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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Friday, October 14, 1994 


No. 34,719 


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The brokers of the Protestant cease-fire, including the paramilitary leader. Gusty Spence, center, after announcing an end to 


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"operational hostilities" Thursday. 


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Ulster Protestants Call a Cease-Fire of Their Own 


By John Darnton 

tfe*> York Tuna Serna 

. BELFAST — Hope for peace in Northern Ireland 100 k 
a giant stride ahead Thursday as Protestant gunmen 
responded to the six-week-old cease-fire of the Irish 
Republican Army by declaring their own cease-fire. 

- The Protestant terrorist groups pledged to ‘"universally 
cease all operationalhostilities^ as of midnight Thursday. 
The duration of the cease-fire, a communique said, will 
be “completely .dependent* upon bow long the IRA 

v •' ■• 

Tbfcstep was^fmtbex brMkthronghin steps to end the 
sectarian waifftre .ftarharWiadced the province for 25 
years. .-• , • 

It meant that for the* first time, tV heavdy-aimed 


paramilitaries on both sides of the religious divide have 
said they were stopping fighting, not for short-term 
tactical reasons but to bring about negotiations and a 
democratic solution. 

It does not, however, mean that peace is guaranteed. 
That would come only with a final settlement, and one 
has yet to be proposed that would square the desires of 
950,000 Protestants, almost all of whom want to remain 
part of Britain, with those of 650,000 Catholics, many of 
whom yearn for union with Ireland. 

Thursday^ announcement was greeted warmly by 
‘ most politicians on both sides of the Iran Sea. 

Prime Minister Albert Reynolds of Ireland saw it as 
“the dawn of a new era.” John Hume, a Catholic politi- 
cian from Northern Ireland who played an important 


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U.S. and Israel 
Pressure Arafat 
On Kidnapping 

By Clyde Haberman 

New York Tbna Senkx 

JERUSALEM — The United States 
joined Israel on Thursday in applying in- 
tense pressure on Yasser Arafat to make 
sore that a kidnapped Israeli soldier is 
delivered safely fran Islamic radicals who 
idxreaten to kill him anytime after Friday 
'night. 

• T| Tn dqrHninR the soldier's dual American 
and Israeli citizenship, U.S. offic i als led by 
Secretary of State warren M. Christopher 
phoned Mr. Arafat several times and 
warned hhn that he was responsible for 
ending the crisis since he was in charge of 
the autonomous Gaza Strip. 

• The United States thus gave full support 
tp Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who 


i y. 




Kiosk 


Kohl Makes Plea 
For Big Turnout 

FRANKFURT (Reuters) — Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl, mating his final cam- 
paign speech in Western Germany be- 
fore Sunday’s general election, urged his 
supporters on Thursday not to waste a 
single vote. 

We need every vote," he said at a 
rally here. “We in the Christian Demo- 
cratic Union have no votes to give away 
and none to lose.” 

The CDU was cautiously optimistic at 
the end of the campaign as party strate- 
gists hoped for a strong tumour by sup- 
porters to secure a fourth four-year term 
for Mr. Kohl’s center-right coalition. 


Related article, Page 2. 



Book Review 


page 10 . 


PANAMA BOUND — Lieutenant General Raoul C£dras, with Ms family 
at the Port-au-Prince airport on Thursday, on his way into exile. Page 3. 


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that the abducted serviceman, 
Nahshon Waxman, 20, is being 

Xaomewhere in Gaza by armed radicals 

of the Hamas Islanxic group. 

. With American backing. Mr. Rabm also 
has b mke n off peace talks with Mr. A ra- 
fat’s Palestine Liberation Organization 
and bas implied that existing agreements 
could be suspended if Corporal Waxman 
was lolled. 

•' Reacting to the pressure, the Palestinian 
police under Mr. Arafat’s control raided 
houses overnight across the coastal strip 
and arrested some 200 Hamas militants, 
some said, to belong to the 

^But T^Sc ppenfy defied the 
PLO, accuang it i* leaflets of doing Isra- 
el’s “dirty work” and renewing its threat to 
kill the soldier after its deadline of 9 P.M. 
See ARAFAT, Page 10 


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Lebanon ...USSl Jo U.S. MH. (Eur.l 11.10 


Japanese Writer Is Awarded Nobel Prize 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tima Serriee 

TOKYO — The Swedish Academy announced Thursday that 
Kenzaburo Oe, a Japanese intellectual known for his powerful 
accounts erf the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and his struggle to 
come to terms with a mentally handicapped son, has been 
awarded the 1994 Nobel Prize in literature. 

Mr. Oe, 59, is just the second Japanese writer to have received 
the coveted award, which was announced in Stockholm. 

He follows Yasunari Kawabata, who received the honor in 
1968. But while Mr. Kawabata generally explored traditional 
Japanese themes with a delicate writing style, Mr. Oe has written 
politically charged tales filled with a sense of anger and betrayal, 
nke the post-war generation he has come to represent 

Mr. Oe came of age under the American occupation after 


Iraq Offers to 
Its Claim on 




Moscow- Dagnaaa uemmmiisions 
End to UN Sanctions in 6 Months 


role in getting the peace initiative off the ground, was 
equally enthusiastic about “a very good day for the 
people of Northern Ireland.” 

But Prime Minister John Major of Britain tinged his 
favorable comments, in which he called the cease-fire 
“unalloyed good news,” with supreme caution. “We must 
analyze it and consider it and then carefully decide with 
realism what is the way forward," be said. 

The British government has not yet fully accepted as 
genuine thnSepL 1 cease-fire by the IRA because it is not 
satisfied, that the cease-fire is permanent. Until such a 
puiclainaticm is made. Mi. Major says, the clock will not 
start licking' to count off a good-faith period of up to 

See ULSTER, Page 10 


CampMty Our Staff From Dispatches 

BAGHDAD — Saddam Hussein of- 
fered Thursday to recognize Kuwait as a 
sovereign state if the United Nations 
promised to ease its embargo after six 
months. 

The offer came in a joint lraqi-Russian 
statement issued after a meeting here be- 
tween Mr. Saddam and Foreign Minister 
Andrei Kozyrev of Russia. 

There was no immediate official reac- 
tion from the United States, which in a 
week has dispatched tens of thousands of 
troops and scores of warplanes to Kuwait 
to counter an Iraqi military buildup near 
the border with Kuwait 

But CNN reported from Washington 
and the United Nations that the first reac- 
tion was extremely skeptical. 

“Iraq has a whole host of resolutions to 
comply with,” a U.S. official said. “It can- 
not choose 4 la carte what it wants to 
comply with.” 

There was also another complication 
Thursday evening as U.S. intelligence de- 
tected that three Iraqi combat brigades 
had halted their withdrawal from near the 
Kuwaiti border. As much as one of two 
Iraqi divisions stopped about 150 kilome- 
ters (100 miles) northwest, and tanks dug 
in in defensive battle positions, U.S. de- 
fense officials said. 

The Rnssian-iraqi statement said, “Iraq 
confirms its readiness to solve the issue of 
recognizing Kuwait’s sovereignty and bor- 
ders as decreed by Security Council Reso- 
lution 833 in a positive manner.” 

“Russia will support following Iraq's 
formal recognition of Kuwait the specify- 
ing of the formal start of the formal opera- 
tion of die long-term monitoring system 
according to Security Council Resolution 
715," it said. 

Washington has said in tile past that 
sanctions would not be lifted until Iraq 
complied with resolutions on Kuwait's 
borders as well as resolutions on Bagh- 
dad’s weapons of mass destruction, threat 
of minorities, support of terrorism and 
reparations Tor the Gulf War. 

The United States is likely to view this 
latest gambit as an effort to drive a wedge 
between it and Britain, both of which have 
taken a hard line against Iraq, and also 
between the United States and France, 
China and Russia, which have been more 
interested in seeing sanctions removed. 

Some U.S. experts argue that Mr. Sad- 
dam will never keep his promises and that 
even after sanctions are lifted his behavior 
will be threatening to his neighbors and the 
United States. 

Mr. Kozyrev was in Baghdad to try to 
work out an agreement to defuse tension 
between Iraq and the West. Mr. Saddam's 
offer echoed a similar statement made by 
his ambassador to the United Nations on 
Wednesday. 

Russia said it would support a six- 
month test period for the UN system in- 

See GULF, Page 10 


Swiss Find 
Remains of 
Sect Leader 


By Alan Riding 

Ncr York Ttmn Senior 

GENEVA — One week after 48 
members of a doomsday sect were 
found dead in two Swiss villages, in- 
vestigators said Thursday that they 
had identified the group's spiritual 
leader among the victims, reinforcing 
first impressions that he may have 
organized a ritualistic collective sui- 
cide. 

Only 24 hours earlier, the police 
said they were still hunting for Luc 
Jouret, who founded the Solar Tradi- 
tion in 1984, on suspicion ofpremedi- 
tated homicide and arson. The police 
had also issued an arrest warrant Fri- 
day for Dr. Jouret’s chief associate. 
Joseph di Mambro, but his body was 
found Sunday. 

Now. with the identification of Dr. 
Jouret’s body, investigators have had 
to abandon the idea that he arranged 
the deaths to appear like suicide in 
order to flee with the sect’s consider- 
able funds. Rather, Dr. Jouret. a 46- 
year-old Belgian homeopathic physi- 
cian, appears to have believed his own 
preachings that the end of the world 
was near. 

This view has been reinforced by- 
documents sent anonymously to 
many newspapers in which the 
group’s derision to die was explained 
in lengthy, esoteric terms. One docu- 
ment, entitled ‘Transit for the Fu- 
ture,” said the earth would soon suffer 
the fate of Sodom and Gomorrah. 

The documents were mailed a few 
hours after the bodies were found, on 
OcL 5, but a lawyer for a young sect 
member. Patrick Vuamet, said Thurs- 
day that on the previous day Mr. di 
Mambro gave Mr. Vuainet a batch of 
sealed and addressed envelopes to 
mail. They included an envelope in 
which the passports of Mr. di Mam- 
bro and his wife were sent to France's 
interior minister, Charles Pasqua. 

Reinforcing the notion that every- 
thing was carefully planned, the bod- 
ies of five people linked to the sect 
were found last week in a burned-out 
house owned by Mr. di Mambro in 
Morin Heights, Quebec. The police 
now believe that three of these victims 
were murdered by a man whose body 

See CULT, Page 10 


East Asians Scold Europe 
For Incredible Arrogance 9 


Japan’s shattering defeat in World War II and was recognized as 
a leading writer while still a university student in the late 1950s. 
While some authors found nothing but despair in those bleak 
days, Mr. Oe’s leftist political essays, short stories and lyrically 
written novels revolve around what critics generally describe as a 
core of hope and courage mixed with bitter humor. 

In perhaps his most famous novel, “A Personal Matter," 
written in 1964, the pro lagan ist plots the murder of his infant 
son, who is born with severe brain damage, but finally realizes he 
must take responsibility for the child and embraces him. The 
influences on Mr. Oe's complex art range from Jean-Paul Sartre 
to Huckleberry Finn. 

The Swedish Academy noted the “poetic force” of Mr. Oe’s 
works, saying he “creates an imagined world where life and myth 

See NOBEL, Page 10 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Europe should put 
aside “arrogant" attitudes and fear of a 
competitive challenge from East Asia, the 
region's leaders said Thursday. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad 
of Malaysia said that most of Europe still 
had to get rid of an attitude that “some will 
call incredible arrogance." 

“The age of hegemony has not yet quite 
passed,” he said. “It should die away. We 
should bury it.” 

Mr. Mahathir made his comments at a 
meeting of top officials and business exec- 
utives from Asia and Europe. And despite 
some harsh rhetoric, East Asian leaders 
urged Europe to take advantage of the 
region’s surging economic growth by in- 
creasing trade and investment. 

While countries in the European Union 
have substantially increased trade with 
East Asia in recent years, they have lagged 
in investment, giving Japan and the United 
States a dominant position. 

This worries many Asian leaders, who 


want to avoid becoming dependent on any 
major economic power or region. 

Lee Kuan Yew. Singapore’s senior min- 
ister, said that if Europe added its econom- 
ic weight to that of Japan and the United 
States, East Asia would haw more free- 
dom to maneuver. 

“A tripod is better than a bipod," he 
said. “If we have only a predominance of 
Americans and Japanese, there isn't the 
same comfort as when you have three ma- 
jor sources of capital, technology, exper- 
tise and markets. 

Noting that the World Bank had esti- 
mated that half the growth in the global 
economy in the next six years would come 
from East Asia alone, the European Com- 
mission recently called on policy-makers 
and businesses in Europe to give Asia a far 
higher emphasis and tap its booming mar- 
kets. 

EU exports to Asia reached 93 billion 
European Currency Units ($75 billion) in 
1993, from 15 billion Ecus in 1980. 

But the Union's relative share of foreign 
direct investment in the region declined 

See ASIA, Pag© 10 



Americans Are Eating More Broccoli (Now, Did You Know That?) 


By Steven A. Holmes 

New York Times Sernce 

WASHINGTON — As a people. Americans are 
living longer, smoking less, spending more money on 
books, newspapers and magazines. Fewer of them are 
owning guns, and they are less likdy to get a divorce 
and more Kkely to belong to a church. They are even 
eating more broccoli. 

These are some of the highlights of the 1 994 Statisti- 
cal Abstract of the United States, a potpourri of 
factoids compiled by the Census Bureau. The report, 
published annually since 1878, provides a snapshot of 
change* in American life during 20 or 30 years or 
more. 

Coming in a political season in which candidates of 
both the left and the right are focusing on America’s 
shortcomings, it is a portrait of a nation that is 
remarkably healthy. 


“You look around and look through the Abstract 
and see what we own, what we've purchased, the size 
of our houses — on those issues there is clear and 
steady progress,” said Ben J. Wattenberg, whose book, 
The Good News Is the Bad News Is Wrong,” asserts 
that the nation is in relatively good shape. “The idea 
that everything stinks, and the country is stagnant or 
in decline, is mostly bunk." 

While many of the thousands of tables contained in 
the report present an overall rosy picture of the United 
States, others depict significant problems and a 
marked polarization between the comfortable lives of 
most people and the despair of those at the bottom. 

Violent crime rates have remained steadily high, 
and the number of children bom out of wedlock has 
increased by more than 200 percent from 1970 to 
1991. Moreover, in what some economists and politi- 
cians say accounts in part for the sullen mood of the 


electorate in a time of relative peace and prosperity, 
average hourly earnings and average weekly earnings 
as measured m constant 1982 dollars declined from 
1980 to 1993. 

But on some of the most basic measures of well- 
being, the news is good. 

The report indicates that Americans bom in 1992 
will have an average life expectancy of 75.7 years, up 
from 70.8 years for those bom in 1970. And infant 
mortality dropped to 8.5 per 1,000 live births in 1992, 
from 20 per 1,000 live births in 1970. 

Per capita income measured in constant 1987 dol- 
lars increased to $16^66 in 1993 from $13,922 in 1980, 
and disposable income rose by nearly $2,300 in that 
same period when inflation is taken into consider- 
ation. 

The report also depicts a nation whose level of 
educational attainment is higher than it has ever been; 


21.9 percent of Americans had completed four years 
of college in 1993, compared with 7.7 percent in 1960. 

Perhaps as a remit of the increasing level of educa- 
tion, the report indicates that the movement toward a 
less destructive lifestyle has taken hold. In 1974, for 
example, about half of those 12 to 17years of age said 
they had tried cigarettes and alcohol. By 1992, those in 
the same age group who said they had tried smoking 
had dropped to 33.7 percent, while those saying they 
had sampled alcohol had declined to 39.3 percent. 

Similarly, the Abstract indicates that Americans’ 
consumption of red meat and eggs — two foods 
associ ated with stroke and heart disease — decreased 
markedly from 1970 to 1992. 

Even broccoli, which nutritionists have long praised 
and former President George Bush has disparaged. 

See U.S JL, Page 10 


*■* 

& -*• ‘ 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 


Germany’s Greens Fancy the Kingmaker Role 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Times Service 

BERLIN — - Germany’s envi- 
ronmentalist Green Party, 
which has languished for years 
on the fringes of power, is rid- 
ing a wave of success, and its 
leaders, hope to become king- 
makers in Bonn after Sunday's 
elections. 

For years the Greens relished 
their role as the joker in Ger- 
man politics, provocative and 
entertaining but rarely taken se- 
riously. They believed there was 
something inherently immoral 
in seeking or holding power. 

But the shape of German 
politics has changed with the 
end of the Cold War, and the 
Greens have also changed. 
Their new leaders are not only 
more moderate than a decade 
ago, but unabashedly hungry 


for power, 
voters hi 


Voters have responded favor- 
ably to the Greens’ new prag- 
matism. PoQs suggest that the 
party will emerge from Sun- 
day’s election as Germany’s 
thud strongest political force. 

There is even a chance that 
the Greens could enter a gov- 
erning coalition in Bonn for the 
first time. If they and the Social 
Democrats together win a ma- 
jority of parliamentary seats on 
Sunday, unlikely but not im- 
possible, they could form a 
“red-green” government that 
would mark a sharp break from 
the conservative 12-year rule of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl. 

But eveu if the Greens fail to 
reach that goal, Sunday’s elec- 
tion will almost certainly make 
them a more important factor 
in German politics than before. 

At their most recent conven- 
tion, the Greens reaffirmed 
their support for strong envi- 
ronmental laws and women’s 
rights. But they also clung to 
some of the radical foreign poli- 
cy positions that have cost them 
votes, calling for sharp cuts in 



Ruble Crash 
Renews Fear 
For Reform 
In Russia 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Sri Lanka Talks Held in Tamil Town 


JAFFNA Sri Lanka (Reuters) — Government arid Tama 
negotiators on Thursday held their fust peace talks in this Tama 


town. 


Previous talks about ending the 1 1-year civil war, m winch more & 
than 30.000 people have been killed, were held other in the Sn 
t an Iran capital of Colombo or in neighboring India. 

“We discussed how to overcome economic problems and open a 
land route to transport food and other essentials to u» Jaffna 
Peninsula,” Karikalan, a leader of the Tamil rebel delegation, told 
reporters during a break in the meeting. 



By Fred Hiatt 

IVashinpon Post Service 

MOSCOW — President Bo- 
ris N. Yeltsin and his Russian 

am patois are looking every- (tfi Killed in Crash of Iranian Plane 

where for scapegoats m this w 

week’s ruble crash, from the 
hapless acting finance minister 

to Western saboteurs. reported Thursday. . 

But the currency’s plunge The Assouan Airlines plane was en route to Tehran when it 


vMs a 


4 * 


NICOSIA ( AP) — An Iranian plane crashed in the mountains 
of central Iran, killing all 66 people on board, Tehran radio 


Moron Alhmuedl/Agmce FrartX- Prose 

Two cows, very likely supporters of the Green Party, find nourishment in consuming a Helmut Kohl poster in Germany. 


military spending, withdrawal 
from the 


: North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization and a ban on Ger- 
man participation in United 
Nations peacekeeping missions. 

The party’s top leaders, how- 
ever. say they reject those posi- 
tions. 

“People know that our con- 
ventions are a bit nutty,” said 


the East complain that their is- 
sues and concerns have been 
ignored in the current cam- 
paign. 

Despite this split, party lead- 
ers sense the potential for a 


breakthrough Sunday. The par- 
Joshka 


Antje Vollmer, a party leader. 
“Things will be different if we 


become responsible for helping 
to govern the country." 

The Greens have a reputation 
for incessant internal bickering. 
Now that its moderate leaders 
have defeated the radicals, the 
party is facing a new split, this 
time between the eastern and 
western parts of Germany. 

Most of the party’s support is 
in the West, and members from 


t/s best-known figure, 

Fischer, has been crisscrossing 
the country appealing for votes. 

The 46-year-old Mr. Fischer 
urges Germans to reject Mr. 
Kohl, whom he calls “a man of 
the past.” He also pledges envi- 
ronmental reform and appeals 
for racial tolerance. 

Mr. Fischer's history reflects 
that of his party. He is a former 
taxi driver who two decades ago 
was a member of a radical 
gronp called Revolutionary 
Struggle. 

He served in Parliament in 


the 1980s, but was not able to 
build a career in Bonn because 
of the Green Party's rotation 
policy, which requires most of 
the party’s elected officials to 
leave office after one term. Lat- 
er, after the Greens became part 
of the state government in Hes- 
se, he was named environment 
minister, a post he still bolds. 

He has a credible record in 
Hesse, and at least some of 
those who scorned him and his 
comrades a decade ago can now 
imagin e him as a senior official 
in Bonn. 

Mr. Fischer has asserted that 
the Greens will enter a coalition 
with the Social Democrats only 
if the Social Democrats agree to 
close Germany’s nuclear power 
plants and impose a highway 
speed limit 


Even if the Greens do not 
form part of the next govern- 
ment they will in all likelihood 
press for these goals. 

“I was never a Marxist al- 
though I have always felt myself 
part of the anarchist tradition,” 
Mr. Fischer said in an inter- 
view. “Utopian thinking can be 
fatal. Stalinism would have 
been impossible without the 
ideal of utopia, because you 
need to have an unbelievable 
moral certainty in order to kill 
people in the name of creating a 
better world.” 

The same moderation that 
has given him a political base, 
however, has earned him the 


fundamental question than who 
will get the sack next The 
week’s turbulence has raised 
doubts once again about wheth- 
er the transition from commu- 
nism to a free market can be 
gradual and relatively painless, 
as Mr. Yeltsin and his govern- 
ment have hoped for most of 
the past year. 

The events also' have high- 
lighted the great uncertainty in 
Russia’s future: whether such 
undeniably positive trends as 
awakening entrepreneurship 
and personal initiative can out- 


searchers found the 

wreckage of the Fokkcr F-28 1000 Thursday in the Kankas 
mountains near Natanz, 100 kilometers (60 miles) north of Isfa- 
han. 


w* | 

•- At#- ; 
- •***# 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


ran such negative ones as bu- 
reaucratic corruption and pop- 
ular resentment. Can Russia’s 
sapling democracy and free 


Tokyo Paper Giles Illegal Donations 

TOKYO (Reuters) — Forty-six members of Japan's Mum 
took illegal donations from the construction industry during 
elections m July 1993, a newspaper reported on Thursday. 

Asahi Shimbun, in its lead stray, said ^legislators. including 
Transportation Minister Shrraika Kama ana a top opposition 
figure, Ichiro Ozawa, violated laws that forbid politicians to 
receive campaign funds from companies with government con- 
tracts. Most of the legislators contacted by the newspaper attrib- t 
uted the problem to bookkeeping errors or lack of awareness that 
the donations in question were illegal. 

The newspaper said campaign-fund documents revealed that 
100 companies that were engaged in government business gave a 
total of 62 million yen ($620,000) to the 46 politicians. Its list of 
aitff gaH violators included many of the leading lights of the power- 
sharing Liberal Democratic Party and a handful of figures from 
conservative opposition groups. 


• • 


1 


- - M* 

. : . o 


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scorn of many in his own party, 
to H" 


T have to live with the fact,” 
he shrugged, “that 85 percent of 
the Greens think fm a jerk.” 


Scientology Movement Assailed by German Leaders 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tuna Service 

BONN — Leading members of the 
German government and opposition 
parties have attacked the American- 
based Scientology movement as a dan- 
ger to democracy, and called on the next 
government to ban iL 

The interior ministers of the 16 Ger- 
man states last spring called Scientology 
“an organization that combines de- 
ments of business crime and psychologi- 
cal tenor against its own members with 
economic activities and sectarian traits, 
under the protective cover of a religious 
group.” 

On Tuesday, Renate Rennebach, a 
member of Parliament from the opposi- 
tion Social Democratic Party, asserted 
that Scientology was not a religion but a 
conspiratorial movement with global 
political aims. 

“At present Scientology is misusing 
international concern about right-wing 


radical attacks in the Federal Republic 
to cause serious damage to the reputa- 
tion of the country abroad, with an ad- 
vertising campaign in influential Ameri- 
can newspapers,** 


Mrs. Rennebach said. 


Full-page advertisements paid for by 
the British-based International Associa- 


tion of Scientologists appeared in The 
The Washu 


New York Times and The Washington 
Post last month. The advertisements re- 
counted the rise Of militant, right-wing 
violence against foreign asylum- seekers 
anH immigr ants in Germany since unifi- 
cation four years ago and said that “fas- 
cism is on the rise a g ain, condoned and 
encouraged by the German govern- 
ment.” 


Labor Minister Norbert Bluem de- 
nounced the advertisements Wednesday 
as a campaign of defamation against the 
German government, which has strong- 
ly condemned the attacks against for- 
eigners and since 1992 has outlawed five 


neo-Nazi parties that it maintained had 
inspired the attacks. 

“Scientology is not a church or a reli- 
gious organization.” Mr. Bluem said. 
“Scientology is a machine for manipu- 
lating human beings.” 

Asserting that the movement’s real 
aims were political and transcended na- 
tional boundaries, Mrs. Rennebach, her 
party’s spokesman on sects, said the new 
German federal government that will be 
elected on Sunday should put the group 
under surveillance. 

With an estimated two million mem- 
bers in Germany alone, Scientology has 
aroused considerable controversy since 
it first came here in 1970. It has been the 
focus of at least six books denouncing it 
for defrauding adherents of their sav- 
ings, threatening opponents with vio- 
lence and seeking to infiltrate compa- 
nies and entire branches of commerce, 
such as commercial real estate, in major 
German cities. 


Ursula Cabertha, who heads a depart- 
ment of the Hamburg state Ministry of 
the Interior that is devoted exclusively 
to dealing with complaints about Scien- 
tology, supported Mrs. Rennebach’s call 
to outlaw the movement here and said 
the Hamburg authorities would pursue 
legal action against it all the way to the 
German supreme court. 

“Scientology is by far the most dan- 
gerous and the most widespread of these 
psycho-technical groups.” she said. 

Scientologist documents made avail- 
able by Mrs. Rennebach Wednesday in- 
cluded one titled “Call-to-Arms Germa- 
ny,” which complained of bomb threats 
and violence against Scientology 
churches. “We can prove beyond any 
doubt that this is the exact same pattern 
which was used to start the hate cam- 
paign against the Jewish people in 
1935,” said the document, signed by 
Klaus Buchele, from the group's office 
of special affairs. 


Channel Tunnel: Visionary Idea, but Drab Reality 


By John Damton 

New York Tima Service 

FOLKESTONE, England — 
For a project that has stirred 
tiie imagination of daydream- 
ing engineers and otter arm- 
chair visionaries for almost two 
centuries, the opening of the 
Channel Tunnel has been some- 
thing of an anticlimax. 

It has happened so gradually 
that it may be hard for histori- 
ans to pinpoint the exact mo- 
ment when Britain became 
joined, psychologically, to the 
mainland. Significantly, the 
mainland is still called “Eu- 
rope” here, as if Britain were a 
continent apart, which of 
course in many ways it is. 

The tunnel trip itself, a 35- 


halfway along the 50-kilometer 


trip on an exploratory test run. 
iboveT 


minute journey on a specially 
g through 


designed train, hurtling t 
darkness at 145 kilometers an 
hour, (90 miles an hour) is un- 
nervingly smooth and unevent- 
ful. That is just what Eurotun- 
nel, the outfit that operates the 
trains, wants it to be. 

“So far, so good,” said Judy 
Campbell, cautiously. She was 


Above her was the metal skin of 
the train, the prefabricated con- 
crete lining of the tunnel, about 
45 metexs of chalk marl seabed, 
and the English Chann el. 

“I was skeptical. I don’t like 
tunnels, claustrophobia and all 
that But this is not too bad.” 
She stood with her husband, 
Donald, and her daughter, Hel- 
en, next to their parked car in- 
side a gray-and-white double- 
decker train carriage. 

The upper section where they 
were riding was a little more 
than two meters in height. It 
had yellow handrails, a narrow 
toilet, surveillance cameras, an 
alarm button, nine small win- 
dows, and red electric signs 
with messages like “arrival 
soon” in three languages. 

“It’s just like being in a 
tube,” ventured Helen, 25. 


The family got an early 
future because 


glimpse of the 
Mr. Campbell, a project engi- 
neer from Essex, invested in 
Eurotunnel and then signed up 


for one of the many precom- 
mercial trial runs called “The 
Overture.” 

He pronounced himself hap- 
py about the trip, though not so 
happy about the shares he 
bought years ago at £12 each, or 
$19 at current rates. A long his- 
tory of delays, cost overruns, 
refinancings and negative press 
coverage has sent the stock to a 
low of 250 pence, or about $4. 

(The shares were under new 
pressure Thursday after reports 
that the company will miss its 
revenue targets and may need 
to raise more funds in the short- 
to-medium term, Agence 
Francc-Presse reported.} 

Fans of the C hann el Tunnel 
can pile on the superlatives. It is 
the first link between Britain 
and mainland Europe since the 
Ice Age, the largest civil engi- 
neering project ever undertaken 
by private enterprise, the long- 
est submarine tunnel in the 
world. But that sense of breath- 
lessness has not carried over to 
the events on the ground, or 
rather, under the ground. 


What was planned as a head- 
line-grabbing ribbon-cutting 
ceremony last May — when 
Queen Elizabeth II and Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand rode 
trains back and forth to click 
champagne glasses on both 
sides — fizzled because the tun- 
nel was not ready for commer- 
cial service. It was like christen- 
ing a slick new ocean liner only 
to watch it glide down the slip 
and disappear into dry dock 
But now the tunnel is ready. 
There are two separate services. 


both expected to be operational 
id-Noven ' 


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“the original'' 

Just tell the taxi driver, 
"Sank too doc not>"® 

5, rue Daunou Paris (Op&ra) 
TuL ( 1 | 4261 . 71.14 


ask the butter... 


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ZyctfM 

Win imnt ri ji> imu it it it. 


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by mid-November. 

One is the passenger service 
on the high-speed Eurostar line, 
running between London and 
Paris in three hours and Lon- 
don and Brussels, 15 minutes 
longer. The other is a shuttle 
service for cars and their pas- 
sengers between Folkestone 
and Calais. Cars cannot drive 
through the tunnel. 

Fares have not yet been an- 
nounced for the next season, 
though the price for Eurostar is 
expected to be competitive with 
the airlines and the cost for the 
cars will be roughly close to 
what the femes charge. 

The Eurostar trains have 
been plying the tracks between 
the capitals since August, carry- 
ing staff members. The car ser- 
vice. called by the macaronic Le 
Shuttle — the pure French ver- 
sion, La Navette, lost out — has 


been undo- way for sharehold- 
ers and bigwigs for some time. 

The freight service, in which 
truck drivers load their rigs 
onto specially designed steel- 
ribbed railroad cars and then 
gather in a forward cabin for a 
quick hot meal, has been up and 
running since July. 

British truck drivers have 
complained about the high 
quality of the Continental cui- 
sine, so Eurotunnel is planning 
to introduce what its public af- 
fairs department calls “bad 
food, consisting of greasy chips 
and steak and kidney pies.” 

About 350 trucks a day 
choose the train shuttle over the 
ferries. 

On the British side cars drive 
aboard double-decker train car- 
riages. Once the cars are loaded 
— five to a carriage — shutters 
descend to separate carriages 
and act as fire barriers. They 
have doors so that, in theory, a 
passenger can wander the 
length of the train, though there 
is liLtie incentive to do so. 

The good news is that it is 
over so quickly, a recent trip 
took 41 minutes one way and 38 
minutes the other. The bad 
news is that one travels the en- 
tire journey, from the landward 
side of Castle HiH to the pylon- 
crossed plain of Pas-de-Calais, 
without spotting a single drop 
of water. 


aHst dictatorship? 

By chang in g rules on the ex- 
change market 
to sell dollars, the 
managed Thursday to push the 
ruble dramatically back up, 
with its value rising, from about 
3,700 to about 3,000 to the dol- 
lar. But traders raid they expect 
the ruble to slowly lose value 
be ginning Friday or next week. 
The central bank’s dollar re- 
serves have fallen from an esti- 
mated $7 billion this summer to 
$2.45 bQlion on OcL 1 to $1.8 
billion on Thursday, limiting its 
future maneuverability. 

Despite the gloom of this 
week’s instability, many observ- 
ers remain optimistic. Russia 
has changed irreversibly in the 
past three years, with thousands 
of new, private businesses and 
milli ons of private-sector work- 
ers who do not want a return to 
the past Foreign investors are 
looting to Russia as the next 
great emer ging market. 

Within a “confusing and rap- 
idly evolving dynamic, often in- 
scrutable from the outside,” the 
U.S. ambassador, Thomas R. 
Pickering, said this week, there 
are “clear elements of order, of 
progress and of hope for the 
future.” 

StQl, the fall of the ruble this 
week brought a cold shower of 
reality to the government’s fre- 
quent boasts of having turned a 
comer in reform. 

The government and Parlia- 
ment, which have done little ac- 
tively to promote reform this 
year, both began searching for 
villains. The Communist Party 
chief, Gennady Zyuganov, fin- 
gered “alien, oonnational capi- 
tal,” while Mr. Yeltsin’s spokes- 
man, Vyacheslav Kostikov, 

S oke of a “financial coup” by 
ommunist-financed banks 
aiming “to remove the presi- 
dent and halt market reforms.” 

While speculation and cen- 
tral bank mistakes played a 
part, many economists agreed 
that the ruble’s fall from 2,000 
to the dollar in July to a low of 
3,926 on “Black Tuesday” re- 
flected more fundamental 
problems — in particular, the 
difficulty of nurturing a private 
sector in an environment that 
has moved rally partway from 
the Soviet command economy. 


Sarajevo resumed Thursday after having been 
day for the second time in a week because planes had been hit by 




city prepares for a third winter under Serbian Five planes 
e schedt 


rive pi 

were scheduled to land Thursday, said Peter Kessler, a United 
Nations aid official in Zagreb, Croatia. ^ 

Kris Janowslri, a UN aid spokesman in Sarajevo, raid efforts 
would be made to bring in 900 tons of food overland in the next 
several days to help offset losses caused by the airlift disruptions. 


• :j y 


Russians Fire Warning Shots at Ship 

OSLO (Reuters) — A Russian military aircraft fired warning 
shots at a Norwegian trawler that apparently came too dose to a 
Russian naval exercise in Arctic waters, Norwegian officials said 
on Thursday. 

Bemt Aasboe, a shipowner, said the crew of the Staalbjoern 
told him the shots hit the water 50 meters in front of the bow in tile 
incident on Wednesday off the Russian naval base of Murmansk. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman said Norway was investigating 
and might seek an explanation from Russia. “As far as we know, a- 
this fisting boat went into a Russian zone legally,” he said. 40 


stjrtifjrt c kmm 


■4T 


Skinhead Jailed in Buchenwald Riot 


WEIMAR, Germany (Reuters) — A court here on Thursday 
jailed a slrinh«*H for 20 months and gave two others suspended 
sentences of 6 and 15 months each for ram p agin g through the 
former Buctenwald death camp. 

The three were among eight skinheads tried for chanting Nazi 
slogans, throwing stones and threatening to bum a supervisor to 
ripjth at the Buchenwald memorial site on July 23. 

Three of the others were warned and sent to a youth remand 
center for four weeks and two were acquitted. They had all been 
charged with a breach of the peace, threatening life, causing 
bodily harm and using banned Nazi symbols and slogans. 


A Foretaste of Italian General Strike 


ROME (AP) — Italian journalists began a 24-bour 'walkout 
Thursday, the first step in a general strike called by unions to 
protest Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s economic austerity 
plan. Unions said that at least 3 million people would take part in 
demonstrations in 80 dries during the general strike Friday. 

The strike by journalists silenced news agencies and most 
television and radio newscasts and was intended to prevent 
newspapers from publishing Friday. Mr. Berlusconi’s conserva- 
tive coalition, seeking to control a $100 billion deficit, has present- 
ed a budget plan to Parliament that would trim generous pension 
and welfare benefits. 


tele 'dnquott* 


For the Record 


A fire broke out at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo-2 international 
airport terminal on Thursday, forcing officials to evacuate the 
bunding. There woe no injuries, fire fighters said, and the fire wasgr- 
quickly put out. (Reuters) 


,#a y From Poll 1 


■-V * 


TRAVEL UPDATE 






e soviet command economy, oic p I oaa i? rti< i . 

in essence, the ruble is falling bAo Cancels 200 European Flights 

because Russia keeps printing COPENHAGEN (AP) — A second day of wildcat strikes 
money to prop up the meffi- Thursday forced Scandinavian Airlines System to caned 200 
aent economy it inherited. And European flights to and from Copenhagen. 


x -i \ 


'M!,. 


the pressures to do so have SAS mte^nti^tal ^SdoSeSe^U and other airlines. 


me pr 

hardly lessened in the past year. 

»f ref 


The slowdown of reform 
takes a toll in another way, as 
welL Enterprises that remain 
largely state-owned have built 
up huge debts among them- 
selves. as managers sock money 
away in dollar accounts instead 
of paying their workers or sup- 
pliers. These managers, who in 
the absence of a real free mar- 
ket have little incentive to pay 
their bills, can only gain as the 
ruble falls, while their creditors 
— including millions of Rus- 
sian workers — can only lose. 


were not affected by the strike, which involved check-in personnel 
at Copenhagen's international airport. 

The strikers were demanding the reinstatement of a anion 
spokesman fixed Tuesday. An airline spokesman said SAS was 
ready to take his case to arbitration. 






United Airlines is dropping service to dgit foreign cities. Losing 
service on Dec. 1 arc Cabo San Lucas and Guadalajara, Mexiccc 
Glasgow; Grand Cayman; Panama City, and Port of Spain, 
Tmndad. Athens will be dropped Jan. 4, and Geneva Jan. 9. (AP) 
The Cambodian gove rnm e nt is looking for new investors tt> 
renovate the only major hotel serving the country’s best-known 
tounst attraction, the Angkor temple complex, the tourism minis- 
ter said Thursday. The ministry has repossessed the Grand Hotel 
d Angkor in Siem Reap from Thai-owned SK Air, a news release 


1. v<-$ 

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(AP) 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14. 1994 


Page 3 




THE AMERICAS/ THE 





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+ POLITICAL NOTES + 


. W hat»s Next for Health Plan Architect? 

* WASHINGTON — As the White House regroups to 
devise health care proposals for tlic next Congressra dispute 
has broken out within the administration over the future role 
; of In Magazmer, the chief architect of President Bill Clin- 
ton s ill-fated health plan. 

Leon E. Panetta. the White House chief of staff, has been 
discussing ideas for a new policy-making process in which 
Mr. Maffiziner’s responsibilities would be reduced. Bui ad- 
, , ministration officials said Mr. Magaziner was lobbying to 
keep his portfolio, with some support from one extremely 
influential patron, Hillary Rodham Clinton. 

Mr. Magaziner supervised a beehive of more than 500 
people who developed Mr. Clinton's health plan last year. 
And as the battle, over health care played out. he p uzzle d 
many Washingtonians. In public speeches. Mr. Magaziner. a 
‘ 1 soft-spoken Rhodes scholar, seemed diffident and self-effac- 
ing. But co-workers, members of Congress and lobbyists said 
he could also be intellectually arro gan t 

A business-strategy consultant in Rhode Island before he 
joined the White House staff in January 1995. Mr. Magaziner 
j described himself as an outsider with no experience in Wash- 
- ington. Many people agreed with him after seeing the com- 
plex health plan he drew up. Indeed, he was said to lack a 


i* 4 a . , '“tin jjjj ‘ plex health plan he drew up. Indeed, he was said to lack a 
* i ’ i *‘ ,f !Jt Vfh ^' « sense of what was politically possible. 

. Under the arrangement Mr. Panerta is considering, health 


Hpr 4 . | . . , , vinj. i wjiuci uicdrraiiscmem iwr. ranena is considering, neaitn 

SiAtii i--. h» Ik. proposals would be developed through a more conven- 

,i r .- tional process managed by the Naiional Economic Council 

*j ** li-cv.i! . and the Domestic Policy Council, with a larger role for 

l.jjrj ^ ■ . people who have more experience in Washington. 


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Mr. Magaziner could be involved in the process. White 
House officials said, but would not necessarily have a central 
role. 

One senior administration official eager to reduce Mr. 
Magaziner's role said: *‘He's a symbol of what went wrong. 
That may be unfair, but it‘s a fact.” f NYTj 

Republicans Get Heal in Democrats 1 Ads 

WASHINGTON — The Democratic National Committee 
has announced a S2 million advertising campaign that por- 
trays Republican candidates as intent on tax cuts for the rich, 
huge new spending for the Pentagon and “devastating cuts in 
Medicare.” 

The campaign reflects an effort by Democrats to tum the 
“contract with America,” a list of promises embraced by 
Republican candidates for Congress this month, into a liabil- 
ity in the final weeks of the fall election campaign. 

In a statement announcing the advertising campaign, Da- 
vid Wilhelm, chairman of the Democratic National Commit- 
tee, said, “The American people should know the Republi- 
cans- are proposing a return to Reaganomics.” 

The announcement came amid a new sign of a rising 
Republican tide in November. A poll made public Wednes- 
day found that most Americans were inclined to vote for a 
Republican candidate for Congress this fall. 

. The poll, by the Tones Mirror Center for the People and 
the Press, found that 52 percent of registered voters nation- 
wide said they would vote for a Republican and 40 percent 
said they would choose a Democrat. ( WP) 

Discomfort Over Legal Fund for Clintons 

WASHINGTON — The White House counsel, Abner J. 
Mikva^ays he is “uncomfortable” with the idea of Mr. 
CHnton's legal defense fund and wants to review the structure 
of. the fund to see .if more can be done to reduce public 
concerns about it. 

Speaking at a breakfast with reporters, Mr. Mi leva said 
that he did not “totally approve” of the concept of soliciting 
funds to help the Clintons pay their legal bills for Whitewater 
and the Paula Corbin Jones lawsuit. But he said he could not 
sec a practical alternative that would allow the Clintons to 
handle, bills thatcould run ipto theraillipns. 

“It is an (Uncomfortable situation,” Mr. Mikva said. “I'm. 
uncomfortable: l expect the president is uncomfortable.” But 
he said the Clintons are not wealthy enough to pay the bills 
themselves, and that ethical questions could be raised if the 
legal services were provided free of charge. 

Given those constraints, Mr. Mikva said. “We're trying to 
insulate 'it as much as possible to avoid the appearance 
question.” He said that he wants "to make sure it is perceived 
and treated as a private fund.” { WP) 

Quota/Uiquote 

Senator Phil Gramm. Republican of Texas and chairman 
of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, after a 
meeting with representatives of about 60 political action 
committees in which he pleaded for contributions: “The 
message was, if you want to change America, get on board.” 

. .. ( WP) 


Away From Politics 

• The decomnrisstomng of die Shoreham nuclear power plant 
in Long Island. New York, has been completed, and all 
radioactive material has been removed, Richard Kessel, the 
/•hfltrmwTi of the Long Island Power Authority, announced- 

• Theodore Briseno, a Los Angeles poficeman wbo was fired 
despite being acquitted three tunes of wrongdoing in the 
Rodney King beating, has sued the city, claiming it hung him 
“out to dry/ He said he was bring punished for breaking a 

“code of silence.” , , . . 

• Two Marines were kffied and 12 others were mwed m a 
land-mine explosion at a firing range at the army’s Fort A.P. 
JEU. in Virginia. 

• The Teamsters Union has filed civil-rights charges against a 
Walt Disney Worid hotel in Orlando, Florida, charging that 
its “English only” policies discriminated against the hotel s 
Haitian and Hispanic housekeeping and laundry workers. 

• Elevated levels of pfatomum have been detected m a public 
part: adjacent to. an elementary school in Livermore, Califor- 
nia, near the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, ac- 
cording to the Environmental Protection Agency. 

• A Judge his refused to order 3,800 Denver public school 
t ea chers b 3 dc to wort, ruling they have a right to strike. The 
teachers walked off the job Monday. 

AP. Reuter* WP. YJT 


Quirky Campaign for Senate 

Democrat Plays the Outsider to Buck Trend 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

Vw York Times Sertiee - 

WILMINGTON, Delaware — This tiny state, 
with barely enough voters to fill a Chicago pre- 
cinct, could play a role next month in determin- 
ing the balance of power in a closely divided U.S. 
Senate. Contrary to the national’ trend in this 
volatile election year, however, it is the Republi- 
can incumbent who may be vulnerable. 

Senator William V. Roth Jr., 73, who is seeking 
a fifth tom. is bring challenged by the state 
attorney general, Charles M. Oberly 3d, 47. With 
less than a month before the Nov. 8 election, 
polls show Mr. Roth ahead but Mr. Oberly 
gaining. 

Mr. Roth is already Delaware’s longest-serv- 
ing statewide official, and the state's somewhat 


young and energetic, and I think he should win." 

Still, Mr. Roth may not be as vulnerable as the 
Democrats hope. 

“If Roth was a Democrat and an incumbent 
and the same age. Fd say he had three strikes 
against him.” said Samuel B. Hoff, a political 
scientist at Delaware State University at Dover. 
“But 1 think the anti-Democratic surge will be 
stronger than the ami-incumbent surge." 

Mayor George Loebe of Delaware City, a 
Democrat, said he planned to vote for Mr. Roth. 
“I don't think we should throw everybody out 
just because we’re frustrated," he said". 

The candidates' third and final joint appear- 
ance, which took place in Milford, reflected the 
tone and content of the campaign. 

In his low-key manner, Mr. Roth said his work 


conservative voters have historically let their m Mpiog W atreanihne government, cut taxes 


incumbents decide for themselves when their 
time is up. 

But Democrats in Washington, fearful of los- 
ing their majoriw in the upper chamber in what 


and protect Delaware's important credit-card 
industry had just begun. “Now is no time for on- 
the-job' training in Washington,” he said. 

Mr. Oberly came out swinging, first by reciting 


ing their majority in the upper chamber in what . . u ^ J V u & 

could be a big Republican year, are looking to H * 18 ** l Mora ^ &a ^ 10 be 

Mr. Oberly as one Democrat who might buck the electe ? b “ successfully pros- 

frenj ecuted several high-profile criminal cases as well 


Mr. Oberly as one Democrat who might buck the 

1X1 rtu . . _ . . as public officials of both parties. Then he dc- 

0f nouaced Mr. Roth for failfcg to engage in live 
energy with a deserved reputation for mdepen- Revision debates. 

Sf5t- h 2JS Un1 * d “ ¥?£ SS T “The greatest problem with our government 

With his as a crime fighter, his pledge to today ,” & declared, "is the very seniority and 
rerve no more than two terms and his support for represented bv Mr. Roth. Waihing- 

n ° D£ ?°L S 1 V y 1 ^ ton, )e said, has "more experience than we’ve 

veto, he boasts the kmd of profile found more ^ ^ but we get !ess do £.» 

often among up-and-coming, law-and-order Later, at the Rotary Club in Wilmington, Mr. 
Republicans. Oberly pointed out that when Mr. Roth was first 

So far Mr. Roth, a soft-spoken, slightly built elected to the Senate in 1970, he called for a 
patrician, whose most prominent moment in the constitutional amendment to force senators to 
Senate came more than a decade ago with the retire at age 65. When that failed, he said, the 



Kemp-Roth tax cut proposal, has played into his senator introduced the idea that they retire at 70. 
opponent's h a n ds. Mr. Roth said in an interview "that he bad 

Never perceived as the most articulate mem- called for mandatory retirement "in the follv of 
ber of the Senate, he has recently been criticized my youth." 

by local news organizations for verbal miscues “Now,” he added, "we all agree that a person 


R*k Hi&ihi TV 4*»*ujkil I'fr* 

A Haitian police trainee learning how to salute from a U. S. Justice Department instructor. 

Generals Go to Gilt-Edged Exile 


and memory lapses. He has refused to debate his 
challenger on television and has appeared with 
him on only three occasions. 

Mr. Roth prefers to campaign the old-fash- 
ioned way, at small events, one voter at a time. In 


called for mandatory retirement "in the folly of irenerals i*o to Lrilt- Judged Jbxile 

my youth.” 

should not be discriminated a gains t on thebasis Freed Assets, Wealth and Rentals Ease Haitian Departure 
of a B c ” ^ 

It is unclear whether Mr. Oberlv's attacks on By Douglas Farah While General Ctdras is the general’s salary was about 


It is unclear whether Mr. Oberly's attacks on 
Mr. Roth are making much difference. Mr. Roth 
says Mr. Oberly does not address the big issues 


the absence of a majot media market, campaigns like health care, which voters care about. 


here play out intimately, door to door, hand to 
hand. 

At a bowling alley in Wilmington one night 


Indeed, the Roth campaign is broadcasting a 
radio commercial that accuses Mr. Oberly of 
negative campaigning. “Charlie is acting like a 


At a bowling alley in Wilmington one night negative campaigning. “Charlie is acting like a 
recently, Lou Bullock, who has voted for Mr. desperate politician,” the ad says. “Make no 
Roth in the past, greeted him warmly but said mistake about it. Power and experience are the 
later: “He’s been in too long. Oberly is real issues. And Charlie just doesn't have any.” 


GA Chief Jettisons 
2 in Ames Epilogue 


By Tim Weiner 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In an- 
other embarrassing epilogue to 


agents secretly working for the 
United States died, Mr.Wool- 
sey said. 

The most severe reprimands 


the Aldrich Hazen Ames espio- he issued that day went to four 
nage case, the director of cen- CIA officials, three of whom 
tral intelligence, R. James were already retired. The fourth 
Woolsey, has removed two se- was Mr. Bearden, who had long 
nior officials for giving an been scheduled to retire at the 
award to a colleague only hours end of September. 


after Mr. Woolsey had repri- 
manded him for having failed 
to oversee Mr. Ames. 


On SepL 29, Mr. McGaffin, 
the second-ranking officer in 
the agency’s clandestine service. 


The two officials were the sent Mr. Anderson, the Near 
CIA’s associate deputy director East operations chief, to Bonn 
of operations. John McGaffin, with the award 
and the Near East operations i n 1935 Mr. Bearden was 
chief, Frank Anderson. They deputy chief of the CIA’s Sovi- 
re tired after Mr. Woolsey reas- et-East European operations 
signed them last week and supervised Mr. Ames, then 

Two weeks ago they gave head of the division’s Soviet 
Milton Bemden. the agency s counterintelligence branch, 
station chief m Bonn, an award That was the year Mr. Ames 
for outstanding wort during the became a spy for Moscow. 
1980s. The day before, Mr. Mr. Bearden again super- 
Bearden had been reprimanded vised Mr. Ames in 1989 and 
by Nfr Woolsey for "very sen- carfy 1990 but failed to act 
ous failures m the case^of Mr. quickly on mounting evidence 
Ames, Moscow’s "mole” inside that his subordinate was a mole, 
the Central Intelligence Agency CIA officials said, 
from 1985 10 1994. 

Senior staff members of the 

congressional committees that 

avetsee the CIA noted that the IT C A rrrPPfi tf\ 
punishments against the two U '*£.1 i3t>n LU 
men were more severe than any & 

meted out in the Ames case it- New York Times Service 

self. They also noted that the WASHINGTON —In a step 
award to Mr. Bearden might that could eventually halt the 
signify disrespect within the use of dozens of common pesti- 
CIA for Mr. Woolsey. cides on major crops, the Envi- 


Simpson Case 
Losing Its Pull 
With Citizens 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — 
Americans are more inter- 
ested in news of Haiti, Iraq 
and Congress than the O J. 
Simpson murder case, ac- 
. cording to a new poll. 

The proportion of Amer- 
icans who are following the 
trial “very closely” has 
dropped to 25 percent, 
from 48 percent in June 
and 30 percent in Septem- 
ber, according to the survey 
by the Times Mirror Center 
for the People & the Press. 

The survey found that 
only 53 percent of those 
asked knew Mr. Simpson 
did not face the death pen- 
alty if convicted. 

By contrast, 61 percent 
knew Congress passed a 
crime bill this year and 58 
percent were aware it failed 
to pass health care reform. 

A total of 38 percent said 
they were following the 
U.S. intervention in Haiti 
very closely. 


