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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Friday, October 21, 1994 


No. 34,725 


jTo Make Loans to China 

^Hoping to Lock In Large Contracts, 
Washington Copies Japan and Europe 




'***'&* rid 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

/ lat ai uu i onn l Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — In another bid to 
improve jt£ global competitiveness, the 
. United States has streamlined its export 
loan practices to match other big exporting 
nations in hopes of landing lucrative over- 
• -seas contracts for Ametican companies. 
~~_XTie strategy is one of several effected by 
President Biff Clinton aimed at creating 


a t X bolUvul MUJL urnuuu amitai a, l LTCdUHg 

1 tu 1 • jobs in the United States through ea- 

" Iu ’* 1 ■«!■. jj nanced UiSw exports. 

a!t . , "" 1 "s ^ Nowhere. is the rush to gain those job- 

•: ^ creating contracts more apparent than in 


Oto:»i ll -v .. ; 1 ’ ^Rh.t.bC compete with .financing packages offered 

cm.' v , ‘ by the Jajflnese and Europeans. 

i 4 ^, ...V . ;iw_ ; The United States does not want to be 

?l h i left flat-footed, as h has in the past on 

a ; , . v ' some infrastructure and construction oan- 

^ , ; . ' : 1 ' ' : i , .up . 1 ■ tracts in Asia. 

m '.' . ‘ W ; In the last three years, many senior for- 

‘ '• •.!.*; . 1 7 ;.;^ dgn officials have landed in Bening with 

[f :iw guarantees Of increased financial backing 

L ‘7 : ! i; ? «*■ prefects involving leading industrial 

” ’ j • companies from their countries. French, 

i •••. ., a'\ „ German, Italian and Japanese com panies 
:• r, ... ...... have benefited. 

k»n_r ( Kenneth D. Brody, a former Goldman, 

»«h r .. i , „‘ x ‘ “V; r Sachs & Co. investment banker who now 

!«■*!■ . • : v ■ *1 t heads theUil. Ex-Im Bank, as it is known, 

»!:.«, r • : ^has;'oinedtheparade.HesaidThursdaym 

we.!,-. • Beaming, as he began a six-day tour, that 

______ China could become the bank’s largest 

~ — . single Todpknt of low-cost loans. 

In effect^ China is the magnet for a fierce 
global competition for exports, and the 
United Stales .must expand its loan pro- 
grams in China to stay abreast, analysts 
- say. He wants the United States to “get in 
on the ground floor in establishing good 
rotations as major changes occur in Chi- 
,jk \ -riwy’ he said. “We have no limits on the 

^7 | amounts that we will lend to China.” 

jag g* *; Last year, he said, the bank backed S1.3 

■'lllak- ‘ bilhon m U.S. exports to China, making it 

* the largest angle recipient in Asia. 
k Mr. Brody’s tour, which includes talks 

with Chinese development and banking 
officials in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangz- 
hou, comes immediately after a visit to 

L 1 - ■ 


up* 


China by the U.S. defense secretary. Wil- 
liam J. Perry, and a recent tour by Com- 
merce Secretary Ronald H. Brown. The 
trips further underscore U.S. resolve to 
place trade, investment and friendly rela- 
tions ahead of human-rights issues. 

The latest targets of American interest 
axe in the aviation and power sectors, 
where huge projects are envisioned by the 
Chinese. Coma is reportedly building or 
expanding more than 60 airports, requir- 
ing construction services as well as air- 
traffic control equipment. 

Commercial banks generally find loans 
for such projects in China far too risky. 

Mr. Brody was expected to meet with 
China's Civil Aviation Authority as well as 
with bankers. 

Until earlier this year, the Ex-lm bank 
frowned on so-called soft loans, or long- 
term credits at low interest rates that allow 
a developing nation to purchase goods 
made in the United Stales. Only when a 
competing nation violated international 
rules on “soft” loans could the Ex-Im Bank 
match the competition. 

Aware that competing nations were of- 
ten offering better terms, Mr. Brody re- 
vamped the U.S. loan procedure. Now soft 
loans are acceptable, regardless of whether 
foreign competitors are complying with 
international rules. 

Fees charged by the Ex-Im Bank to 
borrowers trill be m line with the fees of 
foreign competitors subsidizing their ex- 
porters, Mr. Brody says. 

“!We are now in the position of being an 
aggressive matcher of soft loans offered by 
other countries,” he said, according to 
news services. “This levels out the playing 
field in terms of financing.'’ 

China’s infrastructure has been serious- 
ly overwhelmed by the annual growth rate 
of 9 percent it has achieved since the early 
1980s. 

Although there is no shortage of power 
generation, transport and telecommunica- 
tions projects on the drawing boards of 
planners m Beijing and the provincial capi- 
tals, workable financing schemes for most 
of them remain In short supply. 

Without means of generating hard cur- 

See CHINA, Page 5 






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Michel Euler The AmckiuioJ Prew 

The family of a victim of the bus bombing during a service Thursday at a cemetery in Holon, a Tel Aviv suburb. 

UN Agency Doubtful on North Korea Deal 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

The director of the International Atomic 
Energy Agency expressed skepticism 
Thursday about the U.S.-North Korean 
nuclear agreement, saying it could delay 
inspections by the agency. 

Officials at the agency, some U.S. Re- 
publican senators, and politicians in South 
Korea criticized the accord, saying they 
feared Pyongyang had bought itself a fur- 
ther five years of secrecy, thus concealing 
whether it has reprocessed enough plutoni- 
um to build one or more nuclear weapons. 

The energy agency says it needs u> in- 


spect two nuclear waste dumps to be able 
to answer the question. North Korea has 
never conceded the existence of the 
dumps. 

“It would be in the interests of all con- 
cerned that a prolonged delay be avoided." 
said the agency director, Hans Blix. But he 
added, “We are better off" with the agree- 
ment than with none at all. 

"We have to worry about how much 
have they squirreled away,” an agency offi- 
cial said. “Blix thinks five years is a long 
lime to have to wait for our inspectors to 
gain access to the facilities we need to see. 


including the two facilities the North Ko- 
reans have never declared." 

Under the agreement reached earlier 
this week. North Korea agreed to place in 
storage the fuel it removed last spring from 
a five-megawatt graphite reactor contain- 
ing enough plutonium for four or five 
nuclear bombs. 

U.S. Republican senators protested in a 
letter to Resident Bill Clinton that this 
reversed long-standing U.S. policy because 
it allowed the North Koreans to hang on to 
their spent fuel rods and would delay for 

See KOREA, Page 5 


• ■■ 

''0*-Wd 





timing a Bit More Respect Abroad, Clinton Turns to GATT 


‘ r- By Joseph Fitchett 

. * • Inunwdemql Herald Tribune 

PARIS Washington’s foreign-policy successes, 
notably against Iraq and North Korea, have created a 
glimmer of new respect among other governments 
ig to see more effective international leadership 
r’ from President Bill Clinton. 

"Ilfl \.NI> PROFESr^J Foreshadowing a further rise in the administration’s 


* > i miHniotiL Tariffs and Trade accord late this year by calling 
A M. .hkI hi * Congress back into session after the November elec- 


toons. 


The mood of wanting Washington to be stronger — 
which could seem strange at a juncture when Europe. 
Russia and some Asian nations are claiming larger 
roles — reflects these countries’ continued depen- 
dence on U.S. initiative. American diplomats say. 

European officials were therefore reassured that 
recent U.S. diplomacy had shown greater steadiness 
and unexpected staying power — in contrast to the 
image that Mr. Clinton had acquired as a leader who 
ignored foreign policy most of the time and then 
stumbled in crises. 

Typical of this more purposeful diplomacy, the deal 
with North Korea, scheduled to be signed Friday and 
promising to curb the risk of the spread of nuclear 


weapons, relieves a pressing concern for Japan. Russia 
and even the European allies. 

Mr. Clinton has been involved personally, Ameri- 
can officials say, in the changeover in Haiti, the 
peacemaking in Northern Ireland, Israel’s treaties 
with its Arab neighbors and, with less success. Bosnia. 

“It lodes like the world has finally caught his 
attention and forced him to show his mettle," accord- 
ing to a British official impressed by the administra- 
tion's handling of Iraq. The official said the Clinton 
team's military response and diplomatic agility “has 
left Saddam Hussein in a much worse position now 
than he was before he triggered the crisis.” 

A French official said Mr. Clinton might start 


relishing foreign policy as an arena where he can act 
with greater freedom "from the congressional opposi- 
tion that has Frustrated his domestic program. 

American diplomats contended that Mr. Clinton's 
commitment had often been underestimated, citing 
his successful uphill battle in behalf of the North 
American Free Trade Agreement in order to resist 
global protectionist pressures. 

Although cautiously aware of how precarious diplo- 
matic success can be, they predicted a comparable 
result for the GATT accord, which would greatly 
reassure European governments. After getting the 

See CLINTON, Page 5 


West Bank 
And Gaza 
Are Cut Off 
Indefinitely 

PLO Cites Act of War 9 
As the Israelis Move to 
Sever Economic links 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TEL AVIV — The Israeli cabinet ap- 
proved the indefinite closure of the West 
Bank and Gaza Strip on Thursday as pan 
of a crackdown on Islamic militants after a 
bus bombing that killed at least 21 people. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin said, “To 
the kidnappers, gunmen and bombers: Is- 
raeli soldiers and security forces will get 
you sooner or later, and your fate will be a 
bitter one.” 

“No enemy will defeat us," he said at an 
annual memorial ceremony honoring dead 
soldiers of the Israeli Array's Armored 
Corps. “Just as we won all the wars against 
all enemies, we will achieve our aims — 
peace and security.” 

Acting to prevent more atrocities like 
the bombing Wednesday in downtown Tel 
Aviv, Mr. Rabin won cabinet backing to 
close off the territories indefinitely in what 
officials called a strategic move to separate 
their economies from Israel. 

A spokesman for Yasser Arafat, the 
leader of the Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation, said the move constituted “eco- 
nomic and social war" against Palestin- 
ians. 

Mr. Rabin called for a “clear border” 
between Israelis and Palestinians. 

Cabinet ministers also decided to extend 
the powers of die security services, but 
details were kept secret. 

Ministers gave no hint that the govern- 
ment was discussing widespread arrests or 
expulsions of members of the Islamic mili- 
tant group Hamas. 

Mr. Rabin deported 41S people suspect- 
ed of being Hamas members to Lebanon 
after attacks in 1992. 

The Gaza and West Bank closures will 
keep 65,000 Palestinians from jobs in Isra- 
el, mainly in construction and agriculture. 
The government approved a measure to 
bring in 15,000 foreign workers to take the 
place of Palestinians. 

The cabinet decisions will also prevent 
Palestinians from visiting religious sites in 
Israel without a permit. 

^ A spokesman for Mr. Arafat, Marwan 
Kanafani, said the Palestinian autonomy 
government considered the closure “col- 
lective punishment” against innocent peo- 
ple and warned that it could slow the peace 
process. 

“I see in these resolutions adopted by 
the Israeli cabinet today a declaration of 
war, an economic and soda! war against 
the Palestinian society that will negatively 
affect the whole process,” he said. 

Israel has tried to avoid inflammatory 
measures since signing a peace accord with 
the PLO in September 1993. Through the 
agreement, the Gaza Strip and the West 

See ISRAEL, Page 5 





Kiosk 


U.S. Gulf Buildup 
C&tliis Crisis Eases 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — United 
States defence nffimals said Thursday 
that the Iraq crisis had eased and that 
^OGOTMarines, 6 B-S2 bombers and 12 
F-14-7 Stealth fighter planes would 
therefore not be sent to the Gulf. 

Because the threat had “ameliorated 
somewhat," Lieutenant General Howell 
Estes said, “the vast preponderance of 
the forces we were going to deploy are 
gping to ]be taken off of alert and will 
not acplcry.” 

He said the U.S. buildup would stop 
at about 13,000 ground troops, 274 
planes and one aircraft carrier battle 
group. 

The United States at one point 
planned to send 40,000 ground troops 
and 600 planes to the Gulf, and a total 
155,000 troops were cm alert to go. 



Book Review 
Bridge 
Crossword 
Weather - 


Page 7. 
Page 7. 
Page 19. 


Affxee Fnm-PmM 


Page 20. A HARD LEFT AND RIGHT —Italian legislators from both political persuasions mixing it up Thursday. Page 2. 


Question Time: How Much Scandal Can Tories Take? 


By Fred Barbash 

Waxhington Pen Service 

;.LONDON — Last year, it was sex. This 
<*r, it’s money. 

•rPrane -Minister John Major, already 
Htssed by a series of scandals in his Con- 
servative Party, confronted yet another 

• ... Newsstand Prices 

Andorra.. ...9.00 FF Luxembourfl 60 L. Fr 

Antilles.....!] .20 FF Morocco 12 Dh 

Cameroon..! 400 CFA Qatar 8.00 Rials 

E3yrrt..,«.E.P.5000 Reunion. ...11. 20 FF 

Fronce.,^.9.00 FF Saudi Arabia . .9 .00 R. 
Gabpn;,.^.jl6QCFA Senegal ....J60CFA 

Grwce.^.;.. joo Or. Spain — -WQPT as 
I taly Lira Tunisia ....1.000 Din 

ivory. CoastJi20CFA Turkey -T.L.3S.OOO 
Joidan^vfSir.ii JD U.A.E. .....8.50 Dirh 

i.ebafM»5j^8]J0 U.S. Mil. (Eur.) S1.10 


• - U' ;i£- 


storm on Thursday when a well-known 
businessman here said he had paid thou- 
sands of pounds for parliamentary favors 
from two members who are now officials 
of Mr. Major's government 

One of them, Tim Smith, a junior North- 
ern Ireland minister, immediately re- 
signed. The other, NeO Hamilton, a minis- 
ter in charge of ethics in the Department of 
Trade and Industry, denied accepting any- 
thing from the businessman in exchange 
for anything. 

It was the second controversy of the past 
three months involving “cash for ques- 
tions,” payments to Conservative mem- 
bers of Parliament for raising helpful sub- 
jects during Parliament’s question period. 

A broader debate is raging over the fact 
that many members of Parliament — the 


full number is unknown — are employed 
part-time by lobbying concerns, a practice 
that appears to be legal. And it was the 
umpteenth generic allegation of wrongdo- 
ing to hit the Conservative government in 
the last 12 months, dubbed “the year of 
sleaze” by gleeful opposition politicians. 

The gallery of people and institutions 
embroiled one way or the other is peculiar- 
ly English: a peer of the realm who has 
made millions writing middlebrow novels; 
a former Westminster city councilor called 
Dame Shirley Porter, and the son of for- 
mer Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. 

On Thursday, it was the same pattern: 
Harrods, the famed London department 
store, was at the center. 

The owner of Harrods, Mohammed al- 
Fayed, told The Guardian that he had paid 


Dollar Falls to 2-Year Low 
As Bentsen Rattles Market 


thousands of pounds through a lobbying 
concern from 1987 to 1989 to gel the two 
Conservative members of Parliament to 
ask questions at a time he was having 
trouble getting approval for his purchase 
of the store. Mr. Fayed also said he provid- 
ed one of the members with a shopping 
spree at the store and a vacation in Paris. 

He told the paper that he was shocked to 
have been asked for the money by a lobby- 
ist. *‘I couldn’t believe that in Britain, 
where Parliament has such a big reputa- 
tion, you had to pay MPs,” he said. “I was 
shattered by it. I asked how much, and he 
said it would be £2,000 a question." That is 
about S3.250. 

Shattered though he was, pay he did. He 
told The Guardian that “every month we 

See SCANDAL, Page 5 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar tumbled to a. 
two-year low against most major curren- 
cies on Thursday after Lloyd Bentsen, the 
U.S. treasury secretary, said the United 
States had no plans to buy dollars to stem 
its recent slide. 

“Market forces will decide” the level of 
the dollar and other currencies, Mr. Bent- 
sen said. “We have no plans to intervene.” 

Mr. Bentsen also said that the United 
States was not using the dollar as a trade 
weapon. 

Hu comments prompted speculation 
that the Clin ton administration was not 
concerned about the dollar's weakness. 
Many traders had been expecting the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board to buy dollars if the 
decline this week turned into a free-fall 
The Federal Reserve acts as the Treasury’s 

agent in the foreign-exchange market. 

The dollar tumbled to 1.4927 Deutsche 
marks from 1.5015 DM on Wednesday 
and to 97.050 yen from 97.325 yen. The 
dollar also fell to 1.2385 Swiss francs from 
1.2455 francs and to 5.1185 French francs 
from 5.1480 francs. 

The pound rallied to 51.6315 from 
SI. 6226. 

Earlier in Leipzig, Germany, the 
Bundesbank president, Hans Tietmeyer, 
said he hoped that the dollar would remain 
a strong currency and asserted that the 
mark would remain so. 

Mr. Bents en’s comments fueled a de- 
cline in the dollar that started after two 
reports showing strong economic growth 

? )urred concern about inflation and sent 
reasuiy bond prices lower. Inflation 
erodes the value of fixed-interest invest- 
ments. 

Bonds fell, pulling the dollar lower, after 
the Commerce Department said housing 
starts rose 4,4 percent in September. 

The Philadelphia Federal Reserve's in- 
dex of economic activity in the region 
more than doubled to 332 in October from 
14.8 in September, while the index for 
prices paid by businesses rose to 53.6 from 
40.4 last month, the highest reading since 
February 1989. 

(Bloomberg Reuters ) 


P as | iTo&r^ 

i II 7 :. 3 ?. i 

The Dollar 

N«w YmK Thun, do— pwfauaemn 

DM 1.4927 1.5015 

Found 1.6315 1.6226 

Yen 97.05 97.325 

FF 5.1185 5.148 


A Big Engine 
That Couldn 9 t 

Reuters 

LONDON — A sleek new train 
designed to speed passengers through 
the Channel Tunnel broke down be- 
fore the start of a media trip to Paris 
on Thursday, to the embarrassment of 
the tunnel operators. 

An electrical fault torpedoed the 
fanfare departure from Waterloo Sta- 
tion in London of the £24 million ($39 
million) Eurostar train, with 400 re- 
porters and travel agents from around 
the world on board. 

A replacement train finally left an 
hour late. But railway managers tried 
to put the best gloss on the fiasco by 
making up for lost time. Tie actual 
journey took 2 hours 50 minutes, the 
fastest-ever crossing, and the train 
reached 300 kilometers (190 miles) an 
hour as it sped through the French 
countryside. 

The train service has been billed as 
the fastest link between the centers of 
London and Paris. Newspapers had 
set up special races with reporters 
crossing the Channel by plane and 
feny to sec if they could feat the train. 

The media trip was a prelude to the 
scheduled start of passenger train ser- 
vice on Nov. 14, 







. SOU 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Martha Raye, Entertainer Who Cheered GIs, Dies at 78 


By Lawrence Van Gelder 

New York Tima Service 
Martha Raye, the big-mouthed, big- 
hearted entertainer whose career 
spanned the decades from vaudeville 
to videos, died Wednesday in Los An- 
geles. She was 78 years old. 

In recent years, she had suffered a 
serious of ailments, including a stroke 
and circulatory difficulties. A hospital 
spokesman said: “Her death was an 
aggregate of that and other problems." 

Miss Raye sang, she danced, she 
acted on Broadway, in Hollywood and 
on television, but uie knockabout com- 
ic won perhaps her greatest renown as 
an indefatigable trouper who traveled 
thousands upon thousands of miles 
through three wars to lift the morale of 
America's fighting forces. 

Her real name was Margie Yvonne 
Reed. She was bom on Aug. 27. 1916. 
into a show business family in the 
charity ward of a hospital in Butte. 


Montana. Her mother and father, the 
former Pe ggy Hooper and Pete Reed, 
were Irish immi grants whose song- 
and-dance routine, under the name 
Reed and Hooper, took them to carni- 
vals and vaudeville houses around the 
United States. 

“i didn’t work until I was 3,” Miss 
Raye was to say years later. “But after 
that, I never stopped." She picked the 
name Martha Raye from a phone book 
and piled up the credits, first on 
Broadway and then in Hollywood. 

And on one of the Sunday nights 
when stars gathered and entertained 
one another at the Trocadero night- 
club, she got a couple of her friends to 
play the straightmen to her comedy. 
Their names were Jimmy Durante and 
Joe E Lewis. The producer Norman 
Taurog saw her perform, and the next 
day she was working with Bing Crosby 
on the 1936 film “Rhythm on the 
Range.” 


Miss Raye appeared in films like 
“Monsieur Verdoux,"“Waikikj Wed- 
ding," “College Hobday,” “Give Me a 
Sailor,” “Keep 'em Flying" and “Hell- 
zapoppin." 

In 1940, she starred on Broadway 
opposite Al Jolson in the revue “Hold 
Onto Your Hats." She appeared on his 
radio show and made guest appear- 
ances on the programs of stars like 
Eddie Cantor and Bob Hope. 

During World War II, she began 
entertaining troops, and the 1 944 film 
“Four Jills in a Jeep" was based on a 
USO tour of bases in England and 
Africa made in the company of Kay 
Francis, Carole Landis and Mitzi 
Mayfair. 

Anna Hauptmann Dies at 96, 
Lindbergh Kidnapper's Wife 

LANCASTER. Pennsylvania — 
Anna Hauptmann. 96, who spent 


much of her life steadfastly trying to 
clear her husband after he was execut- 
ed for the abduction and murder of 
Charles Lindbergh's babv son. died 
Ocl 30. 

Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a Ger- 
man immigrant carpenter, was con- 
victed of murder in 1933 for what was 
then considered the crime of the centu- 
ry — the kidnapping the Lindberghs’ 
baby son. 20-month-oid Charles Jr., 
from his nursery in Hopewell. New 
Jersey. 

The baby's body was found in a 
shallow grave near the Lindbergh 
home two months after the March 
1932 kidnapping. Prosecutors said the 
boy died when a ladder collapsed as 
Mr. Hauptmann carried him out of the' 
house. 

Mr. Hauptmann maintained his in- 
nocence until his electrocution in 1936. 

His wife said that be was with her 


the night the baby was taken, but pros- 
ecutors said Hauptmann’s handwrit- 
ing was on ransom notes sent to the 
Lindberghs and that ransom money 
was found in Mr. Hauptmann's ga- 
rage. 

Various federal courts, including the 
Supreme Court, rejected Mrs. Haupt- 
mann’s lawsuit charging that the state 
of New Jersey wrongfully tried and 
convicted her husband. 

Oldrich Cemik, 72, prime minister 
of Czechoslovakia when Alexander 
Dubcek launched his iU-faied Prague 
Spring reforms in 1968, died Wednes- 
day of heart failure, the Czech news 
agency CTK said. 

BiD Fanre, 43, who gained interna- 
tional recognition for television pro- 
ductions such as the “Shaka Zulu" 
miniseries, died Tuesday in Johannes- 
burg of kidney failure. 



Reutov iw 


Martha Raye saluting veterans at a Los Angeles parade. 


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hi MONTBEUX. VUIA RS, GSTA AD, 
l£S MABLHlHVviaFBL 
CRANS-MONTANA. etc. 1 to 5 bed- 
rooms, Sir. 200,000 fa 3JS mio. 
REVACSJV. 

52, Montbdmt 04-1211 Geneva 2 
Tel 41 22-734 15 40. Fa* 734 12 20 


LONDON MAYFAIR, ouhtondng, quiet 
tody FM, dosetoGrosronor Square & 
i authorized, #ie American Embassy. Begcmtfy 

ante 1975 funushed bur Landfard or Tenant can 

5 1 CHALETS add more Funiture if required 

JU S, GSTA AD, £1,251!/, 4 to long let 02 months +J. 

L VBBFHL Would suit lop executive A ton3y. 

■tc 1 to 5 bed- Please erf Mr Sean an 44 71 499 5SW 
10 40 3.5 Brio. 









MONTE CARLO 




Pm (Il.Ml 


Unique. Dctfaiohed freehold wlo to 
be redeoaratedT Exmpnonai view on the 
Fxrbor and prioce. 540 sqjn. bring 

S and huge terraces, for Further 
canted: Mn Bodonsen - SEM. 

9 ave <f Ostende - MC 98000 Monaco. 
TaL- (33)92 16 90 00 


PANAMA 


MAGNBKENT WATERFRONT Eriato 
2100 goes + private 125 acre eland. 
TAX FREE S3JBM For + 33-l-3SW>7 




French-speaking part 
of Switzerland 

Close to Geneva and Lausane 


A 10 room castle 
of historic interest 

Medieval castle in magnificent state of preservation, 
renovated with particular attention, enjoys a 
panoramic view over the whole contryside, only 50 
minutes by road from Geneva airport The ancient 
stonework, the high-vauited rooms, sumptuous 
hearths give unique distinction to a private home of 
outstanding quality. With its two outbuildings, it 
could also be converted to other uses. 

Pietist’ rwitatf as for further information and visits. 

Burnier, Galland & Cie s.a. 

3, rue Saint-Pierre - 1002 Lausanne (£>+41 21 / 320 69 01 



r . .j j 

wilfc-.-V jl 




Renovated from a 
w •’ large casa colon ica, 

^13 w,f h - monumental 
i-v^St-Jiga stone structures. On 
kSiSi ahillsunrounded 

private land, with 
— panoramic view. 

Main House f^u s»i m = vm'-i u i i ivinknnv < 
bathnximu,. rien. living r«mni. I'»rnidl dining r. •« >iti l- nurm.'us 
kitchen, granite counter iu^-i Teriai.>'ll.< lile-, an»4 )i,in'|ucl 
flooring throughuuf ht -use Klewifor (. . Jnd f|. u <r _• KAr ,,.^. 

I15 sq m = ?7n sq !( i 

GUEST House l j OK sq m = l lo? >q ll I Imlejn-ni lenl 
water/elect ric. kitchen, shower, toilet hrepldi.c lerracolu tiles 
elect nc windows 

Both houses have central heat and air conditioning systems 
Automatic sprinkler system, electric gate with remote control 
and TV security cameras Security monitors are throughout 
both houses, alarm system connected to carabinieri 
Ideal for corporate retreat Private road. 

For further information ionhKI in lufii 

Anna Rita 

TUSCAN ENTERPRISES 
Tel.: 0577-740623 or Fax: 0577-740950. 


FOR SALE 

U.SA - HOUSTON / DALLAS / FT. WORTH 

ro-y?<j old ctxnpcny. oww not m good tieafln and past reUranenl age seeks to sen company 
WELL ESTABLISHED • EXCELLENT CREDIT • EXCaLENT REPUTAH0N 
Approximately 1000 high quality income producing apartments 100% leased, plus 
5 mrllicn ;qtrao feel oF PRIME Deralopnwi! Land. aU with tugti densilv. utilises n place. 
PUB; a Property Manogemenl Company 
Wdl sun Air (or cash or listed sta*. (US $75 000.000) 
BROKERS'AGENTS Protected wfli o 10% commission. 

SERIOUS C0NRDENTHL INQUIRIES ONLY: FAX (7 13) 468- 1 506 


BANC ASSETS LIQUIDATION 

SALE; 60 ACRES at the HOUSTON INTERCONTINENTAL AIRPORT 
(2, 613.600 square lea) - OnlySl.50 persq Ft.or Best Otter! (Appraised al 
$2.00 per sq. ft.l) 24-.2BZ Hectare (242.620 square metere) 

15% Agents' Commission 

Far Detailed intarmpbcn -CaHor f B x Jet.: (713) 780-1797 Fax: (713) 780-4405 


SWITZRLAMD 




I OR or r H | UP r» * i D 

Luxury flnti in very besi loeertion, 
connected wrth 5-Star-Hotel. 

■ A m sms. 166 sq.m , living/dining 
room, fireplace, 3 bedrooms. 
2 bathrooms, kitchen. 

■ 2 rooms. 82 sq.m., Rving/dining 

room, fireplace, I bedroom. 
1 bathroom. Vjlchen 
not furnished, long lets. 

Facsimile: +41 82-3 27 38 


REAL ESTATE GUZMAN 


MARflEUA FRONTUNE GOLF 
Lu*urv viflo wirh a view sourfiwardi down die 
fairway. Immoculate. 4 bedrooms, 

3 receplions, superb kitchen, breatiml room. 
2 garages, pool jocuizi. 1200/360 sq.m. 
Price Pis 69.000.000 (qukli solo desired] 
25 years experience. We oFtoe yunm a ns , 
™os. era mettmenl opportunilksL 

Caff KRISTINA SZHtELY. 

Tol 34-52-81 JJI .02 Fo* 34-52-81.77.88 


ITALY 


f~ exceptional - 
LAND PROPERTY 

6,300 m J in Gorizia fITALY) 

Next to Italian-Sloveman border 
aaoss University of Diplomacy and 
International Right. Ideal for 
residential/commercial complex 
rndudrng green part and car pari 

s. Pt-/Fax: IUSAI 503-097-7707. 


Real Estate Agents 

1;> Omipam Inriirtnc T'«n? 

foi Investors in Arizona: 

Sew Homes In Golf A Tennis 
■ViATFlM OM-.tr ^ ■Minx RESORTS, 
Wt up f"i P.TiijL-. . .r Grvii «'nl>t 
Hums in Flirv/mv-Vi ift^Lik-. 

3 Liours Emm Grand Canyon! 
Am.i.-uig Lim Pni.cs M" Fnrn-.V.VI drills 
l-'iur Senses - \n huMlin.'i.vj- 
'W E BiinriT.rl'W. S.Tiri'<iik'. 
Ariroiu RUW 1 ' S X 



Auction Sale at the Tribunal de Nanterre, 
Thursday, November 10, 1994 at 2 P.M. 
Property in Neuilly-sur-Seine (92) 
37 bd du Chateau Three buddings and a garden 
Starting Price: FF. 1 5,000,000 
Me WiLSIN, Lawyer, 7 Avenue de Madrid. 42200 Neuilly-sur-Seine 
Tel : ( f F 47.47.25.30 from 4 p m to 6 p.m. - Visit with Maftre VENEZIA, bailiff. 
Tel.-. (I) 4b 24.b2.50 - November 3 from 10:30 a.m. to 1 1:30 a.m. 


A RARITY 

Beautiful villa 

in an idyllic park with old trees, top location in Frankfurt 

Romani ic designer villa, amongst other things wilh cantilever, technical - 
mechanical steel construction; .325 sq.m, floor space; high quality method of 
constiiKiion: and exclusive furnishings such as 

open fireplaces, natural mwk floors, oak smp flooring, oak window 
frames. 2 bathrooms with whirlpools. 2 small bathrooms 
(nplinnally with undcrllnor healing i. wine cellar with natural stone 
lacing, iwo kitchens an: ppsmWc upnn request, suspended designer 
*pral staircase, swivelling and cxrendihle snlar collector elements, 
roof icn-ace facing inwards Ihc south, balconies all aroond the 
house and a lookout platform, and much mnfu 

Purchase price: DM 4 miu.ion 

Encrg\ -saving design with solar cullccfnrs. wind generator and waier 
purification plant The hasemeni level can he used for commercial purposes. 

Only fur serimiT pmrpettne buyers: m realfxtuie agents. 

Box number 3688, 1 HT, 

Friedrichslr. 15, 60323 Frankfurt, Germany, Fax + 49-69-72 73 10 , 


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 


Auction Sale at the Palais de Justice in Bobigny 
1/j, ave. Paul-Vadlant-Cou tuner, November 15, 1904, at kfpan. 

A BUILDING- 

FOR OFFICE USE 

Ground floor * 7 stories, about ISosqjn. of usable space + 56 parking spates, located in 

PANTIN (Seine St Denis) — 

27 , rue Delizy 

?00m to™ Metro "Eglise de Pantin’’ and 5® m from the •P^ripherique" 

■a STARTING PRICE : 7,000,000 FF 

ForaUinfbrmatm Bkavcanbni: 


the law firm 5CP J. WUILQUE - D. KNINSU - M. BOSQUE 
established at the bar of Seine St Denis with offices at2.Pl.de la Republioue 
93b00 AULNAY/BOIS. TeL: (1) 4S 66 7? 00 - 48 66 tx2 4/ ^ * 

or thedericat the Tribunal de Grande instance of Bobigny, 

Palais de Justice, where the documents are on file. 

Visits. 1 Nov. 9 . 1994 from 4 p.m. lo b p.m and Nov. 10, 1994, from 2 pm. to 4 pan. 


kitrhen. RepFv Box: 3754, W, 
92521 Nruiy. Cedrw. Frone. 


1 6)h - AV FOCH -210 stun. 

Apartment to (Kepnoro, pnvale 
garden, rrotfi roam, 2 parljnm. Sumy. 
Tet P) 47 45 22 60 


17A, EKniF/WAGSAM 
7 rooms, high das, 195 sqjn. 
Mad's stridfa 16 sqjn. Bargom price. 

Tel owner alter 8pm 1-46 23 03 65 


Mr - near CHAMPS ELYSHS, 
Srh floor, splenSd 2-room apartment, 
70 sqjn^ perFed corvtoon sunny. 

Tet (1) 47.45.22.60. 


HOLLAND 


AM51BDAU CANAL oMetoMBte 

ftem Dfl. 2500. Teh +31206464102 
ftp a 6461844 KOOL5 HOUSING 




CAFTTALE • PAKTNBtS 
Handpidtad qut*V opattmerts, 
ei Bies. ft* is and tuburbi. 

Td 1-4614 8211. Fax 1-4772 3096 


i r "-lT n H'TVi:'-"r i T ^ 


USA GENERAL 



i»-4 imj j U'i i ln’ w iiM m iv. 



TT i r ■ v ‘ 

• V;-.' 1 ! ' 1 j 


11 1 r/.n? via te-' v;c , n > v 





K^ 7 ^\r.nC»iiiBgni 






rrT 777 .Tnii’i*;«r , *Y.'.w ; rv«-» 




USA RESIDENTIAL 


NmrJenay 15 Mm. to NYC 

Came RrwHy to Hie GALAXY 

7000 Btvd. E. Guttenberg. / L>we> Mai 
Tenrvj, In & Otrdror Poab. Club 
1-2 S 3 Bedrooms & ferthouses 
K09TA13 $1200-54000 

SALES SW, 003-5565^00 

CORPORATE RELOCATION 


Riverfront 

=nwir fS 


201-861-6777 

OPEN 7 DAYS FAX. Ml ^61 06/7 


NYC/Cerfrol Perl: South 31% Roans 

S op histicated Pied-A-Terre 

1st offering -Sim. SunhBed & 
dummy 3Vi roam oparonenl - sunLen 
bvrng roam & rosed dnr*} area Hah 
ceAfors & interegm q mdirteOuid details 


PBIUGIA 

VELA FOR KBIT 

Owner rents to long periods unaesrve 
modem wla on promfaent hti eaOed 
‘Tnnrta . A most oksgouf and exdudva 
mea with very dduiguished neighbon. 
The 2-starey 4a a situated m a large 
part well empte high daw eiedun- 
mert Fdatoes and a _ Hugh bdeony 
oommondhig a superb view over 50 bn 
of striking central Kefari lanchoope. 
Upper floor carats oh Eving/dniiu 6 x 
12 m., bfa Fvepioce, IB r 4 m. bafcorry, 
studo. 2 bedrooms, 2 btths, new. 
krtchen. 

Ground Floor with direct accew to 
goren mdudes: hnng/famiy room with 
faeploce. tirang room, new bxben, 
moster b edroom and new brdfroam 
with large hrb. 2-car garage. 

The nk is hJy equpped and elegamfy 
Fumshed. A new Kwror medum graid 

QrfwV) a nfeo rjyfdoMf. 

Gadner mduded m The rent. Trusted 
domeshc e<itebyee(s) with asm car at 
reasonable toes. Pets wqelc m ne. 

CAN BE R0JTH3 AS AWHCXE 08 
UPPER FLOOR ONLY 
Current tewi b: a tfsmgmshed reived 
Amencon heart surgron who a return' 
mg » Colfbrna after 2 yeorv 
ProFife vndi pidwes andablt 
Agenaes welcome. Coreact owner on 
FAX 39 (432) 294900 (ITALY) 




nkbihGTaE: 


.'■CM:. 1 ! 






r- < , i rjl I 3 1 l rri 


J2-.V i y-A m ; i wiVgTl 



- fcU i l lESg 


cerkr^s & interesting mcFiteCmd detals 
m one oF NY's FJJ serweed ccrops. 
MconJenance $7)5. 

Undo Rufaw 212-891-7058 

DOUGLAS OllMAN 





NYC/Pork Ave 3» ROOMS 

Fd* Avenue Condenwwm 

Best toy >i elegant exdirwe buiMna. 
Ideal for pedatore. I bedroom, m 
barfa. large rrvwig room, dressing aiea 
Priced for a aadr sale. V4I0K. 

Own Shadnanr 2I2891-70F1 

DOUGLAS BLIMAN 


VENCE ZATIHS. Began) ly u n n cni 
with terrace overlooking coral. kW 
tor two. Tet J392) 6571778 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 






EUtO CASA - NEW YOKE. 
Fur rushed) unfurnished oponmenl s , 

» - Monthly • Yearly Pcnlah. 

Ave, W floor. MV. 10011. 
Tel (212) 243-2471 Fat (2171 2436205 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 



Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 




Tel: (1) 47.20.30.05 



^EE3BEZEa(ES 




IDEAL ACCOMMODATION 

BEADY TO MOVE4N 
Over <fl0Q j m Stne Us 
- TOP QUALITY - emit cards acceptor/ 

De Crcourt Associates 

TN 1-47 53 80 13 Fas 45 51 75 77 


I3.V- 




French Country Properties 


will run on 
October 28, 1994 

For more information, 
call Paris. 

Tel: (I) 46 37 93 85 
Fax: (I) 46 37 93 70 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


HOLIDAYS 
& TRAVEL 
SECTION 

Afjpears 
on Page 8 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. i 


PERSONALS 


CONGRATULATIONS 

5oBe and frcnc niv Mort 
on rhe birth of yaie son 

Alexander Martin Ides 

on October 19th, 199J 
292 kg ■ 47 an 

Lois of km & best wishes 
ham your fnends a> Ihe Tnb 


AVAILABLE CAPITAL 

Eqa rty or debt finerang. 

A progrom hatoed to your corpo rate 
needs. 

No from Fees. Ow fees ore corned 
based stridfy on perfarmarce. 
tong terns. b«r rates, broker lees pad 
grofeded. 

Fw your proposal summary to: 

Fa- Emt Investment Groop, Inc. 

Altn: Hraiad Daparhnen] 
tec (507] 63-5035 (Fmm) 


BUSINESS SERVICES I FINANCIAL SEKVICES 


Save on 
International 
Phone Calls 



MOVING 



If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get if at home ? 
Same-day delivery available 
in key Ui, dries. 



EDUCATION 


RBKH MADE EASY ftois 5A. Snrf 
groom, B x n m ui K utc n sUb 4hr/wk. 
FlJdSim 1-43296106 1st toson Ira. 


0/Nr£/y -)EAN 

FOP A FRS K71MATI CALL 

PAHS P) 39201400 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

' 750 READY MAM COMP AMS 
' BAJVK INTRODUCTIONS 
‘ ACCOUTRING. LEGAL 8 ADMIN 
' LCs AhO TRADE DOCUMBVTAtiON 
1 TELEPHONE & MAIL FORWARDING 

Telephone or Fax (or nw n edate service 
and 100 pege colour brochure 

0ttAA9AUMfTH> 

2A02 Bonk of America Tower 
Harcoun Road. Hong Kong 
T* +852 5 320m 
Far: +953 5211190 


COMPAN1B £195 

kw-anxfance vehicles: 

SUL 1 *?* ^ Ewapeon. Surt- 

te "’ •towng. consultancy & ether 
*™ries. tor iramednte senna caWra 

BOsh toe pby, Director, Sw n retgi 
l - au ‘Pjy T i Jtaiai, 56 nfc w RB oni 
a*6i % Inland. 

Teb +353 1 6618490 Fas 6618493 


OfRHQie COMPANB 

* Free profonond amsaltatoiki 

* Waridwidf incoparonans 

* ImnnSate ovrrfabSty 

* FuO confidentid services 

* London represe rt orive 

* Fnfl o dmin a li auen senice» 

ASTON CORPORATE TRUSTS LTD 


OA55 A BAfw in hot Free ucrxw with 
pdmnwlraiiv* services and estabftdied 
and secumei acoounb. US 
hr mediae nonsfer. Cdf 
^426169 or Fa> 

071 3®< 51 


Saws 55% cmd more compared 
to loto phone corapones. 
ud from home, office, cor. 

even hotels [and ovoid 
swdwgesj. CJwk our rates 
far any counties and see how 
yai eon start savfag today 

Cad us now end well 
cafl you right badd 

Tel 1-206-284-8600 
Ftix 1-206-282-6666 

tows open 24 hours. 


RINDMGPROBI£MS? 

Venture Capital - Equ4y toons j 

Red Estate - Business i 

nncraig . Long Tens 
Collateral Supported G u a ran tees 

Baioble aaantoss to secure hating 
fa* noble projects arranged by: 

B ancor of Aria 

Lunmnon Burned only upon Furring. 
writer * Oxrnncsmn Assured 


TeU(6M) , |^5ro 0 2?15M439 

<k our rotes 

-.IMiAWLw 

L&M. Fox * 662 2583691 

end well -- - 

FOR SALE ft WANTED 


TRAVEL 


1st/ Business Ora Froajert TioveBars 
lo OnBU/Austrofio/Afriai/No. 8 So. 
America. Save up to SOIL No cou- 
pons. no r a t n Otow. Imperial Gmada 
U 514-341-7227 h* SH3U JVM. 


CONSULTANTS 


MEXICAN FOOD 

Amerioan CoosiA« 5 yrs expenena n 
Europe w4 he^t you. to greate r profits 
rtiougn Mboouti rood. 
Bestaurant stoMp/donge over 
Flood shops 
Catering 

Large spedd events 
Cdddng, bar Dooagetnent 



46 33 77 Si. ’ ^ 


COLLEGES ft 
UNIVERSITIES i 



COMMERCIAL 




NUD54A1M QUAIIH toge shop to 
rent, comer street 3 rooms ground- 
floor 2 rooms/lst Boor. 1435*5559 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 

FOR 

AU.8USNESS PROJECT 

OR FOR 

LETTERS Cf CREDfl 

B AhK GU ARANTEB 

OTHER ACCEPTABLE COLLATBtAL 

B'sker s umndsian guaranteed 

Mtouiew* MJJPXH 6 de 
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Brands - BELGIUM 

ln ^ on,XJ,i “ , hy, f » 32-3-534 02 77 
or 32-2-538 47 91 
TELEX: 20277 




OHJESlB 


Hj Lr.vi JYTTTr 


L*Jv :(>' i:'n 



































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Page 3 





W 



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^(.K. 

' vl>u 

t ;; 

Mr.1 i ’ ’ ,c a * 

fci3l««SS{ 


THE AMERICAS/ 





% ,fe" i^l 








as t/ie Democratic Party’s Public Enemy No. 1 


**Mh 

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W 4f. 


1 s... 




tv-i 


U-i} 


- 


Cft, 


f'k 


P» Wd» !ry u 


By Dan Balz “I think I am a transformational figure," he said 

• Waikkigion Post Service over coffee earlier in the day. “I think I am trying to 

NEW LONDON, Co n necticut — It is a brilliant effect a change so large that the people who would 
iaQ morning, and the House minority whip. Newt be hurt by the change — the liberal. Democratic 
Gingrich of Georgia, has come to Connecticut to machine — have a natural reaction, which gets 
raise money for another Republican candidate for wear ying sometimes." 

^ ^ ^ 100 <Hstricts Almost as much as disaffection with the Clinton 

■ doz “ * presidency. Mr. Gingrich has come to symbolize 

^^^^^ f “^T? bc “u takcoverof what midterm Sections arc about. He is thfe 
a life radar ? lockcd 011 ' i *}* T % eL architect of a Republican strategy aimed at toj 


i*. 

a *»**{(.•, 

tli,, 

m u* A ,: ir 

^ Wi! Hi, 

S«hWl»;, 


’he fc 


for All 






A repeater begins to ask a question. “If you are 
elected and become majority leader. .."he starts, 
but before he can finish, Mr. Gingrich interrupts. 

“Actually, speaker," Mr. Gingrich says. “Armey 
would be majority leader. I'd be speaker.” Richard 
KL Armey is a Texas Republican. 

Laughter ripples through the room as the Repub- 
lican faithful react to Mr. Gingrich's characteristic 
brashness while they savor the idea of a House led 
by a speaker nam ed Mr. Gingrich, whose climb from 
bomb-throwing backbencher is one of the more 
startling .evolutions in recent American politics. 

He is the Republican whom Democrats love to 
hate. He has enormous self-confidence - and an ambi- 
tion of even larger proportions. 


„ toppling 

Democrats from control of the House. 

Mr. Gingrich, whose confrontational .style 
brought cries of obstructionism from the White 
House this year, is under fire now for playing host at 
a meeting with lobbyists in which he described 
President Bill Clinton as the “enemy of normal 
Americans” and threatened to shut down Mr. Clin- 
ton’s presidency by initiating a series of ethics inves- 
tigations if Republicans take over the House. 

He has also been criticized for putting enormous 
pressure on corporate and trade association political 
action committees to stop giving money to Demo- 
cratic incumbents and channel it to Republican 
challengers. 


Die House Republicans’ 10-point “Contract with 
America,” an extravaganza on the Capitol steps 
orchestrated by Mr. Gingrich, has become the target 
of attacks by Mr. Clinton and Democratic congres- 
.sional candidates, who say it would return the coun- 
ter to the trickle-down economics of the 1980s and 
either enlarge the deficit or force cuts in Social 
Security ana Medicare. 

Energized Democrats claim Mr. Gingrich's tactics *' 
are an unexpected gift that could allow them to* 
blunt the Republican offensive. “He's determined 10 ^ 
gain control at all costs, and I think that's what the 
problem is,” said Tony Coelho, senior adviser to the- 
Democratic Party. 

The Democratic attacks on the Republican con- 
tract only bring a smile. “It's great,” the husky, gray- 
thatched' conservative said with a tone of seif-satis- 
faetion. “The contract is working perfectly. It is 
nationalizing the elections in a manner which I’m 
shocked to see the Democrats fall into.” 

