t 30 am- 5:45 pm - Seminar 1 : The New Frontier: Mediterranean What 
Forms of Cooperation at the Ago of ihe Information Superhighway? 


9X)0 am-5:45 pm - Seminar 2 : IntemaJtonsI Economy, Regulation and 
the Decwon-maWng process in the Telecommunications Sector. 


CMS! hwtttut cte rautltovfsuefettJes 


MonBMipiKpSBcaloVri’AJLlSr 88 3*67 144407- 

en EUrep* - 8P 41G7 - M409Z monspeffler cedwcS- 


:33JS7 14 AH 4*- fex ; 3$IS? 1*44 00 ' 

' ‘ \ - . • 


is poistfti t > ipatcos u> role in 
*pace transport a tifn. 

Ariunespaee expects- 1.* book 
about !:•■.> launch*.-' from now 
to 21HJ3. mainly ff lelcuom- 
mumejlifiV' i.htl broadcast 
satellites. Bui competition for 
the launching business, expect- 
ed to be worth a total of $15 
billion, is strong, coming from 
U.S. rockets liiTc the Atlas-2, 
Japan’s M- ! I launcher. Chi- 
na's Lung March rocket and 
Ihe Proion t-f Russia. 

Arianespace’s advantage 
should grow if, as. seems likely, 
customers seek to place heavier 
and heavier payloads — of 3.7 
to 5 metric tons — into orbit. 

Ariane-5. now in its final 
phase of design development, 
will be able to exceed this re- 
quirement. t he 35 billion franc 
program is one of Lhe most 
ambitious and costly aero- 
space projects ever undertaken 
outside the United States or 
Russia. 

The design calls for a low- 
cost cryogenic engine using liq- 
uid oxygen and hydrogen. This 
will allow the Ariane-5’s motor 
to provide 20 percent more 
thrust than the Ariane-4’s Vul- 
can engine. 

Reliability has been a key 
consideration. Ariane-5 will 
have just one engine, com- 
pared to its predecessor’s four 
first-stage engines. And the 
new rocket's third-stage engine 
does not require lurbopumps. 
which have been identified as 
the cause of a number of past 
failures. 

Ariane-5 will be able to 
launch satellites of up to 5.9 
tons. By 1997 this capacity is 
due to have been improved to 
7.4 tons. 

“The new rocket's growth 
capability.” said Mr. Bigot, 
“will allow the development of 
many higher-performance, 
more flexible versions, possi- 
bly in cooperation with other 
space powers, giving us a pow- 
erful. adaptable launch system 
for the next century.” 

The first .Ariane-5 test flight 
is expected to take place next 
fall. A second flight, the fol- 
lowing spring, will cany two 
commercial satellites and a 
demonstrator version of Eu- 
rope's future space capsule. 

That capsule, the Atmo- 
spheric Re-entry Demonstra- 
tor, or APvD, is a prototype of a 
crew transfer vehicle able to 
transport four astronauLs and 
400 Integrants 1880 pounds) of 
equipment to a space station. 

After almost a full revolu- 
tion of the Earth and a 15- 
rainute re-entry phase, the 
cone is to be parachuted into 
the Pacific, in a scene reminis- 
cent of the pre-shuttle U.S. 
space missions. According to 
Aerospatiale, lead contractor 
for the ARD. the return to 
Earth is expected to be precise 
within 1 square kilometer (0.38 
square mile). 

Looking about 20 years 
ahead. Arianespace is thinking 
about an Ariane-6. with a 
launch vehicle that would be at 
least partly recoverable. 

Robert Bailey 


Bull Tries to Climb Back 


By Richard E. Smith 

P ARIS — It’s make-or- 
break time, yet- again, 
at Bull. But this time 
it just may be for real. 
The state-controlled French 
flagship computer company, 
long cushioned by some of 
Europe's most controversial 
subsidies from the tremors 
that have shaken the comput- 
er industry, is bracing to go 
cold turkey. 

Virtually a new company is 
rising from the shambles of 
one that has posted three 
years of extensive losses. The 
early signs are promising but 
subsidies have masked the 
company's true problems for 
so long that analysts are not 
quite sure what is emerging. 

“The reshaping of Bull, 
which looked like a near im- 
possibility two years ago, is 
perhaps "nearer in sight, but 
the strategic direction of the 
company, and its understand- 
ing of its own core business, 
remains still somewhat un- 
clear,” said Martin Oertel, an 
analyst with Dataquest, a 
market research organization 
in information technologies. 

The key turning point was 
the decision by the French 
government to abandon con- 
trol of Bull as part of its broad 
privatization campaign. 

The state has had a major 
stake in Bull since 1983 but in 
the ensuing decade the com- 
puter industry underwent 
jolts that tripped up even the 
hardened private-sector gi- 
ants. It was hardly surprising 
that a heavily subsidized be- 
hemoth like Bull was even less 
nimble. 

In the meantime. Bull had 
become not only a liability 
and an embarrassment for the 
European Commission, which 
has had to approve the subsi- 
dies. but for the French state, 
which has had to ask for them. 

“They have reached the 
bottom of the barrel in terms 
of the availability of govern- 
ment funding that is permissi- 
ble by the European Commu- 
nity.’"' said lan Macleod. an 
analyst with Natwest Securi- 
ties. 

The French government, 
long willing to brave interna- 



tional criticism over its subsi- 
dies in order to maintain glob- 
ally sized players in high- 
visibility industries, has conic 
to the realization that the 
computer world and its tech- 
nology no longer can be 
bound by borders, analysts 
said. This has made it both 
more difficult and less rele- 
vant to have a national flag- 
ship. 

“At one time, France was 
interested in having an inde- 
pendent capacity in micro- 
electronics, not only for image 
reasons but for strategic and 
defense reasons,” said Pierre 
Boucheny. an analyst with the 
brokerage Fcni SA in Paris. 

“But now microelectronics 
has become an industry in 
which marketing is the key. A 


The company 
expects to make an 
operating profit 
for V 


lot of technology is available 
to everyone and a lot of Bull's 
technology is coming from 
other foreign companies in 
any case.” 

Bull looked steadily more 
expendable as other French 
companies, like Air France, 
needed major infusions. 

“The point has come where 
choices have to be made,” said 
Mr. Macleod. “When you 
look at the comments from 
the French government, that 
is very much the message ” 

The government made its 
move late last year when Min- 
ister of Industry Gerard Lon- 
guet appointed Jean-Marie 
Descarpe runes as chairman. 

Mr. Descarpentries, who en- 
gineered creative turnarounds 
elsewhere in France, has over 
the last year made misc en ten- 
sion a buzz phrase in the French 
business press, referring to his 
campaign to subject each or the 
company’s operations to a high 
degree cif scrutiny and pressure 
in a bid to shake up bureaucrat- 
ic fiefdoms that had taken form 
over the previous decade. 


Last month he said frit 
would like the govemmeot 
reduce its stake in the comp% 
ny to a maximum of 10 pe^.. 
cent from the current 76 p»= 
cenl. 

He also forecast . that 

would repeat an 

profit for 1994 and return-^ 
net profitability in the MCGjgy 
half of 1 995. The fact that #5 " 
company had narrowed its tsst 
loss in the first half of 1994® 
843 million French frauds 
(S160 million) from 1.98 
lion francs a yew earlier gtee 
credence to the predictionae- 

“Our turnaround is bdhpl 
us,” he said confidently. ^ ■; 

Analyst’s are intrigued bar . 
wanr. . _ 

They generally commend 
the initiatives of Mr. Descar* 
pennies on two major counts^ 
he is not doing the easy thing 
by simply cutting staff across 
the board and he is playing ro. 
a long-time strength of Bulk 
the company’s openness-fo co^ 
operation with other Fuias. 

Although the staff has been 
cut significantly worldwide;- 
Mr. Descarpentries has taken 
particular care .to focus, on 
management ranks. 

“The new management' 
team rejected the traditional 
turnaround methods of mas*- 
sive global staff reductions' 
and of immediately. . halting 
activities that were tosihg 
money since some of those ac-gi 
tivilies are businesses ’. that-; 
may be imjportant for the fu-£ 
ture.” said Mr. Oertel. 

Bull has also embarked on a>« 
conspicuous string of- alB- : 
ances. In addition to longer^ 
standing links with Interna^ 
tional Business Machine!*' 
Corp., NEC Corp. of Japan 
and France Telecom, the com- 
pany has forged new accords <] 
this year with Motorola Corp., r - 
Tandem Computers InG. and ’ 
Wang Laboratories Inc. - yf. 

The real task for Bull is tio> 
turn around market sentiment 
and this may prove substan- 
tially harder than turning 
around results. 

“Things are clearly improv- 
ing but it will be a major chal- 
lenge to convince financial 
markets that Bull represents 
an attractive long-term invest- 
ment," said Mr. Macleod. 


Y 




Framatome Looks East for Growth 


Continued from Page 17 

because it would be impossible 
to build reactors fast enough to 
cover their needs, but nuclear 
power is definitely going to be 
pari of the mix,” he said in a 
recent interview. 

In France itself, Framatome 
— which became the producer 
of the standard reactor adopt- 
ed by France after the 1973-74 
energy crisis — is expecting a 
surge in orders soon, as the 
state electricity monopoly buys 
a new generation of improved 
reactors for its power stations. 

