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Benoit Jadonhl at Chase Manhattan 
Bank in New York dismissed the moves as 
typical end-of-wee* profit-taldng and pre- 
weekend closing of positions. 

“The dollar is in a downtrend,*’ he said. 
“The negative feeling is well embedded, 
and Ac upcoming congressional elections 
are hot going to help the dollar.” 

He added: “There is a total lack of 
confidence in the Clinton administration, 
which appears to have no clear dollar poli- 
cy." 

On Friday, Treasury Secretary Lloyd 
Bentsen did his utmost to explain that the 
markets had misunderstood his midweek 
comment that the United States had “no 
plans Jo intervene,” which triggered a big 
selloff. ■’ 

But analysts brushed aside the clarifica- 
tions, asserting that the real issue was a 
fear that the Federal Reserve Board was 
not acting forcefully enough to tame the 
pace of the U.S. expansion and to thwart a 
spurt in the inflation rate. 

“Decisive Fed action, backed by the ad- 
ministration's support, should limi t the dol- 
lar's rides of a sharp new drop.” said John 
Lipsky at Salomon Brothers m New York. 
But even he said that “few reasons exist to 
.expect that .ibftdoHar. tan be more than 
sfltbuittri for now.” 

“A sigmficanl dollar rebound is difficult 
to emda^tfrytirhe soon,” he said.* 

Ned MacKinnon at Citibank in London 
said: "There’s scope for further declines.” 
He predicted the dollar would be testing its 
historic lows against the yen and the marie 
“very spon.” 

The dollar, he said, is down because it is 
responding to fundamental factors in the 
United States and Europe and to capital 
flows. “That’s no reason for panic” if the 
currency continues to slip, he said. 

The main issues upsetting markets arc the 
timing and size of the Federal Reserve’s 
next move on interest rates. This uncertain- 
ty unsettles the bond market, where the 
yield on 30-year bonds touched a two-year 
high of 8.03 percent last week, and rattles 
equities markets. 

“The skepticism over the Fed's commit- 
ment to restrain prices is related to the 
anxiety over the US. current-account defi- 
cit," said Paul Chertkow, an analyst at 
Union Bank of Switzerland in Lo nd on. 

“The tmVng e is funding,” he said. “If the 
trade deficit continues to trend higher and 
inflationary pressures’ intensify beyond the 
Fed’s expectation, investors win refrain 
from paring funds in U.S. instruments in 

See DOLLAR, Page 8 


Kiosk 

Sri Lanka Blast Kills 
Opposition’s Leader 
And 50 at Party Rally 

COLOMBO (AP) — The opposi- 
tion candidate for president and four 
top leaders of his party died Sunday in 
a tomb blast that killed about 50 
people at an election rally, the police 
anti hospital officials said. 

The explosion on the outskirts of 
Colombo that killed G amin i Dissan- 
ayake came less than three weeks be- 
fore the Nov. 9 election and one day 

beforepeace talks were to resume with 

T amil guerrillas to end an 11-year 
ethnic war. The police said there was 
no indication of who was responsible. 

Mr. Dissanayake was an outspoken 
critic of the peace talks. The govern- 
ment warned him three weeks ago that 
the guerrillas would try to kill him. 


the guerrillas 

Book Review 
Bridge 
Crossword 
Weaker 


Page 7. 
Page 7. 
Page 19. 
Page 20. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Monday, October 24, 1994 


Dollar’s Drop: 
Has the Fall 
Reached the 
Crisis Stage? 

Analysts Say Currency 
Is UnUkefy to Rebound 
Until the Fed Intervenes 

By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The dollar is in a downtrend, 
and fac leading currency analysts that is a 
fact, not a prediction. 

Therinly issues are whether the currency 
is headed modestly or substantially lower 
against the Deutsche mark and the yen and 
whether the movement constitutes the 
start of a dollar crisis. 

The dollar traded briefly last week be- 
low its historic low of 96.65yen and ended 
trading at 97.24 yen on Friday in New 
Yoik-The dollar hit a two-year low against 
the mark before closing the wfcek at 1.50 
DM. But these small recoveries failed to 





». . 

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Stdoo EUn The Allocated Prm 

WAITING TO BE FREED — A Palestinian arrested for entering Israel The Gaza Strip has been sealed since a terrorist bombing last week in which 
illegally being released on Sunday on the Gaza border by an Israeli policeman. 23 died. Dozens of Hamas militants have been arrested since then. Page 8. 

Inside Story: Why the Gulf War Ended Whenlt Did 


By Michael R. Gordon 
and Bernard E. Trainor 

New York Times Service 

On Feb. 27, 1991, President George 
Bush and his senior advisers assembled in 
the Oval Office to make what has turned 
out to have been a pivotal decision of the 
Gulf War: when to stop attacking Iraq's 
fleeing army. 

Seated in his customary while chair near 
the fireplace, Mr. Bush was worried that 
the reports of carnage in Kuwait could 
turn a crushing military victory into a 
public-relations defeat. 

But the president made clear that he 
would defer to the Pentagon’s top general 


on the timin g of the war's end. as he had on 
strategy and forces. 

“What do you need?” he asked General 
Colin L. Powell, then Ibe chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, according to previ- 
ously undisclosed notes taken by a partici- 
pant. 

General Powell was also concerned that 
the bombardment of the Iraqi forces 
would ta rnish the image ctf the U.S. mili- 
tary: -Relying on his political instincts as 
well as his intuitions as a soldier, be made 
the case for wrapping up the ground war, 
which had begun three days earlier. 

“We are in the home stretch,” General 
Powell said, adding that General Norman 
Schwarzkopf, the allied commander, 


agreed with the assessment: “Today or 
tomorrow by close of business.” 

Even as he accepted General Powell’s 
assessment and made the land offensive a 
“100-hour war,” however, Mr. Bush sensed 
something was missing. 

“Why do I not fed elated?” he asked 
aloud. “But we need to have an end. People 
want that They are going to want to know 
we won and the kids can come home. We . 
do not want to screw this' up wiib a sloppy, 
muddled ending.” 

Such an ending, however, is exactly 
what the United States has got. 

Three and a half years later, the Iraqi 
Republican Guard forces that General 
Powell thought had been largely destroyed 



Republicans Likely to Gain 
At Statehouse Level as Well 


By Richard L. Berke 

New York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Led by three ag- 

S ve, conservative newcomers. Repub- 
appear poised for significant gains 
in races for governor, with candidates 
ahead or in tight races in the nation’s eight 
biggest and most politically important 
states. 

The Democratic governors in three of 
the states are slightly behind or dead even 
in most polls, facing three inexperienced 
challengers: in New York, State Senator 
George Patald is giving Governor Mario 
M. Cuomo the race of his career, while 
President George Bnsh’s eldest son, 
George W., seeks to unseat Governor Ann 
W. Richards in Texas. Another Bush son, 
Jeb, is leading Governor Lawton Chiles in 
Florida. 

The latest polls show these incumbent 
Republican governors hold comfortable 
leads: Pete Wilson of California, Jim Ed- 
gar of Illinois, John Engler of Michigan 
and George V. Voinovich of Ohio. Of the 
right states, only in Pennsylvania is the 
Democratic candidate, Lieutenant Gover- 
nor Mark Singel, barely ahead of his Re- 
publican opponent. Representative Thom- 


as J. Ridge, and that race could go either 
way. 

In all of the 36 gubernatorial contests, 
the only Republican governor who is well 
behind in the polls is Fife Symington of 
Arizona, who faces serious legal troubles 
over his involvement in a savings and loan 
association that failed. 

These challenges pose a new worry for 
Democrats, who already fear that they 
could lose control of Congress in next 
month’s elections. While local issues may 
be playing a bigger role in the gubernato- 
rial than congressional contests, officials 
in both parties say that the same wave of 
anti-government, anti-incumbency anger 
battering Washington officeholders is at 
work in the gubernatorial races as welL 

There are several reasons why Demo- 
crats would hate to lose these races. Some 
have to do with 1996. The large states are 
viewed as important organizational and 
fund-raising bases for any presidential 
campaign. And many Republican political 
professionals put Mr. Wilson at the top of 


professionals put Mr. wnson at me top oi 
the list of candidates for the party's presi- 
dential nomination, dismissing the gover- 

See RACE, Page 8 





No. 34,727 


have again menaced Kuwait, and Presi- 
dent Saddam Hussein of Iraq is unbowed. 
Earlier this month, some of the same U.S. 
units that took on the Iraqis in 1991 were 
ordered back to the Gulf to prevent a 
possible second Iraqi invasion. 

The story of how the Gulf War ended 
has never been fully disclosed. Interviews 
with nearly all of the senior participants, as 
wdl as private notes and classified docu- 
ments, now show that what some officials 
considered an inconclusive close to the 
conflict resulted from a misjudgment of 
the Iraqis' military capabilities, a failure to 
coordinate war plans among the military 

See WAR, Page 8 


U.S. Diverts 
Ship Thought 
To Carry Fuel 
From Iraq 

Vessel Is Sent to Kuwait 
After US. Forces Check 
For Embargo Violations 

Compiled hr Our Staff From Dispatches 

KUWAIT — A U.S. warship intercept- 
ed a vessel suspected of coming Iraqi fuel 
in violation of UN sanctions and diverted 
it to Kuwait under escort for further inves- 
tigation Sunday, officials said. 

“We boarded it and diverted it. It’s 
loaded with diesel fuel that we believe to 
be from Iraq," a U.S. Navy spokesman 
told Reuters in Dubai. 

“We have substantial evidence that she 
went to Iraq,” the spokesman continued. 
“The ship has been turned over to Ku- 
wait.” 

The guided missile cruiser Leyte Gulf, 
pan of a United Nations operation to 
monitor ships coming from or bound to 
Iraq, stopped the Honduran-flagged tank- 
er AJ Mahrousa in international waters in 
the northern Gulf on Saturday, the spokes- 
man said. 

He added that navy and coast guard 
personnel had boarded the ship to check 
whether it was violating the UN oil embar- 
go imposed on Iraq after its 1 990 invasion 
of Kuwait. 

A shipping source said the vessel was 
currying about 3,000 tons of diesel fuel. It 
had an Egyptian and Pakistani are w. 

The Kuwaiti government was expected 
to work with the UN Sanctions Committee 
to decide what to do with the vessel. 

Kuwaiti naval officers boarded and ifr 
spected the ship at sea. 

According to the U.S. Navy spokesman, 
the captain of A1 Mahrousa said the vessel 
had been to Iran. But the ship had maps 
only for the Khawr Abdullah waterway 
leading into Iraq. It had no documenta- 
tion, no bill of biding and no manifest. 

Kuwait Radio said several crew* mem- 
bers bad indicated the ship had loaded 
diesel fuel in Iraq’s port of Basra. 

The boarding was the second in 10 days - 
and occurred amid heightened tension in 
the Gulf region as a result of Iraq's mass- 
ing of troops near the Kuwaiti border early 
in October. 

On Oct. 13, the U.S. Natty boarded the 
tanker Katerina P, saying it had oil be- 
lieved to have come from Iraq. 

Iran and the ship’s agents denied reports 
that the Katerina P had probably been 
carrying Iraqi oil to Iran, or that it had 
often carried Iranian fuel oil to Iraq. 

The Katerina P remained in internation- 
al waters in the Gulf, with its crew and a 
U.S. Navy team still aboard. 

Iraq says the continuing trade sanctions 
— particularly on its main export, oil — 
are causing severe suffering. 

On Sunday, Iraq denounced President 
Bill Clinton’s scheduled trip to the Middle 
East, saying it was aimed at keeping Amer- 
ican troops permanently in the Gulf. 

“Clinton is bringing apian guaranteeing 
a permanent presence for his troops," 
Iraq’s ruling Ba'ath Party daily, Ath 
Thawra, said in the official media’s first 
comment on Mr. Clinton’s visit 

Iraq also denounced the leaders of Saudi 
Arabia and Kuwait, which Mr. Clinton is 
to visit, and accused Washington of trying 
to seize the oil wealth of both those coun- 
tries. 

Ath Thawra said the United States 
sought to “milk” Kuwait and Saudi Arabia 
to make them dependent on Washington. 

The United States sent thousands of 
troops to Kuwait as part of a large military 
buildup after Iraq massed up to 80,000 
soldiers, including its elite Republican 
Guard divisions, on the Iraq-Kuwait bor- 
der in the first week of October. 

The Republican Guard troops have 
since been withdrawn from southern Iraq. 

Mr. Clinton is to attend the signing 
Wednesday of a peace treaty between Jor- 
dan and Israel. His stops include Egypt, 
Israel, Jordan and Syria. 

(Reuters, AFP) 


In East Europe , Old Gang Is StUl on Top 


(«f- r r 





JST* T 


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Antilles 11-20 FF Morocco 12 Dh 

Cameroon J AM CF A 0°^ 8.00 Rials 

Egypt E.P.5000 R4unlon....UJ0FF 

France. .9.00 FF Saudi Arabia ..9.00 R. 

Gabon WOCFA Senegal 960 CFA 

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Ivory Coast. 1.120 CFA Turkey ,.T.L. 35,000 

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Lebanon ;..USS 1 JO U.S. Mil. (Eur.l *1.10 


A health woricer offering water to a malaria victim in Rajasthan, west India. 

Malaria Outbreak in India 

Officials Dispute Death Tott in Western State 

Compiled by Ow From Dxpmvhts state, denied the severity of the outbreak 

NEW DELHI — The government on and said that the reports were “totally 
Sunday ordered the widespread spraying wrong and exaggerated.” He said that 
of insecticide to wipe out malaria-cany- fewer than 300 people had died, 
ing mosquitoes that have caused several officials of the federal Health Mims- 
hundred deaths in northwestern India, try ordered doctors in Rajasthan on Sun- 
news reports said. flay to survey the magnitude of the out- 

Independent health groups said that hy visiting every house in the 

hundreds of thousands of people were at districts, the Press Trust of In- 

risk in the outbreak in Rajasthan state, ^ sai(L 
on the Pakistan border. 

According to reports in newspapers 
and from private health groups, up to 
4,000 people have died from malaria in 
the area since August. But Rajendra 
Rathore, health minister in Rajasthan 


Private health groups said most of the 
victims in Rajasthan, a mostly desert 
region, were found to be infected with a 
form of malarial parasite that attacks the 

See MALARIA, Page 4 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Pott Service 

TIMISOARA, Romania — Radu 
Ttnu could be described as a model citi- 
zen of the new Romania. Five years ago, 
he played the same part for the Commu- 
nists. 

Dapper, driven, well-read and fond of 
Romania’s fine red wines, he has seen his 
two import-export companies boom 
since starting them two years ago. To 
him, success is natural — because ne was 
a success as a Communist spy. 

Lieutenant Colonel Zbigniew Wqjt 
should be forgiven for feeling a little 
dizzy from the changes shaking up his 
life. But the Polish Army battalion com- 
mander is accustomed to lunging at the 
curveballs of history. It is a family tradi- 
tion. 

His grandfather fought for the Ger- 
man Army in World War I and then 
narrowly escaped a Gestapo execution 
three decades later. His father battled to 
free Poland from one overlord, Berlin, 
only to help another, Moscow, prevail 

Thirteen years ago. Colonel Wqjt com- 


manded a detachment in the martial-law 
crackdown ordered by the Communists. 
Last month, he participated in the first 

S : maneuvers with NATO armies ever 
on Polish soil. 

Mr. Tina, 46, and Colonel Wqjt, 39, 
illustrate two great problems bedeviling 
Eastern Europe today. On the one hand, 
the transformation of political and eco- 
nomic life is complicated by the continu- 
ing, and sometimes overwhelming, influ- 
ence of the former Communist 
bureaucracy and its members. 

At the same time, the region has failed 
to solve the problem that plagued its 
history for centuries before Communist 
rule: how its nations can survive and 
govern themselves independently be- 
tween Europe’s two great powers, Russia 
and Germany. 

The twin legacies of communism and 
history have colored every move of the 
six former Warsaw Pact countries that 
this fall mark the fifth anniversary ctf the 
popular revolutions that ended Soviet 
rule. Today, former Communists control 
five of the six countries and dominate 


every economy as managers and owners. 

Tne Communists, as Mr. Tinu proudlv 
boasts, were the best trained to profit 
from the change. And although their 
leaders were removed from power, the 
party’s apparatus, the key to its dominat- 
ing political influence, largely remained 
intact 

Although Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria 
and Romania have survived as nations, 
one of the former Warsaw Pact six. East 
Germany, no longer exists, while 
Czechoslovakia, site of the Velvet Revo- 
lution in November 1989, has split into 
two states, the Czech Republic and Slo- 
vakia. 

The surviving East European states 
wallow in a nervous nethetworld be- 
tween Russia and the reunited Germany, 
tantalized by the prospect of joining the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization and 
the European Union but still waiting for 
a firm commitment from the West. 

Many governments, including the 
United States, underestimated how the 

See EAST, Rage 8 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


L 


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2 


* + 


A Sinn Fein Leader 
Demands U.K. Say 
It Will Leave Ulster 


Roden 

LONDON — A leading 
number of the Irish Republican 
Anny*spoUtical wing demand- 
ed Sunday that Britain give no- 
tice that it will quit Northern 
Ireland. 

Martin McGuinness, a 
spokesman for Sinn Fein, said 
pro-British Protestants in 
Northern Ireland must not as- 
sume that the province's 300- 
year-old union with Britain was 
secure, despite solemn assur- 
ances to that end by Prime Min- 
ister John Major. 

“It is quite clear that nothing 
is secure," Mr. McGuinness 
said. “It’s quite dear that every- 
thing is about to go into melting 

pOL” 

His remarks are an indication 
of how tough the planned all- 
party talks on ihe future of 
Northern Ireland will be. 

Mr. McGuinness was speak- 
ing to the BBC in London, 48 
hours after Mr. Major scrapped 
an order that banned Mr. 
McGuinness and the Sinn Fein 
president, Geny Adams, from 
traveling to Britain. 

The Sinn Fan spokesman re- 
peated his claim, denied by the 
government, that a British en- 
voy told him during secret talks 
in March 1993 that London 
eventually wanted Northern 
Ireland to reunite with the Irish 
Republic. 

The North, where Protes- 
tants are in a majority, was par- 
titioned from the predominant- 
ly Roman Catholic South and 
remained a part of the United 
Kingdom when Ireland became 
independent 70 years ago. 

Many people in both parts of 
Ireland, and indeed within the 


British political establishment, 
had concluded that Britain was 
“slowly but surely disengaging” 
from ihe North, Mr. McGuin- 
ness said. 

“We have to test this in the 
forthcoming taUcs,” he said. 

“What I would like to see 
happening," he said, is for the 
British government to give "a 
clear commitment that they in- 
tend to end British jurisdiction 
in ray country.” 

Mr. McGuinness said Mr. 
Major, in a speech Friday in 
Belfast heralding talks with 
Sinn Fein, had implicitly agreed 
that the partition of Ireland had 
failed and that Northern Ire- 
land had been a disaster. 

“The reality is that the place 
where I live is a political slum,” 
he said. “It has failed There can 
be no papering over the 
cracks.” 



i uper Jutncn/ Union 

WAR GAMES — Traditionally dressed soldiers stanfing guard over the weekend daring the opening ceremonies of 
NATO exercises in Stroe, Netherlands. The games inchide countries in NATO’s Partnership for Peace program. 


In Sarajevo , a Musical Clash Rages for City’s Soul 


By Roger Cohen 

New York Tunes Service 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — Among the scarred 
streets and alleys of Sarajevo 
there is one comforting cross- 
roads, where the sound of a 
Beethoven sonata or a Chopin 
waltz may be beard 

The music, sometimes flow- 
ing, sometimes betraying a stu- 
dent’s faltering hand, cascades 
from the Sarajevo Conserva- 
tory. In its lightness and other- 
worldliness, it offers solace in a 
city still raw with suffering. 


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Pvra 'ftwr * rnrntm Vftli; mT: 


But the music is deceptive in 
the comfort it offers, for the 
institution it comes from has 
been lacerated Once synony- 
mous with civilization, and the 
universality of music, the con- 
servatory now shows the barba- 
rous legacy of war. 

The solid Austro-Hungarian 
school contains destruction, 
physical and spiritual; intereth- 
nic suspicions, spoken and un- 
spoken. and tragedy laced with 
the candid optimism of youth. 

The physical toll on the 
school of two and a half years of 
war has been onerous. Seven 
music students and one teacher 
have been killed Last year, two 
Serbian shells came through the 
ceiling of the concert room. Of 
276 prewar students, 206 have 
left. 

But this suffering is probably 
no greater than that of any in- 
stitution of similar size in Sara- 


jevo. What sets the conserva- 
tory mart is the spiritual battle 
waged by students and teachers 
to save their music, and what it 
mam to them, from the en- 
croachment of war. 

Their fight, in many ways, is 
a light for what is left of the 
soul of Sarajevo, just as, two 
years ago, Vedran Smaflovic, a 
cellist, fought his own battle for 
peace by playing in a city street 
as shells fell around him. 

“I play to defend myself," 
said Ivana Vdican. 14, a piano 
student. “I mean, I am not — I 
cannot be — free. But 1 can sit 
at the piano. And I can 
that everyone learns to feel 
love that I feet” 

The difficulty, after a long 
siege by Serbian forces that has 
left a tragedy in almost every 
family, is finding the moral 
strength to play. Emioa Dubra- 
vic, the school’s director, wres- 


tles with tears every time she 
readies for her flute. The uplift 
of music is offset by the painful 
memories it stirs. 

Mrs. Du bra vie was pregnant 
when the war began in April 
1992. Just before Serbian shell- 
ing started she and her hus- 
band, Kenan, fled their house 
in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, 
now controlled by Serbs. As 
Muslims, they had been threat- 
ened with death. 

Their son, Amer, was bom in 
Sarajevo on April 27, 1992. He 
tame into the world, Mrs. Do- 
bra vie recalled “with shells 
falling everywhere around me.” 
Six months later, on Oct 13, 
1992, her husband, Kenan Du- 
bravic, was killed fighting near 
his former home. 

“It is so hard to play my 
flute,” she said “You see, my 
husband would always accom- 
pany me on guitar.” 


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The way the world's going 


New Revelations From Charles 

Book Turns to ihe Most Intimate Friendship of My life’ 


By Fred Barbash 

Washington Peat Service 

LONDON — Chapter Two. 

Flashback: Prince Charles is 
23, a young officer in the Royal 
Navy. The most “eligible bach- 
elor on earth,” be is besieged by 
flighty, daffy young women 
wherever he goes but finds none 
to his liking. 

Into his fife one day steps 
Camilla Shand. “She was pret- 
ty, bubbly, and she smiled with 
her eyes as well as her mouth. 
Unlike some others, he had met, 
she lacked coquetry and did not 
preen herself. 

“His taste for the absurd was 


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complemented by her down-to- 
earth irreverence.” 

So began the second install- 
ment of Prince Charles's autho- 
rized biography, by Jonathan 
Dimbleby, which is being sera- 
lized in the Sunday Times. It is 
the not-very-detafled story of 
his now famous relationship 
with Camilla Parker Bowles. 

Although it had occurred to 
him to propose in the years af- 
ter being introduced to her by 
Lucia Santa Cruz, “he felt that 
she could be a friend and com- 
panion to love and to cherish,” 
and he saw her frequently dur- 
ing the early 1970s. He fdt be 
was “still too young and too 
uncertain of his feelings to con- 
template such a huge step.” 

So be did nothing and went 
off to sea. He was heartbroken 
when he heard the news that 
Camilla had married Andrew 
Parker Bowles. “ ‘I suppose the 
feeling of emptiness will pass 
eventually,’ he wrote forlornly," 
the book says. 

Apparently it did not pass, 
for in the years that followed he 
developed what he described as 


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2 Spanish Nuns Shot Dead in Algiers 

ALGIERS (AP) — Armed men shot and killed two Spanish 
nuns in central Algiers on Sunday, medical sources said- 
The nuns, Of the Augustine order, were longtime residents oi ( 
Algiers carrying out humanitarian work, according to Spanish 
diplomats. Tine dead nuns were identified as Sister Caridad Mana 
Albaras Martin, 61, and Sister Ester Paniagua Alonso, 63. 

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack. 
The Armed Islamic Group, which has singled out foreigners in its 
campaign to overthrow the military-b ackcd government, took 
responsibility for the slaying of a French nun and a French pnest 
in May. 

Gunmen Kill Briton Touring Egypt 

ASYUT, Egypt (Reuters) — Suspected Muslim miUtants fired 

on a tour bus in southern Egypt on Sunday, killing a British tourist _ 

and wounding three others autd an Egyptian driver. 

The Interior Ministry said that the bus was on a road that is not 
designated for tourist buses and that the driver had not notified ■ 
the police of his journey. The four Britons arrived from London ; 
last week, the sources said. 

Security sources said a witness saw three men wearing tradition- 
al robes tire on the bus with machine guns in Naqada in the . 
southern province of Qena, 300 kilometers (300 miles) south of ■ 
Cairo. The gunmen escaped. 

Election Quirk Protested in Germany 



Every working day, 
out the war. Mis. Dubravic has 
gone to the music school to 
teach. 

“I am dying to give my pu- 
pils as much love for their music 
as possible,” she said. “But not 
only that Love for everything. I 
try to encourage them to see the 
world in a different way 
through their music, for I do 
believe in the power of love.” 

For all the students of the 
academy, reality has been 
turned on its head 

“I became very different in 
the war,” said Jasmina KLapic, a 
pale and slight 16-year-old who 
resumed playing the piano at 
the b eginning of the war be- 
cause. she explained, it was a 
means to survive. “I grew up 
very fast. I know what war is. 
Many adults do not know what 
war means, the way it not only 
kills people but hurts the soul” 


“ ‘the most intimate friend- 
ship*” of his fife with Ma. 
Parker Bowles. 

In last week's episode, 
Charles was described as bewil- 
dered by the suspicions of Lady 
Diana Spencer after the two be- 
came engaged in 1980 that he 
still harbored love for Camilla. 

This week’s chapter could 
make one wonder about the 
source of his bewilderment, 
since the book makes it clear 
that “his feelings for Camilla 
had not changed.” 

He did not, however, renew 
his relationship with Mrs. 
Parker Bowles until 1986, 
“when he and the Princess of 
Wales had begun to lead sepa- 
rate lives." 

The formal separation came 
about, Mr. Dimbleby writes, in 
part because Charles felt the 
princess was denying him ac- 
cess to the children. They trad- 
ed names of lawyers; informed 
the queen and the prime minis- 
ter and went on with their lives. 

As far as he was concerned, 
the princess could spend as 
much time as she pleased with 
the handsome young men sur- 
rounding her, while he “re-es- 
tablished (he intimacy” of his 
“earlier friendship” with Mrs. 
Parker Bowles. 

“That they loved each other 
was not in any doubt.” Mr. 
Dimbleby writes. Though it was 
portrayed in the tabloid press as 
a “tawdry affair," it was, to 
Charles, “a vital source of 
strength to a man who had been 
saddened beyond words by a 
failure for which be invariably 
blamed himself.” 

The Sunday Tunes also re- 
ported over the weekend that 
Charles has told advisers that 
when he is king he intends to 
change the name of the House 
of Windsor to the “House of 
Moumbatten-Windsor,” in 
honor of Lord Earl Mount bat- 
ten, the prince’s mentor, who 
was killed by an Irish Republi- 
can Army bomb IS years ago. 


majority in last week’s general election. 

Hans Meyer, a specialist in constitutional law, said be would 
lodge a complaint with Parliament and, if necessary, take the case 
to the Constitutional Court in KadsrOhe. 

Under Germany’s two-vote system, each voter is allowed to cast 
one ballot for a specific candidate in one of the 328 constituencies 
and a second ballot for a party. Federal election officials can 
sometimes award so-called overhang seats to parties that perform 
well in the first vote but get a lower percentage of the second vote. 
Mr. Kohl received 12 overhang seats in the enlarged 672 -seat 

Par liame nt. 

Moderates Win Spanish Basque Vote 

BILBAO, Spain (Reuters) — Moderate Basque nationalists 
emerged winners of elections in Spam’s most intensely nationalist 
region on Sunday, but with fewer seats than four years ago, first 
results indicated. . .. 

With some 50 percent of votes counted, the Basque Nationalist 
Party was set to take 20 seats in the new 75-seat Parliament in 
Vitoria, compared with 22 in the last 

The Basque Socialist Party, partners of the PNV in the last two 
coalition governments, fell from 16 seats to 14, while the center- 
right Popular Party surged to II seats from its previous 6. The 
radical nationalist party Hem Batasuna lost some ground, taking 
11 seats, as aga inst 13 m 1990. 

Runoff Vote Tests Creek Socialists 

ATHENS (AP) — For the second week in a row, Greeks voted 
Sunday to choose mayors and regional governors in a runoff 
election that is considered a gauge of popularity for the governing 
Socialists. 

Early returns for Athens showed Dimitris Avramopoulos, 
backed by die conservative New Democracy party, taking almost 
55 percent of the vote. He had won 44 percent in the first round 
last Sunday. 

A former European affairs minister, Theodores Pangalos, sup- 
ported by the governing Panhellemc Socialist Movement, who 
received 32.6 percent last week, was considered too far behind to 
catch up. His defeat would be a political embarrassment for Prime 
Minis ter Andreas Papandreon, who personally chose him to ran 
for the position. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
Strikes to Slow Air Traffic in Italy 

ROME (AFP) — Italy faces air traffic disruption as of Monday, 
with strikes expected to hit on four out of five days, officials said 
Sunday. 

On Monday, a 24-hcwr strike by customs officials at Rome's 
international airport over pay and working conditions is expected 
to delay flights. On Tuesday, pilots and ground crews are expected 
to hold a three-hour strike in line with an appeal from the main 
national unions for strikes against government policies. It will be 
followed by a similar three-hour strike by air crews on Wednes-. 
day. 

On Friday, pilots of the domestic airline ATT, a subsidiary of 
Alitalia, will stop work for four hours to protest what they say 
would be a worsening of working conditions in a planned merger 
with Alitalia. 

A third suspected case of cholera was reported in Bari, Italy, on 
Sunday, and local authorities said the bacteria that cause the 
disease had been found in the city’s sewers. Authorities said 
Saturday that two Bari residents bad contracted cholera after 
eating contaminated seafood. (Reuters) 

Air AlgMe will fly a new service between Djanet in extreme 
southeastern Algeria and Frankfurt The opening of new routes 
between foreign cities and southern Algeria is designed to help 
foreigners avoid northern Algeria where Tslamic militants are 
most active. (AFP) 

Nine people died from flash floods after torrential rains swept 
through Athens and its environs causing millions of doDars of 
damage to roads and establishments, the police said. The down- 
pour disrupted telephone and electricity services and trapped 
scores of people in elevators and in basement apartments. (AP) 

Brussels and Paris will be finked by France’s high-speed TGV 
train as of January, Belgian state railroads said Sunday in Brus- 
sels, but Belgium's failure to build special tracks means there will 
be no cut in journey time. (AFP ) . 

The Colorado Springs Airport opened over the weekend on tune 
and within budget, officials at the facility said. The airport will 
have 100 flights a day and nonstop service to nine cities. (Reuters) 

This Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or services 
curtailed in the following countries and their dependences this 
week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Haiti, New Zealand. Thailand, Zambia. 

TUESDAY: Grenada. Taiwan. 

WEDNESDAY: Austria, Rwanda. 

THURSDAY: Ttadmcnistan. Zaire. 

FRIDAY: Czech Republic, Cyprus, Greece. 

SATURDAY: iw«y. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


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POLITICAL NOTES 


Oregon to Pa— Judgm— it on Dying 

^ ^ wbcn a booi called “How We 
Die ^Alfred K, KaopO was on the best-seller list for mouths, 
Americans commas to grapple with the question, “How 
should we die?** 

In Oregon, the public is debating and must decide the issue! 
Op Noy.8, voters there will pass judgment on Ballot Measure 
16, which would allow doctors to prescribe lethal drugs or 
provide other help so that terininaihr ill patients couldend 
tluar own lives. 

Those who drafted the Oregon initiative learned from 
failed campaigns in neighboring stales. Unlike initiatives 
defeated m Washington and California, .Ballot Measure 16 
distinguishes between doctor- assisted suicide and euthanasia. 

Doctors could legally make easier the suicides of patients 
with less than six months to live, but could not actually inject 
the medication or carry out the procedure that would 
death. 

The measure would also hedge doctor-assisted suicide with 
safeguards.. A doctor’s opinion that someone was terminally 
Aland within six months of death would have to be 
in writing by a second doctor. 

But opponents say that even this safeguard falls dangerous- 
ly, short They cite medical literature maintaining that most 
people se ekin g medical help to kill themselves are victims of 
efimea] depression, winch the average doctor is not equipped 
to diagnose or treat And they question whether doctors can 
eurately. 


predict life expectancy accurately. 


(NYT) 


Chicagoans Grapple With the Ugly Truth 

WASHINGTON — The Illinois gubernatorial race has 
turned ugly — literally. 

It started last week when posters were spotted on some 
downtown Chicago streets that described the Democratic 
candida t e, Dawn Clark Netsch, as “a tax cheat” and added: 
“The truth is as ugly as she is.” 

The “tax cheat" accusation was a reference to a recent 
disclosure that Mrs. Netsch and her husband, Walter, owed 
back taxes on a Chicago apartment, but that is not what got 
Mrs. Netsch's attention. 

Later, during a debate with her telegenic opponent. Gover- 
nor Jbn Edgar, a Republican, the prim. 68-year-old Mrs. 
Netsch decided to make the most of her appearance. She 
trotted out a new campaign slogan: “More than just a pretty 
face.” 

Then Mrs. Netsch. the state comptroller, called in heavy 
reinforcements in this nonbeauty contest She posed for 
pictures with Senator. Paul Simon, an Illinois Democrat who 
nas never been accused to getting ahead on good looks alone, 
in front of a statue of Illinois 1 most famous politician — the 
dour, brooding Abraham Lincoln. 

Mrs. Netsch accused the Edgar campaign of being respon- 
sible for the posters, an accusation the governor and his aides 
denied. She also began running a televirion commercial fea- 
turing a woman who says Mrs. Netsch reminded her of “my 
Aunt Thelma.” But while Mrs. Netsch appeared to enjoy the 
self-deprecating campaign gambit, there was little evidence 
that it would help her close the 2-to-l lead that Mr. Edgar 
enjoys in the most recent polls. (WP) 


Big Daddy 9 Roaring in Florida Race 


By William Booth 

Washington Post Service 

OCALA, Florida — “Big Daddy" Don 
Garlits, drag racing's undisputed lifetime 
champion whose car cowlings were em- 
blazed with the words “God is Love," has 
set his sights on Congress, convinced that 
the country is skidding without a drag 
chute into a socialist epoch. 

If Big Daddy is elected to the House of 
Representatives, Congress will gain a man 
whose name is a registered trademark and 
whose fans consider him a nitrome thane- 
sucking, drag-racing god. The racing world 
holds its breath. So do Democrats. 

The flamboyant, anti-tax and hang-em- 
conservative Republican is running 
1-out in a nose-to-nosc match race 
against a freshman representative, Karen 
L. Thurman, a Democrat, in Florida’s fifth 
congressional district, one of the most con- 
servative and rural regions in the state. 

It is a nine-county district "where the 
golf carts got gun racks," as the Florida 
Democratic Party executive director, Lyn- 
da Russell, put it, a district filled with 
horse farms, retirees, orange groves and 
backwoods. 

Yet, although it is tempting to see Big 
D's race as a colorful but thin slice of 
American politics, the national Democrat- 
ic and Republican party hierarchies see 
something bigger. For here is an unvar- 


nished folk hero plugging into deep resent- 
ments over a political culture that many 
see as too soft, too greedy and too out of 
touch to do the necessary job of whacking 
taxes, slashing welfare ana executing pris- 
oners. 

“I keep reading in the newspapers about 
how I’m not really that mainstream,’’ said 
Mr. Garlits, 62, who advocates “more me- 
dieval-style" prisons and quickie execu- 
tions and who The St. Petersburg Times 
called a bigoted big mouth. "But everyone 
I meet keeps telling me they agree with 
everything I'm saying." 

Polls by both Democrats and Republi- 
cans show Mr. Garlits slightly trailing Ms. 
Thurman, 43, a former math teacher and a 
conservative Democrat. Mr. Garlits claims 
he is gaining, particularly among conserva- 
tive Democrats in west-central Florida be- 
tween Gainesville and Tampa. 

“I think this country needs to start kick- 
ing some butt," said Mr. Garlits’s former 
arch-nemesis, Shirley Muldowney, the first 
woman to race high-performance top-fuel 
dragsters, appropriately painted pink. 
“And Don uarlits is a strong man, he 
backs up what he says. And 1 think the 
country needs him." 

Although Republican leaders in the 
state have winced at some of Big Daddy's 
recent pronouncements, his fans see' a 


straight-talking anecdote to Washington 
doublespeak — a man in a flame-retardant 
jumpsuit willing to stomp on the accelera- 
tor. 

Mr. Garlits, like many of his constitu- 
ents, comes from a bumble background. 
His father was an inventor of the electric 
iron who became a nutritionist-healer and 
nudist, moved to Florida for his health tq 
raise oranges and went bust during the 
Depression. 

Mr. Garlits remembers skipping school 
in Tampa, wearing leather jackets ( H we 
weren't Boy Scouts") and the birth of hot-' 
redding in the 1 950s. when America fell in 
love with the automobile and Mr. Garlits 
and his friends hopped up their old Ford 
coupes and drag-raced down the nighttime 
farm roads of rural Florida, keeping an eye 
out for the local sheriff. 

Mr. Garlits is not proud of his illegal 
hot- rod ding days. He now advocates pub-, 
lie paddling of juveniles in town squares as 
a partial remedy for truancy and other 
misdemeanors. 

Mr. Garlits has been branded by the 
Democratic Congressional Campaign 
Committee as “a cross between David 
Koresh and David Duke." 

On the campaign trail, Garlits does not 
often mine his drag racing days for meta- 
phor. But the voters know all about his 
raring career. 


CIA Cites 2- Year Delay 
In Exposing Ames as Spy 


Feinstoln's Risky Stand on Immigration 

LOS ANGELES — Saying it might cost her re-election. 
Senator Dianne Frinstem has declared her opposition to a 
hotly disputed California ballot proposal aimed hi contro lling 
the flood of illegal immigrants across the state’s southern 
border. 

“It raises state and federal constitutional issues and makes 
no provision whatsoever to deport illegal aliens and reduce 


Dianne Femstein is opposing an immigration issue. 

their number,” the Democratic senator said of the proposal, 
which is supported by Representative Michael Huffingion, 
her Republican opponent m a closely contested Senate race. 

The ballot initiative. Proposition 187, which would strictly 
limit state government services available to undocumented 
aliens, has strong support among voters, polls have found, 
and is already a major factor in the race for governor, the 
other big election contest in California this fall. 

In admtion to denying illegal aliens most government soda] 
services, including schooling and non emergency health care, 
the initiative would require that school and health officials 
determine whether recipients of their agencies' services were 
legal residents of the United States and report to the immigra- 
tion authorities those who appeared not to be. (NYT) 

Quote/Unquote 

President Bill Clinton on Oliver North, the former Reagan 
administration aide who was involved in the Iran-contra 
scandal and is now r unning lor Senate from Virginia: “I 
noticed the other day he said that 1 wasn't bis commander in 
chief. Someone asked me if it bothered me. I said it didn’t 
bother me nearly as much as the fact he didn’t act as if Ronald 
Reagan was his commander in chief, either, when he had a 
chance.” (NYT) 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
identification of Aldrich Hazen 
Ames as a spy may have been 
delayed by at least two years 
because the agency’s counterin- 
telligence center allocated only 
one part-time investigator to 
look into the veteran officer’s 
sudden show of wealth. 

The delay in conducting a 
thorough financial analysis of 
Mr. Ames “represents one of 
the most glaring shortcomings 
of the molehunt," the agency’s 
inspector-general, Frederick 'P. 
Hitz, said in a 28-page summa- 
ry of his report on the case. 

The summary of Mr. Hitz’s 
400-page classified report fo- 
cuses heavily on the investiga- 
tive failures of a Central Intelli- 
gence Agency molehunt that 
began in 1985, when the direc- 
tor of operations realized the 
agency was losing “a significant 
number of CIA Soviet sources.” 

The declassified snmmi 
does not detail the individi 


or operations disclosed by Mr. 
Ames. But it does say that in 
June 1985, when he delivered 
his major gift to the Soviets — 
the idoitification of more than 
36 U.S. and allied paid agents 
— Mr. Ames wrapped up five to 
seven pounds of cable traffic 
“and carried them out of head- 
quarters to deliver to the 
KGB." 

After a colleague pointed out 
that the once-broke Mr. Ames 
returned to Washington in 1989 
from a three-year tour in Rome 
and “made no special efforts to 
conceal his newly acquired 
wealth,” his bosses began a 
background investigation. 

The financial inquiry “fal- 
tered over resources limits tionr 
and priority conflicts," Mr. 
Hitz said, and was not complet- 
ed until mid-1993. 

“If the financial inquiry had 
been pursued more rapidly and 
without interruption," Mr. Hitz 
said, “significant information 
about Ames's finances would 
have been acquired earlier." 


Away From Politics 


• A former CIA spy chief. Clair E George, lost his bid to have 
a special appellate court panel authorize the payment of 
□early SI.3 million in fees to his attorneys by the government 
Mr. George was convicted for lying lo Congress about his 
knowledge of the Iran-contra scandal. He had said taxpayers 
should pay his bills because President George Bush pardoned 
him in 1992. 

• The NAACP has reached a settlement with its former 
executive director, Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., ending a lawsuit in 
which Mr. Chavis said he had been wrongfully dismissed. 
Details were not disclosed. Mr. Chavis had sued the National 
Association for the Advancement of Colored People after its 
board dismissed him in August. The board said he exceeded 
his authority by secretly settling with a former deputy, Mary 
E Stansel. who had accused him of sex discrimination. 

• A drag- trafficking and murder suspect, who jumped bond 
and fled the United States after receiving a heart transplant, 
has been arrested, the U.S. Marshals Service said. Bartolome 
Moya, 37, was arrested after boarding an American plane in 
Santo Domingo. Dominican Republic. 

• Crews worked to dean up crude oil and gasoline along the 
flood-swollen San Jacinto River in East Texas. Federal offi- 
cials said they believed debris on the river, overflowing after 
torrential rains last week, punctured five pipelines, spewing 
gasoline, diesel fuel and crude oil into the waterway. 

• A TWA McDonnell-Douglas 80 jet made an emergency 
landing in Allentown, Pennsylvania, after the pilot shut off 
one of the plane's two rear engines. No injuries were reported 
among the crew and more than 100 passengers aboard. The 
plane was on a flight from St. Louis to New York. 

AP. WP. SYT 


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Page 4 


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Q & A: Rebuilding Cambodia 

Prime Minister Is Dismissive of Khmer Rouge 


■„ Eighteen months after elec- 
r lions supervised by the United 
Nations restored democracy to 

■ Cambodia, the country is strug- 
gling to press ahead with develop- 

* meru while keeping the Khmer 
"• Rouge at bay. Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh, the most senior of 

■ Cambodia's two prime ministers, 
discussed the situation with Mi- 

■ chael Richardson of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

Q. Can the Khmer Rouge 
make a comeback? 

A. No. Remember that they 
boycotted UN-supervised elec- 

■ lions in May 1993. They are 
isolated from the Cambodian 
people and from the national 

' government. They are commit- 
ting crimes and atrocities in the 
villages they occupy. No one 
wants them back. 

The international communi- 
ty. which made such a big effort 
to restore democracy in Cam- 
bodia. will not allow the Khmer 
Rouge to return to power. Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton has written to 
me giving an assurance that the 
U.S. will never allow Pol Pot 
and his guerrillas to take over 
Cambodia again. 

China no longer supports the 
Khmer Rouge as it once did. 
Even Thailand dares not sup- 
port the Khmer Rouge as open- 
ly as before. Cambodia plans to 
join ASEAN, the Association of 
South East Asian Nations. That 
will provide more safety for us 
and make life even more diffi- 
cult for the Khmer Rouge. 

• 

Q. But don't the guerrillas 
control considerably more terri- 
tory today than when they tried 
unsuccessfully to enforce a boy- 
cott of the UN-supervised elec- 
tions? 

A. No. At present the Khmer 
Rouge control around only 
around S percent of Cambodia 
and 5 or 6 percent of the popu- 
lation. They may have a maxi- 
mum of 6.000 or 7,000 men with 
arms, including local militia- 
men, although I think the actual 
number is not more than 3,000 
or 4,000. 

The Khmer Rouge have been 
able to strengthen their position 
in cer tain areas thanloc to the 
weakness of the former UN 
temporary administration in 
Cambodia. It demobilized and 
destroyed between 20 and 30 
percent of the weapons of the 


former government’s army and 
the forces of the two nationalist 
parties that contested the elec- 
tions, but was not able to dis- 
arm any pan of the Khmer 
Rouge. We have asked the U-S- 
to replace the arms taken away 
by the UN but have not re- 
ceived an answer. 

Q. Is the Cambodian Army 
an effective fighting force? 

A. Our armed forces are too 
big because we were obliged by 
the UN to amalgamate the Viet- 
namese-trained army of the for- 
mer government and the non- 
Communisi armies of the two 
nationalist parties. 

It was very difficult to mix 
them together. We bad 1,786 
generals. Instead of a pyramid, 
we had a rectangle whose head 
was as big as its feet. 

Under our reform program, 
we have reduced the number of 
generals to 91. We are reducing 
the overall size of the regular 
army from 130,000 to a maxi- 
mum of 50,000. We are training 
the army to mak e it more pro- 
fessional and united. 

We are also training small- 
unit commando forces to send 
into Khmer Rouge areas to cre- 
ate trouble. 

However, rural development 
will be the key to our success. 
Instead of fighting, the bulk of 
the Cambodian armed forces 
should concentrate on recon- 
struction of the country, build- 
ing or upgrading rural roads, 
bridges and irrigation systems 
to open up even the most re- 


mote village. The military has 
to help the people. 

• 

Q. Are you seeking a military 
solution to the Khmer Rouge 
problem? 

A. We need weapons and 
arms to contain the Khmer 
Rouge and provide security to 
our people so that development 
can go ahead. 

But the real problem of Cam- 
bodia is not the Khmer Rouge. 
It is the poverty of the people. 
When we win the war against 
poverty, we will be able to solve 
other problems, including the 
security problem. With interna- 
tional assistance, we must in- 
tensify our rural development 
program to improve local ad- 
ministration. education, health 
and economic production. 

Q. Critics say your govern- 
ment is weakened by factional- 
ism and corruption and that 
this is playing into the hands of 
the Khmer Rouge. How do you 
respond? 

A. We inherited from the UN 
not just a coalition army but a 
coalition government and ad- 
ministration. The UN tempo- 
rary administration wanted me 
to use the structure of the for- 
mer government. So far, 1 have 
not been able to replace Lhe 
head of department of any min- 
istry. 

Reforming the administra- 
tion to make it smaller and 
more efficient is a slow and dif- 
ficult process. But we are mak- 
ing considerable progress. 


The five officials hiding their faces Sunday after being arrested for failing to fix the bridge Hwt collapsed, ki lling 32. 

Seoul Officials Accused of Hiding Bridge’s Defects 


The AssocuueJ Press 

SEOUL — Prosecutors arrested five 
Seoul city officials and were investigat- 
ing other senior administrators Sunday 
for possible negligence in a bridge col- 
lapse that killed at least 32 people. 

The five officials, who work in the 
city’s construction office, were charged 
with f ailin g to repair the bridge and 
concealing the amount of work that 


ne.pt 

of the arrested officials told the police 
that the city did not repair the bridge, 
after engineers said the 17-year-old 
structure was dangerous, because a lack 
of funds. 

The arrests came as President Kim 
Young Sam was reportedly planning to 
reshuffle his cabinet in response to pub- 
lic anger over the collapse, government 


sources said. The sources, who requested 
anonymity, said the reorganization was 
expected to affect the prune minister and 
the construction minister, among others. 

A large section of the Songs u Bridge 
collapsed during the morning rush hour 
Friday, sending a packed city bus, a 
police minivan and several cars plum- 
meting into the Han River. At least 32 
people were killed and 17 injured. 


Nuclear Pact’s Hidden Agenda : Tie North Korea to Neighbors 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washingum Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The ac- 
cord that Washington signed 
with North Korea is not only 
meant to alter the Comm unis t 
country’s threatening nuclear 
program but also to improve its 
relations with neighboring 
Asian states and help change its 
political system, according to 
some U.S. officials who worked 
on the deaL 

Washington began negotia- 
tions with North Korea last 
year primarily because of the 
suspicion that the North pos- 
sessed at least one nuclear 
bomb and its evident aspira- 


tions to make dozens by the end 
of the decade. 

But a less obvious U.S. aim 
was to open the isolated, xeno- 
phobic nation to outside ideas, 
to move its economy toward 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

capitalism and to encourage it 
to develop stable economic and 
political relations with South 
Korea and Japan, neighbors 
with which it has little trade or 
direct contact. 

“It will allow us to step into a 
new political era, a policy that 
will pufl us into the next centu- 
ry, not only with North Korea 
but with all of Northeast Asia,'' 


a U.S. official said of the nucle- 
ar deal. As people get enmeshed 
in the realities of working to- 
gether to carry out the deal, he 
said, “it will accelerate a series 
of political changes there that 
are already under way." 

The accord, signed Friday in 
Geneva, includes what a U.S. 
official referred to as an impor- 
tant “crowbar" to help open 
North Korea to outside influ- 
ence: a $4 billion project that 
will bring in hundreds of work- 
ers from South Korea. Japan 
and perhaps China to help 
build two advanced nuclear re- 
actors over the next decade. The 
novelty of conducting such a 
huge foreign-run construction 


there. 


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project in a nation with an al- 
most religious commitment to 
self-reliance can hardly be over- 
stated, U.S. officials say. 

Despite its often bitter de- 
nunciations of foreign interfer- 
ence in its domestic affairs. 
North Korea's regime finally 
seems to have embraced the 
idea that it can no longer pursue 
its policy of isolation, the offi- 
cials add. It transparently 
sought to revive its declining 
economy by using its nuclear 
program as leverage to win the 
reactor project and other new 
economic and political ties with 
Washington. 

Will North Korea's decision 
to accept an influx of foreigners 
and — necessarily — unfamil- 
iar ideas also spell the destruc- 
tion of its hard-line Communist 
political system? Or will North 
Korea’s leaders seek to trans- 
form their system in the pattern 
of China and Vietnam, embrac- 
ing a mixture of both commu- 
nism and capitalism that tries to 
keep to foreign political ideas at 
arm’s length? 

Many U.S. analysts said 
changes are unlikely to occur 
overnight. North Korea re- 


mains one of the world's most 
closed and repressive societies, 
and membership in the Com- 
munist Party is still common- 
place, unlike in the Soviet 
Union before its dissolution. 
These analysts expressed skep- 
ticism about South Korean 
claims that North Korean lead- 
ers could be toppled forcibly 
after foreign contacts widened 
pent-up social pressures for po- 
litical freedom. 

But two senior U.S. officials 
who worked on the deal said 
that it was made with the even- 
tual dissolution of the present 
North Korean regime in min d. 
Such an event, they said, would 
ensure that the country carries 
out its long-term obligation to 
dismantle all worrisome nuclear 
facilities and allow the interna- 
tional inspections that Noth 
Korea first rejected in February 
1993. 

One of the officials depicted 
as mere “theoretical games- 
manship” the concerns ex- 
pressed by some U.S. analysts 
that North Korea could pocket 
the two new reactors, expel in- 
ternational inspectors and re- 
start its nuclear bomb program 
in 10 years. The official said 


that the decade-long period 
covered by the accord “is al- 
most certainly a sufficient peri- 
od of time for their regime to 
have collapsed.” And alter the 
regime’s collapse, he added, 
“the country amply won’t ex- 
ist” because it will be absorbed 
by South Korea. 

Some critics suggest this view 
is naive and assert that the deal 
does not go far enough in pres- 
suring North Korea’s leader- 
ship to move toward a more 
accommodating posture. They 
note that North Korea’s hard- 
line leadership has displayed re- 
markable staying power in the 
face of international pressure 
and economic deprivation. 

Several U.S. officials who 
took part in the negotiations 
said they sensed a significant 
change of heart by the North 
Korea government, or at least a 
victory by moderates in the 
leadership who support a more 
pragmatic foreign policy. They 
noted that only days before the 
deal was completed, senior 
North Korean military leaders 
had publicly stated they would 
never allow some of the interna- 
tional inspections the accord 
demands. 


Shalikashvili Wary of North Koreans 


Washington Post Service 

MANILA — North Korea 
shows no sign yet of defusing a 
“very explosive situation” cre- 
ated by the huge deployment of 
conventional forces near the 
border with South Korea, the 
senior U.S. military officer said. 

The officer. General John M. 
Shalikashvili, c hairman of ibe 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Satur- 
day that be was “well satisfied” 
with a U.S.-North Korean nu- 
clear agreement signed in Gene- 
va on Friday. 

But he said that the country's 
large conventional offensive ca- 
pability continues to pose “a 
considerable threat” and that 
there was no sign that Pyong- 


abandoned designs on conquer- 
ing South Korea. 

Genera] Shalikashvili, 58, in 
Manila for talks with President 
Fidel V. Ramos, said the can- 
cellation by the United Slates 
and South' Korea of the 1994 
joint military exercises sched- 
uled for next month was “the 
prudent thing to do right now.” 
But he indicated that he wanted 
to see the 1995 maneuvers go 
ahead as scheduled in March. 

North Korea in the last few 
years has been building an of- 
fensive capability that is “veiy 
threatening” to the United 
States and South Korea, the 
general said. “They have em- 


yang's secretive leadership has barked on a very rapid develop- 


ment of an extensive long-range 
artillery program,” he added. 

Guns capable of reaching 
Seoul and of causing “great 
devastation” have been massed 
along the Demilitarized Zone 
and placed in well-protected 
caves in mountainsides, he said. 

North Korea is also building 
“one of the world’s largest un- 
conventional warfare capabili- 
ties, whose only purpose is to be 
offensive in nature,” General 
Shalikashvili said. He said this 
consisted of about 60,000 spe- 
cial forces. These forces include 
airborne units, naval compo- 
nents close to the DMZ on both 
coasts and ground units trained 
in penetrating the world’s most 
heavily fortified border. 


On Rights 
Abuses in 
Indonesia 


By Philip Shenori 

Hen York Times Service 

BANGKOK — Less titan a 
month before President Bin 
Chiton travels to Indonesia for 
a meeting with Asian leaders, 
hitman-rights groups are warn- 
ing of a deterioration in human 
rights there, including the re- 
cent banning of newspapers 
and magazines, stepped-up ha- 
rassment of labor activists and 
new instances of torture by the 
military and the police. 

Diplomats and human- rights 
groups say Mr. Clinton’s visit 
may be part of the reason the 

government of President Su- 
harto is eager to silence critics 
during the meeting of the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation 
Forum, which starts in Novem- 
ber. 

Among the recently muzzlecL * 
publications are the nation's* 
most prominent news maga- 
zine, Tempo, and two of its 
hard-hitting competitors, all of 
which were ordered shut down 
over the summer. Hte move was 
described by Indonesian jour- 
nalists as the most serious blow 
to free speech in Indonesia in 
decades. 

Human-rights groups, disap- 
pointed by Mr. Clin ton's deci- 
sion in May to retain trade priv- 
es for China despite human- 
its abuses, worry that he wiD 
fer similar treatment to Indo- 
nesia. a huge archipelago nation 
of more than 190 million people 
with a booming economy. 

“The message to China and 
the world was that human 
rights will be the sacrificial 
lamb to trade,” Amnesty Inter- 
national said in a statement is- 
sued in September with a report 
on human-rights abuses in In- 
donesia. “That message is now 
in danger of being played out 
a g ain in the U ^.-Indonesia dia- 
logue.” 

The Clinton administration 
has announced that it will not 
raise rights issues at the meet- 
ing. 

In anticipation of the meet- 
ing, which will be attended byg| 
leaders of most of the maicr 
Pacific Rim nations, rights 
groups have issued reports in- 
tended to remind the leaders of 
the record of their Indonesian 
hosts. 

Amnesty International said 
in its report that Indonesia was 
“a country ruled with an iron 
rod, where dissent is punished 
by Imprisonment, torture and 
death.” 

The International Confeder- 
ation of Free Trade Unions, an 
umbrella organization for labor 
groups, joined the protest this 
month with a report detailing 
the Suharto government’s ef- 
forts to crush an independent 
union movement. The report 
accused the government of “a 
flagrant breach of internation- 
ally recognized standards on 
freedom of association and the 
right to organize." 

The spokesman for the For- 
eign Ministry, Ira wan Abidin, 
said in a telephone interview 
that criticism of Indonesia’s 
rights record reflected the views 
of only a “handful of people,” 
and that the timing of the new 
reports was meant to embarrass 
Indonesia. 

“I would say that we do havt?* 
human rights in Indonesia,” the 
spokesman said. “We are not 
perfect, but we are trying to 
improve." 

He noted that the govern- 
ment had recently allowed 
United Nations investigators to 
visit the disputed territory of 
East Timor. Indonesia’s foreign 
minister, Ali Alatas. also 
opened negotiations this month 
with East Timor independence 
leaders. 



MAI4ARIA5 Indian State Struck 


Continued from Page 1 

brain. They said they feared 
that this strain could become 
resistant to commonly pre- 
scribed chloroquine pills. 

“We believe the lethal Falci- 
parum parasite has been 
brought to the region by immi- 
grant workers from other 
states,” said P.V. Unnikrish- 
nan of the Voluntary Health 
Association of India. He said 
his group estimated the death 
toll at 1,000. 

Mr. Unnikrishnan said the 
difficult terrain, with poor road 
and telephone links, was a ma- 
jor hindrance in providing 
quick relief and getting a clearer 
picture of the outbreak. 

“There are hundreds of thou- 
sands of lives at stake,” he said. 

S. M. Mohnot of Jodhpur 
University, who has been super- 
vising nongovernmental oraani- 
zations in Rajasthan, saidthe 
residents of four districts, Jodh- 
pur, Banner, Jaisalmex and Bi- 
kaner, were most at risk. The 
districts have a combined popu- 
lation of about 4 million. 

Mr. Rathore said the death 
loll was inflated. 

“The reports are totally 
wrong and exaggerated,” he 
said. “Only 238 deaths have 
taken place in government hos- 
pitals in the state due to malar- 
ia. There could be some 50 more 




T 


I 




: i - 
J v.. 


deaths in private hospitals in 
the state,” 

The Health Ministry direc- 
tor-general, A.K. Mnkhetjee, 
said the number of deaths was 
“very small.” 

“It is not tike pneumonic 
plague.” he said, referring to the 
disease that broke out in a re- 
gion south of Rajasthan last 
month and killed at least 57 
people. 

Health groups said the region 
may get a three-month respite 
from the outbreak as cold 
weather kills the mosquitoes. 

“We expect the current out- 
break to be over by the third 
week of November because of 
the cold,” Mr. Unnikrishnan 
said. “But the deadly mosqui- 
toes will breed again next year." 

Health groups blamed a new 
irrigation canal and recent 
heavy monsoons, rare for the$'^ 
mostly desert region; for a 
sharp increase of malarial mos- 
quitoes. 

Mr. Mohnot said Mr. Rath- 
ore’s lower death toll was based 
on an inadequate survey of the 
region by government health 
officials. 