WasJungon Post Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
— In a move that will cushion 
the exile of Haiti’s former mili- 
tary leader. Lieutenant General 
Raoul C 6 dras, who reportedly 
amassed a fortune during his 
three years in power, the United 
States agreed to rent three 
properties that will yield him 
thousands of dollars a month in 
income, U. S. officials said 
Thursday 

General Cedras, his former 
chief of staff. Brigadier General 
Philippe Biamby. and the Ce- 
dras family left Haiti early 
Thursday, flying in a U. S.-pro- 
vided jet into what is expected 
to be luxurious exile in Panama. 

Family friends speculated 
that General Ctdras would end 
up in Spain, where the family 
owns other properties. 

U. S. soldiers loaded massive 
amounts of luggage onto the 
aircraft while the two former 
leaders and their entourage 
mounted the stairs to the plane, 
never pausing to look back. 

Another U.S.-provided jet 
flew 23 “relatives and asso- 
ciates” of the two to Miami, 
said the U. S. Embassy spokes- 
man, Stanley Schrager. “After a 
review by the departments of 
State and Justice, they were pa- 
roled into the United States by 
the attorney general,” he said. 

[The White House press sec- 
retary, Dee Dee Myers, said 
that the two deposed generals 
“will not be allowed to come to \ 
the United States, ever.” The 
Associated Press reported from 
Washington.] ; 

The departure of the two men I 
clears the way for the return to 
Haiti on Saturday of the man 
they overthrew in 1991, Presi- 
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 


While General Ctdras is 
renting his properties to the 
United States, the former police 
chief, lieutenant Colonel Jo- 
seph Michel Francois, the third 
of the military leaders now in 
exile, has rented his Haitian 
home out as a residence for offi- 
cials from the Dominican Re- 
public, diplomatic sources said. 
Colonel Francois went last 
week to the Dominican Repub- 


the general’s salary was about 
$900 a month. Colonel Francois 
built homes and businesses 
when his salary 1 never exceeded 
$500 a month. 

Diplomats close to the nego- 
tiations said the rental agree- 
ments were a last-minute de- 
mand, and haggling over the 
details delayed the departures 
by several hours. 

"The rental will be deter- 


lic, where he has extensive busi- mined at fair market value and 


ness holdings. 

General Biamby. who lived 


the property will be used by 
U. S. personnel in Haiti or sub- 


more austerely than his two col- other tenants,” Mr. 

leagues, does not own a home. Schrager said. The main home. 


also announced that the assets 
of the military leaders, frozen in 
most countries for the last year, 
would be released. 

“We’ve always envisioned 
that when Aristide returns that 
all the sanctions, including the 
sanctions on assets, would be 
lifted,” she said. 

Mr. Schrager said the United 
States had, in order to get the 
generals out of the country be- 
fore Father Aristide returned. 


the beach front home. The third 
house would normally rent for 
about $ 2 , 000 . 

Diplomatic sources familiar 
with the deal said General Ce- 
dras’s wife, Yannick, led the ne- 
gotiations and set the terms, 
concerned not only about the 
price of the rentals, but de- 
manding that the houses be 
protected against possible de- 
struction by angry crowds. 

All three men amassed large 


agreed to rent three Cidras fortunes from their time in 


properties. 

The properties, worth hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars, 
were acquired at a time when 


INSEAD 


power by controlling basic 
products whose value soared 
because of international embar- 
goes placed on the nation. 


U.S. Agrees ta Bar Cancer-Tied Pesticides 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — In a step 


found to cause cancer in ani- 
mals, but have nonetheless been 


that could eventually hall the allowed as residues in foods like 


The agency’s proposed settle- 
ment, negotiated with environ- 
mental and labor groups w*bo 


use of dozens of common pesti- juices and canned vegetables, joined the state of 
cides on major crops, the Envi- where the pesticides can con- suing 
ronmental Protection Agency centrate at higher levds than on prove< 
has settled a lawsuit demanding raw crops. Food 

that it eliminate possible can- Even more pesticides could arc ® 
cer-causmg residues from pro- be prohibited later, after further 
cessed foods. smdv. .T fac 


On Sept. 28, Mr. Woolsey an- 
nounced that 1 1 senior officers 
would receive official repri- 
mands in the Ames case, al- 
though no one was fired or de- 
moted. He said that Mr. Ames’s 
activities had gone undetected 
because of “a systemic failure 
of the CIA — and most signifi- 
cantly, of the directorate of op- 
erations —-a failure in manage- 
ment accountability, in 
judgment, in vigilance.” 

As a result, at least 10 double 


suing the agency, must be ap- 
proved by a U.S. District Court. 
Food and chemical companies 
are expected to oppose it in 


cesseo roods. study. 

Under a tentative agreement The chemicals include some 
announced Wednesday, the of the most widely used, like 
agency proposed to ’ move alachlor, a herbicide used on 
against as many as 36 pesticides peanuts and soybeans, and cap- 
within two years. These pesti- tan, a fungicide used on grapes, 
cides have previously been plums ana tomatoes. 


The most pronounced effect 
of the settlement, however, will 
be to increase pressure on Con- 
gress to enact a far-reaching law 
governing all pesticides. Such 
an overhaul could supersede the 
agency’s settlement with envi- 
ronmentalists. 


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First Ndntir 

Company Name _ 
Company Addreu_ 

Post code/Zi pcude_ 

Telephone 

Fix /Tele* 


_Titlr: Mr/Mrs/Ur., Oi 1 ht_ 
. Job Till.- 





Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 


mqnipelljer* 


-Estate in' 


ANTIBES 

CANNES--* 


fCE,THE 


[ONA( 


SALES 


PjOYBKE, CAMAKUE 

MwwAhi * Wiifcnww Sag 
tXnd5ahbyOwmr. 

2 buftfapon lBhacf land 
1ST UMT: 600 Kyn. 19ft eatoy 
Mm tafi^ restored -Carvtrttd 
_ tato 2 apstureili and 1 rtirfo. 
Apvtmanfit Each with Evimbing 
roat^ Irildren, 3 budrooats/bdhroami. 

; Stoatoi ImmEnna ran, fafchon. 

1 fiedwnt, bedroom. Gmed pate, 
taffidry room - Wwj art* nriabla 
hr 3.W0 batik*. Stabh wift man 
sfafh - Sbddk roon. Boil 
2ND UMT: Urique P row m ea l tfjrfa vflo 
-350 Kyrv fiacapfion, S*ing room. 


HOKHBMBA 

ROQUEBUMCAPMADM 

A few unfed 1 owey from Monra-Orio. 
Onrmng wlawift wondertui homw. 


I BaAID « Amaru ftownea, yd 
^^rydiofWca.Arpcrt.a 
ho of bwufeW yx riqnrf wd part 
with bwMnc perdy dawg fram lift 
century ore <** I™ «|UMtn» w* 


imd ywnd poking. 3- 
mam up orlwwrt . 2nd floor, 85 m 

OwwerT&WOSff FbiWN 1223 
M THE HEART OF PROVB4CE 
Spimfid land, ta Etey vflage. near 
Ua & man. Ready to baU or fnmit 
For individuals or motor*. 20 qudty 
vflas from FttSQ.OOOL Oftar properties 
avwtebte. Mrs Mchel fat I (33) 
42 60 91 49. te (3 42 24 09 07. 

ST. TROPEL l uo gni fce nt house, 600 
an an 2 Roan, 50M mm sea, park 
3200 sun, 5 bodooms, 5 batfwoaa 
Odbui&m, wgrishga PassMa for 
unfeBomTeta. T* M 53 90 82 B& 
■EAUU BJ Sff MB. «aol vita « 
parted loaded in meet or no. 


indapardart itdf or goat qxrtnot, 

Garden wift sunning pooL 

PARK AGENGE 

W1BNA1WNAL 
UPutPdaa 
25 Avenue <h la Capa 
MC 98000 AtontoCarib 
Hobart tetMT 
Tab 93 25 15 0Q te» 93 25 35 33 


SAINT TROPE 

nUalyRaekMd Unary Vfci 


century end gna twa agw ftw W; 
tar, cowarlad rto 9 « urtintd 
apartment*, 3 thrift i<df ra«ft 
rmtourmt, bar, fcuw* W. fart vornnf 
poHasaon Idad loriaamjAmj 
xhod/oarfeon oanlar. Offan m 

a^juar »*■ fa 



rat garden trf 30 _ . ^ 
AGEKE BOWS Tel, (33) 9341J5036 

te (331 9101.15.91 

CHAJt&nt 7 year oU very comfort- 
able orettaOoaigncd house in his- 
tone vfes.Wonn.Tdfc +3353 90 
05 49 tearanoa no. 2427 hale duo to 


Spadous Evra and doing roanv 
brekooas with btaroami an-nde. 
For s«fe foly furnished 

Viewing by n yointaent. 


•tody room - Sauna - fetacatibn mam. 

fa*- 4 g^ «w ia n ali B fa n fa r e* . 
Cu r ri ed Tat/ hoc 11) 41 *2 91 94. 


3 JOHN 
TAYLOR 


Cdl Omar rind (mabdnya 

ras-ii 4»eaa&4T 

or fax (33-1) 47.2tL25.09 


MONACO LA VICE 

olS-STjZ^. 

mnta d wortmart ta swA hiwncaj 


lb fiSHS of Mm ftBKH KtVBtA 

CANNES 



Cel: Monica Borao 93 38 OO 66 
or Fob 93 39 13 65 


-I ~r~: 


RBKHOVBtA 

VUEFRANQC4UHHS 

Btoutiful hdn oputmeeff. 
4-rooan, in a chonrang resk fen cc 
Web a mim in g poet 
enjoying an enaotional view 
on ttatltodB ofvaafrcridhD. 

19. Bid do GMrd Ledwc 
0£|10 3EAUJEU-SURMBI 
Tel (33)9301 04 13. te (33) 93 0111 96 


CAfMS 

an 100 ape prf wri a 


& 24 hour recurily. Had wig, 

2 beds, dreomg room, 2 bafts, modem 
tester*. 60 sam. Mrraca + garaga 
+ oflor. Cium*o nol views. Focjwlh 
to Mon*e-Corto Baodl & Country Cm 
J iOifiBdpnon NJ00/XD. 
te (1) 40.7097.91, nlamien 19 


MONIFHJJER 

fOna of #w moat famous French 
Iriversfel - (OfXB sSudanl* - nod to 
MedtarrcinKa) mi. bMtf in rad afloto 
by rerting «• tferfanta 1 eportmantL 
ted buMm of M with garage 
in cantna or town, dose to anpus. 
Totdi 400 1 am. AwAftk, SspJ. Vi 
US$950000 dlMndad 
Tat (331 67W6636. Fin 6769 6601 


PKOVBKE NEAR AVIGNON 

BaoutM astray 8 ecm of natoral porti 
srienrSd wnws on biberav vary cohr. 
STONE BUST MANOR HOUSE 
ntOVEHCE-STYlE 
7 bedrocm.5 bdfvoorns/ihawin. 
300 irpn. Swng rpcjco. AJ comforts. 
Central healing, awwi an g podLtews 
court Separata bangdbw. F3^B,000. 

QotxPQmmn (33] 90 753034 


4" ■" ~ - I — — — 

i m hm ™ tnrrv 

Price: FUSOiXIO. 
tec tan 93 63 63 89 


FAYB'O-CHARACTER ESTATE 

StoM bait, 250 9»» « 

8.038 sem ground 200 to*, ffjund- 

■Satsfib'* 

Ownar (i) 94 84 11 94 


aan uuamj-uaaiuiioj im i 

tone tAna. 900 sqm. Tab +33 
05 49 iwanoa n& 2427 (nle i 


Ion with upenia didng man sudy. 
Sftxftsd an 4^J0D sqjn. of ao u tMoemg 
nxflura gndara *mh sea & courtry 

teQ3)93JB SnSL 


FOR SALE -Hff - HH40CV100. Ite 
floor via flai on 2 Icveb, 8 roomy d 
comforts, gardvv gmga DcwriBown, 
rawdenlid cna, quiet, for more in- 
formation a* Pb«m47 57 7911 


WAR CANNES, dnrader property, 
saa/raortdn wow, 250 Sam. twig 
space. 4 beds, 3 Whs. IjSoO sqm 
garriSs Urn* idtr F48M CjSms 
Knofas Tnl&93<58484 Fax 93468127 
CANNES SEA VEW. New. hmiry ros- 
idence of 7 upu rtinanBr 2/3/4 room 
+ pwlhouM. Bcatiant anAin. 

NkotcTefc 03|93 458484 
te (33) 93 46 81 27. 


MOUUNSt tevwncel Haaaa, 117 
sqm 2 lawk Doubt* Suing, &eptoai, 
4 beds, 2 bad* 860 1 sqm genJen. 


ROQUEBSUNE CAP MARTM 

Lnngpoof te gfl 9z92 HMSTlte 9292 WSS. 800m from MONACO. Charring ham 
Arpon. 1 ruM [> caiK AM) KNTA15 - +/-350 xua._io_o prrvme port 


CAM4B 

BASscAiironc 

Owner safls apartment in tread par* 
top float. 125 sqm + 24 sqm 
terrace. Sec view. 2 beds, 2 bafts, 
nwi.F 2 m 
tef33)M90 47 «5 

S CANNES - PANORAMIC VffS 
Freedom vfla in icdided area aver- 
hrdang greenery and saa, 200 sqm I 
+ 100 sqm hrracn on 1500 iqn . 1 
treed ground Spaaous p m own t | 
Bving onto owrScw pod, 2 SrejAm, 
BBQ, master bedroom with dresdna. i 
baft + 3 bedrooms, 2 basis Sudy.. 
Law fees. HJM. Tut (33 93^ 4444 


CAtMB - SALE AM) RENTALS - 
Sea view, opertssens and vtibs. 
Crabatte, CcWfomie, Pdm Bemh. 
Ag MUK Td 9307243. Fax 93436850 
IS rwhi CANNES ST At motorway, 
200 sqm. beautiful ft nuened house 
on LJU torn teed gro u nd s PooL 
F29 miloitte 03 93 «t 55 61 
ST TRORZ PAMPHOWE, Prawned 
Mag, 4 beds , 2 ba fts- Itooi. 2^00 
sqm oorden. Pmw locution, odm. 
RShite Owner m 94 79 91 53 
MKBIT - PEAR CANNESy do prhrnts 

S 2 OMMOOfned Hots, 40 Uptt. 
SOLD UNDBt FWCE Telephone: 

(33 89 43 704Z Fronoa 

MCE - near tea i Negrasco. lovely 


+ /-350sqm in a private pork 
wrih a brodhidting wew an 

,£ZZ£ttmjsb«. 

Ante solar, no operas nfaam 
Td: (33) 9X15.12.04 


DUMB CROSE77E 

Maar Car ter 
EXCHmCNALGHEM 
For dssdutian raasorq a company a 
32 S rag a superb 4/Sroom qp a tmed, 
187 aim, fbdngjo^ Sot gmege. 


HdL btchon. 2 beds, 2 bafts. 

■r comfitianeng, SDlqm. tomn, aim. 

F3jOPOjOOi Agncm dbOda. 

Toi; Owwar (IJ494X6.9S.1Z 


irnfaia. Axe cat & owe* *As. 
Tth 3393 46 60 95 fat 319346 76 B1 

SOUTH RANOE - CHOKE OF prop 
cries tel analogue - 36-16 LE TUC- 
te (33) 90 345 w 


Law fees. F4-2M. Tab (33 9366 4444 
OLD ANTIBES - CHA1ACTER 
TCIWNHCXJSE. on ramparts, wni 
view over Bay and Cap cTAnMns. 3 
starys with booms and roof terrace. 
5 nan wdk to Homo nuam and 
PTOwncd mote 3 btdroaa* 3 
baftnxms, kne siting roam. Tab 

Arris (33-1) 46 31 34 48 

PROVINCE. InumarfcL Omriodting 
Durcrot VMey. Conimig modenr 
eaten wifi A owned iviifrHomesal 
in wld pnes & hob*, fray morte- 



F89ft00q Td Owner (33 9398. 17AS. 
CANTCS, vary btoriM uBo. 220 aqm 
+ 180 sqm. basement. Gan, terrace. 
FISA Td33-929B3032.fairo38013D 
COT1GNAC VAJL Chairing 200 yr dd 
bmftouse 2 ha 6 bed , 2 bofts-viwT*- 
I tew pool FF24eLte 44 71 6025856 


617-876-3227. teak G. Clark (3391 
72 07 55 & BBPPERT G3 90 68 W71. 


MONIE CARLO 

New prajacf wift stmfos to Sroom 
u o a rt m e n is awdotfa. Po nuw iwc wew, 
avttta office Spaoq attractive pnee. 
Farther drtdk MkaBodanmn - SB4. 
9 one (fOdenda - MC 98000 Monaco, 
te (33) 92 16 90 00 


BY INVITATION ONLY 


“42, LA CROISETTE” 

In Cannes, between the Carlton and the Palais de.s 
Festivals, the most beautiful address on the French Riviera 
is now for sale. A new building of such quality and luxury 
that potential buyers are truly limited to a very select few. 
If you are among them, please contact 
Jacques Chataignier 

John Taylor - Jacques Chataignier 

— 1 1 55, La Croisette - 06400 Cannes (France) ii 

Ta: (33) 93 38 00 66 -Fax: (33)93 39 0 65 


COTE D'AZUR - VAR 
FrGoate Golf & Village 
4-star Hotel 
Golfers' houses from 
F.F. 1.817.000 to F.F2.300.000 
or constructabie land from 900 
sq.m, overlooking superb golf 
course and dominating 
the Mediterranean. Swimming 
pool and tennis courts. 

StCyrsur Mer 
TeL (33) 94 29 01 16 
Fax (33) 94 29 01 17 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


RARE 

BAST1DE IN PROVENCE 

Near Si Remv & Baux de Provence. 
XVlIIlh CtMTURY BAST1DE 
420 sq.m, living space. 
Restored to very high standard. 
Garden, swimminmxxtsflcwily system. 
Numerous other simitar otters, 
OPTIMUM IMMOBIUR 
59, COUR5 BHION 
13990 FONTVBUf 
FRANCE 

TeL: C33j 90 54 69 33 
Fax: (33) 90 54 71 88. 


RomanSe*** 


IFTH CENTURY FARMHOUSE BA5TIDE 
Beautifully restored in a panoramic 
position. 30 mins, to Cannes & St. 
Raphael. 10 mins, to A 8 . 3600 sq.ft 
living space, very big living-room. 52 
acres around house, large pooL covered 
retrace with barbecue, fully equipped & 
furnished. Near Fayence, Var. 

F.F. 1 ■illlaa. 

TeUFax 9WIM owner : (331*4 7651 79 


HOTEL - RESTAURANT 

Bocxaad bodanunlry 30 adn ten 
Not 8 room/ 40 nab, pod. EmaBent 
condtion. Fnndi/Ul efcntda. Plica 
n r g n ti uUB . fig owner at 33-93 03 06 31 


NWE, BRASSBDE - PUB FOR SALE 

mfc LOoatON. Hem of anr 

Lang torn ravoteig feroa far 
any conmocKi ocivny. 

Fas (33) 92 1606 20 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Bteft ! 
yncto g m itin m dody. te PAK 

MBA SCH0N The mod, refined of d 
tte in ZUBCH ndudvdy 9 . 
wepwawi ■ boding roen’i rtore - 
13. Sahnhote. 014211 29 50 

MOVING 


INTERDEAN 

FOR A RS BT1MATE CAli 

PAHS (1)39201400 


import/export 

OMNQB of RBUJtoi KQM- 

fnft 6 hnan ten wcteW«*jB _S4. 
Wate»g & Sbjna. Gra*4snte 6 * 
fa* (97gM9137i 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

totvduaocy Offer 

50 U.$. CBITS 
pa MINUTE 

ATKTNefwadk 
WerWwidt • Anyfim# 


apW 14 hn. a day! 

i 

OerCariMiwn 
Continualy Enjoy 
D hc o u nb of 15% to 50% 
On AlCab 

US TEL: 1-407-253-5454 ExT.114 
US. FAX: 1-407-2534130 

ACS4TS WHCOME 

CORPORAIE 
BANS i 

AVABA8LE 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls 

Save SU% and nare compared 
fo loom phone ronpnie 
Cdl tram homo, oHkb, qj- 
nen hatob (and ovod 
nrdnya4. Qwck our rata 
far raiy oaortiria and sh how 
you con Part roving today. 

Cafl us now aid well 
caB you right badd 

Td 1-206-284-8600 
Fax 1-206-282-6666 

Lket open 24 hours. 

( ^kafi bacK 

419 Second Anna Wed 
Sadia, WA 98119 USA 

CONSULTANTS 


mehcanfood 

ApwricD H C o cau ft tot 5 y n eaperianoa in 
Europe wfl hetoywto greder pronti 
through Meteor bod 
RnJourart storhup/chemgt owr 
F oodft opi 
Otienog 

Loroe vecid ever* i 

Coobr*i, bra nanoanad 

3 Arohwfa CrowaWng 

Gil Cwrurny WfXJ&m 
Fox M9W1727BS21 ! 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


Tfaonctag AvoloUa" 
"Confinmd Vrohae toMT 
"fandi AvoUftr 
“Coraurda P um fcg" 
•ynaftineftto Drdto" ^ 
"TJufaiftid falfnQ liw i Pi RHih j w 
“Moway for Rani** 
“fiamdd Ouro uul ai" 

“T n rnn - 
“Fundmg ProUtadT 
2S72 oft onofyad & tatod. 33 raw*, 
popenl Fob %mS2U ItauM Pootiwd 
lorej Ponoma-aftn just fate NOW 
tor tht first lind Wted-VAfa. “THE 
RNANOAL FACT GUR3H Aa Al YOU 
need is “Oh* impfa Baft letter fvnft 
guotati e e avdfabh far mmryo nd) and 
tar it with your reowremenB to onu for 


BBSHN0N4IES1DGNT 
COMPAQ £195 


law profle, te fane & European 
able far anting, conateicy & oBier 
odivitiB. for inaaadato service tortoch 


a™* 01 * _ 

bitarhn Bminaai MadtoO 
te « 662 2583691 


FUNDING FROREM5 ? 

Veniwe Cap*d - Equity Loom 
Red Btoie • Bjsnea 
Fmonang - Long Tarn 
Cdtatord Supportoa Georartees 

Brtenb le ^uarrrtaa l a teare_f wdng 
ftx wnc pujoiJi anungod by? 

i . Bq ncor of Amq 

Braiar'i CammSSn 1 ^^^^ 1 * 
Far [63-21 8KK9Z84 
te (63-3) 8104OT> or 812-3429 

SERVICED OTFKES 

YOUR OFHCE M LONDON 
Bond Swat Sea h and ynl dm M 
te 46 71 499 9192 te 71 499 7517 


BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Gemipany Service^ 56 Kto w Bi an 
Squme, Dubtia 2, MmKL 

te +3S3 1 661*490 Fax 6618493 


AVAILABUE CAPITAL 

EquitY or debt fi nonon g . 

A p roynu U ored to your aorpevato 
ne w k. 

No frort faro. Ow he are earned 
bared irtrialy on performmica. 

Lon taros, best retos, brntar fees pore 
creTprotaoid. 

fax yow preposd tunreary to: 

For Edrtl hmaSrero* Group, Inc 
Alta Hmrecid Dapartaant 
fax: (507) 63-5C33 (Panama) 


ONAVA SJLM. MONACO 

Oftn 

from oaf OCtapony 

STEB. 

WOE 1005 

Quarty: UWOJMT 

SS” 

Awfiabity; TN POO READY TO SMT 





500 H. U5. 1, Mdbouroe, ft 329» 


CAPITAL AVAEABLE 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

rat 

AU BUSNS PROJECTS 

OR FOR 

LETTBtS Cf CSHJ5T 
BANCGUMIAN1B 
OTHBt AOSTMIE OOUATBW. 

ftdcrlttntaon gnofted 

M e ni i vr i M4JJKJ. A Ge 
FViANOAL MsmunoN 
Brareell - BBjGMM 

Wartnoeon by to 32^534 02 77 
or 32-2438 4791 
TOE* 20277 


OFFSHORE COMPAMB | 

'^OREWTMhKCOMPANS 

* BANC INTRODUCTIONS 

• THEPHCNE & MAIL FOKWARWtG 

Tdtdm er fra lor tanedWa nreira 
gad 100 page edeor brodwre 

OCXA ASA UMITHJ I 

3 WJ2 Bonk of Araaxn Tower I 

Hreeourt RoadHongKang 
Tef +853 rnmn 
te +852 5211190 


CLASS A RANK n tax tee veMwqh 
u dran u tarere renam end eUiimhed 
bon hn g and ucureu acmuro. US 

S50.000. tamertiato trmfar. Cdl 
Ctnsda (604) V06UF or IwJM 
942-3179 a Lorefan 071 394 STS or 
PAX 071 231 9928. 


ASTON cpwqMTSTMBfasro 



KB ISA n Bottles & Cans. Booming 
USA sate Nw opening ei tomu t wnd 
markets. Ftnxs with experienced 
(fatribuhon network red;: Horiron Tea 
Irfl FAX; B131 01-6953 USX 
OHSHORE OOMMMB. For free 
brochure or atftnce Tet London 
44 61 741 1224 te 44 81 748 6558 
BASMUU1 HCE rtireO from p rocB m ng 
factory to gentm buyers woddu n th. 


TODAVS 

HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Appears 
on Page 8 

EMPLOYMENT i 

DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS WANTED j 

EXPBBBKD COURE avedabfe now. 
French. Portuguese and same Encfah 
fax 351.1 Ag/352 

AUTO RENTALS 


mn FROM DBtGI AUTO 
WfflJB®: FF 515 
SPECIAL OFFER - 7 DAYS: FT 1500 
PAMS TR: (1)45 *7 27 04 

LEGAL SERVICES 

DIVORCE FAST • (495 

Certified by US. embassy. Cefl/te 
(714) 968805 USA 


COLLE GES & 
UNIVERSITIES 

PRBTON UNVBSITY, USA 
B8A. E. MBA MS, PhD, ate pro- 
pronK Hm Stody or On-Cmxpui. I 
Gca nred by fte Duwimw* of Educo- ! 
bon 2727 uNei Av®, 

WT 82001 Foe 1-3W-632-27S0 


READBSAJtSADVBH) 

that the laTeraatioaat 
HoraU Tribune earn* bo 
hMimpaaMetbr tamer 
drowg g ea l ae u rred m a re- 
aofr of trem a cham Manx 


It la 8 erehre ro u tm m ea d 

«f Ihjl wad b ro mehh ep- 


awHdtag aty m rx wy rewt. 

no*® ww w j 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


MONIE CARLO 
PIMOMliTT OF MONACO 

Lurory apgrtmad, double liwng room, 
large master bedroon, 2 nd buroaai, 
+ baft} w idto, guest tokft. 

targe equipped liildion + dming nodt, 
COrtw v uhx y . taraCd, 
privnto bentod pod with jd teem, 

2 odors. 

INTERMHNA 

AG&fT 

OW)\ te 33-93 50 66 84 
\MZfi te 33-93 50 45 52 


MONACO GRANWARGE 

On fte New Mam. South axposure. 

Unique 'Master Hof 212 sun. 
Double ivinfr 4 bedro ona, 3 ooftt. 
Loro; TVS tun. terrace. 

Spfamid view on the Sea, Cop Martin 
and the Pat /Utrobto ggreftress. 

BREMOND-DOTTA 

te (33) 93 25 50 25 
teI33)93 S09S*1 


MONTE CARLO 

DUffinR suburb 3-rootn apartmsr* 

2 btdrooao, 2 batnxm fetnsa reo 

viewpLitf 

AAGEDI 

7/9. Bd da Atodta AtOW3t» Manam 
U33-92 165959 fax 3393 50 1942 


REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 

EXCBUNT MVE5TNM Huy a fat n 
sonny faaaL Fait awning tomt 
area near beaft, 55 fan good road 
from Irfl carport USJ4 por WUS. 750 
sgjt. fat far US&flOQ. B£T37ft UiT 
92521 NeA Cette France or Fox 
luriano CcwtofaBa 85 261 3100 
IHAlAWi A 3K Storey hadde houn 

& 4 odjetent land parah, oR w*. 

C view of mdfl boy 6 resort «y 
of Pfidcd UoreL S549 f CTXX (Bdum on 
in i as tnwnt of 1379U Detdh Tab 66-1- 
464 1273 or fm 66763* 0364 AM 
Mr Adams 


EXCEPTIONAL 

Ita PLACE FRANCOIS IBt 

TOP FLOOR- BMC0NT 


□ 


UKEGBfEYAi 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

AUSTRIA 



REAL ESTATE 
SERVICES 


AMQKAN REAL STATE Spid uW i 

in Pdfs since 1980 wil find, fi nance, 
design and renovato ros i di n tid/ 
oomnartid pn far mvwkxi or 

ntividuab at nvetfmert level pricav 

CiA. Td P3-1) 42571777 For 4&1797 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

f ABfUHEA N 


ST. KITTS, 
WEST INCHES , 

20 or 140 an sto wUfi beacMrom 
World dots hold & aandoi wift cam 
Earn & tax rfx*ranant Mostly Beach 
Front Brafar conmniai auarameed. 
Mead from S22 nSon to Jff reBon. 
te NYC. USA 
(212) 8*3-7555 

(212) 371-9133 
FRENCH PROVINCES 



BASTH1E - “HFPS .* 1 BeUag 
200 sqm. LOFT wfafa toriuca. 
Luwrioudy renovotad. Top floor. 
PnctsB^OOfiOO. 

te IMS (i) asnxnxL 


17*, BOUE/WAGRAM 

Mo^r^lfiqSt’BnigwpJte 
Tel awirer afire *pm 1-46 X2 03 65 

CROISSY SUL SWE Modem 
240 kww AroariaavtfyU, 600 sqm 
gmden, 50 sqm Bwna bow wmkmi, 
Sbals, 4 Wtecdm. 200* British 
Schod of PSns.fil7M.Te4 Owner QJ 
CT62185 feffla) fl) 397625W OwreA 
PARS 7ft - OUMP DE MARS 
5 rooms, double Ivina 3 bethnnq, 
2 baftrooms, ground (floor on Itne 
privat e^ garden, n pdting in front rtdj- 

TOMWlTd=nf&7.1^ (Maa 
I AVB 6 JE MONTAIGNE - be ep tiond 

tirzv&tiEi M 

security. Gorge potsbie. Fnt«r*nhng 
trta. Tat til ffaT 56 OB faremmirt 


LE PHMtEUX SUR MARS (94). 
Lovely lunvoFttwronlury rortorod 
ixo paty . 320 nm Bring spoca.1245 
laTroNOA 

10 RMS EAST PARS - A BARGAIN. 
SMALL CHATEAU, 400 sqm. pork 
7.100 sqm Bud^ng permit ft T 2 
houm. RfBOO/XlO. TA Ownar (1) 
47 06 00 80(£rtwaen 9an and llawj 
4*. MAIAIMEAUBOURGb qumt 
pwfadrian ureeL 3rd floor, Bt, 30 
sqm flat fitly renovated, separate 
latchon & heft. Ptonreroia cwiboarch. 
FF75OD00L Tab (1) 40 29 98 6 ? 


ETOHE - 90 sqm Froertant. don 
brikfing. 35 sqm Bring + 2 beds. 
11 sqm equipped Wkttei, baft WC 


oer mdmfjti* 1975 
adaOnmOESACKMEn 
fa MONTTBJL, VUAJB, BSTAADt 
US DUflEBi VBBlBt, 
CRAI^NONTANMle. ItoS baft- 
roams. Sir. 20^000 to 3J raft 

HVACSA 

52, Man*r*asLCH-1211 O aneva 2 
Tef 41 22-734 ll 4a te 734 12 20 

USA GENERAL 

HOLLTWOOO HUS gated celebrity 
aside. Nnt to Bawqr Hfa dus 3 
badroom auetf._ho«M. Soto Ursa, 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


New Janey 15 Ma toNYC 

Coma Oredly tote QAIAXY 

70)0 Bite E GdtardwraAiMerMoH 
Tamre, to & Outdoor fads, Qub 

1-26 3 Be d oorsi & Panfwsas 

BENTAIS SI 20064000 




Riverfront 


201-861-6777 _ 

OPEN 7 DAYS FAX 201-861-0677 


htamfag NYC/Eosf 60s 


GREECE 


A CHEAM ON 1HE MiNQi BMUA , 
3 bn from Momm, access to your ! 
SUPERB SKUBfflVIlJLAbyyourown , 
pnvafe Ul, faring Iht wodiraiui I 

fra* garage, 6 bedrooms. 5 baftrooms i 
on 6 tXTiqmSeow(rigrpc«t/(>od house, I 
beautitd flordsn, dred privde sea 
access. AtaMh farWrffy A 
omM r far Modm GneOfiVot FI, . 

QwmmFaMmd Stamm. 

Contort umw drertty te (33) 

99 78 46 41 . te (33) 93 78 00 72 


mX-nOmMUDBANGUIS 

faeng fte Medterronaan. vary 
toianvB^ room 

nr CASNCT Cartact owner teTKti 
93784641. te (33) 93 78 00 72 
Avafabta Chrormas, Manan 
Grand te FI, Cannes Fatfwd 
and Swwner, faster. 


GABAUT, 3 KM MOM MCE 

var wxuuous vttiA, 

i mi nr ping win nf ifai Hmt •*- ‘T 
set in a marvelous garden. 4 b e dumu . 
swimviapod. pnvate gym 
Avteabhtar Jdy and Aumif 

NEM MCE. BBI0B4Q HOTH." 1 ** 
Mogftwt sea wew, terrace. Stwtiro, 
aB tu mfort s. siaKk TV, telechane, 
equipped known. Weekends • Weekly 
-MomNy. SPECIAL OFFS BATES. Td: 
(38 93 a 37 20. te 031 93 22 39 21 
TOUHttlilS-SUR-iOUP, ipariow via, 
bn irina frodace. 4 beck 3 bafts, 
poof garage. FiLOOft faph iwitoWer 
retdSl 9358 ffv. te 93 58 80 42 
CANPC5c Speetoafar view, bwtofnxo. 
3>ao« flrftentemol Td M80471B3 
93389999 - 93434650. Option to buy. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

WANTED: 2-4 BEDROOM HOUSE. 
Mac. 1 hr. Meeton/Cames, Now. far 
67 months, prefer oountry, or panUy 
purchase. Td LK 1441 730 829600 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 



PAMS 16ft - AUONL 8 / P-room 
u p ui tcnert in high dan fauMng, an 
rased ground war bveL mik ovbp- 
looking fte gmden. F6.SM.000. 
FROMOREAL Tetfi] 44.17.1802 


PAMS 78s - RUE OE BOURGOGPC 
Townhouse to be renovated. 

Tat Ownar (J) 4SM3MM 

60 KM SOUTH PAMS, 1<MX» sqm. 
wooded park, stream, pend, 130 sqjn. 
house, quafty conshudion, afl core- 
farts, garage, 24 nun. terrace. Ik- 
owft flJlOd: Owrer m 6424596a 


cent FI JM Id: Owner HI 6424596a 
16ft BEST TASIE. VBtY LUXUSOOUS 


LAME B 8 AOCIANO. » hour from 
Borne, rofenctid Sdnride vJb wift 
gerden & 5,000 sqjn. of land, includ- 
ing 3 HpOrtft) howev 2 terraces 
overiodung fte kfte and vAage of 
Anguikra S and an Etruaam aalta. 
tea $28 mBon. Private sde. lab 39- 
69968101. 


MAGNRCBfr WATHffRONT Estate 
2100 oan + pmeta 125 acre dwd, 
TAX FBg.l38Mfd» +33-1-3W96197 

PARIS A SUBURBS 

RARE. TOWNHOUSE 
1930, 300 sqjn>2 levek + artists 
ateker m aupim, 45 sqjn. treed 
courtyard, on acres. F7/XXLOOO. 
ALSO: 16ft MJTHM, BcCB’TTONAl 
53 sqm. + 49 sqm. terrace, mrfhing 
in tav, uuke ia nix cottar, tislancal 
uto. In greenery. F3iXX).00a 
Aaenoes abshm Mark* Brauff 
te a 92 20 05. te 38 96 48 83 


AVENUE FOCH 

EXCBTIONAL 

Owner sdk rfcptae, top floors, 
2B6 tqjlC, 3 bectioomi, doable 
reception, 2 reads' roamv 2 parisngs. 

Triple exposure. Lawned Terrace. 
R5MQ00. Tab (1 ) 47 j06.20lA1. 


PARIS 1ST 

VtN DOMS-CO NCCIBPti AREA 
2 i ridW ii epartreants 
in new high dan fet&fog, 
parking- 156 SOM 
WUK»UBC SATIS 
te (1) 45.0371^8. 

NBJB1Y BOB HIGH CLASS 50 ft* 
aparenen l + 50 sqm. ganren, very 
quat. jwte owtitan, 


FUOOJOaTet: 14230 8107 after 5pn I 
IS* COMMERCE. Urique. modern, 
nrefafava) house, pmota gmden, I 
pidore wmdows, skytighis, fireptocs, 

3 bedroont + mdepamJent stoctia 


TBOCADBtO DUPLEX, 5ft floor, fac- 


ing south. htd> dtu. freestone buBd- 
bto, 4/5 beds. 4 bafts, 189 repn. 
FfflMTd; MID 11147 5568 20 
SAINT MALM IE PARC 194). Re* 
dance opposite Marne, 4/5 rooms, 
125 sqjw.j balconies, parkrng. 


PALATIAL 3,000 sf.COfOO 

-vrift dty & river views. No omean 
sand la create the parted tank 
ttoree. 5 bedrooms, 5 reeptale nat* 
bafts, elegant entartaning space. 
Simsaiiond eaNn ktoren + 

Spectocdcr den. 

LYDIA BALAS4Y 

212-891 7032/Rm 212-8262925 

DOUGIAS HUMAN 


NYC/5ft Are STi 45 ROOMS 

TRUMP TOWER CONDO ^ ! 

BEST BUT. var SPECIAL AiW IXOiT . , 

ajVBSAssa. 

19X1 5", Bedroom ltald 1 . ***■ 

Souft/Wcst exposures with rrver views. 
Owner endoro to mA fcre opportunty. 
MYRA BOOK 

21 2-891 -7093/Res. 212-7727587 

DOUGLAS HUMAN 


NTC/fififi Ava/E m 6 too™ 

(BRRALPARKVEWS 

Sudboded home has eari/west exco- 
swes, 2 master be<kv»a& 2 mart* 
hdfts, farmd drag roam.Nwe titdrea 
and maid's roan plus bam. Whit 

Fax. (212) 588-9424 

GRBNTHAL RESHNTIAL 


NYC/Sth An Here Opportunity 

HISTOWC MANSION 

Turn of creftcy imesMna. 3ff. 2QjOOQsf. 
Drastic reduction. Beouhfui ornore 
faoode. A aand ratidenea far aarewiaM 
or non-profit. Bed buy n NT. 
MY 8 A 8 GD 8 C 

2128717OT3/*es, 2127727587 

DOUGLAS BUMAN 


ste tauniy room, targ* 
beAaatm, 2fag&B, 

y O%tnr te ooffl-m H N 


houand 

AMSTOOAM CANAL antrearfa 

from DR 2500. T* +3TS6464UB 
te 6461844 KOOSHOUSNG 


PERUGIA 

VUAFORRBT 

modern vw on prarenam lire caaea 
"Trinita". A axat ckgtni and ndure* 
area wift very dntingMhed wsM mi, 
The 2-starey «3a is jinatod m a krge 
peek with amd* Iwgh dare etsSartom- 
maf facfiiai rnd a hu^t bebrey 
amuring a suparb vww owr M fan 
of sbfang eantaiPchm tandnpe. 
itaper floor caraists af: Ering/daiag 6 a 
12 a, big teffae* 18 x4 m. bdum; 
ttado, 2 bedroNK, 2 bafts, new krt- 
chen. 

Ground floor wift dead ooaws to ga^ 
dsn indudea _ Ering/fareiy roo m raft 
dmg iiMuig nvw Uchfio, 
mezstar bodroon ond Mur boflracm 

hntiftad. A new Kcma reretum grand 


capitaae •nu nras 

hondpctadgrtfey ^tortiw *. 
d nark fans oodsubte* 

Td 1-1614 B11. te MJW 7096 

6 th - lUXBWURRJ^ 
otafiar. 5ft flow, mof&A 


4C07.15J8. 



wrdtsr in dteed in fta red Trretad 
dome st ic req pfaya M <* rereonode 

CAN BE JS41ED AS A WHOLE OR 
UPPER FLOOR ONLY 
CarrenT tenanta a eti rtto g u a h ed rekad 
Armricm heort surgeon who ■ retwn- 
tag to CaEbmia after 2 yacn. 

Profile wift pictures ovedabta. 
AouidM wdauire. Cbrtart owner on 
HkX 39-433 292900 (ITALY) 


EgrajTZCS 35^551 


AG0KE CHAMPS BYSS5 

OfFBB HGH C1ASS APARTMENTS 

“ Qm-GEOfcGc Vg S^ooffl oupMOL 
2 bafts, prekin TOMOO 

Tab (1] 42 25 32 25 

Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT N PARS 
Tab (1) 47.20-30.05 


1 7.1 > f l i 7.1 iiCi jESISj lU 


CHAMPS RTSS in former, towdiocsa 
uncmnMitiond 120 sqm. taceptiona, 
fawrious 3 bedrooreq 2 baShroom^ 
wc fadane ired dneoratod. On a 
garden. ftaiAxa, pairing ta*-. ^ PI 
«63 64 64 bncroem or arentagfl- _ 



16ffc HENRI MARTI Ta wsdrema i 
R 1 JM. F80M08EAL Td fl] 44 17 1802 


RE SAINT LOUS, spacious 'apparte- 
mant de recaption - . 6 saiJ9ad 
wr n daws an fta Seine, 2 bedrooms, 
140 am TaLFW (1140 43 0B 17 
MONTMARTRE CHARMING DUPLEX 
quiet street, (round od 1 st floor, 
125 sqm. bwenad me peefiU 

Td: Owner [11 42 55 37 76. 

8 fa AVENUE MONTAIGNE, in ftgh 
dan bufldiiqi baadriU 47 sqm. prea- 
a-serre. cl caifttrli, poking. Tafc 

(1140 50 07 69. 

5TGERMAWDB HBb end 16ft ota 
3/Aroom couple «MUu ci* . odm. rap 
floor, wew. m mo twie. Tel 1-43294294 , 
15ft dtoroaiig sunny home item 
Square Conmerae, 4 be droom s/2 
baths, terrace. F3JM. Tet 1-60723763 
LA VAflBfC - MAINE (94), B-room 
house, 1^339 sqm port fv«W. Tel: 

TO5qAmftEA5^5. 


NYtyCentral Park South 30TH FLOOR 

Spectacular Condo Exdushm 

2 Hdroams, 2 warble bertn. 35 ft. 
(ring roam. Al major roots facing 
Cam Park. NTs mad dstfaguidwa 

J- C t f 

conoo DiMOno. 

MAH BANCO 212-8917083 

DOUGLAS BUMAN 


IDEAL ACCOMMODATION 

READY TO MOV64N 
Over 4CI00 qaartaaanh 
- TOP OUALflT - sn# 's A aauptod 

Da Grcourf Associates 

te 1-47 S3 80 13 te 45 51 75 77 


FLATOTE 

HnBTOWHtO* 

EXPO PORTE KVBtSAUES 
from sSudos ta fore -room de knee. 


Kv,/tr/>’>P.iiU 


Rouamow rev ostaad to w 

ywafy beautifai duple* flat m Swiss 
dutiet. 3 bedroon, 2 brths, flaraaa. 
SR^jOO reonftly. Rantcf of senm fat 
tarn dnte patofak Tdi +41 22 

731 66 31. 

BON - AHUEnKNT IN OIY, fufly 
equipped, ana yecr or more faring 

(41) 31 351 30 92. 

PSA 

EURO CASA - NEW YORK. 
Fornishad/unfomishod apa rt ment s, 

« . MorfMy • Yoafir tortak 
Aw. 9ft Hoar, N.Y. 10011. 
Td 12121 2GMn. fox 1^121 24M2D5. 
ftreta faWN bedroom, 2 baft 
home, fnmatnd. BOOQ/ma 15711- 15/ 


r" 


te (33-1)45 73 6220 
hoc (33-1) 45 79 73 30 

1ft M* Bienne Mareft hi^i dare fltri 
her Mapped 3 roacro, fireptoas. 
n 7500/ mo. HJXMvak. 1-43B4401 


ma, F4j000/wMk. 


RUSSIAN REPUMUC , 

ST. P HHBRU RCl E rcefcrt wmiern 
u n fuc nrihnd oportmeK - 2 raann. 
separata Irisdreq brahrocMi. sepratta 
wc. hal pta leaftiy. NmtJ to Am- 
ariare Corsdatn. Jl/00 per month. 

T«k 44 71 267 6825 ar 7 8125288218 

REAL ESTATE ' 

WANTED/EXOrtANGE - 


RtnaunoNM ksbcnoe, « - 

& ed uni iond emhanges far prahs- 
kwerdtooge. 286 ton S,. 
Haarinn. OMnvcainiaUIP 3GA 


'•7. 

: m 


II SAMT LOUR 
and mezzamw. 


Swing roam 
y redone. 


NBJRLY -BOB DE BOULOGNE. Ideal 
lenmous p>edo4erTe. 48 sqm Priae: 
F15M. launobfiara Are Tai: 1-46330177 

SWITZERLAND 


.9*6 TeL Owner 


VQJLARS - PtBINHOUS, NEW 
2 bedroow duple* apartnreft 107 
sqm. + 2 bdooraes, garage. Clare to 
center and sWfts, m ugri fiort vunr. 
Al one hour from Geneva. Sfr. 
aDC.OOO. Contort owner Mr. Mencta 
Tet +41-22 733 25 30. 1 


ITALY 


NYC/ tort Aw 315 ROOMS 

Pork Avrnn» Ceadcrnmhm 

Best boy m etagom asdurive bdUna, 
Ided far piodoierm. 1 bedroom. lT5 
bafts. Inns Suing roam, drentag area 
toiaro far a itt sofa. J410K. 
Odoten 212-891 7011 

DOUGIAS BUMAN 

MfDTOWN MAMWTTAN CONDO 
Fdl service luxury doorman bdkb^t, 
ISO sqm, 2 bedrooms, ideal p«da- 
tane or ompanta ap u tta w nl. Near 
fteatra/Cenfid tort/Lmcata Cartar. 
For quick sde by owner, asking ; 
$375/308. te 212-315-1437 Yd: 21? I 

315-1435 USA. 

BEST DEAL N TOWN. Ouref stvdfa 
Funsahad. Air confitiorana l ep ireJ e 
kitchen, much data space, rail service 
buUno. ta heart of Mta wttres. Near 
Cenirn Fork. 57ft & 6ft. J115K. Cofl 
from Bam-lltrei Nf time 212^466160 


PHkA-TEBSdWC tort Ara/63rd 
ft. Funtifted room, kifij ioiette. mdd 


MWI 

B ICcralb^^Sribune 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


MOPE 

Fare (1)46 37 93 70. 

GERMANY! AUSDBA 6 CB4I 
BUmfeFroiBret 
TaL(Wg72d7ll 
te (06597273 Ift 

SVWQBHANDiPdk 
TeL mil 728X121. 
te [021)7283091. 

(JNIDXNGDCHifclandba, 
Td.: (0711836 4802. 
Telex: 26/009. 
te (071) 2402254, 


MOKIHAMHBCA 

NEW YORK: 

Tft 012752-3890. 
TJfrettJBCOI 572-72 1 2. 
Wmc 427175 
te (212)755^785 

AHA/WKWC 

HONGKONG: 

M: (852) 9222-1 188. 
Tefac 61170 WIHX. 
te 1852] 9222-1 19a 
ENGAP0RE: 

TeL 223 6478. 
te (63224 1566. 
T*ktaa749.HT5K 



Magnificent Villa 
in the heart of 
CHIANTI. 
Renovated from a 
large casa colonica, 
witfi 2 monumental 
stone structures. On 
a hill surrrounded 
by 25 hectares of 
private land, with 
panoramic view. 

Main House (550 sq m = 5.920 sq ft ): 3 bedrooms. 3 
bathrooms, den. living room, formal dining room. Enormous 
kitchen, granite counter tops Terracotta tiles and parquet 
flooring throughout house Elevator to 2nd floor. 2 car garage 
(35 sqm. = 376sqft.) 

Guest House i !08 sq.m. = l .162 sq.ft), independent 
water/electrlc. kitchen, shower, toilet, fireplace, terracotta tiles, 
electric windows. 

Both houses have central heat and air conditioning systems. 

Automatic sprinkler system, electric gate with remote control 
and TV security cameras Security monitors are throughout 
both houses, alarm system connected to carabinieri. 

Ideal for corporate retreat. Private road. 

For further information contact in Italy: 

Anna Rita 

TUSCAN ENTERPRISES 
TeL: 0577-740623 or Fax: 0577-740950. 


ILIA. 

FOR SALE 

U.SA, - HOUSTON / DALLAS / FT. WORTH 
20 -ynr rid company, onwr nal in goad hedti and pasl nBamdi^saelebsMainipiny. 
WELL ESTABLISHED • EXCELLENT CREDIT • EXCELLENT REPUTATION 
ApprorimoWy 1000 high QuaHylnconaprnk^ 100% teased, plus 

6 mMtan sqixra feel tf PRBff Davdopmafl Land afl wBi hfoh danRy. uMles In place. 
PIUS: a Property Management tanpony 
WBssfl Afl ft* cash wisM slock. GJ5 S 75 . 000 . 000 ) 

BROKERS/ASff/TS Protected wflh a 10% ammfeston. 

SERIOUS COMTONTW. INQUIRIES ONLY: FAX (713) 468-1508 


YOU SAW THIS AD. 

So did nearly half a million potential 
real estate buyers worldwide. 

Shouldn't wwt advertise vow property in the 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE? 


r Auction sale at the Palais de Justice fa Part* ' 

Thursday, Nov. 3, 1 994 at 2-30 pjn. In one lot 

APARTMENT IN PARIS 5™ 

10 rue Broca 

4 main rooms on the 2nd floor, cellar 
STARTING PRICE: 500,000 FF 

Fw uitewttm cmriod: SCP cfeMOURZITCH. de BOUCHONY G Assoc, 

Lawy s s iif S 5 rt &M. *SlNs til 47^3.78.01 or the Berk 

. at the Trib. de Cde. Inst de Pwis. MlniteL 3616 AVOCATVENTES. 


OMAT BRITAIN 


CENTRAL LONDON 
INVESTMENT 

Next to Buddngham Palace, fti 



IRILAND . 

FARNEY CASTLE,’ 
THURLHS, 

CO. TIPPERARY. 
IRELAND 

For Sate by Private Treaty 
"Magnificent Historic . 
Caertte Residence" 




TeL: UK (44) 71 828 0796. . 


BARBADOS 

Barbados - St. James 
(West Coast Beach) 

One storey via tor safe wflh two 
double bedroom lultw and forge 
entertaining rooms, forming part 
of the exclusive "Seftiert Beoch 

complex' Exquisitely decorated- 
Offtm tevfled in the replan of 
US$350,000 pfu*. 
Contact; MncNevOe, 
for complete detdb. 
and photograph*. 

Tell + 44 932 84725) 

Fax: + 44 932 869796 


Urrique Castte Hasktence tea lowly I 
rural sating on 25 sores bounded by a 
rwar.Tatafly ranoveted and 
modernised. 6/7 reception rame, 1G ■ 


176 Pembroke Road, 


MARBQ1A F80NTU9E GOtF 

Luxury via wifli a vfaw loufltwank dawn Aa 
tevroy b mo o fata. ibednxro, 

3 roCe?*wu, superb Wwn, breolrfoil room, 
3 garages, poa jocuzzi. I200/3fl0sqjx. 
Price Piv MfiOO 000 {quidt nfa dnndl 
25 y«n taparitatota Weate apartrereft, 


C*J nSTMA SZBCELY. 