Mr. Gingrich is at once theoretician, strategist, 
antagonist, self-promoter and bad boy. With the 
retirement of the House minority leader, Robert H. 
Michel of Illinois, Mr. Gingrich is in line for the top 
House Republican leadership post in January. 


If the. November elections produce the landslide 
Republicans predict, he would become the first 
Republican speaker since Joseph W. Martin Jr. in 
1953-55. 

Mr. Gingrich and his advisers are already plan- 
ning the transition. Democrats are preparing for the 
worst, even if they still control the House. “Where 
Bob Michel was respected. Newt they loathe," said 
one' Democrat. 

“1 clearly fascinate them,” Mr. Gingrich said of 
therDemocrats. “I’m much more intense, much mere 
persistent, much more w illing to take risks to get it 
- done. Since they think it is their job to run the 
plantation, it shocks them that I’m actually willing 
to lead the slave rebellion.” 

A White House senior adviser, George Siephano- 
poulos, sees Mr. Gingrich as driven mostly by “an 
absolute ambition for power." 

Representative Mike Synar, Democrat of Oklaho- 
ma, who was defeated in his primary, railed Mr. 
Gingrich a “control freak” with no’ compass or 
principles. 

Mr. Gingrich speaks in language rich in military 


metaphors, historical analogies and rvber-age 
phrases plucked from the works of futurists like 
Alvin Toffier. 

His stump speech offers a lecture on five mega- 
trends sweeping the globe that will help to demolish 
the existing liberal power structure. 

The five megatrends are the coming of the infor- 
mation age: the development of a world market: the 
gradual demise of the welfare state, and the arrival 
of an opportunity society; the emergence of citizen 
politicians to replace the professional class now in 
power, and what be describes os his belief in the 
eventual triumph of “American cxceptionatism" 
over counterculture values. His shorthand on that 
clash is Forrest Gump versus Bill Clinton. 

His shorthand on that clash is Forrest Gump 
versus Bill Clinton. 

Critics dismiss much of this philosophizing as just 
so much intellectual pretension, but Mr. Gingrich 
said the real problem was that his ideas give Demo- 
crats the willies. 

“If you're them, J’ve just described a horrifying 
and inconceivable future," he said. "So how could 
you ever really trust and work with a guy who has 
those weird ideas?” 


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Presideiit Clinton, at a fund-raising event for Governor Mario Cuomo of New York. 


Speaking From the Heart on Crime 

LOS ANGELES — As sound biles from cam- 
paign debates go. it was not in the same league with 
Lloyd Bentseu’s withering riposte that Dan Quayle 
was “no Jack Kennedy." 

Nevertheless. California’s Democratic gubernato- 
rial candidate, Kathleen Brown, delivered a debate 
sound bite to remember — and one that is now the 
subject of hot debate. Midway through a televised 
face-off with Governor Pete WQson last Friday, she 
demanded that be stop questioning her commitment 
to being tough on criminals and then delivered an 
emotional, personal revelation about crime. 

“You cannot possibly imagine whal it’s like to be 
a woman at night, worrying about your safety," she 
told the governor. “And you cannot imagine what 
it's like to be a mother, waiting at home late at night 
for your kids to come home — waiting for your 
daughter to come home in the evening and having 
her come home and comfort her because she’s been 
raped. Or your son, who calls coming home from 
school, when Tm working, to say, ’Come home 
because Fve been robbed and I've been mugged.’ " 

The governor, a moderate Republican who has 
made the crime issue a mainstay of his re-election 
campaign and has frequently questioned the “cour- 
age” of his more liberal Democratic opponent to 
confront the issue, seemed caught off guard by Ms. 
Brown’s emotional revelation. 

But Mr. Wilson quickly recovered, apparently 
sensing that although he had been punimeled a bit. 
there might still be opportunity at hand. “A moving 
performance,” he said sarcastically when she had 
finished. 

Since then, the debate over Ms. Brown’s remarks 
has centered not just on whether she stung the 
governor politically but also on whether she calcu- 
latedly went after the crucial women’s vole with 
some blatant political grandstanding that risked 
exposing a daughter to unwanted publicity. 

“Whatever Kathleen Brown actually planned or 


POLITICAL MOPS 


intended,” said Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a political 
scientist at the Qaremont Graduate School who 
specializes in California elections, “the reality is that 
the motive behind this rather striking moment in a 
debate has become at least as much ofan issue, if not 
more of an issue, than the message she was trying to 
deliver." 

Ms. Brown contended later at a news conference 
that she “spoke from the heart.” Sbe also said that 
her daughter was “totally supportive” of the disclo- 
sure. 

But in no way, Ms. Brown insisted, did she intend 
for her mention of the rape and the robbery to 
become a bombshell. (NYT) 

Candidates Unfazed by Bad Press 1 

WASHINGTON — One candidate is portrayed 
by the media as an untrustworthy figure who lied to 
Congress about Iran-contra and still refuses to come 
clean. Another is depicted as a former crack user and 
womanizer whose mayoralty collapsed amid incom- 
petence and corruption. A third is ridiculed by 
reporters as an empty suit with a wacky wife, using 
his personal fortune' to buy a Senate seat. 

Yet tins avalanche of negative publicity has not 
stopped Oliver L. North, Marion S. Barry or Repre- 
sentative Michael Huffington, Republican of Cali- 
fornia, from winning their respective nominations 
and looking strong in recent polls. They are among u 
select group of 1994 challengers who have been 
virtually impervious to the kind of press assaults 
that once would have left a politician bruised and 
battered. 

“The media used to draw blood and the candidate 
would bleed." said Jay Severin, a Republican politi- 
cal consultant “Now the media do everything they 
used to and it doesn't wound as much. Voters tend to 
see attacks by the media as having exactly the 
credibility of opponents' attacks^ It’s ‘all politics.’ " 


Mr. Nortn, the Kepu 
Virginia, casts himself 


as a conservative patriot 




taking on the liberal establishment. Mr. Barry, the 
District of Columbia’s Democratic mayoral nomi- 
nee, is a symbol of black pride challenging the white 
power structure. 

Mr. Huffington, the millionaire trying to unseat 
Senator Dianne Feinsiein, Democrat of California, 
is the self-financed candidate running against en- 
trenched special interests. 

All began as underdogs, and all are in a position 
to win. " (Howard Kurtz. WP) 

Basketball as a Campaign Issue 

WASHINGTON — As if there were a shortage of 
national campaign issues, the Senate race in Wiscon- 
sin has taken a bizarre swerve into the politics of 
professional basketball. 

The incumbent senator. Herb Kohl, a Democrat, 
is also the millionaire owner of the Milwaukee Bucks 
of the National Basketball Association. His oppo- 
nent. Bob Welch, u Republican slate representative 
who is far behind in both money ami polls, began 
running a television spot earlier this month making 
an issue of Mr. Kohl's negotiations with a star 
player, Glenn Robinson, who has been holding out 
while seeking a contract reportedly worth Si 00 mil- 
lion. 

The point of Mr. Welch's ad seemed to be that if 
Mr. Kohl was willing to spend that much on a 
basketball player, he would also play fast and loose 
with taxpayers’ money. If that was the idea, it 
backfired. Mr. Kohl has refused to agree to such a 
large contract and has been winning applause on (he 
campaign trail when he talks about it. (LAT) 

Quote /Unquote 

President Bill Clinton at a fund-raising event for 
Governor Mario Cuomo of New York, who is in- 
volved in a tight race for re-election: “I watched him 
tonight, and I was thinking: Why is this a race? Whv 
is it even close?" • (WP) 


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Judge Restricts Media’s Coverage in Selection of Simpson Jury 




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LOS ANGELES — The judge in the 
O. J. Simpson trial on Thursday 
barred the media from part of jury 
selection, citing concent over intensive 
coverage of the case. 

The order by Judge Lance A. Ito of 
Superior Court pertains to individual 
questioiuitg of potential jurors over 
whether the barrage of publicity has 
affected their ability to be impartial. 

The judge has been particularly con- 
cerned about a book published this 


week that he says threatens Mr. Simp- 
son’s right to a fair trial. 

A court spokeswoman, Jerri anne 
Haysleu, said that general question- 
ing, known as voir dire, would be open 
beginning Oct. 26. 

“His ruling only applies to the me- 
dia portion of voir dire” she said. 

Attorneys for media organizations 
were studying the ruling before decid- 
ing whether to file an appeal 
In issuing his ruling. Judge Ito said 
extreme measures were required. “This 


is a situation where this case has re- 
ceived international coverage," he 
said. 

Mr. Simpson. 47, the former foot- 
ball star and television personality, 
faces two counts of murder in connec- 
tion with the June 12 slayings of his 
former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, 
and her friend Ronald Goldman. 

The motion to close jury selection 
was made by both the defense and the 
prosecution at the urging of the judge, 
who has long expressed frustration 


about the amount and nature of the 
media coverage. 

The ruling, came a day after two 
media organizations turned down a 
request by Judge Ito that they post- 
pone plans to interview the co-author 
of a new book about Ms. Simpson. 

Written by Faye Resnick, a friend of 
Ms. Simpson's, the book alleges that 
Mr. Simpson stalked his former wife 
and threatened to kill her. 

Judge Ito, who planned to question 
prospective jurors about the book. 


cited concerns that they would not be 
candid if faced with scrutiny of their 
answers. 

Kelli Sager, representing several 
news media organizations, argued that 
closing the proceedings not only vio- 
lated the First Amendment, but also 
would probably not address concerns 
of jury contamination or juror candor. 

Before Thursday, jury selection had 
been halted for two days because of 
the the release of the Resnick book. 


Children Bom Abroad 
Benefit From New Rule 


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^Trust Lawyer Questioned Harriman Estate Deals 


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. .. By. Sharon Walsh 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — A prom- 
inent ; New York trust lawyer 
deqh&ed' last year to become a 
trustee for the estate of the fi- 
nancier W. AvereQ Harriman, 
saying he would have a duty to 
sue previous trustees because of 
their poor handling of the es- 
tate,: according to a letter he 
sent to the heirs. 

Henry S. Ziegler, former 
head df the trust deparfinent at 
Shearman & Sterling in New 
York, was asked by the Hard- 
man heirs to serve as a trustee 
following the resignation of 
Clark M. Clifford and Paul C. 
Warlike, the Washington law- 


yers who had served as trustees of the investments by the prior 


since Mr. Hardman’s death in 
1986. 

But in October of last year, 
nearly a year before the Ham- 
man heirs sued Mr. Clifford, 
Mr. Wanike and the U.S. am- 
bassador to France, Pamela 
Churchill Harriman, accusing 
them of losing millions in fool- 
ish investments, Mr. Ziegler 
wrote a letter outlining his rea- 
sons for turning the job down. 

Mr. Ziegler, a past regent of 
the American College of Trust 
and Estate Counsel, wrote that 
after months of analyzing the 
investments made by the trust- 
ees, he was concerned about the 
“serious legal issues arising out 


trustees and by the general 
partners,” according to a source 
who has seen the letter. 

Mr. Clifford and Mr. Warlike 
were trustees of the Harriman 
funds, while Pamela Harriman 
was a general partner of the 
funds. William Rich 3d, who 
headed the New York office 
rhar managed the Harriman 
money, was also a trustee for a 
brief period. 

The heirs have sued the for- 
mer trustees, as well as other 
former lawyers and managers, 
for fraud and malfeasance, say- 
ing. they mismanaged the trust 
and lost mill i nns of dollars in 
investments. 


Mr. Ziegler, who is still a 
counsel at Shearman & Sterling 
but is preparing to retire de- 
clined to comment on the letter. 

Mr. Clifford and other law- 
yers involved in the case have 
said that the Harriman descen- 
dants, in particular the Ham- 
man grandchildren, wanted 
more and more money from the 
trust and sued the trustees be- 
cause they had never been hap- 
py about the fact that Averell 
Har riman had married Pamela 
Digby Churchill Hayward 
when he was nearly 80 and she 
was 51. Mr. Harriman left most 
of his S65 million estate to his 
widow. 


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UN Insists GIs Disarm Haitian Gunmen 


Away From Politics 


• FJoodwaters apparently ruptured a pipeline east of Houston, 
sending pools of burning gasoline down the San Jacinto River 
and setting fire to homes and boats on the banks. Eight people 
were treated for minor bums. 

9 A New York jury has ordered Coca-Cola to pay $550,000 in 
damages to a man who became ill in 1989 after drinking a 
bottle of Coke that had two transistor batteries inside. 

• Federal regulators fined the operator of a nudear power 
plant $100,000 because someone at the northwestern Illinois 
plant slipped a radioactive disk into a worker’s pants. The 
worker received a dose of radiation that was about half the 
annual limit set by the government for nuclear plant workers. 

• An explosion ripped through an o3 refinery in Torrance, 
California, injuring 30 workers, including some who were 
trapped on scaffolding by their safety belts. 

• Americans are gpving less to charity. A study by Indepen- 
dent Sector, an organization that does research on volunteer- 
ism, said 3.4 percent fewer Americans volunteered in 1993 
Lhan in 1991, and Americans are giving about $19 less per 
household to charitable causes than in previous years. 

AFP. WP. NYT. AP 


By Robert C. Siner 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Just be- 
fore going home for the N ovem- 
ber elections. Congress adopted 
a new naturalization rule that 
should make it easier for some 
children bora abroad to be- 
come American citizens. 

The new rule; which takes ef- 
fect on March 1. will apply to 
foreign children adopted by 
Americans living abroad. It will 
also apply to certain children 
born overseas to an American 
citizen married to a noncitizen, 
who cannot become U.S. citi- 
zens because their American- 
cilizen parent had not lived in 
the United States for at least 
five years before the birth of the 
child. 

Overseas citizens' groups say 
thousands of children have 
been denied U -S. citizenship be- 
cause of ibis residence require- 
ment 

Under the new procedure, 
American parents will be able 
to apply from abroad to have 
their children naturalized and 
formalize the naturalization 
during a single, short visit to the 
United States. Current proce- 
dures require that the applica- 
tion be submitted in the United 
States and that the applicants 
live in the United States until 


the naturalization process is 
completed, which can take 
weeks or months. 

The new rule apples to chil- 
dren under age 18. 

Another provision passed by 
Congress grams former U.S. 
citizens bom abroad between 
1934 and 1952 the opportunity 
to regain the citizenship they 
may have lost as young adults 
through failure to reside in the 
United States under a law that 
has since been abolished. 


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By Julia Preston 

Washington Past Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 
York — UN officials • have 
warned. the United States that it 
must thoroughly disarm para- 
military gunmen opposed to the 
president of Haiti before Unit- 
ed Nations peacekeepers can 
> replace U.S. troops there UN 
T - ancLAmerican officials said. 
The Security Council has au- 
thorized up to 6,000 troops for 
» Haitian duty once U.S. forces 
\have established a stable envi- 
./? ronment there — a key transi- 
tion if tite Clinton administra- 
.. tkui is to hold to plans calling 
; y for withdrawal of most of the 
^ 19,000 American soldiers in 
<■ Haiti within months. 

>■ But UN officials say they are 
concerned that U.S. military ef- 
forts to search out and confis- 
cate the weapons of armed civil- 
ians still loyal to the corrupt 
former military regime may not 
be. extensive enough. 

“We would like to see a much 
/ more massive disarmament," a 
senior UN official said. He add- 


ed that the caution U.S. troops 
had shown in pursuing suih 
gunmen, known as attaches , 
was “absolutely disquieting.” 

The situation has stirred a 
powerful sense of dq& vu in 
U.S. and UN officials, remind- 
ing both parties of the dispute 
over disarmament of militia 
groups in Somalia. The UN sec- 
retary-general, Butros Butros 
Ghali, irritated Washington by 
insisting publicly that U.S. 
troops should seize the heavy 
weapons of waning clans in 
Mogadishu before the United 
Nauons assumed command of 
the operation. 

U-S. forces did launch raids 
on Somali weapons caches, but 
when UN forces took over, the/ 
found themselves locked in al- 
most continuous battle with the 
well-armed forces of the clan 
leader Mohammed Faxrah Ai- 


threat in Haiti remains impor- 
tant because — unlike the So- 
mali operation — this time the 
UN contingent will not have a 
Security Council mandate to 
use force aggressively, only in 
self-defense. “Our people won’t 
have the capability to put down 
disorder” one high-level offi- 
cial said. 

U.S. officials say they are not 
opposed to a broad disarma- 
ment campaign but argue it is 
more important for Haiti’s 
president, the Reverend Jean- 
Bertrand Aristide, to take mea- 
sures to encourage political rec- 
onciliation. They contend that 
it will not matter if there are 
some-illicit weapons and unre- 
generate gunmen about if most 
Haitians — even those who op- 
pose and fear Father Aristide 
— feel they are safe. 

U.S. forces have announced a 


searching systematically for 
guns in possession of the atta- 
ches, who have largely gone un- 
derground with their handguns 
and rifles. 

Father Aristide encouraged 
Haitians to turn attaches over 
to the U.S. military rather than 
beating or lynching them. Bui a 
U.S. military spokesman in 
Port-au-Prince, Colonel Barry 
Willey, has acknowledged that! 
UiL troops have been turning 
suspects over to the Haitian po- 
lice. who in turn have been let- 
ting most of them go. 


did. Many officials here and in program under which Haitians 
Washington say they wonder receive payment for turning in 
now if a disarmament campaign weapons, and troops have taken 
there was ever realistic. control of an army heavy-weap- 

But UN officials contend ons unit in Port-au-Prince. But 
that suppressing the weapons the Americans have not been 



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■ha nightmare of anarchy 
and bloodshed in the 
African nation of Rwanda 
defies description. The hearts 
of everyone at the African 
Wildlife Foundation go out to 
the people of Rwanda. 

Dir beans also go ointo Itw 
mountain gorillas, popularized in ihr 
film ‘Gorillas in the Mist* who live in 
I ho Parc Dm Volcans m Rwanda 
Understandably, many oi the pari 
rangers who guard ibis endangered 
species fled during the fighting Others 
bravely mmoined ai m»r post m rough 
most of ihe civil war, monitonng the 
gonDas' whereabouts and well being 
It is imptjrarive for the gordLx' 
safety Thai these wardens and 
rangers receive the food and basic 

equipment thev need in order li> 
return to the part and set up regular 
patrols to protect the gorillas 
That's why the African Wildlife 
Foundation has established the 
Mountain Gorilla Emergency 
Fund. Our goal is to raise S85.CKM to 
rc-equip iho ran gets, and provide 
part personnel with food and equip- 
ment and money 10 live on for the 
next si* months 

Please send a donation to the 
Mountain Gorilla Emergency Fund cto 
African WHdlife Foundation, 1717 
Massachusetts Avenue. MW, Suite 
$02. Was hingto n. D.C 70038, or call 
(202) 26W3393 far mam information. 

Together, we can ensure the sur- 
vival of one of Earth's true wildlife 
wonders — the magnificent mountain 
gorillas of Rwanda' 




«Jl«u4 i.V.' .VMtNIIte a 





-a#> 


Plage 6 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21. 1994 

OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Pul'luhnl With Th. \«i Wk Tiiws and Th. Wn-huipi.in F\,.j 


Delaying the Test Ban 


tribune Mr. Arafat 9 the Palestinian Interest Is to Stop Hamas 

Va<huid'in (\,«| V * 


More than 30 years after the United 
States, the Soviet Union and Britain 
signed a Limited Test Ban Treaty halting 
nuclear tests in the atmosphere, they are 
finally getting around to negotiating a 
comprehensive test ban, barring tests alto- 
gether. But they and other nuclear-armed 
states seem to be looking for ways to limit 
the new treaty's comprehensiveness. That, 
in turn, is delaying a final draft 

Delay is precisely what Britain and 
France want Both want to keep testing, 
and both hope that if negotiations drag 
on long enough, other states will lose 
interest One of their delaying tactics has 
been to press for an exemption for so- 
called hydronuclear explosions that stop 
just short of a big bang. Although both 
countries argue otherwise, hydronuclear 
blasts are not needed to assure that war- 
heads are safe and reliable; simulations 
using high explosives will suffice. 

China, which has said it will accept a 
ban in 1996, is stalling while it completes 
a few more tests. It also seeks a loophole 
in the treaty permitting “peaceful” nucle- 
ar explosions. Washington and Moscow 
toyed for many years with the idea of 
using nuclear blasts to cut canals and 


tunnels through mountains, but all that 
ever came of it was India's attempt to 
pass off its 1974 warhead test as a peace- 
ful nuclear explosion, fn short, it became 
a pathway to proliferation. 

The United States itself has proposed 
one of the most pernicious limits on the 
treaty. Washington would allow states to 
withdraw from the treaty after 10 years 
without even citing supreme national in- 
terests, as is customary. No reason would 
be needed, just 180 days* notice. Giving 
states so easy an out could effectively kill 
the treaty after 10 years. 

The responsibility for energizing the 
negotiations and pointing them toward a 
truly total ban rests with the United 
States and Russia. They should stipulate 
that when the treaty says no tests, that 
means no hydronuclear tests and no 
“peaceful” explosions. 

One way to accommodate the laggards. 
China and France, would be to delay full 
enforcement of the treaty until 1996, giv- 
ing them time to complete a few' more 
tests. But a treaty should be ready for 
signing by next spring. That will require 
more energetic efforts by Washington. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Youngest Offenders 


Thirty years ago, the juvenile courts of 
America were concerned with offenders 
who ranged from truants to neighbor- 
hood thieves and occasionally included 
an armed robber or a killer. Over the 
decades, offenses committed by young- 
sters grew more serious, and juvenile 
courts now regularly deal with drug cases 
and vicious multiple murderers. Just 
about every crime that turns up in crimi- 
nal court, except sophisticated white-col- 
lar schemes, is now seen in courts where 
all the offenders are under 16. The most 
troubling new development in this area is 
that those being charged are no longer 
just hardened teenagers. Some are so 
young that the juvenile justice system 
hardly knows how to deal with them. 

Saturday's newspaper provided two 
horrifying examples. In Hopewell, Virgin- 
ia, brothers aged 10 and II were found 
“not innocent” — a juvenile court term 
used to avoid the harsh “guilty" — of 
dousing a 3-year-old with gasoline and 
setting him on fire. The victim, burned 
over 85 percent of his body, survived. The 
1 1-year-old assailant is in custody pending 
sentencing, but the 10-year-old. too young 
for confinement, was sent home. 

In Chicago, another pair of boys 10 
and 1 1 were charged with murder after 
pushing a 5-year-old out a 14th-story 
window in a public housing project The 
victim and his brother had refused to 
steal for the older boys, both of whom 


already have criminal records that in- 
clude weapons charges and theft of valu- 
ables worth more than $300. 

Traditionally, juvenile judges try to 
leave offenders at home and supply the 
kind of supervision and encouragement 
that will lead to rehabilitation. When 
youngsters are dangerous to the commu- 
nity, confinement may be the only course 
to take. But what is to be done with a 10- 
year-old who is extremely dangerous? 
Some jurisdictions have no residential 
facilities for offenders this young. 

Without knowing anything about the 
home situations of the boys involved in 
these two cases, except that two of the 
three fathers of the accused are in prison, it 
is probable that their families alone cannot 
be given responsibility for their future. 

Terrible as these offenses are, the boys 
charged are themselves children, in need 
of correction surely buL one would hope, 
still salvageable. It is a formidable task 
that depresses even the experts. One 
Cook County assistant state's attorney 
said ominously of the Chicago killing. 
“Every day you think you've finally seen 
as bad as it's going to get here, and then 
something like this happens.” It will con- 
tinue to get worse if early signs of vio- 
lence in children are ignored or mini- 
mized, and if society remains reluctant to 
intervene early and effectively to change 
the course of those children's lives. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Vitamin Cease-Fire 


In wrapping up its year. Congress did 
manage to conclude one long-running 
battle that was odd and intractable even 
by current standards. This was the con- 
flict that has been raging since 1990 over 
whether dietary supplements must obey 
the new law on nutrition labeling that 
now applies to foods. Alas, the result, if 
not a draw, is something of a muddle. 

Dietary supplements — a large, in- 
between class of remedies, neither food 
nor drug, that include vitamins, herbs 
and a lot of less familiar substances sold 
in health food stores — will have to obey 
the food law, which prohibits health 
claims not based on “significant scientific 
agreement" that has been recognized and 
cleared by the Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration. This has to be viewed as progress, 
given that makers and sellers of the sup- 
plements insisted that this would amount 
to the government's depriving people of 
their vitamins and anything else they 
took without a prescription — and insist- 
ed this with such fervor that it generated, 
combatants aver, more mail to Congress 
overall than health core reform. 

The supplements will, however, be al- 
lowed to make a different class of 
claims, known enigmatically as “struc- 
ture and function” claims, as long as 
they do not mention a specific disease 
and are not “misleading.” What “mis- 
leading" means, and whether a state- 
ment such as “Vitamin A is necessary to 
good vision” counts as a disease claim, a 
structure and function claim or a mis- 
leading claim, has to be settled in yet 
more regulations by. yes, the FDA. 
There will also be a commission to study 
the law’s effects for two years and then 
advise the FDA on said regulations, al- 
though its advice will not be binding. 

The food law, you'll recall went into 
effect eventually with visible and appar- 
ently popular new labels to surprisingly 
little fuss. But the makers of supple- 
ments, many of which are already certi- 
fied as helpful or else harmless, but a few 


of which have caused real difficulties, 
argued that if they had to back up health 
claims before making them they would 
have no chance of selling the products. 
Given the flimsiness of this argument, it 
is surprising just how much fuzz and mist 
they managed to retain through the law’s 
final, or at least present, incarnation. 

Besides the structure and function stip- 
ulation, the industry gained some ground 
in a fight over whether the FDA had to 
prove harm from a dietary supplement 
before seizing it from shelves. Where be- 
fore the FDA could seize a product on 
suspicion of hazard, and the maker then 
had to prove it safe, the FDA now must 
present evidence of “significant risk.” 
“unreasonable risk” or “imminent haz- 
ard” to a court 75 days before any such 
seizure. Companies introducing a new 
ingredient are now required to notify the 
FDA that they are doing so. 

These sound like improvements in safe- 
ty and marginally in good sense. But they 
also have the sound of a fight that has an 
uncomfortably high possibility of being 
continued by other means. Too b3d. Four 
years on this was more than enough. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

A Break in the Tango of Death 

If the idea of Yasser Arafat as a 
“peace" laureate makes you queasy, 
wait till next year: Nobels for Gerry 
Adams and Ian Paisley? 

Protestant paramilitary forces have 
joined the Irish Republican .Army in a 
cease-fire in Northern Ireland. The tan- 
go of death is suspended. Weakness at 
last has forced the warriors to pick up 
the olive branch. Lasting peace won't 
come easily. But it couldn't come at all 
until the killing stopped. If this be 
peace, make the most of it. 

— The Baltimore Sun 



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W ASHINGTON — The bombing of 
an Israeli bus in which 21 people 
were killed on Wednesday shows that the 
only way to contain Hamas is to treat it 
like the violent terrorist group it is. 
Yasser Arafat's efforts to lure the ex- 
tremists into the peace process are guar- 
anteed to fail. If not stopped. Hamas will 
surely succeed in wrecking the fledgling 
Israeli- Pales tinian peace accord. 

The only way peace can be saved is if 
Mr. Arafat delivers on the promise he 
made a year ago to the Israelis and the 
United States: to take definitive steps to 
clamp down on Hamas. 

Berause the Palestinian leader has never 
moved beyond rhetoric, Gaza is fast on its 
way to becoming a new Lebanon. Israeli 
intelligence and Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization security officials say thousands 
of Hamas terrorists openly train in Gaza, 
many in makeshift camps in citrus groves. 
A senior Israeli intelligence official told 
me that Israel believes there are 3,000 to 
5,000 Hamas terrorists now ready to carry 
out murders and kidnappings. 


By Steven Emerson 


Hamas has acquired arsenals that in- 
clude thousands of automatic weapons 
and grenades, hundreds of pounds of 
deadly plastic explosives, and even anti- 
tank missiles. Hamas squads roam Gaza's 
streets without any hindrance from the 
9.000-man Palestinian police force; not 
one weapon has ever been confiscated. 

The t raining is carried out openly; an 
Israeli television has aired film of a Hamas 
terrorist squad preparing to cany out op- 
erations in Israel. The television crew en- 
tered Gaza, asked Palestinians on the 
street where terrorists might be found, and 
located a Hamas camp within an hour. 

Mr. .Arafat felt he was wrongly blamed 
last week when Israel said the Israeli sol- 
dier who was kidnapped — and ultimately 
killed — by Hamas was being held in 
Gaza. But it is now clear that the Hamas 
killers were dispatched from Gaza. Israeli 
intelligence has pinpointed the master- 
mind of the kidnapping, Abu Khaled.. He 


lives in Khan Younis, in central Gaza, 
plotting deadly terror operations. 

In the year since the signing of the 
Israeli-PLO accords, more than 90 Israelis 
have been killed — triple the number 
murdered in any year during the intifada. 
None of the more than 50 Hamas terror- 
ists named by Israeli officials as responsi- 
ble for the murders has been prosecuted. 

In August. Mr. Arafat ordered the ar- 
rest of 30 Hamas operatives after a series 
of lethal attacks; they were released one 
day later because the police said there was 
no" evidence against them. Last month a 
known Hamas terrorist, who was shot by 
Israeli soldiers while fleeing to Gaza after 
he killed an Israeli guard, walked out of a 
hospital in Gaza City despite Palestinian 
police claims that he was “too seriously 
wounded to be arrested.” 

If Mr. Arafat really wants to control 
Hamas, he will have to confiscate all 
weapons that are not now in the hands of 
the Palestinian authorities. He should 
shut down the terror camps — especially 
those in Khan Younis and Rafah. And he 


should arrest those terrorists already 
identified by Israeli intelligence. 

All these steps are practical, but they 
require political willpower. Brigadier Gen- 
era! Nasr Yousef, commander of the Pal- 
estinian police, told Israeli radio: “We 
have the capability to act against the ter- 
rorists, but we have not received an order 
from the political level to do so.” 

Unfortunately, it is unlikely that Mr. 
Arafat will take tough action. Last year 
Israeli leaders said be would crack down 
on the terrorists because it would be in his 
self-interest. But the past year has demon- 
strated that this is not so. Mr. Arafat has 
learned that as long as he allows Hamas to 
target only Israelis, it will leave him atone. 

In the long run, this strategy will doom 
him, because Is rad will find itself com- 
pelled to reoccupy Gaza. .And ultimately it 
will not be Mr. Arafat but the Palestinian 
people who will suffer the most 

Mr. Emerson, who writes frequently on 
terrorism, contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


India: An Accelerating Economy With Plenty of Room for Growth 


W ASHINGTON — The 1989 
revolution that razed the 
Berlin Wall seems to have had 
more profound economic effects 
outside Russia and Eastern Eu- 
rope than inside. Capitalism and 
free markets are suddenly taking 
bold in China, Vietnam. Latin 
America and. perhaps most 
promisingly of all. India. 

In 1991, India's economy hit a 
brick walL Protectionist policies 
that had limited imports and ex- 
ports were precipitating a disas- 
ter. The prime minister, P. V. 
Narasimba Rao. had few choices, 
so he cut taxes and opened India 
up to foreign trade and capital. 

Today, despite poverty, finan- 
cial scandals and political vio- 
lence. India's growth is accelerat- 
ing, and it is attracting money 
from abroad. U.S. companies in- 
vested more in India in 1 992 and 
1993 alone than they had in the 
previous 40 years. Ford, which 
now sells no cars in India, last 
week announced a joint venture 
with Mahindra & Mahindra and 
will begin manufacturing soon. 

India is now the third -largest 
economy in Asia and the 1 2th in 
the world. But more important is 
its potential for further growth — 
with its 900 million people. 150 
million of them middie-class and 
well educated. Some 25 million 
Indians own stocks, and despite 
the stifling bureaucracy entrepre- 
neurship has deep roots. 

Released from government re- 
strictions, Indians are showing 
that they can innovate like crazy. 
A good example is cable televi- 
sion, which is completely unregu- 
lated. As a result. Bloomberg 
Business News reports, there are 
now 60.000 independent cable 
operators delivering 15 channels 
of programming to 10 million In- 
dians using wires strung hastily 
between apartment blocks. 

Foreigners still cannot buy- 
stocks directly in India, but it is 
now easy to bet on the country’s 
prosperity through mutual funds. 
One closed-end fund. India 
Growth, was started in 1988 and 
has returned an average of 19 
percent annually since then. 

Three more closed-end funds 
and one open-end fund were 
launched this year, and their man- 
agers have lots of choices. The 


By James K. Glassman 


Bombay Stock Exchange, founded 
in 1875, lists 3.263 companies — 
50 percent more than the New 
York Slock Exchange. And India 
has 2! other exchanges with an 
additional 4.000 listed companies. 

More shares are coming to mar- 
ket all the time. This week the 
government completed the sale to 
the public of minority interests in 
seven state-owned companies, in- 
cluding Indian Oil Corporation, 
which refines most of the country’s 
oil and is one of the 500 largest 
firms of any sort in the world. 

One hot stock owned by all five 
of the U.S. mutual funds that 
specialize in India is Reliance In- 
dustries. a petrochemical company 
that is one of the world's 10 largest 
makers of polyester. Last week. 
Reliance announced that profits 
for the first half of 1994 had risen 
146 percent, to $163 million. Its 
chairman. Dhirubhai Ambanl is 
considering a $6 billion invest- 
ment in telecommunications. 

Other attractive stocks cited bv 


David Tripple, who manages Pio- 
neer India, the only open-end 
fund, are Tata Iron ana Steel; 
BaUapur Industries, India's larg- 
est paper producer Great East- 
ern Shipping, a cash-rich compa- 
ny; and JCT Ltd, a manufacturer 
of textiles and synthetic fibers 
with a price-earnings ratio of 10. 

Pioneer India managers are so 
high on India that the country's 
shares represent the second-larg- 
est holding in its Emerging Mar- 
kets Fund, just behind Hong 
Kong and ahead of Mexico, Indo- 
nesia and Thailand. India is “like 
a very large ship.” Mr. Tripple 
told me in an interview in his 
office in downtown Boston. “It 
turns slowly. Most emerging mar- 
kets are like small sailboats. They 
can make quick turns, but they 
can also be blown over.” 

One worry with a single-coun- 
try open-end fund such as Pio- 
neer India is that if stock prices 
suddenly drop, investors could 
panic and demand redemption of 


their shares. The fund manager 
might be forced to sell into a thin 
and sharply declining market. 

Mr. Tripple recognizes the risk, 
but he notes that Pioneer has ex- 
perience running open-end funds 
in even thinner markets, notably 
Poland. Pioneer's fund there has 
attracted 400,000 Polish inves- 
tors; its value tripled last year. 

Closed-end funds carry their 
own risks, mainly that the market 
will sour on a country and drive 
shares far below their “net asset 
value” — that is, the actual price 
of the stocks in the portfolio. 

At the end of September, the 
India Fund was trading at a dis- 
count of 15 percent, and the two 
other new funds — Morgan Stan- 
ley India Investment and Jardine 
Fleming India — were trading at 
discounts of 6 to 7 percent. 

Jardine Fleming closely tracks 
the Bombay Stock Exchange Sen- 
sitive Index, which is dominated 
by large companies such as Tata 
and Reliance. “The fund’s focus 
on industrial stocks ... has 
clearly paid off handsomely.” say s 


William Dinning of PaineWcbber 
Intx, who recently recommended 
Jardine to clients. 

Mr. Tripple’s fund uses a “top- 
down” approach, he told me. “If 
sugar quotas come off, what hap- 
pens?” He looks for companies 
that will benefit. Sales of mopeds 
are exploding in India, so he 
looks for a company that can cap- 
italize on the trend. 

Still, even India's blue-chip 
stocks are highly volatile. In 1992, 
for example, shares of the India 
Growth Fund rose 81 percent in 
the first quarter, then dropped 35 
percent m the second. For the 
first nine months of this year, the 
fund’s net asset value rose 24 per- 
cent, but the stock price fell 1 1 
percent — as investors who once 
granted the fund a premium sud- 
denly demanded a discount. 

And then there are the assassi- 
nations, revolts, and epidemics 
. . . Disasters seem so numerous. 
Mr. Tripple argues, because it's 
such a big place with a free press. 
Good point. 

The Washington Past. 


Vietnam: Determined to Be a Tiger but in Need of Help 


N EW YORK — Eight months 
after President Bill Clinton 
lifted the U.S. trade embargo on 
Vietnam. Washington and Hanoi 
are moving rapidly toward a new 
relationship. Diplomatic liaison 
offices in the two capitals are to 
open soon, perhaps nexL month. 
Foreign Minister Nguyen Manh 
Cam said here recently. 

Some 65 American companies 
already have offices in Vietnam. 
American investment has risen 
rapidly, although the Lotal at 
$160 million, is still modest. 
Trade is slowly picking up. Hanoi 
is hoping for much more. 

The Vietnam that Americans 
are rediscovering almost 20 years 
after the end of the Vietnam War. 
is a very different place. It is on a 
spectacular roller-coaster ride of 
economic and social change. The 
ride is far from over. 

In bustling northern towns or 
Mekong Delta farmlands, Viet- 
namese say it is their “turn" to 
join the East Asian economic mir- 
acle. Hanoi hopes to double its 


By John Williams 


GNP in this decade, helped by an 
estimated $50 billion in foreign 
and domestic investment. 

Vietnam appears to have the 
credentials: a hub location be- 
tween Northeast and Southeast 
Asia, internal stability, rich re- 
sources. a large and literate labor 
force, a strong work ethic, a big 
domestic market, a stable curren- 
cy and stunning tourism pros- 
pects. The 2 million overseas 
Vietnamese — in Europe. North 
America and Australia — provide 
a pool of capital and skills for 
their former homeland. 

Vietnam's economy is booming 
Growth probably will lop 8.5 per- 
cent this year. Inflation, once-ram- 
pam. is under 10 percent. Previ- 
ously a rice importer, Vietnam is 
now a major exporter. Production 
of rubber, coffee and seafood is 
rising Total exports are forecast to 
increase 25 percent this year. 

Not for Vietnam the gray sad- 
ness endured by East European 


French Sulking Endangers Europe 


P ARIS — France has gotten 
sharply prickly again, seeing 
slights and risks to its sovereign 
identity from various sides in a 
way that revives the question of 
how strong a Europe it wants. 

The financial scandals and 
open bickering within the gov- 
ernment majority as it prepares 
to elect a new president next 
spring have a lot to do with the 
sour atmosphere. While the pol- 
iticians are totally absorbed in 
their contest for power, it is the 
kind of politics that turns off 
the electorate and provokes dis- 
dain for them all. 

There is noticeable envy, if 
also relief, that Helmut Kohl 
managed to demonstrate Ger- 
many's political stability and 
continuity in last Sunday’s elec- 
tions, even if his majority was 
shaved to a wedge. Le Monde 
contrasts “the confidence that 
Germans gave their government 
and the distrust between the 
French and tbeir political class.” 

The commentator considers 
it a French identity problem, 
reflecting French failure to 
adapt and strengthen itself after 
the economic recession and to 
come to grips with the big Euro- 
pean issues. That isn’t the way 
the Germans see it. but the 
French have always been more 
nervous about their mutual rela- 
tions than (he Germans. 

Underneath, there is a deep 
psychic struggle about which 
way France should go and how 
much it should rely on the 
French-German “axis" to guide 
and drive Europe. 

As usual when France feels ill 
3t ease with itself, it takes 
swipes at the United Slates to 
reassure itself that it is really 
self-reliant, despite consider- 
able improvement in French- 
American cooperation lately. 

Thus the defense minister, 
casting doubt on American re- 
ports of Iraqi military move- 


By Flora Lewis 


merits recently because neither 
France nor Europe has the inde- 
pendent capacity to confirm the 
intelligence, suggested that Bill 
Clinton was deliberately exag- 
gerating because of coming con- 
gressional elections. The minis- 
ter said be wanted to show that 
France does not “cling” to the 
United States, and makes it own 
policy decisions. 

When the U.S. ambassador to 
the United Nations snapped 
back insinuating that France 
wanted sanctions lifted because 
it was in such a hurry to do 
business with Iraq, the French 
foreign minis ter retorted that 
“France takes orders from no- 
body.” He said, “Yes, France 
defends its interests throughout 
the world," and as for commer- 
cial interests the United States 
is at least as self-serving. 

But the bigger issue is the 
coming transformation of Eu- 
rope and what kind of role 
France should seek in it along- 
side Germany. Mr. Kohl and his 
party have been quite dear 
about their intentions. They will 
press for a more federal Europe, 
at once opening itself to the 
countries to the east and light- 
ening the bonds that limit na- 
tional sovereignty. 

Otherwise, Mr. Kohl’s party 
declared, the danger is division 
between France and Germany, 
with France leading a group of 
southwestern countries toward 
protectionism and Germany 
leading the northeastern group 
toward open trade. 

Some went further, warning 
of a trend that could leave Ger- 
many feeling insecure in the 
middle and provoke a revival of 
its interwar turn to seek cooper- 
ation with Russia at the expense 
of its neighbors. 

The Germans know where 


they want to go, and it is away 
from the past toward a more 
integrated, inclusive Europe 
that removes the temptation to 
rely on their own power. Con- 
ceding that fears of a unified 
Germany throwing its weight 
around have not been justified 
so far. the French argue that 
Germans are used to federalism 
and decentralization, but that 
France to be French requires 
strong, centralized nationhood. 

What the French know is 
where they don’t want to go. 
They are aware that neither/ nor 
will not get them far — that is. 
□either fighting against loss of 
sovereignly nor leaving Germa- 
ny to itself. Thai only adds to 
tiieir discomfort and heightens 
internal tensions. 

But there isn’t a lot of time to 
decide oq the central question. 
Austria and three Scandinavian 
countries are due to join the Eu- 
ropean Union on Jan. 1; they 
will have to be accommodated. 
Then comes the time for big 
commitment, with the 1996 con- 
ference to review the Maastricht 
treaty and reshape the Union’s 
institutions for the long future. 

France is not ready for its 
great debate, and fears the de- 
bate because it is tom. It is edg- 
ing up in nibbles and quibbles, 
such as the National Assembly’s 
refusal to respond to Brussels's 
“invitation” to try to bring 
down its budget deficit because 
that interferes with its sovereign 
right to set fiscal policy, al- 
though it already pledged to do 
just that at Maastricht 

It would be a tragedy for all 
if a sense of weakness and dis- 
array should be allowed to un- 
dermine the French-German 
understanding on which a stur- 
dy Europe depends. There real- 
ly is no choice. France needs to 
face up to it without dragging 
its feet and sulking. 

£ Flora Lewis . 


countries making the transition to 
market economies. Construction 
dust fills the air. Stacks of bricks 
along the roadsides of Lang Son 
Province, which was economically 
stagnant not long ago. dwarf the 
old houses behind. Drivers in Ha- 
noi's outskirts are confused by 
streets that did not exist on tbeir 
last visits, but which now are filled 
with weaving cyclists, animated 
tea stalls and bulling shops. 

The World Bank has studied 
how the East Asian miracle na- 
tions succeeded economically 
while increasing social stability. 
The factors include evenly distrib- 
uted incomes, effective public ad- 
ministrations. reliable legal frame- 
works, sound banking systems, 
good infrastructures and healthy 
savings levels. Also important are 
investment in primary education 
and tasic health services, reduced 
discrimination against girls and 
lower fertility rates. 

in many ways this is Vietnam’s 
reverse image. Foreign companies 
complain of weak banking and le- 
gal systems (efforts to improve 
them are undo- way). Domestic 
savings levels are low. Public sec- 
tor payrolls have been cut by al- 
most 1 million jobs, and the shock 
of transition is far from over. 

’‘Most families in Vietnam have 
become richer over the past two to 
three years,” Unicef reported re- 
cently from Hanoi. Yet, as it also 
noted, income gaps have widened 
within communities, between 
provinces, and between cities and 
hamlets, with the heaviest impact 
on children in remote villages. 
About 10 milli on Vietnamese are 
jobless or underemployed. 

The infrastructure for economic 
success is lacking. More than 85 
percent of tire road system is din. 
Most railroad bridges were built 
early in the century. Only 1 village 
in 10 has telephones. 

Fertility rates have slowed, but 
more than half the pop ulace is 
under 20. The World Bank expects 
a population rise from today’s 72 
million to 1 17 million by 2025. 
About seven years ago, with 


coffers nearly empty. Vietnam 
cut spending on its basic health 
and education networks. Until 
then, its literacy and child surviv- 
al levels were extremely high for 
a low-income country. A derision 
to allow family farms to replace 
agricultural cooperatives, which 
unleashed surging production, 
saw local funding for village 
health clinics and preschool pro- 
grams evaporate. 

It was a damaging double 
blow. School construction, teach- 
er training and supplies were 
drastically reduced. Low-paid 
teachers lost motivation. Enroll- 
ment levels slipped as children 
left to work. In many places ma- 
laria spread, drug supplies dried 
up, and child malnutrition grew. 

Revitalizing the networks is 
now a major governmental con- 
cern. Spending is increasing, but 
much more is needed. Japan — 
Vietnam’s largest country donor 
— and Australia have pledged 
assistance for health and educa- 
tion, while the World Bank has 
mounted a $78 million program 
for primary schooling. 

Most Vietnamese clearly sup- 
port the switch to a market econ- 
omy. Their intelligence, ingenuity 
and determination make it proba- 
ble that Vietnam will become an 
economic success. The question is 
when, and at what social cost. 

Th e government’s commitment 
to social goals is beyond doubt 
Senior officials frankly admit past 
m ist a kes, and openly discuss cur- 
rent problems — street children, 
prostitution, crime; corruption. 

Foreign Minister Cam, who 
was speaking in New York to the 
Asia Society, expressed Hanoi's 
pleasure at the removal of con- 
gressional roadblocks to Ameri- 
can assistance to Hanoi Certain- 
ly Vietnam needs help. A 
Vietnam that is both prosperous 
and at peace with itself would be 
no small addition to the stability 
and strength of East Asia. 