Despite this, Framatome 
□ow faces a threat from its own 
government: privatization — 
in practice, a euphemism for 
selling it to Alcatel Alslhom. 
France's largest private com- 
pany, which incorporated 
GEC, Framatome’s smaller ri- 
val before being privatized in 
1986. 

Although Mr. L&ny is too 
loyal to publicly criticize his 
own main shareholder, he 
clearly believes Framatome 
should be left to pursue its own 
specialty and not be sold — 
along with its fat bank account 


— to a conglomerate with an- 
other industrial agenda. 

“As long as this company is 
in the hands of investors who 
want to go on making profits in 
the nuclear industry, Frama- 
tome will be a success,” Mr. 
Leny said in the interview just 
as the privatization issue was 
coming to a Head. 

Government financial ex- 
perts contend that Framatome 
is too small — with 7.000 em- 
ployees worldwide and annual 
sales of 17 billion francs — io 
bold its own in today's global 
market. Many government in- 
dustrial strategists in Paris ar- 
gue that Framatome needs to 
act more like an ordinary com- 
pany and that the atom, in a 
post-Cold War world, is a com- 
modity like any other. 

In addition. Alcatel Alslhom 
executives contend that Fra- 
maiome is too small to handle 
its important joint venture 
with Siemens AG intended to 
design an advanced nuclear re- 
actor intended for export. 

Framatome executives insist 
that they deal on an equal foot- 
ing with Siemens because they 
have the technical know-how 
and corporate agility to cope 


high-tech sector. Even though 
Framaione does not handle 
any military projects, its suc- 
cess is often attributed to a 
quasi-missionary corporate 
culture that could never be sus- 
tained in an ordinary big busi- 
ness. 

“This is not a regular com- 
mercial market, we are not Re- 
nault or Bull competing in a 
consumer market,” a Franta- 
tome executive said. 

The privatization threat to 
Framatome has receded in re- 
cent months, partly because 
Alcatel Alsthom has had trou- 
bles enough of its own, partly 
because the government want- 
ed to avoid a potentially em- 
barrassing debate ahead of 
presidential elections next 
year. 

The delay also defused the 
displeasure at Siemens, which i •; 
competes directly with Alcatel 
Alsthom over telephone sys- 
tems and high-speed trains. It 
had no wish to see its rival gain 
a nuclear monopoly. 

JOSEPH F1TCHE7T is on the 
staff of the International Herald 
Tribune. 


Drive for Electric Cars 


Continued from Page 17 

electricity. Gasoline for lhaL 
distance would cost her four or 
five times as much. She drives 
the car an average of 30 kilo- 
meters a day. 

Mr. Bureau, who is the La 
Rochelle project boss, says 70 
percent of the urban driving in 
La Rochelle comes to less than 
five kilometers a day. 

In environmental terms, the 
electric car is the obvious win- 
ner over such short distances. 
Gasoline-powered cars pollute 
the most when they are cold, 
before the engine lias reached 
maximum efficiency. But elec- 
tric cars are efficient from the 
moment the key is turned, in 
addition, the electric car is usu- 
ally recharged at night, during 
a lull in electricity consump- 
tion. 

Critics of the electric car 
point out that the vehicles do 
pollute, not from a tailpipe, 
but from the smokestack where 
the electricity is produced. 
This is true in countries that 
rely heavily on fossil fuels for 
their electric production. In 
France, however, 90 percent of 
electricity is produced at either 
nuclear or hydroelectric plants, 
making the country ideal, in 
terms of air pollution, for the 
electric car. 

Where the planned French 
models fall snort is in their 
range. But, as Mr. Bureau as- 
serts, “The electric car is an 
urban vehicle.” 


And as for price: “Our 
goal," Mr. Bureau says, “is to 
sell an electric car for the some 
price as Lhe corresponding gas- 
powered model — without' the 
battery, that is.” 

This would put it at about 
60,000 francs, plus S1G0 a 
month for the battery. 

“The sticking point for the 
electric car is the battery,” said 
Laurent Bernard, Renault's 
electric-car project director. 
“All the other parts we know 
how to make because of our 
experience with gas- powered 
cars. But the battery is the 
problem.” 

Renault and Peugeot-Ci- 
iroen both use nickel cadmium 
batteries manufactured by Saf t 
SA, a unit of Alcatel Alsthom 
SA, the French electrical-engi- 
neering concern. Each electric 
car is fitted with a battery that 
weighs a startling 250 kilo- 
grams. Both car manufacturers 
are offering to lease the bat- 
tery, which, if bought, would 
significantly raise the price of 
the vehicles. 

“As batteries evolve," said 
Mr. Barber of the U.S. Energy 
Department, “you have the op- 
tion of putting the same mass 
battery in and getting greater 
range or reducing the battery- 
mass and accepting the range 
you have. Those arc the trade- 
offs.” 


THOM4S FULLER is on the 
staff of the International Herald 
Tribune. 


Auto’s Silence 
Poses a Danger 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Drivers of 
electric cars have 
noticed a problem 
that could easily 
have been overlooked on 
the test circuit: the cars’ si- 
lence. 

Ray Hutton of Car & 
Driver magazine, who test- 
drove a Citroen AX Electri- 
que in La Rochelle, WTpte 
that the car was so quiet 
that “regular use of the 
horn was needed to avoid 
collisions with unsuspect- 
ing pedestrians in the 
town’s center.” 

Peugeot Citnjttn says it 
plans to install a “buzzer” 
in its new electric models, 
complementing the existing 
horn, which it says is too 
loud for city driving. 

But silence, says Noel 
Bureau, head of the La Ro- 
chelle project, has its ad- 
vantages: “We've found 
that people who drive the 
electric car are much more 
aware of pedestrians.” 

ChaotaJ Vetter, one oF 
the La Rochelle residents 
who rents a Peugeot 106 
Electrique, agrees. “1 was 
surprised to see that my re- 
actions were far more cour- 
teous than before,” she 
said. “Likeletting pedestri- 
ans cross in front of me. 
Things like that, without 
even thinking about it.” 










Technology Changes Thinking. 

Our Thinking Changes Technology. 



W hen man invented the airplane, the 
world shrank. When he invented 
radiocommunications, military 
thinking was revolutionized. When he 
discovered the means to jam the 
signals, it was time to think again. 
Technology has been changing man's 
thinking for a long time. Several 
million years ago necessity drove our 
remote ancestors to make tools. To 
control the complex movements of the 
hand, the brain evolved. With his 
better brain man developed better 
tools - and a still better brain. The 
process was interactive. Technology 
changed his thinking. His thinking 
changed technology. 

At Thomson-CSF we're continually 
stretching our minds to improve the 
tools man uses. Every year we spend 
over 20 percent of our revenue to 
enhance our systems and develop new 
technologies - in both defense and 
civilian electronics. 

A considerable part of our RS-D 
efforts goes to creating better 


software, the key component that 
masterminds all our systems.ln 
artificial intelligence development, for 
instance, we're doing a lot of hard 
thinking about thinking itself, 
investigating, among other things, 
how the brain recognizes shapes. Just 
one example of the kind of sharply 
focused, product-oriented research 
that's basic to our determination to 
keep Thomson-CSF on the cutting 
edge. Technologically - and 
competitively. 

The result of our endeavors is pure 
synergism. One advance leads to 
another. The more we improve 
technology, the more technology 
we improve. 

Tftomson-CSF: 173, bd H aussmann 
75415 Paris Cedex 08- France 


O THOMSON-CSF 

World-Class Electronics 



I if 







Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


SPORTS 


f Hongs’ Yets 
Trip Up Green 
Giants, 27-10 

The Associated Press 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jersey — 
Anthony Parker and Warren Moon 
showed prize prospect, Dave Brown, that 
he still has a lot to Ieam about life in the 
National Football League. 

After Brown engineered a 94-yard drive 
that sent the New York Giants into half- 
time with a tie, Parker struck four plays 
into the third Quarter, returning an inter- 
ception 44 yards for a touchdown chat led 
to the Minnesota Vikings to a 27-10 vic- 
tory on Monday night. 

Moon, with 154 NFL starts to Brown's 
five, was 23-of-34 for 299 yards and a 
touchdown pass, picking apart the New 
York defense with the precision that 
Brown has yet to leam. Qadry Ismail 
caught seven of those passes for 117 yards. 

“I knew the minute 1 stepped in and 
intercepted it that 1 was going to score,” 
Parker said. 

The interception came after Brown, who 
also had a ball picked off that set up 
Minnesota’s first touchdown, had tied the 
score at 10 with a three-yard run that 
capped a drive that began on the Giants’ 6- 
yard-line with 1 :27 left in the first half. 

It alone demonstrated why the Giants 
decided to give him their starling job and 
release veteran Phil Simms. Brown was 6- 
for-8 for 91 yards in the drive. 

But on New York's first series of the 
second half, his inexperience showed 
when, without looking, he passed into the 
flat and hit Parker perfectly in stride. 

Moon threw to Cris Carter for a 20-yard 
TD late in the period to make it 24-10. 
Brown finished 18-for-36 for 226 yards, 
with three interceptions. 

