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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


London, Thursday, October 20, 1994 


No. 34,724 


EU Turns Sights South , 
Across Mediterranean 

Proposed Economic and Security Pact 
Would Create Largest Free-Trade Zone 


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By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The European Com- 
mission proposed an economic and se- 
curity pact Wednesday with countries 
of the Middle East and North Africa to 
stem the threat of political instability 
and mass migration. 

The plan, which would include the 
world’s largest free trade zone, says 
population growth, a yawning wealth 
gap and the threat of Islamic funda- 
mentalism make the southern Mediter- 
ranean a prime security ride for all of 
the European Union. 

By addressing those risks, the initia- 
tive aims to restore cohesion within the 
Union following complaints by such 
southern members as France and Spain 
that the body was ignoring the Mediter- 
ranean to pursue a German-led drive to 
bring Eastern Europe into the Union. 

“The problem of the East isn't an 
exclusive problem of the northern coun- 
tries of Europe, and the problem of the 
Mediterranean is not an exclusive prob- 
lem of the southern countries,” said 
Manud Marin, the Spanish develop- 
ment commissioner who presented the 
EU executive body’s plan. 

Mr. Marin’s proposal, which will be 
put to Union leaders at their summit 
meeting in December in Essen, Germa- 


ny, calls Tor more than doubling aid to 
the region, to 5J> billion European cur- 
rency units ($7 billion) over the next 
five years, and to convoke a peace and 
security conference among EU and 
Mediterranean countries in 1995 to 
agree on a framework for cooperation 

A free-trade area involving the 
Union, its prospective members in East- 
ern Europe and the Mediterranean 
would contain as many as 40 countries 
and up to 800 million people, more than 
double the size of the North American 
Free Trade Area of the United States, 
Canada and Mexico. Mr. Marin said it 
would take at least 18 months to negoti- 
ate such an accord, and perhaps 15 
years to actually dismantle trade barri- 
ers. 

But the strategy, which is by far the 
most ambitious attempt yet by the 
Union to forge a co mmo n foreign poli- 
cy, faces hurdles that are as lofty as its 
intentions. 

One European Union diplomat cited 
a “cleavage of interest” between such 
northern member states as Germany 
and Britain, which want to offer mainly 
trade concessions, and southern states, 
which emphasize aid over trade, fearing 
that greater imports of fruit and vegeta- 

See EUROPE, Page 4 


Israel Vows Revenge as Hamas 
Boasts of Bombing That Killed 22 

Arab Militants 
Say Assaults 
Will Continue 


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From Bananas to Beluga, 
Airlines Try Innovations 


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By Adam Biyant 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Coffee? Tea? AD the 
bananas you can eat? 

Northwest Airlines has scrapped its tra- 
ditional meal service and now offers a 
moving buffet on most flights. The passen- 
gers on a morning flight, for example, can 
take as many bananas, bagels or sand- 
wiches as they want. 

The buffet is one of many ways in which 
airlines are experimenting with new kinds 
of services that just might hdp to fill empty, 
seats and end a long streak of losses. 

Other recent innovations include a bath- 
room for women only (on Midway Air- 
linesX private showers in the arrival lounge 
(American Airlines and British Airways), 
and the boarding of passengers not from 
the back of the planes to the front, but 
beginning with the people who have win- 
dow seats (United Airlines). 

Not everyone appreciates the efforts of 
the airlines. Mona Doyle, president of 
Consumer Network Inc. in Philadelphia, 
which surveys about 5,000 consumers a 
year for their opinions on retail service, 
said a growing number of people had been 
using airline service as a reference point 
for describing the way retail service had 
deteriorated. 

The pace and breadth of the changes in 
up many aspects erf air travel are seen by 
Industry experts as perhaps the most visi- 


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competitive pressures on carriers and sent 
them on sometimes desperate searches to 
find a combination of amenities that will 
appeal to passengers and earn a consistent 
profit. 

That goal has proved elusive, as attested 
by the U.S. airline industry’s S12.8 billion 
in losses during the last four years. The 
heavy losses have forced the airlines to 
rethink their in-flight services. 

Some carriers are pushing the high end 
of service even higher. This spring, Japan 
Airlines installed an electronic massage 
chair for the first-class passengers on its 
longest flights. United upgraded its first- 
class menu last year to indude Dom Perig- 
non champagne and beluga caviar. 

Other earners are trying a different tack, 
moving to meet the demand by passengers 
for low fares. Companies like Continental 
Airlines do not serve meals on short 
flights, just peanuts or pretzels, and then 
boast of the changes on their so-called 
Peanuts Fares flights as a less-is-more bo- 
nus to passengers: 

Sensing a marketing opportunity, Mid- 
way Airlines this year offered “No-Pea- 
nuts Fares,” bragging that by not serving 
peanuts, the airline was saving passengers 
13 cents each on their fares. 

“These are the fruits of deregulation,” 
said James V. O’Donnell, chairman of Sea- 
brook Marketing, an airline consulting 
firm in Houston. “They took along time to 

See AIRLINES, Page 4 


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Rescuers in Tel Aviv stepping over one of the dead on Wednesday to remove a wounded passenger from the bos. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TEL AVIV — Israeli leaders vowed 
Wednesday to retaliate after a bomb 
ripped through a rush-hour bus on Tel 
Aviv’s main shopping street, killing 22 
people and wounding 48. 

The explosion, which was believed to 
. have been the work of a suicide bomber, 
was one of the worst acts or ten-orism in 
Israel's history and the third major attack 
in 10 days claimed by Islamic militants of 
the Hamas organization. 

In Gaza City. Hamas, the armed wing of 
the Islamic Resistance Movement, boasted 
in a statement broadcast from the loud- 
speakers of a mosque that it had carried 
out the attack, and would launch others. 

“God is great. God will torment them 
with your hands and the hands of the 
faithful." the statement said. It said the 
attack was a reprisal for the killing of three 
militants who were holding a kidnapped 
Israeli soldier last .week. The soldier was 
killed in the raid. 

Anonymous callers to Israeli radio sta- 
tions also claimed that Hamas had carried 
out the bombing. 

Yasser Arafat, chairman of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization, angrily con- 
demned the bombing “in the name of the 
Palestinians and in my name.” He said it 
was the work of “the enemies of peace.” 

President Ezer Weizman of Israel re- 
fused to take a call from Mr. Arafat and 
warned, “We cannot tolerate more and 
more attacks.” 

“It will end,” Mr. Weizman said. “It has 
to end. We will tear them to bits.” Israel, 
he said, would have to take “extraordinary 
action” to root out extremists. 

A government spokesman. Uri Dromi, 
warned that Israel “will be very tough on 
the Hamas.” 

“We must both fight the Hamas and 
other Islamic fanatics and at the same time 
pursue the peace process,” he said. “The 
only alternative is bloodshed.” 

The bombing was the deadliest act of 
terrorism since Palestinian self-rule Hagan 
in May. It struck at the heart of the agree- 
ment for which Mr. Arafat and Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Foreign Min- 
ister Shimon Peres of Israel share the No- 
bel Peace Prize this year. 

President Bill Clinton, who is scheduled 
to visit Israel next week, said in Washing- 
ton that the attack was directed both 
against the Palestinians and Israelis. He 
called it “an outrage against the conscience 
of the world,” and urged Arab leaders to 
ensure that there would be no haven or 
support for those responsible. 

The bombing softened any joy over the 
peace agreement with Jordan, just as Israel 
was preparing for a festive signing on the 
border to be attended by 5.000 guests, 
including President Clinton. 

After the blast, troops sealed off the 

See TEL AVIV, Page 4 


A U.S. Diplomatic Flurry Amid the Horror, Silence 



UN Force Vows New Pressure on Terrorists Is Urged 

To End Blockade By Paul F. Horvitz «®<>n next week to witness 


Then Came the Cries and the Rage 


KJena Doherty/Rraun 

1 WRAPPED IN A FLAG — The 
Princess of Wales leaving a Lon- 
don gym Wednesday. She flew lat- 
er to the United States. Page 3. 


SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina 
(Reuters) — UN peacekeepers in Bos- 
nia said Wednesday that they were run- 
ning out of fuel because of a Serbian 
.blockade and warned that they would 
take “extremely strong action” to cor- 
rect the situation. 

They also admitted that they were 
failing to persuade Muslim-led Bosnian 
government troops to leave a demilita- 
rized zone outside Sarajevo before a 
Thursday deadline set by Bosnian Ser- 
bian forces, who are threatening to in- 
tervene. (Page 2) 

Health / S c i e nc e 

Three books on intelligence, race and 
class fuel an IQ debate in the United 
Stares. Page 8. 


Book Review 


Page & 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tnbune 

WASHINGTON — The United Slates 
strongly urged foreign leaders on Wednes- 
day, including Yasser Arafat and Presi- 
dent Hafez Assad of Syria, to use their 
influence to halt the surge of terrorism 
against Israelis. 

Reacting swiftly to the Tel Aviv bus 
bombing, the State Depart mem an- 
nounced the diplomatic effort soon after 
President BUI Clinton condemned the lat- 
est attack. 

Mr. Clinton denounced the terrorists 
who carried it out as “enemies of peace” 
who should be given no haven in the Mid- 
dle East or elsewhere. 

He called the bombing “an outrage 
against the conscience of the world” aimed 
at undermining the Middle East peace pro- 
cess. 

The White House later made it clear that 
Mr. Clinton remained committed to a trip 


to the region next week to witness the 
signing of a peace accord between Israel 
and Jordan. He is also expected to address 
the par liam ents of Jordan and Israel and 
to visit U.S. troops in Kuwait 

The State Department announced that 
private diplomatic contacts were under 
way. presumably with countries through- 
out the Islamic world and beyond, to press 
for assistance in curbing the violence in 
Israel. It was not known whether Iran, 
which Washington has repeatedly identi- 
fied as a source of support for terrorism, 
was among the countries contacted. 

Nor was it clear what special leverage 
the United States might have beyond what 
it has employed for years as a peace media- 
tor in the region. The United States has 
recently committed itself to a major aid 
package for the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization. 

The State Department spokesman. Mike 

See CLINTON, Page 4 


By Barton Gellman 

Washington Pott Service 

TEL AVIV — The silence, that was the 
striking thing. 

Soon enough there would be sirens, and 
mottos, and calls for help, but the first 
thin g that followed the thundering blast 
was a noiseless panorama of suffering — 
like a horror film with the sound switched 
off. 

Stunned and deafened, those who could 
help themselves stumbled speechlessly into 
a hellish scene of charred flesh, beadless 
bodies and scattered limbs. 

“There were no screams," said Eddie 
Booth, 25, a backpacker from Nottingham. 
England, who ran into the street from a 
youth hostel two floors up. “There was a 
huge blast and then just quiet" 

Inside the Dan No. 5 bus, where police- 
men believe a suicide bomber set off “tens 
of kilograms” of explosives, the merest 
whim divided the living from the dead. 


For Schmuel Sadan. 28, it was an un- 
laced shoe. As the bus neared his usual 
stop at Dizengoff Square, the personnel 
manager bent to gather his belongings and 
tie the laces. Just as his head dropped to his 
knee, a crushing force flung him from the 
seat Many of those near him were maimed 
or killed. 

“I went through a window,” he said in 
the post-surgical ward at Elias Sourasky 
Hospital. ‘There was nothing left of iL T 
saw bodies, lots of blood. I don’t remem- 
ber the fire.” 

Rona Bodman, 21, stood a block from 
the punk fashion store where she works, 
still shaken from the horror two hours 
later. On the pavement outside the small 
boutique she had found remains so badly 
tom that she could not tell whether they 
belonged to a woman or a man. 

“It was disgusting, aH organs on the 
See SCENE, Page 4 



Her Side of the Spy Story: Rosario Ames Says She’s Also a Victim 


Newsstand Prices 


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Kuwait.. 500 Fils Zimbabwe. 


By Sally Quinn 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Maria del Rosario Casas 
Ames, 41, wife of the confessed spy Aldrich Hazen 
Ames, sits in a tiny, wtndowless room in the Alexan- 
dria, Virginia, Detention Center. She is dressed in a 
green prison uniform ova a white T-shirt and white 
sneakers. Her brown hair is cropped short, her face 
sallow with no trace of makeup. Dark circles under her 
eyes attest to the strain she is under as she awaits her 
sentencing Friday morning for conspiring to commit 
espionage and for conspiring to defraud the govern- 
ment of taxes. 

She has not seen her 5-year-old son. Paul, since she 
was arrested on Feb. 21, shortly after her husband was 
arrested. 

Under a plea bargain negotiated by her court- 
appointed lawyer, she- agreed to plead guilty rather 


than go to trial with her husband, who has been 
described as the most notorious and destructive spy in 
CIA history. He is serving a life sentence. Because of 
sentencing guidelines, she faces a minimum of 63 
months in prison. As part of her plea bargain, she 
agreed not to ask for less, though the judge has the 
option of giving her anything from time served to 10 
years. 

Now she has a new lawyer, John Hume, who invited 
two reporters — one print, one television — to inter- 
view Rosario Ames before the judge hands down the 
sentence. He hopes that once she teDs her side of the 
story, she will be perceived more sympathetically. 

In a compelling and heartbreaking recounting, she 
paints herself os a victim, isolated by a controlling 
husband and caught in an expanding web of secrets. It 
is a story of the mental and emotional deterioration of 
a woman, and whether the spontaneous truth or a 


carefully crafted fabrication intended to sway her 
interviewer, she tells it with conviction. 

She talks rapidly, in fluent English with no accent 
She answers every question thoroughly, as though in 
the detail lies her salvation. She seems bewildered and 
disbelieving of her situation at times, by turns angry, 
desperate and distraught. 

when she talks of her husband she alternates be- 
tween rage and disbelief, crying often at the thought of 
his betrayal of her, of his country, of their child. When 
she talks of her son she cries most of the time, speaking 
almost to herself in a kind of stream of consciousness. 
Her voice turns guttural, her anguish is almost feral. 

The day her fife ended, Rosario says, was in the 
summer of 1992. 

A couple of weeks earlier, she had needed a small 
wallet to fit into a special purse and remembered an 
unused red wallet of her husband's in a closet. In it she 


found a typewritten list Two items on it worried her: a 
reference to “the city where your mother-in-law lives” 
and one to “our embassy.” She thought it strange and 
was worried about the reference to her family. She had 
never told them her husband worked for the CIA. She 
assumed the note was related to his work. But she 
knew his work involved Soviet affairs and was not 
linked to Latin America. 

She asked him about it that night, but he didn’t 
want to talk about it. “For a couple of weeks he did 
what he should’ve kept on doing.” she says, “which 
was to say nothing." When she continued to press him 
about it, though, he said be would idl her. 

They made a date for dinner that night at Ger- 
maine's, a Vietnamese restaurant in Washington. 
They got a table in the front of the room, where the 

See WIFE, Page 16 







Pa ge 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THU RSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Black Tie 9 Red Square , and Intrigue in Yeltsin’s ‘Court’ 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Timex Sernee 

MOSCOW — Some Rus- 
sians were wondering Wednes- 
day aboul the future of Prime 
Minister Viktor S. Cherno- 
myrdin, who hotly denied res- 
ignation rumors that floated 
into print Tuesday night. 

But many more were won- 
dering where President Boris 
N- Yeltsin and bis many offi- 
cials got the dinner jackets 
they wore for Queen Elizabeth 
II of Britain at the state ban- 
quet Tuesday night, the first 
black-tie affair in the Kremlin 
since 1917. 

The Communists had not 
only put a stop to formal wear, 
but also murdered the Russian 
royal family, which cast a pall 
on relations with the Britain 
and its royal family ever since. 
Czar Nicholas II was the first 
cousin of King George V. and 
the Russian State Archives are 
full of handwritten letters 
from the king to his cousin. 
Addressed to “Nicky" and 
signed “Georgie." they are full 
of affection and educated con- 
cern for the problems of an 
increasingly chaotic Russia. 

But when the Bolsheviks 
took over. King George, on the 
advice of his government, did 
not allow his beloved cousin 
and his family to take political 
asylum in Britain. In 1918, 
they were murdered on Lenin's 
orders in Sverdlovsk, now Ye- 
katerinburg, Mr. Yeltsin's 
home town. 

It was Mr. Yeltsin, when he 


was party boss there, who au- 
thorized the destruction of the 
house where the royal family 
was murdered, fearing that it 
was becoming a shrine. 

The visit this week of Queen 
Elizabeth. George NTs grand- 
daughter, to a newly reborn 
and semi-democratic Russia, 
is supposed to draw a line un- 
der all that unpleasantness. 

The queen also praised Mr. 
Yeltsin for making a crucial 
beginning, saying: “The pro- 
cess or change has brought un- 
certainty; not all are con- 
vinced this great effon will be 
rewarded with the success it 
deserves. I firmly believe that 
it will be." 

She might have been refer- 
ring to the furor over Mr. 
Chernomyrdin’s alleged resig- 
nation, which broke just be- 
fore dinnertime with a radio 
report citing “sources close to 
the president.” Mr. Cherno- 
myrdin and his aides de- 
nounced the report immedi- 
ately from Sochi, the Black Sea 
resort where he preferred to 
stay raLher than to welcome 
the queen at the airport on 
Monday. 

She was met instead by a 
first deputy prime minister, 
Oleg N. Soskovets, the same 
fellow who also had to explain 
to the Irish prime minister, 
waiting at Shannon Airport 
that Mr. Yeltsin was Loo indis- 
posed to get off the plane. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Yeltsin 
called the resignation report “a 
wild canard" and said; “These 


rumors don’t have any basis in 
fact. I absolutely trust Cherno- 
myrdin and Kozyrev.” Andrei 
V. Kozyrev, the foreign minis- 
ter, has been criticized for 
slaying at the United Nations 
rather than returning for the 
queen. 

“He is on the most responsi- 
ble business trip with the goal 
of talking the Americans down 
from aggressive actions vis-a- 
vis Iraq," said Mr. Yeltsin, 
who has much to learn from 
the queen, should he wish, 
about indirection and euphe- 
mism. 

But the Chernomyrdin af- 
fair points up other similarities 
between the queen and the 
man who is the current equiva- 
lent of Czar of All the Rus- 
sians and often behaves that 
way, understanding that most 
Russians want their strong rul- 
ers to preserve a certain dis- 
tance and mystery. 

That is the kind of distance 
and mystery the British royal 
family once fostered. And 
while no Russian was impolite 
enough to ask the queen and 
her husband about their dys- 
functional family and the lat- 
est fuss around her son and 
heir. Prince Charles, who calls 
his parents cold and his own 
marriage loveless, an awk- 
wardness hangs over their vis- 
it, which continues in Lhe for- 
mer czarist capital. St. 
Petersburg. 

There is an awkwardness 
around the Yeltsin -Cherno- 
myrdin relationship, too. and 







v ••• 




Mcunikr Zemluretlrnku-Thr Vswoain] ta 

President Yeltsin beckoning Queen Elizabeth to the banquet table in the Kremlin. 


considerable court intrigue. 
With presidential elections 
due in June 1996, succession 
questions hover over Moscow, 
also. Mr. Chernomyrdin is the 
only figure with a court — the 
government apparatus, now 
filling the former Russian 


White House — to rival the 
president's. 

Mr. Yeltsin has increasingly 
surrounded himself with loyal- 
ists from Yekaterinburg and 
early Moscow days, rather the 
way an American president 
does. And these officials, with 


U.S. Renews Push for Lifting Bosnia Arms Embargo 


By Daniel Williams 

Washington Past Semite 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States began another at- 
tempt on Wednesday to per- 
suade its allies as well as Russia 
and the United Nations to let 
Bosnia's beleaguered Muslim- 
led government obtain arms to 
fight separatist Serbian forces. 

But the Clinton administra- 
tion acknowledged that the ef- 
fort might fail, and the cam- 


paign comes at a time of 
increasing unease here and 
abroad over the wisdom of try- 
ing to arm the Muslims. 

The administration wants to 
set an exact date, probably in 
April, for granting the Bosnian 
government an exemption from 
a three-year-old UN arms em- 
bargo. Arms would flow to the 
Muslims if the separatist Serbi- 
an forces refuse to accept a 
nearly 50-50 partition of the 


Peninsula's rooftop pool 


___ . 


country. The Muslims have al- 
ready endorsed the separation 
plan'. 

The United States is pre- 
pared to act by itself to lift the 
arms embargo against Bosnia- 
Herzegovina if the United Na- 
tions refuses to do so, the White 
House Press secretary. Dee Dee 
Myers, said Wednesday. 

“Our preferred position has 
been a multilateral lift," Ms. 
Myers said. “We certainly are 
going to pursue doing it multi- 
laterally, working with our al- 
lies, particularly countries that 
have troops on the ground." 

Getting the arms ban lifted 
has been one of the longest- 
running melodramas of Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s foreign poli- 
cy. American officials express 
uncertainty that Britain and 
France, who fear a wider war, 
or Russia, historically a Serbian 
ally, will go along. 

“What we want and what we 
will get are not the same 


things." a senior U.S. official 
said. He spoke after Mr. Clin- 
ton's top foreign-policy advis- 
ers met Tuesday to discuss the 
subject 

Mr. Clinton had promised 
Congress to go to the UN Secu- 
rity Council this month for im- 
mediate action, but the Mus- 
lims themselves got cold feet. 
They asked for a quick UN res- 
olution for lifting the arms em- 
bargo, but with a dale for carry- 
ing it out set six months away. 

The Bosnian president Alija 
Izetbegovic, had begun to fear 
that a decision to let the Mus- 
lims arm would invite immedi- 
ate attack from the Serbs. To 
further sap his confidence, Brit- 
ain and France, both of which 
have large contingents of peace- 
keepers in Bosnia, threatened to 
withdraw their troops if the em- 
bargo was lifted. That action 
would remove a buffer to major 
Serbian offensives. 


France. Britain and Russia 
opposed a previous U.S. pro- 
posal to lift Lhe embargo in Lhe 
spring of 1993. 

Even pro- Muslim voices in 
lhe United Slates have recently 
been set adrift by second 
thoughts. George Kenney, the 
first of several Stale Depart- 
ment officials to resign last year 
to protest lack of help for the 
Muslims, has changed his mind 
on the issue. 

“The kind of back and forth 
fighting we could expect to go 
on for years would not restore 
Bosnia to anything like the sta- 
tus quo ante.” be wrote in The 
New Republic magazine. 

A State Department official 
who has expressed sympathy in 
the past for the Muslim cause 
said: “It is becoming, in some 
minds, impossible to imagine 
changing the outcome of the 
war,- and therefore, the use -of - 
force is not as attractive now as 
last year.” 


has the only 


lanes in New York 


that aren't jammed. 


THE PENINSULA 


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EUROPEAN 

TOPICS 

Netherlands’ Neighbors Worry 
Which Way the Drug Wind Blows 

There had been hopes among some of the 
Netherlands' neighbors that the new left-right 
governing coalition there would get tough on 
drugs. Instead, the winds seem to be blowing 
toward further liberalization. 

Justice Minister Winnie Sorgdrager recent- 
ly said Lhat the government wanted to distrib- 
ute heroin free to a select group of hardened 
addicts, most of them seriously ill with AIDS 
or other ailments. 

The past government resisted the idea, 
fearing that it would seriously damage anti- 
dmg cooperation with neighboring countries, 
though the liberalization bad the support of 
many Dutch policemen and public health 
workers. 

Ms. Sorgdrager has said that the legaliza- 
tion of soft drugs, such as hashish and mari- 
juana, is a realistic option and Lhat she favors 
a new approach to hard drugs, whose sale is 
still legally forbidden. 

Other liberalizing initiatives are under dis- 
cussion. The city of Arnhem, in the east, is 
considering setting up a drug drive-in for 
“drug tourists" from Germany. This would 
keep them from wandering around the center 
of the city, possibly courting trouble, while 
looking for places to buy soft drugs. 

And a high-profile group that includes the 
police, health-care authorities and court offi- 
cials has proposed the complete liberalization 
of the drug business. Every Dutch citizen 
would be given a “drug card,” allowing the 
purchase of a range of inexpensive narcotics 
in about 150 government-controlled “drug- 
stores." The idea may sound farfetched, but 
its promoters, according to the daily Le Soir 
of Brussels, are getting a serious hearing in the 


Netherlands, 


Around Europe 

The European Commission is not — repeat 
not — planning to go into the pizza business. 
But the message doesn’t seem to be getting 
through. Reports circulating in Italy that 
Brussels officials were planning to decree 
standards for pizza thickness and diameter 
led to angry protests; the Real Pizza associa- 
tion in Naples denounced the alleged new 
rules as “pure nonsense." But then maybe the 
rumor-mongers can be excused — if the Euro- 
crats can set standards for banana length (as 
they have), why not, say, pizza crusts? 

Smudge, a tortoise-shell cat, survived six 
weeks stuck in a drainpipe, eating nothing but 
insects and drinking drops of condensation, 
his owner said Wednesday. The pel, long 
since given up for dead, was skeletal when it 
was found by a garage owner at Gillingham in 
Lhe southeastern English county of Kent. 
“Smudge was weak and could hardly stand.” 
said his owner. Beryl Banks. “The vet gave her 
liquids and medication and we were all 
amazed when she pulled through." Eight left. 

Fires are good business for the German 
company of Total-Ungermann, in the Rhine 
Valley city of Wuppertal. A maker of fire 
extinguishers, it has found perhaps the most 
eye-catchingly appropriate spot for its adver- 
tisements: on the sides of the city's fire trucks. 
Hans Jochen Blaue. chief of tbe local fire 
department, calls the ads “a small contribu- 
tion to fighting the budget deficit.” Bui Her- 
bert Schnoor, interior minister of North 
Rhine-Weslphalia and thus in charge of all 
the state’s fire departments, is hot under Lhe 
collar. Public servants, he says, are not al- 
lowed to advertise anything, the weekly Focus 
reports. Mr. Schnoor Tears the ads could dis- 
tract drivers and cause accidents. Chief 
Blatte, whose city takes in 4.000 Deutsche 
marks (SZ666) a year from the advertising 
arrangement, dismisses such fears — as “pre- 
historic bureaucratic thinking." 

Brian Knowiton 


Egypt Police Raid Kills 
8 Extremist Suspects 

The Associated Press 

CAIRO — Eight people sus- 
pected of being Muslim extrem- 
ists were killed in a police raid 
in the village of Abu Qurquas 
near Mallawi, about 260 kilo- 
meters south of Cairo, and 
three men were wounded in an 
attack by the radicals in a near- 
by village, officials said 
Wednesday. 

The incidents on Tuesday 
night were pan of the govern- 
ment's crackdown on Muslim 
radicals blamed in a knife at- 
tack Iasi week on Naguib Mah- 
fouz, 83, an author who was 
awarded the Nobel prize in Lit- 
erature in 1988. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Tokyo to Help With Korean Reactors 

TOKYO (AF) — Finance Minister Masayoshi Takernura said 
Wednesday Lhat Japan was ready to meet some of the wtimated 
billion cost of supplying two nuclear feaaors 10 North Korea a> 
part of a deal between Washington and 

The reactors are part of the deal under wtach North Korea w,U 
dismantle nuclear reactors lhat the United States suspects are 
being used to produce material for atomic bombs. The new 

reactors produce less plutonium. . , , . . . 

A senior Japanese Foreign Ministry official had balked at a 
U S assertion that Japan and South Korea would have a centra! 
role" in financing the reactors. The question c»r financing the 
reactors is a delicate one for Tokyo. Although Japan was not a 
party to the U.S.-North Korea negotiations, it bears some respon- 
sibility for the shape of the agreement because it bad generally 
opposed the tough measures the Washington planed to pursue if 
talks had broken down, including UN economic sanctions. 


all the perks of office, know 
that once Mr. Yeltsin is gone, 
they are, too. And they know 
that Mr. Chernomyrdin is re- 
garded as the most plausible 
successor. So there is in-built 
struggle, and much room for 
mischief. 


U.S, Finds 
Scant Use 
Of Drugs in 
Air Industry 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Fewer 
than 1 percent of aviation in- 
dustry people checked for drugs 
last year tested positive, and 
half of those were job appli- 
cants. the Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration reported. 

Of 268,809 drug tests con- 
ducted in 1993, just 0.82 per- 
cent were positive, the FAA 
said in releasing a report Tues- 
day. Of the 2, 793 positives, 
1,096 were in pre-employment 
checks, 960 were caught in ran- 
. dom worker tests, 94 were peo- 
ple returning to duty, 29 were 
tests ordered because of em- 
ployee actions and 14 were peo- 
ple subject to periodic testing, 
the report said. 

According to the FAA analy- 
sis, the 2J93 positive tests in- 
cluded 437 workers or job ap- 
plicants for commercial air 
carriers, including eight flight 
crew members. 

An additional 183, including 
12 flight crew, were air taxi ana 
commercial workers and appli- 
cants. The remaining 1,573 
worked at repair stations, main- 
tenance contractors, sightseeing 
operators and other related 
businesses. 

Of all the positive tests, mari- 
juana was the most common 
drug found, at 1,220 positive 
tests. Cocaine was next at 880, 
followed by amphetamines, 
opiates and PCP. 

The Air Transport Associa- 
tion president. Tun Landry, 
said he was pleased with the low 
rate of drug use indicated by the 
tests. 


France and U.K. Set Air Command 

PARIS (Reuters) — Britain and France plan to set up a joint air 
command to protect and transport troops involved in peacekeep- 
ing or humanitarian operations, diplomats said Wednesday. 

The project, under discussion for several months, is due to be 
announced at a French -British summit meeting in Chartres, 
southwest of Paris, on Nov. 18, they said. 

The diplomats said the goal was to improve cooperation and 
“inter-operability" between the Fraich and British air forces 
without France's returning to the military wing of NATO, which it 
left in 1966. 

Kohl Opens Talks on New Cabinet | 

BONN (Reuters) — Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany held 
preliminary talks Wednesday with leaders of _his center-right 
coalition on forming a new cabinet, and coalition sources said 
most major minis tries would remain in the same hands. 

The Christian Democrat, whose 12-year-old government was 
re-elected with a greatly reduced majority Sunday, met with the 
Free Democrats’ leader, Klaus Kinkel, and Thee Waigel. head of 
the Christian Democrats’ Bavarian sister party, the Christian 
Social Union, to prepare for next week’s formal coalition negotia- 
tions. ... 

Mr. Kinkel is certain to remain foreign minister, and Mr. 
Waigel will continue as finance minister, coalition sources said. 
They added that the new cabinet was likely to be trimmed to 16 
ministries from 18 in the old one. 

Macedonia Rightists Threaten Unrest 

SKOPJE, Macedonia (AFP) — Macedonian opposition forces 
threatened to steam Parliament on Wednesday unless disputed 
elections were voided, the Interior Ministry said, while police 
reinforcements massed in Skopje before a demonstration against 
the elections. 

The extreme-right nationalist VMRO-DPMNE. the main op- 
position party, demanded the voiding. of the first round of 
presidential and legislative polls Sunday in a meeting Wednesday 
with Interior Ministry officials, the ministry said. 

The party also called on the government and the electoral 
commission to resign, threatening to take Parliament by force and 
hah its activities unless the party's demands were met, Macedonia 
Radio said, quoting the statement. 

China to Rewrite Eugenics Draft Law 

BELTING (AFP) — China’s top legislative body said Wednes- 
day that it would make “major changes" to a draft law that has . 
been widely condemned since its introduction last December as J 
advocating a Nazi-sryle eugenics policy. 

The unusual length of delay in ratifying the draft, followed by ! 
the announcement that it is to be heavily rewritten, is a dear ; 
reflection of government concern over the protest that greeted the 
law's promotion of abortion and sterilization to reduce “inferior 
quality” births in China. 

“Major changes will be made to the draft of the natal and health 
care law,” the National People's Congress standing committee 
spokesman, Zhou ChengkuL'was quoted as saying by Xinhua 
press agency. Apart from stipulating that the law would be 
renamed, Mr. Zhou gave no indication as to the nature of the 
changes. 

Muslims Blamed in 2 Algeria Deaths 

ALGIERS (AP) — An Italian and a French national were slain, 
officials confirmed Wednesday, while journalists staged a strike 
protesting the killings of 22 colleagues during a long-running 
Muslim fundamentalist insurgency. 

The deaths of two more foreigners brought to 64 the number of 
expatriates slain in a nearly three-year-old conflict between Mus- 
lim militants and the military-backed government In all, more 
than 10,000 people have died since tbe conflict began. 

No one immediately took responsibility. But suspidon fell on 
Muslim militants battling the government since cancellation of I 
January 1992 elections, which the Islamic Salvation Front was j 
expected to win because of voter discontent with corruption and ’ 
high unemployment i 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
Strike to Disrupt French Railroads - J 

PARIS (AFP) — Strikes called by two rail unions for Thursday 
are expected to lead to some disruptions in service, the SNCF 
national railway system said Wednesday. 

Rail officials said service should be mostly normal for the Paris 
region, with the exception of tbe northern suburbs, trains from 
Montparnasse Station, and trains on Line C of the RER system. ' 

They said the high-speed TG V service should be normal except 
for points souLh of Lyon, where only two-thirds of TGV trains 1 
wmild operate except for the Paris-Nice route, which will have 
only a smgle round trip. The offidals said traffic should be normal ; 
on other major routes except for points in the southeast and along 
the Parts-Caen-Cherbourg line, where two-thirds of the scheduled 1 
trains wifi operate. 

v cabin crew were urged by two unions Wednesday to . 

hold 48-hour strikes to protest new working conditions. One 1 
union, ■ which claims to represent 95 percent of stewards and . 
stewardesses, called its members out on Oct 30 and 3 1 . The other 
called for strikes next Wednesday and Thursday. 

In Athens, airport staff of the OSYPA trade union began a 24- i 
nour strike to protest a government proposal to hand over! 
P^fSement of Athens' future international airport to either 
Hochtief AG or Aeroports de Paris. An airport offidal said traffic; 
was not affected Wednesday morning by the strike. (AFX)' 

To improve services, Alltafia announced Wednesday a 563' 
minion plan for congested airports in Milan. (AP), 

*w^"^, a ? er Jhdten plague outbreak, flights from Seoul tq 
2 nd Swiss airlines will resume this week 
after .£ 20slay lapse because of the epidemic 
of pnaimome plague, will restart Bombay flights on Thursday 
while Swissair resumes weekly flights on Fridavl (API 



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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Arafat 

Condemns 

Bombing 

Don't Stop Talks, 
PLO Chief Urges 

The Anotiafed Pros 
GAZA — Yasser Arafat con- 
demned the bus attack in Tel 
Aviv on Wednesday and said 
the only response to extremists 
was to press on with peace ne- 
gotiations. 

Mr. Arafat, chairman of the 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. called Foreign Minister 
Shimon Peres of Israel to ex- 
press his sorrow, Palestinian 
sources said. An Israeli official 
said Mr. Arafat offered the Is- 
raelis help in finding the mas- 
terminds of the bombing. 

However, an Arafat adviser. 
Ahmed Tibi, said Israel should 
not hold the Palestinian author- 
ity government responsible. 

“I hope that no one is rush- 
ing, as has been done lately, to 
put all the responsibility on the 
Palestinian authority,*' Mr. Tibi 
told Israel Army radio. “The 
attack was earned out inside 
Israel, and there is a high prob- 
ability that the attackers did not 
come from Gaza." 

The Muslim mili tant group 
Hamas, a leading opponent to 
the Israel-PLO autonomy ac- 
cord. tod; responsibility for the 
attack. 

Mr. Arafat issued a condem- 
nation, saying that be expressed 
his condolences “to the families 
and relatives of innocent vic- 
tims who lost their lives as a 
result of the despicable act car- 
ried out by the enemies of peace 

this mo rning ." 

The condemnation came just 
hours after the bombing, in 
contrast to Mr. Arafat's reac- 
tions after previous attacks, 
when the PLO remained silent 
and had to be prodded into de- 
nouncing the violence. 

Mr. Arafat rounded up about 
200 Hamas activists after Israel 
and the United States demand- 
ed action in the aftennath of 
Hamas's kidnapping of an Is- 
raeli soldier last week. Hamas 
staged mass street rallies, and 
by Wednesday only 81 of the 
detainees remained injafl. 

The bombing occurred as Is- 
raeli and PLO negotiators were 
talking about expanding Pales- 
tinian autonomy at a meeting in 
Cairo. But the attack raised 
questions about whether Israel 
would continue. 

Mr. Arafat argued that going 
ahead with talks about an Israe- 
li troop withdrawal and autono- 
my for the West Bank was the 
bat way to defeat extremists. 

“Pushing forward the peace 
process and implementing the 
rest of the agreement," he said, 
“is the only way to respond to 
the enemies of peace who are 
getting their support, their 
training and financing from 
well-known outside parties." 



Vatican Hopes for Best-Seller 

Pope’s Book Gets Aggressive Launching 


Mnudm Kjhaiw.’A^CTCc Frunce-Prruc 

Israelis expressing their rage Wednesday in Jerusalem against the Tel Aviv bus bombing that killed at least 22 people. 


A Resume 
Of Carnage 

Agence Frtmce-Presx 
TEL AVIV — The bus. 
bombing that killed 22 peo- 
ple here Wednesday and 
wounded 48 others is 
among the deadliest attacks 
to have rocked Israel. Fol- 
lowing is a compilation of 
other attacks: 

• March 17, 1956: Palestinians 
ailack a bus in southern Israel loll- 
ing 12 

• Nov. 22. 1968: A bomb rips 
through a Jerusalem market killing 
12 and woundmz 55. 

• May 22, 1970: A bazooka is- 
fired on a school bus along the 
border with Lebanon, killing 12. 
including 7 rhiU trwn 

• May 30. 1972: Three Japanese 
Red Army commandos open Ore 
with macnine-euns in die arrival 
hall at Tel Aviv’s Lod Airport, k£D- 
ing 26 people and wounding 85 
others. Two of the attackers also 
are kilted. 

• May 15, 1974: The Democratic 
From for the Liberation of Pales- 
tine takes schoolchild nen hostage in 
Ma’aloL Twenty-four ci vilian* and 
a soldier die iti the rescue opera- 
tion. 

• March 5. 1975: Eight Palestin- 
ian seaborne attackers open fire on 
a Td Aviv beach before taking hos- 
tages and fleeing to a hotel Banks 
the next day with security forces 
leave 18 dead, including 7 guerril- 
las. 

• March II. 1978: An 11 -mem- I 
her Palestinian seaborne comman- 
do group fires on two buses near 
Haifa. They arc intercepted by se- 
curity forces en route to Td Aviv 
with 100 hostages and blow up a 
bus. The attack leaves 47 dead, in- 
cluding 9 guerrillas, and 80 wound- 
ed. 

• July 6, 1989: A Palestinian hi- 
jacks a bus on tbe Td Aviv -Jerusa- 
lem road and runs it into a ravine, 
kChng 16 people. 

• April 6, 1994: A Palestinian 
rams a booby-trapped car into a 
bus in Afula, kill in g 8 Israelis and 
wounding 44. 


SCENE: Amid the Horror, Silence Is Followed by Rage 


Continued from Page 1 block away and sprayed her 
floor,’* she said. “I see this de- with water. “She died. 1 bent 
capitated body with no leg.” down to move someone, and I 
^I got in this panic,” she said, thought I was moving a body. 
“I didn't know what to do.” but 11 was on ^ a 
In the long minutes before Avi Shemer, 35, whose car 
the media arrived, some pass- was right behind the bus. 
ers-by began to organize help brushed his shattered wind- 
for the wounded. But many shield off his clothes and moved 
were beyond help. to help the survivors. He said be 

“There was an old lady on walked through the mangled 
fire." said Alon Tsabari. 29, side of the bus and found a 
who raced to the scene from a bloody-faced woman, blinded 
Bank Leumi branch half a and too shocked to speak, grop- 


ing for an exiL He guided her to 
a sidewalk restaurant's chair. 
He never learned her name, or 
what became of her. 

Live power lines sizzled on 
Dizengoff Street throughout 
the morning, and the country's 
proudat shopping boulevard 
stood shattered. The five-story 
Israel Jewelry Exchange had 
barely a window intact, and 
masonry was still f allin g from a 
restaurant whose sign boasted 
of “Hungarian Blimzes — Orig- 

: 1 c.-: i.. tr I « I- 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 

ROME — With an unusual and aggressive 
marketing campaign, the Vatican and the 
publishing company that is half-owned by 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi on Wednes- 
day launched a book of personal reflections 
by Pope John Paul II ou his office, bis faith, 
a wide variety of topics related to religion 
and morality in the modern world. 

Church officials said they hoped the book, 
titled “Crossing the Threshold of Hope," 
would be a best-seller. 

Couched as philosophical essays in re- 
sponse to questions, the book offers little that 
is new in doctrine. Instead, John Paul offers a 
deeply personal portrait of himself as a “man 
of joy and a ma n of hope, a man of the 
fundamental affirmation of the value of exis- 
tence, the value of creation and of hope in the 
future life.” 

Employing language at times highly techni- 
cal but more often deeply personal, be re- 
counts boyhood events in Poland, citing 
memories from youth and influences exer- 
cised upon him by his parents. 

Recalling his boyhood in Wladowice, in 
Poland, be talks warmly of his early friend- 
ship with Jerzy Kluger, a Jew from the Pope's 
native village who now lives in Rome and 
occasionally dines with John Paul at the Vati- 
can. 

In his chapter on Judaism, which he refers 
to as tbe “religion Lhat is closest to our own,” 
be reaffirms recent church teaching that 
“anti-Semitism is a great sin against human- 
ity.” 

Though the book is not intended as a doc- 
trinal treatise, the Pope taka the occasion to 
reaffirm his position on matters of morality. 
A chapter tided “The Defense of Every Life" 
explains his opposition to abortion. 

The book generally eschews politics, 
though in a chapter called “Judaism” John 
Paul expressa satisfaction at the achieve- 


ments toward establishing peace in the Mid- 
dle East. Elsewhere, he affirms his belief that 
the “hand of God” was at work in the fall of 
communism, and expressa the view that his 
survival of an attempt on his life in 198 1 was 
providential. 

But the main thrust of the 229 pages of text 
is personal and religious, with the Pope offer- 
ing reflections on the meaning of prayer, the 
existence of God, and the essence of Roman 
Catholicism and its relations with other 
faiths. 

Excerpts of the book, which will go on sale 
in 35 countries Thursday, appeared in recent 
days in newspapers in several countries. 

The novelty of his latest book coma in the. 
aggressive marketing campaign surrounding 
its appearance, reflecting the Pope’s skill in 
employing modem means of communication 
to reach broad audiences. In Milan and 
Rome, news conferences were organized with 
the Vatican's chief spokesman, Joaquin Na- 
varro-VaDs, and senior church leaders, in- 
cluding Cardinal John O'Connor of New 
York and Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the Cu- 
ria cardinal who is the church's monitor of 
orthodoxy. 

The campaign was largely engineered by 
Arnaldo Mondadori Editore, the Italian pub- 
lisher in which Mr. Berlusconi holds a 47 
percent stake, after having sold the remainder 
of the shares on the stock market earlier this 
year to raise cash for his debt-ridden business 
empire. 

The Pope plans to donate his royalties to a 
charity. 

Though John Paul who holds a doctorate 
in philosophy, cites numerous secular philos- 
ophers, the range of discourse is heavily 
marked by Catholic doctrine. Frequently, ar- 
guments are built on documents issued by the 
Second Vatican Council particularly in deal- 
ing with issues such as the multitude and 
diversity of religions and relations with other 
faiths. 


*-“*•*■ mal—Strictiv Kosher "From a 

CLINTON: Call to Foreign Leaders a erLu hunk of the bus's roof TEL AVIV: Israelis Vow Revenge for Bus Bombing 

& dangled and swayed. 

Continued from Page 1 said that terrorism "is aimed at The rigorously Orthodox Continued from Page 1 ond bus passingin the opposite lamic terrorist groups, “tht 
destmvine the hones of the Pal- Jews of the Hevra Kaddisha, or _ _ . direction was damaged. who are the enemies of peso 

hii.ip estinian^ople aifsurely as it is burial society, donned clear Gaza Strip and the Wat Bank, Since the limited self-rule Ariel Sharon, the leader 

^e^yCTnmOTts bang. contact- .wted « the Deoole of Israel" P lastic bags over their black barnng Palestinians from enter- agreement took effect, about 40 the rightist Likud bloc, said l 


said that terrorism "is aimed at 


McCuny, declined to identify destroying the hopes of the Pel- 
the governments being contact’ ? um .“S p fS ,le “ ““ 


Continued from Page 1 

Gaza Strip and the Wat Bank, 


ond bus passing in the opposite 
direction was damaged. 

Since the limited self-rule 


Baghdad Takes the Press 
To 2 Weapons Facilities 


The Associated Pros 

AL MUSAYYIB. Iraq — 
Baghdad has opened pans of a 
missile tat site and an explo- 
sives factory to Lhe media to 
argue its case that stifling trade 
sanctions on Iraq should be lift- 
ed. 

But Information Minister 
Youssef Hamadi said that Iraq 
was convinced the United 
Stata would try to keep the 
sanctions in place, even if Bagh- 
dad did comply with United 
Nations resolutions lhat fol- 
lowed the 1991 Gulf War. 

“They are saying to the Iraqi 
people: ‘Either you change your 
ruler or you will die from hun- 
ger,' Mr. Hamadi said in an 
interview Tuesday. “This is hos- 
tage-taking." 

The carefully controlled tour 
of two munitions plants Tues- 
day was scheduled in the midst 
of a confrontation between 
Gulf War allies and Baghdad 
set off by an Iraqi military 
buildup earlier this month near 
the Kuwaiti border. 

Some people believe Iraq 
provoked the standoff to focus 
world attention on getting the 
crippling sanctions luted. 

Now. Baghdad is trying to 
have the sanctions eased by 
pushing for the UN Security 
Council to begin testing a sur- 
veillance system of Iraq's mili- 
tary installations. 

Rolf Ekeus, head of the UN 
Special Commission charged 
with dismantling Iraq's military 
programs, says the monitoring 
system needs a six-month test- 
ing period before it can be con- 
sidered operational 

At that point, Iraq asserts, it 
will have complied with all UN 
requirements about disman- 
tling its weapons of mass de- 
struction and should be allowed 
to resume oil sales. 

■ Bomb Attack in RagKA^I 

A powerful bomb blast dam- 
aged a ministry building 
Wednesday in Baghdad, Reu- 
ters reported in a dispatch 
based on local television cover- 
age. 

The television showed several 
people being loaded into ambu- 


lanca outside the Ministry of 
Endowment and Religious Af- 
fairs after the explosion 
Wednesday morning, but no of- 
ficial casualty figure was avail- 
able. 

Foreign reporters were not 
allowed to visit the site and no 
damage could be seen from a 
distance. Several hours after tbe 
blast the official Iraqi news 
agency, INA, had made no 
mention of it. 


ed by American officials, but he 
confirmed that Syria was 
among them and that PLO offi- 
cials had also been contacted. 

Syria, which Washington has 
accused in the past of abetting 
terrorism, was among the coun- 
tries immediately contacted tbe 
State Department said. Mr. 
McCurry said he did not know 
what reply, if any, the Syrians 
had made. 

Before the latest attack inside 
Israel the White House had re- 
portedly been considering add- 
ing a stop in Damascus to Mr. 
Clinton’s itinerary. 

“Those who believe they 
might have some influence on 
this type of activity ought to use 
that influence to bring this to an 
end” Mr. McCurry said 

“The increased activity by 
those who would attempt to 
poison and destroy the peace 
process is precisely because the 
peace process is working and 
moving ahead with greater mo- 
mentum," he said “It’s for ex- 
actly that reason that the Unit- 
ed States, in the strongest 
terms, condemns not only the 
violence, but suggests that oth- 
ers in the world community 
now have to take a stand 
against this type of violence.” 

With mentioning specific 
countries, Mr. McCurry said to 
“those who have lent either en- 
couragement or financial re- 
sources or support, tacitly or 
directly, to groups like Hamas 
and others who would datroy 
the peace procas. now is the 
time to bring that to an end.” 

Hamas, the radical Palestin- 
ian group opposed to peace 
with Israel is suspected of engi- 
neering the explosion in Tel 
Aviv. 

In his statement, Mr. Clinton 


directed at the people of Israel" P lasnc pags over tneir black 
“I call upon leaders in the bats and coats to collect more 
Middle East and throughout macabre human debris. One of 
the world to condemn this act them, expressionless, climbed a 
and to ensure that there is no ladder to pluck a bloody hand 
haven or support for those re- ^ rora a Coca-Cola sign. 


barring Palestinians from enter- agreement took effect, about 40 


sponsible,” he said. 


Autboritia said it could be 


While noting that Mr. Arafat, days before they identified all 
the PLO chairman, had con- of ^e dead - 
demned the attack, Mr. Within minutes of the deto- 
McCurry said the PLO leader nation, officials took to the ra- 
also had a responsibility to “do dio airwaves and asked every 
everything possible to deter and vehicle in the nation to stop and 


everything possible to deter and vehicle m tbe nation to stop and 20 kilogra 
to thwart this type of incident.” check for bombs. Cars and bus- ripped tin 

- r*i v i r a *s “ over * drivers 1111(3 P 35 - before 9 

■ Global Condemnation sengers searching hastily. No along Diz 

Messages to Israel from further explosives were found- 
around the world on Wednes- Hundreds of volunteers — — — 
day united its supporters and poured into hospitals, respond- 
many former enemies in an out- mg to broadcast appeals for 
pouring of grief and outrage, blood. By late morning, the re- 
Agence France-Presse reported, quests were more specific: Only 

“We have always been “O negative” was still needed, 
a gains t any terrorist actions The mood on Dizengoff ■ ? • 
wherever they were, especially Square, in the hours after the 
those targeted against civil- explosion, appeared to be rising 
ians,” said the Jordanian prime anger. v 

minister, Abdel sal am Majaill With Prime Minister Yitzhak 
who initialed a peace treaty Rabin in England, the scene 


mg Israel 

The Israeli chief of staff. 
Lieutenant General Ehud Ba- 
rak, said it might be necessary 
to impose a long-term closure.' 

“Perhaps we need to recon- 
sider our way of life with the 
Arabs, which permits a flow of 
so many people into Israel" he 
said. 

The police estimate that up to 
20 kilograms of high explosive 
ripped through the bus shortly 
before 9 A.M. as it traveled 
along Dizengoff Street. A sec- 


Israclis have been killed by ter- 
rorist. The bombing was the 
worst single attack since a sea- 
borne raid and bus hijacking in 
1978 in which 38 civilians and 
nine hijackers were killed. 

Mr. Rabin, who heard about 
the bombing during a radio in- 
terview in London, cut short his 
visit to Britain and flew back to 
consult with defense, security 
and other officials at the De- 
fense Ministry in Tel Aviv. 

He said he had no doubt the 
bombing was carried out by Is- 


lamic terrorist groups, “those 
who are the enemies of peace.” 

Ariel Sharon, the leader of 
the rightist Likud bloc, said the 
government’s peacemaking pol- 
icy with the PLO had opened 
the doors for terrorists to attack 
the heart of Israel from the au- 
tonomous Gaza Strip. 

“The government decided trf 
leave Gaza, and brought Gaza 
to Tel Aviv,” he said. 

Even as rescue workers 
cleared up after the bombing, 
using paint-strippers to dean 
scraps of flesh from the side- 
walks, some Israelis persisted in 
their desire for peace and recon- 
cxliation. (Ap Afp Reuters) 




with Israel on Monday. 


was dominated by opposition 


The United Nations secre- figures. Binyamin Netanyahu, 
tary-general Butros Butros who heads the Likud bloc, 
Ghalx, condemned the attack as stormed over a pedestrian bar- 
a "savage act of terrorism” and rier and denounced the tragedy 
expressed hope that it would as Mr. Rabin’s "personal re- 
not disrupt Israeli-PLO peace sponsibility” because he had re- 
negotiations. versed an order last week seal- 

President Hosni Mubarak of mg bra el's border with the 
Egypt sent condolences to autonomous Gaza Strip. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin a small crowd began chant- 
of Israel. mg in Mr, Netanyahu’s wake. 

Pope John Paul II, in a mes- “Rabin go home!” 
sage of “prayer and solidarity” Then a voice from the gather- 





Prime Minister Yitzhak Kabul a small crowd began chant- 
of Israel. mg in Mr, Netanyahu’s wake. 

Pope John Paul II, in a mes- “Rabin go home!” 
sage of “prayer and solidarity” Then a voice from the gather- 
to Israeli authorities, called the mg sang out, “If I woulocatch 
bombing a “deplorable" act of an Arab now. I’d just slaughter 
violence. He expressed his “fer- him. With joy, even!" 
vent hope” that the peace pro- Then the chant of the crowd 
cos in the Middle East would began to change, growing loud- 
continue despite such attacks, er and more rhythmic. 

The Russian Foreign Minis- “Death to the Arabs!” the 
tty condemned the attack “in crowd said. And the silence was 
the most resolute fashion." eone. 




I— < tr, 





NOSEDIVE — An Ansett Australia 747 jet after its front landing gear failed on an 
emergency landing Wednesday in Sydney. None of tbe 272 on board, mostly Japanese 
tourists, was injured. Tbe jet returned to Sydney after takeoff when an engmefafled. 


EUROPE: Mediterranean Pact on Economy and Security Is Proposed 


AIRLINES: Bananas to Beluga in New Flight Se, 


Continued from Page 1 

bles from across the Mediterranean could 
hurt domestic producers. 

France is the EU member most exposed 
to the issue, with 1.6 million people of 
North African origins on its territory and 
the risk of many more arriving if Algeria’s 
government collapses. 

Diplomats said it is hesitant about the 
Union's taking the initiative in an area 
where it has long-standing interests. 

