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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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p& Message to Iraq: 
Move Troops or Else 

Gttjfetopher Sees Sanctions in Place 
Al Long as Saddam Stays in Power 


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• ■ 

- : By Paul F. Horvitz 

. . ’z ffuematinnaf Herald Tribune 
WASHjN GTON — Maintaining a 
hardline bgainst Iraq, Secretary of State 
WarrcaM- Christopher said Sunday that 
inrernafiogal sanctions against Baghdad 
prob^tfy would not be lifted while Sad- 

' darn ffnsaein re mains in power. 

Another^ senior U.S. official declared 
that lraq had only a matter of days to 
withdraw ijs elite forces from southern 

t . 

.^ra^a'BiQ CKnton, reacting to a 
ne^jSecurity Council resolution voted 
la& Saturday, restated a message he has 
ddira^l dafly for tie past week: “Iraq 
must -complete its withdrawal It must 
threaten its neighbors in the future. 
lUgnst comply with all relevant Security 
Coanril resolutions.” 

Ste rhetorical pressure came shortly 
after the Security Council unanimously 
dejafcndcd that Iraqi forces recently de- 
ployed near the Kuwaiti border return to 


thee' original positions and stay out of 
southern Iraq. It also demanded that 
Iraq- not use its military in a hostile or 
provocative manner and warned of “seri- 
ous 1 consequences” if Iraq did not com- 
pty: 

- The U.S. representative to the United 
Nations, Madeleine K. Albright, bluntly 
warned Iraq following the Security 
Council action, saying that despite reser- 
vations expressed by France and Russia, 
the United States intended to vigorously 
enforce the latest demand, by military 
means if necessary. 

But she also declared herself “mildly 
optimistic” that Iraq would complete its 
troop pullback. Mr. Clinton ordered a 
huge American baddup m the Gulf after 
lUiS... intelligence found that roughly 
70,000 Iraqi troops, including some of 
Baghdad’s finest tunic divisions, had 
moved dose to Kuwait: ~ 

The primary effect of the UN resolu- 
tion is td bar bom southern Iraq some of 
Mr. Saddam’s best-trained ami best- 
equipped troops, the Republican Guard, 


while permitting the regime to keep regu- 
lar army forces garrisoned in the south. 
Two elite guard brigades remain in the 
south, near Nasariyah, but appear to be 
preparing to move north to their bar- 
racks, U.S. officials said Sunday. 

Originally, U.S. officials supported a 
plan to bar all Iraqi troops from below 
the 32d parallel, but they relented after 
France withheld support. A later effort 
to require Iraq to give two weeks’ notice 
of any troop movements was dropped 
after France, Russia and China objected. 

Although some Security Council 
members, notably Russia, openly ques- 
tioned on Saturday whether the United 

Iraq takes notes of a Security Council reso- 
lution on Kuwait, but doesn’t reply. Page 5. 

States had the legal authority to strike 
irxHrte Iraq, U.S. officials maintain that 
such authority is embodied in UN reso- 
lutions passed after the Gulf War. 

Mr. Christopher gave his most explidt 
assessment to date of the possibility that 
Mr. Saddam could win a lifting of the 
UN-imposed ban on oil sales. Iraq is 
desperate to resume a3 sales to pump life 
into its moribund economy. 

“Our goal is to have him comply with 
all UN resolutions — all of them,” Mr. 
Christopher said in a televised interview. 

U.S. officials, quoting UN resolutions, 
have repeatedly said that Baghdad must 
cease hostile acts; allow UN inspections 
of its arms industry; permit the destnic- 


account for missing and imprisoned Ku- 
waitis; halt repression against Shiites 
and Kurds, and formally recognize Ku- 
wait 

“We don’t see any occasion for easing 
up on sanctions,” the secretary of state 
added. “Indeed, just the opposite.” 

Mrs. Albright said on television on 
Sunday that no deadline had been set for 
Sec IRAQ, Page 4 


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Mad Reopeus Gaza Border 
And Plans to Resume Talks 


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By Barton. Gellman 

Washbtgo* Pest Service 

JERUSALEM -r-Inwl decided on Sun- 
day to reopen^Knder with the Gaza 
Snip and resume 1 self-rule negotiations 
with PalestiniariTeadcrs, 

Prime Mhtister Itzhak Rabin shut the 
border and su^iended peace talks last 
week as part of a pressure campaign to 
force tiie Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat, 
tO c nfiffr nnt T«T«mie tniKumta responsible 
far the kidnapping of Corporal Nachshon 
,Waxman, a stmfier with aual Israeli and 
Am e ri c an dtaqaihip. 

> Corporal ^axman died on Friday night, 
V§»ig witii 'one <rf his would-be Tescuers 
Md tlfiee Palestinian kidnappers, in a 
filled raid against the hideout where he 
iwashdd. 

• But Israeli officials acknowledged 
grudgingly that Mr. Arafat’s self-rule gov- 
ernment-had mndg vigorous efforts tO.find 
Corporal Waxman and to crack down on 
‘.the group that sponsored his capture, the 
■Islamic Resistance Movement, or Hamas. 

I Gaza remained tense on Sunday, with 
Hamas and Mr. Arafat’s nascent Palestin- 
ian Authority in open confrontation after 
months of delicate efforts to coexist The 
i undapcplalisti of Hamas oppose the lim- 
ited self-rule a greem en t with Israel, insist- 
ing that-'aBof Israel and its occupied terri- 
^c^musfDe ruled by Palestinians. 


arent, 


By Andrew Pollack 

1 v Hew York Times Service 

* TOKYO — Kim Joi» D appeared in 
‘public on &mday tor me fixst time in 
nearly three months, partly allaying suspi- 
cions thafheis ill and raising expec t a t ions 
that he will soon complete the. process of 
— - ^ — 1J - i the leader 


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bf Ncoth'Korea. 

• The rechiSiVcMr. Kim appeared Sunday 
[afternoon in Pyongyang, the North Kore- 
an capitalist a ceremony to mark the end 
of- the KKWay mourning period for his 
lafher, k^i n &ing, who died on July 8 of 
a heart attadc at the age of 82. 

V N orth^ orea^^ wed television inches 

a balcony overlooking a plaza 

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- Fronca;i_9;0aFF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

■ Gab*£CT#c£A Senegal .....960 CFA 

■ Greeoii^:;.30DDr. Spain ....m200PTAS 

[ ltalv~-££^6b0Lire Tunisia ....1.000 Din 
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• L^bpnoi^|=lS*l-50 y-S.MIL (Eur.)Sl.lO 

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filled with thousands of people. He stood 
nearly motionless and did not speak. 

Although Mr. Kim has been presumed 
to be North Korea’s new leader, he had not 
been seen publicly since the funeral for his 
father on July 20. Nor has be assumed two 

of^thenation and general secretary of the 
Communist Workers Party. 

Some North Korea watchers interpreted 
these signs as indicating that Mr. Knn, 52, 
was cither involved in a power struggle or 
was 01. More questions were raised when 
Mr. Kim failed to show up at a wreath- 
laying ceremony for his father on Sunday 
morning. 

But his appearance in the afternoon, 
looking somewhat healthier than he did in 
July, will allay some of that speculation 
and lend support to the alternative theory, 
that Mr. Kim was merely trying to show he 
was a dutiful son by observing the tradi- 
tional mourning period, 

“At least on the surface it seems there is 
no problem” with Mr. Kim’s succession, 
said Yu Suk Ryul, head of North Korean 
studies at South Korea’s Institute of For- 
eign Affairs and National Security. 

Some analysts now expect that Kim 
See KIM, Page 4 


Paris, Monday, October 17, 1994 


No. 34,"2| 


Kohl Coalition Survives Election 
But Faces Losses in Parliament 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times S en it r 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl's 
12-year-old government coalition suffered 
heavy losses in Germany’s national elec- 
tions on Sunday but held on to defeat the 
■ combined opposition oanowly, according 
to exit polls and computer projections. 

“We have won the second all-German 
election,” Mr. Kohl told cheering support- 
ers less than 90 minutes after the polls 
closed, predicting that the coalition would 
emerge with an S-to-10-seat majority in the 
Parliament 


Bui with 3.5 million people unem- 
ployed, including more than a million in 
Eastern Germany after the collapse of the 
communist economy there, and with total 
public indebtedness swollen to $1.3 trillion 
since reunification four years ago, Mr. 
Kohl paid the price for widespread disillu- 
sionment. (The Deutsche mark will be a 
major beneficiary of the election. Page 13.) 

Computer projections by Germany's 
two state television networks said he might 
end up with only four seats more titan the 
opposition parties, compared with a 134- 
seat advantage now. “That will be difficult,. 


but such is life,” the chancellor said, shrug- 
ging. 

Rudolf Scharping, his Social Democrat- 
ic challenger, conceded defeat this, time 
but promised to keep giving Mr. Kohi a 
hard time. 

“I am not sure whether the coalition will 
have a majority of one, two or three seals,” 
he said, “but it is still a coalition of losers." 

He vowed to win power for his party in 
the next elections, by 1998 at the latest. 

“It can’t be excluded that the coalition 
w0] have troubles in the course of the next 
legislative period,” he said. 


Hundreds of militant students rioted 
when Palestinian policemen stopped buses 
carrying them to what was planned as a 
second day of demonstrations at the Gaza 
City jail, where various reports say that 
200 to 500 Hamas supporters remain im- 
prisoned. 

Mr. Rabin and Foreign Minister Shi- 
mon Peres, meanwhile, flew to Amman on 
Sunday night for the second time in less 
than a week to meet with King Hussein of 
Jordan. Israeli officials said agreement was 
very near on a peace treaty between the 
two countries. 

Palestinian policemen loyal to Mr. Ara- 
fat prevented a repetition of demonstra- 
tions on Saturday night, in which thou- 
sands of Hamas supporters tried to storm 
the Gaza City jafl. The police intercepted 
about 20 buses and declared Gaza City's 
mail boulevard, Omar Mukhtar Street, a 
closed military area. 

The students from Islamic University, a 
Hamas stronghold in Gaza, responded by 
blocking Gaza’s main north-south road 
and throwing stones at an Israeli military 
checkpoint The Israeli soldiers withdrew 
to Gaza’s remaining Jewish settlement 
Netzarim, where they remained bottled up 
for some time. 

Palestinian policemen said many of the 
arrested Hamas supporters would be freed 

See ISRAEL, Page 4 






*- 



t 



Micfcari Utfcafl/Rcmen 

Mr. Kohl waving to his Christian Democratic supporters Sunday after claiming victory in Germany’s federal elections. 

Aristide’s Daunting Task: Healing Haiti 

By Larry Rohter rupted and riven by the ordeal of the last know that he will take care of us. No more 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Times Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — The na- 
tional treasury is empty. More than 3,000 
people; many of whom were counted on to 
help run the country, are dead, the victims 
of state-sponsored violence. Schools, 
roads, hospitals, electricity and other ser- 
vices have collapsed, and at least half the 
work force is idle. 

Against all odds, the Reverend Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide has been restored to his 
rightful place as the legitimate, popularly 
elected president of Haiti. But he returned 
Saturday to a country exhausted, bank- 


three years, and he now faces a daunting 
challenge: how to live up to the people’s 

NEWSANALYSB 

expectations that be bringabout an imme- 
diate improvement in every aspect of their 
lives. 

“Only Aristide can take us out of the 
dark ages," said Gilles Lous saint, 27. a 


shop clerk who was part of the elated 
multitude that gathered in front of the 
National Palace to great Father Aristide. 
“Now that our father is coming home, I 


fear, no more beatings, no more hunger, no 
more ignorance.” 

Father Aristide has actively encouraged 
those aspirations, promising in the many 
radio addresses he has made to the Haitian 
people in recent months to create thou- 
sands of jobs and invest heavily in social 
services like schools and hospitals once he 
returned. 

But the grim reality, one American offi- 
cial here said, is that three years of corrupt 
and inept military rule and months of 

See HAITI, Page 4 


Projections from early results on Ger- 
many’s ZDF and ARD television networks 
gave Mr. Kohl and his Christian Demo- 
cratic alliance and their Free Democratic 
coalition partners a combined 48 to 49 
percent of the vote, down from the 54.S 
percent they won in the first elections after 
unification in 1990. 

Mr. Scharping. the old former state gov- 
emor of Rhincland-Palatinute, led the So- 
cial Democrats to nearly 37 percent of the 
vote, according to the projections, which 
also indicated that the Greens had won 
close to 7 percent. 

The Social Democrats’ result was better 
than the 33 J percent they won in 1990, but 
not enough for them to form u government 
with the Greens unless deputies from the 
former Communist Party in Eastern Ger- 
many support Mr. Schaiping. Mr. Scharp- 
ing repeated Sunday that he would not 
accept the former Communists’ help to 
become chancellor. 

That left Mr. Kohl still in charge, but 
with a razor- thin edge in the lower house of 
Parliament, while the upper house re- 
mains, as before, controllca by the Social 
Democrats. 

He will also be a lame duck if he holds to 
his pledge not to run again in 1998. The 
main reason he ran again this time, he said, 
was to continue the work of advancing 
European unity. 

His re-election was welcomed Sunday 
night by the European Union’s commis- 
sioner for foreign affairs. Hans van den 
Broek. 

But domestically, the election was hard- 

See GERMANY, Page 4 


Finns Approve 
Joining the EU, 
57% to 43% 


Compiled hr Our Staff From Dtspd uhes 

HELSINKI — Finland voted, 57 per- 
cent to 43 percent, to join the European 
Union in a referendum on Sunday, accord- 
ing to the final result. 

Voter turnout was put at 74.2 percent 
shortly after ihe polls closed, significantly 
lower than the 85 percent that had been 
predicted by experts. 

National security, independence and the 
economy had been the focus of the debate 
over EU membership among the elector- 
ate. Finland is scheduled to become a full 
member of the European Union on Jan. 1. 

“A clear majority wants our counuy to 
join the European Union," President 
Martti Ahtisaari declared in a nationally 
broadcast speech. 

Prime Minister Esko Aho said. “It’s 
dear that the people are supporting the 
government's policy." 

The referendum was the first of three 
Nordic ballots that could enlarge the 
Union by millions of people. 

The referendum was nonbinding, and 
the Parliament now must make a final 
decision. Most of the 200 legislators have 
said they will respect the referendum out- 
come. 

Voters in Sweden will vote on EU mem- 
bership on Nov. 13, and Norwegians are to 
cast ballots in a referendum on Nov, 28. 

“I would like to congratulate Finland on 
a clear result,” said Prune Minister Ingvar 
Carlsson of Sweden. “1 would also like to 
congratulate Europe; this is a step forward 
for European cooperation." 

Mr. Carlsson's predecessor, Carl Bildt. 
who was instrumental in hammering out 
the membership plans and referendums 
during his term that ended last month, said 
the Finnish vote “will have a great impact 
on the Swedish referendum." 

“This is a way for us to strengthen Nor- 
dic cooperation and the Nordic influence 
in Europe ," Mr. Bildt said. “I believe in a 
renaissance for Nordic cooperation within 
the framework of the European Union.” 

In Norway, Prime Minister Gro Har- 

See FINLAND, Page 2 




Kiosk 

Chechnya Repels 
Attack on City 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — Dzhokar 
Dudayev, leader of Russia’s rebel 
Chechnya region, appeared to be still 
in control of most of the mountainous 
southern republic on Sunday after re- 
pelling an attack by opposition forces. 

Russia's NTV independent channel 
said the Moscow-badced opposition 
forces had withdrawn from around 
the ethnic republic’s capital, Grozny, 
after taking parts of the city during 
the assault. Mr. Dudayev appeared on 
local television on Sunday to an- 
nounce the attack had been repulsed, 
Itar-Tass news agency said. 

Mr. Dudayev, a thorn in the Krem- 
lin’s side since he declared indepen- 
dence three years ago, said the govern- 
ment had enough forces to crush any 
attack on the city and blamed Mos- 
cow for the fighting. 

Bridge * ^*8* ^ 

Books 5 - 


Creme de la Creme: The Verdict Is In 


By Patricia Wells 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — One year ago, I accepted an 
audacious and d Hi|r> bng assignment: 
Travel the globe and select the top 10 
restaurants in the world. Then, as an 
added challenge, I was asked to compile 
a second list, of the top 10 casual restau- 
rants. 

How could one comb through such a 
range of cuisines, wines, languages, time 


on Page 10. 

zones and customs and come up with 
authoritative lists? But only a fool would 
have said no to such a once-in-a-lifetirae 
assignment. 

At the outset, my biggest fear was: 
“How would I know?” Meaning, when 
faced with any cuisine — familiar or 
unfamili ar — how would 1 be sure that 
this was the finest in the land? I needn't 
have worried. When the big one comes 


along, the earth moves. It’s that clear and 
simple. 

When I dine, I filter out everything 
about the restaurant that's not food: its 
reputation, my preconceived notions or 
previous experiences, other people’s 
opinions, even the service and the room 
in which I dine. 1 focus only on the look, 
the aroma, the taste, the texture of the 
food. The restaurant wins or loses based 
on my physical and emotional response, 
my ultimate pleasure or displeasure. 
Only later do I factor in the nonfood 
portion of the experience: 

So when I sampled JoSl Robuchon’s 
explosive macaroni gratia in Paris, Frcdy 
Girardet’s incomparable duck bathed in 
goose fat and lime juice in Switzerland. 
Cheung Kam Chuen’s deep-fried scal- 
lops with fresh pears in Hong Kong, Jiro 
Ono’s lush red tuna sushi in Tokyo, and 
Mara Martin’s landmark cuttlefish risot- 
to in Venice, the earth really did move. 
And 1 knew that 1 was no longer compar- 
ing cuisines, like apples and oranges, 1 

See MEALS, Page 4 




The 10 Best Restaurants 
In the World 


1 JoS Robuction, Pans. 

2 Restaurant Fredy Girard et, 

Crissiar, Switzerland. 

aui Chfng Heen, Hong Kong. 

4 L» Louis XV-Afain Ducssse, 

• Monte Carlo. 

5 Ostwfa da Flora, Venice. 

6 Jiro, Tokyo. 

7 Guy Savoy, Paris. 

8 TaBteyent, Paris. 

8 Restaurant Daniel, New York. 

fOOaCasare, 

Atbaretto delta Torre, Italy, 








Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


Q & A: Dim View of Russia’s Economic Reform Efforts 


After the ruble's weak performance 
on currency exchanges last week, Rus- 
sia’s acting finance minister and Us 
central bank chief lost their jobs. A 
leading candidate to fill one of those 
pasts is Boris G. Fyodorov , who re- 
sisted as finance minister in January. 
He spoke with Erik Ipsen of the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune in London. 

Q. What sort of conditions would 
the government have to meet to per- 
suade you to return? 

A . My terms would be the same 
ones that 1 had in January. Among 
other things, that means th a t certain 
people would have to go and that the 
president should never ask us to 
spend money that is not in the bud- 
get 

Q. Many currency experts say the 
battering of the ruble in recent weeks 
reflects the market’s sudden skepti- 
cism about the course of Russia’s 


economic reform. Are such doubts 
well placed? 

A I have bad lots of talks with 
bankers. When they see that for 10 
months nothing really is being done, 
they react The government, for in- 
stance, said that it would decontrol 
oil and gas prices but it has not been 
done. Export customs duties, which 
limit our own exports, are stupid but 
they are still there. And on the spend- 
ing side, nothing is controlled. On the 
one hand, those who should be get- 
ting something are not getting it — 
areas like health care and education 
— and those who should not be get- 
ting money are getting it. 

Q. Who is that latter camp? 

A Let us say, for instance, that the 
president goes for a trip on the Volga 
River. Several regional leaders typi- 
cally come to him with papers that 
say such and such enterprise is in 
very bad shape, give us money. The 
president then writes to the finance 
minister and says, “Within three 
days give this and this enterprise this 


amount of money." The finance min- 
ister fights like hell, but if. the person 
who made the appeal has the right 
connections there is nothing the fi- 
nance minister can do. 

The biggest problem is that no one 
considers the budget a law. They 
spend money that is not in the bud- 
get They think that bring in govern- 
ment they can spend any amount and 
print any amount of money they 
wish. 

• 

Q. Does President Boris N. Yelt- 
sin's erratic performance in public of 
late contribute to a lack of confi- 
dence in the government? 

A Of course it is troubling. If you 
talk to 100 people in the street you 
will not meet a single person who is 
sympathetic until Yeltsin. It is an 
embarrassment to the whole country, 
ft is not so funny. 

Q. You have said that you do not 
have much hope in further reforms 
until after the next election, in 1996? 

A Personally I do not have much 


hope, but in Russia we believe in 
miracles. The country ana the people 
will not disappear. 

Q. Do you have any hope that 
Andrei Vavilov, the new acting fi- 
nance minister, will push for more 
reforms? , 

A. If he were committed to reform 
he would not have survived all these 
years that he has in the government. 
• 

Q. But the government can point 
to real progress on inflation and on 
privatizations, can it not? 

A. Unless inflation is less than 20 
percent per annum. I will never agree 
that this is huge progress. That is less 
than 20 percent per annum, not 4. 5. 
8 percent per month. Unless this is 
achieved, it is impossible to talk 
about stabilization. 

On privatizations, yes, the transfer 
of titles is growing by leaps and 
bounds. The problem is* that privati- 
zation so far has not led to real im- 
provements in efficiency or produc- 
tivity. If you have a state enterprise 


and you take the state away but the 
management stays the same, the bu- 
reaucracy' stays the same, and the 
productivity stays the same, you have 
not achieved much. 

These companies pay no divi- 
dends. They do not allow outsiders as 
shareholders. They do not show the 
share register to anyone. It isn’t pri- 
vatization. It is only one pan of the 
process. The second part is you kick 
out the bad management and you cut 
die work force and that has not hap- 
pened. The same thing needs to hap- 
pen with the government. Why is it 
there are more Communists tn the 
government than there are in the 
elected parliament? 

Q. Will the ruble's fall now add to 
that expected inflation? 

A It cannot be avoided. The falls 
we have seen in the currency in the 
last month have to translate to sever- 
al additional points of inflation. In- 
flation was 5 percent in August. 8 
percent is September, and it will now 
go back to double digits. 


Assertive Russian Steps at UN: U.S. Watches Warily 


By Steven Erl anger 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei V. Kozyrev will go 
to the United Nations on Mon- 
day with something more im- 
portant to Moscow than a pos- 
sible deal with President 
Saddam Hussein of Iraq. Mr. 
Kozyrev has the world’s atten- 
tion, ensuring once more, as in 
Bosnia, that Russia’s voice and 
views get the hearing Moscow 
thinks it deserves as a nuclear 
superpower. 

The Americans clearly do not 
like it very much, saying polite 
things to Mr. Kozyrev through 
clenched teeth and' trying to en- 
sure that Russia’s intervention 
does not get in the way of 
Washington’s policy. 

Part of the American difficul- 
ty is the desire not to offend 
President Boris N. Yeltsin, 
whose authority can seem shaky 
from time to time and whose 
main challenge comes from ex- 
treme nationalists eager to see 
slights to Holy Russia, with 
which they try to beat Mr. Yelt- 
sin over the head. 

U.S. officials understand that 
displays of independence from 
Washington do Mr. Yeltsin 
good, but they rarely pretend to 
like it 

In a s imilar way. the Bush 


administration tried to be polite 
as former President Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, already teetering, 
made last-minute efforts to 
avoid the 1991 Gulf War, the 
last time Moscow tried high- 
profile Mideast diplomacy. 

The difficulty for Washing- 
ton today is that in Iraq, as in 
Bosnia, the Russians do not 
really stand alone. Their posi- 
tion is not very far from that of 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

other Security Council mem- 
bers, in this case, France, China 
and to some degree, Britain, all 
of which want to restore eco- 
nomic, energy and trade ties to 
Iraq and to avoid an American 
attack on Iraqi forces. 

The United States has come 
to a grudging appreciation for 
Russian efforts m the former 
Yugoslavia, but Russian offi- 
cials say privately that Wash- 
ington regards the Iraq-Kuwaiti 
affair as an “American show," 
despite efforts at preserving a 
“United Nations umbrella." 

Saturday night provided a 
good example of the tensions. 
The Americans forced through 
a Security Council vote on a 
resolution demanding that Iraq 
pull its troops back from the 
Kuwaiti border and not threat- 


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INSTRUMENTS 


PROFESSIONALS 






en its neighbors again. The Rus- 
sians vainly asked for a delay, 
so that Mr. Kozyrev could re- 
port in person on his Middle 
East trip, but then voted for the 
resolution anyway. 

Russia has been calling for a 
relaxation of the UN embargo 
on Iraq for some time now, in 
part because cash-short Mos- 
cow is owed some $ 10 billion by 
Baghdad for equipment, arms 
and old loans. Moscow is also 
eager to be able to sell new oil- 
drilling equipment to Iraq, to 
help rebuild its bombed-out in- 
frastructure and to resupply 
Baghdad's mostly Soviet- 
equipped military. 

But Moscow’s commercial 
ambitions are shared by other 
countries, including France, 
Britain, China, Turkey, Japan 
and Germany, which was Iraq’s 
largest source of imports before 
sanctions were imposed in 
1990. 


In fact, as Mr. Saddam was 
sending troops to the Kuwaiti 
border, the Iraqi oil minister 
was in Moscow to discuss a po- 
tential $2.3 billion in contracts 
with Russia's two largest oil 
companies, Lukoil and Rosneft. 

There has been growing pres- 
sure. not only from Russia, to 
ease the embargo on Iraq. Rus- 
sian officials admit that differ- 
ences between Washington and 
its Western allies give Moscow 
more room for diplomacy. 

France, after all, has already 
offended Washington by sug- 
gesting that Washington’s mo- 
tives for a big troop buildup in 
Iraq might have somet hing to 
do with President Bill Clinton’s 
stature and forthco min g mid- 
term elections. The French also 
objected to a U.S. plan for an 
extended exclusion zone in 
southern Iraq. And the French 


agree with the Russians that 
Saturday night's resolution 
does not give the Americans 
leave to use force against Iraq, 
as the U.S. envoy. Madeleine K. 
Albright, asserted. 

Similarly, in the former Yu- 
goslavia, Russia's efforts to 
drag its putative allies and Slav- 
ic brothers, the Serbs, into some 
kind of Bosnian peace agree- 
ment found support from 
France and Britain, whose 
troops are on the ground with 
the LIN and would be the first 
to suffer in a renewed, full-scale 
conflict. 

.After much annoyance in 
Washington, the Clinton ad- 
ministration decided that on 
balance Moscow's intervention 
in the former Yugoslavia was 
beneficial, even crucial. The 
two countries have tried, with 
mixed success, to talk tough to 
the two sides but in tandem. 



UN Turns 
Again to 
The War 
In Bosnia 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — The United Nations 
Security Council will have to 
turn its attention to Bosnia this 
week after the deadline for the 
Bosnian Serbs to agree to a 
peace plan passed. 

The United States had vowed 
to react with a resolution that at 
least threatens to lift an arms 
embargo on the Muslim-led 
Bosnian Army if the plan was 
not accepted by Saturday. 

Last week. 50 U.S. senators 
representing both parties wrote 
to President Bill Clinton warn- 
ing that if the administration 
did not press the Security 
Council to terminate the arms 
embargo on a definite date. 
Congress would take up the is- 
sue again this year. 

Both houses have approved a 
clause in the 1995 Defense Au- 
thorization Act that requires 
(he president to act within 14 
days of OcL 15 if the Serbs do 
not accept the plan to partition 
Bosnia. 

A meeting to discuss the 
Serbs' continued defiance is ex- 
pected to take place this week 
among officials of the five na- 
tions steering peace talks- 

At the same time, talks will 
be held at the United Nations 
between the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and UN 
peacekeeping officials. 

Stung by UN restrictions 
limiting NATO support opera- 
tions in Bosnia to symbolic at- 
tacks that can leave the military 
looking ineffectual or foolish, 
NATO proposed three changes 
to the rules governing air strikes 
in an OcL 7 letter to Secretary- 
General Butros Butros Ghali 

NATO proposed that while it 
bad no quarrel with UN peace- 
keepers calling in NATO air 
strikes at a level proportionate 
to violations, it wanted a more 






Thorns Wilrcuim/Acrtict Frmcr-Preuc 

BIG STEP FOR DEINMARK — Prince Joachim entering the new tunnel under the 
Great Belt waterway, part of a traffic system that will link Copenhagen with mainlan d 
Europe by 1996. He inaugurated the 7.4-kiloroeter stretch over the weekend. 

Unions Plan New Anti- Berlusconi Protest 


The Associated Press 

ROME — Encouraged by a 
strong backlash to proposed - 
government budget cuts, union 
leaders are planning another 
nationwide strike and a huge 
rally outside Prime Minister Sil- 
vio Berlusconi’s office. 

The heads of Italy's three 


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largest unions predicted Satur- 
day that they could bring a mil- 
lion people to an anti-govern- 
ment march in Rome on Nov. 
19, the day scheduled for an 
eight-hour general strike. 

About 3 million people 
joined marches around the 
country during a strike on Fri- 
day. It was one of the most 
significant pretests against Mr. 
Berlusconi's economic policies, 
which call for cuts in pension 


/ust ask the butter.. 


and welfare benefits. The labor 
leaders also urged a one-hour 
strike on Oct 27. 

The cost-cutting effort has 
helped galvanize opposition to 
Mr. Berlusconi's coalition. 

Mr. Berlusconi, who was in 
Moscow during the strike and 
protests on Friday, promised 
not to back off from ms efforts 
to tackle Italy's $100 billion 
budget deficit. 


mgs of impending strikes and a 
choice of at least four targets. 

UN officials said they had 
problems with two of the pro- 
posed changes. 

The officials said Mr. Butros 
Ghali was opposed to increas- 
ing the number of possible tar- 
gets and to leaving the choice to 
NATO because this would put 
UN commanders on the ground 
in the dark about what would 
be hit and when. 

Mr. Boutros Ghali and the 
peacekeepers also reject the 
proposal to stop warning ag- 
gressors before strikes. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Greece’s Socialists Harshly Criticized 
For Irregularities in Local Elections 

ATHENS (Reuters) — Greece's ruling Socialists , were fiercely 
criticized Sunday after a chaotic round of nationwide local elec- ft 
tions in which scores of polling stations never opened. 

The justice and interior ministers offered to quit after a day of 
constant criticism of the Panhellenie Socialist Movement-led 
government from people interviewed outside empty polling sites. 
But Prime Minis ter Andreas Papandreou brushed aside uje offers. 
Many of the would-be votere, who face steep fines unless fey - 
cast ballots, said they arrived at polling stations only to trad them 
dosed or without officials and ballot boxes. 

Officials, citing unofficial figures, said about 150 polling s ta* ■ 
tions in Athens never opened, and that 130 opened only in fe 
final hours of voting. Athens has 1.400 polling centers. Seme 8J 
million voter s were to cast ballots for 434 mayors and local 
council members around Greece. 

Algeria Reporter and Executive Sain 

.ALGIERS (AP> — A state radio reporter was fatally shot, and 
the head of Algeria's sugar company was found slain Sunday as 
the cycle of violence between the government and Muslim funda- 
mentalist militants continued. fi 

Armed men attacked the journalist, Tayeb Boutelfis, 41, as i he 
was getting in his car outside his home in the southeast Algiers 
suburb of Baraki. said a communique by security forces. 

In Khemis-Miliana. 100 kilometers (60 miles) west of Algiers, 
the president of the national sugar monopoly, Mohammed MaddL 
44. was found slain, security forces said. He was kidnapped 
Saturday from his home in the same town, near the company’s 
headquarters. . 

Militant Tied to Mahfouz Plot Killed * 

CAIRO (AP) — Five suspected Islamic militants, including one 
who the police said was the mastermind of a plot to kill tine Nobel 
Prize- winning author Naguib Mahfouz, were killed in raids across 
Egypt. 

An Interior Minis try statement said Sunday that seven suspects 
were arrested in connection with the stabbing of Mr. Mahfouz on . 
Friday. It said the attack, which the writer survived, was part of a - 
c am paign by Muslim fundamentalists to destabilize Egypt. The 
police killed the suspected leader of the attack, Basem Moham- . 
med Khalil Shaheen. in a shoot-out late Saturday at a coffee shop 
in a Cairo suburb. 

Four other radical suspects were shot and killed the same night ■ 
in southern Egypt, police said. 

Balladur Decides Against Shake-Up 

PARIS (Reuters) — Jose Rossi, secretary-general ol France's 
center-right Republican Party, was appointed industry minister 
on Sunday, replacing G&ard Longuet, who resigned in a corrup- 1 
lion scandal on Friday, the president's office announced. 

The statement from President Francois Mitterrand’s office • 
made clear that Prime Minis ter Edouard Balladur had decided on . 
a straight replacement for Mr. Longuet rather than a broader 
cabinet shake-up. 

Mr. Rossi. 50, a popular lawyer and member of Parliament 
from the island of Corsica, received all Mr. Longuet’s portfolios, 
including postal services, i decommunications and foreign trade. 

He is from the same free-murket party as Mr. Longuet, maintain- • 
ing the cabinet's political balance. 

Khmer Rouge Unit Joins Army Side 

KAMPOT, Cambodia (AFP) — Military officials confirmed 
reports Sunday that a Khmer Rouge commander had defected . 
with about 100 men, who were now fighting former fellow ■ 
guerrillas holding three Western tourists hostage near here. 

Fighting broke out when guerrillas loyal to the Khmer Rou$ 
district commander. Paei, had attempted to stop the defectors, ted 
by another rebel leader, Rin. a government staff officer based 
said. 

“Rin said they must fight Pact, so now his men are fighting 
alongside our troops against General Pact near his Phnom Vour ' 
base," the officer said. 

Manila Leader Urges Renewed Talks 

MANILA (Reuters) — President Fidel V. Ramos urged exiled 
Filipino Communist leaders to resume collapsed peace talks with 
Manila, and hinted that he might open negotiations with other 
rebel factions without the exiles' participation. 

Mr. Ramos, in a statement released Sunday, expressed regret 
that the preliminary talks broke down in the Netherlands between • 
a government panel and the exiled leaders of the Communist-led 
National Democratic Front. 

TRAVEL UPDATE ~ 

Doctors in .Belgrade reported the first case of cholera in Yugo- 
slavia. The highly contagious intestinal ill ness recently has been 
noted in several European countries. (AP) 

hi Gmi^Bissau, cholera has killed 11 people and 13 others are : 
seriously ill in the Bijagos archipelago. (AFP) ■ 

Iran has the highest number of traffic accidents in the world even 


Minister Akbar Torkan said- He said there were 37,000 senous . 
accidents a year and about 120 accidents per 10,000 vehicles. 10 
times the average in other parts of the world. (AFP) ft 

This Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
curtailed in the following countries and their dependencies this 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Colombia. Haiti, Jamaica. Malawi. 

TUESDAY: Sri Lanlr^ , 

WEDNESDAY: Bunna. 

THURSDAY: Australia, Guatemala. Kenya. ! 

FRIDAY: Honduras. Somalia. 

SATURDAY: Somalia. Vatican Gty. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan. Reuters. 


FINLAND: 57% Approve Joining the European Union 

f Al lt i ialim d fmm 1 nr* .1 . ■ -w * m ■ ■ . m ■ 




S-I-N-C-A-P-O-P-E 


Continued from Page 3 

lem- Brand tl and said Finns 
were intent on securing their 
roots in Western Europe. 

“Many will say. Why 
shouldn't Norway go along 
with Finland and Sweden in 
Western Europe?” she said. 
M We have to think in terms like 
these.” 


With the Nordic nations and 
Austria, the European Union 
would grow to 16 members, to- 
taling 375 milli on people. 

After a long recession and 
decades in the Soviet shadow, 
Finland is hoping for stronger 
ties with Western Europe. 

Sharing a 1, 270-kilometer 
border with Russia, Finland 


fought two bitter wars against 
the Soviet Union to keep its 
independence. During the Cold 
War, the Finns subjected their 
foreign-policy decisions for 
Moscow's tacit approval, but 
the breakup of the Soviet Union 
gave them new freedom. ■ 

The main EU opponents 
were Finnish farmers. 

(Reuters, AFP, AP) 


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** 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


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Governor Pete Wilson of California and his challenger for the office. State Treasurer 
Kathleen Brown, preparing for a dehate. Immigration has become an issue in the race. 


Now, California Shuts Door 


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SAN FRANCISCO —Governor Pete Wil- 
son, cond emnin g the failure of federal immi- 
gration policy, is pushing the Clinton admin- 
istration to declare an “immigration 
emergency” and reimburse California for 
what he calls a “muIUbiUion-dollar problem.” 
Senator Dianne Femstem, a California Dem- 
ocrat who is running for re-election, is calling 
for a SI border toll to raise money for stron- 
ger border enforcement. 

But a close e xaminat ion of the record 
shows that policies promoted by Mr. Wilson 
when he was a UJ>. senator and Ms. Feinstein 
when she was mayor of San Francisco active- 
ly encouraged illegal Imm i gration into Cali- 
fornia, and as a result, hundreds of thousands 
of illegal immigrants came. 

Reflecting on California’s earlier policies, 
Leslie Goodman, the governor's deputy chief 
?7 of staff, ruefully acknowledged that “in some 
ways there have been self-inflicted wounds.” 

Ten years ago, the mood in California 
could not have been more different. “The 
attitude of the time,” said Alan C. Nelson, a 
Californian who was then commissioner of 
tion and naturalizati on, “was that 
immigration was OJL~ 

In fact, in 1984 and "1985, dry councils in 
Lc» t Angde^ San Francisco and many other 
dtjes^arounTOje stale and the country passed 
resolutions and ordinances dddaring their tit- 
les to be sanctuaries for Illegal immigrants 
from Central American countries that were 
regarded as centers of repression supported 
by the United States. 

In 1986. Mr. Wilson, then a senator, and 
others from the California congressional dele- 
gation held up passage of the Immigration 
Reform and Control Act until a provision was 
added to allow several- hundred thousand 
legal immigrants into the country temporarily 
so that they could help harvest crops. Under 
the provision that eventually resulted, more 
than a mi l li o n nnw to stay. 

In 1985, San Francisco began to consider 
creating a “sanctuary,” declaring that police 
officers and city employees were not to bother 
illegal immig rants from £1 Salvador and Gua- 
temala, or to h<4p the Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service to find or deport them. 

“We begged them,” recalled David II chert, 
then director of the San Francisco office of 
- the INS. “We told them they would be inyit- 
jT ing illegal immigration. Even as the resolution 
was bong debated, we were apprehending 
aliens who said they’d heard about it in Cen- 
tral America,” 

But San Francisco passed the resolution 
and Ms. Feinstein, then mayor, signed it — 
reluctantly, her allies say now. (NYT) 


Year of the Clueless Novice? 

ATLANTA — The last time Georgia bad a 
Republican in the governor's mansion, that 
scourge of the South who was also a Republi- 
can. Ulysses S. Grant, was in the White 
House. Now, Georgia Democrats are wonder- 
ing if their 123-year string is about to be 
broken in an election year in which incum- 
. bency has become a handicap. 

By most accounts. Georgia's Democratic 
governor, Zell Miller, is struggling to avoid 
bring swamped by an anti-incumbent tide 
that appears to be rising nationwide. A 20- 
year veteran of Georgia’s political wars. Mr. 
Miller has come up against a strong challenge 
in his bid for a second term, a challenge that 
has surprised a lot of Georgians. 

One reason is that the opponent, Guy 
Mfllrer, had never run for political office 
before; he is the founder and majority owner 
of Norrell Corp_ a temporary-employment 
agency. But what also has surprised residents 
is that the challenge comes against a Demo- 
crat whose moderate-to-conservative stances 
over the years on matters like crime, gun 
control and welfare overhaul have deprived 
Republicans of the issues on which they have 
usually run. 

The governor’s pollster, Alan Secrest, has 
derided Mr. MTlln er as “a clueless novice.” 

But the governors supporters also concede 
that if the electorate is as cynical about gov- 
ernment as it is portrayed to be, this might 
well turn out to be the year of the clueless 
novice. 

Even top Republicans concede that their 
candidate’s strength lies less in his stands on 
issues, or even his wealth — his estimated net 
worth is S84 milli on — than in his political 
inexperience. 

“In some years, Milln er’s novice status 
would be a problem," said Whit Ayres, a 
Republican pollster who is working for the 
Milkier campaign. “But this year it is a plus 
because there is such widespread cynicism 
about career politicians as not being connect- 
ed to the people." (NYT) 


Quote / Unquote 

John J. Pitney Jr„ a government professor 
at Claremont-McKenna College in Clare- 
mont, California: “What I expect to happen 
in the next mouth is the power of incumbency 
is going to kick in. Democrats are going to be 
able to raise and spend a lot of money.” ( WP) 



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Away From Politics 


• Tbe wife and children of the cult leader 
- DavidKoresh were among 28 people buried in 

unmarked graves without ceremony by coun- 
ty officials in Waco, Texas. The unclaimed 
bodies, some of them unidentified, were the 
last-of tbe 80 Branch Da vidian cult members 
killed after a 51-day standoff with federal 
agents in April 1993. 

■ Pogp mMtmg tm onruBfttS ruwi that its chairman 
had engaged in financial improprieties, the 
board of the National Association for die 
Advancement of Colored People voted to hire 
an outside auditor to investigate spending by 
the or ganizatio n’s chief officers from Jan. 1, 
1989, to Aug. 31, 1994. 

• A 23 percent cost-of-tiving increase will be 
given to the 43 million U.S. Social Security 


recipients in 1995, starting with checks re- 
ceived Jan. 3, Health and Human Services 
Secretary Donna E. Shalala announced. 

• Three Marines killed themselves and two 
others tried unsuccessfully to do so in the 
space of a week at Camp Lejeune, North 
Carolina, military sources said. A spokesman 
at tbe base said the suicides were not linked to 
U.S. military operations in the Middle East 
and Haiti. 

• Survivors of tbe 14 fire fighters killed while 

battling a wind-whipped forest fire on Storm 
King Mountain in Colorado in July are re- 
ceiving checks for $27,000 — the proceeds 
from a relief fund that raised almost 
$400,000. AP. NYT. WP 


Obscurer Races Hold Fate of Next Congress 


By Kenneth J, Cooper 

Waduitfpcm Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The possibility 
that angry voters will sweep out big- 
name incumbents like the House speak- 
er, Thomas S. Foley of Washington, and 
Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massa- 
chusetts, both Democrats, has captivat- 
ed (he political establishment and com- 
pounded Democratic fears about losing 
congressional seats next month. 

rat the biggest stakes in the mid term 
election — which political party con- 
trols Congress next year — could be 
decided in about 60 races mostly be- 
tween little-name ranriiriatas like Zach 
Wanrp (the Republican) and Randy 
Button (the Democrat) in a House dis- 
trict around Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

Similarly obscure candidates are vy- 
ing for a total of 52 open seats in the 
House and the nine open seats in the 
Senate. 

It is these largely ungl amorous con- 
tests for the open seats bring vacated by 
retirees, losers is primaries or aspirants 
for higher office that could provide most 
of the expected Republican gains in the 
House and form the foundation for a 
Republican takeover of the Senate. Both 
parties say they have invested heavily in 
these races. 


Republicans are on the offensive in 
the contests for open seats. Democrats 
have more to defend: six out of the nine 
open seats in the Senate are currently 
held by Democrats and 31 of 52 in tbe 
House. Democrats expect a bard time 
retaining most of their open House seats 
because many are swing districts, partic- 
ularly in the South. 

"Most of the losses we’re going to take 
are going to come in these open seats," 
said David Dixon, political director of 
the Democratic Congressional Cam- 
paign Committee. 

Tbe National Republican Congressio- 
nal Committee has officially predicted a 
Republican gain of at least 22 House 
seats, but other Republicans speak 
about gaining as many as 70 seats. Dem- 
ocrats lately have estimated iheir losses 
at around 26. Historical averages for 
midterm gains by the party that does not 
occupy the White House range from 13 

to 26 . 

Republicans need a net gain of 40 
seats to control the House for the first 
time since I9S4 and seven to recapture 
the Senate, which the Republicans last 
held in 1986. Republicans last won both 
the House and Senate in 1952, the year 
in which Eisenhower was first elected. 


To pick up enough seats for control of 
both houses. Republicans would have to 
defeat a number of Democratic incum- 
bents in the House and Senate who 
appear to be in political trouble because 
of the double-barreled unpopularity of 
President Bill Clinton and Congress. 

The last big shifts in congressional 
seats between the parties have come 
mostly from the defeat of incumbents. 
Democrats picked up right Senate seats 
in 1986 and 43 House seats in the post- 
Watergate election of 1974. 

What makes Democrats fear and Re- 
publicans exult is the possibility that 
voter attitudes in 1994 may be like those 
in 1974. not 1992. 

“It’s the same kind of frustration and 
cynicism I saw post-Watergate said 
Representative William J. Hughes, 
Democrat of New Jersey. “It's reminis- 
cent of that." Mr. Hughes, who is retir- 
ing, was a member of the Class of 1974 
whose district Republicans count on 
capturing. 

The retirement of Democrats like Mr. 
Hughes has increased chances of big 
Republican gains in open seats. “We 
think there’s an opportunity to make 
historic gains in open seats," said Repre- 
sentative Bill Faxon, Republican of New 
York and chair man of die National Re- 


publican Congressional Committee. He 
added, “We’re going to pick up more 
than our usual number of open seats 
because of who’s retiring." 

In the Senate, Republican candidates 
are favoted in Maine, Ohio and Arizona, 
or in half of the six Democratic open 
seats. The races for the Democratic seats 
in Michigan and Tennessee rate as toss- 
ups, while the Oklahoma race is leaning 
Democratic. Democrats have their best 
shot at winning a Republican open seat 
in Minnesota, but their candidates trail 
in Missouri and Wyoming. Since 1946 
the number or open Senate seats has 
exceeded nine once — in 197S when it 
reached 10. 

Of the 52 open House seats. 48 result 
from voluntary departures, the third- 
highesi since World War 11. Almost half 
of the 31 open Democratic &euts are in 
southern or border states where Mr. 
Clinton has been more unpopular than 
elsewhere, and the last reapportionment 
created more competitive districts. 

“The majority of Democratic open 
seals are marginal seals where the Dem- 
ocrat won by a narrow margin in the last 
election.” Kir. Paxon said. “A signifi- 
cant number of Democratic open seats 
are in the Soutii when; our opportunities 
are just booming." 


U.S. to Take 
Some Cuban 
Refugees 


By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
Clinton administration has an- 
nounced that it will allow sever- 
al hundred Cuban refugees now 
being held at camps in Guanta- 
namo Bay, Cuba, and Panama 
into the United States on hu- 
manitarian grounds. 

The order applies to unac- 
companied children, refugees 
over 70, and those with serious 
illnesses. They will be admitted 
into the United States under the 
attorney general's “parole” au- 
thority, which grants broad dis- 
cretion to Attorney General Ja- 
net Reno to permit foreigners to 
enter the United States. 

The White House press secre- 
tary, Dee Dee Myers, said tbe 
adminis tration would also re- 
view the status of all children in 
the camps, which now house 
more than 30,000 Cuban refu- 
gees. 

“The administration shares 
the deep concern of the Cuban- 
American community for the 
well-being of all the Cubans in 
safe havens," Ms. Myers said. 
“The root cause of these prob- 
lems is in Cuba. The adminis- 
tration is dedicated to pursuing 
policies which will lead to a 
rapid and peaceful movement 
to democracy in Cuba.” 

A senior administration offi- 
cial said the move did not con- 
flict with Ms. Reno’s earlier 
statement that Cubans who try 
to flee to the United Slates and 
are sent to the U.S. naval base 
at Guantanamo Bay will not be 
“processed” for entry into the 
country. 

“We said we would not pro- 
cess people," the official said. 
“We are not processing peo- 
ple.” 

The official said the order 
would affect about 45 unac- 
companied children on tbe base 
and about 100 Cubans over 70. 
In addition, U.S. officials have 
identified 12 people with seri- 
ous illnesses and win review the 
cases of 30 to 40 others. 

■ Exiles’ Return 

The Cuban authorities said 
Sunday that a group of seven 
armed and camouflage-dressed 
Cuban exiles shot and killed a 
fisherman after arriving on the 
island in a motor launch from 
Florida, Reuters reported from 
Havana. They said the men bad 
been captured Saturday in the 
Caibari&n area, about 350 kilo- 
meters east of Havana. 



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AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Eight Are Accused of Taming 
An Arizona River With a Bang 

White-water rafters confronting 
Quartzite Falls on the Salt River in Ari- 
zona could swallow their fear and take 
the plunge, or get out and cany their 
boats around it. Eight men, prosecutors 
say, took a third route: They dynamited 
it. reducing the wildest rapid on the river 
to a mild thrill ride. 

