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Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribu 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 





London, Thursday, October 13, 1994 


Ruble’s Fall 
Poses Fresh 
Political Risk 

• .4- . 

For Yeltsin 

parliament Delays Vote 
On His Request to Fire 
Head of Central Bank 

V A L; By Margaret Shapiro 


£ MOSCOW — Responding to the dra- 
matic frcef an this week of the Russian 


rt&fc, President Bods N. Yeltsin dropped 
fis finance minister, Sergo: K. Dubinin, on 
.Wednesday and demanded that Parlia- 
„ -v. dismiss the head of the Russian cen- 

wogUt 1 tif c iti | jf - qfclbank. 

As Russia's monetary crisis threatened 
Mih\r- - . . to tttm “ to ? hdtfledged political crisis 

•! “ V 1 '" 1 - nwtqaei^ for Mr- Yeltsin, the Russian leader moved 
' ihAji Ir 5 ^e distan c e himself and his policies from 

j; fiouraC? "P * tnrmo5L He suggested that the ruble’s 
ume ... a^lapse may have been orchestrated as an 

nr* Is. m*!!, cater . iol-jmw “tentional act of sabotage, and he ap- 
!i: 1 he~3{H ponded a special commission, headed by 

l wtr ilut as t!-.« sw *he director of the former KGB, to investi- 

t*"fcrju;uhc :i «S5£SS - 

•hen. w? %cic stall f ■ The Russian Paifiament, dominated by 
aftti Hcvi..;}." oLw opponents of Mr. Yehsin’s policies, sig- 
net rt urranav. o: *bat it would use the crisis to in- 





\ V 




or * ariav ‘ « doing a^j 

ltr ' • J ••'*•’ r ‘- •’ *■ 

,r •* 5r.-.nsai 


crease pressure on the gove rnm ent It set 
an Oct 21 date for a vote of no-confidence. 

It also postponed voting on Mr. Yelt- 
sin’s request that the head of the central 
■bank. Viktor V. Gerashchenko, be fired for 
failing to take timely action to shore up 
.Russia’s beleaguered ruble. Mr. Gerash- 
chenko has been un enthusiastic about 
many aspects of Mr. Yeltsin’s economic 
pedicles and for this reason free-market 
•advocates have long sought his removal 


* *••»* i:cw movie. ! - Although the ruble strengthened slightly 

tuatfu n, tvil’ *njle 'Wednesday after the central bank bdated- 

flrt 4i! j: in-. • . . r r c.‘.swyi\ began seflmg dollars, anxiety persisted. 
&*'»?<*[?-. • , n ^Mahy'dichazige pants were closecL'ah'd 

\ o-i wunsk t— .shnes, especially those dealing with im- 
atf;‘v» ■ i It? i.-nlkOTisr Parted goods, marked their prices way up. 

/Shoppers with large stashes of rubles spent 
.the day hunting for ways to unload them. 
. , In several former Soviet republics, 

omui ^ i <t?np. n - totiio wfc.j where the ruble is still in circulation, peo- 
nMp. -;.t . . pie also flooded exchange points to buy 

f. I* «• ,i. KiiVjrtki Me donar^fiarfitrly marirs. rayf ei ther fiwyign 

III < ir-- •. •! * .* ■ ;r:»-.id> a ciifhm^ics, ^oarehng teohews reports Jkje. 
m^-v. iV im.’ •i‘i.\rtiii: Mir. Y d^ni metTuesdayieve^ii^ wth 

Stthk* - Britt Uc Prime MimsterViktarS. Chehtomyrdin to 

tdiLin hhjshoixir.' discuss the stuation, accorifing to; reports 
f Ivm * - • Km ibtiri Huikm here. But theladt of Concri^e information 


l»n:: 

•ft. *-• : -ii 

Al .. 
f i'll h 

ak»nt£ H:r j 


c\prrt.-:^ 
:: i jamNES S' 


n-r atSW* 


qOT^ ^^Bc^ ^^^^ ^rqpo^ jfege; 

Prime M^wterYfttOBFS. Oiertioti^idm to 
disenss tbe situation, according to. reports 
here. But the ladt of Concrete information 
from the .Kremlin, and the conflicting re- 
ports about what had caused the ruble’s 
ooHapse/seCTed mostly to add to the feel- 

P ^ ^ ,^ gT 1 as Jost more tha^tfifcils 
vahao^^nnst the UJL .dollar l§noe the 
begmmngfbf the pionth, with the bulk of 
the faH Ji^pen^g an Monday and Tties- 



fd A 

ft'a 


„• - : :c:an 
ps.w!ehs^ 


low on Tuesday. Bat few people seemed 
confident here— ii ev«ii government experts 
~~ that the upntaod would continue very 
lon^ ‘ ! ' '■ ‘ . 

A g o v ernm ent source quoted by the 
news agency Interfax predicted that the 
ruble' would rebound by another 500 
points on Thursday because of a new re- 
quirement that all requests to purchase 
^foreign currency on the rate-setting Mos- 

See RUSSIA, Page 4 


Compiled by Our Sufi From Dispatcher 

LOS ANGELES —The filmmaker Ste- 
ven Spielberg, the Hollywood billionaire 
David Geffen, and Jeffrey Katzenberg. a 
former top executive at the Walt Disney 
Co., are joining forces to form a major 
movie studio, the three said Wednesday. 

It is an alliance of three of Hollywood’s 
top power brokers that could alter the very 
Structure of the movie business. Theirs will 
be the first major Hollywood studio to be 
Started since 1939, when 20th Century-Fox 
was created. And it is expected to compete 
head-to-head in animated films with wait 
Disney Studios. 

“Hus represents the opportunity of a 
lifetime — to j'oiu forces with two of the 
smartest and most creative talents in the 


industry,” said Mr. Katzenberg, who re-, 
cently was forced out as chairman of Walt 
Disney Studios after a bitter dispute with 
Michael D. Eisner, the chairman of the 
Walt Disney Co. 

At the same time, in a related and per- 
haps even more significant development, 
top industry sources said that Lew R. Was- 
serman. chairman of MCA Inc., and his 
No. 2, Sidney Jay Shemberg. were set to 
meet Tuesday with MCA’s owners. Matsu- 
shita Electric Industrial Co., in Japan to 
buy back their entertainment company. It 
was sold to the Japanese four years ago for 
$6.59 billion. 

If the Japanese refuse, the sources said, 
Mr. Wassennan and Mr. Shcinberg. un- 
happy with Japanese ownership, will quit. 


Alu*x\i 


11 


Kiosk 


Wider Than U.S. Revealed 


3» * '"• •' 


kb ■ “■ 




j: ■ By Rhilip J. Halts 

J-t lie*' York Times Service 

■ ^WASHINGTON — In the early years 
of t&Gahl War, & systematic effort to gain 
knowledge of the effects of radiation by 
conducting experiments cm human sub- 
jqttst was sedretfif planned at the highest 
lftvds of the U-S.jgovennnenL The number 
of q menmen ts was some 10 times larger 
- wan has been revealed until now, but there 
was also more discussion than expected on 
the ethics of the experiments. 

That is the ot^ttae of the complex pic- 

ture* being developed by the Presidents 

Cmnxnittee oo Httiruta Radiation Experi- 
i^BBjts after six rhoatiis of sifting through 
$fC~archivesof a’dozen federal agendea. 
>'the committee has bronght to light a 
ywjfth of documents about the govexn- 
nSettfs behavior — sometimes furtive, 
ymetimea ethical — r-that will force histori- 


ans to rewrite part of the history of the 
dawn of the atomic age. 

In particular, the advisory committee 
has traced the almost continual conflict 
between the military’s desire for data on 
radiation and the ethical scruples of some 
senior officials. Since no dear operating 
policy emerged, the result was that some 
ethically dubious experiments were dis- 
couraged or disapproved, while others 
went ahead. 

. Last year, after a New Mexico newspa- 
per, The Albuquerque Tribune, reported 
on a group of patients who bad been given 
high doses of radiation treatment for large- 
ly experimental purposes, Energy Secre- 
tary Hazel R. O’Leary responded by prom- 
ising to open her agency’s files, and 
President BUI Clinton later ordered the 

See RAYS, Page 4 



No. U.71S 


Jr//' 


U.S. Finds Support 
For Arms-Free Zone 

Key Allies Back Iraqi Containment, 
No UN Action Believed Necessary 


By Joseph Fitchelt 

Imemanoaal Herald Tnbuae 
PARIS — President Bill Clinton has 
been told by his senior security advisers 
that the United States can impose a demili- 
tarized zone in southern Iraq without seek- 
ing approval from the United Nations Se- 
curity Council. U.S. officials said 
Wednesday. 

These officials said the White House got 
a simple message from U.S. military and 
security policymakers: “The key allies, in- 
cluding Saudi Arabia and Britain, will be 
willing participants in a coalition ban on 
Iraqi forces near the border and the United 


Iraqi forces near the border and the United 
States has the air power there to destroy 
any armaments in violation.” 

Mr. Clinton, who has not approved such 
a policy, was reported on Wednesday to be 
wavering partly because of objections 
from other governments, including France 
and possibly Russia. 

But his senior aides insisted that, even if 
the White House was reluctant to bypass 
the Security Council, the U.S.-!ed coali- 
tion. with strong backing from the Gulf, 
could find enough authority in existing 
UN resolutions to make it untenable for 
Iraqi forces to approach Kuwait again. 

French objections, which surfaced on 
Wednesday, were brushed aside by the 
U.S. officials, who said that France had 
negligible influence in the Gulf and would 
be reluctant to mount any serious opposi- 
tion to Saudi Arabia’s wishes for U.S.-led 
action. 

Apparently intent on positioning them- 
selves favorably for future business with 
Iraq, French government leaders criticized 
the idea of creating an exclusion zone. But 
Foreign Minister Alain Juppe gave no sign 


of backing away from French insistence 
that economic sanctions remain until Iraq 
complies with UN requirements. 

Saudi officials, meanwhile, joined the 
United States in calling on other Gulf 
states to take action to prevent Iraq From 
again mussing its troops and creating what 
Washington officials call ”the yo-yo ef- 
fect” on U.S. and other forces protecting 
Kuwait. 

The United States is considering a ban 
on Iraqi Forces within 150 kilometers IS5 

In one Palestinian camp, Saddam Hinsein has 
lost Us knighthood. Pige 1 

miles) oF the Kuwaiti border. Similar 
zones, a no-go area in the Kurdish-popu- 
lated north and a no-fly zone in southern 
Iraq, have already been put into effect by- 
coalition Forces under existing UN resolu- 
tions. The Clinton administration con- 
tends that Iraq has exposed itself to new 
restrictions by violating the rules against 
threatening Kuwait 
With 150 kilometers of desert for Iraqi 
forces to cross, there would be enough 
warning time for Kuwait to defend itself 
with the help of U.S. air power. Kuwaiti 
territory would be beyond the reach of 
Iraqi artillery, including the Scud missiles 
the UN has authorized Iraq to keep. 

The U.S. air armada dispatched to the 
Gulf, while equipped to meet any chal- 
lenge from Iraqi planes, reveals an empha- 
sis on U.S. ground-attack aircraft, includ- 
ing gunships designed to fly low and slow, 
searching out tanks and other small targets 
for their armor-piercing shells. 
Diplomatically, the coalition could im- 

See GULF, Page 4 


Suilufr.. Lj.jfi'Thr .Vanoial Plr\' 


White House Continues 
Buildup Despite Retreat 


Women selling cans of baby food on a Baghdad street. UN sanctions force many Iraqis to shop on the black market. 

3 Hollywood Honchos Premiere a Studio 


leaving the studio in considerable turmoil. 

The new company created by Mr. Spiel- 
berg, Mr. Geffen and Mr. Katzenberg 
plans to produce films, animated movies 
and television programs and to launch a 
record company and an interactive enter- 
tainment venture, he said. 

Mr. Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment 
Co., which produced the recent films “Ju- 
rassic Park” and “The Flints tones,” and 
Mr. Geffen’s film unit will be merged into 
the new company. 

The new studio is to start producing 
movies by early next year and will proba- 
bly have a slate of 12 to 16 films over the 
year, the three executives said Big HoIIy- 

See STUDIO, Page 4 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The White House 
reported evidence of a broad retreat of 
Iraqi forces from the Kuwaiti border on 
Wednesday, but it saw enough ambiguity 
to declare that Baghdad’s forces remained 
a threat 

U.S. officials made no move to curtail 
the flow of U.S. troops, warplanes and 
ships to the Gulf. 

As diplomatic efforts cast a widening 
shadow ova- military activities, the White 
House press secretary. Dee Dee Myers, 
said that although many Iraqi forces ap- 
peared to be pulling back, others remained 
in place. 

“We’ve seen some evidence that troops 
are withdrawing from the southern area, 
from the Basra region of Iraq,” she said at 
a briefing “There have been some indica- 
tions that that is broad based.” 

Tanks were being loaded onto trains, 
she said, and there were other indications 
that “they are in fact pulling ouL" Bui 
“some units do appear to be in place, so 


we’re continuing to monitor it closely, and 
there’s been absolutely no change in our 
deployment at this point,” she added. 

Earlier in the day. Secretary of Stale 
Warren M. Christopher said during a visit 
to Kuwait that Iraqi forces remained “an 
unmistakable threat” to the emirate and 
that the government of President Saddam 
Hussein was ^‘untrustworthy .” 

“This particular crisis, this episode, is 
not over,” the secretary said. 

From a command post in the Gulf, Ma- 
jor General Everett H. Pratt Jr. of the U.S. 
Air Force said in a briefing that Iraq still 
had enough troops and weaponry near 
Kuwait to cause trouble. 

Mr. Christopher, after meeting with 
British and Gulf Arab officials, said he bad 
discussed ways to prevent Iraq from 
threatening its neighbors in the future, 
including the possible imposition of a 
weapons exclusion zone in southern Iraq, 
which could ban tanks and other armor. 
But amid signs of opposition to the idea 
from France and Russia, Ms. Myers cau- 
tioned that no U.S. decision had been 
made on whether to pursue the plan. 

Further discussions on the topic and 
other means of dealing with Iraq were 
under way at the United Nations. 

“We expect to have allied support,” Ms. 

See TROOPS, Page 4 


A Cult Suspect See TROOPS, Page 4 

^ 0ead Haiti President 


GENEVA (Reuters) — A Swiss man 
suspected of being responsible for at 
least three of the 53 cult deaths in Swit- 
zerland and Canada was formally identi- 
fied on Wednesday among the dead. 

Police officers from the canton of Va- 
lais said the corpse of Joel Egger, 35, was 
among the 25 bodies found in three 
charred Alpine chalets in Granges- sur- 
Salvan. 

According to earlier Swiss and Cana- 
dian media reports, the police suspect 
that Mr. Egger and Dominique BeUaton, 
another sect member, traveled to Canada 
and kiDed a family of three in Quebec 
four days before the deaths in Switzer- 
land. 


Fob rido Benvh/Rratcn 


WORKING THE CROWD — Chancellor Helmut Kohl during a campaim Book i 
appearance on Wednesday in Deuunin, north of Berlin. Page 7. Bridge 


Book Review 


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Dad’s Paycheck Often Grows if Mom Stays at Home 



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f^CvSriix 1 C £1-90 Nigeria '.9000 Naira 
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£ Kuwol^™w-50O Fils Zimbabwe. Z!rruS2O0 


By Tamar Lewin 

A'fh' Yo i k Times Service 

NEW YORK — Working mothers often worry about 
the “mommy track,” fearing that they will be consigned 
to lower paid. less prestigious jobs. But their husbands, at 
least those who are managers or professionals, may face a 
penalty, too. 

According to several recent studies in the United 
States, men from traditional families, in which the wives 
stay home to care for their children, earn more and get 
higher raises than men from two-career families. 

Just why a gap exists is a topic of considerable debate. 
Some experts attribute it to individual choices, with men 
who are the sole breadwinners working longer, produc- 
ing more and p ushing harder for raises and promotions. 
Outers say that even if there is a gap, it may not be a 
matter of cause and effect. And still others suggest 
corporate prqudice is to blame. 


“There’s a definite daddy penalty, but it’s only on the 
dads in dual-career families,” said Linda Stroh of Loyola 
University of Chicago, the co-author of a study of 348 
male managers at 20 Fortune 500 companies. “I think it’s 
a new diversity issue for companies to think about — 
diversity of family type.” 

Ms. Stroh’s study found that over five years the tradir 
tional fathers had received 20 percent higher raises than 
had the men with working wives. 

Another study of 231 men who had received MBA 
degrees in the late 1970s found that, all else being equal, 
those whose wives were at home with the children had 
earned 25 percent more than those whose wives held jobs 
Of their own. 

“The traditional family men were on a fast track, with 
the highest income, jobs at higher management levels 
and greater pay increases, on a percentage basis, over six 


years,” said Frieda Reitman of Pace University, an 
author of that study. 

“I don't know if you call it prejudice, but I do think the 
people in the top positions, who are mostly traditional 
men, are more comfortable with people who seem like 
themselves." 

Both studies, presented at the annual meeting of the 
Academy of Management in August, found that the men 
whose wives were at home had worked an average of two 
extra hours a week. 

But even after controlling for the effects of the number 
of hours they worked, their experience, field of employ- 
ment and interruptions to their career, Ms. Reitraan's 
study found that men who were the sole breadwinners in 
their families earned an average of $121,630 a year, 
compared with $97,490 for those with wives who worked. 

See EARN, Page 4 


Is Last of Junta 
To Step Down 

Compiled to Our Staff From Dispatches 

PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti — Haiti’s 
military-backed president resigned 
Wednesday, completing the removal of 
coup officials before the return of the 
country’s democratically elected leader, 
the Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

The formal resignation of Emile Jonas- 
saint, broadcast Wednesday on local radio, 
followed the takeover Tuesday of the Na- 
tional Palace and other government minis- 
tries by U.S. troops. 

A Haitian military aide said Lieutenant 
General Raoul C6dras, the former army 
chief who installed Mr. Jonassaint, would 
go into exile by the end of the day. either to 
Panama or Argentina. 

U.S. officials said two planes were wait- 
ing on Wednesday to fly General Cedras 
and his army chief of staff. Brigadier Gen- 
eral Philippe Biamby. to exile. Both the 
United Slates and Mr. Aristide have asked 
Panama to take them. 

U.S. troops landed in Haiti on SepL 19 
to help restore Mr. Aristide, who was 
ousted three years ago by a military junta 
led by General Cedras. Mr. Aristide is 
expected to Teturn on Saturday. 

Mr. Jonassaint, 81, was instrumental in 
getting Haitian officials to sign a pact with 
the United States and accept an agreement 
to avert an American invasion. Under the 
pact, the military leadership had until Sat- 
urday to step down. 

“Because of the exceptional circum- 
stances and the situation imposed on our 
country, from this day on the government 
See HAITI, Page 4 


>**»■•• r '. . 


5 * 





I 

- Pa 1 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THU RSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


In Palestinian Camp, Saddam Has Lost His Knighthood 


By Nora Boustany 

Washington Post Sente* 

BAQAA CAMP, Jordan — In ihis crowded 
°f 80,000 Palestinian refugees, the icon of 
President Saddam Hussein of Iraq has fallen. 

News of the American military buildup in the 
Gulf has been received here with indifference, in 
sharp contrast to the near-hysterical support 
shown Iraq four years ago, when Mr. Saddam 
was hailed as the Knight of the Arabs after 
invading Kuwait. 

At the modest outdoor Father of the Arabs 
Cafe in the heart of the camp, a group of men 
huddled at sunset to take stock of the loss of yet 
another traditional symbol of Arab defiance' of 
the West. 

“People were stunned and shocked by their 
own hopes" during the 1990-91 Gulf War. said 
Mahmoud Dueik, a teacher. “They were shocked . 
because they bet on something that did not exist 
All we had were fiery speeches and media wars." 

- He was explaining the letdown Palestinians 
felt after the crushing defeat suffered by Iraqi 
troops in 1991. when American air power deci- 


mated Mr. Saddam's retreating armies in the 
desert. 

~ Saddam is no longer a phenomenon," echoed 
Rashid Arar. 55, also a teacher, from the Pales- 
tinian town of Abassiyeh. 

Palestinians here are recovering from two 
blows: Iraq’s defeat and the later dashing of dieir 
dreams to return home in the wake of a Palesrin 
lan-lsraeli accord that so far has left them out. 
The prospect of another Arab country going to 
war no longer excites them. 

In 1 990, when Iraq boastfully predicted a great 
triumph in the “mother of all battles," appealing 
to what was left of an Arab nationalism that had 
failed them, many Palestinian refugees wanted to 
believe Mr. Saddam, Palestinian women ululated 
praise for him, named their newborn sons after 
him and sold their golden earrings to donate to 
his cause. 

Iraqi radio broadcasters painted a vivid pic- 
ture of victory by sending chilling accounts oyer 
the airwaves of American soldiers returning 
home in blood-drenched coffins. Iraqi and Pales- 
tinian flags fluttered from the rooftops of Baqaa. 


and visiting Westerners identified with allied 
troops were met with anger and hostility. 

The mood is different now. There are no 
portraits of Mr. Saddam or of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization chief. Yasser Arafat. 
People here also regard Mr. Arafat as a disap- 
pointing figure because, in Lheir view, he con- 
cluded a peace accord with Israel without consid- 
ering the Palestinians displaced from their 
homeland in 1 948 who are now in refugee camps. 

A laborer in Arab headdress and gray robe 
said there was sympathy until now with Iraq, 
“but our aspirations remain buried in our 
chests." 


The days when Baqaa residents remained close 
to their, radio receivers to hear of Iraq's latest 
Scud missile attacks on Israel are nothing but 
flashes of confused memory. 

“People have lost hope in the traditional lead- 
erships of the Arab world,” the 47-year-old la- 
borer said. “From the depths of our hearts, we do 
not believe in anybody, even the obvious. We 
have lost as a people.” 


Threat of Malnutrition in Iraq 


Baghdad Cut Rations by One-Third, UN Says 


By Alan Cowell 

Aim- York Times Service 

. ROME — With its ability to 
finance food imports dwindling 
after four years of sanctions. 
Iraq has reduced rations to its 
people by more than one-third, 
raising the likelihood of greater 
malnutrition among women 
and children. United Nations 
officials said Wednesday. 

The development coincides 
with an increasing desire among 
donors to channel food aid 
away from parts of central and 
southern Iraq under govern- 
ment control and toward the 
Kurdish-run north. UN World 
Food Program officials said. 

The officials, including the 
executive director of the World 
Food Program, Catherine Ber- 
tini, were speaking as the 
newest Iraqi crisis once more 
focused attention on what some 
analysts depict as Saddam Hus- 
sein's increasingly frantic ef- 
forts to escape UN sanctions. 

The sanctions, in force since 
the 1990-91 Gulf conflict, do 
pot prevent Iraq from import- 
ing food and medicine, but they 
freeze its overseas assets and 
prevent it from exporting oil to 


it is “virtually free." UN offi- 
cials said. 

Starling on Oct. 1, Ms. Ber- 
uni said, the government has 
announced it would “reduce the 
food basket by an average 36 
percent," cutting back on some 
provisions so that the nutrition- 
al value of the handouts could 
be halved. 

Mona Ham mam, a senior 
World Food Program official, 
said: “We think that the gov- 
ernment cannot sustain that 
level of expenditure." 

Ms. Hamm am said at the 
news conference that the im- 


pact of food shortages in Iraq 
included a doubling of infant 


mortality rates over the past 
three years, while infant malnu- 


three years, while infant malnu- 
trition, once unheard of in Iraq, 
now affected 23 percent of all 
children. 

Since August 1993, she said, 
food prices had increased by 
600 percent in central and 
southern Iraq and by 84 percent 
in tbe north. “The monthly sal- 
ary of a civil servant is barely 
enough to buy one kilogram of 
meat," she said. “People are 
selling assets and land just to 
make ends meet." 


Gulf War Illness 


Remains Mystery 


pay for the food it does import. 
Since that time. Ms. Bertini 


Since that time. Ms. Bertini 
said at a news conference. Iraq 
has been spending an average 
$100 million a month on food 
for distribution among its peo- 
ple. UN officials said they had 
□o idea where Iraq found that 
money. The cost of the food 
handouts is 98 percent subsi- 
dized by the government so that 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The De- 
fense Department is sending 
monitors with the U.S. forces 
going to the Gulf to watch for 
symptoms of an unexplained 
illness that afflicted thousands 
of troops after the war in 1991. 

The military medical special- 
ists will monitor for toxins, in- 
vestigate suspicious incidents, 
and document all medical treat- 
ment of soldiers, a Pentagon 
spokesman said. 

Since the Gulf War ended, 
about 20.000 of the troops that 
had been sent there have com- 
plained to the Veterans Depart- 
ment of symptoms including fa- 
tigue. rashes, muscle and joint 
pains, headaches, memory loss, 
shortness of breath, and respi- 
ratory problems. 


The World Food Program, 
the principle UN agency re- 
sponsible for procuring arid de- 
livering large amounts of food 
to crisis areas, is spending over 
$60 million a year to feed 1.3 
million Iraqis regarded as desti- 
tute — 750,000 in the north and 
550,000 in the center and south 
— Ms. Bertini said. 

But, she said, there was an 
“increasing trend” for donors, 
including the United States and 
the European Union, to insist 
that food aid be sent to north- 


ern Iraq, under the protection 
of the Gulf War coalition, in- 


of the Gulf War coalition, in- 
stead of to government-con- 
trolled areas. 

Thus, of the $33 million dol- 
lars needed to finance World 
Food Program aid operations in 
Iraq from October through 
March, 1995. donors had not so 
far pledged the $11.4 million 
earmarked Cor sending food to 
people in central and southern 
Iraq. Ms. Bertini said. 



X _ 

Laurcni Rctvwg/Tbc Aswraicd Prc** 

Warren M. Christopher in Kuwait on Wednesday with Major General James B. Taylor. 


Higher Morale for Kuwaitis New Worry Looms for Saudi Leaders 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Service 

ABDALI, Kuwait — Kuwaiti troops deployed 
along the border with Iraq insist they will not flee 
southward to Saudi Arabia, as many did in 1990, 
if Iraqi forces invade again. 

“This time is different,” said Private Abdel 
Mussim Balushi. as he stood near a dun-colored 
Yugoslav- built tank sheltered behind a sand hill. 
“If we were here alone we would be afraid, but 
the Americans are with us. If there were no 
Americans. I would go to Saudi Arabia.” 

The fighting spirit of the tiny Kuwaiti Army 
has been given a huge lift by the firepower and 
troops Washington is sending. 

The first elements of a 4,000-troop contingent 
from the 24th Mechanized Infantry Division, in 
Fort Stewart, Georgia, landed in Kuwait on 
Monday and moved quickly north to reinforce 
Kuwaiti units. 

The carrier George Washington, with 60 com- 
bat planes and cruise missiles, began patrolling 
the Red Sea, within range of Iraq. -President Bill 
Clinton has assigned 36.000 soldiers and Ma- 
rines to the region and pul 15,000 more on 
standby. 


Bui American military officials say Kuwaiti 
forces, at the moment, would be hard pressed to 
hold off the 80.000 Iraqi troops that they esti- 
mate are stationed just 20 kilometers (12 miles) 
north of the border. Still, they add, a thrust by 
Iraq could be severely crippled by allied missile 
and air assaults. 


Cost of Supporting U.S, Troops Would Strain Finances 


At the moment, it is the Kuwaitis who would 
have to pay if an invasion came. The 16,000 
troops, still short of equipment and often inade- 
quately trained despite the rout in the invasion of 
Aug. 1 1990, would be no match for the Iraqi 
Republican Guard divisions facing them. 

But there is an unquestioning faith in the 
prowess of the U.S. military. The presence of the 
Americans has stiffened the resolve of the 
Kuwaitis. 


Captain Jassim Abdullah Bagri, with a flowing 
beard and a large girth, stood near some of the 
tanks in the armored company he commands. 
The tanks, Yugoslav copies of the Soviet-built T- 
72 tanks in the Iraqi arsenal, chugged out gray 
exhaust as gunners preened and posed for pho- 
tographers. The Iraqi border, lost in a haze to the 
north, was quiet. 


By Clay Chandler 

Washington Post Service 

RIYADH — The presence of President Sad- 
dam Hussein's Iraqi forces near the Kuwaiti 
border has heightened economic as well as secu- 
rity anxieties in neighboring Saudi Arabia. 

As they were four years ago, rulers of this 
desert kingdom are deeply troubled by the strate- 
gic implications of allowing Mr. Saddam to move 
troops in an area only a few hours’ drive from 
Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province, the sandy ex- 
panse that embraces more than 80 percent of the 
nation’s industry and houses nearly a quarter of 
the world's known oil reserves. 

But now the Saudi leaders must also worry 
about something that has not troubled them in 
the past: the costs of supporting tens of thou- 
sands of U.S. soldiers. 

Senior Saudi officials say the kingdom will 
marshal whatever funds are necessary to deter 
aggression from Iraq. “Money is not the issue.” 
one said. “The issue is Saddam." 

Tbe Saudi government, he added, assumed 
from the instant it received word that Iraqi 


troops were gathering on the Kuwaiti border that 
Riyadh would bear primary responsibility for 
funding the campaign to hold Mr. Saddam in 
check. 

Still, the Iraqi encroachment comes at a terri- 
ble time for the Saudi nation. Tbe desen king- 
dom is just now coming to grips with the cash- 
flow difficulties created by its hefty contribution 
to the 1991 war with Iraq. 

The Saudi government shelled out a staggering 
$55 billion in a single year — by far the largest 
financial contribution of any member of the Gulf 
coalition — for that campaign. Some Saudi eco- 
nomic planners estimate the war’s total cost to 
the Saudi .economy at more than $150 billion, a 
sum exceeding die nation's total domestic 
product. 

That expense, combined with tbe effects of 
weak oil prices, has put a severe strain on public 
finances. Earlier tins year. King Fahd called for a 
20 percent cutback in government spending. Ri- 
yadh has also moved to reschedule repayment of 
several major U.S. defense and aircraft contrac- 
tors to ease its cash flow problems. 


In Algeria, Gunmen Kill 2 and Car Bombs Explode 


Compiled h\' Our Sttiff From [hspauhn 

ALGIERS — In a brutal ex- 
plosion of fresh violence in Al- 
geria. gunmen killed a South 
Korean businessman and a lo- 
cal politician on Wednesday, 
and five car bombs exploded in 
the capital. 

The car bombs exploded in 
what appeared to be a signifi- 


See our 

Education Directory 

every Tuesday 


cant escalation of the terror 
campaign beingwaged by Mus- 
lim extremists. The first blast at 
8 A.M. outside a university 
building in the city center 
brought panic to tbe busy 
streets. At least one person was 
injured. 

Almost simultaneously, two 
other booby-trapped cars ex- 
ploded, one in front of a girls' 
university dormitory and the 
second near the Justice Minis- 
try. Both buildings are located 

in an residential area overlook- 
ing the center of the capital. 
Witnesses said at least two stu- 


dents were injured in the attack 
on the dormitory. 

Security forces said an armed 
Islamic militant died when a car 
blew up in the working-class 
area of Kouba. His two accom- 
plices were then killed by secu- 
rity forces, they said. The com- 
mando was planning to leave 
tbe car outside a state-subsi- 
dized supermarket, according 
to security officials. 

Another car exploded in the 
Kirkhadem district outside a 
gasoline station, but no one was 
hurt, the security forces said. 

A South Korean business- 


man, Kang Dae-Hyun, 56. was 
gunned down as he bought 
newspapers near his home in 
Bordj el Bahri, about 25 kilome- 
ters (17 miles) east of Algiers, 
state radio said quoting security 
officials. His killing brought to 
64 the number of foreigners to 
be murdered in Algeria since 
last September when they be- 
came caught up in the conflict 
between Muslim fundamental- 
ists who have been battling the 
army-backed authorities since 
January 1992. 

Mr. Kang, was a representa- 
tive of the South Korean con- 


glomerate Daewoo, which sells 
Korean-made automobiles in 
Algeria and is involved in sever- 
al joint projects. One project 
was building tbe Hilton hotel 
near Algiers International Air- 
port, which opened in 1993 af- 
ter a delay over a payment dis- 
pute and was later closed, 
apparently for security reasons. 

Tbe leader of an Algerian 
moderate Islamist movement, 
Labcene ben Saadaflah, also 
was killed, in an Algiers suburb 
on Wednesday, according to 
the official Algerian press 
Agency, APS. (Reuters, AFP) 


Reuters 

LONDON — Amnesty In- 
ternational has accused the 
French police of a pattern of ill 
treatment, shootings and kill- 
ings, particularly against non- 
Europeans and juveniles. 

In a report issued in London, 
the human rights group detailed 
11 cases of ill treatment by 
French law enforcement offi- 
cers in the 18 months up to June 
1994. It concluded that they 
used force recklessly and with- 
out due respect for the law and 
that many victims were juve- 
niles. 


1 


WORLD BRIEFS 




w 


Economic hardship brought on by the expul- 
sion of thousands of Palestinians from Kuwait, 
the United Arab Emirates and other oil-produc- 
ing .Arab countries has hit home. 

“The first time around. 1 sold no less than $700 
worth of first-aid kits, medicines and baby 
food.” said KhaJik Zaghnun. 32. a pharmacist at 
the camp, recalling the heated campaigns led by 
Palestinians to help Iraq. “Today, nobody 
cares.” 


Vietnam to Join ASEAN Next Year 


ton ,* 


“Now the feeling toward Iraq is lukewarm.” 
said Mahmoud Am bar. 42. a barber whose fam- 
ily came from Jaffa, now part of Israel. “Our 
people are bored with hollow words. The Pales- 
tinian people arc the only ones who were harmed 
by the Gulf War. They were expelled from Ku- 
wait. the Gulf. They came out as beggars. When 
another Palestinian barber starts a business 
across the street, it means less work for me. 


SINGAPORE (AFP) — ^ieiriam on Wednesday said it wjwW 
join the Association of South East Asian Nations next year, 
dispelling speculation that Hand might put off membership tiniil 

it was better prepared. „ jk-- : 

“Vietnam is now actively preparing all necessary carnations to 
become a full member of ASEAN next year ” Deputy 
Minister Rian Van Khai said at a meeting; oraanned 
Switzerland-based World Economic Forum. ASEAN comprises 
Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, tfca^bilipgiaes, Singapore aadTSttfe 

land- 

Mr. Khai said that Hanoi would also participate m $thcr 
regional organizations and would join the 17 -member Asia Pacific 
Economic Cooperation forum -“when k » possible. 4 ' ~ * t 




jjb 5 ’ . *** 


Major Feels Heat as Tor^ 

BOURNEMOUTH, England 


“We cannot tell you we don’t like Iraqis, but 
there is no faith in the leadership. If 5 million 
Israelis were to go to Iraq today. Saddam would 
roll out a red carpet for them." 


BOURNEMOUTH, England (RwfeV^RimeMin^RfJdhn 
Major, his Conservative Party already de^2y «tivkfed 
issue of Europe, was faced with a fresh bout of infighting oq 


Wednesday on how best to tackle the riefc Labof. Jeader, Tony 
Blair. Mr. Major, whose party is mrax thanf^ poims bchl^Mri 


Blair. Mr. Major, whose party is itiGreiJiaff2s points behhgLMt: 
Blair’s in recent opinion vitfi try to brid^ titei gap ■twtei ht? 
addresses the conference on Friday. 

The ideological squabbling further dashed Mr, Major'srh^pes of 
using the Conservatives* annual confeenCC as a faundqjad- td 
revive the party's flagging fortunes. - 

Employment Secretary Michael ' PortiDb. the pariyV young 
rightist pretender, set the conference alight with a venomous 
attack on meddling Brussels bureaucrats. In another rousing 
speech later, away from the main hall, Mrr Portillo demanded that 
tbe Conservatives distance themselves Jreim the opposition with a 
stretch of “dear blue water." a coded but unambiguous call for a 
rightist agenda. Tbe two speeches were widdy seen as renewing 
Mr. Portillo's claim to be a futuroleaderof a party in power since 
1979. : -.f • ■ 


*-* 

. J * 


featiV Hi 

(turn »f 


Romania Seizes Smuggled Ifraniiim „ * 

BUCHAREST (Reuters) %— Romanian authorities said jt * I 


BUCHAREST (Reuteis) %— Romanian . authorities said 
Wednesday they had seized 6.8 kj3ograms of uraniui&- and a 
quantity of strontium smuggled from Ukraine and tod-arrested 
two Jordanians planning to ship iLout of the country. V 1 - 
Police and Interim- Ministry spokesmen confirmed UxSal news- 
papa- repots that the radioactive material fea&been seizbd in the 
province of Moldova on Oct. 10, the second interception of 
uranium smugglers in as many weeks. 

The officials said the material was found tirthe 'yfliage df 
Urechesti near the border of the forma Soviet republhrof Moh- 
dova, which borders Ukraine. A total of seven people, including 
the two Jordanians, were arrested Among those dfeiarafed was a 
former Soviet Army officer. 


\l • ;- ti l1 


. . . ;»= 

». .i an 

t : 1«*»I 

. • \ 

f. . . . 


LYON (Reuters) — The police arrested former ■ Coramonica* 
tions Minister Alain Carignon on Wednesday m ft widening 
judicial inquiry into the costly bailout of Iris cjm^jaign hewsp^r 
by a public-works company. •' - -• u . 

Mr. Carignon. who resigned in July, was arrested athis Paris 
apartment hours before Prime Minister Edouard BaUSdur was 
due to hold a nonpartisan meeting of senior politicians bn mea- 
sures to combat corruption. The Carignon affair is onebf several 
involving ministers and other politicians that have jolted Mr. 
Bail ad ur*s center-right government and Boated his image-in opin- 
ion perils. 


. ; 

.-I *»}• 


The latest mvestigatiqn jpyoWes a subsidiary of the utility 
impany Lyonnaise des Eaux that bought the beava/mdebted 


company Lyonnaise des caux- that bought the heavgy indebted 
newspaper Dauphin6 News a few months after it wan a contract 
to run water services in Grenoble, of which Mr. Carignon, a 
Gaullist, is mayor. The short-lived papa bad backed his 1989 
mayoral campaign. * 


Berlusconi Attacks Graft Investigator 

ROME — Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi adcused ‘Milan’s 
chief prosecutor on Wednesday of sceJong to undermine his 
government and said neither he' nor his business empire had 
anything to fear from Italy’s corruption inquiries.* . " 

In a speech to a stormy session of the Senate, Mr. Berlusconi 
also confirmed that he would propose legislation to the next 
meeting of his cabinet on how to end any conflict between his 
business interests and his political office. His proposals, drawn up 
by three senior jurists, would not force him to sell his Fininvesl 
empire, which owns Italy’s three main private television stations. 

Tbe prime minister called Fininvest the cleanest business in 
Italy and accused magistrates of “abnormal” investigations of its 
affairs. He was responding to questions about a bitter clasty 
between his government and Francesco Saverio BorreUi. Milan’s 
chief prosecutor and head of -the city's elite pool of corruption 


■ • ^ * ‘ 1 ‘ 1 ■ • o r?? 


investigators. Mr. BorreUi .hinted last week that inquiries into 
Telepiu, a pay TV channel tiarfly owned by Fininvest, could touch 
the prime minister hims elf. 


• .4* 

t . • . -VF 

‘ J.:’. •’-»! 


• •-«;* 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Norway Plans New Ferry Safely Buies; 

OSLO (Reuters) — Norway is planning new safety rules to 
improve tbe stability of all car femes usi ng its ports in the 
aftermath of the Estonia disaster, the country’s Maritime Direc- 
torate said Wednesday. « 

So-called roll-on roll-off fanes will have to be upgraded to 
withstand the destabilizing effect of between a half-meter and one 
meter of water that may flood their vehicle decks in case of an 
accident. . ! 






' " ; ■*! 


A general strike across Italy scheduled for Friday is expected to 
severely disrupt transportation and bring up to 15 million em- 
ployees out into tbe streets to demonstrate, trade union sourcei 
said Wednesday. . ~(aFP$ 

Air France baggage handlers went on strike on Wednesday 
delaying flights from Roissy-Charles de Gaulle airport and hold- 
ing up a morning Concorde flight to New York when they 
demonstrated on the runway. (Reuters) 


„ • •••J 

.. l 


demonstrated on tne runway. (Reuter^) 

Tbe Cypriot charter company EuroCypria has begun weekly 
flights to Belgrade, the second airline to do so sin ce the lifting of 

l IN ttnphnnc aoainn n ° , 


V • --ffM 


. -O ; - W w MU i« UJC IUUUX Ul 

UN sanctions against Serbia and Montenegro. ' (Reuters) 
The International Air TranspoitAssoriation pmficted Wednes- 
day that international scheduled passenger traffic would increase 
by an average of 6.6 percent a year from 1994 to 1998. (ReutepJ 


, r. ■ _ — — ibv, auuut -iiM 

kilometers east of Ho Chi Minh City. (AFP) 

Continental Airlines is offering (fiscounts of up to 30 percent on 
some fares for travel through Feb. 10. The deepest discounts come 
on tickets for flights Monday through Thursday, Discounted 
tickets, for U.S. and some international routes, must be purchased 
by Oa. 21. " im 


> PQlit 


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mikA*. ti '. . 1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Page 3 




■ 


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THE AMERICAS / Hlg¥ ST k.T: £ feTT £ 

Clinton, on a Limb, Invites Comparison With Reagan 


By David S. Broder cans — candidates and incumbents — signed a 

Waskmgtm Pan Service “contract with the American people 3 ' on the 

• WASHINGTON — When President Bill Gin- Ccpitol steps that included pledges of a stronger 
ton asks the dyspeptic American voters of 1994 defense and a series of tax reductions and a 


generic ad campaign, targeting the Republican 
contract and amplifying the theme of the Dear- 
born address. 

The question is whether the Democrats have 
chosen their targets well. “It’s a classic gambit,” 


ads to “refer to the stale policies of the *S0s, M 
rather than to Mr. Reagan personally, it can 
work. 

Support for that proposition can be found in a 
Gallup Poll published in Tuesday's USA Today. 