Paris has made it clear that it will not act 
as host to the foram while it holds the 
revolving EU presidency, in the first half 

Trooper Links 
Clinton to Loan 
In Whitewater 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — An Arkansas state 
trooper has told investigators he overheard 
Bill Clinton ask for help in arranging a 
federally backed loan to figures in the 
Whitewater investigation, according to a 
published report. 

The trooper, L. D. Brown, told the in- 
vestigators recently that Mr. Gin ton, when 
he was Arkansas governor, questioned a 
Little Rock municipal judge. David Hale, 
in 1986 about the possibility of making the 
loan. The Washington times reported 
Wednesday. 

Judge Hale’s company lent $300,000 to 
Susan McDougal a partner of the Clin- 
tons in the Whitewater real estate venture, 
on April 3, 1986. The loan, backed by the 
Small Business Administration, has never 
been repaid. 


of 1995, to avoid stoking disputa before 
the presidential election in April and May, 
diplomats said. 

Instead, they said, Spain intends to or- 
ganize the conference when it holds the 
presidency, in the second half of the year. 

It also remains unclear just what such a 
conference should discuss, and who should 
attend. 

Mr. Marin said the gathering should 
draw up a charter for cooperation on issua 
ranging from trade and oil and gas projects 
to security issua like terrorism, drugs, im- 
migration and the proliferation of weap- 
ons of mass destruction. 

Such a charter could lead to a Mediter- 
ranean institution patterned on the Con- 
ference on Security and Cooperation in 
Europe. 

That prospect chills some Union mem- 
bers. who want to limi t contacts to ad hoc 
groups focused largely on economic issua. 

“The last thing we need is a new institu- 
tion,” an Italian official said. 

The plan is predicated on support for 
democracy and human rights, which Mr. 
Marin acknowledged would be “one of the 
most difficult questions to negotiate.” 

It is also far from clear that Mediterra- 
nean countries will agree to clamp down 
on emigration and drug trafficking in re- 
turn for aid, which many Union countries 
are expected to demand, officials said. 


Eurppev 

The Wealthy Neighbor 

MedtSerranaan: Morocco, Algeria, Tufirsta , .’ / ' 

Libya. Ewpt fefcaeJ, Jordan: Lebanon. Sym, • ' 


. Tvrtey. < 
Eastern 


.tetaei, Jordan, 
ufcAfefta. 
ope: Poland. fjt 


B&Bcetetea, Atoanta, Ifovwla. ■ 
infPemX 


POPULATION 


,1982 □■2Q10j 


Continued from Page 1 

come, but this is what free mar- 
kets are abouL” 

The recent burst of experi- 
mentation surpasses the one 
thaL occurred shortly after de- 
regulation, when airlines like 
People Express changed the 
rules in the 1980s by letting pas- 
sengers pay for their flights on 
board and charging for coffee. 


thing approaching a full meal 
like a sandwich and salad, on 
some routes. 

Delta Air Lines recently 
started reducing the number of 
flight attendants on some 
flights to three, from four. But 
the airline contends tha t cus- 
tomers have said the service is 
as good or better because the 
flight attendants appear busier. 


rvices 


cul “What they are now pre- 
senting as dinner is laughable.” 

Annual surveys of 90,000 
travelers by Plog Research Inc. 
m Reseda, California, suggest 
that there is a much more mod- 
at decline in the way passen- 
gers see airline service. In iheir 
overall evaluation of their 
“Jghts, passengers in 1990 gave 



yinp i or coftee. -e-* uihki. ^ 0 0 — 


9; European Union 


TO OUR READERS IN BELGIUM 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Just call toll-free : 

0 800 1 7538 


United are served sevruga cavi- 
ar canapes. Several carriers 
have installed video screens at 
the seats in many plana Lhat 
allow passengers to play games 
and watch movies. 

Last month. MGM Grand 
Air, based in Los Angela, start- 
ed offering its so-called Grand 
Gass on flights between New 
York, Las Vegas, Nevada, and 
Los Angela. Like a throwback 
to service in the era of regula- 
tion. MGM Grand Air ingtallad 
only 34 seats on its 727 plana, 
instead of the more typical con- 
figuration with 156 seats. 

The meals are cooked on 
board, rather than in catering 
kitchens near the airport, and 
each plane I 135 four meeting 
rooms. A round-trip ticket be- 
tween New York and Los An- 
gela costs 52,846. the same fare 
charged by other airlines for a 
first-class ticket on the route. 


Classes of service. Last month. 

USAir said it would soon offer 

a new “Business Select" service nSrSfr , declined by only U 
that would give bigger seats and to a raun S 3 . 10 last 

extia amenities to travelers who . ’ 

paid full fares for a coach seat. . Whether airlines are spend- I 
Southwest Airlines and Delta mg their money wisely on in- 1 
are testing “ticketless" systems, m&ht amenities is undear. In a i 
Delta announced that it would purvey of business travelers by i 
begm testing a system using a D - Power & Associates, tie- : 
credit card with a computer ^ent travelers ranked in-flight 
chip that frequent travelers on service as the sixth-most-impor- , 

its shuttle snvin> wnnM tarn : 


its shuttle service would use at 
the gate before a flight. 

When the card is inserted 
into an electronic reader, a res- 
ervation is made, the flight ^ 
charged to the passenger’s cred- 
it card and a receipt is printed. 
In the future, the transaction 
may be done without the need 
of a gate agent. Delta said. 

Many passengers are not im- 
pressed with all tbe experimen- 
tation. George Brakeley, a con- 
sultant on fund raising for 
nonprofit organizations who 


tant consideration in gang in g i 
then 1 satisfaction with a long j 
flight. j 

^They said on-time perfor- I 
““nee. the plana’ interiors, the ) 
ability to reserve the seats tbeM j 
-nted, the comfort of their : 

schedules and ticket- 
rag procedura were more im- 
portrait. 


BoBer Blast in Bonn Kills 4 

Reuters 

wS?^ N J - ',^ oujr People were 
three seriously in- 
jutkJ Wednesday when a boiler 


not on transcontinental trips — had worsened in coach class. m a "Oen a boner 

as snacks, raiher than meals. ‘There has been a slow and sprayine them S*k bu Ss 1 ' 
That way, the airline said, pas- insidious decline across the rials in Bonn 
sengos would be pleasantly board,” said Mr. Brakdey, who injured wen* ™ wo 

surprised when they got some- is based in Stamford, Connect!- survive n ° l ex P ccte< ^ to 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Page 3 
















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By Robin Toner That, of course, is the Demo- 

New York Times Service crais’ design: In advertisements 
WASHINGTON — They nmning throughout the country 
; ^ are filmed from a rfiymnr^ in the final three weeks before 
r. moms in slow mo ri on , and of- Nov. 8 election. Democrats 
s? ten in lockstep, sometimes with 816 trying to turn the Republi- 
the whir of a camera’s motor 9*°*' “Contract with America” 
’<■. drive in the background and a in 10 a dark and frightening cer- 
■n threatening, ominous sound- emony — and along the way, to 
• track. V isually , scenes tnect some urgent political 

-i' 1 from Democratic commercials needs. 

have the fed of an illicit gather- Democrats axe hoping that 
ing, recorded on the sly. the political extravaganza 


staged by Representative Newt 
Gingrich of Georgia on the 
Capitol steps last month, when 
300 Republican candidates 
committed to the “contract” of 
political promises, can be used 
to galvanize core Democratic 
voters, strip away the Republi- 
cans' image as a party of outsid- 
ers and turn the political debate 
to much less dangerous terrain. 

Republicans scoff, but Dem- 
ocrats clearly scent an opportu- 


nity to at least blunt their 
losses. The Democratic Nation- 
al Committee is running $2 mil- 
lion worth of advertisements, 
and Democratic strategists esti- 
mate that as many as 40 con- 
gressional candidates are either 
already broadcasting or about 
to broadcast their own versions 
of the commercials. 

“When Republicans were the 
angry protest party, they were 
in a very strong position.” said 


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POLITICAL NOTES 


jjwr House Stamp Scandal 

WASHINGTON — In the latest spin- 
off from the House post office scandal, a 
federal grand jury on has indicted Joseph 
P. Kolter, a former Democratic represen- 
tative from Pennsylvania, on five felony 
charges, accusing him of embezzling 
more than $44,000 in congressional 
funds for his personal use. 

Mr. Kolter, an accountant and one- 
time high school teacher, represented the 
Fourth Congressional District outside of 
Pittsburgh for 10 years until he was de- 
feated in a primary election in 1992. 

He is the second House member to be 
indicted in connection with a long-run- 
ning federal inquiry into the House post 
office that has so far resulted in eight 
guilty pleas, mostly by low-level employ- 
ees. 

The first lawmaker to be charged was 
Representative Dan Rostenkowski. 
Democrat of Illinois, who was forced to 
relinquish the chairmanship of the 
House Ways and Means Committee af- 
ter he was indicted on 17 felony counts 
on May 31. Mr. Rostenkowski has plead- 
ed not guilty. 

The indictment says Mr. Kolter ille- 
gally obtained more than SI 1,000 from 
1985 through 1990 by disguising cash 
payments from the House post office as 
stamp purchases by his congressional 
office. Mr. Kolter dealt with Robert V. 
Rota, the former House postmaster, who 
has pleaded guilty and has cooperated 
with the prosecution. The indictment 
also accuses Mr. Kolter of taking more 
than 533,000 worth of merchandise pur- 
chased from the House stationery store 
with money from his congressional office 
supply account. (NYT 

More Ch— rs for Clinton 

NEW YORK — Americans are more 
approving of President Bill Clinton’s 
handling of foreign policy these days 
and, at the same time, less ] 

..economic management, 

CBS’ News. poll. ...... 

. . Ova all, 44 percent approved of Mr. 
Clinton’s job pcrforifaaifber'yhti for the' 
first time in any CBS poll since June, that 


was as high as the number who disap- 
proved, also 44 percent. 

The latest survey was released Tues- 
day. 

CBS analysts attributed Mr. Clinton's 
popularity gain to recent successes in 
Haiti and' Iraq, which pushed his foreign 
policy approval rating up from 32 per- 
cent in mid-September to 47 percent in 
the poll which was taken Sunday and 
Monday. 

On the issue most important in elect- 
ing Mr. Clinton, tire economy, approval 
fell from 46 percent to 39 percent, and 
his disapproval rating shot up to 51 per- 
cent. 

Though a majority said the economy is 
in good condition, six in 10 declined to 
give Mr. Clinton credit for improving the 
economy. 

CBS stud it polled 975 adults by phone 
and its results have a margin of sampling 
error of plus or minus 3 percentage 
points. (AP) 


An Unslnkabie Sonny Bono 

PALM SPRINGS, California — If he 
ever makes it to Congress, Sonny Bono 
knows there will be titters. 

They will wink behind his back, nudge 
ffarh other in the aisles, grin when he 
stands to talk. 

None of that matters, he says. His skin 
is thick. 

Once a failed Senate candidate in 
1992, Mr. Bono could go to Washington 
this time. 

“I learned a long time ago the secret is 
to just hang in there, to keep at it," Mr. 
Bono said m a recent interview, staring 
out toward the desert beyond his cam- 
paign office door. 

“Eventually, people will start to re- 
spect you." 

. Working his way up through night- 
clubs, hitting it big with a television 
show, Mr. Bono was famous for his 
droopy moustache, bell bottoms and 
ringing. “I Got You, Babe” to a taller, 
more-talented Cher. _ 

■ When the show wound down and Cher 
left, he wandered around in a strange 
nether world -of television guest spots. 

Eventually he pulled himself together. 


opened a restaurant, got married, bad 
kids. 

When he got mad at City Hall bureau- 
crats who stopping his building plans, he 
plunged into politics. 

Soon he was mayor of Palm Springs, 
then an unprepared Senate candidate — 
and once again the bull of jokes. 

When asked once about world trade 
issues during his his 1992 Senate race 
against Bruce Herschensohn, Mr. Bono 
answered: “That's a tricky one." 

“1 was much more inexperienced on 
the issues back then,” said Mr. Bono, 
who is skinny, balding and almost frail at 
age 59. “But I hung in there." 

Better-informed and better-financed, 
Mr. Bono could win a House seat this 
year in a Republican district where the 
longtime incumbent. Representative Al 
McCandless, is retiring. 

Mr. Bono’s polls show him ahead. 
Polls by his Democratic opponent, Steve 
Qute, a former navy pilot, show a dead 
heat No independent polls have been 
conducted. (AP) 

Post Endow » Barry^ Foe 

WASHINGTON — The Washington 
Post is endorsing a white Republican, 
Carol Schwartz, for mayor over the 
heavily favored Democrat, Marion S. 
Barry Jr., a black. 

The newspaper said Wednesday that it 
wished “we could have back” its en- 
dorsement of Mr. Barry eight years ago, 
when he defeated Ms. Schwartz. 

The editorial said the paper's regret 
for the 1986 decision was not only be- 
cause Mr. Barry later was convicted of 
cocaine possession but because his per- 
formance as mayor “created much of the 
fiscal and social wreckage the city is still 
having to contend with today.” (AP) 

Quote /Unquote 

Lawton Chiles, Florida’s Democratic 
governor, at the start of a debate with his 
Republican challenger, Jeb Bush: “I’m 
tired of having my record maligned and 
distorted by your fabrications and dema- 
goguery. You’ve had a year's time and $5 
million to- plant youf half-truths, but- 
now it’s shcw-and-tdl time." (WP) 




Rains Ease 
But Waters 
Still High in 
East Texas 


Stan Greenberg, President Bill 
Clinton’s pollster. "But once 
they begun to tell people what 
they’re for, they’ve complicated 
this election." 

Mr. Greenberg added. 
“These outsider candidates 
didn't need to be anything but 
vessels for people's alienation, 
and now they've taken on a 
form.” 

In fact. Democrats are trying 
to use the contract to cast Re- 
publicans in a form they are 
comfortable campaigning 
against. The contract commits 
the Republican Party to an ar- 
ray of tax cuts, a constitutional 
amendment to require a bal- 
anced budget and a stronger 
military. 

As one Democratic adver- 
tisement puts it: ‘‘How will they 
make up the spending gap? Ex- 
plode the deficit again? Make 
devastating cuts in Medicare?” 

In several of the advertise- 
ments, as (he announcer talks 
about the contract as a return to 
the Reagan years, the camera 
lingers on a headline: “Rea- 
gan’s Ax to Cut Social Securi- 
ty.” 

Republican strategists are 
crying foul, asserting that Dem- 
ocrats are up to old tricks: 
When in danger in a close elec- 
tion, try to mobilize the elderly 
by warning of Republican plans 
to cut Social Security or Medi- 
care. 

“They obviously don’t want 
to run on Bill Clinton and the 
Clinton Congress, so they’ll re- 
sort to lies or distortions to try 
to divert attention,” said Barry 
Jackson, who runs the “con- 
tract with America" office at 
the Republican National Com- 
mittee. 

Still, the economic promises 
in the Republican agenda have 
attracted critics from outside 
the partisan fray. The Concord 
Coalition, a bipartisan group 
devoted to reducing the deficit, 
said, “As is often the case, if it 
sounds too good to be true, and 
it looks too good to be true, it 
probably is loo good to be 
true.” 

And the Washington imagery 
is attractive to many Demo- 
crats, since they have been ham- 
mered this year for being part 
of the establishment. 

Anita Dunn, a Democratic 
consultant, said. “Three hun- 
dred Republican candidates 
flew to Washington, signed over 
their votes to the Republican 
leadership and then promptly 
returned to the states to accuse 
the Democrats of bring insiders 
with an agenda out of step’ with 
their districts.” 


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CempUed by Oer Staff From Dispatches 

HOUSTON — Eastern Tex- 
as got a respite on Wednesday 
from the torrential- rains that 
brought widespread flooding to 
D *ln\M v the region, but flood watdhes 
remained in effect because of 
high water levels in rivers and 
streams. 

Although some businesses in 
Houston reopened, officials 
said there was still a threat of 
new flooding from rivers swol- 
len by 9 inches (23 centimeters) 
of rainfall that paralyzed the 
city Tuesday, making many 
roads and freeways impassable. 

There was more rain farther 
west Strong thunderstorms 
early Wednesday dumped up to 
7 inches of rain in two hours in 
Uvalde County, southwest of 
San Antonio. Winds gusted to 
58 miles (94 kilometers) per 
hour, and more than 2 inches of 
rain fell further south in Alice, 
i • \ • ,. y causing flash flooding. 


Rom Sofer/The A w ai te d Free 

A mob tormenting a suspected “attach^,” or pro-military gunman, in Port-au-Prince. He escaped by leaping onto a taxi. 

Aristide Unveils Plan 9 Not Prime Minister 


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‘There’s vesy little hope it’s 
going to stop for a while,” Gov- 
ernor. Ann Richards said. 
“What we’re seeing now is just a 
part of it” 

She designated 48 counties as 
state disaster areas. President 
Bill din ton declared 26 coun- 
ties federal disaster areas, mak- 
ing them eligible for federal aid. 

Bill Read, the meteorologist 
in charge of the Houston office 
of the National Weather Ser- 
vice, said some pans of the 
greater Houston area had re- 
ceived 30 inches or more of rain 
since Saturday- 

: The rain and flooding have 

4 killed at least eight people in 
eastern Texas, with several 
more feared dead. Hundreds of 
others were stranded in desper- 
ate situations as waters rose 
around their homes, and at least 
10,000 people were forced into 
shelters in a roughly 50-mile ra- 

- dius around Houston. 

In Harris County, which in- 

- eludes Houston, officials were 
moM concemed about neigh- 
borhoods near the overflowing 
San Jacinto River.. Several 
houses wot seen floating in the 
area, according to television re- 

. ports. .. (Reuters, NYT. AP) 


Compiled by Our Smff From Dispatches 

PORT-AU-PRTNCE, Haiti 
— Haiti’s president, the Rever- 
end Jean-Bertrand Aristide, un- 
veiled an ambitious plan 
Wednesday For creating a dem- 
ocratic government and over- 
hauling the military. 

Father Aristide, in his first 
news conference since be was 
restored to office Saturday, said 
he had begun meeting with mili- 
tary leaders about reshaping the 
army, which has long ban criti- 
cized for human rights abuses. 
He also said he had held talks 
with leaders of political parties 
about creating a political sys- 
tem that tolerates dissent, and 
with business executives. 

But Father Aristide, who has 
come under mounting pressure 
to name a new prime minister 
and cabinet, made no an- 
nouncement on a replacement 
for Prime Minister Robert Mal- 
vaL Mr. Malval was never Fa- 
ther Aristide’s candidate for the 
job but was the favorite of U.S. 
diplomats, who saw him as a 
moderate in the conflict be- 
tween the president and the mil- 
itary that deposed him in 1991. 

The selection or the prime 
minister and government, par- 
ticularly the economic team, is 





r 


widely seen here as the presi- 
dent's first key test. Haitian 
businessmen, as well as the 
United States and other nations 
donating milli ons of dollars in 
emergency aid, are hoping he 
will name technocrats — not 
ideologues — to the key minis- 
tries of finance and commerce, 
as well as the central bank. 

A leading industrialist said 
the business community “is 
watching and waiting for a sign 

from Aristide” before moving 
to reopen plants, hire workers 
or organize imports needed to 
re-energize the nation's stag- 


nant economy. “He needs to 
announce his derision on prime 
minis ter now, like today or to- 
morrow," the industrialist said. 
“The power vacuum is what is 
really unhealthy.” 

Sources close to the delibera- 
tions say Father Aristide has 
run into several political road- 
blocks on his choice of prime 
minis ter. Business leaders are 
pressing him to select a conser- 
vative capable of attracting in- 
ternational investment and 
keeping wages low to stimulate 
employment. 

Haitian political sources said 


the businessman who spon- 
sored the president’s 1990 cam- 
paign and who would have en- 
joyed wide international 
support, Smark Michel, had 
been offered the job but de- 
clined. A friend of Mr. Michel’s 
said he was “saving himself the 
aggravation of working with 
Anstide.” 

The interim army chief. Ma- 
jor General Jean-Claude Du- 
perval is also expected to be 
replaced. He was named last 
week to replace the junta leader. 
Lieutenant General Raoul C£- 
dras, now in exile in Panama. 

(AP. WP) 


After GI Suicides, Counselors Go to Haiti 


Washinpon Past Service 

WASHINGTON — 
Alarmed by three suicides in 
three weeks among U.S. service 
members in Haiti, the Pentagon 
has announced that a “combat 
stress action team” has arrived 
in the country to proride psy- 
chological counseling. 

Pentagon officials said they 
did not know if the suicides are 
related, but the number of .self- 
in flic Led deaths among the 
roughly 20,000 military person- 


nel serving in Haiti was unusu- 
al. 

The action team includes 
three military psychiatrists, 
who officials said would work 
with chaplains from the army to 
help leaders from individual 
units identify the symptoms of 
someone who might be suicidal, 
as well as provide direct coun- 
seling to soldiers in emotional 
distress. 

Two of tiie suicides were 
committed by people who 


served in the same brigade of 
the army’s 10th Mountain Divi- 
sion, and one was by a Marine 
who was serving on a navy ship 
involved in the Haiti operation. 

In Somalia, where 96,000 
troops served more than a year, 
there was only one suicide. Dur- 
ing rite Gulf War, there were 25 
times more U.S. service- 
members sent to the Middle 
East than have been dispatched 
to Haiti, but just eight suicides, 
a ratio less than in Haiti. 



Nut Ui'Thf A-nunl Ftcv- 


Robert L. Shapiro, one of O. J. Simpson’s lawyers, arriving in court in Los Angeles. 

The Big Top and the Bench 

Judge Tries to Keep Simpson Trial From Being a Circus 


By David Margoiick 

A lew York Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — It has become as much 
of a pattern in the O. J. Simpson trial as the 
tiffs between Robert L. Shapiro and Marcia 
Clark or the defendant's cheery smiles to 
prospective jurors. 

Judge Lance A. lto, his dander raised by 
whal he deems wayward lawyers, journalists 
or police officers, threatens, scolds or with- 
holds and hints at some action that will 
change the case. Then, a few days later and a 
few decibels lower, he opts for the least dras- 
tic alternative. 

It happened again Tuesday, when Judge lto 
turned down the defense’s request to suppress 
crucial DNA evidence, despite repeated and 
ominous admonitions to Ms. Dark that he 
was going to punish the prosecution for de- 
lays in scientific testing of blood samples. 

Mr. Simpson’s lawyers complained that 
prosecutors had deliberately dawdled for tac- 
tical reasons in testing the samples. And the 
judge seemed to buy it. 

“I don’t know if I can telegraph to one side 
more openly that you are about to lose,” the 
judge told Ms. Dark last week before reject- 
ing the prosecution's belated, written attempt 
to explain the delays. 

But here, as in several prior instances. 
Judge lto confounded expectations. Once 
again, he commended Mr. Simpson's counsel- 
ors for their ingenuity. This time, their argu- 
ments were “beguiling”: on previous occa- 
sions, they were “interesting” or “novel." 

Then, as he has done with every other 
significant evidentiary issue raised by Mr. 
Simpson's lawyers, he found them without 
merit. 


If Judge lto’s language is sometimes blunt 
in this lengthening series of anticlimaxes from 
the bench, so, too — at least up to now — is 
his saber. But to kibitzers watching People v. 
O.J. Simpson, the sound and fury signify 
something. 

They are the tools by which Judge lto — a 
man lmown for running a tight courtroom 
even when the whole world is not watching, 
and who subjects even less famous and expen- 
sive lawyers to law- school-style Socratic ques- 
tioning — thinks he can keep a lid on the case. 

“What he’s trying to do is keep maximum 
control of the trial," said Laurie Levenson, a 
law professor at Loyola University Law 
School in Los Angeles. 

Peter Arenella, a professor at the Universi- 
ty of California at Los Angeles Law School, 
said that there were limits on just how much 
Judge lto could punish those who displeased 
him. and that he knew it. 

“He is using the courtroom as a bully 
pulpit, even when he doesn't necessarily have 
the authority to make good on the threats.” 
Mr. Arenella said. 

If the Simpson trial is to be anything but a 
complete drtnis. Judge lto seems to believe, it 
needs the strictest sort of ringmaster. And so 
the judge is carrying not only a stick, but a 
whip as well. He cracks it regularly, albeit 
without drawing much blood. 

All he has done is lease Mr. Simpson's 
counsel into thinking happy thoughts: After 
Judge lto lambasted Ms. Clark last week, Mr. 
Simpson and one of his lawyers. Johnnie L. 
Cochran Jr., embraced. 

The celebration proved premature and per- 
haps a bit naive. For Judge lto, as for any 
otherjudge, the threshold for excluding mate- 
rial evidence is high indeed, and rarely meL 


Princess Seeks Respite From Storm 

As Revelations Unfold, Diana Heads to U.S. for a Break 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Leaving be- 
hind a trail of tell-all books, 
bare-your-soul television inter- 
views and a national debate on 
whether she will be getting di- 
vorced, the Princess of Wales 
left Wednesday for a short 
break in the United States. 

Diana. 33. was driven on to 
the airport runway to board a 
scheduled British Airways 
flight to New Yoric. 

News reports said she was 
headed to Washington to stay 
with Lucia Flecba de Lima, a 
dose friend who is the wife of 
che Brazilian ambassador to the 
United States. 

Diana smSed at a dozen air- 
port workers who applauded 
her. One shouted, “Good Luck, 
Dil” as she went up the steps to 
the plane. 

D iana will stay in Washing- 
ton through the weekend, the 
British news agency Press Asso- 
ciation reported. 

That would keep her out of 
town when The Sunday Times 
of London publishes the second 
installment of the authorized 
biography of her husband. 
Prince Charles, 45-year-old heir 
to the British throne. 

The first installment of the 
“Prince of Wales,” by Jonathan 
Dimbleby, said the prince never 


loved Diana and was forced to 
many her by his domineering 
father. Jt created a sensation. 

The couple's lawyers have de- 
nied a report in the French 


weekly magazine Void that 
they have agreed to divorce and 
that Diana is getting a settle- 
ment of £24 million ($38 mil- 
lion). 


Away From Politics 


• Residue from potent agricultural weedkillers is contaminat- 
ing the drinking water supplies of millions of Americans, 
according to a study by the Environmental Working Group, a 
nonprofit organization. Five herbiddes commonly used by 
farmers wind up in drinking-water systems used by 14 million 
Americans, the report says. 

• The U-S. Navy dropped afl claims of fraud against Stanford 
University, settling a four-year dispute over allegations that 
the California school overbilled it by millions of dollars for 
contracted research. Under the agreement, however, Stanford 
will pay $12 million to the government. 

• In New York's latest outbreak of auto rustling, about a 
dozen masked men held a garage attendant at gunpoint and 
stole four BMWs, two Lexuses, two Acuras and a Jeep. 

• An agreement on energy-efficiency standards fa- refrigera- 
tors that would save an owner about $120 during the appli- 
ance’s life has been announced by appliance makers ana the 
Natural Resources Defense Council, the environmental group 
that spearheaded the conservation effort. 

• A thief used a biddozer to knock down shed doors at a 
quarry in Rockford, Illinois, and drove off in a truck loaded 
with 900 pounds (400 kilograms) of dynamite, authorities 
said. Three pounds is enough to destroy a car. 

• A man who allegedly stabbed a customer at an automatic 
teller machine in New York was captured after five outraged 
passers-by threw themselves against a glass door, trapping 
him in the bank lobby until the police arrived. 

WP. AP. NYT 


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Page 6 


THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20. 1994 


OPINIO* 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune 


Pnlili-liril With Tin- IShk Yurk Turn** him) TH4' Wa-hin^lmi Hiwl 


Breakthrough in Korea 


Victory for Diplomacy 

Diplomacy with North Korea has 
Korea a resounding triumph. Monday's 
draft agreement freezing and then dis- 
tnantling North Korea's nuclear program 
should bring to an end two years of 
international anxiety and put to rest 
widespread fears that an unpredictable 
nation might provoke nuclear disaster. 

The U.S. negotiator. Robert GaJIucci. 
and his North Korean interlocutors 
have drawn up a detailed road map of 
reciprocal steps that both sides accepted 
despite deep mutual suspicion. In so 
doing they have defied impatient hawks 
and other skeptic^ who accused the 
Clinton administration of gullibility and 
urged swifter, stronger action. 

The North has agreed first to freeze its 
nuclear program in return Tor U.S. dip- 
lomatic recognition and oil from Japan 
and other countries to meet its energy 
needs. Pyongyang will then begin to roll 
back rhai program as an American-led 
consortium replaces the North's nuclear 
reactors with* two new ones that are 
much less able to be used for bomb- 
making. At that time, the North will also 
allow special inspections of its nuclear 
waste sites, which could help determine 
how much plutonium it hud extracted 
from spent fuel in the past. 

A last-minute snag. North Korea's 
refusal to resume its" suspended talks 
with neighboring South Korea, was re- 
solved to Seoul's satisfaction. If Wash- 
ington and Pyongyang approve the 
agreement, and" if the North fulfills its 
commitments, this negotiation could be- 
come a textbook case on how to curb the 
spread of nuclear arms. 

Hawks, arguing that Lhe North was 
simply stalling while it built more 
bomb's, had called for economic sanc- 
tions or attacks on the North's nuclear 
installations. The Clinton administra- 
tion muted the war talk and pursued 
determined diplomacy. 

Reassuring (he North paid off in the 
end. Given the residual mistrust be- 
tween the two sides, the United States 
will now sensibly prot ide more tangible 
reassurance. It is moving toward diplo- 


Trust $■$' ill Take Years 

If it works out, Lhe accord just an- 
nounced by the United States and its 
longest-running adversary . North Korea, 
marks a gigantic political breakthrough, 
ft could end the specter of a rogue state's 
going nuclear, challenging an American- 
supported regional order and provoking 
others to go nuclear as well. 

In. negotiations extending over two 
American administrations. North Korea 
had only one card: its status as a rene- 
gade would-be nuclear power. As an 
isolated and failing Communist slate 
abandoned by its patrons and increas- 
ingly outclassed by its neighbors, it des- 
perately needed access to security, eco- 
nomic and political benefits. 

First it sought these by trading in its 
prospective nuclear capability. But 
Washington insisted, as it bad to. that 
North Korea abandon any previously 
acquired capability, too. 

This is apparently the deal — inter- 
nationally monitored containment plus 
eventual rollback — announced in out- 
line in Geneva. The text completed by 
.American negotiator Robert Gallucci. 
with his North Korean counterpart, re- 
mains to be approved, signed and sub- 
mitted to public scrutiny. Il seems, how- 
ever. that for the phased opening up of its 
nuclear plant and for yielding its danger- 
ous plutonium-producing graphite nucle- 
ar technology. North Korea is to get, 
again in phases, early resumption of dia- 


Hunting Season for Horses 


At the Seventh Regiment Armory, on 
Park Avenue in Manhattan, is a bronze 
horse and chariot from the second centu- 
ry A.D. “I have people panting to buy it." 
an antique dealer told The New S’ork 
Times - . He is asking S3.5 million. 

At Pier 92. which pokes into the Hud- 
son at 52a Street, is soon to be — among 
other monuments to Americana — enough 
chalkware. spongeware. spatterwarc and 
slip ware to choke quite a few horses. 
None of it will go for a song. 

At the Coliseum, at Columbus Circle, 
is mi re to be 12 arms' worth or Bak elite 
bracelets, three rooms’ worth of Tiffany 
and Tiffany-likc lamps, the occasional 
architectural artifact and several inde- 
seribables. all of which w ill be described 
as "to die.” 

As or last Fridjy. when the Inter- 
national Fine Art and Antique Dealers 
Show (home of that horse) opened, it is 
hunting season in New York. 

In other njrts of America, deer and 


rabbits are running for their lives. Here 
the prey is an antique dealer who does 
not know the value of his wares and 
underprices accordingly. One has a better 
chance of finding a dodo. 

The season reaches a peak of sons next 
month, at the so-called Triple Pier, for 
which the wise wear sensible shoes and 
the really smart carry’ cellular phones. 
(“Frances! Where are you? I'm at Booth 
25, next to the glass walking sticks.") The 
accents may be somewhat posher and the 
voices somewhat more muted at the prici-' 
er shows, but do not kid yourself that the 
rich are different. Whether the object 
under discussion is lagged at $1 million 
or SI 00, the dialogue is always the same. 

"Is this your best price?” “Can you do 
any better for cash?” “If 1 take both, can 
we work out something?” And, trotted 
out on the show’s last day. “You don't 
w’ani to bother with repacking that and 
caning it back to your shop, do you?" 

— THE fiEW YORK TIMES. 




International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED IBS 7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

t.'i'-Chuimti-n 

RICHARD Mcl'LEAN. ruMahrr & Quel 

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^fJoRTH KOREA ^ Ultej 1 !’ b.ljM 


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» JJ5& J Aft£ ']C5M6 TC ®AY I 




Rent for Raoul Cedras, 
Fuel for Kim Jong II 


■3 


By Jim Hoaglam* 


matic recognition, in the- form of an 
exchange of liaison offices, and econom- 
ic cooperation, in the form of heavy fuel 
oil from others in the U.S.-led consor- 
tium and the start of construction of 
new nuclear reactors. 

In return, the North will put its nucle- 
ar program in a deep freeze by not refu- 
eling its nuclear reactor, arranging tem- 
porary safe storage of the spent fuel rods 
removed from that reactor and sealing 
its reprocessing facility to prevent the 
extraction of plutonium from those fuel 
rods. Implementing the freeze and al- 
lowing it to be verified are important 
tests of the North’s good faith. 

Then, in elaborately choreographed 
stages detailed in a confidential note, 
nuclear dismantling will proceed step by 
step with reactor replacement. That gives 
both sides leverage against reneging. At 
the end of stage one, with construction of 
the first reactor well under way but be- 
fore key nuclear components have been 
supplied, the North will allow special 
inspections of its nuclear waste sites. 

In stage two, as construction proceeds 
on the two reactors, the North will grad- 
ually ship its 8,000 spent fuel rods 
abroad for reprocessing. 

In stage three, as the second replace- 
ment reactor nears completion, the 
North will dismantle all its bomb-mak- 
ing facilities, including its old graphite 
reactors and reprocessing plant. 

Critics say the United States is in 
effect bribing North Korea to comply 
with the Nuclear Nonproliferation 
Treaiy. Yet Washington has previously 
provided inducements to oLhers. includ- 
ing South Korea, to refrain from bomb- 
making. It has got the North to do a lot 
more than the treaty requires, like dis- 
mantle its nuclear installations. 

From the start, the hawks' alternative 
to diplomacy was full of danger. Their 
solution — economic sanctions and 
bombing runs — might have disarmed 
North Korea, but only at the risk of war. 
President Bill Clinton, former President 
Jimmy Carter and Ambassador Gallucci 
deserve warm praise for charting a less 
costly and more successful course. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


logue with South Korea, a diplomatic 
link with the United States, safer light- 
water nuclear reactors and transitional 
energy supplies and other inducements. 

President Bill Clinton, to win this 
agreement pursued a twisting trail. 
With an unorthodox assist from Jimmy 
Carter, he added a diplomatic track to 
tactics of military and economic pres- 
sure at what turned out to be the right 
moment. China evidently applied its in- 
fluence in Pyongyang behind the scenes. 
Japan at least played a part as ready 
financier of arrangements made by oth- 
ers. South Korea contributed an essen- 
tial steadiness. 

North Korea's record of treachery, its 
maintenance of a regime conducive to 
treachery and its leadership uncertain- 
ties compel great wariness. But the you- 
do-this-we-do-that phasing of the new 
accord lets the United Slates hold North 
Korea to its obligations to freeze and 
dismantle the graphite reactors, comply 
with the nuclear abstinence demanded 
under the Nonproliferation Treaty and 
expand relations with South Korea. 

North Korea’s negotiator said the 
agreement removes distrust. No. only 
delivery on the agreement wiJJ remove 
distrust. It will take years. 

But if North Korea follows through in 
undoing this lone military confrontation 
left over from the Cold War. it will 
ensure a belter future for many others as 
well as for itself. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


cua ELECTRIC jjj 


*2 - 
C.U j 




F c rS:. 


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Bj, JEFF DANZIiJER. 


A Big Step Toward Korean Normality 


H onc. kong — it is too 
soon to give three cheers to’ ■ 
the agreement reached between 
the United States and North 
Korea. There can be few cer- 
tainties in dealings with Pyong- 
yang. But so far, at least, it is a 
victory for quiet but hardhead- 
ed diplomacy, and its signifi- 
cance for Korea is immense. 

Tire headline news is that the 
deal represents resolution of the 
issue of nuclear proliferation, 
and hence reduces the potential 
for war on the peninsula. But at 
least as important is the way it 
opens up the North to economic 
and diplomatic dialogue with 
the outside world, andlhus ulti- 
mately to reunification. 

All along it had been appar- 
ent that Pyongyang's nuclear 
program was meant as much for 
economic and diplomatic bar- 
gaining as for military potential. 
But the United States could eas- 
ily have been pushed by the hys- 
teria evident in Washington ear- 
lier in the year into abandoning 
negotiation, if not actually re- 
sorting to bombing the North as 
advocated by some. Forthright 
policies on Iraq and Haiti pro- 
vide cover for the administra- 
tion not to be too vulnerable to 
accusations of weakness vis-fl- 
vis North Korea. 

Credit is due to the State 
Department, to U.S. negotiator 


By Philip Bowing 


Robert L. Gallucci and to for- 
mer President Jimmy Carter 
for maintaining a realistic 
course that recognized North- 
east Asian realities. 

The negotiating has weath- 
ered some erratic talk coming 
out of Seoul, where the adminis- 
tration has veered between ac- 
cusing Washington of saber rat- 
tling without regard to Korean 
interests, and, more recently, of 
kowtowing 10 Pyongyang. 

The United Skates may not 
have stopped Pyongyang "from 
acquiring a nuclear capability of 
sorts, but whatever the North 
may possess is militarily largely 
irrelevant while U.S. forces are 
in Korea. Now the deal should 
put a stop to development of the 
nuclear program. 

Provision of $4 billion worth 
of reactors may seem a high 
price — to be paid mainly by 
Japan and South Korea But Of 
nonproliferation is so impor- 
tant, the price is cheap, and if tt 
is not so important, the United 
States and its allies have only 
themselves to blame for exag- 
gerating Pyongyang's potential 
and playing into its hands. 

The interim energy , by help- 
ing the North get by while the 
nuclear power stations are being 


built, may possibly help keep 
the regime in power. That is 
clearly unsettling for ideologues 
who see any deal with Pyong- 
yang as delaying the inevitable 
demise of the system. But the 
resumption of dialogue and busi- 
ness dealings with the South will, 
together with the power deal, 
start to open up the economy, 
and ultimately the system. 

Although many Southerners 
would in their hearts be happy 
to see the collapse of the Pyong- 
yang government, their minds 
p ref ergr adu alism. 

It remains to be seen how 
quickly the two Koreas can 
move toward cooperation. The 
North may still need an enemy. 
Many in the South are content 
with a status quo that allows the 
South to concentrate on making 
itself richer. Kim It Sung's 
sucessors. whoever they may ul- 
timately be, will lock to the Chi- 
nese model of Communist sur- 
vivalism. It is doubtful that it 
will work in the Korean context, 
overshadowed by the South, but 
it is the only chance they have. 

The agreement with' Wash- 
ington. which includes provi- 
sion for a U.S. liaison office in 
Pyongyang (a first step toward 
full relations), is a giant step 
toward normality for this most 
abnormal of regimes. 

International Herald Tribune. 


W ashington — T he con- 
trast between the firm line 
that Bill Clinton has taken with 
Iraq’s saber rattling and the ** Let's 
make a deal” approach followed 
with the troublemakers in Haiti 
and North Korea is troubling. 
The United States has taken the 
morally and politically sound posi- 
tion that Iraq must not be reward- 
ed for bad behavior. But on Haiti 
and North Korea, Mr. Clinton has 
become the facilitator in chief. 

Was it really necessary for the 
White House "to agree that the 
United States government would 
rent three houses owned by Lieu- 
tenant General Cedras for a total 
of $5,000 a month to clinch the 
deal for the general to leave Haiti? 

In one sense. Sandy Berger. Mr. 
Clinton's deputy national security- 
adviser, is right when he says the 
renting of the houses is "a minor 
blip." Compared with letting Ce- 
dras & Co. stay in power for a full 
year of murdering and looting af- 
ter they tore up the U.S.-brokered 
Governors Island accord, and then 
helping ease them into golden ex- 
ile, renting three houses from Gen- 
eral Cedras is no big deal. 

Except it is. 1 suspect that the 
house deal is the drop that causes 
the cup to overflow for many 
Americans who understand that 
rancid diplomatic deals are neces- 
sary but have trouble grasping 
why America must go along with 
even the smallest crass commercial 
concession demanded by one of 
the universe’s great blackguards. 

Is there no suspicion at the 
White House that General Cedras 
may have been rubbing American 
noses in the dirt with the real es- 
tate deal? He reportedly said that 
his real concern was not money 
but that the houses would be 
burned down when he left. De- 
manding rental by the United 
States seems to have been his way 
of getting a security system and 
full-time guards for his property. 

Mr. Berger sees it differently. 
He was managing the scheduled 
Oct. 15 return of Jean-Ben rand 
Aristide, and felt it vital to get 
General Cedras out of town before 
President Aristide returned. 

When the general brought his 
real estate into the LaUcs on 
Wednesday, Mr. Berger’s concern 
was to avoid having Ambassador 
William Swing spend “the next 
two days worrying about whether 
Cedras’ was really going to leave.” 


Mr. Berger added: “We wanted 
to establish that the past had end- 
ed and it was now the future. That 
was worth disposing of the hous- 
ing question” quickly, once it had ‘ 
been established that General Ce- 
dras was asking a fair rent. 

Reasonable people will not 
quibble with the administration's ' 
goals of avoiding a Haiti invasion . 
or a military confrontation with 
North Korea over nuclear weap- 
ons. But the way in which the 
deals have been arrived at sug- > 
gests a tendency in this adminis- 
tration to reward its adversaries 
for hanging tough. Other rogue 
regimes abroad may now think 
that behaving obnoxiously and 
dangerously is the best way to 
exact tribute from Washington. 

The cave-in to China's ruling 
Communists bn both the eco- 
nomic and the political fronts, ev- 
idenced by Defense Secretary - 
W illiam Perry’s bullering-up visit *■ 
to Beijing this week, sends a mes- 
sage of reliability. 

So do slowly yielded but now- 
apparent U.S. concessions on the 
timing of international inspec- 
tions, the supplying of fuel oil 
and the guarantee of two new 
nuclear reactors worth $4 billion 
to North Korea in a deal to be 
signed on Friday. 

Initial press reports describe a 
deal that leaves the most impor- 
tant leverage over its terms in the 
hands of North Korea up to the 
year 2003 and perhaps beyond. 
North Korea can preserve the 
ambiguity around its current nu- 
clear weapons stockpile for an- 
other five years. Pyongyang con- 
trols for a decade enough ma- 
terial to build new bombs if it ■ 
decides to back out of the deal. 

The Haiti housing deal is 
symptomatic of these larger con- 
cerns. The national security ad- 
viser, Anthony Lake, defended 
the housing deal and the other 

S merosity offered to Cedras & 
o. by telling reporters: “There is 
no bribe here, there is nothing 
hidden here, there are no hidden 
inducements. I am not apologetic 
in the sUghtesi here.” 

That is the problem. Mr. Lake. 

It may be necessary to commit . * 3 
America to becoming Raoul Ce- 
dras's tenant or Kim Jong Il*s fuel 
supplier, but Americans deserve 
an apology for having to do so. 
even in the line of duty. 

The Washington Post. 


America and China: Two Wary Powers With Much to Talk Over 


L ONDON — This week's visit 
ft to China by the U.S. defense 
secretary, William Pern', was 
both overdue and necessary. The 
two sides had much to talk about. 

The visit was the first by a U.S. 
defense secretary since 1989. It 
would not have been feasible dur- 
ing the maelstrom over America's 
extension of favored-trade status 
for China. But it is proof of the 
benefits of delinking human 
rights from the broader aspects of 
Chinese-American relations. 

It was a politically sensitive and 
high-risk visit. It could backfire on 
Presidents Bill Clinton and Jiang 
Zemin, who approved it in the face 
of domestic opposition. 

In Beijing, a substantia] por- 
tion of Communist Party leaders 
and People's Liberation Army 
brass view the United States in 
suspicious terms. They perceive 
Washington to be carrying out a 
hostile policy of “peaceful evolu- 
tion" aimed at destabilizing Chi- 
na and the party's rule internally 
while containing it externally. 


By David Shambaugk 


This perception allegedly in- 
cludes Washington's moves to en- 
courage independence for Tai- 
wan and Tibet: to frustrate 
China's accession to the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade: 
to trump up a “‘China threat" to 
Asia; to pressure the Chinese 
army to become more transpar- 
ent; and to tie China into an 
.American-dominated collective 
security system in East Asia. 

Beijing’s brass is still slinging 
over the 1989 cutoff in military^ 
to-mfiitary ties and U.S. soles of 
defense technology to the PLA. 
The aborted “Peace Pearl" pro- 
ject to upgrade China's most ad- 
vanced fighter cost China several 
hundred million dollars. 

Critics in Washington believe it 
is inappropriate to deal with 
those responsible for Lhe Beijing 
massacre. They' offer a litany of 
problems in China's security be- 
havior — from missile sales to 
Pakistan to the building of naval 


bases in Burma — that are inimi- 
cal to U.S. interests. 

So there was every reason for 
the two military establishments to 
talk. It is not in the interests of 
the United States or other nations 
to isolate China. An isolated Chi- 
na is a dangerous China. 

Moreover, as China approaches 
the post-Deng era, there is ample 
evidence that the PLA generals are 
playing a central role in Politburo 
politics and will be pivotal to Chi- 
na's future. The military could be 
called on to keep the regime in 
power and hold the country to- 
gether. It was as important for Mr. 
Perry to gauge PLA perspectives 
on internal Chinese politics as on 
external security policy. 

While Mr. Perry' apparently- 
made little headway on human 
rights concerns, he was correct to 
tell his hosts that Chinese-Ameri- 
can military ties must proceed in 
the context of the political rela- 
tionship. There are other areas of 


Downloading Other People’s Writing 



B erkeley, California — 

Intellectual properly has 
become an opulent, sophisticat- 
ed. even somewhat debauched 
region of American law. 

Individuals and corporations 
have staked legal claims to slo- 
gans. facial and vocal like- 
nesses, melodic snippets, genet- 
ic sequences, bits of mathe- 
matical reasoning, unpublished 
letters and the look and feel of 
software programs. 

It’s a little startling, then, to 
discover that something as tra- 
ditional as a printed page can 
5 till routinely fall prey to acts of 
verbatim for-profit theft. 

Yet in the supposedly cutting- 
edge world of the electronic data 
base, thousands of surprisLngly 
old-fashioned. Brooklyn Bridge- 
Style recyclings and resellings 
are in progress. 

Data base companies are us- 
ing their status as “indexes” to 
shield themselves from the legal 
obligations that the rest of the 
publishing industry has devel- 
oped over several hundred years. 

The National Writers Union 
is now questioning the right of 
one text poacher to furnish 
magazine articles to buyers 
without the authors’ consent. 

Articles, essays and book ex- 
cerpts of mine that fust appeared 
in The Atlantic Monthly, The 
New Yorker and Playboy arc 
among the many thousand* of 
offerings available by fax — at 
S8 per retrieval — or electroni- 
cally — at $3 per retrieval — 
from The Magazine Index, a 
service of Ziff Communications 
that is distributed on the Inter- 


By Nicholson Baker 


net by the CARL Corporation. 

Some of these pieces will ap- 
pear in a forthcoming collec- 
tion. Others are excerpts from 
books currently in prim. I own 
the copyright to all of them. 

1 was never asked by the Mag- 
azine Index whether l wanted my 
work faxed or downloaded to 
crediL-card buyers on demand, 
and I would not have given the 
company permission if I had 
been asked. 

Out of curiosity. I ordered 
several of my own pieces from 
the company. The service is ex- 
pensive — a single faxed article 
tor the price of a paperback. It 
is troubled by typos — one 
piece of mine is listed under 
“Nicholas Baker.” It is not de- 
pendable — I was charged for 
pieces I never received. 

And. most important, it was 
built on piracy — that is. on the 
repubbeation of materials for 
financial gain without their cre- 
ators’ consent. 

It is not unlike the sort of 
piracy that flourished in the 
industry in the 1 8th and early 
19th centuries, when unscrupu- 
lous American publishers would 
hastily, and without obtaining 
the assignment of any right, 
bring out editions of books le- 
gally printed in England. 

What about the magazines 
that printed the articles in the 
first place? In my experience, 
most magazines have li tile in- 
terest in subsidizing or helping 
to build data bases bv sellina 


rights to things they don’t own. 
They are in some cases un- 
aware of the secondary com- 
mercial uses to which their pub- 
lication is being put. 

The Magazine Index, and oth- 
ers like it, are playing on the 
confusion Lhai reigns in the area 
of electronic-document delivery. 

One solution to the problem, 
now proposed by the National 
Writers LInion. is to create a 
royalty-sharing plan modeled 
on" the music industry’s Ascap 
system. Whenever a magazine 
data base “plays a single 1 ' — 
downloads or faxes an article to 
a consumer — some percentage 
of the fee charged would trickle 
down to the piece's author. 

It is interesting 10 speculate 
on what the hit singles might be 
in this proposed arrangement. 
They would not necessarily be 
big cover stories in general in- 
terest magazines, since those al- 
ready have a wide distribution. 

Rather, they might be obscure 
genealogical treatises, how-to 
tips for the beginning designer 
of flume rides or sell-your-satel- 
li te-di sh- and- lease-it- back mon- 
ey-making schemes that appear 
in specialized periodicals. 

whoever the new database 
stars are, they deserve some frac- 
tion of the money being charged 
for their prose. A writer should 
have a say in determining who 
will sell hii or her words, in what 
formal and at what price. 

Mr. Baker is author, most re- 
cently. of "The Fermaia . " He 
contributed this comment to The 
New York Times. 


importance where Mr. Perry 
hopefully exchanged views. 

First is the question of U.S. 
forces in the Asia-Pacific region. 
Members of China’s military and 
civilian security establishments 
have become more vocal in ques- 
tioning the need for American 
forces in the region. They suspect 
that these forces will increasingly 
be positioned to contain China. 
Hopefully, Mr. Perry explained 
the U.S. rationale for the contin- 
ued presence of 100,000 Ameri- 
can troops in East Asia. 

Second, Mr. Perry hopefully ex- 
plained American thinking about 
governmental dialogues on region- 
al security and the potential for a 
collective security regime in the 
Asia-Pacific. Beijing remains wary 
of such mechanisms, fearing that 
they aim to contain China by en- 
meshing it in binding structures 
that would compromise China's 
sovereignty. China is adamant that 
regional security issues are inap- 
propriate for multilateral resolu- 
tion through venues such as the 
ASEAN Regional Forum. 

To many in Asia, China is the 
looming security problem in the 
region: it is therefore vital to in- 
volve Beijing actively in such dis- 
cussions. Taipei should also be 
brought into the process. The Tai- 
wan Strait is again becoming a 
focal point of potential conflicL 

Third, Mr. Perry correctly tried 
to convince his interlocutors that 
transparency enhances security 
by opening military establish- 
ments, reducing outside fears and 
building confidence. The PLA is 
one of the least transparent mili- 
taries in the world. 

By raising the issue. Mr. Perrv 
threw his weight behind a reform- 
ist faction in the Foreign Ministry 
and the military that favors greater 
transparency, including the publi- 


cation of a Defense White Paper. 

Fourth, Mr. Perry hopefully 
pressed Beijing on its nuclear force 
modernization program, and en- 
couraged it to adhere to the inter- 
national moratorium on nuclear 
testing. Japan recently threatened 
economic penalties if China per- 
sists in testing; the United States 
should consider the same. 

Fifth, Beijing’s exports of mis- 
sile technology were high on Mr. 
Perry’s agenda. The United 
States and China recently 
reached agreement on banning 
further exports of the medium- 
range missile, and this is to be 
welcomed. But Beijing should be 
made a full member of the Missile 
Technology Control Regime. 

Sixth, the North Korean nucle- 
ar crisis was alleviated in Geneva 
while Mr. Perry was in Beijing. 
China has helped broker the crisis 
behind the scenes. American and 
Chinese security interests con- 
verge on the Korean Peninsula. 
Continued cooperation will be 
crucial in getting Pyongyang to 
adhere to the agreement. 

Mr. Perry initiated a series of 
steps to broaden and deepen se- 
curity and military consultations. 
This can and should be done 
without restarting U.S. military 
sales to China. 

The United States and China 
p 1 ® too b'S and important to be 
locked into a relationship of suspi- 
cious hostility. The perception gap 
between the two remains deep, but 
Mr. Perry’s visit was an import ant 
step toward bridging it. 

77ze writer is a specialist on Chi- 
nese politics and miliiary affairs at 
the School of Oriental and African 
studies. University of London, and 
editor oj The China Quarterly. He 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


UN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894; Lafayette Praised 

PARIS — Nearly three hundred 
American and French gentlemen 
and ladies assembled yesterday 
lOcL 19] at the Picpus Cemetery 
to do honor to Lafayette. Captain 
Nathan Appleton, Vice-President 
and Delegate of the Society of 
the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, said it had been his privi- 
lege and honor to bring a “mark- 
er’ of the society to place on lhe 
tomb of Lafayette, who more 
than a hundred years ago had 
aided the American people to 
secure independence as a nation. 
The debt of gratitude owed to 
France could never be too often 
or too forcibly expressed. 

1919: Signs of the Times 

LONDON — Some nervous peo- 
ple are protesting against the real- 
ism of the picture warnings used 
by the Underground Railways. 