Td.: 34-52413)142 te 34-52-81 .77,88 


Tafc JnC+353-1 -6882588 
FncM 4353-1-6682981 


ausvmua 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA. 
WATERFRONT BOMB, 

Lreft 3-4b/r hom* 30 min bom dty, 
pontoon far yacht Seflwater pool, ducted 
•fraoo. btaWIM «MCf *faw», best sonny 
aspect. Private sale USS1.T5 ntiSoa. 
rri i nrfrwlwr vre frti lf (nre 
The Vriadoc. P.O. Boj 
N orth Sydney. 3051. AusinJt*. 












3£*iTlJ 

ft,* * "*u ... 

**■" — wsSSb 

l> °ui ^ jp t 'to^ 
£ *■«&>* 



AFLOAT IN VIETNAM — At least 180 people have died, and the rice 




. , Cl jin «. «>ne-. -LI P ruler 

crop has been damaged in the Mekong Delta's worst flooding in 16 vears. 


North Korea Talks Flounder 

Hopes for an Accord Fade as Experts Wrangle 


Compiled fa Our Stiff From Dup&chn 

GENEVA — Hopes for an 
imminent conclusion to nuclear 
talks between the United States 
and North Korea faded Thurs- 
day. as experts from the two 
sides continued to wrestle with 
technical issues. 

The outcome of the expert 
discussions, which were con- 
tinuing Thursday evening, is ex- 
pected to determine whether 
chief negotiators will be able to 
meet to wrap up the talks. 

But a Thursday meeting be- 
tween the two heads of delega- 
tions looked unlikely, officials 
said. 

The talks are aimed at resolv- 
ing an international dispute 
over North Korea’s suspected 
nuclear weapons program, but 
they have been deadlocked for 
the past three weeks. 

In Seoul, a South Korean 
politician said the United States 
had offered major new conces- 
sions that would allow Pyong- 
yang five years before accepting 
full checks from international 
inspectors at all its suspected 
nuclear sites. 

Lee Sei Kee of South Korea’s 
governing Democratic Liberal 
Party said Washington had also 
agreed that construction of a 
new, internationally financed 


light-water nuclear reactor to 
replace North Korea's current 
graphite technology would be- 
gin before the sues were in- 
spected. 

Mr. Lee gave no source for 
his information, but Washing- 
ton has kept Seoul abreast of 
the negotiations. The Demo- 
cratic Liberals’ leader. Presi- 
dent Kim Young Sam. has ex- 
pressed fears Washington 
might accept a "dangerous" 
compromise. 

The apparent U.S. climb- 
down could touch off new fric- 
tions with South Korea, already 
unhappy at what it considers 
Washington's conciliatory 
stance with the North. 

Signs appeared late Tuesday 
that the two sides may be close 
to a breakthrough. 

A spokesmanTor North Ko- 
rea’s Foreign Ministry told re- 
porters that progress had been 
made on some points. 

The chief U.S. negotiator. 
Robert L. Gallucci, said any 
progress would depend on the 
outcome of the expert level 
talks. 

A broad agreement between 
the two sides was reached in 
August after North Korea 
agreed to open up its nuclear 
facilities in return for closer 


diplomatic ties with the United 
States and technical aid to re- 
place its outdated nuclear 
plants. 

Bui Pyongyang is balking at 
allowing inspectors into two 
crucial sites that it says are mili- 
tarv- related and out of bounds. 

The West suspects the sites 
contain evidence that North 
Korea has been developing nu- 
clear weapons. It is insisting on 
verification. 

Another sacking point is the 
future of 8,000 spent nuclear 
rods in a cooling pood north of 
Pyongyang. 

The United Suues fears that 
reprocessing the rods could 
yield enough plutonium for five 
nuclear bombs. 

President Kim said earlier 
this week that he did not believe 
the North had actually yet pro- 
duced nuclear weapons, but 
thought it was using ine implicit 
threat to try to squeeze conces- 
sions in Geneva. (AP, Reuters) 

Li Peng to Visit South Korea 

Reusers 

SEOU L — Prime Minister Li 
Peng of China will visit South 
Korea at the end of October, a 
presidential spokesman said 
Thursday. 


g§||; Myopia Operation 
Has Mixed Results 


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By Warren E. Leary 

New York Times Service 

WASjHINGTON — A 10- 
year study of an increasingly 
popular; surgical technique used 
to correct poor distance vision 
shows that the method is rea- 
sonably safe and effective but 
that it Aiay lead to an acceler- 
ated decline in the ability to see 
things up close. - 
The study, the longest and 
most detailed on the aftermath 
of the surgical procedure, radial 
keratotomy, concludes that it 
can have long-term benefits in 
correcting myopia, a common 
condition in which light from a 


fcdkt* 11 facet focuses in front surg«y that this w< 
-U> * of the retina, producing blurred was generally small and 

“■ ’•# *= vi j maces 1 able with glasses. 


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images. 

But a previously little-known 
effect of i the surgery — gradual 
changes jn the eye that result in 
progressively fuzzier near vision 
— should be a consideration in 
deciding] whether to have the 

operation* the study concluded. 

The study, sponsored by the cd vision was due to aging in 
National L Eye Institute, one of particular the decline in close- 


lished in The Archives of Oph- 

Radial keratotomy is a proce- 
dure in which spoke-like slits 
are cut into the surface of the 
cornea, the clear, curved cover- 
ing of the eye. As the cuts heal, 
the cornea flattens and redirects 
light rays so that they fall prop- 
erly on the light-sensitive reti- 
na. . 

Experts estimate that the 
procedure is performed on 
more than 250,000 people a 
year in the United States. 

The study said that in only 3 
percent of cases was distance 
vision worse than before the 
surgery and that this worsening 
" correct- 

wjth glasses. 

The study found that 10 
years after surgery, 58 percent 
of patients heeded some correc- 
tion by glasses or contact 
lenses, for near or distance vi- 
sion, at least some of the time. 

Part of this need for correct- 


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the Natfonal Institutes of 
Health, determined that the 
surgery “had a reasonable mar- 
gin of safety.” 

“Vision-threatening compli- 
cations wfcre rare,” said the re- 
port, compiled by researchers at 
nine medical centers and pub- 


» .hBOUW-O* 

°^fCTicf 


up vision that commonly devel- 
ops after 40, the researchers 
concluded. But some of it, they 
said, appeared to be attribut- 
able to the radial keratotomy 
procedure, which seemed to 
cause the change in some peo- 
ple at an earlier age. 


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China Says Military Ties 
With U.S. Will Increase 


JMUUW 


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Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

BEUING — - China expects 
military exchanges with the 
United States to increase and 
sees Defense Secretary William 
J. Perry’s visit as a chance to 
▼improve overall relations, a 
1 Foreign Ministry spokesman 
said Thursday. 

“We hold a positive attitude 


China plans to discuss mili- 
tary cooperation and exchanges 
during Mr. Perry’s visit, Mr. 
Chen said. He declined to say 
what specific bilateral issues 
would be discussed. 

A U.S. official said earlier 
this week that the topics would 
include weapons proliferation, 
nuclear weapons testing and re- 


l ■ . , , uuviuu wvawua tvouut auu to- 

to the dovebpmeDt- of relations ; ations with North Korea. The 




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sakneyE? 

c.oTir{ff 

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between thp two armed forces, 
said the spokesman, Chen Jian. 

Mr. Perry is to arrive in Beij- 
ing on Sunday after a visit to 
the Gulf for talks with leaders 
in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait- 

Military; relations between 
China and] the United States 
have resumed and will “gradu- 
ally increase,” Mr. Chen said, 
noting that high-ranking Chi- 
nese military leaders recently 
visited Washington. 

Mr. Chen told reporters that 
overall Chinese-U-S. relations 
were “at a critical juncture," 
and that Mr. Perry’s visit would 
be ah opportunity to improve 
them. H& suggested there were 
"challenges to be faced” but did 
not^labpraie. 


United States also seeks more 
openness on such issues as 
weapons modernization and 
military budgets. 

Mr. Chen also reiterated 
Thursday that China’s senior 
leader, Deng Xiaoping 90, was 
in good health ana that recent 
foreign press reports that his 
condition had seriously deterio- 
rated were unfounded. 

Mr. Deng’s younger sister 
was quoted by an official news- 
paper as saying he attended a 
Bering fireworks display with 
heron the OcL 1 National Day. 

Rumors about Mr. Deng’s 
health have proliferated in re- 
cent weeks. 

(AP, Reuters) 



Legislators in Murder Plots 





■■ ; -Lot Angela Tima Service 

MEXICO CITY — An ac- 
cu^.cqnsgtftator has. told in- 
vestigators. &at federal lcgi5la= 
t<ws:;p lotted the Sept. 2£ 
asffiLsirt atwiy . of the second- 
ranking official m Mexico’s rul- 
ing party. tu^L planned to kill a 
former party chairman and oth- 
er politicians. 

' Fernando iRodriguez GonzA- 
Jez, an aide to Congressman 
Manuel Miifjdz Rocha, told, the 
police that his boss belonged to 
two political groups whose pur- 
pose was to. eliminate political 
reformers, ^without regard to 
what means ihad to be used to 
adrieve. that*” according to a 
statement ’from the attorney 
generaTsoffice. Mr. Mufloz Ro- 
cha is a.fumtive from justice. 

■ Thehilfist included Fernan- 
do Ortiz Arana, former -chair- 
man of the Institutional Revo- 


lutionary Party, which has 
governed Mexico for 65 years; 
Governor Manuel Cavazos 
Lerma of the stale of Tamauli- 
pas; Congresswoman Laura 
Alicia Gam Galino, head of 
the Tamaulipas legislative dele- 
gation, as well as the slain man, 
Jose Francisco Ruiz Massieu. 

Mr. Rodriguez GonzMez told 
the pdice, according to the 
statement, that one of the two 
political groups consisted of 
members of die Federal Cham- 
ber. of Deputies, the lower 
house of Congress, and that the 
other was led by Senator Enri- 
que Cdrdenas Gonzalez. Mr. 
Clrdenas Gonzalez complained 
to the attorney general's office 
last week that he was being 
slandered when. other suspects 
accused him of involvement In 
the alleged assassination ploL 



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P. Page 6 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 

OPINION 



INTERNATIONAL 



Publiabnt ¥iih Tlr N**» York Tiiw- anil Thf Vaiihuiplun Pimi 


Sr Until c Saddam : Contain His Desperate Efforts to Intimidate 


It’s Late in Algeria 


Tlie clock licks on in Algeria, and the 
□eking grows louder and /aster. On Mon- 
day this week came the assassination of 
|he 19th Frenchman to die in the war 
between Islamic guerrillas and the mili - 
tary dictatorship; on Wednesday five ear 
w>mbs in Algiers and the war’s 64th for- 
eign victim, a South Korean; on Thurs- 
day an estimate that the death toll among 
Algerians themselves, not long ago 200 a 
month, may now be well over 400 a week. 
This is what happens when the logic of 
events lakes its grip. 

In a bid to deflect that logic. Algeria's 
military regime — with the backing of the 
French government — is now trying to 
negotiate with some of the milder mem- 
bers of the Islamic Salvation Front. 

As well as the fanatically anti-demo- 
cratic and anti-Western sort, there is a 
less extreme faction among the Islam- 
ists. If Algeria’s rulers had attempted to 
deal with them in January 1992, that 
month’s election might not have been 
canceled, a relatively moderate land 
honestly elected) Islamic government 
might have come to power, and perhaps 
an increasingly savage civil war would 
have been prevented- 

As it is, the mistake was made and the 
blood that has been shed since then has 
eaten away much of the willingness to 
compromise, on both sides. This is why. 
by late 1994, negotiation has such a slen- 
der chance of success. 

It will be very difficult for President 
Liamine Zeroual to get the hard-liners in 
his army — the "eradicators" — to accept 
a revival of the election they killed 33 
months ago. That would be humiliation. 
Worse, these officers will correctly say, 
an election now would produce a more 
explosive result than an election in 1992 
would have done, because the presum- 
ably victorious Islamists have meantime 


From the Ruble’s Rubble 


President Boris Yeltsin, after a stun- 
ning 25 percent drop in the value of the 
ruble on Tuesday and only a small recov- 
ery on Wednesday, dismissed his finance 
minister and demanded that Parliament 
fire the head of the Russian central bank. 
But Russia needs to do more than sack a 
few officials. The currency debacle has 
been months in the making. To keep its 
drive to freer markets from stalling, Rus- 
sia needs to turn its policies around, with 
help from the West. 

Recently, the Russian economy has 
looked O.K. Inflation fell from 20 per- 
cent per month to 4 percent. The deficit, 
though large, was set at respectable lev- 
els. Stores have been stocked with plenty 
of goods. But the favorable signs masked 
problems waiting to explode. 

Inflation fell because the central bank 


He look the first step on Wednesday — 
dismissing officials who debased the cur- 
rency. The next step is to separate the 
central bank from the government and to 
dedicate monetary policy to the mission 
of stabilizing the' exchange rate of the 
ruble. That means that the government 


could no longer print new rubles when it 
ran huge deficits. 


drove interest rales to impossibly high 
levels that, left alone, would have crushed 


levels that, left alone, would have crushed 
economic activity. The bank relented this 
summer, flooding the market with new 
rubles in an effort to bring rates lower. 
That in turn triggered inflation. Mean- 
while, bankrupt enterprises borrowed 
massively from each other — staying 
alive until the government bailed them 
ouL Which is just what it did during the 
past few months, pumping rubles into 
agriculture and other sectors. That, too, 
had an inflationary effect, and the value 
of the ruble fell. 

Events came to a climax this week 
when traders, realizing that the central 
bank had spent most of its dollar reserves 
vainly trying to prop up the ruble, 
dumped more rubles onto the market. 

Mr. Yeltsin has one overriding eco- 
nomic task; to stabilize the ruble. Mar- 
kets cannot thrive if people refuse to hold 
currency because its value disintegrates 
in their hands. 


ran huge deficits. 

Here is where the West has a crucial 
role to play. It needs to give Russia access 
to loans to help pay some of the govern- 
ment’s bills, thereby removing some of 
the need to print rubles. Of course, the 
loans would be conditioned on Russian 
pledges to limit deficits to sustainable 
levels. 

The West also needs to provide dollars 
for a stabilization, fund, so that traders 
know that Russia has reserves to stabilize 
the ruble. If reform works, Russians will 
hold rubles and the stabilization fund will 
not be touched — which is what hap- 
pened in Poland when the West helped it 
get market reform under way. 

Russia also needs to create a credible 
tax system that not only raises revenue 
but assures domestic and foreign inves- 
tors alike that the system is fair and 
predictable. Foreigners also need clearer 
and less restrictive corporate and labor 
codes. Finally, Moscow must provide 


easier bankruptcy procedures to stop the 
hemorrhage of rubles from government 


hemorrhage of rubles from government 
coffers to worthless companies. 

Russia's choice is this: It can under- 
take these reforms, or revert to form and 
try to solve problems by government fiat. 
With modest help from the West, the 
temporary pain erf market reform need 
not be severe as Moscow lays the founda- 
tion for a sounder, more vibrant econom- 
ic future. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Reform Is Up to Ukraine 


Ukraine, deeply divided, still has not 
fully made up its mind about economic 
reform. Its president, Leonid Kuchma, 
this week urged Parliament to relax con- 
trols and let the country move toward 
open markets. But the Parliament has 
resisted. The West has been offering sub- 
stantial aid. but most of it wifi have to 


depend on progress toward better policy. 

Ukraine has fallen into dangerous cir- 
cumstances. It cannot retreat into commu- 
nism, but it has not been able to agree to 
move toward privatization. Meanwhile, its 
economy and Living standard decline. 

The trouble isn't a lack of democracy. 
Both branches of the government are 
elected. But the country is operating un- 
der its old Soviet constitution — a con- 
tinuing source of weakness. 

The deeper question is whether Ukraine 
can hold together. Its western region, 
which speaks Ukrainian, tends to look 
toward Western Europe and to support 
Mr. Kuchma’s plans for rebuilding the 
economy. The eastern part mostly speaks 


Russian and has resisted the ideas of pri- 
vate property and competition, which is 
odd, since Russia itself has been moving to 
adopt them. It is hard to think that this 
paralysis can continue much longer. 

Mr. Kuchma sees that clearly. In a 
ringing speech Tuesday, he warned the 
Parliament that failure to pursue reform 
decisively could lead to anarchy and even 
to civil war. Ukraine is a big and popu- 
lous country. Instability there would have 
severe effects on its neighbors, particular- 
ly Poland and Russia. 

The West is doing what it should. A 
succession of emissaries, including Vice 
President Al Gore, has offered encour- 
agement and promises of billions of dol- 
lars in loans to rebuild the economy, 
including its nuclear reactors. But all of 
this outside help has to be contingent on 
Ukrainians' determination to spend the 
money well and proceed with rational 
purpose. Ukrainians themselves now 
nave to come to a decision. 


— THE WASHINGTON POST. 




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P ARIS — Western analysts are admit- 
tedly stumped trying" to figure out 


tedly stumped trying to figure out 
why Saddam Hussein trumped his own 
ace with threatening military maneuvers 
just when the UN Security Council faced 
an open split on lifting sanctions. 

This time he apparently has beat a 
quick retreat- withdrawing troop rein- 
forcements confronting Kuwait when 


By Flora Lewis 


grown angrier and more intransigent. No 
election, the eradicators will say, tapping 
their holsters. 

But it will be even harder for the 
Islamist leaders to accept what Presi- 
dent Zeroual wants. Algeria's military 
regime, again with France’s backing, 
seems to be hoping that its adversaries 
will settle for a power-sharing deal with- 
out any firm promise of an election. The 
hard-liners on the other side will cor- 
rectly say that this would mean giving 
up what the guerrillas bave been fighting 
for since 1992. That, too, is humiliation. 
Election or else, these people will say. 
fingering their own holsters. 

On this knife edge the hope or a negoti- 
ated settlement teeters. If an agreement is 
not reached fairly soon — say. bv the end 
of the year — there will probably never 
be an agreement. And then the prognosis 
is grisly. 

It is now almost inconceivable that the 
army can decisively beat the guerrillas. But 
the army, with its near-monopoly of heavy 
weapons, will not itself be easily mopped 
up. This points to a prolonged war of 
attrition in which Algeria may break up 
into rebel-held zones and army-controlled 
ones. This would tempt the Berbers — the 
amiably Muslim, non-Arab quarter or the 
population, with its own language and its 
own mountainous homeland in eastern 
Algeria — to cry a plague on both militant 
Islam and dictatorial soldiers. 

Out of this disintegrating Algeria 
emerges the danger, for Europe, of a 
wave of refugees and of an implacably 
hostile Islamic power on the other side 
of the Mediterranean. The clock has 
not quite reached midnight. Before it 
does, the European Union must try to 
prevent Algeria's generals from making 
bad even worse. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


especially around Basra and '.Amaru. 
They presumed it was to escalate the 


A demilitarised zone would 
also curb Saddam *s abuses of 
kis own suffering people . 


President Bill Clinton ordered in U.S. 
forces to demonstrate Saddam's miscalcu- 
lation. The Security Council is not even 
considering, removing sanctions now. 

But Saddam will keep pushing. His 
country is desperate. The surprising 
threat showed that he is, too. 

When he invaded Kuwait in 1990. the 
then Iraqi ambassador in Paris explained 
the move privately with a long account of 
his country's financial problems given 
the low price of oil, concluding, "He had 
no choice, his head was on the block." 

For at least a month before the disclo- 
sure by the United States of the latest 
mass deployment of Iraqi elite divisions 
toward Kuwait, the exiled Iraqi opposi- 
tion had been reporting the arrival of 
important military forces in the south. 


campaign against the "marsh Arabs" be- 
ing driven out of their watery homes 
alongside the Euphrates and to put down 
increasing attacks from the resistance, 
which opposition sources claim has 
mounted open battles as well as suc- 
cessful ambushes. 

For considerably longer, they have 
been reporting dramatic rates of deser- 
tion from the ordinary army, up to 60 
percent in some units, cruelly countered 
with the order to cut off an ear and tattoo 
the forehead of those who are caught. 
Doctors who refuse the operation are 
said to have been executed. 

Now. U.S. military experts confirm the 
assessment that Saddam's armv, nearly a 


ized and awed with nationalist fervor. 

He thought he could intimidate the 
United Nations into a deal to end sanc- 
tions. which he could then claim as a 
great victory, showing his concern for the 
people’s welfare. But he has adamantly 
refused to accept the UN offer thai 
would allow him to sell oil for food 
and medical imports. 

He has good reason to feel that his own 
life as well as his regime's are now at 
stake. Even the Arabs who supported or 
sympathized with him in the Gulf con- 
flicu including Jordan and the Palestin- 
ians. refuse to back him this time. 

Still. Saddam has a certain subtle inter- 


national support. For legal and diplomatic 
reasons, no aovemment calls for his oust- 


million strong at the start of the Gulf 
War, is now a "hollow force.” Less chan 


100,000, essentially in die five Republi- 
can Guard divisions, are rated as effec- 
tive — although dial would be plenty to 
overrun Kuwait without determined 
American support of the Kuwaitis. 

It is true that the economy is in sham- 
bles as a result of sanctions, although all 
signs of w’ar damage have been removed 
from Baghdad. The main victims, of 
course, are the bulk of the people whom 
Saddam, a firm believer in the utility 
of intimidation, has at once terror- 


reasons. no government calls for his oust- 
er. Some, including Security Council veto 
members Russia and France, are eager to 
do business with him. 

The opposition, which represents all 
major sectors of the population, is a frac- 
tious coalition gradually gaining allies 
within the regime. The only way to mea- 
sure this is by Saddam’s high-level- 
purges, which are becoming broader 
and more frequent. 

Therefore, the proposal from William 
Perry, the U.S. defense secretary, that the 
UN enforce a deep demilitarized zone 
across from Kuwait to match its flight- 
exclusion zone can bring many benefits. 

Mr. Perry's reason is to prevent Sad- 
dam's on-again off-again threats from 
pinning down a substantial U.S. force or 


obliging it to return. But it would also 
dramatically reduce Saddam’s ability to 
persecute the suffering people in the 
south. Without his army’s support, his 
police and party apparatus would be un- 
able to sustain the level of repression. 
The opposition could organize in the area 
and greatly enhance the chances of over- 
throwing him from within. 

There is one obstacle, and it seems to 
repeat the reason for the unsatisfactory 
end to ihe 1991 war. There Is good cause 
to believe that Saudi Arabia leaned on 
President George Bush then not to press 
For the collapse of Saddam's regime. It 
doesn’t like popular upheavals. Now the 
Saudi rulers are under greater internal 
pressure than ever, and King Fahd ts 
reportedly too U 1 to rule effectively and 
too stubborn to abdicate. 

But the United States cannot preserve 
the Saudis from iheir own mistakes forev- 
er, no more than it could preserve, the 
shah’s power in Iran. Forcing -Saddiim’s 
army out of southern Iraq would no doubt 
take some military action (it should have 
been donein 1991), but it would not only 
■protect Kuwait- and> Saudi Arabia, h.. 
would advance Saddam’s demise. 

The United States should convince the 
Saudis that they have much more to gain 
this way, and that they should counter 
their fears that the despot’s fall might 
encourage their internal opposition "by 
liberalizing their own regime: 

G3 Flora Lewis. ' ~ 


A & 


. atirtft.- 


■ -s. * 



. .*,1 tub- 


Assad: He Speaks of Concessions While Buying More Tanks 


W ASHINGTON — I spot- 
ted Shimon Peres, the Is- 


VV ted Shimon Peres, the Is- 
raeli foreign minister, on a flight 
to Los Angeles last week and 
plunked myself down in the seat 
next to him. How did he explain 
the latest polls in Israel that 
show the opposition leader. Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu, running neck- 
and-neck with Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin? 

A fast man with an aphorism. 
Mr. Peres replied: “Polls are like 
perfume — nice to smelL dan- 
gerous to swallow." 

That playful parrying was 
O.K. because the answer is ap- 
parent: ( 1 ) inflation under the 
Labor government is over 14 per- 
cent; (2) Mr. Rabin's answer is a 
cock am ami e capital gains tax, 
undermining much-needed in- 
vestment; (31 the PLO is unable 
to restrain the murders and kid- 
nappings of Israelis by its rival 
Hamas: (4) Syria's dictator, Ha- 
fez Assad, wants every inch of the 
Golan Heights before granting 
Israel the favor of peace. 

What’s with Mr. Assad? I 
asked. Sometimes a non-pene- 
trating question draws a revealing 


By William S afire 


response. “Assad may miss again 
the beau” ruminated Mr. Peres. 
“He waited 17 years for no thing , 
and now he thinks he should be 
paid for it. He thinks if he waits, 
he’ll get more, as if the .Americans 
could deliver Israel. 

“He’s afraid to bargain be- 
cause he’s worried he may not 
get the best bargain. He thinks 
his comment that he is for peace 
was a great concession and we 
have to pay for it. and we’re 
not impressed." 

Lei's assume that is a dovish 
diplomat talking tough in the 
hope of turning up the heat under 
a frigid interlocutor. From other 
sources, both in and out of touch 
with the Syrians. I get this assess- 
ment of what's with Mr. Assad: 

• For all his reputation for 
shrewdness, he has outsmarted 
and isolated himself. Egypt's 
Anwar Sadat, despised by Mr. 
Assad, got “every inch" of land 
back; Mr. Assad. 17 years later, 
finds it painful to settle for less. 
The penniless Yasser Arafat 
went into negotiations without 


Syria: that in turn gave the 
hungiy king of Jordan leave to 
negotiate a peace treaty with Is- 
rael, even as it encouraged the 
Saudis to ease the boycott. Mr. 
.Assad is standing on the plat- 
form watching the train of Arab 
leadership leave the station. 

• Accordingly, he is dropping 
hints of flexibility. His con- 
trolled television shows King 
Hussein in Israel: his foreign 
minister gives an interview to 
Israeli journalists. His negotia- 
tors, who demanded a first- 
phase negotiation lasting only- 
six months after a token Israeli 
withdrawal from the Golan, now 
agree to one year, a concession 
extracted by Secretary of State 
Warren Christopher. 

• At the same time, he posi- 
tions himse lf for a classic double 
cross. Damascus remains the 
capital of terrorism. Mr. Assad 
has conquered Lebanon and 
does not trouble its Hezbollah. 
He is adding to his force of 4,200 
modem tanks, and is buying 
missiles from North Korea and 


other weaponry from Russia. If 
fundamentalists take over in 
Egypt and Mr. Assad's allies in 
Iran buy or develop a nudear 
bomb. Syria could lead the Ar- 
abs into a Mideast Armageddon. 

Taken together with his need 
for economic sponsors to replace 


Assad has outsmarted 
himself; now he stands 
on ihe platform 
watching the train of 
Arab leadership leave. 


the Russians, these omnidirec- 
tional tugs suggest that the Is- 
raelis are wise to try to reach a 
territorial compromise with Syr- 
ia, but would be foolhardy to 
totally abandon the Golan — a 
military position that cries out 
to be shared, offering security 
to both nations. 

Mr. Christopher, at his best as 
a shuttling lawyer, spends six 
hours closely analyzing each 


point with the suspicious Mr. 
Assad for every hour he spends 
with the forthright Israeli leader. 

What’s with Mr. Rabin? He is 
willing to negotiate ultimate to- 
tal withdrawal in return 'for a 
“warm peace," with a force of 
1,000 Americans permanently 
stationed on the heights to. guar- 
antee against a surprise attack. 
(Thirty Israeli troops are on 
their way to Haiti, as a kind of 
advance repayment.) - 

Honorably, Mr. Rabin ^-who 
promised not to take this gamble 
— is prepared to ask Israelis to 
ratify such an agreement;' in an 
unprecedented referendum. A 
regular election beforehand 
would be better. 

Mr. Rabin's motive is ’noble, 
and his military career gives his 
strategic judgment weight. But l 
think Americans on a Syrian 
Golan would be a. mistake. as is 
the current positioning of Amer- 
icans in the Egyptian Sinai. Isra- 
el should not rely on another 
nation’s monitors for its defense, 
and America should make its 
interventions decisive and brief. 

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The Chinese Army: Professional but Accustomed to a Central Role 


B EIJING — The army will 
most likely play a decisive role 
in China’s politics after the demise 
of Deng Xiaoping, but it is far 
from clear how it will do so. The 
military’s past performance in the 
political arena may be a guide. 

Until now, the army has been a 
central force in Chinese politics, 
but this was not tantamount to 
political intervention by the mili- 
tary. The reason for this essential 
distinction derives from China's 
revolutionary period, when Com- 
munist leaders bad both political 
and military functions. 

After the establishment of the 
Communist regime in 1949, rival 
hierarchies developed within the 
power structure, but at its apex. 


By Ellis Joffe 


political and military leaders re- 
mained closely integrated because 
of their unique personal stature as 
revolutionary godfathers. 

The most significant result of 
this integration was that the na- 
tion's paramount leaders, Mao 
Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, were 
also supreme and active com- 
manders of . the Chinese Army. 
Their special standing enabled 
them to use the army as a power 
base in conflicts within the ruling 
elite. Such involvement was most- 
ly indirect. The exceptions were 
the Cultural Revolution, when 
Mao embroiled the army in a gi- 
gantic social struggle, and the 


Tiananmen Square crisis in 19S9, 
when Mr. Deng compelled it to 
crush pro-democracy demonstra- 
tors with brute force. 

China’s military leaders of that 
generation also relied on the array 
for political maneuvering. But 
they never moved troops for po- 
litical purposes on their own ini- 
tiative. The professional militaiy. 
for their part, tried to stay out of 
politics. The army’s two large- 
scale interventions were carried 


out despite their opposition. 
Mr. Deng's successors will 


Mr. Deng’s successors will not 
be able to involve the military in 
politics in the same way. Their 
hold on the array is much weaker. 


It rests on institutional arrange- 
ments and performance, not on 
personal stature and long-stand- 
ing ties. So they will not be able to 
take unconditional support from 
the armed forces for granted. 

This will probably give the mil- 
itary great influence on the make- 
up of the leadership and on major 
policy issues. However, there are 
important limits- First, the uncer- 
tain stature of the new leaders is 
paralleled by the emergence of a 
new postrevolutionaiy generation 
of military chiefs who, unlike the 
old marshals, lack the personal 
standing to readily lake assertive 
stands against party leaders. 

In ordinary circumstances' the 
new party leaders will not have to 
haggle constantly with the mill- 


Politicians Loose on an Urge Splurge 


tary for support because such 
support will be forthcoming — 
due lo tradition, the professional- 
ism of the armed forces, the insti- 
tutional position of the leaders, 
and their instruments of power. 

However, whether circum- 
stances remain ordinary will de- 
pend on four conditions. 

The first is the state of leader- 
ship politics. Basic policy consen- 
sus and cooperative working rela- 
tions among senior leaders are 
vital for projecting authority and 
confidence to the bureaucracies 
and the nation. A breakdown of 
consensus could lead to pro- 
longed paralysis, which the mili- 




W ASHINGTON — People 
who seek public office 
tend to be what you might call 
urgeful, were that a word. When 
they want something, they want 
it badly. The winner of a party’s 
presidential nomination is usu- 
ally whoever wanted it worst 
That is one reason Bill Clinton 
is president: extremely urgeful 
man. When that guy wants a 
chili dog, stand aside. 

As a politician, Mr. Clinton 
feds an urgent need for change, 
he says. He has rushed reform 
legislation, and most of it has 
blown up spectacularly. 

He seems to know that in 
these days no president can 
count on a second term. His is a 
regency of urgency. 

All humans have urges, but 
politicians can be particularly 
impulsive, importunate, driven 
by the desire for power or money 
or righteousness or maybe even 
good seats at football games. 

Tarnished Agriculture Secre- 
tary Mike Espy, an able man 
who deserves a better first name 
than Tarnished, got in trouble 
for various things, but the one 
that sticks out was his decision 
to attend the playoff game last 
year between the Green Bay 
Packers and the Dallas Cow- 
boys. Any sports fan would 
have wanted to go. 

Someone offered Mr. Espy 
two great seals in a sky box. 
Could we reasonably expect 
him to resist the urge to go, 
simply because the person offer- 
ing the seats was Don Tyson, 
the chicken magnate, the angle 
individual on earth who might 
be most dramatically affected 
by chicken inspection reform ef- 
forts then under consideration 
at the Department of Agricul- 
ture? This was a big game. 


By Joel Achenbach 


The foundation of civiliza- 
tion (this is the obligatory Big 
Picture sentence) is the suppres- 
sion of individual urges in ser- 
vice of a greater good. The new 
sex survey that came out a few 
days ago shows that American 
womes, on average, have had 
two sexual partners in their en- 
tire life, and men six. Obviously 
some people out there are sup- 
pressing some urges. 

(It is hard at first to under- 
stand how women can have had 
two and men six if, as the survey 
says, only about 3 percent of 
men are homosexual. You imag- 
ine six men and six women in a 
room. How do they combine so 
that the men have six partners 
but the women only two? Can 
this be a question on the next 
Scholastic Assessment Test?) 

The paradox is that civiliza- 
tion’s suppression of urges is ulti- 
mately governed by urgeful lead- 
ers. The rule makers, by nature, 
are almost 'incapable of follow- 
ing the rules. 


uig the rules. 

In the old days the press didn't 
cover transgressions. Now It cov- 


cover transgressions. Now it cov- 
ers every alleged peccadillo, ev- 
ery potential conflict of interest, 
every hairy mole and polyp. The 
voters have had to leam what to 
forgive and what to condemn. 
They have to discern winch urges 
are understandable and which 
pathological. 

Henry Cisneros is counting 
on forgiveness. A few years ago 
he was the mayor of San Anto- 
nio. smart, talented, handsome. 
He knew Lhe rules of success. He 
broke one of them. The civilized 
man violated his marital cove- 
nant He confessed publicly. He 
asked for time to work it out He 


later got a job as secretary of 
housing and urban development 

The affair would be long for- 
gotten except that his former 
mistress has sued him for violat- 
ing a verbal agreement to pay 
her $4,000 a month, and in the 
grand tradition of Gennifer 
Flowers has given a television 
tabloid show transcripts of se- 
cretly taped phone calls be- 
tween her and Mr. Cisneros. She 
claimed on television that he 
deceived the FBI about how 
much money he had paid her 
after they broke up. He says he 
was just helping out a friend 
who couldn’t get a job because 
of publicity about the affair. 

In other words, he was just 
being nice. Maybe that’s just an 
urge of his: humanitarianism. 
But he paid her more than 
$200,000. Very nice indeed. 

He apparently will survive this 
little scandal, but it’s embarrass- 
ing, and he probably wishes he 
had suppressed a few more urges 
in his rise to stardom. 

Former and May be- Again 
D.C. Mayor Marion Barry had 
urges. He says he was a sex ad- 
dict, but it was his urge to light 
the crack pipe, the urge for eu- 
phoria, that blew out his career. 

Teddy Kennedy is perhaps the 
most urgeful politician of our 
times. The young lads were 
asleep that night at the Palm 
Beach estate. He woke them up 
and suggested they go to a bar. 
Even in late middle age; old 
enough to get the senior citizen 
discount at Denny's, a man can 
reach deep within himself and 
find the urge to PAR-TAY. 

The Republicans have coun- 
tered Mr. Kennedy with Mill 
Romney, a man of no obvious 
urges other than to make money. 

The Washington Post. 


tary chiefs could be tempted to 
break, or to conflicts in which the 
protagonists would try to enlist 
the support of army leaders. 

The second condition is the 
leadership’s control over the par- 
ty and other ruling organs. Ero- 
sion of such control could fatally 
impair its capacity to govern and 


impel the military to step in. 

The third is the effectiveness of ” 7 . 
these organs. Prolonged ineptness « ' ; 

or .corruption would lead to a , \' : " 
similar result 

• The fourth is social stability. 7" J; : . 
which will depend primarily on - • 
the success of economic progress ‘ J 
in China. If signs of unrest appear 7 l ’f '• 
after failure of the reform pro- 77 
gram or its disruptive side-effects. * .* 
the military might intervene first j- 1 '' 
at policy levels. If demonstrations 
break out, the military will make 
every effort to let the People’s 
Armed Police deal with them. 

Only if widespread violence 

threatens the existenceof the re- _ , 
gime will the armed forces inter- ^ 1 
vene massively. 

The possible actions of the mil- * 
itary thus range from unques- . 

tioned backing of the post-Deng 
leadership to full-scale interven- /**"•• . r. 
tion. A precondition, in any case. ; . 4 . 

will be its own cohesion — the 7 1 
unity of the top command in ^ 
dealings with party leaders, and .-j. : , 
the unity of the lower ranks in _ 

their response to high command. . 

So far, the professionalism of 
the Chinese armed forces has pre- f m ’ 
vented serious cracks from devel- '•* :* '' 

oping. However, the military’s ex- > ■ ’. ' 
tensive involvement in -economic 5 
activities and the stresses of cop- / 

ing with unprecedented silua- .V ; ' 
dons may endanger this unity. ^ >. 

If that were to happen, inter- 'V;,* 
vention in politics might split the 7 " 

military and cause internal strife, ’-'s. . \ 


• w 


HR1 


*1 1 . , . 




•; a 

»?i d 


The writer, professor of Chinese 
studies at the Hebrew University oj 
Jerusalem, is author of "The Chi- 
nese Army After Mao." He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894?: A Cancer Theory 


PARIS — The writer of Le Can- 
cer, a recent medical publication. 


ses to a friend: 'The President 
suffered some kind of cerebral-le- 
sioru either during his speech at 
Pueblo or — “L. 


mli I f-T \r,\ TJ i 


theory of cancer, and clairnTthis 
terrible disease is not the effect of 
an infectious germ coming from 
the exterior, but ihe prottoct of 
morbid evolution of certain 


ui uis jceuuy uu&cixk 

suits is a slight facial parai; 


1944:Russian$ Take 




LONDON — Russian, jyy 


microbian origin of cancer, howev- 
er, stick to their dogma and defend 
it with every possible argument 


1919: Wilson Incapable? 

WASHINGTON • — Everythin 0 
of importance in Washington has 
taken secondary place lo the Presi- 
dent’s illness. The question as to 
whether or not the President will 
ever again be able to perform the 
duties of his office is discussed 
openlyin close Administration cir- 
cles. The matter was brought to a 
head by a letter from Senator Mo- 


ital and Nazi naval .base of. 
yesterday [Ocl 13J, smai. 
seven miles through- a st 
maze of Axis defenses in *,««-. 
quest which released hundreds 
of thousands of Soviet vctejSnS 
for the Battle of * ’ 


Berlin’s high command 
ed the battle for pre-war _ 
ny already had begun 
massed Soviet Lank.atta* 
gte East Prussian ga/risori 
Port of Memel and a IargL> 
Red Army attack across the 
rew River ip northern Potend'en 
the lower side of East Prussia. 




to/m 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 

©PIN IO N 


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P ARIS — Haiti and even 
Iraf^ for all of the personal 
tragedies they entail, are for- 
eign affairs sideshows. Even 
Iraq’s strategic position with 
respect to the Gulfs oil produc- 
tion affords it little more than a 
nuisance role in world affairs. 

The world’s industry already 
gets along without Iraq’s cSL Sei- 
zure of Kuwait's will not be tol- 
erated, as the United States is 
again demonstra ting, but even 
that would be of surmoun table 
economic consequence. There is 
simply a lot of ofl. on world mar- 
kets, and those who produce il, 
whatever their political charac- 
ter, have to sell it. 

A more perplexing, long- 
term problem for makers of for- 
eign policy lies farther' south. 
Saudi Arabia is the principal 
Arab oil producer, but its social 
and governmental structures are 
totally unadapted to contempo- 
rary circumstances, and they are 
beginning to crack. 

. The country is run by the 
royal family, 'largely in "their 
personal interests. The govern- 
ment imposes upon its subjects 
a religious orthodoxy and cul- 
tural-social repression irrecon- 
cilable with the secular, liberal, 
hedonistic and materi alis tic 
values set loose in the country 
by its world economic role, the 
Western education of its elites 
and modem communications. 

Despite certain recent Wash- 
ington utterances meant to dis- 
tance the United States from 
some of what has been going 
on, America is tightly bound to 
this monarchy. There is an 
analogy in this to Iran’s condi- 
tion under the shah, and to 


By William Pfaff 


America’s situation with re- 
spect to him In other words, 
there is no military answer. 

Die problem however, is 
that the United States now has 
trouble producing solutions 
other than military ones. Its 
policy in the entire Gulf region 
was fundamentally mili tary 
even before Saddam Hussein 
ordered his troops to Kuwait’s 
frontier, including pre-posi- 
tioned stocks and programs of 
military exchanges and joint 
training meant to produce po- 
litical as well as militaxy results. 

Haiti policy, meanwhile, 
rested on the American mili- 
tary's good relations with Hai- 
tian generals, until the latters 
coup d’6tat deposing President 
Jean-Beartrand Aristide. None- 
theless, policy today is military 
in execution, if not formation, a 
matter of a huge invasion de- 
ployment on the one hand and 
General Colin Powell’s assur- 
ances to the generals of honor- 
able treatment on the other. 
The continued American en- 
gagement in Haiti — and there 
will be one — will undoubtedly 
be assigned to the army and 
marines to cany out 

This reliance on militazy so- 
lutions not only follows from a 
lack of political imagination in 
Washington, and the State De- 
partment’s lack of political 
clout, but reflects the popular 
trust that Ameri can* place in 
the mili tary, as the one presum- 
ably uncorrupt element in a 
government otherwise widely 
portrayed as an unproductive 
burden upon the citizenry. 


The Pentagon has also be- 
come the main government ac- 
tor in America’s economy. Since 
the onset of the World War IL, 
when military spending ended 
the Great Depression and put 
the country to work again, the 
Pentagon has provided subsidy 
and direction to America’s 
heavy and high-technology in- 
dustries. This has been the 
American version of industrial 
policy. Other countries have 
state industrial policies, but 
their militaries don’t run them. 

This now is a problem. Since 
the end of the Cold War, the 
UJS. military budget has shrunk 
in real terms, or at best remained 
stable, and the real military 
threat to the country has dwin- 
dled. But the Pentagon has diffi- 
culty reducing its arms spending 
while keeping force-lew! com- 
mitments intact because high- 
technology research and pro- 
duction costs steadily rise. 

Thus, one privately published 
European analysis argues that in 
the effort to justify its budgets, 
the Pentagon has committed it- 
self to a series of difficult, even 
unrealizable, high-technology 
projects for winch there is nei- 
ther a realistic mission nor the 
money for operational use. 

The most dramatic case was 
the Star Wars program, but 
there have been others since, 
such as the B-2 stealth bomber, 
the F-18 and F-22 advanced 
fighters and the abandoned A- 
12 attack aircraft. The analysis 
asks if America’s military-indus- 
trial system is capable of halting 
this flight into irrelevancy. 


Some Republican critics of 
President Bill Clinton contend 
that his adminis tration has gut- 
ted America’s military forces so 
that they no longer have the 
stocks, transport, infrastruc- 
ture and training to cany out 
their missions should they meet 
real opposition. There is some- 
thing in this reproach, but it 
deserves to be addressed to 
America’s military leadership, 
which has set these priorities. 

However, both Republican 
Anri Democratic administrations 


allowed this situation to happen. 

The use erf military influence, 
threats, deployment and action 
has become the privileged in- 
strument of American world 
policy. It is a strange develop- 
ment for a country that for the 
first century and a half of its 
existence took pride in its lack of 
a permanent military establish- 
ment. At a time when America 
has no serious military rival, it is 
also a dangerous situation. 

International Herald Tribune. 

9 Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


EW YORK — Affairs of By Brent Staples 

the heart can produce r 

of venom as they die. 





A 


55 


d 






Jimmy Clinton, 


N EW YORK — Affairs of 
the heart can produce 
lots of venom as they die. 
Once, the beastly things that 
lovers said at the end disap- 
peared into the ether. They 
were pardonable on grounds 
of momentary insanity. 

Less so since 25 million peo- 
ple tied themselves into the In- 
ternet, the international com- 
puter network through which 

MEANWHILE 

participants send electronic 
mail (E-mail) a n d commune 
for group discussions via thou- 
sands of forums known as 
computer billboards. 

Since the mass con version 
to the Internet, verbal venom 
has transformed itself from 
mere shouting to written defa- 
mations, many signed, that cir- 
culate among thousands and 
even millions of people. 

A spoken fit of anger was 
just noise. A written one is 
grounds for a libel suit, or, as 
m a recent case at Santa Rosa 
Junior College in California, a 
sex discrimination case. 

The Santa Rosa federal case 
and the porcine manners it dis- 
plays offer a dear view of how 
the computer-based “virtual 
neighborhood” has been dras- 
tically oversold as a cultural 
innovation. 

The case began with a pair 
of students who had dated, 
then fallen apart. The woman 
posted disparaging remarks 
about her former beau on a 
public billboard accessible to 


thousands erf people. The beau 
fired bade with some graphic 
sexual comments on a dosed 
billboard for men only, which 
had fewer than a dozen partici- 
pants. The male-only board 
had been set up by the college, 
as had a board for women. 

The systems manager who 
erased the woman’s comments 
said they denigrated the man’s 
sex appeal. The man's remarks 
were profoundly grotesque, 
and anatomically specific, in 
line with what one finds on 
bathroom walls in bus termi- 
nals. A third party burglarized 
the male billboard and passed 
along the offending remarks, 
along with some nasty com- 
ments about a second woman. 

Soon a childish spat had 
blown into a full-fledged fed- 
eral battle. The two women 
complained that the male-only 
billboard was sexually dis- 
criminatory and that the mes- 
sages posted there constituted 
sexual harassment. 

The civil rights division of 
the Department of Education 
agreed, saying same-sex bill- 
boards violated the provisions 
of Tide DC, which forbids sex- 
ual discrimination in schools 
that receive federal funds. 

Santa Rosa and the govern- 
ment are now in a dispute over 
how or if to regulate what stu- 
dents say on-line. The govern- 
ment’s first stab at the guide- 
lines is being attacked as a 
hazard to the First Amend- 


ment. A settlement could take 
years to reach. 

It was an article of faith that 
the information superhighway 
would transform workaday 
life. The information super- 
highway — say it three times, 
click your heels, and you 
would have any movie you 
wanted on demand, be exam- 
ined by your doctor without 
leaving your bed of pain, find 
yourself on a planet that had 
become a cozy little virtual 
neighborhood. 

The clue was in mixed meta- 
phor. Y ou don't build a neigh- 
borhood on a superhighway. 

The promise of the virtual 
neighborhood has proved far- 
fetched at best. How could it 
be otherwise when the commu- 
nicants are faceless and voice- 
less, many writing under as- 
sumed names? 

Consider that the first verb 
cyberspace contributed to the 
language was 4 ‘to flame,” 
meaning to singe someone's 
eyebrows with an obscene or 
derogatory message. Flaming 
has become the on-line soon 
of choice; whole sectors of the 
Internet are given over to the 
most putrid insults. A curse 
muttered on the street disap- 
pears into the air. A flame ech- 
oes on, to be read by millions. 

The information superhigh- 
way may vet rise to its lofty 
promise. But as of now, its 
most pronounced accomplish- 
ment has been to chisel into 
stone trash that would belter 
have been left to disappear. 

The Hem York Tunes. 


Times Get Tougher and Morals Get Toughest 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


/CHARLOTTESVILLE, Virginia — 
Oliver North, in a close race for a 
Senate seat, is a moral hero to many of 
my neighbors here in Vir ginia . 

Although he has encountered criticism 
in recent days for intemperate remarks 
about American preparedness in the 
Golf, those remarks are no more likely to 
hurt him than are his frequent, wen- 
documented lies. The local paper gets 
lots of letters praising him for upright- 
ness, for a sense of honor, for exemplary 
character. When his opponent. Senator 
Charles Robb, called him a liar, he easily 
brushed aside the charge. 

Mr. North got away with this because 
Mr. Robb has pretty much admitted to 
bring an adulterer. For Mr. North's ad- 
mirers, the crucial testof moral character 
is sexual behavior. In their eyes, Mr. 
Robb's infidelities are enough to show 
his unfitness for office. It is also enough 
" to Show That he is, al bottom; writic. 

like- most voters in Virginia, 1 got a 
letter from Mr. North telling me that he- 
wotild greatly value both my advice and a 
contribution to his campaign, The very 
first sentence of this long letter men- 
tioned that his opponent — “the liberal 
son-in-law of Lyndon Johnson” — fa- 
vored letting gays save in the military. 

This was no doubt the right way to 
□vet the attention of the people Mr. 
North is counting on. A homosexual is, 
in their eyes, a paradigm of moral weak- 
ness and of the defilement that is the 
penalty for such weakness. 

A man who owes his political success 
to family influence is clearly weaker than 


BRIDGE 


By Richard Rorty 

someone who. like Oliver North, can 
claim to be self-made. A liberal is some- 
one with a bleeding heart — someone too 
soft to experience icy contempt for those 
weak enough to accept welfare checks. 

Mr. North, by contrast, comes across 
to his admirers as hard, strong and pure. 

He does not use the words “strength" 
or “purity” much himself, but these 
words leap to his supporters' lips. These 
virtues are prized when times are hard. 
When' we have what we need and expect 
to get more, the virtues of charity and 
compassion sometimes take their place. 

During the Martin Luther King years, 
the American middle class was making 
more money every year and was able to 
fed sympathy for the weak. The moral 
achievements of those years were made 
possible by 'prosperity. Mr. Robb re- 
members the difference his father-in- 
law's civil rights legislation made, how it 
alleviated unnecessary suffering. 

Mr.' North’s sense of America is of a 
strong and valiant nation that should 
have no patience with weakness. When 
he looks around, he does not see unneces- 
sary suffering but rather confusion and 
spinelessness — things that a military 
officer cannot tolerate. So he proclaims 
the need for more prisons, suffer sen- 
tences, more discipline, more hard work. 

Addressed to middle-class voters, 
whose average real income has been 
steadily declining for years, this is proba- 
bly the only rhetoric that will work. 


Virginia 
i U-S. se 


ous U-S. senator since the notorious rac- 
ist Theodore Bilbo, but not because it is a 
poor, ignorant, Bible-thumping stale. It 
has areas of grinding poverty, but it is. as 
a whole, wealthier and better educated 
than most of the country. 

If Virginia dects Mr. North, it will be 
because the suburban middle class — 
who form, here as elsewhere, the majority 
of the people who get out and vote — £s 
scared stiff, and has every reason to be. 

Its sacrifices to pay coUege tuition will 
not necessarily be rewarded by comfort- 
able white-collar jobs for its children. Its 
hard work is probably not going to pay 
off in rising income. Its moral upright- 
ness may go unrewarded. 

Mr. North has no ideas about how to 
provide such rewards — about how to 
make the country more prosperous — : ajiy 
more than do Senator Bob Dole and Rep- 
resentative' Newt Gingrich, his" powerful' 
supporters. All any of them are likely lo do 
is block President Bill Clinton's programs, 
and then sneer at his weakness. 

It is a bad augury for a democracy when 
“strength" and “weakness" become the 
main terms of praise and blame for its 
leaders. The world has had experience 
with what happens when a middle class's 
expectations are disappointed, and when 
it starts looking to strong, valiant men 
whose hearts never bleed. 

The writer, professor of humanities at the 
University of Virginia, is author of “ Objec- 
tivity , Relativism and Truth. “ He contribut- 
ed this comment to The New York Times. 