«^l^sr«inS 
Hi . u, Hs JL., 


■■ gan. — .who in nostalgic memory is viewed as a 
t more significant and successful chief executive. 
■And he challenges the prejudices of a public that 
is down on him and gloomy about the country's 


MtNtL. is down on him and gloomy i 
future. 

r, 1 Democratic officials say, b 

V ’ ’ : 1 ’ . J \*? ! ‘« g- , \ no better way to frame the mi 

1 >* i ' ! : '-'j ' ^r- some neutral observers sugg 
: V Ua «it: sroifc. . 

** 1''^' . ‘ - 1 W In a speech Tuesday in D< 


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officials say, however, that he has 
to frame the midterm election, and 

observers suggest the ploy might 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

the message that it is a return to what one White 
House official called “the bogus politics of false 
promises.” 

To hear these White House officials tell it, the 
Republicans made a major strategic blunder. 
Instead of being ou the defensive about the 


said Mr. Reagan's longtime pollster, Richard By 46 to 37 percent, those polled said they 
Winhlin. “Every campaign needs an enemy. But preferred to continue current economic polities 
the chances of success in making Reagan the rather than return to those of Mr. Reagan. But 51 


enemy are not good." percent said they would vote for a congressional 

In his most recent poll, Mr. Wjrthlin said, “63 candidate who opposed Mr. Clinton while only 


percent said they would vote for a congressional 


percent of the people said the country was off on 
the wrong track.” 

“They’re worried about where we're going,*' he 


39 percent said they preferred a Clinton 

supporter. 

Richard Brody, a Stanford professor who has 


said, “not where we were in the past, and the studied presidential c ommuni cations strategies, 
main reasons they give are Clinton and the said he admired Mr. Clinton's gumption. 
Democrats in Congress.” «... •» .« ~»n.. — h k;. feiim,. 


r, ,1^ 1“ a. 5 p**ch Tuesday in Dearborn, Michigan, gridlock in Congress and thepersistent weakness 

Mr. Clinton asked voters to reject going “back to ® the president’s polls, Democrats now have a 
the 1980s and trickle-down economics.” He did target. 

, . 1 Mr u notmention Mr. Reagan by but his target “I’ve always believed that you have to be on 
1 was what Democrats used to call “Reagan o- the offense to win," said Tony Coelho, a Clinton 


“I've always believed that you have to be on 
the offense to win," said Tony Coelho, a Clinton 


When the Turtes-Mirror survey asked people Democrats to : 
last summer to compare Mr. Clinton and his five said. “Not to 
predecessors, Mr. Clinton ranked ahead of only field.” 


"He has to try to rally the public and his fellow 
Democrats to support what he's trying to do,” he 
said. “Not to do it would be to' abandon the 


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*W*U*y 


£35 


in '‘•'firainji.. 


mics,” the combination of tax cuts and defense political adviser. “We’ve been playing defense 
increases that Democrats Many for running the too long.” 

national debt from SI trillion up to $4 trillion. The Democratic National Committee on 
, On Sept. 27, more than 300 House Republi- Thursday is scheduled to announce a S3 million 


Haiti’s ‘Haves’ Fear 
Return of Aristide 

Elite Expects Mob Violence 


Gerald R. Ford. On both questions, Mr. Reagan 
placed first, the choice of roughly three times as 
many people as named Mr. Clinton. 

Celinda Lake, a Democratic pollster, sold. 
“No question, Reagan is very popular." Still, she 
said that as long as Democrats are careful in their 


But he added: “Often when presidents have 
tried to affect midterm elections they have failed, 
and the interpretations of that failure weaken the 
president even more. Clin urn's credibility may 
have reached the point where it won’t work, but I 
think he has to try." 


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By Catherine S. Manegold 

New York Times Servlet 


(he military, which draws its 
troops and most of its officers 


. PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti from the lower classes, as a pro- 
— Up in the hiDs, where the air tector. In opposing Father Aris- 
is sweet, the lawns are trimmed, tide's return, it argues that the 
and fife is lived in languor, they tenets of capitalism, not the ad- 


hall him “the little monkey” and vantages of the few, are at stake, 
.“the little jerk,” and add that Father Aristide counters that 
height months of the Reverend die elite has molded a society 
Jean-Bertrand Aristide as presi- that crushes the vast majority of 
dent were enough to lay a road darker-slritmed people. 


*Amsi«-din$ ( * 

In* Ivir. .... i . 

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s, ... 




to cavil war. 

“What he offers his followers 


But to his critics. Father Aris- 
tide, who was elected by 80 per- 


nxnut s , . .i ... "• 1 *: 

pan: 


.is simple,” said Edward Gollon, cent of the popular vote in 1990, 
.47, a commodities br<*er from is not a force for democracy, 
' Arkansas who has lived here for a dangerous ideologue bent 

adit years. “He says to them, upon revenge. They believe he 


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•What you don’t have, we will is naive about international 
give yon.’” market forces and dogmatic 

With the dock ticking toward and unrealistic in his hopes for 
Father Aristide’s return three change. 


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.V Mr f; 
rue :: 

1 ; ' 

: :»■ M-'i t ;; 
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ttkst years after his ouster in a mflj- 
tary coup, U.S. and Haitian 
business executives here look 
‘ i. with unvarnished dread toward 
^ future that they fear will bring 
mob violence, deeper class re- 
!r sentment, and the destruction 
jof their homes and businesses. 

They watch with despair and 
incomprehension as U.S. soJ- 
.< (tiers passively observe looting 
but then mobilize to disarm the 
^pararmtitary groups that once 
provided the cKie with a mea- 
^ ‘ sure of safety. They trade sto- 
ries of the hardships imposed 
by the international embargo 
\ >nd lament foreign policy deti- 

® ■ sions in Washington that have 
^rushed their businesses and 
: mary now threaten their safety. 

1 The znititaxy-domiixated gov- 


The Aristide government’s 
political message, they say, left 
the chronically poor with grand 
expectations that were always 
unrealistic but will be even 
harder to meet now, since a 
choking embargo has splintered 
the industrial base, drained fi- 
nancial reserves, and given rise 
to a new class of merchants 
driven by greed and accus- 
tomed to operating outside the 
thin chains' erf law. 



Ini' l>j|in/nic Atwuihl Piw 

A U.S. solder of the XOtfa Mountain Division handing cigarettes to Haitians across barbed wire in Port-an-Prince. 


“The rage of the crowd is 


“But the man in the The kindest words business- 


unquestionable,” said Fritz street, you can change his mind men offer for the exiled presi- 


Kenol 63, the head of Haiti’s 
Mercedes and Fiat dealerships 
and a co-owner of a untile com- 


build the economic base, they 
say. Instead, energies were 


if you give him a job. Aristide's deni are that his government poured into revamping a soci- 
rage is ideological. Nothing will was disorganized and direction- ety defined by immense gaps of 
stop iL” less. No effort was made to wealth. 


+ POLITICAL \OTES+ 


White House Report Goes Eas y on Espy 

WASHINGTON — The White House has issued a mildly 
worded report on Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy, conclud- 
ing that no further action is necessary in light of Mr. Espy’s 
resignation and his reimbursements for gifts and travel ex- 
penses. 

The report by the White House counsel, Abner J. Mikva. 
outlines the relevant ethical standards and Mr. Espy's con- 
duct but docs not make direct judgments about his actions. 
Instead, it reviews Mr. Espy's activities and determines that 
he has taken steps to correct any problems. 

“Members of the cabinet should set an example for all 
federal employees," Mr. Mikva’s report says. "When they 
run afoul of the Standards of Conduct, however inadvertent- 
ly. their actions reflect negatively on the president and the 
executive branch, and promote distrust of the government." 

The mild tone of Mr. Mikva's report contrasted with the 
White House stance last week when Mr. Espy announced his 
resignation. At the time. President Bill Clinton said he was 
“troubled by the appearance of some” of Mr. Espy's actions 
and other White House officials had harsher judgments. 

( H7M 

Clinton-as-Hftler Billboard Taken Down 

GRAND RAPIDS. Michigan — An anti-gun control 
group's billboard depicting President Clinton as Hitler was 
taken down after a week because of protests. The Arms 
Heritage Federation’s billboard featured a portrait of Mr. 
Clinton dressed in a German uniform and a Hitler-like 
mustache, with the words; “Arms control, what next?" 

Kelly Duff, vice president of Gannett Outdoor Advertis- 
ing. said he pulled the ad Monday after receiving about 20 
complaints. “They were mostly complaints from the Jewish 
community, and the concern was that we're opening up old 
wounds in terms of the Holocaust." he said. 

The ad's designer. Diek Van Haften, said he meant to link 
gun control with Nazi Germany. “It's kind of like what 
happened in Germany in the 1930s.” he said. i AP) 

M om and Dad Campaign for Job Bush 

FORT LAUDERDALE. Florida — There were 500 peo- 
ple for lunch at S500 a head. There were centerpieces in red. 
white and blue and a “Jcb for Governor" banner over the 
head table. But the big draw for the Republican faithful here 
at the Design Center of the Americas and elsewhere across 
Florida this week was less Jcb Bush, the party's candidate for 
goieroor. than Jeb Bush's parents, former President George 
Bush and his wile. Barbara. 

With their son in a race against Governor Lawton Chiles, 
that polls say is neck-and-neck. the Bushes have been out 
campaigning to help their son win his first elective office. 

“Dynasty” is how Mr. Chiles describes the Bush family, 
and he accuses 'Jcb Bush. 41. a Miami businessman, of being 
no more than an undeserving heir. It is a criticism being heard 
as well these days in Texas, where another Bush son. George 
W. Bush, is in a close gubernatorial nice with the Democratic 
incumbent. Governor Ann W. Richards. 

The former president has taken pains to point out that he 
does not give political advice to his son. What the Bushes 
have done, however, is help fill his campaign chest. To date, 
in three visits to Florida, the Bushes have raised S6 million for 
Jeh Bush's campaign. i ,V >T» 

Quote/Unquote 

Guy V. Molinuri. president of the New York City borough 
of Sialen Island, on the Democratic candidate for state 
attorney general. Karen Burstein, a homosexual: “The next 

attorney general shouldn't he an admitted lesbian." ( APi 


El ri’DATL. 

l'<*rrv Safety 


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The ntititaxy-dozninated gov- 
ernment wins no great praise: 
The friends and family of well- 
ronnected military figures — 
" inany of whom are not mem- 
bers <rf theold-tine dite — prof- 
' jted immensely both in the le- 
- gitimate marketplace and in the 
'Extravagant black market that 
flourished after tbe embargo 
took effect. But at least there 
„ was a sense of security, business 
leaders say. 

“I hate to see him go,” said 
-- "Chris Pomagevich, a IXS. bus- 1 
, nessman, referring to Lieuteai- 

0 ant General Raoul C 6 dras, the 
^ leader of the nrilitaiy junta who 

-y announced his resignation on 
Monday. “He was probably tbe 1 
tmc person in that group who 
should have stayed. He kept us 
put of civil war.” 
r Throughout most of modem 
* history, Haiti has been con- 
trolled by a tiny, wealthy, light- 
slcnmed elite that has dominat- 
ed- farming, business and 
» ^commerce. The elite is drawn 
from a handful of prominent 
families, many of French de- 
scent but mcr^singly joined by 
r Second- generation Haitians 

1 whose families migrated from 
t Lebanon and Germany. 

r . *' The elite has always relied on 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY* OCTOBER 13, 1994 


- Pa 


Nobels Awarded in Physics and Chemistry TROOPS: wku bum ^, em *™ 

J j ~ .. Morinn. *fr*r the Golf War prevent Iraq “We are besewd, and the people «e 


Our Sutf From Dupacha 

Stockholm — An Amer- 

, a ^^adian were 
girded -the Nobel Prize in 
^yacs on Wednesday for pio- 
development of neu- 
“On scattering techniques 40 
years ago. 

American received the 
Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 
revolutionizing the study of hy- 
drocarbons, the ingredients of 
ou and natural gas, and for un- 
covering new ways to use them. 

The $930,000 physics prize 
Wul be shared by Clifford G. 
Shull of the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology and Ber- 
tram N. Blockhouse of McM as- 
ter University in Hamilton, 
Ontario. 

Their research, begun in the 
1940s and ’50s, helped develop 
a powerful tool to study matter 
in its tiniest detail, using beams 
of neutrons much the same way 
a microscope uses light. It has 


broad applications in many 
fields of science, from the devel- 
opment of superconductors to 
tetter computer memory. The 
research led to further advances 
by others who already have 
been honored with other Nobel 
awards. 

The recipient of the $930,000 
award for chemistry was 
George A. Olah, 67, of the Uni- 
versity of Southern California 
in Los Angeles. 

In the early 1960s, he and his 
colleagues discovered that ex- 
tremely strong adds, called su- 
peradds, could be used to mod- 
ify hydrocarbons so they were 
easier to study. The discovery 
also led to a wide variety of 
industrial processes, such as 
new ways to break down heavy 
oils and liquefy coal. 

In a statement announcing 
the award, the Royal Swedish 
Academy of Sciences said that 
Mr. Olah’s work “has a promi- 


nent position in all modem 
textbooks.'' 

Notably, his research has al- 
lowed improvements in com- 
bustion engines by raising the 
octane of fuel without adding to 
pollution, the academy said. 

“Recognition is always a sur- 
prise," Mr. Olah said from his 
home in Beverly Hills, Califor- 
nia. “It is gratifying. There is 
nothing in our life that is not 
touched by hydrocarbons, from 
pharmaceuticals to gasoline " 
Mr. Shull, 79, and Mr. Block- 
house, 76, devised instruments 
based on a technique they de- 
veloped called neutron scatter- 
ing, in which neutrons are 
bounced off liquids and solids 
to reveal their atomic structure. 

“I’m astonished and sur- 
prised," Mr. Blockhouse said of 
the award. “How on earth could 
they pick me?" 

From his home in Lexington, 
Massachusetts, Mr. Shull said: 


Continued from Page 1 


“It has been very exciting 
news." 

“In simple terms.” the Swed- 
ish academy said, “Clifford G. 
Shull has helped answer the 
question of where atoms 'are' 
and Bertram N. Blockhouse the 
question of what atoms ‘do.’ " 

Study of atomic structure 
and dynamics made possible by 
Mr. Brockhouse and Mr. Shull 
through development of neu- 
tron scattering techniques had 
been crucial in the development 
of new materials like ceramic 
superconductors, the academy 
said. 

“This has been described as 
the angle most important meth- 
od to get information about 
structure and dynamics of at- 
oms in Quid and solid matter," 
said Carl Nordling, professor of 
physics at Uppsala University 
ana chairman of the Nobel 
committee that awards the 
physics prize. (AP. Reuters) 


Myeis said. But France publicly opposed 
the idea and said Iraq had done nothing 
Illegal in its military maneuvers. 

American officials were apparently try- 
ing to carefully gauge international sup- 
port for such a demilitarized zone, to de- 
cide how restrictive it might be and to 
determine whether UN authorization 
would be required. 

The delicate task of rebuilding the allied 
coalition that carried out the 1991 Gulf 
War was well under way, and Mr. Christo- 
pher reportedly gained assurances from 
the Gulf emirates and Saudi Arabia that 
the costs of the new U.S. deployment 
would be shared by Arab allies. 

Mr. Christopher also raised the possibil- 
ity that the United Nations would require 
Iraq to sell some oil and use the foreign 
exchange to buy food for a populace that 
Baghdad officiate say is on the brink of 
starvation. Sanctions imposed by the Unit- 


ed Nations after the Gulf War prevent Iraq 
from freely selling oil to gain hard curren- 
cy. 

“We are very concerned about the mis- 
ery of the people of Iraq,” Mr. Christopher 
said in a TV interview. “Our quarrel is with 
the government and particularly with Sad- 
dam.” 

The UN Security Council has autho- 
rized tfraphdaH to sell $1-6 billion worth of 
oil, but Iraq has refused to do so, saying 
the ground rules arc an unfair restriction 
on its sovereignty. 

Ms, Myers called reports of malnutri- 
tion and suffering in Iraq “unsustainable 
propaganda." noting that the UN. sanc- 
tions do not prohibit the importation of 
food and medicine. 


“We are bested, and ate people are 
starving," Mr. Saleh stid. . 

Iraqi o ffic ials welcomed the imminent 
arrival of the Russia*, foreign minister, 
Andrei V. Kozyrev* who was exported in 

Baghdad on Thursday and who has argued 2l 

a closing .of die Western vise < 
arpimd die embattled Saddam govern- 
ment. 


Iraq’s Parliament speaker. Saddi Mehdi 
was quoted by Reuters as saying 
that Baghdad would consider meeting a 
UN demand, the recognition of Kuwait's 
sovereignty, if the sanctions were lifted. 


A spokesman in Moscow said Mr. Ko- 
zyrev would tty “to help ease tension in the 
region and promote stability " but it was 
unclear with whom he planned to meet 
The Soviet Union formerly supplied most 
of Iraq’s armament^ but Russia broke 
with the Iraqi leader ra the Gulf War. : 

In his talks with Guh Arab leaders, Mr. 
Christopher was joined by the British for- 
eign secretary, Douglas Burd, who ex- 
pressed his scradarify.wttb Kuwait. Britain 
is sending S)0 commandos to tho emirate 
along with a dozen additional Tornado 
aircraft and two warships. . 


c 


GULF; LIS. Finds Allied Support for an Arms-Free Zone in Soitfkcrn Iraq 


Israel Sees TV Plea by Abducted Soldier 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 


JERUSALEM — A fright- 
ened Israeli soldier, only 
months out of high school, 
stood beside a masked gunman 
and pleaded Wednesday for the 
release of Palestinian prisoners. 

“If not, they will kill me." 
said Corporal Nachshon Wax- 
man, 19, who holds dual U. S.- 


Isradi citizenship, in a televised 
appeal. 

The young soldier's abduc- 
tion by the militan t Islamic 
group Hamas shocked Israel 
and thrust the Middle East 
peace process into its deepest 
crisis yeL Hamas, the leading 
opponent of the Palestinian au- 
tonomy accord, said it would 
kill Corpora] Waxman unless 


200 imprisoned Palestinians 
were freed by Friday. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin of Israel told Yasser Arafat, 
leader of the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization, that he held 
him responsible for the safety 
of the soldier who he said was 
being held somewhere in Pales- 
tinian-ruled Gaza. 


STUDIO; New Hollywood Project 


Continued from Page 1 


wood studios normally produce 
12 to 20 films a year. 

The three — who are long- 
time friends — will be equal 
financial partners, Mr. Katzen- 
berg said. He is expected to run 
the new studio, which has not 
yet been named. 

What roles Mr. Geffen and 


Mr. Spielberg would play re- 
mained unclear. But the execu- 


mained unclear. But the execu- 
tives said Mr. Geffen would not 
only be involved in creative en- 
tertainment decisions but also 
spend much of his time working 
to attract investors to the new 
studio's films. 

Mr. Geffen is said to have a 
net worth of $1 billion, while 
Mr. Spielberg’s worth is put at 
more than $600 milli on. 

Other potential backers in- 
clude Bill Gates, the head of 
Microsoft Inc., and John Ma- 
lone of the cable television giant 
TCI, the industry newspaper 


Daily Variety reported 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Spielberg, the most suc- 
cessful director in movie history 
in box-office terms, has long 
sought a way to own films, a 
move that would assure him po- 
tentially lavish profits on nits 
over the foreseeable future. 

Mr. Katzenberg is considered 
one of Hollywood's biggest tal- 
ents, responsible for revitalizing 
Disney’s moribund animation 
division when he took the helm 
in 1984. His latest film, “The 
Lion King,” is expected to be- 
come Disney’s most profitable 
animated film ever. 

Tensions between Mr. Kat- 
zenberg and Mr. Eisner deep- 
ened after the death of Disney’s 
president, Frank G. Wells, in an 
accident earlier this year. Mr. 
Katzenberg was angered by Mr. 
Eisner's refusal to appoint him 
to Disney’s No. 2 position and 
announced his resignation Aug. 
24. (NYT, AP) 


The prime minister, who sus- 
pended peace talks with the 
PLO in Cairo on Tuesday and 
sealed off the 1 million Palestin- 
ians of the Gaza Strip, sum- 
moned an emergency cabinet 
meeting on the abduction. 

Corporal Waxman is the 10th 
Israeli to be kidnapped by Is- 
lamic militants since 1989. All 
the otters were killed. 


In a videotaped appeal 
Wednesday, the young soldier 


Wednesday, the young soldier 
urged Mr. Rabin to comply 
with his captors’ demands. “I 
ask you to do all you can so I get 
out of here alive," he said. 

A man holding an assault ri- 
fle, with a red-checkered head- 
dress covering his face, prompt- 
ed Corporal Waxman several 
times with questions in Hebrew 
and placed a hand on his shoul- 
der at the end of the tape. 

“What do you have to say to 
your mother?” the gunman 
asked. 


where the tape, broadcast on 
Israel’s Channel 2, was filmed. 
Corpora] Waxman disappeared 
Sunday night. It is believed he 
was abducted somewhere in 
central Israel while hitchhiking. 

The Palestinian Authority, 
which has run Gaza and the 
West Bank enclave of Jericho 
since May, denied Corporal 
Waxman was in Gaza. 

But Mr. Rabin telephoned* 
Mr. Arafat on Wednesday after 
seeing the videotape and insist- 
ed that Corporal Waxman was 
in Gaza, 

Mr. Arafat’s spokesman said 
Mr. Arafat met Wednesday 
with three Hamas leaders and 
asked them for help in finding 
the hostage- But, said Marwan 
Kanafani, Mr. Arafat's top 
press aide, “we do not have any 
proof that the kidnapped sol- 
dier is in the Gaza Strip." 

Israel has repeatedly' accused 
Mr. Arafat of f ailing to curb 
attacks originating from Gaza, 
but the PLO insists it is living 
up to the terms of its self-rule 
accord. 


Continued from Page 1 

pose this fresh restriction, officials said, 
because President Saddam Hussein has 
aroused such fierce international enmity, 
especially among his oil-rich Arab neigh- 
bors, that no international backlash need 
be feared. 

“France can stand aside if it wants to. 


significant political stakes for Washington 
or for Paris, U.S. officials shrugged off a 
public jab by Defease. Minister Francois 
Leotard suggesting that the American 
buildup in Kuwait was “not unconnected 
with domestic politics” in the United 
States. 


prives them of their tra&tional Gulf diem 
while U.S. companies' get the lion’s dure 
of contracts in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. 


provided it’s done by the coalition and not 
by the Security Council " according to 


by the Security Council,” according to 
Richard Haas, a National Security Council 
aide in the Bush administration. 

Since French objections do not involve 


French politicians, themselves em- 
broiled in a presidential election cam- 
paign, may well see domestic benefits in 
distancing the government from Washing- 
ton at this juncture. French business has 
chaffed at the Iraqi embargo, which de- 


With Saudi Arabia’s support, the Unit- 
ed States has air power in the region that 
could deny Iraqi forces access to the pro- 
posed exetusk^zone, Nte'or General Ev- 
erett H. Pratt Jr. said on television 
Wednesday. 


called upon, we cotui 
zone on the ground. 1 


“We have the capability" he said. “If 
Ued upon, we could enforce an exclusion 


RUSSIA: The Ruble’s Collapse Poses a Fresh Political Risk for President 


Continued from Page l 


“If my parents are watching 
me, I am all right now, and I 
hope to return to you if Rabin 
decides to release the prison- 
ers," he replied, appearing to 
try to steady his voice. 

It was not known when or 


Mr. Arafat, who along with 
Mr. Rabin is widely expected to 
win the Nobel Peace Prize on 
Friday, had earlier condemned 
the kidnapping and vowed to 
work for the soldiers return. 

In Jerusalem, his tearful 
mother Esther, 47, who immi- 


grated from New York City 25 
years ago, called on the u. S. 


government “to save my son 
who is an American citizen." 

(AP. Reuters) 




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146,461 


* 


doctors 


get more out 


of iht . 


As regular readers you tell us that you study our pages for a full 30 minutes, t 
You like the paper's concise but comprehensive style. 

You also tell us that almost one in three of you has a doctorate or higher 
university degree.* ■ ■ ■ 

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cow Interbank’ Currency Ex- 
change must be paid for in ru- 
bles a day in advance. The 
source predicted, however, that 
such a rally would be only tem- 
porary. 

Economists said the main 
reason for the ruble's plunge 
were government decisions this 
summer to loosen the budget- 
ary strings and dole out new 
credits to agriculture, the mili- 
tary and others. That fueled 
worries about skyrocketing in- 
flation and sent people scurry- 
ing to unload rubles and buy 
dollars as a hedge. Inflation had 
already begun to creep up in 
September and is expected to 
worsen this month. 


Economists have warned that 
the ruble's collapse could harm 
economic reforms by igniting a 


new round of politically desta- 
bilizing inflation and increasing 
demands for a partial return to 
Soviet-style economic controls. 

The ruble’s freefall has chal- 
lenged government assertions 
that the turmoil of the past few 
years was mostly over and that 
Russia had achieved a measure 
of economic stability. Mr. Yelt- 
sin made this point repeatedly 
during his visit last month to 
Washington, where he eagerly 
sought U.S. investment for his 
country. 

Western economists here said 
that the ruble's fall would not 
necessarily scare off foreign in- 
vestors. 

Government officials, mean- 
while, offered little in the way 
of reassurance on Wednesday, 
with many of them focused on 
finding a scapegoat. Many 
dearly agreed with Mr. Yeltsin 


that something more insidious 
occurred than a mere “crisis of 
capitalism,” as some econo- 
mists here put it. Several sug- 
gested that speculators had 
caused the plunge in the ruble 
value. Ivan Ryfakin, speaker of 
the lower house of the Parlia- 
ment, blamed a plot by com- 
mercial banks. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin was one 
of the few willing to take the 
blame himself. “I'd like to say it 
was a plot of some commercial 
structures, but 1 most admit 
that to a certain extent it was a 
miscalculation by the govern- 
ment and the central bank," he 
said in an interview with the 
Ostankino television network. 

Mr. Dubinin, the ousted fi- 
nance minister, said the most 
important thing now was for 
the government to keep firm 
control over inflation and stop 


issuing new credits. “If not, no 
amount of short-range mea- 
sures to bade up the ruble will 
save us in the longer run," he 
said. 


In addition to selling off 
some of its dollar reserves, the 
central bank raised a key lend- 
ing rate in an effort to make the 
ruble more attractive. But fi- 
nancial experts said the central 
bank’s reserves were already 
fairly depleted from having 


propped the ruble up for much 
of the last year. According to 
published reports the bank has 
already spent about half its $8 
billion to $9 biffiom reserves. 


The bank spent $90 million 
on Wednesday to reverse the 
ruble’s fall, but Mr. Gerash- 
chenko said the bank could not 
do that indefinitely. 


HAUL Presidentlnstalled by Military Resigns as Aristide Prepares Return 


Continued from Page 1 


ceases to run the administration 
of state," Mr. Jonassaint said. 


Hie world never recognized 
the military's designation last 
May of Mr. Jonassaint, who is 
not expected to leave the coun- 
try. 

Last week, ihe neighboring 
Dominican Republic provided 
exile to another coup leader, 
Michel Francois, the Port-au- 
Prince police chief. 

Now, Mr. Francis is run- 


ning into trouble there. The 
lower house of Parliament 
unanimously declared him per- 
sona non grata Tuesday and 
called on President Joaquin Ba- 
laguer Ricardo to expel him. 

“We cannot allow our coun- 
try to be converted into a sanc- 
tuary for this class of people," 
said Vmido TobaL a spokes- 
man for the opposition Domin- 
ican Liberation Party. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Aristide is 
spending much of his final days 
in exile m Washington prepar- 


ing to take a large entourage of 
Haitian supporters and foreign- 
ers with hum to Haiti — so 
many that U.S. officials are try- 
ing to hold down the numbers 
for security reasons. 

Mr. Aristide said Wednesday 
he was confident that concerns 
about his personal security 
could be addressed. 

At Mr. Aristide’s invitation. 
Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher will return with 
him, a State Department offi- 
cial said. American black activ- 


ists, inducting the Reverend 
Jesse L. Jackson, members of 
the Black Congressional Cau- 
cus and Randall Robinson, a 
lobbyist, have been invited. 

Numerous Haitians who 
have shared Mr. Aristide’s life 
abroad will return for what is a 
unique event in Haitian history: 
the first time an exiled ruler has 
returned to office. 

Mr. Aristide is scheduled to 
meet with President Bill Clin- 
ton at the White House on Fri- 
day. (AP r Reuters, WP) 


EARN : Dad’s Paycheck Is More likely to Grow if Mom Remains at Home 


Conthmed from Page 1 
compared with $97,490 for 
those with wives who worked. 

Earlier research, inducting a 
1 982 study based on a national- 
ly representative sample of 


5,000 adult men in all types of 
careers, and a 1992 study using 
data from a large multinational 
corporation, found the same 
phenomenon, 

“Everyone knows it’s true,” 
said Jeffrey Pfeffer. an author 
of the 1982 study who teaches 


organizational behavior at 
Stanford University. “It makes 
sense. It’s two people working 
on one career. It’s the argument 
divorce lawyers use, that the 
wife at home was responsible 
for part of the husband’s in- 
come." 

While no one can cite studies 
to the contrary, some human 
resources experts were skeptical 
of the pay gap. 

“Fm cynical about these re- 
sults, because there could be 


lots of intervening variables," 
said John Moses, a human re- 
sources researcher at Hewitt 
Associates, a consulting firm 
based in Chicago. “And corre- 
lation doesn’t mean causation, 
so even if having a spouse at 
home may be correlated with a 
higher income, that doesn’t 
mean that asking your spouse 
to stay home will make your 
pay go up.” 

The gap in pay between the 
two groups, however well-docu- 


mented in a ca dem ic aides, re- 
mains a sensitive topic among 
corporate officials. Of nearly 
two dozen corporate spokes- 
men who were interviewed, 
none would discuss the ques- 
tion. 

“We have no familiarity with 
this phenomenon, and people . 
here would not be comfortable v 
with engaging in any specula- 
tion as to why it might or might ' 
not exist," said Scott Brooks of 
IBM. 


RAYS: U.S. Conducted Far More Human Tests Than Previously Known 


Condoned from Page 1 


committee to make a detailed inquiry into 
the experiments. 

The Tribune article and the previous 
discussion of unethical radiation experi- 
ments initiated by Representative Edward 
J. Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, at 
congressional hearings in 1986 suggested 
that a thorough search would extend the 
litany of horrific stories. 


'Hicy also raised questions about what 
ethical guidelines, if any, had governed the 
experiments and at what level in the gov- 
ernment the research program had been 
directed. Dr. Ruth-Faden. an ethidst at 
Johns Hopkins University who is the 
chairman of the committee, said: “Did we 
find new horror stories? Well, we know 
now that much more experimental work 
was done than anyone guessed." 

While the doses received by subjects in 
most cases were not large, at 'the time the 
hazards of low levels of radiation were not 
known, and consent was not usually 
sough L 

But Dr. Fades did express surprise at 
the apparent deliberateness of the decision 
makin g. 

“Frankly, we did not believe before we 
started tins that there was much debate 
and planning done in connection with 
these experiments,” she said. “But there 
was, and it was at a high level of die 
military and scientific establishment 

“That is not to say what the motive was 
for these ethical discussions — whether it 
was high-minded moral reasons or legal 
reasons or public relations reasons — but 
in any case there was an awareness at high 
levels that one could not proceed in the 
area of radiation and human experiments 
just casually. They took it seriously." 

Among the papers unearthed by the 
committee are documents that staff mem- 
bers estimate will increase the number of 
known experiments by at least 10-fold, 
from about 60 to 600. Most of (he experi- 
ments involved exposing troops to varying 


amounts of radiation, usually without in- 
forming them of the risks or seeking their 
consent 

At the time; tire documents suggest, be- 
ing the subject of experiments was counted 
as one of die expected hazards of military 
life and training — not unlike subjecting 
soldiers to live fire in t raining exercises — 
and was not considered to be human ex- 
perimentation. 

The committee also found that, contrary 
to the belief that there was little debate 
about the ethics of such experimentation 
in the 1950s, in fact, army ethical guide- 
lines written in 1953 were far stricter than 
the current rules. 

Bui the rules — a nearly verbatim copy 
of the Nuremberg Code, a set of ethical 
principles that came out of the Nuremberg 
war crimes trials after World War H — did 
not become operating guidelines, appar- 
ently because they were declared top se- 
cret. 

One of the most important bits of histo- 
ry found in the hundreds of thousands of 
documents so far received by the co mmi t" 
tee, Dr. Faden said, is that a fixture of 
current ethical debates — whether it is 
possible to offer patients honest treatment 
and experiment on them at the same time 
— appears to have been a consideration in 
even the earliest documents of Cold War 
experiments. 

An Atomic Energy Commission memo- 
randum dated ApriTl7, 1947, recommends 
that human experimentation not be made 
public. “It is desired that no document be 
released which refers to experiments with 
humans and might have an adverse effect 
on public opinion or result in legal suits,” 
the memorandum says. “Documents cov- 
ering such work in this field should be 
classified 'secret’ ” The memorandum was 
also classified secret 

In the fall of 1947 the co mmi ssion, 
which later became the Nuclear Regula- 
tory Commission, established a division of 
biology and medicine and the Advisory 
Committee on Biology and Medicine 


made up of outside experts, to consider 
future human and animal experimenta- 
tion. 

Two years earlier, 18 patients — the 
subjects of The Albuquerque Tribune arti- 
cle — were injected with plutonium to help 
track its course in the body. The committee 
has found that in 1947 the military pro- 
posed that more systematic studies be con- 
ducted. While this was disapproved, some 
individual experiments, including the in- 
jection of radioactive material into hu- 
mans, continued in June and July 1947. 

After repeated requests from the mili - 
iaiy and private researchers to conduct 
radiation experiments cm humans. Dr. 
Shields Warren, the chief medical officer 
of the Atomic Energy Commission, said in 


July 1949 that he was “taking an increas- 
ingly dim view of h uman experimenta- 


The debate continued cm one track, but 
so did the experiments on an o the r! in the 
absence of firm policy to the contrary. 

The Defense Department tried to initi- 
ate experiments using atomic isotopes to 
conduct total-body irradiation experi- 
ments on healthy h uman subjects. Offi* 


ments on healthy h uman subjects. Offi- 
cials of the commission, chiefly Dr. Wap* 
ren, protested, but soon relented. 

Since the commission controlled the 
supply of radioactive materials, Dr. War- 
ren was apparently able to block some of 
the worst experiments, which called, for 
total-body irradiation of healthy subjects. <C 

But some researchers were able ttFget- 
around the commission’s objections. Hun-, 
dreds of people were irradiated by uMng . 
cancer patients who presumably mights 
have benefited or, at least, whosc^ Jjves^ 
would not be greatly shortened W 1 ## ' 

In September 1951 the Jomt Pant£te^ : 
the M edical Aspects of Atomic 

wer enu merous reasons ; 

experiments in atomic bomb expIosfcfiS" .. 
and later documents show tb&tat i; 

of the experiments mentioned were earned ' 

out . r . - ,JE£S£f. 


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Eage 6 


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n 


Is China Developing 
New Nuclear Arms? 


Study Cites Recent Testing 


[ Compiled by Our Sttfff From DhjvtJies 

\ LONDON — An assessment 
j ™ “K yields of nuclear tests 
j conducted by China over the 
past year suggests it is develop- 
; mg a number of new nuclear 
; weapons, according to a survev 
■ 'released Wednesday. 

The annual report on global 
military power from the Lon- 
don-based International Insti- 
tute for Strategic Studies was 
prepared before the latest Chi- 
nese detonation last week. But 
it covered earlier nuclear blasts 
carried out in June and October 
1993. 

• “An assessment of the yields 
of the tests and of previous tests 
suggests that a number c>f new 
nuclear weapons are being de- 
veloped," the report said. 

It said the October explosion 
had a yield of between 50 and 
100 kilotons of TNT while the 
June test was smaller, between 
10 and 60 kilotons. In 1992. 
China tested a much larger 
weapon, equivalent to 1 million 
tons of TNT. 

“The differences in yields 


weapons programs. 

Tne report said China was 
also continuing to develop two 
new ballistic missiles, one with 
an expected range of 8,000 kilo- 
meters (5,000 miles) that could 
be ground or submarine- 
launched. the other with a range 
of 12.000 kilometers. 

The report also noted that 
China was modernizing its con- 
ventional armed forces, acquir- 
ing eight Cobra attack helicop- 
ters. four Kiowa scout 
helicopters, and four Chinook 
transport helicopters in the past 
12 months. (AFP, Reiners) 


U. S. and North Koreans Aim 
To Wind Up Talks Thursday 


The Assortmetl Pres\ 


GENEVA — U. S. and 
North Korean talks on Pyong- 
yang's nuclear program. dead- 
locked for two weeks, contin- 
ued Wednesday and the current 
round is expected to be 
wrapped up Thursday, officials 
said. 

The United States has ac- 
cused North Korea of back- 
tracking on an outline accord 
reached in August, under which 
Pyongyang agreed to open up 
its nuclear facilities in exchange 
for technical aid and for diplo- 
matic links with Washington. 

Late Tuesday, the North Ko- 
rean Foreign Ministry’ spokes- 
man, Ho Jong, said there was a 
slight hope that a way out of the 
stalemate could be found. “In 
some parts a little progress was 
made." he said after an eight- 
hour session at the North Kore- 
an diplomatic mission. 

The U.S. chief negotiator. 
Robert Gallucci. was more 
guarded. 

“Whether we really made 
progress, we won’t know until 


tomorrow's meeting," he said. 
In the talks Wednesday, experts 
were expected to thrash out 
technical issues. 

North Korea is still balking 
at allowing inspectors into two 
crucial sites. 

The West suspects the sites 
contain evidence that North 
Korea has been developing nu- 
clear weapons. 


EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 


British Rewrite 
10 Commandments 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 13. 1994 


ii 



fifths 

f; •'Sfc'.S 




mm 




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tested suggest that a number of 
new weapons are being devel- 
oped,'” the institute said 

Some experts believe China is 
trying to develop land-based 
missiles with increased range, 
capable of carrying multiple 
warheads that could be 
launched at several targets. 

The CIA director. R. James 
Woolsey Jr., said last year that 
China was recruiting scientists 
from the former Soviet Union 
for help with a wide range of 






Muslim Militants 
Protest in Dhaka 
Against Feminist 


DHAKA, Bangladesh — 
Tho usan ds of Islamic mili- 


fete 


pit? 




Esr.z3^ 


m 




- gr. 


^ cized the government for fail- 

ing 10 create a blasphemy law 
2 to deal with people they con- 
,J sider to be apostates, includ- 
\ ing Dr. Nasrin. 

1 It was the first major protest 

against Dr, Nasrin since her 
departure. She sparked oui- 

S »e among fundamentalist 
uslims after an article in 
which she was quoted as say- 
ing that Islam's holy book, the 
Koran, should be “revised 
thoroughly." 

_____ Dr. Nasrin. who has since 

~ ~ Ro*k« received death threats, said 

Police in the Bangladeshi capital turning back fundamentalists who marched on a government building Wednesday, she had been misquoted. 


2 More Plague Deaths in India Bring Total to 58 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW DELHI — Two more people died of plague 
Wednesday in the western Indian city of Surat, bring- 
ing the nationwide death toll from the outbreak of the 
disease to 58, the Press Trust of India reported. 

The two deaths in Surat, the coastal city at the 
center of the three-week-old plague epidemic, were the 
first reported in India in five days. 

The deaths took to 54 the number of plague fatali- 
ties in Surat, 270 kilometers (170 miles) north of 
Bombay. The disease has claimed three lives in New 
Delhi and one in the southern state of Karnataka. 

Indian officials say the outbreak is under control. 
The World Health Organization has said the epidemic 
will be declared over when no new cases are reported 
for 12 days. The last new cases were reported Sunday. 


In recent davs the number of suspected patients has 
tapered off sharply and many rictims have been given 
a clean bill of health and sent home. 

The World Health Organization said the disease had 
had a “very limited spread" outside of the originally 
infected areas in and around Surat. 

In a statement, the organization said that some cases 
of plague appeared to have been imported into Bom- 
bay, but there was no sign of the disease spreading in 
Bombay. Delhi. Calcutta or Madras. 

Pneumonic plague, which can kill people quickly 
unless it is treated with antibiotics, is spread by fleas 
from infected rats or by sneezes and coughs from 
infected people. 

The outbreak, the first in India in nearly 30 years. 


Two-thirds of young Britons 
today live in a moral no- 
rnan’s-iand in which the line 
between good and evil is badly 
blurred, according to a survey. 

Most members of a sample 


group of young people, aged 
15 to 35, could identify no 
more than three of the Ten 
Commandments. Traditional 
moral models and references, 
such as church, the monarchy 
and politicians, had little posi- 
tive influence on them, the 
Mori research institute found 
in a poll taken for the BBC. 
And yet. pollsters said, a prac- 
tical new moral code has aris- 
en in which God has no part. 


composite list: Thou shall not 
kill: thou shall not drive 
drunk: thou shall not steal: 
thou shall treat others as thou 
wisheth to be treated: thou 
shall not resort to violence: 
thou shall not be a racist: thou 
shall be environmentally con- 
scious: thou shall not take 
drugs: thou shall be loyal to 
thy friends: and thou shall not 
commit adultery. 


I would have been: Thou shall 
I not be sexist. 


Around Europe 


Asked to suggest their own 
Ten Commandments, the 
young people offered this 


Confirming the influence of 
political correctness, the 
group’s “11th Command- 
ment." had there been one. 


As people live longer, the 
number of four-generation 
families in France is growing 
fast, reports the daily Libera- 
tion. In a reversal of conven- 
tional wisdom, links between 
generations have become 
stronger. 

The numbers of healthy- 
young grandparents with lime 
on their hands has risen even 
as more and more working 


i mothers — many of them sin- 
! gle — struggle with the heavy 
j demands of daily life. The re- 
sult: Grandparents and even 
great-grandparents play an 
important part in helping with 
children and household tasks. 

Id France, about one-third 
of grandparents, and one- 
fourth of great-grandparents. 
[ look after their grandchildren 
; at least one day a week. Nearly 
45 percent take the children 
during school vacations. 


out its carrier pigeon unit, 
have threatened to force a na- 
tional referendum on the issue. 
The government said last 
month that it planned to give 
up its 7.000 pigeons within two 
years and reassign the 266 men 
responsible for them in a mon- 


ey-saving move. A pro-pigeon 
committee contended in. ft 
pointed letter to the Defense 
Ministry that the pigeons are 
still useful, being difficult to 
spot in wartime, and are popu- 
lar with the public. 