A federal grand jury has charged a 
river guide and seven other men with 
conspiracy and destruction of federal 
property." 

Gail Peters, Arizona director for the 
environmental group American Rivers, 
said, “It's like these guys were too lazv or 
too incompetent to run this rapid or go 
around iL" A U.S. Forest Service spokes- 
woman, Joyce HasseL said, “We kind of 
viewed this as an act of eco-terrorism.” 

A conspiracy conviction is punishable 
by up to five years in prison and a 


$250,000 fine. Destruction of property is 
punishable by 20 years and a $250,000 
fine. 

Tbe rapid spanned the bottom of the 
Salt River Canyon in the Tonlo National 
Forest about 100 miles (160 kilometers) 
northeast of Phoenix. The sheer red and 
brown cliffs are sometimes known as the 
Little Grand Canyon. 

Short Takes 

Thanks to his bulletproof vest, Pietro 
Ferrantc, a rookie New York City police- 
man, escaped with only a stomach bruise 
when he was shot Iasi week with a .38- 
caliber revolver while questioning a 
group of men in Brooklyn. He even man- 
aged to arrest one of the men. New York 
policemen have been required since 1989 
to wear bulletproof vests. Doctors said 
that had Mr. Ferrante, 24, not been 
wearing his vest, his wound could have 
been fatal. 

For decades. Grant’s Tomb in New 
York Gty has been a graffiti-marred 
magnet for drug dealers and the home- 
less. Now President Ulysses S. Grant's 
descendants have threatened to remove 
the remains of the Civil War hero and his 


wife unless the site gets a raultimillion- 
dollar renovation. Federal officials plan 
to spend $400,000 on it this vear and 
$450,000 in 1995. A family spokesman 
said renovation would cost at least 10 
times that much. 

When a revival of “Show Boar.” the 
1927 classic by Jerome Kern and Oscar 
Hammerstein 2d, opened on Broadway 
this month, the director, Harold Prince, 
had everyone take a bow. Not just the 73 
members of the cast, but 30 musicians, 
24 dressers, 16 electricians, 13 carpen- 
ters, 6 stage managers, and assorted 
helping hands — a total of 217 people, 
“we thought it would be a nice way to 
say thanks," said the producer. Garth H. 
Drabinsky. This array of hired hands 
also demonstrated why “Show* Boat" 
would have the highest running costs in 
Broadway history. Mr. Drabinsky said it 
would have to sell $600,000 worth of 
tickets a week just to break even. 

Ina New York Times review of tbe new 
film "Only You,” about American tour- 
ists living it up in Italy, the critic Janet 
Maslin remarks, “Not shown: the excit- 
ing moment when Faith, Kate, Peter and 
Larry return home from their mad esca- 
pades and open those credit card bills." 

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Page 4 


EVTERJNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


Iraq and Haiti Bolster Clinton 

Poll Shows Growing Foreign Policy Support 


HAITI: 

A Daunting Task 

Cratnuied from Page 1 


By Daniel Williams 
and Ann Devroy 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — With its use of mili- 
tary muscle to restore Haiti's elected presi- 
dent and to protect Kuwait, the Clinton ad- 
ministration has demonstrated its 
commitment to a two-pronged doctrine on 
the use of force abroad, an issue that has 
bedeviled it since taking office. 

Administration policymakers argue that in 
a chaotic world without a Soviet threat, power 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


must be used not only to protect traditional 
“vital” security interests but also to advance 
“important” national goals. 

As the White House celebrated the success 
over the weekend of its policy to remove 
Haiti's military leaders and grappled with the 
showdown with President Saddam Hussein of 
Iraq, the president and his senior foreign- 
policy advisers made the case that however 
messy the application of the theory may be at 
times, it had now produced practical results. 

In Kuwait, where oil and by extension the 
health of the U.S. economy are at stake, 
President Bill Clinton is performing the tradi- 
tional presidential role of protector of “vital” 
US. interests, his advisers said. In Haiti, he is 
doing something markedly different. There, 
he is trying to reform and stabilize an eco- 
nomically unimportant country that has little 
impact on U.S. security but where he beieves 
a principle is at stake: the defense of democ- 
racy. 

The president has labeled Haiti an “impor- 
tant” American interest, raising the largely 
altruistic prefect to a relatively nigh foreign- 
policy position, certainly in comparison with 
his Republican predecessors. 

Mr. Clinton, in an interview Friday, said 
his administration had “learned an imm ense 
amount" from the experience of ejecting Hai- 
ti’s military leaders but that the application of 
protecting “important interests" would still 
be “different from place to place" and hard to 
define for Americans. 

“I think that while a lot of these situations 
may not be perfectly parallel, I think that we 
have learned a lot about how the combination 
of American diplomacy and American force. 


working through the world community, can 
achieve a desired result and also develop 
public support within the United States for 
doing it,” Mr. Clinton said. 

In a stroke, Mr. Clinton's performance in 
the Gulf and in Haiti seemed to have c almed 
public concern about his foreign-affairs abili- 
ties. Doubts about going into Haiti have been 
eased considerably. 

A new CNN-Time Magazine poll con- 
firmed the entrenched public support for a 
strong stand against Mr. Saddam, with 61 
percent agreeing that Mr. Clinton had done a 
good job handling the situation. 

For the first time, a majority, 54 percent, 
approve of Mr. Clinton’s han dling of the 
Haiti situation, a number even the White 
House agrees could decline swiftly if the situ- 
ation does not remain peaceful. 

For the moment, the twin situations have 
alleviated some of the national skepticism 
about Mr. Clinton’s foreign-policy expertise. 
Forty-eight percent of those surveyed ap^ 
proved of his handling of foreign policy, with 
44 percent disapproving. It was not a heany 
endorsement, but a far higher approval rating 
than Mr. Clinton had been receiving. 

“The last six to 10 days have treated Presi- 
dent Clinton very kindly,” said Richard 
Wirthlin, a Republican pollster who also dis- 
cerned a rise in Mr. Clinton’s overall ratings 
as a result of the way the two foreign episodes 
have proceeded. 

Members of Mr. Clinton’s battered for- 
eign-policy team, looking for respite from 
criticism, suggested that they bad put up the 
long-awaited “points on the board” that will 
erase doubts about their competence. 

“I would certainly be happy if it is per- 
ceived that way,” Secretary of State Warren 
M. Christopher said. 

Mr. Christopher has been the subject of 
reports that he will be forced from office by 
“4 During a return trip from the 
Middle East on Friday, he listed his foreign- 
policy accomplishments, an unusual perfor- 
mance he described as “somewhat of a com- 
mercial 

He listed as signs of success progress to- 
ward peace in Northern Ireland, China’s 
agreement to stop selling missiles abroad, and 
suggestions of progress in nuclear negotia- 
tions wth North Korea. 


sweeping economic sanctions 
have left the Haitian govern- 
ment “without a nickel to its 
name.” 

The United States and other 
donors have promised to help 
get things moving again, pledg- 
ing more than SI billion in aid 
over the next five years. But 
“the pauperization of society” 
is so complete, said Kesner 
Pharel, an economist for the 
Haitian Central Bank, and the 
economy so damaged that Hai- 
ti’s ability to absorb that assis- 
tance is likely to be limited. 

Another economist said, “It 
would be like trying to pour a 
gallon of water into a thimble." 

Nevertheless, the pressure on 
Father Aristide to create jobs 
will be unrelenting. Haiti is the 
poorest country in the Western 
Hemisphere, with a per capita 
income of only $250 a year. 

Father Aristide’s supporters 
also argue that he has to move 
quickly to dis man tle the the 
military apparatus responsible 
both for his overthrow and the 
three years of slaughter and re- 
pression that followed. He must 
work not only against the en- 
trenched remnants of that pow- 
er structure but also against the 
clock. He has only 16 months 
remaining in his term and. un- 
der Haitian law, cannot be re- 
elected. 

The U.S. troops who began 
landing here on Sept. 19 have 
stripped the Haitian Army and 
police of the firepower they tra- 
ditionally used to mount coups. 
But the U.S. forces seem to have 
stayed away from many parts of 
the countryside, where 70 per- 
cent of the population lives, and 
to have missed some of the most 
dangerous private arsenals, 
controlled by the paramilitary 
militia members, known as at- 
taches, who continue to be a 
source of alarm to Haitians 
“If we want to be a free, dem- 
ocratic society, disarmament 



Aristide 
Gets Down 
To Business 
In Haiti 


By Tod Robberson 
and Douglas Farah 

ttcBfanRfnn Pan Semn 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti 
— The mantle of terror that 
hung over Haiti for decades afl 
but disappeared on Sunday af- 
ter Amen can forces re-estab- 
lished the democratic govern- 
ment of President Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide, offering 


residents their first opportune? 
to walk the streets without fear 
The capital exploded with 
foot traffic and market activity 
on Sunday after Father Aristi 
de’s first night in the National 
Palace since the 1991 militaiy 
coup that forced him into exile. 
Emerging from two nights of 
parties and revelry, Haitians re- 
sumed the daily business of sur- 
vival while Father Aristide be B 
gan deliberations on selecting * 
broad-based government aimed 
at fulfilling his pledge of na- 
tional reconciliation. 

Widespread fear of repres- 
sion, bolstered by almost dailv 
shootings and beatings by antf- 
Aristide thugs, bad forced most 
Haitians off the streets at dark 
before Father Aristide's return. 

Father Aristide remained be- 
hind a tight cordon of security. 
Government sources said be 
was being advised by U.S. secu- 
rity specialists to limit public 
appearances for at least the 
next 72 hours. 

Roman Catholic Church offi- 
dais said they had expected Fa- 
ther Aristide' who is a priest, to 
attend Mass at two Catholic 
churches on Sunday, but be 
failed to show up. 

Instead, he consulted at the 
National Palace with leaden of 
both houses of Parliament on 
possible choices for prime min- 
ister, a choice diplomats say 
will be crucial in setting the 
tone for his presidency. 

Meanwhile, the caretaker 
prime minister. Robert Malval, 
convened a four-hour cabinet i 
session to assess the state of the 
nation. 

Raymond Jenty. admjnistra* 
live director of the cabinet, saw 
Father Aristide was conducting 
consultations with various po- 
litical leaders to determine 
which of four or five front-run- 
ners would be most acceptable 
to take over the prime minis- 
ter’s job. 


t Abu Mdnna-'AgcKC FmcrPnsc 

President Jean-Bertrand Aristide waving to well-wishers on his return to Port-au-Prince. 


must be complete, and it must 
take place now.” said Suzy Cas- 
tor. director of a leading social 
policy research institute here. 
“If not, the attaches will re- 
group and return to their old 
methods” as soon as the U.S. 
troops leave. 

The Clinton administration 
has said it wants to begin re- 
moving the U.S. troops, who 
have won enormous popularity 
and respect among the popu- 
lace, and replacing them with a 
UN force as soon as possible. 

Even after the U.S. troops 
leave. Father Aristide, who in 
his earlier, more radical days 
derided the United States as 
“the cold country to our north,” 


will have to contend with the 
large number of U.S. diplo- 
mats, economists and other ex- 


perts who have come here to 
help him build democracy. 
Some of his sympathizers say 
they fear the American pres- 
ence will limi t the president's 
ability to plot his own course. 

“His hands are tied,'’ a Latin 
American diplomat here said. 
“He has nowhere else to go, so 
he is going to have to cooperate 
with them if he wants to get the 
aid package he needs.” 

Though there will be de- 
mands on Father Aristide to do 
everything at once, he must run 
the country with “an extremely 
weak apparatus of govern- 


ment,” said Ian Martin, a Haiti 
expert at the Carnegie Endow- 
ment for Peace in Washington. 

The state bureaucracy not 
only has decayed and been 
looted since 1991, but also is 
populated to a large extent by 
functionaries unsympathetic to 
the president and his program. 

“Everybody says he has to 
take on the army and modern- 
ize it,” said Anthony Maingot a 
Caribbean scholar at Florida 
International University in Mi- 
ami. “But what about the tele- 
phone company, the state flour 
and cement companies, and the 
Central Bank? If he wants to rip 
these personalized companies 
out of the hands of those who 
control them, I say good luck." 


ISRAEL: Gaza Border Reopening 


Continued from Page 1 

soon, but those with connec- 
tions to the group’s militar y 
wing would remain in custody. 
The police continued their 
search for what they described 
as a “hard core” of 50 to 70 
armed militan t*. 

Hamas, which once vowed it 
would never take up arms 
against fellow Palestinians, 
continued to threaten the self- 
rule authorities. In a leaflet, it 
accused Mr. Arafat’s security 
forces of “making themselves 
Zionists” by leading Israeli au- 
thorities to the Hamas kidnap- 
pers at Bir Nabalah. 

Mahmoud Zohar, a Hamas 
leader, heaped scorn on Mr. 
Arafat in an interview, denying 
rumors that the two men had 
met. “I will never meet with 
Arafat as long as there is one 
Palestinian in the Palestinian 
jaDs,” he said. 

Israel's cabinet which met 
Sunday, was divided over when 
to take the pressure off Mr. 
Arafat. Several ministers said 
the border should remain 
closed and the peace talks sus- 
pended to put pressure on the 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion leader to continue his 
crackdown on Hamas. 

The Gaza border's reopening 


means that some 28,000 Pales- 
tinians can return to their con- 
struction and agricultural jobs 
in Israel an economic relation- 
ship on which both, sides de- 
pend. Israeli officials said they 
expected the border to open 
Monday, and peace talks to re- 
sume in Cairo the following 
day. 

Even so, the government re- 
pealed its message that Mr. 
Arafat must continue to choose 
between peace with Hamas and 
peace with Israel. Lieutenant 
General Ehud Barak, the army 
chief of staff, said that Mr. Ara- 
fat would have to crush the 
armed elements of Hamas mili- 
tarily, and that if he would not 
do so, Israel would. 

The Declaration of Princi- 
ples, a framework for Palestin- 
ian self-rule worked out last 
year, foibids Israeli security 
forces to enter Gaza's autono- 


IRAQ: 

U.S. Warnings 


GERMANY: Kohl Coalition Survives Votings but Faces Parliament Losses 


mous areas except in joint pa- 
trols with Palestinians, or in not 
pursuit. 

Israeli radio reported that a 
“senior security source” assert- 
ed that the chief planner of Cor- 
poral Waxman’s kidnapping re- 
mained in Gaza and had not 
been arrested. The planner, 
identified as Mohammed Abu 
Daif, is also known as Abu 
Khaled. 


Continued from Page 1 

the removal of the Republican 
Guard from southern Iraq. But 
when asked whether Washing- 
ton would tolerate a delay of a 
few weeks or a few days, she 
responded: “days.” She added: 

“We recognize this area as 
vital to U.S. national interests 
and we will behave with others 
multiiaterally when we can and 
unilaterally when we must.” 

Before the Security Council 
vote, near midnight Saturday, 
Russia appeared determined to 
block any vote until after For- 
eign Minister Andrei V. Ko- 
zyrev could report to the coun- 
cil on his diplomatic efforts in 
the Gulf. Compromise lan- 
guage in the resolution welcom- 
ing the Russian initiative ap- 
parently satisfied Moscow. 

Mrs. Albright said Sunday 
that she was not satisfied with 
the vagueness of the Iraqi asser- 
tion s on Kuwait. To fully recog- 
nize Kuwait, she said, Mr. Sad- 
dam, must sign a declaration. 
Iraq's Revolutionary Council 
must endorse it, Iraq’s Parlia- 
ment must approve it and it 
must be published in the gov- 
ernment’s official gazette. 


Continued from Page 1 

ly a triumph for Mr. Kohl's 
Christian Democrats and their 
Bavarian sister party, the Chris- 
tian Social Union. Projections 
showed the two parties winning 
a combined total of less than 42 
percent of the vote, their worst 
performance since 1949. 

The Party of Democratic So- 
cialism. the former East Ger- 
man Communists, won only 
about 4 percent of the vote na- 
tionwide, which would normal- 
ly not be enough to get into 


would beat a yearlong losing 
streak in state elections and 
make it into Parliament. 


Parliament. But the party got 
nearly 20 percent of the vote in 


nearly 20 percent of 
the East and a plurality in four 
electoral districts there, which 
entitled them to their full 4 per- 
cent share of seats in Bonn, up 
to 30. 

A Democratic Socialism dep- 
uty, the author Stefan Heyra, 
81, is an American citizen and 
will apparently have the honor, 
as the senior member of Parlia- 
ment, of opening the new ses- 
sion in November. 


With both Mr. Kohl and Mr. 
Scharping dependent on small- 
er patties for a majority in what 
was expected to be a close race, 
much attention was focused on 
whether Foreign Minister 
Klaus KinkeFs Free Democrats 


They did according to early 
projections, but with less than 7 
percent of the vote, down from 
11 percent in 1990. 

“We did iu” a perspiration- 
drenched, hoarse but obviouslv 
much-relieved Mr. Kinkel told 
his supporters on Sunday night. 
“But it was incredibly tough.” 

Mr. Kinkel succeeded Hans- 
Dietrich Genscher as foreign 
minister and party chairman 
when Mr. Genscher resigned in 
1992, and his campaign slogan 
expressed the troth: “This time, 
everything is at stake.” 

Mr. Kohl will continue in of- 
fice until next month, when the 
new Parliament will meet in 
Berlin and if early projections 
prove correct, re-elect him as 
chancellor with a much-re- 
duced legislative support. 

Whether Mr. Kohl should get 
yet another four-year term was 
the only real issue in the cam- 
paign. 


mentioned with both candi- 
dates pledging continuity and 
dedication to anchoring a unit- 
ed Germany in a more closely 
united Europe. 

Mr. Kohl's stump speech ac- 
knowledged a few unspecified 
mistakes in the unification pro- 
cess. but the burgeoning pros- 
perity he had promised voters 
in the formerly Communist 
East four years ago was defi- 
nitely on the way, he said. 


The Christian Democrats' 
campaign posters simply 
showed the chancellor wading 
through a crowd with a smile on 
his face. 


For Mr. Scharping, who 
stepped down last week as gov- 
ernor of his native state or 
Rhineland-Palatinate to relo- 
cate to Bonn to lead the Social 
Democrats in Parliament, the 
campaign was a character- 
building experience. 


KIM: North Korean Successor Makes Rare Appearance 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 


It was universally described 
as the dullest campaign in 
years, without any personal 
mudslinging or rancor and not 
a single debate between Mr. 
Kohl and Mr. Scbarpuig. 

Foreign policy was hardly 


Continued from Page 1 

Jong H will be named to at least 
one of the two top national 
posts fairly soon. One report 
circulating in Seoul is that 
members of the Central Com- 
mittee of the Workers Party 
have been instructed to remain 
in Pyongyang after Sunday's 
ceremony, presumably to elect 
Mr. Kim formally as party 
chief. Bui such reports about 
what is supposedly happening 
in secretive North Korea often 
turn out to be wrong. 

Other experts cautioned that 
too much meaning should not 
be placed on Sunday's events. 

“It will calm some of the wild 
speculation about his personal 


health," said Yang Sung ChuJ. 
professor of political science at 
Kyungbee University in Seoul. 
Bui he added, “It’s too early to 
suggest that he’s in firm con- 
trol.” 


North Korea's govemmem- 
ran press agency said Mr. Kim 
appeared at Sunday's ceremony 
in his capacity as chairman of 
the National Defense Commit- 
tee and supreme commander of 
the army. Those are (he titles he 
has long held. 


Mr. Yu, the North Korean 
expert in Seoul said the offi- 
cials standing with Mr. Kim on 


the balcony appeared to be the 
same as those who had stood 


same as those who had stood 
near him at the funeral in July. 


That seems to indicate that 
there have not been big changes 
in the government since then. 

Many analysts say that being 
formally appointed successor to 
his father, who ruled the nation 
for almost half u century, is tbc 
least of Mr. Kim’s challenges. If 
he sticks to his father's policies, 
the economy will continue to 
sink and Mr. Kim will be in 
trouble. But if he liberalizes the 
economy, he will be seen as re- 
futing his father's policies, 
which would also weaken his 
claim to power. 

“North Korea is going 
through power succession Act 
I,” said Professor Yang. “We 
haven’t seen Acts 2 or 3 or { 
yel" $ 


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MEALS: For the Global Gourmet, the 10 Finest Restaurants in the World 

Continued from Page I of top chefs in Spain, Gennanv. lure, transnnrtminn i . , 


was simply judging food as 
food. 


The geographic makeup of 
the final list is perhaps no sur- 
prise: Three of the top 10 are in 
France, two more are so close 
they might as well be. and the 
top restaurant in America — 
Daniel — is ran by a French- 
man. As it should be. For all its 
flaws, French cuisine remains 
supreme in its intricacy, depth, 
and sheer ability to please the 
senses. 

The choice of one restaurant 
each from Hong Kong and To- 
kyo reflects the excellence of 
Asian cuisine, with all its com- 
plexity, freshness, purity. I se- 
lected two restaurants from Ita- 
ly, the cuisine I find the most 
satisfying in the world. Would 
that the list could have gone 
beyond 10, for then the under- 
rated yet extraordinary cooking 


of top chefs in Spain, Germany, 
and Britain would surely have 
been included. 

Actually, of the two lists, the 
selection of the top casual ta- 
bles was by far the more diffi- 
cult assignment. With thou- 
sands upon thousands of great 
trattorias in Italy and an equal 
number of bistros in France, 
where does one begin? The gi- 
ant America — with dozens of 
cuisines and styles to choose 
from — all but defies compari- 
son. 

In the end, I put my sensory 
tester to work, reflecting upon 
George Germon’s incompara- 
ble grilled pizza from A1 Forno 
in Providence, Rhode Island, 
the gastronomic nirvana served 
up at La Tupina in Bordeaux, 
the intense layering of flavors 
found at Frontera Grill in Chi- 
cago. 

So how does the world look, 
one year later? Today's agricul- 


ture, transportation, and the 
kind of demand that wealth cre- 
ates make it possible for any 
ingredient to be on any table 
anytime, almost anywhere in 
the world. But few of the talent- 
ed and proud chefs whom I met 
over the last year abuse that 
privilege. 

In only one instance did I 
fmd a chef simply assembling 
luxury ingredients for the sake 
of bravado, and the restaurant 
was a bitter disappointment. 
Since the assignment was not to 
do a 10 worst list the guilty one 
goes unpunished. 

In general. I was encouraged 
by the high level of technical 
competence of the chefs I visit- 
ed, as well as their talent, innate 
creativity and respect for native 
traditions. 

While much of the world 
turns to Italy for satisfaction, to 
Thailand for litillation, to 
America when it thinlrc it wants 


to be young and smart, one 
need not worry about the wold 
palate merging toward a single 
taste. National appetites, tradi- 
tions and customs are not about 
to give way to a single craving 
for Big Macs and Coke. 


The tour was of course filled 
with surprises, disappoint- 
ments, anecdotes. As I traveled, 
the sheer volume of food or- 
dered in many restaurants 
alarmed some waiters. . After 
one particularly hefry order at 
dinner in London, the waiter 
had just one question: “When 
was your last meal?" I dared 
not tell him I’d ordered just as 
copiously at lunch. 


And now, to answer the ques- 
tion on many minds: The bath- 
room scale reports a two-kilo 
gain. At least there’s something 
to show for it. So Dear Mr. 
Editor, perhaps it’s time for a 
senes on spas of the world? 


Ao matter where you're t rave-lino to 


COUNTRIES 


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ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


• By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

Nmt York. Tunis Service 

BAGHDAD — Iraq acknowledged a 
United Nations resolution Sunday wara- 
- mg it against future “hostile” actions to- 
ward Kuwait without much official com- 
mentary, but there were indications in the 
officially controlled press that Baghdad 
was willing to go along with the resolution. 

The articles of the resolution, which was 
approved by all 15 members of the Securi- 
ty Council on Saturday, were read over 
radio and television, a move whose frank- 
ness startled' foreign diplomats and ordi- 
nary people. Iraqi media are normally 
heavily censored. 

The Iraqi government had, in the previ- 
ous few days, repeatedly taken the position 
that its .aimed forces were on a “routine" 
military exercise, which the United States 
had decided to dnb a plan to attack Ku- 
wait Baghdad said Washington was thus 
trying to prevent friendly members of the 
Security Council — particularly Russia 
and France — from exerting efforts to lift 
sanctions imposed since Iraq's invasion of 
Kuwait- in August 1990. 

Confirming this notion of Baghdad's 


nonaggressive attitude, Iraq’s minister of 
culture and information, Hamad Youssef 
Hammadi, told the nation's official press 
agency, IN A, Sunday that the “miiitaiy 
force whose presence in the south was the 
subject of the big storm raised by the 
Americans has moved to rear position af- 
ter completing its training operation ac- 
cording to orders that have been issued." 

Mr. H ammadi said the return of the 
Republican Guard units to their original 
positions further north “will be completed 
m a few days." 

In repons on the UN resolution, Bagh- 
dad did note that Russia succeeded in 
preventing the council from adopting a 
clause that would have obligated Iraq to 
inform the council of any troop move- 
ments toward the country’s southern re- 
gion IS days in advance. 

Government propaganda organs have 
portrayed the whole crisis as an attempt by 
President Bill Clinton to shore up his do- 
mestic position. 

*Tbe storm was stirred for reasons relat- 
ed to boosting his shaky popularity in 
American public opinion." an editorial in 


Pact to Rescue Parched Land 

100 Countries Sign Convention to Reverse Desertification 


• By Marlise Simons 

New York Tones Service 

PARIS. — A plan drawn up two years ago 
at the Earth Summit to prevent agricultural 
land front turning into desert has been trans- 
lated into an international agreement signed 
by some 100 countries here. 

The Convention on Desertification focuses 
on the world's arid and semi-arid lands, 
which are steadily yielding less because of 
overgrazing, excessive planting, poor irriga- 
tion and deforestation linked to population 
pressures. 

The erosion and exhaustion of the son is 
considered most serious in Africa, where dose 
to 75 percent of the arid land is already 
considered degraded. Over all, arid and semi’- 
arid lands make up a quarter of the earth's 
landmass and sustain some 900 million peo- 
ple. ■ 

The convention, which win become legally 
binding for the signers in two years, establish- 
es a “global me chanis m" to coordinate pro- 
jects to protect and rehabilitate lands and to 
find money for that purpose. 

It urges governments to channel such mon- 
ey through the Global Environmental Facili- 
ty, a fund that was created to finance projects 
dealing with worldwide environmental con- 
cerns tike changes in the clima te and the loss 
of species. 

Desertification was an important topic at 
the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, with 
African nations pressing for action on the 
issue from rich countries in exchange for 


votes on issues more important to the indus- 
trialized world. With the convention, poor 
nations hope to revive interest in the issue and 
attract development aid. 

At the signing ceremonies here on Friday, 
rich nations pledged little new money but 
committed funds for further exploratory 
studies. The United Nations estimates that 
$10 billion to S22 billion will be needed annu- 
ally over the next 20 years to finance the 
rehabilitation of land and stem the decline in 
fertility. 

Supporters of the convention generally 
agree that action is urgently needed to pre- 
vent mass migration from exhausted lands, 
which would create a need for emergency aid. 

The United States is expected to pledge 
5500 million initially, and other Western do- 
nors are expected to contribute as well. The 
donors refused to set up a new global trust 
fund, as requested by poor countries, saying 
that existing development funds could be 
applied more effectively. The global mecha- 
nism will be used to locate and channel such 
financing. 

Word that only modest new funds would 
be Forthcoming angered many representatives 
from the developing world. 

“We have to realize that environmental 
degradation is as much of a threat to the 
planet and civil society as war," said Kama! 
Nath, tiie environment minister of India. 
“And we have to combat it with as much 
vigor.” 


27 Still Detained, 
Saudis Say, After 
130 Are Released 


DUBAI — Saudi Arabia said 
Sunday that it was still bolding 
27 of the 157 people it arrested 
recently for threatening the se- 
curity of the kingdom and sow- 
ing dissent. 

An Interior Ministry state- 
ment. carried by the official 
Saudi Press Agency, said the 
other 130 detainees had been 
released after they admitted to 
offenses and promised not to 
repeat them. 

Saudi Arabia said in Septem- 
ber that it had arrested 1 10 peo- 
ple in connection with attempts 
to sow dissent and chaos. The 
statement Sunday said that 
those detentions had led to oth- 
ers, reaching a total of 157. 

“The investigation with those 
who are less responsible, num- 
bering 130. ended, and Lhey 
confessed to the mistakes they 
made and their actions against 
the security of the state, the 
statement said. It added. “They 
regretted that and pledged not 
to repeat what they did and 
they were released ." 

The remaining 27, it said, 
“some of whom played major 
harmful roles, are still under 
investigation." 


BOOKS 


Ath Thawra, a daily that reflects the views 
of President Saddam Hussein’s ruling 
Arab Ba’aih Socialist Party said Sunday, 
reflecting a view that is widespread among 
ordinary Iraqis interviewed at random. 

There were few restraints, however, 
about what Iraqi officials portrayed as the 
defection of several Arab governments 
from supporting Baghdad during the cri- 
sis, as they had done in 1990 and 1991. 
During that time, Jordan. Yemen, .Algeria. 
Tunisia and the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization openly sided with Iraq in its con- 
frontation with the United Slates and its 
allies in the Gulf War. 

King Hussein of Jordan was a major 
target of this criticism. In an article head- 
lined “Et Tu Brutus," A1 Jumhuriya. an- 
other daily that expresses Ba’ath views, 
castigated the king for his condemnation 
last week of Iraq’s troop movements. 

Nonetheless, the article reproduced the 
full text of King Hussein's comments, 
which were in several segments heavily 
critical of Baghdad's actions and in which 
the king vowed to stand against any new 
aggression by Iraq against Kuwait. 


A PIECE OF THE ACTION: 
How the Middle Class 
Joined the Money Class 

By Joseph Nocera. 464 pages. 
525. Simon & Schuster. 

Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupt 

VER the past two decades, 
V-f “we've been participating 
in nothing less than a money 
revolution.” writes Joseph No- 
cera, a business and financial 
journalist, in his entertaining 
but uncritical cultural history. 

“Money revolution" is “not a 
term I use lightly ” he contin- 
ues. “When one recalls what the 


financial life of the middle class 
was like 20 years ago — when 
thrift was the highest value, 
when the daily movement of the 
Dow Jones average had almost 
no relevance to our lives, when 
few of us knew what a mutual 
fund was. much less the distinc- 
tion between, say. a growth 
fund and a balanced fund — it's 
hard not to conclude that the 
change has, indeed, been revo- 
lutionary.'’ 

How did the change come 
about that has permitted the 
middle class to spend and invest 
in a way that once only the 
wealthy could do? Nocera traces 
the change to three major finan- 
cial innovations: the widespread 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Leonard Korea, an author 
living in Tokyo and San Fran- 
cisco, is reading “Imaginative 
Qualities of Actual Things . " by 
Gilbert Sorremino. 

“It’s a novel that's a decon- 
struction of the typical novel. 
He makes the characters as flat 
and cardboard-like as possible. 
You're basically watching the 
backstage mechanics or writ- 
ing.’* (Steven BrulU 1HT) 


M f *gj 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

T HE diagram shows the 
most dramatic deal in the 
World Mixed Pairs final. Most 
pairs arrived in a contract of six 
hearts, which was doomed by 
the bad trump split. A few 
avoided that fate, however, and 
one was John Swanson of Mis- 
sion Viejo, California, who held 
the North cards. After he had 
responded heart to one dia- 
mond, his partner, Carol Sand- 
ers of Nashville, leaped to five 
no-trump. This was a grand 
slam force requiring a bid of 
seven hearts if North held two 
of the top three trump honors. 

Six clubs showed the queen 
of trumps and South settled in 
six hearts. But Swanson thougt- 
fully converted to six no-trump, 
judging that that contract 
would be as good as six hearts, 
and perhaps better. He knew 
that his partner's hand must 
contain a void club and enor- 
mous strength in the other suits. 

After a spade lead. South was 
able to make three spade tricks, 
two hearts, five diamonds and 
two clubs. A club lead would 
have been more difficult, but 
South would, perhaps, have 
prevailed: Cashing the heart 


ace would have revealed the po- 
sition in that suit, and would 
have forced South to work on 
spades for a 12lh trick. 

A few pairs reached the diffi- 
cult contract of six diamonds. 
After a club lead, the slam 
could be made by discarding 
spades on the club' winners and 
maneuvering a spade ruff in the 
strong hand. After drawing 
trumps, the play of the heart ace 
followed by a duck endplayed 
■the East player. 

NORTH 

♦ i 3 t 

: Q 7 3 2 

: J r- 5 2 

* A K 


WEST 

* Q 10 3 2 
V K 

: 76 3 

* H 6 5 A 3 


EAST (D) 

♦ 76 

: J 10 6 5 

:• s 

* Q J 10 R 7 2 
SOUTH 

♦ A K S ft 
' A R S 4 
.* A K O 10 4 
*- 


Ni-ithrr side was vulntTalili'. ITm- 


acceptance of the credit card, 
which democratized debt: the 
rise of the mutual fund, which 
democratized investment, and 
the coming of the discount briv- 
kerage house, which democra- 
tized investment strategy. 

What spurred these innova- 
tions, Nocera reasons, was a 
shift in the financial ethos of 
the average American caused 
by the great inflation of the late 
1970s and early I^SOs. The re- 
sulting decline in the value of 
money wiped away the lesson 
taught by the Great Depression 
of saving now and spending lat- 
er and replaced it with the prac- 
tice of spending now and pay- 
ing later, with cheaper dollars. 
A climate of thrift gave way u* 
one of extravagance. 

This shift, along with the ar- 
rival of credit cards, mutu.il 
funds and discount brokers, 
built up a pressure that eventu- 
ally blew away the legal harriers 
that once separated such enti- 
ties as banks and brokerage 
houses, savings accounts and 
money-market funds. Once 
these barriers fell, the middle 
class rushed in to May. 

Nocera recounts how all tins 
happened in what he jptl\ de- 
scribes as a melding of history 
with journalism. \Vhal nukes 
Nocera’s narrative lick along so 
effectively, though, is his close- 
up portraits of figures like 
Charles Merrill, who dreamed of 
selling stocks to everyone but 
failed because he disliked mutu- 
al funds, and Dee Ward Hock, 
who evolved the Visa card and 
made it work; Edward Crosby 
(Ned) Johnson of Fidelity Man- 
agement and RcscurcK. who 
thought up the idea of j money- 
market fund with check-wiiting 
privileges. 

The result is particularly ab- 
sorbing because it describes a 
series of events that must readers 
will find us familiar as mashed 
potatoes, vet it places them in a 


larger context that is well known 
only to those who follow the 
financial pages closely. 

A minor flaw in the book i:-. 
paradoxically, that it tends tog.-: 
bogeed down in gvvxi but re- 
side-ihe-point drama, like 
story of Ted and Nina Wan,: 
two" Hone Kong stock specul'. 
tors who immediately a(w 
Black Monday. J987‘, oua 
Charles Schwab & Co. S84 n:; 
lion in unpaid margin calls. Ni • . 
Wang bargained the settlem; r 
down to Sb7 million. Her hi 
hand was shortly thereafter fc- 

napptyi for a 560 million ra.- 

som. 530 million of which is s.i . 
to have been paid by his wife, ye 
he was never seen again. 

Nocera holds that the mon.’ 
revolution he describes is 
force For gen'd** because sw 
“have tools and resources atom 
disposal dial were formerly un- 
available io us. ana we haw 
been handed possibilities foi 
making money that !ud always 
been out of our read:.'’ 

The trouble is ili.u he fads to 
resolve that part i*f his thesis that 
involves the spectacular piling 
up *»! debt us a consequence of c 
lingering inflation psychology . 

The paradigm ol Ins hook 
may well be one Andrew- Kabr. 
a brilliant analyst of the credit- 
card market, who.se ideal cus- 
tomer would lake 44 vuars and 
$4,950 in interest to pay off a 
SI. i )00 loan. 

What **\ Piece of the Ac- 
tion" never acknowledges is 
that if marketers like Ruhr had 
their way, instead of rising into 
the money class, most of us 
would sink into the un-money 
class. As the old song puts it, 
we'd keep getting another day 
older and deeper in debt, and 
we'd owe our souls to the com- 
pany store 

Christopher Lehmann- Haupt 
t\ nt; the staff af The Sew Turk 
Times. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. OCTOBER IT, 1994 


Sri Lankan City Caught in Crossfire 

Jaffna, Under Siege by Anny, Ruled by Brutal Rebel Regime 


By John F. Burns 

' Sew York Times Service 

JAFFNA Sri Lanka — After years 
Under siege, this old colonial city in a far 
• comer of Asia has become a sad vestige 
of blasted buildings and ripped-up rail 
lines, of flickering kerosene lamps and 
tinkling bicycle bells. 

For nearly five years, the 750,000 peo- 
ple who live in the windswept Jaffna 
Peninsula on the northern lip of Sri Lan- 
ka, almost all members of the Tamil 
ethnic group, have lived without electric- 
ity, without telephones, and with scarce 
supplies of food and fuel. 

Even the railroad line to other parts of 
Sri Lanka is gone, its ties chopped for 
firewood and its rails melted for scrap. 

Surrounding Jaffna are Sri Lankan 
government forces, which haw used 
bombing raids, artillery salvos and naval 
attack boats to strike homes, churches 
and flotillas of small boats that try to flee 
the siege. 

Bui what seems to instill the most fear 
in one of the world's longest-running and 
most brutal ethnic wars is the rebel 
group that rules here, the Liberation Ti- 
gers of T amil Eelam, which has built one 
of Asia's most repressive societies. 

The fear is acknowledged, obliquely, 
even by top Tiger officials. 

“We are a small guerrilla organization 
fighting for the rights of a small people." 
said Anton Balasingham. the chief 
spokesman for the rebel group. “So we 
have had to utilize certain extraordinary 
methods in our style of war." 

Human rights groups say Tiger rule 
has been built on arbitrary arrests and 
torture, disappearances and assassina- 
tions. Similar practices have flourished 
on the other side of the conflict, where 


death squads formed from the Sri Lan- 
kan Army and police have operated for 
years. 

Most estimates put the combined 
death toll among civilians at 40.000, per- 
haps more, in addition to die 20.000 to 
30,000 combatants who have died on 
both sides since 1983. 

But where the Tigers are unique is in 
their reliance on what amounts to a chil- 
dren’s army. Tiger leaders have recruited 
boys and girls as young as 1 1. sending 
them into battle equipped with “suicide 
capsules,” glass vials of potassium cya- 
nide on cords around their necks to be 
taken if they are threatened with capture. 

At Tiger war cemeteries, headstones 
show many fighters who were not yet 
teenagers when they died, only a few 
older than 18. At street comers through- 
out Jaffna, there are shrines to dead 
Tigers consisting of life-size cutouts of 
teenage fighters killed in battle. 

Moving about Jaffna in sullen-faced 
groups, young fighters spread an atmo- 
sphere of anxiety. When a truckload of 
guerrillas carrying Chinese-made auto- 
matic rifles stopped beside a row of food 
stalls in the city, adult shoppers fell si- 
lent. Many hastened away. 

Asked why, one middle-aged man re- 
plied curtly. “Can’t say.” A woman com- 
panion placed a finger to her lips, saying. 
“The facts must rest in our hearts.". 

The Tigers are the survivors of a vio- 
lent rivalry among militant groups acting 
to avenge decades of grievance among 
the country’s 3 milli on Tamils. 

After independence from Britain in 
1948, succeeding governments in Colom- 
bo, the capital, passed measures that 
gave privileges in education, government 
employment and language to the coun- 


try’s Sinhalese majority, who make up 
three-quarters of the population of 17 
million. 

Since the rebellion began among Tam- 
ils in 1983, Jaffna has known little peace, 
but recently there has been fresh hope. In 
a conciliatory gesture, the newly elected 
government of Prime Minister Chan- 
drika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga has 
begun raising the possibility of creating 
an autonomous T amil homeland in 
northern Sri Lanka that would have its 
capital in Jaffna but would remain 
linked to the rest of Sri Lanka in a 
federation. 

Velupillai Prabhakaran, the Tiger 
leader, has hinted that he may be ready 
to settle for less than an independent 
Tamil state. 

“We want a peaceful solution, one that 
will make our people secure,” said Mr. 
Balasingham. the rebels’ spokesman. 
“We know we cannot go on like this 
forever.” 

On both sides, the urge for peace 
seemed pervasive. Government troops at 
the air base said conditions were barely 
tolerable, with intense heat for much of 
the year and malaria epidemics. 

“We can't beat the Tigers," one officer 
said. “All we can do is to try and hang 
on.” 

In Jaffna, too, war weariness is strong. 
Along streets made gap-toothed by 
bombing and artillery, many people 
compared conditions under the siege to 
the battles involving colonial conquerors 
that went on for hundreds of years. 

“We are living in the 18th century." 
said Vincent Selvanayagam, 62, a notary, 
who makes his living typing documents 
on a battered Olivetti in a storefront in 
Jaffna’s center. “We have come to the 
tether's end.” 





n II •' Rir.iicr. 


Mr. Perry and Mr. Chi paving homage Sunday in Beijing. 


Extra Talks Held, but Pact Eludes U.S. and North Korea 


Compiled by Our Suff From Dispatches 

GENEVA — Negotiators 
from the United States and 
North Korea held two hours of 
unscheduled talks Sunday on 
easing nuclear tensions, but 
they reported no movement to- 
ward a settlement. 

“There is no progress to re- 
port, and we have not set plans 
for further meetings." said the 
chief U.S. negotiator, Robert L. 
Oallucci. 

But Defense Secretary Wil- 
1 liam J. Peny. arriving Sunday 
-n Beijing for talks, said an 
agreement could still come as 
soon as this week. 

Mr. Peny described the Ge- 


neva negotiations as moving to- 
ward a “very complicated" and 
“very far-reaching” agreement 
that would entail “working with 
the North Korean for years and 
years to come." 

He did not elaborate. 

Mr. Gallucci met informally 
with his North Korean counter- 
part, Kang Sok Ju, on Sunday, 
although no meeting bad been 
planned. The tw r o sides had 
seemed close to a breakthough 
Saturday, but the talks ended 
acrimoniously. 

A spokesman for the North 
Korean Foreign Ministry, Ho 
Jong, said the UJS. delegation 


had raised an “unacceptable 
and abnormal position." 

“Therefore the discussions 
became very serious and divi- 
sive." he said. 

Neither side explained why 
the talks had stalled. In Seoul'. 
South Korean officials said the 
United States was demanding 
that North Korea open up dia- 
logue with the South as part of 
the agreement. 

North Korea says any dia- 
logue between the two Koreas is 
an inter-Korean issue that does 
not concern the United Slates. 

South Korea says Washing- 
ton is making too many conces- 


sions to the North. Seoul was 
particularly concerned by re- 
ports that North Korea might 
be allowed a five-year breathing 
space before opening up two 
suspected nuclear waste sites to 
international inspections. 

North Korea has continually 
balked at opening the sites, 
which it claims are convention- 
al military facilities. The West 
believes they could contain 
proof that North Korea has 
been m aking nuclear bombs. 

The weekend reverse had 
come after increasing signs that 
a deal was close that would for- 
malize and flesh out an outline 
accord reached in August. 


Under that accord North Ko- 
rea agreed to freeze its graphite 
reactor construction program 
and close its one experimental 
reactor if the United States cre- 
ated a consortium of nations to 
provide it with much more cost- 
ly light-water reactors. 

Sticking points in the negoti- 
ations have included a North 
Korean demand for S2 billion 
in compensation for power lost 
during the freeze. 

The United States, supported 
by South Korea and some inter- 
national specialists, insists that 
Pyongyang provide convincing 
assurances that it has not di- 


verted plutonium in the past to 
make nuclear devices. 

The International Atomic 
Energy Agency, the United Na- 
tions nuclear watchdog, says 
the sites at Yongbyon north of 
Pyongyang could provide evi- 
dence of whether die Commu- 
nists had already worked on nu- 
clear weapons. ’ 

The United States has said 
that, as part of an overall deal, 
Pyongyang must formally com- 
mit itself to allowing the agency 
jo take a detailed look at Yong- 
byon. North Korea says it will 
ensure “transparency” once the 
new technology is installed. 

(AP. R euiers) 


W illi Pern’s Arrival 
U.S.-Guna Thaw 
F.Trpands to Military * 


By Steven Mufson 

WdlftnqpiVi Fuss Service 

BEIJING — The thaw in 
U.S. -Chinese relations contin- 
ued Sunday with the arnval 
here of Defense Secretary Wil- 
liam J. Peny. the second cabi- 
net member to visit since Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton eased tensions 
with Beijing by severing the link 
between human rights and 
trade in May. 

Unlike Commerce Secretary 
Ronald H. Brown, who deliv- 
ered a sales pitch for American 
companies during an August 
visit, Mr. Peny has diplomatic 
objectives. 

He aims to renew ties with 
the Chinese military because it 
is an important player in Chi- 
nese politics and because Wash- 
ington and Beijing share securi- 
ty interests ranging from arms 
control to defense conversion. 
Pentagon officials say. 

Mr. Perry’s mission is a sensi- 
tive one, both in the United 
States and China. 

In tbe United States, human 
rights advocates have con- 
demned the restoration of mili- 
tary contacts, which were cut in 
1989 after Chinese troops 
opened fire on pro-democracy 
demonstrators around Tianan- 
men Square. 

Other critics have raised con- 
cerns about China’s exports of 
sensitive missile technology to 
Pakistan and other nations. 
That criticism comes despite an 
accord signed in Washington 
this month by Foreign Minister 
Qian Qichen in which China 
promised not to sell medium- 
range missiles abroad. 

One indication of the politi- 
cal sensitivity of Mr. Perry’s vis- 
it: Whereas Mr. Brown brought 
25 corporate chief executives 
with him to promote deals. Mr. 
Perry has brought two key sena- 
tors: the chairman of the 
Armed Services Committee. 
Sam Nunn, Democrat of Geor- 
gia. and the committee’s rank- 
ing Republican, John W. 
Warner of Virginia. 

“I will stress,” Mr. Perry said, 
“that the military relationship 
is bounded by the political con- 
text, which includes human 
rights, and that security prob- 
lems caused by proliferation 
damage the mutual security in- 
terests and bilateral relation- 
ships.” He spoke to reporters 


while flying from Kuwait to 
Beijing. Reuters said. 

Mr. Peny encounters a mili- 
tary in flux. The 3.2 million- 
member People's Liberation 
Army is re-examining its strate- 
gy, outdated equipment and re- 
lationship to the Communist 
Party — issues that have inten- 
sified in the five years since the 
suspension of U.S.-Chinese 
military cooperation.' More- 
over. China’s newfound confi- 
dence, from .economics to 
sports, has fanned nationalist 
sentiment embracing the mili- 
tary. 

Mr. Perry reviewed Chinese 
troops with Defease Minister 
Chi Haotian outside Beijing's 
military museum on Sunday af- 
ternoon. 

“These meetings wilt hdp our 
two militaries to build under- 
standing and trust that have 
been missing for too many 
years," he said later in a dinner 
banquet toast. “By building this 
understanding and trust we can 
make China, America and in- 
deed the whole world more 
peaceful and more secure." 

Mr. Chi raised a toast to 
“friendship and cooperation 
between our two countries." 

Chinese military leaders have 
an agenda for Mr. Perry’s visit 
.that sources in Beijing say has 
little in common with the 
A men can’ 5 . 

First, they want to mend the 
rifts that followed the 1984 
crackdown. Some observers sec 
Mr. Perry’s visit as a vindica- 
tion of China's supreme leader. 
Deng Xiaoping, who following 
the killings shrugged off foreign 
criticism and the damage done 
to relations as temporary. 

In addition, said a regional 
military attache in Beijing. 
“The Chinese want to regain 
what they see as their rightful 
position in the world — that is 
to say a position as an interna- 
tional power." 

The Chinese effort to regain 
status is driving shifts in strate- 
gy. arms purchases and spend- 
ing. 

On the strategic front, the A 
military wants to move, away r 
from a defensive, land-based 
force, which was the bedrock of 
Mao's notion of “people’s war." 

Instead, the army wants to 
develop the ability, to move 
troops more effectively and 
quickly by air and sea. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


Page 7 


Charles Tells All in Authorized 9 Book 


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By Fred Barbash 

WasHngon P oa Sorter 

LONDON — The “autho- 
T rized biography” of Prince 
U Charles, written by a friend 
1 ■ with his cooperation, made its 
\ debut on ^mday. 