Albania and the Greeks 

Regarding "Albania's Show 
Trial Looks Like a Perilous 
Provocation of Athens” ( Opin- 
ion , Oct. 7) by Nicholas Cage: 

The five Albanian citizens of 
Greek origin were found guilty 
by the Tirana Court and the 
appeal court of aiming people 
of the Greek minority with 
weapons bought with Greek 
government funds and smug- 
gled from Greece into Albania: 
of illegal arms possession: of 
organizing the registration of 
ethnic Greeks from Albania in 
military schools in Greece with- 
out the consent and knowledge 
of the Albanian government; 
and of transferring classified in- 
formation on the Albanian mil- 
itary to the Greek secret service 
— all with this service's collu- 
sion. The five had an open, 
transparent trial by an indepen- 
dent court. Videotaping of the 
interrogation made public by 
the prosecutor tarnished claims 
by the defendants of being tor- 
tured or intimidated. These al- 
legations were declared invalid 
by the high commissioner on 
national minorities of the Con- 
ference on Security and Coop- 
eration in Europe, Max Van 
Der StoeL who had met private- 
ly with the defendants before 
the trial. 

Albania provided an open tri- 
al attended by Grade members 


of Parliament and officials. 
Western diplomats and interna- 
tional press observers. At the 
meeting of European Union for- 
eign ministers in Luxembourg 
last week, the German foreign 
minister, Klaus Kinlc eL wbo was 
chairing , declared that “the trial 
procedures observed Alb anian 
law and there was no tendency 
to influence the courts in Alba- 
nia.” At this meeting Greece, at 
odds with the other 1 1 member 
nations, again blocked financial 
aid to Albania. 

h is regrettable to see the 
Greek minority in Albania be- 
coming an instrument of ques- 
tionable policies of Athens and 
of hypemaiionalisi elements of 
the Greek lobby in the United 
States. Almost every interna- 
tional delegation and fact-find- 
ing mission visiting Albania and 
its Greeks has determined that 
since the fall of the Communist 
regime the situation of the Greek 
minority has improved tremen- 
dously and that the current gov- 
ernment is committed to respect- 
ing minority rights in 
compliance with modern West- 
ern standards. This minority en- 
joys all rights foreseen in the 
CSCE Copenhagen Charter. 

Ethnic Greeks in Albania can 
move freely to Greece (so far as 
Greece let them in), they hold 
unrestricted religious services, 
they have their own associations 
and their own political party, the 


Human Rights Union. There are 
two elected representatives of 
this party in the Albanian Parlia- 
ment There are four Albanian 
members of Parliament from 
other parties, as well as council- 
lors, mayors, district chiefs, min- 
isters. ambassadors and Consti- 
tutional Court judges, who 
belong to the Greek minority. 

The size of this ethnic group 
has been hyperbolically project- 
ed just like the figure of Albani- 
ans working in Greece. A reli- 
able index would be the vote 
gathered by their party in the 
last three free, nationwide elec- 
tions. The Human Rights 
Union scored the highest result 
in July 1992 with 49.000 voles 
— that represents less than 1 
percent of the total electorate. 

With regard to Tirana’s re- 

K 'onal polity, one cannot over- 
ok the fact that with its mod- 
erate polity and influence, its 
respect for the CSCE commit- 
ments. its support for the inter- 
national community and 
NATO, Albania has become an 
important factor of stability. 

Nationalistic policies in Ath- 
ens, the recent Macedonian 
blockade and the current dis- 
pute with Albania, constitute, 
along with Serbian military ex- 
pansionism, the real threat to 
peace in our region and Europe. 

GENC POLLO. 
Adviser to the president 
of Albania. Tirana. 


More to the Picture 

Regarding "At 86, a Photogra- 
pher Looks Back" ( Features. Oct. 
I) by Mary Anne Fitzgerald: 

The writer pays a long over- 
due tribute to the photojoumal- 
ist George Rodger, the unsung 
co-rounder of the international 
cooperative photo agency Mag- 
num. However, there is one 
omission. Following tire death 
in childbirth of Cicely, George's 
first wife, a young American 
journalist named Lois (“Jinx") 
Witherspoon joined George on 
his travels. She has never left his 
side. Together they have creat- 
ed a charming cottage home in 
the English village of Smarden. 
Kent; they now have three chil- 
dren and three grandchildren. 

JOHN G. MORRIS. 

Paris. 

Modern-Day Lincoln? 

Regarding "Maybe a Vote for 
Change ” {Opinion, Oct. 6); 

All the political analyses and 
polls have overlooked the real 
determining factor in the up- 
coming German election: Ru- 
dolf Scharping's beard. No 
democratic country in the 
world, I believe, has an elected 
leader with a beard. (Another 
reason, perhaps, for the isola- 
tion of Fidd Castro?) 

MARVIN SPEVACK. 

MQnster, Germany. 


BOOKS 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE most discussed deal of 
the World Mixed Pair 
Championship, shown in the di- 
agram, saw a variety of doubled 
contracts coming home. At 
many tables, East opened with 
a weak two-spade bid and 
played that contract doubled 
after South had passed his part- 
ner’s take-out double far penal- 
ties. That contract so me times 
succeeded, but could be beaten 
with best defense. 

At a few tables North-South 
landed in five dabs doubled, 
w faich could not be defeated. 
And in one case, as shown. 
South was in the weird contract 
of three hearts doubled. West 
had passed his partners open- 
ing because the opening was 
limited to IS high-card points. 
He then feh on firm ground in 
doubling three hearts, and was 
disappointed to find that the 
contract was unbea t a b l e 
A spade was led to the ace, 
and a dub was led to the jack. 
The diamond ace was cashed 
and a diamond was ruffed. 
Dummy was entered again in 
dubs for a second diamond 
ruff. Finally South ruffed a 


spade, ruffed yet another dia- 
mond and led a spade. He could 
not be prevented from scoring 
his ninth trick with one of dum- 
my’s trumps. 

Oddly enough, it does not 
hdp the defense for West to 
lead a t ramp originally. South 
stiU cannot be prevented, if he 
times the play correctly, from 
taking five ruffs and four out- 
side winners. 

NORTH 

♦ — 

9 Q J 10 . 

6 A J 6 3 2 

4AQ632 


WEST 
4107 
C K8765 
O KQ75 

494 


EASTCD) 
4 K Q J 5 4 3 
A 

O 10 9 8 4 
487 
SOOTH 
4 A 9 S 6 2 
79432 
O — 

4 K J 10 5 


Neither side was vulnerable. The 
bidding*. 

East South West North 

1 4 Pass Pass DbL 

2 4 3 <7 DbL Pass 

Pass Pass 

West ted the spade ten. 


DEBT OF HONOR 

By Tom Clancy. 766 pages. 
$25.95. Putnam. 

Reviewed by Judy Shelton. 

T OM CLANCY’S latest 
work is a boomer. If you 
thought that currency turmoil, 
bond market volatility, trade 
wars, financial panic and eco- 
nomic collapse were dull stuff, 
you will be pleased to find that 
Clancy serves it all up in a most 
entertaining format. Unfortu- 
nately, the villain of this story is 
Japan — not exactly a diplo- 
matic touch during these sensi- 
tive days of negotiations with 
our vital trade partner. 

The premise of “Debt of 
Honor” is that leading mem- 
bets of Japan’s powerful indus- 
trial cabal, portrayed as the true 
force behind the government, 
have never really gotten over 
the humiliating defeat of World 
War IL Now they fed victim- 
ized by America’s treatment of 
them in the business arena: 

“Today they devalue the dol- 
lar relative to the yen, and our 
assets are trapped there, are 
they not?” observes the group’s 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• David Owen, circulation di- 
rector of the Guardian newspa- 
per in London, is reading “ iron 
Lady ” Hugo Young's biogra- 
phy of Margaret Thatcher. 

“Having not started out as a 
great fan of Margaret Thatch- 
er’s, with the distance of time 
I’ve learned to respect some of 
the decisions she made. This is 
an objective book which allows 
me to look at her with more 
favor." (Erik Ipsen, IHT) 




“Debt of Honor” posits a Ja- 
pan that has m ana g ed to arm 
itself with, you guessed it, 
nukes. And wouldn’t you know, 
shortsighted U. S. officials have 
cut military spending to the 
point where America can no 
longer project the power neces- 


ringleader, Raizo Yamata, with 
righteous indignation. “Today 
they trick us into investing our 
money there, they complain 
when we do, they cheat us at 
every turn, they keep what we 
give to them for their property, 
and then they steal back what 
we’ve bought.” 

Japan’s desire to garner some 
global respect and reassert its 
rightful place in the world order 
comes at a time when Russia 
and the United States have 
agreed to bury tbe nuclear 
hatchet in the posl-C-oid War 


era, leaving a superpower void 
of sorts. In the meantime, Japan 
has just been hit hard by protec- 
tionist U.S. legislation inflicted 
by politicians beholden to spe- 
cial interests. Ships loaded with 
Japanese-made autos rest at an- 
chor in U. S. ports, their cargo 
unloaded, awaiting intermina- 
bly slow safety inspections. 

A strike against Japan’s abili- 
ty to export is a threat to its very 
survival — a point Clancy 
makes clear, not without empa- 
thy. What’s a former imperialist 
nation under siege to do? 


vaae aaipan ana Lruam. - 

Into the fray comes our hero, 
Jade Ryan, who has been en- 
ticed back into government ser- 
vice as the president’s national 
security adviser after a brilliant 
interim stint as an investment 
banker. (And you thought he 
was just a high-level spook wbo 
occasionally gave tbe president 
a dressing-down.) 

Turns out to be a lucky thing 
that Ryan is so savvy about 
Wall Street, because that is 
where the most fiendish pan of 
Yamata’s plan to humble 
America is unleashed. By or- 
chestrating a massive sell-off of 
U. S. Treasury bonds from tbe 
portfolios of Asian banks, the 
Japanese tycoon precipitates a 
run on the dollar; the falling 
dollar forces the Federal Re- 
serve to hike interest rates, the 


largest mutual funds start 
dumping their currency-sensi- 
tive bank stocks, and the Dow 
starts dropping like a stone. 
Well, you get the picture. The 
crisis is further exacerbated 
when all records of market 
transactions are wiped out by a 
computer virus. 

For all its fictional flourishes, 
there is a real-life message in 
Clancy’s latest novel that 
should not be ignored. Ex- 
change-rate turmoO can be the 
first warning sign of deeper, 
more serious tensions over 
trade and financial relations, 
and trade wars can be the pre- 
cursor to real wars. 

True to form, Clancy is me- 
ticulous when it comes to pre- 
senting the technical aspects of 
his material, explaining the 
workings of financial markets 
and capital flows with the same 
detail he normally lavishes on 
submarines and strategic 
bombers. 

Warning: You may find 
yourself discomfited by eerie 
feelings of prescience if you in- 
tersperse your recreational 
reacting of “Debt of Honor’’ 
with daily newspaper accounts 


of trade sanctions and a shaky 
governing coalition in Tokyo 
(not to mention revelations 
concerning the transfer of 
weapons-grade plutonium tech- 
nology to Japan and suicide 
flights into prominent Wash- 
ington edifices). Just keep re- 
minding yourself: It’s only fic- 
tion. 


Judy Shelton, a senior re- 
search fellow at the Hoover Insti- 
tution at Stanford University and 
the author of “The Coming Sovi- 
et Crash ” and "Money Melt- 
down,” h rote this for The Wash- 
ington Post. 


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, ... 


P International Herald Tribune 
” . Friday, October 14, 1994 
l Page 8 

k 



S Z7 



~ ] A Visit to the 3 Cultures of Singapore 


By Philip Sheaon 

New York Times Service 


i amm an Temple on South Bridge Road 
beginning at about 4 P. M. 


S INGAPORE — No one is quite 
sure whether Singapore's tourism 
industry was helped or hindered by 
the furor that put the city-state on 
the map for millions of Americans. Last 
spring, the caning of Michael P. Fay, an 
American teenager accused of spray-paint- 
mg cars, outraged the Clinton administra- 
tion and human rights groups. A Dutch 
engineer was hanged last month after her- 
oin was found in his luggage at the airport. 

The incidents reminded travelers that 
the Singapore government is serious about 
keeping the city safe and dean. This may 
be the only nation that has banned both 
handguns and chewing gum, the latter 
because it can jam subway doors. The 
city's other attractions — including fine 
restaurants and shopping, and spectacular 
tropical gardens — make it one of the 
most popular Southeast Asian destina- 
tions. It can be a fine place to relax for a 
few days between visits to other cities — a 
break after the smoggy exoticism of Bang- 
kok, Jakarta or Manila. 

One of the major accomplishments of 
Singapore's government is the sense of 
harmony that it has fostered among the 
three ethnic groups that make up most of 
the island'spopulation: the numerically 
dominant Chinese, the Malays and the 
Indians. The festivals of all three groups 
are times for national celebration. 


Through Nov. 4, tens of thousands of 
Chinese Taoists will make their annual 
pilgrimage to nearby Kusu Island and the 
temple of Da Bo Gong, the god of pros- 
perity. The worshipers carry offerings of 
brilliantly colored flowers, candles and 
joss sticks. The island is served by a ferry 
from the Singapore World Trade Center. 

Through Nov. 13, the National Muse- 
um is sponsoring Singapore's first major 
exhibition of Indian art including scores 
of works on loan from the National Muse- 
um of India. Many of the objects, from 
3000 B. C. to A. D. 1900, include stone, 
bronze and terra-cotta figures of Hindu 
deities. The highlight is the coffin in which 
relics of the Lord Buddha were found in 
1979. 

Along the Singapore River, the Empress 
Place Museum, winch offers rotating ex- 
hibits on Chinese culture, is showing relics 
of Chinese city life from the Song, Yuan 
and Ming dynasties. 

Once renowned for wild night life, the 
city now promotes G-rated attractions. 
The government endorses only one type of 
nocturnal wildlife: the kind found In the 
Singapore Zoological Gardens, which this 
year opened the Night Safari, billed as the 
world's first nighttime zoo. It is an impres- 
sive effort to showcase twilight-loving 
creatures, including Nepalese rhinoceros- 
es, Malayan tigers and the aptly named 
Asian sloth bears, at their most energetic 
(which, in the case of the sloth bears, is not 
very)- 

Subtle bluish lighting makes it possible 
to see the animals dearly without disturb- 
ing them. The trip through the 100-acre 
(40-hectare) zoo, at 80 Mandai Lake Road 
and open from 7:30 P. M. to midnight, 
can be made by foot or on an open-sided 
electric tram. The 45-minute tram tour is 


On Oct 24, the Indian community cele- 
brates Thimithi, an anmial fire-walking 


ceremony honoring Draupadi, heroine of 
the epic Indian poem *Mahabharata.” 


the epic Indian poem ^fababharata.” 
Draupadi supposedly proved her chastity 
by walking on fire, so her worshipers re- 
peat the feat by strolling across red-hot 
embers. The fire-walking is at the Sri Mar- 


conducted by guides trained to pounce on 
any visitor who dares to break the zoo’s 
unbreakable rule: no flash cameras, which 
might spook the animals The animals are 
separated from visitors by moats and oth- 
er natural boundaries, and they have a 
relatively large space to roam. A ticket for 
the Night Safari is $12, children 58. 

For those who prefer feathered beasts, 
the Juiong Bird Park has more than 4,000 
birds, spread over 50 acres. The walk-in 
aviary has a 98-foot-high (30-meter) water- 
fall at one end. The park is on Jurong Htil 

With Singapore’s year-round tropical 
heat, evening can also be the best time for 
a stroll on Seniosa Island, just off the 
southern coast, which the government’s 
forward-thinking planners set aside in 
1967 as a recreation center and amuse- 
ment park. Private cars are banned. 

The island can be reached by bus, ferry 
or, best of all by cable car from the station 
atop Mount Faber. The cable car offers a 
spectacular view of Singapore’s futuristic 


skyline and the ships crowding one of the 
world’s busiest container pons. The 
round-trip cable car ride costs 5435 (S3 
for children) and there is an additional 
admission charge to Sentosa of S3.35 (S2 
for children). The best of Sentosa’s attrac- 
tions is Underwater World, an aquarium 
in which visitors walk through acrylic tun- 
nels that snake along the bottom of gigan- 
tic fish tanks. 

Singapore has some of the best Chinese, 
Malay and Indian food anywhere outside 
China, Malaysia or India, and the Western 
food can also be world-class. Two of the 
finest Chinese restaurants in the city are in 
the Goodwood Park Hotel at 22 Scotts 
Road, 737-7411. The hotel’s Chang Jiang 
Shanghai restaurant is very formal with 
plates of food brought out for viewing 
before they are returned to the kitchen to be 
portioned out into individual servings. The 


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vast menu includes every son of delicacy 
offered bv formal S hanghai cuisine, which 


■ Coming out of retirement, 
George Bush has agreed for a fee to 
sign 750 “collectible” cards for 
Michigan-based Box Score, The 
Washington Post tells us. The card 
features a painting of a photograph 
of Bush meeting with Baseball 
Hall of Fame president Ed Stack in 
the Oval Office in 1989, and 
10,000 of them were printed that 
year. The owners who get the first 
750 cards to the company get the 
signature for $195. The company 
believes Bush’s fee (not reported) is 
going to charity. 


offered by formal Shanghai cuisine, which 
stresses natural flavors. 

The hotel’s Min Jiang Szechuan restau- 
rant, decorated in traditional Chinese 
style, with Oriental screens and paintings 
set in a room of pastel green, is one of the 
most popular restaurants in Singapore. 
Spicy sauteed scallops with dried red chili 
(SI 6) and shredded beef with red and 
green pepper (S8) are delicious. In Chang 
Jiang, the price of dinner for two with 
wine will be about $65, slightly less in Min 
Jiang. 

what is offered in the Goodwood Park 
is fancy Chinese food in a fancy hotel. For 


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a true Singaporean dining experience, visit 
one of the open-air centers where hawkers 


one of the open-air centers where hawkers 
sell their specialties from small booths. 
The simple stir-fry stands, which offer 
noodles and satay, tend to serve up the 
best fare, and there are always several 
choices of tropical fruit for dessert. Diners 
eat on tables and stools scattered among 


the booths. A satisfying meal for two need 
not cost more than $10, including beer. 
Among the largest and most popular 
hawkers' centers is the one at Newton 
Circus, at the top of Scotts Road. 

For adventure seekers, there is one truly 
unforgettable dining experience in Singa- 


Eat. Drink and Gamble: A 36-Hour Cruise to Nowhere 


By William Grimes 

New York Tunes Service 


N EW YORK — Travel on the 
open ocean has always suggest- 
ed a potent blend of romance, 
mystery and adventure, three 
words not associated with New Jersey. 
Yet that’s the unseen land that beckons 
off the bow on the two-day “cruises to 
nowhere” that regularly depart New 
York. 

Ships leave the Hudson River docks, 
float serenely southward, not much farther 
offshore than a crab pot A day later, their 
screws turning slowly, they turn right 
around and, with due deliberation, mak e 
their way back to New York. 

The point is to step aboard a full- 
fledged ocean liner on a Friday afternoon, 
then eat, drink and gamble, gamble, drink 
and eat, take in a few floor shows, and 
return 36 hours later totally sated. 

Several cruise lines offer the quick get- 
aways when their ships’ schedules permit. 
Carnival Lines got in cm the act when the 
Fascination arrived from the shipyards ear- 
ly. The company offered cruises to nowhere 
before the snip began its regolar schedule of 
cruises in the Caribbean. 


The Fascination, a gleaming white be- 
hemoth, is billed as “70,367 tons of fun.” 


My wife, Nancy, and I signed on, booking 
a cabin for 5650. a price that included all 
meals (but not liquor) and entertainment. 

The fun began on a sweltering Friday 
afternoon. At a shipside processing sta- 
tion we were issued plastic shipboard 
credit cards. The cards were good every- 
where except in the casino. (For drink 
orders, a 15 percent tip was automatically 
added on.) At a second station, we re- 
ceived our plastic key-cards. We ascended 
the gangplank and stepped aboard. 

For the next 36 hours, the Fascination 
would be our world. We came to know, 
intimately, its glittering promenade level 
its outdoor decks and pools, its fabulous 
discos, its innumerable slot machines, its 
seven-stray atrium, its many bars and tall 
pastel drinks, although not its topless sun 
deck. The Fascination sparkles, shines, glit- 
ters and flashes. It is an all-out assault on 
the body's fun receptors. 

Our cabin was admirably laid out, spa- 
cious and comfortable, with an unexpect- 
edly soothing color scheme of gray and 
salmon. A closed-circuit television system 
broadcast an orientation film, one first-run 
film each day, and whatever channel it 
could pick up on satellite. At one point, 
passengers could take in an Imnt-language 
program from Canada showing the ins and 


wood theme. When passengers stroll along 
the promenade level dubbed Hollywood 


outs of polar-bear hunting. 
The Fascination is gpver 


governed by a Holly- 


the promenade level dubbed Hollywood 
Boulevard, they can duck into the Beverly 
Hills Bar, the Diamonds Are Forever Dis- 
co, the Passage to India Lounge (that’s the 
one with two models of elephants inside), 
the Puttin’ on the Ritz Theater and the 
Casino Royale, nerve center of the ship. 

The effect was a little like moving 
through a life-size board game, with light 
and sound effects added on. or living 
inside a giant pinball machine. Elsewhere 
along the promenade, a life-size Dooley 
Wilson tickled the ivories of a player pi- 
ano as Bogey looked oil 

Wilson and Bogey were not alone. Here 
and there, Hollywood’s greatest legends 
popped up in pairs. Outside the Passage to 
India Lounge, Elvis Presley (slim phase) 
and Liz Taylor (ditto) engaged in casual 
conversation. Sometimes the mannequins 
blended right into a small group of chat- 
tering passengers, drinks in hand, oblivi- 
ous to the frozen celebrities in their midst. 

The effect was unnerving, but nothing to 
compare with the ship’s architectural cen- 
terpiece, its mall-like atrium, an eye-pop- 
ping symphony of clear plastic, faux gold, 
neon lights and shiny marble, rising six 
stories from the Empress Level to the sky- 
light that sits atop the sun deck. Along a 
faceted pillar, a clear glass elevator outlined 
in blue neon carried passengers up and 


down, as they moved restlessly from the 
Coconut Grove Bar and Grill to the mall 
shops to the swimming pool with water 
slide to the massage and loofah rooms. 

My wife and I boarded too late for “fun 
quiz time” in the Palace f jmngt» and our 
exploratory wanderings caused us to miss 
the Friday evening Rum Swizzle Party. But 
not to worry. On Saturday morning, after 
breakfast in our cabin, a smorgasbord of 
cultural activities awaited before noon. We 
bad our choice of a trivia quiz, horseracing 
shipboard-style, a tour of the bridge, arts 
and crafts lessons, body conditioning and 
trap shooting. We chose the horseracing. 
You put your money down, watch wooden 
horses advance with a roll of the dice and, 
more often than not, lose. 


progress at the poolside bandstand. Alas, 
we arrived too late, or the day was too 
warm. Either way, curly a puddle of water 
remained. There was no time to pout. As 
waiters circulated among the deck chairs 
offering a lime-colored mink called Twi- 
light Zone, another shipboard funmeistcr 
organized a gladiator contest on the band- 
stand that required beefy young men to sit 
astride a gymnastic horse and pummel 
each other with pillows. If you have a firm 
grip on a Twilight Zone, this could qualify 
as entertainment. 


A T night, in the Puttin' on the 
Ritz Lounge, crew members 
throw off their daytime identi- 
ties and reveal themselves in full 
splendor in the ship's Las Vegas-style re- 
vues. The production, values are remark- 
ably high. The first night's show, “Fascin- 
atin’ Broadway,” took a tour of current hit 
musicals, with high-kicking by the Fasci- 
nation Dancers and some pretty soulful 
singing by Christopher Alan Graves. The 
cast returned on' Saturday with “Holly- 
wood!,” which ended in a retina-searing 
display of multicolor strobe effects. 


After lunch, we headed to the Palace 
Lounge for the Newly Wed and Not So 
Newly Wed Game. This amaieur version of 
the TV show relied on volunteers, which 
made for some dread-filled moments as the 
beady eye of the ship’ s entertainment direc- 
tor scanned the audience for couples who 
looked as though they would be mortally 
embarrassed by questions rife with sexual 
innuendo. Stinking low in our seats, we 
survived the cut and rather enjoyed seeing 
the couples on stage squirm. 

Invigorated, we raced to the Lido Deck, 
where an ice carving demonstration was in 


My wife and I sampled the cultural 
offerings in between tong stints in the 
Casino Royale, a venue I approached with 
something like reverence, having passed 


/#/ I 9 F / / GUIDE 


HaavMly Creatures 

Directed by Peter Jackson. 
New Zealand. 


Described by its 33-year-old 
director as “a murder story 
about love, a murder story 
with no v illains, ” this film is 
based on a notorious case 
that occurred in New Zea- 
land in the ’50s. It relates the 
unfolding of a passionate 
friendship between two 
schoolgirls and their final de- 
cision, when faced with per- 
manent reparation, to kill 
one of their mothers. Pauline 
Parker (Melanie Lynskey) 
appears a rather dull and 
dowdy individual until Juliet 


Hulme (Kate Winslet), an at- 
tractive, sharp, precociously 
sophisticated (but, in reality, 
vulnerable) English girl ar- 
rives in the same classroom 
(her wed-to-do parents hav- 
ing just moved to Christ- 
church). Though seemingly 
wildly different, both are 
highly creative misfits and 
find an instant rapport. To- 
gether they invent a mythical 
medieval kingdom, Borovnia, 
about which they write a se- 
ries of novels, and resolve to 
run away to Hollywood to 
become famous scriptwriters. 
Peter Jackson has confessed 
to having bad profound mis- 


givings about making “Heav- 
enly Creatures,” since both 
main protagonists and many 
others involved are still alive, 
but decided to gp ahead 
when it became dear that 
other, sensationalized treat- 
ments were about to be shot 


, in this meticulously 
led version, which 


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researched version, which 
makes dexterous use of Pau- 
line’s and Juliet's diaries, let- 
ters and novels, the psycho- 
logical complexities of the 
story are treated with an in- 
telligence, subtlety and deli- 
cacy seldom witnessed on the 
screen. The giddy exuberance 
of the giiis’ friendship and 
the hectic blossoming of their 
artistic talents in a rigid, 
class- and convention-bound 
society are masterfully cap- 
tured, and both Lynskey and 
Winslet give mesmerizing 
performances. And, though 
the denouement is tragic, 
there are many amusing, even 
hilarious moments, in a film 
rare for its depth and human- 
ity. ( Roderick 

Conway Morris, I HI) 


though, Al comes across whiz 
kid Steve Nebraska (Brendan 
Fraser), who throws so hard 
that he routinely knocks the 
catcher and the umpire on 
their behinds. Realizing that 
Steve, who also hits tike Babe 
Ruth, could be the greatest 
ballplayer who ever lived, Al 
moves quickly to sign him up 
and get him to New York. 
Though the film is anything 
but realistic, the exaggera- 
tions al its end — complete 
with “Rody-style flourishes 
from composer Bill Conti — 
seem too extreme even for 
fantasy. Maybe it’s impossi- 
ble for a Hollywood sports 
picture not to resort to pan- 
dering big-game cliche But, 
until the end, eveaything in 
this oddball item is so de- 
lightfully unexpected that the 
impossible seems within 
reach. (Hal Hinson, WP) 


Funky ’50s, Dangerous Liaisons 


By Suzy Menkes 

Immatinnai Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — It was the 
most fabulous fashion 
happening since Eve 
put on her fig leaf. In 
the center of the studio a hunky. 


half-naked guy sipped Cham- 
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pagne in a 1950s Oldsmobfle. 
upstairs, there was a platinum- 
blonde Madonna on a chinoise- 
rie sofa, and the French actress 
Arielle Dombasle perching on 
an antique bed in which a tat- 
tooed male was stripped down 
to his Calvin Klein underpants. 

And only a brief 90 minutes 
to wait (Madonna didn’t) for 
John Galliano’s show to start 
Vroom! A white Chevrolet 


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As a baseball movie, Michael 
Ritchie's “The Scout” resem- 
bles less the realistic jock 
style of “Bull Durham” or 
“The Pride of the Yankees” 
than the fantastical tradition 
of “Field of Dreams” and 
“The Natural. ” But even in 
this dotty company, “The 
Scout” qualifies as a genuine 

— and immensely enjoyable 

— curiosity. The mam pro- 
tagonist here is Al Ferrolo 
(Albert Brooks), a scout for 
die New York Yankees. ATs 
job is to beat the bushes for 
new talent, bnt lately his luck 
has ranged from bad to atro- 
cious. As punishment for 
signing a young pitcher 
whose only accomplishment 
is to throw up on the mound, 
Al is sent tty his boss (played 
with sinister relish by Lane 
Smith) to Mexico, where 
goats casually graze in the 
outfield. In one town. 


her way down “The River 
Wild” is an active response 
to the ebbing tide of worthy 
roles for actresses over 45. 
Portraying a former white- 
water rafter turned subur- 
ban wife, the actress wrestles 
rapids and paddle-whips 
psychopaths to save her 
loved ones after a family va- 
cation goes awry. She is 
woman, see her oar. Curtis 
Hanson directs this routine 
action thriller, which like his 
earlier film “The Hand That 
Rocks the Cradle” turns on 
an intruder's attempt to in- 
sinuate himself into the fam- 
ily by duping Mom. The 
film would be utterly banal 
without the novelty of the 
high-toned Streep m an ac- 
tion role. The fact that she 
makes a believable Super- 
mom, however, is totally ir- 
relevant to action audiences, 
which are made up mostly of 
men who don’t cotton to the 
idea of a woman rescuing 
her man from another man 
(Rita Kempley, WP) 


The clothes were tike that too 
— a houndstooth dress molded 
and draped above the tight long 
skirt, the model bending into a 
black-and-white image of a Jac-> 
ques Fath outfit photographed 
by Irving Penn. And there was 
Lauda Evangelista’ giving pho- 
tographer Steven Meisd a twirl 
in her Balmain-esque tulle- 
skirted gown with a swan-lake 
bodice of primrose feathers. 

“He’s such a wonderful cut- 
ter,” breathed Beatrice de Roth- 
schild, eyeing a Vionnet-style 
black dress, with butterfly 
shapes sewn into bias-cut seams. 

“That coat!” said Paloma Pi- 
casso, of a kimono creation 
with vast obi-sash bow. 

There was just one problem 
with the British designer Gal- 
liano’s funky, witty, brilliantly 
crafted high-camp couture. He 
was supposed to be showing 
ready-to-wear. 

Fashion needs the creative 
imagination that Galliano 
showed in the ambience of dec- 
adent glamour. But he needs a 
couture house. And women in 



Vivienne Westwood's poke bonnet with pique dress. 


the 1990s need clothes fra- here 
and now. 

Vivienne Westwood's fashion 
history lesson was a sly, tonguc- 
in-chic glance at the past 

“Dangerous liaison jacket” 
read the program to describe a 
fitted jacket with this season’s 
favorite winged shoulders. 
“Erotic Zones” read the invita- 
tion. Last season’s padded bus- 
tles had become a bird-cage of 
mesh, which went under cute 


knits, dainty Liberty print 
dresses or all on its own with a 
unique rear view. 

It was a show that suggested 
what Gainsborough’s bo-furbe- 
lowed beauties were up to off the 

canvas. Frilled necklines 
swooped low; Westwood’s sig- 
nature corsets pushed bosom: 
high; skirts that might onahave 
exposed the ankle rose flirt*, 
tioiisly. This return to ladylike 
elegance had a sexual charge. 


ratjuaite touch of glamour. 


pore: a plate of durian, the maiigp-like 
inrit beloved by Singq>oieans donate its 
revolting smell. The Fom Seasons Restau- 
rant along Clarke Quay, 336-3603, spe- 
cializes in it, and is usuatty packed with 
durian lovers on weekend nights. Most 
dishes are about 55, Brace yourself. 


erf !_**► 

H ** 

. a«*v$£- 


in toy formative yearsLTxrre^ by the 
flashing tight* of. 200 slot machines, the 
rattle of the roulette ball makingits final 
turns around the wheel the heady atmo- 
sphere of the gaming table, I entered the 
Casino Royale and scanned the room, 
looking for the chanin de fer table. There 
was no chanin de fer. If there were, I 
would have had no idea how to play it, so 
perhaps it was all to the good. The Casino 
Royale offered the basics: slots, poker 
machines, roulette, blackjack and various 
forms of poker. At the roulette- table, 1 


proved beyond a reasonable doubt that 
the odds do indeed favor the house. At 
blackjack, I was wiped out in minutes. It 
was a sub-Bond experience. - - 


There was always solace in .food, of 
course. A passenger determined to extract 
full value for money could strap on the 
feedbag at the crack, of dawn and graze 
nonstop into the wee hours, when the ship 
laid on back-to-back buffets. 

By Sunday morning, a subdued atmo- 
sphere had overtaken the ship. Even the 
hardest partyers wore the stunned look of 
triathletes who hadgivea their best and 
could do no more The great white whale 
of totally mindless fun had been stalked, 
harpooned and vanquished. Work was 
looking pretty attractive. 


Behind the bustles, the phal- 
lic shoes and the saucy allure 
given to the prim poke bonnet, 
there was a collection of delec- 
table clothes, especially the lacy 
knits, the fresh summer dresses 
in striped cotton or piqu6 and 
the tailored jackets. 

“Sex — was it sexy?” asked 
Westwood, who took her bow 
wearing one of the cages with a 
rear view of a brief bodysuit. “It 
was my stand against mediocri- 
ty in fashion, where everyone 
lodes a shapeless mess,” she 
said. “Eroticism is about con- 
cealing as much as revealing 
and the show was about chang- 
ing (he zones.” 

Karl Lagerfeld's show Thurs- 
day was an attempt to be Mod- 
ern with a capital M. It con- 
tained some of the most 
hideous colors and prints under 
the sun. men mooning down the 
runway after the model legend 
Veruschka and starry jackets. 

Since “Sun, Moon and Stars” 
is Lagerfeld’s latest fragrance, 
the finale of the show had silver 
solar embroideries on pastel 
dresses opening over shorts. 
They were an improvement on 
jersey second-skin dresses, mix- 
ing bilious green, bubble-gum 
puik, manure brown and dee- 
trie blue and with daubed prints 
that would be hard to praise if a 
toddler brought them back 
from playschool. 

But the jackets were splen- 
did, shaped to the body with , a 
Sjnping jigsaw of seams. 
Techno fabrics and the b&ixh 
colors suggested that Lagerfeld 
was reaching for a millennial 
futurism. Between the romantic 
nostalgia of his Chloi collection 
and this brash modernity, there 
ought to be a mi dd le way. - 

Knitwear seems to be an 
e cwging story this spring-sum- 
season. Sonia Rykiel made 
her modds into sweater gMs,. 
ghdng a glamour to . curving 
nuts and even embroidering 
t he o utline of a bra in sequins. 
Cerruti stayed with sportswear, 
making layered cardigans -add 
sweaters for day into evening. 

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S & J? A 7 


International Herald Tribune 
Friday , October I4 t 1994 
Page 9 


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Liaison? 


BELCUUM 

A n t w er p 

jtfijgde Plantin-Moretus, tet: (33) 
02-94, open daily. To Dec. 31: "An- 
tters; Ogrtre Typographkjua Dissi- 
dent. Documents the rote of Ant- 
w«p primers tn the lKh-century 
conflicts between English Protes- 
tants and Catholics. 

Bruges 

Graeningemuseum, tef: (SO) 34- 
79-59 open dally. Continuing Ao 
nw. 15: Hans Meiming: Five Centu- 
ries ot Reality and Flctton." 

BRITAIW " 

AMebwgh 

Britten Plus Festival, tel: (728) 45- 
35-43. Oct. 20 to 23. Focuses on the 
relationship between Benjamin Brit- 
ten and French composers Darius 
Mflhaud and Francis Poulenc, in- 
cludes performances ot Poulenc's 
"Dialogue des Carmelites" and Mi- 
lhaud's "Quartet No. 3. 

London 

English National Opera, tel: (71) 
836-3161. A revival of "The Magic 
Flu®,’" directed by John Abudana, 
conducted by Martyn Brabbins/Atex 
Ingram (from Nov. 19), wttti Neil 
Archer/Thomas Randle, Rebecca 
Caine/Gildan Webster and Quentin 
Hayes/ Alan Ople. Oct 20, 26. 29. 
Nov. 2, 5. B, 10, 12 and 17. 

Hayward Gallery, tel: (71) 928- 
3144, open daily. Continuing/To 
Jan. 8: "The Romantic Spirit in Ger- 
man Am 790-1 990. “ 

National Gallery, tel: (71) 839- 
3321, open daily. To Dec. 4- 
"Themes and Variations: Ideas Per- 
sonified." Thirty allegorical paintings 

that depict abstract concepts in hu- 
man form. Includes personifications 
of Charity by Cranach, Van Dyck and 
Reynolds, as well as the “Four Ages 
of Man" by Nicolas LancreL 
National Portrait Gallery, tel: (71) 
839-3526, open daily. To Jan. 22: 
‘The Sitwefls and the Arts of the 
1920s and , 30s." Celebrates the lives 
and art of Ecfith, Osbert and Sache- 
verafl Sitwell, with family portraits and 
other works reflecting their associa- 
tion with the Bloomsbury Group, the 
Ballet s Rus ses and other contempo- 
rary artists. 

RtVal Academy of Arts, tef: (71) 
494-5615, open dally. Conti nu- 
ing/To Dec. 14: "The Glory of Ven- 
ice: Art in the 1 8th Century. 

Tate Gallery, tel: (71) 887-8000. 
open daily. To Jan. 8: “James 
McNeffl Whistler. " 75 paintings and 
120 works on paper emphasize par- 
ticular themes: the Nocturnes, his 
works as a designer, the pastels and 
the full-length portraits. Includes 
“Nocturne in Black and Gold," de- 
scribed by John Ruskin as a "pot of 
paint flung in the public's face." 

CANADA " 

Toronto 

Art Gallery of Ontario, tel: (416) 
977-0414, closed Tuesdays. Con- 
tin ulng/To Dec. 31 : “From Cezanne 
to Matisse: Great French Paintings 
from The Barnes Foundation.” 

DENMARK ~~ 

Copenhagen *• 

The Royal Danish Opera .tel; 33-32- 
20-20. Prokofiev's "The Love tor 
Three Oranges," directed by Flem- 
ming Flindt, conducted by Jan 
Latham -Koenig, with John Laursen 
and Christian Christiansen/Stephen 
MUilng. Oct. 18. 22, 25, Nov. 10. and 
15. 

FRANCE 

Parle 

Fondafion Cartier pour I'Art Con- 
temporain, tat 42-18-56-50, dosed 
Mondays. To Oct 23: "Chuck Close: 
Huft Pelntures Recertes." Ofl paint- 
ings based on reproduction of photo- 
graphs through the use of lines and 
squares. 

Grand Palais, tel: 44-13-171-17, 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Jan. 9: "Gustave Calllebotle, 1848- 
1894." Also, to Jan. 2: "Nicolas 
Poussin." 

Musde-Galerte de la Setta, tel: 45- 
56-60-18, closed Sundays. To Nov. 

30: "Klimt: DessJns." More than 60 
drawings (portraits and nudes) from 1 
American collections. 

Musee du Petit Palais, tel: (1 ) 42- 
65-12-73, dosed Mondays. To Jan. 
a- "De Bagdad a Ispahan." From the 1 



Jeffrey Tate, who is conducting the “ ''Ring ” in Paris. 

Bayreuth on Seine: 
The 'Ring’ Resumes 

Jnitnumrmal Herald Tribune 

T HE major musical project of the year in Paris, the 
complete production of Wagner's “Der Ring des 
Nibdungen" by the Thfcatre du CMtelet, begun in 
June with "Das Rhdngold” and “Die Walkure," 
resumes Friday with “Siegfried” and Sunday with “Gotter- 
dammenmg,” both starting at 5 P. M These final two parts of 
the tetralogy will be repeated on Oct 21-23 and Oct. 27-29, 
completing “cycles” begun in the raring. 

Then two more complete cycles mil be done on a Bayreuth- 
ian time span, the first on Oct. 31, Nov. 1, 4, 6, and the second 
on Nov. 8, 9, II, 13. For those within reach of the radio 
antennas of France Musique, the final cycle will be broadcast, 
either slightly delayed or direct 

■ Die musical architect of this “Ring” is Jeffrey Tate, with 
Radio France's Orchestre National in the pit It is Tate's first 
complete “Ring,** yet he brings deep and varied experience to it, 
having been in on the musical preparation of the cycle under 
Georg Solti, among others, at Covent Garden, then assistant to 
Pierre Boulez for (he centennial “Ring” at Bayreuth in 1976-80, 
an experience he credits with generating his own conducting 
career. Pierre Slrosser is both stage director and set designer, 
with Patrice Cauchetier the costume designer. 

A parallel event is “Wagner: Le Ring en Images." an 
exhibition open daily from Ocl 14 to Jan. 4, 10 A. M. to 8 
P. M, in the Galerie Mansart of the Bibliotheque Nationale 
in Paris. It consists of a large part of the Wagnerian library of 
Bruno Lussato, the largest private Wagner collection outside 
Bayreuth. The exhibition includes manuscripts, letters, anno- 
tated scores, printed scores and other published material, and 
a rich store of iconography. 


amts 


On OCL 16: "Europe, Europa: Das 
Jahriiundert dor Avant garde in Kfitte*- 
und Osteuropa." Kunst- und Aus- 
steUungshaHe, Vienna. 

On Oct. 16: "Salvador Dali: II Surrea- 
femo nella Terza Dimenstone e nel- 
r Arte Grafica." Museo Santa Croce, 
Florence. 

On Oct 16: “Goya, Truth and Fanta- 
sy: The Cabinet Pictures, Sketches 
and Miniatures." Art Institute, Chi- 
cago. 

On' Oct. 16: "Robert Irwin." Musde 
d'Art Modeme de la Ville de Peris. 
On Oct- 16: FlAC. the annual con- 
temporary art fair, featuring 160 gal- 
lerias from around the work! Qua! 
Branly, Parte. 


*. coflections of the institute for OftemaP 
Studies in SL Peteraburg, illuminated 
manuscripts dtelng beck to the 16th 
century; Persian and Mogul minia- 
tures, and copies of the Koran', docu- 
menting Islamic civilization. 

OERMANY 

Berlin 

BrDCke- Museum, tel: (30) 831- 
8029, closed Tuesdays. Conttnu- 
Ing/To Nov. 27: "Der Fra he Kan- 
dinsky." More than 100 paintings, 
drawings and prints dating back to 
the years 1900 to 1910, before the 
beginning of his abstract work. 
Darmstadt 

Kunsthafle, tel: (6151) 89-11-64, 
dosed Mondays. To New. 20: ' 'Zhou-' 
Brothers: Craneslsche Symblose: 
Vter Hande, Zwei Brader, Bn Ge- 
maJde." Recent nonfiguratlve paint- 
ings by two contemporary Chinese 
brothers. 

Munich 

Lenbachhaus, tel: (89) 233-20-00, 
dosed Mondays. To Nov. 27: ‘Tan- 
zania." Features 400 pieces of tradi- 
tional East African sculpture, some of 
which can be linked to Art Brut and to 
contemporary trends in German 
sculpture. 

Stuttgart 

Staatsgaierie, tel: (711) 212-4050, 
dosed Mondays. To Jan. B: "Max 
Beckmann: Mefsterwerke a us St. 
Louis." On loan from the St Louis 
Museum, paintings by the German 
artist. Features the triptych "Die Ak- 
robaten." painted during his Amster- 
dam exile after he fled Nazi Germany 
In 1937. 

ISRAEL 

Jer u s a lem 

The Israel Museum, tel: (2) 708- 
ail, open daily. To Nov. 15: "John 
Heartfietd." Anti-Nazi satirical photo- 
montages created between 1 930 and 
1938 by the German artist who 
fought against Nazism, capitalism 
and war. Also, to Jan. 9: "Camflle 
Pissarro: Impressionist Innovator." A 
retrospective of 125 oil paintings by 
the French impreastonts!, from early 
drawings to works completed in 
1944, the year of his death. 


David Stevens 


ITALY 

Padua 

Palazzo della Raglone, tel: (49) 
820-500B, open daily. To Dec. 26: 
"Luca Carlevaris e la Veduta Vene- 
ziana del Settecenio." Nearly 100 
works by the Venetian painter and 
etcher who painted scenes ot Venice 
tor foreign visitors, as well as paint- 
ings by his successors, including Ca- 
naletto and Guardi. 

Venice 

Museo Correr, tet: (41) 940-200. 
open daily. To Dec. 11: "Impressiorv 
ismo & Neoimpression ismi: Donne e 
Paesaggi dal Petit Palais di Glnevra." 
70 works representing women and 
landscapes. Includes works by Fan- 
tin-Latour, Cafflebotte, Degas, Kislfng 
and Foujita, as well as a bronze by 
Gauguin. 

Palazzo Fortuny, tel: (41 ) 71 5-597, 
closed Mondays. To Jan. 6: "New 
Pop; lllustrazione Americana." An 
exhibition of the new tendencies In 
American illustration: comics, carica- 
tures, books and record covers and 
videos. 

JAPAN 

Yokohama 

Yokohama Museum of Art, tel: (45 ) 
221-0300, closed Thursdays. To 
Nov. 6; “Oncrt Koshiro: A Poel ol 
Colors and Forms." Features 280 
works, including prints, book de- 
signs, photographs, drawings and oil 
paintings by the Japanese artist 
(1891-1955). 

NETHERLANDS "" 

Amsterdam 

Stedelijk Museum, tel: (20) 5732- 
911. open dally. To Nov. 27: "Asger 
Jom." A retrospective ot 100 paint- 
ings and drawings by the Danish art- 
ist (1914-1973). Jom's color paint- 
ings are inhabited by mythical 
figures, strange animals and human 
faces. 

RUSSIA ~~ 

St Petersburg 

Hermitage Museum, tel: (812) 2t9- 
8657. dosed Mondays. To Oct. 30: 


"Nicholas and Alexandra: The Court 
of the Last Russian Czar." 600 ob- 
jects including costumes, jewelry 
and portraits of members of the impe- 
rial family and other famous people of 
the time. 

SPAIH 

Barcelona ~~ 

Fun dado Joan Miro, tel: (93) 329- 
19-06, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 20: 
"Erwin BechtoW: Painting - Graph- 
ics - Integration." A retrospective of 
the work of the German Informalist 
painter. Includes 140 paintings, 
drawings, graphic works, as well as 
documents relating to the artist's In- 
volvement with architecture. 

Madrid 

Fundactt La Caixa. td: ( 1 ) 43-54- 
833, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 13: 
"Kandinsky/ Mondrian; Dos Ca- 
minos hacia la Abstraction." Docu- 
ments the parallels and differences 
between the two painters in their ear- 
ly phases. Both started as figurative 
painters although Kandinsky later de- 
veloped an abstract style white Mon- 
drian adopted a geometric idiom. 

Museo Thyssen-Bomemisza, tel: 
(91 ) 369-01 51 , closed Mondays. To 
Feb. 12: “0 Siglo de Oro del Pai'safe 
I Hdandes." More than 70 Dutch 
paintings from the 1 6th and 1 7th cen- 
turies, including works by Rem- 
brandt, Ruysdael. Meindert Hobbema 
and Jan van Goyen. 

SWEDEN 

Stockholm 

Nattonalmuseum, tel: (8) 666-42- 
50. dosed Mondays. To Jan. 8; 
“Goya" 50 paintings and 60 prints 
on loan from the Prado Museum in 
Madrid, the National Gallery in Lon- 
don and the Metropolitan Museum in 
New York. 

SWITZERLAND 

Lausanne 

Formation de rHemiltaga. tel: (21) 
320-50-01. open daily. Continu- 
ing/To OcL 30: "Les Pelntres de 
ZborawskJ; MorfigHani, Utrillo, Sou- 
tine et leurs Amis. 20 works each by 
Mocfigilani and Soutine, landscapes 
by Utrillo and several paintings by 
Kisling. 

Lugano 

Museo Canton ale d'Arte, tel: (91 ) 
22-93-56, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 

6: "Jean- Baptiste Camille Corot: Un 
Sentimento Particolare de) Paesag- 
gio." Focuses on the relationship be- 
tween the French painter and nature 
and the countryside. 

UNITED STATES 
Atlanta 

High Museum of Art. tei:J404) 898- 
9284, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 27: 
"Wllllem de Kooning." 50 paintings, 
drawings and sculptures front 1939 
to 1 985. Includes “Oueen ot Hearts," 
a portrait anticipating de Kooning's 
mature figurative style: "Zurich,” one 
of the abstract paintings ol the late 
1940s, and paintings and drawings 
from the “Women" series of the 
. 1950s. . . _ . | 

New York | 

Cooper-Hewitt Museum, tel: (212) 
860-6894, closed Mondays. To Feb. 
26: "Good Offices and Beyond: The 
Evolution of the Workplace-" Explores 
the major themes m the office environ- 
ment - the management of time, 
numbers, paper and information. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570*3951, closed Mondays. 

To Dec. 31: "The Photographs of 
Edouard Baldus: Landscapes and 
Monuments ot France." Photographs 
by the 19t/i -century artist including 
excerpts from his survey of French 
historic monuments, landscapes and 
scenes of daily life. 

Museum of Modem Art tel: (212) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To 
Jan. 3: "American Politicians." Ex- 
amines how photography has Illus- 
trated and affected American politics. 
Features 150 photographs. 

New York Public Library, tet: (212) 
869-6089, closed Sundays. To Dec. 
30: "The Raw and the Cooked: Im- 
ages of Food." A selection ol 150 
prints, drawings and photographs ot 
edibles, including works by Dorer 
and Warhol. 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 
tel: (212) 423-3840, dosed Mon- 
days and Tuesdays. To Jan. 29: 
"The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943- 
1 968.” A survey of Italian art a a time 
when the country became a leading 
exporter of culture, design and style. 
Paintings include works by Alberto 
Bum', Lucio Fontana and Piero Mart- 
zoni. Also features architectural mod- 
els, fashion, photography as well as 
furniture and experimental designs. 

World Financial Center, tel: (212) 
945-2600. To Dec. 4: "Celebrate 
Prague In New York." In different 
venues at the World Financial Center, 
a salute to Prague's visual arts, archi- 
tecture, design, crafts, literature, mu- 
sic, dance and video, it Includes an 
exhibition of Czech and Slovak inde- 
pendent art ot 1984; installations fo- 
cusing on the relationship between 

po Sties, environment and people, 
and a 12-hour performance of 16th- 
to 20th-century music. 


By Christopher Peikanas 


L ONDON — The late and formi- 
dable English food writer Jane 
Grigson hesitated to call Patrick 
Ranee a guru — too suggestive of 
“a bearded sage sitting on a mountain or 
under a bo-tree.” “Guru” conveyed pas- 
sivity, she felt She preferred to call hun a 
champion. 

Of what?Not of lager or vernacular pub 
grub or traditional Sunday lunch, all 
thin gs worth championing, but of British 
and French cheese. Ranee, 76, wrote the 
standard works on the subjects, “The 
Great British Cheese Book” and “The 
French Cheese Book.” The chief irony 
and injustice of bis 40-year commitment 
to the finest, most artisanal, most “succu- 
lent” (Ranee's word) farmhouse cheeses is 
that the French book may never be trans- 
lated into French. Ranee’s publisher tells 
him that French publishers say they can’t 
touch it because it’s too big — 562 pages. 

“It’s got more in it than any of the 
others, rll say that,” Ranee says. “The 
others" include all of the works by his 
French friend Pierre Androuet, a retired, 
second-generation Paris cheese-ager and 
seller with a holy reputation in cheese 
circles. “And it does attain my aim to give 
the state of French cheese from the mid to 
late ’80s, before the worst effects of the 
EEC were felt." 

Ranee was referring to the Ell's ruth- 
less enforcement, starting in 1984, of the 
Milk Quota, which subsidizes volume; 
quality and diversity are the casualties, 
under (be Quota, he writes, “The fanner 
is prevented from expanding his cheese 
production because the nnlk supply for his 


cheese must come from his own farm and 
is reduced by the Milk Quota.” 