Bird-lovers, angered by the 
j Swiss Army’s plans to phase 


Brian Knowlton 



To Russian 


, ... -•■***' 




Approach 
On Kurils 


. • J 
r E , 

•- ' ? 

fc.-dtf 


Agtnct FnmtX’hvsir 

TOKYO — Japan reacted 
coolly Wednesday to a Russian 
plan for a free economic zone in 
the disputed Kuril Islands. 

The Kyodo news agency 
quoted sources in Moscow as 
saying that First Deputy Prune 
Minister Oleg N. Soskovets 
conveyed the Russian govern- 
ment's proposal to Japan’s am- 
bassador, Koji Watanabe, on 
Monday. 

Mr. Soskovets reportedly 
urged Japan's participation in 
the project to help bring a “con- 
structive solution" to. the dis- 
pute, which involves four of the 
Kuril Usands, called the North- 
ern Territories by Tokyo, 
Kyodo said. 

But Chief Cabinet Secretary 




flo!'* b 

nil HiM*l 


Kozo Igaradu declared at a J J «’ |*f|* 
news conference Wednesday, jK-u/* * 


led many countries to cut air and sea links with New 
Delhi and impose a variety of travel curbs that have 
caused huge losses to the Indian economy. 

Some countries have begun lifting restrictions on 
Indian travelers and goods arriving at airports and 
seaports, but Russia suspended all flights to and from 
India on Tuesday. 

Quarantine officials at China’s border with Hong 
Kong turned away eight travelers arriving from 
plague-stricken areas of India, an official report said. 

President Hashemi Rafsanjani of Iran dropped In- 
dia from an Asian tour this week, apparently because 
of the plague. 

But Malaysia lifted a two- week-old ban on flights to 
India, the news agency Bemama said. (AFP, AP) 


“It is difficult for us to accept 
the proposal for creating a free 
economic zone on the islands 
with the condition that they are 
kept under Russia's jurisdic- 
tion.” 

Japan maintains that the four 
islands were illegally occupied 
by the Soviet Union in the clos- 
ing days of World War II. Ja- 
pan demands their return and 
says that joint development 
projects on the Kurils are possi- 
ble only when Moscow recog- 
nizes Japan's sovereignty over 
them. 


Establishing a free economic 
zone, where foreign enterprises 
can be given financial help such 
as low taxes, was originally part 
of the Russian government's 
plan to develop the islands, the 
Kyodo report said. 

But a shortage of funds has 
forced suspension of the pro- 
ject. 

Following last week's earth- 
quake; which devastated the 
Kuril Islandds, Russia is be- 
lieved to have judged that it 
should take advantage of the 
timing and request direct eco- 
nomic hdp from Japan to re- 
construct the islands, the report M 
said. ** 


The quake, measuring 8.1 on 
the Richter scale; reportedly 
killed 1 1 people, injured some 
200 others and made about 
1,000 people homeless on the 
Kurils. 




arlsberti beer 


The w 

news* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Page 


Bonn’s Shaky Free Democrats Still Hold Key to the Vote 


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By Rick Atkinson 

Wcshmgicn Pen Service 

BERLIN — As Sunday’s German na tional 
election nears, the new campaign slogan for the 
liberal Free Democrats summarizes the party's 
plight with unusual clarity: “This time every- 
thing's at stake.” 

For theFree Democrats, Chancellor Helmut 
Kohrs junior coalition partner, it all hangs in the 
balance this week — self-respect, influence and, 
above all. power. If Mr. Kohl fails to win a fourth 
term, it will very likely be because the Free 
Democrats have let him down. 

To preserve the status quo, Mr. Kohl's Chris- 
tian Democrats need Free Democrat support to 
rnamain a majority. But the Free Democrats are 
floundering badly. In six consecutive state as- 
sembly elections, and in the European Parlia- 
ment elections in June, they failed to muster the 
requisite 5 percent needed for representation. In 
several races they have been h umilia te d , getting 
only 1.7 percent in Saxony and 22 percent in 
Brandenburg last month. 


Whether the party can break the 5 percent 
threshhold also needed to remain in the Bundes- 
tag has become the preeminent question. Most 
opinion polls this week shw the Free Democrats 
squeaking by with 6 or 7 percent, but one survey 
indicated that the party would get only 4 percent 
and thus be bounced from Parliament 

This could cost Mr. Kohl the office he has held 
for 12 years. More likely, he would be forced into 
a “grand coalition” with the opposition Soda] 
Democrats, a shotgun marriage that few Ger- 
mans see as either healthy or desirable. 

The Free Democrats have served as junior 
partners in all but two of the 16 governments 
formed in Bonn since 1949. After serving with 
die Soda] Democrats from 1969 until 1982, the 
parry changed horses to the Christian Demo- 
crats, giving Mr. Kohl the chancellor’s office he 
has held ever since. 

In the last election, held shortly after German 
unification four years ago, the Free Democrats 
collected a respectable 1 1 percent, enough get 5 
of 20 ministries in Mr. Kohl’s government. 


In postwar German politics, the Free Demo- 
crats have positioned themselves as a guardian of 
civil liberties and a proponent of greater rights 
for Germany’s 6.5 million foreigners. They also 
espouse free-markei economics, minimal govern- 
ment regulation and a preference for private 
initiative over public intervention. They have 
been traditionally strong among white-collar 
professionals, shopkeepers and the German Mii- 
telstand of midsized companies. 

“A Parliament without the liberals — without 
liberalism, openness and tolerance — that would 
be a different republic," Foreign Minister Klaus 
Kinkel, the Free Democrat party chairman, re- 
cently told a German newspaper. “Germany has 
truly had the good fortune after the war to be 
ruled from the middle, and not from the fringes." 

But the liberals have been hard-pressed to 
make the case for their mdispensabilily. The 
party's recent efforts to promote a leaner federal 
budget proved ineffectual, as did resistance to 
wider police eavesdropping powers and the 
adoption of yet another social benefit — and tax 


toiy r 

;affe, the Free Democrats 
rives to be the party of “higher 


— in the Form of mandatory nursing-hotne insur- 
ance. In one 
declared 
income earners. 

Finally, a party that collected more than 10 
percent of the vote in Eastern Germany four 
years ago has been unable to sustain any strength 
in the East 

Not least among the party's woes m Western 
Germany is a dearth of strong, colorful personal- 
ities. Mr. Kinkel, who replaced Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher as party chieftain two years ago, has 
□ever come close to matching Mr. Genscher’s 
popularity or political touch. 

Despite these shortcomings, the liberals’ 
chances on Sunday look reasonably good. Under 
German voting procedures, voters cast two bal- 
lots: one for an individual parliamentary candi- 
date and one for a party as a whole: The Free 
Democrats traditionally have benefited from this 
second baflot, which some voters see as a means 
of tempering extremes of the political right and 
political left 


On Election Bourse , 
Race Is Wide Open 

German Contest Remains Close 
For Buyers of Political ‘Shares’ 

Despite the recent rise in 

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Delors Keeps Mum 
On a Race in France 

Cloudy View From Brussels 


By Tom Bueride 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The inten- 
tions of Jacques Delors — 
whether to ru.i or not to run for 
'the presidency of France — are 
the political question of the 
hour in Paris. But for those 
looking for an answer, Mr. De- 
lors rem ains equally an enigma 
hare in the capital of Europe. 

The president of the Europe- 
an Commission has gone quiet 
as he nears the end of his 10- 
givmg few hints of 
j into the French fray but 
avoiding any controversy that 
-could hinder a campaign. 

He has steered clear, for ex- 
ample, of debates over a recent 
German proposal for faster in- 
tegration among a hand core of 
European Union nations or the 
wider use of English within the 
.commission. 

V At the same time, Mr. Delors 
.is maintaining a rigorous 12- 
hour workday focused on fine- 
-tuning a report on jobs and 
competitiveness that he will de- 
liver to EU leaders at their sum- 
: nut meeting in Essen, Germany, 
in December. His message, call- 
( ing for lower government defi- 
cits, increased training and in- 
vestment and social solidarity 
ibetween haves and have-nots, 
.could serve either as the vale- 
dictory plea of a devoted Euro- 
pean or as a springboard into 
•French politics, aides say. 


Which it will be is a question 
that even Mr. Dclors’s closest 
advisers and fellow Socialist 
politicians in France cannot an- 
swer. 

“Even when he talks to his 
closest advisers," said one Brus- 
sels consultant who has worked 
closely with Mr. Delors. “he 
doesn’t bare his chest." 

Mr. Delors has good reasons 
for staying quiet. His states- 
man’s role as president of the 
EU executive agency helps keep 
him at the top of the opinion 
polls even as he stays free of the 
Socialist Party’s internal wars. 

A poll in Fiance’s Journal du 
Dimanche on Sunday con- 
firmed that Mr. Delors was the 
only Socialist with a chance of 
winning the presidential elec- 
tion in May, indicating that he 
would win a runoff against Jac- 
ques Chirac, the GaoBist leader, 
out would lose narrowly to 
Prime Minister Edouard Balla- 
dur. 

What is more, uncertainty 
over the health of President 
Francois Mitterrand, who is 
battling prostate cancer, is 
helping to keep Mr. Delors on 
the sidelines. A sudden deterio- 
ration and resignation could 
prompt a snap dection before 
Mr. Delors steps down in Brus- 
sels on Jan. 5, making it hard 
for him to enter the race. 

“He hasn’t decided yet,” said 
one longtime adviser. Mr. De- 



Nathabt KcwhtdiftiRann* 

Jacques Delors, talking with an associate Wednesday, is keeping busy as he prepares to leave his EU post in January. 


lore said in an interview with 
the Paris newspaper Liberation 
on Wednesday that he would 
not announce a decision before 
January. 

Mr. Delors is “hesitant,” this 
adviser said because as a man 
with a passion for policy over 
politics, he does not relish the 
demands of an election cam- 
paign on Ins stamina or his f am- 
ity 

Perhaps more important, a 
senior Socialist politician who 
met Mr. Delors recently said he 
was troubled by an “incoher- 


ence" between his beliefs and 
the party’s direction, including 
a recent proposal to combat un- 
employment by cutting the 
wont week to 33 hours with no 
cut in pay. 

Mr. Delors, who is reviled by 
the far left for turnin g the So- 
cialists to the hard-money aus- 
terity policies long advocated 
by Europe’s conservatives, re- 
jected such painless prescrip- 
tions in his white paper on jobs 
and competitiveness. 

But if he does decide to run, it 


will be to defend Ms vision of 
France as helping to forge deep- 
er European integration, not to 
stump for the party platform. 
“The Socialist Party can't im- 
pose any policies on Delors that 
contradict his convictions," a 
senior aide said 
And so for now. Mr. Delors 
does what comes naturally: 
work. Aides say he is deter- 
mined to go to Essen in Decem- 
ber to make sure that EU lead- 
ers do not use the economic 
recovery as an excuse to avoid 
attacking the deep-rooted 


causes of Europe’s unemploy- 
ment problem. 

He is keeping up an active 
travel schedme. so much so, in 
fact, that he will not be malting 
the commission president’s tra- 
ditional farewell tour of EU 
capitals. Mr. Delors is also in 
top form physically, showing no 
trace of the back problems that 
plagued him for much of the 
past year. On a visit to Chile 
two weeks ago, “he was fresher 
after 17 hours on a plane than 1 
am after 3 hours in a car to 
Paris." one aide said 


By Brandon Mitchcner 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — As Ger- 
many enters the final election 
lap, the Frankfurt Stock Ex- 
change, where blue chip stock 
prices have risen more than 5 

percent in three days, has clear- 
ly placed its bets on Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl. 

But on the Election Bourse 
operated by the universities of 
Bochum and Regensburg, the 
outcome is far from conclusive. 

“It’s extremely close, closer 
than most people realize," said 
Joachim Wennann, an econom- 
ics professor in Bochum who 
supervises the exchange, which 
is actually a computer in Iowa 
on which political parties are 
bought and sold by electronic 
mail. "Everything is possible." 

Aside from their novelty val- 
ue. election exchanges are in- 
creasingly notable for the quali- 
ty of their predictions, often 
more reliable than those of es- 
tablished opinion polls. 

“The trick with this bourse is 
that we don’t ask people which 
party they personally prefer, 
but rather how they expect the 
election to end" Mi- Weimann 
said. “Personal preferences 
shouldn’t play any role.” 

“In the last U. S. presidential 
elections the final results were 
very close to those predicted by 
the bourse," agreed Alexander 
Krone. 25, an economics stu- 
dent with 140 Deutsche marks 
worth of shares in the Social 
Democrats, Greens. Democrat- 
ic Socialists and Others. 

According to Wednesday’s 
prices, neither the current rul- 
ing coalition of Christian Dem- 
ocrats and Free Democrats, nor 
the opposition Social Demo- 
cratic Party and any one other 
party together, would be worth 
more than 50 pfennigs, the mar- 
ket equivalent of a parliamenta- 
ry majority. 

Mr. Kohl’s Christian Demo- 
cratic Union and its Bavarian 
sister party, which are bundled 
as one, were listed at 40.8 pfen- 
nigs, the Social Democrats at 35 
pfennigs, the Free Democrats at 
6.1, the Greens at 7.9 and the 
reform communist Party of 
Democratic Socialism at 4.4. 
The far-right Republican Party, 
with X5 pfennigs, and Others, 
with 35, were too low to expect 
to be represented in Parliament. 


£ 


furt stock prices, the like- 
lihood of a new grand coalition 
or another, shakier political al- 
liance is considered almost as 
likely — in both game and reali- 
ty — as the continuation of the 
current regime. 

With an air of pride, Mr. 
Weimann noted that real-world 
11 results after much turbu- 
ence, haVe gradually come 
closer to the bourse’s, which 
have been "relatively stable" 
since the it opened for business 
on May 30. 

In the latest opinion poll 
from Germany’s Aliens bach In- 
stitute, published Wednesday, 
the two Christian panics boast- 
ed 42 percent support, the So- 
cial Democrats 34.9 percent, 
the Free Democrats 8 percent, 
the Greens 8.1 and the reform 
communists 3.9. 

Some 400 students, profes- 
sors and university employees 
in Bochum and Regensburg are 
participating in the exchange, 
risking sums between 20 and 
1.000 marks on the outcome. 

Klaus Zolzer, 31. who has in- 
vested 500 DM in the gome, 
agreed that the exchange’* 
prices are relatively objective. 
“1 invested u lot in the Christian 
Democrats because l thought 
they were undervalued," he 
said, adding. “I’m not really the 
type to support them." 

Jens Wiecking, an institu- 
tional investments adviser at 
Merck, Find: & Co. in Dussel- 
dorf, meanwhile, said the recent 
rise in Frankfurt stock prices 
could easily reverse the day af- 
ter Sunday’s vote. 


2 Ministers Replaced 
In Belgian Government 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — Prime Minis- 
ter Jean-Luc Dehaene of Bel- 
gium has reshuffled his govern- 
ment to replace two ministers, 
but maintained the political 
makeup of his center-left coali- 
tion, officials said. 

Frank Vandenbroecke re- 
placed Willy Claes as foreign 
minister and deputy prime min- 
ister; Mr. Claes becomes 
NATO secretary-general next 
week. Johan Vande Lanotte 
took the place of Interior Min- 
ister Louis Tobback. 


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Coming 
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


OPINION 


Jtmlb 


INTERNATIONAL 


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Sribuuc 


Pub Lu bed With The New Wk Timw and The Wawhinjann Port 


Truth Corrects the Ruble 


' Russia’s ruble has been f alling like a 
ptone, which is dramatic but not neces- 
gnly a bad thing. Russia runs a high 
Inflation rate, which makes the ruble de- 
cline against more stable currencies. Its 
central bank has unwisely devoted a lot 
of money in recent months to an attempt 
Jo hold the ruble firm against the dollar. 
That kind of artificial propping always 
fails in the end. The bank apparently 
[oslized in late September that it could no 
longer stave off the inevitable, and ceased 
ds expensive currency support operation. 
The downward swoop followed, with a 
tremendous acceleration on Tuesday. 

• Massive swings in exchange rates are 
dangerous, not least because they frighten 
investors and traders who are important to 
a country’s growth. But with the ruble 
inflating at a rate that fluctuates between 5 
and 10 percent a month, it had become 
severely overvalued in respect to the dollar 
and the other hard currencies. An overval- 
ued currency is seriously damaging, for it 
encourages imports of goods for consump- 
tion and discourages the exports on which 
jobs depend. That distortion is now being 
ended, although in a disruptive way. 

2 The real threat to the Russian economy 
is not the falling exchange rate but the 


inflation that causes it The Russians 
have not yet managed to organize an 
effective tax system, and the result is an 
enormous budget deficit Until the new 
Russian state is able to bring its revenues 
into a reasonable relationship with its 
spending, it will be idle to talk about 
stable exchange rates. 

Amid all this turmoil and evidence of 
things gone wrong, it is important not to 
miss the larger truth that Russia's eco- 
nomic revolution is, so far, basically suc- 
ceeding. The standard of living seems 
clearly to be rising on average, although 
not for everyone. A well-off commercial 
middle class is rapidly expanding. More 
than half the economy's output is being 
produced by the private sector. 

Russia has immense resources, chief 
among them a well-educated popula- 
tion. Its economy is capable of growing 
strongly unless it is crippled by too 
many political mistakes. Trying to main- 
tain an overvalued ruble was a mistake, 
but now that is being corrected. Govern- 
ments habitually confuse exchange rates 
with national prestige and economic 
health, but it is a misconception in which 
no one else ought to indulge. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Getting China on Board 


‘ The United States has now got China 
to sign on a dotted public line that it will 
not feed local nuclear missile races in 
South Asia or elsewhere in the world. 
That the Chinese had to be dragged into 
what a responsible country should have 
seen as a supple recognition of national 
self-interest is not reassuring. China's in- 
sistence on selling M-ll missile techno- 
logy to Pakistan could not be ignored. 
Those sales, which could provide a way for 
Pakistan to deliver nuclear warheads on 
Indian targets, led the American govern- 
ment last year to cut off Beijing's access to 
highly prized American satellite techno- 
logy. Feeling the bite, China eventually 
came around in its self-protective fashion. 

Not that Chinese indulgence of Paki- 
stan has been the sole factor driving 
South Asia toward a nuclear confronta- 
tion. India's work on a ground-to-ground 
missile of its own also contributes to a 
looming danger. But what China has been 
slow to realize is that nudear nonprolifera- 
tion necessarily entails a universal com- 
mitment- The common requirement to en- 
gage South Asia in a broad security 
dialogue is just a part of it. China goes the 
wrong way, for instance, when it contin- 
ues, as it did last week, the nudear testing 
that makes it the only continuing tester 


among the five professed nuclear powers. 
It goes the right way when it joins, as it 
also did last week, international efforts to 
cap nudear armories by writing a verifi- 
able ban on production of fissile materials. 

For the United States, drawing China 
into the collective of nations seeking limi- 
tations on national nuclear aims is just 
one part, but an essential part, of a large 
and complex relationship. In President 
Bill Clinton's time, the crux of it has been 
to find a politically sustainable way to 
promote a reluctant China's adherence to 
its formal pledges of respect for human 
rights. When China's foreign minis ter 
was in Washington the other day, his 
strategy was evident: to offer procedural 
steps and token progress on human rights 
— releasing one prominent dissident, for 
instance, but continuing to detain many 
others — while making more substantial 
progress on other issues. 

This was the basis on which he invited 
Mr. Clinton to visit China — a trip that 
would erase the political memory of the 
Chinese government’s anti-democracy 
Tiananme n massacre of 1989. But China 
has plenty more work to do on the human 
rights front to make it worthwhile for an 
American president to take the trip. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Doing Right by Poland 


The Clinton administration is deciding 
whether to admit Poland and other coun- 
tries in Eastern Europe to NATO, which 
is tantamount to committing U.S. troops 
to their defense. At a recent meeting of 
NATO ministers, Volker ROhe of Ger- 
many began a drive to broaden member- 
ship in the alliance, setting off active 
discussion in Washington. There are ex- 
cellent reasons that such a commitment 
should not be made now. 

Never mind that Eastern Europe's ar- 
mies are still largely Soviet-trained and 
equipped and not ready to join NATO. 
Enlarging NATO would oblige the United 
States to defend countries mainly threat- 
ened by internal disunity and their own 
regional rivalries, not Russian resurgence. 

Furthermore, expanding NATO now 
could jeopardize the future of Boris Yelt- 
sin and fellow reformers in Russia, in- 
creasing East European insecurity. Why 
run this risk when NATO membership 
does not meet Poland's most immediate 
need, which is political reassurance rath- 
er than a military alliance? 

It is understandable why Western-ori- 
ented Poles wish to join NATO. For them 
NATO is Club West, The problem is that 
most Russians still regard it as a military 
alliance of America, Germany and others 
'against Russia. That may change as 
Western ties with Russia thicken and 


Russia’s westernize rs strengthen their 
tenuous grip on power. But for now Rus- 
sia’s extremists can use the bogeyman of 
NATO against Mr. Yeltsin and ms allies. 

If NATO is too quick to swallow Po- 
land, the extremists may swallow Mr. 
Yeltsin. Poland will be more secure if 
Russia stays on the road to reform and 
out of the hands of vengeful nationalists. 

Nor is Poland in any immediate dan- 
ger. If, despite Western efforts, Ukraine 
falls apart and Russia reverts to aggres- 
sive nationalism, it will be years before it 
can mobilize an army that could threaten 
Poland — time enough for the United 
States to forge a firm military alliance. 

In the meantime there are ways to tie 
Poland more closely to the West without 
stoking Russian nationalism. One is ad- 
mission to the European Union, which 
would boost Poland’s economy. Another 
is for NATO to make the most of the 
Partnership for Peace with Eastern Europe 
and Russia, moving beyond technical mili- 
tary cooperation and joint exercises to 
foster democratic patterns of civil-military 
cooperation. A third is to strengthen the 
web of cultural, economic and political 
contacts between Poland and the West 
Such reassurances will meet Poland's le- 
gitimate economic and political needs 
without destabilizing a reforming Russia. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


In Russia, Power Passes Hands 

A few days ago the state electric 
energy company in Moscow cut ofr 
power to the Strategic Missile Com- 
mand Center because the center had 
not paid its bills. 

The transformation of the ex-Soviet 
Union continues to have unpredictable 
results which, in this case, could have 
deactivated one of the most important 

parts of Russia’s military. 

. The decision, which would have been 
inconceivable during the era of Com- 
munist totalitarianism, was mobilized 


by the debt of more than S20 million 
that the Moscow military owes Mosen- 
ergo, the state company without which 
the powerful missiles would not even 
have the force of firecrackers. 

The fact that the measure was 
approved by the energy company’s 
highest authorities suggests that 
the transformation of the political 
regime has brought a change of mental- 
ity from the old monolithic and obedi- 
ent bureaucracy to the practical and 
autonomous criteria common in the 
capitalist world. 

— La Nation (Buenos Aires). 



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Saddam’s Problem Is That He Himself Is die Problem 


P ARIS — The truth about the current 
crisis with Iraq and the reason the 
United States has deployed so much 
force is that the Clinton administration is 
determined to reach what has become a 
dear — of course, publicly unavowable 
— U.S. goal: use Saddam Hussein’s , mis- 
takes to escalate the pressure on his re- 
gime until be is overthrown. 

In U.S. eyes, sanctions have gained an 
unspoken new requirement: they should 
not be lifted until Saddam is ousted. 

Saddam's problem is that his limited 
notion of realism blinds him to geopoliti- 
cal facts. Baghdad complains that vindic- 
tiveness motivates U.S. opposition to any 
easing of sanctions, without grasping the 
full dimensions of policy in Washington. 
Mistakenly assuming that he can force 
people to make a deal, Saddam, by his 
own miscalculations, constantly creates 
new opportunities for the U.S.-fed deter- 
mination to get rid of him. 

In provoking this crisis, his design was 
to heighten military tensions, hoping to 
arouse fears of a desperate but destruc- 
tive Iraqi suicide raid into Kuwait — 
without actually doing it. of course. His 
idea was to show that he is not paralyzed. 

He brought thousands of stateless 
Bedouin civilians to the border to mount 
protest demonstrations against Kuwait, 
hoping that could create a clamor in the 
Arab world. It was a miscalculation 
about his isolation. In fact, most Arab 
regimes were probably in a mood of 
“ mak e my day," spoiling for an occasion 
to see his remaining forces smashed. 

He also miscalculated U.S. policy. In 
his wishful thinking. Saddam wanted to 
see Jimmy Carter arrive in Baghdad to 
negotiate with him, perhaps a deal in 
which sanctions were eased and then he 
recognized Kuwait. 

This obsession with forcing the Ameri- 
cans to make a deal had already back- 
fired once when Saddam tried it with 
President George Bush, hoping to get 
American attention by invading Kuwait. 
Instead he got force in 1990. This time 
again he gets force instead of recognition. 

President BUI Clinton, whatever his 
behavior in other foreign crises, views the 
Iraqi regime as a dangerous direct threat 
to the oU-rich Gulf and to the overall 
stabilizing c lima te in the Middle East So 
Washington has firmly adopted a policy 
of hermetically isolating Iraq, a strategy 
similar to the policy of containment to- 
ward the Soviet Union in the Cold War. 


By AJbdul-Karim Abou-Nasr 

The object is to weaken Saddam’s regime 
and show other leaders that he is a pariah 
who can be ignored. 

Already before this crisis. UJS. offi- 
cials had let it be known that Washington 
was determined to maintain the United 
Nations embargo against Iraqi oil sales 
until further world economic growth 
stimulated the oU market so that fresh 
supplies would not harm exporting coun- 
tries that have resisted Iraq. 

Nor was Washington ready to see the 
Iraqi embargo lifted until a peace accord 
had been reached between Israel and 
Syria — as a sign of which countries are 
rewarded, which punished. As part of 
this policy of quarantine, Washington 
even frowned on political feelers put out 
by Israel toward Iraq. 

The fact is that the Clinton administra- 
tion does not want anyone to make any 


deal with Saddam or even negotiate with 
him over sanctions. Any contact could 
start his rehabilitation. 

Why is Washington so hostile to Sad- 
dam now after choosing to leave him in 
power after the Gulf War? His survival in 
1991 stemmed partly from an agreement, 
which Arab leaders have disclosed, that 
the coalition would not enter Baghdad. 
But instead of seizing that opportunity 
for a “conversion" in his thinking — as 
Mr. Clinton once said he was hoping to 
see — Saddam has sunk deeper into his 
old reflex of bullying. 

This crude tactic is Saddam's idea of 
“realism” — a phony toughness that used 
to be shared by many leaders in the 
Middle East, including Israelis. Now, in 
contrast, all these leaders — both Israelis 
and men like the PLO's Yasser Arafat 
and Syria's Hafez Assad — have adopt- 
ed a new definition of political realism, 
involving compromises after hard work 
to gauge the balance of forces and limits 





of each side’s vital interests, induing 
one’s own self-interest. • .... . 

Even Libya’s Moaromar Gadhahtes 
observed enough of this change to team 
to keep quiet Only Saddam doesn t get 
it — that by scorning political realism as 
capitulation and loss of face, he *4 com- 
pletely out of phase with what is hap- 
pening around him. n 

What did his tough-guy “realism dic- 
tate this time? Saddam knew that the UN 
special commission on Iraqi 
merit, in a report delivered on Oct. JO. 
was not going to call explicitly for an end 
to sanctions. He was convinced Aat ef- 
forts by other countries, mainly France, 
Russia and Turkey, would fan even to 
ease sanctions against the oppoatktti of 
the United States. Britain andthc Gulf : 
states. Ignoring the advice of his Frown ^ 
and Russian friends — that good behav- 
ior might gradually win clemency he.- 
resorted to a show of force. . 

That is fast turning out to dispay not 
his strength but his weakness. Saddam, 
used to getting his way by creating crises,, • 
fails to grasp the new rules of the'gameT 
By creanng a crisis, he Joses. 

What wul happen now? To overthrow ■. 
the regime, U.S. forces would have to; 
occupy Iraq long enough for a new gov-" 
eminent to emerge. That would require a 
commitment of ground forces that seems 
out of the question. The Iraqi opposition 
has not yet been able to lay the ground- 
work for a popular revolution. 

The alternative is to increase the heal- 
until it ultimately produces a military: r 
coup in Baghdad. The mod likely first 
step is an international agreement to inj 
pose a demilitarized zone on southern 
Iraq to box Saddam in more tightly. If he 
is foolish enough to defy it, U.SMed 
coalition forces will issue an ultimatum, 
then fly air strikes to destroy any raffitaTy 
target they can find — not just heavy 
weapons, but communications facilities, 
command bunkers, headquarters. • 

Saddam Hussein is not mart, but he is 
a textbook case of denial. He refuses to 
see that the Gulf War -seated a deal 
between the United States and its Arab 
allies: there would tie only one policy 
toward Iraq, a policy of “no deaf' — 
and continued punishing isolation until 
Iraq disgorges Saddam. - . 

The writer, a prominent Arab political 
commentator, contributed this comment to ' 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Amid the Bluster, Threats to Transfer Saddam 9 s War Abroad 


W ASHINGTON — Bill 
Clinton has responded 
with splendid resolve to Iraq's 
military thrusts toward KuwaiL 
But President Clinton and his 
generals should not simply pre- 
pare to refight the last war again. 
Saddam Hussein won't. 

Saddam is not likely to wage 
the war be has in mind for Mr. 
Clinton only in the deserts of the 
Iraqi-Kuwaiti frontier. The Iraqi 
dictator has openly warned this 
president to yield to his de- 
•mands or face terror attacks on 
the United States and its allies. 

It is not true that Saddam is 
completely irrational or unpre- 
dictable, as many in the West 
assume. He* manipulates the 
politics of brute force better 
than most leaders. And as he 
did in the spring and summer of 
1990, before he invaded Ku- 
wait, he is again broadcasting 
the steps he intends to take if 
his threats go unheeded. 

On Sept. 27, Saddam pro- 
mised in a speech to his follow- 
ers that he would not stand by 
and allow Iraqis “to die of hun- 
ger" because of United Nations 
sanctions. The speech was im- 
mediately analyzed by Baghdad 
newspapers under his direct con- 
trol. They asked if the United 


By Jim Hoagland 


States really failed to under- 
stand “the meaning of every 
Iraqi becoming a missil e that can 
cross to countries and cities." 

Saddam’s scribes went on to 
warn the world community in 
these terms in the following 

People have now started 
to prepare for hot 
confrontations in more 
than one country 
and continent . 9 


days: “When peoples reach the 
verge of collective death they 
will be able to spread death to 
alL” And: “The patience of the 
Arabs and Muslims is about to 
reach its end and people have 
now started to prepare for hot 
confrontations in more than one 
country and continent.” 

Empty Iraqi rhetoric intended 
to influence the UN debate on 
lifting sanctions? Or real threats 
that Saddam Hussein will try to 
execute? America’s only answer 
can be to hope for the former 


and prepare for the latter — es- 
pecially as sketchy evidence sug- 
gests that the Iraqis may have 
already put in motion terrorist 
networks in America. 

But that evidence and the 
threats coming out of Baghdad 
had not engaged the Clinton 
administration, preoccupied at 
home, in Haiti and elsewhere, 
before last weekend. My guess 
is that Saddam moved his Re- 
publican Guard units through 
the desert to focus Mr. Clin- 
ton’s attention on the dangers 
that Iraq still poses and on the 
deal that would avoid them. 

Do not be surprised, or de- 
ceived, if Saddam now indicates 
that he will lower the tensions he 
has created and recognize Ku- 
wait’s frontier, the major re- 
maining hurdle he has to clear to 
get sanctions lifted. In his mind 
recognizing Kuwait would be a 
meaningless commitment that 
he could reverse when the cir- 
cumstances change. He has over 
the years signed and torn up 
treaties fixing Iraq's border with 
Iran in the Shatt al Arab water- 
way as his needs dictate. 

For Saddam, frontiers are 
etched in blood shed in battle, 


not in ink scrawled on treaties. 
That is why he will be a threat to 
his neighbors as long as he and 
his Ba’ath party survive in power. 

George Bush and his generals, 
Colin Powell and Norman 
Schwarzkopf, continued to un- 
derestimate Saddam when they 
made the political decision to 
let him recover key Republican 
Guard divisions from the Ku- 
wait theater and stay in power at 
the end of Operation Desert 
Storm. The Clinton administra- 
tion was also taking for granted 
Saddam’s greatly weakened state 
until this new wake-up call. 

At the Justice Department 
there has been no aggressive 
pursuit of the many loose ends 
created by Iraqi penetration and 
manipulation of UJS. banks in 
the Bush years. 

More surprisingly. Justice has 
dragged its feet in pursuing 
Abdul Rahman Yasin, an Amer- 
ican citizen of Iraqi origin who 
fled to Baghdad after being 
questioned about his role in the 
bombing of New York’s World 
Trade Center 19 months ago. 

The Yasin case and Iraq’s po- 
tential involvement in the World 
Trade Center blast have been 
pursued more diligently by Lau- 
rie Mylroie, a perceptive analyst 


and writer on Iraq, than by the 
U.S. government Ms. Mylroie 
has concluded that the New 
York attack may have been part 
of a broad revenge campaign by 
Saddam that included the plot to 
assassinate President Bush in 
Kuwait in April 1993. 

That is why she picked , up on 
the recent rush of threatening 
statements in the Baghdad media 
much more quickly than did gov- 
ernment counterterrorist agen- 
cies. which have not assigned a 
high priority to countering Sad- 
dam's operatives in America. The 
Iraqis were unable to mount ter- 
ror operations during Desert 
Storm, the government agencies 
recall Why would they try now? 

There can be no excuse for 
misreading Saddam again. The 
counterterrorist agencies need to 
make Iraq their top priority. 

Iraq’s coercive diplomacy 
cannot be rewarded with a deal 
on sanctions. President Clinton, 
who ordered a one-shot retalia- 
tory raid on Baghdad for the 
Bush plot, needs to emphasize 
consistently to all government . 
departments, not just the Penta- 
gon, that Saddam's survival is a 
continuing threat to American 
interests at home and abroad. 

The Washington Post. 


Time for Hillary to Remember Eleanor and Mount the Big Platform 


W ASHINGTON — Hillary 
Rodham Clinton's office is 
surprisingly modest, not much 
larger than that of a junior part- 
ner at a big law firm, with a post- 
er-size photograph of her hus- 
band. looking serious and a bit 
tired, gazing down from the walL 
The size of the room belies her 
influence. The framed black-and- 
white photograph of Eleanor 
Roosevelt ou a table bespeaks it. 

Her staff say reports that she 
has withdrawn from a policy- 
making role after the crash-and- 
bum denouement of health care 
reform are simply wrong. After 
the first couple’s Vineyard vaca- 
tion, reporters wrote that Mrs. 
Clinton, bruised and battered by 
criticism of everything from her 
investments to her wardrobe, had 
fled to California to escape the 
pressures of politics. 

“She went to campaign for 


By Anna Quindlen 


Kathleen Brown,” Lisa Caputo, 
Mrs. Clinton's press secretary, 
says drily. “We made about II 
stops in a day and a half.” 

But it is indeed the moment for 
Mrs. Clinton, approaching mid- 
term, to give day-to-day policy a 
pass, not out of weakness but out 
erf strength. In the first half of her 
husband’s ad minis tration she 
showed off her abilities. It is now 
time for the best use of them. 

It is Mrs. Clinton herself who 
brings up the old analogy of mak- 
ing legislation and making sau- 
sage, neither a pretty sight, and 
lakes note of how much sausage- 
making the administration has un- 
dertaken, with her in the thick of 
it Perhaps, she says, that needs to 
be “better balanced with what the 
context is, what the values are.” 

No one in the administration. 


I 


To Help Others 9 However Distant 

Following arc excerpts from South African President Nelson Mandela's 
sp&xh last Thursday to a joint session of the U.S. Congress: 

F WHAT we say is true, that paralysis in world affairs which 

resulted from the conflicts of 
the Cold War and the threat of 
a nuclear holocaust posed to us 
all the challenge to redefine the 
purposes of the world system of 
international relations? 

I do believe that the people of 
this country who have done so 
much to write the history of the 
world have the vision, the wis- 
dom and the daring to strive so 
that what is good shines over the 
cities and the villages of that 
world enveloping man and land. 
Surely the order of the day is: 
Forward, march. 

The Washington Past 


manifestly the world is one 
stage and the actions of all its 
inhabitants part of the same 
drama, does it not then follow 
that each one of us as nations, 
including yourselves, should 
begin to define the national in- 
terest to include the genuine 
happiness of others, however 
distant in time and space their 
domicile might be? Is the time 
not upon us when we should 
cease to treat the tyranny, in- 
stability and poverty, anywhere 
on our globe, as being peripher- 
al to 'our interests and to our 
future? Has not the end of the 


with the exception of the presi- 
dent, is better qualified to bal- 
ance the day-to-day with defining 
rhetoric and use the bully pulpit 
to best advantage. Mrs. Clinton is 
a gifted public speaker, and some 
of her messages may come as a 
surprise to a public that has come 
to see her as a knee-jerk left liberal. 

“There's been this false debate 
about children’s issues,” she says, 
“where you’ve got the right basi- 
cally blaming parents and fam- 
ilies for everything that’s wrong 
with children ana denying that 
society or the government has 
any role to play in shoring up 
families so they can take care of 
their own needs. 

“And then you’ve got the left 
engaging in the other half of the 
false derate, which is excusing in- 
adequate or neglectful parenting, 
excusing what I see as irresponsi- 
ble parenting and saying every- 
thing is the fault of society in the 
abstract and that government has 
to solve all these problems.” 

“We’re just going to have to 
think differently," she adds, “get 
beyond the old categories of 
right and left and liberal and 
conservative.” 

If Mrs. CUn ton, a longtime ac- 
tivist for children, travels the 
country making major speeches 
about such family issues, it will 
surely be said that she is trying to 
soften her image, that instead of 
sausage she is making word 
cookies. “Compared to Nancy 
Reagan or Barbara Bush,” says a 
reporter who has covered all 
three, "she’s a warm fuzzy, 
charming and funny. But some- 
how It doesn’t come across." 

The woman who stays up late 
line-dancing to Motown music at 
the tail end of the state dinner for 


Nelson Mandela is in stark con- 
trast to her dour Mother Courage 
image. Many Americans have un- 
derestimated how much of what 
they see in her is a complex reac- 
tion to the changes in the roles of 
women. And she has underesti- 
mated how much rancor is not a 
function of such gender confu- 
sion at all but a genuine disagree- 
ment with what she has done and 
how she has done it. 

Recently Doris Kearns Good- 
win, whose new book “No Ordi- 
nary Time” looks at Eleanor Roo- 
sevelt during the war years, spoke 
to the Washington radio com- 
mentator Diane Refam about the 
two activist first ladies. “Eleanor 
deliberately chose to represent 


EV OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND SO YEARS A CD 

1894: China Seeks Peace 

SHANGHAI — China is suing 
for peace. Her intermediary in the 
negotiations with the Japanese 
Government is the British Minis- 
ter at Tokio. China offers to give 
guarantees to respect the inde- 
pendence of Corea and will fur- 
ther pay a large war indemnity to 
iSB. 30 " T^ e British Minister 
O’ Conor is waiting Japan's reply 
at Pekin and will communicate it 
to the Chinese Government. 

lnin p , , _ PEARL HARBOR*— [From our 

1919s Censorship Ceases Nc ^ York edition:]' Or 

PARIS — France from to-day 
JOcL 13] really enters upon her 
triumph, and even the press now 
returns to the liberties it enjoyed 
m the piping times of peace. For 
by the decrees promulgated this 
moriung in the “Journal Offl- 
ciel the state of siege in France 


censorship. Civilians free in their 
criticism of State officials 
no longer run the risk of fac- 
ing a firing squad at dawo. And 
the irate editor and, anxious 
have no further need of 
expletives with which they eased 
their minds when the Censor 
krat the machines waiting to ran 
off the first numbers to catch 
the early trains. 

1944: Attack on Formosa 


— Bumgujj One thou- 
sand American planes attacked 
Formosa, just north of -the Philip- 
pines, concentrating on the is- 
land’s three most important 
towns, the Tokyo radio an- 
nounced today [Oct. 121. The 
report was not confirmed by 
“ e Navy here, but if true this 
and Algeria c^Tyesnitfav* the greatest air armada 




d 


herself as a voice for outsiders,” 
Ms. Goodwin said. “She would 
talk for blacks, for poor people, 
for migrant workers who didn't 
have access to power.” 

Ms. Goodwin added: "It 
makes me wonder whether or not 
Hillary might be better off re- 
thinking the strategy, not so 
much bang the insider. She, too, 
could have an enormous plat- 
form in the country at large.” 

Perhaps the fact that Mrs. Clin- 
ton called Ms. Goodwin immedi- 
ately after the broadcast meant 
that she saw the wisdom in those 
words. The White House office 
may not be very big, but the plat- 
form is huge, and the time is right. 

The New York Tones. 


if 

k\ 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Page 9 


OPINION 


NUT, 


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Long-Armed Russian Mafias 
Should Be Manacled Now 


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By Flora Lewis 


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P ARIS— The links between Rus- 
sian criminal gangs and orga- 
nized crime in the West are develop- 
ing rapidly, and ominously. Now, 
Russian experts report that substan- 
tial amounts of money from drug 
pafficksrs elsewhere are bong sent 


me that he stumbled on an example, 
without leaving Manhattan. His firm 
gave a small loan to a Russian com- 
pany and, as usual, was about to 
announce it with a brief press release. 
“They begged us not to say any- 
thing,” he said, “or else the mafia 


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into the country for laundering, at a would torn up in Moscow the very 
solid fee, and then sent back to the next day demanding 20 percent.” 
Western mafias. — - 

1 These ties are becoming a serious 
menace to business. Marshall Gold- 
man, director of the Russian Re- 
search Center at Harvard, says there 
are 4,000 racketeering gan g? which 
the Russians call mafias, in the 


The speaker of the Russian 
Duma, Ivan RybJdn, figures that 
$1.5 billion to $2 billion leaves the 
country illegally each month. 