The growth of "kindergarten 
posters since the war is remark- 
able, though we have not got to 
frf, SJ? m skull and cross-bones 
that French and Italians put up 
nter bad drinking water. Perhaps 

hrioK? 63 COuld ** ex tonded to 
ricjhten up the dull official read- 

Ui° n ""”*** Platforms. We : 
w^/f°° n ^ for instance: “if 
« d 5 w ? ward P uI1 the chain. You 

spread alarm and stop the train.” j 

1944: MacArthurBack • 

headquarters — 

eral**!*?*!** forces undtf r Gen- . 
f™ Dptjgtes MacAnhur have 
nvaded the Philippines, it was 
*~ ed knight [Oct. 191. f 

pronti sc keCpJ L ng 8O0d h *l 
made . “ ^e last United 

^ m lhc Philippines \ 

1 ■! 





... ■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1904 


Page 5 



iiPiii: 


isS’' 

n sB 




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Page 8 



HEALTH /SCIENCE 


IQ Debate: Explosive Books on Intelligence, Race and Class 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

Nov York Times Service 




EW YORK — One may loathe 
or share the opinions expressed 
in the three books discussed 
here, but one thing seems dean 
The government or society that persists in 
sweeping their subject matter under the 
rug will do so at its peril 

The issues raised by the scholars who 
wrote these books bear intimately on 
America's near future: its quality of life, 
its citizens’ sense of belonging, its eco- 
nomic survival and the very foundations 
of a democratic society. They believe that 
America is rapidly evolving a huge under- 
class, an intellectually deprived popula- 
tion of men and women whose cognitive 
abilities will never match the future needs 
of most employers and for whom Ameri- 
can society seems to have less use each 
year. The prisoners of this new underclass, 
the authors fear, may be permanently 
doomed by their intellectual shortcomings 
to welfare dependency, poverty, crime 
and lives shorn of any hope of realizing 
the American dream. 

The numbers are far from encouraging. 
Indicators of national intelligence in the 
United States have declined compared 
with simil ar measurements of intelligence 
in other countries. The demographer 
Daniel R_ Vining Jr. has calculated that 
America’s IQ scores have fallen about five 
points since intelligence tests first came 
into use at the beginning of this century, 
and the College Entrance Examination 
Board says that scores for the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test feQ from 1962 to 1990 by 1 1 
percent in the verbal section and 5 percent 
m the mathematics part The Educational 
Testing Service does not call the S.A.T. an 
intelligence test, but the test is neverthe- 
less supposed to measure something like 
native brainpower. 

Worst of all say the authors, the lowest 
intellectual levels of the population are 
strongly outbreeding the brightest and if 
(as most psychologists believe) intelli- 
gence is partly inhen ted. America is losing 
the cognitive Base essential to coping with 
national problems. 

I N “The BeD Crave: Intelligence and 
Gass Structure in American Life*' 
(The Free Press, New York). Richard 
J. Hermstein and Charles Murray 
write, "Mounting evidence indicates that 
demographic trends are exerting down- 
ward pressures on the distribution of cog- 
nitive ability in the United States and that 
the pressures are strong enough to have 
social consequences." It makes little dif- 
ference whether people at the low end of 
the intelligence scale pass on their deficit 
genetically or environmentally, they say: 
“If women with low scores are reproduc- 
ing more rapidly than women with high 
scores, the distribution of scores will oth- 
er things equal, decline, no matter wheth- 
er the women with the low scores came by 
them through nature or nurture." 

This thesis becomes especially unpalat- 
able when one considers the authors’ ob- 
servation that a large proportion of this 
emergent underclass is black. Unless fu- 
ture accommodations between ethnic 
groups lead to a more harmonious social 
structure, Mr. Hermstein and Mr. Murray 


say, the potential for racial hatred seems 
enormous. 

However much one may disagree with 
this assessment the possibility that the 
authors may be even partly right makes 
these three books worm plowing through 
and mulling over. The articulation of is- 
sues touching on group intelligence and 
ethnicity has bom neither fashionable nor 
safe for the last three decades, but these 
scholars argue that the time has come to 
grasp the nettle of political heresy, to 
discard social myths and to come to grips 
with statistical evidence. 

The authors suggest that unless we do 
something to correct present trends. 
America may soon be permanently split 
between an isolated caste of ruling merito- 
crats on one han d and a vast powerless 
Lumpenproletariat on the other. Society, 
the authors predict will have little use for 
this underclass in a world dominated by 
sophisticated machines and the bright hu- 
man beings who tend them. 

This grim future may already be un- 
avoidable. 

S EYMOUR W. Itzkoff, whose 
book “The Decline of Intelli- 
gence in America: A Strategy for 
National Renewal** (Praeger. 
Westport Connecticut) is the gloomiest of 
the group, writes: “Our problem is simple, 
but oh-so-difficult to discuss, let alone 
accept We are a different people than we 
were 50 years ago. In truth, we are not the 
nation that we were. Relative to the rest of 
the developed and developing world, we 
probably no longer have the intellectual 
capital that can profit from the available 
educational resources." 

These books are heavily laced with sta- 
tistics. bibliographic citations and ideas 
requiring time to consider, and they are 
not light reading. 

The writers are recognized by col- 
leagues as serious scholars. Mr. Herrn- 
stein, who died from lung cancer at the 
age of 64 in September, just before pub- 
lication of .“The Bell Curve." was a 
professor of psychology' at Harvard 
University; Mr. Murray, a fellow at the 
American Enterprise Institute whose 
views influenced the Reagan White 
House, is the author of “Losing 
Ground: American Social Policy 1950- 
1980"; J. Phillipe Rushion, the fire- 
brand of the quartet, is a professor of 
psychology at the University of West- 
ern Ontario, and Mr. Itzkoff is a profes- 
sor of education at Smith College. 

Although their books vary in viewpoint, 
the authors share a suite of controversial 
convictions. They believe that intelligence 
in some deep but ill-defined sense is a real 
attribute of h uman beings, not some arti- 
ficial construct of the psychometricians 
who invented intelligence tests. They be- 
lieve that IQ can be quantitatively mea- 
sured, and that intelligence is at least 
partly heritable. They say that numerical 
measurements of intelligence are statisti- 
cally (albeit weakly) correlated with job 
performance, as well as with rates of birth, 
marriage, divorce, illegitimacy, crime, 
welfare dependency and participation in 
the political process. 

Moreover, they say. intelligence test 
scores tend to vary with ethnic groups. In 
the United States. Asians generally score a 
few points higher than whites and blacks 


some 15 IQ points lower than whites. ("Mr. 
Hermstein and Mr. Murray mention in 
passing that “Ashkenazi jews of Europe- 
an origins . . . test higher than any other 
ethnic group.") These relative standings 
have not changed appreciably over time, 
despite many profound changes during 
the last half-century in social and eco- 
nomic conditions. The authors acknowl- 
edge that an enriched social educational 
economic and intellectual environment 
can and does raise intelligence scores, but 
they insist that even when due allowance 
is made in terms of statistical comparisons 
of all other factors and measuring their 
relative weights, intelligence still seems to 
be strongly influenced by the genes of 
ODe’s forebears. 

This leads to the depressing inference 
by the authors that no matter how many 
remedial education programs are brought 
to bear on intellectually disadvantaged 
children, many of them will still be ham- 
strung by an ineradicable cognitive dis- 
ability created by genetic bad luck. 

Society, the authors argue, should ac- 
cept this as a real possibility and learn to 
cope with it, rather than merely denounc- 
ing ah intelligence studies and ignoring 
the data they yield. For one thing they 
say, much of the government money spent 
on education programs like Head Stan 
(wbich was launched in 1964) is wasted, 
helping only the nation's bloated educa- 
tional bureaucracies. 

“The earliest returns on Head Stan 
were exhilaratin g, '* Mr. Hermstein and 
Mr. Murray write. “A few months spent 
by preschoolers in the first summer pro- 
gram seemed to be producing incredible 
IQ gains — as much as 10 points." The 
gain was so impressive that in 1966 
Congress expanded the program, but by 
then, the authors of “The Beil Curve" 
say. “experts were noticing the dreaded 
‘fade-out.’ the gradual convergence in 
test scores of the children who partici- 
pated in the program with comparable 
children who had not. To shorten a long 
story, every serious attempt to assess 
the impact of Head Start on intelligence 
has found fade-out." Cognitive benefits 
“picked up in the first grade of school 
are usually gone by the third grade. By 
sixth grade, they have vanished entire- 
ly." 

T HIS leaves unanswered questions 
about whether the declining edu- 
cational environment after Head 
Start may in itself account for the 
fading out of its beneficial effects, and it 
raises related questions about IQ itself: if 
it can be raised by education, how strong- 
ly is it linked to inheritance? 

Taken individually, none of the propo- 
sitions advanced in these books is neces- 
sarily a call to arms, but in combination 
they are explosive. The writers themselves, 
whose views have been widely known 
(among academics, at least) for many 
years, are no strangers to public rows, 
student boycotts, hostile demonstrations 
and even legal assaults. Aware of the 
storm of criticism their latest books may 
face, all four invoke mountains of statis- 
tics to fend off anticipated criticism from 
such critics as Stephen Jay Gould, the 
Harvard paleontologist who in “The Mis- 
measure of Man" (1981) charged that 
“determinist arguments for ranking peo- 


ple according to a single scale of intelli- 
gence, no matter how numerically sophis- 
ticated, have recorded tittle more than 
social prejudice.” 

The authors cite many surveys suggest- 
ing significant correlations between low 
scores on intelligence tests and undesir- 
able tendencies: a difficulty with learning, 
a likelihood of remaining impoverished 
and jobless, an involvement in ail types of 
crime, a tendency not to vote or partici- 
pate in community affairs, a high inci- 
dence of abusing or abandoning children 
and a record of producing far more chil- 
dren (most of them illegitimate) than can 
be supported. 

Mr. Itzkoff believes that the least intel- 
ligent, least educable, poorest, most politi- 
cally apathetic and abusive contingent of 
the population is reproducing faster than 
the smart, rich, politically active and nur- 
turing contingent- He believes this has 
fueled a dysgenic trend: America's collec- 
tive smartness is being diluted, gravely 
endangering the nation's ability to com- 
pete economically in international mar- 
kets. 

I N his book. Mr. Itzkoff places most 
of the blame for America’s alleged 
intellectual decline on what he sees as 
an economically and intellectually 
elite caste of misguided liberals. 

They have isolated themselves from 
American society, he says, by their pater- 
nalistic treatment of the underclass, by 
discounting the importance of traditional 
family values and by failing to raise 
enough bright, educated children to sus- 
tain national competence. Mr. Itzkoff s 
unabashedly conservative tract condemns 
liberals in government, in the news media 
and in society at large, and calls for an end 
to welfare programs, a radical reform of 
the academic and employment quota sys- 
tems that are supported by affirmative 
action and a tightening of immigration 
standards. 

No such calls to action are urged by Mr. 
Rushton, the author of “Race, Evolution, 
and Behavior: A Life History Perspec- 
tive” (Transaction Publishers, New 
Brunswick. New Jersey ), or by Mr. Herm- 
stein and Mr. Murray. Nowhere do they 
advocate the measures championed by the 
eugenicists of the 1920s and 1930s. whose 
ideas were appropriated and perverted by 
the Nazis as the rationale for the Holo- 
caust. Indeed, the authors of “The BeD 
Curve" say that the granting to any gov- 
ernment or social institution of the power 
to decide who may breed and wbo may 
not is fraught with such obvious dangers 
as to be unacceptable. 

Still one suspects that the authors of 
these three books may have softened their 
agendas somewhat to parry the expected 
fury of liberal critics, fellow academics 
and hostile mobs. Given their conclusions 
about intellect and demographics, it is 
hard to believe that these writers would 
oppose a eugenically motivated program 
designed to influence patterns of repro- 
duction. 

They leave many subjects untouched, 
including the genetic opportunities creat- 
ed by molecular biology — a Pandora’s 
box loaded with paradoxes and snares. 
For the first time in human history, it may 
soon be possible to confer resistance to 
disease upon living organisms and to free 


people of inherited scourges like sickle- 
cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease. Most 
people would argue that society is justi- 
fied in fighting physical disease, but what 
if we were to cany the war against disease 
a step farthef? Is it wrong to regard a 
hereditary predisposition to lower intelli- 
gence as a kind of genetic disease and to 
find ways to cure it? 

Merely asking that question is 
enough to cause fear and outrage, and 
these authors, perhaps wisely, elect to 
leave it alone. Sooner or later, however, 
society may have to decide whether hu- 
man beings have the right — perhaps 
even the duty — to strengthen our spe- 
cies* cognitive defenses against an in- 
creasingly dangerous global environ- 
ment. Human beings evolved over the 
eons to defend themselves against 
changes in their environment, and 
things are still changing. 

Meanwhile, there are matters of practi- 
cal policy to consider, such as the merits 
of affirmative action. Psychometricians 
generally agree that blacks, on average, 
nave scored lower than whites on intelli- 
gence tests and that whites have scored 
lower than Asians ever since such tests 
were devised early in this century. But it is 
often argued that standardized tests can- 
not measure intelligence, and that the 
tests administered in the United States are 
especially pointless because they are cul- 
turally biased agains t blacks and Hispan- 
ics. 

Mr. Murray and Mr. Herrnsiein ar- 
gue, however, that charges of systematic 
bias in intelligence testing are refuted 
by objective analyses of the available 
data. They cite the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test as one of their examples. “If the 
S.A.T. is biased against blacks.” they 
say, “it will under predict their college 
performance." But “external evidence 
of bias has been sought in hundreds of 
studies,” Mr. Hermstein and Mr. Mur- 
ray say. “It has been evaluated relative 
to performance in elementary school, in 
secondary school, in the university, in 
the armed forces, in unskilled and 
skilled jobs, in the professions. Over- 
whelmingly, the evidence is that the 
major standardized tests used to help 
make school and job decisions do not 
underpredict black performance, nor 
does the expert commm unity find any 
other general or systematic difference 
in the predictive accuracy of tests for 
blacks and whites." 

O NE of the strengths of “The Bell 
Curve" is that it devotes an en- 
tire section to the relationship 
between IQ and behavior 
among whites alone, thereby eliminating 
the complications arising from interracial 
comparisons. Analyses of data gathered 
from exclusively white demographic 
poops strongly suggest that even if one 
ignores race, socioeconomic status and 
family background. IQ does indeed corre- 
late with birth rates, crime rates and many 
other things. Taken as a whole, the statis- 
tics are impressive; it seems hard to chal- 
lenge the notion that IQ plays a statistical- 
ly important role in the shaping of society. 

Statistics can be powerfully persuasive 
but they are as slippery as eels, often 
susceptible to opposing interpretations. In 
brief, it is sometimes difficult to tell good 


statistics from bad ones. Epidemiology, a 
branch of medicine that relies heavily on 
statistics and has had some brilliant suc- 
cesses but also some spectacular failures, 
is a case in point. 

One of the main problems in assessing 
statistics is the risk of overlooking con- 
founding variables. A graph demonstrat- 
ing a positive correlation between intelli- 
gence test scores and academic 
achievement may be very persuasive until 
perhaps, one looks at an equally impres- 
sive graph that shows a negative correla- 
tion between academic achievement and 
the level of environmental lead to which a 
student in exposed. Does the lead impair 
the learning process directly, or does it do 
so indirectly by reducing cognitive ability? 

Mr. Rush ton’s book, “Race, Evolution, 
and Behavior,” is incendiary. His thesis is 
that separate races of human beings 
evolved different reproductive strategies 
to cope with different environments, and 
that these strategies led to physical differ- 
ences between races, including differences 
in brain size and hence in intelligence. 
Human beings who evolved in the warm 
but highly unpredictable environment of 
Africa adopted a strategy of high repro- 
duction, while human beings who migrat- 
ed to the hostile cold of Europe and 
northern Asia took to producing fewer 
children but nurturing them more careful- 
ly. 

T HIS, Mr. Rushion contends, gave 
rise to three major races (he 
scorns the phrase “ethnic 
groups”) — mongoloids, Cauca- 
soids and negroids — and to physiological 
differences between the races (things like 
pelvis size, genital size and fertility rates) 
that are consonant with their rated of 
reproduction. He cites worldwide studies 
concluding that black women ovulate 
more often than white women, have more 
twins than white women, mature sexually 
faster than whites, and differ in other 
ways that affect their reproduction rates 
and strategies for child rearing. Among 
Mr. Rushton's conclusions are that 
whites, on average, emphasize nurture 
rather than numbers of offspring, while 
blacks, on average, are shaped by evolu- 
tionary selection pressures to produce 
more children but to nurture each one 
less. At the other extreme, some studies 
suggest that mongoloids evolved to pro- 
duce even fewer offspring. 

This is the kind of proposition that 
makes Mr. Rushton a constant target of 
furious protests. He is nevertheless re- 
garded by many of his colleagues as a 
scholar and not a bigot. One of his papers 
on racial differences was presented at a 
1989 meeting of the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science and 
caused an uproar, but demands to sup- 
press the paper were ngecied by Walter 
Massey, who at the time was president of 
the association. Mr. Massey, who is black, 
argued that no scientific organization has 
the right to act as a censor of scientific 
debate. 


Malcolm W. Browne is a science report- 
er for The New York Tunes. This has been 
excerpted from The New York Times 
Book Review. 


More Sober Look at Prozac 


IN BRIEF 


Growth Hormone and AIDS 


By Daniel Goleman 

New VwA Times Service 


N EW YORK — .After listen- 
ing to all the good news 
about the anti-depressant 
Prozac, researchers are tak- 
ing a more sober second look. A 
statistical analysis of 13 studies of 
the medication finds that it is no 
more effective than the older genera- 
tion of ami-depressams it has largely 
swept from the marketplace. 

The study, published in The Jour- 
nal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 
was the first meta-analysis of all of 
the published, stringently controlled 
studies of the effectiveness of fluoxe- 
tine. the generic name for Prozac. It 
concludes that “fluoxetine produces 
modes I effects, roughly comparable 
in magnitude to those of other anti- 
depressants." 

Meta-unalysis is a statistical 
method for combining findings from 
many smaller studies into one large 
one, rendering a more accurate over- 
all assessment of the effectiveness of 
a treatment than does any single 
study. 


The average patient treated with 
fluoxetine hid more improvement 
than 66 percent of those who received 
a dummy pill, or placebo. But meta- 
analysis of tricyclic anti-depressants, 
which were widely used before the 
advent of Prozac, found equivalent or 
higher rates of effectiveness. 

“Despite all the talk of this beinga 
wonder drug, it doesn't seem to pro- 
duce any better effects than other 
anti-depressants,” said Dr. Roger 
Greenberg, a psychologist in the de- 
partment of psychiatry’ at the State 
University of New York Health 
Center at Syracuse, wbo was the 
main author of the new report. 

Dr. Stuart Yudofsky, chairman of 
the psychiatry department at Baylor 
College of Medicine in Houston, 
said: “It doesn't surprise me. The 
tricyclics have been extraordinarily 
effective in treating depression.” 

The new finding is in keeping with 
one of the few studies to compare 
fluoxetine directly with tricyclic 
anti-depressants. A 1990 article in 
The Journal of Affective Disorders 
by Danish researchers found that 
tricyclic anti-depressants were more 
effective in treating depression. 


though they had more side effects 
than fluoxetine. 

Prozac works by altering the action 
of the neurotransmi tier serotonin. 
Ordinarily when brain cells secrete 
serotonin to send a chemical message 
to a nearby cell, the serotonin is rap- 
idly reabsorbed. This “re-uptake” in- 
activates the serotonin, clearing the 
way for another chemical message. 

Fluoxetine interferes with the re- 
absorption of serotonin, making it 
more available to brain cells. Unlike 
earlier anti-depressants, which are 
more scatiergun in their action in the 
brain, the new class of drags limit 
their action to serotonin, and so have 
fewer side effects. 

This makes fluoxetine easier to 
tolerate, an advantage that has 
played an important role in its be- 
coming the leading anti-depressam 
in sales. Side effects of tricyclic anti- 
depressants can include dryness of 
the mouth and eyes, sensitivity to 
bright light, blurry vision, constipa- 
tion, anxiety, weight gain, night 
sweats, cardiovascular problems 
and, in men. trouble getting an erec- 
tion or ejaculating. 


‘Yo-Yo’ Dieting Called 
Minor Health Risk 

WASHINGTON (WP) — Ac- 
cording to a new report, yo-yo diet- 
ing — repeated, unsuccessful cycles 
of diets and subsequent weight gain 
— does not carry significant health 
risks and does riot imperil the suc- 
cess of future weight-loss efforts. 

The report, which appears in the 
Journal of the American Medical 
Association, “kind of flies in the face 
of current medical opinion." said 
Susan Z. Yanovski, a researcher at 
the National Institutes of Health 
and the executive secretary of the 
National Task Force on the Preven- 
tion and Treatment of Obesity, 
which compiled the findings. 

However, Sally Smith, executive 
director of the California-based Na- 
tional Association to Advance Fat 
Acceptance, said that the study de- 
fies common sense and her mem- 
bers’ dieting woes. “It's fat people’s 
experience generally that weight cy- 
cling is harmful to our health and in 
the long ran causes weight gain." she 
said. 


By Tim Hilcbey 

New Tork Times Semce 


N EW YORK Daily injec- 
tions of a human growth 
hormone helped reverse 
the severe loss of weight 
and muscle common in AIDS pa- 
tients, according to researchers at 
the University of California at San 
Francisco. 

Dr. Moms Schambelan, a profes- 
sor of medicine at San Francisco 
Genera] Hospital, which is affiliated 
with the university, said patients 
who received the’ hormone also 
showed improved endurance. 

“The people who gained weight 
with growth hormone gained lean 
body tissue," he said. “In fact their 
gain of lean tissue exceeded their 
Min in weight because they were 
losing fat at the same time."’ 

He reported the findings at the 
Third International Symposium on 
Nutrition and HIV/ AIDS in Phila- 
delphia. 

In the two-year trial, with 178 
AIDS patients at 12 medical centers 
in the United States, the subjects wbo 


received growth hormone injections 
gained an average of 3.6 pounds (1.6 
kilograms) in the first three months of 
therapy, including 6.6 pounds of mus- 
cle. The 172 men and 6 women who 
took part had lost at least 10 percent 
of their normal body mass before 
entering the study, said Dr. Schambe- 
lan, who directed the study. 

Half of the patients injected them- 
selves daily with the growth hor- 
mone while the rest injected a place- 
bo. Neither patients nor doctors 
knew who was receiving growth hor- 
mone in the first three months of the 
trial, during which time the patients 
were monitored for changes in 
weight, body composition, endur- 
ance and other factors, he said. 

After the three months, all the 
participants were allowed to use the 
hormone, and those who began at 
that time also began gaining weight, 
the researchers said. Of the 50 par- 
ticipants in the San Francisco area in 
the initial phase, for instance, all 
have continued to take the hormone. 
Dr. Schambelan said, with some 
g a i n ing as much as 30 pounds so far. 

Dr. Donald P. Kotler. an AIDS 


researcher at St. Luke’s- Roosevelt 
Hospital Center in Manhattan, said 
Schambelaa's growth hormone ther- 
apy holds great promise because it 
aims to improve a patient's metabo- 
lism by stimulating the body’s cell- 
creating processes. 

“You deal with disease either by ft j 
trying to cure it or trying to make 
people feel better,” Dr. Kotler said. 

“A I DS- associated wasting affects 
tiie way a person feels and performs 
independent of immune function. At 
the present time we can't improve 
immune function. Growth hormone 
is one of the therapies that is based 
upon trying to improve quality of 

Dr. Kotler said the hormone ther- 
apy might have wide applications 
beyond the treatment of AIDS. “In 
so many other chronic diseases — 
lung disease, heart disease, kidney 
disease, joint disease — muscle wast- 
ing is a problem that limits perfor- 
mance,” he said. “In stroke patients, 
for example, muscle strength is the 
difference between someone getting 
therapy and going home or being 
warehoused in a nursing home for 
the rest of their life ” i 


BOOKS 


BRIDGE 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Sidney Altman, winner of 
the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 
1989, is reading ~Pnin " by Vla- 
dimir Nabokov. 

“I find it a very interesting, 
humorous, nostalgic book. It 
portrays a Russian emigre. 
Some of it must be autobio- 
graphical. It has terrific insight 
into the mores of Americans.” 

(llise Gersten, IHT) 



CHRISTINA STEAD: 

A Biography 

By Hazel Rowley. 644 pages. 
S37.50. Henry Holt. 

Reviewed by 
Elizabeth Ward 

E ARLY in 1965 a long-out- 
of-print novel was reissued 
in New York bearing a lavishly 
admiring introduction by Ran- 
dall Jarrell: "It seems to me,” 
Jarrell wrote, choosing his 
words with characteristic preci- 
sion, “as plainly good as ‘War 
and Peace' and 'Crime and Pun- 
ishment' and ‘Remembrance of 
Things Past' are plainly great." 

The author, so accustomed to 
criticism that reading reviews of 
her books generally brought on 
a “quiet nausea.” was rendered 
nearly speechless by Jarrell’s 
generous, yet shrewd’ apprecia- 
tion. 

The author was Christina 
Stead and the book, which 
vaulted briefly to the best-seller 
lists on its second appearance, 
was “The Man Who Loved 


Children,” probably the funni- 
est and most searing novel 
about family li/e written in 
English. Its belated success 
proved a turning point for 
Stead's literary reputation, if 
not for her output. 

“The Man Who Loved Chil- 
dren” is still the best known of 
her books and the measure of 
fame it brought Stead has guar- 
anteed a continuing, low-key 
buzz of interest in all her novels 
ever since. 

Yet perhaps the acclaim 


came too late. Stead wrote un- 
stoppably for 15 years after 
“The Man Who Loved Chil- 
dren” sank out of sight in 1940. 
but even she admitted that Jar- 
rell may have been right in his 

judgment that rejection and ne- 
glect made it her last, possibly 
her only, masterpiece. 

Hazel Rowley’s book is 
sprawling because Stead's own 
Ufe was. She was born in Syd- 
ney, in 1902, left For England in 
1928, and didn’t return perma- 
nently until 1974, just nine 


years before her death at the age 
of 80. 

In the intervening decades. 
Stead and her companion (lat- 
er, husband), the Marxist writer 
William J. Blake, sojourned 
restlessly between England, Eu- 
rope and the United States, put- 
ting down shallow roots here 
and there, in Paris. London, 
Greenwich Village, pre-civil 
war Spain. 

All Stead's novels were writ- 
ten, as Australians used to say, 
“overseas.” This was to cause 
problems for her in her own 
country: Australian publishers 
issued none of her books until 
196S and then showed interest 
only in the two with local con- 
tent, “Seven Poor Men of Syd- 
ney” and “For Love Alone.” 

The problem of her “Austra- 
lianness” unfortunately cut two 
ways. When Stead set out to 

S atively recreate her own 
>d childhood in “The 
Man Who Loved Children," Si- 
mon & Schuster insisted on an 
American setting, which is tbe 
reason turn -of-the-cen tury Syd- 
ney appears as 1930s Washing- 
ton and Baltimore. 


Despite Stead's meticulous 
local research, there were, inev- 
itably, some American critics 
who found fault; “Though 
there is a compulsive circum- 
stantiality of detail in the 
book,” sniffed Mary McCarthy, 
“the sense of reality is feeble." 

In fact readers of Stead's 
books are more likely than not 
to have been overwhelmed pre- 
cisely by their “sense of reali- 
ty.” The daughter of a natural- 
ist. Stead seemed to have 
imbibed her father’s habit of 
observation, along with the nat- 
uralist's professional indiffer- 
ence to moral judgment. Com- 
bined with her near-Joycean 
gift for reproducing the’ idio- 
syncrasies of people’s speech, 
this spectator's stance gave 
Stead’s novels the density, the 
illusion of objectivity, of the 
great 19th-century realists she 
so admired: Balzac, Flaubert. 
Zola, Tolstoy, Gorky. 

The best thing in Rowley’s 
book is the warts-and-ali por- 
trait of Christina Stead herself. 
Nothing could be sadder than 
the story of her childhood: Her 


mother died when she was 2. 
her clever, handsome father, 
tormented her for her plainness 
and clumsiness, her stepmother 
favored her own six children. 
Nothing sadder, perhaps, ex- 
cept Stead’s own callous treat- 
ment of her “true companion," 
the devoted Bill Blake, who left 
his wife and daughter for her 
but who was repaid over the 
years by the spectacle of her 
fevered crushes on other men 
and her fractious neglect when 
he was dying of stomach cancer. 

“Bill knows he is taking all 
my time and energy," she wrote 
cruelly, “but his own need is 
greater than his conscience.” 

That was probably truer of 
Stead herself. Yet one closes 
Rowley’s long, exhaustively re- 
searched, impeccably fair biog- 
raphy regretting tbe incompre- 
hension that embittered, and in 
the end silenced, the voice of 
this true literary original. 


Elizabeth Ward, an Austra- 
lian-born editor with the Japan 
Times in Tokyo, wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


By Alan Truscott 

O NE top-ranked American 
team was eliminated at the 
NEC World Championships 
while others made astonishing 
comebacks. 


queen would falL When this 
failed, he continued spades by 
cashing the queen and finessing 1 
the nine. He then disposed of his 
losing heart on the spade (ting 
and made his slam. 


In the Rosenblum Open 
Teams contest the star team of 
James Cayne, Chuck Burger, 
Mike PasseU, Mark Lair, Bob 
Goldman and Paul Soloway 
seemed well placed, but could 
only score 47 percent in its last 
three matches and fell short. 

An unheralded Irish four- 
some of Tom Hanlon, Hugh 
McGann, Paddy Walsh and 
Roiy Timlin finished first in 
their section, thanks in pan to 
the diagramed deal. Walsh 
opened the South hand with 
two diamonds, a Multi bid that 
showed either way a weak two- 
bid in a major suit or certain 
strong hands. He landed in six 
dubs, which would have been 
defeated by a heart lead. 

But West led the spade two 
and South captured the jack 
with tbe ace. He then played the 
ace and king of clubs, hoping the 


In the replay. South failed in 
the same contract and the Irish 
team gained four imps. 


NORTH 
4K9SS 
?K J32 
* Q42 
« J 6 


• 1U 7 3 2 

*7 10 B 7 S 4 
v 5 

*Q82 


♦ J4 

<? AQfl 
O J ID 9 8 7 6 
*73 
SOUTH 

♦ AQ8 

■■ A K 3 

* A K 10 9 3 4 


Nrnli and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

East 
Pass 
Pass 
Pass 
Pass 
Pass 


South 

West 

North j 

2 c- 

Pass 

3<P ! 

4* 

Pass 

40 ' 

4 * 

Pass 

5* 

8* 

Pass 

Pass j 


West led the spade two. 





hi»i I,., 
JUlw 


# Ci*! 

IK 3ta* 

S. '®«ik 
MjW. 




ilflrjj The Appalling Public Fall 
^ Of the House of Windsor 

By W illiam Pfaff 

■■'.''■■It.. T>ARIS — It is frightening to see a tian emperor for the West was 
. . I man deliberately. if unwittinelv. anointed bv the Pooe. This emperor 


, "V XT man deliberately, if unwittingly, 
destroy his public reputation. Prince 
Charles has probably also destroyed 
; . *V the British monarchy, but only be- 
. ■ . cause be has submitted to the logic 
of a decision made by his parents 
./■-V and thdr advisers. 

, i .‘‘ The prince’s collaboration in a 
. ' biography which provides a whining 
“ ! and self-pitying account of the mis- 

fortunes life has dealt him — heir to 
. possibly the world’s greatest private 

", 4. fortune as well as to the throne of 
\ Britain — is an appalling affair. 

; v His mother, he says, was distant, 
his father tough and unsympathetic, 
*•' his sister the favored child, and the 
' other boys at his school bullies. He 
* C. w 35 sensitive and misunderstood. 
He married the wrong woman be- 
cause his father told him to make up 

■ - i" his mind and either leave the girl or 
’ <;> wed her. He claims society's syxnpa- 

■ r 'Othy for his plight He is a victim. 
' He is a sad spectacle. 

. That the monarchy can survive the 
derision and contempt engendered 
by the conduct and egoism of Charles 
. and Andrew and their fll-cfaosen 
spouses is unlikely because this gen- 
•.* -• .7 eration of 'Windsors has abandoned 
.. the sacral role of monarchy, without 
' ^ ■ apparently understanding the signifi- 
T _ cance of their decision. 
il It is this abandonment, not 

Charles’s conduct which is the cru- 
^ cial weakness in their position. 

Monarchy is a phenomenon of ear- 
liest society. In the Mediterranean, 
‘ the earliest form of dvOized political 
^ society seems to have been the city- 
empire rifled by a god-king, as in 
"i’i Mesopotamia and Egypt. After im- 
penal Roqie’s collapse, a new Chris- 


L > ^ A Wider, Stronger Europe 

1^ Regarding "Doing Right by Po- 


~.Z- 


lamT (Opinion, Oa. 13): 


h to 


“■;*/ The West’s most important inter- 
. ,! » ' est is to cooperate across the Con ti- 

nent, all the way to Russia, so as to 
avoid Europe’s redivision into an 
■ ' ’ •' • East and a West Close cooperation 
.- ^between Europe and the United 
- ' States- must remain the mainstay of 
‘ ; ^ ' ’ '1 international security. 

It would help if an American were 
appointed secretary-general of 
NATO and a European its com- 
mander in chief. This could pave the 
way for French military reintegra- 
TP II A tion aiu * f® 1 a conunc ® European 
I *1 ! K U\ <m.ihc basis of full 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 

OPINION 


anointed by the Pope. This emperor 
was to be God's instrument in the 
political governance of God’s people. 

Thus the subsequent claim by Eu- 
rope’s dynastic families that monar- 
chy was divinely instituted, and that 
monarchs possessed “divine right” 
and a form of priestly power. The 
bishops of the Church of England 
have always consecrated the kings 
and queens of England with holy 
oils at their coronation, and an 
equivalent ceremony takes place in 
nearly all other monarchies. 

The sacral function of the mon- 
arch was in the past held to be what 
the theologians called “ex opere 
operaio” (from the work wrought), 
meaning that its validity was not 
subject to the personal merits of the 
monarch. The legitimacy of the mo- 
narchical succession continued, 
whatever the crimes of individual 
monarchs. Sovereignty lay in legiti- 
mate succession. (This is why in 
British law adultery with the pnnee- 
heir’s spouse is high treason. If Brit- 
ain today were a serious country, the 
pathetic Captain James Hewitt 
would have to be hanged.) 

Britain has known more bad or 
indifferent kings than meritorious 
ones. The British public has always 
known about their kings’ adulteries, 
and in pre-Victorian times cheerful- 
ly derided and mocked them. Since 
Victoria’s Puritan regime, the love 
affairs of Edward VII and of 
Charles’s granduncle, briefly Ed- 
ward VIII before his abdication, 
were never secrets, even if the press 
did not write about them. It was 
generally understood that a good 
king could be a bad man, and that 


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even a bad king was a real king, 
inheritorof the nation’s sovereignty. 

This generation of Windsors, with 
the help of press, television and pub- 
lic relations counselors, decided that 
the monarchy could no longer stand 
on the old principles. They have set 
out to modernize and re-establish 
their claim to the monarchy on the 
ground that they deserve to be 
queens and kings because they are a 
family of nice, likable, hardworking 
people holding a public trust — the 
Good Queen Mum, Our Dear 
Queen Elizabeth, that nice, hard- 
working Philip. And there, unfortu- 
nately for the Windsors, it stopped. 

Thors was a fatal choice. No mon- 
archy can survive on personal popu- 
larity, least of all today, with the 
hounds of both scandal and celebrity 
press baying after its members. The 
monarchs of Denmark. Sweden, the 
Netherlands, Belgium and Spain may 
all be nice people, but they do not 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


NATO participation by Poland, 
Hungary and the Czech Republic. 

America might accept the mem- 
bership of those countries if military 
responsibility in Europe were placed 
more or less on European shoulders. 
NATO should be deliberately ex- 
panded, not as an anti-Russian alli- 
ance, but as a zone of stability for 
European states. 

It is in the vital interest of the 
democracies to support freedom 
and democracy on the Continent 
and even to defend it. When War- 
saw, Budapest and Prague are in 
danger, the fate of freedom on the 
Continent is at stake with them. 

STANLEY STEIN. 

New York. 


A Right to Health Care 

Regarding the report “ In Health 
Care Melodrama, Villains Are 
Many" (Sept 28) by Robin Toner: 

Whatever one thinks of the role of 
big government, it would be ludi- 
crous, for example, to privatize na- 
tional defense. If private companies, 
cities and states had their own air 
forces, armored divisions and na- 
vies, not only would it drain their 
treasuries, it would be a prescription 
for anarchy. 

Certain functions, including the 
protection of one’s country from 
foreign invaders, simply have to be 
undertaken as part of a national 


consensus. No authority other than 
the federal government is capable of 
enforcing that consensus. 

The same conditions apply to 
health care. Nationwide vaccina- 
tions are required to fight off viruses 
and bacteria; universal pre- and 
postnatal care is required to ensure 
the health of the populace. A sick 
person bankrupted by medical bills 
has lost his freedom just as much as 
a citizen living under the yoke of 
foreign occupiers. 

If the United States cannot ensure 
the physical well-being of its citi- 
zens, then it has lost touch with its 
original purpose. 

LARRY SHAPIRO. 

Capri, Italy. - 




rest their claim to their crowns on 
their niceness. They go about their 
duties, live unassumingly and are 
conscious of ihtir sacral roles; and of 
course they, loo, are by no means 
certain to survive. The latter three 
all have gone through tricky periods 
in recent years. 

A symbol of the Windsors* confu- 
sion was Prince Charles’s own ex- 
pressed wish, in a television inter- 
view earlier this year, that instead of 
being crowned as “Defender of the 
Faith" he would prefer to be “De- 
fender of Faith." Faith? Faith in 
what? He obviously said this out of a 
muddled consciousness that Chris- 
tianity is a shrunken force in secu- 
larized Britain today, and that many 
of his believing subjects are Muslim 
or Hindu. “Faith” undoubtedly 
seemed to him an inoffensive, ecu- 
menical and politically correct substi- 
tution for “the Faith,” and could 
probably be extended to include 


A Politically Correct Story 
By an Evil Caged Writer 


By Brad Spurgeon 


“faith” in the virtues of good citizen- 
ship, so that no one was left out. 

Does anybody care about all 
this? Obviously the British do. But 
they must ask themselves what they 
want in a monarch. The monarchy 
is embedded in the nation's history 
and political civilization. When 
kings ceased to be feared and 
obeyed, the British monarchy had 
to make itself respected, which it 
did, without its members necessar- 
ily becoming liked, but at a time 
when most people had no way of 
knowing whether they were likable. 

Now they have decided that they 
have to court personal popularity. 
They have decided that the British 
people will not accept an unlikable 
king. If this really is true, the monar- 
chy is finished, whether the Windsors 
realize it or not The public reaction 
to Charles's book suggests it is true. 

International Herald Tribune. 

'S' Las Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Demilitarize Haiti 

The root of Haiti’s problem is its 
army. It consumes wbat little there 
is of the economy, it sidetracks con- 
siderable amounts of badly needed 
human talent to unproductive and 
sometimes illegal ends, and it 
amounts to an ungovernable stale 
within the slate. 

Yet it serves no positive purpose 
because Haiti has no known ene- 
mies. Haiti does not need an army. 

Surely it should not be beyond 
the wit of the United States or the 
United Nations to guarantee the 
frontiers of Haiti. 

NORMAN SANDERS. 

Drammen, Norway. 


P ARIS — Stepfathers are evil. 

Gypsies neglect their children. 
Animals should be locked up in 
caj’es. Black people are ventrilo- 
quists’ dummies. 

Now that I've got that off my 
chest, I feel I can tell you about the 
children’s story 1 was asked to write 
for a start-up publishing company, 
and what it all has to ao with the 
provocative statements above. 

After I completed (he story, i had 
it approved by several readers close 
to me before i sent it to the publish- 

MEANWfflLE 

er. The publisher lauded my accom- 
plishment in fulsome terms. Every- 
one loved my children’s story. 

Then the trouble started. Over sev- 
eral months the publisher called me 
up periodically with criticisms: “1 
just spoke with so and so of a Very 
Big Publishing House, and he said. 
‘There are 60,000 public libraries in 
the U.S. You understand? 60.000 po- 
tential sales for the book. And not 
one of those libraries will buy your 
book if it depicts a nimals in cages.’ ” 
I said, “I lake the animals out of 
the cages. I got no story anymore.” 
But 1 wrote around the problem. 
He called again: “We just love it. 
But don’t describe the ventrilo- 
quist’s dummy’s hair as an Afro. 
You’re being offensive to blacks. 
You're saying all black people are 
ventriloquist's dummies." 

Well. Never min d that the dummy 
of the story is based on my own real- 
life ventriloquist's dummy, which I 
have had for 20 years and which I 
designed with an Afro because I 
loved Jimi Hendrix and black peo- 
ple to the point that I wanted to 
fantasize that I. too, could be black. 
So I put an Afro on my dummy, 
though he is not black. No black 
person has ever complained. 

The Gypsy girt? The publisher had 
wanted it to be a multicultural story. 
The Gypsy girl was a natural 1 wrote 
that she ran away from her family 
and joined the circus. When I got the 
phone call oa that one. my friend's 
voice hinted that he had been let 
down by my moral turpitude. “If the 
Gypsy girl ran away from her par- 
ents, her parents would go out and 
And her.” Did I say that they didn’t 
try? How many children are reported 
missing, all races combined, and nev- 
er found again? 

Stepdad, huh? O.K., children's 
Action is too full of evil slepdads. 
But sometimes those old cliches 
have a reason for being there. 

I wanted the central boy character 
of the story, who was bom into a 


circus family, to fear the circus own- 
er, who is truly evil. It's a traditional 
family circus, but I didn’t want the 
owner to be the boy’s father. 1 want- 
ed my child reader to identify with 
the t>oy, and assumed it would be 
easier to fear an evil stepdad than an 
evil natural father. How dare I. 

The boy geis punished by the step- 
dad. Locked in an animal's cage for 
apparently letting the animals out. 
“Why do you have to punish the boy 
at all? Maybe he could be sent to his 
room.” The hint was that ray story 
might offend the Society for Preven- 
tion of Punishment of Kids. My re- 
sponse was. “If this kid is to take the 
initiative to solve the mystery of who 
is really the guilty party, then the kid 
has to have a good motive for doing 
so. What better motivation than to 
stop being corporally punished?" 

J was asked to write a classic mys- 
tery story. That meant there had to 
be a mystery. For children l didn't 
want blood and guts. So I tried to 
find the most innocent, least harm- 
ful sort of mystery that could hap- 
pen in a circus. The way; Someone is 
letting the animals out of their cages 
and the kid is wrongly blamed 

So we're back lull circle to the 
animals, and the truth comes out: 
“No animals in cages, please! We 
know this is reality you're describing, 
but we want to make a profit. Look, 
friend, we don't really core about the 
animals. If you want to know, we're 
wonied we won't sell enough books. 
So don't take it personally.” 

Is this what they mean by the 
hypocrisy of those who practice po- 
litical correctness? But, heavens, I do 
hope I have not offended anyone in 
saying all this. 

Which brings me to the final in- 
sult. When, like a true professional, 1 
had tried to improve my story by 
rewriting the sensitive areas, i said 
to the publisher. “1 cannot make any 
more changes without destroying 
the story." His insult was: “Don’t 
worry, friend. I won't be asking for 
more changes. I can't imagine any- 
body being offended by anything in 
your story now.” 

Yeah. Like who can be offended 
by a meat loaf, right? 

International Herald Tribune. 


Leners intended for publication 
should be addressed " Letters to the 
Editor " and contain the writer's si- 
gnature. name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing, We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


GENERAL NEWS 




China Stonewalls Perry on Human Rights 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WUHAN. China — Defense 
Secretary William J. Perry 
broke no new ground on human 
rights 00 Wednesday in talks 
with President Jiang Zemin of 
China despite a clear wanning 
of China-U.S. military and po- 
litical 1 ties. 

Mr. Perry left late Wednes- 
day for Manila Tor a brief stay 
before going to Seoul and To- 
kyo for talks on a new agree- 
wment between U.S. and North 
^Korean negotiators on Pyong- 
yang’s nuclearprogram. 

Earlier in China, Mr. Perry 
described his hour long meeting 
with Mr. Jiang, who also heads 
the influential Central Military 
Commission, as “warm and 
very positive. 

**We had an exchange on hu- 
man rights, but we didn’t reach 
any kind of agreement." Mr. 
Perry said. 

Without giving details. Mr. 
Perry said he and Mr. Jiang 
discussed many issues in talks 
that cautiously rekindled raili- 
larv ties, frozen by Washington 


in 1989 after Chinese troops 
crushed the Tiananmen Square 
pro-democracy protests. 

But Mr. Jiang delivered a 
standard rebuff when Mr. Perry 
voiced U.S. concerns over hu- 
man rights, saying China had 
embarked on an independent 
course of democratic centralism 
and had “many people to feed 
and clothe,” the defense official 
said. 

Mr. Jiang praised Washing- 
ton for a fresh accord with 
North Korea under which Beij- 
ing's Stalinist ally pledged to 
replace a nuclear energy pro- 
gram suspected of being weap- 
ons-related with safer civilian 
technology. 

Beijing maintains that the 
“subristence rights” of food, 
shelter and employment take 
precedence over political and 
civil rights, which it says will 
evolve in due course. 

Mr. Perry’s four-day visit 
also included discussions with 
military leaders. U.S. officials 
stressed that transfers of arms 
or military technology to China 


were not discussed during his 
stay, and were not part of Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s “construc- 
tive engagement” policy toward 
Beijing. 

But the two militaries agreed 
to hold regular consultations on 
military strategy, budgets and 
broad planning from next 
month. 

Mr. Perry also offered to 
share technology to simulate 
nuclear explosions on comput- 
ers, hoping to persuade Beijing 
to curb its underground testing 
program. He did not say if the 
Chinese accepted the offer. 

(Reuters, AFP) 

m Chinese Released 

A labor activist has been re- 
leased nearly five months after 
the police took him from his 
home. The Associated Press re- 
ported Wednesday from Beij- 
ing, quoting his wife. 

Liu Niancbun, who helped 
found the League for the Pro- 
tection of the Rights of Work- 
ing People in February, was re- 
leased after being held under 


police guard in Beijing, said his 
wife, Chu Hail an . 

Mr. Liu was picked up on 
May 28 because of his labor 
activism, but that police told 
him when he was released that 
his actions bad not gone far 
enough to be considered crimi- 
nal, his wife said. 

Austrian Rightist Plans 
To Rename His Party 

Reuters 

VIENNA — The Austrian 
far-right leader Jorg Haider, en- 
joying a big general-election 
boost, said Wednesday that he 
wanted to change the name of 
his Freedom Party to “Citizens 
Alliance 1998” — the year of 
the election he hopes will bring 
him to power. 

Mr. Haider was speaking at a 
news conference in Vienna to 
publicize changes he has made 
in the party organization. He 
led the Freedom Party to a gain 
of 14 seats in the general elec- 
tion 10 days ago. 


In Karachi’s Political Void, Chaos Rules 


By John Ward Anderson 
and Kamran Khan 

Washington Past Service 

KARACHI. Pakistan — It was sup- 
posed to be a simple photo-op. Prime 
Minister Benazir Bhutto appeared at an 
amb ulanc e station here to show empathy 

with the beleaguered citizens of Karachi. 

where dozens of people have been killed 
in recent political and religious violence 
and where monsoon rains have washed 
away roads, leaving electric, water and 
sewage service a shambles. 

Suddenly, Miss Bhutto turned to an 
employee of the private ambulance com- 
pany, one of the few services that work in 
the city, and proclaimed him the new 
adm inistrator of Karachi, whose entire 
elected government has been jailed or 
gone underground over the last two 

years. 

The man handpicked to solve the 
seemingly insurmountable problems of 
we of the world's largest cities is fahi- 
muzzaman Khan, an ambulance helicop- 
ter pilot. His qualifications? During the 
elections last fall, Mr. Khan, 33. a Bhutto 
loyalist, appropriated the ambulance ser- 
vice’s helicopter to ferry Miss Bhutto 
around the country. 

“One would expect an elected govern- 
ment to run a megalopolis Kke Karachi 
through elected representatives, and not 
through a helicopter pilot," said M. Ya- 
sin Lakbani, president of the Karachi 


stock exchange. “He may be good at 
flying a helicopter, but managing the 
largest city of the country is serious busi- 
ness.” 

“His performance has been pretty 
good,” countered a Bhutto spokesman, 
Husain HaqqanL “He’s as qualified as 
anybody who would be able to get elect- 
ed.” 

In the current political vacuum, politi- 
cal, religious and criminal gangs — with 
huge arsenals left over from the Afghan 
war — are engaged in a deadly battle for 
control of Karachi, a city of 10 million 
people that used to be Pakistan’s capital 
and now is the country’s economic en- 
gine, generating about half the federal 
government's revenue. 

More than 40 Karachi police officers 
have been killed in street violence this 
year, and more than 70 political activists 
have been killed. Rooftop snipers assas- 
sinate political foes: armed gangs steal a 
dozen cars a day at gunpoint; Sunni 
Muslim militants supported by Saudi 
Arabia and Shiite Muslim extremists 
backed by Iran have attacked each oth- 
er’s buses and mosques. 

Aggravating the lawlessness is the rap- 
id collapse of Karachi’s aged infrastruc- 
ture, already overtaxed by a population 
that is increasing by 400,000 a year. 
Monsoon floods in the summer de- 
stroyed roads and killed 55 people, 40 of 
whom were electrocuted by downed 


power lines. Electrical outages left neigh- 
borhoods sweltering in the dark Tor 
weeks and devastated local industries; 
water and sewer problems bred epidem- 
ics. 

The appointment of the helicopter pi- 
lot as city administrator underscores the 
continuing feudal nature of politics in 
Pakistan, where despite relatively un- 
tainted recent elections, democracy is 
still struggling to take hold. It also illus- 
trates the clash in pans of Pakistan be- 
tween rural, indigenous ethnic groups _ — 
such as the Sindms, represented by Miss 
Bhutto — and booming urban centers, 
where the vast majority of people are 
Muslims who immigrated here from In- 
dia during partition. 

These Urdu-speaking immigrants, 
who call themselves muhajirs, formal 
their own political party — the Muhajir 
National Movement — in 1985; now, it 
typically captures about three-quarters 
of the vote in Karachi But Pakistan's 
army and leading political parties, shut 
out of power in the country’s most im- 
portant city, have accused the Muhajir 
party of being rife with criminals. Over 
the last two years, most of its leaders — 
including Karachi's mayor and members 
of the City Council — have been arrested 
or gpne into hiding, effectively dissolving 
the local government- The city has been 
under occupation by 30,000 army troops 
since May 1992. 




M H 

.•£'•'-45^ 


get more out 

ofiht. 


You tell us you spend an enjoyable 30 minutes engrossed in your paper.t 

You also tell us thai on average, you have an annual household income of 
USS 147,600* 

It seems then, that our pages are the perfect place for you to decide where to 
, start spending some of it. (Our regular Leisure section, perhaps?) 

And the perfect place for our advertisers to get more out of the International 
: Herald Tribune, too. 

, . For summaries erf the surveys from which these facts are taken, please call, 
.. m Europe, James McLeod on (33-1) 46 37 93 81: in Asia, Andrew Thomas on 
<65) 223. 6478; in the Americas, Richard Lynch on (2 1 2) 752 3890. 


’ • Srwnv; ? VIVA Surveys ’92 / W.‘ ? ReaderSunvy '94. 










Page IQ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


MARKET diary 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


lechnology Shares 
Spark Big Board 


Compiled ty Ow Staff From Dopmdies 

NEW YORK — The stock 
market rose Wednesday, sup- 
ported by strong earnings, par- 
ticularly in blue-chip and tech- 
nology issues and by the 
narrower U.S. trade deficit. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage closed 13.50 points high- 
er, at 3,936.04. Advancing is- 

U.S. Stocks 

sues led decliners by about 1 1 to 
9 on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. where volume totaled 
316.7 million shares. 

Ralph Acarapora, director of 
technical research at Prudential 
Securities, said the gains were 
concentrated in blue-chip is- 
sues, which are more heavily 
weighted in international com- 
panies. They got a boost from 
news that the U.S. trade deficit 
had narrowed in August and 
thaL imports and exports had 
risen. 

The 30-year Treasury bond 
ended down 7/32. at 95 17/32, 
for a yield of 7.88 percent, up 
from 7.87 percent on Tuesday. 

The Dow industrials, on the 
seventh anniversary of the aver- 
age's largest point drop in histo- 
ry. were led higher by shares of 
Aluminum Co. of America. In- 


ternational Business Machines - 
and Walt Disney. 

The most active issue was I 
Compaq Computer, which 
along with Johnson & Johnson 
and MCI Communications re- . 
ported profits that beat Wall' 
Street forecasts. 

“The stock market is still try- 
ing to digest earnings, which 
have been great," said Gail Du- 
dack, market strategist at S.G. 
Warburg & Co. “But there are 
questions as to whether we will i 
carry that momentum into 
1995.” 

IBM rose on optimism about i 
the computer maker's earnings, ; 
which are due Thursday. , 

Mercantile Stores rose on | 
news it might be bought by Dil- . 
lard Department Stores. 

Snap-On. the industrial and ; 
mechanical tool company, re- 
ported third-quarter earnings or 
53 cents a share, compared with 
48 cents a year ago, but the 
stock fell. 

Amgen, a drug maker, and 
Zenith Electronics, a maker of 
furniture and home appliances, 
jumped on higher earnings. 

Adaptec rose after the semi- 
conductor maker’s second- 
quarter earnings climbed higher 
than expected. 

(AP. Bloomberg) 


V«o AMactofcd Pimt 


The Dow 


Daly closings of the 

Dow Jones industrial overage 

4000 



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1994 


J J ft s o 



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27901 

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U.S. Deficit With Japan 
Jolts a Fragile Dollar 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 

Trans 

UN 

Comp 


Open h«Jt low lxM dig. 