The writer, a former senior Uni- 
cef official and now a free-lance 
writer, contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1894c Young Monarchy 1919: WarSwart Fields 

DRESDEN — “*Vale Cesar. The PARIS rtna , 

beginning of the end" This is the quenceof SediS CXp ?? edc ^ llSe " 

meaning attributed to the first to visit the battiS^ u A ^ l ^ 1cans 
official bulletin regarding thele- £ JE th? {ESS'S F P nce 
rious illness of thTCzar filted 

litical consequences of a change crowded with B 

in the ruler of Russia cannot 6e S Wa, i” g 

calculated. The notorious dislike ^ 

nf Germanv on the nan nf ih> _ .. to go to France and 


official bulletin regarding the se- k that rH- , 01 r F anxx 

nous illness of theCzar. Tile mv filled^ *!" 
litical consequences of a change crowded whhi?”^?’ The aty is 
in the ruler of Russia cannot be “ nsts W!u i“ E 

srssjMSss?: 

ssstsTBsas SSawSte 

friendly sentiments of his heir do m ^ cause liberty, 

not in any way guarantee it. In ioj 4. V 1 w 
any case our Eastern hemisphere IUgOSlav r Uture 

will have a somewhat curious ap- MOVYIW rev V r 

pearance at the close of the centu- ySaSLT, 


ry on account of the youth of the 
reigning monarch s. One hundred 
and sixty-five millions will be un- 
der the rule of a thirty-five-year- 
old Emperor and a twenty-five- 
year-old Oar, not to speak"of die 
little kingdoms erf Servia, the 
Netherlands and Spain, whose 
rulers are almost all children. 


1944s Yugoslav Future 

MOSCOW — [From our New 
York edition:] Prime Minister 
Churchm and Premier Josef V. 
Stalin have ended their conference 
here after making important pro- 
gress toward establishing a joint 
Bnhsh-Russian policy toward Yu- 


that the Yugoslav people have the 
unalienable right to settle their 
constitutional future after the war. 


i 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Hamas and Israel: Tale of Enmity and Miscalculation 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

' - JERUSALEM ■ — There is a 
lingering irony in the rise of 
Hamas, the militant Islamic 
group that took responsibility 
For tie attack in Tel Aviv. 

Secular Palestinians say that 
at Hamas' founding in Decem- 
ber 1987, Israel did little to halt 
its activities, seeing the group as 
a potential counterweight to 
broad support for the Palestine 
Liberation Organization. 

The calculation, at the start 
of the Palestinian, uprising, did 
not last long, but it has returned 


to haunt Israel The power of 
radicalized Islam among the 
Palestinians of the Gaza Strip 
and the occupied West Sank 
has come to represent a force 
that defies conventional mili- 
tary countermeasures. 

On Oct 9, Hamas guerrillas 
Sprayed restaurants in Jerusa- 
lem with automatic-rifle fire, 
killing two people. On Oct 11, 
the organization announced the 
kidnapping of an Israeli soldier, 
Nachshon Waxman, who was 
killed along with another Israeli 
and three of his captors in a 
rescue attempt. Then came the 


bombing attack Wednesday in 
Tel Aviv, killing at least 21 peo- 
ple on a bus. 

The spate of attacks is only 
part of a long tally of actions 
that demonstrate how a small 
and secretive group can mar- 
shal surprise and suicidal com- 
mitment to terrorism to project 
a political message. Hamas's 
opposition to the current Mid- 
dle East peace efforts is rooted 
in the idea of a holy war against 
Israel and its replacement with 
an Islamic state. 

The organization was found- 
ed by a quadriplegic deric. 


Page5 




Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, in the 
Gaza Strip in December 1987. 

Initially, Israeli officials be- 
lieve, the group’s funds came 
from Saudi Arabia, the Gulf 
and, possibly. Iran. Hamas also 
levied “taxes" among local sup- 
porters, particularly in the refu- 
gee camps and other places in 
the Gaza Strip. 

These days the picture is far 
more opaque. Collette AvjtaL 
the Israeli consul-general in 
New York, said Wednesday 
that tr aining and financing for 
the group was provided in the 
United States. 


— 


In Fearful Tel Aviv, Life StiU Rolls On 





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New York Times Service 

TEL AVIV — Yitzhak Razimor had 
one overwhelming concern Thursday as 
he rode the No. 5 bus down Dtzengoff 
Street, past the stores selling books and 
fashion boots and jewelry, past the fast- 
food outlets offering shwarma in pita, 
and past the little, makeshift shrine of 
1 candles and flowers where at least 21 
people died in a suicide bomber’s attack 
on the same bus line Wednesday. ■ 

“Fear,” said the 29-year-old Israeli 
who works in the marketing section of a 
big hank. “I fed fear. Tin sitting in this 
bus and Tm not sure Til get off again 
alive.” 

Hannah Schreiber, a social worker 
who came to Israel from New York five 
years ago, was also edgy. Earlier Thurs- 
day, she said, she had tried to take the 
No. 4, rather than ride a line associated 
with one of the worst terror attacks in 
Israel’s memory. Indeed, she had tried to 
steer clear completely of Dizengoff 
Street — a place, Mr. Razimor said, that 
had been “a symbol, the one place that 
we thnnght was safe.” 

In the end, though, Ms. Schreiber said, 
she had decided to pay hex three shekel 
(SI) fare and board the Dan Co.’s No. 5. 
“I decided that Hfe had to go on.” 

Thus did many Israelis resume then- 
normal life Thursday to find that a famil- 
iar stoicism had blended with a new 
sense erf vulnerability provoked by an 
attack for which the militant Islamic 
Hamas movement took responsibility. 

“It’s the fear, it’s the feeling that my 
home isn’t safe anymore,” said Sigal 
Saad, 27, a jewelry designer, as she wait- 
ed at the bus stop outside Ben and Joey’s 


fast-food outlet near the site of the 
bombing, where people gathered to gaze 
on blown-out windows and twisted met- 
al five stories high. 

“Hamas is so strong and we are sot 
protected,” said Marion Nakshol who 
came to Israel 12 years ago from South 
Africa, weeping as she spoke. “Nothing 
in South Africa was like this. Even with 
apartheid.” 

Perhaps surprisingly, few of the people 
interviewed during a round-trip ride on 
the No. 5 between Dizeugpff Street and 
its terminus at Pinlras Street said they 
believed that the attack Wednesday 
should be permitted to halt the effort 
toward peace. 

And some pondered the irony that the 
No. 5 runs to a prosperous area of north 
Td Aviv, where many people support the 
Labor government seeking peace with 
the Palestinians. 

“Don’t think the opposition politi- 
cians haven’t noticed that,” said Gill 
Marx, who came to Israel 40 years ago 
from London, as she rode the south- 
bound No. S to meet friends for lunch. 

These are unsettling times, she seemed 
to say. There is the sense that, with the 
emergence of the radical Islam of Ha- 
mas, Israelis face a new foe — not mar- 
shaled Arab armies or stone-throwing 
Palestinian youths, but a faceless adver- 
sary in their midst 

“If a terrorist gets onto the bus, how 
do you know? What can you do?” asked 
Mrs. Marx. But you still had to take the 
bus, die said: “You can’t just dose up 
shop.” 

That is a familiar dichotomy for Israe- 
lis. Buses are targets that have drawn 28 


attacks since 19S4, six of them this year. 

But they are alsothe prime form of 
urban and intercity transport: The Dan 
Co.’s 1,430 buses, plying 107 routes in 
the Td Aviv area, carry about 700,000 
fares each day, a company spokesman 
said, almost half the 1.5 million people 
using public transportation each, day 
across Israel. 

The spokesman, Itzhik Kagan, said 
there haa not been much of a drop in the 
number of passengers Thursday. But the 
No. 5. at least, did not seem too busy as it 
began its run, with the air-conditioning 
blasting to beat the fall heat and the 
radio pumping jaunty music to somber 
people. 

“We have to go on living,” said Adam, 
16, as he and two teenage friends headed 
back from schooL 

“It just shows why we need peace,” 
said Inbal, 16. 

“The peace process has nothing to do 
with this,” added Yeniv, 17. 

But Urid Dom, a 52-year-old engi- 
neer, did not quite agree. “The whole 
peace process is in doubt in the minds of 
many people who supported it, like my- 
self ” he said. 

“Once, we thought the alternative to 
war was peace. But now we have peace 
and we are not sure if peace is the ulti- 
mate answer. 1 think security is the ulti- 
mate answer, and that’s what we are 
looking for now — security before peace. 

“Every sabotage that takes place in 
Israd is going to turn a lot of people 
against peace, no question of that.” ne 
said. “But life is returning very fast to 
normal.” 

—ALAN COWELL 


Ignoring Perry, China Plans More A-Tests 


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- By Steven Mufson 

„ Washington Peat Service 

BEIJING — China will con- 
«. tinue underground nudear test- 
ing despite Defense Secretary 
William J. Perry’s suggestion to 

- Chinese leaders earlier this 
■ week that American-provided 

computer simulati ons could rc- 
~ -place-die tests, * senior Chinese 
Foreign Ministry official said 
Thursday. 

Moreover, he added, China 
still has reservations about the 
comprehensive test ban treaty 
~ being negotiated in Geneva that 

- China has said it expects to sign 
“ in 1996. The treaty would end 

- nudear tests, though nudear 

- powers other than China are 
_ already observing a moratori- 
" ronton tests. 

” -v Nudear powers have said the 
i- test ban agreement would be 
£ complete by 1996, but the Chi- 
: nese official called that “an arti- 
” fidal date, indicative of pofiti- 
“ oil wiDL” 

He said China wanted the 
’ United States to declare that it 

- would not use nudear weapons 


first. He said that that was not a 
condition to finishing a test ban 
treaty, but that an American 
assurance would make a differ- 
ence. “A U.S. commitment on 
no-first-use would certainly 
hdp Chinese participation in 
the negotiations,” he said. 

China has already declared 
that it would not use nudear 
weapons first, but only if under 
nuclear attack. 

Despite the moratorium ob- 
served by other nations. China 
has continued to test nuclear 
weapons at Lop Nor, its testing 
ate in the westernmost prov- 
ince, Xinjiang. Its most recent 
test was on OcL 7. Though pro- 
tested by the other nuclear pow- 
ers, the test had been widely 
expected by other nations. 

Some American officials ap- 
pear resigned to further tests, 
but Mr. Perry had raised the 
possibility of progress in re- 
marks to reporters. 

Most analysts say they be- 
lieve, however, that China is 
pursuing further tests because it 
is on the verge of finishing de- 


velopment on a new generation 
of nuclear weapons that would 
narrow somewhat the wide 
technological gap in nudear 
weaponry between China on 
the one hand and Russia and 
the United States on the other. 

“In terms of security, we’ re in 
an inferior position,” the For- 
eign Minislty crffidal said. “We 
have to seriously consider our 
position. The number and qual- 
ity of weapons would be frozen 
forever and would put China in 
a permanently inferior posi- 
tion." 

At the same time, however, 
he noted that there were rea- 
sons for China to sign the test 
ban treaty. “Tins is not the only 
weapon system on which China 
depends.” he said. Moreover, 
he added, “we don’t have the 
financial capability. We need to 
be able to say we can do it, and 
please don’t blackmail us.” 

The official also said that 
China had in fact exported mis- 
siles to Pakistan. He said the 
missiles were not missiles for 
carrying “weapons of mass de- 


es - 1 ! * * 

IfX t 1 ? 


it' ’ ' f KOREA: UN Nudear Agency Official Is Skeptical of U.S. Deal With North 


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Continued from Page 1 

several years the inspection of suspect 
.sites. 

^- Tbe accord “shows it is always possible 
4o get an agreement when you give enough 
^aiway said Senator Bob Dole of Kansas, 
the. Republican leader. The deal also has 
bees heavily criticized in South Korea. 
Many people there see it as a diplomatic 
triumph try Pyongyang, which failed to 
dispel doubts about its nuclear intentions. 

As part erf the pact, which will be signed 
in Geneva on Friday, the United States 
will head an international consortium to 
provide North Korea with an interim sup- 
ply of fuel to overcome its chronic energy 
shortage, and eventually two 1 , 000-mega- 
watt light-water reactors. _ 

In exchange. North Korea will abandon 
its existing nudear facilities and renounce 
any plans to build nudear weapons. 

Only once the new nuclear installations 
are substantially completed, however, will 
North Korea allow agency experts to in- 
spect its sites. And that could be five years 


or more, according to agency officials in 
Vienna. 

North Korea’s refusal to allow unlimit- 
ed access to agency inspectors under the 
tarns erf the Nudear Nonproliferation 
Treaty was at the root of the crisis. 

North Korea signed the treaty in 1985, 
but refused to allow safeguard inspections 
until the United States removed nudear 
weapons from South Korea. Seoul said no 
such weapons were based cm its soil. 

North Korea promised that it would 
shut down the five-megawatt graphite re- 
actor and stop construction at two 50- 
megawatt and 200-megawatt plants, which 
would have been able to produce consider- 
able quantities of weapons-grade plutoni- 
um. The fight-water reactors win operate 
on imported uramum, making it easier for 
the international community to maintain 
some control over the North Korean nu- 
dear program. This type of reactor is also 
described as less efficient at producing 
bomb-grade plutonium. 

The agreement was reached after several 


weeks of negotiations in Geneva, which 
followed a meeting between forma Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carta and the late North 
Korean leader, Kim 0 Sung. 

The U.S. negotiators, headed by Robert 
L. Gafiucd, hope the agreement will re- 
duce military tension in the Far East and 
hdp the isolated North Korean state im- 
prove relations with the United States, 
South Korea and Japan. 

■ Seoul Rebuffs War Games 

Sooth Korea has asked the United 
States not to bold joint military exercises 
this year, Agence France-Presse reported 
from Washington. 

“The Republic of Korea has asked that 
the exercise not be held this year,” a State 
Department official said. “We’re at a very 
sensitive point, espeaally in terms of 
North Korean relations. 

“This has to do with South Korea feel- 
ing that it doesn't want to have these 
exercises happening at this time because of 
the negative inference that could come 
from them,” the official said. 


SCANDAL: At Question Time, How Much More Can the Tories Take? 


a*r*M 



MS? 




\ lilt* 


Continued from IPige 1 
got a bill for parliamentary ser- 
vices, and it would vary from 
£8,000 to £10,000 depending on 
the number of questions.” The 
Gt&dian reported that it had 
traced 22 Fayed-rdated ques- 
tions during the peri od, all 
~asked by the two Mrs in ques- 
tion,' 

For Mr. Major, it is all part of 
a dea fening yearlong backfire. 
At the beginning of the year, as 
he' was preaching “back to ba- 
sics” morality. Tory sex scan- 
dals be gan breaking all around 
him and he dropped the thane. 
. This year, the message is 
“crackdown” on crime and the 
^i^ndturo,” irresponsible 
bpys (spdled backward) who 
mate trbuble in public. 

Ahdamid the plea for proper 
bd*aVibr K a parliamentary com- 

mittee is. already investigating 
die “cashfpr questions” allega- 


tion against two junior Conser- 
vative MPs exposed in a sting- 
type operation by The Sunday 
Times. 

A local London investigation 
is under way into allegations, 
denied by Dame Shirley, that 
she and other Tory Westmin- 
ster city councilors engaged in a 
form of precinct “cleansing,” 
doling out units of publicly 
funded housing to reliable Con- 
servative voters instead of to 
the deserving pom. 

Yet a third controversy is still 
simme ring over a Sunday Times 
article claiming that Mrs. 
Thatcher’s son, Mark, who fives 
in Texas, made millions of 
pounds brokering a govern- 
ment-approved aims deal when 
she was prime minister. Both 
Thatchers have denied it 

This, just as the Conservative 
Party was recovering from “in- 
sider trading” -accusations lev- 


eled at its former deputy chair- 
man, Jeffrey Archer, author of 
“Not a Penny More; Not a Pen- 
ny Less" and “A Matter of 
Honor,” among other best-sell- 
ers. 

Through an associate, Lord 
Archer placed an order for 
50,000 shares of AngHa Televi- 
sion, where bis wife is a direc- 
tor, four days before the stock 
price skyrocketed as a result of 
a takeover bid. The shares were 
then sold fox a $120,000 profit 

Although the check went to 
Lord Archer’s address, he said 
in a statement in August that he 
had no made information and 
had not profited from the deal 
He was cleared or wrongdoing 
in a government investigation 
but confessed “a grave error" in 
allowing “his name to be associ- 
ated” with the transaction. 

Mr. Major was greeted with 
noisy cheering when he ap- 


he ap- 


peared for Thursday's question 
time, but it came from the op- 
position benches. The most re- 
cent Gallup Poll showed that 61 
percent of those queried agreed 
that the Tories woe “sleazy and 
disreputable.” as opposed to 18 
percent who felt that way about 
the Labor Party. 

While question time is often 
uninformative, a topic raised is 
a topic attended to, by the gov- 
ernment and the press. Thus, 
lobbyists, who have multiplied 
in number here in recent years, 
consider it useful to have entrfe 
to the process for their causes 
and their problems. 

In July, The Sunday Times 
sprang its “cash for questions” 
operation, revealing that re- 
porters operating undercover as 
businessmen had paid £1,000 to 
each of two MPs in exchange 
for their agreement to “table” 
questions about contracts. 


“Hamas has an infrastruc- 
ture in this country,” she said in 
New York. 

While it initially joined forces 
with the PLO in the uprising, 
Hamas soon began to carve a 
more radical course, resorting 
to firearms in 1989, first to exe- 
cute Palestinians suspected of 
collaborating with Israel then 
to kidnap and kill Israelis. 

It was only in 1990, though, 
that it founded its militaiy 
wing, the Qassam Brigades, 
named for a firebrand cleric 
killed by the British in Palestine 
in 1935. They are thought to be 
made up of only a few hundred 
people organized in small cells. 

Hamas's following has al- 
ways increased as efforts to- 
ward peace stumbled. 

Equally, though, the Middle 
East peace moves by Mr. Arafat 
and others have only spurred 
the group to ever greater vio- 
lence. 

In the past, Israel has re- 
sponded to attacks by mass ar- 
rests of Hamas militant*. The 
militants, though, seem less 
worried at the prospect of de- 
tention by the new Palestinian 
police force in Gaza. 

■ Hamas Tapes a 'Martyr’ 

H amas issued a videotape on 
Thursday of a man calling him- 




Hfe;-. -*>• , 


! . ■ 


. *.. V •• 






Saleh Abdel Rahim Souvri bolding an Israeli-made assault rifle in Hamas tape. 


The Aununl Plw 


self a “living martyr,” Reuters 
reported from Jerusalem. 

The timing suggested that he 
could have been the one who 
carried out the apparent suicide 
attack in Tel Aviv on Wednes- 
day. However, the man said 
nothing on the tape to link him- 


self specifically to the bomb at- 
tack ou the passenger bus. 

Saleh Abdel Rahim Souwi, 
27, said farewell on the tape to 
his family and friends, the nor- 
mal practice of Islamic guerril- 
las about to embark on suicide 
missions. He also warned of 


further Hamas suicide attacks if 
Palestinian prisoners were not 
released. 

After the tape surfaced, the 
Israeli Army told Mr. Souwi’s 
family to leave their home in 
Qalqilya in the occupied West 
Bonk befor it was demolished. 


Clinton’s Advisers Urge Him to Visit Assad 


struction” as the Clinton ad- 
ministration had alleged. 

But he added thaL the defini- 
tion of what sort of missile was 
capable of carrying such weap- 
ons was fuzzy. 

On OcL 4, the United States 
and China signed an agreement 
in which China said it would no 
longa export missiles with such 
deadly capabilities, without 
saying whether China had done 
so in the pasL In return, the 
United States agreed to lift 
bans on an array of high-tech- 
nology sales to Beijing. 

The official said that some of 
the conflict between the United 
States and China could result 
from different views of what 
missiles had the ability to deliv- 
er nuclear weapons. 

As recently as last week, he 
said, the United States had 
alerted China that a plant in 
northern Pakistan was making 
long-range missiles using parts 
provided by China. But the offi- 
cial said Chinese investigations 
had concluded that the U.S. al- 
legations were false. 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON —Many of 
President Bill Clinton's senior 
advisers are urging him to visit 
Damascus during his trip to the 
Middle East next week even 
though they acknowledge that 
such a visit might not produce 
any public steps by President 
Hafez Assad that would further 
peace between Syria and Israd. 

In what is proving to be the 
stickiest issue in planning the 
Mideast trip, these advisers are 
recommending the Damascus 
visit even though they recognize 
that Mr. Clinton could open 
himse lf to charges that he is 

ISRAEL: 

Cracking Down 

Continued from Page 1 
Bank town of Jericho gained 
limited autonomy. 

In Tel Aviv. Isradis visited 
the site of Wednesday's bomb- 
ing, lighting candles in a box set 
up on a metal stand. 

Some cried; others argued 
politics.- 

Rabbis ordered thaL all trees 
in a 50-meter radius of the 
bombing be uprooted. The 
force of the bomb splattered 
blood everywhere and pieces or 
flesh were embedded in the ma- 
ple trees’ branches and trunks. 
Under Jewish religious rules, 
human remains cannot be left 
in the open air. 

“They hate us, and we must 
be completely separated from 
them," said Fruma Levy, a 
schoolteacher, referring to the 
Palestinians. “We must erect a 
Berlin Wall between us and 
them.” 

Exceptions to the isolation of 
Gaza and the West Bank would 
be permitted only for humani- 
tarian reasons, said Hannie Ye- 
shorun, spokeswoman for the 
West Bank militaiy govern- 
ment. She said doctors and 
nurses would be allowed across 
if a specific need was proven. 

Police Minister Moshe Sha- 
hal said the government also 
planned an international cam- 
paign to cut off donations from 
Americans, Britons, Iranians 
and othos to Hamas. He said 
American support for Hamas 
was centered in Chicago and 
Texas. 

Although the closure could 
defuse tensions in Israel an ex- 
tended shutdown risks increas- 
ing support for Palestinian ex- 
tremist groups. 

(AP. AFP, Reuters) 

CHINA: 

U.S. Joins Rush 

Coutmned from Page 1 
rency or direct backing by Chi- 
na's central government, many 
projects will never be built, ac- 
cording to project finance ex- 
perts surveying the China mar- 
ket from Hong Kong. 

In Europe, the U.S. initiative 
appears to some executives to 
be a way erf correcting years of 
having neglected China for po- 
litical reasons. In their view, fi- 
nancing is seldom the decisive 
factor in large projects. 

Peter Olfs, a spokesman for 
Siemens AG in Munich, said, 
“The quality of products and 
systems will continue to play a 
major role and we are confident 
that with our expertise in sys- 
tems integration — energy sup- 
ply, transportation, communi- 
cations and health care — our 
products will continue to be 
very good acquisitions.” 

To be sure, the U.S. initiative 
means harder competition. Be- 
cause many big French and 
Italian companies competing 
for exports are all or partly 
State-owned. 

Kevin Murphy in Hong Kong 
and Brandon Mitchener in 
Frankfurt contributed to this ar- 
ticle. 


visiting a country that is on the 
adminis tration*?; fist of nations 
that sponsor terrorism. 

Officials say this is an espe- 
cially delicate* issue this week, 
coming after three recent ter- 
rorist incidents in Israel includ- 
ing the bombing of a bus in Tel 
Aviv on Wednesday. 

The centerpiece of the trip is 
the signing of a peace treaty 
between Israd and Jordan. Mr. 
Clinton wall address the Israeli 
and Jordanian parliaments and 
visit American troops in Ku- 
waiL 

If Mr. Clinton goes to Da- 
mascus, he also runs the risk of 
offending Jewish groups, which 


assert that he should only visit 
Damascus if in exchange Mr. 
Assad promises major new 
steps to promote peace between 
Syria and Israel such as an an- 
nouncement that he would meet 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. 

Steven Grossman, chairman 
of the American Israeli Public 
Affairs Committee, said in an 
interview, “Failing a substan- 
tive, meaningful, dramatic 
breakthrough, something that 
was qualitatively and substan- 
tively different from what we 
have seen since President Clin- 
ton met Assad in January, then 
I would say a visit to Syria 
would not be advisable." 


The calculus of the advisers is 
that promoting peace between 
Syria and Israel is so important 
that a visit to Damascus would 
be worthwhile even if Mr. As- 
sad only makes some private 
new commitments that narrow 
gaps between his country and 
Israel 

■ Clinton to Meet Fahd 

Mr. Clinton is planning to 
meet King Fahd of Saudi Ara- 
bia while in the Middle East, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. 

The president will probably 
will go to Egypt as well for a 
brief meeting with President 
Hosni Mubarak. 


Rwanda Official Denies Theft 

Missing Foreign Minister, Accused of Taking Cash, Surfaces 


CtmyiM hy Our Staff Fmm Dispatches 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — The chief of Rwanda's 
Foreign Ministry said his minis- 
ter. Jean-Marie Ndagijimana. 
who apparently surfaced in Par- 
is on Wednesday, should be 
“tracked and arrested as a com- 
mon thief” for disappearing 
from New York with about 
$187,000 earmarked for Rwan- 
da’s diplomatic missions in the 
United States. 

“Statements that he is deny- 
ing theft are totally unaccept- 
able.” Claude Dusaidl the min- 
istry's director-general, said at a 
news conference at the United 
Nations. 

Mr. Dusaidi said he had been 
instructed by President Pasteur 
Bizimungu, who was in New 
York earlier this month to ad- 
dress the UN General Assem- 
bly, to ask Mr. Ndagijimana to 
hand ova some $ 1 87.000 to his 
UN envoy. 

Mr. Ndagijimana “didn't do 
it” 

“We don’t have the money," 
Mr. Dusaidi said, adding: “I 
think he should be tracked and 
arrested as a common thief." 

The foreign minister said 


CLINTON: 

Next Is GATT 

Contiroed from Page I 
liberalization of world trade 
signed in lough negotiations, 
the Clinton administration ap- 
peared to falter on getting it 
approved in the face of congres- 
sional objections. 

But Mr. Clinton plans to call 
the Senate back into session to 
deal with the agreement, diplo- 
mats said, confident that he has 
enough votes now that big U.S. 
companies have persuaded 
fence-sitting senators that ap- 
proval will increase U.S. ex- 
ports. 

In an unexpected tribute to 
Mr. Clinton, Owen Harries, a 
prominent conservative ana- 
lyst, receatly defended the ad- 
ministration's foreign policy — 
despite its generaDy sloppy ap- 
pearance — as the best that 
could be expected, no matter 
who is in the White House, as 
the United States goes through 
a trial- and-error process to de- 
fine its real interests in the post- 
Cold War era. 

U.S. policy dilemmas ma y 
ease even in Bosnia, where 
Washington has rattled London 
and Paris by threatening to 
break the arms embargo. Brit- 
ain and France have started re- 
deploying their UN peacekeep- 
ing forces to be out of harm’s 
way if warfare escalates. 


Storms Hrand Iran Coast 

Reuters 

NICOSIA — ' Rainstorms 
and tiring sea waters wreaked 
havoc along Iran’s Caspian 
coast, damaging more than 
2,000 houses. 


Thursday that he had never had 
the money. 

Mr. Ndagijimana, who tele- 
phoned Agence France-Presse 
from somewhere in France, also 
spoke of political differences 
with the Kigali government and 
said he feared for his safety if he 
returned to Rwanda. 

A spokesman Tor the French 
Foreign Ministry, meanwhile, 
confirmed that Mr. Ndagiji- 
mana had arrived in Fra n ce. 

The minister was on a “pri- 
vate slay,” and Paris was not 
planning to contact him, the 
spokesman said, adding that 
Mr. Ndagijimana had a multi- 
ple-entry visa valid for France. 

Mr. Dusaidi later told report- 
ers that he had asked the 
French UN Mission to have 
Mr. Ndagijimana arrested and 
extradited. 

In a statement faxed to Reu- 
ters in Paris. Mr. Ndagijimana 
denied absconding with funds 
for Rwanda’s Washington Em- 
bassy and UN Mission. 

He said the accusations 
against him showed “the atmo- 


orktetate you’ll 
-v.&idtbe right balance at lhe New Otani 

.C&ring w different travellers ‘ demands is never child’s play, 
•"-j.'lfjrtfit a business Dawdler, you’d wart easy access 10 die 
’ ccnunerciai dstrici, an efficient business centre and fuDv -equipped 
meeting rooms for a sen. 

On the ocher hand, as a tetsue navefler, you'd be asking about the 
swimming pool, the fitness centre, shopping and tourist haunts ... 
Come to Hotel New Oiani and well meet a& these demands and more, 
lust so you won't be thrown off-balance. 


sphere of prejudice, suspicion 
and mistrust which currently 
rules at the heart of the Rwan- 
dan government" 

Mr. Ndagijunana was am- 
bassador to Paris for about four 
years under Rwanda's Hulu-led 
government which was over- 
thrown in July by the mainly 
Tutsi Rwanda Patriotic Front 
Mr. Dusaidi said the minis- 
ter's disappearance from his 
New York hotel room on Oct. 9 
“certainly set back our efforts" 
to include members of the for- 
ma administration in the new 
government 

Mr. Ndagijimana said in his 
statement that “some Rwandan 
leaders are trying to push me 
towards the exit given the posi- 
tions 1 have adopted on a num- 
ber of fundamental political is- 
sues." 

He called the theft charge “as 
serious as it is ridiculous for 
anyone who is aware of proce- 
dures for transferring public 
funds in our country.” 

(Reuters, AFP) 










Steven IWcn 


The Ashoka pillar, believed to have been erected in the 3d century B. C. 


On Buddhist Holy Ground in Nepal 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 


CHINA 


L UMBINI, Nepal — In my hotel 
room in Lumbini, instead of a 
Gideon Bible, there was a copy 
of “The Teachings of Buddha.” 1 
searched it and found a lesson appropriate 
to the place: “Soft zephyrs pass through 
the trees of that Pure Land and stir the 
fragrant curtains of the pavilions and pass 
away in sweet cadences of music.” 

It was evening, and a cooling breeze 
stirred the flower gardens of the small 
hotel where birds twittered to mark the 
fading of daylight. For milli ons of Bud- 
dhists, this isolated pocket of Nepal is 
holy ground. They believe that the Lord 
Buddha was bom here more than 2,600 
years ago as Siddhartha Gautama, a 
prince of the Shakya clan whose people 
still live among the rice fields and groves 
of the subtropical Terai, a region of Nepal 
along the border with India.. 

Though pilgrims have apparently been 
coming here for a very long time, archaeo- 
logical work around the birthplace has 
only recently begun in earnest And Ne- 
pal, with the help of Buddhists the world 
over, is turning hundreds of Lumbini's 
green acres into an international center 
for study and meditation. With an airport 
and a few hotels in place, tourists can now 
come here to watch a new religious center 
bloom, while learning about a faith whose 
appeal continues to grow in the West. 

Pilgrims come in dusters, skirting ar- 
chaeological excavations to pray in tem- 
ples or just stroll in the grass of this green 
space that Buddhist history calls Lumbini 
Garden. 

Archaeology buffs will be fascinated 
with the practical problems Lumbini 
poses. First of all, there is more legend 
than history associated with this sate. Not 
all secular experts agree that the man 
known as the Buddha Shaky am uni — the 
sage of the Shakya people — was unques- 
tionably bom here. 

Legend says that Buddha's parents’ 
home was at Kapilavastu, about 15 miles 
(24 kilometers) away. Why he was bom 
here in a pleasant grove under a sal tree (a 



The Ne* Yorfc Tima 

tropical hardwood, shorea robusta ) is still a 
matter of conjecture. According to a pop- 
ular version of the story, bis mother, 
Queen Mahamaya, had stopped to rest on 
her way to her parents' palace in a nei gh - 
boring kingdom. Local custom demanded 
that she return home to give birth, but the 
child came too soon. 

Another version says that she deliber- 
ately chose the peaceful garden for its 
natural beauty and that she was accompa- 
nied by a retinue of attendants expecting 
the baby to be bom here. In any case, a 
spot of grass under a tree doesn’t produce 
many artifacts to prove or disprove a leg- 
end a couple of thousand years later. 

For centuries vety few scholars apart 
from a couple of ancient Chinese monks 
visited or were able to find Lumbini or 
nearby Kapilavastu, where the palace of 
Buddha's father. King Suddhodhana, is 
thought to lie in ruins. Then in 1895, 
Khadga Shums her, the brother of the ruler 
of Nepal and a historian, led a German 
archaeologist working for the British Sur- 
vey of India to the place where a pillar was 
supposed to have been erected in the third 
century B. C. to mark the spot where Bud- 
dha was bom in the sixth century’ B. C. 


The pillar, ordered by a great Asian 
Buddhist emperor, Ashoka, was found 
partly buried and cracked, perhaps by 
Mwiin g- Nearby, there was a temple with 
a frieze-tike sculpture depicting the Nativ- 
ity. It recounts in stone how the Buddha - 
to-be, stepped from his mother’s side and 
stood in her shadow. 

Desultory and sometimes da m agi n g ex- 
cavations in search of the first temple built 
on the site look plare in the 1930s. But it 
was not until the last few decades that 
Nepal plunged with any vigor into Lum- 

binL 

Through the United Nations Develop- 
ment Program, a Japanese architect, Kenzo 
Tange, was soon brought in to create an 
ambitious plan for landscaping and the 
construction of buildings, inducting tem- 
ples and study centers, that cover an area 
three miles long and about a mile wide. The 
prqjeCL is finall y be ginning to take off. 
though not entirely without controversy. 

In India, there are scholars and religious 
leaders who insist that Buddha was bom on 
their soil, and that the ruins of the Shakya 
capital tie buried there. Furthermore, lurk- 
ing behind the debate is an Indian Hindu 
revival movement, which lays daim to Bud- 
dha and Buddhism as an offshoot of Hin- 
duism. Indian Hindu priests control Bud- 
dhism's most important landmark, the 
temples at Bodb Gaya, in Bihar, where 
Buddha attained enlightenment 

But development at Lumbini goes on, 
with a number of Shaky as from Buddha’s 
clan working at the site, among them 
Puma Man Shakya, the Lumbini project 
manager . He says that the contemporary 
brick museum building, at the opposite 
end of the grounds from the archaeologi- 
cal center, is now finished and that the 
first exhibitions mil be in place by the end 
of the year. 

Work has begun on a Korean temple- 
monastery complex and a Vietnamese 
Buddhist center, paid for by exiles in Eu- 
rope; these are the first of about a dozen 
monasteries under contract. Two existing 
temples — one built by Tibetan Buddhists 
and one by Theravada Buddhists, the 


school followed in Thailand, Burma and 
Sri Lanka — will be dismantled and re- 
constructed in new locations m the mon- 
astery cluster, within 100 yards of the 

legendary birthplace. 

When all the work at Lumbini is fin- 
ished, the temple at the birthplace site 
with its sacred pools, surviving bases of 
votive stupas and other ruins yet to be 
excavated will stand alone in an area 
called the Sacred Garden. 

At this moment, the beauty of Lumbini 
is in the tranquillity of its rustic setting of 
meadows that were once farm fields, 
which is beginning to attract tourists worn 
down by the traffic and pollution of Ne- 
‘s capital, Kathmandu, a 45-minuie 
,t away. 

On an initial visit to the archaeological 
center, I went by taxi (arranged with ad- 
vance notice bv the hotel). Next day. I 
switched to a bicycle, and that made all the 
difference. Pedaling along stiU-eanhen 
roads that traverse the site on its north- 
south axis — lanes more jarring to cars than 
bikes — makes it possible to listen to those 
zephyr breezes and see small pictures of life 
that would otherwise be missed. 

HE people who live around 
Lumbini are mostly Hindus and 
Moslems, said Nirmala Nandi 
R hflrln i. the abbot and only resi- 
dent monk at the Theravada temple. 
“There's not a Buddhist in sight,” he as- 
sured me. 

In the area, the Lumbini Hokke offers 
both Western and Japanese accommoda- 
tions that are luxurious by Nepalese stan- 
dards. Nearby, the new Sri Lankan Pil- 
grim’s Rest House is inexpensive and 
monastic. A third hotel now rising in the 
complex will be strictly commercial, built 
by a Japanese chain. 

Lumbini is being developed coinciden- 
tally at a time when Buddhism is enjoying 
a renaissance in Nepal, led by Tibetan 
exiles. “Buddha belongs to everybody." 
said Babu Krishna RijaL. a Nepali histori- 
an and archaeologist who has written on 
Lumbini and other nearby sites. “But we 
are lucky to have Buddha born here.” 


T 


Honduras, the Less Traveled Caribbean 


By Martha Stevenson Olson 


T ELA, Honduras — Between 
Honduras's border with Guate- 
mala and the roadless swamp- 
land to the south known as the 
Mosquito Coast stretch countless white 
sand beaches, punctuated by an occa- 
sional town and by s mall villages of Gari- 
funa, fishing people descended from Afri- 
can slaves. 

Overlooked for many years by all but a 
few intrepid tourists, Honduras has re- 
cently been experiencing a tourism boom 
fueled in part by a new measure of politi- 
cal stability. Although tourist facilities 
are meager compared with other Carib- 
bean countries, luxury resorts are on the 
increase and prices are still a bargain. 

A visit last spring began in Tela, a 
small town given over mostly to fishing 
and tourism. The former United Fruit 
Company headquarters here has been 
convened to a luxury resort, Hotel Vil- 
las Telamar, on one of the loveliest 
beaches on the coast. Across the Tela 
River is old Tela, a jumble of classic 
Caribbean architecture — brightly col- 
ored gingerbread-style houses — and 
newer cement-block cubes. 

Much of the area around Tela is al- 
ready, or is soon to be. a protected nature 
presene. A pleasant day can be spent in 
the Lancetilla Botanic Garden and Re- 
search Center, a national park with a 
collection of tropical species from around 
the world founded by the United Fruit 
Company in 1926. Of the park’s 1,714 
acres (685 hectares), only 131 are open to 
visitors. 

Alorg the coast on both sides of Tela 
are Garifuna villages and nature re- 
serves. To the west is Pun la Sol National 
Park, a 485-square-mile land and marine 


preserve that is home to monkeys and 
manatees. The Punta Izopo Wildlife 
Refuge, to Tela's east, is 70 square miles 
(180 square kilometers) and supports a 
similarly wide range of habitats. 

La Ceiba, the biggest town on the 
north coast, is about 95 miles (150 kilo- 
meters) east of Tela by an inland road 
that skirts the lush Nombre de Dios 
moun tains. Along the way are thousands 
of acres of b anana and pineapple planta- 
tions, along with tantalizing glimpses of 
coastal beaches. 

Most foreign viators come to La Ceiba. 
in order to fly to the coral reefs of Hondu- 
ras's offshore Bay Islands, but it is also 
home to one of the country’s best-known 
preserves, Pico Bonito National Park. 

Viators wiling to venture farther 
afield, however, will be rewarded in Tru- 
jillo, a charming and quixotic coastal 
town about 150 miles east of La Ceiba. 
It was here that Christopher Columbus 
and his crew had their first Mass on the 
American mainland, on Aug. 14. 1502. 
Gold and silver from the interior was 
shipped from this port, making it a fre- 
quent targe* for pirates; remains of sever- 
al Spanish forts still dot the high ground. 

Energetic nature lovers might enjoy 
hikin g in the jungle-clad mountains that 
surround Trujillo; monkeys, waterfalls 
and all the splendors of the tropical rain 
forest are fairly accessible from Hotel 
Villa Brinkley, owned and run by Peggy 
Brinkley, an American expatriate. On a 
clear day, the view from the bar and 
dining room can include the offshore 
Bay Islands as well as a breathtaking 
stretch of the northern coast 

It was these Bay Islands that lured us 
from Trujillo. Inhabited mostly by the 
descendants of pirates, British settlers 
and African slaves, the islands seem 
more Caribbean than Honduran. 


The biggest islands are Utila, Roatan 
and Guanaja, sprinkled roughly east to 
west parallel to the coasL Roat&n, the 
middle island, has the widest range of 
accommodations, from Lreehouses to 
luxury diving resorts. Utila, on the east, 
is geared more to the budget traveler; it 
lacks Roa tan's smooth beaches but has 
some good diving spots. Guanaja, to the 
west, is known as the Venice of Hondu- 
ras; its major town, Bonacca. is built 
atop stilts on two offshore islands, de- 
signed, it is said, to distance it from the 
sand flies. 

Almost every traveler coming from 
the islands had a story of pernicious 
clouds of bloodsucking no-see-ums. 
Various prophylactics were suggested: 
Avon's “Skin So Soft," or coconut oil 
mixed with insect repellent. Curiosity 
prevailed, and we decided to go to Roa- 
tdn. 

Most visitors bypass the island's big- 
gest town, Coxen Hole, and go directly 
to a resort. We chose the little communi- 


■ Every body-has-to-keep-busy 
update: Within the last two weeks, 
Bangkok chefs cooked up a one- 
and-a-balf-metric-ton serving of the 
Thai noodle dish Pad thai during a 
food fair, and in Copenhagen, 
Gaudio Caviechi won the men’s 
title at the Eighth World Pipe- 
Smoking Championships, puffing 
away for two hours, 52 minutes and 
35 seconds. 


ty of West End, which is a jumping-ofi 
place for excellent snorkeling as well as 
a fine beach. 

West End turned out to be an easygo- 
ing place, about a half-mile of dirt road 
anchored at one end by the Church of 
God and at the other by the Fust Baptist 
Church, its back wall a stretch of win- 
dows looking onto neighboring Half 
Moon Bay. 

Excellent snorkeling can be had all 
around Roatan; however, deep-sea div- 
ing is the principal attraction for many 
visitors. All the resorts, and many inde- 
pendent operators, offer various scuba 
courses, including the introductory class 
that leads to diver certification. 

Although the ideal way to discover 
Roat&n, and for that matter all the Bay 
Islands, is by boat — and almost every 
kind is available for charter — for land- 
lubbers a rental car can provide a fine 
day’s excursion. The newly-paved road 
that runs almost the length of the island 
passes through surprisingly high moun- 
tains and affords vistas along both coasts. 

The more one sees of Roat&n, the 
more the unknown beckons — those 
tracks that lead to the wild north and 
south ends of the island, and the reefs 
and wrecks waiting to be explored un- 
derwater. Then there are the other is- 
lands — Utila and Guanaja, as well as a 
plethora of little outposts with names 
like Raggedy Cay, Barbareta and the 
Hog Islands. 

As the sea breezes work their spell, the 
mind weaves “Owl and the Pussycat" 
fantasies: if only one had a boat, lots of 
time and plenty of money. 

Oh yes, and plenty of “Skin So Soft.” 

Martha Stevenson Olson, who recently 
nt five weeks in Honduras, wrote this 
The New York Times. 


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Magic Hunter 

Directed by Jldiko Enyedi. 
Hungary. 

Perhaps only a Hungarian 
would even attempt to make 
a “philosophical thriller,*’ as 
this film is subtitled, and the 
result, a modern fairy tale in- 
tercut with flashbacks to the 
stray of a centuries-old mi- 
raculous portrait of the Vir- 
gin Mary, is suitably oddball 
and engaging. Mix (Crazy 
Kemp, of the pop band 
Spandau Ballet) is the Buda- 
pest police force’s ace marks- 
man, but during the rescue of 
a girl seized by an armed 
man, he accidentally hits the 
hostage. His confidence shat- 
tered, Max unwittingly 
makes a pact with the devil in 
the form of Kaspar, a sinister 
colleague at police headquar- 
ters, who offers him seven 
mysterious bullets sure of 
finding their mark. Having 
regained his position using 
some of the bullets in a tar- 
get-shooting test. Max’s next 
assignment is to defend Max- 
im, a visiting Russian chess 
master, who has been receiv- 
ing death threats but has re- 
fused formal protection. 
While shadowing him. Max 
witnesses his wife meeting 
Maxim by chance in the park 
where she takes their small 
daughter to play, and be- 
comes an unw illin g voyeur as 
the relationship looks set to 
become an affair. Mean- 
while, the assassin «*Hring 
Maxim prepares to strike, but 
Max is unaware that the last 


magic bullet win strike the 
target not of his own, but of 
the devil’s choosing. The un- 
derlying message, that we all 
live simultaneously both in 
the present and within the 
continuum of history, 
emerges naturally and with- 
out didacticism. And the Vir- 
gin Mary’s dais ex mar-hina 
intervention is fun. (Roderick 
Conway Morris, IHT) 


Crest of Betrayal 

Directed by Kinji Fukasaku. 
Japan. 


Dusmess got bad, the K 
ki managers would s< 
times combine their 
best-sellers into one si 
spectacle — “The Yot 
Ghost Story” would be 
Bated with “The Loyal 
ty-Seven Ronin” and 
chips allowed to fall as 
might. Now, when bus 
is again just as bad, mol 
picture executives have 

n ted the same fora 
e Japanese title of 
effort indicates: “Ghus 
gura Gaiden/ Yotsuya ] 
dan.” Evil lemon, who g 
faithful Oiwa a potion 
turns her into a bug-c 
monster, is also the g 
48th ronin, intent on his 
emplary revenge. This U 
to many complications 
the story lines collide ant 
dodge the falling chips, 
his credit, action-diro 
Fukasaku does not take 
of this too seriously and 


consequently enlivened his 
film with much sword-chop- 
ping, and lots of really Ka- 
bulri-like bad taste — creepy 
morality, over-tbe-top act- 
ing, and such prime period- 
sleaze as severed heads that 
blink. (Donald Richie, IHT) 


WH« Flagrante 

Directed by Raymond Depar- 
don. France. 

When somebody is caught 
red-handed st ealing at the 
Galeries Lafayette; decorat- 
ing the M6tro with graffiti, 
insulting a cop or pulling a I 
kntfe in a fight, he is arrested 
and taken to the bawds of 
the Palais de Justice to be 
interviewed by a deputy pros- 
ecutor. It is the face-d-face 
between the law and the law- [ 
breaker that Depardon has < 
chosen to capture on screen, i 
Tne reportage has the brutal- 
ity of an emergency: the en- 
counter takes place d fads 
clos, in an antechamber to ■ 
tite courtroom, and means 
freedom or jaiL The camera 
closes in on the accused and 
on the intensity of the en- 
crainter in which he is being , 
judged on the spot The film- ; 
ma ker has cropped his im- 

to show these human i 

in profile, each ; 
caught m a role, each a pris- 1 
oner of his identity. The pros- ] 
ecutor is as closely seniti- j 
otied as the accused, and 
nobody — including the 
spectator*— gets off lightly in 
this taut documentary. 