Minnesota remained tied with Chicago 
atop the NFC Central The Giants, on the 
night when Lawrence Taylor's “56” jersey 
was retired, lost their second straight 


BOARD 




-g. \ 




’■0 t 


A 


I 












* • V ... 

✓ ; 


rimntbvCUn/Apncr France- Pna»c 


Tight end Andrew Jordan was upended before he could score for the Vikings. 


ou*: 3 vi 

i — Sir* 


Aslan Games 


BASEBALL 
China 16. Thailand 1 
Totem 20. Monootla 0 

BOXING 

Semifinats 

FeatbametBltt: ZaWham Mascd. Paki- 
stan def. ErfcConay, pnftta>fnu,2S-24; Sam- 
toefc Kamstao, Thailand. det Nemo Michel 
BahorL Indonesia. 11-7. 

LMWWdtarvBMt: ReynaWoGailda.PMl- 
Ipptaexdef. Pomdxii Thansburan, Thailand. 
1M; Usnun UBah Khcn Paklsiaa deL Boiat 
Ntasymbetav. Kazakhstan, detautl. 

UaMMlddlwetolit: Pan Pena, China, dot 
MahomacIGhrosJ Tel four, 5 vt1o. 1M, Konat- 

befcOiooctfoev.iCca jfc liata vs fricpcdSuttietm 

Wangsuntorn. Thai land. 0:40. 2nd round. 

Utah! Hw m l iM : A. Pourtaghi Gftush- 
dik, Iran, deL Lakha Singh. India, 1*4; Ko 
Youno-sonv 5cutti Korea, del Vasili Jlrov, 
Kazakhstan. 17-W. 

Sapor Heavyweight; Oies Mascoev, Uzbek- 
istan, stopped Rai Kumar Sangnan, India. 
1:50.2nd round; M. Samadl KaHdwon. Iran. 
stuuw ed SHorash Khan, Pakistan, 0:02. 2nd 
round. 

FIELD HOCKEY 
Women 

Incflo 7, smoapon 0 
Japan 1. Uzbekistan o 
South Korea 2. Chino l 

HANDBALL 

Women 

Japan 27. China 26 

SOCCER 

Man 

South Korea 31 Japan 2 
Otlna Z Saudi Arabia 0 
Uzbekista n 3. T w t aw e nlzton 0 
Kuwait Z United Arab Emirate* 1 
TENNIS 


Loander Pobl Indta (U.deL SuwandUndo- 
nesta 10), 6-1, 64; Pan Bine, China (2). del. 
Yasufuml Yamamoto. Japan (7). 6-2. 6-4; 
Yoon YonaJLSowfh Korea Ul.OttOleaOaor- 


odav. Uzbekistan (4). 4-3, 7-5; Benny Wllava 
Indonesia* Ol.deL Shin Han-elMoL South Ko- 
rea (5). 5-7. 64. 06. 

Chen LL Chino, def. War® Shl-rfna, Taiwan 
(4L6-Z7-5; Naoko So w ama Hu , Japan Q),det. 
Tamar Ine Tanasuoanv Thalftmt 6-z, 6-2. 
TRACK AND FIELD 
Men 

NO Meters: l.Talal Monsoar, Qatar. 10.18.Z 
Vitaly Savin. Kazakhstan, HL2»;1 Chen Went 
hanp. China. 10JX 

Lapp Jump: 1, Huong Gens, China 024 me- 
ters; Z Huang Booting, China. 8.12; X Kon- 
stantin SaraatskL Uzbekistan. 8.10. 

W M e t er Hardies: 1. Sltunfl Karabe. Jo- 
pcei.4V.l3; Z YasMhDc a Salta. Japan. 4V.1J; X 
All I small Date Qatar, 49.56. 

women 

100 Me t er Hardtes: l.Otoa Chlchlglna. Ka- 
zakhstan, 12M; X Zhou Honsvong, China. 
1X87; X Zftana Yu, China. 120ft 
2M Meters: 1, Wono Huet-clwn. Taiwan. 
2U4; X Susan thUta Javoslnghe. Sri Lanka. 
2157; X Darsha K. DamayantM, Sri Lanka 
2X41. 

3000 Meters: l.Zhano LWilLCWnaB:5XW: X 
Harvml H koroma. Japan. 0:5X74; XLuOu, 
Chirm. 8:5X68. 

Heptattlap: XSheaa Ghada Syria, 6JN0; X 
Zhang Xtaahut Oikta, XWO; X mo ClKHdm. 
Taiwan. £786. 

Modem Pentathlon— lndhrldpal: i. Kim 
Mvung-guiu5Qutn Korea, 5i329;X Alexandra 
Paryglne, Kazakhstan, £327; X Kim Ml-seob. 
South Korea 5,16a 

Team: 1. Kazakhstan. 1*493.2. South Korea, 
l&an. X Kyrgyzstan, 15JH4L 4, China 14453. X 
Mm 14J45. 

VOLLEYBALL 

Men 

Kazakhstan Oef. Iran, 12-15, 1*9, 15-7, 15-5 
Japan dot. PaWslaa 1S-X 15-1 104 
China del. Mongolia 15-1, 15-X 15-5 
WATER POLO 
Iran IX Singapore 4 
China It, South Korea 2 
Kazakhstan n, Japan 8 

Medals Table 

Gold Silver Bronze Total 
China 100 44 26 190 

Japan » 46 fl 12 


South Korea 

35 

28 

43 

106 


West 




Kazakhstan 

16 

14 

22 

52 


w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

PF PA 

Iran 

8 

7 

7 

22 

San Diego 

5 

0 

a 

1JM0 

134 84 

Tainan 

6 

7 

74 

27 

Kansas City 

3 

2 

0 

MO 

90 00 

Uzbekistan 

3 

7 

14 

24 

Seattle 

3 

3 

0 

300 

130 86 

Syria 

3 

3 

1 

7 

LA Raiders 

2 

3 

0 

AM 

116 141 

Malaysia 

3 

1 

ID 

14 

Denver 

1 

4 

0 

300 

103 146 

Kuwait 

3 

1 

4 

8 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


Indonesia 

1 

11 

6 

18 



East 




Trkmntatan 

1 

3 

2 

6 


W 

L 

T 

PCL 

PF FA 

Mongolia 

1 

2 

1 

4 

Dallas 

4 

1 

0 

J00 

135 56 

Vietnam 

1 

2 

0 

3 

Philadelphia 

4 

1 

a 

.BOO 

127 82 

India 

1 

I 

10 

12 

N.Y. Giants 

3 

2 

o 

-600 

III 117 

Saudi Arabia 

1 

1 

5 

7 

Arizona 

1 

4 

0 

300 

49 111 

Singapore 

1 

1 

2 

4 

Washington 

I 

5 

0 

.167 

112 165 

Qatar 

1 

0 

2 

3 


Central 




Thailand 

0 

5 

8 

13 


w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

PF PA 

Hong Kong 

0 

4 

4 

8 

Chicago 

4 

2 

0 

667 

113 108 

Kyrgyzstan 

0 

2 

5 

7 

Minnesota 

4 

2 

0 

Ml 

134 95 

Philippines 

0 

2 

5 

7 

Green Bay 

3 

3 

0 

300 

107 14 

Jordan 

a 

2 

2 

4 

Detroit 

2 

4 

0 

333 

106 129 

Pakistan 

0 

1 

4 

5 

Tampa Bay 

2 

4 

0 

333 

80 118 

U. A. E. 

s 

• 1 


4 


West 




5rt Lonka 

0 

1 

1 

2 


w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

PF FA 

Brunet 

0 

0 

2 

2 

Atlanta 

4 

2 

0 

A 67 

i3B m 

Nepal 

0 

0 

2 

2 

San Francisco 

4 

2 

0 

Ml 

154 131 

Burma 

0 

0 

1 

1 

LA Rams 

2 

4 

0 

333 

84 109 

Macao 

Q 

0 

1 

1 

New Orleans 

7 

4 

a 

333 

97 138 

Tallklstan 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Monday's Gama 




Minnesota 77, New York Giants 10 


■fi •; yv; • - ■v.-wsv 

NFL Standings 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


CFL Standings 


Buffalo 

Miami 

New England 
N.Y. Jets 
Indianapolis 


Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Houston 

Cincinnati 


East 

W L T Pet. PF PA 

4 2 0 ,667 117114 

4 2 0 .667 160 127 

3 3 0 300 158 159 

3 3 0 .500 92 105 


Central 

W L T Pci. PF PA 

4 1 D 800 111 58 

3 2 0 .600 100101 

1 4 0 300 79 m 

0 5 0 BOO 78 >29 


Eastern Dhrtsioa 
W L T 
x -Betti more 10 4 o 

Winnipeg ID 4 0 

Taranto S V 0 

Ottawa 4 10 0 

Hamilton 3 11 0 

Shreveport 0 14 0 

Wesfeni Dhdstan 
Cotaary 12 2 0 

Brtt.Colvnibla 10 3 1 

Edmonton 10 4 0 

Sacramento 7 8 l 

Saskatchewan 7 7 0 

Las Vegas 5 9 0 

x-cJ Inched Playoff berth 

Monday's Game 
Cotaary 28, Ottawa 24 


PF PAPtS 
437 341 20 
512 416 20 
402 486 10 
396 605 8 
340 43V 6 
241 541 0 

551 277 24 
478 339 21 
407 328 X 
346 381 15 
375 366 14 
395 441 10 


A 


■ 

LA- "Vi -. 