3WJ9 JW 9.84 JW105 3936 04 
1498.58 IH6.99 1W.W 1S23-SJ - 33- » 
181.58 182.38 180.84 181.58 ' D.% 
im 1315.14 1297-34 I311J0 


Standard & Poor's Indexes 


Previous Today 

Htsfa Low Close 4:M 
Industrials 557.33 5504 55644 559.51 

Tronsp. 34141 341.12 363.61 365.93 

Utilities 15175 151.45 151 55 152J4 

Finance OM 0.14 43J8 4345 

SP 500 469.17 446S4 44744 47038 

SP 100 43440 43106 4J3JS 435l«3 


NYSE Indexes 


Mian Low Last Cho- 


Oynposite 

Industrie** 

Tramp. 

UliTitV 

Finance 


25803 25439 35033 
3Z6J6 322.98 325.53 
23405 232.33 23439 
205.97 303.92 70175 
205.94 20438 70148 


r 1.0? 

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► 057 

►a« 

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NASDAQ Indexes 


NYSE Most Actives 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



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916. ia 

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Tramp. 

717.71 

706.64 




AMEX Stock Index 


Higli Law Lust Of*. 
458.41 455.91 *5874 - 1 54 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


30 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 Industrials 


Previous 

Close 

94J4 

91.10 

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Compiled hr Oar Stiff/ From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
. fell to a three-month low against 
' the yen Wednesday after a re- 
port showed that the U.S. trade. 
• deficit with Japan bad swollen 
2.4 percent in August 

The U.S. unit slipped to 
1.5014 Deutsche marks in late 

Foreign Exchange 

trading from 1.5021 DM on 
Tuesday and eased to 97215 yen 
from 97.725 yen. 

“The widening trade gap 
with Japan was disconcerting,” 
said Charles Spence, director of 
currency sales at Standard 
Chartered Bank in New York. 
He said the dollar would proba- 
bly set new postwar lows this 
week. 

The U.S. trade deficit with 
Japan widened to $5.8 billion in 
August, the third-biggest on re- 
cord, from $5.7 billion a month 
earlier. U.S. imports of Japa- 
nese merchandise rose to a re- 
cord $10.7 billion. 


“For me the key thing is the 
trend of rising imports," said 
Brian Martin, economist at; 
Citibank. “Consumption in the' 
economy is still very strong.” 

The dollar fared somewhat 
better against European curren- 
cies. as the U.S. trade deficit 
with the world as a whole 
shrank 13 percent to $9.7 bil- 
lion in August. The U.S. deficit 
with the European Union nar- 
rowed 32 percent. 

The dollar rose from the 
day’s lows amid speculation 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoL 

Htoti 

Low 

Lad 

CM. 

Vioc vrt 

32306 

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1V U 

1V U 

♦ Ul, 

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Market Sales 



Today 

Prev. 


4:00 

coos. 

NYSE 

J16l69 

316J1 

Amax 

2468 

31J9 

Nasacq 
m millions. 

31492 

308A0 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 

Declined 

Uncnanaed 
Tolai issues 

NewHteTi5 
New Lows 


1131 

1029 

746 

7904 

54 

8? 


891 

1299 

?tn 

2890 


AMEX Diary 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Previous 

DM Aak 


148430 

240900 


Close 

BM AM 
aluminum (High Grade) 

Delian Mr metric ton 
Spot 172000 1751.00 I711KJ 1714.00 

Forward 1741.00 I742JM 173100 173250 

COPPER CATHODES (Hied Grade) 

Doiian per metric ton 
snot 254100 2543.00 

Forward 2539-00 254040 

LEAD 

Del tors per metric loti 
Sool 646X0 M7JJ0 

Forward oSD-QO 42050 

NICKEL 
Dal Ian per metric tan 
5 poI 478100 679100 45803)0 450000 

Forward 489000 690000 6685.00 449500 

TIN 

Dalton per metric tea 
5soi 54 BtUJO 549000 53903)0 540000 

Forward SMM 557000 547100 548000 

Zl NC (Special Hiatt Grade) 

Dolton aer metric ton 

Seat 106100 106050 10544)0 105500 

Rirword 108100 108050 7 07 Uffl 10753)0 


I HUM LOW Last Settle cuts 

MOV 15400 15X00 15X00 tSSJS unen. 

June 15275 15200 15200 1 5200 — 02S 

July N.T. N.T. N.T. 15X00 — IL25 

Ana N.T. N.T. N.T. 155.25 Until. 

Sep N.T. N.T. N.T. 154JS +025 

Oct N.T. N.T. N.T. ISM0 + 005 

Est. volume: 12209 . Caen bit. 100,427 

BRENT CRUDE OIL (IP6) 

uj. donors per teium rt* at lAOO barrels 


MLB 

456.00 


Financial 


Hlgb Law Close change 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

1504000 - pis Of 109 pci 


Dec 

Mar 

JlHI 

See 

Dec 

Mar 

Jua 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

See 


9154 

97.73 

92.15 

91.74 
91.40 

91.15 
90.99 
9082 
90 J1 
90.63 
KM 
9059 


9147 
92.66 
9209 
9157 
91 J4 
91.12 
90.96 

9070 

9001 

9003 

9058 


9152 

9171 

92.13 
9175 
91J9 

91.14 
W.97 
9001 
9071 
9063 
9053 
9058 


Est. volume: 71428. Open Ini : 476,442. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE1 
SI miman-ptiat 190 pet 


— 002 
— CUJ4 
flftt 

— 0.04 

— 004 

— 0.04 
-004 

— 004 

— 003' 

— 003 

— O.tM 

-O0« 


DOC 

N.T. 

N.T. 

?4j)8 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93.67 

Jon 

N.T. 

N.T. 

93.26 

Seo 

N.T. 

N.T. 

92.93 


— 0.04 
-005 

— 04)6 


Est. volume: 0. Open ini.: 4J01 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE1 
DM1 mlLItOO - pis 01 190 PCt 


-004 
- 0.02 

— 004 
— 003 

— 004 

— 004 

_ . — = — 405 

Est. volume: 95J7J Onen int.: 639.40®. 


Dec 

9482 

9479 

94J0 

Mar 

9453 

9448 

9450 

Jun 

94.18 

94.10 

9413 

S«p 

9179 

9173 

*3J6 

Dec 

9244 

<040 

93»| 

Mar 

9118 

93.13 

97.16 

Jua 

92.95 

9291 

9294 

Sep 

917* 

9273 

9274 

Dec 

9264 

925? 

9257 

Mar 

9249 

9246 

9245 

Jua 

9234 

9236 

9135 

Seo 

92» 

9225 

9225 


Dec 

IMS 

16.18 

162 

16J6 

+ 020 

Jan 

10J5 

16.16 

142 

162 

+ 0.16 

Feb 

162 

16.13 

162 

1622 

+ai6 

Mar 

16.19 

16.10 

1612 

1624 

+ aio 

A or 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

16.15 

+ 609 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1616 

+ 009 

Jun 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1616 

+ 009 

Jiy 

16.15 

16A5 

1605 

1605 

Unch. 

Aug 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1608 

unch. 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1600 

unca 

Od 

102 

162 

162 

162 

Uitoh. 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1608 

unch. 


Est. volume: 32,106 . Otwn int. 1440S7 


Stock Indexes 

Htab Law Close atom 
PTSE no (LIFFE) 

OS per Index paint 

Dec 31 MO 30650 30700 -300 

Mar 3I31B 3107.5 309331 —300 

£st. volume: 13705. Open EnL: 50060 
CAC40 (MAT m 
FF2W per Index point 

Od 191400 187000 188500 -2000 

Nov 191850 188800 189X00 —2X00 

Dec 192X50 1*0200 1902X0 — 2X50 

MOT N.T. N.T. 192050 -2150 

Jao H.T. N.T. 191100 —2150 

See KT. ALT. 1936X0 — 2600 

Est. vo tome: 21X34. Open int.: 61368. 
Sources: Motif, Associated Press. 
London Inti Financial Futures £VcftMM. 
inn Petroleum Eechonoe. 


Dividends 


— 006 

Company 

Per 

And 

Roc 

Pay 


IRREGULAR 




1 OiDgenor SA 

D 

.1872 

10*27 


-002 

Kevstano AmWldBd 


.05 

10-25 

11-4 

— 005 

1 Sentinel BOFrj 

_ 

032 

10-24 

10-31 

-007 

Sentinel GvSec 

_ 

049 

10-24 

10-31 

-004 

Sentinel PA TxFr 

- 

051 

10-24 

10-31 


3-MONTH PIBOR (MAT IF) 
FF3 million -pts of I 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchansao 
Total issues 
NcwHrtns 
New Laws 


Close 

Prev. 

286 

239 

293 

n 

238 

252 

817 

617 

13 

11 

25 

2J 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unctianaed 
Total issues 
NewHtohs 
New Lows 


Oose Prev. 
1727 1451 

1458 1744 

1919 1905 

5104 5100 

130 109 

91 99 


Spot Commodities 


Commodity 
Aluminum. Jb 
Capper electrolytic, lb 
Iron FOB. Ion 
Lead, lb 
Silver, trov as 
Sleei (scrap), ton 
Tin. lb 
Zinc lb 


Today 

0.781 

1.21 

213X0 

042 

SJ85 

11017 

NA 

05263 


Prev. 

0777 

Ul 

713.00 

0.43 

5J75 

11017 

3X768 

05772 


Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

5op 


F 100 pet 

94X1 94.16 

9X78 93J4 

®14l 9306 

■>3X8 »3.03 

9177 9172 

9U4 9149 

9134 9130 

9120 92.17 


94J0 +002 

93.77 Unch. 
7X39 —0X3 

93.06 —0X1 

9174 — 0J\ 

9152 —0X1 
9133 — O01 

9119 —001 


STOCK SPLIT 

Fst Alert inc 2 for 1 soili. 

TSX Cora 2 for l split. 

INCREASED 

Capital Bcp 
C ommerce BK Va 
I Fst FedSvg Sioux 
Hawaiian EMC ind 
Midianilc Coro 
O metro Healthcare 
Princeton NoiIBcb 
U ni-Marts Inc 
VF Cora 

wasftMuiSvas _ 

c- Record and pov daws to be announced later. 
INITIAL 


O 

.18 

10-27 

11-3 

O 

20 

10-31 

11-15 

O 

.18 

10-31 

11-11 

O 


11-10 

12-12 

Q 

.17 

11-1 

11-14 

Q 

58 

11-2 

11-1S 

Q 

09 

10-31 

11-15 

Q 

02/5 

24 

12-9 

12-19 

0 

.19 

10-31 



EM. volume: 4X850. Open Ini.: 187568. 
LONG GILT (LIFFEJ 
£50X00 - pts & 32ods at 100 pet I 

Dec 101-17 101-08 101-19 -0-13 

Mar N.T. N.T. 100-2: -0-13 

Est. volume: 58+43. Croon ini.: 91*49. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
dm mm- mat 100 pet 
Dec 9174 90X0 9037 -0X5 

Mar 89 JO 89 JO 8957 — 0A7 

Est. volume: 144,187. open Int.: 183.310. 

10- YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FFSOwm - pis of loo bo 


Queens CtvBcs n 
Thomson AdvLP n 


A5 11-1 11-18 
JO 11-1 11-10 


Dec 

11122 

11106 

11103 

— 0—6 

Mar 

11006 

110.70 

110.7* 

-0^4 

Jun 

llO.ia 

uma 

109:78 


Sep 

N.T. 

N.T 

N.T. 

unch. 


Est. volume: 131.147. Open mt.: U1165. 


Industrials 

High Low Last Settle Ch'oe 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UJS. dollars per metric ton-lots of 100 ions 
Nov 151X0 149.75 160X5 15050 +1X5 

Dec 153. M 152X0 15025 15X25 + 0J5 

Jan 155X0 154X0 154.00 154J0 +0X0 

Feb 15625 155X0 155X5 755X5 + 0X5 

Mar 156X0 155X0 155X5 155X5 Unch. 

Apr 15450 15250 154X0 15X50 — 050 


Amcosi Indus 
Blair Carp 
Brown Alex Inc 
Buckeye Ptnrs 
Consol P opera 
Dun&Brod street 
i Fst Charier Cp 
1 fsi mill bcp 
I Fst Union Cn 
FlelCftOwll ADR 
Fleicncnoii Fst 
GAB Bcp 
G reen Tree F1ru 
! Harbor Fed! Sv9s 
! Health-Mor Inc 
i Iowa Natl Bkshs 
Keystone Cast Bl 
I Keystone CustKl 
Lotehaad PloeLn 

Leao Mom Inc 
Lillian Veman 
Provident Bcp 
R avcnem Cp 
R oyonMr Inc 
Si Paul Ben 
Sctilumberser Ltd 
Sthestrn Mich Gas 
villose bcp 


REGULAR 

a 


b-Approx amount per ADR. 


.13 12-2 12-23 
, J5 11-23 12-15 
Q .175 10-28 11-8 
Q .70 11-8 11- -~r 
Q J2 11-4 11-18 
Q J£ 11-18 12-9 

8 .13 12-23 1-19 
X5 11-7 I1-J0 
O M 11-30 12-15 
Q .4426 10-77 11-28 
b X124 10-27 11-28 
Q .IS 10-25 10-29 
Q XA25 IMS 12-31 
. .1125 10-28 11-20 
Q X833 12-21 1-4 

Q XI 11-2 11-0 
.078 10-25 11-4 
.09 10-25 11-4 
M 10-31 11-14 
.11 12-15 1-9 

J}7 11-16 12-1 
X5 11-10 11-25 
X8 11-9 1214 
.18 124 >2-30 
X75 10-31 11-16 
J6 12-19 1-6 

JO 11-4 11-15 
.11 10-21 11-4 


Viacom to Sell Cable Operations 

WASHINGTON — Sumner M* Redsww 



days lows ami a speculation tj T _ 

that the Federal Reserve would Utdi! Former Executive Jailed in V.S. for 8 Years in Bank Fraud Case 

buy the currency to break its J 

fall, although traders said they Continued from Page 9 years in custody in Abu Dhabi wildly speculative trading. 


mcarioosIm^He <8®° said Viacom would not purchase 

which Mr Redstone estimated would bring in more; 
bi£™ h ™id help reducethe deb. Vj-raN* - W ■ 
buy Paramount Communications Inc. Mr. Redstone smd the 
^ble industry was '‘subject to an onslaught of competition from 

he bed no pta. » -Id » -j-W 
network to his media empire, which includes MTV Blockbuster 
Entertainment Corp. and the publisher Simon and Schuster as 
well as Paramount. 

Defense Companies Report Earnings 

CHICAGO (Combined Dispatches) — McDonnell Douglas ; 
CorpTand General Dynamics reported positive thud-quarter . 
earnings on Wednesday, while Northrop Grumman Cog-SJ^ort 
was not well-received. Both General Dynanucs and McdwmeU . 
reported health gains in their military equipment operations. i 

• General Dynamics earned $54 million on revenue of 5714,, • 
million. A year' earlier, profits before a $24 million gmntotaled , 
$49 million on sales of $776 million. The company s slock rose 

115 cents to $44,125. . — 

• McDonnell Douglas said its net profit rose 1 3 percent to 5 1 61 

million. Sales rose 1 percent to $3.46 billion. The company’s 
military aeronautics division had a record quarter with an operat- 
ing profit of $182 million. McDonnell stock rose $3,375 to- 
2226 375 

• Northrop Grumman, formed by Northrop Corp.’s purchase 
of Grumman Corp. and Vought Aircraft Co. this year, had third- 
quarter net income of $39 million. That was below anmysts j 
expectations, and the company’s stock fell 25 cents to S45.75. 

^ (AP, AFP. Bloomberg) 

Better Margins Increase MG Profit 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — MCI Communications Corp. 
said Wednesday its Third-quarter net income rose 26 percent, as 
wider profit margins offset a slowdown in phone traffic growth. 

Net income at the second-largest provider of long-distance 
phone services rose 26 percent to $220 million. Revenue rose 12 
percent to $3.41 billion. MCI stock fell 32.25 cents to $24.5625. 

Meanwhile, AT&T asked the Federal Communications Com- 
mission to bar MCI from providing a new service which lets 
callers get the phone number of a resident or business anywhere in 
the world by dialing an 800 number. AT&T alleged that federal 
laws prohibit companies from charging for 800 numbers. 

Strong Quarter for Phone Finns 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Two regional Bell operating 
companies and GTE Corp. posted rises in third-quarter profits 
before special items, as cost-cutting programs took effect and 
cellular customers increased. 

• GTE said profit from operations rose 9.5 percent to $611 
million, paced by a 48 percent increase in cellular subscribers. 
Revenue rose to $5 billion from $4.94 billion. GTE stock rose 12 J 
cents to $30,625. 

• Bell Atlantic Corp. posted a 2,8 percent increase In operating 
profit to $397.4 milli on. Revenue rose 3.8 percent to $3.42 billion. 
One analyst said Bell Atlantic had made progress in reducing 
costs in its core business. The company’s stock rose $0.75 ot 
$52,125. 

• Pacific Telesis Group said its earnings rose 2.3 percent to 
$314 million, paced by cost-cutting at its local phone operations. 
Operating expenses declined 2.7 percent Revenue was edged 
down to $2.33 billion from $2.34 billion. 


‘J ! 


saw no evidence the Fed was 
buying. The Bank of Japan 
bought dollars for yen in Asia, 
traders in Tokyo said. 


Continued from Page 9 

actions had caused losses of 
$255 million to regulators and 
several U.S. banks. 

Mr. Naqvi’s attorneys and 
The dollar drifted down to federal presentencing reports 
5.1475 French francs in late describe the banker as destitute, 
trading Wednesday from 50 his ability to pav the restitu- 
5.1535 francs Tuesday and to don is in doubt. ' 

1 .2453 Swiss francs from 1 21467 Mr. Naqvi was technically 

sentenced to a term of 1 1 years 
to $1.62—5 from $1.6130. and three months. But he re- 
( Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) ceived credit for nearly three 


and in the United States while he Prosecutors say Mr. Naqvi 
awaited trial, bringing his total was intimately involved with 
term to a little over eight years. BCCl’s secret infiltration of 
Ptittinp Mr Naavi behind four U - S - banks - including the 
bars in the United "States is a Fiist American Bank- 

significant victory in the trou- n lhe 

bled federal investigation of bank m Wa5 ^ ngtcn ‘ 

BCCI. The bank Was shut down 
by regulators July 5. 199 1 . after 
auditors’ reports revealed mas- 
sive losses from illegal loans to 
corporate insiders and from 


The disclosure that BCCI 
had secretly gained control of 
First American led the bank's 
chairman, former Defense Sec- 
retary Clark M Clifford, and its 
president, Robert A. Altman, to 
step down and face trial. 


For the Record 

Johnson and Johnson's third-quarter profit rose 16 percent to 
$525 million as it cut costs and increased sales to $4.04 billion 
from $3.51 billion. (Knight-Ridder) 

A federal judge declared a mistrial in a securities-fraud case 
brought against Marriott Corp. by bondholders. ( Bloomberg, ) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Aggnco Franca Ptvua Od. 19 
Close Prev. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 

5700 

5700 

ACF Holding 

3430 

36.711 

Aegon 


Ahold 



Akin Nobel 

i-*r. iWl. il 

AMEV 

Mri WhK 

tih' 

aolj-lVessonen 


r * ■ 

CSM 

■ rX*B 


DS.V. 





Fofcner 

ISJ0 

1520 


*5.20 

44.90 

HBG 

2S6 

3e 

Hetaeven 

37.10 238.lt 

Howovwh. 

W-f ji '1 

QXv.il 

Hunler Douglas 



INC Coland 



mux Mueller 

9259 


inn Neaertana 

78 

71 

KLM 

4440 

4) 

KNP BT 

*?.°0 

St 

KPN 

52J0 

52 


5420 

5! 

Dee C-rlnien 

74M 

7501 


4650 

4i9t 

Phllltn 

S430 

M M 

Polygram 

71M 

7140 



Redamco 

S0-TO 

5080 


11590 11410 

Rorenlo 

8200 

02.70 

Roral Dulch 

190.10 191JC 

Stark 

45 

4401 

Unilever 


Von OmmMtn 

46.10 



Woltors/ Kiiivwr 121X3 121.10 
EOC Index : 404X1 
Prev ton : 405.3* 


Brussels 


Almonii 
Arbed 
Bnrco 
DDL 
Be* aer! 

CBK 
C MB 
CNP 
Cocker III 
Cobcna 
Colruvt 
DeUiaiza 
Electrode! 

Eloclrallna 

Farm AG 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevoert 

Giaverbel 

immobci 

KredleiDonk 

MOMUM 

Pcrrdlrio 

Pawerfin 

NCClKCl . 

Pxvcle Bdoe 


7490 7480 
VQO 5010 
2470 2515 
4M0 4340 
23350 23300 
17075 12USD 
7495 2S25 
i9ao r»7s 
197 190 

5420 5450 
7150 7150 
1734 1734 
K20 5520 
W30 3075 
2450 2450 
1244 1240 
4005 3975 

5980 8940 

4000 4600 

2340 2843 

6210 6700 

1330 1374, 

9670 9700 
2970 Ml 
498 488 

4780 48S0 


S<K Gen Banaue 7530 7610 
SocGenBcIStouc 2210 2215 
Satina I79S0 T7975 

Salvor 15775 15300 

TesscOdarlo 97^ 9970 
Tracieboi WTO 

UCB ZC5D 24300 

lessor 6M0 


Frankfurt 

15050155.40 

300 300 

23IB 2355 
645 453 

B45 B50 

310.90314X0 
149X035380 
392391X0 
439 428 

680 695 
3S9384.ro 
773 TO 
310321X0 
222227.M 
755 7« 
455X0 469 
227230X0 
723791X0 
496 495 


AEG 

Alaslol 5EL 
AllknK HOW 
Altana 
Asha 
BASF 

Dover 

Bov. Hypo non* 

Bov Verdnabk 
BBC 

BHF Bonk 
BMW 

Com men don* 

Continental 
Daimler Bens 
Dswsso 
□I Babcock 
Dcutadia Bank 
D0U0W5 . w 

Dre5dncr Sonic 39550 »6 
FeUmuetile 

PKrvPpHeesdc i« W 

Haraoner 312 310 

Henkel 5BtM Sj£ 

HoemW mjg 

HoecWt K53SW0 

HDlsmarai Ms 51! 

Horten 2i6 316 

IWKA 339 3*8 

Kali Soli I54J0157SO 

Kdrstadl 617 6^ 

KwfMf .512 Sa 

KHD 12150 123 

Kloeckner Werkc 139 
Unde B59 832 

Lutlhonsa 1BA 186 

MAN J* 413 

' Mannesmonn . "4?™* 

Wef ® HBe 3F!L. 

Muoncn Rueck 2810 2810 
Penene 665 ^ 

PreUSAM 4045450 

PVJA 225. 2K 

RWE «24«£ 

RMIrunotall 274 379 

scncrlno 94*97150 





Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtvma 

Ensa-Guizeir 

Huniamakl 

K O.P. 

Kvmmenc 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pon tola 

Ranala 

Stockmann 


99 99J0 
4280 4150 

147 147 
NA. 10X0 

132 134 

148 148 

63H 400 

&&.m 75 

103 104 

272 279 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 3270 33.10 
Caltwr Poallc ll JO 11X0 
CheunaKOnO 35X0 34X0 
CBlna LlBfll Pwr 40.10 4a 
Dairy Farm inTI lOXO 10.15 
Hang Lung Dev 1X55 1270 
Hang Seng Bank 53X5 5X50 
Henderson LOna 4X50 49.10 
MK Air Eng. 31.40 3X90 
HK Ctllno G<rt 14.05 14.05 
HK Electric 23X5 23X0 
HK Lana ibjo 19 

HK Realty Trust IflxO 18.75 
HSBC Holdings 89.75 BM5 
HK strong Hits ioxs n.io 
hk Telecomm 15X5 14.05 
HK Ferry 1075 TOJ5 

Hutch Whomgoa 3X40 34.40 
Hvsan Dev 19X0 20 

Jaralno Mom. 65 65J0 
jardinc Sir HM 3010 30X0 
Kowloon Motor U BS 14.90 
Mandarin Orient 9.95 10 

Miramar Hotel 19X0 I0A5 
New world Dev 2205 2575 
SHK Props 56 56JSI 

Status 125 12S 

Sartre Poe A 55X5 5475 
To I Ctwung Pras I0A) 10X5 
TVE 4.15 4.1S 

Wharf Hold 29J5 29.90 
WltNiOCkCO 14-70 16X5 
Wing On CO Inti 1210 10.15 
Wlnsor Ind. 10 1215 

BgaasTWSa 5 ”* 1 " 


Forte 

GEC 

Gem Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gulnneu 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hfllsdmvn 

H5BCHWOS 

ICI 

inchcmo 

Kingfisher 

LoCDroke 

LondSec 

LODortg 

Lovno 

Legal Gen Gra 
UovtfS Bank 


Close Prev. 
233 
2X5 
5L70 
Ul 

A17 
1.91 


Maries 
ME PC 
Nan Power 
Navwest 
NfhWsI Water 
Pearson 
PiO 
PI Iking ton 
PoworGen 

Prudontlal 

Bonn Ora 
RNklK Col 
Redland 
Reed tall 
Reuters 

RMC Group 
Rolls Rovcc 
Rotamn infill) 
Rural Seal 
RTZ 

Salnsbury 
Seal Newcas 

Scot Power 

Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

Sletoc 

Smith Nephew 
Smith Kline B 
Smith (whi 
S un Alliance 
Tate & Lvle 
Tosco 
Thom EMi 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3^ 

Wall came 
Whitbread 
wnuamsHOgs 

Willis Corroan 

BilRpw 


5X3 

Z28 

IJ5 

7J0 

BX3 

434 

487 

1-53 

634 

7.1B 

1X9 

*X3 

5-53 

424 

4X5 

480 

4J7 

263 

6 . 1 * 

217 

1X7 

5X2 

3.09 
4)3 
5.78 
4.70 
7ST 
457 
9J4 
1J5 
412 
427 
272 
357 
5X8 
152 

1.09 
5X9 

7.11 
228 
1X3 
416 
449 
3X5 
4X8 
234 

10.09 

2.12 

118 

1134 

3JM 

202 

4131 

6X5 

5X2 

3.40 

1X1 


2J« 

2X5 

5J2 

S99 

423 

151 

463 

5X7 

239 

1J5 

23 

434 

494 

134 

636 

730 


Close Prev. 
BCE MaDtie Com 399k 39H 


11Vk 

24 


IBto 
1814 Iff* 
12H 1210 
9014 2Bli 
134# 


Can Tire A 
Cdn Util A 
Cascades 
Crowrw Inc 
CT Fim Svc 
Gtn Metro 
Gl Wes? LI taco 

Hies JnPI Bcd . 

Hudsons Bov Co 2714 ST'A 
imascoud 38i# sets 
Investors Gratae 14 16 

Looati (John) 2ii+ aiira 
Loo low Cos 22 V» 72 

MOlSOnA 2Mb 214# 

Natl Bk Canada TV: 

jxi ■ Poneda j Pofralni xii# 4i»i 


4X1 

5A3 

421 

423 

4/7 

SOI 

535 

6X9 

6.14 

1X6 

5X1 

Jj09 

4)9 

5X6 

475 

744 

459 

9X8 

139 

4.11 

430 

8.78 

196 

5X3 

146 

1X7 

563 

731 

538 
I At 
430 
467 
137 

432 

235 

10.11 

2.16 

230 

11X3 

3X8 

2X5 

41JS 

633 

539 
3X1 
134 


Power Carp 
Power Fim 
Quebecer B 
Rogers Comm Q 
Royal Bk Cda 

Sears Canada Inc 
Shell CdaA 
Sautham Inc 
Stelco A 
Trllon Fln'l A 


UP# 181# 
2818 271s 
16b 

194# 191# 
281# 28i# 
ffVk S'u 
*5 *47+ 
ISW 1518 
9’+ 87# 

34. 170 

ss :,m>7 


AO 


RUURttSi ““ 


Johannesburg 


AECf 
Aitech 
Anglo Amer 
jrtows 
Iwoor 
-uftais 
Do Beers 
tXlefonteln 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
HiahveJd Steel 
Knei 

Nedbank Grp 
Panafoniotn 
Ruralai 
SA Brews 
51 Helena 
Sasol 

WestarnDcw 


3 2730 
100 100 
237 239 

3130 

10J5 1135 
NA 5* 
9910130 
6150 6450 
1435 1*30 
19530 126 

4235 *3 

32X0 32 

68 69 

.■wm: a?_es 

4930 5030 

115 113 

87 85J5 

NA 52 
Jia 3485 


Madrid 

BBV 3215 3180 

Bra Central HISA 3050 3W5 
Bono Sant an der 4910 49 a 


London 


Abbey Natl 
Allied Lvons 

Aria wtaalns 

Argyll Group 
Ass Brif Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scotland 
Barclay# 

IS? 

BET « . 
Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Bools 


Brit Airways 
Bril Gas, 
BrHSfoeJ 
Brfl Telecom 
BTR 

Came Wire 
CndBury Sai 
Caradon 
CoaH Vtyeikj 

SKsasr 

IS^on 

Eurotunnel 

Fi sons 


4(0 

5.91 

230 

238 

533 
5X9 
*78 
2X4 
535 

534 
44] 
1X4 
2X7 
682 
5 39 
431 
4X8 
375 
2X4 
139 
193 
3.10 
4X7 
4X2 
2X8 
2.0* 
533 
4X0 
155 
1X4 
2.15 
1 17 


409 

5X4 

2X9 

2X7 

537 

5X1 

4XS 

106 

5X5 

5X5 

450 

1JM, 

2X9 1 ' 

6X9 

537 

4X3 

4.15 

170 

2X7 

1X3 

197 

111 

4.13 

445 

27l 

2.12 

5X4 

45] 

3AS 

175 

339 

1.14 


Banesto 
CEPSA 
Drawdoi 
Enaesa 
Ercros 
Iberdrola 
Repsd 
raoocalera 
re Won lea 


839 835 

3300 3225 
1890 1900 
5530 5570 
159 158 

832 J2S 
3895 3870 

3300 3300 
1725 1710 




Milan 

Altaprua 15450 15610 

ASSlIOIlQ 13430 13008 

Autosirodeorlv 1646 16*2 
Bca Aarlsotfvra 2620 3660 
Boo Confirm- ItoJ 300 3710 

Bca naz Lavoro 12210 12210 

Bca Pop Novara 7990 8000 
Banes di Roma 1584 1582 
Bca Ambrasiano 3865 3885 
Bco Nanai) rtso 1050 1041 
Benetton 
cmflta Itoilomi 
EnJchem aub 

Pert in 
Ftotsoa 
FImsk Aaraind 
Flnmecamica 

Fondlarla sea 

Generali assIc 
IFIL 


Paris 


ACCOT 557 568 

Air Liquids 724 725 

Aicoiei Alsthom 469 4ta 

AJIO 2443024440 

Boncalre IClei soo 515 

B1C 629 643 

BNP 25170 254.20 

Bouvomw 532 54a 

Danone 711 724 

Ca rrelour 2216 2250 

C.CF. 21 21530 

Cerus 102-70 1IM70 

Chare ears 1772 1268 

Ciments Franc 276 273 

Club Med 429427.50 

Ell -Aquitaine 347 3 /s 

Euro Olsnev 7.10 7JS 

Gen. Eau* 454 47130 

Havas 41123 42220 

1 metal SO 556 

[Xrfarge COPOC* 40450 41250 

Legrand 6940 6920 

Lyon. Eouv 452.1a 467 

PtHl'.V* 1070 1W0 

LVJW.H. 844 86* 

Matra-Hactierie I03.t4 10470 
MlOietln B 225.40 J3Q8J: 

Moulinex 1)8 118 

Fariccn 342 343 

Pechlneylnll 154 1K.« 

Pcmod-RIcard 298X0 299X0. 

Peu^eol 771 769 

Plnuuli Print 95* 975 

Radlotecnnfcrue FI8 51* 

Rrv-Pouienc a rH.10 123 


Faff. 51. Louis 
Sonofl 

Saint Go bain 
S_E_B_ 

51a Gencrole 
Suez 

Thamscn<5F 

Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


CAC-40 lades; 1876X1 
Previous: IB9UW 


1415 1*03 
250 251X0 
645 6SS 
551 530 

572 568 

24SJ0 24490 
144 148X0 
323X0 325.90 
133.20 133X0 
2S8 283.10 


Sao Paulo 


Itoicomefiri 

wSStabonca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 
Pirelli 500 
RAS 

RJ nascent* 


19155 19440 
iroO 1729 
3060 3075 
1270 1505 
6040 6180 
9800 9450 

1215 1200 
10823 10770 
37250 37550 
5270 5420 
10110 10195 
4725 4770 
12600 TZ7DD 
1191 1200 
182* 1865 

2210 2210 
18600 18539 
8050 8250 


San Paolo Torino 8900 9920 
SIP 3995 4D 80 

SME 3945 3893 

Sniabpd 1875 1925 

S tarda 36000 36000 

Sief *380 4*« 

ToroAsUC 23000 23900 


Montreal 


A Ico Ltd I 
Fans Montreal 


2*5k 245k 


Banco do Brasil 

Bonespa 

BrotJesaj 

Brahma 

C4Kni0 

EretroOrus 

Uaubanco 

UBM 

Paranapatma 
Pe trots os 
5guzaCns 
Teiearas 
Teiess 
Usiminas 
Vale Rio Doce 
Vorlg 




Tyr? 

fBM 


i-ft rj 












-IF * * 



"•F.ij 


VtSII 


■ r- <1 


Bh'1 





Close Prev. 
Sembawang llxo 11. 90 
Slme Singapore 1.16 1.17 

5tao Aerospace Z34 2x5 

Stag Airlines fern 13J0 1190 

Sing Bus Svc 9X5 9X5 

Sing Land 9 9^ 

Sing Petlm 2X0 230 

Sing Press tam 26 

Sng Shlpbkfg 
Sing Telecomm 
Straits Steam 
5 traits Trading 
rai Loe Bank 
Utd industrial 
utoo sea Bk tarn 16.10 16X0 
UM Oseas Land 2X3 2X5 


Prev tool 


26^0 
2X0 260 
120 122 
4X8 5.10 
3.98 402 
4X4 4X2 
1X9 130 


Shlmazu 
Shinotsu Qwm 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 

Sumitomo Chcm 
ju m] Mori n; 
itromo 




Stockholm 


AGA 
A50O AF 
Astra AF 
Allas Copco 

Electrolux b 

Ericsson 
Esseite-A 
Hondelsbank BF 
Investor BF 
Norsk Hydro 
Pharmacia AF 
Scndvtk B 
SCA-A 

S-E Ban ken AF 
Skandia F 
SkomknBF 
SKF BF 
StoraAF 
Tretiefaorg BF 
Volvo BF 


6730 

550 

186.50 

9450 


98 

91 

181 

262 


AffaorsvoerWeii : 
Previous : 1H9X0 


: 1873X5 


Sydney 

Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Boral 

Bougainville 
Coles Myer 
Coma Ico 

CRA 1 

CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICi Australia 1 
Magellan 
MIM 

NalAust Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 

PocDunton 

Pioneer inn . . 

Nmncr Poseidon 2X9 2x2 
OCT Resources 1X1 IX* 
Sailas 3.94 3X6 

TNT 2X9 239 

western Mining BJJ2 ijt 
Westaac Balking 434 437 
Woods U* 5.14 485 

MS^ , 3swr :a0,M0 


Z70 2J1 


3X4 3.90 
168 3Al 
*M 403 
3X0 1X1 


Sum’ 

Talsel Corp 
TakedoOiem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toprtoi Printing 
Torov Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yamaldil Sec 
a; x 100 , 

Oio2» 

Tontx index : isse 
Previous : 1587 


Close Prev. 

7211 

736 

2050 

2060 

5870 

5880 

1820 

1840 

566 

5/S 

mo 

8/6 

355 

354 

645 

64J 

1230 

1230 

4510 

4540 

565 

54 9 

1120 

1120. 

2828 

3830 


1430 

771 

779 

745 

753 

2070 

2070 

760 

760 




Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew IftXO 1&X0 
Cerates 7.« 7M 

City Oevetopfimi 655 8x0 
Cycle 8i Carriage M 1420 
DBS 1080 10X0 

DBS Land 4X4 4X2 

FE Lrvlraolun 7.1D 7X5 
Fraser & Neove 17 JO 17-50 
Gl Eostn Lite 27X0 27X0 
Hang Leang Fin W U0 
tacncope 5X5 

Jurono Shipyard 13J® 

Kay HkmJ Cape) l.W 1W 
Krapei _ nxo 1320 

Nctateef 3J4 

Nsplune Qrtonl 2X2 222 


„ totwon 

139s 136S f-G ‘seas Union Bk 


1480 14£S 
7X0 7X5 


O^eas union fem 9.10 8X5 


Tokyo 

Akal Electr 428 431 

Asatn Chemical 7oi 770 

Asohl Glass 1250 1250 

Bank of Tokyo 1520 1520 

BriegestaM !.'» 1S« 

Canon 1760 17S0 

Casio 1SJS 1ZM 

Del Nippon Print IE® 1830 

Da two House 1310 1370 

Da Fwc Securities 1400 T410 

Fanoe 4780 4810 

Full Bank 2150 2140 

Full Phata 22*0 2230 

Fulittu 1060 1II7D 

Hltocltl 99* 1010 

Hitachi Cable 858 867 

Hondo 1720 1730 

ltd Yokado 5270 5260 

Itochu 740 740 

J open Airlines 735 737 

Kollma 956 962 

Kansal Power 2460 2480 

Kewosokl steel 443 447 

Kirin Brewerv 1120 1720 

Komatsu 900 9W 

Ruteta nt TIP 

Kyocera 7280 7340 

Matsu Elcc Inds 1620 1660 

Matsu Elec Wks 1060 1050 

Mitsubishi Bk 2450 3440 

:Mltsub Chemical 573 574 

MlfSuOISM Elec 713 715 

Mitsubishi Hev 786 708 

Mitsubishi Cora 1250 1270 

Mitsui and Cc 847 847 

MtisjIMarfna 762 762 

NUnukasht 955 944 

Mitsumi 1430 1390 

NEC 1240 1250 

NGK insutaiors IMS 1050 

NIkko Securities 1120 1132 

Nippon Kogofcu 985 999 

Nlooon 011 688 W5 

Nippon Stool 387 390 

Nippon Yusen 659 la 

Nissan 837 825 

Nomura Sec 2010 29*9 

NTT 8960O8890O 

Olympus Onticoi 10*0 noo 

Pioneer • 2*90 2490 

Ricoh 963 968 

Sanyo Elec 579 579 

Stern 1780 1790 


ft Toronto 


Ablttbl Price 

1814 

W» 

1 Air Canada 

8 







37 


J4V5 


Avenor 

25 

24*» 


2/ 

27’+, 

BCE 

47V 

48 

BCTetacomm 

25*6 

25Ni 


21 Vi 

21 


4 

4 

Bnutnn A 

I9W 

19 


28 

28 

CIBC 


321b 


■TTvj 

16 

CdnOcdd Pel 

owl 

30*6 

Cdn Pacific 








r . 


I6tt 

16*b 


23 Vi 

231b 


13Vk 

13Vi 


I9M» 

196b 


iwt 



13V5 

I I 


224v 



I8M1 

181b 

liz:--, vt; A- - 




8b 

BW 


15 



21 

21 

Imperial Oil 

45* 

46 





28V 



NA 

[Of 1 



11 1 


11 

1 


31* 

3T»b 


HP* 

221b 


18W 

18Vb 





109b 

10% 


2S» 

t ■ 

ir’mm 

411b 



26*b 



119b 

IllJ 


)/ 

LJ \ 

Nmern Telecom 

46*% 

46A. ' f 





13H 



111b 

■ Hi 


32W 

nrvi 

lira’ll*. 

4716 


Prgvleoi 

5*2 

■ '■i 

PWA 

001 

■ / 1 ■ 1 


uv. 

14H: 

Rengluonce Eny 



Rla Aigafn 








77 

Talisman Eny 

w 


Tehmtobe 

164i 

m J 1 

Telus 

16491 

1679 

Thomson 

ltW 

16 


21 

209b 


14V» 

141* 

TraraCda Floe 

17V5 

173b 


M«r 

261 5 


10li 

Ill’ll 

II 1 . : I.--.-- ii 

21 lb 

219* 

Woston 

4 m 

4 GM 

1 m : ’ - ™T« ■ • ' 1 . • ; * . *1 - ■ 


SO 



Zurich 


Ada Inti 8 

220 

222 

Atusuisse B new 

646 

650 

BBCBrwnSovB 

1119 

1114 

OteGelsvB 

70S 

711 

CS HoMlnos B 

541 

543 


eiefctrowB 
Fischer B 
Interdiscount B 
JrimollB 
Landis Gvr R 
MaovemUck B 


NosttaR 
Oeriik. Buenrio R 
PargesaHId B 
Room Hdg PC 
Safra Republic 
Sandax B 
Schindler B 
teller PC 
SurvoHlanee B 
Swiss Bnk Carp B 

Swiss Retnsur R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

WtatertaurB 
Zurich Ass B 
SBC tadev: 90153 
Pravtoa* : rtfii* 


332 338 

1450 1470 
1930 I960 

869 863 

725 730 

J85 3C5 
1179 1184 

133136X0 
1400 1480 
5610 5650 
99 98 

642 655 

7010 7000 

870 869 
1765 1830 

370 33® 
707 700 
820 835 
1256 1275 
625 633 

1170 1175 


The IHT Pocket Diary 
Fits In The Palm 
Of Your Hand. 



Year after year - even at a period when 
diaries abound - the Inteniatiotial Herald 
Tribune flat, silk-grain leather diary is the hit of 
the season. 

Ingeniously designed to be thinner-than- 
thin, it still brings you everything ... including a 
built-in note pad with always-available "jotting 
paper r \ Plus there are conversion tables of 
weights, measures and distances, a list of 
national holidays by country, a wine vintage 
chart, and many other useful facts. All in this 
incredibly flat little book that slips easilv into a 
pocket. 

The perfect gift for almost anyone ... 
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— Please allow three weeks for delivery. 


.31 


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holidays in over 80 countries: world 
lime-zone tabic; international telephone 
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conversion tables of weights, 
measures and disiances. 
■ Blue ribbon page marker. 
* Includes removable address 
boot thar fits snugly inro its own silk 
pocket No need 10 re-wriie your most 
important phone numbers — the address 
book will fit right into next year's diary. 

• Each diary packed in a blue gift box. 

• Cnrpnrate personalization and 
discounts are available. 
For details,, fax Paul Baker at 
(44-81)944 8243. 



I 

[ Ptease send roe 1995 IHT Pocket Diaries. 

I Price includes initials; packing and postage in Europe: 

I M diaries UK £22 (U.S.S33) each initials 

| 5-9 diaries UK £20.50 (U.S. $3 1 1 each up 10 3 per diary 

| 10-19 diaries UK £18 (U.SJ27) each |~~] | | 

□ Additional postage outside Europe £4-5f)rt IS won) 

LI Check here for delivery grnside Europe hy registered or 
certified mail: £5.75 «US.$8.60) per package pte^oge. 

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D Access □ Ame* D Diners □ Earocard □ MasterCard □ Vim 

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■ Blue notepaper sheets fit on 
the back of the diary — a 
simple puli removes top shea 
1 00 refill sheets included. 


signature 


Name. 


Company. 
Address _ 


City/Code 

Country 


Company EEC VAT ID N° 



rate. 

Mail or fax this order form to: 20 - ] °- 94 , 

Fax:( 44 Sl )944 82 £ UJC 









International Herald Tribune, Thursday ; October 20, 1994 


Page 9 



THETRIB INDEX: 117.01 

International Herald Tribune World Stock Index <g>. composed of 
280 internationally investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1 992 = 100. 


120 






V/' 


y.;? x 

• • ■ 




" / • ’ ‘ ” 

■■ '. v 

■ ■ ■ ■ 

inn "in"' V'liii'" 

*■ ■ ■ 



■v , v tv™ 1 • ■ : 






v-v'.l 



‘ . ”t 

■ . . - ; s ,' , 

L * % * ’ 





M J 

J 

A 

L S O 




1994 

■ Asi^Pacilfc 


Europe fl 

Approx, weighing: 32% 

■m 

Approx, weighting: 37% BHWSI 

04PJiL 129.77 Prev.: 129J>0 
si 


B4P.M- 1 18.06 Prev.: 11875 Q|g| 


110 


90 


‘j J A S O 
1994 


M J J A S O 
1994 


North America 


Latin America 



1994 


1994 




Wortd Index - 


, 77m Indue tracks US. deter values at stocks to: Tokyo, New York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Finland, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong, Maly, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. A tow York and 
London, the Max b composed of the SO top Issues or taints at market capitabaticn. 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tiackod. 


1 fraiu&trrai Sectors l 


Wot Prm. % 


Wed. 

Pm*. 

% 


4PM, don donga 


4 PM. 

dose 


Energy 

114J3 115.77 -DJI 

Capital Goods 

119.42 

11924 

+0.15 

Iftfflfcs 

128.17 12&80 -1.26 

Raw Materials 

137.85 

138.60 

-054 

Finance 

117.19 117.01 +0.15 

Consumer Goods 

106.02 

iosna 

-0.06 

Services 

12021 12033 -0.10 

Miscellaneous 

124.38 

124.44 

-0.05 

R>r nxM& tnfomatkxi about the Max, a booklet is avaSabie freed charge. 


Write to Tflb Index, 181 Amw Charles de GauBe. 92521 Neuftfy Cedex, Fiance. 


Ex-Chief of BCCI 
Is Sentenced in 
U.S, to 8 Years 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A federal judge Wednesday sentenced 
a former top executive of BCCI to more than eight years in 
prison and ordered him to pay $255.4 million in restitution. 

Swaleh Naqvi, former chief executive of Bank of Credit & 
Commerce International, received the maximum sentence 
possible under a plea agreement reached during the summer 
with federal prosecutors. 

The 61 -year-old British citizen, a mastermind in one of 
history’s most elaborate frauds, pleaded guilty In July to three 
counts of bank fraud that involved conspiracy, wire fraud and 
racketeering. 

[Creditors of BCCI have agreed to accept $1.8 billion in 
compensation from Abu Dhabi in a deal to be announced 
soon, a creditors' spokesman said Wednesday. Reuters re- 
ported from London. 

[Abu Dhabi. BCCrs majority shareholder, put the money 
on the table in March after a $1.7 billion deal was thrown out 
by a Luxembourg court a year ago.] 

Mr. Naqvi faces arraignment this week on separate charges 
in state court in New York, where the Manhattan District 
Attorney’s Office has aggressively prosecuted the BCCI af- 
fair. 

Mr. Naqvi quietly told U.S. District Judge Joyce Hens 
Green that he intended to continue to cooperate with prose- 
cutors under the plea agreement. Judge Green, in handing 
down the sentence, cited Mr. Naqvi’s high profile within 
BCCI and the threat that the bank's activities posed to the 
integrity of the U.S. banking system. 

“"Without your leadership, without your continuing crimi- 
nal activity, the loss wouldn’t have been as large,” Judge 
Green told Mr. Naqvi. Losses from the international bank 
scandal are estimated to exceed $10 billion, and the Justice 
Department said it was prepared to prove that Mr. Naqvi’s 

See BCCL Page 10 


Results Fire Up Compaq and DEC 


Compiled by Our Stag From Dispatches 

HOUSTON — Compaq 
Computer Corp. and Digital 
Equipment Corp. on Wednes- 
day joined the parade of com- 
puter companies that have post- 
ed markedly stronger results 
recently and buoyed high-tech- 
nology shares in general. 

Compaq, citing strong sales 
increases worldwide, said that 
earnings in the third quarter 
had risen 88 percent, while Dig- 
ital Equipment managed to sig- 
nificantly narrow its loss in the 
quarter ended OcL 1. 


Lower Costs Lift AMR Net 


goods sold — declined to 23 
percent in the third quarter 
from 24 percent a year earlier, 
as the company cut prices to 
build sales and market share. 
Chief Financial Officer Daryl 
White said the company expect- 
ed to maintain margins at that 
level despite falling prices. 

Compaq hopes to capitalize 
on product shortages at rivals 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp. and Packard Bell 
Electronics Inc. Both have said 
they will run out of their hot- 


test-selling products as they go 
into the Christmas season. 

Analysts have been keeping a 
nervous eye on Compaq’s in- 
ventory levels, which more than 
doubled this year as the compa- 
ny accumulated supplies, in- 
cluding Intel 486 microproces- 
sors. which are quickly being 
made obsolete by the powerful 
Pentium processor. Compaq re- 
ported Sept. 30 inventory of 
$23 billion, double the level 
held last year at that time and 


Shares of both 
posted strong 
shares rose 

and it was one of the most 
heavily traded shares on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 
DEC shares rose $2,125 to 
$31.50. 

Compaq said earnings in the 
third quarter had surged to 
$201 million from $107 milli on 
a year earlier as revenue rose 63 
percent, to $2.8 billion. 

It said its sales had surged 57 
percent in North America and 
SO percent in Europe, where 
Compaq surpassed its own pro- 
jections and mark et share rose 
to 14 percent from 123 percent 
in the first half. Sales also more 
than doubled in the combined 
Japan, Latin America and Asia- 
Pacific markets, Compaq said. 

But Compaq’s gross margin 
— net sales minus the cost of 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

FORT WORTH, Texas — 
Profit at American Airlines’ 
parent, AMR Corp., rose 74 
percent in the third quarter be- 
cause of lower costs, the compa- 
ny said Wednesday. 

AMR attributed the im- 
provement to economic growth 
in the United States and 
abroad. The company also died 
the small revenue improvement 
and a 2J2 percent drop in oper- 
ating expenses, partly because 
of cheaper jet fuel. 

AMR posted profit of $205 
milli on, or 52.47 a share, in the 
three months ended SepL 30. 
The company earned $118 mil- 
lion, or $ 1 33 a share, in the third 
quarter of 1993. The year-earlier 
results include a $7 million 
charge to pay off debt early. • 


Revenue rose less than 1 per- 
cent for the period, to $433 
billion from $4.19 billion. 

The results were significantly 
better than expected, sending 
AMR’s stock $2 higher, to $54, 
on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. 

Chairman Robert Crandall 
said the company was “heart- 
ened by these improved results" 
but said American still needed 
to cut costs. 

American is in the midst of a 
plan to reduce costs by $1 bil- 
lion. with $750 million of that 
coming from labor. The airline 
also is in contract negotiations 
with its pilots* union and bind- 
ing contract arbitration with its 
flight attendants’ union. 

(AP. Bloomberg) 


up almost $60 million from the 
second quarter. 

But Mr. White said that the 
inventory build-up had been a 
good idea in view of the com- 
petitive situation. 

“We took a risk on inven- 
tories because we saw a market 
demand that appeared to be 
stronger than others were see- 
ing," he said. “We’re able to 
take advantage now of strong 
market demand because of the 
position we look.” 

Antoine Tris tani, an analyst 
with Southcoasi Capital, said; 
Compaq’s gamble appeared to 
be wise and that it was “posi-; 
honed well for the founb quar- 
ter." • 

At Digital Equipment, mean-; 
while, the loss narrowed to $ 1 3 1 
million in its first financial 
quarter because of reduced 
casts, the company said. The. 
company's loss was $154 mil- 
lion a year earlier. 

The' performance was the 
first sign of a payoff from the- 
job cuts and other restructuring 
efforts that the company accel- 
erated this summer. 

The computer maker's reve- 
nue rose nearly 4 percent, to 
$3.12 billion, in the quarter. 

“While we are not satisfied 
with any loss, the current quar- 
ter’s results contain many en- 
couraging signs that give us 
confidence in our current plan 
to move the company toward its 
objective of sustained profit- 
ability.” said Robert B. Palmer, 
DEC'S president. 

(Bloomberg, AP, Reuters) 


EU Seeks to Cut Cost and Time of Bank Transfers 


C hDamational Herald Tribuna 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — The European Com- 
mission has proposed requiring banks to 
cut the fees they charge and the time 
they take to transfer money across na- 
tional borders. 

The European Union executive wants 
to impose a time limit of Cve working 
days for money to move from one bank 
to another in a different country. It also 
wants to forbid the existing practice in 
which banks at both ends of the transac- 
tion charge the consumer. , 

The move follows a commission- 
sponsored survey published this month 


that showed EU banks kept more than a 
quarter of every 100 European currency 
units ($120) transferred from one EU 
country to another. The average fee 
charged for an urgent transfer, exclud- 
ing foreign exchange margins, was 2239 
Ecus. The average lees charged for non- 
urgent transfers was 19.80 Ecus. 

‘‘We are quite disappointed at the 
commission’s derision to propose a di- 
rective.” said Diane Iannuori, who is 
responsible for payment systems at the 
European Banking Federation, an in- 
dustry trade group. 

“We believe it is far healthier for an 


economic sector to develop through 
market forces rather than legislation," 
she said. Of the 31 billion payments 
made by EU banks every year, she said, 
only 30 milli on are cross-border. How- 
ever, according to the commission, such 
transfers wi thin the EU, currently val- 
ued at 170 million Ecus a year, are 
expected to triple by the year 2000. 

Tightening the rules is necessary, said 
Single Market Commissioner Vanni 
d’Archirafi, because small businesses 
are suffering as a result and existing 
banking practices offset the beneficial 
effects of the Ell's angle market 

Under the proposals, banks would be 


required to keep pledges to consumers 
on the amount of time needed to trans- 
fer money. If they did not set their own 
deadlines, banks would have to move a 
consumer's money to a bank in another 
country within five working days and 
would have an additional day to put the 
money into an individual account. 