“They visited just a fraction 
of the villages and their assess- 
ment is based on a survey last- 
ing less than a week,” Mr: Mob- 

n0t “ d fUM 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


Page 5 



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AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Taking the Historic View 
OfthelLS. Homicide Rate 

Homicide rates are indeed high in the 
United States, but they were higher still 
in Europe during the Middle Ages. The 
findings were reported this month at the 
annual conference of the Social Science 
History Association here in Atlanta. 

Eric H. Monkkonen, a professor of 
American urban history at the Universi- 
ty of California at Los Angeles, said: 
"'What we are finding is that violence is 
not an immutable human problem. 
There really has been a civilizing pro- 
cess” in which, scholars say. an increase 
in state power and courtly manners be- 
ginning in the 16th and 17th centuries 
helped curb impulsive, violent behavior. 

New data presented at the conference 
by a Dutch, scholar, Pieter Spierenburg, 
showed that the homicide rate in Am- 
sterdam, for example, dropped from 47 
per 100,000 people in the mid-15tb cen- 
tury to 1 to 1 A per 100,000 in the early 
19th century. 


By contrast, the 1993 homicide rate in 
New York City was 25.9 per 100.000. 
The 1992 national homicide rate for the 
United States was 9.3 per 100,000. 

Short Takes 

When Jeff Burney reserved a table for 
four at David's in Columbus, Ohio, last 
New Year's Eve and neither showed up 
nor canceled, the restaurant owner. Da- 
vid Pelzman. sued him for S440. Mr. 
PeZzman calculated that be would have 
taken in $240 from the party of four on 
one of the busiest nights of tbe year, and 
that he spent $200 more tracking down 
Mr. Burrey. The lawsuit was dropped 
when Mr. Burreys lawyer said the defen- 
dant had made a donation to the Mid- 
Ohio FoodBank. Mr. Burrey said, “I’ve 
learned that you should always cancel a 
reservation." 

Changing a 22-year policy on uniforms, 
the New York police department will 
require that the current powder blue 
shirts be replaced by navy blue within 
the coming year. “The department 
switched from navy to powder blue in 
1972 to give the force a softer look after 
race riots that broke out in cities across 
the country," The New York Times re- 
ports. The Times goes on 10 say, “But 
police officials said they found that light 


blue shirts all too often showed stains 
from the jelly doughinuts officers ate for 
breakfast and the pizza they ate between 
patrols." 

Speaking of uniforms, Charles Mos- 
kos, a military sociologist at Northwest- 
ern University, advises President Bill 
Clinton that when he is saluted by the 
military, he should, as a civilian, stop 
saluting back. “Avoid saluting,” Profes- 
sor Moskos urges. “This is an innovation 
introduced by Ronald Reagan and has 
no historical precedent for a commander 
in chief. Each salute only accentuates the 
president's nonmilitaiy background.” 
Mr. Moskos was an architect of the pres- 
ident's “don’t ask, don't tell” policy on 
homosexuals in the military. 

What to give children on Halloween? 
Candy is hard on their teeth, although 
Kathleen Zelman, an Atlanta dietitian, 
says. “While candy's fine in moderation, 
there are some other things out there that 
kids love to receive: pencils, stickers, 
little rings they can wear, boxes full of 
cereal, things you can put in kids' lunch 
boxes — they love to get juice boxes. If s 
kind of fun to come home and open your 
bag and have something other than can- 
dy” 

Inlemariemal Herald Tribune. 


The IHT/Delta Air Lines 
Destinations Competition 


Here's How to Enter. 


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for at least 12 of the 18 days and qualify to win. Twc 

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drawing. The first 10 entries drawn with the 
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® Valid only where legal. No purchase necessary. 

® Entries will hot be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, Delta Air Lines, their agents and 
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® Winners will be drawn on November 15th and 
published thereafter in the newspaper. 

© On all matters, the editor's decision is final. 

@ The editor reserves the right in his absolute 
discretion to disqualify any entry, competitor or 
nominee, or to waive any rules in the event of . 
circumstances outside our control arising which, in 
, his opinion, make it desirable to cancel the 
competition at any stage. 


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AIMTAAIRUNES 

I08TI Lor* tbi W*t V* Fir- 


24 - 10-94 


By Catherine S. Manegold 

N&>- York Times Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE Haiti — Three 
years after President Jean- Bertrand Aris- 
tide became a prisoner of exile and a week 
after his triumphant homecoming, he is 
struggling to repair 3 government so ram- 
shackle that on his first night back he took 
his bath in the National Palace with a 
bucket and a cup. 

By Wednesday, the lack of running wa- 
ter made bathrooms so foul that a cabinet 
minister said he had to roll up his pants to 
keep from ruining a good suit. Carpets are 
dirty, walls scuffed, and the temperature in 
some rooms soars past 90 degrees Fahren- 
heit (32 centigrade) because the air condi- 
tioning does not work. 

There is no respite. When the president 
tried to leave the palace last week, his car 
was mobbed by supporters desperate for a 
glimpse or this man who once stirred hope 
with fiery words. He did not join them but 
retreated behind the lines held by U.S. 
soldiers.' He has not left the palace since. 

Even when he stands outside, gazing at 
the street where lens of thousands wel- 
comed him with songs and screams Oct. 
15, he stands behind a shield that many 
Haitians see as a signal of his new status, 
the semi-transparent hand of Washington 
— part protection, part control. 

Now. secure within the palace grounds, 
behind its tall green fence and long ex- 
panse of lawn, in a mammoth white build- 
ing once hung with canvasses by French 


impressionists but now stripped and dirty. 
Father Aristide presides over a govern- 
ment that can barely function in a country 
famous for despair. 

As he stays out of public view. Haitians 
at every level of this splintered society are 
waiting to see if he has made the change 
from priest to politician. They are watch- 
ing, too. for signs that three years in Wash- 
ington quenched his fire and made a pup- 
pet of a defiant populist. 

The nation is waiting for him to appoint 

a new prime minister and fashion a gov- 
ernment that can channel hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars in foreign aid to build 
roads, open hospitals, renovate schools, 
replant barren mountainsides and tend to 
the overwhelming needs of 6 million peo- 
ple. Bui the president is taking his time. 

Already, there are signs of transforma- 
tion. While absent from public view, he has 
shown a more statesmanlike mien inside 
the palace, visitors say. At a cabinet meet- 
ing Wednesday, after a welcome and a 
description of that sponge bath on his firsi 
night, he said: “1 cannot believe 1 am here. 
Is it true?" But he then conducted a crisply 
professional meeting at which each minis- 
ter provided a grim outline of the work 
ahead. 

So far, he has kept his public words to 
soothing calls for peace and reconciliation. 
His private meetings are dominated by 
talk of investment, growth and industry. 
Hour by hour, as others wail outside, he 
meets with politicians, ministers, old 


friends and the foreign officials who ush- 
ered him home and now promise aid. 

Once reviled by the business class 3S ar. 
irresponsible demagogue who could excite 
crowds but not provide a plan to help 
them. Father Aristide now needs to show 
them that he can be a technocrat and guide 
as well as an inspiring speaker. 

“You have to remember that the coali- 
tion that brought him to power is not the 
same coalition that brought him back 
now,” said a prominent intellectual unde; 

consideration for the prime ministership. 
“He will not be the first politician It 
change course. That is the bread and butte: 
of politics." 

m Top Choice Is Dropped 

Under pressure from political oppo- 
nents and the business community. Father 
Aristide dropped his top choice for prime 
minister and was considering on Sunday a 
more moderate candidate. The Associated 
Press reported front Port-au-Prince. 

The front-runner. Claudette Werleigh. 
the interim foreign minister, was ruled out 
because of her leftist stance. Father Aris- 
tide now was leaning toward a prominent 
businessman to replace the caretaker 
prime minister, Robert Mal\al, a source 
close to the government said. 

Such a choice could placate business 
leaders anu many in the middle and upper 
classes who feel threatened by his return. 

There was no word on when the presi- 
dent might announce his choice. 


towns, suburbs, rural areas 

a maximum of 1 50 subscribers per square 1 cm 


99 % (1 % blocking rate! 

66mEri 

120 s 

o 


RADIO IN THE LOCAL LOOP (RLL) PROJECT IN HUNGARY 

Prequalification Notice to Prospective Suppliers 

The Hungarian Telecommunications Co. Ltd. [HTC| is to extend the use o! RLL systems nationwide in the Hungarian 
telecommunications network. One or more suppliers will be awarded from among qualified bidders invited by HTC to participate in a 
tender planned to be issued in tbe near future. 

The project, planned to be implemented in 1995 through 1997, wifi have the following main characteristics: 

Magnitude: 

Overall number of subscribers served with 

RLL systems throughout the country approximately 200,000 

(irrespective of the number of awarded suppliers) 

Field of application: 

Typical coverage areas towns, suburbs, rural areas 

Subscriber density a maximum of 1 50 subscribers per square km 

Traffic and service characteristics per subscriber 

Grade of service 99 % (1 % blocking rate) 

Traffic per subscriber 66mEri 

Average holding time per call 120s 

Number of calls during the busy hour 2 

Frequency band: 

Downlink 935 ... 942i MHz 

Uplink 890 ... 897.5 MHz 

System requirements: 

DTMF and pulse dialling into the PSTN 
12 kHz metering pulse 
Connection to MDF or DDF 

Services: - telephone 

-data 

-fax 

Special dialling tones for supplementary services 

Test possibility of the Subscriber Remote Unit (SRT) from the O & M Centre 

Configuration of special parameters of the SRT |e.g. power) from a central terminal 

Traffic measurement -per subscriber 

-per base 

station 

Original equipment manufacturers who wish to be considered for prequalification for the above explained tender are invited to submit a 
capability statement, addressing the questions below. In case of 

- a main contractor with sub-contractors, or 

- a consortium, 

all companies (including sub-contractors or consortium members) shall submit the applicable statements and evidences according to 
their planned responsibilities in the frame of the project targeted. 

Applicants shall acknowledge that in case of successful qualification they are supposed to participate in the tender with the same sub- 
contractors or consortium members Qualified bv HTC far the relevant project Although at the time of tendering bidders will be allowed 
to make minor changes concerning their actual partners and their responsibilities, HTC shall have the right to refuse any sub-supplier, 


935 ... 942Ji MHz 
890 ...897.5 MHz 


sub-contractor or consortium member not approved in the course of the prequalification. 


Documentary Evidences 

Company profile including type and size of the company, and 
consolidated financial statements (balance sheets and statements of 
income) for the last 3 years 


Details of at least 3 similar RLL projects completed or currently being 
implemented 


List of telecommunications authorities which have already approved the 
offered RLL sworn 


List of other vendors, if any, whose devices the bidder (as a main 
contractor or the leading party of a consortium] intends to integrate with 
his own equipment 


Description of die project management methods and took 


Technical brochures 
Type approval in Hungary 

Development history and planned future developments of the RLL 
system 


Minimum Criteria 

minim um annual turnover: 

■ in cose of a single supplier, main contractor or consortium leader: an 
equivalent of 50 million USS 

■ in case of equipment sub-suppliers or consortium members: an 
equivalent of J5 million USS 

- in case of sub-conttactors if or installation, etc.) an equivalent of 
3 million USS 

■ each project shall be described . and reference letters signed by the 
customers shall be attached (with a certified English translation, if 
necessary) 

■ each project value shall be at least 5 million USS, 

■ the value of the bidder's own RLL equipment shall represent at feast 2 1 
million USS for each project (in case of other companies participating 1 
under the bidder's control ) 

■ all companies involved shah submit a statement that thev arc capable 
of arranging a visa by HTC to any site of the documented reference 
projects 

approval certificates from at least 3 frivol authorities for each \ 
equipment category shall be submitted, v. irb certified English 
translation, i/ necessary 

■ authorisation bv the vendors, 

attachment of the vendors' capability statement in response to all the 
applicable requirements stipulated m this table 
a realistic allocation of responsibilities among the partners 

demonstrated ability to efficiently and reasonabh manage, monitor 
and administer all activities, including the control oi sub-xutTactors 
or consortium members 

compliance with tbe relevant European standards and 
recommendations 

approval by the Hungarian Telecommunications Inspectorate, or 
willingness to obtain the same in case of contract award 

a well thought out development strategy, targeting tot ally own 
manufacture of all equipment in the near future 


Only those companies and/or groups of companies will be qualified to participate in the coming tender who have met the above 
minimum criteria. 

Prequalification materials shall be received, before 4:00 pan. on 22nd November, 1994, at the following address: 
Inteltzade Co. Ltd, Ms. Marta Gabriella T6th, Sales Executive, Budapest, Medve u. 25-29. 1027 Hangary 
Tel.: +361-201-0054., -0328 - Fax: +361-201-0017, -0008 


Prequalification materials shall be submitted in 5 (five) copies in E 
attachments written in other languages a certified English translation 


j- In case of reference letters or other 
also be enclosed. 


(to"* 
















Page 6 


MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 

o P I \ l © \ 


Ueralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


Pultli-hnl U ilh TJw \.-v. Virk Tim**' an, I Tlf Va>hin|[lnn h"l 


The Murayama Surprise 


, l . . Japan’s Socialist-conservative coali- 


tion government was laughed off in June 
: as a cynical and unworkable union of 
opposites. The government is actually 
.■'working out surprisingly well. 

L ‘ Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama, a 

* Socialist, and his Liberal Democratic and 
'independent partners have fashioned a 
r stable majority that sharply contrasts 

with the almost weekly cabinet crises of 
f last winter and spring. The new govern- 

* ment has found enough coherence to reach 
*a limited trade agreement with the Unit- 
fed States. Most important, it has given 
. Japanese voters a second vehicle for ad- 
vancing political and economic reform. 

One-party politics was the root of 
Japan's present political discontent. 
"Now, two modernized, broadly centrist 
coalitions are taking shape — the pre- 
^sent coalition and the cluster of parties, 
soon to merge, that supported the recent 
"governments led by Morihiro Hosckawa 
’and Tsutorau Hata. 

- The new coalition has prospered be- 
* cause its two very different elements both 
responded to voter desires and updated 
"‘their programs. The Socialists, in office 
' for the first time in four decades, have 
-dropped their strict interpretation of Ja- 
" pan’s U.S.-sponsored peace constitution; 
that let them come to terms with realities 
like Japan's postwar armed forces, UN 
peacekeeping and nuclear power. The 
■Liberal Democrats, the permanent ruling 
■'party from 1956 to 1993, have learned to 
talk the language of reform rather than 


restoration; they now support many of 
the initiatives begun under the Hosokawa 
and Hata governments, like electoral re- 
form, fiscal reform and deregulation. 

They can do so unburdened by the 
negative image of Ichiro Ozawa, the main 
power broker of those two previous gov- 
ernments and a man widely reviled as a 
symbol of the old back-room, money- 
driven politics. Mr. Ozawa, more than 
anyone else, brought down the old sys- 
tem. But his history and his often abra- 
sive tactics have thwarted his efforts to 
consolidate a new power base of his own. 

There are so few substantive differ- 
ences between the two coalitions ihat the 
opposition has been reduced to empty 
parliamentary tactics that do not threat- 
en the government's popularity. Still, spe- 
cial elections have shown strong opposi- 
tion support, and the next national 
election, the first under the newly re- 
formed rules, could go either way. Voters 
will then be able to choose between Mr. 
Ozawa’s brand of reform, with a slightly 
hawkish, bureaucracy-bashing tilt, or 
some version of the present coalition, 
espousing a gentler foreign policy and 
more deference to bureaucrats. 

The Socialists and the' Liberal Demo- 
crats banded together primarily to save 
themselves from extinction and to block 
Mr. Ozawa's ambitions. By doing so, they 
have brought Japan closer to competitive, 
two-party politics, and thereby signifi- 
cantly advanced political reform. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Defendable Deal 


It is evident that the nuclear deal be- 
■ tween the United States and North Korea 
has some very big flaws. It pays North 
’ Korea, and handsomely, for returning to 
-the nonnuclear obligations that it took on 
’’and violated and that ideally should not 
■have had to be paid for at alL Nor is there 
ironclad assurance that this “framewotk" 
agreement between two wary states that 
"do not even recognize each other will 
' uncover weapons or weapons-grade nude- 
~ar materials already in hand. The accord 
'sets an international precedent that lets 
’• the North Koreans keep hiding for years 
-'the very facilities whose inspection would 
' show their nuclear cheating to date. 

- How can such an agreement even be 
^defended? It can be defended because, by 
-permitting immediate inspection of sites 
7 where known nuclear work is going on, it 
1 enables the United States to accomplish 
'the urgent business of freezing ana dis- 
mantling a major “strategic’’ program 
that was running free and that could have 
'produced plutonium for hundreds of 
■bombs and a full-fledged nuclear capa- 
bility. The accord also at least makes 

I jossible the later rollback of a prior and 
ess menacing North Korean program 
that may already have turned out one or 
two — it is not clear — warheads. 

Can either of these ends in fact be 
achieved? The question persists because 
North Korea has a record of lying and 
cheating on matters nuclear, and events 
have shown that the United States' natu- 
ral partners in reacting to such conduct 
— China, Japan and South Korea — 
'wobble away from economic sanctions, 
never mind military enforcement. So 


couldn’t North Korea fail to keep its 
promises without fear of any punishment 
or price? The answer is that the agree- 
ment is constructed to require controlled 
reciprocal responses, by stages, that are 
in American hands. For instance, “key 
nuclear components” in the new, safer 
reactors that North Korea is being of- 
fered do not get delivered until it opens 
up its suspect undeclared nuclear facili- 
ties. If this desperately impoverished and 
isolated country is not lured by the join- 
the- world economic and political incen- 
tives in the package, it goes back to im- 
poverishment and isolation. 

To the special dismay of international 
inspectors. North Korea insisted on a 
delay in complying with some of the 
standard inspections — affecting the sus- 
pect sites. The example of pick-and- 
choose, or “& la carte,” is a really bad 
idea. Nor is it adequate compensation 
that in some other respects Pyongyang 
has accepted tighter than normal stan- 


dards. Especially in light of these circum- 
s, the United Si 


stances, the United States needs to reaf- 
firm earlier pledges to beef up protection 
for the 37,000 American troops in South 
Korea. There must be rigid insistence on 
North Korea's compliance with all its 
nuclear obligations. 

The American government could not 
impose its will on an independent and 
defiant North Korea as it could on a 
defeated Iraq. Washington had to negoti- 
ate. The resulting deal is far from being 
what it should, but it can be defended as 
what was available, and if enforced it can 
ease an ominous regional nuclear threaL 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Again, Killing in Rwanda 


When Rwanda's Hutu-led government 
. slaughtered hundreds of thousands of 
Tutsi six months ago. the world watched 
helplessly and was embarrassed by its 
helplessness. French forces belatedly inter- 
vened on a LiN humanitarian mission, but 

• this was not the United Nations’ finest 
’ hour. Eventually, a Tutsi-led rebel army 
-drove the genocidal Hutu regime from 

power. Now there are disturbing reports 
from the UN high commissioner for refu- 
gees and Amnesty International that Tutsi 
forces are taking murderous revenge 

- against Hutu civilians. The LIN bureau- 
'cracy, it seems, would rather not hear 

about it. But these new charges deserve 

- serious international attention and more. 

This lime the world need not be help- 
less. The new Rwandan government de- 
pends on continuing international assis- 
tance and is thus responsive to external 
pressure. Meanwhile, the underlying 
problem of identifying and punishing 
those guilty of last spring's massacres 
cannot be left to local troops in the field. 

A report prepared last month by the 
high commissioner for refugees, but" nev- 
er officially released, found that the new 
Tuisi-Ied Rwandan government and its 
military forces were systematically ha- 
rassing and killing Hutu. The office of the 
high commissioner is not a human rights 
agency but is responsible for advising 
Hutu refugees whether it is safe for them 

• to return home. Nevertheless, the report 
displeased UN headquarters, which did 
not want the high commissioner speaking 


consistent Security Council attention. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED IK ST 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

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A Sane Deal With North Korea, but There’s a Big TP 


W ASHINGTON — It is difficult to make 
a liule word bear as much weight as it 
must in this instance, but if the U.S.-North 
Korean nuclear agreement is ultimately car- 
ried out, it will be the most important single 
foreign policy feat of the Clinton administra- 
tion to date, and an achievement of major 
Strategic significance by any standard. 

There are innumerable ways for the agree- 
ment to fail. The North Koreans will hesitate, 
backtrack, throw stones in the way and may 
even repudiate the agreement. They may try a 
double cross or two. South Korea, on whose 
support the deal absolutely rests, may be 
unable to swallow a deepening U.S.-North 
Korean relationship, and for domestic politi- 
cal reasons be unable to produce the needed 
financing. One serious U.S. misstep in the 
delicate balancing of the torn halves of the 
peninsula could torpedo the deal. 

The list can be lengthened almost at will. 
But if the plan holds up. the gains are 
equally sobering. A potential new nuclear 
power — and a certain spark to a nuclear 


By Jessica Mathews 


arms race touching Japan South Korea. Tai- 
i — will I 


wan and China — will have been removed. A 
nuclear exporter wiling to sell to any country 
or terrorist group with enough cash will not be 
selling. A blow from which the nonprolifera- 
tion regime might not have recovered will have 
been dodged. ".And the possible cause of a 
second Korean War will have been eliminated. 

For these gains the United Slates conceded 
remarkably little, and North Korea, desper- 
ate for energy to prop up its collapsing econo- 
my, a great deal. Most important, Pyongyang 
has agreed to give up reprocessing (the pro- 
cess for producing plutonium). This is a right 
it holds under the Nuclear Nonproliferation 
Treaty, although one it gave up (before reneg- 


for weapons use in 19S9 and 1990. If. in the 
IAEA's opinion, this requires special inspec- 
tions — a step that North Korea rejected in 
the past — so be h. Before the first plant's 
completion, the spent fuel rods must be 
shipped out of the country. During the second 
plant's construction. North Korea must begin 
dismantling its plutonium-production reac- 
tors and reprocessing plant. 

In a perfect world, one would have liked 
the past to be clarified right away and the 
spent fuel rods removed immediately. One 
would wish that North Korea had not chosen 
io spend its nuclear leverage od new reactors, 
or that the agreement had spelled out how 
their spent fuel will be handled. 

But these and other criticisms are quibbles. 
The Clinton administration was right to cor- 
rect its earlier mistake of insisting that what 
happened in the past be the first step in resolv- 
ing this crisis. There is no urgency to clearing 
up the past, and greal urgency to preventing its 
repetition on a much larger scale. The agree- 
ment appropriately puts That threat first. 

Nor does the deal rely on trust. If the 
inspectors are ever interfered with, or if U.S. 
intelligence detects any violation, the oil de- 
liveries and construction work on the new 
plants can be stopped instantly — leaving 
North Korea stoned for energy. In this worst 
case, we will be back where we were last 
spring, having lost nothing but diplomatic 


A Risky Nuclear Gamble Worth Taking 


ing) in a 1991 agreement with South Korea. 
Its 


out publicly on sensitive human rights 
issues and perhaps complicating ties with 
the new Rwandan government 

Amnesty’s report reaches conclusions 
similar to the commisioner’s. The alleged 
Tutsi reprisals are far smaller in scale than 
the earlier Hutu violence, and many may 
occur without the knowledge or approval 
of government authorities. Still, they are 
inexcusable, and the government must be 
persuaded to make clear to all armed units 
that such behavior will not be tolerated. 

The reprisal issue is related to the issue 
of assuring impartial justice for the thou- 
sands of Hutu formally accused of in- 
volvement in last spring's killings. Plans 
to establish an international tribunal 
have stalled in the LIN Security Council 
over questions of location and mandate. 
Meanwhile, some 6,000 Hutu prisoners 
await their fate in Rwandan jails, and 
relatives of Tutsi victims grow increasing- 
ly impatient and doubtful about whether 
the outside world will ever really follow 
through on its lofty rhetoric. 

Some of the questions holding up Secu- 
rity Council action are legitimate. But 
surely an international tribunal is prefer- 
able to trials organized by a government 
not fully in command and still suspected 
by many of tribal partisanship. Formal 
justice of any kind is preferable to ad hoc 
reprisals. This time, the world and espe- 
cially the United Nations owe Rwanda 


present supply of spent fuel rods will 
remain in storage until shipped out of the 
country. It has undertaken not to refuel or 
restart its existing research reactor, which 
would produce more plutonium-laden fuel, 
and to immediately cease construction of two 
much larger reactors of the same type. All this 
is to be under continuous IAEA inspection. 

In return, in addition to trade and political 
openings, the United Slates promises to sup- 
ply (but not to pay for) two large new conven- 
tional power reactors that produce spent fuel 
lean in plutonium, and to provide heavy oil 
exactly equal to the amount of energy the 
three forgone reactors would have produced 
until the first of the new reactors goes on line. 

Before the new plants’ nuclear equipment 
can be delivered, about five years from now. 
the IAEA must have cleared up the mystery 
of whether North Korea diverted plutonium 


B ILL Clinton says ihat the deaL while 
risky, is better than a war. There is much 
to be said for that view — always assuming 
that the nuclear bargain is made in good faith 
and will be carefully policed and kepL 
One collateral test oF the process will be 
what temptations it offers to other outlaw 
states. Will they, too. catch the gravy train? 

The rationale of the nonproliferation treaty 
remains a powerful and simple one. There is 
no great profit in being a nuclear power, all 
the less if it arouses more powerful and re- 
sourceful neighbors {Japan and South Korea, 
in this case) to take offsetting steps. 

For a time after World War II there was a 
minor school of thought in Washington that 
the U.S. atomic monopoly would be a “gun at 
the hip” reminding others at the international 
poker table not to cheat. It turned out that the 
possession of this gun was more appropriate 
for poker than for statecraft, since the main 


ingredient was bluff. The more the world 
learned about the horror of atomic weapons, 
the larger and more hollow the bluff became. 

And soon enough the LLS. monopoly end- 
ed and we entered that long, dark tunnel of 
nuclear deterrence from which we are only 
now emerging after 50 fretful years. 

A nuclear-armed pipsqueak slate would be 
no more than a pipsqueak with a nuclear 
weapon or two, whose temptations to practice 
blackmail would be offset by the firm assur- 
ance of national obliteration if it went too far. 

Is this logic dear to the potential mischief- 
makers? Or might their judgment be further 
clouded by the concessions made to blackmail 
in North Korea? We don’t yet know. But the 
logic remains firm and. assuming that the mis- 
chief-makers are not altogether impervious to 
it. the Clinton gamble seems worth taking. 

— Edwin M. Yoder Jr., commenting 
in The Washington Post. 


Different Ethnic IQ Scores — So What Else Is New? 


unflinching investigative reports and 
ity Cot 


W ASHINGTON — -The 
black-white IQ difference 
[is] about 15 points in the U.S." 

“In the United States, blacks 
of above-average socioeconomic 
status have not averaged as high 
!Q as whites of lower socioeco- 
nomic status.” 

“The question here is not 
whether differences are cultural 
or genetic in origin. The point is 
that they are real and that their 
consequences are real.” 

So this is Charles Murray's 
heresy, the incendiary declara- 
tions about race and IQ that 
have landed him and his co- 
authored book “The Bell Curve” 
on the cover of Newsweek, The 
New Republic and The New 
York Times Magazine, and put 
him in the liberal pantheon of 
bigoted pseudoscience. Well. no. 

The quotations above are from 
“Race and Culture." published 
just two months before “The Bell 
Curve.” The author is Thomas 
Sowell, ibe Stanford economist 
and social scientisL Mr. Sowell is 
black. And his interest in ethnic 
differences in mental capacity is 
even broader than Mr. Murray's. 

Starting with Cicero's obser- 
vation 20 centuries ago that Brit- 
ons were too stupid to make 
good slaves, Mr. Sowell offers a 
worldwide survey of ethnic dif- 
ferences in intelligence. They are 
ubiquitous. 

“Among Indians in colonial 
Malaya, for example, Tamils had 
higher scores than Gurkhas, and 
both had higher scores than Ben- 
galis in Bengal.'’ In math, he 
points out ethnic Chinese school- 
children outperform the English 
in Hong Kong, the Malays in Sin- 
gapore. the fndonesians in Indo- 
nesia. In the United States, EasL 
Asians outperform whites. 

With the phenomenon of eth- 
nic IQ differences so universal. 


Bv Charles Krauthammer 


Mr. Sowell is quite relaxed about 
the American bl 2 ck-white differ- 
ence. He notes (.in a passage that 
I purposely truncated above) that 
“the black-white IQ difference 
of about 15 points in the U.S. has 
been matched by the IQ differ- 
ence between Sephardic and 
Ashkenazic Jews in Israel or be- 
tween Catholics and Protestants 
in Northern Ireland.” 

“The Bell Curve.” on the other 
hand, is more narrowly focused 
on ethnic differences in America. 
In particular, it marshals volumi- 
nous validation for the black- 
while IQ differences that Mr. 
Sowell and others have noted. 

For this. Mr. Murray has been 
subjected to fierce personal at- 
tack. To take an example, the 
sociologist Alan Wolfe writes that 
Mr. Murray and co-author Rich- 
ard Hermstein “may not be rac- 
ists. but they are obsessed by 
race.” and “see ihe world in 
group terms and must have data 
on group membership.” 

An interesting charge, given 
that for the last two decades it is 
the very liberals who so vehe- 
mently denounce Mr. Murray 
who have been obsessed by race, 
insisting that every institution 
— universities, fire departments. 
Alaskan canneries — “must have 
data on group membership.” 

It is they who have oppressive- 
ly insisted that we measure eth- 
nic “over-” and “under-” repre- 
sentation in every possible field 
of human endeavor. To lake only 
the latest example, on Sept. 26 
the federal government pro- 
posed that banks making small 
business loans be required to ask 
the applicant’s race and gender. 

Not a month goes by when I do 
not get a survey of some sort in 
which 1 am asked to identify my- 


self by race. (As a rule. I refuse.) 
Here is a liberal establishment 
forcing racial testing and count- 
ing for every conceivable activity, 
and when a study comes along 
which does exactly that for SATs 
and IQ, the author is pilloried for 
being obsessed by race. 

In fact. Mr. Murray is obsessed 
by class. “The Bell Curve" is a 
powerful, scrupulous. landmark 


study of the relationship between 
intelli; 


gence and social class, which 
is what the book is mainly about. 
It is secondarily about differences 
among ethnicities (.they are not ad- 
dressed until chapter 13), which is 
what the fuss is about. 

I have two difficulties with the 
book. First, I see no reason to 
assume that group differences in 
intelligence, as opposed to indi- 
vidual variation, have anything to 
do with genes. The more plausible 
explanation is Mr. Sowell's: elh- 
nic differences in intelligence, 
which change over time (the Brit- 
ish have come up smartly since 
Cicero), are due to culture, that 
part of the environment which, 
unlike socioeconomic status, is 
unmeasurable. 

Second. 1 have trouble with 
Mr. Murray's recommendations 
about what to do with the fact of 
inequality, He offers a kind of 
conservative multieulturalism in 
which each ethnicity finds its 
honored niche in society accord- 
ing to its own areas of excellence 
and distinction. 

I distrust all multieulturalism, 
liberal or conservative. The Bal- 
kans amply demonstrate the per- 
ns of balkanization. My answer is 
simpler. Stop counting by race, 
btop allocating by race. Stop 
measuring by race. Let's return to 
measunng individuals. 

It seems hopelessly naive to 


propose this today. But it was not 
naive when first proposed by 
Martin Luther King and accepted 
by a white society that was finally 
converted to his vision of color- 
blindness. Instead, through guilt 
and intimidation, a liberal estab- 
lishment has since mandated that 
every study of achievement in 
American life be broken down by 
race. “The Bell Curve” takes that 
mandate to its logical conclusion. 

Enough. As both Mr. Murray 
and Mr. Sowell explicitly state, 
knowing the group score tells you 
nothing about the individual. 
WelL we have now seen the group 
score. Let’s all go back to count- 
ing individuals. 

Washington Post Writers Gr.yup. 


A Country 
Full of 
Soreheads 


By Garrison Keillor 

N EW YORK. — The voters 
are angry. There was a front- 
page story in The New lock 
Times Iasi week about this, in 


which an anesthesiologist in Sa- 
fi retired fit 


effort and the cost of some ofl in an attempt to 
avoid nuclear conflict. 

There is one cost that neither this nor any 
other negotiated end to the North Korean 
crisis could have avoided, and that is the mes- 
sage to other would-be proliferators that if they 
can get far enough along before being discov- 
ered, a covert nuclear program is the ultimate 
bargaining chip. That opportunity was lost 
long before the Clinton administration took 
office, as the IAEA let itself be diddled by 
Pyongyang for seven years and the United 
States took no effective action for even longer. 

The task for the international community 
now is to undercut that precedent by demon- 
strating that neither Nuclear Nonprolifera- 
tion Treaty members nor nonmembers will be 
able to gee far enough along to exploit it. 

This will mean maintaining a strict regime 
on Iraq and North Korea, creating a more 
aggressive and effective IAEA through ade- 
quate funding, intelligence sharing and politi- 
cal support, taking a tougher stance against 
reckless exporters of nuclear technology and. 
by far most important, establishing that, 
henceforth, early steps toward a weapons 
capability, even if legal under the treaty, will 
be seen and responded to as a direct threat to 
international security. 

implementation of the agreement will not 
be smooth; setbacks are the rale when dea lin g 
with Pyongyang. But there should be no 
doubt that if its terms can be sustained, the 
deal is a solid win for world peace. 

The Washington Post. 


vann ah and a retired Fire fighter 
in Richmond each announced 
that he is thinking of moving to 
Costa Rica because of how bad 
things are in the USA these days. 

The anesthesiologist said that 
in 10 years it would not be eco- 
nomically feasible to live in the 
United States. The retired fire 
fighter said the tax laws were 
more favorable in Costa Rica, 
you could raise your children as 
you saw fit, and you could defend 
yourself and your property. 

If these angry voters believe 
that America is on the rocks and 
that Costa Rica offers them the 
good life, then God bless them ^ 
and grant them generous tax ad- W 
vantages, and if the anesthesiolo- 
gist wants to learn how to say 
“Count backward from 100” in 
Spanish, then God speed. 

But shouldn’t someone warn the 
Costa Ricans that these men are 
coming? Does Costa Rica really 
need a lot of Republican boat peo- 
ple with all their high expectations 
of what society owes them? 

The article says that the angry, 
cynical voters are themselves do- 
ing O.K. financially and don’t 
seem to be upset about specific 
issues. The voters’ anger, say 
opinion polls, is due to uncertain- 
ty about the future and a feeling 
that they aren't getting ahead. 

How can one say this diplo- 
matically? In the adult segment of 
your life, Angry Voter, in the part 
of your life that comes after your 
parents kiss you good-bye and 
Kick you out, the future is always 
uncertain. Even in the past, the 
future was uncertain. 

And if you don’t get ahead, you 
aren't entitled to blame the presi- 
dent, the Congress, or your poor 
old mom and dad. This is true 
even in Costa Rica. I thought ev- 
erybody knew this. 

Back in the Vietnam era, people 
talked a blue streak about the sys- 
tem being broken — but was it? m 
Water came out of the tap. your 
toilet flushed, the buses ran. the 
schools taught your kids, you paid 
your taxes, the mailman came. 
Whax else is the system supposed 
to do for you? It can't come to 
Your home and blow your nose. 
You have to do that yourself. 

This is the age of the dumbing 
of America, and. frankly, the cyn- 
icism of people who are rowing 
with one oar is not of great inter- 
est. Everyone I know who ever 
took a trip to Washington and got 
a firsthand look at government 
came away impressed with the 
workings of it and not inclined to 
seek exile in Costa Rica. 

But are there three newspapers 
in America that cover Congress 
with anything like the thorough- 
ness and flair that they bring to 
their coverage of the NFL? 

Newspapers are keenly aware of 
a younger generation of nonread- 
ers and are trying to appeal to it by 
writing down to it. In the mind of a 
not very bright 14-year-old, the 
entire adult world consists of dolts 
and jerks and meanies, and that is 
how reporters tend to write about 
government these days. 

Look at the carpet-chewing edi- 
torials and the Gothic conspiracy 
tales that have come down on the 1 ^ 
president in the past year. Can you ’ 
blame the voter for believing some 
of what be or she reads? We Amer- 
icans are becoming a nation of 
soreheads, and so this fall we prob- 
ably will go to the polls and shoot 
ourselves in the foot. 

I say the Angry Cynical Voters 
should elect a Congress of pin- 
heads, nincompoops and radio 
talk show hosts, and then in 1996 
they should elect Newt Gingrich 
to be our angry, cynical president. 

He and the Congress ran cut 
taxes in half, triple defense spend- 
ing build a naval base in the Okee- 
fenokee Swamp, require all public 
schools to teach the doctrine of 
original sin. Elect the worst Con- 
gress you can find, and the system 
still will not break, and we won’t 
go to Costa Rica. America will still 
be a great country. 


The writer, author of "The B\ 
of Guys. ” contributed this comm 
to The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894-: Falling Cat Study 

PARIS — Until the days of Sir 
Isaac Newton, no one could satis- 
factorily explain why an apple 
falls off a tree. Newton, however, 
failed to discover one thing — 
why a caL if thrown into the air, 
always reaches the ground feet 
downwards. This question is now 
occupying the French Academy 
of Sciences. The discussion was 
initiated by a paper by M. Marey, 
who laid before his colleagues six- 
ty photographs of a falling cat. 


“ . J UUi, ¥T, 

the theatre two nights ai 
count of rioting called’ 
the offering of Hun musi 
York, the company st 
performance last cvenin 


1944c De Gaulle £ 


1919: Drama at Opera 


NEW YORK — Rouen eggs 
thrown on the stage from boxes in 
the Lexington Theatre, and 
bricks dropped into the orchestra 
pit, causing the musicians to leave 
in haste, interrupted the perfor- 
mance of a German opera bv the 
Star Opera Company last night 
[Oct. 22]. Under the protecting 


WASHINGTON — [j 
New York edition:] Tl 
States. in a sudden n 
its long stand against 
ing the government o 
Charles de Gaulle, ann< 

daylOn-Slthaiithai 
the French de-facto av 
Pans as the provision; 
ment of France. The act 
to a successful condusk 
Jomatic struggle for ri 

Kg" French 

1 VW. Amving imhentid 
don at that time. Q 
Gaulle said: “France i 
battle. She has not lost 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


Page? 


OPINION 


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Kohl Again Can Be Good 
For Alliance and Europe 


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N EW YORK — Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's coalition has 
prevailed with the narrowest mar- 
gin in the Bundestag since the first 
German national election after the 
war, when Konrad Adenauer 
emerged as chancellor by dint of a 
single vote (presumably his own;. 
Mr. Kohl's is nevertheless an ex- 
traordinary achievement. 

He rebounded from being behind 
by double digits to win his fourth 
consecutive election despite a major 
recession, in the face of a substantial 
tax increase in West Germany to 
cover the unexpectedly high costs of 
unification, and in the midst of the 
pangs of upheaval associated with 
the political and economic restruc- 
turing of East Germany. 

In the German political system, 
the margin by which a chancellor is 
chosen is not necessarily an indica- 
tion of his ability to govern. Once 
established by the Bundestag, a 
chancellor can be replaced only by 
a majority vote for a successor and 
not, as in a parliamentary system, 
by a vote of no-confidence or a 
majority against specific policies. 

A hostile, closely divided Bun- 
destag can harass the chancellor, as 
this one surely will. And the upper 
house will in any event be dominat- 
ed by the Social Democrats. But a 
positive vote to replace him re- 
mains hard to achieve. In nearly 
half a century, it has happened only 
once — when Mr. Kohl came into 
office in 1982. 

A narrow margin did not prevent 
Konrad Adenauer from becoming 
a dominant chancellor. And it will 
not by itself diminish Mr. Kohl’s 
authority, because the Kohl coali- 
tion's real margin is greater than it 
appears. No current leader would 


By Henry A. Kissinger 






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the 30 seats of the former Commu- 
nist Party, which entered the Bun- 
destag fay a heretofore inoperative 
clause in the constitution. To 
change the chancellor, the Free 
Democratic Party with its 47 seats 
would have to switch coalitions. 

□ 

But this is precisely why the elec- 
tion is likely to be viewed in retro- 
spect as an angary of impending 
upheaval in the German political 
landscape; in fact, as the be ginning 
of the end of the Kohl era — an 
event which will bring home to Eu- 
rope and to America how much 
Atlantic and European cohesion 
has come to depend on his towering 
personality. 

He has managed the NATO mis- 
sile deployment, the unification of 
Germany and the integration of 
Europe with such matter-of-fact*- 
ness that few remember how pre- 
carious those processes were at ev- 
ery step along the way. 

But the election makes it likely 
that Mr. Kohl’s coalition partner, 
the liberal Free Democratic Party, 
will at a minimum become increas- 
ingly fractious. It may even aban- 
don the coalition altogether and 
switch sides by midterm. 

For the Free Democrats are hav- 
ing an identity crisis. They know 
that they scraped by in this election 
by the skin of their teeth; they came 
very close to failing to achieve the 5 
percent of the total vote that is a 
prerequisite to entry into the feder- 


al parliament. They may well have 
crossed that hurdle primarily be- 
cause Mr. Kohl’s party encouraged 
the switch of enough of its own 
votes to sustain the governing co- 
alition. And they have lost every 
election to state legislatures in the 
last three years. 

The FDP seems to have reached 
the point which Han 5 - Dietrich 
Genscher, the former vice chancel- 
lor and foreign minis ter, described 
to me in 1980, when his party had 
been in coalition with the Social 
Democrats for more than 10 years. 
He said then that the FDP would 
have to look for an opportunity to 
switch during the next electoral pe- 
riod because if its voters became 
too accustomed to a permanent co- 
alition with the SPD, they would 
lose interest in a separate existence 
and vote for the SPD directly. 

That situation seems to have 
arisen again, although the current 
FDP leader does not have the ma- 
nipulative skill of Mr. Genscher 
and would have to take into ac- 
count the risk of a complete disin- 
tegration of his party if he tried to 
change coalitions. 

But self-interest will drive the 
FDP toward greater assertiveness, 
and, at an opportune moment, 
tempt it to switch coalitions — for 

A dear sense of identity of 
the Alliance and a dear 
definition of the European 
Union are needed for good 
relations with Russia. 
Revitalizing European and 
Atlantic institutions would 
be a noth culmination of 
Mr, Kohl's stewardship . 

which the narrow mar gin of victory 
provides the mathematical possibili- 
ty, as it did not in the last Bundes- 
tag A switch at that time would not 
have sufficed to produce a majority 
for any alternative chancellor. 

By contrast, if, in the wake of the 
recent election, the FDP joins the 
Socialists and the Greens, the liber- 
als will be in a position to elect a 
new chancellor. Mr. Kohl's posi- 
tion will therefore be unprecedent- 
edly precarious, and his govern- 
ment will require far greater effort 
than it has needed heretofore to 
pass its legislative program. 

In addition, his own party may 
be tempted into succession maneu- 
vers, although his domination of 
the machinery has so far squelched 
all would-be successors. 

Mr. Kohl hinted strongly that, if 
elected, he might not serve more 
than two years and would hand 
over the rest of his term to a succes- 
sor of bis own choosing. But after 
the recent election, such a proce- 
dure could trigger the shift in coali- 
tions by giving the FDP a pretext to 
reject the Christian Democratic 
Union's choice. 

On the other hand, if Mr. Kohl 
serves out the course, he will have 


■ STiu/ffm: 
KEfiRKDHl. 


STttilHEKe 



By COLUGNON m Dc Vottitaum (Annwdurt C&W Sy ixhrair 


Thanks, Norway, but We Give Up 


an exhausting term as a prelude to 
fighting another bitter election bat- 
tle, with, this time, very uncertain 
allies constantly reviewing whether 
they are more likely to reach 5 per- 
cent as the right wing of an SPD- 
led coalition or as the left wing of a 
CDU coalition. 

a 

To me, these are melancholy 
prospects because 1 consider Hel- 
mut Kohl one of the seminal fig- 
ures of our period He has been a 
guarantee of Germany’s Atlantic 
and European orientation and a 
shield against the nationalistic or 
romantic temptations from which 
his people have suffered through 
much of their modem history. 

This does not reflect a lack of 
confidence in the leaders of the 
principal opposition party, the 
SPD, which proved its sense of re- 
sponsibility under Chancellors 
Willy Brandt and Helmut Schmidt. 
Since then, however, its radical 
wing has grown far more restless; 
its coalition party would be the 
Greens, whose formal program re- 
jects the Atlantic Alliance and a 
major international role for Ger- 
many. The center of gravity of such 
a coalition would be much further 
left and make the implementation 
of traditional Atlantic policy much 
more difficult. 

The approaching end of the Kohl 
era is due not only to electoral 
arithmetic but to the transition in 
generations. Mr. Kohl is the last 
West German leader with a living 
memory of World War II and its 
aftermath, and for whom American 
help in reconstructing Europe rep- 
resents a personal, indeed a senti- 
mental, experience. 

The next generation — of all the 
parties — mil be less tied to tradi- 
tional interpretations, more cool- 
headed about assessing national in- 
terests, and more ready to assert a 
national German role. This will be 
reinforced by the growing influence 
of the formerly Communist part of 
Germany — a region whose people 
lived under totalitarianism for 60 
years, did not experience the great 
period of Atlantic cooperation and 
European construction, and saw in 
nationalism a refuge from Commu- 
nist oppression. 

These trends are compounded by 
the fact that the post-Cold War 
world has cut Germany loose from 
some of its previous moorings. 

When Germany was divided, Eu- 
rope provided a political home and 
a substitute for a national policy. 
So long as German armies stood on 
the Elbe, the Atlantic Alliance was 
essential for German security. Ger- 
many’s unification removes one in- 


centive for subordination to supra- 
national institutions, and the retreat 
of Russian forces from Central Eu- 
rope eliminates another. 

At the same time, there has been 
no American initiative to define 
new purposes for the Atlantic Alli- 
ance other than the Partnership for 
Peace, which erodes geographic de- 
lineations without developing new 
common purposes. 

No wonder that both the extent 
and the content of Europe have be- 
come controversial — all tempta- 
tions to a more national role. 

□ 

For America, the approaching 
end of the Kohl period represents a 
watershed of its own: whether to 
continue emphasizing new univer- 
salist institutions that threaten to 
weaken progressively the Atlantic 
Alliance and change' the nature of 
the European Union, or to turn to 
revitalizing the existing building 
blocks of the European order and 
the Atlantic Community. 

The Clinton administration will 
not have time to pursue both ap- 
proaches in partnership with Mr. 
Kohl; it must establish priorities. 
Unless the Atlantic Alliance is giv- 
en a mission and a purpose reflect- 
ing its historic essence, it will grad- 
ually dissolve in a mi shmash of 
universalis! slogans indistinguish- 
able from those of the United Na- 
tions and of genera] collective secu- 
rity. One can hardly build Europe, 
or an Atlantic partnership, if one is 
not willing to define where Europe 
begins and ends. 

In the time remaining, America 
must work with Mr. Kohl on defin- 
ing membership in both the Atlan- 
tic Alliance and the European 
Union for the states of Eastern Eu- 
rope, and on creating new but dif- 
fer cm structures for political con- 
sultation with the states arising out 
of the former Soviet Union. 

A clear sense of identity of the 
Atlantic Alliance and a clear defi- 
nition of the European Union are a 
prerequisite to good relations with 
Russia. The reluctance to draw new 
lines means reliance on those made 
irrelevant by the end of the Cold 
War. But neither Europe nor the 
Atlantic Alliance can stop at the 
East German border without creat- 
ing a vacuum between Germany 
and Russia — the historic source of 
European wars. 

Revitalizing European and Atlan- 
tic institutions would be a noble 
culmination of Mr. Kohl's steward- 
ship. It is important, for, whatever 
happens, America and Europe will 
not soon find so reliable and coura- 
geous a partner as Chancellor KohL 
© 1994, Los Angeles Tones Syndicate. 


N EW YORK — Thirty years ago 
this fall, inside the concrete 
field house on the campus of the 
Moses Brown school in Providence, 
Rhode Island, a group of architects 
and social planners installed the 
world's first field of artificial grass. 
They were looking for something to 
cover the hard asphalt of urban 
playgrounds, to create for inner city 
children an experience equivalent to 
the grassy playing fields enjoyed by 
their counterparts in the suburbs. 

It was not to be, of course. Artifi- 
cial grass proved too expensive for 
city budgets and ended up instead as 
Astroturf, the surface of many pro- 
fessional and college sports stadiums. 

A generation later, the abortive 
experiment at Moses Brown stands 
as a powerful symbol of a lost era in 
urban thinking, a testament to how 
much America’s approach to the 
problems of cities has changed since 
the early 1960s. 

The people who dreamed up arti- 
ficial grass thought that the poor 
could be lifted by changes to their 

MEANWHILE 

environment; that by knocking 
down tenements and building 
gleaming new bousing projects, by 
designing innovative schools ana 
playgrounds, something real could 
be done to change the prospects of 
the disadvantaged. 

This past summer, in the Red 
Hook area of Brooklyn, the Norwe- 
gian government built an 580,000 
artificial turf soccer field in honor of 
America hosting the World Cup. 
The Norwegians deliberately chose 
one of New York's toughest neigh- 
borhoods because they wanted to 
bring a playing field to people who 
have only asphalt and concrete. 

Ten days after the field opened 
last month, vandals set the turf on 
fire, destroying it completely. 

What is striking about what hap- 
pened in Red Hook is not simply 
that it took Norwegians to try to 
replicate what was attempted at Mo- 
ses Brown a generation ago. It is that 
when the field went up in smoke, the 
response of the city and the commu- 
nity was not anger, or even disillu- 
sionment. There were no flliKjpn s 
left to be shattered. 

“I told them it was pretty foolish 
to put it there,” a weary Henry 
Stem, New York’s Parks Commis- 
sioner, explained to reporters the 
next day. ^This isn’t Kansas. And 
Red Hook isn't Norway." 

We Americans are all realists now 
about urban problems — and with 


By Malcolm Gladwell 

good reason, given the disastrous 
record of many of the grand social 
experiments of the 1950$ and '60$. 

The story of artificial grass and 
die ideas that lay behind it, however, 
is a reminder of how shallow this 
new “realism" can be. After all, 30 
years after the creation of artificial 
turf, cities like New York still have 
not managed to bring the play- 
grounds of the inner city up to par 
with those of the suburbs. In effect, 
we have abandoned the old ideas 
about helping the disadvantaged, 
without coming up with any better 
ideas of our own. 

“In the early days, we had this 
sense that if you put intelligence and 
reason to work, you could solve so- 
cial problems,” said Jonathan King, 
an architect at Texas A&M and a 
member of the group that first con- 
caved of artificial grass. “I don't see 
that anymore. All I see is a deep 
cynicism about the decay of our so- 
ciety, and the sense that we can’t do 
anything right-" 

The group that came up with As- 
troturf was a spin-off of the Ford 
Foundation known as Educational 
Facilities Laboratories, or EFL, 
made up of architects and educa- 
tors. Their driving premise was that 
bettor design of school buildings 
could make a measurable difference 
in the quality of urban education. 

The ideology was rooted in a 
long-standing and honorable intel- 
lectual movement, what historians 
refer to as the “environmentalist" 
tradition. This was the philosophy 
of reformers like Jacob Riis, who in 

the 
slums, 

„ — dons in 

which the poor lived, not any deficit 
in character, that kept them poor. 

The idea has been around a long 
time,” said Nicholas Lemann, au- 
thor, most recently, of The Prom- 
ised Land.” “It was a staple of the 
progressive era, this idea that if you 
improve the physical environment, it 
will improve the spirit and tbe mind." 

EFL pushed successfully for the 
use of carpeting in new school con- 
struction, which made classrooms 

S 'eter and easier to dean. It was 
> the group responsible for the 
move to build schools with air-con- 
ditioning, overcoming opposition 
from school boards and educators 
by proving both that the idea was 
financially feasible and that it creat- 
ed an environment more conducive 
to learning in hot weather. 



LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


Halt the Attacks on Israelis 

Nearly all Israelis accept the fact 
that the peace process with the 
neighboring countries and especial- 
ly with the Palestinians does require 
the granting of considerable conces- 
sions by Israel, even if these are 
costly and painful to Israel 
However, not even the most 
peace-loving and concessicra-rcady 
Israelis can accept the fact that de- 

? >ite these concessions some at the 
alestinian groups keep on attack- 
ing and killing Israelis with no reac- 
tion from tbe Palestinian authori- 
ties, or for that matter the Arab 
countries, other than verbal con- 
demnation of these attacks. 

Unless this situation improves 


drastically — that is, unless the Pal- 
estinian authorities and the other 
Arab countries control Hamas etc. 
and stop them from their terrorist 
activities — there will be no choice 
for the Israeli government but to 
react in a most forceful manner. 
Such reaction win surely have the 
same result as all previous reactions 
to Arab attacks on Israel 
I and the vast majority of .Israelis 
who are desirous of peace and good 
relations with all our Arab cousins 
— I repeat: all of them — sincerely 
hope and pray that true peace will 
come soon to all of us and that no 
forceful Israeli reactions will be 
necessary. 

PAUL KOLLEK. 

Jerusalem. 


Then, in 1963. came artificial turf, 
the brainchild of EFL President Har- 
old Gores, a former superintendent 
of schools in Newton, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Gores, who died last year, was 
obsessed with the fact that cities 
COukl not m aintain playing fields for 
their children because tbe heavy wear 
and tear of urban life made maintain- 
ing grass fields impossible. 

Astroturf, of course, was a bust, 
proving far too costly for the typical 
school system to install and main- 
tain. So was another of EFL’s pet 
ideas, the open classroom concept in 
school design. 

EFL didn’t survive, but the fruits 
of the environmental movement are 
everywhere in American cities. The 
"monumental" design of urban high 
schools built in the early pan of this 
century in cities like New York and 
Washington, with their classical pil- 
lars or Gothic turrets, are expres- 
sions of tbe belief that disadvan- 
taged kids can be inspired not just 
by what they learn but by where 
they learn it. 

Even tbe first public bousing pro- 
jects, however much they are now 
reviled, were built at the tune to the 
highest of standards. The Red Hook 
housing project in Brooklyn, for ex- 
ample, across tbe street from tbe arti- 
final grass field destroyed last 
month, was described by the archi- 
tectural critic Lewis Miimford after 
its completion in 1940 as “Versailles 
for the masses" and “miles above the 
product of any commercial builder.” 

It is important to understand that 
much of what we take for granted in 
urban life — from parks to play- 
grounds to public housing — was the 
result of specific ideas about what 
makes cities livable. It is also impor- 
tant to understand these ideas be- 
cause each of them, in whole or in 
part, has beat abandoned since the 
time EFL laid down Astroturf in the 
Moses Brown field bouse. 

The spirit of environmentalism is 
now almost extinguished, snuffed 
out by the apparent failure of so 
much of the urban redevelopment 
experiments of the 1960s. 

“In the '50s and ’60s, architects 
felt that if we could just design 
something correctly and inteLu- 
gently, life would change,” said 
Richard Dattner, a New York City 
architect. "Some of us still hope 
that and aspire to that. But tne 
intervening 25 years have brought us 
crack, all ends of substance abuse, 
the explosion of angle parenthood 
and lads out of control so that tbe 
situation is now so much more des- 
perate that some of these wonderful 
thoughts no longer seem appropri- 
ate to the problem at hand. Inis is a 
much more desperate time.” 

Parks funding in New York City 
and other major urban areas has 
dropped precipitously in recent 
years and the playground boom is 
long over, a victim of budget cuts 
ana lawsuits. "When we started do- 
ing playgrounds, there was a senti- 
ment that better a broken bone than 
a broken spirit,” said Mr. Dattner. 
“Now if you said that you would 
have 25 lawyers around your neck.” 

Inna-dty children are, according 
to the education writer Sara Mosle, 
a forma teacher in Washington 
Heights, under the equivalent of 
“house arrest,” unable to pick up the 
social skills that other children ream 
in sandboxes and on soccer fields. 


The writer is New York bureau 
chief for The Washington Post, in 
which this comment appeared 


BOOKS 


BRIDGE 


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SEARCHING FOR MERCY 

^ ■ STREET: My Journey Back 
to My Mother, Anne Sexton 

By Linda Gray Sexton. 307 
pages. $22.95. Little, Brown. 

Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutard 

F EW writers’ lives have been 
as relentlessly dissected as 
Anne Sexton's. 

The poet's great subject, of 
course, was herself. Ha poems 
feverishly anatomized her 
moods, lrer breakdowns, ha 
anxieties, ha marriage and ha 
divorce, and they created a con- 
tinuing self-portrait: Sexton the 
rebellious teenager, obsessed 
'with boys "and cigarettes and 


cars”; Sexton the middle-aged 
suburban housewife who “wore 
rubies and bought tomatoes"; 
Sexton the s tressed-out mother 
haunted by “ugly angels”; Sex- 
ton the emotional invalid, 
“queen of this summer hotel” 
known as Bedlam. 

Since Sexton’s suicide in 
1974, others have taken up tbe 
task of explicating ha life. In a 
startling and highly controver- 
sial move, the poet’s psychia- 
trist, Dr. Martin One, turned 
ova more than 300 tapes of ha 
therapy sessions to the writer 
Diane Middlebrook. 

Middlebrook, in turn, drew 
heavily on those tapes for ha 
1991 biography of Sexton, cre- 
ating a book that minutely 
chronicled tbe writer’s emotion- 
al crises, suicidal fantasies, in- 


cestuous relationships and 
adulterous affairs. 

Now, we have before us an- 
other account of that tempestu- 
ous life, from the point of view 
of ha older daughter and liter- 
ary executor, the novelist Linda 
Gray Sexton. 

What makes this memoir so 
powerful and affecting is its 
candid, often painful depiction 
of a daughter’s struggles to 
come to terms with ha power- 
ful and emotionally troubled 
mother. 

In these pages, Linda Sexton 
grapples not only with her 
mother’s sexual arid emotional 


abase of ha, but also with the 
psychological implications of 
ha mother's writing: the fact 
that Linda’s own childhood and 
youth were routinely mined for 
dramatic material by her moth- 
er, the fact that ha mother 
spilled their family’s domestic 
difficulties for all the world to 
see. 

Certainly it was not easy be- 
ing a daughter of Anne Sexton. 
Both the poet's mental illness 
and the gift that enabled her to 
turn ha emotional torment into 
art tended to take ha away 
from ha children. 

Linda and her sister, Joy, 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


r, os 



TO OUR READERS IN BELGIUM 

it’s never been easier to subscribe 
and save. Jusf call toll-free : 

0 800 1 7538 


• Cesare CastdH, m anaging 
director of an Italian designer 
housewares manufacturer called 
Domodinamica, is re ad i ng Cic- 
ero’s “On the the Art of Growing 
Olet * in Italian and Tjitin. 

“At a certain point in life it’s 
good to start thinking about it 
Cicero contradicts the notion 
that the passing of the years 
needs to rob someone of his joie 
de vivre.” 

(Brandon Mitchener, JHT) 



grew up dreading the dark un- 
dertow of their mother's mad- 
ness, worrying that she would 
abaridon them through suicide 
or hospitalization. 

When she was feeling better 
and hard at work, she could be 
equally elusive. Linda remem- 
bers her slapping down lunch 
an the table and quickly going 
back to ha typewriter. 

“I saw how she left it only 
reluctantly when I pestered her 
for a cookie or a story; how she 
resented my questions and my 
need to be near ha,” she writes. 
“I wanted to cuddle in ha lap, 
but she wanted to concentrate. 
In desperation she would put 
on a record or set me down in 
front of the television and go 
back to ha desk." 