It is a woefnl, sdf-justifying, 
self-pitying story of a lonely 
>: childhood, a remote and relent- 
f, kssly demanding father, a mar- 

riage into which Charles was 
<■ browbeaten and which, by this 
i account,, fdl apart despite his 
>■ best efforts to cope vwth Di- 
ana’s bewildering neurotic be- 
havior. 

1 The Sunday Times published 

!i the first 'iustaUment of three 
*. weeks of serialization of ‘The 
,! Prince of Wales,” by Jonathan 

/; Dimbldyy, a broadcaster and 

journalist The book will be 
published Nov. 3. 

i The paper reported that 

I Prince Charles cooperated with 

v the book, turning over intimate 

II letters and journals, and 
“checked its factual accuracy.” 

r It is his story, the paper said. 

^ Since Princess Duma's buli- 

mic behavior has already been 
t. reported, the revelation receiv- 
■' * ing the most attention here is 
; that Prince PhiSp, the Duke of 
Edinburgh, rushed Charies into 
t the marriage in 1981 out of con- 
cern that Diana's reputation, 
and that of the royal family, 
were being compromised by her 
c frequent presence with Charles 
at Balmoral Castle. 

The prince interpreted his 
father's attitude as an ultima- 
tum,” the book says. Tn what 
he confessed was a ‘confused 
and anxious state of mind,' the 
prince tried to reconcile himself 
to the inevitable” and went 
ahead. 

Diana’s strange behavior be- 
gan after they became engaged 
and after she moved into state 
apartments in preparation for 
marriage- She fat “trapped and 
1 frightened,” the book says, and 
became bulimic and demand- 
ingly suspicious about whether 
Charies had broken off his pre- 
vious relationship with Camilla 
Parker Bowies. 

The prince,” says the book, 
“was not prepared for this 
transformation- Having known 
only the'joQy’ girl who had en- 
tivened Balmoral six months 
earlier, he was baffled to dis- 
cover her sudden shifts in mood 
— her ‘other side’ as he referred 
‘ to it. He put it down to the 
strain of media attention.” 

After the mar riage, her “con- 
fusion and uncertamty” contin- 
ued. She had “bouts of unhap- 
piness” and would “sit hunched 
on a chair, her head on her 
knees, quite inconsolable.” 




’** ‘ - . . 


the marriage had deteriorated. 
And a former army major 
caused & sensation recently by 
publishing an account of what 
he described as a torrid affair 
with Diana before the separa- 
tion. 

There have been suggestions 
from constitutional scholars 
that Parliament deny Charles 
succession to the throne, in fa- 
vor of one of his sons. 

Some observers suggested 
that his television interview and 
this book are attempts to pro- 
tect his position in line by blam- 
ing everyone else for the cou- 
ple's troubles. 

Much attention focused here 
on Sunday on the book's ac- 
count of Charles's boyhood re- 
lationship with his father and 
mother. Queen Elizabeth. Phil- 
ip was described as disappoint- 
ed that his son was “soft,” “a bit 
of a wimp” unathletic and dis- 
interested in horsemanship. 

The small boy was frequent- 
ly brought to tears by the mock- 
ing banter” of his father, partic- 
ularly at social gatherings, the 
book says. Nor did he find com- 
fort in his mother, who he de- 
■ scribes as aloof and deferential 
* 0 * 1 ^. JZZ gPhilip in matters involving 

Charies arriving Sunday for church services at BalmoraL M ^ &(rN - mto 

they grew even further apart. 

“Yet she scoured every tab- der the rug. The couple, who Charles felt “squashed and 
loid newspaper for photographs have two children, are now sep- guilty that by choosing the ti- 




r- \ 


of herself, as if hoping to dis- 
cover her identity there," the 
book says. 

“Even the Falklands cam- 
paign failed to arouse her curi- 
osity,'’ the book says, referring 
to Britain's war with Argentina 
over the Falkland Islands. It 
adds, “Indeed, she seemed to 
resent the interest bong shown 
in the Falklands rather than in 
her.” 

Diana grew increasingly de- 
spondent and jealous and was 
subject to mood swings and fee- 
ble attempts at self-destruction, 
the book says, at one point 
hurlng herself down a staircase. 

Charles “watched her tears 
flow and, on one occasion, he 
had sat much of the day alone 
with her, bowed in silence, ap- 
parently insensible to his pres - 1 
enc&” 

Later, the book says, he 
wrote that he was in ““total 
agony about the situation and I 
don't see how much longer one 
can go on trying to sweep it 
under the carpet and pretend 
nothing is wrong.' ” 

He added, “ ‘It is like being 
trapped in a rather desperate 
cul-de-sac.’” 

Of course, it did not stay un- 


have two children, are now sep- guilty that by choosing the ti- 
ara ted. Charles has gone on brary rather than the horse, it 
television confessing that he be- seemed he had in some indefin- 
came unfaithful, but only after able way let his family down.” 


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Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
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Page 8 


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 




OPINION 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sritmue 


PnJJulMd With Thr Mr* York Turn and Tl» Wnshiapuw Pr n i 


A Prize to Encourage Peace 


There were three winners of the Nobel 
Peace Prize announced on Friday, but 
only one, Yasser Arafat, has generated all 
the controversy. Let it not be forgotten 
that Yitzhak Kabin and Shimon Peres 
were also honored for their contribution 
to the most important peacemaking de- 
velopment of the last year, the framework 
agreement between Israel and the PLO. 

Prime Minister Rabin and Foreign 
Minister Peres both played key roles in 
securing the peace agreement, and the 
Nobel Committee was right to have them 
share the honor. The two fought bitterly 
over the leadership and direction of Isra- 
el's Labor Party for many years, but they 
set aside their differences, and Mr. Rabin's 
well-earned skepticism about PLO reli- 
ability, to seize a historic opportunity for 
peacemaking. In doing so. they at first 
responded to and then went on to lead a 
d rama tic change in Israeli public opinion. 

Mr. Arafat Has spent most of his adult 
life leading a terrorist organization 
pledged to brad’s destruction. But last 
year he put Ins reputation and life on the 
fine to work for a peaceful resolution of 
the long Isradi-Palestmian conflict. Of 
course, a peace agreement is not yet peace. 
The crisis over the abduction of the brad 
soldier Nachshon Waxman by Hamas ex- 
tremists, leading to Friday’s tragically 
failed rescue attempt, illustrates the con- 
tinuing vulnerability of peace efforts. 

Some argue that only pacifist saints, 
healers or nonviolent crusaders like the 
Dalai Lama, Mother Teresa or the Rever- 
end Martin Luther Kin g Jr. shoald win 
the Nobel Peace Prize. But there is value 
also in honoring more worldly political 
leaders — even former terrorists — who 
have taken an important and courageous 


turn toward peace. Such awards can en- 
courage persistence in a difficult, long- 
term process, strengthen the hand of for- 
mer terrorists like Mr. Arafat against 
present-day terrorists like the Hamas or- 
ganization, and set a positive example for 
future converts from the path of violence. 

This is not the first time the committee 
has ignored the warlike past of candi- 
dates to honor their later deeds. In 1973 
the prize was awarded to Henry Kissinger 
and Le Due Tho of Vietnam for agreeing 
to end a war they had previously helped 
conduct. The 1978 co-winners, Mena- 
chem Begin and Anwar Sadat, were also 
chosen for switching course from war to 
peace. Mikhail Gorbachev, who won the 
1990 Peace Prize for dis m a n tling a police 
state and liberating a captive empire, was 
also responsible for waging wax in Af- 
ghanistan and authorizing deadly repres- 
sion in the Caucasus and the Baltics. 

Such mixed careers and late-life 
changes reflect the career of the prize's 
creator, Alfred NobeL Although neither 
terrorist nor politician, be started out as a 
munitions maker, earned his first Swed- 
ish patent for a method of making gun- 
powder and made his name and fortune 
from inventing and manufacturing lethal 
explosives, including the old terrorist 
standby dynamite. Yet be is now remem- 
bered mainly for endowing the various 
Nobel prizes, including a peace prize. 

For all his past outrages and present 
equivocations, Mr. Arafat, the former 
terrorist, along with Mr. Rabin, the for- 
mer general, and Mr. Peres, the former 
champion of Jewish settlement in the 
occupied West Bank, have made this 
year’s most notable contribution to peace. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Change for Brazil 


Brazil now seems to be taking off on a 
burst of growth that can place it firmly 
among the world's major industrial pow- 
ers. Its economy is growing strongly, an H 
the man who devised the current econom- 
ic policy as finance minister has just been 
elected president It is the first time in a 
generation that Brazil has known strong 
economic performance under competent 
democratic leadership. For decades, Bra- 
zil has puzzled outsiders as a country thar 
produced a less good fife for most of its 
people than it was clearly capable of 
•doing. It may now be entering a period in 
which the gap between potential and real- 
ity is at last diminished. 

The reasons why a country chronically 
foils short of its economic potential are 
always instructive. In Brazil’s case, one 
clue is the extremely Ugh inflation that in 
recent years seemed to be turning into a 
national tradition. But behind the infla- 
tion were other bad habits, such as pro- 
tectionism and a pattern of r unning large 
parts of the economy for the benefit of a 
few people with political influence. Over 
the decades, that led to grossly uneq u a l 
distribution of income — the most un- 
equal of any large country in the world — 
and great concentrations of wealth. That 
inequality has been the cause of the coun- 


try’s political instability over the years. 

But Brazil is chang in g . The presiden- 
tial election this month was the third 
since the militaryjunta collapsed nearly a 
decade ago. and despite many crises and 
disappointments since then the demo- 
cratic process seems weD established. The 
winner in this election, Fernando Henri- 
que Cardoso, believes that an expanding 
economy is the necessary base for social 
reform. That was the crucial difference 
between him and the populist candidate 
he overwhelmingly defeated. 

Mr. Cardoso understands clearly that 
inflation is an enemy that has to be 
fought; under his plan, the inflation rate 
has fallen from SO percent a month in 
June to less than 2 percent in September. 

He has promised to open Brazil’s pro- 
tected markets and push the privatization 
of state enterprises. That will not be easy, 
for it is an assault on all the highly profit- 
able alliances between businesses and the 
old-style politicians. But Mr. Cardoso has 
impressive public support. Brazilians have 
been attentively watching what has hap- 
pened elsewhere in Latin America when 
markets have been opened to competition. 
Now Brazil has voted by a decisive major- 
ity to turn itself in the same direction. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Don’t Get Stuck in Haiti 


r of Hai- 
tians, the return of President Jean- Ber- 
trand Aristide is a joyous occasion. For a 
small but important minority, particular- 
ly among the economic and military elite, 
it is a nightmare oome true. For President 
Bill Clinton, it is a foreign policy victory 
but by no means an undiluted one. It 
took three years, many policy reversals 
and finally a dubious use of U.S. military 
force to get to this point The road ahead 
could be even more militarily treacherous 
and politically complicated. 

These cautions take nothing away from 
Father Aristide. He won Haiti’s first and 
only democratic election overwhelming- 
ly. Although he then needlessly antago- 
nized political allies and spoke in ways 
that seemed to countenance mob violence, 
his seven-month tenure was marked by 
fewer human rights violations and fewer 
boat people than any comparable period 
in motion Haitian history. After the mili- 
tary ousted him in a September 1991 coup, 
his supporters never deserted Mm; they 
suffered for him and kept dreaming of his 
return. Now he calls for reconciliation, 
justice and an end to bloodshed. 

But the very novelty of Haitian demo- 
cracy means that there are no institutions 
to cany out orderly change and to reas- 
sure members of the old elite that their 
rights and even their lives will not be 
sacrificed. No court system worthy of 
the name exists. The only forces of order 
that Haiti ever knew were partisan de- 
fenders of the old regime. 

Now that these have been broken by 
American power, only unreliable recruits 
of dubious loyalties are available to re- 


place them. The Clinton administration 
must steel itself against any temptation to 
move into this vacuum. U.S. troops must 
try to limit their involvement in police 
activities while an interim UN peace- 
keeping force is recreated and trained. 

That will be harder than ever now that 
Lieutenant General Raoul C&dras and 
his cronies have finally gone and Father 
Aristide has physically returned. Even if 
President Aristide heeds U.S. pleas to put 
aside his radical electoral mandate, Ms 
supporters have high expectations and 
may be tempted to take matters into their 
own hands. So may his enemies. If prop- 
erty owners recruit armed men to defend 
thar estates from vigilante seizure, 
should U.S. troops try to disarm these 
private defenders? If so, should the 
Americans protect these threatened es- 
tates themselves, using deadly force if 
necessary? Anything Washington does or 
does not do in such circumstances would 
have serious repercussions both in Haiti 
and at home. The best thing the din ton 
administration can do is to keep the U.S. 
nrihtaiy mission limited and brief. 

The United States has a human interest 
in helping Haitians out of thar pain and 
misery. So long as the new government 
lives up to its promises of democracy, 
reconciliation and h uman rights, Wash- 
ington should be generous with aid mid 
technical support But with an elected 
government now in charge and no roil 
U.S. national security interests at stake, 
the U.S. military occupation, never a 
good idea in thie first place, must be 
wound up as soon as possible. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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Now Follow Up With a Drive to Bring Down Saddam 


TT7ashington — The American show of 
W force that pushed Saddam Hus- 
sein’s marauding troops and tanks back 
from the Kuwaiti frontier should be pre- 
lude. not finale. The Clinton administra- 
tion must follow up this modest success 
with a mili tary and diplomatic campaign 
to bring down the Iraqi dictator. 

America has the military capability, 
the moral obligation and sufficient eco- 
nomic national interest at slake to pro- 
tect Iraq's dozens and its neighbors from 
the criminal regime that holds power in 
Baghdad. The Clinton administration 
should not be deterred from doing that 
by abstract arguments about Iraq's “ter- 
ritorial integrity" or by the new obstruc- 
tionism of France and Russia in the Gulf. 

Americans should some day erect a 
statue to Saddam for all that he has done 
for America's role in the world. His 
aborted military thrust toward Kuwait 
brought Washington’s attention back to 
the unfinished conflicts of the Gulf, 
which have not been calmed by the No- 
bel Prize-winning diplomacy of an Israe- 
li-Palestinian peace accord.’ 

Bill Clinton has been newly reminded 
that the Gulf and its oil supplies form the 
Achilles’ heel of foreign policy for modem 
American presidents. Misadventure in So- 
malia or Haiti mil damage you. Mistakes 
in ihe Gulf that cause gas lines will destroy 
you. The Gulf is in America's economic 


By Jim Hoagland 


and political hemisphere as certainly as 
Haiti is in its geographic hemisphere. 

Saddam’s desert excursion also ex- 
posed the changes in French- U.S. rela- 
tions and the withering of Russian- 
American cooperation on global affairs 
that President Clinton now confronts. 
The unchallenged authority that the 
United States has exercised in the Gulf 
since Operation Desert Storm is eroding 
as the global political dimate changes. 

This became clear when France openly 
opposed the admirable idea floated by 
Defense Secretary William Perry of estab- 
lishing a demilitarized zone in southern 
Iraq. Mr. Perry’s counterpart, Francois 
Leotard, brazenly accused the Americans 
of playing politics with the crisis and said 
Saddam had done nothing wrong by mov- 
ing his troops around in his own country. 

Gaullists are poised to take complete 
power in France when the ailing Socialist 
president, Francois Mitterrand, steps 
down in a few months. French diplomacy 
could then revert to the anti-American, 
pro-Saddam, oil-centered policies that 
prevailed before Mr. Mitterrand. French 
oil companies, eagerly seeking new oppor- 
tunities in the rogue regimes of the Middle 
East, expect to win privileged positions 
under Saddam if sanctions are lifted. 


Russia, which holds billions of dollars 
in lOUs from Saddam, rushed in to pro- 
pose lifting UN sanctions in return for 
Saddam’s conditional recognition of the 
Kuwaiti frontier. The changes in the 
French and Russian attitudes underscore 
the need for a bold American initiative 
along the lines of the Perry plan to rectify 
the errors that George Bush made at the 
end of Operation Desert Storm. 

The senior Bush officials who formed 
the Deputies Committee to mana ge cri- 
ses Had drawn up plans for a demilita- 
rized zone in southern Iraq to deter rise 
kind of operation by Saddam that trig- 
gered last week’s costly and distracting 
dash by 30,000 American soldiers to the 
Gulf. But Mr. Bush and Secretary of 
State James Baker let themselves be 
tfltltvd out of it by General Norman 
Schwarzkopf, who was eager to get out of 
Iraq with Ms reputation as a conquering 
hero at its height 

Also opposed were Bush foreign policy 
officials who feared that detaching part 
of Iraq from Saddam’s control would 
cause the country to fragment and open 
the way for Iranian control of the south. 

Saddam has used the control granted 
him by Mr. Bush to implement genoddal 
ramp ai gns against the Shiite Muslim pop- 
ulation of the south. “Territorial integrity” 
in Iraq's case is simply a license for the 
murder, on a massive scale, of S a dd a m’s 


opponents. VS. policymakers seem to 
condone this death sentence because of 
the unproved premise that the Shiites 
would quickly fall under the control of the 
mullahs in Tehran if Saddam goes. 

The Iraqi excursion gives Mr. Clinton 
a golden opportunity to beef up U.S. air 
power in the region sad to zap Saddam's 
Forces if they remain in the south, whether 
a formal demilitarized zone is declared o t 
not Authority for such air strikes already 
exists in United Nations resolutions. 

The brief period in which American 
power could best be exercised in the Gulf 
through a multinational coalition is 
ending. On Iraq, the international envi- 
ronment will now be competitive, rather 
than cooperative. 

Americans must respond to that 
change by being clear about their own 
interests, which in this case parallel the 
interests of Iraqis abused citizens and of 
global peace. Those interests can be 



Mr. Bush caved to the generals and 
refused to make Iraq's south a no-go 
zone for Saddam’s butchery. Mr. Clinton 
and Mr. Perry cannot turn back the 
dock, but they can make sure that they 
do not let Saddam get away with mass 
murder once again. 

The Washington Pest. 


Russia: High Time for a Tough Program of Currency Stabilization 


/Cambridge, Massachusetts — 
V/ After the forced resignation 
on Friday of the cMef of Russia's 
central bank, Viktor Gerash- 
chenko, some credibility may be 
restored to the ruble — if the 
Parliament does not restore him 
to office. But the ruble’s wild gy- 
rations may well produce a new 
round of political instability. 

And that is not alL Even if the 
ruble is stabilized at its Friday 
dose of 2,988 to the dollar, there 
will still be a tidal wave of infla- 
tion as prices adjust to the ruble’s 
loss of value since AugusL Infla- 
tion surely will soar to more than 
10 percent a month from foe 1994 
low of 5 percent in AugusL 

The general cause of the ruble's 
downward trend is easy to pin- 
point After pursuing a tight mon- 
etary policy for half a year, the 
government and the central bank 
flooded the market with new cred- 
its in the last three months to cover 
the government's budget deficit 


Bv Jeffrey Sachs 


and relieve favored enterprises of 
bulging debts. These credits imme- 
diately found their way into the 
foreign exchange market causing 
the ruble to lose value. 

From Sept. 22 to Oct. 10, the 
value of 1,000 rubles fell from 46 
to 34 cents. The next day. Black 
Tuesday, foe value collapsed to 
just 25 cents. By Friday the ruble 
had rebounded to about 33 cents. 

The specific cause of last week's 
dramatic collapse is hard to fath- 
om. One view- in Moscow attri- 
butes it to market panic caused by 
a growing perception that foe 
bank had stopped selling dollar 
reserves to support foe ruble. 

Another theory in Moscow, 
equally plausible, is that the col- 
lapse on Black Tuesday was actu- 
ally concocted by foe central 
bank, which misjudged the pub- 
lic's fury at its inflationist poli- 
cies, and then backpedaled. In 


this view, the bank's goal was to 
transfer income to politically 
powerful exporters via a weaker 
currency as well as to inflate away 
foe value of ruble debts of the 
government and key enterprises. 

Although bizarre, this interpre- 
tation has its merits. The former 
central bank chief, Mr. Gerash- 
chenko, has been a relentless in- 
flationist. He has always been 
ready to run the bank's printing 
presses to benefit political pa- 
trons and has never been shy 
about confiscating the public's 
savings through inflation or even 
the cancellation of currency notes. 

His most powerful backer has 
been Prime Minister Viktor Cher- 
nomyrdin. whose main political 
base is Gazprom, the state gas 
monopoly and the country's larg- 
est exporter, and therefore the 
primary beneficiary of a cheaper 
ruble. When President Boris Yelt- 


sin exploded in fury at the col- 
lapse of the currency and called 
for Mr. Gerashchenko's head, die 
prime minis ter rushed bade from 
his vacation and reportedly tried 
to protect the central bank chief. 

Whichever interpretation is 
correct, a more fundamental 
point is clear. Russian monetary 
polity has been in the hands of a 
few powerful people who under- 
stand little and care little about 
normal monetary policy and in- 
stead view central bank credits as 
a resource to be manipulated at 
will for short-run advantage. 

The IMF, which should know 
better, has played into this per- 
sonalism relentlessly by desi g nin g 
its recommendations to give max- 
imum freedom of maneuver to 
senior Russian officials while 
providing for minimum scrutiny. 

I was Mr. Ydtsin's economic 
adviser until January, when I re- 
signed because 1 thought that nei- 
ther the government nor the West 


Haiti: Serving Haitians and the U.S. National Interest 


W ASHINGTON — Henry 
Kissinger has asserted that 
the Clinton administration fails to 
show a “demonstrable threat to 
the national security" justifying 
U.S. entry into Haiti. He seems to 
think that a desperately poor near- 
by country ruled by brutal military 
officers, throwing off refugees and 
undermining the Western Hemi- 
sphere’s commitment to the rule of 
law, could not constitute a security 
threat But if so. very little would 
qualify as a threat to UJS. interests 
in the post-Coid War world. 

As President BQl Clinton out- 
lined in his speech to the nation 
on Sept 15, foe rule of the gener- 
als in Haiti did indeed thnraten 
the stability of the hemisphere 
and the interests of America. 

The threat came from horren- 
dous abuses of human rights by 
an illegal military government at 
war with its own citizens. 

It came from an economic and 
ecological disaster in Haiti that 
could much every nation in the 
Caribbean and on the Gulf of 
Mexico, including the United 


By J. Brian Atwood 

The writer heads the U.S. Agency for International Development. 


Slates. The toll of such a threat 
would be measured in new refu- 
gee flows, as Haiti's 7 million 
people faced the prospect of star- 
vation or perpetual dependence 
on neighbors for imported food. 

In the wider context, the threat 
from Haiti under the generals was 
the assault on the progress to- 
ward democracy that has been 
made throughout the hemisphere 
— progress that the United States 
has actively supported. 

For the first time in history, 
nearly every country south of the 
U.S. border has an elected gov- 
ernment, and with it a free market 
economy that makes the Americas 
one of foe world's premiere grow- 
ing regions and creating jobs and 
markets for the United States. 

This development is a critical 
and admirable gain that has en- 
hanced hemispheric stability and 
America's own security. But it 
was endangered by events in Hai- 


ti, and as long as U.S. security is 
shaped by events in its hemi- 
sphere it could not ignore such a 
threat to peace and prosperity. 

In a number of countries, polit- 
ically ambitious dements of the 
military continue to be a poten- 
tial threat to their countries' de- 
mocracies. Recognizing this, the 
Organization of American States 
has acted to deter military coups 
d'&tat and encourage a new ethos 
of democratic civilian control. 

The most significant of these 
initiatives was foe Santiago Reso- 
lution, wMch established that 
“representative democracy is an 
indispensable condition" and 
committed OAS governments to 
counter “the sudden or irregular 
interraption of the democratic 
political institutional process.” 

In the case of Haiti, the OAS 
member states first tried to per- 
suade the Haitian mihtaxy leaders 
to return the elected government 


A Chance at Last to Redesign the CIA 


W ASHINGTON — When 
George Bush’s post-Desert 
Storm popularity ran off the 
charts (it was 90 percent at one 
timeX people said he should use it 
to rally the country around some 
acute domestic need. He didn't. 
Bill Clinton expects no such 
boost from his two-fingers- 
crossed successes in Haiti and 
Kuwait. Bui say someone finally 
noticed and he got ieadersMp 
traction. Where should he lead? 

The CIA cries out for his atten- 
tions. The Aldrich Ames scandal 
ripped off the seven veils of the 
haunted bouse in McLean. What 
has been exposed is an agency 
that can’t spy a spy in its midst 
and doesn't think that foe incom- 
petents who failed should be pun- 
ished in any way. In fact, two of 
them flew to Bonn to give an 
award to one of the principal mis- 
creants in the Ames affair. 

We have also found out that the 
CIA, whose predilection for effi- 
cient right-wing Idlleis was abso- 
lutely demonstrated in B Salvador 
and the infamous contra war, was 
at it again in Haiti. They were 
funding die head of the paramili- 
tary organization who organized 
the nimble on the dock that sent 
the Harlan County scuttling out of 
Port-au-Prince harbor. It was one 
of the many instances when the 
CIA has given citizens the oppor- 
tunity to see their tax dollars at 
work on both rides of U.S. policy. 

Of course, the agency, with its 
wonted high-handedness, was try- 
ing to find a substitute for the 
democratically elected President 
Jean-Bertand Aristide, whom it 
slandered in a notorious “psycho- 
logical profile.” The CIA seems to 
feel that democracy is all very well 
and good, but let's not overdo it 
R. James Woolsey, the director 


By Mary McGrory 


of Central Intelligence, has creat- 
ed for himself an insoluble prob- 
lem. He wants to defend the inde- 
fensible. Leave aside the agency’s 
long record of Borgia- type activi- 
ty, the illegal domestic spying 
during Vietnam and so on. The 
Ames case is itself a most power- 
ful argument for Senator Daniel 
P. Moynihan’s bill to close down 
the joint But in the end Mr. 
Woolsey issued reprimands only. 

In foe incident of the secret 
$310 mdllion office building that 
the CIA built for itself in Virginia, 
Mr. Woolsey seemed to fed that 
critics were overreacting. Candi- 
dates for re-election, flinching un- 
der the “tax and spend” lash of 
their opponents, were not amused. 

“Woolsey has a genius for rub- 
bing Congress the wrong way." 
grumbled a White House aide. 
The pale-eyed director is most 
anxious to maintain morale at the 
agency, which was founded to 
keep watch on the Soviet Union. 

Why the fall of the Wall did not 
inspire the abolition of an agency 
created mainly to monitor Mos- 
cow is a mystery buried deep in 
the congressional psyche. Mr. 
Moynihan thinks that the thrill of 
having knowledge that others are 
denied keeps members voting 
huge, secret sums for operations 
that cannot be discussed. 

Dan GKckman, the Democrat 
who chairs the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence, 
think? that what is needed is out- 
rage, both from die president and 
Mr. Woolsey. Mr. Clinton is apt to 
be ultra-deferential in dealing with 
any bureau in the defense com- 
plex, and Mr. Woolsey is anxious 
not to tread on spooks’ toes. The 


result is that the public hears noth- 
ing about the gravity of it all nor 
any resolve to reform. 

Mr. Gtickman thinks it makes 
no sense for the Clinton adminis- 
tration to take the r^p for deeds 
done in Langley with which be has 
no connection whatever. Congress 
voted for a 17-member commis- 
sion to inquire into what the agen- 
cy does. “No one has ever asked 
since h was founded" in 1947. 

Some of the agency's worst 
blunders can be rectified. Presi- 
dent Aristide was given God- 
speed at the White House and is 
being restored to Ms rightful 
place, the CIA’a claims of his al- 
leged mental illness having been 
long disproved. But the agents 
who were killed when exposed by 
Mr. Ames are beyond recall 

The president just doesn’t like 
to make enemies. This past week 
has shown him how useful they 
can be. Saddam Hussein, by belly- 
ing Up to the Kuwait border, gave 
him a chance to be presidential 
and tough. He summoned up U.S. 
troops and won respect worldwide 
— although not in Washington, 
where craven Democrats and ma- 
chete-throwing Republicans hear 
nothing but foe sounds of their 
wildly beating hearts, 

Raoul Cfedras and Cx, by slith- 
ering into exile; helped to show 
how a humane and rational for- 
eign policy, backed up by troops, 
can produce a just and happy out- 
come: Who knows? Hav ing seen 

that he has exceptional courage — 
he let Jimmy Carter go down and 
negotiate a peaceful invasion — 
people may be willing to follow 
Mm into dumping or at least 
downsizing the CIA, a Cold War 
relic wasting money that would be 
better used for drug treatment. 

The Washington Post. 


to power. When that failed, they . 
supported the imposition of sanc- 
tions. The United Nations and 
the broader international com- 
munity soon followed. Now that 
President Clinton, with the OAS 
and the United Nations, has act- 
ed decisively, the prospects for a 
more stable, democratic hemi- 
sphere have been enhanced. 

Critics who raise concerns 
about the use of U.S. power to 
preserve democracy in the far 
reaches of the globe are offering 
red herrings — implausible sce- 
narios intended less to enlighten 
debate than to feed public fears. 
They might remember that Amer- 
ica’s dear interest in preserving 
democracy in its region and its 
duty to uphold its international 
c ommi tments have been biparti- 
san tenets of UJS. foreign policy. 

We hear warnings about foe 
Hangar? of “nation building." Hai- 
ti wfflnot be the object of a unilat- 
eral reconstruction exocise, .nor 
one be undertaken by the UJS. 
military. Efforts to hdp with its 
economic and political reconstruc- 
tion plan are fully multilateral. 

President Jean-Bertrand Aris- 
tide is an elected leader with a real 
plan to transform Ms poor coun- 
try. He intends to decentralize 
government, gyving more authority 
to Ms people and to elected local 


tive justice system and a political 
process that will indude all Hai- 
tians. He intends to privatize state- 
owned firms, create capital mar , 
keis and lower trade barriers. This 
is an enlightened transition plan 
that has the full support of the 
intcanational community. 

Bill Clinton has chosen a sensi- 
ble course. With each passing Hay 
Haiti is becoming less threatening 
to American security and more 
conducive to freedom and liberty 
far the Haitian people. 

The Washington Post. 


was cm the right track to achieve 
real financial stability. And I 
wrote in March in the Financial 
Tunes of London that “almost no 
stabilization program in history 
has worked the way the IMF re- 
commends in Russia.” 

The most successful anti-infla- 
tion programs in the past decade 
— in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, 
the Czech Republic, Estonia, Is- 
rael, Mexico, Poland — have all 
worked by establishing a few sim- 
ple rules of monetary policy that 
can be easily monitored. 

The central bank should be giv- 
en political independence and a 
dear mandate to preserve the val- 
ue of the currency. The bank 
should stabilize the market value 
of the currency relative to the 
dollar or some other international 
currency. It should limit central 
bank credits to maintain the ex- - 
change rate target Compliance • 
with the rule should be evaluated 
at short intervals by monitoring 
the market exchange rate and the 
foreign currency reserves. 

What the Russians and the 
IMF have failed to understand is 
that such dear rules would speed 
economic recovery by bolstering 
confidence in the currency, there- 
by allowing the interest rates to 
come down to reasonable levels. 

Under the Rusaan-IMF ap- 
proach, because confidence in foe 
ruble was so low, interest rates had 
to be hdd at 15 percent a month to 
encourage Russians to hold rubles 
rather than black market dollars. 
After a few months of such pun- 
ishing rates, it was not surprising 
that the Russians abandoned the 
IMF program last summer. 

Both an exchange rate rule that 
was honored and lower interest 
rates would do more for Russian 
enterprises than all of Mr. Ger- 
ashchenko’s inflationary credits 
over the past two and a half years. 

Fiscal reform must accompany 
monetary reform. Russia’s tax sys- 
tem is a mix of punitive marginal 
tax rates, gaping loopholes, fla- 
grant evasion and admini strative 
neglect Russia urgently needs a . 
tax system with broad-based taxes# 1 
and low marginal tax rates along 
with tough tax 

The ruble crisis may finally 
wake up Russians and the West to 
bedrock realities. The IMF should 
stop backing the economic prom- 
ises of Individuals and instead 
promote a program of currency 
stabilization based on tough and 
transparent rules, a revised bank 
law and far-reaching tax reforms. 

It is not too late to make the 
ruble a stable currency, backed 
by an IMF stabilization fund. 
The costs of not doing so would 
be catastrophic if Russia fell prey 
to another bout of hyperinflation. 

But the real test is whether die 
Russians are prepared to live by 
the rule of law rather than foe 
often reckless discretion of pow- 
erful political figures. 


The writer, a professor of eco- 
nomics at Harvard, contributed did 
comment to The New York Times. 


IN OlIR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Kabul Ameer Is Hi 


had reduced their orders since the 
price was raised on October 1. He 
said that he objected to pouring 
surplus milk down the drain. 


PARIS — Surety there were al- 
ready enough elements of trouble 
in Asia, and now the Ameer of 

Kabul is ill. So many questions 1944: Roosevelt FWnted 

have been left m suspense until __ uwevcHDeraieu 

the d ea t h of this Asiatic Sever- LOUIS — [From our New 
ago, that whoever is familiar with edition:] Coventor Thomas 

international politics mays for . ^wey asserted before a roar- 
ing audience of Missouri Repub- 
“Mas that, since the Roosevelt J 
administration's domestic record ™ 
is “one long chapter of failure.’* 
the nation cannot trust it to do 
any better in administering Ameri- 
can policy abroad. TheRepuMi- 
can Presidential candidate 
charged that Roosevelt has 
Drought American representation 
ra vital areas abroad to “the brink 
of chaos,” and that even Prime 
Minister Winston Churchill 
J55* 4 » 1937 that the New 
*J!f ar °n private enterprise 
was lading the whole world 
into the trough of depression.* 


the prolongation of the life of 
this petty tyrant, who has de- 
ceived the European Powers. 
The danger for Europeans in Af- 
ghanistan can never have been 
greater than it would be in the 
event of the Ameer’s death. 

1919: A Strike Succeeds 

LONDON — By a silent strike, 
the women of Cherstsey have re- 
duced the price erf mflk a penny a 
quart at retafl. One prominent 
r-man announced that he 
reduce his price, dedaring 
that the majority of housewives 




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INTTERNATIONAL HER.ALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


Page 9 


The Stage is Set for 


The 

Greatest Cast 

OF 

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The International Herald Tribune and The State Commission for Restructuring The Economic Systems Present 


The 1995 China Summit 


APRIL 10-12 1995 -BEIJING 


Once again, the International Herald Tribune and the the world. ★ For the second time running, there 


State Commission for Restructuring the Economic will be an opportunity to hear and personally meet 


Systems of the PRC are inviting the world's business the people who are driving China's economic direction 


leaders to the most important meeting of the year in into the next millennium. ★ If your corporation has 


China. ★ The success of the inaugural C hina Summit a stake in the future of the Chinese economy, the 


in May prompted the Chinese government to call for 1995 China Summit is the gathering that you cannot 


an annual gathering in Beijing where the leaders of afford to miss. 


i32’i6f 71 y ; . r 


China and world business can work together in order 


■s.s'T’' 

.H - r 1 / 


•Wi ■- 


to promote better understanding between China and 


Heralb^Mune 


nnUNHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON PO*T 


Don’t mis> tins opportunity to become one of the World Players in the future 
of Lhp Chinese economy. Please take u moment now to express your interest. 
There are only thirty seven places for sponsors at this world-wide event. 


The Publisher. 181 Avenue Charles de Gaulle. 
9251 jNeuilly Cedes, France. 

Tel: 1 33 1 1 46 37 93 01 Fax; *33 1) 47 45 53 21 


Hong Kong Andrew Mac Arthur, 7th Floor, Malaysia Building. 
50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kong. 

Tel: |852l 9222 1174 Fax: (852)9222 1190 


New York Richard Lynch. 10th Floor, 850 Third Avenue. New York, [ I 
NY 10022. USA. Tel: (1212)7523890 Fax: <1 2121 755 8785 *— 1 


1 am interested in sponsoring thr 1995 China Summit. Please rush me more 
information. 1 understand that places are limited. 


Name: 

Job Title:. 

Company: 

Address: 


Or, please attach business rani. 








Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER IT, 19 9^ 


Rating the World’s Best Restaurants 


m ITALY 


With this page on Italy, the JHTs restau- 
rant aide, Patricia Wells, completes her 
search for the world’s top restaurants, and 
compiles her list of the Top JO restaurants 
around the world, and the Top 10 more 
casual and affordable restaurants. 


The Top Tables 


• No, 1: Osteria da Fiore, San Polo-calie 
del Scaleter, Venice, tel: (41) 721-308. 

• No. 2: Da Cesare, 12 Via Umberto, 
Albaretto della Torre (45 kilometers south 
Of Asti), tel: (173) 520-J41. 

• No. 3: Ristorarrte Aimo e Nadia, 6 Via 
Montecuccoli Milan, tel: (2) 416-886. 


International Herald Tribune 

O N this the world agrees: Italian 
food is the most satisfying, 
among the most diversified, and 
the most popular cuisine in the 
world. Although French cuisine is consid- 
ered superior in terms of finesse and sheer 
ability to overwhelm the senses, I would 
not reject a lifetime diet of Italian pasta, 
vegetables, cheeses, wine and breads. 

Of the dozens of 
meals I’ve savored 
throughout Italy in 
recent years, my vis- 
its to Venice's Os- 
teria da Fiore remain 
culinary benchmarks. 
Chef Mara Martin 
and her husband, 
Maurizio, are wizards 
of understatement, offering diners the pur- 
est possible cuisine based solely on local 
fresh fish and shellfish. Arrive with an 
open palate, anticipating tastes, flavors, 
textures you’ve never before experienced. 

Much of the Martins’ greatness lies in 
chef Mara’s willingness to lose her ego to 
the ingredients, dignifying them with irre- 



PATRICIA 

WELLS 


ye 


: ingredients, dignifying i 
proachable preparations mat may include 
nothing more than a gentle touch of heat, a 
drop of lemon juice, a drizzle of oil What 
bravery, what confidence- 

The smaller the shellfish the more in- 
tense the flavor, and that theory is played 
out on the quietly elegant tables of Da 
Fiori daily, as miniature shrimp, octopus, 
spider crabs, cuttlefish and scallops arrive 
in an almost rhythmic succession. There 
may be baby shrimp, flawlessly fried, so 
sweet you recall the haunting flavor of 
newly toasted hazelnuts. Tiny octopus are 
simmered, then allowed to cool in their 
cooking water, arriving lukewarm, all soft- 
ness and silk, showered with olive oO and 
paired with a welcoming salad of minced 
baby celery stalks. Rice is elevated to its 
highest order with Mara's cuttlefish-ink 
risotto, so rich, so sweet, you eat as slowly 
as possible, hoping for a loaves-and-fishes 
miracle. Anyone who has ever grilled a fish 
should try Da Fiori’s masterfully grilled 
‘turbot to sample the heights to reach for: 
fish that's moist, evenly cooked, silken in 
j texture and sweet in flavor. 

With no previous experience, the Mar- 
! tins transformed a neighborhood bar into 
' a restaurant that’s a model of crisp preri- 
■ rion, restrained with white linens, delicate 
1 glassware and framed Venetian prints, and 
j that has a clientele that includes real 
J Venetians and casual families who bring 
j their children for Saturday lunch. There is 
room for no more than 40 diners, so reser- 
vations are essential, and difficult to ob- 
t-tain. 

1 With dessert — often peach ice cream or 
, lemon sorbet, served with delicate cookies 
| — sample one of the Vencto’s great white 
i wines, Torcolato, a sweet and lemony full- 
' grown dessert wine that’s neither cloying 

* nor sticky. 

• Closed Sunday, Monday, Dec. 25 to Jan. 

2 15, and August Credit cards: American 
i Express, Diners Club, Eurocard, Visa. A la 
t carte, 45,000 to 75,000 lire ($28 to $48), not 

including service or wine. Reservations es- 
] sentiaL 

< For many of the world's top chefs, going 
l to market means picking up a telephone. 
For the lean, mustached 48-year-old Ce- 
sare Giaconne, a typical market day in- 
volves driving hundreds of kilometers 
through the Piedmont countryside, visiting 
one farmer for fragrant white truffles and 
varied wild mushrooms, another for fresh- 
ly hunted wild boar, a third for half a 
dozen just slaughtered chickens, which he 
will pluck and dress himself. 

Much of Da Cesare's cuisine might be 
described as primordial, it is so earthy and 
rudimentary, like spit-roasted goat cooked 
in the corner of the restaurant over beech 
and oakwood coals, or his thick fillet of 
beef seared on a scorching-hot limestone 
rock. Yet other dishes — an ethereal guin- 
ea-hen mousse paired with roasted pota- 
toes drizzled with grappa — seem to have 
come special delivery on the wings of an 
angel. 

It's hard to know whether Cesare is a 
gentle man with a wild streak or a wild 
man with a gentle streak, for over the years 
1 his cowboy-style behavior has guaranteed 
him the reputation of an iconoclast. 
There's not much about Da Cesare's that's 
'user-friendly: He may open or close the 
restaurant on a w him : there’s no sign, so 
finding it the first time around on your 
own could be a trial; he’s expensive, and he 
doesn’t take credit cards. 

Yet a visit to Cesare's little culinary 
palace can be a gastronomic milestone. 
Aided by his sons, Filippo and Oscar, he 
cooks his heart out, offering miracles from 
the stove, the oven, the fire. The small 



dining room is immaculate, with delicate 
Riedel crystal, a different hand-crocheted 
cloth for each table, waitresses in crisp 
black and white. 

A sonata of flavors can be found in his 
fall salad of raw sliced porcini and tender 
white ovoli mid mushrooms, married with 
pomegranate seeds, fresh chestnuts, a tan 
gle of greens, a shaving of Parmesan, wal 
nuts, sliced pheasant, turkey and rabbit, 
united in a refreshing orange vinaigrette 

He roasts onions on a bed of salt until 
the skin resembles burnished mahogany 
the interior fragrant, creamy and mellow 
enriched by a touch of fonduta cheese and 
a shaving of white truffles. 

f was overwhelmed by the purity, the 
lack of trickery in his spit-roasted goat, 
seasoned with nothing but salt, pepper and 
olive oil. Cooked for four hours, the young 
goat turns crisp, crack] y, resulting in meal 
that’s firm, chewy and fragrant, with an 
imperceptible smokiness reminiscent of 
the finest bacon or ham. Likewise, the 
sheer simplicity of beef and rosemary 
branches cooked on a thick rock that had 
been heated in a hot oven offers pure joy 
— a finely crisp exterior, lender juicy inte- 
rior, topped with cubed tomatoes and 
herbs that tumble onto the rock as you 
slice into the meat 

Desserts include hazeinut cookies baked 
in hazelnut leaves (like a child's fantasy, 
hazelnuts that turn into cookies on the 
tree) and a feather-light croustade of ap- 
ples and apricots in exemplary puff pastry. 

The best of the Piedmont wines are 
found at Cesare’s table, including Domen 
ico Clerico’s 1990 Arte, a powerful barrel 
aged wine that’s half nebbiolo, half bar 
bera. 

Closed Tuesday, Wednesday lunch, Janu- 
ary and August. No credit cards. A la carte, 
90,000 lire per person, including service but 
not wine. Reservations essential 

Understatement is the key to the cook- 
ing at Aimo e Nadia, a modem, upscale 
dining room, away from the center of Mi- 
lan. With husband Aimo Moroni in the 
dining room, wife Nadia in the kitchen, 
and daughter Stefania at the cash register, 
this is a solid, family affair. 

The Moroni cuisine is 100 percent Ital- 
ian, yet dishes found here won’t turn up 
elsewhere. Rather than cooking, Nadia 
waves a gentle, magic wand, whether she is 
turning the richest, freshest ricotta cheese 
into a soup- like liquid flavored with fresh 
porcini mushrooms and a touch of rich 
grana padano cheese, or weaving a com- 
plex appetizer of fresh anchovies stuffed 
with a mix of spinach and pine nuts, 
anointed by a touch of celery sauce faintly 
seasoned with hot pepper. 

Perfection arrives in the form of a raw 
wild mushroom salad of delicately earthy 
white ovoli, sliced paper thin and seasoned 
with rich Tuscan oil and lemon juice. 

The menu changes from day to day, 
according to what's in the market, and on 
my last visit Nadia offered two exquisite 
swordfish preparations: ha one, she floated 
tiny squares of fresh, baby swordfish in a 
white bean purge; in the other, the delicate 
swordfish steak was barely cooked, then 
paired with plump fresh borlotti beans. 

Wine choices include some top-rate 
wines from Piedmont and Tuscany, in- 
cluding Aldo Contemo's astonishing 1982 
Barolo Granbussia, Quercecchio’s 1985 
Brunelio di Montaldno, and Elio Altare's 
1985 Barolo Vigna Arbenina. 

Closed Saturday lunch, Sunday, and Au- 
gust Credit cards: American Express, Din- 
ers Club, Visa. 95,000 lire tasting menu. A la 
carte, 78.000 to 120,000 lire, including ser- 
vice but not wine. 


Ajrncc Fmue-Pitac for ibe 1HT 

Top, Pina Bongiovcmni in Osteria delVUnione, in Treiso; above left, chef Mara Martin and her husband, Maurizio, 
in Osteria da Fiore in Venice; above right , Cesare Giaconne in Da Cesare, in Albaretto della Torre. 


CASUAL DIKING 


• No. 1 : ChecdHno dal 1887, 30 Via di 
Monte Testacdo, Rome, teL (6) 574-6318 

• No. 2: Gbito, 8r Via del Verrocchio, 
Florence, teL (55) 234- J 100. 

• No. 3: Osteria defl’Unione, 1 Via 
Alba, Treiso (7 kilometers east of Alba), 
tel: (173) 638-303. 

International Herald Tribune 


W ELCOME to the land of 
bright lights, loud voices, full 
flavors: With a cuisine that’s 
earthy, rich, traditional — as 
well as wildly creative — Rome’s Chec- 
cbmo dal 1887 captures the essence of a 
solid, great Italian trattoria. 

Hie brothers Elio and Francesco Mar- 
iani, along with their mother. Nlnetta, car- 
ry on the family tradition, with a restau- 
rant begun in 1887 to feed workers 
building the city slaughterhouse. Cuts of 
meat from the “fifth quarter” — tripe and 
organ meats — remain a specialty. Great 
dishes here include a delicate head cheese 
seasoned with blade pepper and drizzled 
with olive oil; their famed coda alia vaccin- 
ara, hearty and wholesome portions of 
oxtail stewed in a rich tomato sauce with 
celery, pine nuts and raisins, and a state- 
of-the-art spaghetti alia Carbonara, steam- 
ing with eggs, pecorino and black pepper. 

Their trustworthy combinations of 
cheese and wine indude a breathtaking 
trio of Gorgonzola cheese drizzled with 
honey and served with a glass of aged De 
Bartoli Marsala from Sicily, haunting with 
flavors of wood and caramel 
Closed Sunday dinner and Monday (all 
day Sunday from June to September '), Au- 


gust and Christmas week. Credit cards: 
American Express, Diners Club, V'isa, Mas- 
terCard. A la carte, 55,000 to 90,000 lire 
(535 to $57), including service but not wine. 

I wouldn’t think of visiting Florence 
without a dinner at Gbrto. the homey, 
popular trattoria run"bythe outgoing Fa- 
bio Picchi and his wife, Bcnedetta. Tuscan 
natives, the two were childhood sweet- 
hearts who went on to create a small Ci- 
brto empire near the Sant’Ambrogio mar- 
ket They reign over a quietly elegant 
restaurant with a b are-bones trattoria on 
the other side of the kitchen; a small, 
elegant caffe, as well as a carry-out shop 
that features honey, oil, olives and pre- 
serves from the region. 

My last dinner here began with a proces- 
sion of exquisite antipasto samplings, in- 
cluding marinated salads of first-of-season 
raw fava beans and salty pecorino sheep's 
milk cheese; traditional chicken-liver 
spread, and slices of fresh goat cheese with 
hot peppers. Much of the year Fabio ofTers 
his now-famed yellow-pepper soup, pas- 
sato di peperoni. 

But one item you’ll never find at Gbreo 
is pasta: Fabio and Benedena prefer to 
display their culinary creativity here in 
other ways. If it's on the menu, sample a 
slice of pecorino cheese served with mos- 
tarda di Cremona, preserved in sugar syrup 

and flavored with a fiery mustard. The 
cave offers some real treasures, including 
the rare Le Pergoie Torte, from the estate 
of Sergio Maneiri. 

Closed Sunday, Monday and August. 
Credit cards: American Express, Diners 
Club, Visa, MasterCard. Trattoria 30,000 


lire, restaurant 60,000 lire, not including , 
wine and service. 