Inicmarional Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — The world is a funny old 
place in which to make a living, and 
soccer reflects its peculiarities to a tee. 
Take the case of two World Cup goalkeep- 
ers, Claudio Taffarel of Brazil and Packie 
Bonner of Ireland. 

As experienced sportsmen, they know 
the loneliness and the vicariousness of 
han g in g around between the goalposts. 
But who would believe that Taffarel, a 
World Cup winner barely three months 
ago, would today have no team to play for? 
Or that Bonner, whose calamitous error 
ended his nation's participation in the 
Same World 

taincy of Ire- 
land for its European Championship qual- 
ifying match against Lichtenstein in Dub- 
lin on Wednesday. 

Taffarel is 28, the prime of goalkeeping 
life. He went about his work with unruf- 
fled reliability at the World Cup, generally 
unheralded for maintaining the last line of 
defense while Romirio and Bebeto got the 
plaudits for shooting Brazil to the title. 

He then returned to Italy, where his 
club, Parma, pays his wages but does uot 
need his services. In fact, in the final year 
of his contract, Parma told Taffarel not to 
even bother joining in its training sessions. 
So Taffarel keeps trim training with Reg- 
giana, the club which employed him on 
loan last season but also, for the moment, 
has no place for his talents. 

Hungry for action, he turns out for a 
church team in the northern town of Reg- 
gio Emilia. But Taffard is too much of a 
sportsman to keep goal for the bretheren. 
“It wouldn't be fair to the other teams," he 
said, “for me to play as a goalkeeper.’' 

Taffarel, a proud and decent human 
being, is being treated as a pawn in the 
Italian game of acquiring more imported 
chattel than can be fielded, and so is wast- 
ing his talent 

Bonner, meanwhile, can scarcely believe 
his luck. Never did he make such a hash of 


trying to save a shot as he did against the 
Netherlands at the World Cup . And he, 
like Taffarel, returned to chib soccer to be 
told he was surplus. Glasgow Celtic ap- 
pears to think that, at 34, Bonner has had 
his day. How. then, could Ireland recall 
him and honor him so? 

Alan Kelly, the younger Irish goalkeeper 
who expects to replace Bonner, broke a 
fin ger , an everyday mishap in the trade. 
That opened the door for Bonner, for the 
older man’s 78th time between the posts 
for Ireland. And the captaincy? 

“It's just a fantastic honor,” said Bon- 
ner. 

Fantastic indeed It came about when 
Jack Chariton, Ireland's impulsive team 
manager, was muring in the bar of a Dub- 
lin hotel the other day. He was asked by 
journalists who would lead the team in the 
absence of the regular skipper, the injured 
Andy Townsend* 

“Until you mentioned it,” Chariton re- 
plied, “I hadn't given it a thought” 

The group got to listing Ireland's most 
experienced campaigners. Paul McGrath, 
suggested the journalists. “It won’t be 
/urn,” responded Big Jack. 

McGrath is a lovely feller, a walking 
miracle on knee joints that for years have 
been too crippled to permit him any train- 
ing. He is a leader by example, but be is 
partial to Guinness and has a habit of 
going AWOL when the team needs him 
most 

Someone then mentioned Bonner. “Aye, 
we’ll give it to Packie,” said Chariton. 
“That will be nice.” 

I N THE EXPOSED WORLD which 
Taffarel and Bonner inhabit there are 
not too many managers who think of nice 
gestures. Not many are relaxed enough, 
fulfilled enough, in a position to be human 
enough to forgive the mistake of a goal- 
keeper which betrayed the effort and the 
as^rationof^a World Cup. Fn . ^ 

Wednesday takes the field in a friendly 
match against Romania. It offers two ex- 
amples of being able to forgive if not - 
entirely forget past deeds. 


I.;- e f- 3 ; jlh 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Coventry X Ipswkn 0 
stoMUotn: Newcastle 21 petals. Notting- 
ham Forest 21. Block bum IX Liverpool 17. 
Manchester Unftad IXaidsea JS. Southamp- 
ton IX Norwich 15. Leeds 14. Tottenham IX 
Manchester City IX Anenal It. West Ham II. 
Aston VI Iks V. Wimbledon 9, Sheffield Wednes- 
day 9. Coventry 9, Queens Pot Rangers 7. 
Crystal Palace 7, tpswtdi 7. Leicester 6. Ever- 
ton X 


1WS DAVI5 CUP DRAW 
Wortd CraefL First Round 
United States vs, France 
Italy vs. Czech Republic 
Denmark Vi Sweden 
Austria vs. Spain 
South Africa vs Australia 
Belgium vs. Russia 
Switzerland vs. Netherlands 
Germany vs. Croatia 
Mu tc hes to be ployed F ebr u ary VS. 

Earn/ African 2ea& Flrsf Round 
Group One 

Morocco vs. Romania 
Hungary vs. Portugal 
Slovenia vs. Zimbabwe 
Norway vs, Israel 
To be played March ll-AprO X 
Group Two 
Lithuania vs. Luxembourg 
Nigeria «x Poland 
Ghana vs Ireland 
ivory Coast vs Finland 
Belarus vs Ukraine 
Estonia vs Latvia 
Egypt vs Monaco 
Slovakia vs Britain 
To be ployed April tut 

Ameri cm Zone, First Round 
Group One 

Venezuela vs Uruguay 
Argentina vs Chile 
Brazil vs Bahamas 
Mexico vs, Peru 


To be played February 34, 

Group Two 
Ecuador vs Cuba 
Guatemala vs Bolivia 
Paraguay vs Coiambta 
Halil vs Canada 
To be played r s ivu nr M, 

Asia/ Ocean Zone. First Round 
Gram One 

New ZeoUmd vs Taiwan 
South Korea vs Indonesia 
Philippines vs Japan 
India vs Hang Kang 
To be played February W 
Group TW« 

Pakistan vs Chino 
Thailand vs Malaysia 
Qatar vs Uzbekistan 
Sri Lanka vs Kan 
To be oiayed Feoreary XX 


BASEBALL 
American League 

SEATTLE— Activated Greg Hibbard and 
Ted Power, pitchers. from 60-davdbabled list 
and Chris Baste and Shawn Bask te. Pilchers, 
tram 15-day disabled list. Designated Power 
far esstanmenf. Announced Ifwf Keith Mi Wf 
el I, outftekler, refused an outright assignment 
to Calgary. FCL ond has elected to become a 
free agent. Announced they did not otter a 
contract to Sammy Ellis, pllchine coach. 
Named Matt Sinatra, coadb and Bobby Cuel- 
lar. Pitching coach. 

TEXAS— Named Doug Mefvta general 
manager. 

National League 

CHICAGO— Named Ed Lynch general 
manager. Sent Todd Haney. In tl etdcr. Mike 
Maksudkta.catctwr-infleider.and Rafael No- 
voa.pl tcher.lo kmaAA. Activated Mike Mor- 
gan, Ditcher, ond Kevin Roberson, outfielder, 
from the 154ov disabled Ihf and Jose Guz- 
man and Anthony Young, pitchers from the 
60-day disabled list. 

HOUSTO N - - Named Jesse BarfteM outfield 
coach. Announced Matt Gaiante. third base 
coach, Mel Slottiemyre. pitching coach. Julio 
Linares bullpen coach, and Steve Henderson, 
bitting coach, wbi return tor the 1995 season 


LOS ANGELES— Named Mike Sdooda 
roving catching instructor for rhetr minor 
league affiliates Jim Gatf. pitcher, refused a 
minor league ass i gn m ent and elected to be- 
come a tree agent 

PITTSBURGH— Named Mara Hill manag- 
er aid Jim Blbbr pitching coach of Lynch- 
burg. Carolina League. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Put Bud Black, pBch- 
ar; while McGee and Dave Martinez. au9- 
netden; ana Todd Be n z taper, first baseman, 
on waivers for purpose of sending them out- 
flow to Phoenix. PCL. 

BASKETBALL 

mnteonl Basketball Association 

ATLANTA— Stoned Sergei Bazimevfch. 
guard, to 1-year contract. 

BOSTON— Agreed to terms wMft Rk* Fox. 
forward, on 6-year ca nl rocL 

DALLAS— stoned RoyTon>tey,center.ta4- 
year con tract ond Morton Wiley, guard, ta 1- 
year contract 

DENVER— Signed aw Levtngston, forward. 

DETROIT— Stoned - Johnny* Dawkins, 
uuard. 

GOLDEN STATE— Signed Rad H too Ira and 
Oavld tmxxi, forwards Announced eote of the 
lean toChristotfrer Cchan. effective January 
1 V9X pending the approval oflhe NBA's Bawd 
Of Governors. 

LOS ANGELES— Stoned Malt Ftoi and 
Robert Wenkxwu centers, ond Stephen 
T h o m pson, guoni. 

MIAMI— Re-sianed Keith Asktra, ward. 
Stoned Chucfcv Brawn and Andre Spencer, 
forwards, ond Ledetl Eackles. Jerome Har- 
man. Steve Henson aid Kevin PrttchaU 
guards. Stoned Khalld Reeves. auonL to mul- 
tiyear contract. 