“Any demand is too much 
when rm like this," Anne Sex- 
ton told ha psychiatrist on a 
tape lata played by ha daugh- 
ter. “I want her to go away, and 
she knows it” 

At other times, Linda Sexton 
says, ha mother suffocated her 
with demands. She recalls ha 
mother sexually molesting ha 
and frightening ha with candid 
discussions of sex. 

She recalls ha mother pre- 


tending to be a child and forc- 
ing ha to assume the role of 
parent And she recalls Sexton 
flying into a possessive rage 
when ha primacy in ha daugh- 
ter’s life was threatened by a 
therapist or a boyfriend. 

It’s clear that Linda Gray 
Sexton’s feelings of anger and 
resentment were always 
grounded in a thick matrix of 
love and adoration, and that 
part of ha always wanted to 
emulate and please ha mother. 

She realized as a child, she 
says, that if she ever wanted to 
share ha mother's life, she 
would have to learn to love po- 
etry. 

“If I wanted to be dose, in- 
dispensable, a companion,” she 
writes, “then words and lan- 
guage would be the bricks with 
which I would build the 
bridge." 

And so, in time, Linda, did 
become a writer, learning, like 
ha mother, to use words to 
grapple with familial ghosts 
and, with this volume, to em- 
ploy the power of the confes- 
sionaL 


Michiko Kakutani is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


By Alan Trascott 

T HE most exciting final in 
the history of world wom- 
en’s team competition, with the 
result in doubt until the last 
deal was ova, ended in a vic- 
tory for a team led by Marinesa 
Letma. 

She and ha teammates, Judi 
Radio, Jidian Blanchard, Sue 
Ficus and Rozanne Pollack,' 
trailed the team led by Sally 
Woolsey by just one imp with 
two deals remaining, with a 
large audience watching intent- 
ly in the Vugraph theater, a 
part-score gain pm them in the 
lead, and they won the McCon- 
nell Cup by 5. 

In the diagramed deal from 
the Women’s Team final, Leti- 
zia as South reached four 
spades after aggressive bidding. 
She ruffed the opening club 
lead in dummy, cashed the 
heart ace and cross-ruffed in 

hearts and clubs to take the 
next four tricks. 

She then cashed ha two 
trump winners, leaving a five- 
card aiding in which East held 
the last trump, the dub ace and 
ace-jack-eight of diamonds. 
That player was helpless when a 
diamond was led to dummy’s 


queen, whether or not she won 
the trick. The post-mortem 
showed that the game would 
have been defeated if East had 
thrown ha dub ace earlier, 
leaving ha partner with a dub 
entry in the end position. 

This gained 1 1 imps for Led- 
zia's team, far more than the 
eventual margin of victory, for 
in the replay East’s overcall of 
one no-tramp ova one heart 
ended the bidding and eight 
tricks woe scored. 

NORTH (D) 

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The bidding: 

North East South West 

1 C Pass 1 4 Pass 

3 4 Pass 4 * Pass 

Pass Pass 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. OCTOBER 24, 1994 


Dozens of Militants 
Arrested in Israel 


ni 


3 Hostages WAR: Ho^he 


Toll in Bombing Rises to 23 


By Gyde Haberman 

■Yew York Tinas Svmce 

JERUSALEM — Israel said 
Sunday that its security services 
bad arrested dozens of West 
Bank militants from the Hamas 
Islamic group in a crackdown 
begun after the attack on a Tel 
Aviv bus, now said to have 
killed 23 people, including the 
suicide bomber. 

No details were given about 
how many Hamas members 
had been picked up, or in which 
towns. 

Some Palestinians waved off 
the arrests as involving only 
low-level Hamas supporters. 
But a senior Israeli government 
official said that they belonged 
to the group's armed wing and 
that some were suspects in anti- 
Israeli attacks that preceded the 
bus bombing last Wednesday. 

The arrests were reported as 
the government moved to wid- 
en the separation between Is- 
raelis and Palestinians, already 
considerable because of a post- 
bombing ban that has kept 
West Bank and Gaza Strip Ar- 
abs from entering Israel. 

Despite skepticism from 
some ministers, the cabinet in- 
creased the number of autho- 
rized foreign construction and 
farm workers, mostly Roma- 
nians, Bulgarians, Thais and 
Chinese, from 35,000 to 54,000. 



Said to Die 
In Riyadh 


Continued from Page 1 officials pressed US. attesto 

semcR.poliiicalsensiuviUMto W rov “ toawSs Kuwait 
now the war was described in ira S irora 6 

the news media, and General again. 


Powell's determination to get The Generals 
the troops out quickly. These . 

were among the revelations: When the Iraqis sw 


Nick of Time: 
Rabin Pops Out 
For Some Puffs 


It means that whenever the 
ban on Palestinians is lifted — 
and no end is in sight — there 
will most likely be far fewer 
Arabs allowed on Israeli streets 
than the roughly 60,000 labor- 
ers who had entered each day 
from the tern Lories before the 
bus attack. 

The action left some cabinet 
ministers uneasy, mainly those 
on the political left Not only 
would it hit many Palestinians 
hard in their already threadbare 
pocketbooks. they argued, but 
it could also help Hamas by 
undermining the fledgling Pal- 
estinian Authority of Yasser 
Arafat, which runs Gaza and 
the West Bank town of Jericho. 

"We have to be very careful 
here," Absorption Minister 
Yair Tsaban said. 

Along a similar line, Nabil 
Shaath, the chief Palestinian 
negotiator in talks with Israel, 
protested that the territorial 
closing “means siege and star- 
vation for Palestinians." 

As he prepared to meet For- 
eign Minister Shimon Peres in 
Cairo Sunday night to discuss 
an Israeli-PaJestinian relation- 
ship that has rapidly turned 
sour, Mr. Shaath said the Pales- 
tinian Authority bad nothing to 
do with the Tel Aviv incident. 

But the Israeli cabinet's con- 
cern was less with Palestinian 
sensibilities than with how to 
improve domestic security. The 
prevailing sentiment was that 
the solution lay in a more 
through separation of the two 
peoples, as urged last week by 




vf. 








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A poster of Yasser Arafat being put up in Hebron. 


Complied in Our Sufi From ttapauhn 

RIYADH — Four people 
were killed and two others were 
wounded when security forces 
stormed a Saudi villa in Riyadh 
where Filipinos had taken the 
residents hostage, official Saudi 
sources said Sunday. 

The dead included a 2- 
monlh-old baby and one of the 
hostage-taken:.’ who had de- 
manded a ransom of S10 mil- 
lion. the official Saudi press 
agency SPA reported. 

Residents and diplomats said 
earlier Sunday Chat Che Saudi 
police had stormed the villa 
Saturday in the Saudi capital's 
King Fahd District. 

They said three hostages bad 
been lolled in the drama — two 
servants and a son of Youssef 
Rajhi, who comes from a lead- 
ing business f amil y. 

The Philippines consul-gen- 
eral tried unsuccessfully to ne- 
gotiate with the hostage-takers 
before the police stormed the 
house. 

Diplomats and residents said 
a Filipino housemaid and an 
Indonesian driver were killed 
by the attackers. 

' Residents said a child. Mr. 
Rajhi’s son. was killed and was 
buried in Riyadh on Sunday. 
They did not know his age. 
They also said Mr. Rajhi’s wife 
and another son were believed 
to have been wounded. 

“We were informed by the 
police that the attackers are Fil- 
ipinos," an official at the Philip- 
pine Embassy in Riyadh said. 

(AFP, Reuiers) 


s swept i 
2, 1990. 


©No one in Washington. Kuwait on Aug. 4 
even General Powell, under- M important figure i jo the 
stood what was clear to military U-S. military was General 


commanderein Ae field: that 

much of Iraq’s crack troops, the adviser to 


Republican Guard, had not 
been destroyed and were, in 
fact escaping across the Eu- 
phrates River. 


Reagan and a career army offi- 
cer, General Powell had a finely 


tuned sense of politics. He had 
served as a young officer in 


• The inability to cut 


Vietnam and was fiercely pro- 
em . _r ,L a ;„cninlinn in 


tective of the institution 


those troops stemmed not only fae ^ t ^ 

from a premature decision to ^ ^ 


end the war but from a funda- 
mental flaw in the battle jplan, 
which assumed that the Iraqis 
would stand and fight Instead, 
they bolted when the Marines 
began their assault to free Ku- 
wait, and the U.S. troops had 
trouble accelerating their attack 
to catch them. 

• As the war drew to a close, 
the clear goal of destroying the 
Republican Guards gave way to 
confusion over political con- 
cerns. After the cease-fire, the 
Saudis were so unhappy with 
the outcome that they proposed 
a secret plan to arm Iraqi Shiite 
insurgents, and one top U.S. 
Army general developed a se- 
cret contingency plan for 
American tanks to roll north to 
Baghdad — a project quickly 
shut down by his appalled supe- 
riors. 

• Wary of long-term com- 
mitments, top military officers 
blocked a proposal by U.S. dip- 
lomats at the end of the war to 
create a de militariz ed zone in 
southern Iraq. After two Iraqi 
Republican Guard divisions 
moved near Kuwait earlier this 
month. Clinton administration 


His watchword was caution. 
General Powell did not want to 


Washington did 
not understand 
what was dear to 
commanders in the 
field: that most of 
Iraq’s crack troops 
had not been 
destroyed. 


Agence France-Prase 

JERUSALEM — Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
was forced to pop out twice 
during Sunday’s cabinet 
meeting to satisfy his ad- 
diction to nicotine, state ra- 
dio reported, as ami-smok- 
ing laws came into force. 

Mr. Rabin, a lifelong 
chain smoker, found all the 
ashtrays bad been removed 
from the cabinet room 
when he arrived. The new 
legislation bans smoking in 
virtually all public places, 
including at work. Restau- 
rants and employers have 
set aside smoking areas. 

Before Stmda/s cabinet 
session. Health Minister 
Ephraim Sneh, a doctor, 
presented Mr. Rabin with 
the legislation to make it 
clear that passive smoking 
was out as far as he was 
concerned, the radio said. 


Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. . orfi . 

Mr. Rabin has also said that JjiAo 12 5 Years After they Were Kicked Out L Ex-Communists Are Thriving 

Israel’s army and security ageo- j ^ o 

cies will take tough new mea- Continued from Page 1 There are even indications that many of late loyal to Mr. Ceausescu fired on 

sures against Hamas, whose burden of history would complicate the the former Communists are doing better crowds of demonstrators in Timisoara and 

armed wing took responsibility transition. In 1990, the U.S. government now than ever before, thanks to their Bucharest, killing more than 100 people, 

for the Tel Aviv bombing. predicted that the creation of free markets knack of exploiting their positions and the For several years after December 1989, 

The retaliatory steps the Is- and democratic governments in once Sovi- cohesiveness that in many ways defines the some measure of justice was sought against 

raelis have in mmd are not be- et-ruled Eastern Europe would take about former Communist camp. the perpetrators of the bloodshed, 

mg spelled out. but officials five years. But five years after the revolu- Henryk Domanski, a Polish sociologist . Bu * b X , ? SI n,0O “ 1 * *fj former Commu- 

have mentioned mass arrests lion began, there is still a lot of work to do. who is studying the influence of the former £* sls baa been released from prison in 

like the ones said to have just On the streets of Eastern Europe, a sense Communist elites, has recently found that Romania. Mr. Tinu gained his treedom in 

been carried out. house demoli- that they are being mocked by history Poland's Communist managers, who gen- December 1991. afte r a court of former 

lions and cutoffs of overseas pervades the chatter of housewives, ped- erally made about 50 percent more than Communists determined there was not 

financing for Hamas. dlers, bustlers and those just straggling to skilled workers before the revolution, now en0u S“ evidence to convict him of first- 

There were reports Sunday 8« by Griping has become a way of hie. enjoy a gap 10 times as wide. 

that Mr. Rabin has ordered Is- P^-V bemuse people are impatient for ^ ^ leavine res , 0 f socieiv IS&d £e 

raeli “hit squads" to kill Hamas change and partly because after 45 years of behind « he said. ” P^P 1 * who dled Y 1 “nusoara, said the 

leaders. Government officials government-enforced silence, everybody .. . . , „ , , , „ man once accused of ordering Secuntate 

JESS, eniovs a good beef Manipulating the old comrade net- agenls l0 open fire on unarmed protesters, 

declined to discuss the reports. J Q J a d - a Timiso ^ work of party bosses ministry bureaucrats was just an ant carrying information." 

, In L th f, U bus , bomb J n S‘ fk* where Rnmanin** iQRQ revnhuion heoan ^ customs offiaals. Mr. Tmu nas phed a kev auestion for Mr. Tinu and other 

death toll has changed several 
times because some bodies were 
ripped to pieces so badly that 
the total number could not at 
first be determined. On Sunday, 
the authorities put the figure at 
23, including the Palestinian 
suicide attacker. 


RACE; Republican Gains Foreseen 


Continued from Page I 

nor’s protestations that he is 
not interested. Others talked 
about as possible nominees in- 
clude Governor William F. 
Weld of Massachusetts, who is 
well ahead in the polls. 

President Bill Clinton’s re- 
election efforts would not be 
doomed ifhis fellow Democrats 
were defeated in electoral-vote 
rich stales. In 1992, he won in 
California even though Mr. 
Wilson was governor, and he 
lost Texas, despite help from 
Governor Richards. 


By gaining control of the gov- 
ernorships in the biggest states. 
Republicans would get an ad- 
vantage in setting a national 
agenda on issues. 

“If Republicans do pick up 
these seats, the most important 
factor will be the sheer number 
of people in the general elector- 
ate who will be introduced to 
reforms that Republican gover- 
nors have proven they can do." 
said Chris Henick, executive di- 


rector of the Republican Gov- 
ernors Association. 

The Democrats knew from 
the start of the campaign season 
that it would be a tough cam- 
paign if for no other reason 
than that they hold 21 seats that 
are up this year, compared with 
13 by the Republicans. There 
are also two races for seats held 
by independents, though in 
Alaska, the independent Wal- 
ter J. Hickel. has switched back 
to the Republican Party. 

As happens with the Con- 
gress. die party that wins the 
White House usually loses 
many gubernatorial seats in the 


Continued from Page 1 

burden of history would complicate the 
transition. In 1990, the U.S. government 
predicted that the creation of free markets 
and democratic governments in once Sovi- 
et-ruled Eastern Europe would take about 
five years. But five years after the revolu- 
tion began, there is still a lot of work to do. 

On the streets of Eastern Europe, a sense 
that they are being mocked by history 
pervades the chatter of housewives, ped- 
dlers, bustlers and those just straggling to 
get by. Griping has become a way of life, 
partly because people are impatient for 
change and partly because after 45 years of 
government-enforced silence, everybody 
enjoys a good beef. 

On a recent market day in Timisoara, 
where Romania's 1989 revolution began, 
Emilia Radulescu. a 48-year-old engineer, 
summed up the contradictory feelings of 
many. “It’s not worse now ” she said. “But 
it was better then." 

Mr. Turn, a party member since the mid- 
1960s, rose quickly through the ranks of 
Romania's infamous Secuntate secret po- 
lice. By age 34, he was a major, and be soon 
jumped to deputy security chief for Timis 
County, the richest in Romania, where he 
supervised “counterintelligence activities 
and disinformation.’’ 

By late 1989, Mr. Tinu had taken per- 
sonal responsibility for directing surveil- 
lance on Laszlo Tokes, an ethnioHupgar- 
ian pastor and crusader for human rights. 
It was Mr. Tokes's refusal to leave his 
parish house in Timisoara, the county seat, 
that touched off Romania’s revolution on 
Dec. 15, 1989, when hundreds of Roma- 
nians clashed with police and Secuntate 
agents trying to dislodge him. 

“I never met the man, but I listened to 
the wiretaps on his house,” Mr. Tinu said 
in a cynical acknowledgment of his eaves- 
dropping operation. “He seemed tike an 
educated fellow. He played Bach. I liked 
his music very much.” 

Mr. Tinu’s story reflects one of the iro- 


Poiand's Communist 
managers, who generally 
made about 50 percent 
more than skilled workers 
before the revolution, now 
enjoy a gap 10 times as wide. 


rate loyal to Mr. Ceausescu fired on 
crowds of demonstrators in Timisoara and 
Bucharest, killing more than 100 people. 
For several years after December 1989, 
some measure of justice was sought against 
the perpetrators of the bloodshed. 

But by last month, all former Commu- 
nists had been released from prison in 
Romania. Mr. Tinu gained his freedom in 
December 1991. after a court of former 
Communists determined there was not 
enough evidence to convict him of first- 
degree murder. 

“I didn’t have anything to do with the 
people who died in Timisoara,” said the 
man once accused of ordering Secuntate 
agents to open fire on unarmed protesters. 
“I was just an ant carrying information." 

A key question for Mr. Tinu and other 
former Communists is: Would they wel- 
come the return of the old days, when men 


like them kepi society under their boots not allow the invasion to stand. 


s irate©', he gave them the over- 
whelming forces they requested 
and he allowed them to decide 
when the war would stop. From 
start to finish, it would be the 


many gubernatorial seats in the mes of 1989, that those in the security 
subsequent midterm election., services and the Communist Party who 
The last two times the Republi- were supposed to be swept from power 
can Party lost the presidency, were actually the best prepared to lake 
Republicans picked up six seats advantage of the changes. Across Eastern 
in 1978 and eight seats in 1966. Europe, men and women tike Mr. Tinu 
The Northeast, which for have capitalized on the move to capitalism, 
years has been dominated by In Warsaw, casual observers note with 
Democrats, is unusually com- irony that the stock exchange is in the old 
pelitive for this vear. Republi- headquarters of the Polish Communist 
cans are locked in tight races Party. But many of the major investors are 
and could pick up seats in New former Communists, a testimony to their 
York. Connecticut. Rhode Is- seamless move from dominating political 
land and Pennsylvania. power to substantial wealth. 


his trade in soft drinks, cigarettes and 
gasoline. For him, the successes of the new 
system are indisputable. He and his wife 
have summered in France the last two 
years; he drives a new Mercedes-Benz, and 
she uses a shiny Audi sports car. 

“The people who praise themselves for 
not bong Communist Party members were 
mostly those who didn’t get high enough 
grades in school to qualify," he said. “We 
were the elite then. It’s natural we should 
be the elite now.” 

In contrast to Poland. Hungary or the 
Czech Republic, the old elite never left 
power in Romania. 


through Stalinist methods? Mr. Tmu says Whether they wanted to or 
“no.” . not, the generals were going to 

“Things are too good for me now," he war. But the president would 
said, fingering a glass of mellow Romanian allow the lop generals to set 
red. strategy, he gave them the over- 

Mr. Tinu’s office sits on Timisoara's whelming forces they requested 
Opera Square, where thousands massed and he allowed them to decide 
five years ago, sparking the nationwide when the war would stop. From 
revolt. “It’s better for me now,” he said. “I start to finish, it would be the 
worked the same way before, but I was tied generals* war to win or lose, 
up by obsolete rules. Now I am free.” m, m 
The career of Colonel Wojt, following JHe rlflllS 
his family tradition, has ridden a roller The goals Mr. Cheney was 
coaster of recent history. seeking were made clear when 

In 1974. he joined the Polish People’s General Schwarzkopf met with 
Army, hoping to become a fighter pilot in his lop military commanders in 
the forces of the Warsaw Pact. When a November 1990. He reminded 
health problem grounded h i m , he became them that the administration's 


The Plans 


The goals Mr. Cheney was 
seeking were made clear when 
General Schwarzkopf met with 
his lop military commanders in 
November 1990. He reminded 
them that the administration's 


a sapper, a specialist in bunkers, explosives objective was not just to defeat 


The country’s longtime Communist dic- 
tator, NicoJae Ceausescu, was ousted and 
executed in December 1989 by a faction of 
the Communist Party. That group, led by 
Ion Iliescu, then consolidated its hold on 
power, formed a new political party and 
won subsequent national elections against 
a weak, divided and occasionally persecut- 
ed opposition. Mr. Iliescu is now presi- 
dent. 


and roads. the Iraqis or chase them out of 

As a second lieutenant in 1981, Colonel Kuwait. The Republican 
Wqjt commanded a platoon of soldiers Guard, the most capable and 
guarding fuel depots and a pipeline run- loyal unit in the Iraqi Army, 
ning from the Soviet Union to East Ger- was to be destroyed, an explicit 
many as part of the martial-law crackdown mission the Central Command 
on Solidarity, Eastern Europe's first inde- later put in writing, 
pendent labor union. He still supports the One chief goal of the allied 
cl amp down, believing it saved Poland attacks was also to eliminate 
from an invasion by its Warsaw Pact allies. Iraq's capacity to threaten its 
Then, last month. Colonel Wojt, now in neighbors. American officials 
the independent Polish Army, was ap- also believed that without the 
pointed chief of staff of the 13-nation Republican Guard. President 
international battalion for Operation Co- Saddam’s chances of holding 
operative Bridge, the first joint exercise power would diminish, 
between East European and NATO coun- Over months of wrangling, a 


Over months of wrangling, a 


tries, held on Polish soil as part of the U.S.- war plan took shape, with each 


Romania’s revolution was the most vio- 
lent in the region; members of the Securi- 


led Partnership for Peace. 

Asked if he was amazed by the changes. 
Colonel Wojt smiled: “We're used to this," 
he said. “We’re Poles." 


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Continued from Page 1 
the absence of additional mone- 
tary restraint. 

1 “ Indeed, investors may re- 

, duce existing holdings in the 
United States. The result would 
be a crisis of confidence, with a 
further depreciation of the dol- 
lar leading to a jump in bond 
yields and in response, to a 
plunge in equity values." 

Analysts are agreed that the 
Fed has waited too long to in- 
crease rates another half-per- 
| centage point, or 50 basis points 
— a move that is widely antici- 
pated in the bond market. 

This week, the major eco- 
nomic report will be prelimi- 
I nary third-quarter gross domes- 
tic product, to be released 
Friday. 

The consensus is that third- 


vember to increase rates and 
then only moves by 50 basis 


sendee in the U.S. military com- 
peting for an important role. 
The air force wanted to win the 
war carrying out precision air 
strikes in downtown Baghdad 
and pounding Iraqi ground 
troops. 

The army hoped to deliver 
the knockout blow with a “left 
hook,” an ambitious plan in 
which two army corps — the 


P 0 ^ XVIII Abborae Corps and the 


under severe pressure,” said 
Brendan Brown, an analyst at 


VII Corps — would sweep 
across western Iraq and slam 


Mitsubishi Finance Interna- j^efiSkoftbe 


tional in London. 


Guard forces dug in just across 


He would prefer to see the Kuwaiti border in southern 
Fed move before the Nov. 8 


congressional election. Conven- ^ Marines, insisting on 
uonal wisdom has the Fed on having ^eir own attack, drew 
hold untfl after that dare. Mr. yp plans for a lightning assault 
Brown added that another 25 to liberate Kuwait. 


General Schwarzkopf became 
furious as he realizedwbat was 
happening. He demanded that 
the VII Corps s commander 
pick up the pace and crush the 
Iraqis before they got away. • 
The annv’s plan could not ; 
easily be speeded up, but by 
Feb 27 the attacking divisions 
had finally built up significant 




momentum. , . . 

The XVIll Corp s field com- 
mandos had wound up thttr 
troops and were ready to spnng 
forward. Major General Bany 
McCaffrey bad taken the -4th 
Mechanized Infantry Division 
deep into the Euphrates River 
He nianned to cut oft the 


* ^ 

y! IM" 1 ^ 

' . Not <>0 

1- 




valley. He planned to cut off the 
Iraqi retreat by driving east to 
the canal on the outskirts of 
Basra, a city in southern Iraq. 

Meanwhile. Major General 
Binford Peay of the 101st Air- 
borne Division penetrated deep 
into western Iraq and was head- 
ing cast. He planned to use his 
helicopters to deploy a brigade 
of U.S. troops north of Basra to 
trap any Iraqis that escaped 
General McCaffrey’s grasp. 

To the south, the VII Corps 
was fi n ally gathering momen- 
tum. All they needed was an 
order. And one more day. 


get into the war in the first 
place, and once the war came he 
wanted to win quickly and get 
the troops home. 

Wien the Iraqis invaded. De- 
fense Secretary Dick Cheney 
met with General Powell and 
other senior Pentagon officials 
to discuss how the United 
States should react 

“We need an objective," Mr. 
Cheney said, according to notes 
taken by an aide. He wondered 
whether the American people 
would support military action 
to put the emir of Kuwait back 
on his throne. 

But General Powell argued 
that the West had little choice 
but to accept Saddam Hussein’s 
invasion and should concen- 
trate on defending Saudi Ara- 
bia. "The next few days, Iraq 
will withdraw " he said, accord- 
ing to the notes. "But Saddam 
Hussein will put his puppet in. 
Everyone in the Arab world will 
be happy.” 

He continued; “I don't see 
the senior leadership taking us 
into armed conflict for the 
events of the last 24 hours. The 
American people do not want 
their young dying for SI .50-gal- 
lon <»L" 

Mr. Bush, however, saw it 
differently. Stiffened by a meet- 
ing with Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher of Britain, Mr. 
Bush declared that he would 


Hie Politics 

In Washington, the stunning 
success of the allied forces was 
becoming a potential political 


problem. News reports told of 
U.S. pilots' bombing Iraqi 
troops retreating from Kuwait 

^he U.S. military later deter- 
mined that a couple of hundred 
Iraqis had been killed on the 
“highway of death,” as the road 
north had been named by jour- 
nalists, but the administration 
feared that it would be seen as 
slaughter. 

On the afternoon of Feb. 27, 
Mr. Bush met with his senior 
national security aides in the 
Oval Office. He and General 
Powell were concerned not only 
about achieving their military 
goals but also about how the 
war was being portrayed by the 
news media. 

Mr. Bush suggested that he 


give a speech to punctuate the 
end of the war. The basic deci- 


end of the war. The basic deci- 
sion was set. 

At 9 P.M. in Riyadh, General 
Schwarzkopf strode to the lec- 
tern at the Hyatt Regency Hotel 
and announced that the Iraqi 
Army had all but been de- 
stroyed. . 

“The gate is closed,” he de- 
clared. 

An hour and a half later, he 
was on the phone with General 
Powell, who called to say that 
the White House was consider- 
ing imposing a cease-fire as ear- 
ly as 5 A.M. Gulf time. Things 
were getting difficult back in 
Washington, General Powell 
explained, alluding to the re- 
peats about the “highway of 
death.” 

The White House planned to 
have Mr. Bush tell the Iraqis in 
his war-ending address that 
they should get off their equip- 
ment and walk. That way the 
Iraqis could not salvage many 
of their tanks. 

But because of the difficulty 
getting word to the Iraqis in the 
field to abandon their equip- 
ment, that demand was 
dropped from the speech. 

Despite General Schwarz- 
kopfs confident statements at 
the briefing, reconnaissance 
missions were showing that 
substantial numbers of Iraqis 
were continuing to escape. 

General Schwarzkopf told 
General Powell that if a cease- 
fire were announced, the White . <$. 
House would see Republican 
Guard T-72 tanks escaping 
north. Nevertheless, Mr. Bush 
and his aides agreed to end the 
ground war at 100 hours, mean- 
ing the cease-fire would begin 
in the gulf at 8 A.M. local time. . 

Lieutenant General Cal Wal- 
ler, the deputy head of the Cen- 
tral Command, became irate. 

“Why a cease-fire now?” • 
General Waller recalled asking 
his superior. 

“One hundred hours has a 
nice ring,” General Schwarz- 
kopf replied. 

General Waller uttered an 
epithet. 

“Then you go argue with 
them," General Schwarzkopf 
said. 




wV. .J*"' 

THE T*li 




***!««»*:* I 


-■W-'ijj c- 


basis point increase at the Fed’s General Schwarzkopf, the 


Nov. 15 meeting “would proba- commander responsible for 
bly be enough to stop” the dol- meshing the parts of the plan. 


iar’s rout. 


said in an interview that he nev- 


“If we see nothing, then we’U er expected the Marine attack 


have a full-blown dollar crisis,” 
he said. 

But Mr. MacKinnon of Citi- 


to move as quickly as it did. 

But in the first hours of the 
land offensive, it became clear 


bank said that talk of a crisis that much of the Iraqi Army 
was overdone. “It can only be a lacked the will to fight and had 


The Post-Mortem 

To General McCaffrey, of 
the 24th Mechanized Division, 
the news that a cease-fire was 
about to be called came at the ■ 
worst possible moment. 

Neither General McCaffrey 
nor his key commanders 
thought that the entire Republi- 4 
can Guard has been destroyed, 
nor did they believe that driving 
to the outskirts of Basra and 
cutting off the Iraqis' two major 
escape routes posed a high risk 
of U.S. casualties or would lead 
to the slaughter of Iraqis. 

This year, Mr. Bush defended 
bis decision to end the war at 
100 hours. 


Cu **KlltC 


quarter growth has slowed from 
the second quarter’s annual rate 


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the second quarter's annual rate 
of 4.1 percent. Some analysts 
say it will have slowed to a near 
2 percent annual rale, while 
others predict a number closer 
to 3 percent. 

As for the fourth quarter, an- 
alysts think growth has acceler- 
ated to “probable boom condi- 
tions,” with J. P. Morgan 
analysts predicting a 4.5 per- 
cent annual rate. 

“If the Fed waits until its 


crisis if the dollar's decline im- 
pinge negatively on the U.S. 
economy, the German econo- 
my. or tile world economy.” 


been seriously weakened by the 
allies' bombing attacks. 

The success of the Marines 
was a relief for the top com- 


_ In written responses to ques- 1 r -l" 
tions. he said: “If we continued - 
lighting another day, until the * 

ring was completely closed,* ’* ^ 

would we be accused of a W v - 

slaughter of Iraqis who were v SH rVfci . 

*55$. to not N N ***** 

fight. In addition, the coalition 

agreed cn driving the Iraqis 3 ' t'*- 

r° m Kuwait, not on carrying K * J** 

the conflict into Iraq or de- 4 *b 
stroymg Iraqi forces. ^ ^ 

, 77le writers of this article V* 

book, "The. C ; 

2?* be published ^ 

Brom & Comp ^ 01 Ks tl, 


That is not the situation, he manders, who feared that they 
added. “The Bundesbank is would take serious casualties. 


quite happy with the dollar at But it also posed a problem, 
these levels; exporters can live Instead of distracting the Iraqis 
with a strong mark. The White while the army readied its “left 




House has no problem with dol- 
lar slippage, as it buoys exports. 
It would only be a crisis if it 


hook,” the Marines acted as a 
bartering ram, driving the Ira- 
qis into retreat while the army 


triggers some sort of sea -change units to the west were just get- 
in interest rate policies, which ting under way. 


would be bad news for the ma- 


next scheduled meeting in No- jor economies.” 


In the war room at the Saudi 
Ministry of Defense in Riyadh, 











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THE TRIB INDEX 


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International Herald Tribune 124 
Wbrid Sfodf Index, composed 
of 280 internationally investabie 122 
sfodcs from 25 countries, 
compBedby Bloomberg 120 
Business News. 

118 

Weekending October 21, 
daily closings. 

Jan. 1992 = 100. 11b 

AstolPscWc BSHj 


World Index 


F M T W T F 



Europe 

i 

i 





129 Sfess 116 

I.- F M T W T F 

;.;V ^ 104 North America Cg gl 145 


H • 


F M T W 4-1- T F 

Latin America A ftEd 

- ’V"' 


98 — « ■ 139 


96 F M T W T F 


r ms-Lt:S :: v *^1 


F M T W T F 




Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 

1W2UM tSIUK % 1KHM 1WV94 % 

ctot do— changa rtopp dOAA an*nga 

Energy 114.06 115.70 -1.42 Capital Goods 117.35119.12 -1.49 

UtffltfeB 12652 129.47 -228 Raw Materials 13635 137.57 ~aK 

Finance 117.02 117.18 -qi4 Consumer Goods 104J0 10628 -1.39 

Services 11857 12036 -156 Miscellane ous 124.40 125.15 -0.60 

7 T» Mm imeks US. do Sar wfcas of stocks* TokyjMi* Lan^ and 

Artian tin a. Australia. Austria. Belgium, Brazil. Canada, Chita, Danmark, 
S F^tonrany. HongKong, «aly. .Uaaico, K-Uwtands. N» 
aMhod Norway, Sbtgapora, Spaki, Swadon. Swltzariand and Vonacniala. For 
Tokyo, Now Yak end London, the index a c omp ose d of V» 20 top mm> m Dwms 
or marker cspU^aulon, odmrwiae tf» len lop stocks are tracked 

O International Hamid Tribune 


CURRENCY RATES 


Cross Rates 


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International Herald Tribune, Monday, October 24, 1994 


Page 9' 


By Carl Gewirtz 

P ARIS — Hie international bond market is in a waiting 
mode. Wait ing f or an increase in VS. interest rates from the 
Federal Reserve Board, winch is waiting until after the Nov. 
8 congressional election. And the waiting, which is feeding 
fears of renewed seUoffs, keeps prices under pressure. 
Prices in all major markets except Japan fell last week, and the 
outlook is for more of the same as European markets remain 
incapable of decoupling from the bearish impulses emanating from 
New York. 

Issuers looking to raise money in this enviro nme nt have only 
two choices, bankers report: — i — 

KSa Z The outlook is lor 
^^^kre^avafl- farther price declines 

i able because Japanese investors in most markets. 

are awash in cash and unwilling 

to buy foreign assets until there 

is evidence that the yen has ceased appreciating. With recovery just 
getting under way in Japan and the currency strong, there is no tear 
of any imminent upward pressure on Jong-term interest rates. 

The World Bank is expotted to tap into this favorable environ- 
ment with a global issue of up to 200 billion, yen. The issue will be 
the bank’s fifth yen global bond, most likely *a 10-year maturity. 

Elsewhere^ investors are looking for floaters — in general because 
they provide the best protection against rising interest rates and in 
Germany because the demand for money-market instruments re- 
mains high after the summer’s imi»gm?t im of money market funds. 

More than SI billion in pure Eurobond floaters were sold last 
week, including $500 million from BankAmerica, with a coupon at 
18.75 basis points over the three-month interbank rate and $250 
millio n each from the National Bank of Canada and Ford with 
interest set at 20 basis points over the ben chmar k. All three bad a 
maturity of five years. 

The Federal Home Loan Board, a triple- A rated federally spon- 
sored institution, sold $200 millio n of one-year notes, with interest 
set at 20 basis points below the three-month interbank rate. Offi- 
cials at IP. Morgan, the sole manager, said the paper was placed 
p rimari ly with non-Japanese investors in Aria who are “keen to 
diversify” into such a rare international issuer. 

The Federal Home Loan Board set up a 55 billion global 
medium-term note program earlier this year. Under the aegis of 
Salomon Brothers, it also sold $400 millio n of two-year notes 
carrying a coupon of 6.875 percent and offered at a slight discount 
to yield five basis points more than comparably dated U.S. govern- 
ment paper. A Salomon Brothers official estimated the borrower 
saved “five to eight basis points” compared with what it would 
expect to pay to raise money in the U.S. market. 

Sold under difficult market conditions, with the Treasury market 
declining, the Federal Home Loan Board paper was quoted late 
Friday at a spread of 16 basis points. The major takers were also 

% See BONDS, Page 11 


nfir TL a’s Lukoil Thrives on Reform China Reports 

Over Aide s v * £\£\i t • 

Memo to Russian Firm Takes On West’s Giants 49 /C Increase U1 

By Richard W. Stevenson associations, Lukoil has established itself as ■ l • "| 

| Hvifrkvi tow York rimes Semce one of the country’s most promising corpora- I hit I 0’%7'fi 

uUllUIll MOSCOW — For years, a group of West- tions and one of the most appealing targets in M. VrX * J u %m U * IX l/ld J KJ 

era cal companies negotiated with Azcrbai- Russia for foreign investors. O w 


By Ann Devroy 

Weahingtoft Post Serrtce 

WASHINGTON — Budget 
Director Alice M. Rivlin has 
outlined for President Bill Clin- 
ton a broad range of options, 
including tax increases and cuts 
in popular programs such as 
Medicare and Social Security 
that she said Mr. Clinton will 
have to choose among as he 
plots his fiscal — and political 
— course the next two years. 

Republicans, smar ting over 
Democratic criticism that their 
proposals for reducing the bud- 
get deficit would lead to cuts in 
Social Security and Medicare, 
are hoping to make political 
waves with the document. 

The package of choices Mrs. 
Rivlin presented to Mr. Clinton 
includes six paths, three of 
which keep the deficit on a 
downward track by such de- 
vices as capping Social Security 
for wealthier recipients, limit- 
ing mortgage interest deduc- 
tions or state and local tax de- 
ductions. All are politically 
explosive and diffi cult choices. 

White House officials called 
the memo a listing “of what’s 
out there in the fiscal litera- 
ture,” that is unrelated to pro- 
posals Mr. Clinton might make. 

But by outlining entitlement 
cuts and tax increases as possi- 
bilities, Mrs. Rivlin's memo, is- 
sued Oct 3, provides Republi- 
cans fuel for charges tha t the 
White House is being hypocriti- 
cal in attacking Republicans for 
signing a “Contract with Amer- 
ica” to. among other things, 
balance the budget. 

The memo was leaked Friday 
to Republicans. William Kris- 
ta!, a Republican strategist. 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

tow York Times Serrtce 

MOSCOW — For years, a group of West- 
ern oil companies negotiated with Azerbai- 
jan, seeking a deal to develop some of the 
former Soviet republic’s vast oil reserves. 

Then, early this year, the Azerbaijanis 
stunned the consortium with the news that a 
new company would be joining them at the 
table: LukoO, Russia’s biggest oil producer. 

Azerbaijan’s decision to grant a 10 percent 
stake in the project to Lukoil was motivated 
in part by the tangled political ties between 


f As long as we can get the 
financing, we will be able to 
produce as much oil as the 
market allows.’ 

Leonid A. Fedun, Lukoil executive 

Russia and the other former Soviet republics 
and by Moscow’s insistence that it share in 
the oil wealth around the Caspian Sea. 

But the deal also suggested how powerful 
Lukoil has become in the oil industry. Not 
only is Lukoil a beneficiary of Russian for- 
eign policy, it has also been one of the most 
aggressive Russian enterprises in any industry 
in transforming itself into a market-oriented 
company. 

For now, Lukoil plans to concentrate on 
solidifying its position as the dominant oil 
company within Russia. But there is no doubt 
that its ambitions extend beyond Russia. 

“We’re trying to become an international 
oil company,” said Leonid A. Fedun, a Lukoil 
vice presidenL “We don’t hide it.” 

Formed four years ago out of three of the 
Soviet Union’s largest regional oil producing 


associations. Lukoil has established itself as 
one of the country’s most promising corpora- 
tions and one of the most appealing targets in 
Russia for foreign investors. 

CS First Boston, an investment firm, al- 
ready holds a 2B7 percent stake bought 
through the initial stage of Russia’s privatiza- 
tion program. In addition to selling 20 per- 
cent of its shares domestically this year, Lu- 
koil plans to sell 15 percent of its shares 
abroad next year. The Russian government 
will hold on to a 45 percent stake in the 
company for at least three more years 

Lukoil's ofl and gas output accounts for 1 5 
percent of the Russian total and. at about a 
million barrels a day, is slightly less than that 
of Texaco, the third-largest U.S. producer. 

Its reserves, which are estimated at more 
than 15 billion barrels, put it within range of 
the Royal Dutch/ Shell Group, whose re- 
serves of 1 7.7 billion barrels are the largest 
outside the state-owned nationalproducers in 
the Middle East, China and Latin America. 

LukoQ is still adding to its reserves by 
searching out new fields in Russia and, as the 
deal in Azerbaijan showed, throughout the 
former Soviet Union. It is cooperating with 
Agip, the Italian ofl company, in joint ven- 
tures in Egypt and T unisia, and has been 
negotiating with Iraq about joint deals in that 
country. 

At the same time, it is adding refining 
capacity to turn the crude oil it produces into 
gasoline, heating fuel and other finished 
products. 

Lukoil has started building Western-style 
gasoline stations in Russia, a nation where 
man y drivers buy fuel from tank er trucks 
parked at the ride of the road. 

“The only problems we have are technical 
and financial,” Mr. Fedun said. “As long as 
we can get the financing, we will be able to 
produce as much oil as the market allows.” 


Compiled bp Our siatf From Dupoieha Bui the latest figures indicate ■ 
BEIJING — Foreign inves- a slight easing in the pace of 
tors continued to pour into Chi- investment. In September, for- 
na in the first nine months of rign firms pumped $2.2 billion ' 
the year, totaling $22.72 billion of new money into China, down . 
for a rise of 49 percent over the from an average of 5236 billion 
same period last year, the offi- over the previous eight months. , 
dal China Daily reported on Mr. t.i said 50 multinational ' 


dal Chi] 
Sunday. 


Mr. Li said 50 multinational ’ 
corporations had gotten ap- 


“The increase was primarily proval to set up holding compa- 
led by the establishment of nies since the 1980s, half of 


more capital- and technology- 
intensive projects from the 
world’s transnational corpora- 


iheru in the past two years. 

These holding companies are ' 
seen as a major conduit of new 


tions.” Li Xinming, an official investment in the future. For ; 
with the Ministry of Foreign instance, the German electron- 


Trade and Economic Coopera- 
tion, told the paper. 

The larger size of projects 


ics iant Siemens AG announced 
on Friday that it planned to 
invest $1 billion in China by the 


helped offset a decline in the lum 0 f ^ century. 


number of new ventures being 
set up, which fell 46 percent 
from the same period a year 
ago. 

A separate category indicat- 
ing future investment also de- 
creased, with promised foreign 
investment down 32 percent at 
$57 billion. 


The government will soon in- 
troduce a new law regulating 
the establishment of holding 
companies. 

One area where Beijing wants 
more foreign investment is in 
ailing state-owned enterprise 
sector. Companies will be of- 
fered “certain stakes" to help 


• w!iiJ*r attribl, t ed f e «wSi C rcvto Chinese pauiners, MnLi 
in both figures to the govern- ^ j 


* maaoecoDomc pobey M SBUe enterprises have 
since July 1993, desrped to re- ;drcady J Mt up joiM ventures or 
dua property specuTauon. jomt-sioek companies with for- 
China is on course to top last n ,„. r 


Holzmann Balks at Merger 


year’s foreign investment intake 
of $26 billion, second only in 
size to the $32 billion that 
flowed into the United Slates. 

But higher foreign invest- 
ment might not be all good 
news for Beijing. 


rign partners, the paper said. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 

■ Singapore Air Soan 
Singapore Airlines Ltd., the 
world's fifth-largest carrier, 
said Sunday it had posted an 18 


Ma Guonan, chief China percent jump in half-year profit 
economist with Hong Kong- and predicted an end to a global 


balance the budget. By Brandon Mltchener “The fragmented nature of 

The memo was leaked Friday international Herald Tnbune the German construction mar- 
to Republicans. William Kris- FRANKFURT — Genoa- ket will return to haunt us if we 
tol, a Republican strategist, n/s largest construction group, don’t strive toward a true indus- 
said it was obtained from “a Philipp Holzmann AG, no trial structure,” Hans-Peter 
public-spirited senior adminis- longer finds much pleasure in Keitel, the Hochtief chairman, 
tration official” and reflected the view from its Frankfurt said recently. He described his 
the “craven hypocrisy” of the headquarters. move as a preemptive strike to 

White House charges that Re- For the last few years, con- keep Holzmann out of French 


based investment bank Pere- 
. _ . grine Investment Holdings, said 

over, a rare event m Germany’s ^ big inflow was unexpected, ported from Singapore, 
clannish web of drfensive cor- “Th c leaders were caught off- “Wecansavvrithmorec 

porate and financial cross-own- gu*^" hc said. “They had been dence than before that th 

_ . expecting an increase of 20 per- dustry is past the worst,” 
But while some analysts have ft ^ bul ^ve Cheohg (Soon Kong, the 

welcomed HochtieFs move as a about 50 percent more." line’s managing director, 

healthy one that could eyentu- ^ Ma foreign investors The airline said its afte 
“P . of b elp fuel inflation, which is now profit in the six months to : 

each, it has initially put Holz- r unnin g at ^ annual rate of 30 was 460.5 million Singa 
? M ^ , ^iS! d ? < ^f 1V [ emaCOSl ‘ 27.5 percent in China’s 35 big- dollars ($312.6 million). : 
jy, distracting battle to preserve gest ^es. by creating extra de- rose 7 percent, to 3.25 bi 
its independence. mand in the economy. Singapore dollars. 

Hochtief has charged Holz- 

mann with performing so poor- m -> m -y^ 

Tokyo Plans Farm Supports 

while Holzmann accused Hoc h- The Associated Press n-nmmi tn tm>n nrirM hioh 


recession in the airline industry, 
Bloomberg Business News re- 
ported from Singapore. 

“We can say with more confi- 
dence than before that the in- 


expecting an increase of 20 per- dustry is past the worst,” said 
cent to 30 percent, but they’ve Cheong Choon Kong, the air- 


tration official” and reflected the view from its Frankfurt said recently. He described his 
the “craven hypocrisy” of the headquarters. move as a preemptive strike to 

White House charges that Re- For the last few years, con- keep Holzmann out of French 
publicans would slash Social tract after lucrative contract for or Japanese hands. 

Security and Medicare. the city’s most prestigious new “I’m convinced neither we 

Mrs: Rivlin, in an interview, skyscrapers have gone to its ri- nor Philipp Holzmann could 
said the memo, part of early val from Essen, Hochtief AG, still earn money in 10 years with 
budget planning, was prepared the country’s third-largest the structures we have today,” 
amply “to bring the president builder. he said, 

up to speed cm the debate” and In addition, Hochtief, which Indeed, an alliance of the two 
the options “are not necessarily bought 20 percent of Holzmann companies would catapult 
can options.” in 1981, recently announced its Holzmann-Hochtief into the 

The White House chief of intention to increase its stake to league of the top 10 builders in 
staff, Leon E. Panetta, added 30 percent or higher, effectively the world, 
his voice to the White House forcing Holzmann to agree to Hochtief declines to describe 
denials over the weekend work in tandem. its maneuver as a hostile take- 


cent to 30 percent, but they’ve 
about 50 percent more” 

Mr. Ma said foreign investors 


Cheong Choon Kong, the air- 
line’s managing director. 

The airline said its after-tax 


up to speed on the debate” and 
the options “are not necessarily 
our options.” 


I’m convinced neither we 


he said. 

Indeed, an alliance of the two 
companies would catapult 
Holzmann-Hochtief into the 


help fuel inflation, which is now profit in the six months to Sept, 
running at an annual rate of 30 was 460.5 million Singapore 


27.5 percent in China’s 35 big- 
gest cities, by creating extra de- 
mand in die economy. 


dollars ($312.6 million). Sales 
rose 7 percent, to 3.25 billion 
Singapore dollars. 


d enials over the weekend 


Tokyo Notebook 


Hochtief declines to describe 
its maneuver as a hostile take- 


Smoke Clouds Bottom Line 


agement was long overdue, 
while Holzmann accused Hoch- 
tief of a suicidal embrace that 
could end badly for both com- 
panies. 

“One plus one is less than 
two,” said Lothar Mayer, chair- 
man of Holzmann. 

If only (me of the two compa- 
nies is invited into the final bid- 
ding for major projects because 
neither is considered a truly in- 


The Associated press eminent to keep prices high and. 

TOKYO — Japan plans to competition out. 
spend more than 12 trillion yen But as part of the Uruguay^ 
($75 billion) to help its politi- Round trade accord, Japan" 


cally powerful farmers cope agreed to slightly relax its ban 
when their long-protected home on rice imports, which has kept 
market partially opens to less domestic retail prices at about’. 


expensive imports next year. 

Two six-year spending pack- 
ages agreed to by the govern- 
ment over the weekend are de- 


dependent competitor, “the signed to help Japanese 
business of each will suffer,” he agribusiness adjust to a major 


No smoking on Jong-hanl flights to Hong 
Kong, Taiwan and other heavy-smoking 
Asian destinations have become popular. But 
what about to Japan, where 60 percent of men 
smoke and no-smoking zones in restaurants 
remain a rarity? 

The preHimnaiy answers from Canadian 
Airlines International, which last month be- 
came the first international airline to make all 
its flights to Japan smoke-free, are clear; Let 
them light up, or risk losing business. 

“It’s not doing our competitive position a 
helluva lot of good,” said Tony Buddey, gen- 
eral manager for Japan and Korea. 

Passengers in business class, who pay about 
double the fare of group passengers in econo- 
my, decreased 32 percent in September com- 
pared with the year before, even as overall 
traffic rose by double digits during the 
month, he said. 

The decision to make its flights to Japan 
smoke-free goes bade to 1990, when the Ca- 
nadian Parliament passed a law regulating 
smoking in the workplace and on commercial 
aircraft. The airlines were given three years to 
phase out the total number of smoking seats 
by at least 25 pocoit each year. 

Since domestic flights in' Canada, as well as 
those to the United States, were already 
smoke-free, the reduction affected only inter- 
national flights. 

Canadian Airlines began by banning smok- 
ing on flights to Australia. It followed with 
South America and Europe in 1992. Reluc- 
tantly, it turned to Asia, banning smoking on 
Sights to Hong Kong and Taiwan. To its 
pleasant surprise, Cathay Pacific in Hong and 
Mandarin Airlines in Taiwan followed suit 

In 1993, the airline lobbied and won a 
year’s extension on banning smoking on its 19 
weekly flights to Japan. But last June, Parlia- 
ment told” them to snuff out all smoke by 
September. That left Japan. 

Mr. Buddey, a smoker, said only similar 
legislation by the United States would dear 
the competitive air across the Pacific. 


f For Now, It’s a Ringing Success 


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(Tomato); tMF (SDR)- «rwr data from Reuters ondAP. 


At the beginning of the year, Keith Durrani Japans foreign reserves, of course, have 
had gigrwi up 200 customers for a callback jumped as a result of the intervention, rising 
service offering international telephone calls to $117.54 billion at the end of September, a 
at less than half the rates charged by Japan’s record for any country. The reserves, in fact, 
major carriers. Now he has nearly 5,000 sub- jumped about $50 billion in just the past two 
scribers and expects as many as 8,000 by the ycafis economists say. owing largely to mar- 
end of the year. ket interventions. 

Mr. Durrani is not alone; Marketers of But in yen terms, the value of these reserves 
other callback services, as well as direct-dial have been diminishing Overall, Mr. Koo esu- 
discount systems, report that business is mates total government, commercial and pn- 
booming as ward spreads erf the savings to be ya*e Japanese evaluation losses on foreign 

had bypassing Japan’s traditional carriers. investment, mcludmg securities and property. 
The totalnumbcr of subscribers to callback at about $350 billion since the Plaza Accord, 

services in Japan is unknown. It appears to be R e TPVPT1 n_.ii 

at least 10,00Mmt could be higher. by Meven 


“Business is growing exponentially,” said 
Mr. Durrant, whose service is MTC Passport. 
“Each customer tells one friend and it grows.” 

Mr. Durrant, whose monthly revenues are 
now just over $200,000, predicts sales will 
quadruple by next June. 

With callback systems, users typically dial 
a computer in the United States, hang up 
after it rings once and then wait a few seconds 
for a computer to call back and provide a dial 
tone. They then can call virtually anywhere in 
the world at discount rates. 

The systems, however, can be cumbersome 
to use, when, for example, faxing from a 
computer. There are also lingering doubts 
about their eventual legal status. 

Japan’s main international phone compa- 
ny, Kokusai Denshin Denwa, petitioned the 
government last January to act against the 
services. It charged that the systems unfairly 
exploit international telephone regulations 
that make a practice of not charging for 
uncompleted calls while at the same time 
tying up circuits. 

These concerns have kept the customer 
base in Japan concentrated in the foreign 
community. But Japanese now comprise 
about a thud of all subscribers, a ratio that is 
steadily rising There are also a growing num- 
ber of major corporations and embassies in 
Tokyo experimenting with the systems. 

Hie $100 Billion Understanding 

If otter governments had lost $100 billion 
in currency trading it would raise a ruckus. 
But few in Japan seem to mind, or even to 
have noticed, that the Finance Ministry has 
suffered as much as $100 billion in foreign 
exchange losses since the Plaza Accord of 
1985 sent the yen spiraling higher. 

“In other countries, if the government was 
losing its shirt left and right people would be 
very upset,” said Richard Koo, senior econo- 
mist at die Nomura Research Institute. “Here 
nothing happens, even though they’ve spent 
billions of dollars on foreign exchange with 
nothing to show but trillions of yen in losses.” 

Japan's foreign reserves, of course, have 
jumped as a result of the intervention, rising 
to $1 1734 billion at the end of September, a 
record for any country. The reserves, in fact, 
jumped about $50 billion in just the past two 
years, economists say. owing largely to mar- 
ket interventions. 

But in yen terms, the value of these reserves 
mates total government, commercial and pri- 


said. 

Both companies agree with 
the logic of collaborating 
abroad. 


international trade agreement. 

The fra pic governing coali- 
tion, whidi depends on the 
farm vote, is expected to for- 


Opinions differ, however, on mally approve the plan on 
whether an alliance in the Ger- Tuesday. The main aim is to 
man market would be wise, or culm the nerves of rice growers, 


even permitted. 


who have depended on the gov- 


aomesne retail prices at atiouir. 
five times the world average. - 

The measures are scheduled; 
to lake effect April 1. 

The Finance Ministry resist-; 
ed government plans to include*, 
easy credit for farmers in the 
package, the Yomiuri Shim bun 
said Sunday. 

The governing coalition, dom-‘ 
mated by Socialists and cooser- . 
vative Uberal Democrats, dis- 
agree on many issues but they 
apparently agree on the need to . 
attract the farm vote. 





AND 


THE LINK BETWEEN THE PAST 
THE FUTURE 


Omega Constellation. 

Self-winding chronometer 
in 18 kgold. 

Swiss made since 1848. 


;*• . • ’.-Ci 










Q 

9MEGA 

The sign of excellence 





f 


Page 10 


INTERN ATIONAL HER 41. n TRIBUNE. MONDAY OCTOBER 34, 1994 



Weekly international bond prices 


Crt. 1 

On. mua&Ms 




Pnte Cpn. I 


Of. 

Fna 


bwtt&M « 


G«. 

9"W ClW 


m** 


PwyWed by CS First Boston 
ymited. London, Tel: (071 ) 
516 40 25. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. Oct 21. 


Cpn Mot ft*. iU in, teuuf Cpn M« YId Tn> I l»w 


Cpn Mar Pnee rid Tn, 


PoU«r Straights 


Cw» Mot Price YId Tr*y 


Governments/ 

Supranationals 


25 S H* m» +n 

£fc £ on m «j 
2* IP 91ft B20 +« 
55 5 as-* lao +aa 
W ti am Bja +«3 


iKSKssfesa « 103V, 737 +34 

iS£*fo2S?'?‘ « WW 7J8 +37 

s 97 94% 7.13 -11 

A lberta P r Feb 7 03 92ft 829 -W7 

am m 57V, aii +31 

JSSSK £* " t s» mi ■** 

yWMflFm TV. 97 I flirt 09 

AuijrtaF«b 7ft M MM 817 +27 

frgjrjo.lro i 94 ffltk 473 +4 

ftWrtOJftn tft 00 USA 730 +30 

Acajou 0% 00 102V, 7.90 +30 

AlWrlaMr 7ft 02 9Brt in +35 


AuMrtaMr Sft D3 101% 114 +33 
BmhrtomAor lft S3 HDXB9 UJ +37 


gejBhmiFcfc e 97 loiv, yjs +» 

BHolwnJun Sft 99 93ft 7J3 

BtjohimJul 5% 98 1« 7J3 +31 


BaWwnJUl 7 99 96% 7X3 +M 

MMumNOtf 5ft 03 02% 137 +4? 