(Joan Dupont, IHT) , 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Page 7 i 



OPINION 


mo* 


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. I 4 *-*-' 


I- 




A New Book on Genes and IQ Rings an Old Bell 


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TY7ASHINGTON — If you had 
v , » ▼ aoy doubts that Americans 
- li y c a ^ me deep pessimism 
about the possibilities of social re- 
fonn, the revival of interest in genet- 
ic explanations for human inequal- 
ity ought to resolve them. 

This is a recurring pattern in 
American history. Whenever the so- 
cial reformers are seen as failing. 


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This is not a r scientific 9 
hook at all hut a political 
argument offered by skilled 
polemicists aimed at 
defeating egalitarians. 


along come allegedly new theories 
about how the quest for greater fair- 
ness or justice or equality is really 
hopeless because people and groups 
are, from birth, so different, one 
from another. Tire social reformer is 
dismissed as a naive meddler in 
some grand “natural” process that 
sorts people out all by itself. 

That is the real significance of the 
appearance of and interest in “The 
by the late Richard J. 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 


H earns tein and Charles Murray. 
The implicit argument of the book is 
that if genes are so important to 
intelligence, and intelligence is so 
important to success, then many of 
the efforts made in the past several 
decades to improve people’s life 
chances were mostly a waste of time. 

Mr. Hermstein and Mr. Murray 
never quite say that Their book and 
their article summarizing it in the 
current issue of The New Republic 
are full of careful hedges aimed at 
saving them from being charged 
with crude racism or determinism. 

On the one hand, , they cite data 
showing persistently large differences 
between the IQ scores of blacks and 
whites (and smaller ones between 
whites and Asians). But they then 
assert that it is, of course, wrong to 
attribute to any given individual the 
characteristics that the data asso ciate 
with their race. They produce an 845- 
page book on race, class, genes and 
IQ, and then assert that “the fascina- 
tion with race, IQ and genes is misbe- 
gotten” — as. if their book would not 
increase the level of fascination with 
race, IQ and genes. 

But let us accept their goodwill and 


their caveats. The real problem here 
is with the authors’ claims that mak- 
ing the argument they are making 
requires enormous courage; that this 
argument represents some sort of 
breakthrough; and that “it doesn't 
much matter” whether “the black- 
white difference in test scores is pro- 
duced by genes or the environment." 

Mr. Hermstein and Mr. Murray 
assert that they are taking on “a 
taboo issue.” They argue that the 


“Tow-IQ” women to have babies. 

They are in a long tradition. Every 
time arguments about genes .or intel- 
ligence have arisen in American poli- 
tics, it has been to blunt the drive for 
“some sort of redistribution." 

That is wiiy their argument is not 
new. One need only revisit the histo- 
rian Richard Hofstadtefs fine book, 
“Social Darwinism in American 
Thought.” He showed how similar 
theories — holding that “nature 


question is “filled with potential for would provide that the best competi- 
hurt and anger” but that it is “essen- tors in a competitive situation would 

- - “ — 1 M • W l i r ^ . 


tial that people begin to talk about 
this in the open.” 

But who will be hurt and who will 
be angry? Surely it does not require 
great courage to make arguments 
that will reassure the well-educated 
and well-off that they hold their 
high positions because they are, on 
the whole, smarter than everybody 
else. If you deserve to be at the top, 
you needn’t trouble yourself over 
whether those who aren't have been 
relegated to their positions through 
bad luck or discrimination OT Other 
forms of injustice. 

Mr. Hermstein and Mr. Murray 
say they support “some sort of re- 
distribution” for the poor. But they 
also “urge generally” that welfare 
be ended because it encourages 




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Merit Is Merit, and the Races Do Not Race 


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TASHINGTON — Bade in the 
’50s, a group of feisty dreamers 
gathered for breakfast every week in 
the execu 




tin ... F? 


’50s, a { 

.for 

executive eyrie of the realty ty- 
coon William Zeckendorf. Their 
dream: to build the world's largest 
building, with the tallest tower. 

‘ Using the air rights over Penn 
Station, “The Palace of Progress” 
would not only combine an office 
building with a merchandise mart, it 
would contain a “videal dimension” 
— television shopping made interac- 


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TI7HAT do biology and genetics 
YY have to say about racial differ- 
ences? First, the human species most 
Hkely arose only a hundred thou- 
sand years or so ago. Superficial 
adaptations like skin color can 
evolve very quickly. Changes in 
brain structure and capacity take far 
longer — on the order of hundreds 
of thousands of years. 

Second, genetic diversity among 
the races is minuscule. Molecular 
biologists can now examine genes in 
different geographical populations. 
What they have found is that the 
overwhelming mqority of the varia- 
tion observed -—more than 85 per- 
cent — is among individuals within 
the same race. Only a tiny residue 
distinguishes, Europeans from Afri- 
c^nSfi^Qin -Asians. So, while all men 
may not be created equal when it 
comes to cognitive abilities, it would 
seem that aU races are. 

Genes encode only a sketchy 
blueprint of our conical hardware. 
Even identical twins have somewhat 
dissimilar brains at birth, a conse- 
quence of the different patterns of 
stimulation they were exposed to in 
the womb, which give rise to differ- 
ent neuronal connections. 

The importance of this prenatal 
“hard-wiring” for a child’s future 
intellectual prospects is only begin- 
ning to be appreciated. 

— Jim Hob, commenting 
in The New York Tones. 


By William Safire 


tive with telephone ordering, much 
as we have today. 

That was some bunch Mr. Zeck- 
endorf gathered: The lawyer was 
“Wild Bill" Donovan, fresh from 
creating the CIA; the industrial 
showman was Billy Rose; the archi- 
tect was Charles Luckman, who had 
transformed Park Avenue with Le- 
ver House; the publicist was the 
legendary Tex McCrary. 

As a hotshot press ' agent, I sat 
below the salt with an enthusiastic 
young designer, Ieoh Ming, who 
couldn’t sign architectural drawings 
because he was not yet admitted to 
the elite club of architects. But in the 
course of those breakfasts about a 
budding that never was built, the 
modest Chinese-American im- 
pressed all of us as having the finest 
mind in that high-powered room. 

What brings Ieoh Ming to min d 
after all these years is the furor over 
“The Befl Curve,” the book by 
Charles Murray and Richard J. 
Hermstein that dares to e xamin e a 
thesis unhelpful to race relations: the 
likelihood that much of intelligence is 
inherited, and the possibility that the 
average black is not as smart as the 
average white who is, in turn, not as 
smart as the average Asian. 

Nobody disputes that individuals 
within each race score higher cm IQ 
tests than do most in other groups. 
What bothers Mr. Murray's legion 
of critics is his scholarly contention 
that public policy should not en- 
courage procreation among the least 
intelligent lest we perpetuate a per- 
manent underclass, and his gloomy 
projection that an intelligent elite 
will soon be running everything 
from an ivory tower. 

Should such an analysis be 
banned or its author condemned as 
a bigot? Of course not; we follow 
inquiry whoever it leads. Instead of 
denouncing such study as roiling up 
feelings of blade inferiority, it might 
be helpful to look in what Mr. Mur- 


win” — have been used for nearly a 
century to thwart social change. 

Social Darwinism, Mr. Hof- 
stadter wrote, “gave strength to at- 
tacks on reformers and on almost all 
efforts at the conscious and directed 
change of society.” 

Before Mr. Murray and Mr. 
Hermstein there was William Gra- 
ham Sumner, who wrote 80 years 
ago that “the milli onaires are the 
product of natural selection, acting 
on the whole body of men to pick 
out those who can meet the require- 
ment of certain work to be done.” 

Sure, these people “get high wages 
and live in luxury, but the bargain is 
a good one for society.” Why? Be- 
cause, said Mr. S umn er, “there is the 
intense competition for their place 
and occupation,” and “this assures 
us that aD who are competent for 
this function will be employed in it.” 

The Hermstein -Murray argument 
is thus not a brave breakthrough but 
ray says is the other direction — a flashy repackaging of a repeatedly 
toward the group that scores high- discredited fashion, 
est, the Asians. Thus was pseudo-science about 

Does their apparent intellectual racial differences used to justify the 
superiority constitute a new “yellow end of Reconstruction and the reim- 
praT to whites? Wffl the knowledge position of a segregated caste system 
of test scores, or even hard proof of on the American South. 


greater group intelligence, make 
whites fed inferior to Chinese, Japa- 
nese and others with different eyes? 

I went back to the Bronx High 
School of Science recently to help its 
alumni drum 
derfunded public 


test for entrance and admits students 
on their merits. In my day, the stu- 
dent body was 98 percent white, 
about half of them prodded onto the 
subway from all over the city by 


So the focus on nature or nurture 
really does matter. Of course, all of 
us are inescapably a product of both 
genes and environment. But the is- 
sue of which factors to emphasize in 
for this' un- explaining what is happening to a 
which sets a society is not, finally, a “scientific” 
question, because the “science” of 
the matter is utterly crude, to the 
extent that it exists at alL 
Mr. Horns Lein and Mr. Murray 
say that estimates of whether IQ is 


Then Here Were the Kamikazes 


M ELBOURNE — Fiftieth an- 
niversaries that ought to be 
remembered come up fast these 
days. In Europe after the D-Day 
landings, the Allies were fighting 
their way to the Rhine, while in the 
Pacific the Americans were about 
to launch the air offensive on Ja- 
pan that would soon reduce all 
major cities, with the exception of 
Kyoto, to ruins. 

The Japanese mihtaiy was driven 
to desperation, and so, in October 
SO years ago the Special Attack 
Corps, the kamikazes, was formed. 

1944 PACIFIC 1994 ~ 

A young mao named Yukio Seki, 
who had just been married and was 
based in the Philippines, was asked 
to lead the suicide bombing group. 

On the night of Oct. 20, the 
heavy cruiser Australia took up its 
position in the Leyte Gulf with an 
impressive array of American and 
other Allied ships. They were 
about to make good General 
Douglas MacArthur's promise to 
return to the Philippines. 

Next morning at first light, there 
was a radar alert for approaching 
Japanese aircraft. Lieutenant 
Commander Richard Peek, the 
gunnery officer on the Australian 
cruiser, spotted a plane from the 
bridge. It was astern, about a mile 
away and traveling at about 300 
feet (90 meters) above the water 
directly toward the ship. 

There was little he could do but 
sound the alarm and watch in 
horror as the kamikaze headed 
staight at them, below the line of 
fire of the cruiser’s guns. Not 
until the plane was virtually over 
the stem could the air defense 
batteries open up. 

Meanwhile, the kamikaze pilot 
used his cannon to rake the Aus- 


By Denis Warner 


traha’s upper deck, causing many 
casualties among the gun crews. 
When the plane struck, its gasoline 
tanks exploded, killing dozens of 
officers and men on the bridge and 
deck. Lieutenant Commander 
Peek was badly burned. 

That attack was just a foretaste 
of what was to come. A couple of 
days later, five Japanese aircraft 
struck with devastating effect 
against an American naval force 
off the coast of Samar Island in the 
central Philippines, sinking one of 
the warships and seriously damag- 
ing two others. 

The kamikaze campaign 
readied its peak during the battle 
for Okinawa early in 1945. Re- 
cords of vessels lost or damaged to 
kamikaze air attacks are hard to 
put together, but with careful 
checking It appears that they sank 
at least 57 Allied ships and that an 
additional 107 were permanently 
disabled. Eighty-five others suf- 
fered major structural damage or 
heavy crew casualties, or both, and 
at least 221 received lesser damage. 

Before the war ended, almost 
every type of Japanese weapon 
had been used on suicide missions. 
Kamikaze fighters attacked U.S. 
B-29s on their bombing missions 
over Japan, knocking one out of 
the sky during the first raid on 
Tokyo. Japanese suicide boats 
sank seven Allied ships and dam- 
aged an additional 14 in the clos- 
ingmonths of the war. 

The oka, or baka, guided bomb 
first made its appearance off Oki- 
nawa, when a Japanese Betty 
bomber launched Sublieutenant 
Saburo Dohi, crouched in a rock- 
et-propelled bomb with a warhead 
carrying some 500 kilograms of 


high explosives. The human bomb 
was released a little more than a 
mile (about 2 kilometers) from an 
American destroyer. The crew of 
the Betty watched as it sped at low 
altitude toward its target. Soon 
they saw a huge column of water 
and black smoke belching from the 
destroyer. The plume of smoke did 
not linger long, as the warship 
sank with heavy loss of life. 

The Japanese also unleashed ka- 
mikaze torpedoes, or kaiiens, ka- 
mikaze midget submarines and 
even kamikaze frogmen. Fortu- 
nately for the Allies, they made the 
mistake until just before the war 
ended — when it was far too late 
— of using both the torpedoes and 
midget submarines against well- 
protected ships at anchor. On the 
open sea, especially against slow- 
moving convoys, the kaiiens could 
have been devastating. 

The Japanese navy and air force 
lost 3.913 pilots on suicide missions. 
Of these, the vast majority were 
trainees, most of them aged 18 to 
20. Some were even younger. 

Was the kamikaze campaign 
simply an inhuman waste of life, 
resources and effort, since it did 
not achieve its hoped for result and 
save Japan from total defeat? Per- 
haps. But the use of planes and 
other weapons on spectacular and 
highly destructive suicide missions 
created a major psychological 
shock among Allied forces. Only 
the United States could have suf- 
fered such losses and continued to 
fight an offensive naval war. 


The writer, who covered the war 
in the Pacific for Australian news- 
papers, is co-author with Peggy 
Warner of "The Sacred Warriors, 
Japan's Suicide Legions. ” He con- 
tributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Jewish mothers. Today the break- inheritable range from 40 percent to 
down is two-fifths Asian, one-fifth 80 percent. This is science? 


black and Hispanic, and two-fifths 
“other” (the euphemism for white). 

That is as it should be; Merit is merit. 

Does this trend mean that people 
of my skin color are doomed to the 
middle stratum of group intellect? 

The answer is that there ain't no 
group intellect. Individual motiva- 
tion and stamina, buttressed by val- 
ues within the family, join intelli- 
gence in determining “superiority." 

The races are not in a race. 

Even if Mr. Murray's thesis is cor- 
rect, and membership in one group or 
another gives its members a genetic . 
edge, that is no reason for anyone’s polemicists aimed at defeating egali- 


Even if a figure as high as 40 or 60 
percent were accurate, that leaves a 
huge amount of room for environ- 
mental factors that can be affected 
by the conscious choices of individ- 
uals and their government. 

And all of this begs the question 
of how important intelligence 
should be in ordering the rewards 
that a society offers, as agaiusL other 
virtues such as hard work, risk-tak- 
ing loyally or concern for others. 

The Hermstein-Murray book is 
not a “scientific” book at all but a 
political argument offered by skilled 


acceptance of social immobility. 

Early reading training may shrink 
the gaps within and between groups. 
And the computer, while no level er, 
can provide on-line access to cre- 
ative communities far beyond the 
dangerous neighborhood. 

I ran into Ieoh Ming at a black- 
tie fund-raiser the other night- As 
we embraced, he looked through 
this media biggie to the hustling 
flack of long ago. and 1 looked 
through I. M. Pel the great archi- 
tect who revitalized cities from 
Washington to Paris, to the young 
designer who made the most of his 
chance to use his intelligence. 

The New York Times. 


tarians. It is gaining attention be- 
cause social reformers have not 
done such a good job of it lately and 
because it is a lot easier to blame 
somebody else’s genes or brain cells 
than to improve a society. 

Mr. Murray’s critics should op- 
pose him but resist vituperation, lest 
they suggest that they are afraid of 
what he is saying. There is nothing 
to fear in these stale notions, provid- 
ed they are understood as such. 

What does need to be worried 
about, and changed, is a political 
climate so pessimistic that offer- 
ings such as these come to be taken 
as “science.” 

The Washington Post. 


For a Good Irish Peace 

Regarding '‘A Modem Labor Par- 
ty" (Opinion, Oct. 11): 

Being a traditional Conservative 
voter who runs his own business but 
is now prepared to entertain the 
thought of voting for Tony Blair's 
new-look Labor Parly, I found your 
article most enlightened. 

The last paragraph, however, 
which refers to “issues of special in- 
terest to the United States.” led me to 
despair, so wide was it of the mark. 

On the issue of Northern Ireland, 
it was John Major's government that 
opened up a dialogue with the IRA 
and Sinn Fein, only to be castigated 
in the media for doing so. It was 
Prime Minister John Major and his 
Irish counterpart, Albert Reynolds, 
in their Downing Street declaration, 
who gave the IRA a way out of an 
armed fight- The fact that it took the 
IRA seven months to reach a deci- 
sion — whereupon the British gov- 
ernment was immediately expected 
by a vociferous and ill-informed 
U-S. lobby to welcome it on board 
— is ludicrous. 

Representatives of the IRA won 
only 10 percent support at the polls. 
The IRA lost the armed struggle; 
little wonder Mr. Major is standing 
back. We live in a democracy, and 
while we will entertain discussion 


with minority groups, we do not rush 
to embrace those who use the gun 
and terror to get their way. 

Gerry Adams is no Yasser Arafat 
representing a majority view under 
an army of occupation. He repre- 
sents a minority view that tried, by 
a campaign of terror, to force its 
view on the majority. 

John Major knows he can go 
down in history as the prime minis- 
ter who brought peace to Northern 
Ireland, and he wants that acclaim. 
He has the time to extract a good 
peace. Anything else would sell the 
people of Northern Ireland short. 

D.S. GOLDSACK. 

Banstead, England. 

Food for the Chinese 

Regarding “ Question for 2030: 
Who Will Be Able to Feed China?" 
and “ When China’s Scarcities Be- 
come the World’s Problem" (Opinion, 
Sept. 28 and 29) by Lester R. Brown: 

I do not agree with Mr. Brown's 
view of food production. The main 
problem is not the ability to produce 
food but the prices at which it is 
sold. There is still plenty of land 
available for agricultural purposes. 
If grain prices were attractive, pro- 
duction would increase. 

Mr. Brown offers an estimate of 
China’s future grain needs, and then 


concludes: “The more difficult 
question is who could supply China 
with grain on such a scale. The an- 
swer: No one.” This is wrong. Aus- 
tralia, Argentina, Canada and other 
countries in the Cairns group (Uru- 
guay, for instance) have a tradition 
of grain production as well as large, 
unexploited land reserves. 

Argentina, for example, used only 
16 million hectares of the 30 million 
available for agricultural purposes 
in 1992. It could use the extra land 
to produce 30 million tons of grain, 
a significant portion of the demand 
Mr. Brown predicts for China. - 

And don't forget countries like 
Ukraine, whose prairies arc among 
the most fertile in the world. 

FERNANDO CORTINAS. 

Madrid. 

Where the Marbles Belong 

Regarding “ Artworks Far From 
Home ” (Letters, Sept. 16) from Ger- 
ald C. Hardy: 

I agree with Mr. Hardy on one 
point: The Parthenon Marbles are 
“vety, very special.” Lord Elgin was 
a pirate. For the British Museum 
knowingly to possess stolen proper- 
ty is illegal and morally disgusting. 

CHUCK FARMER. 

Athens. 


. 

M-.-: ’ 
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By Alan Trnscott 

U PSETS abounded in the 
Rosenbhun Open Teams 
at the NEC World Champion- 
ships in Albuquerque, New 
Mexico. In two cases top- 
ranked American teams were 
eliminated by lesser-known 
compatriots. 

The team headed by Michael 
Becker lost by 29 imps to John 
Roberts, George Tomay, Walt 
Walvick and Steve Lapides. 
And Andy Goodman, with a 
strong group, lost by 19 to Dan 
Rotznan and his team. 

Malcolm Rrachman and his 
team lost by 6 imps to an unher- 
alded Portuguese xeasa, and 
strong squads from Britain, Ice- 
land,ltaty and the Netherlands 
were also eliminated. 

Cm the diagramed deal from 
the Rosenblum, South took ad- 
vantage of a subtle misde f ense. 
A heart was led against three 
no-trump, dummy played low, 
and East took the kmg and 
shifted to a spade. Sooth won 
with the king, cashed two dub 
winners and the heart ace, and 
surrendered a dub to West. 

It would not have helped 
East to return a heart at die 


second trick for the declar er 
would have crossed to dummy 
with a dub lead and played a 
spade. If East ducked, South 
would have time for dubs, and 
if not, East would lose his quick 
entry for hearts. 

Dummy pointed out the win- 
ning defense: East must refuse 
to take his heart king at the first 
trick and is then in control since 
the king can win the third round 
of the suit 

NORTH 

*53 

A3 

«AJ8 
* A K 87 65 


WEST 
♦ 9842 
652 
<- Q 65 
48 Q 10 2 


EAST (D) 

♦ A J 76 
O K 9874 
0 K7 4 

♦ 9 


SOUTH 
♦ KQ 10 
t?Q J 10 
0 lira 3 2 
*J 4 S 

Both sides were vulnerable. Tbe 


bidding: 

East 

South 

West 

North 

I C 

Pass 

Pass 

DbL 

Pass 

IN.T. 

Pass 

3 N.T. 

Pass ■ 

Pass 

Pass 


West led the heart six. 



SIHANOUK: Prince of 
Light, Prince of Darkness 

By Milton Osborne. 275 pages. 
$26. Allen & Unwin. 

Reviewed by Derek Parker 

TN7HEN Norodom Sihanouk 
YV was crowned king of 
Cambodia in 1941 at the age of 
19, the royal astrologer pre- 
dicted that his would be a reign 
of greatness. As it turned out, 
his rule has bees marked by 
turbulence and conflict, reach- 
ing a tragic nadir during the 
period of Khmer Rouge tyran- 
ny from 1975 until the Viet- 
namese invasion in 1979. Yet 
through it all, Sihanouk has 
maintained a special relation- 
ship with his people. 

Even now, at the age of 71 
and in declining health, he re- 
mains a key figure in Cambodi- 
an politics. 

Milton Osborne, formerly an 
Australian diplomat in Phnom 
Penh and later a senior intelli- 
gence analyst in the Australian 
government’s Office of Nation- 
al Assessments, has written a 
fascinating book, telling the 


complicated story with clarity 
and occasional humor. He does 
what a biographer should do: 
paint in the background, avoid 
judgments and let the facts 
speak for themselves. 

Osborne traces Sihanouk’s 
progress from a young monarch 
concerned almost solely with 
the pursuit of pleasure to the 
central figure in gaining Cam- 
bodia’s independence from 
France. But independence 
brought new problems, as the 
country’s political institutions 
were nven by factionalism and 
deadlocks. 

Sihanouk’s solution was to 
abdicate in favor of his father. 
This enabled him to take a di- 
rect political role as the bead of 
government and a nationalist 
political party, although he re- 
tained a title that translated as 
“the prince who has been king.” 

As Osborne points out. this 
gave Sihanouk the best of all 
political options, enabling him 
to centralize power in himself. 
But in the long term, it did little 
to help Cambodians adapt the 
institutions of Western democ- 
racy to their own culture. 

For much of Sihanouk's rule. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Mario Santinofi, of Barcelo- 
na’s El Periddico de Catalunya, 
is reading the Spanish transla- 
tion of “War ana Anti-War, ” by 
Alvin and Heidi Toffler. 

“The raw material of the fu- 
ture is knowledge and future 
wars win be intimately linked to 
this world of knowledge- 1 hope 
books like this will help pohti- 
rians develop an outlook that is 
less rooted in the short term.” 

(A1 Goodman, IHT) 



Cambodia was caught in a geo- 
political vice. Suspicious of 
both the United States and the 
Soviet Union, he often sought 
support from China despite his 
avowed anti-communism. 

He realized early that the 
United States would not win 
the war in Vietnam and there- 
fore sought to protect his coun- 
try through limited cooperation 
with the Communist govern- 
ment of North Vietnam. He was 
partially successful Cambodia 
was not the “oasis of peace” he 
claimed it to be; but it escaped 
the worst ravages of the region’s 


conflicts until the Khmer 
Rouge emerged. 

In conducting the country’s 
foreign relations, Sihanouk was 
always swayed by personal 
w hims . His warm relationship 
with the late Kim H Sung of 
North Korea was largely based 
on Kim's willingness to play to 
Sihanouk’s extraordinary vani- 
ty- 

Above all he wanted to be 
taken seriously. His dislike of 
the United States stemmed 
from an early brush with John 
Foster Dulles, who suggested 
that be visit a circus while in 


Washington. Sihanouk never 
forgot die slight 

His personality exacerbated 
Cambodia’s problems in' other 
ways. He saw any criticism as 
treason and could be ruthless in 
dealing with his enemies. This 
drove opponents, including the 
faction that became the Khmer 
Rouge, underground. Sihanouk 
could not understand the na- 
ture of the threat posed by the 
ultra-nationalism and extreme 
political ideology of the Khmer 
Rouge. In the late 1960s, when 
decisive action might have pre- 
vented their rise, Sihanouk 
seemed mainly interested in his 
hobby of making melodramatic 
films. He simply failed to com- 
prehend the importance of eco- 
nomic management Poverty, 
especially in rural areas, bred 
the discontent that fed the 
Khmer Rouge and other dissi- 
dent movements. 

First as a pawn and then as 
prisoner of the Khmer Rouge, 
Sihanouk could do nothing to 
avert Cambodia’s catastrophe. 
He was eventually allowed logo 
into exfle, returning only after 
the Vietnamese withdrawal in 


1989. He immediately plunged 
into factional politics again. 

Is Cambodia fated to reflect 
the flawed nature of Sihanouk, 
who is once again the country’s 
lemg yet is unable still to distin- 
guish form from substance? Os- 
borne implies that it is. 

Fra: anyone wanting to un- 
derstand a complex man in a 
tumultuous time, this book is 
essential reading. 

Derek Parker, an Australian 
free-lance writer, wrote this for 
the International Herald Tri- 
bune. 


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International Herald Tribune 
Friday , October 21. 1994 
Page 9 





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Culture Clash in Tokyo Dining 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 


T OKYO — With eyebrows raised, 
the fashionably dressed, fony- 
some thing woman poked her 
spoon into thenar a moelle and 
asked, “This isn’t pudding, is it?” 

As the Taillevent-Robucbon Chateau 
Restaurant opened its doors on Wednes- 


day, after five gears’ preparation, the lead- 


ing figures of French cuisine who are run- 
ning the show here have concluded that 
their biggest challenge is not creating 
haute cuisine, or serving it in a replica of a 
1 7th-century French chateau, or even edu- 
cating Japanese about the fine points of 
French cooking. 

Rather, it is getting the Japanese cus- 
tomers and staff to relax in a setting often 
associated here with something slightly 
stiff, if not snooty. 


than a cultural calling, more a time for 
propriety than pleasantry. 

“It’s all about status.” explained Hideaki 
Kikuchi, a sommelier at the restaurant XI- 
Vln Karuizawa, a resort town in the moun- 
tains north of Tokyo. “But it gives us a 
feeling of richness in our hearts.” 

Vrinat says he will be satisfied if the 
Japanese can learn to establish a respect- 
ful rapport with the sommelier and sit 
back while eating a masterful meal. To 
help thing s along, he has even lowered 


The peach and white chateau, built al- 
most entirely of French materials, serves 
as the anchor of the Yebisu Garden Place, 
a $3 billion commercial development that 
began in the bubble economy of the late 
1980s but has only now reached fruition. 


Developed by Sapporo Breweries, Ja- 
dne bn 


prices, particularly for wine. 
; Japanese ow 


“We don't want customers to be up- 
right, but you have to teach them — that's 
the trouble.” lamented Jean-Claude 
Vrinat, owner of the Tail! event restaurant 
in Paris, who has spent the past 10 days 


trying to soften up the edges and stock up 
Even toward the Japanese 


the wine cellars. I 
staff, most of whom have lived and 
worked in France, there was open, if mut- 
ed, frustration: “We want them to be more 
natural but not familiar, to be warm but 
respectful.” 


Japanese have long enjoyed French cui- 
sine, which is copious, if expensive, in 
Tokyo. There is no shortage of technically 
superb Japanese French chefs, nor cogno- 
scenti whose knowledge is informed by 
annual pilgrimages to the best restaurants 
in France. 


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Joil Robuchon , left, and Jean-Claude Vrinat, in Tokyo to open their Taillevent-Robuchon Chateau Restaurant. 


Instead, what suffers is the ambience. 
For Japanese, going to a good French 
restaurant is less a culinary indulgence 


The Japanese owners “were surprised at 
the low prices I wanted to set for the 
wines,” he said. “Wine should be a plea- 
sure, but they’ve always believed that high 
prices mean high quality.” 

Lunch in the first floor tearoom start at 
a quite reasonable 3,000 yen (S30), al- 
though dinner in the main dining room on 
the second floor goes up from 18.000 yen. 
not including wine. 

The high prices do not appear to be a 
problem, despite the fact that the nation is 
only b eginnin g to emerge from its longest 
postwar recession. The dining room is 
booked through the end of the year. 

If Vrinat wants to teach the Japanese 
the pleasure of French cuisine, his partner 
Joftl Robuchon, a chef who has achieved 
the status of a cultural icon in France, is 
more concerned with discipline. 

“Silence!” he shouted as the noise level 
in the ldtchen rose to only modest propor- 
tions. “ Shabenmaiy echoed chef Tooru 
Kawano, translating for those in the 44- 
person staff of chefs who do not speak 
French. 

Hawklike, Robuchon strutted through 
the pristine kitchen, chastising mistakes 
and establishing a disciplined, focused at- 
mosphere. “What’s this?” he barked at 
one chef who had prepared a romaine 
salad without sufficient romaine lettuce. 
“Put it back!” 


pan’s third ranking brewer, the ultramod- 
ern complex is connected to the Ebisu train 
station by a 400-meter-long (435-yard- 
long) moving sidewalk and includes a 45- 
story office building, a Mitsukoshi depart- 
ment store, a concert hall, cinema complex 
and a Westin hoteL It is the largest of 
several opulent projects begun in the bub- 
ble era but only recently completed. 


T HE chateau, which stands at the 
foot of a wide promenade, is 
framed in surrealistic contrast by 
its austere, modem neighbors, 
and is conspicuous as a symbol of an era of 
financial excess that began to deflate four 
years ago. The stones were brought from 
Chauvigoy and the roof tiles from Trelaze. 
Nothing was questioned as Vrinat and his 
wife selected interior decorations. 


“They were very professional,'' Vrinat 
said. “They didn’t question our choices.” 


Still, Vrinat and other French staff 
members are vaguely uncomfortable 
about their roles as ambassadors of 
French culture, if only because the Japa- 
nese appear not to grasp fully the signifi- 
cance of the enterprise. 

Vrinat, for example, asked Sapporo not 
to place two statues, one by Rodin and the 
other by Antoine BourdeUe, in the court- 
yard in front of the chiteau. 


“Do people really appreciate the value 
rtuch 


of these statues, which would attract 
crowds in a French museum?” he said. 
“Here, everybody is simply taking snap- 
shots of them.” 


/// IDES GUIDE 


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1 iiJifct ii: »; ; 


AUSTRIA 


( t / 1 1 



Vienna 

KOnstterhaus, tel: (1) 52177-404, 
open dally. To Jan. 29: "Agypto- 
manie: Agypten und das Abend- 
land.” Emphasizes the Influence of 
Egyptian art on 18th- and 19th-cen- 
tury European art and design. 


t BELGIUM 


Briigos 

Qroenlngemuseum, tel: (50) 34- 
79-59. open datfy. Continuing/To 
Nov. 15: "Hans Memfing: Five Centu- 
ries of Reality and Fiction." 


LaMormate,teJ: (2) 218-12-11. Phi- 
lippe Boesmans's Reigen." Direct- 
ed by Luc Bondy, conducted by Pat- 
fttk. Dayjn wfth.Deborah Raymond, 

N8fcT2v53,' «?, 1 6. 17 and 18. 


Uftfl* 


Salle Sahnt-Georges, tel: (0) 41-21- 


26-16. open dally. To Jan. 15: "Gau- 

S in: Les XX et fa Libre Esthetique." 

atures 60 paintings, water colors, 
drawings, sculptures and ceramics 
as wen as 30 works by other painters 
participating with Gauguin in tin 
avant-garde exhibitions of "Les XX" 
and "La Libre Esthetique." 


BRITAIN 


Cambridge 

FHzwlBlam Museum, tel: (223) 332- 
900, closed Mondays. To Dec. 18: 
"New York, New York: Prints of the 
City 1 880-1990.” Documents the de- 


velopment ot the aty from the late 
19th-century mansions to the sky- 
scraper boom following 1910 and to 
present-day architecture. 

London 

Barbican Centre, tel: (71) 638- 
8891 . Oct. 25 to Nov. 20: "Every- 
body's Shakespeare.” Leading the- 
ater companies from Germany, 
Japan , the United States ( with Peter 
Sellars staging "The Merchant ot 
Venice"). Israel and Georgia offer 
productions of Shakespeare's plays. 
British Museum, tel: (71 ) 580-1 788. 
open daily. To Jan. 15: "Japanese 
Imperial Craftsmen and the West" 
Metalwork, ensnefware and lacquer- 
ware of the Meiji period. Also, to Jan. 
8: "Pre-Raphasfite Drawings." 120 
drawings from the museum s collec- 
tion, including works by Dante Gabri- 
el Rossetti, John Millctfs and William 
HoimanHmt. - 

Design Museum, tel: (711 403- 
6933, open daily. April 23: “It s Plas- 
tic!” plastics in an their forms and 
functions: medicine, fashion, com- 
munications, science and everyday 
me. 

National Gallery, tel: (71) 389- 
1785. open dally. To Jan. 15: “Mak- 
ing and Meaning: The Young Michel- 
angelo." Traces Michelangelo's 
development from his apprenticeship 
in the sturSo of the Ghirlandaio broth- 
ers, with two unfinished panel paint- 
ings ‘The Manchester Madonna” 
and "The Entombment." Also in- 
cludes early drawings and sculp- 
tures. 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (71 ) 
494-5615, open dally. Continu- 


ing/To Dec. 14: "The Gkxy of Ven- 
ice: Art in the 1 8th Century. 

Tate Gallery, tel: (71) 887-8000, 
open dally. To Jan. 8: "James 
McNeill Whistler." 75 paintings and 
120 works on paper emphasize par- 
ticular themes: the Nocturnes, his 
works as a designer, the pastels and 
the full-length portraits. 


CANADA 


Montreal 

Canadian Centre for Architecture, 
teh (514) 939-7026, closed Mon- 
days and Tuesdays. To Jan. 8: "Ur- 
ban Revisions: Current Projects for 
the Public Realm." An examination of 
the physical and social space of the 
contemporary city, as envisioned by 
architects, urban designers and plan- 
ners. 

Museum of Fine Arts, tel: (514) 
285-1600, dosed Mondays. To Nov. 
27: "MarkTansey: A Retrospective." 
25 large oil paintings of landscapes, 
interiors and figures from 1979 to 
1992. The paintings often include 
disguised portraits and hidden im- 
ages, or texts by theorists such as 
Barthes and Derrida. 


Hotel de la MonnaJe, tel; 40-46-56- 
66, closed Mondays. To Jan. 8: "Vol- 
taire et I'Europe.” A celebration of 
the 300th anniversary of the birth of 
Voltaire, with more than 280 paint- 
ings, engravings, sculptures, manu- 
scripts and art objects documenting 
Voltaire's life abroad and in exile, and 
his philosophy and ethics. 

Muste du Louvre, tel: (1) 40-20- 
53-17, dceed Tuesdays. To Jan. 1 6: 
"Autour de Poussin." Documents the 
influence of Poussin on his contem- 
poraries. Features 5 paintings by the 
17th-century painter, and 25 works 
by lesser-known painters such as 
Bourdon and Lebrun. 


way scenario. Conducted by Ram- 
bert de Leeuw, with Lyndon Terra- 
clni, Marie Anger. Miranda van 
Kraf Ingen. Nov. 2 (world premiere). 
5, 8, 1 1 , 14, 17, 20, 22, 25 and 28. 


SINGAPORE 


National Museum, tel: 332-3656. 
closed Mondays. To April 30: 'Song, 
Yuan and Ming: Life in the City.’ 
Exhibits from the Song, Yuan and 
Ming dynasties from 960 to 1 644 give 
glimpses ot the vibrant life in towns 
and cities of the period. 


SPAIN 


GERMANY 


DENMARK 


Nuremberg 

Germanisches National Museum, 
tel: (911) 13-31-0, closed Mondays^ 
To Nov. 6: "Cut and Thrush Contend 
porary Leipzig Artists." 95 graphic 
and sc Li plural works by contempo- 
rary artists living in Leipzig. 

Stuttgart 

Staatstheater, tel: (711) 203-20. 
Rolf Rjehm's "Das Schwetgen der 
Siren en." Directed by Christoph Nel. 
conducted by Bernhard Kontarsky. 
Nov. 3, 7 and 16. 


Madrid 

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte 
Reina Sofia, tel: (91) 467-5062. 
closed Tuesdays. To Nov. 21: 
"Franz K/ine." 50 works spanning 
the period from 1947 to the early ‘.60s 
by the American Abstract Expres- 
sion^. 


UNITED STATES 


Copenhagen 

Statens Museum for Kunst, tel: 33- 
91-21-26, closed Mondays. To Jan. 
8: "Johannes Rump: Portrait of a 
Collector." Features 100 paintings 
and 125 works on paper from the 
French art collection donated in 1 928 
by Johannes Rump. Indudes works 
by Matisse, Derain, Modglfani, Picas- 
so. Gris, Braque. Maillol and Lau- 
rens. 


ITALY 


( l 9 U S t / t 9 .f 


Rome 

Palazzo Ruspoli, tel: (6) 683-21- 
77. open daily. To Feb. 19: "Neter- 
tari: Light of Egypt." A commemora- 
tion of the dscovery ot Netertari’s 
tomb in 1904, and a tribute to Ram- 
ses It's favorite wife. Features 130 
objects, including amulets, funerary 
statuettes, jewels, and the queen's 
sandals. 


Atlanta 

High Museum of Art, tel: (404) 577- 
6940, dosed Sundays. To Jan. 14: 
“Workers. An Archaetogy of the In- 
dustrial Age: Photographs by Sebas- 
ttao Salgado." 200 black-and-white 
images drawn from the Brazilian pho- 
tographer's epic study of manual la- 
bor throughout the world. 

Los Angeles 

County Museum of Art, tel: (213) 
621-2766, closed Mondays. To Jan. 
8: "Richard Wilson." Two Installa- 


tions by the young British sculptor: 
"20:50 is a room filled with used 


FRANCE 


On Oct 23: "Greek Gold: Jewellery 
of the Classical Wcrid." British Mu- 
seum, London. 

On Oct. 23: "From Van Gogh to Ger- 
hard Richter Major Works from the 
Museum FoBwang Collection in Es- 
sen," Louisiana Museum of Mod- 
em Art, Humtebaek, Denmark. 

On Oct 23: "WHhelm Lett* Zum 1 50. 
Geburtstag." Wallraf-Richartz-Mu- 
seum, 


On OcL 23: "The Utrecht Ww, 1495- 
m, Utrecht, 


1995." Centres! Museum 
The "Netherlands. 


On Oct. 23: "Christian Dior The 
Magic of Fashion." Powerhouse 
Museum, Sydney. 

On Oct 23: "Elizabeth 1 to Elizabeth 
II: Master Drawings from the National 
Portrait Gallery. National Portrait 
Gallery. London. 

On Oct. 23: "Flames of Rebirth: 
Czech Art from 1956 to 1963. "The 
Municipal Library, Prague. 

On Oct 24: "Vivienne Westwood." 
StedeUJk Museum de Lakenhal. 
Leiden, Netherlands. 


Parts 

Bibltothfcque Nationals, tel: (1 ) 47- 
03-81-26, open daily. To Jan.4: 
"Wagner: Le rang en Images." More 
than 300 manuscripts, scores, por- 
traits, photographs, costumes and 
accessories, as well as stage models 
documenting the representation of 
■■s "Ring" since the beginning 


JAPAN 


Tokyo 

National Museum of Western Art, 
ref: (3) 3828-5131, cfosed Mondays. 
To Dec. 24: 'The Unknown Modiglia- 
ni." Drawings by Italian artist Ame- 
deo Modigliani from 1906 to 1924, 
until now the most obscure period in 
his life. 


of the Bayreuth festival. 


Grand Palais, tel; 44-13-171-17, 
closed Tuesdays. Continuing/To 
Jan. 9: "Gustave Caflfebotte, 1848- 
1894." Also, to Jan. 2: "Nicolas 
Poussin." 


NETHERLANDS 


Amsterdam 

De Nederlandse Opera, tel: (20) 
551-B922. Louis Andriessen’s 
"Rosa," based on a Peter Greena- 


sump oil, and the visitors walk on a 
walkway above the flawless and re- 
flective surface; the other installation 
consists of a single pyramidal sky- 
light soaring to 60 feet Anchored 
upside down, there is a blue fiber- 
glass swimming pool complete with 
steps and diving board. 

Malibu 

J. Paul Getty Museum, tel: (310) 
459-761 1 , dosed Mondays. To Jan 
15, 1995: "A Passion tor Antiquities: 
Ancient Art from the Col lection of 
Barbara and Lawrence Fleishman." 
200 objects from ancient Greece, 
Rome and Etruria dating from 2600 
B. C. to A. D. 400 - sculptures In 
marble and bronze; vessels In 
bronze, silver terra-cotta and glass; 
frescoes, and gold jewelry. . 



Louise Bourgeois’s “Arch of Hysteria, ” at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington. 


New York 

Jewish Museum, tel: (212) 423- 
32700, dosed Saturdays. To Jan. 

aglieri: Trie GHtterir 


American politics. Features 150 pho- 
tographs, mostly of elected figures. 


29: "Mario 


Years 1912-1922." More than §8 
paintings by the Italian iansdscape 
and portrait painter. 


Museum of Modem Art, tel: (212) 
708-9400. To Jan. 3: "American 
Politicians." Examines how photog- 
raphy has Illustrated and affected 


Philadelphia 

Philadelphia Museum of Art tel: 
(212) 715-6475. To Nov. 20:" Japa- 
nese Design: A Surrey Since 1950." 
More than 250 objects Inclucfing fur- 
niture, electronics, toys, fashion pho- 
tography and textiles will be on view. 
Designed by the Japanese architect 
Klsho Kurokawa. 


Washington 

Corcoran Gallery ot Art, id: (202) 
636-3211, closed Tuesdays. To Jan. 
2: "Louise Bourgeois: The Locus of 
Memory: Works 1982-1993." 27 
sculptures and 30 drawings in water- 
color, charcoal, pencil, and oil from 
1982 to the present time Illustrate the 
themes which have long obsessed 
the American artist; gander, sexuality 
and the rights to freedom and individ- 
uality, 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 





ADVERTISEMbJN l 







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' ~~ *** * *•''• •••^ -t-' : ■• : ';^/< •• i'i 



ood ideas have a way of becoming reality. 

J~ A match between the United States' finest - 
women professional golfers versus their '. 
European counterparts had long been considered. . 
Representatives from both sides of the Atlantic 
were strongly in favor of a Ryder Cup-type event 
to highlight the world's top women professionals. 
The idea only needed a push. 

Enter the Karsten Solheim family. As the manu- 
facturer of FHNB golf equipment Karsten and his 
company were long-time supporters of women's pro- 
fessional golf, dating back to the early 1970's. They 
were enthusiastic about the idea of an international 
match. So much so that in 1990, they agreed to 
sponsor an event to be known as the Solheim Cup. 

The match between the Ladies . 

Professional Golf Association (LPGA) 
and the Women Professional Golfers' 

European Tour (WPGET) would be 
held every two years and alternate . 
between the United States and Europe. 

No prize money would be at stake. The 
participants would play only for • 
national pride. 

With little time to prepare, orga- 
nizers set late November of that year 
to hold the inaugural event at Lake 
Nona Golf Club in Orlando, Florida. 

As hosts of the historic first event, the ; 

United States team proved anything 
but gracious on the golf_course, hand-' 
ily downing the young European team 


pilii 



by an 11 Vz - 4 score. Pew were surprised at the 
lopsided outcome, but it didn't deter the 
Europeans from looking ahead to their opportuni- 
ty to host the event in 1992. “We're a young 
team," said Laura Davies. “We can only get better." 

Most accepted Davies' comments as youthful 
thinking — the proper thing to say following a 
defeat at the hands of a team that, were it assem- 
bled today,' would include three LPGA Haii-of- 
Famers and two waiting just outside. Fewer 
remembered her quote two years later when 
Edinburgh, Scotland's Dalmahoy Hotel Golf & 
Country Club welcomed the event to the country 
recognized as the "home of golf " in between bites 
of haggis, experts once again installed the U.S. 




team as overwhelming favorites. The European 
team, captained by Mickey Walker and led by the 
powerful Davies, paid little heed. When the sand . 
settled (and it stopped raining), it was the Europeans 
hugging the Waterford Crystal trophy .and singing . 
the Solheim Cup victory song ("We'll really shake 
'em up, when we win the Solheim Cup..."). Not 
only had the Europeans won the event, they had . 
sent the U.S. team a clear message. It react Europe 
11 1/2, United States 6 l h. "It's the most.incredible 
achievement," said Captain Walker "I don't think . 
anyone envisioned this.- We went out arid beat the' ; 
best players in golf, and beat them totally." ‘ 

All of which brings us to The Greenbrier iri 
White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia for : the third 
match. The 5-star resort Will shine 
even brighter when it opens its doors: 





Louisa and Karsten Solheim 


h- 


to a gathering of golfs finest Women ’ .1 
professionals. Both teams come in • 


■ Famer JoAnne Carrier will return :• 

players from the '92 list, led by-Betsy, .; rtgfgZ * j : ; . 

King. Walker returns to the helm of-a ~ 'vv ;: ‘ . 