Gose your eyes and picture the quintes- 
sential trattoria: There’s no sign, just a 
double door covered with immaculate white 
curtains. There’s no menu, just a procession 
of staunchly traditional Piedmont special- 
ties, prepared with love. There’s no wine list, 
just a series of terrific local wines lined up 
along the shelves. The food? Quality flavors 
at once rich and intense, all subtle, simple, 
seductive dishes that come from the kitchen 
of smiling, bright-faced Pina Bongiavanni, 
bom in this house and following in her 
mother’s footsteps. 

Starters at Osteria defl’Unione might in- 
clude rounds of moist, steaming herbal 
frittata, very thin and generously seasoned, 
paired with slices of local sausage. A flaw- 
less rendition of vitello tonnato arrives from 
the liny kitchen, poached veal sliced paper 
thin and topped with a creamy tuna sauce, 
a cheery rendition of what’s often a tired 
Italian classic. 

Her favorite dish is also her best, an 
exquisite platter of rabbit in Barolo with 
sweet red peppers spiked with cloves and 
cinnamon, a cfish for cooks short on mon- 
ey, rich on time. The rabbit meat all but 
falls off the bone. 

The wine shelves offer some treasures, 
including Luigi Pelissero’s 1990 Bar- 
baresco, a wine with a perfect arid balance, 
custom-made for a region where food is 
hearty and copious. 

Closed Sunday dinner, Monday and two 
weeks in August No credit cards. 40,000 lire 
fixed-price menu, including service but not 
wine. Reservations essential 


Following is the IBTs list of the 10 best 
restaurants in the world, and the 10 best 
casual tables. The list includes reviews on 
Hong Kong, Tokyo, the United States. 
France, die Benelux countries, Spain, Brit- 
ain, Switzerland, Germany and Italy. 

The Top Tables 

• No. 1: JoS Rotadxn. 59 Avenue Ray- 
mond-Pcancarfe, Paris 16, teL 47-27-12-27. 

• No. 2: Restaurant Fkedy GfranJet, 1 
Route dTYverdon, Crisrier (6 kilometers 
west erf Lausanne), Switzerland, let (21) 
634-0505. 

• No. 3: Lai Gang Heen, The Regent, 
Salisbury Road. Hong Kong, teL 721-1211. 

• No. 4: Le Lotas XV-Ahun Ducasse, Hd- 
td de Paris, Place du Casino. Monte Carlo, 
Monaco, teL 92-16-30-01. 

• No. 5: Osteria da Flore, San Polo-calle 
del Scaleter, Venice, tel: (41) 721-308 

• No. 6: Jinn ChuO'ku, Ginza 4-2-15, 
Tsnkamoto Sazan Building (Bl. basement), 
Tokyo, ret 3535-3600. 

• No. 7: City Savoy, 18 Rue Troyan, Par- 
is 17, teL 43-80-40-61. 

• No. 8: Tafflevent, 15 Rue Lamennais. 
Paris 8, teL 45-63-96-01 and 45-61-12-90. 

• No. 9i Restaurant Daniel, 20 East 76th 
Street, New York, tel: (212) 288-0033. 

• No. Mfc Da Cesare; 12 Via Umberto, 
Albaretto della Torre (45 kilometers south 
of Asd), Italy, tel: (173) 520-141. 

Casual Dining 

• No. 1: AI Fomo, 577 Smith Main 
Street, Providence, Rhode Island, id: (401) 
273-9767. 

• No. 2: La Thpina, 6 Porte de la Mon- 
naie, Bordeaux, teL- 56-91-56-37. 

• No. 3: Frootera GriH, 445 North Clark 
Street. Chicago, tel: (312) 661-1434. 

• No. 4: Gty Chiu Chow Restamnt. East 
Ocean Goitre, 98 Granville Road, Trim Sha 
Tsui East, Kowloon, Hong Kong, tel: 723- 
6226. 

• No. 5: Ca ITsidre, Les Plots 12, Barce- 
lona; teL 441-1139. 

• No. 6: The Seafood Restaurant; River- 
side, Padstow, Cornwall PL28 8BY, Eng- 
land. tel: (841) 532-485. 

• Nb.7: Checchioo dal 1887, 30 Via 
Monte Testacdo, Rome, tel: (6) 574-6318 

• Na & Gbrto, 8r Via del Verrocchio. 
Florence, teL (55) 234-1100. 

• Na 9: Viriduma, Juan de Mena 14, Ma- 
drid, teL 523-4478 

• No. 10: Le CamfeKon. 6 Rue de Chev- 
reuse, Paris 6, tel: 43-20-63-41 ■ 


TIPS 

International Herald Tribune 

I NEVITABLY, when an Italian chef 
cooks with a French accent, he falls 
flat on his face. Here are thoughts on 
visits to two top-rated Italian restau- 
rants, both of diem definitely NOT worth 
the detour. 

One recent sunny Sunday afternoon. 1 
drove to Gualriero Marcheri's Michelin 
three-star restaurant (Gualriero Marches!, 
at Erbusco near Milan), dreaming of roast 
chicken. And there it was on the menu, 
served with a simple garnish of potatoes, 
mushrooms and onions. We waited pa- 
tiently, comsuming an unimpressive fust 
course of fish, an unimpressive second 
course of pasta, a nice white wine, all the 
while dreaming of a plump, moist roast 
chicken. The waiter rolled a cart to the 
table, and from the black cast-iron pot 
came the most shriveled, dried-out bird 
Fve ever seen. We were served tidbits of 
bone-dry white meat — not a chop of juice, 
sauce, moisture — accompanied by a few 
bites of mushrooms, a rock-hard potato, a 
tiny roasted onion. We signaled the waiter, 
requesting a bit of juice, and were in- 
formed: “This is dry-roasted chicken, style 
MarchesL” By any standards, it was a very 
badly roasted chicken. I wouldn’t have 
served such a bird, and neither should he. 

While the Umbrian Gianfranco Vissani 
is commonly hailed as one of the top chefs 
m Italy, I found the food at Vissani, along 
route 448 between Todi and Baschi, inex- 
cusably self-indulgent and a major affront 
to good taste and judgment It ls impossi- 
ble to imagine any sane diner seeking satis- 
faction in fatty morsels of chicken set 
adnf t in a greasy Gorgonzola soup; tough, 
lukewarm duck breast supported by a du- 
ty mound of ravioli filled with bits of 
undercooked artichokes, or a tepee of te- 
pid risotto camouflaged by strips of egg- 
plant as tough as shoe leather. Service and 
setting are charmless, the wine list a jum- 
ble, prices very likely the highest in Italy. 

^ 1X111 “O.OOO lire 

(5380), without wine. The sheer amount of 

^ 

a dozm silly breads, flavored with every- 

™S^fv f0ie *5“ 10 P«n“ts) should 
make chef Vissam hang his head in shame. 










































































Page 12 

MUTUAL FUNDS 

m , , _ Grp Nan 

Cwse of trading Friday. Oct 14. Fd Nat 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994' 

GreNamc Wfctr CrpNomc WWy Grottm* WWy Grp Nome WWy, Grp Nam* WWy GrpNan* WWy Gn> Nome Wtlv 
RIName Lntaw Fd Noma Lost aw; Fd Name Lost aw ; Fd Name Last am; Fd None Last One FdNcme Last One; Fd Name Last Owe 


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SCMuni 1044 -.04 CMTjcFrt 


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767 +.03, 
1472 >42, 


WtRsGoIdt 11.03 +71 ! MytnTA 1070 + 39 
TxFBT 943 -.06 MunlAa 1070 + 3f 


NYInsp 10.53 +38 HummrG 21J4 +J7i 
NYT«b 1144 - 37 ! HypSO 879 

NCTFg 11.19 >.06iHvpSO? 9JW — 31 ! 

:M\ iSM 1 


TatRlr iii3 -78 
1459 - 37 Vatt JS.94 -74 
1430 - CS Manooers Funds: 

438 >01 Cod AO n 2476 -53 
9J9 -.18 5 p 6C n 3848 -36 
743 -.17 
2170 -56 

Tn * 35 » Sard 18J7 -015 

773 -.15 GWOedn 1954 - J3 
-.IS Bond n 1973 -.12 


SIGvlAP X99 +31 1 MHIftAP 9.90 


CATF 1043 -.iu 
EaVM 1242 +J0 
vlnco 951 +.04 
CAn . 9.74 *31 

ASOA o 105J “.IS! 
ATLAP 1479 + 70 
BlueAp 1459 +75 
CoTTAR 1044 +.11! 
COPAAp 1276 -76 
OnTcA 9J8 +J0 
DvGfAp 1936 +48 
AD X90 * JO 
. t 1179 -.11 
nAp 9.98 +38 


GrthAB 19.99 -4 
HilnA DX 743 —31 
irtvGApx 979 -37 
9.90 *39 


.. NidlA 
10 Nichfi 
“ Ad/ A 


1144 + 54 I 

R33 +.63 14® , 

12J7 +J3 VUinTFn 9J2 + 
11.94 +71 1 TgxFrwn 9® 
9.43 US.Gov. WJ0 


« Z-$f "Si* 

nn.f.ti *.os 1 


KnliJ* +. 

n 9tj ♦; 


WTjStn I'lS ^ 


A 1172 +7o‘si'{^S!e “'j £g»8Sm* 

A 11.12 +.18 ApWVTn 9.W +.16! WJ 1 * n 


-.ISj CAinA 
+70 iauiA 
+75 pmc/ 


hi 97? +31 | 

CAinAP 10 m +37 

GNMA A lXn +.10 
GMOAP 147? +53 


ii It— — 
an4652 +5? 


iffB 1174 *.16. 
Wnt 1M *34! 


SiDvjCt 1W +31 

. _.GvTAn X99 >31 

Cod AO n 2074 -53 STlnTAn 9M +X 
SpEen 3848 -76 STMuTA ncW.flt * 32 
n 27J6 -59 1 5TIMN1 950 +.03 


735 -32' 
irrt.VGan 1476 *.14 


STlnlCt 950 + 32 
SCiTAn 10.10 +34 


51 Bond 1857 -35 1 SFTAn 9M -35 
GWOact n 1954 -73 TXITAn 9J6 -35 


Hidilnm 1142 + 02 ■ 
IntMun 9.48 -.06! 


InuGrBdn 950 -.04 
LWGv 9.51 *Xn 
LTGn 1073 -.11 


ReESeCP 1055 
SI Gov Miff 
SmCcmCr 63J7 
TAGavp 9.90 
TxAdH> n 8.14 


9.51 *sn. TX TF a 11.19 -34; Resrvpn 9.94 -31 
1023 -.11- USGovp 449 >.06! Vakjen 1051 -.14 


9.77 >35 ; Keystone Amer A 
1347 +26 AulOCPt 8J7-.09 
- CAPIF 
FIXA 
FOAA 
Gl 


Gdncp 1347 + 26 
rntFan njs -jo 
InstQd 931 + 36 
Midctan 1428 -53 
Region np2058 *26 


-J5 Bondn 1973 -.12: VahieWt JJJJ +J4 

TxETrt TSTfl -35 inHSan 3843-104 ! VrtuetABl3J| +J5 

TaxFrt 722 -.04 Atoms' Funds: • VgWeTA 1XM +35 

eystaa* A itmt A; Fxdinc 948 -33 vaita/i jOTy *35 

aSiKj 8J7^-(W NY TF 1054 -37 1 VA1 1A.P 1030 +35 

Auncoi STFtlnc 941 -.01 , Nrtoowide Fds 

1007 -36 TREa 1167 - 25 1 NIGond .856 +J4 

1077 -27 MMketWattHFdS! 

1954 - 57 Eaurtv 1039 +.1* 

22^-142 941 -33; U5Gvinr 922 +35 

□mega 1576 -23 GvtSecA 944 -.05 ! GuardnnlBJS -50 

10 77 - 04 GthlnA 954 -.14, LtdMctll 9.90 +31 

721 -36 VOIECAB 934 +26, MOMxitn 10.92 +20 

r . . 940 -014 MarshaB Fifflds: “ 

DlRelA 1220 -33 Bain 949 +.10 

045 -.06 EqTnc «.M -.19. 

. . . terBc Gvitncn -35 1 

__ ST Inc n 959 +013 lN«wAPef 2954 >34 


MDMum 9J8 -35. UtilWMP 848 + 33 I IDEX Group: . 

Mun In r 9.72 -JW , VA TF p 1105 -34 Mx 1736 +54. ImdAi 

NJHYr 10JB +JJ6 :FranWWM3dTn 2GWMP 1624 +54 Omega 

NYHYm 1000 +37 i CorpQixS 02341 +32 KfObCp 16.15 +551 PlxA 

NYlnrern 9.84 +35; invGradepBJi -JU 2GrawApl6.M +50 1 “ " 

.... -.1 Q >n>, — Til AD _ +1 1 ITMiirnliaj . n 


Brtanced 7.19 +.12 
EqGrawlh 744 +.J7 
Ea Index 7J5 +22 


1651 +28 Ealndax 7JS +22 
18.05 >23 ExlnvHiP 720 >31 
25J1 +70 FAM Vain 21.14 +.13 


PAHYm 10.11 +35 RisDrvp M5B -21 ?Gr0wCpl6J4 +51 

Sntlncn 9J3 > .01 Fronkfin Tsm* I ZTaxEx 11.11 +37 


6012 _ FBLSvnr* FiduCapn I9 a1 +. 

9.17 >31 BldSil 19.18 +34 59Wt5StrMfc . 


Incn 9J3 >31 Frankfin T mto* ZToxEx 11.11 +37 

SGvn 9J4 +.03 ; GermGvrd3.M *24 3IOCP1AP 978 * 37 

WMun 978 -.02 1 GWbCurcnrl431 -.tal W«3 1457 +571K1 

coon 1931 > J8 HordCurpB7| +39) fflxInAp 8.86 -JM 1 

□a STraet MivncCurdMAS + .02 , IDS Group; 


CATEP 5.09 -35 
DEI p 752 +.10 
Lhscovo 1128 >21 . 

EquilPI p 1079 *27 | 

|xW n B 19S _ SJcBt 

Feancp 433 >.02 1 TxFBr 


AAuMcBl 1440 


Govt np 836 >0)7 An 
Gwmnp 1658 *50 Aq 


HYBdp 851 +013 
Inconp 1X12 +.10 
MuBdNat 9.10 +35 
Sodnp 2056 +27 
Strati nc 1231 +0)3 
Aetna Advisor. 

Aetna r 1051 +21 


Bonds «57 -35 Aaiiinas Food: 
GrlncorntlUJi *32 Balance n 952 +.11 
InitGrt 1155 + 28 Ealncn 977 +.72 

££SSd: P • ,7 *" AgfiBfc'-**" 


Halim Select: 

Aetna n 1054 + 21 
AsianGrn JJB +.13 
Bondn 956 +.04 


TxFLtdn 1057 +.01 Delaware Group: Growth t 1X38-31 EuraEq 31 26-1 21 | Fremont Funds gtLCpo 656+23 

TxFrLt3C1054 +31 TrendAp 1Z« +.18 HiGrBdt 9J7 +35 Paefcn 3998 +.73; Bondn 951 -05 ; Barflp 481 +31 

TxFLno 16.04 +.12 ValueAp 20.13 +.19 HfYBd 1 9J8 +0)3 5m Co 11 JJ *54 Globdn 1125 *33 CATEp 5.09 -35 

TxFVT 1555 >.11 Deleap p 25.16 + jfl Ato nudr 11A1 +016 TxFSI 10.12 *33 I Gw/fhn 11.18 + JO | DEI p 752 +.10 

USGov 1X72 +32 DcdnAp 1640 + 28 FraL&oen: FmHorGvt 10J2 -34 JP**" 7-72 +27 Dt^rovo 11^ >21 

Cambridge Fds DecTRAplZ95 *36 QaoAoo 11J5 +22 BnHofMurlO.M --OfiLGAmr lOJO +0M Eqtn/Plp 1079 +27 

CopGrA 15.13 * 24 Detawp 18JB2 *23 Fxdm 9J2 +35 FM Amer Fds A: j Fu nrfTnB fc Exfrlnp 3. 95 

GvlnA 1177 +.05 irtltEqA p 1240 +29 IrUGv 9.86 +33 AstAJl p 1049 + 20, AS9res_pfl557 Fealncp 483 +.02 

GwtrS 1476 -A0 SSSap 622 SetVMue 011,92 *33 Bakmp 10.62 >.l?l Gwttl pf 4.19 ‘ 27 GtoDBdP 576 + 37 

IncGrA 15.16 >75 USGdvIb 723 +33 SmCoGrnll24 >.M Equifyp 1726 -.15 ' Grwnof 1630 -40 GtoGrp 7014 +20 

MuincA MJ9 *.11 TrealAp 9.17 +31 FFBEa 1042 + 23 Eqldx p 1£LJ4 +22 1 lnconf 9.63 -35; Gro wth p 1834 -53 

COPG/Gt 15-04 >J4 TxUSAP 1137 +JM FFBNJ 1023 +.07 FxdlnCD 1040 - 34 | _ Mg<frRptll J7 -.15 HiYdTEp 437 -M3 

GkCB 1428 + .30 TxinsAp 7056 +JH FFTW Funds: irrtGvBdp 9.00 -.03 , Fundomenliil Funds InsrTEn 527 + 35 

GvlnSI 1X78 +35 TxIrkAp 10.18 +.04 LiSSharr 9,92 >31 Inttncp 9.53 -.04,' CAMun no 744 >.13 Inti p 1QJ4 > J7 

GwttSt 1460 *29 Td-oAp 8.19 +35 WWFxdln 944 +3S IntTxp 1037 +.07 • NYMunnp.99 >31 MgdRp 1125 +27 

KSSlt 1X17 -25 Dot-Pooled TYua: WWShTmt.94 +31 Irfflp 1040 -^JlBGoyn 1.41 +3l Mgsp 5. 16 >JM 

13.07 +29 FAAB Funds: Lldlnc 937 -32 Funds IV: Mich p 529 +35 

973 + 34 DIvECp 1171 +27 MtgSecp 974 -35; AgSlkAS n 9.91 +26 MNTEp 5.10 +35 

1X95 +24 DivE I 117t +27 ReSiqp 1148 -24 : iridlnSn 9.90 -.03 AAiMp 1173 +J2 

M FdS IntGC p 9.B3 >33 Stock O 1649 - 42 ' StVApSn 9.9S -27 NYTE p 535 +34 

J0J>3 +41 IMG I 933 +33 Flrsl Amer Fds C: GAMFunds NtwOp 1419 +41 

1410 +42 MJTFp 1025 +35 AstAUn 1048 - 20; Europe 9122-104 Of;,,} p 5.19 -35 

8l72 +22 AftiTFI 1025 *05 Boloocenl042 -.19 | dobd 13824+124 FrecMtp 830 

1174 +.18 FPA Funds: Ealdxn 1033 - 22 1 inti 198.17 -429 ! Prooresp A93 *38 

2728+134 Cartt 2021 +48 Fxdlncn 1029 + 3S _ Po^as 196.14-102, Select P 848 +34 


GjoOBdP 576 +37i TMRetB 1X21 -24 


TrldBA 845 

:eyston»AmerBc „ 

CPi28r 940 -31 inTBdn 

FTXBT 1031 -37 1MT*F 

FOASI 1071 -27 
1922 -42 
926 * 35 

ImdSr 871-33 STTkFn 939 -00 

OrnegaBt1540 - 23 Slock n 929 -.1? 

PTuFBt 1070 - .06 VMEan 1073 

724 - 36 Mass Mutual test: 
92S -.07 Bdlareo* 1038 -.17 


N *" R1 

TvFre 1 9 AS +36 
USGvinr 922 +35 


AAanhat n 10.92 >20 
MUST 1041 *35 
Pormrs n 2039 +44 

3^S"n^ :fl 


NToxAR 11^ - .10 
NYTxAp KUD *39 
Ap 17.98 +.15 
A PX 228 +31 
KW32— 25 
DX 84? +JM 
IAjjx 840 +.12 
AsStBl 1042 *.14 

ATLBt 1X95 +.19 

BlueB 1 14.14 +24 

! 1046 +.10 

» 1X59 +26 
_. TcB 9JI +29 
19J2 +47 


GlEnSt 1128 +.101 


- ^ *-13 . 

'ffitj* t'iai 

»: ,5S :®| IS. 

SS :* 2SSW!” * a i fcSS.5Si .Si 

+31 j TXg +2J j 

A Sj6 +ji [ wYidn" 'aia *.o| j Xk£* >55 I'S 

ill® :fl teS Bfi ;* 

® A nt!^+.ip & n i “* 4-! ' MWhn ** 


E3^ 


GU&IB1 1441 +41 sqwmv 
1326 +JO f 3airedin 

n>iX79 +42 Schroder 


rt 1342 —.03 
Ifn 8.4a +36 
— 922 +32 
II J9 -.13! 


1X63 +26 1 

•TSM +73 ' 

12 tjSj 

a +25 


Trust: WW ShTm 9.94 

1107 +29 FMBFundE 
973 +34 DivECp 1131 
1X95 +26 Dive I 1171 
1 Fds: IntGC P 9.g 

JO-53 +41 IriKSI 933 


AsianGrn 928 +. 
Bondn 946 +J 
Govt 940 +J 
Growth 1073 + J 
Grwtnco lMM +: 


Bal 930 +.15 CamegC«TE92B +32 

EmGrth 17.20 +26 Centura Funds 

GovCBTO 975 *05 eqGrwCn 949 +26 

Grolnc 13JJ7 +29 FedSInCn 933 >012 

MoTF 10.90 *08 NCTFn 9J3 +.W 

US Gov 10.17 >J» CenturnGo 8.99 +.18 


IT 1440 +.10 DelEa 1107 +29 FMB Funds: 
xniua +23 GloFix 973 + 34 DivECp 1131 *30 

Ruslana re: intlEo 1X95 +26 Dive I 1171 +27 

n 1129 +J4 Dimensional Fds: IntGC P 9.g *33 

1X11 >29 InflVan 10.53 +41 InIGI 933 +33 

UU 871 +.18 US LTD 14.10 +42 MTTF p 1075 +35 

.... .Groiip: ussm 872 +.12 MfTF I 1025 *0)5 

H^ndSW 1474 >.1S US6-10n 1174 +.18 FFA Funds: 

Grwiti 1198 +23 Japann 27J8+1JM Oirtt M21 +48 

Gvttnc 4M +.01 UKtl 2440 +47 Newln c 1029 +36 

AAedRs 1829 + 23 Cantn 1548 +47 Parmnt 1474 +.16 

NZland 1029 >.26 DFARIEslM.15 +32 _Feretl 220Q +45 

NJapan 8-00 +25 Fixdnx 100.W — 23 Favmln 2429 +48 

Cardinal F amity-- GiBd 9727 +JB FracWon 17070 +20 

AooGtn 1034 +26 Govt 71 100.95 +40 Federated Fortress: 

Balanced 9.95 +.16 InIGv 1(MJ5 +43 AdlRtt 940 +31 

Fund 1X86 +J7 InflHBM 1236 +47 Bondr 9.16 +36 

GovtOblip 7.95 +0)5 LCoDlnt 13-93 +47 EqjnCFStll^ +22 

CarKO 7X99 +37 PacRlm 1845 + 27 GlSIrn 848 +34 

1TE9J8 +32 USLoVal 1X43 +28 Munlnct 1028 +38 

Umb: USSmVol 1171 +.10 NYMunit 93B +39 


Irnip 

MgdRp 

Massp 

Mich p 

MNTEp 

Mutlp 

NYTEp 


Ep 427 *013 
P 527 + 35 
10.84 >27 
P 1135 +27 . 
i 5.16 +JM 
529 +35 
ip 510 +.BS 
1173 +22. 


lAmfrC 

1 19^ -. 

9S9 

10M - J8 


STTkFn 939 - J2 iNew Cna fp 1.224 >20 
stock n ?J9 +.W New ta Ja a d rgc 

AdiUSAp 729 - 

BatanAp 1135 +22 

Balnrca4 1038 -.17 ! BdincA 11.13 +.® 
CATFAp 721 *J0A 
A P 1434 +40 
Apll.17 +.1 
_ p 12J2 +24 
GvScAp 1067 *36 


InlGvSdn 9.00 -33 GEEUanSiLS: 

Intlncn 9.58 - JM D*versfdnT421 +29 
TxFrn 1022 - 38. Global n 17J8 +40 
inan 1041 -24, income n 1072 + 36 
linen 937 - 32; S&SLngnl049 +35 
jSecn 9.74 -35 SiGPMn 3722 -.96 
3Eqlnl248 -.13 TcMEx ll.1l +37 
*£an 1726 -.13 Trusts n 3447 -39 
den 1648 -41 GE Funds: 

Amer Muff A: I GtohdC 1978 *45 
rGrp 9.26 +29 , IncomeA nil 28 - 35 
neap 9.96 +20 incnmeCnll28 +.06 
nalnco 944 * 02 IrMEaOn 1543 +49 


FascOcnon 1770 +20 
Fefirated Fortress: 
AdlRtt 940 + 31 
Bondr 9.16 +0)6 
EqlncFS 11123 +22 
GlSIm 848 +34 
Munlnct 1028 + 38 
NYMunit 97B +39 


Growth! 2044 +44 
tncGrr 1221 +26 
MidCuGr MXI9 +25 
SmCapt 2X08 >46 


ABsKep 677 +.18 
Bdan d 1322 +28 
BotanB^ 1AM >20 


+29 ArleiApp np?t.92 +41 CntrySftrn 2X93 +23 
+.19 Ariet^ronp2828 +J0 OrCg?6C 249 +.15 
Armangn 7J6 >28 CHesGrtn 1A12 +28 
+ 44 Arrow FwW CHestnt 14927+4.17 

+26 Eauuy 978 +28 ChlcMihwn14T49 >29 

+25 Fxd/nan 922 +36 QiubbGrln 1629 + 43 

+46 MuM 944 +45 ChubOTR 1423 -28 

AJIamaGrpn.12 +20 CBppwTL 4X14 + 120 
+ .18 Allas Funds: Colonial Funds: 


Inline n 9.58 >34 
IMTxFrn 1032 -38 
into nan ioai +24 
Lldlnc n 947 >32 
MtpSecn 9.74 -35 
ReaEqlnl248 +.13 
SpecEan 1726 -.15 


SlcCl 

TxFCr __ 

535 + 34 1 Tort 5 . etC 1221 
1419 +41 | Kidder Growe 
5.19 -35 ARMGvAll 76 

1 ARMlnstA 11.91 . 

ARAAInstB 1 1.91 —.01 

i9ji >45 ; IMa1?J? :S 


Otwp 5.19 -35 
PreCMtp 840 
Prooresp 693 +38 
Select p 848 +0M 
StDCkP 1941 >45 


Aoat 1423 *26 ! EmMktB 1X24 -23 


5 1221 -24 CdreSd4 100)3 -35 

lRt1Ee4 10.16 +20 

Prime4 10.07 -31 

_ ShTmBdOlOjn -34 1 

i niH -018 scan V a 9.99 -.171 

1077 *37 ValueEB4 10.12 +27 GwthA p 10.14 +27 

927 -0)5 Mcmersn 1441 —22 . «lncAp 9.19 -3] 

871 -00 SWRWG 1197 -24; trrfEaAp 1649 +46 

t 1072 -06 MaxuS Funds: 1 LMTrmAW77 +0)3 

723 -36 E5?rv Sm.l6 -25 ! AW- A pi 547 +.10 

926 - 06 Incamef 9.97 -34; SlarAp 1344 +J3 

LOurectMlO 00 -.12' TxExAp XII +.04 
MtdaflST Funds: 

MDMul W1D.I6 *08 
Stack I tn 1179 -24 

stockTn 1179 -24. . . _ 

1348 -40 uSGovTn 944 -32 1 Int&Bt 1627 +45 

IA 1X31 -24 USGvtltn 944 - 32 SWfip 

8 1X24 -23 VAMuT n 1023 +0)7 1 Values 


irivGfiBt 971+36 
MHlnBt 94? +01? 


p li.45 +.11 
tX 447 +32 
16.S4 +.19 
COPAD 170)5 +25 
ComTecp 922 +20 

Vi 

GIG1D 10.98 +.16 
NTxDp 110)5 +.10 
GrmD 1943 +43 
GO nDt 9.98 +38 
HilncDBX 744 —31 
IrrvGOx 979 + 37 
NYTkDp 1037 +019 
MHJDp 949 +018 
STGvtDjn 228 +31 


K ina nr 70s? +.01 

01 


^ & 


inttindx 1878 
NTITRBn 970 


9.81 +.03 
113 * 


Vak/eAp 7.98 +26 
BatanBf 1141 +22 
BdlncSp 11.13 +015 
CanG+Bf 1472 +28 
Int&Bt 1627 +45 
StarB p 1341 -J7 
Values 7.97 +25 


7J» *J»l 

740 + 39 

, inVerSnt 120» +.1*, - — 

NTaxBt 11.05 +.11 1 MUlttB 1345 + 20 I _ SmCPjcp c 1D34 ♦ 

NYTxBf TOiB +J9 PwCtfi 16.83 SOMntrV 20.72 • 

RmFHI 1748 +.14 STGffiB 844 +31 1 SrorWkll 1440 * 

STGwtBpk 228 - Strata f 1344 + J4 1 se*k»H Fond*: 

smCopB txQ.9S —25 MurArit 1129 -37 1 Balanced n 1 1.94 +26 
848 + 34 JVUlFLA 9.67 +. 

840 +.13 MUGOt 10.91 +, 

- MunHYBtH)J7 +.« 

MuIrtsA 1042 >36 
Munint 1042 +.06 1 
MuMdt ia« +37 
ArtunflAAt 11.12 +.08 
MuMflt 1124 +JS 
MunMM 1142 +37 

RSSSgrv^ 7 :^ 

MunNJI 1048 + 37 
MuNYt 1144 +37 

mSSt 1 !ofi MALlTFnllJX +A1 
NtMunt 1479 +.101 MATxn 1245 +72 

fssss JHf :fi 

:st| ffiss «s 

Prudeaha inaL I PA Tax n 1?.7< +.12 


n 1374 +.12 
nnl>49 +23 
n 1633 +48 

?\}$ +ofi 
n H.40 +.10 


1 

nen 1A04 *41 

UKomen ixaj+i jj 
imcmari n«473 + 142 
mttSdn ti4i +.U 

vs 

sks 

NYTxn 1037 +.D7 
OHTxn 1X43 +49 


GfbEqB n 1678 -40 VaMunltlOXS - 37 I N ewt^ Ag 1X15 +28 


Strlncl 549 + 33| GlbEoC n 1732 +41 MeMGth 1341 +20 

StrSTt ja GlbEaA 1646 -4l MentSlrn 1X28 *39 ! 

5frWGt in >.19 1 GbFcB 1236 -.19 MergerFdPMLBI —32 

TEBndp 175 -JM GffiFxA 1237 -20 Merritem n 2535 +29 

Utafticp 622 >.13, GVTAt — *■*- 


1.17 + o>5 CentumGP 8.99 +.18 Stock n 56.05+171 

1.92 +41 OtfrvShrn 2X93 -33 DomSadaJ 1248 +2? 
128 +J0 OjCqdBC 1X89 +.15 Dreman Funds: 

|.16 >28 ChesGrth 1A12 +28 Contm 14.18 +46 

CHestnt 14927 >417 HiRtn 1623 + 48 

38 +28 ChlcMilwn14749 >29 SmCpVal nil JO +41 


DodaeAQcc I OHFdrtP 1069 >39 ManalriCD 944 * 02 IntlEaC 

bSHti «J4 +.98 Utllr 1221 +26 Fust Amer Mull C StrapC 

Incanen 1090 *37 tFedenrtedlnat DivrGwtti n927 +29 1 USEaD 

Stock n 56.05+171 ‘ 


Arm In 9.58 
ArmSSpn 948 
ExchFan 7348 > 


DivrGr P 9.26+29 
Eqlncop 9.96 +20 
ManaincD944 *02 
"irxt Amer Mutl C _ 
DivrGwtti n927 +29 


IS1 Funds: 

45 /vumipti toon 
35 NoAm p 9.15 
.06 I Trot D 926 
-59 I indOneGT 942 


1 I/HFIA 

002 +.10' KPEt 2X72 -40 
9.15 +0)3 MuniBdA 1073 -37 
926 -06' SmCopA 110)5 +41 


1X68 -.09 MemB Lynch A: 
1147 —36 AmerltlAT 9.16 
2372 -4C AtfiRAp 946 
1073 -37 AZMA 10.14 



tnB IXfi +20 

CoreGthA 1337 +21 


Eton IaJT +41 


22 Independence Care 


- Eatvlnoo n 9.96 +020) GEUSE 1628 >41 


LMTermn9.96 


USEaA 1627 >41 


3 opart p 1077 +361 
JnlGuip 90» +31 


t Cap: I intTmBd n 1.99 +31 

hTmGovnt.99 

. a*Exmpt h.99 -.81- 

924 +37 1 Landmark Funds 


gxchFdn 7348 + 1.92 Mnadlnatn944 >012 iGrriiwA ! TRGro 1128 +.16 1 Bakin n 1375 + 22 

GnmalSn 1045 >37 FstBosIG 9.06 +35 1 EgSpcn 1940 +.17 I InvResh 4.66 -37 i Eauilvn 1443 +41 
GnmaSp 1045 +37 FsfEoglnr 1526 -.11 wGln 943 +35 InvSerOpfiH: Intire 907 -06 


1178 + 28 CoreGrihB 1X96 + 31 


BasVJA 2329 -41 CoroGrlnsI 1245 
CAlMAt 941 -.11 : EmgGrA MJS +29 
QdMriA 1136 +.12! EmaGrS 1228 +2V 
CapFdA 2741 -41 ~ ' 

Consult P 1X87 +23 1 __ ... 

CdHLA 741 -.021 IncGrS 1345 >.13 


ErrigGrins114i +28 
IncGrA 1346 +.14 


vtBp939 ♦ JJo 
IP 1149 +25 
IP 746 +0U 
IP 746 +JM 
iP 7.66 +34 
CP 2.33 +JM 

ip 3U3 
Vo :fl 

Pdc :S 


+28 CAJnsA ?J7 *03 
+20 CaMuniA 1044 +.lfl 
+.09 GvtSecA »J0 +39 
+019 GratncA 1437 +25 
+0)9 NaMuniA 1066 +0)9 
+39 BB&T Funds 
+47 BaiTrn 941 +.12 
+ JM GrolncT nllAO +26 
+ 25 IMGavTn 925 +JM 
+JM NOntTBn 979 *34 

:a MX 1 * +Ja 

+36 E.4kEf 2523 +48 
*A3 tatlEq 2075 +78 
+41 MuniBd 1445 + 38 
+ 43 ShtDurClt n4.9I 
+ 36 SrtCXtrlnv n A92 
+ 20 15J5 +37 

+36 BFMaiDun 9J0 1 31 
*06 BJBGlAp 11.13 +.17 


CdTEA 691 +35 
CbnTEA 7.11 +3ft 
FedSec 10JJ5 *07 
FLTEA 7.11 +JM 
FundA 633 * 07 
GibEqA 1243 +41 
GnrthAp 1X87 +23 
HfYldA 643 + .01 
lnaxneAp6D3 *02 
IntGrA 1049 + 20 
MATxA 74T>0)5 


MITEA t 
+ 48 MN TEA 6 
+J8 NatResA 13 
+38 NY TEA A 
” Oh TEA « 
_ SmSJK D IB 
+37 StrTIncA 6 
+.11 TxExAp 12 
+ 41 TxinsAp 7 
+ .17 USGrA 12 
+27 USGvA 6 


K-A I A I2.IA +.10 

MullCAB 1X15 +.10 
MINBp 943 + 37 
MuOHCp 930 *38 


UivLGvta 1 9^ 

.BEUff 


I 948 + 35 
1 643 >31 
633 + 32 


Ip 9.05 +38 
:p 935 +38 
697 +37 




:f 


rAp 1120 +46 
rBn 1292 +44 
ivA 8.58 +31 
vB P 8-59 +31 
vC 848 +41 

:i 

Jtap B-a +41 
ItlF ITT +31 
ip Ml +125 

5 TO^P1093+^ 


X 1020 
IX 920 


mils:! 

m :f 

rtn9J0 >.19, 

i 



A Bondn 1341 +.09 
Aprecnp 544 + 45 
AssetAIn 331 +29 
Batncd 34V *07 
BasiClMMM48 +36 
CMTxn 421 +.13 
Callntn 290 +JM 
CTIntn 17« +.07 
Dreyius 271 +4? 
EdEllnd 127 +23 
FLlntn 196 +J» 
GNMA np A35 +.10 
GnCA 239 +.12 
GMBdp 4.13 +.09 
GNYp 9.15 +.13 
GJGrp 3474 >.90 
Gtlncn 1641 >26 
GwthOpn1040 >.15 
lflsAAunnpl731 +.15 1 
Interim n 1X58 +.07 
InterEqp 1573 +40 
InvGN n 425 + 39 
MA kit n X68 +.08 
MA Tax n 5.40 +.10 
MunBdn 109 +.10 
NJlntn X94 +37 
NO Munn X76 +39 
NwLdr 3616 +48 
NYTTxnp 0.94 +39 
NYTatin 665 +.11 
NYTE P 728 + 37 
Peoalndt 1630 +48 
PeaMidm 7.00 +24 
ShlnGvn 075 >32 
STIncpn 1178 +33 
ShlnTp 1191 +37 
ThdCntrn 7.B3 +20 
l/STlrd 1140 +32 

:3 


GovBdn 941 +37 FrsFaE 1DJB +27 TkFrVAnl042 - 37 
GrowItiTrBl.lJ +42 FrsiFtfTot 9J3 • 34 1 GT Globat 
HKH 840 + 31 FIHwAAu 1048 -35' Amerp 1940 + 22 

incoTrSn 9.90 *03 First Investors A/nerB 921 +21 

IncoTrip 9.fi +33 BJQipp I54B +43 EmMkt 90)5 +42 

InlGovS p 1X23 >oc Gtobl p 624 >.181 EmMktB 8.93 -42 

IntGovI 1022 +JC Govtp 1046 * 06 \ Europe P 075 >40 

IntMun I 1044 +33 Grolnc P 666 -.14 EuraB 1046 + 40 

MgdAgrSnlO.16 +!2 HlgtiYdD 695 +31 GvIncA 666 +.15 


InlGovS p UL23 >0)3 
IntGovI 1022 +013 
IntMun I 1024 +^ 
MgdAgrSniai6 >23 
ModGroS nlo.09 +-20 
MedG&1Sn)0-04 +.13 
MgdlncSn 9.98 +.ffi? 
MaxCool 11.93 +25 
MidCap 10.93 > 22 


Income p X87 >31 . 
InvGrd O 9.39 + .04 . 


USA np 1147 
MATF p 1128 


MiniCaD n 1 1.65 +20 
S-IGovI n 1026 +.01 
S+IGovS P 1026 +31 
Shtlnd n 866 +31 
ShtlncSp 666 +.01 
SWMunl lOLId +32 
ShtMunSplO-ta *07 
SlockTr 26.17 >70 
Stic Bond 1626 +26 
Intlnclnst 930 >35 


COPVMA 1149 —11 EmMktA 
CopVaBnri.49 —22 EoPGR 

®8.W=S !S£? 


AmLdrA 1528 + 41 
CatJGrA P1124 +23 
EqmcAo 1123 +21 
EqkicCt 1123 +21 
HilncBdA 3047 — JM 
HilnBdC tx 1048 — .03 
IntlEqA n [9.73 +77 
mtllncAt 1048 +.15 
LtTrmA p 9.62 +.03 
L)dMunAp97a + 07 
Ml Mu Inc 1025 >35 
MunSecA 1049 +.06 

B e +.ia 
, >om 

, +.04 
' >23 
+ .22 

EmMktA pi 129 + .10 


L93 +22 Ml TFp 1135 +.07! HltCrB 
45 + 20 NO TFP 1X40 +.07' HIIncA 
126 +.01 NYT »Fr p 14.06 -38 HilncB 

126 +31 PA TFp 12-03 -JM . InfraA 

L66 +31 SpecS a 1)20 -.01: InfrnB 

L66 +.01 SoSilD 17.92 -23' Intt D 

Lib +32 TOkEkPt 0 9.64 +.D6, IriHB 

un >on TotRetD 1142 +.16, Jaxmi 
J7 >70 UtillnatP 5.07 +.121 JopanC 
26 + 26 VA TFp 11.95 + 08 • Lot Am 
20 >35 FirstMut 837 - 22 Loiftm 
erty: First Omaha: > Paata 


1X54 +29 
NYTFno 1043 -37 

Amerp 940 * 22 1 USGvt 925 -I USGyn 945 +013 

AmerB 921 +21 Inventor Funds Lauroi investor: 

EmMkt 9^ +42 EqGHTiApl0.ll +21 1 CaoAp 2820 -79. 

EmMktB 8.93 -Og. GNMA A p 9.90 +0)6 , Hasp 1114 -JM 

Eurooe P 075 *40' IntGovAD 9.91 >33 Imp 1372 >49: 

EuraB 1046 + 40 PAMuniAp9.93 +35! Msdt P 1042 - 33 

GvIncA 8.66 >.15 htvesax 1 SoErp 15.94 +25 

GvIncB 846 +.4 Dynmp 1029 >25, TtBdo 1149 -34 

GrtncAp 617 +.171 EtngntiDnll49 -JM l LourHTrush 
GrlncB 617 +.17 Energy n 1047 +.15 Baincdn 1034 - 24 

HltnCrp 1943 -27) Envimn 655 -03 ■ hrlmlnn 1027 - 33 

HltCrB 1940 * 27; Eurooe n 1337 + 45- S&P500n 1023 - JO 

HjlncA 1246 -.11 FinSvcn 1547 -28 • Stock n 1844 * 41 

HilncB 1X85 +.10 Goldn 5.90 —.10 , Laxard Group: 

InfraA 1242 >2 Growth np 527 -.14 Equity 1*80 -24 

InfrnB 12-tO -21 HirhScn 3529 -42 1 inrtEa 1346 -44 

InttP 1139 - 24 HiYId np 665 -02 IntISC 1131 -21 

IntfB 10.98 +23 manconpll45 + 23 SmCaD 1575 -27 

Japan p 1X94 +28 mtGovn 1X03 -0)3: SpEa 1427 —.02 

JdpanGrB 1X82 -27 1 IntIGrn 17J6 - 62 ShflYd 921 -.02 

LatAmG 2702 -1.01 ' Leisure n 22J4 +40 LeoenNY 7J2 -.10 
L«AmGB2686-1.0Ii PocBasn 170)2 + 40 1 LeebPer n 1041 -38 


□cvCcpp 1694 -26 .Nomura n 1822 +29 
DrooAT 7746 +25 North Am Funds 
EuroAt 1602 >47 1 As1AHCpnllJ4 +.14 
FeaseeAp924 -.05 QGrp 1489 +24 
FLMA 947 -.09 1 Grwt 
FdFTA 1443 -46 


FLMA 947 -.09 1 GrwlTlC PfilW +26 
FdFTA 1443 - 46 GrlneCpn1182 +26 
FdGrAp 10.07 +24 USGvtAp 943 *OA 
QAlAt 1X17 -21 NelnvGr n 2527 +79 
GIBdA 921 -.11 NHnvTrn 9.97 +.03 
1048 -079 Northern Fondt 
_ _ 1340 +40 Rxlnn 9.63 +.04 


-.03 : HlthCrp 1943 -27 . 


1940 + 27' 
1X86 -.11 : 
1X85 -.10 
1242 >21 
1240 -21 
11.09 -24 
10.98 +23 
1X94 +28 


trsumana: • roam )«/» - ut> : Setlncm no 5 10 + OU ■ Legg Mason: 

Equity n 11.19 +.191 PocitB 14J0 +26l ShTrBdP 9J9 +31 j AmerLda9.97 


o 

Tree 90 

hipp 1?4 
ntonZU 



in 1145 -.01 
l _ 19.97 +25 




MDMunAl 
MJMunA 1. 


*23 Fxdlncn 9 43 >0)6 
+ 21 SIFxInn 949 + 03 
+ 21 FPDvAstP 1240 - 20 
— JM FPMuBdP 11.70 +34 
—.03 First Prior&v: 

+ 77 EquityTrnlOTO -.18 
+ .15 FkdtncTr 9.(0 - .05 
+ .03 LtdMGv 9.66 
+ 02 RrstUmoa: 

>35 BrfTn 1168 +24 
+ 34 BciCtn 11.69 -24 
+ .10 BalBp 11.68 +24 
+ J* FLMuniC 9.13 +.07 
+ .04 FxInB P 9.72 *.04 
>23 FxtnTn 9.72 +0M 
+ .22 HiGdTFB plO.ID >38 
, HGdTFCHO.10 *.08 
♦•10 MnBdTn 942 1 .06 
+-« NCMunCr 939 + 091 
*76 USGvtBP 9.21 >35 

USGvtCr 921 -35, 
*■“ UWitYCt 9.31 -21 
*J6 VHueBP 17.89 +29 
♦-K VaueCtn 1739 + J8 
— ?! VrtueT n 17J8 • J8 

J *29 

5 E» P P ^‘51 

MAAunip 1032 >.10 


StratAP 11.06 
StratB 11.07 
Telecom 17.40 
TeieB 17.46 
Wldwp 174.1 
V/ldwB 1743 


11.06 +.17 

11.07 + 18 
17.60 +46 
17.46 +45 
1741 +48 
1743 -47 


T»Fneenpl5.l9 +.06 
Tech n 2X94 + 47 
TctRTn 1B49 > 21 
USGdVtnp 687 +.06 
Util n 9.B0 + 22 
ValEq 1833 • .46 
InvTrGvJB ) 8.50 *m 


05 Gnbelli Funds InvTrGvTB) 650 

.. ABC n 1040 — 31 itSeiFdnp I4J6 
Asset no 2346 > 43 | JPM Imtit 


.06 GWGovlP 10012 
47 GvtlRd np 9014 

21 1 Hrridp IA02 

.06 1 invGr np 9J0 

22 AAdTF p 154) 
PATFp 1558 




Splnvnp 2046 -.19 
TkFrlntP 1487 • .05 


24, ConvSc pnlljrt +.05 
24; Ealnco 11.69 <33 
24, GllnlCPn 1040 *33 
.07 1 GlConvn 1045 +.09 
.04} GrTHO 1046 +24 
OM Gotdn 11.98-04 
38 Growth (102X83 >74 


TkFrlnto 1482 
TatRetnp 1341 
VafTr no 1940 


*08 | ■ 29 I Jackson National: ~ 

1.06 vahiep 1227 * 25 Growth tl29 1 23 

+ 09 IGrfoxy Funds A: income 947 *0M 

135 AssetAflnl045 , J4 TaxEx 100)6 -.05 

• 35. CTMun 9.46 +37 TotRtn 1QJ1 , .17 

> 21 , EqGHh 1431 + 29 Jaws Fund: 

+ 29 EatVal 1305 +29 Balanced nlllO +.16 

^ :i Fm/tSex Sj9 :5S 

IntBd 935 +.04 Flxlncn 9.01 i .01 


Bond n 9 JO • JM VafTr no 1940 • 

Diversion 10.17 « 21 Lehman Brothers 
EmoMkEdhM +J5. FlRlGvA 988 - 
IntlEqtyn 10.82 *25' SelGrStBU0J2 - 
ST Band ft 943 • 37 I ShDurGvA 9.93 
, SmallCon1023 , 23.Le, 

SelEotvn 1137 *24 

Jaduan National 


GIBdA 
GICvA 

GrttdA . . 