The factory cheesemakers, on the other 
hand, are untouched by the regulations. 
They can increase their milk supply at 
wilL In this way the path was paved for 
such “old treasures" as the last artisanal 
Brie de Montereau disappearing from Lhe 
roll call of French cheese, cutting into de 
Gaulle's reported complaint to Churchill 
about how impossible it was to govern a 
country with 246 or 265 or 324 or whatev- 
er number of cheeses. Cumonsky, who 
was elected Prince of Gastronomes in 
1927, counted 483. By the time Ranee 
finished researching his book, which was 
published in 1989, he had found more 
than 750. 

u My book did not establish where 
things had happened, or where they are 
happening, which I feel is important.” 
says Ranee. “Because if you want to stage 
a cheese revival, you've got to know where 
the thing was made successfully before." 

A CAREER soldier who served in 
the 58ih Regiment and who re- 
tired as a major in 1949, Ranee 
next worked in the Conservative 
Party's research office. When, in an econ- 
omy drive, the party decided to eliminate 
his department, he karted casting around 
for a new life. Opportunity ads in The 
Evening Standard described village high- 
street grocery stores as bdng jusi the thing 
for “people in their declining years.” 
Though this hardly applied to Ranee and 
his equally cheese-loving wife, Janet — 
there were still children to come — they 
settled on a shop, Wells Stores, in Streat- 
ley. 

As Ranee remembers, “The only thing 


the shop stocked when we took it over was 
Edam, New Zealand Cheddar and Danish 
Blue. Now l don't know if you’ve ever had 
the misfortune to eat any of those in the 
form in which they're usually sold . . .” 

By the late 1970s, Wells was offering 
200 British, French, Swiss, Italian and 
Dutch varieties. “Our family grew with 
the number of cheeses," says Ranee. “Sev- 
en children, 200 cheeses — think of it. 
that's almost 30 times more cheeses than 
children." His son Hugh, who eventually 
took over the shop, sold it a couple of; 
years ago. 

Ranee's desert island cheese? Wrong if 
you guessed Saint-Neciairc. Rather, 11 is a, 
mature Cheddar made on the farm with, 
unpasteurized milk. Pasteurization kills, 
almost 100 per cent of bacteria and. with- 
it. the esters that determine flavor and, 
fragrance. Esters are carried by plant oils* 
into the body fat and mammary glands of 
cows, sheep,’ and goats. From" there they: 
are carried into milk and, finally, cheese'. ; 

“First of all there’s the aroma.” Ranee 
says of his desen island cheddar, “which: 
you’ve got to smell as the cheese is cut, 
before it forms a protective skin — a rich, j 
slightly sweet aroma. You know what ai 
good French Beaufort smells like? It’s cor; 
dissimular. To the touch this cheddar is; 
firm but not oppressively hard. And it has> 
a fairly close texture. You can crumble it,{ 
it’s not rubbery. The initial taste on thej 
tongue is just as rich as the aroma. There’s! 
a long aftertaste, as with wine." J 

- » 

Christopher Perkanas is the author of ca 
kistory of the New York decorating /u-m\ 
Parisn-Hadley. which will be published nexe 


Down and Dirty in Hollywood 


By Kathryn Wexler 

Washington Pm Serrice 

L OS ANGELES — Some would 
say the sun set long ago on Holly- 
wood Boulevard, once a play- 
ground for every rising star. First 
the tawdry souvenir shops outnumbered 
the chichi boutiques. Then, to the cheesy 
delight of Hollywood-crazed tourists, 
bronze stars bearing the names of the 
famous who had stopped coming to the 
boulevard were slapped into the side- 
walks. But it wasn't until prostitutes made 
the boulevard a red-light district and pan- 
handlers came in droves that die fabled 
street seemed to sink to an all-time low. 

That was before August 1994. Holly- 
wood Boulevard has now descended to' a 
level never before thought possible — four 
to nine inches below where it used to be. to 
beexacL 

The trouble began with an unremarkable 


plan to bore a large hole beneath the famed 
nine-block drag to make way for a spiffy 
new subway, one that would connect one 
end of sprawling Los Angeles to another. 
But Hollywood Boulevard s underpinnings 
are a veritable Pandora's box. 'Water mains 
got in the way of construction and broke. 
The workmen instantly ran into mushy soil 
that dribbled rather than hardened. Grout- 
ing around the tunnel that would normally 
keep soil from slipping and settling was 
used only in places. 

Hence, an icon of American culture and 
one of the most recognizable streets any- 
where began sagging around the edges. 

The sinking in itself isn’t catastrophic. 
Workmen scurried to make superficial re- 
pairs on the warped floors ana inch-wide 


portable toilets, the traffic, the ripped-up 
sidewalks and the trenches that detract 


from a stroll down Hollywood Boulevard, j 

Bart Sterling, owner of a storefront tourl 
company-cum-Coca-Cola memorabilia] 
shop, who has been doing business on the* 
strip for 26 years, wonders if the merchants! 
will be around long enough to reap thej 
benefits of the subway once it's finished. - 
He said passengers on his Hollywood Fan- 7 
tasy Tour are down 80 percent since the) 
work began about seven weeks ago. j 

Sterling has seen rosier times. “1 was in? 
2.000 movies and a big star until I started 
this tour business,” he said, next to a win- 
dow displaying a 2-by-3-foot photo taken 
more than 30 years ago of a handsome; 

B Sterling with low brows and a high; 

e. He's weathered riots, earthquakes, 
and economic downturn, but the Red Line 
subway might just be the clincher, he said. 

“Nobody comes here anymore.” Sterling 
said. “This is the most well-known street in* 
the world, and it*s just being mined." 


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No cash alternative to prizes. 

Winners will be drawn on November 15th and 
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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 


Lifting of Sanctions Eagerly Awaited by Business World 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — While 
Saddam Hussein’s latest saber- 
rattling sounds alarms in diplo- 
matic and military circles, it is 
provoking groans among coun- 
tries and companies that have 
been waiting four years to do 
business with Baghdad 

Those hopes, faint before, are 
now even fainter. 

“When the trade sanctions 
are lifted, there's an enormous 
job to be done rebuilding the 
country’s infrastructure," said 
Kla us-Diet er von Horn, a Ger- 
man Economics Ministry offi- 
cial in charge of Middle Eastern 


affairs. “Of course everyone 
wants to get involved A lot of 
companies will be interested." 

Given the current situation, 
however, “the likelihood of the 
sanctions being lifted anytime 
soon has shrunk,’' he said 

Before sanctions were im- 
posed in 1990, Germany was 


to 4 percent of Germany’s over- the United Nations Security 
all foreign trade, the region is Council to lobbv that the four- 


all foreign trade, the region is Council to lobby that the four- 
considered a strategic export year-old trade sanctions be lift- 
priority because of its massive ed They have done so frequent- 
demand for lelecommunica- ly, without success. The United 
dons, construction, transporta- States and Great Britain have 


soon™has shrunk," be said ~ lion and other services in which opposed any easing of trade 
n e . German companies excel. sanctions as long as Iraq re- 

Before sanctions were im- , „ f u< *H to tbcomum Kuwait 

posed in 1990, Germany was Gemnm m (obiqM fu ^^ 1 f^ u has ^ 

fraqs single biggest source of froi £ }■} “J}. 10 * , De »^ sc ^ putting pressure on foreign 
imports, followed by the United marks ($1 .4 billion) w 1 989, be- P^S\P contracts 

Sums, Turkey, France, Britain fo« ran mva^d Ku»™i m “^“^d^oTX effecl 
and Japaa Those countries, nm “ on until the trade embargo is lifted, 

along with Brazil and the Neth- ™ German companies^ forbid- 
erlands, were also the biggest food jf*® 111 3°°^ den from conducting such for- 

recipients of Iraqi exports, are excluded from the embargo. . ^ but 


Iraq’s sing le biggest source of from 2.2 billion Deutsche 
imports, followed by the United marks ($1.4 billion) in 1 989, be- 


States, Turkey, France, Britain fore Iraq invaded Kuwait^ in 
and Janaiv Thnw mnntries. August 1990, to 69.4 mfllion 


and Japan. Those countries, August 1990, to 69.4 mfllion 
along with Brazil and the Neth- UM m 1993. Medical supplies. 


mostly oil 

While trade with the Middle 
East accounts for only 3 percent 


ward contracts with Iraq, but 


Now, it has fallen to France, other countries enforce the 
China and Russia, more than trade embargo with greater dis- 


Germany, which has no seat on crelion. 


One of the most lucrative are- 
nas for foreign trade with Iraq 
is ofl exploration. With around 
100 billion barrels of petroleum 
reserves. Iraq has the world’s 
second largest known supply of 
crude oil after Saudi Arabia. 

In 1990. Iraq exported 
around 2 milli on barrels of 
crude oil worth an estimated 
SI 0.2 billion, but ofl exports 
came to a stop with the embar- 
go, costing the country dearly. 

Elf Aquitaine and Total two 
French state-owned oil compa- 
nies, have admitted to t alkin g 
with Iraqi officials about possi- 
ble business dealings once trade 
sanctions are lifted. 

“We’ve never denied that 


we’ve been talking with them,” 
said a spokesman for Elf Aqui- 


taine. "but we'd never expect to 
do anything as Iona as the em- 


U.S. Sees Quick UN Action on an Iraq Buffer Zone 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The United Nations Se- 
curity Council may be able to act as 
early as next week on a plan to declare 
a buffer zone between Iraq and Ku- 
wait where any intrusion of elite Iraqi 
armored units could trigger military 
retaliation by coalition forces, U.S. 
officials said Thursday. 

Although details remain to be 
worked out, the formula would curb 
Iraq's ability to tie down large num- 
bers of U.S. forces in Kuwait It would 
give allied air power an opportunity to 
decimate armored forces as they 
crossed the desert toward Kuwait. 

The advantage of this plan is that it 
would leave some Iraqi forces in place 
to avoid a vacuum of power that 
neighboring Iran might exploit The 
phrase used to describe the plan is 
status quo ante, meaning Iraq should 
not again increase its normal force 
levels in the southern region. 

U.S. officials said that judging by 
preliminary assurances, action along 
these lines will be supported by 


France, Britain and Russia. <c None of 
these countries wants to contradict 
both the United States and Saudi Ara- 
bia for the sake of Saddam." a Clinton 
administration official said. 

In objecting to an earlier proposal 
floated by the Clinton administrating 
to create a fully demilitarized zone in 
southern Iraq, French officials argued 
that their real concern focused on the 


risk of infiltration by Iranians to link 
up with their fellow Shiite Muslims in 
Iraq. 

But French officials also sought to 
play down the impression that Paris 
was soft on Iraq, especially after a 
meeting of Saudi Arabia and the 
smaller Arab stales in the Gulf called 
for action to curb Iraq’s military 
movements. 

The Gulf states at the Kuwait meet- 
ing also rejected an overture from the 
Arab League for mediation, saying 
that the U.S.-led coalition could han- 
dle the crisis, Arab diplomats said. 

Saudi Arabia and its Arab neigh- 
bors have agreed to repay the United 
States for much of the cost of defend- 
ing Kuwait It was not disclosed 


whether other nations, such as Ger- 
many and Japan, would be asked to 
hdp. 

While Washington has refused to 
rule out the possibility of bypassing 
the Security Council if necessary, the 
White House decided to shelve the 
more sweeping plan urged by its top 
military and national security aides. 

Officials said that President Bill 
Clinton was swayed mainly by objec- 
tions from other U.S. agencies. The 
State Department argued that a move 
perceived as unilateral might create a 
precedent exploitable by Russia in in- 
tervening in crises on its perimeter. 

The more limited option meets the 
basic objective of placing Kuwait out 
of range of Iraqi artillery. But it does 
less to bottle up Iraq’s armed forces in 
the center of the country, a strategy 
that could “cause the Iraqi military 
establishment to question whether 
Saddam can keep control of the na- 
tional territory," according to John 
Chipmao, director of the Internation- 
al Institute of Strategic Studies in 
London. 

He made the comment, reflecting 


the underlying U.S. aim of toppling 
the Iraqi leader, while presenting the 
institute’s annual survey of the 
world’s military forces, which showed 
enough U.S. power in Kuwait to repel 
an Iraqi invasion if defenders have 
warning time. 

The key factor there is U.S. air 
power, much of it equipped to find 
and knock out tanks, even at night. 

Another drawback to letting some 
Iraqi forces stay is the need for closer 
monitoring to detect a buildup. De- 
serters from the Iraqi Army, however, 
can flesh out detailed surveillance pic- 
tures provided by J- Stars, an aircraft 
that has come into full service since 
the 1991 Gulf War. 

Publicly, the Clinton administra- 
tion largely ignored criticism from 
Paris. Reacting to a French govern- 
ment minister’s remark suggesting 
that U.S. foreign policy was more vul- 
nerable to domestic political pressures 
than French diplomacy. Madeleine K. 
Albright, the U.S. ambassador to the 
UN, said simply that the French re- 
marks were “fll-informed and coun- 
terproductive.” 


do anything as long as the em- 
bargo is in place." 

Many other companies. In- 
cluding some in the United 
States, are said to be conduct- 
ing simil ar pr elimin ary negotia- 
tions without talking about it 
openly. 

In any case. Elf, Total and 
other companies deny already 
having si gne d contracts with 
Iraq to take effect later. 

Another country with strong 
traditional ties to Iraq is Russia. 
Indeed, Russian Deputy For- 
eign Minister Igor Ivanov and 
the head of the ministry's Mid- 
dle East Department, Victor 
Posuvalyuk, who arrived in 
Bagdhad on Wednesday to act 
as mediators in the conflict, 
were quoted as saying they fa- 
vored a lifting of the embargo. 

But the Moscow daily Izves- 
tia, in an editorial published 
Wednesday, warned Russian 
President Boris Yeltsin — and 
other governments — not to 
rush to s ign contracts without 
considering the stability of the 
current regime. 

"Oil talks with Iraqi dele- 
gates are now senseless because 
the embargo will probably not 
be lifted until Saddam yields 
power. If that happens and new 
people take the helm, they will 
probably want nothing to do 
with us," the newspaper wrote. 
"That will leave us not only 
with no repayment of outstand- 
ing debts, but no aims contracts 
and no ofl contracts." 

Many companies have appar- 
ently drawn the same conclu- 
sion and are keeping Iraq at 
arm's length until trade fric- 
tions are fully resolved. "The 
subject of Iraq has been dead 
since the sanctions were im- 
posed," said Gustav Mayert, a 
spokesman for Siemens AG. 
Germany’s biggest electrical en- 
gineering group. 


GULF: Saddam Offers a Deal on Recognizing Kuwait ARAFAT: 

Continued from Page 1 heard our message," Mr. Clin- Gulf and store a division’s Mor6 PreSSUT€ 

stalled to check that Iraq does ton told a group of broadcast- 


ASIA: Europe’s i Arrogance’ Cited 


stalled to check that Iraq does ton told a group of broadcast- 
not rebuild its weapons of mass ers. “Its forces have begun a 
destruction. After this period broad retreat from the border 


Gulf and store a division's 
worth of armored equipment 
there even if Iraq continues to 


Continued from Page 1 


withdraw its troops from the Friday unless Israel met a de- 
Kuwaiti border. Defense Secre- mand for the release of the 


the Security Council should lift area. Kuwaiti border. Defense Secre- mand for the release of the 

the sanctions. (A P, Reuters) “We’re watching the situa-- tary William J. Perrv said jailed Hamas founder. Sheikh 

' ... k. *ri i tl. vt * v..k .. < „ • . .. 


[ U.S. Slows Buildup 

Paul F. Horvitz of the Intema- 


tion very, very carefully," he 
added, "and well continue to 
deploy our forces in the Gulf 


Thursday. The New York Ahmed Yassin, and more than 
Times reported from Jidda. 200 other Palestinian prisoners. 


tional Herald Tribune reported satisfied that Iraqi 


earlier from Washington: 

U.S. military officials said 
Thursday that they would mar- 
ginally reduce and slow their 


troops no longer pose an imme- 
diate danger to Kuwait" 
Earlier, the overall com- 
mander of U.S. forces in the 


Times reported from Jidda. 200 other Palestinian prisoners. 

The steps are pan of a broad ^thSets^d.^ou^ 
^ the kidnappers offered no prdrf 


porver and would reprint a 

marked increase in the Amen- _ ...... 


deployment to the Gulf after Gulf, General J.H. Binford 
reporting what Mr. Clinton Peay 3d, said the United States 


called “a broad retreat" of Iraqi 
forces from the Kuwaiti border. 

But a Pentagon official said 
that the 155,000 U.S. troops 
placed on alert earlier this week 
would remain on alert status. 

“I am pleased to say that Iraq 


had “defused the crisis" and 
that the U.S. deployment had 
been slowed “at the margins." 


Public on Wednesday that 
can military presence in die re- $ H howcd Corpora | Wasraan. 

& ‘ bound and plainly frightened. 

The ground troops would be pleading for his life. Sheikh 
withdrawn over a period of Yassin, too, appealed to the ab- 

fr .1 V _■ _i — J rln/*tr\pr nnt Ia Uill rha rnMinr m 


weeks if the Iraqis completed ductors not to kill the soldier in 
their withdrawal and refrained an interview from prison with 


■ 30,000 to Be Deployed 

The United States plans to 
deploy 30,000 troops in the 


from belligerent actions. But television. 


Mr. Perry said that many of the There was no sign, however. 


additional warplanes? would re- that the Israelis were about to 


main indefinitely. 


CULT: Suicide Theory Is Revived 


Continued from Page 1 
was later found in Switzerland. 

Nonetheless, many questions 
remain unanswered. The sect 
owned extensive properties in 
Switzerland, France and Cana- 
da, but was it also engaged in 
money laundering and arms 
trafficking, as the Canadian po- 
lice and Swiss press reports 
have suggested? And what were 
its activities in Australia? 


that the cause of his death was 
not yet known. “His body was 
very badly burned,” he said. 


U.S.A.: 

More Broccoli 


Continued from Page 1 


’TVe were lucky. He was Identi- has gained a wider acceptance. 


negotiate the Hamas demands. 

The impasse left Israel and 
the PLQ mired deeper than ever 
in their worst crisis since Pales- 
tinian self-rule began five 
months ago in Gaza and the 
West Bank town of Jericho. 

It seemed to many political 
figures and commentators here 
that the two sides were at a 


fied through his dental re- In 1970, per capita consump- turning point, with the future of 
cords.” tion of broccoli was half a peace negotiations imperiled at 


While relatives insisted that pound; by 1 992 it bad increased the very moment — 


the victims would never have to 3.4 pounds (1 J kilograms). 


riled at 
Friday 


committed suicide, thejud 
vestigating the deaths at Cl 


‘For us to make such 


* changes in our food consump- 

Andrt Wler, said the sea mem- , 20 _ periodis 


— that Mr. Rabin and Mr. Ara- 
fat reportedly axe to receive the 
Nobel Peace Prize. 

“I see this as a fundamental 


have suggested? And what were “"“I tion over a 20-year period is ‘ 7* 35 a lunoameniai 

its actives in Australia? bCTS ™g hl h » ve 1 1 ? own ~ really remarkable." i£d Lais «t tvitiifiir-r^chin* unpbca- 

c . , — . accepted — that they were go- T 0 h an «m rw-r nf the Static- 11008 f° r tbe future, Mr. Rabm 

Even more pertmentiy, what £gto die and might have bSm said, 

exactly happened on the night 'shot after losinz consciousness. «... » .... Hamas has embarrassed and 


Continued from Page 1 

sharply in the same period, as 
European businesses focused 
first on the opportunities of an 
integrated market at home and 
then on the needs of East Euro- 
pean countries newly liberated 
from Communist control 
Fidel Ramos, the president of 
the Philippines, said that the 
Europe- East Asia meeting in 
Singapore was taking place in 
an atmosphere that was "cer- 
tainly more optimistic" than 
the two groups’ inaugural gath- 
ering in Hong Kong last year. 

Mr. Ramos said that there 
was a “vast reservoir of good- 
will and even admiration" in 
East Asia for Europeans. 

East Asians admired Eu- 
rope’s culture, technology, eco- 
nomic power and “the way you 
have softened individual enter- 
prise with compassionate social 
values,” he added 
Mr. Mahathir noted as well 
that East Asians still had to 
“fully discover Western Eu- 
rope” and its economic poten- 
tial 

But he said that before there 
could be the kind of "partner- 
ship of equals” between East 
Asia and Europe that the Euro- 
pean Commission has urged 
Europeans would have to ac- 
cept that Asian ways of busi- 
ness, economics, politics and 


Asian leaders who, in their 
more exuberant moments, 
thought they could "solve the 
Serbian atrocities in Bosnia, the 
Basque problem, the income in- 
equalities between northern 
and southern Italy, the problem 
of homelessness in rich societ- 
ies, drug addiction, classroom 
violence, vandalism and the ri- 
diculous health systems" in 
Western Europe. 

Exports from East Asia are 
widely blamed for displacing 
domestic production in the 
West, thus increasing domestic 
unemployment and contribut- 
ing to economic stagnation. 

Some Western politicians 
and media commentators have 
asserted that East Asian exports 
are competitive because they 
rely on labor that is exploited 
and underpaid and on labor 
practices that would not be tol- 
erated in the WesL 

Mr. Lee said that in reality, 
exports from Asian developing 
countries make up less than 4 



Kenzaburo Oe outside bis Tokyo home Thursday. 


Excerpts From Novels 


The Associated Press 

Following are excerpts from the writings of Kentabwct Oe> 
who was awarded the Nobel Prise for Literature on Thursday: 

In this scene from the novel “A Personal Matter;" the 
protagonist, a young father, is with the lover he has taken 
after learning ms firstborn child suffers from a birth 'defect. 
The translation from the Japanese is by John Nathan, j:. 

“They were watching the midnight news, Bird in bed on bis 
stomach, lifting only his head like a baby sea urchin, ffiSSko 
hugging her knees on the floor. The heat of 6ay had dQfMtited 
and like primeval cave dwellers they were enjoying the cod air 
in nakedness. Since they had turned the volume way xfcwn 
with the telephone bell in mind, the only sound in t&e.isom 
was a voice as faint as the buzzing of a bee’s. wrings. .But what 
Bird heard was not a human voice endowed with meaningand 
mood, nor was he distinguishing meaningful shapes in . the 
flickering shadows on the screen! From the external world he 
was letting in nothing to project its image on the screen of his 
consciousness. He was simply waiting. Eke a radio, .set 
equipped with a receiver only, for a signal from the distance 
which he wasn't even certain would be transmitted.” 

From “The Silent Cry," translated by John Bester: 

“Even before the eye injury I was already showing more 
and more clearly a quality of ugliness that often reminded me 
how mother had prophesied that, when we grew up; my 
brother would be handsome and I would not. The-.jto&^eyt 
merely emphasized the ugliness each day, throwing it into 
constant relief. My bora ugliness would have liked, to hang 
back, silent, in the shadows; it was the missing eye that 
continually dragged it out into the limelight. Not that I 
neglected to assign a role to this eye: I saw it, its function lost 
as being forever trained on the darkness within my skull a 
darkness full of blood and somewhat above body neat. The 
eye was a lone sentry that I’d lured to keep, watch on die forest 
of the night within me, and in doing so I'd forced myself to 
practice observing my own interior. 


■ - - * 


AMU 


. a CfWttCai 

1,r '- ” ■ i 


poorer countries, that was the 
basic cause of unemployment in 


of Oct 4 at the farmhouse in 
Cheiry, a village 80 kilometers 
(50 miles) north of here, and at 
the three wooden chalets at 
Granges-sur-Salvan, 70 kilome- 
ters east of here? Indeed, what 
prompted the sect’s leaders to 
renounce wealth and power and 
choose to die? 

Having first said they sus- 
pected collective suicide, the 
Swiss police then concluded 
that some of the victims had 
been murdered, since 20 of the 
23 bodies found at Cbeiry had 
bullet wounds, 10 had plastic 
bags over their heads and at 
least one had his bands tied. 

Dr. Thomas Krompecher, 
who is_ heading the team of pa- 
thologists in Lausanne examin- 
ing the corpses, said Dr. Jouret, 
whose body was found at 
Granges, had not been shot but 


■ . _ J- _ _ J • 9 ~| 1 _ yv i »l « »*UVM» VUiVi VI UiW , 

mg to die and might have been cal Abstract Section of the Cen- 

shot after losing consciousness. Hamas has embarrassed and 

On the other hand, one sect ^ ZriLrisS XnldSI wakened the PLO liefer in the 
document sent to newspapers themselves on the back.” eye& of many Palestinians by 

last week clearly suggested a „ , pushing him mto a comer, 

combination of suicide and . offers data i on w j iere ^ jg f orC ed to choose 

murder, noting that some mem- , Statramost obdu- whether to alienate his Israeli 

bers of the order had not Though more negotiating partners or the siz- 

reached the state of conscious- £^ c ? r 5f ns 1 a ^ graduatm8 c rP“ able portion of the Palestinian 
ness required to understand the ! sc T*r ““ s< ?”5 5 °. n public that considers the Islam- 

need to leave this world and lasuc Assessment_Tests have £ attackras „ 


administration would not be and social costs are high, man- 
carbon copies of those in the agements avoid hiring more 


Union. 

Reflecting resentment among 
many East Asian governments 
at previous attempts by the EU 
to link human rights standards 
to trade or aid, be said that no 
Asian country had demanded 
that European states reform 
themselves. 


percent of total consumption of TVrfYDT7T r rvr • vt i 

manufactured goods in devei- INLroJLJLS Japanese Writer Honored 

oped nations. ■* 

He said it was technological Continued from Page 1 Mr. Oe is the 91st recipient of 

“ndensc to form a disconcert- Nobel Prize m Literature, 

ggs-Sw® zs rc ^ humanp,& JSfE'sra 

the Union and the Untied ^ ^ dte d d* » 

“Because European wages Japan s defeat had on ttu. detnrh«t- 

and social costs are high, man- *“» development. “The humilia- 

agements avoid hiring more £°“ took a firm grip on him and m a 

SSbyS^lut^ hasMto^mu^&hiswoA,” ffS, 

tion. computerization snd to- « sa^. “He himself describes 5 

holies." he said. “So their de- hts writing as a way of earn*. “f 

mand for highly educated labor mg demons.” 

is increasing, but their demand In a telephone interview s™,,, i^v, 


basic cause of unemployment in 
the Union and the United 
States. 

“Because European wages 


workers by increasing automa- 
tion, computerization and ro- 
botics,” he said. “So their de- 
mand for highly educated labor 
is increasing, but their demand 
for unskilled labor is falling.” 

The meeting, held by the 
World Economic Forum, which 
organizes an animal gathering 


Mr. Oe is the 91st recipient of 
the Nobel Prize in Literature, 
which was received last year by 
Toni Morrison of the United 
States. The award includes a 
$930, 1 000 payment. 

The owlish, often detached- 
looking Mr. Oe grew up in a 
snail village on the Japanese 
island of Shikoku, steeped in 
Japan’s rural traditions and 

wartime propaganda. The sense 
of wonder and security he 
seems to have felt in those mno- 


cent days -before the atomic 


Mk wh&K plun s e T“lS. 1 f 993 ’,5 ea 'S; 

die for their own benefit. T fnl 

All but one of the bodies at 

leiiy were found in the sect’s ^themadcs wdon, 468; 30 
Lrror- lined meeting room. ?«* earlier, the average was 


But Mr. M ahathir said he of in tern a tional leaders in Da- 
was sure that there were many vos, Switzerland, ends Friday. 


voluble if somewhat solemn 
man, said the call from Stock- 
holm, at a little before 9 PAL 
local time, had come as a thun- 
derbolt. 

“It was a total surprise,” he 
said. “Completely. Total” 


bomb was dropped and an' em- 
peror he was taught to regard as 
divine announced that Japan 
had been defeated — appears 
again and again in his worn. 

In the interview, Mr. Oe com- 
pared himself with Kobo Abe. 


Cheiiy woe found in the sect’s 
mirror-lined meeting room. 


Nineteen were lying in a circle 466 for 'the verbal part, and 492 
with their heads pointing out- for maUl - . 


ULSTER: Protestant Terrorists Declare a Cease-Fire 


Continued from Page 1 


London. But as time went on. 


ward and many were wearing 
white, red and black ceremonial 
capes denoting their rank in the 
order. Fire fighters who found 
the bodies said there were no 
signs of a struggle. 


Conversely, while test scores 
have declined, the amount of 
money Americans spend on 
books has increased — to $16 J 
billion in 1992 from $10.5 bil- 


three months before mlks ran and London remained s eemi ng- 


fe still have to reach a satu- 


ly ambivalent, the anxiety lift- 
ed, eventually making it possi- 


ation where we are satisfied it is f? r _ the Protestant 

permanent,” he said Thursday, par amili t ar ies to match their 


If we snatch at these t hing s it is Catholic antagonists in turning 


lion in 1970. And the amount of going to slip away. We need to aw ®y from the armed stru gg le. 


- ■* « ^ T* ““T 1&u VYl aoout and disorienting novel “The 

J-.-...—... SS&Efe.™ 

Both Washington and Dub- uSSSe jKKf about the torrora of thefight- 

lin have made it clear that they would encouraMotihereh^^ dUr SL tl?e 

would like to see a faster pace «t j T ' war, and Masuji lb use, who is 

and that London should^ ne 2 £«tknown for “Black Rain*” a 

squander the opportunity: \ 1 novd . a ? out ^ victims of the 

r ,l ,, j .. ^ always wanted to write about atomic bombin* 
in the 43 days of the cease- our country, our society and 
fire, the IRA has refrained from feelings about the con tempo- 


One of the weapons used at money spent on newspapers retain the confidence and trust Now, London's position is 


Cheiry, a .22-caliber pistol with magazin es rose to $20 J bfl- Q f ajQ the people of Northern less effective b«ause it is refus- 


a silencer, was later found at A 00 from $13 3 . billion in the 
Granges, which meant that one same period 


Ireland.' 


ing to recognize a cease-fire 


Cholera Epidemic in Albania 

Reuters 

TIRANA, Albania — A 
monthlong cholera epidemic in 
Albania has claimed its 12th 
and 13th victims. 


or more people drove the 160 But that increase is dwarfed 


Ironically, it has been the whose legitimacy is granted 
government’s caution that to even by the most extreme Prot- 


all acts of intercommunity vio- rary scene. But there is a big 
lence, despite some provoca- difference between us and cla? 


tions by the loyalist ade. The sic Japanese literature.” 


kilometers between the villages by the surge in the amount some degree assuaged the fears estant fighters. Pressure is 
in the middle of the night. The spent for video and audio erf Protestant “loyalists,” who bound to mount upon the Brit- 
fires that drew attention to the equipment and personal com- — — i” — — •— 


Protestant paramilitaries mur- He said that, ul tima tely, his 


mg in the Philippines during the 
war, and Masuji Ibuse, who is 
best known for “Black Rain,” a 
novel about the victims of the 
atomic bombing 
“They created the way to the 
Nobel prize,” Mr. Oe said. “I 
am the youngest one of that 
group.- I received the prize in 
their place.” 


deaths in Granges began some puters. Spending in that catego- 
three hours after a similar fire at ry ballooned to $703 billion in 


Cheiry. 


1993 from $8.8 billion in 1970. 


are “loyal” to Britain. They ini- ish government to get explor- 
tialiy worried that the IRA atory talks moving. London 
must have laid down its arms and Dublin are working on a 
because of a secret deal with “framework” document that 


dered a Catholic worker the writing was focused on a single 
night of the cease-fire, set off a concern. “I am writing about 


bomb near a Sinn Fein office the dignity of h uman beings,” 
and planted a detonating de- he said, as a throng of reporters 
vice, which only partially ex- gathered in front of his home in 
ploded, on a train to Dublin. a festive mood. 


To subscribe In Gummy 

just coil, toH fr«*. 


013084 8585 






Page 11 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14s 1994 


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International Herald Tribune, Friday, October 14 , 1994 



Page 13 



THE TRIB INDEX. 117 . 49 $! 

SSiS?SSS3 

Dy BJoomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 10D 
120 


Plot Thickens in Film Industry 

Studio Marks Major Shift A Matsushita-MCA Split? 



150 


110 


90 




—I— — : L— 


• .V X , ' ’ 


3 *■ > ’ a. «ri if 


• • • 

M J 

J 

A S O 

■■MRRHRRRRI 


1994 

Asia,' 'Pacific 


Europe 1 

Appro* weighCing:3a% 

Close: 130.45 Prev.: 129.31 
) 

n 

Approx, weighing: 37% RtfR 

Ctosa 11839 Ptev: 116.12 IBSM 




s o 

1994 


150 


North America 


Approx. wBigltfngc 26% 
Oose: 97.31 Prevj 96.82 


M J J A S 0 
1994 


t-a tin America 


Approx, wrighihg: 5% 
Oosa: 14851 Pm: 14389 


130 


110 







M 


pf World Index 


S O 
1994 


The max tacks UJS dollar values ct stacks 4r Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
ArganUn* Australia. Austria, Belgium, Brazil. Canada. CM*. Dorewrt. Finland, 
ftanoe, Germany, hong Kong. Italy, Mexico, Natharhmda, Nat* Zealand, Norway, 
Shgapora, Spain, Sweden. Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. New Yotk and 
London, the Index Is composed of the 20 top Issues In terms of market capkakzaBon, 
othanrisa the ten top eureka era tracked. 


| industrial Sectors | 


uu Pm. % 


Tbs. 


* 


don don donga 


dun 

don 

donga 

Energy 

11654 11434 +132 

Capital Goods 

118-81 

118-02 

+037 

UifflUM 

12934 12140 +1.12 

RnrMetoiak 

136.16 

'13438 

+1.10 

Finance 

117.78 116JQ +1,10 

Consumer Goods 

106.11 

105.00 

+1.06 

Services 

121.17 119.41 +1A7 

Uscelaneous 

125.31 

12434 

+1.02 

For more infontadoa about the Index, a booklet is available free ol charge. 


Write lo Trio Index, 1B1 Avenue Charies de GauSe. 92521 NatNIy Cedes, Fiance. • 


By Bernard Weinraub 

New York Times Sendee 

LOS ANGELES — Plans by 
Steven Spielberg, David Geffeu 
and Jeffrey Katzenberg to form 
a new motion-picture, anima- 
tion, television and entertain- 
ment company — whose cre- 
ation could involve reclaiming 
ownership of Universal Pic- 
tures from its Japanese owners 
— represent a seismic shift in 
Hollywood’s traditional studio 
system. 

The union of three of the 
most powerful brokers in Hol- 
lywood to own and run their 
own studio marks the biggest 
merger of talent since Charlie 
Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Doug- 
las Fairbanks and D.W. Grif- 
fith founded the United Artists 
movie empire in 1919. 

It also underscores the finan- 


impact on Disney, notably in 
animation. 

One development that could 
shape the structure of the new 
studio is that the company for 
which Mr. Spielberg currently 
produces movies, MCA Inc, 
and its Universal Pictures unit, 
may be repurchased from Mat- 
sushita Electrical Industrial Co. 
of Japan and combined with the 
new company. 

Matsushita bought MCA for 
S6.1 billion in 1990, but MCA’s 
top executives have bridled un- 
der the foreign ownership. 

Even if the MCA deal does 
not materialize, Mr. Spielberg, 
Mr. Geffeu and Mr. Katzen- 
berg would seem to have the 
financial wherewithal to create 
a powerful new film and enter- 
tainment company. 

The three men said they ex- 


The Spielberg-Kalzenberg-Geffen 
union underscores the financial and 
creative turmoil at Hollywood studios. 


O International Herald Tribune 


dal and creative turmoil rock- 
ing Hollywood studios, includ- 
ing Sony Pictures, which also 
has Japanese owners that have 
lavished hundreds of millions 
of dollars on salaries, buildings, 
buyouts and, in many cases, 
faded movies. 

“This has got to be a ’dream 
team,’ ” said Mr. Katzenberg, 
who quit his job as rJiairmnn of 
Walt Disney Studios in August 
after fading to gain a promotion 
at Disney. “Certainly it’s my 
dream.” 

Mr. Katzenberg, 43, was 
flanked at a news conference 
announcing the plan by his two 
dose friends, Mr. Spielberg, 46, 
the movie director, whose net 
worth is more than $600 mil- 
lion, and Mr. Geffen, SO, a bil- 
lionaire record impresario, in- 
vestor and producer. 

Mr. Katzenberg went out of 
his way to speak warmly of his 
former boss, Michael D. Eisner. 
But the new studio could haves 
direct and long-term negative 


pected the first of their studio’s 
movies to go into production 
next year. Although they de- 
clined to discuss the initial costs 
of the venture, the three are 
believed to be combining more 
than $100 milli on of their own 
funds as a start-up. 

During the next five years, 
one of them said afterward, the 
necessary capital would be 
probably reach $1 billion to $2 
billion. But Mr. Katzenberg 
contended that raising financ- 
ing would not be a problem, 
given the track record and repu- 
tations of the partners. 

“We start off self-financed.” 
said Mr. Katzenberg. “We’re 
very confident.” The new stu- 
dio. he said, appeared to have 
“unlimited financial resources” 
from WaD Street and the busi- 
ness community. 

Privately, one of the partners 
said that once filmmaking be- 
gan, the company would use 

See STUDIO, Page 14 


By Andrew Pollack 

Nov York Times Service 

TOKYO — When rumors 
were circulating this year that 
Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. might sell a stake in its 
Hollywood movie studio to a 
cable-television operator, exec- 
utives of the Japanese company 
denied any such intention. 

“Matsushita has purchased a 
beautiful and tasty apple,” 
Tsuzo Murase, an executive 
vice president, said in March. 
“If half the apple is cut and 
sold, the remaining half would 
not be as tasty." 

Now the two U.S. executives 
who actually run the movie 
business want to buy a slice of 
the apple. But Matsushita's phi- 
losophy is likely to make it re- 
luctant once again to sell. 

Officials at the giant Japa- 
nese electronics company said 
Thursday that they were caught 
by surprise by reports from 
Hollywood on Wednesday that 
Lew R. Wasserman and Sidney 
Jay Sbembexg, the chairman 
and president of MCA Ino, 
wanted to buy back the compa- 
ny from Matsushita and were 
contemplating quitting if they 
could not do so. 

“I was so surprised. I never 
heard anything about it,” Su- 
sumu Ishihara, a director of 
Matsushita and head of public 
relations, said Thursday. Mr. 
Murase. the executive at Osaka 
headquarters who oversees the 
movie business, said he, too, did 
not know what was happening. 

Both executives said they 
could not comment on what 
stance Matsushita would take if 
it were confronted by demands 
to sell all or part of MCA. But 
the Japanese officials reiterated 
Matsushita's general position 
that it has no interest in selling 
even a stake in MCA, which 
owns Universal Studios. 

Mr. Murase, reached at his 
home near Osaka, said MCA 
had a banner year last year, 
largely because of the block- 
buster movie “Jurassic Park," 
and that this year looked even 
better. He also said he saw no 
reason Mr. Wasserman and Mr. 


Sheinberg should want to quit. 

Mr. Ishihara said he did not 
know of the Friction between 
Hollywood and Osaka. He also 
said it had not yet been decided 
whether there would be a meet- 
ing next week between Matsu- 
shita and MCA executives. 

On the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change, Matsushita’s stock 
dropped only 10 yen to 1,690 
($17), but the repons about 
MCA had not been widely dis- 
seminated here by the time 
trading closed. 

MCA is only a small pan of 
Matsushita, which makes video 
recorders, televirions, washing 
m ac hin es, rice cookers, tele- 
phones, robots, semiconductors 
and a host of other products 
that are sold under the brand 
names Panasonic, Technics, 
National and Quasar. 

Matsushita has been bit hard 
by the recession in Japan, the 
rise of the yen and the lack of 
new hit products. Its earnings 
have declined for three consec- 
utive years, although there are 
now signs of an upturn. 

In the year that ended March 
31, the company’s entertain- 
ment business, of which MCA 
is the nuyor part, contributed 
586.8 billion yen. about 9 per- 
cent of total consolidated reve- 
nue of $64 J billion. Operating 
profit in entertainment was 23 2 
billion yen, about 13 percent of 
operating profit overall 

But analysts say the Holly- 
wood business is more impor- 
tant than its size suggests in 
terms of Matsushita’s image 
and its valuation on the stock 
market “That’s the asset that 
they’re telling everyone is the 
future for them,” said Joseph 
Osha. an analyst at Baring Se- 
curities in Tokyo. “Consumer 
electronics is just not a good 
business anymore.” 

Peter Wolff, an analyst with 
CS First Boston here. said. 
“The market would probably 
take it as a negative if Matsu- 
shita would be betting its future 
on hardware” by selling its soft- 
ware business. 


Inflation Data 
Give a Boost 
To U.S. Stocks 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Imenuninnal Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — A surprisingly low inflation report on 
wholesale prices drained more anxiety out of the financial 
markets Thursday. 

Bond yields fell, stocks firmed, and gold was cheaper 
because traders assumed the Federal Reserve would hold off 
on any interest rate increases at least until after next month’s 
U.S. elections. 

When economists were expecting a rise in the producer 
price index, plummeting energy and especially gasoline costs 
were the principal factors in a 0.5 percent drop in the index in 
September, the sharpest decline reported by the Labor De- 
partment since August of last year. The drop reversed two 
months of rises at roughly the same rate. 

The core rate, which excludes food and energy prices, rose 
by only 0.1 percent, helped by price restraint in automobiles 
despite high consumer demand. Wholesale car prices actually 
dropped 1.1 percent. 

In some ways, said David Munro of High Frequency 
Economics, the report was “almost too good to be true," but 
he expected the index to keep climbing at an annual rate of 
about 3 percent or less and to be reflected in a moderate 
consumer price index for September, which is due for release 
on Friday. 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average rallied 
more than 50 points in the first 12 minutes of trading as large 
investors piled into the market, forcing a curb on index-linked 
trading that was on and off for much of the day. Later in the 
session, however, enthusiasm wore off somewhat and the 
index closed at 3,889.95, up 14.80 points for the day. 

Bond yields slipped across the board and the yield on the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond fell to 7.85 parent from 
7.89 percent on Wednesday. 

Gold for December delivery on the Commodity Exchange 
closed $2 lower at $388.60. 

What has happened in the markets is largely a matter of 
Wall Street perceptions. Mickey Levy, chief financial econo- 
mist for NationsBank, said that fears of higher inflation and 
interest rates had clouded markets as consumer demand 
failed to slow down this summer and that this had driven 
down stock and bond prices. 

“People thought about other business cycles and figured 
the Fed would have to tighten a lot.” he said. “They braced for 

See INDEX, Page 14 


Microsoft Buys Intuit 
In $ 1,5 Billion Deal 


WALL STREET WATCH 


Tackling Bottom-Fishing 


By James K. Glassman 

Washington Pan Service 

W ASHINGTON — To most stock 
market professionals, so-called 
bottom-fishing — buying stocks 
whose prices have collapsed in 
" _ a big score on the rebound 
the same appeal as playing long-shot 
horses has to most professional gamblers. 
That is, none. 

Market technicians, who follow price 
charts, prefer to buy a stock after it starts 
moving up powerfully. More conventional 
money managers are embarrassed to have a 
disgraced stock in their published portfolios 
where their peers and clients can see it. Many 
fund managers automatically sell any stock 
that falls 15 percent or 20 percenL 
But for small investors, a little bottom- 
fishing can make a lot of sense. Certainly, 
long-term money — for retirement or for a 
chnd’s education — should be in strong 
slocks and diversified mutual funds. But that 
need not rule out the fun and profit of making 
a big killing in a company the pros hate. 

The main reason bottom-fishing works is 
that when bad news hits a stock, the market 
frequently overreacts, malting it possible to 
pick up bargains as others rush to get out. 

A good recent example is Philip Morris 
Cos. In 1992, it was the most profitable U.S. 
company, hitting a high of $85 a share. Then 
the stock lost nearly half its value as the 
market got the notion that brand names in 
cigarettes and food were losing appeal 
For most of 1993, Phflip Morris was trad- 
ing in the mid- to high 40s, even though its 
profit remained impressive. The market was 
paying just $9 for every $1 of the company’s 
«»mrngs — a price/ earnings ratio of just 9. 


Lately, Philip Morris has turned around, 
trading late Thursday in New York at $60.75, 
a P/E of 14. For an investor who had bought 
the stock a year ago, the gain, including divi- 
dends, would be more than 30 percenL 

To understand bottom-fishing, take a more 
modest case: Sallie Mae, the Student Loan 
Marketing Association, a U.S. government- 
chartered, privately owned company that 
buys and services loans that banks make to 
Students. State and federal authorities guar- 
antee that the loans will be repaid and naan- 
date profitable interest-rate spreads. 

Sallie Mae’s earnings rose an average of 39 
percent annually from 1973 to 1993, and the 
stock soared from $10 a share in 1985 to $74 
in late January 1993. Then trouble hit. The 
Ctinion budget brought in a new way to 
finance student loans — with money coming 
directly from the government. The new sys- 
tem will be phased in gradually, but by the 
end of the decade, 60 percent of student loans 


vrih bypass the middlemen. 

As the budget moved to passage in early 
1993, Sallie Mae’s stock dropped sharply. It is 
now down to around S32J0, less than half its 
hi g h . Based on earnings estimates for 1994, 
that represents a P/E of 6 — about one-third 
of the company’s average for the preceding 
four years. 

Sallie Mae’s executives are looking at sever- 
al solutions to their problem, including com- 
plete privatization, getting into new business- 
es, making do with less or just buying back 
low-priced stock. Another alternative is that a 
future Congress wflj change the 1993 policy 
and cancel the direct-lending approach. 

As is the case with most bottom-fishing, an 

See FISHING, Page 18 


Body Shop Flexes Its Profit Muscles 


Bloomherj’ Businas News 

LONDON — Body Shop International PLC 
said Thursday that its aggressive program to 
open stores had boosted earnings, as pretax prof- 
it rose 23 percent in the six months that ended 
Aug. 31. 

Die London-based retailer of natural cosmet- 
ics posted pretax profit of £12.3 million (519.4 
millioa), up from £10 million a year earlier. The 
earnings were boosted by higher margins and 
lower net interest expense. 

The company said it would lift its dividend to 
0.9 pence a share for the first half from 0.75 
pence a year earlier. 

Sales rose 18 percenL to £208.1 million, as the 
company opened 83 new stores. 

A growth rate of 5 percent in same-store sales 
in Britain cheered analysts. They expected that 
the marketing and display techniques that were 


used to bolster British sales would also be ap- 
plied to its U.S. stores. 

“Although the U.S. is a different market, there 
is room for improvement based on the lessons 
learned in the U.K.,” said Julie Ramshaw, a 
retailing analyst at Moigan Stanley. 

The company, which is known for its stand 
against testing cosmetics on animal*?, said sales 
did not suffer this fall from an attack on its social 
and environmental policies by the U.S. magazine 
Business Ethics. 

Body Shop refuted the charges, but its shares 
fell about 21 percent to a three-month low of 196 
pence in late September. The shares dosed at 225 
pence Thursday, down 2. 

Chairman Gordon Roddick said that during 
the first weeks of the second half, it was business 
as usual. “Trading in the last six weeks has 
overall been in line with the (rends seen in the 
first half. " he said. 


BJoomherj; Business News 

REDMOND, Washington — 
Microsoft Corp. said Thursday 
it would acquire Intuit Inc. in a 
$1.5 billion stock transaction 
that would give Microsoft dom- 
inance of the personal finance 
software market. 

The boards of both software 
companies agreed to the merg- 
er, in which each share of Intuit 
slock will be exchanged for 
1 J36 shares of Microsoft stock. 
The agreement ensures that In- 
tuit shareholders will receive no 
less than $71 of Microsoft 
shares for each Intuit share. 

Microsoft said it expected to 
issue about 27 million common 
shares and said this was less 
than 5 percent of its 581 million 
outstanding shares. 

Microsoft also said it had en- 
tered into a separate agreement 


to divest its current personal 
finance software product, Mi- 
crosoft Money, to Novell Inc., 
to avoid any competitive con- 
cerns. 

Intuit is a leading developer 
of personal finance, tax prepa- 
ration and small business ac- 
counting software. Its Quicken 
program dominates the person- 
al finance software market 

Scott Cook, the founder of 
Intuit, will be responsible for 
Microsoft’s future businesses in 
the personal finance area . 

Earlier on Thursday, rumors 
of the merger drove Intuit's 
stock to an all-time high of 
$50.25, up $3.25, before trading 
was halted, 

Intuit's share price has 
climbed 18 percent in the 
course of this week. 


Whirlpool Says High Sales 
Lifted Third-Quarter Net 


CompUed by Otr Staff From Dispatches 

BENTON HARBOR, Michi- 
gan — Whirlpool Corp. said 
Thursday its third-quarter prof- 
it rose 41 percent reflecting re- 
cord shipments in domestic and 
international markets. 

The home-appliance maker 
said its net income rose to 598 
zniKion from $70 million a year 
age. Earnings per share rose to 
$130 from 96 cents. 

The results indude a gain $15 
million from the sale of a mi- 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


% 


! Cross Rafts* 



Oct 13 

» s I DJUL fj=. ura an hjf. sjf. yh a Peseta 

‘■simmnte ubs in um uzr uw — mu* uu uxb* un uos* 

an suz suns ums usi ■ ums — 2 us um w/i me* 

is» us — um use* ura use* is mot* iui mr 

(o) um» — 2 xm us) MftB use suss sjbm wub usn vaxt 

uun vun utu x# ui’ ms* ura run aw* vjm — 

imo lesta VSUH mX «VJ3 ***** U2UD U*» MtUO UIM 

'IfewYMM UUSa L9M UdS LBUt L7T3 TUB L33 «M*5 USB* QMS 

■Ml IX IH K» 6OT* MSSS 1M*S 0089 SMI* UM 4.B* 

*Tom VM VIM MU 1US l» 5W» MW 7M7 70S 07790 

*TWWta 1JSV U4» UH 1297 MW* Uttt MW* USH USN* lit* 

inw itm flimi ua lira * owe uea m — ubi* use urna* 

’l ECU ua UH UW UO ZUO SUM LOT DUB U7« 1SUB 

}lHW 1.4051 0930 22W 713*1 MMH US WBS7 1179 14MJ9 IS7JT VJS 

• a os l ngs in Amsterdam. London, New York ond Zurich fkdnas hr other centers; Toronto 
•rotes of 3 run. 

e: To buy one pound: b: To buy one dodor: •: Units ot MO: *LO.- not anted; HA.: not 

m mlfrafifa 

ORmt Dollar Valuss 

Currency Per* 

Arynttew QJfH 
AnaOraLt U57 

AMtr.MhH. 10X28 
■men rani 8SI 

8X113 
27 M 
4 WK 

EtlVLteMl XR4 
R& markka 4.746? 


Eurocummcy Deposits 

Serf** 


French 


Oct 13 

Dollar 

D-Mark 

Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

Imontti 44w£ik 

4Vr4 4k 

iMh 

BWVz 

Ste-Fi 

»-» 

5"eS fk 

Smooths 5*rSyk 

5 Vw-5 V» 

4 IW4W. 

5>4-5ft 

5*4-5 0. 

2 W2 *. 

HW 

6 months SowS <*w 

5hrS*. 


6*V+Vk 

6-6Va 

JM'. 

fiVW'A 

J war 69W4* svih 

Sources: Reuters. Uoyas Bank. 

4h-4tk 

7-719 

<WHW) 

7*4-2% 



Kates applicable la interbank deposits otSI million minimum (or enuhmknU 



Currency 

Per* 

Currency 

Per* 

Currency 

Perl 

Crack drop. 

235X0 

Max. peso 

ms 

5. Air. rand 

15758 

Hoag Konst 

?J2B 

iLZateoads 

1.4324 

S. Kor. won 

79458 

Hum (orbit 

10494 

NOn*. krone 

um 

Smo«lkrano 

7X985 

Indten nwa 

3U3 

PUL pom 

2SA0 

Tehran 1 

24.17 

liwta. ranloti 

2T7UB 

PdBdtMr* 

XBM, 

TtaafbgM 

•MK 

Irish f 

0X391 

Port, escudo 

157X9 

TaridmUni 

34754 

Itroati sbefc. 

si r» 

Ruu. ruble 

29*4X0 

UAE tertiam 3X727 

Knwaffl tenor 8X975 

Saudi rival 

3J51 

VewtZ- bo* hr. 