■ crew that features eight players from r\:': \ : , : .• 

the class of '92.. Her team will rely ^ 

heavily on Davies, the worid's number v . • ■ 

one player, for inspiration. ~ • v • . VT' ;'i_ 

"We expect it to be a spirited and 
healthy competition,". says Kaisten > :•. ’ ^ 

Solheim; "We're looking fqiwaxd to - \ 

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International Herald Tribune World Stock Index 6, composed of 
280 internationally investable stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1992 = 100. 




Wortd Index 

/20/9-: ciosn: 1 17.32 
evious. 1 16.53 



Prudential 
Fills Its 
Top Post 

Arthur F. Ryan 
To Lead Insurer 


Bloomberg Busmen News 

NEWARK, New Jersey — 
Prudential Insurance Co. of 
America broke with tradition 
Thursday to elect Arthur F. 



1 1 n s] i —:i fiUiM 


!■ ' 4 , : . M 


| Asia/Paciric 

Europe I 

Appro*, wagftffng: 32 % 

CkEK 13087 Pigv- 12 a 64 

0 — 


Approx, wagminc: 37 % 

Ctoss: 11 & 2 J 6 Ptbvj 11403 






■*• * V - 


MJJASO MJJASO 

1894 1894 


North America 


Appra*. weighting. 26 % 
Ctose: 97.11 Ptbvj 9 &Q 2 


Latin America 


Approx, waiting: 5 % 
Ctefi: 141.11 Prev~' 141.92 


I 


< *S' 130 







MJJASO MJJASO 
‘ 1994 1994 

Wotdhdn 

The index tracks US. doBar valuea at stocks be Tokyo, Haw York, London, end 
Argentine, Australia. Austria. Batghan, Brazfl, Canada, ChBa, Daranrt. Rnbnd, 
France, Germany, Hong Kong. Italy. Mrndco, NMhertanda, Now Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, S wadan, Saritasriand and Vomniol*. For Tokyo. New York end 
London, the Index to composed of the 20 top issues in terns at market capitalization, 
otherwise the tan top stocks am tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


. Enagy 114.70 114,80 -0.09 CapBal Goods 118,09 119.47 -032 

1 tffltei 128.74 12&04 +055 Hwrlhteriab 138^4 137J0 ->032 

Rwnco iiaiQ 117.09 +0J6 Conamar Goods 106^5 106.04 +0.01 

Sendees 12021 12025 -0.03 Htohnooia 12538 124-36 4130 

For mow information about foe Index, a booklet is avatiabte free of charge. 

Write to Trib index. 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe. 92521 Neu&y Codex Franca. 

O Intern a tional Herald Tribune 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


atmg officer of Chase Manhat 
tan Bank, as its new chairman. 

Mr. Ryan, 52, will join the 
largest U.S. life insurer on Nov. 
1 and succeed Robert C Win- 
ten, 62, as chairman and chief 
executive officer on Dec. 1. 

The appointment marks the 
first time in the company’s 1 19- 
year history that it has not se- 
lected its chai rman from among 
its own ranks and comes a week 
after its brokerage unit reached 
an agreement with U.S. prose- 
cutors to avoid a crimin al in- 
dictment in a scandal involving 
limited partnership sales. 

Prudential Securities Inc. has 
agreed to pay almost $700 mil- 
lion in fines and reimburse- 
ments to customers bilked in 
the fraudulent partnerships. 

The departure of Mr. Ryan is 
a significant loss for Chase 
Manhattan. Mr. Ryan is credit- 
ed on Wall Street with having 
successfully reorganized Chase, 
both by improving its retail 
branch network and by selling 
problem assets. 

The board decided it would 
rather break with tradition than 
give the job to Vice Chairman 
Garnett Keith, who turns 59 on 
Nov. 27. If Mr. Keith had taken 
the job, he would have been the 
oldest executive to assume the 
relatively new tide of chairman 
of Prudential, which insures 
one of every five Americans. 

Mr. Ryan has held his tides 
at Chase Manhattan since 1 990. 
ha that time, the sixih-largest 
U.S. bank has seen its earnings 
rebound from a loss in' 1990 to 
earnings of $966 million in 1993 
and $995 million for the first 
nine months of 1994. 


Issue of EC Access 
Complicates Asia’s 
Free-Trade Efforts 

By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — As pressure increases for new measures to 
liberalize trade in Asia and the Pacific, countries in the region 
are divided over how to structure a free-trade arrangement in 
relation to Europe. 

Most want any lowering of tariff and nontariff barriers to 
be on a nondisenminatory basis so that the benefits would be 
available to all nations, not just members of APEC, the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. 

In an interview Thursday, Ali Alatas. Indonesia's foreign 
minister, said he thought that "the overwhelming view*' 
among APEC countries was that “the operating principle of 
APEC must remain open regionalism.” 

This would preclude moving “toward anything that would 
even be a semblance of a dosed shop or a closed trading 
bloc,” he said. 

However, some APEC countries — including the United 
States, Australia, Singapore and South Korea — want access 
to a giant Pacific free-trade area to be made conditional, at 
least for European countries, officials and analysts said. 

Such a move would force the European Union to make 
equivalent cuts in import barriers if it wanted free access for 
its exports to fast-growing APEC economies that already 
account for 50 percent of global production and 40 percent of 
the world's trade. 

The issue, which is regarded as highly sensitive by trade 
policymakers in Europe and elsewhere, will be discussed at a 
meeting in Indonesia next month of landers of the 18 APEC 
countries. 

On a recent visit to Australia, Peter Sutherland, the director- 
general of GATT, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
which supervises the global trading system, warned that it 
would be “extremely dangerous” if APEC adopted any regional 
trading arrangements that discriminated against nonmembers. 

He made it dear that such a move could provide impetus for 

See TRADE, Page 13 


Cost-Cutting Takes IBM 
Back to 3d-Quarter Profit 


By Lawrence Malkin 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Riding the 
worldwide recovery and profit- 
ing from its own cost-cutting, 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp. said Thursday that 
last year’s third-quarter loss 
had turned into hi gber-lh an -ex- 
pected profit this year. 

But the world's largest com- 
puter company still trailed the 
growth rate of other companies 
m America's most sparkling in- 
dustry. IBM Chairman Louis V. 
Gerstner Jr. said it still had “a lot 
of work to do” in some of the 
company’s sluggish sectors. 

Net income in the quarter 
was $689 million, or $1.18 a 
share, compared with last year's 
loss of $87 million. 

Stock analysts issued buy 
recommendations. ana 
Moody’s Investors Services Inc. 
upgraded IBM’s short-term 
debt as a sign that Wall Street 
think s the company is at last 
coming out of the woods. 

IBM shares lost 50 cents to 
$74,875 on the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

The IBM story is a combina- 
tion of cutting huge overhead 
costs, which had accumulated 
in its entrenched corporate cul- 
ture, and a strong economy, 
which is buying time for other 
wounded giants such as Gener- 
al Motors Corp. to reorganize 
and redirect themselves. 


“Why shouldn’t corporate 
profits sparkle when the world 
economy is sparkling?" said Al- 
len Sinai of t-ehman Brothers. 
“When revenues go up and 
costs go down, it's bound to hit 
the bottom line.” 

Having cut costs by $5.6 bil- 
lion since the end of 1992, IBM 

Bankers Trust says earnings 
fefl 45 percent Page 12. 

executives now have to redirect 
the company to catch up to the 
rest of the industry. 

“It certainly is a more re- 
spectable company than it was 
a year ago,” said David Wu of 
S.G. Warburg, a former IBM 
executive. But it now has to 
rebuild its principal problem 
areas. He listed those areas as 
low-level software, bad disk 
drives and a misdirected per- 
sonal computer division that 
has had four bosses in six years. 

Revenue comparisons indi- 
cate that so far Mr. Gerstner 
and his team — not all of them 
trained in the swiftly evolving 
computer industry — can keep 
up with the race. 

While IBM’s third-quarter 
revenue rose 8.6 percent, reve- 
nue in the semiconductor busi- 
ness increased 30 percent, said 
W illiam J. Milton of Brown 
Brothers Harriman. “So I can't 
get too excited by 8 percent 
growth,” he said. 


Mr. Milton said that revenue 
at rival Compaq Computer 
Corp., which focuses on person- 
al computers, rose 63 percent, 
while IBM's personal computer 
business increased only 15 per- 
cent. 

And in the second quarter, 
while the revenue of the 14 larg- 
est U-S- computer companies 
grew by 9 percent, the revenue of 
IBM, representing almost half of 
the total, grew only 2 percent 
while the rest rose 14.4 percent. 

IBM also reported that de- 
mand for its mainframes, the 
dinosaurs of the computer busi- 
ness, actually outstripped sup- 
ply last quarter. “But that is 
hardly a growth business,” said 
Mr. Milton, and overall, main- 
frame sales are probably down 
IS percent this year. 

■ AT&T Posts a 3% Gain 

AT&T Corp. said third-quar- 
ter net income rose nearly 3 
percent, to $1.05 billion, partly 
because of an increase in sales 
of equipment to phone compa- 
nies, news agencies reported 
from New York. 

Revenue rose 8 percent to 
518.6 billion from $172 billion. 

Results reflected the 511.5 
billion acquisition of McCaw 
Cellular Communications Inc. 
in September. 

Excluding the McCaw merg- 
er, AT&Ts net income would 
have risen to $1.19 billion. 


GM Posts a Profit Despite Loss in North America 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

DETROIT — General Mo- 
tors Corp.. benefiting from a 
recovery in the vehicle market, 
announced Thursday a profit of 
$552 million for the third quar- 
ter, but its North American 
automotive operations contin- 
ued to lose money, and Wall 
Street was disappointed. 

The company's stock fell 
$3.75 to $43,125'. Analysts had 
expected GM to report a profit 


in the range of $620 million to 
$650 million. 

The world's largest automak- 
er said its profit, which fol- 
lowed a $1 13 million loss a year 
earlier, came on strong revenue 
of $34 J5 billion, up from $30.1 
billion. 

GM’s North American auto 
business, which recorded a loss 
of $328 million, trimmed its 
deficit from the $1.1 billion it 
lost in the 1993 quarter. 


The company’s international 
vehicle business was less profit- 
able than last year, as earnings 
fell to $240 million from $403 
million. 

Unlike previous years, when 
GM's profit came solely from 
strong international operations 
and nonautomotive subsidiar- 
ies such as GM Hughes Elec- 
tronics. Electronic Data Sys- 
tems Corp. and General Motors 
Acceptance Corp., analysis say 
GM's core North American 


automotive operations should 
end the year in the black. 

“The market remains strong 
in North America, and it's im- 
portant to note that GM’s mar- 
ket share increased in both the 
third quarter of 1994 and Lhe 
1 994 model year compared with 
the previous year, despite in- 
tense competition and capacity 
constraints " said John Smith 
Jr~ president of the company. 

(Reuters, AP) 


■ Latin Slump for Chrysler 
Chrysler Corp.’s internation- 
al retail sales fell 3 percent in 
the third quarter, mainly be- 
cause of a decline in Latin 
American business, Bloomberg 
Business News reported 
Latin sales slumped 29 per- 
cent, and Chrysler said various 
depressed markets in the region 
had accounted for the decline. 
Sales in Europe, Chrysler’s larg- 
est international market, fell 5 
percent. 


The Days of 'Frontier Justice’ Are Over 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — Now that 
new, improved rules have 
been agreed for the world 
trading system, many of 
them at U.S. behest, the time has come 
for America to stop trying to impose 
what its critics call “frontier justice*’ on 
its trading partners. 

Logically, the birth next year of the 
World Trade Organization should mark 


the end of the ID-year-old policy of so- 
caSed aggressive unilateralism, in which 
. Washington appointed itself as judge, 
Vqtiury and executioner in trade disputes, 
f T Washington will no longer have the 
excuse that the multilateral rules aren't 
working or that it needs to prod negotia- 
tions forward. On the contrary, the re- 
vamped rules that emerged at the end of 
the Uruguay Round last December go a 
long way to meet past American com- 

S laints. It is in the U.S. interest that they 
e respected. 

As an exhaustive new study by tire 
Institute for International Economics 
rightly points out, if the United States 
undermines the WTO’s authority by 
flouting those rules, it will jeopardize all 
the economic achievements it fought so 
hard to obtain in the seven years of the 
Uruguay Round negotiations. 

Anyway, as the study also concludes, 
America’s unilateral trade weapons are 
becoming increasingly obsolete. 

The Clinton administration seems to 
have grasped these points. But for now it 


is still trying to have things both ways — 
urging Congress to ratify the new rules 
and at the same time reassuring the 
doubters that the United States is still 
free to act unilaterally. 

In a narrow sense that may be tine, but 
unilateral action under the new rules will 
cany a much higher price both economi- 
cally and politically. The United States 
will face a greater risk of foreign retalia- 


America’s unilateral 
trade weapons are 
becoming increasingly 
obsolete. 


tion and, as the HE study puts it, “fur- 
ther erosion in America's already weak- 
ened leadership.” U.S. demands are 
more likely to be ignored 

There has been one encour aging straw 
in the wind. That was Washington’s ded- 
scm at the end of last month not to use 
its most provocative trade weapon — the 
so-callea Super 301 provision of U.S. 
trade law — m its dispute over auto parts 
with Japan. 

To the Test erf the world. Super 301, 
which requires the administration to 
name priority “unfair” trade practices, is 
the prime symbol of the “frontier jus- 
tice" approach. 

It is also, in the study’s words, unnec- 
essary and counterproductive. Other 
countries are insulted by it but are no 


longer afraid of it. The study concludes 
that it is no more effective than the 
regular provisions of Section 301. which 
the administration chose to invoke 
against Japan instead. 

But none of the Section 301 provisions 
are all they are cracked up to be. The 
study finds that the legislation, which 
provides the basis for U.S. unilateral 
action, “has been neither as powerful a 
market-opening crowbar as its support- 
ers assert nor the unmitigated disaster 
for the global trading system that critics 
feared.” 

It may have increased U.S. exports by 
about 1 percent a year — only a fraction 
of the boost expected from the Uruguay 
Round — and even this success is unlike- 
ly to be repeated. 

Many potential target countries, in- 
cluding Japan, Korea and Taiwan, are 
now less dependent on the U.S. market 
— and thus less vulnerable to sanctions. 
Negotiations have eliminated man y of 
the barriers most easily removed by uni- 
lateral U.S. action. 

That’s all the more reason the United 
States should in the future bring its com- 
plaints to the WTO and work to make 
the new multilateral dispute procedures 
effective. Other countries accepted those 
rules on the understanding they would 
apply to the United States too. 

The time for trying to have it both 
ways is over. As the HE study puts it, “If 
the United States is to maintain its lead- 
ership of the international trading sys- 
tem , it must play by the same fair trade 
rules it demands of others 


1994 interim results 

CNP strengthens its position 
personal insurer in France 


as leading 


CNP's consolidated premium income for the first six months of 
1994 advenced 19 % to FF 39.6 billion, versus FF 33.2 billion 
for the same period last year. 

Individual insurance generated FF 32.7 billion in premiums, 
while premium income from group insurance amounted to 
FF 6.9 billion. 

These results consolidate CNP's French personal insurance 
market leadership, with a market share of 1 7 %. 

Net earnings [Group share) registered further steady growth, 
advancing to FF 691.5 million, up 14.9 % relative to the first 
six months of 1993. 

The following table charts changes relative to first-half 1 993 : 


Analysis of premium 

INCOME C%J 



Change in consojoathd 

NET EARNHNJGS On FF NraJJOM) 


In FF million 


Premium income 


Net earnings 
Assets managed 


First-half 1 993 First-half 1 994 Change 


- 33,243 39,597 +19.1 % 


BOI-7 691.5 +14.9% 

192,900 252,900 +31.0% 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rote* 


AMMton UBS 

'■reman an 

R ranMwl U8M 

toatHto) IBB 

MBrM rain 

NOtaa UaUB 

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teia me 

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Ckulngs In Amsterdam. London, 
rules al 3 air. 

■: To buy one Bound: o: To bur 
uvottatUa. 


Oct 20 

FA Lira Drt BJF. SJ=. Yin Cl Peseta 

ipm aim* — uu* uw us* ucs u«* 

IMS 21172* 14JS7 341175 U174 2U2 34711* 

UR? tins* ura uw* uoa lmi* iw 12015 - 

L33K 20027 27311 U1K UMU 21W XU6 

HJB Mi* 742H 4JU5 MUh 12LW* 92M 

27729 Mil 4MB U29JS US 1J3U0 1227 

£17*5 U37JB 1JK3 3072 UW VMS UW 13430 

anti* IBM 0.1446 4.1341 SMS* UN 4 . 117 * 

Ufj uu 5406 0.1421 7129 — 7215 0751V 

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UQ2 mu* 0741 4JD34 * UBS* MBS U9I4* 

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1M 277034 25023 15125 USB USjMS 2115 1BJMV 

New York and Zurich, fixings In other cenJort; Toronto 

one doUar; S uw to of W AU3-- not ousted; na.: not 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 


French 


Oct. 20 

Dollar 

D-Mark 

Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

1 moatii 4 Wv, 

4 Wta 

3 , fc 3 , *k 

5 fc -5 ft 

5 iwj 

2 V 2 >» 

5 'rJ v. 

Smooths 3 h- 5 «» 

5 hrf*. 

+ 41 b 

55 U -6 


3 %- 2 *t 

5 >v ^5 r -> 

6 moattH 5 TrS Yk 

5 Vb- 5 V» 

4 Vfa- 4 % 

(r*- 6 V, 

PM* 

7 Hr 2 ft 

6 <•- 

1 year 6 U- 4 M SVW 9 k 

Sources: Reuters, Lloyds Bank. 

4 M'. 

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6 U.- 6 H 

2 r v »-2 ■». 

Mte 6 Vi 


Ratos aoatteabto to I nt erbank decants at St mutton mtnbnum (nr Mutvatantl. 


Kay Monay Rataa 

United Stoics 
DHeourtrate 
Prim* rate 


3thar 

Srrencr 


ogrrma P*rl 
Ararat ran u*m 
Antonis 1 X 71 
Amman UW 
traUraul ax 
runts mn asm 
Cachtonm Z7J5 
Danbukrara un 


Ha. markka 44W 


DoBar Values 

pgrl . Currency Pm* 

■ u*M firaekdrac. ZU60 

1X71 HmaKamt 7-7357 

l UW HtratMfM HUM 

AX IndMtwH 31-33 

on 05113 2173JD3 

on 27X Irish c &52S1 

M U72 tvoefl took. . US 

M 3X3 Kuwait] dinar OJHB 

a Motor, rim*. W 


Mm. pcm 
M. Zealand S 
Norn. kraM 
PUR. peso 
PatWizMv 
Port escudo 
Hips.rvMe ; 
Savfllrlv* 
Mm-f 


Currency Port 
S-Alr.rand 15245 
5 . Mr. woe 7 HJOO 
Swed. krona 7.179 
Taiwan I 24.10 

TbalbaM 2453 

Turk toll tiro 3S2SL 
UAEdhUam 14327 

vmLtoNv. 

1AVJHS7 


Forw ar d Rotas 

tewa 30-day tbdtn ndn Currency 

T’nrad Wr ua . M1M um 14173 C ra ad ton flO lU r UOS 1XM 1XM 

teraatmonrfr-i'uaM iX2t IXSl JraonMeyra W-27 *- w *** 

tetoovranc ' VUlb ixw 1-2512 

W iw Bank (Amsterdam! ; In**** dank IBMtU Bonca ComnwrcMe tioHona 
tmtwUi Ammr Ftmat mote (Forts); Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo); Royal Bank at Canada 
(Taranto); IMF (SDR}. Other data from Rattlers an/AP. 


3 -mnmti CDs 480 run 

Comm, paper 1 M dan 554 152 

iKBoatti Treasmy UU 459 489 

1- year Treasury Mil 162 572 

2 - mar Treasury nota 475 463 

S-vear Treasury note 744 733 

7 -voar Treason note 7.48 73t 

IHracr T reasury raft 7J9 747 

Xvear Treasury bead 7.99 7JB9 

Merrill LvocblMur Ready osmt 423 422 

Jopon 

Obuwuirata 1^0 1 * 

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1 -month interbank 214 2 U> 

3 - awitk tatmbMic 2 y. 2 k. 

tnwntk intertask 2 K> 2 fl. 

lO-year Government bond 468 465 

Cena boy 

Lombard rate 4 dA 480 

Cad money 490 495 

Mnentti tnttrbank 400 5 X 0 

3- montH Interbank 420 520 

4- aoatta Interbank 4X 430 

iB-ynar Band 7X 7X 


Can money 
i*mratb iaterbenk 

9jkuu>4h hUUub 
laHUUltk ln|uMuV 

10-year Gilt 
Prance 


» Pk 
n.a. S¥ 
5Y, 5 tt 
544 5 *. 
6 V. 6ft 
842 858 


Assets managed were up 31 % relative ta June 30, 1993, 
at FF 252.6 billion. 

CNP's expansion is based on a clearly defined strategy of : 

• Specialization in all types of personal insurance : life 
insurance, capitalization, casualty cover (health, accident and 
disability]. 

• Strengthening links with partners providing individual and 
group insurance in France and the rest of Europe. 

• Increasing earnings by maximizing management efficiency. 


Shareownefiship at 
JUNE 30, 1 9S4 


BTaupa 
rstitea dtpargna 
10%. 



Investor information : 

4, place Raoul Dauoy 75015 Paris 
T&. : 4318 86 53 


Inttnra nit ra rata 400 580 

Coil money 514 5U 

Untmtn krterbook 5 k. j * 

3-montt) Intarboftk 5ft 5ft 

6-moan Interbank 5* 5% 

TO- year oat 415 405 

Sources: Reuters, Btoomoent. Merrill 
Lynch, Bank of Tokyo, Commerzbank, 
GreemteU Montagu, CcMt Lyonnais. 



CNP 





AM. 

PM. 

Ch'w* 

Zurich 

39855 

39895 

-005 

London 

39855 

3 PUS 

+ 845 

Hew York 

39279 

39830 

+ 1 JB 


CNP, VIVEZ BIEIM ASSURE 


UJ. datum per ounce. London oHtetai «*- 
inns .-Zurich anti New York openlne and ao*- 
tea prices: Now York Comer l December.) 
Source: Reuters. 


.a ‘-t' -'tCrnx:'-' 









Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


*** 


market diary 


U-S-/AT THE CLOSE 


Fears of Inflation 
Undercut Stocks 


Bloomberg Business Nns 

NEW YORK - U.S. stocks 
weakened Thursday amid con- 
cerns that the economy's 
growth had not slowed enough 
this year to forestall another in- 
terest-rate increase by the Fed- 
eral Reserve. A slump in Gener- 
al Motors shares fueled the 
decline. 

“Everyone’s fearful about the 
Fed tightening.” said Nola 


U.S. Stocks 


Maddox Falcone, president of 
Evergreen Asset Management 
Corp. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage, off as much as 4 US 
points, closed at 3.91 1.15, down 
24.89. The drop erased most of 
the 25.57-point gain accumulat- 
ed so far this week. 

Declining stocks outnum- 
bered advancers by more than 
2-to-l on the New York Stock 
Exchange, where about 326.11 
million shares changed hands, 
up from 317.04 million 
Wednesday. 

General Motors accounted 
for almost half the decline in 
the index. Shares of GM 
slumped 3% to 43tt after the 
company reported earnings for 


the third quarter below most 
analysts' estimates. 

Slocks began to fall as a se- 
ries of economic reports raised 
the prospect of accelerating in- 
flation, notably a report that 
housing stans had grown 4.4 
percent to the highest level of 
the year, and pushed yields on 
30-year Treasury bonds up to 
7.99 percent from 7.89 percent. 

The threat of higher rates 
Clouded better-than-expected 
earnings at several major com- 
panies, including International 
Business Machines. Microsoft 
and AT&T. 

"It’s one of these good news, 
bad news days,” said Hugh 
Johnson, chief investment strat- 
egist at First Albany Co. 
“There's a continued battle in 
the trenches between better 
earnings and worries about a 
strong economy.” 

Shares of .Alcoa climbed 1% 
to 9014 as the price of aluminum 
set a four-year high amid grow- 
ing industrial demand and fall- 
ing stoclqpiies. 

Gold stocks, a traditional 
hedge against inflation, were 


among the biggest advancers, 
gow 1 


The S&P gold index of five 
stocks climbed 4.55 points to 
249.97. 


Rockwell Makes Bid 
To Acquire Reliance 


Bloomberg Business News 

SEAL BEACH. California — 
Rockwell International Corp. 
said Thursday it would launch a 
SI .5 billion tender offer for Re- 
liance Electric Co., topping 
General Signal Corp.’s $1.4 bil- 
lion agreement to buy the mak- 
er of industrial equipment 

The cash offer, equivalent to 
S30 a share, is an attempt by 
Rockwell to diversify away 
from its roots in '-he defense 
industry and build up its elec- 
tronics and industrial-equip- 
ment businesses. Rockwell said 
it would begin the offer Friday. 

In a letter sent to Reliance 
Thursday morning, Rockwell’s 
chairman, Donald Beall, said his 
company planned to combine 
Reliance with its industrial- 
equipment unit Allen-Bradley. 
to form a subsidiary with esti- 
mated 1994 revenue of about 
$3.5 billion. In 1993, Rockwell 
had sales of $ 10.8 billion. 


To subscribe In France 
|ust call, tell free, 
05437437 


“We have concluded that the 
strategic and financial advan- 
tages of combining our two 
companies are too compelling 
to ignore,” Mr. Beall said in the 
letter to Virgil Sherrill. Re- 
liance’s chairman, and John 
Morley, Reliance’s chief execu- 
tive officer and president 

Analysts said the combina- 
tion of Rockwell and Reliance 
makes sense. Rockwell’s Allen- 
Bradley unit which makes com- 
puter controls for industrial 
equipment would benefit from 
Reliance’s industrial motors 
and drives operations, said Pe- 
ter Aseriris. an analyst at CS 
First Boston. 

“We think it’s a very good 
fit" Mr. Aseritis said. “They 
could virtually offer one-stop 
shopping, making them a good 
competitor with Siemens of 
Germany, which already makes 
both controllers and motors.” 

Reliance shares were up 
$5.25 to close at $29.75 in trad- 
ing on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Rockwell shares lost 
37.5 cents to close at $36, while 
General Signal stock rose $1.25 
a share to dose at $35,625. 


Vlo Associated Prm 


On 30 


The Dow 


Dally dosings of the 
Dow Jones industrial average 



3506 


A M 
1994 


J J A S O 


NYSE Most Actives 


GnMoIr 

IBM 

Carncoa 5 
Pei 

KlmoClK 
Gnlnst S 
ForftMs 
GeriEls 

Owy*lf 

MJcrTcs 

Flngernt 

cocoa 

AT&T 

Dr»lrd 

ReTEIc 


VoL 

High 

LOW 

Last 

127438 


42 *b 

43'. 

51166 

7*'., 

737. 

75’. 

46900 

38*» 

36',ii 

30*4 

34004 

18V» 

17 

17*i 

31101 

175. 

52 

57"» 

31090 

M". 

29*9 

30 

29104 

295b 

20 >b 

»*♦ 

79970 50 

40' 1 

49 

27*08 HV. 

46 H 

46'j 

27671 

36 

Ml's 

M’i 

27307 

21V. 

18 

I0'i 

26270 

S0"i 

495b 

50 

26138 

545b 

S3 : > 

54’b 

2S784 

31 V, 

3 ft* 

3l'-» 

25570 

30 

29’ 

79*. 


eta. 
— 3>, 
— 1 'b 


- H 
— 5'i 


NASDAQ Most Actives 



VoL Hkth 

LOW 

Last 

Cfcg. 


65307 9T, 

S77b 

59 V. 

-? 



SW 

ts’.'i 




If 

31b 





I7*t> 





31 l i 




39720 ll*b 

9V. 




19456 61 

60 




3678* 9V. 

3’,* 










27 1 .« 


* ' ■ 

MCI 


23 V. 




I’r'l't'! 

29'*b 




F’lvIlK 

dJVt 

3 

_ 

TalOnA 

23580 23Tb 

23 



Entractun 

72BS7 



-• 


AMEX Most Actives 



Vat 

Htah 

Low 

Last 

019- 

vioewrt 

26734 

It* 

Hi 

Hi 

—A. 

ViacB 

11581 

39*. 

J9'b 

y>'m 

— 

Echo Bov 

7060 

13*b 

ir's 

13’. 

- % u 

EruoBI 

6819 

15*b 

13 V. 

13% 

— V^i 

IvayCc 

6461 

20H 

19’b 

19 V. 


XCLLffi 

6365 

lib 

r.'u 

1'<K 


Amftii 

4966 

9M 

94b 

9H 

... 

US AlC 

4406 

ss 

4'V„ 

JIV„ 



HeUortef 

4106 

2 

l"/l4 

l'V H 

_* 

Irrt&lcm 

37 J 7 

IS 1 * 

)4*» 

)4tb 

— 'j 


Market Sales 


Commodity 

Today 

0.796 

Pro*. 

0JC1 


Today 

Pre*. 

Cooper elect roly Me. Ib 

1J1 

121 

21X00 





0X2 

0X2 



380.15 

Sliver, troy or 

5J9 

SJa 5 


19X6 

27.93 

Steel 1 scrap), ton 

11780 

1)780 


31382 

34384 

Tin. Ib 


nd 

In millions. 






Dow Jones Averages 


Open Low Lost C*B- 


Mfl 

Trans 

UTlI 

Comp 


3V34.ro 394X1-3 3594.44 JVH.I5— M B0 
1501 6- I5J1J0 1504 « 1S11JV—I2.II 
<Bi.m lai *5 i?»4] 100.00 — i.sb 
1310.52 >311 90 1297 40 1302JJ —9-3’ 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


industrials 

Trans. 

utilities 

Finer** 

SP 500 
SP 1M 


High Low Clove Cti*ve 
55V jU7 5514* 555J5-3X7 
365.01 340.15 

15250 15005 150X4 -106 
435V jioi 43.14—0x5 
470J7 46SJ9 44085 -143 
434.08 J3l.lt 432X4 - 3.48 


NYSE Indexes 


Hi* Low LOW Cfg. 


COTioosiie 

irtauvtrjtfs 

Tr arise 

Utility 

Finance 


258.32 254.91 254-54 
325. 43 J32.6 0 323.54 

234.47 531X2 533 J I 

205.76 201.00 503.43 

505.48 203.53 203.40 


— I.J8 
— 1 « 
- 208 
-2 12 
—I SE 


NASDAQ Indexes 


►tan Low Lad Cta. 


CcmPOsiii? 

trtdusrrials 

Bonks 

insurance 

Finance 

Transo, 


77X08 765.75 767.80 — 2J2 
781 VI 775.17 77458 — 193 
747.93 743.14 744J8 — 3_M 
V2V.73 924.53 *24-53 — ! *8 
VIS VI V13X3 913X3 — £23 
717 50 7134)8 714V2 —1.25 


AMEX Stock Index 


►ta* Low Last 019. 

J59.12 4547V 457 76 —0-50 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 industrial 


Close 
9SX0 
90 66 
101.14 


Cltae 

— 0X3 

— 0X7 

— 0-30 


NYSE Diary 



Oase 

Prev. 


692 

1137 

Declined 

157T 








Now HigPIS 

45 

56 

New low; 




AMEX Diary 


Advanced 

Oase 

2W 

P rev. 

25? 

DectlTteo 



Uncnongcd 

2>6 

239 




New Higtis 

9 

13 

New Laws 




NASDAQ Diary 



data 

1389 

prov. 

1727 


1012 

1458 

Unchanged 

1908 

1919 




Hew Higns 

1D4 

120 

New Lows 




Spot Commodities 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Close 

fit a Ask 

ALUMINUM (HMti Unde) 
Dollars per metric too 
Sort 1754.00 175580 

Forward 1774.00 1 77400 

COPPER CATHODES tHWi 

Dollars per metric ton 

Seal 2S8S8D 258450 

Fwwora 2SK0O 2584* 

LEAD 

Dollars per metric ion 
Spot 65X00 65400 

Forward *500 66SJ0 

NICKEL 

Donors per metrician 
spot 6915.00 49253X1 

forward JteOM 702400 

TIN 

Dollars per metric te w 
Spat 554000 557000 

Forward 5613-00 565000 

ZINC (Special High Grade) 
Dollors per melrKton 
SPOt 10713X1 10723X1 

Forward 109080 109180 


Previous 
Bkt Ask 


Htflh Low Last Settle 
15450 15400 15425 15400 


17203X1 1 72109 
1741310 17433)0 
Grade) 


2SC0O 35000 
753900 25403X1 


6463X1 647310 
654QQ 6J450 


678400 679400 
48903)0 49003)0 


54803)0 54903)0 
SS6Q.OO 55703X1 


106100 106850 
10833X1 108350 


APf . — -y . — ,y ,J-J - .. 

May 1S3JW 15100 15100 ]B« 

JgM 152-50 151.75 15250 15250 

July 1S3J5 15225 15175 15450 

An N.T. N.T. NT. 156® 

Sen N.T. N.T. N.T. 15733 

Oct N.T. N.T. N.T. 1603)0 

Est. volume: no. . Open ini. 98089 


cirae 
+ 0.75 
+ 0L2S 
+ 050 
+ 150 
+ 0.75 
+ 050 
+ 050 


BRENT CRUDE OIL OPE) . 

U8. denars per bnrreUaTs of 1800 barrets 


Dec 

ItSb 

1*83 

Jan 

16X9 

16 ?S 

Feb 

14X1 

16.1/ 

Mar 

1630 

16.10 

apt 

1AI7 

16.10 

Mgy 

N.T. 

N.T. 


1680 

16.10 

Jly 

16JI 

16.16 


N.T. 

N.I. 

Sep 

N.T. 

M.T. 

Oct 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Hot 

16.15 

16.15 

Est. volumo: 32870 . 


14X1 1657 +045 


N.T. 16.11 — 0.05 


I63W + <U» 
160» + 0.01 
N.T. 16.10 +053 
N.T. 16.U +053 


N.T 


Stock Indexes 


Financial 


Hlgn Low Clese Change 
S-M0NTH STERLING (LIFFE) 

C0t OJMO - Pts of 1® pal 


pec 

Mar 

Joe 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Sen 

Dee 

Mar 

Jan 

See 


9253 

9271 

9212 

<nji 

9158 
91.15 
9298 
V0 JO 
90X8 

90S? 

N.T. 

N.T. 


9148 
9244 
9206 
VI 46 
9151 
913)9 
va93 

90-75 

90X6 

90-57 

N.T. 

N.T. 


9149 — 0301 

9247 —2041 

9209 —204 

9158 —004 

9154 -055 
91.10 — 004 
9051 — 03)4 

9076 — 0-05 

9046 — 0315 

9259 —204 
9054 — CL04 

9054 —CUM 


Est. volume: 44522 Open mi.: 4793148. 
3-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LiFFE) 

SI million • pti otrae pet 

Dec 943* 943* 94313 — 03* 

Mar 9167 9265 9X58 —209 

Jan N.T. N.T. vxis —0.1 1 

Sen 925V 9259 9250 — 0.13 

Est. volume: 62 Open Ini.: 4502. 


Dec 

Mar 

Jaa 

See 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

SOP 

Dec 


Jan 


EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 
m - pts of 100 pet 

9485 

94J9 

9484 

94J6 

74X9 

94X5 

94.19 

94.12 

94.16 

9381 

9174 

9X78 

9X45 

9X39 

93X3 

9X22 

91 IJ 

9X17 

9380 

9193 

91*5 

*2J9 

9X74 

9X76 


92X0 

9X5* 

92X9 

92X7 

9X47 

9288 

9X36 

9X36 


+ 053 
+ 053 


+ ojn 

+ 0322 
+ 03)2 


+ 03)1 
+ 053 


pts 69 100 per 
9484 94,71 

9422 

+ 082 

9382 

9X77 

7380 

+ 083 

93X4 

9138 

93X0 

+ 081 

9X09 

0383 

9384 

0JJ2 

9X76 

9X71 

9X73 

— 082 

9X53 

9147 

92X8 

— 084 

9X34 

*127 

9X28 

— 085 

9119 

9X13 

9X14 

— 085 


9230 9225 922S 

Est volume: 97X92 Open Ini.: 638.751. 
I-MONTH P1BOR (MATIF1 

fB ~ " 

Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
See 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sop 

Esr. volume: 44577. Open lot.: 191X51. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 
csuxm • pts « J2»di of in pci 
D ec 101-32 101-00 1OL08 -0-11 

Mar 100-12 100-12 100-11 -0-U 

Est. volume: 4X2T7. Ooen InL: 94X12 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM SSM00 - pts of 1® PCt 
Dec 90L59 90.13 9054 — OJD 

Mar 8975 8970 8955 —0313 

Est. volume: 108537. Open Irrt.: 186.906. 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIR 


Hrrtl LOW Close Change 

FTSE 100 (LIFFE) 

OS per tadez point „ ... 

5£ TH « S JS 

E5t. volume: 11J48. Open mi.: 583)79. 
CAC4D (MATIR 

18743)0 -11® 

to* M 1880.M 

Dec 192250 89250 1891 330 — II-VS 

NT N.T. 19173)0 -1150 

jS? nt N.T. 190200 - W 

sSp N.T. N.T. 19353* — 113X1 

Est, volume: 21070. Owen Int.: 63809. 

Sources: Motif, associated W H. 
London lnt‘1 financial Futures £.* dtonac. 
Inn Petroleum £ kdianoe. 


Dividends 


Compart Per Amt Rvc Pay 

IRREGULAR 

AmerFst Pre»2 - -125 JW< ”"3? 

Mesa OttshoreTr - 31092 10-31 l-3‘ 

STOCK 

Summit BCPNJ - 10S 11-22 12-15 

INCREASED 

Fst Westrn Bcp Q -26 10-31 H-4 

INITIAL 

Fin) Trustee « - *3 11-1 11-10 

Torchmark Cart- LC - -1338 10-28 10-31 

REGULAR 


FF 590800 

pts Of M0 PCt 




11186 

11186 

11188 

— 0X4 


110JB 

1T0A8 

11X32 

— 11X4 


11086 

11086 

10984 

— 0X4 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Unef. 


AAR Care 
Amor Fntrana 
AZ PubS adlpto 
Aupat Inc 
Bk of Brolnrree 
CMAC liivt CP 
CdoOcdd Pete 
Cental Fs CdaA 


CilteiirpodlPtv 
Hartnafare 


Esf. volume: 134,194. Ooen Ini.: 129.37. 


m Bras 

Herlteoe FlnSvcs 
Inti Game Tech 
Lawler Inti 
MorgStan HIYW 
NBB Bcp 
P lumCrk TlmbLP 
Realty Inc CP 
Solomon SrosinvFa 
Stxmo Corp 
Sherwtn-Wll I lams 
SolrxJloooGAE 
Sftfel Find 
Summit Bcp N j 
Summit BcsltsFtwin 
Sun DtetA 
Sun Dlst B 
Temottn GlbGvt 
Teem Indus 


,K lOOl 1 2-3 

75 71-10 M-25 

150 11-1 12-1 

3M 11-10 11-30 

3)7 10-31 IMS 

05 11-7 17-1 

.10 13-10 1-1 

3)1 10-28 U-U 

57 10-28 11-15 

095 12-9 12-22 

09 10-31 11-15 

3*3 11-1 12-1 

.10 11-16 12-1 

.12 10-31 11-15 

JO 10-38 11-10 

X3 11-15 11-29 

.15 11-1 1M5 

317 10-21 ll-O 

.705 It? 1-1 

„ .14 11-18 12-2 

O X125 11-18 12-20 

Q JO 3 1M IMS 

a 71 11-22 12-15 

Q 49 11-1 IMS 

M 3)916 1M 11-M 

M 42 1M 11-30 

M 3K 10-31 11-14 

a .05 11-4 11-30 

e-annual; 9- Payable In Canadian funds; nt- 
mount It; Q+warferty; s^emMmoool 


Industrials 


Htab Low Lost settle Cfatol 
GASOIL (IPE) 

U5. dollars per metric ton+ors of 180 tans 
Nov 152-50 15)3* 15250 15250 +200 

Dec 15475 15275 15475 1S47S +2.00 

Jan 154.00 15450 15550 15X50 +150 

Fes 15675 15575 15425 15625 + 1JM 

Mar 15450 15575 15425 1543* +075 


To subscribe in Germany 


just call, loll free. 
0130 84 85 85 


Housing Data Point to Rate Rise 

WASHINGTON ^ he hi 2 hcs! 


WASHINGTON IBlOOmDcrg.) — . j cv j 

rose an unexpected 4.4 percent iii September l Reservc u> 

the year. Analysts said this could prompt the Ftd 
raise interest rates for the sixth time uus y«£. , jedinejn 

The housing report — along with the repor Fc(k4iL 

weekly unemployment claims and a b,g .®f“ n in l j ox — contrib- 
Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s business activity inoL. 
uted to declines in U.S. stocks and bonds. •£ 

Ronald R Blown, the U.S- commerce secrejaij, 
the talk of another rate increase. Mr. Brown cud 
along with a drop in wholesale prices mid tame cl nsum p- ' 
monto, was “further evidence the economy will continue to expand 
in the near term with no significant increase in uifia o.. 

Brokerage Firms Say Earnings FaU . - , 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Salomon Inc. and 
Group Inc. reported lower third-quarter earnings Thursday & 
trading and investment banking revenue fell amid a s.ur p the 

Se ^moIt theorem of Salomon Brothers Inc., posted i a l«s of 
$104 million; the company earned $20 million a year earlier, lb 
stock fell SI. to $37,625. PaineWebber said its profit dadmed 6i t 
percent, to $203 million. Its stock was unchanged at ; 


Coca-Cola Net Rises on Better Sales - 


ATLANTA (AP) — Coca-Cola Co. said Thursday its third- 
quarter profit rose 20 percent as sales growth surpassed jjs 

^^Tliecompany earned $708 milli on, compared with $-’*90 m, !lis?|i 
a year earber. Revenue rose 23 percent to $4.46 billion. 

The company said international soles, which account for about 
two-thirds of the its business, rose 17 percent over last year. C ocz- 
Cola stock fell 623 cents to $50. 


Lockheed Posts 3.4% Profit Rise 


CALABASAS, California (Bloomberg) — Lockheed Corp., the 
world’s hugest defense company, said Thursday that third -quarto 
earnings rose 3.4 percent, although revenue slipped nearly 9 perceap. 

Net income rose to $1 12 million, or $1.76 a share, from S10S 
million, or $1.70 cents, in the year-earlier quarter. Re\ enue fell 8.9 
percent, to $3.2 billion from $33 billion. ^ 

Separatdy, Martin Marietta Corp. said third-quarter profit rose 
14 percent to $148.8 millio n, or $1.39 a share. Revenue rose 33 
percent, to $ 2 J 6 billion. ' ']■ 


Union Pacific Had Loss in Quarter _ 

BETHLEHEM, Pennsylvania (AP) — Union Pacific Corp. ins- 
ported a $213 milli on third-quarter loss Thursday after writing 
down the value of its hazardous waste business in preparation fora 
The loss compared with a profit of $108 million a year earlier. 

The company reduced the value on its books of U.S. Pollution 
Control Inc. by $423 million; an agreement to sell the companyis 
expected wi thin a month. 

Without the write-down. Union Pacific's profit would have be® 
$210 million, 94 percent more than a year ago. Revenue totaled 
$1.96 billion. j * 


For the Record 


Bankers Trust Profit Plunged 45% in 3d Period 


NEW 


The slssixiaicJ Press 

YORK — Bankers Trust 


New 


York Corp. said Thursday iis profit plum- 
lird c 


meted 45 percent in the third quarter, as 
weak financial markets hurt the bank's 
trading revenues, its biggest source of 
earnings. 

The seven th-largest American bank said 
Thursday that it had earned $169 million. 


or $1.98 a share, during the quarter, down 
1 million, or $3.60 a share. ; 


a year 


from $310 
earlier. 

Revenue from securities trading fell 55 
percent to $278 million from a year earlier. 


Bui by adjusting its positions and taking 
fewer risks. Bankers Trust boosted trading 
revenue by $145 million, or 59 percent, 
from the previous quarter. 

Analysts said quarter- to-quar ter com- 
parisons more accurately reflect revenue 
trends when it comes to trading because of 
market volatility. So even though trading 
revenue plunged from a year ago. Bankers 
Trust has made strides to repair its prob- 
lems. 

“Trading is recovering.” said Rafael 
Soifer. a bank analyst at Brown Brothers 
Harriman & Co. 


In a troubling disclosure. Bankers Trust 
said Thursday that it had set aside an 
unspecified amount to cover potential 
losses in the bank’s fund-management 
business. Bankers Trust manages invest- 
ment portfolios for large corporations and 
mutual funds, investing the money in 
stocks, bonds and derivatives. 

Derivatives are exotic financial con- 
tracts whose value is derived from the 
movement in a certain market, such as 
stocks, interest rates or currency exchange 
rates. Profit from derivatives were $67 mil- 
lion. up $17 million. 


ITT Covp. said it was considering selling its Sheraton hotel 
franchising business. The company also reported that thirifc 
quarter profit rose 2 percent to $257 million. M O 

Textron Inc. said improved demand and better profit margiitf 
contributed to an 1 1 percent rise in third-quarter profit, to S 11 r 
million. Sales rose 7 percent, to $238 billion. (Bloomberg 
Colgate-Palmolive Co. said third-quarter earnings rose 
cent to $151 million, buoyed by increased sales, which also rosc$ 
percent, to $1.93 billion. (Bfaintbergl 

Northwest Airlines said net profit in its third quarter rose 54 
percent to a record $170 million. Revenue rose to $235 billion 
from $2.39 billion a year earlier. f-4 FXi 

Westinghonse Electric Corp. reported that third-quarter profit 
rose 12 percent to $73 million, or 15 cents a share, on an 8.2 
percent revenue gain to $2.23 billion. ( Bloombcr g) 



: percent to $1.5 billion. (Bloomberg) 

BellSouth Corp. said third-qcarter earnings rose 3.1 percent 


from a year earlier to $499.5 million, or $1.01 a share. Sales rose 
4.6 percent to $42 billion. ( Bloomberg ) 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agones France Prana Oct. 20 


daeePrav. 