If the banks faded to meet the dead- 
line, they would have to pay interest 
charges to consumers. Double-charging 
would be prohibited, and consumers 
would only pay a fee to the bank sending 
the money to another country. 

{Bloomberg, AP) 


INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


Euro Disney Throws the Book Away 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

MARNE-LA-VALLEE, France — 
What do you do when you are in trouble 
and you don’t know what do do? That’s 
right. You Give a little Whistle! 

The financial skies may be grey over 
Euro Disney, the attendance figures may 
or may not be a disappointment But 
management is taking a bit of home- 
grown advice from J imm y Cricket and 
remaining optimistic despite every ca- 
lamity the wicked witch can throw at it. 

To shield “cast members” from tbe. 
financial storm, Hulippe Bourguignon, 
chairman of Euro Disney SCA, said “we 
broke the company into two pieces.” To 
avoid anything getting in the way of 
show business, “I even held financial 
negotiations in the room next to my 
office,” be said. 

Mr. Bourguignon realized that cus- 
tomers want the same kind of Disney 
experience as at Disney parks in the 
United States, but at the same time he is 
eliminating some of Disney’s by-ihe- 
book management rules to give “cast 
members” more responsibility and au- 
tonomy. 

“The product should be like the Dis- 
ney product everywhere else, but the way 
we manage should be European,” he 
said. 

Throughout the crisis, the theme park 
has continued to grow and improve. 
Next year, Mr. Bourguignon plans to 


inaugurate a major attraction called 
Space Mountain. 

A Saudi Prince, Walid ibn Talal ibn 
Abdul aziz. promised to finance a con- 
vention center, whicb the park badly 
needs to fill empty hotel rooms during 
the winter. 

High-speed trains will soon be arriving 
directly from Britain, a major market, 
through the Channel tunnel, delivering 


"No amount of adversity 
or difficulty can take away 
the fact that this is really 
a fun place to run.” 

Philippe Bourguignon, 
chairman of Euro Disney SCA 


customers to the door. Mr. Bourguignon 
says he has no reason to revise his predic- 
tion that the park will show an operating 
profit in 1996. 

Nevertheless, market analysts expea 
more bad news when Euro Disney an- 
nounces its financial results next month. 

Euro Disney shares slumped a little 
further recently after a French magazine 
reported that visitor attendance in 1994 
was likely to be down to 83 million from 
9.8 million. Euro Disney shares fell to 
7.10 francs ($139) Wednesday, from 
755 Tuesday. 


The company said that the report had 
“no basis in reality" but would not give 
its own figures before the annual meet- 
ing. The market is eagerly waiting to see 
whether Euro Disney has managed to 
narrow its losses from the 53 billion 
franc ($1 billion) deficit reported for its 
last financial year. 

Mr. Bourguignon insists that Euro 
Disney’s long-term plans, including a 
second theme park, are still intact — 
even if they have been pushed back in- 
definitely. Like Pinocduo in the belly of 
tbe whale, he says be is confident be will 
climb out of tbe crisis one day. 

“We would leave if there were no vi- 
sion, no plan,” he said. 

“I am managing a toy I’ve dreamt 
about managing all my life” Mr. Bour- 
guignon added. “No amount of adversity 
or difficulty can take away the fact chat 
this is realty a fan place to run.” 

Steve Burke, Euro Disney's chief oper- 
ating officer, said a flood of news reports 
“trashing” the park had been frustrating 
because they did not reflect the fact that 
“the morale here is unbelievably high." 

He said, “They touch on something of 
which we are proud, and enthusiastic 
and positive.” 

A reporter who was present at the 
opening of the park and visited it again 
recently found it considerably more re- 
laxed. This perhaps reflects the personal- 
ity of Mr. Bourguignon, whom associates 
describes as more friendly and easygoing 
See DISNEY, Page 11 


Patchy Road to Reform 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — An authority 
live study published Wednesday 
indicated that progress toward 
economic reform in the former 
Soviet Union and Eastern Eu- 
rope has been highly uneven 
since it began five years ago. 

In its first “Transition Re- 
port," the European Bank for 
Reconstruction and Develop- 
ment tallied achievements in 25 
countries, from privatization to 
price liberalization and banking 
reform. 

The report showed that while 
the private sector in the Czech 
Republic accounted for 65 per- 
cent of the national economy — 
a level equal to that of many 
Western nations — countries 
such as Turkmenistan and Be- 
larus bad rally 15 percent of their 
economies privatized. 

The best overall marks for 
economic reform went to the 
Czech and Slovak republics, 
Hungary and Poland. 

The EBRD, created to bolster 
economic reform in the region, 
also said the most successful re- 
formers were the best at gaining 
foreign investment 

The report said that of the 


$12 billion in direct foreign in- 
vestment in the region between 
1990 and 1993, two-thirds went 
to three countries: tbe Czech 
Republic, Slovak Republic and 
Hungary. 

Nick Stern, chief economist 
for the EBRD, said there were 
“no clear answers" to which re- 
form strategies work best. “We 
have not had enough experience 
yet” he said. 

The report cited a major split 
in the economic performance in 
the region beginning last year. It 
said that by 1993, most of East- 
ern Europe and the Baltics had 
begun to show considerable 
gains in cutting inflation and 
getting their economies growing, j 

The report contrasted that 
with tbe performance of former 
Soviet republics. With few ex- 
ceptions. tbe report said, those 
countries “continued to experi- 
ence high inflation and declines 
in output.” 

Russia received high marks 
for what was called its “spectac- 
ular” progress in privatization 
over the past year. But the re- 
port said Russia’s progress in 
reducing inflation was endan- 
gered by its difficulties in re- 
forming its tax regime. 


The report said that although 
on the face of it. Russian taxes 
were high, lax exemptions were 
widespread and tax evasion was 
rampanL 

Restructuring the state- 
owned industrial behemoths 
that once dominated the eco- 
nomic landscape was also a ma- 
jor problem in the region, ac- 
cording to the report. 

As to the EBRD’s own per- 
formance, Mr. Stem confirmed 
forecasts that the bank's board 
probably would approve loans 
and investments totaling 1.8 
billion European currency units 
($23 billion) this year. 


Trade Gap 

InlLS. 

Shrinks 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — 
America’s foreign trade 
• deficit shrank 1 3 percent in 
August despite the fact that 
Japanese exports to the 
United States surged to a 
record high, the govern- 
ment said Wednesday. 

The Commerce Depart- 
ment said the U.S. trade 
deficit in goods and ser- 
vices fell to $9.74 billion as 
U.S. exports hit an all-time 
high, reflecting increases in 
shipments of commercial 
aircraft, industrial machin- 
ety, computer chips and 
cigarettes. 

The U.S. trade deficit 
with Japan continued to 
worsen, widening to $5.8 
billion. . 

Bruce Steinberg, an 
economist with Merrill 
Lynch in New York, said 
the trade gap with Japan 
should begin to improve in 
the months ahead. 

He said that with Europe 
and Japan emerging from 
economic slumps, their 
growth rales should surpass 
that of the United States. 


-X the aircraft 

FOR YOUR 

BUSINESS 

CHARTER • SALES • MANAGEMENT 

ALG AEF?OL EASING 

GE.NEVA • ZURICH • LUGANO • NE'.V YORK • HOUSTON • M 

FARIS • ERUSSELS • 3ERLIN • HAMBURG • MADRID • 

KIEV > KINSHASA • SINGAPORE * EElJiNG 

Geneva 41-22/798 45 10 Zurich 41-01 /814 37 00 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


ms Rates 


Oct. 19 

, «- djvl p.F. Uro DJi B.F. S.F. Yen Cf Peseta 

rdm UM ira U2M UU5 IW VS* '■ n * ,JCS ,J * 5 * 

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pound: h: To buy one dollar; •: Units of IW NA: "• 


Eurocurre n cy Deposits 


OCt. 19 


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1 year 6W4W 
Sources.- Reuters, Lkrrds Bank 

Hams anpttaable to Merton* aeaoslb o/si million mlnknum lorenvtvment). 


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Inoaruatah J17WB WWtaoty 23057. 
Irish t 0420 Port,4seodo 15W0 

lawfllM. 0032 Hlrt*. row* 299&JW 
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Currency Per* 
S, Air. rand 15156 
S.K 1 T.WM 760.70 
Stood, krona 7.1959 

Taiwan I 26.11 

TWrtbaW 3453 

TtflKlBt lira 35088. 
UAE tflrfHUII X6727 

venex-boilv. 

149.0057 


Key Money Rates 

united Stores Close Prev. 

outwent rots 4M 4JJ0 

Prtme rate rt* TJ* 

Federal (Midi <■** ** 

S-maatf) CDs 4*» 4M 

Camm.p*Mr INdatrs £52 153 

Smooth TrtMWiY Ml XB9 450 

t-yeor Treownr Ml 5J* £70 

2 ^r«nrTreasarvHte £43 £S 

5- veer Treasury sofa 7.33 7.2? 

7-yeer Treason note 7J6 7J2 

tfcyear Treasury note 7 & 7M 

ao-yuor Treasury bond 7S& VB 

Mania LvochSMav (toady asset 422 £21 


Britain 


5Vi 5k i 
5U £00 
5H 5*1 
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£58 £53 


£00 500 

5U 5V. 


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5% 

805 


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£00 


»-dav M-day w-aay 
1J545 UM4 13H7 
97.13 «J» WJ* 


nrd Rates 

v M-doy 4 0 dor tutor Currency 

frribm UW 1*171 UlW Canadian deSor 

naiark MW V4J9Y IJOOO Jwamseyen 

m 12437 13450 12470 

«. -a-* (Amsterdam!! Itutuum Bank t Brussels i; Banco CamamxtaN ttalkmo 

Bank at Tokyo ITokvol: Fatal Bank of Canada 

nij imf isoft). ot ne r o ota hvm Revtnrs and AP. 


Ottawa! rate 
Call money 
l^noatb Interbank 
ymontti taternmk 
taaafli Mtertxmk 
lbyaar OmernmeBt bond 
armour 

Lombard rat* 

Can money 
Mnaotb MttriMflk 

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A-ntontn Merbart 
tfryeor Bund 


1% 

2ft 

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445 148 


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£20- 520 
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738 731 


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l-mantti Interbank 
3-awatti interbank 
£a«itti hderiwak 
tt-TBarOm 
Prance 

Intervention rnto 
Can money 
1 -month taterbonit 
3-montb Interbank 
fHnonm toierbcmfc 

Sources: Reuters, Bloomberg. Merrill 
Lynch, Bank of Tokyo. Commerzbank, 
CmmeUMontanv Credit Ltvmab. 

Gold 

Zurich 
London 
Mew York 
US- dollars per ounce. LMOonoHidatfix- 
has.- ZurktiandNc w York o pen ing and do) 
Ins Prices; New York Comes (Oacsmber.l 
Source: Reuters. 


AM 

PM. 

Cti’go 

38830 

391 JO 

+ 1J0 

38930 

39L10 

+ 135 

391 JO 

39230 

+ 1J0 


Matsushita Bars 
Bid by Former 
Owners of MCA 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Matsushita Elec- 
tric Industrial Co. said Wednes- 
day it had turned down a call 
from the top managers of its 
U.S. entertainment subsidiary, 
MCA Inc., to give them back 
fuller Control over MCA. 

It is possible, however, that 
the issue w31 be discussed fur- 
ther in tbe near future, said Set- 
suo MSzoguchi, a spokesman 
for the Japanese conglomerate. 

Mr. Mizoguchi said tbe 
transfer of fuller managerial 
control was proposed by the 
MCA chairman. Lew R. Was- 
sennan, and President Sidney J. 
Shdnberg in a 5 Vi-hour meeting 
with the Matsushita president, 
Yoichj Morishiia, 

“The meeting produced tit- 
tle,” Mr. Mizoguchi said. “Mat- 
sushita declined to accept the 
proposal. However, tbe issue 
has yet to be resolved, possibly 
through further meetings in the 
near future.” 

Mr. Wasserman and Mr. 
Shdnberg sold the company to 
Matsushita in 1990. 




CORUM 

Maitres Artisans d y Horlogerie 

SUISSE 



Admiral’s Cup with enamelled nautical pennants marking the hours. Registered model. 
For a brochure, write to: Corum. 2301 La Chaux-dc-Fonds, Switzerland. 



















































































































A- 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Page 11 


EUROPE 


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UBS Confronts 
Large Holder on 
Voting Rights 


Bloomberg Busmen Hews 

ZURICH — The board of 
Union Bank of Switzerland said 
Wednesday it would not allow 
registered shareholders a sepa- 
rate vote on its plan for a new 
share structure, but it recog- 
nized that a bruising legal bank 
could result if the new structure 
was approved. 

In the latest salvo against 
Martin Ebnex, whose invest- 
ment company BK Vision is 
Union Bank’s largest share- 
holder, the bank rejected Mr. 
Elmer's demand that a danse 
be added to its bylaws req uirin g 
that each class of shareholders 
be represented on the board. 


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NoMaProfit 
Surges Sixfold 

Com^UedbyOvrSu^fFromDupatcha 

HELSINKI — Nokia 
AB, the Finnish telecom- 
munications company, said 
Wednesday that net profit 
rose more than sixfold in 
the first eight months of the 
year, to 1.67 billion mark- 
kas ($361 million) from 269 
m iTlinn maridcaa a year ear- 
lier, as telecommunications 
units showed strong 
growth. 

Jorma Offila, chief of the 
company, said the outlook 
for the rest of the year was 
favorable. 

The company said it 
planned to sdl its tire sub- 
sidiary and to expand cellu- 
lar phone production as it 
continued to shift its focus 
toward telecommunica- 
tions. (Bloomberg Renters) 


The bank’s bearer shares fell 
19 francs, or 1J> percent, to 
1,256 francs ($1,006) Wednes- 
day amid worries that Switzer- 
land’s largest bank was on the 
defensive and would be dam- 
_ the showdown with Mr. 
r.' The vote on the new 
structure is scheduled for Nov. 
22 . 

Chief Executive Robert 
Studer said investors could ex- 
pect “a negative period of a 
couple of months” because of 
the uncertainty over the con- 
flict. 

BK Vision is part of Mr. 
Elmer's BZ Group, which con- 
trols about 18 percent of Union 
Bank's registered shares and 
about 5 percent of its bearer 
shares. 

Mr. Ebner and bis lawyer 
have said BK Vision could chal- 
lenge the bank in court if it did 
not call a separate meeting of 
registered shareholders. 

Mr. Studer acknowledged 
that Mr. Ebner was likely to 
mount a legal challenge if the 
share structure was approved. 
He said he expected, however, 
that "the courts will make a 
medal effort to get this solution 
final as soon as possible.” 

Registered shareholders, who 
represent 51 percent of the 
bank’s votes and 173 percent of 
its capital, would lose consider- 
able voting power under the 
plan. 

Separately, Mr. Studer said 
that business at UBS was "cer- 
tainly better” in the third quar- 
ter than in the second quarter. 
Profit for the full year, however, 
will be lower than it was last 
year, he said. Net profit last 
year surged 69 percent, to 237 
billion Swiss francs. 


French Uncertainty Chills Investors 


Bloomberg Businas Seva 

PARIS — France, with its 
low-inflation growth and sta- 
ble currency, would be a fine 
place to park money, were it 
not for political scandals and 
an impending presidential 
election that have combined 
to create an inhospitable in- 
vestment climate. 

Investors have shown con- 
cern by shunning French se- 
curities and driving up French 
bond yields. They are shifting 
to German investments now 
that the political picture in 
Germany has cleared with 
Helmut Kohl’s election vic- 
tory Sunday. 

This all may make it more 
difficult and more expensive 
for the French government 
and companies to borrow, as 
well as threaten efforts to 
tighten the budget and damp- 
en the recovery. 

“There are many scandals 
in France right now,” said De- 
nis VaQier, deputy treasurer of 
the French investment fund 
Alfi Gestion, which has $5.8 
billion under management. 
“And yes. I’m concerned 
about the value of my invest- 
ments here.” 

The scandals have touched 
both the government and pri- 
vate industry. Several busi- 
ness leaders have been investi- 
gated for bribery, fraud and 
misuse of company funds, and 
two top government officials 
have resigned. 

On Friday, Industry Minis- 
ter Gfcrard Longuet quit amid 
allegations of involvement in 
Ohat funding, both for his po- 
litical party and for his villa at 
St_ Tropez. He has denied the 
allegations. 

In July, Communications 
Minister Alain Carignon re- 
signed when he became the 
subject of a judicial investiga- 
tion. He was jailed last week 
on charges of “passive corrup- 
tion,” relating to allegations 


Firms Discuss Honor Code 

Reum 

PARIS — France’s public-works contractors are discussing 
adopting a new code of honor to allay widespread suspicions 
of corruption, the head of a lobbying group said Wednesday. 

Philippe Levaux of the National Public Works Fedoation 
told a news conference that four major companies had asked 
the group to recommend that its member companies go on the 
record against paying political kickbacks and bribes to offi- 
cials to win contracts. 

Last week, former Communications Minister Alain Carig- 
non was jailed and Industry Minister Gerard Longuet re- 
signed amid investigations into alleged funding by companies 
seeking municipal contracts. 

Mr. Levaux said representatives of the federation's 6,000 
members would discuss at a meeting Friday what son of code 
of honor might be acceptable to all of than. 

The proposals would then be put forward for approval by 
the federation’s board at the end of November. 

On Tuesday, officials at major companies said firms would 
unveil a charter at Wednesday’s news conference. But some 
small companies reportedly had asked for more time to 
discuss the idea. 

Mr. Levaux said four of the industry’s “majors” met 
privately on Oct. 12 and drew up a letter calling for a code, to 
which about 10 other company heads had added their signa- 
tures. 


lx had benefited improperly 
from political financing. 

Beyond the corruption 
scandals looms the presiden- 
tial election scheduled for 
next spring. President Fran- 
9 CHS Mitterrand's second sev- 
en-year term ends in May. Al- 
though Mr. Mitterrand, 01 
with prostate cancer, has said 
he wants to complete his term, 
he admits he may have to quit 
if his treatment restricts his 
ability to perform his duties. 

Investors tend to want 
Prime Minister Edouard Bal- 
ladur, who has not yet official- 
ly announced his candidacy, 
to succeed Mr. Mitterrand. 
But Mr. Ball ad ur is seen as 
having been weakened by the 
scandals, and this is seen as 
helping Jacques Ddors, a for- 
mer finance, minister and the 
likdy candidate of the left. 


Mr. Delors’s term as 
dent of the European 
mission expires in January, 
and he is considered the So- 
cialists’ only chance at hang- 
ing on to the presidency. 

Investors say Mr. Delors, 
with his record on forging 
closer European ties, partly 
through strict adherence to 
budgetary and monetary tar- 
gets, also would probably be a 
safe helmsman for the French 
economy, but many still pre- 
fer what they see as the stabil- 
ity of Mr. Balladur. 

So far, Mr. Balladur’s 
weakness has not improved 
the ratings of the GauBist 
leader, Jacques Chirac, Mr. 
Balladur’s former mentor and 
his main rival from within the 
center-right The financial 
markets view Mr. Chirac, who 


also has yet to declare his can- 
didacy, with suspicion. 

Essentially, investors are 
concerned that Mr. Chirac 
lacks the commitment Mr. 
Balladur and Mr. Delors have 
to European unity. They say 
Mr. Chirac might be more 
likely to reverse efforts to cut 
the budget deficit, which is 
forecast to shrink from an es- 
timated 301 billion francs 
($58 billion) this year to 275 
bfflicra francs in 1995. 

The bottom line for inves- 
tors is that all the uncertainty 
has increased the risk in buy- 
ing French government debt, 
whose prices could go any- 
where, depending on the ex- 
tent of the scandals and out- 
come of the elections. 

Yields on the French gov- 
ernment 10-year bond reflect 
the unease. The yield has risen 
from 6.66 percent on May 19 
to as high as 8.30 percent on 
OcL 5. It ended at 8.05 per- 
cent Wednesday. 

■ Industrial Output Up 

French industrial produc- 
tion jumped 23 percent in the 
■combined period of July and 
August from June, according 
to seasonally adjusted data re- 
leased Wednesday by the na- 
tional statistics office INSEE, 
Reuters reported. 

The rise defied private 
economists* expectations that 
recovery from 1993's reces- 
sion would begin to slow in 
the summer after a vigorous 
start to the year. The increase 
took year-on-year growth in 
French industrial output to a 
healthy 53 percent 

INSEE publishes no sepa- 
rate figures for July or for Au- 
gust, when much of French 
industry shuts down for sum- 
mer vacation. Consequently, 
analysts treat the summer sta- 
tistics with caution, as they 
contain a large element of sea- 
sonal adjustment 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt:' London Parts 

DAX : . . ■ fTSE TOO Index CAC 40 

'aw- — ; — 2300 

'3300- 



'SO 1 

1** . . 


aTS 1 . 

1804 


&chanjje. 

Amsterdam 

icxdex * 

AEX ; 

Wednesday Prev. 
CSoae ■ -Close 

404*1 405^0 

%' 

Change 

-037- 

Brusaefc* • ■ 

• Stock index 

y&SLSfS 

7^25.36 

♦034 

Frankfurt . 

OAXi .. . 

2,051.16 

2,084.78 

-1^1 

Frankfurt 

FA Z:. 

77MA ■■ 

701J39 

■ass 

Helsinki - 

HEX 

1357,49 

1.947.06 

+0J54 

London 

RftoiciaiTlmes 30 

2^57100 

a374^0 

-0.73 

London 

FTSE tOO 

3,060^0 

3,085.30 

-0.79 

Madrid 

General index 


297.88 

<t,48 

man 

MffiFTEL 

9890 

10009 

-1.19 

PaiH 

CAC 40- 

1^7^31 

1,898^0 

-t.17 


Affasrsvaerkten 

1373JB5 

1.869.80 

+0^2 

VJenna 

Stock index .. 

430.17 

429.77 

+ao» 

Zurich . 

SBS 

901.53 

906.74 

-OJS7 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


iMCftMmul HeraU Tribune 


Very briefly; 


• British police foiled a $10 billion international fraud by seizing 
nearly 200 letters of credit obtained by deception from the 
Agricultural Bank of Scotland Yard said. 

• Spanish businessman Javier de la Rosa, facing charges of fraud 
and misuse of funds, was ordered held without bail after a 
Barcelona judge questioned him, prison officials said. 

• StatoQ AS, the Norwegian oil company, said it had discovered 
natural gas valued at as much as 40 billion kroner ($6.1 billion) off 
the southwest coast of Norway. 

• Forte PLC of Britain said it would reorganize its hotels business 
and put about 80 hotels into a separate operating unit, for which it 
may seek outside capital. 

• Safra Republic Holdings, an international private banking group 
based in Luxembourg, said third-quarter consolidated net income 
rose 28 percent, to $383 million. 

• Telefonica SA agreed to sell its 13.24 percent stake in Alcatel 
Standard Electrica for 223 billion Spanish pesetas ($176 million) 
bade to Alcatel NV, in response to a recommendation from the 
European Commission. 

Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP, AFX 


GL4TT Rules Against U.S. on EU Stool Actions DISNEY: Euro Disney Makes Some Adjustments to its Management Style 


AFP-Extd Neva 

WASHINGTON —A GATT panel has 
upheld nine of 15 com plaints mans by the 
European Union against U.S. anti-damp- 
ing and anti-subsidy duties on steel and 
criticized Washington for violating its 
trade obligations. 

Separately, the European C ommis si on 
said Wednesday that it had approved an 
Italian decree to grant 790 billion lire 


($515 million) lire in stale aid for the 
restructuring of the Bresdani steel compa- 
nies in northern Italy. The aid consists of 
600 billion lire for companies dosing units 
and 190 billion lire for investments to 
rchire workers. 

According to acopy of the ruling by the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 
the trade body's panel said the United 
States, in imposing the duties last year, had 


gone too far in judging certain European 
privatizations and debt-forgiveness pro- 
grams as subsidies. 

The panel's ruling is not legally binding. 
Under the rules of the world trade body, 
Washington can block adoption of the 
panel’s report, effectively vetoing iL The 
decision is seen, however, as a good omen 
for other complaints concerning sled trade 
lodged by the EU. 


? ^y^a«w «Br:.T inTjg: w . nan r3acf c 


Business 

Op portunities 
i n the U A E 

Offsets, Privatization and Capital Markets 

Abu Dhabi December 5-6 

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Continued from Page 9 

than his predecessor, Robert 
Fitzpatrick. 

Had the company started out 
by being too arrogant and too 
bound by its own rules? Mr. 
Bourguignon replied: “You 
couldn't have opened the place 
without standard operating 
procedures. The team that 
opened Euro Disneyland was a 
good team. I know there was a 
lot of criticism. But no one 
opens anything on time in 
France." He added, however, 


“Clearly they could have been 
more modest," 

Mr. Bourguignon conceded 
that the company misjudged 
European tastes at first 

“For example, it was at first 
thought that Europeans would 
want exotic and spicy foods,” 
he said. “In fact what they want 
is the basics. They want to be 
able to eat quickly and get back 
to the visiting. We found out 
that they behave very much like 
Americans. They Eke the same 
kind of merchandise — things 


they can buy quickly and at a 
reasonable price.” 

One small change illustrates 
Mr. Bourguignon’s style. When 
the park opened, executives 
confidently predicted that visi- 
tors would stay in the Disney 
hotels and perhaps make a side 
trip to Pans, as if the capital 
were a sideshow. Mr. Bourgui- 
gnon, however, has recently 
changed the name of the park, 
in advertising and marketing 
material, to Disneyland Paris. 

Since the park opened, the 


number of attractions has been 
increased to 39 from 29, and 
some have been improved and 
expanded. Lines are shorter as a 
result, although still a problem 
on busy days. 

Mr. Bourguignon, who had- 
been responsible (or the Euro 
Disneyland hotels, and Mr. 
Burke, vdx> ran the Walt Disney 
stores in the United States, have 
managed to hit it off both as 
colleagues and as friends. It has 
become, simply, the Philippe 
and Steve show. 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vm Aaodotad Pm 


Oct 1 9 


Soman Soman 
Htoh Low 


Opm High Law Ckne C3ig OoJnl 


Grains 


MEAT (CBOT) Mngunw ..... 

4.1 P* m Dec »4 3.93W lWVi 191 197W tOJQUi 42,530 


■ BtrbuM 


4J4* 

U8M 

USU 

IAS 

VS 

isn 


1 U MOT 93 4jD3Vi 4J» 
11 6ft May 95 ID XU 
111 Jul M 1® 152 

131 ft Sep « 152ft 154 
153 Dec 93 161ft 164 
U7 Jul M 


•UK! -Ufflft +UBtt 21J43 
140ft 145ft tOJQtt 1496 

l*ft 151ft tain 9,112 
IKft 154 -OXQ 224 
161ft U4 *(L02 139 

139 6 


Est.iata MA. Tub's, sales 32JS 
Tue'iaaenM 77552 alt 3400 
WHEAT (KBOT) unMnMiwvaglors per hand 

ACTA 112ft DOC 94 4J» JL06 199 UKft t CL ERA JSUOfl 

4CTJ. 223 Mar 95 <-W 4.11 4JM 4.10 ♦tUH HJM 

4.03 121 ft May W 3.M 185 1MH. l*7ft tOJl’A 1.478 

368Ui 114ft Jul K 353ft 157ft 152ft 157 +031246 1444 

177 129 Sep 95 151 159ft 158 159ft + 002ft 77 

MSft 3U58ftDeC95 144ft tOJJft 4 

Est. sales HA Tug's. Kites 7.W3 
Tile's open im 38J14 up 456 
CORN (CBOT) MWQbu rrwwrvrrv oonori MrDusfwl 
177 2.116 Dec 94 114ft 114ft 11* 114 ft— 008 ft 121304 

isn't, 127AMV9S 2CT4 usft us usft— ajjoft sun 

2JB 2J0ftMay9S 2J3V1 133ft 133 133ft-0JUV. MJJ97 

2LB5K. 2JSft Jul 95 138ft 139 138 139 27.4BS 

170ft 139 Sep 95 243ft 243ft 142ft Z*jft-a00ft loco 

143 135ft Dec 95 148ft 149 148 149 11,281 

157 250ft MarH 154ft 2JSft 254Vi 15Sft 19* 

141ft 155ft JlriW 24H4 —0.0014 292 

Est. salts NA rue's sates 78.782 
Toe's open int 24X002 up 7BS 

SOYBEANS (COOT) MM Bu minimum- Mm Per luM.... 

757ft 536ft Hoy M 543ft 543ft SjMft Ml ft— <L03 ft 42454 

7M 537ft Jan 95 5J4 554 551ft 553 — 00214 U764 

7JB 5.47ft Mar 95 SAU 564 561ft J63ft— 0.02ft 20,186 

7.05ft 554 May 93 571 171ft 569ft 571 ft -002 ft 9544 





pTVfl 





i.r 1 , " 








fTTii 


1.1 

n ' \ 





1.^ . iV 1 
















KJ 


EPtsatas NA Tueft-sates 34646 
Toe's open im 151,158 afl 465 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) MO rm- Mm per km 
207J0 159500094 164.90 164.90 16170 164.10 —1.10 1,038 

709.00 14030 Dec 94 16180 163.90 14250 14100 —130 41930 

2075D 141.90 Jan 95 16550 14550 16430 14460 — 150 14J35 

20750 144.90Mar9J 1U5D 16050 16760 16760 —1.10 13519 

207.00 167 60 MOV 95 17163 I71.M T7D50 17030 —130 7 MS 

30450 17D.TO Jul 95 17480 17480 17460 174.10 —050 4.799 

16260 1 72.00 Auo 95 17430 17630 17550 17550 -160 1.063 

1H70 17055 Sep 95 17850 17120 17730 177.40 —170 1.007 

181 JD 1756000 95 17960 179 JO 17E90 179JB —1.10 1,704 

18260 17450 DOC 95 18230 182.00 18130 18130 —130 804 

Esl sates NA Tup's, solos 13534 

Tue'socenlnt 94639 off 947 

SOYBEAN ML (CBOT1 nuaU-uuuolIlK _ 

2950 22.1000*4 26.70 26J6 2465 2472 -4L04 2JB1 

2487 ZLOODecW 25JD 25L20 2496 25.13 -0.13 31,909 

2*55 2265 Jan 95 3465 2468 2424 2462 —0.10 11115 

2*30 2251 Mar 95 3400 2408 2185 2199 -005 13504 

2405 2235 May 9S 2365 23JB 2350 ZL70 -002 70334 

2785 22J8JUI9S 2152 2350 2360 2360 —006 7341 

2730 2273 AuaM 2350 ZL51 =164 2147 —006 2344 

2475 22755«P95 2365 2165 2115 JLB -005 1J01 

2360 22750095 2U5 2365 2130 2132 i-OJQ 1,006 

2X85 2200 Dec 95 2130 3135 2330 2332 ♦ 062 MOT 

Esl sales HA Tub's, sales 24,120 
Tue's open Inr 93689 up 7778 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMSQ pP60PM.-ami.iwas 
7410 457000 94 47.17 £755 47,10 £765 

7430 4730 Dec 94 4*72 4935 48.45 4950 

7435 4485 Fe09S £765 4*25 4765 48.15 

75.10 4737 APT 95 0.77 6*27 6772 4830 

4930 54.20 Jun 95 4452 6100 4*52 6490 

4*10 6360 Aua 95 6X90 4410 4190 4403 

4755 642000 95 4470 4485 4470 4485 

Esl sales 12555 Tue's.idM U4240 
Tub's coon ini 41920 off 174 
reStmCATIU ICMBt) SUHts-GMiivA 




8135 
8*80 
8095 
IMM 
7190 
7130 
7105 

7*18 

Ea. sole* 1626 Tuo'* sales 1528 
Toe's open bit 9,228 up 114 


70.9500 H 71.90 7355 71.40 7260 

71 75 Nov 9* 7250 7355 7150 7147 

71 60 Jan 95 7115 7100 7115 7187 

7*35 Mir 95 7130 71.75 7130 7157 

7*10 Apr 95 7135 7130 7105 7J.M 

6980 May 95 7055 7*90 7055 7*85 

0480 ADO 95 7060 MM 7060 7*80 

06O&P96 4983 7*1 0 0935 TIM 


♦068 1674 

♦ 090 3*371 

♦ *4B 11925 

♦ 053 11,9*3 

♦ 038 3.194 

♦ 035 1371 

♦ 063 228 


♦033 U79 
♦1.15 4645 
♦ 180 1681 

♦ 082 S5S 

+060 455 

♦ 085 300 

♦080 79 

♦ 055 3 


HOGS 

(CMER) no* 






*961 

59.97 Od 94 

30X7 

31.00 

nm 

30X1 

♦0.17 

571 

50.50 

31X7 Dec 91 

3190 

34.15 

33X0 

3170 

♦ 0X8 17614 

9L80 

3545 Eft 95 

'U.VJ 

34X0 

3460 

3465 

♦ 0X5 

4X17 

«xo 

36.WAPTM 

3465 

34.90 

3*53 

3*45 

♦0X0 

3|91S 

4760 

4167 Jun 95 

41X0 

42X0 

41X0 

42 J/ 

+867 


*5X0 


41.90 

42X0 

41J0 

aja 



45*0 

41.15Auo9S 

41X0 

4165 

4165 

4160 

♦0X5 

317 


J&30OH9S 

3*47 

3*60 

3*40 

3160 

+0X3 


4165 

39X0 Dec 9J 




3930 

+0X0 

31 

EH. sate; 5J07 Tin’s, idles 

5X00 





TUB'S Often ini 31670 

OH 132 





PORXBEUJES (CMER) auKons.-cewswris 


9JU 


37X0Fte95 

»J» 

4*25 

3865 

3967 

+ 162 


J760MorW 

39.15 

4060 

39X0 

39X2 



41.15 

3165 May 95 4U» 

*1.15 

4*20 

40X0 

+ 1X0 

Wl 

fa iu 

39 JU Jul 95 

41.15 

41.90 

41.15 

4160 

+ 160 

277 

44X0 

3065 Aw 95 




4060 

+ixa 

41 


Esl sates 1,90 Tw's, sates *450 
Tue'socenlnt 1*457 up 3 48 


Food 

COFFEE C OJC5E) DJMfct- arts owls 

24425 77.10 Dec 94 1*280 20435 19010 »U0 +470 14^9 

74400 7990 Ma 95 19450 21180 19450 20530 **50 11J28 

24460 2250 MOV 95 19780 20*00 19730 20880 +680 *410 

245.10 05X0 Jul 95 19980 19930 19930 309.10 *6X0 1^5 

23*00 18SJ05ep95 20975 20975 »97S J»7S .iXO K9 
242X0 81 30 Dec 95 203X0 203X0 203X0 210X0 * 6X0 056 

ESL sates 9,553 Tub's, sales 4.965 
Tue'SDOenW 34397 up 9 S 

SUBAR-WQRLDI1 (KSO nJ6» *».<*« per . 

1281 9.17 Mar 93 1267 lZJte 1162 J*79 ♦*» »W4I 

12J0 I *59 May 95 1268 1*85 1U5 I2J0 ♦*10 21.909 

1149 1 067 JUl 95 lfJffi 1275 1260 <269 ♦*09 1*292 

1239 1067 Oct 95 1138 1264 12JB tl« ♦*04 11340 


Season Season 
Hteh Low 


(tan Won Low Clos* aw OpJiw 


12X7 


1280 108BMar94 11.97 

11X0 11. 18 May 94 

11X8 1170 Jut 96 

Est. sales NA Tue's.sdes 13316 

Hit's aaen int 140676 up U84 
COCOA (NCSE1 i0iMncmtt-s»ic 
1580 ion Dec 94 iron a 

1405 1077 Mor 95 1352 1355 

1412 IQ7BMOY9S UK 1383 

1400 I22SJUI9S 


1L97 12X2 

12X2 
12X2 


1285 

1332 

1342 


1304 

>361 

1379 

1404 


♦*U 1640 
♦ *06 9 
•DM S 


♦ > 3*916 
♦4 21605 
♦4 7,990 
•2 3JC4 


1540 

1388 Sep 95 

1413 


1X33 

*7470 


ttm 


*7385 

-1 35,105 

1433 

1290 Dec 9S 

1443 

-3 

4,966 

*7605 


Ivl 


*7381 

—1 1X78 













3 441 

1225 May 94 

1520 


312 

06438 

*04S5ep«5 



*7354 

—1 

504 


JUl 9* 

1540 

—15 

II 

06400 

06040 Dec 95 



*7340 

-1 *3 


ESI. totes *329 Tub's, sates 3677 
Tub's open lot 73737 all 322 
ORANGE JUICE (NCTNJ lUOPtoA-amiMr*. 

13400 8580 Nov 94 10560 10780 10585 10460 ♦170 5,739 

13280 ©.SO Jan 95 10980 11075 10860 11*23 *165 9623 

12425 9X03 Mor 95 11120 11175 111X5 11135 ♦ITS 5710 

11725 9780MOV95 UA2S 11460 11575 11540 .1.15 1649 

11980 100X0 Jul 95 11525 11825 11825 119.40 ♦afS 7B6 

12280 107 25 SCP 95 12175 12175 12160 12225 ♦UK 340 

12275 109310 NOV 95 12380 12380 12275 122.95 ♦060 970 

12480 1 0560 Jan 94 12550 12S60 12580 12400 — 060 394 

Mar 96 124X0 —0X0 

Esl. sates 4800 Tub's, sates 4740 
Tin's open in) 34750 up 1344 


Metals 

HtORADSCOFINER (NCMXl &IUII 
1 22.10 
11*80 
11960 
118X0 
11760 
11760 
11460 
115J0 
11520 


7520 OCSM 11860 12*20 118.* 12*05 ♦!» 1^7 

7775N0U94 11760 11*90 11725 119.00 +180 MIS 

7575 Dec 94 11580 11*85 11580 11060 ♦4X0 38791 

74.90 Jon 95 115.10 11*10 11*10 11*00 t375 

7380FN19S 11570 11770 11570 11765 * 365 

7380 Mar 95 11470 117.15 11470 11*90 +065 *112 

9I.1BAPT 95 11475 11475 11470 116.45 +13S 

74855AOV 95 1100 11*10 11420 11480 ->125 1724 

1W.10JW195 11*65 11565 11565 11*55 ♦HD 245 




iuoa 

I1S65 

1UX0 








112X5 

111X0 Aua 95 




114X0 

+2X0 


77X5 

59X8 Dec 94 

49X0 

69.90 

4*25 

4868 

-1X4 24,38V 

1030 

79. 10 Sep 95 

11360 

11360 

11360 


♦ 7X5 

1X50 

7*15 

4260 Mar 95 

7*95 

71.11 

4961 

0.93 

-US 12X0 

11565 

DADO Dec 95 

112X0 

11365 

11160 



1X83 

7865 


7265 

71.10 

71.15 


*873 

10*00 

8860 Jan M 




11*10 

♦ 215 


7165 

S9J0JW95 

7245 

7260 

71.80 

71X5 

-160 

4, M3 

11*30 

4260 Mar 94 111X0 

111X0 

mjn 

11160 

♦ 210 


7460 

64X000 95 

4960 

49 JO 

49 JO 




10960 

















Jul 94 




109X0 

♦ 160 


7*00 

48X0 Mr 94 

4960 

6960 

1960 

065 

-an 

11 


Esl sates 208M Tue'* sales 4X73 
TUe'socenlnl 57X47 a If 511 
SAVER (NCMX) SJMUnwos.-cnnwiTwiM. 

5416 51160a 94 537.1 

NOV 94 5386 

9978 3808 Dec 94 5396 54*0 53*5 54*5 

57*5 4018 Jon 95 54*5 5456 5428 54L1 

4040 4146 Mar 95 5476 5536 547.5 5498 

40*5 418.0 Mov 95 55*8 5588 5545 55*1 

61*0 4208 Jul 95 5428 5436 5428 5413 

40X5 5326 Sea 95 5708 57*0 57*0 5*77 

4288 5398 DSC 95 57*0 581X 57*0 5776 

4128 5758 Jan 94 51*7 

4228 5540 Mar 94 58*0 

5998 B78MOVH 5911 

Jul W 4027 

Esl sates 24000 Tub's, sows 1*412 
Tutes open int 113604 00 502 
PLATINUM (NMER) soirwcau-acteniwimo* 
<3i« 34*00 Oa 94 423.00 42380 42380 42260 

43560 37480 Jtei 95 42170 42190 421 JO 42440 

43980 39*00 Apr 95 42400 42980 J2k80 42*00 

43*00 41960 Jill 95 43*50 43060 43*50 43380 

Oii! JWMflrt W 43460 

43960 «^SJan» 43960 

EzLiotes 3603 Tub's. solas >680 
Toe's open tnl 23X72 off 139 
GOLD (NCMXl laokwas-aoHanpartiwoL 
417X0 34480 00 94 39*10 

NovW 39*80 

42460 34380 Dec 94 39180 39X70 391X0 39260 

41180 36*50*0095 39580 39*90 391*0 39370 

41780 344^1 Apr 95 39960 39960 39960 399X0 

42*60 361X0 Jun 95 403X0 402X0 40380 jqxbs 

41460 30060 Aug 95 40*50 

419X0 -38180 CW 95 41*50 

429.00 40060 Dec 95 415X0 415X0 415X0 41460 

42460 4126a Fat 94 418.60 

430X0 41*30 APT 94 42260 

43160 41280 Jun 94 42480 

Aug 96 43180 

Ed. sates 18600 Tun's, sole s 23689 
Tue'sopenH 155,141 off 2311 


♦26 41 

1X3 

♦26 0*443 
♦26 

♦ 26 14X75 

♦ 2J 4625 

♦ 26 3X13 
♦26 264s 
♦26 2610 

♦ 26 

♦ 26 1.433 

♦ 26 
♦ 26 


♦ L90 145 

♦ 190 11677 
*3.10 3649 

♦ 190 744 

,340 

,3X0 


♦ 180 90 

♦ U)0 

♦ 180 13741 

♦ 180 19,149 

♦ 180 7691 
+ 180 10X91 
+ 180 

+ 180 1,193 
+ 180 
+ 1.10 
* 1.10 

+ 1.10 5612 

+ 1.10 


94X7 —4183 11X44 
9120 9X22 

9378 -0X7 3X1* 
«U9 -0X7 5 


Financial 

UST.HLLS (CMER) tl mMan-WteMOpo 
9*10 94X5 Dec 94 9464 9468 946* 

9585 7*9* MOT 95 9461 9122 91X0 

94X4 9*44 Jun« 9379 93X0 9379 

93X7 9365 Sea 95 

EsL sales NA TUe'ASOUs 1690 
rue’s open Int 31X92 ua 5 
SYR. TREASURY (CiOTJ tioojnoarn- mKlMMOl HOBO 
194-20 101-05 Dec 941U-0B51D24B5 102435 102 -W- 075 168X1* 
103-09100-255 Mor9S01-19S 101-195 101-155 101-14- 075 3X14 

Esl. sales NA Tue 1 * ides 30742 
Tin's aaen M 171X50 Off 1908 

10YR. TREASURY (CBOT) Ittxuoaimn. (W&BnmDriWOC 

114- 21 100-44 Dec 94101-20 101-20 101-12 101-14- 10 70618 

111*417 99-13 ANY 951 00-23 100-24 100-30 100-31- 10 7,711 

105-22 98-24 Jun 95 99-30 - 10 101 

101-0* 98-28 StpSS 99419 994)9 99417 99417 - 10 2 

110-31 90-10 Dec 95 98-22 — 10 

Esl. sales NA Tue'* sates 51687 
Tin's aoen nf 255632 off 2921 

US TREASURY B09IDS (C80T) Nao-IWUlHMsASmtite MOPCD 
118-08 91-19 DM94 96-30 98-30 98-1* 98-71 - 12 397725 

115- 20 94-15 Mar959B4K 984H 97-28 97-11 — 12 

115-19 94-00 Jun 95 97-15 97-15 97-flS 97-11 — 17 

112- 15 95-13 5ep95 04-24 — 12 

113- 11 95-09 Dec 95 96-13 94-13 9*4)0 0*4— 12 

114- 04 95-17 Mar 94 95-21 - 12 

vn-ffi 94-05 Jun 94 95-10— 17 

Est.SfiMS NA Tub's. sate* 30*301 
Tuff’s Open in 434629 off S72S 

MUNKVAL BONDS (CnOT> slBB0i,lnte»-an*3MitialHBeet 
91-17 85417 OecUat-75 15-27 14-17 85-70 - 13 20,209 

064)9 844)6 Mar 9585-18 85-73 85-li 65-10 — 13 358 

EH. sates na Tin's sue* 1658 
Tue'sopenint 206*7 off 77 
EURODOLLARS (CMBRI slmieui-MMlteact. 

9*100 9*710 Dec M M890 94.110 94801 SaSSO 

9*240 MarTS 91700 91710 91*40 91*70 
9* 716 Jun 95 93618 93610 93640 93640 

91 jio sea h nwo n.mt mm moo 

91.180 DaeVS 91440 *1440 92890 92600 

9*750 Mar » 92679 92670 92610 91650 

92640 Jun 9* 92450 924S0 92400 92400 


95600 

K730 

9*650 

94200 

M620 

93.180 


27673 

1T673 

251 

130 

a 

21 


— 30M76U 
- 4(1 WiA" 1 
—88300628 
—9023*471 
-90171,954 
—90149X77 
—90123,947 


Season Season 
HWi Lp» 


Oaen High Low Owe Off OMM 


9114643 


93670 92.15Q Sep 9* 933« «6« 92690 92J0Q 

EH. sales NA Tue'* sales 233633 
TuB'&GOMM 7.55*897 UP 5044 
OR m5H POUND (CMER) iMfiw» I pviaaoucMMlwei 
IA152 1X500 Dec M 1X1 2D 1X221 1X112 1X312 ♦104 41X22 

1X130 1X640MBT95 1X1*0 1X310 1XM* 1X194 +104 489 

}J4BW 1634 Jun 95 1X142 +104 8 

Esi. sales NA Tuo** steal 7,997 
Tue's open if* «J29 off 13 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) sue, ter- 1 naan aoutes PLflOOl 


EH. sates NA Turt. sales 2X14 
Tin's open H 37X50 off 878 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) t w mam- 1 Ptete rates UMOI 


0X700 06590 D*C 94 *4654 *668* 0X437 0X443 

0X711 HWiaMarVS *UU *4495 *4*58 *4473 

OXTOO 06980 Jun 95 *4*90 06*98 0X474 06487 

*45*0 *4347 Sap 9S OA70I 

EH. soles na Tub-* sates 30648 
Tue'i anenU B 94.235 ua 1078 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) ip«r - . - 

081049m»)952Sn«c9JIUllin79a810Mn*810Z72U)10317 

D81O54lIL0O948QMar9S0jn(HQ5081D47S*Oim94*OI(M19 

*81047HL009774Jiin9S *010500*0)05400811151)0*010517 

*01 0775*81 0200Sep 95 *0105900X10415*8105900810411 

*010440U10441Dec95 OX105900X1071»010*900 01070* 

Esl sates NA Tin's, sates 14X84 
Tue'sopenint *3X23 off 829 
SWISS FRANC (CMER) tDsrftanc-lpelterateiUOHI 
08040 AMUDeCM n 08074 0X01* 08044 

0X002 07420 Mor 95 0X103 0X1 OS 0X055 08074 

0X1.18 0846* Jun 95 08133 *0133 08098 *11 07 

0X140 00130 Sep 95 0X140 O.BWO 0X140 0X142 

EH. sales NA Tub's, sates 14X71 
Tile’s open Ini 43.199 up 944 


>5 91X11 
♦ 6 4635 
,« 579 


♦ 0 54612 

♦40 

4681 

*42 

450 

♦ 44 

10 

♦ 44 

11 

♦ 11 41,90 

♦ 71 

1,101 

♦ 11 

IM 

♦ 1? 

3 


Industrials 


Esl solas 13X00 Tin’s, sates 7.73* 

Tub's open int 50645 UP 258 
HEATMGOO. (NMER) 4UDoa.a«iw« 
5*30 4480 Nov 94 4780 4080 47X5 

5980 44X0 Dec 94 4&X5 4960 4060 

4265 065 Jan 95 4960 5*15 49.10 

5*75 47.95 Feb 95 5180 5065 4985 

5760 4780 Mar 9S 4980 5060 4980 

55.15 4385 Apr 95 4965 4965 4960 

5460 47.00 May 95 49.15 49.15 4*95 

5360 4679 Jun 95 4870 48.75 4860 

5460 47X5 Jul 95 4980 49X0 4*90 

55X0 4270 Aug 95 4962 4962 4962 

53.10 41X5 Sep 95 5*42 5082 5*42 

5385 5085 OU 95 5162 5162 5167 

5440 52 00 Nov 95 52X0 52X0 S2X0 

57*0 5380 Dec 95 5369 5360 53.20 

5*50 54)60 AT 94 53X7 5302 5382 

5960 53.90 Ftb 94 5382 5382 53X3 

5480 5470 Mar 94 

5460 4480 Apr M 

EH- sates 40,450 Tin's, seaes 23670 
Tup's ope n int 145703 Off 530 
UCHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) ■paaok-i 
30X9 14X2 NOV 94 1760 1760 176* 

20X0 14.93 Dee 94 17X3 17X3 1767 

19X5 1L13J0n95 1760 17X2 17X3 

1960 1568 Feb 98 1767 1768 17X3 

2*4* 1582 Mar 95 17X0 1767 17X3 

19X8 1565 Apr 95 1765 1761 17.46 

1964 15X9 May 93 1762 1764 17X9 

2*30 1*73 Jim 95 1769 1769 1763 

1987 1*05 Jul 94 17X0 17X2 176* 

1987 16.I4AUB9S 17X0 17X0 17X0 

18X0 17X0 SOP 95 17X5 17X5 17X5 

19.17 14X20095 17X5 T7XJ 17X5 

19X4 17.15 Nov 95 17X7 1765 1760 

2*80 1*60 Dec 95 17.49 17.75 17.49 

31.15 17.05 Jan 94 176* 1764 1764 

18X4 17.75 F9h 9* 17X1 17X1 17X1 

13X0 17.1 5 Mar 94 17.85 1785 17.BS 

EH. sales 118.941 Tub's, antes V623 
Tin's open In! 419654 up 3310 


4161 

4197 

4962 

5*17 

49.97 

4962 

4867 

4867 

48X7 

4*97 

49X7 

5162 

51.72 

52X7 

8127 

53J7 

52X3 

5167 


17X0 

17JS) 

1761 

17X8 

17X0 

1760 

1764 
1768 
1768 
17X0 
17.45 
17X5 
17.75 

1765 
1764 
17X1 
1785 


-0X3 33,909 

♦ 065 44X33 

♦ 0X5 31.752 
♦QJ5 ISJj37 

♦ *43 11X94 

♦ 060 S814 

♦ *10 4,921 

♦ 0X15 4X11 

4X90 

1.914 

♦ 065 1X1* 


,*18 42X01 

♦*I5 9*929 
,089 57,04 
,*04 28639 
♦005 23X34 
»OS4 17^6 
♦089 12X51 
,080 21X83 

♦ *04 13X20 
♦082 

,083 11.934 

♦ 004 14609 
*083 7X10 
♦083 

*003 4774 


UNLEADED CAS0LM8 _ 

55X0 42,75 Nov 94 4965 4980 4780 

4065 5080 Dec 94 54X0 57X5 55X0 

58X0 5040 Jon 95 5585 5560 *460 

5485 51. 10 Feb 95 5460 54X0 54.00 

5465 5280 Mar 95 54X0 5480 54X0 

4*30 9465 Apr 95 57X0 5660 57X8 

5SJM 54X0 May 95 54X0 J4XS 54.40 

5*20 5480 Jim 95 15.90 5*85 54.90 

S7J4 55X0 Jul 9* *560 5580 55X0 

5*35 5480 Sep 95 54X1 54*1 54X0 

SUS 5260 QH 93 53X4 53X4 53X4 

55X0 52X0 Nov 9S 53X4 51X4 5384 

54,75 5289 Dec 95 52X4 52X4 52X4 

S769 54.90 Aug 94 $4X4 5**4 *4X4 

Ettsales 30X43 Tue - *. sales 24609 
Tin’s open irV 70X45 off 1349 


4780 

5560 

S4X5 

5480 

5465 

58X0 

54X5 

MM 

IUI 

54X0 

53X4 

5104 

WM 

54X4 


—182 17X04 
-067 21X13 
-0X0 12X93 
— *40 4X53 
♦0X5 1482 
— *85 4X88 

™ajn 

-U0 024 

— *05 1,1*4 
,0.15 481 

,0.1# 370 

♦ 014 243 
,0.1* 134 

—0*9 402 


Stock Indexes 

SAP COMF. INDEX (CMER) SW> Md 

487.10 42?jSf£c94 473X0 448X0 471X0 +26021264: 

484.10 4416) Mar 95 470X0 474.10 44960 47460 >2X5 10JU 
EH. sales NA Tue^. sales &S683 

Tu£s Often w 225,847 u» 9M 

NYSE COME. INDEX (NYFE) •untewlwii 

24460 37.1 J Dec 94 25*90 259X5 254X0 25*85 ,1X5 4393 

344.(0 348J0MOT9S 25860 3AIJS 257.95 941X0 , 2.10 195 

2*5X0 254X0 Jun 95 243X0 24385 24300 243XS ,265 72 

24460 25560 Sep 95 2*389 343X0 243X0 343X0 'LID « 

Ess. sows NA Tub's, sates IJ82 

Tin's open )nl 4X4* off m 


Commodity Indexes 

Moody's MX 

BB™ "U >es 

Com. Resecrch 231.10 »J2 































Pa ge 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUITMENT 



INTERNATIONAL 

CONSULTING 



SAP PROFESSIONALS 


CAP GEMINI SOGETI. a global leader in Information Technology services, and global International 
Consulting Partner with SAP AG, is doubling the number of SAP professionals in its National 
SAP Competency Centres in Europe and the United States, due to unprecedented demand. 
CAP GEMINI SOGETI has a track record of more than 25 years in the IT business and has been working in 
the SAP arena since 1 986. 