Matey, ring. 

25718 

Step-* 

1-4*12 

1(9X057 


Currency 

CMMBMMfcr 


3MOV 4Mnv 904a V 
U489 1348$ 13487 

99X4 49JB 99X3 



Forward Rttas 

Currency iMor Udar n*rr 

PaMriStarttM 13819 UH8 1.MH 

DnbdM mark 14J»8 MW kMar 

Swiss franc 138M 13890 UU9 

Suraw IMG Bonk /Ametensaml: Irxkmmt Bank fBrvsseXJ; Banco Commercial Italian 
f Milan ; ; Atone* MM Mat IPorlsJ; Bank of Tokyo f Tokyo/; fbmd Bank of Canada 
tnroMotr Mlf (SMI, Other data tram Borders andAP. 


Ksy Monty Rotas 

united suites Close Prev. 

Mcomf rate 4.00 4X0 

Prime rate 7% 704 

Federal tank 444 4U 

S4MMRICD1 4J31 4X2 

Comm, paper m don 5X0 5X0 

hmentti Treason' HU 43V 499 

Mear Treasury MU 5X5 5X9 

Hreur Titaranrsote 6X1 &*6 

Uroar Treasury note 7 JO 7JS 

7-year Treasury note 7J3 7J7 

H-yeor Treasury note 7 M 730 

Treasury bond 7 AS 7X9 

Merrill LyadiJOdav Ready oasel 4.1? 417 

Japan 

DtKoontrate 
CHI money 
Vmenlti InterBase 
hnwelk Merton* 

4-iMafli MtrMeK 
18-year Governme n t pood 

Germany 

U aioa rd rate 
Coll manor 
1 -mooNi latertanfc 

Xpoatli tetertaeifc ' 

MaonUi Intel tea* 
lMnarMod 


1*6 1*6 
2h 29k 
2*4 214 

2 7. 2 7k 

478 479 


4X0 4X0 
495 495 
5X0 5X0 
5V. 5V. 
535 535 
740 7X2 


BrttnW 

■aek base rate 
Coll m on ey 
i-aumfli InteriMak 
UneoHi lateraan k 
S-montb heterbaek 
W-yearWH 
Fra n ce 

Jeteracaftoii rate 
GaU money 

l*i i mufti Interbank 

frmoalti Int e rban k 
i-month Interbank 
IFycarOAT 
Sovftxs: Reuters, Bloomberg, Merrill 
Lynch. Bank of Tokyo, Commerzbank, 
GrtmwtU Montam. Credit Lyonnais. 

Gold 


W4 » 
4te nx. 
5fk Sfc 
set 5*. 
itk 61k 
852 L59 

5X0 5X0 

5 irk 514 
5*k 

5Yi 5 *k 
5 * 59k 

7X7 M3 



AJ4 

PJWL 

Ctage 

Zurich 

38475 

387X0 

— 0X5 

London 

38495 

387X5 

-0X5 

New York 

391 JO 

3*440 

-2X0 


US. dollars per ounce. LonOan official flx- 

tnas; Zvrhst and New York aeentaaandctae 
too prices; New York Cemex taecembe rj 
Source: Reuters. 


nority stake in Matsushita 
Floor Care Co. and a “minor" 
European restructuring charge, 
the company said. 

Revenue rose 9 percent to 
$2.08 billion. 

In the first nine months of 
the year, the company said, rev- 
enue increased 7 percent to $6 
billion. Whirlpool posted a 
profit of $249 milli on for the 
period, reversing a loss of $18 
mfllicm a year earlier. 

Whirlpool’s shares fell 25 
cents to $54. 

The company said it had im- 
proved its sales in Europe. 
“However, the region remains 
highly competitive and chal- 
lenging.” Whirlpool said, eating 
a shif t in consumer d eman d to- 
ward lower-margin appliances. 
The company said it would an- 
nounce an across-the-board 
price increase in Europe soon. 

Whirlpool said its North 
American unit had higher oper- 
ating results. 

Total earnings from Latin 
America nearly doubled be- 
cause of the solid performance 
of Whirlpool’s Brazilian affili- 
ates, the company said. 

In Asia, product shipments 
increased by nearly one-quarter 
and revenues rose by 30 per- 
cent, although strategic invest- 
ment in the region led the unit 
to a quarterly loss. 

Whirlpool recently reached 
an agreement to raise its stake 
in TVS Whirlpool Ltd-, an Indi- 
an washing machine joint ven- 
ture, to 78 percenL It also said it 
would complete an agreement 
to acquire a controlling interest 
in Kelvinator of India Ltd, the 
biggest maker and marketer of 
refrigerators in India. 

(Bloomberg AFX) 


]B 


Blanc paiN 



Since 1735 there has 

NEVER BEEN A QUARTZ BlANCPAIN WATCH. 
And THERE NEVER WILL BE. 


Ar£ 


an 


jualhR IlnMfD. MnWk dr v.t»miK k Wr«rTM> 

V. hoakvjitl dn CSpu-Ucv 7Wfl’ Pan*. TfL (I) 42AIM.74 

7H. luihanr Sl-Hoooir 7JOUK Pjtn. T#l. 1 1 1 44 24 01 te 
HJfcfl Hojjl. 14*0 Dnanttr TH |IAI 


SAM': 







Page 14- 


~ market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRTPAY t OCTOBER 14, 1994 


1 V' 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Inflation Anxiety 
Eats Away at Dollar 


I Via AifAci4hd Pm» 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Datfy dosings of the 

Dow Jones industrial average 

4000 


ODM Hifltl LOW Utit Chfl, 


Indus 39 K .51 3937 A3 387S.1S 3389.95 - 1 4. SO 
Ti-ons 1501.14 1507.89 1434 70 1 487. S3 — 156 


Metals 


UW 181.72 182.57 18070 IB? 1 1 >1.91 
Come 1301 J3 1305 B9 1770.15 129401 - 187 


Compiled by Oar Stuff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
dropped against most other ma- 
jor currencies on late specula- 
tive selling Thursday as the 
market shifted its focus to the 
September inflation and retail- 
sales reports that will be re- 
leased Friday. 

The dollar also was pressured 
by the view that the unexpected 
decline in producer prices, re- 
leased Thursday, was an aber- 


Forelgn Exchange 


ration and that the September 
consumer price report would 
not contain the same good news 
about inflation. 

The fear is that Lbe inflation 
numbers wfll erase the bond 
market’s gains Thursday and 
“that’ll be it for the dollar,” said 
Tom Moore, a director at 
American Express. 

Currency traders watch the 
U.S. Treasury market to gauge 
foreign investors' appetite for 
U.S. assets and the dollars 
needed to buy them. 

“Unless we get another very 
nice surprise or evidence the 
economy is slowing down, we 
can't look for any more gains in 


bonds,” said Kevin Harris, an 
international economist at 
MCM Currencywatch. “No 
bond gains . No dollar gains.” 

The dollar closed at 1.5284 
Deutsche marks in late New 
York trading, down from 
1.5408 DM on Wednesday. The 
dollar also fell to 99.395 yen 
from 99.750 yen. 

The dollar also slumped 
against European currencies, 
trading at 5.2405 French francs 
from 52740 late the previous 
day and 12730 Swiss francs, 
down from 12860 francs. The 
pound rose to $1.5895 from 
$1.5822 on Wednesday. 

Dealers, who had reported a 
flurry of buying after the pro- 
ducer prices were released, said 
the interest waned when a sec- 
ond look at the report reflected 
unusual declines in car prices. 

“One number doesn’t change 
the trend," said Chris Iggo. in- 
ternational economist at Chase 
Manhattan Bank. “PPI is a vol- 
atile number, so it won’t change 
sentiment much.” 

Mr. Iggo said the dollar's 
prospects would improve if 
consumer prices showed a de- 
cline, or a modest increase. 

(Reuters, 

Knight- Bidder, Bloomberg) 



Standard ft Poor’s Indexes 


irtvtfrtcHs 
Tran so. 
utilities 
Finance 
SPOT 
SP ItM 


HHm Uw Chut OTae 
599X3 55X35 5S5x! + 12S 
3*5X2 361.10 361X9 + 0S9 
153.19 15X82 152.46 + 1X4 
*3X9 43JC 4X29 +0 2? 
471 JO 465X7 467.77 + M 
436.90 431X8 433X4 *1X6 


NYSE Indexes 


High Low Lena ens- 


Comwilie 

industrials 

Transit. 

umiy 

RncrKO 


259.07 25ft 35 257X3 -138 
32633 333X3 324.08 -1.05 
234.91 23251 233.13 -0X2 
307.12 20435 204.12 -177 
206.10 203X6 204.97 .1.11 


Oft* 

Bid An 
ALUMINUM (Hlyl, Orafe) 
pollan pw metric run 
. Spot 1654X0 1655X0 

! Forward 1671X0 167200 

Copper cathodes (hmi 

; Do tort Per metric Ion 
Seal 2490X0 2491X0 

Forward 2489X0 249000 

LEAD 

Dottm per metric ho 
Spot _ 634X0 635X0 

Forward 646X0 646X0 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric ton 

6585X0 6595X0 
Pwwa 6683X0 6690X0 

TIN 

DalUro par metric ton 
Snot 5360X0 53*5X0 

Forward 5460X0 S445X0 

ZINC (Special Httf) Crude} 
Dalian per metric tan 
Spot 1045X0 1046X0 

Forward 1065X0 1066X0 


Pravkws 
BM Aflc 


163650 1637X0 1 
1656X0 1657X0 j 
Grade) 



High 

Law 

Last 

Apr 

1SX0 

1505D 

150X0 

May 

151 J5 

15000 

isaoo 

June 

15100 

149X0 

149X0 

July 

N.T, 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Aug 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Step 

156X5 

15025 

1S65S 

Dee 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


Est. volume: 20878 . Open bit. 101529 


311X0 2513X0 
2509X0 2SWX0 


634X0 63050 
647X0 648X0 


6590X0 6600X0 
4690X0 6700X0 


5325X0 5335X0 
5410X0 5420X0 


B RENT CRUDE OIL HPE) 



UA donors per barre+Wts of IAN barrels 

Nov 

T6J» 

15X2 

15X5 

15X5 

+ 0X1 

Dec 

lftM 

15X0 

15X0 

1576 

-0.10 

Jan 

16J15 

15X7 

15X5 

15X5 

— 0.11 

Feb 

14.18 

1577 

1572 

1572 

-0X2 

Mar 

lftJS 

1570 

1&B7 

1570 

— 0.10 

Apr 

liffl 

1576 

15X7 

15.92 

—008 

May 

1A05 

1570 

15.95 

1576 

—0X4 

Jun 

I6L07 

15X0 

I&95 

15.90 

—0X2 

JIY 

16JXJ 

15.91 

16X0 

16X0 

Unch. 

AM 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16X4 

Until. 

Sea 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16X4 

Until. 

oct 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16X4 

Unch. 


1064X0 1045X0 
1066X0 1067X0 


Eat volume: 65X66 . Open Int. 197X69 


Stock Indexes 


Weak Trading Results Hit Morgan 

NEW YORK (.Combined Dispatches) ' wugb 

said Thursday its third-quarter earnings ^ banK 
times on Wall Street dragged down Jevenue from tnc 

securities businesses. , , . . n „ income fell to S327 

The fifth-largest American balk 30 a shaft, a 

million, or $1.63 a share, fr°m S468 rrull . sts “^p CCtc d, and 
year earlier. The results were hrgfaer than analysts expecreo, auu 

Morgan’s stock rose 12.5 cents, to $61.ua^ houses, has suf- 
J.RMorgan, hire many “d seam ^uircnwmarkets. It 

fered from a turbulent year m ^unties SSmSS in contrast 
had a net loss of $27 million on rnvestm^tsrcun . . 

to a gain of $98 million a year ago. (Bloomberg, wigm > 

Georgia-Pacific Swings Back to Profit 

. ATLANTA (Bl«mberg) -_G®^-Psdfic Coip^M 





Financial 


AH J J A S O 
'1994 


NASDAQ Indexes 


H*tl LOW LOU Ch9. 


NYSE Most Actives 


Comoosue 

Industrials 

Banks 

insurance 

Finance 

TTo r sc. 


77661 768.51 76051 -1.51 
785 J9 781.05 781X5 - 2.07 
754.40 752.05 752. A1 -2X6 
935.18 932.12 732.17 -0.19 
93736 924.99 724X8 -197 
705.15 701.78 704.00 -3X6 


FordMs 
RJRNt* 
EMC s 
NM«£nt 
WalMart 

BausdiL 

TdMta 

GanQs 

AMD 

GnMorr 

Merck 

Comraq s 

A/UcrTcs 

Gtaxo 

IBM 


VOL High 
61603 2914 

38655 6«v 
36156 22*i 
32312 154k 
32052 24 W> 
29376 35 
29176 64<A 
ajsTB si 
2789? 23 V, 
27135 *8% 
270B0 37V, 
26747 36*1 
2437S 35 Vj 
24137 !?'<. 
23315 74 V. 


AMEX Stock Index 


Kkjti Low Last Chd- 
46065 458J3 458X7 -007 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


INDEX: U.S. Stocks Move Higher 


Conducted from Page 13 

a bad inflation number, and 
now they are holding off to see 
what the Fed does next.” 

Some economists watched 
the government's weekly report 
of new unemployment claims, 
also out Thursday, and noted it 


U.S. Stocks 


fell by 5,000 to 314,000, imply- 
ing a tighter job market. But 
this has yet to be reflected in 
wage inflation, a factor that the 
Federal Reserve closely watch- 
es. 

But Edward Yardeni. an ana- 
lyst with C J. Lawrence, pant- 
ed out that “labor, not com- 
modity costs, is the key 
determinant of inflation, ana 
the wage inflation rate remains 
tame in all major industries.” 

■ Earnings Boost Market 

Favorable inflation news 


came against a backdrop of ro- 
bust third-quarter corporate 


bust third-quarter corporate 
earnings, Bloomberg Business 
News reported from New York. 

Of the 76 companies in the 
S&P 500 that have reported 
earnings for the latest quarter. 


46 percent were above most an- 
alysts' expectations. “The earn- 
ings side of the equation is in 
superb shape,” said Philip Or- 
lando, portfolio manager at 
First Capital Advisers. 

Telephone, international oil, 
financial, household product 
and chemical stocks poked the 
largest gains. 

Almost 13 stocks gained for 
every nine that fell, and volume 
smged to 337.91 million shares 
on the Big Board from 269.56 
million Wednesday. 

Among the stronger gainers, 
Monsanto rose 1 Hi to 78%, In- 
ternational Paper climbed 1 to 
77%, and Coca-Cola firmed % 
to 50%. 

Altera led gains among tech- 
nology stocks, surging 5% to 
33%. The maker of programma- 
ble logic devices, semiconduc- 
tors that can be reprogrammed, 
earned 40 cents a share in the 
third quarter, up from 30 cents 
a year earlier. 

Caere, a software company, 
climbed 2% to 1 3 after the com- 
pany reported it had swung into 
profit. 

Hasbro rose 1% to 30%, and 
Champion International 
climbed 1 to 39% 


Novell 

Altera 

Intel 

MCI 

AppleC 

NtXrBty 

TetCmA 

MtCStt 5 

SunMIe 

LevotOns 

SVtHMBS 

Cisco* 

Biogen 

WeflRts 

CEurMdo 


VaL High 
84112 16% 
63390 34 Vk 
S3577 60** 
47657 25% 
46911 421k 
42040 8% 
4K76 24% 
39346 57% 
38431 31 ?■ 
37840 28 
34772 50% 
32771 28 

29839 49% 
28556 7Pn 
27168 17% 


urn Last 
15% lAVk 
31 W 33% 
58% 581k 

24% 241*1 

40% 41 Vi 

6 % 6 % 
ZTVj, 23'A 
56% sn * 
31 31 V U 
18% 18% 
44 'A 47% 
27% 27Vj 
45 45% 

22V„ 22% 
15% 76% 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total issues 
New Hi ohs 
New Laws 


1325 1015 

890 nio 

664 743 

2879 2868 

73 58 

53 91 


HMi Law One atom 

3-MO NTH STERLING (LIFFEJ 

•SOMO0 - pts of 188 net 

9X64 93lS 3 9162 +0X7 
Mar 92X9 92X5 9£X5 +9X6 

Jim 9128 92.13 9224 + 0X7 

S«P 91X5 91X8 SI 29 +0X7 

Dee 91 J0 91X4 91X6 +0X7 

Mar 91X5 91X6 9L20 +0X8 

JOB 91X5 9088 91X3 + 007 

jW 90X8 9024 90X7 +005 

DK 9027 9064 9077 +0X4 

Mw TOJ3 90X6 90J2 +0X2 

Jim ?O70 9062 9067 Until. 

Sv 9069 9067 9065 Until. 

Est volume: 100,147. open bit: 473,904. 
3MONTTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

SI million -PB Of KM act 
Dec 94.lt 94JJ9 94.10 + 0X7 

MW 9172 9322 9322 +0X7 

Jua N.T. N.T. 9X32 +0X8 

5ea N.T. N.T. 93-00 +007 

Est. volume: 1 20 Oaen inL: 4X82. 
HMNTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

DM1 mUflua-ptsoMMact 
DM 94X0 9420 9428 +0X8 

Mar WJD 94X6 9+48 +0.12 

Jan 94.14 93X9 94.13 + 0.14 

Sep 93X1 93X4 9328 + 0.13 

Dec 9151 93J1 9147 +0.13 

Mar 9324 93X6 9322 +115 

Jan 93X0 92X2 9196 +0.12 

s*p 9229 92X3 9225 + 0.11 

Dee 92X2 9140 9158 + 0.11 

Mor. 9140 9132 92X5 +112 

Jm 9224 9122 9134 +111 

59P 9117 9114 9124 + 0.10 

Est. volume: 231X40, Onen Int: 696X01. 


NM Lew Close Change 
FT5E 188 (LIFFE) 

BS per Index point 

Dec 3I79X 3107X 31600 +54X 

Mar 3T90X 313X0 3191.0 +J3X 

Est. volume: 18X86. Open Int.: 58X14, 
CAC8B (MAT1F) 

FP280 per Index paint 

Oct 1970X0 1924X0 1967X0 + 35X0 

MOV 1975X0 1934X0 1775X0 +33X0 

Die IMffl 194150 198*50 +25X0 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2011JO +35X0 

Jun N.T. N.T. T 99550 +35X0 

SW N.T. N.T. 2021X0 + 36X0 

Est. volume: 30X77. Open ML: 65X5*. 


Theprefit at the second largest U.S. forest 
reversed a net loss of $36 million m the war-earlier quarter. Third- 

quarter revenue rose 10 percent, to 53.3 biflion. . 

“The pulp and paper industry is ocpenencmg a faster than 
expected recovery, with demand and pricing strong both in 
U.S. and abroad," A.D. Correll, chairman, said. 


I*" fc* 

‘ A* 

.rikf rrf- 
■..'KHU- 

S-S 

vs -JFrtrf 


Sources: Motif, AMMloted Pr» ss. 
London tntl Financial Futuraa exchange, 
mri PatnXwm Exchange. 


Live and Carolco End Merger Talks 

LOS ANGELES (Bloomberg) —Carolco Pictures In c. j and _ Uve ■ 
Entertainment Inc. said Thursday that merger discussions be- 
tween the two comoanies had broken off. ...... 




. lit 

\ Mta A 

,» ; tn efim 

J B . "i f^PWl 


nr Amt Rbc Par 
IRREGULAR 


BP Prvdlioe Bov b X356 10-20 10-21 

b-Appro*. amount per ADR. 


EXTRA 

Pam Virginia . 20 11-25 13-16 

STOCK SPLIT 
Hubca inc 3 tar 2 spIII. 

INITIAL 

CattrpUlar inen .U 10-21 10-31 

C I Fd Mom I 0 X4 13-30 12-15 

FCNB Corp _ .16 10-21 10-31 

INCREASED 


tween the two companies had broken off. 

On Aug. 12, the companies said they would meige, with Li e 
Entertainment shareholders owning 21 percent to percent ot 
the surviving company. . . . . 

“We are disappointed that a number of factors, manyof wtuen 
were beyond our control, have resulted in our joint agreement to 
call off the merger of our two companies.” Mano Kassar. Carol- 
go’s rfiirf executive, and Roger Burl age, Live Entertainment s 
chief executive, said. 


iwwsi 


m 

V** w« 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New low* 


769 268 

??0 301 

248 239 

807 80S 

19 15 

24 -K 


3-MONTH PI BOR [MAT IF) 



FF5 million 

-rts of 100 pet 



Dec 

74.14 

94X5 

94.13 

+0X6 

Mar 

9373 

93X0 

9371 

+ 008 

Jon 

9134 

9121 

93X3 

+aio 






Dec 

9272 

92X* 

9271 

+ 0X9 


92X2 

92X0 

*2X0 

+0.10 

Jun 

92X2 

9119 

92X1 

+0.10 

Sep 

92.75 

9105 

92.18 

+0.11 


Ford Motor Co 
South (npfon Svgs 


X6 ll-l 12-1 
.14 11-1 IMS 


Vlocvrt 

SPDR 

ThneeFs 

XCL Lid 

ViocS 

SoortsC n 

GreyLne 

EdiMc 

Amdfil 

Echo Bav 


VaL 

Htoti 

Law 

Last 

on. 

22019 

IV- 

IV* 

lv u 

-V* 

15061 47tV H 

4fttU H 

AtfV u 

+%< 

11800 

42 Vs 

38 

38 '-1 

—9<n 

10697 

1% 

1V.I 

1V„ 


10370 40 

39". 

39 1* 

—‘ 4 . 

7M2 

V 

9 

9 


6029 

2<A 

1% 

1<V U 


6352 

T/it 

I'A 

VVk 


6085 

9% 

B V, 

9 

♦ Ks 

5860 

13>y 

131* 

13% 

— % 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Dedmed 
unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


1668 1674 

1538 1 518 

1896 1906 

5102 5090 

133 92 

71 54 


Spot Commodities 


Est volume: 60X08. Open InL: 176X15. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

IS0X00 - PtS B 32nd* of 190 Pti 
Ok 102-02 T 00-31 101-28 +0-17 

Mar 101-00 101-00 100-31 +0-17 

Ext. volume: 70867. Open InL: 89X36. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM Z5QXM - PtS of 108 pet 
DM 9048 B9X2 90X6 +0A4 

Mar 89 JO Oj60 8947 + 0X5 

Est. volume: I9&34V. Open InL: 157,975. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF5MX9Q - PtS Of 100 pcf 
OK 11L96 110.70 111X6 +1X2 

Mar 110.98 109.98 111.18 +1X0 

Jun 10902 109X2 11043 +1X0 

S«P N.T. N.T. N.T. Until. 

Est volume: 203X60. Open Int.: 146X90. 



REGULAR 

0 

a 

Q 

i a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

Q 

O 

’ I 


SI 10-21 11-15 
X75 10-28 11-11 
.10 10-21 10-31 
.15 11-1 11-15 
.12 11-23 13-14 
41 10-25 11-15 
XO W-21 11-1 

.15 11-15 12-1 
.06 11-10 13-1 
X2S 10-21 11-11 
XS TO- 25 11-10 
X2S 10-24 11-11 
.15 11-1 11-23 
X2 10-20 11-15 
45 11-25 12-16 
X4 11-22 12-7 
J7 11-4 1J-1 
.24 104)1 11-18 
X5 10-37 11-15 
XO 12-7 14 


Hedging Protects Enron’s Profit 

NEW YORK (Knighi-Ridder) — Enron Corp- said Thursday 
its profit for the third quarter rose 28 percent from the previous 
year, as natural its natural gas marketing activities grew sharply. 

The company said hedging protected it against depressed gas 
prices as it posted a profit of $96 million, up from $7 . million a 
year earlier. Revenue rose to $2 billion from $1 .9 billion. 


: 

is** *m 


Summer Travel Heats Up Hilton Net 


Opel 

Hava 


(Konanal; o-oarntoic (a Canadian funds; m- 
tnantMr; kuoImIt; s-keml-anHual 


Market Sales 


Commodify Today 

Aluminum, lb 0X51 

Coopk electrolytfc. lb 1X1 

Iron FOB, Irn 213.80 

Lead, lb 042 

Silver, trovas 5X45 

Steel (scrap), tan 110.17 

TUI. lb 06414 

Zinc lb 0X204 


Industrials 


High Low Last Settle Orve 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UX. dollar* per metric tan-iats at 1M teas 
Nov 149X5 145X5 145X5 145X5 — 4X5 

Dec 151X5 148X5 148X5 148X5 —4X5 

Jan 153X5 150X5 150-50 150-50 — 4X0 

Feb 154X0 151X0 151X0 151X5 —4X0 

Mar 154X0 152X0 152X0 152X0 — 4X5 


Ccniii adeiing* e( xcitiiin. fruodal 
Una nr bncnui ta red nun pABkhtd la 
Ikii Bmpaper m ui kuttorinil la cmkta 
futndcam M ><kck ihe Iktnkkilwtil Iknld 
Trlbkoe n dlurlbuKd. ishdias Ike Uailed 
Sikw* of Anaiu. ind 6a ior mhiii«Ic 
affcnap at wcariiia. wenhxi at ioxmu n 
ikoc juriidMIans. Tkt Iklauliiiaa] IknU 
TriUne bubo ao nptkiMip «faktmm 
lor key kJtcmaaeHi tar oOcriop of kay likd. 


BEVERLY HILLS, California (Bloomberg) — Hilton Hotels 
Corp. said Thursday its third-quarter net income rose a higher- 
than -expccted 32 percent because of a surge in summer travel, 
which luted its hotel results. 

The hotel and casino company said its net income gained to $27 
million, or 56 cents a share, from $20.5 million, or 43 cents, a year 
earlier. Revenue rose 10 percent, to $380.9 million. 

The results also beuefited from the money the company lost on 
property and currency transactions in the year-earlier period. 


Operating Profit Slips at Hasbro 

PAWTUCKET, Rhode Island (Bloomberg) -—Hasbro Inc. said 
Thursday that third-quarter profit From continuing operations 


declined on a 2 percent drop in sales. 

The toymaker said profit from continuing operations was $64.7 
million, or 77 cents. It bad net income of $75 J million, or 84 cents. 


STUDIO: The System in Hollywood May Never Be the Same Again 


a year earlier. The result still topped the mean average of 76 cents 
a share of 12 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research. 

Net income in the latest quarter was $75.2 million, or 85 cents a 
share, after a $12.5 million restructuring charge and a gain of $23 
million from the liquidation of an interest in the toymaker J.W. 
Sper & Sons PLC and the sale of rts stake in Virgin Interactive 
Entertainment PLC to Blockbuster Entertainment Corp. 


Continued from Page 13 
investors and partnerships to 
reduce the financial risks. 

“I want to start something 
great, even investing in it my- 
self,” said Mr. Spielbeig. “Over 
the years I’ve had almost a reli- 
gious fervor in not investing my 
own money in show business. 
Not in my wildest imagination 
would I have guessed that this 
trio would have come together. 
Now I can't think of a better 


place than to invest in our own 
r u lure." 

Should the MCA deal fall 
apart, the three will begin their 
own studio, which is still un- 
named. and start producing 
movies by next year. How the 
films will be distributed re- 
mains vague. 

Both Mr. Katzenberg and 
Mr. Spielberg made it clear that 
they were intent on building a 
strong animation unit at the 


new studio. Mr. Katzenberg 
will seek to enlist ihe help of 
animators and executives at 
Walt Disney Studios who are 
close to him. once their con- 
tracts expire. 

But Mr. Katzenberg., Mr. 
Spielberg and Mr. Geffen in- 
sisted that across-the-board 
competition with other studios 
would only improve the quality 
of movies throughout the indus- 
try. 


Under the arrangement, Mr. 
Spielberg will fold his company. 
Amblin. which is currently at 
Universal, into the new studio. 

Mr. Geffen's movie produc- 
tion unit will also be merged 
with the new company. The 
three men will be equal finan- 
cial partners, but their specific 
management duties have not 
been defined, although Mr. 
Katzenberg will most certainly 
run the operations of the studio. 


* *** 

* 

• fTliEWJ 


Liberty Will Buy Colonial Group 

BOSTON (AP) — Liberty Financial Cos. said Thursday it had 
agreed to acquire Colonial Group for about $310 million in cash 
and stock. . .* 

Colonial is a mutual fund company with $14 bUKdh'm assets 
under management for 800,000 investors and 650 employees. 


wrf 

<7* F» 
ilv 
.4 1R8 I 

* 


Liberty, with about $29 billion in assets under management, is a 
subsidiary of Liberty Mutual Group. _ . 


WORLD STOCK 


U.S. FUTURES 


Seaan Seoson 


Aganok Franca Pram Oct. 13 
CtoMPrav. | 


Via Auocatod Pnm 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holding 
Aaaan 
AhaM 
Atao NoM 
AMEV 

Baj*-W«3sanan 

DSM 

EUavtar 

Frtknr 

Hainakm 


Haoaavms 


Intar Mueller 
Inf I Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 


Neaiiavd 
Oee Grlnten 
PoklKMd 
Philips 
Polygram 
Robeca 
Rodamco 
Rollnce 
Rorento 
Royal Dutch 
Siam 
Unilever 
Van Omnww 
VNU 

WBIMre/Khnmr 


RlMJrarrwtall 200 279 Glaxo . 

SdmTna 991 959 Grand Mat 

Stamm 644 6 ® gre 

ThYSNfl 294.!® 294 Gulnnou 

Varta 111 314 GUS 

Vote 531X053270 Hanson 

VEW 354X0349X0 HinsdOwn 

VI OO 482X0 487 HSBC Hldgs 

VoHcskvagen 46SX0 468 ICI 

wmm 1015 1015 inchcaae 

DAX Index : 20*243 Kingfisher 

Uadhrot* 

P ret low: 781X2 ld parte 

LraalGanGrn 

Lloyds Bank 

Helsinki 

Amer-Yhtyma 103 1D2 NatWOSt 

^ NWWsI Water 

Huhtamakl 148 147 Pearson 

ICO.P. ■ 10 10 PSQ 

Kyrnmana 135 \n piiklnatan 

Metro 145 147 PawerGen 

MoKta 573 STB Prudential 

PoWoW M 69 Rank Oro 

Repata 9OB0 1®} Hsckltl Col 

Stockmann 255 250 Radkmd 


NttiWst Water 


148 147 Pearson 

10 .10 PAD . 



It 3998 38* 
11 * 11 
23* 23* 
8 8 
18* 18* 

18 IBM 
12 * 12 * 
20 % 20 * 
13* 13* 

l 27* 27* 
37* 37* 
e 16% is* 
21* 21* 
2Z* 22* 
21* 21* 
9* V* 
19* 19* 
42* 43 

19 19* 
28* 29* 



2X5 2X7 

a £3 

£ 2 J 7 

g ta 

180 182 


143 149 


Shimaru 
ShlneTsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumltamo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sumltoma Metal 
Jabei Carp 
TakocoOiem 
TDK 
Tell lr 

Tokyo Marina 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppan Printing 


Toray Ind. 

Toshiba 

Toyota 

Yamal chi Sec 
a: X lea 

ana 


M* w. Stockholm 

17* 17* AGA 

IS: aSSaf 

Astra AF 

« 44 % AH« Copco 

tra? tSS Etactrolux B 

w5 wS ISSSSi 


mamur ,mtm \s&gr 


'Hasarmf 




Brussels 


RMC Group 
Rolls Rayce 
RaftHim (unit) 
Royal Scot 
RTZ 

SaMsbury 
Scot Newcos 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shall 

Sleba 

Smith Nephew 
Smith Kline B 


Almanll 

Arbea 

Bar co 

BBL 

Betcaart 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocke rill 

Gobeua 

Calruvt 

Deflialxe 

ElectraMl 

Electraflna 

Fonts AG 

GIB 

GBL 


7350 

^ Markets Closed 


Smith (WH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate 8, Lyle 
Tosco _ 


^ The stock market KEmS* 1 
« “ *5% Kong was SmT 
w closed Thursday. \CSi5SS 


Gknwrbel 

Imtnobel 

Kredlenxmk 

Mosone 

PetroAno 

Powerfin 

Red leal 

Rovale Beige 

Soc Gen Banaue 

SocGenBetotaue 

Soima 

Salvay 

Tessenderla 

Tractebel 

UCB 

Union Mlnlere 

wagons Llis 


w closed Thursday. 

7D5B 

1220 

5380 

2980 

2425 

1290 

3995 

8930 

4500 1 — 

»" Johannesburg 


Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loon 3* 
Wellcome 
Whitt) read 

Williams Htfgs 
Willis Corroon 
FT 30 index : W 


Accor 
Air Ltaulde 
Alcatel A Whom 
Axa 

Bancalre (del 

BNP 

Bouvaues 

Danone 

Carrefour 

C.C.F. 

Cents 
Owroeurs 
dments Franc 
Out) Med 
Elf-Aauttalne 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Haven 
imetaf 

Laforae G opp — 
Learond 
Lvon. Eau* 
Oreal I LI 
L.VJ9UL 

Matra-Hatiiene 
Michel In B 
Moulinex 
Parlna* 


M 8* 

1977X3 investor BF 
Norsk Hydra 
Pharmacia AF 
Sandvlk B 

SCA-A 

5-E Banken AF 
Skandki F 
Skanska BF 
SKF BF 
5toraAF 
Trelleborg BF 
Volvo BF 



dose Prev. 
736 737 

2050 2090 
5970 6000 
1900 1900 
580 571 
887 890 

350 346 

640 639 

1210 1230 
4590 4640 
548 542 

1140 1130 
2850 2830 
1440 1420 
782 782 

2090 2070 
7*0 796 


Season Season 
High Low 


Oaen High Low dose Chg Op. kit 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOT) LOOapuniirinium-aeOanPk'builikl 

4.18*. 3X? Dec 94 4XS’ j 4X4 4X0% ACT') -004 V, kL4J9 


A26% 3X7 Mar ?5 4.1J 4.1S 4X9* 22X51 

198 V> 3.16V: May 95 3X7* 1B7 ’*i 184 186% -0X2 1337 

163% 311 JUI95 aJT.y 154 151 3X34-001 5X51 

3XS 3X1 Vj Sep 95 157 15T,i 156 3X6 -0X3* l«6 

175 155 Dec 95 3X4 Vi 3X6 164 166 -BJ 2 128 

3X6* 146 J<jt«6 142V. —0X1 6 

Esc sales 23X00 Wed's, sates 25X27 
Wen's open Int B1.565 up 670 
WIEAT (KBOT) unu n*kTUD-kmnnrtk»W 
4.23’X 112^1 Dec 94 All All Ansvs Alta — 0X6% 21X79 

A77W 125 Mar 95 A14* AI4S9 409% At1%-0M» 11,966 

403 121ViAAav9* 3X8 191 188 189V,— 0X1 1X06 

1X8V» II 6 V 1 Jui 95 155V, 140 3X4 158 *001 2,750 

177 2X9 Sep 95 160 167V: 3M 160 *000% 72 

3X7V, 360% Dec 95 1X5 167* 3X5 167**0X0% 3 

Est. sates NA Wed's, sates 7.708 
Wed's wen Ira 31.078 ah 442 
CORN (CBOT) ! AW Bu minimum- aoOon norDukrw 
177 llSUDecW 115* 115% 114* 115**0X0*128,950 

2.82* 123% Mar 95 2X5* 2X6 2X3 125% *0X0* 50X44 

2X5 130* May 95 2X3 2J3W 2X2* 133**0X0*21018 

2X5* 2J5V1 Jul 95 138 V, 139 137% 138% *000% 25.203 

170* 139 Sap 95 2X3* 2X3* 2X3 2-43* ‘OOTA 1.960 

2X3 2X5* Dec 95 148* 149 148* 2XM1 10,092 

2X6* 2X0* Mar 96 154* 2X5% 2X4* 2X1% -0X0% 144 

2X2% 151* Jui 96 161* 2-62* 161* 2X2* *0X0* 176 

Est. sales 2AM0 Wed'S, sates 11X31 
Wears aoen in 239X22 up 1284 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) SAWOurterimuri- OMeriaerbuM 
7XTn 5X6% Nov 94 5X7% 138 5X3 133* -0X3* 75X71 

73M 137* Jan 95 548* 5X9* 5X4* 5X4* -0X3* 30X21 

7.05 5.47* Mar 95 5X8* 5X8* 153% 5X4 -0X3*19X20 

7.05V. 156 Mov 95 5X6 5X6% 5X1* 161% -OX3* 8X19 

7X6% 163* Jui 95 173 173* 5.48* 168 * -003 V, li4« 

6.12 144* Aug 95 177 177 171 5.71*— 0X3* 679 

6.15 171 Sep 95 177 177 174 5J4 -CL02V4 292 

6X0* 17B*Nov 95 187* 588 5-83% 5X3 V, —0X3* 5486 

4X1 199* Jui 96 6X6 17 

Est. sales 37X00 Wed's, sates 48X72 
Wea'sooanirt 151939 up 6707 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) Wtenk-txAnperMn 
207 JO 159X00394 742.70 14Z70 tbIXO 162.10 -0X0 2.589 

209X0 160JDDec94 163.00 163J0 161X0 161X0 —1X0 46 2 

207X0 161.90 Jan 95 16AS0 164X0 16330 163X0 —1X0 14,113 

207X0 16A90MW 95 167X0 167X0 156.20 16(J0 -0.9012,5?! 

207X0 167X0 May 95 169X0 170.00 1«X0 169.40 -0X0 7X80 

206X0 170.7DJU95 1HX0 17120 T72J0 17140 -030 4.503 

182X0 172X0 Aug 95 17A70 17A70 17370 17170 -330 874 

18170 173X05*095 P6J0 176J0 175X0 I7U0 +0J0 747 

181.00 175x0 Oct 95 177X0 178X0 177 JO 177X0 —0X0 713 

182X0 174.it/Dtc95 180X0 101X0 179X0 179X0 —0X0 408 

Est sales IJ4B0 Wed'S, sales 15X35 
Wed's open Ira 9A547 up 1277 
SOYBEAN OfL (CBOT) 4AOO IBs- oaten eer Iooim 
3X4 22.10 Oti 96 15.90 25X7 2SA3 3SX8 *0X1 4JB8 

28X7 22X0 Dec 94 3A28 2A42 2A1I 2AI7 -0.01 34, W 

28X5 22. 65 Jar 95 23X5 23X0 23X0 23X4 -0X5 11X22 

2830 22.91 Mar 95 23X0 23X2 23X4 23.31 — 0.1 D 12,483 

28-05 22X2 MOV 95 2138 2142 2112 2113 — 0.17 9X17 

27X5 2216 Jui *5 EL2S 2135 22.95 22.96 -All A305 

27 JO 22J3AUB95 23J0 TUB XlK 23X0 —0X7 2X45 

2475 22.75 S8P 95 2302 23X3 2190 22.90 -0.18 1.10* 

23X0 22-75 Od 95 23 17 2117 22X0 22.92 -0X5 537 

7185 22X0 Dec 95 2120 23» 22X0 ZVK> —114 914 


Toronto 


AMttU Plica 
Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Aluminum 
Amer Borrick 
Avenor 

B* Nova Scotia 
BCE 

BC Tetoccmsms 
BambartilerB 
Bramalea 
BrascanA 


Waasms#"* 


PecWney Intt 
Pemod-RIcord 
Peugeot 

. ■— Plnoult Print 

2 Ro B tatetiinkwie 

Me , 1 —. Rh-PoulencA 
S35 3120 Roast. Louis 


1372 AECr 
fS6D 

2810 Anglo Amgr 
475 Barlows 
4 x 50 Btyvaor 

lisa 

Qc Beers 
12800 D^Wwftln 
Goncar 

MOW 

2 OT 0 Htahveld Steel 

KlOOt 


Z7J0 27X0 

100 100 
232 230 

30X5 30X0 BBV 


Madrid 


10X5 10X0 Bca Central HlK. 3105 2975 I SanafT 
N A so Banco Santander 5120 4970 Salw t 




2685 

mi NwRwnkGni 

Rand tpn i M n 

Rusolat 


SA Brews 

St Helena 49 njl 

SfSDl TA wm 

Western Dm 220 2)5 

85 W?m :S5,7ja 


Frankfurt 


AEG 

Alcatel SEL 
All ten How 
Altana 
Aska 
BASF 

Barer 

Bov. Hypo bank 
BavVereimok 
BBC 

BHF Bank 
I BMW 

.Commerzbank 
(Continental 
(Daimler Beta 
■ Deaussa 
Dt Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
Douglas 


NA 50 Banco Santander 5120 ewn 

SB® 98X0 Banesm 836 839 

64X5 64 CEPSA 3225 3150 

IOD 14X5 Drapmtol 1TO 1H7S 

126 124 Endeso M 55« 

42 41 Ertros 167 160 

3QJC 30X5 Iberdrola 835 814 

69 68 Repeal , 3985 3965 

31 21 Tabacalera 3230 3180 

50 49X0 Telefonica 1775 1710 

'S 'a 


t**"" *12 ^70 Saint Gobeln 
“ S.E.B. 

^ ste Generate 

rros VH75 Sun 

3 ^^ S:- 


Sydney 

Amcor 8X6 0X8 

ANZ 3X8 3X8 

BMP 19X4 19X6 

Baral 3X2 3X9 

Bougainville 1.06 1x6 

Coles Myer 4.11 4X6 

Comal ca 5J25 5X0 

CRA 18X6 18X2 

CSR 4X9 4X5 

Fosters Brew 1.19 1x0 

Goodman Field 1J4 1X7 

1C1 Australia 10.90 11JM 

Magellan 1X5 UW 

MIM 2X3 2X9 

Nat Aust Bank 10X4 1036 

News Corp 8.17 825 

I Nine Network 3.95 3.99 

N Broken Hill 3X4 3X9 

Pac Dunlop 403 3X6 

Pioneer InTl 3X4 3X4 

Nrnndy PoseWon 2X2 2X3 

OCT Resources 1X3 1X5 

Santas 3X8 4 

TNT 2X0 2X6 

Western Mining B B.14 

Westooc Banking 429 429 

woaaside 4 82 492 


CISC 

Cdn Natural Res 
can ootid Pef 
Cdn Pacific 
Cascades Pawr 
Comlnco 
Consumers Gas 
Dafnsoo 
Daman Ind B 
Du.Pont Cda A 


Echo Bay Mines 
Empire Col A 
Falcoftaiiago 
Flefchet Chau A 
Franca Nevada 
Guardian Cop A 
Hem to Gold 
Horsham 
Imperial Oil 
Inca 

IPL Energy 

Lac Minerals 
LaldtawA 

La kilaw B 

Laewen Group 
London Insur Qe 
Mocmlll Bioedel 
Magna InllA 
Maple Leaf Fds 
Moore 

Newbridge Netw 
Norteida inc 
Noranda Forest 
Norcen Energy 
Nthern Telecom 
Hava 
Onex 

Petra Canada 
Placer Dome 
Potash Corp Sask 
Proviso 
PWA 

Ouebecor Print 
Renaissance Env 
Rto A teen 
Seagram Co 
Stone Cansald 
Talisman Eny 
Tetegiobe 
Tehts 
Thomson 
TorDom Bank 
Transalto 
Trans CM Pipe 
UMDomtnkxi 
utflwesttMme 
WesteaastEnv 
westen 

Xerox Canada B 


Sao Paulo 


433 425 
780 700 
1268 1260 
1550 1540 
1520 1520 
1790 1800 
T290 1300 


158157.10 

J00 300 

2305 2277 
657X0 640 
800 830 

315 313 

35450 356 

385 388 Ift. 

427 424 W" 

700 705 Abbey Non 
380 385 AH led Lyons 

7945079250 Aria Wiggins 
317 320 Argyll Group 


London 


Alleanza 
Ass) tat Id 
Autostrada ortv 
Bco Agriculture 
BCO Camcnar ItsJ 
Bca Naz Lovoro 
Bca Pap, Novara 

m Banco dl Rama 

BcoAmhraskma 
4X0 410 BcoNapalLrtsp 

5X8 5JJ8 Benetton 

252 2X6 Cnedlto liaikino 


Cemto 

Eletrouna 

itoubanca 


2X6 2X5 EnlchamAug 


s 9 338 Ass Brit Feeds 5X4 5.1s Ferfln 


78678550 BAA 
47950 478 0Ae 
237 234 Bank Scotian 
712712X0 Barclays 

505 515 Bass 

DreulnerBank 38950 389 BAT 

Feldmuehle 307J03C3J8 BET 

F Krapp Haesdi JWJtexo BlueOrcle 

Harpener 309 309 BOC Group 

Henkel 592 595 Boats 

Kadrtlef ,,992 tra Bewaler 

Hoeehst 32750 326 BP 

Holztnam 838 901 Brit Airways 

Horten 21LS121550 BrttGas 

IWKA 356 350 Brit Steel 

Kali Safz 15450 155 Bril Teteteom 

KarstatH 625J06125O BTR 

Kouflwf 50750250 Cable Wire 

KHD 127X0 129 JO Cadbury Sen 


Scotland 2JH 


5.15 sjn Ptal5M 

4X7 4X9 Flnanz Agratnd 

2JH 2JJ3 Finmeccanica 

5X1 5X3 Fandlarlo spa 

5X4 SX7 Generali Assic 

457 4X9 IFIL 

1J)8 157 italeementl 

2. VS 2X8 Itakxs 

6.95 657 Mediobanca 

5X0 5X7 Montedison 

475 449 Olivetti 

4X3 4X1 Pirelli SPQ 

m in RAS 


Souza Cruz 

Totems 

Tetejp 

Uslmlnos 

Vale Rio Dace 

varlg 


Bevesne Index : 49 ms 
P revious : 49239 


Singapore 


Tokyo 

ran 4, Akal Electr 

itdxb AsoM CnemlaU 

Asahl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
BriOKstane 

Canm 1790 1800 

IcmiIm COSto T290 1300 

'tflJIO Dal Nippon Print 1840 1850 

I 18JJ1 18XD Dahroa House 1390 1390 

9X0 9X0 Datwo Seeurilles 1460 1450 

8X0 8X0 FOtWC 4748 4778 

278 2*6 P«ll Bank 

» bsS Fuji Pumn 

325 ^ FulJtsU 

383 290 Hitachi 

3415? S5 Hitachi Cable 

I 11X0 10l 70 H°hP° 

137 138 ,,a Takada 

7X0 7X0 Uoehu 
4450 44 £n Japan Airlines 
418 430 Kallma 
ixs 1x0 Kansal Power 

764 I*!, Kawasaki Steel 

200 na Kirin Bre wery 
, Msec Komatsu 

i WM5 Kucola 

Kvacera 

Matsu Eieeinas 1690 1700 

MotsuEtecWks loao nno 

Mitsubishi Bk 2570 2620 

aare Mitsubishi Kasti NJL 565 

r ulc Mitsubishi Elec 730 734 


4740 4770 
2340 2230 
2240 2270 
1100 1090 | 
1010 1010 
863 863 I 

1770 1760. 

5 74§ *738 
748 743 

1010 WO 
3480 2500 
492 446 

1170 <140 
9M TO 

719 720 

7360 7300 




««h 

LOW 

OBBl 

Hah 

Law 

Ctoso 

Oia 

Op .tot 

1 2JJ0 

HUB Mar 94 

11.67 

11X7 

11X7 

11X7 

—0X8 

1X10 

II JO 

M.lBMorV4 




11X7 

—0X0 


11X8 

1170 Jti 96 




11.47 

-oxa 

5 


12X37 






off 1479 





COCOA 

(Not) WmcWcetn-iurie 





1500 

1041 DBC 94 

1240 

1277 

1240 

1243 

-27 33X03 

1605 

1077 Mar 95 

13Z3 

1328 

12*4 

1297 

-25 20468 

1612 

1078 May 95 

1347 

13*7 

1320 

1325 

—25 

7.747 

1400 

1225 Jti 95 

1358 

1358 

1357 

1354 

—35 

iW*3 

1560 

13(8 Sep 93 

1394 

1394 

1388 

1383 

-23 

1.294 

1633 

1290 Dec 93 

1420 

1420 

1420 

1414 

—18 

A9» 

1674 

1350 Mar 94 

M6S 

140 

1445 

1452 

—18 

0509 

1442 

1225 May 96 




1*85 

—10 

312 


Jui 96 




1505 

—10 

11 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open Hteti Lae Ckae Chg Oo.W 




9X180 92X40 Junta 92X10 92540 92X10 92X80 1 40 120.991 

92570 9219) Soc 96 92)00 91430 92300 92370 •40111X13 

Est. sates NA WstTLSOHS 306,779 

Wod-souenlnt 7532342 oh 11095 

BRITUH POUND (CMER) 1 wW equate M 0001 

15900 1X500 Dec 94 1,9824 1J67* 1.5770 UM 4S8 41XB 

1J960 1X640 Mar 95 15770 1.5880 157*0 15134 x38 366 

15800 15J48 Jun 95 I5K0 ^30 I 

Est. sates NA Wed’s, sates 6759 

Wetfsooente 42099 up 263 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBR) 1 sw »- 1 paint emaU sOMCt 


* Jf I — 


Est. sates 9,141 Wed's, sties 4X73 
Wed's ooen kit 74J3B up 152 
ORANGEJUKE (NCTN) lSXnVte-anfiswl 
134JM mO Nov M 8275 97.00 1975 

132-00 S9JMJti1?5 94JJ0 99 J5 9400 

12425 TIM Mar M 97X0 10325 97X0 

11429 77.00 Mav 95 101 J» 10600 101JU 

119.00 10050 Jui 93 10680 109JB 106.00 

114X0 107 25 Sep 95 11150 11275 11150 

113X0 109.00 Nov 95 11250 11150 11250 

171X0 10550 Jqn 96 

Mar 96 

Est. sates NA Wea'6 sales 2X83 
Wed's ooen tot 20X54 up 64 


*1M 3.933 
•290 7,040 
•210 4X47 

♦ 1X0 1,183 
♦215 

*285 299 

♦ 255 458 

♦ 255 
+ 255 


Metals 


HI ORAOE COFFER (NCMX) 96000 tes- cm we. 
119X0 75.73 Dec 94 11470 114X9 11325 11270 

mwt 7690 Jon 93 71325 

117X0 73.00 Ft* 93 ¥12.70 

117x0 7X00 Mar 95 11220 71120 111.90 11230 

115X0 7LB5May 95 11230 112X0 111.70 111X0 

11470 78JMJUH 110.90 

11230 79.105tei 95 11050 11050 110.00 1)0J» 

12110 75200099 11630 11620 11J50 715X6 

118X0 77.75NOV95 11420 


B£U)0Dec95 10920 10920 100X0 700X0 


108JU WJOJtMiVi 
11020 OJOMar 96 

71650 97.10 Anr 96 

10950 107X0 MOV 96 

11520 1 OLIO Jun 96 

Jui 96 

11205 111X0 Aug 96 

Est. sales 5500 Wafs-sdea 6592 

Wed-soeenint 58X72 


—1.10 39295 
—1.10 845 

—1.10 504 

—1.10 7X74 
—1.10 1X06 
— 1.10 1,594 
—1.10 996 

-8X5 2,132 
— 0X0 

—1.10 1X70 
— 1.10 
—1.10 
— 1.10 
— 1.10 
—7.10 
— 1.10 
— 1.10 


07670 0.7038 Dec 94 07423 02421 02390 02400 -3*41X61 

02605 0202DMar9S 02410 02422 02380 02396 —36 ljt* 

02S22 0X990 Jun 95 02393 02401 023H 02385 -» 50 

02438 0X965 SOP 95 02375 07373 02375 0.7370 —31 391 

02400 0.7040 Dec 93 07359 07359 02359 07353 -09 27 

Est. sates na wea-Lsato 6x10 
Wed's oaen M 43265 oft 1201 
OERMANMARK (CSMSt) Snsriiwk-lsaHseinltMUtai 
0X606 0X990 Dec 94 0X496 UXSU 06475 0X523 * 38 76,138 

0X595 05810 MOT 91 0X514 0X131 0X480 0X5B *29 3,927 

0X595 0^80Jun9S . 0X546 *29 610 

0X325 , 0X347 Sap 95 0XJ15 0X540 0X51! 0X557 *29 13 

Est sales NA Wed's, sties 13,900 
Wed's open Int 80X8B up 348 

JAPANESE YBI (CMSR) I mr yen- 1 ■MeauoJe WMOOM 
0.01 04900JX)9S25Dec 94 001008880101090X100320X10098 *20 58272 

0X1036mX094B066or950j010M«Lai01B30X1011«JP(n76 +19 4X08 

0X1 067tXL009776Ain 95 SXI076I +17 494 

aOH177S0.010200Sen9S 0X1 0356 *16 H 

6X10^600X18441 Dec IS - 0X10*43 +]J 11 

Est. soles NA Wetfv soles M277 
Wtefsocenint 43271 off 413 
SWISS FRANC (CMHJ lj*riraie-l ratal eemtelMOW 
029D5 0X885 DecVJ 02M) 0.7*48 QJ78Q 02845 ♦43 34J78 

0JW5 0JJ3) Mar 95 02146 07877 02810 02175 +43 941 

07955 07466 Jun 95 02907 +43 53 

SOP 93 02737 +43 2 

Est. salts NA Wed's, sales 12.266 
Wed's open tot 35X68 oil IN 


■ ’ • A* fS 

“ ^ « 
;■■■■« *^9 

v -‘ ^ Mw 
• ‘H 

= . ,kri 




11 UJ U 


V#r » Many, 

A* 


industrials 


561 J 

51UOti94 



"" 


NOV 94 




597X 

3800 Dec 9* 

553.5 

554J 

5360 

57 aj 

401 X Jon 95 

5500 

5SL0 

5400 

604J) 

41 4X Mar 95 

5*20 

563-5 

5450 

6005 


560X 

5605 

553. D 






6DU 

532-5 Sen 95 

5740 


5605 

4200 

SWXOecH 

5900 

mo 

5710 

4I2X 





622X 

£HXMar« 










Jti 96 





—119 171 

-I3X 

—13X90X54 
— I3X 49 
—13.1 11X45 
— 133 4X40 
** 

-TJX 2,6*5 
— 14X 
-M2 
— 14J 
— 142 


Est. solas I9j»0 Wed's, sties 21,983 
Wed's open tot 85.924 aft 983 


wed's oow. Irt launo 

PJ-AT1MJM fNMSt) % may ot- aoten oer irovn. 
435X0 368X000 94 eiSIO 415.10 414X3 41 U0 

AJ3.5U 374X0 Jan 95 420X0 4Z1X0 41520 417X8 

439X0 390X0 Apr 95 422.ua 4» nn 420X0 420X0 

435X0 41950 Jti 95 427.00 42850 42350 4200 

43tSJ 422X00095 427.00 

43950 43958 Jan 96 jsnnp 


Livestock 


Est. totes SMi wed's, totes 1.705 
Wed's open Ini 23X53 up 112 


-130 207 

—130 19.357 
-2 JO 3,180 
— 2J0 5*2 

—230 
—230 


CATTLE (CMER I eunte- eomim te- 


GOLD (NCMX) IWtwet-tMlBnp e v u vez. 