NEW JERSEY— Stoned Erie "Sleepy" 
Floyd, ward. 

ORLANDO— Stoned Brooks Thomason, 
guard. 

PHILADELPHIA Wai ved Jahnnv Daw- 
kins, ward. Agreed to terms wllti Dona Bar- 
ns. guard, on Wear contract Signed Derrick 
Alston, forward. Invited Lloyd Dontets, tor- 
ward. to traintag canto. 

SAN ANTONIO— Released Demetrius Co- 
lip and Matt OTttck. guards. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Shawn Ketrw, forward, 
to multiye ar contra c t signed DontontoVWng- 
flekl and Paul Graham, forwards. 


Captaining Finlan d for the first tilDC is 
Jus career is the Arsenal defender Tony 
A dams . He, as every newspaper has not 
faile d to mention, is the first man ever to 
lead England out at Wembley after serving 
a jail sentence. 

Adams’s crime was drunk-driving- His 
car mounted a pedestrian sidewalk and hit 
a wall four years ago while he was three 
tinre over die legal alcohol limit. He did 
his hW, served 57 nights in custody, and 
by his own admission was kept awake on 
some of them fearing England’s elders on 
the Football Association might never al- 
low him to wear the white shirt again. 

Not only did they relent, they uttered 
not a murmur when Terry Venables, the 
England coach, announced that Adams, a 
patriot and an upright example of the 
winning ethic, would be granted the high- 
est honor in the English game. 

F orgive, and forget. Anghd 

Irodanescu, the Romanian coach 
whose World Cup success this summer 
earned him promotion from colonel to 
general in the Romanian Army, humor- J, 
ously wonders how much forgiveness there *' 
is in Venables’s heart. “I think Terry Vena- 
bles will remember me,” Irodanescu said 
with a smile. 

They met in 1986, when Steaua Bucha- 
rest beat Barcelona on a penalty shootout 
in the European Cup final Venables was 
coach at Barcelona, Iordanescu was a re- 
tired midfielder, or so Venables thought 
“I became assistant coach with Steaua,” 
recalls Iordanescu, “and was sent to spy on 
Barcelona before our clubs met in tbe 

final. 

“I don't know about Teny Venables, 
but their players were certainly surprised 
when a few weeks later I took off my suit 
and put cm my playing shirt against them.” 

The wOy Romanian, a late substitute, 
helped deny Venables’s team and thus 
frustrated the Englishman's career with 
Barcelona. 

It is a small, and strange, world. 

fob fhqfin a m rtf naff gf The Tana. 


Tnumr 


NHL’s Board Assessing 
Ptoj^ers’ New Proposal 

NEW YORK (AP) — The 
NHL’s board of governors was 
meeting Tuesday with Commis- i 
rioner Gary Bettman to assess^ 
the latest contract proposal 
from the players union. 

The governors were expected 
to determine if the NHL can 
open its season on Saturday, 

Bettman's targeted restart date. 

Frank McGuire Dies; 

Coach of^ ’57 Champion 

COLUMBIA, South Caroli- 
na (AP) — Frank McGuire, 
who todk two different schools 
to the NCAA championship I B.4 
game and helped bring big-time ! mb' 

basketball to the South, died at ! 1^ 
his home Tuesday after a long m 
illness following a stroke. He 
was 80 years old. 

McGuire coached North 
Carolina to tbe NCAA champ ; - 
onship in 1957, beating Wilt 
Chamberlain's Kansas team in 
triple overtime, 54-53. He had 
taken St John’s to the 1952 
championship game, bat the 
Redmen lost to Kansas, 80-63. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



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CALVIN AND HOBBES 





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To our roodors in Bortln 

You can now receive the IHT 
hand delivered to your home or office 
every morning on the day of publication 
Just ctdl us toll free at 0130 84 85 85 


GARFIELD 


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A MEDIC \ l 


OTKIatE TNES ME 
FOR GWWED.' NO0OOT 
PWS AW ATTENTION 
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IS IT TOO MUCH TO K5K 
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APPREtlATON?/ 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 


Page 21 



SPORTS 


100 Mark Set Again 
By Qatar’s Mansoor 


fe# » Him. *Vl 

.)!.,! ■ a!, a"U!| Le j W 


The Associated Press 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — Qa- 
tar's Talal Mansoor defended 
ins title as Asia's fastest human 
and a 14-year-old Malaysian 
won a yachting gold -medal 
Tuesday as China’s gold-medal • 
pace slowed somewhat in the 
Asian Games as h took only 
one of (he day’s four women’s 
track events, and one of the 
three men’s. 

Syria's Sbeaa Ghada cl riw ri 
the title of best aH-roand ath- 


"'“..Hi,, 

$P***a\ :fv ii Ru,,!,,f i ijH 

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^rv :i!!l _ u ^ 

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lete by winning the seven -event 
heptathlon, while South Ko- 


rea’s Kim Myung Gun won the 
modern pentathlon, which 
combines competition in fenc- 
ing, running, swimming, shoot- 
ing and riding. 

Singapore captured its Gist 
.gold of the games, in yachting. 


games record because it was 
wind-aided. As expected, its 
powerful contingent of distance 
runners won the women’s 3,000 
meters, Zhang LmH ’s time of 8 
minutes, 52.97 seconds broke 
the games record of 8:57.12. 
■Harumi Hiroyama of Japan 
failed in a home-stretch effort 
to catch Zhang and took the 
silver in 8:53.74. 

But Olga Chichi gina of Ka- 
zakhstan edged China’s Zhou 
Hongyang and Zhang Yu in the 
100-meter hurdles. The times 
were 12.80, 1187 and 1190. 

In the heptathlon, Syria’s 
Ghada piled up 6,360 points, 
beating the games record of 
6,231. China’s Zhang Xiaofaui 
was second with 5,800. 



The 82d Tour de France 

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’95 Tour: Tailor-Made for Indurain 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — No Tours de France 
are easy but some are easier than 
others, which explains why Mi- 
guel Indurain was trying to re- 
strain a smile Tuesday. 

He faadjust seen the route for 
the next Tour, and it appears to 
be tailored for him as he seeks 
to become the first rider to win 
the world’s greatest bicycle race 
for five successive years. 

“It’s not a race just for climb- 
ers,” Indurain said. “A com- 
plete rider will win.” Who is the 
most complete rider around, a 
man who can clim b with the 
best and time-trial better than 
anybody? Big Mig, of course. 

The crowd of several thou- 
sand at the Palais des Congrts 
imcrainxHj Heraid Tnbunc agreed with his judgment that 


the winner would have to be 
more than a climber. 

Although the 82d Tour will 
d two days in the Alps and 
i in the Pyrenees, just one of 
those stages can be considered 
extraordinary: the 15th, on July 
18, which comprises six big 
climbs. They include the Peyre- 
sourde. the Aspin and tbs Tour- 
malet, aD part of the legendary 
**Cjrde of Death** in the Pyrenees. 

All the other mountain stages 
are, at their toughest, standard 
Tour fare. 

Excluding the short pro- 
logue, the two individual time 
trials play into Indurain’ s 
strength over the long haul. The 
first, the eighth stage, on July 9. 
will cover 54 kilometers (34 
miles), and the second, the 19th 
Stage, on July 22, 46 kilometers. 

Tm happy with those dis- 


tances," he said. Sitting near 
him, some of his rivals looked 
less pleased. The Spaniard has 
won the last four Tours by 
building a big lead in the first 
time uiaL staying with his Op- 
ponents as they rode each other 
into collapse in the mountains 
and then holding his lead in the 
second time trial. 

On paper, nothing looks to 
be standing in his way. The 
1995 Tour is not overly imagi- 
native or challenging. 

It wiH stan July 1 in Sl Brieuc. 
a city in the Cdtes d* Armor region 
of nonhem Brittany, with 20 
teams of nine riders each, one 
team fewer than this year. 

A team time trial of 64 kilo- 
meters is scheduled for the third 
stage. July 4. Moving clockwise 
around France and spending 
three days in Belgium, the Tour 


Mansoor’s gold also was Qa- 
nere. 


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SIDELINES 

MH.V Board 

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1 '-:n IWlRETliB. 
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»K* r^iT.-jar 


.tax's Gist acre, although it 
marked the third time he has 
won the Asian Games 100. He 
lowered the games record time 
again in doing it. 

! Taiwan was among those cut- 
ting into China's haul on the 
'track. Wang Huei-chen won the 
women’s 200 meters in a games 
record 2334 seconds. 

Ryan Han Wui Tan, the 
Asian champion, was Malay- 
sia’s 1 4-year-old champion in 
Optimist Class yachting. Ex- 
cept for a seventh-place finish 
in the last of seven races, he 
-finished no lower than third. 
The worst race does not count 
in a competitor’s total score. 

Mansoor and his rivals went 
.through five false starts before 
completing their 100-meter 
sprint He won. in 10.18 sec- 
onds, beating the 4-year-old 
games mark of 1030 and finish- 
.uig comfortably ahead of Ka- 
zakhstan’s Vi tab Savin, who 
took the silver in 1039. 

Japan’s Shunji Karube beat 
teammate Yosmhiko Salto in a 
photo finish in the men’s 400- 
meter hurdles. Both were timed 
in 49.13, beating the 8-year-old 
games record of 4931. 