Crime has become one of the 
main threats to Russia’s chances for 
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country and lists them as a majof ^ and consolidating the foundations 
reason foreigners should not invest - of democracy, a strategic issue for 

the West. But the new organization- 
al pacts among criminals make a 
mockery of borders and national po- 
lice. Two new factors permit this. 

One is technical, the new 24-hour- 
a-day instant flow of money around 
the world, the globalized economy 
that gangsters have learned to use. 
The other is a huge leap in the 
amounts available to criminals as 
they link up and provide services to 
one another. A few milli on dollars 
may suffice to corrupt local police 
and bureaucrats who have to stamp 
forms. But here we are talking about 
billions — an estimated $25 billion 
— enough to buy some countries. 

The worst situation does seem to 
be in Russia. The government ap- 
pears helpless. But the imminent, 
much greater threat is the new' inter- 
national connections. The countries 
under attack need to join to create a 
coonterforce. It would not take very 
many, a dozen or so major financial 
centers coordinating reports of 
large, unexplained transfers and 
some belter checking of invoices on 
bigshipmenl of a few commodities. 
The same technical facilities that 

help the criminals malm tha t feasi ble 
The money is moved by computer 
and can be traced. What is missing is 
agreement by governments to estab- 
lish a tracking center and a set of 
rules. It has never been done — but 
money never rushed around before in 
this way, mi this scale. 

It is one of the most important 
steps the West could take to support 
Russian democracy. But the West, 
too, is menaced by the growing web 
of international crime and the power 
it is acquiring. Businessmen are be- 
coming aware of it No government 
can confront it successfully alone. 
The U.S. requirement that banks 
report any cash deposit over 
$10,000, to harass the drug trade, is 
easily evaded because the money 
can be moved across a border. Gov- 
ernments need to act together. 

'■ & Flora Lewis. - 


m Knssia now. 

| It is much more than a police 
problem. As Western efforts to 
stanch narcotics trade have shown, 
when the amount of money involved 
gets big enough, police are over- 
whelmed and often corrupted. 
Many billions are involved here. The 
rackets reach far beyond drugs, af- 
fecting all kinds of business. 

A choke point, where there is a 
chance of cutting it off, would be in 
monitoring international financial 
transfers. When I wrote about this a 
few months ago, suggesting a new 
international agreement to identify 
and track c riminals ' money, I ex- 
outraged complaints from 
and bankers saying 
that it would be an intolerable intru- 
sion on the freedom of the market. 

But talking to a group of interna- 
tional executives gathered recently 
in Budapest under the auspices of 
A.T. Kearney, an American con- 
sulting firm, and to a number of 
others since, to my surprise they all 
responded enthusiastically. Enough 
of them have bumped up against the 
criminals’ approach to oe aware of 
the terrible climate it makes for do- 
ing business and to be eager for 
some reliable legal protection. 

In Russia, in Marshall Goldman’s 
words, gangs “have gained great 
sway over 70 to 80 percent of do- 
mestic businesses and are now de- 
manding tribute from and even 
partnership with foreign business- 
es.” The going rate for “protection” 
(from the gangs’ own retribution) 
seems to be 20 percent of income. 

A New York merchan t banker told 


A Gentle Rebuke to Those Doubters of Indian Expertise 


S INGAPORE — Every 12 years, a million 
devout Hindus crowd into the little town 
of Hardwar in the foothills of the Himalayas 
for a ritual dip in the swift-flowing waters of 
the sacred Ganges. Every imaginable horror 
— disease, drownings, fire, stampedes — 
would seem to await those pilgrims. Yet 
nothing could be more tranquil than the 
Kumbh Mela festival. 

On a visit to Hardwar for the festival. 1 
tried to cut comers with an inoculation cer- 

MEANWHILE 

tificate that lacked the full array of officially 
required jabs. Without taking the least notice 
of my expostulations, an orderly in a medical 
tent at a checkpoint along the road ordered 
me to roll up my sleeve, got his syringe out 
and gave me a poke. 

So I can understand why India politely 
de clin ed assistance from the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control and Prevention in Atlanta dur- 
ing the recent plague outbreak. There is little 
that anyone can teach Indian doctors. After 
all, Britain’s health service would long ago 
have collapsed without them. 

If India is woefully short of drains, sew- 
age disposal systems, sanitation, garbage 
trucks and garbage incinerators, it is not for 
a lack of awareness of public health and 
hygiene but because of insufficient re- 
sources. Once Indians would wake up to the 


By Sun an da K. Datta-Ray whatever else she remembers or forgets, she 

* J wilt nftt urannns inrl fn*»nr11v 


' daybreak swoosh of water from hose pipes 
scouring the streets clean, Bui as cities ex- 
ploded and municipal treasuries emptied, 
the luxury of cleanliness was abandoned. 

AD this occurred to me when my nephew 
flew into Singapore from Calcutta the other 
day at the bright of the plague scare. 

At Calcutta airport, he said, a team of 
doctors had gone over him thoroughly, 
searching for telltale lumps, checking ms 
temperature, listening carefully to his forced 
cough. In contrast, the Changi International 
Airport in Singapore could not have been 
more relaxed. A casual question or two and 
he was waved through. 

Not for Singapore (he panic measures of 
Gulf airports, where paramedics in white 
coats were hauling passengers from India off 
to isolation wards. Clearly. Changi's doctors 
placed Full credence in the assurances they 
had received from their Indian counterparts. 
Reeling from quarantine restrictions im- 
posed by many other countries, India could 
not fail to be impressed by that token 
of confidence. 

When a far worse peril, the Great Bengal 
Famine, carried off more than a million 
Indians in 1942, Prime Minister JawaharlaJ 
Nehru thanked China and Ireland, poor and 
struggling themselves, for sending food. “In- 
dia has a long memory.” he wrote, “but 


will not forget these gracious and friendly 
acts.” Nor will India forget ungracious anil 
unfriendly acts during its recent ordeal. 

There is an uplifting moral in the meticu- 
lous medical examination my nephew had to. 
undergo before he was allowed to leave Cal- 
cutta. For what is ordinary in the West is not 
so in a country where a ship’s captain usually 
gets his derailing certificate by plying the 
inspectors with Scotch whisky' 

Cynics might argue that the' international 
boycott forced India to be conscientious. 1 
am cominced that responsibility, not fear, 
was the spur. 

I have childhood memories of young 
toughs in Calcutta abandoning the intersec- 
tions where they usually hung about, whis- 
tling at the girls, to rise magnificently to the 
challenge of a garbagemen’s strike. Handker- 
chiefs tied over their noses, they got down to 
work with buckets and brooms. 

When the sweeping and the swabbing was 
done and the strike called off. all those lusty 
lads returned to their streetcorncr idleness. 
But not before they were invited to a sumptu- 
ous thank-you tea at the palace of the British 
colonial governor. 

A similar pride rides Calcutta’s modest 
Metro. It is the only one in India. More 
important, it represents the only major in- 
vestment in the city since the British left. 
Unlike the rest of a fly-blown, litter-covered 
metropolis, the Metro is spotlessly clean. 


Legend has it that when a passenger followed 
habit and threw his ticket on the platform, 
a dozen others forced him to pick it up and 
take it to the trash can. 

Those same paragons of civic duty might 
urinate against walls elsewhere in the aty. 
But the Metro is the shrine of their aspira- 
tions . It is a temple to the future. They will 
not desecrate it. 

India has gone through a medieval pag- 
eant of earthquake, flood and disease. I 
hope that will be enough to cleanse the past 
and rebuild the future without the ordeal of 
fire to complete the apocalyptic circle, as 
in Restoration London. 

The ability to make the best of circum- 
stances. to bend before the gale then to rise 
again, is perhaps India’s greatest strength. 
The government’s account books bear out 
this resilience. In June 1991, the ccuntty 
faced bankruptcy with barely 51 million in 
the kitty. Now at $20 billion, its reserves are 
increasing by SI billion a month. 

A single plague death diminishes a nation. 
But India is limping back to normal. Several 
thousand demonstrators look to the streets 
of New Delhi recently to demand a new’ 
slate. The report reassured me. While there is 
politics, there is life. 


The writer, a former editor of The Statesman 
in Ca/curta. is now an edihnul consultant to The 
Straits Times in Singapore. He lonirthuted this 
comment to the International Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Letters intended for publication' 
should be addressed ** Letters to the 
Editor* and contain the writer's si- 
gnature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


The WHO Record 

Regarding “An Ongoing Torture" 
(Letters, Sept. 22) front E. Armas: 

The letter writer reproaches the 
World Health Organization for ig- 
noring the issue of female genital 
mutilation. Pennit me to set the re- 
cord straight 

WHO is a technical support agen- 
cy whose role is to respond to coun- 
tries’ requests for information and 
assistance. Efforts to eliminate fe- 
male genital mutilation must come 
primarily from the countries con- 
cerned if they are to have long-term 
impact. Therefore, WHO has con- 
centrated on disseminating informa- 
tion about the health consequences 
of the practice to health profession- 
als, governments and nongovern- 
mental organizations. 

WHO's regional offices, particu- 
larly in the eastern Mediterranean 
and Africa, have long worked to 
draw attention to the serious health 
implications of female genital muti- 
lation. WHO initiated one of the 
first research projects on the extent 
of the problem in 1976. 

WHO has consistently expressed 
unequivocal opposition to any medi- 
caHzation of the practice -by health ' 


professionals. The organization has 
worked to bring the issue to the atten- 
tion of other agencies such as the UN 
Committee on Human Rights. 

Successive World Health assem- 
blies and regional committees have 
called for the elimination of female 
genital mutilation. Such resolutions 
provide the policy basis for dealing 
with the issue, bearing in mind that 
action in the affected countries will 
have a better chance of success if it 
comes from national and local wom- 
en’s organizations or from govern- 
ment departments, not from outside. 

DR. TOMRIS TORMEN. 

Geneva. 

Adams as Peace Advocate 

Regarding “An Irish Peace Is 
Not a Chimera, Please Let the 
Talks Start Now" (Opinion, Oct. 5) 
by Gerry Adams : 

Reading Gerry Adams (“reach out 
and return our embrace . . . I 
thought I was listening to Diana 
Ross. It is almost impossible to see 
any sense in his verbal mist. But one 
thing must be noted: He mentions 
Ireland seven times but Northern Ire- 
land only once, and his concluding 
comment is on “our country.” 

Which countiy? As Mr. Adams 


seems to forget, there are two coun- 
tries in Ireland: Northern Ireland 
and the Republic of Ireland, where 
Mr. Adams's Sinn Fein commands a 
tiny I percent of the electorate. 

Northern Ireland contains a mil- 
lion unionists who are and wish to 
remain British, who find the Repub- 
lic alien and hostile and will never 
be part of it. 

IRA “death squads” have made 
sure of this by slaughtering hundreds 
of unionists in the last quarter-centu- 
ry, yet Mr. Adams writes as if there 
were already Irish unity and the 
unionists were already a minority. 

BRENDAN HUMPHREYS. 

Helsinki. 

Besides the military presence in 
Northern Ireland (which gives the 
lie to the notion that it is a “normal” 
part of the United Kingdom) there 
is a further irritant to Irish national- 
ists (and others) that both William 
Safire (“ Scenario for a Workable 
Irish Peace" Opinion. Oct. 4) and 
Mr. Adams overlooked, namely the 
1 8th century act of settlement which 
stipulates that the monarch must be 
a practicing member of the Church 
of England, thus ensuring that Cath- 
olics, Jews and Muslims cannot be- 
come loyal subjects of Her Majesty, 


even if they should form a majority 
in the kingdom. 

JAMES G. KEEHAN. 

Gort. Ireland. 

With one simple gesture. Gerry 
Adams could succeed in his wishes, 
end Prime Minister John Major's 
“games” and force Mr. Major to 
“engage" with him. That gesture is 
to hand over all the IRA's arms. 
Semtex included, to the legal Irish 
Army, trusted by everyone. 

He could invite a European com- 
mission to oversee the process. 

Show us your meule, Mr. Adams, 
show us your strength and your faith 
in God with this simple gesture. 

W. E LEES. 

Madrid. 

Gerry Adams states that one of 
the current disagreements is 
“whether, for example, the results of 
referendums held in Ireland, north 
and south, should be counted to- 
gether or separately.” But Ulster is. 
and has been for almost 200 years, a 
part of the United Kingdom. The 
Scots, Welsh and English might or 
might not wish for Ulster to secede. 
Let them express their wishes, too. 

D. H. CLARKE. 

OsterviUe, Massachusetts. 


1 am outraged by (he dignity you 
have accorded Gerry Adams by 
printing his comment. The British 
reel strongly that Mr. Adams fronts 
for a murderous band of terrorists 
in Northern Ireland. Their experi- 
ence supports this. He carefully 
avoids characterizing the cease-fire 
as “permanent.” Why. then, play 
his song to our ears? 

THEODORE SIMPSON. 

Plaisance, France. 

From Terrorists to Heroes 

Regarding “Nobel Panelist Objects 
to Prize for Arafat “ ( OcL 12): 

So Kaare Kristiansen wants to' 
resign from the Nobel committee to 

f protest its selection of Yasser Arafat 
or the Nobel Peace Prize (along 
with Prime Minister Yitzhak Ra- 
bin)? Let him! In case he needs 
reminding. Nelson Mandela was a 
convicted terrorist. And many con- 
sidered Menachem Begin a murder- 
er for his involvement in the Jewish 
underground group that bombed 
the King David Hotel. 

Perhaps Mr. Kristiansen should' 
be reminded that one man’s terrorist 
is another man’s freedom fighter. 

BARBARA BEECH. 

• Brussels. 


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ONE TRUE THING 

By Anna Quindlen. 289 pages. 
$22. Random House. 

Reviewed by Carolyn See 

P EOPLE may get lost in the 
gruesome topicality of what 
happens in “One True Thing." 
Don’t many of us have parents 
who are looking peaked, acting 
as if they might die? And isn't 
their demand, “When I get too 
sick to take care of myself, I 
want you to be the one to give 
me die pills, the seductive com- 
bination of vodka, morphine. 
Nembutal etc., because there’s 
no one else I can trust to do it”? 

So it’s easy to get caught up 
in what to do about aging par- 
ents, and the pros and cons of 
mercy killing. But the real ques- 
tion this novel poses is: Which 
is it better to be, good or smart? 
In a moderately perfect world, 
,t it be rx)ssible to be both? 
n the Gulden family, who 
live in the pretty college town of 
Langbome, the lines are clearly 
drawn. George Gulden is chair- 
man of the rengtish department 
and one of those guys who — if 
you’ve got his number — you 
avoid hke hives. If you don't 
have his number, you’ll be up in 
his office past 10 o’clock at 
night performing the sexual act 
with him on an uncomfortable 
couch, thinking you're having a 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Carla Bnmi, the model, is 
reading “The Name Above the 
Title” by Frank Capra and “ No- 
tre Coatr ” by Guy de Maupas- 
sant 

“I love [Capra]. It’s incredi- 
ble. It’s the complete American 
dream. *Notre Coeur* is a typi- 
cal. small romance that Fm 
reading again.” 

(Ilise Gersten, IHT) 



peak experience. George is all 
charm t© the ladies, a “wonder- 
ful teacher,” an irresponsible 
person whose real label can't be 
written in a family paper. He 
sets great store by being smart, 
but he’s second-rate down to his 
elbow patches. At some level he 
knows it, and that doesn’t im- 
prove his disposition. 

His two sons can’t stand him. 
But one of the women he has 
totally charmed is his eldest 
child, Ellen, who writes award- 
winning essays in high school, 
gets to Harvard and then to a 
magazine job in New York, 
where she dwells in relief and 
joy. She’s following in her fa- 
ther’s footsteps and even more 
— she may be out-striding him. 

The second good pan about 
all this is that Ellen is not lead- 


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By Alan Truscott 

O N the first day of the 1992 
NEC World Champion- 
ships, Lucaana Capodanno of 
Naples, a former world champi- 
on, was the only player to over- 
come the bad trump split on the 
diagramed deal and bring home 
six diamonds. West’s Michaels 
cue-bid. showing length in the 
mgor suits, suggested that bad 
breaks were likely. 

■ A heart was led, and Capo- 
danno as South took a free fi- 
nesse by playing dummy’s jack. 
She threw a spade from her 
hand, led a dub to the ace, and 
raffed a dub in the dummy. She 
then cashed dummy’s three ma- 
jor-suit winners, raffed a heart 
and niffed a - dub to reach this 
ending: 

.«•, - | NORTH . 

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A low spade from the dummy 
forced East to ruff with the 
eight. South overoffed, ruffed 
her club ten with the diamond 
queen and led a spade. East’s 
trumps were only worth one 
trick, and the slam was made. 


ing her mother’s life, which the 
smart daughter has known all 
along is a mug’s game. Kate 
never got to go to college and 
has devoted hex life to her bus- 
band and children. She papered 
all the bedrooms by herself and 
papered matching picture 
frames as well. She found furni- 
ture, which she stripped and re- 
finished. Her garden is lovely 
enough for House BeautifuL 
She’s made her home a jewel of 
domesticity on an English pro- 
fessor's salary. She has made 
cookies and Halloween cos- 
tumes and zucchini soup, and 
she's been a fountain of love to 
her family. She has put up with 
her husband’s compulsive fool- 
ing around and never men- 
tioned it At age 46, she is beau- 
tiful respected and loved by the 
whole town. She is good, but 
who cares? Her children bathe 
in her love but notice it hardly 
more than a fish notices water. 

Then sweet Kate gets cancer 
in her liver and ovaries. Profes- 
sor Gulden orders Ellen to give 
up her good job and come home 
to take care of her mother. 
There's no way on earth he's 
going to do it, and the boys 
have to go off to college. Ellen 
protests bitterly. She’s worked 


so hard to put together her own 
life! And besides, something 
about her mother gives her the 
creeps. Ellen feels betrayed. Af- 
ter all the prizes and honors and 
attention, is this what her life is 
going to end up being? 

But Kate very shyly suggests 
that they set themselves a read- 
ing project: to take a look again 
at ’’Pride and Prejudice," 
“Great Expectations,” “Anna 
Karenina.” She wants to be able 
to talk to her smart daughter, 
and offers some gutsy, variant 
readings on the classics. It fol- 
lows that in the next several 
months Ellen develops a cau- 
tious respect for her mother's 
mind, a mild envy for her depth 
of character — the way she has 
made love and goodness her 
currency and become, in that 
currency, very wealthy indeed. 

But the cancer is relentless, 
and in another couple of 
months Kate is begging EUen to 
kill her. Dad is absolutely un- 
available for comment, holed 
up in his office with compliant 
students. The misery becomes 
unbearable. Kate dies from a 
heavy overdose of morphine, 
and EUen is arrested for com- 
mitting a mercy killing 

All this comes in Pari 1. 
There’s a lot more here, which 
deals with medical questions 
and the assignment of roles in 
any given family, and what is 
really “bad,” what is really 
"good.” But like aU excellent 
novels, “One True Thing” asks 
us one more time: How should 
we be spending our lives? How 
should we live? This is a hyp- 
notically interesting novel, 
straight and plain, and very lov- 
able. 


as a serious 

business school, 

we encourage you to 

read the fine 

We're proud of it IMD's fine print lists the 116 leading companies who take an active part in the 
institute - our Partners and Business Associates. The osmosis that results from this unique partnership 
between industry and IMD puts us at the forefront of international executive development. 
Collaboration with some of the most successful companies in the world ensures that IMD's programs 
and research are solidly grounded in today's market while preparing executives for the future. 


Carolyn See reviews books 
regularly for The Washington 
Post. 


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Now Printed in Tokyo For 
Scene-Day Delivery to Most 
Homes & Offices in Japcn 

-r , To subscribe call our Tokyo office 

y (03)32010205 

It 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


- F 


IT* 


Page 10 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


Ti- 


ny 


Shearing Horn 
Of Rhino Doesn’t 


Stop Poaching 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 


H wange nation- 
al PARK, Zimba- 
bwe — The black rhi- 
noceros wore a radio 
collar and her horns had been 
shorn with a chainsaw to make 
her less valuable. 

Even so, Million Sibanda 
shouldered an AK-47 assault ri- 
fle as be circled in. trickling 
dust through his Angers to 
make sure he was downwind. 

The gun was not for the rhi- 
no, but for poachers, who 
would kill the beast just for the 
pathetic stump re maining on 
her face — and would kill a 
park scout like Sibanda for be- 
ing in the way. 

In the war for the future of 
the black rhinoceros, one of the 
planet’s most ancient and en- 
dangered mammal^, Zim babwe 
has been an embarrassing rout 
Even the leaders of the conser- 
vation campaign use phrases like 
“spectacular failure" to describe 
the country’s calamitous five- 
year decline from Africa's rich- 
est haven, with as many as 2,000 
black rhinos, to a ravaged popu- 
lation of fewer than 300 today. 

Beginning in May 1992, Zim- 
babwe darted every rhinoceros 
it could find with a tranquilizer 
gun and sawed off its horns, on 
the theory that poachers would 
bypass a hornless animal. 


Milky Way: Doubts 


About Black Hole 

Reuters 


LONDON — The Milky 
Way may not have a black hole 
at its center after alL French 
and Russian astronomers who 
used the Sigma telescope 
aboard the Russian spacecraft 
GRANAT to measure X-rays 
and gamma rays from the al- 
leged black hole say their find- 
ings show less energy coming 
from the object than expected. 

The astronomers, led by scien- 
tists of the Service d’Astrophysi- 
que at the Centre d’Etudes in 
Saclay, France, wrote in the 
journal Nature that something 
darir and massive was there, but 
it did not act like a black bole. 


But so dramatically have 
Zimbabwe’s tactics failed that 
the country now proposes a 
radical new approach: under- 
cutting the poachers by legaliz- 
ing trade in rhino horns, which 
are prized in Asia where they 
are ground into a fever-reduc- 
ing potion and in Yemen for 
ceremonial dagger handles. 

Mike Kock, the state veteri- 
narian who oversees the rhinos 
in Zimbabwe, envisions state 
farms where herds of rhinos 
would be harvested like flocks 
of sheep. The horns grow back 
about three inches a year. 

In November, at a meeting in 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, of the 
rhino committee of the Conven- 
tion on International Trade in 
Endangered Species, which is 
the main international treaty on 
wildlife trade. South Africa and 
Zimbabwe plan to support a 
resolution lowering the protect- 
ed status of the more plentiful 
white rhino, as a first step to- 
ward legal trade in the horns. 
Despite the new respect South 
Africa commands after the elec- 
tion of President Nelson Man- 
dela, the committee is virtually 
certain to reject the proposal. 

The public outcry would be 
too great, and even among wild- 
life officials in southern Africa, 
where commercial use of wild- 
life is a favored method of con- 
servation, there is debate about 
whether it would drive the price 
low enough to put poachers out 
of business. 

In Zimbabwe's case, the crit- 
ics say. it is not the ban that has 
failed, but the government, 
which has been unwilling to do 
the one thing that does seem to 
save rhinos: spend money. “The 
Zimbabwe budget for national 
parks in 1981 was $18 million," 
said Esmond Bradley Martin, a 
Nairobi-based consultant to the 
World Wildlife Fund. “It is $5 
milli on today.” 

Mr. Martin pressed Zimba- 



The Good With the Bad 


By Rick Weiss 

Waslunpan Post Stmce 


W ASHINGTON Two women are m *** - — - — . -m,- 

eating ice-cream sundaes, looking found evidence that a single mutated L r i k gene 
puzzled, in a New Yorker cartoon, confers protection against Cholera, a bactenaum- 
Says one: “If homosexuality is inher- t j iat causes massive diarrhea and potentially 
ited, shouldn’t it have died out by now?" j alai dehydration. Cholera has posed a sene** 

Variations of that simple but taming question threat throughout much <* hBUsy, IXGafrra 
have arisen repeatedly, not only for the gene that said, and any gene that protected a^L w 
may predispose men to homosexuality but for disease would be Ukely to endure even u it 
other genes that would similarly seem to get in the killed those who inherited two copies. 
way of their own survival — such as disease genes Moreover, researchers have known jorwwnu 

that are likely to kill a person in childhood, before years that the CFTR gene, when irorfflaLregu«ra 
the v ictim has a chance to pass the gene on. salt and water secretion in the body, oo poetic 

Researchers appear to have answered the water — 

question of how two “dead ouT genes _have infected 



common; one in 20 Caucasians harbors a mutat- 
ed CFTRgene. \- 

Sherif E. Gabriel, a physiologist at the Umwj 
ty of North Carolina, and his colleagues j*P**Jfj 
ih Science that in experiments ntt 




T#»?S 

t-il 






managed to persist through human history. What 
they’ve found suggests that doctors and scientists 
may have to rethink simple distinctions between 
good genes and bad. In fact, some “bad*' genes 
may be good to inherit. 

The concept is not entirely new. The classic 
example is the hemoglobin S gene: Inherited from 
both parents, it causes sickie-celi anemia. The gene 
remains common in the African population de- 
spite its ill effects, because children who inherit 
just one copy of the gene are resistant to malaria, 
the world’s greatest infectious killer; only those 
children who inherit genes from both parents risk 
death from anemia. Children with a single copy of 
the sickle-cell gene are more likely to live to 
adulthood and reproduce than are their peers with 
“normal" hemoglobin genes, and the gene persists. 


might have a 
with the cholera bacterium. . 

A qwMiar report in Nature suggests that a gene 
that can fatally exacerbate the symptoms Of ma- 
laria may also have the hidden benefit of boosting 
the ipimnna response against other diseases... _ 




ESEARCHERS led by William 
McGuire of the John Radcliffe Hospital 
in Oxford, England, found that among 
Gambian ehfl&w n with malaria, those 
who have a gene called TNF2 are seven times 
more likely to have their malaria progress into a 
fatal brain disorder. In an African country where 
malaria remains common, it seemed strange that 
such a troublesome gene would persist in fully 16 
percent of the population, as it does. 

The Oxford team suggests that the gene for 



. NYT nuf 


Park employees tracking rhinos in Zimbabwe; rhino with sheared horns. 


Now researchers have found a similar ratio- TNF2 is bad only when present in a double dose, 
nale for why cystic fibrosis, which usually kills its it tuns out that TNF2 is an immune-system 
victims before they reach 30. has not only sur- supercharger, which in double dose responds to 
vived but has thrived as the most common fatal malaria with an inflammatory reaction so intense 
inherited disease among whites. that it can fatally interfere with brain function. 

Cystic fibrosis occurs when a person inherits But a single copy of tire gene , tire researchers 
mutated versions of a gene called CFTR from propose, offers jtBt enough extra imnmmtt togive 
both parents. But despite its lethality in double carriers a survival advantage over those wno doo t 
dose, the gene mutation remains surprisingly carry the gene at afl. 






dozen to about 900, now the 
largest number in Africa. Na- 
mibia and Kenya which invest- 
ed heavily in intelligence net- 
works to foil poachers, have 
also made headway. 

Thanks to those countries, 
the black rhino’s plummet to- 
wards extinction, from 65,000 
in 1970. is thought to have lev- 
eled off at around 2,500 today. 




bwe unsuccessfully last year to 
>tn< 


do what most other countries 
rich in wildlife have done: raise 
park admission fees, at least for 
affluent foreign visitors. 

By spending money on pro- 
tection, Mr. Martin said. South 
Africa has increased the num- 
ber of black rhinos from a few 


UT Zimbabwe has 
not given its parks the 
same priority. It 
charges visitors a frac- 
tion of the fees demanded in 
other countries (or at the pri- 
vate resorts in Zimbabwe it- 
self). Admission to this park, 
for example, costs S2.50, and a 
cozy bungalow for two people 
rents for $15 a night. 

Glenn Tatham. the chief war- 
den of Zimbabwe's parks, says 
his staff is demoralized by low 
pay, danger (four rangers have 


been killed by poachers in the 
last decade) and the lack of suc- 
cess. They are up against sea- 
soned killers, who perfected 
their skills by exterminating the 
rhinos of Zam bia, then moved 
south across the Zambesi River 
in search of new hunting 
grounds. 

Rangers here say the poach- 
ers may cross the long, poorly 
policed border, kill a rhinocer- 
os, hack off the bora and disap- 
pear. Or they may camp and 
prey on a park for months be- 
fore lu gg ing their booty tack to 
the well-established wholesale 
horn market in Lusaka, the 
7a mb ian capital. 

Mr. Tatham says the fact that 
no rhinos have been poached 
here since February is a mis- 
leading consolation. “Yes. 
there's been a de-escalation of 
rhino poaching," he said. “But 
there are very few rhinos left to 
poach." 


DELLA VALLE 


PARIS 



52, Fbg St HONORE 


Yes, Practice Does Make Perfect 


By Daniel Goleman 

A>h York Times Service 




EW YORK — The old joke — 
How do you get to Carnegie 
Hall? Practice, practice, prac- 
tice — is getting a scientific 
spin. Researchers are finding an unex- 
pected potency from deliberate practice 
m world-class "competitions of all kinds, 
including chess matches, musical recitals 
and sporting events. 


more total lifetime hours of practice." said 
Dr. Michael Mahoney, a psychologist at 
the University of North Texas in Denton. 
“These days you have to live your sport.” 
That total dedication is in contrast to 


the relatively leisurely attitude taken at 
the turn of the > 


Studies of chess masters, virtuoso musi- 
cians and star athletes show that the re- 
lentless [raining routines of those at the 
top allows them to break through ordi- 
nary limits in memory and in physiology. 


World records have been falling inexo- 
rably over the last ceniurv. For example, 
the marathon gold medalist's time in the 
1896 Olympics Games was, by 1990, 
only about as good as the qualifying time 
for the Boston Marathon. 


“Over the last century Olympics have 
become more and more competitive, and 
so athletes steadily have had to put in- 


century, when even world- 
class athletes would train arduously for 
only a few months before their competi- 
tion. “As competition got greater, training 
extended to a whole season." said Dr. 
Anders Ericsson, a psychologist at Florida 
State University Tallahassee. ’Then it ex- 
tended through the year, and then for 
several years. Now the elite performers 
start their training in childhood." 

To be sure, there are other factors at 
work: Coaching methods have become 
more sophisticated, equipment has im- 
proved and the pool of people competing 
has grown. But studies are beginning to 
reveal the sheer power of training itself. 

Perhaps the most surprising data show 
that extensive practice can break through 
barriers in mental capacities, particularly 
short-term memory. Ln short-term memo- 
ry. information is stored for the few sec- 
onds that it is used and then fades, as in 


hearing a phone number which one for- 
gets as soon as it is dialed. 

In a stunning demonstration of the 
power of sheer practice to break barriers 
u the mind’s ability to handle informa- 
tion, Dr. Ericsson and associates at Gar- 
negie-MeBan University have taught coL 
lege students to listen to a list of as many 
as 102 random digits and then recite it 
correctly. 

Through their hours of practice, elite 
performers of ah kinds master shortcuts 
that gnetiicm an edge. Dr. Bruce Aber- 
nathy, a researcher at tire University of 
Queensland in Australia, has'found that 
the most experienced players in racket 
sports like squash and tennis are ..aNe to 
predict where a serve will land by cues in 
the server’s posture before the ball is bit. 

A 1992 study of baseball greats tike 
Hank Aaron and Rod Carew by Thomas 
Hanson, then a graduate student at the 
University of Virginia in Chadottesvilfo, 
found that the all-time best hitlers typical- 


films of the pitchers they would face, to 
spot cues that would tip off what pitch 
was about to be thrown. 


• •• * 
■> j 




- & m 


mm 


NTERNATIQffti 


Shining Examples From Lacroix 


Prej 


>art 




By Suzy Menkes 

I m emotional Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Christian La- 
croix sent out a spar- 
kling collection on 
Wednesday. Was there 
anything that did not shine, 
from the rhinestone athletic 
stripe running down black pants, 
through the shapely slip dresses 
in silver Lurex. to the disco ball 
that whirled above the runway? 


But this was not a show that 
plunged fashion back into the 
glamrock era — in spite of 
I970s-styie skinny trench coats 


PARIS FASHION 


or a lime-green marabou-feath- 
er jacket. It was about giving a 
sheen of glamour to clothes that 
were flirtatious, oftea richly 
decorated but still fresh and 
young. 


And Lacroix found a silhou- 
ette on which to hang his rhine- 
stone-studded vinyl tat: a fitted 
jacket with shoulders that were 
tweaked up like a pagoda; skirts 
that were short, soft and flirty, 
and a dress that fitted at the 
bosom. Exuberant ideas 
bounced off that base: here a 
print of lips pouting from a flu- 
id skirt; there a jacket in vinyl, 
Lurex or fish scales of sequins: 
dresses patterned with exotic 
Hawaiian blooms, or just a sim- 
ple, shimmering slip of shock- 
ing-pink satin. 


The fashion crowd gave La- 
croix an ovation for the creative 
force that pulsates through ev- 
ery item. 


Although the massive show 
still had some overcomplicated 
and indigestibly embellished 
outfits, Lacroix has got his jubi- 
lant fashion energy relatively 
nqrlw control. His clothes are 
not for everyone and for after 
dark — except for those who 
can face a cocktail of lime-green 
jacket and tequila-sunrise skirt 
in early morning. For a less 
knock-your-eyes-out measure 
of the same potion, the designer 
opened with colorful pieces 
from the less-expensive Bazar 
line. 



behind mesh fencing helmets, 
was a shock from & designer 
who is known for body-con- 
stious clothes with color and 
decoration subtly drawn from 
his Turkish origins. Sure there 
were some fine fitted jackets, 
their corset seams picked out in 
white stitches. But then a white 
crepe jacket came with a red 
bead, representing a drop of 
blood oozing from scarlet rapi- 
er-slashes across a jacket front. 




And then there were the 
shoulder pads, part of the fenc- 
ing look, that stuck out weirdly 
under simple slip dresses. For 
every simple trouser suit with 
soft pants, there was a cutaway 
bodysuit with hqjster skirt. So 
although back m the show- 
room, the designer might have a 
good collection, in Ozbek’s on- 
stage duel between fashion anc 
drama, the clothes lost out. 


A NN Demeulemeeste 
managed to pus! 
things gently forwar 
— with skirt hems o 
the rise (she has moved inexon 
bly from ankle to knee) and 
nascent stirring of femimnir 
That meant sweaters snuggtis 
the body above .the Ne 
Length, on- th e-knee A-Iir 
skirts and curvy riding coat 
Demeulemeesteris strength is. 
using fabric like mushroom-cc 
ored panne velvet to enrich ar 
pie clothes. ; 




Claude Montana’s choice. 



the Cirque d'Hiver seemed syr 
ndfe 


bolic. Around the mot , 
walked in their sculpted clotiu 
heads beating styii» 


[uer curls, arms banded; 

julde 


Lacroix 's pagoda-shouldered sparkle jacket. 


Ujhit ThflB 


liveries aisle changing backers. 
Lang is the perpetrator of mod- 
em urban glamour — all shiny 
synthetic fabrics and a silhouette 
based on narrow-shouldered 
jacket and pants (with much- 


copied turned- over cuffs). 


The ectoplasmic spread of 
Helmut Lang’s look onto other 
runways has made the Austrian 
designer a cult fashion hero — 
even though he canceled fall de- 


ls show stayed on die samp 
mean streets — but moved for- 
ward, as the models stepped out 
in high heels and abstract color 
flashed from shiny candy-wrap- 
per tops. There was a futuristic 
sense of urban danger in Lang’s 


military-khaki tailoring and in a 
march-past of slip dresses in 
gleaming red-light nylon. But 
Lang’s strong show tods this to a 
sophisticated level with hazard 
color just flashing from the un- 
derdress at shoulder and hem of 
its nylon cover. 

Whatever possessed Rifat 
Ozbek to joust in fashion’s 
theme park? His show of fenc- 
ing vests, hanging open like un- 
fastened underwear, with the 
super mod els’ faces concealed 


satellite bracelets, shou 
molded as if from day, skirts 
geometrically precise petal 
wide shorts legs forming a cor 
pass twirl around the thig 
Montana seems to be spinnii 
in a perpetual drde of ,h 
imagination. 




He tinkered with sportswea 
showing soggy track pants, i 
sequins with spar kling swcatei 
sets. There were bold colors ilk 
fuchsia and cyclamen to gjv» 
vibrancy to the sculpted taifor 
mg. But for all the attempts at t 
softer femininity, with a pleatet 
fnll attached to a firm jackd 
coflax, or ballooning sleeves, 
the clothes seemed to be fire&in 
a different kiln From the rest of 
current fashion. 


Si 










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THE TRIB INDEX: 116. _ 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©. composed of 
280 intemationaHy Investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1. 1992 = 100 
120 — ' 



100 


World Index 

10/12/94 a 4P.r.V: 116.02 
Previous: 115.26 


90 -1 "I'VJ f 


mu. 


O 

1994 


Asia/PaciSc 


Apprax. weahang: 32% 
e4PAL 120^3 PlE».:127J3 


150 


Apprax. waghtng: 37% 
©4PJil.: 116^4 PfBV- 115.67 


130 «« V a y ^ 1 




110 


90 


M 


O 

1994 


O 

1994 


North America 


Latin America 



The Max tracks U.S. doBftr vs turns of stocks sc Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
A rgon Mno . AustraBs, Austria. BoJghim, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Rnhnrf, 
France, Germany, Hong Kona Italy. Maodoo, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nanny. 
Singapore. Spain, emdan, Switzerland end Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, the index is composed of the 20 top issues in terns of marker capoakzetoo, 
othenmo the ten lop stocks ate tracked. 


1 Industrial Sectors | 


Wad. ha*. % 


Wed. 

Pnv. 

% 


dam cJoae donga 


Ck»t 

doot 

dllDQC 

Bwgy 

114.35 11428 +0.08 

CaprUCoods 

11804 

115.98 

+1.78 

Utilises 

12133 127.77 +044 

Raw Materials 

134.68 

13321 

*058 

Finance 

116.41 115.02 +121 

Consumer Goods 

104.76 

104.68 

-0.10 

Services 

11925 118.80 +0.46 

MbcaBaneous 

124.03 

12255 

+121 

For mas information about rfw Index, a booklet is available free of charge. 


Write to Trib Index, 181 Avenue Criaites do QauDe. 92521 Neu31y Cedex. France. 


C International Herald Tribune 


Germans 
Get Wary 
On Rates 

Bundesbank May 
Delay More Cuts 

Bloomberg Bust * iu Afan 

MAINZ, Germany — Two 
members of tire Bundesbank 
policy-making council cau- 
tioned Wednesday that the 
German economy might not yet 
be ready for further mlerest- 
raxe reductions. 

Hans-JQrgen Kdbnick, one 
of the Bundesbank’s leading 
backers of rate reductions, is 
having second thoughts, saving 
inflation was too high and the 
economy growing too fast to 
permit quick cuts. 

He said rising commodity 
prices, higher operating rates in 
German factories and the risk 
of higher wages in the 1 995 col- 
lective-bargaining round had 
“cast doubt on the further de- 
cline in inflation in the medium 
term.” 

Mr. Kobnick, who waged a 
public campaign for lower rates 
this year, echoed comments by 
Johann Wilhelm Gaddum, vice 
president of the Bundesbank, 
saying growing inflation risks 
cast doubt on further cuts. 

Mr. Gaddum, meanwhile, 
told a bankers group in Diissel- 
dorf that interest rates were al- 
ready low and the Bundesbank 
was nearing the point “where 
interest-rate cuts will conjure 
up inflation dangers, where 
confidence is damaged.” 

The statements came a day 
after Germany's largest trade 
union, IG MetaU, kicked off its 
annual pay talks by demanding 
a 6 percent raise in 1995. 

The Bundesbank has kept 
rates on hold since the midale 
of July after two years of rate 
reductions. The council meets 
for one of its regular sessions on 
Thursday. 

West German inflation is 
running at a 3 percent annual 
rate, while the Bundesbank has 
set a target of 2 percenL 


BaUit^QuiEurope 

Overdo, stiitfi? aW in 'Garapb tn.SQJ per person employed, and (drefeoiyas a 



Mitsubishi Bank 
Plans to Rescue 
Nippon Trust 


Imanstnaul HcraU Tribune 


EU Losing the Subsidy Battle 


IlitERiiATIOilAL MANAGER 

Prepare 58 Corner Offices 


By Laurence Zuckerman 

Hew York Times Sendee 

N EW YORK — Despite a nosedive 
.in profit this year, Goldman, Sachs 
& Co„ Wall Street’s last major pri- 
vate partnership, named 58 new 
partners Tuesday, its largest crop ever. 

. Each new member of Goldman's exclusive 
, dub of owners is almost guaranteed to be a 
multimillionaire within a year or two. 

Hie large number of new partners shows 
how repidhr.Wall Street and Goldman are 
changing. Former partners recall that not too 
- long ago, the investment finn was able to hold 
its annual partnership dinner in a private 
' room at the.21 Gub. A decade ago, the total 
number of active partners was 79; now the 
: finn will have more than 180. 

The rise of computerized trading, the grow- 
ing sophistication of financial instruments 
' and the internationalization of- the securities 
business have transformed the industry. 
Gol dman employees now become partners at 
a younger age and retire earlier than in the 
past 

Tuesday’s announcement followed the bi- 
ennial autumn ritual in which Goldman's 
active partners size up candidates, lobby, de- 
bate and ultimately choose a new bunch, 
w hile those in the running grit their teeth and 
try to focus on their 18-hour workdays. 

Stephen Friedman, the firm’s senior p in- 
ner, who is stepping down at the end of 
November, said the size of the new class 
reflected the number of talented people re- 
: entiled during the boom years of the 1980s 
. and the firm’s rapid international expansion. 
“We did extremely well recruiting in the 
’80s and now have a great talent pool which is 


eligible,” he said. “Plus we also have in- 
creased involvement in businesses throughout 
the world that need representation." 

Unlike many large law firms, where being 
passed over for a partnership means it is time 
to look for another job, Goldman encourages 
" do not make it to stay and 


partners, only three are 
Goldman’s slow progress 


most of those who i 
try again _ 

Of the 58 new 
women, reflecting 
in bringing women and minority groups into 
its top ranks. Eric M. Mindich, 27, a risk- 
arbitrage specialist in the firm's equities divi- 
sion, is Ihe youngest person to be named a 
partner in the firm’s 125-year history. 

By accepting the partnership, the 58 will 
trade years of seven-day workweeks and 
much of their personal lives for the richest 
compensation on Wall Street and the cachet 
of joining the elite of a firm known for its 
discretion, noblesse oblige, punishing work 
ethic and fabulous success. 