417X0 344X00094 388JD 38850 335.50 386.10 

NOV W mm 


•010 

65JOOCJM 

OK 

P.90 

P-55 

67x0 

—042 

0723 

74X0 

47X0 Dee 94 

6075 

69X0 

6045 

6070 

— 0-27 9.147 

7A2] 

6085 FftO 95 

<7 JO 

0.97 

47X5 

P-72 

—0X0 10717 

7010 

47X7 Apr 95 

P.90 

6015 

47 JO 

6005 

—0.02 11.123 

6* JO 

&?.?:iJtii*5 

64X7 

64X7 

tJ! JUI 

04X2 

+0X7 

3X28 

68.10 

43X0 Aug 95 

6105 

64X5 

63X0 

<4.00 

♦0ia 

1,203 

67 Si 

6420 Od *5 

44X0 

64J0 

44X0 

MJ0 

*0X5 

184 


Esi. sates 10,721 wed's, sales 11284 

Wed’s oaen Int 67J07 up 87 

FEEDeR CATTLE (CMER1 56X00 ■».. cetes t 


8145 70.?5OdM 7245 7190 7245 

88X0 7145744V 94 73X0 7125 72X0 

80.95 riXOJanfS 7137 72.95 72.10 

8935 70J5Mcr 95 71 JO 71.90 71.10 

76.90 70.10 Opr (S 73.95 71.45 70X0 

7640 69X0 MOV 95 5838 7044 703S 

J3W W 88 Alio 95 70X0 7045 70X0 

70.15 *9*0 SAO 96 

Es tates 1X73 Weds, sates 1X2) 

Wed's aoen Inl A113 off III 
HOBS (CMER) NMk-tMiHriL 


•0.15 1.918 
-0.03 4X38 
•DJD ixa 
+0.10 546 

+ 647 404 
+048 369 

+020 60 


42640 34100 Dec 94 39140 391X0 38840 388X0 

411X0 MJOFebH 39450 39450 391 JO »lS 

417X0 36450APT95 398X0 398X1 39550 395.40 

CS-W 34130 Jun 95 300.00 40050 39150 398.90 

41450 380J0 Auo *5 403X0 48100 SOLDO 402x0 

419X0 481XQ Oa 95 406X8 

2^-52 41X10 41X10 410Jfl 410X0 

42450 41 150 Feb 9* 414X0 

W3 <1840 Apr 96 418x0 

43150 413X0 Jun 94 424X0 434X0 494 46 ern 

Aug 94 427H) 

Esi. Sties 60X00 WWs. sales 16X01 
w«rs open tot 162.280 


—1X0 71 

—2X0 89X24 
—2.10 19X60 
—110 7^R3 
—2.10 10X04 
—3.10 1744 
—DO 
—DO 
-DO 
—DO 
— 2.10 
-110 


Finana'al 




Zurich 


Atie Int) B 224 220 

Aluwisse B new 642 63ft 

BSCBrwnBovB 1104 1171 

ana Gelgy B 722 721 

C3 Holdings B 
ElektrowB 
Fischer B 


DO DO | Rlnasccnte 


Klocckner Werke 145 144lCaradon 


Unde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannesmann 

Me»iH»seii 

Muench Rueck 

Porsche 

Preussag 

PWA 

RWE 


085 889 Coats vtvella 
18550 183 Comm Union 
4)3 413 Courtauids 

405 413 ECC Group 
102 160 Enterprise Oil 
2860 2800 EurahHMcl 
687 489 Ftens 
4564SU0 Fgta 
241 143 GEC 
454.1045350 G*"1 ACC 


1X9 1X7 San Pno* Torino 

358 356 SIP 

3J9 3,18 SME 

4j24 433 5/i la bed 

43V 450 sranda 

2 j< 2 ja siti . ^ 

2X0 2.18 TaroAssK 

S is K%GKM : 

3X7 170 


Asia Pac Braw 16x0 16X0 Mitsubishi h«v tm 791 

Cerebas B.1S B Mitsubishi Coro 1260 1260 

City Develgpmnl 8JD 8JD Mllsul and Co 

Cycle & carriage 1410 isxo Mitsui Marine 
1 DBS 10X0 ib^o Mitaukaanl 

1 DBS Lana 47B 488 Mlfsuml 

. FE Levlngstan 455 _ 7 NEC . 


549 536 
337 335 
1550 1SS5 


Interdiscount B 1980 2000 


858 819 
780 775 
OTI 931 
1410 1350 
1270 1250 


#78 890 
760 76S 

387 388 

1111 120ft 


Fraser & Neara 17X0 17X0 1 NGK Insulators 1060 |0» 
GtEasfnUfe 28 28 Nlkko Securities 1170 1140 


192 189 1 

2X9 2X0 1 

1.18 1.13 

2X6 2J3 

199 19ft 
5.91 189 


Montreal 


AtCOLtd I 
Bonk Montreal 


Hong Leona Fin 4x8 44* Nippon Kaaaku 

inchcaae 5X0 5X0 Nippon OH , 

Jurong Shipyard ’a- 70 M Nlooon Steel 

mn Kay Hkm J Cocci 1.94 US Nippon Yusen 

. Kennel 12.90 13 Nissan 

Natsnei 3J0 322 Nomura Sec 

NteHuae Orient 224 127 NTT 

■ — OCBC foreign 1490 15 Olympus Optical 1120 1090 

at O’sem union Bk 7.10 7.15 Pioneer 7490 ira 

erseos Union Ent 8.15 830 Rletii TO W7 

13% 13% sembowona n.70 il.to Servo Elec 508 5»0 

24* 24* 5!me Singapore 1-16 1.16 Sharp 1830 1830 


989 ?7« 
693 894 
395 389 

650 646 
819 820 
2100 2090 


Jebnoll B 
Landis Gvr R 
MaevenglckB 

. Nestle R .«• im 

1 OeriMc. Duehrle R 131X0132X0 
Porpes aHId B 1500 1400 

Roche Hdg PC 5940 5910 

Safni Rcputnic 
SondozB 
Schindler B 

Saker PC „„ „ u 

Survelltetee B 1890 1900 
SwtaBnkCorpB 375 374 

fwpS Rtinsur R 700 685 

Swissair R — - 

UBS 8 
Winterthur B 

. Zurich Ass B 


4975 33.470094 33.70 3400 3137 

60.50 34 75 Dec 94 3470 33.10 3455 

SL80 34.75 Feb 95 36.75 37.1S 3457 

48.80 36X0 Aar 95 37JS 37X5 PM 

47X0 42.15 Jun 93 42.75 43.00 42.75 

4SX0 43.17 AS 9S <2.17 43X0 42.70 

4 3A0 41.70 Aug 95 42X0 42JS J5JJ0 

40X0 39X200 95 39.12 39.12 3?.I7 

41JS 39X0 Dec 95 

Eg.Mte* 4,74< Wen’s, tom 6,9)1 
WWt open i« 31,109 up 215 
PORK BajJES ((MSI) Jaan4u.-jpui.BP, 
6005 38X0 Feb 95 39.10 3T55 3855 

6020 3020 AW 95 39.12 39X5 3855 

61.15 39 42 May 95 40J0 070 ALSO 

5<X0 40X5 Apoj 41.10 41X0 41X5 

44.00 39.a0Aug95 

Esi.5tin 1+077 wars-stin 2X57 
watrs open int 9,745 lp 301 


— 0.13 ixn 
,0.15 17.061 
• 0.17 6X04 
-0.11 3,619 
♦0. 13 1X26 

—0.13 415 

-0.10 376 
—ora lot 
33 


•030 8J49 
‘ 833 135 


U9T.BBJJ 1 (CMER) flmnan-toitilDOBd. 

96.18 94J5DecW 94X1 MJ2 94X1 94X1 *0X3 19X10 

95X5 93.98 Mar 95 94.19 94X8 94.18 9422 *0X2 9X31 

9424 9346 Jin 95 93X7 93.90 93X3 9104 * BX? 2X23 

^ _ ..Sep’S 93X7 91X7 93X5 9US 

gJjties NA Wed's, sales 1X81 

Wed'S ooenirt 38X 63 tit 379 

8 VR. TREASURY (CBOT) tioiMmiprtn.pMi.x»»>eiiM n; , 

ID6 -M 101-05 OK 94102-005 102-20 101-31 102-0b7 0U m.ffi] 
103-09100-265 Mar 95 101-sSr B5 

Est. sates 42X08 Wnfs-sties 35.223 
wed-! open int 174X30 off 2734 

!« Ik. TREASURY (CBOT) tia,UBin.Mitn)atflD0Dcl 

J 1 *-" ’SSiJ Sf*! 4 ! 01 -®’ l«-« l°MD llSjl I II 263X23 

litS 2 « ““'W’W-'S 101 ■» 180-12 100-23 + tl 8^ 

185-22 98-24 Jui 95 IW-fts + M 101 

101-06 98-jfl SOP95 9^5 * 3 

MWI 98-10 Dec 95 , ,i 3 


COTTONS (NCTN) tamfet-amere 
77X5 59X8 Dec 94 68X1 68.65 68.10 61X6 

7115 62JDNlar95 70-16 70J5 69X0 70X5 

7355 WOO May 95 71.10 71.18 70X0 70X5 

7EJ5 69X0 JUI 95 71.90 71.90 71X0 7U0 

7470 66X00095 69X5 69X5 69.10 S9-30 

«8X0 68X5 68X0 <8X3 

68X0 68X0 Mar 96 69X5 

Eti. sates NA- Wed's, sties 8,184 
50X25 ah 1731 

HEATING OK. FNMfiR) 42x00 eti- cants ear sal 
SL30 44 DC Nov M J*J0 47X0 46X0 4475 

»X0 46X0Dec»4 67X0 47 JKI 47X0 

«X5 Janos 48X0 49.1D 48.00 *45 

47.95 Feb 95 49A0 49X0 4465 «. 45 

57X? 47X0 MOT 95 49JU 49.95 49X0 49X3 

56.15 *3X3 Anr 95 49.10 J9J0 «lxo joxa 

5430 47X0 May 95 4495 49X0 4440 AIJO 

53X0 46X9 Jun 95 *8X0 48X0 4430 48X0 

5430 47.85 jm 9J 48,90 49.IS 60X5 44717 

HX0 42X0 Aug 95 49XB 49.70. 49X5 49X5 

2-15 S-«5ep« 5050 50JO 50.20 50S 

53-75 50.050(795 J1J0 51X8 51.10 51X0 

54*0 SUONovVS S2JB 52J0 52JW Pm 

57X0 5420 Dec 95 3150 3150 mg niOO 

JBJfl 50X0 Jan 96 5195 SJ.V5 53.95 5195 

» JO WJ#F«b*6 5390 53.90 SS Afl 

Bt. sties 53JM6 weirs, sties 61,901 
Wed's ope n int 168.135 up 2314 
LIGHT SWEBT CRUDE (NMER) I.DOOBti-MlwiMr 
20X9 14X2 Nov 94 17X? 17X41480 

UXO 1493 DK 94 17.23 ITM 1490 17X9 

’J 15 JO" »J 17X3 17X5 17,00 17X9 

IHSP*” 17Ja 1X44 17.10 17X5 

2]U* 1442 Mar 95 I7J4 17X8 17.1* -17X1 

las? 17 - 41 ,7 - so 17-15 1JJS 

lU»NlB|fW 17X4 17SI »J5 T7J7 

iSm l^S-S* 195 17iS 17X0 l>jn 

JS'S '405 Jti 9S t7.S8 17X8 17X5 17X8 

loS 17 - 4S 17X5 17X0 I7M 

17X75ep95 17X0 17X0 17X0 17 JO 

10 it '7J0 17X0 17J0 17JQ 

1906 17.15 Nov 95 17X9 17 J9 17 M I/S 

2GW 16X0 Dk 95 17X5 1762 17.48 17X4 

20-BO 17X3 Jun 9ft 17X7 17^ 1J jw itvj 

E«.«to ISAO Wetfi.50tes 134477 w * 
Wtersoptnlnt 424063 oA 265ft 
iwuSADeoGMOUNE outsm -UMOBti-cwneer 
a.40 43.75 Nov M J4XJ tiUO MM ^92 

W-IODrcVt 55XS 57.70 35.3s 34.92 

38X0 5040 Jan 95 5480 JjJD 54X0 S.I7 

S-Ifift** 91 MW 4478 «X2 

66.93 UXOMarvj 14X0 HJS jttei Jk 

WXO 56X5 Aar 95 5800 3M0 58.00- 51 3* 

Sm “JM »*5 J485 M94 


— Okix TSjnr* 

— 0X5 I2J74 


J > : .7 v .. ‘ ' : m, x Utai 
• i r,- ‘ 1 


•I UM 2X02 

♦au 


-0X1 29X79 
+B.1) 42X80 
, hm 33XJ0 
•0.13 17Sft 
♦0*“ 


.0.12 4X03 
•an nth 
* 097 4342 
*0X2 1981 
♦0X7 U38 
♦0X7 1.247 
♦an ; . no 
+037 4017 
an 492 
0X7 


-004 83X13 
— 009 84227 

—an 55777 
-00134921 

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BAe Bid for VSEL 


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0? rpikdby Ovr Staff From Dbpauhar 

LONDON — General Elec- 
tric Co. of Britain said Thors- 

Tine maker that agreed Wednes- 
day to be acquired by British 
Aerospace PLC. 

Analysts said GEC, which 
has big cash reserves, could eas- 
ily bette the British Aerospace 
offer of £478.5 nuffion (£756 
minion). 

But when it announced the 
General Electric offer, VSEL 
said it “continues to recom- 
mend the offer by British Aero- 
space to shareholders. 

Some analysts said it was un- 
likely General Electric would 
buy VSEL, although it may 
make an offer that would force 
its competitor, British Aero- 
space, to pay a little more. 

“1 don’t t hin k the govern- 
ment's particularly interested in 
haying all the country’s ship- 
building assets in one compa- 
ny” Clive Walker-Fores tier of 
Charterhouse TOney Securities 
said. 


Britain and build most of the 
nation’s warships. 

General Electric, which is not 
related to the American compa- 
ny with the same name; em- 
ploys 2,600 workers ax Yarrow, 
Scotland, where it builds navy 
frigates. 


. VSEL’s shipyard in Barrow- 
m-Fumess, England, which em- 
ploys 6,500, is the only one in 
Britain with fatalities to build a 
nuclear submarine. 


If the two operations were 
umted, it would reduce compe- 
tition when the government is 
preparing to seek bids on major 
naval projects, Mr. Walker- 
Forestier said. 


VSEL shares rose 10 pence to 
1,320 on Thursday — above the 
value of the British Aerospace 
bid That suggests investors ex- 
pect a higher bid 


VSEL and GEC operate the 
two biggest naval shipyards in 


British Aerospace shares feD 2 
to 467, while GEC rose 3 to 299. 

British Aerospace said 
Thursday it would offer VSEL 
shareholders either 2.727 BAe 
shares or £1 1 .40 in cash for each 
of their shares. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


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Operating Profit Lifts 
Havas’s First-Half Net 


PARIS — Havas SA, a 
French media company^ 
said Thursday that first-half 
net profit rose 39 percent 
because of a strong rise in 
operating profit 
Havas also confirmed an 
earlier forecast of a “signifi- 
cant increase” in 1994 net 
profit 

All companies in the Ha- 
vas group except the pay- 
television operator Canal 
Plus SA are expected to post 
higher profit this year be- 
cause of restructuring mea- 
sures and a better economic 

dimflte 

First-half net profit rose 
to 589 million French francs 
($1 1 1 million) from 423 mil- 
lion francs a year earlier. Ex- 
cluding the impact of in- 
creased stakes in some 
subsidiaries, net profit 
would have risen 30 percent 
First-half sales rose 26 
icrccmt, to_18.7 billion 


mg profit after financing 
costs but before one-time 
items — rose 8.7 percent to 
939 milli on. 

Havas also owns CEP 
Communication SA, 
Groupe de la Qt£ SA, a pub- 
lishing house, Avenir Havas 
M 6 dla SA, an advertising 
agency, and a chain of travel 
agencies. (Bloomberg, AFX) 


Canal Plus Goes to Chile 
Canal Plus and Salomon 
International Enterprises 
said they would form a com- 
pany to tap the pay-television 
market in CMe, Bloomberg 
Business News reported 
Canal Pins, Europe's larg- 
est pay- television company, 
is making its first foray into 
the Latin American market 
with its venture, Canal Plus 
Chile. 


A new holding company, 
owned 75 percent by Canal 


percent 
francs. 

Current profit — operat- 


PIus and 25 percent by Salo- 
mon, will be set up in the 
next few weeks to operate in 
Chile, the companies stud. 


Deutsche Bank Shares Dip 



. ■ c -, 
ij. l ' : < 


Deutsche shares recovered to dose nearly unchanged from 
Wednesday. “I have noidea where these stories are coming from, 
but there is nothing in them,” Dierk Ernst, chief executive of 
Advanta, said (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Very briefly: 


e Sergei Mavrmfi, the Russian banker who headed the MMM 
investment scheme that collapsed in July, was released from jafl 
after being detained for two months on accusations of tax evasion. 


i*nriu* Inc!s 


e France’s gross domestic product rose an unrevised 1 percent in 
the second quarter after a 0.7 percent gain in the first quarter, the 
national statistics institute IN SEE said 


? it * 

It « ' 


• Citibank and Society G£n 6 rale SA and four Russia oO compa- 
nies have signed credit deals worth 5893 million for U.S. equip- 
ment and services, sources involved in the loans said. 




* * 
« * 
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• Tuscaloosa Steel Corp^ a U3. subsidiary of British Steel PLC, is 
to invest 5154 million in a new steel factory at its plant in 
Alabama, making it British Steel's first wholly owned stedmaldng 
operation outside British. 

• Banco Espafiol de Cred5to SA (Banesto) signed a letter of intent 
to sell its 8Z75 percent stake in Banesto-Banco Shaw of Argentina 
to Baaaaaex of Mexico and the main shareholders of Banco del 
Sod, for $97 million. 

■ Tesco PLC said it was given sole supermarket retailing rights to 
the new Virgin Cola soft drink, announced this week by Virgin 
Group PLC, for ax months following the product’s launch. 

to the sakTof^l public boosts to Pobumtei? aluiri^rireiit 
WaBcer Group PLC, for £79 million (5125 million). 

• Swiss Bank Covp. said it was launching a bonus-points program 
for its clients, tto cost an estimated 15 mfllion Swiss francs (512 
milli on) in the short teqxL_ 

• BAT Industries PLC said it had won an investment tender 

conducted by the Moscow Property Fund for a majority stake in 
the Java tobacco factory in return for an agreement to invest more 
than £70 milli on in the factory. Ot^u-Odder. AP, AFX 




-- 



•»** 


- 


» 

( r 


: ■ < 



1?S — . 




J f - 


CALOR. ROWENTA. SEB. TEFAL 

nine month consolidated sales 



1994 

(FRF millions) 

1994/1993 

f%J 

12 months 
rolling [%) 

France 

2.001 

+ 3 

+ 3 

Germany 

936 

- 2 

+ 2 

Other European countries 

1.713 

+ 2 

“ 

NAFTA* 

892 

- 22 

+ 23 

Other countries' 

460 

■*10 

+ 15 

Total 

5.9P2 

+ 5 

+ 5 


North American Free Trade Agreement. 


Airlines Challenge Paris 

Fight Looms Over Landing Rights at Orly 


Bloomberg Biomess News 

PARIS — Six months after British Airways 
forced a showdown with the French govern- 
ment to win the right to ffy into Orly Airport, 
three other European earners are bracing for 
a similar fight. 


Under European Union rules, any airline 
in the EU or in a European Free Trade 
Association country is entitled to serve any 
destination it chooses in the EU, provided the 


Deutsche Lufthansa AG, the Austrian car- 
rier Lauda Air and KLM Royal Dutch Air- 
lines are planning to begin service to Orly in 
the next two weeks. France has yet to give the 
green light, however, and it appears the air- 
lines will tty to get tough with Paris, as British 
Airways did. 


airport chosen has landing slots, or arress 
given hour. 


The three airlines, for example, are already 
selling tickets for flights to Orly. 


A spokeswoman for Acroporls de Paris, 
which runs Orly and Charles de Gaulle air- 
ports, confirmed that the three European car- 
riers had applied for rights into Orly but said 
“for now, no dates have been set for the 
beginning of service.” 

Lauda’s chief executive, Niki is 

planning to fly the first plane from Vienna 
himsdf, although whether the plane will actu- 
ally be allowed to land at Orly is still unclear. 

BA, too, told France it was c oming in and 
only backed off at the last minute after John 
Macgregor, then the British transport minis- 
ter, worked out a compromise with his French 
counterpart, Bernard Bosson, that delayed 
the start of service for about six weeks. 


rights, available at a given 

Generally, European carriers flying into 
Paris land at Charles de Gaulle Airport. How- 
ever, because Oily is closer to the center of 
Paris and most flights to other French cities 
leave from Orly, many European carriers are 
eager to offer passengers the option of flying 
to that airport. 

France, which wants to protect its ailin g 
flag carrier, Air France, from increased com- 
petition, has fiercely resisted this. After it 
turned down British Airways in early 1993, 
BA challenged that decision in the European 
Commission and won. 


The current situation “looks a lot like what 
happened with BA,” said Nick Cunningham, 
an airline analyst with Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd in London. He said he believes France 
will be forced to allow in other carriers. 


Lauda has already filed a complaint with 
the European Commission seeking to force 
French approval, and the commission has 
given France until Ocl 23 to respond. In 
August, France turned down Lauda’s request 
for rights to serve Orly beginning in late 
October. 


Joblessness 
In Spain 
Increases 


Compiled by Oar Suff Ft&rt Dupaieha 

MADRID — The jobless 
rate in Spain rose to 16.54 per- 
cent in September from 1634 
percent in August, reversing a 
trend since spring of falling un- 
employment, the Labor Minis - 
try said Thursday. 

The number of unemployed 
registered with the National 
Employment Institute rose by 
30,825, to about 2,560,000, the 
ministry said. 

The ministry said increases in 
unemployment in September 
were normal because Spain’s 
tourism industry, a motor of the 
economy, slows after the sum- 
mer. 

But those increases were 
mostly offset by declines in the 
jobless rates of the construc- 
tion, industrial and farming 
sectors, the ministry said. 

Analysts also said the rise in 
the number of unemployed 
workers had moderated. 

The government has pointed 
to steady drops in unemploy- 
ment since last spring as a sign 
its recent easing of rules on hir- 
ing and firing was bearing fruiL 
(AP. 

Bloomberg, Knighl-Ridder) 


Investor’s Europe 



AS 0 


M JJ 
1904 


A S O 


Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Index 

AEX 

Thursday 

Close 

407^1 

Prev. 

Close 

402.30 

% 

Change 

+1.25 

Brussels 

Stock Index 

7,148.17 

7.131 J25 

+0^4 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,(02.63 

2,077.57 

+0.24 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

78A35 

781.72 

+0 34 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1312-54 

1,899.04 

+0.73 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2,413.60 

2,381.60 

+1.34 

London 

FTSE 100 

3.141JQ 

3,100.50 

+1.34 

Madrid 

General index 

297.11 

293 J27 

+1.31 

Milan 

MI 8 TEL 

10220 

10113 

+1.06 . 

Paris 

CAC40 

1356^8 

1.918.14 

+1 96 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaoriden 

1^57.37 

1.82577 

+1.73 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

479,95 

431.77 

-0.42 

Zurich 

SBS 

923.19 

914.55 

+094 


Soutcos: Pouters. AFP 


liptmilhiuj Ht'i'jlti TnNunc 


Incentive AB to Relist Its Cardo Unit 


AFP-Exid Setvs 

STOCKHOLM — Incentive AB said Thursday it would relist 
its Cardo AB unit on the Stockholm exchange at the start of 1495. 

The relisted Cardo will consist of the Cardo Door, Cardo Pump 
and Cardo Railways operations outside North America. It has 
projected annual sales of about 5.4 billion krona ($730 million). 

Cardo was delisted this year after a shareholder buyout bv 
Incentive, a Swedish investment company. 


Wit- ' 


, <: 


, v 


All of these securities Iwing been sold, 
this anouncemem appears as a matter of record only 


REGENT PACIFIC HEDGE FUND 


(an exempt company incorporated and registered on 10 September 1993 with limited 
liability under the laws of the Cayman Islands with registered number 50530) 


2,000,000 Shares - fully subscribed 


Investment Manager 

di 

Regent Fund Management Limited 


7 October 1994 



Regent Fund Management Limited 
is pleased to announce that 


at an Extraordinary- General Meeting of Shareholders of 


CLEMENTE KOREA 
EMERGING GROWTH FUND 


on 7 October l'W4 


Shareholders voted by majority to implement the proposals put forward by 
Clients or Regent Fund Management Limited t» remove the board »r Clemente 
and appoint new directors and to authorise the new hoard to appoint 
Regent Fund Management Limited as manager of Clemente. 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dkpalcha 

FRANKFURT — Shares of Deutsche Bank AG, Germany’s 
largest bank, fell as much as 2 percent Thursday on speculation 
that the bank had suffered large losses on loans to Advanta 
Management AG, a company that has a 503 percent stake in the 
luxury hotel chain Kcmpinski AG. 

Both Deutsche Bank AG and Advanta denied there was any 
basis to the speculation, which appeared to focus on possible 
difficulties at KempmskL 




", IV 


■ ■ ■-■■■* 
r.» : « 


K3W 

f.xW| 


IK 


m 




rm 


All of these securities having been sold . 
this anouncement appears as a matter of record only 


WHITE TIGER INVESTMENT CO. LTD 


(an exempt company incorporated and registered on 25 August 1994 with limited 
liability under the law's of the Cayman Islands with registered number 55736) 


PLACING OF 

2,000,000 Shares of US$0.01 each at a price of US$10.00 per Share 


Investment Manager 



Regent Fund Management Limited 


All of these securities having been sold, 
this anouncement appears as a matter of record only 


UNDERVALUED ASSETS TAIWAN FUND - SERIES THREE 


(an exempt company incorporated and registered on IS August 1994 with limited 
liability under the law's of the Cayman Islands with registered number 5562 J ) 


: i 


PLACING OF 

4,000,000 Shares at a price of US$10.00 per Share 


Investment Manager 



Regent Fund Management Limited 




f ii - .: - >. :■ ^ - 







Page 16 




Pa 


AMEX 

Thursday’s Closing 

Tabtes include the nationwide prices up to 
Jneciosing on Wall Street and do not renect 
™ trades elsewhere. Vfa The Associated Press 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 


let . ff wonm 

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Satan nswres ore unofficial. Yearly bJstts and laws reflect 
me previous g wtek s plus me oirrentweek, but not me latest 
trading day. Where a spilt or stock dividend amount ins to 25 
penant or mare has bean paid the years hloh-tow rarere and 
d ivide nd are shown for (tie new stock only. Unless otnerwtse 
noted, ratos of atvWends are annuti disbur sem e n t s based on 
Ihe latest dedo ration. 

0 — dividend also extra(s>. 

b— annual rate of cflvtdend plus stock dtvMend. 

C— liquidating etvktend. 

CM— called, 
d — new yearly lew. 

e— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, 
p— dividend In Canadian funds, sublect to 159* non-resMeneo 

j — Ovldend declared after spIH-up or stock dividend. 

1— dMdend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no action 
iokon at latest dividend meeting. 

k— dividend declared or paid to Is year, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n— new Issue in the past 52 weeks. Tlw higWow range beg Ins 
wlto the Start of trading, 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — price ear nii i MJ ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paid hi preceding 12 months, plus 
stock dividend. 

s— stock split Dividend begins with date of spilt, 
sis — sales. 

1 — dividend paid in slock In preceding *2 months, estimated 
cash value on ex-dtvidend or ex-d U frt b uMon data 
u — new yearly hloh. 

v— trading hatted. 

vi— In bankruptcy or receivership or being reoraanlzed un- 
der Ihe Bankruptcy Act, or securlttn assumed ay such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed. 

wl— when Issued. 

ww — with warrants. 

x — ex -dividend or cx-rlgfite. 

xdls — ex -distribution. 

xw — without warranto. 

y — ex-dividend and sales In full. 


vW— yield. 

z— saws 


InfuiL 


Uni trades Sicav 

19-21, bvd da Prince Henri L- 1724 Laxembaarg 
Tfl: 46 14 U Fate 22 IS 91 
RX-B-3LSZ2 

Notice 


is hereby given that ihe Extraonfinaiy Meeting of the shareholders of 
Uni trades. Sicav will be held at Che Registered Office on 2-3 th October. 1994 
at 1 1.00 bjil for the foilowiiig purpose: 

1. dissolution and liquidation of the Sicav; 

2. appoimerneni of the liquidator: 

3. determination of the liquidator's powers. 

Shareholders wishing lo exercise personally their rights at the meeting may 
deposit their share certificates no later than five working days before ihe 
General Meeting at the Registered Office. Socidfe Euopeenne de Banque, 
19-21 boulevard du Prince Henri, ly 1724 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of 
Luxembourg. 

The Board of Directors . 


Countries for Sale: 

TTA TaikBack is Seeking Qualified Partners to Participate 
in Hie Exploding Multi-Billion Dollar Telecom Industry. 
TTA TaikBack provides a turnkey program including credit card 



advanced technical support, and unparalleled profit margins 
of 30% to 50% for our Partners with virtually no risk. 

As a TTA TaikBack Partner you can provide uit'l. telephone 
rates to end-users saving them 20% to 70% when compared to 
local telecoms, calling cards, and hotels. 

Exclusive territories begin at $25,000 U.S.D. Call or FAX 
Mr. Donald Long to discover your 
significant return on investment /""N s r/,v 1 1 v/ /-y.VrJ w’ 
U.S. Tel. 407-253-5454 U 2®™^™ 
U.S. Fax 407-253-6130 5ooNwttius»i ■ Mdbumw . h .wbusa 


NYSE 

Thursday's Closing 

Table® indude the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wan Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
Kan law S»» 


_ , su 

Div V»d PE iQfa High LowLouaiQi*9e 



$ 

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skjp 2 

Coa finned on Page 19 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14. 1994 


Sega Shares Slump [~ ; ; 

On Video Price Cut J ar dine Shifts Weight Southward 


Page 17« 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


II ■ 


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Bloomberg Staines Nnvj 

TOKYO — Shares of Sega 
Enterprises Ltd tumbled £9 
percent Thursday to their low- 
est level in nearly four years 
after the company lowered the 
pnee of its newest offering in 
the hotly contested video-game 
market. 

. The move sparked specula- 
tion among investors that Sega. 
* W P„-* s largest game maker 
^ l j r Corp., was wor- 

nal that its next-generation 
video game player would not 
seu as well as hoped, said Paddy 
Hogan, a broker at Smith New 
Court. 

TTw shares fell 340 yen, to 
5,400 ($53.84), after Sega said 
after the market closed 
Wednesday that it would sell its 
new game, the Saturn, for 10 
percent less than planned. Se- 



ga’s new product, which is fast- 
er and produces better images 
than (rider machines, will go on 
sale for 44,800 yen Nov. 22, or 
5,000 yen less than the price 
Sega announced a week ago. 

Sega is the first of Japan's big 
machine makers to release next- 
generation games players using 
32-bit chips, which are more 
powerful than the 16-bit models 
common now. 

Sega's current profit peaked 
at 55 billion yen in the year 
ended March 1993, triple the 16 
billion yen profit it reported 
three years earlier. 

But in the year that ended in 

March, Sega announced its first 

profit drop in 12 years as the 
figure fell 22.7 percent, to 42.5 
billion yen, amid growing com- 
petition. 

Nintendo last week lowered 
its earnings forecast for the year 
ending March 31, 1995. The 
company tilted a fall in export 
earnings because of the strong 
yen and a price war on mw 
software in Europe. 

Sega and Nintendo, longtime 
rivals and for years the undis- 
puted leaders in the video game 
field, are facing new challenges 
as more companies enter the 
field. Sony Corp., for example, j 
will introduce its machine, the 
PlayStation, in time for Christ- 
mas. 

Nintendo has also said that it 
would introduce an even more 
powerful machine next year. 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — - The Jardine Mathe- 
son group is building a stronger presence 
in Southeast Asia to take advantage of 
the region’s growth but also to hedge its 
bets in case expansion in Hong Kong 
and China is blocked by Beijing for polit- 
ical reasons, analysts "say. 

Jardine, the oldest and most British of 
Hong Kong’s trading bouses, said re- 
cently it would move its main stock list- 
ings from the colony to Singapore early 
next year and also seek operational head- 
quarters status in Singapore. 

“It is pan of an overall plan to diversi- 
fy away from Hong Kong and China," 
said a Singapore securities analyst who 
requested anonymity. “But the group is 
doing it in a series of small steps so as to 
try to avoid further aggravating relations 
with Beijing." 

Briefing journalists in Singapore. 
Alasdair Morrison, managing director of 
Jardine, sought to play down the signifi- 
cance of the decision to expand into 
Southeast Asia through Singapore. 

He said that Hong Kong and China 
"wflj remain the heart of our business 
and that will continue to grow. In addi- 
tion, we are developing our Southeast 
Asian business; it’s a complementary de- 
velopment.” 

Analysts said that Singapore, which 
has dose political and business ties with 
China, prefers to see Jardine keep its 
expansion in the region as low-key as 
possible in the sensitive run-up to 1997. 
when Beijing regains control of Hong 
Kong from Britain. 

Nonetheless, Singapore sees an oppor- 
tunity to woo investment capital from 
Hong Kong. 


The shift from Hong Kong to Singa- 
pore early next year of the main stock 
listings of five Jardine flagship compa- 
nies complements Singapore’s plans to 
enlarge its stock exchange and establish 
a stronger trade in shares of companies 
with regional or international opera- 
tions, said Bibiana Yow, research direc- 
tor at Smith New Court in Singapore. 

While companies in the group are list- 
ed in London, Aust ralia, Luxemboure 
and the Philippines, Singapore is expect* 

Singapore is expected to 
become the principal 
trading market for 

Jardine shares in 1995. 

ed to become “the principal trading mar- 
ket” for Jardine shares from 1995, said 
Boon Yoon Chiang. managing director 
of the company in Singapore. 

Chinese officials, who still resent the 
role played by Jardine in helping per- 
suade Britain to fight China in the Opi- 
um War of 1840-41, which resulted in 
China ceding Hong Kong to Britain, 
have described the delisting as “extreme- 
ly irresponsible.” 

Chinese officials were also furious 
when the group changed its legal domi- 
cile to Bermuda in 1984 to protect itself 
from a possible Chinese takeover after 
1997. 

Beijing recently opposed Jardine’s 
participation in a container port project 
valued at $1.6 billion in Hong Kong, 
apparently because of its perceived sup- 
port for democratic reforms in the colo- 
ny that China bitterly opposes. 


In the six months to June, the group — 
which has major interests in trading, 
property and financial services — report- 
ed a 24 percent rise in net profit to S216 
milkon on sales of nearly $4.5 billion. 

Hong Kong and China account for 
about 60 percent of group earnings and 
Southeast .Asia 15 percent. 

In the past 18 months, Jardine has 
taken several steps to increase its pres- 
ence in Singapore, which Mr. Boon de- 
scribed as “a development base” for the 
group in Southeast Asia. 

Dairy Farm Ltd., which is 52 percent- 
owned by Jardine. bought the retail op- 
erations of Cold Storage Ltd. for just 
over $82 million. 

It purchased a 24 percent stake in 
Cycle & Carriage Ltd,, which has its core 
businesses in motor-vehicle sales, prop- 
erty and food retailing, for $226 million. 

This year. Jardine Pacific, the group's 
trading arm, teamed up with GE Capital 
of the United States to acquire a 64 
percent interest in Associated Merchant 
Bank with the aim of developing it into 
one of the leading installment financiers 
for vehicles and commercial equipment 
in Singapore. 

Cycle & Carriage owns the rem ainin g 
36 percent of the bank. 

Cold Storage in Malaysia, a unit of 
Cycle & Carriage, is seLting up a joint 
venture with Dairy Farm to own and 
operate Cold Storage's super mar kets 
Mid expand the food retailing businesses 

Jardine’s interest in Southeast Asia 
“reflects the rapid economic expansion 
of the region and its potential for future 
growth,” said John Engle, research direc- 
tor at Smith Barney Shearson HG Asia 
in Singapore. 


| Investor’s Asia 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

11000 - 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2400 - - 

Tokyo 
Nikkei 2?5 

2200C 

tw» - - - A 

2300,/Hm 

™ An. 

mj\f - r -™ 

2200 -- Y' " “ 

2mf 

M T J j ' A S O 
1994 

M' J J A S O 

1994 

U JJ 
1994 


Exchange Index 

Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore Straits Times 

Sydney Ail Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kutala Lumpur Composite 


Bangkok 

Seoul 

Taipei 
Manila 
Jakarta 
New Zealand 
Bombay 


SET 

Composite Stock 
Weighted Price 
PSE 

Stock Index 
NZSE-40 
National Index 


Thursday Prev. 
Close Close 
Closed 9,532 35 

2.357.B2 2,368 3f 

T.mw 2 : 002 : 6 c 

20,148.83 20.0BB.72 
1,135.67 M37 1 UO 
T47R06 1,470.90 

‘ijOBAH - "Tom' hT 

6,626.39 M9578 - 


Change 


2£90.75 

507718 

2,043.71 

Closed 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


2.970.46 
51142 
2.056SCr~ 
2,071 ip 

|j|rr!uiL.'ii ■' I l.-f 


Strong Australian Jobs Data Spur Inflation Fears 

L. n *7 1 


Compiled by Ota Staff From Dispatches 

SYDNEY — Australian bonds tum- 
bled to their lowest levels in more than 
two-and-a-half years Thursday on con- 
cerns that record-high employment fig- 
ures would prompt the central bank to 
raise rates to rein in inflation. 

The yield on the benchmark 10-year 
government bond rose to 10.34 percent 
from 1020 percent on Wednesday as the 
price feD to 91.87 from 92.68. 

Australian employment leapt by 
75,700 jobs in September, to 8.01 million 
— the highest number of jobs ever re- 
corded by the Australian Bureau of Sta- 
tistics. The figure was much higher than 
analysts expected. 

Unemployment remained unchanged 
at a three-year low of 9.5 percent in 
September. 

Economists said such strong growth 


erodes the value of fixed-interest securi- 
ties such as bonds. 

Bruce Hockman of Bain & Co. said 
strong employment “certainly makes 
the case for a credit tightening.” 

Mr. Hockman said the Reserve Bank 
of Australia most likely would raise the 
benchmark short-term rate by 0.75 per- 
centage point, to 6.25 percent, by early 
November. He added that a rate’rise of 
one percentage point was also possible 
before the bank meets on Nov. 1. 

The Reserve Bank also caused infla- 
tion concerns with a report showing that 
housing lending rose 24 percent in the 
year to August. 

Brad Holland of J. P. Morgan Austra- 
lia Ltd. said: “The central message here 
is that with the economy growing so 
strongly, the current monetary policy 
settings are too lax." 

The central bank raised rates for the 


first time since 1989 in August to 5.50 
percent 

Prime Minister Paul Keating de- 
scribed the data as a cause for “substan- 
tial rejoicing” and said Australia's job 
picture had not been so rosy since the 
1980s, when economic growth grew at a 
brisk annual rate of five percent 

Stocks fell only slightly, witbthe All 
Ordinaries Index dropping 0. 1 8 percen t, 
to 1,998.90. as investors waited for two 
key reports on U.S. prices to be released 
after Australian markets closed on 
Thursday and Friday. 

Analysts said the central bank and the 
government had little choice but to raise 
interest rates to curb inflation as txo- 
nomic growth begins propping up wages 
and causing higher consumer prices." 

“If it turns out that there's no rate rise 
forthcoming then the market will be a 
little anxious about their ability to keep 


inflation low,” Roiy Robertson of 
Bankers Trust Australia Ltd. said. 

But Employment Minister Simon 
Crean said the economy was in no dan- 
ger of overheating. 

He said Australia was experiencing 
“strong economic growth, low inflation; 
but most of all the strong economic 
growth is translating into jobs." 

In New Zealand, meanwhile, bond 
prices fell on worries about inflation 
data to be released on Friday. The yield 
on the benchmark 10-year bond rose to 
9.09 percent from 8.98 percent. 

(Bloomberg Reuters) 

To our reoders at France 

If', never been easter to subscribe 
and taw with our new 
>oli free service. 

Jus» ceD us today cd 
05437437 


Very briefly; 

• General Motors Corp.’s automotive components group is pre- 
paring to build a car parts production base in China, the official 
Xinhua news agency said. 

• Taiwan said investment applications from abroad in the first 
three quarters of 1 994 totaled SI. 08 billion, up 27 percent from the 
year-earlier period. 

• Amalgamated Sled Mills Bhd. said it would raise 56.1 million 
nnggit ($219 million) through a series of share issues. 

• Shanghai’s trade volume surged to S1 1 .03 billion in the first nine 
months of 1994, up 25 percent from the like period .1 sear earlier. 

» Fletcher Challenge Ltd. said it would assume management 
control of the Datong steelworks west of Beijing and would take a 
58 percent interest in a joint venture that will own the plant. It said 
tt would invest $25 million. 

• Jardine Fleming Holdings Lid. has appointed Timothy F. Mc- 

Carthy, formerly of Fidelity Investments, as chief executive of its 
unit trusts business. w-Wm;. afv. tin 


Bapindo Directors Replaced 

AFr Fxtcl .\Ym 

JAKARTA — Finance Minister Mar’ic Muhammad replaced 
all the directors of state-run Bank Pembangunan Indonesia on , 
Thursday, a Bapindo spokesman said. The shift came right before 
the expected arrival of specialists from Standard Chartered PLC.; 
who are to help Bapindo improve its operations. . 

According to the Finance Ministry. Bapindo and Standard 1 
Chartered arc to sign an accord for technical assistance on Friday. ! 
The assistance is expected to increase Bapindo** credibility after it f 
was hit by a $430 million fraud scandal in February in which a] 
business loan was allegedly diverted for personal use by the. 
borrower. Mr. Mar'ie said the British bank would will help set up; 
a prudent banking system and improve information svstenis and 1 
internal controls at Bapindo. 


When an airline has a young fleet, 
experienced pilots, attentive cabin crew, 
and the pickiest ground technicians 
in the world, it’s free to concentrate on 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 


;:*it ■ 


Page 18 




Taiwan-Chi 



By Jay Matbews 

H'aihington Post Service 

NEW YORK —As Benny T. 
Hu lives his busy life sealing 
the Chinese mainland with Tai- 
wanese enterprise — a chemical 
plant here, a calculator factory 
there — he reads with wonder- 
ment about new political malice 
between China and Taiwan. 

Mr. Hu said that trade be- 
tween Thailand and mainland 
China has never been better. 
Along with Lynch & Mayer Inc., 
a New Y ork investment advisory 


firm, he is about to close a deal 
to create the S250 million Asia 
Corporate Partners Fund with 
the help of the People’s Con- 
struction Bank in Shanghai 

Politically, the People’s Re- 
public of China is “trying to iso- 
late Taiwan, but that is a differ- 
ent group of bureaucrats,” said 
Mr. Hu, 45, president of Tai- 
wan-based China Development 
CoTp. 

Mr. Hu's corporation, created 
in 1959, was determined to do in 
China what it was already doing 


in Malaysia, Indonesia and Viet- 
nam: Find Taiwanese entrepre- 
neurs setting up small compa- 
nies in those countries and lend 
them money to expand. 

Many of these entrepreneurs, 
drawn by family and linguistic 
ties, have set up enterprises on 
the mainland, but their oppor- 
tunities for growth have been 
limited by small bank accounts 
and occasional Chinese govern- 
ment obstacles. 

Four years ago. Mr. Hu be- 
gan visiting with officials at 


Shanghai Trust & investment 
Co., a subsidiary of the People's 
Construction Bank. 


When the talks became seri- 
ous about an investment fund 
full of Taiwanese and U.S. 
money with the Chinese as offi- 
cial advisers, officials of the 
People's Construction Bank 
called Mr. Hu in and said they, 
not the subsidiary, would do the 
deal. “1 had no problems with 
thaL ” Mr. Hu said. 


American companies interested 
in lending their money and ex- 
pertise to Taiwanese ventures in 
electronics, chemicals and food 
production on the mainland. 

Lynch & Mayer and China 
Development Corp. committed 
S250 million to investments in 
Asia over 10 years, with half of 
that focused on China. 


Lynch & Mayer looked for 


Cl RRI \< > AM) CAFITU. MAKKI I SERVICES 


Catch The Big Moves 


Hugh R. Winokur. the chief 
executive of Lynch & Mayer 
Asia Inc., said the company's 
approach is to “work alongside 
corporate partners, looking for 
a support mechanism." 

Mr. Hus firm is now the larg- 
est private development bank in 
Taiwan and has a market value 
of more than S4 billion. 


Trade between Taiwan and 
China was S14 billion in 1993, 
and Mr. Hu and Mr. Winokur 
said it was growing and unlikely 
to be stopped by even a major 
diplomatic tiff between two 
governments. , 

Mr. Hu can still remember 
when trade between his country 
and China was expressly for- 
bidden by both governments. 

It grew all the same, some- 
times by boat at night over the 
Taiwan Strait 

“The relations do die eco- 
nomic side were always quite 
good, no matter what was going 

n t ■ J UT. 1 1 


Murdoch Children to Own 
AU Shares in News Corp. 


Bloomberg Business Sens . , 

SYDNEY -Rupert Murdoch, chairman ' of 11 

has arranged for hts Four children to own all t m ' 

family’s&hares in the global media giant, the magazine. 


Pjv> i 




on.” be said. “It has such mo- 
mentum. no force in this world 
can stop it-” 


nor. muruocn aiso saw ne , , . #hll ,-nmnanY » 

rival media group John Fairfax Holdings Ltd. t •• 

in which News Corp. said in July it had acquired a* ^ * 

In an interview to be published Friday. Mr. N . * 
said he had set in motion plans for his 
40 percent of Cruden Investments Pty. held by h ' j 
Mr. Murdoch’s immediate family owns a ^° ui ri ^ Mur^ 
Crudest, the closely held investment company tha the mu£ . 
doch family has used to control its ^ '• 

owns about 32 percent of News Corp “TTie awBgjartB 
confidential but it will lead to my children s trusts' ev $ ■ 

having 100 percent of Cruden Investments, the magazi 
quoted Mr. Murdoch as saying. 


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investor cannot possibly know 
what course the SaJJie Mae story 
will take. The questions instead 
are: Is there a decent case for 
optimism? .And has the stock 
been beaten down so far that it is 
unlikely to go much lower? 

The Value Line stock guide 
reflects the conventional mar- 
ket wisdom when it concludes. 
“Until Sallie Mae's future be- 
comes more clear, we favor be- 
ing on the sidelines.” 

Still, some analysts, includ- 
ing J. Richard Fredericks of 
Montgomery Securities and 
Samuel Liss of CS First Boston 
Group Inc., recommend that 
clients buy the stock. 

Sallie Mae could well be 
worth fishing off the bottom. 


Like Philip Morris, it is a strong 
company that pays a good divi- 
dend. It is risky, but the market 
may well have overreacted. 

It Is also comforting to know 
that some excellent: mutual 
funds own the stock, including 
Yacktman, MainStay Value, 
Investment Co. of America and 
Nicholas. 

In general, though, mutual 
funds want nothing to do with 
stocks that have been tainted by 
big declines. 

One fund that comes close to 
the piscatorial ideal is Crabbe 
Huson Equity — this reporter 
owns some of its shares. Morn- 
ings tar, the research service, said 
the fund’s managers look for 
“once- successful stocks that 
have recently suffered signifi- 
cant price declines.” Among the 


hol ding s: International Business 
Machines Corp., Navistar Inter- 
national Corp„ Nike Inc. and 
Delta Air Lines Inc. The fund's 
average annual return for the 
past five years is 14 percent. 

Other funds simply search 
for undervalued or out-of-favor 
slocks and provide a comfort- 
able alternative to the extremes 
of bottom-fishing. 

One with a strong record is 
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ment, whose manager buys only 
stocks that trade below their 
book value, or net worth per 
share. Top holdings include 
Kmart Corp., whose price has 
fallen by nearly half in the past 
two years, and Continental 
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that has dropped 60 percent in a 
year. 


But beware of the risks. Avon 
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decades ago, as Samuel Mitch- 
ell and Christopher Niem- 
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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1904 



: 1 


SPORTS 


■,-.*** a?*. 


( 


,1 

fj 


Unbeaten Chargers and Unknown Coach Are No Flukes 


By Thomas George 

ew York Times Service 

SAN DIEGO — This is what you need 
to know about Bobby Ross: 

He is in his third season as the coach of 
tbe Natio nal Football League’s San Diego 
Chargers. He is driving to Jack Murphy 
Stadium for a game. He gets to the en- 
trance of the parking lot, and an attendant 
asks him to pay $5 for the parking fee. The 
attendant does not know who Ross is. 
Ross doesn't want to make a fuss. He pays. 