GIRsAt 15.97 +20 
GJbISmA 949 -.15 
GlUt At 17J9 +24 
GriRA 1845 - 27 
HealthA 163-36 
Instln d 944 * 31 
intfEaAt IIJM +29 

MIMuAt 9JS4 >.08 

MNJMUA tons *37 
LotAmA r 1844 >47 
MnlnsA 775 > 27 
MunLldA 9.84 +31 
MuinTrA 9J6 -34 
MNatlA 9.94 -37 
NOMA 10.41 + 36 
NYMllA 1035 -39 
PocA 2X81 • 45 
PA MA 1074 - 06 
PhnxA 1X51 +.16 
SoVlA 1547 +.11, 
SirOvAt I10a +2 
STGlAt BI 
TechA 

TXMA ___ 
WJdlncA 8.44 * 34 
Merrfl Lynch B: 

AdiRB 9.47 . .02 
AmertnB (9.16 +34 
AZMBt 10.14 >39 
Bo® I 1136 +28 




BosWBI 2302 
CaiMnBl 11.06 


men 1620 
1129 


934 - .01 
443 — 37 ' 
02 


IntEqtn 13.12 
MA MU n 9.31 
NY Mun 10.14 
STBdn 9.77 

}s& m 

'SSeSrSllS 


Furotn 1928 •J*|, 1 S2£7 
Grthinc 1443 4 J4 MSSSy 
InrGvt 433 -31! HSK 
Mercury 1174 +J8 
pyerseosnl02i +25 
ShTmBdn 288 


ClnvGdB 1037 +.05 
>ITBt 1X90 +.04 
t 1689 • 36 
□rpgBp 1743 *25 
-umB. ,.5-34 

t 947 


— GrEa n 10.40 *33 

.... .... incEon 10.01 +.15 

1749 + 241 imTaxEx 119.89 *33 
1845 - 27 ', imtFxInn 1030 +.16 
363 -36, IntGrFq n 1032 >25 
. _qnl!26 +24 
SHEan 10.12 +26 
SmCBGrn 935 +37 
TxExptn 930 *09 
.... .. , USGovtn 978 *03 
7.75 >37 Norwest Funds 
9.84 >31 AdiUST 942 + 31 
-• 1 AdfcovA 941 

COTF A 949 +37 
GvttncTr 673 +015 
GvttncA 873 + .05 
incomeSPt 10.10 +.23 
IncomeTr 925 +.05 
IncameA 9.76 ‘35 
TF btcA 947 • 36 
TF IncT 9.42 > 36 
ValuGrA 1767 +46 
13 1 VctuGrT 17.66 +46 
•n Funds 
InsR rut 939 > JM 
VIRnx 9.88 - -.JO 
VaIR IH9.67 *.05 
MO VIRnx 9 61 • 34 
MAIftiR (1X9.78 >33 
MAVIRIU929 ■ 07 
Ml VaIR nx9.81 > 05 
* X 331 - 04 
nxlGOO < 0U 
NJValRnx9.74 > 03 
!n*936 >37 
nx 9.91 -.01 
(W9.86 -31 
! nx 946 > .06 
.04 


AOBaln 1023 +.10 t 

Bain 11.12 +.17 

n 1236 +25 

jn 929 + 35 

n 1522 +.73 1 ixrvirn km >.iy 

SftcWxn 1144 + 241 Value n 1X13 +2S 

Putnam FMsA: Zer20oan 1124 +35 

AcCAp 1022 +.0? SeafiretlRA: . _ 

AmGvAp 61V +J» AssetA I3L67 >JJ 

AsfaAp 1472 +26 BOi 1735 +49 

.p 828 +.15 Bond 1041 +JU 

p 827 +.10 Security Funds 
.ItiAp 849 +.18 “ — *- **• 

BtGvAp 447 >0)2 

AZTE X65 +.04 

TkAp 306 +34 

p 19.11 +25 

4077 +J5 
946 +.18 
p X93 *31 
PX1146 — 31 
P B3S +.19 

Ap 1X76 +48 

925 +.04 
848 +.06, 

1X65 +23 

$8 :* 

HlthAp 3043 +8\ 

HiYdAp 11.93 +.IU 
HYAdAp 928 +35 
IncmAp 649 +.M 
knvAp 335 +24 
MnlnAp 872 +.12 
MoTxIl US +.05 
MITxllP 848 +JM 
MuniAD 355 +JM 
MrTxllP 848 + 34 
NIRsAp 1447 + 20 
NJTxAp 342 +.04 
NwOpAp 2544 >78 
D 845 + 35 
P 845 +.02 
p 1141 +44 
klip 342 +.04 
QvSeAD 1224 + 23 

Pate bjs >05 

TxExAp 840 + JM 
TFlnAp 1421 >37 
TFHYA 13.91 +36 
USGvA p 1X32 >.10 
U1UAD 907 +.17 
VstaAp 721 +.15 
VavAp 1X12 >24 
Putnam Fuads B: 

S5p; b . 1 1 s :s 

, Sil :» 


STCorph 
ITTvy n 


.11 

\$ 

is 

SUmrriOHY 932 —.01 

s »SSf.Ca* 


W+,' 


P 9.14 +31 
! XW 
p 7.09 -31 
D 7.10 —31 
1X76 +X 
r.fli +43 

6.94 +43 

msAnllJI +36 I 
HUB 1181 +.041 


It 9.74 >.OS > 
„ n 9.99 +21 

40 < .04 inttEan 1460 >47 

USGvtAp 660 >31 LpCapGrnlOJKf >21 

HlYBdAp 643 +.01 LflCapV 1049 +.25 

SenMMGnun: MnBkdn 944 >36 

.. Balanced RWL49 >21 Srr£oPG 11.79 f3T 

325 4.15 Bandp 5.9B +JM SuCapV 1184-33 

t 325 >.)0 ComSlk P 2941 *73 _ ToimSd ?» *36 

. a ak > i6 I EmGrp 564 >.12 TIFF Wm Pro: 

GvSecsp 941 >.07 Bond 9.33 >.05 


t 345 > .18 
4 67 t 02 
t 80S 1 34 
_ » 19.02 • 25 
DvrEoBI 893 *31 
DvrtnB fxU47 —.02 
.18 


50 

11.06 1 . 12 
9JI • .11 
2735 +J9 
74! > 31 


68 > 07|seven 


Growth D 16 
PATFp 13. 
TFIOCP 1386 
WorW p | 
Sertn^dn 1 




24 

1025 - .08 

us IT :* 

Util _ 1046 -.19 


._r 9... 

Bt not 

®t 921 
iB I 1073 
GlRsSl 15.95 


Fwros MM 

. .. — , GavtSecAn9.12 4 .04 

13 01 +20 WVaTxA n9J8 *34 
92t +.t! CtakHaUti 13.18 +.01 
1073 +.D? Oakmrk 2S24 +29 


nr 111 


USE 1 *! 1041 +.28 
eiupleron Group: 
AmerTrrUJJ >29 
CoaAcC 1613 >49 
DevMktp 1406 >.17 
Forunp 10.00 1 28 

%£% gp J 

incamp 9. 

RIEstp 13— 

(20 

6 +49 

84 >.14 
343 +.43 




Ills 

1780 +.17 




975 + 27 
922 + 36 


^njjg : J 

Ambassador lav: 
Bondn 922 * 06 
EdCoGfnl616 ++W 

kiflgkn n 1329 +^ 
MITFBdn 939 +37 
SmCoGrnllflO +28 
TF Bd n 9.98 *07 
TFlfflBdnlOJW +JM 
Andktssador Ret A: 
Bond! 923 *06 
EstCoGr 1X16 +49 
Grwtti 1X87 +40 
IntUond 928 +JM 
inttStk 1129 +J8 
SmCoGr 1381 +29 
TFIntBdt 10J» +36 
Amcoro Vintage: 
EquByn 1046 +26 
Fxmco 941 +.04 
IntdtTFn 9.79 *017 
AmerAAdvaatlnsfl: 
Bakinn 1X38 +21 
Grlnpon 1415 +J1 
teEqtynlXai +45 
LWTrm n 971 +.01 
AmerCupdot 
OrtHAp 1S89 +41 
CmstBp 1X90 +41 
OtBdBP 648 +33 
CorpBdAp647 +33 
EmGrCB 2412 +41 
EGAp 2437 +42 


*39 ffTYJeW 9J4 +31 Mu 

+ 24 Bondn 9J4 +33 Sj 

Equity 1074 + 25 air 

:s Wn'^+. d 

+ 49 Bondn 9J4 +33 b3 

♦ Ji _ Eouity n 1074 + 25 Gw 
+28 BeocHUl 2920 +45 inF 
+34 BSEmcdbt 9016. +36 n5v 
+ JB Beadimark Funds Tx! 

♦ 29 BatancednOon +.10 US< 


GrtlAp 1130 +29 NYMunA1378 +.10 

GrtIBp 1176 + 28 NYMuBM378 +.10 

MunB 1X11 +JM OHMuA 1248 +37 

«n pass Copitot OHMuSt 1249 >37 

Ecovlnco 487 +.14 PAMunA 1572 +.13 
Fxdln 7.97 +.05 PA MuB 11X71 +.12 

Growth 1U5 +27 TXMuA 2039 +.19 

jrtjEq 1428 + 47 VAMuA 1X65 +.14 

IntIFl 10J8 +.12 VAMu8tl54$ +.14 

MunBd 1025 + 37 Dreyfus Strateoic 
NJ Mun 1075 + 38 Growth p 39.91— 121 
Shrtlnt 10.15+32 Income p 1105 +36 

SmCcrpValllJO +20 InvA 2X19 +3 

lornpaME Group: JnvBt 19.93 +29 

BdakA p 1133 +.18 DutfPEnRn 9.98 
GwthA p 1X68 +25 Dupree Mufti* 
InFc-AD .842 + 35 IntGovn 944 +35 

NW.5QApl4.49 >23 KYTFn 720 +34 
XxEkAP 7 JO +36 JCYSMfn X16 +31 
USGvA p_ 928 + 37 EBIPundx: 

Oaedoga Funds Ecwityp 6146 +148 


AMaHn n 
Bakmc 1272 +73 
BlueCh 2646 +.75 
CAInsn 943 >37 
CATFn 10,98 +37 
Cmadar 17.15 —03 
CapApp 1701 +26 
Caplnca nrX97 
canjirstrt54.94 +4.13 
Contra 3075 +76 
CnvSecn 1X96 +.16 
Deslinyl nl7J7 +42 
□estinyll n28J0 +44 
DIsEan 1883 +48 
Divermtinl241 +43 
DivGtnn 1X61 +46 
imgGrar164i +47 


BondAn 1846 + 36 GKW^ga Funds Equdyp 6146+148 

+ -2£ P quf,v 1S 9$ nexp sxsi +o» 

Eql»An 1029 Incm 9.91 +.06 Income p 4589 +27 

FgCgrAnlO.10 +23 IJdMat 10J3 +33 Muftflxp 3943 +45 
52S£ n ?2-iS + -3S Conn Mutuofc ESCStrlnA 9.70 +.04 

c2ST«r ’fHS - J3 5°^ ,?■?? EaoleGflh 11.16 +35 

SWDurn 9,99 Grwtti 1X16 +40 Eaton V Cknsic 

SIBdAn 1975 + 34 Income 9J7 +.03 Qiinap X92 +.13 

SmCHA 11J1 +.19 TotRet 14.12 +23 FLLICP 943 +0)5 

USGvA n 19JG >35 CGCapMMFds Gavtp 9.16 + 02 

_ USTIdx Anl9JM +.1Q EmaMktn943 + 23 NatlLidp 945 +.04 

BenhamGrauk intrFxn 782 + 33 NattMunp X98 +38 

^Govn 9j3 +31 intEq n 1X80 +40 Eaton V M m Uliana 
rSrSJ-’S'S "Wprn 8J9 +20 CALM t 940 +JM 

CaTgP n ,J46 +^ LsGrwn 9.93 +21 Chine f 1331 +2D 

9°TFSn 10.06 +.E LaVal n 9.15 +211 India t 1083 —J» 
CarTFHn Ml *M Mtgfikdn 747 + 37 FLLMt 9.99 +34 

CgTFLt»1044 + 39 jytunln 732 + 36 MALtdt 986 *03 

SmGrwn 1X07 +23 MlLtdt 944 +JM 

|^ n n & :fi W 7^ :s BH 1 W 

LTnmsrt 872 + 09 BctanAn 10JM +.16 


DIsEon 1883 +48 NYTE P 10.10 +38 

DiVerlilttnl24l +43 OHTEAD1X96 +37 

DivGtnn 1X61 +46 OHTECP JX96 *07 

gmgGrorl64l +47 PATEAP 984 >36 

EmrflAkt 1983 + 47 TnTEAp 1046 + 3B 

Equtfnc 3138 >.79 UtHAo 945 +.15 
EGlIn 19J0 +28 VATEAd 10.12 +.10 
Eqldx 1725 + 42 Flex Funds 
ErCapAp nil 40 + 29 Bondnp 1926 
Europe 2087 *93 Gtolnpn 924 -0)1 


GATEAplXOO *J» Gitdd Group; 

GldRbp 1678 >.18 Er tears 2442 +25 
InfTEp 9.96 *05 GintIFan 1X34 >.16 
KYTEAP1041 +39 Gteamede Funds 
K5TEP 948 +.10 Equity n 1332 +40 
LATEA 0 1025 +.08 IntGovn 9.91 +35 
LTtfTEp 1048 +JC Inin 1X12 +41 
MITEAp 1139 +.08 Munint n 9.90 +37 
MOTEAP1026 + 39 SmCapn 1428 +.12 
Ml TEC Pi 138 +38 OtrwinIA 948 * 02 
NCTEAp 935 *J07 GoktenoakDimn +.18 
NMTEp 943 +.08 Goldman Sachs Fmly: 
NYTEp 10.10 +38 AsfoGrth 1571 +39 


GfOWttip 14.03 t 34 i *.«9 

'VA + -S! «wS?n 1244 + 21 


LTGvA p L46 —OH ' 
MATE H29 +39 
MgTEB 1134 +39 

KBB’W 4 * 

1X22 Z3 


ExchFdrllM.72 +24B Growth nplX07 
FidelFdn IBJB +45 Muiridort 5J7 +.01 

Fifty 11.18 +21 Fanioinen 1131 +.12 

GNMn 10.10 +38 Fort-s Funds: 

QaBd 1047 +.14 AstAnp 1426 +27 

GklBaln 1X25 +.17 CapApp 2X54 +49 

GvISecn 923 +0)5 Capitl p 1X18 +45 

GroCO 2846 + 83 FkJucrp 2980 +43 EntBMk 1747 +44 RaBkSt 

Grolnc 2128 +45 GfcGrtbp 1441 +41 GiGvln 844 + 35 J Hancock 

HiYId 1173 +37 GovTRp 7.80 +33 IntEq 1249 + 40 AcJl A 

InsMunn 11JW +37 Grwtnp 2622 +21 PfcStg 946 +.13 AchBl 

IntBdn 9.94 +.02 HiYId d 748 - Snpra 1646 +28 BdAp 

InterGvtn 929 +33 TF MN 1035 +37 Gradaon McDonald: BalBp 

IrdlGrtn 1741 +22 TF Nat 1026 +38 Estval pn 2X00 +47 BondAp 

invGBn 7-01 *03 USGvt 878 + 33 Govinco 1X23 +38 Bora® 

Japan nr 1426 + 44 4JWoJlEq X95 >056 OH TFp 1226 +J» InvAp 

LotAmr 1X93 +40 Forum Funds OpovoTd 18.B5 +21 MvBp 

LtdMun 924 + 35 InvBnd 9.99 +34 GHMNTE 946 + 36 USGvA p 

LawPrr 1676 + 26 ME Bod 1023 +.07 GHNatTE 9.99 +JH USGvBt 

fiUTFn 11.13 +35 TaxSvr 1X17 +35 Greensirnfl 1X15 —OH J&vBal 

MN TF n 1046 + 35 Founder* Funds GriffinGrln 1121 +24 KSMun 

McneOan 6770+149 Bolnp X90 +21 GuanSan Funds KSIMunU 

AAkfind nr 3487 + 1.03 BlueQip np649 +21 Ast Alloc 1042 +.17 Kaufmanp 

MA TF n 10.98 * 06 Discvp 1928 +28 GBGIntl 1X67 >48 KanperFT 

MidCppn 11.W +28 Fmtrnp 27.11 +73 Bondn 1148 +36 AdiGovA 

MtpeS«cnIDJ7 +37 GavSec X91 +012 ParkAv 28JM +43 BlueCho/ 

Muncpln 779 +0)6 Grwtti no 1X29 +44 Stock n 2X48 +45 CaHfTxA 

NYHYn 1149 +38 Pmsirtn ia.06 +28 TaxEx 933 +36 DivtncoA 

NYlnsn 1X98 +36 Spedwi 748 +.17 US Govt 947 +34 FLTxA 


NYTEp 10.10 +38 AsloGrth 1X71 +39 
OHTEAP 1X96 +JD CapGr 1X46 +25 
OHTECP 1X96 *07 Gfljlnc 1343 +J» 
PATEAP 944 + 36 Grtnc 1643 +.19 
TnTEAp 1046 + 30 IntlEa 1X90 +41 
UtBAo 945 +.15 Muni me 1X35 +.10 
VATEAp 1X12 +.10 SeiEn 1X55 +46 
lex Funds _5moCap 1920 +34 

Bondnp 1926 - GaMman Sachs last: 

GttJlnpn 924 —Oh AdiGv 9.77 +31 
Growth nplX07 . Gov An 9.78 

MuirfdPttf 527 +.01 ShriTF 936 +33 
dnwnen 1131 +.12 ST Gov 947 + OH 
orbs Funds GovSTBnd 2028 +38 

AstAnp 1X26 +27 GvtEqtyn 2329 +47 
CapApp 2X54 +49 Gavett Fuads 
Capitl p 1X18 >45 DvtpBd 846 + 35 


5bcOpsB 7.72 +.17 

StrlncAp X94 +43 

Strlr^B X94 +.03 

TaxEx p 1023 +38 

UrilsS X04 >.16 

JHancadcFreedm: 

AvTech 939 +.17 

Envnwp 840 +.17 

GlInBt 849 +.15 

GtobB? !» Zj[7 T^c5p1X14 -39 

GUnA X90 +.15 TFFLp X60 +JM 

GSdbRx 1X95 +26 TFMOp X85 +33 


Gr&mn 1X85 +22 
1X94 +26 
1X18 -.191 
Counset 
Tr 444 >32 
441 +32 

AW& 445 *•” 
AffiHd p T136 >25 
D933 >37 
P1X10 +27 
1990 D 1477 +29 
CdUP 1248 +21 
IP 1X97 +27 
Gflncp XI 7 +.12 
GovtSecp 244 +32 
TaxFrp 1048 >36 
TFCTp 947 +36 
TxFrCal plX14 -J» 


MNMBt 1 
Mnin 
MtXJ 


1X46 +34 
1133 +39 I 


Eoldx 7149 +43 

— GIBdA n X99 *09 

... .... STTreas n 971 +31 GdEqAn 948 +20 

LM Trrnn 9 21 +.01 Tor i W Sn 9526 +.16 inffidAn 9.60 +32 

jperQmftPt „ Troffioon67.o9 *37 intlGrAn iaos +29 

OtWAP 1X89 +41 T(r7005 n 454V +44 ValEqBpnlX2S +22 

!5J0 +41 TMDlOnaiJU +46 CoiSetopA 1325 +29 
CBB«D 6M +33 Tor201 5 n 2X91 >45 COwenlGfAllJlfi +23 
CoroedA P6.47 +33 TOr2Q20nlX36 +40 CrnbbeHuion: 
&nGrCP2X« *41 TNoan 9,94 +32 AstAllp 1192 +.16 

EGAp 2427 +42 Uffllnoan 9.19 +23 EoultvP 1X37 +24 

|roGrBp 23M +40 BmerGrowk OR Munn 1X1 2 +36 

EntAp 1123 +32 lOCpn IX15 +44 SpeckXn 1337 +2t 

EMBp 1X11 >21 lOlnn 1141 * 24 crestFunds Trust 
ISP. 0 . ’S-IS **S _ SmOiG rnpX77 +38 Bondn 929 +33 

EotylncA P542 +.10 BornsteuiFds SI Ban 940 +.02 

fcalncS d 5M +.11 GvShOunl225 +32 soEqn 1139 +.19 


EotylncA P542 +.10 BomsteiflFds 

*■!] aStOunlHS +-{3 SoEqn 1139 +.19 

la^cCo,,^ +.11 atourn 1223 + 37 value n 11.12 +20 

ExaiFd 11X71 +225 IntDurn 1X54 >36 VAMun 9.67 +37 

P 1X03 *02 Ca Mun 1336 + 36 CuFdAtfn 9.90 
1X04 +32 DtvMunnllVV *06 CuFdSTn 946 +0)2 
1 1JJ5 tfYMunn 1X97 +35 Cutter Trust 

«114? +23 _lnttValn 1445 *M ApvEan 1029 + 25 


NYLIdt 9.94 +34 
PALM t 10.00 +JJ5 
ALTxFI 9.95 +.08 
AZTxFt 1037 +37 
ARTxFt 937 +J® 
CdMmit 926 +36 
COTxFt 949 >0)6 
CTTXF1 970 +017 
Ealnt 10.17 +.13 
FtaTxFt 1023 + 39 
GATxFt 946 +37 
GovtOWt 9.15 *02 
Hilnct X99 +.01 
KYTkFt 947 +38 
LATXF 1 971 +37 

MDTxFf 9.77 +0)8 
MAT* Ft 9.93 +017 
MITkFt 9.93 +37 
MNTkFt 9.74 +017 
MSTxFf 93B *07 


GfTech 1824 +42 
GOWA 1472 —.11 
MW8t 1470 —.11 
Potfta 1X64 +40 
PO^asB 1548 +29 
RBBkA 2138 +.18 
RBBkBt 2172 +.18 


Japan nr 1426 + 44 4JWoilEq X95 > 06 
LotAmr 1X93 +40 Forum Fands 


AAkhnd nr 3X87 + 1.03 
MATFn 10.98 +J» 


G®aAP 11.92 +25 NYMunn X97 +35 Cutler Trust 
GJEtopn 114? +23 inttVain 1X65 +40 ApvEan 1029 _ 

GtEqC np 1140 *34 BerwynFdnlL73. +23 Eatytnca n 9.94 +.18 
WGvAp 8.05 +.10 BerwmjK.nl 122 +37 GoviSecn 9,77 +32 
QGyBpn 8.09 +.11 BhlrudMCG 1047 +0)5 DG Investor: 

GtGvCp 833 +.10 BOmara Funds Equity 1073 


value n 11.72 +20 ArtOTxFt 9.95 *09 

VAMun 9.67 +37 NJTxFt 10.15 *07 

UFd A<gn 9.90 _ NYTxFt 1X40 *00 

UFdSTn 946 + 32 NattMuni 942 *09 

Utter Trust NCTxFt 9.73 +37 

ApvEan 1029 + 25 OHLtdl 944 +0U 

Eatytnca n9.94 +.18 OHTxFt 1033 +38 

GoviSecn 9.77 *02 ORTxFt 937 +38 

iG Investor; PATxFt 10.07 +37 

Equity 1073 + 22 RITxFI 9.05 +37 


MidCaon 11.W +28 Fmtrnp 27.11 +73 Bondn 1148 +36 

MlgeSecnig37 + 37 GavSec X91 +012 ParkAv 2838 +43 

Muncpln 779 +0)6 Grwtti no 1X29 +44 Slock n 2848 +45 
NYHYn 1149 +38 Passprtn 10.04 >28 TaxEx 90)3 +36 

NYlnsn 1028 +36 Sped Wi 748 +.17 US Govt 947 +34 

NewMkl nl!28 +.12 _WWwj3r p 1828 +40 HDnsEqp 12S6 +23 
NewMITI 1X61 +25 Fauntaii Square Fds KTMgRp ?Jo +0)4 
OTC 2346 +41 Balanced 947 + 24 HanitnCoio 907 

OhTFn JK.97 +36 GoytSec 943 + 33 Hanover Imr Fds: 

Ovrsean 19.16 + 10X3 InhEruy 9JJ +.19 BtChGH 10.19 +20 
PocStan 19.96 +43 MidCcv 1048 +24 STGvJ 947 +31 

Purtttn 1540 +26 OhloTF 9 M *M SmCpGrl 10-09 +.10 

RedEsfn1X03 +0X1 QudBd 929 + 35 USGtfl 928 +0M 

RetGrn 1847 +28 OualGr 972 + 21 Harhor Funds 
ShITBdn BJ94 +0)2 Franklin Group: Band 1046 + 36 


GiGvln 844 + 35 J Hancock Sovergn: 
IrdEq 1169 +40 Adi A 1136 +34 

PfcStg 936 +.13 AchSl 1150 +24 

SmCos 1X86 +28 BatAp 10108 +20 
TOdaon McDonald: BalBp 103B +28 

EstValpn2X00 +47 BondAp 1X08 +36 
Gavinca 1X23 +38 Bore® 1X08 +36 

OH TFp 1X36 *09 InvAp 1X51 +25 

OpaVafo 18J9 +21 tnvBp 1X51 +J5 

HWNTE 946 *M USGvA P 923 +36 

. JHNatTE 9.99 +.05 USGvBt 922 +36 

GfWBPtns 14.15 —OK J&VBal 1229 +.11 
iGrtffitorln 1131 +24 KSMun 1134 +09 
ocnSan Funds: KSIMunU 1130 +0)5 

Ast Alloc 1042 +.17 Kaufmanp 347 +.13 
GBGIntl 1347 + 48 Kemper Funds A: 


TFNJp X93 + 
TnxNYp 1049 + 
TKp 946 +37 
PA p 475 >33 
TF HI p 449 +0)3 
TF MJ 444 +32 
TF WA P X71 >0)3 
VahiApo pll26 +25 


SntTBdn 854 +JD Frankfin Group; 
STWkfn 929 +0)1 AGE Fd p 244 +31 

JmoBCnp 1048 +.18 AtSUSpx 924 —08 

feAskjnrlJJO +014 ARS 9.71 

StkScn 190)3 >45 AL TFp 11.18 +36 

StrQnpt 20.14 +24 AZ TF o 1059 + 0)6 


048 +014 STGvl 947 +3) 

940 +36 SmCpGrl 1009 +.10 

929 +0)5 USGvl 928 +0M 

972 + 21 HoTOor Funds 
UR Bond 1046 +36 

244 +21 CapApp rtTX93 +46 
924 —08 Growthn 1X58 +21 
9.71 _ Irttn 2649 +74 

1.18 +36 inKGrn 1145 +41 
059 +36 SMDurn B-00 >on 


35 TrerxTn 5744+121 Ballnvp 2X78 +.11 Value n 1041 +27 

37 UfflJn 10.12 +35 CAHYBd p 946 +.07 KavenFd ntl043 + 23 

37 U Toy rt 14.17 +37 Cdlnsp 1144 + 37 Heartland Pd£ 


AdiGgyA 828 *03 
BlueChoA1X23 +25 
CaHfTxA 7X0 +36 
DivtncoA 536 +37 
FLTXA 939 + 36 
GtilncA 877 +.16 

a *w:s 

liKdnA 7.99 +34 
tntlA.. 11JJ7 +41 
MurtA 946 +0tS 
NYTjA 1048 + 36 
OHTFA 921 +07 
Helwel 11.02 +.15 
Retire? 1242 +.16 
Rtfire3 10.1? +.15 

sa:.jf 

|mC^AA tjS 
Tedrt 1039 + 20 
PCTFA 932 +37 
TorReTA 907 +.19 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON PAIBS GENEVA ZURICH 

Escort Agency Credit Condi Welcome 

UK 071 589 5237 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 21) 


0H3trALBC0RTS3YlC£ 

LONDON 

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Tat 21230-7996 Haw Yot. USA 
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BlueCEq 1X99 +41 
DscVOf 1172 +26 
Eolndx 1225 +26 
GvArmn 932 +31 
GvBdP 925 +36 
IncEq 1134 +28 
inoomeBd 938 + 33 
mtPjcl 940 +33 
IrtTF TO43 +35 
InttEan 7193 +43 
LoCoGr 11.97 +26 
LoCaVol 1178 +24 
Ltvol 1028 + 32 
OH Mu 1040 +36 
5hTmGln 849 +31 
17J» +.16 
941 +32 


+.04 
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‘ £3 

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♦JM 
+ 26 
041 +.12 

?27 

Numeric 1XM +40 
BosNum016j02 +40 
OtmtFarVahie: 
CATE 10-32 +.10 
Ftjjd 1245 +21 
GEO 1X61 +28 
936 +.14 
977 +36 
1040 +39 
NYTE 1042 +.07 
Oppart 1929 +21 
Opporffl 19.19 +20 
‘ ^ 1X32 +.05 

)«.§« +37 
944 +36 


2X15 +.16 
3X11 +132 
3640+125 
2545 +.10 
1829 +31 
+45 
+ 36 
1117 +.14 


:s sKSKErf 7 ssr*ss +.» 

*.43 FxdMCP 941 >34 GWIhA 2223 >4» 
- GrEctu«vPl048 >21 InHA 111? >.44 


12 +74 

A 1325 +S I 
848 t JM 
1741 +.17 1 





3244 +49 
n947 +32 


RBBGvtp 

RSI Trust 
ActBd 
Qxq 3X11+132 
EmGf 3X50+125 
IntBd 
5T1F 

vakw 

gSSSTp 1X17 +.14 

1138 +.12 
E q 1112 +.18 

Dv 11.15 +23 

DSI LM 922 +J)5 
FMAspc 1026 + 38 
iCM5C_ 1625 +.M 
MCKIntEaH22 +20 
SAM!Pfdn927 

n 1X93 +23 

n 945 +.18 

SJrSTRn 1031 +31 
926 +.12 

n 977 +JJ1 

Serfltn 11.17 +.13 
TSWEq 11.19 +20 
TSWRx 947 +34 

_TSWtntl 1X81 +48 

RchTcmgn L7.W. + .19 

Rwn wflfl JI Fluids: 
AstoTT 1029 +.18 
Btorn 935 +.16 

SSWiS 

.. J 977 +.19 
TEFtTrn 947 +.05 
Tax FTTrn947 +36 
vmueTrnltbU +.j? 

1X74 +48 


LWTln 1178 -31 

LWCOf 1X43 +J)3 

LtdGvtp 1X04 +JR 

UdMun»lX16 +.03 
NMInt 1171 +35 

Tocauev 1X88 +25 

ThHtfMs 
CapApp 1154 +41 

_ LAjVfcin 1®J9 +39 

Europe 9.91 +46 ToWRet 949 *06 

SpEquirn 17.90 +.19 USGv 976 +36 

SpEquiHI 1026 + 24 1 Tradtmoric Funds: 

Equity n 1073 +27 
Gpvttncon9.12 +36 
ICY Mlkl n 943 +37 
SlGavTn 927 + 34 
TraBsuiMriak 
AdiGvA 974 +32 




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ASIA11A IYa 
CATF A 104 
MuincA 1X1 
STOtGrA 132 
ST Govt 493 
USGvlA 93 
VRGA 94 

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RIBcwEG 137 
Growthn 153 
Inttn lai 

FAMCoMt 

+44 

+26 

+25 

Man ItU 

1 +20 

CopApn 132 
DivLown 11 JB 

+41 
+ 26 


—31 

RTFdrvJtaSAi —41 
GovSbcp 1226 +31 
~ MkJCap p 2840 _ 

I'S, „ SQCA wp 2633 +3l 
+M RkncoBd 921 +34 
+.11 RknaaStk 1149 +26 
+24 RiverlnE 11.15 +3 
BtWrilfi VL 9.10 +34 

+48 

+45 


Equity 12J7 +.13 

Fxdln ?28 +35 

^sg?p n 

ValPlus 1 


DMnp lX£fl +JJ4 
Growth p 1671 +28 
+45 MIEqp 1344 +^ 
+31 RaubtaiPflndB 
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♦ 21 Grin 107) + 

+4d AfficfWGr Ilia +ji 

+.15 Ravoo Rinds: 

+24 PwvtMti 820 + 36 


1m X64 +39 

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CabGrp 1133 +22 
CATFAp 9.76 +37 
CATTB 976 +37 
EmGAp 2X10 +46 
EiriGAf +44 

GfljRsBt 1540 + 32 







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'in*'** ■$ £« 

£r : ;s; 3 ^ 

■•* •«.«. ..V .,. :£!■ 


rCAPITAL 

U®“ : 

J ^Corporal 


^Corporations’ Battle Cry: 
Pay Off Short-Term Debt 


New Culprit in Metall Case? I German Election Result 

R ank Maj Have PuJled Plug Too Soon Bodes Well lor the Mark 



. jj WT\ 

v $JT 

‘if ft- 


£ jif : 5 

yn ■>: 

F*?V 

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Elf? ■ « 


' fcf; By Carl Gewirtz 

i i r ; ;j ^ | ‘. 1 International Herald Tribune 

f \ . j* ARIS — With economic recovery under way and prices in 

- 1 ■ *5. • L# futures markets showing that interest rates are headed Mgb- 

,;'-V ■?, Sty. ■ er, il would seem logical to assume that corporate borrowers 

/ - : '■ ’• Sjj/, 'JL would be in a rush to issue bonds and lock in a fixed long- 
r* ■ * ^ tenh cost of money before rates do rise further. But a 

^ * different kind of logic prevails on the international capital market. 

> ; ; ; a . ' *’ ■ jj v j^,. Corporate issuance has been and remains focused on shon-term 

[ \ ■ '■ j^UJS. and Canadian dollars, lire, ■ 1 

■■-V;/ 1 ' ! V : fefe sterling and yen — sectors that c^„ Arn i i afit WM klr’s 

4 *T?^«on rii; ■ .* provide the most attractive sibi- ^ ver " ^ week S 

' m • * §& pR! 0 swap into a Boating rate iggnes were tO repay 
- i-;w r 35 ? inability. Using the standing * J 

i* -. documentation of a medium- loans for recent 
' >5'.;? wam note program, borrowers . ... 

'v? ;i gh.jhie poised to sell paper to ac- actJDlSIllOllB, 

^y^jnmmodate any pocket of de- 

t. i ? . Ij i mand that provides an aD-in cost of funds lower than the borrowers 

E-ifvvl 'c $, . :: 'expect to pay by issuing short-term Boating-rate debL 

H ■$£].■ The proceeds are then used to pay down existing commercial 


By Sylvia Nasar 

Hew York Tima Serna 

NEW YORK — It’s a classic mystery 
twist: No sooner do the police arrest the 
obvious suspect than a brainy private eye 
comes on the scene and says that they’ve got 
the wrong guy — the real viHain is mnocenl- 
1 oolong Mr. X. 

That’s more or less the la lest turn in a real- 
life financial whodunit involving a SI 3 bil- 
lion loss from trading in o3 futures, Deutsche 
Bank and the New York subsidiary of MeiaU- 
gescllscbaft AG, one of Germany’s larges: 
mrins rri a l concerns. 

Last winter, when Deutsche Bank whisked 
MetaUgeseflschaft from the brink of ruin, 
most observers accepted the bank's version of 
events: A bunch of financial cowboys at Me- 
tallgesellschaft’s American subsidiary, MG 
Refuting & Marketing, were making hugely 


risky bets with oil futures. 

When an unexpected plunge in oil prices 
threatened staggering losses, Deutsche Bank, 
Metallgcscllschaf t ’s biggest shareholder and 
creditor and the power behind its supervisory 


board, Bred the old management, brought in 
a team to liquidate the bets, installed a new 
mana gement and lent the company money to 
cover the losses. 

That was last winter. Now, three American 
financial sleuths — the Nobel Prize-winning 
economist Merton Miller, Christopher Culp, 
a former bank examiner and doctoral candi- 
date, and Steve Hanks, a futures and options 
expert —are saying that Deutsche Bank is the 
culprit. 

The bank misunderstood a prudent, fully 
hedged oil marketing strategy', they contend, 
and, in a panic, sold off the hedges with 
catastrophic consequences. 

“They thought it was an oil bet that had 
gone sour,” said Mr. Miller, a professor at the 
university of Chicago business school. “But 
that's not what happened. They cut the hedge 
off too soon. If they had done things right, 
they wouldn't have lost $13 billion." 

Mr. Hankc, a professor at Johns Hopkins, 
added: “Old management was doing a very 

See HEDGE, Page 15 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tnbune 

PARIS — Apart from the 
victorious politicians, the Deut- 
sche mark will be the major 
beneficiary of Sunday’s election 
in Germany. 

The return of a coalition of 
conservative parties assures fi- 
nancial market operators that 
the policy of higher taxes and 
lower spending to reduce the 
overall budget deficit will re- 
main in place. 

Assured rectitude on the fis- 
cal side is seen as enhancing the 
central bank's room to maneu- 
ver interest rates lower, as the 
economic recovery under way is 
expected to be accompanied by 
a sharp decline in inflation. 


live victory or whether there ther setbacks from renewed 
was a lot more to come when confidence in the mark. 


markets open Monday, 


The dollar’s weakness was at- 


The German bond market tributed to a quarter-point 
was one of the best performers snugging in overnight money in 


last week, with rising 
driving yields on 10-year 


rices Japan that was taken as a signal 

ends that the Bonk of Japan was pre- 


down 35 basis points, or more pared to be more aggressive 
than a third of a percentage than the U.S. Federal Reserve 
point, to 7.99 percent. Likewise, Board has bam to prevent a 
stock prices gained more than 6 resurgence or inflation, 
percent. The dollar also suffered from 

“Most investors are already the latest U.S. economic data — 
positioned for u victory by unchanged industrial produc- 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl." said tioo in September and tame 
Joanne Perez at Banquc Indo- movements in the leading price 
suez in Pans. “The margin for indexes — that appeared to rc- 
any significant or sustained move any likelihood of a fur- 


post-election bounce looks 
rather hmited.*' 


ther rise in U.S. interest rates 
before the Fed's next scheduled 


'■« « "3 billion, and the activity in the medium-term note market since then 
* §§,1 suggests a further sharp run-down. 

' ' j p ; - >: . Bankas report that in current market conditions companies are 

ji* • 9* liable to issue up to three-year fixed-rate paper and swap the 

‘ "‘ 1 a* - ~ proceeds into floating-rate proceeds at a cost of up to a quarter 

ILL* • n vci : t- percentage point, or 25 basis points, below what they currently pay 

. ;• i ^ * r ; ;• ^|.U3 issue commerrial paper, 
f 1 ; V ■ ■ Ti Short-term floating-rate debt constitutes a permanent part of 

•’* ’’h' 'n‘ -a corporate balance sheets, bankers note. They add that in the current 

j jg! I market environment — with investors reluctant to buy long-term 

ir*!? ! ?i '■»’••• Sri ; ? bonds — treasurers are best off managing their short-term cost of 

P * - ^|fundathan in trying to issue fixed long-term bonds. 

\ h . i ■ ’ij.v • o s.i A number of last week’s ocnporate issues — Samsbury*s S150 
S i r : ■ 1 •• .il&iii million of three-year notes, ScmthKline’s $200 million of three-year 


* • c : 4 A number of last week’s corporate issues — Sainsbury’s SI 50 

^ .'o ^ million of three-year notes, ScmthKline’s $200 millitm of three-year 

ai “ ■ 11 notes and Roche’s equity-linked 100 billion yen of eight-year braids 

woe aimed at repaying bank loans used to finance recent 


Beijing Takes Aim at State Factories 


»v . (k Roche was the most interesting — and the first ever non- 

s v a 1 ;. % _ .; ij Japanese company to issue an equity-linked bond denominated in 

'Ji . «!!, f yen. Also notable, the issue was arranged by Swiss Bank Corp, and 

! i "}' u : '4 ^ J only one Japanese firm, Nikko Securities, was included among the 
: u five co-managers. The yen was obviously chosen as the vehicle as it 

* * •« • r r5? ^provided the lowest possible coupon — a mere 1 percent. 

f: ‘ •’ " ■ In exchanee for this low coupon, investors were offered warrants 


See BONDS, Page 15 


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THE TRIB INDEX 

World Index g 

International. Herald Tribune JT ~7v I 

Worid Stock Index, composed fil"^ — — — f 

of 280 Internationally irtvestablB 11B ; : 

stocks from 25 countries, 117 ^ > 

compiled by Bloomberg _ . ' jr. 

Business News. 116 ' 


Week end ng October 14, 114 
daily dosings. 

Jan. 1992 = 100. 

Axin/PncWc BBS , iQ 




so.-'"-- - 

; : . 


Batters 

BEUING — China said Sun- 
day it was aiming its refrain 
effort for 1995 squarely at the 
thousands of failing state fac- 
tories blocking the road to a 
capitalist-style economy. 

The government also an- 
nounced that there was still 
hope for a big harvest this au- 
tumn that would make up for 
earlier shortfalls and check ris- 
ing grain and meat prices. 

“China will shift its focus of 
ref ram to state-owned enter- 
prises next year, with the aim to 
establish a modem enterprise 
system," State Councillor Li 
Tieying annoanced. 

Mr. Li, a member of the 
Communist Party Politburo 
who oversees economic restruc- 
turing, said that curbing state 
industrial losses meant striking 
a balance between public own- 
ership and the market, a cau- 
tious approach reflecting Beij- 
ing’s fear of losing coatrol over 
state industry. 

Many state factories have 
raised capital by issuing equity 
shares to the public, but Beijing 
has generally limited -public 
shareholdings to less than 50 
percent to retain control. 

The problem with state own- 
ership, economists say, is that 
managers pay more attention to 
their state masters than to the 


market or to efficient produc- 
tion. As a result, losses mount. 
The People's Daily account 


of chemical fertilizers over 13 raised as the election results be- 
million hectares (3.2 million came dear was whether the 
acres) of farmland will boost fall mark and German financ ial as- 


AH of this translates into re- Boston in London was less cer- 
stored confidence that the mark tain. As prices on all major gov- 
is a safe store of value, a cunen- ernment bond markets all- 
ey that can be held with oonfi- vanced last week, he argued 
(fence that it will re main strong, that “it's difficult to separate 
The so-called political risk that what happened in Germany 
had weighed on the mark in the from the rest of the maikei." 
run-up to the dection has now The outlook for the currency 
been removed. appears more certain. 

The only question analysts The U.S. dollar suffered u 
raised as the election results be- sharp setback last week. It 


Andres Drobny at CS First meeting on Nov. 15. 

Boston in London was less cer- With midterm congressional 
tain. As prices on all major gov- elections set for Nov. K, poliu- 
ernment bond markets ad- ca | xiiik now shifts to the United 
vanced last week, he argued States, where President Bill 
that “it's difficult to separate Clinton is threatened with los- 
what happened in Germany i ng control of both houses of 


Congress. 

Long-standing optimists on 
the dollar's outlook, such as 
Paul Chcrtkow. a London- 
based analyst for Union Bank 


of Mr. Li’s remarks gave only a grain production by 400,000 sets — notably government 
vague outline of his “modem tons, Agriculture Ministry offi- bonds — had already advanced 
enterprise system,’’ but said it dais told the newspaper. in anticipation of the conserva- 


enterorise system," but said it 
involved “coordinated and 
comprehensive reforms" in so- 
cial security and market circula- 
tion and a transformation of 
government functions. 

Mr. Li also bemoaned indus- 
try’s stale ideas and lack of 
competition. 

“We must be armed with fresh 
ideas for development and cre- 
ate new systems in reform," he 
said. “Advantage in a good sys- 
tem comes first in competition.” 

Thousands of unprofitable 
state-owned factories across 
China are under orders to turn a 
profit or face bankruptcy. But 
Beijing has held off on wide- 
spread liquidations for fear of 
unrest if millions of workers are 
thrown out of jobs. 

Separately, regarding this 
year’s harvest, China Daily said 
farmers were “doing everything 
possible to head off a further 
slide in the nation's grain pro- 
duction.” 

China’s summer grain crop 
fell by 4.6 million metric tons, 
triggering sharp increases in the 
prices of grain and grain-fed 
livestock. 

It is hoped that intensive use 


closed at 1.5173 DM, a low not of Switzerland, and loog-stand- 
seen since early summer. For ing pessimists, such as Simon 
technical analysis, who look at Crane, an adviser to bank trad- 
chart patterns, the dollar ap- 
pears to be vulnerable to fur- See MARK, Page 15 


Thinking Globally From the Get-Go 

Audio Conferencing Firm Beats a Path to the World 




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Vietnam Gets Offshore Oil 
From a Second Location 



Berners Vietnam is aiming for annual 

HANOI — Vietnam's second economic growth of at least 8 
offshore field has begun pro- percent into the 21st century to 
duemg erode oil, which the lift it from the ranks of the 
country is counting on for hard world’s poorest countries. 


currency to bolster its economy. 

BHP Petroleum of Australia 
said oil began flowing from the 


The country's first field, Bach 
Ho, operated by the Vietnam- 
ese-Russian joint venture Viet- 



Dai Hung field off Vietnam's SovPetro, produced 5.1 million 
southeastern coast Saturday, metric tons of crude in the first 
The company did not say bow nine _ months of this year, 
much it would produce, but said Projections for the whole 
the oil would be sold throughout year are for 7.1 million tons. 


Aria, particularly to J 
Gil is the biggest 


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Hung and another VietSovPe- 


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125.15 121^0 

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rency earner for Vietnam, tro Odd, Rong, due to begin 
which is relying on an increase production shortly. 

in output to about 20 million 

metiictans a year by 2000, from 

63 million tons last year. I. === 


By Kevin Murphy 

Imentationul Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Many new businesses dream of making 
it big in global maikets. Polycom Inc., a small Silicon Valley 
start-up company, went a step further: It had its international 
strategy in place well before shipping its first high-tech 
conference call telephone system. 

“Most American companies think of their ow n large mar- 
ket first, then try to sell a product developed for it overseas, 
with mixed success," said Edward Burfine. international soles 
head of Polycom. “We set out in the very 
beginning to be an international business 
and a world leader in our field.” 

Polycom was started in December 1990 
by Brian Hinman, who as a student at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology ,;>• . 
was part of a three-man team that figured . ’ ■ ] 

out now to compress television signals so 1 9^ 

that they could be transmitted on digital 
telephone lines. 

The trio’s pioneering work eventually became PictureTel 
Corp., the leading U.S.-based manufacturer of video confer- 
encing systems. 

But Mr. Hinman decided to apply the same science to 
teleconferencing speaker phones, in the belief the market was 
potentially much larger. He put together venture capital 
funding of about SI 7 million and a team of experienced 
Silicon Valley executives. 

Video conferencing systems can cost up to $25,OOU for basic 
models and much more for advanced installations. Sounds: a- 
tion, Polycom’s sole product line, costs up to $2,000 for a 
device with supersensitive microphones ana clear audio chan- 
nels that allows two or more voices to be transmitted simulta- 
neously, making it especially good for live-time arguments or 
debates. 

“Motion video — it’s a nice thing to have, but it's the most 
expensive element of conferencing," Mr. Burfine said during 
a recent trip through Asia. “The problem with the business is 


To subscribe In Franco 
|ust coH« toll froo, 
05 437437 


that the price-performance ratios are absolutely backwards. 
You may pay for much more technology than you need to 
conduct a meeting." 

Arguing that people who already know each other don’t 
need to see each other — the case in most conference calls — 
Polycom has created what it claims to be the world's best 
audio conferencing system through close work with leading 
international corporations. 

In just over two years, Polycom has miuiufactured and 
shipped 25.000 of its (able- top machines, a figure it says has 
eclipsed the total number of video systems sold. Turnover has 
doubled in the past year. The units are designed for use 
anywhere in the world. 

California-based Intel Corp.. the world's largest semicon- 
ductor manufacturer, has bought 800 Soundstauons for its 
international office network. The group now uses them for up 
to 3,000 hours of audio teleconferencing euch week. 

“Currently 35 percent of revenue is international, but our 
goal is that half of revenue should be derived outside of North 
America," said Mr. Burfine, who oversees a sales network 
operating in 58 countries and distribution partnerships with 
large corporations such as British Telecommunications PLC 
and Siemens AG. 

But Polycom will have to move quickly, analysts say. os 
desktop personal computer video-conference machines are in 
the technological race for better performance at lower cost. 

“Video conferencing has advantages over audio if it's done 
right, but to do it right is expensive." said Jonathan Stone, an 
investment analyst with Adams Harkness in Boston. 

“There are some PC systems available now, but they’re not 
very good yet," he said. “There is a ease to be made for audio 
systems, but ultimately video conferencing will catch up." 

To keep pace, Polycom is developing a system based on the 
same technology that will allow different groups to collabo- 
rate on documents, drawings and other visual materials. The 
company is fine-tuning ifie still- secret machine, again in 
consultation with major corporations whose offices are scat- 
tered around the world. 


« m&t. C 




Aiwdra. Austria, Batofum. Brazil, Canada. CWte. Danmaric, 

Zwland, Norway, Singapore, Spdn. Swadan, Swtaartandand Vna* For 
Tokyo. New York end London, mo indue Is compoeod t* tfw 20 top utues n tame 
otwaikotcapitaSeation, otiwrwtsa ttxttenlop stocks an* tracked. 

O Irumattontd Haraki Tribune 


CURRENCY RATES 


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f Toronto); tMF (SDR), o me r d a ta tram HetHersunaAP. 


Kidder Officials 
Meet Amid Talk 
GE May Sell Firm 

Bloomberg Business Hem 

NEW YORK— Managers of 
Kidder, Peabody & Co. branch 
offices met Sunday amid specu- 
lation that PaineWebber Inc. 
may boy part or afl of the secu- 
rities fixm, Kidder brokers said. 