Amsterdam 


57.70 57 JO 
34J0 34J0 

10460 10120 
48J0 48X0 

anxo 203 
70.10 71.10 
3320 3U0 
A4JI0 6770 

141 JO 141 JO 

1480 1670 
1470 1130 
44.90 4570 
785-50 284 

237 JO 237.10 
76 7570 
75-50 7520 
4150 43J0 

92.70 92JQ 

78J0 78 


ABN Amro HW 
ACF Holding 
Aovotl 
Ahold 
Akzo Nobel 
AM6V 

Bots-Weswmen 
CSM 
DSM 
Elsevier 
Fokker 

GfsT-Brocodes 
HBG 
H elnefc en 
Hoooovens 
Hunmr Douglas 
IHCCnland 
inter Mueller 
mn Neaerlana 

KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 
Nadlloyd 
Oce Grin ten 
Pakhocd 
Philip* 

Pohrorom 

Bob* co 

Rodamca 
Rollnco 

Roranlo 
Royal Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
Van Ommeren 
VNU 

woitars/Klutvar 121X0 12170 
! Index :«3J7 


49M 49 . 90 

5HJ0 5770 

51.10 MJO 

7X50 74J0 

46J0 MJ0 

54.10 5470 
71 JO 71J0 

11370 113 

51 JO 5070 
116 11570 


18850 190.10 
44.70 45 

199J019U0 
45JN 44-10 
17A10 173J0 




Brussels 


Almanll 

Arhed 

Barca 

BBL 

Bekoort 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

Cocker) 1 1 

Coovaa 

coi run 

Delta In 

ElectraMI 

Electnaflna 

FcrtUAG 

GIB 

GBL 

Gevacn 

GlavartMl 

Immotxjl 

Kradletbonk 

MO*™ 
Pelroflno 
Pomrria 
Recrtcel 
Royaie Seine 
Sec Gen Bonaire 


7500 7490 
NA 5020 
H80 2470 
4150 4200 
ZnOOZBSD 
11975 12075 
2500 2495 
1980 17*0 
193 197 

5400 5420 
7190 71 SO 
1232 1234 
5520 5520 
3000 3030 

24*0 2450 

1246 1244 
4025 4003 
0940 8990 
4590 4400 
2040 2840 
6150 4210 
1372 1380 
9510 9520 

2M5 2970 

495 498 

4780 4780 
7540 7530 


SocGen Beleiaut 2190 .2210 


12975 13950 

14900 15275 
9800 9770 
9710 9700 
34250 2050 
2690 2690 
NA 6500 

v&s&mr™ 


Soflna 
Solway 
Tewondwrlo 
Troctetal 
C/C6 

Untan Mhtiere 

weaom Lira 


SEL 

HOM 


Frankfurt 

w dS ,a S 

300 300 

2333 2318 
435 *45 
848 845 

312J0310M 

351 JO 349a 

DO Dank 396 392 

s 

* % ^ 

Jtxmfc 33030 318 

Hal 224 JO m 
Ben 768 735 

464 455 JO 
ock 230 227 
J Bonk 738 723 

510 494 
r Ban* 399J039SJ0 
idle 300 300 

Hoesch 195 194 

i 317 313 

S895S8J0 
979 972 

328 325 

812 806 




330 
15515X50 
628 617 
IXA. 513 



aotaPrey. 

RtaU) me toil 

273 

274 

Senerlng 

969 

964 

Siemens 

621X0 

622 

Thvssen 

286 

282 

vartu 

31450 

315 

Veoo 

521.50 

518 

VEW 

377 367 JO 

Vlog 

47X5047030 

Volkswagen 

44044X80 

Wei la 

1025 

1020 


Helsinki 


Amer-Ylilvnta 

Enn-Grtzeir 

Huhiamaki 

K.ap. 

Kvmmene 

Me fra 

Nokia 

PtJWoia 

Recala 

Stack mam 


99X0 99 

«J0 4100 
144 147 

HJ5 10 J0 
131 132 

144 148 

640 638 

64L50 66X0 
97 JO 101 
265 272 




Hong Kong 


Bk East A*ia 
Camay PacHIc 
Cheung Kong 
China Llahi Pwr 
Dairy Form Int'l 

Hcno Lung Dev 

Hong Sene Bonk 
Henderson Land 
HK Air Erw. 
HKCWnaGcs 
HK Electric 
HK Land 
hk Realty Trust 

HSBC Holdings 

hk snang Hill 
HK Telecomm 
HK Ferry 
Hutcn Wtamaoa 
Hyson Dev 
JarameMattk 
Jardlne Str HkJ 


Kowloon Motor 
n Ortenr 


Mandarin 

Miramar Hotel 

New World Dev 
SNK Ptops 

SMux 
Swire Poc A 
Tai Cheung Pros 
TVE 

wtiort Hold 
Wtieelock Co 
WlnaOnCa Inti 
WHnear ind. 


Haag Seng Index 
Prtvmnjjm 


; 932U6 


33 22J0 
11X0 11-50 
36X0 35JH) 
39.90 <0.10 
1045 1030 
13X0 13J5 
5525 53-25 

49.10 050 

31.10 31X0 

14.15 14JB 

23X5 23X5 

18X5 1BJ0 

1670 10X0 

09.75 89.75 
10-75 1005 
1SJ5 15X5 
)0.« 1075 
33X0 3140 

19.70 19J0 

6175 65 

29.75 3ai0 
14J75 14X5 

9.95 9XS 

19.10 19X0 
2520 25X5 
S6J0 56 

115 125 
56 55-74 
1L20 10X0 

4.15 4.1S 
29X5 29J5 
16X5 1620 
iaio iaio 

10.10 10 
938M8 


Johannesburg 

27 J0 28 

130 100 

23S 237 

32 31 JO 
10X5 1075 
54 NA 
100 99 

66 63 JO 
14X5 14JJ 
125J012SJ0 
42 4135 
3225 32X0 
TflaS 68 
39.95 3125 
48.75 49J0 
I13J0 115 

88 87 

52 NA 
37 JO 37X5 

228 225 


AECI 
A Keen 
Anglo Amer 
Barlows 
Blyvocr 
Buftos 
De Beers 

□rlefontekn 

Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
HtahveM steel 

KlOrt 

NedbankGni 

RSfidfanteln 

RU3p4df 

SA Brews 
St Helene 
5asoi _ 
Western Deep 




124.7012130 


sr werke!4iJ0 

857 858 

la 186 184 

404X0 404 

w 

i 449 « 

231 JO 225 

464 JO *0? 


Ataev Non 
Allied Lyons 
Ario Wiggins 
Argyll Group 
Asa Bril Foods 
BAA 
BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Berdievs 

Bass 

BAT 

BET 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
BooM 
Bowuter 
BP 

! Brit Airways 
i Brit Gas 
i Brit Steel 
Brit Telecom 
BTR 

Cable Wire 
Cadbury Sett 
Carodan 
Coats viyeua 
Comm Union 
Cavrtaulda 
ECC Group 
Enterprise Oil 
. Eurotunnel 
Flsens 


London 

All 


187 

2X4 

2X7 

123 

505 

4X0 

106 

5-71 

5X0 

4X1 

1X5 

2X8 

6X1 

5J1 

4J2 


180 

2X6 

1J8 

190 

3.09 

4.10 
4X1 
274 
203 
5J4 
4X0 
131 
1 « 

1.17 


4X2 

5.91 

2J0 

2X8 

5X3 

5X9 

47 a 

2X4 

5X5 

534 

443 

1X4 

287 

6 X? 

5-39 

4J1 

4X0 

176 

284 

1J9 

3.93 

110 

4317 

4X3 

2x8 

201 

532 

4.40 

155 

3X4 

215 

1 . 1 ? 


GE? 

Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 


HIIISdOWTt 

HSBC HMM 

inch cone 

Kingfisher 

Lodbrokc 

Lond Sec 

Loporte 

Lasmo 

Legal Gen Gra 
Lloyds Bart: 
Marks So 
ME PC 
Nan Power 
Natwesf 
HthWst Water 
Pearson 
P&O 
Pllklngtan 
PowerGen 
Prudential 


Rank Ora 
Retfcltt Got 

8S 


edtand 
oed Inti 

■uters 

IMC Group 
Rolls Rovce 
Rottunn (unit) 
Royal Scot 
RTZ 

Salrvsbury 
Sent Newcas 
Scot Power 
Stars 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

State 

Smith Neotaw 
SmlttiKllne B 

Smitn (WH) 

Sun Alliance 

Tote » Lyle 
Tesco _ 

Thom EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
Utd Biscuits 
Veoefane 
War Loan 3VS 
Wellcome 
Whlibraad 
williams Hdes 
Willis Corroon 

FT 30 I 


Ctoee Pre*. 

» 

283 

285 

5X7 

5X0 

5X2 

5X0 

4.16 

417 

1.91 

1.91 

4X2 

464 

565 

5X3 

X27 

288 

1X2 

1X5 

722 

780 

022 

883 

422 

434 

480 

4J7 

183 

183 

ts 

624 

7.10 

181 

1X9 

4.40 

4X3 

585 

583 

423 

424 

431 

425 

483 

480 

5 

4.97 

561 

5X3 

410 

616 

682 

617 

1.91 

187 

S3 

382 

389 

415 

613 

594 

5X8 

4X2 

470 

784 

787 

464 

487 

9X5 

9X4 

1X6 

1.75 

4.19 

412 

427 

627 

B86 

6J2 

198 

3X7 

in 

588 

380 

382 

180 

189 

5X1 

589 

785 

7.11 

527 

588 

1X3 

1X3 

420 

416 

453 

4X9 

384 

1X3 

421 

421 

X34 

284 



X13 

112 

.2-24 

XII 

1186 

1184 

383 

aw 

286 

2JJ2 

41 

4181 

688 

685 

5X7 

5X2 

3X2 

3X0 

184 

181 


Madrid 


BBV 

Sen Central Hlso. 

Bonco Santander 

Boneslo 

CEPSA 

Dragoons 

E ndesa 

Ercros 

loerdroio 

Reosol . 

Tatacntera 

Telefonica 
node 


3210 3215 
3085 3050 
4980 4910 
842 839 

3200 3200 
1875 1890 
5580 5530 
IS6 IS? 
830 832 

3880 3893 
3400 900 
1725 1725 
;2NX8 


Milan 


lAlleoiuo 15200 15450 

AMltolla 12245 12430 

Autcstrode pr 1 v T44T 1646 
Bca Aortcolturo 2600 2U0 
Sea ConWior IKH ,3685 W0 
Sea KOI Lavoro 12220 1 2210 
Bca POP Novara 
Banco til Soma 
Beg Amferashsno 
Bco Napoli rlsp 

SSrttafmiiatio 

EllKtHRI AUS 
Fertln 
Ftatspa 
Flnanz Aoraind 
Finmeccanica 
PondlOrtOSPa 
Generali Asslc 
IFIL 


Halcementi 
llaloas 
AAedlobanca 
tented Hon 
jllveni 
Pirelli spa 
RAS 

RlnoscerrTe 


7950 7990 
USS U84 
3935 3865 
1059 1050 
198SCWI55 

ISSS 122 

2970 WJ 
1268 12W 
6045 6040 
9790 9800 
1215 1215 

37350 3 7250 
S265 5270 
10115 10110 
4650 4725 
12800 12600 
1218 1191 
1800 1824 
2225 22T0 
19050 1B800 
8200 8050 


IIP 


Porta Torlta 8*10 8800 
3970 3995 
SME _ WOJB 

SnUi ted 1871 1875 

stotaa 36W 340M 

Top Asslc 23^ 23000 

V&S&vtitS 01 ”" 


Montreal 


AtCO Ud I 

Bonk Montreat 


13H 13% 
24H 246* 


ClauPrev 


BCE Mobile Com 
Cdn Tiro A 
Cdn uni A 
Cascades 
Crowra Inc 
CT Plfi'l Svc 
Gaz Metro 
GtWestUfeco 
Heesmri bcp 
H udson's Bay CO 
imascaLtd 
investors Gra Inc 
Labatt (John) 
LaWawCos 
Mo Ison A 
Natl Bk Canada 
Ostawc A 
Poncdn PetTrtm 
Power Carp 
Power Flnl 
Oueoecor B 
Rogers Comm B 
Roval 8k COT 
Sears Canada Inc 
Shell Cda A 
Souttionj Inc 
StelcoA 
Trllgn Fltfl A 


39H 39W 

nw uw 

24V, 24 

- ■ 8 

18V. 18b 
18 18U 
12 ki 1 


20 

13te 13W 




27W 27V. 
38 30W 
16 16 
21 Vk ZHa 
22 Z2t* 
21 W 211 * 
91* 9W 
19V. 19ta 
40W 41H 
186b 186b 

aw 28W 

16H 16U 
19V. 19W 
286b 281* 
5% FVS 
44*. 45 

15V, 15V. 
9U 91b 
3v. n. 
19633)1 


Paris 


614 629 

25Z.W 257.70 
524 532 


ACCOr SSI 557 

AIT UoukJe 712 724 

Alcatel Alsttam *7180 46* 

flvn 244 40 744.30 

Banco! re (Clel 498X0 500 

BIC ~ 

BNP 

Bouygu« 

Danone 
Camrfour 
C.C.F. 

Cerus 
Chargeurs 
Clments Franc 
aub Mod 
EJt-AavJtolne 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Earn 


721 711 

2200 2216 


213 212J90 
103.90 in.70 
1275 1272 
275 276 

428J0 429 

340 367 

6-50 7.10 

446 454 


I metal 

Lcrforae Copoee 399.10 406JD 
Legrand 6830 «« 

Lyon. ECU* 453 45210 

Oroai (L'l tOK 1070 

L.VJW.H. 830 844 

Mafra-Hataetfe 10220 103X0 

MlCtatlnB 22540 228X0 
Moulinex 117 118 

Paribas 336 343 

PeehKv Inti 15640 15* 

Peraod-Rlcara 296 298JO 
Peugeot 7B0 771 

Plnautt Print 9SS 95* 
Rodiotectmidue 5n 518 
Rh-PoutoXA 122.70 124.15 


Raff. SI. LOUiS 
Sonofi 

SdintGobaln 

S.E.B. 

Sle Generate 
Suez 


1424 1415 
749 J0 250 
640 645 

546 557 

S79 572 

240X02*5X0 


TTwmson-CSF 141 JO 144 


Total 

UAP. 

Valeo 


319.90 323X0 

133.90 13320 

29170 288 


Sao Paulo 


Banco do Brasfi i&do 16X0 


aonespo 
Broanco 
Bra hma 

Cernto 

Eleliuliius 

Itoubonto 

Ltatfi 

P a ranqponetno 

PetroOras 

Souza Cruz 

TeUbr os 

Teteso 

Uslmmas 

VotaRioDoce 

Varig 


10 10.10 
825 820 
284X2 298 

83 85 

291 297 

27101 170 
315.12318X2 
.1W0 12 

K9J0 134 
7X9 7X0 
42 41X0 
421417.99 
1X5 1X6 
166 165 

185 190 
Bovopa tadgLi 47294 
PrevtaaS : 4/587 


Singapore 


Asia Poc Brew 16.90 16X0 
Cerebos 8X5 7.90 

City Develoremr 8X0 BJ5 
CVCtaA Carriage U90 14 

DBS 10^0 10X0 

DBS Land 5 4M 

FE Levinoston 7.15 7.10 
Fraser 8. Weave 
Gt Eastn Life 
H ong Leo na Fin 

juwngSnipvora '3^ 1JJ0 

Kay Hum JCapef I.J* 1« 
Kcsjcrt 12.90 12X0 

Natsiee 1 ua la 

Neptune Orient 224 223 
OCBCtoretan 15.10 14X0 
0*SMB Union Bk 720 720 
O'Sens Union Ent o.JS ».I0 
Setntawong 12 1JXT 

Slme Sinoonore 1.17 1.16 


17 JO 17 JO 
27 JO 27 JO 
456 460 
U5 5X5 


Close Prey. 


Slno Aerospace 225 2J4 
Sing Airlines fern 13X0 13.70 


Sing Bus S«c 
5lna Land 
SlfKJ Petlm 
Sing Press font 
Sing Shlptildg 
Sing Tetecomm 
Straits Steam 
Straits Trading 
Tat Lee Bonk 

Utd industrial .... 

Utd □'sea Bk (ant 75X0 16.10 
UidOleasLOfld ita 293 
Strait* TfaiM* Wa: 238225 
Prevlaui : 2M4.il 


9X5 9X5 
9JS 9 
Z50 z 50 
26 26 
2J8 2X0 
120 320 
5 4?B 
402 198 


1-52 1X9 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Asea AF 
Astra AF 
Atlas Concn 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 
Esseite-A 


*7J0 67 JO 
551 550 

lg 18450 
95-50 94J0 
37D349J0 
43S 427 

104 9fl 


Handel sea nk BF 9050 91 

Investor BF 182 111 

Norsk Hydro 2*5 262 
Pharmacia AF 134ij*jo 
Sandvik B 116J0 177 

SCA-A 77450 116 

S-E Ban km AF 4SL10 45JD 

SkandhjF 

s kanaka BF 
SKF BF 
Store AF 
Trrttatarg BF 
Volvo BF 


128J0129JO 
14? JO 150X0 
136 135 

437 435 
110 111 
14450 143 




isrtden: 1893X5 


Sydney 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bcral 

BowalnvWe 
C oles My er 
Comal CO 
CRA 
CS R 

Foster* Brew 
Goodman Field 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM 

Nat Aust Bonk 
News Carp 
Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Poc Dunloo 
Pkxiee r Inti 


8X2 8X4 
3X4 3X7 
19X8 19X4 
135 136 
a« 0.92 
412 413 
530 521 
18.76 1826 
4X3 4X8 
122 120 
127 125 
10-70 10J4 
1.90 1X2 

2 JB 170 
1050 10X4 
8.41 050 

3X2 3X4 
3.75 3X8 


3.22 330 


Nmndy Poseloon 2X7 239 
OCT Resources 127 lxl 
Santas 
TNT 

Western Mining — - 
Westpac Banking 431 434 
woodslde 5X9 5.14 

Afl OrW agrtas.Indett: 381638 

mtkniNM 


3.96 3X4 
229 239 
8X9 8X2 


Tokyo 


430 428 

766 761 
1250 1250 

too 7520 

1560 1540 
17B0 7740 
1280 7288 


Akol Clear 
Asohl Chemical 
AsaN Glass 
Bank M Tokyo 
Bridoestone 
Canon 

CasJo 

Dol Nippon Print 1830 1820 
Polwa House 1370 1370 
Dalwa Securities 1430 7400 
Fonuc 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
HKactil 
Hitachi Cable 


jtaYokcdo 
Itochu 

jaaan Airlines 
Kailmo 
Kansal Po wer 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kutata 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Imfa 
Matsu Elec Wks 
MIbuttsffl Bk 
MitSuD Chemtaa 
MitsuWsnl Elec 
Mnsutlslil Heu 
MDsuMsM Corn 
Mitsui and Ca 
Mitsui Marine 
AAttukashi 

wursuml 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nlkko Securities 1120 1120 
Nippon Kogaku 9«4 9BS 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 


4750 4780 
2170 2150 
2300 2260 
1D7D 1060 
997 994 
863 858 

1730 1720 
53)0 5270 
744 740 

750 735 

9SS 956 
2470 2460 
446 443 

1150 113 
900 900 

724 724 

7320 7290 
1410 1620 
1040 1046 
24711 2450 
570 572 

718 713 
781 786 

1300 1250 
854 847 
755 762 

979 755 

1460 1430 
1240 1240 
1050 1040 


072 688 

390 387 
440 659 

843 837 

2020 2010 
90800 87600 


Olympus optical 1070 1060 
Pioneer 2510 2490 


Ricoh 
Son ro Elec 
Stare 


949 963 
578 579 

1800 1780 


Shlmazu 
Shlnatsu Chem 
Sony 

SumlromoBk 
Sum nemo Chem 
Sum I Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tabel Core 
Tafceda Chem 
TDK 
Tellki 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toppan Printing 
Torav ln«j. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
YamaKtdSec 
a: * 100. 

Nfltkriffl : J7792 





Toronto 


179b 18b. 
8W | 
1916 19U 


AWttW Price 
Air Canada 

A rberTo Energy 

Alcm Aluminum 37W 376b 
Amer Barrlck 35 34W 
Avenor 25 3516 

Bk Nova Scotia 26*1 27 

BCE 479b 47J1 

BC Telecomm 25Vi »b 
Bombardiers 21W 21W 
Bramaleo 4.1D ^4 

BrasconA I9VJ I9W 

Cameco 28W _28 

CIBC 32 Vi 32ta 

can Natural ROS i6W I6W 
Cdn Occid Pet 32 3i*> 
Cdn PacHIc 2T4, 22U, 

Cascades Poper 7 TVb 
Comlnco 26 259k 

Consumers Gas 1«» 1Mb 
Dots ICO 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vw AuociaU Preu 


Oct. JO 


Season Seaton 
tfgh Low 


Open rfoh Low Oase Cta Op.W» 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBOD S0Utumniru«-«i>nnrBuM 












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Est. sain na. Wed's, sales 70X7S 


wed's «>en w 75,914 off 1638 
WHEAT KBOT) 


- ._ v . . Lmbumtaiwn-oWP+Dtrbuwwl 
4J3V. 3.1 2 W Dec W 4JJJVi All 4«’4 4X8 

4J7’A 335 Mor95 4.10 4.15 4.06V, 4.12V 

4JC 3J1W May »S 3.90 192 147 3J«M 

3xfl'4. 3.UViJu195 15796 ISTVj 154 158 

3.77 127 Sec »5 3X0 Vl 

1X9') 3X0 W Dec 75 3X7V; 

EP. soles NA WertLsaie* 4J66 

Wed’s ooen W 37J4I oft 775 

CORN (CS OT1 sXM 6 uiiPwrk»iH«taWywdinta 

2.77 Xt3'40fC74 lUV. 11IW 2.14'A 2-lTVj 

Lt 2 r <J 2J2'4 Mor«S Z25Vi 129 N. 125 U3'a 

’ ' V. 


tOm'Ti 19X17 
-OJDM 12.9*3 
.(UD 1 * 1J03 
*0311 1356 

-101 7B 

*001 4 


Daman Ind B 
- t Cda A 


DuPont ... 

Echo Say Mines 
Empire Co. a 
F aJcnnDridge o* 

FI richer Chall A I7J, 
Franco Nevada B316 
Guardian Cap A Bib 
Hernia Gold 15 

Horsham 21 

Imperial Dll 46W 
inco 41 

I PL Energy 3W 
Loldlaw A 10*6 

LoldlawB 30 3 *. 

Loewen Group 37W 
London InsurGp 2TW 
Moonlit BtoeOet 181b 
Magna inti A 
Maple Leaf Fde 
Moore . 

NewfcrWw Nefw flta 

Nerofxla l rvc 26 Vj 
N oronda Forest 
Norten Energy 
Nthera Tel e com 
Nova 
Ones _ 

Pet ro Canada 
Placer Dome 
Potash Corp 5os» 

Provlgo 
PWA 

Ouebeeor Print 


ill* lie* 

1791 17 

47*4 4 Mb 

13W 14 

13ta 13* 
UW 111b 
37*. 32Vb 
48 

Slfc 

8 X 1 

141b MW 


A 


Renaissance Eny Z73b 27W 


Rk) Aigom 
Seagram Co 
Slone CoasoW 
Talisman Eny 
Telepiohe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TorDom Bank 
Tnaisalta 
TransCdo pipe 
Utd Dominion 

Utd Westaume 

westaxnt £nv 

W e st on 

Xerox Canada B 
T5E 300 lode* : 4319X0 
Previous : 432040 


26 Vi 
411b 

14K. 17 

28 K 
IMi 16V. 
1634 167b 
16V, 1616 
2011 21 
14H 14V. 
171b 17W 

24 *416 

10VS I0Vi 
21 Sfc 21 % 
4JW 4pta 

saw sou 


Zurich 


Ad 10 mil b 218 230 

Aiusuisse B new 636 666 
BBC Brwn Bev B IKS 1119 


OHGcfgvB 
CS Holdings B 
Elektraw B 
Fischer 8 
Interdiscauni B 
Jelmall B 
Landis Gr r R 
MpevtnelckB 
Nestle R 

Oerillr. Buaorle R 
Parana Hid B 
RecneHdgPC 
satra RepuhiK 
Sandar El 
Schindler B 
Sutler PC 
Survelllonce B 
Swiss BnkCoraB 
Swiss RMnsur R 
Swissair R 
UBS B 

Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 
SBC index: 932X6 
Previon ; 901 J3 


715 


705 
536 541 

333 333 

1470 1450 
1955 1935 
863 869 

740 725 
385 385 
1179 1179 
131 133 

1480 1480 
5665 5610 
100 99 

647 642 

7050 7010 
867 B7D 
1760 1765 
370 370 

715 707 
820 830 

124S 1356 
633 625 

1166 1170 


2X5 

2JST-5 

2J0VJ 

1.61 

2-57 

2X4W 


L30ViMay95L3J 2J7V, 2J3 2J4V 

2J5V Jji 95 2J8W 2X3 2J3Vi 2X2’. 
2J9 Sep 95 2X4\4 2X7V, 2X4 2X7 


235WDec95 2X9 ZJ29. 2X8V. 2-51 Vj 

2J0V,(Mor96 L55 2JS 2JS 2J8 

2J5V|JulV6 2X2 2X5 2X2 2X5 

ESI. sales NX. Wed'S, soles 29J12 
wed's uoenlni 242,127 off 875 
SOYBEANS ICBCTl SXBBbuirkWTun-dDilanewiwi 
75T/1 5J4VNov 94 5J9W 5J0V5 5J9Vi 5X9 '5 

UT^Joti 95 5_52Vi 5X2 Vj L53 5X1 

5xr^Va-9S 5X1 5.72 5X1 L71 

556 Mgy95 5X9Vi 579 5*9 

!*JWJl/l9S 576 
5X6 V] Aug 95 580 
571 Sep 95 5X3 
5J8WNBV95 592 

, Jen 96 680 
_ &MWJUIM 

Est. sows NA. Wed-vwte 34J33 
Wed'scwenM 151821 o« 137 
SOYBEAN MEAL (OOT) itato^dstasewten 
207 JD I S9 JO Oct 94 16380 17380 163J0 14».I0 

l60J0Dec 94 162X0 165X0 162JD 164X0 

761.90 Jwi9S 14480 766X0 16480 16170 

164.90 Mar 95 1*7.10 1M.4Q 16780 16AJD 


•083 121 JH 
*08716 55807 
*083 24840 

•083% 27.184 
♦ 083% 2.129 
-D82V. 11X27 
*08256 218 

-08SX. 292 


784 

785 
785V. 
7.04 W 
617 
6.15 
550 Vj 


621 


585D 576 
58BV. 580 
190 5 S3 
60OW 192 
687W 680 


UIV) 

565V. 

58TA 

590 

600 Vi 
687Vi 
620 


‘088'm 60841 

• o.c* is.959 

-0.08 '4 20X84 
► 08e , 6 9846 
■ O88V1 16558 
>-088% 992 

• D.O8V1 349 

-080 6X52 

- 0.07'i 40 

-D.03V6 77 


20980 
207 JO 
207 JO 
20780 


1*7X8 Mcy 95 /7B0 17270 _14<l» 171 JD 


2 A4 9S inX0 17680 173X0 17170 
17280 AuQ 95 17100 177.70 17580 17680 
173J0S«J9i 1 77 JO 17980 177.10 178J0 
1716000 95 171 JO 1B180 178J0 100X0 

174-50 Dec 95 18280 IS380 10280 18230 

E9. sates NJL Wed's, sola 74J7B 
Weds ooen lie 95X17 up — 


18270 

181.00 

isin 


-500 543 

-1X0 44X22 
-I JO 16.733 
-180 13812 
♦UP 7X5* 
.1x0 7.313 
-1X0 1895 
-DJ0 183* 
*1X0 2.007 
• 1.10 0D4 


29-54 

3M7 

2BJJ 

2 SJ 0 

2385 

2785 

2780 

2475 

2380 

23X5 


if. ^ 0I1 “ * 




[4 $t • -i ■ 






if 1 n 

r ’* 1 » " ' 1 


p-Vl 

p Ih 



fst 1 - • Vrl 


r- 



B'Vl 7-'i\ 





■ * 1 



Yrl VTUf' 1 '■ 

w t-1 

-J 


HT'1 ■l'(l 


( ' 



(■I ’1 





t < f ■ 

p*l •] 

r ■ 

f 1 1 


■ 'L-l 



t-xl- ] 




I-**, •’-i 

L < r ■ ■ 



^t - 1 


IX'-J 




1*^1 











Wed'S open kit S7J73 oft 11497 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMER) 4MH.-mwK 


74.10 
7480 
7485 
7510 
6980 
< 0.10 
67 JS 


6570 Oct 04 *7X0 6430 1780 

4770 Dec M 49.60 «.90 69X7 

6485 Fed 95 68JS 6675 6087 

6787 Apr 9S 68X5 6472 6485 

6470 Jun 95 6580 6SJ5 65» 
6160AUB9J 6480 64J2 64.10 

64JOOC195 6585 6585 6580 

Est. sales 16804 Wed's, sates 15775 
Wed's ooen im *6.104 up 256 
FEEDER CATTLE (OXER) bLOOBBs-anti 
0185 70. 95 Od 9* 7X« 73.90 72X2 

0080 71 .75 NOW 94 71X5 7420 73X5 

71 80 Jan 95 73JQ 73X5 7370 

rajs Mar « n.» 7335 7ixo 
70. 10 ACT 95 T\JO 71.75 71X0 
69X0MOV9S 71.00 71 JO 7)80 

69X0 Aug 95 70.90 7180 70X0 

*9xCSep9t 7085 7085 7025 


00.95 

3075 

7490 

7680 

7385 

70.15 


Est ates ion . wed^sota 1.903 


WetfsBtanw «795 up 
NOGS I CMS] 408W ea-cemj cels 
4975 29.970a « 30.90 31 JO 30J0 

3387 Dta« 3480 1412 3X52 

3165 FN) 95 3LS5 3695 36X0 

3410 Apr 95 3490 TJ5 34X5 

41 J7JW195 4287 4247 42.10 

41X0A495 42X8 4ZJ5 42.10 

41.1 5 Aug 95 41 JD 41.92 41 JO 

3BJ0OO95 a. 70 38.95 30X0 

.._ 3980 Dec 9S 

Est- soles 5X72 Wecrs. sates 4JK8 
Wedsopenirt 32J75 up 7 k 

poRKoeuj£s (Ouer; 

6085 37X0 FeO *5 39X5 40X0 39JS 

60JD 37 JO Mor 95 39.15 4180 39X0 

61.15 28.95 MOV 95 4180 41X0 40X5 

5480 39X52u<H 42.10 42J0 41 JS 

4480 3&75AUS« 40X0 41x0 4080 

Est. sates 2.102 Weds, soles 2J91 
WetfsapenM 10J7 dll 190 


50-50 
5080 
4000 
47 JO 
44 m 
4140 

a m 

4775 


60X7 

*QJJ 

1,270 

6M7 

♦ 087 30.205 

6*72 

-(LS7 I7J94 

*0X0 

♦ OJO 12X93 

mo 

♦0 XI 

1333 

*437 

•OJS 

1J9I 

6130 

-0X5 

28 

•wb 



7175 

‘085 

1X50 

7417 

-0.70 

4575 

7110 

‘0.93 

1X4 

7X2S 

‘088 

707 

nj2 

♦ 082 

45* 

71a 

*085 

311 

71 JS 

-0X5 

83 

7025 

-615 

7 

sora 

.088 

«7 

3X65 

-085 10.180 

3665 

♦am 

7800 

34,7) 

‘087 

1*57 

«X0 

*083 

1.753 

<XS 

*105 

50) 

41.92 

‘029 

322 

3805 

*0.15 

754 

39X0 

*010 

11 

• ft. 



40X5 

*1*8 

0X05 

40.92 

*1.10 

1826 

41X5 

-005 

2*9 

4X25 

•085 

27t 

41X0 

*uo 

*1 


Food 


COFFEE C MCSE1 DteM.pna 
74475 77. 10 DSC 94 30075 20580 

7080 MOT 95 2EKJ0 709JS 

02JOMayf5 3O0JO 7KL»5 
05.00 Jul 95 30*80 21280 
i|SJ05ep*5 210 75 nL75 
0180 DK 95 
19780 Alar M 

4X91 Wed’s, sales 9,101 

Wed’sopemri 33.759 oft 530 
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSB M2A0DI 
12.16 9.t7Mpr95 12.75 1282 

IDJ7May*S 1276 
10J7JUI95 «.£ 

105700 «5 JIM 
1088 Mar *6 12.00 
U.14Mav?b 


34480 
364 40 

245L10 
23180 
24280 
2 PJJJD 
Esi. tales 


19980 

2 WJP 

ww 

20980 

30980 


202X5 

M7JS 

ERAS 

71080 

30975 

21280 

21 ZJ 0 


-105 l).7a 
-1.15 12.00 
1X5 4X«4 
•0.90 1.551 
BX3 

•1J0 040 

■IOP IM 


12X5 

12J5 

1244 

1107 

1180 


1280 

1240 

1287 

1280 


1270 

1270 

1240 

1274 

11.90 


terte. 

IB? 

IfiS 

n.86 

11 x 6 


-081 95X60 
— 083 71.949 
-404 13.546 
—0 16 11.6*9 
-0.14 1.567 


-0.16 


Season Season 
►+9h Low 


Open l+gh Low Oase Ota Op. In! 


1106 1 1 70 .kii 96 

EM sah-, 12860 W*d's. sites 71.114 
Wedsopenint 144.235 up J6?> 
COCOA (NCSE) ll im, wm. I nor . 


1186 -0.16 


Season Season 
Hign Low 


Open Htah Low Ctote Cta Op ini 


1500 

1605 

1613 

1600 

1560 

1627 

167* 

16C 


1041 Dec*4 1290 1345 


1293 

1341 

1370 

1400 

1453 

MSS 

ISM 


1070 May 95 1370 

1 235 Jut 95 1400 IM* 

1388 Sep 96 1459 1459 

) TOC Dec 95 MSS ISO) 

1 350 Mar 96 1514 I5T2 

1275 Mov *6 

■M«* 

Esi.saes 14.IT5 we<rs. sates 6.143 
Wed's open ini 73X00 up 43 
ORAMCE JUICE (NCTN) lUaUcamw 
1)400 05.00 Nov 94 107.25 1IIJ0 10783 

99.00 Jon *5 111.50 114.90 11185 

*3.00 Mar 95 11475 11780 11485 
97.1X1 May ?S K7J0 12000 1 17 JO 
100J0Jul95 12180 12280 12180 
10785 SeP 95 12380 12S80 12385 

109 DO Nov 95 17X50 174-511 12U0 
TO 5-50 Jan n 125 JO 12780 I34J0 
Mar 9* 

ES. sales NX. Wefl's.sale» 4806 
Wedsopenint 25.151 UP 001 


1340 

1383 

1413 

1440 

14*1 

150? 

1528 

1555 

1575 


1 3* 30J*5 

■ 34 21.741 

• 34 0856 

■ 34 3824 

• 36 1833 

,3* 4.M4 
•35 3.772 
‘35 313 

*35 11 


13280 

11485 

117.25 

119.00 

12280 

12380 

17680 


110J0 

113X5 

11450 

11985 

121.95 

12485 

124X5 

126J0 

12450 


• 380 SJS5 

♦040 10.165 
*115 5.2S9 
♦285 1872 
♦JJS 000 

♦ 1X0 479 

♦1J0 18M 

♦ 2J0 399 

• 2J0 


Metals 


HI GRADE COPPER (NC00X) TSXDOtev-emtiPwb. 
122.10 7580 Od 94 12080 12080 1 17 JO 111D0 

77.75NOV94 11970 117X0 U8J0 11785 

75.75Dec«4 119X0 12050 117JD 1)7X0 

76.90 Jen 9S 119X0 119X0 110X0 11785 

73. OO Fed 93 1 16-55 

7380 Mar 95 110.00 110X0 11480 11680 

91.10 Apr *5 115X0 

MX5Mcy*J HiJ5 nitf 115.(5 118.15 

104 IOJjn9S USAS 115X5 11L« 114J0 

7a.D0Jul9S 1)5X0 116.10 115X0 11485 

1 11. 40 Agg 95 115.90 IliSO 11580 1V3J5 

79. 10 Sep 9J 11580 11580 11580 11385 

8080 Dec 95 11380 11380 112X0 1I1J5 

28J5) Jan 96 1118S 

4280 Mar 9* 11085 

WXOMarM 109 JS 

Jul«6 10075 

Est sates 10 Jm wen's, sates 19.703 
Wetfs ooen irt 60.9TB UP 3111 


118.90 
119X0 

110.90 
117.70 
11740 
11450 
(1410 
115X5 
11585 
11285 
11380 
11575 
10880 
111X0 
109 JO 


-285 1844 
—185 1X00 
-1.00 40,935 
-095 M0 
— 070 OT 
—090 B.743 
— 0X5 645 
-085 1X48 
—0X5 276 

—0X5 1X70 
—005 89 

—0X5 1852 
—0X5 1,172 
— 0-05 

— 0X5 2SS 

—085 

-0X5 


5*18 

5llJGet«4 
NOV 94 
3808 Dec 94 




597 0 

S43J) 

5488 

5400 

5765 

401.0 Jon 95 




6040 

4165 Mar 95 

$a.o 


548J 




6700 

4200 Jt4 95 

5640 

567.0 

van 

6UXJ 

5315 Sao 95 

57X0 


57X0 



5BU) 


61X0 

575.0 JOT 96 









5990 

507.0 May 96 





5403 

S41J 

50J 

5441 

£528 

5508 

5648 

5708 

560X 


ISO 


5917 

5907 

UU.A 


MAH 

Est. sotes l« 801 Wed's, sales 26X12 
wed s open tel 117803 oft 1403 
PLATINUM INMER! Minn at,.<Mkvseviro»aL 
43X40 34 SJXlOa M <27x6 

43550 37iMJan99 4SSU0 43280 42£00 429.60 

47903 790 06 Apr 95 439.00 415 90 429.00 43X90 

4X580 419 JO Jul 95 43980 439.00 43*80 438.10 

43680 42 100 Od 95 442.10 

479 JO 479 JO Jen 9e 445.10 

Esi. solos HA. Wed'S, sow 3X16 
wed’s ooen tet 23X98 up «26 

SOLD INCUXJ w>««-ownH.IT»ei 
41700 344 00 Oct *4 J91JD 39280 391 JO 39180 

Nov 94 391,90 

JODuOkVJ J92.70 394 JO 392-50 39180 

3*JiOFeO05 39680 39100 39680 39670 

364 JO Apr 95 4D0J0 40180 4080 4mm 

3*1.20 Jun *5 404.00 40400 40380 403.90 

J30J04ug 95 40770 

40181)0095 411J0 

4XJ0DeC95 41 580 41SJ0 4TI5J0 <15.90 

41283 Fed *6 42080 

41 £80 Apr 96 424.J3 

4119) Jun 96 47s xn 

Aug 76 ' 4Wui 

Esr.itfes 34800 Worts, sates 23,134 
Wed's ooen ire 155.290 oft 071 


•38 
*11 
•38 7HXB4 
*10 72 

*38 14,982 
*2-9 4X77 
-38 3,775 
*11 2X*9 
• 13 2X15 
♦IS 
*37 
•38 
* 1 * 


-580 116 

*580 10,915 
-5.10 3X67 
*5.10 844 

*5J0 360 

• 5J0 


436-50 
41180 
41780 
420 JO 
414 JO 
41970 
429.00 
424J0 
43080 
4J1J0 


• 180 43 

* 1.10 

• 180 03861 

• 180 19874 

• t.10 

• 1.10 10844 
*180 

♦l JO 

*1.40 7837 

• 1X0 
- 1 JO 

• 1X0 
*1X0 


Financial 


UST.BILLS (CMER) slmflnon-ptsoiiaei 


96.10 

94XSDK94 

946- 

9467 

9487 

94 W 

9505 

«9B Mar 95 

9410 

94IB 

9409 

9410 


93 66 Jun 95 

+172 

917J 

9164 

9166 


9385 Sen ?s 




9134 


-HI® 17,692 
-aiO 9,284 
—0.12 3857 
-0.15 9 


ES sates NA Wed's, sates IJ»3 
Wed's ooen or 3080 oft 250 
STR. TREASURY (C80T) tldUttorW- Ms ABnesteWeer 
IO«-ra 10I-Q3 Dec 741 02 -035 102-06 101-195 101-20— 16 177.173 
183-09100-265 Mw 9301-165 W-U 101-00 101 -W- U 4516 

Est sates NA wefts, sates 43856 
Wed's com m 176 X99 up 51J9 


II TR. TREASURY (OQT) HOOAtti-ir-Pte&XMsftiMKi 
* -17 1(0-10 100-19 - 27 ' 


114-71 130-04 Dec 94101-13 101-17 100-19 100-19 — 27 250X95 

111-07 09-13 Mar 95100-16 100-1* 99-27 99-27 - » 8.19B 

105-22 98-24 Jun 95 9989 99-09 99-OS 99-05 — 2S |01 

101-06 98-78 Seo95 90-14 — V J 

HO-31 98-10 Dec 95 97-29 - 25 

Esi. sates na wefts sates *0.394 
Wed's open <m 58.79s up 3364 

US TREASURY BONDS ICBOT) nBd-(ieex*l+oliX«Hhi41Hpcn 
118-00 91-19 Ctec *4 98-21 98-24 97-19 97-20 —101 3*4807 
9B-B2 96-30 ” 

97-12 96-11 
96-03 95-25 
95-10 95-08 


96-31 -100 
96-11 —100 
95-25 -100 
95-00 -100 
94-24 -100 
94-00 — 1 0) 


20816 

11.192 

251 

135 

49 

21 


1J6-2Q 96-15 Mar 95 97-31 
ns-19 94-00 Jun 95 97-12 

112- 15 96-13 Sep 95 96-00 

113- 14 os-09 Dec 95 95-10 

114- 06 95-17 Mar*6 
100-20 94-05 Jun 96 94-11 94-11 94-0? 

Esi. soiec NX. wefts, sates ffllJSi 
Wed'S mwiffU 433.777 Off 2BS7 
MUNICIPAL 80*05 ICBOT) SlOOta mdn -Ml ASMMM IBOpct 
?I-I7 8S-0T Dec 9486-19 0*-26 85-30 85-21 — 31 30J41 
88-09 84-08 Mar 0J 04-23 84-23 84-10 04-10 -.100 30 

Est sates NA werfs.saies 2.170 

Wed SOPCn ini 70,901 up 337 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) it .nilikMi, « IODBO. 

*5.100 907I0DK0J 94000 *1100 91790 94X00 —*0443X14 

90740 Mar 95 93 679 93X59 91550 91560 —110390825 

90 770 J^n 95 91740 91250 *7100 HIM —130300499 

9|JI0'teD*5 91900 92.YI0 92.750 91770 —130737877 

9U»Dec95 92X00 91610 *2X50 92X60 —140175.715 

----- 90.15BMW 66 92S20 *LS1D 92J70 92301 —1«15T.97J 

niBO 92.260 Jun 96 92X00 91410 *1250 92J« -14012580 

*2.570 *2.150 Sea 96 *1300 92JOO 91150 92.160 —140116X70 

Esi. sates NA. wea-s sates 317.238 
Wca s ooen .re j $59,374 us 424 


95 J® 
94 730 
94J50 
942B0 
94230 


BRIpSH POUND (CMER) 1 tm «wid- 1 oeW •oNBH 
I&I74 IOWOkm I.6H0 1.*- 


I.63M IXlU 1*300 *04 42.765 


1X292 

16250 


r? 

6 


02605 

0JS22 

07430 

07*00 


-14 

-13 

—11 

-If 


34.000 

1.403 

753 

566 

6J 1 


1X310 1 .4640 Md 05 14160 I 6310 1*144 

IJ0OQ 1.5348 Jun 95 1.6230 1X2*0 1X120 

Est. tales NA Wefts, sates 15X71 
Wefts open kit 43,245 aft 1004 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 1 oar cte- 1 pent .ouaii KU001 
07670 0.7030 Dec 94 0.738* 02307 0 7367 07369 -Is 

02020 Mrr 95 0.7385 0.7305 0.7368 0.73*7 

0X990 Jun *5 ft7367 0.7367 0 735* 0 7)» 

0X965 Seo 95 0.7353 0.7353 0.7341 02345 

0.7040 Dec f! 0.7337 0.7337 0.7317 O.'JT* 

Mar 96 0.7311 1 

Est. sates NA. Wefts, sixes 3.563 
wefts open Irt 36,970 afl 880 

uERMANAAARK (CMER) kefrnwt-iiwvmniiUMi 
0X700 0.5500 Dec W 0X665 0X712 0.6x51 0X702 - 40 91,210 

HOT 0J810Mar« 0X672 0X023 CL 6670 0 6714 <41 4,225 

(LS700 0J*WJun95 0X700 0X730 0 6700 0 6730 ■ <J 570 

0X5« 0.6347 Sep 95 06*90 0X740 0X690 0X747 . 46 110 

Est. sates NA Wefts, sates 30,194 
Wefts ooen kit 96.193 g« 113 
JAF AW bSE YEN (CMERJipervtn-' MMMuateWMMl 
(L01049aU)09S2SDec 94 0 010337081 03641-010288001 COO 
081 05600 JOtaB OMor 0508104100.0104460.0110600.010426 
Q81067HUB9776Jun95 08)05090.01053500 10504)81 0576 
081 0775081 0200Sap 95 081 057 508106200.01057 5D.0104U - 

0810712CL01 0*4 (Dec 95 0810700081077008107000810710 - 

Es). sates NA Wefts, sates 28831 
Wefts open bn 63,026 uo 903 
S WIS S FRANC (CMBU »«r t rw. lpoktf equals SO 0091 
08074 0X605 D6C 94 08046 OJnDS 08019 0 8071 

08105 0-7287 Mix 95 08060 0.0133 0.8065 0.0124 

08133 a.7466Jun0S 08115 0.8160 aeil2 05163 

08)50 OJlX5eeK 0.B198 

EB. sates NA Wefts, tales 14,901 
wefts ooen tet 43,150 gfi 49 


56X69 

6.421 

44? 