MDlumOd BVi 01 Wrt IIS +43 



438 Amo Con Sep TA 

+3T Amo Co Mr 9W 

+23 AIT Apr 

4+3 AIT Aar 


Hft 821 +42 
. . >04% 9M +!© 

Art 77 97% 732 +16 

Rfe 71 74V, 7J5 +25 


Belgium MOV 99 
Bk Greece Apr97 
SnoAuow 
CloJonfj 
CcnFftaH 
Cr Fancier Aorta 
Cr Italia Jui 77 
ElbFeOOJ 


97% lie 

98V. U3 


77% <U7 

77% 1X6 


70% 11* 

97% 000 


+48 AIT Fee 5% 97 72% 7JB +23 

+27 AtTJun Art » 90% IE +14 

+27 BasnrdflnJirfi* n f?ft Iffl +68 

+19 Bret Fin Aug 7 97 78% 737 -2 a 


Ul +42 ElbAugOl 

820 +M EftPp MorTO 


9«. 0.44 

95% 117 


+79 Bad Fin Apr 3 01 73% 831 +47 

+33 Bet Cap Apr A 70 94% 711 +52 

... +35 Bal COP Nov Art 03 15% 185 4+A 

8JH +I& Seiwn TcAm SV « 92% 756 +23 

137 +44 MISttlTcSaP 6% 08 HU 840 +43 


7m +A2 UwjTrrJun Jun«7 
844 +7i iwdmer Nov 75 

7 a +49 Italy Qet 05 _ 

*,< +57 Lavorg o/5 Apr 00 

7j| +55 PuoiiePwrSwW 

ill Si StwobginePen) 


97% 113 

100 0JH 


Cm fob 49 

CDO Jul99 
CbaFrtW 
Op Jul W 
CcdMor97 

CefAugGS 
Cd.Morw 
Ccf. MCT03 
CO ihi hi, sea 03 


rt 810 
1B7 

LH 

97% 1M 


Rhone Foul D*e47 

BBSs* 


97% 114 

' M 1.SS 


Bmsg 

|Rlt)kAMy«| 

Satan inc Feb 

Son Paolo Use Jen 97 
5<mtandCIDecM_ 
SqnMfWiaMorm 

Is^gg 

SeBonfceniunfisI 
Se Banken Jul 971 
Sekttev® I 
SawanwrgJulW 
Shea h Pic Jun UJ 
5tartwmA|H-»9| 
StotaaikOdM 


J 1.17 
70% 123 


CesmeJun 
CM Fob© 
CHAinllOCtU 
CflAuxU FebOO 
CHAwtUSopE 
aws« Mon see 03 
CnemcorpAerU 
Owns F in job 01 
China TB A« 98 
OirJjt Os Oct 97 
Christ On sop 01 
Chris! On Nov 47 
□be Aw 47 
OMJUI49 
aflcRMeemtAnrA 
O Herr No S«P OS 
atienr NaJunQS 
ctlkrf Na Aug 03 
Comoanesaaffl 
ComltFiintavOS 
Gomrzbnk SaoE 
Coma* 6/s NovAS 
ComAk 0/1 Auc 05 
CenuHn/sNovTO 
Conti BkAuoM 
Cr Du Nord Od 77 
Cr Italia Aw 09 
Cr I ted to Jim 77 
Cr Local Asr OS 
Cr Local Feb 03 
Cr Local Aug 02 
CrLvnnnSepB 
CrLvannMsrH 
CrLvem Aug97 
Cr LYnnn Jon 95 
CrLmn JutH 
CrL.yomDtc99 
CrLvonriJuITt 
CrLTorwiMorM 
Cr Natl Oct OS 
Cr Natl Feb 77 
Crat Local Dec 77 
CreOltHk Jur 03 
Creaks Os mot 79 
Cr«St Lac Deed 
CreditanstAoglB 
CnaHbat* Aorta 
Credos 0/s5eo 98 
Crenem Fin Mor 03 
CiftBvMar49 
Csfb Bv 2] Sep 79 
C*m flr 275«0W 
CstbBv AuoDI 
CsfDBvMarOS 
Csfb Grp Oct 05 
CMbOfpMIFsb© 
Csfb W Mf US 
CstblncFebM 
Ct delta Fee 00 
DaawooAua9S 
Dfc Fin Nv Od 02 
Derc Dosha* Nov 49 
Dm Dansta Fr Jui 00 
□cn Domke Tr Jan 00 
Dzn Nanke Ne Aug 49 
Dm NorAc 01 NOv 47 
Dendonske Fr Jui 00 
DvhJDmSmCIO 
Donoiuse588iF 
Dra Fin 3*0 02 


95VS 060 
99% 022 


90% 149 

91rt 19} 


832 +44 BmwLeaNOV 7% 96 99% 7AJ +51 

7M <MA BmwUlCcMrA% 04 BTrt 8A2 +71 

8S1 +59 Boots PIC Jon 9 97 103% 7J3 +78 

84| 440 BRomerMr 7% 79 105% 805 +S8 

114 +53 Baca Fin Apt 8% 98 101% 767 +57 

Ml 464 Br Gas hit Jul AU 03 87% 827 4C 

847 445 Br Gas lid Mr 6% 77 94% 7.3 +24 

757 +JJ BrGasIniSm 8% TV 101% 7JB +42 

8A3 +85 Bt Fin Aug Art 97 78% 7.18 

U1 48 Bl Fin Aug 8% 77 1D3JM IS* +39 

850 +73 Bt Fin NOV 7% 98 105% 763 +47 

855 414 CotrteWtreDc 4% 03 Mrt 87A +61 

as +S CBWWFI nsen$% W *n* 884 +144 

728 +28 CMngNov 1% 03 81>A 721 +141 

727 +27 CMna Pec Fed Art 04 84% 720 +130 

M3 +18 Cltubu El Aus AV, 03 87% 83A +50 

854 +4 OnihuEl Jon 4 97 103% 7M 442 

7/1 +44 auOuEISeo 8V « 7JW 722 +44 

729 +33 ChugoElFcb 7 97 90% 764 +4A 

m +60 as® core dc a% 97 77% 72s +21 

834 +46 UbaCarPMr 5% 00 90% 737 +38 

8J0 +]9 CltwCornOd 5% 96 73% 761 +31 

124 +45 COtaA-TMtlNV 7% M 100% 721 +51 

*’■ +1* CemOancMav 7% «7 99% 722 +72 

+25 calm NocMarOU u 101% 7JB +39 

-36 Dalai NacOd 0 98 100% 72A +47 

+4 Daimler Apr 10 99 166% 615 +46 

+17 DunmiElApr 0 1 a 824 +48 

+a OuMuUEIJun 8% 98 IOTA 775 +43 

-HSR Dupont El JUI 7W T9 98% 7.90 +38 

IS EH AaulIMT 7% 97 MWk 729 +27 

Ell Lilly Jul 5% 98 93% 753 +19 

Elba Jan 7 98 te% 114 -tee 

Emerson 7% « 100 % iao +23 

x Enemif Bejui5% 00 wa3 757 +34 

Esllpnrwlv Mr A% 04 88% Ml +50 

■ -- EurnflnnMtn 8% m 102% 127 +« ■■ 

is Exxon Mr Art 03 88% a® +20 Dnll*p Tamm 

tit Exxon Oct a 78 IHJrt 7J0 +31 uu,,Br terwl 

I* Exxon Sep A% 01 00% aSl +54 

t£ Foe Nov n m m<«, elm +72 spd 

«’ SfS^Od ’!« S 18 IS5Uer Mat Price Ylo Trsr 

jp. Ford Jun Wi 97 777 +67 AflhAiiD 04 i<ia om j.1j 

JB U. +», mSapAw * £« 33 

1047 ESJii4,rr. N £i.«2 u 22? §« + i!5 Amer Inti Aug 04 45% 

■hd 5SSt CcF, * , Si S AmexbkDc « t\v. _ . 

?2 S J2i JS ^ Ann inti usa *7 7314 II J! +49J 


DrcwjnbJun 7*. m 97% at? +j? 
cm meet Feb 4% 97 9*% 734 +3A 


CdgHm Jul 6% 77 97% 72? +23 

... +3 , 


Banks ft Finance 


CM Europe JunA 
Coeod 
ComunkM 


IB n 98% U7 -K9 

MV? 99% 727 +M 

78 9316 7.71 +57 


Cr Fender Feb 7% 7? iDSrt 723 +36 


D#nMrk Aug 4% 77 93% 721 +5 

Den Mr* Fee 6% «7 turn Ut +» 
DenMrXFrb 5% 9* RM30 


5% 

97 

9S% 

770 

-1 

Sft 

98 

93X99 

7.54 

+23 

7ft 

02 

97% 

LI6 

+39 

6% 


95% 

7J9 

+a 



102% 

796 


6% 

04 

39% 


+41 

4% 


94% 

751 

+29 

9% 


105ft 

7X0 

+33 



99% 



8% 

99 

TO% 

753 

+25 

9 ft 

DO 

105ft 

7.97 

+33 

H 




+13 

m 

01 

100% 

7.92 

+10 



*4% 



Sft 

98 

103% 

744 

+29 

6ft 

99 

«% 

757 

+24 

7% 


98rt 

758 



W BAJ030 MB +28 
77 104% 72A +33 


IMuxAPT 10 77 IBM 721 +3A 
fafeix Jun 5% 90 73% 75? +29 


ElMinMr 9% 9V 106289 7J7 +30 

Cxltnl* Frb 6ft 0Q HVi 721 +71 

EximM Feb 8% 01 imu, 609 +41 

Edmnk Jen 9% 00 HA% 729 +34 

E umcAJun fft m 7 am iu +® 

EdmbkMov 8 02 99JM9 815 +38 

ExIrnbkMoy 6% OS 85% 125 +40 

ExUnbkMr 7% 79 105% 724 +37 

FedhektAwi 6% M 78% 693 +17 


Ftenaumjvim m 95% 123 +ti 
F hlmcJui 


FhlmcJul 7% 97 78010 777 +33 
Finland Apt 71* 9? 99% 741 +34 


Rn Id Res Jut 7% 04 94% 851 +58 
FlnM Rep New 6% 97 91050 720 +30 


Italy Feb 
Italy Jim 
Holy Jun 
.iteivMr 
Italy SeP 
Italy sea 
Joo Hahn 


4% to Vfts M7 +34 

4 77 9614 779 +12 

9% 00 104% 7*4 +31 

01 103% 110 +38 

S 04% 618 +32 
9B» 727 +28 
77 103% 725 +18 

7% 79 10AU 721 +34 

7% 23 91% 858 +47 

7% 94 184280 680 +1* 

91* 16 KU% 673 +67 

91* 98 WSrt 771 +31 

7% 99 781* 770 +13 

SVi 03 03% 821 +14 

5V, 99 71ft 773 +38 

Brt 78 101% 7 JO +24 

51* 98 70% 771 +9 

9% 97 HQV. 757 +53 

8% 01 101% 632 +44 

5% 9fl 73000 720 +55 

4% 03 8ff% 158 +74 

9% W 105% 824 +57 

A 03 85% 157 +7| 

Art 33 77% 977+115 

B% 01 107% 614 +43 

7% 04 95% 622 +38 



U.S. Dollars 


Abbev 7sr Mar 97 
Abe Mar 76 Morn 
Afidll l$t Apr 03 
AbdlllSISepaZ 
Ahn Amro Apr 
Aim Amro Aon 
Atm Amra Re Jul 02 
Advance Bk Jun 99 
AtbPeroFerp 
Alb PIC NOV 49 
Alb Pie Jul 49 
Alaska hmjuIQi 
A nus Fin Jim 00 
Amen Bk Feb 04 
Am BkoGoAor an 
Anz Bka Gp Dec 99 
AnzBkgGpOdflS 
An: BkD Go Oct 49 
AluBkfl GoFebTA 
AmBksG»M0r75 
AiuBkgCaFeb95 
Arab Bkitg Jun DO 
Asflngg Jul 77 
AsWkooalrflOO 
Astk-eser juiAO 
Austria Jan 03 
Austria Od OB 
Austria Auo 97 


mt ftif 
W 887 


89% 127 

97% 1.15 


17% 150 

97% U2 


1S3% 135 

97% 637 


71 022 

03% !.42 


02 124 

vm 62a 


70% 634 

95% 674 


97% 664 

01 151 


1WV. 021 
97% 617 


79% 612 

99% CJB 


97% 615 

77% 026 


97 69S 

93% 692 


Bacobo/s See 77 
flacob a/s Kov 74 


m m 

94% 1.17 


BuicaNaz Aug 97 ■ 
BanaunmltlJuiOi 
BgneslAlsMarTe I 
Barclay Old Nov 49 
Barclay s I Jul 49 ■ 
Bardav S2 Feb49 
Borings Bv Jan ':i 


100 020 

99% in 


W* 053 
99% 659 


79% 630 

|}ft 129 


85% 720 

84% 1.17 


Borinas Bv mot 01 
Bath So Mar 9a 
Bayer Land Aus OS 

BOW Land Mov TO 
Baver i/are Aug 85 
Bayer vere Jen 03 
Baver Vere Aug 02 

aoriBnpiJanjantB 

Bel Inti Nov 49 
BU Inn Jun 01 
Bbi inti AprW 
Be Nop Ldn Dec ft 
8c No, Ldn Ftp 99 
Be Nop Ldn Dec 98 
B co Dl Rom Jim 01 
BcoDl RunDec79 
BcoDIRomAuo97 
Ben Dl Rom Jul 97 
BdJun98 
Bat NOP Hk Sep 03 
BCD NOP In Aue 97 
Bcocomlrol Jun 79 
Belgium Nov V* 
Belgium May 96 
Belgium Jan vs 
B**tiium Dec 99 
Bergen Bk Aug 77 
Bergen Bk Aug 49 
B/ce AUO 97 
BM Fhi BvMQr99 
Bhuwtmk A us 03 
BlkubenSepDO 
Bilbao 1 nil a Aim 01 
WGrf«sOct97 
Bk China AAov 97 
Bk China Jul 90 
Bk Greece JMDecH 
Bk Greece Dec 76 
B* Greece Mar (tf 
Bk Greece Mdr 99 
Bk Greece Dec 70 
Bk lnrianaSep4T 
Bk ireiendDece? 

Bk Atr(fWorOcff7 
BV Montrl Jul 98 
Bk novo Sc Aug 49 
Bk Scot Nov 47 
Bk Scothmd v Pen, 
SkeamrmnilOdfn 




Aft 77 9B% 7.13 


04 45% 637 +39 

00 61% 620 +60 

97 7316 1121 +49} 

75 99% 615+50 

75 75% 652 +96 


a i-js Austria jul 75 95% 

** ffi ES IS BP Cap Jun 95 95% w -r^, 

ru mS w liv Br Goa Ini Nov 21 lOiCO 688 +44 

•u, IS CCCBMOY 95 96% - — 

ff? £ tS CceeMav 01 60% 

4*u M V6^ 6-56 +7 Ctem Mov 1C « 

= 2 Wgn «9 cSSK S 35 

814 W 2-?l +S CcceP 09 29% 


1% 90 102% 7JI +42 cSeP 

6% 99 94% 727 +71 ChrmNvF+b 

f 2 i-g + n SSSJIJfS 

Ie GeccDregAorSrt 98 m 7*1 +31 qSonI^ 

IS Gecc Drag Nov «<* 96 <4% 728 +31 awmNyFM? 

ItS GetxTrAFgd Art 97 98% 7jB -4 qJSKIfS 

GncnmOd 8% 99 ltaou 7Sa +40 oSmNrFm 

GMAC Art 70 94% 725 +40 

15 GMAC Jul 9 96 182% 7.11 +38 DbFtaJon 

IS GMAC Oct Trt 97 9W. 7J4 +54 oSnMrkZjg 

IS C-ronc invJun 7 99 «% 614 +S3 Exxot Nw 

IS hj Heinz Oct 7% % iMrt 7x1 +55 Fn^aFee 

15 HedrtiMr 8V, 97 101% 7x5 +a 

IS Hena Rn Dc A 90 B9ft 9.19+177 GmcmJuI 

IS Hitachi Cr Dc 7% 96 99281 728 +65 GnMIlKAup 

.n Hitachi Cr id 7rt 97 9B% 7J6 +63 Gen Mills Aug 

M +57 I us, Jun 

+H lgdbDc 

... ... 7J2 +52 I act!) Jim 

™ Hondo Mir Feb 9% 97 103% 720 +91 lo^jun 

IbmJooanDc 6ft 97 96ft 721 +58 IQdbDc 


420 Hitachi cr Jul 5ft 90 


T5 Wf.- 660 +121 

01 H% 7.94 +» 

02 SS 628 +54 

07 35 675 +5B 

09 29% 826 +56 

95 98 625 +141 

W 91299 7JT +117 

97 84% 7X8+90 

98 77269 620 +110 

99 71W 624 +66 

01 59% 8X9 +88 

S3 55% 649 +77 

03 49% 675 +93 

95 263% no. 

% 76% 733+5 

04 44% 629+18 

05 41% 6 94 *97 

95 97% 626 +146 

9A 89% 627 +42 

04 44% 654 +5b 

13 18% 9X3 +100 

*6 89% 7.0D +59 

W 8*250 7 JR +64 

96 76% 721 +28 


Intelsat Aug 7% 02 94% 82H +50 


01 40% 

02 52% 821 


Ttf I mortal j an 6% 00 *4% am +0 lodoDc 

12 IntetsotMr 6% 04 88% 8X5 +54 lotfcDc 

IS intertgiOd 8% 04 99% 8X1 +47 igabPDc 


S3 50% 626 +41 
03 49V. 007 +14 


Inwstr Jem Ift 99 92ft 8J» +«4 I ihreOet 


06 36% 849 +54 
CB 30 829 +61 


JolCoJul 6% 03 87% 674 +88 

Kodok Apr 7% 97 %% 724 +7H 


Korea Ei 1A 4ft 96 «4% 7J® +93 Merck Ca Aue 97 82% ... 

Koran Eld DC 4% 03 B4% 92A +118 Mladletawn Jul 11} 305 2X3 -512 


TJS Kvushu EleJUlArt TO 87% 827 +51 MniCorpJul 9$ 94Zc 7J5 +lri 

+W 2? 2 Mft 139 +60 NEr^tanFcb 99 60% 9^ IlB7 

In £25*006 % « ,S5 fg +M Pru Realty Jon 99 72% 721+51 


T" MetllfeFdOd 7% *6 108% 727 +51 Safa Nov 

+J* AMnneiataJun Wb 07 7.11 _ iBCCmnNov 


.96% 721 I® 


5% 01 1011* MO 

8% 96 102% 7.19 +29 

*rt 97 IMrt 7J1 +28 

7rt 99 98% 727 +24 

Trt 04 94% B22 +10 

0 02 98% 617 +40 


NfTDc 

NIT Feb 

Global Corporates NIT Jui 

NITMr 

Abb Fin Jun Aft 97 97% 7X1 +28 Nt TNov 
Allied Fin Aug Art 97 96% 7.75 +57 nITNov 


. %c nwHmoiajwi trig »/ *o« t,i I 5BL rmn Nnu vt qn 

15 MiBrtJEst Jun Hi 97 165% 7J5 +13 SeorO/SJW *8 ” 

TK SBIfewbEltSep 8% 01 100% 654 +TO Stows Jun 01 SO 

+ ]J Natl Power DC 6U TO 86278 650 +6? VfcS?0lS»p 99 Iff 

Nestle Hkl Xn 6 98 95% 7X8 +21 fthttmn Fin Mov 94 98 

■t? nestle HW Alta 4ft 97 98% 7J1 -16 

+Z1 Mesne HW Feb 6% 97 97% 7J0 +37 

4.7 Nestle HM Feb 5 97 95% 7J3 +21 

4I5 Nesfte HW Jun 5% M «+». 75* +ZT 

IS NesrteHkjNov7ft ve )oo% 7.o* +15 Floating Rato Notes 

IS Nestle Hid Od 1% 99 83rt 7J6 +16 — — 

12 Norsk Hyd Apr Brt 97 100% 7Je +72 

IS Norsk Hvd Oct 1% 01 100% 842 H9 

+/ tv, M Jfl2U 7Jf +a} issuer 6 Mat 

90 95% 7X3 +16 

1* 97 183% 740 +45 

99 1(0% 7S3 +19 Eane 

6% 97 99% 736 +22 ECUS 

7% ffl 100ft i/S +5 

Art 97 97V, 7.17 -5 BcoDl Rom Aw 97 

7% 98 10514 720 +19 Belgium Apr 0Q 


94 99% 721 +38 
V 85% 726+27 


Biidl Aus 99 
BnilHklNovTO 
Bnl (Hk) Oct 03 
BnpFebTO 
Bnc OcilD 
Bnp Ju< 97 
Brti5ea47 
Boa Coro Jun IB 
Boa Carp Mar 99 
BeaComMavn 
Bol H WO Nov 97 
Ba Paribas Nov 05 
Bo Paribas Sep 49 
BrltCalum Feb 03 
BroaOxurOctO 
Blnyc Sea TO 
BtnvcAprOS 
CarlptaPe098 
Caiipla Aar 97 
CtarisBUulTV 
CcssUerar Feo99 
Cha Jul 49 


98 75 '4 728 +72 
01 tn, 606 +41 


99 *r» 7.92 +47 

94 98 tUJ. 


Crt. 

Price Con. 


99% 0X2 

99% 619 


75% 120 

99% tiH 

98 1JB 

SJft 1X6 

871* Ut 

86 12* 

911* 124 

93 029 

2 25644 

98% 600 

97V, 054 

98ft 053 

99% 0X7 

98% 054 

991* 056 

95% 022 

99% 04X2 

99% 020 

iaa aia 

98% 058 

B8ft 145 

99% QJ7 

99% 041 

99% 020 

99% 020 

99% 022 

991* 023 

97ft 050 

74% 225 

lOm 622 

99V, 0.18 

89ft 128 

99% 1.14 

98% 028 

wort has 

99% 642 

100 0X7 

99% 027 

98ft 1X0 

97% 0X2 

99 0X7 

9816 124 

9014 121 

80% 144 

79% 828 

99rt 0X7 

77 121 

B2U, 1X4 

Mrt 129 

98ft OJ4 

99% 639 

87% 1X5 

87ft 121 

91% un 

91% 127 

100% 02) 

II 1X1 

91rt 121 

99ft 023 

1D0V, 02) 

99% 033 

84 126 

80ft 152 

93% 694 

98% 069 

92ft 1,13 

07% 153 

wort az 

99% 021 

99% 625 

99% 637 

99ft 603 


89% 1X4 

DO 600 


9jft 690 
92% 127 


♦1% 1JS 
92rt 128 


90% Lll 
ITS 1X4 


97ft aw 
100% 64* 


1 


SiaiAbSepH 


suNtMtiTocnp 
gSnjRnAugWj 


99'* 654 

95% 666 


75ft UP 
127 


82ft 1X» 
M 600 


87% U« 
90% 1.1 


71% L 
*3 ft 6 m 

92ft 049 


73 698 

45% 157 


144 
603 
100 ii 625 


99ft 624 
97ft 658 


97% 023 

06% 140 

91 US 
931* 675 


SkeabankaPejutAO 
SndOKOMH 

SadMarHH 

50cgenNov«*| 

SocoenTsr Aua02| 
® oa * n TdSePTAl 
Soeomr pwil 
SpWobAbOdW 
Spintab Ab SePjw 
St Bk nsw Feb Ml 
SI Bk VIC Oct 4fl 
SI Bk Vic jdwftl 


on, 22? 

«lft 151 


Stana Ch 1 Jul 491 
5tondOl3Dec49| 

5tandOl4J<m47| 
Stand Char Nov «1 


79% #g 
97ft 60 

’ ,l * IS 

99% 624 

79ft 6U 
99% 6U 
89ft 1X7 
71% 1.10 

97% 6« 

?9 027 

77% OX 
— 616 

.... LIS 
gift 123 
W* ’J* 

« 1 g 
r a 

83% LM 

92ft 127 

79% ora 

79% 600 

WOrt 612 
tom 616 
77% 621 

86% 677 

99% 601 

100ft 637 

74ft ZU 
74ft 2.3 
7Jft IIS 
74% £28 


gasssodg 


99% 611 

ft 617 
99ft 613 
«8 1.11 
Sft fg 
99ft 6»7 
«% 6M. 

79% 6*6 

Wft J2 
Ktts ip 


&*** 




9f% 024 

97% »» 


99% ftS 


■SKtoipii’jW* 


«ns m 

« 458 


Essen 

«9MfpofAugny 
SSwLOd^l 

YukonBLttOecWd 
BonAostMOvBi 

ZWOAUSIAPr«j 
DonAugFeb* 
ZtanAastAugDZH 


78% 6TJ 
97% fW 

U» oa 

72 121 

»22S K5 

99% on 
Mm LB 
73% vis 

81% 1X7 

89ft 1J7 
99% 831 

I1U. IjB 

wS p 
JS SS 
s% ^ 

t» in 


78% 667 

%, SB 

99% DOS 
100 027 

79ft 0.19 

BSrt 1J0 
97ft 608 
HOft 618 

T 3 

92ft 694 
~ 146 

U4 
634 
1X5 
LM 
123 
1X1 


iDresdbk AaAugbj 
Dresdbk AgMarM 
Drasabk ap AprTOl 
EbrdOditC 
Etf1Jun94| 
EdcFetotn 
Edf NOV 02 

bufmpN 
Entrance Mar 961 
Eotn Thai jlitarffl 
Etb janos^ra 
Eft Oct 02 ■ 


Eksparffln Aug TO 
E kmoMfl iiSepW 


EMere Res Dec 96 
Eup Com Deem 
EurgHma Jan 03 
ExJm Korea Sea ft 

Exterior nov 01 
FxJLOdD 
Fenavle May May 97 
Fin dc Aug Dl 
HnOcSepn 

Fin dc Mov 96 
Fin Ert, Aug 97 
Fin Real Aug 93 
Final acMavTI 
Finland, Ma 
Finland Jul 
FerdmCr Auo 9a 
Full ini FtnSeoOQ 
Gecc Feb 03 
GectJenTO 
Gecc Dec 02 
GJJIU3) Feb 
GJJ-Ibnp} See 
Giro Cr As Dec 03 
GoMnw, Lokteva* 
Goldman LoOd k 
G atanonLaAugn 
Goldman Lp May 03 
Goldman Lp Feb ft 
GambankanSepOl 
Great Lakes Dec 97 
G* Western Mar 95 
Guangdong Mov 98 
Halifax Bs Sen 99 
HetoSu Jan 03 
Hill Samuel Jui 36 
Hill Samuel Perp 


93% 

100'- 

99% 

9? 1.10 

22% 1X8 

1011* 600 

100U. 600 

74% 107 

75% Z16 

%% 023 

97 6S6 

99rt 000 

93% 102 

M 126 

92ft 627 

89ft 1X0 

103 
Sjitt 
106 
1JQ 
Ifll ODD 

98ft 1X0 

79% 612 

92ft 096 

92 1JJ4 

BVrt IJZ 

f!ft IPS 

97 

98% 610 

97 U» 

ars 

9Bft 610 

92 1.11 

79% 612 

99% 620 

>00% 622 

OO 615 


99% 008 

99ft 631 


97% 

991* 

97% 601 


.... Ill 

71% 106 


77% 6M 
79 6S6 


00ft 1X1 
8 5ft LX) 


05% 

90ft 
90ft 1X7 



Okebank Jul9S 
OspreB Aug 98 
Osprey Aug 73 
PStateCan Dec 97 
Pro Of DM Aug 97 


77% 641 

100% 653 


99ft 083 
607 


Quebec Apr 01 
Quebec Odoi 
Quebec Hvd Od 03 
Quebec Hyd Sea 49 
Quebec Hyd Jul 02 
Quebec Hyd Apr 79 
Robabk Ned Odin 

RbcJuias 

ja?c Jun 49 
RbsG<PNov49 
Rente. Nov 98 


TO 
71ft 677 
100ft 63D 

97% 053 

9Wt ttfi7 

no 05i 

79ft 609 
90 1 50 


9*% 851 

84% 1-79 


83ft UO 
97ft 634 


98% 636 

921* 699 


TO OUR REAPERS 
IN POLAND 

Hand-delivery of 
the IHT 

day-of-publication 

is now available 
in these cities: 
Warsaw, Cracow, 
Gdansk, Poznan 
and Wroclaw. 
Please call: 
MINI-MAX GMBH 
Tel: 43 29 46/43 00 28 
Fax: 43 00 20 


it*!*** 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


tooling 


Sales i 

Div YId IDOs Htgh Low 0*x Chgc Stacks 


Consolidated trading tor week | _ 
ended Friday, Oct. 21. ^ 

ABCR1P 
AmFB 58 
ARBrn. 1.00 


Stem 

Div Ykf I OIK High Low Oh Chgc 


BHA .12 1.0 697)3 lift 12% *?» [ BroWrt 

BHC Fnd JOB .8 4367 10 9'., 9ft —ft BroGour 


On YId 100* High Low Oh Chgc 1 Stack* Div YU ICO* High Lom Qse Choe j Stack* 
._ tea 10 9 9ft —ft ■ Cerovn _ 18 7": 2ft 2ft —’A ' ctxiWi 


sale* t 

□w YId lDOsHIgh LOW DM Owe Stadu 


Sale* | 

Dtv YM IDEM High LOW CM Choa | Stachs 


Sflld 

Dfv YM IDEM High Low CM Owe 


_ 199 10 9ft TV. +«., 


21 U 2028 12ft 11% 11% 

AFiltm 1.00 34 328 27 28 *!& 

AmFrghr _ 3158 22ft 21ft 21% — rt 

AGreet 56 25 12078 29% 27% 27ft— I % 
AMIhOJS _ 4806 7% 6ft 6ft — % 

Div YK) IDOs HWl Ujw CM Owe AHamFW ” 3ta1 31ft 19ft 20ft * ft 

======== 54 25 m* jsa =*. 

A - ^3 ««r :: ™ A ft ft -* 


^ftl!|l 

k 27ft— 1% , 





_ 1195 5i* S S' , -ft BrTom 

_ 956 22% 21% 21ft — % Bruno* 
.. 34S 4 3 3ft - ft BrvnMw 

_ 3EJVS1 46ft «V, 44Cft - 1ft Bu-3-.Am 


_ 4806 7% 6ft 6ft — % §51 ■ 
_ 477 t'%! 1»ft 1*/}J _ ££[' 
... 3161 31ft 19ft 20ft * % §Pli 
_. 2278 10% 7% 10% * % , BS® 
!5 484 11 10% 10ft BTF 


I 439'?% Vv. V% I ft Umcrck 

„ 2219 4S 4% 4ft -V = BuilcJT 

^ 41 13 % *» ft — 1 B'jHRun 

_ 210 ft V,. Vu _ BurrBr 

X0 13 165617'.. 10 18%— 'rt. Butrev 

„ 916 13% 12ft 13 Vn -•«/,. I 
_ 7407 44% 40 42ft *1% 1 1 


._ 10 9 9% — ' ft ■ Cerovn 

_ 46913ft 12' J 12% -ft'Certsco 
- 507612% lift 11% — ftjCemer 
56 2.7 1B481 10ft 9E-, 9% — CerWex 
60 25 56 32ft 31ft 31+1 —ft Cervece 

.. 85 0% H 8% _ ChalNa' 

J6B13 12 12. — % , Chatane 


18 2% 2% 2% —ft COtlWor 1.18 65 679 10% 16ft 10ft - Ift CXscZav _ 291 19H 18% IT *% I 

_ 32 3% 3ft 3ft -ft Confl Cl _ 319024ft 23% 24 -'A DixtaYr 50 2J 1572 Art 7ft 0 _ 

_ 21 D45 44' , 38ft 41’.,— Ift OlCCore _ 238 6ft P’. 5% - DolIrGnl 50 J 11 459 27ft 25% 24% *'/• 

-4133 12 lift lift — V. CMCCwt _ 778 1ft ft 1 * ’* Donegal 56 2J OUllVi 12% 13ft - 

TO* 1.7 331627ft 25ft 25ks— 11. OlMtg .60 4J 165 l«ft Id 14 _ D onhjBn y - 2504 21 * 20% 20% —ft 

„ 76 3ft 3ft 3ft —ft CllSavOf 77 X8JJ 25J 1% IW 1ft — ft DrcftHb M IX »P 13ft >214 »2ft - 


D 560 35 158 >5 >4% 15 *W 

XO 25 lift JSft 15ft +ft 

Be 54 IX x3BS 16. 15ft 15% _ 


- 340520ft 19ft 17% —% 


-14688 16'. I4rt 16ft *1% ; Qximol : 
_ 207E 13ft 11% IT. —ft , QimttPr 


cl* 50 1 17625ft 23ft 24ft -ft 1 CJivSol 


’lift 11 lift - ft OiamOPS 
lift 1% 1% — rnjQianlp 


.. 264013ft 12% 13% -ft ; 
.. 3895 36ft 3!ft 34% -2ft 
_ 11035% 34% 34% — % 


81 6ft & 6ft » ft 1 ChlDt - 7413 7ft 5ft 6% - DarwvTr - 1222 16% 15% 

76 25' . 23ft 24ft - ft 1 CnvSol „ 519 1ft I'Vi, 1% _. Dowd _. 1112 9ft 8% 

22 4V. 4ft xv, — % Con wsJ a 54 - 40 IIP*, 17*Vi. 17% — w n Dcoml* -3311%, leju 

■OQ 4’. . 6 6' , - CooorO — 6 3 3 3 —1 Dbietree — 743 19 18% 

75 5% rv Sly - % CoaprL - 203 V} 7% 7% —ft DalsLom .40 2.4 4 >646 16ft 

TO r , 7% 7ft —ft I CoaoBk * _ 31619 18ft 18% *% Davctfril __ - 4797 26ft 22% 


15a 6rt 


.. 200 6’. 6 6’. - CooorO 

- 75 5ft r* SV, -% CooprL 

.0? 1510493 r , 7ft 7ft —ft CoapBk S 

SO a 2.7 152 31ft 27ft 30 —V. CoarsB 

.OBe / 574 12ft II 11 —1ft Cocart 
X« 35 237520ft 20ft 2EH* —ft Cootevft, 

_ 170 7 6ft 6ft —ft Coavtal 

- 243 5% 5% 5% —V. GorTtasr 


.0? 1510493 r, 7% 7% —ft CoapBk* _ 31619 18ft 18% *ft I Dcvafnn „ - 4799 26W 22% 26ft *1 

SO a 77 153 31ft 29'. 30 — V. COOTS B 50 25 4172 18ft 17% IB *• ft I Draras a .10* — 1369 1ft 1ft lfti + 


- 1222 16% 15% lift —ft 

1112 7ft 8% 9ft -ft, 

- 331 1ft. 1ft, 1 rt* —ft, 

_ 743 17 18% lift —ft 

>4 41646 16ft lift +%, 

_ 479926ft 22% 26ft *1% 


.120 J 3! 
- 19 


siriRS M. 
sa saastK 


_ 585 6% 6% 6% 

1751 8% 7% Bft —ft 
„ >142 2% 2ft 2ft —ft 
.125098 18 1«ftl^ft.-JVp 


_ 7407 44V, 40 42% -1% 

r ’HSft, It IX 

_ 44 11ft 10% 11V, — % 

_ 646 6% 5ft 6ft —'4 

.06 3 441714?. 14% i'a%— 1“ 

„ 71 6% .5% 6 -ft 


_ 1007 14% 13ft M 
n. Ill 13 20% 17 20% *3% 

_ 65 9 Oft 9 

.08 5 13410 16ft 17ft .% 
^ 1030 6ft 5ft 5% —I 


-125098 18 16% 17 J V„— 'ft, 

J»3e 5 625612ft 12 12ft -ft 
54 AO .58 6ft 6 6 


= attki a-s 




<1. Oh Cl/. 1 nK D.* CJJI 6»-*» -67a nti — 

& Si £ fik ^ 1 


m i»SS*]% IWk »% —ft A— Tele 

~ 8124 32% 30ft 31ft *1% 

3X 24 2Sft 24% 24% —ft 

sJSKS.st :.s S- 


ARINef 

AST 

ATS Med 
AW An 


I 1181 14% 13% 13% —ft 


18 17V, 17% —ft I 
' — 4% 4ft - 1 


188 lft, n/ B IV, — Jr D g 0 ** 3 " 
- 8 Bft 7V, 8% — % B cpNJ 

_ 377 4ft 3ft 31l _ Bond«S 


■“ ? grapua -t 

nPoriC 1J» 35 1S58 37 38 JO,,— 1ft 

nf»n ot 2.09 IU 124 34V, 24% 24ft —ft 
OneptC3JO fc5 1227 5SV, 53ft 53% -lft 
cFatOK 54 15 3015% 14ft 141, 

WOHS M 3A 324', 24ft 24ft— 2 

nefns _ 20 4ft 4% 4% _ 

cGalie -37 r 1.1 3777 29ft 27ft 28V. —1ft 

pSou lJWb 3J SB 32 31 31 — k, 

PNJ M 7.6 230 31 24 ft 30'-, —ft 

naec ...10574 20V. 19 20 ♦ >A 


= J8JT 

1 50 3.9 no 34ft 
.68 2-0 17 46 

_. 2421 4ft 

“ “ Ilf 


Aomn 50 3J 
AornRt B .08 7 

AcronRT .06 J 
AooefwT 
Abaxto 
AbbevH 


_ 1046 8% 7% 8% —ft £££2. ■" 

_ 5507 5’5 4ft 4ft —ft 

AbincxSfl 40 jj “Sitft lS' 1 K%-3i£ Ariirtai 556 J 3818% 18% 18% —% I 522^* 

AWnaSB XO 25 M 15ft 14 14%->lft 50 25 5422 9 Bft 8ft *% SS£ sl 

AbteTd I 2927 8ft 7ft 8 — aSSSI " 777 ?!'i ® Banm 

1SKUS. ‘ ,2 7J rA i», uj?. ,q 3L _r- AmrcHCD 58 X 7765 11ft 10% 10% — 1 *3 S 0 "!?? 3 , 

_ »8 10ft 10 .. 10ft -ft An^rtm 8 iq iq *. toy. ipft ♦ ft ganvSlJ 


_ 788 9ft 

z 4 »SS 

50 35 ^ 
7 4% 
_ 662 14% 

M 25 1037 JO 
57 IX 295 51 

i JIR 

_ 3172 4 
_ 1773 14 
X8 2X> 357 34ft 

1.16 2-8 16 44 

... 711 6% 

54 1.7 185514% 
XS 3X 163 26% 
_ 3287 6% 


10% _ I 

21 —2ft 

44ft— 1% 
4ft *lft 
42V, _% 
47 -ft 
7% -ft 


_ 170 7 6ft 6% —ft CDPVtel 

„ 243 5ft 5ft 5% —V. Cornier 

—71321 4% 3% 3"/u — »% CorGabF 

— 1540 7 7ft 8% — % Carcain 

- 1806 l?>4 18% 17 -ft Cordis 

_ 3650 5ft 4 4 —1ft CorejCos 

_ 64 13 12 19 —1 CmrFn 
X4 1.1 2541ft 37 S — % Corlmog 

_ 240 4% 3ft 3% — % Camew 
_ 555 16% 15% 14 -ft ■ 


17% +% DrocoE - 118 7% 8ft 8ft — 

17 —ft DibB - 561610% 10, 10 — 

4ft - Drewln f _ 87 8ft 8% Bft ♦ 

16% — % DnuUr _ 2465 5* 4% 5% 

18ft -ft Dreyens M .7 355520% 25% 25ft — ’ 

4 -ft DiugE - 776 4% 4’A 4% — V 


_ 1857 17ft 16% 17% +% DrOCOG 

- 2605 18 17 17 —ft DibB 

_ 2216 Sift 4ft 4ft Drewln 

_ 1956,4ft 13% 14% — % DTWXir 

- 268618% 17ft 18ft -ft DreyeMS 

- 16S6 4ft 3% 4 -ft DrugE 

- 14920 60% 58ft STM,— ‘ft, DrVPjr* 
-11427 16% 14 14ft— 1 DoalDrl 


_ 40 4% 4% 6% *% DuraPh 

_ 357018 15% 16 —ft Durocrtt 

_ 7503 24% 229, 23ft - Durtcn 
_ 114717% 16% 16% — % Durwned 


171 lift 11 lift +fti 
W13% 12% 12ft —ft 



Fn JO W4 i|ft _*% 


10% lift, 


t * 


5 Eng — 

stvs 520 1J 


- 34713% 12ft 12ft 

- 45812ft I? a 


(Vta .15 25 
T^n l56 35 




33 10 9ft 9% —ft Durirans X2 2J 3570 16% 14 16ft 

- 3866 3ft 2ft 3 —ft DwwrGp - '03; +% 4% 4% 


2% 2 2% i% B7.U1F pf _ _ 6 8% 8% 8ft -ft 

18% 18% 18% % Donkrs s X0 2J>2310 15% 14 ft 144, — 

8% 8% -ft BnkFsl .60 3.0 B3 20% 17% 30% -ft 

B lft -ft Bkmti XO 25 4324ft Bft 24% -ft 


I -j/ M I 


_ 1487 2% lft lft —ft 


52 1.7 4181 33ft 31% 31 H— 2% 
_ 162 2>V M 2ft W, ♦'/« 

_ 918 Irt. lft lft - 


Actio 

ACMT A — ... . . 

AcmcMct „ 1820 21ft 17% 20% — % I A nrt, 
Acta 
AciFart 

ActPrWI _ 7S3 1 ft IV H — Vu SwlSS." 

Acrvota _ 733277, 21 21 -ft 

ACT torn ..2384 29 76'., 28ft -2 

AOOCLb XB SX 4919 8ft 7V. a'., - % 

_ 3o*sft 4>. s • % ££££!'* 

_ 64286 21 >,lBft21'rt.-2'Vu 
._ 5170 10% 10 10 —ft fTgTff 0 

_. 345 13% 12*, 12ft —ft SJS™ 

.16 X 17837V, 35ft 36’., -V, 5™g= 


I 20 4% _ J BotTec+i 

AndvBc .40 2X 1368 17 16 16% „ 

AndvToa 1 -. 242 2% I 'ft 2% *1% SSDH 1 ** 


AdcocSy 50 .6 17874 37V; 351, 35ft 


242 2’i l'ft 2 3 i * 1ft I BayHidge .. 2769 14V, 13 13'', — ft 

1 7SW SO 45,“ 4 *vy — 3 I BaWw XO 17 317 23V, 22V: 22% —ft, 

I B46 18ft 17V* 17% *% BavHfcj l.W 3.0 5039 59% S4% 59'i ♦ 2% 

:b#» Wi -% _ _■* 'jg 5 A SSL M ’ll 

2167 TV, y% 7% % BeauCtl X2 ZX IS 14% 75 - % 

_ 11152 26% 24*-, 2S% -ft BoaBam -.1143126% 24% 26 *1 

r 12394 10% 9ft 10 —ft MtffnJBc - 44811'* lO". 10ft -ft 


-.12396 lO 1 ^ 9ft 10 
-. 990 10 % 8% Iff- 


AdvKn 
AdvROSS 
AtivClr 
AdvLoo 


„ 724 6% 6ft 6‘, - TSSSi," 

_ 4802 2ft 2V. — rt. 

.. 2273 Sft 4ft 4% -ft 

I ™ 3% fvi 5ft 

= "XT' % » iS s* 

Achronta JO 3 M% M% —3% SSSKto 1 

Aavonm J4 j B9TO30V, »% 3Tft^5% fiScrC-j 

AdvBcp - 128 29 28% 29 -ft vrlgi 

— _. 803 4ft 4% 4% .% 

_. 1026 9% 8ft 9'„ —ft 


_. 649 5% S'.i 5% -ft MAW 
_. 160311ft 10% lift +% gf*«W 
_. 2911 6ft 5ft Pi —ft g^tts 


I 1255 rt. V. : Breijenv 

_ 13149 26ft 22 24V, -ft BFranleR 


“ 5105 5% 4% 5v u — "u 1 gmibon 
976 24% 21ft 21%— 2V. | gensonF 
-.7072048% 44'., 47ft .1% 1 genfOG 


_ 701 4 3 3ft — % 

_ 1372 SV. 7% 7ft —ft 

3428 14ft 13>V,, 1J% .. 

50 e IX 9919'i IB'., 10’- —ft 
50 1.1 ,83427', 25ft 27% -lft 

- 33«925ft 23% 23*.— 1'-, 

._ 1BS214 12 13% -I 

_ 5812 23ft 20ft 22 -V. 

_ 201 6 5ft S»r„ — rt, 

_ 7ai 14V, 13ft IJ'i —I', 

_ 792 5 4ft 4% * ft 

_. 479 5% 4ft SV„ -‘rt, 

- 188012 lift 11% — ’•« 

_ W68 r V 7ft 7% -Vu 


77 e 26 3 30 

JO 2X 209 14ft 
_ 454 26*. 

_ 278 8ft 

_ 47224% 

_ 243811ft 
- 1221 8 
_ 314617 
_ 1JLS5 7V„ 
1X1 127 X 1003 S% 

_ I4S7 6ft 
_ 6813 11ft 
1.17 e 4.1 552 29ft 

_ 213 =Vd 

- 3585 S 

TO 1.1 B67 1Bft 

_ 37501 15% 

_. 479 a 
-.37315 9ft 
_ 2304 5ft 
56 3.1 314 18ft 

- 924 6% 

-44b 2.9 124 16 

- 66300 9% 

- 6524 28% 

XI) 35 217 1 1 1 -* 

5 6ft 
-. 464 12ft 
... 1018 lft 
_ 37635ft 
_ 30W 4% 

_ 501 4% 4 


*rt.,gadgis 

24% — % Chtocom 
4% -ft CTilpsTc 
13V. —v, Chiron 

20% -ft ChcDru 

g^ft- 

13W —V. CJBER 
34rt —ft Odoo 
42 —2 OMALb 
tV. _ CltTKO 
15% -ft QmFln 
26 -ft GnMIc 
4ft —ft Onerd 
3*Vu -»u antes 


_ 240 4ft 3% 3% —ft ComCxp _ 750324*. 22V. 73ft _ IJXlcn 

_ 555 16V. 15% 14 ♦% CordCp _ 114717% 16V5 16ft — % Dtxpmed 

_ 404 17 14% 1? CorCpWt ._ 33 10 9ft 9ft —ft OurUwn* 

- 101722ft 20ft 71%— Ift Cartecfi _ 3866 3ft 2ft 3 — % OwvgrGp 

J 321 21 21 -ft Carves - 1714 2% 1% 2 —ft DvnHWi 

A 13» 10% 10’A 10ft -ft Carvel -. 1485 Bft 21Vu 21ft -ft DylChC 

- 4989 7% 7 7% — U CosOrA _ 403 19 17% IBrt -ft 

_ 311 3ft 9ft 3<rt -ft CasOrB _. 22018% 17 17% —ft I 

_ 735 14% 14 14ft —ft Con Co .10 -97673 13ft 70% 11 —2ft I 

- 340 I'Vi, Ift 1ft _ Ctrl SLfln .14 1 J 12 9ft 7ft 7ft -ft 

-14704 58% 51V, Sl%— 5ft Courer 50 1J 516% 15ft 16’A -ft EtarM 

-16579 6ft 5ft 6ft -ft Cvrtry* -10880 15% 24ft 24ft —ft ES.B Mar 

-18670 63% 61 42% - CrkrBrl 07 .1 7286 22% 31ft 21% — % EAEng* 


- -** i.n 1,. ^ _ — 

- 1025 42 38ft 41ft +*ft 

- 14010% 17ft 17% — 

_ 1807 17 15 IS — 1% 


% FOjriBBiA J5 10X 


M i JBW y* WUS 8SS 


- 1714 2% 1% 2 —ft DvnRSh 
_. 1485 22ft 21 Vu 21ft “ft DylChC 
_ 403 19 17% 18% —ft 


_ 4ft 4% 4’A — V% FartnBr 200 >3 

DvnRWi X0I11X 1|> 3ft 3 3ft _ ParrnMCri 

DylChC - 6780 30 28 29ft -ft Farr - 

Fane! jmo i 
I FastCm ^ 


1/ + •/* 

i‘i% IS 

I3^k+B% 


-16579 6ft 5ft 6ft -ft CvrOryS -10880 25% 24% 24ft —ft 

52 23 1 « Vi S%S? te -s S& S M- 13l ij wilMh. 

- 3255 3ft 2"6| 2% —ft CrayOn _ 6860 Ift lft lYn — Vu EOTTs .131 .774656 20% Ire 20 +2% H<fflnCh 

I |£b 3ft 2ft 2% -ft CrFUaMol - 3377 3W 2% 3 -ft 

_ 754 22 20ft 21 — % OTcflL 1 - 7851 18ft 17ft 17% -ft 

S X7I4J 4102 11% 10ft 11 —ft CrtKfiyS _ 6384 24ft 22ft 23 —ft 

- 350 9 Bft 7 -ft GxJAcps - 1817 S5ft 31% 34% -2% 

- 957731ft 24% 30ft +4% CreeRsZl _ 108 7% 8ft 9ft - 

, _ 707 7ft 8% 8"/u +V« CresAIr - 1541 1%, ft l«p — V» 

_ 120 5ft 51+ 5ft —ft CreeATWf _ 1040 % ft ft —ft 

1X8 IX 2OT4 53V, 52% 53ft _ O-lttoe _ ,407 7% 2ft 2ft —ft 

_ 4721 4% S% 4ft -ft OtwG _ 1067 1% I lft —ft 

_ 1371 5ft 5% Sft — % CrooGpf J9St275 .77 3% 3ft 3W -ft 


- 297 4% 4 4% - 

_ 43 6 5 * *1 

_ 458 9% 9 9 — Vl 


% 55 Si IS 

drt^TOft-lft 


_ 108 9% 8ft 9ft - 

- 1541 Irt, ft lft, — V» 
_ 1040 % ft ft —ft 
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... 56916'* 15% 157, — ft I Bollirwer - 9413 12% 13 *% CBda«0 

— 3477 6% 5ft 6ft »Ve Ban Ton - 6232 14ft 12% 13% *1 CefSCi 

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Ul -. 2534 )7rt lift 17 *1% I — ■— J 

1 _ 10714ft 15ft lift -rt 

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Ajr^om xaeia ot b * _£ ^ xo is 128 23% 22’/, 23 -ft Brkfree 


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_ 949 3rt IV, Sft -rt OrBnlc .16 15 1713 TOrt 13 +7 ConeHWi 

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- 353711ft 4ft lOft— Ift Condor 
_ 463 lift 15% 1 Sft — % QHtaudu 
_ „ . ... 71.7W 17 lift TOrt —rt Coneaoa 


„ 844 5ft 4% 4ft —rt Ddplnf 
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_ 784948 45 46rt ti DeltPlne 

_ S30 lz'x llrt lift — % oemro 1 
_ 2748 3ft 71YU 3Vu w DanfKIv 

_ 1182 «Vu 3%. 4Vk — rt DCPGt y 1 

_ 8091 72h lift 72ft _ Dswitm 




_ 43554 43 40ft 47rt— Ota 

- « '.’V 1 W* I’Vi *% EwrMOd 
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~ 15467 I4ft TOft t3ft —ft EvgmRs 


55e 3 S4I7V, 16% to*, ZjH 
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- 104S 7 6% 6ft +V». 

- TO 3 2rt J Vu +»« 

- 4631 Tft 9 »Vu — ‘V* 


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3194 3rt 2rt 2% —ft Dmlgns 
6724 23ft 20% Srt *2 1 DatSys 


._ .894 10% to 10 —rt Brauns _ 494 3ft 3% 3/, .. } £enhbk 

_ 1SB1 6'A Sft 5rt -ft BrttvMtB ..TO1M ft ¥b. .ft -rt? Cantarcn 

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_ 11499 18% 16ft TOft - ft ( uiBrend _ 332 Irt U rt - “"»*« 

407436% 34% SS* 1 IrS^ & 50 25 174 Sft T* 9** -ft CEreMda I TOM TO IS*, 14'* -rt CotwOgo „ 197412 lift 12 Dlm net 

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4 136 4% 4ft drt ♦SlBritMB 59* it 7» 18% 18% *2 CanGariM _ 795 1% 5 S>* *% Conmod _ 385622rt lT’A 22 +?ft »reu 

136 4% 4% 4 A *» 878 7ft 7 7ft * ft Q rllN BC 51 JX OT52Jft 27V, 27% -ft ConnYVt 1X4 6X 47 24% Elft 24% *1 DOdV 


_ 6724 23ft 20% 23% +2, DtaSw 
- 1509 4 5% 6 +V, OeirxC 


_ 2821 ift ift 1% — Vu Devcem 

- 417 8ft Brt 8ft *% OeVBuI 

_ 6791 1% 1% IVi, -ft Devdl 

„ 11 3ft 3 3rt *% IMalPoo 

_ 1970 5% 4% 5rt -ft Dtato0*C 

„ 1974 12 lift 12 —ft Dkjmetrc 




— IMU IM-7J |<7| u-7 * Bvwnna — m /■**, 77* vtj. . ■ viHiram < — V* ^ 

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- 4714 TOrt IS'* 16% *1 ■** 15 'i? 8ft ,7V« 8 

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- 314 8% 7% 7% — 1 rt EjeeTI 

- 15 12% 12% 12% — Vu EXTON 

_ 134 8% 7% Vft -% Exhte 

- 276 1% Tft 1% -rt Emins 

_ 825 25 25 -W Exa-Ar 

- JJl 3 ** WVi -% ExpScp 

_ _ 270217% 1 SVi 16% — 1 E xsm 

„ 1976 12 11% 12 — rt Dknnetrc - 19? 6rt 5% 6rt -ft Ezogny 

_ 933 4ft 4% 48% — Vu Dfonon ^ 1454 4ft 4% taft, —Vu EZOTTP 

_ 383622% 19% 22 +2% \ DtareU XO 19 1253 2:% 70% 20% -V« 

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I 437 14% 14 14ft - grySo 
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1 * 5 , 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


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w-pjblKai, 
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cities: 
'saw, Cracow 

ansk p oznQn ' 

a Wroclaw. 

’lease call: 

l-MAXGMBH 

2946/43001 
ix: 43 00 20 


Hew International Bond Issues 

Compiled by Laurence Desviteltes 






laatnr 

Amount 

(muttons) 

MIL 

Coup. 

% 

Pries 

Price 

end 

week 

Term* 

Floating Rate Note* 

* Banco di Napoli 

5100 

1999 

030 

9916 

— 

Oer 3-month Libor. NoncoUabJe. Fees 020%. Denomsnotiora 
St 0X00. fSdomoo Brothers Inti.) 

BankAmerica 

$500 

1999 

3/16 

99.935 

— 

Over 3-month libor. Co9cfcia ee par in 1997. Fees 0.175V 
Darwnwwfiws $10,000. (GoUttan Sachs Wl.) 

Ford Motor Credit 
Corp. 

$250 

1999 

Ojo 

99.757 

— 

Obt 3-month liar. Cafiabb re par in 1996. Fees 0.175%. 
Dcnominahore 510,000. (pddmon Sachs Int’IJ 

MBNA Master Credit 
Card Trust II 

$870 

2000 

0.33 

100 

— 

Over 1 -month Liber. Average fife 4 years. Aha $45 mJtion 
paying 0J5 aver Libor. FeesO.TBV Denominations $1 mifion. 
{Merrill Lynch Inti) 

MBNA Master Gedit 
Card Trust (1 

$870 

2001 

0.26 

99538 

— 

Over 1 -month Libor. Average life 7 yea's. Also $45 lalton 
paying 0.45 over Libor. Fees 035% Denominations SI rnlioa 
(Merrill Lynch Inti) 

National Bank of 
Canada 

$250 

1999 

0J0 

99 J8 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. Reoffered at 99.97. NoncaQebie. Fees 
CL20% Denominations $10,000. (Goldman Sachs Inti.) 

Deutsche Bou imd 
Badenbank * 

DM200 

1999 

1/16 

99.85 

— 

Over 6-month Libor. Noncdlabla. Fees D.20%. Denominations 
510,000. (5GZ Baric.] 

IMI Bank Int’l 

DM300 

1997 

K 

99.925 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. Noncaflobie. Fees UHL (J.P. Morgan.) 

Fbwd-Coupons 

Argentina 

5500 

1999 

10.95 

99.925 

— 

Senvannudly. NonoaflabJe. Fees 0405%. (Goldman Sachs 
Infl.) 

Central Puerto & 
Central Neoquen 

$100 

1997 

10U 

99.552 

— 

5cfriomuafiy. NoncaBoble. Fees 1% Denomination! $10fl00. 
{Citibank (nt’IJ 

Eksportfinans 

$200 

1997 

zero 

100 

— 

NoraaDabie. Redemption amount at maturity will be Mead to 
the Goldman Soria's Grmimxfey (ndu-Totnf Return, fees not 
doctaed. Denominations $10,000. (Goldman Sarin Int'L) 

Federal Home Loan 
Board 

$400 

1996 

6% 

99.833 

99MS 

Nonadabie. Fees 015% Denomination] $104100. (Salomon 
Brothers Inti) 

OesttMTekKsdw 

KontroUbank 

$400 

1999 

m 

101.378 

98xo 

Reoffered at 99.753. NoncaOdde. Fees 1 JV% [Goldman Sachs 
Int'L) 

EuroRma 

DM400 

1997 

6% 

101X17 

— 

Nonoofeable. Fees 114%. (Dresdner Bank.) 

Notional Bank of 
Hungary 

DM500 

2001 

9% 

101.65 

— 

Reoffered at 9944. NoneaSable. Fees 2W% (Bayerische 
Landesbankj 

Depfa Finance 

FF2JXX) 

1998 

7H 

99.567 

99X5 

Nonoollable. Fee 025%. (BNP Capital Markets.) 

Deutsche Bank 

Finance 

m. 100,000 

1996 

11 

1 01 -575 

99 JO 

Noncrilabie. Fungible with outstandng blue, roiling toted 
amount to 300 bBion Ire. Fees 114% (Deutsche Barit.) 

European Investment 
Bonk 

m. 200,000 

1998 

10.15 

98.555 

— 

Noncodablc. Fungible with outstandng issue, robing total 
amount to 2 trillion Ere. Fees 1W% (Banco Commercials 
bok'unaj 

World Baik 

rTL 300,000 

1997 

10H 

101.135 

— 

NoncaUoble. Fees 114% (Deutsche Bank.] 

France TeJeoom 

C$125 

1997 

814 

101243 

— 

Reoffored at 100X155. NoncaBobJe. Fees 1H% (Paribas Capi- 
tal Markets.) 

New South Wales 
Treasury Corp. 

AusSlOO 

2004 

10U 

101A5 

— 

Noncrilabie. Fees 2M% (Hambros Bade.) 

Swedish Export Credit 

Y 10,000 

1997 

3.10 

99.99 

— 

Interest will be 3.10% until Nov. 1995^ when issue b callable tt 
per, thereafter 370% Noncrilabie. Fees not cEsdased. (Yo- 
mabhi Int'L) 

Equtty-Unkad 

Renong Berhad 

$225 

2005 

216 

100 

— 

Redeemable at 12970 in 1999 to yield 714%. Convertible at 
436 ringgit per share, a 10.10% premium, and at 2^49 ringgit 
per dollar. Fees not disclosed. (Morgan 5kn!ey Int'L] 

Sanancor Overseas 
financing Ca 

$100 

2004 

open 

100 

— 

Coupon indicated ot to 7W% CaHabia re par in 1998. 

Convertible at an expected 10 to 15% premium. Fees 214% 
Terms to be set Oa. 28. (Swiss Bank Crept.) 


I" " • 


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Sr 


£ - :v. 

i •-« - - 


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:> -.S- 


Retooling Japan’s Economy 


1 r, ii 


• »/::* 


•n '< 


-4 •> 



' J _• 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tones Service 

TOKYO — Japan’s longest 
economic slump since the end 
of World War Q is finally end- 
ing. But that has brought little 
cheer to Sakawa Sdsakqo, a 
ftVperson company in Tokyo 
that makes guide rails for deva- ■ 
tors. 

Sakawa, like most Japanese 
companies, prides itself on 
quality. Elevators in Japan rare- 
ly jiggle or creak. 

But now, companies in other 
parts of Asia are learning to 
produce rails that are nearly as 
good but are priced 30 to 40 
percent lower, prompting Ja- 
pan’s elevator manufacturers to 
start baying foreign-made rails. 
Toshio Sakawa, executive direc- 
tor of the company, fears it 
might not be around in 5 to 10 
years. 

Miles away, and several 
nmgs up the industrial-sophis- 
tication ladder, is a highly auto- 
mated Citizen Watch plant. A 
small corps of technicians 
works beside armies of minia- 
kture robots piecing together 
7 800,000 intricate quartz move- 
ments eac h day. 

At Citizen, there are fewer 
worries about foreign competi- 
tion. The final assembly — put- 
ting on the watch faces and 
wristbands — is migrating to 
Hong Kong and other nations. 
Still, the company has no inten- 
tion of making its high-tech 
quartz movements outside Ja- 
pan because specialized ski ll s, 
not cheap labor, are more cru- 
cial in this kind of work. 

Citizen and Sakawa show the 
two sides of the structural shift 
in the Japanese economy that is 
unfolding despite the cyclical 
recovery. 

The main force behind the 
shift is the relentless strength- 
ening of the yen, which has ap- 
preciated another 25 percent m 
the last two years. The dollar hit 
an all-time low in Tokyo on 
Friday, when it dripped briefly 
to 96.55 yen. In the mid-1980s, 
the dollar was worth 250 yen. 

The strong yen phis high 
wages, an inefficient domestic 
distribution system and exces- 
sive regulations have made Ja- 
pan less hospitable for manu- 
facturing. 

“The production cost in Ja- 
pan has become the highest in 
the world,” laments Haruo 
Tsuji, president of the Sharp 
Corp., the cakmlators-to-copi- 
ers maker of electronic goods. 

Already, the steep costs at 


home are forcing automobile 
and electronics companies, ar- 
guably Japan’s two strongest 
industries, to transplant their 
manufacturing to lower-cost 
nations. 

The shift offshore of manu- 
facturing and the pressure on 
domestic -prices mom lower- 
priced imports means that Ja- 
pan, which once roared bade 
from recessions, will not recov- 
er so muddy tins time. Econo- 
mists t h i n k in the future Japan 
will grow only 2 percent to 4 
percent a year, well bdow its 
historic rates. 

Yet as the case of Citizen 
shows, there is a core of prod- 


To say that 
Japan’s competitive 
edge has been 
blunted is not to say 
that h is gone. 
History has shown 
underestimating 
Japan as an 
economic rival is 
short-sighted. 


ucts, requiring specialized tech- 
nology and skill, that can still 
earn their way in Japan's high- 
cost environment. And the Citi- 
zen formula is likely to be a 
model for Japan in the future — 
namely, the finished product 
might be assembled abroad, but 
the core high-tech component 
will still be made in Japan. 

Indeed, for all its fame as a 
producer of videocassette re- 
corders, cars and cameras, such 
finished products account for a 
declining part of Japan's ex- 
ports. Instead, Japan is becom- 
ing a supplier of components 
and production machinery, like 
robots, to be used by other na- 
tions to assemble the final prod- 
ucts — a trend that has helped 
keep Japan’s trade surplus high. 