The brokers said they did not 
know all the topics on tiie agen- 
da of the meeting at the firm’s 
New York headquarters. But 
Kidder managers have been 
concerned because General 
Electric Co., Kidder’s parent, 
did not comment last week on 
talks with PaineWebber. 

GE wants to sell Kidder be- 
cause the brokerage firm has 
faded to meet its profit require- 
ments, Kidder officials have 
said. Kidder lost more than 
$300 million tins year, suffering 
from the bond market’s slump 
and a bond-trading scandal. 

Kidder officials told employ- 
ees this month that they had 
held sales talks with other secu- 
rities firms. 

The talks last week explored 
a variety of options, including 
selling just Kidder’s brokerage 
network, Kidder brokers and 
people close to PaineWebber 
said. GE also considered selling 
all of Kidder and acquiring pan 
of PaineWebber, the people 
close to PaineWebber said. 

PaineWebber wants Kidder's 
1350-member broker force as 
wen as some investment bank- 
ers, research analysts and trad- 
ers, sources said 


USIF - Real Estate 

International Depositary Receipts 
Issued by 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York 

Notice of Annan] General Meeting of Shareholder* 

Notice is hereby given that the Annua] General Meeting of the 
Shareholders of lUS I F, Real K&lalc ( M bSIK*1 will be held ai the U- 
Mcridicn Roval Bahamian Hotel, Wes! Bay Street. Nassau. N.I’.. 
Bahamas, on Tuesday, the 6lh December. 1994, at HMH) a.m. for the 
following purposes: 

1. To consider and, ir thought flu to approve the appointment oi 
Messrs. Coopers & l.ybrand of Nassau. N.I*.. Bahamas, as llie 
auditors of USIF for the eurrent fiscal periods and 

2. Any other business which maj properly come before lh< 
meeting. 

Dated this 17th day of October, 1991. 

CouUs & Co (Bahamas) limited. Custodian Trustee 

Note: A shareholder entitled to attend and vote may appoint □ 
proxy lu attend and vote in his/her place and stead, and such 
proxy need mil be a shareholder «*f I'SII 1 . 

Holdrrs of International Depuailarv Rereipls f'lDRs") issued by 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York vd«» wish In vntv 
(heir underlying share.- - of 1 1 is IK. must complete the Veiling 
Instructions Form, whirli is available from the paying agent* IkIcu 
below. Completed Voting Instructions Forms ann (hr applicable I MR 
certificates may l»e deposited with any one nf the paying agents. 
Alternatively, the holder may deposit ifie 1DR rcrtifirales with their 
hank or other financial institution, who will hold them until ufter tin - , 
meeting, and have fh«- bank nr other finnueial institution complete 
the Confirmation of Deposit form on the Imrk of the Noting 
Instructions Form. The Voting InUriicliiins Form and completed 
Confirmation of IJi-jiti-it Fnnii ina> then Ih- dejmsili'd with any one of 
tin; ua\iitg JgrnLs. Completed Voting Instructions Forms and il 
applicable, Confirmation of iK jvosil Forms, must he fifed with any »iu 
ot (he. paying ,igeitta t«* later lli.ii i 15 Noicnibci , I ’W4. 

ParlupAjOTtn 

1) Morgan Gnaranty Trnnt Company of New York, 
Biwwb, Franklfart, London, Paris and Zurich 

2) Banqne do Paris rt d« Pays-Ban, Lasriaboarg 

S) Banqnr Internationale ■ Lnxrmbonrg, La a cm - 
hourg 

4) Cal#w cTfipargue de I’Elot, Luxembourg 

5) Hong Kong and .Shanghai Banking Corporation, 
Main Brandt. Hong Kong 

Depo^fcu-y: Morgan Gnaranh Trust (innpany of New 
York, .15, Aiennr dea Art*, IBM SnewU 





AND 


THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation. 

^1 8 k gold. 

Wk Swiss nude since IS48. 






mk 


o 

OMEGA 

The sign of excellence 


ft' : 5 - 

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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 




NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Consolidated trading tor week 
ended Friday, Oct. 14. 

(Continued) 


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On November 7th, the IHT wifi publish a 
Sponsored Section on 

Air Travel 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Competition for routes and passengers. 

■ A report on new aircraft models being put 
into production. 

■ Airport expansion and development. 

■ Current options in today’s fare wars. 

■ An analysis of air rights on major world 
routes. 

This supplement will benefit from special distribution 
at the American Society 
of Travel Agents (ASTA) annual meeting 
and international trade show in Lisbon. 

For further information, please contact BUI Mahder 
in Paris at (33-1) 46 3793 78. fax: (33-1)46375044. 



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CREDIT LY'ONNAIS 
is pleased to announce the transfer 
of its International Private Banking activity 

from 

S4/94 Queen Victoria Street 

to its new offices at 

BERKELEY SQUARE HOUSE 
BERKELEY SQUARE 
LONDON W1 

on 

MONDAY 17th OCTOBER 1994 

Tel (44) (0) 171 -499 9146 
Fax (44) (0) 171 -499 9168 
Telex 924077 
A member of the SFA 


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Continued on Page 16 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 


Page 15 


yM 


i:f- 

* "M 
• •: •; lie 


New Internal! onal Bond issues 

Compiled by Laurence Desviiettes 


Amount 

(muttons) 


Floating R«t« Hot— 

^BBLW'7 3 


Gticorp 


Nafmsa 


$125 perpt 94 


$150 1999 Vt 99 Jt — 

$250 1 999 0.20 99J7 - 

$200 1999 0jo 100 “ 


DM300 1996 0jS4 100 — 




t: r* 
*■: •„ ' 


A 

ITT 


Birmingham Midshires £150 1999 ft 100 

Bidding Society - 


)«'• • 1 

+'■9 l 


^ ?C 


5u . 


'j? '!'•?■ 


.Si *:■’ 
-■>#: 

•• isjr'V 
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1^1 ; I 

to* 
, , lf : ? 

*’ic 

., , ' 5 Ke‘ ?■, 

^{! 
f > \* fcl ? > 


Iris Nbr 2 m.310,000 

Flxect-Cottpofia 

Banco Safra $100 

Bayer USA S300~ 

Fronde ra Energetica $150 

National 

Los Angeles $1,365 


Sdnsbuiy (J.) $150 

SmittiKfine Beecham $200 

Toyota Motor Finance $200 

(Netherlands} 

Stotkroft DM 300 

Ford Credit Europe £100 

General Electric £100 

Capital Corp. 

Cofmaga ff 1,000 

Cr&fit Local de FF 3,000 

France 

G6n6rale des Eoux FF IjOOO 


m 310,000 1 999 Ojo 99ji — 


2002 10% 98 J0 — Sanvanrudy. Redeemable 0*9714 in 1997. Fee* 1*. Danomi- 

letons SI 0,000. (Swig Bank Carp.) 

1999 7Vt 101.054 99m R«rffcradct99.479.Noocaahh.lrelH%|D«^^ 

1999 9 99.753 — SaowswueJy. Nonco H obto. Fw 0625%. Denomnotiom 

510X00. (i.P. Margan Securities) 

— — 100 — Note issued in 15 (ranches with mc4urt*s ranging from 1996 

to 3010 and seaaamual coupon {ram 6BOS to EL62% 5255 
mttan m zero coupon notes priced befween 24.404 and 
32501. Fees not disclosed. [Lehoral Brother, Inti) 

7% 100.94 99.90 Reoffered or 9979. NoncaDable. Few 1*% U-F- Morgen 

Sccunhas.) 

7% 101 99 JO Reoffered at 99J5. Nonadabie. Feet 194% P-G. Warburg 

Secrtio.] 

7ft 100J9S 9970 Reoffered at 9971 . Nonooflabie. Fees ltt% (C5 First Boston.) 


m 100.94 99.90 


7% 101 99 JO 


• - v- . -J *1 

■■ • ; , • y - 

n ■’ *» '.' ii «• 

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• ’ . : _ • ■W*' -J 14 - 

V, 11 - 'U . 

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M 

1, 

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“-•*« • i- 




PhiEps Bectronics FFl^XX) 

Cridtt Local de m. 150^00 

France 

European Investment m 400,000 
Bank 

ABHAMROBank DF300 


• XFW Inti Finance 
Bayerisdie 

* Landesbonk 

’ European Investment 
>Bonk 

^Kredetbank lnt'1 

■ Finance 

• Nationd Austrafia 
1 Bonk . 

’ Queensland Treasury 
Corp. 

* SBC Austrafia 

■ Belgium 

- Gticarp * ■" ■” 


716 102,09 — Reoffered at 99J4. NoncaOnfala. Few 2%. (Dertsdto Bonk,} 

8tt 100 J8 — toofferedert 99705. Norcaloble. Few 1»%(H5BCMo.Le>v) 

8!4 100.96 — ReoKeredaf99.9B5. NoncdaUa. Feet 1 W%- (Foribai Capital 

MorkesJ 

7% 101.57 — Reoffend a 100.435. NoneaUefile. Fee* lWk (Soottfc Gkn- 

icoKJ 

7% 99.91 9977 NotKofiable. Fees 0.1875%. (W4P Capital Markets.) 

B 101 A3 100 JO Reoffered otlOGjOB-Noncdkible. Fees! Wt.(Okdt Commer- 

cial de Francs.) 

BK 100J8S 100 JO Eeoffered at 99J1. Nonoafldble. Fen 2%. (CrhtSf Lyonnait) 
TIJO 101 J15 100.10 Noecafloble. Fees 1WK. (Creckto llefiane.) 


10.15 97795 97 JO 

816 101X15 101 JO 

Th 101.425 99 A5 
8% 101.025 99v<5 

~8 100767 99^0 


NoncaDable. Fungible with ou tsta nding issue, raising total 
emount la 1J trifion Are. Fees 1H%. (Banco Commerdoie 

Reoffered at 99 JO. CaUde at par in 2004, wAen coupon may 
be reset. Fees 2% (ABN-AMRO Bade) 

Reo ffered at 9936. NoncoBdble. Fees 2%. (ABHAMRO Bonk.) 

Reaffered at 99Ji NoncaDable. Fees IHX. (Wood Gundy.) 


Reoffered at 99.50. NoncoDobte. Fees 1 (Goldman Sade 
Inti) 


AosSlOO 

AusSlOO 

AutllOO 
Y 75JQQQ 
Yl5fl00 


10 101 JO 99 JS NoncaDable. Fees 2%. (Macquarie BcmkJ 


9% 10114 100. 05 NoncoHoUe. Fees 1H%. (Hambras Bank.) 


8.20 100 — NoncaDable. Fees IHflt (Nikko Europe^ 


•#. .** *. 
r, ' . r . 

Vr • '* 


i rr, -' 

.• n» m 

j. i vi"<" <■*■ 

it ter •* : 
UVT *■ 

•..-.I 

•° ' iin-e*: 

- • r-^) 
? i' M 
•• y% 

S|l- 
.i” f r 

S?.B 


, onttflu*^ 00 * 


• Irtf’l Finance Corp. Y 20,000 

■ Equlty4Jnk>d 

„ Aegon $600 


Roche Financial Y 100^00 

Management 


914 101.197 99/45 
4ft 9934 99.89 

4 - 100 — 

zero 82.10 — 


2004 4% 100 — 


2002 1 100 — 


NoncaDable: Fees IfcX. [Swiss Bank Corp.) 

NoncaDable. Fees 0325%. [MUta Europe.) 

NonaJfcble. Fees not dadosed. Denonmodoni 10 rmtton 
yen. {Merril Lynch Inti] 

Yield 4J23% Noncofabie. Proceeds 16 bUSon yea Fees not 
disclosed. Denominations 10 niSon yea (NbrindtiAia] 


NoncoBoUe. Camemble after May 1995 at 120 gulden per 
share, a 16J5X premium, aid at 1728 guBden per dollar. 
Redeemable at maturity at 138.90 to yield 7V4% Fees 216% 
(Morgan Stanley fnrl) 

NonatBoble. Each 1 mUomyen non with 69 worr orris ewroir 
obieonJune 15, 1998, into company's shores. 100 warrants to 
one share. Foreign exchange rate set at 1 J84 francs per 100 
yea Fees 2%% (5 was Bank CorpJ 


ThU Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar. Oct. 17-22 


A schedule of thiM week's ooonomte and 
SnmteM event* oonyMcf ter tfw Intoma- 
tbn*HvM7Hbur»tvBtoomI»nrBuit- 



file Big ** <>veS 


MM-17 HoagKsBi British Wnfater 
tor Trade Richard Neetffwn weeks at a 
luncheon orgentoed by tfw Hong Kong 
Qvwal Chamber td Commerce. 

New DeM W meflo nal Stw Frir be- 
gbto. me mrowday wem toorgarwed by 
h*H« Trade FYontotton Orgentzattoa 


*■1 ■' 


tUTt»REStOP^ C? ' : ' 

$32 


Tim*: io srI ',, 



t awK i ey a ^oria Tnt i aat ru ct ura Forum 
; begins flve-day run. Repreeen- 

'■KaMram 13 AsMn-PacWo oountries to 
.togBna'.4nlnetnictur« plane with repnt- 
een te three from prtrete business. 

• Oat. ft AdsM rf e New» Corp. en- 
nud sharahoMem meeting. Cnahman Ru- 
perr Murdoch to attend. 

Hong Kong Tha Arnarioan Chamber of 


Commerce hokte a tuKtey oonwranca on 
doing business in Vietnam. 

Mstariiwl, .tspen Logto-Tach Tokyo 'B4. 
an axMM pul on by 13 European compa- 
rries » promote European exports to Ja- 
paa Continues unH Saturday. 

• (tat. IB Msfcoums Vkaoden Min- 
ing Week Cwrienmas. 

Jakarta Ptwrasceultcat euppOer Daiya 
Varta Labpratoria to dose its lO-mHDon 
share otforing tor a Jakarta Bating. 
Betjkig Wortd Economic Forum maata. 
e Oct. 20 Hongkong The govrem- 
mant holds an rntedon o( two pieces ol 
land. biducBng a 13^30 square meter atta 
In Fading in the New Territories ear- 
marked for housing. 

■ OobSS Osaka APEC small and mo- 
efium an terp ria a a mbriasarld meedng at 
the Royal HotsL Through Sunday. 

Earop* 

• OotIT FranMat Bundesbank re- 
laaaea Ootober monthly report 
Fnmtn gs apt l e d Eurotunnel PUC. 

• Oat. IB London Confederation ol 
British industry trades survey. 

e Oat. 20 Amsterdam Juty-August In- 
dustrial production. 


• OoS. tT Now Yosfc Trans World Air- 
lines Inc. praaen t a to proposed nrtandd 
restructuring plan to debt hotders. 


Washfagtoa The Commerce Depart- 
ment reports August bustnese Iman- 
todee. 

Universal City, CaHomla Hollywood 
2000 conference on changing media. 

• Oct 18 Hemal] MCA Inc. Chairman 
Law Wasaemtan and President Ski Stein- 
berg meet wMh executive* at parent com- 
pany Mamhuatrita Electric industrial Co. 
The executivw are expected to aeek buy- 
ing back a stake in MCA. 

Wa shington A Senate panel holds a 
hearing on the structure of the World 
Trade Organization. 

e (tat. IB Washington The Federal 
Communfcattons Commission conducts a 
lottery tor unaarvfid areas In the Domestic 
Public CaMular T alaoo mm unloatlons Ser- 
vice. 

C a ecu n The Mexican Banking Aaaocte- 
tlon opens its annual banking convention. 
Toronto MergaraacquIsittoreBndtate- 
ovets with a locus on the Mexican market 
w« be the topic at a two-day Gsmhw 
sponsored by Insight Mtormatton lac. 
a Oct. 20 Washington The Federal 
Communications Commtseion meets. 
Sant ia go Chilean authorities may report 
companies' snare ol the long-distance 
telephone market under a new system 
which aflows caDers to chose which cant- 
er they use on longHaistanea oats, 
a Oet. 21 Houston Drilling Baker 
Hoghes Inc. refeues Its weekly survey of 
the number of active oil and gas drilling 
rigs In the United States and Canada. 


BONDS: Issuers Focus on Paying Short-Term, Debt 




^5 “\2- 

iVvr »** _ 






i^Li 


IK«|I )v |n . J 

IS ON 




tt** { °* 


' Coatlnrffraaft^e 13 

To purchase Roche’s nonvoting 
equity securities at a discount 
from the current price. Each 
note of 1 milli on yen carries 69 
tw^nantSi and 100 warrants are 
needed to purchase one Roche 
share. At the offering terms, the 
cost of the 100 warrants was 
iequal to 4J84 Swiss francs. At 
■the true, the shares were trad- 
fog'At5,880 francs. 

- The warrants axe exercisable 
bnly on June 15 3 1993, and at a 
-'Tjprij^oot toexoad 7,100 francs. 

T Rodte has the option of re- 
deeming the warrants either in 
sei&orvin cash. If the share 
price.exceeds 7,100 francs, war- 
rant holders will obviously re- 
ceive cash. Roche is not creat- 
ing new shares and presumably 
{^. hedged its obligation by 
pRER^ang. the shares it will 
i Deed -to pay off the warrant 
[holders. 

i Thus, if the share price ex- 
ceeds 7,1Q0 francs at redemp- 
ition, Roche gets.to pocket all of 
(the excess. 


Roche will use the 100 billion 
yea to repay part of die $5 bfl- 
Hon one-year bridging loan it 
arranged in August to finance 
its $5 J billion purchase of Syn- 
tex. Details of the loan were not 
made public, but the borrowing 
cost was rumored to be a thin 
six basis points over the inter- 
bank rale. 

Roche also is exchanging yen 
into dollars when the yen is 
near its all-time high, lue in- 
triguing question is whether the 
conmany sits with this yen li- 
ability and gambles that in 
eight years the yea will have 
depredated, providing Roche a 
potential windfall profit, or 
whether it hedges that risk and 
swaps its repayment obligation 
into dollars or francs. Company 
officials would not comment. 

In the dollar market, Aegon, 
the Dutch insure, issued $600 
mmuvn of 10-year convertibles 

a large amount when equity 

markets arc not hot. To com- 
pensate, Aegon promises to re- 


Inflation Tamed for Now, Bonds Head Higher 


Intwtsl will be It over 3-month Libor urri 2001 when Issue is 
cdBobia or par, thereafter 2ft over. Fees not dsdosed. 
Deno mi nofisra (100,000. (CS First Boston.) 

Over 3L<nenth Libor. Nenrotablc. Fees 020% (S-"» BonL 
Corpj 

Over 3-mcnth Libor. Cokable at par in 1997. Fees 0.175% 
[Citibank Inti) 

Over 6-month Ubor. Rcdeemebla at par in 1997. Fees not 
dbcbicd Dcnpna n gf i ofB S2SQ,000- pBJ Asia.) 

Chw 3viwnth Libor. Noneaflable. Fees not dsdawd Denomi- 
nator 1D0 JOG maria. (Swas Bank Corp.) 

Over 3mwn)h LSxv. Reoffered at 9970. CoRaUe at par in 
1998. Fees 0.45% Denommations ET 0,000. (S.G. Warburg 
Seeunties.) 

Over 3-momh Libor. Norc olfa ble- Abo 65 bffior Ere due 2000 
paying 0.40 over Libor and pricsd ar99J1. and 45 bDEon bre. 
du* 2001 with lama coupon but pnnd at 9975. Feat 0375% 
(Banco Commeroale IkdianaJ 


Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Treasury prices 
should continue to drift higher this week 
now that the market has survived the 
recent barrage of economic reports for 
September. 

But given expectations for the Federal 
Reserve Board to raise short-term inter- 
est rates again in a month’s time, and 
perceptions that the economy continues 
to grow at a good rate, the market's 
gains are not likely to get out of hand. 

Treasury securities already have re- 
traced pan of the sell-off that occurred 
heading into the September employ- 
ment report, when investors were shak- 
en by the possibility that the economy's 
stamina might lead the Fed to tighten 
twice more this year. 

Hie lower- than-expeaed gain in Sep- 
tember nonfarm payrolls ana tame Sep- 
tember inflation and industrial produc- 
tion data have convinced investors the 


Fed can limi t itself to one more rate 
increase this year, expected to come at 
the Nov. 15 Federal Open Market Com- 
mittee meeting. 

Fabio Savoldelli, who oversees S1J 
billion in bonds at SBC Portfolio Man- 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

agemeni International said members of 
the Fed’s policy-making committee had 
“room io sit down and reconsider” 
whether to raise the funds rate in No- 
vember. 

To slow the economy and keep infla- 
tion in check, the Fed has raised short- 
term interest rates five times this year. 

But with further Fed tightening on the 
back burner for now, investors were ex- 
pected to put a little more money to 
work. 

“The market could do a little bit bet- 


ter next week, if only because of some 
momentum from this week,” Kevin Lo- 
gan, chief economist at Swiss Bank 
Corp.. said Friday. “People decided the 
data weren’t as bad as many had antici- 
pated.” 

“It appears some investors will be 
willing to purchase some securities to get 
higher returns. 1 ' he added. 

But Mr. Logan said he did not expect 
large additional gains He said the 30- 
year bond yield's new range probably 
was 7.7 5 percent to 8.0 percent. 

On Friday, the 30-year bond finished 
at 7.83 percent, down from 7.91 percent 
a week earlier. The two-year Treasury 
note concluded the week at 6.54 percent, 
down from 6.62 percent. 

Bonds initially fell Friday on a report 
that retail sales rose a healthy 0.6 per- 
cent in September, at the high end of 


expectations. A simultaneous report 
that consumer prices rose 0.2 percent 
last month had little influence at first 
because it had been expected. 

Later, however, the market bounced 
upward after the Fed reported industrial 
production was stable and utilization of 
the nation's factories had declined 
slightly. Traders fear fast-growing pro- 
duction could outstrip the supply of raw 
materials, causing prices to rise.' 

On balance; the reports were in line 
with other recent ones that all show- 
moderate inflation. 

Robert Brusca, chief economist for 
Nikko Securities International Co., said 
he saw relief in the bond market because 
of a decline in commodity prices, which 
the Fed tracks closely in assessing infla- 
tionary hazards. 

(Knight- Rulder, BliHmiberg, AP ) 


HEDGE: Did Deutsche Bank Putt the Plug Too Soon? j Last Week’s Markets 


dean the bonds at a substantial 
premium of 138.9 percent, 
guaranteeing a yield of 15 per- 
cent, if the stock fails to per- 
form and bondholders decide 
not to convert into common 
stock. The bonds, carrying a 
coupon of 4.75 percent, are con- 
vertible into shares at a price of 
120 guilders, a premium of 16 
percent over the current price. 

In the straight market, the 
city of Los Armeies made a 
global offering of H-365 billion 


global offering of: $1-365 billion 
via a series of 1 1 bonds matur- 
ing between 1996 and 2006 and 
carrying semiannual coupons 
ranging from 6.8 percent to 8.6 
percent and four deeply dis- 
counted zero-coupon bonds 
maturing between 2007 and 
2010. How much of this was 
actually sold outside the United 
States was unclear. Lead man- 
ager T .ghnrtan Brothers declined 
to give any geographic break- 
down of sales, ana the firm’s 
competitors said they saw no 
international demand for the 
paper. 


Continued from Page 13 

clever hedging program. It was 
people on top that did precisely 
the wrong things.” 

The professors' analysis, con- 
tained in several articles, has 
had an electric effect. 

When it surfaced this fall in- 
vestors hammered Metallge- 
sellschaft and Deutsche Bank 
stock. Then MetaUgesellschaft’s 
new management, along with 
Ronaldo H. Schmitz, the Deut- 
sche Bank director who is chair- 
man of MetallgeseDschaft’s su- 
pervisory board, Bred back. 

At a news conference last 
week in Frankfurt, senior exec- 
utives of Metaligesellschaft 
handed out their own paper, 
which said that while the pro- 
fessors’ theoretical points were 
valid, in reality Metal] geseils- 
chafl would have faced a $50 
billion loss if it hadn't liquidat- 
ed the hedges. 

Mr. Miller called their rebut- 
tal “preposterous’' and denied 
press reports that he had with- 
drawn his criticism. 

The academics' first discov- 
ery was that MG Refining and 
Marketing seemed to have been 
engaged in a hedging strategy 
rather than simple speculation. 
“I could understand how you 
can lose $1 J billion by specula- 
tion," Mr. Miller stud. “But I 
couldn’t see how you could lose 
$1.3 billion hedging.” 

MARK: 

Election Windfall 

Coatmaed from Page 13 • 

ers, agree that the dollar is now 
poised to fall to about 1.48 DM. 

“Trading in the foreign ex- 
change market is still very thin, 
and therefore price movements 
shouldn't be overdramatized,” 
said Mr. Chertkow. “Institu- 
tional clients already have a 
veiy low weighting of dollar as- 
sets, and I see no reason to 
expect a further heavy sell-off 
to lighten the weighting.” 

Mr. Crane argued that with 
the approaching year-end, insti- 
tutional investors will be under 
pressure to sell if the dollar 
drops below 1.5150 DM. Mr. 
Drobny warned that there was 
“a risk we could get a dollar 
crash." 

Political risk now also shifts 
to the French franc, suggesting 
further gains for the mark 
against the franc. France’s pres- 
idential election will be held no 
later than next spring, and 
Prime Minister Edouard Baha- 
dur, the leading candidate, is 
slipping in the polls because of 
a series of scandals affecting 
past and present members of 
his government. 

The Swiss franc also looks 
vulnerable. It has scored a sig- 
nificant appreciation against 
the mark since late summer but 
will now lose its allure as a ha- 
ven. 


Euromarts 
At u Glance 

Eurobond Yhrids 


US. i. long tana BJ» 8JM aj# fc21 

UahRMtalerm 771 754 776 54} 

OS. J. Oort tain tX ?tt 7X1 Ul 

POWMillartMl 9 JO «* Ml AJ* 

Ff*«d! frond MB MO l» S47 

I MUM Ita 1177 1U2 1U0 771 

SnUkroM D71 BJI S74 620 

SwcdMkRraoB H72 1072 1173 7 « 

ECU, tong tarn V6 BM U 41 ! 

ECU, mdm term US 5* Ut W 

Cm 4 ?.H 7.17 9M «JB 

AklS MS Ml MO 457 

UZ.S 9J8 M7 Ml 1» 

Tan 4JO 4JI 4*4 2S7 

Sourer: Luxembourg Stock Exchange. 

WooUy Sfkoo O0.i3 

Cflfcl ewoefcor 
j Naas S Hoot 
Stratum 7320 56120 1, 11770 S2M0 

Caawt 090 - A10 020 

pbhi ** mm — 

ECP 6732J0 1340J0 MB420 49RM0 

T«t0 4J04B LKU0 112H20 744010 


Ccdd Eurodcar 
I IM I Nob) 
straw* lasouo wzuo 27j».u 

Conran. 35*10 4MJ0 125140 MOJO 

FUfe 743570 1A44XX8KJ0 473430 

ECP 6J6&20 UlIMO 741770 205070 

TOW 244MM 3074150 iUOfl) 6U2M0 

Source: Eurocteor- Cam 

Ubor Rates 00.14 

mumA taaaait Ctnoa a 

UAJ SI/M Pi S’* 

tamdttraal A 15/U 53/14 Sint 

Pwndfttflka SHi SH OSflS 

FraaditrtMC 5 M0 M » 

ECU » 5 li/14 41/1* 

Yea 5 5/1* X* m 

Sources: Uoytts Bank. Reuters. 


Hedging is a technique for 
offsetting the price risk inherent 
in any cash market position by 
taking an opposite position in 
the futures or options market. 

To break into the American 
market, in 1991. MG Refining 
began offering small retail cus- 
tomers fixed-price contracts for 
five to 10 years for heating oil 
and gasoline. 

By mid-1993, MG Refining 
had entered into contracts to 
deliver some 160 million barrels 
ver the next 10 years. 


To protect itself against the 
possibility that oil prices would 
rise, MG Refining bought fu- 
tures contracts. 

“Our intellectual contribu- 
tion,” Mr, Culp said, “was 
showing that contrary to public 
perception you can hedge long- 
term commitments with short- 
term contracts, if you do it 
right.” 

Mr. Miller and his colleagues 
figured out what, in their view, 
really had gone wrong: Deut- 
sche Bank panicked as MG Re- 
fining's paper losses mounted. 


4U figures are as of dote oi /rotSmr Friday 

Stock IndaxM 

UaUW State Oct. 14 Oel.7 Qfoe 
DJ Indus. a»l 0.47 3,79743 +2.VB “b 

DJ Util. 1824* 17842 +277% 

DJ Trans. 149648 144478 +158% 

S & P 1D0 434.76 42156 +113% 

5&P500 469.10 455.10 +108 % 

S&PInd 556*6 539*5 + 321% 

NYSE Cp 257.99 2S1J3 +2*5% 


FTSE 100 3.106.70 
FT 30 2J9170 


2,99870 + 340% 
241050 +149% 


Nikkei 325 1976959 19744.75 +1.14% 


DAX 2.10573 

Hew Koom 

Hang Sena 9550.93 


1,46059 + 7.40% 


9384J8 +2J7% 


615.90 +2.97 % 


Money Rates 

Unite State Oct. 14 Oct. 7 

Discount rale 400 4 00 

Prima roto tl, 74, 

Federal funds rata 4 1M6 4*2 

Japan 

Discount 1% Ik 

Coll money 23/16 T-* 

3-montH interbank 25/16 2 1 . 

Otrntami 

Lombard iOO 6.00 

Call money 490 5X0 

3-monlh Inlet bank S'* 5% 

Brltohi 

Bank base role 54. 5% 

Call monev 5*6 S*fc 

3-month inlerbank 5li 600 

Oo*U OC1. 14 OCt 7 ora 

London tun. tlx* 38745 3*200 —1 16% 


400 600 

490 500 

5’- 5% 


MAILED FROM AMERICA 


Woritt Index From Morgan Stanley Capftpf Inrt 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. OCTOBER 17, 1994 


WO N DAY 

SPORTS 



Never-Quit Auburn 
Stuns No, 1 Florida 

By Larry Dorman 

New York Times Service 

GAINESVILLE, Florida — Against all odds, and 
aga in st the top-ranked college football team. Au- 
burn has pulled off another stu nning victory. 

In what must rank as the biggest upset of the 
season. No. 6-ranked Auburn scored with 30 sec- 
onds left in the game Saturday to defeat the Univer- 
sity of Florida, 36-33. 

On a chilly gray day at The Swamp, where Florida 
had not lost to a Southeastern Conference opponent 
since Steve Spurrier became coach. Auburn forced 
Florida into six turnovers and the 16-point under- 
dogs turned the last one into the w innin g touchdown 
in front of a record crowd of 85,562. 

‘They just don’t give up, do they?" said Spurrier, 
who watched Auburn, now 7-0, run its undefeated 
streak to 18 straight games under the coaching of 
Terry Bowden. “You've got to hand it to them. They 
do not give up.” 

The Gators came from behind three rimes to take 
the lead, and seemed to have the game won on 
Danny Wuerffel’s 28-yard touchdown pass to Jade 
Jackson. It was Jackson’s third touchdown of the 
game, and the point after gave Florida a 33-29 lead 
with 5:51 left to play. 

But Wuerffel, who had come on to replace ineffec- 
tive starter Terry Dean in the third quarter, tried logo 
deep down the middle on Florida’s next possession. 

The pass was intercepted by free safety Brian 
Robinson, his third interception of the game, and 
Auburn went to work from its 45 with just 1 :20 lefL 
“I figured we had enough rime,” said Nix. who 
completed 28 of 51 passes for 319 yards and three 
touchdowns. “If we just executed and didn't panic, 1 
thought we’d be able to move the ball down there." 

The Tigers might be on probation, they might not 
be able to play in a bowl game this season, but they 
definitely are the genuine item. And never was it 
more evident than on that final march through the 
heart of The Swamp. 

Nix began it with a 13-yard completion to Frank 
Sanders, the big-play wide receiver who had five 
catches for 65 yards on the day. 

From the Florida 42, Nix couldn’t hit Sanders on 
a comer route. On second down, his pass to Willie 
Gosha bounced off Gosha’s shoulder pads. Auburn 
called a timeout with 57 seconds left. Then Nix 
found Sanders wide open, at the Florida 35. but 
Sanders dropped the bafl. 

Fourth down. As Nix took the snap in the shot- 
gun, he looked off Sanders and threw a line drive to 
Bailey at the Florida 28. First down, and Bailey got 
out or bounds to stop the clock with 41 seconds left. 

Nix fired to Gosha for 20 yards. That put the ball 
at the Florida 8. The clock was down to 36 seconds, 
and the Gators were reeling. 

Sanders ran a comer routein front of Gator de- 
fender Michad Gillmore. Nix put the ball right into 
his stomach. Ben Hanks arrived late for the Gators 
and Sanders fell into a heap, cradling the ball and 
the victory in the left comer of the end zone. 





Sanders Stars as 49ers Zap Falcons 


i 

A 


Car.-. C-lur, 


Florida cornerback Anthone Lott nearly intercepted this pass, but big- 
play wide receiver Frank Sanders (81) caught the game-winner. 


Tr.e Axana'eJ Pre& 

To Deion Sanders, anytime 
in Atlanta is Prime Tirae.'Even 
on a Sunday afternoon. 

Making his first appearance 
against the Falcons in the city 
where he played football for 
five years and baseball for Four. 
Sanders returned an intercep- 
tion 93 yards for a touchdown 
as the San Francisco 49ers rout- 
ed Atlanta. 42-3. 

For good measure, he got 
into a fistfight with former 
teammate Andre Risen, al- 
though the two hugged near 
midfield after the game. 

Sanders even overshadowed 
a near-perfect Steve Young, 
who had four touchdown passes 
and went 15 of 16 for 143 yards. 
Young gave way to Elvis Grbac 
after throwing his fourth TO 
pass with 9:35 left in the third 
quarter. 

But it was a day for Sanders, 
who ended up playing only a 
half, leaving the game with a 
groin injury after his intercep- 
tion return — one of six turn- 
overs by the Falcons. 

Four of them led directly to 
San Francisco touchdowns and 
two others stopped Atlanta 
threats. The result: San Fran- 
cisco (5-2i took over fust in the 
National Football Conference 
West and Atlanta <4-3) lost a 
chance to take over the division 
lead alone. 

The 49ers jumped to a 21-0 


lead in the first 15:06. on TD 
passes by Young, for 10 yards 
to Ricky’ Watters and one yard 
to Jerry Rice, with Tun Mc- 
Donald's 49-yard TD return of 
a Craig Heyward fumble in be- 
tween. 

Then Sanders entered the 
picture and the game moved 
into Prime Tune. .After shutting 

NFL ROUNDUP 

down Risen for the first quar- 
ter. he locked up with his for- 
mer teammate on a short route 
3:22 into the second. 

As the play ended, Sanders 
swung with his left, then landed 
two more lefts and a combina- 
tion. Rison landed two rights 
and a combination before offi- 
cials stopped the bout and 
marched off 15 yards against 
Sanders. 

That led eventually to a 34- 
yard Norm Johnson field goal 
that made it 21-3 and the Fal- 
cons looked like they were 
ready to make it competitive 
when a pass interference call 
against Risen on — who else 
but Sanders? — gave the Fal- 
cons a first down at the 10. 

Three plays later, Jeff George 
tried to find Ricky Sanders in 
the fiat He found Deion Sand- 
ers, instead, who picked it up 
and raced down the sideline. 
The second half was easy for 
the 49ers. Atlanta turned the 


ball over on two of its first three 

second-half plays. 

Colts 27, Bffls 17: In Orchard 
Park, New York, Tun Harbaugh 
threw for 206 yards and two 
touchdowns as Indianapolis 
dominated the clock and Buffa- 
lo. 

Harbaugh was IS-for-22 be- 
fore leaving the game in the 
fourth quarter with a bruised 
throwing hand. On Don Maj- 
kowski's first pass, he hit Floyd 
Turner for a 19-yard touch- 
down score — the Colts’ first 
fourth-quarter TD all year — to 
make it 24-10 with 8:14 to go. 

On the kickoff, Don Beebe 
ran into teammate Russell 
Copeland and fumbled. The 
ball was recovered for India- 
napolis by Ed Toner and the 
Colts added a field goal to put 
the gome out of reach. 

Tun Kelly finished 25-©f-34 
for 286 yards and set a Bills 
record for career passing yard- 
age. He finished the game* with 
27,788 yards, breaking Joe Fer- 
guson’s' mark of 27,590. 

Dolphins 20, Raiders 17: 
Dan Marino again struggled — 
except when he handed off to 
Bemie Parmalee, who rushed 
for a career-high ISO yards, in- 
cluding a 26-yard dash to spark 
the winning drive, as Miami de- 
feated visiting Los Angeles in 
overtime. 

Parmalee carried five times 
for 47 yards after Miami took 


In Battle of Heavyweights, Penn State Whips Michigan 


The Associated Press 

People bad been saying that 
Penn State was running up big 
scores against weak competition. 
They can’t say that anymore, not 
after the visiting Nittany Lions 
won the battle of heavyweights 
with a 31-24 victory over No. 5 
Michigan in Ann Arbor. 

Kerry Collins threw his third 
touchdown pass, a 16-yarder to 
Bobby Engrain with 2:53 left Sat- 
urday. to extend the Nittany Li- 
ons' winning streak to 1 1 games. 

It is Penn State's best start since 
the 1986 team went 12-0 and won 
the national championship. 

Penn State is now alone in first 
place in the chase for the Big Ten 
title and Rose Bowl berth, and 


very much in the running for the 
national championship. 

“For me, this is the biggest 
game of my life,” said Ki-Jana 
Carter, who* ran for 165 yards on 

COLLEGE ROUNDUP 

26 carries for the Nittany Lions. 
“They dominated the Big Ten for 
so long. 1 think we just gained 
respect as a great football team.” 

It was the second time the Wol- 
verines gave up a late score to lose 
at home. They were defeated by 
Colorado on a desperation pass as 
time expired. 

No. 2 Nebraska 17, No. 16 Kan- 
sas State 6: In Manhattan, Kan- 
sas. Nebraska beat the Wildcats 
for the 26th straight lime despite 


starting third-string quarterback 
Malt Turman, a sophomore walk- 
on. Lawrence Phillips ran for 126 
yards and one touchdown for the 
Comhuskers. 

No. 4 Colorado 45. No. 22 Okla- 
homa 7: Rashaan Salaam ran for 
161 yards to move ahead of Napo- 
leon Kaufman of Washington into 
the national rushing lead at 175.7 
yards per game and solidified his 
position as the leading scorer with 
16 touchdowns. The visiting Soon- 
ers averted a shutout with *23 sec- 
onds left. 

No. 7 Texas A&M 41. Baylor 
21: At College Station. Texas. 
Corev Pullig threw two touch- 
down passes and Texas A&M won 
its 25th straight game in the 


Southwest Conference and ex- 
tended the longest winning streak 
in the nation to 24. 

No. 9 Washington 35. Arizona 
State 1: Damon Huard threw for 
three touchdowns and 268 yards, 
leading Washington, at home in 
Seattle, to its fifth straight victory. 
Kaufman was held to SO yards. 

No. 10 Alabama 17. Tennessee 
13: In Knoxville. Tennessee. Sher- 
man Williams ran for 142 yards 
and the go-ahead touchdown with 
three minutes left for Alabama. 

No. 14 Arizona 10, No. 20 
Washington Stale 7: In Pullman. 
Washington. Steve McLaughlin's 
27-yard field goal in the third 
quarter decided a game dominat- 
ed by defense. 


Brigham Young 21. No. 17 No- 
tre Dame 14: John Walsh passed 
for 216 yards and Brigham Young 
won a non-conference road game 
for the first time since 1989 m 
South Bend. Indiana. Noire Dame 
is off to its worst start since 1986. 

Quarterback Ron Powius was 
injured late in the game, and back- 
up Tom Krug stalled at midfield 
in the final minute. 

No. 24 Boston College 45, Tem- 
ple 28: In Boston, Omari Walker 
scored on two short runs as the 
Eagles took a 35-0 halftime lead. 
Temple, now 0-20 in the Big East, 
rallied to 38-28, but Eric Shorter 
stopped the comeback with a 35- 
yard interception return for a 
touchdown with 2:04 lefL 


the kickoff to start overtime, \ 
The 10-play. 65-yard drive set 1 
up Pete Stoyrtnovich's 29-yard \ 
field goal with 9: 14 lcfLparaut- 1 
lee also recovered a key fumble ! 
as Miami improved to 5-2 and .i 
took over sole possession of j 
first place in the AFC East. - 

Jets 24. Patriots 17: In East 
Rutherford, New Jersey, Johnny i 
Johnson rushed for 122 yards, j 
Brad Baxter had two short-range 
touchdowns and New York «h . 
three takeaways in defeating • 
New England.’ The Jets ostr- . 
came six sacks, two turnovers . 
and the usually reliable Nick 
Lowery a missed 32-yard field 
goal. Lowery did make a 37- 
yarda-. however, with 1:36 left, 
to clinch the victory. 

The Patriots quarterback, 
Drew Bledsoe, come into the 
game leading the league in pass- 
ing attempts, completions arwMS 
yards. But the aggressive Jets 
defense, led by Ronnie Lott and 
Mo Lewis, held him to 242 
yards, 45 in the dying nannies. 

Stcelers 14, Bengali l(fc 
Pittsburgh, playing at home.; 
had Bam Foster for only one 
carry and still found a way to 
win. 

The Steelcre, slowed offen- 
sively after Foster injured his 
knee, turned an interception of 
Don HoUas's only pass this sea- 
son into Neil O'Donnell’s 14- 
yard touchdown pass to Ernie 
Mills. O'Donnell also threw a' 
13-yard touchdown pass to 
John L. Williams as the Stcelers 
scored all of their points in just 
over three minutes of the sec- 
ond quarter. 

Cardinals 19, Redskins 16: In 
Washington. Steve Beuerlein, 
threw a touchdown pass with 19 
seconds left in regulation play 
to lie the Redskins, and Todd 
Peterson kicked a 29-yard field 
goal with five minutes left in 
overtime as Arizona beat Wash- 
ington. 

The Redskins' rookie quar- 
terback. Heath Shuler, was in- 
tercepted five times. After Ter- . 
ry Hooge picked off a pass and ‘ 
returned it to the Washington 4 
12 in overtime, the Cardinals" 
immediatel y kicked the winning 
field goal. ’ 

Arizonu overcame a 14-3' 
fourth-quarter deficit tying it 
at 16 on Beuerlein’s five-yard 
TD pass to Ricky ProehL 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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... 4846 416 Sft 6»/„ • "/„ 

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- 11541 5W 5 Sft ‘ft 
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- 1317 6 Sft 5W 


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_ 1499 12 10ft II —ft 
_ 565 A W JV, 3ft —ft 

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_ 9971 7H AH 7W ‘W 

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57 17V, 1/W 17", -ft 

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_ 7437 IW 1ft l’/« 

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- 428 13V, lift 13ft -IH 

_ 1341 9V, IV to ‘ft 

_ 475 ION 9W 10ft .V, 
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1.10 S I 537 73W 21 H 21ft— 1ft 

- 256 4N 4 4W — W 

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International Herald Tribune 



A Special Report 


Monday, October 17, 1994 ■ 
Page 17 


t 


Fashion 


Retailers TeM an Industry Secret: Whose Clothes Sell and Whose Don’t 


By Suzy Menkes 

P ARIS — The designers are taking 
tile final bow. The order books are 
closing. The buyers are packing 
their bags ai the end of the Euro- 
pean spring/summer show season. But the 
real story of fashion in the 1990s is not in 
the vinyl hot pants gyrating, on the runway 
or the wearable knits back at the show- 
room. It is summed up in two words: sell- 
through. 

That means the percentage of a design-, 
ex's range that finds a customer at full’ 
price when the clothes hit the stores. And 
increasingly, if the clothes do not sell,' the 
fat hits the fan. 

j_“lt’s the buzz word of the 1990s,” says 
Iv* Marie Bravo, president of Saks Fifth 
Avenue. “Even stores like Saks look at 
sell-through percentages, when before it 
was not the driving force.” 

Joan Kaner, senior vice president and 
fashion director of Neiman Marcus, un- 
derlines that message. “We are in business 
to sell clothing,” she says. “There are some 
stores that sell fashion as the icing on the 
cake.. For us, fashion is the cake. And our 
goal is always to sell at regular price.” 

What percentage a store makes with 
each designer is one of fashion's most 
fiercely guarded trade secrets. It is behind 
the store wars that makes buyers demand 
exclusives and tight through the courts — 
as Barney’s did with Giorgio Ar mani — to 
keep a profitable designer. 


No wonder. For in an IHT survey of 
leading retailers of designer clothes at- 
tending the current shows, the Italian 
designer is everyone's Numero Uno. From 
Asia to Los Angeles, Armani's average 
sell-through over the last five years has 
been 8 1 percent. That means that he is the 
most profitable designer a store can stock, 
and is the reason Armani received for his 
60th birthday in July not only an antique 
table lamp, but an unprecendented per- 
sonal visit Rom America’s most important 
store presidents. 

Although retailers would speak only 
on an unattributable basis, their secrets 
are not so secret For, with a few geo- 
graphical blips (Armani is not such a hot 
seller in France, for example) the sell- 
through percentages are almost identical 
across the stores and across the world. As 
the president of Barney's, Gene Pressman 
puts it, “What is good. sells everywhere — 
taste levels are similar. And bad things 
don't sell anywhere.” 

Buyers also have the same comments 
and complaints. 

■“When they deliver early, it sells early," 
says Dawn Mello, president of Bergdorf 
Goodman, Her words are echoed round 
the world, from Roberto Dominici, man- 
aging director of the Joyce group of Hong 
Kong, to Joseph, the London-based avant 
garde retailer. 

“Part of seD -through problem is deliv- 
ery,” agrees Ms. Bravo. “People who de- 
liver best, sell best” 


WhatPriceFashian? 



Armani 

81 

Calvin Klein 

47 

Azzedine Alala 

75* 

' YSL 

45 

Chanel 

65 

■ Yohji Yamamoto 

44 

Donna Karan 

65 

Ann Demeulemeester 

39 

Jif Sander 

64 

£ Helmut Lang 

38** 

Ralph Lauren 

63 

» Viviennne Westwood 

36 

Comme des Garpons 

59 

i Claude Montana 

34 

Ungaro 

56 

. Karl Lagerfeld 

34 

Versace (incl. jeans) 

53 

Chloe 

31 

Valentino 

50 

• Martin Margiela 

30 

Christian Lacroix (incl. Bazar) 

50 



’Erratic deliveries | 

season. 



BetptJDrff^Ockaaa. 
j Avenues. . 




Christopher Moore 


Armani, bottom center , with executives from Neiman Marcus, Bloomingdale’s, Saks, Barney's and Bergdorf s. 


This is especially true of the United 
States, where the fall season starts for the 
stores in July and ends with Thanksgiving. 
The pattern of just two spring /summer 
and autumn /win ter seasons has changed 
radically with the introduction of cruise, 
holiday, pro-fall and other lines. Bui 
stores would like an even faster flow, 
praising Armani for the way the company 


constantly tops up the stock with fresh 
deliveries, while other designer clothes 
will hang around until they are looking 
“ratty’' and go on sale. 

Who's hot and who is not? After Ar- 
mani come Chanel; Donna Karan’s 
DKNY sportswear (but not the main line, 
which has had major delivery problems); 
and Jil Sander, the great hope of retailers 


with currently a 64 percent seD-through, 
but rising sharply. 

Although he does not appear in the 
accompanying chart, the Belgian designer 
Dries Van Noten is performing strongly, 
and Prada’s clothing is whizring upwards. 
Azzedine Alala is a sellout with any store 
that can get the merchandise delivered. 
Jean-Paul Gaultier, which is currently re- 


structuring its distribution, is cited as be- 
ing a maddening example of a line that is 
sought-after by customers but erratically 
delivered. 

Mr, Pressman says that he is pinning 
hopes on the secondary lines, such as G- 
Gigli from Romeo Gigli and Bazar from 
Christian Lacroix, with other retailers eat- 
ing D & G from Dolce & Gabbana as a 
strong new resource. 

The problem for a good sell-through is 
often that prices are pitched too high for 
the target customer. Lacroix's line has 
been a tough sell, but Bazar, peforming 30 
percent above projections in Europe in its 
first season, pushes the line up the chan. 
The Versace jeans and secondary lines fly 
out of the stores, while Gianni Versace's 
top line is just b eginning to edge forward. 