1 « 

16 


-47 

•» 

*54 

♦56 


J !;£ 


Industrials 


^TTON 1 (NCTN) .HMA- era dv *j 
7725 59X3 Dec 94 4iLln 69.10 afl 

70.15 62J0MOT 95 70.05 70J5 70J 

6100 May 95 7125 71 J5 71— , 

■■SjWW 7120 7220 71.90 77J3 

6680 Oct 95 06.70 

w - , ° «■« 

WJW/VWtq 


7080 


EB iates NA Wee 5. soles Mi? 
Wjftsopen int S0J5* off 11 


SUB 
5980 
6225 
58.75 
57 J0 
55L15 
5420 
5150 
5420 
50X0 

nio 

S385 

54X0 

£-40 

£2 


4385 Aar 95 saw ui 91 499* 


5280 Nov 95 


5020 Jon 9i 

5382 Fed 96 
S4J0Mtx96 
46.00 Arr 96 


soles NA. , Weft 1. Mies 41,05) 





►( 1 F’B 




BjiF 1 





rjri i| 

1 LL1 


f V/t-l 

H iji 











t 'it-l 


rl'tliH 




p llil 

K t 7 ]! 


p 1 Jt ■ 















l- ’*■/ 1 









M' ■ 









1 ■■ 







wefts oo en tnt 165.972 up a* 


20X7 

2080 

19x5 

19x0 

20X6 

19X0 

1924 

2020 

1*87 

1*87 

19.17 

W 86 
to xa 

31.15 

« M 

7080 

18.17 
2080 
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UNTEKISAI IOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Bundesbank Is Hopeful on Rates 


Page 13 


41 ;W 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


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Bloomberg Business Newi 

LONDON — Ivax Coip., the 
second-largest U.S. generic 
drugmakex, and Knoll AG of 
Germany announced plans 
Thursday to move into the ex- 
panding generic-drugs market 
m Europe. 

Joining other major drug 
companies that have made simi- 
lar moves, the two companies 
said they had signed a letter of 


Profit at SAP AG 
Nearly Triples 

, Bloomberg Businas News 

- 'W ALLDORF, Germany — 
SAP AG, a computer software 
and services company, said 
Thursday pretax profit had 
nearly tripled in the first nine 
months as sales of hs business 
applications system continued 
to soar. 

Net profit for the period rose 
to 262 million Deutsche marks 
($175 million) from 89 milli on 
DM in the year-earlier period. 
Revenue surged 66 percent, to 
1.14 billion DM 

The increase in nine-month 
sales was buoyed by strong 
gains in the company’s U-S. 
business, which contributed 
about 30 percent to sales. 

' “The order boom is coming 
from the U-S-,” said Chief Ex- 
ecutive Dieter Hopp. 


intent to form a joint venture to 
make and market generic phar- 
maceuticals first in Germany 
and later throughout Europe. 

KnoD, a unit of BASF AG 
based in Ludwigshafen, Ger- 
many. said it would contribute 
more than 80 generic products 
It had licensed in Germany to 
the new company. Ivax said it 
would contribute the rights to 
150 generic products made and 
marketed by Norton Health- 
care Ltd., its British subsidiary. 

Armando A. Tabemilla, an 
Ivax spokesman, said the com- 
pany’s intention was to expand 
its British presence into the Ger- 
man generic-drugs market and 
later into Europe as a whole. 

Mr. Taberztilla would not say 
whether any money would 
change hands under the joint 
venture, but the accord calls for 
Knoll to acquire a minority 
holding in Ivax. 

Virginia Pascoe, European 
pharmaceuticals analyst for 
Union Bank of Switzerland, 
said the European market for 
generic drugs was growing 20 
percent a year. By contrast, the 
market for prescription drugs is 
growing at 8 percent, she said. 

“Its the way you want to go, 
really,” Miss Pascoe said. “It’s 
the market you want to be in.” 

Driving the growth is an ag- 
ing population that needs more 
drugs. In addition, govern- 
ments are seeking to cut the 
costs of health-care programs 
by buying more generic drugs. 


CoapHed in Our Scoff From Dbpatcha 

FRANKFURT — Top Bundesbank 
officials said Thursday they were keep- 
ing an open mind on interest rates, indi- 
cating that the next money-supply re- 
ports might prompt a reduction. 

The German central bank’s president, 
Hans Tietmeyer, and its chief economist, 
Otmar Issing, separately expressed con- 
fidence that money-supply growth, the 
bank's chief inflation gauge, would con- 
tinue to decline. The bank's 1994 target 
is 4 percent to 6 percent. 

“We now have to wait and see how the 
money-supply figures look in September 
and maybe in October, too," Mr. Tiet- 
meyer told Suddeuiscbe Zeitung. 

September M3 figures are expected to 
be released Friday, and analysts forecast 
a decline from the 8.2 percent growth in 
August. 

In a speech in Leipzig, Mr. Tietmeyer 


disputed the notion that German rates 
must move in concert with U.S. and 
British rates. 

“As opposed to Anglo-Saxon coun- 
tries, where understandably the question 
is evidently when and how much central 
bank interest rates will be raised, the 
direction of posable further interest-rate 
changes in Germany is open,” he said. 
“We're not only behind them in the eco- 
nomic cycle, but we don’t pursue an 
anti cyclical policy.” 

Meanwhile, at a conference in Lon- 
don, Mr. Issing said the German econo- 
my would grow as much as 23 percent in 
1994 and possibly more in 199S because 
of a strong revival in business activity. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 

■ Growth Strengthens in France 

France’s economic recovery has be- 
come unexpectedly robust, the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune reported, citing 


data from the National Statistics Insti- 
tute, or IN SEE. 

The institute revised upward the offi- 
cial forecast for 1994 gross domestic 
product growth to 2J2 percent from 2 
percent 

Separately, Finance Minister Edmond 
Alphandtry said that France's economic 
recovery was now firmly entrenched, 
with no risk of faltering. 

He said INSEEs forecast was even 
stronger than the government's own 
forecast, made in January at 1.4 percent 
and later raised to 2 percent. The govern- 
ment made the forecast while still under 
fire for having greatly underestimated 
the depth of the economic slowdown in 
1992 and 1993. 

Mr. Alphandfery forecast that GDP in 
1995 would surpass the 3.1 percent 
growth forecast on which the govern- 
ment has based its 1995 budget. 



London 
FTSE 100 Index 


mf\ 
3000 V 

2900 - 


■GAC40 

2300 

■*V 

2100 4- 


““M JJ A S O 

1994 

Exchange Inch 


M JJ A S O 
1904 

Thursday 
Dose 

AEX- 40SU37 

Stock Index- 7,210.13 

DAX JUW9.95 

FAZ • 780.22 

HEX 1351.41 

Financial Times 30 2356L20 


M J J A S O 
IBM 


Rumors Say Ax Hovers Over VW Officer 


3,06320 

29638 

9900 

136737 

1,89345 

42638 

902.66 


404.01 -0.16 

7300.93 40.13 

2,051.18 -K).92 

779.44 +0.10 

1.957.49 -031 

2357.00 -0.03 

3,080.80 +0.08 

29653 -0.15 

9890 +0.10 

1,876.31 -0.48 

1,873.65 +1.05 

430.17 -0.86 

901.53 +0.13 

lnKnuiionJ Herald Tribune 


Raders 

BONN — Volkswagen AG's 
supervisory board is likely to 
dismiss the car maker’s chief 
financial officer, Werner 
Schmidt, on Friday, sources 
dose to the company and in- 
dustry analysts said Thursday. 

Speculation has been rife that 
VW’s chairman, Ferdinand 
Piftch, wants to make Mr. 
Schmidt take responsibility for 
a large 1993 loss at the compa- 
ny’s Spanish unit, SEAT, wmch 
dragged VW down to a record 
loss of 1.94 bifficm Deutsche 
marks ($13 billion) last year. 

The German media have 
been saying VW will persuade 
Mr. Schmidt, 62, to leave the 
company at the end erf this year, 
before his contract expires. 


VW's announcement last 
month that it would hold a s pe- 
dal supervisory board meeting 
OcL 21 fueled the speculation 
further and convinced, many in- 
dustry analysts that Mr. 
Schmidt will go. 

“The issue has to be ad- 
dressed of how such a shambles 
ax SEAT could happen without 
anyone noticing," said an ana- 
lyst in London, who asked not 
to be identified. “Someone has 
to pay the price, and it looks 
like that will be S chmid t." 

VW would not comment on 

the speculation. 

meeting will also consid- 
er a report by the consultants 
Arthur Andersen & Co. on how 
SEAT crashed to a 1.84 billion 
DM loss in 1993 and who in 


VW had been informed about 
the loss and when. 

Since the loss at SEAT was 
announced, VW has got rid of 
most of the SEAT board, in- 
cluding the chai rman, Juan An- 
tonio Diaz Alvirez. Analysts 
have long thought, however, 
that a senior figure at VW 
would have to go too. 

“Schmidt will go," said a 
German analyst, who also 
asked anonymity. “The pres- 
sure on him has increased dra- 
matically. He would be made a 
scapegoat for the losses, but it is 

well known that he has had 
problems working with Mr. 
Piech.” 

Mr. Piech removed the head 
of VW’s Audi luxury-car opera- 


tion, Franz- Josef Kortttm, in 
February after Audi turned in a 
dismal performance for 1993. 

Mr. Korttlm was succeeded 
by the development chief, Her- 
bert Demd, but Mr. Demel is 
only management board 
spokesman and not chairman, 
indicating a centralization of 
authority. 

“Piech wants to centralize 
power, and he wants his own 
men,” the German analyst said. 
“He is not happy that Schmidt 
has been on the board longer 


has been on 
than he has .’ 1 


In the 1970s, Mr. Schmidt, as 
Audi chairman, was Mr. Pifidi’s 
boss when Mr. Piech was head 
of testing and development. 


TRADE: Asia-Pacific States Are Split Over Access for European Union Once Regional Barriers Are Lowered 


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Continued from Page II 
development of two giant trade 
blocs centered on Europe and 
the Pacific, undermining efforts 
to liberalize trade worldwide. 

A senior European official 
■ Said a Pacific free-trade zone 
“Ljcompassm^ several conti- 
nents, two major trading pow- 
ers and the most dynamic eco- 
nomic area of the world on an 
exclusive basis must be consid- 
ered discriminatory, at least by 
those excluded.” 

. APEC currently comprises 
the United States, Japan, Chi- 


na, Canada, Australia, South 
Korea, China, Canada, Austra- 
lia, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong 
Kong, New Zealand, Mexico, 
Papua New Guinea and the six 
countries in ASEAN, the Asso- 
ciation of the South East Asian 
Nations. They are Indonesia, 
Malaysia, the Fhihppmes, Sin- 
gapore, Thailand and Brunei. 

Chilc is due tb 'become the 
18th member of APEC in No- 
vember, when minis ters from 
the coup hold their annual 
meeting in Jakarta followed by 
as informal summit meeting at- 


tended by President Bill Clin- 
ton and other leaders in Bogor, 
also in Indonesia. 

On Saturday, a group of busi- 
ness executives from APEC 
members delivered a report to 
President Suharto of Indonesia' 
that called for free trade and 
investment liberalization in the 
region by 2002 for developed 
economies. _ 

Mr. Suharto will chair next 
month’s summit meeting. The 
report was requested by APEC 
leaders when they held their 
!- first meeting nearly a year ago. 


APEC “must produce con- 
crete results this year in order to 
sustain its role as a policy forum 
which will guide the growth of 
the Asia-Pacific region.” said 
•Bustanil Arifin and Les 
McCraw, the co-chairmen of 
the group that produced the re- 
port, 

Mr. Arifin beads PT Berdi- 
kari, a state-owned Indonesian 
company. Mr. McCraw is chief 

executive of Fluor Corp. of the 
United States. 

On a visit to Australia last 


month, Goh Chok Tong, Singa- 
pore’s prime minister, said that 
Singapore and the United 
States preferred to see some 
conditionality attached to Pa- 
cific trade liberalization. 

Analysts said that Australia 
and South Korea also support- 
ed such a position. 

Mr. Goh said he would have 
no problem in giving uncondi- 
tional benefits to the develop- 
ing countries but would have 
some difficulty in giving some- 
thing away to Europe. The EU, 


be added, “must reciprocate in 
some way." 

Mahathir Mohamad, the Ma- 
laysian prime minister, said he 
was concerned that APEC 
might become a trade bloc and 
be used as “a counterbalance” 
to the EU. 

“A free- trade zone means 
discriminating against people 
outside the trade zone, and that 
is a trade bloc.” he said. **We 
would not like to see that hap- 
pen, because we want to be free 
to trade with anyone we wish.” 


Amsterdam AEX- 

Brussels Stock Inc 

Frankfurt DAX 

Frankfurt FAZ 

HeiainM HEX 

London Ffeiancial 

London FTSE 100 

Madrid General Index 

lean MtBTEL 

Paris CAC4Q 

Stockholm Atfamavaeritien 
Vienna Stock Ind ex 

Zurich , SSS 

Sources: Reuters. AFP 

Very briefly; 


• Compagnie G£n£rale des Eaux said net profit rose 5.4 percent to 
136 billion French francs ($245 million) in the fir^t half; the 
company said it expected sales to rise 4 percent, to around 154 
billion francs, for the full year. 

• Caisse Nationale de Purveyance, the leading French life insurer 
and a candidate for privatization, said its first-half net profit rose 
15 percent, to 692 million francs. 

• Soci&fe Suisse de Mkrotiectronique & d’Horiogerie SA, said it 
would produce and launch in China a watch brand that will be 
“much cheaper" than its Swatch watch. 

• The Swiss Finance Ministry plans to slash the federal budget 
deficit by 73 percent before 1998 through measure including 
higher energy taxes and welfare-spending cuts. 

• Poland's prime minister, Waldemar Pawlak, has approved a final 
list of companies to be privatized, setting the stage for the sale of 
444 manufacturing companies. 

• Kaufbof Holding AG said it would offer 200 Deutsche marks 

($133) a share for the remaining shares of Horten AG; Kaufhof 
acquired nearly 60 percent of Horten this year. Both companies 
operate department stores. Bloomberg, afx 

Bond Loss Hits Spanish Bank 


Compiled by Ov Scoff From Dispatcher 

MADRID — Banco Bilbao 
Vizcaya SA said Thursday its 
third-quarter net profit slid 7 
percent, to 47.91 billion pjsetas 
($383 million), as losses in the 
bond market offset gains in the 
bank's core business. 

Net interest income rose 3.9 
percent, to 252.8 billion pesetas, 
and commissions for services 
were up 18 percent, to 83.6 bil- 
lion pesetas. 

Banco Bilbao Vizcaya said its 


operating income rose 21 per- 
cent, to 137 billion pesetas, 
largely because of recoveries of 
previously nonpaying loans. 

The bank’s profit was 
brought down by losses of more 
than 20 billion pesetas in its 
investment portfolio, the result 
of a sharp decline in the price of 
Spanish government bonds. 
Banco Bilbao Vizcaya’s stock 
fell 5 pesetas, to 3310. 

(Bloomberg AFX) 


sijmi.'v w Mr. 


The IHT/Delta Air Lines 
Destinations Competition 


-r 




Am* • * ct 




Here's How to Enter. 

Test your travel knowledge! Each day for 1 8 
• consecutive days, a due describing a dty to which 
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. Delta's Map, fill in the name of the city correctly 
- for at least 12 of the 18 days and qualify to win. 

Once yon have at least 12 answers, put 
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i completed coupon below. 

Winners will be selected from an official 
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Delta Air Lines’ Destinations Map 




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PANEL 


1994 


The Search for new Relationships 
1 7-18 November 1994 
Maastricht 


500 opinion leaders and decision makers from the international business community 
and political world will meet at the 7th annual Global Panel Conference. 

The conference includes plenary sessions, parallel sessions, networking lunches and 
receptions . These will give the participants the opportunity to exchange ideas about 
the latest developments in the field of global politics, economics and business. The 
Global Panel offers the participants excellent networking opportunities. 


wmmE: 


ODetes 


j£p«; ;•-** 




,V? ? °TelAYiv 


felted 




Delhi o 


SC 






• O 

:irA4S I s 


RULES AND REGULATIONS 


YOUR RESPONSE: 


** **.**.■ 


■* ' \.rT 


@ Airline tickets are non-transferable and seats subject 
to availability. 

@ Travel must be completed by December 31st, 1995. 

Entry must be postmarked no later than November 

w 7th, 1994 v 

® Valid only where legal. No purchase necessary. 

® Entries wiB not be accepted from staff and famOies of 
the IHT newspaper, Ddta Air Lines, ta agents and 
subsidiaries. 

@ No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt 

No cash alternative to prizes. 

® Winners win be drawn on November 15th and 
published thereafter in the newspaper. 

® On ail matters, the editor's decision is final. 

® The editor reserves the right in his absoiirte 
discretion to disqualify any entry, competitor or 
nominee, or to waive any rules in the event of . 
circumstances outside our control arising which, in 
hfe opinion, make it desirable to cancel the 
competition at any stage. 




fame of City: 


JOB TITLE. 
COMPANY. 


POSTCODE. 


Some of tbe main plenary sessions include: 

The Search for new Relationships 

Supachai Panitch pakdi, vice-premier of Thailand 
Zheng Hongye, chairman China Council for the 
. — . Promotion of International Trade 

Moving out to tbe 21st Century 

Gordon Sullivan, chief of staff United States Army 
Richard Pascale, business consultant, USA 

KA-t-i w World Economist Forecast 

Franz Vranitzky, chancellor of Austria 
Andreas van Agt, ambassador EU, Washington 

M-t-A /) Tbe Global Automotive Industry 

Louis Schweitzer, chairman & CEO of Renault, France 
John Vino cur, executive editor and vice president 
International Herald Tribune 
Pehr Gyllenhammar. former chairman Volvo, Sweden 
Frans Scvenstem, president of Ned car, Netherlands 

• Business in a Competitive Area 

Stan Shih, president & CEO Acer, Taiwan 
— Florfs Maijers. former chairman Unilever, Netherlands 

kTtr® Hew P aradigms for the 2 1st Century 

Gyula Horn, prime minister of Hungary (invited) 

David Owen, EC-mediator on former Yugoslavia, UK 
Allen Weinstein, president Center for Democracy, USA 


Global Panel is sponsored by: 
UPS, 

Paribas Asset Management, 

Randstad, 

van Hecke, 

Impac, 

Microsoft, 

Polynorm, 

Ward Howell/Maes & Lunau, 
Rank Xerox, 

Renault, 

Unocal, 

St eel weld, Division of Ambac, 
CEBECO, 

Hoogovens Group, 

Reuters, 

Concord Corporaation, 
NVS-Verzekeringen, 

Port of Rotterdam, 

Meyn Group, 

Tilleke & Gibbins, 

City of Maastricht, 

Province of Limburg, 
International Herald Tribune, 
Singapore Airlines. 


COUNTRY. 


o Please send further information on Global Panel 1594 

o Yes, I shall attend Global Panel 1994, US$ 1950,- excL VAT (exet. dinners & hotel, incl lunches & farewell drink) 


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tel: + 3M0.234.01.55, fax: + 31-10.460.49-69 


AJWITA AIR T.TNFS 

— Yo«m Ion Til Wit l»t JPlT*— 


INTERNATIONAL 


in association with: 


une 


i 



Page 14 


** 


AMEX 

T Thursday’s dosing 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on wall Street and do not reflec 
fete trades elsewhere. Vre The Associated Press 



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Soles figures ore unofficial. Yearly highs and lows reflect 
the prawfousSweeks plus Hwcurrenl week, but not Ihc la mt 
from no stay. Where a split or stock dividend amounting td 3 
Percent or mor* has been Paid, the rear's two n-iow range and 
dividend are shown tor toe new stock only. Unless otharwisAl 
natod. rates ot dividends we aimial atsbursanwnts based on 
toe latest declaration. ni 

a — dividend wjo carols). 

h— annual rote of dlvkhma plus slock dividend- ■ •-* 

c — ilauidatifia dividend. 

ch}— called. — 

d — new yearly low. 

e— dividend declared or paid in preccdinp 12 months, 
a —dividend In Canadian funds. subleci to 15% nonresidence , 

I —dividend declored after soin-up or stock dividend. , i 

I —dividend naid this year, otnlttea deferred, or no adkut. 
token of toJew a vtoeod mee Mnp. .. • > 

k —dividend declared or paid this year, an accumulative 
issue wtto dJvtdands In arrears. 

a — new Issue In toe east S2 weeks The high- low range begins : 
with the start of trading. 

nd— neat atrv dellverr. >- 

P/E — prtce-eaminps rallo. 

r— dividend declared or pom in precrdlnp 12 months ptui 
Stock cMWOena 

S— stock split. Dividend begins with dole at split. : 

tts— sates Qk 

>— dividend paid Instock In preceding 12 months. esNmoiS 
bash value on en-divktond or ex-dlstrlbwiian date, 
a— new yearly hipt*. •- •- 

v — troennp honed. 

vi— In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganised un- 
der the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such cohi- 
nanies. 

wd— when distributed. . ' j 

wl— when issued. 

ww — with warrants. ' 

*— e« -dividend tv «a-rtoH)s .. 

kdls— en-drt/rlbuthxi. . j 

m — wl toout warrants. 

V — ex dividend and sales In tolL 
kW-vleld. 

< — soles In full. 


. r* 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Page 15 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


With Growth at 8.5%, 

l • 

(Malaysia Battles Inflation 


Bloomberg Business News 

KUALA LUMPUR — Ma- 

\ laysia’s government has vowed 
1 to hold down inflation, worried 

' that the nation's 8_S percent 
growth m the Gist half of this 
year is pushing up prices too 
rapidly. 


■' V' slowed slightly in the second 
«\ quarter, to an 8.1 percent arnra- 
al rate from 8.8 percent in the 
first quarter. 

~ . ; " But with consumer prices ris- 
* ing at an annual 3.6 percent rate 
V in September, the government 
' . ■ is taking no chances. 

‘ Prime Minister Mahathir bin 
v : Mohamad, who last month 
•: tossed oat the idea of “minus* 
*' . inflation” in an annua) speech 
lO finawcinl institutions, prom- 

J3i Sunday that the federal 
budget, doe next Friday, would 
focus on inflati on COQtroL And 
he called on consumers to boy- 
cott such products as chicken 
; > when they see prices rise. 

Meanwhile, Bank Negara has 
■ . S’- been intervening in the market 
^ this week to buy the Malaysian 
> ringgit, dealers said, a move in - 
' • terpreted as anti-inflationary. 
.For the past two weeks, the cen- 
- tral bank has been nudging in* 

. terest rates higher by borrowing 


money from banks and issuing 
new debt 

Bank Negara also urged com- 
mercial banks this week to in- 
crease their deposit rates, a step 
dealers called unprecedented. 

“The government is really 
hammering home the point that 
they want to control inflation,” 
said P. Guoasegaram, research 
director at Standard Chartered 
Securities. 

Despite its second-quarter 


Rover Sets Pact 
With Malaysia 

Rearers 

KUALA LUMPUR — Brit- 
ain's Rover Group may transfer 
the technology for making en- 
gines to Malaysia's state-owned 
car company Proton BhdL un- 
der an agreement signed Thurs- 
day that loosens Japan's hold 
on Malaysia’s indigenous auto 
industry. 

Under the agreement, the 
two companies will look into 
Proton making Rover’s T-series 
gasoline engine for Proton cars. 

On Sept. 7, Malaysia ended a 
ban on contracts for British 
business, imposed in retaliation 
for British media reports claim- 
ing British-Malaysian trade was 
corrupt. 


slowdown, Malaysia still oas 
one of the world's fastest-grow- 
ing economies. By comparison, 
in (he second quarter the Unit- 
ed States grew at a 4.1 percent 
rate, Germany 4 percent and 
Britain 4.4 percent, the central 
bank said. 

Analysts have long said that 
Malaysia cannot sustain such 
rapid growth without prices ris- 
ing. But until now, the govern- 
ment has not needed to do 
much to keep inflation down. 

That seemed to change when 
the government announced that 
consumer prices had risen more 
in September than in July and 
August. ' 

It has not taken long for the 
government's actions to have an 
effect, analysts said. The dollar 
hit a two-month low against the 
Malaysian currency of 23470 
rmggit Wednesday, though it 
gained to 23482 rmggit Thurs- 
day as Bank Negara’s buying 
eased, dealers said. The bench- 
mark three-month interbank 
rate has risen from 4.4 percent 
to 4.6 percent in two weeks. 

Dealers reacted with a yawn 
to the growth figures. 

I Growth is "within consen- 
sus,” said George Yap, a dealer 
,at Apex Securities. “People 
think that by year-end it will be 
h igher than that” 


frH H* . . . 

• ■, , 

-V.- 

Uw + r 

w* >-,,•» 

*«•*»' . 
* -M* . .• - . 

ara-v-j ... .. 

. : U _ 


-to 

WW ... 

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e »*<*..« . v 


'E. 


“ < ■‘u 


Hong Kong IPOs Lose Luster 


# — . ■ 

■■ 

mm 1 . 


"V** ••• • rJHGNG KONG — A poor response to Hong 

rt : - Kong’s latest initial public offering shows the 

■ v.. market for new listings is falling quickly back to 

‘ :>cn: earth after years of soaring profits and demand, 
analysts said Thursday. 

■ ■ Wmg Fai International Ltd, a repair and 

maintenance company, said only 22 percent of 
its, initial offering of 873 millio n shares was 
: .'-"Z'.'X . r , ?s taken up Thursday. 

- 7u«. “We’ve had a very artificial IPO market that 

was basically money far nothing,” Archie Hart 
of Crosby Securities said. 

r ' rr '' -“Now it's returned to a much more natural 
. state of affairs.” 

. \1 r :.~. Analysts said lukewarm investor sentiment. 


ket in the doldrums, investors feel they can wail 
until after an IPO hits the mark et and then buy 
the shares later for less. 

Simon Male, a fund manager at GT Manage- 
ment (Asia) Ltd, said: “People have to become 
more cautious with the pricing. They can't just 
come to the market and ask whatever they want” 
But Alex Tong erf Barclays International Fund 
Mangers said quality was the problem. 

“Last year we saw a lot of poor-quality IPOs, 
and the share prices performed very well right at 
the listing,” he said. “Right now it depends on 
the quality of the company.” 

■ Ming Pao Chair man Quits After Censure 
Yd Pun-hoi, the chairman of one of Hong 
Kong's most prominent newspapers, resigned 


pricing and issue quality have corded the market Kong's most prominent newspapers, resigned 

r, , • y lor initial public offerin gs Thursday after being censured by the stock ex- 

" Shandong International Power Development change for failing to disclose a criminal past. 


« u* . . 

» * ■ ■ 

<7 *'• " 


K !i* 

-*• I 
*'!■? : 


Co.’s 2.7 fnmon Hong Kong dollar ($349 million) 
share offering was recently postponed after two 
other IPOs from Chinese power companies met 
with tepid demand in the United States. 

Fund man a g e r s said that with the overall mar- 


The stock exchange censured Mr. Yu, 35, the 
c h ai rm a n of Ming Pao Enterprise Corp- for 
breaching listing rules that require company di- 
rectors to reveal material information, including 
previous criminal convictions. 


Investors Scramble 
To Purchase Stock 
In Shanghai Posts 

Blo om be r g Business News 

SHANGHAI — Foreign investors got their first chance to 
own a piece of a Chinese telecommunications company 
Thursday when shares of Shanghai Posts & Telecommunica- 
tions Equipment Co. were listed on the Shanghai B exchange. 
Hie price of the shares jumped 44 percent. 

The company sold 60 million shares at an issue price of 39.6 
U.S. cents, for a total value of S23.8 million. The shares closed 
Thursday at 57 cents. 

Although Shanghai Posts — a maker of switching equip- 
ment, cables and telex machines — is a relatively small 
company, with sales in 1993 of 243.9 million yuan (S29 
milli on), it has much room for growth. China hopes the 
number of telephone lines in the country will triple by 2000, to 
140 million. 

Shanghai Posts is well-positioned to benefit from growth. It 
has a strong distribution network, selling 85 percent of its 
products to local bureaus of the Ministry erf Posts of Telecom- 
munications across China. 

Chin a forbids foreign ownership of telecommunication 
service companies because of security concerns, but it has 
allowed foreigners to buy shares in equipment makers. 

Investors said they were attracted to the stock in large part 
by the company’s two joint ventures with AT&T Corp. 

AT&T provides Shanghai Posts with technology for its 
transmission equipment The joint ventures accounted for 69 
percent of Shanghai Posts' profit in the fust half of this year. 

Shan ghai Posts has a 22.5 percent stake in AT&T Shanghai, 
a maker of fiber optics, and a 50 percent stake in another 
AT&T venture, which makes transmission equipment 

Although the Shanghai Posts listing was for B shares, which 
are supposed to be reserved for foreigners, Chinese nationals 
had managed to buy many shar es before the first trading day, 
said a fund manager . These investors were selling shares on 
the first day to lock in a gain of about 40 percent the fund 
manag er said. 

Indosat Extends Gain 
With 6 % Rise in Jakarta 


JAKARTA — Shares m Indonesia Satellite Corp. rose on 
Thursday as foreign investors sought exposure to the princi- 
ple telecommunications company in the world’s fourth most 
populous country. 

Indosat, which made a strong debut on the local market 
Wednesday, rose about 6 percent Thursday, to 8,950 rupiah 
($4.12). in heavy trading. Indosat has risen 28 percent from its 
7,000 rupiah issue price in just two days of trading. 

“Yesterday there was good demand from foreign investors, 
but today they are definitely buying more aggressively.” 
Richard Fischer of Barings Securities said. 

Although some brokers were a little surprised at how well 
Indosat had performed, they attributed this to its growth 
potential and size. The state-owned company listed 10 per- 
cent of its shares in Jakarta and 25 percent in New York. 

At current price levels, it is Jakarta's second-largest listed 
company, with a market capitalization of $42 billion. Only 
the cement maker, Indocement is larger at $4.4 billion. 

Mr. Fischer said foreign investors were buying the stock 
because Indosat was now an important index stock Tor fund 
managers seeking investments in Indonesia. 


Carmakers 
In Japan 
Cut Job 
Prospects 

The Associated Press 

TOKY O — Japan's two larg- 
est carmakers announced job 
cuts Thursday in their latest re- 
sponse to the industry's long 
slump. 

Nissan Motor Co.. Japan's 
second biggest automaker, said 
it would cut back its hiring of 
new college graduates, and Ja- 
pan's largest automobile com- 
pany, Toyota Motor Corp., said 
it would require managers to 
accept earlier retirements. 

Nissan said it planned to re- 
duce its work force to 48,000 in 
1995 from 50.000 and would 
hire only about SO college grad- 
uates, compared with 170 in 
1994 and about 600 in 1993. 

“Unless there is a dramatic 
turnaround in the economy, our 
hiring prospects will remain 
bleak,” Nissan said. 

In May, Nissan reported a 
second consecutive year of 
losses, citing weak worldwide 
demand for autos and the 
strengthening of the yen. 

Toyota is introducing 
changes Jan. 1 under which the 
mandatory retirement age for a 
deputy department chief will be 
53. A section chief must step 
down at 50, the company said. 

The retirement age for all 
managers is currently 55. 

■ New Matsushita Games 

Matsushita Electric Industri- 
al Co. announced Thursday a 
fresh menu of video games for 
its 3DO Real machine in an 
attempt to compete more effec- 
tively with established game 
makers such as Nintendo Co. 
and Sega Enterprises Ltd., Reu- 
ters reported from Tokyo. 

The new titles include games 
based on hit movies such as 
“Jurassic Park” and “Demoli- 
tion Man.” 

The company hopes the new 
titles will help justify its paying 
more than $6 billion for MCA 
Inc., the California studio that 
released the two films. 

Matsushita also announced a 
new version of the 3 DO ma- , 
chine, called the FZ-I0. At I 
44.800 yen ($460). it is about ; 
$100 cheaper than its forerun- 
ner. the FZ-1. 

The company expects to have 
sold 500.000 game players by 
the end of the year, down from 
its initial estimate of 1 million. 


|| Investor’s Asia 1 

Hong Kong 

Singapore 


Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Straits Times 

Nikkei 225 


i m ■ — 

2400---. 

i ii* 

22000 

■■ ~ - 

10000 

£ :to 


210110 An' 

V 

“rV 

ZcW Tf 



V 

®*H J J A S O m M J J 

A SO 


A So 

1994 

1994 


1094 


Exchange 

index 

Thursday Pnev. 

% 



Close 

Close 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

9,388.78 

9,320.06 

+0,74 

Singapore 

Straits Tknes 

382.25 

2, 364.11 

+0.77 

Sydney 

AS Orcfinaries 

241&30 

2,013.40 

+0.14 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

19^91.90 19,888.87 

+0.62 

i Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1,124^9 

1,118.86 

+0.49 

Bangkok 

SET 

1^21.61 

1,501.42 

+1.34 

Seoul 

Composite Stock 

1,088.77 

1,094.76 

-0.55 

Taipei 

Weighted Price 

6,781.37 

6,669.10 

+1.38 

Manila 

PSE 

3^77.12 

3,099.34 

-0.72 

Jakarta 

Stock Index 

518.76 

518.97 

-0 04 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

2,067 JW 

2,061.66 

+0.27 

Bombay 

National Index 

2,028.54 

2,036.12 

-0^7 


Jakarta Said to Award Contract to Suharto’s Son Save on Infl Calls 


m 




If 

w 


te 

If-rE-. ’ 

fl-efs. 


Reuters 

; JAKARTA — Indonesia has awarded 
the Humpuss Group, controlled by one of 
President Suharto's sons, a $495 million 
J): contract to build a three-berth terminal at 
the Jakarta port of Tanjung Priok, a com- 
i;*: pany executive said Thursday. 

; “The contract was signed in August,” 
; Denis Sibbald, planning director of PT 
. ; Humpuss Petikemas, said, referring to the 
■ X . Humpuss contract. “Construction will 
..| (Start m December.” 

V - Mr. Suharto’s children have faced grow- 


: ical influence to 
— ' 


up vast business 


empires. A magazine survey conducted in 
November 1993 listed three of them in its 
list of Indonesia's 10 wealthiest people. 

The government has since 1 992 regarded 
the upgrading of its weak port facilities as 
vital to maintaining the country’s growth. 

Taigung Priok, Indonesia’s busiest port, 
with two terminals operating and plans for 
two more by the end of the century, han- 
dled 22 million tons of cargo in 1992, 
nearly half of it for export, compared with 
83 million tons in 1980. 

Mr. Sibbald said construction of the 
termmaTs first berth was expected to be 
completed by the first quarter of 1996 and 


that the entire project should be finished 
by 1999. 

He said financing for the project, the 
first terminal construction contract to be 
awarded to the group, would come from 
bank syndication and equity. He did not 
elaborate. 

“The port authority is responsible for 
the infrastructure and the private side; 
Humpuss is responsible for the superstruc- 
ture and equipment,” he said. 

Humpuss, with interests in a domestic 
airline and shipping, is controlled by Hu- 
tomo Mandala Putra, Mr. Suharto's youn- 
gest son. 


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Sources: Reuters, AFP imenuiRiuJ Hcmj tuiwk 


Very briefly; 

• John Fairfax Holdings Ltd., an Australian newspaper company, 
said it would focus its growth on pay television, electronic data- 
base services and digital technology and would have 1 billion 
Australian dollars ($735 million) for acquisitions by 1997. 

• Two Hong Kong residential developments sold Tot less than 
expected at a government land auction, reflecting an uncertain 
mood in Hong Kong’s property market. 

• The Ptrilippmes’ largest pension fund, its social security system, 
said it would quadruple the size of a fund it used to proride low- 
interest loans for members to buy slocks. 

• Taiwan's central bank urged local commercial banks to lower 
interest rates, reversing a money-tightening policy taken over the 
past six months. 

• Swire Pacific LttL, a Hong Kong conglomerate, is closing some 
of its Carroll Reed women's clothing stores because of poor 
prospects in the U.S. retail market, the company said. 

• Samsung Electronics Co. of South Korea said it would invest $30 
million to build a factory in Thailand to make washing machines, 
air conditioners and refrigerators. 

• Taiwan's export orders reached a record $8.43 billion in Septem- 
ber, up 21 percent from September 1993, because of the recovery 
in the world economy, the Economics Ministry said. 

• Nikko Securities Co. of Japan is expected next week to sign an 
accord with Nanfang Securities Co^ one of China's “Big Three” 
national securities companies, a Nikko spokesman said. 

• Sweden will give the Energy Ministry of Vietnam 200 million 

kronor ($28 million) over four years to improve power distribu- 
tion. a Swedish Embassy official said. Rearm, afp. ap 


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NASDAQ 


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Page 18 


SPORTS 



Are Baseball Owners 


Softening Their Stand? 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — If the 
words their chief labor execu- 


tive spoke were not simply rhet- 
asebalJ 


one, major league baseball club 
owners may be backing away 
from their “three-imp” plan: 
Impose a freeze on free-agenl 
signings, declare an impasse in 
negotiations for a new labor 
agreement and implement the 
salary cap they covet. 

Richard Ravitch. the man- 
agement official, offered hints 
of change after a meeting 
Wednesday where talks were re- 
sumed after a 39-day hiatus, 
during which the World Series 
was obliterated for the first time 
in 90 years. 

Ravitch led a contingent of 
11 club owners and executives 
in the first formal bargaining 
session since Sept. 9. Donald 
Fehr, the players' labor leader, 
led a group of six players, and 
they all met with Bill Usery Jr., 
the veteran mediator, whom the 
White House has asked to help 
settle the difficult dispute. 

“We didn't talk about sub- 


stantive matters in the true 
sense of trying to exchange pro- 
posals,” Usery said. "That was 
not what the meeting was for.” 
The meeting, Usery added, 
“was constructive ’from my 
point of view.” 

He did not schedule a further 
joint session, explaining that he 
would first meet with represen- 
tatives of the two sides sepa- 
rately. He said he would call a 
joint session "as soon as I think 
it's feasible." That time, he said, 
could be in a week or 10 days or 
later. 


agreeable resolution to this dis- 
pute.” the chief negotiator said. 
“I’m not going to speculate on 
what happens if this process is 
not successful because I have 
every expectation that it will 
be.” 


But the most promising as- 
pect of the day might have been 
Ravitch's comments on the 
owners’ plans for the immediate 
future. He did not rule out any 
steps the owners could take that 
would affect players and their 
abiiity to sign contracts, but he 
seemed to indicate nothing was 
imminent. 

"1 hope at no point in this 
process will we say anything 
publicly or privately or do any- 
thing we don't absolutely haw 
to do that could harm or impair 
the ability to get a mutually 


The most immediate step the 
owners would have to take 
would be to impose the freeze 
that would put off the start of 
the free-agenl signing period 
from OcL 30 to Dec. 1. Man- 
agement lawyers have talked of 
wanting to have a new system in 
place before clubs started sign- 
ing players and seemed set to 
impose the freeze unilaterally 
after the union refused to agree 
to it. 


But when asked about the 
Oct. 30 date. Ravitch said: 
“We don't have to make any 
decision whatsoever on any 
particular date. In our judg- 
ment. this process is going to 
be the method by which this 
dispute is resolved and we 
don't consider there to be any 
outside date by which we abso- 
lutely. as a legal matter, have 
to do anything." 




As Best in Majors 


The Associated Press 


NEW YORK — Barry 
Bonds’s reign as the top player 
in major league baseball lasted 
just one year, according to the 
sport’s computer rankings for 
1994. 

Greg Maddux, almost certain 
to win an unprecedented third 
straight Cy Young Award next 
week, displaced the San Fran- 
cisco Giants’ outfielder, accord- 
ing to the rankings released 
Wednesday by the Elias Sports 
Bureau. Frank Thomas of the 
Chicago White Sox remained 
third. 


Ken Griffey Jr. of the Scaiife’ 
Mariners was among the top; 
three outfielders in the AL For 
the fourth straight season. 
Cleveland's Albert Belle repeat-; 
ed and was joined by Detroit’s 
Tony Phillips, who replaced 
Kirby Puckett. 

Chris Holes of Baltimore re- 
peated at catcher. Jack Me- 1 
Dowell’s two-year reign as ifc 
top AL pitcher in the rankings- 
was stopped by Jimmy Key of; 
the New York Yankees. Jeff 
Montgomery of Kansas City re- 
placed Duane Ward, who was; 
injured all season, os the top- 
reliever. 


r.Jin BnJrv ' Rculcn 


Maddux, who went 16-6 with 
a 1.56 eamed-run average for 
the Atlanta Braves, finished 
with a 97.705 ranking on a scale 
of 100, moving up from his sec- 
ond-place finish behind Bonds 
lasL year. 

Bonds, who hit 312 with 37 
homers and 81 RBIs, had a 
97.662 ranking this year fol- 
lowed by a 97.5 for Thomas, 
who hit 353 with 38 homers, 
101 RBIs and 106 runs scored. 


Paul Molitor of the Toronto 
Blue Jays was the top dcsignai-t 
ed hitter for the fourth consecu^ 
tive year. *■ 


Colorado's Andres Galar- 
raga was the top NL first base- 
man; last year, Mark Grace and , 
Fred McGriff tied for No. 1.. i 


Pittsburgh's Jay Bell ended; 
Barry Larkin’, 


Bob Hamelin was congratulated by' Mike Macfarlane after bitting a two-run bonier In July. 


NHL: Bound for Europe 


Because Ravitch referred to 
“a legal matter." he was asked if 
the clubs would impose the 
freeze as a practical matter. 


Royals’ DH Voted Top AL Rookie 


The rankings, used to deter- 
mine free agent compensation, 
are based on statistics from the 
last two seasons. 


Complied hy Otir Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The only movement in the National Hockey 
League's stalemate seems to be players moving to Europe. 

Josef StumpeL the Boston Br uins * forward, was been Lhe latest, 
returning to his old club. Lhe Cologne Sharks. He would play in a 
league game Friday, a team spokesman said. 

The NHL lockout reached its 20th day Thursday. 

The commissioner, Gary Bettman, said the day before that no 
matter how many games were lost, they would not be made up 
past June because many of the league's older buildings could not 
produce adequate ice surfaces in the summer. 

He also said that the league would need at least a 40- or 50-game 
schedule in order to have a legitimate season leading to the 
Stanley Cup. In order to play a 50-game schedule, the NHL would 
have to resume play by mid- December. ( jp yvjT) 


“We have no contemplation 
of taking any legal steps what- 
soever at this point." he said. 
“We reserve our right to do 
what we’re legally entitled to, 
but we have no current expec- 
tation and there was no discus- 
sion with the negotiating com- 
mittee about our proceeding 
with any legal steps whatso- 
ever. We are fully committed 
to the process that BUI Usery 
has set in motion today and 
that's where all our energy is 
going.” 


The AssoaaieJ Press 

NEW YORK — Bob Hame- 
lin, who became the Kansas 
City Royals' designated hitter 
when George Brett retired, and 
then became one of the league's 
best sluggers, was an easy win- 
ner of the .American League's 
rookie of the year award. 

Hamelin was the first DH to 
win the award, and the first 
player for the Royals to do so 
since Lou Piniellain 1969. 

Hamelin. who was batting 
.282, led AL rookies in homers 
(24), RBIs (65), runs (64). hits 


(88), doubles (25). walks (56) 
and games (101) when the play- 
ers' strike started Aug. 12. 

Hamelin. 26. was drafted by 
the Royals in 1988. Despite the 
power, his progress to the ma- 
jors was slowed by back prob- 
lems. 

“I did spend quite a few years 
in the minor leagues." he said 
“I definitely paid my dues. That 
does make it a liule more re- 
warding." 

Hamelin, who also played 24 
games at first base, received 25 


of 28 first-place votes in ballot- 
ing by the Baseball Writers As- 
sociation of America. He also 
got three second-place votes 
and finished with 134 points. 

Cleveland outfielder Manny 
Ramirez, who hit .269 with 17 
home runs and 60 RBIs. was 
runner-up with 44 points. Texas 
outfielder Rusty Greer, who hit 
.314 with 46 RBIs and also 
made a diving catch that fin- 
ished off Kenny Rogers' perfect 
game, got the other three first- 
place votes and was third with 
42 points. 


Ryne Sandberg, who sudden- 
ly retired from the Chicago 
Cubs in June, had his 10-year 
run as the NL’s best second 
baseman ended by Houston's 
Craig Biggio. 

Thomas was the top AL first 
baseman for the third straight 
season, and Toronto's Roberto 
Alomar was tops among AL 
second baseman for the third 
consecutive year. John Valentin 
of the Boston Red Sox replaced 
Tony Fernandez at shortstop 
and Detroit’s Travis Fryman 
ended Robin Ventura's two- 
year run at third. 


’s four-year reign 
at shortstop. Matt ’Williams, 
who hit 43 homers and drove in 
96 RBIs for San Francisco, was 
the top third baseman. He dis- 
placed Terry Pendleton, No. I 
for two straight years. 

Bonds, among the top three 
NL outfielders for the fourth 
consecutive year, was joined by 
Montreal's Moises Alou. Atlan- 
ta’s David Justice and Cincin- 
nati’s Kevin Mitchell tied for 
the third spot. Last year, Lenny 
Dykstra and Bobby Bonilla 
were among die top three. 

Rick Wilkins of the Chicago 
Cubs, tied for the top spot at 
NL catcher last year with Dar- 
ren Dauhon. took sole posses- 
sion this year. Maddux repeat- 
ed as the top NL starter and 
Montreal's John Wetteland re- 
placed Rod Beck as the top NL- 
reliever. 


Carr, Former Towel - Waver, Now Carrying the Flag for Boston’s New -Era Celtics 


By Harvey Araton 

New York Tunes Service 


WALTHAM, Massachusetts — M. L. 
Carr, who once waved sweaty towels from 
the end of the bench, was airing dirty 
laundry as the most well-leveraged mem- 
ber of the Boston Celtics’ brass. 