As owners, the new partners receive an 
annual share of Goldman's profit, which was 
a record $2.3 billion before taxes last year. 
That has translated into an annual income of 
$3 million to $5 million for each partner in 
recent years, one analyst estimated. 

But the hitch is that the money must be 
reinvested in the firm until the partner retires. 
Before then, Goldman partners receive sala- 
ries of about $200,000 to $250,000, modest by 
Wall Street standards, supplemented by in- 
terest payments on their capital stakes. 

lerefore, along with the honor of being 


Hi- 

named 


to the firm’s inner circle, the new 

See GOLDMAN, Page 13 


By Tom Buerkle 

Iniemaiwnal Herald Tnbune 

BRUSSELS — The Europe- 
an Union appears to be losing 
the battle to control subsidies to 
industry in the face of growing 
pressure from national govern- 
ments to bail out their belea- 
guered champions. 

On Wednesday, France’s 
state-controlled computer mak- 
er, Groupe Bull, won approval 
from the European Commis- 
sion to receive 11.1 billion 
French francs ($2 billion) in 
state aid, the bulk of which has 
already been paid. 

The decision follows the 
commission’s approval in July 
of a 20 billion-franc govern- 
ment bailout for the state carri- 
er Air France, which seven Eu- 
ropean airlines have since sued 
to block. 

Paris has one more bomb- 
shell: The government has 
promised a huge aid package 
for Credit Lyonnais, Europe's 
biggest bank, which has posted 
losses of 1 1.4 bilhoafrancs over 
tbepast 18 months. 

Those cases are only a drop 
in the overall aid bucket. Euro- 
pean Union governments fork 
out some 90 billion European 
currency units ($112 billion) of 


aid to industries ranging from 
manufacturing, transport, agri- 
culture and mining each year. 
That is roughly 2 percent of the 
union's total economic output 

It was not supposed to be 
that way. To ensure fair compe- 
tition in the single market the 
commission claims it must keep 

Taman computer maker Acer's 

profit triples. Page 12. 

steady downward pressure on 
subsidies, and ensure that com- 
panies receiving aid restructure 
to become competitive. 

Tom Ottervanger, a partner 
at the Brussels law firm of Loeff 
Claeys Verbeke and co- author 
of a book on EU state subsidies, 
said that clearly was not hap- 
pening. 

Mr. Ottervanger blames the 
recession of the early 1990s, 
which drove many European 
companies into the red, and a 
post-Maastricht political cli- 
mate in which certain countries 
seek to curb the powers of the 
commission, the EU executive 
body. 

“The companies involved 
and the amounts involved and 
the political pressure has been 


so big that it has been difficult 
for the commission to say no.” 
he said. 

The subsidy problem goes far 
beyond France, despite the 
weight of the three latest cases. 

Traditionally, France has 
been only an average doler of 
state funds. Italy's aid to manu- 
facturing industry alone aver- 
aged an astonishing 2.175 Ecus 
per worker a year from 1988 to 
1 990, the most recent period for 
which figures are available. 

In overall aid, even liberal- 
minded Germany doled out 2.4 
percent rtf total output, thanks 
in part to huge subsidies to the 
country’s shrinking coal indus- 
try. In contrast, the figure for 
France was 1.8 percent. 

Britain slashed its subsidies 
following the wave of privatiza- 
tions under Margaret Thatcher 
in the 1980s, and it is the most 
vocal critic of them today. 

“We can stomach state aid 
when it is part of an effective 
restructuring” and is truly one 
last bite of the subsidy apple; as 
commission guidelines stipulate, 
a spokesman for Britain’s mis- 
sion to the Union said. But refer- 
ring to Bull, which got 600 ntil- 

See BULL, Page 13 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — In the biggest 
bank rescue since Japan’s bub- 
ble economy burst, Mitsubishi 
Bank Ltd. said Wednesday it 
would pay 19933 billion yen 
($2 billion) to take a majority 
stake in Nippon Trust Bank in a 
government-orchestra ted deal 
to help stabilize Japan's finan- 
cial system. 

The takeover marks a tacit 
acknowledgment by the govern- 
ment that despite official reas- 
surances, several of Japan's 
trust banks are in effect insol- 
vent because of ill-advised 
property and stock lending. 

But the transaction, which is 
the latest in a series of financial- 
market rescue operations that 
include loan-reschedulings and 
buy-backs, also underscores the 
government’s determination io 
ensure a soft landing in the fi- 
nancial crisis triggered by the 
collapse of the bubble economy 
four years ago. 

“The Ministry of Finance ap- 
pears to be finally recognizing 
tiie problem and no longer wail- 
ing for the commercial property 
market to recover to reduce the 
banks’ losses,” said Betsy Dan- 
iels, a Morgan Stanley analyst. 

The takeover by Mitsubishi 
Bank was also aided by a sense 
of obligation that stemmed from 
the bank’s long-standing ties 
with Nippon Trust, of which it 
owns 5 percenL The deal also 
was financially within reach: 
Mitsubishi Bonk has 48.83 tril- 
lion yen in assets, compared with 
Nippon Trust's 1.38 trillion yen. 

Mitsubishi Bank said its mon- 
ey would buy 443.4 million new Dusm , < 
shares of Nippon Trust at 450 p™ 1 

wn punh TV,« InnnMinn a.411 Via wUSUM 


have been too high, considering 
that Nippon Trust had been 
disclosing 130 billion yen in 
nonperfonning assets, a figure 
it raised abruptly to 230 billion 
yen on Wednesday and which 
some analysts say may be as 
high as 500 billion >m 

“The price is excessive in that 
it will yield nothing for two to 
three years ” said Alicia Oguwa. 
an analyst at Salomon Brothers. 

“But from the long-term per- 
spective it may pay off." she 
added, noting that the Japanese 
pension fund management mar- 
ket w; 


yen each. The transaction will be 
completed Nov. 10 and give Mit- 
subishi 68.8 percent of Nippon 
Trust, the smallest of Japan’s 
seven trust banks. 

“This decision was taken af- 
ter careful review at the request 
of and in consultation with fi- 
nancial authorities who were 
concerned about the possible 
negative impact of Nippon 
Trust’s difficulties in Japan's fi- 
nancial system," Mitsubishi 
Bank said. 

Analysts said the price may 


was huge and growing. 

Access io the pension fund 
management business was the 
incentive Mitsubishi extracted 
from the Finance Ministry in 
return for bailing out Nippon 
Trust. 

Japan’s 1 1 city banks, includ- 
ing Mitsubishi ’ Bank, will be 
permitted to set up trust bank 
subsidiaries next year, but they 
will be restricted from major 
trust bank activities such as 
pension fund management. To 
get the ministry's blessings to 
operate the trust bank with full 
powers, Mitsubishi played 
tough in negotiations that be- 
gan last spring. 

“The Ministry of Finance 
simply warned us to bail them 
out mthout much in return,” a 
Mitsubishi Bonk executive said. 

Daiwa Bank won a similar 
concession last year when, in 
return for rescuing its ailing af- 
filiate Cosmn Securities, the Fi- 
nance Ministry gave it permis- 
sion to engage' in the securities 
business. Other banks will be 
itted to enter the securities 
ess next month but with 
severe restrictions. 

The Finance Ministry's con- 
cessions speak to its desire to 
hasten cleaning up the financial 
system. Ms. Daniels said that 
Japan’s 21 city, trust and long- 
term credit banks were saddled 
with 40 trillion yen in bad debL 
Of this, about ’20 trillion will 
eventually have to be written 
off; so far only about one-third 
has been. Disposing of the re- 
maining debt could take two to 
three years. 


U.S. Drops 
Trade Talk 
Demand 


Reuters 

GENEVA — The United 
States said Wednesday it was 
dropping a key demand in ne- 
gotiations on liberalizing finan- 
cial services that Iasi year 
threatened the GATT treaty. 

The sources said the an- 
nouncement had been made by 
Todd Crawford, a U.S. Trea- 
sury Department official, at a 
meeting of a group set up under 
the General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade to coordinate 
talks on financial services. 

“We are no longer pursuing 
the two-tier approach and do not 
intend to reintroduce it," Mr. 
Crawford was quoted as saying. 

Under the two- tier approach, 
Washington insisted that it 
would only liberalize its bank- 
ing and insurance sector, under 
the Uruguay Round treaty, on a 
reciprocal basis with countries 
that opened their own financial 
services industry to the same 
degree. The GATT treaty was 
approved in December 1993 
and signed in April, without 
agreements on financial and 
maritime services. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 






Jh'* 


kvtttb 
Frankfurt 
Ko) 


LIBS' 2»B 
1UD- S02DS 
1543. im 

ia’ — 


L11W 

as 


ion 


FJ. 

uzn 

un 

03932 


Lira 

UF 

2JB35' 

MOT 


ILF1 


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S2N Utttt U81 

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Djjcs tom * ims 


BJF. 

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5114*5 


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Oct 12 

Yn CL PCMtt 

vm* usb iw 

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157 J* 1134 nut 


ex unjs 
3L7D >Jh 
iuo‘ on 

3JS4I 7731 
M4S* 10W 
ABO- — 


zua jM«tt 
153*5 AMS 


LB* 

1JB53 


ISM? 1JAAJ8 
*»75 UUI 
J aw 3*117 

74i6 

134*7* 

UB8- US? 
124.W IAS 
146338 >5*42 


1£2U 

KLI? 

4.132* 

&.7U7 

ion* 

law 

1B.U5 

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SiJr. \ 

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1J415B Tjns urctt 

Nr* Yam (M U«4 LJ“ 

Ml SOTS U47 14Z2S 

Trim 1BW isua 4Wfl 

Taranto LWB WS 

Zurich UOS 30W MJ« 

tHCU UW a* vna asm ujm 

ISDN L4MS U2U 12» «*1 VBM 

Oastnas in Amsterdam. London, New York and Zurich, fixings h o<h*r centers,- Toronto 
ndesatarurl 

a: To tan- one pound; to Tetoir one donor. 

■BYtdtobto. 

OUttr Dollar Values 

Comner 


Eurocurrency Deposits 




Oct. 12 


Dollar 

D-Mark 

Swiss 

Franc 

Starling 

French 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

1 month 


44h-5 


SIMfo 

5 >--5 \ 

2 W ■- 

5 'vS '•!. 

3 months 

5V1-5M) 

S'ri*. 


5VFh 

5 *v5 v, 

2 *’4-2 i« 

5 “ *4 

6 months 


5 l »-5 v. 

V. 

6 •- 

5 >r5 V, 

2 --2 ■« 

5 i^5 -» 

littr 

tv*-m 

Sfa 5V. 

4 Sr4 v. 

7-7Va 

6 *t6 -• 

2»*-Kh 

6 


Sources: Re u ters, Uards Bank, 

Ratos applicable to tn t e ro a nk deposits of Si mtHtoa minimum foreautvotoruj. 


Discretion is a virtue, profit is a must. 


Units of I Oil N.O.; not meted; NAJ not 


M* 1 


L. 


■ 


' AttttraLS 
t Aotr.KMl 
knoll mol 


( n 

*&»'*'* * 
sfii U' 1 ‘ • 

Vi’:*:- 
tlttf *<*» it K/‘ 


;.jv v . £' 


Oa nNti Krone 
ttovriLMWI 
Ftti. mown 


RWf 

a*9W 

13587 

KUB2 

on 

asm 

2M* 

A04 

saw 

4JBC5 


Hong KowS 

HUOB. forint 

iHdtaaronM 

USn.tatfa* 

Irtftt 

ln-acU took. 


PWI 

Cumnev 

Pori 

23530 

Max. peso 

331a 

73277 

aZMtaMS 

lJfiSl 

109.03 

Nonr. krone 

<JZ) 

3133 

Phil, pass 

3540 

217X02 

pghhikiir 

2332 

(U3*A . 

Port-ascMio 

15705 

3X02 

Russ-rutna 

373400 

■ 02775 

Saudi rival 

17515 

25705 

Woo-s 

I3B23 

9i dm 

Cumncv 


L5799 

Caoodtae dollar 

U4A1 

Jnmanm 



Camncy Pert 
S. Afr.rara! 15725 
S-KBr.VHA 799.00 
Sued. Krona 7.4055 
Tehran t 2 UP 

TbaiboUf 2103 

TorklaOBra 34481- 
UAEririwm 10727 
VMez.Mtv. 

14*0057 


A 


Atatar.rW. 

k Forward Rates 

■MB# W# 

LSMS LSB0D 

toes LSGO 

If Mo knc 1iW UNI UMi 

fW Umwnrdami; UttUBtm Bank. (Brussels!; Barteo Commerchle itaHona 
krone* Pm*» IW» *** of Tokro (Tokmli Rant Bonk of Canada 
, OWWAO?.- IMF ISDRh other data from Rnrtors ana AP. 


1304 

WJ6 


»oor *Mor 
1304 1307 
»jo 


Kay Mon »y Rates 

United Stated Close Prev. 

OheotHd rofe im LOO 

Prime rata 7=4 TV, 

Fedarot tonds 3% AH 

n.-onm CDS 4SQ 483 

Couni. popar in days SM Sid 

J-nmufti Traosury Mi tS7 AJC 

1 - roar Treasury bill 5 AS 5J£ 

2- nor Treasury note u 5 Ml 

VyoorTrattwry note 735 730 

7-yaor Treaiary pow 7J7 733 

KMratB- Treosonmote 7 j» 7 js 

n-veor Treownr Bond 739 736 

Merrill LvnciiSMav Ready asset 417 4.17 

Jaeue 

Dtsoiwit rale 13. 14. 

Coll money 2 *■ 2 *• 

VraooJh tatertonfc ZLfa 2 1. _ . . 

3- month Interbank 2*a 2 >. GOM 

4- maaffeMcrixmft 
lO-yoar Oo varmn tn t bond 
Oanncny 


Britain 

Bank base rate 
Cell mo ney 
l-nwotti intertianK 
3-month Btortank 
frnwttti iateraank 
lfamr Gilt 
Frnweo 

intervention rote 
Call money 
Huaiii miertnuk 
Innanth Interbank 
lotorbank 
J0-V«flr OAT 
Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lvnch, Bank of Tekvo. Commerzbank. 
Greenwetl Montagu- Credit Lvonnolx 


5V, 

5%* 

ruL 

Stt 

5 T» 

5*.^ 

5H. 

5<v 

b* 

6*. 

U9 

B47 

5 no 

SM 

5’A 

5V. 

5Y» 

5 v. 

5*w 

5 S 

5*, 

5*. 

8.13 

Ill 


CaH money 

1 month intcrtKuiK 
S-month mrerttojiK 
(month Interbank 
it-yoor Bund 


3 r. 

2 4, 


JLM. 

PM. 

entae 

470 

A.74 

Zurich 

•aw ys 

387.95 

+ 020 



London 

38820 

387.90 

+ 025 

6AJ 

too 

Hew York 

SWUM 

39CU0 

+ IU0 


4.95 4.95 

5-80 5J» 

54 9* 

535 535 

732 751 


UA do/km oer ounce. London official fix- 
mgs; Zurtcn ana New York opening and efto- 
!na prices: New York Comae (December.) 
Source: Reuters. 



ass.. 


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y- .A*.» .i'- 




ri-SS 


r . ?age 12 


F 


- Market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 13, 1994 


■i 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 




Tl 

IT' 


Tl 


Inflation Concern 
Weighs on Stocks 


Bloomberg Butinas .Vwj 

YORK - Stocks 
lower Wednesday as op- 
about strong corporate 
Profits was offset by concern 
inflatiOD might rise 
Investors remained con- 
^ned that inflation reports 
“ ue out this week would spur 


U-S. Stocks 


■the Federal Reserve to raise in- 
terest rates For the sixth time 
this year. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
^ge closed down 1.68 points 
a * 3,875.15. Declining issues 
outweighed advancing ones bv 

an 1 1-tO-lQ mar gin . 

IBM’s shares rose on news 
tne_ company is concluding ne- 
gotiations to acquire Kalpana 


nandal Securities said. If the 
reports show infla tion is accdh j 
eratmg, “it’s just that much j 
more certain the Fed will tight- ! 
en in November and next year.” 

Not all investors believe Lhnt ■ 
the Federal reserve will raise 
rates again this year. Richard 
Eakle. president of Eakle Asso- 
ciates, said the Fed’s previous 
rate increases were taking effect 
and had sufficiently slowed the , 
economy’s growth. 

M 1 think they’re done, and the, 
□ext significant move in rates is. 
down,' Mr. Eakle said. 

Higher rates pressure stock 
prices because they encourage 
people to put their money in J 
fixed-rate investments lhaij 


seem less risky. They also raise ^ 



patible computer networks. 

Investors hesitated to make 
rag bets on slocks before the 
release of two closely watched 
reports. The Labor Department 
Will issue its producer-price in- 
dex Thursday before the open- 
ing of trading, followed by the 
consumer price index Friday. 

“The market's anticipating 
the reports with some dread." 
Walter Revis of Principal Fi- 


the cost of borrowing, which! 
hurts future corporate profits, j 

A decline in paper stocks was 
led by Consolidated Papers and ( 
Weyerhauser. 

Both companies posted morej 
than 60 percent increases in 
tbird-quaxter earnings, and 1 
Consolidated Paper's net in-< 
come exceeded analysts' esti- 
mates. 

But shares in Consolidated: 
had risen sharply in anticipa- 
tion of better earnings, and 
traders said investors sold stock, 
after the earnings report. 


German Poll and Data 
Pressure the Dollar 


Compiled bv Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
slipped a gains t the Deutsche 
mark and other major curren- 
cies Wednesday before the re- 
lease of key U.S. inflation data 
late this week and the German 
elections Sunday. 

The mark jumped against the 
dollar after a poll released 
Wednesday by the Allens bach 


Foreign Exchange 


Institute showed that Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl's coalition 
government was expected to 
win re-election. 

“The mark is staging its post- 
election rally early” said Carl 
Weinberg, chief economist at 
High Frequency Economics. 

The mark has suffered in the 
past mouth amid speculation 
Mr. Kohl would lose the elec- 
tion. His opponents, led by the 
Social Democrats, are consid- 
ered by many traders to be more 
willing to boost government 
spending, a move that could ex- 


acerbate inflation and harm 
German finan cial markets. 

“The dollar will likely be ; 
more sensitive to the German 1 
elections this weekend than the; 
economic data, with the mark j 
possibly finding support should ! 
Kohl win as expected.” said! 
Margaret Kudarauskas, an ana- j 
lyst at Technical Data. ; 

Late in New York, the dollar 1 
was at 1J408 DM. down from 
1.5448 DM on Tuesday. The 
dollar fell to 99.795 yen from 
300.200 yen. The dollar was 
also at 5.2740 French francs, 
down from 5.2850 francs, and 
at 1-2853 Swiss francs, down 
from 122886 francs. The pound 
was at $1.5820, up from 
$1.5795. 


Via Aiioaated Pie» 


Oct. it 


The Dow 


of the 

Dow Jones Industrial average 
4000 



A M 

1994 


J J A S G 


iht 


NYSE Most Actives 



WL 

Htah 

LOW 

Lott 

an. 

AMID 

41681 

24ft 

23ft 

23ft 

—1ft 

NMedErt 

39030 

16 

15ft 

15ft 

—ft 

Fnroti 

35351 

Bft 

7 

Bft 

—3ft 

IBM 

32266 

74 ft 

71 

73 

+ lft 

TelMev 

31750 63'.; 

41ft 

*3ft 

*lft 

FordMS 

31725 29ft 

28ft 

2* 

—ft 

GenEls 

26337 

50ft 

48ft 

»ft 

♦ Ift 

BkNYs 

27748 

30 

2*ft 

39ft 

* V, 

DtoHol 

24170 

219ft 

28 VS 

28ft 

—ft 

PepsC 

23653 34ft 

34ft 

34ft 

—ft 

Merck 

23048 

37 

36 ft 

37 

-ft 

Malarias 

23051 

54ft 

53ft 

54ft 


Compaq s 

219® 

36 

34ft 

35ft 

-1” 

AMaH 

21727 

24ft 

2* 

24ft 

-ft 

TUesEP 

20196 

3Vj 

3ft 

3ft 

-ft 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL High 

LOW 

Last 

as. 

Novefl 

71617 16ft 

15ft 

16ft 

- 

weants 

60601 23ft 

21ft 

22ft 

—1 

Cisco 3 

576)5 28ft 

27 

27ft 

—I 

AuoleC 

52833 42ft 

39 ft 

42ft 

*2W 

TefCmA 

50348 24V» 

22ft 

23ft 

- ft 

Intel 

44130 60ft 

58ft 

59ft 

—ft 

MnttKton 

39285 17ft 

16 

ITVh 

+ >Vll 

SunMic 

38459 31 ft 

30ft 

31ft 

• ft 

Seopale 

30774 25ft 

24>Vn 

25ft 


StrCTjds 

25122 14 

12ft 

13ft 


SvnOPHc 

34523 17ft 

15ft 

16Vu 

ll~J 

Cmcsps 

22957 17ft 

16% 

17ft 

*v« 

Acdakn 

21060 19ft 

18ft 

19 

* Vu 

Marine rH 

21157 22ft 

22ft 

22ft 

♦ ft 

Necrvs 

19814 8 

7ft 

7ft 



AMEX Most Actives 


1 


v«. Hsh 

Low 

Lost 

an- 

Viocvrt 

44830 1"h 

I'm 

1ft 


VkJCB 

18501 39ft 

38ft 

2»'i 

- ft 

ForumR 

8430 7W m 

2ft 

2ft 

• ft 

ALC 

6370 34ft 

33ft 

34ft 

rift 

NY Tim 

5421 22ft 

22 

22ft 


EcHoBav 

5005 13ft 

13ft 

13ft 

♦ ft 

Viacom 

4812 41ft 

40ft 

41ft 


Vtoc wtC 

4734 3Vu 

TV u 

3ft 


XCLLtd 

4319 lVu 

1ft 

1ft 

—Vi, 

SuvnLHa 

4006 5 

3ft 

4ft 

—ft 


Market Sales 


NYSE 
Am ex 
Nasdaq 
In millions. 


Today 

4:oo 

24944 

nn 

30773 


Prev. 
cons. 
420.17 
7X64 
347 J? 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Ugh Low Lmt Ora. 


Indus SWIM 3387.34 3842.03 3875 IS — l .AH 
Trims I 48*84 14*2.17 1479X5 I4W.I9 -578 
Util 180.99 181JJ 1811.13 18070 —1.12 
Como 138877 139143 1387.03 1390.75 * 1.25 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Prev io us Today 

Hitft U« Ook 4.0# 


Industrials 

Trento. 

Utilities 

Ft nana 

SP 500 

SP 100 

553X3 54470 
359J2 35186 
15856 15816 

43 v* XX 
46*34 459X4 

432.06 42804 

553X4 
3S8.94 
151 31 
43.00 
46*80 
431X6 

552.95 

3*1 

15894 

53.11 

465X7 

411X8 

NYSE Indexes 


High 

Loir 

Lad 

Cfig. 

Com pan 1C 

industrials 

Tramp. 

Lffifity 

Rnonce 

25*82 

mu 

232.72 

705.04 

704.36 

255,95 

32236 

23868 

20*25 

203.75 

25*35 

333.03 

232J1 

204X5 

20186 

-0.03 
<0.08 
♦ 1X2 
—0X9 
— 807 

NASDAQ Indexes 


High 

LOW 

Last 

Ota. 

CompcsJre 

Industrials 

Besiks 

Insurance 

Frntiico 

Transp. 

767X9 

779.79 

750.92 

93876 

922.47 

703X7 

764.97 

777X7 

74937 

958.95 

950.35 

700. 7t 

767x9 

779X9 

74U7 

931X5 

922.20 

705L3S 

*2.1? 
•202 
—1.08 
*2.92 
+ 0J27 
• 1.54 

AMEX Stock Index 


High 

LOW 

Last 

Oig. 


458X4 

457.14 

458.50 

♦ 0.74 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 

20 Bands 

10 Utilities 

10 industrials 

Previous 

Close 

9*01 

9893 

101319 

Tatar 

Neon 

9*10 

91X8 

101.13 

NYSE Diary 


Adwmced 
Docfined 
Unchanged 
Tala! Issues 
New Highs 
New lows 


Close Prev. 

1010 1540 

1115 468 

741 M3 

3844 3871 

59 60 

91 70 


AMEX Diary 


Close Prov. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
Mew Highs 
vew Laws 


270 

319 

396 

289 

240 

m 

806 

814 

15 


27 

24 


NASDAQ Diary 


don Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1474 

1518 

1904 


Spot Commo di ties 


Commodity 
Aluminum, at 
Coptw electrolytic, n> 
iron fob, ten 
Lead, lb 
5!lvor. hrov az 
Steel (scrap), ion 
Tin. lb 
Zinc, lb 


Today 

0743 

173 

31800 

0.42 

5.485 

110.17 

34199 

05184 


Prev. 

0734 

122 

31X00 

042 

149 

11017 

3.6206 

am 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Previous 
BM AUt 


QNt 

BM Of* 

ALUMINUM (HMi Grade) 

Do Hon per mettle ton 
soot 10450 1437 JO 141450 141750 

Forward _ 145*00 145750 167 50 1, 
COPPER CATHODES (High erode) 

Dalian per metric fan 
Spot 331 UQ 251X00 248550 

Forward 2509JH 251050 248X00 

LEAD 

Dal Ian per metric ton 
Spot 63450 mo mawf 

Forward 447X0 448X0 638J0 

NICKEL 

DoHors per metric top 
Soot 6590X0 4400X0 674SX0 

Forward 6490X0 4700X0 4580X0 

TIN 

Dol Ian per metric tsa 
tool 5325X0 5335.00 5290X0 S3MX0 

Forward 541000 5420X0 5370X0 5380X0 

ZINC (Special HUD erode) 

Dollars per metric ten 

Spat 1O44J0 1Q45J0 1034X0 1037X0 

Forward 1064X0 iae?X0 105*00 1091x0 


XQ 


Financial 


High Law Close Orange 


3-MONTH STERLING (LlFFEj 



pn at HO pet 



Dec 

93X8 

93X2 

93X5 

+ 0,10 

Mar 

9283 

92X2 

9279 

+ 8M 

Jun 

9222 

91.98 

9117 

+ 016 

sen 

91J6 

91X2 

9UZ 

+ 818 

Dec 

91X2 

91.20 

9U9 

+ 817 

Mar 

91.16 

9093 

91.12 

+ 016 

Jim 

90X9 

9079 

90JA 

+815 

Sep 

90B4 

90X5 

9082 

+ 814 

Dec 

9074 

90X5 

90J3 

+ 012 

Mar 

9070 

90X5 

9070 

+ 0.10 

Job 

90X7 

90X5 

90X7 

+ 810 

Sep 

90X5 

90X3 

9065 

+ 0.10 


DSC 

94X4 

94X4 

Mor 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Jhm 

N.T. 

N.T. 

See 

N.T. 

N.T. 


bee 

9*71 

Mar 

94X7 

Jun 

9*02 

Sea 

93X6 

Dec 

9333 

Mar 

9209 

Jun 

92X6 

StP 

9266 

Dec 

9250 

Mar 

9234 

Jan 

9234 

Sep 

92.14 


93X9 unch. 
93X5 +0X1 


93X3 —0X1 

93X7 —0X3 


92X4 -003 

9244 — 0X3 


9247 —0.03 

9233 — 0X2 


92X3 —0X1 

9214 —0X1 


Ext. volume: 131X52 Open mt.: 474X22 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE) 

SI mUHOH - PtS Of 100 PCI 

MX3 —OX* 
9305 — 0X4 

9124 —0X5 

9293 — 0X5 

Est. volume: 300. Open hU.:*l4S. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 million • Pis of 100 pet 

94X7 9*20 Unch. 

WJO WJ6 +0X3 

9293 

9257 
9224 
93X2 
9279 
9240 
72X2 
9230 
922) 

9214 

Est. volume: 97X84. Open tot.: 699X54. 
3-MONTH PI BOR CMAT1F1 
FF5 flUHKn-Rfsof IDS pd 
Dec 94X8 94X5 94X7 —0X1 

Mor 9345 9239 9243 UnOl. 

Jim 9X34 92)9 9X23 —0X1 

Sep 9291 9285 9290 

Dec 9262 9258 9242 

Mar 9243 9238 

Jun 9223 9218 

Sep 92X8 92X3 9207 +0X1 

Est. volume: 34X22. Ooen lnt.: 174572 
LONG GILT (UFFE) 
■SMM-pK*33ndiOflMpa 
Dec 101-15 100-17 101-11 +0-18 

Mar N.T. N.T. 100-14 +0-18 

Eft. volume: 77,457. Open int.: 92421 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 

dm mm -ms or ioo per 

Dec B9J5 89.1A 89.42 —0X9 

Mar 8895 8830 8842 —0.10 

Eft. volume: 129409. Open In!.: 158X82 


+ 0X1 
+ 0X1 


9240 -0X3 

9221 Unch. 


1744 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 


FF5MUKW 

-Pis of TOO PCt 




Dec 

nan 

11862 




Mar 

11818 

10958 

11810 

—020 


Jim 

109X4 

109X8 

109X2 

— °.?fl 


Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Unch. 


Esi. volume: 118X54, Open Int: 140X72 


industrials 


Low Lnt Settle chUe 


High 
GASOIL (IPE) 

U.S. donors per metric Ion-loti at 100 tons 
OCt 15ZX0 15030 151X5 15275 Exp. 

Nov 155X0 15030 15030 15030 — 5JM 

Dec 156.75 152.75 15275 15200 — 430 

Jon 15830 155X0 15X0 155X0 —430 

Feta 15930 156X5 15630 15*25 —425 


APT 

June 


High Lew Lest Setfle CVge 

15X25 194X0 '154X9 159X5—4X0 

15475 154.75 154.75 154.75 — 3JS 

155J0 15530 15275 —275 

15200 15250 153X0 153X1 —150 

N.T. N.T. N.T. 1S27S —4X0 

N.T. N.T. I4.T. 15275 -4X0 


Esi. volume: 2L929. Open hit. 1)5X63 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IP®) . _ _ 

UAdonorg ptrbgrwl-Wf e» MW barrets 


May 

16X1 

1*83 

TSXS 

15X4 —860 

Dec 

16X5 

1885 

1589 

15X6 —0X3 

Jap 

18X4 

ISM 

15.90 

15.96 —058 

Feb 

16X3 

ISM 

1S90 

15.94 —058 

Mar 

1*59 

1800 

1800 

1800 —850 

Aor 

1*58 

142® 

1830 

1800 —050 

May 

1*58 

1*30 

1830 

l<UH! —052 

Jan 

KU6 

1830 

1830 

MXO —852 

Jhr 

16X0 

1837 

1837 

1*00 — 05* 

Aog 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1804 — 056 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1804 -856 

Oct 

18X0 

16X0 

16X0 

1804 -056 


Est. volume; 41422 . Ouen M. 184X41 


Stock Indexes 


aese Change 


Mgfc Low 
FTSE M (UFFE) 

125 per Index naM 
Dec 3T37X 309SX 3114.0 +120 

Mar N.T. N.T. J138Q +118 

Est. volume: 14.971. Ooetl Inl.; 52497. 
CAC40 (MATIF) 

FF3M per index paint 

Oct 1932X0 1912X0 1932X0 + 5X0 

NOV 193200 1925X0 1940X0 +SM 

Dec 1749.00 1930X0 194930 +5X0 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1974X9 +530 

Jon N.T. N.T. 194030 +&m 

StP N.T. N.T. 1985X0 + 6X0 

EsL volume; HUMS. Open tod.: 62656. 
Sources: Motif. Associated Press. 
Umdoft inti Financial Futures Exchange, 
Inn Petroleum ExcAanpa. 


DMdanda 


Per Ami Re 


Company 

IRREGULAR 

COrp Bancor Esoona b .4658 10-19 11-ID 
Embofollod And mo O X449 10-19 10-25 

Evergreen Foundtn . .154 10-12 10-19 

Puoot SP&Lad{pf B - .3906 10-24 11-15 
b-Apprax. amount per ADR. 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 


Dull Phelps Cora.: XX! tri a stare of DuH 
Phelps Credit Rating Hr each stare ot Dull 
Photos Cora. held. 


STOCK SPLIT 
CblpcDm Com; 3 far 2 split. 

Cfironlmed Inc.; one share of Orphan MedJ- 
col com m on far every ten stares Of Cbnxv 
Imed cm man. 


INCREASED 


FFY Financial 
IIDnavu Carp 
Walgreen Co 


.135 10-31 11-17 
35 1-10 3-1 

.195 11-14 13-12 


INITIAL 


CBS men . .10 11-23 12-12 

Caterolllar Incn c .15 

Queens Cfy Bean - X5 H-T 11-18 

c-Rocora and pay dates unannounced. 


REGULAR 


All Amer Term 
Bard (CR) 

Brmton Banks 
CSX Cora 
Evergreen Am Ret 
Evergreen Tata I Ret 
ForMsSecur 
Global HlInccDonr 
Greiner Engineer 
ITTCotp 
K5 Bancorp 
Ule Tech 
Melville Cora 
Metrotank 
Nrttun BrdPtnrs 
PotoeWeb Prm hi 
P aineweb Prmlnsur 
PolnwWeb Prm In 
Paineweb PrmTxFr 
S) Paul Ba> 

2002 Target Term 
Three D Dept A 
Three □ dest B 
Trip A Gv 1995 
Trtp A Gv 1997 
Weyerhaeuser 
Woa (worth Cora 


M .10 10-20 10-28 
Q .15 10-24 11-4 

Q .11 10-20 11-1 
Q M 11-25 13-1S 
O .IS 10-12 10-19 
Q 31 10-12 10-19 
M X75 10-25 11-15 
I* .115 10-20 10-28 
Q XT 10-21 11-4 

Q X95 tt-ia 

- .10 10-2) 

Q XS 12-16 

Q 38 10-24 

O .15 10-25 .. _ 

O 35 10-31 11-14 
M .114 10-20 10-28 
M X67 10-20 10-28 
M X44 10-20 10-28 
M XB13 10-20 10-28 
Q X75 10-31 11-14 
M X7H1 ID-20 10-28 
Q .0125 10-24 11-7 
Q J0O75 10-24 11-7 
M JBS4 10-20 10-28 
M X417 10-20 10-28 
Q JO 10-28 11-28 
Q .15 11-1 12-1 


1-1 

11-3 

1-20 

11-1 

11-8 


a-amwal; g-pa ruble In Caaodtan funds; m- 
monthly; a-mmiterly; »-saml-aaugal 


SAN FRANCISCO fBloombrig) -ChMlfeg;", h „, its \hiid- 
rtf thp worst slumn in the securities industry _ ? eter. 


of the worst slump in the secuntia industry ^ qUftrtcr , 

Revenue grew 4 percent- to $248. -n-Systs Mid had: 

The results were better than expecied ^ fun/busincsses, 

wf ku firns'jc market and mutual luna UU4 


* 



l ne results were oeuer u*u» - -■> ~ ; « 

been buoyed by the firm’s market and ^muutfj to 

Schwab said. Assets in customer MCjMilstad. balmces had 
•$116.7 billion, while money market and casn 

climbed 40 percent, to $25.8 billion. expectations that 

i The increase in earnings carne than 25 

most Wall Street firms would would report 

: percent Salomon Int, for ejramplt mainly because 

kloss of about 5100 million for the third quarter, mamiy oecausc 

of losses in trading in its own account. 

Ford’s Vice Chairman Steps Down 

DEARBORN, Michigan (Bloomberg)— 
chairman, Allan D. Gilmour, once widely ^ j ^ 

to head the second largest U.S. automaker, will retire Jan. », tnc 

‘be replaced on Ford’s board, a Mmpanyj^es™ 
departure had been widely expected since he was passwi ow tor 
Ford's chairmanship in November 1905, when Alex Trotman was 
; named to the top job. 

Santa Fe Refuses to Aid Union Bid . 

! SCHAUMBURG, Illinois (Bloomberg) -pSantaFePa^O 

| Corp.’s board refused Wednesday to prowde Union iWic Cor£ 
: with the information that might justify a higher bid for a merger 
between Union Pacific and Santa Fe. p fi - offer lo 

. Santa Fe's board last week rejected Um°n Pacific s^offCT to 
merge with Santa Fe in a transaction valued at about S3.-bdbon. 
The Union Pacific offer had ben an attempt todcradSwitaFe 
Pacific’s merger agreement with Burlington Northern Inc., a stock 
■ transaction valued at about $25 billion. . . _ 

On Tuesday, Union Pacific said it might be 
offer for Santa Fe if it had access to information that would jusuly 

a higher price. 

Absence of Sports Ads Pummels CBS 

NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) •— CBS lac. sakl 
Wednesday that third-quarter earnings fell 5 1 percent, <uwen 
: down by the absence of professional football and baseball games, 
•which undercut advertising sales by 4 percent- 

The company, which posted earnings of $55.4 million for the 
quarter, said the settlement of a lawsuit with Viacom Inc. had 
inflated results in the year-earlier quarter. In addiUOn, CBS said a 
higher tax rate had hurt earnings this year. , . 

But operating results unproved for company-owned television 
and radio stations, reflecting strong local advertising spending, 
the company said. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


IXM 



Ml 




’ rm 


>«* 


r<*ua! 


For the Record 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. said it expected to post third- 

• P (fit f.‘ - A_ l>1ft - - *11- 111ft tr 


-* (j 



Hoedhst Unit Pays Japan Fine 


The market is also awaiting 
U.S. consumer and producer 
price reports this. week. Bonds 
and the doilar'are euqjected to 
rise if the reports show that U.S. 
inflation is under control 


( Bloomberg, 
AFX, Knight- Ridd^r) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Hoechst Japan 
Ltd. said Wednesday that it had 
paid the authorities 4.42 billion 
yen ($44 million) in back taxes 
and penalties demanded by au- 
thorities earlier this year. 

But the Japanese unit of the 
German chemical and drug 
company Hoechst AG denied 
that it had intentionally under- 
stated its taxable income by in- 
flating the price of materials 


imported from its parent com- 
pany. 

It said it paid back taxes of 
2.49 billion yen, plus penalty 
taxes of 1.93 billion yen. 

The company said it had 
lodged a complaint with the 
Japanese tax authorities, de- 
manding a refund and saying it 
was doubly taxed in Japan and 
Germany on the same profit 
(AFX. AP. Knighl-RiJderl 


Profit Leaps at Taiwan’s Acer Inc. 


Bloomberg Business News 

TAIPEI — Acer Inc., Taiwan’s largest computer maker, 
said Wednesday its provisional net profit for the first three 
quarters more than tripled from the like period of 1993, to 2.1 
billion Taiwan dollars (S80 million), or 4.40 dollars a share. 

Sales for the first three quarters rose 67 percent, to 22.1 
billion dollars, on increased shipments of components for 
assembly at overseas factories, the company said. 

Acer’s stock rose 7 percent or 5.50 dollars, to 91 dollars 
before the company issued the statement That was the 
maximum rise permitted in one day under Taiwan stock 
exchange rules. The profit Figures include earnings from 
Acer’s subsidiaries. 


Weyerhaeuser Co. said third-quarter earnings rose 67 percent, 
to $144.4 million, as pulp, paper and packaging markets recovered 
and sales of wood products stayed strong. (Bloomberg) 

Nikko Securities Co. said.it would slash its mortgage trading 
and sales force by 95 percent citing poor prospects for the 
mortgage market ’ . (Bloomberg) 

The Federal National MortgsgeiAssodation reported that third- 
quarter earnings rose 14 percent^ to $477.2 million, due to an 
increase in net interest income and the absence of repurchases of 
high-cost debt. (Bloomberg) 

Bankers Trust New York Cl, a large trader in derivatives, 
asked a federal court to dismiss Gibson Greetings Inc.’s $73 
million lawsuit asserting the card company knew the risks in 
buying the exotic securities. (AJP) 

Alcan Aluminium Co. reported its second consecutive quanqriy 
profit fueled by increased* demand for fabricated afiimfiulip 
products. The company, one of the world's largest aluminum 
manufacturers, reported profit from operations, of $39 , mil|$gn in 
the third quarter, reversing a loss of $7 mfllicm a year earlier. 

(Bloomberg) 


-H*?# * 

« fcta 

■' fi| 

• 

- m 


* m 

'W ft 


a 


fu 1,1^ 


rm 




(WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


I Agw*» From Oci.11 


Clow Prev. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HM 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AtaM 
Akio Nobd 
AMEV 

Boh-Wesamen 
CSM 
D5M 
Elsevier 
Fokker 
Gist-Brocades 
HBG 
htelnoken 
Hoogovens 


4840 4830 
200JO 30020 


Hwiter Douglas 77X0 JVJ0 


M0 92.10 


39-40 


IHC Cakmd 
inter Mueller 
inn Nederland 
KLM 
KNP BT 
KPN 
Neathovd 
Oce Gr Infen 
Poknocd 
Pumas 

Pol-iOrom 

Rabeca 
Rodomco 
Rollnca 
Karen to 
Rovol Dutch 
Stork 

unllaver 

Von Ommtfcn «7.I0 4730 
VNU 176JW 180 

Welters/Khiwer 125.90 124X0 
FOE Index : 403J8 
Previous : 9*4.11 


193 193.70 
4120 4110 


Brussels 


AG Fin 
Almcmll 
Artied 
Boras 
BBL 
Befcoert 
CBR 
.CMS 
CNP 
Corterlll 
.Cabnra 
-Calnryt 
DeHiaize 
EleOrabd 
Electranno 
GIB 
GBL 
Gevaert 
Gtaverbel 
iaimabel 
Kraiielbonk 
Mosane 
.Petrol too 
-Pawerfln 

Recti cel 
Royote Betoe 
SacGenBonque 


Close Prev. 


Rhelntnclall 

Scherlno 

Siemens 

Thyssen 

Varla 

Vetaa 

VEW 

VI OB 

Volkswaaen 

Wetla 


279 240 

959 938 
44040 643 

294292X0 
3M 305 
53270529X0 
3«®1 349 

487 497 

448 471 

1015 1008 


PAX Index : 3877J7 
km : far 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yfttyma 

Enso-Gutzell 

Huntomakl 

ILO.P. 