There are three other changes 
creating what might be called 
Japan’s new terms of trade: 

• Japan is relying more for 
growth on booming Asia and 
Iks cm the mature markets of 
the United States and Europe. 

• It is moving from manufac- 
turing toward services and in- 
formation-based industries. 


The loss of profits and sales 
from die cyclical downturn, 
however, does not necessarily 
signify a loss of long-term com- 
petitiveness — an attribute that 
is based more on variables like 
work force skills, savings hab- 
its, government policies and 
technological skills. 

Indeed, the cyclical slump 
has provided the incentive for 
Japanese companies to cut 
costs, which should help them 
adjust to the structural changes 
in the long run. 

Having companies trim their 
work forces or shift manufac- 
turing abroad might not be 
good for employment in Japan. 
But from the point of view of an 
American company, it is proba- 
bly tougher to compete against 
a Sony that makes its products 
in low-cost Malaysia than in 
high-cost Japan. 




BONDS: International Market in a Waiting Mode 





Cootmued from Page 9. 
reported to be non-Japanese 
Asians, including central banks. 

Fannie Mac, or the Federal 
National Mongage Associa- 
tion, the largest of the federally 
sponsored enterprises, an- 
nounced last week that it sp- 
linted Lehman Brothers to 
lead a group of banks to ar- 
range a $20 billion global pro- 
gram. 


£ 


While the official reason 
driving these programs is a de- 
sire to widen and to diversify 
the investor base, bankers said 
the domestic cost of issuing pa- 
per has been increasing as U.S 
portfolios are already large 
holders. “Domestic spreads are 
under upward pressure, and the 
aim is to tap into the large pools 
of overseas capital in me hope 
of getting better rates," one 
banker said. 


These federally sponsored 
lenders were large issuers of so- 
called structured debt — highly 
leveraged exotic issues, which 
provided low-cost funding. 

But with that market drying 
up after the large losses suffered 
this year by holders of such pa- 
per, the borrowers are now 
looking Tor a new source of 
cheap funding, bankers said. 


Bears and Bonds 

Dollar Sours the Market 


Compiled by Our Staff Frm Diipoicka 

NEW YORK — The Trea- 
sury market is expected to post 
new lows this week as U.S. inter- 
est rate uncertainty, die doOar 
and data on third-quarter eco- 
nomic growth keep the pressure 
on. 

“You have the risk to see new 
lows across the Treasury 
curve,” said Deb Packman, 
market strategist for Smith Bar- 
ney in New York. 

The first look at third-quarter 
gross domestic product, which 
is expected to show growth 
around 3 percent, wall undoubt- 
edly be the major economic 
news for the week. 

Last week, a surge in single- 
family home sales in September 
and sharp increases in price 
gauges of the Philadelphia Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank's October 
manufacturing survey caused 
bonds to slump, pushing the 
yield on the benchmark 30-year 
to the highest level in at least 
two years. 

The data renewed concern 
that the Federal Reserve Board 
had fallen behind the inflation- 
fighting curve and would raise 
short-term interest by more 
than 50 basis points before the 
end of the year. 

Most analysts expect a tight- 
ening of at least 50 basis points 
at the Nov. 15 Federal Open 
Market Committee meeting 

“Until the Fed moves, unless 
you get unusually weak eco- 
nomic data next week, the Fed 
has a problem," said Steve 
Wood, director of financial 
market analysis for BA Securi- 
ties in San Francisco. 

He said that fund managers 
were only willing to buy securi- 
ties that mature near Nov. 15. 

When Treasury yields were 
□ear their highs two weeks ago. 


some fund managers consid- 
ered the yield attractive because 
the economy was showing signs 
of slowing. 

At the time, the expected 
tightening in November was 
seen as the last one for a while, 
said John Kim, chief invest- 
ment officer for Aetna Life In- 
surance and Annuity Co. in 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

Recent economic data have 
changed the picture. 

“The issue now is whether the 
Fed has lost its grip" on infla- 
tion, Mr. Kim said. 

Treasuries also are being hurt 
by weakness in the dollar, espe- 
cially against the Deutsche 
made. 

A weakening dollar carries a 
two-fisted punch against Trea- 
suries. It makes doUar-denomi- 
nated securities less attractive 
to investors and also can lead to 
inflation by malting imports 
more expensive. 

All the uncertainty in the 
market could make bidding dif- 
ficult when the Treasury auc- 
tions $17-25 billion in two-year 
notes Tuesday and $1 1 billion 
in 5-year notes Wednesday. 

“Economic growth is still 
strong and two-years and five- 
years are coming out in the bad 
environment. These notes will 
be traded at a discount rather 
than a premium over the next 
year," said William Stevens, 
portfolio manager at Mont- 
gomery Asset Management 

In when-issued trading late 
Friday the two-year note was 
being offered to yield 6.81 per- 
cent and the five-year to >aeld 
7.46 percent Both were up 10 
basis points since Wednesday, 
when the Fed announced the 
terms of the auctions. 
(Knighi-Ridder, Reuters, NYT) 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Oct. 24 - 28 


A sctxxltslm at tt#s week's economic end 
Snarctd events, compiled lor rhe Intema- 
ttarwiHerakiTripwwpygtcembefsBua* 
naaaNtmn. 

Asia-Pacific 

■ Oof. 24 

Hong Kong August ratal sales fig- 
ures. 

Tokyo Bank ot Japan news two-day 
quarwfy branen managare masting. 

• Oct. 2B canbarra Lawn crop eatt- 
mataa. 

Haw DoM Communications India ’W. a 
tour-d«y International ethtohion and con- 
fannies on oouipnwu, rwtworta ana ser- 
vices tor talocommurwcation. opens. 
Taiwan Tawan Restoration Day Ml- 

flay- 

• Dot 26 Canbana Consumer pnos 
Index data tor Juty-AuguM quarter. 

Europe 

a out. 24 Copenhagen Mirasw of 
Finance presen t* the October economic 
review. 

Frankfurt October con 01 living for 
North-flnine Westphalia. 

Expected sometime tMa week 
Frankfurt August trade balance; August 
current account; August balance of pay- 
manta. 

Frankfurt October coat of living for Ba- 
dan-WOrttemburg. Hesse. Bowls, 
v Oat 29 Bona Leading German 
economic Institutes p res ent a joint Au- 
tumn report 

London October Confederation ot Brit- 
ish Industry trends survey. 


a Oct. 20 Copen ha gen July-August 
trade balance, excluding ships. 

■ OoL 27 Frankfurt Bundesbank 
central councS mooting. 

Frankfurt September Import prices. 
Parti Saprember household consump- 
tion. 

Earnings expected Axa. Impanel Chem- 
ical Industries PLC. L’Oresd. Royal Dutch 
Petroleum Co. 

e Oat. 2B Brussels October CPI. 
Brussels Trade Commissioner LeOit 
Britten of the EU mean with Privatization 
Ml nicer Anatoli B. Chubais of Russia. 
Paris October meee industrial survey, 

Aimricas 



* Oat_ 24 Monterey, CeMamia Amen- 
lean ElectronJcfl Association annual tech- 
nology conference. Through Oct. 26. 
Washington The Treasury Department 
reports September budget. 

Was h ington The U.S. Agriculture □*- 


partmeni releases its weekly report on 
punting progreae for seven crops. 
Earning! expected Allstate Corp.. 
American Express Co.. Apple South toe., 
Ashland Oil Inc. Atlantic RtahMd Co.. 
Black & Decker Corp.. Brin Voice Sys- 
tems ine., Caterpuur Inc.. ConaoiKUnct 
FrSrghtweys tot, Deluxe Corp., Eastman 
Chemical Co. 

»0oL2B Washington Th* Labor De- 
partment reports costs Index for the thM 
quarter. 

Washington Existing home sale* for 
September. 

Haw York The Conference Board re- 

laaaaa U Indax ol consumer confidence 

Mr October. 

Earning* — p— «— « AJnouch Communi- 
cations Inc.. American General Corp. 
Baxter InteniaSonal toe. 

e Dot. 2ft Washington September 
durable goods orders. 

Washington The Federal Communica- 
tions Commission opens tts auction tor 30 
regional narrowband Rcanaea (o offer 
personal communications aanrtces. 

San Jeea, Cattomis Semiconductor In- 
dustry Asaodedon win announce its an- 
nual forecast lor the semiconductor in- 
dustry tor 1995-1097. 

Washington U.S. Department of Energy 
Issues na weekly report on U.& petroleum 
stocks, production, Imparts and refinery 
utO cation. 

• Oofc. IT Washington The Com- 
marcs Department reports tMrd quarter 
housing vacancies. 

W as hington The Labor Department re- 
ports min at weekly state unemployment 
compensation insurance dal ms. 


U.S. to Change 
CPI Formula 

The Ajscdoted Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
U 5. Labor Department is go- 
ing to change how it measures 
the cost of living. 

Effects of the changes, due in 
January, will perhaps shave 
only 0.1 percentage point off 
die annual inflation rate. But 
even that will be felt by millions 
of Americans because the Con- 
sumer Price Index is used to 
make cost-of-living adjust- 
ments in Social Security and 
other government benefits. 

The government is modifying 
how it tracks prices of food, 
shelter, and prescription drugs. 


Bank Branches: Dying Breed 


• It will fuel growth by con- 
suming more at home instead of 
exporting its products. 

How successful Japan is in 
making these changes will, to a 
large extent, determine its fu- 
ture prosperity. 

“At the turn of the century, 
we may look back on the early 
"1990s as a very difficult time, 
but a time of transition," said 
Kenneth S. Courtis, senior 
economist for Deutsche Bank 
in Tokyo. But if Japan fails to 
make adjustments, he said, the 
nation may see “some of its 
greatest industries being com- 
promised or even destroyed.” 

The transition ahead win not 
be easy and some Japanese 
businessmen are warning their 
countrymen of the conse- 
quences. 

“We are now malting a big 
fuss over 3 percent," said Kat- 
sunoke Maeda, president of the 
synthetic fiber giant Toray, re- 
ferring to the current unem- 
ployment rate, which is high by 
Japanese standards. “We have 
to be prepared when the unem- 
ployment rate goes to 10 per- 
cent" 

Still, to say that Japan's com- 
petitive edge has been blunted 
is not to say that it is gone. 
History has shown that under- 
estimating Japan as an econom- 
ic rival is short-sighted. 

The perception that Japan is 
in decline is magnified by the 
fact that the nation has been 
suffering at the same time from 
both a cyclical recession and 
long-term structural change. 
Moreover, the cyclical down- 
turn was particular sharp be- 
cause the fall was from a high 


By Saul Hansel! 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The next time you visit a 
bank branch in the United States, take a long 
look to savor the memory, then say good-bye. By 
this time next year, it may not be' there. 

'With growth slow, expenses high and competi- 
tion fierce, big banks around the country, from 
Chemical Bank in New York to Bank of America 
in San Francisco, are preparing to close an in- 
creasing number of branches. 

Banks have been dosing branches steadily 
over the last decade as they merged with nearby 
competitors and eliminated duplicate locations. 

Now that many people have come to accept 
the impersonal technology of automated teller 
machines and other electronic devices as a rou- 
tine part of doing business,' the banks believe 
they can dose more brandies without losing 
many customers. 

PNC Bank in Pittsburgh plans to dose up to 
30 percent of its 619 branches over the next two 
to three years. Chemical Bank dedded this year 
to dose SO more branches, just as it finished 
shutting 80 others as part of its 1991 merger with 
Manufacturers Hanover, leaving it with 280 in 
New York. 

While many people find electronic banking 
more convenient than trudging to their tradition- 
al branch, a lot of those who resisted automation 
are about to find it not only more difficult but 
probably more expensive to talk face-to-face to 
their local banker. For some, the changes are 
already hitting home. 

“When Chemical Bank dosed its branch, it 
was a body blow to everybody in the area," said 
Roland Lewis, a lawyer who lives in the Flatbush 
section of Brooklyn, where Chemical eliminated 
a branch this year. 


“1 had a routine every week to get cash," Mr. 
Lewis said. “I would walk three blocks and spend 
my money in the neighborhood bookstore and 
the Associated Supermarket Now I walk eight 
blocks and spend my money in a different 
neighborhood.’ 1 

The industry’s resolve to dose branches is 
bound to conflict with the government’s demand 
that banks devote more resources to poor, under- 
served communities. In August in what many 
bankers fear was a portent of things to come, the 
Justice Department settled a case against Chevy 
Chase RanV in Maryland on the condition that 
the bank open branches in black neighborhoods. 

Banks are starting the cutbacks by closing 
branches in more affluent urban and suburban 
areas, where the new banking technologies have 
been most accepted. 

Huntington Bancshares, of Columbus, Ohio, 
for example, is replacing a third of its branches 
with smaller all -electronic sites. But William M. 
Randle, a senior vice president, said it was hold- 
ing off in poor communities, “where people may 
be less comfortable with the technology than in 
up-market areas.” 

What is driving all this is the recognition that 
the cost of 'maintaining a bank branch in every 
neighborhood — with the tell ere. managers, real 
estate costs and other expenses — is too high for 
most banks to justify any longer. 

“In the last few years, the banking industry 
has done extraordinarily weU,” said Joel Fried- 
man, a partner in Andersen Consulting, the con- 
sulting arm of the big accounting firm. “But 
structurally nothing has changed: There are too 
many competitors chasing too few customers.” 


Export-Import Bank 
Weighs Beijing Office 

Agmce France- Prase 

BEUING — The U.S. Ex- 
port-Import Bank chairman, 
Kenneth Brody, said he was 
considering Beijing as the site 
for the bank’s first representa- 
tive office outside the United 
States. 

Mr. Brody discussed the pro- 
posal with Vice Prime Minister 
Zou Jiahua, who emphasized 
China’s desire to work with the 
bank on infrastructure projects. 


Euromarts 
At a Glance 


Eurobond Yield* 



OcL 21 Oct. W 

YrbWh Yrlow 

UJhS, lent term 

Ut 

027 

US 

431 

UJ.S,ndntenB 

776 

771 

7J6 

5-45 

ILS. Libert term 

734 

737 

737 

438 

Feuedstttrfhie 

737 

730 

1M 

*34 

French francs 

tM 

me 

024 

567 

Itofianllre 

1U4 

1137 

1130 

7.71 

DcuUkraae 

til 

071 

074 

*20 

Swedish krone 

1074 

1072 

1133 

734 

ECU. ions term 

073 

076 

*64 

01* 

ECU, unto) term 

Ut 

04S 

050 

S31 

Com 

7.17 

f.M 

764 

4JI 

AUS 

7.9S 

MS 

KUO 

0 97 

NJLS 

7.15 

731 

761 

Sto 

res 

432 

462 

434 

237 


Source: Luxembourg Stack Exchange. 

Weakly Sales or. 20 

PrUnam Mart* 

Cadd Enradaor 

S HoaS 1 HsaS 
Strain fib Dii 505.10 fiUO LI 9190 

Convert - — Ut l* 

FKNl KM — I 7 M 0 into 

ECP tMUO 4 -IUto lUtttt 7 , 449.10 

TOM 7 ,UU 0 AMMO 11591 JO UOSto 


cedw earaew 
t Moos i No 
Stratofcb 1007490 19,74170 2U1M) 79,911 JO 

Convert 31040 sous iJUto itorto 

FRM 9,13* J0 IWtoJOJMJO iJ3ttt 

ECP LU4to 1U2U0 9/41.10 71 J09to 

TOM 2S85UH 34J10J9 57JB3A0 OKUO, 

Source: Eunclear,CeM. 


Libor Rates 


Ocr. 21 


1 -month 

3 -mostfe 

4 -tmatb 

U 5 .S 

S 


515/16 

Deotsenemertt 415/14 

5 3/14 

Si 

PoeedsterfliiD 

57 /M 

• 

4 Vfi 

Franc* franc 

57/14 

M 

5 13/16 

ECU 

511/16 

4 

43/14 

Yen 

25/14 

» 

2 U 


Sources: Uovtis Bantu Reuters. 



NOV. 26 & 27 (830 ajn. to 12-30 p.m.) 

FEB. 16-18 

WORLD ENERGIE INDEX 

General Interest Irritative 
to be hdd at the hta Acropolis. Fiance 
Entrance lee mdudes the program, 
resented sea. badge and subsequent report 

Lrm Bed number ri places 
.Man rede Tribute 2.800 F Lecturers 1 700 F 
Congressmen: l/OOF General ptijhc 250 F 

Associations 150 F Students 80 F 

Reservations by fact (331 S3 27 09 31 
and by matt 

Secretariat EVALOKATECSCH Expertises 
BP 55, 546Q2 VHers-Les-Nancy Cedes 
FRANCE. Tefc (331 83 28 31 08. 

Societies In Crisis 
and Mental Health 

Leading European psyduansto psydiologHs. 
eccoonusis and sea olopas will aamine the 
mental health efiws on sooayri 
Unempkvment. immigration and Violence 
Spensaed ty European SccaJ Uirestnes and 
Inlemtooral Sooal Ogamatrons Ccnteence 
otEanoas seek soaaLy-aware Companies to 
dwdcp symposia iSusoabnc then eflorts to help 
solve these problems | 

Contad Mercure Communication 
International. 

Tel.: (33-1 142 99 17 70 

Fax; 133-1 145 63 2568 

NICE 

PARIS 



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Page 12 




MUTUAL funds 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 




Close of trading Friday, Odt. 21. 


Grp Name 


Wkly 


• Fa Nome last chge 


AAL Mutual- 

. Sg? 

. SmCoSlf V ^06 

BaJS&Bf) M.59 — ,73 
CopGrn bits ~U 
. GirueMn 1463 —.07 

Grwjncn M.o5 —a\ . 

HQ.ajn 14.92 -.13 1 

. to to -.17; 

AfcYFureK- 
g-YentP 1040 -.14 
HI 9.93 — JJ7 
. El fE 1034 — m 
OwtWnft 10.73 —.13 
UMincp 7131 — .18 
■ AFLBQanUI —.12 


Qn> Nairn 


WkJr 


FdNnme Last awe 


GjMdsBne9.4A-.04 
GlMoac np9^4 — .03 

CvScAa 936-36 


Ip 970 —37 

GvTlAp 8.10 -37 
evngp e.io— 37 
GVnCo 8.10-37 
GrlnAp 1237 —.15 
Gr’rcp 1238 —.15 
HaroAp TIBI -.10 
Hjradp 13L75 —.10 
HiYiainvAp6.Q3 „ 
HiYJ#p 603 -31 
>P 9.77 -34 


MunBBP .? 77 — W 


- — in 1134 —33 
Full ?J? —.07 

AtSGv p ? J2 —3i 
Aorsv p 2738 
BcAAp 15.18 -.11 
BalBT 15.17 —.17 


asft -*»-* 


1733 —30 
9.13 —38 
t 1030 -34 


SHOP 10.90 -M 


..._k6 9-20—02 
HYUJ8T 9.19 —37 
inma 7J5 —31 

IrmEB 1334-34 

.ImM p 93V —.02 
7.94 —05 
930— 34 
10.48 —.07 
10.50 —35 




VduBI 21 il -.09 
- VohJP 217S — 39 

■JMSk" 1 - 05 


AdMIB ®7® — 31 
IntMtor 


9.34 —34 


ShUSGn 1035 -33 
U50MI 


JSGAttn 102? -.08 
wW Puntfc: 

CopGrn ID. 1 8 —37 
Grmcon 10.07 —35 
income VJS —05 
ASM Fan 975 —JO 
A VEST A: 

Balanced 1733 —.05 
FaGra Ifle* — .07 
Eqlnatm 17.95 —.18 
Income 15.24 —.72 


InfFx/nn ... ... 

AccMorto 11.-16 —39 
ShllntF* 11-79 -33 
Acornln 16.44 —.02 


AcmRJ 1131 —.14 
19.97 —31 


AdsnCau . . 
AovCBai p 10.08 -37 


AUvCR ^b JIJ3 —0V 


Advesf 

Govt no 877 —.09 
Bwthne 1 (l*o —.18 
HYBdp 8.42 *.0i 
mat no IZ.05 —.0/ 
MuBdNal 9.02 —.08 
SpCl IIP 2077 —39 
Stratlnc 11.93 —.08 
Aetna Aovlsan 
Aetna! 10.52 —39 
Bond! VjSJ —35 
Grinoom 170.89 —.12 
IntfGri 1133 —.12 
TccFrc! 9.11 —34 
Aelna Select: 

Aetna n 1035 —39 
ASkmGrn 9J3 —35 
Bond (1 931 —.05 

Govt v.45 —OS 
Growth 10.64 —39 
Gnwinco 10.92 —.12 
imtGrn li^a — .n 
CoGr 1033 -.13 
r Funds: 

..jwtnt 20.41 —03 
IncGrr 1X11 —.10 
MidCnGrtl2J3 *33 
SmCap t 22.10 *32 
ABanceCno: 
wfaceo 1.74 —03 
Bolen b 1320 — .12 
BalnnB t 14. 0B —05 
BondA p 1X7D —.12 


PoaiA P 1137 ... 
Pecefip 1734 — >08 
RefstA c U6 —.14 

RoEstBp aas -.14 

Hefegc a 836 —14 
TEHiYA pi 037 -3d 


TEHjYBpVLi4 -37 
TqtExia plDjffl— 34 


Grn Name 
FdName 


Wktv 
Mama Last Chae 


Ealndex 111.49 —39 
Fbtodlgc x 931 —.11 
977 -.10 
STRxInc x 933 —35 
SCMunl. J0J7 —37 



Fjgrlncn .434 — 32 


no 10.19 —35 
PTCMtn 9,44 +.11 
5TGin 1.74 
STBandn 2.90 -31 
B«£ndow 16A0 -38 
Bmdvsin T7J3 
B md ywn n 2431 —39 
Brinson Funds: 
BtlnsnGI 11031 —M 
BrinsGIBf 9.70 *.02 
NUSEOfV 938— 09 
Bruce n 9135 >.17 


Brundpan 1037 -36 
Bun S Bear Go: 


Gfcincrns 433— .02 
Goidinvnnm7 * 


GovtSecnpiAJo— 88 
Mulnco 1535 —.14 
Qiws&iti pi 333 +jtc 
S pfej o 1837 —33 
' no 830 -32 


TxEfflp '>Q£7~— 04 , Burnham P3Q06 


P 92ft —37 
UlilAD 831 -.17 
UtilB p 831 -.12 
American Funds: 

Am Bat p 12.18 —.10 
AmcD D 1232 — Oi 
AmMuH aJ132 -.22 
BondFdo 13.90 —.08 
CamnBi p 3329 — l; 


CooWia p l SM +39 
~ “ ~ 018.19 —35 


CapWGrpi . 
EuDOte 2235 —10 
Fdlnvp 1BJ3 — .10 
Gavin 1234 —.09 
Gwfl3MP».92 — .)? 
HlTrslp 13.79-03 
IncoFap 1154 —39 


C&SRttvn 31.44 —M 
COM Ponds: 

AmerTF 938 —04 
CapGevn2433 —M 
Fxdlncn 1032 — 38 
Mgtln 2638 — .19 

Realty n 937 —.12 
Calmos p 1230 - .04 


C&OABBGT 02.14 -33 


invCoA p l 

LtdTEBd pI187 —37 
rtwEcarpu.97 —.13 
NewPerp I8i? —33 


SmQiWp7l67 
TasExPtpll33 ■ 


TrExCApl4.99 — 11 
T»E>MDpl4.56 — .10 


Tx&cVAp!j0?— . 70 
PI7J8 — J2 


V/shMutpl __ 
AmGwtti »A7 
AHenign 1.04 —.02 
Amer Natl Funds 
Grawm 436 —32 
Income 2131 —34 
T rifle x 1SJ0 —.14 


APIGrprtf 7237 
AmPnfann 
AffgGro 1336 -.07 

Bond 9.09 -.08 

Eauifv 1130 — -OV 

intBO 1034 —06 


lntnnjT*F 10.13 —09 


AmUtlFdn 19.93 —26 
AmwvMui 721 -.03 
AnalvtShTGv9 66— .03 
Analytic n 12.14 —06 
AncnCao 2060 —.08 
AnthmGr rnlOJS — .14 
AauilQ Funds: 

AZ TF 10.02 —07 


CO TF 


—06 


HI TF 10.92 — J07 

TF 16.15 — . 


. .. 16.15 —35 

NranaTF 9.27 — .o; 
OR TF 10.11 —37 


CA T Fin 1032 —37 
CoBfeima Trust) 

Cal Incn 11.77— 11 
CaJUSn 937 —39 
58^500 n 1139 —10 
SAPMidCOJAS — 
Catven Group: 

GlaoEa la. 13 —38 
inco 1535 —.16 
MBCA! IB.03 —.05 
Munlnl 9.95 —.05 

Socea ro.40 ~.IS 
jtrGwtti 1633 +.18 
TxFLtdn 1037 
TxFrLmCl034 
T*R_rw 75.96 —38 
T»FVT 1557 —38 
USGov 11*1 —.11 
Cam IhMm Fite 
CapGrA 15.70 —.03 
GvinA 1255 —.12 
GwthA 1436 —.10 
IncGfA 14.9b —30 
MuIPCA 1427 —12 
CapGrBI 1530 —.04 
GtabB 14.17 —II 
GvfrtBt 1266 —12 
GwttlBt 1450—10 
incGrBl 1437 —JO 
MulncBt 14J9 —11 
CapAAkidxnii.n —39 
" Rvsftmon: 


Gm Name wtdr 
FdName LastCtwe 


Mumincv 973 —14 
□eanwitran 



..it 1757 . _ 

;iti? 3034-38 
tnf TS—fll 
Ot 1350 TTI7 
11 8.71 -32 

tv! 1V49-JM 
2f IflJ4 —32 
Jt 8J3— 39 

ffi» SCI 7034 —25 
COP 931 +.01 
Id 6J0 +31 
IntSmCt 9.77 +.06 
tmrnd r 9i —37 
LttlMuni ?J3 —30 

Muffil 9.W —.09 
AVjCAt 9.79 —12 
MUFLf 7031 -tO 


MU^l —10 


MuOKO 934 —39 
MultPAl 9.95 -38 
NYTxFt 1136 —09 

PrcMt 11.91 -.ID 
Prarmerp B.77 —32 
SelMun 1152—.U 
Mcnqsed 1 10 M —.01 

9J8 —33 
1434 -39 
11.18 —09 


STBd 
ST USD 
5tr«t 
Tax Ex 
USGvtt 


GrpName wwy 
FfiNamn Last aide 


MQTxFt 9.85 —10 
NJTXft 1036 — 39 

NVTxFr 70# —.10 
NtflMun t 933 —ID 
TXF t 954 —09 
-tdt 9S —35 

ORTXFI IS— 10 


PAW t 9. 
«Ft 8, 


RlTx . . 

STStrat BJ4 
5CTXFJ 9.60 -39 
TNTxFI 951 —39 
TXTxFJ 9.81 —09 
TOlRtnl 6JS —34 
VATxFI 931 —39 
WVTxFt 9.03 —38 

^"TiS'Sj, 

EVSlfc 11.93-39 
Grejvthp 730 — 37 


Incfias a 7.BS 


indiqa 1IL76 ' 
lBd 9.47 


Muni 

STTsyfl 57.02 

i 634 — 36 

TrorfTati 

EdPBal 1853 —10 

E SSlnst^*^M —.08 

is^n ns=£ 

FLTrlhl l'dil —10 
MgdBdl n 950 —.10 
SmCnol n 1030 —33 
-A 9.81 — W 


•» ;6 S1K£ u^SSJl'SHS S P-a+r 


_ . *iwy wpimnw may - isrp name vnay ■ i#ni rwrrn wwiwiwmo . i cho* 

RiName Last Chfle; Pd Nome Last am f=d Nome Last Chfla . Fa Nami? Las? Cw Fa Name Last Orae FdNv** Losf Oipt; Fd Name La* area j Fd Name U*t Owt J Ffliwme uw™ 

7.43 —37 | K5TF 10.?’ -« l.uS'SS^h L .VW® njslf T-S 



l Grl 10. IS —.03 ‘ 


NYTkA 1051 —07 MSB Ffl n 1&3J — .13 
OHTFA 9 :4 — D7 Mcdmnbe Gnr. 
Reriwi 70.»2 — 09 AdiGvAp 932 — 32 


SmSIcan ia|2 -34. 

SE Asia r 1435 — .151 

{IJi —J2 I Boilnvo 21M — J6 1 sT&vT * is — S ; Retires 1230 —12 AnwrFd'plllW —33 Nftina 

Trandn 5733 — Ji ■ EAKYBflnvji — 35 1 SmCnGri 10 02 — 3» ■ geiire3 1031—10 CA Mun o 936 — .06 Nations Fund: 

uSPn 1034 —38 Cdlnsp HJS-.tS' usgvi 9 31 —07 ReiireJ 8.92 —09 Conocn «.« — is - 

1197— JO I CAfmermM.10 —36 tHartor Fundi: Retires 8 74 —3* Flxinco 9J5 —36 

_ - — — - ■— 1030—06 


V«uen 4435 —J9 CrtTFrp 4.90 —.03 ' Band 10.40 —.06 ; SIGaviJ 7V7 -36 GWMI 1236 — .14 BalINt 1050 —33 

Wridw 1191—351 COTFp 11.1 1 —37 ; Copado n 16 91 - 02 . SmCsEoA 5.78 —Oi LiSMuc 9.91—34 SolTAn 10.43—03 

l=Sy5ri6rtfc 1 CTTFO 1058 — .07 Growth n 17.51 —07 TeoiA ll.lD - 21 NVMuno 935 -.05 CoGTAn 1152 —03 


2.90 —.76 ! AoGrp 2330 -34 Jl-S '-■HJ Xt' 

175 —.09 CATFO 6.96 —36 smCooG^1233 — W STT 

J: CoDlnca 1432 -.01 PrudSPCnT 

_ 'IA p f JO— 021 OSPPBd 1173— 14 

AdiRfTA n 9JB —32 p ^f. 77 —00 ! 

AFTesn: 10 


_ ... —07 TecnA . .. .. . 

AiFr' _ Tiw -.42 CvtSecp 1125 —031 Inti n 26J4 — 03 tSitfa 9.B5 — 07 watMuo 955 -3. 

AmGold r 22.95 -.101 DNTCp 1034 -.11 intiGm 11 J3 — 02 
Autar SI Ja — 36 ; Eoultvp .6.78 — 35- SWDir 


TirRetA 902 —35 NAmerp 5.42 —05 

8.79—01 L'SGovtAyaja — .il Madieiuiet 


—Jll Pri-B irusi } rt p«_.BS' t-ipipn ':-<7 Vi 7 

. , HfiEfrfl! fcglij! fi$»:W3E! IP |=| 


BWWti r 7436 — J2 ) BqlnCD 13.94 —.77 1 Volwn 7DJ4 —17 USMTpA* 6.71 — . >0 OiiraAl 9.87 —34 EmGTA 

liwwr 15.45 — 09| F1CTARS09J1 -.01 iHavenFdiTtlDJS -38 ' K«npw Funds B: CP “ - 

Qierii r tim —It . Fedlntefml0J2 —.06 Heartland FA* DvincB tt £32—03 ly» 


_ naB 9.81 -J4 
IvyEbA I #34 — .03 


Campr 28JS -l26- FedTr llJi — .05 . USGvro 693 —08 vtablncBxlTB Gritup 1531 

CwiPrdr 1437 +37,' R.TFt(iD ?3d —.10 . Value o 2184 —,0! GrmS f 1238 —M GrtnAp 9.43 


7737 —11 \ GATFp 17J3 -3>! Wf fxF 9.38-37' HWOStit 758 -M irij 

DevComr 19.94 +57* Gbvlncp 8.07 -32 1 HcnaiiesFufld: mnB 10.99 —06 Max 

Efectrr 17.94 - J7 • GBJHffh p 1154 — 06 . Eurpvi n 10 J5 — 0s Shtlnfl 7.9i — .06 Ca 


r 16.91 — J3 FL TF P 11.14—37 Vdueinco 9 81 — 07 , GrtnC 


1233 -.08 IntlAp 39 J7 — 02 

' " ' UtTlB 29.77 —.03 

Attain Stay Funds: 

Co API 19 J9 —17 


.. —10 Giump 112|—09: LAmValnll.60— J5 SmCnoB t S.75 — 35 Convt 12.62 —34 

:r 11M—.I4 1 GoKJp 1635 -J4; NAmGrinn9.fl4 — 14| TecfiB 1106 -Ji Crsaut 7.67 inreaim 12J0— 10 

r 7050—72 Gmwmp 1531 -37 FcfBvol n 1055 — .19 Tot RIB! 9.01-06 Eald* W 20 —.13 . im&jTAnllM —11 

, 11M . fc r 49J4— 57 HY TF p 10*1 —34 1 WwldBdn 9.21 -33 " " "* 

Foadr 37.76 — 38 . HIMuEldPlO.Ol -38 IhoHow P unds: 1 

HBcBtir 7446 — .01 ; lnt£Sero .121 CuoApppl474 — 19 K 

HwTieF 2114 —n I INTFo !lJ4 —JS7 : Ovine p 9^7 , 


EqlrtCJN' 

EalnlA 
EalnTA 
£tru}T A 
FlaintM 

GAITAi . . 

GviTA n 935 —38 . 
GvtlNt 935 — 38 ' 
IrtMuTAn 9J4 —37 I 


Envlro . . . ... . _ . , 

FinSvcr 49 J6 —.57 HY TF p 10A1 — 34 | WoridBd n 9.2t -33 ToIRlC 9.C _.05 fflOOIt 1139 -.03 MaeTah 9.75—07 

- ■ - ■ “ USMiflBh6.ro -.10 Go-rrt 7.86 —05 MDIIp 1IU! -. 

I Funds Indt MRsGald f 10.9 7 —36 Mpl TA 1031 — 

&Untr IJA* —m. T+FBI 9^7 —0ft M85 TA n 9. Oft — 

.. . .. 1531 —.11 . MUKlTA 10.7a — 

LMGdvfl 937 . IdxEqlfBI 61.02 —ID Veit J 5.77 —.17 MynlAP 10.10 — .10 


indEqpr 2036 — 01 I InsfApi 9.18-331 IncGro 11J3 -39 Pxd|nlnstn551 — 0? TatRti ]531 —\l MuWTA 10.10 —.10 
inoMat r 2356 —.10 1 insTFp 1 1.74 —36 ! 



Jff 


Eia in 1?:??=S? 


Endow 17.25 —18 


Utnn 

VolAd 


12 


—.16 

—20 


EmciGrn 1IJ6 +.19 
Grwth 11.96 —.15 


Cappieiun BJ8 ... 

c SSgSS?l»- is 

Grwrti 1190 —38 
Gvtlnc 485 —01 
MhRS >3-19 —20 
NZUmd 10.45 +.16 
Njcpcti 604 +.04 
Cardinal Famfly: 


Ti'FUT 9! 12— .11 AoaGIh 1033—37 
_ Baonceo 9.&5 —.70 


Cn^Irtv 1119 -Og 


dBp 

"tp 1270 —17 
17.19 —16 
. JO 9.02 -37 
GibSAp 11.66—05 
_ TA a 7.40 —.06 
iBp 7.60 —36 
ICC 7.60 —.BA 
Inc P 2J1 —37 

ssa3f 

1 1 20.94 —15 
230 —32 
11.65 —.06 


AquiDaS Fund: I BalonCeo 9.85 —.10 

tScncen »J7 — 351 Fund 1+55 —31 
~ ‘ GovtOtXip 7.90 —05 

CdrJCo IZ.« —M3 


Eqlncn 9J1 — 36 
9J4— JI6 


Arch Funds 
Bal 9J2 —37 
EmGrth 1129 -39 
GovCorp 9jtJ —.08 
Gralnc 12.98 —39 
MnTF 10.82 —.OB 
USGov 10.09 —.08 
AriefApp TO2152 —JO 
ArielGro no 2B J3 —05 
ArmtJrw n 9.14 —32 
Arrow Funds: 

Equity 9.70 —38 
Fxdlncm 9J3 —.ID 

H i 9.77 —37 
aGrpll.07 —55 
Altos Funds: 

CAtnsA 932 —35 
CaAAuriA IQJ4 —10 
GvtSecA 9jf —17 
GrOlncA 1402 —35 
NaMuniA 1DJ7 —39 
BB&T Fund& 

BofTrn JJ3 —.08 
GroIncT nil J3 —.07 
imGovTn 9J7 —.08 
NClntTB n 9 JS —34 


ComegQHTE 935 — .03 
Centura Fundt- 
EaGrwCn «J0 —.19 
FedSjnCn 933 —35 
NCTFn 9.78 —.05 
CentumGp 8.92 —.07 
Cntrv Srir rt TOMS — J® 
OiCcweC 1230-.89 
ChesGrtn 1433 —39 
CHesmt 14B32 — 1J5 
OiicMHw n 147.13 —56 
OnjbbGrln 163B —31 
ChUDOTR 14.11 —22 
CT^p er n 49J1 +.17 


l Funds: 


SSI A A 


. — .36 

FeaSee 9.94 —.11 
FL TEA 735 -36 
FundA 7.97 —.06 
QbEaA I2J5 -.08 
Grwrti a a u.73 —.14 
HIYJCA 642 —37 
incomeAn5.98 —35 
IntGrA 1032 —.17 
MATxA 736 -35 



1857 —05 
19.00 -35 
IntIB 1B57 — . 


S*3ttvT)t 9J7 — 34 Mi TEA 653 —35 
BEAFund* \ MNTEA 634— 04 


EMJtEI 24.78 -55 
20.65 — 


l:.H6a 


UJV -.% 


ShtDurOt ni.91 .. 

ShtOurlnvn4.9l —31 
SIcFxInp ISJ8 -37 
1432— .10 




Q»ABp_n1132 *31 


. jIxnlOAl —10 

WiS'1^0 


&l 

. 9. 

. JP 9, 

MuCA C P 9. 

ICATA* 0 1Ui —14 
MuIlCAB 12.01 —14 
MINES) 9J4 —09 
MUOHCP 8.91 —39 

fl»5 HIzS 

MNYA 888 -39 
MuNYBO 83B —10 
MuNYCp 8.BB —10 
MuPABp 9.04 —.08 
NMuAp 9J4 —.09 
NIIMuCp 934—39 
NEurAp 1332 + K 
NEurBn 12 95 +.03 

NAGvBp 0^—39 

\p7?.b1=^ 

JpllJO -.04 
TAp 22J9 —.13 
1AIOP 8.71 
■Mtel 8.71 .. . 

Kflp 3132*131 
lame p_ .138 


invfntEftnU.14 — . 
(nwi^Eqn is.16 — 



NfflResA 1335 + 32 
NY TE A 6.66 —37 

1 

StrtlncA 658 —.01 
TxExAD 1272 —10 
TxIrrsA O 7.76 —35 
USGrA 7236 —ID 

^ i^Zfs 


treBf 635 — 36 


.. jBt 735 -.06 
FedScBt 9.94—11 


KM’, 2^=5? 
68ST 10^=$ 

MATaBI 726 —35 

_F3i ©sraijj 

1737 —06 

v tM-a 

ilSf ‘ iP- n 
imiM 


WWlne ^737 

TCLntt 1337 -52 
TCNorfp 535 —33 
TCSCPt 9J6 —32 
Del Grp Inti: 

DeC< I 7630 —2 
DalWTl 17.93 —12 
OVcpI MJI —10 

0)3)1 622 _ 

TsvRsI 9.12 — JB 


DelawnreGnxn 
TrendAp llg 


—36 

VdueA p 2a £14 —09 
Detenu p 2536 —.10 
DeclnAp 16.19 — Jl 
Dec TRAP 12.79 —16 

Detow p 77.90 — .72 
IntlEqAp 1237 —33 

□eichAp 

DektiB 

USGavtp 7.77— 06 


TreasAp 9.12 —05 
TxUSA 


,p 1131 —36 

TxInsAp 10-31 -.05 
TXlrifAp 10.13 —35 
TxPnAp 8.14 —05 


1239 —IB 
930 +37 

, 72.91 —34 

Dimensional Fds: 

IntlValn 10-48 —35 
USLrp 1197 —13 
USSnu BJ1 —31 
U5 6-10n 1159 -35 
japan n 2752 + .04 
UK n 2473 *20 
Carln 75-51 —37 
DFARlEstWiM —1 
R«d n 10039 —3 
GJSd 9723 +M 
Govtn 100.48 —57 
irnGv 104.15 — ~ 
tntlHBM 1231 —.1 
LCa&at 1233 — 

“ fen 18.45 


'USLOVal 1045 —.06 


USSmVol 1159 


Bafcmn 4633 — Jl 
Incomen 1031 —39 

Funds: 

1411 —37 

HRtn 16.13 —10 
ntIJ9— 11 




AssetAlIn 12.93 —36 
Sained 1357 —32 


1147 _ 

IM12.4Q —38 
CalTxn 141#— 13 
Callnt n 1232 —.08 

'Jnv 




1250—11 
Edfllnd 11.15—12 
FL Intfi 1235 —11 
GNMA np 1196 —39 
GnCA 1277 —.13 
GMBdP 1199— U 
GNYn 78.98 —.17 
Grlncn 16J8 — 13 
GwttKlpnlDJ4 —36 
irtsMunnpl 
fntemin T 


mtem p 1 _ __ ... 

interEq p 1557 —36 


invGNn 14 
MAIntn 12 
MA Tax n IS 
MunSdn 11 
NJ Inin 12 
NJMunnt? 





Enterprise Grew 
COPApp 3135 —04 


GvSKP 10.^ — >L 
Gwtti np 8J7 + 02 
Grlnc p 17.84 — JI 


p 10.96 

-7J> -23 


InltGr p 1 . .. 

SmCo 436 
TE Inc P 1337 —39 
Ewrarew Funds: 
Evramn 1457 —06 


n 1138 —09 
161 —.13 


IK 

Bremen 1578 —.15 
LtoMktn 2175 +J. 
MunCAfl 9,97 —33 
MuniFn I0.li —33 


Muni Main 9.65 —.1 
1 i.06 —36 


Retiren 1 
T dtr 


rtWn 17.99 —.13 
199 - .10 


!SG?SA' 

Ealnflex 726 —37 
FAMVttn 2(75 +J1 
F Uc5p¥ S! 19.10 —38 


Growth t 1123 —.15 
HIGrBdt 979 —38 


F^OJn 

IrrtGv 


HiYBd f 9JS — >03 
MCfttOdl 1175 —39 
FFB Lexicon; 

CooApp 1127 —38 
9.77 —35 
933 -33 
pit 38 — 34 

nil. 13 —.11 

FFBEo 10.35 —07 
FFBN J 1075 —38 
HE VW Funds: 

US Short 9.91 —31 
WW Fxdln 9.40 —.04 


^WWStiTm 9.94 


STG 9.98 

FM8 Funds: 

DivECp 11MS —J6 
DivEI 1165—06 
hrttGCp 977 —36 
IntGl 9.77 —.06 
MiTFp 1020 —35 
MiTFI 1020 -35 
FPA Funds 
Ccpit 19.71 -JO 
New, me 1075 —.04 
Parmnt 1475 +31 
Peren 22.02 —31 


Foirmrn 25.lt +.17 
17.96 +3# 


FdsQ'anon 


9.49—31 
Bond r 9.13 —.(□ 

J alncFSf 1124 -39 
ISI m 8.43 —35 
jVtejnlnc! 1020 —38 


ITMunit 9.64 —.14 


OHFort P 10-62 —^7 


Util r 1222 
Federated Instt 
Arm I n 9-56 —32 
9J6 —32 

GnmolSn lifl- — 


GrowthTr 8135 -.10 
Hi Hid 831 +31 
IncaTrSn 9.73 — 37 
IncaTrl P 9.73 — 07 
imoovS p 10.I6 —36 
intGovI 10.16 —.06 
mtMunl 1027 —37 
MBdAprS iW.10 — 36 
tAiidGroS n 1 0 03 — os 
MgdG&IS n9.97 — 37 
MftdincS nx9.88—.r0 
MaxGapI 1133 — 10 
MidCan 1034 -39 
NUnjCOP nil 26 -.09 
S-IGovI n I0J5 —31 
S-IGovS P 1025 -31 
SWIndn S.64 -.02 
SlwlncSP 8.64 — 32 
911 Mu Id 1037 —.03 
ShtMunSp]037 —.03 


StOcYTr 353* -Jl 
M -.15 


StfcBand 1 
lit 21 —09 


UMB 

n. jtUV.-jf 



UMlVn 11.97 —.11 
IntBona n *23 — 05 
InttSth n IJJi —37 


□iverwn 11.92 —39 
InflEqn 6.19 *31 

Sine 9.0 — .07 

Chip p 19J6 —.08 
3oDev p 2L55 —.13 
1st n 2332 —24 
I Funds: 

_CVIn 1427 —20 
..kedln 9.60—37 
ShlTmBd n974 —.04 
VI ind 1231 —.09 
" JSCOmBOl B258 —29 



SmCoGr nlJBO —33' 
AmOassadoniiv: 
BCKn 9.15 —.07 

EittoGr nlt.Ol —.15 

Grwrti n 12.84 —03 
mp»dn V 76 — fll 
in'Bondn 9.73 —05 
infBft n 1322 —07 
MITFBdn 933 —.06 
5mCoGrnl3.7B —02 
TF Bd n v 93 —os 
TFfnfBdn 10 05 —.04 
Ambassador RW A: 
Bonat 9.15 —.07 
Esl CoGr 16 00 —.16 
Grwrti 1234 — 03 
mi Bond 923 —.05 
lnil$:k. 1122 - 07 


Yield 
Band n 

sS&i, a 

STYietdn 921 —33 
Bpndn 929-35 
Eouilyn IOJ0 —.04 
eochln 2921 +31 
moDbt B.98 —38 
imark Funds: 
‘(19.72 —.09 
1827 —3" 
..'All 10.16— .17 
EpMxA n ia90 —09 
PocQrA H 10.03 —37 

IPTIBdAn 30.75 +29 
Inter An 1D.76 —34 
ShtDurn 9.99 


5IBdAn 19 JO —35 

Smi 


. . iCOIA 1123 —0B 
U&GvAn 17.2B —05 
U3TldxAn1B.9i — .12 
Benham Group: 
AdiGpvfi 7.42 —31 
CaTFI n 10.63 —.06 
CaTFlnn 9J8 —08 
CaTFSn laos —.03 


^arTFHn B.83 —38 


-J— -u, , CdTFLn 1023 —.11 

f 13.7B — 03! EdGron 11.94—12 

TFinlBd 1 1035 —04i EurBdn 10.95 -.14 
Arnccre Vintpor: GNMAn 9.95—10 

Eau.tvn Id 45 — ll I Goidinn 1324 -.17 
Fxrncn vj* _05 incGron 146? — 19 
IrnaiTFn 9.72 —07! LTroasn 0.59 —.13 


Amor AAdvonl Instt , 
Baicnn 1525 —.13 


Nrrnn iojv — 07 
NITFLn 10.94 — .09 


G# Incan 1J.01 —.14 STTreosn 9.68 —.03 
lnfiEcty n 127S — 03 1 Tor1995n 95.13 —13 


LlOTimn 0 68 —.03 
AmerCopUnt 


TarTOW n 6448 —61 
T 1X^005 n 44.»9 —to 


CrnstAP 1547 — ??l Tar3Jll7n3l.24 — J4 
CmsiB a 15 68 — .22 1 Tar201 5 n 2223 — 2fl 


n 1 

§3°" 1 

Grihn 
IntlS Ren 

&,n 


—31 

AflOp28r»IP.J6 -32 
Gavt 9.97 —.IB 
Groinc 1528 -.16 
Growth 15.08 —.11 
GrllA n 1 1 J3 —37 
GfllBP 1139—07 
MunB 1203 —38 



flnco 12.70 —.17 

16 =» 

IntlEq 1431 —37 
InUFI 10 A3 +.05 
MunBd 10.19 —36 


Growth 


NJMun 1029 

stinint 10.13 —31 
5mCapVaill4l2' " 


«l* 


Ip 1M4 —09 
GwthA P 1227 —11 
InFdAp 8J3 —.09 
NW 50A p 1442 —37 


TxEsrAn 7.23 —37 
— ' TM—la 


U5GvA P _. :r ... 

'BSWW-j • 

Incm x 9.79 —.12 
LM'Maf v 7a26 —07 
Conn Mutual: 

Govt 
Grwth 
income 
TotRet ..... 

CG Cap Mid Fds: 
EmaMfci n 933 —20 
IntrFxn 7.78 —.04 


mtiEan I0«a — .12 
intlFx n M7 - 36 


. . BA7 ... 

LflGrw n 937 —36 
Lovan 9.05—10 
MlflBkd n 720 —37 
Muni n 7.75 —.07 
SmGrwn 1333 —34 
SmValn 857 —0? 
TttRtn n 729 —05 
Cooley n 1*78 —.16 
CoreFimds: 

BotanAn 9.98 —06 
Eald* 21+10 —.19 
GIBdA n 8.98 —31 
923 —35 
0 9.56 —34 


inllGrAn 1187 —13 
■ ilTlS— 10 


CsBdBn 6.43 — 05 Tor2020 n 14 *4 — 42 


VatEaBpni ... 

CawvnQoA 1329 —.It 
Caw eniGrA 10B5 —21 


CoroBdA a 6A3 — 04 • TNolen 9B8 —36 
EmGfCp — 1?( UMlncun 9.0i — 14 
EGA p 7425 —.12 I Bwier Grow: 
EnSC-rBo 21*2 — .11 ; 100 on 1637—08 


EfflAp 12.1* —04 
EntB a 12.0? —.04 
Entcp . 121? — M 
EmvIncA p5 J7 —35 
EalncBp 5.37 —05 
EalncCn SJ? —.05 


11JS —.06 


loipn lu 
SfenOtGrnpJ.TS -Ml 


O wium n 

GvShOu n 12 Jl —34 
SnlDurn 112* —04 
IniOurn 1244 —.in 
ioMun 12.99 —07 

—06 

. —37 

GlEaAB H.S5 — 07 i Intiva) n 1636—17 
GlfcqB pr 1 1 63 —.07 BorwynFd nl8 52 —21 
GlEaCnp 11.73 — 07 BerwvnmcnllJa -.01 
GtGvA p 8.06 * .01 BhirwSMCG l DJ0 — 37 
GCvBpn B.I0 + 31 1 BiBmore Funds: 


ExchFd 11433 — ifl CoMun 12.99 
FafjtaAn 11.99 —04 pivMunn 12.93 
FMoBp 123! —03' NYMun U12.90 


S»n9 a 53^! ^riSii 5 -^ 


Crabbe Huson: 


AW All p 1227 . 


Eflulfv'p 1430 
OHMunnU35 —.07 
Special n 13.98 +.11 
CrostFonds Trush 
Bondn 9.22 —07 

Si Bd n * J5 —35 

SoEqn 10.74 — J3 


value n\ 10.98 — .M 


VAMj n 9 JO 

CuFd Adl n 9.B9 - 01 
CuFdSTn 9.54 —32 
Cutler Trush 
ApvEqn 10.19—10 
Ecpvlncnn9.Bl —.13 
Gavtsecn 9.73 —04 
DO Investor 

Equity 10.72 -31 
Govtinco 1 921 —.11 
LTGovt > 7J7 —06 


sis m 



MunAl. 

MuBt 1 

!MUA 1^ . .„ 

IMuBt 1141 —38 
PA MunAl 5 J8 —.14 
PAMuB t 15J7 —.14 
TX MuA 1938 —21 
VAMuA I SJ1 —.14 
VAMuBI 1SJ1 —.14 


Dreyfus Slrategc 
Growth p 3923 +21 
Income p 1195 —10 


.10 

InvA 2028—11 

^'nva t 1932 —.11 
DuHPEnR n 9.98 
Dupree Muhrafc 
InIGov n 9M —10 
KYTFn 7.13—07 


KYSMtn SIS —01 
31 Fur 


Funds 

Faulty p 61.1J —/a 
Flexo 54.12 —39 
Income p 45J4 — J5 




StrtnA 937 — 03 

China p 185—07 
FLLWP 9JB-25 
GCNTp 9.10 —36 
NatILfdP 9.41 —34 
NotlMun 0 8.90 —09 
Eaton VMoramare 
CALM t 9.B5 —05 
China f 1191—10 
India 1 10.75 —08 

R-Lldr 9.94-35 
MALldt 9.02 —34 
MILia r 920 —.04 
NattLtdt 1030 —34 
NJLtdt 9.88 —35 
NYLfdf 939 —05 
PALM) 9.95 —35 
ALTxFl 936 —39 
AZTVFt 9.97 —.10 
ARTxFt 9.77 —10 
CodVtUnif 9.17—39 


. T*Ft 9A1 —3* 
Eqinl 10.13—04 
FtarxFI 10.13 —.10 
GATxFl 9 j 47 — 39 
GavtOblt 9.10 —35 
Hilncf t*8 —31 
KYTxFt 9J8 —.09 
LATxFt 9.62 —09 
MOTxF t 9.68 —39 
MATxFt 935 —08 
MlTxFt 934 —09 
MNTxFt 935—09 
MSTxFt 9.00—38 



LITrmA 0x9.54 — C 
UUMunApK 


“ IMylnC ,1032 r‘37 



,Pl 1.19 —10 
- 10 28.96 *35 
>lnAp 16J8 —.08 
_ sp 17 J7 —.14 
lAp 
JB pi 

Hi MuA p 1129 —.06 
k Mill. 19 +.04 
14JS —09 
9.78-35 
ip 1029 —04 
•I 9.78 —35 
IP 1190—13 

iA« 






AMurGrnl3J9 —12 
AMcrlnn 1034 —34 
Bdanc 1263 —09 
BlueCh 2637 + .01 
ttnsn 9 J5 — OS 
iTFn 1039 — .09 
in 1738 —07 
' 16.93 —39 
inrl97 
tn!54J6— .18 




envseen 15.97 +.oi 
DftsHnyjnlTJS —39 
Destlnyll n3fl36— 14 
OfsEqn 1837—16 


Inti nl2J3 

Ihti 1268 +37 

;maGrori6JQ *Sf} 
19 J0 -23 
Inc 32*6 — J2 
11 n 19.15—15 
17.1* —.16 
ErCa>Apnl127 — .13 
Europe 2130 +.13 
ExchFd 1)104.17—55 
FideJFdn 18J2 —08 
RfTy 11.12 —8S 
GNMn 10.02 —08 
GloBd 1036 —31 
GtoBoJn 1218 —37 
GvtSecn 924 —39 
GroCo 2871 +.05 
Groinc 2132 —.16 
WYId 11M —09 
InsAAunn 10.93 — 37 
IntBd n 9.90 —04 
InterGvtn 924 —05 


Insure 19.98 -.10 NYIntmlTR«7 —.04 SmCopSp1sl3 — V . inflEainn M.04 - 02 Manaflere Fimdsi _ . SIGvlAo in —22 
Lwctt 39.08 —66 (ntlEap 1132 — 06 HWlMorS Plmds: UTEInsl 90S — 02 CtSSon 74J9 — .1? SIGvICt 177 —.02 

MedDd r 2274 — J7 I KYTPp 10.14—11: Balonce n 9.M — .10 1 LtMoflnst n9.6« — 02 Sofia n 3828 -JO . SIGvTA n 197—03 

NMtlmedrtl.95+12. LA TFp 1026 —M BOrtdn 9.81-38, MedTEInstWQ —05 InCfiqn 2659 -J7 STlnTAr. 9J7 -33 , 

NatGas r 9.33^14; MDT#-n 10A1 — 37 GovtBdn 9JJI — 03 Ml MunlrtsrtttJ — .02 ShorrGvn 17.00 —35 STMuTA np9.79 — 32 USGvA 

paper r 2023—32 MdssTFp 1I.M — .05' Growth n 9.88 —09, VolEqlnst M*7 — 13 latMts n 1 4 30 —.14 STInlNt 9J7 — 23 UhAp 

pSwetr»26 +J1 MJctTF a 1 1J2 — 0? , irWSrr 1032 -.12 Kent Funds invest S' Sana l|3t — 31 STjnicr 9J7— .33 AsW|t 

.... ..1 - 1 lr ^ 4J n .o2— u. E (Gains 1243 — Oi GiDOnstn 19J6 -JE SQTAn 10.04 — 061 ATLBt 

HnfiirdGr 15.93 +.D1 idyEoln n.W-io. Bo«Jn 19J3— 21' Sift An 9 ai 

HoroeStPA 1112 +.03- in^cirts 13.9! -.02 inflSqn 3a 33 — .10 wTAn 9JB 


.... inVerAp 1213 +34 vaiinap iu37 — .‘J jjj, Hjvjcwp 921-33 

* «=*! m: i B»r m ■ 

Growrtin 17l41 —10 1 ComSi Ml— ^1 
HiYIdfl SJ6 -.C | Dn#B£M ,9.18 —-11 : 

Incorrt ft 1#.03 —10 , ToxEx 


RegBrtfc r I8J5 -A0 JANlns. JUS —04 
R^t dir 32.19 — .17 ■ MQJpD 11.J0-JJ7 
SBwrr 26.19 -.17, NjTF 1133 -27 

Tecnr 40.1 B -.15 

Telecom r39 Jl +24 


Tronsr 21.77 -.tfl 
UfilGrr 34J1 —41 

CAHYm 931 —37 
CTHYnr 10.49 —.08 
CAIMTTTt n 9J9 —37 
FL Mu m 10J2 —.0* 
GNMA n 


NYlnsp 10.43 — 10 
NYTcwp 11A0 —0 


QhiOiTF plU2 —07 
ORTF p 1193 — 08 
PocGrwth tt 50 —.11 


PA TFp 9.97 — 36 


HomstdBd n A99 — 32 , VolEam 10.61 — 1 3 Mariner Funds: 
HomsMVl 1513 -37 <K( " " ' 




Balanced h]6.06 —JO | 
Ealrtan 1S49 — JS 

inn n ibmo —. 08 : 


CusKlI 

ZuiKlt 

Prompt p 638 — 06 • LowDurn *.BB — .05 CusSit 
PR TFp 11.07 -291 HudsonCflP 1238 —to I CusS3t 
ReESec P 10A4 —11 1 Hurnmerlnac JO —.12 CusS4t 


—07 

... Vaiuelnt 1331 — "n 

F+alttc 9A1 — 37 VaiuelApl3J8 — 11 
isBIt 1C JO— 09 NY TF lO.Ji-Ot; VatueTA 1328 —11 
i»B2t 14.73 — .0? STFvinC *58-33 VAlTAn 1033 -27 

_ " I 433 - TP Ec 1256—11 VAIIAP 1033 — 37 

9 31 — OE MarheTWatdi FdK NalionwkH Ftk. 