China’s only men’s victory 
long ’ 


came in the 


Huang Gen£s winning 27 feet, 
4& Inches didn’t count as a 


jump, and 
imgZt. 



U.S. to Host France in Davis Cup 




Talal Mansoor, after five false starts, won easily, then said he was retiring. 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The United 
States was drawn Tuesday to host 
France in the first round of the 
1995 Davis Cup, matching up the 
two teams that played for the 
championship three years ago. 

The draw matched the other top 
seed, Germany, against Croatia, 
which will be making its first ap- 
pearance in the 16-nation World 
Group. 

The first-round matches wQl be 
played Feb. 3-5. 

The draw also sent the Canadi- 
an team to Haiti in the first round 
of regional play in the American 
Zone's Group 2. also set for Feb'. 
3-5. 

The last time the United States 
and France met, in 1991 in Lyon, 
Gny Forget and Henri Leconte led 
the Frendi to a 3-1 victory and the 
title. The Americans rebounded to 
beat Switzerland in the champion- 
ship match the following year. 

The United States and Germa- 
ny were made the top seeds by the 
Davis Cup Committee despite 
their defeats in last month's semi- 
finals. Russia, which beat Germa- 
ny, and Sweden, which defeated 
the United States will meet at 
Moscow’s Olympic Stadium in 


this year's championship on Dec. 
2-4. 

Russia and Sweden were made 
the joint third seeds, and both 
drew away matches for next year’s 
first round. Russia will visit Bel- 
gium. while Sweden drew Den- 
mark for its opening round match 
for the second consecutive year. 
Sweden won this year’s encounter 
5-0 at home. 

South Africa, making its first 
appearance in the World Group 
since 1978, drew an opening- 
round home match against Aus- 
tralia. South Africa was readmit- 
ted to the competition in 1 992, and 
has steadily worked its way in> 
through regional play to qualify 
for the top group. 

The other first round pairings in 
the' World Group are the Czech 
Republic at Italy, Spain at Austria 
and the Netherlands at Switzer- 
land. 

The host nation for each match 
is the team that played away the 
last time the two countries met, 
unless the last meeting was prior to 
1970. If the last meeting was earli- 
er, or if the teams have never met, 
the choice of ground was deter- 
mined by lot 

Haiti won promotion from the 


American Zone's Group 3 this 
year, and its match with Canada 
was determined by Iol The piece 
of paper drawn from the bowl fa- 
vored the Carribbean nation. 

A record 115 nations have en- 
tered the 1995 competition, in- 
cluding newcomers Bermuda, 
Macedonia, Moldova, Ethiopia, 
Kazakhstan and a team, represent- 
ing several island nations, to be 
called Pacific Oceania. 

Also readmitted was Yugosla- 
via, following the lifting of U.N. 
sanctions last week on sporting 
contacts with the Balkan nation. 
Yugoslavia and the six new coun- 
tries will all begin play at the bot- 
tom, in Group 3 of regional play. 

One nation, Djibouti, was 
dropped From the Ust of partici- 
pating nations after it did not en- 
ter its credentials on time, and 
Iraq’s application for readmission 
was refused because of ongoing 
U.N. sanctions. 


To subscribe in Switzerland 


juil coil, toil free, 
155 57 57 


will transit the Alps and then 
the Pyrenees before it ends in 
Paris on My 23, 

The race will be considerably 
shorter than usual about 3,500 
kilometers, or 500 less than this 
year. 

"Overall it will be much easi- 
er than this year,” said Roger 
Legeay, the direeieur sportif of 
the Gan team, based in France. 
“Shorter, two rest days, moun- 
tains no worse than usual." 

He said he thought the pro- 
file would benefit his team lead- 
er, Chris Boardman. Entering 
his second year as a profession- 
al after a record-setting career 
on the track, the Briton is still 
learning bow to deal with a long 
and mountainous stage race. 

Jean-Luc VandenbroucKe, 
the direeieur sponif of the Lot- 
to team from Belgium, agreed 
with Lcgeay. “Definitely easi- 
er,” he said. “With 500 kilome- 
ters dropped out. the riders will 
not have to work as hard.” 

Although that was also the 
feding of Jim Ocbowicz, general 
manager of the Motorola team 
from the United States, his direc- 
teur sportif, Hennie Kuiper, was 
one of the few who thought the 
race would be harder than usual. 

“The riders go right into the 
Alps after the time trial.” 
Kuiper noted. “That might 
cause trouble.” 

After the time trial, from 
Huy to Lifegc in Belgium, the 
pack will spend the next day 
Hying to the Alps and then rest- 
ing Mfore setting off on July 1 1 
over three climbs on the way to 
the resort of La Plague, 1.800 
meters (5,900 feet) up. The day 
after, three more climbs lead to 
Alpe d'Huez, 1 ,860 meters high. 

Stephen Roche, the Irishman 
who won the Tour in 1987 and is 
now retired, pointed out another 
big difficulty. “The stage in Bel- 
gium the day before the time trial 
wfl] be a miniature Li&ge-Bas- 
togne-LiSge,” he said. At least 
five of the hills in that demanding 
classic will be port of the stage. 

Beyond that, there seem to be 
no booby traps. 

“The course reminds me of 
the 1993 one," said Indurain. 
looking untroubled. He won 
that Tour easily, of course. 




Nii 

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■JJj Fore Warning: Next Great Leap Forward Witt Be in Golf 


Reuters 


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inutk MHftiirel 

( 4K>rh iif *•> «1 )e 


HIROSHIMA, Japan — If you’re, tired, 
of hearing about Chinese swimming and 
track stars, you win not be happy to hear 


tUP 1 .*: 




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ri.«» W.U' 


they’ve taken up golf. 
‘Tthii 


think in China, golf has a very good 
future," Cm Zhiqiang, secretary-general of 
Ihe China Golf Association said Tuesday. 
“It’s a sport with potential.’’ 

Cud was at the Asian Games where his 
.women’s team beat out Japan for a bronze 


medal and his top men’s player, Zhang 
moerpar over four rounds 


Jianwei, shot 3 tm 

to win a silver in the individual event. 


“This is just the beginning,” Cui said 
- The. sport was opened up to Chinese 
players 10 years ago because golf was listed 
as a medal event at the 1990 Beijing Asian 
Games. Cui, then a 23-year-old high 
school teacher, was detailed to accompany 
a group of 10 boys, aged 16 to 18, for three 
years of golf training at a course in Shiga 
Prefecture in western Japan. 

Those 10 are leading what Cui said will 
be a professional boom that has left China 
scrambling to train officials to run courses, 
tournaments and training programs. “We 
have only 10 golf courses now but 60 are 


planned or under construction," he said 

Cui has set his sights on getting a player 
onto the professional circuit in Asia and 
expanding Lhe professional base inside the 
country. “If 1 can I want to start next 
year,” he said 

Professional tournaments have already 
been held in China and next month the 
SI JZ million World Cup will be held in 
Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, just 
across the border from Hong Kong. 

The China Professional Golf Tour starts 
next year and will have four stops, the 
biggest a $400,000 tournament in Beijing. 


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Pavin Is Top-Seeded for World Match Play Golf 


The Associated Press 

VIRGINIA WATER, Eng- 
land — Defending champion 
Corey Pavin was made the top 
seed Tuesday and riven a first- 
round bye is the draw for the 

»I994 World Match Play Cham- 

,. *?* 7 pi nnfihip , which starts Thurs- 
day at Wentworth. 

Pavin, ranked No. 9 in the 
world, will play the winner of 
the first-round match between 
No. 8 seed Vijay Singh and 


Japan, Pavin conies to Went- 
worth’s West Course attempt- 
ing to become the first player to 
win die richest top prize in Eu- 
ropean golf in back-to-back 
years since Seve Ballesteros did 
so in 1984-85. 


Jesper Pamevik. 

Coming off a victory last 


ag off ^ ~ _ . . 

weekend at the Tokai Classic m 


Also receiving byes in the 
competition for the £160,000 
($252,800) winner's check were 
U S. Masters chanmion Josfe 
Maria Olaz&bal, seeded No. 2; 
Uj$- Open dhampion and third 
seed Ernie Els and two-time 
champion and No. 4 seed Nick 
Faldo. 


Seve Ballesteros, who was 
originally omitted from the 12- 
player field for the first time 
since 1976, will face the same 
it that ousted him in the 
round last year. 

Ballesteros, who shares the 
record of five Wodd Match 
Play titles with Gary Player, 
was invited to this year's event 
only after the withdrawal of 
American John Daly. Balles- 
teros will face David Frost, 
seeded No. 6, who routed the 
Spaniard, 7 and 6, last year. 

Another opening round re- 


peat involves No. 5 seed Colin 
Montgomerie, the leading mon- 
ey winner on the European 
PGA Tonr, against Yoshmori 
Mimmaki. Montgomerie won 
at the 37th bole m last year's 

op ening mstph 

The other first-round pairing 
pits No. 7 seed Ian Woosnam 
L Brad Faxon of the Unit- 
States. 