Kvmmene 

Metro 

Nokia 

Potiiola 

Regala 

Stockmann 


103 101 

44 4280 
147 145 

10 10 
137 133 

147 143 

578 553 

49 44X0 
100 98.10 
250 247 


magmar tmm 


Hong Kong 

BkEasI Asia 32X0 3240 
Cottar Pacinc I1J0 11X5 
Owuna Kono 3770 36X0 
CnlnoUghrPwr 4070 4X3® 
Dolor Form Inti mXO 1020 
Hang Lung Dev ia?8 13X5 
Hong S eng Bank 5375 5275 
Henderson Lana 49.30 47.90 
MK Air Eng. 33.70 33.1 a 
HK China Gas 14.45 14X0 
HK Electric 3AX0 24.05 
HKUmd 19X5 1 9 JO 

HK Realty This! 19X0 18 j« 
HSBCHoJdtogs 88.75 87X0 
HXShangHHs ujh n 
HK Telecomm 14.25 15.40 
HK Ferry toto ia9s 

HutOl Whompoa 35.70 35J0 

H VKH1 Dev 20X5 2080 
Jordtoe MattL 45 64J0 
J online Sir HW 30 29X0 
Kowloon Molar 14X5 1470 
Mandarin Orient 1078 9.75 
Miramar Hofei 18.90 18X0 

f.Tr: Worm Dev 23.« 2s.9a 
5HK Praps 57 5573 

steluit 3X0 228 

Srntra Poc A 57.75 58 

TUI Cheung Pros lajo 1825 

TVE 4.15 

JUJjnrl H0« 30X0 30.10 

Wheel ock Co i6X0 14x0 
Wing On Co Inti 10J5 11J0 
Wlnsor iikl iats 10x0 


SocGenBetotoue .2135 3140 


Selina 
Solvay 
.Tessenderla 
TrocteOel 
UCB 

Union Mlnler* 
WQgans Llts 




Frankfurt 

AEG I57.T 

Alcatel SEL 
Adlatu Haw 
AJIano 
Asko 
BASF 
Bavor 

Bov. H ype bank 
BovVeretmok 
BBC 

BHFBonk 
BMW 

Commerzbank 
Continental 
Daimler Benz 

g?°^cK , 



DWBjos 
Dresdner Bank 
Fehtmuehie 


HWfenw 

Henkel 

HocWtet 

Hoeetwf 

Hoxzmann 

Horten 

IWKA 

K oiison 

Kgrrtodt 

Kauinot 

(tHD 

KlogknerWerk 

Lnfltanrt 

“AN _ , 

ossr 

Muancn Rueck 

Porsche 

Preussag 

PWA 

RWE 


Johannesburg 

AECI 
Attach 
Anglo Amgr 
Bartoni 
Stwoor 


Bullets 
De Beers 
Driefameln 
Gen car 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Highveia Sieel 
Kloof 

NeataankGrp 
Randlonteln 
Rwsofal 
SA Brews 
ST Helena 
Sasal 

Western Deep 



49X0 SOTS 


IJJ .114 


83X0 
NX 47X0 
33X0 35X0 
215 216 




London 


Sri 

3*50 

Abaev Nertl 

*10 

*08 

78550767X0 

AlNea Lyons 

5X0 

873 

47847750 

Ar|« Wosins 

256 

2X3 

234 

232 

Argyll Group 

2X5 

263 

71220 

715 

Ass drtl Foods 

5.15 

5X5 

515 

■nr 

BAA 

5X6 


389 

3«0 

BAe 

4X9 

4X2 

30350 

301 


2JB 

?A5 

2845020550 

Borclovs 

5X3 

5X0 

309 

307 

Bass 

*37 

551 

w 

591 

BAT 

4X9 

4 St 


luiu 

BET 

1X7 

IXb 

32637250 

Blue Circle 

2X8 

736 

Ml 

9IQ 

BOC Group 

*97 

892 


216 

book 

527 

8)2 

350 

350 

iowater 

4X9 

*68 

155 

148 

BP 

*21 

*20 


610 

Brit Airways 

8X1 

3X3 

5025049950 

Brit Gas 

3X3 

3X1 


129 

Brit steel 

1X7 

1X7 

14414350 

Brit Telecom 

JM 

295 


■ .1 


218 

114 

1B31S250 

Cable Wire 

*23 

*17 

41341350 

Cadbury Sch 

450 

445 

413 

403 

CaradM 

276 

2.77 

16013450 

Coon viyella 

21B 

716 

2800 

6 1 


552 

544 

689 

690 

Ceurtooisss 

*50 

450 


*63 

ECCOraup 


3X9 

243 

243 


3X9 

3L89 

€0X0 

453 


260 

250 


Close Prev. 


F Isons 

Forte 

GEC 

Genl Ace 

Glam 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gutonexi 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hlllsduwn 

HJBC Hides 

Indicwp 


cape 
Kin gfisher 
Lodbrake 


Land Sec 
Ltraarte 
Las mo 

Legal Gen Grp 
Lloyds Bank 
Marks Sd 
MEPC 
Natl Pownr 
NotWest 
NthWst Water 
Pea non 
P&O 
Pliklnatoa 
PawerGen 
Prudential 
RWih Ora 
Reckltt Cal 
Red rand 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
RMC Grom 
Ralls Rovce 
Rattimn (unit) 
Raval Scat 
RTZ 

Satosbury 
ScotNewcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Slebe 

Smith Nephew 
SmlttiKllns B 
SmHti IWH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate & Lyle 
Tesco 
Thant EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Groun 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3W 

Wellcome 
WMttoread 
WIlUamsHdas 
Willis Corrom 
FT 381 


Market Closed 
The stock market 
in Madrid was 
closed Wednesday 
for a holiday. 


Milan 


AUearcn 15950 15850 

Assltalla 12410 129SD 

Autastradc wlv 1458 1477 
Bca AsrlaXIura 2450 2700 
BaaCommer Ital 3400 3620 

BOO Nn LdvoTO 1300 12280 

Bca Pop Novara 7950 8100 
Banco dl Roma 
BcoAmbraalano 
Beo Nason rise 
Benetton 
Credits IfaHano 
Ervtehem Auu 
Ferfin 
Flat spa 
F taonzAaro tod 
Ffnmscconlca 
Fond lark) saa 

Generali Assic 

IFIL 


IKflcemenn 
1 1 aloas 

Medlotaanee 

Montedison 

Olivetti 
Pirelli axj 
RAS 

Rlrwscente 


1580 1589 

ms mm 

1041 1120 
20100 1F380 
1930 193* 
TWO 2838 

1356 1381 

4285 4320 
9300 9700 

t299 1399 
10650 11135 
38050 38300 
3310 MB 
10280 10220 
4840 5000 
13050 U23S 
1308 1233 

1842 1845 

2173 2190 
)»4U 30130 
8585 8445 


San Paolo Torino 9000 9040 
SIP 4120 4220 

SMC 3840 3895 

SntahPd 1995 2005 

S fondo 39550 J45W 

St»t 4480 4495 

Taro AssJc 3450a 3«voo 


NHMT 1 "” 


Close Prav. 


Montreal 


AlCO Ltd I 1319 139! 

Bank Montreal 249! 24 vj 
BCE Mobile Cam 38ft 38ft 


11 11V. 
23ft 23M 
8 8 
18ft 17V5 
1BV4 17Vt 
\7Va 12ft 
20V. 
13ft 13ft 


Cdn Tire A 
CdnUtU A 
Cascades 
Crown x inc 
CT Rn’l 3 VC 
Gaz Metro 
GtWtsf Ufeco 
Hoes InH Bcd 
H udson’s Bay Co 27ft 27ft 
Imasco Ltd 37ft 37 
investors Grp inc 14ft 17 
Latatt (John) Zlft 21ft 
LotHowCoi 
Motion A 
Natl BkCanado 
Oshawa A 
Portcdn Petrol m 
Power Cara 
Power Flni 
Quebecor B 
Rogers Comm B 
Rovol BkCda 
Sears Canoda Inc 
Shell Cda A 
Saulham Inc 
SfnlcoA 
Triton Flnl A 


22ft 22ft 
21ft 21 
9ft 9ft 
19ft 19ft 
a 

19ft J9ft 
29ft 29 
17ft 17ft 
20ft 19ft 
28ft 28ft 
8ft 8ft 
44ft 44ft 
14ft 13ft 
8ft 8ft 
370 145 


I 196372 


Paris 


Accor 594 615 

Air LtouMe 731 733 

Atcotal Afsftam 471JS4/5« 
aw 25av.- 

BanadrelClc) 522 511 

BIC 640 m 

BNP 25*20 256.20 

Bnuyguea 560 5*2 

Danone 733 722 

Carretour 


„ 2184 2138 

C.CF. 217X0 218411 

Conn 103.10 103 

diorgeurs 1334 1329 

Clments Franc 285 285 

CTuOMM 444X0 44 

EH-Aaullalne 3877038870 
Earn Disney 7.40 7 x 0 

Gen. Eaint 49450498X0 
Havas 419X0 07.90 

Imehd 571 350 

Lafaroe Cappee 401 402 

Lea rand 

Lyon. Eeux 
Orecd IL’l 
L-VJW.H. 

Matro-Hachefte 
Mlchelln 8 


7060 *830 
501 494 

1123 1124 
844 MO 
107 MS 
225X0 23488 


Moulinex ira nmo 

Paribas 34470 338X0 

Pedimev inti 150X0 150X0 
Pernod-Rloord 302X0 304 ao 
P eugeot 790 79) 

Plnaull Print 950 935 

Radiotedmtoue 511 527 

Rb- Poulenc A 134X0 125 

Roll. SL LtkrtS ‘ “ 

Sanafl 

Saint Gatxrtn 
SJE.B. 

Sle Generale 
Suez 

THomson-C5F 

Total 
UAP. 

Valeo 


1502 1492 
252X0 24170 
652 650 

531 529 

544 56 9 

24424770 
145 min 
33040 339X0 




) 27470 




Prev tons : 


Sao Paulo 


Oct. 12 


Banco do Brasil 

BanesM 

Brndesca 

Brahma 

Cvnlo 

Eletrataras 

ItaOtXBKO 

UaW 

Paranofxmama 

Petrabras 

SiwzaCna 

Trtetras 

Teles> 

Usiminas 

Vole RtoDoce 
Varla 




Prevtoul : 


1070 19J25 
?J0 933 
M0 8X8' 
244243X0 
89X0 87 

328 328 
290 300 

3M 332 
1070 11X5 
138 144 

7X0 7JC 
44X0 4673 
430435J0 
1X0 1X1 
144 170 
NA 205 
49259 


Close Prev. 


SI me Singapore 1.16 1.16 
Sing Aerospace 2X7 2X6 
Slna Airlines tom lXsa 14 
Sins Bus Svc 9X0 9X5 
Slog Land 
StogPetlm 
Sing Press tom 
smg Shlpbldg 
5 loo Telecomm 
straits steam 
Strolls Trad too 
Tat Lee Bank 
UW Industrial 
Utd O'sea Bk font 14X0 16 

UMCPseasLand 2X7 280 
Straits Times lades: 2368X1 
Previous : Z3457J 


9X0 975 
2X3 2X0 
26 26 
257 2X1 
3X4 3X4 
5X0 5X0 
382 3X8 
4X0 4X4 
1X9 1X4 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Asea AF 
Astro AF 
Atlas Copco 
E lectrolux B 
Ericsson 
Esselte-A 


45X0 44X0 
540 533 

183 182 

9050 90 

asfi-50 343 

417X0 416 

9150 92 


Handelsoank BF 92 92 

investor BF 174X0174X0 

Norsk Hydro 256249X0 

Pharmoda AF 133 132 

SandvikB mse in 
SCA-A 115X0U4XS 

s-e Banker AF 46.10 46_w 
SkondiaF 124X0125X0 

Skonska BF 
5KFBF 
Store AF 
TreUetoorg BF 
Volvo BF 


143X0141X0 
128X0127X0 
404 400 

100 100 
139 138 
ANaersvaerMen : I82S77 
prevuas : 1999X2 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boro I 

Bouoatovliie 

Coles Myer 
Comaico 
CRA 
C5R 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Maoeuan 
MIM 


Nor Aust Bonk 
■>s Carp 


8X8 873 
378 382 
19X6 19X2 
3X9 3XA 
184 185 

4X6 482 

5X0 5X5 
10X2 1870 
4XS 4X9 
1X0 1X0 
1X7 1X7 
11 JM 11 

180 182 
2.79 281 
1036 1032 
8X5 8X7 
3X9 3J9 
3X9 3X9 
354 191 
3X4 3X5 


News 

Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pac Dunlop 

Pioneer Inn 

Nnmdy Pasekton 2.43 2X8 
OCT Resources 1X5 1X4 

Santos 4 Aits 

TNT 2 M 248 

Western AAinlna 8.14 Oas 
WbsIpoc Banklna 479 471 
Woodside 452 458 

«arr3s^ : ^ 


Tokyo 


AkalElectr 
Asam Chemical 
Asatil Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Brldsestooo 
Canon 

Casio 

Dai Nippon Print 1830 16« 
□o we Home 1390 mo 
Dahra Securmes 1450 1430 


42S 438 

780 772 

1340 1250 
1540 1540 
1520 1500 
1800 1000 
1300 1300 


Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew 1480 1680 
Cerebas 8 7X0 

Cily Devctorennt UO BX0 
Cycle & Carriage 1380 1340 
DBS 1080 1080, 

DBS Land 488 480 

FE Levingston 7 sso 
1780 17X0 
28 2780 
486 480 
5X0 5XS 

14 1380. 
1.95 1.92 

13 12.90 
3X2 124 
2X7 2X1 

15 1480. 
7.15 7.10 
8X0 020 

11X0 1180 


Fanve 

Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitoeni 
HttaauCnMe 
Hondo 
lloYokodo 
Itochu 

Joan Airlines 

Kaiima 

Kamel Power 
KpwoHfcl Sleet 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kvocsra — .„ 

Matsu Elec Irufa 1700 uso 
Matsu Elec Wks 1070 1040 
Mitsubishi Bk 2820 2550 
Mitsubishi Kasel NA 550 


■2379 4740 
3330 2200 
2270 2240 
1090 1110 
laio 1010 
863 8M 
1760 1740 

738 725 

743 742 

990 978 
2500 2470 
.446 441 

1140 1140 
909 905 

720 713 
7300 7230 


734 728 

791 78S 


' 

Fraer&Noave 
Gt Eostn I '• 


Ufo 

Hong Leona Rn 
inehenpe 


Jurons SMayard 

J Cocci 


Kay Hw 
Keppel 
Noisteei 
Neptune orient 
ocBCtoretwt 
OY» Union Bk 
OYeas Union Ent 
Sembowana 


775 739 
931 92S 

1330 1290 
1290 1240 


MtttubisM Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev ... 

Mitsubishi Carp 1240 1230 

Mitsui and Co 859 839 

Mitsui Marine ~ 
MJfsukoshl 
Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK Insulators 1050 1081 

Nikko Securities ll« ll» 

Nippon Kooaku 974 949 

Nippon OH 494 498 

Nippon Steel 367 379 

Nippon Yusen 444 435 

Nissan 820 Bis 

MomwoSee 2090 2050 

NTY B730a 8728a 

Olympus optical 1090 TWO 

Monger 2520 34» 

Rtonh 977 966 

Sanya Elec sn m 

Sharp 1830 1830 


Close Prev 


Shlmazu 
Shtoelsu Ctam 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Atari tie 
Sumitomo Metal 
TalselCarp 
Tokedo Chem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pvt 
Toppan Printing 
Toray ind. 


737 

2090 

4000 

1900 

571 

890 

344 

439 

1230 


542 

1130 


Toray it 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yamaichi sec 
a: x 100. 


1420 

782 

774 

2070 

796 


723 
2080 
4000 , 
1880 
5HS 
887 
341 
642 
1220 
4540 
S4I 
1140- 
2840 
1430 
748 
760 
2060 
780 


Toronto 


Abltlbl Price 
Air Canada 7ft 

Aiberio Energy 2flv» 
Alcan Aluminum 34ft 
Amer Barrick 35ft 
Avenor 

Bk Nova Scotia 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 

Bombordter B 

Bramolea 
Brascan A 
Cameco 
CIBC 


24ft 

24ft 

48ft 

25ft 

22ta 

190 

19 

2fF«k 

31ft 


C*i Natural Res 17ft 


CdnOcdd Pet 
Cdn Pod lie 
Cascades Poner 
Cam toco 
Consumers Gas 
Do Tosco 
Daman Ind B 
Du Pont Cda A 
Echo Bov Mines 
Emolre Co. A 


39 
22ft 
5ft 
24 
17 
23ft 
13ft 
19ft 
18ft 
13ft 
21ft 
19 
84 
Bft 
14ft 
21ft 
46ft 
38ft 
28 Vi 
17 
UK* 
10ft 
31ft 


Fletcher . . 

Franco Nevada 
Guardian Con A 
Hernia Gold 
Horsham 
Imperial Oil 
Inca 

1 PL Energy 
Lac Minerals 
LakUavi A 
Loktlaw B 

Laewen Group .... 
London ImurGp Z2ft 
Mocmlll Bloedel 18ft 
MfOonalntlA 51ft 
Maoie Leal Fds HU 
Moore 2Sft 

Newbridge Netw 43ft 
Norandoinc 25ft 
Nonmda Forest _TZ 
Nor cm Energy 
Ml hem Telecom 
Nova 
Onex 

Ftotro Canada 
Placer Dome . 

Ptnash Corn Soak 51ft 
Prpvlgo 5ft 

PWA 860 

Quebecor Prlrri 14ft 
Rena issa nce Env 29 'A 
RloAlgom 25ft 

Seag ram Co 41ft 

anno cumoM left 
Talisman Enr 
TeleglObe 
TOUS 
Thomson 
TorDorn Bank 
Transaiia 
TronsCda Pin# 

UW Dominion 
UWWtstburne 
Westeoast Env 
wgstan 

Xerox Canada B 
tse pm index :«S&M 
Pm tons : crndO 


17ft 

48ft 

14ft 

13ft 

lift 

32ft 


29ft 

16ft 

14ft 

16ft 

20ft 

14ft 

17ft 

27ft 

10% 

21ft 

40ft 

50 


19ft 

7ft 

20ft 

35ft 

34ft 

24 

24ft 

47ft 

24ft 

22 

3X5 

18ft 

27V. 

31ft 

17ft 

30ft 

22V. 

5ft 

24ft 

17 

23ft 

13Ui 

19Vfc 

17ft 

14 
21ft 
18ft 
85ft 

8ft 

15 

20ft 

44ft 

38ft 

28ft 

144b 
10ft 
10ft 
31ft i 

22 ft; 

18ft 
50 W. 

SS' 

2Sft, 

If 

17ft 

47ft 

1414 

13ft 

lift- 

32U 

Sift 

5ft 

0X0 

14ft 

28ft 

35ft 

40ft 

18ft 

29U 

17 

14ft 

16ft 

am 

14VZ 

17ft 

26ft 

10ft 

21ft 

39 

48ft 


U.S. FUTURES 


v® Auebmed 9ms 


Ocu 12 


Zurich 


AdtointiB 220 220 

Alusirtsse B new 434 444 
BBCBrvmBovB 1111 1100 


721 725 
534 544 

335 334 
IS5S 1545 
2000 2030 

745 740 

388 3U 
1204 1209 


OtaGelovB 
CS Holdings 8 
Eiektrawi 
Fleawr B 
intonuscawit B 
Jeimoii b 
L« kflsGyr R 

MtowanplekB 

OerilK. Bwehrle R 132X0 133X0 

EBBim T -^ ,5M 

SohJ Republic 

Sandra B 
Schindler B 
Subar pc 
Surveillance B 
Swiss Bnk Cares 
Swiss Relnsur R 
SwtosolrR 
UBS B 

Wlnierthur B 
Zurich AssB 


SBC Index; »MX5 

:nEir 


5910 5850 
98 98 

£45 445 
7700 7658 
870 BSB 
1900 1890 
374 375 

m 684 
,850 848 
1240 1238 
*47 651 

1183 1185 


Previous: 


Season Season 

Hiflt! Lav* Ooen 

High 

Law 

Case 

aw 

Oo.lnt 


Grains 




WHEAT (CBOT) S.KQ£umminun- donors dw mrtwi 










435^ 

127 Mar 95 425 

*26>-< 

*15 

*I6*s-0X8'A 22311 

198ft 

114ftMov95 194 

197ft 

3X8 

JXSft 

-807 

3,273 

3X3ft 

3.11 Jul 95 356 

3XH'-> 

253 

153ft— 0.04 ft 

7.936 

165 

351 ft Sep 95 3X0 

3XT 

3J9'., 

159 ft -0X2 

195 

175 

355 Dec 95 167ft 

3X0 

167 

3x8 

-0X2 

123 


346 Jul M 




6 

Es. sates NA Toe's, sate 

18X33 





Tue’s ooon lnt 80^95 uo 923 








43IU 

112ft Dec M *20 

433'i 

*nv. 

*13!*— -0X8V, 22297 

436 

3X5 Atar95 *25 

427V1 

416ft 

*16 Vi — 0X8 ft 12310 

*03 

321ftA1av95 196 

*00ft 

190ft 

3.90ft —0X7 

U45 


3.16ft Jul V5 3.60 

3x3 

257 

357 

-0X444 

2451 








3X0ftDec95 



3X7ft 

— 0JMV, 

5 


6363 





Tue's open &il 38520 ofl 687 





CORN 




277 

213’4iDeC»4 113ft 

216 

2T3ft 

215 

• 801 ft 129,715 

2X2ft 

223’«Mor95 2J4 

236 Vi 

234 

225ft >0016, 50X49 

2X5 

230ft Mav 95 231ft 

2JDft 

231ft 

233 

-OXIft 21,7*1 





238 ft 



239 Sea 95 242 

2X3 ft 


243V, 

• OXIft 


263 

235ft Dec 95 2 Xh* 

249V, 


2*8ft 

-0X1 ft 


256’a 

250ft«kr94 254 

255V. 

254 

255 

*801 ft 


267ft 

255 1 7)JUI 96 261 

2X2 

2X1 

2x2 

-0X1 'A 

149 

ESI. sales NA. Tue's. sales 

23X84 





Tue's open mr 738 338 an 11 W 







757ft 

536 ft NOV 94 530 

SJS'A 

539ft 

5J6ft • 804ft 71916 


*37ftJon95 530ft 

5X9 ft 


5 47ft »Uteft 27,927 

7X5 

&47ViMorVS 551 

5J9 

fLSD^ 

5X7'* 


7.05ft 

556 Mayos S5Bft 

W6ft 

i5Bft 

5X5U +0X3V. 

8200 







*12 

SJ6ftAuo9S 171 

5.75ft 

*71 

574ft turn* 

579 

*15 

*71 Sec 95 536 

*79 

*74ft 

576ft tQJHft 

290 

LSOft 

5J8ftr«v9S 5X4 

5X8\b 

*83 

5X679 40JBft 


*21 

5.99 ft Jul 96 *06 



6X6 









Tue's open tal 149,222 Oti 4 






SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) lOOlam-doiiariMrim 



20750 

15950 03 9* 16138 

16X30 


16250 



309X0 

16030 Dec 94 l«150 

163.70 

161.40 

16290 

+ 1X 45.993 

3O7J0 

16 1.90 JOn 95 16250 

16*90 




30750 

16*50 Mar 9S 165X0 

167.90 




207X0 

1 67.60 Mav 9b 16930 

17870 





20600 

170.70 Jul 95 171X0 

173X0 



-140 




175JI0 





18270 

17330 Sep 95 175.00 

17*50 


iriso 




178600995 17800 






102X0 

1 7&J0 Dec 95 180X0 

181X0 


180X0 



Est. sates NA Tue's. sales 






Toe's ooen int *3.270 on 76 





SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) MODI 











28X7 

2200 Dec 94 2192 

2439 


34.18 


3*55 

22xSJbi95 2148 

21X0 







ZU! 




2805 

22X5 May 9f 2110 


2110 

2224 





2333 


2107 

,0.15 



2273 Aug vs 21X0 

3333 

2340 

2107 

-812 

1.925 

3A7S 

2175 Sen 95 23X2 

Z330 

22X0 

2100 

*815 









23X5 

22X0DSC9S 2X00 

23.15 


2X04 



Est. totes NA Toe's, soke. 






Tub's open W 06.907 off 3852 






Livestock 








7*10 

687000 94 67*0 

6830 







6935 




7*2J 

64X5 Feb 95 68.00 

aj5 


67.93 



75.10 

6737 Aor 95 <815 

6847 


68X7 



6*30 JOT 95 6*90 






6810 

6860 Aug 95 «*m 

603 

6190 

63.90 

-815 

1754 

6755 

6*300095 64X0 

6495 

6*60 

64X5 

—820 

175 





Tue’s open M 67,120 off 1234 





FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 








72^0 



in nn 



7175 




BQ.95 

71X0 Jan 95 7155 

72X5 

7135 


-am 

1423 

US 


71X3 

71 JO 




7*90 

78 10 APT 95 70.90 

71.15 

70.90 

7895 

+810 

TM 

7650 

69X0 May ?i 70X5 

70.00 

hl« 

KUO 



73X5 

69X0 Aug 95 70.70 

nun 

70X4 

7855 




*9x0 Sec 96 70.15 

70.15 

70.15 




Est. tales 1X58 Tus's.jute 

1,751 





Tue’sapontor 9 33* all 09 






HOGS (CMEiu «xaa tes.- cents wd 






3891 Od 94 3*75 

34.75 

33x7 

3375 

— nm 


5QJ0 

3810Dee9t 35.90 

3*90 

3*75 

3*U 

—0X5 14796 

XM 

3*90 Feb 95 37.40 

37X5 

3635 

3*75 

— (U0 

6401 


36X0 Apr 95 37X5 

37X0 

37.15 

37 JO 

—025 


as o 

42I5JUP95 4117 

4135 

42*5 

4282 

—435 

1X05 


4212 JlO 95 43-10 


4270 

4197 

-813 



41 JO AM 95 4237 

42J7 

jypS 

4ZJ0 

-817 

278 

xn tn 

39X2 OCT 95 3935 


39.12 

29.15 


174 


39X0 Dec 95 39X8 

39X0 

39X0 

39X0 

-810 


Est, totes 6JW Tue's. tote. 

2«40 





Tue'iopcriint 30X74 up Z73 





PORK BELLES (CMER) 40XM ■a.-cnraiwb 



60X5 

38 00 Feb 95 40X5 


39X7 

39.75 

-US 



3R20MOT95 40X5 


39.05 

39.12 

—148 


61.15 

39.4} Mav 95 42X0 

4200 

4035 

40-U 

-1J0 

rn 


40 35X495 42X0 

else 

tt.95 

<1.1* 

—1.1S 

w* 

44X0 

39.00 Auo 95 RL50 

4LX3 

39.90 

4800 

—IX 

58 

Est.sotes 2291 H+'s-ws 






Tue's open int 9X17 oil II 








MM 

■M 




High 

Low Open 

Hign 

Utw 

Cia» 

aw 

Op.lllt 


11.1 8 IVtav 94 



1175 

t8H 

9 

11X8 

1170 Jul 96 



1175 

‘817 

5 

Est. sates 13,086 Tue's. sola 39,763 




Tue's open tot 123X10 off 

1859 





COCO/ 

(NCSE) 10 mcn< lw t Ptr ron 




ISBO 

1041 Dec 94 1253 

1275 

1253 

1270 

til 33X41 

1605 

1077 Mar 95 I30B 

1325 

1307 

1372 

tl 20440 

161? 

1071 Mav 95 1339 

1350 

1335 


•tl 

7X28 

Ia00 

1225 Ju< 95 1 373 

1I»3 

1373 



2X73 

1560 

l390Set>95 13W 

1399 

1377 

1406 

•9 

1X75 

163) 

17+0 Dec 7S 1*31 

1431 

1431 

1434 


*959 

1676 

1350 Mar 96 1458 

1470 

1462 

1470 

1 12 

X5BJ 

1642 

1Z25MOV96 



1503 

*12 

312 


Jul 96 



1523 

+ 12 

11 

Est sales *708 Tub's sate 

*231 





Tue's open tol 7*386 off 19| 





ORANGE JUICE (NCTM ISOMwe- 




\3*Cfi 

BLOBIto/M 73X0 

9*40 


72X5 

—1X0 

6 .W6 

13200 

BVJJ0 Jon 95 9720 

9850 

9440 

9645 

-890 

*770 

13*25 

93.00 Mar 95 100X0 

10175 

97X0 

10820 

—040 

*895 

11425 

97X0 Mav 95 1(040 

10540 

lOUN 

10*10 

-810 

1.192 

119X0 

10850 Jul 95 106.90 

10*90 

10*90 

10690 

-045 

625 

11*00 

10725 Sep «5 109.90 

109.70 

109.90 

109.90 

-830 

297 

113X0 

1»X0Nov«5 113X0 

113X0 


112.95 

+ 825 



10*50 Jan 76 



114.75 

•825 



Mar 96 



11445 

-875 


Est. sales na Tue's soles 

2.917 





Tub’s ooen int 20290 up N 







Metals 




1 HI GRADE COFFER MCMXJ 

29xea ns.- cma per tab 




7*7SDeC94 11*70 





11890 

7*70 Jen 75 11*90 

11*90 


11*35 

*835 



73. 0Q Fob 95 1)0) 



11180 

4-025 


117X0 

73X0MW9S 113.70 

11*20 

11X30 

113X0 

+ 825 

*769 

115X0 

76X5 Mav 75 



11270 

+ 81S 

1,612 

11470 

7800 JUTS 



112X0 

• 815 

L98 

11320 

TV. ID Sep 95 111X0 

HU® 

111.60 

111.10 

+ 815 


12210 

7*20 Od 75 116X5 

116X5 

11*70 

11*70 

+ 170 


118X0 

7775 Nov 95 115,40 

11*40 


11*10 


IX5I 

11*75 

98 00 Dec 95 11820 

MOJO 

110.10 

109.70 

+ 0.1S 


laaxo 

8840 Jan 76 



109X5 

•aii 


11830 

6270 Mor 06 



10825 

+ 815 


n*50 

f 1.10 Am 96 



113X5 

+ 820 


IIP JO 

107X0 May 96 



10745 

*815 


11*20 

10*10 Jun 76 



11245 

+ 815 



Jul «6 



10*95 

+ 815 


11205 

1)1X0 AuoftS 



111-55 

*815 


Esi. tote BJNO Tub’s sate 

10X9S 





I Tue's ooen int 






SLVEF 

(NCMX1 UMwix 




5414 

51140CJW 



547X 

IJ 



Nov 94 



549.1 

-ij 


597X 

3880 Dec 7* 5585 

55*0 

551.0 

5514 

—14 92X30 

5764 


5574 

SSSfl 

554.1 



10*0 

41 64 Mor 95 54X0 

56*0 

5680 

560.1 


6064 

41 ex way »5 569X 

5WX 


56*4 



610X 


576.0 

576X 

5724 



6034 

5324 Sep 95 5834 

5824 


5794 



6280 


KU 


5894 



6120 

57*0 Jan 96 



5927 



632X 







587X 

5B7XMay96 



6074 










Est.sdes 1*000 Tue's soles 33X07 




Tue's ooen W 









43540 

368JX)Oct94 418X0 

418X0 

418X0 

41*80 



43*50 

37*00 JOT 75 42820 

eie 




■07X0 

390.00 Apr 95 423J0 

42*00 

47150 

73- 1 




41740 JUTS 42800 

428X0 


42AJO 

— o m 
















) Est.sotes 1214 Tue's. tote 






Tue's oonnW 23441 off r. 










417X0 

34*000074 38800 

388X0 

388.(10 

mro 

+0X0 

163 


NUVW 



389.10 




34X00 Dec 94 378X0 






36340 Fen 95 39XM 






36440 Apr «5 397X0 






42850 

36120 Jun #5 401X0 





41440 

3805) Aug 95 0470 

4W70 

40470 

40*70 







40870 



639X0 

400X0 Due 75 41300 

413X0 

413X0 

412.70 



43440 

612-50 Feb 96 



61870 



43020 

41830 Ait 96 






431X0 

41XU JOT 96 



436.90 




Auo 96 



4».ld 








Tue's open lnt 







Food 


2AUU 

24440 

245.10 

ZHXO 

242X0 


COFFEE C (NCSE) 

744X5 77.10DK94 184X5 lto.U 

7a 90 Mar 9J 1 89 JO 196X0 

87.0 MOV 93 I91JS 197X0 

81001895 177X0 19880 

185X0SOP9S 198X0 190X0 

81X0 Dec 95 199X0 199X0 
Mar« 197X0 197X0 
Est. srtes 9JttO Tw's. sates 1MJ9 
TuFSOpenW 33X45 « 1151 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) lisxaeb 
13X0 9I7MW95 12X2 12X8 

12X1 1057 MOV 95 12X0 12X5 

10-57 JUI 95 <2.10 12X5 

105700 95 1L78 12X8 

IILUMa-ft 11X3 11-75 


184XS I90.W 

109X0 19540 

191.25 1 97 JO 

194X0 199X0 

WSXO 19 944 

195X0 200.10 

177X0 MI .00 


•6-50 IM83 
»*X0 10.912 
*5X0 4.101 
74X5 1478 

• 5X5 m 

• 5X0 071 

+ 550 100 


1252 

1129 

non 


L-COttlM*. 

12X1 1247 

1127 1244 

1118 1245 

11.98 3208 
11.63 11.75 


■0X3 01343 
•0X3 17,294 
•021 11,970 

• 0.10 9J6S 

• 0.17 1^24 


Financial 

IGT.BtLLS (CMER) llntooo-Miof I bObgl 


Mil 

Mil 

91X1 


94X2 

94X0 

9182 


—004 19.993 
— 0X4 9,043 
—0X5 1007 


94.10 94 45 Dec 94 94.45 94X5 

95X5 9191 Mar 75 9420 94X3 

94X4 9264 Jun 95 9MI 9182 

Est. scum na Tub's, sam SXS3 

Tin's ooen W 31 xc oft 1897 
JV9LTHEASJRY (CBOT) s146.Aodprk<- ph SBiMioIIOSkI 
04-M Ifl!^ Dec 94JQ2-075 102*075 107-02 102-025- 045 174X35 
103-09100-245 Mw 95101 -17 101-10 101-15 101-15— 04 2X79 

ESI.UMS NA Tge-s. sales 41271 
Tuc'sonen Int inx io oft 4377 
10 YR. TREASURY I CBOT] uoojnaivin-mAJTnHaiauM 
4-21 100-0* Dec 94 un-15 101-16 101-00 101-10 — 07 246X54 

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105-22 7844 Jun 95 97-27 - S 101 

101-06 78-28 50)95 99-04 - a ; 

110-31 98-10 D«c 9) 93-19 — 08 

Est- sate NA Tub’s, sate 65X54 
Tue^aaenKit 275.213 Off £542 

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110-00 91-17 Dec 94 98-24 99-25 99-16 98-18 — 07 41i3Jl 

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118-14 95-09 Dec 95 76-06 - 07 nf 

114X4 7S-I7 Mar 94 95-23 - 07 « 

100-20 94-os Jun 94 95-09 - 07 S 

Est. sates NA Tin's, safes 330,954 ” 

Tub's open W 450Xto up 8671 

MUMOPALBOWS (CBOT) ttom ro.-oKA Dndiei in M 

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Est- sates NA Tue'v soles 302.554 


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1X908 1.4500 Dec 94 1.5746 U830 1X744 

1X940 1X440 Mar 95 1.5770 1X810 

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Est. sates NA Tue'v sales 10J08 
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GERMAN MARK (CMER) |Hrmrt-lnM 
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JAPANESE YEN (CMER) tovno-lpaMM 
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Moody's 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures • 
Coro. R*s«rdi 


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Close 

\xu8 


NA,;- 

2771 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Pfl^ie 13 


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EUROPE 


British Inflation 
At Record Low as 
Joblessness Drops 


" - • - i 


Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispatches 


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LONDON — Britain’s most 
important gauge of inflation hit 
a record low Wednesday and 
unemployment fell to its lowest 
level in nearly three years, giv- 
ing welcome relief to Prune 
Minister John Major. 

The favorable economic 
news helped push the Financial 
Times-Stock Exchange index of 
100 leading shares up 27.5 
points, to 3,100.50. 

“It calls into question the lat- 
est rate hike a few weeks ago,” 


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Italy’* Growth 
Heats Back Up 
To 2.3% Rate 

Compiled by Our Siuff From Dispaches 


ROME — Italy’s econo- 
my expanded at its fastest 
rate in more than three 
years in the second quarter, 
the government reported 
Wednesday. 

The economy grew at an 
annual 23 percent rate, 
compared with a 0.6 per- 
cent decline in the Hkt* peri- 
od last year, according to 
the national statistics insti- 
tute Istat 

The recovery was 
spurred in large part by in- 
creased domestic demand, 
the institute said. 

The news means that Ita- 
ly had one of the higher 
growth rates in the indus- 
trialized world between 
March and June — higher 
than those of the United 
States and Germany. 

Economists said they 
would upgrade forecasts 
for Italian growth this year 
to above 2 percent 

Italy’s real, or inflation- 
adjusted, gross domestic 
product rose 1.4 percent in 
the second quarter from the 
first. 

(Reuters. 

Bloomberg, AFP) 


said Nick Stamenkovic, an 
economist at DKB Internation- 
al. “It certainly lowers expecta- 
tions of another early move by 
the authorities.” 

The index that measures re- 
tail price inflation fell to 22 
percent from 2.4 percent in Au- 
gust, while underlying inflation, 
which exdudes home-loan pay- 
ments and is the gauge most 
closely watched by the govern- 
ment, fell to 2 percent, its low- 
est reading on record, from 13 
percent. 

Underlying inflation has now 
been below 3 percent for a year 
for the first time in 30 years. 

Unemployment fell by 
28,000 in September, to 
2370,000, or 9.1 percent of the 
work force, down from 93 per- 
cent the previous month, ac- 
cording to the Central Statisti- 
cal Office. 

Unemployment has fallen 
steadily since the end of a two- 
and-a-half-year recession early 
in 1993 and is now 400,000 be- 
low its peak. 

‘‘These improvements are 
taking place against an encour- 
aging jjicture of sustainable, 
noninflaii onaiy growth,” Em- 
ployment Secretary Michael 
Portillo said. 

The government bond, or 
gOt, market also moved up. 
buoyed by the lack of signs of 
inflationary build-up. 

But the Bank or England's 
governor, Eddie George, 
sounded a note of caution when 
he said British inflationary 
pressures had been “fairly con- 
stant” since interest rates were 
raised in September. 

(Reuters, AFP, Knight-Ridder) 


ISS Scours for Its Business 


By Erik Ipsert 

Inremuionat Herald Tribute 

LONDON — Lowly 
though its field may be. ISS 
— International Services Sys- 
tems AS — suffers from "no 
lack of ambition. 

The Danish company that 
bills itself as the colossus of 
cleaning — the world's larg- 
est contract cleaner — - aims 
□ot just to be No. 1 in each 
country where it operates, but 
incongruously enough plans 
to become the “Rolls-Royce 
of cleaning.” 

The question nagging ana- 
lyst s is: Can it also make 
money? 

As ISS gears up for its first 
share issue in New York this 
year, company executives are 
stru gglin g to persuade would- 
be investors that it can be 
done. Unsexy though it may 
sound, they insist there is real 
money to be made from 
sweeping shop floors and 
cl eanin g airport toilets. 

Nonetheless, skepticism 
abounds. “It is very difficult 
to make any sort of reason- 
able profit margin in tradi- 
tional cleaning," a London 
analyst insisted. 

He said that although the 
company had grown at a 15 
percent annual rate in recent 
years, to revenue of S2.1 bil- 
lion last year, most of the 
growth has come through ac- 
quisitions. 

Even Waldemar Schmidt, 
the head of ISS's London- 
based European division, 
concedes the constant threat 
posed to the company by 
smaller firms trying to muscle 
in and clean up. 

“The industry Is relatively 
new, and there are a lot of 


cowboys out there who 
tender at one-third of the 
highest bid,” said Mr. 
Schmidt, who was recently 
designated to take over the 
head of ISS in two years. 

With 125,000 mostly part- 
time workers in 18 countries, 
the company is struggling to 
expand into higher-margin 
areas. Topping the list are 
hospitals and rood manufac- 
turers, whose standards of 


The company 
has elevated 
cleaning to a 
science. 


cleanliness, and willingness 
to pay for them, far exceed 
the norm. 

What is more, Mr. Schmidt 
sees his company increasingly 
using its big cleaning con- 
tracts as mere starting points. 
“Our strategy is cleaning- 
led,” he said. He explained 
that once it was on site, ISS 
sought other labor-intensive 
services it could add to its 
basic cleaning contract. 

A case in point is one of the 
company’s largest single Eu- 
ropean contracts. It began 
four years ago with a deal to 
dean 11,000 


staircases in a 


sprawling group of apartment 
blocks in Berlin. That con- 


year airport cleaning business 
by branching into the supply 
and maintenance of luggage 
trolleys. In its hospitals divi- 
sion, the company has al- 
ready moved into catering 
and portering. 

“It is easy to say that any- 
one can clean and that ISS 
faces no end of competition 
from one-man companies, 
but they have managed to 
demonstrate that they can 
produce growing earnings." 
said Frans Hoyer, an analyst 
for S.G. Warburg & Co. in 
Stockholm. 

The company that mops up 
the mess at, among others, 
the houses of Parliament in 
London and the Sears Tower 
in Chicago, has elevated 
deaning to a science. For se- 
nior managers it even has cre- 
ated its own university. 

ISS says it hopes that such 
polishing will also help it 
overcome its biggest problem 
— staff turnover in an indus- 
try that averages 100 percent 
turnover a year. 

Mr. Schmidt credits his 
company’s success in reduc- 
ing annual turnover u> 70 per- 
cent to a more rigorous 
screening of applicants and 
special training. The compa- 
ny also pays more than its 
peers and lets workers buy 
company stock after they 
have been on the job more 
than one year. 


tract has since grown to en- 
compass everything from 
building maintenance to 
snow removal at a price of 20 
million Deutsche marks (S13 
million) a year. 

Similarly, ISS is p lannin g 
to build on its S45 mfllion-a- 


■ New U.S. Chief Named 
ISS named Dennis Spina, 
head of the U3. company 
Suburban Propane, as man- 
aging director of its North 
America division, Reuters re- 
ported from Copenhagen. 