It was the first day of training camp at 
Brandeis University," and already Xavier 
McDaniel was volunteering to break the 
logjam at small forward, if Carr could be 
so kind as to find another team for him. 

Dino Radja was saying he wanted a 
long-term extension of his contract, and 
soon. Reporters were demanding defini- 
tive news on the condition of Pervis Elli- 
son's knees and Dominique Wilkins's 
back. 

Michael Leon Carr had an answer for 
everything, and usually there was a punch- 
line.’ 

“How does it feel to be the guy who let 
The Last Celtic leave?" someone asked 
Carr, who last June, at 43, was named the 
Celtics' director of basketball operations 
after the dour Dave Gavitt got the boot 
upstairs. 


“Chief was just here last week, working 
out in Charlotte Hornets' sweats." Can- 
said, catching the reference to Robert Par- 
ish, a certain Hall of Famer. “My son went 
over and said, ‘Mr. Parish, I don’t like the 
way you look in teal.' 

“Chief said, ‘Mike, go talk to your fa- 
ther. He’s the one who ran me out of 
town.'" 

Nothing personal. Carr knew it was 
time, almost halfway through the 1990s. 
for the Celtics to let go of the 1 980s. Larry 
Bird wasn’t coming back. A new arena, the 
Shawm ut Center, was going up. Even Bos- 
ton Garden, that beloved, banner-rich rat- 
trap, could only be tolerated one more 
season. 

“It's run its course," Can- said. “It’s a 
new day, a new era.” 

Everyone from Bird’s era got old. Regj 
Lewis, who was supposed to be star of 
next generation, collapsed one awful sum- 
mer day and died. The highest-tenured 
Celtic happens to be a 25-year-old mercu- 
rial guard. Dee Brown. Next is point guard 
Sherman Douglas. 

“I look around and see nobody left ex- 


cept me and Coach," Brown said, nodding 
in the direction of Chris Ford. “It's bi- 


zarre. 

Go back to 1979. when Red Auerbach 
whisked away a scrappy free agent forward 
just as he was about to sign with the 
Knicks. That’s when the Bird-Porish-Ke- 
vin McHale era actually began. 

When 6-foot-6-inch M.-L. Carr signed 
with Boston, joining the rookie sensation 
Bird, the Celtics owed Detroit compensa- 
tion, which those days could be negotiated 
by the two teams, or left to the discretion 
of the league. 

Auerbach’s coach. Bill Fitch, called his 
Detroit counterpart, a noisy fellow by the 
name of Dick Vitale. “You need a star,” 
Fitch said, offering Bob McAdoo. a great 
shooter the Celtics never wanted in the 
first place. 

Vitale, feeling lucky, kicked in two first- 
round draft picks. His team finished dead 
last. Those picks, after one more Fitch 
trade with Golden Slate, landed the Celtics 
Parish and McHale. Thus was formed the 
best frontline in the history of the game. 

The irrelevant argument can be made 
that the Celtics would have three fewer 


championships had Carr listened to Madi- 
Garden's Sonny Werblin, if he 


son Square 
had accepted more money from the 
Knicks. 

“My wife never did figure that one out." 
he said. “But 1 just wanted to be a Cekie. 
And see what happened? 1 came in here 
and turned the whole damned thing 
around." 


Now the Celtics, after winning 32 games 
rffs for the 


and failing to make the playof 
first time in 15 years, or the year before 
Care first joined them, want him to do ii 
again. If only Carr had Bird to help him by 
distributing the ball, instead of as a some- 
times scouL 

As a player. Carr’s skills were modest, 
but his value was more than one who' 
averaged 6.3 points over slx Celtics sea- 
sons, whose name became synonymous 
with his towel, whose infectious laugh was 
always rising above the din in crowded 
Celtic locker rooms. 

Carr was something of a defensive spe- 
cialist. or hit man, depending on one's 
point of view. 

Once. Carr forearmed no less a target 
than Bill Laimbeer. right to the floor. 


Laimbeer, he said, was flopping, drawing 
cheap offensive fouls, and Carr decided 
that if Laimbeer wanted to go down, by 
golly, he would go down. 

Carr couldn't lloat like a butterfly, but 
he could sting like a bee. Matched against 
one player whom the NBA grapevine had 
cruelly lagged as a possible cross dresser, 
Carr strolled over during a play stoppage 
in a tight game and said, “Want to go out 
on a date?” 

Away from the court, Carr’s sass al- 
lowed him to become the Celtics’ off-court 
ambassador, to cross all of Boston’s stiff 
racial barriers. He could go right from a 
basketball clinic in Roxbuiy to a bankers* 
luncheon near Copley Square, and often 
did. 

When he retired he formed his own 
company, selling plastics, using his Celtics' 
ties to get a foot in the door. Those ties, by 
then, were merely symbolic, and from the 
Celtics’ side, shameful. 

For a couple of years. Carr was listed as 
an unpaid scout, though he admitted he 
did no actual work. He was, at that point, 
the only black on the Celtics’ administra- 
tive roster, or coaching staff. 


Times change. Haunted by poor deci-\ 
sions and bad luck, the Celtics atrophied; 
They don't hoodwink the whole league 
anymore. They are hamstrung, like every- , 
one else, by the salary cap. 

That is why M. L. Carr, a man with; 
boundless energy and optimism, seems 
such the right man to lead them in their 
push forward That is why Gavitt. and 
Bird and even Auerbach, now rank behind 
the man who waved his towels. 


“Look,” he said, finally, to lhe Robert’ 
Parish defender. “I don't take it lightly 
that he isn't here. But Bill Russell left, too. 
That must have been a sad day. John' 
Havlicek left. Bob Cousy. 


“I'm hoping that in 10 years, people will 
say. ‘Can you believe they let Dee Brown 
and Pervis Ellison go?’ *’ 


Pause. i 

“Don't laugh,” Carr said. '/ j 

It was too late for that. But M. L. Carr, i 
not one to get carried away with seif* j 
righteous Cellicness, was already hims elf > 
breaking up. . j 


DENNISTHEMENACE 


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CVTERJNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1994 


Page 19 


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a j0r 8 ^CzechOpen 


British Golfers Davies and Nicholas: Power, Putting , Puns 


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The Asuxbaetl Press 

MARIAN SKE LAZNE, 
Czech Republic — The scores 
appeared sensational: Sam Tor- 
rance and Gordon Brand Jr. 
each shot 54 Thursday, Jamie 
Spence and Malcolm MacKen- 
ae opened with 57. 

But they played only 15 boles 
at the $750,000 Czech Open. 

Heavy frost made three holes 
unplayable, so organizers de- 
ckled to make the par-71 Mari- 
anste Lazoe Golf Club course a 
par-59 layout for the day. 

' The start of the first Europe- 
an PGA tournament to be 
played in the Czech Republic 
was delayed by more than three 
hours before it was decided to 
omit the 11th, 23th and 24th 
holes. Then, only 51 of the 102 
. starters were able to finish the 
first round before darkness 
halted play. 


By Larry Dorman 

Ne w York Tima Service 

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, 
West Virginia — They are the Mutt 
and Jeff of European women's golf, 
the long and short of it, a par 3 and a 
par 3. They are to the European Sol- 
heim Cup team what Seve Ballesteros 
and Jos6 Maria Olaz&bal are to the 
European Ryder Cup team. They are 
Laura Davies and Alison Nicholas, 
best of friends and Europe's best 
pairing in the Solheim Cup. 

Davies, 31, is the longest hitter in 
women's golf, and Nicholas, 32. is 
one of the game’s best putters. Ibis 
combination of power and finesse is 
always difficult to beat in team golf. 
And when combined with the other 
compatibility factors, it makes Da- 
vies and Nicholas a strong combina- 
tion again this week as Europe and 
the United States meet Friday 
through Sunday in the third edition 
of the bi ennia] Solheim Cup at the 
Greenbrier resort hem. 

In the Solheim Cup, which is the 


women’s version of the Ryder Cup, 
Davies and Nicholas are 3-1 as a 
team since the competition began 
four years ago at Lake Nona Golf 
Club in Orlando, Florida. They 
haven't been defeated since a nervous 
4 and 3 loss to Betsy King and Beth 
Daniel in their first match that year. 
Now, the two women from Britain go 
together better than fish and chips. 

‘‘Well, since we’re the same size, 
the same height and hit the ball the 
same distance, we should be a good 
team,” Nicholas said with a laugh. 

A bit of Brit humor, of course. 
Davies stands 5 feet, 11 inches (1.S0 
meters), and her weight, a closely 
guarded secret, fluctuates. At the mo- 
ment, she appears to be dose to 190 
pounds (86 kilogjrams). Nicholas 
claims to be “5 feet in my spikes,” but 
in reality stands a shade less. She is 
considerably less in weight, and driv- 
ing distance. 

If tins disparity matters at all, it is 
because the two women have turned 
it to their advantage. They have 


known each other for 15 years and 
share in common a dry sense of hu- 
mor and a keen sense of purpose, 
tempered by an ability to laugh at 
themselves. 

This is one of the first things you 
notice about Davies and Nicholas. 
They do not take themselves serious- 


ly. They take their golf seriously and 
they want nothing more than to keep 
the Solheim Cup m Europe, where it 
has resided since the Europeans de- 
feated the United States, II £-716, 
two years ago at Dalmaboy in Scot- 
land. But they refuse to allow the 
pressure of the competition to out- 


Fore! Here Comes the Champ 


Afcw York Tima Service 
The search for a mythical world 
golf champion will be undertaken in 
a new event with 32 players vying for 
the $1 million winner’s prize. 

The S3.65 million tournament will 
start next year and take place periodi- 
cally at courses worldwide from 
March to December, pitting eight 
golfers from four regions in single- 
elimination match play. Seven of 
each region’s eight players will be 
chosen from the Sony Rankings, a 
worldwide rating of golfers; the last 
will be the sponsors' choice. 


The regions are the United States, 
Europe, Japan and the rest of the world 
(Australia, Asia and South Africa). 

The tournament, called the Ander- 
sen Consulting World Championship 
of Golf, will start March 3-4 with the 
Japanese region’s preliminary 
rounds, and conclude Dec 29-31 
with the semifinals and finals from 
the yei-unopened Grayhawk Golf 
Club in Scottsdale, Arizona. 

The organizers claim the tourna- 
ment will draw the top players be- 
cause it is sanctioned by each coun- 
try’s governing bodies. 


strip their No. 1 desire —which is to 
have fun on the golf course. 

“I think that’s a big part of what 
makes us successful is that we're good 
friends having fun in a very competi- 
tive situation,” Davies said. “It's sim- 
ple as that. Ali and 1 have fun. We 
don’t get downhearted.” 

But they do get down, which is to 
say that both enjoy a liule wager every 
now and again. Davies enjoys betting 
nearly as much as she does hitting a 
par 5 in two. Her gusto for the race 
track has been well-documented, but 
she also enjoys spicing up the competi- 
tion on the course with a bet or two. 

She and Nicholas put the pressure 
on fellow European team member 
Trish Johnson during a practice 
round this week. They were playing 
for $50, and Johnson had a 3-footer 
left for par. She looked over for a 
concession. She got silence. 

“She gave us a few looks,” Davies 
said. “But she made the putt The 
Americans aren’t going to give any- 
one any 3-footers.” 

If one is to listen to the British 


oddsmakers, the Europeans aren’t 
going to give the Americans any com- 
petition, either. Coral's, one of the 
legal betting emporiums in England, 
will pay about $62 for about $18 bet 
if the Europeans win. 

Two years ago, when some mem- 
bers of the American team were dis- 
missive of the Europeans’ chances, 
Davies became inspired, inspiring 
and unstoppable. She and Nicholas 
won their foursome match over Betsy 
King and Beth Daniel, their four-ball 
match over Patty Sheehan and Juli 
Inkster and Davies birdied five of the 
last six holes to beat Brandie Burton 
in singles, 4 and 2. 

This season, fueled by a desire to 
accomplish something no other Euro- 
pean woman has done — win the 
LPGA money title — Davies has won 
$667,652 ana leads the list. The latest 
Solheim slight by the oddsmakers 
might fire her and her little partner 
up to great heights. 

“If I were an outsider,” she said, 
“I'd steam in and lay plenty of money 


South Koreeai Wrestler 
Won Gold With Cancer 


SEOUL — A South Korean wrestler won a gold medal at 
the Asian Games with a cancerous tumor bigger than a 
‘ baseball in his stomach, hospital officials said Thursday. 

- Song Sung D, 25, lode won the Greco-Roman mid-heavy- 
weight title by defeating Kazakhstan’s Vi tali Leikine on Oct. 
5 in Hiroshima, Japan 

Wednesday, Song underwent a 5 Mi-hour operation in Seoul 
The surgeon, Lee Byung boong, told the newspaper Joongang 
. Hbo that “a tumor the size of your two fists put together was 
removed. I'm just surprised at how he could compete in the 
Games with the cancer advanced to such a state.” 

“Song had to fight with pain in Ms stomach as well as 
' strong dhaUengers at the games,” his coach said. “He could 
not even take pills to kill the pain because of dope tests.” 

Song, who thought the pain was bang caused by a stomach 
! ulcer, said after he won the gold medal that he would deliver it 
. to his mother. She, too, is suffering from stomach cancer. 


i - ^ 


Arsenal Holds On for Victory 
Over Plucky Danish Team 


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LAS VEGAS <AF) — Just hours after UNLV bid a S1.8 million 
farewell to Rollie Masamino, efforts to hire former assistant Tim 
Grgurkh as the new coach failed and the athletic director quit. 

The school's president, Kenny Guinn, said an interim coach 
would ire hired as soon as possible for this season, and tire luring 
of a permanent coach left until next year. 

The athletic director, Jim Weaver, whose reported personality 
conflict, with Grgurich hampered efforts to sign the only coach 
UNLV was seeking for the job, resigned during an hour-long 
meeting with Guinn. 

For the Record 

Allan Bristow, coach of the NBA Charlotte Hornets, was hospi- 
talized in Bologna, Italy, with a kidney infection; a team spokes- 
man said doctors did not think the infection was serious. (AP) 

Vietnam will hold its fourth international marathon in Hanoi 
on Jan. 15 to boost tourism, organizers announced. (Reuters) 


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• ESPN’s Beano Cook; “Coaches say there's a lot of pressure, 
icy make $400,000, $500,000 a year. If they don’t want pressure, 
>rk at Wendy's/' 


SOMETHING BLUE — Wimbledon champion Conchita Martinez gave tine ball a kick 
Thursday as die was losing, 6-1, 6-3, to Larisa NeOand of Latvia in the Brighton 
International Martinez did save herself the cost of a round-trip private jet to Z urich; she 
had arranged to attend die wedding of Iier coach, Eric van Harped, Friday in Switzerland. 


Compiled tf Our Staff From Dispatcher 

Arsenal was grateful for an 
early two-goal cushion as their 
Danish opponents, Brondby, 
threatened to derail the title- 
holders’ European Cap Win- 
ners’ Cup campaign on Thurs- 
day night in Brondby. 

Everything looked like clear 
sailing for the London side 
when Ian Wright and Alan 

EUROPEAN SOCCER 

Smith scored within three min- 
utes of each other just after the 
quarter-hour mark. 

But on a freezing evening in 
the Copenhagen suburbs, the 
Danes came roaring back. They 
halved their deficit eight min- 
utes after the break when the 
striker Marc Strudel hit the tar- 
get from dose range after a pin- 
pointed low cross from the mid- 
fielder Bo Hansen. 

And it became a genuinely 
lough lest of the Gunners’ 
famed resilience as Brondby 
poured it on with the backing of 
a noisy crowd of 16,000 in tbeir 
tight little stadium. They went 
unthin inches of beginning the 
return match on level terms. 

Nigel Winlerbum headed off 
the line from Thomas Thoger- 
sen, and the goalie David Sea- 
man had to come rushing off his 
line to block the ball at (he feet 
of Ole Bjur before Strudel's 
glancing header went agoniz- 
ingly close to the far post. 

Besiktas 2, Auxerre 2: The 
French team rallied from two 
goals down to tie on rainy night 
in Istanbul 

The Turks dominated the 
first half, with the striker Meh- 


met OzdQek scoring in the 39th 
minute with a shot from six me- 
ters after a pass through a 
crowded penalty box from Ser- 
gei Yalcm. 

Ertu grul Saglam pounced on 
a defensive error by Frank Ver- 
laat to score the second goal 
with a left-foot strike in the 43d 
minute. 

But Auxerre attacked from 
the start of the second half and 
broke through with two rapid- 
fire goals in the 53d and 58th 
minutes by Moussa Saib and 
Corentin Martins. 

dob Brugges 1, PanatMnri- 
kos (ft Lorenzo Staelens, a Bel- 
gian international midfielder, 
scored a fourth-minute penalty, 
which was enough to give Club 
Bmgge a victory over the Greek 
side in their European Cup 
Winners' Cup match. 

Sampdoria 3, Grasshopper 
Zurich 0: Italy’s Sampdoria 
struck two late goals as it over- 
powered the Swiss team to vir- 
tually book a place in (he next 
round of the European Cup 
Winners’ Cup. 

Goals by the Serb Sinisa Mi- 
hajlovic in the 76th minute and 
a fellow midfielder. Riccardo 
Maspero, seven minutes later 
sealed a victory that should 
make the second round second 
leg in Switzerland next month a 
formality for the Italians, win- 
ners of this trophy in 1990. 

Feyenoord Rotterdam I, 
Wevder Bremen (ft A single goal 
from striker Henryk Laxsson 
was Feyenoord Rotterdam's 
only reward for persistent pres- 
sure as they treat Werder Bre- 


men in a Cup Winners* Cup 
second round, first leg match. 

The Swedish international 
struck in the 63d minute to 
break the deadlock against a 
Werder side that played with a 
sole front-runner ahead of a 
packed midfield. 

Chelsea 0, Austria Vienna 0: 
In London, the evening at 
Stamford Bridge finished goal- 
less as Chelsea failed to over- 
come the 10 men of Austria 
Vienna. 

The London dub surged for- 
ward for most of the game but 
could not break down an obdu- 
rate defense. With a numerical 
advantage for the last 20 min- 
utes slier Manfred Schmid was 
sent off, Chelsea still could not 
find a way round Franz Wohl- 
fahrt in the Austria goal. 

Parma 1, AIK Solna (ft In 
Stockholm, Massimo Crippa 
struck 18 minutes from time for 
an away victory in the first leg 
of a UEFA Cup second-round 
match. 

Real Zaragoza 4, Tatran Pre- 
soy (ft Juan Eduardo Esnaider 
scored twice for the Spaniards 
b their Cup Winners’ Cup 
match in Bratislava. Gustav 
Poyet and Stanislav Varga add- 
ed goals for the winners as the 
defense frustrated any scoring 
chances by the Slovak team. 

FC Porto 6, Ferencvaros 0: 
Playing at home, the Portugues 
completely dominated the Hun- 
garians in their Cup Winners’ 
Cup second round match. Lju- 
binko Druiovic led the scoring 
with two goals. (AFP Reuten) 


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CRICKET 


MW DAY IMTEBJIATIOIIALS 
Sooth Africa n. PakWaa 


Pakistan Hwm»: mm 


South Africa Innings: HM 150 owrsJ 
Rasutt: Pakistan won by 3V iw* 

India vs. west lades 
Thursday. Is eomtaay 
West imfles barings: !»■» 

India IfmJnpK On 34th ovsr) 
Match abandoned due to roM. 

Result: India wins on superior nm-rate. 
SECOND INTERNATIONAL T1ST 

Sri Lanka vs. ZMobatan 
Thursday, to Bntowava 
Sri Lanka 1st Innings: 21*4 


BALTIMORE— Dedlnsd to ofi®r salary nr* 
MtroriHon to HaniM Baines. autfMder.and Las 
Smltn. Pltctisr, making them eUgtoie lor lm 
agency. 


BOSTON— Ostflned to offer salary ariri tra- 
tlon to Andre Dawson, designated timer. 
Frank Viola and Joe Heskcttv pHchers. and 
Tom Brunonsky.deslonatodWtter-oulfleMer. 
making Ihem cllglMe ter tree agency. 

CALIFORNIA— Announced Kiev haw of- 
fered salary afbttratton to ami Davli, out- 
fielder. 

CHICAGO— Dedtnod to offer salary artri- 
fratfan to Joss DeLeon, pitcher, Jufio Franco, 
desi gn ated iritter. Bob Melvto, oatener, and 
Dan Pasnua outfielder. 

CUEVELAND— Declined la otler salary ar- 
bitration la Rene Canzaes, tofislder. Tony 
Pena catcher, and Jeff Russell, pitcher. 

DETROIT — Declined to alter salary arbi- 
tration to Tim Batcher, and BUI GdlWwon. 
pHdnrs, Eric Davis. ouHtetaer. and Alan 
Trammell, shortstop. 

KANSAS CITY— Declined to offer sokrrv 
arb itration to Vines Coleman, outfielder. 


Named JcH Cox third base coach. Named 
Mike Jlrsctwle. manager: Mike Alvarez 
pitching coach: and Tam Poauette hi til no 
coach, of Omotia AA. Named Ran Johnson 
manager ol Wlctiita. TL; Jalui Mtasrack mam 
ager of WUmbWtofl. Carolina League; Brian 
PoMberg manaair of Sortnafleld. Midwest 
League: At Pedriaue managar o i Spokane, 
N ui lhw uH League: and Bob Harold manager 
ol Fori Myers, Florida Stale League. 

MILWAUKEE— Dedtoed to otter unary 
arbitration la Brian Harper, and Dave Valle, 
catcher*, and Teddv Higaera ntttther, 

NEW YO RK— Declined to otter salary are l- 
( ration to Mike Gatlen Inflelder. 

OAKLAND — Declined to offer salary arbi- 
tration to Bab Welch, pitcher. 

TEXAS— Detuned to offer salary arbitra- 
tion to Tom Henke. Pitcher, and Manny Lee. 
inflelder. 


ACROSS 

i Erie Stanley 
Gardner pen 
name 

7 Bo Derek's film 
debut 


ii Jade or jenny 
i« Kind of 
association 
is Prefirranary race 
is Penn, for one: 
Abbr. 


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IT A, to Ludwig 
van Beethoven 
so Octogenarian’s 
goal In life? 
si Thoms in one's 
side 

22 Ask 

overperson ally 

23 Framework 

as Flood residues 
2 a Presided over. 

as a case 
29 Chevron 
wearers: Abbr. 

31 facto 

32 Humble 
34 Dog-tired 

SSB. to Samuel 
Morse 

40 Kind of 
kingdom 

«i Alms 

43 Sharpen 
4« Critic Pauline 
4« Italian “please’ 
43 Playwright 

Connelly 

sa Marched along 

52 Fresh 

53 Last words 

85 Grammy song 
Of '83 

89 C, to Albert 
Einstein 

62 The elected 

•3 Humorist 
Bombeek 

64 Waterford 
worker 

65 Middla grade 

66 Monopoly piece 

57 Platforms 


1 “Pooh* 
monogram 

2 TV voice ol Fred 

Fflrrtstorre 

3 View from 
Tokyo 

4 Egypt's Ra 

a Legal memo 

starter 

• Laugh-a-minute 
comedies 
7 Electrical unit 
a ‘Beverly HIHs 
Cop" co-star 
9 Beat, in a way 

10 Building block 
of nature 

11 Invites, as to an 

apartment 

12 Lipplzaners 

13 Insists 

ia Ford role in 
‘Clear and 
Present 
Danger* 

19 String on a 

finger, e.g. 

22 Third degree? 
24 Break up 
27 Things to be 

paid 

29 ‘Chitty Chitty 
Bang Bang” 
screen wriler 

30 Oscar Madison, 

e-fl- 

33 Mont neighbor 

35 Live — 

3T Phrase after 

“Variations' 

M Type of stand 
39 As a unit 

42 Farm mother 

43 Uke ipecac 

44 Strauss opera 



Purato by Mark DMri 


45 Dolphin 
Hall-of-Famer 
Bob 

47WoH,lnJu6re3 
bi Put oft 
54 Mimed 
si One of the 
Dumas 

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38 Spasms 
so Pop 

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0 New York Tunes/ EeSled by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Pnnle of Oct. 20 


soiisom mann naa 
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BHQ ass asanaa 
qqsb Baa aaaaa 
aaosa aaaaan 
amaaanaasaaaa 
HD0EQa aasan 
dqqqq ana anna 
smamaa naa asa 
saaa uhqo sauna 
aao anaanaaianaa 
maa aaaa □aaaaa 
bbb gaga aaaaaa 


On November 29th, the IHT plans to publish 
a Special Report on 

Telecommunications 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Phone company privatization around the 
world. 

■ The global mobile phone standard. 

■ Overcrowding on the information 
superhighway. 

■ The competition to wire up the fast- 
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■ Alliances among media providers. 

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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 21, 1994 


• - 


OBSERVER 

How I Made Up My Mind 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK - Scheduled 
to be away from home on 
Election Day, I have just sealed 
and mailed my absentee ballot 
My vote for senator went to 
A. I gather he is unpatriotic and 
possibly a child molester. I 
gleaned this from B'$ commer- 
cials. Of course A admits noth- 
ing. Nevertheless. A's spin doc- 
tors say that A would 
vigorously deny all if it were 
practical to do so without dis- 
rupting his vicious television as- 
sault on B’s character. 

I once meant to vote for B. 
for he has a magnificent jaw as 
well as teeth so glorious that 
they would do our slate's den- 
tistry great credit. A's commer- 
cials, however, exposed shame- 
ful moral deficiency behind B's 
showy jaw. 

These commercials declared B 
to be a hopeless liar. The scales 
fell from my eyes when 1 heard 
this. I had loved B’s commercial 
showing him striding so grace- 
fully through our native heather 
with his beautiful Irish setter. 

This commercial's subliminal 
message: “Since B loves dogs, he 
should be elected to the Senate." 

However, after A's commer- 
cials explained that B was a liar, 
I realized B’s commercial must 
be a lie from start to finish — all 
10 seconds of it. I offered to bet 
people that the Irish setter was 
not B’s dog and. in fact, wasn't 
even Irisb. 

□ 

What finally turned me 
against B, though, was his own 
commercial. In it he swore to cut 
government spending on every- 
body but me. Being a consum- 
mate liar, he obviously meant to 
strip me of federal funds for 
life's necessities — police sta- 
tions, street lights, garbage pick- 
up. The mendacious swine! 

I reasoned that while A might 
be wanting in patriotism ana a 
child molester, sending him to 
the Senate would keep him un- 
der such a publicity spotlight 


that he would be forced to curb 
his unnatural in clina tions 

In short, I figured that the 
Senate might make a new man 
Of A. This is the only persuasive 
reason I can see for sending 
anybody to the Senate any- 
more, now that the only thing 
they do there is nothing. 

□ 

For Congress my vote went to 
X even though Y’s commercials 
said X was a tireless womanizer. 

Let me assure you 1 was not 
swayed by X’s beautifully made, 
magnificently poisonous com- 
mercials. These dwelt on the fact 
that Y’s fortune had been made 
by merging and acquiring or- 
phanages, then downsizing them 
and spinning them off to movie 
studios which specialize in low- 
budget orphan movies. 

In fact, the ingenuity that 
went into Y’s shameful business 
left me convinced that Y was 
such a clever go-getter that he 
would never be content to sit 
quietly in the House of Repre- 
sentatives doing nothing but 
collecting his paycheck. 

If the Congress was to con- 
tinue to be utterly dysfunction- 
al, electing a man as inventive 
as Y would be a great mistake. 

On the other hand a tireless 
womanizer like X would be so 
immobilized by Washington's 
many persons eager to be wom- 
anized with, that he could be 
counted on to do nothing else 
and so contribute to the point- 
lessness to which everything 
now tends. Hence mv vote for 
X. 

Politics almost always comes 
down to the choice of the lesser 
evil, and this has never been 
truer than this year when all 
campaigning consists of “at- 
tack" commercials between du- 
eling evildoers. 

Imagine the bleakness of life 
without the fun and excitement 
of these well-poisoners making 
a farce of democracy every oth- 
er October. 

JVfw York Times Service 


Robert Paxton: France’s American Expert on Vichy 


By Joan Dupont 

P ARIS — When Pierre Pean's ex- 
plosive biography. "Une Jeu- 
nesse Fran^aise,” revealed that Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand's ties to 
Vichy had been older and more dura- 
ble than was commonly known, one 
of the first specialists the French con- 
sulted was Professor RoberL O. Pax- 
ton of Columbia University. 

The historian gave a dire diagnosis: 
“We thought that the Resistance had 
triumphed with Francois Mitterrand, 
instead. Vichy has reared its head.” 

A quiet Virginian with a soft ac- 
cent and courteous maimer. Paxton 
said that he was not completely con- 
vinced by the president's televised 
explanations: “Mitterrand could not 
possibly have been ignorant of Vi- 
chy’s 1940 anti- Jewish laws.” 

Author of the ground-breaking 
“Vichy France, Old Guard and New 
Order" (1972), for years the Ameri- 
can historian was a thorn in (he side 
of the French establishment: he is 
now hailed as a pioneering hero. 

In Paris on his way to Caen to be 
awarded an honorary doctorate by 
the university there, he remembered 
that French academia bad not always 
been welcoming: “Professors at Sci- 
ences Po said I had gotten it all 
wrong and couldn't be trusted be- 
cause I misspelled names.” he said, 
referring to the well-known French 
institute of political science. 

Paxton's mild blue eyes light up 
with a pugnacious glint: “I'm a target 
to shoot at, but I don't think they’ve 
taken any main pillars out — no one 
is attacking fundamental pieces of 
my version, that the Vichy govern- 
ment was not a shield but took active 
initiatives, and that its domestic pro- 
gram was not imposed by Germany." 

The main lines of Mitterrand’s in- 
volvement in Petain's government 
were not a complete surprise. “We 
knew that he wasn't just a technician 
doing chores, but a convinced Vichy 
person; it turns out he stayed around 
later than we thought. People who 
had clung to Mitterrand as a wily old 
fox, but on the right side, feel be- 
trayed. They are not concerned! 
about his business connections or 
what be did to his own party; they’re 
focusing on things he did 50 years 
ago!" 


When Paxton began digging into 
the period, he was practically alone: 
“French journalists love io say that I 
was the only historian; actually there 
were several and they were mad as 
hops because I got all the credit!” He 
laughs. “I was the first to use German 
records, captured by the Allies after 
the war. on microfilm in London and 
Washington. No one in France has 
ever admitted to me that they’ had 
heard of these microfilms, and histori- 
ans even said, we can’t trust the Ger- 
man archives, those people were Na- 
zis! But of course you can use them, 
with care. I think that’s an astonishing 
prejudice because no record is a chem- 
ically pure truth, it has to be evaluat- 
ed. I nave a terrible memory myself.” 

He came to Paris in I960, to do his 
Ph. D. on the French military acade- 
my during the Third Republic, a 
“perfectly proper, boring subject." 

“But I was told that Saint Cyr bad 
been bombed by (he American Air 
Force in 1944, and to go away.” 

He went away and wrote “Parade 
and Politics at Vichy” 1 1 966). During 
the research, he realized that the Vi- 
chy he was investigating was totally 
different from the view portrayed in 
the standard postwar work, Robert 
.Aron’s “Histoire de Vichy” (1954). 
which claimed that the regime was a 
shield to protect the French against 
the German victors. 

“I was angry because I found that 
people had been putting things over 
onus — the mythical Vichy was a lie.” 

He found out, for example, that 
the French were the only people in 
Western Europe who turned over 
Jews from areas where there were no 
Germans. “The big raids, the round- 
ing up of Jews in the unoccupied 
zone would have been impossible 
without the French police." 

He wrote “Vichy: Old Guard and 
New Order” in a white heat: “It was 
during the Vietnam War and I felt 
strongly about people blindly obey- 
ing their governments; 1 felt being a 
passive citizen was a terrible thing. I 
saw a parallel between the U. S. and 
Germany: our country was son of an 
occupying power.” 

A major French publisher refused 
the book, saying the French wouldn't 
be interested. Le SeuR published it. 
and it turned cut that the May '68 



S Mjswn MPA 

Paxton, for years a thorn in side of the French establishment. 


generation was avid. Roger Errera, 
an editor at Calmann-L6vy. commis- 
sioned Paxton to write a book nailing 
down French responsibility In gov- 
ernment policy toward the Jews. It 
Look 10 years' to finish because, he 
says, it was so depressing that he 
couldn’t stand doing the job single- 
handed. Canadian historian Michael 
Marrus came on board as co-author. 

“Reaction to my first book had 
been gigantic.” he said, “a lot of 
an gr y denial and letters to newspa- 
pers, a huge debate, but after ‘Vichy 
and the Jews,’ there was embarrassed 
silence. The reviews were sort of 
through clenched teeth and I didn't 
get much mail.” 


In the letters, he was often asked, 
what could you possibly know about 
our suffering? America has never lost 
a war. “I never answered, but I would 
have said, Tm a Southerner and I 
know very well what it is to lose a 
war, thank you.' ’’ 

Paxton was raised in a small town 
where there were few Jews — “We 
didn’t know much about anti-Semi- 
tism in Appalachia” — but with 
strong feelings about the past “T had 
been raised on stories of how the 
Union officers came in and took the 
silver, and I thought I knew something 
about occupations. The town had 
been bombarded in 1863; my great- 
grandfather, a brigadier general, was 


hilled in the war. I was sent to school 
in the North and came back my 
hostile to the segregation system. I did 
not want to be an American historian. 
I wanted to flee all that- and I was 
fascinated by Europe.' 

He understands how young 
French people today find Vichy the 
epitome of evil, and that they are 
“profoundly shocked to discover that 
their president was closer^ to the re- 
gime than they thought. 

Particularly shocking is the revela- 
tion of Mitterrand’s prolonged 
friendship with Rene Bouquet, po- 
lice chief in charge of the raids and 
deportation of Jews from Paris and 
the unoccupied zone. 

“Mitterrand created the image, the 
language of people of the Left, and 
he obviouslv doesn’t have those sen- 
sibilities: If you had those sensibil- 
ities you just wouldn’t have those 
friends.” Paxton says. 

After the war. the high court let 
Bousquet off lightly: “.Anti-Semitism 
was not a crime in the civil code. It 
was duck soup for somebody like 
Bousquet. part of the elite, very in 
command of himself, very articulate, 
to portray his job as if be had put the 
brakes on these arrests — absolutely 
false. But in 1945, Jewish survivors 
were not talking: they only wanted to 
l ead some sort of normal life. And 
Vichy survivors wanted to become 
invisible.” 

Bousquet was assassinated in 
1993. 

The professors at Sciences Po who 
mistrusted Paxton because he mis- 
spelled names, now assign his books. 
“Younger teachers and their students 
read the two versions of Vichy — the 
shield version and mine — and seem 
to have accepted mine." he says. 

But today the tide is turning back 
to a more ambiguous view, in the 
direction of Mitterrand's ambiguous 
stance. “The French elite shares a 
secret — they accepted, without a 
murmur, the laws against the Jews — 
so a lot of people would be pleased if 
Vichy appeared more gray, not so 
black.” 


Joan Dupont is a Paris-based writer. 


<5 


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WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 







Mon 

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rflgti 

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21.70 

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* 


Forecast tor Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 



North America 

Much ot the Southern Untied 
Stales wtf haw dry weather 
this weokond A powerful 
Gfflrm near Hudson Bay wiS 
generate showers from 
Chicago to Toronlo early m 
(he weekend Mild weather 
ml prevail (ram Washkigton. 
D C.. » Boston: a few show- 
ers will occur laie in the 
weekend. 


Europe 

A Blow-moving storm will 
ingger heavy rains across 
southeastern Italy. Greece 
and parts ot north Africa this 
weekend. A spell of mild 
weather wdl occur from Bul- 
garia through Poland. A 
series of storms from the 
Atlantic will bring strong 
winds and heavy rains to 
parts of Wesem Europe. 


Asia 

Typhoon Teresa will bring 
heavy rains and gusty winds 
to the north om Philippines. 
Including Manila. Saturday. 
Tokyo and Osaka will be 
sunny and warm this week- 
end. Shanghai witl also be 
sunny and pleasanl Hong 
Kong wrfl have partly srstny 
skies, while a few scanered 
rams dampen Singapore. 


Middle East 


Today Tomorrow 

Mph Low W High Low W 
Cff Of OP OF 

Baku 27/00 22/71 s 23 AM 22171 s 

Cette M/84 19/BO • 33*1 20/08 S 

Damascus 27/00 i«/S7 s 20/0* 14/57 a 

Jannwam M/79 17*2 s 28/82 ia«< s 

Linor 33/01 18«4 ■ 38/10010106 a 

R/yaiti 34/93 22/71 a 35/95 23*73 S 


Latin America 


BuanoaMma 


Today 

High Low W MQK Low W 

OF OF OF OF 

17/82 ft/40 pc 20/88 11/E2 pc 

27/00 21 TO ah 20.02 M«8 pc 
Lima 21/70 18*1 pc 21/70 19/81 pc 

MmdcoOly 23.73 11/52 pe 2J/73 12*53 PC 

nodajanauc 20.02 21/70 pc 27/00 21 rt) pc 

Samtago 2i/70 8«3 a 20*3 409 pc 


Legend: s-aumy. pc-party tSouflv, o-doudy. sn-ohowors. t-tfiunderstotma. r-raln. sf-enew Uurrtea 
in-snow, Lice. W-Woalhor All rape, forecasts and data provided by Accu-Weettler. Inc. -3 1904 


Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 


Mgh 

Low 

W 

High 

Low W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Bangttutt 

29*4 

23/73 

Ml 

20*4 

23/73 ui 


17.02 

4.T0 

5 

19*8 

0/43 S 

Hong Kong 

20/70 

19*8 


20*2 

20*0 a 

Marita 

29*4 

23.73 

r 

27*0 

23/73 r 

Now Dona 

36*7 

17*2 

8 

36*7 

17*2 a 

Sect? 

17*2 

11*2 

sn 

19*6 

10/50 S 

Shar^/ta 

17*2 

9.40 


18*4 

12*3 a 


32*8 

2*/75 

PC 

33*1 

24775 sn 

Taw 

26/79 

14*7 

8 

28.70 

10*6 a 

Tc*vo 

20*8 

17/62 

r 

22/71 

10*1 pc 


Africa 



22771 

17*2 

PC 

23/73 

19 -60 sh 

Caoo Tom 

13*5 

8-40 

c 

19*6 

12*3 S 

Cuvioiinca 

24/75 

15*9 

5 

2577 

17*2 S 

Hararr 

20.56 

H-46 

pc 

2373 

j/40 1 

Lagoa 

28*2 

74775 

in 

79 PM 

74/75 1 

r/aarrtx 

22/71 

11*2 


74/75 

1355 pc 

Tito 

2271 

14*7 

ah 

24/75 

17/62 an 


North America 


Anchorage 

1/34 

•7/20 

si 

5M1 

•3/27 

PC 

Aftants 

28/79 

14*7 

PC 

2577 

13*5 

PC 

town 

16*1 

8'48 

sn 

17/02 

10*0 

PC 

Cfacago 

19*6 

9/40 

a 

17/82 

7/44 

sn 

Denver 

22.71 

4*9 

s 

2170 

205 

s 

Denwi 

17*2 

8/40 

1 

10*1 

0/43 c 

HonaUU 

29/84 

23/73 

in 

30*6 

2373 pc 

HCuttSl 

29/84 

2170 

pc 

28*2 

10*4 

l 

Los Angdee 

26/79 

14*7 

pc 

24/75 

14*7 

PC 

Miami 

30/80 

21/70 

s 

29*4 

2271 

PC 

tawtatai 

20*8 

7/44 

pc 

13*5 

3/37 

sn 

Monraal 

14/57 

400 

Ml 

14*7 

4/39 c 

Nassau 

31/80 

2271 

1 

32*8 

2373 

pc 

New York 

19*6 

11*2 

c 

19*0 

11*2 

s 

Riper* 

31*0 

16*1 

■ 

32*0 

18*4 

■ 

Son Fan. 

20*0 

10*0 

a 

2170 

12*3 

PC 

6WN 

14*7 

7/44 

PC 

14*7 

0/46 

PC 

Tororao 

16*1 

6/43 

PC 

15*8 

5/41 

pc 

Wmnsigasi 

20*0 

10*0 

I 

2170 

11*2 

s 



Joe TabJua/AP 


REMATCH — Roseanne has met her 
match, again. Although she is not yet 
divorced from Tom Arnold, the televi- 
sion star has announced her engage- 
ment to her bodyguard, Ben Thomas. 


D UTCH maestro Hubert Soudant mil 
replace ousted Paris Opera music di- 
rector Myimg-whun Chung to conduct 10 
performances of Berlioz's “The Damnation 
of Faust” early next year. Chung led his 
Final performance, of Verdi's “Simon Boo- 
canegra,” OcL 14 and received an emotion- 
al. 19-minute ovation. Soudant is conductor 
of the Pays de la Loire Symphony. 

□ 

Catherine Deneuve has been named by 
Unesco’s director general, Federico Mayor, 
as a goodwill ambassador to help restore 
and safeguard the world's Film heritage. The 
French actress will preside over the Interna- 
tiona] Federation of Film Archives. 

O 

The Welsh bass-baritone Bryn Terfel 28, 
stumbled as he tried to leave the stage 
during Act 1 of Mozart’s “The Marriage of 
Figaro,” and sprawled face down for a 
moment before getting up, apparently un- 
hurt, to make his exit But it was the only 
time the singer stumbled in his critically 
acclaimed debut at the Metropolitan Opera. 
□ 

Director Roman Polanski has a film de-. 
buting in the United States at Christmas, 
and he’s looking for a way around a pesky 


little legal problem. A “Dear Colleague" 
letter from Fine Line Features asks Amen- j 
can reporters if they would be willing to 
interview Polanski on a boat “in interna- 
tional waters, outside the United States' 
legal limits.” Polanski pleaded guilty in 
1977 to having unlawful intercourse with a 
13-year-old. but he fled the country before 
sentencing. He has since been prevented 
from entering the United States. The letter 
adds that Sigourney Weaver and Ben 
Kingsley, stars of “Death and the Maiden.” 
will “join Roman on this historic occasion.” 

O 

Oliver North's former secretary’. Fawn 
Hall, who came into the spotlight when she 
testified that she had helped him shred 
documents in the Iran-contra affair, is be- 
ing treated for cocaine addiction in Flori- 
da, according to People magazine. 

□ 

Workers are repairing Hairy Houdim's j 
grave site in New York — which was 
vandalized five months ago — t hanks to a i 
SI 0,000 donation from the illusionist Da- 
vid CopperfiekL The repairs are expected 
to be completed by Halloween, the 6Stb 
anniversary of Houdini's death. 



ASIA /PACIFIC 


AUSTRALIA 

1000-881-011 

CHINA. PRC** 

10811 

HONGKONG 

008-1111 

INDIA* 

000-117 

INDONESIA* 

001-001-10 

JAPAN'. 

0039-111 

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009-11 

MACAO 

OBU-111 

MALAYSIA' 

800-0011 


NEW ZEALAND 000-911 

PHILIPPINES' 105-11 

RUSSIA ‘’(MOSCOW) 155-5042 
SAIPAN* 235-2072 

SHCAPOI* 600-0111-111 

SfilLAHKA 430-430 

TAIWAN'.. 0080-10268*0 

THAILAND* . 00 t 5 -y)i mi 
EUROPE 

ARMENIA'*. 8014111 


AUSTRIA "tit 022-803-011 

BELGIUM' . 0-800-190-18 

BULGARIA 00-1800-001(1 

CROATIA 1 * . 8905-0011 

CZECH REPUBLIC 00-428-00181 

DENMARK* 8001-0010 

FINLAND' 9800-100-10 

FRANCE 13-5-8011 

GERMAN? 01 30-0010 

GREECE’ . .. 00-000-1911 


HUNGARY- 000-800-01111 
ICELAND'. 999-081 

IRELAND . 1-000-550-000 
ITALY-. .. . 172-1011 

LIECHTENSTEIN' 155-0041 
LITHUANIA* flvISO 

LUXEMBOURG . U-EDG-OUl 

MALTA 0800-080-110 

MONACO' 191-011 

NETHERLANDS' . 08-022-0111 


NORWAY 

B00-1 90 -11 

POLANDT*' 

IW 01 0-400-0111 

P0FTTU6AL f . . 

.00017-1-2 B8 

ROMANIA. 

. 01-000-4288 

SLOVAK RB» 

. 00-420-00101 

SPAIN. 

900-99-00-11 

SWfflEN' 

029-795-611 

SWITZERLAND' 

. 155-00-11 

UKRAINE' 

80100-11 

U.K. 

. ..D5HO-B9-0011 


MIDDLE EAST 

B/WWIN . . . . BOO- 001 

CYPRUS' 000-90010 

EGYPT' (CAIRO)' 518-0200 

ISRAEL . . 177-100-2727 

KUWAIT 9W-SB 

LEBANON tBEnUR* 420-801 
SAUDI ARABIA . 1-B00-1D 

TURKEY* ■■ 00-000-12277 
U AfttB BORATES' 900 121 


AMERICAS 


ARGflinru* .... 

.071-800 200-1 1 1 1 

B0UVIA- 

..O-aB -1112 

BRAZIL 

000-6010 

CANADA 

. 1-800 S75-222 

CHILE 

■ 000-0312 

COLOMBIA 

980-11-0010 

EL SALVADOR'. 

190 

HONDURAS'. 

123 

MEXICO J» 

?5-anw62-4240 


PANAMA. 109 

PERU* . . . ... 191 

VENEZUELA', . . . 00-811-120 
AFRICA 

GABON’ . . 085-001 

GAMBIA' 00111 

IVORYCOAST . 00-111-11 

KfflYA» 0800-10 

LIBERIA 797-737 

SOUTH AFRICA... .0-800-90-0123 


AT&T USADirect* and World Connect ® 
Service lets you quickly place calls 
on your own. 

Calling the States or one of over 100 other countries? 
There’s no easier, more reliable way than AT&T 
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TrueKorld* 1 Connections 



AWT 


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