It happened twice this season, once at a 
preseason game a gainst the Los Angeles 
Rams and again in a regular-season game 
against Cincinnati. Both times Ross sim- 
ptypaid, kept driving and went to work. 

This is what you need to know about the 
Chargers: 

As the NFL’s lone unbeaten team with 
five straight victories, they are not a fluke. 
They are the real deal. 

They have a quarterback, Stan Hum- 
phries, who was not quite good enough in 
Washington with the Redskins but has 


been superb since being traded to the 
Chargers in 1992. 

The Chargers are 22*7 with Humphries 
as the starter. He is now the American 
Football Conference’s top-rated passer. 

They have Leslie O’Neal at defensive 
end, as intelligent as he is ferocious. He is 
the Chargers' career sack leader with 84. 

They have Junior Seau, possibly the 
game's most complete linebacker and as 
emotional a player as be is do minatin g. 

They have Natrone Means, a bully of a 
running back. He looks more like the guy 
who rolls out the tarp than a prize back. He 
is round and short and heavy, but he is 
tough and quick, and a clutch performer. 

They have Ronnie Hannon, tbe best 
third-down bade in the league. He has 
caught more passes in the past two seasons 


than any other back. He has IS receptions 
this season: 12 have been for first downs. 


this season; 12 have been for first downs. 

They have John Carney. He is 10 of 1 1 
on field-goal kicks, including a game-win- 
ner against the Raiders with two seconds 
left. 


They have their best start since the ’61 
Chargers went 11-0. They have beaten 
each divisional opponent once and have a 
two-game lead in the AFC West. 

The Chargers have a lot 
They’ve got two Bobbys — Ross, the 
coach, and Beathard, the general manager 
— and they look very much like the old 
Redskin teams that Beathard p rimari ly 
built: strong running game, strong kicking 
game, swift defense, power ball, big plays, 
few turnovers and even fewer penalties. 

Ross has been here for three seasons. 
Beathard for five. The Chargers were 4-12 
the season before Ross arrived in '92. In 
his first season they lost their first 4, then 
won 10 of 11 and claimed the AFC West 
crown. Last season they were 8-8. Only 
two players remain from Beathard’s first 
season: O’Neal and safety Courtney Hall. 

Ross, 57, has been married to his wife, 
Alice, for 35 years, with five children and 
five grandchildren, and has been a football 
coach for 29 years, with head coachingjobs 
at the Citadel, Maryland and Georgia Tech. 


“When I was at Maryland and he was at 
Washington. I didn't rally know him that 
well," Ross said of Beathard. “But I always 
respected him. I had close friends on the 
Redskin staff who thought die world of 

trim 


not going to drive the ball and stuff it in 
there every week against every opponent. 
You’ve got to stretch the field.” 


Moldova Steals 
Europe’s Show 


“When he called me in Hawaii, we were 
getting ready for a bowl game, a big game 
for Georgia Tech. I talked it over with my 
wife. The kids were grown. We said, ‘What 
the heck. The time is right. Let’s try it.’ “ 
Ross will tell you 15 times that he’s not 
Lhat smart, but in reality he is in touch with 
what works and what does not in tbe NFL. 


He lets his coaches coach. Bill Am* 
sparger runs the defense, and Ralph Fried- 
gen runs the offense. His football axiom 
remains “You have to be able to run the 
balL” But be has been adaptable to change. 

“We had Marion Butts when I first got 
here and Rod Bemstine, and heck, we 
could run the ball, always have.” Ross 
said. “But the one thing I learned in die 
NFL is you have to have oig plays. You are 


The Chargers play at New Orleans on 
Sunday, and the Saints are struggling with 
a 2-4 record. The challenge for Ross is to 
kero hi$ team focused, and the Saints are a 
perfect match to do just that 

Last season. New Orleans began 5-0 and 
finished 8-8. Ross wfll milk that message 
for all it is worth to his players this week. 
To a man, they respect Ross. They respect 
him because he is true. 

“The only thing I know how to do is 
work hard," Ross said, “You have to do 
things right on the practice field, and when 
they re not right you have to do them over 
again. I enjoy game day. I love the compe- 
tition. Players want to be dealt with hon- 
estly. You have to be up front with them. 
You have lo be up front with all people, i 
am what I am.” 

So far this season this is what he and his 
team are: ahead of the entire pack. 


leeAngeksTimaS*™* f 

jattaaBSSss. 

it was unheralded Moldova that captured 
the big headlines in Europe. 

On a night when 34 nations 

jHJsttwbr Wales at Chrsmau « 
Wednesday evening. . . 

The loss dealt a blow to Wates bag* 
finishing at least second m Group 7 Wund 
Srored Germany and boostodthefar- 
tunes of Bulgaria, which beat 
with both goals comrng from Kwta- 
dinov off passes from balding World Cup 
hero Yordan Lctchkov. 

Although the Welsh played without in- 

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South Korea Is Stunned J 


By Uzbekistan in Soccer 




Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — Bad 
shooting, bad luck and worse 
goalkeeping knocked favored 
South Korea out of gold medal 
contention at the Asian Games 
soccer tournament Thursday. 

The three-time Asian Games 
champions lost, 1-0, to Uzbeki- 
stan, which plays C hina in Sun- 
day’s finaL 

South Korea boomed 27 
shots over the goal, off the bar, 
off defenders, off goalkeeper 
Yuri SheDrin’s chest, off his legs 
and off his arms. The ball went 
everywhere except into the net 
as the match was played almost 
exclusively in Uzbekistan's half. 

But in the 64th minute, Aza- 
mat Abduraimov took a weak 
shot from 40 meters that dipped 
and rolled under the hands of 
the South Korean goalkeeper, 
Cha Sang Kwang. 

It was only the third time that 
half that the ball had been in 
the South Korean end of the 


field. The other two times were 
clearing kicks by Sheflrin. 

Off the playing fields, six 
more athletes were reported 
miss ing bringing the total to 15. 

Tbe latest were three Bangla- 
deshis, an Iranian, a Nepali and 
a Sri F jwifam, organizers said in 
a series of statements. 

They said the heads of all 
delegations would be called to 
an emergency meeting Friday 
to discuss ways to prevent fur- 
ther disappearances. A similar 
meeting was held Tuesday after 
nine athletes disappeared 











SB^-f 


Before the latest reports, po- 
x already were searching for 


lice already were searching for 
four Sri Lankans, three Nepa- 
lese and two Pakistanis. 

None of those missing has 
been identified and officials 
have refused to speculate on rea- 

man y Asians fflealTiritO^Japan 

or overstay their visas to seek 
higher-paying jobs than are 
available at home. 

(Reuters, AP) 




1 • f f .'ttiffr ■' 




Ma Junren (third 
from left), China’s con- 
troversial track 
coach, went shopping 
Thursday in Hiroshi- 
ma with three of his 
runners, Zhang LinB 
(far left), Wang Jumria 
and Qu Yunxia 
(right). Ma, who had 
said the day before 
that II of his runners 
had had appendecto- 
mies, added to that puz- 
zling announcement 
by saying that all tbe op- 
erations had been 
carried out on the same 
day . “They had the 
operations tins year in 
July. They had them 
afl done at the same 
time,” Ma said. He 
again sidestepped ques- 
tions about the rea- 
son for tbe surgery, say- 
ing only: “If there’s a 
problem, you take it 
out.” 


Pogorclov scored the winner for Moldova 
in the 79th minute. 

There were no upsets in the three mqjor 
encounters of the night. In Copenhagen, 
tbe Danes fell behind 1-0. "'“cn Marc 
DeGiyse scored for Belgium, but goals by 
1992 European Championship stars Kuo 
Vflfcfft and John Jensen erased that advan- 
tage. Mark Strudhal scored Denmanrs 
thir d goal late in the game. 

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In Oslo, the Netherlands and Norway 

o 7_t ri* The Norwegians Yield- 


in vsau/| usw — , • . j 

played to a 1-1 tie. The Norwegians yield- 
ed a first-half goal to Dutch winger Bryan 
Roy but regrouped to salvage a tie on 
Kjetil Rekdal’s shot in the 52d minute. 

Sweden, which finished a strong third in 
World Cup *94, was taken apart in Berne. 
It was Switzerland’s third consecutive vic- 
tory over the Swedes. 

The game was barely five minutes old 
when Rennet Andersson put Sweden 
ahead, and the Swiss had to wait half an 
hour before getting back on level terms on 
Christophe Ohrd’s goal. 

The Swedes regained the lead in the 61st 
minute on Martin Dahlin’s shot, only to 

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rive it up a g ain minutes later on Jesper 
Blomqvist’s goaL Ciri Sforza scored the 
game-winner in the 81st minute and Kubi- 
lay Turkyflmaz got Switzerland's fourth. 

Greece, on the rebound after a disas- 
trous World Cup campaign, scored anoth- 
er impressive victory under its new coach, 
Costas Polyhroniou. The 4-0 drubbing of 
Finland in Salonika followed a 5-1 victory 
over the Faeroe Islands in September and 

- -left the Greeks in first place in 

Group 8. 


PhjrJta Fan^/Rcutcri 


-fj... • 


Allan Games 


BASEBALL 

SamlflnaH 

South Korea K China 0; Japan IX Taiwan 3 
For Sth Place 
Thailand 20. Mongolia 3 

BASKETBALL 
Wonon. CoM M o dal 
South Korea 77. Japan 7* 

Men, lamHhMli 
China B& Phlllpplnos 74 
South Korea Wl, Japan S3 
BOXING 
Float 

H eavyweight, PcM Modal 
A. PourtosM Ghwhchl, Inabdef. Ko Yoong- 
■am. South Karoo, 9-7 

Bronze Medals 

Lokha Singly India, ana Vasslll Jirov. Ko- 
zoklMan 

KoovremgM, Gold Modal 
Allalwr Avozhoev. UzhoMitan. slopped 
Youzff Harron Hawsawt, Saudi AraMa, 1:11 
3rd round. 

Bronze Meda ls 

Jiang Too, China. and BoIvnanAzlzpaur, Iron 
Super HoovrweMit Gold Medal 
Woo Moscow. UzBOklsfan, Hoppad M. So- 
madl Kalhhoran, Iron, 1J5, aid round. 


Bronze Medals 

Sllarasti Khan, Pakistan, and Ral Kumar 
Sangnoiy India 

CYCLING 

Wamea 3-KI Is meter individual Pursuit 
Gold Medal 

Wang QtngzM, China, drt Ota Hubhen. China. 
3MUS2 ID 3-JStJUO (Asian record; aU record 
3^7M9. Solka HasMnnota Jaoary July 21. 1«W). 
Bronze Medal 

Seiko HashUnotOk Japan, 3-JAM9 
Men, 40-KHo motor Paints Race 
1. Cho Mo-sung. South Korea. 44. x Vadim 
Krovtenor**, Kazakhstan, 43. X AkUilro 
Osawa JOpaa 24. 4. Park Mln^oo. Saulti Ko- 
rea. 2X X Chon Dana-llen. Tatwory IX «, Hiro- 
shi Dolman. Japan, 11. 

FIELD HOCKEY 
Mo*. For Sth Place 
Malaysia 5. Kamkhstai 0 
For 71h Place 
Bangladesh X China 1 

Handball 

women 

South Karoo 34, Japan 20 

GOLD — South Korea (X0>r SILVER — Ja- 

aan (2-11; BRONZE — China (14). 

JUDO 

Woman 

<1 KHogromi, OaM Medal 
Jwig Sung-sook. South Korea, del, Yuko 
Emato. Japan, wozo arl 

Brano Medals 

Zhang DL China, and Wu Chine HiH, Hong 


Kang M Kilograms 
Gold Medal 

Alko OHM. Japan, del. Cha Mlrvsua South 
Karoo, kales 

Bronze Medals 

Nadelda Zdttakava Turkmenistan, and Wu 
Mm-llna. Taiwan 


Scmlflaals 

Dwa dof. Chau 21-lX 2 MX 71-11. 

Koyama dof. Oloo. 21-17. 14-71. 21-17. 21-19. 

Gold Medal 

Koyama del. Deng, 20-22. 21-19. 22-20. 71-16- 
Mlzed Oouhles 


Medals Table 


15 KHognnns. GoM Medal 

Yoan Dafimslk. Sou hi Korea def. Hldenorl 
HorO w shL JOPary koka 

Bronze Me do ts 

La Yu-wcLTahMm. and Vladimir Shmotcov. 
Uzbekistan 

16 KHoerams, Gold Modal 
Yoshlo Nakamura Japan. dof. Sorutl Albn- 

lanov, Kazakhstaa hantoi 

Bronze M e dal s 

Kim Suk-kyu. South Korea and Khalraulio 
Nazrtav. TallkWan 


SOCCER 

Mao 

Semifiaato 

China X Kuwait 0; Uzbekistan 1, South Korea 0 
TABLE TENNIS 
Womea Stooios. Quarterfinals 
Oeng Taping, China def. Rika Safa Japan. 
21-11, 21-lX IB-21. 21-18; Chal Po Wo, Hang 
Kong, del. Ryu JWiye. South Korea 21-19, 21- 
1L 21-14; Chlro Koroma. Japan, def. Chen 
Jins, Taiwan. 21-18. 1X21. 21-14 22-20; Qiao 
Hong, China dot Chan Tan Lui, Hang Kona. 
21-lX 21-9, 21-9. 


Kona Unohul and Deng Y opine, OUna def. 
Oilang PenoandXu Jlno. Taiwan. 21-1X21-M. 

TENNIS 

Men. Singles. GoM Modal 
Pan Bing. China (2). del. Yoon Yong-ll. 
South Korea (4). 6-Z 6-1. 

Poobles. Gold Medal 
Loonder Poes and Gaivav Natekar, India 
(1). def. Chang Eul-long and Kim Chl-wan. 
South Korea (3), 6-4 7-5. 

womaa Siestas, GoM Medal 
Klcnlka Dale, Japan (1). dof. Naako Sawo- 
matsu, Japan □). 6-X 6-4 

Doubles. GoM Medal 
Kyako Noeatsuka and Al Sugtyama. Japan, 
def. LI Fang and Chen U, China, 6-1 6-1. 
Mixed Doubles. GoM Medal 
X|a J taping and U Fang. China, dot Ryuso 
Tsui Ina and Nano MlyogJ. Japan. 7-6 (7-41,7-X 
VOLLEYBALL 


Chmo deL Paklstaa 15-1X 15-X 154; South 
Korea def. KazsUstan. 15* 154. 154; Japan 
def. Mongolia 15* 15-1, 15-2 

WATER POLO 

Kazakhstan 14 South Koroa 10: CM no 10. 
Iran 6; Japan 17. Singapore 3 


cnina 

Gold 

112 

Silver 

72 

Bronze 

35 

Total 

219 

Japan 

48 

54 

63 

165 

South Korea 

48 

41 

54 

143 

Kttzoknyoii 

2D 

20 

23 

63 

iron 

» 

V 

7 

25 

Tolwon 

7 

11 

18 

34 

Uzbekistan 

6 

8 

17 

31 

Syria 

3 

3 

1 

7 

Philippines 

3 

2 

7 

12 

India 

3 

1 

13 

17 

Makiyslc 

3 

1 

10 

14 

Kuwait 

3 

1 

4 

8 

Outer 

2 

0 

2 

4 

Indonesia 

1 

11 

9 

21 

Thailand 

1 

8 

9 

18 

Turkmen. 

1 

3 

3 

7 

Saudi Arabia 

1 

2 

5 

8 

Mongolia 

1 

2 

2 

5 

Vietnam 

1 

2 

0 

3 

Singapore 

1 

1 

2 

4 

Hong Kong 

0 

S 

7 

12 

Kyrgyzstan 

a 

4 

5 

* 

, Pakistan 

0 

4 

4 

8 

Jordan 

8 

2 

2 

4 

UA£_ 

0 

1 

3 

4 

Mocoo 

0 


2 

3 

5rl Lanka 

0 

1 

1 

2 

Brunei 

0 

8 

2 

2 

Neaal 

0 

0 

2 

2 

TollUstan 

0 

0 

2 

2 

Burma 

0 

0 

1 

1 


FIRST TEST 

Zimbabwe vs. Sri Lanka mini day 
Thursday, In Hone* 

Sri Lanka 1st InnMos: 3S3 
Zimbabwe 1st Innings: 172-2 


ATLANTA— Announced that Mika BMecM, 
pHcher.and Bill Pecata I nH e t oer. refused out- 
rlatit asstonments and elected tree agency. 

NEW YORK— Bought contract of Alberto 
Costilla catcher, from Bmohamien. EL. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Claimed Steve Faster. 
Pilcher, off waivers from OndtmatL 


“This is a new learn formed 
after the Work! Cup.” Polyh- 
roniou said- “They play fast 

and simple, and this Lslbe secret 

to success." " 







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BASKETBALL 


Scotland kept pace by 
-inxmciiig the Faeroq|^5-L ,at 
Glasgow. ,, 


1 -'4 ii,Ni 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Woles 2*. UOhr 10 


- * ’ ' ' T 


CHICAGO— Signed Dickey Simpkins, for- 
ward. to mult I year contract. Waived Walter 
Palmer, center. 

MINNESOTA— Waived Raney carter and 
Brian Davis, f orw ards . 

MILWAUKEE— Signed Eric MoMev. cen- 
ter. to 4-year contract. 

VANCOUVER-Named Chuck Davisson 
manager of basketball operations and David 
Ponderwaft scout. 


BALTIMORE— Announced mat Chrb Saba 
InfleMer-outfloMer. refused outright assign- 
ment fa Rochester. I Land elected froeagon- 
cy. 

Ml NNESOTA— Announced that Carl Willis. 
Pitcher, refused outright assignment and 
elected free agency. 

TEXAS— Fired Kevin Kennedy, mgnoger, 
and Marty Scott, director of mayor develop- 
ment. 

TORONTO— Put Dave RlahettL pitcher, an 
waivers for purpose of giving him his uncondi- 
tional release. 


ARIZON A Released Barry Word, running 
bock, signed Todd Peterson, kicker. 

CHICAGO— Waived Ryan WehHoht. Hflht 
enC. Activated Darwin Ireland, linebacker. 


CINCINNATI— Waived Terry Ric har dson, 
runn too bock. and Mike Frler.dofenslve tack- 
le. Claimed Brocey Walker, safety, off waiv- 
ers from Kansas Cftv. ' 

NEW ORLEANS— aalmed Setwryn Jones, 
oomerbock. ott waivers from Browns. 


The Scots were ahead. 3-0. at 
the half, thanks to goals from 
John McGinlay, Scott Booth 
and John Collins. Billy McG in- 
lay made it 4-0 in the 61st min- 
ute and Collins got his second 
goal 1 1 minutes later. _ 

There were fireworks at Val- 
letta, where tiny Malta stole a 
point off the Czech Republic, 
the team that bad beaten it, 6-1. 
at Ostrava last month. This 
time, tbe Maltese defense held 
firm and, even though Czech 
striker Jan Suchoparek hit the 


dingjbre 


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;t with a penalnr kick. Malta 
erved its scoreless tie; 


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DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 




CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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CVTERWATIOJVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 


Page 21 


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SPORTS 


Ballesteros Torches Frost 
In Match World Play Opener 

Singh, Montgomerie and Faxon Also Advance 


7fce Associated Pros 

VIRGINIA WATER, England — 
A rejuvenated, and nearly unbeat- 
able, Seve Ballesteros avenged one 
of his most painful defeats' Thursday 
wben he trounced David Frost in the 
first round of tie World Match Flay 
Championship. J 

Ballesteros, who was close to tears 
after he was routed by Frost, 7 and 
6, in the opening round here last 
year, carded 13 birdies and shot bo- 
gey-free golf to beat the sixth-seeded 
Sooth African, 8 and 7. 

“I didn’t have a bad day today,” 
said Frost, who was 5-under when 
the match aided at the 29th hole: “I 
simply ran into a brick wall, and the 
wall wasn’t going to move.” 

“ He just didn’t make any mis- 
takes,” Frost added. 

Ballesteros, bidding for a record 
sixth world match play title, called it 
Ins best performance in Ins 19 ap- 
pearances at the to urnam ent 

“I wasn’t thinking about the result 
last year. I was just trying to won,” 
said Ballesteros, who shot a 9-under- 


par 63 over the first 13 holes. “I said 
yesterday it would take something 
special to beat him. That 63 was 
something special.” 

In other first-round matches, 
Jesper Pamevik blew a 3-hole lead to 
lose to Vi] ay Singh, 4 and 3; Colin 
Montgomerie beat Yoshinori Mizu- 
maki, 2 and I, and Brad Faxon de- 
feated Ian Woosnam by one bole. 

For Ballesteros, last year's loss to 
Frost was the low point in a season 
in which he failed to win a tourna- 
ment for the first time since 1975. 
a The 37-year-old Spaniard has 
since rebounded with two victories 
an this year's European PGA Tour, 
one in the German Masters two 
weeks ago, and is now second on the 
European money list He was invited 
back to the World Match Play after 
John Daly withdrew from the 12- 
man field. 

“Once you hit the fairway the 
game becomes a lot easier,” said 
Ballesteros, who was overwhelming- 
ly the crowd favorite Thursday de- 
spite the presence of two Britons. 


“That's been the difference the last 
month and a half. I’m driving wdL 
Fm hitting the ball a lot farther than 
last year. Last year I was hitting the 
ball with the shaft.” 

Ballesteros could do little wrong 
against Frost. A 24-foot (73-meter) 
putt to win the third hole was the 
first of five consecutive birdies. At 
the 18th, Ballesteros chipped from 
just off the green to within one foot 
of the hole: 

He even managed to save par after 
hitting a 1-iron tee shot that landed 
behind a tree at the par-4, 399-yard 
25th hole. A wedge back to the mid- 
dle of the fairway, followed by a 9- 
iron approach and an 18-foot putt 
allowed the Spaniard to halve the 
hole: 

Ballesteros will play No. 3-seed ed 
Ernie Els, (me of four golfers with a 
first-round bye, in Friday’s second 
round. 

Singh will play the defending 
champion and No. 1 seed, Corey 
Favin, while Faxon draws No. 2 
seeded Jos6 Maria CHazdbaL Mont- 



1 im Ochcakn-- Afcnor l rank *- 1 

Seve Ballesteros, blasting out of a bunker, “just didn't make any mistakes,” David Frost said after losing by the score of 8 and 7. 


gomerie will tee off against the 
fourth-seeded Nick Faldo. 

Perfect conditions on the West 
Course at Wentworth made for low 
scores in every first-day match, al- 
though stroke totals are often mis- 
leading in match play because many 
putts are conceded. Still, anything 
short of a birdie often resulted in the 
loss of a hole. 

Pamevik, the runner-up at this 
year’s British Open, began his Went- 


worth debut by winning the first two 
holes against, the eighth-seeded 
S i ngh. The Fijian responded with 
nine birdies over 14 holes starting at 
the 10th, dropping two 45-foot putts 
on the way to a comfortable victory. 

The No. 5 seeded Montgomerie, 
who beat Mizumalti at the 37th ho- 
lein the first round last year, found 
himself in another see-saw battle 
with the Japanese golfer. 

Montgomerie went 1 up with a 12- 


foot birdie putt at the 3 1 st, then won 
the match at the 35th when Mizu- 
maki, who is 103 places below the 
Scot in the world rankings, missed 
from the same distance for par. 

In the only match to go the full 36 
holes, Faxon took a 2-hole lead over 
Woosnam when the seventh-seeded 
Welshman hit back-to-back 3 -irons 
out of bounds at the 17th and 
promptly conceded the hole. 


Both golfers were in the trees in 
the second 18. Leading by three with 
three to play, Faxon failed to win it 
at the 34th when he missed a 4-foot 
putt for par, but he emerged from a 
bunker to sink a 7-foot birdie putt 
and halve the final hole to win the 
match. 

“I missed a short putt on 16, then 
tried to give it away on 17 ” Faxon 
said. “Choked like a big dog.” 


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The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK —The Nation- 
al Hockey League, having 
stomped talking about contracts, 
is talking about cutting games. 

The league spokesman, Ar- 
thur Pincus, said o fficials would 
have an announcement “later in 
the week” regarding possible 
schedule revision. 

The lockout by the owners 
reached its 13th day Thursday, 
having surpassed the 10-day 
strike in April 1992 as the long- 
est in hockey history. 

No new negotiations have 
been set up, and both the league 
and NHL Flayers Association 
have now warned of a long and 
bitter battle. 

Harry Sinden, general man- 
ager of the Boston Bruins, said, 
“I don’t see any other word for 
it than a lockout” 

In the major league baseball 
strike, the sides had tentatively 
been scheduled (oresume talks, 
but put off their session until 
next week at the earliest. 


The Associated Pros 

STOCKHOLM — Many of 
the 30-phis Swedish players in 
the National Hockey League 
have returned home during the 
lockout to ask about playing for 
local teams. 

But they probably can forget 
about doing so unless the NHL 
shuts down for the season. 

While the NHL Players As- 
sociation has said its members 
should be able to play anywhere 
they want, the league faxed the 
president of the Swedish league, 
Tommy TopeL, in early October 
to outline its position. 

“The players may not play in 
Sweden d uring the postpone- 
ment,” said the fax, signed by 
Brian Burke, the director of 
hockey operations. “Any player 
who attempts to play during the 
postponement will be in breach 
of his NHL contract, entitling 
his NHL club to caned the con- 
tract, as well as to pursue any 
and all other available reme- 
dies.” 

Tuesday^ announcement 
that league owners had rejected 
the players’ latest proposal for a 


new labor contract is not likely 
to change anything. 

“fm still waiting for an offi- 
cial statement from the NHL” 
Topel said. He added: “We 
have to listen to the NHL first 
because we have an agreement.” 

The NHL and the Interna- 
tional Ice Hockey Federation, 
to which Sweden belongs, 
signed a three-year agreement 
on Sept. 16. The agreement in- 
cludes player transfers. 

Even if some players deride 
to play in Sweden, it could be 
expensive for the clubs to pay 
insurance money. 

“I don't think they would 
play for free,” Topel said. 
“Sure, it would be ran to see 
[NHL stars] in Sweden, but 
there’s also a negative side. It 
could be unfair to players who 
are under contract with Swed- 
ish teams. The sponsors may 
not like it" 


Among the Swedes to have 
returned home is the Olympic 
star Peter Forsberg, who signed 
a $5 million contract with the 
Quebec Nordiques. 

“I would like to play for my 
team MoDo,” he said. “If they 
want me." 

Uipo Hilkovaara, head of the 
Finnish Hockey League, said 
Wednesday night Ins league 
would show its solidarity with 
the NHL and not allow F innish 
NHL players to play in Fin- 
land. 

There are seven Finns in the 
NHL among them Winnipeg's 
Teemu Selanne, who was the 
league’s top rookie in 1993. 

None of the Finnish players 
has returned to Finland so far 
into the lockout. 

The NHL-11HF agreement 
was signed in Helsinki during a 
preseason tournament last 
month. 


ER.NAT10NAL M # 4 

iV* YORK TIMES AM* THE WASHINGTON 1 


TO** 

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Lookingfor a Piece of Basketball History in Spain 


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MADRID — Three years ago, MDce 
Smith and his teammates on the Spanish 
1 dub Joventut Badalona came within two 
. iz points of bating Magic Johnson and the 
.j Los Angeles Lakers at the McDonald's 
: r:t: Open in Paris. 

vrjfff It would have been a historic upset, 
:v&- since no National Basketball Association 
v team has ever lost to a foreign chib. 

1 l*' Smith gets a second chance on Oct. 20, 
cf ■- when the Golden State Warriors play Jo- 
ventut, the European dub champion, at 
the Olympic Pavmon in Badalona, a Bar- 
celona suburb. That is the arena where the 
- — U.S. national team dominated the world at 
the 1992 Olympics. 

; “Maybe it could happen. Fd still like to 
,’ fi & be part of history,” said Smith, a 31 -year- 
old native of Brooklyn. “It would be an 
.. —* upset, along shot, but that’s OJC. with me. 

' Inis is mostly entertainment, fun for the 
ye fans — but we’ll be out to win and get a 
place in history.” 

•Vj:' The pre-season game is one of three in 


Europe — and one of an NBA record 1 1 
ouUdde the United States this fall. 

The Warriors play the Charlotte Hor- 
nets Oct 18 in Paris,’ then travel south for 
the Badalona game The European tour 
concludes Oct. 21 wben Charlotte visits the 
drf ending Italian league champion Buck- 
ler Bologna. 

While those two NBA dubs are busy in 
Europe, nine other NBA teams will play 
pre-season games in Puerto Rico, Mexico 
and Canada. The NBA regular season 
opener mil be on Nov. 5 in Yokohama, 
Japan, between the Los Angeles Clippers 
and Portland Traflblazers, who play a sec- 
ond game there the next day. 

Ray Lalonde, the NBA’s European 
spokesman, said the 1995 McDonald’s 
Open — held every two years — would 
feature for the first time the NBA champi- 
on against an unspecified number of na - 
tional dub champions. He said Britain was 
the likely site, with Spain also possible. 

Smit h., a 6-foot-5 (1.96-meter) forward, 
knows Joventut is no match on paper for 
Don Nelson's Warriors, the NBA's most 


CROSSWORD 


unproved team last season, whose lineup 
indudes the rookie of the year. Chris Web- 
ber, and Chris Mullin and Tim Hardaway. 

The Spanish dub, led by Smith and the 
Spanish internationals Jordi Villacampa 
and Rafael Jofresa, has started sluggishly 
under new coach Pedro Martinez. 

“We’re the defending European cham- 
pions and there’s pressure on us — but it 
also should give us more motivation,” 
Smith said. “So far, the motivation seems 
to be working for the other teams.” 

Smith, a star at the University of South 
Carolina at Spartanburg, is in his seventh 
season in Spam, where he has staked out a 
career and started a family. He and his 
Spanish wife, Claudia Garda, have a 2- 
year-old daughter. Smith has dual U. S.- 
Spanish nationality, an apartment in Bar- 
celona and a house in Miami, where he 
said his family plans to settle after four or 
five more seasons. 

“My No. 1 dream would have been a 
career in the NBA,” Smith said. “Bui 1 did 
reach a second dream, playing in Europe 
and winning the championship here.” 


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, As regular readers, you tell us you enjoy 
the 30 minutes you spend engrossed in 
your paper.f You find its concise but 
■ comprehensive style meets your needs. 

; You also tell us that three out of four of 

’ ' you travel so often that you’re members 
• of exeomve or fret^uentfKer clubs.* 

We can only conclude tiien, that you, 
...'the pages of the International Herald 
;,...Tribune .and the many airlines, who 
•. advertise;, with us are just the ticket for 
•..each other. . . • , 

’ For summaries of the surveys from 
V which these ‘facts are taken, please calL in 
. Europe, JOtnesMdJsod on (33-1) 46 37 93 
f.vSI; in Asia,. Andrew Thomas 
«oti .(iS5) : -2S3 6478; in the 
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ARGENTINA: 

A COMPETITIVE 
MARKETPLACE 

A Conference/Debate 
Organized By Club 
Europe Argentina 
And The International 
Herald Tribune. 

With their vast experience, 

Club Europe Argentina is taking an 
active role to help potential 
European investors establish 
successful businesses in Argentina. 

With the help of a strong 
economy, Argentina is poised to 
compete with other regions for 
investment and development. This 
conference will explore investment 
possibilities for European business 
decision-makers interested in 
expanding in Latin America. 

Addressing the conference will be: 
Domingo Cavallo, 

Minister of Economy 

Guido di Telia, 

Minister of Foreign Relations 

Enrique Iglesias, 

President, IDB 

Conference Date: 
Thursday, November 3, 1994 
Hotel George V 
75008 Paris 
3:00 pm - 6:00 pm 

For additional information, 
please contact Mx. Thierry Courtaigne 
at Club Europe Argentina 
31 t Avenue Pierre ler de Serbie 
75784- Paris Cedex 16 
Tel: 40 69 44 32 
Fax: 40. 70 96 47 


PuzzItbyBobSaficfc 


W 'You're ihe — 
Care For’ 

— -and outs 
82 Sports scores, 
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63 Kind of mania 

84 Cave 


©«ew York Taneaf Edited by WM Shorts. 
Solution to Puzzle ol Oct. 13 


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OBSERVER 


T Maybe the Butler Did It 


1J £ 

isli. 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Many per- 
sons have begged me" to re- 
veal the secret of how to write a 
newspaper column, and I now 
do so gladly, for — 

Which brings us to Rule One: 
When a sentence threatens to 
get out of hand always cut it off, 
preferably with some unusual 
punctuation mark like a dash or 
something exciting like !!!! 

Today’s reader is too busy to 
read long sentences. 

Or long paragraphs either. 
So. 

Keep paragraphs — 

— short! 

Which brings us to Rule Two: 
Avoid cute attempts to satirize 
/ourself by creating new words 
ike “beightlf simply because 
you have written lisp words like 
“girth” and “depth.” 

Next: Before writing a col- 
umn select a subject. This com- 
plex process should begin first 
thing in the morning. Simply 
stare into the bathroom mirror 
and say, “Mirror, mirror, on the 
wall, can you give me any col- 
umn idea at all?" 

It won’t. Mirrors never do, no 
matter what you've read. So. on 
to the next step: Ask family 
members and office colleagues, 
“What would you like to read a 
nice column about?” 

Their feeble, unimaginative 
responses will give you fresh self- 
confidence that you alone, in all 
of humanity's multitudinous nu- 
merosity. are qualified to per- 
form tlus difficult task of dilat- 
ing on brilliant and fresh insights 
into the human predicament. 


collapse, Kennedys, Clintons, 
abortion, feminism, cigarette 
smoke, interest rates. Wall 


Street, sports corruption, the 
evils' 


evils of drugs, the 
he fail 


; of televi- 
sion, the failure of American 
education, dangerous driving 
on the New Jersey Turnpike 
and — !! 

The reasons for discarding 
these subjects were: 

Cl) Ignorance of subject so 
substantial as to be disgraceful; 

(2) Suspicion that readers are 
already too bored with subject to 
read beyond first paragraph: or, 

(3) Fear that other, shrewder, 
wittier, more brilliant colum- 
nists will also write about same 
subject today, subjecting me to 
humiliating comparison. 

Eighty-seven other subjects 
were discarded for one or all of 
the same reasons, and — 


The subject I finally decided 
to write about was: “Whose 
fault is it?” The idea was sim- 
plicity itself. Who is to blame 
for this terrible situation we 
read about and hear about and 
feel surrounded by every day? 


This is the question all Amer- 
ica wants answered: “Whose 


fault is it?" Quickly I began 
compiling a list. It was easy 
work. Everybody is constantly 
telling us whose fault it is. 

I wrote down “Rush Lim - 
baugh, liberals, Hillary Clinton. 
Bob Dole, Newt Gingrich, the 
Pope, Saddam Hussein, the Co- 
lombian drug cartels, the me- 
dia, Islamic fundamentalists. 


the Christian right. Speaker 


Thus heartened, sit at the 
typewriter or word processor 
and put the fundamental ques- 
tion silently to yourself: “What 
do I want to write a nice column 
about?" 

We begin by deciding whai 
subjects NOT to write about 
Today for instance, I decided 
not to write about the latest sex 
study. O. J. Simpson, Congress' 


Tom Foley, Hollywood, the En- 
ola Gay — ” 

Then, stopped. A column has 
to express an opinion. Yet I 
wasn't sure it was the fault of 
any of these people, places or 
things. Come to think of it in 
the fault department I am sure 
of only one thing . The baseball 
strike is the owners' fault 

At this stage the trick is to 
start another column. 


iVew York Times Service 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1994 




Percy Sledge: A Morality Tale and a 28 - Year Roll 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — A member of some grunge band 
said that he was amazed how far you can 
get in the grunge business just by showing up 
on time. And it is a well-known show-biz axiom 
that if you play your cards right one hit song 
can be enough for a lifetime. It was “Flamingo” 
for Herb Jeffries, Tony Bennett is still riding “I 
Left My Heart in Sah Francisco.” and Percy 
Sledge has “When a Man Loves a Wo man " 
Sledge is reliable, friendly and good at what 
he does and he played his cards right Son of. 
The moral of this stoiy is that morality can pay 
Off. It is also that Old cliche in action — the 
glass is half full not half empty. As a matter of 
fact overflowing it is if you think it is. 

In 1966, he was a 26-year-old male nurse 
employed in what is now the Helen Keller 
Memorial hospital in Tuscum- 
bia, Alabama. On weekends 
he sang Beatles and Otis 
Redding numbers with a band 
called The Esquires, which 
toured the Deep South for SI 8 
a night (they paid their own 
gas). 

“When a Man . . was 

cut the first time Sledge was in 

a recording studio, in Muscle 
Shoals, a sleepy town lost in the middle of 
nowhere in Alabama. Sledge’s producer Quin 
Ivy shipped a test pressing to the Atlantic 
Records office of Jerry Wexler in New York. 
As a reporter for BQlboard magazine. Wexler 
named the down-home style be would later be 
instrumental in building “rhy thm and blues." 
(He has apologized for not having thought up 
something better.) He listened to the acetate of 
a singer he had never heard of and immediately 
called bis partner Ahmet Ertegun, who was in 
Turkey. “Ahmet," he said, “a fantastic master 
just flew in over the transom. Our billing for the 
whole summer is in the bag." 

For Sledge it turned out to be the beginning 
of a 28-year roll (he’s 54 and it’s still rolling). 
According to his Virgin Records bio, “ ‘When a 
Man ... * went to number one on all the 
charts of the world, without exception." He 
calls it “my meal ticket and my passport to gigs 
all over the world.” The hit launched him into 
the R & B big leagues along with Wilson Pick- 
ett, Sam Cooke and Solomon Burke. 

“When a Man . . was on the sound tracks 
of “Platoon,” “The Blues Brothers" and “The 
Commitments,” a movie about an Irish trum- 
peter who is given a mission by God to bring 
rhythm and blues to Dublin. He rounds up an 


The pianist, also the oreanist in a local church, 
confesses to the priest mat he has been playing 
“the devil's music,” citing “When a Man Loves 
a Woman” as an example. Hoping for a shot of 
redemption, the kid cannot believe his ears. 
“Not Marvin Gaye,” the priest whispers from 
the other side of the confessional. "Percy 
Sledge, my sop.” The picture was a big hit. 
(Sledge has not seen it.) The inside joke kept 
the legendary name in' the air. 


‘When a Mao* . / 
became hi s passport 
to gigs all over the 
world. 


In 1992, the blue-eyed soul singer Michael 
Bolton sold something like four million copies 
covering “When a Man ...” He forgot to 
thank Sledge in the course of accepting a 
Grammy for it. And, in his liner notes, Wexler 
writes, “Percy was somehow left out when the 
residues of ownership were being spooned 
out.” Why is this man smiling? 

His whole face disappears into his smile, 

which remains as he tells of 

fortune lost. Sledge said he 
gave composer royalties to 
two of The Esquires, because 
“without their two chords, the 
song would never have exist- 
ed. We wrote it together. I was 
making so much money gig- 
ging and I had the performing 

rights coming in. Quin Ivy 

kept the composer's royalties 
in escrow, there must have been a couple hun- 
dred thousand dollars in there. Finally I told 
him to just give it to them. 1 didn't know squat 
about business thin gs. I guess I should nave 
listened to Quin. He warned me: ‘Percy, you're 
giving away a fortune.’ I jusi thought it was the 
right thing to do." 

Jerry Wexler calls Philippe Le Bras “a funky 
Frenchman with an intractable case of the 
Boogie Disease.” Sledge’s new album “Blue 
Night” is being released in Western Europe this 


unlikely assortment of dreamers and losers. 


rope tws 

month on Le Bras’s Virgin sub-label Sky Ranch 
Records. Coming from a culture that uses ratio- 
nality and an overdose of meetings to delay the 
decision-making process. Le Bras’s “let’s do it” 
philosophy is exceptional. 

In 1992, when Sledge heard Le Bras’s tape 
demonstrating a rich choice of old and new soul 
songs, he knew right away that “this was the 
next project for Percy Sledge." Over the years 
he had been offered plenty of them, but he 
could not find a body of' material he liked 
enough to commit on. He’s a performer and a 
crooner of ballads (“I don’t uy to work as hard 
as James Brown any more”), not really a song- 
writer. Choosing material is not his thing. He 
had depended on Ivy and Wexler (“they’re 
family") to pick material. After they retired he 
was a bit lost. In the album notes, Wexler calls 



*‘I didn't know squat about business things. I just thought it was the right thing to 


"Blue Night” Sledge’s “first really new album 
since the 1970s; yet another glaring example of 
the music business’s endemic myopia.” 

Sledge thinks “Percy," an album he cut in the 
interim that was never released because the 
backers went bankrupt, would have been a 
“monster hit.” As it was, copies somehow leaked 
into the Republic of South Africa. It was a big 
hit down there, he was invited to tour. Asked 
about the cultural blockade in force at the time, 
he said: “I didn’t like what was going on down 
there but, hey man, I sing songs for people not 
politicians.” He put together a racially integrated 
local band (“sort of like Ftiul Simon did later, 
they sure got good musicians down there”). 

A two- week contract stretched into four 
months. He toured Swaziland, Lesotho, Zimba- 


bwe (then Rhodesia), Mozambique and I 
He says “that experience still rings in my 
There was a lot of love and no trouble. ” 
and whites came together over me.” ' 

In retrospect, Sledge finds that even 
spells in his career were not exactly ‘ 
stayed busy on a circuit • 
ana theaters in sou than Africa (he 
three times), northern Europe (big in 
and South America (not much in the Unit __ 
States). He earned enough to buy a comfortable 
home in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and ha&the 
space to find time to spend with his 12 children 
and nine grandchildren: “I always try to take 
summers off to be -with the kids when they arc 
out of school. I've always been a family man and 
I guess you could say I’m still a country boy.” 




rrv 


Wm 


■-« a -let 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


r«tw 




High 

Lorn 

W 

High 

Low 

w 


C/F 

CIV 


C/F 

C/F 


Algarac 

23/73 

17tC 

07 

M-71 

17-E2 

an 

Amarefcani 

17S2 

1253 

5 

14 57 

11.52 

«1 

Ankara 

16 64 

6.43 

w> 

2271 

9-40 



23 73 

1661 


23.73 

17/B2 


Ba-cctoM 

23/73 

14 57 


3J/73 

16.61 


Be/goae 

30 66 

r .44 

1 

22.71 

I0>50 


Berfci 

17.62 

7 44 


1S.61 

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Bri owls 

vies 

12-53 

4 

I7.« 

11-32 

ih 

Buttasesi 

19/66 

B'4£. 

s 

21.70 

9.40 


Cooenlwoen 

1569 

7 44 


14. -57 

7/44 


Ccira Dfci Sor 

23/73 

1864 


23.73 

17.53 


DuCIrtl 

lfi-61 

9/48 


1457 

B-4f. 


ftWiCuigti 

14/57 

11/52 


13.55 

0.-JS 


Fliyenoe 

24.79 

1050 


2' 7a 

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Frar*tud 

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9.48 

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19-M 

9 48 

s 

1752 

3/40 


heiMiy 

9. 48 

6'43 


B.-4S 

2/35 


Kranbui 

22-71 

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LasPa/mas 

27. B0 

20 68 

s 

26-79 

21-70 DC 

Luton 

2170 

1762 

sn 

2170 

19/61 


London 

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11.62 

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17/68 

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Macofl 

24 75 

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2fl«0 

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MSan 

2271 

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12.-53 

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1 

17-62 

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NW 

2373 

11-52 


22-71 

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OHO 

12.43 

f43 


10S0 

1-34 


PaVna 

22.71 

1661 


22-71 

17.52 


Pario 

22.71 

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DC 

17/62 

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ah 

Prajpa 

17.62 

8/46 

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17-« 

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Reyi^vili 

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19/66 

1253 


1066 

1355 


Syanay 

27B0 

14.-57 

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2852 

16-ei 

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t for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


Asia 



Today 



Mgh 

Low 

W 

Mgh 

Low 

W 


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Of 


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Of 


Ban)WK 

3259 

2jm k 

11 TO 

24 <75 ah 

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t*ut} Kan} 

31/M 

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DC 

2954 

23/73 

511 

War. La 

31/00 

24/75 

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30« 

24 75 

Sri 

NnwCeWi 

MW 

17 52 

1 

31 08 

16*1 

s 

Sf-H/J 

2J/73 

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2271 

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Shanghai 

22-71 

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23-73 

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Sh 


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27.80 

21 70 

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27 -BO 

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28.82 

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27 80 

22.71 

ih 


I T is becoming a season of honors for 
Pete Seeger. The folk musician was one 
of nine arts figures named by the White 
House to receive the 1994 National Medal 
of Arts, the highest official U.S. accolade 
for an artist. A few weeks ago Seeger was 
saluted at the Kennedy Center Honors. 




Also named by the president for the arts 
j: the 


. 

Jetstream 


North America 

Th« Northeast and Midwest 
will have dry. pleasant 
weather ths weekend. Warm 
weather will extend north- 
ward horn New Orleans and 
Nashville Ih rough Indmnapo- 
lis. The remnants of Hum« 
cane Rosa will bung scat- 
tered heavy downpours to 
the centra] Plains over the 
weekend. 


Europe 

London through Pam will be 
dry and pleasant Saturday. 
Cooler weather will arrive 
Sunday and continue into 
Monday. Wintry cold will 
invade Scandinavia this 
weekend. Snow flumes will 
fly from Stockholm lo 
Moscow Sunday into Mon- 
day. Athens to Rome wil be 
sunny and pleasant. 


Asia 

Japan wifl have manly dry. 
seasonaPly warm woather 
this weekend Hong Kong 
through Manila wifi also have 
warm weather this weekend 
with no more than a passing 
shower. Cooler weather may 
reach Hong Kong Monday 
Chilly air from Sibena will 


Africa 

Akpen 

23/73 

I8«4 

DC 

23/73 

10.64 


CJW Tom 

27/FiO 

14/57 

s 

27 BO 

•3/55 


Casataancj 

24.75 

16/61 

DC 

23/73 

16/61 

an 

Haranr 

I9W 

8 /«v 

DC 

23 73 

9-40 


Lagtn 

29/84 

22/71 


29*4 

24/75 


Mairota 

21-70 

10/50 

PC 

24.76 

I2'S3 


T^aa 

2679 

13/56 

s 

22/71 

15/59 

Ml 

North America 


medal were: the singer and activist Hany 
Belafonte, the dancer Gene Kelly, the jazz 
musician Dave Bnibeck, actress Julie Har- 
ris, choreographer Erick Hawkins, contral- 
to Celia Cruz, painter Wayne Thiebaud 
and poet Richard Wilbur. 


□ 


reach Boning Saturday and 
bysu 


Seoul by Sunday. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Berne 

C«*o 

Damascus 

Janjsalam 

Linar 

Rryaan 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
27/flO 22' 7i 
28/82 20/68 
24/76 1407 
2475 1B*4 
35-JS 22/71 
34 1C 21/70 


Tomorrow 
High Low W 
OF OF 
2700 21/70 3 
29/84 17/62 • 
24/75 12/53 a 
2577 1601 1 
36/1021702 a 
37/M 22/71 a 


Today Tomorrow 

High Law W High Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

BiMPOtAuw 26/79 1407 t 27/80 10/61 a 

CarKM 2802 2006 kh 29/84 21/70 pc 

Uma 21/70 1702 pc 1006 16/61 pa 

MesGOCny £2/71 1203 pc 22/71 11/62 pc 

HJcdOjOnWra 3208 12(56 1 26/79 1906 pc 

Saratoga 26/82 11/52 pc 21/70 5*1 pc 

Unarm; wumy. pc-portty doudy. odoudy. Bh-snowan, Mhundoirorms. r-ndn. shanow flunlea. 
svenow. hce. W-Woadw AH maps, forecasts and data provided by Accu-Wootfiar, Inc. £ 1994 


A/'cf’oiaje 

Alton* 

Boston 

Ooqo 

Denver 

Detro* 

Honolulu 

MOu®*i 

Los Angelas 

Miami 

Mtnmapoas 

MOnOWN 

Nassau 

New Tom 

Phoanm 

San Fran 

Serna 

Toronto 

Wastonpon 


307 
1B«4 
18*4 
1604 
1601 
1906 
3006 
27.80 
23/73 
3209 
1604 
1305 
3108 
1906 
2602 
1906 
1609 
1609 
19 <68 


■6/22 

1202 

7/44 

10/50 

307 

9/48 

23.73 

13/55 

14/57 

2271 

11/52 

4/39 

23/73 

11/62 

16/81 

12/53 

7/44 

6/43 

1103 


I 6.43 

an 21170 
pc isoi 
PC 18*4 
C 1702 
C 1906 
pc 3006 
PC 2602 
PC 24/75 
PC 28/64 
• 17*2 
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pc 3108 

PC 1904 
■ 31.86 
9 22/71 
Sll 1407 
C 14/57 
C 1804 


-4/25 pc 
1203 PC 
7'44 S 
10/50 pc 

1/34 5/1 
8/46 PC 
23/73 pc 
16/61 pc 
13/55 pc 
22/71 pc 
9/48 DC 

2/35 pc 
22/71 pc 

7/44 pc 

1601 pe 
1203 pc 
7/44 pc 
2/35 pc 
0/46 pc 


The Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey has been 
released from a Los Angeles hospital after 
an operation. Frey, 45, underwent surgery 
on Oct. 6 to relieve pain in an inflamed 
colon, which forced the Eagles to postpone 
their first concert tour in 14 years. 



she has no claims pending in Martin Coun- 
ty, where the two once shared a home. 

□ 


Lawyers for Loo! Anderson have asked 


Burt Reynolds 


Renter* 


for a ^protective order for her, saying that 


Bint Reynolds wants to take her deposition 
in Florida “soldy to harass” hex. Reynolds's 
attorneys scheduled a deposition for Ander- 
son in West Palm Beach on Monday on her 


motions to recover SI 1,000 in alimony and 
$37,000 in personal properly from hex ex- 
husband. But Anderson, who now lives in 
California, withdrew the motions last week 
and says the deposition is pointless, because 


Prosecutors in New York arc trying to 
freeze the assets of a man they say stole 
more than $3 million from Peter Falk* 90- 
year-old mother, Madeline. They accuse 
Alfonso P. Cacace of stealing money, 
bonds, jewelry and furniture from her. In 
April 1992, Falk put his mother in a nursing 
home near his home in California because 
of her failing health, and three months later, 
without the actor’s knowledge, Cacace ar- 
ranged to have Mrs. Falk discharged and 
returned to New York, the district attor- 
ney’s office said. Cacace’s lawyer said the 
allegations were “motivated by resentment” 
because Cacace “cared for Mrs. Falk in the 
absence of her family members.” 

O 

Robert Bedford has dropped out of the 
much-hyped movie “An American Presi- 
dent," about a widowed American presi- 
dent who finds his moral compass through 
the woman he loves. A Redford spokesman 
told The Washington Post that, when Rob 
Reiner was brought in as director, he took 
the script “in a more political direction, and 
Bob saw it as a romantic comedy.” 


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Service lets you quickly place calls 
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ASIA /pacific 

AUSTRALIA 1800-881-011 


CHINA. PRC*** 
HONG KONG 
INOIA* 
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JAPAN’, 

KOREA 

UiCAO 

MALAYSIA' 


10811 

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IHH-117 

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PHILIPPINES' 

RUSSIA ’’(MOSCOW) 
SAIPAN* 


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BE10IUM' .0-HMM-10 

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CROATIA'* 88-38-0011 

CZECH REPUBLIC . 00-420-00181 


ARMENIA- ' 


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1-800-550-800 
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NORWAY. 

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MIDDLE EAST 

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EGYPT- (CAIRO]- . .510-8208 

ISHAQ. 17H0B-2727 

KUWAIT BOO-288 

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CANAOA 

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