BAe Buys 

Submarine 

Builder 


Bloomberg Businas Sm 

LONDON — British Aero- 
space PLC said Wednesday it 
had agreed to acquire VSEL 
PLC for £478.5 million (S757 
million), in a step toward con- 
solidating two of Europe's larg- 
est defense contractors. 

British Aerospace, the largest 
European defense company, 
said it would offer VSEL share- 
holders either 2.727 BAe shares 
or £11.40 in cash. VSEL con- 
structs submarines, surface 
warships and arms systems. It 
also makes equipment for ihe 

oil and gas industries. 

Analysts said the purchase 
would expand British Aero- 
space's exports of naval ships 
and weaponry, a market the 
company said would be worth 
£1 12 biliion by the year 2010. 

“The skills within VSEL fit 
ideally with those of British 
Aerospace, and together we 
shall be in a much stronger po- 
sition to compete for con- 
tracts," Dick Evans, chief exec- 
utive of Britidi Aerospace, said. 

Hie buyout would almost as- 
sure British Aerospace of win- 
ning a £2.5 billion contract to 
build Britain's next generation 
of nuclear-powered subma- 
rines, analysts said. 

VSEL shares rose 82 pence to 
1310 on the London Stock Ex- 
change, while British Aerospace 
finished up 12 at 471. 

In recent years, British Aero- 
space has sold several units to 
concentrate on its defense busi- 
nesses. Its most recent sale was 
that of Rover of Britain, the 
automaker, to Bayerische Mo- 
toren Werke AG. 


|| Investor’s Europe !' 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 

FTSE 100 Index 

Paris 

CAC40 


22Qj}Y| — ' 


3380 - 

m- - - 

3100 ft — *1 

£ 

as*,-- 

IB -t ) 

r 

2000 r - 

ias» 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

A S’ O' 

Index 

AEX 

* W' 

■ -j; 
1994 

. " HOC IV- 

aso %7j- 

1994 

Wednesday Prev. 
Close Close 

402.30 404.11 

V 

ASO 

% 

Change 

-0.45 

Brussels 

Stock index 

7,131.25 

7.059.71 

+1.01 

Frankfurt 

DAX 


2,077.57 

2,071.06 

+0.31 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 


781.72 

772.92 

+1.14 

Helsinki 

HEX 


1,899.04 

1.863.72 

+1.90 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,381.60 

2,357.50 

+1.02 

London 

FTSE100 

3.KXL50 

3,073.00 

+0.89 

Madrid 

General Index 

Closed 

293.27 

- 

Milan 

MIBTEL 

10113 

10193 

-0.78 

Paris 

CAC4Q 

1,918.14 

1,91902 

■0.05 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaerlden 

1,825.77 

1,809.62 

+0.69 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

431.77 

430.50 

+0.30 

Zurich 

SBS 


914-55 

91610 

-0.17 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


iTiftiulii'iLil ILtaU (r.:uin. 


Very briefly: 


• RWE AG, a German utility group, said it would raise its 
dividend for the year ended June 30 to 13 Deutsche marks ($8.41 ) 
a share from 12 DM. 


• Isosceles PLC the owner of the supermarket operator Gateway, 
said that to repay debt it would probably Iim Gateway on the 
London Stock Exchange or sell it in 1997." 

• Aegon NV, a Dutch insurer, said it planned a 2.5-for-l stock split 
next year to improve the marketability of its shares. 

• Matthew park PLC said it would buy Gajmer Group Europe 
Lti, a British cider maker that produces Bahycham perry and 
Olde English cider, for £109.1 million (S 172 million). 

• Eunetcom, a joint venture between Deutsche Telekom and 
France Telecom SA to provide telecommunications services to 
multinational companies, said that after one vear of existence, it 
had contracts valued at SI billion. 


■ France Swings to Snrplns 
France’s preliminary current 
account swung to a surplus of 
7.6 bQHon French francs ($1.4 
billion) in July from a 417 mil- 
lion franc deficit in June, the 
Economy Ministry said, ac- 


Swiss Banks Refuse to Divulge Data on Suspects 


• South Africa’s producer prices jumped 9.9 percent for the year 
through August as agricultural food products continued to exert 
upward pressure on the index. 

• Virgin Group PLC plans to launch a Virgin vodka in Russia next 

month. AFX, Kiupb RiiiAr, Reuters 


cording to a Bloomberg Busi- 
ness Net 


lews report from Paris. 

In unadjusted terms, the cur- 
rent account showed a 10.7 bil- 
lion franc surplus after a 4.8 
billion franc shortfall in June. 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

ZURICH — Swiss banks, defying the 
state prosecutor, have refused to' disclose 
information on Mafia suspects thought to 
be using the banks to whitewash drug 
money, the Swiss Bankers Association said 
Wednesday. 

Italian investigators have sought the in- 
formation to track down people thought to 
be involved in heroin trafficking. 

The issue has set off a battle with the 
state prosecutor's office. The banks said 
the office believed they had a duty to 


answer such inquiries after a loosening in 
the country’s strict laws. 

But the b anks refused to give out any 
information. About 30 banded together to 
fight the issue in federal court. The court 
dismissed the case Tuesday, saying there 
was no basis for a trial because the Public 
Ministry’s directive was not binding. 

The state prosecutor had sent all banks 
in Zurich, Geneva and Tessin a list of 
about 60 names, asking them to check 
whether any were on lists of bank deposi- 
tors. 


The dispute centers on the interpreta- 
tion of a new article in the penal code that 
states that a banker “has the right” to 
communicate information ou clients if 
there is suspicion of wrongdoing. 

The b anks argue that under the new law 


Lloyds Chemists Posts Higher Profit 
For Year and Raises Dividend 31 % 


such reporting is optional, not mandatory. 
Jean-Paul Chapuis, head of the bankers 


association, said members wanted to help 
fight drug crime, but he said they would 
never willingly allow client information to 
go to foreign authorities. 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


Bloomberg Businas VVns 

LONDON — Lloyds Chemists PLC, which operates the largest 
chain of pharmades in Britain, said Wednesday that pretax profit 
for the year ended June 30 rose 17 percent, to £58.3 million (S92 
million). Sales also rose 17 percent, to £939.7 million. 

The company announced a 3 1 percent rise in its dividend, to 9.5 
pence a share from 735 pence. 

Lloyds, which operates 1,184 pharmades and 271 health-food 
stores, said the results were “very encouraging.” 


Jrt. 


. . .I. 


Utter 

m * 


BUUjj Stoie AidStiU Looms Large Ebner Denies UBS Takeover 


... 



Costumed from Page 11 

lion Ecus of aid in 1992, he said, 
“they’ve had that last bite.” 

-The commission endorsed 
the aid after France pledged it 
would really be the last and said 
it would to sell a majority of 
Bull to a private partner within 
“a very short delay," one offi- 
cial said. Officials indicated a 
link with a European company 
was most likely. 

C ommissi on officials justify 
the other aid approvals by say- 
ing similar strict conditions 
have been attached, but many 
industry observers disagree. 

Geoffrey IJpman, head of 
the World Travel and Tourism 
Council, criticized the decision 
on Air France. 


He said the agreement did 
not commit the government to 
privatization, (fid not indude 


an independent assessment of 
the earner’s restructuring plan 
and did not prove that competi- 
tors would not be affected. 

In their defense, commission 
officials said they bad exposed 
subsidies to greater transparen- 
cy and scrutiny, and that with- 
out such measures, aid could 
have soared during the recent 
recession rather than remaining 
stable. 

But Mr. Ottervanger said the 
best hope for controlling subsi- 
dies may lie uot with the com- 
mission but with industry itself. 

The suit by British Airways 
and others against the Air 
France aid would have been un- 
heard of a few years ago, either 
because companies were afraid 
to complain or thought they 
might need aid themselves later 
on, he said. 

Today, he said, such action is 
more common. 


Bloomberg Business News 

ZURICH — Martin Ebner. the financier whose BK Vision 
investment group is the largest shareholder in Union Bank of 
Switzerland, said Wednesday he expected shareholders to block a 
plan to limit his influence. But he also said he did not plan to take 
.control of the bank 

The UBS board said Sept. 29 that it would propose the creation 
of one class of bearer shares, with a nominal value of 10 Swiss 
francs ($7.75) and with one vote each, to replace the existing 20 
franc registered shares and 100 franc bearer shares. The proposal 
would dilute the voting powers of registered shareholders. 

Mr. Ebner warned that if shareholders approved the plan, there 
was no guarantee that the bank’s value would increase. Registered 
shareholders, of which he is one, are also unlikely to surrender 
their voting power, he said. 

“I can’t imagine that a registered shareholder wifi, without 
compensation, sign his death sentence,” Mr. Ebner said at a news 
conference. Registered shareholders control 51.1 percem of UBS’s 
votes but only 173 percent of the capital. 


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partners will see their actual 
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firm's partnership capital, 
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wasn’t ever necessary but neither 
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cal business is smart enough to 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Page 15 




^ Packard Bell Sneaks Up on Big Blue, Apple and Compaq 


i Packard BelFs New Reach 


By Laurie Flynn 

Nat York Tima Service 


As the consumer market has become the fas test- 
segment of the personal computer industry, big, weU-f 


dollars in revenue this holiday shopping season because its 
factories will be unable to keep up with demand. Likewise, both 
Compaq and Apple have faced enormous order backlogs the last 


Share of U.S, personal computer 
market among ttp six makere 

16% 


market, Packard Bell Electronics Inc was ouietiv vlihtriw. To prosper in this competitive climate, Packard Bdl faces the But Packard Bed's supply channel is not unlimited. The 
: computers one at a time at Wal-Mart Stores Inc and nthw of evolving beyond simply selling cheap computers to ^losed Tuesday that U had postponed shipments of a 

discount and denartm^nf ctmvMc ‘ making machines that are innovative vet ineroensive. 55* Bne multimedia computers, called Spectna, until after 




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" discount and department stores. 

;v . conaimer-market retailing strategy helped Packard Bell 
“°“ olwcmi^ to the top ranks of the computer industry. 
■'i\L ‘Hf, _ j ? e dosely hdd company recently unseated International 
■“•it ,'\l Business Machines Coip. to become America’s ihird-largest 
se Uer w personal computers, and it now sells more computers to 
the ctmsimia- and home-office market than any other company. 
IK ll Packard Bell will account for nearly 10 percent of America’s 
“ v *%| computer market this year, up from 4.6 percent in 1 992. 

■’•Hu 9 “is expected to have sales of nearly $15 billion —all this from a 

i Mjrr.H company that just a few years ago looked to be fust another small 


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poor quality. 

Even as it enjoys record success from having anticipated the 
suree toward home computing, the question now for Packard 
Ben is whether it can continue its remarkab le growth. 

NYSE 

t-k, ^tZ*?*****'* do*ing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associate* pm« 


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making machines that are innovative yet inexpensive. 

Analysts attribute much of Packard BdTs success to its ability 
to gauge what the average consumer wants, all the way down to 
the color of the computer: The company cow offers pop-off 
color panels to fit home decors. Its software walks the sometimes 
timid new user through the computer’s basic functions. 

Another key to Packard Bell’s success, analysts said, is that it 
has been able to make machines as fast as it can sell them. 
Turning out computers from its factories in Westlake Village, 
California, and wizchen in the Netherlands, the company has 
consistently been able to meet demand, while virtually every 
other computer company has badly misjudged demand for 
certain models. 

Just last week, for example, word emerged that IBM had so 
underestimated the potential for its new consumer line of ma- 
chines. the Aptiva, that the company may forgo millions of 


JdS W * 


new line of multimedia computers, called Spectria, until after 
Christ m a s ; the machines were originally to have been delivered 
in August, 

Rather than the 84 percent revenue growth originally project- 
ed for 1994, _ Mai Ransom, the company's vice president of 
marketing, said revenue was expected to increase by 100 percent. 
Because it is closely held, Packard Bell does not disclose its 
results, but most analysts assume the company is profitable. 

In anticipation of the coming holiday season, when the bulk of 
home computers are bought each year, Packard Bell announced a 
sleek new line of multimedia computers in June. 

The machines range from $1,000 to $3,000 and will be vying 
with comparably priced all-in-one offerings just introduced by 
Compaq and IBM. 

The new computers offer such enhancements as a built-in 
radio, television, stereo, facsimile machine and telephone an- 
swering machine, along with more than two dozen software 
programs. 


8 Packard - 
fiBeU 


Compaq 

Gateway 

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Where U.S, consumers, 
buy computers 
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Sources: Packard Belt. Dataouest Inc. nm v» YwL Time* 


Through such machines, as well as its computers for home 
users who want raw computing power, Packard Bell has emerged 
as the leading seller to the consumer market of computers based 
on Intel’s newest and most powerful chip, the Pentium. 

“They’ve managed to open the eyes of those who didn't respect 
them," Richard Zweichkcnbuuni of International Daia said. 


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unicef* 

United Nations Children's Fund 

The United Nations Children's Fund, with headquarters in 
New York and offices throughout the world, seeks qualified 
candidates for the following position: 

PROJECT OFFICER 
(EDUCATION) (L4) 

Monrovia, LIBERIA 

Under the general guidance of the Programme Officer, 
responsible for the formulation, planning, design, implemen- 
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Minimum Qualifications: Advanced university degree in the 
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English. The varied subject 
matter will bring you Into contact 
with the entire organization. 
We require a native American 
English speaker with a good 
command of French and a 
degree in engineering, science, 
or technical translation. He or : 


she should also have some 
experience of translation in 
industry. Knowledge of the 
nuclear power field would be 
a definite advantage. 

This executive level position 
is based in the Paris area. 

please write with full C.V. and 
letter, mentioning reference 
number 53795, to Media System, 
6 impasse des Deux Cousins. 
75849 Paris Cedex 17. 


INSEAD 


seeks full time a 


CAREER COUNSELLOR , 

for the^MBA PROGRAMME / 

As a member of tbe Career Management Service, the- Career 
Counsellor would. barw|><iasxbl« ; for, ; ^ssi^tapce.wUb self- . 
assessment, career oriantatwJn and individual career counselling, 
as well as corporate liaJspn contributing to the development of 
career opportunities to match MBA aspirations. 

The idpd candidate .would be a European national, hold a 
graduate degree in Industrial Psychology, have several years 
professional experience in different countries, and be preferably jj 
iril&gua] English/Fjfench /German. ® 

Efease send CV. photo, salary requirements and references to : 

J. ::: : t-. »:■ " -svjNSEADk** •: ■< 

Hyman Resources Management { . 

Recruitment and Wclcpme Department 
i Boulevard da Constance * 

F-77305 FONTAINEBLEAU Cedex. 


MMBUe SHXS for AMBSCAW 
nVNUiVt RRM5 in PARS; 
Enefah mother tongue secretaries, 
bxnvlsdge of French reqwred 
42£Im S aint Hanara 


75008 Ptrk 1 
let (1) « 61 : 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 

EXECUTIVE 5EGtETASY, hem Trend). 
Bnofah, 0«»d» some Cwnxaijteefa wi 
m »i4h ii Csl Ffce 9316 w9 


QUALIFIED, SMART, tri- 
hr Seda secrotanai fob fin 


fJOH Mowfa* «*»- 

e 6 T«t {33] 93J31 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSmONS WANTED 


FRENCH AfiTOT/ART 1EAQER seeks 
porrrae orders Middte Bai & •eaehma 
pod Auarota/aS. Tel (33) 9301 40 10 

EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


NOTH MANAGER 

is roq u e ud to manage in e u erSes 
fas faro, Mdferai and Monaco. 
Univentfy degree, 5 yearn wperienct. 
accounting, French & ErrgEsh me 
needed. Age 30-45, mde or tends. 
Send CT te k* 3732, Uil„ 
93521 NeoBy Cedes, Ranee. 
(For ewreew porposa.) 


ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 


GALOERMA. LABORATOIRE PHARMACCUTIQUE A LA POINTE DC LA Q ER- 
MA TO LOG IE, CONTINUE SA FORMIDABLE EXPANSION AVEC COM ME SEULE 
ET UNIQUE AMBITION OE DEVENIR LEADER MONDIAL. 

SecrEtaire Ass ist ante marketing au sein de notre 

STRUCTURE. DONNEZ DE NOUVCLLES PERSPECTIVES A VOTRE 
AVENIR. EN PLUS DE PRENDRE LA R CSPONS A Bl LITE DES 
FONCTIONS CLASS1QUCS D'UN SECRETARIAT THES OUALI- 
TATIF. NOUS VOUS PROPOSONS D 1 ASSURER DES MISSIONS DE 
COORDINATION AVEC LE5 tQUIPES MARKETING DE 
NOS FILIALES DU MONDE ENTIER. TIT U LA IRE D'UN BTS 
SECRETARIAT OU EQUIVALENT. VOUS AVEZ OEjA FAIT VOS 
PREUVES A UN POSTe SIMILAIRE OU POSS^DEZ UNE EXPE- 
RIENCE DU SECRETARIAT AU SEIN D'UNE ENTREPRISE 
PHARMACCUTIQUE. VOTRE EFFJCACITE ALLICE A VOTRE SENS DES 
CONTACTS SONT LES CLES DE VOTRE REUSSITE. L'UTILISATION PERMA- 
NENTE DE L'ANGLAIS TANT CCRITE Qll'ORALE NECESSITE D'feTRE 
TOTALEMCNT BILINGUE. 

Si rejoinore notre dvnamique du succes vous motive, mcrci d'en- 

VOYCR VOS LETTRE HANUSCRITE. CV ET PHOTO SOUS REF. MKHE A 
GALDERMA - 20. AVENUE Andr£ MALRAUX - 92309 LEVALLOIS 
FERRET CEOEX. ■ nr-m ■ ■ rn 


SECRETAIRES* 
A SSI ST ANTES 
BILINGUES ANGLAIS 

— E SE?<S 

DE L'ORGAN !SA~'ON 
DANS LA PEAU. 



L, OEURCTJf NUM^BO I : DEVENIR NUMERO 1 


y : tSCBEtAMAL POSTS IH AN : 
mri^ATH>HAL OIUSAWISATION 

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development 
(OECD), an international organisation based in Paris, is seeking 
bifingual secretaries. Gross salary for full-time work FF 11.000 to 
13,000 per month. Half-time positions also available. Excellent 
knowledge of English or French and a good knowledge of the other 
language essential. High-speed accurate typing 150 words per 
minute) and experience with word processing systems required. 

Applications from male and female nationals of OECD member 
countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium. Canada, Denmark, Finland, 
France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, 
Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, 
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United 
States) with curriculum vitae to: 

Homan Resource 
Maoagoment Division, OECD 
2 roe Andre -Pascal, 75775 PARIS CEDEX 16 
marked "HT/SEC OCT 94" 

Only short-frsted candidates will receive a response 


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 

Executive (ri-Imgual personal assistant for CEO ol international 
division of Hollywocxl based television production company. Company 
is experiencing tremendous growth. Position offers tremendous 
opportunity. Must be educated, poised, extremely organized, flexible, 
ambitious with initiative. Looking for someone with strong language 
skills. Preferably French, Italian, English. Must have proper working 
papers. Will be based in London or Paris. 

Fox or moil CVsto: 

PSF 

33. rue Galil6e 75116 Paris 
Fax (33) 147 20 56 38 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


FtSAKCE EXECUTIVE (SWISS], 
nuance boapound, sound sfcffli, 
leoderttq, broad uperiana, memo. 
food asspunert, vrtl hove free a> 
parity - Please carted Bat 3737, LH.T. 
92521 Newly Ce-ia, Fiance. 


GENERAL POSITION'S 
AVAILABLE 


Medkd - International 

The Pwae Cores has eppow u niaa fg r 
MfltSE PRACnfb^PKV5IClAI4S 
ASSISTANTS. REGtSTBS) NWSB « 
PHYSICIANS ten hoi* atpewe 
wbrn in remote, dnBenaiu oeas. 
Wfca you skAs & gen voluobfe 
ereerierea as a coreaaed Peace Corps 
Metficrt Omen, prewdng health am 
support id Peace Corps Votunmrs. 
tteponbSrie mebde prevmhc hertth 
education, awmeSng, dried duhts. & 
aaRnmaih* mor u ge m ert of heabfi 
vrv). Thee are pad portm. not 
volunteer assnnmenl]. EUROPE, 
CBITRAL ASIA, MBXTBRANEAK 
AFRICA, A A5IA/PAOBC BOONS. 
Sdcjy range S30JXO w J60.000 US, 
12 -dkm1i cortiod «Mi renewd opens 
Fn resume A letter of event to; 

202436-KOe, Am. WN Mter. 
Pea* Carps OfBee of Metfed Savices 


GALDERMA m 


EXECUTIVES 

AVAILABLE 


TO COMPANIES I NTERES T ED 

FN THE 

ARAB MARKETS 

Arab countries have recently 
decided to cancel the Israeli boycott. 
MARKETING DELEGATE.’ SWies 
citizen, 20 years experience in 
Impori/oxpon business Excellent 
contacts, both with pubic ana private 
sectors, wilh m- depth knowtedgo ot the 
vonpus areb erthnes and CIS lepiRXcs. 
Fluont English. French. Arabic, Turkish 
and Arm omen. SeoLrg a new position 
vrth a company interested n mtroduonB 
thoir pioducts. Ready la relocate. 

Please wnie under P.O. Box. 

IWTISi.xv Qtarfes-de-Gaiifle, 
92200 tteuflly-sur-Seine 


THE BULLETIN Englishtenguoa* 
nnwjweMv or the ca^rol ol Europe 
seeks a fal-raa duel sab*d£7 
depuf/ -drtar n charge of ol repeat 
of production. Canddrte thonUbe n 
te iwenom.'Xwfces, have o ft* ter 
longtroge and ilyJ* be a Adder for 
acnnoey and be able ro bad a team 
of reporters and prnen. Baentm 
xi mogaane produesan hoNy dev- 

"5* “ * rf* nte. 

Good French or Dutch evened Ap- 
pkcxiore to Bn^d Grounx*. the 8 1 
tem. 779 Avenue Mo&ve, UU0 6ru» 
wb, Beteixs. 



r Cores Offer o 
V ^ ehigtort ! 


ddteBM cnxmcs. 

• No expenem xi ides neceaary. 

the (Ob ertads conxxts on itw bgheii 
level ol pvet ihc world and a reword 
mg idory 

If you itm you here die drive ana are 
anfathous enough to fit ihe choflerw. 
we would lie you to send us your CV 
toget h er with a recent ptotogiaph 
prcxipriy 10 : 

c/«NOA 

91, RUE DU fBG ST HONOIE 


Intenal'wiJ DwiujLM, 
h aih f n Gem is leetang far an 
EXPBDBKB) AS5BTANT 
far ns penomH depamura. 

The cotxktale should be cxouid 30 
yean old, bfrpd FrmdvEngfah wirh 
•sKritea odmrcrorve »Ub vd topa- 
Ue of working under pressure. 

If you hare a vdid work twrM, 
please sand ddoAed oppkabon to 
opter 18-115753 PubMw Genevo, 
ease ponie 6*5, 1211 Geneva 3 


International 


Recruitment 


Every Thursday 
Contact 
Philip Omo 
Td.: (331) 
463793 36 
Fax: (331) 
46 37 93 70 
or your nearest 
IHT office 
or representative 


r . j, 


AB 

w ■-> - . 











8 




Pa 


•Page! X6 ,- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


NASDAQ 



t 

lat 


the 1.000 

most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a yew. 


121 | — 

35 W 


1 2 Month 
Hish Low Stock 


Sts 


DhtVM PE ran Hfah Low Latest Oto 


fPHff 

i§ s 


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31 1418 42^ ij!S 4? ' ftk 


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31 1 OV; ACdkHd 

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AMEX 


Wednesday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflec 
tlate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


17 Monm 
HWi Low Stock 


95 

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TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Pag*l 


MOST AIRLINES WILL FLY YOU TO 


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Page 18 


EVTERJVAT10INAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 




asia/pacifi 


' -*5 


l 

tat 

T — 

R 


China Picks Up the Phone 

HK Telecom to Help Develop Services 


Compiled tn Our Staff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — Hong 
Kong Telecommunications 
Ltd. said Wednesday it had 
signed agreements with China 
to help the country develop mo- 
bile phones and paging services 
in Beijing, an accord that sig- 
naled the opening of China’s 
huge phone-services market. 

The company, a unit of Cable 
& Wireless PLC of Britain, also 
said it and China's Ministry of 
Posts and Telecommunications 
would study building an opti- 
cal -fiber cable system linkin g 
Beijing and Hong Kong. 

Hong Kong Telecommunica- 
tions. the British colony’s mo- 
nopoly supplier of fixed-link 
phone services, said it expected 
to invest 2 billion Hong Kong 
dollars (5259 million) in the two 
projects. Final contracts would 
be signed “in a matter of 
months,” it said. 


Japan’s Workweek 
Slips Below 40 Hours 


Currently, China bars foreign 
companies' from taking equity- 
stakes in or managing its tele- 
communications networks. Co- 
mpany executives at a news con- 
ference avoided giving details of 
how far that ban had been lifted. 


Analysts had been expecting 
China to open its telecommuni- 
cations network since June, 
when the government broke up 
the ministry’s decades-old mo- 
nopoly and ordered it to reorga- 
nize its service operations into a 
commercial arm. 


more than triple this, to 140 
million, by the end of the centu- 
ry'. Even then, it will have only- 
eight telephones for each 100 
people, compared with two at 
present. 

“China has recognized it may 
not be able to fill these ambi- 
tious goals on its own," said 
Tim Storey, research analyst at 
HG Asia in Hong Kong. “The 
cake is big enough for other 
players to get involved.'’ 


Shares in Hong Kong Tele- 
com jumped 85 cents, or 5.S 


percent, to 16.25 dollars 
Wednesday, as almost 25 mi- 
lion shares changed hands. The 
rise accounted for one-third of 
a 1.8 percent increase in the 
Hang Seng Index. 

China has 42 million tele- 
phone lines and is aiming to 


Beijing currently has about 
60,000 analog mobile-phone us- 
ers and 300,000 paging custom- 
ers. Cable & Wireless said offi- 
cials planned to set up a trial 
network based on the GSM dig- 
ital mobile standard and ex- 
pand capacity enough to double 
the number of users within a 
few years. 

( Bloomberg, 
Knight- Ridder. Reuters) 


BellSouth to Set Up China Network 


Compiled fry Our Staff From Dispatches 

ATLANTA — BellSouth 
Corp. has agreed with a Chinese 
company to set up telecommuni- 
cations networks in China, start- 
ing with Beijing and the nearby 
indusuial city of Tianjin. 

Under the preliminary agree- 
ment. BellSouth will help estab- 
lish a cellular, wireless and 
long-distance telephone system 
as part of a joint venture with 
China United Telecommunica- 
tions Corp.. a government- 
backed company set up in July 
to insiaJl and operate domestic 
telephone services. 


Company officials said Tues- 
day they expected to establish 
their joint venture by early next 
year, starting with a digital cel- 
lular network in the two cities. 

The officials would not dis- 
cuss terms of the agreement, 
which was signed at Bell South’s 
Atlanta headquarters late Mon- 
day. 

Analysts estimated the deal's 
value at about 5150 milli on. 

Marshall Neel, president of 
BellSouth China, said Chinese 
regulations barred foreign com- 
panies from directly investing 
in or operating telecommunica- 


tions companies, so BellSouth is 
technically restricted to advis- 
ing on and planning telephone 
services. 

Chinese officials have said 
Lhey want to add 100 milli on 
telephone lines by 2000. 

BellSouth has operations in 
more than a dozen countries 
and provides services to nearly 
20 million subscribers in the 
southeastern United States. 
The company is also the sec- 
ond-largest U.S. provider of ra- 
diotelephone services, with 
more than 4_5 million custom- 
ers worldwide. ( NYT AFP ) 


Bloomberg Business Mews 

TOKYO — The Labor Ministry said Wednesday that ihe 
average number of hours worked weekly by Japanese employ- 
ees fell below 40 last year for the first time since its survey 
began nearly two decades ago. 

The report said the average work week in 1993 was down 12 
minutes from 1992, at 39 hours and 51 minutes. The ministry 
said its figures were based on a survey of S.300 businesses with 
30 or more employees, of which 94.4 percent had responded 
to its questions. 

When the ministry began the survey in 1 975. the average 
time worked each week was 42 hours and eight minutes. Ten 
years later, the the workweek was down to 41 hours and 45 
minutes, and it has fallen steadily since. 

The shorter workweek partly reflects government efforts to 
emphasize leisure time and improve the Japanese quality of 
life. But while government exhortations to trim the workweek 
have had some effect, economists said Japan's longest eco- 
nomic slump since the end of World War II was a major 
factor. 

“There was clearly a cyclical component in it.” Robert 
Feldman, director of economic research for Japan at Salomon 
Brothers Inc., said of the impact of the recession on the 
workweek. “But that being said, there's also sort of a long- 
term move toward shorter working hours.” 

The so-called lifetime employment system characteristic of 
Japanese labor practices has prevented many companies from 
making major cuts in their work forces. As a result, companies 
have had to try to reduce costs by cutting down the hours 
worked by each employee, Donald' Kimball, an economist at 
Mitsubishi Bank, said. 

The average workweek in the financial, insurance and real- 
es late sectors was among the lowest of all fields included in 
the survey. These are the same sectors that have suffered the 
most from the recession. 

Meanwhile, employees in fields that have proven more 
resilient to the recession have experienced less of a drop in 
hours on the job. 

The Labor Ministry’ also said Japanese workers' average 
number of days off rose to 19.9 in 1993 from 19.5 a year earlier. 
Still, old habits die hard: Last year, paid vacation days rose to 
an average of 16 3. the ministry said: but only 9.1. or 56 percent, 
of those days marked for vacation were actually taken. 


Shares Gain 
On Major 
Markets 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

113D0-- 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo •** 

Nikkei 225 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — Stocks 
rose in Asia on Wednesday, hit- 
ting a record high in Seoul, re- 
bounding 6 percent in Taipei 
and m aking gains in Hong 
Kong and Tokyo. 

A move by the South Korean 
government to accelerate finan- 
cial changes sent the composite 
index to a new high of 1,089.66, 
up from the previous record of 
1,078.66 reached Tuesday. 

The surge followed an an- 
nouncement by Park Jae Yoon, 
the finance minister, that resi- 
dent foreigners would soon re- 
ceive the same treatment as Ko- 
reans when investing In the 
stock market. He also said daily 
share-price movement limits 
would be widened. 

Taiwan stocks rebounded 
strongly after recent sharp 
losses linked to a payment-de- 
fault scandal. 

Brokers said hopes of govern- 
ment intervention helped the 
index jump 371.07 points to 
close at 6,495.78. 

Stocks in Hong Kong and 
Tokyo also rose, helped by a 55- 
point rise in the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average Tuesday in 
New York. 

The Hang Seng index gained 
1.8 percent to 9,532.35. and Lhe 
Nikkei average in Tokyo rose 
1.4 percent to 20.089.72. Bro- 
kers said a strong dollar also 
helped Tokyo stocks. 




2i»MrjTstf 


.1994 1894 

Exchange Index- 


m 

. . _ . ; ,z : :i 

fcTj -it' aTs 

te.-.-i 


Hong Kong Hang Seng -, 

Singapore - Strait s Times 

Sydney AHOncBnartes 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 ~ 

Kuala Lumpur Composite- 

Bangkok SE T • : 

Seoul • Composite Stock 

Taipei 

Manila PSE • 

Jakarta Stock Index 


New Zealand NZSE-40 .. 
Bombay National Index 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


Wednesday 

Close Close . Gna 

9.532.35 

2^6831 

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■. • ' , - i— «— »t— 

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s 


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Very briefly: 


Convenience Stores Lift Ito Profit 


Surging Exports Feed China’s Surplus 


Compiled fry Our Staff From Dispatches 

BELTING — Surging exports helped China 
post a trade surplus of 51.38 billion in the first 
nine months of 1994. the government-con- 
trolled China News Service said Wednesday. 


from the like period in 1993. imports rose 15 
percent, to $78.06 billion. 

“Export momentum is still very strong as 
world markets improve.” said Ben Kwong, 
research director at Dhannala Securities. 


That compares with a 56.97 billion deficit 
in the first nine months of 1993. 


Last month the news service said China's 
trade surplus in the first eight months of 1994 
was only 5100 million. That indicates a sur- 
plus of $128 billion in September alone. 


China posted a 512.2 billion trade deficit in 
1993. Economists say the trade balance may 
slip back into deficit by the end of this year. 


From January to September, Chinese ex- 
ports totaled $79.44 billion, up 30 percent 


Separately, Chinese media reported that 
industrial output had risen 18.1 percent in the 
third quarter from a year earlier. In the first 
nine months of the year, output rose 16.6 
percent from a year earlier. AFX) 


Bhtcmherg Business Sens 

TOKYO — Ito-Yokado Co. said Wednesday 
that first-half profit rose 37 percent because of 
an improved performance at its 7-Eleven stores 
in the United States and continued strong sales 
at its Japanese convenience-store chain. 

Ito-Yokado said consolidated net profit came 
to 38.64 billion yen (5385 million) in the half 
ended Aug. 31. For the year through February 
1995, Ito-Yokado expects profit to rise 16 per- 
cent, to 68 billion yen. 

Sales fell 0.5 percent to 1.43 trillion yen in the 
first half. Ito-Yokado expects sales for the full 
year to rise 2 percent, to 2.94 trillion yen. 

For the parent company, Ito-Yokado said cur- 
rent profit, which is before taxes and extraordi- 
nary items, rose 0.8 percent to 42.03 billion yen 
in the half-year. Parent company sales in the first 
half were 1.1 percent higher at 759.23 billion yen. 

The earnings were in line with expectations.’and 
Ito-Yokado’s stock dosed 10 yen higher at 5.260. 

Ito-Yokado heads a retail group that owns 70 


percent of Southland Corp. of Dallas, which runs 
the 7-Eleven chain stores. Ito-Yokado and its 
Seven-Eleven Japan subsidiary bought a control- 
ling interest in Southland in 1991, one year after 
the U.S. company filed for bankruptcy-law 
protection. 

Seven-Eleven Japan said current profit rose 8 
percent, to 49.84 billion yen, in the half. 

Tat5uhiro Sekine, managing director of lto- 
Yokado. said Southland had been working to 
improve profitability. It has shut down unprofit- 
able 7-Eleven stores and remodeled others. 

The changes and a pickup in the U.S. economy 
appear to be paying off, as Southland showed a 
profit in the first half of 523 million, reversing a 
loss of SI3 million a year earlier. 

The improvements at Southland are helping 
Ito-Yokado to weather difficult times in Japa-- 
nese retailing. Ito-Yokado operates supermar- 
kets that sell such items as clothing and appli- 
ances as well as groceries. 


• Vietnam needs as much as 520 billion in foreign direct invest- 

ment by 2000 to develop and modernize its economy, a senitfr 
Vietnamese government official said. « 

■ Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd- of Japan said it had developed 
a commercially viable biological emulsion oil treatment SVsteiji 
that used bacteria to break oil down into water and carbon 
dioxide. The company said it had applied for a patent. 

• Hoechst AG said its total investment in China would Teach 5600 
million within two years. 

• Sega Enterprises Ltd. said it would sell its next generation of 
videogame players for 10 percent less than originally announced. 

• Wharf Cable. Hong Kong's only cable-television operator, 
signed an agreement to carry programs from ANBC, the Asian 
arm of NBCs global business news service. 

• Taiwan, boosted by strong exports, is expected to post economic 
growth of 6 percent this year, after registering a growth rate of 5.7 
percent in the first half.' 


■ Indonesia's Parliament approved the establishment of the global 
trade agreement that will lead to the formation of the World 
Trade Organization. afx Movmbrrg, afp, Reuters. aY 


AFX, Movmberg. AFP, Reuters. aY 


Asarco to Keep Its MIM Stakd 


Bloomberg Businas News 

NEW YORK — Asarco Inc. said Wednesday it would not sell 
its 15.5 percent interest in the Australian base-metal producer 
MIM Holdings Ltd. even though MIM plans to sell its 24/7 
percent stake m Asarco. 

Asarco, also a mining concern, has “held MIM for numy yeafs , 
and currently plans to keep it for investment purposes,* 1 aspokes- It- 
man. Jerry Cooper, said. ■ 

The disclosure that MIM was seeking a buyer for its Asa rep 
stake, which has a current market value of nearly 5350 million, 
was made in a registration statement that Asarco filed with the 
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The statement covers 
the issuance by Asarco of os much as 5300 million of debt and 
equity securities. 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBINE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13. 1994 


Page 19 
































































































I a. 


Pa 


Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


SPORTS 



1 

NHL Season Put on Ice Until Agreement Reached 


By Leu Hochberg 

Washington Pan Service 
NEW YORK — Commissioner 
Gary Bettman has announced that the 
already-delayed 7Szb National Hockey 
League season will not begin Saturday, 
became the league's board of gover- 
nors has rejected the latest labor pro- 
posal made by the players. 

Bettman said that the season would 
not begin until there is a collective 
bargaining agreement between man- 
agement and players. 

The board of governors met for four 
hours Tuesday afternoon and, said 
Bettman, unanimously rejected the ( 
most recent proposal of die NHL Play- 


ers’ Association, which was presented 
during a negotiating session Monday 
in Toronto. 

The NHL has been without a labor 
agreement since SepL ]5, 1993, and 
although last season was played in its 
entirety without one. Bettman said that 
could not happen this year. The day 
before the scheduled Oct 1 opening 
games, he postponed the season’s start 
at least until Oct 15, so an agreement 
could be reached or, he said, “signifi- 
cant progress” made toward one. 

Bettman maintained Tuesday that a 
full season still could be played, and 
said, “We will review the schedule on a 
day-to-day basis.” 


TheplantheunionpreseatedMonday 
calk for a 3 percent flat tax on owners’ 
gate receipts and a graduated tax. 
peaking at 7 percent, on players' sala- 
ries. 

That proposal would raise $20 mil- 
lion, the players* association says, with 
most of the money taken from the 
highest-spending clubs to be distribut- 
ed among the needier clubs. 

The union says that proposal would 
address two of the league’s premier 
concerns: The graduated tax would 
deter the wealthier clubs from spend- 
ing enormous sums on salaries while 
both taxes would help the poorer clubs 
compete for players. 


The league’s previous offer — it had 
two plans rejected last Wednesday — 
was based on gate receipts and a grad- 
uated tax on players’ salaries, although 
the rates were vastly different from the 
union's plan. 


The NHL’s graduated tax peaked at 
107 percent, a figure that Bob Goo- 
denow, the union's executive director, 
said was “aimed singularly to act as a 
cap on salaries." 


The league issued a release that said 
the average player salary has jumped 
140 percent in the last five years, from 
$232,000 in 1989-90 to a “preliminary” 
estimate of S558.000 last season. 


“Yes ” said Goodenow. “player sala- 
ries are increasing, but player value is 
increasing — the value of the business 
has increased.” Player salaries make up 
just one of the differences between the 
two sides. Besides that said Bettman, 
there has been “no movement on entry- 
level salaries, free agency, salary arbi- 
tration and other issues we’ve asked to 
have addressed.” 

As for further talks, both sides were 
taking the high road. 

“We usually have a phrase” at the 
end of our talks: “Keep the lines of 
communication open,” said Goode- 
now. “And that’s where it’s at now/’ 


Hockey’s Mr. Fix-It, 
Or Just Tough Guy? 


-w. 


By Joe Lapointe 

,Ve# York Times Scrvree _ ■ „ ■ x* 

’ EW YORK — Gary Bettman couldn’t quite 
i w co V the “L” word. Even after he announced the runner?.' 

postponement of the National Hockey 

and consonants that make up the word lockout never passed h^. 
lips. 


N! 



P “Draw your own conclusion,” flic commissioner finally sai^; 

indeed, many conclusions to draw as 
continues the longest, bitterest and possibly most destrucU^ ^. 
labor strueale in its history. Absolutely. . . . . j£. 

For instance: One might conclude that the commissioner 
hockey is a union-buster who is fc 'jgfSr 


Ma : 11 Runners Had 
Appendectomies 


Reuters 

HIROSHIMA. Japan — 
China’ controversial track 
coach, Ma Junren, said 
Wednesday that 1 1 of his long- 
distance runners had under- 
gone appendectomies last year. 

Ma’s announcement that 
more than half his squad had 
been operated on may have 
helped explain their dramatic 
loss of form after a world re- 
cord-breaking romp late last 
year, but it only added to the 
mystique that has swirled about 
the team since its abrupt with- 
drawal from of this year’s grand 
prix circuit. 

“We had to stop tr ainin g last 
year because we were getting 
sick,” Ma told Japan’s Kyodo 
news agency. “We were having 
toxicological problems and that 
is why we are running slower 
times 

“Eleven Ma’s Family Army 
members had to have their ap- 
pendices removed and they 
needed to recover from their 
operations,” he said. 


Ma did not elaborate on the 
causes of the “toxicological 
problems.” and others reacted 
with puzzlement. 

“It sounds astonishing,” said 
Arne Ljungqvist, chairman of 
the medical commission of the 
International Amateur Athlet- 
ics Federation, track and field's 
ruling body. 

“Usually the inflamma tion of 
the appendix occurs in very 
young children. It seems 
strange to me. It is a remarkably 
high frequency ” 

Ma’s record of stunning re- 
sults have led to allegations that 
he is using banned substances 
to improve performances. But 
in this area, the ljungqvist 
came to Ma’s defense. 

He said IAAF tests on Ma’s 
athletes in Beijing, shortly be- 
fore they left for Hiroshima and 
the Asian Games, had revealed 
no evidence of drug-taking. 

“We have made several tests 
and they have always been neg- 
ative,” he said. 



willing to punish fans and players Vantage 
to force the flow of wealth into the p Q e n * 
purses of promoters and away from _ 

the pockets of performers. One 





Schoolchildren were ushered out of an already mostly empty stadium in Hiroshima as high winds forced postponement 
of six athletics events Wednesday, leaving just three finals on the program. The 1,500-meter world record holder, Qu 
Yunxia, led China’s 1-2 finish in the women’s 800, but in the men’s taijiquan competition of wushu, his nation’s fighting 
sport, China’s Wang Erping dropped out with a sprained ankle and Masaru Masuda of Japan won the gold medaL 


SCOREBOARD 


UJC DUACU uwimuixw. V,.- | 

might wonder shout the long-lasting scars his tactics will leaver 
this fragile business and the relationships between labor at 

manag ement. ■ . . 