Each match consists of 36 
boles. The second round will be 
Friday, the semifinals 
lay and the championship 
match on Sunday. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 


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. informally 

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Great s horse 

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Venedig" 

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23 'The Wizard of 
Oz' producer 
Mervyn 

25 Indy champ 
Luyendyk 

26 Mr. Levant 
29 henpeck. in a 

way 

31 1966 Michael 
Came role 
34 Cicadas 
sounds 

36 L-P connection 
38 'Lohengrin' 
hetome 
39Adogsage 
40 Winter wear 

43 Blue Chip mmals 

44 Sacramento 
arena 

as Trivial Pursuit 
piece 

47 Skirmish 
4§ Sedakaand 
Simon 
SI Mouths 

53 Dennst s gas 

54 Peace Garden 

State Appr 

sc Lu>gi s ladder 

58 1957 Henry 
Fonda film vwr 
-Tne' 

61 Surfaces 
65 Latin 101 wdid 
as Dale Evans s 
horse 
88 Pasi due 
$9 C'fy SSE of 
Buffalo 

70 bre*e 

71 Kuwa>t‘ leader 

72 Ouasimcdo 5 
cna'des 


73 'Harper's 
Weekly' 
cartoonist 


DOWN 


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pop group 
a Oat 

3 ’Time" founder 
4 BnHiam 
s Fall color 

6 Sly* ferryman 

7 Up io 

8 Big turds 

9 Seed cover 
to Hospital-dean 

1 1 Tex Ritter s 
horse 

12 Top Dime ime 

13 RabDit 
18 General 

Beauregard 
22 Southern 
constellation 
24 Bellyaches 
28 Indian, for one 

27 Encvno Man 
Siar Pauly 

28 Ulysses S 
Gram ? norse 

so Wildebeest 
22 Cordage fiber 
33 Glutton 
38 Spring nser 
37 Frequently in 
poetry 

41 CruiSd port 

42 Gas station 
attendant 

45 Graycrearo 
4a i&94 sci-fi film 
so P'opped down 
52 Solvent 
55 Barbecue 
entree 

87 Solemn assents 
58 Yarn 

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& New York Times/ Edited by Will Shortz. 


Solution in Puzzle of Od. 11 

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67 Aviv 



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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1994 





OBSERVER 


I Tale of Common Scents 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK - The death 
of Harriet Nelson of “The 
Adventures of Ozzie and Harri- 
et” sent me rooting through the 
Basket of Great Ideas here on 
the desk. In this basket weird 
letters and clippings from old 
magazines and newspapers 
gather mold while waiting to 
make themselves useful. 

The search produced — Aha! 
Knew it was there! — a science 
story ripped out of the March 
1992 issue of Harper's magazine. 
The title: “Scenting a Genera- 
tion Gap.* 4 It's about the power 
of smell to evoke nostalgia. 

A consumer research study by 
Dr. Alan Hirsch asked 989 peo- 


1950s, which brings us back to 
Harriet Nelson. 


My guess is that 1950s people 
were so busy inhaling television 
that they had no space left Over 


for smelling. 1950s people seem 
ique in their 


pie, “What odor causes you to 
)le t 


become nostalgic?” People bom 
in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s 
said: Pine, roses, hot chocolate, 
fish, lilies, manure, honeysuckle, 
violets, attics, Cracker Jack, bak- 
ing bread, soap, figs, cut grass, 
bluebemes, cinnamon, ocean 
air, meadows, hay, clover, petu- 
nias, tweed, meatballs, split-pea 
soup, ftesh air and burning 
leaves. 

Those bom in the 1960s and 
19705 said the smells that made 
them nostalgic were: Play-Doh, 
chlorine, crayons, rubber fish 
bait, marijuana, tuna casserole. 
Downy fabric softener, dirt, 
smoke, airplane fuel, disinfec- 
tant, refineries, motor oil, tacos, 
SweeTARTS, Cocoa Puffs, 
urine, garbage, Windex, hair 
spray, plastic, ferns, old socks, 
dog waste, baby aspirin, feet, 
mothballs, exhaust, mosquito 
repellent, factories, nail polish, 
enchiladas, candy cigarettes, 
suntan oil, scented Magic 
Markers and burning tires. 

O 


1 cite his work only to prove 
that one generation's pine, cin- 
namon and roses is another 
generation's urine, garbage and 
old socks. There is no explana- 
tion why the study omitted 
odors that stimulate nostalgia 
among people bom in the 


unique m their devotion to the 
memory of TV sitcoms of their 
pubescent years. Members of 
the "Ozzie and Harriet” family 
still seem to them like real peo- 
ple they once knew well. 

I confess to having never seen 
the Cleavers of “Leave It to 
Beaver" on televirion, nor “The 
Adventures of Ozzie and Harri- 
et” for that matter. By the time 
they came along, however, I had 
seen a great many Andy Hardy 
movies. 

These were simple-minded 
fictions about a ludicrously ide- 
alized family, like most movies 
of their time, they existed to 
help people escape the mean 
realities of the 1930s and 1940s, 
when the aggravations of pover- 

S f and war intensified the fanc- 
y's natural tendency to be- 
come dysfunctional. 

□ 

Few sensible persons, least of 
all the children growing up in 
the Depression and war years, 
mistook the Hardy family for a 
real-life possibility or felt nos- 
talgic afterward for the bogus 
world the Hardys inhabited. 

Yet immediately after World 
War II there was indeed a ten- 
dency for mom and dad and 
their two and a half children to 
flee town and hunker down as a 
lonely self-contained unit in 
suburbs, like the sitcom fam- 
ilies. 

The explanation does not en- 
courage sentimentality. The 
postwar booms in housing and 
good jobs combined to let peo- 
ple escape cramped and depen- 
dent prewar lives which had 
tied them to extended families 
they were tired of. What the 
sitcoms idealized was an unre- 
alistic dream of escape to inde- 
pendence. 

New York Times Service 


The Japanese Everyman 


By Carol Lutfy 

N EW YORK. — “I'm famous for 
being a boxing interview,” Issey 
Ogata, the wildly popular Japanese 
actor and satirist, announces as he 
sits down to a beer with a journalist. 
“I have nothing of importance to 
say.” 

The self-introduction, though pre- 
dictably self-effacing, is no joke. One 
of Japan’s funniest, most expressive 
men on stage may be one of the least 
forthcoming in real life. Hard-work- 
ing. hard-drinking and slow-talking, 
the Tokyo-based award-winning per- 
former is, unexpectedly, a lot like the 
stifled characters he portrays. 

At 42, Ogata is known throughout 
Japan for his side-splitting, heart- 
wrenching interpretations of the 
overwrought Japanese every man. 
With one-man shows, like “Nonstop 
Life" and “A Catalogue of City 
Life," he has built a national reputa- 
tion in a country where comedy has a - 
marginal following. 

He has been performing ‘Cata- 
logue" in Paris, Munich and New 
York, where he played to sold-out 


audiences at the Japan Society. He 
has 14 videos in circulation, makes 
regular appearances in films and on 
prune- time television programs, and 
does about 50 live performances in 
Japan a year. 

Ogata's skits are populated with 
upstanding citizens who have been 
pushed too far, squeezed too hard, 
crammed once too often in a jam- 
packed subway car. It is a world in 
which people, teetering on the verge 
of revolt, divorce, defiance, chicken 
out, a culture of exasperated salary- 
men suffering from too much booze, 
lack of sleep and not enough fun. 

Since 1984, Ogata has been devel- 
oping a collage of 300 characters for 
“Catalogue," which he created with 
the director Yuzo Morita, his collab- 
orator of 23 years. “The starting 
point for the show is that there is no 
such thing as individuality in Japan," 
Morita says. "Japanese act according 
to their rank in society. Whether you 
are a section chief or an assistant 
section chief completely determines 


A blend of Robin Williams, Eric 
Bpgosian and Lily Tomlin, Ogata's 
humor dares to question the social 
conditions that have created this 
tragicomic state of affairs. He por- 
trays, for example, a haggard office 
worker who goes to a parking lot to 
meet a client and forgets why he 
came, what he does, who he is. After 
finally getting his wits about him, he 
begs to lose them again. 

We also meet a bankrupt middle- 
aged company p resident-turn ed-con- 
struction worker who retains the 
pompous elocution of his former life. 
A symbol that Japan's era of over- 
spending is still alive, he brags to his 
co-workers. “A man is only as big as 
his debt.” 

Ogata has never held a white-col- 


lar job. He gets his inspiration, he 
'on. He is unfa- 


how you raiv, how you think , what 
look 


you look like.’ 



Mskpiu Knur»jl(i 

Issey Ogata: skits about people who have been pushed too far. 


says, from observation, 
miliar with W illiams and Bogosian, 
but he admires Woody Allen. Tm a 
fan of the wacky early works, but I 
hate the serious ones," he says. 

Like so many an forms, theater 
and comedy in Japan are run largely 
through an iemoto system in which 
one studies under a master with the 
intent of learning, but never altering, 
his technique. Ogaia and Morita 
have stayed clear of this kind of sty- 
listic inbreeding. But because they 
function outside the system, they are 
relegated to off-Broadway-style the- 
aters with limited access to funding 
and publicity. 