Designers’ own-label boutiques have 
been excluded from the survey, as have 
“trunk shows," where the designer travels 
to stores promoting his clothing. The lat- 
ter make designers like Oscar de la Renta 
and Bill Blass big sellers. Of the upscale 
European designers, after Chanel as ev- 
eryone's pace-setter, Ungaro is selling 
well; Valentino is idling; Montana is “dif- 
ficult”; Moschino's Cheap and Chic range 
is still selling weD; Thierry Mugler is in a 
sudden surge after a slow period; and 
Yves Saint Laurent is “a very small busi- 
ness,” buyers say. They add that it is 
difficult to quote a sell-through on 

Continued oo Page 18 


After Everything Else Is Tried and Discarded, Glamour Remains 


By Katherine Knorr 

P ARIS — WeD, it's quasi-official: 
Waifs are out and glamour is in. If 
this sounds familiar, it’s because 
you've heard something simil ar 
quite a few times. Fin-de-sifecle fashion 
now has all the worst aspects of the art 
avant-garde, spinning around and around, 
desperately seeking the new, looking 
backward to look forward. We are all too 
st£ ssed and Prozao-ed to be just “sur- 
prised," the new must SHOCK, and then 
be followed by a return to tradition/ repre- 
sentation/good taste/ tailoring/ glamour. 
But is anybody truly shocked by fashion 
anymore? After the micro-mini, what? 

Fashion, like rock, like movie sex, like 
avant-garde art, has lost the sense of sin. 
Kurt Cobain wasn’t a bad boy, he was a 


sad boy, he had, maybe, a disorder. AD the 
bad boys died or grew up. Mick Jagger is a 
businessman (wbo performs, incidentally, 
in sensible athletic walking shoes). Jean- 
Paul Gaultier is funny. Postmodern art is 
an expensive joke, many serious painters 
and miters are going back to form. What 
redeems fashion — though not p ainting , 
not literature — is its wonderful silliness 
(except to the business folk who make 
money, of course). Designers pretend to 
be shocking, and consumers pretend to be 
shocked How glorious clothes are, after 
all! 

And what is glamour? Curled hair, fin- 
gernail polish, clothes with a sheen, a take 
on the movies — not today's movies, but 
The Moines, when Screen Goddesses 
didn't tell Vanity Fair about their abused 
childhoods. Glamour is Form. 


Stealing a glossy magazine page from 
Philip Larkin, you could say that modern 
fashion cycles began, like sexual inter- 
course, in 1963. between the end of the 
Chaiteirley ban and the Beatles’ first LP. 
That’s when the teenager became king, 
when clothes became cheap enough to 
make dr amati c changes from season to 
season, when blue jeans took over the 
world 

That was the last time when fashion 
really shocked when parts of the body 
were uncovered ihaL had never been un- 
covered before, when skinniness became 
pretty, when the veiy marketing of clothes 
got mixed up with countercultural ideas. 
Street style and store windows became 
interchangeable in Carnaby Street, clothes 
were not only decoration, they made polit- 
ical statements, they said free love, they 


Pockets of Recovery, Led by Accessories 


By Nadine Frey 


P ARIS — Late last 
month, the Ferragamo 
store on Avenue Mon- 
taigne here briefly 
locked its doors after an unex- 
pected flurry of shoppers en- 
tirely overwhelmed sales staff. 
By month’s end the same sce- 
nario — shoppers facing 
locked doors and polite re- 
quests to wait outside until 
traffic inside the store cleared 
— replayed itself at Ferragamo 
boutiques in London and Mi- 
lan. 

While isolated incidents of 
the kind haven’t yet signaled a 
refern to the gluttonous con- 
sumption of the 1980s, design- 
er houses throughout Europe 
are cautiously noting signs of 
recovery. After three years of 
declining sales, the market for 
French designer fashion and 
accessories is exported to rise 
in 1994, largely driven by im- 
proved export markets in the 
United States and Southeast 
Asia. 

The gains are most striking 
in companies that are special- 
ized in handbags, luggage and 
leather goods. At Ferragamo, 
for example, the chief execu- 
tive, Ferruccio Ferragamo, re- 
ported that sales rocketed 63 
percent in the first six months 
of 1994. At LVMH Mofit Hen- 

nessy- Louis Vuitton, sales of 

leather and luggage goods rose 
31 percent in the first half to 
3.18 billion francs ($612 mil- 
lion), boosting LVMH’s con- 
solidated net sales nearly 20 
percent. At Hermfcs, revenue 
from leather goods, apparel, 
accessories and perfumes com- 
bined soared 24 percent in the 
first half, to 1-5 billion francs. 

Just why recovery in this sec- 
tor should be led by designer 
luggage and handbags has left 
erven the experts baffled. Says 
Sylvain Massot, a European 
analyst with Morgan Stanley 
in London, “Companies in this 
sector won’t even meet de- 
mand until next year. And it's 
not just Japan, it’s Japan, the 
US. and Europe, where there 
hfyen’t been any other signs of 
.t prck-up in consumption other- 
wise. Luxury luggage . and 
handbags didn't suffer as 
much through the early ’90s as 
other sectors. But it’s now 
picking up sharply. Why? 2 
find it very difficult to ex- 
plain.” 

One explanation designer 
firms are turning to is a new 
interest on the part of consum- 
ers for investment purchases 
iat reflect their connoisseur- 
' ship. “The market is coming 
towards us," said Ferruccio 




Lacroix’s new Bazar tine is boosting the designer's sales. 


Ferragamo. “It appreciates 
quality and a long-term prod- 
uct” Or it may just be that old 
adage working girls used to live 
by, “put your money in a good 
bag and the best shoes you can 
afford,” applied to a fashion- 
waxy public. 

Smaller, but still notewor- 
thy, signs of growth are emerg- 

In Indian fashion, optinssm is 
the watchword. Page 18 

mg from the designer clothing 
sector as well According to the 
French fashion federation, 
which put an the Paris shows 
in the Louvre and which 

S together France's top 
v companies, the high 
end 'of the industry wfll see 
sales increasing by 3 percent 
for 1994, to 6.9 billion francs, 
80 percent of which is attribut- 
ed to exports. 

According to Jacques Mou- 


clier, president of the federa- 
tion, fashion's ruling body, 
sales “are picking up strongly 
in the U.S. market, and Europe 
is beginning to follow.” 

The glamorous styles and 
dolce vita colors sailing 
through the fashion runways 
this month speak of designer 
houses ready to catch a fresh 
wind in their sails, however 
feeble it blows. Several design- 
er firms ore launching or repo- 
sitioning second lines. Jean- 
Paul Gaultier recently 
scotched his Gaultier Junior 
line in favor of a cheaper, 
sportier secoud line called 
JPG. 

Donald Potard, Gaultier 
chairman, said sales of Gaul- 
tier Junior went from a high of 
200 million francs the year of 
its launch in 1985 to 75 million 
francs last year, even while 
sales of Gaultier's top line shot 
up 30 percent in 1993 to 


around 400 million francs. 

Mr. Potard said Gaultier Ju- 
nior looked too much like a 
watered-down version of the 
designer’s top line. 

A creative second line can 
power sales right up the pipe- 
line to the designer's top line. 
Emanuel Ungaro is riding a 
wave of increased sales owing 
to sales of his newest and low- 
est priced line, “Emanuel," 
currently available only in the 
United States. 

“From a sociological point 
of view, nobody today wants to 
flaunt their wealth, so the 
growth of our top line has 
slowed,” says Managing Direc- 
tor Carlo Valerio. “A brand , 
label today, unless it really car- 
ries with it quality and fashion, 
isn’t an instant ticket for suc- 
cess." 

Designer houses used to be 
just that — self-contained 
units with everything under 
one roof. Today, in an age 
when a designer as rich as 
Ralph Lauren goes to Wall 
Street to raise cosh, designer 
houses are going co-op. Un- 
garo perfumes are handled by 
ChaneL Elf-Sanofiu the French 
pharmaceutical concern, 
bought Yves Saint Laurent in 
1 993, and also owns Nina 
Ricci perfumes. And inside 
Europe’s largest luxury con- 
glomerate, LVMH, Christian 
Lacroix, Givenchy and Kenzo 
share manufacturing and other 
labor areas to streamline costs. 

For example. Christian La- 
croix’s new second line. Bazar, 
one of the most successful de- 
signer launches in France this 
year, is manufactured and 
shipped by Kenzo. Lacroix: 
handbags and luggage are 
manufactured and distributed 
by Louis Vuitton. 

Bazar, which is priced 30 to 
40 percent less than Lacroix's 
top ready-to-wear line, is target- 
ed at a younger customer — the 
one who typically bought the 
Lacroix accessories but couldn't 
afford the clothes. Sales of the 
line, says the Lacroix president, 
Robert Bcnsoussan. “are ex- 
ceeding our best projections by 
30 percent." 

The line is expected to help 
Lacroix break into the black 
for the first time by late 1995 
or 1996. 

The final message seems to 
be that holding the tiller on an 
established designer name 
won’t be enough to keep afloat 
in the fashion-wary nineties. 
Or as Mr. Valerio of Ungaro 
sums up, “If you fall asleep in 
this business, you wake up to a 
lot of problems.” 


NADINE FREY is a journalist 
based in Paris. 


said hell no I won't go, they said, ahem, I 
don’t care about material possessions. 

Fashion history doesn't repeat itself, or 
to garble Marx, that proto-fashion critic, 
it plays itself out first as outrage and then 
as farce. If fashion desperately zigzags 
from so-called street fashion (whose 
streets? we might ask) to so-called glam- 
our, it is because there is no impetus for 
the kind of fashion revolution that came 
with the upheavals of the 1960s. Women 
have flooded the work force, men get to 
cry and wear ponytails, even when their 
hair is gray, we've done discordant and 
we've done ugly and we've done bald. 
Rock repeats itself, and so does fashion, 
with a certain weariness. Punk, glamour, 
hip hop, glamour, grunge, glamour. The 
key is to keep the details varied. 

There is no fashion or music “trend" 


you haven’t seen before. (Discounting 
gangster rap, which isn’t music and 
doesn't quality as art, since it is simply 
incitation to rape and murder). But the 
second time round (or the third, or the 
10th), form is emptied of content, or the 
medium is the message, as somebody fam- 
ous a long time ago said. Twi ggy was. in a 
goofy, bug-eyed way, glamorous. Kate 
Moss is a cipher. Tom jeans are nothing 
new, but in the 1960s, the jeans companies 
hadn’t started peddling worn pants so 
jeans had to be worn before they got tom. 
Drag overdoses continue to be the rock ’n' 
roll rite of passage, but Jim Morrison was 
seen as sulphurous, as representing rebel- 
lion (never mind that it was all nonsense) 
whereas River Phoenix and Kurt Cobain 
(who committed suicide, but was ajonkie) 
were portrayed as sensitive boys who 


couldn't take a wild, wild world. No won- 
der the Jaggers and the Claptons are stfll 
getting the girls, including the fashion 
models. And the gigs. 

The ’90s were supposed to be a reaction 
to the excess of the '80s. which were a 
glamorous (and acquisitive) reaction to 
the ditsy disco 70s. But nothing works in 
decades anymore. The mid- '90s is right 
back to the ’80s, with variations from the 
70s — good ones, like a new go-round for 
Zoran’s sumptuous and elegant clothes, 
and not so good, like a revival of the 
Carpenters. Came the revolution, what? 
Choice. 

Go, glamour. 

KA THER1NE KNORR is on the staff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


// 


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BW-"" 








PARFUM 

N°5 

CHANEL 

PARIS 


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Page 18 





to Put Best Foot Forward 


By James Hansen 


M ILAN — Optimism in ihe 
face of mourning problems 
is the party line from the 
maesiros of Milan. The do- 
mestic customer is staving home and 
Italy’s corruption- fighung magistrates 
are investigating the industry. But ex- 
ports of Italian fashion are booming. 
That is why designers dared to use the 
“0” word 'during the spring/ summer 
fashion season just concluded in Milan. 

“There is a new atmosphere of opti- 
mism,” said Gianni Versace. “Italian 
fashion has come out of mourning.” 

Valentino said. “The public is no 
longer depressed. The crisis is over. Viva 
I’ottimismo!" Meanwhile, designers 
Dolce & Gabbana described their au- 
tumn collection as “optimistic.” 

Giorgio Armani said he saw “a new 
hunger for fashion" emerging. “Women 
are looking for clothes, not uniforms,” 
he said. 

Optimism is the sentiment of antici- 
pating the rest possible outcome even 
when things still look grim. 

“Teat about sums up the position of 
the industry in this moment,” said An- 
drea Pinto, a Milan-based fashion in- 
dustry consultant. “The domestic mar- 
ket is still very weak,” Mr, Pinto said, 
“but positive signs are coming from ex- 
port sales, particularly in the United 
States.” 

According to Moda Industrie an ap- 
parel trade association, exports of Ital- 
ian fashions to the United States grev. 
more than 42 percent in the first quarter 


C'F 1994. In other key markets, exports to 
Germany rose 23.S percent, while ex- 
ports to Japan jumped 53.3 percent. 

The most startling growth came from 
South Korea, where the market for kal- 
ian fashion surged 242.3 percent in the 
first three months of 1994. 

Overall. Italian clothing exports in the 
first quarter, the latest period Tor which 
full data are available, grew 24.3 per- 
cent. and indications are that the trend 
is holding. 

But weak domestic sales continue to 
drag the industry down because they 
account Tor about half of its revenue. 
Preliminary data place traditional bou- 
tique sales in Italy down nearly 8 per- 
cent from 1993. But Federtessile. a tex- 
tiles trade association, thinks retail 
clothing sales overall are managing to 
hold the line at 1993 levels. The oaly 
Consolation for Italian producers has 
been that clothing imports have also 
fallen, but only by around 5 percent. 

June order books for Italian clothing 
manufacturers were up just 4.7 percent, 
slightly above inflation. That is slim 
pickings for a business that was boom- 
ing in the 1980s. when Armani jackets. 
Gucci shoes and Fendi bags were not so 
much a luxury as a necessity for the 
newly moneyed class. 

“The beginning of the ’90s saw the 
bubble buret.” Mr. Pinto said. “When 
the market turned down, it triggered a 
severe shakeout, which only the stron- 
gest houses survived." He said many of 
the survivors were mostly the same 
names that were alreadv big in the 
1970s. 

But even the survivors of the fashion 


world's shakeout have stumbled upon 
hard times. 

Giorgio .Armani's clothing has always 
been about money — making it. flaunt- 
ing it. All told, his activities generate 
aggr egate annual revenue of 5700 mil- 
lion from clothing sales and licensing 
agreements. 

Now, trouble with the American ex- 
pansion of his Armani A/X Exchange 
boutiques h3s saddled him with a com- 
pany that has suddenly revealed hidden 
losses of over S1Q0 million. 

Armani originally took a stake in Si- 
mini SpA of Italy, which makes Armani 
jeans and controlled the A/X chain, as a 
way of plowing profits back into busi- 
ness. As partners bailed out. he took up 
their stock, gaining control of the com- 
pany. 

Then an audit turned up huge hidden 
losses. A spokesman said previous man- 
agement had “calculated certain items 
as assets, which a review considers as 
costs.” 

The money-losing American subsid- 
iary has been sold, and Mr. Armani now 
says he is seeking an “industrial part- 
ner” to take care of business so he can 
get back to his real trade of dressing the 
upwardly mobile. 

That side of things seems to be going 
well. Revenue so far this year is up more 
than 30 percent. Armani's Milan shop is 
said to have t alien in a billion lire 
($630,000) more this September than it 
did in the same month of 1993. 

The fashion industry here has also 
been shaken by the near collapse of 
Gruppo Fin anzf ario Tessile, which man- 
ufactures clo thin g bearing the labels of 
Giorgio Armani. Valentino, Emanuel 


A Look at the Textures and Colors of the Future 


By Micbfele Loyer 

P ARIS — To anyone 
who has speculated on 
the reasons why a col- 
or. shape or fabric be- 
comes a fashion trend, a visit 
to the textile fair Premiere Vi- 
sion reveals the answer. Be- 
yond fashion. Lhe biannual 
fabric fair is also a valuable 
indicator of tomorrow’s con- 
sumers attitudes. 

Held during the first week- 
end of October, the fair under- 
lined several fashion trends: 
toward synthetic, shiny, metal- 
lic. fabrics; and at the same 
time, a growing popularity of 
natural and “ecological” mate- 
rials such as cotton, particular- 
ly in the United States. 

“I travel the world looking 
for interesting fabrics.” said 
Sarah Lord, fabric coordinator 
for Calvin Klein's women's 


collection. “For us. Premiere 
Vision is an imperative.” 

After many seasons of de- 
ceptively poor wools and cash- 
meres. she is now in search of 
something different. “I believe 
in the return of luxury fabrics, 
more attuned to the tastes and 
lifestyles of Calvin Klein's cus- 
tomers.” 

Suzy Tompkins, creative di- 
rector of Esprit International, 
the California sportswear com- 
pany. said “I think fabrics are 
taking on much more impor- 
tance now’ that we have fewer 
colors in our collections. Our 
customers now demand more 
interesting fabrics and good 
technical performances." 

Right now. for the Suzy 
Tompkins line, she is looking 
for very feminine, transparent 
or lacy fabrics. 

Premiere Vision is also the 
place where long-term projects 


get started. Miss Tompkins, 
long an environmental activist 
is campaigning to promote the 
use of “environmentally 
friendly” fabrics. Her latest 
clothing company. Eco. geared 
to “young t hinki ng" adults, 
uses only natural fibers like 
“organic” cotton, which means 
grown without pesticide and 
dyed with nonartificial dyes. 

“At Premitre Vision, I met a 
large European chain retailer 
who is just as concerned about 
environmental pollution as 1 
am. We decided to launch a 
European campaign together.” 
said Miss Tompkins. 

Fashion victims who worry 
about their fall 1 996 wardrobes 
should be aware of the demise 
of their favorite “mourning” 
black. Premitre Vision’s fash- 
ion orade reveals that the new 
“in” color will be brown — 
from chocolate to coffee — oc- 


casionally perked up with 
bright touches. 

Sophistication and feminini- 
ty’ will make a strong come- 
back with soft dresses in dusty 
pastel colors. But addicts of 
fiauni-it luxury can also re- 
joice: there will also be plenty 
of alluring shine: satin, se- 
quins, embroideries and laces. 

Started 20 years ago by a 
group of 14 Lyon silk weavers 
trying to contend with the in- 
fluence of Inierstoff. the Ger- 
man textile fair. Premiere Vi- 
sion has grown steadily from 
its humble beginnings to be- 
come the most important tex- 
tile rendezvous in lhe world. 
Some 45.000 people attended 
the latest session. 

Although individual figures 
3re never given out the fair's 
total turnover is estimated to 
be around 130 billion francs 
(525 billion). Business arising 


from the October session was 
up 15 percent from a year earli- 
er. 

Whether the buoyancy of 
the figures indicates the end of 
the recession for textile goods 
remains to be seen. It signals. 

at the very least, a renewed 
interest on the part of the 
trade. 

"The textile business is in- 
creasingly complex with an ac- 
celerated’ obsolescence of the 
products.” said Jacques Bou- 
bal, general manager of DMC. 
the largest French textile 
group, with 1993 volume of S 
billion French francs. “At our 
level of the market, price is a 
very important factor, but so is 
quick delivery and creativity. 
The creative process becomes 
an all-year-long continuum.” 

MICHELE LOYER is a journal- 
ist based in Pans. 







THE METAMORPHOSIS OF CRYSTAL IN PARIS ON RUE ROYALE 


Retailers Tell 
What Sells 

*7 ■ Continued from Page 17 

.? • lines like Dior and Saint Lau- 
’ rent when the focus is on li- 
, , censed products rather than the 
■ ■ : designer line. 


./J . . „ • 

. ’ /V . • f 

L: '' 

: s' TV 

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:r-M § 1 ? 





Accessories ■ Jewellery ■ Objects 



DANIEL 

SWAROVSKI 

PARIS 


7. RUE ROYALE ■ 75008 PARIS 
TEL HI 4017 07 40 


What is top of the flops? 
Both Karl Lagerfeld and Chloe 
have poor seU-throughs of un- 
der 30 percent. Joan Buretein of 
Browns in London would con- 
sider such a figure for any de- 
signer “shocking,” and some of 
the independent retailers say 
that large stores have them- 
selves to blame for weak buying 
structures and for the mark- 
down policy that means that 
customers are starting to antici- 
pate designer merchandise go- 
ing on sale. 

Joyce Ma, with a chain of 
designer stores in Asia, empha- 
sizes the importance of invest- 
ing in new names with the prof- 
its earned from best-selling 
lines. She is proud to have been 
one of the First to sell the Bel- 
gian avani garde. Both Van No- 
ten and Ann Demeulemeester 
are performing well. 

There is a gulf between the 
large stores and the indepen- 
dents on selling the newer de- 
signers. A leading American 
fashion director dmes out on 
the story - of buying a Martin 
Margiela collection and selling 
nothing but a pair of cuffs — 
which were then returned. Yet 
Joseph Euedgui of Joseph says 
that Margiela is starting to sell 
steadily. 

It is sobering to realize that 
less than 50 percent of designer 
clothes in the stores will find a 
customer at the regular price. 

Yet fashion's life blood is its 
designers and their force can- 
not just be measured in dollars 
and cents. “It is not only bread 
and butter,” says Mrs. Ma. “We 
have to have fantasy — without 
that I would refuse to work.” 


V. 




Ungaro. Claude Montana. Calvin Klein. 
Pierre Cardin and other designers. 

GFT has annual revenue approaching 
S90Q million, but has also been piling up 
losses. Creditor banks are now examin- 
ing a 5250 million purchase offer from 
the .Arab-owned American manufactur- 
er Plaid Clothing, a maker of men's suits 
and holder of the Burberry license for 
the United States. 

The latest shock for the Italian fash- 
ion industry has been the involvement of 
some of its biggest names in the bur- 
geoning scandal of payoffs to the coun- 
try's fiscal police to avoid tax audits. 
Fashion stars of the first magnitude — 
.Armani. Krizia. Gianfranco Ferre, Ver- 
sace, and others — have been touched 
by the affair. 

* The inquiry, still under way. has irri- 
tated the industry, which is largely in 
sympathy with Mr. .Armani's comment 
that “Italy has become a country where 
it is impossible to be honest.” 

All this is unpleasant, but the consen- 
sus is that it will not hurt business. 
“Maybe it's wishful thinking.” said Ar- 
mando Branching a fashion industry 
consultant in Milan, “but when some- 
thing similar happened to Saint Laurent 
a while back it had no effect at all on 
sales.” 

Alfredo Ciampini, secretary-general 
of Federtessile. Lhe federation of textile 
and clothing manufacturers, agrees. 
“People are not thinking about tax scan- 
dals when they go to buy a suit or a 
dress,” he said! 


JAMES ff.LVS£V is a journalist based in 
Sorthem Itafv. 


AriEttd gg -fry : . *• •-* 



Marion Lesage, a scion of the embroidering family, in the Indies shop 


As Young Designers Spring Up, 
Paris Boutiques Are Flowering 

'Having the boutique means 1 am in contort 

h ilu« n v:*»i) Mr Mi'r1,v “1 


By Pal McCoIl 


St'ZY MENKES is fashion editor 
of the International Herald Tri- 
bune. 




Peter Keppler 

presents 

Gala Evening Dresses 
Cocktail Extravagance 
and a Bridge Collection 
on October 15*19, 1994 

at the Hotel George V 
Avenue GeorgeV - Paris. 
Salon 154. 

Tbl.: (1)47.23.54.00 


P ARIS — For the current generation of 
young designers, an eponvmous bou- 
tique is the surest highway to recogni- 
tion: and. although many of these bou- 
tiques arc off the more traveled fashion routes, 
the curious make the journey. 

Still in her early 30s, Corinne Cobon has 
become den mother and doyenne to her fellow 
designers. She opened her first boutique five 
years ago at 28 Place du Marche St. Honor*. A 
second, in a courtyard at 45 rue de Sevres, is 
now two years old. 

Having her own boutiques has. Miss Cobson 
says, made her rethink her approach to fashion, 
especially the rue de Sevres boutique, which 
was designed, with an enormous pillow-heaped 
bed in the middle of it. to appeal to the young 
customer. 

“Well,” she said “instead of the daughters, 
we got the mothers who brought the daughters 
and both bought variations of the same looks. I 
realized that the idea of Tash- 
ion by generation* is com- 
pletely gone; today's mothers 
and daughters are more like 
pals. Fifteen years ago, 
mothers told their daughters 
how to dress and there was 
no arguraenL” 

Miss Cobson’s style ranges 
from silver sequin ed disco 
minis to slithery slip dresses 
over printed T-shirts to hacking jackets that 
wouldn't look out of place at a hum meet. Her 
way is to toss it ail together to. as she puts it: 
“Make it magic. For me, fashion is enthusi- 
asm.” 

Cobson enthusiasts include the French pop 
stars Patricia Kaas and Vanessa Paradis as well 
as the American actress Nicole Kidman. 

Like Miss Cobson. whose parents are Jac- 
queline and Elie Jacobon of Dorothee Bis. 
Marion Lesage has deep roots in the French 
fashion world. Her father is the couture em- 
broiderer Francois Lesage. Her brother is also 
an embroiderer. 

In the collection Marion Lesage designs for 
the just-opened Indies boutique al 18 bis rue 
Bonaparte — the boutique is owned by yet 
another second-generation scion. 24-year-old 
Jean Brice Garella — the simplest of shapes has 
a Lesage touch: embroidered patchwork appli- 
ques to shape button holes or African hair 
ornaments used as buttons. Jackets tie with 
binding tape while bands of band-woven Afri- 
can fabrics wrap the hips on wool miniskirts. 

Among Indies fans are Barney's and Joseph 
of London. In January, the Parisian depart- 
ment store Franck & Fils will sponsor an exhib- 
it: “HI & Fille en Aiguille," focusing on the 
three Lesages’ very different approach to the 
art of embroidery. 

. While most young designers begin their ca- 
reers with a minimum of fanfare and money, 
Robert Merloz, who had designed the Yves 
Saint Laurent fur collection for Tour years, was 
launched with a maximum of both, including a 
large boutique on cue of the best Left Bank 
shopping streets. 

Originally financed by the house of Saint 
Laurent, Mr. Merloz is now backed solely by 
Pierre Berge, the company's chairman.’ “It 
sounds complicated but it isn’t." says Mr. Mer- 
loz. “Mr. Berge is the financier; my connection 
with the house of Saint Laurent is finished and 
from now on, it’s my story." 

For two seasons, Merloz dropped out of the 
show calendar but returns this season with his 
spring collection. At the ready-to-wear salon in 
early September, he picked up 12 new accounts. 


'Mothers used to 
tell their daughters 
how to dress; 
today they're more 
like pals/ 


with the customer*" .said Mr. Merloz. 
realized that a woman ls a .style, not an age. and 
it is this contact w ith the client that has helped 
me to learn so much.” 

Chris tophe Lemaire. whose boutique is at 4 
rue Cherubini, is a young designer hesitant 
about leaping into licensing- "It’s about mar- 
keting; not fashion,” l»c says. 

For him the advantage of having hi-* own 
boutique is twofold: for the direct contact with 
the clientele and psychologically, as a petsor.i! 
encouragement. 

Although he does sell to oilier stores and has 
a boutique at Gaieties Lafayette, the choice of 
merchandise isn’t his and he has no way to 
monitor customer reaction. 

“With this shop, we show clothes in car 
environment and how we want them shown.” 
Mr. Letnaire says. Because his workrooms art 
directly above the boutique, he can adapt or 
interpret his style to customer demands. "And 
if things don’t sell." he laughs, “we throw a 
“ — sale.” " „/ 

Michele Meunier udu 
O livier Chatenet, the duo be- 
hind -the Marioi-Chtmei li- 
bel. seem to look for out-of- 
the-way locutions to dispfa) 
their talents. Their new bou- 
tique. opened in July, four 
flights up at 7 rue de Surine 
is. as Olivier says: “not jus'. 
~~ another boutique.” 

The atmosphere is more like a mmi-couiun- 
bouse with customers receiving personal atten- 
tion. Racks of nearly all-black clothes frame we 
room for as Miss Meunier says: “everyone 
comes in asking for color and leaves wilt 
black.” Because the ateliers are under the same 
roof, clothes can he specially ordered for an 
almost custom fit. 

■ T'JS? most recent newcomers aiv Fat- 
nek Cox and Aga the Gonnct. 
ui 9 ox s s P ace at b2 rue Tiuuetoone, a few 
blocks from the Place des Victoires, is as color- 
ful as Manot-Chanet’s is spare. Here, ererv- 
tlung is for sale from the Art Deco minors to 
me arum tables which display Mr. Cox's raison 
dStre: shoes. Not just any shoes: tinan muk' 
with patent leather spike heels: babv blue ward 
* e palem leather tanao shoe. 
Eighteen months ago, I didn't have a sin? U' 
French customer, * said Mr. Cox, who is ba 

N / w F L ancc « my bigeest market-' 

oct bigger than Germany .md the I'nilM 

STiSJ . ■ secmcd Ulc right moment for sre , 
}° °EV, *» that Anglomania it at ; 

freiw?^ hc referring to the fashion; 

W«two/t r °r Undl J g band’s V.viem* 
W^wood _ for whom Mr. Cox has design** 
John Galliano. / 

the fiSSi I, h ari 5 t wihfcr or iremfier the 
lel Sel V,. Ws Jon Christ op he Uj 
lhe sh °P. whose custom^ 

SS * to lUS Z SS 

Sid is? R i a if n !L tens 5 n ' Chaiuul Thomf 

F iSCr u ° four pairs, 3 

fofa ™i^ b0U, i qUtf ' Afiathc Gounet op* 

shop an ^ 

Although ha, St.-Sehastu.-n. near the Haiti!! 

Ke^fnd cLSf g r0und iiinb > 

she describes SSfSS 

f love the contrast of textures- the 

S®saaBfifcsi 


PAT MCCOLL is a journalist based 


in Paris. 



Pin A 



* 1 mere 




if# l 


Page 19 


INTERNATTONAT HUBirn TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 







Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. OCTOBER 17. 1994 


O N D A Y 


SPORTS 


Asiad Ends With Uzbek Upset 


vr >- " 


Cwpikdb? Oiv Sufi Frrm Disptixha, mo v, who discovered Shkvyrm playing since the event began 40 years ago. 
HIROSHIMA, Japan — Runaway for a second division team 12 years ago. closed with organizers admitting they 
champion China won four more athletic In total medals, the Chinese got 289 to had been hard-pressed to cope, 

events Sunday on the Asian Games’ fi- 207 for second-place Japan and 179 for *Tbe size of the games has reached or 

nal day, winding up with 137 — or 41 South Korea. even surpassed its Omits for a non-capi- 

percent — of the 337 gold medals at Still, the debut of the central Asian tal city,” said the organizing comma- 
stake in the two weeks of competition nations cut into China's winnings, os tee’s president, Hironoshin Furuhashi. 
among nearly 5,000 athletes from 42 well as m aking it harder for the smaller “There was some difficulty in operating 
nations and territories. countries. The Chinese had 183 golds in training venues and competition sites 

It was the third straight games that the 1990 games in Beijing; Kazakhstan, because they covered a large area." 
China had dominated, but newcomer one of five former Soviet republics com- Officials had originally planned for 25 
Uzbekistan foiled Beijing’s efforts to peling for the first time, had 77 medals, sports but found themselves putting on 

claim Asian soccer supremacy by win- including 25 gold. Uzbekistan had 40 337 competitions in 34 sports. 

nin g the final event of the Asiad. 4-2. medals, 10 gold. Hiroshima also failed to reach its tar- 

Siriker Igor Shkvyrm. who played In the evening, during ceremonies gel Figure of a million spectators, 
with his left thigh strapped, scored a ranging from folk dances to fireworks, Only by including the 300.000 people 
goal and helped create two others. the Olympic Council of Asia’s president, who paid nothing to stand in the streets 
He had demanded that he be allowed Sheikh Ahmad al Fahad as Sabah of to watch the marathon did organizers 
to play despiLe a H ams tring injured in Kuwait, declared the games closed, get to 1,118,591 spectators, 
the semifinal upset of World Cup quali- Flags were handed over to the 199S host, Even then, organizers admitted, fig- 
fier South Korea. He felt, he said, that Bangkok. ures released for some venues might 

he owed a debt to coach Rustam Akra- The 12th Asian Games, the biggest have been grossly inflated, f AP. AFP) 


* -8). ^ 



SIDELINES 


McCoIgan Says Drug Use 'Blatant* 


COVENTRY, England (API — Former world 10,000-meier 
champion Uz McCoIgan, out with knee and toe injuries for 18 
months, won Sunday's 10-kilometer Great Midland run after 
reportedly accusing her British teammates of "blatant" drug use. 

Several reports in Sunday’s papers quoted the 30-year-old Scot 
as saying she was glad that seven British athletes had been caught 
this year by tests. 

"There are a lot more people on the British team doing it," she 
said. “And it is so blatant — but everyone just turns a blind eve. I 
don’t think Britain’s worse than any other country but I don't 
think we've been as honest as we should be." 


UNLV Wm Pay 
Massimino to 
Quit as Coach 


he owed a debt to coach Rustam Akra- 


r LT5 VjaeuM 'Tie .Vsnzual Pres* 

Igor Shkvyrin: A debt repaid. 


For ihe Record 

Defender AJexi became the first American to score in an 
Italian first division game as Padua upset AC Milan, 2-0. and 
dropped the three-time defending champion into sixth place. (AP) 
Anfenwe Hardaway, a contract holdout after making the NBA 
all-rookie team last season, became one of the league’s highest- 
paid players by signing a nine-year deal with Orlando for an 


U a Anj/cin Tuna Stnttr 
LAS VEGAS — RoHie 
Massimino’s tumultuous 
two-year reign a» Nevada 

has emfed with his accept, 
ing the university's cash of- 
fer to terminate his contro- 
versial contract. 

Mass! mi no will receive 
S350.00Q a year for five 


years to leave, pending a], 
most certain approval by 


estimated S70 million. 




Top 25 College Results 


How Hie top 25 teams In the Associated 
Press' college football pell fared Saturday: 

1. Florida [5-1 1 lost to No. 6 Auburn 34-33. 
Next; vs. Georgia. Oct. 27; 2. Nebraska [7-01 
beat No. lo Kansas State 17-0. Next; at Missou- 
ri. Saturday; ft Penn State (6-0) beat No. 5 
Michigan 31-24. Next: vs. Oil to Slate. Oct. 29; 4, 
Colorado (Ml beat Na 22 Oklahoma 45-7. 
Next; vs. No. 14 Kansas Stale, Saturday; 5, 
Michigan [4-2) lost lo Na 3 Penn Slate 37-24. 
Next: at Illinois, Saturday. 

ft Auburn (7-01 beat Na I Florida 36-31 
Next: vs. Arkansas. Oct. 29; 7. Texas AAM (6- 
0} beat Bavior 41-21. Next; vs. Rice, Saturday; 
8. Miami (4-1) dkJ net May. Next: at West 
Virginia. Saturday; 9, Washington 15-1 ) beet 
Arizona State 35-14, Next: at Oregon Satur- 
day ; 10, Alabama (7-0) bsai T e n nessee 17-13. 
Next; vs. Mississippi. Saturday. 

1ft Florida State (4-1) did nd ploy. Next: vs. 
Ciemsoa Saturday; 12, Texas 14-1) did not 
May. Next: at Rice, Sunday. Next: vs. South- 
ern Methodist. Saturday; 13. Colorado state 
(70) beat Texas EM*aso47-9. Next: vs. No. 21 
Utah. Saturday; iftArlznao (5-T) beat No. 30 
Washington State 10-7. Next: vs. UCLA. Satur- 
day; IS, North Carolina (5-1) beat Maryfand 
41-17. Next: at Virginia Saturday. 

14. Kansas State (4-1) lost to Na 2 Nebraska 
17-6. Next: at Na 4 Colorado, Saturday; 17, 
Notre Dame (4-3) test to Brigham Young 21- 
14. Next: vs. Navy.Oct.29; II, Syracuse (5-1) 
did not play. Next: at Temple, Saturday; 19, 
Virginia Tech (6-1) beat East Carolina 27-20. 
Next: vs, Pittsburgh. Saturday; 20, Washing- 
ton State (4-2) lost la Na 14 Arizona 10-7. Next: 
at Arizona state. Saturday. 

21, Utah [6-0J beat Hawaii 163. Next: at No. 
13 Cofarodo Slate. Saturday; 22. Oklahoma (3- 
3) lost fa Na. 4 Colorado 45-7. Next: at Kansas. 
Saturday; 23, Wisconsin (3-2-1) tied Purdue 
27-27. Next: vs. Minnesota. Saturday; 24. Bos- 
ton College (3-2) beat Temple 45-28. Next: vs. 
Rutgers. Saturday; 2V Duke 16-0) beat Ctem- 
son 19-13. Next: at Wake Fores). Saturday. 

Other Major College Scores 


EA5T 

Army 30. Louisville 29 
Bentley 39. Siena 6 
Boston U. 35, Northeastern 14 
Brown 20, Holy Crass 18 
Cent. Connecticut St. 24. Springfield 20 
Cornell 29, Bucknell 28 
Dartmouth 14. Yota 13 
Florida asm 35. Delaware St. 18 
Franklin & Marshall 14, Gecreelown, D.C 7 
Harvard 35. Coiaato 27 
Illinois SI. 17. Buffalo 7 
Iona 31. St. Peter's 14 
Maine 35. Connecticut 31 
Mortal 16. Duquesne 7 
Monmouth. N J. 36. W. New England 0 
Navy 7. Lafayette 0 
New Hampshire 42. Lettish 10 
Penn 12. Columbia 3 
Princeton 27. Fardtiam 20 
Rutgers 14 Cincinnati 9 
5t. John's, NY 34 Ganlsha 22 
Wanner 38. Robert Morris 21 
West Virginia 47, Pittsburgh 41 
Johns Hankins 14 Muhtenberg a 
S. Connecticut 44 Rowan 21 
Wilkes 21, FDU-Madisan 15 
SOUTH 

Aia.-Blrm bighorn 24 Miss. Valley SI. 14 
Alabama st 28. Texas Southern 14 
Cent. Florida 33. NE Louisiana 16 
Citadel 52. Furman 44 
Davidson 9, Methodist 6 
Delaware 28. Richmond 3 
E. Kentucky 49, Murray St. 13 
Georgia Southern 34 Appalachian St. 31 
Gramblhig St. 44 Ark.-Flne Blutf 17 
Howard U. 15. N.C. Central 19 
Jackson 51. 24 Southern U. 21 


James Madison 31. VI I Ionova 23 
LSU 17, Kentucky 13 
Marshall 34 W. Carolina 14 
Massachusetts 23, William ft Mary 14 
Memphis 15. Arkansas SI. 6 
Middle Term. 63. Ma rehood St. 6 
Mississippi CoL 20. So i n lord 19 
Mississippi 51. 41, South Carolina 36 
N. Caroline AftT 26. Morgan St. 16 
n. Carolina SI. 34 woke Fores) 3 
NW Louisiana 54 Sam Houston St. 0 
S. Carolina 51. 24 Bethune-Cookman 26 
Southern Miss. 43. SW Louisiana 20 
Stephen F-AirslJn 24 Nlcnalts SI. 10 
Tenn.-Martin 24 Tennessee Tech 10 
Tennessee St. 24 Austin Pray 21 
Texas Christian 34 Tuiane 28 
Tn.-Chottanooga 49. VM1 14 
Trey SI. 55. Charleston Southern 20 
Utah St. 7, Louisiana Tech 3 
V underbill 4X Georgia 30 
Virginia 24, Georgia Tech 7 
W. Kentucky 22, Jacksonville 51. 20 
M1DWE5T 
Ball St. 14 W. Michigan 13 
Bowffng Green 31, Toledo 16 
Butler 31, Dayton 24 
Cent Michigan 47, Akron 0 
Drake 23. Valparaiso 3 
Illinois 47, Iowa 7 
Kansas 41, Iowa St. 23 
Liberty 27, 5W Missouri St. 19 
Miami, OMo 31, Ohio U. 10 
Northwestern 37, Minnesota 31 
Ohio St. 21 Michigan St. 7 
SE Missouri 24 S. Illinois 14 
W. Illinois 34 Indhxia St. 17 
Youngstown SL 24 Kent 14 
SOUTHWEST 

Alcorn St. 69, Prahie View 14 
Arkansas 31, Mississippi 7 
Houston 39, Southern Mem. 33 
Missouri 24 Oklahoma St. 15 
Norm Texas 34 McNeese Si. 17 
Tulsa 44 UNLV 22 

PAR WEST 

Cal Polv-SLO 31 UC Davis 31 
Fresno St. 34 Wyoming 24 
Idaho 27, Montana St. 13 
Idaho St. 32, Boise Si. 31 
N. Arizona 35. E. Washington 31 
Nevada 45. New Mexico St. 24 
Oregon 21 Californio 7 
Orman St. 21 UCLA 14 
Pacific 41, N. Illinois 32 
San Diego 28. Evansville 16 
San Diego St. 24 New Mexico 13 
Southern Cal 27, Stanford 20 
St. Mary's. Cat 2D, CS Northrldge 10 
Weber St. 24 S. Utah 14 


Ranald Mainaicy and Ricky Achmaa Su- 
bogdla, Indonesia, del. Owah Soon Kit ana 
5oo Bene Klara. Malania. 15-10. 15-2. 
Women singlet 

Bane Soo-hvtm South Korea def. Hisaxo 
MtzuL Japan, 1V4. n-6. 

Doubles 

Shim Eun-lung and Jang Hve-ock, South 
Korea. deL Chung So-yaung and Gil Young-o n. 
15-9. 150. 

Mixed Doubles 

Yao Yona-suitg and Chung So- young, south 
Korea del. Kang Kyung-lln and Jang Hve- 
ock. South Korea 15-14 15-12. 

BASKETBALL 
Men. Gold Medal 
China 104 South Korea 72 
Bronze Medal 
Japan 79, Philippines 76 
CYCLING 

Women, 5448-Kilometer Road Race 

1. Guo Xtnghong, Chirm, 1 hour, 57 minutes. 
10 seconds. 1 Zhao Halluan. China 1:57:10.1 
Wang Shubina. China, 1:57: 14 

Men, Mf9A4-Kflomcter Rood Race 

1. Andrei Klvllev, Kazakhstan. 4 hours. 31 
min utea 53 seconds. 1 Alexandre VI no kourov. 
Kazakhstan. 4:31 A 1 Tang Xuezhang. Chi- 
na 4:32£7. 

FIELD HOCKEY 
Men. Gold Medal 
South Karra 1 India 2 

Bronze Medal 
Pakistan 4 Japan 0 

JUDO 

Men. 68 Kilograms, Gold Medal 


Jln-U, Kim Saan-hyung 1.3: 141«.l Thai Iona Talwen 
3:1431 1 Qatar. 3:1459. mala 

Javelin 


cord; oW record 2471. Chang Joe-keun, South 


Qatar. 2084 

1 IB. Me te r Herdles 

1. LI Tong, China 1130 (games record; old 


record; old record 7,799. Munehire Kcneka 
Japan, 1990). Z Oleg Vereteinlkov. Uzbek L 
shm. 7,702. 1 Tomokazu Suoama Jaocn. 7 M4. 

High Jump 

1. Takahlsa Yoshlda, Japan. 227.2, Lee Jln- 
laslk. South Korea 224.1 Xu Yana China 224. 

88-Klloingter walk 

I,5ergueJ Korepanov, Kazakhstan, 3 hours, 
54 minutes. 37 seconds. 2 Fumlo imamura. 
Japan, 3:56:16. 1 Todahlro Kasaka Japan, 
4:05:04 

WOMEN 
1.500 Meters 

I.Qu Yunxto. China 4: 1148 (games record; 
oM record 4; (844 Chang Yong Ac. North Ko- 


Talwen 

7 

ir 

V 

43 

India 

4 

3 

IS 

23 

Malaysia 

4 

— 

13 

If 

Qatar 

4 

1 

5 

10 

Indonesia 

3 

12 

11 

26 

Stria 

3 

3 

1 

7 

Philippines 

3 

3 

a 

13 

Kuwair 

3 

1 

5 

« 

Thailand 

1 

It 

13 

25 

Saudi Araaio 

I 

3 

5 

9 

Turkmen. 

1 

3 

3 

7 

Mongolia 

1 

■t 

6 

9 

Vietnam 

1 

2 

0 

3 

Singapore 

1 

1 

5 

7 

Hong Kong 

0 

S 

7 

12 

Pakistan 

a 

4 

6 

10 

Kyrovzstan 

D 

4 

5 

9 

Jordan 

0 

2 

S« 

4 

UAL 

D 

1 

3 

4 

Macao 

a 

1 

1 

2 

Sri Lanka 

0 

1 

1 

2 

Eanslcdesh 

a 

1 

0 

1 

Brunei 

0 

0 

2 

n 

* 

Neoei 

0 

0 

n 

2 

Tajikistan 

0 

a 

2 

2 

Burma 

0 

0 

2 

2 

----- ---- — 


•— - 

— 

— 


sen. Denmark. 7-e (7-41, 7-6 (fteli Amoud 
Boetsan. Franca del. Jonas Sverason. Swe- 
den.2-6.A-2.fr-3; Diego Narataa- Italy, aef. Jan 
Stemerlnk, Netherlands. frO, 7-6 (7-4). 
Semifinals 


I hour. 40 minutes. 26289 seconds. IB2J07 kpn 
(11143 mottl: 2, DenHW MOL Britain. Wil- 
liam*- Renault. 746*7 seconds behind; XMhm 
HaMttnen. Finland. McLarerePw 
aeot.l:09A48 behind; 4 Eddte irvhM. Britain. 


Washington del. Damm, 6-1 S*. 7-5; Boeisch Jordan- Hon. 1 : 18.446: 5, Gerhard Berger. 


del Nora Isa, 6-7 (6-8), 6-4 6-2 
Final 

Washington dot. Beerscn. 4-4. 6-1 4-1 
PORSCHE GRAND PRIX 
In Fllderstadt, Germany 
Singles. Quarterfinals 
Mary Pierce (3). France, del. Glgl Fernan- 
dez, Aspen. Cato. 6-0. 4-t; Karina Hotaudovo, 


Austria Ferrari, 68 Ians completed. 

4 Metu-Harato Freotzen. Germany, 
Souber-Memda.68 loos.- 7. Ufcve Ketavama. 
Japan. TyrreU-YamoM. 68 tape; 4 JeMmv 
Herbert. Britain, Lati&Mugcn-MondaM taps. 
9, Olivier Pante France. Utfer-Renoun. M 
taps; 14 Jean AtesL France. Ferrari. 68 laps. 
Drivers standings after 14 of 14 races; t. 


Czech Republic del. Conehlto Martinez (1). Michael Schumacher. Germany. 86 points; X 


KJm Kw*. South Korea. def. Rvuil Sonodo. rea 1982). X Yon Wri, China 4:1132. 1 Khln 


Japan, yusol 

Bronze Medals 

Hasscxi Ahadaour. Iran, and Serlk Adv 
gonov, Kazakhstan 

Open Class, Goto Medal 


Katsuvukl Masuchl. Japan, def. Lee Joon- 1, j0Dan# US7 


Khin Htwe. Burma 4 .-lain. 

400-Meter Relay 

I. China (Chen Yon. Liu Xtoomel. Ou y an- 
ion. Huang Xloavan). 4185 (games record; 
eta record 44 j*. cn Ina 1990). 2. T hallond. 44^6. 


young. South Korea ippon 

Bronze Medals 


I ^88-Meter Relay 

1. China ( Lena Xue van. Liu Hoo. Coo Chunv- 


Wang Rulshenp. China Badmaanyamhuu lng.ChenYanhoo).3;29.n (games record; old 


SEIKO SUPER TOURNAMENT 
la Tokyo 

Singles, Semifinals 

Goran Ivanisevic ill. Croatia def. Stefan 
Edberg (21. Sweden. 6-4. 6-4; Michael Chang 
(6l.U5.det. Jocco Eltlngh (101, Nether (anas. 
6-1 6-4. 

Final 

Ivanisevic def. Chang, 6-4, 6-4. 

CZECH INDOOR TOURNAMENT 
III Ostrava 
Singles, auerterflnals 
Martin Damm. Czech Reaubiicdef.Jeremv 
Bates. Britain, 6-1 6-4; MallVoi Washington, 
Ponte Veoro Beach. Fla. aef. Kennein Cori- 


Sooln. t-4. 6-1. 

Semifinals 

Anke Huber (8), Germany, def. Marlome 
wardeL LU. 4-6. 6-2. 6-3; Pierce def. Huwu- 
dava 6 - 4 . 4 - 1 . 