By demanding a major revision of the collective baigaimng 
relationship in a transparent effort to retard the growth of wodett-;.. 
salaries' Bettman and the owners who pay him have adopted a_ 
hardball strategy that is at least as harsh as that of the temp, 
owners in strikebound major league baseball. v 

By locking out the players, Bettman and the owners have., 
sacrificed the month of October 1994, a window of opp 
they’ll never have again. With no baseball, they had only ' 

football for medip and fan competition. .* • : ;„.- 

By stopping the sport during an era of unprecedented growth*' 
thcv’ve risked losing the kind of momentum that hock cy j ias • . 4^ 
sought for more than a quarter-century, since the big-bang ex^Qr ; •• 
sion of 1967, when the league doubled in size from 6 to 12 tajaxfc^; vfc 
Instead of restructuring the relationship between labor 
management with a gradual approach over a long period of fSMa^p. 
Bettman went for everything at once: a huge payroll tax t o gfed ,- 
down salaries, the elimination, of salary arbitration and an.eqtry^y '■*£; 
level wage structure to hold down the pay of rookies aadtN 
eventually, everyone else. • /; 7 Tj 

His bargaining style was obvious horn the start When be took . 
office less than two years ago, Bettman spoke conciliatory words 
about retired players, who had won $40 million from the league hi >' - 
a pension-money dispute. In court his posture was quite different 
The NHL appealed on two levels. losing both times. 

When the officials went on strike last fait he brought in scab 
labor to replace them. He won that strike, too, and the humbled 
officials returned to work with little to show for their idleness. 

Now he has taken on a determined players union for what looks 
like a long and nasty fight- Bettman insists that his demands an 
the union won’t hurt the players financially when anyone can 
clearly see the opposite. 

He’s a tough and smart executive, but his opponents might be 
just as tough, just as smart 

Surely a commissioner as smart as Bettman had to know that no 
union would capitulate to his demands. Certainly the owners who 
employed him had to know that this agenda was a collision course 
in a game of chicken that is dangerous for both sides. 


-a I*-'- 




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latk-HT , 


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Aslan Games 


BASKETBALL 
Women 
Braize MMal 
China 83. Taiwan 31 Mon 
Coaiolatioa Round 
Kazakhstan 77, Saudi Arabia 71 
Taiwan vs, Iran w 

Women 
NO Meters 

LOu Yunxia China, 1:5945; 2. Liu LL China 
2:0066; a, Shiny Wilson, India 2:0132. 
CYCLING 


One-Kilometer Time Trial 
T. Masanaaa stifahara, Jopov 1:0US1: X 
Hons Suk-hm South Korea 1:00317; 3. Won 
Chang-ron, South Korea 1:07267. 

4-KBomoter Individual pursuit 
OaM Modal 

Vadim Kravtchenko. Kazakhstan, def. Ev- 
oenty Vokkar. Kyravzstan, 4:484094:40.757 
Bronze Medal 

Guo Lonachen, China 4:52381 In semifinals 
FIELD HOCKEY 


Semifinals 

South Korea det. Pakistan, 4-1 iponalty 
Shootout) after 2-2 lie; India 1. Japan & 
Consolation Round 
Kazakhstan 4, Bangladesh g 
Malaysia 4, China 1 


JUDO 

Men 

H Kilogram s 
Gold Medal 

Snlgeru OkalzumL Japan, def. Kim Joe-slk, 
South Korea 

Bronze MednH 

Dmitri Soloviev, Uzbekistan, and Serguel 
Chakhnov, Kaza k hstan 

95 Kilograms 
Gold Medal 

JunKanna. Japan, def.Seyed Miron. Iron. 3- 

0. 

Bronze Medals 

Wang Ruisneng, China and Bodmaonvom- 
buu Bat-Erdene, Mongolia 
Women 
72 Kilograms 
Gold Medal 

KlmMHunaSaith Korea dot. Leng Chun- 
hul. China 

Brans Medals 

Chen OdihPliia Taiwan, and Yurlko Fu- 
kuba Japan. 

Over 72 Kilograms 
Gold Medal 

Zhang Ybtg. China def. Yeh Wen-hua Tai- 
wan. 

Braize Medals 

Shon Hyun-me. South Korea, and KooriSu. 
zukL Japan 


HANDBALL 

Men 

China 21, Kuwait IB 
Japan 25. Saudi Arabia 17 


SHOOTING 
Women 
Standard RMe 

Individual: 1. NarHoOllma, Japan, 664.7; X 
Xu Yanhua China 6617; 1 Zhang QknXna 
China <615. 

Team: l,Chlnali498;lSoutti Korea 1492; 
X Japm 1,673; 4. Thailand. 1X69; 5. India 
1437; 6. Sri Lanka 141*. 


Standard Pistol 

individual: 1. Wang YMu. China S7S; Z Park 
Byung-taofc. South Korea 573; 1 Meng Gang. 
China 573. 

Team: 1. China 1 3U: X Kazakhstan. 1481; 
3. Uzbekistan, 1481; 4. South Korea 1469; & 
Thai Iona 1460; 6. Vietnam, 1 .658. 

SOCCER 
Women 
Gold Medal 
China 2 Japan 0 

TABLE TENNIS 
Mixed Doubles 
Semlfl oal 9 

Chlang Pcng-fuag and Xu Jlng. Taiwan, def. 
Yoo Nom-kvuand Pork Hae-fung.21-1123-21 : 
Kona Unghul end Dene Yoplng, China, def. 
Wu Wen-chla and Chen china Taiwan. 21-11 
21-15. 

Meg's Doubles 
Sendflnals 

Chu K vo-sung mid Lae Chukseung, South 
Korea deL AAa Wcnge and Zhang LeL China 
71-19.22-20: Kim Taek-sooand Yoo Nam-kva 
South KaroadeLUs Lfn and Wane Toa China 
21-19. 21 -IS 

TENNIS 

Semlflaals 

Men 

Pan BJna China (2), def. Bcmv WMaya 
Indonesia a). 6-0, *0; Yoon Yang-0. South 
Koreo (61. deL LeanderPaea Indio <I),6-7 □- 
71. fr-L 7-5. 

Women 

Klmlko Data, Japan (ll.def- Yayuk Basakl. 
Indonesia I3|,U,57 .44); Hooka Sawomatsu, 
Japan (21. def. Clwn U, ChCna. 6-1. 6-3- 
TRACK AND FIELD 
Men 

400 Meters 

L Ibrahim i small AAuflah, Qatar. 4548; 2, 


Shon Ju-ll, Souih Korea 4SJ7: 1 Akiawal So- 
kutchun, Thailand. 4440. 

8N Meters 

1. Lea Jln-li, South Korea 1:4573; 2. Mu 
Wehma China 1:4644; 3. Kim Yong-hwan. 
South Korea 1:4649. 

Women 


l.Qu Yunxia China 1 : 59.85: Z Uu U. China 
2:0046; X Shiny Wilson. India 2:0122. 
VOLLEYBALL 
Men 

Pakistan def. Mongolia 1J-S 15- 1, 15-4 
South Korea del. Iran. 15-X 15-6. 15-3 
Chino def. Jaoaa 15-9. 15-10. 10-15. 15-12 
WATER POLO 
Kaza k hst a n 12, Chino 9 
South Korea M. Singapore 8 
Japan IS, Iran 11 


Hong Kcng 

KvrgvMian 

Philippines 

Jordon 

Poklslon 

U. A. E 

Sri Lanka 

Brunei 

Nepal 

Burma 

Macm 

Tollklsian 


Wednesday, In Lahore 
Australia Innings: 207-6 
South Africa Innings: 201-8 
Result: Australia wins by six runs. 
Zimbabwe vs. Sri Lanka 
Wednesday, in Heron 
Sri Lanka 1st innings: 3834 





Medals Table 



Gold 

Sliver 

Bronze 

Tolol 

Chino 

106 

68 

30 

204 

Jaoon 

41 

47 

59 

147 

South Korea 

38 

34 

47 

119 

Kazakhstan 

17 

15 

23 

55 

Iron 

S 

1 

7 

23 

Taiwan 

7 

10 

15 

32 

Uzbekistan 

3 

7 

1ft 

26 

Svrio 

3 

3 

1 

7 

Malaysia 

3 

1 

ID 

14 

Kuwait 

3 

1 

4 

8 

Qatar 

2 

0 

1 

4 

Indonesia 

1 

11 

6 

18 

Trkmntatan 

1 

3 

2 

6 

Mongolia 

1 

2 

2 

S 

Vietnam 

1 

2 

0 

3 

India 

1 

1 

11 

13 

Saudi Arabia 

1 

1 

5 

7 

Singapore 

1 

1 

2 

4 

Thailand 

0 

s 

9 

14 


ITALIAN CUP 
First Leg, Third Round 
Napoli 3. Cremunese 0 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Manigues I. Metz i 
Montpellier X Lyon 2 
Nice 0, Coen 1 
Parts-St- Germain 3. Lille 0 
Bordeaux a Monaco 3 
Sochaux X Comes l 
St. Ellen ne L Bastlo 2 
Rennes X Auxerre 2 
Le Havre 0, Names 0 
Lens 1. Strasbourg 0 

Steadings: Nantes 26 points. Lvon 23. Porls- 
St. Germain 21. Cannes 20, Lens 20, Martlgues 
19, Auxerre 18. Strasbourg 18. Bordeaux 18, 
Rennesl7.SI. Etienne 16. Wionoco 15, Bast la 14. 
Sochoux 1L Nice 13, Le Havre IZAAelz 11, Lille 
la Montpellier 9, Caen 7. 


-t-'err-v •• ■ -r — 
6 •. > • ■ ” 

J . ■. — — i. — 

INTERNATIONAL TESTS 
Australia w South Africa 


BASEBALL 
Amertcoa League 

BALTIMORE— Announced that Tom Bol- 
ton, pitcher, refused minor league assignment 
and elected to become a free agent. 

CLEVELAND— Declined In exercise the 
1995 action at Candy Maldonado, outfielder. 

SEATTLE— Announced that Rich Gassog# 
and Ted Power, pitchers, refused minor 
league assignment! and elected to become 
free agents. Recalled Makolo Suzuki, pitcher, 
from Jacksonville. SL Outrlghled Torey Lu- 
vollo, infWder, to Calgary. PC|_ 

National League 

LOS ANGELES— Announced that Cory 
Snyder, outfielder, and Roger McDowell, 
pitcher, refused minor leamie assignments 
and elected to become free agents. 

NEW YORK— Sen! Maura Gozzo and Doug 
Union, pitchers, ad Jett McKnlgh t, hi fielder, 
outright to Norfolk. II_ Old not renew the 
contract of Sieve Garland, head trainer. 

PHILADELPHIA— Named John Timber- 
lake director of Florida operations; Jim Her- 
lihy general manager of the Clearwater Phil- 
lies; and Diane Gonzalez business manager at 
rite Clearwater PM files. 

PITTSBURGH— Claimed Mark Parent, 
catcher, off waivers from the CMcago Cubs. 
Designated Gary Varsho. outfielder, for as- 
signment. 


labor relations since Ronald Reagan unleashed the movement by 
filing the air controllers in 1981. It some people thought that sport 
unions, whose members had unique skills, would be immune from 
such tactics. Betunan and his baseball counterparts are proving 
them wrong. It merely took a decade for the sports promoters to 
catch up. 

Who gets how much of the money? How much are both sides 
willing to fight for it? 

Perhaps that final decision will be made by the owners, Bett- 
man’ s employers. After another week or month or six months of 
lockout, they might have second thoughts about hiring a tough 
guy who might have gone too far in carrying out their mission id 
put the players in their place. 

They might decide that a new commissioner can better serve 
them, can restore the money from tickets and beer and hot dogs 
and television to which they had become accustomed. They might 
decide to replace Bettman. their expensive hired hand, who is, 

• * 6 t j: ..Li - A 




after alljust another disposable employee. They might see the 
i mid someone who can do the job cheaper ; 


need to 


and better. 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TH IBS DAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 


Page 21 


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Weakened Welsh Team Upset in Moldova 

Compiled &> Our Sia{f From Dispatches T/"* •- ¥" Y? A I* I Q O Slovak goalie La 

The soccer unknowns of Visitors Lose European Uuahtier by o m M nar then faced a ba 

Moldova came from behind A ^ */ •/ shots as Israel m 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispatches XT'* X 

The soccer unknowns of V ISIZOFS JUOSE 
Moldova came from behind 
against a weakened Wales side Scorers: 

On W ed nesday to DOSl a 3-7 MoWovo— 5en»i Selous <9tn),5eryluS*aj 
,I-. M ti.rr.nL, l 3 * 111 *' Vqferl PooothIov {7Bm)i Wole* — 

upset in their European Cham- eor> sena <sn d, i-ran Rot*m mmm. 
pionsmp Group 7 qualifying Bulgaria, 2, Georgia <h In So- 
ttish. fia, Emil Kostadinov scored in 

Wales, the visiting team, ap- the 55th and 62d minutes erf 
reared to have secured a point that Group 7 match, 
from a highly entertaining game Russia 4, San Marino 0: In 
in Chisinau when striker Iwan Moscow, Russia struggled for 


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Roberts scored from close 
range in the 69th minute to 
make the score 2-2. 

But with just 12 minutes left, 
Moldovan midfielder Valeri 
Pogorelov picked up a pass in- 
side the area and blasted the 
winning goal into the back of 
the net from 11 meters. 

Moldova, which beat its fel- 
low former Soviet republic 
Georgia, 1 -0, in their first quali- 
fying match, fell behind in only 
the fifth minute when Welsh 
midfielder Gary Speed headed 
home a comer. 

Defender Sergei Belous 
equalized just four minutes lat- 
er when he unleashed a tremen- 


Scorers. tun. He had little else to do in 

MoMbvo— Serve! Selous (?tit>.Servlu5caj r;^ {.-If 

[3Wi». Vcrterl Pooor.lav (7Bjn); wales - Itle 11151 naU ‘ 

Gory Speed iStnj, I won Roberts Mem). Scorers: 

Bulgaria, 2, Georgia (h In So- vouri Konun «mi. t«or Kaiyumow (omi. 
fia, Emil Kostadinov scored in Vur| Nikttor^ imm, Dmitri Rtxtctwnvo 
the 55th and 62d minutes erf 

that Group 7 match. Ukraine 0, Slovenia 0: In 

Russia 4, San Marino 0: In Kie>', Slovenia held Ukraine to 
Moscow, Russia struggled for a lifeless draw in a Group 4 
more than an hour before scot- niatch. 
mg three limes in three minutes Slovenia, relying heavily on 
in its Group 8 qualifier. Quick breakaways, came closer 

Russia, recovering from a to scoring with team captain 
player rebellion that wrecked DarkoMilanic missing a penal- 
the team's World Cup chances, ty eafly in the second half after 
labored to break down the part- he had been brought down on a 
timers’ packed defense. one-to-one with the goalkeeper. 

They had scored onlv once Ukraine, which sacked it’s 


Slovak goalie Ladislav Mol- 
nar then faced a barrage of long 
shots as Israel pressed for a 
Italy and T.iihnnqlj n, Ukraine is 8?®^ ugainst its 10-man • 
sixth, ahead of Estonia. opposition. 

Slovakia 2, Israel 2: In Tel Israel remains in second , 
Aviv, the Slovaks opened their place in the six-team gmup. be- 
Group 1 encounter with a flur- hind Romania. Slovakia is tied * 
ry, scoring in the 7th minute with France for third, 
when forward Peter Dubovski's „ 
defcnM-spIining pass found ^ T „ w . 

Stetan Kusnak alone in the pen- rum. wmoiry], siovnua - smtan Rimn 
altV box. Lubamir Moravak (ittn). 

The Slovan Bratislava strik- ^ ft !n 

2 thT BclareSSr team ' 

SS?i n P chancc - . posted its first victory in Euro- 
, I™. Championship^ qualifica- . 


.IU uuwtiiu a 

g pass found iM-oe* - Hofozl Wtfil, Tfll B«i*« 
lone in the pen- (Urn. mmoirvli suvowa — SMan Rmnan 
<7m|. Lubamir Moravak Mtfnj. 


timers’ packed defense. one-to-one with the goalkeeper. 

They had scored only once Ukraine, which sacked it’s 
until they decided to change coach after a 0-2 upset by Lith- 


Lubomir Moravcik curled a 20- 
meter free kick around Israel's 


tion in a Group 5 game. 

The home team attacked 


_ n . . l lib uvniib tbam attavMu 

2 -°' Jnd a v,c ‘ from the outset but did not cre- 


tory looked certain. 


n... .U- it.. v. »■ , ate scoring opportunities, while 

v • nM i Isra ' LuxemboSrg responded with 

sc , ored . on a rare counter-attacks. 


tactics and resort to long-range 
shots. 

Igor Kolyvanov doubled the 
score in the 63d minute with a 
25-meter free kick and, less 
than 60 seconds later, fullback 
Yuri Nikiforov belted home a 
magnificent 30-meter shot. 

Dmitri Radchenko headed in 


dous 25-meter drive that f rom c j ose ^ge ^ 66lh draw following a 1-1 tie with had already picked up a velli 

flashed past surprised Welsh minute to wrap up the scoring. Invent Italy last month. Slow- card, was sent off. 

goalkeeper Neville Southall the cross was provided bv Igor 1113 remains fourth in the six- Tal Banin fired home i 

Fellow defender Sergiu Seal Shalixnov, one of several rebels leam standings behind Croatia, penally to even the score. 

Save his side the lead in die 29th who returned to the fold after 

iSTfAteSdteS: 55S5aft2’Sd"“' World League Holding Player Tryouts in Britain 

fensive wall into Southall’s bot- But they ' found it hard to International Herald Tribune 


uania last month, struggled to 
mount any serious attacks. 

The new coach, Yosef Sabo, 
kept ooly four players from that 
match, bringing in four from 
the national club champion Dy- 
namo Kiev — the team he is 
continuing to run. 

it was Slovenia's second 
draw following a 1-1 tie with 
favored Italy last month. Slove- 
nia remains fourth in the six- 
team standings behind Croatia, 


el's Ronen Harazi scored on a 
powerful shot from the edge of 


it., v, mu ■ u . s In the second half, however, 

Ha,m Rm - the Belarusian leam stepped. 
■ i up the pace and played most of 
I ra ' pmod on Luxembourg's 
side tfte field. 


kovich, was brought down in 
the box by Marian Zeman, and 


In the 67th minute, mid/ield- 


uit uu* uj nioudu Lilian, unu M id^iKtrU. . * 

£ e d &oS^ fmder - Z b ° 

^rdtS L P orf P > tS Miroslav Rotuash- 

T-Jt R,nm fiL* u u chenko, who scored the opener 

I 0 ™ U “ from about 18 meters. ■ 

penalty to even the score. a 


Rpv. Kiniuord/Reutcr, 


Gary Speed (left) opened the scoring id the fifth minute, bat Wales was then ontgimned. 


fensive wall into Southall's bot- 
tom left-hand corner. 

Wales, lacking top forwards 
Ian Rush, Ryan Giggs and 
Dean Saunders, towered over 
their stocky opponents but 
could not make their physical 
advantage pay. Moldova leads 
the group, with Wales tied for 
second with Bulgaria. 


But they found it hard to International Herald Tribune 

break through the massed ranks ION DON — The World League, which will attempt to resusci- 
of a San Marino side that had tate Continental interest in American-style football next spring, is 
conceded 79 goals in their pre- looking for a few good men in Britain. 

vious 18 matches. The first of six preliminary player tryouts is to be held Friday, 

Midfielder Valeri Karpin fi- with others scheduled Tor later in October and in November. The 
□ally broke the deadlock in the requirements are simple: you must be at least 20 and hold a 
42d minute with a fine header passport from a country other than the United States and Canada, 
from 12 meters that looped over For further information, call Bill Peterson or Nick Priesinall at 
goalkeeper Pierluigi Benedet- telephone number 71355.1995 at the league's office in London. 


from 12 meters that looped over 
goalkeeper Pierluigi Benedet- 


from about 18 meters. 

A minute later, Belarussian 
defender Sergei Gurenko was; 
shown his second yellow card 
and was sent off. 

Luxembourg tried to take ad- 
vantage of that but left its de» ■ 
fense open, enabling Sergei 
Gerasimeis to enter the penalty - 
area and lob the ball into the 
net above the goalkeeper's * 
head. 

Scorers: 

MlrulBv Romoshchanho (*7th). Saw) 
Gorotlmtti |7Uh) 


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Autissier Safls to Big Lead in BOC Race 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


By Barbara Lloyd 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Tbe day before leaving 
the docks in Charleston, South Carolina, 
for the start of the BOC 'round-the-world 


With less than 2,500 miles to go in the 
opening leg, that margin was probably 
enough to sustain her lead. But Autissier 
wasn’t counting on it. 

She knows that nature has a way of 


whose strength advantages would seem to 
serve them so much better during a solo 
voyage on a nine-ton yacht. 

First Autissier had the boat built to her 
liking. Rather than using a water-ballast 


it&od U K., 

hu 

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Today's 

nmVATHWAL 


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present from one erf her admirers. 

“Ah, earrings," Autissier said. “People 
know how I like these." She put them on, 
tilting her head as if to look in a mirror, 
then asked, “How do they look?" It was 
the feminine side of a woman who has used 
witand might to. build a substantial lead in. 
a decidedly masculine race. 

- Of die 1 9 solo skippers competing in the 
2 7,000-miie <43 ,400-kiloiiieter) BOC Chal- 
lenge, Autissier is the only woman. In 
1991, she became the only woman to com- 
plete a BOC race by placing seventh. 

On Wednesday afternoon, Autissier was 
475 miles ahead of her closest rival Jean 
Luc Van Den Heede of France;’ On this 
6, 800-mile passage to Cape Town,. 


a E ie P dl S t ^' of three *£Sl l 4 ** ys Th e keel and ballast bulb pivot 

off the 76-day pare set in 1989 by two sideways beneath the hull. This pendulum Appears 

North American sailors. motion shifts the boat’s weight from one Paep 1 S 

“I know the boat perfectly." the 37-year- side to the other, depending on the yacht's ^ 

old sailor said before leaving Charleston, point of sail It has proved easier to man- * — ■ 

|*So I know better how to push it. 1 know age than water ballast, and more practical. DLrry FR£E SHOps 

its best abilities." But more than the mechanics of her ■ ' ■ 

The yacht, which she named Ecureuil boat, Autissier has sailed smart While _ 

Poitou-Charen tes 2 after its French spon- others in the BOC fleet took a right wm J_p£.(|||y 

sors, a national bank and her region in after the Sept 17 start, Autissier went • t> 

west central France, is compeiingagainst straight, following an easterly path across gj JJ-g 
sevoi other Class I yachts, the big 60- the Atlantic. 9 “%vtl2’hWs froSlihrx^a' OF 

footers of the fleet The ploy worked for her and, to a lesser nort to the American btptea Bank. 

And so how is it that this French worn- Mtrat for Giovanni Sojdini, the iRJKiWteSH!. 

an, of medium height and build, Ha.«> been ^. e 50-fool yacht Kodak, who held a 34-- ^ m 

able to compete sureessfully with men Wedn«day on David Adams of MOVING 

Austraba in the Gass II competition. Ko- muvuvtj 

■ dak was even ahead of five of the 60-foot 

rmnJfl Imp rilfllTP The choice to head east was bold, be- 

f ffflUli l/flUl flilllt/ cause it meant sailing more miles to Cape M0VWC 

Town. But the decision also put Autissier ags. 
drive Sunday at the Grand Prix of Europe and Sddini in a more favorable weather 
in Jerez, Spain. pattern. 

But for 1995. “You’ll have to be patient - By hcadill g ^ followed the out- 
"iTZlP-ft u a . - , side of the right triangle while others took aal 

*= hypoteutS side?|id Bill Biewenga, a 


aders in GRES Mansell Mum on Formula One Future 


slier to subscribe ands? 
it call today 
9*328 in Athens. 


I resent 

THAT-' 


r‘ - 


77»« Associated Press 

ESTORIL, Portugal — Is he returning 
to Formula One or isn’t be? Nigel Mansell 
is keeping them guessing. 

The former Indy-car and Formula One 
world champion said Wednesday “the 
fire’s still burning" as he rejoined the Wil- 
liams- Renault Formula One team for the 
last three Grands Prix this year. 

With Mansell alongside world-title 
chasing Damon Hill Williams is hoping to 
end the season on a high note. And Man- 
sell wants to be part of that. 

But beyond, the 4 1-y ear-old Briton is 
making no predictions. 

“Indy-car for the immediate future is 
definitely over,” said Mansell, in Portugal 
to test the WiBiams-Renault FW16 he mil 


“I know the boat perfectly.” the 37-year- 
old sailor said before leaving Charleston. 
“So I know better how to push it. I know 
its best abilities." 

The yacht, which she named Ecureuil 
Poitou-Charen tes 2 after its French spon- 
sors, a national bank and her region in 
west central France, is competing against 
seven other Class I yachts, the big 60- 
footers of the fleet 

And so how is it that this French wom- 
an, of medium height and build, has been 
able to compete successfully with men 


Appears 
on Page 15 

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MOVING 


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But for 1995, “You’ll have to be patient 
and wait and see." 

Mansell said he bad agreed to return to 


“By heading east, she followed the out- Ag* 


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cm the comer.’ 


Despite her large lead, Autissier was 
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“It is too premature to even try to an- dreaded more by an ocean racer than the 
swer that," he said, wildest storm. In a ship-to-shore message 

After winning the world Formula One Monday, Autissier was ago nizin g, 
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Indy-car racing with Lola-Fond. little distressing.’’ 


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20 San Francisco 
site 

23 Bridge support 
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a Blue Lady 
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» Eunpiciea 
iragedy 

30 Milieu (or EdUh 
Pial 

34 Search (or 

35 Corporate 
name in 
Chen, cals 

36 Welland Canal 
letminus 

37 Evening even! 
41 Performed 

badly 

44 Have some fa«r 

45 Prince Valiants 
firstborn 

46 Lasting 

miroducUon 

47 wnere Ainens is 

sa San Francisco 
siie 

ssFiasf. 

57 Gaelic Ireland 
55 Future star 
so Israeli airline 
60 Editor S notation 
si Hersey locale 
02 Kind ol swoop 
63 Miss Truenuan 
04 Ernie and 
otners 


9 Proportional 
<o Crowded 

11 - - da capo 

12 li may nave a 
head bul not a 
tail 

is Senno the 

boiiom 

21 Ultimatum word 

22 Patella s place 

27 One who sees 
red" 

28 Devastation 

29 Suit 10 

30 Hair raiser, 
perhaps 

31 Shampoo 
ingredient 

32 Set course 
sa Best Picture ol 

1977 
M Golfer 
SaNesieroe 

39 Hillary s 
conquest 

40 Home wrecker 

41 Refrigerator 
decoraiors 

42 Furies 

43 Rainier cover* 7 
46 Aunt of song 
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so Peace goaaess 
Si 60'S hairdos 
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53 Unoccupied 

54 Imprimatur 
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Piazfn by Manny KoMwahy 

©New Yorfc Times/ Edited bv tS'Ul Shorts. 


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Page 22 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1994 






vwS 


Your stomach's growling 


: ‘S~ *■*»-" 

<V ' j 


Nature’s calling 


Your flight's boarding 


Plenty of time to rrv 


ten calls 




WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Hgvm 

Amstenterr 

Ankara 

Mm 

Baicekma 

D U g ra* 

Betkn 

Biu&Mb 

Budaped 

Copenhagen 

Comb Dal Soi 

DK*n 

EdKmugll 

Ronton 

Framtfun 

Qaneva 

Hetarto 

Manfcui 

Las Fionas 

LMxm 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


S> FoWM urg 

Stocwmn 

SinntMuq 

Tjfcn 

Vorao* 

Warns 

Wann 

Zitocti 

Oceania 


Today 
High Law 
OF OF 
23/73 V *S 
I7.K B«6 
la/BB 13*5 
23/71 14/57 
31/70 1f»&1 
20*8 7/44 

16*1 7/44 

10/B4 7*44 

18*4 7/44 

13/55 7/44 

23/73 18*4 
16*1 8/40 

15*9 9/48 

23/71 B/48 

17*2 7/44 

I7/E3 B/48 

7/44 5*«1 

19*6 14/57 
28*3 21/70 
21/70 17*3 
18*4 11*3 
20*0 13/55 
20*8 10/50 
BM8 */39 
17*2 0/43 

21/70 13*8 
11*2 SMI 
20*8 17*2 
19*8 11/52 
16*1 7(44 

7/44 3/37 

22/71 9/48 

TAW 3/37 
B.’46 8/43 

10*4 A.ufi 
7/44 5.41 

21/70 11/52 
1 5*9 7/44 

16,59 7/44 

77.62 B-* 


Today Tomorrow 

Mgh Low W High Low W 
OF QT OF OF 

Bangkok 32*9 23/73 pc 31*8 24.75 sn 

Bagng 22/71 12/53 a 19*5 7M4 4i 

Hon] Kong 31*0 24/75 50/86 23/73 Mi 

Mania 32*9 26/78 I 31*8 20/79 I 

NawOaM 31*0 10*4 pc 31*8 15*1 I 

Seoul 23/73 8/46 s 24,75 11/53 t 

Shandn 23/73 18*1 pc 25/77 17/62 s 

Sfegapoie 3I*B 24775 ah 30*9 24/75 I 

Taipei 27*0 21/70 C 27*0 22, 7l ah 

Tokyo 25/77 18*4 s 25/77 17*2 a 


Jatstmam 


North America 

A storm will exit the mid- 
Atlantic coast Friday, allow- 
ing dry. pleasant weather 
from Washington, D.C., to 
Albany thla weekend. Nice 
weather wtll also prevail from 
Houston to Chicago end 
Detroit. Rain from Tropical 
Storm Rose will soak the 
Southwest and western Mm- 

iCO. 

Middle East 


Europe 

Much of Europe wflt be dry 
and pleasant Fnday Wo the 
weekend. London lo Paris 
and Munich will be partly 
sunny with the next several 
days with mild afternoons 
and coo ( nights. CoM weath- 
er wll remain north of Stock- 
holm end Moscow. Rome 
and Athens wffl have sunny, 
seasonable weather. 


Asia 

Japan will have mainly dry. 
seasonably warm weather 
this weekend. Hong Kong 
through Manila will also be 
warm the next several days 
with no more than a stray 
afternoon shower. Cold srr 
from Siberia will plunge 
southward through Mongols 
Friday, reaching Beijing Sat- 
urday night or Slmday. 


10*4 10/50 pc 19*4 13> 55 Ui 
21/70 14,57 1 27*0 15,50 , 


Today Tomorrow 

High Low W High Low 
OF OF OF OF 
Bnu 27*0 21/70 pc 26/79 21/70 

Cam 29*4 18*4 a 20® 18*4 

Ounrxus 27*0 14*7 pc 24/75 13*5 

JoiUMlCjn 27*0 17*2 PC 24/75 17*2 

Luxor jam 22/71 s 39/10210*4 

RryaOi 36*7 22.71 s 40/104 23/73 

Legend: s-sumy. pc-porVy cloudy, c-c/oudv. 
an-snwn. moo. W-weartwr AB maps, larac 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

W «gh Low W High Low W 

OF or OF OF 
Ml Burner, Aims 24/75 13*5 * 26/79 16-61 I 

i Caracas 29*4 20*8 pc 29*4 20 *8 Eh 

t Ijhb 18*4 16.61 pc 19*6 18*1 pc 

a Umooccy 22/71 12/53 pc 32.71 11*2 pc 

i HtoOBJanMiQ 26/79 1B/B4 9 26/79 20*8 PC 

i Sanrapo 24/75 u*2 s 26.79 10/50 pc 

Btvyhawas, Hhwdarslonns. Ham. sT-sixjw Hunks, 
rats and data prodded by Accu-Weadtor. he. © 1994 


Algwn 23/73 

CqxTnm 21/70 

Casablanca 25.79 

Harare 20*0 

Lagos 29*4 

NaM> 21/70 

Tine 28/79 


18*4 pc 24/75 18*4 s 

11*2 9 25/77 16*1 t 

16*1 pc 25/77 18*1 s 

BA* pc 23/73 9/48 a 

23773 pc 29*4 24/75 (h 

11/52 Sh 24/75 12/53 PC 

13/55 5 23/73 16*1 pi 


North America 

Ancnorego 6/43 < 

AHana 18*4 u 

Boston 18*4 ( 

Otago 18*4 ( 

Denver 16*1 1 

Doom 17*2 i 

Honolulu 29*4 Z 

Houston 28*2 II 

Los Angtfes 25/79 11 

Unit 31*8 2* 

Mneapote 17*2 1 

hbrerear 12/53 

Nassau 31/88 Z 

New York 19*6 I 


RcMm/ICK rile pbnui 

Nureyev scholarship established. 


T HE 1994 Right Livelihood Award has 
been awarded jointly to a Nigerian 
human-rights activist and self-help groups 
from India and Trinidad, the awards com- 
mittee announced Wednesday in Stock- 
holm. The award, started in 1980 by the 
Swedish-German writer Jakob von Uex- 
kufl to support individuals and organiza- 
tions doing practical work to solve prob- 
lems, is shared by Ken Saro-Whva of 
Nigeria and his organization, the Move- 
ment for the Survival of the Ogoni People: 
H. Sudarshan's Vivekananda Girijana 
Karyana Kendra of India, and Servol, or 
Service Volunteered for All, of Trinidad. 
□ 

Rudolf Nweyev’s dance foundation has 
established a scholarship at the School of 
American Ballet Jane Hermann, a mem- 
ber of the foundation's board and a long- 
time friend of the dancer, who died in 
January 1 993, said the first scholarships had 
been awarded to 18-year-old twins, Kyle 
and Kurt Froman of Fort Worth, Texas. 

□ 

A free-lance photographer has riled suit 
against the actor Suit Reynolds and his 
girlfriend, Pam Seals, claiming that the two 
obstructed his ability to earn a living. Rob- 


ert Cafrert says Reynolds and Seals abused 
the court-system by filing petitions for pro- 
tection against- him — petitions that, m any 
case, a Honda judge has rejected. 

□ 

The animal trainer Joan Embery has 
made hundreds of TV appearances with 
animals from hu mmin gbirds to dephaatik 
But Tumba the cheetah wasn’t so coopere 
tive. Tumba took a swipe at Embays face 
during the taping of Suzanne Somers’s 
show. The goodwill ambassador for Jhe 
Zoological Society of San Diego insisted 
on finishing the mow before drivihg-jaa 
hospital for several stitches. All in a day’s 
work. “He's a wild animal” die explained. 
“Wild animals react to things.” 

Four, drunken tramps swigged cham- 
pagmtvgorged on canapes and danced with 
celebrities at a lavish black-tie party for the 
opening in London of Walt Disney’s “The 
Lion King” before being* gected by bounc- 
ers. Sylvester Stallone, Elton John and the 
entrepreneur Richard Branson were among 
the guests who thought the. down-and- 
outers were guests in costume. Security 
guards became suspicions when the tramps 
started to stuff food in their coat pockets. 


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ART BUCHWALD 

AM r /kTftfkAnfif'6 


Visiting an 80- Year-Old Literary-Genius Gun-Nut 


or tneir runa-nusers. 

“Thanks for reminding me,” 
said Downey, who represents 
the National Association of 
Rich People. “I have to send a 
check to Senator Boom town for 
leading the fight against lobby- 
ing reforms. If it hadn’t been for 
his filibuster no lawmaker 
would ever be able to play golf 
at Pebble Beach again.” 

Zoik, of the TV Remote Con- 
trol Clicker industry, asked, 
“What do you think was the 
biggest accomplishment of the 
103d Congress?” 


Lotooe Restaurant Sold 

New York Times Sendee 

NEW YORK — AndrA 
Soltner, chef and owner of Lu-, 
tecc, the Manhattan restaurant 
that has epitomized French cui- 
sine for more than 30 years, has 
sold it to a company that primar- 
ily owns thane restaurants. 


be the ones to resort to gridlock 
and no one will ever pass any 
legislation. Congress will be- 
come an honoraiy body like the 
House of Lords in Britain,” 

*Td rather see that than a 
health bill,'' said Zoria. 

“Or a trade bill.” 

“Or a toxic waste bill.” 

“I don’t want to brag, bnt I 
have more senators in my pock- 
et right now than voted against 
the Brady Bin." 

“I have an e-mail connection 
with Senator Giles's office so 
that I can communicate with 
him at a moment's notice. He 
listens to me more than he does 
the Christian right.” 

Adams said, “We’re all 
blessed. We have our jobs, we 
have money to bum, and we 
associate with the most dedicat- 
ed public servants in America. 
I'm proud to call each and every 
one of them a friend — even at 
3 o'clock in the morning.” 


Dinner starts a little late, but it doesnt 


So, Bill, what would you do if you found 
yourself in the crossfire someday? “I'd blow 
'em away,” he shouts. “Become a great Ameri- 
can hero!” 

The weapons are examined and discussed a 
while and then they go back where they came 
from. A gun coward, you’re glad this part of the 
visit is over. And, no, there'll be no talk of 195 1 
and the night a drunken Burroughs tried to 
shoot a glass off his wife’s head and killed her 
instead. 

One of the Thursday night regulars goes to 
freshen up Burroughs's vodka and Coke while 
he fidgets on his chair by the window, constant- 
ly to uchin g the buttonholes on his jacket or 
reaching over to straighten the edge of the 
bedspread. 

Burroughs talks like an old gangster and 
loads us up with deadpan pronouncements: On 
Timing: “Once you’ve got a problem, it's too 
late to do anything about iL” God: “Something 
out there, yes; some supernatural entity.” The 
English: “If there ever was a sinking ship, it's 
the English and the English gentleman.” 


Author-painter William Burroughs in his Kansas lair amid some surplus art works. 


Words: “Strike the word ‘should’ from your 
vocabulary." Colette: “She takes you right 
there." 

Right there happens to be right here in the 
middle of America, where Burroughs has lived 
in Lawrence, a university town and Midwest 
mecca for hipsters then and now, since the early 
1980s. While be seldom goes out anymore, he's 
still writing: Coming soon will be “The Book of 
Dreams.” But the collapse of the an market has 
left him with a surplus of works and a waning 
interest in producing more. 

The evening light seems to throw the room 
back into 1927 when the house, a two-bedroom 
Montgomery Ward kit, was built. Burroughs 
sips his drink. The talk slows. 

Time for a tour of the house. First, of the 
writing room up front, where there is a desk 
with a Smith-Corona typewriter and manu- 
script-in-process next to it, and a life-sized 
Mugwump from “The Naked Lunch" movie at 
the end of a neatly made guest bed. Someone 
asks how it is to sleep in there with that bug- 


looking, addicti ve-j trice-spurting Mugwump. 
But Burroughs is gone. 

For it’s time to feed the fish. Same time every 
day. We cut through the kitchen: Mind the cat 
food! There are six small aluminum trays on 
the floor, carefolly placed for each kitty. We cut 
through the maze and out onto the back porch. 
Here ties a jumbled pile of Burroughs paint- 
ings. The old man is out by a fish pond shaking 
a canister of food, as if to call them near, and 
chucking out pellets. If there ever was a fish 
pond deserving of the name, Burroughs has it: 
mossy, dark and deep, with papjrrus and lotus 
flowers. The goldfish do a feeding frenzy as 
Burroughs tosses more peDets onto the water, 
his long, waxy face lighting up. 

You’re relaxed here, and wander around. 
One of the other guests takes you into the 
basement, which is empty except for a safe the 
size of an icebox containing Burroughs’s gun 
collection. To one side is a long, insulated tube 
on a stand, a homemade silencer for shooting 
down there. The air is clammy. 


matter. Appetites tonight arenoge ana wrew 

goes down amid loud praise. After all, deocm- 

ing, stuffing and tying up a chicken marolinati 

been no easy feat Ultra-thin slicing was the 
trick on the potatoes — “My compliments to 
Grandma!" Bat it’s the raspberry couhs onthe 
ice cream that dmehes the mcaL You t hink 
lack to how Burroughs explained the title Tsa- 
ked Lunch": “A frozen, moment when evayone 
sees what is on the end of every fork." 

Plates are carried away and Burroughs leans 
far bade into his days as an exterminator. 
Question: Where do bedbugs make thdriwsts? 
You’d never guess it: in the comers of the 
cefling. We all lookup. Then: There once wasa 
lady who loved her bedbugs so muc h that we 
had to drag her out kicking and scar eaming 
before spraying. She was literally in love with 
those suckere. The joke’s on somebody — or is 
it? 

Burroughs doodles on a sin? of paper a wh ile, 
then riffles one of his sdf-defense magazines, 
reads aloud an ad about some special skunk-oil 
spray, 100 times nmrc powerful than real skunk 

juice. At one point, he goes and fetches a recent 
gift a superb hunting knife. We pass it around. 
A fine knife, indeed. There is no tcfl m g how 
many there are in the house. You don’t fed the 
sli gh test fear, though: after all, this isn’t the 
night somebody brought over a collection of 
hi ghly poisonous snakes and let them crawl 
around on the floor. 

No, tonight it’s just Burroughs and bis cats. 
Did I know raccoons get in through the kitty 
door to eat the catfood at night? He shoos Chem 
out with a cane. Why not just lock the fatty 
door? No way. Cats have special needs. You 
dare not say, With all these guns, why not just 
shoot the damn raccoons? 

It is only about 8:30, but Burroughs is start- 
ing to fade. Time to go and let the man rest 
Lovely to see you, thanks, come again, my 
pleasure, good night. 

The perfect gentleman sees us out, and from 
the small white porch, waves good-bye. An 
ordinary old man deep in the heart of America 
standing under a bright light. Only for a sec- 
ond, though: With a sudden blast at one of the 
cats that's just come up — “There you are, you 
old bitch” — be turns to go in. 

But wait Something is wrong with the storm 
door. W illiam Burroughs — Father of the Mug- 
wumps, Commander of the French Order of 
Arts and Letters — can’t get into his own 
house. 

“Come back here! Hey!" 

We go bade. Get it opened.