Such built-in hardship has inhibit- 
ed talented performers from trying to 
develop their own styles, Morita 
says. “What you get instead is an 
incredibly low level of slapstick hu- 
mor where comedians get laughs by 
making fools of themselves," he says. 
“I think that many people would Uke 
to do the same land of humor as 
Ogata, but they are afraid of being 
ostracized” 

To meet Ogata is to find it difficult 
to think of Him as a r eneg ade. Small 
and slim, he is in many ways a carica- 
ture of his characters: a man who 
says he spends his free time “waiting 
for more work” and who returned a 
day early from a recent two-day trip 
with his' wife to the resort town of 
Hakone because “there was nothing 
to do.’’ 







jtirt 11 

Yeltsin 


f 
* 0 **'' 


si ut 


W-em 


JO'”"' 

V ‘.I. 

; 1. »-•*' *• .. r* 


A - * 


.4 it# 


Ogata in a scene from his “Catalogue of CStyjL^?’ 


^Mdfpto 


Bom in Kyushu, Ogata moved of- 
ten as a child bee 


because of his father’s 
work. As far back as he can remem- 
ber, he says that he was f unn y. And 
he developed his humor as a way to 
avoid the inevitable bullying that 
came every time be changed schools. 
“I learned that if I could make the 
tough guys in the class laugh," he 
recalls, ‘They would let me hang 
around with them.” 

After failing his university en- 
trance exam in the early 1 970s, Ogata 
had, by his own account, three 
choices: drop out of society, join a 


subwrswcL 

come involved frihe underground 
theater that was- -flourishing at the, 
time in JagMh. . v 7 . . 

He Chose theater jomirig Jm' Ge-r 
kijo in Tokyo when fie was 19. Et was . 
there that he met Morita and that the 
two began fce& bcffiaborauon^Badc; 
then, we were 1 interested m Hater 
and Beckett," Ogata recalls. /“We 
never dreamed- or doing comedy." 


Carol Lutfr is a Tokyfrbased free- 
lance journalist 


arts. 


who spetiaUzetin die 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 


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Forecast tor Thursday through Saturday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



#J W- 

Jew mam 


Heavy 

Stow 


North America 

A slow- moving storm in the 
Southeastern slates will 
cause Camp, cool weather 
from Atlanta through Char- 
lone late this week. To the 
north of this storm, a large 
swath of sunny, pises ant- 
weather is expected from 
Dallas to Boston. In tha 
West, rain will dampen San 
Diego and Los Angeles. 


Europe 

Much ot Europe will have 
dry. pleasant weather late 
this week Madrid through 
Nice wtl be army and warm 
Thursday into the coming 
weekend. London through 
Frankfurt and Munich wil be 
sunny with mild afternoons 
and dear, cool raghts. CoW 
weather wfl be locked north 
of Stockholm and Moscow. 


Asia 

In the wake ot Typhoon 
Seth, nice weather mil return 
lo Korea and Japan later ihis 


week. Hong Kong through 
ill have sunny. 


Manila wil 
warm weather the next sev- 
eral days Dry. seasonable 
weather in Bering Thursday 
into Friday will be replaced 
by much cooler weather the 
weekend. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 



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3545 

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27/80 1908 pc 26/79 1702 i 

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Caracaa 290* 160* pc 290* <80* pc 

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I map*. forecasts and data provided by Accu-Weather, me. « 1B94 


new yo* 

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2802 1604 i 2700 1601 PC 

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14/57 3/37 pc 12/53 307 pc 

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1844 8/40 a 1900 9M8 I 

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1609 4,39 a 1407 409 po 

16*4 7/44 a 1906 9/48 ■ 


B RITISH reporters hunting an ex-cav- 
alry officer, who went into hiding after 
the publication of a book that said he had 
had an affair with Princess Diana, tracked 
him down to a converted pigsty in the 
south of France, tabloid newspapers re- 
port. James Hewitt was branded a cad and 
a bounder by his fellow officers and politi- 
cians for allowing details to appear in the 
book “Princess in Love.” “We Find Di’s 
Swine in a Pigsty,” was the headline in the 
Sun. “Hewitt’s Pigsty Hideaway," said To- 
day and the Daily Express in hot pursuiL 
But by the time the reporters arrived 
Hewitt had lefL “He was a very charming 
man,” said Philippe Demeurissa, who con- 
vened the pigsty into a guest room to 
supplement his farm income. “But if t had 
known what he did I may have sent a few 
other pigs to keep him company.” 

□ 

Queen Noor of Jordan and Cincinnati 
Art museum officials unveiled a symbolic 
rejoining of two halves of a sculpture split 
by an earthquake in the Middle East 1,500 
ago. Tht 



ingpartoer on his new mbiie, 
Broadway." AHen win make up" 


McGrath said in an artide in New York 
magazine. Allen also wants to see what 
Farrow says in her forthcoming book. 


□* 


Irana Tramp, die former wife 6TDonaM 
Tramp, has celebrated her engagement to 
the Italian engineer Rkcardo Mmucchel 
with a party for 120 friends at a British 
mansion. The £60,000 ($95,000) party was 
attended by the actress Britt Ekhnd, the 
arms dealer Adnan Khashoggi and the Brit- 
ish tycoon Richard Branson. ^ 


□ 


TVfNca VuikTu 


Queen Noor of Jordan. 


been exchanged, allowing the sculpture to 
be displayed as if whole. 


Amy Tan isn’t an expert on immigra- 
tion, assimilation,. Tiananmen Square, 
most-favored-nation trade status, the fu- 
ture of Hong Kong after 1997 or Chinese 
cooking. The acclaimed author of “The 


years ago. The Zodiac Tyche remains apart 
— half is in Jordan’s National Archaeolog- 


ical Museum in Amman and half is in the 
Cmonnati museum. But plaster casts have 


Revenge on the big screen? Woody ABen 
is considering making a movie about his 
child custody battle with Mia Farrow, ac- 
cording to Douglas McGrath, .Allen’s writ- 


Joy Luck dab" and “The Kitchen God’s. 
We" 


doesn’t want to be boxed in as an 
Asian -American writer. “Why is it so hard 
to break out of this literary ghetto?" she 
asked on a tour to promote her new chil- 
dren’s book, "The Chinese Siamese Cat." 


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AT&T USADirect? and World Connect 9 
Service lets you quickly place calls 
on your own. 




jL. Calling the States or one of over 100 other countries? 

f. 

W* There'S no easier, more reliable way than AT&T ; 



3. f'h 


^ ' USADirect and World Connect Service. Especially if 
you take this shortcut After dialing the AT&T Access 
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ASIA /PACIFIC 
AUSTRALIA 1B0B-U1-011 


CHINA. PRC*** 
HONGKONG 
INCH*. . . 
INDONESIA* 
JAPAN'. 

KOREA 

MACAO 

MALAYSIA' 


10811 
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001-001-10 
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NEW ZEALAND . . 000-911 

PHILIPPINES' 108-11 

RUSSIA' T (MOSGOW) .155-5042 

SAlPANi 235-2872 

SINGAPORE 800-0111-111 

SNI LANKA 430-430 

TAIWAN' 8080-10288-0 

THAILAND* 00)9-991-1111 

EUROPE 

ARMENIA* ’ 8014111 


AUSTRIA-™. 
BELGIUM". . . 
BULGARIA. 
CROATIA" . 
CZECH REPUBLIC 

DENMARK' 

FINLAND’ 

FRANCE 

GERMANY 

GREECE' 



HUNGARY' 

ICELAND'S . . 

IRELAND 

ITALY' . .. . 

UEorrasTHN' 

LITHUANIA* 

LUXBBHJRG 

MALTA 

MONACO' 

NETHERLANDS'.. 


899-001 

1-800-580-000 
172-1011 
155-00*11 
. 00190 
MOQ-OT1T 
.0800*890-118 

190*0011 

.05-022-0111 


NORWAY . . . 
POLAND** 1 . 
PORTUGAL* .. 

ROMANIA 

SLOVAK REP. 
SPAIN*.... 
SWEDEN'. .. . 

swiranuND- 

UKRAINE*. . 

U Jt . . 


800*190*11 
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01-800-4288 

00-420-00101 

000-09-00-11 

. . .029-795-611 
IB* 00-11 
. . 80100-11 
. 0500-80*0011 


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MIDDLE EAST 

BAHRAIN 600-001 

CYPRUS' . . . 060-90010 

EGYPT" (CARO)' . . 310-0200 

ISRAEL 177-100-2727 

KUWAIT 800-238 

LEBANON (BEIRUT] 1 . 428-101 

SAUDI ARABIA .. .1-600-10 

TURKEY' . .00*800-12277 

U ARAB EMIRATES' 800-121 


AMERICAS 

Argentina* ooi-aDO-M-im 

BOLIVIA' 0-000-11 12 

BRAZIL 001-8010 

Canada . . . 1-800-575^22 

CHILE 000-0312 

COLOMBIA 980-11*9011 

EL SALVADOR'S 190 

HONOURASt, 123 

M0QCQ6W .. ,S5-M0-4fi2-42« 


PANAMA 

P®U f 191 

VENEZUELA'S . . . 80-911-120 
AFRICA 

GABON" 000*001 

Guam- 08111 

IVORY COAST 00-111-11 

KENW 0800-10 

LMWA 797-797 

SOUTH AFRICA .9-800-99-0120 


TnttWorleF Connections 



Altai 


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