Final 

Huber del. Pierce. 6-4 6-2. 

ISRAEL OPEN 

10 Tel Aviv 
Singles, quarterfinals 

Wayne Ferreira (1). South Africa oof. Jo- 
nas Blorkman. Sweden. 7-1 6-4; Thomas Mus- 
ter (3). Austria det. Lulz Mortar, Brazil, 6-4.6- 
2; Amos Mansdorf, Israel, def. Andrei 
Cherkasov. Russia. 6-1. 6-2; Fabrloe Santoro 
(71, France, det. Marcos Ondruska. South Af- 
rica 6-4, 5-7. 6-4. 

Semifinals 

Mansdorf aef. Sanf ora, 7-6. 2-6, 6-2; Ferreira 
del. Muster, 14 6-1 6-2. 

Final 

Ferreira del. Mansdorf, 7-6 (7-4) 6-1 


Daman HflL Britain. 8); 1 Gerhard Berner. 
Austria 35; 4, Mika Hakkliwn. Finland. 26; & 
Jean AtesL Franca 19. 

4 Rubens Barrtchefia Brazil 16: 7. David 
CoultnartL Britain. 14: a Martin Brandte, 
Britain 12; 9. Jos verstappen, Holland. 10; tft 
Mark Blundell, Britain. 8. 

Constructors standings: l. Benetton- F ord. 
97; 1. WiiUamvREnaun. 95; 1 Ferrari, <0; 4 
Me Loren- Peugeot. 38; 5. JordorvHort, 23; 4 
Tyrrell-Yamaha 13; 7, Ltoter-RenaulL 11; 7, 
(tie) Sauber - M ercedes. 11; % Feetwor k -Fora 
9; 10, Mmanfl-Fora, 5: 1 L Lorret i sec- P ard. 1 


• *2 -•> .1 . m 


Bat-Erdene. Mongolia 

Women, 48 Mlograma Gold Medal 
RvofcoYamura.Jaaan def. UAlvue. China, 
yuset 

Bronze Medals 


record 3:3157. China 19*0>.1 India. J.-33JI4. 1 , 
The liana 3:37.76. 

hum Meters ! 

1, Wang Junxla China 20;S(U4 (acmes re- J 
card; eld record 31:50.98. Zhong HuandL Chi- 


Kim So-to, South Korea Huang Yu- itslaTaL no, 19901 1 Dong LL China, 3. MiH \ 


CFL Standings 


East era Division 



w 

L 

T 

PF 

PA PIS 

Winnipeg 

11 

4 

0 

553 427 22 

x-Baltlmore 

10 

4 

0 

432 341 20 

Toronto 

5 

9 

a 

402 

486 10 

Ottawa 

4 

10 

0 

396 

505 8 

Hamilton 

3 

11 

a 

340 

439 6 

Shreveoart 

a 

14 

0 

241 

546 0 

Weileiw D Iris loo 



Calgary 

12 

2 

0 

551 

277 24 

Brit .Columbia 

ID 

4 

1 

505 

377 21 

Edmonton 

W 

4 

0 

407 

320 20 

Saskatchewan 

8 

7 

0 

413 

393 16 

Sacramento 

7 

6 

1 

346 

381 15 

Las Vegas 

5 

10 

0 

406 

482 10 

x-cUndied Playoff berth. 





wan Open Class 
Gold Medal 

Nariko Anna Japan, def. Qiao Yanm in. Chi- 
na Ippon 

Bronze Medals 

Moan Jl-voon. South Korea and Sambuu 
Oasndulani. Mongolia 

SEPAK TAKRAW 
Semifinals 

Thailand def. Singapore. 15-1. IS-9; Ntoiay- 
sla def. Indonesia 15-1 13-10. 

Gold Medal 

Malaysia def. Thailand. 15-9. 15-1] 

Bronze Medal 

Singapore del. Indonesia 15-11 18-13 
For 5th Place 
Laos def. JDPOrv 156- 158 
SOCCER 

Men, Bronze Medal 
Kuwait 2. South Korea 1 

OOM Medal 
Uzbekistan 4 Odna 2 

TRACK AND FIELD 
Men, UR Mgt rz 


loarashL Japan. 31:45.82. f 

Long Jump 

X. Yao Weill, China 691 (games record; o*d j 
record 669, Xlom dying, China 19901.1 U Jlng. 
China 66«. l Elmo Mures Philippines. 641. 

Javeilo | 

1. Oksana Yarglna Uibeklstan.64.62.2- Lee I 
Young-sun. South Korea 62J0.1 Ho Xiooyon. | 
China 6108. 

Shot Pat | 

I.Su 1 XlnmeL China 7045. IZhong Liuhong, 
China 1925. 3. Sunisa Yooyaa Thailand. 1624. 
VOLLEYBALL 
Mea Semifinals 

Japan def. South Korea 15-7. is-u, 15-5; 
Chino del. Kazakhstan. 1S4, 15-7. 15-7 
For SHI Place 

(ran def. Pakistan. 15-11 158, 15-2 
Bronze Medal 

South Korea aef. Kazakhstan, 152. 15 -e. is- 
11 

Gold Medal 

Japan def. China 12-15. 13-15, 15-13. 15-1 15- 
10. 

WATER POLO 


TRIANGULAR SERIES 
South Africa vs. Pakistan 
Sunday, In Karachi 
South Africa 163-9 (50 overs) 

Pakistan 166-2 144.4 overs) 

Result: Pakistan wins bv 8 wickets 
FIRST TEST 

Zimbabwe vs. Sri Lanka fifth day 
Sunday. In Harare 
Sri Lanka first innings: 383 
Zimbabwe first Innings: 3198 
Result: Match drawn. 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Arsenal 1 Chelsea 1 
Aston Villa t. Norwich 1 
8 lock burn 1 Liverpool 3 
Crystal Paloca 1 Newcastle t 
Evertan (L Coventry 3 
Leeds 1. ToHerfiom 1 
Leicester «. Southampton 3 
Manchester United I. West Ham B 
Queens Park Rangers L Manchester Ciry 3 
laswich 1, Sheffield Wednesday 2 
Standings: Newcastle 24 BWckburnZL Nal- 


most certain approval by 
the Nevada Board of R*. 
gents on Wednesday. 

Additional buyout con- 
tributions will push the to- 
tal package to about SJ.9 
million over the length of 
the agreement it was an- 
nounced Friday night. 

Replacing the coni rover- 1 
sial Jerry Tarkanian. Mas- 
si mine was brought in from 
Villanova to help improve 
the team's image academi- 
cally as well as keep the 
Runnin* Rebels among the 
nation's elite. 

But Massimino quickly 
fell out of favor, with 
UNLV finishing 15-13 last 
season and failing to gain a 
berth in the NCAA tourna- 
ment for the second consec- 
utive season. Massimino's 
position was further weak- j 
ened by the revelation he I 
had brokered a secret, sup- 
plemental contract with the 
former UNLV president 
Robert Maxson. 

That deal was to pay 
Massimino an additional 
5375,000 on lop of his an- 
nual salary of S5l 1,000 that 
was agreed to by the Neva- 
da Board of Regents. 


Metz 1 Lu Havre t 
Cams 1 Paris Sr, Germain 3 
Bastta 0 Bordeaux 0 
Standings: Names 29, LVdp 24 Cannes 29, 


llnoham Forest 21. Manchester United ». Ltv- AumerreTL Parts SL Germain 21. Strasbaura 


Arabella 

Grand Hotel 

:-rt.s w». nr am V.vv 


NBA Preseason 


The 

Grand Hotel 
of our Time 


Downtown location, 
complete health dub 
with indoor pool 


Saturday's Gama 

Saskatchewan 38, British Columbia 27 
Winnipeg 41. Las Vegas 11 


Aslan Games 


1 , Mahomed Ahmed Sutaiman. Qatar. WATER POLi 

3 :«U» (games record; old record 3 : 4 X 49 . Fai- Kazakhstan 21 , Stogapare 7 
Mi Jaraltah, Iraq. I 9 B 2 LW mu weigua. China iron 9 . south Karra 8 
3 : 4093 . 3 . MltsuhlreOkuyama Japan, 3:41 Jl. China 9 . Japan 5 

. M 88 Meters GOLD— Kazakhstan ( 5 - 0 ); SILVER — China 

1 . Tastilnarl Tpkaaka, Japan, 13:3837 { 41 ); BRONZE — Japan ( 3 - 2 ) i 

(aames record; atarecard 13 : 5822 . Mohamad 

Sutaiman, Qatar. 1998 ). Z Ahmad Ibrahim Final MeufllS Table 

Worramo, Qatar, 13 : 39 J 9 . 3 , Sun Rlpeng. Chi- 

na 13 : 40 jB 7 . Gold silver 

«*-Meter Relay China 137 92 


Speciality restaurants 
japanese & Chinese cuisine. 
Sushi-bar 

Bar with live music. 

1 3 banquet & meeting rooms 


FiMert Germ pi 
Orlando 105. LA, Clippers 82 
Miami 110, Boston 104 
Atlanta lift Chartatie 183 
Detroit 123, New Jersey 117 
Minnesota 97, Milwaukee 95 
Washington 131, Chicago 124, OT 
Houston 114, Philadelphia 93 
Seattle 128, Golden Slate 122 
LA. Lakers lift Sacramento 103 
Saturday's Games 
Chicago 121. Dallas 103 
LA. Clippers 104 Atlanta 84 
Miami 124 Boston 108 
Phoenix 142, Detroit 121 
Indiana m Milwaukee 98 
New York 108. San Ant onto 88 
Seattle 97, Portland 93 
LA. Lakers 125, Sacramento 120 


Final Medals Table 


BADMINTON 
Gold Medals, men, staples 
Hertyanto Arbt, Indonesia, def. Jofco Su- 
Prtanto, Indonesia 15-7, 15-1. Doubles.- Rexy 


3945. 3. Qatar, WJ1. Kozt 

1 ^08-Meter Relay Uztx 

1. South Korea (Lee Yirink. Shan Ju-Jl, Lae Iran 


China 

Gold 

137 

Silver 

92 

Bronze 

60 

Total 

289 

South Korea 

63 

53 

63 

179 

JtiPtll) 

59 

68 

80 

207 

Kazakhs) txt 

25 

26 

26 

77 

Uzbekistan 

ID 

11 

19 

40 I 

Iran 

9 

9 

8 

26 1 


Konrad-Adenaner-Str. 7 
D-60313 Frankfurt 
Telephone.: ++69 - 29 81 0 
^ Fax: ++69 -29 81 810 ^ 


European Grand Prix 


eraool 17. Norwich 14 Christa IS. Mancttester 
City 14 Leetts i4Soumompion 15, Arsenal 14. 
Tottenham 14. Sheffield Wednesday 11 Cov- 
entry ift West Ham 11, Aston VH10 ift Wlmbte- 
don 9. Leicester 9. Queens Pork Ranow-s ft 
IPMfich 7. Crystal Palace 7. Evertan X 
GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Dynamo Dresden 1, FC Kaiserstoutern 0 
Bavem Munich 1 ElntracM Fronklurt 3 
Kartsntae SC A Borussto Dortmund 0 
SchaHte 1. VtB Stuttaart 1 
Moenclteitatadbodi 1. MSV Duisburg 0 
Werder Bremen ft FC Cologne 2 
Boyer Leverkusen l. Bayer (Jerdlngen t 
SC Freiburg ft Hamburg 5V 0 
VIL Bochum ft I860 Munich 2 
Stand! mu: Borussto. Dortmund 14. Weraer 
Bremen 14.SC Frel burn Tft Bayern Munich ift 
HamnurB sv Ift Karlsruhe SC 11. FC Kaisers- 
toutern 11. Bayer Leverkusen IftMoenchenp- 
kidbach ift VIB Stuttgart luSchoikg ft Dyna- 
mo Dresden ft Etatracnt Frankfurt ft Saver 
Uenflngenft FCCntogne 4 VtL Bochum S.1860 
Munich X MSV Duisburg ft 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Alax Amsterdam 4. Go Ahead Cagles 0 
VHesse Arnhem ft NEC Nllmcgen 0 
RKC Woalwllk 1, Willem li I 
FC Tweflfe Enschede ft FC Groningen 2 
FC Votendam 1, MW Maastricht 1 
Fevenoard Rotterdam ft FC Utrecht a 
Roda JC Kartarode 1. Sparta Rotterdam a 
P5V Eindhoven ft sc Heerenvewi 1 
NAC Breda 1. Dordrecht Y0 1 
Standim; FC Twente Ift Alax it. psv ift 
Rada Ift MW Ift FC Utrecht Tft Ferenaord 9. 
Willem II ft Vitesse ft NAC 7, NEC 4 FC 
Votendam 4 Hccremreen 4 FC Groningen ft 
RKC ft GA Eagles ft Sparta 4, DordredifW 4. 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Monaco ft St. Eftomw 0 
Line 1, Nice 0 
Caen L Montpellier 0 


>1. Lera 2ft Bordeaux 19, Mart town 19, SI 1 - 
Etienne 17, Rennes 17. Monaco ift Basifa i\ 
Metz iftSoctiaux W. Nice 1ft utte Ift L»Ha»i 
12. Coen ift MantacIHer 9. .>* 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Brescia 1, Genoa 2 
Caaliari 1, Cremenese 0 
Foggta ft Juvmhn at Turin 0 
internaztonale t. Bari 2 
Lai la at Rome ft NaooO I 
Padova Z AC Milan 0 
R era Iona l. Flarentlna I 
Sampdorla of Genoa ft AC Parma I 
S t a ndin g s : Roma 1ft Parma 1ft Lotto 11.' 
Foogtoll. JuventvsU.SomPdoflal&Barl Ift' 
Milan ift FtorenNna ft inter*. Coal tot tft Gen-' 
00 ft Torino 4 Cremaoese 4 tamoU 5. Padove 
4 Brescia ft Reaalena I. 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Aftettco Madrid LDeportlvade La Coruna 1* 
Sevilla ft Athletic de BlRtoP 0 
Valencia 1. Barcelona 2 
Esnanal I. Real Madrid 2 
Standings: Reat Madrid II, Deport hm m 
Coruna 11, Barcetona 9, Betts ft Tenerife l 
Valencto ft Zaragoza ft Athletic do Bilbao fc 
Espanat 7,sparting de Glhm 7. Se vHto 7, CNla 
4AltottcadeModrld5.Albacetg5,Comsimt6- 
la ft ValtodoHd ft Oviedo 3. Rral Soctedad ft 
Racing de Santander 2, Lagronas 2. 




BASEBALL 
American Leagae 

BALTIMORE— Added Jeff Manta. IhW 
basemon, and Cesar Devarez. cericlwr, to 40- 
man rosier. 


Results of Sunday's Forme la One race, a Ulte I, Nice 0 
taps of the ftCHdhmetar (173-mite) Jorez Caen ft Montpellier 0 
drain, a total of 38S47 kHometors OS9J5 Strasbourg ft Sochoux 2 
miles) with driver's earn caeatry, make of Auxarra ft Marttguss 0 
car, lima md xrlnneris average speed: ft Ml- Nantas ft Lens 0 


chari Scbemadier. Germany. Benefton-Ford, Lyon ft Rennes 8 


BOSTON— Reassigned Todd Frehwtrthond - 
Jam Melendez, pi tatters, to PawtuckeL IL • 
Announced that Scott Fie tatter and Greo Lit- 
ton. Infleldarft refused outright astonmirti' 
and elected free agency. Added KeMfi Stop 
hgnl. pitcher, and Rat Lennon, outfleMer, to 
40-man raster. 



’ feWWE T0URSEUF. JDET. OR lOU COULD GROW 
UP TO BE PRESIDENT * 




CVW?6 tO- 17 


BEETLE BAILEY 


6 OIN 6 ON 

^ YEAH, A FAMILY REUNION 

LEAVE, 

1 AT MY SISTER LOIS' 

BEETLE?^ 

HOUSE 


WHERE 


LIVE? 


JUST A FEW 


COMIC STRIPS 


AWAY 




To subscribe in Franca 
fust call, fall frao, 
05 437437 



MY RIBS HURT, MY JAM *~ 
HURTS, I CAN HARDLY EAT, 
THE COACH KEEPS 
YELLING AT ME. AND ft SO 
TIRO? I CANT DO MY 


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set at tang marks belong to me, my friend!” 


















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$3 •■5.1 m.i on top of fc. 
ntt.il Mib n rfSSIMBfe 
was Jjia-ed tobvfafc 
u.i Board of Rwean' 



Schumacher Returns to Victory, With Hill 2d 

ManseU Doesn’t Finish Jerez Race 


Catplled by Out Staff Front Dispatches 

JEREZ, Spain — Michael Schumacher’s 
two-race suspension ended Sunday in a 
victory that braked, if it didn’t haft, Da- 
mon mil’s run for the Formula One title. 

Schumacher looked anything but rusty 
as he drove his Ben ett on-Ford to an easy 
victory at the European Grand Prix. 

Hill, in a Williams- Renault, was second, 
24.689 seconds behind, but fell five points 
back in the standings. Hill won the two 
races Schumacher missed, but was no 
match for him this rinre 

“It’s just the way you like to come back 
to Formula One,” Schumacher said. “I 
mean, that’s where I left it. 

“It has been a hard time, but we got over 
it and got the whole team motivated to 
push even harder.” 

His eighth victory of the year tied him 
with the late Ayrton Senna for second in 
season victories. He can match Nigel Man- 
sell with one more triumph. 

Schumacher's return was a far bettor 
one than that of Mansell, who came back 


to Williams-Renault for the season’s final 
three races after two years on the Indy-car 
circuit in the United States. 

Mansell ran as high as fourth before he 
had to come in for a long pit stop after IS 
laps to replace a nose cone damaged in a 
slight collision with the Brazilian driver 
Rubens Barrichcllo’s Jordan. 

Mansell finally spun out of the race, 
while lying 15th, on the 49lh lap. 

Schumacher was suspended for two 
races for ignoring a black flag at the British 
Grand Pnx. In ms last race before the ban 
took effect, he was disqualified after win- 
ning the Belgian Grand Prix because his 
car did not meet technical requirements. 

“But as soon as I came back and began 
testing at Estoril, everything came back to 
normal," he said. 

Normal for Schumacher is being in front. 


“Today, we proved again how good we 
are,” he said. 

Mika Hakldnen, in a McLaren-Peugeot, 
got his third straight third-place finish, 
more than a minute behind the winner. 
Schumacher averaged 182.507 kph (1 13.43 
mph) over the 4.43-kilometer (2.75-mile) 
circuit and lapped all but three of the 26 
cars in the race. 

Hill was down after the sound defeat. 

Tm pretty disappointed obviously,” 
the British dnver said. *T did get my hopes 
up. The margin of victory was greater than 
I would have liked as well'’ 

Hill overtook polesirter Schumacher at 
the stan and led for the first 14 laps as they 
pulled away from the rest of the field. 
Schumacher said he wasn’t worried about 
being behind early. 


“I knew what we were doing," he said. 

His team planned a three-stop race to 
have the car on fresh tires about every 15 
iaps. Hill stopped only twice, but was no 
match in the speed department. 

Schumacher went in first at the end of 
15 laps. Hill came in two taps later, and 
came out of the pits just as Schumacher 
sped past. 

By the time Hill got up to speed, he was. 
more than four seconds down and the race, 
for all practical purposes, was over. 

Hill inherited the lead for a lap at the 
second pit stop. But Schumacher pulled 
away thereafter. By the end of 45 laps. 
Schumacher held a 30-second advantage 
and never lost it again. 

The next race is the Japanese Grand 
Prix on Nov. 6. The Australian Grand Pri\ 
concludes the season a week later. 

Hill tried to remain optimistic. 

“Being second to Michael here means 
my chances of winning the championship 
are still open,*' he said. "That is the main 
thing with two races left." (AP. Rimers* 


Els Adds Montgomery 
To List of Overmatched 


The Associated Press 

VIRGINIA WATER, England — Ernie 
Els added a world title to his U.S. Open 
crown Sunday, beating Colin Montgo- 
merie 4 and 2 in the final of the World 
Match Play Championship. 

A day before his 25th birthday, Els took 
home the biggest winner’s paycheck in 
Europe and earned more plaudits as a 
golfer pegged for superstardom. 

"It’s nice to hear those kind of remarks,” 
Els said, “but I don’t think you want to 
start believing in that stuff. I've got a long 
way to go." 

The South African defeated three of the 
top 18 players in the world — five-time 
champion Seve Ballesteros, U-S. Masters 


won the next two holes: taking par at the 
33d after Montgomerie hit into two bun- 
kers, and finishing with a birdie at the 34th 
to clinch the match. 

Montgomerie said that, in 10 years’ 
time, it will be said that he was beaten by a 
great player. 

“There’s very little weakness, and that's 
off the course as well,” Montgomerie said. 
“He has a very, very old head on young 
shoulders, and everyone that's played him 
and been beaten by him has said the same:" 

In an 18-hole playoff for third place, 
Olazdbal defeated Vijay Singh, 2 and I. 

Els defeated Olaz&bal, 2 and 1. in the 
semifinal, repeatedly bailing himself out of 
trouble and taking the lead when Olaz&bal, 


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Smt-Lrap Granan/ARpicc Fmcc-Pmr 

Mfidnd Sdnmncber: “It’s just the way yon like to come hack.” 

Europe’s Door Is Thrust Open 
For Locked Out NHL Players 


falter on his tee shots over the final 
holes. 

Montgomerie had birdied the 35th and 
halved the 36th to defeat Singh by one 
hole. 


PERSONALS 


m * 


i M. 

s** 

: Ft 

p». 

#4 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

Jari Karri, the star forward - of the Los 
Angeles Kings, flew home Sunday to play 
in ms native Finland as it appeared that 
the National Hotkey League’s lockout 
could not be extended to Europe. 

Kurri planned to be playing akmgsidfi 
Ms friend, the Winnipeg Jets’ Tecum Se- 
lanne, by the of this week in Helsinki. 
The Vancouver Canucks said they would 
not stand in Pavd Bure’s way if he wants 
to play on the Continent during the NHL’s 
labor strife. 

Rent Fascl, president of the Interna- 
tional Ice Hockey Federation, had said last 
week that neither his organization nor the 
NHL would allow locked out players to 
join European teams. 

“We will not let them play, we have a 
contract with the NHL and we wiQ abide 
by that contract,” Fasd said. 

But the Canucks* vice president, George 
McPhee, said players have a legal tight to 
play elsewhere during the labor dispute, 
aZthough.hu club would not be happy to 
see its marquee player risk injury doing so. 
SeJaane, one of the NHL’s brightest 
.ni Ukko youn^ stars, received permission frmn the 

• it ( . u'M! tj* Winnlr*“ Ta», mnn, w# Aid WmnicK 

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Jets to rgoin his old Finnish 
' s lockout. 

Barry Sbenkarow, 


dub, ^Srit, during the lockout. 


3he Jets’ president, 

Gtsphasizcd that Selanne’s contract is with 
his dub, not the NHL or the HHF. 

“It's funny, both of us playing for the 
same team,” Kurri said before leaving Los 
Angeles: "I haven’t been there" with Jo- 
kent ftorl5 years. The whole dty has gone 
crazy about it” 

Hie Finnish Hockey Federation’s presi- 
dent, Kai Hietarinta, told Canadian Press 


that he does not feel bound by the IlHFs 
pact with the NHL “We will welcome our 
players back with open arms," he said. 

Said Kurd of the HHF: ‘They’ve tried 
to stop us. It would be a big mistake if they 
did.” 

... ■ Bure^ wha last spring signed a $24.5- 
rmUion, five-year contract to stay with the 
Canucks, would rather play than wait out 
the squabble between NHL players and 
owners. He is entertaining offers from 
teams in Germany and Switzerland, said 
his agent, Ron Safcex. 

Defenseman Jyriri Lumme also is con- 
sidering invitations to play in his native 
Finland, but said he probably won’t do so 
if the Canucks object 

The 34-year-old Kurri, who was the 
Kings’ third-leading scorer last season 
with 31 goals and 77 points, had ruled out 
a return to Finland before he grew pessi- 
mistic about the breakdown m negotia- 
tions. 

“I was hoping we could get things go- 
ing,” Kurd said. “But I fed 1 need to keep 
playing at tins stage of my career. I need 
ice time. I need to play, if s as simple as 
that. 

“Ifs not the money thing — I just need 
to play.” 

The decision was not easy for the Kurri 
family. For the immediate future, his wife, 
Hina, and twin sons Joonas and V3)e will 
remain at their home in Calabasas, Cali- 
fornia- Kurri said it was premature to pull 
the fourth-graders out or school 

“If s really hard after working out all 
summer and with training camp," he said. 
“Ifs not a fun way to do it. But we have to 
stick together." (LAT, AJP) 


THANKS soaed hunt of Jew i and 
Sami Jude for proyen answered. 

EC. 


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winner Jose Maria Olaz&bal and leading playing with a pulled hip muscle, began 
European PGA Tour money-winner falter on his tee shots over the final 16 
Montgomerie — in consecutive days to 
take home the $240,000 top prize. 

“It’s nice to know that you’ve beaten 
some of the really great players in the 
game, but it was my week this’ week." Els 
said. “Fve reached all my goals and more 
this year.” 

Montgomerie lost the match on the 
greens, failing to hole three short putts for 
pars on the opening nine. The Scot failed 
to make any putt from more than 10 feet in 
the 34-hole match. 

“I never gave myself a chance on the 
greens," Montgomerie said. T had two 
putts all day that went past the bole. The 
rest of them I didn't even miss because I 
didn't have a chance of missing because 
they were short." 

Montgomerie; who also lost to Els in a 
threo-way, 18-hole playoff with Loren 
Roberts at this year's U.S. Open, said the 
light rain that fell during the first six boles 
was no excuse for his slow start. 

“He had the pace of the greens from the 
word go, and I didn’t have the pace of the 
greens at all." Montgomerie said. “If one 
can get the ball to the bole, the other 
should be able to." 

Montgomerie's poor putting led to a 2 
over-par 37 on the front nine, but he rallied 
to birdie three of the last four holes of the 
morning round — mostly with good ap- 
proach shots — to tie the score at the 
midway point on the gray day at the Went- 
worth West Course 

Els, who never trailed in the match, 
struck the first blow in the afternoon with 
a birdie at the 19th to go 1 up. The next 
seven holes were halved, although Mont- 
gomerie hit an extraordinary biting wedge 
from the bunker that lipped out ax the 23d. 

Els made a 15-foot birdie putt at (he 
27th to go 2 up, but lost the next hole, a 
par-3, when he overshot the green with a 5- 
iron, chipped well past the pin, then 
missed from 10 feet for only his second 



Tun i\ViT»bn 5$*'r5a 1 urat-PinW 

Ernie Els with Match Play Championship trophy: "It was my week this week.” 


bogey of the day. 
Theke' * 


;key hole, according to both players, 
was the 32d. Els birdied from 12 feet; 
Montgomerie missed from 10. Els also 


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Page 22 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1994 




LANGUAGE 


Drawing Some Contradistinctions 


By Williain Safire 
TTTASHINGTON — “I’m 

Y Y glad you asked that ques- 
tion,” President Qimf>n said at 
a news conference, “in contra- 
distinction to the one you asked 
right afterward." 

What’s the difference between 
distinction and contradistinc- 
tion? The Larin distintuere 
means “to make distinguishable 
to the eye as something discrete, 
separate.” A distinction is a sepa- 
rating; a contradistinction is a 
sharper separation, using contra, 
“a gains t," as an empfaasizer. 
However, a native speaker does 
not say “in distinction to"; that 
it would be expressed as 
"as distinguished from." 

“ Contradistinction is a conve- 
nient and emphatic way." Jac- 
ques Baizun says, “of pointing 
out the difference one has in 
mind when using words that are 
close in meaning or commonly 
confused: 1 mean knowledge in 
contradistinction to informa- 
tion.’ Distinction by itself does 
not permit the use of to and, 
requiring between instead, it 
seems to call for an explanation 
of what the difference actually 
is: ‘7 have in mind the distinction 
between knowledge and infor- 
mation.' All right, tell us what it 
is. The other construction, using 
contradistinction, needs no ac- 
counting on the speaker's pan.” 

Contradistinction is distinc- 
tion by means of contrast. Clin- 
ton used the word correctly, 
elevated the public discourse. 
However, politicians seeking 
the common touch might prefer 
in contrast to or which is much 
different from, and critics of the 
foreign policy of past adminis- 
trations should steer clear of 
contra constructions. 

While I had Barzun’s atten- 
tion, 1 asked about the word 
nubile: why does this word for 
“marriageable" apply only to 
females? The sex is deep-root- 
ed: the Latin nubere means “to 
take as a husband,” not to take 
as a wife, and Baizun traces the 
etymology a step further. 


“The historical reason nubile 
applies only to girls," he says, 
“is that only they wore a veil at 
the marriage ceremony: nubes 
equals cloud. The practical. lin- 
guistic reason is that the conno- 
tation has always been ‘capable 
of bearing a child.' The word 
marks the point, at any age, 
where physical development is 
perceived as adequate to that 
purpose. It follows that nubile 
boys sounds facetious; nubility 
carries an essentially passive 
aura." 

While he had my attention, 
the great usagist took issue with 
a political comment in my Mr. 
Hyde role about the president's 
jejune jitters. “The meaning 
‘youthful, childish' for jejune,” 
Baizun noted, “has got into the 
dictionaries only as a conces- 
sion to the misusers." 

The original meaning of je- 
june — “empty of food, meager” 

— led to its modem sense of 

“dull, insipid." Probably be- 
cause the word sounded lie ju- 
venile, it picked up a meaning of 
“puerile, childish," which is the 
way it is commonly used today. 

Should we stand with the pre- 
scrip tivists, as Barzun suggests, 
and hold fast to the “proper" 
m eanin g? Or do we go along 
with the language slobs, adopt- 
ing as “correct" a mistake merely 
because it is so frequently made? 

At a certain point, what peo- 
ple mean when they use a word 
becomes its meaning. We should 
resist its adoption, pointing out 
the error, for years; mockery 
helps; if the meaning persists, 
though, it is senseless to ignore 
the new sense. 

“Investigate the use of the 
word morph as a verb," urges 
Rabbi Carl M. Perkins, of 
Needham, Massachusetts. “In 
the phrase ‘It’s morphin’ time,' 
used by the characters on the 
‘Power Rangers’ television pro- 
gram, I have the sense that it 
means ‘to transform.’ " 

Morphe, in Greek, means 
“form”; preceded by meta-, de- 
noting “change," we had meta- 


morphosis. which means 
“change of physical form.*’ a 
word the first-century Latin 
poet Ovid used in its plural 
form as the title of his legendary 
work, ", Metamorphoses 

Ovid also celebrated Mor- 
pheus, the god of dreams < not to 
be confused with Orpheus, a 
poetic character who knocked 
about the underworld). Mor- 
pheus, in Greek mythology- the 
son of the sleep god Hypnos 
(you are getting drowsy), led us 
to morphology, a branch of lin- 
guistics that dissects words: a 
morpheme is the smallest mean- 
ingful unit in a language. In the 
word words, for example, ward 
is a free morpheme and - s is a 
bound morpheme. 

A morph, still a noun, was 
used by science writers in the 

1950s to mean “a variant form 
of an animal species," like a 
resident of the Planet of the 
Apes. Bui along came the com- 
puter, and the word was trans- 
formed into a verb meaning 
“transform from one shape to 
another by computer graphics." 
in the definition given by John 
and Adele Algeo in American j 
Speech. Citation: “There are 
flashes of the special effect 
known as ‘morphing,* ” The At- 
lanta Constitution wrote in 
1992, “in which Mr. [Michael] 
Jackson — who arises from a 
pile of magic dust — material- 
izes and dematerializes.” 

Characters morph in the pop- 
ular children’s television series 
“Mighty Morphia Power Rang- 
ers"; in this live-action fantasy, 
teenagers are transformed into 
superheroes empowered with the 
strength of prehistoric creatures. 

Computer literati, so far 
ahead of the rest of u$ that they 
are prepared to pun on senses 
unfamiliar to the cyberstupids, 
will occasionally ask Irtemet- 
tled anonymous correspon- 
dents MorF? That means “Male 
or Female?” but is surely a play 
on morph. 



New York Tima Service 


By Suzy Menkes 

lmemc::orjl Hvdz Tnteae 

P ARIS — The white satin shorts that opened the 
shows at both Valentino and Yves Saint Laurent 
were symptoms of the hemline virus that swept 
through fashion on Sunday. It afflicts only those 
designers of a certain age.’ is contagious for their 
mature clients, yet is unknown to pre-menopausal 
women. 

Valentino’s symptoms were virulent. A perfectly 
pretty spring/ summer collection broke out in flashes 
of hot pants, hemlines hobbling the knees and bal- 

PARIS FASHION’’ 

lei-lengih mid-calf dance dresses in which even 
Claudia Schiffer looked like her mom had run some- 
thing up for a ballroom dancing contest. 

Yet whenever Valentino was in remission, the 
clothes were fine: curvy jackets that were mostly 
brief boleros writh a corset-belt beneath. When the 
ever-changing skirt became a dirndl, the outfit had a 
cute lyroiean charm. With a straight skirt f allin g 
like an' arrow to the knees, it seemed dowdy. Short 
skirts with pleats opening up were fancy but pretty, 
especially with embroidered panels. 

Valentino is unique in making luxurious clothes 
with delicate decoration in ready-to-wear. Tufts of 
feathers sprouted from satin jackets. This season’s 
wonder was a kid's paper-cutout effect on silk or 
suede. All the evening clothes were upscale or glam- 
orous. especially a white sheath that had a stripe of 
sheer chiffon running down the sides. Chiffon saree- 
styies were graceful. But for day. what's an uptown 
girl to do? Joan Collins. 61 going on 21. found the 
hemline fashion cure. She wore a cappuccino-col- 
ored pants suit. 

Yves Saint Laurent took his ovation and fled — 
the first time the designer has broken with the 
tradition of the backstage bravos. It left his fans with 
a feeling of anti-climax. But for the first time in 
several seasons, his spring/ summer ready-to-wear 
show on Sunday did not. 

For without throwing down the fashion gauntlet. 
Saint Laurent’s show addressed in its tasteful way 
the central issue of the 1990s: How to move fashion 
away from menswear and toward a new f emini ty 
without profaning retro glam our or sex-and-sleaze? 

Saint Laurent just made some polite suggestions. 
Why not swap stem pants or straight skirt for white 
satin cuffed shorts? Perhaps lacing on the front 
instead of buttons, a reworking of the classic YSL 
safari jacket A new length skirt? Yes. to the full skin 
on a soft trench coat, or whirling to the knee under a 
strict jacket. But no to Spanish tiered ruffles, which 
always look like costumes for “Carmen." 

Saint Laurent also endorsed the dress. It came out 
mini length (with white belt, shoes and gloves): over- 
tire- knee for jeune-fille dresses frilled at sleeves, hip 



M/MR.ThoUU 

Saint Laurent's lacey, over-th e-knee dress. 


and hem; mid-calf for slithering knitted dresses that 
also came ankle length. All options looked quite 
convincing. The show was fresh in its light fabrics: 
bathrobe jackets with pajama pants in regatta 
stripes; or chiffon evening dresses with floating 
don’t- go- near- the- lobster- bisque sleeves. For sweet 
mixes of color Saint Laurent is in the master class. 

It was like seeing a distinguished establishment 
figure Haunting his mistress in public, when the 
hemlines reared up the thighs in Hubert de Gi- 
venchy’s show. First came the flirtatious weekend in 
Biarritz — all brief navy knit dresses, salted with 
white, and mateiot-stnped shorts with Givenchy’s 
signature big blouse. Tnen it was off on safari, in 
shorts or a sand-beige dress with a tiny bolero jacket 
and curve-front hemline. 


’t Go Away 

And oh what a jaunty mix of color or pattern for a 
pistachio pants suit, its jacket cheeked and uousers 
striped, or a sky-blue shirtwaister dotted and d a sh e d 
with white. Once the shock was over, the coDecikai 
ffimwi pretty nice, with its fresh flower prints and 

.1 Dm h«M*c fh,* fnetrinn imnv Inn 


has traded it in for a younger model 
The Hermte woman seemed to have bolted to the 
disco when blade satin jeans and a leather blouson, 
revealing the inevitable bra, appeared on the run- 
way. But galloping hooves pounded on the sound- 
track and Henris kepi its thoroughbred image. 
Here were fashion’s key pieces like trench coats in 
soft leather, safari jackets in suede and riding coats 
in bright cashmeres. For the authentic Henris 

3 , luggage-strap stripes were printed on a 
coat and gift ribbons on shapely swimsuits. 
The famous fllk prints were crunched into cloqri 
and shown as pajama pants patterned with trout. 
Without being a fashion leader, Henris makes 
clothing coherent with its Image. 

Hervi L£ger stuck with sex. His hug-me- tight 
bandage dresses, in rainbow colore this season, 
squeezed the supermodels* curves. How short, bright 
and tight they were in lagoon turquoise, orange 
sherbert and coral L£ger is not so hot when it comes 
to fitting regular fahne to a bionic bosom. Nor at 
inventive tailoring. But who cares, when the models 
wiggled down the runway in Silver Screen swimsuits, 
orshea ths bad a glitter gulch of rhinestones at the 
cleavage? And Lfiger had loosened up a little, with . 
flutte ring chiffon skirts, or extra fabric fanning a 
across a well-wrapped demure. ' 

Is there any pattern emerging from the jumble of 
shows? Yes, for the dress. Designers at the cutting 
edge axe turning away from tailoring. John Rocha, 
Aszan-bom and Irish-based, made a good Paris 
debut, with light dresses hand-painted with Celtic 
symbols, in sweet pmk-and-blue colors and flimsy 
fabrics. They were layered with mesh knits to create 
a silhouette in flux. 

ghinf- is another strong trend. Beaded collars and 
Afro wigs — tottering conical creations in tribal 
colors — were Michel Klein’s laborious way of 
dressing up knits and dresses in the slithery viscose 
and nylon fabrics that look modem. Robert Merloz 
tori: a shine to the black and white ticking-striped 
satin that backs men’s vests and suit sleeves. He 
feminized it as a high-waisted dress. 

There is also a comeback of color. Kenzo, who 
always designs on the bright ride of life, had fresh 
color and lively pattern mixes, even if graceful long 
dresses, light fabrics and his signature folkoric- 
pattemed sweaters were overwhelmed by the scenes- 
to- a- theme from Russian peasants to 1920s flappers. 
The hemlines? As it should be, they were not an 
issue. 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 






High 

Loo 

W 

High 

LOW W 


OF 

OF 


C/F 

at 

«spuvp 

20*8 

16*1 

C 

20*8 

ifl*i r 

ArnttarDun 

10*0 

5/41 


14/57 

9/48 DC 

Antram 

21770 

11/52 

a 

17*2 

9/43 1 

Ajhoas 

23/73 

15/59 

DC 2 1/70 

16*1 sh 

Barmens 

21 770 

15*9 

DC 

20*6 

14/57 an 

Bfltflraba 


409 


15*1 

0/46 a 

Baiun 


3.27 

DC 

11/52 

409 1 

BniEMU* 

10/50 

</39 

pc 

15.59 

8/46 C 

Budapea 

13/55 

1/34 


11/52 


Copenlugan 

7*4 

l/3< 


9/40 

409 i 

CocuiMSa 

21/70 

18*4 

DC 

22/71 

17*2 Vi 

Cubic 

12*3 

6/46 * 

12/53 

7«4 , 

iflirCuiQli 

11/52 

3/43 

DC 

12/53 

9/43 , 

Ftonmco 

20*6 

10/50 

S 

1B/B4 

11*2 pc 

FianMutt 

9/40 

002 

pc 

11/52 

5/41 pc 

Geneva 

16*1 

7/44 


15/59 

7-44 an 

KeMnfcJ 

4/39 

205 

an 

6.43 

1-34 at 

taanbu 

21/70 

14/57 

DC 

18*4 

12*3 an 

Un Palnv'i 

27/80 

18*6 

■ 

23/73 


LMDOn 

19/M 

16*1 

c 

19*6 

ia*i an 

London 

12/53 

7/44 


15*9 

9/4fl c 

Maom 

19*6 

10/50 

c 

21.70 

10*0 DC 

Mtten 

18/84 

10/50 


17*2 

6/40 tn 

Moscow 

7/44 

-1/31 

■ 

4/39 

-1/31 r 

Whwcn 

12*3 

205 


13« 

5(4i a 

Ntca 

21/70 

12*3 


19*6 

12*3 pc 

DUO 

a/*a 

-5/24 

c 

6/«3 

1/34 an 

Palma 

20*3 

18/61 

pc 

18*4 

15*8 an 

Parte 

16*1 

b/43 


19*4 

B/43 pc 

Praoua 

10/50 

-1/31 


11/52 


RiWtv* 

7/44 

5M1 

sh 

7/44 

409 «< 

Rorrw 

23/73 

aw 

• 

23/73 

11*2 ■ 

S«. PmmtHirg 

4/39 

205 

r 

5/41 

-101 an 

StocknoJm 

6/43 

-IOI 


8/43 

1/34 ■ 

Syatexxvg 

14/57 

3/37 

■ 

18*1 

0«3 S 

Tnmnn 

5/41 

205 

■n 

B/43 

104 an 

Venica 

1BZB4 

10*0 

9 

17*2 

11/52 oc 

Vtovia 

11*2 

1/34 

DC 

11/52 

7/44 « 

Wanaw 

7/44 

■4/25 

C 

S/41 

205 an 

ieieh 

14*7 

6/43 

SC 

14/57 

7.44 m 

Oceania 

Angara 

17*2 

11(52 

£ 

17*2 

ii(52 pc 

Bjoney 

25/77 

12«3 

pc 

18*4 

6/46 pe 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 




m w 



\y k> 

7 


4? <4^'^ 


p^t UnfMgMiMy |C f/ij UnsmsoraUv NWjrtu.y *-Wvy 

JetsOKun Cam ///]**« levy a*" 1 


North America 

The Atlantic Seaboard will 
begin with mild, sunny 
weather: by Thursday the 
return of clouds may bring 
widespread showers. 
Ontario and the Great Lake 
slates will be showery at first 
then chilly end mainly dry. 
Pacific Coast cities will be 
mostly ram-free: California 
wd be especially dry. 


Europe 

Rising winds with ram and 
drizzle wifi begin Tuesday m 
Ireland and Britain. After- 
wards. strong, gusty winds 
will overspread France 
through Germany and Scan- 
dnavia along weh rain from 
Ume to lime. Most Mediter- 
ranean borderiends will have 
some sun and little rain. 


Asia 

Unsealed weather with seme 
ram will reach trem Shanghai 
and Be$mg. China to » croa 
and southwestern Japan 
China will mm cold. Eastern 
Japan such as ToKyc will 
become rainy at midwoeh 
Sun will warm South China 
Tropical heal wll foster stray 
thunderstorms in Bangkok 
and Singapore 


Middle East 


Latin America 


BMUt 

Cairo 

□anwttua 


Rryaan 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
HfTS 20 <60 
28/82 19*6 
31/70 12*3 
22/71 17.82 
32*9 2103 
33/91 18*6 


Tomorrow 
W KJtfi Low W 
OF OF 
pc 3S<77 20*6 tfi 
pc 25 *77 10*1 pc 
PC 22/71 11*2 ah 
pc 23/73 10*1 m 
pc 96*7 10*1 a 
PC 30SE 16*1 t 


Toma 


in -snow, hce. w-weamgr. 


Today 

High Low W High LOW W 

OF OF OF OF 

Beanos Altai 22-71 it *2 pc 20-53 -.0‘S® sr. 

Caracas 3203 26/78 pe 32*9 25/?5 pc 

Lima 20*8 16*1 pc 19.66 18/61 c 

MeuoOty 24/76 10/50 I 24.75 11.62 J> 

noosJanoira 32*9 21/70 pc 30 Be 2170 PC 

Santiago 16/61 4/39 pe 14*7 307 cc 

dourly, rxioudy. Shahmmro. Mhundaraiorms. r-ntti, rrt-arow flumes 
All rmpa, forocaata and data provfdad by Accu-Weather, Inc. s 1994 


Asia 


loom 


Tomorrow 


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LG» 

w 

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UM. Y/ 


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OF 


or 

OF 

Bar.cv.-. 

it W 

23 73 

Dc 

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North America 


ancr-jc-iae 

736 

■7 20 * 

4.-30 

3 27 pe 

All no 

JJ75 

1 1 -62 a 

2271 

13*55 pc 

Soaon 

l£**» 

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15.53 

9 40 u. 

CncvjO 

72*71 

13*55 C 

18*4 

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11*2 

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1661 

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OeKU 

21.70 

B 4b a 

13 

9*48 in 

MorJlu(u 

23/SU 

23.-T3 PC 

30*6 

2373 pc 

HcuJtcn 

2932 

20/63 an 

26*4 

16*1 SD 

Loa Angetes 

2475 

13.-S5 » 

26 70 

15.59 s 

Uulir, 

29*4 

2170 pc 

23-34 

22/71 pc 

MnnflJOCHa 

18*84 

13*5 at 

14.-57 

5*1 91 

Monireaj 

14,5? 

3-37 s 

14/57 

409 pc 

Noiau 

M-84 

2373 PC 

3'*8 

24.75 pc 

i(t»irt 

is. a 

3'*0 C 



PTKCftn 

2373 

13/55 ; 

23*4 

13*1 S 

Sdh Frpn 

21/70 


20/60 

12-53 t 

Souse 

lS*3 

7/44 c 

16*1 

0 46 DC 


'7*2 

6'43 pc 

ismi 

5-141 PC 

uVashingian 

1804 

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10/84 

10 .-50 pc 


A Musical Bridge Between Eastern and Western Europe 

fertilization with the Krakow Music Acati^ 


By Jane Perlez 

Sew York Tima Service 

K RAK.OW. Poland — Amid the un- 
packing of instruments and first prac- 
tice sessions at the piano, gifted music 
students from throughout the world gath- 
ered here for the opening of the academic 
year, intent on the lofty ideal of bridging 
the cultural gap between Eastern and 
Western Europe. The nearly 50 students, 
chosen by a jury of grand masters for their 
virtuosity as well as their intellectual curi- 
osity, opened a new campus of the Europe- 
an Mozart Foundation. 

Last year, the foundation was housed in 
the 18th-century Dobris Castle near 
Prague. Its permanent home will be the 
grand Ester haza Castle in western Hunga- 
ry, which should be restored by the fall of 

The Mozart Foundation is an academy 
devoted to the notion that more attention 
should be paid to the arts of Eastern Eu- 
rope. Its creator, Alain Coblence, says that 
much can be accomplished in bolstering 
orchestras and opera companies debilitat- 


ed by politics and a widespread artistic 
drain to the West under Communist rule. 

The foundation also strives to energize 
the cultural debate between the two parts of 
Europe that used to be — and many believe 
should a gain be — one. 

“The bottom line of what we teach is that 
the students of Central Europe should be 
proud to be Central European; that it was 
here that it was all bom,” said Coblence. a 
New York City-based American-French 
lawyer whose passion is music. “We’re try- 
ing to transplant back on this soil the origi- 
nal exodus. The Marlboro Academy in Ver- 
mont, the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia; 
these were run by Central Europeans. The 
least we can do, now we’ve created great 
artists in the United States, is to bring back 
the recipe and train them here, because the 
recipe was lost here in the last 40 years." 

This year’s students study on the graceful 
campus of the Polish Institute of Przegorza- 
ly on the outskirts of Krakow, a city that has 
been the crurible of much of Poland's mod- 
ern classical music. There will be cross- 


my. visits from world-renowned local 
composers — Krzysztof Penderecki is on 
the foundation's board — and for diversion, 
a collaboration with a Krakow cabaret to 
produce the love poems of W. H. Auden set 
to music by Benjamin Britten. 

The student body is divided almost even- 
ly among Eastern Europe, Western Europe 
and the rest of the world. A roster of 125 
visiting professors will teach classes in Kra- 
kow, with the emphasis on chamber music. 

For Mihfljlo Arsenski, a 23-year-old ten- 
or from Macedonia, the 10 months at the 
foundation will be the broadening experi- 
ence he has long dreamed of beyond the 
Skopje Opera Company. “Our city has no- 
money to put on new productions and no 
money to put on operas for young singers, 
like Donizetti, Rossini, Mozart,” Arsenski 
said. He performed three Richard Strauss 
lieder in an impromptu concert that opened 
the school year on Oct 3. “They go instead 
fra the big repertory of Verdi and Puccini. 
Every year for 30 years if s been Traviata* 
with the same costumes, falling apart” 



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