The figures speak for themselves : over 200 customers, more than 300 SAP R/2 and R/3 projects, and a 
network of 14 national SAP Competency Centres co-ordinated by our International SAP Support Group 
working closely with SAP AG in Walidorf, Germany. We are seeking 


PROJECT MANAGERS ref. 1216 


BUSINESS CONSULTANTS ref. 1217 


MODULE EXPERTS ref. 1218 


TECHNICAL SPECIALISTS ref. 1219 


with 
a future 


to join our team of professionals in implementation of SAP systems across the world. 

The prerequisites for these roles are real "hands-on" experience in SAP R/2 and/or R/3 implementation 
allied to strong business acumen and first-class interpersonal skills. Our clients ask for the best from such 
a prestigious, worldwide organisation as ours. 

We are committed to your Technical and professional development and you will have the opportunity to 
work with GEMINI CONSULTING, the change management arm of our Group, in combined SAP and 
Business Transformation projects. 

Remuneration packages are excellent and will fully reflect your business background and SAP 
experience. You have the drive and commitment to take up the challenge of national and international 
SAP implementation with us ! So to build your future, please send your curriculum vitae quoting the 
appropriate reference number and stating whether your preference is for a base in this country or 
overseas to CAP GEMINI SOGETI, Jean Jack Loudes, 76 avenue Kleber, F - 75116 PARIS. 



CAP GEMINI SOGETI 

EXPERTISE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 


executives 

AVAILABLE 


TO COMPANIES INTERESTED 

IN THE 

ARAB MARKET'S 

Arab countries haw recently 
decided to cancel the braefi boycott 
MARKE tinq DELEGATE: Swiss 
cilizen, 20 years experience in 
impart/expori business Excehem 
contacts. both with pubhc and onvale 
sectors, with in-ctoptfr knowledge cl to 
various emt> culture’s and CIS repubLcj 
Fluent English, French. Aratnc. Tib lush 
and Aimemen. SNtang a naw Boston 
with a L-omoiny interested in ntroducxig 
ITigir products Roadv to tokteata 
Please ante under P.O. Box O 43 r. 

IHT 181, flv Chsrtes-dfrGaufle, 
88200 Nouffly-wt-Sdn* 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH/ H&SRM 
Human Eghtj Wcxdi. the fracing Ui- 
bated international human nghts 
orgxtcahan, is MeVxiq tn Execute* 
Director of as Hetanfci dwiucfl. to deeci 
in work cocnbaOHig woteftora of human 
rights abuses m Europe & the former 
Soviet Unan. He or to represents the 
cxyuniaition frequently before the 
pres, meets regularly wxfr feqhJevet 
orffcnb, sets regional pnonhes nr the 
on, wpervaei a mu&Hiifice 

neorchers & advocate, cw- 

duiaes ucl w mq with ofted arpano 
Ions, rakes part in research & writing, £ 
men m Fund 'gang. Applicants n*s 
hove thorough knowledge of human 
right issues & wbsttMftd evpenence m 
the regon To apply, please send by 
December I, a cover tatter, resume, 
writing sample & the name & phono 
numbers of three work-iebred refer 
cnca ta Helsinki Search Co mmitt ee, 
Human Ritfth Watch, 485 FMt Av*. 
New York, NY 10017. EOE 


KNiGHT-RIDDBl 

HNANdALNEWS 

The Feat growing international rtoUmr 
news agency, seeks FINANCIAL 
COMMODITY MARKET REPORTERS 
lor its Pont. Mian end FronHuO 
bureaux. Qualified camfctotei «iB he 
bfinged ffrench-Engfish in Pare, Italian- 
Eng&h xi Milan, GenrovEngfah n 
FTWkfurf) with a keen interest m undo-- 
stanckng and reporting forex, anil, 
denvames. energy ana raw materials 
markets. Abiby to write dear, fast copy 
wider pressure a essential News 
agency experience and additional 
languors would be an advantage. 


ekes if avadabta, to itie Gwrf 
orresponaent, France 'Itoly/Spon, 
KRFN, 14 rue Lafayette, 75009 Pans 


Corresi 


HOTEL MANAGER 

is required to manage prope r ties 
in Pen*, Mofeea *rod Manoaa. 
Unwerofy degree. 5 years experience, 
accounting. French & Engksh are 
needed. Apt 30-45, male cr fern*. 
Send CVtos Bex 3732, LHT„ 
92521 Neoffly (Max, France, 
ffor rtBrvxw purptxet! 


■i 


.30 Purchasing Professionals 
Europe 


Valeo 


The Valeo Group designs, develops, manufactures and markets automotive components & 
systems to major vehicle manufacturers worldwide. Our global growth strategy is 
extremely ambitious. 


To drive this strategy for progress and make sure it integrates our suppliers, we are strengthening 
our purchasing skills in our main facilities in Europe and are seeking 30 Purchasing 
Professionals. 

Engineering, Business School, University graduates, specializing in purchasing, you should have a 
good knowledge and practical experience of purchasing (quality, price, service). You will also 
need to have wide experience in an international industrial environment. Experience with 
working in a project team structure would be appreciated 

The positions available, which are part of our international supplier development strategy in 
which you will play a leading role, offer good prospects. Youx proactiveness, openness, 
entrepreneurial spirit, will all go towards making a success of your career with us. 

The positions axe based in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the U.K. 

Please indicate in your letter which countries you would be interested in working in and in which 
languages, besides English, you are proficient professionally. 

If you would like to join as, please send your application (resume, photo, letter) to our partner 
MERCURI URVAL, c/o V&LEO KECRUTEMENT - BP 911 - 75829 PARIS Cedex 17 - France, 
quoting the reference 60 .32. AC on the letter and the envelope. 


Through its high technology product end systems and global operations, the Valeo Croup is one of the 
rna/or partners to passenger car and commercial vehicle manufacturers worldwide. VaJeo employs oivr 
05.000 people in its 10 operating units. It has 80 manufacturing and research facilities and totals sales of 


over FT SO billion, 60 “a of which is achieved outside France. 


Valeo 


L’EQUIPEMENT 

AUTOMOBILE 


ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 


r 


SECRETARIAL POSTsHM AN - 7<> 
INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION 7 

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
(OECD), an international organisation based in Paris, is seeking 
bilingual secretaries. Gross salary for full-time work FF 11,000 to 
13.000 per month. Half-time positions also available. Excellent 
knowledge of English or French and a good knowledge of the other 
language essential. High-speed accurate typing (50 words per 
minute) and experience with word processing systems required. 

Applications from male and female nationals of OECD member 
countries (Australia, Austria. Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, 
France, Germany, Greece, Iceland. Ireland, Italy, Japan, 
Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands. New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, 
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United 
States) with curriculum vitae to: 

Human Resource 
Management Division, OECD 
2 rae Andr6 -Pascal, 75775 PARI5 CEDEX 16 
marked "HT/SEC OCT 94- 


Only short-listed candidates will receive a response 




A 


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 

Executive iri-lingun) personal assisiani for CEO of international 
division of Hollywood based television production company. Company 
is experiencing tremendous growth. Position offers tremendous 
opportunity. Musi be educated, poised, extremely organized, flexible, 
ambitious with initiative. Looking for someone with strong language 
skills. Preferably French. Italian. English. Must have proper working 
papers. Will be based in London or Paris. 

Fax or mail CVs to: 

PSF 

33. rue Galilee 75116 Paris 
Fax 1 33) I 47 20 56 38 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


COSMOPOUTAN 
RBKM YOUNG LADY 

WASHINGTON D.C 
GRADUATE 

E.cefo«> pmtWimon with mufo- 
ciAir al A W> wool background 
French K American doom* 

[ini I tetamni with speoanaf'on 
r-tadta East & Latin Arncntai snskm) 
Rvant in French, Enciiih, 
Spanis h , Itatkm A Arabic, 

And with e>ppicncc in mil organ- 
iwitcns eonuwroal & group* 

SEEKS PA / PR POSTTJCJN 
WITH AN WTL VIP OR COMPANY. 
Free to nowl 
Seri- Ecu J.V. I.H T. 

725?l tirmllv Code.. Fiance. 


SAINT JUDE AND SACKS] HEART 

ijt Jewn lhanli (o' pa*n answered 

AX 


EUROPEAN, MD wrth MBA 

Fluent xi Enqtah, French and German. 
35, married to Awn wilh 2 It xfc, 

yews at experience m the phtrmaoeu- 

ueal industry with 3 ycors m Ecct Asa is 

looking tw new diofcngi) xv merkeirng 

Qi general manogemert. preieraUv <n 

East Asa, bid negMtable. 

Piesentiy located m south East Asia. 

Pleas* tat to Jh 62-21 -345 25 69 


THANK YOU SACRED HEART OF 

Jesus and Sr. Jude for payers 
answered A.V. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCQHOUCS ANONYMOUS Mqh 
thm dathr. Tel. PAB6 
... ^ ^ 9> a. ROME ft?# 0320. 

Frankfurt areas. 


soeoktno mM tings dathr. 
"34 


AID0J The hnea Amenan toes. 
Ai-rsteble a the testing 

men's store in ZURICH, BoWtaS* I) 
Fhooe 01-21 12950 


FEEUNG tow? — having problem? 

SOS HELP CtnaXne m Enqloh. 3 fun ■ 
IT pm. TeF ftm (1] 47 2? 60 TO 


MOVING 



AG.S. 
A.G.S. 
A.G4. 
A.G 4. 
A-GJ. 
AGS. 
A.G.S. 
A-GA 


PARS (33-11 «)W20 40 

LONDON 7P5 

WUS5asp 3)534 25 08 
BBOM M9-30) J3I 26 s5 
MADRID 3649 71 
BUOAPBTp6-fll63a0 5Q 
PRAGUE 142 2) 085 7210 
WARSAW (48-33) 5$2 555 


FRIENDSHIP 


PRETTY AMERICAN WOMAN, nS. 
dim, Uordr. kvmg ui Cone, aedft 
eenerom and nonorobta gemtatnai. 
tot mutunftv rewdmg Satan. Coll 
Rome on ps>] o 397 397 00 e«r. 18 


A FRENCH CmZBi 28 YEARS OUI 
^oduatod n marketing manogemeM, 
entartamment business cipenence m 
Pons, training m Los Angeles, now 
soda to brmg hn sfalls to a po uaon n 
manogemen] or cocxdinatian m Los 
Angeles Lawyer based >n Los Angeles, 
ready 10 pay the HI vao process. Ask 
_ for Luota, Pares, France 33-14307^31 . 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


HOTEL DIRECTOR - French. Am-ncan. 

seeks pKrtion with Esrosecn H«ei [or 

Chateau). U years USA openense 

with 3 £ 4 Slat Rewtts. Strong Sates' 
Marketing skills with Eut-Jpwi. N^rth 
& Saijth American dienteta. berfent 
references. For.- USA ?K .>i->971 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


CREATIVE INTHUGENCE (Cernion. 52 
yws young) teehna challenge op- 
COrtumN a irJFOFSENEUR e.g. elec 
norsc mufritneto publishing. Hease 
ccmcci. Fo (33) 79 01 5A thanb 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

* 750 READY MADE COMPANIES 

* BANK INTRODUCTIONS 

' ACCOUNTING. LEGAL 8 AOMIN 

* LCi AM) TRADE DOCUMENTATION 
■ TELEPHONE 4 MAIL FORWARDING 

T elephone o» Far tar immedate wrvrce 
end TOO pegs colour brochure 

OCRA ASIA UMJTB) 

24TI2 Bank Amonca Tower 
Harccwrt Road, HanqKong 
Tel- +B5J 5220172 
Ftn: +852 5211190 


OWN YOUR OWN BUS1NES5 
Sell starters requeeti A prenmr Utatea 
States xtvenlor servtoes company d 
taking to continue tb expanuan into 
Europe N«g«tobli xwestmert required. 
LWmw«f growth potenkal, ftfl nwhon 
experience necessary. MM us at to 
foernaaatnf bUkuan. ideas and new 
products (IENA|Nufemburg 2u710-3D'IO 
at the Amencon Group tar kvtwtoa & 
Technology sW(Te! : 0W1 860T0 - 
Germany) or contact Edtwn Sheppvd 
on 0993 813588 |UK) 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

* Free pro fes s « i» J cona j fc a ttain 
' Worldwide mcoporohores 

‘ knmedrte avoflobUy 

* FiA conPdenM serview, 

‘ London rtpesenMrve _ 

’ rul odmnilraiion service* 

ASTON CORPORATE TRUSTEES LTD 
19, Peel Road, Dowjlaj. We at Mai 
Tel: OOi 430591 Fto WJ4 6351 2e 


SB90NG POSITION; HOTE GENERAL ! 
MANAGE lor msatl hoW recsond 
or year round: abdty m Itolicn. Greek 
& Spares h. Puses; Advertang & VWea 
prociuctian, hood e. bevtsace. Tel 
BI4 -589-5322 USA 

FR84CH MAN, 39 FLUENT: English. 

Otwese. 3panr+i jeefa twsirron cs “nT , 
. retsesentotwe. Tei P2 ij 40.101-Lfl. .! 


OR5HORE COMPANIES t BANKING 

• FRS Brochure J Ad»nc 

• 9ieff C om p aa es IX £ Worldwide 

• Norn nee Management & Otoe 

• Banking, Acawnlsticy i Ta» 

• VAT Adran S RefureS 

APPISONS 

184 Hammer unlh Ed London Wa TDJ 
Tei 44 B1 741 1224 Fre. 44 01 .'40 4555 


BMGUSH SPEAKING COUNSELORS 
tor student e> change program 
thnwghoui Europe. Ausnafa. rtaw 
Zealand. Memo a and Central Amenta 
FAJ resume-. 41S.-499-56SI, Tak 415/ 
j^-7669 USA. 


WE ARE LOOKING FOR B4GUSH o> 
American reeehers far our Language 
Det-criment. Pte-35* c enroei u tor cm 
interview. Con Pots 44.94.1 4J3. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


BUNGUAL SECRETARY, French mother 
tongue, fluent Engish, lowwledge of 
German, oudo word processng, 4| 
years' experience in low firms, seeks a| 
stable, challenging posdwn with PorBt 
based law tarn. Tab |1> 47 a332.I1. 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

INTL CARER OPPORTUMTY 
We ree on mtl PRESS & ADVemSIW 
AGflilCY seeking soles coorirotors. 
UenBy you cre 

• Between 24 and 30 yews old. 

• Excelleni i^penanee. 

• ExceHere commend of Eng&ih, French 
and knowledge of Spanoh. 

• Dynomc, extrorert, carfidem, opfc- 
iiMk, mdependent. seff-nwtrvatad 

• Praiared 10 hovel 10 months a year 
wnh residency and extended stays m 
different countries. 

• No experience m sole 5 necessary. 

The job entofc cor facts a-i the bghesf 
level df over the world aid o reword- 
ing solary. 

H- you ttwtl you have the drive and are 
ambmaui enough to take the dxAenqe. 

woidd Sfee you to send us your CV 
together with a recent photogrqsh 
pramptfy ta 

c/o NOA 

91. RUE DU RG ST HONORE 
75003 PARK 


far cm 


totenwfiaml ... 
located io Geneva a 

EXIW»1CED A 

tar h personnel deportmert. 

The umcfdato should be oround 30 
yean old, binguol Frendi/Engfeh with 
excelenl cniiwnbuiive skih ard CCpO- 
ble of working under pressure. 

If you have a vdid wart permit, 
pteow send detdBed opptadwn to 
opher 18-118753 PuMatoTGewra. 
case pastole 445. 1211 Geneva 3. 


TRADE JQURNAUST 
wanted by leodng monthly magazine 
for the piasfca mintry to write and 
raiCTch leehnied artides. bp erience m 
trade pubtsting prefcried. Regulor 
travel returned. Tap sdory end woefta. 
Send resume and sdary requirements to 
Ethonal D e portme n t. 

Modwn Ptaftc Irternattond 
MeGravwHI PubfawmB Co. 
r 19. 

I AJvV 


pANADA 

Delegation to Unesco (Paris) 

j Political assistant Reporting to ambassador, you promote Canadian 
interests through meetings, negotiations, initiatives, support to 
delegation activities Absolutely required. University degree 
(min. Bac. +4|. relevant experience of international organizations, 
high operational level in both English and French, working 
capability on computers, excellent knowledge of Canada 
Applications to be submilled with C.V., 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Page 13 

AS1A/PACIF1C 


■ 


rr. 


NTT Is Willing 
hi’ To Give Local 
: Access to Rivals 


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TOKYO — Nippon Tele- 
graph & Telephone Corp said 
Wednesday it was willin g to 
connect its domestic lines with 
other carriers. When and if an 
agreement is reached, part of 
Japan’s telecommunications 
market will be opened to fresh 
competition. 

Since October 1992, three 
long-distance carriers — Japan 
Telecom Co„ DDI Corp. and 
Teleway Japan Corp. — have 

Honda Expects 
To Drop Its Auto 
Project in China 

Bloomberg Business News 

TOKYO — Honda Motor 
Co. may scrap a plan to assem- 
ble Civic cars in Guangzhou 
that has been on hold since the 
Chinese government banned 
new car projects. 

’‘Officially, it is not can- 
celed,” said Yo Harada, a 
Honda spokesman. “But 
Honda and our Chinese partner 
believe it will be canceled.” 

Mr. Harada added that can- 
cellation would not mean that 
Honda had given up hope of 
ever making cars in China, po- 
tentially the biggest car market 
in the world. He said, however, 
that the Japanese maker had no 
other cuuent projects there. 

Honda and Guangzhou 
Yangcheng Automobile Co. 
last year set up a 50-50 joint 
venture to assemble Civic se- 
dans at the Chinese company’s 
factory. 

Honda’s shares fell 20 yen to 
dose at 1,720 ($18). 


been hying to persuade NTT to ' 
connect their networks with 
NTT’s local circuits so they 
could start a new type of high- 
speed data transmission service 
for corporate users. 

M asas hi Kojima, president 
of NTT, said negotiations on 
cost-sharing and other issues 
were needed before the lines 
could be connected. 

Mr. Kojima made his an- 
nouncement a day after Japan 
Telecom requested government 
intervention to resolve its 2- 
y ear-old dispute with NTT. 

Major Japanese newspapers 
reported that the dispute 
stemmed from NTT’s monopo- 
ly of the domestic telephone 
network. Some said (he issue 
would support (he politically 
sensitive view that NTT should 
be broken up. 

[Peter Wolff, a senior analyst 
at CS First Boston (Japan) Ltd. 
told the International Herald 
Tribune that the statement by 
NTT marked a retreat under 
pressure and that its days as an 
unassailable monopolist were 
numbered. 

[He said, however, that while 
NTT was likely to have to com- 
promise on price, Japan Tele- 
com would also have to com- 
promise, because the Ministry 
of Posts and Telecommunica- 
tions wanted the issue resolved. 

[“NTT has been trying to 
mam tain its monopolistic posi- 
tion in the market and is refus- 
ing to cut a deal. But the breezes 
of deregulation are blowing 
through Japan,” Mr. Wolff 
said. He added that the extent 
to which competition would be 
increased depended on what 
price N i l would agree to for 
the services.] 


Asia Bargains for Power 

Countries Set Tough Terms in Deals 


By Michael Richardson 

Iiuenuuwwl Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — Swamped with offers to fill 
their power-generating needs, Asian coun- 
tries are demanding better deals and setting 
tough new terms in negotiating contracts. 

Intensifying competition among private pro- 
ducers to start generating electricity projects in 1 
Asia is allowing countries to impose tougher 
entry terms on newcomers, officials said 

The glut of comped tors has allowed Indo- 
nesia to negotiate tighter terms, and India is 
considering such a move. 

“There is a case now for tightening terms," 
an Indian official said Wednesday. “The rules 
of the market will dictate whether and how 
much we change.” 

Gordon Wu, who controls Hopewell Hold- 
ings Ltd of Hong Kong, recently said he put 
a brake on his activities in China when Beij- 
ing, worried about rising inflation and elec- 
tricity costs, began talking of offering only a 
12 percent rate of return, which he said no 
banker would look at. 

Electricity generation in Asia has tradition- 
ally been the preserve of the state. But govern- 
ment funding constraints and surging de- 
mand as the region industrializes have 
prompted many Asian countries to turn to the 
private sector, both local and foreign. 

A recent report by the World Bank estimat- 
ed that Asia would spend S277 billion on 
electric-power expansion in the next five 
years and that China and India would ac- 
count for 75 percent of the total. Indonesia is 
expected to be the third biggest source of new 
power plants. 

[On Wednesday, officials here said that 
British Gas PLC would lead a consortium to 
build a $350 million gas-powered plant in 
West Java along with Bakrie & Brothers PT of 
Indonesia, a diversified company with inter- 
ests in lelecomunicaiions and plantations. 

[Industry sources said the agreement prob- 
ably would be signed in November after Brit- 
ish Gas and Bakrie signed a gas purchasing 
agreement with Indonesia's state-run oil com- 
pany, Pertamina.] 

So far this year, India has approved seven 
private power projects. They include one by 
Enron Corp. of the United 'States to build a 
2,000 megawatt plant near Bombay at a cost 
of $3 billion. 

A further 35 foreign-investment proposals 


Manila Exchange Cancels Peregrine Fine 


MANILA — The Philippine Stock Exchange 
on Wednesday withdrew a 5 million peso 
($199,000) fine it had imposed on Peregrine 
Capital Philippines Ltd. 

Peregrine Capital, a unit of Peregrine Invest- 
ments Holdings Inc. of Hong Kong, was fined 
Friday for incomplete disclosure in a draft pro- 
spectus concerning shares in Liberty Telecom 
Holdings Inc. The prospectus failed to disclose 


that the chairman of Liberty, Raymond Moreno, 
had a U.S. criminal conviction. 

The Philippine Stock Exchange board decided 
to hand the case over to the Philippine Securities 
and Exchange Commission after Peregrine ques- 
tioned the exchange's authority to impose the 
penalty. Brokers said the Peregrine case would 
lead to “more transparent reporting" on people 
whose companies are going public. 



for power generation, valued at more than 
S21 billion, are awaiting approval by Indian 
authorities. 

A. Arismunandar, director-general of In- 
donesia’s Mines and Energy Department, 
said Indonesian authorities now could bar- 
gain with independent producers who want to 
sell power to PLN, the Indonesian stave 
electricity utility. 

In doing so, Jakarta will reduce the rate of 
return to investors below the current 22 per- 
cent, compared with the 16 percent offered to 
private companies in India and the 15 percent 
maximum in China. 

An Indian official, who requested anoni- 
raity, said India's benchmark rate of 16 per- 


The glut oi competitors has 
allowed for tougher contract 
negotiations. 


cent was more generous than it seemed be- 
cause it was conditional on the plant being 
operational for 68.5 percent of the time. 

An efficient plant would be in service for 
more than 80 percent of the time and thus 
earn a higher rate of return, he said. 

China is resisting pressure from investors 
to improve its terms of private power produc- 
tion, which are considered among the least 
rewarding in Asia. 

But despite such complaints, Beijing says 
that foreign interest in its power projects 
remains strong. 

“Currently, there are still more than 10 
joint-venture proposals in my office.” said 
Chen Tong Hai, vice minister of China's State 
Planning Commission. 

Power-company executives and bankers 
said the tightening of terms outlined by Mr. 
Arismunandar was unlikely to dampen en- 
thusiasm by the private sector for investment 
in Indonesian power generation. 

The head of a large Indonesian group of 
companies said his power unit bad teamed up 
with British and American firms to negotiate 
agreements for two major projects under 
which PLN would buy electricity for the na- 
tional grid. 


Indosat 
Plays Well 
At Home 
And Away 

Confuted fry Our Stuff From Dispatches 

JAKARTA — Shares in PT 
Indonesia Satellite Coip. fol- 
lowed up a strong debut in New' 
York with another in Indonesia 
on Wednesday, rising 21 per- 
cent from their issue price of 
7,000 rupiah ($3.22). 

Indosat shares closed at 
8.475 on the Jakarta Stock Ex- 
change. Trading in the stock 
accounted for 68 percent of the 
exchange's turnover. 

Indosat, Indonesia’s state- 
owned provider of international 
phone service, offered 10 per- 
cent of its shares in Jakarta and 
25 percent in New York. 

In New York on Tuesday, 
American depository receipts 
for shares in Indosat were 
priced at $32, traded as high as 
$40, and dosed at $37,125. 
More than 9.1 million ADRs 
were traded, making it the most 
active issue on the New York 
Stock Exchange. Wednesday 
afternoon, the ADRs were trad- 
ing at $38.00. up 87.5 cents. 

The interest in Indosat, fund 
managers said, came in part 
from buyers eager for a piece of 
anything from Indonesia. With 
180 million people, Indonesia is 
the fourth most populous coun- 
try in the world. 

“It’s been a neglected mar- 
ket,” said Anthony L.T. Cragg. 
a fund manager at Strong/Cor- 
neliuson Management Inc. Mr. 
Cragg said he had bought more 
than S3 milli on of the stock. “If 
you’re going to go in there, this 
is a good long-term play.” 

The showing by Indosat in 
New York will probably result 
in more Indonesian companies 
going public in the U.S.. said 
Linda Killian of Renaissance 
Capital in Connecticut. 

{Bloomberg, N YT) 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 

hood 

- 2W 

22000 

‘ “ h *JV 

sooiAi - mJ* 



2200 — ■ 

20000 ■ 

M J J A S O 

1994 

jj'aso 

1994 

jj 

1994 


Exchange 

Hong Kong 

Singapore 

Sydney 


Wednesday Prev. 
Close Close 


Hang Seng 
Straits Times 
Ail Ordinaries 


Close 

9,320.06 

2,384.11 

2,013.40 


9.418.57 

2,383.98 

2,003.40 


% 

Change 

-1.05 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

19,868.87 

19,992.40 

-0.62 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,118^6 

1,118.74 

441.01 

Bangkok 

SET 

1,501.42 

1,501.68 

-0.02 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

1,094.76 

1,113.29 

-1.66 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6£69.10 

6,755.53 

-128 

Manila 

PSE 

3,099.34 

3,092.95 

+0.21 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

51SJB7 

510.63 

+1.63 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,061.66 

2,052.41 

+0.45 

Bombay 

National Index 

2,036.12 

2,043.54 

-0.36 

Sources. Reuters. 





Very briefly: 


• Chrysler Corp. plans a joint venture in Vietnam to assemble and 
eventually manufacture Jeeps, pickup trucks and other vehicles. 

• Singapore has imposed curbs on credit card ads to encourage 
thrift among its people. The Monetary Authority of Singapore has 
told banks that credit cards advertisements cannot include gifts, 
special discounts or incentives that encourage consumer spending. 

• Hong Kong’s Hang Seng stock index fell 1.0S percent; dealers 
cited concerns about Beijing's announcement Tuesday that Chi- 
na’s annual inflation rate had risen to 27.4 percent in September. 

• Shandong International Power Development, which was expect- 
ed to be the third Chinese utility to issue shares in Hong Kong, 
said it would wait to list its shares until investor confidence in 
Chinese power companies unproved. 

• Caterpillar Inc. said its sales in China could rise several times and 
reach $500 million by the end of the decade. 

• PSA Peugeot Citroen SA of France and Premier Automobiles 
Ltd. of India said they agreed to establish a joint venture in India 
to manufacture Peugeot 309 models. 

• Taiwan courts have indicted 16 people in a case in which the 

state-run Bank of Taiwan allegedly sold property at an artificially 
low price to a group of government officials, the Economic Daily 
News reported. 4 a Bbomfrcr^ 


j4syoti can well imagine , you need a lot of talent to build an estate . 
That's why some bankers do only that . 


HELLENIC REPUBLIC 

MINISTRY OF TOURISM 


ri- 




4 r* . 

r. * . t- : _ 

■br-'. 


INVITATION TO SHOW INTEREST IN THE 
DEVELOPMENT OF CASINO AND MARINA ENTERPRISES 
IN THE LAND AND SEA AREA OF PHLISVOS, ATTIKI 

• < 

(Ministerial Decision 1364/1994 
Government Gazette 615B/1994) 

Interested parties are hereby invited to take delivery of the particulars of a 
competition for the award to the highest bidder of the development of the sea and 
land areas of Phlisvos, AtfikL as those are defined in the joint ministerial deci- 
sion of the Ministers of Tourism and of Environment, Planning and Public Works 
(Joint Ministerial Decision 1363H994, Government Gazette 827A/1994). 

The development of the following installations and buildings is permitted in 
' the land area, in accordance with the site construction terms laid down by the 
Joint ministerial decision: 

lal Construction of marina management offices and marina support premises. 

El A 4006- seat conference centre. 

[c] A luxury hotel with a maximum capacity of 300 beds. 

@] a casino with a total, floor area of 78.000 square meters. 

[13 Open-air car parks to international specifications. 

OQ Landscaping of the surrounding gardens and other ornemental work. 

In the sea area, the award will provide for completion of the work already in 
progress and the construction and operation of the marina to international speci- 
fications. 

The competition will be conducted under the terms and conditions laid down 
by decision of the Minister of Tourism no. 920/1994 (Government Gazette 422B), 
in conjunction with Law 2206/94, Article 57 of Law 2224/94, and Law 2160/1993, 
Article 30 ff, as those hove been supplemented by decision no. 1364/1994 of the 
minister of Tourism and Joint Ministerial Decision no. 1363/1994. 

Investors wishing to take part in the competition may obtain the necessary 
details as of the date of publication of the present notice in the Press, from the 
following address: 

MINISTRY OF TOURISM 

SECRETARIAT OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION FOR THE 

CONCESSION OF CASINO LICENSES TOTHE HIGHEST BIDDERS 
2 Amerikis St. Tel.: 3221239 - Fax: 3232605 
5th floor, offices 517-518 
105 64 Athens, Greece. 


Business Message Center 

Every Wednesday 
Contact Philip Oma 
Tel.: (33 1)46 3793 36 
Fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office or representative 


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They know a personal 
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Geneva's Private Bankers 

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In Geneva: 

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(1844) (1796) (1798) (1819) (1805) 








--W 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


WIFE: When They Married, She Didn’t Know He Worked for the Russians; When She Found Out, She Panicked 


Continued from Page 1 
tables are spread out enough for 
private wnversaiion. They or- 
*tered drinks, thev ordered din- 
ner, and then he 'told her. “I’m 
working for the Russians." he 
said. It was that simple. 

At ^ first she didn't believe 
him. “My first reaction, apart 
from utter panic, was one of 
denial. My first impulse was to 
say. *Well, this is obviously 
something that has to do with 
your work . . . like the CIA told 
you to do this, some strange 
son of operation.' I knew that 
these things happen, that peo- 
ple get sent over . . . and he said 
no. 

■ “I didn’t want to know what 
it was. I said, ‘I don’t want you 
to tell me anything else.’ ” 

The Russians, he told her, 
had asked for pictures of her 
and Paul “He made it very 
clear that the Russians were not 
going to like it that T knew. He 
suggested very clearly that I was 
a liability, i was a problem be- 
cause I wasn't supposed to 
know. He had told me. so I was 
in danger, and they had pic- 
tures." 

She says that was one of the 
main reasons for her “ruinous 
decision" not to tell anyone. 
“My panic was that these peo- 
ple know what l look like, what 
my son looks like." she says. “I 
had nightmares in which I 
dreamt that the Russians are 
coming after me and Paul. They 
know what my mother looks 
like. They know what her name 
is, too." 

To understand her predica- 
ment that night, it helps to un- 
derstand how she wound up sit- 
ting opposite this man at a table 
in a restaurant. 

As a 30-vear-old university 
teacher of literature, criticism 
and philosophy, she had lived ai 


home in Bogota with her promi- 
nent family. A friend of Colom- 
bia's then-president she was 
chosen to be cultural attache at 
the embassy in Mexico. There 
she met Aldrich Ames — attrac- 
tive. separated from his wife. 1 1 
years older than Rosario and 
working at the U.S. Embassy. 
They began to date. They 
shared an interest in the arts, 
she says, and she found him 
“cosmopolitan.” “cultured." 
"traveled. ” 

Tery Gentle and Sweet 1 

‘‘What was compelling about 
him. for a person like me who is 
very nervous and high-strung 
and passionate about things, he 
was sort of very stable and very 
quiet and very calm. Very gen- 
tle and sweet.” 

They fell in love and he pro- 
posed. Only then did he tell her 
that he was in the CIA. She was 
shocked, she says. “1 would 
rather have had him be what he 
appeared to be so magnificent- 
ly. which was a very cultured, 
quiet diplomat." 

After their engagement. Al- 
drich Ames left Mexico for 
Washington, and she followed. 
They got a small apartment, 
and she traveled back and forth 
to Bogota and Mexico for a 
while before their marriage on 
Aug. 3. 1985. Unknown to her. 
he had begun working for the 
Russians that March. 

It was right after he started 
with the Soviets and before 
their marriage, she says, that he 
explained his finances to her. 
He had an old friend Robert 
from Chicago, he told her, with 
whom he had made some in- 
vestments. Robert had done 
very well. She thought nothing 
of it. she says, because lots of 
people have investments. So 
there was never any sudden in- 


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fusion of cash. Her husband 
she says, always liked to live 
well. 

Mr. Ames — she calls him 
Rick — was assigned lo Rome. 
There, she says, for the first 
year or so, she was “full of en- 
thusiasm. optimistic, just very 
happy.” She had a miscarriage, 
then became pregnant with 
Paul. But during that time, she 
says, her marriage was deterio- 
rating rapidly. “Rick started be- 
coming indifferent, showing 
less and less interest in. lei’s say, 
the sexual part of our relation- 
ship, which was very hurtful to 
me,” she says. When she 
brought it up, he said he didn't 
want to talk about it. 

She was so delighted with her 
new baby, she didn't worry 
about sex for a while. But her 
husband bad a “strange hold" 
on her. “I look back on it now 
and see this very' unhealthy de- 
pendency relationship," she 
says. “He knew exactly what 
strings to pull to get me to react 
in whichever way he wanted." 

Secrete From the Start 

“1 think the other thing that 
contributed to that sort of un- 
healthy dependency that 1 de- 
veloped with Rick was the fact 
that there were so many secrets 
involved from the start in my 
life." Nobody knew that her 
husband worked for the CIA. 
and she was not allowed to tell. 
“Rick was the only one who 
knew everything. So I became 
unhealthily attached to the only 
person who had all the secrets," 
she says. “We had to share the 
CIA thing, he knew our rela- 
tionship was not working. And 
then later on. this horrible 
thing, ft was very strange. 

“Who could I tell what? 
Where would I start? Nobody 
even knew he worked for the 



- A -o 

l: J, * 

/■ • v; ■ 

l: - 



kolh Jfnkin«- Thr \kjdnnciim p.i%t 

Rosario Ames in a visitation room at the detention center. 


CIA,” she continued. “How 
could I tell all these people all 
of a sudden: ’No. my husband 
is not a diplomat. He really 
works for the CIA, but he 
doesn't even work for the CIA. 
he works for the Russians. I 
really haven’t had a wonderful 
life for the lasL four years. I'm 
ugly* — my self-confidence was 
totally crushed at that point. I 
just didn’t have any will. I 
couldn't do anything, I was like 
a robot. 

“That was my biggest mis- 
take. 1 could not confide in any- 
one," she says. “I ended up con- 
cluding that Rick was the one 


who had to save me or protect 
me. That’s why I stuck there. 

“But it became a nightmare 
because obviously I hated what 
he was doing. I despised it. I 
insulted him. We fought all the 
time." She became sick, she 
says, with migraines, hives, al- 
lergies and other psychosomatic 
ills. “I just felt toiaUy trapped. I 
did not know what to do and 
the fear got so bad 1 was unable 
to function like in mv normal 
life." 

At one point, in front of her 
husband and her mother, she 
says, she started pounding her 
head against the kitchen cabi- 


nets. Her husband, she says, 
had to grab her arms. 

She is relieved, she says now. 
that she didn't Lell anyone. “It 
would have ended up endanger- 
ing more people, endangering 
my mother." She says now. as 
devastating as her arrest was. 
“in a horrible sort of way. yes. it 
was a relief." 

Throughout all this time, she 
says, she begged her husband to 
stop working for the Russians. 
He promised her over and over 
that he would, even telling her 
once that he had discussed retir- 
ing. But he never did. 

The FBI learned of Mr. 
Ames's activities nearly a year 
after his wife said she found 
oul It began bugging the house 
and the tar, following the car 
and setting up surveillance in 
the neighborhood. It was also 
during this time that the bureau 
taped several comments by Ro- 
sario Ames relating to the Rus- 
sians. comments that were 
widely publicized at the lime of 
her arrest 

Inc riminating Evidence 

On one mission she told him. 
“I hope you didn't screw it up.” 
On another, she told him that 
she hoped a lost suitcase didn't 
contain “anything that 
shouldn't have" been there. She 
warned him about the weather, 
and suggested he send a mes- 
sage to the Russians before it 
got bad. Another time she sug- 
gested the possibility that the 
house was bugged. And in one 
instance, she drove with him 
when he went to a site to check 
a signal. It is these incriminat- 
ing conversations and events 
that resulted in her being ac- 
cused and ultimately pleading 
guilty to espionage. 

Most of those incidents, she 
says, refer to one period at the 


end of 1993. And she did it. she 
says, because she panicked. "1 
was so scared. It was fear- 
That’s really the first time 1 
said, ‘Oh my goodness, what s 
going to happen?' And 1 
thought, stupidly I guess, that 
by saying these things I was 
going to prevent something 
else. Of course. I wasn’t." 

She knew he was getting 
money from the Russians, be- 
cause he had told her so. but she 
says their lifestyle never 
changed, and he never dis- 
avowed his earlier claim that he 
was getting money from his in- 
vestments with “Robert from 
Chicago.” So she continued to 
make her usual cash deposits, 
which he would give her for her 
own spending account, she 
says, usually in small amounts, 
once as much as 53.000. 

She says she did not think 
there was anything unusual 
about this, because she says her 
husband had always dealt in 
cash. Before she knew about the 
Russians, she says, she did 
question the fact that he paid 
cash for their house — $540,000 
— but she says that he didn't 
like mortgages and didn't want 
to pay interest. 

What She Feds for Him 

Aldrich Ames continues to 
corroborate his wife’s story, 
writing letters to the court and 
to the public. 

After the Ameses were arrest- 
ed. the FBI found a typewriter 
ribbon in their trash and recon- 
structed a letter that Aldrich 
Ames had written to the Rus- 
sians in the summer of 1992. 
“My wife has accomodated [sic] 
herself to understanding what I 
am doing in a very supportive 
way.” Mr. Ames would later say 
that he wrote that note to pro- 
tect her. 


Ask her whv he is so support- 
ive of her. and' she will say: “He 
has to be. It's the troth. Ask 
her how she feels about him, 
and she’ll say. tears welling in f 
her eyes, “I hate him." 

Rosario Ames cannot handle 
the idea of spending the next 
five years away from her child. 
When the subject of the sen- 
tencing comes up. her eyes fill 
with tears and she waves her 
hands as if to magically dispel 
the notion. “Now. Tor me. it's 
hard to get through one day 
without Paul, i can’t think 
about it.” 

Her son is in Bogota now 
with her 64-year-old mother. 
Rosario Ames is allowed to talk 
to him once, sometimes twice, a 
week. 

“I don't want Paul to see me 
like this," she says. “He doesn't 
know I'm in jail- He thinks I'm 
staying in a hotel. " 

Paul she says, is seeing a psy- 
chologist. He has been told that 
his daddy did something wrong 
and is being punished. He be- 
lieves his mother is helping the 
government and she can't come 
home yet. He has told his jj, 
grandmother that he knows he • 
will never see his father again. 

He has taken a photograph of 
his parents and pasted his own 
picture next to his mother’s, 
covering that of his father. He 
sits at meals with the photo in 
front of him, talking to his 
mother as he eats. 

Rosario says she is not able 
to explain to Paul that she will 
be in jail. “Right now I feel so 
weak that 1 feel somebody else 
should tell him,” she suys. 
“How can he understand? 1 
mean, he’s watched TV. There 
are good guys and bad guys. 

“Are we going to tell him I’m 
a bad guy? Am I really a bad 
guy? I don’t know.” 


rrn 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Page 15 - 




U.S. Justice Department Investigates Possible Price-Fixing on Nasdaq 


By Jerry Knight 

Washington Pan Service 


investigation of possible price-fixing in- 
volving dozens of Wall Street firms that 
handle trading in over-the-counter stocks. 

Industry sources said the federal investi- 
gation was pursuing charges simil ar to 
those raised m more than 20 private law- 
suits filed in recent weeks. 

The lawsuits contend that companies 
that specialize in trading many of the best- 


known over-the-counter stocks, inc ludin g 
Apple Computer Inc_, have rigged the 
prices they offer when buying and s ellin g 
shares to the detriment of small investors. 

"The antitrust division is looking at die 
possibility of anti-competitive practices in 
the over-the-counter stock market," a Jus- 
tice Department spokesman said this week. 

Neither the National Association of Se- 
curities Dealers, which oversees trading in 
stocks not listed on the New York or Ameri- 
can stock exchanges, nor its computerized 
trading arm known as Nasdaq, has been 


contacted by the Justice Department, ac- 
cording to Robert Fern, a Nasdaq official. 

Unlike the New York and American 
exchanges, in which traders buy and sell 
shares face to face, the Nasdaq market is 
an electronic network. 

Computers link screens in offices of trad- 
ers an over the country. The screens show 
the prices at which professionals are willing 
to buy and sell Nasdaq stocks and allow 
transactions to be made electronically. 

The possibility that price quotes were 
being rigged wasfirst raised by two univer- 


sity professors, William Christie of Van- 
derbilt University in Tennessee and Paul 
Schultz of Ohio State University. 

Using computers to analyze thousands of 
such trades, the professors said they found 
evidence that dealers were fixing prices to 
make a few more cents on earfi sale. 

The researchers found that when traders 
sold Apple shares, for example, they added 
25 cents to the price they had paid for 
them. They said this was unusual because 
similar slocks on other exchanges traded 
with a spread of only cme^ighth of a point 


— 12.5 cents — between the so-called bid 
and asked prices. 

The researchers said they could find no 
economic explanation for the bigger 
spread on Apple Computer and several 
other popular Nasdaq issues. 

Soon after the professors' research was 
made public, unhappy investors began su- 
ing the Nasdaq trading firms, saying thev 
hid lost money to this pricing practice. 

Nasdaq officials and the trading firms at 
first said the professors had failed to un- 


derstand how the stock market really 
works and then said the lawsuits were an 
effort to make money from faulty research. 

Later, the Nasdaq officials and repre- 
sentatives of the trading firms denied any 
price-fixing- 

Despite the denials. Nasdaq trading 
practices have begun to change. On June 1, 
Tor example, the spread on Apple Comput- 
er shares — which had been 25 cents for 
years — abruptly dropped to J2.5 cents 
and has staved there ever since. 



New Amex Chief Means Business 

Punitive Delistings Signal Desire for Quality Image 


By Tom Petruno 

Los Angeles Tuna Service 

NEW YORK —The Amer- 
ican Stock Exchange suddenly 
is talking tough about quality 
— the quality of the mostly 
small, often speculative com- 
panies whose stocks it lists. 

In a surprise announcement 
last week, the Amex said it 
would launch delisting proce- 
dures against Conversion In- 
dustries of Pasadena, Califor- 
nia. and one of its affiliated 
companies, Beta Well Service. 

Delistings by stock ex- 
changes are rare enough, but 
the Amex’s decision is re- 
markable because it is puni- 
tive in nature. Citing unspeci- 
fied “disclosure" problems 
with Conversion and Beta, the 
Amex is essentially telling the 
companies it no longer wants 
their business. The exchange 
has not delisted a company 
for cause since 1971. 

What did Conversion and 
Beta do wrong? The Amex 
will not say exactly, pending a 
private hearing Monday at 
which Conversion and Beta 
can plead their cases. But the 
new chairman of the Amex, 
Richard F. Syron, made it 
dear that the cases involved 
serious infractions of the ex- 
change's rules. 

“This was not something 
done casually," Mr. Syron 
said. “I did not come in and 
say, 'Go find me two to 

hang .* ” 

That statement was a refer- 
ence to Mr. Syron *s ascension 
to the Amex’s top job April 1 
and subsequent Wall Street 
speculation that he would 
seek to alter the exchange’s 
image as a home for little 


companies of dubious appeal. 

The Amex — whose history 
as a formal stock exchange 
goes back to 191 1 — has plen- 
ty of legitimate stock listings, 
including Viacom Inc. the en- 
tertainment giant; Hasbro 
Inc., a big toy maker, and The 
New York Times Co. The ex- 
change also, since 1975, also 
has become an important cen- 


“we’ve got to change that im- 
age from the inside out.” 

Without referring specifical- 
ly to the actions against Con- 
version and Beta, Mr. Syr on’s 
point is dean The Amex needs 
to do a better job of policing 
itself and may have to set high- 
er internal standards for better 
investor protection. 

In the battle for business 


Mr. Syron, who left the presidency of 
the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston to 
take the Amex post, argues that the 
exchange’s image is "a bum rap.” 
Nonetheless, he said, "we’ve got to 
change that image from the inside out.’ 


ter for trading in stock op- 
tions. 

But the Amex, with 873 
companies currently listed, has 
long struggled to compete with 
the New York Stock Exchange 
— which has more than 2,300 
companies — and the electron- 
ic Nasdaq stock market, with 
4,600 companies. To stay in 
business, some on Wall Street 
say, the Amex has bad to ac- 
cept a lot of marginal compa- 
nies that could not be listed or 
traded elsewhere. 

Tie ultimate victim, these 
critics say, is the investor who 
buys those stocks and winds 
up losing his shirt. 

Mr. Syron, 50, who left the 
presidency of the Federal Re- 
serve Bank of Boston to take 
the Amex post, argues that the 
exchange’s image is “a bum 
rap." Nonetheless, be said. 


among the three principal 
stock markets, Mr. Syron said, 
there are only two important 
competitive issues. One is ser- 
vice to the listed companies, 
meaning the trading liquidity 
offered and the quality of the 
pricing mechanism for the 
stocks. 

With the Nasdaq market 
now the taiget of a Justice De- 
partment investigation into al- 
leged price-fixing, the Amex 
and New York Stock Ex- 
change auction systems of hu- 
man-regulated, single-site trad- 
ing may get an image boost. 

The other issue, Mr. Syron 
said, is fairness to the investor 
— especially the ability to 
keep out companies whose 
operations are shady or down- 
right fraudulent 

“Fairness has to do with 
what kind of risks you take 


with what kind of compa- 
nies,” Mr. Syron said. Beyond 
some basic standards, he is 
not interested in regulating 
the “business risk” of Amex 
stocks, he said. In other 
words, if a company is small 
and speculative, the business 
risk should be apparent. 
“That kind of risk is core to 
capitalism,” he said. 

Bui “regulatory risk" is an- 
other matter, Mr. Syron said. 
If a stock is listed on the 
Amex, its investors should be 
able to assume that the ex- 
change holds the company to 
high standards of disclosure 
about its business. 

“We can have companies 
with business risk, but then we 
have to be extremely vigilant” 
about reducing regulatory 
risk. Mr. Syron said. 

The question is, how tough 
.can Mr. Syron afford to be in 
chan ging the Amex’s culture? 
As a former Federal Reserve 
official, he is expected to be a 
better cop than the previous 
chairman, former Representa- 
tive James Jones. But some 
analysts trace the Amex's im- 
age problems back to the term 
of Arthur Levitt Jr. in the late 
1980s. 

Mr. Levitt, chairman of the 
Securities and Exchange 
Commission, is now a cham- 
pion of investor protection. 
Yet some Wall Streeters say 
he seemed to have difficulty at 
times balancing the need for 
more discipline at the Amex 
with the need to keep his trad- 
ers in business. 

By sanctioning two delist- 
ings this early in his term, Mr. 
Syron seems to be signaling 
that he is willing to give up 


that he is V, 
quantity for 


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Page 18 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday's 4 p.m. 

Tnrs I tet compiled 6y the AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twtce a year. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY. OCTOBE R 20, 1994 - 

„ i J2ST5T. r. I urc c,, -re & -tiqp L:..‘-ai«'Ch av | D~ PE I00> H-n LowLtfcrfq^ [ ^ ™ ” l«r ^ wp'Sl 0 '." 


■Jttwin s»> I i ; Mann* Ms , irv+nn . 

High L.O/J Slock D<» I ID PE («K Hig*. LOivLairtfOl K I Hmtl Lo* SlGC» Cn« tld PE IM*. Hi'4l< L'i J - Lo<-^ | v h >-' H. if L?." 1'tt" *-'■ 






range covers the world, providing 
the highest quality investment 


As a result of this approach, 
sewn of our nine otfchorc funds I particular sectors in the period 


management. 


arc in the top 25V.'. of their 


OFFSHORE FUND PERFORMANCE TO 1ST SEPTEMBER 1994 

SINCE LAUNCH OVER 5 YEARS 

j fEBFETUAL CffPSHOBE FUNDS LAUNCH QATE % CHANCE POSITION W SECTO* ■*-* CHANCE 


since launch, and of these, tour 
are the top performing funds. 
It has also seen qualitative 


Japanese Growth Fund an AA Management Group of the \fcar 

rating in their in-depth assessment for the second year in succession. 


of funds and fund managers. 
And last vear. we were 


For more information, 
telephone Marion Buchanan 


j International Growth 25-1-83 

Emerging Companies 8-4-85 

American Growth 21-4*84 


Far Eastern Growth 
Japanese Growth 
Eurof san Growth 
UK Growth 
Globa) Bond 


21-4*84 *743.0 

8-11-86 *437 2 

30-11-31 +6 2.4 

8-11-86 + f 30. 1 

24-10-87 +201.4 


3 out Of 27 
I out of 40 
J out of 29 
I out of 22 
3 out of 93 
6 out of 23 
I out of 3 1 


fund management analysts. Fund awarded Investment Internationals on +44 534 607660, or 


Research Ltd. assign our American prestigious Rosebowl tor 


7- J 2-92 


Asian Smaller Markets 8-3-93 


*2.7' . f 19 out of 145 
+84.9 12 out of 86 


Growth. UK Growth, Far Eastern 


Growth. Emerging Companies 
and hiccmarion.il Growth Funds 
their top AAA raring, and our 


Offshore Fund Management 
Group of the Year a 


and Of&hore 


Equity Fund 


send her a fax on 
+44 534 38918. 


Perpetual 

Independent Fund Management 


Out il:c pur 5 years. S .uu ,.f o Funds luve achieved top quaniic performance. Positions arc To i'.t September 1494 and arc on an offer-to-offer US Hollar basic, inclusive of reinvested income, net of withholding uses fcource Micropal). Past performin' 

The value of an investment and the income from it can go down as well j% up 


Alternatively, fill in the 
coupon below. 

>4— 

To: Perpetual Unit Trusr Management (Jcney.l 
Limited. PC Bon 459. d’Hautevillv Chambers. 
Seale Street. St Helier. Jersey JE4 NWS. 
Cliaunel Islands. Hejse send me details on 
IVrperuaia range of Offshore hinds. 

Important: Pfaiu- pnni rfaiffy. 

Print Name 

(MrAWMj) 

Ailics 


.ftmcodf ‘ 

IHT 20-10-94 

:c is not necesianly a guide to future performance. . 


I 

























































AMEX 

Wednesday's Closing 

/ Tables include the natron wtde prices up to 

H ,'v the dosing on waH Street and do not reflec 
Hate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


‘ l :\‘ 1 ; Month 
• wan low iwgc 


sis 

Dw YM PE IPOs BfrTi UwrLMadOi'9B 


I- 


9V. 8 AIM Sir Jl U> _ 8? 

37 73** ALC 33 4904 

UH WAMC „ It ]t 

?AtoM%AMCpI US 7 j0 - 1 

9 tWitARC _ o 121 

KM71*ABMFtf 2JS 111 S3 

A 1'inASR .180 a.7 ... 170 

75 AltoATTFd 173o 4.1 _ 66 


_ 22 


■>. 