7J* —.04 Faulty* 10.01 —38 NtBond SM —.10 

2253 — .1 ? Re* I nan xUS —.04 NamFd 1539—38 

916— .06 InfFxIn * 934 — Q7 NtGwth 1135—2* 


WlnAD 
IrwCMp 92 
MH'rtAp 931 —.09 
NTaxApxlILM —11 
NYTsAp 9.91 —11 
RegFAp 1727 —II 
lA p 237 -21 

1030 —.02 

>Ap 8.61 —06 

a. 29 —.11 
1037 —15 
ISA* —36 


BlueBt 1430 —14 
CoTTBl 1035 -.11 


as® m=M 


DvGrBt IWS— .M 



937—04 USGov n 6.43 — I 


Bulan pn 10.17 +.01 


LTG n 10-09—U UtmtigsB 8 40— 28 1 Band on B.77 —23 
MD Mum 931 —07 VA TF p 1108 —37, EmflGrpn7439 — 16 
Munlnr 9.65 —37 FranhEnMgdTr Gavipn 9.73—04 


&uincat 89? 
CAPIF 


.» 877 +24 

t 19.17 — 39 

GlEnBt 1131 -.07 

g lfflBT 9.98 +37 

KXBt 1034 — .12 

HilnBt 7A1 — 32 
InvGBt 9.n— 07 
MHlnBt 9.80 —09 
NTaxBtx 10.94 —II 
NYTxfl t 9.91 —11 
RugFB. t 1757 —.11 
STGvtBo 127 -31 
SmCanBt 9.93 —33 
StIB 888 

UtitBp 839 —11 

***? ’Sfrll 


Marshall Funds: LtaMal n *J8 — 

Bain 9.44 —25 Mannar n 1033 

9 Si —.02 Ealrtc *A2 —12 MuST 1DJJ —37 

, -- .... PtxA 9.9* —03 Gvtincn 933— .Ot; Pamirs n 20JI —18 

..... ir 9.65 — 37 I FrankSn MfldTr Govi pn 9.73 —04 1 rOAA 10.53—19 inrBdn *31 — .04 1 SaiSdC h 2U9 —.20 

NJHYr 10.71—371 CoroOual P23.62 + 31 1 Grlnc P 1141 —.04 , GOA 19.44 -.03 irtTicF *55 —.04 UftrnBdn 9A7 — 31 ... ... 

NY HYm 9.91—09, lnvGrpdeo8.7B — .03 intFdn 1355 —.10 GvSAt *27 —05 iniiSlfcn 9.7J — 33 NeuberoerSBerm Tr. | AtlDp 16.11+37 
NYlniern 937 —07. RisDjvp 14A9 — .19 I InstBd 898—33 HrEGA 31 37— 65 MiaCapn 9J1 — 3? AMT Bd nlA63 — .09 CcpAD 1 1.92 —.13 

PAHYm 1035 — 36 iFronUniTenipL i Midcaen 14J5 —.03 • HrtGrA 20 H — 3? fTlncn *58—01 GuortTrnlOJO — .10 ComTeco 9J5 — 37 

Shtinen 9 JO -03 GermGvipliK + J2 Re»onrxi206l +.03| ImaAt 8«-35 STTxFn 9.87 — 02 NYCDCri 10.19 “ 

iSftZnSbSS! BtSXrVtfA :B RF* u3=S %8A iSS =:Vf ussnw 

■ ■■ ■ 


RauCann 19J0 — 11 . _HllneCurpll J* -.11 [ ID EX Group: 


71* —.02 Mass Mutual insh 


New Engl 


—35 

—30 

—31 


AdfUS A p 728 —01 
Baton/ 


Framaat Funds I ictex 17.B0 +34' TiFAt 9 14 — r* Balance 10.03 — .05 

Bondn 9J0 — .11 I JGtobA p ltJ9 — 35 TotRelA 12.1$— 05 CoreBrM 9.96 —07 BalanAn 11.76 — 0* 

Globaln 13.19—06 SGlcbCp 16.10—05; MHdBA B4£ lmiEa4 10.11 — 05 BdlncA 11.04—39 

Growth n 1 J.06 —.12 , 2Gratt#A p 16.98 +.0J 1 Keystone Amer S: Prh)e4 1033 - .01 CA TF A p 727 —.04 

2GrowCn 1638 +34 CPI2B ) 9« SnTmBd4 9.99 — 34 “ - 

2Ta>Ex 1131—10: FtxBt *95-38 SCaDW 9.90—39 
2lncPiAp> 9M. —12 ■ FOABt 70J3 — 1* VaH*efia4 1036 —36 


Idex3x ' 1437 +M6 G1QPB1 i*J4 — '08 .Mathers n UA3 - 07 

— ' - - - - SWRWG 13.87—10 GwttiAp 1039 —OS 


AplA?l +27 
Apll 22 +3S 
P 1170 —.12 
p 1059 —38 


CT E r^ijo -os 

^ ??A8— n .. 

TxFSI 10.0* — 03 l inhGrn 9,80 +38 

RnHarGvt 10.10 —.1! j CAInt 1023 —07 
FinHorMu r 1033 —11 FuntfTrusfc 

Fust Amer Fdi A I Aflflres nt 545 — 32 ... . , 

AstAllP 1041 —38 | Gwthpt 1J.14 —.03 2FlxlnAp 8.78 — 33 GvSBr »2T — 05 SWI . . _ 

Baton p 1053 —39 1 Groinpt 15.92 —38 IDS Group: imOBr 567 —04 Maxus Funds: 

Eouityp 1 723 —.03 ; Incouf 959 —.04 BIuCop 6J8 — 38 OmepoBtlS.47 — 13 Eaun-, art 14.11 — 05 

Fqldxp 10J4 — .10, MedTR pill. 1 4 —33 Bond a 478 —03 PTiFBt 1061—0* Income f 8.91—35 

FjkUinc n 1DJ3 —.07 Fundammitql Funds: . CA TE P 5.04 —.05 StcBt 7 21 — 03 Lou real nntv.w —31 

IniGvBdP 8.96 — 3J CAiWjn np 7J2 — .14 I DEI p 7J6 — .06 • TxFBr *.30 —06 Medalist Funds: 

Inline n 9.53 —05 NY Mun np .97 —32 Dfacnvp 1123—05 TetRetB 12.it —05 MDMuiml0 06 — .10 

UlTTxp 1028— .04-. US Gov n 1.39 —02 EquItPi P 10 36 —13 Keystone Anter C SWCkitn 1IJ2 — 37 

Intlp 1028 —.12 Funds IV: , Ertrlnp 3.95 .1 GlOoCl 192* —09 Sleek T n 11.72—37 

Inc *87 AgStlcAS n 9.88 — .03 FedlrtCP 482 —31 • KIARF ».S7 — 35 USGcvT n J £3 — 04 

' :p 9.70 —04 1 IBdlhSn 9.84—0*1 GfcfeBdP 5.78 -02 Put 1 *.*5 — 03 USSvtltn 9.80—34 

0 1732 -.U, StfcAoSn 9.92 —36 1 GloGTP 6.94—10 FOACf 10 53 —1® VAMuT rt 10.13 —.10 

16 J3 —14 1 GAM Funds: I Growth p 1821 —.03 , GvSCr *22—05 VaMunlt 13.13 —.10 

AnwrFdsC: ! Europe 91J6— J6| HiYtfTcP 4H — JJ ! imdCr 5 it - 05 MeniGih 13 J6 — 05 ... 

TE p 5 22—05. PTjcFCi I0.&J — M3 .MetfSTrn 7221 —07 NewUSAo 1222 

1024 —.10 sicCt "21 —.02 MeroerFd ol387 - .04 Nicholas Grow* 


SaTiVT ‘1041 —07 , GJabdf 141.07 +178 I Si 
once n I0J3 — 09 1 inti. 201 j? +3.301 1 


HilncAo 9.17 —02 
ImEaAn 16A2 —37 
LtdTrm AH.66 —36 
McssT A pi 545 — .12 
SlarA n 1X50 + 34 
TxEtAO 7.06 —.05 
VctueA D 7.90 — 38 
BalanBI 1172—09 
BdlncBo 1134 —09 
CopGrBl 1479 +37 
IhtfqB t 1629 —OB 
StarBp 1147 +.06 
values 7 MS —.07 


PacCrA 16.93 —.17 
STGlAp §J6 +32 
StralA 1177—04 


5iralA 
USGavt A 9.15 —.10 
UtilAB 934 —.17 
AflocSBt HJ9 —37 


AUOCCB1 H.OO — .0? 
1 1X99 


CHMut 10-99 —0* 
EqufBrrt 1X79— .(7 


Ealrcnr 1334 — .1 2 


EmGrA 11.47 >31 
GNMAitf 1X56 —13 
GWssat 1440 —31 
GlUta 1X34 —.12 
GloGenB ntl830 + 31 
GtoRsnf 12J7 — 35 
GvtnB rm IMS —38 


- 


AiCSicn sf giav 

NWn 1XS1 -.rlsiFarro^i^ ifg! B r .r.w-03 


™ SS^Si Mir fiSiB 


f-fiYIdBrrt 738—01 
InlGlL 734+35 


IntGIIB 7.66 +.06 
mverSnt 1113 +.04 
MuDlB IUI +36 
PocG re 16.66 —17 
STC&a X56 +32 
StrCJB t 13J9 —33 
MunAret 11.32 -.07 
MUFL A 929 — 08 
MuGa ll 1032 —.09 
MUtlHYBtlOJO —.07 
MulnsA 10.46 —06 
Mun In? 1X46 —36 
MuMdt 10J3 —37 
_ . . - . - MuoMAtll 33 —09 

ComToc p 925 —37 I MuMnt 1126—08 
DvGOo 1973 —14 1 MunMU 135—07 


S +34 
—.13 
—.11 
—39 
+ .01 

Hilncon 733 —.01 
InvGD 9.71 —.08 
NYTxDP 9.91 —11 
MH1D p 9.81 — .08 
STGvtDP 127 — 3t 
SmCapO 9.92 —03 
StIDn X88 —.01 
USGO D 830 —36 
UtlD a X29 — 10 
PanGkib n 1075 —.04 
FappSth 1438 —13 
ParosonPh 
GulfS 1533 


InrBd 
LATF 
ST Gv 


__ —.08 
*34 —.09 
1028 —35 
973 —02 
1233 -39 
1436 —13 


qldxn 1073 — .10 1 PocBos 1*131—33, /JtodRP 11.73—12 T(FCr 9J|j — 06 Mer, dlann 1493 — 12 NiChoi 

. cdlncn 10J3 — 36 iGEEHun 58,5: I Mcr.SP 5.11—05 ToiRetC 1216—05 MerriC LvrtCh A: Nchlll 

irrlGvBdn 896 —041 DrsersMnl4.ll —101 Micnp 524 —35 Kidder Group: AZMA IO09—0* AfecMm 


liitincn * M3 — .05 Globaln 1*34 —.14 

inrTxFrn 1037 —05 


, Income n 10J4 —l 

—.13! SS^Lnon 10.62 —.07 


Udine h 987 -I 545 PM r 34*4 —78 i NewOo 14.13—34, As iAH6 :34s — 12 

MtgSecn 9.70 — 34 1 TaxEx 11.03 —38 Ohioo 5.14 —35 ; ErnMkiA ILM —.07 

RegEai n 12.63 +.15, Trosrsn 34.15 — J2 ! PrecMl 0 X86 -.06 EmAViB 12.17 — .0? 


N (Chain 50.77 —JO 

. . .. 263* —22 

Kidder Group: A2ftA 1035-0® McWncn 329 

LOS — .05 : ARMG+Ai: ?S — .01 BaiAr 51.66— .12 NchLdrr 18.1B — 37 

1130—13 ARMInsiA 1 , s® — 02 B3SVL4 23.19 —10 Nkholns Appiewne: 

- CAIMAt *19-12 galGlhanSJI — 01 
cjivnA ipw— ir 
CapFOA 57.26 — JS 
Consults 12 ?5 —12 


Purkstone hist: 

.. . Bahncdnl139 —37 
07- Bondn 9.10— Mi 

EctuUvrt 16.13 — 3B 


MN 

Mutl P 

NYTEp 501 —.04 


ARMInstB'-l ?*— J2 


Irst ArnerMuflA: 1 incomeAnll jo— 38 Stock p 1®JE —23 Gfisfia- 14?9— 17 lcITa 10.B1 — 0* 
DtvrGr n 933 —03 | IncomeCn 11.20— .08 i StrAw* 14J2 — .01 ' Glt>F «B 1112 -.04 C*v>j» s la 77 — .17 

Eqincop 935 — .11 | UMEqpn 15J2 — .11 ! SlrEai 9J5 — 3* GlbF«.A 12l2-Ci| EuroAi 15.75-77 

Mcnglnca * J4 - Slrmt 15.76 —13 ■ Slrlnct 5.84 —35 GvtAt 1750—18 FL7.1A *43—09 

(rd Amer Mutl C: USEc^n 1X18 — 13 ■ StrSTt .90 intRA :ij? — 19 FdFTA 14.26—17 


_ ..10974 — 03 ____ 

Vinca n 935 —.11 I USEoA H.U — 13 I TEBndn 171— 0J MuniBaA 10 t6 — 0? 


GE USE 16.16 —.12 , SrtWGl 172 — 06 


KPE ' 


23^7 - C$ 


G1AIA 

GiSdA 


ifhA 12.99 —38 
CareGrinBUBD — 38 
CoreGrlnst 12.43 —37 
EmcGrA I2J2 —13 
EmaGre 12.15 —.13 
ErosGrlnsU J4— 12 
IrcGrA 1147 —.07 
IreGrS 13JB —07 
VYWOrB I5J® — 3B 
VVWar IS A3 —08 
1307 —10 Nomura n 1874 —38 

97! .. Nonh Am Funds: 


Gvtlnc C 9.19 —.04 
KGYEqn 1366 -39 
MHO'S 1139 —35 
InlGvrn 968 —.04 
LldMt C 9M — JJ3 
MIMnC 10J7 —.06 
MuEdC 10.16 —35 
SmCapC 2X39 —09 
PorksJooe brv A: 

Bal A 11.09-37 
BondFtf «.ll —.06 
Ecwttv 16.11 — J 
9.1B 


LtdTenn n 9.96 _ GIT hivsh I Util Inc 0 679 —33 < SmCapA 1100—05 

MngdlrKD n9J4 _ EaSoch 19 48 —12 1 ISI Funds: Xiewit hist: 

FstBosIG 9.01—35, TRJatl n 9.76 —07. Muni on 9.93—0* InlTmBd n 1 94 - 01 

FstEopI nr 15.10 —36 j TiFrVAn 10.54 —08 NoAmo 9 I) _.0J ShTmCc.nl *9 

FrstRfc 10.66— 12 GTOIobafc , Trstp 9.19 _J7 7c*EvmptM6 —Cl GrIPA 1847 . C2 USGvtAp®76 

FrslFdTM 9JS —08 1 Amer d 19.45 -.15 IndOneGT *J5 —0? Landmark Funas: heoirnA 3.61—02 NeinvCrn 257? 

QHwMu . AmcrB 19^6 -.15 , Independence Cap: ; Balann 13*4 —ii ins:lnc ®e0 — CF NelnvTrn 9.9? 

Fin) Investors > EmMkr is.93 — .12 , Cpcone 10 75 - 3J Eouitvn it 39 — 09 MWuA r ta — ID Northern FundJ: 

BlCitiPP 1574 — .16. EmMIclB 18J1 —.12 SlnlGvtp 9 58 —31 Inline a.«9 -08 - 

Gtobip pi— 03| Europe p 10.64 —11 ; TRBdn 976 -38. InKEo 12 3: -T9 

Govt P 1035 —11. EuroB lOJJ-12! TRGrp 11.46 -.08' m TF nc 103; - Oi 

Groinc p A 31— 05/ GvlncA 8.66 _ MvResh 4^J — OJ' USDsn ( j: — S3 

HignYdp 4.94 —01 I GvIncB 8.66 . InvSer OptHd: Lazard Group, 

income 0 187 1 GrlncAa 616—01: CapGrl 1170 —04 Eai.itv I4t0 — JO 


Gavhnc 9.1B —05 
rt&l 1X66 —09 
IrrtGovf *A7 —05 
InttDis 1X32 —05 
LldMnt 9.46 —02 
Ml Mu 10J7 — 06 


GiCvA 10.69 +31 A51AIIC pnll.ou — .16 ( SmCap XL23—3* 

GiHdA UJ® — 11 GhSrp 1J68 — 21 PamBaTn 1578 —.14 

GiRsAt 15.96—01 GrwmC onl 474 —J3 1 Parnassus 11.97 -75 

GiU.'A ; 12 J? —22 Gr mcC pniz*4 —.06 Pasadena Group; 

GrIPA 18 47 . 03 US GvtA p ®76 —07 BaIRtnA 20.98 — 08 


InvGrd p *J1 —.08 ■ 
USA np I! Ad —.01 1 


MNVUjA 5 9* — 0* 
MnlnsA 7 Mi — 0? 
MunLtOA 933-0! 

h’UlnTrA 9 70—04 
MNOHA * 85 —.0* 
NJ.MA 10 34 -0? 


Fixlnn *J$ —08 
GrEan 10 Jt —06 
incEan 1030 —01 


GrowrtiA 1536 —03 
Nitty 50 1749 

PojiWortdn 13.62 —.19 
PavsonBln 11J3 — >J 
PeoChTBd 9 JO -35 
PeoehTEq 9.91 —38 


intTcrKBx n9M -35 ; Pelican 17.13 —.01 
InnFvIn n 10 1! -.12 .PenCopA 
intGrEq n 10.78 — 04 | Pertormonce Fds: 
ntiSeiEar" 


A/LuruMod 1 10.32 — .05 
MUNCI 1070 —08 
MunNJt I0J1 —37 
MuNYt 1U6 —38 
MunOIlt 11 A1 —36 
MuPat 10,11 — 37 
NIMurt 1438 —11 


inmmg _ ioto — w 


202.40 — W 
35434 + J5 


fffl'reBn —3® j OErWfi -■“* ( 

sSv 2o:?6 

iSMau^ 8 1 ggSfS Isa -lo I 





nil JM —ID 
\71 -37 


'sn 7.71 

n 19J8 — .28 
pn29J9 +.11 

IhC 11.46 — 04 

MAn 1X20 —31 
24A3 —.18 
1626 —.01 


USf 0 


833 . . 

8JO —11 




NYTFC J.72 

StrModr »J4 —.06 
Steadman Fumto: 


■■ JS 

n 7DJ>0 *.J2 

1338 +33!“Amindri'Tu*— 01 J 1X97 —21 


AsselAn 1174 —16 
CorM n 11.17 —0* 
Eqlncn 1113— JS 





ActBatn 1033—10, 
Bain 1134 — 06, 


MALITF n!13A — j§ 3 ' 
MATxn 1233 —.12 
MedTFn 10 JS —3? 
MMB 8.19 —07 
NY Txfl 9.*B — 09 
OHTxn I2J4 —D* 


GlhSIkn 1337 +.01 
income n 9J2 —07 
InttSIkn 1572 —10 
SDckix n 1134 —jo 
P utnam Funds A: 
AdiAox 1X16 —36 
AmGvA P &13 
AsiaA] 

AABal, .. _ 

AACnAp 124—33 
AAGthAP BAS —.04 


ip 1A34 —08 
DAP 8J5 —33 


BJGVAP 435—02 
A2 TT 


. _ TE 8J* —06 
CATxAp 831 —.05 
Convert p 19.00 -.11 
CPAT Jtu>7 —.75 
DivGrp 9J3 -.13 


DvrEqAp 837 —36 
DvrinAp 1136 


— LtdMlnn 934 —03 

PA Tax n 123d— .10 I flApdMun 154— 05 
PocOww nl 7?0 +31 PritneEqniA«l— 16 
'luolGrn 15.90—13 Sp«sn 0.S +32 
T Bond n 1 1 24 — .02 ! stockn SS — 21 

»8 n m —39 -39 

^S^ixsb-iw! 

.061 BICh 1774—11 GrEap 1A10 +33 

Bond 10147— M lntfi3x ’.4?-.” 

SecuntyFuiwc ! LMGovAn9J5 —04 
Band P 672 —36 VaLMomert3:56 —13 
SJ2 — .05 iSfratton Funds 

1131—07 Dividend nj4.)J—, 33 
6.91 -36 I Growth n 7025 —A7 
939 —36 SmCap n M3B —19 
631 —32 StronsFundt 

in 10.02 —33 
._.._jnn 936 —09 
AsioPocnlO.lS +37 


HVMurvn ItLBS -36 j STCorph 1043 — S 

infmSSn &=£l SB ig 

IntMunn 10.8? —05 1 TCocpn 9.02 — n* 
intin l?36 -37 l tj^gv n a 931 

^ It 72B —a 




EqUltY 

EOGJA 

Grmc 

TxEx 

UBro 


SpiShsnp 9J5 +.03 


+.11 


COpFdA 1439 —07 
COTxA ’.02 —.06 
CmStkA 13.16 —.10 


CmStctcO 1X12 —10 
ComunA 17.12 *31 


12^ -22 


DfSOOVO 


Gavscn 938 —09 
Growth n 11 J? —01 


HiYIMu 


9J8 -33 
935 —OS 
10J8 — 0* 


Ea/fiAP 8.73—12 
EuGrA P 12.75 —31 
Feain p 978 —37 
FLTxA 833 —35 
GeaAP IX48—I7 

GIGvApx 1X34 +31, , _ 

GIGfAD 930—37 CommunO 1634 + .40 Intin 1479 —32 

GrinAP 1151 — IB FLTxA 778—35 Invfln 1X15 —.IB 

HWtAP 30.18—75, GATxA —.08 MumBdlt 741 —08 

HiYtJAPX 11.84 -.09 GMEfnvAlJT +.19 Opqirtfy n 29.41 -75 . 

HYAdAPx*JI — 07 Glfimoo 11.65 +.19 STBandn 930 —061 USGran 15 l43 — 07 

incmApx 6.51 — .08 GlobTechA8J5 +3? STMunn. 9.96 — .02 lm»r 14.15—13 

InvAp 8.03 —.02 GrowlhA 5. 11 — 06 ' Tdfol n 2X81—14 W««Jyn I7A3 —73 

MnirtAp B33 — .B9 btcomeA 13.49 —35 iSutwnimY po —02 Wetrtnn 1938 —25 
MoTxll BJ9-.06 incomeO 1145 - 05 |SwtAm#ricaPdt I Wndsrn M» — U 

MITxll P 163 —35' IrtlA 17J3 — 31 1 8atAsetAal466— ,11 ; Wndsll 16.95 —17 

MuniAP 830 —.05 1 IntID 17 JO —01 ■ BcflAMtBol4A6-. 11 

MnTxlln 833 . — .05 | LATxA 735 —07 ‘ BIUeChipB 15J6 —1 7 


xfotBn 921 — M 
xSTBn 9.63 —05 


SxlTSn ,*^5— ' C 
toxBoi 10J3 — .m 

NSntlfa 

, - „.’ain 1132 —.09 
kixGra n 10J? —05 
laxvatn liAS— IS 
idxSmC 15.71 —11 


WKEMMnnA* —2y 


ISIS! i!| ..a 
KS'-:* 

Aftd.on8nlO.J9 —.12 

Mulltian 11.57 — 13 
MunSWn 15.41 —02 
AlrsIT n 938 —36 
irsLTnlCJO— 13 - 
. _lnsn 1031 —.10 
Njimn 1031 —12 
NYlnsn lain— ll 
OHlnsn 10.72—09 
PAirnn 1036 —10 
or 1S71 —17 
Tr 1430 + 77 
. f 37.64 +3? 
a ulio — u . 

15.42 —07 



l®=fi 


Ml TF p 


GrincB 6.16—31 Inventor Funds IntiEc 1372—24 NYMnA TO.H -3® intlSelEonTI 33 — 04 I EaCono 11.25—17 

HIMCrn 1931 —72, EoGrtriA plOMl — 10 intiSC no* -0? P=cA 72,?? - !» SeiEan 1004 —06/ Enins n 11.25—17 

■ - - - i;j_17 FA MA 1068—06 SmCpGr n ® B3 — 07 InFI C P 9.55 —.10 


NIRSAP 1454 —.14 MoslTjcA 7 Ji — .06 i DivlncBp ttS —.02 

NJTxAD 8.56 — M MDTXA 735—06, FNJScBp 9.74 —ID 

NwOpAp 2572 —22 I MITxa XI8 — <M GibBatB 6.93—34 

NYTxAp X48 -.07 MinnTxA 7 66 —34 1 HihtcAp 7J18-01 

NYOrAP 8 45 .. MOTxA ?J5 — 36 : HUncBp 7.09—31 

OTC Ep ll.JW—ll. MaWTxA 7.10 —JK I ' “ 

I OtlTxllp 8J7 — 35 I NJTVA 
1 OvSeAp 1226 —08 “ 


JX40 —.16 


. nxExpt p 9J7 —37 
TotRet p 1IJ7 —35 


SpVia 
5trC 

TecnA 
TX MA 
V.ldlncA 


12 57 


HltCrB 19.1 B —72 • GNMA A p 901 -.0® SmCqp If 55 -17 RAMA 
-—+ .— HilncAx 12.72- 14 : InfGavAp 9.55 —0ft SpEp li 32 05 Fhn.A 

NJTF n J2J2 — .08 I Hij ncS X '2?J —'3 PA MuniA P9 88 — 05 Slrfl'id ®M— « 

N>TxFr ptX®7 — 0* , InfraA I7J7 — 05 'Invesco: LebvRN > ?73— C* 

PA TFp 11.94 —09 Irifrae 1J 34 — 05 , Dynmp 1044 - .05 . LeeOP'-r n WM-C* 

SoecBa 1121 —.02 Intin 10.®3 — tft: Emorlhpfill 63 — 06 Leflfl Mason: 

SpSitP 17.95 +33 InttB 10JJ — .15 Enerovn 1041 — .76 AmerLCo *?> — '■! 

Ta»Exptp9J7 — OT' Jacan p 12J6 —36 • fnurnn 6.52 -33 GblGovtc 10 05 • 03 MerriBLrndfiB: 

Jacon GrB 1X76 — 06 1 Eurwwn 1288 - 1® Gvtfndnn ®W — 34 AOiPB 966 -01 


TiErotn 9.71 -09 
USGavln 9 74 -04 


,'IA 15.52 -05 USijCVln 9 74 — 

:.A! !1 55 —.15 Norwest Funds: 

-TA 505 Ad,U5T 9.4* - 

MA 10 lb — 0? AdiGawA 9 49 - 

HncA 8 43 -01 COTFA 9.41 — 


InFI in 955 —10 
NCpGrtn J.73 — 1J 
STFlCpn 939 —03 


Utlllnata S.0I — .05 J 
TFp 1136 —09 


VA TF p „ 

FirstMut 8 ?7 — 10 
Firsl Omaha: 


Equity n IU4 -35 


LaiAmG 26 3* — 73 FinSvcn 15 50 — 1? H.VIflp, 13*4—08 AmerinBi ®0B — 08 

LOIAmGBJ/. O - ?3, Golan 5 94 •« mvGr no *43—0? AJ.V.BI 10 05 -0* 

PacHip 14 49 — 16! Growth np 5.25 - 02 MdTFc 15 4j-0? BalBt 1174-12 . . 

POO ffl t4J4 — 16 * HlthScn 34.75 -.54 PATFp (544-12 BasVIBt 22 97 -10 TF lnc« 


D3 $TFt in 9.69—03 
07 Perm Port Funds: 
... .08 1 PormPtn 1433 —.02 

GvflncTr 834 —09 ( TBilln 66 2 7 < -IP 
GvllncA 864~09i v Bondn 5554 —02 


mcomesn, 10 02- Of iPerjiCGn _ 1X07 -33 1 


PA TE 879 —06 
TcEi-An 844 —04 
TFlnAp 1473 — 3B 
TFHYA 1334 -37 
U&GvAD 12.2) -.09 
UtilA p V.l» —.07 
VslaAp 779 - 02 
Vova P 1206 - .06 

a& b 5 ,0! - -“ 


StralA pi 10 99 —.0? • Hilldnp 6 63 - 02 Soinvnp i9 9ft_5o Coir.ViBl 1094 -.12 , TFincT 9J6-06 

StraiB > 11.00 -07; IndMconpll 3® — 0* T*Frtn)P It "4 — CS CA/MB * !® — 17 VWuGrA 1740 - J9 

Telecom 17 53 - 0? mtGovn ll*e -0?- TotRet no I3J5 -?6 CapFdBf 7631 -24 vaiuGrT 17.47 — 1® 


SIFxinn 955 -34 . „ _ . . .. _ 

i POvASto 1232 -381 TeleB 17 J9 -.07 inllGrn 1? 13 -23 VaiTr np 1*39 — Il CpHIBt :5®-07Nuv«etiFiiitds: 

FPMuBdp 11.6J — 0? Wldwp I7J8 —53 j Leisure n 22 33 - 01 Lehman Brothers: . ClnvOdB 1067 0 CA ImR n 930 — 09 

FWPnorijy; WIcMB 1721 -.73 1 Pacfiasn f4.«t —II FIPtGvA *85-03 CPITB f ra.SI -.0® CA VIRr 9.81-38 

EquitvTrnlO.6.1— 39 Gr*effi Funds: . Sellncmnpft.W -.04 >IGr5tBtlO?5 - 07 DvCooBl 14.21 -. 8 , FL ValR n 9.57 — 36 

F+dlrwTr 9.52— * ABCp I0J* -01 ShTrBdp *36 - 03 ShDurGvA ® *2 - id DraoB 0 17 2*— 4 MDVIRn 9.55 -Mi 

LtdMGv 9.6S—OI Asset np 2341 -25 | T .Free tip IS. 1 2 - 0? Le»in«oii Grp: EuroBI I5P8-J6, MA Imp n «.?3 -.04 

■Wore GOrtvScpnii 58-01 , Techn 24 2* 1 37, CovSm n 13 46 -As FedSecBt *.lo —.OS MAuffin 9.74—06 

n II 58 —.10 EainCP 1137 -07' TolRtn 18 44 - 05 CLdi 10 59-0* FLAJBI 9.A6~0®: Ml VoIP n 9.73 — .08 

in 1159—10 GllntCPn 10.49 — 09' USGovi np 6 ?8 -.09 GNMA n 7 *6 — C6 ' FdFTBt 14 08 -.7 MureBd 8.7B-03 

-JConvn 10 65 • Uhln *68-17 Globaln U51 -W GlAlBt 17.91 - 0 1 inMunR n 9.97 - 09 

rr«p 1OJ6-IO; ValEq 17.90 -.13, Gohlidn ’2* 19 GIBdBI 921 . NJ VdR n 9 69 — 05 

akin 1X19 1 21 IlnvTrGvIBr 8.43 -0?: Glhlncn 1619 -.If GlCvBi 10.74 • .01 • NflnsPn®30-fl7 

,rowlhnP72J8 — 7S 1 isteiFdnn U26 - 10 • tmin 1119-10. GiRsBI 1L93 -07. NYVlRn 934 -.0? 

17 12 -07)4PMInslil: . SlGovtn *70 -34 GtUSmBl 9.80 -0? OHValRn 9.81 - 3ft 

923-37 Sftil 445 -07 GiutBt I2J4 - 22 i PAVlBn ®J9 — .07 

dnl0.04 — 08 : Sllnv 3 74 .18 GflRBI 17 45 02, VA ValR n 9 64 -3* 

EdTi57 — 17, TE Bdn IQ.uO -04 HealthSl X2? -01 -ONE Inti 14.74 1 08 

n 10.74 —33 , WMEm 1191—04. MHEoBl J 1.47 -.11 OVB Funds 


mcamoTr 9 17 — .08 PnaaFund 640 —.05 
incameA 9.18 —08 1 PfMOtix Series: 

*J5 -3? 1 BalanFd lilS -3? 

Cc4T»EP 1741 — III 


NJTXA 737—06 SmCoGrA».14 +.08 
NYTxA *3? —m SmCoGrB 17 03 + .08 
NCTXA 7.7! -37 TE KtsA P 11 J2 — 39 


OtneT kA 7.87 — 05' TElma 
ORTkA 7.37 —36 ! USGvA 


PAT* A 7.46 -.07 i USGvB p 
CAHyT> A 676 — 04 (TARGET: 
CAOTxA 6 ji — 09 1 Inters* ft 
SCT*A 7 54 -.06 , 1' 

US GvtA e 6 5' —031 


13 Ir 

HfYBOAp 643 . 1 L 

Sentinel Groin: . ' 

Batoncvd pu.34 — JS 


AABolBt 'sj7 -w) C^iStpTvS -36 j 


Siic'i-gS- 

KlnBp* 932 -. 
xlnTn\ ?32 — . . 

HiGdTFC i ?.79 — " 


MnBdT n< 9.40 — . 
NCMunC 


_t 9 JO . 
p 9.13 — 
r 9 .13 —3a 

_t« 9.17— .14 

values p 1735 —24 
VdueC fit 1735 —34 
Valuer n 17.65 -33 
Flafl Investors: 
EmGthp 1X56 +33 
Infln 0 9.80 —35 

IntTro 1X98 —35 
MMuni p 9.93 — .1 


OuaKSrp 1X48 —.11 


jsshXbse 


iniEatn 1305 —07 
LorpeCo r\1532 —.13 
MAMun 9.25-36 
MuniBd ®.68 —36 


N> Mun 10.05 

SmSiKSinirir — 


1138 —.08 



AP1 W=« 


A80TEA PI0. 

Ml TE Cp 10.98 —JO 
NCTEA P 9J7 —38 
NMTEp ?J2 -.11 


NYTEp .9.99 — ^1 j 


IP 10.89 


SmCoEanlXOB 
; Bondman • 


TE .... . 

US Treas n 9.88 — . 
Utility 9 85 —.13 

Galaxy Funds Trust: 
AStAI n 10JS 
EoGran 1194 
Enlnc n 1X58 
EqVWn 133* 
HKffldn 9J3 
IntBd n 9.6B 
IntlEa n 1X06 
NYMuni nlD.05 
SdTrtin 9.73 
5mCoEqnl238 
TxEBdn 10.13 
GtwylndxR1637 —.08 
GtwvSindx n 9.95 —34 
GfiSecit 1X82 
Gmtel Group: 

Erisa nc 74 J5 —37 



ISM|.=S 

InOfBt 935— .06 I 


AACnBt 832 -31 EmGfP 5.67 .33 
AAGIhBt 841 —04 1 GvSecsP 9.45 -.06 

1 M» ^p p !7 4 -S=5S 


967 —07 
n 10.0a +39 
14 16 —.74 
niooo— M2 
10.43 —.06 
n 9.56—00 
1131 — , 

11 86 

TatRtBd 9 jl —.09 
TIFF tov Pro: 



Venture Advisers: 
incPI 4.91 *33 
Muni nt 93« —31 
NYVen 
RPFBt 


HR —14 
582 —32 
I 1439 +39 


RPFCV 
Victory F 
Auor&r 
CmpBQ 
Bilitv 

%S82 

Rfsr 


1135-36 

7». 


'32 —10 

^tS? 





SM&hhn 9.54 —32 
Victory PorttaB 
Batanee* 9J 


«*' " 9 % -.13 


Inti I3J7 * 01 , 
MutFIAP IZ3J —O* 


KP8TBB=« 

m 



1 prra-o* 

CapAnpn7a90 —.11 
inn&jn MAO —.10 


11.19—10, US.Gov * 


axEr 10.00 —06 I Lindner Fui . 
TorRfn (038 - IJ I Bulwark n ? 
Juris Fund: . 

lanced n 1X06 —34 



,, -33 

Ixlnc n XW. —.03 
Fundn 1922 — 16 
Grthlnc 14J6 —07 
intGvt 4.8t -32 
Mercury 1191 +.17 

Twenn 2366 +37 
Ventrn 5137 + 65 
WrtdW 26.76 -36 


JOPCtoFdn 1X1) —16 
JPCqpApprl6Al —.13 
JPIGBk 078 


.. — . . _ — 23 

John Hanoodc 
CATE 11.06—39 
DiscvB I &90 


Growth p 1595 -38 


GmtlFdn 1X29 —.05 ' 
Gwumetfe r 


•Funds 


p 1039 —37 I Equity n 1193 —39 


(rttlGrln 17A6 —IS 
6.97 —.04 


invGB n 6.' .. 

japan nr 1430 —36 
Lai Am r 16J7 — J6 
L«Mun 9.18 —06 
LowPrr 16.78 +32 
MI TF n 11.05—38 
MN TF n 10J9 —07 


MidCaonll35 -31 
MtaeSeenlOJO —07 
MuncPI n 7.72 —37 
NYHYn 1130 —.09 


NYlnsn 1039 —3® 
NewMn ■" 


_ mi U6 —iz 
NewMdl 1X58 —33 
OTC 2X7T +35 
OhTFn 1088 —39 

OvfMOR 2835 — Jl 
PocBisn 19.93 —03 
Puritan 1537 —.13 


P 9.78 
10A7 —09 
UTUAp 9J5 —lo 
—09 

Bond np 1936 
Gtoto pn 9 J4 ♦ 32 
Growth rip 1108 -31 


MuirMpnf 5J7 

1.13 +.12 


Fontaine n 1 
Foriis Funds: 

ASIAN p 1426 
CooApp 22J9 —.15 
CopiHp 1829 -,)1 
Fiducrp 30.03 +23 
GtoGrth p 1A65 +.04 
GavTR p 723 —37 
Grwfftp 26.14 —IS 
HTYIdP 739 +.01 
TFMN 9.98 —.07 
TF Nal 1027 —39 
USGvf 8.70 —MB 
44 wan Ea 539 —36 
Forum Funds 
mvBnd 9.88 —11 
MEBnd {0.13 —10 
TaxSvr 10.10 —37 
Founders Funds 

Bal np X76 —la 
BlueChp nD6J2 —07 




Frmrrp 
GovSeC 887 —34 
Grwrti np 1223 + 01 
Possprtn 9.97 —.09 
SDedon 7 JO +.02 
vwdwGrp 1X43 +.02 
Fountain Square Fds: 
Balanced 9.56 —11 
GavtSec 9J0 —33 
IrilCdty 9.68 —05 
MidC® 10.46 —.02 
OtioTF 9J4 —.06 
Quaffla 


*JI —08 


irrtGav n 7.88 —.03 
tntn 1438 —04 
Munlnl n 933 —.07 
SmQ»n 1A17 — ll 
OtnwintA 9J3 —35 
GaloenoaknBpf —.02 


GaUmai .Sachs Fm^. 


AslaGrlh 15.96 
CapGr 15.13 — J3 
GibllJC UJ0 —03 
Grlnc 1636 — J7 
IntlEq 16.70 —20 
Muni Irtc 1326 —39 


UACOre 1^., 
JLTGvA p 8.43—03 
MATE 1120 — OT 
MaTEB 10.95 — Jfi 
NYTEp 1125 —38 
STSrtptB 8J9 
SodEAp ISAfl +.13 
SpcJEBp 1525 +.13 


7.76 -31 
721 -31 


OtU P 223 —.15 , 
GIEQP 12.85— 12 i 
Gllncp 8.18 +.01' 
GavtSee 0 231 —.03 
p IOJO —38 

,940—07 

. VQXP1D34 —.10 
TF FL P 4J6 —34 
TFAAO p 431 —04 , 
TFNJ p ,43? —04 ! 
Ta>NYp 1029 —.10 
TFTX 0 9A8 — 08 

TF PAP 4.70 —05 
TFHIp 465 —34 
TF Ml 4J1 —33 
TF WA P 4 67 —.04 
VatuApoPll J9 —.17 
... _ [Lirltienin Brae 

. 13.95 —.07'. BrOHiYd XB5 -32 

GtabB T 1X73 .07 1 Fund 17.44—19 

s3bT iwl3t7l 01^ .HS-vBI Enme 835 -37 

^toSaP 1915—15 PtKS* 5?Wrti .832 —35 

GoIdmM Sachs Inst: '■ -MS OwsGr . 10A6-03 

AcfiGv *.76 —31 

tSP?P 


SlrinCAp 6.96 +.02 
StrliKB 6.96 + 02 
Ta+£xp 10.15 —08 
.UtiTsB 7.99 —05 
J Hancock Freedm: 
AvTeat 1030 +.11 
EnvmA n 824 —.06 
GlinBl 


t 768 -.06, 
t *.B3 -31 1 
9 JO —36 : 

25 16 — -ii MNntlBt 9.85 —09 ' 
.. 21 85 —33 , NJMBI If Jl —07 1 

L&Fn^=^' NCMB?' 930-1? I 
Lungit5Cn 1427 —.02 OHMBt 10.0* —39 I 
Loomis Sayln: j ORMuniB?9.02 —39 

Bondn I0A5 —37 
GtoBd n 9.73 -.03 
Growth n 1171 +37 


t 9 99 —.10 iQahHOll n 11^8 —10 


Grilnn 13.74 —.11 
lEqn 12.90—.-- 


inriEqn ll®0 — .04 
SmCap n 1321. + .03 
Lnrt AMCoursefe 
BdDrtiTr 464 
NaJTFTr 4J7 —34 
USGavt p 4.41 —34 
Lord Abbetfc 
AtfiUd n 10.94 —.13 
BondDebp9JJ2 —01 
DeveiGihPiaii -31 


E^990 p 14J6 — 21 


irk 25.12 -.12 
:mnli 1424 —.18 
@sn2M7 ».07 
]TEo 70.19 —36 
imMk n*.80 —.01 

B n »A4 —02 
1030 —.16 
ikfijortWi 1924 —.09 

, ... , jne Group: 

PacBt 21.67—11 Aset AN p 9.83 - 08 
PA 6491 1038—06 BlueCta 1232 —.17 
PtuwBt 1221 +.051 Dscvqi 1229— .13 

STGIBt 111 _| Ealndx 1X14—11 

SpVIBt 15.06 — .05 1 GvArmn 921—31 

SfrDvB 1 1124— IS | GvBdp 9.17—08 

TechBI 5J5 _ ! fiicEq 1X70 —.14 

MBl 10.16 -.07 | IncameBd 9JH — 36 


UHlnB r X17 . 

WldlncS 1 &43 
AAerriB Lynch C&D: 
AdIROP 946 
AmeflnD) 938 —.08 
117A3 —.13 
p 9.16 —38 
f 9.B5 —.08 


?g 9.99 -MS 


— - - . 923 — 03 

ST Gov 964—03 

GovSIBnd 70.1ft —.12 
Gvteatvn 2117— .12 


GoldA 1AB6 -.14 ; MAS Funds: 

Gokfflt u.84 +.14, Balanced nii.M— 23 
Pac&os. 15.60 -34 , imerGrn]624 -39 


-34 




RflEUtB. 
J Hancock 


33 


Gayett Funds: " I" SSiT* S H28 3rc us 

a, aSbi \\m -re 

gw™ ' 1^7 —JO 1 BolA D 9.99 —3* 
* ' BalB.n ,9.99 —3* 


GtGvIn 

IntlEq 

PtcShi 

_Smpos 


829 +35 
1X64 — 35 
9.77 -39 
1729 +23 


Grodnon McDonakt 
■ EslVal a|| 


Ph 2129 —.11 

Gov Inc p mi —.12 

OH TFP 1X26 — 10 


OH TFP 1X26— .10 
OaaValo 1735 —.14 
GH MN TE 926 —.ID 
GHNatTE 9.93 —Mb 

SESiSPiYff^R 

GuardBan Funds: 
AsSAllDC 1027 —35 
GBGIntt 1326 — Jl 
Bondn 1130—08 
PtrkAv 2734 -2A 
Stock n 2824 —24 


BondA P 1X97— .11 
Bond0 1197— .11 

irtv An 1426 — 15 
invB p 1426 —.75 
USGvA p ®23 —.10 
USGvBt 9X1 — .10 
JAVBaf 1X30 —.09 
k'SMun 1125 —3* 
j<5 IMuttLI 11.74 —06 
Kaufmanp 3.68 +31 
kemper Funds A: 
AtSGovA * 8J2 —36 
BlueChpAlXW —.06 
CdifTxA 7JB —.05 
DivJrjcoA * J.S7 —MS 
FLTxA 9.B1 —38 
GffiincAX X77 

GrihA 1X93 —08 


iWjitvn 20.93 — , 
;»dinlln 10J3 — , 
-*dlncn liui —. 


—28 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 


LONDON PUBS GENEVA ZURICH 
bear! Agency Credit Card* Welcome 


UK 071 589 5237 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

Server ■ Warite 

Tot 21 1-765-7 t9& Now fart, USA 
Afcj or OtU Cods Accented 


NATAiHAMANN 
LOMTON escort service 
on 252 !0>3 


CHE5EA SCOOT SSMCX. 

51 Beauchamp Place, L-pndon SW3 
Tef. 071-584 6513 


LONDON SfiAZUiAN Escort 

Servtat 071 724 559? ,"?i . erode cards 


| INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED | 

(Continued From Page 19) 

AMBSS 

Utndon 0956 431364 Escort Senna 

MILAN - JUUA BCORT SStVKE 
CAU. 86 54 39 

“KMGHTSBRDGEESCORir 
""New York USA"" 
let 1-800-5543444 WorWvnde Service 

JET SET ESCORT SOVKS 
Amstmfam/ScNehoi/The Horae. 

Tet 06-5271761 i 

^ “ 2MWW *• VICMT 
aeon Sawe. Oedtf cardj accepted. 
Tel: 077/ 63 63 31 

TOKYO -TOP far TOP 
•6*9*1 guide agency Td 3S 88 IS 90 

LONDON HEATHROW GATWKX 
JAPANESE GUIS SCOOT SKVKI 

TE 0956 401164 or 0956 572543 

•* ’* A TOUCH Of CLASS •" 

* MU lADiS ESCORT SBVCE * 
Londcn Heathrow Gatwct - Hear 
cat 0956 421739 credit axds wekome 

LONDON’S NO.1 ESCORT 

AG&KTQ71 2580090 

TOKYO '*• eWWT SBWKE 

Moor aedH cards ooceptsd. 

TeL (031 34364591 

ZUKCN/tUCBVC/ZUG 

MONA facort Service 

Te): 077 / 4116 13 

G8CVA • GLAMOUR ■ PARS 
BASa pfecon Agency* 022/346 00 B9 

5WS2EN, STOCKHOLM 

ESCORT SBMCE 

Tt 08 157821 

swirzauio - pass - vhwa 

Escort, Travel S, Bvwws Swwe. 
Svrttzerfcni +41 B77 72 72 30 

ZURICH - PARC 

Zundi380 15 86 

Other ctfy (feal <nt 1 19-32-2-2010700 
Ewart Service. 

BICH ANTE EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 
Semen. Mian, Boston, Okowl TaL 
305WQ524 

'PARIS A LONDON' 
•ELEGANCE* 

Escort Service London 171) 394 5145 

.... «. escort SERVICE — 

•• londoo * Hwttraw • Gatwidr *• 

"'PRETTY WOMAN'" 

GENEVA Escort Service 

AMSTERDAM 'DREAMS * ESCORT 

Dimer (Jew & penaned glide wms. 
TA +31 fmiffi 111 / W K666 


ARISTOCATS ESCORT SERVICE 

Trt 071-*0? 5544 


TO OUR READERS IN BERLIN 

You can now receive rfie IHT (mi delivered jo your 
home or office every morning on the day of piiWif^ 
Just cdl us toll free ot 01 30 84 85 85 


icafion. 


LONDON PQRTMAN BCORT 
Servra. 67 0*em Street. W1 
Td: 071 486 115&--3774 . Mre h 


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ZURICH * BERN ■ LUZERN 

NATHALIE Escort Serves 
Td: 01 / 463 23 34 


yaiuApian,— .to 


** GMVA INTERNATIONM 


Escort Service 
1 021 / 731 63 


Tel- 1 


52 - 077 .‘259280 


fltANWUOT IttHN DUSSaOORF 
dl areas, Escort Service. 
069-473274 


FRANKFURT & AREA 
Maras Escort Agency. 

Please Can 067 S97M66. 


Ufa - OUneldarf - Bonn 
Esro* Service . 0231-510 6145 

£H 71 -5404909 


•ZURICH'SUSAN 

Escort Semes 
Tet 01 / 38179 46 


NEW YORK an AD ASTRUM Escon 

sssa?.^ 


MUNICH ’ WELCOME 

ESCORT & GUIDE AGENCY 
PLEASE GUI 089 -VI 23 U 


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ZURICH * FRANKFURT . MONACO 

A6IE7HV 5TE In rT Bcart'Tiawf Serna: 
CALL SWITZERLANO 067-610 22 59. 


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BERLIN 

ESCORT »MCE. Tel.: 0171 5252B50 
or 0306253185. 


— ZUOCH — GMVA — 
Escort Service - Credit Cods 
OW 252 73 59 


caiBffAi escort sanra 

LONDON 

PLEASE PHONE 071 225 3314 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


Page 13 


Qon sol (dated trading tor week 
|j\ ended Friday, Oct 21. 


(Continued) 



* W 


International 


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WVAShryeys "92/ *93. +8* adtr Suney ‘94, ■ 









































Pajse 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


O N 


A Y 


Owners 


May Lower 
Salary Cap 


The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — Major 
league baseball owners plan to 
withdraw their $1 billion yearly 
guarantee to players, according 
to a memorandum sent to teams 
by the management negotiator. 
Richard Ravitcb. 

Owners also will propose 
minimum salaries ranging from 
SI 12,000 for rookies to $500,000 
for fourth-year players, a person 
familiar with the memo said Sat- 
urday. The source asked not to 
be identified. 

The plan also drops the own- 
ers* proposal to split licensing 
revenue. In the original propos- 
al. made June 14, owners call 
for all licensing money to be 
included in the 50-50 revenue 
split they were asking players to 
accept. The union objected be- 
cause players use their licensing 
money as a strike fund. 

The owners haven’t decided 
when to give the new proposal 
to the union. 

Owners made the changes, 
one management official said, 
so that teams could unilaterally 
implement their plan without 
the union's consent, their right 
under federal labor law. 

The original plan could not be 
imposed because owners could 
not force players to share their 
licensing money. It also lacked 
details on the minimum salary. 

Ravitch, the head of manage- 
ment’s player relations commit- 
tee, declined to comment when 
reached at his home. 

Bud SeUg, the acting commis- 
sioner, said: “This is a memo. 
We haven’t even discussed it 
with the clubs. This is just 
thinking from the PRC and op- 
erations committee. Other than 
that, I don’t have any comment 
because the only proper place 
to talk about it is at the bargain- 
ing table with the union." 

The union head, Donald 
Fehr, said owners had not yet 
made the proposal to players. 

“Once again, they’re more in- 
terested in making proposals to 
the press than us," he said. 

The Si tuition guarantee was 
based on estimates of about SI .8 
billion for 1994 revenue. 



Chang Wins 
2d Tide 


Talks Likely as NHL 

Plans Short Season 


In Beijing 


Michael Chang of the 
United States slamming a 
return to Anders Jarryd of 
Swedes on Sunday en route 
to a 7-5. 7-5 triumph in the 
final of the Salem Open 
tennis tournament in 
Beijing. Chang stuck to 
baseline play, and Jarryd 
failed time and again to 
keep up with his swift pace. 
Chai^g, who also won the 
tournament last year, gave a 
short victory speech in 
Mandarin. Ranked No. 7 in 
the world, the .American is 
popular in China because he 
is of Chinese descent. 


MBaud Ccxu-AtEac* Prater- Pnuc 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispaichn 

NEW YORK —Negotiations 
aimed at aiding the National 
Hockey League work stoppage 
could resume this week, when 

the league announces details of a 

shortened schedule. 

Co mmissio ner Gary Bettman 
said he had spoken with the 
NHL Players' Association exec- 
utive director, Bob Goodepow, 
“a couple of times” on Friday. 
Previously, they had not con- 
versed since Oct. 1 1, when Bett- 
man further delayed the start of 
the NHL’s 7Stb season, origi- 
nally slated to begin on Oct I. 

Bettman declined to disclose 
the nature of the discussions 
with Goodenow, but the talks 
were the first step in resuming 
collective bargaining. An an- 
nouncement of exactly when 
negotiations will continue 
could come within a few days. 

There has been no hockey 
this season because manage- 
ment has locked out the players, 
citing the lade of a labor agree- 
ment between the two groups. 
It is too late to salvage a full 
regular season of 84 games. 


“Nexi week.” said Bettman. 
“we’ll probably make an an-; 
nounoement in terms of Hie* 
length of the schedule were; 

working on.” ■ 

In Stockholm, the Swedish; 


piite League voted Saturday, 
against allowing NHL players - 
to sign short-term deals with 
their former Swedish teams 
during the lockout. 

The vote wasn’t unanimous, 
among 12 teams that attended a 
meeting, the Swedish news uggn- ; 
cy 7T reported. Only NHL play- ■ 

ers who agree to play a full season 1 

in Sweden will be able io join . 

their old teams, the league saki. ■ 
The Swedish league is the. 
Fust in Europe to not allow- 
NHL players to play for their ; 
old teams” during the lockout- . 

Four Finnish NHL stars — ;> 
Jari Kurri (Los Angeles),! 
Teemu Sclanne (Winnipeg),- 
Esa Tikkanen (Sl Louis) and.' 
Christian Ruuttu (Chicago) — . 
played their first games in the ; 
F innis h League on Thursday.; 


Germany, the Czech Republic 
and Russia also have allowed; 
NHL players to play. (U’P. API . 


They Robbed Us of the World Series — Memories- That- Weren’t and All 


By George Vecsey 

AVk York Times Service 


N EW YORK — The rage kicks in 
when you least expect it. You 


IN when you least expect it. You 
think you're fine. You can do without 
baseball. You have a life. Then with 
absolutely qo wanting, reality kicks 


Vantage 

Point 


you right in the backside. The dirty so- 
and-sos have killed the World Series. 

No Country Slaughter steaming 
from first with the winning run. No 
Babe Ruth taunting the Cubs and 
hitting one over the wall. No Bob 
Gibson glowering in the shadows. No 
Bill Mazeroslti heading for home with 
all of Pittsburgh about to climb on 
his back. No World Series. Just 
twitchy Bud and rigid Don. Just rage. 

Both sides now. First it was the 
owners you hated, or maybe the play- 
ers, but now it's both. Selfish, stupid. 


arrogant, boorish, pig-headed un- 
American whining weasels. They 
robbed us of the 1994 World Series. 

It would have begun Saturday 
night, much too late for fans in the 
East. The dopes who run baseball 
didn’t even run it right when they were 
working. But at least you could have 
woken up Sunday morning in Montre- 
al or New York or Cleveland, or wher- 
ever the World Series might have been 
extra important this year, and mum- 
bled, “Who finally won that game?" 

No Reggie Jackson hitting three 
dingers in one game. No Kirk Gi bscn 
hobbling around the bases late on a 
Saturday night. No Grover Cleveland 
Alexander lurching out of the bull- 
pen. No nothing. 

Rage isn’t good for anybody, so 1 
did the most pacific thing possible. I 
called Mookie Wilson, whose gentle 
wisdom was a delight when he played 
for the Mets. He still works for them 
as a roving minor-league instructor 
and community-relations specialist. 


which means people can look at him 
and say. “Here, this is what baseball 
can be, at its best” 

The reason I called Mookie Wilson, 
of course, is that eight years ago this 
Tuesday, he was the central figure in 
the most stupendous sequence I ever 
saw at a sporting event, a World Series 
turning completely around on two 
freak plays, both nubby little inci- 
dents, altered by millim eters. What 
made them so stunning was that they 
happened on the potential final pitch 
of a World Series. 

"I guess we won’t have any memo- 
ries like that this year." Wilson said 
with his high-pitched Southern voice. 

I asked Wilson about his earliest 
World Series memory. 

“I wasn't what you’d call a baseball 
fan when 1 was growing up," he admit- 
ted. “But in 1975 I was in junior col- 
lege in Spartanburg. South Carolina, 
and I watched every game in our dor- 
mitory. I was rooting for the Big Red 
Machine of Cincinnati. Foster. Mor- 


gan. Perez. Rose. Griffey. Concepcion. 
Bench. They had a great team.” 

Is there one 1975 moment Mookie 
Wilson remembers best? He chuckled 
at the other end of the phone line. 

“Fisk's home run,” he said. 

He meant the IZth-inning shot 
down the left-field tine that Carlton 
Fisk made stay fair by waving his 
arms like a carnival magician per- 
forming hocus-pocus. It is one of the 
defining moments in all those World 
Series. It won the sixth game. Eleven 
years later, Mookie Wilson would 
also have a defining sixth game. 

“During the season, you always 
say, 'We can come back tomorrow 
and win,' " Wilson said the other day. 
“But during the postseason, the at- 
mosphere is different. You get to a 
point, it could be your last game. You 
don't want to play catchup bail in the 
World Series. The tradition, the me- 
dia, the atmosphere, make it differ- 
ent . I was so excited being there, it 
made me more relaxed." 


On the night of Oct 25, Mookie 
Wilson became immortal — although 
he doesn’t act immortal. He was due 
up sixth in that 10 th inning, the far 
side of the moon, the way it appeared. 
Two quick outs. The Red Sox moved 
up the dugout steps, ready to roll 
“It’s funny,” Wilson said, “but the 
only thing I can remember from that 
inning is Oil Can Boyd on the top 
step, his foot on the dirt, another 
player looking at him. That’s the only 
picture in my mind.” 

Three st raigh t singles. Oil Can Boyd 
removed his foot from the dirt Toe 
Red Sox began to edge down the steps. 
Mookie Wilson levitated himse lf to 
avoid being hit by Bob Stanley’s inside 
pitch; some Boston fans still blame 
Rich Gedman for not stepping it. 

By ducking the wild pitch, Wilson 
allowed the tying run to score from 
third. Had he bran hit by the pitch, 
the bases would have been loaded, 
the Mets still down a run. 

With the winning run on second. 


Mookie Wilson slapped a magical' 
mystery grounder toward Bill Buck-; 
ner, who was playing deep behind! 
first base. The ball squibbed through - 
the gnarled wickets of Buckner. The! 
game was over. 

We only know that 1986 is remem-; 
bered best for Mookie Wilson’s at- bar. 
We only know that 1975 is remem- 
bered for the Carlton Fisk body-eng- 
tish home run. We only know that 
1947 is remembered to Cookie Lava- 

S tto breaking up B3I Bevens’s no-. 

tier, and A1 Gionfriddo robbing Di~ 
Maggie with a great catch in left- 
center, and doggone it, the Yankees 
still won the Senes and the Brooklyn’ 
Dodgers bad to “Wait ’til next year." - 
Back then, “Wait ’til next year" had; 
a romantic notion to it, tike the Lost! •- 
City of Atlantis or Brigadoon. Now we 1 
are totally out of romance. 

The owners and the players stole a 
year from us, they state the World' 
Series, they stole baseball We try to 
shrug it off, and then the rage kicks in. 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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Sates 

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_ 5543 8V. 7V, 7V- — >.» 5<#<vTc ... 4 >48 l”» 1*4 »’«, *«> TrlanBc 

J33 .9 9099 34 33". 34*. SunMnwt 1557 K„ — v a TrtPacf 

... *46 9V# BLi 9’74 — '. 1 1 Sansiote - 36 iV 6'"7 4*4 TrlCoBn 

274 1V., V'l, IV* .V,,I Sunstaial 175 13J 37B »> ■ 27’* 2»'.-j — V» TrtajPd 
- Ill 7U 7%* 74* — 4*lSoDRte -. 7170 137ft i?v# I3»4 -'.4 Tricon* 

_ 87112 II*. 11 '.-f . ••# • iuoTotn ... .644 71,, 4'a 7 - Tricord 

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_ 1 407 7 Hu 10’i llte. - p/u i japerm - 3297 n*, /?’/, -1 TrfmarK 

_ 2104 12V* 10V. ltpft— 1 , S(#prM* ... 451 5*. 47 * 4V, Trimble 

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_ 496 6H 6V. 6H -'ft Swimi ... ja I7 1 .'# li' ; , 12*# pjnzic 

40 11 141213'A 12V* 13 -v, SwjLsr ... IOW 3f« 3V'. 24* — ** Trlon. 

-. I 43 11 *4 11’.* 11’.* -V* SunjTc ... 785 4'ia, 4»1, 4jj * *# Triples 

•" ^ fw li: R :S 1.08 44 50 24 ^ T% TJg— r 

JlSa J 4470 224ft 21 Vi 22 ’rj - liS/nT^ - in 9 « 47 .. fs ’' 1 /i^ TrtSm 

.. 49B013V, 12«* 1244 - Vi, §w fjs - 133* « «"* « +, t . Trbtar 


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_ 446141ft !3>> U — >> RO»CSp9 >.75 5.4 79 31 ** 3) 31 — ’# s St* 

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- 8194 18H 16'* 169,-1’.# RijSqi .. 82 12V. 12 12 - • SlrroOut 

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■V 1.0 J406 

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02 5J 378 IS 1 '. 14V, 14V* — •* RassSv 

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■60 4.1 42 149* Id 14', -** RciloRlr 

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274 v w Vi _<r„| 

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M 2J ,0714 IS 14 - 

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1078 11;* Of* 1Wl —Vi TrjdAAlC -. *»09 B4* 61% 74% -lVft 

22»7 114* >? '* 1 JMr - 1 71-frnartC „ 107 74* TV* —4% 

VJL JV* 9>» i''* — Trimble _ 7267154, 13ft 15ft +1Vk 

660 2ft jfiw — 1“ Trlmed _ 900 3ft 3ft 34* —ft 

, JE 1 2 1 -# «, • •*» pirate „ 3219 4J6 4ft 4ft +V B 

1059 J*# lli 34, —ft Trltn _ 630 5ft 5ft 5ft #. 

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S* A ..A- Truck Cm __ „ 5744 12ft 10ft 13ft *-lft WD40 


... 9909 B4, 61% 7ft *1 ft 
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_ 7247 ISh 13ft 15ft 


_ 7247 in, 13ft 15ft +11% 
» 900 3Jk 3ft 3ft —ft 
- 5219 4ft Jft 4ft +V B 


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.. 3110 4’ , 3ft 4ft * '■< 1 ImiriF 
_ 3021 24'.# 25ft 26ft -V* . 

2.5 50 25V# 23V* aft I 


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114 1V 4 1*„ U„ #.ft 
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.. 101 124* 1)4* lift —'A 


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.. 3059l'4i. l’V a 1ft _ I powr 


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-M 1.7 1027ft 26'* 77', -t Rufe'nd 

..10340 10"; 8 J . 10*1. -I*i, Rural Mel 
_ 8794 26V. 2d". 2J —i, RvnnBck 
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119 10’# 9«# 9ft ~i 'ft PennVa 1 «3a il 
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151 21, 2*i —ft PonnFed 


41 6'* 6*i 6ft —ft , . 
484 T/» 7Vi. 7ft —ft 1 1 
46 Uft 15ft 15ft _. I 


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ROuSC A0 3.1 1104 19'# 104., lBft — ft 1c 

Rouse Pf 3.25 4.5 375 50’ , 50ft JO’* —ft S 

RvBPA Jfll 6.4 II 9 S'* 9 • ft S 

RtjvIGrlo 331 7># 7ft 7ft —ft cl 

RovOTC . 1080 7'* 6ft 64* —ft 1 fi 

Rufe'nd ... 1208 16ft IJ4* 16ft *1'., 1 rt 

Rural ftAel . .. 2E15 19 1 # 18V. 19ft -I 13 

RvnnBck .(Wa A 173 7 s* 7’.# 7ft • ft 1 Si 

RyanF . SJ79 6ft 5ft 6V, - ft S 


_ 194319ft I4’A 19ft -2V* 
70393 fTft lift f/ft -ft 


_ 1500 10ft 9ft lav# -ft 
_ 280 4V, 3ft 3ft —ft 


.... ' J - . . * ' a • r-vunri- 

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, remair 


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■02 c .6 2360 3ft 3 ft 3", —V* , OuOdLa 
.72 IX *7077 44ft 42*. 44 - , QuofcCn 


- 8074 44 ft 47ft 43V'u — '4'„ 

.. 3930 7V* 5ft 6ft -IftlSK 
... 266114 13 lift I 5iT 
_ 2« 64* 4ft 4’» — '"Vm I 53 tr 


7979 5ft 44, 5ft -V, Quakcty 
Vn 23 2iv« 22Vi— 14% . QuBkFaO 

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_. 230 13 II 12'A _ 1 

_ 543 lv, 1 1 l — 1/„ I 


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_. 957 0 »>* lift— 14, 

- 1153 lift 10ft 11 —ft TsSST 

- 7438 16 16 10 +1 TLrttMX 

-.25181 16ft 15 16V, +ft -rtSS 

... 490 0W 7ft 7>* —7 ft -nSS? 
._ 5088 13ft 114* 12 —ft tuEj 
... 51050 1 7ft 51, 17ft -ft 

.40 2.1 475 MV* 19 19V* —V, flSori 


. ... 7451 6ft 54* 5ft), — V„ 
2#40 5.7 452 42ft 41ft 42ft . 


1091 3 41 J 4?» —ft { Sw»r vp 

., 2«2 0> 7ft 8 


SJ3 2ft 1ft 1ft —ft 
3892 0ft 7" « 7ft *4% 
1193 S 4ft 5 -ft 
7329 5ft 5 5ft — 4% 


.10* £ ,1713 12ft 13 -Vi |v™«v 

_ _ 6299 19i, li/u ift .9* Syrota 
m jyv eft -v, 


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... J7417 ft 16 —ft yp to 
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JO 1.1681 IB 15ft 171% WTO 
.00 J JJ730 244% 238% 23V« — WaOtCer 
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i'l 4J 1 • PcwCT .aa J S 4793 14.* 13 [3 ft — V. OlFoad 


_ * 2V,* 2'., — 

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>SOd5ft 43 ■ 43’, —V,; P'JUoTei . 7,11 5', eft } — '* < Ou'cHri 

1949 £ 4* 6>* 64, ... 1 PeuosR .. 20094 61 S3ft 54’.',— 3’* I Quikslv 

M66 2>. 2'* J’. .PcrSolv 14914 144, lift |4C, -V|# 1 Ou.nlva 

,w - — 4i? 1? lav, [0ft - ' # : Quuifites 


Oenmon ... 9949 6»# *1, 64, ... ' Pcunsn 

Octaonwi ... 3464 34# 3'. j’. . PcrSnh. 

OctfH 4700 71 ’ , 20‘* ?!•* . Pvtr.atr 

OdciksB _ 1917’* 5ft 6»* — ftlPcrFoad 

OdCiiOsA _ 1630 7ft S'# Porlum 

OttsLOB . IftJS 13*» t?‘> 13 — ftiPermBoJ 

DWMV 1.20 4.0 210 31ft 29ft 30‘ . • V* I PorlliMlui 

On<oCos 1 46 5 1 1528 30ft 704 . 20*,— Ift ! P«?rri9L> 

o-wcar .JO 1.6 84 12ft l?ft 12ft — ' # I Per -.no. ft 

Oinamcr ... 503 ll># lo-ft H PnFoed 

OldDom 97 19 10 19 -I PolcOAn 

OkSKCTU 124 3 7 1497 13’, 13’ t Uft — ft, . PcirLmt 

DkJLvmc 10 i.O 4J 10ft 10ft 10ft — ft : Perrrcr 

OiaJrtJ .92 J.$ 418 37 36’iJf.ft . ' PelD# 


. 1311 14V# 1 5»* 154 , -ft q 
.. 249 3ft 2", 2’, — 1 ft : Qui- 


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. I89151J', io«, IJi, -IV, PJHcfll 6 


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OiymFpi 700 7j ■^27’s ft’s 26ft— ■ Pcisiwa 


DivmoSii 

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OrrwonEfT 


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374 U', l4'« 14' .- — • PnrmMr 


DmcaFn _ . ___ 

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DnAssfon ... 313712'# lift IJft -##'PnarLD 

OtiOCB 100 3.7 260' 57ft 304. 27ft Ph.tCCT) 

OnDcPOt 1.09 6 9 34S25', 24 Id’ , — ' ■ ; • PnnEm. 

OnCOftn .. 1035 3 t’l 2ft Ptin.Srt 

oncer - 205S S’ # 54. —I , Fln.Tc 

OnePrcs ... 3566 11'.# 10ft 11 —ft PUcitoC 


- ff.’6 5ft 5' 


81 76 24ft 754# —ft PHrm-Uo 


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. *637 a 1 , 30ft 23ft - I' 
... 1074 7», 0 4—1 

- 905 4>. 4' , 4«# — 

II 1* 1105 6i* 6 6ft 

- 3366 304+ 17 19V* -1 

... 11552 45* 4ft 4ft -1 

76 2ft 75 , Jl, 

._ 529 1ft >. 1 — 

. 00351 44'.- 43ft J44 ( ... 


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. 66*7 22V+ 30>. 20ft— IV, : jBOxtrd 

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19 3B0 3? 39 39 —1ft RSFn/ 

5537 38'. 36’.. 36ft _ 1 V., Racalnk 

. *5S 10?* 10 I0"'i# RadoEC 

300711’. I Oft l|'.. _i* RodC are 

. JWr l«'i I8N 18ft —ft RctScaG 

. 4130 16 12' , 14'.# -J'., , Radius 5 

7«?i’V., 1 ft 1 ’’. H Raasno 

306?"'.. 2ft 2' » ' Railte* 

JS U’# 13 1*’.# -V# ' RalnTc 

60 5ft 5ft 6V, — I'm ‘ Rullys 
... 2987 7 6ft 6*« -ft Rem Fin 

... mi? 4ft 5ft 6ft - t* ; Ramsay 

52 6’.; 6 0 1 '; -"s ' Rcmiron 

923 3’* jft —ft 1 ROTWACC 
. 2IS4I? 1 I 21 V- 22', .. . RcFtnBC 

3639 36ft JdS, 34ft— It, . Pasfrop 
.. 71*9 23 311. 22*. -V, Roms ft 

... 7915 18ft 17’.. 17ft _ 7 . ( Raven 
.. 160 13 12ft 12ft — ’■» . Rawlinas 


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62 IS 853 IB 17' , 17V, .. SBE 

409 9ft 9>% 9ft —ft ! EBS En 
...6513ft 13 13 — ftlSOSvS 

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__ >. 22 * 2 ", 2 2 _ SFX Bra 

JO .9 151423ft 71 V, 221+ +•>-.,! SHLSv 

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4992 2ft l’v„ Jv„ — 1 . g ) SKI 

.20 Jl 229027 I6 1 * 26ft — V, 1 SLMS 

.ISt 10 4363 5’ • *'« S ... SPSS 

_ 153*17 IS 15V# — '.!STV 

- 3936 10’* 94# 10'/I, + .„ SaberSft 

- 3391 3ft ?••• J _ Solera 

_ .. 6692 17ft 15ft 17' , - v . I SafHIt 

JO £ 456 24’, 24ft 24'V„ ... : Safeskln 

_ 744?9ft 27'.# 27'#— lft I Srtvist 

i J'l 3': 3' r - SrtvCmo 
1- d 3957 10V* 15ft 15ft— 3ft 5flttV IK 

- 2JT221 19ft 19".-— J’# iSIFranas 


- 7B8 2», 2ft 2ft I 

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_ 7TO 0ft 7ft 7ft —ft 
-. 97 17V, Wft 16ft —ft 

.. 1742 19ft lBft 18ft —V* 
-. 8590 B'-, S’/j B -2ft 


8§ lB’ i 10ft IBvS IS I SMWO -MB 4.4 20419 1BV. 18 7 /. I 

?Sl7ft 16 ’ l lift _ SMTltr 1X9 e 5.1 M9 31W 20ft 21ft -V* * 

3123 S' . 5'~ ! SoEWC _ 2127 6ft S'#, 6ft * 1ft 

3 « l"i 8 8 ii . StrmSnH 379 14ft 15 IS — TAT 

if f.' !’•# fv. ** I SaMmrt .05 4#6 1695 1ft I lft -ft, ™r 

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™si?j* ‘*1 !•.» *ft Saumn AA U JOi* Ml# ■- TCI lr 


... 7*06 3'.'# 2! * 3ft - ft 
50*7 10’% 9ft 9ft —ft 


147 14V# 14V* 14 ft —ft 
3074 ?' « 6V# 6ft _ 


Saultltrsl M 15 0890 20ft 19'A 19ft — I?'.?* 


■" ,7 lr,.'. SK ~ SwSIBO, .20 1#* 

•” 2 iv.' #ri SwBcSrt 1.206 5.0 

o "‘11127 9ft Sdl 

1.94 19 8086 51,, M’# 50ft -1 CZSSff 'if 1? 


... 785* 7'. 
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6 15', 14’.-, 1*';— f- 
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I SafHIt ... 207110’.), 8 V, 9ft —ft KBSS 

■ Safesl'ln ... lOTBiSft 15>.# 15ft 

I Spry 1 St ... 6»3 »• , M’ . 20V, —ft 

WivCmo - 1424 17ft 16’. 17 —ft 

Satrrtk . 36? 9 B’.# B’ j ... !£££" 

[51Fi-anos ... 1117 l/v# 14ft 14 '-, — Sg'gJ 1 * 
Stives . 1 ? 1.4 85 8 *. 0ft 0 ft _ s£E£L 

St Jude .40 1114*53 36 34 ft 35 ft -ft | * 

I SlAAarv .16 1.2 1918 13'* 1 ?V„ 13 

• SiPaulB s J0 IS 3486 20 ft 19>* 20 '.’# , SSKJ 

—ft I Sales . 3055 J3 22'.* 22ft —ft 

« r SallMa, .. 433 2ft 2 2’-# 

iSamLby 237 1 '* 1 >'„ I-., .. sSeSnl 

-I ., SandTq _ 545 2ft 2V„ 2ft —ft , £S?rrh 

— ft SandPm X 0 1.4 MOM 19 |9 —1 I I ?*™ 1 


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- *115 3** — »■ Hn!!!£ .ioe 1.1 * 379 ’. B', 9«.* -ft 1 

— 947 4'-i, 3ft 4 I Sonomar _ 4 7.4 6', 4ft ... 


_ 17*4 2 ift 1'Vi, —1, Sanmina 

_ 3789 |»* S' , 5ft „ SaalCr? 

... 6590 9 7-» 9 - L d Sapiens 

— 37S 2ft 2', #*, — ft • Saloon 

. 846 20ft 20 20ft - '.# I SciTech 

_ 8104 le 1 -, iy,- to Savoy 

... 1*97 4ft *', *' , —v. Seven 

_ 3246 2Vi, 2", 7’-. ... 1 Seven mi 

z 'iS? Jft i-t ^ rsfi-SSo 

RandAcC ... 1845 J 1 '; 2ft 3ft - l # ScwHI 

RalnBCS M 3.6 TO IS 17ft 17’, SehmlV 

PaafrOo 5765 S 4 4V. - '% 1 imaiCo 


- iis 3 ;- v; 3 ,’7 aasr& 

.. 1576 7ft 4ft 7’i —ft 
... 795 26V'. 24'* 2SV* -ft |S«YS 

. . 106 70’ .- 20< s 70V, ... IsISSSi^ 

.20 £ 1117 24'# 33', , 23ft «2S“# 

- .170? ?!!<• ‘P* J6 -2V. sgH!? 


Jft i PfivslcHII 
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2675 4'.* Sft 6 -I-, Romfid 

302 23’ : 23 22 -ft , ReCao 


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_ 1034 3 

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4S«717ft 16ft 17 


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I PierePoa 1201 11'# W‘i lOft — ■■# • RecvSna 


_ 30212 18?* 17ft SCiSff ... 4931 7'., 7 7ft -ft SHE? 1 . - HU 

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Sceclra „ 2639 Hfi, 1 IV* — TocnCao 

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s^eaeis JO u 1173 a is lift 15 ft — 2 TomPn 

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Duty-Free Sales 
Prospects Bright 

This $17 billion business has doubled since 1986. 

Cjrowth is anticipated in the world travel shopping sector 
due to a -steady increase in international travel and an ongo- 
ing economic recovery in many countries. 

•Travelers are not yet buying duty free like they did in the 
1980s, but they are beginning to spend more, and there are 
more of them,” explains Yngve Bia, president of Generation 
Publications, the most authoritative statistical monitor of the 
trade. “This should translate into a 6 percent to 8 percent in- 
crease in duty-free sales in 1 994.” 

Prospects for duty free, in fact, look brighter than in many 
domestic markets. ‘The expansion in duty free has been 
very good despite the recession," says Patrick Bousquet- 
Chavanne, senior vice president of Estee Lauder’s travel re- 
tailing division. “We expect the next three years to be better 
than the last three.” 

10th exhibition 

The continued growth is one of many topics being discussed 
at the 10th annual Tax Free World Exhibition (TFWE) in 
Cannes this week. The annual trade show brings together 
over 5,000 buyers, agents, operators, distributors and” other 
representatives from some 140 countries. The event has also 
grown, now commanding twice as much space in the 
sprawling seaside Palais des Festivals as it did in 1 9S5. More 
than 500 luxury goods companies are exhibiting. 

The majority of participants at the TFWE are, not surpris- 
ingly, European. Europe still represents over 50 percent of 
worldwide duty-free sales, French companies are responsi- 
ble for generating half of all duty-free revenue, and Britain 
sells more duty free than any other country in the world. 

Aggressive expansion 

BAA, the airport authority that runs numerous British air- 
ports (383 percent of duty-free sales are in airports, and 
sales grew 73 percent in 1993). is continuing its aggressive 
expansion program and developing downtown-lure shop- 
ping malls attached to runways at Heathrow and other air- 
ports. BAA's specialist retail stores include names like 
Austin Reed. Harrods, Thomas Pink. Mappin and Webb, 
and Hamleys Toys. Within Harrods are "rooms of luxury” 
featuring D unhill , Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent, Cartier. Guc- 
ci, Christian Dior and other designer brands. 

In addition, the now-famiiiar ‘Tax Free For Tourists” pro- 
gram, which beckons non-EU residents to reclaim value- 
added taxes if they spend over a certain amount in European 
downtown markets, is omnipresent And rare is the interna- 
tional or charter airline (8.8 percent of duty-free sales are on 
airlines) that has failed to exploit duty free. 



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SHOPPING 


Asia-Pacific boom 

Global growth, however, is most notable in Asia and Ocea- 
nia, where duty-free sales leapt 125 percent last year, pri- 
marily due to the emerging market in China. Honolulu, 
where passengers spend an average of $100 each, compared 
with just over $19 at Heathrow, is still the world's number- 
one duty-free location, with sales of over $400 million in 
1993. (Heathrow is close on its heels, with $395 million, fol- 
lowed by Hong Kong, Paris and Amsterdam. Today, the 
world's 50 most important duty-free shop operators account 
for almost 60 percent of global sales). 

Sophisticated Middle East duty-free shops in Abu Dhabi, 
Bahrain and Dubai, where business is up 1 1 percent this 
year, continue to offer the best prices in the world’s duty- 
free emporia. 

East European prospects 

Duty free in Eastern Europe is also opening up, but at a 
much slower pace than had been anticipated. “There is a 
great deal of pent-up demand and a desire to purchase inter- 


nationally known products throughout Russia and other for- 
mer Communist countries,” explains David Hope of Aer Ri- 
anta International, which operates outlets in Russia and other 
East European countries. “The economic transition to a free 
market is difficult, but the long-term future is optimistic." 

Purchasing patterns 

Purchasing habits are also changing. The Japanese, the big 
buyers of tax-free luxury products in the 1970s and I9S0s. 
are spending less, with younger consumers purchasing lip- 
stick instead of porcelain-packaged cognac. Lower prices on 
the Japanese market, discount stores and the domestic eco- 
nomic depression have also tempered Japanese purchasing. 

“Duty free still means exclusive gifts, but the presenta- 
tions have become a little more reasonable because the 
Japanese are buying fewer porcelain and crystal containers.'* 
explains Joel Lafon. director of duty free at Rcmy Martin 
Cognac. ‘The best clients at the moment appear to he the 
Arabs, Russians and Chinese." 

Joel Sira tt e-McClure 


TFWE to Remain 
Cannes Institution 

This year offers a new, improved exhibition. 

The Tax Free World Exhibition iTFWEi. v\ Inch gets 
under way this morning with a conference featuring 
U.S. consumer guru Faith Popcorn, is second onl v to (lie 
Cannes Film Festival as a revenue earner lor this 
Mediterranean seaside city. 

The event is so popular that a luxury cruise liner is in 
the bay to house delegates this year. In the meantime, 
the city is celebrating the TFWE’s 10th ammersarv 
with music, dancing, fireworks and its typical panache, 
including a complimentary drink offered to all dele- 
gates. 

Cannes has hosted the TFWE for nine ol the past 10 
years and recently managed, despite serious competi- 
tion from Barcelona, to maintain its lock on the event 
for at least the next three years. 

New improvements 

TFWE executives decided to keep the event in C;innes 
alter the city agreed to extend exhibition space in the 
Palais des Festivals tat u cost of over $25 million*, con- 
trol exhibition prices, work with hotels and restaurants 
to improve the quality/priec ratio, develop new hotel 
projects, redevelop the port to allow docking of large 
cruise ships and resolve a number of logistical prob- 
lems. 

“There is a synergy between the glamorous image of 
Cannes and the prestigious image of TFWE." savs 
TFWE’s president, Jueky Paquel. “We are delighlal the 
city has given its wholehearted commitment to address- 
ing the issue." 

Continued cooperation 

The city, noting the financial importance of the event, is 
obviously pleased that the TFWE chose to stay despite 
exhibitors' concerns over whether Cannes coiiM meet 
increased demand for exhibition space and hotel accom- 
modation. 

“The TFWE. which is the biggest luxury product 
show in the world, has been faithful to Cannes and is 
tremendously important to our economy and image.” 
explains Dario dell'Amonia. director of tourism for 
Cannes. “We naturally listened to their requirements 
and are doing our best to meet their needs.” 

This year’s exhibition will be proof of that continued 
understanding. 

J.S.M. 




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Whoever you are meeting: 
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Page 16 

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WORLD 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MON DAY, O CTOBER 24, 1994 




I N G 



TFWE: New Exhibitors 
As Well as Comebacks 









For exhibitors, nothing succeeds like exposure ut this key event. 




The Current Favorites 
In Duty-Free Purchases 




1 he success of the Tax Free World 
Exhibition cun be judged h\ the Sri- 
some new companies ihui request 
space each year. Even if floor space 
were available, however, not all of 
them would be accommodated. Ex- 
plains Sara Brunquinho of the TFWE: 
“Our criteria urc very strict. Our ex- 
hibitors must have a large distribution 
in duty free. If they don’t, they aren’t 
eligible. After that, we decide on the 
basis of space availability.” 

This year there are 19 new ex- 
hibitors, replacing 19 companies that - 
because of acquisition or indiv idual cir- 
cumstance - have chosen not to return. 
Seven of the newcomers can be classi- 
fied in the fragrances and cosmetics 
category , three are in fashion, three in 
confectionery, three in jewelry, two in 
liquor - and one produces model air- 
planes. Their headquarters tire as close 
as nearby Monaco (Misslyn cosmetics) 
or its fur away as Australia i Juki. Opals 
jewelry'). 


Cosmetics. Two other companies 
chose not to exhibit last year, but have 
relumed. They are Berentzen. a dis- 
tillery. and Michaelu Frey, makers of 
fine enameled jewelry. 

Why do they come to Cannes? One 
of the first-timers. Misslyn. has been 
u ailing five years for the opportunity. 
According to Mauri zio Ricciardi of the 
cosmetics firm. “It is very prestigious 
for the upscale market that interests us. 
Plus, it is very selective in lerms of par- 
ticipants and visitors." 



Luxury goods and brand natnes are showing increasing pnmtineucc. 






Coming back for more 
Not all these newcomers ure complete- 
ly new to Cannes. Four are companies 
that were formerly incorporated in oth- 
er stands and have chosen to stand 
alone this year. They are Maxim’s de 
Paris, purveyors of gourmet food: 
Oily's Cosmetics: fashions by 
Francesco Smalto: and Etienne Aisner 


Just off the boat 

Philippe Nicolas, export sales manager 
for Neuhaus chocolates, notes that his 
company was unofficially present in 
Cannes lust year t with a boat to host 
delegates to the exhibition) and signed 
two major contracts. He says, "It is 
very important for us to be officially 
exhibiting in order to be recognized as 
a major new duty-free confectionery 
supplier" 

Another confectioner. ASTO Inter- 
national. is relatively new to duty free 
but has created a separate structure and 
specific packaging for this market. 
"We v iew it as critical to be present at 
TFWE so that operators and agents are 
aware of our interest in developing our 
involvement in duly free." says Paul 
Ridgwjy. managing director of ASTO. 

Passing from food to fashion, the ra- 


Michaela Frey, makers of fine enameled iaivsry. is back again at the show, which has strict 
criteria for exhibitors. 


tionale remains unchanged. Maie- 
ChamborJ makes fine belts for fashion 
giants such as Dior. Givenchy and Lan- 
cel. and also commercializes belts un- 
der its own trademark. Rcn« -.n.;. "F-.-: 
the past seven years. Renoma has rep- 
resented the bulk ol "ur company’' 
sales in duty free." explains Patrick 
Poncelei. "so this year v.e JowaJ.-d t • 
have a stand of ourLwn.’’ 


European showcase 

Cognac Landy sells c« •gnu*, with .. de- 
ference: inside each decanter there i' a 
handcrafted glass sculpture, it-. 
huvinc been well -received in Vnm 


DUBAI 

DUTY FREE S 


markets. an-J the company has included 
European duty free in its expansion 
program thi - year, reports Landy' s Ve- 
gur Bruynildscn. He sees TFWE as the 
be.* : . to become known in Europe. 

L* :wc’* Lather g«.*ods from Spain 
already have a deserved reputation 
worldwide. Perfumes Locwe will dis- 
play t- range of %ix fragrances in a 
•ur.d parafe from its leather goods to 
higm’ghl the former for TFWE’s pre- 
• crccn cd visitors. 

T best u.sv to judge the success of 
7F l A E L to ask a returning exhibitor. 
Toy n taker Lego was a newcomer in 
: Ml "*3 and t> hack with a larger booth 
■his year. Why ? Explains Ole Wiihus 
. •: Leg* c ”Vi c had planned for 3o meet- 
figs tn Cannes and wound up holding 
meetings. Between 1992 and 1994. 
we tripled our in-flight sales." 

Claudia Flisi 


X he Tax Free World Exhibition natu- 
ral ly mirrors product trends in the 
worldwide duty-free and tax-free busi- 
ness. Exhibits here this week illustrate 
that wine and spirits still represent 2S 
percent of duty-free sales, followed by- 
perfumes and cosmetics < 24.4 pereentl. 
and tobacco goods ( 13.5 percent). 

The exhibits also exemplify, surpris- 
ingly. that only six product categories - 
cigarettes, women’s fragrances. Scotch 
whisky, women’s cosmetics and toi- 
letries! cognac, and men’s fragrances 
and toiletries - account forever 50 per- 
cent of all goods sold in duty and tax 
free. Professionals conclude that some 
sectors are set for faster growth than 
others. "Alcohol and tobacco have cer- 
tain problems that ure directly reflected 
in a decline in sales and reduced space 
allocation in the stores." says Yngve 
Bia, president of Generation Publica- 
tions. "Luxury goods, including per- 
fume and cosmetics, continue to get 
more shelf space in increasingly more' 
attractive stores." 


LipscaJe gift categories 
Purchases of luxury goods have been 
fueled by a penchant for acquiring 
unique gifts while traveling, which is 
why many suppliers and retailers now- 
produce exclusive tax-free products. 
One hoi -selling item in the 1990s is 
boxed perfume sets containing small 
bottles of well-known fragrances. 

The booming miscellaneous catego- 
ry 1 34. 1 percent, or $5.8 billion, of all 
sales in 1993) is also continuing to 
grow. Almost every traveler has wit- 
nessed the phenomenal explosion and 


division. "The consumer is definitely 
dictating the p;ice of change." 

The customer, of course, has also 
changed, and many travelers arc much 
more price-conscious than they were a 
decade ago. Real travel enthusiasts col- 
lect price catalogues from different air- 
ports and check prices of particularly 
expensive items, like watches. io find 
the best buy. Or they keep an eye on 
what airline crew members, Who usual- 
ly know the best prices, purchase at 
particular airports. J.S.M. 


Some Cross-Purposes in the Chunnel 




Eurotunnel, operator of Channel Tiumels Le Shuttle . has opened duty-and tax-free shops at both the Folkestone 
and Calais rail terminals in lime for Le Shuttle s planned start-up for the general public in mid-Novemlter. 


i 7~- 

■ iZWotunnel has introduced duty free 
’ with seme ambivalence, for it has been 


BMW 850 a Arctic White And Fen an 348 Spider Blue 


Dubai Duty Free, pioneers of the luxury car 
promotion, now in its filth year, offer you a 
choice. Tickets may lx? purchased for one or 
(x>th cars. 


u vociferous opponent of the European 
Union's extension of duty free until 
1999. arguing in the British courts that 
the cross-Channel ferry companies use 
their large duty-free sales to subsidize 
cheap fares, particularly for day trips. 
Nevertheless, it has been obliged to of- 
fer duty free as pan of its commercial 
war with the ferries. 


For each car. tickets are priced at Dhs 500/ 

US 139 and limited to 1000 bonafide travellers 
either departing or transiting through Dubai 
International Airport. 


Irish expertise 

The 4 Kips will be operated by Aer Ri- 
unta. the Dublin airport authority, 
which has opened many outlets in East- 
ern Europe, notably in Moscow. St. Pe- 
tersburg. Kiev. Warsaw and Budapest, 
as well as others in Kuwait. Bahrain 
| and Karachi. 

The shops at live Channel Tunnel ter- 
minuses will be the Irish company's 
first in Western Europe outside of 
Dublin. Shannon and Cork airports. 

Another irony is that Aer Rianta is a 
prominent voice in the duty-free lobby 
that fought for the extension of the con- 
cessions and which will be opposing 
the attempt by Eurotunnel to rescind 
I the 1999 extension granted by the Eu- 
1 ropeun Union for intra-Union "travelers. 



Channel Tunnel operators are hoping that passengers will break their journeys to shop. 


The draw date and winning numbers will be 
published, and each participant w ill be 
advised. 


The cars will lie shipped to the winners’ 
address free of charge. 


Tbc fines! collet Hon at tbe trorUl's most elegant duly five. 


FlyBuyDubai — l j# - 


For further information please call Dubai (9714) 206-2433 or Fax (9714) 244 455 


CONGRATULATIONS! 

DUBAI DUTY REES FINEST SURR1SE WINNERS 


Duty-free victory 

This extension was a major victory tor 
the duty-free operators, as they had 
feared an end to the system with the ad- 
vent of the single market. 

"V\’e have agreed to differ with Euro- 
tunnel." sjvn Aer Rianta ‘s spokesman 
Fiu.i Clime. "We are very happy to 
h.oe won this prestigious contract and 
to have shops which will sell an inter- 
nuiiiinal range of goods as well as Irish 
products." 

The shops will combine duty-free 
| ti.e.. no excise Laxes) sales of liquor 
j and cigarettes with VAT-free sales of 
j perfumes, cameras, clothes and gifts. 

Aer Rianta will extend the range in 
line with demand. ‘This is a new mar- 
ket. and we will have to see how it de- 
velopj*. In any event, we intend to 
adopt a high profile." adds Mr. Clune. 


33-IKh Winner 
IBRAHIM ALRAMSI 
(Series # 330 - Ticket # 00971. 
UAE national from Dubai, 
winner of an amaranth viola 
Fbreche 9 ! 1 Carrera. 


331st Winner 
VELLUR SATYANARAYAN 
(Scries #331- Ticket #0914). 
Indian, from Dubai, UAE, 
winner of an afkxis grey 
BMW 850 Ci. 


332nd Winner 
ABDULWALDPALABASSI 
(Series # 332 - Ticket # 0982), 
UAE: national from Umm A1 
Quwain. winner 
of a blue Ferrari 348 Spider. 


333rd Winner 

SAMBASIVAM SWAMINATHAN 
(Series # 333- Ticket # 0899). 
Indian, from Madras, India, 
winner of a silver 
Mercedes Benz SL 500. 


knowledge that the imponderable fac- 
tor is whether car drivers, who will 
choose the shuttle for speed, will be 
prepared to break their journey in order 
to go shopping. 

Christopher Garnett, Eurotunnel’s 
commercial director, thinks they will. 
"We expect passengers will part: their 
cars. eat. shop and then catch the next 
shuttle." he says. "There will be a shut- 
tle train every quarter of an hour." 
Truck drivers and shareholders, who 
have been using the shuttle during the 
so-called "overture" period, have been 
the first to use the shops. 

Mr. Gameu insists that the shops’ 
opening will not lessen the determina- 
tion of Eurotunnel to fight in the courts, 
although he expects the duty-free lobby 
to fight just as hard “to defend their 
gravy train." 


ing soon on whether certain cases relat- 
ing to European law should be referred 
to the European Court in Luxembourg. 

The Eurotunnel argument is that the 
continuation of duty-free purchases in 
intra-Union travel has been unlawful 
within the single market after Dec. 31. 
I95L. and led to abuses bv the ferrv 
companies that should be slopped. ’ 
In taking the case to court. Eurotun- 
nel is honoring its pledge to sharchold- 
l r c * mscl liie aJ verse financial ef- 
j r Eurotunnel of the continuation 
ot the duty-free concession." 


Nos quite drive-in 

Both turotunnel and Aer Rianta ac- 


The EU question 

In July, Eurotunnel took action against 
the British government and obtained 
leave in the High Court in London to 
seek judicial review of intra-Lfriion 
dury-free- sales. It hopes for a full hear- 


Sales vs. subsidies 
Eurotunnel cochairmen Patrick 
sol e and Sir Alastair Morton sail 
statement at the rime of the Jufv 
hearing: "This is a straight sut 
Irom taxpayers to certain traveler 
Which is ap p llcdilian , 

wh.>h ° . e , n townie an ahus* 
which provides ferries and short 
airlines wuh a discriminatory av 

-rKv a £i ,nsi lheir nevv c °mpetiiji 

cross-Channel traffic. " ^ 

Alan T 


"Would Travel Shopping" 
was produced in its entirely by ihe Advertising Department of die International Herald Tribune 
WmTFRS: Claudia FIim. Joel Si raue- McClure and Alan Tinier in France. Michael Frenchman in London and Gurrv ■ 

Program director: Bill Mahder. ‘ ‘ m Hl,n ? kong. 


exposure of accessories - Irom leather 
goods to watches and jewelry - in 
every tax-free outlet. 

Duty-free shops arc constantly rcluv- 
bished to tempt the shopper. The store 
at Frankfun airport, remodeled just 
over a year ago. i> organized around 26 
alcoves, or mini-boutiques. featuring 
brand names like Swatch. DunhHI. 
Davidoff and Porsche Design. 


Increased specialization 
Indeed, shops of all types keep coming 
io duly free. Examples are a women’s 
lingerie shop and a Momblanc bou- 
tique in Paris. Reehok and Levi's tax- 
free stores in Moscow, and Swatch 
boutiques in Rome and at numerous 
other airports. Some airports, like Ams- 
terdam's Schiphol. offer "Bargains of 
the Month." while others tout incen- 
tives like "Buy Five. Get One Free.” 

"There are many innovations be- 
cause the market is so competitive.and 
customers require and expect greater 
choice in tax free," observes Patrick 
Bousquet-Chavanne, senior vice presi- 
dent of B4ee Lauder’s travel retailing 





tz 




— . -■ 

■■ ■ 




tW. 


N 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


Page 17 



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TRAVEL 


SHOPPING 


The Gulf’s Lucrahve Midnight Hour 

0 Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Bahrain continue to draw millions of dollars in sales - especially during night stopovers. 


w. 


bile half the world is 
sleeping, the other half is 
shopping - or so it seems at 
the tax-free shops at the ma- 
jor Gulf airports during the 
dead of night. Between 
10:30 P.M. and 2 A.M. is 
peak shopping time for the 
thousands of transit passen- 
gers at the airports in Abu 
Dhabi, Bahrain and Dubai. 
With an average stopover of 
less than 45 minutes, pas- 
sengers have little time to 
browse and buy, which ex- 
plains the frenetic activity as 
travelers from many nations 
jostle together at the cash 
registers. 

Today’s travelers through 
the Gulf are spending more 
than ever before. Sales at the 
three leading tax-free shops 
in the Gulf - Abu Dhabi, 
Bahrain and Dubai - are ex- 
i to rise by 13 percent 
the end of this year. Last 
year, combined sales 
reached an all-time high of 
$212 million, with Dubai 
well out in front with $132 
million. 

Donble-digft growth 
This year, according to 
Colin McLoughlin, general 
manager of Dubai Duty Free 
(DDF), total sales are ex- 
pected to top $140 million. 
At Abu Dhabi, Mohammed 
Mounib, general manager of 
Abu Dhabi Duty Free 
(ADDF) says revenue for 
the first half of this year rose 
by 20 percent to $28.1 mil- 
lion, compared with the 
same period in 1993. John 
Sutcliffe, general manager 
of Bahrain Duty Free, says 
that sales so far this year are 
already up 23 percent over 
1993. He adds: “The shops 
continue to break daily and 
monthly records, and the 
projected sales total for 1994 
is $35 million - an increase 
of 48.6 percent in just two 
years.” 

For the sixth year running, 
the readers of Business 
Traveller magazine have 
voted Dubai Duty Free the 
world’s second-best airport 
duty-free shop, behind Ams- 
terdam’s Scfaiphol. 

With some seven interna- 
tional airports in the United 
Arab Emirates alone, com- 


petition between the two 
principal airports, Abu 
Dhabi and Dubai, is intense 

— although the two general 
managers will publicly ad- 
mit to only a kind of friendly 
rivalry. The entry of the new 
operation at Bahrain two 
years ago has introduced an- 
other player to the tax-free 
shopping scene. 

Value at Dubai 
Dubai, which recently cele- 
brated its 10th anniversary, 
was the original trailblazer 
in the Gulf, concentrating on 
a huge variety of goods at 
whar Mr. McLoughlin de- 
scribes as “value for money” 
prices. Today, the Dubai op- 
eration has become a much 
wider enterprise: Dubai Inc. 
“One of our aims has been to 
put Dubai more prominently 
cm the world map, not only 
as a pleasant place to shop in 
the duty-free complex, but 
also as a place to do busi- 
ness, a tourist destination 
and as the sporting capital of 
the Gulf,” Mr. McLoughlin 
says. 

He adds that profits are 
not on the priority list when 
it comes to offering a service 
to the 6 million passengers 
passing through the airport 
each year. Says Mohi-Din 
Binhendi, director-general 
of the Dubai Department of 
Civil Aviation: “Since the 
beginning, DDFs commit- 
ment has been to opening 
the door to international 
business by providing an ex- 
ceptional service and prod- 
uct range at the most com- 
petitive prices. We believe 
we have succeeded, and we 
now provide a link between 
100 worldwide destinations 
and serve 62 airlines 

A heavy emphasis on 
sponsoring a full range of 
sporting events is part of an 
overall strategy to promote 
Dubai. Involvement in 
world-class sports, from pro- 
fessional golf and tennis 
tournaments to snooker and 
offshore powerboat racing, 
has certainly stimulated glob- 
al attention. Mr. McLoughlin 
says that some of these 
events attract worldwide tele- 
vision audiences of more 
than 200 million viewers. 


Redone Abu Dhabi 
Abu Dhabi has gone in for 
only limited sports sponsor- 
ship. The main thrust is on 
developing the shopping 
complex, which has just 
gone through a major refur- 
bishment. making it one of 
the most attractive tax-free 
shops around. It stocks some 
of the most up-to-date items 
in electronics and electrical 
goods as well as a huge se- 
lection of video and Him 
cameras. Its prices are ex- 
tremely competitive, making 
it a “must” stop for the dis- 
cerning tax-free shopper 
seeking real value for money 
in a relaxing and comfort- 
able environment. The mul- 
tilingual staff offers true ser- 
vice with a smile, whether it 
is the middle of the day or 
night. 

Major changes this year 
have included a new per- 


“Some items on display 
may seem incongruous to 
the casual observer, but 
make sense to the interna- 
tional traveler,” says Mr. 
Mounib. “For instance: 
leather and knitwear, ideal 
for customers flying from 
the Middle East to a cold 
European winter climate.” 
Another example of cus- 
tomers’ special needs being 
accommodated is the avail- 
ability of tobacco, bever- 
ages. video recorders and 
cameras that meet the re- 
quirements of those from the 
countries of the former Sovi- 
et Union. 

This year saw the opening 
of Abu Dhabi's second in- 
ternational airport at AJ Ain, 
served by five international 
airlines. ADDF manage- 
ment operates the shop. “As 
in Abu Dhabi, we expect 
gold jewelry and electronics 




Abu DhabTsshoppbig complex (top) has been completely refurbished and offers the most up-to-date electronic and electrical equipment at 
extremefyompetitiveprices.IM)aiDuty Free (above) saw revenues increase by 20 percent during the first half of this year. 


fume and cosmetic shop, 
now one of the largest in the 
Gulf. The old circle ’Island” 
shop, one of the central fea- 
tures of the terminal build- 
ing, has been replaced with 
four island boutiques dis- 
playing leading brand names 
in jewelry and watches. 
With more than 55,000 
items on display, ADDF 
aims to cater to the special 
needs of its traveling cus- 
tomers as part of its “value 
for money” approach. 


to be the top-selling prod- 
ucts,” says Mr. Mounib. 

Browsing in Bahrain 
There have been extensive 
changes in Bahrain's duty- 
free shopping complex, 
which now covere more than 
1.800 square meters. 

It was official!: 
last September by Bahrain’s 
Prime Minister Sheikh 
Khalifa bin Sul man al-Khal- 
ifa. ‘1 now believe we have 
one of the finest shopping 


facilities in the region 
and one of the very best in 
the world,” says Mr. Sut- 
cliffe, the general manager. 

The new design and lay- 
out of the shopping complex 
in the recently expanded in- 
ternational airport encour- 
ages customers to “walk the 
shops” and see the entire 
35,000-item product range. 

More than 3 million pas- 
sengers pass through the air- 
port, and its tax-free shops 
have a distinctive local fla- 


vor that has proved popular 
with many visitors. “The 
Bahraini comer is popular 
for souvenir snapshots,” 
says Mr. Sutcliffe. 

Here a wide choice of lo- 
cally made products, from 
confectionery to brassware 
and textiles, are on display. 
He has also introduced lis- 
tening posts with headsets 
for those who want to listen 
to any of the 5,000 CDs or 
tapes stocked. 

Michael Frenchman 


The Truffle-Dust Factor: 
Packaging Duty-Free Goods 

Beautiful Practical Portable . Duty-free packaging must be all three. 


L roduct packaging, important in any sales 
environment, faces special challenges in the 
duty-free arena. The most critical elements 
in duty free - for both sellers and buyers - 
are space, weight and product protection. 
There is simply less space in roost airport 
shops than in comparable “downtown" 
stores. This space problem is compounded 
for in-flight sales, where space considera- 
tions are paramount. 

No cellophane, please 
When Lego, maker of colorful building 
blocks for children, began an in-flight sales 
program, it decided to create a special col- 
lection with its own packaging. Explains 
Lego’s Ole Withus: “We knew we had to 
minim ize box size because of space limita- 
tions.” Each box is specially coated to re- 
duce damage when the boxes are taken on 
and off in-flight trolleys. Cellophane was 
considered and rejected notes Mr. Withus, 
“because it tears too easily.” 

Weight is also a significant factor in duty- 
free sales. A customer might be attracted by 
a magnum of champagne, but an elegant box 
of liquor-filled chocolates is easier to carry. 
So liquor companies, representing the 
largest category of sales in duty free, do 
what they can to ease the burden 'for their 
customers. 

Accoitiing to Luca Maulini, regional di- 
rector for Cinzano, one of the most common 
packages for spirits is “the gift pack in card- 
board with a handle. It is easy to cany, of- 
fers protection for the contents and may be 
sized to meet import requirements.” He adds 
that wooden cases made of ultra-light wood 
are also popular. Premium brands have the 
highest markup and therefore can afford the 
fanciest packaging. The most extravagant 
liquor decanters are targeted at the Japanese 
market, where a gift-giving tradition encour- 
ages the purchase of such items. 

lightness of bearing 

A 50-centiliter plastic flask, such as those 
sold in-flight, is not an impressive-looking 
gift, but it is light and practical for one’s per- 
sonal use. It can also be slipped into a carry- 
on bag or attach^ case without risk of break- 


Packaging should not only be easy to ear- 
ly, but should also protect the product in- 
side. This is evident in the case of cigars. 
Premium cigars should be kept in an envi- 
. ronment with 70 percent to 72 percent hu- 
midity; otherwise, explains Dominique 
Cron, product manager for Davidoff, the 
dears will become too dry and break apart 
i company looks for either a humidified 


room or a showcase with the proper humidi- 
ty and a temperature of 18 to 20 degrees 
Celsius. Not all airports offer the appropriate 
facilities, so each cigar sold in duty free is 
additionally wrapped in cellophane. Mr. 
Cron adds, “Aesthetically it is more pleasing 
to open a box of dgars without such wrap- 
pings, but we have to protect our products." 

Chocolate bloom 

Similarly, premium chocolates such as Go- 
diva and Neuhaus should be kept in refriger- 
ated cases. Pio Stevens, export manager for 
Godiva. notes that variations in temperature 
have an impact on chocolates. First they 
“bloom" and turn gray; ultimately, the taste 
will be affected. Even with refrigeration, 
shelf life is only about eight weeks. 

Premium chocolaners therefore favor dis- 
tribution of their prepackaged ballotins in 
refrigerated showcases. They are also begin- 
ning to sell in bulk, which requires both re- 
frigeration and a sales clerk. “It’s impor- 
tant,” says Mr. Stevens, “because it enables 
the customer to select either a regular bal- 
loon or a more elaborate container. And of 
course he will have made his own selection, 
so it is more exclusive ” 

Truffles that travel 

Regardless of temperature, until recently, 
Godiva’ s Belgian truffles could not travel. 
They are dusted with cocoa powder, which 
winds up all over the box. But the company 
has devised a special packaging that pre- 
vents this from happening, and truffles can 
now be found in duty free. 

Beyond the primary considerations of 
space, weight and protection, duty-free 
product packagers have to pay attention to 
the psychology and context of the duty-free 
transaction. 

Thom Rankin of Duty Free Electronics 
describes the motivation behind the in-flight 
purchase: ’ll may be that the person in the 
next seat is buying. Or the customer realizes 
that he/she forgot something. Or to use up 
spare change in a foreign currency. Or the 
appeal of a novelty item as it goes by on the 
trolley. And of course the need to make a 
gift - professionally or personally ” 

Revealing outerwear 
Mr. Rankin emphasizes that the outer pack- 
age should reveal the inner contents. If pos- 
sible, the product should be visible, especial- 
ly for in-flight sales: a product visible on the 
airline trolley as it goes down the aisle is an- 
other way to attract a customer. Perfumers' 
Workshop holds the same view and has de- 
veloped packages exclusively for in-flight 
sales. C-F. 



Research shows that some 70 percent of purchasers bought duty-free items out of boredom. 

In Asia, the Name’s the Thing 

Luxury brands are the main drawing card in the Asian market. 

Di 


F uty-free shops in Asia’s 
airports, on airlines and 
cruise ships are seeing a 
changing pattern in passen- 
gers and the type of goods 
they purchase. “The big 
buyers were the Japanese 
and Taiwanese," explains 
United Airlines’ Hong 
Kong-based executive 
David Solloway. “The Tai- 
wanese going into China are 
always loaded down with 
duty-free goods.” 

Other Asians now travel- 
ing across the region, how- 
ever, are not such dedicated 
shoppers and are more ready 
to compare prices. “People 
here compare prices be- 
tween duty free and the 
home market, and don’t see 
that much difference,” says 
Alan Wong, chairman of the 
International Cruise Council 
and managing director of 
Swire Travel in Hong Kong. 

In Hong Kong, where 
most goods are not taxed, 
only cigarettes and liquor 
are sold duty-free at the air- 
port. Other airport shops 
have to compete with shops 
in the city. 

Designer-brand lure 

While what is known in the 


trade as the “LT" (liquor and 
tobacco) business has 
dropped, status-appeal 
goods, like European de- 
signer brands, are selling 
like rice cakes. 

The introduction about 
three years ago of discount 
stores in Japan selling cheap 
liquor and tobacco products 
and discounting in Taiwan 
have made a dramatic 
change, particularly to 
ground operators who run 
the airport shops. 

This is offset by the in- 
creased trade in name-brand 
goods in this stotus-con- 
scious region. Dunhiil, 
Cartier, Ferragamo, Burber- 
ry, Herm&s and Chanel 
products appeal to well- 
heeled Asian travelers. 

Short-hop sales 
Asian airlines such as 
Cathay Pacific also report a 
drop in liquor sales. But 
Cathay Pacific’s sales of 
other items on short routes 
from Hong Kong to places 
such as Taiwan and South 
Korea are so brisk that flight 
crews can barely keep up. 
The most popular items are 
fragrances, cognac, cosmet- 
ics and general gift items. 


“We plan to put more re- 
sources into in-flight sales,” 
says Jane Cowe, public rela- 
tions manager for products 
and events. “It is a good 
source of revenue as well as 
being a customer service. 
Passengers expect it.” 

Gems of the ocean 
Duty-free shops offer great 
sales potential for clothing 
accessories and jewelry 
manufacturers. Jewelry sells 
particularly well at duty-free 
shops on cruise ships be- 
cause passengers can wear 
their purchases at nighL 

In keeping with the chang- 
ing times, duty-free shops 
are becoming more sophisti- 
cated, selling more fashion- 
able products. Even in the 
smaller airports, they have 
become upscale stores rather 
than just liquor and tobacco 
shops. 

These merchants benefit 
because airports are con- 
ducive to impulse shopping. 
According to a Harris poll of 
several years ago, 70 percent 
of purchasers bought duty- 
free goods out of boredom. 
Delayed flights are a bless- 
ing to airport retailers. 

Gariy Marchant 


Shopping in Style 
In Amman Mall 

Airport duty-free shops have been consolidated. 

The most striking display at the newly arranged 
duty-free complex at Queen Alia International Airport. 
Amman, Jordan is ihe eye-catching Cartier island 
shop, which has a wide selection of Cartier products, 
from the famous watches and pens to leather and fash- 
ion goods. 

The Mall, “Where you can shop in style," as the slo- 
gan declares, is often overlooked as tax-free shopping 
point. This is partly because few of the 1 .5 million pas- 
sengers using the airport are in transit. 

“Although we expect a slight increase by the end of 
the year, the bulk of our passengers are arrivals and de- 
partures.” says Taleb Izmigna, the energetic executive 
vice president in charge of duty-free sales in The Mall 
and on board Royal Jordanian, the national airline. 
Sales last year totaled $14 million, of which some $3 
million to $4 million were Royal Jordanian in-flight 
sales. Mr. Izmigna expects a slight overall increase in 
revenue of between 5 percent and 10 percent by the 
end of this December. 

The whole airport is undergoing substantial im- 
provements , and the previous two duty-free shops 
serving Number One and Number Two terminals have 
been amalgamated into one shopping complex located 
on the bridge connecting the two terminals. Mr. 
Izmigna hopes to offer a 24-hour service in the near fu- 
ture. 

Major improvements this year included an enlarged 
fashion area. Emphasis is on obtaining the latest prod- 
ucts, which come direct from suppliers and manufac- 
turers. “We tiy to use our resources and skills to make 
sure that we keep absolutely up-to-date with cus- 
tomers’ demands and changing fashions,” says Mr. 
Izmigna, adding that The Mall has to operate on strict- 
ly commercial lines, unlike some Middle East opera- 
tions. Mi 1 . 

Cyprus to Open 
Clearinghouse 

A new center for mamrfacturers, traders and retailers. 


fl major development is 
taking place in Cyprus that 
is likely to affect the tax-free 
shopping business in Italy, 
the Mediterranean countries 
and the Middle East. It is an 
entirely new concept that 
may lead to some major 
changes worldwide as far as 
the industry side of tax-free 
shopping is concerned. 

Cyprus, a leading offshore 
center in Europe and the 
Eastern Mediterranean, is to 
have a new-style Interna- 
tional Merchandising Center 
(IMC), which will open its 
doors for business next year. 
Already, the first phase of a 
$16 million purpose-built 
exhibition center, complete 
with the latest high-tech 
computerized merchandis- 
ing system, is under con- 
struction on an industrial es- 
tate just outside Nicosia, the 
island's capital. 

Free zone for duty free 
Demetria Louca, managing 
director of IMC. says the ob- 
jective is to provide an inter- 
national shop window for 
manufacturers, traders and 
retailers from all over the 
world in a duty-free envi- 
ronment. Because IMC is 
located in a free zone, no 
duty will be paid on goods 
coming into or going off the 
island. 

“We want the merchan- 
dise buyers to come and se- 
lect their goods from those 
on display, instead of having 
to travel to manufacturers in 
countries that may be thou- 
sands of miles away," ex- 
plains Mr. Louca. “Here, it 
will all be under one roof. 
Only quality products will 
be on show at aJl times, with 
ample stocks available for 
immediate delivery any- 
where in the world.” Al- 
ready, two major companies 
manufacturing fragrances 


are expected to sign up with 
IMC, which is being devel- 
oped by a subsidiary of 
Commercial and Develop- 
ment Finance Co. in associa- 
tion with Cyprus Develop- 
ment Bank. 

Mr. Louca says that the 
range of goods to be dis- 
played will be all-embrac- 
ing, including electronics, 
clothing and footwear, fash- 
ion and leather goods, jewel- 
ry and watches, cosmetics 
and beauty products, com- 
puters, food and beverages, 
all displayed in an area total- 
ing 10.000 square meters. 

New Gulf facilities 
While duty-free managers 
and buyers may find it con- 
venient to fly to Cyprus to 
stock their airport tax-free 
shops in the Middle East, the 
flying public is being of- 
fered many more improved 
shopping facilities. One of 
the newest developments 
has been the opening of the 
first new-style duty-free 
shop in Kuwait's revamped 
airport. It offers some 800 
square meters of shopping 
space and boasts of stocking 
one of the widest ranges of 
cigarettes and cigars to be 
found anywhere in the Gulf. 
Oman. too. is offering new 
facilities at Seeb Airport, 
where Amouage, one of the 
most exclusive and expen- 
sive perfumes in the world, 
is stocked. 

With the launching of 
Qatar Air, the newest airline 
in the Gulf, which is chal- 
lenging Gulf Air and Emi- 
rates on several routes, new 
tax-free shopping facilities 
may be developed at Doha 
Airport. But the biggest 
prize of all for the tax-free 
industry will be the exten- 
sive facilities that are 
planned for the new Beirut 
Aiipart MJ. 


i 



Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


MO N DAY 

SPORTS 



U.S. Roars Off With Solheim Cup 

Europeans Overwhelmed in Final Day’s Singles Matches , 8-2 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS. West 
Virginia — The United States won eight of 
10 singles matches on Sunday, including 
surprising wins from Kelly Robbins and 
Tammie Green, to reclaim golfs Solheim 
Cup from Europe. 

“A/ter having our noses rubbed in it for 
two years, it's a great feeling to have the 
Cup back on our side," said Patty Sheehan 
of the United States. 

The matches were tied 5-5 entering sin- 
gles play, and five of those matches were 
tied or close through the front nine. It 
appeared that the Cup would be decided 
by the final match between Donna An- 
drews and Liselotte Neumann of Sweden. 

But one by one, the Americans caught 
fire. 

Robbins earned a 4 and 2 victory over 
Lora Fairclough of England and Green’s 
35-foot (10.5-meter) birdie putt on No. 16 
clinched her 3 and 2 victory over Annika 
Sorenstam of Sweden. 

Robbins and Green, two newcomers to 
the women's version of the Ryder Cup, had 
lost their alternate-shot and four-ball 
matches earlier and seemed to be a burden 
to the Americans. 

“1 knew mv game would come around a 
little bit and just played real steady today.*’ 
said Robbins. 25, who had been Che wild-card 
pick as the 10th player on the U.S. team. 


The victory was especially sweet for Meg 
Mallon, whose 1 up victory over Pam 
Wright of Scotland clinched the U.S. tri- 
umph. Mallon had lost in the deciding 
match in 1992. 

"To Anne told us not to look at the board 
all day, so I had no idea how 1 stood, 
although I knew with all the players be- 
hind me that the match meant a little 
something," Mallon said, referring to the 
U.S. captain, Jo Anne Corner. 

The host country has won all three Sol- 
heim Cups. 

“We knew we had to play great golf to 
win and we just didn’t do it when it mat- 
tered." said the European captain, Mickey 
Walker. 

The other American winners were Beth 
Daniel, Dottie Mochrie. Brandie Burton, 
Sherri Steinhauer and Andrews. 

Helen Alfredsson of Sweden and Alison 
Nicholas of England were the lone winners 
Sunday for Europe. 

On Saturday, Burton’s seventh-hole 
birdie had helped the U.S. team begin its 
climb back into a lie with the surprising 
and dogged Europeans. 

The kick-in birdie squared the match 
and propelled the U.S. team to a 2-up 
victory. 

It was the second of five birdies for 
Burton, and it was the first of three vic- 


tories for a U.S. team that pulled the Sol- 
heim Cup matches even, 5-5. (AP. NTT) 

■ Johansson Wins Czech Open by 3 

Per- U Irik Johansson of Sweden won the 
Czech Open on Sunday with an 1 1 -under, 
63-hole aggregate total of 237, finishing 
three strokes ahead with a five-under-par 
on the final round, The Associated Press 
reported from Marianske Lazne. Czech 
Rqjublic. 

Fellow Swede Klas Eriksson finished 
second at 240, while Frank Nobilo of New 
Zealand and Russell Gaydon of England 
tied for third at 241. 

Johansson’s victory at the first PGA 
Tour event ever played in the former East 
Bloc earned him his first victory since 
1991. 

Seve Ballesteros of Spain shot a 70 in the 
final round to finish at 244. 

The first three rounds of the weather- 
plagued tournament were played on just 
15 holes because of frost damage to the 
11th, 13th and 14th. But the greens had 
recovered enough by Sunday to use the 
entire 18-hole par-71 course, one of the 
oldest in Central Europe. 

The weather was a factor all week, with 
frost hampering the early rounds, bad light 
ending thud-round play before all players 
had finished Saturday and tog delaying the 
beginning of the final. 


Empty Purse Fells 
Heavyweight Bout 

Compiled by Our Staff From DupaWhrs 

HONG KONG — The World Boxing Organization heavy- 
weight title clash between holder Herbie Hide of Britain and 
Tommy Morrison of the United States was called off Satur- 
day on the eve of Sunday's scheduled bout. 

The expected weigh-in was hastily rearranged as a press 
conference to announce chat the boxers' purses could not be 
guaranteed and that all the fights on the card. which also 
included the WBO middleweight championship and the 1BF 
lightweight championship, were canceled. 

Barry Hearn, Hide’s manager, said he was withdrawing his 
fighters because they were not paid. He said the fighters on 
the card were owed a total of just over S2 million. 

Bob Arum, the Top Rank Boxing chairman and a co- 
promoter, said bankers were unwilling ro release money to 
pay the fighters. “They put us in a very, very terrible position 
and that really left us with no alternative but to postpone,” he 
said. 

John Daly, the Hong Kong promoter, said he had offered 
his bank collateral worth more than 52 million, but was 
refused a loan to pay the fighters. Daly, representing Hem- 
dale Promotions,’ also blamed the postponement on poor 
public response. He said only 2.000 tickets had been sold for 
the show, which was to have been held in a 40.000-seai 
stadium. 