_ 100 
._ 13 


SO 
16 
33 

_ _ 123 
SS 17 
_ 9 151 

_ _ 340 
.ID 


-.313 
_ IS 
_ 18 
_ 13 


SS 

— 19 718 
_ 1? 178 
_ _ 506 
_ _ CM 
_ _ IS 
_ 3854 
_ _ 413 


Bft SV.AOtCem 

4* 3*Acm«u 
»u IHAcflon • 

8* JWAdmlhc 
MS IMrAdbFtn 

17* WftAflvMM 
7V« HAdviWtocrr 
51* i*uAdvpnpt 
3t* 2*Aaroun 
16to AVbAirWoi 
S*2rt%AlrCi*e 
J*Vu TftAircna 
7V4 A Alomco 
12* MAtw 
5V. JVaAlertCin _ 

■185k IS AHaoenn 1.41 8.7 _ 

M* TfcAMdRsI, 

11* 7!)iAKquH 
IVk 3 AlDOdfn 
9* AftMMnGr 
%% HAmmGM 
SOU 4Vu Arndt* 
iw wAimih ... _ 

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lOftlSWAFstfiT 1JD U _ SS 
30 lAftAmBUlS .15 Jh 9 2 

•WThiAmEcos _ 1 

1UA. IWAEopI _ „ 1100 

S S AFomRn .. _ 553 

14* 3VuAlMB4 1X7037.9 8 20S 

16V. 13* AIM BS 1JS lOJ ID 3S 
14* 1 Ito AIM 86 n 1.30 IU 9 13 

15 lift AIM 88 r, ,74a 8J tl 5 
19*14* Am LM .SOb A4 15 1 

. 24* 15WAM»A M ZB 14 79 

237.14S.AMWB M 18 14 15 

14* MbAmPaon _ _ 668 

9* SVvARCinvn Ml MX _ 11 

: ll v. 7*AR«3tr M bj 

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18* SUAudwu 
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11 


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_ 11 195 
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6 

A A — 

19* 1 1 to ENSCO i 


- 23 16W 

14* 

14ft 14ft ♦ ft 

13to TtoEngex 



6V 

8* 

7ft Bft +ft 




20 

3* 

3ft 3ft .- 



- 3411 

Mto 

13ft Mto ♦ft 

24* 13* Epitope 
16* 13* EqGttlT 



725 

19* 

19* 19W —ft 

2J0 

5J - 

3 

15 

15 15 

12* StoEaGHtl 

1 60 

BX _ 

29 

9 

Bft Bft 1 * 

13* BtoEqGttG 

ito 

Itt6 43 

79 

8* 

Bft 8ft —ft 

ISto 11 toEquinll 

68e 

30 

13* 

13* UK —ft 

3* toEssxFn 



67 

Tto 

2ft 3ft + Vu 

1314 SWElzLvA 

JBe 4.1 8 

75 

6to 

Aft Aft 

1AM AftElzLov 

J8e3J 10 

10 

na 

056 «6 _ 

TVu toEVrJenn 



37 

* 

>Vu ft - 

20* 14 Excel 

ja 

26 11 

556 

14* 

14 14ft « ft 


X8o 16 29 



aui 4iy u * n/ M 

K YA i VN i -"VTHHH y. 




1* 

I* i* —ft 


64 

2.1 12 



30ft 30ft ♦ ft 



a 

• 

7ft 8 ♦ to 

39* 21 to FawtxJ 


- 12 

169 

30* 

30* 30ft + * 

79* 67*Rna 

UM 


n 

i/y-'w 

76* 76* 

19* !2*RnFcB 


- 14 

T 

ttiri 


14* 9*HAurt 

11 9 FAusPr 

Jle 3X _ 384 
JO 94 „ 1189 

10* 

90* 

10* to* — * 

9ft 9ft _ 

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.10 

M 8 

25 

7* 

7 7* .ft 


jar XI 

3 

LTT^W 

’ r "i, r CY ■■ 

ESMuMHI 

1 If CllM . : 


KKfl 



16 13VjFlFAla 

.72 

b 1 

LTV'® 


10* 7 FtOjef 



31 

7* 

7ft 7ft 

20* 16* RoPUt 

.16 

63 13 

II 


17* 17* ♦ to 

34toS3*Fk«ck 

60 

1.9 17 



36* 74* — * 

lltoMtoSoSm 

66 

IX 27 
- 45 

55 

4 


29ft 29ft —to 
lift lift _ 

43* 33 FOrslC A 


4 _. 

s 

33 

33 33 

46* 35 FtwfCB 

JOe 

4 

3 

34*034* 34* —* 

SIV,38toForsJLB 


27 

167 

19 

Bft 48ft 

■Vu VuFartPi wt 

31 to, ItoFortPet 



376 ul* 
243 3* 

ft 1ft ♦* 

3 3* IVu 




89 

2* 

2* 2to tto 


_ _ 1181 UA* 

Sto Sto tto 

5ft 5ft ♦* 

4ft 4ft —ft 

A* 

AS IU _ 
60 106 14 

2 

24 

516 

4* 

5* 3 FrKSoln 


6 

3ft 

3ft 3ft _ 

§J5 iJs^r 


— 

147 

114 

m 

Tto. 2V, . to 

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9 StoFnesetwis 
4* 3toFrt«Jm 

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216 

5 

8* 

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7ft 7ft -* 

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15toll*Frisch& 

J4b 1.9 18 

SO 

fir* 

Jft 12* tto 


.11 

3J 14 

3 

3 

3 3 • Vu 


■■ 

■331 



——11 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


12 Montti 

HtahLaw Stock 

Dr/ 

Sh 

VU PE lOOl 

High Low Latest Qfae 


.10 

2.1 





33fti5toGar« 

XOa 4.4 

8 

40 

18* 

17ft 18* ♦* 

-vM 




456 

9ft 






134 

7ft 


15* TftGdmSs 



IB 

107 

14 


9 iftGnEnv 


m 

31 

x95 

Tto 

6ft 6to-ft 


Page 17 


4-w U «ni' 

ft ft 


—— . ..Civrr/Dr 

24* 19ViCi«rtFd 
9 6*CtenCR 
19* laV.GIcWcar 
19* l4*Glatfff 

17 /toGioulink 
3to r.AGoViCMo 

17* BtoGktSnm 

* toGISHfl 
13 S*GUwSom 
30 22 *GotRiipp 

14* io to Graham 

3* 1 V. Grans g 

7% s Grenm 
7 3'uGmTel n 
15* ItoGrcvUne 
3V U »Vi,GrdnB 
4V U 2V»GUCdOB 
5* 3to.Gumj> 
n* 4toGundle 
B* 5toHMGOat 
2 UHAUMA 
13* 4*HMG 
9 SVhHdEP 
3H TtoHalIRtv 
7*. ItoHaiccy 
TV, StoHampN 
7to 3* HangOr 
7* 3*HanvOir 
•to. 'to? Hon wtB 
7* 'VuHorksn 
5 StoHCBlvn 
14* 4 to Harold 
39* zsto Hasbro 
4to 2*KHnOl 
19 to ITtoHnnMor S 
Ito toHKhPro 
3to 1 HMtAm 

14* lltoHeanlnd 

14* VtoHaca 
B 3*HeinWr 
Bto StoHBistC 
7toiWuHe8onct 
2 to H £*-( .!? 5 

* toHeimsrr 
11* BtoHemtog 
22* IS HrtgMd 

5* MHSvTcn 

15* 12 Hiohlncn 

33* Z3*HoOyCo 

ISWUtoHmeOil 

22 5* Hondo 

>4* 7*H00PH1 
1* toHousBio 
IBto StoHovnEn 
33* 25 Howtin 

11* 6 HOWMK 

20*12 HuaGn 


74b 27 12 

72 XI 14 

.14 27 14 
_ 23 
70 4.1 64 

xse IX _ 

Z 171 
-.225 


- 35 

U 14 


21 <V, >Vu ‘Vu — V, 

U v" to, v» .vj 

44 11 10* II * to 

488 23* 23 23 —to 
11 7* 1H 7h <M 

179u19* 18* 19 r* 
440 17* Wto 17* _ 

3 2* 2* 2* —to 

44 12* 12 12 Vi .. 

109 17 14* 16* - 

207 2* 7* 3* —to 

79 12* 12V. 12* . * 

H Vu * Vu +V„ 

39 7* 7* 7‘A — * 

941 23* 23to 23* . Vi 


3 

75 

24 

3216 

2561 

404 


_. 49 

- U 


Ml 147 _ 
_ 28 
- 20 


- 12 
X7t 87 25 
78 .9 14 

_ 23 
JO 27 10 


30 

39 
144 

50 

7 

34 

3 

7B7 

111 

226 

455 

435 

1090 

40 


3: 

5* 

2to 

1 

4 

4* 

5* 

A* 

l 

9to 

A* 

S" 

5* 

3* 

3to 

ft 

ft 


X3I 1.5 - 
- II 


1J9 114 _ 
AO IX 10 
_ 71 


ii* ii* 11* —to 
SrVu 2* 2* — v, 
4* s* _ 
4to Sto t* 
2 OVu-to 

3* 3*-* 

4* 4* —14 

Sto Sto _ 

A* A* — V. 
l l —to 

9* 9* _ 

A* AV. —to 
3V„ 2*u - 

2* 3V U » Vu 
S* 5to —to 
3* 3* .to 
3* 3* —to 
to Vs - 

nv« 2»u * v. 
4 4Vu ♦ Vu 

lOto 10* —to 
4045 31* 30to 31* *1Vh 
IS 2* 2* 2* _ 

3 13* 13* 13* . to 

517 «V„ Vi, * _ 

II 1* Ito Ito-'/u 
20 12* 13* 12* 

IS 10* 10 10 —to 

28 5 4* 5 —to 

10 A* A* A* —to 

1752 2V„ l’V U IU* -* 

84 * * to - 

2 to * to .v. 

350 11* lOto 11 to .<4 

291 27to 21* 22 —'A 

108 4 * 3to 4* .to 

84 12* 17 12 _ 

13 25* 25* 2Sto —to 

150 13<V U I3*Vm13<V m —>/„ 

92 15* 15* 15* t to 
82 7*0 7to 7to _ 

30 >¥u ‘Mi *V[* _ 

234 A* Sto A* _ 

1 27* 27* 77* * to 
2B1 9 B* 9 * * 

14 18* 18* IB* - 


_ _ 30 Ito 


11* 7WGalrnoo 04b S 13 234 5* Bto 8* —to 
18*12 GabcCBl 10.69c _ .. 3ulB* 18* IS* ■* 


\n 


l-J-K-L 

■■ 


S* 3 ICNBiO 

.15 

36 


44 

4ft 

«Vu 4ft * to 

12ft S Id 



34 

2*0- 

10* 

ioto ♦ to 

4V h Tftldanflx 




453 

3Vu 

3 3V|, .V. 

lift 7ft In-ipHly 

M 

56 

- 

17 

8* 

8ft 8* _ 

38 * 29 InwOila 

1 BO a •_ 



33* 33ft _ 

207. Mto IncOoRT 

6Be 3J 


5 

IB 

18 18 

4* iftincstar 




111 

2* 

2Vu Sto _ 

llto (ftlncvte . 




105 

7to 

71* 7to— to 

lift 9tolne*Mkt 




42 

»to 

9ft fto 

1* ftlrtEHs 



34 

■7 

■ft, 

Vu ’Vu - 

M* 9*imtron 

•12a IX 

22 

30 

llto 

lift llto ♦ ft 

25* 9* InwtQTi 




9396 

15* 

15 15* ♦ ft 

7*u IVuInnoSvs 




65 

2ft. 

3% 3ft —to 

3‘v„ TVuInCiPd 




27 

2* 

2* 2* _ 

7ft 2 InterDta 




3575 

3ft, 


20ft 9tolntrman5 



167 

206 

15 

14ft 15 * to 

5 V, InFnDM wt 



342 

ft. 


6* 'VuinFnYwt 


■ex 


210 

Ito 

IVu 1 Vu ♦*. 

6ft Ato IrtFnYB wt 




67 

6ft 

a 6 Aft 

13* Atolniunrv 




64 

7ft 

ito 7* —to 

ft VuIntMovie 



ama 


ft 

Vu ft — Vu 

71* 4* IntMur 


m , 

A 

294 

5 

4>Vy 4-*. ♦ Vu 

4* 2 irnPwr 



12 

46 

3Vi, 

3* 3V4. — Vu 

7* 3ft IRIS 



23 

17 

Aft 

6 Aft 

1ft VulruTesI 




2 

ft. 

Vu 'A, ♦ Vu 

Bto 3ft Int Throb 



15 

122 

4 

4 4 _ 


JMe 

6 

11 

4 

8 


yvu TVuInvins 




2 

ito 

ito ito— *, 

38* 141, ivavCp 

X6 

J 

15 3176 

19ft 

IB* 19* * ft 

12* oft Jalatr n 




51 

9* 

Sto 9 

13* 4ft JonBefl 




193 

5* 

5ft 5ft 

13 ' BftJonetnt 

60 

56 


96 

10ft 

10* 10ft * V. 

3V, lVuJonesPl 




1 

IWu 

TVu 1*. ♦*. 

37u IVu Joule ■ 



11 

16 


TV U 3 ♦ v. 

Alto 39ft JupNat 




3 

46* 

46ft 46ft —* 

11* AtoKVPhB 




6.1 

7ft 

Ato Ato —* 

11* 6* KV Ptl A 




75 

7to 

7 7 —to 

27% 13* Keene S 



21 

11 

209. 

20to 20* —to 

12* 9*Ketttfv 

.20 

2.1 

32 

73 

9ft 

9 to 9* — to 

16* StoKetyOG 

JO 

14_5 


164 

5to 

Sto 5* -ft 

15ft lOtoKewma . 



100 

12 

14 

IS* M 

6* 4*KevEng 



12 

3 

4to 

4to 4to 

6 3toK3em 



9 

38 

5ft 

Sto 5ft - 

23ft 15* Klrt>v 






16ft 16* ♦* 

19* 8*KltMfg 



17 

23 

I4to 

16* 16ft ♦* 

10* AtoKoarEa 



55 

BA 

Bto 

8 8ft r * 

6 IVuLXRfton 




452 

TV. 

IVu IVu — * 

2ft I LaBara 



9 

3 

1* 

1* 1* _ 

22to 13* Lancer 



IS 

3 

16to 

16ft 16 V. —to 


JB 

5J 

16 

7B 

Ifrft 

16* 16ft _ 

3*3WuUK»sPc 




3 

2'*u 

20% 20ft - 

lift 4toLarizz 





4to 

40% 40% ♦Vu 

9ft 5 Umr 



10 

167 

5ft 

5ft Sto ♦* 

715 WuLsfTccn 



43 

37 

4ft 

4* 41% — Vu 

llto 8 Lauren 



10 

22 

10ft 

10* 10ft ♦* 

9* 3toLBEurwt 




25 

4ft 

4* 4* _ 

50*39 LehAMGNH94 

56 


28 tfil 

50ft 51 >2 

25*24 LehGTcIn 




15 

74 V, 

74ft 24ft 

19ft 16ft LetlMUn 

160 

HA 


194 

18* 

I7to 18* ♦* 

38 28toLebORCL 2J! 

62 


26 

3»ft 

36ft 37ft i * 

5ft 4ftLeHK VAvyt 




10 

4* 

4* 4* —ft 

13 IftUSJYPSwl 




21 


2 2 ♦ to 

8* 2r*LeJY96wl 




125 

3 

3 3 Ito 

22ft 1 a* Lirvcm 

JS 

1.6 

12 

28 

17* 

17* 17* 

Vu Vi,, Lilly 1X1 
27T. 3V,LiMttAd 



-5 

600 

24 

ft 

VtB Vi n _. 
6% 6* 1% 

8* 3 L Or "CP 



_ 

2 

Sto 

Sto Sto —ft 

14ft 9 Lumen 



16 

369 

12ft 

lift llto— 1 

15* AtoLUTia 



9 

139 

7to d Aft 7 — * 

32*22 Lynch C 



11 

3 

31 to 

31ft 31ft _ 

L~"" 


M-N 



1 


4* 2*MCSnp 
7* WuMIPPr 
IVu *MSR 
IS* lOtoMacNSc 
* VuMagP wtwi 
11 s MamHrv 
I* i*. Mart Ion 


-.55 x50 3'Vu 3to 3* — Vu 
141 J* 2'4. 2'h 

- 6 223 'Vu <Vu to ... 

X4 5.7 14 579 11* 11 11* . to 

_ _ 254 i? * to to . V, 

_ 1210072 10 10 10 ito 

- 24 70 IV., 1 I 


IStolOtoMaUHE 760 7.2 _ 59 10*010*10*-* 


12 Month 
High Law SWd> 


Ss 

Pl» Vld PE lpfli Hhh Lflf Lctwt OToe 


44* 29* AtaXOm 

io* iViMcftoeA 

16* lOto AACOCR 
11* AtoAMdeva 
31 to 31 to Media 
4'4 IVmMmEoLM 
21 Vi. lVuAACdRA 

2* VuMflcore 
4* 3* Media 
7* 4*MedCh> 

6* 3* Mem 
7* 2toMenHMtt 
l7toi4V.MrcM»a 
7 avuMorcAIr 

2* l'AMOfPU 
4Vu TVuMwMpf 
5 to 7*Marf»7M 
3* toMerPnrt 
5* 3 MerPTSpf 
4* 2*MU4Kwi 
J* .toMUOM pwt 
13* BtoMermic 40 
17*12*MetPra 
2AM IStoMefrBCSh 
is* into Atotrbk 
9* 4*MidiAnt 
20* 17* MldABc 
10* ItoMidatRtv 
4* 2*MK2(>v 
47* 34 Mtdlnd .58 
15* 10* MinnMul X3 
104 B8*A4itlP ptB 7J4 
11* StoMiraiTr? J9 
9* 7 MoogA 

14 9HMOOOB 
18 IDtoMMM 

3 IW.MwgnF 
3* 'VuMSJYovW 
7 3IAMS49SWI 
44 59* MS TMX 113.78 

21* lBtoMS IGT n U3 
7* 4*M0RHd 
3* I MbvtoSIr 
11 to StoMunlln 
ll 7UMunvsr 
Iff* 11 JMunvIAZ „ 

15 I0toMunA27n 81 

19* IStoMyertn % .!« 

21*12*NFC 
II AVuNTTVCorr, 

11* StoNVR 
5* ItoNVRwl 
8* 5* Nabors 
7* 2*Nantck 
18Th 14* NIGsO 
30* Z2*Nt-fltC 

5* 2*NtPamt 
30*25 Ninny 
13* 4ftNotAB 
23tol6*NVBa> 

12* 9toNYTEI 
29* 21* NY Tim 
9 3*NAAdWH 
IS* THNAVacc 
n* 7*NCdOa 
19* OtoNonttboy 
42*49* NIPS of 

Sto 2* NITWIT cn 

J4to JOKrNC4P/ 
lSVh 9*NCAP12 
15 lOtoNFLPI 

IS* I0*NGAPI 
14*10 NMDPC 
14* 10* NvMlP2 
1 4* 1 1 to NMOPI 
14* lOtoNNJPD 
13* 10V.NNYMI 
14 lOtoNNYPl 
ISVhllHNvOHPt 
14*10* NOHPD 
14* 10* NVAPI2 
14to 10* NuwWA 


32a 2.1 
A4 1.5 


330 7J 
37e 4.4 


. 44 

JSe 13 

.73 2.9 

M 39 

60 a 3J! 
X4 96 


70 A* A* 6* 

31 17todl6to 17to —* 

13 8V. 8* 6V. -'.i 

3 4Vu 4Vu 4Vu • Uu 

9 40 39 40 . IV. 

214 11* 11 11 —* 

Z130 19 89 89 

5 9 9 9 

14 a* Bto Bto —* 

12 * 12 * 12 * -* 
16 14* 14f,— Ito 

UVu IVu I'Vu -Vu 

1 »» 1 -h 


65 AJ 

66 8J 
AS 76 

73 

.9 

676 4.7 


- 16 


2 

329 

144 

43 

S 

39 

100 

10 

20 

202 

443 

42 

A 

SS 

19 

104A 

AI3 

233 

897 

3 


4 — ■■ 


4* 

ito 

9 V. 


AOb 42 
64 6A 
66 26 


JO - 
64 2J 
4L25 86 

X6» 1 J 
JSa 73 
69a 76 
.75 7X 
34 7.1 
68 AJ 
Jt 6.9 


33 6.7 
37 4.9 
.74 6A 
JB 46 
68 46 

68 AX 
JB 7J 


89 

5 

12 

3305 

100 

247 

1 

2 

zlO 

1B3 

43 
25 
29 
84 

151 

44 
IS 
3 

58 

7 

58 
14 

59 
2 


A2W Alto A2 
19to 18* 19 
4* 4* 
IVu Ito 
8* it. 

a a ■ 

Uto liw lito 
ii* ii* ii* 
17 lAto 17 
Mto 13* 14to 
7to 7to 7to 
5to 5* S* 
1* IVu 1* 
A* 6* 6* 
AM 4to AM 
ir« 17 17* 

28to 2Bto 28to 
2tot 2to 2VU 
29* 29 29 

Sto 4to 4Va 
19 UK 19 
9* d 9to 9* 
22* 21* 22* 
IVt dm 3Y. 
U!h 10* llto 
iov> ioto loto 
19 19 19 

50 50 50 

5* S Sto 
Jfl* !0Vi IM4 
9 V. 9to 9to 
11 10* 10* 
10* ioto ioto 
io* io ioto 
10to 10* io* 
ii* ll* ii* 
IDtodlO* 10to 

ioto io* io* 

10* 10to 
li* lift 
10* 10* 
llto ii* 
10* 10* 


11 

11* 

10* 

11 * 

ioto 


-to 

♦to 

—'4 

— * 
— * 

— * 


♦to 
—to 
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—to 

• Vu 
—to 
—to 

—to 

»u 

♦ V. 


. * 
—• V. 
—to 
♦ to 


♦ to 

—to 

-to 

—to 


1} Month 
HiaHUm Stpci 


Pro Vld PE l»v Hign LQwUnl«lOi , 99 



57 

33to 

27* 

33to • to 





8 

13 

8* 

1* 

■to —ft 


M 

7J 

14 


66 

17ft 

17 

12 —ft 






575 

lOto 

10* 10to —V, 

3ft IftPraMJB 




25 

258 

28* 

27* 28* '1 

5to T'VuPrcGom 






2* 

2", 


13ft BftPrtSce 



16 


16 

!•% 

IVu 



JA 

5.9 

14 


40A 

2% 

2* 



.17 

AJ 138 


64 

Xv u 

3Q% 

3n% * Vu 


108 

64 

IB 


50 

7* 


7* -% 

64 53 PSCdPi 

425 

S3 



7 

5* 

5to 

5* 

74to 20 ft POSt A 

1X0 

77 

17 


1 

2*Vu 

2* 

r\ ... 

m.Mr.FbSi7 


67 

13 

23 

ID 

15 

15 

is 


15A 

SB 

10 

6 

3» 

Ato 

A* 

6ft • :• 

IBto 1 a Post 10 

1.40 

8.3 

11 



IVU 


«u • to 

18% 15ft POST 11 

136 

7.9 

13 

... 

64 

7* 

2’»to 

2 \ ■ 


IJB 

7.9 


M . 

36 

3H% 

2<Vu 2'Vu —'A. 

18ft ISV.PBS1M 

136 

H.5 

11 

7 

2 

.1 

3 

3 






23 

5 

4* 

S ♦ to 

I51-17’,PD5»I6 

IBB 

76 

13 


40 

Tu 

2* 


I6ft 12ft POSH 7 

1.04 

AX 

17 


S4 

* d >% 


16* 12 Pt>$tlB 

100 

AB 

16 

8 

39 



f —ft 

17ft « POSH 8 

44 

4? 

31 

16 

t 

17* 

17 


IS ll'iPBStM 

XO 


15 

11 

.14 

2S'i 

2441 24to — y, 




10 

■J 

15* 

15* 15* >>. 

Mto lltoPIGIM 

69a 

59 



14* 7*OOkiW 
10* BtoOSutlvnC 
34 21 OhAri 
38* 25* Olsten 
11* VtoOneUbt 
15* 7 Oro non 
22* lAtoOrlentBs 
12* A*OrtoHA 
12* 6 OrrtaH B 
Tto 3*PLCS» 
3* 2 PLM 
17*12* PMC 
23tol7toPGEplA 
20*1 Sto PGEpfB 
l9toU*PGED(C 
19* 14to PGEpfD 
19* 14* PGEptE 
19* IStoPGEpfG 
lA*12ViPGEpft 
27* 22* PGEblM 
28* 23to PGEofO 
78 Vl 74 RGEpfP 
2A*21*PGEglQ 
26to30toPGEPfU 


X U IS 
34 a J 214 
34 3 _ 

■X3e 76 14 


.15 

60 

JO 


54 

160 

137 

US 

US 

1J5 

1J0 

1.09 

I.M 

2X0 

2X5 

1AA 

174 


S 7 
8X 12 
96 11 


56 16 
BJ _ 
86 _ 
B6 - 
86 _ 
8.4 _ 

BJ _ 
BJ _ 
BJ _ 
BJ _ 
BJ _ 
B6 _ 
BJ _ 


42 12* 11* 12* *to 

43 9* 9* 9* .* 

7 34* 34* 34* ._ 

354 34 35* 35* —to 

3 11* llto 11* 

531 14* 14* 14* * to 
29 14* 14* 16* . * 

20 7* 7 * 7* ♦ to 

40 7* 7* 7* 4* 

409 5* 5* 5* _ 

159 3>Vu 3Vu 3* —to 
51 14to 14* 14* . to 
29 18* 18 IS* ♦* 
10 l&to 16* 14* _ 

17 T4to 14* 14* _ 

17 15 14* 14* —to 

4 14* 14* 14* —* 

39 14* 14* 14* _ 

2 13* 13* 13* r* 
31 24* 23* 23* —to 
34 24 Vi 24 24* • to 

21 24* 24* 34* ♦ to 

17 22* 22 23* • * 

21* 20to 21* * to 


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31 

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139 

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6 

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26*21*5000 pfH 1.82 ' 

9* 4*5ondv 
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19 111, Thermit''. 


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10 14V. 14 14'h ** 

11 11 UK. IDT. —to 

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14 30 2'-, 2* 2* —to 

20 7*9 u 9* 9 9* * to 


7 94 

3 

- 3498 


174 


4* 

4* 

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4* 

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12ft 

12V, i ft 

6% 

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31% 

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4 to 

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4 



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18ft < ft 

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Sto 

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26% 

25* 2Sto —ft 

26 

25* 75% -Vi 

9* d 9ft 

9ft —ft 

13* 

13* 

Mto —* 

7 

6* 

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17* 

17* 

12* _ 

12* 

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lAto 

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71* 

21ft 21* _ 

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98 4'V, 4'Vu 4to— Vu 
_ 97 148 I'Vu l'»u l*Vu * to 

■' “ in* 'to 


84 9 J 


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72 16 

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_ 14 891 17V. 11V, 

375 3Vti 2<Vu 3 

48 9 8!* 9 • to 

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30 7 2 7 

138 I’h Ito Ito . 

19 (8 1714 17* • to 

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27 Mto l«* 14* t'., 

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.. 94 814 39!'. 37V. 38* -1* 

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.. M 54 3 3 3 * * 

AO 4.9 72 10 16* 14to I Ato - 

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.. 32 43 9* 9'h 9* —V. 

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SB 131'. 13* 13* -V, 

70 Ito 1* 1* IVu 

203 7'., 2 7to -to 

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_ 56 69 15 M* IS • * 


10 

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54*41 TotEpfB 4J3 
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4 * 4 VuTui»Me« 

29 14*TumB A 
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9>i I'kTurnC 


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67e 4.9 
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40 541 
28 10 
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77 2 

79 1135 
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15 61 

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368 719 

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1707 

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lift 

lift 

lift .. 

14% lOtovovFia 

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41 

11 

10ft 

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17 12 VoyMN 

93a 1A 


26 

12ft 

12* 

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X3a 7J 


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11* 

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21 Vi 16* WRIT 

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5.3 

71 

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3 

16'. 

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3 11%Weiaim 



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20 

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21% • Vu 

i’l TtoWHGrd 




370 

31% 

3* 

3*7 * to 

T toWcncDBr 




5 

W 


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9* AftW5tSrC 



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71 

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l'V. V M XCL Ltd 




AOS6 

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67 a 3.1 

II 

1 

17 

17 

17 —ft 


Sales figures are unefHckil. Yearly hlgtn ana laws reflect 

the prevtousR weeks nius the aimeni week, but nof methlest 

trading dav. Where o salH nr stack dividend amounting la 25 

percent or more has been paid, me reart high-low range and 

dlvldena are shown for Ihe new stack enfv. l/nfess ofherwhe 

notea rates of dividends are annual disbursements based on 

the latei! declaration. 

a — dividend aba exiro(s). 

b— pnnuoi rate of dividend plus slock dividend. 

c— llauklallng dividend. 

dd— called. 

d— new yearly low. 

t — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months. 

0 — dividend In Canadian funds. sublect fa 15* norwcskfenct 
to*. 

I —dividend declared oiler spIII-up or slock dividend. 

I — dividend paid mis year, omitted, deferred, or no action 
taken al latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid mis year, an eccurmilaiive 
Issue with dividends In arrears, 
n — new Issue In the oast 52 weeks. The Mgthtaw range begins 
with the stan of trading, 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — orice-earnlnos ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months. Plus 
stock dividend. 

s— stock spflr. Dividend begins wtm dole of split, 
sis— sates. 

1 — dividend paid In stock In preceding 12 months, estimated 
cash value on e*-dlvWend or cx-dlstrlbution date. 

u— new yearly high. 

v— trading halted. 

vl — In ixuikruoiCY or receivership or being reorganized un- 

der me Bankruptcy Act. or aecurllies assumed by such com- 
panies. 

wd — when tfl sir touted, 
urt — when issued, 
ww— with warrants. 

* — ex-01 vldend or evrlghls. 
xdls — ex-dbtrttmrton. 

*w — without warrants, 
y — ex^hrtdend and sales In HilL 
vld— yield. 
i — sales In full. 


The IHT/Delta Air Lines 
Destinations Competition 


t 


Here's How to Enter. 

Test your travel knowledge! Each day for 18 
consecutive days, a clue describing a city to which 
Delta Air Lines flies will be published. Using 
Delta's Map, fill in the name of the city correctly 

* qualify to win. 


Win Fabulous Prizes 

First Prize: 

Two round-trip Trans-Atlantic 
First Class tickets. 


for at least 12 of the 18 days and 

Once yon have at least 12 correct answers, 
pat them in an envelope and send them to us 
with the completed coupon below. 

Winners will be selected from an official 
drawing. The first 10 entries drawn with the 
correct responses will be the winners. 

Delta Aii Lines ' Destinations Map 


Second Prize: 

Two round-trip Trans- Atlantic 
Business Class tickets. 

4 Third Prizes: 


AT Cross, gold plated, diamond cut, 
roller ball pens, the Signature Collection. 
4 Fourth Frizes: 

Gold Pfeil men's wallets. 


.StocMw)m 0 OHdsSnki 


lO ^ 
*0 

i Mi 


OyaB^n “stP^rstarg 



Berlin OWarsaw 
0 Prague 
oVJenna 


OMoscow 


oBb$K» 


Detroit O 

Cincinnati 
r>rwto_ O Atiaate ' 
Oorts*;.- •: 

. QHasaa 


i jiffl 0 &»*» Cflom J ) 0te,anbul 


OTeiAviw 


oOSwiJuair 


Delhi O 
^Bombay 


£ 


i! 


RULES AND REGULATIONS 


® Ariine tickets are non^ransferable and seats subject 
to availability. - 

© Travel must be completed by December 31st, 1995. 

Cut-off date is postmarked no later than November 
^ 7th. 1994. 

® Valid only where legal. No purchase necessary. 

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Page 20 


! SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


A Warrior Named Mullin: 
In a Golden State at 31 


By Ian Thomsen 

Iniemarkmal Herald Tribune 

PARJS — “Oh. I think he's 
older than that." Don Nelson 
said. 

Chris Mullin is 31 years old. 
. “I think he’s 33, niaybe 34,” 
his coach said. 

He was bom in 1963, Nelson 
was told. He turned 31 last Juiv. 

“Well,” said Nelson, “that 
may be, then.” 

When does time begin run- 
ning out on an athletic career? 
It’s sort of like most of the 661 
games Mullin has played for the 
Golden State Warriors. Each 
one begins full of promise, but 
at the finish the scoreboard 
clock is making most of the 
players frantic, and if they 
haven’t done it already, the best 
players are expected to prove 
themselves now. Everything 
that happened before is held 
hostage by the ending. 

That’s why this season is cru- 
cial. Mullin s talents haven't 
been fulfilled by an NBA cham- 
pionship, he hasn't even come 
close. He’s 31 and his fans are 
starring to watch the clock. 

“For any player I would 
think you'd look deeper into 
every situation as you get older 
— that it becomes so important 
to win. to be on a w innin g team, 
to enjoy things,” Nelson sold. 
“But he's doing fine. He's 
smart, he lakes good care of 
himself, he can play a lot long- 
er. I played till I was 36: he 
ought to be able to play until 
he’s 46.” 

The Warriors came here 
Tuesday for an exhibition 132- 
116 beating of the Charlotte 
Hornets. The Omnispor ... 
at Bercy was sold out mostly 
with teenagers who celebrated 
Mullin and Tim Hardaway like 
rock stars on a world tour. 
Hardaway is still only 28, but 
surgeons had to rebuild his knee 
a year ago. He locked good. 
Mullin has missed more than 50 
games because of ligaments 
tom in his right (non-shooting) 


caught laughing at something 
the referee Jake O’Donnell had 
just said when a teammate re- 
minded Mullin they were sup- 
posed to be pressing full court 
after the next free throw — his 
eyebrows shot up and be took 
off running as if hearing the 
school bell three blocks away. 
Thirty-one years old. 

“That probably is the last 
thing I think about,” he said 
about the pressure to win a 
championship. “I don’t really 
feel pressure that way; or may- 
be you just feel that pressure 
every year. You always want to 
do the best you can. That's less 
pressure than the other things 
you worry about — how your 
life is going to shape up. your 
family, what you're going to do. 
That other part, winning a 
championship, it's probably go- 
ing lo happen if it's going to 
happen.” 

It mostly has to do with how 
he judges hims elf, *Tve seen 
guys win who look like losers to 
me, and I've seen some guys 
lose who look like winners." he 
said. He has struggled to con- 
trol his own life. He hasn't had 
a drink in those seven years. He 
has lost both of his parents to 
cancer since then. He admitted- 
ly has done more with a basket- 
ball than he would have imag- 
ined — two Olympic gold 
medals, membership on the 
first Dream Team, five All-Star 
teams — but all of that looks 
more like the exhaust and less 
like the goal. He couldn't play 
with such love if the only point 
was to win a title. He plays like 
an artist who doesn’t care if he 
never sells a painting. It seems 
as though he plays in order to 
squeeze himself through each 
day happily. 

Part of that has been shaped 
by Nelson, who won five tales 






while playing for the Boston 
Celtics but has yet to manage 
one in 17 years of coaching. 
Only with Bob Lanier in Mil- 
waukee did Nelson coach a 
great, true center. For the other 
dozen years bis teams have al- 
ways exhibited his own dry', 
quirky sense of humor, the kind 
that jokes straightfaced about 
his player's age. He's spent the 
last seven years trying to ar- 
range a composition around 
M ullin. never making it past the 
second round of the playoffs, 
all the while refusing to sell his 
soul for a dominant center. This 
year he will make do in the 
middle with Chris Webber, a 
natural power forward, provid- 
ed the Warriors can sign Web- 
ber as a restricted free agent. If 
they can it will be Nelson's best 
team here. 

“We’ll still probably only be 
the fourth or fifth best team in 
our conference.” Nelson said. 
“But I think well have a chance 
to win the tide.” 

So much is out of any play- 
er's control, and yet there is this 
truth: that of the 15 leading 
scorers of all time, 1 1 were able 
to win championships. If Mul- 
tin can play until 36, he will 
likely join that top 15 of Kar- 
eem Abdul-Jabbar, WOt Cham- 
berlain, Larry Bird and Michael 
Jordan. None of them won ti- 
tles alone, and if Mullin wins 
one he will give thanks to 
Hardaway, Billy Owens, Latrell 
SpreweD and Webber, who have 
come around him just in time. 

“This time of year we’re just 
trying to get our skills together, 
to see what we each do best and 
how that fits in with everyone 
else,” M ullin said. How many 
chances are left at 31? It’s an 
irrelevancy for the great ones 
who prove it at the end. They 
aren’t intimidated by any clock. 




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Buck Sbowalter: First Yankee to win managers’ award. 


Showalter, 

Of Yankees, 
Wins in AL 

The Astoaated Press 

NEW YORK — Buck 
Showalter, who brought calm to 
a New York Yankees dub often 
beset by controversy, was the 
overwhelming choice for Ameri- 
can League manager of the year. 

He became the first Yankee 
manager to win the award, cre- 
ated in 1983. New York had the 
best record in the league, 70-43,. 
and were in position for their 
first playoff spot since 1981 
when the players' strike stopped 
the season Aug. 12. 

Showalter, 38, is the youngest 
manager in the majors. He also 
is the first manager to survive 
three straight years since George 
Sieinbrenner bought the team 
before the 1973 season. 

“In my profession, the re- 
ward for a job well done is the 
opportunity to do more,” 
Showalter said Tuesday. 

He got 24 of 28 first-place 
votes in balloting by the Base- 
ball Writers Association of 
America. He also got four sec- 
ond-place votes and finished 
with 132 points. 

Mike Hargrove of Cleveland 
got the other four first-place 
votes and finished with 86 
points. Chicago's Gene Lamont 
was third with 17 and Oak- 
land’s Tony La Russa was 
fourth with 10. 

Kansas City’s Hal McRae 
was fifth and Boston's Butch 
Hobson was the only other 
manager to receive a vote. 

McRae and Hobson have 
both been fired, with Kevin 
Kennedy hired Tuesday as 
manager of the Red Sox, less 
than a week after he was fired 
by the Texas Rangers. 

Johnny Oates, fired in Sep- 
tember by the Baltimore Ori- 
oles. was hired Wednesday to 
manage the Rangers. 


Tyson Declares 
He f Hates World ’ 


NEW YORK — Mike Tyson, the former world heaw- 
wdght boxing champion, says that he hates the world, that He . 
is just a “black trophy” for the judge who sent hrnxo pmon 
on a rape conviction and that his chief regret in life is falling . 

in love. „ w 

In an interview published this week tn Ring Magazine. 
Tyson was asked what his biggest regret was. 

' “I would have never fallen in love.” he said. ‘Tve never ’ 
been successful in relationships where you really have a deep . 
infatuation for a person.” .< 

Tyson, 28, is expected to be released from prison in early !| 
May after serving about three years of a six-year term for 
raping a beauty contestant in Indianapolis in 1991. ; 

In a wide-ranging interview conducted in August. Tyson ; 
said he ran about eight miles (13 kilometers) a day and , 
shadow-boxed to stay in condition. * 

About his former wife, Robin Givens, Tyson said: “We 
weren’t ready for marriage, and we got caught up in the whole 
situation of being who we were. I don’t want to be her friend, f ■ 
don’t want to hug and kiss and be cordial with her, but 1 have 
nothing bad or good to say about her.” 

Givens has said that Tyson beat her. 

“I don’t beat on women." he said. “A woman may say I 
beat her, but have you ever seen Robin’s face caved in? I hit 
Mitch Green in a street fight, and you saw what happened to 
his face. Robin never had no bruises.” 

Don King, who promoted many of his fights and is under 
indictment for insurance fraud, was “a good man,” he said. 

“Don King sometimes gets caught up in being so suspicious 
of everybody,” he added. “I think that sometimes he even 
distrusts his friends. I don’t think he trusts me totally.” 


Tyson said that before going to prison he thought everyone 
was nice, but “now Mike Tyson hates the world.” 1 

“That’s just a fact,” he said. “I hate everybody. I know they ■ 
say, ‘No, you can’t hate the world, don't lie bitter. 1 But I just 
hate everybody. Weil, the majority, maybe 99 percent." 

About Judge Patricia Gifford, who presided over TVson’s 
trial and sentenced him, the fighter said: “I think this is her' 
daim to fame. I'm her famous black trophy. She wants 
everybody to know she put Mike Tyson in jaiL” 

Tyson said that when he first went to jail in March 1 992, he 
told himself that prison was “ killing me. I want to see my 
family.” 

“But when it really comes down to it,” he said, “I really 
don't have anybody I want to go to. Tve been alone all my life 
and every time I did accept someone in my life, they've 
[expletive deleted] me.” 

Asked if King was his surrogate father, Tyson said: “I never - 
had a father. So how’s he supposed to be my father? What 
would I know about a father-son relationship?” 


thumb and 


I pinky ovi 
If those ini 


over the last 


two years. If those injuries have 
numbed his touch with the ball 
— his imagination and his 
speed — it was hard to tell while 
he was scoring a game-high 25 
points in 32 minutes. 

There is not a wit of boredom 
or indifference to his game. His 
telltale crewcut — which sym- 
bolized his new dedication sev- 
en years ago — still gives him 
the mischievous look of a tree- 
house boy, even when a closer 
look reveals gray in his roots. 
He always looks like he's try- 
ing; trying to enjoy himself 
through hard work. He was 


Every Tuesday 
Contact Fred Ranan 
Tel.: (33 1)36 37 93 PI 
Fax. [33 1) it, 37 *3 70 
Of your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


Dolphins 9 Panrudee Finally Gets His Chance , and Makes the Most of It 


By Charlie Nobles 

New York Times Service 

DAVIE, Florida — It took nine years of 
unwavering faith in himself for Betide Par- 
ra alee to become an overnight star. 

By the time the Miami Dolphins’ third- 
year running back arrived home on Sunday 
night from a game against the Los Angeles 
Raiders, well-wishers in his south Broward 
neighborhood had tied balloons to his mail- 
box — a fresh acknowledgment that someone 
special lives there. 

Pannalee also heard shouts of praise from 
a nearby pool as he opened his front door. 
And that reaction was nothing compared 
with the raucous applause be got from his 
Dolphin teammates in the team meeting the 
next day. 

It was the first time in Coach Don Shula's 
25 seasons of day-afters with Miami that any 
one player had been singled out for an ova- 
tion by bis teammates. 

Pannalee earned such high recognition 
partly by piercing the Raiders for 150 yards 
rushing In 30 carries, including 47 on his final 
four carries in helping set up the winning 
field goal in Miami's 20-17 overtime victory. 

Yet he was nearly as conspicuous on spe- 


cial teams, recovering a fumble and tackling 
Rocket Ismail so viciously on a punt return 
that he knocked him out "of the game with a 
concussion. 

“Bemie’s a throwback player.” said Keith 
Byars, the Dolphin fullback. “He should have 
been playing in the '40s, when they went both 
ways." 

Amazingly, before this season, ParmaJee’s 
only claim to any recognition at all as a 
Dolphin came with the club softball team. In 
April, he hit a home run over the 365-foot 
mark at Fort Lauderdale Stadium as the 
Dolphins defeated the singer Michael Bol- 
ton’s team. Now he is averaging 4.7 yards a 
cany, with 373 yards on 79 attempts. 

The big questions now are: Just who is 
Bemie Pannalee? And how did he come to 
the point of dominating a National Football 
League game? 

A soft-spoken 27-year-old, Parmalee was a 
lightly recruited wide receiver-free safety out 
of Lincoln High School in Jersey City, New 
Jersey, and when he finally did reach the 
NFL in 199Z it was through the league’s back 
door. 

He had been convened to r unnin g back as 
a freshman aL Ball State in 1 987 and became a 


four-year starter for the school in Muncie, 
Indiana, rushing for a school record 3.483 
yards and producing 100-yard rushing games 
16 times. 

Yet when draft time rolled around, he was 
passed over. Several teams were interested in 
signing him as a free agent — - the Giants and 
the Jets each gave him tryouts — but Panna- 
lee chose Miami. 

Only one problem: Parmalee's agent at the 
time, the Denver-based Jack Mills, rejected 
the team’s offer, unbeknownst to his client. 
When Parmalee finally called to try to rectify 
the situation, the Dolphins said it was too 
late. 

"I always knew, if given an opportunity, 
that I could play," he said. “But I never knew 
who would give me the opportunity.” 

Interest in him from other teams evaporat- 
ed. so Parmalee, with a wife and a child, was 
left to sit out the 1991 season. He loaded 
United Parcel Service trucks and worked be- 
hind a bowling alley counter at night in 
Muncie. 

All along, though, he kept working out, his 
NFL dream intact. And the following spring, 
he received a tryout with the Arena League's 
New England Blitz. 


“I was in their camp and everything was 
going well, but then a week before our first 
scrimmage, they folded,” he said. “So that 


makes a good special-teams player is also 
gonna make a good football player.” 

“But the thing I noticed this year is he was 


was another blow. But the good thing I got not having to worry about assignments,” 
out of that was I found out what I really had Shula added. “Just lining up .when he had the 
to do to make it. It exposed me to the pres- opportunity and doing the job, taking advan- 
sures of performing each and every day, with tage of it and showing more than he's shown 
the possibility of getting cut If you look at it in the past.” 


that way, you’ve got to give it your all every Pannalee weighs a muscular 205 pounds 
day.” (93 kilograms), 15 more than in his rookie 

Parmalee went back lo Muncie. He felt he year. Teammates joke that the Dolphins' 
had done well in a March workout for the weight room has become his second home. 
Dolphins, but the phone didn't ring. And he still is unaffected enough to delight in 

Finally, on the eve of t raining camp in his $167,000 salary, even though it’s only 
1992, the Dolphins called: “Can you fly out $5,000 above the league minimum for a third- 


the next day?” y®* P 1 ^- 

“How about right now?” he answered. a " 

“That’s what Inoeded —just to get in the °f h “ lod “ !r 

door," he said. “Then it was up to me to take changed a little, but I'm not 

it from there.” taking anything for granted. Coming from 

it ftom there. where I hav?I don’t drink I ever wilL” 

Until this year, Pannalee s special-teams 

play kept him on the roster. 

“He was a hard-nosed special-teams play- 
er,” Shula said. “When you get a guy who- To subscribe in Fra n co 

makes plays on the special teams and he's a |ust coll, toll frao, 

hard worker, sooner or later he’s gonna start OS 437 437 

playing somewhere. Because the thing that 


















t»bW- 






I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 


Page 19 

























































































Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1994 



ART BUCHWALD 


Political Commercials 



WASHINGTON — It is no 
VV surprise that this year's 
election races arc turning uglier 
eveiy day. People don't realize 
that it's not the candidates who 
are mean and rotten — it’s their 
handlers. Whenever a really dis- 
gusting rumor is spread, a can- 
didate will disc laim any knowl- 
edge of it and 
blame it on 
some “mis- 
guided staff 
member who 
has been repri- 
manded." 

. As far as 
handlers are 
concerned. 

w innin g is ev- 
erything and Ri . .. 

they couldn’t . 

care less what political high 
crimes and misdemeanors they 
are charged with. 

Proof of this was when I visit- 
ed the office of Charles Peanut 
running for Senate against the 
incumbent. Will Willowbright. 

A handler, wearing a bullet- 
proof vest, came into the office 
to screen some videotape com- 
mercials. The first showed a 
st rip leaser doing her number. 

The voice-over said, “Senator 
Willowbright doesn't know this 
woman, but he would like to. 
Protect your family — vote for 
Peanut.” 

“What do you think?” Pea- 
nut asked me.' 

“It does have a political mes- 
sage." 1 said. 

□ 

The handler kept going. The 
next commercial showed Wil- 
lowbright eating dinn er at a 
large political fund-raiser. 
■‘While our boys are in Haiti, 
Senator Willowbright is eating 
swordfish at the Hilton Hotel. 
Now you know why Saddam 
Hussein misread American in- 
tentions in the Middle East." 

I felt that it wasn’t negative 
enough. “Not many Americans 
know who Saddam Hussein is 
or why we are in Haiti.” 

Peanut agreed. “Scrub it." 


The handler pushed the tape 
button. The commercial 
showed a montage of c riminals 
in prison, in handcuffs and 
chains. It ended with a close-up 
of the electric chair. “The rea- 
son you don’t see Willowbright 
in this picture,” the voice-over 
said, “is that he doesn’t give a 
damn about crime.” Then they 
have a shot of the country club. 
“The only thing be cares about 
is his golf game. Are your wives 
and daughters safer on the 
street because Willowbright can 
shoot an 85?" 

Peanut said, “I like iL 1 shoot 
an 81. but I don't want us to 
sound as if we’re running a neg- 
ative campaign.” 

□ 

The handier turned to me. 
“We're working on some more 
— one showing Willowbright 
going in and out of what we 
claim to be a crack house. It's 
actually a halfway house, but 
who’s to know? We’re also plan- 
ning a shot of Willowbright with 
President and Mis. Clinton." 

"How did you get that?" Pea- 
nut asked. 

“We took it with a camera 
hidden in Pat Buchanan's ciga- 
rette lighter. This year no cam- 
paign actually has a photo of a 
Democratic candidate with the 
president of the United States, 
and no candidate has admitted 
to ever having met Bill Clinton." 

“So far so good What else 
are we going to do with Willow- 
bright?" 

"We’re calling him a liar." 

“What for?” 

“It doesn't matter. He has to 
prove that he isn’t" 

“Suppose he charges us with 
hitting him below the bell?" 

“We'll tell him to lower his 
belL" 

“You’re a good man, Dirk 
Dagger. If I am elected 111 see to 
it that you become director of 
the Political Ethics Committee." 

“Politics is a pure and honor- 
able profession — but someone 
has to do it” 


Manfred Eicher’s Ever- Widening Circles of Jazz 


By Mike Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Manfred Eicher is a 
man of the far north. He believes 
that cold, strange light extreme sea- 
sons and geographical distance “in- 
spire musical clarity.” Driving 
through jagged lava fields in Iceland 
he listened to music by the contem- 
porary Norwegian saxophonist Jan 
Garbarek and by the 16th-century 
Spanish composer Cbristobal de Mo- 
rales and flashed on the image of “a 
southern mainland over which a mi- 
gratory bird from the north was 
drawing ever-widening circles." 

Eicher, 51, has been drawing ever- 
widening circles for a living since 
founding ECM (Edition of Contem- 
poraiy Music) Records, which cele- 
brates its 25th birthday in Novem- 
ber. Bringing north to south and vice 
versa, Echer encouraged Garbarek 
to combine his voice with the four- 
part polyphony of Morales and oth- 
ers like him. The recently released 
album “Officium,” a good bet to top 
the Dominican monks on the pop 
charts, draws a circle highlighting 
ECM's motto: “The most beautiful 
sound next to silence." 

The start-up goal was to “record 
jazz with the same sensitivity and 
attention to detail as classical mu- 
sic " Having played both classical 
and jazz bass. Eicher knew the differ- 
ence. He gave a slick slew of .Ameri- 
can musicians a big break. In 1981. 
according to Time magazine: “A 
young jazz musician would want an 
ECM label the way a short story’ 
writer would want to be published by 
The New Yorker." 

Tunes change. Many young writ- 
ers now prefer to publish elsewhere. 
And young jazz musicians play post- 
bebop ana look for big advances 
from Blue Note or Warner Brothers. 
Although the African connection 
dominates the marketplace. Echer 
continues evoking the European con- 
nection to “America’s only art 
form.” He prefers making his own 
trends. He is determined, some say 
dictatorial. And ECM’s music can be 
plain weird. The fact remains that 
Echer expanded the definition of 
jazz by reorganizing multiethnic 
Global Village strains into lineups 


including Zakir Hussain. Marion 
Brown, TriJok Gurtu. Egberto Gis- 
monti. Enrico Rava, David Darling, 
Old and New Dreams, Meredith 
Monk, Teije Rypdal, Nana Vascon- 
cdos. John Sunn an. L. S hankar Jaco 
Pas tori us. Do ni Um R aman and 
Keith Jarrett. 

Recorded in 1975, Jarreit’s “Koln 
Concert” has sold 2.5 million copies. 
Nobody, certainly not Echer. predict- 
ed that abstract solo piano could 
reach the masses. Selling 50,000 copies 
(well above the break-even line) of the 
pianist's rendition of Bach's preludes 
and fugues was another welcome sur- 
prise. He and Jarrett have worked 
together more than 20 years without a 
written contract. It was the same ar- 
rangement with Pat Melheny. When 
the guitarist left for Geffen Records 
and more money, they shook hands 
and wished each other luck. 

With rock ascending, jazz guitar 
was an endangered species in the earlv 
1970s. Metheny is one of many guitar- 
ists ECM hoisted into the standings, 
along with John Abercrombie, Bill 
Connors, Ralph Towner. Bill Frisell, 
John McLaughlin, Sieve Vai, Kevin 
Eubanks, David Tom and John Sco- 
field. It's difficult to avoid name- 
dropping telling this story. 

ECM has released more than 500 
albums, all still in the catalogue. 
Echer produced all but 20 of them. 
This involves having spent a good 
part of the last 25 years buried in 
control-rooms. I asked him how be 
maintained his cutting edge. 

Echer weighed his words and 
spoke them slowly enough to be tran- 
scribed without rewinding the la pie: 
“The process of making music never 
exhausts me. The creative side is con- 
tinual nourishment. But office work 
exhausts me. I still oversee more or 
less everything." 

“How’s business?" 

“I have no idea." Echer runs one 
of the few remaining significant via- 
ble independent labels (in Munich). 
He is distributed worldwide by BMG 
and PolyGram, not exactly small 
players. There are those in the busi- 
ness who say that Echer knows a lot 
more about managing his money 
than he lets on. 

“What’s your gross volume of 
business?” 



Saxophonist Jan Garbarek (left) and jazz producer Manfred Eicher: Inspiring musical clarity 


“I really don't know.” You might 
call this low-profile manager an eco- 
nomic puritan. He owns neither his 
office nor his apartment. He rein- 
vests in bis company. He is interested 
in the quality of the product more 
than profits. 

“Are you making a profit?" 

“I’m not interested.” There is a 
defiant smile. Can this be true? “I 
don't think about money. 1 don't deal 
with banks. We have never taken out 
a loan. All I know is that when I need 
money for a new production it's al- 
ways there.” 

I asked him how come, if he is not 
interested in profit, he produced Pat 
Meihenys series of extremely com- 
mercial easy-listening albums includ- 
ing “American Garage" and “As Falls 
Wichita. So Falls Wichita Falls.” 

“I’m not dodging responsibility, 
but I was never really emotionally 
touched bv lhat music. These records 


had a great commercial impact, al- 
though I don't think that was Pat's 
intention. It was some kind of state- 
ment he had to make at that stage in 
his career. He produced most of it on 
his own in America. He probably 
didn't want my influence because ray 
influence would have changed his 
music for sure.” 

The corporate attitude is some- 
thing like we all have something to 
say, some of it sells, some not. one 
supports the other. It's sort of aes- 
thetic socialism. He prefers to listen 
to Schubert — or better yet, silence 
— than to tty and keep up with 
whatever is going on out there: “1 
don’t feel I'm missing anything. I 
don't need those points of reference. 
Trends are just chapters, soon every- 
body will turn the page. Music 
should be part or a long-lasting heal- 
ing process. In the sadness of life it 
can caress your soul. I don't think 


Fm being naive or corny. This is 
objectively important. We must cre- 
ate with integrity. 

“Record companies are investing 
enormously in jazz at the moment. 
They think U will pay off quickly. 
Everything has to happen in the first 
momentum these days, or it's consid- 
ered lost- That’s wrong thinking. It 
takes time for musicians to be able to 
reach their center, their sound, their 
articulation, their compositional 
skill s and SO on. You c ann ot t hink 
about art as rate of return. You plant 
the seeds, watch the plant grow, 
prune it, transplant it. encourage it. 
It often takes my seeds years to blos- 
som. Jan Garbarek. for example, is 
only now getting the attention he has 
long deserved. But my seeds were not 
investments, they were for future 
nourishment. So this is the privilege I 
now enjoy. I can live from what I've 
seeded.” 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Today 




High 

Loo 

W 

High 

Low 

w 


OF 

OF 


Cff 

OF 


Algarve 

21/70 

TJ/57 

PC 

31.70 

l?*B2 


Vnaoroam 

13.5E 

12/53 


12/53 

10*50 


Vuani 

MAK 

4il0 

HI 21/70 

5*46 

1 

IfflS 

27.60 

16.64 


28/82 


Serafcnn 

20,58 

TS/S9 

9*1 

30-66 

19*81 

SB 

SiXgmH 

IC.BI 

8/46 


14/57 

9/40 


Bcrtn 

11152 

5*41 


15/59 

7/44 


HmSMb 

,4.57 

11/52 

s/1 

18*64 

6/46 1 

Buuposl 

13.55 

7/44 


14.*57 

6.-46 


Ccpennagen 

W M 

*09 


13.55 

6/46 


Ccotn Cud Sol 

24/75 

16*1 

c 

21/70 

17/62 


Duran 

10-50 

7/44 


12/53 

4/39 


EtSntrngfi 

HI52 

10,30 

f 

13/55 

8/43 


Fteerea 

21,70 

16.61 


16*6* 

13.56 

r 

FranWlifl 

U 57 

6*43 


15/50 



Oerma 

MAT 

12.53 

5/1 

t««l 

0HS t 

l-taearta 

7M4 

306 


9/48 



bdtaii 

10/F4 

15« 


18*4 

13/55 

eh 

Las Palmas 

2BI79 

31/70 

pc 26,73 

22,71 

a 

Lisbon 

I9.M 

14/57 


20.™ 

Id. 51 

SB 

London 

13/SJ 

10/50 


12/53 



I.UW 

20« 

9.40 

e 

21/70 

11.52 


Otan 

,6*, 

15/53 





Moscm 

4.39 

•2<2S 


7*4* 

3/35 


UlObCh 

I3.S5 

3*46 

SB 

15/M 

7/44 


[*ec 

22/71 

16/61 

5h 

1VTO 

14/57 

r 

Oslo 

B/46 

104 


9 <40 

5/41 


Polnra 

I9«t 

17*3 

SB 


17/52 


Pons 

15/59 

11/52 

r 

16*61 



I'raguf 

11.-53 

403 


14.57 



■Icvvjjuui 

7,44 

J/39 

SB 

7,44 

3/37 


llrmn 

25/77 

16 01 

l 

23.73 



li PakrobuQ 

7 4J 

0O2 

S 

9/40 

4*39 



Bus 

104 


11/S2 

a/4j 


Vr.rr'oirfl 

M -57 

1152 


'■*c 


( 

Warn 

C 43 

-•35 


11.52 

6/4J 

3 

'^0»cn 

1762 

15,59 


10U 

1355 ah 

'•’Tin.i 

12 -VJ 

M--46 


12.51 

0 46 

rr, 


'1 57 

fl-OC 

; 

14.67 

6*43 

#. 

. unen 

13 V. 

11*52 

1 

10.81 

9<40 

1 

Oceania 

,-jSi.una 

17.62 

10/50 

s 

17433 

10 50 


■-.arty 

i-VW 

12.53 

re 

JiVTid 

OSS 

r»h 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Acco-Weather. 



JMsttcam 

North America 

Diy wnather from Houston, 
Texas, through Shravaport, 
La., this weekend wil alow 
tloodwalers to recede. 
Del ran through Toronto wB 
have scattered rains this 
weekend, then much coder 
weather Monday. The West- 
ern states wfl be mainly dry 
and tranquil. 


Europe 

Windswept rains will affect 
ftaly and portions ot north 
Africa this weekend. Mild 
souh winds win bring a spay 
of warm weather to Germany 
and Poland this weekend. 
Showers will dampen Paris 
and London while heavy 
raine occur along the south 
coast of Ireland and the west 
coast of Spam. 


Asia 

Typhoon Teresa will 
approach the northern Philip- 
pines this weekend. Very 
heavy rains and high winds 
ere possible along the east 
coast ol Luzon. Tokyo and 
Osaka will be aunny and 
warm has weekend Shang- 
hai will have nice weather 
this weekend as clouds and 
rain shift offshore. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Today Taman aw Today Tomorrow 

Hlflti Low W High Um W High Lin W Nigh Um W 

C/F OF C/F C/F OF OF OF OF 

Bom« 25/77 21/70 S 27/BO 21*70 s BuenasAres 21, TO 9/48 % 17 162 BIAS ec 

Ouo Z7re0 1BIM b 31/BB 1 9166 S Caracas 20/82 22/71 in 2 9/04 20/68 DC 

Damorfus S3/T» 13/63 » 27/80 13/55 4 Una 21/70 I Bit I pc 23,71 |6«| pc 

Jcnsaton 23/73 16*1 3 27*00 17163 s MmcoCot 24/75 12,53 pc 25,77 13/55 1 

LL"3I 13/91 18.6* 3 37,88 17/82 a fto OOJanem) 32/89 22-71 I 28/82 21,70 pc 

^*3*1 32 TO 20/68 5 34/B3 21/70 1 Santana 23.73 5/41 4 23/73 0,43 gc 

legend: r-numry. penalty cloudy, c-doudy. sh-snmwts. Hnundorstomn. r-ian. at- snow Suntos. 
an- snow. Ko, W-Wooihcn. AD mops, forecasts and data provided by Acco-WcaAef. Inc. 1B94 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 



High 

Law 

W 

High 

Lam 

' W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 


Bangkok 

30/86 

22/71 

sh 

29/84 

23/73 

SB 

B/Nr-g 

15,59 

2/35 

s 

17/63 

6/43 

C 

Hongkong 

28*62 

23/73 

PC 

28/82 

23/73 

pc 

Ite* 

32/88 

25/77 

PC 

31/88 

24.75 

sn 

Now CM/« 

37 m 

17/02 

s 

■36/97 

17/62 

s 

Sadi 

17«2 

10/50 

SB 

21/76 

12/53 

pc 

Sn/rngnai 

16/61 

8/*6 

c 

17/B2 

12/53 HI 

Sngnioro 

32/89 

23/73 

PC 

33/91 

23/73 

pc 

Ta«w 

25/77 

16/61 

sh 

25*77 

10784 

<■ 

T*yo 

21/70 

15/50 

SB 

19/66 

17«2 

« 

Africa 

A kjwra 

32/71 

10,64 

1 

22/71 

17/62 

«h 

Cap® Town 

19/66 

13/53 

I 

17/52 

11/52 

sh 

C/uab/ancB 

22.-71 

16/61 

c 

22/71 

16/BI 

pc 

Harare 

20/68 

8/46 

PC 23,73 

9/40 

s 

Lagos 

29/84 

23*73 

SB 

38/82 

24.76 

I 

Kama 

21,70 

11/52 

pc 23/73 

12/53 

sn 

Tim 

24/75 

18/04 

1 

23,73 

15*59 

sh 

North America 

AnmngB 

2/35 

■5.34 

PC 

4/38 

-t/2S 

PC 

Altana 

27/80 

16/61 

sh 

24/75 

13/55 

SB 

Bosun 

18/64 

11/52 

sh 

17/82 

11/52 c 

Oacogo 

16*64 

0/46 

PC 

1845* 

6/43 

pc 

Qonwr 

21/70 

3/37 

s 

2T/70 

3/37 

S 

Devon 

16*4 

6/46 

c 

13/66 

8*48 

PC 

HomUu 

31/88 

26.79 

c 

30,86 

25.77 

PC 

HOUBUl 

28/82 

10/04 

PC 

2904 

19/W 

PC 

Los Angolas 

24/75 

14/57 

pc 

28/79 

15/59 

PC 

IfcaiU 

30/06 

23/73 

pc 

30 *6 

22/71 

PC 

MOnHWOhs 

17/62 

7M4 

1 

13/55 

3/37 

pc 

Monhoal 

13/56 

4/30 

SB 

14/57 

4/39 

PC 

Nassau 

3T/B8 

22/71 

pc 

31*80 

22/71 

PC 


New Forte 31/70 12/53 dr 19** 11 *£ pc 

Phoenp 2904 15/99 s 32/89 18.81 s 

San Flan. 10 /SO b 22 /7i 10.50 s 

SftMe 14/57 9/40 sB 14/57 9/40 sh 

Toronto 16*1 4/39 pc 1550 6M3 pc 

Woshk^uxi 22/71 1253 Ml 21/70 9/40 pc 


T HE family of Lord Lucan, a British 
aristocrat who vanished 20 years ago 
after the murder of his children's nanny, 
has launched a legal bid to have him offi- 
cially declared dead. The move would 
dear the way for his children to inherit his 
estate and put his tax affairs in order. 
Lucan is accused of killing the nanny and 
attempting to kill his wife in 1974. Police 
say they still check on about 60 Lucan 
“sightings” each year. 

□ 

Bob and Dolores Hope have been mar- 
ried for 60 years. He's 91; she’s 85. And 
there they were at Sardi’s, holding hands 
and gazing into each other’s eyes. They 
were at the New York restaurant to pro- 
mote “Bob Hope Remembers . . . World 
War D: The European Theater and D- 
Day," a packaged video with two compact 
disks ana souvenir pamphlet. 

□ 

Or. Benjamin Spock. who wrote the 
1946 best-selling “bible" of child care, is 
worried about what he sees as America's 
loss of spiritual beliefs. Spock. 91. promot- 
ing what he said would be his 17th and last 
book, declared that “A Better World for 
Our Children: Rebuilding American Fam- 


ily Values” was a warning that American 
society was heading in the wrong direction 
and that it was harmful to children. 

□ 

Another Elvis book? Yes, but Peter 
Guralnick's biography, “Last Train To 
Memphis: The Rise’ of Elvis Presley" 
steers clear of the sensational aspects of 
Evis’s later years. Instead, it focuses on 
the years from 1935 up to his induction 
into the Army and the death of his mother 
in 1959. The idea, Gurainick said, “was to 
show him as a person who set out seriously 
to make music and was a dedicated and 
consciously feeling artist” 

□ 

Donald Sutherland is in Budapest to film 
“Citizen X,” a movie based on the stoiy of 
Andrei Chikatilo, who was convicted of 
torturing and killing 52 children and wom- 
en in southern Russia in the 1980s. An 
eight-year manhunt failed to produce any 
hard evidence against ChikatiJo. a Com- 
munist Pam functionary. He confessed in 
1992 after speaking with a psychiatrist, 
and was executed Feb. 15. Sutherland stars 
as a policeman who joins a criminologist, 
played by Stephen Rea, to track down the 
psychopath. 




; • \ K ;f 



Luke Frasu.- Agencc Fnaa-Proc 

POETRY AND PROTEST — Allen; 
Ginsberg reading his poem “Howl” in i 
Washington, to protest FCC policy • 
barring “indecent” radio broadcasts; 
between 6 A. M. and midnight. 





ASIA /PACIFIC 
AUSTRALIA 1000-001-911 

CHINA, PRO*** 10811 

HONGKONG 800-1111 

INDIA* IHU-117 

INDONESIA* . .. . 001-801-18 

JAPAN'. DOW-111 

KOREA 809-11 

KACAQ 0809-111 

MALAYSIA' 800-0011 


NEtfiE ALAND 

PHILIPPINES' 


.. 000-91 T 

105-11 


RUSSIA 't (MOSCOW) 155-5042 
SAIPAtf . 235-2072 

■SINGAPORE 600-0111-111 

SIB LANKA 430 430 

TAIWAN' Wffl] -10288-0 

IHV1AND* 0QI94OM111 

EUROPE 

ARMENIA** 8014111 


AUSTRIA’* >’ 
BELGIUM' 
BULGARIA . . 
CROATlAt* 


B22-S83-B11 
.0-800-100-10 
_ oo-iajo-oj-.Q 
. . 99-W-ttlT 


CZECH REPUBLIC 00-420-00101 
DENMARK' . . . 8801-0010 

FINLAND'. . SSHM DO-10 

FRANCE 193-6011 

GERMANY 0130-0010 

GREECE' .08-808-1311 


IRELAND 

ITALY' 

LlECHTENSTEBf 
LITHUANIA* 
IWEWB0URG 
MALTA.. 
MONACO'. . 


..803-800-01111 

NORWAY 

800-190-11 

BIDDLE EAST 

AMERICAS 

PANAMA.. 

TOO 

.899-001 

P0LAND T *v 

00810-480-9111 

BAHRAIN 

800-001 

ARGENTINA* 

001-901.300-11 ?1 

PERU*. 

191 

. 1-800-550-000 

PORTUGAL 1 . .. 

. 05017-1-288 

CYPRUS* 

oaQ-axno 

BOLIVIA-.. . 

Cl -SB-Ill? 

VENEZUELA'. . 

00-011-130 

. 17WBT1 

ROMANIA 

01-000-4280 

EGYPT* (CAIRO) 1 .. 

510-0200 

BRAZIL 

MB- 6010 

AFRICA 

. 155-00-11 

SLOVAK REP. .... 

.... 00-420-08101 

ISRAEL. 

177-1OT-Z727 

CANADA 

MW0-57S-2222 

6AH0H* 

. 005-001 

.. 80198 

SPAIN. 

00049-08-11 

KUWAIT 

803-^8 

CHILE. 

. 00M81S 

GAMBIA' 

. 00111 

o-eoci-om 

SWEDEN- 

... 030-795-811 

LEBANON [BEIRUT] 

1’ 436-801 

COLOMBIA. .. 

.. 980-11-0010 

IVORY COAST*.., 

-.00-111-11 

0800-038-1 10 

SUTHERLAND- 

. . 155-00-11 

SAUDI ARABIA. 

1-300-10 

EL SALVADOR'. 

190 

KENYA* 

0600-10 

.194-0011 

UKRAINE!. . 

80108-11 

TURKEY' 

00-808-12277 

HONDURAS'.. 

123 

LIBERIA 

. . 797-797 

. 06-922-9111 

U.L 

DS8S -89-0011 

U. ARAB EMIRATES* 

.. SB-121 

MEAR.0-.W- 

'35-800-W.M21U 

SOUTH AFRICA.., 

.. 0 -309-99- D1 23 


With AT&T USADirect* and 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1904 


Page 21 


x* 

Ar 



SPORTS 


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A«nc( Frnct fmc 

Scott SeUars hurdled a defender as Newcastle held on for a 3-2 UEFA Cup victory after two late goals by visiting RQboa. 


SCOREBOARD 

NBAPveseason 


TXIrtnT‘1 Gomes 
Golden Stole m. Charlotte m 
i Phoenix !», Miami IT7 
.Cleveland 121, Boston 102 
l New York m San Antonio *2 
, Portland 111, PnBadolphJd 93 
. LA. Lakers as, LA. clippers 104 


favhrr I *- '• 1 " c ' r ! 
,*1 K- ti.i. f v ! 

iriiin’r'l' I' 


SOCCER 


HJEFA Cup Results 


ast of It 


: SECOND ROUND, FIRST LED 

f - Tuesday's Matches 

, Altai bv Wadtr I> Cmom 1 

Sowers: AdmiraWocfcer— Herbert Gaswr 
UUti-penaltYl: FCCimnei— Pascal Bedros- 
“tai MTtti). 

’ v Tyrol X Deoarttee La Cemoo • 
'Scorers: Soulcvmane Sane I30ND. Peter 
Shew 

WiitourtiuT Match 

WtoM Buctarast X StoitnxM Pn U c tu rt l 
Scorers: Rapid Bucharest — Jean Vtoooto 
172nd). Roaln vobiea (771b): Elntracht 
.’VnnkfWt — Jan Furtofc (SSI. 


, . ■*’ •• — i 

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. ■».! ■■ baseball 

da] Lis.il jitAibMicuo lenwn^t i^.1 _>. 

BALTIMORE— Named Mike Flanaoan 
sHctiina ■coach.' ' 

- BOSTON NeaiedNaebi Kunedym ew a— r. 
CALIFORNIA— Phwed John Dopson, 

.Pitcher, on waiver# la o(v» Mm hlsunaxKh- 
-Hanal release. BauaM the contracts of Mik* 
bJomes, pitcher, and Luis Raven, brfWder, 

' trera Vancouver. PCL Sent Kyle Setaacfc. 
^pitetwr, la Vancouver. Andy A Hanson, catch- 
ier, and Ken Pattereoa Pitcher, (elected oal- 
^riaht asNanments and elected tree aeency. 

CH ICAGO— Exercised thehr ms options on 
f Atlee Hamraafcer, pitcher, and Mike LOVat- 
Itere. catdwr. Placed Paul Anenmactwr, 
Pilcher, an enfvere fa afire Mm his uncandt- 
. .Hanoi mease. 

CLEVELAND— Ctotmod Dennis Cook. 
.PDcher, all waivers from me White Son. 

. MINNESOTA — Purchased the contracts o< 
Tim Mdnhish. catcher, <md Mo Sontora 
Kpitcmr. from Salt Lake CHy, PCL 

OAKLAND Am eed h> terms with Tony La 
Rum manager, on l-veor contract extension. 

- SEATTLE— Agreed to 1-venr contract ex- 
tension through m* with Lou PMella, man- 
aaer. and Lee Ella, John McLaren, Sam Me- 
lias and Sam Pertaan, co ach es. 


In tr** 9 
fr **' 

*** 417 



CH ICAGO-flnd Svd Thrltt, assistant gen- 
eral manager. Announced the retirement ot 
Tommy SbleMi, Inttoidcr. Announced Blaise 
IMey and Roioel Novoa, nttchers; Todd 

Hanev,ln4toMer:andMlkeMak3udtan,cotch- 

yr. refused oufrfgM assfonmenft to land and 
' M esected bee agency. Named Scott Neman 
» rector at BasehaK odminWration. 

FLORIDA— Named Rich Dube minor, 
league pitching In st ructor. 

■ LOS ANGELES— Exercised their 1W5 op- 
tion on Jeff Treadway. InfleMer. 

NEW YORK— Announced they woukl not 
txercbe their ms option on Kewto Mcfievn- 
oMs, outfielder. 

PHI LADELPHI A— BIHv Matcher, ouffletd- 
er, refused an outHgtit assignment and «ech 
ed bee agency. Exercised their 19H option an 
Jim Elsenmch. outfielder. Declined to exer- 
cise their IMS options on Norm Chartton and 
Doug Janes, p it chers, and Pete Incavigha 
outfMder. Stoned Brian DuBols. Paul Fletch- 


er, Chuck Rlcd and Dennis Springer. Pitch- 
ers; Shawn Gilbert and Chortle Montoya In- 
HeMers. to minor league contract s . 

PITTSBURGH Agreed la terms with 
Mark Parent, catcher, 1-year contract. 

ST. LOUIS— Activated Donovan Osborne 
and Ride SutdHta. pitchers, from the ttdav 
disabled HsL 

SAN DIEGO— Signed Merv ReftonmumL 
tutting coach, to 7-vear c u i i ti’o c l 
SAN FRANOSCO— While McGee, outfleld- 
er, refused an outright asdgnment and elect- 
ed free agency. Activated Robby Thompson, 
InfleMer, and Trevor wnson.pl icher, from Hw 
tOdav disabled HsL 

BASKETBALL 

Natlenal Basketball Attodatioa 
CHICAGO— Waived Eric Gray, forward. 
CLEVELAND— Waived Marcus Uberfr 
and BUI Edwanb, forwards. 

DALLAS— Waived Sian Rostand Jervcugnn 
Scales, h x w ui th. and Rlchord RelifonL guard. 

GOLDEN STATE— Signed Manute BaL 
cantor, to 1-year contrac t . 

MIAMI— Wcdvcd Andrew Spencer, forward 
ORLANDO— Waived Stacey Paata, guard. 

FOOTBALL 

NaHaaai Football Leogoo 

CHICAGO — An nounced the retbement of 
Merrtl Hooe. fullback. 

HOCKEY 

NaMeaal Hockey League 
N.Y. ISLANDERS— Assigned Brett Uit- 
drae, right wlna. to Kingston. Ontario HocAev 
League. Traded Jason zent, left wing, toOtfo- 
wa far a fifth-round pick in WM. Agreed to 
terms with Bryan McCabe, defenseman. 

. OTTAWA— Assigned Alexandre Daigle, 
center: ttrtnttorkJvfHc, Ouohec Motor junior - 
’ Hocfcev League. 

- PITTSBURGH— Reassigned Sieve Ban- 
croft, de f en seman, from Cleveland la Fort 
wnvne, IHL 

OVEBEC— Sent Jocelyn TMbault. goai- 
tonder. to Sherbrooke. Quebec Malar Junior 
Hodtev League, text Adorn Deadmarsh, for- 
ward. to Portland. Western Hockey Leaaue. 

ST. LOUlS-nAcwilred Adam Creighton, 
center, trom Tampa Bay tor Tom TUIav. de- 
tanseman. 

SAN JOSE— Signed Utf DaMen, forward to 
5-«ar contract Asshmod Jeff Frtesen, center, 
to Regina, Western Hockey League and VattH- 
mll Kraupa. defenseman, to Kansas aty. IHL 
Signed JeM Frtaeen, forward. Agreed to lem« 
with Igor Larionov, center, and Sergei Ma- 
karov, right wtno. Assigned Andrei Nazarov, 
left wing, ad Mldwl Svkora and Kevin Wort- 
mm d efen se men, to Kansas atv. IHL 
TAMPA BAY-nAxNgned Cory Crow and 
Chris LI Puma d ef ensemen, to Atlanta, IHL 
Assigned Martin Tanguoy. More TardH rxwl 
Tom MocDonold, forwards, to Nashville, 
ECHL Signed jasanWIemar. left vri no. lo muf- 
ti year contract Reassigned Marian Kodr. for- 
worL from Attada IHLto CWcogo, IHL 
TORONTO— Asstawd Eric Lacroix, toff 
wing, and Keraiv Jarman, defenseman, to SL 
John's, AHL Traded Eric Lacrabc. left wing, 
dirts Sncfl. defenseman, ml IWt touritv- 
raund draft pick to Las Angeles tor Dixon 
Ward, right wing, Guy Levonue. center, and 
rights to Simyne ToporowsfcT, right wing, and 
Kelly PaircniM, center. 

VANCOUVER— Assigned Nathan La- 
fayette, center. To Syracuse, AHL 

COLLEGE 

BIG WEST CONFERENCE-Amourraed 
that Boise State, Idaho and Cat Poty-San Luts 
Obispo will loin the conference. 

AU BU RN— Announced that Adam Hopkins, 
toward-oenter. has suit the man's basketball 


CLEMSON— Suspended l-M- Ibrahim, 
menu soccer coach, tar four games. 

COLORADO— Suspended football Player 
TJ. Cunningham, safety, for one game tar 
bretakkia an unspecified team rule. 



Jem Pud Bdm*r/ Rcuicn 


BACK ON TRACK — Karl Weodlinger, the Austrian 
wbo lay in a coma for more than three weeks, drove a 
Formula One car Wednesday for the first time since 
his crash at the Monaco Grand Prix in May. “It’s a 
great feeling,” Wendfinger said after the session of 
testing with the Sauber team in Le Castellet, France. 


CROSSWORD 



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— Tot'Ll loti Tsi Wai N* Fit 1 — 
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COMPETITION 


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i Whom Simple 
Simon met 
7 Worn out 
11 Marciano stats 
14 Andeni mystic 
is Alternative to 
Charles 
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16 A Mrs. Mickey 
Rooney 

17 Lunch Item 

taPro 

20 Make even 

21 Stringed grp. 

22 Ahab's lather 

29 D.G summer hrs. 
24 Litfl.. formerly 
2*01 the first 

category 
28 Fishing 
equipment 

30 Curling inning 

32 Francophone's 
income 

33 Cosmetician 
Lauder 

35 Like Pmocchio 
m Lunch item 
as "As You Like It' 
character 

40 Physicist Bruno 

41 Disgruntled 
employee's 
words 

42 Pub serving 

43 Thin wood strip 

47 Fertifeem 

48 Nettle 

si Fourth letter of 
the Arable 
alphabet 
32 Hairdresser's 
preparations 
S3 Pound, tor one 
M Cigar lips 

kb * tu' (Verdi 

aria] 

ss Lundi item 


•i New Yorker 
cartoonist Chast 

B2 OUl 

(scrapes by) 

S3 Greek markets 
B4 Mariner's dir. 

65 Foreign start 
as Attacks on all 
sides 

DOWN 

1 Effervescent 
-Dr.- 

2 Tristram's 
beloved 

3 Possessions left 
behind 

4 Intend 

5 Starts a pool 
8 Art movement 

prefix 
7 Planck 
contemporary 
b Red navigator 
b Capital ol 
Attica? 
to Cobb and 
olhers 

11 Cap rial ol Nepal 

12 Exceed, na way 

13 Japanese guitar 
is Ophthalmolo- 
gist's study 

22 Margarine 
Ingredient 

23 Pairing stones 

27 Greek or 
Maltese, e.g. 

29 Author Ursula 
elal- 

31 Actress Winger 
34 Take careol 
S3 North Sea 
feeder 

sg Southwestern 
cowboys 
37 Make uniform 
wUghtof 
Humbert 
Humbert's life 


p 

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■ 

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Puzzle by Biyarx White 


© New York Times/ Edited bv Will Shorts. 


39 Tots of liquor 

44 Clothes 

-»5 Start olaSeuss 
title 

45 Talks (over) 

4B Nietzsche's 
Thus— — 

Zara Ih us Ira" 

so Small anchor 

54 Presage 

53 Conoco rival 

57 Deux. dos. due 
etal 

59 Do voodoo 

bo Collar 


Solution to Puzzle of Oct. 19 



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Rothenberg Getting $7 Million 
Of World Cup $60 Million Profit 


By Julie Cart 

Las Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Alan 
Rothenberg will receive $7 mil- 
lion in compensation for serv- 
ing as the World Cup Organiz- 
ing Committee's chairman and 
chief executive officer. 

The World Cup Board of Di- 
rectors released the event's pre- 
liminary finan cial accounting, 
and projected the monthlong 
soccer tournament’s net at $60 
milli on, about three times earli- 
er estimates. 

The board announced that 
Rothenberg would receive a SB- 
million bonus. However, two 
board members said the board 
also voted Rothenberg an addi- 
tional S4 million as part of a 
deferred-compensation pack- 
age for “back pay due,” calcu- 
lated at 5800,000 a year, run- 
ning from August of 1990 
through next year. 

In addition, Rothenberg’s ex- 
tensive expenses the last four 
years had previously been reim- 
bursed by the committee. 

In 1992, Rothenberg de- 
clined a salary of 5350,000 a 
year that was offered by the 


board, saying be would accept 
compensation only if a surplus 
was produced. Rothenberg said 
many times later that he was 
□ot receiving a salary. 

Peter V. Ueberroth, a board 
member who chaired the com- 
pensation committee, said 
Tuesday that an outside con- 
sulting group had given a range 
of figures for the executive bo- 
nuses and that the board had 
made the final determinations. 

“One of the things they took 
into account was that I certain- 
ly sacrificed a great deal on the 
other side,** Rothenberg said. 

In an era. of declining sports 
marketing dollars and increas- 
ing costs of mounting interna- 
tional sporting events, the sur- 
plus is considered by some to be 
remarkable. Early projections 
called for a 520-miDiott profit. 

U I think the figures are excep- 
tional,” said Ueberroth, who 
organized the 1984 Olympic 
Games in Los Angeles that net- 
ted $225 milli on. “In this coun- 
try, we like to kick ourselves 
around. We are often embar- 
rassed by our success in Ameri- 
ca. It's a good omen for Atlan- 


ta." the site of the 1996 Olympic 
Games. 

The board also announced 
that it expected to turn over 540 
million to the U.S. Soccer Fed- 
eration Foundation, a nonprof- 
it organization established to 
promote and support soccer in 
the United States. 

• Rothenberg said the World 
Cup, which charged up to 5475 
for tickets, grossed approxi- 
mately 5375 million. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported. 

That figure doesn’t include 
money from the II official 
sponsors, who paid between 
S20 million and S32 million 
each to be associated with the 
1994 World Cup and the 1992 
European Championship. Thai 
money was split by FIFA and 
the UEFA, the sport's govern- 
ing body in Europe. 

World Cup USA 1994 cur- 
rently has about 560 million in 
cash and estimates it will have 
an additional S20 million in ex- 
penses, inducting 57.7 million 
m deferred and continuing sala- 
ry to its staff, which peaked at 
approximately 418 full time em- 
ployees. It will pay about 51 


million in bonuses to its other 
employees. 

It estimates it has given about 
51 1 million to the USSF in cash 
and property. 

The announcement didn't 
address the approximately 55 
million the U.S. World Cup or- 
ganizers lent Major League 
Soccer, the 10- team league 
Rothenberg is heading MLS, 
which plans to start play in 
April, nas seven cities lined up 
and is scheduled to announce 
the rest next Tuesday. 

• Red Star Belgrade's return 
to international soccer competi- 
tion after more than two years 
was delayed Wednesday by 
FIFA, The Associated Press re- 
ported. 

FIFA asked Red Star and 
Olympiad os Piraeus of Greece 
not to play a planned exhibition 
match despite a recent easing of 
U.N. sanctions that kept Yugo- 
slav teams from international 
play for 28 months. 

FIFA told the Yugoslav Soc- 
cer Association in a letter that 
Yugoslavia’s return to interna- 
tional soccer will have to await 
the body's meeting Oct 27 in 
New York. 


’32 Olympics’ Famed 'Loser’ Dies at 85 


The Associated Press 

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore- 
gon — Ralph Hill, the uncom- 
plaining ranner-up in one of the 
most controversial races in 
Olympic history, has died at the 
age of 85. 

A son. Dr. Robert Hill, said 
his father died Monday at a 
nursing home where he had 
been living since breaking his 
pelvis early this year. 

Ralph HiU won the stiver 
medal at 5.000 meters at the 
1932 Los Angeles Games. The 
winner, Finland's Lauri Leh- 
tinen, cut in front of Hill twice 
over the final 200 meters, pre- 
venting him from passing. 

The crowd of more than 
50,000 showered catcalls on 
Leh linen until the public ad- 
dress announcer said, “Remem- 


ber, these people are our 
guests." 

Avery Brundage, who later 
became president of the Inter- 
national Olympic Committee, 
spoke for the United States and 
said that although the race was 
not fairly run, his country 
would not file a protest. 

The chief judge was quoted 
as saying he would have dis- 
qualified Lehtinen had a pro- 
test been filed. 

Humorist Will Rogers said. 
"It looked as if Lehtinen, or 
whatever his name is, made the 
mistake of rigging when he 
should have zagged.” 

HiU didn’t complain. 

“The U.S. made its decision 
and he said, *O.K.,”' said Dr. 
Alden Glidden, a friend from 


Klama th Falls. ‘Tm sure he was 
disappointed, but he never 
showed any bitterness." 

Hill and Lehtinen were given 
the same time for the race, a 
world record of 14 minutes. 30 
seconds. 

Reports from around the 
world denounced Lehtinen and 
praised Htil. 

The Swedish newspaper Da- 
gens Nyheter wrote of Hill's 
graciousness, saying he is the 
“hero of boys and girls who 
turn out for track and sports in 
every school.’* 

Several years ago at an Ore- 
gon Track Club gathering, 
someone asked Hill if he 
thought he would have won the 
race if he hadn't been fouled. 


“You bet," he said. 

It may have been the only 
time he publicly voiced his true 
feelings about the incident. 

Hin moved to the Klamath 
Falls area at age 4 and graduat- 
ed from the University of Ore- 
gon in 1931 with a degree in 
business administration. After 
running in the Olympics, he re- 
turned to Klamath Falls, where 
he fanned until his retirement 
in 1980. 

He came down with polio in 
1953 and lost the use of his right 
arm. From then on. he operated 
farm machinery with his left 
hand. 

In 1992, the track at his alma 
mater, Henley High School, 
was named for Hill and another 
famous alumnus, world decath- 
lon record holder Dan O'Brien. 


No Negligence Found in Death of Skier Maier 


Reuters 

BONN — Prosecutors have 
closed their investigation into 
the death of Austrian Alpine 
skier Ulrike Maier and said that 
they could find no negligence 
on the part of the organizers of 
the World Cup downhill last 
January. 

“There are two main reasons 
for the case being closed," Mu- 
nich’s public prosecutor, Rfl- 
diger Hddl, said Wednesday. 
“The organizers were found to 
have met all the safety measures 
required by the Internationa] 
Skiing Federation. Also it was 
impossible to have foreseen the 
crash.” 

Maier, a 26-year-old former 
super-giant slalom world cham- 
pion, lost control of her skis on 
a normally straightforward part 


of the piste at the Garmisch- 
Partenkirchen course and broke 
her neck. 

HOdl said that it had been 
established that Maier died 
when she hit the back of her 
neck on a mound of snow at the 
side of the course and not on a 
tuning post which, television 
pictures indicated, could have 
been the cause of death. 

Her fiance, Hubert 
Schweighofer, has sued, claim- 
ing safety measures were inade- 
quate. The Austrian news agen- 
cy APA quoted Schweighofer as 
describing the prosecutors’ de- 
cision as "incomprehensible 
and disgraceful." 

• A court in Grenoble, 
France, gave the driver of a 
snow-roller a three-month sus- 
pended jail sentence Wednes- 


International 

Recruitment 

Every Thursday 
Coniad Philip Orna 
Tel.: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 36 
Fax: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative 


day for causing the death of 
Swiss Olympic skier Nicolas 
Bochatay during the 1992 Win- 
ter Games, justice sources said. 

The court said, Marceau 
Grogyiet, 37, bad broken regula- 
tions banning snow machines 
from ski runs in the resort of 
Les Arcs after 9 A.M. 

Bochatay, training at 9.10 
A^l. for the Olympic speed ski- 
ing final, smashed head-on into 
the machine, which Grognet 
had parked behind a hill The 
skier was killed instantly. 

• Christopher Dean, half of 
the famous British Olympic ice 
dance team Torvill and Dean, 
married American skater Jill 


Trcnaiy in a private ceremony 
at the weekend, his spokeswom- 
an said in Los Angeles. 

Dean, 36, and Trenaiy, 26, 
were married Saturday in St 
Mark’s Cathedral in Minneapo- 
lis. Dean’s partner. Jayne Tor- 
vill, attended the wedding and 
her husband, Phil, was best 
man. 

The spokeswoman, Nancy 
Seltzer, said the newlyweds 
were on a one-week honeymoon 
before going to Colorado to re- 
hearse for the U.S. leg of Torvill 
and Dean’s final world tour. 
The American part of the tour, 
in which Trenary also performs, 
starts in Chicago on Nov. 10. 


On December 8th, the IHT plans to publish 
a Sponsored Section on 

European Union: 
Profiting From Partnerships 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ How cohesive is the Union? 

■ New members: How many, and when? 

■ Cross-border investment. 

■ Trade agreements and cooperation. 

■ Corporate partnerships and joint ventures. 


7his supplement coincides 
with the EU Summit in Essen, Germany, at which 
5,000 extra copies wS be distributed. 

For further information, please contact BUI Mahder 
in Paris at ( 33-1 ) 46379378, tax: (33-1)46 375044. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 




The Milosevic Card: Recognition of Bosnia and Croatia WORLD briefs 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Times Service 

BELGRADE — Maneuvering once again to 
use Serbia as the unlikely instrument of its Bal- 
kan diplomacy, die Clinton administration is 
now pressing its president to grant diplomatic 
recognition to Bosnia-Herzegovina and to 
Croatia. 

Such recognition would be aimed at further 
isolating Bosnian and Croatian Serbs long armed 
and backed by Serbia and its president, Slobo- 
dan Milosevic. In exchange, the United States 
would be prepared to accept a further easing of 
trade sanctions against Serbia, Western officials 
said Wednesday. 

“The highest thing on our agenda now is 
securing Serbian recognition of Bosnia and Cro- 
atia,” an official said. 

“It looked like a nonstarter a couple of weeks 
ago, but it may in fact be possible, because 
Milosevic's blockade of the Bosnian Serbs al- 
ready amounts to de facto recognition of the 
Bosnian border." 

After financing their campaign of aggression 
for more than two years, Mr. Milosevic officially 
cut off all political and economic links to the 


Bosnian Serbs in August. His main hope was to 
win relief from international sanctions. 

Nonetheless, recognition of Bosnia and Cro- 
atia within their current international borders 
would amount to an enormous step — one some 
of fidals close to Mr. Milosevic believe is impos- 
sible even now. 

Angered by the way the breakup of Yugoslavia 
marooned ethnic Serbs in countries they did not 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

wish to join, Mr. Milosevic has long dismissed 
the current Croatian and Bosnian borders as 
mere administrative lines drawn by Tito, the 
former Yugoslav ruler, and unjustly recognized 
by the United Nations. 

Many have seen his long support for the Bos- 
nian and Croatian Serbs as a drive to create a 
“Greater Serbia.” 

On the other hand, Mr. Milosevic's decision to 
cut off the Bosnian Serbs suggests that he is a 
man capable of violent policy swerves in defense 
of his hold on power. 

“Mr. Milosevic now represents our best 
chance, short of fighting this war either directly 
or by proxy," the Western official said. 


The need to find some new political momen- 
tum in the quest for peace has become pressing 
over the last three months as a U.S.-backed plan 
to end the 30-month war has sat on the table, 
rejected by the Bosnian Serbs and unlikely ever 
to be accepted by them. 

For the United States, the Milosevic card 
looks like the only viable option. However, Euro- 
pean governments would now like to adjust the 
peace proposal to make it more attractive to the 
Serbs. 

To the Clinton administration, such a step 
would amount to rewarding the Bosnian Serbs’ 
stubbornness. U.S. officials are insisting that this 
was a take-it-or-leave-it plan, offering 31 percent 
of Bosnia to the Muslim-led government and 49 
percent to the Serbs. 

The extent of the trans-Atlantic differences 
emerged this week in an unusually blunt article 
in the Paris daily Le Figaro by the French foreign 
minister. Alain Juppe. Noting that the Muslim- 
Croat federation in Bosnia had the right to form 
a confederation with Croatia, Mr. Juppe said the 
Bosnian Serbs should now be explicitly granted 
the right to form a confederation with Serbia. 

“Everyone agrees in private that this is the 
only logical position to adopt,” he wrote. “Let us 


therefore all have the courage to affirm this 
publicly." 

A U.S. official close to the Bosnian negotia- 
tions said the Clinton administration considered 
the French ideas to be premature. In the U.S. 
view, the Serbs must first accept the internation- 
al proposal for dividing Bosnia. 

Tile problem for the Clinton administration is 
twofold. The first is that the Bosnian government 
has made it clear that any adjustment of the 
peace proposal would lead to a withdrawal of its 
acceptance of the plan. 

The second is one of image: A Serbian confed- 
eration that includes almost 50 percent of Bosnia 
would come very dose to the formation of a 
“Greater Serbia” and leave Bosnia-Herzegovina 
as little more than a fig leaf masking the dismem- 
berment of the country. That outcome may be 
inevitable, but it is not attractive to a president 
who declared as a Democratic candidate that 
Serbian aggression could not be tolerated 

But in the absence of any real mili tary pressure 
on the Serbs, or any likelihood of such pressure 
emerging, there seems to be limited usefulness in 
leaving the peace plan as it is. Moreover, Britain, 
Russia and, to a lesser extent, Germany, all see 
some value in Mr. Juppe's ideas. 


U.S. to Test Allies 
On Bosnia Embargo 

Hard Going Expected in UN 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Tunes Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — The Clinton adminis- 
tration is to introduce a Securi- 
ty Council resolution next week 
calling for the lifting of the 
arms embargo against Bosnia's 
Muslim-led government in six 
months. 

The move is an opening ma- 
neuver in what are likely to be 
delicate negotiations with Rus- 
sia, Britain, France and Germa- 
ny, who have been working with 
the United States in a “contact 
group” on Bosnian peace. 

The countries have been try- 
ing to win Serbian acceptance 
of a peace settlement partition- 
ing Bosnia among the waning 
factions and reducing the area 
under Serbian control from 70 
percent to 49 percent. The Serbs 
have rejected the proposal, 
while the Bosnian government 
has accepted it 

Action to lift the embargo 
against the Bosnian govern- 
ment has been demanded by 
Congress and promised by 
President Bill Clinton. But the 
administration must find a way 
to avoid a Russian veto of its 
resolution or a split with Euro- 
pean allies, who oppose ex- 
empting the Bosnian Muslims 
from a weapons ban covering 
all the combatants. 

Madeleine K. Albright, the 
chief U.S. delegate to the Unit- 
ed Nations, and Richard Hol- 
brooke, assistant secretary of 
State for European affairs, told 
delegates from the '‘contact 
group" countries Wednesday of 
the administration's plan to in- 
troduce the resolution, a U.S. 
official said. 

The Europeans and Russians 
have been opposed to setting a 
firm future date in a resolution 
and it is likely that, at mini- 
mum, there will be demands for 
a weakening of that language, 
allowing for a new look at the 
issue next spring before action 
is taken. And a French or Brit- 
ish veto cannot be ruled out. 

For the Clinton administra- 
tion, there is little public room 
for maneuvering at this point. 
Congress has mandated that 
American forces con no longer 


be used to enforce the embargo 
after Nov. 15 if there is no reso- 
lution on lifting the ban or if the 
resolution is vetoed. 

■ Genocide Trial Opens 

A Serb went on trial in Salz- 
burg on Thursday on charges of 
murder, arson and genocide in 
Bosnia, the first such case to be 
tried outside the former Yugo- 
slavia, Reuters reported. 

The accused, Du&ko Cvjetko- 
vic, 26, denied the charges. 

Mr. Cvjetkovic fled to Aus- 
tria a year ago as a political 
refugee but was recognized here 
by the brother of a victim. War- 
crimes trials have been held in 
Belgrade and Sarajevo, but this 
is the first such trial to take 
place in a Western European 
court. 

Proceedings were adjourned 
after the first day until Dec. 5 to 
allow prosecutors time to sum- 
mon further witnesses. 



Alik kcpjKZ/Thr Awnnaicrf FK. 

RETURN TO AUSCHWITZ — The NazMnmter Simon Wiesenthal wiping away fears Thursday as he spoke 
during has first visit to Auschwitz since World War II. Mr. Wiesenthal. 86, was a prisoner at the camp in Poland. 


‘Good Fight? Says Italian Legislator After Sparking Melee 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ROME — Government and opposition legislators 
brawled in the Chamber of Deputies on Thursday, 
forcing suspension of a debate over public broadcasl- 
ing. 

Italian television showed scenes of pandemonium in 
the assembly as deputies from the government bench- 
es, many from the rightist National Alliance move- 
ment, left their seats and stormed toward their opposi- 
tion rivals. 

Stewards were unable to stop several deputies from 
reaching the floor of the chamber, where they grappled 
and traded punches before the assembly speaker, Irene 
Hvetti, called the session to a halt. 


The melee erupted when Mauro Paissan. a deputy 
for the opposition leftist Progressives group, accused 
the parties in Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's coali- 
tion of corrupt interference in the affairs of the state 
broadcaster RA1. 

“You're the people who give and take bribes today, 
you're the people who use RAI’s money and the 
control of information to corrupt.” Mr. Paissan said. 

A roar of protest went up from the government 
benches, and a National Alliance deputy, Nicola Pa- 
setto, grabbed Mr. Paissan, witnesses said. 

“Other deputies threw themselves at the podium 
where Paissan was speaking, and he was knocked over. 


Russia to Pay Ames a ‘Debt of Honor,’ U.S. Suspects 


By Walter Pincus 
and Bill Miller 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
U.S. government believes that 
Russia's intelligence sendee, 
obliged by a “debt of honor” to 
one of its most successful spies, 
may try to deliver between $1 
milli on and $2 million to the 
wife and sou of the confessed 


espionage agent Aldrich Hazen 
Ames. 

Moscow already paid Mr. 
Ames more than $2.5 million 
before he was caught in Febru- 
ary, but investigators t hink 
Russia still owes more to Mr. 
Ames for his past work. As he is 
serving a life sentence for his 
espionage, the payoff would 
most likely go to his wife, Rosa- 


rio, and the couple's 5-year-old 
son, according to sources famil- 
iar with the case. 

The United States would pre- 
fer not to see further rewards 
flow to Mr. Ames’s family — 
but under similar circumstances 
the CIA would do exactly the 
same. 

A former top CIA official 
said the agency would make 


good on any money owed a for- 
eign agent recruited by the CIA 
who had been arrested or killed 
while serving in that capacity. 

In the intelligence communi- 
ty, such promises are consid- 
ered “debts of honor” that are 
traditionally paid, a federal in- 
vestigator said. 

In fact, the CIA is making 
payments to the widows and 


other heirs of some of the U.S. 
agents killed by Moscow as a 
remit of Mr. Ames's betrayal, 
sources said. 

Such payments are typically 
made through trusts, retirement 
funds or even the handling of 
children’s tuition, without any- 
one knowing about the source, 
the former top CIA official 
said. 


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U.S. Professor in Investigation Leaves Singapore 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — An Ameri- 
can professor being investigat- 
ed by Singapore for possible 
criminal defamation departed 
for the United States on Thurs- 
day to visit his sick father, 
sources close to the academic 
said. 

An airline source at Singa- 
pore’s Changi Airport con- 
firmed that Christopher T .in gle, 


46, had checked into the depar- 
ture lounge for a flight to Los 
Angeles via Taipei. 

One source said that Mr. Lin- 
gle planned to submit his resig- 
nation from his National Uni- 
versity of Singapore post, to be 
effective in 30 days. 

But he “intends to return to 
Singapore within seven days” 
after visiting his 79-year-old fa- 
ther in Atlanta, the source said. 


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He said Mr. Lingle requested 
compassionate leave in writing 
from the university Thursday 
after learning of his father's 
condition. 

University officials were not 
available for comment. 

Mr. Iingle, a senior fellow in 
European studies, was ques- 
tioned by Singapore police on 
Monday “in connection with 
investigations into contempt of 
court and criminal defamation 
arising from an article” he had 
written, a Singapore police 
spokesman said in a statement 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Lingle’s Oct. 7 opinion 
piece in the International Her- 
ald Tribune was critical of 
Asian governments. 

On Monday, Mr. Lingle said 
he gave the police about 100 
periodicals from his office and 


home after they asked to see the 
research material he used to 
write the article. 

“Up to now I’ve been treated 
with dignity and professional- 
ism by the police, and I'm con- 
vinced that if my comments are 
judged fairly, the matter will go 
no further,” he said. 

In Paris on Wednesday, Sin- 
gapore’s prime minister, Goh 
Chok Tong, appeared to defend 
the investigation of Mr. Lingle 
after Mr. Goh was asked a gen- 
eral question about differences 
between Singapore authorities 
and the domestic and foreign 
press. 

“When a journalist, for ex- 
ample, writes that a judge is not 
independent, it is normal tha t 
the police question him to veri- 
fy his arguments,” Mr. Goh 
told Le Monde. 


Sinn Fein Criticizes U.K. Reluctance 

DUBLIN — The president of Sinn Fein. Gerry Adams, held 
talks about Northern Ireland with Prime Minister Albert Reyn- 
olds of Ireland on Thureday and criticized Britain s attitude,}® 
holding a similar dialogue with him. 

*»It Is pertinent to point out the engagement of the Irish 
government is in marked contrast to the faltering and hesitant way 
in which the British government has approached this new ^ ^ 
peace," Mr. Adams said after the hourlong meeting with Mr. 
Reynolds. 



Ex-Stasi Informer Resigns Bonn Seat 

BONN (AF) —A leftist who was elected to Parliament despite 
her admi ssio n that she was once an informer for East German^ 
Stasi secret police resigned Thursday after her party withdrew iu 

SU 2erstin Kaiser-Nicht, a vice president of the Party of Demo, 
era tic Socialism, was asked to surrender her seat Wednesday night 
by the majority of the 29 other new PDS legislators. The PDS was 
created in \990 from the ashes of the East German Communis 

Ms. Kaiser-Nicht's seat will go to Maritta Bdttcher, the newt 
namp on the list of candidates in the Eastern German state of 
Brandenburg. 

Police Alert for Austria Rightist RaPv 

VIENNA (Reuters) — Austrian border guards were on aloi 
Thursday for neo-Nazis heading for a weekend rally in Innsbruck 
of up to 3,000 members of the extreme right, and the police in the 
city were being massively reinforced in case of clashes. 

State radio said surveillance had been stepped up at the borders 
with Germany, Switzerland and Italy, as well as in Innsbruck, to 
prevent the “ in fil tration of rowdies." Citizens were advised to stay 
at home Saturday night. 

Central Innsbruck was to be protected by 900 uniformed police 
with water cannon, including reinforcements sent to the city from 
all over Austria. Two helicopters were being deployed, and 90 
detectives are to support the uniformed force. 

Bus in India Is Pushed Over a Gorge 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Kuki tribal militants in northeast- 
ern India pushed a bus filled with passengers down a gorge. killing 
37 people, mostly rival Nagas, the Press Trust of India said 
Thursday. , 

Naga tribesmen later killed two Kulris in the town of Bishoa- 
pur, the news agency said. 

Knlris and Nagas often operate from across the Burmese 
Trials b 


border. Indian customs officials believe they are „ 
heroin smuggling route. Kukis form 20 percent anc 
percent of Manipur State's population of 1.8 million. 


ova a 
agas 25 


hit and shoved,” the Italian news agency ANSA re- 
ported. 

When order was restored, Mr. Paissan applauded 
his adversaries, ydliog: “Good fight! Even though 
they’re new to Parliament, I never expected such 
passion.” 

Parliament is debating a government decree for 
emergency funding and major restructuring plans for 
RAI, Italy’s hugely indebted public broadcaster. 

The opposition has accused the governing coalition 
led by Mr. Berlusconi, who owns three private televi : 
sion channels, of attempting to carve up RAl's three 
channels between its members. (Reuters, AFP) 


Vandals Attack Jewish Site in France 

BOB1GNY, France (AFP) — Vandals attacked a memorial to a 
former concentration camp where Jews were rounded up in 
wartime France to be taken to gas chambers, officials said 
Thursday. 

The attack occurred at the site of the former Drancy camp, 
north of Paris, three days after an anniversary comrnemoratKrjjf 
the last convoy of 200 children to leave the camp for the exterini- 
nation chambers at Auschwitz. 

The vandals ransacked an exhibition of memorabilia about the 
camp, the police said. Mayor Maurice Niles of Drancy and other 
officials condemned the attack. 

Uruguay Gears Medecin Extradition 

MONTEVIDEO (AFP) — Uruguay's Supreme Court bar 
cleared the way for the extradition of Jacques Medecin. 66. the 
former mayor of Nice, who has been sentenced in France on 
corruption charges, the court said Thursday. 

The court rqected the final appeals filed by Mr. Medecin, who i 
fled in 1990 to Uruguay. 

Sources here said Mr. Medecin, charged with corruption, em- 
bezzlement of public money and tax fraud, could be extradited 
this month or early November. He was mayor of N ice for 24 years. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Leaders Inaugurate Pyrenees Tunnel , 

PUYMORENS TUNNEL, France (Reuters) — The leaden of j 
France and Spain on Thursday officially opened the 4. 8-kilometer I 
(3-mile) tunnel through the eastern Pyrenees, built to speed road! 
travel between Toulouse and Barcelona and bolster regional! 
development. j 

President Franqois Mitterrand and Prime Minister Edouard; 
Bahadur of France and Prime Minister Felipe Gonzdlez of Spain 



entirely on French territory at a cost of 890 million francs (SI73, 
million), it will cm about 20 minutes off the four-hour drive 
between the two cities. (Return} 

Lufthansa German Airlines wifl resume flights to Belgrade on 
Friday after a three-year break in services to the Serbian capital; 
Lufthansa said it would run a service from Frankfurt to Belgrade 
three times a week. (Reuters] 

A 24-faom’ strike by French railroad workers disrupted traffit 
Thursday on some m a in lines and several regional networks 
mainly in the south. Two trains out of three, including high-sped 
TGVs, were running between Paris and cities in the southeast m 
one m four on networks serving Toulouse, Bordeaux, Chamber 
mid Lyon, the state-run railroad said. Suburban services in tti 
Pans region were cut by one-third to two-thirds. (Rcuteri 

Spanish rations have called for two 24-bour strikes next mom! 
against Ibena Airlines to protest a cost-cutting plan. The Geuert 
Workers Union and the Workers Commissions said their mar 
bers would strike Nov. 3 and 1 1, after management failed to m« 
a negotiating deadline on the plan. (Al 

n System signed code-sharing agreemen 

with Bntish Midland Airways and Ansett Australia and is lookir 
for partners in the Americas, officials in Kuala Lumpur sai< 
Uncter die pact with British Midland, MAS will initially ser 
Lewis. Edinburgh, Glasgow, Teeside and Belfast. The agreemo 

Brisbane - 

°? Rho * s flooded many parts of the caste 
23*. ±“1 Thursday and washed away a highway linking t' 
capital aty, Rhodes, with the eastern town of Lmdos. Fottp^ 
drowned when their car was washed into a flooded field. (A 


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