The announcement set off angry scenes involving Bruno's 
manager. Mickey Duff, Hearn and Arum. Boxers performed a 
mock weigh-in, and Bruno called the decision “disgusting.” 
Arum said the show would be rescheduled. 

(Reuters, AP) 



Frenchwoman Wins Leg of Solo Race| 

CAPE TOWN (AP) - The French ^ or l^^^l 

SSs-w- “TfiSS S 

to complete the first stretch of the BOC UiaiieRfi« ‘ 
arrivingfrom Charleston. South Carohna. Sta r.mshed ^ 35day* 

SSK Este. Uruguay.) 

It is scheduled co end in Charleston in ApnJ. > 

Routineer Sets Hour Cycling Mark j... 

BORDEAUX (Reuters) — Tony Rominger of 
shattered the world one-hour cycling record, covering ^ . 

kilometers in a display of power and strength. . 

Hi s performance Saturday beat the mark sft bstnronth on the* . 
same track by Miguel Indunun of Spain, who covered 
kilometers (32.79 miles). Romiager's achif'ement ... 

because he had made no speaal preparauons and was nduig 

ordinary road time-trial bike. Induram had trained for ^ . - 
and used a special bicycle. Rominger said he would make another, 
record attempt at altitude, probably next month in Mexico 

Blow to Head Linked to Senna Death T 

BOLOGNA (AP) — An autopsy apparently shows that the, ... . 
Formula I champion Ayrton Senna was killed when the arm of ms! . . 
car’s suspension system penetrated the visor of his helmet afte - he, 
slammed into a wall during the Imola Grand Prix in M ay. ’ • r ~ : 

The Italian news agency ANSA said Saturday that the information , -• 
was included in a forensic report of the autopsy conducted on the. i . 
Brazilian driver. The report was given to prosecutors investigating * 



SCOREBOARD 

- New Hampshire 24. Maine 7 


Top 25 CoRege Results 

Hew me toe 22 reams In ibe Auactorm 
Press' amove football poll fared Ibis week: 

I, Perm State 1+0) dW not Ploy. Next : vs. No. 
24 Ohio State, Saturday: X Colorado 17-0) Seat 
No. W Kansas State 1+Zl. Next: at No. 3 Ne- 
braska. Saturday; X. Nebraska (SO) beat Mis- 
souri 42-7. Next: vs. Ne.2 Colorado. Saturday : 
4, Auburn (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. Arkan- 
sas. Saturday; S. Florida (5-1) did not play. 
Next: vs. Georgia. Saturday. 

6. Texas A&M 17-01 boot Rice 7-0. Next: vs. 
Southern Methodist. Saturday.- 1. Miami CS-1I 
beat west Virginia 3fM. Next: vs. No. 17 Vir- 
ginia Tech, Saturday; 8. Alabama (8-0) beat 
Mississippi 21-10. Next: at Louisiana Stole. 
Nov. 5; 9. Washington (5-2/ lost to Oregon 31- 
2X Next : vs. Oregon state. Saturday ; 1 0. Flori- 
da State (5-1 1 beat Ctemson 17*0. Next: vs. No. 
20 Duff, Scrturdov. 

II, Michigan 15-2 J beat Illinois )*-)«. Next; 
vs. Wisconsin, Saturday; 12, Colorado state 
17*1) lost to NO. IB Utah 45-31. Next: vs. Wyo- 
ming, Nov. 5; 1% Texas (5-3/ beat Southern 
Methodist 43-20. Next: at Texas Tech, Satur- 
day; M, Altana in-1) beat UCLA JJ-24. Next: 
at Oregon, Saturday; 15. North Carolina 15-2) 
last to No. 25 VI rain la 34-10. Next: North Caro- 
lina State, Saturday. 

16. Syracuse |6-1) beat Temple 49-tt. Next: 
vs, No. 7 Miami, Nov. 3; 17.Vlryinfcl Tech (7-1) 
beat Pittsburgh 457. Next: at No. 7 Miami. 
Saturday; to, Utah (7-0) beat No. 12 Colorado 
State 4531. Next: vs. Texae-El Paso. Satur- 
day; 19, Kansas State (4-2) lost to No.2 Cotoro- 
do 3521. Ncxl: at Okltemmo. Saturday; 20, 
Duke 17-0] beat WaXn Forest $1-26. Next: at 
No. 10 Florida State. Saturday. 

31, Brigham Yoon* (7-1) beat Texas-EI 
Paso 34-28, Next: Arizona State, Saturday ,-22. 
Boston College (3-2-1) tied Rufuers 7-7. Next: 
at Army. Saturday ; 23. Washington State (52) 
beat Arizona Slate 28-21. Next; at California 
Saturday; 24. Onto state 152) beat Purdue 48- 
14. Next: at No. 1 Penn State. Saturday; 25, 
Virginia (6-1) beat No. l5NorthCoro/l/)C 34-10. 
Next; at No. 20 Oufca Nov. 9. 


Other Major College Scores 

EAST 

Army 25. atode! 24 

Boston U. 40. Richmond 24 

Bucknelf 31. Lehfah 27 

Cent. Conned tart St 24. St. Prone! 5. Pa. 21 

Co tea re 35. F antrum 6 

Columbia 3a. Yolo 9 

Connecticut 33, Rhode Island id 

Cornell 17, Dartmouth 14 

Delaware 52. Massachusetts 14 

Georgetown. D.C 17, Johns HoPKIns 14 

Mohtro 34, Buttolo 71 

Latayette 17, Holy Crass 9 

Louisville 35. Navy 14 

Mar 1st 13, Canlslin 0 


Penn 24. Brown 0 
Princeton 18, Harvard 7 
Siena 31. Duauesne Id 
5t John's; NY 27, St. Peter's 7 
Towson SI. 48. American Inti, t 
Vlllanova 13. Northeastern v 
Wagner 39. Iona 22 

SOUTH 

AkL-BIrmlngham 54, Charleston Southern U 
Albany. Ga 30, Bethune-Cookman r> 
Alcorn St. 41. Southern U. 37 
Appalachian St. 24. Monnall U 
Austin Peoy 73, Marehead St. e 
Delaware SI. 50. Morgan Si. 21 
E_ Kentucky XL Tennessee Tech 3 
Furman 24 VMJ 11 
Georgia 34, Kentucky 30 
Georgia Southern 24, e. Tennessee St. 23 
Grumbling St. 28. Jackson St. 17 
Jacksonville St. 32, NE Louisiana 28 
James Madison 33, William & Mary 7 
Liberty 37, Catawba 12 
Maryland 42, Georgia Teen 27 
Memphis 2d, Cincinnati 3 
NUsslsslopl St. 66. Tularw 22 
N. Carolina A&T 24. Howard U. 20 
North Texas 28 NW Louisiana 25 
Randoteh-Macan 28 Davlasan 14 
S. Carolina St. 27. Ffartda A&M 15 
9. Illinois 10. w. Kentucky 7 
South Carolina 19, Vanderbilt la 
Southern Miss. 59, Samtord is 
Tennessee St. 20. TennsMartln 3 
Ttw SL 39, Cent. Florida 38 
W. Carolina si Tn.-Chuftonoogo 15 
MIDWEST 

Bowling Green 59. Ball St. 3d 
Butler 38 San Diego 21 
Cent. Michigan 32, Miami, Ohio 30 
Dayton 24. Drake 7 
Iowa 19, Michigan St. >4 
Kent 24. Ohio U.O 
Middle Term. 38. SE Missouri U 
Minnesota 17. Wisconsin 14 
N. Illinois 27, Louisiana Tech 17 
N. lavra 24. lllinais St. 17 
Northwestern 20. Indiana 7 
Oklahoma 20. Kansas 17 
SW Missouri St. 10, Indiana 51. 7 
Toledo 48, Akron 25 
Valparaiso 34. Evansville 21 
W. Illinois 23. E. Illinois 13 
W. Mien loan 33. E. Michigan 14 
SOUTHWEST 

Alabama 51. 54, Prairie View 13 
East Coro lino 28, Tulsa 21 
McNeese SI. 3a 5am Houston St. 6 
Oklahoma St. 31, Iowa St. 31. tie 
Pacific 3a Arkansas St. id 
SW Texas St. 27. N knolls St. 26 
Stephen F Austin 51, Henderson Si. 0 
Texas Christian 31, Houston 10 
Texas Southern 30, Miss. Valley St. 24 
Texas Tech 38 Baylor 7 

FAR WEST 
Air Force 42, Fresno 51. 7 
Boise St. 38. Montana St. >0 
Cal Poiy-SLO 30. C5 Narf bridge 6 
Idaho 41, N. Arizona 14 


Idaho St. 21, E. Washington 16 
Montana 35. Weber St. 20 
Nevada 42, San Jose SI. 10 
New Mexico 54, New Mexico SL 31 
Portland Si. 47, Sacramento Si. 28 
S. Utah 28. Si. Marys. Cat 13 
SW Louisiana 27. Ulah St. 25 
Southern Cal 61, CaJHarnla 0 
Stanford 35. Oregon St. 79 
Wyoming 52. San Diego SI. 35 

CFL Standings 


Eastern Division 



W 

L 

T 

PF 

PAPtS 

x-WInnlpee 

12 

4 

D 

606 

477 24 

x-Baitlmare 

11 

5 

0 

504 

403 22 

Toronto 

6 

9 

0 

426 

508 12 

Hamilton 

4 

12 

0 

411 

508 8 

Ottawa 

4 

12 

0 

427 

573 8 

Shreveport 

I 

IS 

a 

273 

610 1 

Western Division 



Calnarv 

13 

3 

0 

626 

312 26 

Edmonton 

11 

4 

0 

438 

352 77 

Brtl.CohjmMa 

10 

5 

t 

536 

425 21 

Sacramento 

8 

7 

i 

«2 

414 11 

Saskatchewan 

8 

7 

0 

413 

393 16 

Las vegos 

5 

ID 

0 

412 

489 10 


x-ci inched Mayctf berth 

Fridays Game 
Catearv 52, Shreveport 8 

Saturday's Games 
Baltimore 48, British Columbia 31 
Winnipeg 44, Hamilton 44 
Sacramento 44, Ottawa 9 



SALEM OPEN 
In Belllag 
Semifinals 

Michael Chang, united States del. Brett Ste- 
ven, Now Zealand 7-5, 6-3; Anders Jarrvd. 
Sweden d ef. David Moms, Australia 7-6 111- 
9), 7-6 (7-4|. 

Final 

Chang dot Jarrvd 7-5, 7-5. 

CA TROPHY 
In Vhnana 
Semifinals 

Michael Stlch (2), Germany dot. Thomas 
Muster 14), Austria 64.60; Andre Agassi (3). 
United States. def. Goran Ivanisevic m. Cro- 
atia 6-4. 6-4. 

Final 

Agassi det. Stldi 7-4 (7-4), 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. 

BRIGHTON INDOOR TOURNAMENT 
SomlHaals 

Jana Novotna (2). Czech Republic. del. Julie 
Ho lard (71, France. 6-1 7-5; Helena Sukava, 
Czech Republic, det. Larisa Netland. Latvia, 
4-4 X4 7-3. 

Final 

Novotna dot. Sukava 6-7 (4-7). 6-3. 6-4. 

MARLBORO CHAMPIONSHIPS 
la Hang Kang 
Semifinals 

Richard K ml leek. Netherlands, det. Pete 


Samaras. U-5- 6-3, 1-6. 6-4; stetan Eabera, 
Sweden. det. Todd Marlin, Ui, 6-3, 1-6, 64. 
Final 

Edberg det. Krai tee k 6-3. 7-6 (7-4), 6a 
LYON OPEN 
Semifinals 

Marc Pznsei IS), Switzerland, del. Andrei 
Medvedev (1), Ukraine, 6-2, 6-2; Jim Courier 
(4;, u J. det. Andrei Cttesnekov. Russia tf-3. + 
A 

Final 

Rosset def. Courier 6-4. 74 (7-2). 

U5TA HARDCOURT CHAMPIONSHIPS 
In San Airtoale, Texas 
Final 

Tracv Houk-Kuhn Rancho Cordova, Calif, 
del. Fran Chandler, Jackson. Term- 6-Z 6-1. 


Japan Series 


IN TOKYO 
Game I 

SNbu (PL) 013 000 700—11 10 0 

YomJterl (CL1 000 MO 000—0 4 0 

H.Watanabe. Hastilmolo (6). Shlomk.1 (6). 
Sualvanra ( 81. K atari (9) ana tta; Kuwata. 
Ok. ode (71. Mlvamoto 171, Mlzuna (71. Kada 
E9> and Murata W— H.Watanabe. 1-0. 
L— Kuwata 0-1. HRs— Seibu. Klvahara (1). 
Tanabe (1). 

Game 2 

Seibu 000 MO 008-0 4 I 

YamlaH IDO 000 0to-l 2 0 

Kudah. Ishll 101 and Itoh; Maklhora and 
Murata W — Maklhora, 1-0, L — Kudah. 0-1. 


CZECH OPEN 

Final Leading scores of the Czech Open, 
Played an me 4753, par-71 Marianske Lazne 
OeH Chib course (frost redoced Play to is 
holes par-99 during the first three rounds): 
Per-UIrtk Johansson. Swoden 61-56-54-66— 237 
Klas Eriksson, Sweden 5958-56-67—240 
Russel Gordon. England 56-61-57-67—241 
Frank Now to. New Zealand 54-39-57-71—241 
Sven Straever. Germany 58-58-54-72—242 
Jaahtm Hoeggman. Sweden 59-ss*0-oa-2a 
Darren Clarke, N. iretand 59-56-97-70—242 
Jose Rivera. Spain 59-57-56-70—242 

Sam Torrance. Scotland 54-41-57-70—242 
Christy O'Connor Jr. I refund 63-56-58-67—244 
BRIOGE5TONE OPEN 

Final leading scares 5anday In the Brtdocs- 
tone Open gait tournament oa me 7,1 10- yard, 
par-72 Sodegoara Country Clab coarse In Chi- 
ba, Jam: 

Brian Walts, U. 5. 68-67-67-73-274 

Mark Caioavecchta u. s. 72-78-69-66—277 
Roger Mackey, Australia 67-71-72*0—270 
Noam lew OzakL Japan 71-70-71)48—279 
Hlsavukl SasokL Japan 70-71-66-70-279 
Nick Price. Zimbabwe 68-71-70-70— Z79 


Mcsashl OzakL JODOn 43-71-68-73—230 

Frankie Mlnaza. Philippines 69-69-74-72— 2S4 
Chen Tre-mlng, Taiwan 7&-73-6S-73— 284 

Richard Back well, Australia. 70-73-7443—285 
RALPH'S SENIOR CLASSIC 
Leading scores Saturday otter the second 
round of Me Ralph's Senior Classic, played on 
the ear 7LL340-yard Ran dio Park gaH course 
(e Las Angeles: 

Jim Dent 64-63—131 

Dave Eleheiaereer 70-62—132 

Bab Dickson 70-64—134 

Jack Kiefer ««■ 45—134 

George 5hartrla«c 70-65—135 

Jim Colbert 48-47—135 

J.CSneoa 60-67—135 

Bobby N latols 64-77— 135 

Harold Henning 71-aS— l3o 

Chi Chi Rodrigue: 7046—136 

LAS VEGAS INVITATIONAL 
Leading scares Satvrdar after the fourth 
round of Itie Las Vegas invif atignaLPlaved on 
the 7,20- rord. par-72 TPC at Summerlin: 


Ar^bel^ 

C'R\nd Hotel 

rRA.'.KFVKT VM.VLMS 

The 

Grand Hotel 
of our Time 

Downtown location, 
complete health dub 
with indoor pool. 

Speciality restaurants: 
Japanese & Chinese cuisine. 
Sushi-bar. 

Bar with live music, 

\1 banquet & meeting rooms 

Konrad-Adenaoer-Str. 7 
D-603I3 Frankfurt 
Telephone.: ++69 > 29 81 0 
Fa* ++69 -29 81 810 


Jim Furvk 
K.rV Trldeh 
Bruce Uetzke 
Guv Boros 
Billy Andrade 
Robert Gamez 
Don Foreman 
Sean Murphy 

Sort Hath 
Sieve Elkina ton 


6764-69*66-246 
60-4&65-68-267 
66-67-66-66—267 
70-63-67-68—268 
6+6+67-67— 2tt 

66- 70-64-69—269 

67- 64-68-10-269 
64-69-67-69—169 
64-6370-70—249 
70-67-66-66 — 749 


ONE DAY INTERNATIONALS 
India vs. West Indies 
Sunday, In Madras 

west Indies Innings: 221-9 (49.2 avers) 
India Innings: 225-6 1482 overs) 

Result: Indio wan bv lour wickets. 
Pakistan vs. Australia 
Saturday. In Rawalpindi 
Australia innings: 250-6 (50 oven) 
Pakistan innings: 251-1 (39 overs) 
Result: Pakisltm won by nine wickets. 
SECOND INTERNATIONAL TEST 
Zimbabwe vx, Sri Lanka 
in Bulawayo 

Zimbabwe 1st innings: 462-9 l declared) 
Sri Lanka 1st Imlngs: 218 (all out) 

Sr| Lanka 2nd innings: 30-2 


INTERNATIONAL RESULTS 
South Africa 11- Cardiff o 
Great Britain 8 Australia 4 
Japan 54 Taiwan 5 
South Korea 28, Hang Kong 17 


FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Marti gues 4, Caen 1 
Salnt-Eilenne l. Cannes 0 
Rennes 1. Uiie 0 
Bordeaux 4. Metz 2 
Nice 0. Poris-Si. Germain 4 
Le Havre 2, Bcstla 2 
Lens 4 Lyon o 
Soehoux a Nantes 0 
Strasbourg 1, Monaco 0 
Montpellier 1, Auxerre l 
Standings: Nantes 30 paints, Lvan 24 Stras- 
bourg 24, Porl5-S!.Germoln 74, Cannes 23, 
! Lens 23, Bordeaux 22, Martlguas 22, Auxerre 
22. st.-Etienne 20. Rennes 20, Monaco 14 Bas- 
fla 14 Soehoux 14 Metz 14. Le Havre 13. Nice 
13. Lille 13. Caen 10. Montpellier 10. 

GERMAN BUNDE5LIGA 
Hamburg 5V 1. Maenchengladbach 2 
FC Cologne Z VIL Bochum 1 
1840 Munich 4 SC Freiburg 0 
MSV Duisburg a Barer Leverkusen 2 
Baver Uerdingen 1. Schalke 1 
Vffi Stuttgart 4 Karlsruhe SC 0 


Borusxla Dortmund 1. Bayern Munich 0 
EkitrocM Frank hi rt Z Dynamo Dresden 0 
FC Kaiserslautern 1, WBrder Bremen 1 

Standtngs: Borassia Dortmund 16 points. 
Werder Bremen 14 Barer Leverkusen 12, 
Moenchenatadboeh IX Bayern Munich 12. VtB 
Stuttgart IX SC Frelbutg IX FC Kaiserslau- 
tern IX Hamburg SV, IX Karlsruhe SC 11. Eln- 
tracht Frankfurt ia Schalke 9. Dynamo Dres- 
den 8. FC Cologne 8 Baver UercUngen 7. 1860 
Munldt 4 VIL Bochum 4 MSV Duisburg X 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aston Villa a Nofringftam Forest 7 
Crystal Palace 1. Evertan 0 
Liverpool X Wimbledon 0 
Manchester City 4 Tottenham 2 
Newcastle X Sheffield Wednesday ) 
Norwich 4 Queens Park Rangers 2 
west Ham X Southampton 0 
Arsenal X Coventry 1 
Blackburn *, Manchester united 2 
Chelsea X loswtch 0 

Standings: Newcastle 29 paints. Notting- 
ham Forest 27. Manchester United 2X Black- 
burn 21, Liverpool 24 Norwich If. Chelsea 14 
Manchester City 14 Arsenal 17, Leeds 14 
Southampton 11 West Ham 14 Tottenham 14 
Sheffield Wednesday IX Coventry IX Aston 
vino 10, Crystal Palace IX Leicester », Wim- 
bledon 9. Queens Park Rangers 7, Ipswich 7, 
Evertan X 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Celia I, Aflettoo Madrid 0 
Real Oviedo I. Sevilla 0 
Real Vallodolki 1. Real Sadedod l 
Barcelona l, Tenerife D 
Real Bells 4 Real Zaragoza I 
Real Madrid 1. Compostela T 
Log rones t, Espanai 1 
Afbacete X Rod no Santander 0 
Athletic Bilbao X Sporting Glton 0 

Standings: Real Madrid 12 points. Zaragoza 
!2. Barcelona 1l,D*porrlvo LoCorunall.Am- 
Milcde Bllboo IX Bells 9, Tenerife 9, Sporting 
de Gilon 9, Espanai 4 Valencia 4 Ceita 4 
Attwcete 7, Compostela 7,5evUto 7, Valladolid 
7. Peal Sodedad LAtletko de Madrid 4 Ovie- 
do 4 Rodne do Santander 4 Log rones 1 
DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Rada JC Kerkrade X NEC Nflmegen 1 
NAC Breda 1, Sparta Rotterdam 3 
Hcerenveen X Vitesse Arnhem B 
PSV Eindhoven 1, Aiax Amsterdam 4 

Slandlegi: A lax 13 paints. Rada JC IX FC 
Twente IX PSV IX MW IX FC Utrecht lft 
Feyenoord 9, Willem II 4 Vitesse 4 Heeren- 
veen xnac 7, NEC4FC Votondam XSparta 
4 FC Groningen 4 RKC X GA Eagles 4 Dor- 
drechtYO 4 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Cremonese I, juvenfus 2 
Florenttna 4 Padova 1 
Foo&ta X Internaztanale 0 
Genoa 1, Lazio 2 
AC Milan X Sampdorta 0 
N email X Bari 0 
AC Parma X Regotana l 
Torino X Brescia 0 


Standings: Parma T6 paints. Lazio 14 Rama 
14 Juventus 14 Florentine IX Foggia tl 
Sampdorta 11, Milan Torino IX Bart IX 
Inter 9. Cagrtart 4 Genoa 4 Napoli 4 Creraan- , 
ese 4 Padova 4 Breeder X Remlano ). > 



BASEBALL 
American League 

TEXAS— Announced the resignation of. 
Wayne Krtvskv. aesl s tant oeneral manuger. * 
effective Oct. 3L • 

Hfltianal I awum I 

ATLANTA— Declined to offer salary ortrt- 
trot ion to Steve Bedreshm. pitcher. ' 
CINCINNATI— Dcvitavd to offer salary ar- 
bitral ton to Tam Browning, pKchcr. and Tomr* 
Fernandez, shortstop. Tom Browning and 
Rob Dlbbte. pitchers, end Tony Fernandez. • 
tnflefder, refused oufrfgnf osstenmonts and 
etectea tree agency. « 

COLO RAQO— Oedlnad to otter salarvarbl- 
t rollon to Howard Johnson. outfMder. 

FLORIDA— Claimed Brian Bwiies, pitch- ' 
er, o« wotvors from Lot Aiwoim. DocHnod to 
after salary arhllratlan to Jerry Browne and f 
Dave Maeadan.inf1tMert.dnd Benito Santlo-' 
ga catcher. 

HOUSTON — Declined to after salary orb)- ' 
trot ton fa K«v>n Bass and Milt Thompson, 
autttoktaro. Assigned Ken Ramos, outfitiaer. 

M Tucson, PO- 
LOS ANGELES— Chris Gwynrv outfielder; ' 
refused a minor league assignment and elect- 
ed free aaenev. Retained Rick Dempsey, 
m a nager, of Atouaueroue, PCI; -ton Debus. •* 
manager , of Vera Beach, Florida State' 
League; and Joe Vavra. manager, of Yak Ima. 
Narfliwest League. Named John Shelby man- 
ager of 5onAntontaTL; Ran Roenicfce man- 1 
aper of San B«rnoralno> CL ,- a net John Shoe- r 
maker mareteer of Great Fane, Pioneer 
League. * 

PITTSBURGH— Declined to otter salary' 
ui Miration to Lanoe Parrish, catcher, and " 
Zone Smith, pitcher. 

SAN Dl EGO— Named Dan Warthen roving 
pitching instructor. Declined to offer salary 
arONrattan to Sip Roberts. fnftoMer. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Announced they have' 
offered salary arbitration to Darryl Straw- 
berry, outfielder. 

BASKETBALL ' 

National Basketball Association 
BOSTON— Stoned Greg Minor, guard. 

L. A. CLIPPERS— Waived Atohanso Ford 
and Keith Smart guards/ Isaiah Morris, tor- 
ward: and Robert Werdarm, center. 

SAN ANTONIO— Fined Demis Rodman,* 
forward, S14000 tor missing Thursday's oxht-’ 
teflon game ago Inst Mllwoukne. 

FOOTBALL 

Natkmol Football League 
NFL— Fined Delon Sanders, Were corner-' 
back, and Andre Rtooa Fatant* wide reafiv- 
or. *7.500 tor fighting In SundovY game. . 

CINCINNATI— Signed Jim Balksru, quar- 
terback. to deveio p mental sound. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1994 


Page 19 




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The Associated Press 

Colorado and Alabama are 
perfectly comfortable among 
the ranks of the unbeaten. For 
Utah and Duke, it’s unfamiliar 
territory. 

With a 35-21 victory over 
No. 19 Kansas State on Satur- 
day, the second-ranked Buffa- 

CQIXEGE FOOTBALL 

^oes are looking tough to beat a 
week before their showdown 
with undefeated Nebraska. 

A team that looks beatable 
but keeps winning somehow, 
the eighth- ranked Crimson 
Tide overcame a 10-point half- 
time deficit to defeat Mississip- 
pi, 21-10. 

Colorado’s Rashaan Salaam 
ran for 202 yards and two 
soores,-and KordeQ Stewart had 
127 yards and three touch- 
downs against the stubborn 
Wildcats (4-2, 1-2). 

Stewart scored on a 60-yard 
run that gave the Buffaloes T7-0, 
3-0) the go-ahead score with 10 
minutes left and added another 
TD on a 7-yard sprint with 8 
seconds left 

Chad May’s passing and two 
second-half scoring runs by J. J. 
Smith, who had three touch- 
downs in all, helped Kansas 
State tie the game twice in the 
second half. But the Wildcats 
couldn’t take the lead. 

No. 3 Nebraska 42, Missouri 
7: In Columbia, Missouri, 
Brook Bemnger threw three 
touchdown passes in the second 
half, and Lawrence Phillips ran 
for 1 10 yards to help the Com- 
jAuskere (8-0, 3-0) overcome a 
’slow start. 

No. 6 Texas A&M 7, Sice 0: 
In College Station, Texas, 
for one 
saved another 
with a tackle on a fumble return 
as the Aggies (6-0, 4-0) fought 
off upstart Rice. 


Best 'in the Universe, ’ McNair 
Sets NCAA Of feme Record 

The Associated Press 

LORMAN, Mississippi — Steve McNair ran past Ty Detmer to 
become the NCAA career leader in total offense, and he did it by 
breaking his own Division I-AA single-game yardage record. 

McNair had 649 total yards Saturday against Southern, Divi- 
sion I-AA’s top-ranked defense, to end Detmer’s three-year stay 
atop the NCAA career list. 

After Alcorn State’s 41-37 victory, McNair had 15,049 total 
yards. He has 4,025 yards and has accounted for 39 touchdowns 
(32passing, 7 rushing) for the Braves (6-2, 5-1 SWAQ fids season. 

The senior quarterback broke Detmer’s record of 14,665 yards 
on a 22-yard run on third -and-21 with 1:26 left in the first half of 
the Braves’ Southwestern Athletic Conference game. 

“If there’s a better player in this country, I don’t know where he 
is," said the Alcorn coach, CardeD Jones. “You might can go out 
of the universe and find one, but in this hemisphere; I’d say Steve 
is the greatest.” 

McNair led the way as Aloom State came from behind twice in 
the last four minutes, scoring the winning touchdown on a 1-yard 
run with 10 seconds remaining 

He passed for 587 yards and four touchdowns, taking over 
second place on the Division I-AA career lists for passing yards 
(12,924) and touchdowns (107). He was 32-for-58 with one inter- 
ception. 


No. 7 Miami 38, West Virgin- 
ia 6: In Morgantown, West Vir- 
ginia, Frank Costa threw for 
266 yards and two touchdowns 
as the Hurricanes (5-1, 2-0) 
avenged last year's loss to the 
Mountaineers (3-5, 1-3). 

No. 8 Alabama 21, Mississip- 

J i 10: In Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 
ay Barker became the winning- 
est quarterback in Alabama his- 
tory, scoring the go-ahead 
touchdown on a 2-yard run in 
the fourth quarter. Barker is 31- 
1-1 in four years as the starter 
for Alabama (8-0, 5-0). 

Oregon 31, No. 9 Washington 
20: In Eugene, Oregon, Kenny 
Wheaton returned an intercep- 
tion 97 yards for a touchdown 
with 49 seconds to play, clinch- 
ing the upset by Oregon. 

No. 10 Florida State 17, 


Clemson 0: In Tallahassee, 
Florida, Warrick Dunn ran for 
133 yards and two touchdowns 
for the Seminolcs (5-1, 5-0). 

No. 11 Michigan 19, Iffinois 
14: In Champaign, Illinois, 
Amani Toomer returned a punt 
70 yards for a touchdown, and 
Remy Hamilton kicked four 
field goals for the Wolverines 


(5-2, 3-1). 

No. 18 Utah 45. No. 12 Colo- 
rado State 31: In Fort Collins, 
Colorado, the Utes (7-0, 4-0) 
blocked three kicks, returned 
two interceptions toe touch- 
downs and got a safety. 

No. 13 Texas 42, Southern 
Methodist 20: In Austin, Texas, 
Rodrick Walker ran for two 
touchdowns and backup quar- 
terback James Brown revived 
the Texas (5-2, 2-1) offense. 


No. 14 Arizona 34, UCLA 24: 
In Tucson, Arizona, Dan White 
passed for two touchdowns and 
Ontiwaim Carter rushed for 164 
yards and a score for the Wild- 
cats. 

No. 25 Virginia 34. No. 15 
North Carofina lOr In Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, Mike Groh 
passed for 256 yards and two 
touchdowns for the Cavaliers 
(6-1, 4-1). 

No. 16 Syracuse 49, Temple 
42: In Philadelphia, Marvin 
Harrison scored three touch- 
downs, catching passes of 53 
and 55 yards and naming 20 
yards on a reverse. 

No. 17 Virginia Tech 45, 
Pittsburgh 7: In Blacksburg, 
Virginia. Antonio Free man re- 
tained a punt 80 yards for one 
score, caught a touchdown pass 
for another and set up two more 
TDs with long returns for Vir- 
ginia Tech (7-1, 4-1). 

No. 20 Duke 51, Wake Forest 
26: In Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina, Duke turned three 
fumbles into 21 points in the 
first six minutes. 

No. 21 Brigham Young 34, 
Texas-El Paso 28: In Ea Paso. 
Texas, John Walsh threw for 
330 yards and three touch- 
downs and Jamal Willis ran for 
136 yards and a TD in the Cou- 
gars* rolled up 536 yards for 
BYU (7-1, 5-1). 

No. 22 Boston College 7, 
Rutgers 7: In Boston, the Ea- 
gles' David Green fumbled at 
the Rutgers 9 with 22 seconds 
left, forcing Boston College to 
settle for a tie. 

No. 23 Washington State 28, 
Arizona State 21: In Tempe, 
Arizona, Chad Davis threw for 
355 yards and three touch- 
down s for the Cougars (5-2, 3- 

No. 24 Ohio State 48, Purdue 
14: In Columbus, Ohio, Bob 
Hoying finished with five TDs 
and 304 yards for the Buckeyes 
(6-2,3-!). 


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xi Accountants' 
activities 
22 Be under the 
weather 

. 23 Electrical units 
24 Horizontally 
2a Leave the 
ground 

29 Hint or scandal 

30 ‘Gee whizl" 

31 Yearn (for) 

35 Rarefy 

38 Jury member 
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40 Adored 

41 Mr. Musial 

42 Evaluate 

43 Adherents of 
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48 Gasoline 
rating 

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54 My sweetheart. 

in an old song 
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58 Unknown John 

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ao Winged god 

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2 City on the 
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novelist Grey 

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a Tennis call 

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partner 

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man 

3z Cabot — - 
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Wrote" town) 

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garden 

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legislature 

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landmark 

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in the 
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so Mideastem 

V.I.P. 


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tak br Sidney l. Robbins 

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Steelers Intercept Brown in 4th 
To Rumble Past the Giants, 10-6 


The Assodated Press 

Rod Woodson’s 25-yard interception re- 
turn off a pass by Dave Brown early in the 
fourth quarter set up a game-winning 6- 
yard touchdown run by Byron Morris as 
the Steelers stopped the Giants, 10-6, on 
Sunday in East Rutherford, New Jersey. 

Morris rushed for 146 yards on 29 carries 
while the Steelers’ defense intercepted two 

NFL FOOTBALL 

Brown passes, recovered a questionable 
fumble by him at the Pittsburgh 1 and 
sacked him five times in what was one of the 
league’s worst-played games this season. 

There were seven turnovers in a game 
played in constant drizzle, two punts of 22 
yards or less, blown calls by the officials on 
plays that should not have resulted in turn- 
overs, a dropped TD pass by Giants tight 
end Howard Cross, a wfld snap and several 
costly penalties that drives. 

The biggest mistake was made by 
Brown, who completed seven passes ih 
Woodson’s direction for 159 yards in the 
first three quarters as New York clung to a 
6-3 lead. But on a third-and-8 from the 
Giants’ 49, Brown inexplicably threw the 
ball right at Woodson, who then returned 
it to the New York 34. 

Neal O’Donnell, who completed 16 of 29 
for 138 yards, hit Yancey Thigpen for 7 
yards on a third-and-7 to keep the drive 
alive. O’Donnell later underhanded a 16- 
yard lateral to John W illiams on a third- 
and-8 from the Giants' 22. Morris scored 
on the next play. 


Chiefs 38, Seahawks 23: After a listless 
first quarter in Kansas City, Joe Montana 
threw two TD passes and Marcus Allen 
scored a milestone touchdown as the 
Chiefs won their seventh straight against 
the Seahawks. 

Late in the third period, with the Chiefs 
protecting a 13-7 lead, Allen went through 
a hole on the left ride of the line, cut 
sharply right and ran 36 yards for his 1 17th 
career touchdown. He passed John Riggins 
for fourth on the career list with his longest 
scoring run since going 61 yards against 
Denver in 1985. 

Montana hit 21-of-31 for 270 yards and 
two touchdowns. He found Kimble An- 
ders with a 9-yard scoring pass in the 
second quarter and tossed a 21 -yard cr to 
Lake Dawson in the fourth for the rookie’s 
first NFL touchdown. 

Redskins 41, Colts 27: In Indianapolis, 
Gus Frerotte, making his first NFL start, 
passed for 226 yards and two touchdowns 
to lead Washington over the Colts. 

Henry EDard, the NFC leader in recep- 
tion yardage, caught six of Frerotte’s 
passes for 108 yards and set up the first of 
two touchdown runs by Ricky Ervins. 
Then pass interceptions off the Colts' Jim 
Harbaugb by Martin Bayless and Andre 
Collins — and one off backup Don Maj- 
kowsld by Lamont Hollinquest — led to 
three more scores as the Redskins snapped 
a five-game losing streak. 

Browns 37, Bengals 13: In Cleveland, 
the Browns lost Vinny Testa verde but kept 
their self-respect, turning consecutive 


third-quarter Cincinnati punts into touch- 
downs as they rallied to win. 

The Browns, who at 6-1 are off to their 
best start since 1963, trailed 13-10 at the 
half. But Eric Metcalf returned Lee John- 
son’s punt 73 yards for a touchdown less 
than two minutes after Travis Hill recov- 
ered a blocked punt in the end zone, com- 
pleting a 17-pomi Cleveland third quarter 
that turned the game around. 

Testaverde left the game complaining of 
headaches and blurred virion early in the 
third quarter after being hit bard on the 
Browns' opening possession of the half. 

lions 21, Bears 16: In Pontiac, Michi- 
gan, Mel Gray returned a kickoff 102 
yards for a touchdown, Barry Sanders 
rushed for 167 yards and Detroit's defense 
forced four turnovers as the Lions ended a 
three-game losing streak. 

Chicago had a chance to win in the final 
minute. But Erik Kramer’s pass to Nate 
Lewis on a fourth- and- 5 from the Detroit 
20 was broken up at the 10 by Robert 
Massey with 41 seconds left. 

Saints 37, Rams 34: In New Orleans, 
Tyrone Hughes returned kickoffs of 92 
and 98 yards for touchdowns as he set two 
NFL records and tied another in New 
Orleans’s wild victory over Los Angeles. 

Hughes, who led the league in punt re- 
turns and was second in kickoff returns as a 
rookie last year, had combined punt and 
kickoff runbacks for 347 yards, breaking the 
old mark of 294 yards held by two others. 

His kickoff returns of 304 yards broke 
the old mark of 294 yards. The two touch- 
downs tied a mark held by three others. 


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p. Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, OCTOBER 2*, 1994 


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LANGUAGE 


A Seat in f . Non 9 and Coffee f With 9 


By William Safire 

T17ASHINGT0N — I asked 

yy for a seat in non so I could 
enjoy my coffee with. 

A generation ago, that sen- 
tence would have been gibber- 
ish. Today it readily communi- 
cates meaning: non is instantly 
recognized as that ever-expand- 
ing section of the world given 
over to the ami-tobacco lobby. 
The hostess, who never seems to 
obey her own sign (“Please 
Wait for Hostess to Be Seat- 
ed’*), asks, “Smoking or non?' 

With is "with cream'’ or half- 
and-half, or millr, or skim milk. 
or oon-dairy creamer, or white 
paint. With is a preposition, its 
object (cream) understood, and 
in this function has had a long 
histoiy; in mid- 19th-century 
England, liquor was sometimes 
served with sugar, and Charles 
Dickens had a character in an 
1835 story say. ‘Two glasses of 
rum-and-water ‘warm with. 
But what of the new use of with 
as an adverb, now sweeping the 
United States? 

“I had begun to think it was 
my imagination.” writes Douie 
Hall of Scottsdale. Arizona, 
"but last week, it happened 
again: 4 I thought you’d want to 
read the material on the plane 
so 111 fax it to you now and you 
can bring it with.* Everywhere I 
go. sentences seem to be ending 
in midair: TU fix lasagna and 
we’ll have a salad to go with.’ Or 
‘Do you want me to go with?’ 
Did I miss something? Did a 
recent blockbuster movie popu- 
larize this expression?’’ 

"If you want a model I 
would look to German," ob- 
serves John Algeo. the neo lin- 
guistic observer for American 
Speech. "Jch halte mil — ‘I’m 
with you,’ or Jch mache mil — 
‘HI join in.”’ 

The omission of an object af- 
ter with — which effectively 
turns a preposition into an ad- 
verb — is today’s hot example 
of a language's tendency to ex- 
tend an existing pattern to new 
elements and words, what the 


great Danish grammarian Otto 
Jesperson called "drift." 

1 confess to having drifted a 
bridge too far on with in a re- 
cent political polemic. “A chas- 
tened president came before a 
press corps,” I wrote, "to record 
his acquiescence with political 
necessity." 

“You’re not with it when you 
go p repositioning around with 
with where it doesn’t belong,” 
writes Louis Jay Hetman, des- 
ignated hit man of the Gotcha! 
Gang. “You recently wrote red- 
olent with. Now you write acqui- 
esce with." 

Most usagists accept only 
redolent of and acquiesce in. Not 
with. Redolent means “strongly 
suggestive of.” as in a scent, and 
was first used figuratively in 
1828 with with: “Their craft" 
wrote the theologian Edward 
Irving, "... all redolent widi 
Popish superstition." Rooted in 
the Latin for "to emit a smell," 
redolent is one step short of the 
verb reeks, which can take a 
with. 

Therefore. I would defend 
the use of redolent with, but 
would acquiesce in Herman’s 
denunciation of acquiesce with' 
the with doesn't belong there. 
Acquiesce to? Maybe; it's being 
used more and more, but let’s 
stick to acquiesce in, a usage 
judgment you can take with. 

□ 

Ur recently surfaced in the 
pages of The New York Times 
Magazine in Ron Rosenbaum's 
piece about the spy Kim 
Philby: “after Philby has been 
exposed as a long-term Soviet 
mole, indeed the ar-mole, the 
legendary Third Man. the most 
devaslatingly effective known 
double agent in history.” 

Got a call from Richard 
Helms, the legendary director 
of central intelligence in the 
'60s. “What's an ur?' this long- 
time Lexicographic Irregular 
wanted to know. Fearful that 
we might be overheard, I said 
I’d get back to him. Couple of 


weeks later, a clipping appeared 
in my Farragut Square dead 
drop, a mode of secure commu- 
nication I use instead of E-mail. 
Helms again: “I’m not trying to 
worry the ur thing, but here it is 
again in your own magazine.” 

The article by Michael Kelly 
referred to “the signal event in 
the development of Clinton’s 
character — the ha - compromise 
from which all later compro- 
mises would flow." 

Ur is an ancient Sumerian 
city on the Euphrates in what 
was then Mesopotamia and is 
now Iraq; the Sumerians, in the 
fourth millennium B. C., devel- 
oped the cuneiform system of 
writing, which may have pre- 
ceded Egyptian hieroglyphics. 
This information about the ori- 
gin of language has nothing to 
do with the prefix ur -, but is 
what intelligence agencies call 
noise. 

The prefix that has so en- 
tranced New York Tunes writers 
comes from the Old High Ger- 
man and means “original, primi- 
tive, prototypical.” In German. 
Ursprache means “primitive lan- 
guage.” In English, it has been in 
use only for a century: Joseph 
Jacobs wrote in 1889 about Wil- 
liam Caxton’s translation of Ae- 
sop’s Fables, in favor of “any 
light he can throw on the Ur- 
origin of the Fables.” 

The term most often appears 
in literary discussions of the ur- 
‘‘Hamlet,’’ the undiscovered 
text of Shakespeare's earliest 
version of that play (from 
whose bourn no deconstrucior 
returns). The poet W. H. Auden 
wrote in 1947. “For Long-Ago 
has been Ever- After since Ur- 
Papa gave the Primal Yawn 
that expressed all things." 

Sometimes it is capitalized, 
but that conflicts with the name 
of tbe Sumerian city, so drop 
the capital. The prefix ur- is 
shorter, and certainly trendier. 
than “prototypical”' but it is 
not the word to use if you’re 
striving for aboriginally. 

Ne* York Tima Service 


George Lucas’s Different World 


By Bernard Weinraub 

Ne* York rimes Service 

N ICASIO, California — Years ago 
George Lucas fled Hollywood, a 
town and a state of mind that'appalled 
him. He poured his fortune into creat- 
ing Skywalker Ranch, a secluded Vic- 
torian-style work paradise surrounded 
by groves of eucalyptus and redwood 
in Marin County, just north of San 
Francisco. 

“I opted for quality of life." said the 
50-year-old filmmaker, a shy. almost 
reclusive figure who customarily 
wears jeans, sneakers and work shirts 
and whose beard is rapidly turning 
gray. "Most of my friends are college 
professors. It’s a different world." He 
laughed- "I prefer this to Malibu." 

Lucas, creator of the lavishly suc- 
cessful “Star Wars” sagas and an ar- 
chitect of the three Indiana Jones 
films, is not only one of the world's 
most successful filmmakers. He’s also 
one of the more unpredictable. 

Hi s newest film, “Radioland Mur- 
ders," is an oddball low-budget come- 
dy set in a radio station in 1939. The 
film, which Lucas produced but did 
not direct, opened Friday in the Unit- 
ed States. 

Unlike his old friends Steven Spiel- 
berg and Francis Coppola. Lucas is far 
less corapeDed to direct than to write, 
produce, edit and, above alL forge tech- 
nological breakthroughs ihai serve the 
editing and production process. 

His new film, for which he also 
wrote the story, is an homage to radio, 
the dramatic medium that seized his 
imagination as a child. His nights as a 
youngster were consumed by the ra- 
dio: “The Lone Ranger," The Whis- 
tler,” “The Shadow.” “You can trace 
radio back to the old storytellers 
around the fire." he said. “It’s been 
lost over the years." 

Directed by the British comedian 
Mel Smith, the movie has an ensemble 
cast that includes Brian Benben. Mary 
Stuart Masterson, Ned Beatty, Corbin 
Bernsen. Michael Leraer. Jeffrey 
Tambor and Christopher Lloyd. 

There’s a madcap plot, interspersed 
with musical numbers, a half-dozen 
murders, a backstage romance and 
plenty of mayhem. Lucas acknowl- 
edged the improbability of a Holly- 
wood studio producing such a quirky 


film, but his name and track record as 
well as his guarantee that the movie 
would cost only SlO million, persuad- 
ed Universal. ' 

Now that “Radiolaad Murders" is 
completed. Lucas is focusing on three 
“Star Wars” films that he will write and 
produce simultaneously, as if one film 
were being made. (They are intended to 
predate the current “Star Wars.”) 

For the last five years he has also 
been wanting to make a film about 
black aviators in World War II. He 
already has the story, and a title, “Red 
Taiis.” He just doesn’t have a script. 
“It’s a big story; it takes place over 10 
years with hundreds of people, and 
ihe question is how do you make it 
small and personal and deal with it in 
2 thematic way." he said. 

He also remains involved in “The 
Young Indiana Jones Chronicles,” a 
pet television project that was critical- 
ly acclaimed but a ratings disappoint- 
ment. 

.Although his career has had some 
major bumps — notably the famous 
1986 flop “How ard the Duck" as well 
as “Willow" and “The Ewok Adven- 
ture” — Lucas rem ains , with Spiel- 
berg, a box-office king. But despite his 
successes, or perhaps because of them, 
Lucas fled Hollywood in the early 
1980s, and basn’i looked back. 

In his quiet haven he created an 
enclosed world of technically ad- 
vanced postproduction facilities, in- 
cluding computer graphics and special 
effects that have been used by film- 
makers as diverse as Spielberg and 
Robert Redford. 

Lucas's company has overseen the 
sped al. effects in many recent films. 
He was in charge of post-production 
on ihe film “Jurassic Park," whose 
creator. Spielberg, was in Poland at 
the time making “Schindler’s List.” 

Lucas’s company. Industrial Light 
and Magic, in nearby San Rafael, also 
belped shape the special effects for 
such movies as “Forrest Gump." “The 
Mask," “terminator 2” and “The 
Abyss.” 

Lucas made it plain that the world 
of Hollywood today leaves him dis- 
tressed. “Actual! v. I ’m amused or dis- 


Filmmaker Lucas, the 
ultimate Hollywoodian, 
at his anti-Hollywood 
ranch in Marin County, 
California. 



■i 



a* <* 


- 


Jm Wlboa< The New Vrt Time 


tressed, depending on my mood,” he 
said 

“When T began, you’d go to a studio 
and there’d be three or four people 
and they’d say, 4 0. K-, do the movie,’ 
or, ‘Don’t do the movie,’ ** Lucas re- 
called. “That was the 70s. But once 
corporations and Wall Street took 
over, their way of operating was to 
create a huge middle-management 
structure. These are people more in- 
terested in stock options than in mak- 
ing good movies, people earning large 
amounts of money and pretending 
that they were experts in «w«irfn£ mov- 
ies — and they weren’t 

“And they began to look on the 
people who made movies as sort of 
assembly line workers. They fostered 
the idea that the talent doesn’t know 
anything, that the talent are idiots, or 


idiots savants. I mean it’s c razy . And 
you end up with bland and uninterest- 
ing and bad movies.” 

The only movies that succeed and 
endure on a large scale are family 
films, he said. Lucas, who is divorced, 
has three chfldren, 13 and under, who 
live with lam. {His home is several 
rmks from the ranch.) 

T mean, the studio's idea of a chil- 
dren’s film is ‘Free Willy,’ and that's 
not it, "he said. The films that endure, 
he said, are those that transcend age: 
“E.T,” “Star Wars,” “The Lion 
King” and “Gone With the Wind.” 

“That’s a great children’s film." he 
said. "It deak with basic values that 
people cope with. It’s not some cyni- 
cal, relentless action fest It's not nip. 
It’s not flash. Just a great film.” 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Today 




High 

Low 

W 

High 

Lon W 


OP 

OP 


OF 

OF 

Aigaiw 

20/66 

16*1 

xh 

2170 

15.59 Ml 

Anmontom 

12/53 

9/43 

in 

12*3 

3/46 an 

Anksre 

2271 

14/57 

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2577 

0413 pe 


2373 

lt)«4 

an 

2373 

17*2 oc 

Baiceion. 

10*6 

74,57 

K 

19*6 

14:57 an 

Mgraoe 

16*4 

13 <55 

1 

18*4 

3/43 an 

B*mn 

13*5 

6<43 

*h 

11/52 

3.-37 sh 

Bruns* 

12/53 

7-44 

*h 

12/53 

5/41 r 

BudUMKN 

13*1 

0/48 

W 

16*1 

7 <44 Ml 


11/52 

7/44 

| 

10*0 

4 .-39 an 

Costa Del Sol 

2271 

17/62 


2373 

17/82 « 

Out*n 

9/48 

4,38 

c 

3/48 

2 <35 1 

Ectnburjfi 

11*2 

3/48 

c 

11/32 

7/44 r 

Florence 

19*6 

11*2 

pc 

1B/B6 

9K8 PC 

Fnirntfurt 

13*5 

7/44 

cn 

12<53 

4/30 ah 

Geneva 

12*3 

7144 

an 

12/53 

S/41 I 

Hrawd 

8/46 

7 <44 

r 

9. '43 

6/43 r 


20*6 

16/81 

an 

2170 

14*7 1 

LaaPatmas 

27*0 

20*3 

5 

27*0 

2170 s 

Untxxi 

13*4 

75/59 

ah 

10<64 

14/57 ah 

London 

13/55 

7/44 

Bh 

12/53 

6-43 ah 

Madina 

16*1 

10/50 

ih 

16*1 

8-46 an 

Ulan 

17*2 

10/50 


17/82 

3 46 m 

Moscow 

6/43 

1/34 


11.52 

7/44 an 

Munich 

12/53 

3/43 

■n 

11,52 

2.-35 I 

Nice 

18*4 

12/53 


16*4 

11/52 pc 

OHo 

10*0 

5/41 

oh 

8/46 

2.35 f 

Panne 

17*2 

14/57 


13*4 

14/57 an 

Pans 

14/57 

7/44 

HI 

13/55 

8 '43 l 

Prague 

12*3 

7<*4 

an 

12*3 

3 <37 3ft 

ReyHjavk 

6 <43 

1/34 

tc 

4/39 

0/32 r 


20*8 

0/43 

pc 

10/60 

9,46 pc 

SL P*«t*irg 

3/40 

7/44 

ah 

11,52 

B/43 an 

SeadWJfcn 

11/52 

3/43 

ah 

8.46 

4/39 on 

Strasbourg 

12/53 

7/44 

ah 

11.52 

3/37 an 

T«*im 

B/43 

7l44 

r 

0/43 

6/43 r 

Venice 

18*4 

12/53 


ia*4 

9/46 Hi 

Vienna 

13 <55 

7/44 

sn 

12/53 

6/43 i 

ware*- 

13<55 

8/46 

an 

13/55 

6/41 r 

Zurich 

12/53 

7/44 

Mi 

11/52 

400 l 

Oceania 

Auddand 

13*1 

10.50 

f 

10/84 

12/53 oc 

Sydney 

2271 

14/57 

• 

28/70 

14/57 pc 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 



Teday 

Mgfi Low W 

or of 


jiao 
1?*2 
X <79 
32*0 
33 <91 
20*3 
21 CO 
30*6 
2373 
21.70 


2170 a 

fi U PC 
10/66 1 
24,75 PC 
10/66 I 

a.‘«3 ■ 
HIM e 
23/73 in 
18 ZW c 
16.81 c 


High 
OF 
31 *8 
15/66 
2740 
31 bb 
33*1 
2271 

20.63 

29.64 
34.75 
19/86 


Low W 
OF 

22/71 t 

7 44 ■ 

20 66 pc 
24 75 I 

15 .64 * 

6-4J 6 
13 55 H> 
23 73 I 
1966 in 

16 61 r 


‘Poetry in Motion’: Ode to New York Subway Commuters 


JataRMni 

North America 

Chill winds and passing 
showers wil Oegln the penod 
In the Great Lake stales, 
Oraario and Quebec. A few 
showers will dampen Ihe 
Atlentlc Seaboard. These 
regions wll be mostly settled 
at midweek. Portland, Seal- 
lie and Vancouver will have 
some ran: California win be 
dry. 


Europe 

Showers and gusty, chilly 
winds will be frequent visi- 
tors to western Europe from 
France. Ireland end Britain to 
the Scandinavia Peninsula. 
Between showers will be 
calmer, brighter Intervals. 
Italy. Spain and Portugal wil 
have mostly dry weather bro- 
ken by spotty showers. 


•jrtHaw 
•V*] Snow 

Asia 

Much ot China. Korea and 
western Japan wil have dry. 
uneventful weather. In con- 
trast. rain and wind will hit 
Tokyo. Typhoon Teresa will 
hit southern Vietnam Tues- 
day; Typhoon Verne may 
threaten Philippines with 
heavy rains and high winds 
beginning midweek. 


Africa 


AJg«? 2271 

Care Town 21 -70 

CesaWnca 25/77 

Harare 21.70 

L»joa 29 <84 

ftaroa 25/77 

Twv. 23/73 


13.64 pc 22.71 15-64 in 

14/57 pc 1986 13/53 pc 

14/57 9 2879 18«1 • 

3146 PC 34.75 9/48 » 

23/73 pc 2984 ’4,75 eft 

13*5 Hi 25/77 13-55 pc 

14/57 pc 2271 1681 an 


North America 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Anchorage 

Mama 

BoKon 

Chcaga 

□wnrer 

Devon 

HonoUu 


BAM 

Can- 

Domaacui 

Jcncatem 

luttr 

FkywX 


Today 

High Low W 
OT OF 
2964 23/73 
35,05 23-73 
29.64 10/66 
23/82 2170 
34/03 2475 
30/88 17.82 


Hiyi Loa W 
OF OP 
a 30 /fie 22 . 71 • 
6 32/89 13-66 PC 
s 31 <88 15.50 • 
S 29/64 18/84 a 
pc 37/88 17/82 % 

9 31/83 14*7 » 


Today 

High Low W High Low W 
OP OF OF Of 

Buenos Alma 31.70 9/48 pc 2373 11*2 1 

Caracal 32<B8 26.78 an 32-69 28.78 pc 

Lira 13/66 18/81 c 19*8 10*1 PC 

MwdccCfty 10/86 9/48 th 2170 9/48 pc 

RodeJanesa 33<9i 2373 pc 3I/8B 21.70 1 

Samago 2271 7/44 t 2271 6/43 pc 


LMAngMO 


NSW TOO. 
PhOOTOr 
San Fran. 


Learnt: s-sunrty, pc-perOy cloudy, e-dandy, rtvshawera. WJiunderakirms. r-csin. ef-snow fames, 
sn-aram, Hco. W-Woattwr All maps, tore caa to and data provided by Accu-Wamher, Inc. fi- 1894 


Torpra 

Wasrvngian 


S»41 

2475 
19*6 
14*7 
16*1 
14*7 
30*6 
26*2 
2475 
30*6 
B/46 
12/53 
29*4 
13*6 
29*4 
19 .'68 
16*1 
14/57 
21-70 


-1/31 

12*3 

9<48 

104 

205 

2/35 

2271 

16*1 

14*7 

2271 

-3/27 

2/35 

2373 

11/SS 

10*4 

11/52 

0/43 

4/30 

9/46 


HI 5*41 
s 19*4 
1 16*1 
pc 9/43 
s 20*8 
PC 3/43 
PC 30*3 
PC 2170 
pc 2670 
pc 29*4 
pc 4*e 
C 10/50 
PC 30*6 
■ 17*2 
S 33*1 
S 20*8 
C 15*9 
DC 0M3 

s 16*1 


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5*41 a 
7/44 pc 
-1/31 PC 
2/35 S 
•1/31 Hi 
2373 pc 
8,46 pc 
14/57 pc 
2170 pc 
■I <31 pc 
1<34 w> 
2373 pc 
3/46 pc 
17*2 „ 
12*3 I 
11.52 Hi 
2/35 Hi 
6/43 pc 


By Mindy Aloff 

VfK- York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Poeis need New York: 

It’s a first-rate graduate school for 
moral indignation. Federico Garcia Lorca 
prorides a classic example. 

In 1929, Garcia Lorca sailed here from 
his native Spain, where, at 31. he was 
already acclaimed as a master. His de- 
clared purpose in traveling was to study 
English at Columbia; his deeper purpose 
was to get away from home, which he was 
finding too lovely for words. 

(New York is “a dreadful place, and 
that’s why I’m going," he wrote in antici- 
pation of the city he knew about chiefly 
through novels and films.) 

New York, then entering the Depres- 
sion. proved to be as wonderfully dreadful 
as Garcia Lorca had hoped. Once he set- 
tled into his dorm room, he left it. 

For several months, he boned up on 
Manhattan from Harlem to the Batten'. As 
Ian Gibson’s biography relates the story of 
his trip, he seems to have had a pretty good 
time. Maybe too good a time. For Garcia 
Lorca’s poems about the city are ferocious: 


bloody, bitter, apocalyptically judgmentaL 
Some 65 years later, they could have been 
written yesterday. His “Ode to Walt Whit- 
man,” in Ben Bclitt’s translation, reads: 
Ah, filthy New York, 

New York of cables and death. 

What angel do you carry, concealed in 
your cheek? 

Genius: What can you do with it? Well, 
the Metropolitan Transit Authority is 
sending it to Coney Island on a bus? In tbe 
last two years, the MTA’s public art pro- 
gram “Poetry in Motion" has stocked the 
subways and buses with poems by some of 
the most accomplished and intractably in- 
direct stylists in print, i n c ludi n g Garda 
Lorca, Dante and Yeats. 

Last fall, the organizers took one of Gar- 
da Lorca’s early love poems, “Variations,” 
copied it onto posters (in both the original 
Spanish and the English translation), and 
had the posters placed in all the MTA’s 
5.900 trains and 3,700 buses. At a stroke, the 
poet’s most intimate voice was bestowed on 
a captive population of millions. Poetry on 
public transit is not a new idea. Cities in 
Europe have been doing it since the 1980s; 


in fact, “Poetry in Motion” was sparked by 
London's “Poems on the Underground.^ 
Street Fare Journal, based in San Fran- 
cisco, began to put poems on buses there in 
1984. Nevertheless, New York’s program 
has captured the attention of both the pub- 
lic and tbe press. The poems- -have been 
superior, and some could even be colled 
highbrow. The posters have been eye-catch- 
ing and allusive. (The “Poetry in Motion” 
logo, designed by John Wyatt, marries ref- 
erences to ancient mosaic techniques with 
references to the ceramic tile work inspired 
by them that one finds in die subways.) 

Indeed, “Poetry in Motion" has merited 
the dubious honor of inclusion in “Rip- 
ley’s Believe It or Not!," where its mention 
was nestled among accounts of a woman 
who walked across the Australian desert 
and of a man who made sculptures out of 
matchboxes, then set them aflame. 

The incongruity of fine poetry in the 
New York subway is fundamental to the 
program's existence. “Poetry in Motion" is 
part of a larger campaign that the MTA 
has been waging since the mid-1980s to 
improve the subway’s dismal image. 



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